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INTERNATIONAL 



(tribun 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 



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Paris, Friday, August 5, 1994 


No. 34.659 


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By David E. San ger 

‘ Ne " York T tmcs Service -J 

HIROSHIMA, Japan — For two generations the 'mil- 
hons of Japanese schoolchildren who.,filea through the 
S™ exhibits of the Peace • Memorial Museum at ground 
z^> saw history through Hiroshima's distincti ve prism. 

War II started on Aug. 6, 1945?* OT E .... } • . . . 

Thai was the day the atomic bomb was dropped, and 
the devastation that followed has always beat presented 
in the museum with only the briefest reference to the 
politics of the era or Japan’s responsibility for starting the 
war that the bombing helped to end, 

For 40 years the furosbjxiia museum '.fed Japan's sense 
.... stories of 

D e steps of a 

dropped, moderating 1 the city 


reshLook at Why Bomb Fell 


and. sending 150,000 people to painful deaths from burns 
or radiation sickness. 

But now, just as Hiroshima begins to think about bow 
to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the world’s first 
atomic bombing, ihc message is changing just a bit. 

“Some of us believe that when we think about the 
bomb, we should think about the war, too," Mayor 
Takashi Hiraoka said the other day as he walked through 
the most vivid Symbol of such thinking a new museum. 

Connected to tbetdd one by a skywalk, it is meant to fill 
Hiroshnna's historical amnesia about the days before the 
bombing, describing m uncomfortable detail the city’s' 
role in the war effort. 

The world is changing,” he said, "and so perhaps 
should oar view of history.” 

Mr. Hiraoka’s view and the museum project he pressed 
after taking office four yean ago are not popular with 


everyone here. Japanese rightists have long opposed mix- 
ing the history of the war with the Hiroshima bombing. 

Mr. Hiraoka’s predecessor as mayor, Takeshi Araki. 
who died recently, held the view that exhibits about 
Japan’s war of aggression in Asia would onlv dilute 
Hiroshima's symbolism. 

Bui through a painful chipping away at ihc consensus. 
Mr. Hiraoka, a former journalist, began to win over 
supporters. And whoa the new museum opened in June, 
residents discovered a city from the time before the 
bombing that most of them had never known existed. 

It was a dty in which factories had been converted to 
build mili tary hardware and where the Mitsubishi Heavy 
Industries shipyard turned out the country's giant war- 
ships. 

There are vivid photographs of the Koreans and Chi- 

See WAR, Page 8 


Belgrade Breaks Off 
Ties to Bosnia Serbs; 
Borders Are Closed 



By Raymond Bonner. _ T ' ... 

. New York Tlma S&vke 

KADUHA, Rwanda — Forweeks, tens 
of thousands of Hutu, forced from their, 
homes by the war, have been ‘s tnigglingf to 
survive here in one of the hardiest regions 
of Rwanda, selling cattle and dothesto - 
buy small amounts of food and receiving 
rpjnimal assistance from the international 
relief community. 

Recently, hearing from the awgovan- 
ment in Kigali that it was safe to go home, 1 
some have tried. Arid now they are coming 
back to the wretched refugee canqps-with 


\- • 


'that some Hutu returning to their 
larcbeixifi ■ IriUed^by Tutsi viilageis 
and soldiers of the Rwanda Patriotic 
Front, the Tuni-dominated organization 
that is ntiw the govemnicnL . 

"*T saw so many dead bodies,” said 
Charles Murera, 43, who had escaped from 
a mud bride house where he had been 
demined, by soldiers along with 10 other 
Hutu men. . 

... Mr. Murera, who returned to Kaduha 
oh Thursday, said that he had been seized 
as he entered his village of Gisare, in the 
district of Ntogwe, by six Tutsi who tied 


his arms behind his back and led him to a 
Patriotic Front, military base about a half- 
mile away. 

Mr. Murera rolled up the sleeves of his 
shirt to show festering scabs on the inode 
of his elbows on both arms. He said the 
wounds were caused by the ropes. 

Other Hutu men and women in this 
remote refugee camp in the hills in south- 
western Rwanda, where the French have 
established a security zone, told similar 
accounts of men bemg tied up and led 
away by Patriotic Front soldiers, and of 
women and children being killed when 


they returned to their villages in southeast- 
ern Rwanda. 

“I saw with my own eyes. I am not 
telling lies,” said Louis Nywandi, who 
made a partial list of the women, children 
and men who he said were killed in his 
village at the end of July. 

His father was among them. *T wit- 
nessed with my own eyes. They beat him 
on the bead with a hoe.” 

Mr. Nywandi said that the soldiers 
rounded up a large group of men. "They 
tied us with ropes, like this,” Mr. Nywandi 
See RWANDA, Page 8 


U.S. Warning: 
It Alone Might 
Lift Arms Ban 

Carolled by Oar SlajJ Fnm Dispatches 

WASHINGTON — Issuing a fresh 
threat to the Bosnian Serbs, the Clinton 
administration warned Thursday that the 
United States might defy the international 
arms embargo in Bosnia despite objections 
from U.S. allies. 

The White House chief of staff, Leon E. 
Panetta, said the United States could uni- 
laterally lift the arms embargo against the 
Bosnian Muslims if the Bosnian Serbs did 
not agree to the latest international peace 
plan. The self-declared Bosnian Serbian 
assembly rejected the plan Wednesday, 
calling instead for a referendum Aug. 27- 
28. 

In Geneva, Islamic countries warned 
that they might arm Bosnian government 
forces themselves unless the embargo was 
lifted. 

President Bill Clinton had previously 
opposed unilaterally lifting the embargo so 
that the Muslims could better defend 
themselves. He said be preferred that the 
embargo be lifted by the entire interna- 
tional community. 

France and other North Atlantic Treaty 
Organization allies with peacekeeping 
forces in Bosnia have said that a unilateral 
move by the UJ>. would expose the peace- 
keepers to attack. 

But Mr. Panetta said in an interview 
with CNN that Washington could act 
alone to lift the embargo “if we don’t get 
agreement with regards to the divisions 
that were agreed to by the Bosnians, by the 
Muslims, if we don't get agreement by the 
Serbs and they continue to fight this is- 
sue." 

The international peace plan would di- 
vide Bosnia roughly evenly between the 
Serbs and the Muslim-Croatian coalition. 

The White House press secretary. Dee 
Dee Myers, said the United Sates in the 
next few days would resume negotiations 
at the United Nations on reinforcing sanc- 
tions on the Bosnian Serbs and possibly 
lifting the arms embargo. She said that 
lifting the embargo without the backing of 
U.S. allies would be a last resort, “but the 
pressure may build to the point that we are 
forced to take that step." 

The White House also reacted positively 
to Yugoslavia's announcement that it was 
cutting off all lies with the Bosnian Serbs, 
but it said it warned to see action, not just 
words. 

“We’ve been urging Serbia for a long 
lime to stop resupplying the Bosnian 
Serbs," Ms. Myers said. “They've son of 
indicated they were willing to do that but I 
think we’ll watch and see if that border 
actually seals up." 

Islamic foreign ministers meeting in Ge- 
neva urged strict enforcement of Bel- 
See BOSNIA, Page 8 


On a Continent of Chaos, a Success Story 

Zimbabwe Dodges the Disintegration Common Across Africa 


By Keith B. Richburg economic empowerment. Inflation arid the legacy of socialist 

Watf/dnsnon Pool Stance • - ■ mismanagement dog the economy, and Robert Mugabe’s gov- 

14 yrars of ^ * of 'land in a country where a relative handful of white fanners 

proudly points to.nw MtaW ™ ownsthe minority 6f arable sdl- remains unresolved. 

tins capital s skyline. Then the ^.conversation turns ^ vie ^ wi&m the context of a continent ravaged by dvfl 


i* yCl jvuoL * m • ■ 

“Before independence, we couldn’t mix with whites, he said. 

. “Now we mix With them. We eat with them. We drink- with 
them.” 

Then he paused and added, “But we don’t have any money. 

Mr. Magora, a 59-year-old father erf 10 who lost a son fighting 
in the guerilla war against white d omin ati on , capsuazed the 
state that his country finds itself in since white-ruled Rhodesia 
became black-ruled Zimbabwe in 1980. 

Zimbabwe's black majority has attained pahtical power, pride 
and l ega l equality, and has done so with a re m a rk a bl e a bs ence of 
rancor and retribution given the long and cruel History of whiter t 
min ority rule. 

To be sure, many frustrations remain.: Kadis still await 


Ngofaft biggest labor federation suspends a general strike. Page 8. 

war, ethnic strife, famine, disease. lawlessness and a general 
dhaniegration of nation-states, Zimbabwe's problems pale by 
comparison. The country is at peace, its streets generally are 
dean and safe, and Harare retains its genteel civility. Zimbabwe 
is an African success story. 

“It works — sometimes in fits and starts.” a Western diplomat 
said. “You get frustrated because it doesn't move as fast as you’d 
like. But it works.” 

The contrast of political parity and continuing economic 

See ZIMBABWE, Page 8 


At 409 Founds, 



to Hang? 


By Rebecca J. Fowler 

Washington Pan Sorrier 

WASHINGTON — As he waits for his 
turn on death row in Washington state, 
Mitchell Rupe’s mind is on Jus oversized 
. body. It may seem a bizarre preoccupa- 
tion, but his legal battle tO j esca pe the 
> ’* punishment is focused on his huge frame, 
* Mr. Rupe, 39, who was convicted of 
Murdering two women during a bank io> 


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bay in 1981, contends that the state can- 
.riot force him to face the gallows because 
at 409 pounds (186 kilograms} he is too 
heavy, under the force of bis own weight 
he would risk decapitation, - which was 
' deemed a cruel and unusual punishment in 
-.the last century and is therefore illegal 
, under the Eighth Amendment to the U.S. 
Ccmstitution. 

His case; heard by~ a federal judge last 
month, has: divided the state of Washing- 
ton ova how to handle the death penalty. 
Prisoners who, are sentenced to death there 
get to choose between han g in g and lethal 
injection. But If they cannot decide, they 
are assigned to hang. 

Since Mr..Rupe would not choose; he is 
facing the hangman's noose. ' 

•• . . But .his lawyer contends that if he. js 
beheaded in the process, the state will 
violate the Eighth Amendment- “This case 
‘ focuses In a very grisly -and graphic way 


what capital punishment is all about,” said 
Todd Maybrown, the attorney. 

Since his arrest, Mr. Rupe has gained 80 
pounds. Although be is not permitted sec- 
ond helpings, he consumes 2,700 calories a 
day from prison meals and another 2,000 
from the inmates’ shop, where he is a 
regular viator, prison officials said. He 
also skips exercise, according to officials, 
who say prisoners are allottee 2Vi hours to 
work out each day. 

Those who believe that Mr. Rupe de- 
serves the death penalty describe his ap- 
peal as a transparent rase to eat his way off 
death row. Ken Caproh, whose sister-in- 
law was killed by Mr. Rupe, told The 
Seattle Times, “The state has contributed 
to his defense by allowing him all the extra 
calories he’s getting” 

Mr. Maybrown said Mr. Rape had al- 

See HANG, Page 8 



Kiosk 


7 Islamic Activists 
Seized in France 

PARIS (Reuters) — France ordered 
seven Islamic militants to be transport- 
ed to the east of the country and placed 
under house arrest on Thursday, a day 
after five French citizens were killed by 
suspected Muslim guerrillas in Algiers. 

Interior Minister Charles Pasqua said 
in a interview on TFI television that he 
had ordered the seven militants placed 
under house arrest in the eastern Aisne 
region. He did not identify them or 
disclose what they were accused of. 

French radio said they included the 
head of the Algerian Brotherhood in 
France, a group accused by the police of 
being a front for supporters of the Is- 
lamic Salvation Front in Algeria, which 
is outlawed there. 

Related article. Page 2 

World’s Most Costly Airport 

When the Kansai International Air- 
port in Osaka, Japan, opens in Septem- 
ber. it win be the world’s most costly 
airport — so costly, in fad, that some 
airlines won’t fly there. Page 9. 

Leisure 

The Frankfurt Opera is struggling to 
survive amid subsidy cuts and a bitter 
internal feud. Page 6. 


Book Review 

Page 7. 

| Dow Jones | 

I T rib Index 1 

hM i'iiBuI 

J 


IglW 'HolUT. pun 


. 26.87 

... 3765.79 

The Dollar 

NPwYCHfc. 


m 




tmts doeo 


0.27% pi 
1 15.86 Jg 

.iriSSKX 

previous dose 


The Russian police raiding the 
Moscow apartment of the chief of 
the MMM fund Thursday. Page 9. 


1.5873 


1.5757 


Pound 


1.5357 


1.5427 


Yen 


100.475 


100.275 


FF 


5.4325 


5 3870 


Milosevic Calls 
Their Leaders 
War Profiteers 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dljpatcha 

BELGRADE — Yugoslavia on Thurs- 
day carried out its threat to sever political 
and economic ties with Bosnian Serbs fol- 
lowing the Sabs’ rejection of the latest 
international peace plan. 

Rump Yugoslavia, comprising Serbia 
and Montenegro, said it would bar entry to 
all Bosnian Serbian leaders and shut its 
borders with Serbian-held territory to all 
goods except food, medicine and clothing. 

The Bosnian Sabs have relied on Bel- 
grade for weapons and other supplies dur- 
ing their 28-month -old war against Mus- 
lims and Croats. 

Within hours of the announcement in 
Belgrade, a senior Bosnian Serbian offi- 
cial, Vice President Bfljana Plavsic, was 
turned back at the Yugoslav-Bosnian bor- 
der town of Zvornik. 

Serbia’s president, Slobodan Milosevic, 
called on the Bosnian Sabs to dump their 
leaders, whom he branded “war profi- 
teers.” He said they had jeopardized their 
own people and broken many promises to 
stop fighting. 

“That is why we have to cut off all 
further relations and cooperation with 
such a leadership," he said. 

Mr. Milosevic, the longtime patron of 
the Bosnian Serbs, bad warned that ties 
would be severed if they failed to reverse 
their stance on the peace plan drawn up by 
the United States, Russia and European 
Union countries. 

But in an escalating power struggle 
among Sabs, the Bosnian Serbs' self- 
styled parliament on Wednesday rqected 
the plan for the third time in less than a 
month and called for a referendum on 
Aug. 27 and 28 to endorse the decision. 

Mr. Milosevic, the region’s main power 
broker, is widely viewed as the chief insti- 
gator of the Bosnian war- and the earlier 
war in Croatia, another breakaway Yugo- 
slav republic. 

But Serbia, the dominant state in Yugo- 
slavia, faces a tightening of two-year-old 
trade sanctions punishing it for its role In 
the war. Mr. Milosevic apparently wants to 
stave off further economic damage. 

On Thursday, he delivered a scathing 
attack on Bosnian Serbian leaders, accus- 
ing them of “insane political ambitions 
and greed.” 

He said the Bosnian Serbian leader, Ra- 
dovan Karadzic, was “usurping the right to 
decide the lives” of millions of fellow Serbs 
in the forma Yugoslavia. 

Local economists and Western diplo- 
mats estimate that from 5 percent to 20 
percent of Yugoslavia’s gross domestic 
product has been spent on military and 
financial support for the Bosnian Serbian 
forces. 

The Bosnian Serbs depend on Belgrade 
for arms and food supplies. Western offi- 
cials said the test would be whether Mr. 
Milosevic did actually seal the border. 

In Washington, the White House 
spokeswoman. Dee Dee Myers, said, “This 

See SERBS, Page 8 


Authorities Seal 
Iran City After 
Violent Protests 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatcher 

TEHRAN — Police sealed off the Irani- 
an city of Qazvin on Thursday after two 
days of clashes that left four people dead 
and about 100 wounded, witnesses said. 

Police officers were out in force in cen- 
tral districts of Qazvin, 140 kilometers (90 
miles) from Tehran, and checkpoints were 
set up outside the dty of about 300,000. 

Violent demonstrations broke out in the 
dty, an important agricultural and indus- 
trial center, after a proposal to create a 
new province with Qazvin as the capital 
was defeated by Parliament on Wednes- 
day. 

Witnesses contacted by telephone from 
Tehran said security forces fired at a crowd 
in a main square as about 30,000 people 
took pan in a demonstration Thursday. 

At least four people woe killed and 
dozens wounded in the dashes, raising the 
number of wounded since Wednesday to 
about 100, they said. It was unclear if the 
casualties were victims of police gunfire. 

Residents said the rioters on Wednesday 
smashed windows of banks and govern- 
ment offices and set the finance depart- 
ment building on fire. 

Qazvin, the country's capital in the 
1 920s, has been a part of Zanjan province. 
The dty has been pushing to become a 
province in its own right. 

On Thursday, the government tried to 


city was separated from Zanjan and joined 
with Tehran province. But a journalist In 
the dty said the announcement appeared 
to calm down the protests only slightly. 

“The people are shouting: ‘Neither Zan- 
jan. nor Tehran; independence, indepen- 
dence.’ " he said. (AFP, Reuters) 


•A 




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Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 5, 1994 




Yeltsin Appears Tilting to Right, Perhaps to Head Off Criticism 


By Lee Hockstader 

fKsftftsfiM Past Soviet 

MOSCOW — President Boris N. 
Yeltsin appears to be shoring up his 
political defenses, moving to deflect 
criticism Bom the extreme right tfra t 
has vowed to attack him this M. 

Last month, Mr. Yeltsin paid a visit 
to a Moscow exhibition nail where 
openly racist, anti-Semitic and viru- 
lently nationalist printings by Ilya 
Glazunov were on display. 

Last week, senior officials in the 
Yeltsin government unleashed a snarl- 
ing verbal attack apparently aimed at 
templing the local government of an 
independence-minded region 1,600 ki- 
lometers (1,000 miles) sooth of Mos- 
cow. 

This week, Mr. Yeltsin's envoy to 
the 50th anniversary of the Warsaw 
Uprising infuriated bis hosts when he 
refused to apologize for the Soviet 
Army’s delay in entering Warsaw as 
Germans beat down the P olish insur- 
rectionists, leaving 200,000 Poles dead. 


Spadolini, 
Ex-Leader 
Of Italy, 
Dies at 69 


Reuters 

ROME — Former Prime 
Minister Giovanni Spadolini, 
69, a highly respected Italian 
politician, historian, journalist 
and author, died Thursday. 

Mr. Spadolini, a former lead- 
er of the Republican Party who 
became postwar Italy's first 
non-Christian Democratic 
prime minis ter in 1981, died of 
respiratory failure after a stom- 
ach operation last month. 

He was one of a handful of 
postwar Italian politicians un- 
touched by the corruption scan- 
dals that nave devastated many 
careers in the last three years. 

He became prime minis ter in 
June 1981 after the fall of Ar- 
naldo Foriani, in a scandal in- 
volving an illegal masonic lodge 
that was portrayed as trying to 
create a “state wi thin a state.” 

Commentators said he re- 
stored dignity to the post at one 
of the most difficult times in 
Italy’s postwar history, heading 
two consecutive governments. 

Innokenti Smokfnnovsky, 69 
Leading Russian Actor 

MOSCOW CAP) — Inno- 
kenti Smoktunovsky. 69, one of 
Russia’s greatest theater and 
movie actors, died Wednesday. 
He suffered a heart attack four 
months ago and died in a reha- 
bilitation sanatorium near 
Moscow. 

His first film role was in Mik- 
hail Romm’s “The Murder in 
Dante Street” in 1956. In 1964, 
he became internationally 
known for his performance in 
“Hamlet," a movie by the Rus- 
sian director Grigori Kozintsev. 

Mr. Smoktunovsky was the 
lead actor in the Leningrad 
(now Sl Petersburg) Bolshoi 
Drama Theater and Moscow’s 
Academic Art Theater. 

David Rdchmann, 34, a scion 
of the wealthy Canadian Rrich- 
m ann family of developers, 
diedTuesday night in Israel of a 
heart attack, his lawyer said. 

Sol Adler, 85, the U.S. Trea- 
sury Department's representa- 
tive to China during World War 
II and a translator of Mao’s 
works, died Thursday of lung 
cancer in Beijing. 


Individually, the events may not 
seem much out of character for Mr. 
Yeltsin, whose political style is some- 
times heavy-handed. But viewed to- 
gether, they suggest that the Russian 
leader is determined to protect himself 
from uitranationalist charges that he is 
reluctant to stand up in defense of 
Russia and e thnic Russians in other 
lands. 

“He's got to throw some bones to 
the far ri g h t , because they’re too dan- 
gerous to just ignore,” a Western dip- 
lomat said. “But at a certain point, 
you've got to wonder how much of this 
Is coating from the heart” 

Mr. Yeltsin is by no means adopting 
the nationalist agenda, which includes 
calk for the restoration of the Russian 
empire on the territory of the former 
Soviet Union. 

His government has balked at a cur- 
rency merger with impoverished Be- 
larus, suggesting that economic sense 
triumphed over nationalist appetites. 

And only last week, he agreed to 


withdraw Moscow’s remaining 2,000 
troops from Estonia, a move that en- 
sures ail Russian forces will have de- 
parted from the three Baltic republics 
by the end of August, satisfying Wash- 
ington and European leaders. 

Yet, on other issues where the politi- 
cal price is apparently modest, he 
seems willing to play to nationalist, 
even chauvinistic, public opinion. 

For liberals who once thought of 
Mr. Yeltsin as their darting, perhaps 
the most disconcerting example was 
the president’s lour last month, with 
journalists in tow, of a Moscow exhibi- 
tion of the works of Eya Glazunov. 

Mr. Glazunov bills himself as a su- 
per-patriot, but anywhere else — cer- 
tainly in tiie West — he would be 
considered a hate- monger. Theprolag- 
onists of Mr. Glazunov's paintings are 
Russians. They are depicted as strong, 
brave and ready with a rifle. The vil- 
lains are blacks, Jews and ethnic mi- 
norities. His slogan is “Glory to Rus- 
sia. Russia for Russians.” 


The melting of the exhibit was at- 
tended by Vladimir V. Zhirinovsky, 
the extreme nationalist politician, arid 
the Communist Party leader, Gennadi 
Zyganov — not the sort of political 
company Mr. Yeltsin usually keeps. 

Last week, a number of high-rank- 
ing Russians denounced Chechnya, a 

k&e^^^n^theCas^nSra, 
Much declared its independence from 

Russia in 1991. 

Chechnya’s self-proclaimed inde- 
pendence has gone unrecog niz ed, and 
for most cf the past threeyears — with 
the exception of a brief nnlitaty inter- 
vention m 1992 — Moscow has ig- 
nored the breakaway region, despite 
allegations that it has become a center 
erf organized rnma, kidnapping and 
narcotics gmngpting . 

But after a seizure of bus passengers 
by Chechens led to a shootout that left 
several hostages dead, the Kreadia lost 
its temper and made it dear it would 


no longer tolerate the rebd leader, 
Dzhokhar Dudayev., 

Chechnya officials accuse Russia of. 
planning to invade the tiny republic. 
Moscow denies this. 

Although Me. Yeltsin so far has left 
the denunciations to his senior aides, 
the get-tough stance could placate na- 
tionalists mo say Moscow has allowed 
its far^fhmg, imlepe&dencemnided le- 
gions too modi leeway. 

The Kremlin's refusal to apologize 
fen die Soviet Army's ddayin liberat- 
ing Warsaw 50 years ago is alsoHkdy 
to go down wdL with nationalists. . 

For many Poles, it is an article erf 
faith that die Nazis' bloody suppres- 
sion of the Warsaw. Uprising was at 
least tacitly supported by Staim, whose . 
troops waited for two months just out- 
side Warsaw as the kilting and destruc- 
tion went on. 

Historians say Stalin permitted the 
brutality, hoping the Poles would be 
incapable ot resisting when the Red 
Army took Warsaw. 


WORLD BRIEFS 

Israel Apologizes for Lebanon Deaths 

■ JERUSALEM (Combined Dispatches) a * 

movCtbe Israeli Army acknowledge bombing a eu^tan 
^kafe.iunocent people Thursday during an «rnudoa 
guerrilla bases in southern Lebanon. It J? 

tiiKanw security sooroes said 10 civilians w«e killed m the 
children. The raids were the firatsmee I^i 

attadcs 

merit. It usually has blamed its enemies for cauang endian 
casualties by pitting bases near populated areas. (AP, Reuiers) 

Ge rman Army lists Neo-Nazi Cases 

BONN (Reuters) — The German Array has investigated 23 
cases of neo-Nazi behavior in its ranks so far tins year, a spokes- 
man for the Defense Ministry said Thursday. 

The spokesman added that about 30 cases were investigated m 
1993, a slight drop from, more than 60 in the previous year. 
Germany's Monitor television program reported Thursday that 

ULS*. ™ rwonrtVri AC Sllffshle. lOT CVKltlial 


inciden t is being investigated. 



By Joel Greenberg 

New York Tima Service 

GAZA — At sunrise on the first day of 
July, Intissar Wazir rode across the Allen- 
by Bridge from Jordan into the West Bank 
town of Jericho, returning to the land she 
calls Palestine after more than 30 years. 

Then Mrs. Wazir — widow of Khalil 
Wazir, the late military chief of the PLO, 
who is believed to have been killed by 
Israeli commandos — traveled through Is- 
rael to her native dty of Gaza with an 
Israeli escort. 

Her once unthinkable journey was over- 
shadowed that day by the arrival in Gaza 
of Yasser Arafat, but it was no less a sign 
of the sweeping changes brought about by 
the accord between Israel and the Palestine 
liberation Organization. 

For many Palestinians, Mrs. Wazir, 52, 
is a living monument to her husband, who 
was killed six years ago and is revered here 
as the architect erf the “armed struggle” 
against Israd. 


Mr. Wazir. who was known as Abu 
Jihad, directed raids and terrorist attacks 
on Israd, and, before his assassination, he 
guided a Palestinian uprising in the occu- 
pied territories from his headquarters in 
Tunis. A founder of the Fatah movement 
with Mr. Arafat, he remained his deputy 
and confidant for three decades. 

Mr. Arafat paid tribute to Abu Jihad by 
appointing Mrs. Wazir the minister of so- 
cial affairs in his proviaonal government, 
making her the only woman in the Pales- 
tinian National Authority for Gaza and 
Jericho. She says she was the first woman 
to jean Fatah, in 1959. and, in recent years, 
she has been in charge of PLO financial aid 
to families of Palestinians and 

wounded in the conflict with Israd. 

Back in Gaza for the first time since 
1963, when sbe left to join her husband in 
Algeria. Mrs. Wazir sat in a living room 
with some of her children, surrounded by 
portraits of her husband. She spoke with- 
out rancor about Israd and its people. 


“I hope we can Kve together in peace,” 
she said. “We've turned over a new leaf.” 

Mrs. Wazir, who witnessed the lolling of 
her husband by gunmen who burst into 
their home in Tunis, said memories of past 
violence were not a barrier to reconcilia- 
tion. 

“I’m looking to the future, and I don’t 
want the tragedy to continue,'’ die said. 
“We need peace for both Israeli and Pales- 
tinian children, so other famili es won’t 
have logo through what we did. The two 
peoples can buQd strong ties after we 
achieve our rights.” 

She got her first glimpses of modem 
Israd an the drive from Jericho to Gaza, 
and then again a few days later on a trip to 
Nazareth for the funeral of an Israeli Arab 
member of Parliament. 

“It’s a very beautiful country,” she said. 
“Great efforts were made to raise it to such 
a high level of dvQizatiou. I hope we can 
live with each other.” 


Paris Fears 
Lax Policy 
On Algeria 
Radicals 


Renta* 

PARIS — The interior minis- 
ter of Fiance accused Britain,: 
Germany and the United States 
on Thursday of harboring Alge- 
rian Mamin fundamentalists 

and H h m iMw l the that 

Triamic moderates could; came 
to power in the North African 
state. 

Interior Minister Charles 
Pasqua was speaking a day after 
suspected Muslim guerrillas 
shot awl tilled five Frendigov- 

em m ml wnpln ymt at a R each 

Emba ssy Hmwng crwn p n » nd in 


suef 

Ahmd JadoBoh/Reirtcn 

Yasser Arafat sitting at his desk Thursday in Gaza, where be is urgently seeking aid for the cash-poor Palestinian areas. 

A PLO Guerrilla’s Widow Returns to Gaza 


Mr. Pasqua said that Paris 
was vigilant in cracking down 

On ftmAwnentoliii t activities CP 

its seal, but that Britain, Germa- 
ny and the United States-bad 
failed to act when tipped off 
about similar activities within 
their borders. 

Fifty-six foreigners, includ- 
ing 15 French nationals, have 
been IciBed in civil strife in Al- 
geria since the Mamin Aimed 
Group last year gave foreigners 
a month to leave the country. 

The bodies of the five 
Frenchmen — three paramili- 
tary gendarmes and two consul- 
ar officials — were being flown 
to Paris on Thursday. 

The French government also , 
announced measures to in- 
crease security for its remaining 
s taff tn Algeria. 

No one has claimed responsi- 
bility for the shooting, in which 
gunmen drove a booby-trapped 
cm into the guarded compound 
where about 70 embassy staff 
live. The bomb, timed to go off 
half an hour later, was denued. 

Mr. Pasqua said dial, while' 
the Algerian government was 
“not a model of democracy” it 
was “rubbish” to think that Is- 
lamic moderates might fair* 
power there. 

He was commenting an a 
statement by President Zine 
AMd ine ben Ali of Tunisia, who 
said Britain, France and the : 
United States allowed funda- j 
mentalist guerrillas to operate 
ficedy in their countries tb the 
name of freedom and de aoca - i 

cyr i 


Spain Fishermen Draw U.K. Protest 

- LONDON (Reuters) — Britain protested to §pain on Thursday 
Over attacks by Spanish fishermen on British trawlers in the Bay of 
Biscay in a dispute over tuna fishing. The Spanish accuse British 
fishermen erf using nets longer than authorized by European 
Union regulations. ... ' , 

Two British trawlers have been attacked in the past 24 hours, 
with an gr y S panis h fisher men surrounding the craft far out at sea 
and catting their nets, a fishermen’s spokesman Said. 

Britain sent a gnnboat to the area Thursday and issued a 
. di p l oma tic protest to the Madrid government, saying ^Spanish 
fishfa-nmn Tims t not be allowed to “improperly haixass” British 
crews. “We made it dear that any such-action should be prevented 
by the Sp anish and any offenders dealt with appropriately,” the • 
Foreign Office said. 

Corrections . 

A caption in editions of July 19 incorrectly explained anAgence 
Franco-Presse photograph of a woman kissing her brother's tomb- 
stone in Sarajevo. As the symbol of moon and star on the 
tombstone showed, both the woman and her brother should have 
been identified as Muslims, not Sobs. 

Because of an editing error, an article in Wednesday's editions 
incorrectly characterized Samsung Co.’s automobile activities. 
The company’s planned partnership with Nissan Motor Co. has 
not yet begun. 


Frond Air-Control Slowdown Ends 

AIX-EN-PROVENCE, France (AP) — With the patience of 
airimes at an end, air controllers in southeastern France voted 
Thursday- to stop their work slowdown and ease the delays 
oxppling vacation traffic. 


' regional controllers .union. Earner, 27 of. the 43' airlines using the 
Nice airport demanded' that civil aviation authorities intervene to 
end the dispute^ yrtnefa was costing the carriers millings of dnllan:- 
The Aix-cn-Proveoce center controls all commercial domestic 
and international flights over southeastern France. Controllers 
there strode from July. 22 to July 24, pausing flight delays of^ 
several hours. They had since worked 32 instead of 36 -hours, 
aggravating delays typical during the anmmur holiday period. 

- Archaeological sites and unseams around Greece were to be 
dosed Friday because of a one-day work stoppage by Culture 
Ministry employees. . (AP) 

A disease tint causes fatal counrfribns has killed at least 85 of 
the 3,000 Eons in Tanzania’s Sercugeti Park since March. The 
disease, .called canine distemper virus, has caused concern about 
the East African cotwtty's tourismindnstiy, which brings in about 
$120 million annually. " (Reuters) 

A strike by 70 flight attendants on the SAS Commuter airline 
Thursday mounded most of the carrier's routes, mainly in north 
Norway. The union broke off talks with the subsidiary of SAS 
after m ana g emen t rejected a demand for a 1.7 percent wage 
increase in 1994 arid a 1.9 percent increase next year. (AP) 

■ Spsm has smoothed the way for a British company, Cenargo 
Inte rn a tion al LtcL, to start a ferry service from the southern 
Spanish coast to Nadar, Morocco, by deciding to make Alroeria 
an international port, a spokesman for the Spanish Interior 
Muasuysai± , ^ (Reuters) 

Greek air traffic controllers, whose five-month go-slow over pay 
and benefits has caused long delays, now warn that they cann ot 
guf * 8 ” * ” the safety of flights. .The union said in a statement that . . 
^ne safety level of flights is at a critical paint.” (AP) 

. 1®* service was cxpected-to be restored Thursday or Friday 

in Los Angeles after the end of a strike by Metropolitan Transit 
Authority mechanics. (LAT) 


^ . 



RoyAL Plaza 

l MONTREUX i 


Youths Posing as Refugees 
Lose Free Dutch Vacations 


Administration Split on a Haiti Invasion Deadline 






Duke's Jazz bar. 
Monthly Events. 

. The only grand 
hotel light on the 'shore . 
of Lake Geneva. 

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TTsL.4i-2t/9635131 
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Reuters 

THE HAGUE —-The Dutch 
government said Thursday it 
would act immediately to stem 
a tide of young East European 
tourists posing as refugees or 
asylum-seekers but who are 


§ " * — : 

MaMfd$aA,l 

" the original ' 

Just tell the taxi driver, 
"Sank roo doe noo"$, 

5, rue Dauitou Paris (Op6ra) 
m TeL* (1)42.61.71.14 _ 


really looking for a free holiday 
with pocket money. 

“There seems to be some ru- 
mor going round that you can 
get a bargain holiday in Hol- 
land by pitching up and re- 
questing asylum,” a Justice 
Ministry spokesman said. 

“These youths staying at re- 
ception centers are throwing 
parties, drinking alcohol, start- 
ing fights.” 

About 500 youths, mostly 
Romanians, have arrived at 
centers in the last two weeks 
and used the facilities — shel- 
ter, food and $1 5 pocket money 
a week — but have shown no 
serious interest in asylum. 


By Elaine Sciolino 

New York Tima Soviet 

WASHINGTON — Despite winning 
the approval of the United Nations Se- 
curity Council for an invasion of Haiti, 
the administration is split over whether 
to set a deadline for earning it out. 
senior ad mini st ra tion officials say. 

This division became evident, offi- 
cials said, at a meeting of President Bill 
Qinton's senior national security advis- 
ers at the White House. The meeting had 
been called to draw up recommenda- 
tions for the president. 

Defense Secretary William J. Petty 
apposed a recommendation that would 
set a deadline for an invasion if the 
Haitian military leaders do not leave, 
the officials said. Mr. Perry and ranch of 
the U.S. military want to avoid an inva- 
sion and are willing to explore ways to 


induce Haiti’s leaders to leave for a 
comfortable life in exile. 

But Deputy Secretary erf State Strobe 
Talbott, who has emerged as the State 
DqiaitiiKmt’s chief poKcymaker on Hai- 
ti, argued that offering incentives to the 
leaders was morally repugnant, senior 
officials said. Mr. Talbott was said to 
favor an early invasion. 

In a sharp exchange at die Tuesday 
meeting, Mr. Perry countered that Mr. 
Talbott represented a strange morality. 
He argued that it would be immoral for 
the United States not to do whatever it 
could to awnd the loss of lives of Ameri- 
can soldiers and the expenditure erf tax- 
payers' money, officials said. 

At a sews conference Wednesday 
night, Mr. Clinton laid out the “funda- 
mental interests” that he said would 


justify an invasion, saying he was keep- 
ing his options open. 

fWe have kept force on the table,” he 
said. “We have continued to move It up 
as an option as the dictators there have 

been more obstinates But his premature 

in my judgment to go beyond that now.” 
He also said that although he wel- 
comed congresrional support for a deci- 
sion to invade, lack of it would not 
prevent him f r om acting. 

*T would welcome the support <rf the 
Congress, and I hope that I will have 
that,” Mr. Qmton said. “But like my 
predecessors in both parties, I have xjot 
agreed that I was constitutionally man- 
dated to get ft.” 

Scveralpartkapanls at the meeting on 
Tu«day agreed with Mr. Petty's analy- 
sis, senior officials 

. The views of the two officials reflect 


the extremes of the administration's 
thmfang on how best to restore Haiti's* 
extied president, the Reverend Jean-Ber# 
trand Aristide. 

, M*- Ta Ibott is said by his colleagues 
to ravor an invasion soon, wi thin the ' 
nrattseweral weeks; Mr. Perry, while not 
opposed totally to the use of force, 
wants to exhaust all other options Bret, 
twea if that means promising Haiti’s top 
th ree m ilitary officials that they will not 
be punished far their repre ssio n 
*2 Today's meeting, Mr. Pteny ar-! 
gued . strongly against a deadline for an- 
mvasion, saying that that would artifi- 
cially^ constrain the a dminist ration's 
roo m for maneuv ering 

A P 01 Ac United 

states into a box," said one senior ad- 


I?*--. 


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| + POLITICAL M 






Htti 


, 1 


Meets Health- Measure Goals 811SSIS 

By Ana Deyroy \ v '' 'U- ‘ 

and Dan BeJz - . Richard j^vCbipbardt of Mis- 
. WathbigDmftmSmla Wmi,. ' 

WASHINGTON — presi- The Republican National 
dent MlOmtenhas begun fob. Committee chairman, Haley 
tying heavily for health care Barbour, called the House ver- 
l eg islati on that would cover 95 * <4 no4pofogies govern- 

percent of the popul^ion, putp n«t takeover# the health care 
dog aside his strenuous argu- ^tezn, n ami said Mr. Clinton’s 
moots of only two weeks So 'strategy was to get "any bill 
dial such coverage would iS throuft die Senate and push it 
achieve his “rock-solid princi- to the tefT once the two forms 
' pie” of universal coverage. of the bill art reconciled. 

In a 50-minute news confer- Mr. Qinton, defended the 
eace on Wednesday night the Gejdiardt MILwhich would ex- 
president described dramatical- paid Medicare tocover many 
fy different versions of legal*. Americans without insurance, 
bon pending in each house of 83 his own origi- 

Cangress-as achieving the same na * “1L Medicare, fina nce d 
“central reality” of covering all j<™y by the federal govern- 
Americans. But he retimed of- ™™i and the states, .provides 
ten to legislation sponsored by health insurance for die eWeriy 
the Senatc maionty leader, ^ disai^A ^ r■ ; - 
George J. Mitchdl of Maine, Bmhis strcmgjtrajort of the 
that would extend coverage to J®chefl phn mi 0 it make it p. . . , 1TLT 
95 percent of Americans bv harder for House members to peswentendA® 
2000/ . . s uppor t Mr. Gephardt's bill, is a series of bos 

| “I believe it does meet the — — — ; — • 

objectives that I set out in the 

State of the Union address and A I_ TT m _ ’ 

!r“ Altman : Latest 

Complaining that RraubH- 

ans- "moved away" each time. By David E. Rosenbaum ances, he 

Democrats died to reach a New York rums Service fog his w< 

compromise, Mr. Omton said, WASHINGTON — As the deputy give the a 
“We have reached out to th e m .” Treasury secretary and for many years than of tr 
He added:. “The questions before as a prominent and prosperous About 
should shift to them. Are we Wall Street investment banker, Roger C. blue, Mr. 
going to cover all Americans or Altman has been used to giving orders, “Weil, to 
no *‘/ , . , ••■■■ to cutting deals, to being in charge. Fmalitti 

Mr. CHnion deftly avoided But-thu week he has been anything to him tot 
answenng some qu estion s, such but in command. He has been subjected watching, 
as now he could support two to a form of toiturepeculiar to Washing- somethin! 
bills that take such starkly dif- ton:, the televised congressional hearing him." 
taeat approaches and appear For a total of almost 15 hours, from 5 Hisfrie 

m some ways mcomnstexit with PJA Tuesday until 2 AML Wednesday ed father. 
u*at he onginalty sought and again Wednesday from 9:30 A.M. his sentim 
|Tm not going to getmlo until after 3 P.M., Mr. Altman was attempt u 
befog a legislator, hesaicLJn- forced to sit passively and respectfully, Roger , 

stead, he said he hoped the ■ like a small-toy in the principal’s office first perse 
coming debate in Congress or a motorist stopped for speeding, as lent of th< 
would “grip the imagination of lawmakers of bom parties lectured him. To take 
ordinary citizens" and coast a reviled him and occasionally even ques- ample, 21 
chmate far passage of abflfl that tkmed him. " cm white! 

“works, that solves the hu m an • • There was no break for dinner. Mr. in front o 
problem.” Altman ate fruit* and crackers -that his mittee for 

Even before Mr. Clinton wife, Jurate Kaackas, had brought what tele 
spoke, Republicans bad «c- along In those 

rased Urn of using the Senate in many respects, this ordeal was his spectator 
v eroo m of -the bffl as a Trojan own fault. Even wbeahe is trying to be through!] 
horse for the House.- WH span- warm and helpful in his pubbe appear- hiyt a thn 




Jedsa KebetwAieHx Fn-hnc 

President tod Mrs. CHntozz greeting “Health Security Express” bus riders at the White House this week. The “express” 


support Mr. Gephardt's bill, is a series of bus caravans that have transported more titan 600 people to Washington to promote universal beam 

Altman : Latest Victim of Washington Inquisition 

By David E. Rosenbaum ances, he has a bearing, a way of weigh* smoke in public even during the breaks, once put it this way: “The congr 

; - New York Thnes Service isg his words ever so carefully, that can Lawmakers think nothing of forcing investigation can be an inslru 


By David E. Rosenbaum 

Sew York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — As the deputy 
Treasury secretary and for many years 
before as a prominent and prosperous 
Wall Street investment banker, Roger C. 
Altman has been used to giving orders, 
to cutting deals, to being in charge. 

But this week he has been anything 
but in command. He has been subjected 
- to a form of torture peculiar to Washing- 
ton:, the televised congressional hearing 

For a total of almost IS hours, from 5 
Phi Tuesday until 2 A.ML Wednesday 
and again Wednesday from 9:30 A.M. 
until after 3 Phi, Mr. Altman was 
forced to sit passively and respectfully, 

’ like a small toy in die principal’s office 
or a motorist stopped for speeding, as 
lawmakers of bom parties lectured him, 
reviled him and occasionally even ques- 
tkmedhim. 

■ - There was no break for dinner. Mr. 
Altman ate fruit and crackers -that his 
wife, Jurate Kaackas, had brought 
along 

In many respects, this ordeal was his 
own fault. Even when he is trying to be 
warm aztd helpful in his pubbe appear- 


grve the appearance more of cleverness 
than of truthfulness. 

About 1 AM. Wednesday, out of the 
bine, Mr. Altman, 48, told the senators: 
“Weil, today is my son’s 9th birthday. 
Pm a little sorry to say that 1 didn't talk 
to him today. It’s not Ukely that he’s still 
watching But if he sees the tape or 
-something I want him to know I love 
him." 

His friends say Mr. Altman is a devot- 
ed father. But to Mr. Altman’s critics, 
his sentiments sounded like a calculated 
attempt to improve his image. 

Roger Altman is. erf course, not the 
first person to face the political equiva- 
lent of the third degree. 

To take perhaps the most famous ex- 
ample, 21 summers ago, the former Nix- 
on White House counsel, John Dean, sat 
in boat of the Senate Watergate Com- 
mittee for five days running and told 
what he knew about Watergate. 

In those days, senators, witnesses and 
spectators alike smoked their way 
through the sessions. Mr. Dean, who 
had a three- paek-a-day habit, did not 


smoke in public even during the breaks. 

Lawmakers think nothing of forcing 
witnesses to testify long into the night, 
especially when the hearings are on tele- 
vision. The last day of the Oarence 
Thomas- Anita Hill hearings in 1991 
lasted until 2 A.M n just when prime 
time ended on the West Coast. 

Working late, after all, is pan of the 
congressional routine. One or two times 
a week, the Senate does little business 
during the day and then stays in session 
past midnight. 

- Just last week. House and Senate ne- 
gotiators on crime legislation met until 
2:15 one morning At 5 A.M., Senator 
Joseph R. Biden Jr., a Democrat of Del- 
aware and the chairman of the confer- 
ence committee, called the others at 
home to announce that they would re- 
convene at 8:30. 

Still there is something unusual about 
congressional investigations, something 
almost extraconstitutional neither legis- 
lative nor judicial, where badgering wit- 
nesses is in order and normal rules of 
courtesy do not apply. 

Senator Sam S. &vin Jr., who was 
chairman of the Watergate committee. 


once put it this way: “The congressional 
investigation can be an instrument of 
freedom. Or it can be freedom's scourge. 
A legislative inquiry can serve as the tool 
to pry open the barriers that hide gov- 


1 corrupt 

)yst that spurs Congress and the public 
to support vital reforms in our nation’s 
laws. Or it can debase our principles, 
invade the privacy of our citizens and 
afford a platform for demagogues and 
the rankest partisans." 

■ First Lath 's Aide Testifies 

With Hillary Rodham Clinton's chief 
of staff on the witness stand. Senate 
Republicans sought to show Thursday 
that the first lady was far more interest- 
ed in the Whitewater affair than the 
White House has acknowledged. The 
Associated Press reported from Wash- 
ington. 

Margaret Williams testified that she 
did not recall telling Mr. Altman that 
Mrs. Clinton “was paralyzed" by 
Whitewater. 

In a diary subpoenaed by the panel. 
Mr. Altman quoted her as making such 
a statement. 


Cabinet Battle Against misinformation* 


WASHINGTON — President Bill Clinton enlisted his 
cabinet Thursday in a stepped-up campaign to counter what 
officials called a "disinformation campaign" by administra- 
tion critics against his health program. 

“He told us this is it.” said the secretary of health and 
human services. Donna E. Shalala. “It's time to mobilize 
every bit of energy we have in this administration to take the 
final steps to hcafth-care reform." 

With polls showing Americans worried about how health 
legislation could affect them personally. Mr, Clinton himself 
will appear in a nightly scries of television ads promoting his 
program, und cabinet members will increase their travels and 
news interviews. (AP) 


No Vacations Now for Lawmakers 


WASHINGTON — House leaders have told members to 
unpack their suitcases and put their August vacation plans on 
hold. Like the Senate, the House will be ordered to stay in 
session until health legislation has been passed or defeated. 

House Speaker Thomas S. Foley. Democrat of Washing- 
ton. said through a spokesman that he still hoped to take up 
the issue next week, but he conceded that drafting and 
accounting problems could force the House to meet a week 
past its scheduled Aug. 1 2 summer break. ( WP) 


Too Busy to Watch Whitewater 


WASHINGTON — What Whitewater hearings? That is 
the determined position the While House is taking as it 
endures the second week of senior administration officials 
being grilled by the House and Senate Banking committees. 

President Bill Clinton, officials arc at pains to say, is not 
watching the hearings, or even being briefed daily by his 
counsel. Lloyd K. Cutler, about what has transpired each 
day. “He’s got many other things to fret about," one senior 
official saidT "He may catch a bn of it on the TV news." 

Likewise. White House Chief of Staff Leon E. Pianette 
“has seen maybe five minutes” of the hearings, said his 
spokesman, Barry Toiv. ( WP) 


An Upgrade for Science Spending 


WASHINGTON — The Clinton administration has an- 
nounced its intention to increase the nation’s overall spend- 
ing on science and technology research to a level equivalent 
to those of Japan and Germany. 

At a news briefing. Vice President AJ Gore presented a 
report. “Science in the National Interest." that outlined the 
administration's commitment to expanding its support and 
making science and technology “a top priority" in budgets. 

Dr. John H. Gibbons, assistant to the president for science 
and technology, said the U.S. government and industry 
together were spending 2.b percent of the gross domestic 
product on nonmilitary science, and he said the goal was 3 
percent, roughly the amount spent in Germany and Japan. 
But he added. “We haven't translated that figure into specific 
programs for the future." ( NYT) 


Quote/Unquote 


John Cox. a newly widowed broadcaster from Athens, 
Texas, relaying a message to the Clintons from his wife, who 
delayed seeing a doctor because his new job lacked insurance 
benefits, only to discover that she had stomach cancer “Tell 
them that unless every person, no matter how rich, no matter 
how poor, no matter how middle class, no matter what color 
— unless they have affordable, guaranteed, universal health 
coverage, every other American is at risk.” (NYT) 




-- i-'. -c L.' 


e Bill 


/ r 


By Katharine Q. Seely e 

New York Uma Senlce - 

WASHINGTON — The 
Clinton administration’s com- - 
prehensive crime b£D, which last . 
week seemed on its way to final 
passage in Congress, has rph * 
into an llth-hour threat from 
political forces similar to ones 
that brought down crime bQls- 
in past years. 

A Strange alliance of gun sup- 
porters, blacks and Republi- 
cans has moved to bloat the 
bin, a compromise worked .out 
Last week by House and S e nat e 
negotiators, from reaching die 
House floor for a final vote. The 
maneuvering has prompted 


Preridem KR-Qtaton to step 
up die figjrt f Or the measure.- 
“We have a chance to pass 
ttetoutfi^ignartest crime Mil 
frthe Msto&y of the United 
States, after six yeara of bicker- 
ing over it,” Mr. Clinton said 


Away From Politics ; 

• A computerized; registry of the names and_ Social Security 
numbers of all citizens as wdl as aliens authorized to work in 
the United States should be established so that employers can 
chec k the immigration status of job applicants, the federal 
Commission onlmmigration Reform Has recom m ended. 


LT WuvgM M i n i wm vwmmmw -w I t j.cr- — - — 

first time entirely through public Broadcastmg Service “tele- 
courses.” The nationwide program will start Jnis falL . 

• Three men convicted of murdering an Arkansas man in front 
of his wife were put to death by injection in Varner, Arkansas, 
in the nation’s first triple execution in 32 years. 

• Stepten G. Breyer has been sworn in as the nation's 108th 
Supreme Court justice in a private ceremony at the Vermont 
summer home of Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist, .• 

• The Los Angeles County district attosnetfs office has 
opened an investigation into a black police officer who was 
videotaped beating a Hispanic teenager as the youth lay 
de fenseless on the ground. _ nyt, w, Renters a p, aft 


Offers to Take a Polygraph 


LOS ANGELES -A potra- 

tial defense witness in the O. J. 
Simpson murder case went on 
television Thursday to insist he 
was telling the truth about see- 
ing two white men running 
away from the crime scene. 

: The potential witness, Frank 

Quucmolo, 45, an admitted 
vAirgler with a lengthy criminal 
record, has. told police and de- 
fense investigators that he saw 
two burly white men running 
from. the. murder score wound 
the time when Nicole Brown 
Simpson and her friend Ronald 
L Goldman were murdered. 

Mr. Chiuchiolo’s credibility 
was put in doubt Wednesday 
when the San Francisco Exam- 
iner published' a report that he 
had offered false evidence in 


' other high-profile cases, includ- 
ing that oi Polly Klaas, a 12- 
yeaivrild who Was” kidnapped 
and murdered in northern Cali- 
fornia in 1993. ■ /. . 

On Tbursday,.he asserted on 
several local telerision pro- 
grams that; he was telling the 
truth in the Simpson case and 
was wtiluig to take a polygraph 
test- He said. he was ca si ng 
homes with the Intent of com- 
mitting a burglary when be saw 
die two men. ;:. r . 

“All I know is that two white 
men left the scene of the crime.” 
he said on the-Los Angeles tele- 
vision- station ' KTTv. "These 
guys were white. I didn!l see 
any -black- guy. I didn’t see a 
white Ford Bronco.” That was a 
reference to Mr. Simpson's ve- 
hicle. (Reuters, AP) 


“We are fighting them," he 
said, referring to what be called 
the .“special interests” opposing 

the bill ; 

All sides agreed that the 
Democratic leadership did not 
have the votes to moyo the bill 
to the floor, and no floor vote 
has been scheduled. The $30 
baton measure would provide 
for preventive programs, stiff er 


punishments and new prisons. 

The bill is chiefly snagged on 
a proposal to ban 19 assault 
weapons, a measure that was 
originally opposed by nearly 
hxu tto House members. Those 
members are now under intense 
pressure from the National Ri- 
fle Association to vote against 
moving the bUL 

At thesame time^ some mem- 
bers of the Congressional Black 
Caucus oppose the bill because 
it omits a measure intended to 
protect death-row inmates bom 
racial discrimination and be- 
cause it greatly expands the in- 
stances in whmh the death pen- 
alty can be applied. 


AD House Republicans are 
expected, as a matter of course, 
to block the bill, but they could 
not succeed without those who 
oppose the weapons ban and 
some members of the black cau- 
cus. 

Democratic leaders have 
been working furiously to break 
this alliance, delaying action on 
the bill while they try to nail 
down voles. It was this effort 
that Mr. Clinton joined. The 
lobbying on all sides has inten- 
sified as members recalled the 
specter of crime bills since 1988 
reaching the precipice of pas- 
sage, only to be foiled in the 
end, often by the gun lobby. 


Inquiry by FBI Targets 
Anti-Abortion Violence 


By David Johnston 

• New York Timer Sorter 

WASHINGTON — Setting 
aside a long-standing reluc- 
tance to involve itself in cases of 
abortion-related violence, the 
FBI has begun a broad inquiry 
into accusations that the use of 
force against women's clinics 
and thcar doctors is the work of 
a con spir acy by anti-abortion 
militant s. 

A confidential teletype was 
sent to all FBI field offices after 
the fatal mooting on July 29 of 
an abortion doctor aad his se- 
curity escort outride an abor- 
tion dime in Pensacola, Flori- 
da. 

It mid that the bureau had 
information indicating that 
about half a dozen anti-abor- 
tion miRtmt* might be posing 
“a conspiracy that endeavors to 
achieve political or social 
change through activities that 
mvolveforro or violence." 

The evidence was volun- 
teered ~by abortion rights 
group, the tdetype said. 

It fisted prominent anti-abor- 
tion figures, including the Rev- 
eread David C. Trosch, Mi- 
chael Bray, C. Roy McMillan, 
Matthew Trewhella, David 
Crane and Donald Spitz. 

ABoftiiemsignedadedara- 
tion that supported tiffing doc- 
tors who pcafonn abortions. 


ask lhe butter., 


The declaration circulated re- 
cently among anti-abortion 
militants. 

In a telephone interview from 
Mobile, Alabama, Father 
Trosch, a Roman Catholic 
priest whan the church has sus- 
pended because of his advocacy 
of lethal force against abortion 
doctors, denied any conspiracy. 

The tdetype set off the first 
full government inquiry of ac- 
cusations by abortion rights 
leaden that a campaign of ter- 
ror is under way at abortion 
clinics around the United 
States, a campaign that these 
advocates say the authorities 
have failed to deal with. 

The inquiry was brought on 
by pressure from the Justice 


Department, the FBI’s parent, 
whose leaden, including Attor- 
ney General Janet Reno, are 
supporters of abortion rights. 

Notwithstanding what was 
said to be the eagerness of the 
FBI director, Louis J. Freeh, to 
take it on, the investigation was 
an uncomfortable step for 
many of the bureau's senior 
managers. 

These officials had been wary 
of involving the FBI, for fear 
that it would be drawn into the 
broader ideological clash be- 
tween mainstream anti-abor- 
tion groups and abortion rights 
advocates. 




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Page 4 


FRIDAY, AUGUST 5, 1994 

OPINION 


Jteralb 


INTERNATIONAL M ♦ 




mnusiiKJi Mini tiik new vhkk time*. \nii the washim.ton post 


War Crimes in Rwanda 


fcttb UttC. Tfte Harassed Clinton Presidency May Be Unraveling 


There is no doubt that horrible war 
crimes have bean committed in Rwanda. 
-But Prime Minister Faustin Twagiramim- 
gu*s determination to proceed with the 
trial and execution of thousands speaks of 
victor’s justice. Mass trials in suspect cir- 
cumstances can now only deepen the divi- 
sions that have caused 2 mini on Rwan- 
dans, most of than Hutu, to flee a country 
whose victorious revolutionaries are most- 
ly Tutsi, Far better for the world as well 
as Rwanda to seek justice before an inter- 
national tribunal under United Nations 
auspices. Mr. Twagiramungu believes 
that such a process could take too long to 
- organize, but it need noL 

The world has long lacked a permanent 
tribunal, where soldiers as well as civilians 
could be brought to account for war 
crimes. In its absence, temporary tribunals 
can be established to deal with the crimes 
committed in particular conflicts. The UN 
Security CouncQ has approved creation of 
‘ an international tribunal to punish crimes 
against humanity in the former Yugosla- 
via, and a team of investigators has already 
developed dossiers on mass killings there. 

The crimes perpetrated in Rwanda, 
where upward of 500,000 civilians were 
butchered, cry out for the same UN re- 
sponse. But Rwanda's prime minister 
wants to try the crimes just committed 
against bis people in a national court. He 
cites punishment of war criminals by such 
courts after World War 11 in France and 
Germany as an antecedent — but be ig- 
nores the more compelling precedent. 

During World War Q, the Allies served 
notice that individuals would face trial 
for such crimes as the murder or fll treat- 
ment of civ ilians and wanton devastation 
not justified by military necessity. This 
prepared the way for the International 
Military Tribunal at Nuremberg, which. 


whatever its defects, put major criminals 
in the dock, exposed their deeds, and 
established a salutary precedent 
The proscribed war crimes were then 
spelled out in greater detail in four Geneva 
convections. Regrettably, although it was 
proposed, the United Nations did not cre- 
ate a permanent trib unal. The World 
Court in The Hague does not suffice; it 
deals with conflicts between states, and 
does not ay individuals. What is needed 
is a parallel institution for dealing not 
just with war crimes but also with terror- 
ists, aerial hijackers, narcotics barons and 
other international felons. 

lacking such a court, many nations 
have tried to sit in judgment on them- 
selves, with uneven results. Argentina did 
try generals responsible for human rights 
offenses and for the lost war in the Falk- 
lands, but elsewhere (as in El Salvador) 
grants of amnesty, combined with estab- 
lishment of truth commissions to docu- 
ment atrod ties, have been a more common 
practice. This sacrifice of justice to pro- 
mote social peace can be morally justified 
only when victims and tbdr representa- 
tives agree to the compromise. 

It is hard to see bow any such arrange- 
ment can be struck in Rwanda, where 
courts and judges are among the casual- 
ties of a bitter civfl war. The new govern- 
ment formed by the Rwanda Patriotic 
Front needs urgently now to persuade the 
refugees that they can safely return. The 
new prime minister, a Hutu himself, 
would further that goal by seeking a reck- 
oning in neutral and impartial courts. A 
national court chosen and dominated by 
Tutsi would scarcely reassure Hutu who 
now huddle in disease-ridden refugee 
camps because they fear returning home 
to summary justice. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


W ASHINGTON —If you talk these 
days to President BQ1 Clinton's sup- 
porters, including some officials of m$ 
administration, you find them depressed. 
Something has gone tembly wrong. 

Here is an articulate, activist president 
presiding over one of the most vigorous 
economic recoveries in years, yet his rat- 
ings go down as the economic numbers 
move up. The principles of his health 
care plan — unrversal coverage paid for 
mostly by employers — are broadly pop- 
ular, yet as soon as you stick the “ Clin- 
ton" label on the proposal, support falls 
through tire floor. This seems to be the 
only case in recent history where stamp- 
ing “Made by the U.S. Congress" on a 
program might make it more popular. 

When some horrible event happens, Hire 
the murders for which O. J. Simpson facts 
trial — many Qintonitcs experience a 
grim sense of relief. They figure that at 
least for a couple of weeks the media will 
lay off attacks on the president 
In December the president was very 
popular, coating off his budget and 
NAFTA victories and the initial cheers 
for his speech on health care- Then came 
new speculation on his love life, and the 
rebirth of the Whitewater story. 

It doesn’t matter that most Americans 
are not sure what Whitewater is all about 
The stray was a killer because for month 
after month every television viewer knew 
that “new questions” were being raised 


By E. J. Dionne Jr. 

about Mr. Clinton’s integrity. At some 
point, people get tired of this. First they 
might blame the media for being negative, 
but then they start blaming their presi- 
dent They just do not want their chief 
executive to be the subject of so many 
doubts, questions, rumors and jokes. 

Whitewater engulfed the White House 
itself. It hit at the very moment when a 
new strategy was badly needed to get the 
health care plan moving. The White 
House’s short-term, campaign mentality 
seat everyone scurrying to beat back this 
one story, and much else dropped by the 
wayside. Allies turned, on allies as the 
administration was gripped by the Great 
Fear that scandals produce these days. 

It must also be said that all these 
problems have been aggravated by the 
extraordinary level of personal attack 
against Mr. Clinton — and on so many 
fronts. John Kennedy’s love life and Lyn- 
don Johnson’s past business dadmgs 
never got a going over comparable to 
what Mr. Clinton is experiencing. 

Franklin Roosevelt could be at least as 
cagey m getting partisans on all sides of 
an issue to believe that he empathized 
with them, but it was seen as “flexibili- 
ty.” Ronald Reagan compromised much 
more than people remember, yet few ac- 
cused him of selling out. 


The central problem is that in the 
midst of all the spin and the messages- 
of-the-week, voters have lost, sight of 
Mr. Clinton’s purposes for bring presi- 
dent Take three areas. 

The hst campaign. It is forgotten that 
the 1992 Clinton campaign was built 
around a straightforward theme: govern- 
ment’s need to respond to fears of “the 
forgotten middle class.” Mr. Clinton 
talked about programs to retrain the 
work force, to educate kids for a more 
competitive environment, to ease the 
transition from old jobs to new jobs. 

He still loves this rhetoric, and a vari- 
ety of programs have been launched. But 
mostly they are not very visible, having 
been ground into small pieces by budget 
pressures. The fact that what was so 
essential, to -the campaign has been a 
sideshow to the presidency feeds the 
anw. that President Oinfam is a different 
man from Candidate Clinton. 

The hst task force. In retrospect, it is 
easy to see that having a health care task 
force largely divorced bom the normal 


anting some of the vicious atmeks ste 
Sounder. Most hnportmit 
process would have looked less 
oS&focused on principles and pnr- 
omto rather than on esotenc details. 

The hst values. Mr. Omtons angle 




A f*' 


most enetuYc spcnwi « , -T~r. 

address to a convention of black mum- 
tanTin Memphis. He spoke movmriy 
about racism and personal responsibility 
family breakup, the moral costs erf unem- 

W* nroned that 20V- 


nioymeiiLauw **“«“'* — 7 — , ■ „ 

eminent had a role to play in solving 
problems, but that only individuals and 
communities could solve America s moral 
rriris. Instead of looking slippery, be 
looked gutsy. He did so while saymg 

. * I™™- Ut nmn- 


gionnl politics WSS a TTHBtfllcft- Much of 
the compromising now going on at the 
last minute could have been done much 
earli er The task force should have served 
as staff to a joint a dminis tration-congres- 
sional effort. HHLaxy Rodham Clinton 
could have played the popular role of 
dtief broker conciliator, sbort-cir- 


inmw UIHLIUlWn i i MiM...' .— j ' 

cd to hear. Why was tins emghflilrt? 

The central threads of the Canton 
presidency have disappeared. Mr. Urn- 
ton is said by friends to believe himsdl 
that his presidency is in peril. Thai is why 
he chose to take an important first step 
baefr from the brink with his press con- 
ference Wednesday night. He tried with 
some , success to remind voters of the 
Clinton they had elected 21 months ago. 

He will need to do much more of tins. 
His best against all the personal 

charges has always been that he was in 
pofitics to do big things. When voters can 
no longer see Ouse large purposes, the 
personal overwhelms the political. 

The Washington Past 


The Point Is That Congress Is Supposed to Get the Whale Truth 


In the symbolism of international poli- 
tics, it makes a difference who gets invit- 
ed to the party. The guest lists are partic- 
ularly significant in the succession of 
50th anniversary celebrations that com- 
memorate the great events of the last year 
of World War II in Europe, a continent 
now in the process of knitting itself back 
together after many years of division. 

In June, the Western Allies held a huge 
party on the anniversary of the Norman- 
dy invasion, but did not invite either their 
Eastern allies or their former enemy — an 
opportunity missed for statesmanship. 
But in July, marking the anniversary of 
the liberation of Paris, the Bastille Day 
parade included German soldiers. The 
tight rapport between France and Ger- 
many has been for nearly four decades 
the foundation of the new Europe. Now 
in August, the Pedes havejust commemo- 
rated the begmninE of a heroic and 


doomed battle, the Warsaw Uprising. Po- 
land’s President Lech Walesa invited 
both the Germans and the Russians. 

Y ou will not find a more moving exam- 
ple of magnanimity. The uprising was 
one of the great betrayals of a cruel time. 
In the summer of 1944, as the Soviet 
armies approached Warsaw, their radios 
urged the Polish Home Army, an under- 
armed guerrilla force, to rise against the 
Nazi occupation. When the uprising be- 


gan, instead of sweeping westward to the 
Poles’ support the Soviet army, on Sta- 
lin’s orders, hung back for months while 
the Germans savagely stamped out all 
resistance. Why? Becanse Stalin assumed, 
correctly, that the Polish guerrillas were 
patriots who would make trouble for the 
postwar Soviet occupation. More than 
200,000 Poles died in the uprising, which 
reduced the city to a wasteland. 

At Monday’s ceremony, the president 
of Germany, Roman Herzog, stepped 
forward to say, “I ask forgiveness for 
what Germans did to you” — a ample 
sentence of great weight- Perhaps he had 
in mind another good example, the occa- 
sion in 1970 when a German chancellor, 
Willy Brandt, visited Warsaw, went to 
the tomb of the Polish Unknown Soldier, 
then knelt at the memorial to the Jews of 
the Warsaw ghetto. In retrospect, it is 
clear that his gesture was an important 
contribution to subverting the Soviet grip 
on Eastern Europe and drawing the con- 
tinent’s two halves back toward each oth- 
er. Gestures make a difference. 

Understandably, not all Poles liked 
the idea of inviting Germans and Rus- 
sians to this week’s celebration in War- 
saw. President Walesa did it anyway, as 
an act of reconciliation. That is what is 
known as moral leadership. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


W ASHINGTON — Why 
have the Riegle hearings 
on the Whitewater scandal 
brought credit to the Senate, 
.while the Gonzalez circus has 
brought ridicule on the House? 

Because the essence of the 
Senate hearings is not about the 
abuse of the banking system by 
the CEntom, or even about 
White House attempts to im- 
pede or wrongfully investigate 
an investigation. They are 
abont the constitutional re- 
quirement that the Congress be 
told the whole truth. 

The tenor of the Senate hear- 
ings has changed. A week ago. 
Democratic senators were pooh- 
poohing the investigation as par- 
tisan poking around. Now Re- 
publicans are giving some of 
their questioning time to the oth- 
er ride because Democrats are 
acting as members of the legisla- 
tive branch being deceived by 
the executive branch. 

A generation ago, Congress 


By William Safire 


and the courts came down hard 
on a CIA chief, Richard Helms, 
for doing what he saw to be his 
duty in concealing a covert ac- 
tion. La the ’80s, the Reagan ap- 
pointee Elliott Abrams was con- 
victed, agam not for lying but for 
“willfully and knowingly” failing 
to answer “fully and completely” 
about material information by a 
Senate committee. 

The latest example of incom- 
plete testimony, subtracting a 
si gnificant fraction from “the 
whole truth,” was not to protect 
national security but to help a 
friend, die president, avoid po- 
litical embarrassment. 

Treasury’s Roger Altman 
plainly withheld a series of ques- 
tionable contacts and heated dis- 
cussions of recusal from probing 
senators this spring. Yet the Gin- 
tan-flppomlea counsel, Robert 
Ftske, and the Office of Govern- 
ment Ethics saw no evfl. 


The prospect of condoning in- 
complete testimony drew the 
cheara-and-balances issue for 
the Senate: if Democrats allow a 
Democratic administration to 
make a mockery of congressio- 
nal overright today, what power 
would the Senate have to check 
any president tomorrow? 

With House hearings a na- 
tional joke — die-hard cover- 
upper Henry Gonzaldz awarded 
Mr. Al tman a “Congressional 
Purple Heart” — senators reluc- 
tantly showed their displeasure 
at having been made foals of. 

Mr. Altman, no ax murderer, is 
a prflitirai zombie. Other mem- 
bere of Treasury’s briskly walking 
dead showed how a pattern of 
legalistic half-truth- telling has 
permeated the Clinton culture. 

Treasury General Counsel 
Jean Hanson, whose sworn testi- 
mony frequently conflicted with 
Mr. Altman’s and Secretary 


Lloyd Bentsen’s, was shown her 
memos and written reports of 
phone conversations. Five times 
she claimed to have“noindcpen- 
dentreotiOecxion” of the informa- 
tion in the documents, but she 
did not dispute their accuracy. 

That is a slippery lawyer’s way 
of saying “I don’t remember, so 
you can’t ask me more about it” 
(I am looking at, although I have 
no independent recollection of, 
a cartoon by James Thmber 


showing aprosecuior saying to a 
witness “Perhaps this wifi re- 
fresh your memory” as a large 
kangaroo is brought into court.) 

The dank of falsity goes to the 
tap. Far more than a year the 
white House has been saying 
that Whitewater files were sent 
from Vincent Foster’s office after 
his death to the Clintons’ private 
attorney. At a much praised press 
conference in April, HiDaty Gfin- 
ton was asked if her top aide, 
Margaret Williams, bad removed 
documents from Mr. Foster’s of- 


fice. “I don’t think that she did 
remove any documents," Mrs. 

fTHntrm ans wered. Sue said, “Mr. 

Nussbanm distributed the files 
according to (who] he thought 
should have than.” 

But Newsweek reveals that 
Bernard Nussbaum let Maggie 
wntiatm trice the Whitewater 
files; she spoke to Hillary in Ar- 
kansas and was told to lock them 
in a doset in the family quarters 
of the White House. Five days 
passed before they were turned 
over to die Qmtons’ lawyer, who 
arranged for their continued se- 


by the first lady to mislead. 

Deceiving the press with a half- 
truth is no crime. But willfully 
failing to answer fully to the Con- 
gress is a violation of law. Only a 
misdemeanor — but it helps pre- 
serve- the Ameri can system of 
checks and balances. 

The New York Tones. 


On Bosnia, It Matters That Russia and the West Stick Together 


■9 


at Serbia 

Right and Wrong on Trade ffi 5 . 

O O sian into 


This was the week for the Clinton ad- 
ministration to play tough on trade. It 
threatened to retaliate unless Japan re- 
versed government procurement policies 
that discriminate against U.S. telecom- 
munications and medical equipment. And 
it bludgeoned Canada into agreeing to 
reduce wheat exports to the United States 
for a year while a commission reviews an 

E dispute about such exports. The 
stance toward Japan is justified, 
_ i the administration threatens to 
cany it to excess. The decision to shut out 
Canadian wheat, by contrast, amounts to 
an assault on U.S. consumers — the price 
of Mr. Clinton’ promise to bail out Mid- 
western farmers whose support he desper- 
ately needed in Congress to pass the North 
American Free Trade Agreement. 

Government purchasers in Japan bla- 
tantly discriminate against UJS. equip- 
ment manufacturers, perhaps because Jap- 
anese companies bribe local officials. 
Whatever the cause, the solution is for 
government procurers to adopt open bid- 
ding and contract procedures that would 
expose underhanded deals. So far, the Jap- 
anese have refused to do so, which justifies 
the administration's threats. 

Yet even if the Japanese were to con- 
cede on procedural issues, the dispute 
would not end, because Mr. Clinton is 
fixated on getting the Japanese to swallow 
numerical targets to measure compliance. 
For example, he wants Japan's govern- 
ment to increase purchases from U.S. 


equipment manufacturers by a substantial 
amount over the next several years. The 
Japanese are dead set against numerical 
targets, which they label managed trade. 

Their resistance is misplaced; govern- 
ment purchases are not controlled by mar- 
ket forces. What the Japanese probably 
fear, no doubt correctly, is that if they feed 
Mr. Qin ton’s appetite for numerical tar- 
gets for government purchases, be will 
extend the idea to areas where it ought not 
to apply — to private markets like auto 
parts. Toe important point for Mr. Clinton 
to absorb is that the meager economic 
gains to be had by winning nunT fr rfcri 
targets are not worth risking a trade war. 

There is considerably less merit to keep- 
ing out Canadian wheat U.S. imports are 
high because of misguided policies that 
keep land out of production and subsidize 
the sale of U.S. wheat abroad. Canadian 
wheat fills the void. By keeping it out Mr. 
Clinton would drive up consume: prices of 
commodities like pasta. 

The best outcome would be for the 
Canadian wheat deal to last only the one 
obligatory year and for Mr. Clinton to 
impose sanctions on Japan only to win 
more open procurement procedures. But 
there is little reason to expect the best In 
trade disputes, as well as m its legislation 
to institute the Uruguay Round interna- 
tional trade agreement the administration 
has been all too wining to buy off powerful 
domestic manufacturers. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


P ARIS — Russia’s position re- 
garding Serbia is more com- 
plex than commonly credited. It 
has also evolved, as the political 
situation in Russia has evolved. 

It is not true that Russia is the 
Serbs’ “ally.” The Russian gov- 
ernment finds the Sabs today a 
nuisance and embarrassment 88 
its public statements in recent 
days have made plain. However, 
Moscow has also been able to 
make use of Serbia in its own 
rehabilitation as a world power, 
at Serbia's expense. Further com- 
plicating the matter is that the 
Serbs’ situation is a factor in Rus- 
sian internal politics. 

Russia is not moved by pan- 
Slav sentiments. Bosnians and 
Croats are Slavs, too. The Serbs, 
like the Rnssians, are Orthodox in 
religion, but the resultant politi- 
cal ties have proved slender. 


By William Pfaff ,. 


Christian motivation is not evi- 
dent in either Russian or Serbian 
policy. The Russian people, poos 
or otherwise, have more urgent 
things to concern them than the 
adventures of the Serbs in a war 
that Serbia chose to begin for its 
own aggrandizement 

Russia’s Serbia policy is the re- 
sult of internal political consider- 
ations and die shifting balance of 
power in Moscow of democratic 
and nationalist forces, and be- 
tween the enemies and the friends 
of Boris Yeltsin. It is greatly af- 
fected try Moscow’s perception of 
U.S. policy and UJS. motives, of- 
ten inaccurate or exaggerated. 

When the Yugoslav war began, 
democratic forces in Russia sym- 
pathized with those Serbs oppos- 
ing the natkmal-Comnnruist Slo- 


bodan Milosevic and accepted 
the idea that recognizing Slove- 
nia and Croatia as independent 
countries would help stabilize 
the situation. But this was also 
a tumultuous period when the 
Russian government really had 
no foreign policy. As one well- 
placed Russian analyst has not- 
ed, “There was a minister of for- 
eign affairs, but no ministry.” 
An important part of the po- 
litical class believed then, and 
believes now, that Russia's long- 
term interest lies in cooperation 
with the Weston powers. In Yu- 
goslavia, Russia was naturally in 
a position to serve as intermedi- 
ary between the Western powers 
and Serbia. It assumed this cru- 
cial role in 1993 — to the alarm 
of many in the West, for whom it 


Russia’s MMM Grew in a Culture of Rot 



International Herald Tribune 

ESTABLISHED 1387 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 
Co-Chairmen 

RICHARD McCLEAN. Puhitxher A Chief Executive 
JOHN VINOCUR. Emiaive EtSmr A VkrPnxidtni 

• WALTER WELLS..%hj Ed m • SAMUEL ABT. KATHERINE KNORR and 
CHARLES MITCHELMOREftiwh Edirnn • CARL GEWIR1Z. Aowaor Editor 

• ROBERT J. DONAHUE. Ijfibtr/ftlie EJairiiil Panes • JONATHAN GAGE. Business and Fauna Editor 

• RENE BOND Y. Dtf wy PuNidrr* JAMES NfcLBOD. Adverting Darctur 
•JUANITA I. CASPARL httemavmttf Mn rh^Miuvt Dim tnr • ROBERTFARRlt CtmiLmiDirrcair. fiaryv 

j Ikmietinle hi PuNii ttiimi: fthlumll). Sommu 

L. Him mu Adjtm trlehi Pubhuitun: Aitf/tnrvtr P. Dumnv 

■ Inkmiwwul HxjklTnhm:. IKI AxcnwChaffcsdc-Gaulk-. V2S2I NaMy-sur-Seinc. France, 

j Trf - :i I I-Wfc3WJ.UU. I-d* : Cfe_.|M7JJMI: Adv.. 46.37.51 11 Internet: lHT<j^i*i*orruc 

: V* ,; '^uhT 1 Rki,unl ' tn ■’ G*s vdvt\ HL Saivqmn- W/. Tri. fitfj 472-77M. hre Ih5) 27J-3JM 

. jw l*r A«». til-1! n Kwnqmh!. Vi uw ft/. H>m A>*n*. Tri. X52-'C22-l IHX htv XS2N222-I IVO 


,vu hitcm,Lu<nJ W, n»i/ fiin . M nyta iry.n*l ISS\. iCvt-Mfil 


/"CAMBRIDGE, Massachu- 
V_^ setts — The Russians who 
invested in the MMM mutual in- 
vestment fund are not the first to 
have squandered their savings in 
pursuit of patently unrealistic 
promises. Beginning with tulipo- 
mania in 1637, when the Dutch 
treated tulip bulbs as if they were 
nuggets of gold, virtually every 
country in the capitalist world 
has suffered from get-rich-quick 
schemes. The United States has 
not been immune. In the 1920s, 
thousands of speculators in Chi- 
cago were convinced that they 
could get rich overnight by in- 
vesting with Samuel Insull in his 
Middle West Utilities. Musco- 
vites certainly have no monopoly 
on wishful thinking anr! greed. 

The MMM fiasco, however, has 
greater significance. Stocks and 
mutual funds were not only un- 
known but illegal in the Soviet 
Union. So shady dealers in Russia 
were able to find plenty of gullible, 
inexperienced people ready to in- 
vest in schemes promising a 3,000 
percent yearly return. 

Even after being warned that 
high returns for early investors 
were made possible only by the 
financing of more recent investors, 
Muscovites bought shares. No 
wonder Moscow has become the 
shell-game capital of the world. 

But the roots of the problem go 
beyond avarice and naivete. Rus- 
sia’s poorly conceived and rapid- 
ly applied economic reforms play 
a role. The public was encouraged 
to embrace stock markets and in- 
vestment schemes by the govern- 
ment, which believed that such 
public involvement would further 
the reform process. 

But this push came before there 
was an effective network of com- 
petitive private businesses in 
winch to invest Because the eco- 
nomic reforms woe so poorly de- 
signed, most farms remained col- 
lectivized and little attention was 


By Marshall L Goldman 

paid to creating a vibrant private 
service and manufacturing sector. 

In this artificial business envi- 
ronment, the mafia came to con- 
trol perhaps 75 percent of all pri- 
vate business and banking 
activity. And the campaign to pri- 
vatize the country’s state enter- 
prises often amounted to a big 
property grab by former state 
managers — “spontaneous priva- 
tization” it was called. 

These new “owners,” along 
with a new class of financial ma- 
nipulators, have come into great 
wealth wide all around litem in- 
dustrial production is collapsing. 
Unemployment, formerly dis- 
guised, has crane into plain view. 

Today, Moscow streets are 
jammed with the Merced es- 
Benzes, BMWs and Cadillacs of 

the new ruble billionaires. In 

America such exploits would land 
them in jail cells once occupied by 
the likes of Michael Milken. 

Though Russian tax authorities 
opened a criminal investigation 
Thursday of Sergei Mavrodi, 
chairman of MMM, and the com- 
pany suspended all operations, 
the “Russian Milkens” are usual- 
ly safe and relatively immu ne 
from prosecution. Russia does lit- 
tle to regulate financial manipu- 
lation and even racketeering. On 
the rare occasions when violators 
are arrested, they are usually re- 
leased quickly, with the help of a 
bribe or a threat of violence. Sur- 
rounded by such ill-gotten gains 
and seemingly effortless schemes, 
Russians were certain to find the 
MMM promises tempting. 

Nor is the rot limited to the 
private sector. Government cor- 
ruption is equally blatant, espe- 
cially in Moscow. With Boris 
Yeltsin’s help, the mayor erf Mos- 
cow, Yuri Luzhkov, insisted that 
the city, not national authorities. 


should control the privatization 
of aQ enterprises, buddings and 
land within Moscow’s dry limits. 

Cynics deay this decision, see- 
ing it as a gjant land grab fay the 
mayor and his friends. There had 
already been complaints when 
the mayor directed that ad finan- 
cial transactions with the aty be 
conducted through the Most- 
bank, which is widely thought to 
be under mafia contra. 

In the same spirit, several pro- 
spective foreign tenants in dty- 
owned office buddings have been 
told to send half of their rents to 
the Moscow real estate office and 
the other half to the Swiss bank 
amounts of various Moscow mu- 
nicipal officials. In such a dimate 
of Corruption, TUflnipnlarinn anH 
crime, it is not s urpri sing that 
ordinary citizens should fed that 
they, too, should be able to share 

in the wealth. 

Beyond the personal losses suf- 
fered by 5 milli on to 10 nwTKrm 
investors, the MMM collapse has 
harmed the whole economic re- 
form process. It reinforces those 
who questioned the wisdom of 
moving to the market; this in turn 
will strengthen resistance to fur- 
ther reform. A coQapse of this 
magnitude is certain to spark 
calls by extremists Hke Vladimir 
Zhirinovsky to halt the move to 
the market and remstitute some 
old state economic controls. 

Reformers should realize tha t 
ill-considered economic reforms 
are not adless. They give rise to 
economic and political extremes 
and in the long run prolong rather 
than facilitate the reform process. 

The writer is author of the 
forthcoming “Lost Opportunity: 
Why Economic Reforms Have Not 
Worked m Russia,” and the Kath- 
ryn W Davis professor of Russian 
economics at Wellesley College. 
He contributed this comment to the 
International Harold Tribune. 


represented the “return. of Rus- 
sia” to the Balkans. 

Other jpoups InMosoow have 
supported closer relations with 
the Milosevic government or have 
made common cause with extreme 
Serbian nationalists, in order to 
fixe nationalist sentiments in Rus- 
sia and embarrass Mir. .Yeltsin. 
Their actions have littleor nothing 
intrinsically to do with Serbia, but 
are directed to influradng the do- 
mestic powerstroggfe in Russia. 

There are also those in Moscow, 
among them people from the dem- 
ocratic opposition, who condude 
that Washington’s policy on die 
Yugoslav war — meaning the rhe- 
torical support the Clinton admin- 
istration and Congress have given 
the predominantly. Mushin Bosni- 
an government, and Washington’s 
threat to lift the anns embargo — 
expresses an American aim to dis- 
member not only Yugoslavia but, 
eventually, Russia itself. 

Here we enter the doaded zone 
of European, and particularly 
East European and Russian, po- 
litical paranoia. If you argue mat 
American foreign policy and 
Washington politics are both 
driven by extremely short-barm 
domestic political and “image!” 
considerations, you are not, in 
these circles, taken seriously. 

It is taken fra- granted that 
Washington has a long-term pro- 
gram to weaken rivals and pre- 
vent the emngence of new power 
centers. Serbia must be blocked 
from becoming a major European 
power. Historical Russia must be 
broken up so as to give the United 
States — or Germany —perma- 
nent domination of Europe. 

(Such theories generally hold 
Germany to be Washington’s 
puppet, or Washington Germa- 
ny’s, or both to be occultly con- 
trolled by the Vatican, or by 
world Jewry, or by both in collu- 


sion, or by even, more exotic 
combinations of farces.) 

However, Russian policy today 
remains in the hands of people 
who possess a reasoned and real- 
istic view of Western motivations 
and who understand that Russia's 
long-term interest lies in becom- 
ing a full, partner in the inter- 
national concert of advanced in- 
dustrial states and liberal de- 
mocracies. Fra domestic political 
reasons, they cannot simply en- 
dorse what die West proposes. 
Nonetheless, the role they have 
played in Yugoslavia so far has 
been constructive, and, given the 
limits constraining that role, will 
continue to be constructive. 

It is important that this contin- 
ue. Hie West itself is internally 
divided on what to do about Yu- 
goslavia. Americans are disposed 
to take a moral view, wantmg to 
arm and aid the Bosnians, victims 
of aggression. France and Britain 
say that the partial cease-fire of 
recent weeks represents progress 
tmd that preserving it, wbne look- 
ing for incremental improvements, 
is better for everyone. The Russian 
View and the West European tend 
ta reinforce one another. 

The great danger of the Yugo- 
slav war is that the Serbs succred 
in imposing their own apocalyp- , 
tic vision of a redivided and war-# 
ring Europe upon everyone rise 
drawn into the crisis. Thus far 
they have failed to do so. 

Despite their disagreements, 
the Western powers and Russia 
have managed to speak with one 
voice. They have made some 
progress toward peace. But even 
if they make no progress at all, it 
is of fundamental importance 
that they continue to act togeth- 
er and take great p ains to under- 
stand one another. 

International Herald Tribute. 

© Los Angeles Tones Syndicate. 


IflToUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1894: Tariff Deadlock 

NEW YORK — The tariff dead- 
lock still continues. The House 
and Senate conferees are nnah]^ 
to agree. The rumors that they 
had se ttled the details were 
promptly denied. Sugar is the one 

obstacle, In fact, not ten members 

of Congress know the difference 
between mushrooms and toad- 
stools, as far as the intricaries of 
the sugar question axe concerned. 

1919: f mA Women’ 

NEW YORK — Miss Rose Roth- 
enbeig. New York’s only woman 
Mastant ffistrict attorney, declar® 
that_smce the establishment of 
prohibition there is a great de- 
crease m the numbers of “wild 
women” appearing before the po- 
nce courts. Miss Rothaiberg adHc- 
“Even some of the hardened won^ 
aato^mdroppingfroniae 
notice of the district attorney’s of- 


fice, and we attribute this to tbs 
difficulty of ob taining IkjUOT Of 
drags to move them fra work in 
partnership with sneak thieves, 
pickjpockets and burglars.” 

1944: Ontof Brittany ^ , 

WITH THE AMERICAN AR- 
MORED FORCES SPEAR- 
HEADING THE ADVANCE 
THROUGH FRANCE— [From 
our New York edition;} Germs* . 

cd fleeing from the coastrii*?\ 
yince of Brittany into the history . 
interior region of the Mrinc- .; 
Whether the Germans actually - 
headed fra Fads, and wh^hri'^- 
Americans are puriairrig'tbBB & ' 
that direction, fs something th®* 
must be left to the 
However, the primary parposk® 

wita is to kiD the enemy; who- 
ever the Germans flee the^ 




air aadground forces- 


,« Ok 

'V s '" 1 

• •*/.. i « 




5 




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a 


s 

■». 

N'. 

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5s 

o' - ' 

k '' 

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■*i 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 5, 1994 


Page 5 




it 


» \._ 

. S 

Eai 




25- 


OPINION 


n 



The Need Is 
For an 
Of Workers 

By ViDiam Raspberry 

llTASHDKJTGK — Tliedeciiiie 
YY of the American faeway, acme 
senous observes believe, Tnartn^ 
the bmh of that jobless, hopeless 
and dispirited group we have come 
to call the ‘W tato* 

And it may be that the best hope 
forredeemingthis wasted, (and fro- 
qnentfy daogeroua) cohort is to es- 
tablish again tire functional equiva- 
lent of .the factory. 

The problem is dear enough The 
high-tech jobs, the ecooc&BLSts' say 
are the wave of the future may tam 
out to be a very good thing for those 
with, the wherewithal for coBege or 
te chnic al school. But they are most' 
fy beyond the reach, of the under- 
class — and there is precious little 
evidence to support the hope that 
government job- training 
will make ranch difference. 

What will? Perhaps a 1990§ 

Blent Of the Tnchu f tr^l p1<m* 
while requiring only a sense of re^ 
sponsibihty and~arwflHngness to 
wodchani,Wt^ at least two genera- 
tions of Americans out of then' pov- 
erty and turned them into produo- ; 
tive and proud citizens. 

made in his maiA-n 

speech last week as president of 
the National Urban 
In rase you were (fistracted by Mr. 
Price’s w arning that African-Amwi . 
eras avoid “the paranoid trap : of 
t hink i n g dial racism accounts lor all 
that plagues us,” cm: by his gutsy re- 
buk« of Louis Faiiakhan fra his anti- 
Semitism, here iawfaaidsc he had to 
say in tbatspeecfa in Imfianapofis: 



Slavery Disney* s Way? No Thanks 


T7TNEYARD HAVEN, Massa- 
Y dmsetts — TTnagtrtftflring, an 
adroit neologism, is the Wall Disney 
Ca’s name for the corporate unit 
involved in developing Disney’s 
America, the projected mammoth 
theme park in northern Virginia. 

Not kag ago, the chief hnagmeer. 
Robot Weis, described what would 
be in store, among other historical 
attractions, for hordes erf tourists. 

“We want to make you fed what 
it was like to be a slave, and what it 
was like to escape through the Un- 
derground Railroad.” He added 
that the exhibits would “sot take a 
Pollyanna view” but would be 

m j- l : i ■ : *» 



every o ne mlfa e inne r city who wants 
to, or is expected to, Wk* - . 
It is an; uncomfortable thought, 
a variety of “make wwk" 
ItomtheCSvflianCoaiser- 
bf the 1940s totheWar 
on Poverty's Neighborhood Youth 
to tfae scandal-ikiden Com- 
_ Training 
Act proyams os me 1970s. 

Brain ttetedays of jobkssrecov-: 
cry,it is dear that the free market** 
“invisible hand” could use a htde 
direction. That direction could, as 
Chades GeramLcf the World Trade 
Institute fans proposed, be tax-fa- 


voted labor-intensive enterprises in 
the private sector. Or it could be 
along the lines now advanced by the 
Urban League’s Mr. Price. 

If rite latter, it would not be the 
first time. There was, as he reminds 
us, an eaifier “labor-intensive public 
enterprise employing thousands of 
marginally skilled workers who 
hdped produce goods and services 
that taxpayers wanted.” And what 
was that? The U.S. military — 
vrinch, by the way, managed to train, 
in grin discipline in and reshape the 
lives of mflhons of young Ameri- 
cans. Says Mr. Price: 


“Let’s devate America’s infra- 
structure to the same valued status 
and alleviate urban unemployment in 
the b argain . What’s several bflKcm in 
new public dollars invested in 
schools, parks and people when com- 
pared with rite bufions more now 
spent much less productively an pub- 
lic assistance for the able-bodied, and 
on extra policemen and prisons?” 
The specifics of the idea sketched 
by the Urban League chief ought to 
become the subject of serious de- 
bate. But on his general notion, I am 
tempted to say: Mr. Price is right. 

Washington Post Writers Group. 


I was fascinated by Mr. Weis’s 
statement because 27 years ago I 
pubSshed a novel called The Con- 
fessions of Nat Turner,” which was 
partly intended to make the reader 
reel what it was like to be a slave. 

Whether I succeeded or not was a 
matter of hot debate, and the book 
still provokes co ntr o ver sy. 

But as one who has plunged into 
the murky waters where the imagin- 
eers wish to venture, I have doubts 
whether the technical wizardry that 
so entrances children and grown-ups 
at other Disney packs can do any- 
thing but mode a as momen- 
tous as slavey. 

If it is so difficult to render the 
tragic complexity of slavery in 
words, as 1 once found out, wQl 
visual effects or virtual reality make 
it easier to comprehend the agony? 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Germaiiy r btri; Also Europe 

-• The usually, perceptive William 
Pfaff erred in "America’s Turn To- 
ward Germany — and Away Rom 


•Ic of 


denlafil — at 
cal and economic _ 

America’s true partner. 

■- Pfaff might have noted that 
on July 12, after Resident Clinton’s 


new 


caB upon government to create a ‘Europe’” (Opinion, Jidy 3Qf Prest- meeting with the EC Commission 
labw-mtensivepuhKc enterprise dent Bill CSntcm’s support foramcne president, Jacques Delors, and 
afonn services valued by taxpay- intense bilaterd: partnership with Chancellor Hetamt Kohl (Germany 


era. We taxpayers all know maters 
plenty of infrastructure work to do. 
Schools are crumbling. Subway and 
bus stations are strewn with graffiti 
and railroad rights-of-way ate. Kt- 
teredwithtzash.Pubhcpai^incities 
and submbsarepoai^tuamtained.” 
The recommendation that these 
tasks be undertaken as pt&Ec-ser- 
vice jobs comes with difficulty for 
Mr. Rricej about as staunch a capi-. 

tofindinhft- 


Gexmany is not at the expense of the 
European Union. It is in fundamen- 
tal support of that relationship. 

As ml Pfaff note, the CUnton 
, a ri m lni si p i ri Q gi lnw gyw » more un- 
qualified barking than its prodeces- 
soe did' to theEU. It is shortsighted 
. to cohdude that “the .adventure of 
JEurcpean integration ... l** 8 come 
to a nait Wa^rngton befieves that 
Europe has shown itself Incapable at 
■ baerwiiiwg die true union of states" 


winch “the 12, at ^Maastricht, tamed 
to beoome.” The EU is hardly stag- 
nant: Together, its me mb er states 
have put more md than the United 
States has iota Rusffla, Easter& Eu- 
rope and the Middle East; theEU is 
- * to add four memben. The 

for a common 


taHst as you are 

of-center America. Sot he is also a 
realist, and the reality he sees i» that 
there are fewer and fewer jobs for 
low-skifled woa±exs(espeaaIly in- 
ner-city men) hud that, for the first 
time In memory* a resurgent econo- 
my has faikd to create jobs. 

Pofitidahs and ■ econo- v 

. inists are “in deep demal^he says, - foreign add security policy are in 

■' whether they, blame the economy's force less thana year, too short a time 
victims for not wantingto work; or ; tojerimt sweeping judgments, 
count on burgeoning to£mqtogy to ■ * As issocs^anse^ tbeUmtafStates 
create rmHions of n^ jote to re- jofl mobifiresiqjpQrtfor its positions 
place the lost ones; "* mmnltiplc indodmgbflat- 

"Ibe trouble,” says Mr. Price, “is ^ eraloncs. Ihcre-isnonMnnimportant 
that none of their .soonaiias h(^_gnropean nmon today than demo^ 
out much hope for nmer-oty pec^ crane Germany. Netthei Geahany' 
trapped in poverty today ” Noe, he -nor otter EU states believe, however, 
noted, do government investments . that tbe newly unified conmtry’s des- 
in job-tnaning prOTrams. ffis rdne- fiuy sbotrid he other than to numie 
tant condusion is that we must face, thexau^e to which it has ded i c a ted 
“the ideologically UBoqpjqrtahlc itseff since Wodd War EU to build, 
question of wbraier contort of an integrated 

economy is creating enou^h|^bs'for Europe i— not ooctade or iia dcpe n - 


Hdsnut Kohl (Germany 
currently holds tbe EUs rotating 
presidency), Mr. Clinton told the 
press in Bolin: ‘Throughout my 
entire rdnrnik t nwinn I have advo- 
cated the cause of the European 
Union. I believe our best partner, 
as we look toward the 21st century 
for prosperity and for peace, is a 
Europe united in democracy, in 
free, markets, in common security. 
We have supported that, and we 
w3i continue to support it.” 

STUART E. HZENSTAT. 

US. Representative 
... to the European Union. . 

Brussels. 

It *8 Not Over for Romania 

Regarding “A Welcome Message 
From America on Baltic Indepen- 
dence ” ( Opinion, Jufy 5): 

- Prime Minister Carl Bfldt of 
Sweden writes that the departure of 
rite last Russian troops from Ger- 
many, Latvia and Estonia on Aug. 
31 will mark the final end of World 
War H in Europe. 

1 Under the terms cf the Nazi-Sovir 
et Ribbentrop-MoJ otov Pact imple- 
mented in 1940, not only the Baltic 
states were annexed by Moscow but 
also the Romanian regions of Bessa- 
rabia and Northern Bucovina. These 
territories had been fought over by 
rival em p ire s for centuries until the 


world recognized than formally as 
part of Romania in the settlement 
that followed World War L 

Statin’s 1940 annexation of these 
lands is today an unresolved issue. 
Northern Bucovina is held by 
Ukraine, and Bessarabia forms the 
bulk of the ex-Soviet state of Mol- 
dova, whose Moscow-leaning gov- 
ernment remains in a Russian 
sphere of influence despite becom- 
ing an “independent” republic after 
the Soviet collapse. Russia’s 14th 
Army remains in Moldova’s rebel 
Dniester region, where Slavic sepa- 
ratists hold sway. 

Romania’s post-Commuzust ad- 
ministration, led fay reformed Com- 
munists trained long ago in Moscow, 
has avoided asking noraily for Bessa- 
rabia and Bucovina. But for many 
Romanians, Wodd War II wQl end 
only when they get them bade. 

P. W. HUMPHREY. 

Bucharest. 

Japan’s Socialist Leader 

Em Hoagland’s article “The 
American President Has Devalued 
Clout” ( Opinion, July 14) makes 
sotne important points about - the 
HiminittwH international stature of 
tbe U.S. presidency in the 1990s. 
But I am pooled by his contention 
that the election of a Socialist 
prime minister in Japan “drives 
home” the point that ^cooperating 
with America in the time of Bill 
Clinton does not generate enough 
prestige, it seems, to justify accept- 
ing restraints or risks.” 

What we are witnessing in Japan’s 
political situation today are the 


death throes of an old order with 
iron locations on the scale of the 
1600, 1868 or 1945 political revolu- 
tions. The election caTomiichi Mur- 
ayama is an expediency until new 
elections can be called under new 
doctoral rules, and tbe fact that Mr. 
Murayama is a Socialist is indicative 
only of tbe instability of political 

rrmWtirms facTC. 

If there is any U^.-Japan related 
factor to be discerned from Mr. 
Murayama’s election, it is the possi- 
bility that a Socialist was chosen 
because Jraranese politicians real- 
ized that the United States would 
not push such an obviously unstable 
government for a trade deal, but 
would wait until after new elections 
L a government that was not 
on such an unworkable coali- 
tion. This indicates deference, 
not indifference, toward the U.S.- 
Japan relationship. 

MARK VANHOENACKER 
Tokyo. 

As a Japanese citizen living 
abroad, I cannot understand why 
69-year-old Tomiichi Murayama 

should have been elected as the lead- 
er of Japan. Tbe whole process was 
carried out by a few politicians in 
elosed-door meetings. Japanese vot- 
ers had no influence. 

Mr. Murayama and his cabinet 
members say they win continue po- 
litical reform. Beautiful words. But 
the biggest problem in Japanese 
politics is the way of choosing the 
prime minister through closed-door 
b argaini ng without public debate. 
EnCHIRO TOKUMOTO. 

London. 


By 'William Styron 

No one knows what Disney’s De- 
partment of Imagineering has up hs 
sleeve, but whatever exhibits or dis- 
plays it comes up with would have to 
be fraudulent, since no combination 
of branding irons, slave ships or slave 
cabins, shackles, chained black peo- 
ple in their wretched coffles, or treks 

MEANWHILE 

through the Underground Railroad 
- coaid begin to define such a stupen- 
dous experience. To present even the 
most squalid sights would be to 
cheap ly romanticize suffering. 

For slavery’s abyssal pain arose far 

less from its physical cruelty — al- 
though slave ships and the auction 
block were atrocities — than from the 
moral and legal savagery that de- 
prived an entire people of their free- 
dom, akmg whh then rights to educa- 
tion, ownership of property, 
matrimony and protection unoer law. 

Slavery cannot be represented by 
exhibits. It was not remotely like the 
Jewish Holocaust — of bnef dura- 
tion and intensely focused destruc- 
tion — which has permitted an Ulu- 
mmating mmam 

In its 250-year history in America, 
the institution, which so intimately 
bound slave and master together, 
could not fail to produce almost 
unlimited permutations of human 
emotions and relationships. 

_ How would the Disney tcchni- 
ffjana n»Vg miTli nnc pf their 

fed all these things? How would 
they show that there were white 
people who suffered torment over 
the catastrophe? 

And how can they possibly ren- 
der, beyond the deafening nose and 
the nasty gore, the infinitely subtle 
moral entanglements of tbs terrible 
war that brought slavery to an end? 

I was bora and reared in Virgin- 
ia, and I am the grandson of a slave 
owner. I continue to be astonished 
that in the waning years of the 20th 
century, I should possess a flesh- 
and-blood link with the remote 
past — that from boyhood I have a 
luminous memory of an old lady, 
my grandmother, who actually 
owned black slaves. 

For this very reason, she has 
haunted my life, become embedded 
in the fabric of my work as a writer 
and helped make, slavery an undi- 
mmishm g part of my consciousness. 

Her stray, some of which 1 recall 
being bdd in her own quavering and 
stubborn voice, would possess no ap- 
for those p l anni ng the wicked 
of a Simon Legree tableau, 
but it has its own harrowing truth. 

The drama began in 1862, the year 
the Emancipation Proclamation was 
issued, when Union troops occupied 
much of eastern Virginia and part of 
northeastern North Carolina. That 
my grandmother, Marianna 
was a 12-year-old living on a 


Letters intended for publication 
should be addressed “Letters to the 
Editor ” and contain the writer's sig- 
nature. name and full address. Let- 
ters should be brief and are subject to 
editing We cannot be responsible for 
the ream cf unsolicited manuscripts. 


but her 
into 


remote plantation where her father 
owned 35 slaves. Two of the slaves 
were girls, roughly ha age, who had 
been gjven to her by deed. 

She had grown up with them and 
played with them. They had become 
so lovingly dose that, not surpris- 
ingly, the children regarded one 
another as sisters. 

Her dearest memory was of hav- 
ing knitted woolen stockings for the 
girls during that bitter winter. 

One morning, a large body of 
Union cavalrymen, detached from a 
regiment of General Ambrose Bum- 
side, swept down on the plantation, 
stripped it bare of everything valu- 
able and worthless, edible ana mov- 
able, burned down the outbuildings 
and, after a day’s long plunder, 
disappeared. Most of the slaves de- 
parted with the troops, and the little 
gbds also vanished. 

My grandmother never saw them 
again. She and the family verged 
close to starvation for several 
months, forced “to chew roots 
and eat rats.” 

She grieved fra the 
grief may have been t 
ha own suffering; for she became a 
near-skeleton, and tbe deprivation, I 
suspect, arrested ha growth, mak- 
ing her diminutive and weak-boned 
— t houg h sbe was amazingly resil- 
ient — to the end of ha long life. 

My grandmother’s terror and 
trauma were genuine, but they have 
to be reckoned as no great matter in 
the end, for she survived the priva- 
tion of Reconstruction, reared six 
children in reasonable comfort and 
died at 87, at peace except fra 
ha feeling about Yankees, for 
whom she had a fund of inexhaust- 
ible rage and contempt 

What has haunted me is those 
slave girls, her “little sisters'* 
who vanished on that spring day 
and caused her to mourn whenever 
she spoke of them. 

One can be certain that they had 
no easy time of it. Swallowed up into 
the legion of disfranchised ex-slaves, 
they had little to look forward to in 
the oncoming years of poverty, the 
Ku Khix Klan, a storm of hatred, 
joblessness, illiteracy, lynchings and 
the suffocating night of Jim Crow. 

They were truly, in the lament 
of the spiritual, among the “many 
thousand gone.” 

This renewed bandage is the col- 
lective anguish from which white 
Americans have always averted their 
eyes. It underlines the falseness of 
any Disacyesque rendition of slavery. 

The falseness is in the assumption 
that by viewing the artifacts of cru- 
elty and oppression, or whatever the 
imagmeers cook up — the cabins, 
the chains, the auction block — one 
will have succumbed in a “disturb- 
ing and agonizing*' mann er to the 
catharsis of a completed tragedy. 

But the drama has never aided 

At Disney's Virginia park, the 
slave experience would permit visi- 
tors a shudder of horror Wore they 
turned away, smug and self-exculpa- 
tory, from a world that may be dead 
but has not really been laid to rest 

The writer, whose most recent book 
is “ A Tidewater Morning: Three 
Tales From Youth,” is author of “So- 
phie’s Choice.” He contributed this 
comment to The New York Times. 


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Pa«w* 1 




International Herald Tribune 
triday, August 5, 1994 
rage 6 


z z 7 z 


,!l K 1 



•■••*•■ * Id * 




Sylvain Camberling, 
artistic director of the 
Frankfurt Opera, has 
become embroiled in a 
bitter internal dispute 
in his first season 
with the company. 



jL'x • 'r***?- 

r-r.nt.iv 




Op era Under Siege 



bha KB for The New Yak tw« 


F RANKFURT — From the evi- 
dence earlier this summer, it 
would have been difficult to tell 
that the Fr ankf urt Opera, one of 
the biggest and proudest companies in 
Germany, was near collapse, riven by a 
bitter internal feud and crippled by a 25 
percent cut in public subsidies over the 
next four years. 

Or, indeed, that the entire publicly sup- 
ported theater system in Germany, which 
had provided for spoken, musical and 
dance theater with unequal ed lavishness, 
was in a profound crisis, with politicians 
slashing budgets and theater administra- 
tors wringing their hands in self-doubt. 

At the opening of Debussy’s “PeDfcas et 
Mfclisande," the final new production of 
Sylvain Cambreling's first season as artis- 
tic director of the Fr ankf urt Opera, the 
triumph was complete. And it was reaf- 
firmed by glowing reviews over the next 
few days in the German press. 

Neariy every famous director and con- 
ductor has tackled the impressionistic “Pel- 
lfcas” tale of innocent, evanescent love and 
brute jealousy in the last few seasons, it 
seems. But the combined efforts of Cam- 
brding, 46. a Frenchman, and the Swiss 
director Christoph Marthaler, 43, who was 
undertaking his first opera, was at least the 
equal of any recent collaboration. 

Cambreling drew wonderfully refined 
yet impassioned playing from the orchestra 
and cites his relationship with the players as 
the most satisfying aspect of his brief ten- 
ure. “Without them, I would have left al- 
ready in the middle of the season,” he said. 

Marthaler, who is also a playwright, has 
created strange, droll, knotty pieces, vague- 
ly reminiscent of those of Pina Bausch, with 
fuller texts and cabaret-style songs. 

In “Pdlftas.” moments of dark wit re- 
mained. Cadaverous servants traipsed 
through the dungeonlike living room that 
served as the single set, picking up dead 
birds by their drooping wings. Arkel’s 
palace was not a Victorian salon (Peter 
Brook), a dark fortress fPeter Stein), a 


By John Rockwell 

New York Tima Service 


1920s constructivist tableau vivant (Ruth 
Berghaus) or a Malibu beach house (Peter 
Sellars); it was as if Edward 

Gorey had met the Addams Family. 

The “Peflfcas” capped a superb debut 
season for Cambrelmg, fresh from his 
years as music director of the ThfeScre 
Royal de la Monnaie in Brussels under 
Girard Mortier. If artistic distinction 
were all it took to succeed, Cambreling 
would have no problems. But opera is 
almost always a deficit operation, and the 
Frankfurt Opera is in big troubles 

Frankfurt has become the most extreme 
case of a performing institution in a major 
German city under siege. Although Ger- 
many’s financial ca pital, F ranlcf nrt, is also 
its most highly taxed and heavily indebted 
city, and it has been hit especially hard by 
recession and reunification. 

The ax fell last year, when city officials 
decreed that the municipal theaters, which 
include the opera, would have to reduce 
their overall budgets by 25 percent in four 
annual stages. The opera subsidy is headed 
from 543 minion in 1992 to S32 million in 
1997. 


H ERE is where the internal 
squabbling began. When Cam- 
breling was installed (with no 
hint erf an impending crisis, he 
insists), the structure of the company was 
shuffled. As artistic director, he was put 
on a par with the administrative director 
for opera and ballet, Martin Steinhoff. 
also newly appointed. With no one clearly 
in charge, tensions between the two have 
often spilled into the open. 

Basically, Cambreling wants to fight the 
cuts, threatening to resign if his artistic 
plans are not realized. Steinhoff wants to 
work within the system and force Cambrel- 
ing to make Draconian decisions that 
would conform to the reduced budget de- 
creed by the city parliament. To cut perfor- 
mance costs, he envisions reducing their 
number. The 120 or more opera perfor- 
mances a season might be pared to 50. 

Steinhoff has blocked all contracts until 
Cambreling agrees to stark austerities, 
which he refuses to do. 

The backdrop of this local emergency is 


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YOU SAW THIS AD. 

So did nearly half 
a million readers for whom 
travel is a way of life 
Shouidn 7 you place 
your ad in ihe 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE? 


Seeing the Cevennes on $72 a Day 


a general theater crisis. The reunited Ger- 
many is still a small country compared 
with the United States, its 80 million citi- 
zens squeezed into a space slightly smaller 
than Montana. Nonetheless, German the- 
ater has been the envy of the world, with 
246 full-season repertory companies. In 
the 1991-92 season, they gave about 
57.000 performances, seen by 22 milli on 
people. Of these performances, 15,000 
were of opera. 

Almost every German city of any size 
has a full-fledged repertory opera house, 
often with a danm company attached and 
a separate spoken theater offering 10 
months of re pertory performances. 

Generous subsidies have been available 
on every level, especially the regionaL To- 
taling about S2 bflhon, these subsidies 
have ensured that any German can see a 
full range of operatic, theatrical and cho- 
reographic repertory performed by a local 
or nearby resident ensemble at affordable 
prices. 

In the 1990s, two forces converged to 
jeopardize this; the recession and Ger- 
man reunification. The recession de- 
pressed attendance, tax revenues and pri- 
vate sponsorship, which has played a 
small but increasingly significant role. It 
also augmented welfare costs, as G erman y 
struggled to maintain unemployment, 
health and pension benefits. Reunifica- 
tion cost the former West Germany an 
enormous additional sum. as it strove to 
revitalize the moribund Eastern economy. 

Still, despite nervous predictions of 
apocalypse, relatively little bias happened so 
far to the German theater system. Most 
dries and states have trimmed their cultural 
budgets a bit, or used the recession and 
reunification to blunt rising wage demands. 

The abrupt closing last summer of the 
Schiller Theater, the largest dramatic the- 
ater in the western part of Berlin, shocked 
many and led to fears that politicians 
would dose theaters all over the country. 

Some of the smaller theaters in the for- 
mer East Germany, which was more heavi- 
ly endowed with cultural institutions than 
the West, have been combined or eliminat- 
ed. 


By Susan Spano 

New Yak Tima Service 

N IMES — In the fall of 1878, 
Robot Louis Stevenson and a 
donkey he called Modestineset 
out on a 135-mile (220-kQome- 
ter) trek across theCfcvezmes Mountains, a 
region of soaring peaks, wild upland pla- 
teaus, long ridges covered with Spanish 
chestnut trees and deep green valleys at 
the southern end of die Massif Central in 
France. Along the way he “slept rough” in 
a bedroll under the stars ana took notes 
for a book called "Travels With a Donkey 
in the Cfcveones." 

Eva since I read that splendid little 
volume, I have wanted to hike in the 
Civennes. I knew that Stevenson’s 12-day 
adventure cost him 85 francs. How muen 
more expensive might a trip there be a 
hundred years later, I wondered. After all, 
the C6vennes remains one of the poorest 
regions in France. The native C6vecols are 
rugged, insular people, many of whose 
Protestant forebears fought the army of 
the Catholic French crown in the 18th- 
centuxy War of the Camisards. Today, as 
then, there are few towns of any size in the 
Cfcvennes. 

In July and August the solace is broken 
by tourists, who come to the mountains to 
hike, drive, bicycle and kayak in the Parc 
National des C6voxnes. Established in 
1970 (and declared a Unesco World Bio- 
sphere Preserve a year lata), it encom- 
passes 226,000 acres (107,000 hectares) of 
the C6vexmes* most imp r essi ve scenery, 
including 5,500-foot (1,520-meter) Mont 
Lazfere, 5,000-foot Mont Aigoual and 
3,000-foot Causse Mfcjean, a lonely lime- 
stone plateau bordered on the noth by 

trai^wEi^^' through the park, axu^iHs 
also tra ve rs ed by 12 Grandes Randon- 
n6es, France’s enviable 25,000-mile net- 
work of long-distance footpaths. 

In early May, after spending a week 
sightseeing in Paris, I boarded a TGV in 
the Gare de Lyon, which took me to 
Nlmes in about four and a half hours for 
S144 round trip, second class. In Nlmes I 
rented a Peugeot with four on die floor for 
$40 a day with unlimited mileage, tax and 
insurance. Then I headed northwest via 
the N106, D982 and D6 into the craggy, 
arid mountains. 

Three hours after leaving Nlmes I de- 
scended into Florae in the vaBey of the 
Tamon River, where the national park 
makes its headquarters in a 17th-century 
chflteau. Florae, population 2,100, is jty 
far the busiest town in the region, with 



quart nights I tried *17 end $28 feed- 
^^Mf^^expenses averaged $ 72 , and I 

eeJ ^ E»e the tr^even more 


TbeNew YarttTlmei 

seven holds, many cafes and restaurants, 
a tourist informat ion offic e and at least 
two sporting-goods stores. I drove on, re- 
search of a place to stay, that was a little 
more out-of-the-way. When I saw a sm a ll 
sign for the Aubcrge Le Boufadou about a 
mOe-north of town, I turned off the high: 
way toward the hamlet of Bedoucs. 

At first Le Boufadou didn’t thrill me, 


cam p ground and had been recently built 
in pseudo-alpine chalet style, with three 
guest rooms on one floor adjoining a res- 
taurant But the mistress of the iim seemed 
genuinely pleased to make my acquaint- 
ance, and the room she showed me was 
immaculate. And when she told me the 
mice — S27 — my jaw. nearly dropped. 
Dinner in the restaurant cooked by ha 
and served by ha bashM teenage daugh- 
ter, cost another 517. 

The next four -nights in other Cfcvennes 
hotels, lops and chambres cfhdtcs (the 
French version of a B & B*s) stand out in 
nty nnnd as one of rrty best experiences erf 
rural France — not to mention my .cheap- 
est I stayed in three more places in the 
course of a five-day sojourn in the C6- 
veunes, never spending more than $36 a. 


SSrfy.Hkl taken al«sari*P“g bag, 
Icodd have dotted a long course through 
the mountains, walking ail <Jay 
ing at one of the hundred ^ more gjtes 

drapes along the trails m die national 
paritAjSsuke youth hostels, a bed for 
Stnigjjt costs about $5 to 510 and a 
home-cooked dinn er around $10. 

' I fefl into a routine of nsing cany, 
breakfasting in my hold and then head- 
ing into Florae for another cafe an lmt at 
the Brasserie du Globe on the esplanade. 

One coal surety nronunfc when the fruit 

trees bad suddenly burst into bloom, I set 
off on the GR 43-86, which cuts along the 
northeast edge of Florae, and walked 

norto for five mflesmtotito foothills of the 

Cfcvennes, seeking several prehistoric 
menhirs, or stone monuments, marked on 
my map. I never found th em , but my 
pjcnicmneh in a field of bright yellow 
broom ovcdoolring an ancient-looking 
farm cQ inpfac the Manoir Iss eug e 
was one I won’t soon forget 

Another day I drove along D907 at the 
b ase of the Tarn gorge, took a two-hour 
boat trip (with three other passengers and 
& guide) from the village of La Malfcne 
through the river’s narrows for $16, and 
tb «n hiked up the steep side of the Causse 
Mfcjean, a four-mile journey that took me 
to the Roc des Hourtpus, where the most 
dramatic strctdh of the Tarn gorge spread 
out before me. The fair weather held, so 
cm my third day in the mountains I walked 
along the GR 72 northeast of the village of 
Barre-des-Cfcvennes — a wild, desolate 
13- mite circuit with smashing views of the 
Mount Lozfcrc range. On the fourth day 1 
rested, to uring the region around Mount 
Aigoual behind the wheel of my Peugeot. 


My favorite place to stay, where I spent 
two nights, was the Grand HAtel duParc^ 
which lies along the mam street in Florae 
and has a lovely garden and swimming 
pooL I avoided the more- expensive .new 
wing, and chore a $25 room an the fourth 
floor of the old (where thaewas no eleva- 
tor) — earning a tilted ntire from die 


The best restaurant I tried was La Lo- 
zerette in Cocures, east of Bedoues, with a 
stylish dining room full oflilacs, g u ttering 
candles and taped jazz, where on subse- 


■ Elvis freaks arriving in 
Memphis for Elvis Week *94 fear that 
Michael Jackson's marriage to 
Lisa Marie Presley might turn 
Gracdandinto Nevaland. Neva 
fear. Jack Sodea, head of Elvis 
Presley Enterprises Ino, doesn’t 
expect Jackson to change the estate 
or add a menagerie of exotic 
animals. “ 1 am sony for Jackson,” 
said fan Cathy Cobbs. “I think he 
is in a total state of confusion.” 


A Taste of Ainu Culture in Tokyo 


By David Tracey 

T OKYO — Since it is the kind of 
place you want to root for, you 
enter Rera Chise, Tokyo's only 
Ainu restaurant, hoping the food 
will at least be all right The Ainu are the 
indigenous people of northern Japan. A 
long Japanese government campaign erf 
assimilation has left the 25,000 who re- 
main with just the seeds erf their tradition- 
al culture. The people at Rera Chise are 
hoping to make than grow. 

Good news then: The food is delirious. 
The service is friendly, with none of the 
hyper-politeness of some Japanese restau- 
rants that makes it hard to relax. The 
atmosphere is convivial, with a clientele 
that is young, spirited and crammed dose 
enough together to make the meal seem a 
shared experience. There is always the 
possibility of impromptu ringing and 
dancing. Best of all, when you’re finished 
and the bfll arrives, it’s economically 
harmless. Rera Chise turns out to be the 
kind of place you’d come back to even if it 
didn’t fed politically good. 

“We wanted to start our own restaurant 
for years,” explained the manager, Tatsue 
Sato, an Ainu activist who left ha native 
Hokkaido decades ago. Many of the ap- 
proximately 2 r 5G0 Amu now living in the 
capita] region came to escape discrimina- 
tion, which is easier to do in the anonym- 
ity of Lhe big city. “Whenever we needed a 
meeting for something like a cultural 
event we could arrange to secure a local 
hall, but it’s not the same as having your 
own space. The trouble was the start-up 
fees for something like this in Tokyo are so 
high. But thanks to donations that came in 
from all ova the country, we could finally 
open up the restaurant m May." 


Customers cm a . recent weeknighl in- 
cluded students from the nearby. Waseda 
University who evidently liked the beer 
prices, a few Japanese supporters erf the 
activists and others who had heard about 
the new restaurant and come for their first 
Caste of Ainu culture. The menu includes 
Japaneses tyie dishes such as rice with 

E found on the northern island of Hok- 
x, but the emphasis is on foods re- 
flecting a traditional Ainu lifestyle that all 
but disappeared years ago. 

*TracfitianaIty we ate what we could 

fflfdl" wplainM fain Sa lmnn and herring 

are popular fish choices from the meon. 
Dea md otha game may be available in 
season. WBd vegetables called fatobiro m 
the Ainu language dress up beef or egg 
(fishes, or taste good by themselves. Also 
worth trying are the chiparo imp, a filling 
mix of mashed potato and salmon roe and 
the tsubukai shellfish. You order a variety 
of small dishes to share with everyone in 
your party, drinking all the while, and re- 
peat until die group is full and happy. 


. In 1986 Yasuhiro Nakasonc, then the ■ 
prime minista, insulted the Ainu along - 
with much of the planet when he contend- 
ed that Japan was a more intelligent soci- • 
ety than the United States because it was 
monoethnic. Lata he managed to squeeze - 
more of his foot in his' mouth with an 
explanation that suggested that the Ainu 
had been completcfy assimilated and that 
with his thick eyebrows and heavy beard 


E XCEPT for a seriously salted 
gHlM Minion, the dishes axe 
m!wfa with a fight touch tb»f en- 
hances tiie flavor erf the food. 
“We try to keep it as natural as possible,” 
said Sato. “We don't like to use any pre- 
servatives or artificial flavoring. It tastes 
bettor that way, and it's also healthier if 
you don’t put in monosodimn glutamate 
for flavoring.” 

The rcstammd proved to be a hit in its 
first month, but Sato seems unconcerned 
about numbers or business results. She 
sees Rera Chise as part of a long-term 
campaign to support a culture the Japa- 
nese government has been officially ne- 
glecting for years. 


“The government hasn’t changed a bit ’ 
since Nafcasdne said that.” Sato said, “but • 
more Japanese people are starting to under- ' 
stand us. Some ^oung people these days are - 
very interested in our culture.” 

• Still the Ainu face discrimination Many 
Of those in the capital region have yet to ' 
drop by Rera Chise, in some cases because ‘ 
they don’t want to reveal their heritage. 
The popularity of Rera Chise may help in 
part to change that The restaurant also 
sells Ainu-related books and goods. In the ; 
future Saxo bodies to promote weekly pa- 1 
formances of Ainu songs, a key to preserv- - 
ing their rich oral tradition, as well as 
dancesL 

“But culture is about more than just 
singing and danring,” she says. “Food is a . 
big part of ft too. when you come here to ■ 
eat you can see that the Ainu people are 
alive. The Ainu will never die.” 

Re ra Chise is a 30-meter (100-feet) walk 
from tiie Waseda Don polios box near the 
main entrance to Waseda University. Walk 
away from the university and it’s on your 
nght The hours arelIA.M.to2P.M.£ 
and 5 to 11 P. M, Monday through S atu r- 
day^For inquiries (in Japanese): (03) 3202- ■ 

David Tracey is a free-lance writer living ; 
in Kamakura, Japan. 


I E S ¥01/1 6 f / i / 


It Could Huppon to 
You 

Directed by Andrew Berg- 
man. U S. 

There is a miracle at the cen- 
ter of “It Could Happen to 
You,” the blandly named ro- 
mantic comedy that had the 
punchier working title “Cop 
Gives Waitress $2 Million 
Tip.” The original title plays 



** A ** * 




■TWO* S' j 


itself out early in the film 
when the cop, Charlie (Nico- 
las Cage), runs out of cash to 
tip the coffee-shop waitress, 
Yvonne (Bridget Fonda). He 
offers to share a lottery tick- 
et instead, and the next day 
wins $4 million. But that 
quirk of fete is nothing be- 
side another odds-defying 
event: two good-hearted 
people find each otha in 
New YoA City. Now that’s 
a miracle, at least in the 
scheme of this movie, a 
sometimes awkward mix of 
sawiness and schmaltz. The 
other miracle is that the two 
stars of “It Could Happen to 
You” keep it sailing ova a 
script that is often predict- 
able and flat Cage and 






Harrison Fin’d in " Clear and Present Danger ? 


tneMdua 


Fonda managw to do that 
with w inning simplicity. The 
film is loaded with episodes 
that seem too flabby to have 
come from Andrew Berg- 
man. the writer and director 
of extremely funny, edgy 
comedies. Although "It; 
Could Happen to You” 
lades Bergman’s usual fl ash 
of originality, it is not neariy 
as soupy as last year’s ro- 
mantic hit “Sleepless in Se- 
attle,” and it isn’t saddled 


with the tortured plot erf “l 
Love Trouble.” 

(Caryn James. NYD 

CtoarandPrauntDan- 


Directed by Phillip Noyce. 
US. 

Taming the eyeban-glazing 
prose of Tom Clancy’s 


with tiie same brisk efficien- 
cy they brought to “Patriot 
Games,” the makers of this 


espionage thriller have made - 
their work look easy. And 
dearly, it was anything but. 

No amount of exercise un- 
da the hot sun will beat the 
workout involved in follow- 
ing this story, with its dozens '* 
of locations, interchange- 
able-sounding character * 
dames and high-tech mfli- 
jargon. Yet, “Clear and 
Present Danger” (photo- 
graphed crisply by Donald . 
M. McAlpine and scored by 
James Horner) looks so lean . 
and moves so vigorously 
that it actually seems *' 
streamlined most of the 
time. As directed by PiriKp - 

Noyce, who also, did “Patri- 
ot Games,- this becomes an- 

“ BCV ®- Harrison Ford, mak- •; 
rag only his second screen 
a Pp e *rance as Clancy’s he- “i 

£^^¥“4. Jack Ryan, : 
become Old -j 
™hful to this role. Ford > 
tom® conriderabfe subtlety 2 
’Jtih Of hu m a nizing 
Ryan. His wary intdli- 
^cdoeswondereforapo- /; 
one-dimensional 

(Janet NYT) 











.» •- . *L 


■—. .-•J*. 



S ZZ A? A 7 


International Herald Tribune 
Friday , August 5, 1994 
Page 7 


!«■ .> i-. 

m L i- » 

* f . «> 


i v ;^«e* 
A ’t- 


By Roger Collis 


Costs in Europe 


G ETTING to Europe from Asa 
w North America has never 
been easier or cheaper. Thanks 
to competition os most inter- 
conrinemal routes, there is an abundance 
or choree with fares to match. It’s traveling 

amiirtn PumnaiUt t- < -aJ*. -j 


— ™ J U« 

around Europe that can break' the b***. 

I? 1 front New York to London 
and back for $350. The dreapest round- 
trip from London to Nice cpsts $345. 
Liberalization of air transport has. so far 
had little effect on outrageous air fares in 
Europe, except on xnajorioutes from Loat 
don 10 cities like Amsterdam, Paris; Brus- 
sels and Frankfurt, where innovative, inde- 


Tfr frtfiui Trtrehr 


pendent camera like British Midland and 
Air UK attack the donnohr of 


Air UK attack the duopoly of British 
Amrays and the subsidized state airlines. 

The answer, for people traveling to Eu- 
repe, if not always for Europeans thccn- 
selves, is the air pass, an idea that Europe- 
an and Asian airlines have started to 
import from North America. Air passes 
are one of the travel industry's best-kept 
secrete, and one of its biggest bar gains 

British Airways!’ Europe Air Pass allows 
travel to more than 50 cities on BA its 
partner airlines — Deutsche BA (within 
Germany and many cities throughout En~ 

mnol - TAT T7 • I 


ropeV TAT (within France phis interna- 
tional flights from Paris), Gibraltar Air- 
ways (London to Gibraltar and Tangier, 
and from Gibraltar to T anger, Casablan- 
ca and Marrakech), Anyone tiring outside 
Europe, Israel, Cyprus, Turkey, .Russia 
and other f Miner Soviet Union countries 
and North Africa can buy the pass in 
conjunction with, a round-trip ticket to 
Europe. 

This can be any airiine, providing you 
Start Or finish in London, Birmingham 
Manchester or Glasgow.. You could, for 
example, fly American or Cathay to Lon- 
don and fly home from Frankfurt or Paris. 
You arc allowed stopovers. 

YOU can httyamhmmrmrit three arid a 

maximum of 12 sectors, which must be 
reserved seven days before, leaving. 
(You’re not allowed to reroute, but flights 
can be changed for £25 , or $37.50, a time.) 
Sector fares are priced according to where 



tSofot A*cjn/IUT 


Thereafter you can buy as many coupons 
as you want for $105 to $135 each even 
after you arrive in Europe. 

SAS markets a Visit Scandinavia Pass 
for domestic travel in Denmark, Sweden 
and Norway, pins international flights to 
all three countries and Finland. It is avail- 
able to residents of any country other than 
Sweden, Norway, Denmark and Finland, 
and must be boughtin conjunction with a 
round-trip economy flight with SAS to the 
region. • 

The pass is valid for the duration of the 
international ticket, normally one to three 
months: You can buy one coupon for $80 
and two for $160. Additional coupons up 


to four cost $70 each, then $60 each up to 
a maximum of six coupons for a total of 
$420. Yonmust bode the first sector when 


you fly within or between four zones — 
from £50 to £100 per coupon. 

Thus the following example using the 


men (£65)- Berlin (£65)-Moscow 
(flOOVSt. Peterabuig-London (£100) 
would cost £380. Normal one-way econo- 
my fares would cost £1,068. 

KLM/Ncalhwest Airiines’ Passport to. 
Europe is onfy available to U. & residents . 
buying a round-trip, trans-Atlantic ticket 
*s on either aMine. But It allows you a lot of 
’ flexibility and extensive travel within Eo- 


(£65)-w 

London 


Transmit ^T^role^ r MioEac Alf amdi 
Emowings, a German earner. You must 
buy a m inimum of three coupons for SI35. : 


you buy the pass, but you can leave the 
rest of the flights open. 

SAS also markets a Baltic Pass that 
works in a mtiiiar way for flights between 
Stockholm and Copenhagen and Riga, 
Latvia; Vilnius, Lithuania; Tallinn, Esto- 
nia, and Kalining rad and Sl. Petersburg, 
Russia. You can buy up to four coupons- 
for ,$360. 

British Midland's Diamond EuroPass 
offers five round-trips in business class 
from Britain to seven major European 
cities, saving up to 65 percent on normal 
' fares. EuroPass holders are automatically 
enrolled. in-the Diamond Club frequent- . 
fhei i pix^ramwthout having tdmalcfe'tbe 
-usual four qualifying flights. 

There are two types of EuroPass: For 


EAETS GUIDE 


AUSTRIA 


Vienna . . 

Kunsthistoriches Museum, tel: ft) 
52-177, ctoted htondsys. To Oct. 
30. "J. Tintoretto: Portraits." m acWf- 
tkm to the museum's own collection; 
more man 40 paintings from Europe- 
an and American museums rUustrate 
Tintoretto's Innovations in the. field of. 
portrait painting. 


from which he was supervising the 
bufidtag' of one. of his earthworks 
crashed on a Texas hill. 


BRITAIN 


EdMwrgh 

RoyM Scottish Academy, tel: (31) 
566-8921, open daBy. To Sept 7: 

■>TiM Cnlrifr Tw> CnnnM. Are 


BELGIUM 


Brussels 

Palais des Beaux- Arts, td: (2) 507- 
84-80, closed Mondays. To Aug- 28: 

. “Robert Smithson: Le Paysage &>- 
tropique. Retrospective 1960-1973.” 
One of the representatives of Land 
Art and Minimal Art, the artist created, 
“earthworks," or monumental cre- 
ations that transform the tandscape. 
The exhibition traces Smithson’s ar- 
tistic development through ■ maps. 

photographs, drawings, coll age s, 
sculptures and installations before - 
his death at age 35 when the plane 


"The Romantic Spirit In German Art 
1790-1890." Explores German Ro-, 
mantidsm end its Impact on German 
art over the past 200 yews. Concert-, 
trates mainly on Romanticism, Sym- 
bolism, the Modern Movement and 
the postwar period and Includes- 
paintings and works on paper by Ca- 
spar David Friedrich, Joseph Beuys. 
Kandinsky and Klee. 

Glasgow 

The Burrell CoHectfon, tel: (41 J 
640-7151. open dally. To Sept- 25: 
"New Perspectives; Aspects of the 
Italian Renaissance." Arms and 
books,- bronzes and majolica, draw- 
ings and paintings prowoe an Insight 
into the artistic creation in nafy from 
1400161650. 



ITALY 


Settimane Musical! di Stress, tel: 
(323) 31-095. Aug. 27 to Sept. 18: 
76 concerts with guests soloists m- 


Detoil of a portrait by Wil- 
helm Leibly in Cologne. 


Ortiz. Vtecfimfr Ashken azy wiH con duct 
the Berlin Deutsches Symphony Or- 
cheser in a Brahms program. 




NETHERLANDS 


r i y /./ j f 


On Aug. 7: “Oscar Kokoschka: 
Works on Paper 1906-1924.'' Ulmer 
Museum, Ulm. 


On Aug. 72: "Botoro in Madrid." Pa- 
seo de Recoletos End Pteza de O 
beies, Madrid. 


On Aug. 8 : "Impressionnisme: Les 
Ortgines, 1859-1 869.” Grand Pa- 
lais, Paris. 

On. Aug. 7: "L'Orient des Photo-' 


graphes au 19e Stede." tnstitut du 
Monde Arabs, Paris. 

teh Parting-" Statens Museum for 
Kunst, Copenhagen. 

On Aug. 7: "Les Estampes des Na- 
bts: Vuillard et Ses Contemporairts." 
MusOe du Oufibec, Quebec. 

On . Aug. 7: “Thomas Cole: Land- 
scape in History.” National Museum 
of American Art. Washington. 


felwwaflb 

IHIWOftiB 

Mus 6 e Cantinl, tel: 91-54-77-75. 
dosed Mondays. To Sept- 25: "L’Es- 
taque: Natssance du Paysage Mo- 
deme 1870-1910." Between 1870 
and 1910, the small harbor of I'Esta- 
que near Marseille became the mett- 
eng pot far some French palmers who 
generated Fauvism and tear, Cub- 
ism. The exhibition includes paint- 
ings. drawings end watercokxs by 
Cezanne. Derain, Braque. Dufy and 
Gleizes- 


Afraterdam 

Stedelijk Museum, tel: (20) 5732- 
9i 1, open daily. To Sept 18: "Feder- 
ico Fellini: Costumes and Fashion.” 
60 costumes worn by actors and ac- 
tresses in "La Dolce Vita,” “Casano- 
va." “Roma" and other films, togeth- 


and Kart Lagerfeld. 


SPAIN 


GERMANY 

Berlin 

Berttnische Galerte. tel: (2) 54-86- 
10a To Nov. 2: “Raoul Hausmann." 
250 works by the Austrian-bom artist 


San SebnUdn 

Quinoena Musical, tel: (943) 48- 
12-36. Aug. 70 to 31. The program 
offers orchestral and choral con- 
certs. several performances of Bi- 
zet's "Carmen," and two evenings of 

flamenco. 


ACROSS 


i Roomy sleeve 
7 In the cards 
19 Symphony 
written for 
Napoleon 
is Furniture polish 
ingredient 
17 Spreads the 
news 


aaMauna 

23 Rough it 
as Seating areas 
as Say truly 
*7 Up a 

29 Kittenish 
response 


M Founder of 

’Detroit ’• • • 
as Smith of sorts 
48 Prince Valiant's 
wife 


9 Romans 
precede* - 
ecountiyish. in a 
way 


taWith no 
exceptions 

19 Poet’s 
contraction 

20 One who's 
squeezed m 


ad Fiery dance . 
at Team originally 
called the Colt 
.458 


4 T Fanatic 
.40 Succinct 
so Scr earn and 
shout 


si Traveling aids 

. 33 Business letter 
end. 


aa Guard 
35 Not clerical 
97 Split 


Solution to Fufide of Augurt 4 


f^TlR 3{3S 930 092 
RSn nras ana ana 
nno BHQaasa ana 

nranBOSSQEBQ gag 
Qau aafl aaaasaaa 

□aai aaas a gg aa 

IlislSigg 

SSS gsa “aa ago 

glllaaaflaHsa 


54 Actor Vigoda 
u Quiescent 

n.Poison ' 

saNyimph 
' changed into a- 
- be ® r 

BO Like Don. Juan 
at Added up 
BsDntl ... 

«* Stonecutter 

«< I twtft 

muscle -bound. 


..iDsphnedu 
Maurter novel . 
-a In . .• (behind) 
3 Bon wvant 
‘ '4-Year in « • 
Claudius’s reign 


r Made a toast 
B Critic 

9 A shaman uses 
..them 

to Dull leOow 

.11 Jana Fonda 
• larce* — 
Wednesday’ 

. 12 Library item 
13 Family tree 
’14 — - of 
Aquitaine 
21 Computer 
. capacity, tor • 
short 

24 Plant growth 
medium 
26 Cloaks 
28 Zoo critter 
-aoAdovy 
32 Part dI R.S.V.P. 
M Small number 
3§ Kitchen 
container 
aa Oat with tufted 


43 Wall hanging 

44 Gist 

4 « join again 
4* Mai — 
si Goddess of the 
ttearth 


sa herbal alcoholic sa Him. in 


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ss Part that’s 
thrown away 


sc Catch hold of 


ei inspector Van 

Valk 

(literary 

detecltve) 


2 * Creek Indian 
land 

«o Unfold 



.// v suns; emu mm mu 


£799 you get five round-trips berween 
Heathrow and Amsterdam, Brussels, Paris 
or Dublin; while £999 buys you five 
round-uips on any of British Midland’s 
routes, (except services to Scandinavia), 
which include Heathrow to Nice or Pal- 
ma; East Midlands to Paris, Amsterdam or 
Brussels; and Bi rming ham to Brussels. 

- Thus with a £799 pass you would save 
around £800 in business class and £560 in 
economy on five round-trips between 
London and Paris; the pass paying for 
itself after two and half trips. You would 
save about the same amount on a mix of 
trips to Amsterdam, Paris and Brussels. 

The £999 pass can save you even more- 
five round-uips from London to Nice 
would normally cost £2,860 in business 





PiKttcftyOaaMH-Swv 


«i Charge 


*1 New York 'flmrx hjlitni hv Wilt Shnrlz. 


Carrier/Hotel 
Air Canada 


Location 


Britain to Canada 


introductory round-trip fare in the new "executive first" class of 
Et r 999 (S2.999) from London (Heathrow) to Montreal, Ottawa, 
Toronto, Calgary. Winnipeg. Edmonton and Vancouver saves up to 
£750 on standard business-class fares to western Canada. Travel 
must start by Aug. 28. 


Air France/ 
American Express 


San Francisco to Paris 


class (£572 per round-trip) and £2,230 for 
the cheapest fuOy flexible economy tick- 
ets. You, therefore, break even after less 
than two round-trips, saving £1,860 in alL 
Five round-trips to Frankfurt will save 
around £820 in business class and £208 in 
full economy. 

Both passes are fully flexible, allowing 
you to travd on any flight and to change 
bookings, and are valid for three mouths. 
The only drawback is that you don’t ears 
frequent-flier points. 

Sabena’s Skypass is a “season ticket” 
allowing unlimited travel during one 
month on all Sabena flights between 
Heathrow and Brussels and Antwerp, as 
well as London City Airport and Brussels. 
The Skypass costs £799 for business class 
and £599 for economy. With round-trip 
fares costing £304 in business eTasc and 
£258 in economy, you save money with 
both passes if you make three round-trips. 
Sabena’s business Skypass becomes better 
value than BM*s EuroPass when you need 
to make more than five round- trips to 
Brussels in 30 days. 

Iberia offers an air pass for travel within 
Spain and its European network (includ- 
ing Cairo and Tel Aviv) to U. S. residents 
buying a round-trip trans-Atlantic ticket 
on Ibaia. You can buy an imhmited num- 
ber of coupons (minimum two) for $125 
each. This allows conspicuous savings on 
round- trips such as Madrid-Slockholm 
(normal economy round-trip is $1,429), 
Madxid-Zurich ($722), or Madrid-Vienna 
($1,248). 

Air France, plus Air Inter, its domestic 
subsidiary, Sabena and CSA Czechoslo- 
vak Airlines jointly market a Euro Flyer 
pass to residents of North and Central 
America, South America, Africa (except 
North Africa), Australasia, Hong Kong, 
Thailand, Singapore, Malaysia and Indo- 
nesia. The pass allows travel whenever you 
wish in economy class on all of the Euro- 
pean routes of the four airlines for 5120 
per flight sector. 

You can buy from three to cou- 
pons valid for stays of seven to 60 days. 
Yon are allowed to transit the same city 
any number of times, but you can only fly 
tile same sector twice in the. same direc- 
tion. You must buy thepass with a round- 
trip, in any class, to France, Belgium or 
the Czech Republic with a participating 
earner. 


Pay with an American Express card tor a round-trip in first or busi- 
n ess -class and daim a free companion ticket. For travel between 
Aug. 31 and Sept 15. 


Air UK 


London to Copenhagen 


Fuff-fare passengers can daim a free night in a single room either at 
the Hotel Imperial or the Hotel King Arthur. Until Aug. 31 . 


Alitalia/ 

American Express 


United Slates to Italy 


Pay tor a lull-fare ticket with an Amex corporate card and choose 
from a free companion ticket in first class; 80 percent off a compa- 
nion ticket in business class or economy; or a free upgrade. From 
Boston, Chicago, Los Angeles. Miami or New York to any Alitalia 
destination (via Rome). For travel starting before Dec. 31. 


Ambassador Hotels Taiwan 


Discount of 50 percent off rack rate at the Ambassador Taipei 
rndudes continental breakfast. Same discount at the Ambassador 
Kaohsiung for a “deluxe” twin. Until Sept. 30. 


British Airways 


Bangkok to Australia 


Executive Club members are upgraded to business class outbound 
from Bangkok on a round-trip to Sydney, Melbourne, Adelaide, 
Brisbane or Perth when they buy economy class out and business 
back. Until SepL 30. 


British Airways 


New York Jo London 


Fly Concorde out and business class back plus three nights at a 
choice of six luxury hotels in London, including the Ritz, the 
Dorchester and the Savoy, and Jimo transfers for $4,726 to 55,052 
per person (double occupancy). For travel starting Oct. 31. 


Cathay Pacific 


Hcng Kong to Europe 


Upgrades are possible with half the normal kilometer credit 50,000 
kilometers instead of 100,000 kilometers from economy to business 
class, and 70,000 kilometers instead of 140,000 kilometers from 
business to first. Unl3 Sept. 14. 


GotdenJand Plaza Hotel Bangkok 


“Superior" rooms tor 1,200 baht ($47) a night and “deluxe" rooms for 
1,400 baht. SepL 1 to Oct. 31. 


Hilton/Conrad 


Worldwide 


Rales at 150 U.S. and international Conrad hotels are cut by an 
average 40 percent in the “Summer Break 94” program. Until SepL 
5. 


Holiday Inn 


Asia/Pacific 


Summer rates at 17 hotels in nine countries include S39 per room at 
Penang. Malaysia, and Chiang Mai, Thailand, $64 in Bangkok, $59 
in Manila and 599 in Singapore and Taipei. Until Aug. 31. 


Inter-Continental 


Worldwide 


"Summer Spectacular" promotion offers up to 60 percent off at 68 
hotels. Unlit Sept. 5 


Japan Airlines 


Europe to Osaka 


Frequent-flier members can earn bonus mites from London or Paris 
to Osaka: 5.000 bonus miles one way (10,000 round-trip) for first- 
class, business and full-fare economy passengers. Discounted eco- 
nomy fares earn 2,500 miles one way. SepL 4 to OcL 31 . 


Ho Chi Minh City to Europe 
(via Amsterdam) 


Special mund-irip business-class fare of S2J322 to any KLM desti- 
nation in Europe. 


Meridren/Concorde ! 


Europe 


Discounts of up to 50 percent off rack rates throughout July and 
August. 


Sabena/Avis 


Britain to Brussels 


Full-fare business class passengers from Heathrow or Manchester. 
Two or more people traveling together can extend the rental for a 
second, third or fourth day, according to the size of the party. Car 
must be booked 24 hours in advance. 


Sabena 


United Stales to Europe/ 
Africa/Asia 


“Brussels Connection Free Slay" program allows Hrsl-class and 
business-efass passengers free overnight accomodation in 
Brussels, including airport transfer and meals, before continuing to 
another destination with Sabena. The program is available on both 
outbound and return trips. 


Transavia 


London to Amsterdam 


Fly business class on the last evening flight from Gatwick to 
Amsterdam and daim a free night at the Amsterdam Ascot Hotel 
(subject to availability). Until March 1995. 


AHhouQh She MT carcfaty dwrtt »*»<• alien, please He hvewamed that same trcnel^gan&s may be unman? ol them, or unatXp to booh them. 


( 1 885-1 971 ). a representative figure 
of Berlin Dadaism around 1918. 

Cologne 

Wallral-Richartz-Museum, lei: 
(221) 221-2379. closed Mondays. 
To Oct. 23: "Wilhelm LaW:Zum 150. 
Geburtstag." 90 paintings and 100 
drawings and prints by the German 
Realist painter. The exhibition in- 
cludes some works created during 
his impressionist period in Paris. 


GENERATIONS 
OF WINTER 


WHAT THEY'RE READING 


By Vassify Aksyonov. Translated 
from the Russian by John Glad 
and Christopher Morris. 600 
pages. $25. Random House 


Reviewed by 
Richard Lourie 


E RNEST Hemingway made 
a daft and enduring remark 
about not being afraid to climb 
into the ring with Mr. Flaubert 
or Mr. Turgenev but having 
profound reservations about 
trading blows with Mr. Tolstoy. 
The author of “Generations of 
Winter" has overcome any such 
inhibitions, openly challenging 
the champion. 

A former emigre. Vassily Ak- 
syonov now divides his time be- 
tween Washington and Mos- 
cow. In '‘Generations of 
Winter,” a strong and beautiful 
book, he has undertaken to 
write the great Soviet Russian 
novel, the 20th-century equiva- 
lent of “War and Peace.” 
Aksyonov invites this com- 
parison by quoting Tolstoy, and 
poiemidzmg with him. There are 
several ways in which the rwo 
books are alike — both deal with 
invasions of Russia so great that 
the country heroically tran- 
scends its tendency to somno- 
lence and self-slaughter; both 
are vast and epic yet intimate — 
we hear people's thoughts, see 
their feelings change like quick- 
silver, sense their presence, ihrir 
flesh and ciolhes. 

Aksyonov chronicles the fate 
of three generations of a Rus- 
sian family, the Gradovs. from 
1925 to 1 945, only 20 years, but 
what Russia and the Gradovs 
go through is more history than 
most nations produce in a cen- 
tury, or need to. 

Lenin had died in 1924 but 
his New Economic Policy of 
limited but freewheeling capi- 
talism was still in effect, giving 
life a semblance of peace; plen- 
ty, even luxury. That lasted un- 
til Stalin exiled Trotsky in 1929 
and a decade of terror began, 
reaching its hideous apogee in 
1937. And there was barely time 
to breathe before Hitler invad- 
ed. 

The hero of the book is Ni- 
kita Gradov, a military man 
whose conscience is troubled by 


• Gonzaio Sofinez, the Span- 
ish film director, recently re- 
read his own "El Asesino 
Triste." 

“I feel like a door-to-door 
salesman with the book under 
my arm. The book has stories 
about my personal world and 
imagination and among them is 
a tale inspired by “Dr. Jekyll 
and Mr. Hyde.’ ” 

(Al Goodman, 1HT) 



the part be played in suppress- 
ing the uprising of the sailors on 
Kronstadt Island, an event that 
would in time become synony- 
mous with disillusionment with 
communism. The sailors were 
the reddest of the red but had 
made the mistake of challeng- 
ing those in power. Gradov's 
conscience is more twisted and 
sarcastic than any 19lh-centuiy 
hero's would be. as is made 
clear in this scene with his wife: 


for the Russian state to be re- 
born?" 

But soon enough such scru- 
ples would prove as luxurious 
as his wife's silks; Gradov is 
arrested and sent to the Gufag 
where survival is alL Mean- 
while, his father, a famous sur- 
geon. is called to the Kremlin to 
examine Stalin. 


"As he kissed her shoulders, 
tenderness and a sensuous at- 
traction seemed to crowd out 
the gloom of Kronstadt. How 
marvelous it is. he thought, that 
women can buy silk underwear 
a g ain WeD. maybe Vuinovich 
was right when he said we had 
to crush our brothers in order 


In a narrative thronged with 
vivid scenes of love and battle, 
suffering and humor, this par- 
ticular scene fails doubly. There 
may be a tberaputic value for 
Russian writers, and readers, in 
venting their justified hostility 
for Stalin, but it does not pro- 
duce great art and is the reason 
Russian literature stilt lacks a 
living image of the man. 

Aksyonov is at his best when 


be trusts his own powers and 
does not depend on devices — 
silly poetical asides where Le- 
nin is reincarnated as a squirrel, 
the dated but useful insertion of 
press clippings, the dated and 
not very useful habit of address- 
ing the reader directly. 

In fact, what makes this book 
truly modem is the fusion of 
old-fashioned narrative with 
the convolutions of 20th-centu- 
ry reality; the irony flows natu- 
rally for, in a Soviet epic, as in 
Soviet life, peace is worse and 
more dangerous than war. 

Some flaws and minor quib- 
bles aside, "Generations of 
Winter" is a major novel. Pas- 
ternak's “Doctor Zhivago” de- 
picted the Revolution and the 
early years of communism. Sol- 
zhenitsyn’s “First Circle" cen- 
tered on the Gulag under Stalin, 
but Aksyonov, possibly invigo- 
rated by the distance suddenly 
providro by the demise of for- 
mer Soviet Union, has succeed- 
ed in illuminating the entire So- 
viet experience by concen- 
trating on two critical decades 
of history and three generations 
of a family's life. 


Richard Lourie, translator of 
Andrei D. Sakharov's “Mem- 
oirs" and the author of “Hunting 
the Devil . " a true crime account 
of a Russian serial killer, wrote 
this for The Washington Post. 


Bv Alan Tniscou 


T HE diagramed deal was 
plaved in the semifinal 


JL played in the semifinal 
stage of New York’s Reisinger 
Knockout Team Champion- 
ship. 

South landed in four spades, 
an excellent contract with just 
22 high-card points in the com- 
bined hands. The opening lead 
was the club king, which held 
the trick, and West shifted to a 
heart, attacking South's com- 
munications. Dummy's heart 
ten won, and South finessed the 
spade queen. losing to the king. 

South won with the king and 
could have made his game by 
ruffing a club and leading a 
diamond to the king. Instead he 
led the diamond king, hoping to 


establish an entry to the dum- 
my. This was an error, although 
it ’need not have been fatal. 
West held up his ace and the 
position was this: 


down to defeat when East was 
able to ruff. 


NORTH 
♦ 86 
? AQ87 
v J S 

+ - 


NORTH 
4 864 

CA Q 108 75 
J53 

49 


WEST 

49 

V J 
CAS 
* Q 10 6 2 


EAST 
4 10 7 

r- 

*94 2 
4A J 7 
SOUTH 
4 A J 5 2 
<; : - 
v'Qfi 
485 


WEST 
4 K 9 
V 362 
0 A8 7 
4 K Q 10 6 2 


EAST 
4 10 7 3 
r 94 
O 10 9 4 2 
4 A J 74 


SOUTH tD) 
4 AQJ52 
C K 3 
.' KQ6 
4853 


South now cashed the spade 
ace and led the diamond queen. 
When this also held he ruffed a 
club and led the heart ace. going 


North and South were vulnerable. 
The bidding: 

South W»l North Ea&i 

I 4 Pass 2 Pass 

3 .*> Pass 4 4 Pass 

Pass Pops 

West led the club king. 




S-trb.*,, g&ffB ?. Eg- as -|^ 









** 


Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 5, 1994 


Malaysia and Neighbors to Curb Sects 



By Michael Richardson. 

International Herald Tribune 

KUALA LUMPUR — Southeast Asian 
countries, wary of allowing religion and 
politics to mix, will take coordinated mea- 
sures against Muslim movements that 
threaten the region’s political stability or 
religious harmony, officials said Thursday. 

Malaysia, where Islam is the official 
religion, is expected to issue a ban Friday 
on the teachings and activities of Al Ar- 
qam, a Muslim missionary movement that 
has used Malaysia as a base for expansion 
into other parts of Southeast Asia. 

Analysts said that countries in the re- 
gion, all of which have multireligious pop- 
ulations, were concerned that any form of 
Islamic extremism would cause divisions 
among M uslims and alarm non-Muslims, 
including the influential Chinese. 

Malay sian officials have accused Al Ar- 
qam, which claims to have 100,000 follow- 
ers in Malaysia and many more elsewhere 
in Asia, of planning to gam political power 
and turn the country into an Islamic state 
modeled after Iran. 

The sect believes that a great Muslim 
reformer will soon appear, heralding an 
Islamic rerival in East Asia. 

Tararizi Taher, the Islamic affairs minis- 
ter of Indonesia, said his country, where 


more than 85 percent of the population of 
185 milli on are Muslims, was “seriously 
considering” banning Al Arqam. 

He was attending a meeting of South- 
east Asian ministers and officials in charge 
of religious affairs on the Malaysian island 
of LangkawL 

In comments in Jakarta, Mr. Tannin 
described Al Arqam as a “tendentious" 
political force that could “poison the spirit 
of Islamic bonds, especially among the 
younger generation in Indonesia.” 

Brunei banned the sect in 1991, and 
both Singapore and Thailand recently or- 
dered Abuya Ashaari Mu hamm ad, Al Ar- 
qam's leader, to leave their territory. 

Mr. Ashaari has claim ed that he is more 
popular in Malaysia than Prime Minister 
Mahathir bin Mohamad and said that, 
although he has no political ambitions, he 
would accept national leadership if the 
Malaysian people demanded it and God 

willed it. 

Mr. Ashaari, who is reported to be in 
Jordan, will be arrested if he returns to 
Malaysia, Mr. Mahathir said. 

It is not dear how members of the group 
will react to any ban. But analysts said that 
any crackdown might be difficult to en- 
force and could arouse strong protests or 
even violence from Al Arqam followers. 


Al Arqam was founded in 1968 by Mr. 
Ashaari, a former member of an Islamic 
opposition party in Malaysia. 

Analysts said Malaysian authorities de- 
cided to take action against the sectwhen 
it became dear that it was gaining a signifi- 
cant follow ing in the bureaucracy, the edu- 
cation system and the Malay Muslim parry 
tha t has a dominant position in the multi- 
ethnic coalition that rules Malaysia. 

The government w35 alarmed when 19 
Malaysian members of Al Arqam were 
arrested in April at a Muslim fundamen- 
talist demonstration in Cairo. 

Al Arqam, which gives its followers ac- 
cess to a mystical belief and an exclusive 
way of life, “offers a refuge from the chal- 
lenges of modernization, like cult move- 
ments in the West,” a Malaysian university 
lecturer said Thursday. 

A J Arqam has established about 50 Is- 
lamic villages in Malaysia where members 
form a tightly knit community with their 
own schools, shops, health clinics, play- 
grounds and code of behavior. 

Abd ullah Fahim, research director in 
the Islamic affairs division of the prime 
minister's department, said Al Arqam 
would no longer be able to operate schools 
or run businesses under its name after the 
ban takes effect Friday. 





Quo PfuhLMpmr Frutce-Prcwe 

A woman running past by a French-manned UN vehicle as a soldier prepares to return fire in Sarajevo on Thursday. 


SERBS: Belgrade Breaks Off Ties 


Continued from Page I 
is a good step, but actions speak 
louder than words. We want to 
see the Serbs stop resupplying 
their Bosnian Serb clients with 
arms and other supplies.” 

The five-nation Contact 
Group that authored the Bosni- 
an peace plan, comprising the 
United States, Russia. Britain, 
France and Germany, called for 
tighter sanctions on Yugoslavia 
unless the Bosnian Serbs re- 
versed their rejection of it 

The plan envisages riving 49 
percent of Bosnia to the Serbs 
and S 1 percent to their Muslim- 
Croatian enemies, who have ac- 
cepted the deal. 

In a letter to Serbian leaders 
on Wednesday, the Bosnian 
Serbian assembly said it had 
been “insulted and saddened” 


by threats emanating from Mr. 
Milosevic's government. 

Mr. Karadzic said his people 
must now prepare for more war 
and isolation. 

The Contact Group has told 
the Bosnian Serbs it views a 
referendum as a delaying tactic, 
as has Serbia. A Bosnian Serbi- 
an referendum in May 1993 on 
an earlier peace plan produced 
an overwhelming “no.” 

In northwest Bosnia, mean- 
while, Muslim rebels apparent- 
ly surrendered to Bosnian gov- 
ernment troops in a besieged 
town in the Bihac enclave, a 
United Nations peacekeeping 
force spokesman said. 

Major Rob Annink said the 
rebel brigade surrendered in the 
town of Pecigrad. 

(AFP, Reuters, AP) 


PopePlam a Visitto Croatia 
But Serbia Bars Trip There 


The Associated Press 

VATICAN CITY — Pope John Paul II will make his first 
visit to lands of former Yugoslavia next month, stopping in 
Croatia and possibly in Sarajevo in Bosnia-Heizegovma, the 
Vatican has announced. 

The Pope had hoped to visit Belgrade, the capital of Serbia, 
but the Vatican was informed that the time was “not yet ripe” 
for such a visit. There was reported to be opposition in 
Orthodox Church circles to a visit by the Pope, who is seen by 
some as anti-Serbian. 

An advance team was expected in Saisgevo, the Bosnian 
capital, this week to study whether the Pope’s security could 
be guaranteed. The stop m Zagreb, capital of predominately 
Roman Catholic Croatia, will take place Sept. 11, marking the 
900th anniversary of the archdiocese. 

The Pope has long expressed the hope of visiting Sarajevo 
to pray for peace and recandUation between the Muslims and 
the Orthodox Christian Serbs. Authorities in Bosnia- Herze- 
govina invited the Pope last year. 


BOSNIA: Despite Allies, U.S. Threatens Unilateral Lifting of Embargo 


Contained from Page 1 
grade’s decision. The Organiza- 
tion of the Islamic Conference 
called for UN troops to be de- 
ployed along the Bosnian -Yu- 
goslav border to monitor the 
flow of arms from Belgrade. 

In calling for the UN Securi- 
ty Council to lift the arms em- 


bargo against Bosnia’s Mus- 
lims, the foreign ministers said 
in a communique that if the ban 
were not lifted, the Islamic 
states “may come to the conclu- 
sion that they can provide the 
means of seif-defense” to the 
Bosnian government under the 
UN Charter. 


A French Foreign Ministry 
spokeswoman, Catherine Co- 
lozma, said that Paris had “tak- 
en note” of the latest move by 
Belgrade, but she added that 
France would wait to see 


whether rump Yugoslavia 
Serbia and Montenegro — i 


im- 


plemented its decision. 


On October 6th, the IHT will publish a Special Report on 


The Automotive 
Industry 


Among the topics to be covered are: 

■ The auto industry’s dream of a “global car”. 

■ Efforts to develop a cost-effective electric car. 

■ The latest safety features available in current models. 

■ A strong comeback for the American car industry. 

■ Major players in the China market. 


The newspaper will al& be efistributedaf the TAondial cfe fAutomobUe* 
show, in Paris on the same day. 


For further information, 
please contact BffIMahder in Paris 
al (33-1)463793 78. fax (33-1) 46 375044. 


BSTEK.'UXIONAL 


“We are waiting for a re- 
sponse which must be yes or no. 
The organization of a referen- 
dum or putting forward condi- 
tions is not a response,” said 
Grigori Karasin. a Foreign 
Minis try spokesman. 

The British Foreign Office 
said the Bosnian Serbian vote to 
move to a referendum meant 
that “the Bosnian Serb leader- 
ship have again failed to do 
what the international commu- 


With Talks 
Scheduled, 
Nigerians 
Halt Strike 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dupatdta 

LAGOS — Nigeria's biggest 
labor federation suspended a 
general strike Thursday, a day 
after at least three people were 
killed during clashes with the 
police in the worst violence 
since pro-democracy work 
stoppages began last month. 

The 3^-sndlion'inembcr Ni- 
gerian Labor Congress called 
off its two-day-old action, 
which it had taken to pressure 
the government to release the 
detained presidential claimant. 
Chief Moshood K_ O. Abiola. 

It said it would pursue its 
demands in talks with the gov- 
ernment and resume the strike 


Saturday if progress on resolv- 
ing the issue bad not been made 


“In Belgrade, the tone has 
changed and is now without 
ambiguity concerning the Bos- 
nian Serbs and in accordance 
with what we were expecting,” 
she said. 

Earlier Thursday, Russia re- 
acted cautiously to the Bosnian 
Serbs’ decision. 


by then. 

The president of the labor 
federation. Paschal Bafyau, 
said it was responding to a re- 
quest from the government for 
negotiations under a “free and 
fair atmosphere.” 

Leaders of the federation 
then departed for the capital, 
Abuja, where they were sched- 
uled to meet with military lead- 
ers late in the day. 

But the country’s two major 
oil workers’ unions, winch be- 
gan a crippling strike on July 4 
to press demands for democra- 
cy, said they would not call off 
their walkout until the military 
relinquished power. 

“No other action will be suf- 
ficient,” the two unions said in 
a joint statement Wednesday. 

(Reuters. AP) 

■ Pressure Rises on Militaiy 

Cindy Shiner reported earlier 
for The Washington Post from 
Abwa, Nigeria : 

with the crippling month- 
long strike by oil workers, grow- 
ing popular unrest and discus- 
sion of economic sanctions by 
the West, Nigeria’s militaiy rul- 
ers are facing the strongest chal- 
lenge to their authority since 
seizing power nine months ago. 

The usability of the govern- 
ment of General Sani Abacfaa 
to come to grips with its unpop- 
ularity is leading Africa’s most 
populous nation toward what 
could prove to be its worst po- 
litical crisis since the Biafran 
civil war of the la te 1960s. 

General Abacha is the latest 
in a string of military leaders 
who have held power intermit- 
tently for 24 of the 34 years 
since Nigeria, a nation of 90 
million people, gained indepen- 
dence. 

He and his predecessor. Gen- 
eral Ibrahim Babangida, have 
made numerous promises to re- 
linquish power to elected civil- 
ian leaders, but repeated disap- 
pointments have made 
Nigerian democracy advocates 
increasingly impatient 

“If you just sit around letting 
these jokers run the place, 
you’re going to be back to the 
Stone Age soon,” said Olutola 
Mobolurin, acting chairman of 
Concerned Professionals, one 
of several groups in recent 
months to press the military re- 
gime to stq? down. 

Since independence, power 
has been concentrated in the 
hands of a northern elite, and 
southerners are demanding 
their share, raising fears of re- 
gional conflict that could rival 
the short-lived secession of the 
eastern region of Biafra. 

At least 1 million people died 
from the time that the eastern 
Ibo ethnic group seceded in 
1967 and created the state of 
Biafra to the time the rebellion 
was crushed in 1970. 

"Hie south is home to Chief 
Abiola and most of his support- 
ers. He is widely believed, based 
on incomplete results, to have 
won a presidential election or- 


ganized by the military in June 
and almc 


lost immediately 


1993 

annulled 
Chief Abiola, after sending 
conflicting signals about wheth- 
er he would rally Nigeria’s pro- 
democracy forces and demand 
that the election be honored, 
proclaimed himself president 
on the one-year anniversary of 
the vote. 

. The authorities arrested him 


Abuja, in a civilian court spe- 
cially created by the govern- 
(AP, Reuters, AFP) meat. 


accept unequivocally the con- 
tact group’s proposal." 



Politics oj 

Bangladesh Dispute Goes Beyond Religion 


By John Ward Anderson ally has embraced a more according to 

Washing™ Ptm Scrrte . moderate form of Islam. cxr ruL Jjjg rise in reii- 

DHAKA, Bangladesh — tremists, SafSinism is being fu- 
Shafik Rahman, editor of the tenoratmg Islamic valuffi an g ^ ^ 0 ld-fash- 

largest weekly magazine in the nsmg m ^ e P a ^“ ioned newspaper war started 
Bangladesh, was flabbergast- women,.have launched apro- j^ q jiab, the fundamentai- 

ed when he picked up a fun- paganda war ^ oa !L. I0 increase its rircu- 

” «i mb* ^ papcr ^ch has plunged 


damentalist newspaper a few 
weeks ago and saw an article 
claiming that he was a fugi- 
tive from justice, charged 
with insulting Islam. It was 
news to him. 

“I said to my wife, ‘This 
gives the fundamentalist 
workers the green signal to 
attack me,’” Mr. Rehman 
said in a recent interview, 
noting that the police had 
never served a warrant on 
him, so he had no way of 
knowing that he was wanted. 
That night, three firebombs 
were thrown at the front gate 
of his house. 

“These are intimidation 
tactics to scare me so I will 
refrain from writing against 
the fundamentalists,'’ said 
Mr. Rehman, whose maga- 
zine, Jai Jai Din (As Days Go 
By), also publishes columns 
by Taslima Nasrin, the femi- 
nist author who emerged 
Wednesday from two months 
in hiding to appear in court 
on rfmiy s of insulting Islam. 

Mr. Rehman *r>A Dr. Nas- 
rin are caught in the increas- 
ingly violent surge in religious 
fundamentalism affecting 
RanglaHreh, which tradition.- 


ists and private aid groups, 
ac cusi n g them of corrupting 
Islam and trying to spread 
Christianity. 

But the dispute is about the 
Hash of commercial and po- 
litical interests as well, ac- 
cording to observers here. Po- 
litical analysts charge that the 
government of Prime Minis- 
ter Khaleda Zia, weakenedby 
a five-month-long opposition 
boycott of Parliament, has 
tolerated, if not abetted, the 
risf. in f jipHammtiilign to 
curry favor with extremists 
anrf to divert attention from 
pressing domestic problems. - 

The . government denies 
pandering to religious ex- 
tremists. 

“We don’t encourage ex- 
tremists, ra dicals or funda- 
mentalists, because we know 
they are a potential source of 
anarchy,” said Information 
Minister Nazmul Huda. 

Although not discounting 
the ideological aspects, ob- 
servers here said the cam- 
paign against aid organiza- 
tions is being orchestrated by 
religious leaders, who are also 
angry that they have lost stu- 
dents — and, thus, money — 


lation, — — — - . - _ 

with the rising popularity of 
more moderate papers- 

The fallout from these reli- 
gious, economic and political 
HgcHp-s has raised tensions to 
the boiling point. 

In recent weeks, tens of 

thousands erf fund amen ta li sts 

have taken to the streets de- 
manding enactment of a blas- 
phemy law, calling for the ex- 
pulsion of Western-funded 
aid groups, known as nongov- 
ernmental organizations, and 
^^ffpun^mg mat Dr. Nasrin 
be executed. Half a dozen 
people have been killed in 
dashes with the police. 

■ Death Calk Renewed 

Nearly 2,000 radical Mus- 
lims renewed calls Thursday 
for the death of Dr. Nasrin, in 
their first demonstration 
since Bangladesh’s High 
Court granted her bail on 
Wednesday, Reuters reported 
from Dhaka. 

“Our demand remains un- 
changed that Nasrin must be 
hanged and we shall not rest 

~ n ..,-J AU,„ 


until it is done,” said Abdur 
Rashid, an activist. 


WAR: Hiroshima Takes a Harder Look at Its History 


Continued from Page 1 . 

nese brought from Japan’s colo- 
nies as forced labor and ‘of the 
militaiy headquarters in the 
midst of town. 

While the old museum por- 
trayed the people of Hiroshima 
as innocents, unaware of the 
war around them, the new one 
includes photographs of a lan- 
tern parade one night to cele- 
brate the capture of Nanjing. 

The Japanese-language cap- 
tions below the prints carefully 
skirt the delicate question of 
how many Chinese were killed 
by Japanese forces, saying rim- 
ply that there are “several theo- 
ries. ran ging from tens to hun- 
dreds of thousands The 
English-language caption cites 
the figure used by the Chinese: 
300,000. 

Some visitors are clearly tak- 
en aback. “I didn’t know how 
deeply Hiroshima was involved 
in the war,” said Kimiko Ki- 
moto, a housewife wbo moved 
to the city seven years after the 
bombing, when it was still in 
ruins. 


Students coursed through the 
exhibits, dominated by a three- 
story reproduction of the fam- 
ous A-Bomb Dome, the shell of 
a bombed-out budding that be- 
came a memorial to the victims. 
The middle-school students 
said they knew so little about 
the war that they were haring a - 
hard time making sense of the 
exhibits. 

While the new exhibits do not 
support the U.S. decision to 
bomb Hiroshima, they do, far 
the first time, lay out for die 
Japanese the choices facing 
President Hairy S: Truman. " 

“Your country sometimes 
says that hundreds of thou- 
sands of American, soldiers 
were saved by the bombing,” . 
Mayra* Hiraoka said, “but - 1 
think most of us believe the 
U.S. wanted to drop the bomb 
as qUickly as 'possible.” The . 
U.S. motivation, he said, was 
partly to to establish its pre- 
dominance in the postwar 
world. , . . _ _ . 

The argument over how to 
portray the bombing is Spiffing 


HANG: Is 409-Pound Man Too Heavy for the GaBaws? 


Continued from Page 1 
ways been rather large and that 
even at his height of 6 feet, 1 
inch (1.9 meters) and original 
weight of nearly 330 pounds, he 
would have faced a serious risk 
of decapitation. 

The lawyer added, “They 
could put him on a diet, but he’s 
never got to a normal weight 
before. He moves around, but 
he’s not lifting weights or doing 
chin-ups. He could jog if be 


wanted to. but that’s not what 
he chooses to do.” " _ 


his 


Hanging is allowed in Mon- 
tana and Delaware in addition 
to Washington- There had not 
. .been one in the United States 
since 1965 until 18 months ago, 
when Washington hanged the 
first of two triple Itillere. • . - 


Mr. Rope’s lawyers that 
time might come soon. 

At 220 pounds, Mr. Camp- 
bell raised concerns about be- 
ing hanged at his weight, but his 
appeal was detriod. 


The second. Charles Camp- 
bell, beaded to Washington's 
gallows in May, signaling to. 


Expert witnesses told the fed- 
eral court that Mr. Campbell 
had nearly been decapitated 
and said that Mr. Rupe, who 
weighs almost twice as much, 
almost certainly would be. 


ZIMBABWE: A Success Story on Continentof Chaos 


Continued from Page 1 

inequity appears most vividly in 
the way black and white Zim- 
babweans now freely mix. 

Young .Zimbabweans cross 
the color line easily, forming 
interracial couples, mingling at 
the trendy Sandrock caffe on 
Union Street and dandng at 
nearby Sarah’s nightclub. The 
only barrier here is money. Few 
blacks can afford the hefty ad- 
mission and drink prices, so the 
weekend crowds are predomi- 
nantly white. 

“A lot of things have 
changed,” said Emerson Zhou, 
chief economist with the Zim- 
babwe Fanners Union, which 
represents the country’s black, 
small-scale landholders. “It's a 
different racial environment.” 


and encompass ftriwfr; differ- 
ences within the black popula- 
tion. After a bloody ethnic con- 
flict in Matabddand from 1981 
until 1987. leaders of Zimba- 
bwe’s political factions came to- 
gether and defused tribal ten- 
sions, aiyoiding the kind of 
descent into ethnic war thafhas 
devastated other African states. 

Also. Zimbabwe has shown 
more success than other Afri- 
can countries in dis arming and 
demobilizing .onetime guerrilla 
fighters. After a 15-year, Jow- 
Ievef insurgency forced the 
white regime of Prime Minister 
Ian Smith to negotiate a turn- 
over of power, some guerrillas 
were integrated into the army 
and others were paid off with 
compensation packages. 


Mr. Mugabe’s late and reluc- 
tant embrace in the past three, 
years of an Internal tonal Mone- 
tary Fund program designed to 
cut budget deficits means Zim- 
babweans are just starting to 
fed the pain of higher prices 
and a loss of state subsidies. 

Mr. Mugabe’s socialist rheto- 
ric also makes foreign investors 
timid, and Zimbabwe cannot 
find jobs for most of its highly 
educated population. 

Mr. Mugabe rules with an 
authoritarian streak, intolerant 
of opposition and seemingly 
unable, or un willing , to shake 
his belief that a single-party sys- 
tem is best for his country. 

Still, many in Zimbabwe say 
the successes of Mr. Mugabe 





ST 


across the Pacific. After long 
negotiations, the city has agreed 
to lend some of its exhibits to 
the Smithsonian Institution for 
an exhibit in Washington next 
year that will feature the re- 
stored Enoia Gay, the plane 
that dropped the bomb. 

When Gist approached, Mr. 
Hiraoka said, Hiroshima wor- 
ried that the Smithsonian 
planned to “display the Enoia 
Gay to glorify or justify the A- 
bomb.” The museum assured 
officials in Hiroshima that they 
would rive equal weight to die 
political decision that led to 
dropping die bomb. 

The Smithsonian has faced 
another set of protests, from 
US. veterans' whose concerns 
are the mirror image of Hiroshi- 
ma’s: They fear that the Smith- 
sonian will fail to treat the 
branbers as heroes. 

“The veterans wanted the ex- 
hibit to stop when the doors to 
the bomb bay opened,” a 
Smithsonian official said. “And 
that’s where the Japanese want- 
ed it to begin. ” - 




iiew f <* 


IU STREET Wt 


larnincr 


S 


Li ci cut i octal cuvnonmenL ° j • ■ - 

Tbese social changes reach . ™ bl& ? est to Zimba- b* government outweigh 
beyond ibe blacEwffite divide 2^2® V 5 «*>* s balance. 


nomic: It is there that the legacy 
of racial inequality r 
“There are alot more bl 


Tllirri \TT\ 1 ju«Bait*iuimore DiaCKS m 

RWANDA. Hum Scry Those Who Return Risk Death 

From 

view, blacks are* 
eral land of role.” 

Fourteen years after inde- 


they’ve done a good job ” Mr. 
Zhou of the Fanners Union 
said. 



Contimied from foge I 

said, putting his arms behind 
his back. On the insides of both 
of his arms at the elbows were 
distinct markings, which he said 
were rope burns. 

He said the men were led to a 
military camp, and there the 


More than a million refugees 
poured into the Goma region of 
zaire in the final days of the 
war, where thousands have died 
of cholera, dysentery and other 
diseases. 

As the relief community goes 
about constructing what 


peadence, you really cannot in 
any meaningful sense talk 
about a black bourgeoisie,” said 
Hiphas Mukonoweshuro, dean 

umiuu « yam,,, uiw - ... . erf social studies at the Universi- 

soldiers'^ shoodag U* £^!L«£2^«£ S 4 .ft“S5£ 1 3 ty of^tabwe, adding. “ You 


have been fears of incidents like 
those recounted here. 

In the camps in the Goma 
area, there has been an orga- 
nized campaign by partisans of 
the former government to per- 
suade refugees not to go bade to 
their homes. Stories are dreu- 


an ownership point of 
sstiiiiz] 


Emaperiph- 


Hutu villagers. Mr. Nywandi 
said in the confusion he and 10 
other men managed to escape, 
running with their arms tied be- 
hind their backs. 

The accounts of Tutsi atroc- 
ities will deal a serious blow to 
efforts of the United Nations 
and the international relief 
community to cope with the ref- 
ugee crisis created by the civi] 
war here, which ended with vic- 
tory for the Patriotic Front in 
mid-July. 


building water pipes and truck- 
ing in hundreds of tons of food 
in the Goma region, it has ac- 
knowledged that the only real 
solution is for the refugees to 
return home. 

The United Nations High 
Commissioner for Refugees has 
said that it thinks that it's safe 
for the refugees to return. But 
within the refugee agency, there 
has been a debate about how 
aggressive to be in encouraging 
the refugees to return. There 


had their eyes gouged out and 
worse. 

There has been no confirma- 
tion of these horrific accounts. 

There are an estimated 
500,000 displaced in the French 


can see indications on the hori- 
zon that there is an emerging 
black middle class that shows a 
lot of promise, but it needs to be 
nourished.” 


He added, “When one reads 
about what is happening on; 
other places, we seem to have a 
near-perfect situation here.” 

Even members of the eco- 
nomically powerful white farm- 
ing community — a group (hut 
criticizes the black government 
relentlessly — concede that’ 
fiieir worst fears at indepen- 
dence were not realized. 

- bought it was bead-, 

mg For Zaire,** said Jeny Grant,? 
deputy director of the GMmner-. ’V 
i Union erf white 1 * ^ 

landholders, referring to that', . * • v 
country’s fall. into near-anar-i 


"1 ^ 


ow,uuu displaced in the t-renen The economy ha? broader ± ' V 

security zone, but very little problems, as wdL Inflation, fcj- th 

food aid baa *™d Sed ^veniment o™£ P“pk V 


C*4 


food aid has arrived. 

“The situation is deteriorat- 
ing fast,” said Jack Soldate, di- 
rector of operations in south- 
western Rwanda For CARE 
which was distributing food to 
refugees at Kaduha. 


are in the 40 1 
. The 


uterest rates 
[rural country is 


• * ao wnccra&ui 

{J.™* people about the- 

ftttune of. the country. It could! 


» . — > WIM1UJ, U WHW. 

“gje gone Wrong, but it wait 
right, and Id ' 
wrong now/ 


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t ' fcf - 

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i 

International Herald Tribune, Friday , August 5, 1994 


Page 9 



THE THIS INDEX: 115 . 

Tribune Wo** Stock Index O, composed of 
S wKEE!-??^ fnvestabte stocks from 25 rountries. compfled 
oy Bloomberg Business News. Jan. t. 1992 -100, 

19(1 



North America 


Approx. woghBng: 26% 
Ctose: 93.70 Pres j 9460 


Latin America 


1- A 

I' | 

ppw.»BUOig:5% 
osc 133.12 Pan 131.12 

m 


L. ' 



§8 Wortfllrete 


The Mac tacks US. dollar vetoes d stocks kt Tokyo, Now Yotfc London, and 
Argmtlna, AuaMto, Austria, Bstgtun, BU, Cnd a, CM*, Danmark, Roland, 
Frenco, Oarmany, Hon<| Kong, Italy,. Hredco, Nathert a nda. Naw Tanlonrt. Nonray. 
Stngapora, Spain. Sw da n , SwWaartand arankHwola. For Tokyo. Ns w York snd 
London, too index is canpoeod of the 20 top issues kt tanas o( mmol cup/ta/tadan, 
cfaurwtsB too ten tap stocks am tracked. t . 


U tndastriat Sectors S 


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U» An 



dora doM dnogi ' 

dora dan 

dm* 

Eiwgy 

113-34 11453 -154 OpWGooifc 

118.16 1185S 

-056 

USBes 

124.02 12451-071 RMlhteUa 

- 14299 13259 

4855 

Rnann 

11856 11021-0.45 ConBoiiwrGooW 

100.66 10150 

-053 

9VnC8S 

121.10 12158 -0.72 • ‘MhcitanBOis .. 

133-08 132.60 

+056 

1 For mam Infomtiton about ihe lndBX,abcioMb amMabto1reeofch8iga. 

. . 

Write Id Trib Index, iai AtmuB Ctiartestto Gauds,. 925Z1NauHy Codex. France, j 


Fed’s Quandary: Are Those Really Inflation Signs? 


By Keith Bradsher 

Nos York Times Scrrjce 

WASHINGTON — Top Federal 
Reserve officials axe in a quandary: 
Despite what other analysts see as 
signs of slowing growth, they sense 
early signs of rising inflation and 
strong business confidence Thai could 
lead to an overheated economy. 

- But they have doubts about their 
judgment! and worry that if they are 
wrong, raising interest rales to stop 
inflation coala halt the U.S. economic 
expansion prematurely. 


Because Fed officials want more in- 
formation to form a better judgment, 
no interest rate increase appears likely 
before the Aug. 16 meeting of the in- 
terest-rate policy committee and pos- 
sibly not until the SepL 27 meeting. 

The timing will depend heavily on 
what Fed officials learn from the'July 
emp loyment data to be released Fri- 
day and the retail sales figures that 
come out next week. 

[Meanwhile, the number of Ameri- 
cans seeking state unemployment 


benefits declined for the second con- 
secutive week last week, dropping to 
the lowest level since February, the 
government reported Thursday, ac- 
cording to a dispatch by The Associat- 
ed Press. The Labor Department said 
initial jobless claims totaled a season- 
ally adjusted 319.000 in the week end- 
ed July 30. 

[U.S. bonds were little changed 
Thursday for a fifth day as traders and 
investors declined to bet on the direc- 
tion of interest rates before Friday's 
employment report. The yield on the 


benchmark 30-year bond held steady 
from Wednesday in late trading at 7 Jts 
percent.] 

Five members of the central bank’s 
interest-rate policy committee said in 
separate interviews this week that, un- 
like many Wall Street analysis, they 

did not sec the huge increase in busi- 
ness inventories during the second 
quarter as a signal of economic weak- 
ness in the months ahead. 

They dismiss the notion that retail- 


ers were caught by surprise by a sharp 
drop in consumer spending that left 
store shelves crowded with goods, in- 
stead. they believe that the increase in 
inventories actually reflects a calcula- 
tion by business executives that con- 
sumers will soon resume shopping in 
force. 

“Inventories had gotten awfully low 
relative to sales, so my suspicion is a 
good deal of it was planned,” said 
Susan M. Phillips, a governor of the 
Federal Reserve Board. 


Will Fees Sink New Osaka Airport? 


By Steven Broil 

International Herald Tribune 

OSAKA, Japan — First it was sinking 
in the sea. Now it is sinking in red ink. 

Kansai International Airport, which 
boasts an ultramodern terminal building 
shaped like the outspread wings of a 
giant bird and designed by Renzo Piano 
of Italy, w£Q be among the world's most 
striking when it opens SepL 4. 

It also w21 be the world's most costly 
— so costly, in fact, that some airlines 
won't fly mere, despite pent-up demand 
for international flights from western Ja- 
pan. 

The airport estimates that when it 
opens, the number of international 
flights will be less than half its target of 
630 a week. Domestic flights, for which 
fees are lower, will be doser to the week- 
ly target of 490 but still far below the 
airport s capacity. 

Although below projections, the num- 
bers are a major expansion of service by 
airlines already serving Osaka's Itami 
airport. United Airlines, the 


carrier across the Pacific, 


it US. 
boost 


weekly flights to 21 from 1 1 — still well 
below half of what one executive says is 
the airline's ultimate goal of more ihan 
50 flights a week. 

With Japan's other major internation- 
al airports having mated fierce, even 
violent, opposition from local residents 
outraged by noise and aggressive land- 
acquisition tactics, government planners 
decided to build Kansai International on 
reclaimed land five kilometers (3 miles) 
off the coast in Osaka Bay. 

To their horror, though, the 51 1-hect- 
are (1,260-acre) man-made island began 
to sink more quickly than expected. The 
problem was solved with a series of jacks 
below the terminal building, but not be- 
fore delaying the opening by 18 months 
and escalating costs by SO percent, to 515 
billion. 

To prevent debts from snowballing, 
Kansai International wants to set fees 
equal to or far higher than those at To- 
kyo's Narila airport, already the world’s 

jumbo jet 
more 
most ex- 



pensive airport, at Frankfurt in Germa- 
ny. and 30 times that of Los Angeles. 

That’s not all. For wheeling out the 
passenger boarding bridge — a service 
provided free at many airports — the 
airport wants S575. It’s asking about 
52,500 a month to rent a single check-in 
counter and about S165 a month for one 
square meter of space in the passenger 
terminal, not including S68 in manage- 
ment and air-conditioning fees. 

Meanwhile, airport restaurateurs, fac- 
ing water bills 10 times the Osaka city 
rate, are considering trucking their dirty 
dishes back to the mainland for washing, 
despite a S17 round-trip bridge tolL Hor- 
ror stories of 5)0 cups of coffee abound. 

Some airlines, their own finances 
strained by falling ticket prices and in- 
tensifying competition, are balking. 
Some will bypass Kansai in favor of 
more lucrative destinations, while others 
will increase flights at a far slower pace 
than potential demand dictates. 

Seeking to pressure the airport to 
bring down fees, airlines are warning 

See AIRPORT, Page 11 


Kidder Report Pinpoints Jett and Laxity 


ClntafTwUanal Hamid Tifwna 


" The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Kidder, 
Peabody. A Co. cm Thursday 
released an internal report that 
said Joseph Jett was the major 
culprit in the firm's costly and 
embarrassing financial scandal. 

But the report also blamed 
what was described as a star- 
tling lack of supervision over 
Mr. Jett, Kidder’s chief govern- 


ment bond trader. The report 
said superiors could have de- 
tected fraud if they had scruti- 
nized even the trading dates. 

Kidder also fired Melvin 
MuUin, Mr. Jett’s former super- 
visor. He was the fourth top- 
level figure to go. 

The 85-page report, prepared 
by Gary Lynch, former enforce- 
ment chief at the Securities and 


Exchange Commission, is the 
latest effort by Kidder and its 
parent to control the damage 
from the bond-trading scandal. 

Mr. Jett was dismissed in 
April after Kidder accused him 
of generating $350 million in 
phantom bond profits in a trad- 
ing scheme aimed at hiding 
about 5100 million in trading 
losses. 


Russian Police 
Detain Chief 
Of MMM Fund 


Kidder charged that Mr. Jett 
also inflated his bonus. 

Kidder said Mr. Jen showed 
record trading profits of $32.5 
million in 1992. 

**Had Jett's account of what 
really happened been consid- 
ered, the conclusions of this re- 
port would necessarily have 
been dramatically differenL" 
an attorney for Mr. Jett said. 


By Lee Hockstader 

Washington Pent Senses 

MOSCOW — Having 
watched idly for six months as 
Russia's biggest investment 
firm stripped millions of people 
of their savings, the government 
on Thursday raided the firm's 
main offices and detained its 
president. 

Russian tax agents and spe- 
cial police, some of ibem lower- 
ing themselves down a high-rise 
apartment building on ropes, 
burst in from a balcony to the 
flat of Sergei Mavrodi. presi- 
dent of the MMM investment 
fund, which says it has 10 mil- 
lion investors. Last week the 
MMM fund, which the govern- 
ment says is a scam, collapsed 
when the fund devalued its 
shares by more than 99 percent 
in a single day. 

The government announced 
that Mr. Mavrodi. who refused 
to meet with tax officials on 
Wednesday, was under investi- 
gation on charges of tax eva- 
sion. Well into the evening, 
agents were combing his home 
and office for documents and 
computer files they hope will 
build a case against the flam- 
boyant MMM chief, who is re- 
garded by authorities as a high- 
rolling swindler who raked in 


millions from naive investors. 

The MMM scandal has been 
a midsummer sensation in Mos- 
cow, rocking the country's 
fledgling security markets and 
igniting a round of finger- 
pointing that has set many in- 
vestors against the government 
and government agencies 
agains t each other. 

Yet until Thursday, the gov- 
ernment had taken no direct 
action against MMM or Mr. 
Mavrodi, leaving the fund to 
continue what officials say is a 
classic pyramid scheme, in 
which purchases by new inves- 
tors are used to pay off previ- 
ously purchased shares at 
steadily rising prices. 

Until Thursday it appeared 
that neither law nor logic would 
have any role to play in the 
MMM debacle. Authorities 
seemed completely helpless, 
blaming inadequate securities 
legislation. 

Mr. Mavrodi. whose portrait 
appears on some of MMM’s 
certificates, scoffed at the gov- 
ernment, blaming it for the 
fund’s collapse and the finan- 
cial losses of his legions of in- 
vestors. He has also even threat- 
ened to mobilize his investors 
into a political force opposed to 
the goveramenL 


*e 

a 

=y 

Id 

lit 

le 


■VL 


‘ fhb- (.» G&- 




»if & 




WALL STREET WATCH 



on REIT Stocks 


. New 

N ew 
tor foi 
Street 1 
panics, 
derwritexof reale 


By Laurence Zuckerman . 

New York Times Service 

EW YORK —-The hottest sec- - 
tor for stodc offerings' on Wall 
Street tbesedaysisrefltcstatocoiin- 
pazries, and by far. the hottest un- 
derwriter of real estate stocks is MenUl Lynch 
&Co. .. 

The investment bankers in Merrill Lynch's 
property group have underwritten S2^biHibn 
worth of shares this year in teal estate invest-, 
mem trusts, or REITs, including 52 bfflion in 
initial public offerings- .. j- 

That amounts to more than 40 percent, of 
all new property shares, just as the trustshaye 
become the fastest-growing category , <m the 
New York Stock Exchange. ; . 

Richard Saltzman, managing director of the 
real estate investment banking group, would 
not say how much the unit, which now consists 
of 45 professionals, has earned freon under- 
writing the trusts. But others in the industry 
estimate that last year's fees arid c ommissio ns 
may have been as high as $200 m illio n . _ 

But for all its success, Merrill Lynch is now 
facing criticism from some investors who buy 
real estate stocks. 

They say that the best of the real estate 
investment trusts have already grate to mar- 
ket, and that to meet the enormous demand 
for such stocks, Marin is now underwriting 
companies of Iowa 1 quality. 

“A couple of the transactions that tnejrve 
done; you have to look in the mirror and ask, 
< WhyT ” said Sam Zell, who controls two 
property trusts brought public by Merrill 
Lynch last year. Like many, m the industry, 
Mr. Zell worries that bad deals will soor 
investors on real estate trusts. 


Indeed, some erf Merrill’s most recent deals 
have. been cr iticiz ed by analysts and fund 
! managers who say the deals either involved 
inediocre companies or were being dressed up 
to appear more promising than they were. 

! For example, several analysts have criti- 
cized Fust Industrial Realty Trust, which 
- began trading on the New York Stock Ex- 
. change in; June, because dozens of the proper- 
ties included in the trust were not even owned 
-beforehand by the company’s controlling 
shareholder, the Shidler Group. 

Instead, Shidler secured rights to buy those 
, properties with proceeds from the company's 
initial stock offering. 

In addition, one analyst accused First In- 
dustrial of inflating its operating revenue. 

The First Industrial prospectus “contains 
the most egregious financing gimmick of vir- 
tually any deal to come down the pike in the 
last few years,” said Jon Fosheim of Green 


Street Advisors, a California firm that ana- 
lyses property stocks for institutional inves- 
tors, in a memo to bis clients a month before 
the stock began trading. 

He said the company was booking interest 
payments in a way that inflated its cash flow. 

Merrill Lynch subsequently abandoned the 
accounting method before the stock came to 
market. But Mr. Fosheim said that First In- 
dustrial stin relied on a relatively high amount 
of short-term variable-rate loans, which re- 
quire lower interest payments than long-term 
fixed-rale loans. Thai means the company’s 
cash flow looks better in the short run. But it 
also means the company may face much high- 
er interest expenses later on. 

First Industrial shares now trade at $22.50. 
$1 below their initial offering price. 


Chnia Court 
Backs Disney 
Copyright 

Reuters 

BEIJING — In a landmark 
ruling, a court in China has de- 
cided in favor of Walt Disney 
Co. in a lawsuit accusing Chi- 
nese firms of pirating Mickey 
Mouse and other copyrighted 
Disney property. 

Disney on Thursday con- 
firmed press reports that the 
recently formed intellect ual- 
property section of the Beijing 
court had issued a ruling 
Wednesday that a Chinese pub- 
lisher and its distributor had 
pirated children's books based 
on Disney films. 

Disney called it “a round in 
the fight.” The court has yet to 
assess penalties. [The court 
found a violation, but said the 
circumstances needed further 
investigation, according to 
Knight-Ridder.] 

The publications featured 
Mickey Mouse, Cinderella, Pe- 
ter Plan and Snow White. 

The U.S. trade representa- 
tive, Mickey Kan tor, in June 
rqected Bering’s pleas for pa- 
tience and added China to a 
special watch list of countries 
suspected of tolerating theft, es- 
pecially in computer software 
and video and audio recordings. 

China recently announced a 
crackdown, but much of it may 
have involved pornography. 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


,<i - 

-A- 


Cross Rates 

s * OM- 

JUmlardaM ™ iS 

Bnuseb s* *■“* 

““ ** r^, 

- JS £ 

Mffan l MS WU* 

ttMVarft (h) ISKo isn 

» UK 

T«M MW 00 

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ntesatJpjn. nbur 

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bu e Cm ra we r 


-. Aug. 4 

FJ. Lira OJPt VP. vra C* Peseta 

# 3*2 MIS' — MSS* UW un- U«s MX- 

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am w uv **“’ u** »• 
uns wan tnu sues ua h« inn w 
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UJ51 MBS- VTA UX* WtS US" — - «** 

uu 7 jUM 1 * — t® 1 * tana uosr. 

UU iflza as iwu mu m* I« HM 

zbi w.u a sor .cjm tsu ws » w « 

ntw'Ykrk &d Zurich, Arinas kt okier comm Tinwto . 

ana obrtwr V et m; M.Q-: not outdadf NA.: not 


Eurocarrsncy Deposits 

Swiss 

Dollar D-Mark ' Franc 

Stertiag 

Piwdi 

Franc 

Yon 

Aug. 4 
ECU 

imoafti OM4 


4tt-41b 

S«*w 

' 5 >--SW 

3 ‘-J w 

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• S- 9 M 

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Sources: Reuters, UovdsBadk, 

Roieaeo tH I cd Olt to kOertKsikdeposttsofStmiaian minimum tor emdmienit. 


Ksy Money Rates 


unwed states 


Close Pm. 


prime tola 


Csroncv 

MULpera- 

lilZMoatl 

HoranMna 

rtn.ra*0- 

wrtzWv 

Sort, escudo 

Rm.raM 

Saadi rival 

Star.* 


PW* 

u» 

1JM- 

4877 

M.M 

23833. 

was 


175*3 

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Cumaar Per* 
S-Atr.iand U178 
S.KM-.WM 80250 
ShmLkma 7JI» 
XahnnS ■ 7451 

TMMt 2497 
nrftttJfen 313*1. 

U AS (Urban 3X727 
Vanes. troBv. 18480 






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Devtscbe mart ,1^ JJJO • ■ . 

S < rtn fran c 1J3 W _ _ . . rumk (Brussels); Data Gemmrio». itodtma 

Saarcea: tNGBank otTekYO ITokM: Rant Berk of omudo 

tTWontnU IMF ( SORI ■ 


hurt* cos 
C&mBVFOPWlSSltaT* 

Swntfe Treraury bffl . 
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hurr nsran sum 

S^murjTunsntf ml • 
IWrrHBrvnK 
II m m T Wn noia- 
a mni Tia rm ntiioad 
Mann Lynn 3 mbv Raatvoxt 178 


3% 

n 

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SVi 

5V. 

718 

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M* 

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Iraiaani towbaak 

5*8 

5V. 

41* 

41B 

>mongi MerbuMi 

Sfc 

SH 

4B5 

485 

*«isani ImartMak 

400 

S4 

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430 

ltwrWl 

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Prunes 



45* 

493 

latervatioo rata 

5JOO 

SCO 

471 

489 

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5*8 

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478 

473 


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SK 

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3<h an. 
2 *. 2 * 
SU 2H 
459 453 

400 UB 
&0D 48S 

400 M0 
400 400 

400 400 

444 479 


Sources.- Reuters. Bloomberp. Merrill 
Lynch. Book of Tokyo, Commerzbank, 
Greemvdi Montaou* Credit Lrannute. 

Cold 

AM. PM. dive 

*xidi 377J3 377JS — 0.J5 

*-nw»w 377 JO 377 JO —495 

KawYnrti .381 JO 38110 +1J0 

US. tenors per Ounce. London officio! fa. 

am Zurich and NetrYor* opening and ck» 
too Prices; New Yhrit Comes I December.) 
sown: Reuters. 


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Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 5, 1994 


** 


market diary 


Auto Stocks Lead 
Wall Street Lower 


Via AttOOOtod f* 


Aug. 4 


Compiled ty Our Staff From Dapadus 

NEW YORK — The stock 
market slipped Thursday, bur- 
dened by signs that corporate 
profits in bellwether industries 
such as autos, building products 
and semiconductors may peak 
sooner than had been expected. 

The Dow Jones industrial av- 
erage lost 26.87 points to finish 
at 3.765.79, with the bulk of seU- 

U^. Stocks 

iflg coming in the last hour of 
trading. Lasing issues led gain- 
ing ones by a 4-io-3 ratio on the 
New York Stock Exchange, 
where volume totaled 290.7 mil- 
lion shares. 

Weaker-lhan-expected vehicle 
sales for July prompted an ana- 
lyst at Merrill Lynch to reduce 
his investment ratings for Gen- 
eral Motors, which fell 2M to 
SO 1 *, Ford, which slumped 2 to 
294, and Chrysler, which 
dropped 1% to 454. 

Weak Treasury bond prices 
also pulled down stocks. The 
price of the benchmark 30-year 
Treasury bond fell 8/32 point, to 
86 9/32. and the yield rose to 
7.40 percent from "7J8 percent 
Wednesday. 


Bonds fell after a Federal Re- 
serve official suggested the cen- 
tral bank would raise interest 
rates if Friday’s employment 
data for July showed strong job 
growth. 

Weakness in the semiconduc- 
tor sector was led by Intel, which 
fell 1% to 5TA after a Merrill 
Lynch analyst voiced concern 
about an order slowdown in the 
second half of the year. 

Caremark, a big provider of 
intravenous drugs for patients in 
their homes, fell 24 to 214 after 
a criminal indictment accusing it 
of paying off doctors in ex- 
change for referrals. 

Georgia-Pacific dropped 24 
to 67 after Goldman Sachs re- 
moved it from its buy list amid 
concern about a slowdown in 
the building industry. About 60 
percent of Georgia-Pacific’s 
earnings come from building 
products such as plywood. 

Retailers were weak after sev- 
eral store chains reported 
slightly weaker sales for July 
than analysts had expected- 
Wal-Mart 'fell 4 to 244, and 
Sears dipped 4 to 4714. 

( Bloomberg, AP) 


Job Data Anticipation 
Moves Dollar Higher 


Bloomberg Business News 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
rose against most other major 
currencies Thursday amid spec- 
ulation that the U.S. currency 
was poised to strengthen erven Lf 
Friday's monthly employment 
report showed a slowing of 
growth. 

investors who had sold dol- 
lars short earlier in the week 

Foreign Exchange 

bought them back on concern 
Lhat either a strong or a weak 
jobs report could benefit the 
dollar. 

A robust rise in employment 
could lift the dollar by raising 
the likelihood the Federal Re- 
serve would soon raise interest 
rates, making U.S. deposits 
more attractive. 

A weak report, which would 
diminish those prospects, could 
help the dollar by spurring a 
rally in stocks and bonds. 

“A lot of people think the 
bond market's performance will 
lead the dollar Friday,’' said 
Steve Flanagan, a trader at 
PaineWebber Inc. 


The dollar closed more than a 
pfennig higher against the 
Deutsche mark at 1.5873 DM. 
up from 1.5757 DM on 
Wednesday. 

Against the yen. Lhe dollar 
rose slightly to 100.475 from 
100.275. Analysts said no new 
developments were likely soon 
in bilateral trade talks between 
the United States and Japan. 

“There’s been some squaring 
up ahead of Lhe employment 
report," said Tim Fox, an econ- 
omist at Credit Suisse. 

“People are going to make 
their mind up about what the 
Fed's going to do with interest 
rates on the back of Friday's 
figures," said Troy Bowler, an 
analyst at PaineWebber Inter- 
national. 

Some traders said the report 
could be stronger than econo- 
mists were expecting, after a 
surprise drop in the number of 
unemployment claims made in 
the last week of July. 

The dollar also rose to 5.4325 
French francs from 5.3878 
francs and to 1.3406 Swiss 
francs from 1.3320. The pound 
fell to S 1.5357 from $1.5427. 



Dow Jones Averages 


Open ufati low Lost Chg. 

Indus 378SJ4 37907? J745J9 374579 -JWP 
T mm 141XW 141X43 I4D175 140438 —005 
Util 191.03 19373 1917/ IJIJ4 -00* 
Comp 1317.73 131831 131077 111X90 — 7J0 


i Standard & Poor’s indexes 


Hfflh LOW Ckue OS 'BC 
537.31 53X34 53U4-1W 
372.18 387.94 38879 - MS 
141 JO 14045 14045 — 0J8 
4577 45JB 453)8 —0.19 
441.49 458.40 -M5 

0774 47388 42X94 — U0 


NYSE Indexes 


High Law Last Chg. 

25458 2537ft 25X77 — 1J1 
3110 311 J4 311 M —1.87 
248.44 244.47 24601 —1.11 
714.11 21X98 113 02 —OJA 
21X83 21X05 21118 — WO 


NASDAQ Indexes 


IHT 

NYSE Most Actives 


Va6 High 

Law 

Last 

dig. 


67122 30*k 

79 fa 

29 h 

-2 




45ft* 






■ ** 



Mil 




V . f M 

61 V> 

62V, 

—ft* 

GenEls 

31890 <9*v 

48*. 

48ftk 



31454 20 Vt 

19»« 



NMedEnt 


17W 


- '/I 

WdMlTt 

25690 25 

24' ’♦ 


— ! M) 

McDnids 

I! 1^1 

26 





27 





3IV1 




22325 32fa 

3HVh 




m'rriM U71 

ant 




Caremfc 

19936 279, 

20’-, 



NASDAQ Most Actives [ 


VaL iftgh 

Low 

Last 

eng. 


78479 341k 


ZJM, 

- V* 

Intel 

77645 60 

57'a 

57'- 



66675 1SW 

14W 



CalMD 

469*5 21*6 

11V, 





20"'- 



SkyScfen 

K .r»Cl 

1 

1*0 


AAiCSttS 

i-’i" 

52ft- 



NewbNk 

22TO8 29W 

28W 



VLSI 

22057 1393 

12ft* 



MO 

21002 339+ 

23W 




71641 

15'a 




20205 1QY, 

99» 


— Vi 


18668 B*k 

aw 




17124 791n 

20W 



Chcon 

16695 SftU 

53 



AMEX Most Actives 


Composite 

industrials 

Bonks 

insurance 

Finance 

Trmsp. 


Km low lost CUB. 

72474 719.97 719.97 — X72 

725.75 72277 72277 — XI3 
748.48 744.04 766.98 -W 
90879 901.15 901.15 —830 
944.02 942.91 942.99 —078 
733 62 TBjBX 730.76 —1-3 



VOL 

Htoh 

LOW 

Last 

Chg. 

Elan 

11200 

33 Vi 

314* 

31ft, 

—2 

ScoaVte 

1D8Q3 

2‘.» 

2 

2V» 

♦ ftk 

AdvAAedT 

7551 

1 

ft* 

H 

—7711 

On Med 

7140 24’- 

24 

24 V- 

♦ 1 >- 

OkySHs 

6368 

Pi 

B’’. 

81k 

♦ ft* 

Vkxmri 

5330 

4H 

4 ft* 

4".u 

_ 

SilvFds n 

4553 

74* 

61* 

7 


VfacB 

4066 

35 

33 

34 ft* 



Hraoner 

3995 

3<Vi. 

3 

3ft"u 

— Vl, 

IwnCp 

3528 

18’* 

1 7*6 

17ft* 

— 


Market Sales 


NYSE 
Amex 
Nosdoq 
in millions. 


Today 

dose 

289.15 

17.13 

248.77 


34080 

17.41 

28540 


AMEX Stock Index 


Mali Low Last an. 
441.41 44031 -MIX5 -076 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


20 Bonds 
ID Utilities 
10 Industrials 


Close Cft'BO 

9036 +004 

9478 +0.12 

102.15 —003 


NYSE Diary 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total issues 
New Highs 
Now Laws 


dose P rev. 

910 1100 

1191 1004 

740 736 

2841 7840 

42 43 

26 27 


AMEX Diary 


Advanced 

dm 

246 

Prev. 

292 




Unchanged 


238 




Mew Highs 



New Lows 




NASDAQ Diary 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Tat id issues 
New Highs 
New Laws 


Close Prev. 

1309 1552 

1676 1563 

3016 1948 

5001 5083 

66 72 

a 9i 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


Metals 


PrwtaH 

aid Ask 


Close 
BW Ask 
ALUMINUM (HM) Grade) 

Ddlore per nwtrfcton 
Seal 142X00 1429 JO 1435.® 143X00 

Forward 145470 1457JQ 1463J0 1464X0 

COPPER C ATHOD ES (MM Gratia) 

i ptr metric M „ „ _ _ 
Sect 24053)0 2407JM 240470 340100 

Forward 341100 2415X10 341100 241400 

LEAD 

Dolton per BteMcton 

5001 57 x*i 52 -® gun gj-SS 

Forward 59100 59470 59X00 5MJ0 

NICKEL 

Daittn nr metric ton 
Spat anaoo 6120JH 606X00 607000 

forward 420070 4210.00 615X00 6M0J0 

TIN 

Sof M,PBrn S!£® , 5B5S00 5005,00 501X00 
Forward 511500 512500 508000 508500 

ZINC (Special High Grade) 

Dollars per metric too , 

Soot 94100 94200 737 JD 93X50 

Forward 96300 96400 96X00 96100 


Financial 


Htoh low Close Change 

3-MONTH STERLING ILlFFE) 

E90X08B - Pis Of TB8 Pd 


Sep 


Jon 

Sep 

Dec 

Mur 

JH 

Sea 

Dec 

Mgr 

Jun 


9A20 94.08 M13 —DOS 

9307 9329 fl» -X10 

9209 92.73 

9202 92.34 

9202 9105 

91.72 91.56 

9106 91JJ2 

91X5 91.13 

91.14 9109 

90.96 9007 

9004 90-76 

9070 9004 

Esf. volume; 54456. QP*n hit.: 539,241. 
3-MONTH EURODOLLARS (UFFEJ 
n RiiBlag-PtsoflMPCt 
Sep 94.98 94.98 9X98 +007 

Dee 94.32 94JD 94X2 +007 

NX N.T. MJW +007 
Jun N.T. N.T. 9178 +007 

Sep N.T. N.T. 9X51 

Esl. volume: 75- Open kit.: 7006. 

MAO NTH EUROMARKS (LIP FE) 

DM1 mUllMl • Pto Of IN PCt 
SOP 99.16 9505 

Dec 75.11 94« 

Mar 9402 94.71 

Jun 9466 9401 

Sea 9440 9418 

Dec 9412 9X90 

Mar 9X92 9X71 

Jun 9X73 9X55 

Sep 9X53 9 X39 

Dec 9X30 9X17 

Mar 9X15 9X04 

Jun 9197 9X98 . _ _ 

Esf. volume: 259.241 Open bit.: 791450. 


9276 —0.10 

9X30 —0.18 

91.93 —008 

9143 —007 

nm —rnt, 

91.23 -002 

9107 — 005 
9008 —004 

9076 — 0JB 

9X66 —104 


+ 006 


9X09 —CUM 
9496 —0.13 

9472 — XI 8 

9441 — X23 

9418 — 0JB 
9X90 — X19 

9X70 — 0.19 

9X55 —0.16 
9X39 — X12 

9X17 —Oil 
9305 — X10 

9191 — 009 


3-MONTH PI BOR IMATlF) 
FF5 mDHoa- ptj at 108 pet 
Sen 9407 94J9 

9404 

UfKh. 

Dec 

9430 

94.1* 

9424 

nm 

Mo- 

94.10 

9198 

9402 

—006 

Jun 

9X88 

9X76 

9X81 

— niw 

Sep 

9308 

9X57 

9X5B 

— CL09 

Dec 

9142 

9X28 

9132 

— 008 

Mar 

9123 

9X13 

9X13 

— OJB 

Jun 

9X09 

92.95 

92.97 

— 0.10 


Spot Commodities 


Commodity Today Prev. 

Aluminum, lb 1648 8651 

Cotwer electrolytic, lb 1.M 1.14 

Iron FOB, Ion 7IXB3 21300 

Lead, lb <us 08 

Silver, trov m 5.17 X2I 

Steel (scrap). Ian 119J7 11907 

Tln.lt> NA X4865 

Zinc, lb 04637 04675 


E it. volume: 4448X Open InL: 184703. 
LOHG GILT (UFFE) 

ESXON'ptsa Sfctdsof 100 PCt 
Sop 103-19 101-30 10247 —041 

Due 102-10 102-10 101-23 -0-31 

Esl. volume: 7X798. Open bit: 119,226. 
GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND (L1FFE1 
DM 2SX0N - pts Of H8 PCt 
Sep 9419 9345 9152 —0-57 

Dec 9X49 92 JO 9ZS3 —057 

Esl. volume: 137788 Open hit.: 184247. - 
18-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MAT1F) 
FF5MWM - pts of IN pd 
Sep 117.94 1 17.00 117.08 —882 

Dec 117JM 1 16J6 11630 — 0112 

Mar 11628 11X80 11548 —082 

JOB N.T. N.T. 11470 —OLD 

Est. volume: 101^88 Open In!.: 136442. 


Industrials 

High Lew Lust Settle ChVe 
GASOIL (I PE) 

UA donors per metric toiHotf of IN tons 
Aog 16050 155.50 15575 15535 —625 

Sep 16X75 159.00 15975 159.50 —400 

Oct 16475 16X00 16X00 16X80 —S3 

NOV 1483 1653 1653 1653 —475 

Dec 169.75 1673 167.50 16780 —400 


Hhrtt LOW Lott Sente Ottoe 

Jon 171 JO 16X25 16X50 16X50 —400 

Fet) 16925 16X00 16X00 16X00 —4 Bi 

MOT N.T. N.T. N.T. 16400 —43 

APT N.T. N.T. N.T. lftSOO —400 

MOT N.T. N.T. N.T. 16X90 —S3 

EH. volume: 17200. Oaen tot 104002 - 
BRCHT CRUDE OIL (IPET 
UJ.de! ion per barre l fa * of L O W ban e h 


Sep 

1800 

U.15 

' 1803 

1802 —002 

Ocf 

I8J59 

1708 

1X17 

1X15 -003 

Nov 

1X19 

1704 

1X00 

1X00 —01)5 

Dec 

18J03 

1702 

1702 

1702 —an 

Jan 

17.92 

17J4 

1701 

1701 -007 

Fob 

17JB 

1706 

17J4 

1709 — 007 

Mar 

1708 

1704 

1708 

17J8 —007 

Apr 

1700 

1703 

1753 

1704 -aw 

May 

1707 

1707 

1707 

1703 —an 

Jua 

1704 

1704 

1703 

1702 - 007 

Jlv 

T70B 

1700 

1700 

1701 -007 

Aug 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1730 —087 

Est. votome: 35000 . 

Open bit. 1X5028 


Stock Indexes 

HWi Low close enrage 
FT SB IN (UFFE) 

EH per Me* potnt 

Sep 31B8.Q 3157 J 315X0 — 17J 

Dec 31*08 3150J1 2)71 JO —178 

Est. volume: 7JQX Oaen IntJ SM91 
CAC40 (MAT1F) 

PF 200 pgr fadex pefat 

Al>9 313200 209700 Z102J0 — 25J0 

Sep 2I3S.00 210780 . 210980 —2400 

Oct N.T. N.T. N.T. Unctt 

Dec 216400 216X00 213800 —2400 

Mar 217X00 217800 216600 —2500 

Esf. volume: 19*27. Open Inf.: 6X754 ' 
Sources: Mat if, Associated Press, 
London Inti Financial Futures Exchans a 
tan ammmr Exchange. 


Dividends 


Company Per Amt Pay Rec 

IRREGULAR 

CarraUlan Bcp - .12 8-18 9-1 

Colon I latirnktlcl . 08 8-15 M 

Colonl InvGd Mun « 054 8-15 9-1 

ECl Tdecam Ltd _ oe 8-22 94 

TevaPharm b 066 8-15 9-12 

froppro x anounr per ADR. 

STOCK 

Piemonte Feeds - 5K 8-15 8-31 

REVERSE STOCK SPLIT 
CBC Carp 1 far 5 reverse spilt. 

STOCK SPLIT 
Precision Cosfpn 3 far 2 tPJlf. 

CORRECTION 

Amer Maize Pfd .16 9-7 f-2) 

Correct big pay date*. 

INITIAL 

Conestoga Enterp - JO 8-31 MS 

INCREASED 

Computer Language Q -10 8-18 M 

Dover Carp Q 3 030 9-15 

Fst Colony Cp Q 3 9-15 10-1 

Natl San Supply O 065 849 9-9 

Pioneer Grp S .16 H N 

Roto Rooter Q -15 B-19 +9 

Suburban Bcp Q sbs a-i5 s-srs 

Unltrminc Q 40 8-16 800 

REDUCED 

Noll Insur Grp Q JM 8-15 8-30 

REGULAR 


u.s./Arniltt^ 


C -59 8-79 826 
Q -5343 8-15 9-1 

Q 3 M 10-3 
d 10843 8-11 9-26 
d 10843 8-11 93 
Q 47 8-22 10-1 
Q 3 10-14 11-10 
0 M B-19 9-1 

Q 43 8-19 M 
a 3 8-15 M 
Q 35 Ml 915 
O 415 8-15 9-1 

Q JO 9-3 18-15 
Q 3 8-31 9-9 

Q 3 612 Ml 
Q 49 18-7 1X24 

Q 33 B-31 9-14 

c-Subied fa 1443% South Afrtam Wfihhow- 

fagtax. 

rLApprtndmafe amount per ADR. 


ASA Ltd 

BfcrsTr MY PtdPur 
Block Drug Inc A 
Bril Telecom ADR 
Bril Telecom 2nd 
GTE Cara 
Geal Dynamics 
IPL Energy Inc 
Jefferson Pilot 
Mead Carp 
MarccmtlieSt 
NWPubSvs 
Portland Gent Cp 
PravMeat LttAxa 

SERF* 

Sa not Inc 


a-aanval; g-pavabie In G 
monthly; 


fends; i 


Energy Agency Predicts Demand for Oil Will Increase 


Reuters 

LONDON — World oil demand will 
increase significantly over the next year 
and a half, the International Energy Agen- 
cy said Thursday. 

The Paris-based agency said economic 
growth would push world oil demand to 
69 J million barrels a day on average next 
year from 68. 1 million barrels so far in 1 994. 

Fast-growing demand will help under- 
pin oil prices for the rest of this year and 
may push the Organization of Petroleum 
Exporting Countries into increasing pro- 


duction levels wheo it meets a gain in No- 
vember, analysts said. 

Low crude oil stock levels also should 
support oil prices with the approach of the 
Northern Hemisphere's winter. 

"We're strongly of the opinion that the 
market needs more oil from OPEC.” Steve 
Terry of London consultancy Petroleum 
Economics Ltd. said. 

Brent crude oil for September delivery 
rose seven cents, to S18.S1 in late London 
trading, more than $6 above its lowest 
levels in February. 


QVC Expected to Take Bid 

cable-shopping channel from Comcast Corp. ana ww . 

two cable companies do not already own* , ho ^ he 

If to ^proposal goo |«w to 

would not work for someone else, ^^ whic i? W0U id give • 
company. He has a 12.5 percent stake m QVC wrnen wou u 

him roughly $ 100 million in profit if the mer ®“^ L _ 3erat0 r°and 
ComSS: America’s thiid-Iargest “ble«sM 
Libeny. an affiliate of to biggest operator. 

Inc. last month offered S44 a share for the pomon of g v i- tney 
did not own. Comcast and Tde^mmnmcauons tad 1 been neluc 
tant to raise their offer because they did not believe tney 

competing against other bidders. . djii-, w- 

With no bidding war to help push up the pnee, Mr- 
been seeking other means of sweetening the offer. 

Unitrin and Gupta Take Poison Pills 

CHICAGO (Bloomberg) — Unitrin Inc. and Gupta Corp. on 
Thursday approved “poison pill” plans to fend ofr hostile take- 
over bids. '■■■ . , 

Unitrin in an effort to sour a J2.6 billion takeover by American . 
General Corp., decided to issue one preferred stock purchase nght 
for each common shame on Aug. 17 if any one shareholder buys 
more than 15 percent of its stock by that rime. , 

The plan is designed to make acquisition of the insurer ana 
consumer lender prohibitively expensive. 

Gupta separately adopted a- similar plan after Oracle Systems 
Corp. disclosed its interest in buying the database software maker. , 

First Chicago Will Cut 600 Bank Jobs 

CHICAGO (Bloomberg) — Fust Chicago Corp. will cut 600 
jobs as part of an effort to reorganize its community banking . 
business, the company said Thursday. 

The banking company said it expected to save S20 million a 
year before tax, starting next year, by cutting the cost of operating 
its retail network. The network includes 80 branches of Fust 
National Bank of Chicago. 

Quaker Oats Profit Slips by 6-3% 

CHICAGO (Bloomberg) — Quaker Oats Co. said Thursday __ 
that its profit from operations in. its fourth quarter, which ended . 
June 30, fell 6 j percent because of a poor European economy and 
high inflation in BraziL J 

The maker of cereals and Gatorade sports drinks said it had - 
operating profit of $87 J million, after net income of $93.4 million 
a year earlier. Results were affected by a .$72.8 million restructur- 
ing charge. Revenue rose to $1.62 billion from $1.55 billion. 


Some OPEC delegates say the group wiH 
probably need to raise its overall output 
ceiling in the first quarter of 1995 merely to 
keep supply in line with demand. 

"Without a doubt, we’U need to raise the 
ceiling since we, especially Saudi Arabia, 
are not keen for sky-high prices which 
would stum economic growth,” one Golf 
OPEC delegate said. 

“OPEC can’t afford to let things get out 
of hand on the price front,” said Leo 
Drollas, chief economist at the Center for 
Global Energy Studies. 


Xtra!: Xerox Logo Changes 

; New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Advertising connoisseurs savor the kick- 
offs of corporate image campaigns Hke the uncorking of fine, 
and not so fine, wines. 

On Thursday, a new vintage was decanted: Xerox Corp. 
announced it would no longer be Xerox Corp. In all advertis- 
ing, packaging, corporate c ommuni cations _ and stationery, it 
will now be known as the Document Company — - Xerox. 

“Xerox is who we are,” said Paul A. Allaire, c h a irm an and 
chief executive, “The document is what we do. This new 
signature embodies that understanding and strengthens the 
connection.” • 

Investors may like to know, however, that it is still incorpo- 
rated as- Xerox Corp. 

Replacing the decade-old Xerox banded graphic, the new 
Xerox icon win be a large rod X. 


to be known as more than brand X. the updated corporate 
signature is not amply a redesign but a new "identity system,” 
Mr. Allaire said. 





* 

V 


M 


4 


USE 


xr: i 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


O 

\ 


i 


Agones Francs I V— Aug. 4 
□oMPre*. 


Amsterdam 


ABN Amro Hid 
ACF Holding 
Aegon 
AHoW 
Akro Nobel 
AMEV 

Bob-Wnwnen 
C5M 
D5M 
Elsevier 
Fokker 
Gist-Brocades 
HBG 
Heineken 
Haagovens 


6150 62.90 
4470 4460 
10170 101.70 
4740 4780 
71870 71950 
7480 7740 
3970 39.10 
69.10 6958 
142.90 1*570 
169 16670 
1430 1410 
SD70 Mxfl 
299J0 29950 
23750 73850 
7490 7770 


Hunter Douglas 8140 7430 


IHC Caland 
Infer Mueller 
Inti Nederland 
KLM 
r.NP BT 
KPN 
Nediioyd 
Oce GrJnten 
Pokhaed 

Philips 

Polygram 
Robcco 
Rodamco 
Rot men 
Ffarento 
Royal Dutch 
Stark 
Unilever 
Van Ommeren 
VNU 


4040 4170 
si -jo m 
33-80 8370 
5480 5480 
50 49 JO 
5040 5050 

72.10 7240 

79 79 

5240 533 
5410 563 
8040 7940 
1)7.90 1183 
553 5540 
1203 12050 
88 87.90 
19950 1993 

50.10 483 

19490 196 

5250 5450 
1863 18750 


Walters/ Khmer 1203 120 

FOE. bade* j41 979 
Previous: mn 


Brussels 


AG Fin 

AhnonlJ 

Arbed 

Barca 

BBL 

Bekoert 

CBR 

CMB 

CMP 

Cocfcerlll 

Cobem 

Colrvyt 

Deihaire 

EledTabel 

Elecfraflna 

GIB 

SSL 

Gevoert 

Gtaverbel 

Immotael 

Kredieltnnk 

M owe 

peinfiM 

Powerfln 

Recticel 

Rayale Beige 

Sue Gen Banque 


2025 2625 
BOM 7000 
4790 4810 
2590 2575 
4160 41X0 
27675 27B00 
12100 12300 
2500 2500 
2000 1950 
199 200 

6070 6070 
7450 7400 
1304 1304 
5950 5950 
3260 3305 
1450 1422 
4205 4155 
9940 9950 
5060 SOO 
3100 3100 
7110 7000 
1474 1490 
10559 10400 
3130 3190 
552 534 

5550 5570 
8490 8410 


Sac Gen Belgique 2325 2360 


Soflrta 
Soivov 
Tessendwta 
Trodebei 

uca 

Union MEnlere 
wagons Lira 


14525 14700 
16000 15775 
10675 10800 
10380 102S0 
24775 ILA. 
2585 2580 
NA 7430 


a Ef&n&8F :i7¥M 


Frankfurt 


AEG 

Alcatel SEL 
Alltanr Hold 
Altana 
Askg 
BASF 
Bayer 

Bay- Hypg bank 
Bay Veremsbk 
BBC 

BHF Bank 

BMW 

ComnKrebank 
ConNnentat 
Daimler Beta 
Deouraa 
Dt Babcock 
Deutsche Bonk 
DquqJqs 
D resdncr Bank 391 JO 
Fafamuetifa 312 
F Krupa Haesch 274 

Horoener 
Henkel 
HOCWfal 
HaeGtst 
Holimann 
Horien 
1WKA 
Kail 5olr 
Karstadt 
Knttnf 
KHD 

Kfaecmer Werxc 


1I5J0 187 

345 354 

2472 2505 
816611% 
1020 1015 
mm 330 
36840 7733 
419 424 
45530 461 
755 730 

390 390 
869 87650 
33750 340 

27150271 JO 
82650 834 
495 499 

2635025880 
74474450 
509 510 
393 
312 
223 


RWE 

Rhelrunefall 

Scherlng 

Siemens 

Thvssen 

Varto 

Veba 

VEW 

viog 

Volkswagen 

WeFla 

DAX.fadexj.2ll 

m 


ChnePrev. 

445 451 

330 330 

938 959 

696-50 69550 
311 313 

322 370 

52680527.50 
3K50 355 
48750 492 

517 520 

1027 1033 


Helsinki 

Anner-Yhlwna 
Enso-Gutzeit 
htutitamakl 
VLOP. 

Kymmene 
Metro 

Nokia 
Pahlola 
Repolo 
Slack mann 


125 

124 

4X40 

4X80 

178 

180 

1000 

1050 

125 

123 

175 

I7D 

512 

515 

670B 

73 

101 

98 

220 

220 


Hong Kong 

Bfc East Ask) 32.40 3260 
Camay PocHIc 1175 1X75 
Cheung Kang 38J0 36.10 
China Light Pwr 39.70 4040 
Dairy Farm Inn 1145 1145 
Hang Lung Dev 1450 1+50 
Hang Seng Bank 5550 55 

Henderson Land 4050 4050 
HK Air Ena. 4&60 <ojo 
HK China Gas i*40 ijjd 
HK Electric 2155 ZU5 
HK Land 21 JS 3D.9S 

HK Realty Trust 2150 J15S 
HSBC Holdings 96 95 

HKawngHm 11.90 1155 
HKTelBCOmm 15.95 15 l 75 
HK Ferry 1SJ0 1X95 

Hutch Whamooo 36.10 35-70 
Hyson Dev ZJ.15 2X9S 

Janfliw Main. 61.ri 61 JO 
Jardlne Sir Hkf 7985 29.75 
Kowloon Motor 15.10 1650 
Mandarin Orient 10JO 1065 
Miramar Hold 71-35 21.40 
New world Dev 25-70 2145 
5HK Props 52 51 

Slew* 123 112 

Svrire Pec A 65-50 6*50 
Tol Cheung Pros 1X40 1ZS5 
TVE 387 165 

Whorl How 31 JO 31 JO 
Wing On Co Inti 11.95 UJO 
Wlnsor ind. 11JS 11 J5 


Johannesburg 

23 23J0 


Unae 
Lulitwnu) 
MAN 

Mannesmann 

Meitufaeseir 

MwnchRueck 

Porsche 

Preussng 

PWA 


9» 930 

1LM 

■« 

UI13^ 

163 157 

22X80 21 

449 450 

451 JO 452 
2082ISJ0 
2985 2990 
845 B45 
478J0 476 
245 247 


AECI 
Altecti 
Anglo Amer 
Barlpws 
Blwaor 
Buffals 
Powers 

Drietanteln 

Gencor 

GF5A 

Hannonv 

Hlgtivekl 5 lee) 

Kloof 

NedhankGro 
RamJtantBln 
Rusnlat 
SA Brews 
SI Helena 
Sosoi 

western Den 


118 120 
252 353 
34J0 34 

965 9 JO 
NA 47 
118 114 
6150 66 

1U5 1US 
126 126 
25 25J0 
31 31X5 
57 58 

33-50 33-50 

49 4&25 

icsn ioo 

87Jfi 87 JO 
45 45 

2875 28J0 
194-50 194 


London 


AObeyNotl 

Allied Lyons 

ArtoWlwins 

Aravll Group 

Ass Brir Foods 

BAA 

BAe 

Bank Scotland 

Barclays 

Bass 

BAT 

BET 

Blue Circle 
HOC Group 
Boots 
Bawater 
BP 

Brit Airways 
Brit Gas 
Brl! 5 fad 
Brit Telecom 
BTR 

lewire 

Codbury Sch 
Co radon 
Coats Vlveffa 
Comm Union 
Council lets 
ECC GrouP^ 
Enterprise Oil 
Eurotunnel 
Flsons 
Forts 


194 

5JH 

288 

278 

XVI 

9J3 

5.12 

183 

&S6 

5-43 

4j47 

1.18 

111 

784 

588 

4JS8 

483 

U1 

179 

1J6 

373 

187 

486 

4J4 

105 

220 

543 

5-37 

388 

421 

125 

146 

235 


198 

X90 

XW 

270 

191 

973 

5.12 

183 
580 
585 
481 
1.19 
321 
783 
5J3 
481 
4.10 
441 
XBO 
1J8 
STB 
189 
4J5 
*A7 
18 8 
XI 7 
5.50 
143 
195 
*44 
130 

184 
230 



CfaM Prev 

GEC 

209 

1*4 

Gem Acc 

4 

5.VS 

Glaxo 

6.02 

Xlk 

Grand Met 

XI9 

433 

GRE 

105 

1J« 


405 

401 

GUS 

X72 

SJE 

Hanson 

205 

1M 

HlUxdown 
HSBC Hltfas 

104 

8JD 

108 

802 

ICI 

454 

834 

Inchcaoe 

475 

406 

Kingfisher 

5.09 

5.16 

Lodbroke 

108 

1^ 

Land See 

60S 

X7T 

Laparle 

7.93 

7.94 

Lasmo 

101 

135 

Legal Gen Grp 

467 

404 


506 

501 

Marks Sp 

06 


ME PC 

4.74 


Nall Power 

400 


NatWest 

4J2 


NlhWst water 

501 

505 

Pearson 

600 

407 

P&O 

XBfi 

60/ 

Pllklngtan 

1.94 

103 

PowerGen 

503 

504 

Prudantlal 

112 


Rank Ora 

4.10 


Reckltt Col 

£20 

6.18 

Remand 

5-43 

504 

Reed Inti 

on 

7.M 

Reuters 

4.96 

402 

RMC Groipp 

9.9 7 

9JO 

Rolls Rovce 


1.98 

Rothrnn (unit) 


X72 

Royal Scot 

306 

RT2 

X72 

801 

5alnsburv 

403 

4J0 

Scot Newan 


537 

Scot Power 

XBO 

5ecrs 

1.17 

130 

Severn Trent 

508 

535 

Shell 

733 

7J7 

Siebe 

X15 

Lit 


\S7 


SmlthKtlne B 

403 

431 

Smith IWHl 

407 

406 

Sun Alliance 

119 

321 

Tale & Lvle 

405 

405 

Teaco 

200 

238 

Thom EMI 

1000 

1000 

Tomkins 

135 



205 

105 


1007 

1009 

Utd Biscuits 

« 

134 

Vodatone 

1.95 

War Loan 3V] 

4138 

4235 

Wellcome 

005 

6l74 

Whitbread 

530 

531 

williams Hdgs 

3J0 

306 

Willis Corroon 

101 

104 

F.T. 30 hydexj J 

K10O 


Ptwtw : 3toS 

<: 315000 


l Madrid 

BBV 

3155 3155 

I Bco Central Him 2730 7755 

Banco Santander 5380 5380 

Banes to 

1(05 1020 

CEPSA 

3330 3340 

Drooadra 

2210 2200 

Endesa 

5340 6240 

era os 

100 183 

Iberdrola 

m 903 

RcpsoI 

4245 4235 

Taaaoaiera 

3700 3850 

Tefatorrica 

1X55 1855 

s.E. General index : jij_77 

Prevtoos : mor 


I Milan I 

Boned Comm 

4760 4760 

Bastes 1 

158 160 

Benetton group 

23050 TlflilO 

Dgo 

1100 1106 

C(R 

2X70 2435 

Cred liai 

■ : ftLU.J 

Enlchem 


Ferlbi 

2000 2015 

Ferlln Rte 

1240 1240 

Flat SPA 

6920 6965 


MSS 1875 

Generali 

42400 42000 

IFI 

28500 28800 

IFIL 

6730 6710 

ifaicem 

13000 13240 

i largos 

5550 5585 

itafmabinore 

F iTYT^i 1 

AAedtotKkKg 

E] 

Mord«flson 

IrT 1 ' V ^f 1 

Olivetti 


Pirelli 


RAS 

r-fi | .'t- r . '. J J 

RlnaacEnle 

IflV.-'ltn Y.l 


4190 4185 

San Pat® Torlns 

9520 9690 

SIP 

4595 4570 

SME 

3790 3875 

5nla 


Standa 


Slot 

5330 5330 

Tore Atal Risp 

29)50 30J50 

MIB Index ; 1144 


Previous : il61 


Montreal 1 

Alcan Aluminum 

35*8 3X25 


23*8 3403 

Bail Canada 

42 46 

Bambaidter B 

19U. 19J8 

Combfar 

18 18 

Cascades 

5 7 JO 


Oomlnion Text A 

Donohue A 
FCA InH 
MacMillan Bl 
Natl Bk Canada 
Power Coro. 
Provtoo 
Quebec Tei 
Quebecor A 
Quebecor B 
THeglobe 
Vldeatron 


7U 
12V. 1X63 
440 440 
184k 1088 
81k 875 
19V. 1988 
6 6.13 
1918 1988 
18Vt 1845 
18U 
19 VS 1888 
124*1 1X38 
199987 


Paris 


Accor 477 691 

Air Ltaukte 813 830 

Alcatel Abfham 645 658 


27X80 273-40 
499 505 

1313 1340 
255.10 261.90 
634 632 

859 865 

9091 2 OSS 

23040 23480 
11110 114 

1449 1466 

330 330 

408 415 

42370 42640 
1075 TO 
583 589 

466.90 46340 
5V4 5ftL 
Lafarge Canaee 45X10451.70 
Leo rand 6530 6750 

Lvon. Eau* 541 553 

Orral(L-) 1240 1252 

l—VJVLH. 

Morra-Hachette 119.90 11740 
Midietln B 256 257 )0 

Moulinex 12*126-60 

Paribas 39XB0 J97J0 

Pechlney Inti 170 17030 
Pernod-Rlcard 34X40 34770 
Peugeot 861 864 

Ptnoull Print 9*7 99) 

Radiol ectmlaue 531 529 

Rh-Poulenc A 141 jo 13sj» 


Axo 
Bancalre ICie) 
B1C 
BNP 

Bauygues 
Danone 
Car relour 
C.C.F. 

Cerus 
Chergeurs 
Clnmnts Franc 
OubMed 
EK-Aaultolne 
Euro Disney 
Gea Eau* 


Raft. St. Louis 
Sanetl 

Salnl Gobaln 
S^.B. 

Ste Generate 

Sue: 


163* 1640 
964 945 

6M 694 

558 5*9 

am 612 

27X60 27580 


Thomsan-CSF 16970 17X20 


Total 

UA-P. 

Valeo 


319 320.40 
156 15880 
28X60 28X10 


&& ssr.i.is^ 5 


To Oar Reader? 

Sao Paulo stock 
prices were not 
available for this 
edition because of 
technical problems. 


Singapore 


Cerefias 

8 

70S 

OtvDev. 

7.1U 

7 JO 

DBS 

1100 

1130 

Fraser Nttavs 

17.10 

17.10 

Genllna 

11/0 

I3M) 

GoUen Hope Pi 

zn 

2.74 

ho® Par 

33! 

132 


XI0 


inchcaws 

50U 

500 


10.90 

1630 

KLKepang 

180 

176 

Lum Cheng 

10/ 

109 

Mataron Banks 

905 

935 

3CBC foreign 

14J0 

1420 

3U8 

600 

6J5 

SUE 

80S 

9 


I1JW 

10.90 

Shangrlla 

535 

530 

51 me Darby 

430 

430 

5IA fareign 

1100 

1190 

5'pareLand 

700 

/.4U 

5 'no re Press 

16 

1X10 

Sine Steamship 

414 

418 


ISO 

350 

Strolls Trading 

152 

158 

JOB fareton 

1410 

1410 

JOL 

127 

227 

5 traits Times ind. 

2271.17 

Prevtoos : 2247.13 




Stockholm 


6980 70 

630 631 
173 173 

9880 9980 
393 393 
*27 *24 


Esseile-A 

NandetebanKen 

investors 

Norsk Hydro 

Procardia AF 

Sandvlk B 

SCA-A 

5-E B oaken 

Skandta F 

Sknrreka 

SKF 

Store 

Trelleborg BF 
Volvo BP 
Affoersva widen : 
prevtaus : mijri 


C hue Prev 

105 I0t 
103 IDS 
164 183 

257 25780 
120 111 
120 123 

120' 119 
48 4880 
116 110 
150 168 

158 151 

426 426 

IBB 189 

772 769 

197581 


Sydney 

9.18 970 

474 4.17 
1980 19-44 

389 3.59 
0-90 082 

475 425 
5-09 5.13 

19.20 19 

487 483 
1.14 1.14 
185 185 

1170 1172 
1.95 175 
X99 X93 
11 JO 1172 
888 881 
4.40 4J5 

3J8 383 

488 452 
X98 X92 


Amcor 
ANZ 
BMP 
Boral 

Bougainville 
Cdles Mver 
CgnoJco 

C5R 

Fosters Brew 
Goodman Field 
ICI Australia 
Magellan 
MIM 

Ndl Aust Bank 
News Caro 
Nine Network 
N Broken Hill 
poc Dunlap 

Pioneer Inn 

Nmnay Poseidon 122 X25 
OCT Resources 187 186 
Scoter. X95 X93 

TNT X67 X6I 

Western Mining 776 7X1 
westoac Banking 485 4*2 
wooaslde 473 478 

AH onflaarles Index : 208X50 
Prsetoas ; 107X30 


Tokyo 


Akal Electr 431 481 

Asani Chemical 778 772 

ASUhlGtoa 1200 1220 

Bonk ol Takva 1560 1550 

Briageslone 1&SB 16*0 

Canon 1730 1740 

Casio 1240 1250 

Dai Nippon Prtnl 1900 1910 

Dahtva House 1*90 1500 

Datwa Securities 1620 1640 

FcmuC 4440 4400 

Poll Bank 2300 7300 

FUH Photo 2230 2260 

FUlltSu \OtO 1060 

HW«*I 1020 1010 

Hitachi Cable 5« 9tto 

1740 1720 
5260 5300 
718 721 

740 726 

97S 980 
2600 2630 
412 40B 

1210 1220 

95B 954 

735 74» 

7470 7333 


110 Yokodo 
Itocnu 

Japan Airlines 
Koilma 
Konsal Power 
Kawasaki Steel 
Kirin Brewery 
Komatsu 
Kubota 

Kvoarrn ... v 

MdfSu Elec Inds 1740 TO 
Matsu Elec wks 1140 1150 
Mitsubishi Bk 2tm 2600 
Mitsubishi Kosel 
AUfavbishl Elec 

Mitsubishi Htrv 

Mitsubishi Coro 1200 1180 
Mitsui and Co 8S3 056 
Mitsukasht 
Mitsumi 
NEC 

NGK insutalors .... 

Nikka Securities 1240 1M) 
Nippon KaBaku IBM NU0 
Nippon Gil — -- 


535 515 

690 694 

812 804 


1850 MW 
17« 1750 

nta inn 

1070 WTO 


759 756 
361 353 

651 647 

788 790 

2270 ZJQQ 
86ZJaB610o 


Nippon steel 
Nippon Vtnen 
Nbsan 
Nomura Sec 

NTT 

Olympus Dot teal 1170 1180 
Pioneer 2900 2B70 

Rfaoh 

Santo Elec 
SMTP 
Shtmazu 
Shinelsu Chem 
Sony 

SuffiltemaBk 
Sumitomo Cheat 
Sum I Marine ™ 

SumlfamoMefal 316 310 

TaHJICoro 665 670 

Tabha Marine 
Takeda Qt+m 
TDK 
TeMln 

Tokyo Marine 

Tokyo Elec Pw ™ 

Tappan Printing 1490 1400 

Toray Ind. 778 776 

Tcshtbo 
Toyota 
Yamahdti See 
a; x HU. 


934 940 

577 579 

1SH 1800 
739 736 

2110 2090 
3900 9940 
2010 2010 
548 538 
944 see 


814 824 
1230 1230 
4470 4500 
590 SSS 
1270 1290 
3010 3000 


779 787 

2140 2140 
891 9QC 


Toronto 


AMtiu price 
Agnlca Ernie 
Ah- Canada 
Alberta Energy 


IHi IBU 
16W 1646 
7 7 

21V. 21V 


Am Borrtck Res 31Vk 30*4 


BCE 
Bk Nava Scut to 
BC Gas 
BC Telecom 
Drama lea 
Brunswick 
CAE 
Camdev 
CIBC 


469k 
25*6 2596 
15 18*6 
24*6 24 

027 0X6 
10 10 
7*6 7V4 

S 4M 

30*6 30VS 


Canadian PocHIc 22Vj 73 Mi 


Can Tire A 
Cantor 
Cara 

CCL Ind B 
Gneptek 
Com Inca 
Conwest Expl 
CSAMgt A 
Dofasco 
Dvfex A 

Echo Bay twines 
Equity Silver A 
FCA Inti 
Fed ind A 


11 1146 
21k. 

390 X95 
946 9*6 
5Vn 546 
2246 
24 24V5 
9Vr 9*6 
2U6 2I*k 
074 gjs 
15*6 15k. 
0-81 OJB 
4-20 430 
7Vk 716 . 
Fletcher Oxiii A 1716 17*6 


FPI 
Genlra 
Gulf Cdo Res 
Hees Inti 


5V» 5*4 

042 042 
6 5*6 
12*6 1216 


Hemfa Gtd Mines 17*1 1246 


Hgmnger 
Horsham 
Hudson's Bov 
Imasco 
loco 

IPL Energy 
Jan nock 

Lobatl 
LobtawCO 
Mackenzie 
Magna InH A 
Maple Leaf 
Ataritime 
Mark Res 
Matson A 
Noma Ind A 
Norma Inc 
Noronda Forest 
Norton Energy 
Nthn Telecom 
Novo Caro 
Oshawa 
Pagurln A 
Placer Dome 
Paco Petroleum 
pwa Coro 
Ray rock 
Renaissance 
Rogers B 
Rothmans 
Royal Bonk Can 
Sceptre Res 
5 coirs Hasp 
Seagram 
Sears Can 
Shell Can 
Sherrltl Gordon 
SH LSyst emhse 

Soul I mum 

Saar Aerospace 
Stefca a 
T olbnian Energ 
TeckB 


17*t T2Vj 
1816 1846 
25V6 35*6 
36 36 

38*1 38A 
»<<. 3016 
16*6 16*6 

”2 3? 

20*« 21 

0*6 8*6 
55V6 5766 
1? Ufa 
23V, 23 V. 
9*6 9*6 
21W 2116 
6 5*6 

25*6 2SW 
llAw 11*6 
16*6 I6fa 
44 46*6 
12*6 17W 
19*6 19V, 
3 JO 3*fc 
28 W 20*6 
Ok. +6 
CUB 0J5 
14fa 15 
29*6 J»*k 
20*6 20 1. 

77 78 

Z7*m 28’-. 
I2*b 13 
BW 8 
42*6 43*6 

B 7*6 
4346 42k. 
12*6 12*6 
7*6 7*6 

17V. 17 

15*6 15V. 
BVr 8*6 


Toronto Domn 
Torstor B 
Transatta util 
TnmsCda Pfae 
Ttllon Ffal A 
Trlmac 

Ufacorp Energy 
T5E 318 ta*tek ; 4ZM.18 


Zurich 


Adia I till B 2S0 250 

Aknutsse B new 707 700 

BBC Brwn Bov B 1270 1260 

... ... 

Etoktrows 
Fischer B 
Interdlscovnt B 
Jet atoll B 
Landis GvrR 
MotvenplcfcB 

Nestle R Iin> 

OeriHs. Buehrle R 131 133 
Paroesa HW B 1520 1540 
RocneHdgpc — 

Sofra Reauoilc 
Sandoz B 
Schindler B 
Sutler PC 

Survohlance B ««. 

Swiss Bnk Coro B 407 400 
Swiss Reinsur R 571 572 
Swissair R 780 765 

UBS B 11B4 1107 

wtntonhur B 700 715 
ZurWtAssB 1308 1315 


573 17ft 
m }S7 3U 
1500 1540 
21® 2150 
930 910 
800 800 
412 419 
1187 1188 


5510 5588 
116 115 
718 715 

7850 7950 

JS wo 

2M§ 2150 


Ifs easy fo aberib t 
b Grant Britah 

I^if fcg ■ ■ 

pw nv nrMtm wn 

0 800 89 5965 


U.S. FUTURES 


VnAnoridelhtH 


Aog. 4 


Season Season 
KCgti Low 


Open , Hfah Low Ck»e Che OpJnt 


Grains 

WHEAT (CBOT) s. PH Burak man- dfaen per 6um*i 
JJPm 103 Seo94 X33 133V. 380% X32*k^OL014k 15.950 

XM 3J» Dec 94 145V. 147 X43V. X46 —101% 34.KM 

XM'i X77 Mar 95 3J2V, 3J3'A 380*6 38216-001*5 8871 

3-56 V, 114*1 MOV 95 344W X45 X43 X45 -001 BC 

147*6 XT1 Jgl9S 130 130*6 139 130 -002*6 1095 

Dec 95 140 — OD2V. 7 

ESL soles 9000 WecrsLsafe* 15030 
wed’s oocn kit 61J5B up inss 
WHEAT (KBOTl UNNeMrun-MUlIKrMIM 


X55V, 


303% 

301 

i42ft4— an 


160 

X12WDK94 309 

ISO 

307V, 

309W-JUDW 17017 

159V: 

125 Mar 95 Xffl'-l 

151 

30815 

1505, -001 

SAB 

3099: 

321 1* Mov 9S 



303 * 0J10Vj 

413 

133*6 


321 W 

3 39 

130 -OOO 


X33 

329 Sen 95 



324 

1 


Dec 95 



301 

1 


prj 

29V* 

CATTLE 


h. 


F J 

22ft* 

7187 


TOJZ 

7200 

7070 

7107 






7180 

7110 

7X77 


20fa 

7430 

5720 Dec 94 

71JS 

7120 

71.15 

71 JQ 


244. 

7425 

67.90 F® 95 

7037 

7090 

7022 

7020 


TO 

7X10 


71.45 

7X00 

7101 

71.97 

TO 

17V- 

a?Jfl 

6600 Jui 95 

A55 

<900 

A4M 

60*5 


410 




6000 

<721 



14ft* 


13051 wad’s, sales 150)1 


i-sr 

lfe 

wetrsotonkit 76071 

UP 1631 




Esl safes ha wed’s, sales 50*4 
wed's open int 38817 oh 101 
CORN (CBOT) unbuiHniwn.«fe,wMiM 
192*6 114*6 Sep 94 114*6 115V. X14 XI5 —00016 41068 

X77 117 DecM 2 IBM 119'A 1)7*6 219 -000*6132018 

20166 286 Mar 95 287V. 288 286% X2B -O0OK. 2WM 

201 28?9t May 95 284 284*6 283 134 -D.U1 9066 

205*6 286*', Jut 95 2J8 288*6 282 2J8'4-«4I*» S.903 

280*6 139 5«p95 300 300 289 2-40 -0.0116 600 

163 285*6 Dec 95 2016] 202 '6 201 142 4.70 

Jill 96 . 156*6-001 

Est sales 33000 Wrd'L safes 26814 
Wed-SOPennt 213868 ah 497 
SOYBEANS (CBOT) U00toisMikjm-<MmiMrtuM 
785 581 *6 Aug M 575 576*6 571 ’« 572 —005*6 9.7T3 

708*6 560 *6 Sep 94 542 56SV. 540*6 14! -005*6 15165 

581 Nov 94 586*6 55H 553*4 554*6-004*6 74.137 

540 Jan 95 564*6 565*6 561 562*6-004*6 10038 

589 MorfS 573 574 57DU 571*6—004*6 4086 

585”,Mav93 500 500*6 577’6 587*6 -006 3066 

5JB'jJul95 502*6 503*6 500 V. 507*6-003*6 5.751 

579 Aug 95 504 504 503 503 -000*6 123 

577 Sep 95 SOS 581 589 580 17 

SuWhNtwn 50} 5M 5J3 503 -OfllW 3082 

MW 599 -000*6 

Eslsoku 3X000 wed's. scCes 531073 
Wed’s oaen ini 135078 UP 9074 
SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOT) Kpkn- Aden per Hn 
223JM 173.90 Aug 94 17400 17500 173.40 17300 -180 9.933 

l720OSes94 17X80 17X80 17X10 17X70 — XT0 1X991 

171800094 17X20 17X70 17090 17100 -1.90 1X134 

17100 Dec 94 17X40 17X90 17X60 17X70 —7.50 31,259 

17X100x95 17120 17300 171 JO 17100 —280 4.136 

17380 Mar 95 174 JO 17580 17X00 17X00 —700 4.798 

I74J0Mov95 I75J0 17400 I7AIJ0 I7AI0 — 2-SB MB 

17X5004 « 177 JO 177 JO 17538 17530 -140 1.432 

J78J)0 Aug 95 177 JO -I JO 112 

T7B.Q0 Sep 95 I77JB — 1 JO 14 

Est safes 17.HW WedV safes 18060 
weersaocnH 83024 ua 90* 

SOYBEAN oa. (CBOT) 40000 m- Man p+ mbs. 


7J7V, 

704 

705 
705V. 
7.06*6 
594*6 
500 
550*1 


71000 
207 JO 
20900 
707 JO 
707 JO 
20700 
;to.oo 
181 JO 
icxoa 


3X65 71 AS Aug 94 2300 34.10 9349 

3X34 7X40 Sep 94 2180 2601 2340 

29J4 2X10Od94 2385 2X74 TUB 

7ft® 22jOODec94 2388 2X48 2380 

7X55 2245 Jan 9S 23J3 2 145 2X84 

2X30 2X93 Mar 95 2385 2145 2385 

2005 2X93 May 95 2X40 27L4S 2X25 

2705 23004495 2385 7140 2180 

27 JO 2X95 Aug 95 2125 2125 2385 

M85 2X95 Sep 95 2180 2380 ZL10 

2X10 211000 93 

2100 2200 Dec 95 

Estste HA Wed'S. sete 1X980 
warsoeenini 9X399 on 347 


240* 

2X9* 

2172 

23JB 

2XJR 

2X35 


-084 5040 

* 0.15 22.586 
.008 1X105 
-O0S rj<a 
—005 4JM 
—006 4J72 
2X33 -001 3J60 

zxjo — <u n ijk 
2X25 —007 144 

2X11 —a 16 49 

7205 —027 1 

2X75 -087 2 


Livestock 


FEEDER CATTLE (CMER) tt400fes.-car*ipwli 


71.10AUO94 1X50 8100 8X17 

71 00 Sop 94 79.12 sojo 7?.u 
7X950394 7B07 7902 7BJJ7 

7X40 NOV 94 7900 JJ.W 

72.95 JDi 95 7880 80.00 78JS 
7X25 MOV 95 7580 7X90 7X20 

72J8Mcr94 7440 »4" 

7245 Apr 96 7X90 76JS 7X90 
EH salts 1730 Wed’S, sales 1JB 
Wed's oaen kit 1U50 oil 342 
HOGS (CMER) «J00e»-Dwv>»»*» 

SUO 49.45AU094 43.53 4X25 CJ2 

390OW94 40J0 
3905 DK 94 4085 4185 40X7 

3800 FA 95 4030 4090 4025 
3805 Apr 9£ 3945 J99S .19 JO 
<125 Jun 95 4485 44.70 «8S 

4195JUI95 4480 4405 44.15 

4200 Aug 95 
3980 Od 95 

Est. safes 7J4S «wrt safes JJ02 
Wed’s oaen M 25806 ah 1654 
POflKBELUB (CMERJ JAM# 


ELOO 
81. JO 
6U5 

ton 

W.9S 

76J0 

8025 

76*0 


*3S 

50.50 

5080 

4880 

4740 

4500 

4X25 

4000 


8140 

met 

n& 

0045 

79.97 

7X90 

7725 

76J0 


4680 

4125 

4180 

4087 

3900 

4170 

44JS 

4285 

39.72 


26X5 AU) 94 29.02 
41 00 Feb 95 42.10 
4062 Mar 95 4150 
4280 Mov 95 
4385*695, 45« 


BS 
6005 
6080 
6115 
5U0 
5X25 

Ed. soles _ . . 

ww s open Inf B406 w W 


29J02 


2903 
4380 
44X0 4X50 

6600 45.90 


4)00 Aug 95 4X3 4*00 4X50 

1038 Wed'S sates 2J4B 


■fc 

29.03 
4405 
4480 
its as 
6600 


* 1.05 I6J33 
- a*) JX562 
r(U5 ixm 
f 030 9,7*3 
*QJ2 5JS6 
tO40 1,778 
>0.10 166 


•183 UU 
>180 1308 

* 145 1914 

•105 1,761 
*141 663 

• on 24 

"083 88 

•001 IS 


♦185 <873 
♦04ft 12,120 

•OJJ 5JS7 
+ 003 1.150 
*035 1.126 
• 050 <36 
+033 119 

24 
I 


+200 IJ41 

♦ 100 6870 

♦X00 596 

♦200 45 

•XU 0 

♦ 105 6 


Season Season 

Hah Low 


Wed's open H 


Open Hfeh Low Ckne Chg OpJnt 


SUGAR-W0RU1 11 (NC5E) I114HB 
1TJJ 


1240 

1X10 

1X06 

1X02 

11.90 

1100 

HJ6 


4J90C794 1100 
9.17MOT9S 110S 
HLS7MOV95 1140 
10901193 11J5 

10070095 1104 
1008 Mir 96 

11.56 May 96 


11.94 
1106 
1189 
11 J9 


1140 

1145 

1140 

1U5 

1106 


1103 

1103 

1106 

TIJ9 

11-5* 

rus 

1109 


+027 6X342 
+038 32010 
+082 70B 
+083 31017 
+882 1872 
+082 209 

+082 5 


Food 

COFFEE c (NCSE) 27J00 b.- tmn. am D. 

27400 MJDSeoW 21100 21X25 30670 30700 -XJD 17J36 

24485 77.10OC M 21X20 21X75 31040 31285 -100 13010 

2U0O 784ft MW 95 21 (JS 21085 31X75 3U« —180 5J03 

WM 8250 May 95 22000 2*000 219.90 21700 -100 1J46 

JJilB ujg Jut 95 31X00 -100 390 

•weiki 09J)O5Bo95 31900 —100 41 

s 5tw 8100 DK 95 22240 22240 22X50 22100 -100 SB 

Ejt. sofas 509* Wed’s, sdes X98S 


1530 1530 


1418 

1467 

1501 

1531 

isn 

un 

1*6 

1614 


Est.adas 21068 Wed's. safes UM 
wed's open W |OB02B up MO 
COCOA 0K5Q MmpifcuiptovM 
15«3 10JD3 h»94 135*6 U20 1375 

1500 1061 Dec 94 MM 1460 M27 

1605 1 077 Mar 95 1482. 1505 M63 

16H I078May9S 1511 ISIS 

)#00 1 335 04 75 1530 

UH 1215 Sea 95 

14X1 1890 Dec 95 

1676 1350 Mar 94 

Esl. safes 19,166 W*rs-H6es 16,511 
Wed's open fat 7X233 a« 573 
ORANGE JUICE (NCTN) UUMbfeomiiarB. 

13640 8405 Sep W 9640 9740 9580 97 

134-00 89.1DN0V94 10000 10U5 9X90 TM - 

T3Z40 9300 Jon 95 K04D T04J8 HRJB 10400 —080 3030 

12485 965DMar9S W6J0 107 JO 10600 W78S —(US X47B 

11485 
11900 
11140 
11X60 

ESL safes NA Wed'S, sriss X316 
Weffsooenln* 2X33* off <M 


-T 30331 
+136.147 
-3 O»0 
-4 2021 
-4 2J84 
-4 1.178 
—< <JS3 
-1 1080 


1240 
—030 3838 


97J»Atav9S 11000 

lion 

11000 T102S 

+030 

IS 

04395 

05600 Sep 94 00347 06357 

1010071495 11230 

11130 

112J0 11225 

+020 

236 

06406 

00590 Dec 94 04346 00350 

10500 Sep 95 


T142S 

+020 

10 

BA595 

0900 Jut 95 

ItXDONovH 


11425 

+020 

285 

00395 

O0395SOPH 

Jan 96 


11425 

+820 

# 

00595 

OJHOAtarH 


Season Season 
t#gh Urn 


Ooen Htoh Law aon Oh OpJth 


9X180 

954*0 

9*830 

91350 

9*888 

94020 

9X180 


+ 2042X768 
1 10 44X855 
337073 
245.970 
213.929 
14X372 
— 10I29J7T 
—1O1OS055 


+5 30082 
+ 11 2,537 
+19 M3 
+19 5D3 

+24 76 


Metals 

H GRADE COPPER (NCMX) wata-onnrh 
116.90 7190541. 96 107 JO T0BJH IdUO 10700 

11520 75JSD*C« HK.T0 10900 W740 10705 

llli) 76.90 Jan 95 1B7J0 

HIJO 7800 Fed 95 10705 

H3JO 7100 Mar 95 10X15 10X15 H7J3 10705 

11100 7685MayfS 10705 10705 10705 106J3 

11X50 7ftO0Jul95 10580 

m00 7580 Aug 95 10700 10X00 107.10 107.10 

nans 79.10 Sep « 10500 

11X05 £290(395 107 JO 10X25 107 JO W7JD 

11280 77. 75 Not. 95 107.90 10840 WJO 107.9D 

10900 HUODBC93 1*040 NB40 10440 1DUD 

10X00 8850 JanM 10300 

10X00 6270 Altar 96 10450 10640 10650 10100 

11040 JUKI Apr 96 HU0. 

MOV 94 mo 

107 JO 10X70 Jun 96 10600 

Esr.sries ittm wwxsfaes 1*472 
lAfetfscpenlnt 4X431 ah 254 
SILVER (NCMX) UBtergb-antiM'Iwi 


S970 

5640 

6040 

6064 

6100 

6U0 

etnn 

6120 

61X0 

5870 


5245 Aug 94 
376-5 Sep 94 5144 
Oct 94 

3000 Dec 94 5110 5215 

40IJ Jot 75 

41 64 After 95 3270 5330 
4180 May 95 5350 


5184 S07O 


5160 
5174 
51X9 
51X0 5344 

JB6J 
5300 5320 

5300 5370 


4200 All 95 5440 5440 6310 5420 

«05ep95 5610 5*60 54X0 54X5 

5»ODec?S 5560 55X5 5550 5574 

5750 Jan 96 5404 

5800 After 96 5678 

5S70AtarM 5715 

Jui 96 5800 

Est. safes 34000 Wetrs-sfaes 1X171 
Wcd’xapenaa 121 JOS up 837 
PLATINUM (NMER) nvn^Mnfeims. 

Aog 94 4D8J0 

Q}M mSOOdM 40700 41100 .40340 4MJ0 

43X50 J74J0JBO93 40900 41400 SOM 41U0 

4X900 JMJP0APT95 41 US 41400 41000 41600 

<2740 42740 JulftS ... 42000 

431J0 43&aoocr«S 40400 

Est. Mtes NA. wed's, safes X&51 
WmwiH 3«« HIT 1009 
Sftd? WO»WBt-(Wto.pfelW«L 

41500 361 40 Aug M 37X10 17800 37X40 37740 

38000 38580 Sep 94 STUD 

<1700 344000094 37800 38009 377 JO mio 

(Q640 3CUSDKM 38100 38X00. 3M40 38X10 

61109 1613) Fti> 95 385.00 38X70 38640 38600 

41700 36X50 Apr 73 . J3M 

4J8J0 Ml JO Jun W 39X00 39300 39X00 39280 

41250 30040 Aug 95 X9X20 

4D1000d9S 379 JO 

42900 40040DM95 40300 4051 4Q30O 483J0 

4I4J0 41 240 Fib 96 4B.10 

43X00 41X30 Apt 96 _ .41X98. 

flBBO 4lXB0JwW 41100 41440 81100 <1409 

EsLirtos 35.0W Wed’s, sales 3706!. 

Wed's open Int IS1.SH op 501 


+0175 28090 
+BJ0 12031 
+040 341 

+055 
+0J0 1541 
+040 1017 
♦050 M2 
+1-Q5 442 

+040 *21 

HUB 477 
+050 327 

+040 722 

+040 
+050 122 

+150 148 

♦ XS8 
+o4o m 


-414 
—07 7X707 
—07 

—0-9 25,930 
—02 
-09 X727 
—0.9 3018 
-49 3J69 
-09 441 

-09 XI 10 
-49 1 

-09 71 

-49 13 

—09 «3 


—UJO s 

— u» rune 
— aeo 2j27 
—400 1JB4 


+020 4033 



Financioi 

UST.BLL5 (CMBU iindfan poerwopa. 

960* 9X63 Sap 96 9589 9X43 9SJ9 950) +402 19, tot 

9XW 9X25 Dec 94 9689 *491 Y684 9689 +083 8006 

9585 91 91 M» 93 9444 9441 9441 9449 +085 2J48 

Jun 9$ 9X31 +002 . 1ft 

Es. sofes 3,929 WOTS, safes 1173 
W«P)CPenM 30 Ml up 231 

SYR. TREASURY (CBOT) $16MHfefe-Bfe6MnfeelMBCt 

110- 195102-12 Sra 94 104-285 UB-00 106G6 104-266- OH 179.125 
106-18 101-95 Dec *4 UM-03 19446 106-SI W6-0H- a . 5J9 
Efl-stUos 39400 w*ffx safes ■ SS.e-J 

Wws ooen kit 184084 oil 1489 

to YR. TREASURY (CBOT) UBXSOBfetf snAjamkiErtsaue) 

115- 0) 101-18 Sep *4 105-10- IBS- IT US^«2 MS-OS— 04 mjNS 

114- 21 100-2S DK 46104-07 W4-13 HMKD UK-94 — 04 21073 

111- 07 JOO-OS Mar9S ' WHO- -8* H 

105-22 99-20 Jun 95 . IIB-Ift— 05 X 

101-06 100-17 Sen 95 1M-27— 05 

Ed. tafas 69000 WfeTXKfap 6X84 ; - 

WecTs oaen int 2S10n ua 14B0 ” >•:•••-.•• 

US’ TREASURY RONDS tCBOT) oiMiiwPwiJMawtci 
H8-» 90-12 Sep 96 104-25 S86- 27 WWI 104-17- M 39000 

HUB *1-19 Dec 96 104-01 104-03 RO-20 108-36— 07 '4&X9 

116- » 98-20 Mar 95103-06 10301 NB4T IO«— £ 6,W» 

115- 19 90-12 Jun 95 102-1* WJ-W lOWS HD-13 — 07 

112- 15 97-20 Sap 93 101-26— 01 03 

HJ-14 97-14 Dec 95 W-0J- 07 SJ 

114-06 99-23 Mar 96 100-26— 07 - 40 

WO-M 96-13 Jun 96 • J 00-13— 07 T4 

Ed.saus 235000 WesTi soles 2W455 

Wed's open H 4*2009 up 2161 

MUMOPALHOIODS tmm iioo* rarawwotra „ 

«-17 16-13 SfeNR-lt 99-13 91-31 M-W - « 

91-17 87-71 Ota** . . .91-06 — .10. . ■« 

WLscfes 2000 Wed's, sefes 2069 
VfaTtWBH 2M39 UP 134 


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INTERNATIONAL BERAtD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 5, 1994 


Page II 


EUROPE 


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py. Brandon Mitcbener - 

Intamasitmat Herald Triune 

FRANKFURT — ; Economic 
statistics . released Thursday 
confirmed recent evidence that 
the German economy had tak- 
en a tom Jor the better.but fdl 
short of showing that the coun- 
try’s labor troubles had- raided, 
economists said. 

The government said season-, 
ally adjusted unemployment 
fdl in July and demand lor 
manufactured' goods grew in 
June. 

.Economists said Thursday’s 
statistics pointed to a strong 

thiid quarter. Sothc said they 

would revise their, growth pre- 
dictions for the year. 

“The dedihe in the job mar- 
ket seems to have, come to a 
stop,” said Bernhard Jag oda, 
president of the Federal Labor 
Office. . 

He held out little hope, how- 
ever, for a rapid revival in the 
labor market, noting that it 
typically reacts with' a delay of 
about six months to changes in 
the economy as & whole 

With a little more than two 
months to go until parihunenta- 
ry elections Oct 16, the statistics 
were welcomed by Chancellor 
•Helmut Kohl, whose standing m 
Dublin opinion polls has risen in 
step with the economy. 

Rudolf Kraus of the Labor 
Ministry said the latest statis- 
tics proved the conservative co- 
alition government’s economic 
policy "is on the right road,” 
while the mdepoadent lfb eco- 
nomics research institute raised 
its forecast for pan-German 
economic growth to 2 percent in 
1994 from a previous range 1J 
percent to 2 percent. 

Despite such sentiments, 
however, economists cautioned 
that it was far from dear that 
the current upturn would help 
the legions of unemployed. 

While the latest statistics con- 
firmed die economy was grow- 
ing, they also showed “not nec- 
essarily a boom, especially in the 
domestic economy” said Hans 
JSchd, an economist at DR1 
McGraw-Hill in Frankfort 

“Without domestic demand 
speeding up the domestic eodn-’ 
omy, the growth pace remains 
limited," he said. 

After adjustment for season- ' 
al factors, the number of West 
Germans without. jobs fell by 
about 20,000 in July. It was the 
second month in a row that un- 
employment had faBen, after 


rising steadily since .March 
1993. • 

- The overall jobless rate, 
which is based. on unadjusted 
figures, rose to 8.3 percent from 
.8 percent in June, 

. . Unemployment in the East, 
also unadjusted, rose to 

1.140.000 in , July .from 

1 .120.000 in June.'The icon’s 
unemployment xaie was 15.1 
.percent - 

Orders from manufacturers 
in the West, which economists 
consider an indication of where 
the economyis going, rose 22 
percent in June, largely as a. 
result of strong. - dfeuaSad for 
German capital-goods and ex- 
ports. 

Demand for German con- 
sumer goods ’feD 1 percent in 
the month, a reflection of Ger- 
man consumers’ continuing un- 
certainty about the economy. 


Michelin Man Travels Incognito 


BtoanAag Business News 

CLERMONT-FERRAND, France— 
With a cloak of seoccy worthy of the 
Cold Wax; Micheiu SA has built a plant 
here that it refuses to say when it bqgan 
operating or how many workers it has. 
In addition, machinery at the plant 
ly which — in true 


wasbnihfayac 

CIA style — is jomily owned by the more 
titan 60 subsidiaries of Compagaie G6n- 
tade des EtabJusanents Mrchelin SCA, 
so that no info rmati on on it shows up on 
the annual repeals. 

Moreover, the plant’s manufacturing 
process gpes by a oode name, C3M, and 
the tires n makes are mixed among the 
ISO nrilfion others that Michdin nmket 
around the world, monier to confuse the 


gy and with less investment in factories. 

**11 an engineer walked through the 
factory, be a figure out what we were 
doing ni 30 seconds,” a Michdin spokes- 
man 


maH, the plant marks anew levd 
of secrecy far a company with such a 
firm tradition of privacy that for decades 
the only outsider allowed to visit its 
plants was Ghaxies de Gaulle. 

The reason for the secrecy, according 
to Mkhetin and industry analysts, is the 
plant's revolutionary ability to build 
quality tires in less time, using less ener- 


Michdlin's C3M process promises to 
combine the preparation, assembly and 

Hie reason for the 
secrecy is an ability to 
IraiM thra m less time, 
aging less energy and with 
less investment. 


curing of tires, in essence blending sever- 
al expensive steps inside a microwave 
and coming out with a cake. 

It is likely to be an industrialist’s 
dr eam ^ a labor union’s nightmare — 
a tire plant that occupies only 10 percent 
of the conventional space and employs 
perhaps 25 parent fewer workers. 

If the plant lives up to expectations, its 
technology could be used in Michdin’ s 


66 factories worldwide, at the cost of 
30,000 of its current 120,000 jobs over 
two decades. 

“You wonder who will be able to buy a 
car if no one has a job," said one union 
representative. 

“The thrust of this technology isn’t to 
cut jobs, although it win,” said Albert 
Halm, a chemicals industry analyst at 
the consulting firm EcoRan Internation- 
al. “It’s the continuity and flexibility of 
the process which could be revolution- 
ary." Mr. Hahn said he bad gleaned 
information from patents filed in various 
countries. 

The Michdin spokesman said the 
technology would be phased in as exist- 
ing plants were modernized. Although 
the plant here probably makes fewer 
than 1,000 tires a day, it could produce 
30 times that number, analysts said. 

The C3M technology win not immedi- 
ately propel Michdin to the top of the 
earnings charts, as the cost of replacing 
factories and laying off workers will be 
high. Two-thirds of Mkhdin’s 1993 net 
loss erf 3.67 bfltion French francs (5678 
millioa) was dne to the cost erf layoffs. 


Investor’s Europe 


Frankfurt 

DAX 

2300- — r 


London 

FTSE 100 Index 




Restructurings Hurt Drug; Finns’ Profits Euro Disney 

f Pleased 9 by 
Rights Issue 


' ,s *hinnr 

1994. 

try **1 nr 

1994 

*TTTX 

A M 

1994 

TTa. 

Exchange . • 

tode* * 

Thursday 

Close 

Prev. 

Close 

% 

Change 

Amsterdam 

AEX ' 

419.79 

420.68 

-0.36 

Brussels 

Stock index 

7,74043 

7,725.88 

+0.19 

Frankfurt • 

DAX . 

; 2,18336 

2,19892 

-0.71 

Frankfurt V. 

FAZ 

825.73 

825.81 

-0.01 

■ Helsinki... 

HEpC 

136621 

1,883.67 

+0.13 

London 

FkwnceS Times 30 2^81 .60 , 

2,48340 

■0D7 

London 

FTSE 100 

3,15030 

3,160.40 

-oil- 

Madrid 

General index . 

319.77 

321.09 

-0.41 

Milan * 

MIB 

1,14430 

1,161.00 

-1.46 

Paris ' 

CAC40 ■ 

2J3B6A6 

2,115.07 

-0.88 

Stockholm 

- Afearsuaeriden 

1,975.83 

1,979.42 

. -0.18 ■ 

Vienna 

Stock Index 

461-50 

460.87 

+0.16 

Zurich • \ 

SBS - 

931.41 

931.77 

-0.04 

He trees: neuters. AFP 


{mrmacj'-na! 1 bnU Tribune 

Very briefly: 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispmcha 

LONDON — Two of Eu- 
mes 
and 


rope’s largest. drug conxpa 
— Zeneca Group PLC 
RhGn e-Poulenc SA — said 
Thursday that restructuring 
charges, hurt first-half earnings, 
while a third. Sobering AG, 
posted a slight gain in first-half 
results. 

Zeneca sad ittook a restruc- 
turing charge of £100 minion 
($154 million) in the first half, 
holding pretax" profit to £351 
tniTKon, down from. £362 mil- 
lion in the 1993, first half. 

The British .company said 
£51 mfltion of the charge was 
for restructuring its agricultural 
seeds division and to dose some 
operations in Easton Europe. 


An additional £37 milli on was 
to restructure die specialties 
businesses, which indude or- 
ganic ami fine chemicals, bio- 
cides and colors. . 

Other agrochemical restruc- 
turings would cost £12 million, 
the company saicL Agrochemi- 
cals and specialty chemicals 
generate 56 percent of the com- 
pany's sales. 

Zeneca said its overall sales 
rose 3 percent in the. half, to 
£238 btiHon, led by an 8 per- 
cent increase in agrochemical 
sales and a 6 percent increase in 
pharmaceutical sales. 

Res tru ct uri ng charges also 
offset increases in sales for 
Rh&ne-Poulenc, wlfich said 
first-half profit fdl 69 percent. 


to 337 million French francs 
(S62 million). 

The company took restruc- 
turing charges of 904 million 
francs in ibebalf, 699 million of 
which were for hs 68 perceni- 
hdd U.S. pharmaceutical sub- 
sidiary. Rbdne-Pouleac Rorer. 

The charges offset an overall 
sales increase of nearly 6 per- 
cent, to 4238 billion francs. 
The company said revenue rose 
in all of its sectors, especially 
chemicals and fibers, which 
benefited from rising prices ear- 
ly in the year. 

Lower gains from asset sales 
and adverse foreign-exchange 
rates also dented its profit, 
Rhflne said. 

The company, which was pri- 


vatized last year, said ii expected 
its results for the whole of 1994 
to show a higher net profit than 
the 962 milli on francs earned in 
1993. 

Sobering was able to capital- 
ize on a 16 percent increase in 
revenue, posting first-half prof- 
it of 192 million Deutsche 
marks ($121 million), up 4 per- 
cent from the 1993 first half. 

Sales reached 2.34 billion 
DM, with Schering’s new multi- 
ple sclerosis drug Betaseron 
contributing 127 milli on DM. 

The company said the 
strength of the mark against the 
dollar and pound kept profit 
from matching the increase in 
revenue. 

( Bloomberg, AFX, Reuters) 


Most German Firms Wary of Low-Price Shares 


. • . AFF-Ead News 

FRANKFURT — Tbe vast 
majority of Germany’s 200 big- 
gest companies do mot plan or 
are reluctant to issue new shares 
with a lower initial buying 
price, in. line with a shift in 
.legislation intended to broaden 
stock ownership, a survey by 
BOrse Online magazine said. 

- The survey, released before 
its publication date of Friday, 


found that only Daimler-Benz 
AG, Sobering AG, Continental 
AG and Dyekerhoff AG have 
plans to issue new lower-priced 
shares or carry out a 10-for-l 
share .split. 

The four companies intend to 
present related measures for 
shareholder approval at their 
next annual meetings, the sur- 
vey said. 

Companies are allowed to is- 


sue shares with a nominal value 
of 5 Deutsche marks (S3), rath- 
er than the traditional 50 DM, 
under a law that took effect 
Monday. 

■ Allianz lists Holdings 
Allianz AG, Germany s larg- 
est insurer, disclosed Thursday 
that it held stakea of 5 percent 
in Bayer AG, 5 percent in Deut- 
sche Bank and 9.7 percent of 
Sobering AG as of June 30, 


Bloomberg Business News re- 
ported from Munich. 

The company also said that it 
held 5 percent stakes in Conti- 
nental AG. MetaDgesellschaft 
AG and AMB Aacbener & 
MQnchener Beieiligongs AG. 

Allianz said last mouth that it 
would disclose holdings of 
more than 5 percent in anticipa- 
tion of disclosure laws that will 
go into effect next year. 


Cawpded by Oar Staff Fran Despatches 

PARIS — Euro Disney SCA, 
which operates Euro Disney- 
land, said Thursday its recent 
rights offering had been 80 per- 
cent subscribed by the public 
and Walt Disney Co. 

The 5.95 billion French franc 
(SI billion) rights offering start- 
ed June 20 and ended July 11. 

“Given the current market 
conditions and the timing of the 
rights issue, the company is 
pleased with the level of sub- 
scription and the confidence ex- 
pressed by its shareholders.” 
the company said. 

In one of the biggest capital- 
raising operations ever seen on 
the Paris Bourse, Euro Disney 
created nearly 600 million new 
shares at 10 francs each. 

The issue allowed existing 
shareholders, including Walt 
Disney Co., which has a 49 per- 
cent stake, to subscribe to seven 
new shares for every two held. 

The response to the issue 
came as a relief to the theme 
park’s bankers that underwrote 
the public issue as pan of a 
restructuring plan. 

(AP, Reuters. Bloomberg) 


• KMnwort Benson Group PLC said first-half pretax profit rose 
83 percent, to £45.8 million ($70 million), as a surge in fees and 
commissions offset a slump in income from securities trading. 

• Allied Irish Ranlcg PLC said pretax profit in first half rose nearly 
14 percent, to 162 million Irish punts (S245 million), as provisions 
for bad debts dropped sharply and new lending in Ireland rose. 

• Luf thansa AG said its code-sharing agreement with UAL Corp/s 
United Airlines has resulted in an increase in combined bookings 
of 100,000 since it came into force ou June 1. 

• Bertelsmann AG plans to buy 73 3 percent of G. RiconO & Qx, 
the Italian record company, financial details were not disclosed. 

• Morgan OuctUe Co. said it sold its Holt Lloyd unit, which 
mak es consumer car care products, to a management group for as 
much as £72.9 million. 

• Denmark's average unemployment rate from the third quarter of 
1993 to the second quarter of 1994 rose to 12.6 percent from 1 1 .9 
percent in the preceding one-year period. 

• Betersdorf AG said group sales in the first half rose 1 0 percent, to 
267 billion DM, led by its skin care division: the company said 
operating profit for the full year should grow faster than sales. 

• BTP PLCs Mydrin Ltd. subsidiary has agreed to pay 30.6 

milli on Deutsche marks ($19 million) for Scheidemandel AG’s 
adhesives business. Bbomher^. Reuters, AP. AFX 


CRH Buys 4 U.S. Companies 

Blo omb er g Business Nen-s 

LONDON — CRH PLC. an Irish construction company, said 
Thursday it had acquired Tour road-building supply companies in 
the United States for $66 million. 

Acquired were Balf Co. in Hartford. Connecticut, which makes 
aggregates and asphalt; PJ. Keating & Co. in Boston, which 
makes asphalt; Lebanon Rock Inc. in Harrisburg. Pennsylvania, 
which operates limestone quarries, and Sullivan LaFarge in Alba- 
ny. New York, which operates quarries. 



AIRPORT: Kansoi International Flies Into Controversy Over Its Fees 


Cbetinoed from Page 9 
Kansai International that it risks slip- 
ping into a vicious circle, with high fees 
depressing traffic and revenue and exac- 
erbating the airport's need for higher fees 
to cover mounting debt. 

“Even the world’s most profitable 
group of airlines, in the Asia-Pacific re- 
gion. will be unable to cope with these 
expensive charges, much less generate a 
decent profit,” said Richard Stir land, 
director-general of the Orient Airlines 
Association. “Costs wlU deter airlines 
from starting new services to Osaka and 
deter passengers through higher ticket 
pnees.” 

Undeterred, Kansai International, 
which says it is a private company even 
though the government holds two-thirds 
of the shares and calls the shots, is play- 
ing hardball. 

Executives argue that high fees are 
unavoidable if the airport is to have any 
hope erf paying its debts. With no alter- 
native international airport in an eco- 
nomic region with output greater than 
Canada’s, airlines will either put up or 
risk being shut out as competitors build 
business in a massive market that has 
only begun to realize its potential. 

“This market is booming," said Satoru 
Kanazawa, director of the Kansai Inter- 
national Airport Division erf the Minis- 
try of Transport. “That’s why we’re not 
wilting to accept any big discounts.” 

For newcomers to Japan, though, the 
startup costs may be too great Although 
the new capacity provided by Kansai 
International, the only full-scale 24-hour 
airport in Japan, has given Tokyo the 
ability to grant rights for airlines from 1 1 
countries to serve Japan for the first 


lime, so far only one — Royal Nepal — 
has taken up the offer. 

Yulaka Nojiri. head of planning at 
Kansai International, said that the low 
turnout would cost the airport about 
$400 million a year in revenue it had 
expected to get That equals more than 
two-thirds of the airport’s annual $585 
million in interest payments. But he said 
that airlines would gradually increase 
flights, allowing Kansai International to 
meet its aggressive debt-payment sched- 
ule. 

Nonetheless, the airport has agreed in 
talks with the International Air Trans- 
port Association to lower its landing fees 
by about 5 percent, equal to the level at 
Narita, industry sources said. An an- 
nouncement is expected next week. 


But it is conceding little in other user 
fees, which remain 30 percent to 300 
percent higher than at Narita, until now 
the world’s highest. 

A solution could be found, both sides 
agree, if the Ministry of Finance gave 
more support for Japan’s airports. The 
ministry provides just 20 billion yen 
($202 million) for airports in Japan, a 
small fraction of that allotted to rivers, 
ports and farmers. 

Even building a second runway at 
Kansai International is impossible un- 
less the government contributes more. 
Kansai International's Mr. Nojiri esti- 
mates a second runway cannot be built 
for less than $12 billion — almost as 
much as has been spent so far. 


Counting on an Upgrade 


OSAKA, Japan — Its economy is big- 
ger than Canada’s or Spain’s. Its leading 
companies are among the world's best- 
known. But Kansai, or western Japan, 
has long felt second-class compared with 
Tokyo, the center of government, fi- 
nance, communications and just about 
everything else in Japan. 

With the long-awaited opening of 
Kansai International Airport in Septem- 
ber, though, people here are hoping 
things will chang e. 

The airport will provide an immediate 
r tut to the economy, helping western 
apan to grow twice as rapidly as the 
Tokyo region, known as Kamo. More 
important, planners hope it will help give 


2 


the region a new identity as the gateway 
to the rapidly growing nations of South- 
east Asia. 

“The airport will have a tremendous 
psychological impact,” said Satoshi 
Maekawa, senior researcher at the 
Daiwa Research Institute in Osaka. 

The new airport will relieve congestion 
al fiami, the city's current airfield; many 
international travelers, and much of the 
region’s industrial output, now have no 
choice but to travel first to Tokyo to 
leave the country. 

The airport should give a kick to doz- 
ens of projects designed to promote Osa- 
ka’s regional integration. 

—STEVEN BRULL 


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Time to Speculate? 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST S, 1994- 


Page 13 


ASIA/PACIFIC 





or 

On Record Volume 


replaced shares as the favorite 
. SHANGHAI — Qtlna’s re- investment reiride tins year as 
vitalized domestic stoci market stock market collapsed to 
surged (m record vohune Thors- record lows, a broker with 
■day amid speculation the gov- Shanghai Zhongnan Securities 
®mmeni was preparing to add said. Vdumeoa the bood xnar- 
to market-stim ulaii n g measures . ^ has dropped since Monday, 
it anoounced Saturday. vdien Onuses A. share zxuukeis 

staged a spectacular recovery, 

. “Investor enthusiasm has 

now f ully shifted to the stock 

market, and strong confidence 

In Shanghai, shares valued at hdped the index ctmtinue rising 

n\ today after stacscrins earns in 


reserved for Chinese buyers, 
rose 8.1 percent, while A shares 
in Shenzhen zaineri 2 “5 Tvrrwj^ 


J0.50 trillion yuan ($1 billion) 
changed hands, double the pro- 
vious volume record set in 
March. In Shenzhen, volume 
totaled 3.83 fasBioa yuan. 

Trades said they expected 
Chinese officials to meet with 
local brokerage concerns soon 
to discuss new measures to bol- 
ster both markets. 

■ According to the China Secu- 
rities newspaper, the China Se- 
curities Regulatory Commis- 

sioiris studying plans to supply 
loans to brokerage h o use s as 
part of its effort to spur invest- 
ment in the A share maHret*. 

The markets also got a lift 
from a shift, of funds out of 
bond markets and bank ac- 
counts, brokers said. 

• Much of the money was com- 
ing from the bond market, whki 


China Setts Out 
Yearly Bond Issue 
fore Deadline 


te after 


y after staggering gam* in 
the past three, days,” said Yan 
Y flnjdong . a broker with Guo 
Tai Securities in Shanghai 
■ Brokers said 
the market to 
Thursday’s gaire. 

Shang hai B share market, 
which is reserved for foreign 
investors, has already began to 
consolidate. Thai market de- 
clined 1.6 percent as investors 
took profits after five days of 
(Bloomberg, Reuters) 


Silk and Cashmere 'Wars’ 

Chinese Factories Fight for Supplies 


Roam 

. BEUING — The “wars” in 
China's rural areas for scarce 
raw materials have spread to 
silk and _ cashmere, two vital 
export items, because de- 
mand exceeds supply, offi- 
cials and economists said 
Thursday. 

An Agriculture Ministry 
official said the mriy reason 
for the price wars was not a 
shortage of output but an ex- 
cess of Eactories, while fraud- 
niem practices arc also re- 
sponsible. 

Prices are bring pushed 
above state-set eatings, and 
products are bring contami- 
nated because of the short 


northern Shaanxi, one 
of China's mum casictncxo- 
pxodoring areas, the price far- 
one kilogram (22 pounds) of 


pure high-grade cashmere 
wool has mare than tripled to 
240 yuan ($28) from 70 yuan 
last year, accor din g to the 
Economic DaUy. 

Prices have soared because 
of the rapid increase in fac- 
tories producing ca s h mer e 
its, spurred by hr*" 
_rfrom 

nese buyers. 

The paper said these was 
fierce competition among 
buyers, who include private 
speculators as well as users of 
the materials. Tt also said COft- 

tammattan to increase weight 
had became common, with 

Sugar, nitnd, en gine oil 

or tin powder bring added. 

Price wars also are ragbag 
in the southern provinces 
where 20 miTHnn households 
raise silkworms, with 
for one kilogram of 


worm cocoons as high as 21 
yuan, compared with 12 yuan 
a year ago. 

China's silk exports have 80 
percent of the world market 

Figures from state-owned 
China Silk Co. show that in 
1993 silkworm cocoons sold 
to slate outlets fell to 458,000 
tonnes, a drop of 13 percent 
from a year earlier. National 
output of sSkwonn cocoons 
in 1993 was a record 760,000 
tonnes, up 9.6 percent from 
1992. 

In the first six months of 
this year, China earned S129 
million, up 145 percent cm the 
year, from exporting 5,948 
tonnes of raw silk, up 160 
percent. It also earned S225 
million, up 42 percent on the 
year, from exporting 7,669 
Cannes of silk-woven fabrics, 
op 27 percent. 


Currency Losses Cut Showa Shell Profit 


Befi 


Compiled bf Our SiafJ From Dispatches 

BELTING — China has com- 
pleted this year’s crucial bond 
issue, setting 102.90 billion 
yuan ($12 button) of securities 
ahead of schedule, the Xinhua 
news agency said. 

Between April 1 and Jnly 31, 
Chinese banks sold 70.29 bu- 
tton yuan of three-year bonds, 
2837 bUHori yuan of two-year 
bonds and 434 bfltton yuan in 
other bonds. Finance Ministry 
officials said 'Wednesday. He 
issues were sold out weQ before 
their cutoff datesi 

The success of this year’s is- 
sue stands in contrast to 1993, 
when the government had to 
extend deadlines and force stale 
employees to boy bonds to fill 
its awn™! quota. Weakness in 
the domestic slock market this, 
year drove investors to the bond 
/.-market 

(AFP, Knight-Ridder) 


■ • Coofikd by Otr Staff From Dupatdta 

TOKYO — Shown Shell Sdriyu said 

the first^alf^^W^ it continued to 
absorb lasses from currency transactions. 

Show, a Japanese oil refiner and distrib- 
utor that is 50 percent owned by Royal 
Dutch/ Shell Group, posted current profit 
of 10.60 button yen ($106 mfitton) before 
taxes, down from lfL27biQioD yen in the 
first half of 1993. 

The company said its pretax profit 
would have beat 27.7 billion yen except 
for losses in the foreign-exchange market. 
The company said .early last year that it 
had lost 125 billion yen by betting the 
wrong way on a currency futures contract. 


As of the end of June, the company 
liquidated positions totaling 55 .4 billion 
and written off losses of 136.6 trillion yen. 
2h the first of thisyear, the company 
said it absorbed 193 bUtioa yen in losses at 
thepretax level. 

Showa Shell said it would liquidate 
$1.02 billion in outstanding forward con-, 
tracts to buy dollars and wme off losses of 
29 button yen in the second half of the 
year, which it said would finish its involve- 
ment in the currency a year <>ivg»H 

of schedule. 

R-N. GaskeD, vicepresident, said Showa 



Mr. GaskeD predicted the company 
would post a fun-year net profit of 13 
Trillion yen. 

Company executives said they did not 
expect the value of the dollar or world oD 
paces to affect earning? in the second half 

Showa Shell's revenue in the first half 
to 680.8 billion yen from 746.1 
ion, led by a fall in gasoline sales. Sales 
of light oD and kerosene rose. 

The c ontained dedme in. interest in- 
come also pressured profit. First-half in- 
terest income fell by about two-thirds, to 
1.4 billion yen. 

Mr. GaskeD said 


an H marif faring costs also 


on 
results. 
(Bloomberg, AFX) 


Telecom 
Sees More 
Growth 

Ream 

WELLINGTON — Telecom 
Corp. of New Zealand Ltd. said 
it was on track for sustained 
growth after reporting that its 
first-quarter profit rase a high- 
er- thin-expected 17 percent 
from a year earlier. 

Net Income in the quarter 
aided June 30 rose to 1385 
million New Zealand dollars 
($83 million) from 118.2 mil- 
lion. 

Telecom, which the govern- 
ment sold off in 1990, is con- 
trolled by the LLS. phone com- 
raru es Ameritech Corp. and 
Bell Atlantic Corp, 

Sales rose 11 percent, to 
663 JJ mfitton New Zealand dol- 
lars , reversing a declining trend. 
Excluding its Australian sub- 
sidiary, Pacific Star Communi- 
cations, revenue rose 6 percent. 

“Our excellent first-quarter 
performance reflects the suc- 
cess of Telecom’s initiatives in 
the marketplace, progress with 
the restructuring of operations 
and buoyancy in the underlying 
economy.” said Peter Shirt- 

ettffe, rhairman 

Roderick Deane, chief execu- 
tive, said growth in local service 
and long-distance revenue were 
key features of the first quarter. 
But noncore services also con- 
tributed to profit, with linkups 
of crflnlar customers up 46 per- 
cent. Despite the growth in cel- 
lular, Telecom said its market 
penetration was below that of 
telephone companies other 
countries and that there was 
plenty of room for growth. 

Mr. Deane said Telecom 
would yield 9 percent to 10 per- 
cent in dividends. 




II Investor’s Asia J| 

Hong Kong 
Hang Seng 

Singapore Tokyo . 

Straits Times Nikkei 225 


note — 




11 

HVys, 

— “ "00) nn 

/- yr— 

V 

wu/- 

WV 

62® 

J A ^'STa HTj j“a 

1394 

tndax Thursday 

dose 

Hang Seng 9,642415 

X M 

1994 

Prev. 

Close 

9.535^8 

jTa' 

Change 

+0.59 

™M' AM J 
1984 

Exchange 
Hang Kong 

Singapore ' 

Straits Times . 

2J277.17 

2.287.13 

+0.18 

Sydney 

Ml Ordinaries 

2,083^0 

2,07230 

+0.54 

Tokyo 

Nikkei 225- 

20,576.84 20.632.73. +0.21 

Kuala Lumpur Composite 

1,086^0 

1,079.06 

+0.72 

Bangkok 

SET . 

1^16.71 

1,40758 

+0.87 

Seoul 

Composite Stock 

927.49 

923.47 

+0.4 4 

Taipei 

Weighted Price 

8,78937 

6,723-56 

+0.98 

ManHo 

PSE 

2,897,62 

2,884^8 

+0.46 

Jakarta 

Stock index 

468.73 

464.85 

+0.83" 

New Zeeland 

NZSE-40 

2,101.88 

2,08230 

+0.92 

Bombay 

Nafonai index 

2JM5.10 

2,02435 

-0.49 


Sources: Reuters. AFP 


ltrtenuiifKUl IlcsaU Tribune 


Very briefly: 


• The Japan Machine Tool Builder’s Association said orders in 
June rose 3.6 percent from a year earlier, to 49.16 billion yen ($490 
million), the first rise in three years. 

• The Japan Automobile Importers' Association said sales of 
imported vehicles in Japan jumped 49.6 percent in July from a 
year earlier; sales of 1)3. cars shot up 79 percent, to 10,359 units, 
and made up 38 percent of the total. 

• Taiwan's Economic Ministry said it would offer a further 450 
million shares, valued at S48.9 million, of slate-run China Steel 
Corp. on overseas markets in the second half of 1994. AFPJteuim 


Goldstar Buyout Has High Hopes 


Bloctnberg Bu&tcn Nm 

SEOUL — Goldstar Co.’s plan to acquire 
its Goldstar Tde- 

communkation Col, is an attempt by the 
South Korean electronics maker to move 
ficcm'.tradhional products to the futuristic 
m ul t i media business, analysts said. 

Dhectas.cf both companies decided on the 
acquisition, which wfil result in an increase in 
Goldstar Ox’s paktin capital to 5035 button 
woo ($627.4 mfitton), on Tuesday. The compa- 
nies are subsidiaries of the Ludcy-Goldstar 
Group, South Korea’s thmHaigest conglomer- 


ate. The acquisition most be approved at share- 
holders’ meetings an Sept. 29. 

Analysts said the acquisition could repeat 
the success of Samsung Electronics Co., the 
country's largest electronics concern, which 
merged with its semiconductor-making affili- 
ate five years ago. 

That merger is seen as one of the most 
successful business integrations in Korea’s 
history. Since it took place, Samsung Elec- 
tronics has become the world’s largest memo- 
ry-chip producer and a global leader in many 
Jngh-tedmology fields. 


Philippine Investment Firm 
Sets $1.5 Billion Expansion 

Agence Frmce-Prase 

MANILA — Benpres Holdings Corp_ the newly incorporated 
investment firm of the politically powerful Lopez family, on 
Thursday announced plans for a $15 billion expansion program 
over the next five years. 

Executives said the company had higber-than-expected net in- 
come of 633 nrillionpesos (523 million) in the first half of 1994. The 
profit came p rimari ly fro m telecommunications and broadcasting, 
ranking, movie production and power re tailing, which earned 626 
million pesos, co mp a red with 4003 million pesos in 1993. 

Fifty-four percent of the earnings were contributed by ABS- 
GBN, the country’s largest broadcast network, which itself report- 
ed a 58 percent rise in net profit. 


.41>VERTISEMK.\T 


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The gmkni(iml annnonrr* lhal r from 
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hr on -tf MoriD at {hr LOB- MteHU UtL 
rim he pnahlr nkh Drill. <1.53 jm* 
CDS. rrpR 300 oho. and *Ub DIh. 83.0R 
per CD ft- rrpr. IJOO »h«v (dir. prr rre 
dale 3I.A3.94; grcM* \rn jj p. <hj aflrr 
dcrinrtioo of IS9 JajoBrw lot. - Vm 4I1S® 
b IHIb. 133 prr LOR. rrpr. 500 tilt. Irn llv 
- s lift*. llMi per C1>11 rrpr. >3W0 iki. 
lillwM an Aflidotil SnSJopaonr 111 = Ini 
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In 1. 100.— •= Iff?*. 19.51 per CUR. rrpr. 
1.000 ihfc. nil Hr drdmiid. 

After 3909.94 the dhidend »ill nnlr Im- paid 
under dcdKlion of 20^ Jon. lax villi I His. 
3909; DIR 78.18 rrpr. mp. 500 ond IO0Q 
(ho. m acandonre v/lh ihr Japanese lax rrf 

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AMSTERDAM DEPOSITARY 
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Amsterdam, 2 August 199-1. 


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As- Im 1AVL— = ||fl k IkhO per CJIIC irjir. 
U«0 Ae. W iIIhioI an Aflulaail 2IB* Japam-e 
lax = Yen I4llr * lllk. 2,1* per I n )]L rrpr. 
100 .Ins 1m UVl- - IlfK !IJM p.r C.IIIL 
rrpr. ljWW dr. xiH Ik- dnlnrird. 

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Amsterdam, 2 Augiiol 199-1. 


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Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 5, 1994 


NASDAQ 

- Thursday's 4 p.m. 

This list compiled by the AP. consists of the 1, C30 
most traded securities in terms of dollar value k is 
updated twice a year. 


liMonh as 

High Low Slack Db YUPEIHs High LowUaeSOVga 


16* 5 AAON s 
301. 13 ABC Rtf 
X 141. ABT Bid 


_ 23 290 IS 
- - 25 19 

_ n 3179 17'*» 


X’AISWACCCd Ma J 10 639 1 TO 


24 7V : ACS En 3 
45*XwAO< Tc 
47 W 29% ADC Tal 
17'* I0WAE5C1H1 


« ... M3 12 
_ 32 440 X* 
_ 34 1659 44% 
_ _ 304 III, 


ra*!4 AESCpi A8t 3.9 16 331 171. 


31 wi?*ak sted 
MV;15'.iAP5HW 
15% fcV.A^K 
33 12'/JAST 
2711 lJ'AAbtoevH 
31 s * ITWAciaims 
27* 13 AaneMet 
30V, 7V«Actot 
ISW 6VSAOOCU3 
n Vi 1 JWAdaatCa 
24W10 Adel «i h 
37% 30 AtSaSv 


- 482i aw 
-. 17 5 23'* 

_ .. 2a& 13% 
_. 12 7827 16 
_ 33 ITU 1 7 '.j 
- 17 7185 16% 
.10 146 26 
. 25 U1 av. 

M 7.7 6 151 6% 

_ 16 *65? ??* 
_ _ 102 14',. 

.16 J 17 100 34 


M'^IS'.ifdobffSs JO ; »3W 31 


17% 4%AdvPro 
I 111 4V« AdvTiss 


_ _ » 5h 
_ _ 9*8 6% 


44*-j26'.l Artwonfa s JO A 14 305 32'., 

J8W2S AdvanfBs J4 A 15 104 2* 

15 B AgncvR _ IB 1948 13% 

lb% BHAgnlCDB ,10e J _ 541 13 


1691 SUAgoum 
14V. lWAlrMctn 
63 42V. Akn 
31% PAAIantOC 

28% !79kAlbank 
19% 12 A*»Q» 

34% 16% AlChn 
38% 23 AiexBid 
19% aHAJiosR 
3V» I'kgAiiASnn 

14 7% AUanPh 

lb 7% AlnSOrni 


„ _ 46 11% 

- _ TO TO 

1.74e 2.9 _. 566 61% 

_ ._ 1174 13% 

M IA 13 ISO 74% 

_ 23 6422 13 

_ 35 2564 29% 

M JA 17 77 25% 

- 26 1415 16% 

_ 14 1168 3 

_ _ 732 9* 

_ IS 64 12% 


3rH22%AlUedGo A0 3.1 7 387 39% 


22% lJWAJItfl-HdO 
24% 1%Alpnal 
35% 7% AlPOoBlo 
39' .-21% Altera 
24 Vj 10'/: Albans 


_. 8 39 1614 

... _. 973 2 

- 334 9 

_ 17 4185 25% 
_ 12 202 15V. 


92 43 AmerOn .01* - 75 »54 59% 

304,W*AanW .77 U I 118/ 21% 

21% 1J% AOasVov .16 14 4. 9/ 16% 

33 lOViAColkwJ J4 to Id 384 12*. 

23% 15V,AmFfWir ... 30 4385 u 23% 

34% 25%AGn-el s Si IA 17 4214 31% 


24% SWAWffKPi 
2b % 15% AMS 
17", TOAMedE 
22 12% AmMbSol 

XV, 14% APwrCv s 
28 15V, AmResId 

39'i22'1 AmSupr 
7? 12*AmTeVe 
15% 10’. ATravoi 
14% 7% AmerOn 
26% uwAmfed 
52 31 Amgen 
15 5 Amrtoii 1 


. lo «i tv, 
_ 23 1607 u 26% 
_. 12 97 8'.. 

- _ 411 15% 

_. 24 £825 16 

_ 13 7143 38 
_ ... 197 26% 
_ 1 MV, 

_ II 838 1S% 
_ - 339 8% 

J4 1J 20 100 20% 
.. 1813200 51% 
._ 17 j| 7% 


33% B% AmicftCn At A 11 1824 io% 


16% 11% Anoiacp 
17'.. I0W AnchGm 
42', ir, Andrews 
21% 13 AixfrXB 
30’ , 18% Antcc 
J8% 22 AppleC M 

lfi'-i 10% ApISou S A2 


... 10 556 16 V. 
- .. 484 16 
_. 28 1104 41% 
-.9 2 16 

_ _ 1507 28% 
14 70164M 33% 
.1 39 471 16% 


25% 11 Aptebees .04 J X 607 15 


25 llWAprtDgtl 
33 llWApalnovs 
53 28% ApdMI s 


_ _ 703 19'-, 

_ 30 63 19 

... 25 0776 46% 


21 15V. ArtnrQrg 24 12 22 IS 20% 


35W 26',* ArOoGo 1.16 43) 8 73 29% 

33' •. 17% Anwar _. 49 57 15*1 

15% B'k ArkBest M J 18 330 11% 

H% 16% Armor M 3.0 19 273 22% 

22 1 . 18 Arrows AO 23) 18 78 20 

24% 4 Artsft _ 2015175 15% 

13 V. 7%Asnwrtti - 24 511 10V. 

46 24 Asocm _ 22 528 33% 

XWM'iAsdCmA _.1294 1039 26% 

33% 19',. AsdCmB -.1288 143 26 

20*11 Asiecs _. 12 518 14% 

34% 27% Astort OF _ - 7128 33% 

X% 21 % AnSeAir J2 M 18 692 32% 


2*% 11 Almels 
26V. I6V, AuBon 
9fi« 4% AuroSv 
13 3%Auspex 
61% 37 Autoak 
34 V. 23% Autoind 
29% 13% Autolots 
31% lb AvkfTch 


34W78WB8&T 1.52 

35% 8%0HCFns AS 
24% 16 WSY5 
71 40% BMC SH 

30% 11% BMC Wt a 
27V, |$ BWIP 40 

29% 8% Baboge 
25%lS%BakerJ A6 

24 10*.Bo(vGm 


24% l7%Bonctec 

S % l?74Bk5autti M 
%31 Bcnta Si 
26% 12%BanvnSr 

19 12% Bereft i .08 

17% 9% BoretRs 
7 2%BaiT«A 
65%43%BavBks 1A0 
35% 21 % BedBafti 

S % 44% ExHIBr-p 
% 6%BelUVIiC 
49%2l%B4HlSot 
8% JV.BetnOG 

2 T h BS» ^ 

29% 14 V, Besrpwr 
13% 9%BMBs .16 

52%25%Bioaen 
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Page 16 


SPORTS 


•. s 'Sk-..':.wL. ■ 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST S, 1994 


Pension Caper 
Puts Good Faith 
Out of the Game 

By Cairo Smith 

Sew York Tima Service 

If the owners of the major league dubs were setting out to 
find an issue that would further galvanize the players, they hit 


% %’ \ % 


the proverbial grand slam. 

Nearly a month after the players participated in an All-Star 
Game they traditionally play gratis in return for die clubs' 
contributions to their pension fund, the players have found 
that the owners have no intention of mating their annual 
August contribution. 

They found out, no less, by mail. On Monday, Aug. 1, the 

due date, less than two days 

Vsintaae before a full bargaining scs- 

nf!L* ® C9 sion that was supposed to be 

° oln * dedicated to dealing with the 

big-money issue of a sal- 
ary cap. And less than II days before the original strike date 
set by die players. 

So, even though the salary cap was discussed during testy 
negotiations earlier this week, even though the players handed 
management a list of written proposals, the lion's share of the 
time was spent debating the withholding of the £8 million 
pension contribution. 

The owners say they had a right not to pay it because the 
collective bargaining agreement expired March 31. 

“If the players had intended or wanted to gear the payment 
of the pension funds to the All-Star Game, then the agreement 
would have said that,” Richard Ravitch, the owners’ chief 
negotiator, said after the negotiating session Wednesday. “But 
it didn't say that. And they aren’t legally entitled to it.” 

So it was that the owners tiptoed through a loophole with 
the subtlety of a bull elephant, contrary to the precedent they 
set in 1985. That year, the owners made their Aug. 1 contribu- 
tion, even though the players threatened to strike Aug. 6 and 
eventually did for three days. 

It's a lot of good faith turned to bad for a sum that would 
amount to $285,000 or so per club -—approximately the salaries 
of two and a half rookies. Bat the owners seem more than 
willing to ignore history and the fallout from this maneuver. 

“The issue here remains one single issue,” Ravitch said. 
“That is the business environment in which this game is being 
played. The economic forces that have an impact on the game 
of baseball require a change for the sake of the game” 

So it was that Ravitch tried to stay on the cap issue. But if 
he was observant during his news conference, the whole world 
had moved on to a new conflagration of the owners’ making: 
the pension fund. 

That is where Donald Fehr, the chief of the players union, 
and his troops were rallying. And why not? The owners had 
handed them an issue guaranteed to draw more sympathy for 
players than, say, their fight to keep a system that now produces 
an average player’s salary of more than $1 million a year. 

Talk about hot-button issues. Most Americans are sensitive 
to pension fund and health care issues (the owners’ $8 million 
was designated for the health and benefit funds of players, 
coaches, manag ers and trainers and their families as well as a 
goodly number of those groups' predecessors). And most 
people are f amiliar with the vulnerability of those funds, in light 
of savings and loan failures and the debate over health care. 

Put enough irate players on television talking about health 
care for their predecessors and the public may come to believe 
that 28 Michael Milkens are masquerading as owners out 
there, not fighting millionaire players bat trying to bilk 
widows and orphans as well 

So it is that me fury is high on the players’ side, for reasons 
that are righteous as well as opportunistic. 

“They believe there’s going to be a strike and they want to 
finance it with the players’ money,” an irate Mr. Fehr said of 
the owners. 

No full bargaining session was set after Wednesday's tense 
meeting. 

So, the question must be asked: Is this the result the owners 
were looking for, a shot over the bow, if you will? 

If so, it got the players’ attention, just as collusion did. But, 
if you remember, collusion, which reaped immediate benefits j 
for the dubs, later rose up and bit the owners, in the form of 
millions of dollars in fines and a rrinyigorated union that 
went on to win at the bargaining table in 1990. 

Now, only time wfll tdl if this latest maneuver reaps a 
simflaT whirlwind. 



Astros Move Up 


Mb O. MsfeWjfcVAyacc 

OncbmatPs Barry Larkin slides safely into homeplate as San Francisco’s catcher, K3rt Manwaring, joggles the ball. 

Redr Hot Yankees Win and Clinch f First 9 


The Associated Pros 

With uncertainty the noun, one thing is 
certain: If the season stops on or before 


Aug. 12, the Yankees will be in first place. 

The Yankees became the first team to 
assure themselves of being in the lead on 
the players' original Aug. 12 strike dead- 
line with a 2- 1 victory Wednesday over the 
Brewers in Milwaukee. 

The game was called after 7ft inning s 
due to a rainstorm. 

New York’s sixth straight victory im- 
proved its record to 17-3 since the All-Star 
break and increased its lead in the AL East 
to nine games over the Baltimore Orioles. 

After the Yankees won their eighth in a 
row on the road, Don Mattingly said: 
“We’re just playing the best baseball we 
can, day in and day out” 

Sterling Hitchcock pitched a strong 
game for New York after escaping a jam in 
the fourth mning and protected a 2-1 lead 
through seven innings. Bob Wickman 
came out to start the eighth, but the down- 
pour beat his first pitch. 

After a 68-minute rain delay, the game 
was called. It was a move that irked the 
Brewers. 

“They have a 2-1 lead, but we have two 
at-bats against than,” said Jody Reed, 
who had two of the five hits off Hitchcock. 
"We’re feeling pretty confident we can get 
something done against them and the 
game's over. Do you think we’d be walking 
out of here if the Brewers were leading 2- 
17” 

Angel Miranda, the losing pitcher for 
the Brewers, allowed four hits, but two of 
them were solo home runs. 

Jim Lcyritz hit his 17th in the fourth and 
Randy Velarde connected for his 9th in the 
fifth. 

Royals 9, Athletics 5: Kansas City ex- 
tended baseball’s longest winning streak 
this season to 12 games by defeating Oak- 
land at home. 

The Royals haven’t lost since dropping a 
5-2 decision to Detroit on July 22. 


Bob Hamelin broke Bo Jackson's clnb 
rookie record with bis 23d home run for 
the Rpyals, whose only longer w innin g 
streak was a 16-game run in 1977. 

Hamefin 's two-run homer chased Bobby 
Witt in the fifth and broke the record 
Jackson set in 1987. 

Troy Ned bomered for Oakland, which 
has lost five straight- Jose DeJesus allowed 
three runs and eight hits in five innings. 

AL ROUNDUP 

Indians 7, Tigers 4: The Indians, aided 
by an error by Detroit pitcher Tim Bddier, 
scratched out four runs in the fourth in- 
ning before Sandy Alomar’s eighth-inning 
homer clinched the victory in Cleveland. 

Belcher missed the bag with his foot 
while covering first on Paul Sorrento’s 
grounder to Cedi Fidder. The error load- 
ed the bases, and the Indians — ■ who had 
already scored mice in the inning on 
Manny Ramirez's RBI single — added 
three more for a 5-1 lead. 

Alomar finished Belcher with his two- 
nm shot in the eighth, his 13tb. 

Charles Nagy gave up four runs, one 
unearned, and 10 hits in seven innings. Jeff 
Russell struck out the side in the ninth for 
his 1 7 th save. 

Twins 4, Orioles 3: Scott Ldus's two-out 
RBI single capped a two-run ninth off Lee 
Smith as Minnesota, playing at home, de- 
feated Baltimore to end a six-game losing 
streak. 

Alex Cole led off the ninth with a pinch 
single against Smith and moved to second 
when Kirby Puckett walked on four pitch- 
es. After Shane Mack sacrificed, Chip Hale 
followed with a pinch-hit sacrifice fly to tie 
it at 3. Kent Hrbek was walked intention- 
ally and Leins followed with a single to 
left-center, scoring Puckett with the win- 
ning run. 

It was the 6 th blown save in 38 opportu- 
nities for Smith. Kevin Tapani pitched his 


fourth complete game of the season, allow- 
ing seven hits. 

Red Sox 7, Blue Jays 2: In Boston, Tam 
Brunansky hit a two-run homer to cap a 
six-cun fifth, and Tim VanEgmond pitched 
716 strong inning s to beat Toronto. 

Tim Naehrmg had three RBIs for the 
Red Sox, who sent 10 batters to the plate in 
the fifth. The victory allowed Boston to 
break a third-place tie with Toronto in the 
AL East. 

VanEfgmond, who got his first major 
league victory Friday at Milwaukee, al- 
lowed two runs and eight hits in his sev- 
enth major league start. A1 Later allowed 
six runs and six hits in four-plus innings. 

Rangers 11, White Sox 8: Jose Canseco 
homered twice and Rusty Greer brought in 
the go-ahead run with a sacrifice fly in the 
seventh inning as the Rangers rallied to 
defeat Chicago in Arlington, Texas. 

Canseco’s 31st homer tied it at 8 in the 
seventh for the Rangers, who battled bade 
from a 7-2 deficit He added a two-run 
double in the eighth. 

The loss trimmed Chicago’s lead in the 
AL Central to IK games over Cleveland 
and 3 Wines over surging Kansas City. 
Frank Thomas hit his 37 th homer far the 
White Sox. 

Mariners 8, Angeb 4: In Anaheim, CaK- 
fomia. Jay Buhner and Edgar Martinez 
each homered for the secondxtraight game 
and Ken Griffey Jr. drove in three runs-in 
Seattle’s defeat of Cafifonria. 

Dave Fleming improved his career rec- 
ord at Anaheim Stadium to 5-0, allowing 
three runs and six hits over 5% innings. 
The left-hander has a 238 ERA in his five 
starts at the stadhun. 

Griffey, who struck out his first two 
times up against Mark Langston, hit a 
sacrifice fly and a two-run angle to cap 
Seattle’s four-run sixth inning, which 
chased Langston. 

Chfli Davis homered for the AngeU, 
who dropped their eighth straight at home. 


Two ninth-inning rallies 

2^ into apart moved Hous- 
ton game closer to the Atlanta 
Braves, and a game closer to the 
wild-card berth, as die Astros 
won, 3-1, over the waiting Colo- 
rado Rockies. . 

None of that would matter 
light now if this were a normal 
season, but with the threat of a 
strike hanging over them, teams 

NL ROUNDUP 

-have been playing like rtfs the 
last week of September. 

The victory moved the Astros 
2 VS games behind the Braves, 
who lost, 3-2, to New York 
when the Mets scored two runs 
in the bottom of the ninth. 

t Gonzalez angled off 
Brace Ruffin with one out in 
the *wnth intwig . One out and 
one walk later, Andufar Cedeno 
fined a single to left and Gonzar 

kz scored as Mike Kingery’s 
throw to the plate drifted into 
foul territory. 

Colorado, which was a half- 
game out of first {dace exactly 
one week ago, lost for the fifth 
time in six games and dropped 
3ft games behind Los Angeles 
in the NL West. 

Mets 3, Braves 2s In New 
York, the Braves’ bullpen blew 
its 13th save of the season, as 
New York one-upped Atlanta. 

Jeff Kent walked to open the 
ninth and went to third on Da- 
vid Segnl's hit-and-run single. 

Rico Brogna then hit a one-, 
hop «wigig up the middle, tying 
the score, H arid extending his 
hrttfnp streak to 12aames. 

After Mark Wohkrsreiieved 
Greg McMichacl, Jose Viz- 
caino, pinch-hitting far Kelly 
Stinnett, lined a two-out single 
over the shortstop’s head to end 
the game. 

Expos8,Canttnab 3: The Ex- 
pos, playing at home, won their 
sixth straight game and opened 


the season m the NL East — 5% 
games, by downing St. Louis. . 
Gil Heredia shut out the Car- 


dinals on foor hits over seven 

innings. _ 

Lenny Webster, Seas Bcny 
and MoiscsAlcu had solo home 
runs, and Larry Walker had 
three doubles — inenaang his; 
NL lead to 43 — as Montreal 
won for the 14th time in 15; 
games. 

Beds 17, Giants 4; In a sbig- 
fest in San Francisco, Kcvql 
M itchell had a career-high five* 
hits and five RBIs, Bret Boone; 
had four hits and scored five 
times, Brian Hunter had four; 
RBIs, John Roper (6-1} allowed- 
two runs on two mts m six in-* 
TT rn gR andCmcmnati pounded 
out 23 hits to crash the home- 
team Giants. 

Jacob Brumfield and Boone 
started the game with back-to- 
back homers off Bud Black. 

Padres 4, Dodgers 2: Eddie 
Williams tripled in the go-. 
afrmd run in the top erf the 
ninth after Tony Gwynn, the 
major league’s leading hitter at. 
391, opened the inning with # 
double, giving San Diego the 
victory in Los Angdes. 

The Padres got another ran 
on a suicide squeeze. 

Andy Ashby broke a person-; 
al five-game losing streak, al- 
lowing eight hits m eight in- 
nings while striking out six. 

PHBta»7 ( Pirates 0: In Phila- 
delphia, Danny Jackson 
pitched Ins 14th career shutout 
m a six-hitter in which he struck 
out seven and did not walk a - 
batter to defeat Pittsburgh. 

Ricky Jordan homeredand 
drove in three runs for the Fh3» 
Bos. 

Marlins 9, Cobs 8: Benito 
Santiago’s sacrifice fly scored 
Jeff Canine with the go-ahead 
ran m the ninth inning as visit-' 
mg Florida edged Chicago. 

Kurt Abbott added an RBI- 
double later in the inning, giv- 
ing the Marlins an insurance 
run they ended up needing. - 

Rich Scheid pitched 1ft in- 
nings for die victory and Robb 
Nen got his 13th save in 13 
o pp ort uni ties despite allowing 
a ninth-inning solo homer u} 
Sammy Sosa. 

% 


U.S. Bowls Vie for Top Game 

New Yak Tima Sente* 

UJS. college conference co mmissio ners are expected to 
announce Thursday the creation of a three-part football 
coalition intended to greatly increase the chances <rf a nation- 
al championship game in one of the participatiiig bowls. It ! 
could b e for a three- or a six-year term, starting in 1996. 

The commissioners were choosing from among the Sugar, 
Change, Fiesta, Gator and Cotton Bowls. The three winners ' 
wiu rotate the hoped-for annnal face-off between the nation’s - 
No. 1- and No. 2-nmked teams. The games will most likely be 
played Dec. 31, Jan. 1 and Jan. 2. 

About 65 to 70 percent of the bowls’ fuianrial offers are ' 
backed by tdevxshm. According to reports, the Fiesta’s six- - 

E ffer is worth $118 milfion, the Gator $116 million, the ' 

$108 mflfion .' die Orange $105 million, and the Cotton 
anUxan. . 



DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 



CALVIN AND HOBBES 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 5, 1994 


Page 17 



’■“ip quararoaot warren moon, gema^reany ior toe Kau» Cl ty 

f Cosmic) NFL Rematch in Tokyo 


■ The Associated First 

TOKYO — Exactly 25 yeais ago this year 
man first lauded on the ihoon, and! the Vir 
tings made their first appea ran ce in the Super- 
Bom, against the Kansas Qty niy*f« • 

And, Sunday in the NFL American Bovrt. 
the Vikings have dubbed “The Super Bo^IV 
Rematch in Totyo,^ Mhmesota wOl be going - 
against the Ch iefs again. 7 

Their qnarterbaqKMoon, erf conret War- 
ren Moan. 

According to Moon, the Vikings are hoping 
to do a little better this time than they did in 
Sopor Bowl IV, which the Chiefs won, 23-7. 

‘‘We’ve come this far, we don’t want to 
Joae^* he said Thmsday. !*But they're a form- ; 
dablc opponent, a Soper Bow! contender, and 
I think it will be a good game.” . 

Both teams aimed in .Tokyo Wednesday, 
and held light workouts Thursday meaning m 
temperatures in the higfc30sCintigrade (90s 
Fahrenheit). •' 

Moon, who played in Tokyo in the 1992 
American Bowl, made Ins ' debut noth the 
Vikings intbeir ^season opener 

against the Dallas Cowboys last Sunday. 

He stayed in onljr one quarter, hit four of 
his seven passes, and-watched the Vikings 
lose, 17-9. 

Tokyo has hosted the National Football 
League in American Bowls, each year since 
1989. AH have been sold cot or neariyso, with 


attendance, generally around 50,000 — even 
’ though the highest price tickets xim at around 
20,000 yen, or $200. 

- “The first .time we came here we were 
astonished by the enthusiasm of the Japan esc 
fansj’said Joe Montana, the Chiefs’ quarter- 
back, who played in Tokyo’s inaugural Amer- 
ican Bowl for die San Francisco 49ers. 

. “Bat fins time it’s even greater, if that’s 


■ NFL Looks at Japanese MaAet 

The NFL is considering setting up a profes- 
sional football league in Japan, the league's 
r nrrmnM nner, Paid TagSabue, said Thursday, 
according to The Associated Press in Tokyo. 

TagHabue, who is in Japan for the Ameri- 
can Bowl game said the NFL and Japanese 
companies axe currently discussing plans to 
establish the league. 

“After five years of American Bowls here I 
think we can see a potential for interest," he 
. sa& “It would be something created especial- 
ly for JhpaiL.’* 

' TagSabue said the Japan league would not 
be part of the World League of Axnencan 
Football, ai joint venture between the NFL 
and the Fax broadcasting network that has 
iHww in the United States, Canada and Eu- 
rope. 

Talks axe still in the early stage, he added, 
and jio timetable has been set 


No Early Walkout, Baseball Players Decide 


The Associated Pros 

NEW YORK — Baseball players de- 
cided Thursday to stick to their Aug. 12 
s trike rather than walk out im- 

mediately. 

Angered by owners’ refusal to make a 
pension payment of about $7.8 million, 
the executive board of the Major League 
Baseball Players' Association spoke by 
telephone Thursday to consider chang- 
ing the union’s Aug. 12 strike deadline. 

“It could be tomorrow. It could be on 
the 12th. It could be after," Bren Butler, 
the Los Angeles Dodgers player repre- 
sentative, said on Wednesday night, as 
talk of an imminent walkout swept 
through major league ballparks. 

. Donald Fehr, the union leader, and his 
staff were incensed during a contentious 


2Vi-hour bargaining session. Players were 
angry, too, after owners failed to make 
the Aug. 1 payment, about one-seventh of 
the $57 million annual contribution un- 
der the deal that expire d in March. 

“They’re upset. There's a great deal of 
dissatisfaction,” said Jeff Montgomery, 
the Kansas City Royals' player repre- 
sentative, adding that some of his team- 
males favored an immediate walkout. 

Chicago Cubs' players said they voted 
to walk immediately if the union called 
for it, and CNN reported that three or 
four other teams al*n pushed for an 
immediate strike. 

Labor Secretary Robert B. Retch said 
the government was wfflmg to be helpful 
but said nothing substantive. 

“We win do everything we possibly can 


to get the players and the owners to the 
bargaining table,” he said. “The president 
has indicated that. I have indicated that- 
Tbey have to want lo go to the bargaining 
table. They've got to indicate that they in 
fact are willing to come up with some 
resolution of the conflict." 

Eugene Oiza, the union's associate gen- 
eral counsel, called management's decision 
to skip the payromt “the dastardly deed." 
Players say they are owed the money be- 
cause they appeared in the All-Star game 
last month, but some wondered whether 
the deadline amid be changed. 

During a White House news confer- 
ence Wednesday night. President Clin- 
ton said the government could get in- 
volved in the tense talks but he wanted 
to be cautious. 


“I think it would be heartbreaking for 
the American people if our national pas- 
time didn’t gel through this whole sea- 
son,” Clinton said. 

“There may be some other things 
which can be done, but at this time the 
situation is sufficiently delicate that I 
think we need to leave it at that," he 
added. 

Clinton said he hoped there would not 
be a work stoppage. 

“1 mean, the prospect of seeing re- 
cords that are 30 and 40 years old bro- 
ken for those of us who like the offensive 
as well as the defensive side of baseball 
— I mean this is an exhilarating thing,” 
he said. “And it’s a great opportunity for 
these young players and wbat they can 
become.” 


16 Teams Go for Basketball Gold 


The Asso ciated Pros 

TORONTO — You can't 
talk about the world basketball 
championships without the lack 
of competition for the United 
States becoming a topic — even 
though there are 15 other te am* 
And it’s starting to wear on 
some people. 

“Of course, the gold medal is 
already booked for the USA 
team and I suppose I accept 
that," said Manuel Rainr , the 
coach of Spain, the opening op- 
ponent for Dream Team H here 
on Thursday night. 

“But as a sportsman it dis- 
turbs me that those who fore- 
cast an American victory in- 
clude the tournament 
organizers who have already 
penciled in ‘USA’ instead of 

^W inner s Pod A.* " 

That is true. The distributed 
schedules have “United States" 
ri ght through to the sr^mifirial 
round. 

The field is broken up into 


H Ti 


four perils with the top two 
teams advancing to the playoff 
round after a round-robin 
schedule. Those teams advanc- 
ing will be placed in two four- 
tea ra groups and another 
round-robin will be played with 
the top two from each advanc- 
ing to the semifi nals. 

The U.S. team is the prohibi- 
tive favorite in Pool A with Bra- 
zil and Spain about even to 
move on and China the long 
shot. 

Pool B features Croatia, 
which has Toni Kukoc of the 
Chicago Bulls and Dino Radja 
of the Boston Critics. 

Australia was hurt the by the 
decision of 7-foot-2 Luc Long- 
ley of the Bulls to remain home 
for file birth of his child, butit's 
still good enough to advance. 
Cuba is an unknown team and 
South Korea just doesn't have 
the size. 

Canada is Solid With Rick 
Fox of the Celtics leading the 


way and should win Pool C. 
Russia was a disappointment in 
the recent Goodwill Games, 
finishing fourth, and Argentina 
has been inconsistent. 

Angola is fun to watch, but is 
no medal threat. Puerto Rico is 
an experienced team, which won 
the grid medal at the Goodwill 
Games, and has indicated it 
would like nothing more than a 
shot at the U.S. team. 

Germany was supposed to be 
a legitimate threat here, but will 
play without the services of 
Detlef Schrempf and Christian 
Wrip. 

Greece is usually one of Eu- 
rope's best, but the team 
chang ed coaches in the last two 
weeks and the relationship be- 
tween the players and the gov- 
erning federation has been 
strained. Egypt would be 
thrilled to finish in the top 12. 

The mmifinnls and finals are 
slated for Aug. 13-14 at the Sky- 
dome. 


Games 9 Ice Rink Rescued Lewis-McGall Fight Dale Set 


ST. PETERSBURG (AP) — The Goodwill 
Games' figure skating got under way Thursday 24 
hours late as the ice nnk was rescued by a new 
cooling technology used in the Russian subway 
system. The U.S women's basketball team ad- 
vanced to (be semifinals Saturday against China, 
after beating Italy, 92-37. In men's gymnastics. 
Alexei Neruov of Russia and Grigory Misyu tic of 
Ukraine tied for first place in two of three events. 


NEW YORK (NYT) — Lennox Lewis, the 
World Boxing Council heavyweight champion, 
will take on Oliver McCall in London on Sept. 
24. A champion by default, the London-born 
Lewis inherited his title after Riddick Bowe, who 
had won three titles from Evander Holyfidd in 
1992, dumped the WBC belt in a trash can rather 
than accept a mandatory defense against Lewis. 
Lewis said be looking ahead to a fight with Bowe. 




SUM 








1 is ■ 


t'V." ■*■•> • 


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Id Haynes/ Asm France-Prcsse 

Reggie Miller, shooting free throws dining the U.S. team 
practice in Toronto before the opening game with Spain. 


BASEBALL 


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SECOND TEST 

.Bast— vs. Saum Africa, first dor 


End— Brat Innings: 2 uu 


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Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 5, 1994 


OBSERVER 


Keys to the f Forres f 

By Russell Baker 3. Who is Lieutenant D 


Austria’s Literati Left Puzzled by ‘Ripper’ 


PEOPLE 

A Coy Howard Stem 


N EW YORK. — In response 
to the pleas of many baf- 
fled people, here is a digest of a 
few of toe more trenchant pas- 


sages in my “Key to the Inner 
Meaning of ‘Forrest Gump.' ” 


I. What the feather tells os: 
The common interpretation 
arises from the feather’s long 
history as a symbol for light- 
ness. Appearing at the very be- 
ginning of the film, it seems to 
be a device for letting the more 
cerebral reviewers know they 
might as well go see another 
movie since “Forrest Gump" 
will simply be light entertain- 
ment unlikely to enrich their 
grasp of the meaning of things. 

This too- glib explanation ig- 
nores the salient fact that we do 
not know what kind of feather 
we are seeing. Chicken feather? 
Sparrow feather? Ostrich feath- 
er? We cannot tell 

Why? Because this feather we 
are seeing has no parentage in 
either fowl kingdom or bird 
land. It is the ideal feather, 
which, as Plato notes, can exist 
only in the mind. What we are 
looking at is not a feather, but 
the idea of feather existent only 
in each moviegoer’s mind. 


3. Who is Lieutenant Dan? 
Kutzall and Hammerbung, 
The Village Kvetch’s cantan- 
kerous analysts of movie mean- 
ings. have muddied the intellec- 
tual waters here with their 
monograph, “Shaman and 
Shivaree; Jungian Avatars in 
'Forrest Gump." ” 

Their assertion that Lieuten- 
ant Eton is a symbolic represen- 
tation of Marion Brando in 
“Apocalypse Now” simply 
doesn't hold water. The two of 
them have obviously never beard 
of “Moby Dick" and rage-filled 
Captain Ahab cursing God 
(thinly disguised as a white 
whale) for tearing off his leg. 

Are we not describing Lieu- 
tenant Dan to a T as he sits at 
the top of the storm-tossed 
shrimp boat cursing God for 
blowing off both his legs? 

Lieutenant Dan is Captain 
Ahab. Once we grasp this fact 
we are on our way into the dark 
inner meaning of “Forrest 
Gump." 


By Rick Atkinson 

Washington Ptat Service 


V IENNA — To the Viennese caffc intellectuals 
who Dulled him from orison and embraced him 


V who pulled him from prison and embraced him 
as one of their own. Jack Unterwcger was proof 
positive that bad boys can become good men. He 
was their reclamation project, their social experi- 
ment, their civilized barbarian. 

He was a crook who had come to terms with his 
own criminality, a murderer whose homicidal im- 
pulses had been channeled into die salutary act of 
writing. 

But to the police and, ultimately, to a jury, Unter- 
weger was a monster. He was this country’s most 
notorious serial killer, an Austrian Jack the Ripper 
who — even as he was being lionized by Vienna’s 
literati — strangled at least nice womeiC including 
three in Los Angeles. 

And when it was over, hours after an Austrian 
court had pronounced him guilty on June 28, the 


jailhouse bard who was so good with knots braided 
his shoelaces into a noose and hanaed himself. 


2. Why Forrest drinks too 
much Dr Pepper while visiting 
President Kennedy: Cultural 
historians tell us that in the 
Southland of Forrest's child- 


hood Dr Pepper was marketed 
as a healthful beverage, as 


as a healthful beverage, as 
something good for you, very 
much the way jogging is mar- 
keted everywhere nowadays. 

By downing bottle after bot- 
tle at the White House, with its 
bottomless supply, Forrest is il- 
luminating his profound desire 
for good health. And what lies 
behind this desire? Forrest may 
not know the Latin for it, but he 
obviously knows that ancient 
wisdom prescribes "a sound 
mind in a sound body." 

Thus he clearly and poi- 


4. Who is Forrest Gump? 

I wrestled with this one for 
several sleepless nights. “If Lieu- 
tenant Dan is Captain Ahab," I 
said to myself, “then Forrest 
Gump has to be Ishmael because 
Forrest is telling Lieutenant 
Dan's story just as Iahmad was 
telling Captain Ahab’s.” 

But this was too easy, too 
obvious, too glib. It wasn t deep 
enough. It wasn't meaningful 
enough, and movies without an 
amplitude of meaningfulness 
are hard for me to tolerate. 

The answer leapt out at me 
while I was watching a video- 


tape of “Gunga Din" and mar- 
veling at how the Aristotelian 
ethics of Cary Grant's character 
meshed so naturally with Victor 
McLaglen's Bismarcldan lead- 


ership, thus illustrating the Gre- 
co-Teutonic symbiosis on 


which British colonial imperial- 
ism was built. 


gnantly hopes that the sound 
body that will result from Dr 


Pepper might be accompanied 
by the improved soundness of 
mind necessary to make him a 
more romantic figure to die ad- 
venturess Jennie. 


I was watching Abner Biber- 
m an run (vainly) for his life 
when — but of oourse! — it was 
as plain as Forrest’s incessant 
running. Tehmnai didn't run, he 
swam. Forrest Gump isn’t Ish- 
mael He's O. J. Simpson. 


his shoelaces into a noose and hanged himself. 

Once again he had left behind no evidence, no 
suicide note, nothing except a lifeless body and the 
echo of the impassioned plea of innocence he deliv- 
ered at the end of a two-month trial. 

This time, however, not even his lawyer was buy- 
ing it. “The jury said he was guilty. And I believe it 
was a fair trial,” the attorney, Hans-JOrgen Lehofer, 
said in a recent interview. 

Unterweger was bom in August 1950, son of an 
Austrian mother and an American GI. The father 
vanished before the baby was bom; the mother 
abandoned him when he was 2 to an alcoholic 
grandfather in rural Austria. He grew up tough and 
Illiterate, supporting himself through petty thievery 
and pimping. 

In December 1 974 he abducted and murdered 18- 
year-old Margret Schafer. The court sentenced him 
to life. 

But in Stein Prison, he flourished. He learned to 
read and became a voracious reader. He learned to 
write and became a prolific writer, of poetry and 
short stories, plays and a novel. Much of his scrib- 
bling was autobiographical a vent for rage and 
resentment. His “Endstatvm Zuchthaus” (Terminus 
Prison) won an Austrian literary prize in 1984; his 
“Fegefeueri’ (Purgatory) became a best-seller and 
was made into a successful film. 

Several prominent Austrian writers and prison 
reformists took up his cause with support from the 
literary organization PEN. 

The case had eerie parallels to that of Jack Henry 
Abbott, a convicted American killer- turned- author 
whose cause was taken up by Norman Mailer. Short- 
ly after Abbott was released from jail in 1981, he 

Inllwi a gain. 

With Unterweger, however, the risk seemed mini- 



arrest warrant and raided TJnterweger’s apartmen t. 

He was gone. After fleeing to Switzerland with his 
18-year-old girlfriend, Bianca Mrak, Unterweger 
made his way to; Paris and then to Miami 

.Mrak got a job as a -nude dancer and bought a 
mattress and a Used typewriter. After -a string of 
credit card receipts, agents from the U. S. Marshal's 
office arrested Unterweger in Miami Beach in late 
February. On. May 27 he was extradited to Austria. 


three in Los Angeles, a long-distance prosecution 
permissible under Austrian law. 

Yet the prosecutkm's case hung, literally, by a 
hair. Two years after, the 1990 felfesgin Prague of 
Bodcova, the police had begun locking for the car 
Unterweger drove at the time of the murder. They 
found the old BMW in a junkyard and in th e car 
discovered seven hairs- Extcnstve PNA tests were 
performed on the hair& 

A Swiss DNA expert testified that four of the 
hairs were Unterweger’s, while the other three -~ 
with 9956 percent certainty — matched Rockova s 
genetic fin ger print. Even those convinced of Unter- 
weger’sgnut find ft peiplexmg that an 1 1-year-old 
car with at least four owners was found in a junk- 
yard with such a conveniently tidy package of evi- 
dence. ' 

Other evidence was largely circumstantial or in- 
condusive. ... 

Unterweger lacked a plausible alibi for any of the 
11 murders. 

In bis own dosing argument, Unterweger plead- 
ed, “I implore you, even, if you are disgusted by Jack 


Raunchy radio boat Howard 
Stem has dropped his bid tc 
become governor of New York, 
saying be will not comply with 
statebws requiring him to dis- 
close Iris earnings and total 
wealth. Stem, always ready to . 
discuss his sex life (as well as 
anybody’s rise's), said Us per-* 1 
Bf yifll finances were no one's > 
business but his own. I 

□ 




Int 


Although the 25th anmvasa- » 
ry concert planned for the ate v * 
of the original Woodstock festi- Va* 
val has been called off, officials 
in Sullivan County, New York, - ft 
are no chances. Fearing 
thousands wffl flock to the Max y’ £ 


looasanua wm uvn-®. w 

Vasgar farm in Bethel anyway, ’ 
countv officials say they wm 


Unterweger’s way of life, to think whether that’s 
enough to say, ‘He doesn’t deserve to live in free- 


county officials say they wm 
deploy, jxriice officers as origi- 
nally planned for the weekend 
of Aug. 13 and 14. They mil 
ffhn keep the $200,000 paid by 
the promoters for the services of 
state tro opers. A bigger reunion 
concert, in nearby Saugerties, is 
still sdwdnled to open Aug. 12. 

P 

Queen BBzabeth the Queen 
^father turned 94 on Thursday 
to the cheers of hundreds of 
well-wishers outside her Lon- 
don home. Children lined up to 


Jack Unterweger: murder spree, then suicide. 


mal When he was paroled on May 23, 1990, the 
prison warden observed, “We will never find a 


prisoner so well prepared for freedom.” 

Those who knew him best still harbored some 


skepticism. “Jack doesn’t like literature.” Willi 
Hengstler, the filmmaker who directed “Fegefeuer ” 


told the British -newspaper The Guardian. “Jade 
doesn’t like writers. Jack doesn't like anything. Jack 
only likes Jade.” 

'Die murder spree began in September 1990, four 
months after his release from prison. A Czech prosti- 
tute, Blanka Boekova, was strangled with her under- 
wear at a rime when Unterweger was in Prague 
researching an article on the city's red-light district 

Seven other killing s in Austria followed over the 
next six months, all prostitutes, all garroted with 
their bras. 

Unterweger was a suspect but there was virtually 
no proof tying him to the crimes, no witnesses, no 
forensic evidence. 

In the summer of 1991, Unterweger traveled to 
Los Angeles to write about prostitution in Southern 
California. During the five weeks of his visit three 
prostitutes were strangled with their bras. 

The circle inexorably dosed. Interpol and Los 
Angles detectives deduced that the three California 
homicides coincided precisely with Unterweger’s 
trip. In February 1992 the Graz police issued an 


dom. 

The eight-member jury was unpersuaded. After ■ 
rune hours of deliberation, the verdict was rendered. 
Unterweger was led to his cell At 3 A. M. on June 
29, the defendant was lying quietly on his cot. Forty 
minutes later he was found dead. As one Austrian 
politician observed, “It was his best murder.” 
“Every day he said to me, “If I*m found guilty HI 
kill myself,’ ” Lehofer said. “I didn't believe Mm." 
Those who befriended him are left to mull over a 
cautionary tale of good intentions gone awry. “For a 
while it was chic to listen to the convicted murderer 
who had turned good," one writer observed in the 
daily Die Presse. “But not many of those who 
supported him then Kke to talk about it now.” 
Lehofer finds himself still puzzling through, the 
mysteries of psychosis. 

“If Unterweger was guilty, he was a sick man. Do 
you understand? To loll without a reason must be 
ride. Many medical experts talked to him and they 
all said he was not insane. Bin they also said he 
wouldn't commit suicide.” 


present the mother of 

D with bouquets, cards and 
gjfts, fpeh one getting a polite 
^Ihank you" and a smile as 
ladies-in-waiting and equerric^ 
pOed up the gifts. 

□ 

Four mathematicians, in- 
cluding three researchers work- 
ing inraris, have been awarded 
Helds medals, the most presti- 
gious prizes in mathematics. 
The winners were Jean Boar- 
gain, 40, of the Institut des 
mutes Etudes Sdeatifiques in 


Paris, Pfcov-Locds lions, 38, of 
the University of Paris-Dauphi- 
ne, JMB-anfatophe Yoccoz, 37. 
of the University of Paris-Sud 
and Efim Isaakovich Zefananof , 
38, of the University of Wisocm- 


His victims were not' people he knew, not girl- 
nds or acquaintances. He killed strangers, wom- 


f riends or acquaintances. He killed str 
en he’d known for only five minutes, 
Then, with a slight smile, the lawyer j 
killed them, I mean." 


totes.” 
“If he 


INTE RI\AX1 ON AL 
CLASSIFIED 

Appears on Page* 5. 6 & 1 7 


WEATHER 


WEEKEND DESTINATIONS 


Europe 


Today 


Toi 

noraoH 



H/fltl 

Low 

W 

TOgh 

Low 

w 


OF 

OF 


OF 

OF 


Al^v, 

?9/84 

20/98 

fl 

30*0 

23/71 


AiiwIiiJ'lwn 

3-1/75 

1946 

1 

22/71 

17*2 


Mm 

36/TO 

14/57 


29/84 

14/57 | 

Mwra 

xm 

24/75 


32/89 

23/73 

■ 

RvcWnan 

31 /B8 

33/73 

0 

33,89 

34/73 



33/BB 

30/88 C 

34/93 

21/70 

9 

BnU 

31,88 

17162 

1 

29/84 

18*1 


Bnnwta 

3D88 

31/70 

PC 27/80 

17*2 


BwJbpwiiI 

33TO9 

21/70 pc 33TO1 

91/70 pc 

CupPVipn 

CmlalMSci 

37/BO 

IB/64 

• 

37/80 

14/37 


33/80 

35/77 


33/91 

25/77 

■ 

OU*. 

30 m 

11,52 


19*8 

13/53 


Edktuph 

16/E4 

13/53 


17*3 

13*5 


Fkymco 

05/95 

31/70 


36*7 

23/71 


FisrUifl 

31/BB 

17/83 


31*8 

17*3 pc 

Gcreva 

33/83 

19/60 


32*9 

20*8 



23/71 

14157 


33,71 

15*9 pc 

Wanbul 

Z9/B4 

19*6 


30*6 

30*8 


L*» Poknas 

37/90 

33/71 


2B/B2 

33/73 

• 

Ltebori 

37/80 

18*4 


37*0 

20*0 


Londiwi 

75/77 

16*1 


33/73 

15/59 


Ma*4i 

36/97 

31/70 


38/97 

22/71 


MUm 

3/K93 

31/70 


34*3 

23 /* 

9 

Mnsam 

25/77 

tb*l 



16*1 


Munch 

30/88 

17*2 


39*4 

17*3 


Wo, 

31/88 

20*8 


31/80 

22/71 

a 

CW.J 

24/75 

17*7 


23/73 

13*5 


Polrtw 

30/86 

35/77 


31*8 

26/79 


PWim 

33/89 

31/70 

PC 

29/84 

18*4 


Praguw 

31/88 

17/83 


29*4 

17*2 

9 

Heirtipn* 

16-01 

11/52 

■h 

17*3 

11*3 


Romr 

34/93 

33/71 


34*3 

33/73 


Sl Pi4«Hiwn 34/75 

15*8 


28.79 

15/SB 


Staihoim 

33/73 

16*1 


33/73 

14*7 


Sftart>«»D 

34/93 

20*0 


32*9 

18*4 


Talni 

33/71 

18*1 


23/73 

19/59 


'/-net 

33/89 

23/73 


33*1 

24/« 


Vwnna 

26/83 

1B*« 


28*3 

18*4 

a 

Wsrww 

28/84 

10*1 


39*4 

17*2 

9 

Zunch 

33/91 

1 »<W 


33*9 

19*6 

pc 

Oceania 







AoPJBrt 

14/57 

7144 

rti 

15*9 

8/48 


Sidney 

1B/G4 

9/48 


■ 8*4 

8/40 

pc 


Forecast tor Saturday through Monday, as provided by Accu-Weather. 


JeMream 


i UnmumaMy 
CoW 


Unomnnafay 

HM 


Asia 


Today 

Tomorrow 



With 

Low 

W High 

Low 

W 


OF 

OF 

OF 

OF 


Bar^x* 

33*1 

24/76 

pc 3B.no 

25/77 


Mp/W 

HnrKnna 

33*9 


1 31*8 

22/71 


30*6 

38/79 

1 31*8 

36/79 pc 

Hu* 

33*9 

23/73 

pc 33*0 

34/75 


NnDA 

32*9 

26162 

1 33/91 

37*0 


Smui 

34*3 

23/73 

pc 34*3 

34/75 


Shanghai 

34*3 

26/TO 

pc 33*1 

37*0 


ss r 

31 OB 

33/73 

pc 31*8 

23/73 pc 

33*9 

94/73 

pc 33*1 

94/75 


Tokyo 

38*5 

98*3 

PC 39/95 

28*9 

PC 

Africa 


SATURDAY 



SUNDAY 


Europe and Middle East 


North America 

A pleasant air mass Irom 
Canada will settle Into the 
eastern United Steles this 
weekend. Some oJ the 
coolest weather since early 
June will occur over the 
weekend trom Boston to 
Phladalphia. Hot. dry weath- 
er end gusty winds wW con- 
tinue lo fuel wfldftres in the 
Rocky Mountains. 


Europe 

Cool weaitier end showers 
over me British Isles Satur- 
day wfl give way to sunny, 
pleasant weather by Mon- 
day. A cold front will bring 
relief from the current heat 
wave as far south as Frank- 
tiat and Berth by Monday. A 
few thunderstorms wOt pre- 
cede the change to cooler 
weather. 


Asia 

Abnormal heat and drought 
will persist from Tokyo lo 
Seoul end Shanghai today 
through the weekend Mean- 
while. Typhoon Doug will 
approach Taiwan fate « the 
weekend «rtfi landfall possi- 
ble In east -central China 
early next week. Heavy rains 
will continue across the 
.northern RiBppInes. 


Mi*ra »<*9 ? 3 f 7 a pc xtm rana pc 

Cape Town 3 1 /TO 10150 S 19MB 8 '« pc 

CasaHon 2 M 2 zt/ro > ag/ae 31/TO pc 

Harare 1 B/ 6 J 11*3 I 33/71 13/53 pc 

Lagoa 37/80 33/73 9h 28/® 34/75 pc 

HMkO> 21 -TO 11153 pc 32171 13/53 pc 

Tunb 33.51 21/70 a 33-51 ffl/7T 1 


North America 


Anchorage 

Mam* 


Middle East 


Latin America 



Today 


Toamiuw 



Today 




»gh 

vow 


Wgh Low 




Urn 

W 

High 

Low W 


OF 

OF 


OF OF 



OF 

OF 


OF 

OF 

&rrnjr 

31*8 

23/73 


32*9 33/73 


BumiosAns 

19*0 

lOW 

9 

99/71 


Data 

33*1 

19*6 


34/93 91/70 


Canxwi 

27*0 

10.64 


28*9 

16*4 pc 

□antrarxiis 

28*3 

15*9 


31*6 17*2 


Unu 

1B*4 

16 61 


18*4 

15*9 pc 

Janaulm 

37*0 

19*4 


29*4 19*6 


MertmCiy 

24/75 

11/52 

ah 

awn 

13*3 ■* 

Luxor 

36*7 

31/70 


38/100 30*0 


nadrJantao 33/71 

ta«i 


33,73 


Riyadh 

39/102 23/73 

pc 

41/10638/70 


Santagu 

3173 

9,46 

a 

31/70 

7-44 a 


CNeago 

Danrar 

DrM 

HongttAl 

hbujnai 
Lor Angeles 


Mmvapch 

Montreal 


Legend: s-sunny, pc-oarey cloudy, c-doudy. ah- showers. Htundeaksms. i-ra*t sr-snow Hurries, 
en-snow. He*. W-WoaSier. All nupa, forecast* and data provided by Accu-Waether. Inc.’S 199* 


Toronto 

Wtahwpwi 


36 /TO 15*9 
30/84 IP/66 
37/00 17TOZ 
33773 1 1*2 
31« 14/57 
33/73 11/53 
30786 23/73 
34TO3 31/70 
31.58 20/BB 
33/91 34/75 
33>T3 14)57 
31/70 14/57 
JtW 34/75 
28/BZ I7WZ 
43/109 3904 
38 /TO TOfifi 
33/73 13/53 
24/73 16*1 
30/88 IB/84 


a 2J/73 14/57 pc 
I 29/84 18/88 pc 
Mi 23/73 17*2 pc 
B Se/TO 10411 , 
pc 35/85 17/53 ■ 

• 34175 14 57 1 
pc 31/W 34/75 pc 
I 35/96 23/73 a 
1 37/BO JB/B4 pc 
I 33/91 £4/75 ah 

* 77/90 18/64 a 

pc 28/79 IMI pc 
pc 33/80 35/77 pc 
I 26/73 17/93 3 
a 43/1093058 a 
9 23/73 )4/57 • 
pc 24/75 14/57 pc 
a 34/75 16/61 pc 
1 38/93 16/64 * 


Location 

Wmttwr 

High 

Low 

Water 

Wm 

Wind 



Temp. 

Temp. 

Temp. 

Heights 

Speed 



OF 

CfF 

OF 

(Metres) 

fkph) 

Cannes 

partly sunny 

2S/82 

21/70 

2679 

1-2 - 

E 

. 10-20 

OeauvUe 

partly eunny 

27180 

18181 

IBIS* 

1-2 

N 

15-30 

Pi mini 

sunny 

32/89 

23173 

2679 

0-1 

NE 

12-25 

Malaga 

sunny 

33191 

25/77 

2577 

0-1 

SE 

12-25 

Cagvah 

sunny 

33/91 

23/73 

27/80 

(M 

W 

1020 

Faro 

partly sunny 

27/80 

20/60 

20188 

1-2 

SW 

15-30 

Piraeus 

sunny 

32/89 

24/75 

2679 

0-1 

NW 

12-25 

Corfu 

sunny 

32/89 

24/75 

2679 

0-1 

NW 

15-25 

Bngtwm 

penty sunny 

26/79 

15/59 

17/62 

0-1 

W 

15-25 

Ostend 

party sunny 

26/79 

1066 

19/86 

0-1 

s 

12-25 

Schevemngen 

party sunny 

26/79 

1068 

20/BB 

0-1 

s 

1020 

Syft 

portly sunny 

26/79 

18/B4 

2170 

0-1 

S • 

10-20 

Izmir 

clouds and sun 

37 /ae 

24/75 

2679 

1-2 

N 

20-40 

Tel AVIV 

sunny 

31/88 

25/77 

27/80 

1-2 

SW 

2040 

Caribbean and West Atlantic 







Barbados 

party sunny 

32/H9 

24/75 

27/BO 

T-2 

6NE 

2035 

Kingston 
Sl Thomas 

party sunny 

31/88 

23(73 

2082 

1-2 

E 

25-50 

sunny 

3«/S3 

2475 

2082 

1-2 

E 

25-35 

Hamilton 

party sunny 

24 /re 

16/61 

27/80 

1-2 

SE 

20-40 

Asia/Pacific 

Penang 

clouds and sun 

32/89 

2373 . 

3WB6 

Q-T 

SW 

10-20 

Pbufcel 

clouds and sun 

3M1 

2*75 

2084 

0-1 

SW 

15-25 

Baft 

clouds and sun 

31/BS 

2271 

29/84 

0-1 

SW 

12-25 

Cebu 

party sunny 

32/89 

2577 

30/86 

0-1 . 

ssw 

15-30 

Pokn Beach. Aue 

party tunny 

23/68 

12/53 

.18161 

1-2 

w 

2035 

Bay of Islands, NZ 

showers 

14/57 

7/44 

1081 

1-2 

SW 

25-50 

Shirofiama 

sunny 

32/89 

2577 

27/80 

1-2 

SE 

2035 

Honolulu 

party Sunny 

30/86 

2373 

2679 

0-1 

ENE 

25-45 


Europe and Middle Bret 
Location Weedier 


Al toredMs ana aou provide:! 
by Accu-WMfm. mu 1994 


Cannes 

sunny 

29/84 

2170 

2679 

1-2 

SE 

12-25 

Daauvffla ' 

partly sunny 

2577 

15/59 

18*4 

\ .1-2 

NE 

15-30 

Rimini 

sunny 

33191 

2475 

28/79 

0-1 

NE 

1020 

Malaga 

thunderstorms • 

31/88 

2577 

2679 

0-1 

SW 

12-25 ■■ 

Ceglarf - 

- sunny . 

33/91 

2475 

27/80 

0-1 

W 

10-20 

Faro 

dauOsBRdaua 

2878 

19/88 

18/06 

1 4. 

SW 

15-30 _ 

Pvaeus 

Bunny 

32/89 

2373 

2679 

0-1 

NW 

12-85 

Corfu : 

Sunny 

33/91 

2373 

2079 

0-1 

NW 

15-K 

Brighton 

sunny 

24/75. 

14/57 

18*1 

1* 

W 

20-40 

Ostend 

ckwds and sun 

24/75 

17/62 

19*8 

1-2 

S 

20-40 

.Schenrenlngen 

dauttandsun 

2475 

17*2 

20*8 

1-2 

S 

15-30 . 

SyU 

pertly sunny 

24/75 

16*1 

2068 

OI 

SE 

12-S 

fcmtr 

sunny 

34/93 

2373 

2870 

1-2 

N 

20-40 

TefAvw 

sunny 

31/88 

2577 

27/80 

1-2 

SW 

2040 


Caribbean and West Atlantic 


Barbados 
Krigsttwi _ 
St-Thomas 
Hamilton 


AsWPecffic 


Penang 

Phuket 

Ball 

Cadu 

Palm Beech. Aua. 
Bey of Islands. NZ 


Bay of I s/an 

Shfcafwma 

Honolulu 


sonny 

31/88 

2475 

27*0 

1-2 

ENE 

20-35 

partly sunny 

33*1 

2475 

28*2 

1-2 

E 

25-50 - 

ninny - - 

33*1 

2475 

28*2 

1-2 

E 

25-3o - 

party sunny 

2475 

18*1 

27*0 

1-2 

SE 

20-35 

douda and sun 

32*9 

2373 

30*6 

0-1 

SW 


thunderstorms 

32*9 

2577 

29*4 

0-1 

SW 

15-25 

clouds and sun 

31*8 

2373 

29*4 

0-1 

sw 

12-25 

party sunny 

32*9 

2577 

30*6 

0-1 

ssw 

12-22 

sunny 

2170 

13/55 

18*1 

1-2 

WSW 2040 

cloudy 

15/50 

8/46 

16*1 

1-2 

sw 


party sunny 

33*1 

2577 

27*0 

1-2 

SE 


clouds and sun 

31/88 

2475 

2679 

0-1 

ENE 

25-45 


Travel in a world without borders, time zones 

or language barriers. 


AESETAccessNumbers. 
how to call around the work! 

1- L'jJng ihe chan below, find the country you are calling fern. 

1 Dial the corresponding ffliT Access NumbiX 

3. An .KDS English-speaking Operator oriXMceprompt will ask lor tbe pbane number vou wish to raUorcanneavoutoa 
customer serview representative. ■ 

To rreeive your free waflet card of ACS^s/Voosss Nuntijers, Jost ^al the atxeasTtumber of 

thecounuy youte in awl ask for Customer Service 


<rat- 


COUNTRY 


Australia 


ACCESS NUMBER 

ASIA . 

1-800-881-011 


China. PRO** 

fiiwm 

Hong Kong 

India* 

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Japan* 

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Korea** 

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Philippines* 
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Sri tanka 

Taiwan* 

Thailand* 


^aa otmgo an* • Imagine a world where you can call country ro country as easily as you can from home. And 

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convenient Access Numbers on your right. 


Armenia*’ 

Austria—* 

Belgium" 

Bulguti 

Croatia** 

Czech Rep 

Denmark* 

Finland* 

France 

Germany 

Gre ece* 

Hungary* 

kvhixhi 

Ireland 


** 10811 

018-872 

800-1111 

000-117 

001-801-10 

0039-111 

009-11 

' 11 * 

800-0011 

OOP-911 

109-11 

235-2872 

800-0111-111 

430430 

0080-102884) 

0019191-1111 

EUROPE 

a»i4m 

022-903-011 

0800-100-10 

00-1800-0010 

99-380011 

00420-001QI 

BOOl-OOlO 

9800-100-10 

I9*/0011 

. 0130-0010 

00-800-1311 

00*-8QPPllll 

999-001 

1-800-550-000 


COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER 

Hair 172-1011 

Ucchicnstcln* . 35500-1 1 

TlfTmania* 8*196 

toxanbounT P800-0m 

Ma cedonia , F.YJL of 958004288 

Mate* ■ - 080 pfl 90 .no 

Monaco* . 19 *- 00 ii 

Netherlands- ~ 06 -022-9111 

Norway 800-190-13 

Poland-*- ~ 0*010-480-0111 

FowngaT 05017-1-288 

Rom a nia 01-800-4288 

RqgalaTMo growj 133-5042 

Slovakia 00-420-001P1 

Sprit* WP9WJ0-11 

Sweden* 020-795611 

153-00-31 

Kg- 0500-8»0011 

Ukraine* 8*100-11 

aflPPLEEAST " 

~~ sdopoT 

Q 804001 D 

177-100-2727 

800-288 

Ctefrvt) 42 frfl 0 i 

0800 - 011-77 

i* ~ - i = a55ao. 

00-800-12277 
• - - WXM21 

AME RICAS 

: 001 - 800 . 200^71 
W 

■ ■ ■■ 0-800-1112 


Bahrain 

Cyprus* 

Israel 

Ruwak 

Lebanon (Bclnit) 

Qatar- • 
SmcH/yiibia 
• thrioer ~ 

■hab.* .; 


COUNTRY 

Brazil 

ttfc 

Cotmnbla 
Costa Rka*a 
JEcuadof' 
HSaN-adoT^r 
Guanenola* 


Honduxa^a 

Mexico*** 

Wcaragaa( 

Panama* 

Pew* 

Sn riranw 

Uruguay 

Venezuela*a 


ACCESS NUMBER 

000-8010 

005-0312 
980 - 11-0010 

m 

119 

190 

190 

165 

; 123 

95 -800-462-1 2*0 


Bahamas 

Ber m uda* 
British VI 
Cayman Islands 
Grenada* 

Haiti* - 
Jamaica** 
NfeOLAnIfl~ 
St KtavNeiiT" 


CManagua) 174 

109 

191 

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00-0410 

■ . 80-01 1-120 

CARIBBEAN 

1-800-872-2881 

1-800-872-2381 

1-800-672-2881 

1-80(^872-2881 

1-800-872-2681 

001-SXW2-28S3 

0-600872-2881 - 

001-800^72.2881 
fa 1-600-672-aSl 

AFRICA - 


J:1> ' 


Gabon* 


Kenya* 

W&b ' 
Sooth Africa - 


AT&T 




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