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INTERNATIONAL 



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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 




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Paris, Tuesday, August 9, 1994 


No. 34,662 


UN Swarrvpedby a World Awash With Refugees 



Willi the Crisis 

By John Daraton 

New York Times Service 

GENEVA — The exodus of 2 million, 
refugees from Rwanda was not an aberra- 
tion but part of a trend in which increasing 
millions of people worldwide are being put 
to flight by war and famine. 

The number of refugees has mush- 
roomed ovef the last two decades, from 2.4 
million in 1974 to 10.5 million by 1984 to 
close to 23 million today. 

. When addai to an estimated 26 mfflian 
“internally displaced" people, those who 
have abandoned their home areas but have 
not happened to cross an Hitcmational 
houndary, it readies the staggering level of 
49millioiL 

Thai means, according to the United 
Nations High Commissiouer for Refugees, 
that one in every 114 people in the world 
has been uprooted by conflict and forced 
to move somewhere rise to search for secu- 
rity or sustenance. 

For th 
with the 

an unenti—o ^ 

Commissioner was founded at the outset 
of the Cold War with a mandat* to an- 






V 

1 


water for camps as large as American cit- 
ies. 

“We can't cope," said Sylvana Foa, 
spokeswoman for the refugee agency. “We 
used to be a bunch of lawyers working on 

R rotection. Our function was legalistic. 
Tow it's emergency response." 

What has also grown is the realization 
that the problem erf forced flight, wfckshfor 
decades had been viewed as a I 
of the Cold War, is not 
that the Cold War is over, 

Indeed* aside from the settlement of 
some regional conflicts that has led to the 
repatriation erf refugees to places like Cam- 
bodia' and Mozambique, me problem has 
gotten almost immeasurably worse. 

The high-water marie for repatriation 
was 1992, when some 2.4 million refugees 
returned home. Bmthatnumber has been, 
dwarfed by the number of new refugees. 

And even .the occasional success story 
turned sour. In Afghanistan, where some 
1.5 mSHoa people carirebackax 1992 alone, 
after roorrthan ^decadcirf exilein Paki-? 
stan and renewed SghtingbhAeour * 



.... Muklhiili SCTns'ApcnrtVrancc-Pn.w 

A half-i^rved Rwandan child earing biscuits on Monday at a refugee camp. 


stan has closed its bender, most of them are 
stuck in miserably hot tent camps on the 
outskirts of the provincial capital of Jalala- 
bad. 

Old wars have continued, often with a 
frightening savagery. New wars have bro- 
ken out, many with an ugly ethnic dimen- 
sion in which entire groups are targeted for 
ouster or liquidation. 

In addition to Rwanda, ethnic conflicts 
in Africa have occurred in Liberia, Sierra 
Leone, Sudan, Angola and Somalia. Else- 
where, they have broken out in the volatile 
republics that once belonged to the Soviet 
Union — - Georgia, Tajikis tan , Armenia 
and Azerbaijan — and in a range of coun- 
tries from Iraq to Sri and Burma. 

' Palestinians, the group with the longest 
history of displacement, have been contin- 
ually uprooted by regional wars since the 
creation of Israel in 1948. They are assisted 
by a separate UN agency, die United Na- 
tions Relief and Works Agency for Pales- 
tine Refugees in the Near East. 

“Right after the Cold War, we thought 
all the problems would be solved," noted 
Sadako Ogata, the UN High Commission- 
er for Refugees. “We didn’t realize that the 
Cold War had another aspect to it — that 
the superpowers provided order or pressed 
order on their respective zones of influ- 
ence. And so, ethnic or religious or nation- 
al conflicts, whether within the Commu- 
nist bloc or the Western bloc, had liide 
chance of exploding.* 1 

“So now, post-Cold War," she said, “we 
are seeing the explosion of much more 
traditional, dormant, maybe pre- World 
War I kinds of ethnic conflict." 

Hie new conflicts that occur inside 
countries rather than between countries 
have several distinct aspects: 

• Since the conflict is often ethnic or 
religious, the killing leads to be wide- 
spread and aimed at a specific civilian 
population. The realization of this alone is 
enough to cause mass panic and flight. 

■ In some of the conflicts, as a UN 
report issued last year put it. “displace- 
ment of people is not the by-product of 
war but one of its primaiy purposes/' This 
is seen, for example, in the “ethnic cleans- 
ing" campaign by Serbs in Bosnia. 

■ In others, like those in Somalia and 
Afghanistan, the state has virtually with- 
ered away, leaving the field to warlords 
who plunder the countryside with medi- 
eval abandon, chasing out large groups of 
people. 

• The weaponiy involved, some of it 
pumped in by the superpowers during 
years of proxy warfare, is highly destruc- 
tive, consisting of multiple-launch rockets. 


Rabin, in Aqaba, Vows 
Peace With Hussein 

Jordan and Israel Leaders Open 
A New Crossing at Old Minefield 


amoogthipM^Iim: fighters who ousted the which survived intact the ^jihad" against mn rt*r** n A 

Sovfctt s --V r K. to aW:fi3Tof missiles, artillery, mortars and, most perm 


This/has devastated Kabul. thier capital, . hundreds of thousands. But because Paid* 


See REFUGEES, Page 4 


By Chris Hedges 

yew York Tima Service 

ARAVA CROSSING, Jordan — Prime 
Minister Yitzhak Rabin, in the first official 
visit to Jordan by a leader of Israel, met 
King Hussein on Monday in his seaside 
summer palace in Aqaba and opened a 
common border crossing as the two na- 
tions moved swiftly toward the conclusion 
of 46 years of hostilities. 

The meeting and ceremony, after years 
of secret contacts, came just two weeks 
after the Washington meeting between Mr. 
Rabin and the Jordanian monarch that 
ended the state of belligerency between the 
two nations. 

Phone links between Jordan and Israel 
were established on Sunday, and the king 
may visit Jerusalem as early as next week, 
according to Israeli officials. 

“We are literally seated at this time and 
this place, all of os, Israelis and Jordani- 
ans, on the remains of the past," Prime 
Minister Rabin said at the arid border 
crossing. “We are sitting on an old mine- 
field. which was cleared only three days 
ago. This is what divided Israel and Jordan 
for decades. This is the field in which death 
and destruction were sowed. 1 ' 

“We are sitting at this time and at this 
place, all of us, Israelis and Jordanians, 
before the future.” Mr. Rabin said, “To 
our right and to our left stand the new 
Israeli-Jordan border crossing terminals, 
which sprang up overnight." 

The king, who warmly welcomed Mr. 
Rabin at his palace, promised that this was 
just the start He described his Israeli 
counterparts as “friends and partners." 
And later in the day the prime minister 
told reporters that he had first met the 
Jordanian monarch 20 years before. 

When asked how long he had known 
King Hussein. Mr. Rabin said: “Now that 
it has all been published, 1 will tell you that 
when we were all three at the White House. 
President Clinton, the king and myself. 
Clinton turned to us and asked us: Tell me 
the truth, how long have you known each 
other?* 

“I looked at the king, and he didn't 
reply. 1 answered. Twenty-one years.' 

“Then he corrected me and said, Twen- 
ty years.’ and he was right." 


King Hussein said: “This is something I 
have never experienced over the many, 
many years that have passed. I hope it is 
something we will leave for all people, 
men, women and children, to live with and 
enjoy in the future." 

Secretary of State Warren M. Christo- 
pher, who met with the king and the prime 
minister and later traveled with them 
aboard the king’s yacht, said that “the 
rhetoric of peacemaking is giving way and 
being translated into reality.” 

Mr. Christopher is in the Middle East to 
help broker a deal between Israel and 
Syria. Syria remains critical of the contacts 
between the Israelis and their Palestinian 
and Jordanian counterparts. 

The border crossing, which lies 32 kilo- 
meters (2 miles) north of the Red Sea port 
of Aqaba, will be open, for now, to foreign 
tourists and Israelis with foreign passports. 
But the king said he hoped Israeli and 
Jordanian passport holders would not 
have to wait long to use it. 

The rapprochement comes as Syria and 
Israel struggle to break a deadlock in the 
peace process. Mr. Christopher, who met 
with President Hafez Assad of Syria for 
five hours Sunday in Damascus, said that 
the two countries “have a great distance to 
go" to make peace. 

Mr. Rabin unexpectedly criticized the 
Palestine liberation Organization for de- 
laying Palestinian elections and slowinglip 
the agreement between the Israeli and Pal- 
estinian leadership. He said that further 
agreements, including the status of the 
remainder of the West Bank, could not be 
decided until the PLO went ahead with 
legislative elections, as called for in the 
self-rule agreement. 

The elections had been scheduled for 
mid-July- The prime minister said he ex- 
pected to meet the PLO chairman, Yasser 
Arafat, on Wednesday to discuss the delay. 

“We are not the party that prevents the 
beginning of negotiations about elec- 
tions/’ he said, asserting that the Palestin- 
ians “have not yet started" even offering 
ideas about the process. 

The border ceremony was attended by 
both Jordanian and Israeli veterans, as 

See BORDER, Page 4 


*1 


/ 


Vatican Finds Sin in Text 

ion 



1 Document Promotes Abortion, It Says 

i- Rv Alan Cowell Socdfically, the statement took i 


I 


By Alan CoweU 

New York Tima Sendee 

ROME — Arguing that "die future of 1 
humanity" is at stake at a forthcoming 
United Nations population conference, 
the Vatican launched its most detailed and 
acerbic attack Monday on the United ■ 
States and other participants of the gather- : 
ing, accusing thorn of promoting abortion 
on demand and homosexuality. 

The statement by Joaquin Navarro- 
Valls, the papal spokesman, deepened the. 
already profound rift between the Roman 
Catholic Church hierarchy and a lobby of . 
U.S. administration officials and feminist 
groups that have cast the September con- 
ference in Cairo as potentially one of the 
most significant tinning pants for the 
rights of women around the world. 

Moreover, the Vatican’s condemnation 
not only of specific excerpts from the con- 
ference’s preparatory documents but also 
its use of such langoage as “sexual health” 
and "reproductive hemth" seemed to block 
any prospect of consensus on the propos- 
als as they stand. 

“We are interested in a consensus on the 
true well-being of men and women, not in 
a consensus on words and, even less, on 
slogans," the statement said. 

The broadside was the latest maneuver 
in what U.S. officials have called the most 
vehement and concerted diplomatic cam- 
paign the Vatican has Launched in recent 
years to influence international policy. 
From the Vatican’s viewpoint, the confer- 
ence has come to be cast as 'a cracni 
challenge to its most fundamental doctrine 

on the sanctity of life and the famfiy. 

“The Holy See is wdl aware that the 
future of humanity is under discussion, 
the statement said. 


the statement took issue 
with two of the 16 chapters in a prepara- 
tory document that emerged from consul- 
tations at the UN headquarters in New 
York last April. The document is to be 
debated in .Cairo as the basis for interna- 
tional ■ guidelines for all UN members as 
they contemplate national legislation to 
confront the population etuis. 

The- world's population is estimated at 
around 5.7 bQlion and could burgeon to 10 
billion within 20 years. The Cairo propos- 
als are supposed to stabilize it at 7 2 billion 
by ‘2050. 

When he met the Pope during a visit to 
Rome in Jane, President Bill Umton said 
be did not favor abortion on demand but 
acknowledged abiding differences with the 
Pope Over tiie president’s policy that abor- 
tion be “safe, legal and rare.” 

The Vatican insists that life is sacred 
from conception, and Pope John Paul II 
has turned his opposition to the Cairo 
proposals and his tear that they will legiti- 
mize abortion into one of the most vehe- 
ment crusades of his 16-year papacy. 

“ Thou shalt not kUT is as valid for the 
embryo as for individuals who are already 
bom," the Pope said Sunday. 

Last month. Cardinal Alfonso Ldpez 
Trujfflo, head of the Pontifical Council for 
the Family, said the Cairo gathering would 
lead to “the most disastrous massacre in 
history” if it legitimized abortion as a 
means of controlhng famfly sizes. 

And in Jane, 114 of the world’s 139 
cardinals — the pinnade-of ’the church 
hierarchy -r— backed Cardinal John O'Con- 
nor of New York in a demand that the' 
Cairo conference should not produce “cul- 

See VATICAN, Page 4 


To Build Economic Health, Europe Faces Sacrifices 


By William Drozdiak 

Washington Post Service 

COLMAR, France — Unlike many of his Alsatian 
ancestors, who rarely found peace and prosperity in this 
picturesque Rhine Valley town fought over for centuries 
by French and German troops, Philippe Walter has led 
a charmed life. 

Mr. Walter, 40, a marketing consultant, and his wife. 
Gabrielle, have grown up amid one of the most remark- 
able eras of affluence Europe has ever known. The 
European Union has progressed to a point where war 


between France and Germany seems unthinkable, and 
the Walters have been able to bring up two sons in a 
tranquil welfare state that is considered one of the 
postwar era’s greatest achievements. 

But as be contemplates the future of his sons, Jean- 
Yves, 12, and Francois. 10, Mr. Waiter wonders if their 
generation will have the same good fortune. 

The Walters may pay slightly higher taxes than their 
American middle-class peers living on a $30,000-a-year 
salary. But they enjoy benefits few U.S. companies can 
match. By French law, Mr. Walter gets five weeks of 


paid vacation a year. Like other workers, he receives a 
Christmas bonus equal to an extra month’s pay. Lunch 
at the company cafeteria is heavily subsidized. Paid 
maternity leave at his company can last up to nine 
months, and Mr. Walter’s employer and the state help 
ensure that all of his family’s education, medical care 
and pension costs are covered. 

Now. however, “it’s becoming a national preoccupa- 
tion about bow to keep our benefits when the rest of the 
world considers them outlandish luxuries,” Mr. Walter 

See EUROPE, Page 4 



David G&vA*mx France- Prcne 

ON DISPLAY — An armed 
“bobby,” until now an unusual 
sight, stamfing guard Monday 
outside No. 10 Downing Street 


Bosnia Muslims Launch a New Offensive 

Army k Emboldened by NATO Raid and Rift Among Serbs 


By John Pomfret 

Washington Poet Service 

SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina — 
The mostly Muslim Bosnian Army, long 
the underdog in the 27-momh-old war, has 
launched its second major offensive in six 
weeks in an attempt to profit from an 
apparent rift among the Serbs, better rela- 
tions with the Croatians and a NATO 
ultimatum banning the use or transport of 
heavy weapons around Sarajevo, United 
Nations officials said Monday. 

Like the last Muslim campaign, which 
the Serbs beat back July 6, this fight south 
of the central Bosnian town of V ares is also 
about roads, in this case a route linking 
central Bosnia with the rich agricultural 
and industrial region of Tuzla to the north- 
east. But now, for the first time since 1992, 
Croatian units are fighting side by side 
with M uslim troops in central Bosnia, the 
officials said. 

So far, the battles over Route Skoda, as 
UN officials call it, have played an impor- 
tant role in the North Atlantic Treaty 
Organization’s first air strike around Sara- 


jevo, the Serbian move to rdmpose Saraje- 
vo’s siege and the re-emergence of snipers 
aiming down the streets of this Balkan 
capital. 

The struggle for towns like Brgule and 
Dastansko illustrate how far away peace is 
from Bosnia and illuminate the gap be- 
tween Western initiatives to stop the war 
and the reality in Bosnia’s dust and mud. 
They also reflect how important the pres- 
ence of the UN is to the Muslim-dominai- 
ed army. 

Saddled with an enormous disadvantage 
in weaponry because of an international 
arms embargo, and facing a Serbian force 
equipped by the fourth largest standing 
force in Europe, the old Yugoslav People’s 
Army. Bosnia's Muslims are forced to rely 
on UN forces to protect their flanks ana 
their ci vilians as they strive to win back 
lost ground. The only problem is that the 
patience erf Western nations like France 
and Britain, which make up the bulk of the 
UN force here, is wearing thin. 

“These attacks certainly aren’t venr 
helpful to the peace process," said Sir 


Michael Rose, commander of UN forces in 
Bosnia, in an interview Monday. “They are 
one of the reasons why the Serbs feel quite 
justified in dosing off Sarajevo." 

Lieutenant General Rose announced a 
plan to demilitarize Sarajevo following the 
U.S. -led air strike on a Bosnian Serbian 
anti-tank system on Friday. But the way 
each faction interpreted the move indicat- 
ed it had little hope of success. 

Bosnian Serbian officers said they 
would only recommend approval of such a 
plan if it meant a complete cessation of 
hostilities around Vares as well. Bosnian 
Muslim officers, however, rejected any 
freezing of the lines to the north and 
viewed the idea as a way to liberate men 
from trenches around Sarajevo to fight on 
battlefields nearby. 

The Muslim attack from Vares south 
toward Route Skoda began last week 
shortly after the Bosnian Serbian assembly 
rejected an international peace plan that 
would divide Bosnia into two roughly 
equal parts: one Serbian and one con- 

See SERBS, Page 2 



For Defiant Iranian Youths, Happiness Is in the Hills 


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New York Times' Senke 

DARAKEH, Iran — It was not yet 9 in the morning 
and Mehdi Nazemi, with a M day’s work in front of him, 
had broken into a heavy sweat 

“It has been bad all morning,” he said. “Girls in 
baseball caps, covered with makeup, coming up here 
■without proper head scarves. And the boys use words 1 
can’t repeat and strip off their shirts. It is a dirty, lonely ■ 
job. But we must be ready id die for God.” 

Each weekend, several thousand young Iranian men 
and women take off for the small village of Darakeh. at 
the northwest comer or Tehran, to climb the sharp, rocky 
peaks that surround- the city and to escape the rigorous 
restrictions imposed by the Islamic state. 

And each weekend the members of the government- 
backed. Islamic popular militias, like the Basstj. send their 
finest followers to make .sure that Iranian youths enjoy 
the fresh air and the hike, hut not each other. 


Militia members hide in bushes along the sides of the 
trail and pounce on groups of teen-agers. 

Boys dive from rocks into the pools bare chested and 
scamper up the rocky slopes as panting militiamen try to 
catch them. 

Girls tuck baseball caps under their head scarves and 
apply makeup and fingernail polish once they have 
passed checkpoints. 

And atop some jagged peaks, girls brazenly strip off 
their required baggy cloaks and black head scarves for 
picnics with boyfriends. 

Facing defiance by the young men and women, many 
of whom come from Westernized middle- or upper-class 
families, the militias have set up “detention houses" in 
the mountains where they tty to teach proper Islamic 
behavior to smirking teen-agers caught defying the rules. 
And for repeat offenders, the militias keep buses at the 
base of the park to ferry young men and women to 
detention houses that hold them overnight. 


But despite the best efforts of the volunteers like Mr. 
Nazemi, the park has become the biggest pickup spot in 
Tehran. Some boys spend the evening before they go 
there copying their phone numbers on dozens of slips of 
paper so they can band them out to prospective girl- 
friends the next day. A few said they had forged docu- 
ments to make it look as if their girlfriends were their 
sisters. 

In desperation, the militias recently began to use mega- 
phones at the base of the park to warn young Iranians 
that if they did not stop misbehaving, access to the park 
could be restricted to allow girls and boys to visit only on 
alternate weeks. But few of the youth mere appear ready 
to redirect their interests to the slopes and streams. 

“This is the only fun left to us in litis country." said 17- 
year-old Nahid Azaripour. who was being sent home for 

See IRAN, Page 4 


Kiosk 


Argentine Judge 
Ties Iran to Blast 

BUENOS AIRES (Reuters) — An 
Argentine judge has obtained evi- 
dence linking Iranian diplomats to a 
bomb that killed nearly 100 people 
last month at the offices of a Jewish 
organization in Buenos Aires, a court 
source said Monday. 

Judge Juan Jose Galeano, who has 
been investigating the attack, has ob- 
tained enough proof for the case to go 
to Argentina's Supreme Court, the 
source said. 


Book Review 


Page 7, 







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Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 9, 1994 


North Korea Offers 
Plan for Fuel Rods 

Officials in Geneva Report 
Some Progress in Atom Talks 


New York Times Service 

Resuming negotiations after 
a weekend break, the United 
States and North Korea said 
Monday that they had made 
some progress in dealing with 
an array of issues related to 
North Korea's nuclear program 
and its suspected nuclear ambi- 
tions. 

ATtw nine hours of talks in 
the North Korean Mission to 
the United Nations in Geneva, 
North Korea’s chief delegate, 
Kang Sok Ju, said he proposed 
a solution to the problem of 
8,000 spent nuclear fuel rods, 
which the United States fears 
could be reprocessed into weap- 
ons-grade plutonium. 

Without offering details, he 
said he had proposed a “proper 
way” of handling the fuel that 
would “certainly ease the con- 
cerns of the international com- 
munity." 

North Korea has said the 
fuel now stored in a cooling 
pond, must be reprocessed or 
treated before the end of Au- 
gust if an accident is to be avert- 
ed. 

Mr. Kang said North Korea 
was also ready to freeze its con- 
struction of graphite nuclear re- 
actors in exchange for “proper 
and appropriate” compensa- 
tion and provision of a new 
light-water reactor. Washing- 
ton favors such a change since 
light-water technology yields 
less plutonium than graphite re- 
actors. 

Robert L. Gallucci, who 
heads the American negotiating 
team, said he considered North 
Korea's proposals “interesting, 
certainly worthy of study and 
consideration," although he re- 
fused to elaborate on their con- 
tent. He said the two sides 
would meet again Wednesday, 
allowing time for consultations 
with governments. 

In the negotiations, the Unit- 
ed States is hoping to persuade 
North Korea to accept interna- 
tional inspection of all its nucle- 
ar installations and to place any 
plutonium stocks — as well as 
the spent fuel rods — under 
international control. In ex- 
change, it has offered to ease 
Pyongyang’s isolation by pro- 


viding it with economic aid and 
some diplomatic recognition. 

“I would say that we made 
some progress on some of the 
issues outstanding between us,” 
Mr. Gallucci told reporters af- 
ter Monday's session, “but of 
course there are many issues — 
many complicated issues — yet 
to be resolved. We have certain- 
ly a ways to go.” 

The talks, which were inter- 
rupted after one day last month 
by the death of North Korea's 
longtime president, Kim II 
Sung, resumed in Geneva last 
Friday. At that time, the United 
States presented a set of de- 
tailed proposals to North Ko- 
rea. On Monday, the North Ko- 
rean delegation countered with 
its own ideas. 

“Many of the issues were 
contained in our initial propos- 
al on Friday." Mr. Gallucci 
said, “and many of the issues 
were contained in the set of 
ideas put forward today. Not all 
are completely comprehen- 
sive.” 

The American official said he 
still could not predict how long 
the talks would last 

In Pyongyang, meanwhile. 
North Korean leaders vowed 
on Monday to put Kim II 
Sung’s eldest son “at the top of 
the party, the state and the 
army.” 

But the son, Kim Jong D, was 
conspicuously absent from the 
ceremony. 

The North Korean Central 
News Agency said the S talinis t 
state’s elite made the promise at 
a ceremony marking the pas- 
sage of one month since Kim D 
Sung's death on July 8. 

North Korean leaders have 
pledged allegiance to Kim Jong 
U since his father’s death, but 
he has yet to be officially con- 
firmed in the posts his father 
held — state president, general 
secretary of the Workers’ Party 
and chairman of the party’s 
central military commission.' 

The North Korean agency 
said those attending the cere- 
mony Monday included De- 
fense Minister O Jin U and 
Prime Minister Kang Song 
San. 

— ALAN RIDING 



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Activists protesting on Monday in Paris over Japanese immigration restrictions on people with AIDS. 

Asia Is Warned to Act Quickly on AIDS 


By David Brown 

Washington Past Service 

YOKOHAMA, Japan — Asia has 
barely enough time to apply the lessons 
learned elsewhere about the AIDS epi- 
demic if it wants to prevent the rapid 
spread of the disease here. 

That was the sobering message offered 
Monday as the 10th International Con- 
ference on AIDS began at its first Asian 
venue. 

Though human immunodeficiency vi- 
rus, or HTV, infection is well-established 
in such Southeast Asian countries as 
Thailand and Burma, and is growing 
steadily in India, in many places the 
disease has just arrived and the opportu- 
nity to prevent its spread is greater than 
it will ever be, experts said. 

“In places where the epidemic is just 
moving into the early explosive phase — 
like much of Asia — the overriding need 
is to act now, without delay." said Mi- 
chael H. Merson, director of the World 
Health Organization's Global Program 
on AIDS. 

“Provide your most vulnerable citi- 
zens the information and means — in- 
cluding condoms — to protect them- 
selves," he said. 

By conservative estimates, there are 
now about 17 million people infected 
with HIV worldwide, 3 million more 
than a year ago. Infections in sub-Saha- 


ran Africa, where the virus is believed to 
have arisen, account for about 60 percent 
of the total. Asia’s share has risen from 
12 percent to 16 percent since last year’s 
conference in Bolin, Mr. Merson said. 

HIV prevalence varies widely in Asia, 
though the disease has been reported 
everywhere in the region except some 
island groups of the South. Pacific. Japan 
has reported only 3,317 cases through 
April. The specter of AIDS in Chino, 
however, worries many people. 

More than three-quarters of China’s 
cases are in the southern province of 
Yunnan. Through the end of last year 
there were about 1,000 infections, nearly 
all of them male farmers who inject 
drugs, said Hehe Cheng, a health official. 

Though the number so far is low, Chi- 
na is fertile ground for die spread of HIV 
through heterosexual contact, the most 
common mode of transmission in devel- 
oping countries. 

From 1987 to 1990, new reports of 
sexually transmitted disease, primarily 
gonorrhea, rose 47 percent a year, ac- 
cording to Yun-fong Ngeow, of the Uni- 
versity of Malaya, in Maylasia. Because 
it causes infl amma tion and tissue ulcer- 
ation, venereal disease facilitates spread 
of HTV infection. 

The rise of seually transmitted dis- 
eases in China “tells us how vulnerable 
this country is to HIV spread, especially 


given the massive population movements 
underway as a result of economic expan- 
sion," Mr. Merson said 
“If the HIV epidemic takes hold in this 
giant of a country,” be said, “it could 


Haitian Junta Taking Steps to Show It Will Resist 


By Douglas Farah 

Washington Past Service 

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti — In an 
effort to convince the United States that 
armed intervention would be more diffi- 
cult than military experts have por- 
trayed it, the Haitian Army has em- 
barked on a campaign to show how 
soldiers and civilian volunteers would 
resist an invasion. 

Under the state of siege declared last 
week by the de facto president, Emile 
Jouassaint, the military has also stepped 
up its harassment of supporters of the 
ousted president, the Reverend Jean- 
Bertrand Aristide, as well as cracked 
down on journalists and tightened secu- 
rity around the capital 


“The message is that the army is in 
control and has no intention of leaving,'* 
a foreign military analyst said. “They 
want to show they are calling the shots 
and are getting on with their lives be- 
cause the United States no longer has 
any credibility when it makes threats 
and talks about taking action.” 

The army has been holding training 
sessions every morning with people it 
says are volunteers to fight an invasion. 
The training takes place in front of the 
army general headquarters and across 
the street from the presidential palace. 
Dubbed “Groups of Patriotic Resis- 
tance,” the people do calisthenics and 
march, using sticks as weapons. 

On a recent day. about 1.000 people 


showed up for the drills, including wom- 
en and old men. After finishing, some 
jogged through the main streets, yelling 
slogans against foreign intervention. 

Most diplomats and Haitian analysts 
consulted agree that the 7.000- man Hai- 
tian Army would not present much re- 
sistance to an invasion force. With only 
two small, working propeller-driven air- 
planes in its air force and five armored 
personnel carriers, the military would 
stand little chance of slowing down a 
well-planned operation. 

Haitian soldiers, and sources close to 
the military leadership, have talked 
about a strategy of “evaporation” in 
case of an invasion. They said soldiers 
would simply doff their uniforms and 
slip away with their weapons to their 


homes as civilians. The strategy, accord- 
ing to several sources, would be to wage 
a war of sniping and ha r assment, simi- 
lar, they said, to what international 
forces faced in Somalia. 

Nighttime roadblocks are now more 
frequent around the capital usually 
manned by armed civilians known as 
aLtacbfa. 

On a recent night, the army blacked 
out the entire capital and then carried 
out practice raids on areas where an 
invasion force would be likely to strike. 
The unannounced maneuvers startled 
even those dose to the military. 

The Argentine and Colombian em- 
bassies closed over the weekend, and 
their personnel have left. 


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UN, Hoping for Angola Settlement, 
Delays on New Savimbi Sanctions 


By Thomas W. Lippman 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — In a last 
effort to extract a negotiated 
peace agreement from the 
wreckage of Angola’s civil war. 
United States and other mem- 
bers of the UN Security Coun- 
cil have stopped the dock that 
was ticking toward new sanc- 
tions against Jonas Savimbi, the 
rebd leader, according to U.S. 
and diplomatic sources. 

The council had set a July 31 
deadline for Mr. Savimbi to ac- 
cept a take-it-or-leave-it deal or 
face sanctions aimed at driving 
him and his rebels in the Na- 
tional Union for the Total Inde- 
pendence of Angola back to a 
primitive existence in the bush. 

But the partidpants in the 
Angolan talks have held off in 


deference to President Nelson 
Mandela, who for the first time 
has put his prestige oa the line 
in a country other than his own. 

Mr. Mandela has invited Mr. 
Savimbi to meet him in South 
Africa to discuss the proposed 
Angola settlement. Mr. Savimbi 
has accepted in principle, but 
he has also raised security con- 
cerns and no date has been seL 

Under U.S. pressure, the Lu- 
anda government has accepted 
the agreement as final. But Mr. 
Savimbi has balked because the 
deal gives President Jos6 
Eduardo dos Santos’s faction 
the governorship of Huambo 
province. 

Distressed that one of Afri- 
ca's longest wars was raging on 
because Mr. Savimbi was hung 
up on this point, the Security 


Council gave him until July 31 
to accept the deaL IDs represen- 
tatives faced expulsion from 
Washington and other capitals, 
and his army faced a cutoff of 
arms, which it has been financ- 
ing by exporting diamonds 
from areas under its control. 

Mr. Mandela’s decision to in- 
tervene — prompted in pan by 
evidence mat South African 
mercenaries are again partici- 
pating in the war, according to 
news reports — - injected a new 
element into the negotiations. 

“We would think it’s impor- 
tant that the envisioned meet- 
ing between Mr. Mandela and 
Mr. Savimbi be given an oppor- 
tunity before any action is tak- 
en" by the Security Council, 
said Jim Steward, South Afri- 
ca’s chief UN delegate. 


world briefs 

UJK. Sends 2d Ship in Fishery Fight 

n _ i v t o ram 


have an enormous impact not only on 
China but cm Asia as a whole.” 

A recent epidemiological study in cen- 
tral Africa by the Wood Health Organi- 
zation provided a picture of what the 
“natural history” of the epidemic might 
look like in a population that fails to take 
preventive measures. In Uganda, Tanza- 
nia, Rwanda and Zambia the disease 
took hold in the early 1980s in part 
because its arrival was unfoiseen. 

Researchers found that in those coun- 
tries, nearly half the people who became 
infected in the first dozen years of the 
epidemic did so in its Gist four years. 
People engaged in high-risk behavior — 
primarily intercourse with multiple part- 
ners — rapidly became infected. 

The vast majority ranged in age from 
the midteens to the midforties. 

The disease in that region is now out of 
the “explosive" phase, and the average 
age of infection has dropped. Most new 
infections (except those acquired at 
birth) today occur around the time a 
person becomes sexually active. Among 
women, about 60 percent of newly in- 
fected women get the disease before age 
20. the WHO researchers found. 


SERBS:” 

Muslims Attack 

Cea&aei foam Page I 

trolled by a federation of 
Croats and Muslims. The at- 
tack, General Rose said, was in 
direct violation of an agreement 
made by Sobs and Muslims to 
stop offensive actions. 

The Bosnian Serbian rejec- 
tion of the peace plan had been 
fiercely opposed by President 
Slobodan Milosevic of Serbia, 
the architect of the Serbian re- 
bellion in Bosnia. But Mr. Mi- 
losevic has apparently grown 
disinterested in farther war be- 
cause he wants economic sanc- 
tions. imposed on his country 
for supporting the conflict, lift- 
ed. While Muslim forces were 
inching south. Mr. Milosevic 
shut his borders with Serbian- 
controlled Bosnia in a move im- 
plying that fnel weapons and 
soldiers, which have sustained 
the Bosnian Serbian Army, 
would no longer be provided. 

“Is this theater or is it sub- 
stantial?” General Rose asked 
Monday. “We still don’t 
know." 

Regardless, Bosnian Army 
officials said Mr. Milosevics 
gambit emboldened their attack 
as did a change of heart among 
Croatian forces. 

Croatian soldiers, which held 
a small pocket between Vares 
and Serbian lines around 
Bigule, initially protested that 
Muslim troops had infiltrated 
their lines. The two factions, 
which had fought a vicious war 
in central Bosnia for more than 
a year, concluded a peace deal 
in Washington in March. 

But then, the Croatians ! 
joined the Muslim offensive. ' 


^ Ftsboies Mint 

try awtSe! Alderney was steaming to join the Anglesey m the 
region where Spanish fishermen last wed: cut British drift nets. 

to international waiersinSe Bay of Biscay area ter traditional 
whitefish stocks near Britain’s coasts became depleted. 

Kurds Kidnap 2 Furnish Tourists 

- ANKARA (Reuters) — Kurdish guerrillas, fighting for an 
independent homefaud in southeast Tn^r ^dn^jpcd tv-o Finn- 
ish. tourists after halting their carat a roadblock. local officials 

"SJtSSe still missing, bul their car was rccov «£ i Saturday 
alone the highway between the provincial center of Tunceli and 
the town trfPuIumur in the largely Kurdish southeast. 

A pro-Kurdish newspaper said the Finns were detained for 
faffing to cany a proper travel document in a region c “jf°£r 
the military wing erf the separatist Kurdistan Workers Party. 
Turkish security officials gave the surnames of the two men as 
Hotakainen, bom in 1967, and Po ll a n , boro in 1974. 

Cousteau Opposes Reviving Reactor 

PARIS (Reuters) — The oceanographer Jacques Cousteau 
criticized France on Monday far restarting a fast-breeder nuclear 
reactor. He stud be would ask President Figgis Mitterrand to 
have it shut down. . , ... 

Commandant Cousteau, one of France’s most popular public 
figures, told Le Figaro, the Paris daily, that it was “bypomticar 
to have restarted the 1,200-megawatt Supmphfaiix plant whUe 
most of die country was on vacation. 

The government gave permission tins week for the 18-year-old 
plant at Oeys-Mahulle, near Grenoble, to operate as a research 
unit into recycling nuedear waste after a four-year shutdown. 
Ecologists have protested against restarting the reactor. 

Germans and Foreign Gangs Battle 

SAARBRUCKEN, Germany (AP> — German and foreign 
gangs brawled with clubs, baseball bats, tear gas and broken 
homes at a street fair in tins city near the French border, capping a 
weekend of widespread violence in Germany. 


mm late Sunday mgnt, a ponce spokesman, raui auuut i, »«i. 
The police arrested and released six youths, ages 16 to 19, citizens 
of Jordan, Ukraine, Italy, Turkey and Lebano n . 

' The German youths w e r e also being questioned to determine 
what caused the fight- The gangs had insulted each other but had 
sot. previously battled, Mr. Zimmer said. There were several 
injuries, none serious, he said. 

Ukrainian Increases His Powers 

KIEV (Reuters) — President Leonid S. Kuchina of Ukraine has 
issued two decrees putting himself directly in charge of the 
govemmoit and subordinating all local councils to the presiden- 
cy, state tdeviskm raid Monday. 

Mr. Kuchma won a decisive election victory over the incum- 
bent, ^ Leonid M. Kravchuk, last month on a pledge to improve the 
fakering eoooxHny and build closer ties with Russia. 

The decrees,- which give Mr. Kuchma the power to set the 
government’s agenda and appoint and dismiss the heads of 
powerful state committees, are in line with his assertions that he 
will create a strong presidency. 

Extremists Free Philippines Priest 

ZAMBOANGA, Hrihpptnes (AP) —-Muslim extremists treed a 
Roman Catholic priest on Monday after two months’ captivity, f 
«n«Kng a hostage drama rHut had heightened religious tensions in 
the southern Puilipptnes. 

The Reverend Orito^aeorcla, ''seized' June'S along with about ' 
SO other Christians, was released by a shadowy extremist force 
called the Abu Sayyaf Group after negotiations with provincial 
officials of Barilah Island, where he was being held. Vice President 
Joseph Estrada said. . . . 

Vote Recess Sought in Simpson Trial 

LOS ANGELES (AP) — California state officials asked Mon- 
day for O. J. Simpson’s murder trial to be recessed on election 
day, Nov. 8, and the day before, if it is in session that week. 

Acting Secretary of State Tony Miller sent a letter to Judge 
Lance Ito saying that he worried that the broadcast proceedings 
would divert attention away from the election. Mr. Simpson is 
charged with murder in the Innings of Ins former wife, Nicole 
Brown Simpson, 35, and a friend, Ronald Goldman, 25, who were 
found stabbed to death outside Ms. Simpson’s condo minium on 
June 13. 

In another development, a container of partly melted frozen 
dessert that may help establish the tune of the crime was found in 
the c ond o mi nium and not outside near her body, a source said. 
Newsweek magazin e had quoted unidentified defense sources as 
saying thepartly frozen dessert would suggest that Ms. Simpson 
and Mr. Goldman were alive after 11 PTm., since the dessert 
would have melted quickly in the 60-degree air. By 11 P.M., Mr. 
Simpson was on his way to the airport in a limousine for a trip to 
Chicago. 

TRAVEL UPDATE 

Athens Snubs Air-Control Strikers 

ATHENS (Reuters) — Greece’s Socialist government refused 
to bow to pay demands on Monday from air-traffic contr oller s. ^ 
who are disrupting flights with a work dowdown. r 

Fm«gn tourists arriving for summer vacations in Greece have 
faced long delays at the Athens airport since May, mainly b ecause 
trfthe protest by 500 controllers. The delays, made worse by 
outinoded radar systems; range from one to four hours for most 
arrivals ana departures. 

later tins month to the 

-S3M«JES»iS3BSBSS 

^ Car '. (AP) 

t to ***** between Johannesburg and 

Ljmdra from eight to nine nonstop flights a week, the airline said 

jvumriay. (4FP) 

SK^froS SFv55*r ?I,# ^ ***** **“8 cov ^ 1 fa y 



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ESTERINATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 9, 1994 


Page 3 




ouse 



By Adam Gymer 1 

Nett York Tones Sertice . r 
WASHINGTON — Whan 
the congressional debate ouria- 
tional health inairance-Ieguaa* 
don formally bqgias on Tues- 
day, the Senate will be 
considering -a bill that- relies 
mostly on subsidies to cover 
more people and on enhany ^ d 
competition to control costs. 

The bill, proposed by George 
J. Mitchell, Democrattrf Maine 
and the Senate majority leader, 
would provide the most new 
help to children and pregnant 
women. It would also initiate 
two programs that advocates 
for the elderly have sought for 
years: prescription drug cover- 
age under Medicare and federal 
support for home- and commu- 
nity-based long-term care.- 
But the parts of his bill that 
would affect the most Ameri- 
cans, if- something Kke it be- 
came law, are a' variety of insur- 
ance law changes. They are 
intended to make the 85 percent 
of Americans who already have 
health insurance mane secure 
chat they will not lose the insur- 
ance or find its price suddenly 
doubling or tripling. 

“It’s one of the frustrations 
of the debate,” Mr. Mitchell 
said in an interview, “that those 
who have insurance are unfor- 
tunately bong persuaded by 
some that there is nothing in it 
for them.” 

The legislation that will be 
considered by the House — 
which will start next week but 
finish ahead of the 
late — has many of the sam e 
provisions. ' 

But it also requires employers 
to pay 80 percent erf the cost of 
their workers' insurance .poli- 
cies, and puts the unemployed 
and workers for small, compa- 
nies into a new branch of Modi- 
care, not into insurance pier- 
chasing cooperatives that 
would buy commercial policies, . 
as in the Senate plan. 

If each house passes some- 
thing like the legislation pro- 
posed by its Democratic lead- 
ers, a House-Senate conference 
to reconcile their differences 


Win “be a fairiy tough confer- 
ence" the speakff of the House, 
Thomas S;F61ey, said on a CBS 
news program.;-. 

The- argument -over’ cost con- 
trol win probably be disingenu- 
ous^ as senators complain that 
firmer measures were not in- 
cluded. Bur thfe insurance pre- 
mium Kurils that President Bill 
Clinton proposed feM to conser- 
vative opposition. 

For cost controls, the Mitch- 
ell bill relies first an a modest 
tax on insurance policies whose 
rates go up muchm>re quickly 
than the national average. 

It is also hoped that by stan- 
dardizing health insurance 
benefits, the plan mil promote 
competition among , insurers 
based on price. 

Most of the increased cover- 
age is esqjected /to come from 
four subsidy prognuns, which 
wbuld take effect m 1997: 

• Low-income _ Families 
would receivea .subsidy for the 
full cost of an average health 
insurance poBqyjn. their area if 
they have incomes of up to the 
federal poverty level, or $14,764 
for a family of four. The subsi- 
dy would be gradually phased 
out, stopping at twice the pov- 
erty level, or $29,528. 

-• Children under 19 and 
pregnant women would have 
full subsidies up to 185 percent 
of the poverty level, or $27,313. 
The subsidy would be gradually 
phased out, stopping at' three 
times the poverty level, or 
$44,292. 

• Temporarily unemployed 
workers would be eligible for up 
to six months of subsidies if. 
they had been insured for six 
months before losing their jobs, 
by not having most of their un- 
employment benefits counted 
as income. 

• Employers who expand the 
insurance - coverage of their 
workers could be ehgible for up 
to five years of subsidies, so 
they would jiay no more than 50 
perce n t of the premium or 8 
percent of a worker’s wage, 
whichever is less. 

The. new benefits for the el- 
derly would take effect later. 


AnJm IniKRmiwThc Awneialrd Pnx. 


THE FERE THIS TIME — A graduate surveying the nans after fire ruined a high school In Wedowee, Alabama 
The school was at the center of a furor over the principal's hint be would ban the prom if interracial couples attended. 


Citing ‘Partisanship,’ 
Clinton Lawyer Asks 
Starr to Withdraw 


By Ruth Marcus 
and Rebecca Fowler 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Presi- 
dent Bill Ginton’s lawyer in a 
sexual harassment lawsuit has 
called on Kenneth W. Starr, the 
newly appointed independent 
counsel to investigate 
Whitewater, to step down from 
the case because of an appear- 
ance of "partisanship" against 
Mr. Clinton. 

The attorney, Robert S. Ben- 
nett. said in an interview that he 
had no doubts about Mr. Starr's 
"intellect and integrity." But he 
pointed to Mr. Starr's recent 
comments opposing Mr. Clin- 
ton's argument that he was im- 


Outdoing Himself: The Married Michael Jackson 


By William F. Powers 

- Washington Put Service 

LOS. ANGELES — One night last 
week on Hollywood Boulevard, where 
celebrities become paving stones and 
fans walk on them, the proprietor of the 
Pose With Stars photo booth was having 
a little trouble finding his Michael Jack- 
son. 

Unlike the Tom Cruise and Harrison 
Ford and Madonna and Arnold Schwar- 
zenegger and Janet Jackson cutouts, all 
prominently displayed to pull in the odd 
tourist ready to part with $8, the two- 
dimensional Michael Jackson was in 
back behind the cash register, faring the 
walL 

The proprietor explained that Mr. 
Jackson was not requested much any- 
more. “It’s only for the children,” he 
says. 

If adults no longer want to be photo- 
graphed embracing the image of Mr. 
Jackson, they certainly have not forgot- 
ten he exists. His marriage to Lisa Marie 
Presley, the daughter of Elvis, is just the 
latest inscrutable dispatch from the 
strange world that Mr. Jackson inhabits. 

Earlier this year, hehad drifted off the 
tabloid fronts for a while. Then, in July, 
the Lisa Marie stories began to appear. 
It seemed al first an absurd tale concoct- 
ed by a judge in the Dominican Repub- 
lic who claimed to have performed the 
ceremony. Now the wedding turns out 
to be fact, and Mr. Jackson has taken his 
elaboration of the celebrity archetype to 
its zenith. 


The man who was world-famous be- 
fore puberty, who made the best-selling 
album of all time (“Thriller,” with 48 
. million sold), who bought the rights to 
the Beatles' song catalogue, who wore 
his toy-soldier uniform to the While 
House, who built a private amusement 
park on his ranch, and who seemed 
unable or unwilling to grow up, is now 
the King’s son-in-law. 

Suddenly Mr. Jackson’s willfully fan- 
tastic existence is outdoing even itself. 
The newlyweds are going to sing togeth- 
er at GraceJand in October, according to 

'Michael Jackson is 
basically a small Fortune 
500 company. People 
are gambling millions of 
dollars on him/ 

A music industry officiaL 

reports. They may be having a baby.> 
says one tabloid television show. They 
are living high up in Donald Trump's 
gaudy Manhattan tower, frolicking on 
Italian marble floras with all the world 
at their feet. 

But Mr. Jackson has hardly been re- 
leased from bis earthly troubles. 

In Januaiy, he settled a civil suit filed 
on behalf of a 13-year-old boy who 
claimed he had been sexually molested. 


for an amount reported to have exceed- 
ed $10 million. 

Grand juries both here and in Santa 
Barbara, California, finished their terms 
earlier this year without indicting Mr. 
Jackson. Criminal investigations, how- 
ever, continue in both jurisdictions. 

“It’s sort of gotten a back seat since 
the Simpson case came up,” says a 
source in the office of the Los Angeles 
district attorney, GO Garcetti. 

One of Mr. Jackson's lead attorneys, 
Johnnie L. Cochran Jr., who is now a 
member of O.J. Simpson's defense 
team, says he expects the Los Angeles 
County investigation will be dropped 
within a month. 

The investigation by the Santa Barba- 
ra County district attorney, Thomas W. 
Sneddon Jr., may be another matter. 

C. Michael Cooney, a Santa Barbara 
attorney representing a local newspaper 
In its effort to open up part of the case 
record, said he recently spoke with Mr. 
Sneddon and came away with a definite 
impression that he was pressing the in- 
vestigation hard. 

“He’s not going to let Jackson go," 
Mr. Cooney says. “He's convinced he 
committed crimes with a minor who has 
refused to testify, and he's trying to put 
together a case.” 

What if no charges are brought? Can 
Mr. Jackson move past this controversy 
and mamtflin hjs popularity as a per- 
former? People inside the music indus- 
try say yes, as long as the songs are good. 

“Michael Jackson is basically a small 


Fortune 500 company," said one music 
industry source. "People are gambling 
millions of dollars on him." 

The affair may even stoke interest in 
“History.” a collection of hits and five 
new songs that Mr. Jackson plans to 
release in November. 

Plans for a comeback tour are already 
in the works, according to one music 
industry source. Mr. Jackson is still ca- 
pable of bringing in between $50 million 
and $100 milli on in ticket sales, mer- 
chandising and other income, plus an 
additional $150 million in live-album 
sales, the source said. 

“If I came to you with a business deal 
and said, Tve got somebody who poten- 
tially could gross $250 million,' every- 
body would be interested,'' the source 
said. “That's why Michael is still a 
force.” 

But Mr. Jackson's film deal with Co- 
lumbia Pictures quietly expired at the 
end of last year. 

“I don't think he’s going to be offered 
the Peter Pan movie again, like they 
were talking about,” says Jonathan Tay- 
lor, the managing editor of Variety. 

Mr. Jackson's high-profile marriage 
might help him. 

"If it’s a calm marriage and a success- 
ful one, then people will forget about the 
child molesting." says Philip Stogel 
chairman of the Stogel Cos_ a New 
York celebrity endorsement agency. In- 
stead, they will ‘just think about Mi- 
chael Jackson the talent, and be will still 
be marketable.” 


mu tie as president from bring 
sued by a former Arkansas state 
employee, Paula Corbin Jones. 

He also noted that Mr. Starr 
had planned to file a friend-of- 
the-court brief opposing Mr. 
Clinton’s position. 

"I think Starr should decline 
it,” Mr. Bennett said of Mr. 
Starr's appointment Friday as 
independent counsel. “I think 
there is a real appearance or 
unfairness. If Starr found any- 
thing wrong, I don't think any- 
body could have any confi- 
dence in that." 

Mr. Starr, asked at the Amer- 
ican Bar Association's annual 
meeting in New Orleans about 
Mr. Bennett's comments, said 
he would act impartially and 
“with an open mind.” 

Mr. Bennett’s statements 
were the first public salvo 
against Mr. Starr by a person 
associated with the White 
House and reflected (he intense 
behind-the-scenes unhappiness 
of administration officials and 
their allies with the selection of 
an active Republican and a for- 
mer top official of the Reagan 
and Bush administrations. 

Mr. Starr had been on Attor- 
ney General Janet Reno's origi- 
nal list of possible special coun- 
sels to investigate Whitewater. 
But Mr. Bennett said Mr. Stan- 
had “picked up baggage” since 
then because of his activities in . 
the Jones case. 



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POLITICAL \OCCS 




Killing Off Blighted Housing ~ • 

WASHINGTON — Blighted public-hous- 
ing projects have long been a national symbol 
of urban decay, but after years of ideological 
bickering. Congress has finally dosed ranks 
and decided to give toetd officials the author- 
ity to tear them down. . 

With broad bipartisan support.' lawmakers 
have joined the . Clinton administration m 
crafting reforms of federal housing policy 
that would give communities more discretion 
in how they administer government funds. 

The House passed its Housing and Com- 
munity Development Act of 1994 two weeks 
ago by a vote of 345 to 36. A similar bill is 
ready to come to the Senate floor, and pas- 
sage of a joint bQl is virtually certain by year’s 
end • (WPJ 

Sudden Bumps for Crime Ml 

WASHINGTON — Just as Democrats 
were claiming they had finally wrested the 
crime issue away from Republicans, Demo-' 
cratic-created hurdles haw tripped up House 
action on a $33 3. billion crime bill. 


. _ As a result. Republican gun-control sup- 
porters could now hold the key to the bill’s 
passage. 

■ The six-year measure would authorize bil- 
lions to help put 100,000 new police officers 
on the beat, billions for state and local prison 
construction and billions for crime-preven- 
tion efforts. It also contains provisions to 
create more than 50 new federal death penal- 
1 ties, send some third-time felons to prison for 
life and ban assault-style firearms. 

.. But Democrats conservatives who op- 
pose an assault-style firearms ban and blacks 
who oppose the death penalties and the drop- 
ping of a provision to challenge discrimina- 
tion in capital cases — have stalled the bill. 

, (AP) 


Quotc/Unqiwte 

• An unidentified senior Treasury official on 
why Deputy Treasury Secretary Roger C. 
Altman, under pressure in the Whitewater 
hearings, will do everything he can to remain 
in office and dear his name. "Public service is 
really important to him. And anyway, no one 
wants to be run out of town.” (LAT) 


Away 

From Politics 


• Two fires fanned by gusty 
winds destroyed about 40- 
buildiiigs in the Sierra Ne- 
vada foothills of northern 
Calif ornia. 

• A sightseeing plane carry- 
ing European tourists 
crashed into a mountain 
west of Kodiak, Alaska, 
killing six people and seri- 
ously injuring a seventh. 

• A Delta Airlines agent 
and a drunken mechanic 
toe* an empty Boeing 737 
for a milelong joyride 
around a taxiway, airport 
police said in Tucson, Ari- 
zona. The two were fired. 

• A small plane taking four 
people home after a family 
visit hit power lines and 
crashed onto a highway 
near San Luis Obispo, 
northwest of Los Angeles, 
Jailing all aboard. ap 


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Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 9, 1994 


**■ 


Syria May Ask for Lebanon as Price of Peace 


By Joseph Fitchett 

IntemaUtmd Herald Tnbmt 

^RJS — contrast to the break- 
? ro “f h between Israel and Jordan, 
president Hafez Assad of Syria appears 
determined to avoid copying the forrau- 
^of step-by-step peacemaking that pro- 

NEVS ANALYSIS 

duced results for both King Hussein and 
Yasser Arafat. 

Despite Secretary of State Warren M. 
Christopher’s upbeat comments as he 
left Damascus this weekend, it remains 
>!cw going with Syria because there is 
scant room for concessions over the Go- 
■■"n Heights. Israel has strong security 
’■easons for wanting to keep this strate- 
gic ground permanently out of Syrian 
•-■oniroJ. 

With a Golan compromise looking 
almost impossible. Mr. .Assad seems to 
be weighing possible compensation for a 


deal with Israel in the form of perma- 
nent Syrian hegemony over Lebanon, 
U.S. and Arab officials say. 

“If he can't get the Golan, the only 
thing he can settle for is recovery of 
what Syrians see as their lost land of 
promise — Lebanon and Beirut," ac- 
cording to a Palestinian policymaker. 

Officially, no one in Washington or 
any other Western capital acknowledges 
even contemplating such a trade-off, 
and Israel has almost as many reasons to 
fear Syrian forces in Lebanon as on the 
Golan* Heights. 

But Mr. Assad, whose regime has 
been consolidated by wealth siphoned 
into Syria from Beirut and the drug 
traffic in the Bekaa, makes a point of 
signaling the world that there can be no 
substitute for Syrian authority in mak- 
ing Lebanon a peaceful neighbor of Is- 
rael 

Lebanese leaders, their own political 
credibility shattered by the long civil 
war that ended only with Syrian inter- 


vention, say they find few allies to help 
Lebanon determine its own future. 

In a bid for U.S. help, influential 
Lebanese Christians last month urged 
the Clinton administration to tackle the 
impasse on Israel's northern border by 
starting three-way talks involving Leba- 
non, Syria and Israel The proposal, 
backed by Israel was vetoed in Damas- 
cus, diplomats said. 

Syria’s role in Lebanon is now openly 
acknowledged by Mr. Christopher, who 
no longer bothers to meet with the titu- 
lar government in Beirut but instead 
goes straight to Damascus to deal with 
Lebanese developments. 

Indeed, Syrian-controlled Islamic 
guerrillas in southern Lebanon regularly 
trigger violence almost on cue as a re- 
minder of Syria's power as a spoiler in 
any regional peace that excludes Da- 
mascus. This weekend, Hezbollah killed 
two Israeli soldiers in an ambush, 
prompting Israeli retaliatory air raids 
that coincided with the peace ceremo- 
nies in Jordan. 


Acknowledging that Mr. Christopher 
pressed Mr. Assad to exert more re- 
straint over Hezbollah, U.S. officials 
pointedly did not say the discussion was 
confined to die cross-bonier attacks. 

In fact, according to Israeli sources, 
the main U.S. concern is possible Syrian 
links to recent terrorist bombings 
against Jewish targets in Buenos Aires 
and London, which apparently were 
linked to Iranian-trained Hezbollah 
guerrillas. 

Eves if attacks were mounted by net- 
works organized by Lean, Western spe- 
cialists say, Syria almost certainly had 
advance knowledge of any major opera- 
tion carried out by Hezbollah. 

Publicly, Washington, anxious to 
avoid ruffling the diplomatic calm in 
U.S. -Syrian relations, has blamed the 
terrorism on Iran. But Israeli officials 
insist that Syria was also implicated, 
pointing out that the attacks were timed 
to spou the peace moves made by Jor- 
dan. 




fX 



Afenur Francc-Pivwc 

Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin of Israel, left and King Hussein of Jordan taking tbe air during talks Monday in Jordan. 


BORDER; 

Aqaba Crossing 

Cortinaed from Page 1 

well as some of those who have 
lost relatives in the four wars 
that have taken place between 
the two nations since the cre- 
ation of the Jewish state in 
1948. 

Former Foreign Minister 
Abba Eban of Israel who 
shook hands with Jordanian 
veterans and went on to Aqaba 
with the p rime minister , said, 
‘The task of leadership is not to 
follow public opinion blindly, 
bat to lead public opinion, and 
both Prime Minister Rabin and 
King Hussein are doing this." 

Mr. Eban also paid tribute to 
the PLO leader, noting that the 
agreement with Jordan was 
only possible because Mr. Ara- 
fat had broken the ice. 

“We never would have 
reached the agreement with Jor- 
dan unless we had reached the 
agreement with the Palestin- 
ians," he said, “and we won’t 
have peace with Syria unless we 
cherish the Palestinian and Jor- 
danian agreements." 

The king was host to Mr. Ra- 
bin and Mr. Christopher at his 
palace on the Red Sea after the 
border ceremony. The three 
men met briefly with reporters 
in tbe garden of the palace be- 
fore joining tbe king far a tour 
of the Gulf of Aqaba in his 


France’s Algerian Quagnure 

In Ra nking Regime, Risks Grow for Paris 


By Alan Riding - 

New Yak Times. Senice 
PARIS— For Algeria’s be- 
sieged, army-backed regime, 
France's arrest of 17 sympa- 
thizers of the Islamic Salva- 
tion Front following the mur- 
der of five French nationals 



against 

fundamentalism. 

Bat in clamping down on 
alleged Islamic extremists op- 
erating among tbe large Mus- 
lim community resident here. 
Fiance's conservative govern- 
ment risks being drawn ever 
more deeply into a conflict 
over winch it has little influ- 
ence. 

The government felt it had 
no choice but to show firm- 
ness after Ac lolling of five of 
its citizens last week, but the 
mili tary arm of tbe Islamic 
Salvation Front promptly de- 
nounced the arrests as “a dec- 
laration of war" and threat- 
ened reprisals if the 17 were 
not soon freed. 

The government respond- 
ed by tightening security at 
airports and railroad stations, 
bringing police reinforce- 
ments to Paris and carrying 
out some 5,000 identity 
checks. 

The immediate result has 
been to place Algeria at the 
center of French political 
concerns, with the govern- 
ment arguing that it should 
do all it can to forestall a 
f undamentalist victory and 
opposition voices on left and 
extreme right urging France 
not to take sides. 

For France, the key ques- 
tion is bow France itself will 
be affected by events in its 
forma' North African colony. 
And for that reason, the sim- 
mering civil war in Algeria is 
increasingly viewed hoe as a 
domestic as well as a foreign 
policy issue. 

While France fears die im- 
pact -of a fundamentalist 
takeover in Algeria on the 
rest of North Africa, for ex- 
ample, its main worry is that 
it would stimulate a flood of 


IUIV * ^ 

ing hostility towards the 
millio n or so immigrants 
from die Third World already 
here. 

Interior Minister Charles 
Pasqua has warned that an 
Algerian exodus would be a 
European as well as a French 
problem, an argument Fiance 
has used to try to mobilize 
economic support for die Al- 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

geni an regime. But the record 
shows that both immigrants 
and refugees from Algeria 
prefer to come to France. 

France’s sensitivity was ap- 
parent last week mien Mr. 
Pasqua criticized the United 
States, Germany and Britain 
for harboring members of the 
Islamic Salvation Front. In 
light of the killing of 15 
French nationals by Algerian 
extremists ova the past ten 
months, he said, this was an 
offense to France. 

Closer to home, France is 
already alarmed that Islamic 
f rniriMmerimlis flt are trying to 
influence young Muslim im- 
migrants — or Reach-bom 
childre n of olda immig rants 
— with their radical message. 
They are as mudi a target of 

Algerian Student Held 
At AnmnuiilMHn Cache 

Agence France-Presse 

PARIS — An Algerian stu- 
dent was arrested in Paris 
while collecting an arms 
cache at the weekend as 
French police carried out a 
security sweq> aimed at coun- 
tering a. threat from Islamic. 

on nffiriaT 

said Monday. 

Abderamane Chorine, 24, 
a science student,-, was 
stopped while coQecting more 
than 100 rounds of ammum- 
tion and two automatic weap- 
on magazines and silencers 
from a supermarket store- 
room in die western suburb 
of La Defense. 


Mr. Pasquas clampdown as 
front sympathizers. 

The measures have pro- 
duced ambivalent rea ction s 
among the Algerian commu- 
nity here. Many Algerians are 
opposed to the front and sup- 
port, the government's action. 

Rat many also fear a back- 
lash from the campaign 
against extremists. Karim 
Azaiza, 19, who has both 
French and Algerian nation- 
ality, said he no longer carries 
his Algerian passport. “If I'm 
asked where I’m from and I 
say Algeria, people immedi- 
ately think nzt a fundamen- 
talist," he said. 

Dalil Boubakeur, dean of 
the Paris Mosque, expressed 
similar concerns. He urged Is- 
. lamic extremists not to em- 
bark on a terror campaign in 
France, warning that it could 
trigger “a witch-hunt” here. 
But he also called on French 
authorities not to use racial 
criteria in stopping people for 
identity checks. 

On ’Monday, tbe Algerian 
Fraternity in France, which 
identifies with the fToni, 
called for the release of the 17 
detainees, but Mr. Pasqua has 
insisted they will remain in a 
former army barracks north 
of Paris until a country is 
found w ilting to accept them. 
He said they would not be 
deported to Algeria since 
they would be at risk there. 

' Less dear is how France 
intends to pursue its policies 
towards the conflict in Alge- 
ria itself. The United States 
has urged the Algerian regime 
to open negotiations with 
“moderate” Islamic groups, 
but Mr. Pasqua has dismissed 
the suggestion, noting that no 
moderate voice has yet 
emerged in 30 months of vio- 
lence. 

In an address to Algeria's 
government-appointed Tran- 
sitional National Council the 
country’s prime minister, 
Mokdad Sm, renewed the 
government’s call for talks 
with tbe opposition. “You are 
demanding dialogue, so come 
and join the dialogue," he 
said. 


— _ . — — ||lb VJ l*ll VI rAt |iU/U ill lll?i .. 

IRAN; Defiant Youths, Escaping Restrictions, Find Happiness in the Hills p 00 ^ » VATICAN; An Acerbic Attack RftrlllSCQTH 

TV Ads Are 
Suspended 


Continued from Page 1 
wearing a forbidden white head 
scarf. “And if women aren’t al- 
lowed up here the boys won’t 
come either. This is the last 
place boys and girls can go out 
and be together.” 

Romances are. not surpris- 
ingly. made in these hills. Edris 
Shafeyian. like many young 
men. met his girlfriend, Nargees 
Taklherani, on the mountain 
path. “She kept falling down,” 
he said. “And I had to help 
her.” 

The winding trail leads past 
nine open-air restaurants. The 
small restaurants, supplied by 
pack mules, sell soft drinks, ke- 
babs. buckets of fresh raspber- 


ries, walnuts, sour cherries, and 
dried fruit rolls. Water cascades 
through concrete channels 
through the restaurants, some- 
times m small manmade water- 
falls, and then flows back out 
into the streams. It combines 
with the mountain air to offer a 
cool relief from the sweltering 
summers in Tehran. 

The restaurants are mobbed 
by scores of young men and 
women, many of whom huddle 
and flirt in open defiance of the 
rales imposed by the govern- 
ment. 

The adventurous fill their 
knapsacks with forbidden 
Western music cassettes, blan- 
kets and food, and bead up the 


sides of the mountains. If they 
hike for three or four hours they 
can usually outdistance the mi- 
litias, who rarely make forays 
into the outer reaches of the 
park. On the mountain tops, 
just about every activity seems 
designed to flout the conven- 
tions of the Islamic state. 

On the summit of one peak, a 
young man and his girlfriend, 
both of whom insisted on ano- 
nymity, looked as if they were 
performing a scene from the po- 
etry of the ancient Persian mas- 
ter Omar Khayyam. She sat un- 
da a tree, her hair flowing 
freely down ha back, dressed in 
while jeans and a blue halter 
top. The young man, his head in 


ha lap. was eating pistachios 
she was cracking and dropping 
into his mouth. 

“These are the only moments 
we feel free in this country,” she 
said. “And the freedom is all the 
more delicious because they try 
so hard to take it away from 
us." 

But the imposition of rigid 
Islamic behavior can often be as 
trying for the militia members. 

“When we see couples go up 
the peaks we must follow to 
make sure they are brothers and 
sisters or are married," Mr. Na- 
zezni said. “But aU this climb- 
ing, all this walking, is hard. By 
the end of the day. I collapse.” 

—CHRIS HEDGES 


Israeli boats, waving Jordani- 
an and Israeli flags and un- 
leashing horn blasts, greeted the 
Haya, which means “life” in 
Arabic, as it plowed through the 
placid waters. The yacht briefly 
crossed into Israel as it cruised 
past the coastal resort of EQaL 
“Friends say to us. The pace 
of events is too fast,’” the 
prime minister said in the 
morning. “ ‘We cannot keep up. 
Wait a minute.’ ” 

“Your Royal Highness, our 
friends in tbe Hashemite King- 
dom of Jordan, we have waited 
46 years,” he said. “We have 
gone through war, pain and suf- 
fering. To prevent further loss 
and so on, we cannot wait even 
one more day." 


Carthrd from Page 1 

tural imperialism” whereby 
“abortion on demand, sexual 
promiscuity and distorted no-, 
tions of the family are pro- 
claimed as human righ t*" 

The Vatican statement Mon- 
day seemed to counter recent 
assertions by U.S. and UN offi- 
cials and liberal U.S. CalhoBcs 
that the proposals do not 
amount to an endorsement of 
abortion on demand but to a 
broad set of ideas to advance 
the health and well-being of 
women as the world struggles 
with its runaway population 
growth. 

“Our reading of the docu- 
ment leads us to believe that the 


reality is quite different," Mr. 
Navarro said. 

He said that the documents 
definition of “reproductive 
health" — abroad concept that 
recurs at many prints, m the 
document — included the no- 
tion of “fertiliiy regulation." 

“In this manna, abortion 
cranes to be considered as an 
essential component of repro- 
ductive health.” the statement 
said. 

The Vatican critique also de- 
cried proposals to be debated in 
Cairo that adolescents be given 
confidential access to sexual 
and reproductive health ser- 
vices. 


Master 
and 




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REFUGEES: UN k Swamped by a World Awash With Displaced People Fleeing (inflict 

Continued from Page 1 sanctity of the concept of international But when it does so, it finds itself at order to exert pressure upon goveco- 

aous from the point of view of tepatria- protection for people who fled their cross-purposes: Setting up a camp in- ments to contribute. The problem is that 

tion, land mines. The indiscriminate car- countries from a “well-founded fear of side a country usually means do-empha- the coverage is usually effective only 

nage speeds the exodus. persecution.” sizing the right of the displaced to cross after the catastrophe is out of hand and 

• The combatants do not shrink from As such, it became primarily an in- a border into another country. This goes television screens are filled with footage 
using food as a weapon, either by block- stzument of the Cold War, aiding people a g ai ns t the agency’s original raison of ragged, starving children, 
ing relief convoys or en gagin g in “slash who escaped from Communist countries d'etre, which was to defend the principle International aid officials also 
T techniques of warfare. In to resettle in the West. Ova the years, that asylum is an international right that 


CcBtpiled by Our Slafi From Dispatches • 

ROME — Italy’s public tele- 
vision station, RAI, announced - 
Monday the suspension of a * 
controversial advertising cam- 
paign by P r im e Minister Silvio . 
Berlusconi promoting his gov- " 
eminent’s achievements. 

Mr. Bafusconl who owns 
three television stations in Italy, * 
launched the television ad cam- 
paign Saturday to immediate - 
opposition charges that it was * 
no more than “propaganda" for 
what has become an adminis - ■ 
tration dogged by controversy. 

Hie RAI announcement oc- 7 
cumed only hours after a dose 
Berlusconi aide, Gianni Letta, 
said the government would 
“press forward with initiatives 
destined to inform the public" 
of its decisions. 

It was a partial victory not " 


and bum" techniques of warfare. In 
laces like the Horn of Africa, die co ur- 
ination of drought and war has so sav- 
aged the land that it can no longer pro- 
vide a livelihood. 


e 


• If the state itself is a party to the 
conflict, it may use the media to fan the 


to resettle in the West. Ova the years, 
with mass flights from Cambodia, Viet- 
nam and elsewhere, that mission broad- 
ened: The agency, with the help of the 
International Committee of the Red 
Cross, Doctors Without Borders, Save 
the Children and other organizations. 


sui 


it was founded as a 
raiy agency at the time of the Cold war 
— its life span in 1951 was supposed to 
be three years, and it has been renewed 
_ at five-year intervals — the High Co in- 

flames. In Rwanda ~goverament-con- prided assistance m the form of food goner’s office evolved m arcane 
trolled radio whipped up hatred in April “campments of ■Art* financing. Its budget, $13 

to bring about thVHutu massacres of P°°P le who had fled wth no belongings. 

Throughout, 


international aid officials also point only for the opponents of Mr. 
out that they are often left to deal with Beriusconfs conservative coali- 
diplomatic failures when ethnic con- tioo, but also for some members 
facts arise and the world stands by un- 
able or unwilling to intervene militarily 
The method of financing also leads to 
a sense that the emogendes are, in a 
way, competing with one another. The 


Tutsi and afterward sowed fears among 
the Hutu that they would be killed in 
retaliation. 

Another characteristic of the new 
conflicts is that they can rise up quickly 
or suddenly ignite after simmering for 
long periods, catching international res- 
cue agamies and the UN off guard. 

The office of the High Commissioner, 
while it has been forced to develop a 
level of expertise in supplying large 


the agency was handi- 
capped by a contradiction. It stemmed 
from the fact that it was supposed to 
help only refugees, who were by defini- 
tion people who managed to escape into 
another country. This restriction ig- 
nored the many millions uprooted by a 
conflict who moved to a different region 
within the same country and whose 
needs woe every bit as desperate. 

Ova time, the restriction was side- 


numbers of destitute people, was not stepped. With a request from the UN 
created to do so. It was established in secretary-general the agency can now 
1951, at the time of the Convention set up and supply camps for internally 
Relating to the Status of Refugees, and displaced people, as it is doing in Bos- 
its original purpose was to uphold the nia, where they now ruunba 2.7 million. 


billion for 1993, is raised 
appeals for specific causes to Conor gov- 
ernments, usually the United States, the 
European Union and Japan. 

Contributions can be earmarked for 
particular countries. As a result, dona- 
tions for a cause such as repatriation in 
Cambodia, where the suffering under 
the Pol Pot regime touched a sympathet- 
ic chord around the world, ends up be- 
ing oversubscribed. And repatriation in 
Mozambique, where a long-fought war 
is winding down in obscurity, does not 
raise enough money. 

The system erf financing also means 
that the agency is a hostage to publicity. 
It needs extensive coverage or a catas- 
trophe by the international media m 


greatest fear of all is what Mrs. Ogata 
calls “donor fatigue,” although she says 
that she is satisfied with the results so 
far. “We were fully funded last year ” 
she said. 

Supporters of the policy of working 
inside countries like Afghanistan and 
Bosnia assert that it is an effective way 
of trying to deal with the problem of 
dislocated people dosa to the source, 
before they become a full-scale interna- 
tional burden. But critics charge that the 
internal camps donot allow the people 
to integrate easily into a local economy, 
that they arc often less provided fra 1 and 
that the people axe not always out of 
harm’s way. 

It is a way of accommodating the 
world’s unwillingness to accept more 
refugees, they say. 


of the government itself who 
had criticized the use of the . 
state networks. 

Among the coalition critics ' 
of the ads was Umberto Bossi, 
whose Northern League is an 
uneasy ally. 

Critics have expressed fears 
that by taking advantage of . 
government control of Ihe three 
state networks and holding ' 
onto his p rivate media empire, 
Mr. Berlusconi would dominate 
information in Italy. 

Mr. Berlusconi’s media em- 
pire also includes advertising “ 


short television adver- ' 
tisements began with a voice 
declaring that the “govern- 
ment’s platform becomes fact” 
and then went on to list what it 
called accomplishments in ; 
fields such as public health and • 
the environment. (AFP, AP) 


EUROPE; To Get Shaky Economies Rolling Again, the Continent Is Facing a Need to Sacrifice ‘Charmed Ewes’ 


Continued from Page 1 
said. “I am afraid my children wiB 
have to work much harderjust 10 keep 
what we have." 

As Europe confronts the challenge 
of a new global marketplace and some 
grim economic and demographic facts, 
the trade-offs are becoming clear. To 
balance their budgets and avoid losing 
jobs, the big European countries are 
being forced to re-examine tbe founda- 
tions of the economies they have built 
since World War II, including compre- 
hensive welfare benefits and state 
ownership of key businesses. 

For now, most European leaders 
and workers are hoping to avoid dis- 
mantling the welfare state or abolish- 
ing such programs as stale-guaranteed 
universal health care. But interviews 
with politicians, economists, business- 
men and workers suggest that Europe- 
ans will have to accept much higher 


taxes if they want to keep their entitle- 
ments, and they will have to sacrifice 
benefits if they want to create new 
jobs. 

Faced with escalating comped lion 
as global barriers to capital have fall- 
en, European employers are pleading 
for a rollback in obligatory benefits, 
including long vacations, subsidized 
lunches and sick leave, that have 
pushed wage costs up to a level 80 
percent above those in the United 
States or Japan. 

In Third World nations such as In- 
dia and Vietnam, labor costs as little as 
one-tenth the level in Europe. The 12- 
nation European Union and the Unit- 
ed States want to impose a “social 
clause” in international commerce to 
prevent developing countries from 
gaining unfair trade advantages 
through disregard for the environment 


or through the use of child and prison 
workers. 

Business executives say that there is 
no question of dragging European 
wages and working conditions down to 
Third World levels to maintain mar- 
kets, but that workers need to show 
greater flexibility in coping with the 
more competitive scene. 

“As workers get olda they want 
betta treatment, but tbe reality of (be 
market is that you either become more 
productive or you lose jobs," said Ba- 
aard Wall director erf personnel for 
Peugeot, which has cut its labor force 
in half in the last 10 years. 

Tbe high cost of benefits has inhibit- 
ed employers from hiring new workers, 
contributing to Europe’s hig h unem- 
ployment levels. A record 20 million 
people — 1 1 percent of the labor force 
— will be out of work by the end of tins 


year in EU nations, according to offi- 
cial estimates. 

As a result, European political lead- 
ers are taking a mere indulgent view 
toward “hamburger flipper” jobs cre- 
ated at the low end of the wage scale m 
the United States. 

Europe’s rising unemployment lew 
els during toe long and wrenching re- 
cession just now coming to an end 
aggravated pressure on worker bene- 
fits. Many erf the Continent’s social 
welfare programs are financed through 
payroll taxes an workers and employ- 
ers, a system similar to the “employer 
mandates” that the Clinton adminis- 
tration has proposed to underwrite 
universal health care in the United 
States. 

But when jobs are cut, there are 
fewer salaried workers to contribute to 
health care and other social security 
budgets. ■ 


At the same time, with more f 
out of a job, there are more unen 
meat payments to make, so de 
for assistance soars while toe ai 
of available funds is dimini 
Moreover, those on toe dole in E 
have little incentive to find work. 
European countries offer jobless 
fits up to 80 percent of the pit 
salary for several years, or, in 
cases, for an unlimited time, 

Europe's welfare net has beco 
aU-encxaupassing that in several 
tries, iudnding Spain, toe Nethe 
and Italy, there is one person rec 
a soaal security, benefit for evei 

who IS w orking 

And unless something is do 
curtail services or those eligib 
payments, a minority will sot 
sniggling to support toe maiori 






• ■ ^ 


Ca 






By Keith B; Richbtrrg '■ 

Washi/tgim Past Serriee 

GOMA, Zaire— -Since about 
a million Rwandans, mostly 
Hutu, began pouring into Zaire 1 
last month, the world has! re- 
sponded with alruge glbbalre^ 
Uef effort Including MrfifB^oF 
food and supplies, water purifi- 
cation teams on- location, -and -■ 
health experts. • y 

But there are many refugees * 
and relief worker? who say they 
believe the world's sympathy 
has been misplaced. -They weir- 
der: Where was the world when 
Hutu were slaughtering' Tutsi? 1 
Why didn’t the world act soon- 1 
er inside Rwanda, when- Hutu 
were subjecting, the' minority •. 
Tutsi to a campaign of geco- 1 
ride? 

The irony is not lost on relief' 
workers: Some of the people 
they are struggling to save in 
Zaire are Rwandan Hutu re- ' 
sponsible for the worst case of 
genocide since the Khmer. 
Rouge ruled Cambodia in the 
mid-1970s. 

Massacres of Tutsi by . Hutu 
in April and May have been 
eclipsed by the humanitarian 
disaster in the hellish border 
camps. After the massacres, the 
Tutsi-led Rwanda Patriotic 
Front ousted the Hutu-domi- 
nated government, sparking the 
exodus of Hutu from Rwanda' 
in late July. ,, 

“If .1 were them,” ^ said Mike:. 
McDonagh of Irish Concern, 
referring to Rwanda’s Tutsi 
population, *Td be extremely 
bitter.” 

The International Committee 
of the Red Cross, the only relief 
agency operating throughout 
the country during the massa- 
cres, recently estimated that up 
to a million people may have 
been kBJed in Rwanda’s blood- - 
letting. Previous estimates had 
put the toll at around a half- 
million. The Red Cross said it 
had altered its estimate because 
hundreds of thousands unac- 
counted for in Rwanda were 


UN Implores Paris 


Compiled by Oar Staff From Dispat ches 

COMA, Zaire — Fearing an- 
other mass exodus of refugees;. 

the United Nations /eqewed its . 

appeal to France on Monday to 
dday its departure from south*- 
western Rwanda. ■■■’:'■ : . . . 

A spokesman for the UN’s 
refugee agency said there is a' 

S r cal possibility that up to 1 , 
an Rwandan&could stream 
over the bonier into Zaire when 
French troops leave. 

France already has. withr - 
drawn about 300 soldiers fimn 
Rwanda and plans to remove j t$ £ 

• AAA A iur . 


22. It has said, however, that the 
deadline could be extended two 
or three weeks if necessary, to 
preserve order in its so-called , 
security zone. 

The UN High Commissioner 
for Refugees would like the 
French to stay even longer, the 
agency’s spokesman in Goma, 
Ray Wilkinson, said. 

Mr. Wilkinson said ids agen- 
cy is looking for additional ref- 
ugee camp sites and warehouse 
space around the Zairian bor- 
der town of Bukavu, about 100 
kilometers (60 rafles) south of 
Goma. _ ' 

France sent troops to. Rwan- 
da in June in what it called a 
humani tarian mission to pro- 
tect lives. They established a 
security zone m the nation’s 
south wesL 

Doctors treating the refugees 
meanwhile warned - that a viru- 
lent strain of dysentery is 
spreading rapidly, threatening 
to push the cost of saving lives 
beyond the means of relief or- 
ganizations. 

The contagious, bloody diar- 
rhea, which is prolong resistant 
to cheaper antibiotics bring 
used in the disease-plaguedref- 
u&ee camps, has replaced chol- 
era as the main killer of Rwan- 
dans in eastern Zaire. 

“Antibiotics we use still seem 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 9, 1994- 


Plage 5 






believed to be hiding, but it now 
appeais that they were killed. 

Among the victims were 
moderate Hutu and those not 
belonging to the ruling party of 
the slam president. Major Gen- 
eral.- Juvenal Habyarimana. 
himself a Hutu. In some cases, 
rampaging mobs forced Hutu 
who had married. Tutsi to kill 
their .wives before being slain 
themselves: 

But most flf the victims were 
Tutsi, who have been decimated 
as an ethnic group in Rwanda. 

Joaas Ntazmda is a Tula 
who. fled to Zaire from Kibuye 
in Rwanda. He said Hutu 

■ ‘In my opinion, I ■ 

. think hYGod’s 

p imishme nt.’ 

' Josias Ntazinda, » Tutsi, 
on theauffering and death of 
Hntn refugees 

slaughtered his. wife, brothers 
and parents during the frenzied 
bloodletting of April that wiped 
out the town's Tutsi popula- 
tion. .• 

“Everybody was kflledT* Mr. 
Ntazinda said. 

Ask him about the death and 
suffering ravaging Hutu who 
have sought exile m the Zairian 
refugee camps, and he replies: 
“I&, my opinion,* I : dunk it’s 
God’s pumsHment” 

Before April 6 — the day 
General Habyqrimana’s plane 
crash sparked Rwanda's night- 
mare — Tutsi made up IS per- 
cent of the nation’s population 
and Hutu made up 85 percent 
Now Tutsi are believed to be a 
much smaller fraction, although 
the lost population is being re- 
placed by longtime exiles re- 
turning from abroad after the 
victory of the Patriotic From. 

Lieutenant Colonel Eric de 
Stabca fath, ■ a commander in 

the Fnw* “h nrnanrlarian safe- 
ty zone,” spent several weeks in 


Kibuye, Mr. Ntazinda’s home- 
town, investigating the lolling 
there. He found 4,300 bodies 
stacked in Kibuye's church and 

7.000 to 9,000 more in a sports 
stadium. 

Colonel De Stabenrath said 
Tutsi packed into the stadium 
forshelter aad were attacked by 
hundreds of Hutu militiamen 
and government soldiers who 
killed until they ran out of am- 
munition. 

Then they went away, re- 
turned and killed some more. 

“Between 80 and 95 percent 
of the Tutsi population has 
been destroyed in this area,” 
said Colonel De Stabenrath, 
who com m ands the Gikoogoro 
sector of the French security 
zone of southwestern Rwanda. 

He said in a village of 44,000 
people near Gikongoro, only 
200 Tutsi remain out of a pre- 
April population of 13,400. 

And he said bis. soldiers had 
recently uncovered more mass 
graves in the Gikongoro area. 

To put the Rwandan geno- 
cide in perspective, the Khmer 
Rouge is held responsible for 
the deaths of at least a milli on 
Cambodians between 1975 and 
the Vietnamese invasion of De- 
cember 1978. Rwandans may 
have matched that grisly record 
in three months of killing. 

Throughout most of the mas- 
sacres, the world watched, re- 
luctant to intervene in yet an- 
other African tribal war. The 
United Nations had about 500 
troops in Rwanda when the 
bloodletting began April 6, but 
thrir manda te as peacekeepers 
did not allow them to intervene. 
In June, France sent about 

2.000 troops to Rwanda on a 
humanit arian mission. 


efficient,” Michel Pipemo of 
Doctors of the World said at the 
Mngungacainp, “but the bacte- 
ria has quickly developed other., 
lends tSTewtancerand we have 
to resort to more sophisticated, 
and mote expensive, med ic i ne . ” 

“Yoo am be using an antibi- 
otic one day arid three days lat- 
er it can prove completely use- 
less,” said Colonel Francois 
Metonze, head; of the French 
military medical emergency 
unit. Bioforcq operating at 
Goma airport in eastern Zaire. 

Officials of the office of the 
' UN j High Commissioner for 
Refugees say at least 25,000 
people have died over the past 
: three weeks in the Goma area 
from malnutrition, dehydra- 
tion, cholera, dysentery and 
other diseases. Agency doctors 
. say up to 300,000 indre people 
could contract dysentery, an ex- 

- tremefy .vinrient disease trans- 
... mi tied through direct contact as 

- welT as through contaminated 
water and food. 

Unlike a cholera epidemic, 
which lasts an average six 
weeks, dysentery carries no nat- 
. ural . immunization. Colonel 
Merouze said. “It won’t be im- 

- mediately spectacular,” he pre- 
dicted. “You won’t have 25.000 
deaths in four weeks,, bat it 
could take months, even year?.” 

_■ . (AP. Raders) 


Czechs to Vote Nov. 18-19 

.The Assodaud Pros 

PRAGUE — President Va- 
dav Havd on Monday an- 
nounced that local , elections 
will be held Noy. 18-19, Xt wfll 
be the second round of commu- 
nal. balloting since the end of 
Communist rule arid is not. ex- 
pected to bring about dramatic 
c frmges in the political land;' 
scape here. . / 


International 

Classified 


• Monday 


•Tuesday 


• Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


• Saturday . 

Arts and Antiques 1 ' 



Nigerian Oil Strike 
Enters 6th Week 
With No End in Sight 


Pilmt ilt Nnrm «n • Renin* 

A resident carrying a bag of donated corn in the Rwandan capital, Kigali, on Monday. 


A genre France - Press? 

LAGOS — The Nigerian 
capital was hit by fuel shortages 
and power cuts Monday as oil 
and gas workers seeking to oust 
the military government began 
the sixth week of a crippling 
strike, with no signs of political 
progress. 

Markets in the commercial 
capital remained closed and 
much business activity was bad- 
ly affected by the strike, aimed 
at forcing the regime to hand 
power to Moshood K..O. 
Abiola, the presumed winner of 
presidential elections Iasi year. 

The main opposition leader, 
who is on trial for treason, “is 
going to insist on claiming bis 
mandate.” a source in the 
chambers of his principal law- 
yer, Godwin Kolawole Ajayi, 
said on Monday. 

Oil industry workers went on 
strike on July 4. 12 days after 
the millionaire businessman 
was arrested for declaring him- 
self president on June 11, the 
eve of the first anniversary of 
the poll annulled by the mili- 
tary. 

Petroleum officials said the 
shutdown on Friday of Nige- 
ria’s main refinery at Port Har- 
court will plunge the whole 
country into the kind of chaos 
gripping Lagos and other 
southwestern cities. 

Residents of Kaduna. anoth- 
er key business cemer in the 
largely conservative north, 
where support for Mr. Abiola is 
not strong, said authorities had 
imposed overnight curfews 
there to stan a crime wave. 

The curfews, which have 
been in force since Friday, were 
aimed partly at halting the 


black market trade in fuel in 
Kaduna state, residents told 
Agence France- Presse by tele- 
phone on Monday. 

Mr. Abiola's whereabouts 
were unknown on Monday, af- 
ter one of his close aides, Fred 
Eno. said the businessman from 
the Yoruba southwest was late 
Friday taken out of the Kuje 
prison near the federal capital 
Abuja. 

His family, the opposition 
and the trade unions have re- 
jected bail offered to Mr. 
Abiola on Friday because of 
conditions attached that would 
prevent him from engaging in 
political activity or leaving Ni- 
geria. 


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TUESDAY, AUGUST 9, 1994 

OPINION 








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runilNIIMt «lfll run NfiM VI IKK Tim* UUITHK M.MIIWiT(W POST 


The West Should Get Serious With the Bosnian Serbs 


Hiding Behind Islam 


The burning of boob leads ineluctably 
to the burning of heretics. Freedom of 
conscience is a protection for al] believ- 
ers, to the disadvantage of none. When 
preachers enter politics, scruple some- 
times flies out the door. 

It has taken centuries for Western soci- 
eties to absorb these lessons, whose value 
is periodically underscored in America 
by an outburst of religious zealotry — 
such as the killing in Florida of a physi- 
cian by a foe of abortion rights, to dem- 
onstrate the sanctity of life. Similar acts, 
in other pans of the world, have been 
inspired by what is too sweepingly called 
Islamic fundamentalism. 


Every great religion derives its strength 
from fundamentals, and in that sense 


every believer is a fundamentalist. Rather 
call it crafty fanaticism when clergymen 
with a political agenda agitate to exe- 
cute alleged blasphemers, now including 
Christians. And in countries where this is 
happening — Bangladesh, Pakistan and 
Iran — religious bigotry is in fact a dead- 
ly weapon in a worldly power struggle. 

In Bangladesh, which once prided it- 
self on traditions of tolerance, the most 
conspicuous target is a feminist novelist, 
Taslima Nasrin, who is threatened with 
death by Islamic radicals and with a blas- 
phemy trial by a rattled government. The 
less publicized targets are nonconform- 
ing newspaper editors and aid groups like 
the renowned Grameen Bank, whose of- 
fense is to give small Joans to rural wom- 
en. Scores of journalists have been jailed 
for “un-Islamic practices,” while mobs 
take direct action, bombing houses and 
wrecking offices, as related in a report by 
Human Rights Watch/ Asia. 

In Pakistan, prosecutors use blasphe- 
my laws, carrying capital sentences, 
against Christians and adherents of the 
Ahmadiyya. a minority faith. Some 


Christians have died in custody; others 
face execution, according to a detailed 
Amnesty International report 
As in Bangladesh, a moderate govern- 
ment also led by a politically vulnerable 
woman, is challenged by militant religious 
radicals claiming a divine right to rule and 
threatened by women's newfound access 
to power, whether political or literary. 
Rather than fight, both governments have 
gone along with blasphemy prosecutions. 

Granted, compared with Iran, these 
sanctions are mild. Since seizing power in 
1 979, Iran's clerical rulers have executed 
tens of thousands, and made life miserable 
for 350,000 followers of the Baha'i faith. 
Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini has been 
succeeded as spiritual dictator by Ayatol- 
lah Sayed Ali Khamenei, whose hard-line 
zealotry prevails over the cautious prag- 
matism of President Hashemi RafsanjanL 
Ominously, Islamic radicals elsewhere — 
especially in Sudan, Egypt and Algeria — 
take their cue from Tehran's ayatollahs. 

Hence the sinister implications of a 
new wave of repression directed against 
80,000 Iranian Christians, three of whose 
leaders have been killed this year. The 
search for new victims and fresh heresies 
has been a proven means in Iran of de- 
flecting discontent with joblessness, in- 
flation and clerical corruption. 

The savage mis treatment of Christians 
conflicts with guarantees in Iran's consti- 
tution, just as obligatory bribes for mul- 
lahs shame the religious pretensions of 
ihe Islamic Republic. President Rafsan- 
jani needs to know that these persecu- 
tions are noticed, that there is deep con- 
cern about the perilous example Iran is 
setting, and that Iran cannot hope for 
more normal relations with Lhe West by 
showing such flagrant contempt for uni- 
versal norms of tolerance. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


^EW ORLEANS — For more than 


two years Bosnian Serb leaders have 
been tweaking the nose of the powers 


By Anthony Lewis 


trying to stop their aggression and geno- 
cide. The United States and the others 


Focus on Azerbaijan 


Of all the ethnic and regional conflicts 
crackling within the former Soviet Union, 
in only one, Armenia versus Azerbaijan, 
does the United States have a formal set- 
tlement role, through the “Minsk group" 
set up by the Conference on Security and 
Cooperation in Europe. It is a matter of 
special regret, then, that the Clinton ad- 
ministration has yet to take full advantage 
of this rare opening to offer diplomatic 
leadership in a place of desperate need. 
This is the right moment, too. 

At this late stage, where the two sadly 
battered combatants have just formalized 
a cease-fire, two negotiating tracks con- 
tend. One is an effort by Russia to medi- 
ate a settlement on its own. This would 


involve putting Russian troops protec- 
tively into Azerbaijan (currently the one 


former Soviet republic with no Russian 
troops on its territory) and re-establish- 
ing control of the former Soviet frontier 
with Turkey and Iran. 

The main “achievement" of lhe Rus- 
sian effort so far is to undercut what 
could yet become the more inviting 
CSCE track. But the flagging CSCE bid 
also suffers from American hesitation. 
Washington has not replaced the full- 
time special envoy who earlier served in 


the “Minsk group." It has lagged in figur- 
ing out ways to use Azerbaijan's oil riches 
as an instrument of regional peace. Nor is 
it making Lhe most of the fact that Arme- 
nia would finally prefer an international 
military presence to a Russian one. It 
seems that, on this issue as on some others, 
the Clinton administration has not wanted 
to put itself at cross-puxposes with Russia. 
This is all veiy well but the effect is to give 
an opening to the tendency in Russia that 
favors restoration of the old empire. 

In one further way the United States 
has reduced its own usefulness in the 
Armenia-Azerbaijan conflict. Over the 
protests of two administrations, succes- 
sive Congresses have allowed an Arme- 
nian-American lobby to ride roughshod 
over the American interest in hastening a 
political settlement. This is how .Ameri- 
can law forbids assistance to Azerbaijan 
(although some humanitarian aid flows 
through private agencies) even as Con- 
gress earmarks $75 million for Armenia. 
This is raw ethnic politics. It is unfair. It 
inhibits Washington’s capacity to play 
the honest broker in a conflict where the 
United States has strong reasons of 
friendship and strategy to do so. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Independent Counsel 


Robert Fiske seemed to be doing a 
good job as independent counsel in the 
Madison Guaranty Savings & Loan and 
Whitewater Development Corporation 
case. The special court with jurisdiction 
in the matter was nonetheless right to 
replace him. The theory behind the inde- 
pendent counsel statute is that no adminis- 
tration can credibly investigate and prose- 
cute its own topmost officials, nor should 
it be expected to. The theory is right 

The Whitewater case is the perfect ex- 
ample of the kind of conflict of interest 
the independent counsel statute is meant 
to avoicL The investigation involves the 
president himself; the question is wheth- 
er, when he was governor of Arkansas, 
funds were improperly siphoned out of 
Madison for his personal and/or political 
benefit, and whether he knew about it 
There is no proof that he did, and he says 
he didn't. But his own appointees cannot 
be expected to settle that. 

Mr. Fiske was a presidential appoin- 
tee at one remove. The attorney general 
named him earlier Lhis year when the 
independent counsel statute was not yet 
back in errect ( because Republicans had 
blocked its extension at the end of the 
Bush administration). When the act was 
put back on the books this year (in part 
at the Clinton administration's own urg- 
ing). the attorney general asked the 
court to keep Mr. Fiske in business by 
naming him as its own. 

The court said that it could not, that it 
did not mean to impugn the integrity of 
Mr. Fiske or commem. in any way on" the 


conduct of his investigation, but that the 
statute required it to avoid even the ap- 
pearance of conflict of interest. Therefore 
the counsel had to be someone else, of the 
court's choosing and absolutely indepen- 
dent of the executive branch. 

The court’s choice was a former federal 
appeals court judge and Bush administra- 
tion solicitor general, Kenneth Starr. 

Administration partisans promptly 
pounced on that as unfair. If the goal of 
the statute is to produce apolitical prose- 
cutions, well. Mr. Starr has a long history 
of strong political associations and views, 
none on the Democratic side. Bui in fact 
he is also a respected practitioner precise- 
ly because or his performance as judge 
and solicitor general and he was on Clin- 
ton Attorney General Janet Reno's own 
short list of likely candidates for indepen- 
dent counsel when she picked Mr. Fiske. 

Our sense is that Mr. Starr, no less than 
Mr. Fiske, will conduct a professional in- 
vestigation. The president may in fact be 
the beneficiary of the new appointment, 
not the loser. If this counsel with these 
credentials finds that he did no wrong, 
there will be no room for disbelief. That in 
fact is how the independent counsel stat- 
ute has generally worked out; the accused 
have been credibly exonerated. 

The loss here has to do with time — an 
investigation well begun and in some re- 
spects concluded, now handed oyer to a 
new counsel and no doubt to some inevita- 
ble extent a new team for review. Mr. Starr 
should try to minimize the down time. 

- THE WASHINGTON POST. 



International Herald Tribune 

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have responded by huffing and puffing 
— and then i 


doing little or nothing. 

Thus we warned the Bosnian Serbs 
that they had better accept our new plan 


The effective way to stop the 
Bosnian Serb menace is to use 
ah power seriously now. 


to divide Bosnia, or else. They said M no." 
The five-power contact group said it 
would lighten sanctions. Ho hum. 

Last week the Bosnian Serb leaders, 
Radovan Karadzic and General Raiko 
Mladic, carried out a deliberate provoca- 


tion, taking a tank and other heavy weap- 

(i the 


ons from United Nations guards in 
exclusion zone around Sarajevo. In re- 
sponse, NATO aircraft hit one Serbian 
anti-tank weapon miles away. The UN 
commander gave the Serbs an hour’s 
warning of tins pinprick. 

The taking of the heavy weapons was 
not by any means the Serbs' first viola- 


tion of the exclusion zone. Their snipers 
have been firing more and more intensely 
into Sarajevo, aiming at passengers in 
trams. After the heavy weapons episode, 
they fired mortar shells into the city. Hie 
UN commander has done nothing about 
those provocations. 

If the West were serious, or rational, 
about slopping this cruel war, its aircraft 
would not hit one tiny target miles from 
nowhere. They would hit the military 
headquarters of the Bosnian Serbs in 
Pale. That is where General Mladic and 
Dr. Karadzic give the orders. 

Pale is less than 16 kUomaters from 
Sarajevo. The madness of Western policy 
is perfectly captured by the fact that for 
two years, wide we Westerner wrung our 
hands over the Serbian blockade and mur- 
derous shelling of Sarajevo, we did noth- 
ing about Pale. And we still do nothing. 

Right now is a good time to get serious 
with the Bosnian Serbs. An opportunity 
has been opened by the announcement of 
Serbian resident Slobodan Milosevic 
that he is cutting ties with the Bosnian 
Serbs, and blocking the border, because 
of their rejection of die peace plan. 
Anyone might wonder about Mr. Mi- 


losevic’s sincerity. But he does seem to be 
trying to wind down the Serbian hyper- 
nationalism ■ that he incited, because 
sanctions are hurting and perhaps be- 
cause he fears war crimes trials. It was 
notable that his statement on the Bosni- 
an Serbs said that some were “afraid of 
peace, in the event of which all their 
wrongdoings would come to light." 

Whether he means it or not, his pos- 
ture reduces the likelihood that the Rus- 
sian government will feel obliged to 
block serious action by the West in Bos- 
nia because of pan-Slav sentiment 
Mr. Milosevic has painted the Bosnian 
Serbs as errant Slavs. So the time is right 
for action by the West. That means the 
United States together with the British 
and the French, who have troops with the 
United Nations forte in Bosnia. 

The 

have wan 

ous response to the Serbian aggression. 
Their sending of troops in a “humanitar- 
ian" role, where they are often hostages 
to Bosnian Serb gangs, was a distraction. 

Being serious at this stage means using 
NATO’s overwhelming air power ratio- 
nally and steadily. When a Serbian sniper 
fires into Sarajevo, planes should hit the 
Serbian military headquarters in Pale. 
Reimposition of the Serbian blockade 


Should be met not by humble acquies- 
cence, as it just was, but by air strikes. 

The British and the French have com- 
plained that a serious air campaign would 
make their “humanitarian" troops so vul- 
nerable that they would have to be with- 
drawn. Perhaps sa But it does not follow 
that Britain and France should be allowed 
to turn their backs on the gravest threat to 
and decency in Europe since World 
They must join the United States 


/ai 

in a 

That will require real leaaeremp rrom 
president Bill Uinlon. In recent months 
the administration has become more 
committed to solving the Bosnian prob- 
lem. wisely so. It brought about the cru- 
cial alliance between Croats and Mus- 
lims, Then it pressed for the peace plan 
that would give the Bosnian Serbs 49 
Europeans, especially the British, percent of the country instead of the 72 
■anted all along to avoid any sen- percent they now hold, 
iponse to the Serbian aggression. Bat even if the Bosman Sobs a£***j[} 

the plan, no one can believe that they will 
really withdraw to the new lines on the 
nian without the effective threat of force. 
The plan calls for 15,000 U.S . grou nd 
troops, among others, for enforcement. 
To use air power seriously now would be 
a more effective and less risky way to 
stop the Bosnian Serb menace, 

The New York Tunes. 


real leadership from 


East Asia: Who Will Heed This World Bank Advice on Trade? 


H ONG KONG — When is a 
trade bloc not a trade bloc? 


By Philip Bowring 


The answer seems to be: when it's 
a geographical expression and 
not a set of initials. 

Semantics cannot disguise the 
fact that the World Bank's recent 
proposal that East Asian coun- 
tries in unison reduce their trade 
barriers on a m os [-favored-na- 
tion basis twice as fast as the 
Uruguay Round requires 
amounts to a plea for a trade 
“grouping” if not a “bloc." 

The World Bank's proposal is 
put forward in a suitably dull- 
sounding publication entitled 
“East Asia's Trade and Invest- 
ment: Regional and Global Gains 
from Liberalization.” 

But at a lime when there is al- 
most feverish competition to build 
blocs of different shapes and sizes 
out of East Asian and Pacific 
countries, from Punta Arenas to 
Pyongyang and from Prince Ed- 


ward Island to Phuket the bank's 
innocuous-seeming academic ex- 
ercise contains political dynamite. 

It represents the most powerful 
economic case yet put fonvard for 
the East Asian Economic Group 
(EAEG) vigorously espoused by 
Malaysian Prime Minister Ma- 
hathir bin Mohamad. 

The Malaysian proposal which 
so irritated the United States, was 
subsequently toned down to the 
vaguer-sounding East Asian Eco- 
nomic Caucus, to accommodate 
neighbors. They did not want to 
reject Mr. Mahathir out of hand 
and preferred to pretend that the 
EAEC was. after all compatible 
both with the wider APEC (Asia- 
Pacific Economic Cooperation) 
3, which now is being pushed 
_ the United States, and with the 
narrower AFTA (ASEAN Free 
Trade Area). 


The bank's report shows an 
obvious lack of enthusiasm for 
AFTA. which aims to eliminate 
tariffs among its current six 
members over the next IS years. 
While AFTA. as a s mall prefer- 
ential group, might bnng in 
some new investment and elimi- 
nate some inefficient industries, 
its effects would at best be 
“modest” and might divert rath- 
er than create trade. 

On the other hand, a “large” 
free trade area would be “diffi- 
cult to negotiate." This might be 
taken as a reference to current 
ambitions for APEG Whether h 
is or not, the very lack of discus- 
sion in the paper of APEC as a 
viable option is instructive — 
because over at APEC an Emi- 
nent Persons Group, led by C. 
Fred Bergs ten of the Institute for 
International Economics in 


Washington, has been struggling 
to devise an architectural form . 
to encompass both NAFTA plus 
Chile ana the East Asians arid 
Australasians. 

The group has come up with a 
proposal for APEC to set a time- 
table for complete free trade 
among all its members by 2020, 
with the more advanced mem- 
bers getting there earlier. 

It has made a valiant effort to 
square various circles without 
appearing to be a protective bloc 
or to impede wider trade liberal- 
ization. APEC would not be a 
preferential system, and mem- 
bers would offer unilateral re- 
ductions to each other and recip- 
rocal ones to non-APEC 
members. Conceivably, APEC, 
whose members ' represent 
roughly half of world trade, 
could enhance that trade. 

The idea will make a splash 
and help the images of 


Baltics: When Clinton Decides and Stays Involved 


dents Suharto and Bill Clinlcn, 
but there is widespread skeptir 
dsm over its practicality. It is 
suspect in some Asian countries 
as an attempt to shore up North 
American influence, enabling 
the North Americans to enjoy 
the (preferential) benefits of the 
North American Free Trade 
Agreement without suffering 
any backlash in Asia. 

The World Bank makes a 
strong case that welfare gains for 
East Asia from trade liberaliza- 
tion would be huge. At the same 
time, the East Asians would ben- 
efit the world by cutting then- 
trade surpluses with Europe and 
North America, thereby reduc- 
ing frictions and the likelihood 
of those regions raising barriers 
to protect employment. 

Concerted East Asian liberal- 
ization would be by far the best 
of four options for the region 
studied by the World Bank. The 
next was region-wide preferen- 
tial liberalization, followed by 
unilateral MFN liberalization. 


W flaramatory column of mine 
five years ago was entitled “Free 
the Baltics." Its theme was that “a 
great struggle has begun" to dis- 
member the Soviet empire, and I 
went to the Baltics a few months 
later to be able to put the message 
in a dateline redolent with pro- 
independence propaganda: “Riga, 
Soviet-Occupied Latvia." 

The three tiny Baltic republics 
— Latvia, Estonia, Lithuania — 
were the keys to the kingdom. 
The West had never recognized 
Stalin's deal with Hiller to swal- 
low up the three states; for a half- 
century, U.S. presidents of both 
parties kept the diplomatic faith 
with the peoples of these “captive 
nations” (a phrase derided by anti- 
anti -Communists in America.) 

By emboldening independence 
movements in those disputed So- 
viet annexations, Americans sub- 
tly encouraged nationalists in 
Ukraine and in other republics 
where Kremlin sovereignty was 
recognized. Sure enough, as the 
Russian economy collapsed. 
Balls asserted their freedom, 


By William Satire 


Ukrainians followed suit, and 
the Soviet Union came apart. 

But there was a blot on the 
sovereignly of the Baltics: the 
ominous, continued presence of 
Russian troops. Moscow gave 
such excuses as the protection of 
the human rights of Russians sent 
by Stalin to colonize the states, 
and the need to maintain an ear- 
ly-warning radar station. 

The practical reason was that 
□o decent housing existed in Rus- 
sia for the returning officers. The 
political reason was the rising re- 
sentment within Russia of the 
loss of superpower and the ensu- 
ing neoinmerialist pressure to 
dominate the “near abroad” 

This Aug 31, despite these 
pressures and to the surprise of 
many Russian. American and 
Baltic diplomats, all re maining 
Russian troops will be pulled out 
of the Baltics. Much of the credit 
for this unremarked foreign poli- 
cy stunner should go to the perse- 
verance and persuasiveness of 
President Bill Clinton. 


From the first summit with 
Russian President Boris Yeltsin 
in Vancouver to the recent meet- 
ing in Naples, President Clinton 
pressed for the Baltic pullout. Mr. 
Yeltsin had criticized Mikhail 
Gorbachev on this, but once in 
power he was faced with the mili- 
tary’s demands to stay. Aided by 
Swedish Prime Minister Carl 
Bildt, President Clinton began 
chipping away at the reasons for 
delay, by phone and letter, mak- 
ing plain a personal interest 
The United States successfully 
mediated a radar phaseout that 
met Moscow's defense concerns. 
It made available $160 million for 
resettling Russian military, in- 
cluding $25,000 vouchers for offi- 
cers to build new housing back 
home, more generous than Amer- 
ica's own old GI hill 
But Mr. Yeltsin balked at the 
impending deadline for with- 
drawal. Getting political heat 
from nationalists and resent- 


ment from his army, he com- 
plained of “brutal” repression of 


It 9 s the Worst of Times in Washington 


W ASHINGTON — “The 
mood of tins capital ..." 
That was how James Reston of 
The New York Times used to 
begin columns about the drift of 
the ship of state. Well the mood 
of this capital right now is poi- 
sonous. The air is heavy with 
hazy humidity, fear, loathing, ly- 
ing sanctimony and hypocrisy. 

It's a slimy, desperate place 
these days, worse than I have 
ever seen it. At least daring the 
hot summer of Watergate 20 
years ago the denizens of this 
place, politicians and press 
alike, believed they were dealing 
with high crimes. They saw 
themselves doing the most im- 
portant work they would ever 
do, trying to guide' the democra- 
cy through a true criss in the 
balance between men and the 
laws they made. 

Now the day’s deliberations 
usually involve misdemeanors 
or less, and begin with the liber- 
al gentlewoman from Califor- 
nia, Representative Maxine 
Waters, yelling “Shut up!” at 
the conservative gentleman from 
New York, Representative Peter 
King But the editor of the capi- 
tal's distantly second newspaper. 
The Washington Tunes, Wesley 
Pniden, thinks he sees crimes, 
beginning his column with this: 
“Q. What was O. J.’s biggest 
mistake? 

“A. He could have taken Ni- 
cole to Arkansas, where she 
would have lulled herself." 

The gentleman of the press 
then goes on to talk of “the 
expanding number or suicides 
of hapless folks with the remot- 
est connections to the president 
— from Vince Foster to ... se- 
veral down-home critics.” 

His political judgment at the 


By Richard Reeves 


end of the column: “If they’re as 
innocent as the stonewalling 
Democrats say they are, the 
Clintons could have come clean 
a long time ago. But they didn't 
Now, alas, the Clinton presi- 
dency may wind up just another 
Arkansas suicide.” 

I was reading that in front of 
the Capitol of the United States, 


There is a nouhor-never 


urgency among 
Republicans about 
bringing President 
Clinton down. 


the building, when a big black 


bus pulled up to the curb. 
“Impeach di 


mpeach Clinton Tour ’94” 
was painted on the side along 
with Lhis list of presidential 
transgressions: 

“Womanizing ■ — Trooper- 
gate — Deception — Abortion 
—Adultery — Bribery — Sod- 
omy — Fraud — ADFA — 
Abuse of U.S. Constitution — 
Obstruction of Justice — Docu- 


ment-Shredding — Drug Abuse 
— Geonifer 


— Tax Evasion 
Flowers — Paula Jones.” 

“We want real hearings!” 
chanted a voice from inside the 
black bus, perhaps believing 
that Senator Alfonse D’Amato is 
a Clinton plant in the opposition 
party. The cops shooed the bus 
away, but I learned later that the 
voice was that of Randall Terry, 
an anti-abortion activist. 

The mood of the town is not 


helped, eitiier, by the fact that 
Congress is obviously going to 
stay in session past the sched- 
uled recess date of Aug 12 — to 
continue the political maneu- 
vering around health care and 
Whitewater, seen to be of equal 
importance in the regions of the 
powerful here. 

Meanwhile, in another coun- 
try of Washington, where poor 
people live, the former mayor, 
Marion Barry, already elected 
to the city council after going to 
jail five years ago for drug use, 
seems to be on the verge of win- 
ning bade his old job this No- 
vember — and other powers 
that be are afraid his comeback 
might be prelude to a local poli- 
tics of black natio nalsnn. 

There is not much mystery, it 
seems to me, about why the dty 
is snarling these days. The 
stakes are high for politicians of 
both parties. It seems a long 
time ago now, but BiQ Clinton 
was riding high at the end of 
1993 and Republicans had to 
consider the real possibility that 
he would be a two-term presi- 
dent with a two-term Demo- 
cratic successor. Vice President 
Al Gore, already in place. 

There was and is a now-or- 
never urgency among Republi- 
cans about bringing Mr. Clinton 
down. And, you may have no 
deed, Mr. Clinton ana Ins people 
have a real bent toward living on 
the edge, a need for crisis — a 
fight against boredom. ' 

It’s mean and nasty here. Al- 
though I have been a resident 
for tight years of my life (the 
last time in 1990), I.feel HJce a 
stranger now. Most Americans 
would, which is a big part of the 
country s problems these days. . 

(Jnivmei Press Syndicate. 


the Russian minority in Latvia 
and Estonia. Asked last month if 
he would meet the deadline, he 
publicly answered " nya 

On July 6, Mr. Ointbn was the 
■first U.S. president to visit Lat- 
via, affirming its Western ties 
and raising hard-liner hopes that 
he would abandon “Partnership 
for Peace” bomfog and expand 
NATO membership eastward; 
while opportunity exists. But he 
quieted a . cheering throng in 
Riga with a message that many 
non-Russians did not want to 
hear:- “to never deny others the 
justice and equality you fought 
for for freedom without tol- 

erance is. freedom unfulfilled.” 

Nine days later, he wrote Mr. 
Yeltsin a private letter to assure 
him that the rights of Russians in 
the Baltics “is an issue of princi- 
ple with me" but that “we do not 
see in these countries a pattern of 
abuses ..." 

He added: “Boris, it remains 
my. firm view that we must not 
miss the chance to put Russian- 
Estonian relations on a new path 
by achieving agreement with 
President [Lennart] Men. You 
should make every effort to with- 
draw your remaining troops from 
Estonia by August 31.*' 

The Russian diplomat Vi tali 
Churkin treated Mr. Men rudely, 
expecting his Moscow meeting 
with Mr. Yeltsin to fail; Nick 
Burns, a Clinton national security 
aide highly regarded by tire Balts, 
was pessimistic. But Bui’s pen pal 
Boris, repeatedly made aware of 
l ink ag e , thundered “Solve it!” to 
aides and ordered his troops out 
— on the same day the last Rus- 
sian soldiers are to leave Berlin. 

Thus, Russian imperial interest 
seems directed more southward 
than westward, partly by virtue of 
Clinton diplomacy. That shows 
what can happen in the rare case 
when this- president makes a 
clear-cut strategic decision, takes 
a personal interest in its success 
and quietly follows through. 

. The New York Times. 



As the most dynamic economic , 
region. East Asia has most to gair ^. 
from liberalization, and most of 
that gain would be in intra-region- 
al trade.' .The bank makes the tell- 
ing point that for all the talk of 
interdependence, trade in the re- 
gion accounts for only 41 percent 
of the East Asian total compared 
with 67 percent in 1938 — suppos- 
edly, an era dominated by colonial 
trading patterns. 

The bank’s figures illustrate the 
limits of the mercantilist policies 
long followed in Northeast Asia 
and the losses that will arise if 
Southeast Asia endeavors to fol- 
low the same path. 

For all its logic, however, the 
Work! Bank’s arguments face 
many obstacles. One is the politi- 
cal motivation behind AFTA. 
Another is the lack of intellectual 
commitment by several Eaii 
Asian countries (not least China) 
to the merits of free trade, howev- 
er much it may in fact benefit. 
Yet another is the nationalistic or 
security-driven desire of many 
up-and-coming Asian countries 
to own their own industries, even 
at a high cost of efficiency. 

Last, and first, is the question: 
How does East Asia act in con- 
cert if it has no framework for 
doing so? 

Japan is sympathetic; it did 
nothing to discourage Mr. Ma- 
hathir’s EAEG. But, having seen, 
the virulence of U.S. reaction tcj» 
that, Japan is unlikely to take up 
Lhe cause of this Son of EAEO, 
despite its being clothed in 
World Bank jargon instead of 
Mahathirian invective. Its tinfp 
may come, but not yet 

International Herald Tribune. 1 


Letters intended for publication - 
should be addressed “ Letters to the 
Editor” and contain the writer’s " 
signature, name and fu& address, 
testers should be brief and ate 
adject to editing. We cannot be 
responsible for the return of unso- 
licited manuscripts. 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 5Q YEARS AfiO 


1894: A Tanked -General 


NEW YORK — One of the men 
who tarred and feathered Adju- 
tant-General Tarsney, of Colo- 
rado, has confessed. It turns out 
that the crime was committed by 
political enemies. General Tars- 
ney, who was in charge of the 
militia at Cripple Creek at the 
close of the coal strike, was kid- 
napped by seven men wearing 
masks and false beards. He was 
first called to the telephone at 
the Alamo Hotel As he stepped . 
into the office- he was struck on 
the head, hurriedly placed inn. 
cab, and driven to the eastern 
part of the city..In the suburbs of 
the. town General Tarsney was 
taken from the cab and - tarred 
and feathered. ' 


4 

extensive campaign for the eij- 
jiatmeat of recruits for service in 
Siberia. The necessity for enlist- 
ment now is pointed out as it Is 
difficult to transport troops to 
that couniry during tfae wintej- 
rne call for enlistment mentions 
a . chance . for gold service 
stripes, opportunities for big 
game hunting and thrilling win- 
ter sports, added to the generil 
advantages of travel in forags- 
countries.” yS 


York edition:] Eight ~ 

Arrxvv . 


1919: Siberia Anyone? 


52? Court convi 

^^i^opating in the 
zu attempt cm AiMruui— r* 


NEW YORK — Tbe Army Re- 

cruiting Service has started an 


, ~?*rtan radio announce 




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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 9, 1994 


Page 7 


opinion 


%, Carving Up Africa Isn’t the Way lo Help 


rat 


„<«• 


TY7ASHINGTON' — Jim 
j ▼ Hoagland has proposed 
that Africa redraw its borders 
to avoid ethnic .conflict .and 
genocide of the kind we are 
witnessing in Rwanda flBT 
Opinion, June 18). He argiigg 
that most of Africa's borders 
were artificially drawn bycolo- 

Imagine a continent 
ruled by dozens of mini- . 
Mobutus, tcitk waves of \ 
migrating Rumdar ’•/ 
type populations 


By Pauline H. Baker 


oppression and chaos. 


nial rulers, who often favored 
particular ethnic groups. Cor- 
rect the mistakes of that past, 
he says, and the problems they 
created will go away. 

It is true that most African 
.borders are artificial and that 
ethnic domination has been a 

g roblem since independence. 

ut forming ethnically, pure 
slates will not ensure peace. 
Such measures did not work in 
Cambodia, Nazi Germany, 
apartheid South Africa or, as 
we are seeing, in Bosnia 
‘ The idea is not only morally 
repulsive but politically imprac- 
tical. Tens of millions were 
killed intbeex tended partition 
of colonial India into modem' 


Borders may changem some 
states, such as Sudan, which 
comhines lslanaic, Christian 
and anmiis t cultures in a terri- 
tory bigger than all of Europe. 
Pa&ticramigbt hdp there. 

. Gaining up Africa as a whole 
is quite another matter. This 
proposal puts the future of 
a continent ef 600' million peo- 
ple up lor grabs. With more 
than 2,000, ethnic, groups,' the 
division of Africa into ethnical- 
ly homogeneous states would 
result in a patchwork of eco- 
nomically non viable, politically 
unstable dictatorships. Ethnic 
nationalise, operating from 
‘ new frontiers.' could prey on 
vulnerable populations. 

’■ Imagine a continent ruled by 
..dozens of -mim-Mobutus, with 
waves of migrating Rwanda- 
type populations desperately 
fleeing oppression and chaos. 
That would be Africa cut up. 

It Is not' ethnic conflict that is 
causing state collapse. Rather, 
state collapse— because of cor- 
rupt, authoritarian leadership 
— is fueling ethnic conflict. 

Look at Somalia. Its people 
share a c ommo n origin, lan- 
guage, religion and identity. 
A decade ago, under Moham- 
med Sad Barre’s brutal dicta- 
torship, Somali, nationalism 
was so strong that Mogadishu 
followed an irredentist line, 
claiming parts of Kenya and 
Ethiopia .where people of So- 


mali origin lived With President 
Bane's overthrow, centralized 
government evaporated, clan 
warfare broke out, northern So- 
malia seceded, and the civilian 
population was terrorized by ri- 
val warlords, leading to wide- 
spread starvation and eventual- 
ly, American-led intervention. 

The Somali tragedy was not 
caused by arbitrary borders, 
and it could not have been 
averted by partition. 

The same is true of Rwanda. 
One of the smallest states in 
Africa, it had the highest popu- 
lation density. After the death 
or the president, Hutu extrem- 
ists fit the ethnic match that 
torched the society. How could 
partition help there? How much 
smaller could the country be? 
Who would be forced to move 
out, the Tutsi or the Hutu? 
Where would they go? Who 
would enforce the partition? 

Africa is too integrated to be 
retribalized, and too poor to be 
chopped up further into beggar 
republics. Nor does it help to 
blame the colonial past or to try 
to rewrite history. It is time to 
deal with the continent as it is. 

% As South Africa showed bril- 
liantly, the best way lo prevent 
e thni c conflict and civil war in 
plural societies is to ensure re- 

S " le leadership, power 
constitutionalism, the 
aw and a civil society. 
In short, democratization. 
There are no shortcuts and no 


substitutes. Without basic po- 
litical rights for all, no amount 
of geopolitical tinkering will 
provide lasting solutions. Polit- 
ical boundaries are imaginary 
lines. They mean nothing to 
people who are mired in pover- 
ty or fleeing for their lives. Eth- 
nic demagogues, not illogical 
borders, are the real threat to 
stability and peace in Africa. 

Demagoguery was defeated 
in South Africa, where Afrika- 
ner and Zulu nationalists had 
threatened to kill an emerging 
democracy. South Africa is 
blessed with an outstanding 
leadership and a sophisticated 
population that voted (he 
demagogues down. Democrats 
are beating back demagogues 
and dictators in other parts of 
Africa, from Benin to Malawi. 
That struggle, not partition, is 
what the international com- 
munity should be supporting. 

Rwanda and Somalia fore- 
shadow a threat of disasters in 
the making in countries like 
Nigeria, Zaire and Angola, 
which are teetering between 
democratization and e thni c di- 
vision. The international com- 
munity must face up to the 
realities of Africa, both good 
and bad. It should get involved 
early and keep its eye on the 
democratic prize. 

The writer is associate director 
of the Congressional Program at 
the Aspen Institute in Washing- 
ton. She contributed this comment 
to The Washington Post. 



Saying GoodrBye to a Friend With a Keystroke 


W/ASHINGTON — I knew 
YV soon after Roger Hoff- 
man's abrupt death that it 
would take a long time to ac- 
cept, but I hadn’t realized just 
how deeply he had penetrated 
so much of what I do every day. 

I know at least 50 people who 
could have died and I would 

MEANWHILE 

not have been surprised, but 
Roger's death tiptoed out of 
left field and caught me com- 
pletely unprepared. 

Roger was my computer 
guru, co-conspirator in irrev- 
erent opinions and a marvel- 
ous friend. He was a certifiable 


By Francis G. McGuire 


genius, and in common with 
the Nobel laureate Richard 
Feynman he saw the world 
through a certain filler that 
brought out the bizarre quali- 
ties of what we call the highest 
form of life on the planet. 

Roger believed that if any 
higher form of life existed 
here, it certainly would be 
smart enough not to reveal it- 
self to any life form that would 
surely try to kill it. 

One problem with electronic 
mail being so easy is that one 
tends to procrastinate on per- 
sonal visits, so I hadn't actually 
seen Roger in months, although 
he lived nearby. (Regret does 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


After Rwanda, Will die UN Be Ready Next lime? 


The United Nations has 
-agreed to deploy 5.500 peace- 
keepers in Rwanda. But be- 
cause they lack equipment and 
•the tr aining to use tn« t equip- 
ment, they are unlikely to arrive 
.before October. 

- Why the delays? The United 
Nations approached 55 govern- 
-ments before it was able — af- 
ter a very slow response — to' 
.finally raise troop contribu- 
tions from such countries as , 
Ghana, Nigeria, Senegal, Ethi- 
opia, Tanzania and Zimbabwe. 
The developed world, while un- 
willing to provide troops, was 
supposed to offer equipment 
and logistical s u ppor t . 

• A few offers of aircraft have 
trickled in, but the UN search 
has primarily been for armored 
personnel earners To gjve troop, 
protection whfle offering hu-' 
-manitarian aid. The. United 
States has offered to lease to_ 
the United Nations 50 aich car- 
riers, but it will take at least two 
months for them to be, refur- 
bished and delivered. 

Over the past year the Unit- . 
<d Nations has been trying to . 
improve its efficiency through . 
establishing a standby reserve 
pool of troops, equipment and 
other resources to be made 
available by member states on 
an on-call basis. In April T993, 
Secretary-General Butros Bu- 
tros Gbali established a Stand- 
by Force Planning team of sev- 
en military officers seconded 
from different governments to 
encourage countries to contrib- 
ute to the standby arrange- 


ments. The idea is for the Unit- 
ed Nations to know m detail 
what could be made available 
and for governments to have 
the troops and equipment up 
and ready. 

The task force has been rela- 
tively successful. According to 
a report last month by the_sec- 
retary -general, 21 countries 
had committed troops and/or 
equipment to the reserve sys- 
tem,. but more need to be 
brought into the process. More 
members need to get (heir lists 
to the United Nations. 

The United Nations needs 
to be provided with the neces- 
sary support from its members 
in order to have the means to 
respond to . crises effectively 
instead of starting from 
scratch each time an emergen-, 
cy irises. Member states 
would still reserve (he right to 
withhold troops or resources 
from any particular operation 
that they did not want to or 
were unable to support. 

It is. absurd that the death 
toll is mounting while the 
world waits for -vehicles to be 
painted and delivered. This 
lack of will and efficiency in 
todays interdependent world 
is unacceptable. 

MONA MAKRAM-EBEID. 

• Member erf Parliament, 
Egypt 
JEAN KRASNO, 
Program Officer. 

. Parliamentariahsfor 
Global Action. 

New York. 


I recently returned from 
Goma, Zaire, the morgue of the 
living, the dying and the dead. 
While thousands perish there, 
just across the border from 
Rwanda, there is a feeling of 
utter frustration and helpless- 
ness among the organizations 
involved in rescue efforts. The 
UN agencies were not prepared 
for such immense problems. 

I believe a major effort is 
needed to encourage refugees 
to return home. The U-S. and 
French armies could provide as 
many trucks as possible, and 
use loudspeakers to spread the 
message tnat Rwandans would 
have a better chance erf survival 
if they returned home. 

All those willing lo return 
would be provided with two 
weeks' food supplies upon 
crossing the border. Taped re- 
assurances by the president or 
Rwanda could be broadcast; 
welcoming the refugees and 
guaranteeing their safely. Re- 
turnees could receive oral vac- 
cines at the border. 

This is an idea, anyway. Bet- 
ter ones are certainly welcome. 

ABE.NATHAN. 

Tel Aviv. 

Regarding “ Relief Immedi- 
ately, Then Crisis Prevention 
Quickly"* ( Opinion, July 25) by 
J. Brian Atwood: 

Mr. Atwood writes clearly 
about the needs in Goma, but a 
small correction is needed to 
his statement that “the interna- 
tional community has never 
faced a refugee exodus of such 
magnitude in so brief a time." 

The 1947 partition of India 


saw 50 milli on refugees move 
toward newly created Pakistan 
in six months; the 1971 move- 
ment of 10 million East Paki- 
stani refugees to India was larg- 
er than the Rwanda flow as well. 

Learning from past refugee 
problems to prevent new ones 
is today's critical problem. 

New solutions are needed. 
These, I believe, will come 
about when professionally 
trained, career-oriented young 
men and women enter refiigee- 
related work and begin to re- 
new the whole regime. 

RAYMOND J.SMYKE. 

Geneva. 

Special Responsibilities 

In response to "Covering 
Whitewater: What do People 
Want ?" ( Opinion, July 29) by 
Tom Wicker: 

■ Of course the news media 
must attend to commercial 
concents such as circulation 
and viewing figures. But being 
an estate crucial to the func- 
tioning of democracy, with 
special privileges, they also 
have special responsibilities. 

The question or greatest 
concern is not what the media 
must do to please the public, 
but what must the media do to 
pursue standards of truth and 
objectivity appropriate to its 
responsibility and privileges? 

JOHN W. WOOD. 

Republicans Abroad. 

London. 

Just as Reagan Said 

Regarding “A Welcome Mes- 
sage From America on Baltic 


Independence" (Opinion, July 5) 
by Carl Bildt: 

Mr. BildL, the prime minis ter 
of Sweden, refers to the U-S.SJR. 
as the “evil Soviet empire," 
echoing the much maligned and 
ridiculed words of Ronald Rea- 
gan. That is a welcome develop- 
ment from a country which in- 
sisted on being neutral during 
the Cold War and many of 
whose citizens, like other Scan- 
dinavians. held that the United 
States and the Soviet Union 
were “equally bad" 

In light of disclosures that the 
Warsaw Pact had plans for full- 
scale war that included prelimi- 
nary nudear strikes, it would be 
nice if the Swedes and other 
people in the West who opposed 
the North Atlantic Treaty Orga- 
nization said forthrightly and 
without reserve, “You were right 
and we were wrong." 

Erik svane 
Paris. 

The Anti-Hitler Plot 

Regarding "The Resistance Is 
Honored Rather Late in the 
Day ” ( Opinion. July 20) by Don- 
ald Koblitz, and “The Fate of 
These Resisters Proved a Trage- 
dy for ALT’ (Opinion. July 21) by 
Thomas Fleming: 

From the beginning of the 
war, the vast majority of Ger- 
man officers gave their skilled 
and wholehearted support to 
Hitler’s conquests. Those offi- 
cers may not have liked the 
Nazi brutalities, but they did 
little; if anything, to prevent 
them. If some took action in 
1944, it was because Germany 
was losing the war and the So- 


viet Union was threatening to 
occupy a great pan of their 
country. Hitler’s “military ge- 
nius" was in their way; he had 
to be eliminated. 

PHILIP VAN HEUSDE 
Belves, France. 

When Privacy Hurts 

Privacy laws, strict laws reg- 
ulating physician-patient confi- 
dentiality. were cited to dis- 
suade my husband and me 
from searching out the pbysi- 
cian or clinic that diagnosed 
colon cancer in the case of our 
son. He died in Boston in 1991. 
Not learning of the diagnosis 
until we were notified in Lon- 
don of his death, we altempied 
to pursue the matter upon our 
arrival in the United Stales. 

After reading “Privacy in a 
Big-Eared, Blabbermouth Na- 
tion” (Meanwhile. Aug 2) by 
Richard Reeves, I am left with 
the thought that privacy laws 
can be overlooked for cash or 
political aims, but not to as- 
suage grief. Can you doubt my 
answer to Mr. Reeves's ques- 
tion. “Is America a great coun- 
try or what? 

JEANETTE F. HUBER. 

Kinsale, Ireland. 

When you tour the Palace of 
Versailles you are shown the 
bedroom where the king rose 
every morning in the presence of 
whoever in his court happened 
or wanted to be passing by at the 
moment And Mr. Reeves thinks 
a head of state's lack of privacy 
is a modern blight! 

SHARI LESLIE SEGALL 
Paris. 


not procrastinate, however, and 
now it visits me often.) 

But the Internet was always 
there, zinging messages 
through cyberspace by way of 
God- knows- what way points, 
until they got where they were 
supposed to be. 

The day after I got the news 
that Roger had sat in his re- 
cliner, eaten a dish of ice 
cream (nun raisin, I’m sure) 
and leaned back to die, I 
switched on my Macintosh. 

1 put a message on the Inter- 
net, added his electronic ad- 
dress and sent it into cyber- 
space. The message: “Good- 
bye, Roger.” I assume he got iL 

The lingering presence of 
Roger would dissipate after 
his memorial service, I knew, 
so I simply waited for that nat- 
ural process to occur. It didn't 
work that way. Just like Roger 
to be perverse. 

After his memorial service, 
I was doing some work on the 
Macintosh and 1 opened an 
electronic file folder. There 
was a note from Roger about 
a conference on the potential 
uses of virtual reality. 

I hesitated, then clicked on 
the button that said Delete. 
Roger's note disappeared. Vir- 
tual reality indeed. 

A few days later, I stumbled 
upon an E-mail message Roger 
had sent to my daughter, Vic- 
toria, who had come to see his 
new. big-screen Macintosh. She 
expected a very serious demon- 
stration, she being employed by 
IBM. He switched on the sys- 
tem and its monitor screen tit 
up as a full-color aquarium 
with fish, lobsters and a man 
sinking straight down with a 
concrete block on his foot. 


Victoria gave Roger one of 
those looks. I laughed in recol- 
lection. Delete. 

Days later, I was looking in 
my data base of people for 
someone's telephone number. 
Unexpectedly, there was Rog- 
er. complete with 10-digit ZIP 
code. Delete. 

It's not that I don’t want to be 
reminded, it’s just that I'm re- 
minded at the worst possible 
times, if you know what I mean. 

The trouble with the word 
“brilliant” is that it is so often 
applied lo people who are 
merely smart. The word was 
created for people like Roger. 

The trouble with the word 
“friend" is that it is often used, 
especially in Washington, to 
describe mere acquaintances or 
(worse) business contacts. 

The word was created for 
people like Roger. 

The other day I was about to 
send an E-mail message to a far- 
off place, and 1 opened the mac- 
ro folder to get the Internet ad- 
dress. There was Roger. I bad 
neglected to delete his address 
after my Internet farewell. 

I went through the usual 
hesitation (I always do) and fi- 
nally clicked the button that- 
said Delete. My user-friendly 
Macintosh program flashed a 
question on the screen: 

“Do You Really Want lo De- 
lete This Entry?” 

1 stared at the question for 
a long time. This stupid ma- 
chine would never comprehend 
pain. It didn't want me to talk 
about it, it didn't want explana- 
tions. It wanted “yes" or “no." 

I clicked on the word “Yes.” 
There . . . wasn’t that easy? 

Mr. McGuire, a Washington- 
based writer, contributed this 
essay to The Washington Post. 


CHESS 


BOOKS 


NO ONE SAW MY PAIN: 
Why Teens Kill Them- 
selves 

By Andrew Slaty andLiti Frank 
( larfinkel 208 pages. $23. Nor- 
ton. . 

Reviewed by Polly Baker 

E VERY year in the United 
States 5,000 people under, 
the age of 25 kill themselves. 
Two thousand of them are teen- 
agers. For every suicide, be- 
tween 300 and 350 serious *t- 



children experiences an episode 
of severe depression. What is 
more, these alarming figures are 
increasing. 

Andrew Slaby, a psychiatrist 
specializing in depression and 
crisis intervention, and ms co- 
author, Lfli Frank Garfinkel, a 
specialist in parent education, 
have written an important and 
informative book about teen- 


agers and suicide. The. book 'is 
organized around ■ “psychologi- 
cal autopsies." Slaby and Gar- 
finkel describe the counseling 
of famili es with children who 
have committed suicide. Strug- 
gling with the families to gam 
an understanding erf what hap- 
pened* they make generaliza- 
tions, but are careful to respect 
the unique nature erf each case. 
Their straightforward presenta- 
tion goes a long way toward 
demystifying depression and 
suicide; mitigating the shame, 
and taboo that so often add to 
the farmHes* pain. 

As we read about Chad, 15, 
who hangwH hims elf in bis bed- 
room; Carly, 19; who jumped 
from the top of her dormitory; 
John Joseph, 17, who shot him- 
self; Sara, !9, who a^byxiated 
herself with car exhaust; and 
others, it. becomes painfully 
clear that not all people can be 
saved-However, with wider cir- 
culation of information and a 
greater understanding erf de- 
noa as an illness, many 
l be saved." 


According to the authors, it is 
particularly difficult to diag- 
nose severe depression in teen- 
agers because they are ' often 
perceived as moody, experi- 
mental and rebellious. 

In searching for the causes of 
suicide, Slaby and Garfinkel do 
not directly indict violence in 
the media, but they see it as an 
important element in the sui- 
cide's social context Slaby and 
Garfinkel see a more important 
factor in the avaDahuity of 
guns. Three of the eight young 
people examined in this book 
died by gunshot 

Throughout “No One Saw 
My Pain,” Slaby and Garfinkel 
identify the signs of depression 
Some of the signs they highlight 
are: changes in behavior, errat- 
ic sleeping and eating patterns; 
notgomg out; getting into trou- 
ble; excessive risk-taking; giv- 
ing'away treasured otgects; giv- 
ing deathbed-tike advice to 
friends and family; engaging in 
unprotected sex; drinking or 
ralring drugs. 

Despite Slaby and Garfin- 


kel's nuanced discussion of the 
possible ways to identify a po- 
tential suicide, the book fails to 
offer persuasive insight into the 
treatment of depression. The 
authors recommend cognitive 
or- behavior therapy initially to 
keep the teen safe and to give 
him or her a sense that some- 
thing is being done immediate- 
ly. And they discuss the avail- 
able medications. 

But this rather cursory de- 
scription belies the difficulty 
many patients have in hitting 
upon a course of treatment that 
yields positive results. For a 
great many people, finding a 
therapist they can work with is 
an arduous experience. Finding 
a drug with minimal side-ef- 
fects and optimal results can 
also be a trying experience. Ef- 
fective drug therapy requires 
fine-tuning over time, a condi- 
tion that therapists are not al- 
ways willing to acknowledge. 

All this is given little or no 
attention in the book, but Slaby 
and Garfinkel do make one 
deeply important point on the 


WHAT THEY’RE READING 


• Bernard Hickey, professor 
of English literature and lan- 
guage at the University of Lecce. 
Italy, has just read "Kings in 
Gross Castles ” by Mary Durack. 

“It tells the story of her grand- 
father who spent two years in the 
saddle, driving cattle' from east- 
ern Australia to the Kimberleys 
in Western Australia. This vivid- 
ly describes the terribly hard life 
of the farmers there." 

(John Brunt on. IHT) 



subject of therapy: they stress 
the significance of instinct, in 
particular parents' instincts 
about their child's well-being 
and the effectiveness of the help 
sought. 

Such insights greatly enrich 
this book and make it impor- 
tant for health-care profession- 
als, parents and teachers. The 
authors’ integrity, compassion 
and clearsightedness are wel- 
come. 

Slaby and Garfinkel set out 


to write a practical book about 
depression and suicide and 
largely realized their goal Of 
perhaps the greatest signifi- 
cance, the authors powerfully 
demonstrate that “severe major 
depression should be consid- 
ered as life threatening as any 
other terminal medical condi- 
tion." 


Polly Baker, a Washington 
writer, wrote this for The Wash- 
ington Post 


By Robert Byrne 

T HETaimanov Variation of 
the Sicilian Defense with 
2,..e6 and 3...Nc6 presents a 
flexible formation difficult to 
attack. The form of the Mar- 
oezy bind that arises after 4 d4 
cd 5 Nd4 Nf6 6 Nc3 Bb4 cannot 
be sustained in full strength be- 
cause 7 13?! d5 is too potent for 
Black. 

After 10 Be3. it would not 
have been advisable for Gary 
Kasparov to create doubled c 
pawns with I0...Bc3 11 be be- 
cause the while bishop-pair 
could become a useful weapon. 
So he played 10...d6, but after 
11 Na4!?. Vladimir Kramnik 
threatened to gain space on the 
queen's wing with 12 a3 and b4. 

Kasparov responded with 
ll...d5, but after 12 ed cd 13 a3 
Be7 14 cd Nd5 15 Bc5 Nf6 
(I5...Be6?f 16 Be4f is unpleas- 
ant for Black) 16 Rel Bc5 17 
Nc5 Qb6 18 Qc2 Re8, the posi- 
tion had crystallized into a clas- 
sical confrontation where 
Kramnik had a potential passed 
pawn at b2 as against Kaspar- 
ov’s kingside pawn majority. 

Kasparov's opening of lines 
to the enemy king position with 
40...e341 Rcl ef 42 Qf2 was thus 
ineffective because be lacked 
the resources to follow it up. 

On 44 Nd4, Kasparov would 
have like to avoid simplification, 
but since his king was the more 
exposed, he exchanged more 
material with 44„. Qf4 45 Ne6 
Qf2 46 Kf2 fe. Kramnik forced 
Black further on the defensive 
with 47 Bo4 Nc7 and then infil- 
trated with 48 Ke3 Kg7 49 Kd4 
Kf6 50 g4 Ke7 51 Ke5. 

Kasparov oould not defend by 
51.JCT7 because 52 b6t Na8 
(51..Nd5 53 Rd5!) 53 Bed Ke7 
54 Bd5 Rb8 55 b7 Nb6 56 Rc7 
Kd8 57 Rh7 is dedasve. But 
defending the queen's wing with 


KA-iPAflOWW.AC.lt 



KRAMNHtVWHTTC 

Position after 5 1 ... Kd7 

5J...Kd7 left the king’s wing de- 
fenseless against 52 Kf6! 

On 73 h6, defense by 

73.. .Kg6 would have been 
quashed by 74 Bf5. Kasparov’s 

73.. .Kh7 made no difference. 
After 74 Bf5, he gave up in the 
face of 74...Kg8 75 g6 Ne3 76 
Befi Kh8 77 g7. 

SICILIAN DEFENSE 


While 

Block 

Whlif- 

Block 

KnntnUi Kasparov 

Kraomik 

Kasparov 

1 c 4 

c 5 

38 bS 

g 5 

2 N 13 

e 6 

39 Nel 

Nd 5 

3 C 4 

Nc 6 

40 Qd 4 

41 Rcl 

e 3 

4 04 

cd 

«f 

5 N 04 
8 Nc 3 

NK 

Bb 4 

42 (M 2 
■a ReS 

E 

7 Neb 

be 

44 Nd 4 


8 M 3 

rf 

45 Ned 

8 0-0 

0-0 

46 Kf 2 

fe 

10 Be 3 

d£ 

47 Bc 4 

Nc 7 

11 N 84 

dS 

48 Ke 3 


12 ed 

cd 

49 Kd 4 

13 a 3 

Be 7 

SO £4 

Ke 7 

14 cd 

Nd 3 

31 KeS 

X07 

IS BC 5 

NfG 

52 Kf 6 

RbS 

16 Rel 

BcS 

S 3 K *7 

Kdfi 

17 Nc 5 


54 Rc 6 

Rc 6 

18 .QC 2 
19 h 3 

53 be 

Kcfi 

al 

36 Kiri 

Kd 6 

20 R&cl 

RbS 

57 Kg 5 

KeT 

21 Rr 2 

hS 

58 Kg 6 

Ne 9 

22 Bc 4 

Re 7 

59 M 

NdS 

23 Rifi 

N 

60 BU 3 

N (7 

24 Nb 4 

Q »7 

61 R 5 

62 KM> 

Ne 3 

25 RdS 

Ktl 7 

NO 

26 Ba2 

Bdi 

63 KM 

KI 7 

27 RbB 

‘iS 

64 Kg 4 

NeS 

28 Nc 5 

GS 104 

NRfi 

29 QU 

30 Oe3 


66 Ke 3 

67 M 

Ne 7 

NO 

51 M 

Ab 

68 KT 4 

N 04 

32 ah 

QfaS 

RA? 

69 Bc 4 

Nf 5 

33 Rbl 

70 KcS 

Ng 3 

34 BC 4 

35 NtO 

$5 

71 Befi 

72 B 81 

73 M 


jam 

Rb 7 

Kh 7 

37 Bf] 

BIS 

74 BfS 

Resigns 





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Merceries Make Paris Comeback 
Dressed Up as ‘Creative Leisure’ 


By Pat McColl 


AR1S — Like the corner candy 
stores, merceries, or notions stores, 
had all but disappeared from the 
retail landscape. 

Suddenly they are back. From the luxuri- 
ously outfitted 330-square-meter (3,500- 
square-foot) space on the second floor of 
Au Bon Marchfe department store to two 
smaller, more recent newcomers: Ma Mer- 
cerie at 4 Place Sain te- Opportune and En- 
tire des Foumisseurs in the courtyard at 8 
Rue des Francs- Bourgeois. 

Au Bon Marche, the prototype for Emile 
Zola's novel about life in a 19th century 
department store, “Au Bonheur des 
Dames,” began as a mercerie and fabrics 
emporium. “Lace," “Ribbons” picked out 
in colorful mosaic tiles, along with the date 
1876, frame a no longer used side entrance. 

Once again, Au Bon Marche is in the 
ribbon business: more than 1,500 refer- 
ences across color and quality ranging 
from grosgrain to satin to richly woven 
jacquards. Lace, too, rows and rows of it, 
while skeins of wool occupy a whole wall. 

According to Danifele Benassai'a, direc- 
tor of the department, there’s a new ap- 
proach to what mercerie is all abouL She 
calls it “creative leisure.” 

There are 21 salespersons and eight 
demonstrators in the department who can 
teach customers everything from how to 
run a sewing machine to how to knit your 
own Missoni sweater using Missoni wools. 

Perennial best sellers are sampler kits, 
especially as baby gifts to embroider with 
the name and date of the new arrival. “And 
we sell at least two table set kits a day to 


embroider" added Benassala. They sell for 
about 1,500 francs, or $275. 

Slightly less popular currently are can- 
vas backed embroidery kits, although wall- 
sized tapestry hangings of medieval sub- 
jects —“The Lady With the Unricom” is a 
favorite — and scat, back and arm rest sets 
for chairs also sell well. 

Four times a year, the store sponsors 
embroidery exhibitions in the department, 
which Benassala describes as “the dialogue 
between the store and our customers, as so 
many of them return to show us what they 
have made.” 

Evelyne Franceschi’s Ma Mercerie, 
which was opened last November, over- 
whelms with color from its egg yolk yellow- 
walls to the fuchsia carpet runner trimmed 
in gold braid to the midnight blue ceiling 
painted with gold stars. 

Buttons of every color and size overflow 
from low glass fingerbowls, ropes of beads 
and ribbons dangle from poles along the 
wall, while alcoves are piled high with no- 
two-alike pillows. 

According to the director of the bou- 
tique. Didier Dub us, Franceschi who has 
worked at Yves Saint Laurent, Garouste 
and Bonetti and as a designer of buttons, 
had always wanted to have her own mer- 
cerie and wanted it to look like a summer 
night in Provence. 

“Our busiest time is just after five 
o'clock on Saturday afternoons,” said Du- 
bus. “Suddenly, the store fills up with 
customers who arrive with whatever they 
have bought that day but wanting to 
change the buttons to make what they have 
unique. They'll buy more buttons to trans- 
form into earrings or cufflinks or pick out 
ribbons to use as trim.” 


The store also sells fabrics, mainly chif- 
fon at 60 francs a meter in prims designed 
by Franceschi. 

The clientele? “Mainly students and 
young designers, plus many Japanese tour- 
ists, who love the uniqueness of the shop," 
Dubus said. 

Lisa and Patrick Aboukrat say they de- 
cided to open Entree des Foumisseurs “be- 
cause it is our passion and all the little 
merceries are closing.” . 

Lisa was originally an industrial design- 
er while Patrick's first job was as a sales- 
man supplying merceries. Their boutique, 
open since April, is light and airy, with 
whitewashed walls and a red tile floor. 
Tucked away in a small courtyard in the 
Marais district, it comes as a surprise. , 

“Surprise is the reaction of everyone 
who comes in here for the first time,” said 
Lisa Aboukrat. “We have everything you 
need to make clothes — and you can’t 
imagine how many people are now sewing 
for themselves. It doesn’t come out that 
much cheaper than buying ready-to-wear, 
but it’s more pleasure, and for something 
all your own.” 

The Aboukrats insist on quality. For 
example, there are no dyed buttons and 
their metal buttons are metal, not plastic 
painted gold. The choice of buttons, which 
they hand sew on display cards, is stagger- 
ing- 

Like the Bon March fe, Entrte des Four- 
nisseurs offers free embroidery classes. 
“We didn’t plan it but the shop has be- 
come a wonderful spot for meeting cre- 
ative people,” said Lisa Aboukrat. 

Pat McColl is a free-lance writer based in 
Paris. 


The Hote 


Ian Schrager 
Philippe Starck 
plotting a design 
revolution in 
Miami Beach, 


By Timothy Jack Ward 

New York Times Service 

M IAMI BEACH — Here in 
sooth Florida, the holiday 
home to Madonna, Versace 
and thousands of deeply 
tanned and tattooed tourists, was a scene 
that looked like a war-room strategy ses- 
sion. 

Behind closed doors at the Raleigh Ho- 
tel on the northern frontier of the South 
Beach Art Deco district, Ian Schragcr and 
Philippe Starck huddled around a confer- 
ence table earlier this summer plotting a 
revolution. 

The team that created the Royal ton and 
Paramount hotels in Manhattan — 
Schrager, the entrepreneur, and Starck, the 
French design superstar — is refining its 
next project: the transformation of the 
Delano Hotel on South Beach’s Collins 
Avenue. They want to turn the building, a 
14-story, 328-room, pink-stucco landmark 
built in 1 947, into what Schrager hopes will 
be “a self-contained destination resort.” 
Whether the success of this grand reno- 
vation is a matter of inventive design, 
money (more than $20 million, Shrager 
said) or putting a new spin on popular 
themes is a subject for debate. 

But if only half the ideas survive, the 
new Delano, to open in January under an 
undecided name, will r e p r esent a signifi- 
cant course correction for a couple of im- 
presarios noted for giving the !980s its 
gloss of dynamic decadence. 

“I think people have had it with design 
on steroids,” Schrager said. “This is just 
not a time for one-upmanship and three- 
legged chairs.” Starck, who designed the 
notorious three-legged Caffe Cosies chair a 


decade ago, apparently took no offense. 
“Here is the secret,” he said. “Less to see, 
more to fed.” 

Anda Andrei, the Delano project direc- 
tor, described Starch's hotel concept as “a 
happy monastery.” The rooms will be pure 
white, outfitted with a spare array of eth- 
nic furniture and objects from around the 
world The style, Starck said, will be “the 
deep elegance of a poor people who have a 
very dean house.” 

For some guests, the Delano will be a 
very warm house, too. Schrager, who trav- 
eled to Havana, Rio de Janeiro, Bali and 
Vietnam to sleuth inspiration, plans to 
explore the heretical notion of tropical 
living with minimal air-conditioning. 

rejecting the local obsession, for sonny, 
refrigerated interiors, Starck has reconfi- 
gured the lobby floor of the hotel into a 
progression of “dark, foggy” rooms 
through shaded gar dais lea ding to the 
pool. Guests who prefer to keep the muggy 
atmosphere at bay can retreat to their 
rooms and do what the natives do: switch ' 
on an air-conditioner: 

As a “skinny kid from New York,” 
Schrager vacationed at the Ddano with his. 
family, and he remembers its cozy glam- 
our. Long favored by the family of Frank- 
lin Delano Roosevelt, the bold was a fam- 
ily-oriented resort, where guests swam, 
sunbathed and ate, leaving only in the late 
afternoon for a pre-dinner stroll along the 
boulevards. 

“I really believe in these generational 
things,” said Schrager. whose enthusiasm 
for things familial may stem from his re- 
cently becoming a father. “I just think our 
parents had the right idea.” 

Bjorn Hanson, a hospitality investment 
banker at Kidder, Peabody & Co. in Man- 


Tooy Srnoo fer Tfc New YoA Tw» 

tat^d^ so.wo.-The n^hotd is . 

t airing vacations around our children s 
schedules. The high-powered, two-income, 
no-children exotic field tnp no longer 
makes sense. The full-service resort, where 
you don’t worry about transportation, • 
what will the kids do or finding a good 
restaurant, is a logical evoluuon. 

Starck believes be is up to the challenge of ■ 
Schrager’ s new sobriety. “My ego is quiet . 
now,” said Starck, the former enfant terrible . 

who more than once thundered into publici- ; 

ty events astride a Harley- Davidson motor- . 
cyde. “Now I can honestly do my job ” 

For Mm, the design change, more evolu- 
tion than conversion, also springs from a : 
fundamental shift in cultural values. Now . 
we start a new generation, a new way of 
thinking I call ‘the Responsible Time,’ ” 
Starck said. “I don’t speak about ecology 
because everybody uses it for marketing. I : 
prefer to speak of a new moral way of life." 

B ECAUSE the hotel is part of the 
architecturally protected Art 
Deco district, the team must make 
restorations without altering the 
exterior. That means the vertical eagle 
wings at the top wQl stay intact 
But the interior is another matter. Starck 
is not an admirer of the typical South 
Beach look. “Miami style, to me, is terri- 
ble," he said. “This hotel will have nothing 

todowiththeanecdoleof Miami. You can 
build a real place, from Miami, if we keep 
the essence of the weather, the smells, the 
quality of the water, a place of adventure, 
lire Delano will have the honesty of the 
place, not the trend.” 




Pillows . buttons and beads at Ma Mercerie. left . ami Entree des Foumisseurs. two of Paris's new notions stores. 


In Japan, Motley Foreign Designs 


Idols, a Teen-Fan Slump 


For Pop 


By Elizabeth Kolbert 

New York Times Service 


N EW YORK — David 
Cassidy crooned, 
Donny Osmond coo- 
ed and the Monkees 
did whatever the Monkees did, 
and millions of girls in t rainin g 
bras ran out to buy their albums. 

It was 1970, give or take a few 
years, and the heyday of teen 
idoldom. For magazines like Ti- 
ger Beat and Sixteen it was a 
golden age, a time when every 
sweet young thing in bell-bot- 
toms pined for Mickey Dolenz 
and knew the words to “I’m a 
Believer.” 

Until recently it seemed to 
fanzine readers to be ever on 
the verge of returning, in the 
person of Kirk Cameron or 
Menudo or Michael J. Fox. But 
the reality is that teen idoldom. 



NEW FALL 
COLLECTION 

ESCAD\‘ 

In Paris 
Also, Sales 
on Summer Collection 

Marie-Maitine 

8, me de Sevres, 

Paris 6th 



like America's high school read- 
ing scores, may be on a slow 
and irreversible decline. 

Since New Kids on the Block 
started to fade and Luke Perry's 
hair recede, teen idoldom has 
been in a slump; no new heart- 
throb has managed to excite the 
passions or force open the purses 
of America's adolescents. 

At best, the teen magazines 
have had to market epigones 
like Joey Lawrence (“Blos- 
som”). Jonathan Brandis (“Sea- 
Quest DSV”) and Mark-Paul 
Gosselaar (“Saved by the 
Bell”), with disappointing re- 
sults. Teenagers have tuned out. 
Subscriptions have plummeted. 

The creation of idols has al- 
ways depended on chemistry 
and hormones, a notoriously un- 
predictable mix. (Consider Elvis 
Presley.) But those in the busi- 
ness — the men and women who 
know all those “fab facts.” like 
Why Joey Wants to Marry 
Young! — say forces larger than 
adolescent desire are at work. 

“In the history of teen idol- 
dom, starting from Frank Sina- 
tra and the Beaties, the teen 
idols who have become real 
icons have all been musical” 
said Randi Reisfeld. editor of 
Sixteen magazine, who has 
worked in the field for 23 years. 
She ticked them off: the Mon- 
kees, the Jackson Five, the Os- 
monds, New Kids on the Block. 

“These days," she said, "mu- 
sic has become so polarized, it’s 
hard. There aren't that many 


outlets for the type of music tra- 
ditionally associated with teen 
idols — accessible music, with a 
pop sound. If you're not Garth 
Brooks or a rap group, it's hard 
to get your stuff played.” 

These days, even the phrase 
teen idol is somewhat outdated; 
many of the girls who carry the 
torch are actually pre- teen- 
agers, 1 1 and 12 years old. Lou- 
ise Barile, editor of Tiger Beat 
magazine, said that her readers 
have been gelling younger oyer 
the years, until now the median 
age is 13. 

"Kids are a lot more sophisti- 
cated today,” she said, then 
quickly added: “But crushes 
happen regardless of how so- 
phisticated you are.” 

T HE acceleration of ad- 
olescence and the 
shrinking number of 
teen idols are probably 
related. What girls are looking 
for in teen idols may be practice 
boyfriends. 

“In their minds, they’re try- 
ing out what a real boyfriend 
would be like, but they’re not 
really ready,” Reisfeld said. 

Lisa Mona, a sixth-grader 
from Basking Ridge. New Jer- 
sey, who has a poster of the 
“Saved by the Bell” crew in her 
room, said that what makes 
stars attractive to teenagers is 
“their attitude and the way they 
act on the show.” And, she not- 
ed. they have to be “cute." 

At age 12, though, Lisa said 


she thought her interest in teen 
stars was on the wane. “I think 
when we were really the most 
excited about it was last year 
and the year before,” she said. 

Attitude is ail important for 
teen idols, and only one attitude 
will do. “You find there are 
common ingredients,” said Ja- 
net Macoska, a photographer 
who works extensively for the 
teenage press. “It’s the cute, 
harmless, baby-faced guys. 
They can’t be too mature. They 
have to be safe.” 

Virtually all teen fan maga- 
zines acknowledge a fall-off in 
readership since New Kids lost 
their luster four years ago. Teen 
Beat, the only magazine for 
which audited sales figures are 
available, saw its average circu- 
lation drop 32 percent between 
December 1992 and December 
1993, going from 132,000 to 
90,000. 

The culprit the teen press 
most often blames for this de- 
cline is radio. Over the last de- 
cade or so, radio has become 
increasingly fragmented, with 
Top 40 stations giving way to 
alternative music, classic rock, 
bard rock, rap and country sta- 
tions. 

The music from which teen 
idols are made — songs like The 
Partridge Family’s “I Think I 
Love You” or New Kids’ “The 
Right Stuff” — do not fit easily 
into any of these formats. And 
the music video channels avoid 
it as well 


For investment information, read 

THE 

report 

every Saturday in the IHT. 

I 



I cj'V&P'T 




By Paul Goldberger 

New York Times Service 


T OKYO — Although it has slowed 
down in the last couple of years, 
at least in Japan, the economic 
energy of the Far East has led to 
plenty of business for architects from the 
United States and Europe. 

But if the first generation of their build- 
ings is any indication, Asa has been more 
helpful to architects' balance sheets than 
to their reputations. Most work by Ameri- 
can architects in Japan turns out to look 
pretty much like their work back home, 
only more so. It is as if they saw their 
commissions more as advertising than as 
design opportunities. 

Frank Gehry, for example — as potent a 
creative force as exists in American archi- 
tecture — built a restaurant in Kobe partly 
in the shape of a fish, his favorite form. 

The Kobe fish, whose metal-scaled tail 
shoots up three or four stories, isn't much 
more than a spectacular sign. It's fun, but 
it hardly pushes Gehiys work forward. It's 
more a caricature of Gehry architecture 
than an exemplar of it. The rest of the 
building (which houses an American -style 
restaurant called the Fish Dance) is ordi- 
nary, even dulL 

Slo. too, with Charles Moore’s apartment 
buflding south of Osaka or Kevin Roche’s 
Tokyo office tower: routine buildings that 
seem to have been put up to take advan- 
tage of their designers’ names. 

The Moore buildings are medium-sized 
towers with gabled roofs, an amiable but 
banal attempt to merge high-rise architec- 
ture with the charm of the down-home, 
single-family house — an exaggeration of 
an old Moore theme. 

The Roche building is even duller. It’s 
startling to find Roche, designer of some of 
the most striking commercial and institu- 
tional buddings of the 1970s and '80s, 
retreating into such caution, especially in a 
cityscape as wild and intense as Tokyo's. 

A T least a bit better is Robert 
A.M. Stem's effort in Tokyo,. 
Bancho House, an office and 
apartment buflding across the 
street from the British Embassy. Stem was 
hired to design a facade, penthouse apart- 
ment and lobby for a building already 
under construction. He produced a neo- 
classical granite building, vaguely Soanian, 
that at least pays homage to the British 
Embassy if it does little to engage in any 
serious way with the architectural and ur- 
banistic issues raised by Japan. 

Michael Graves, too, designed just a 
front, a gridded facade of indigo and white 
tile for an apartment buflding that seems 
almost conservative compared with much 
of his other work. 

Is this the architect whose Humana 
Building in Louisville, Kentucky, and 
whoseWhitncy Museum addition for New 
York (never built) caused such architectur- 
al scandals? It's hard to believe, looking at 
this cheerful but watered-down example of 
the architect’s work. It’s as if Graves felt he 
had come to Japan to produce a simplified 
version of his architecture tor children. 

The willingness to be seduced by the 
chance to become an architectural Hennfes 
is not limited to American architects. 

Mario Botta, the Swiss architect, de- 
signed a small commercial museum, the 
Watari-um, in Tokyo, with a monumental 


facade of masonry in light and dark 
stripes, his signature writ large. But the 
facade, handsome as it is, functions as little 
more than a Botta billboard. The space 
behind it is tight, awkward and dreary. 

Two curious exceptions are the Ameri- 
can architect Peter Eisenman and Sir Nor- 
man Foster, an Englishman, both of whom 
seem to have emerged from the maelstrom 
of building in Japan with better resultsu 

Eisenman, whose highly theoretical 
work generally eschews entertainment at 
all costs, threw his normal designing mode 
out the window and jumped with zeal into 


the vibrant Japanese streetscape, produc- 
ing a portion of a showroom structure in 
Tokyo that consists of pink and green and 
glass cubes set into a larger mass, consider- 
ably more whimsical than most of his 
work; it could actually be described as 
delightful not a word normally applicable 
to the Eisenman canon. 

Foster, meanwhile, produced the Centu- 
ry Tower, not only one of Tokyo’s few 
distin g uished skyscrapers but a clear and 
serious descendant of the same architect's 
Hong Kong and Shanghai Bank, one of the 
most important buildings of the 1980s. 


KUTlOf 


Among the more successful efforts is Peter Eisenman’s office J 


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International I Herald Tribune Wbftd Slock lndw©, composed of 
^ internationally imrestabte Stocks ftom 2S countries, compiled 
by Bloomberg Business News. Jan. K198B- 100. 

120 ■' ■ ■- • - 



M A 

M- 

' J J 

A 

IBM 

| Asia/Pacific 


Europe 


Approx. NBighfag: 32% 
Ctae 131.53 Pibv; 132.87 

iso 

Bawl 

Approx. wigHhSF 37% 
OoskI 1105 Prw4 117^3 




Tha Max tracks US. dotar nbn of stocks Ac Tokyo, Nbw York, London, and 
AigwUna, Auatralta, Auatrta, Dai gkan, Bnd, Camd^.CMto, Danmark, FMand, 


Franco, Germany. Hong Kona Italy. Uridco. 

Singapore, Spain, Sweden, Swftzarknd and Vanezueie- For Tokyo. Um Yotft and 
London, tfw motor i» composed of tha 30 top lasuaa bt tame of marker cap kaff r atti q 
otherwise dm tan top toads are Hacked. 


1 Industrial Sectors f 

Ike. Pit*. % 

cka> dan deep 

- 

‘ 'Mae. Pm. % 

dam doom dmga 

Energy 114.15 11358 *024 

Capital Good* . 

118.73 118.76. -003, 

IMBte 12527 124.78 +0A6 

Raw UptariaiB . . 

13222 13158.4026 

fimnw 11754 11354 -051 

Coomtr Goods 

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Write to T& index. 18J Avenue Ctorigs da GatOo, 92S21 NouSy CadBx, Francs. 


Clntot na McnaJ HanM Tribune 

’i » • *- 


Lac Bid 
Raised to 
$2 Billion 

Firm Stitt Rejects 
Royal Oak Offer 

Compiled by Om Staff From Dlqtauha 

TORONTO — Royal Oak 
Mro.es Inc. said Monday it had 
increased its cash-and-share bid 
to buy Lac Minerals Ltd. to 2.4 
billion Canadian dollars (S2 bil- 
lion). 

The latest bid is for 5 Canadi- 
an dollars and 2 Royal Oak 
shares for each Lac share, or 
Lac shareholders can choose to 
receive 2.87 Royal Oak shares 
for each Lac shut. 

Royal Oak, a Vancouver, 
British Columbia, gold firming 
company, said the value of its 
bid was 16.5 Canadian dollars a 
share. 

The company previously of- 
fered to pay 3.75 dollars in cash 
and 1.75 shares for Lac, whose 
production is about three times 
Royal Oak’s. But Toronto- 
based Lac called the first offer 
inadequate. 

The higher cash offer will be 
funded through an increase in a 
short-term credit facility for the 
financing of the tender and a 
public underwriting of Royal 
Oak shares. 

wi<h° gn^ additional P^ mifiinn 
under the credit facility from its 
banking group. 

-• Royal Oak’s announcement 
came hours before Lac's board 
was expected to recommend 
that shareholders reject a com- 
peting bid from Toronto-based 
American Barrick Resources 
Corp. It has also rejected all 
other approaches, saying that it 
wishes to stay independent. The 
increased bid also came one day 
before Royal Oak’s original of- 
fer. valued at $2.05 billion at 
Friday’s dosing stock prices, 
was to expire. 

Royal Oak said the revised 
offer for its bigger rival would 
expire Aug. 19. 

(Bloomberg. Knig/it-Ridder j 


INTERNATIONAL STOCKS 



Return 

SHANGHAI — If the weekly stock market 
"salon” at Shanghai's Changle Middle School 
is anything to go by, China’s latest share rally 
is no flash in the pan. 

hi recent months, the “salon” — a discus-., 
sioc forum for investors - — has seen atten- 
dance fait sharply, with just a few regulars 
mounting the market's collapse. 

It was like that two weeks ago,, but on 
Saturday hundreds of people suddenly 
showed up. 

Maybe that’s because average prices cm the 
so-called A share markets — those reserved 
for domestic investors - — in S ha ng h ai and. 
Shenzhen more than doubled last week. 

On Monday, the Shanghai A share index 
added another 28.95 points, or 4.1 percent, to 
729.52 on record volume. _ 

People from all walks .of life pack ed the 
cmaTi classroom, overflowed into the narrow 
corridor outside and pressed their faces 
against the windows. * 

Among them was Fu Xuefd, a 68-year-old 
retired academic , who has been gripped by- 
the Sha nghai stock marker ever smee it 
opened in December 1990. 

“Now is tiie time to invest, and we need to 

study trends of individual stocks so we can 
put our money in the right place,” he ex- 

^aSf * mflHo ns erf Chinese- stock investors, 
Mr. Fu is driven by dreams of instant wealth. 

Many had come on a sweltering Saturday 
evening to hear Xu Chunhua, a fonner report- 
er onShanghaTs Communist Party-run Lib- 
SntionDaitywho has lately made a name for 

himself as a stock market pundit. ^ 

“Red bullish times have come, said Mr. 


Xu. “I can frankly assert there will be no real 
consolidation before the composite index 
reaches 1,000 points,” he added, drawing a 
round of loud applause from his audience. 

■ Many Shanghai workers spend a lot of time 
tracking stock prices. They tike to swap gossip 
and trade rumors, and the salon is a perfect 
forum. 

“I made some money this week,” said one 
middle-aged housewife. “But what Fm inter- 
ested in is how to switch my portfolio to make 
more money.” ■ 

. Salon participants said the hottest money 
was being bet on small companies seen as ripe 
for takeover, with funds pouring in from 
Taiwan and Hong Kong. 

Chinese securities regulations make take- 
overs almost impossible, but there have bees 
a few attempts, and even rumors about take- 
overs send prices rocketing. 

Usually a takeover bid amounts to little 
more riyrn crude market manipulation. 

. Most speakers at the salon agreed that large 
companies, especially Shanghai Petrochemi- 
cal Co. and Maanshan Iron & Steel Co., will 

provide the best vahie in the long term, partly 
because tbey will attract foreign buying when 
the local A share market opens to overseas 
fundmoney. 

What has most excited salon members are 
.- the plans announced by China’s securities 
... regulators that sparked last week’s market 
rebound - 1 - proposals by Bering to suspend 
new share listings, inject funds mto broker- 
ages and allow foreign investment 
They believe that implementation of these 
'ides over the. next few months will keep 
: markets bubbling. 

Reginald Pale is on vacation. 


Disney and 3 Bells 
Form Video Unit 

Coa^ikdby Our Staff Fran Dispatches 

BURBANK, California — Walt Disney Co. and three 
regional telephone companies — Ameriicch Corp., BellSouth 
Corp. and Southwestern Bell Corp — said Monday they had 
signed a memorandum of understanding to form a joint 
venture to develop interactive video services. 

Services could ultimately include existing broadcast and 
satellite television networks as well as movies on demand, 
home shopping, educational programs, games and travel 

nsaictanne. 

Ameritech, BellSouth and Southwestern Bell provide tele- 

Hoog KongTefecoHanncatioos plans to invest more than SI b3Bou 
to tqigrade for andthnefe. Page 13. 

communications services to about 50 million customer lines in 
19 states. 

“Our goal is to use technological breakthroughs and new 
entertainment delivery systems to proride consumers with a 
compelling and creative array of programming.” said Michael 
Eisner, Disney’s chairman and chief executive. 

Ameritech plans to spend $4.4 billion to upgrade its net- 
work to bring video services to about 6 million customers by 
the end of the decade. 

It has requests pending with the Federal Communications 
Commission to begin constructing video dial tone networks 
that wiB reach about 12 million customers in six metropolitan 
areas in 1995. BellSouth has applied to test interactive multi- 
media services in the Atlanta area beginning in 1996. South- 
western Bell plans a trial of a broad-band network offering 
video on demand in Richardson, Texas, by 1996. 

In the company’s 1993 annual report, Mr. Eisner said 
Disney continued to see its primary role as a supplier of 
programming, but added that it was “not impossible that we 
will be strategically affiliated with hardware providers, with 
computer makers, with telephone or cable companies, with 
domestic and internatioanl satellite companies or with other 
like concerns.” 

In Bonn. Germany’s phone monopoly, Deutsche Bunde- 
spost Telekom, and the largest publishing house. Axel Spring- 
er Veriag AG, dissolved their multimedia joint venture video- 
Tel GmbH. (Reuters, Bloomberg, Knigfu-Ridder) 


Boeing’s China Card: 
A $600 Million Deal 


Caapibd by 0«r Steff From Dupaidies 

BEIJING — Boeing Co., the 
world’s largest aircraft maker, 
unveiled a series of projects 
Monday, from component 
manufacture to jet servicing, 
aimed at strengthening its rela- 
tions with China, its second- 
st market last year, 
company said the value 
of the “whole package” was 
about $600 million, with pro- 
duction beginning in about 
three or four years. 

The biggest project is a plan 
by Seattle-based Boeing to be- 
gin transferring the construc- 
tion of tail sections for its 737 
jets from Wichita, Kansas, to 
plants owned by its Chinese 
partner, Xian Aircraft Co. 

“We’re looking at supplying 
2,000 units over a period of 
about 12 years,” said Ron Woo- 
dard, president of Boeing Com- 
mercial Airplane Group. 


The announcement came two 
months after President Bill 
Clinton said extending China's 
most-favor ed-nation trade sta- 
tus would not depend on im- 
provements in its human rights 
record. Boeing helped lead U.S. 
corporate opposition to the 
linkage, saying it was impossi- 
ble to make long-range plans 
amid an annual political debate 
on China's trade status. 

Boeing's efforts to transfer 
production are also linked to 
the company’s sales interest in 
which Mr. Woodard 
said was “the fastest-growing 
dvil aviation market in the 
world.” 

Last year, about two-thirds 
of China's new aircraft deliver- 
ies, or 52 of 79 airplanes, were 
made by Boeing, according to 
the company. Those 52 aircraft 
constituted more than one-sev- 
enth of the 330 models Boeing 


produced at its plants in Ren- 
ton and Everett, Washington. 
Only the United States was a 
larger market for the company. 

This year, China is expected 
to buy the same proportion of 
Boeing’s output. 

(Bloomberg, AP) 


NEC Corp. said it would be- 
' assembly of laser printers in 


_ long in southern China 
by the end of the year, and 
Matsushita Electric Industrial 
Co. said it planned to establish 
a joint venture with Tangshan 
Electronics Equipment Factory 
to make and market welding 
machines, according to agency 
latches. 

Toshiba Corp. said that it 
would launch joint production 
rtf micr ochips in China in a ven- 
ture in winch Toshiba would 
hold a 60 percent stake. 

( Bloomberg, AFX) 


disjis 


Qantas Cancels Airbus Deliveries 


Bloomberg Businas Hem 

PARIS — Airbus Industrie 
said Monday that Qantas Air- 
ways Ltd. had canceled delivery 
of nine A-320 twin-engine jets. 

The retail price of each of the 
single-aisle planes is about $47 
mlfirm. 

Airbus declined to say how 
much of a deposit Australia’s 
flagship airline had put down, 
but Flight International, a Brit- 


ish aerospace magazine, said 
the carrier had a $14 million 
deposit with the aircraft maker. 

Anstrdu is investigating Qantas 
for unfair competition. Page 13. 


The report said the funds ear- 
marked for the Airbus pur- 
chases would be diverted to pay 
for a long-standing order for 


maintenance work on Qantas's 
fleet. 

David VelupiHai, a spokes- 
man for Airbus, said the orders 
for the planes were placed five 
years ago by Australian Airlines, 
which is now part of Qantas. 

“They pushed back deliveries 
on several occasions, but we've 
now accepted that they will not 
take those aircraft We have re- 
moved them from our order 
book,” he said. 


Dutch Concern Becomes BBL’s Biggest Shareholder 


Coayjilrd by Our Staff From Dispatches 

BRUSSELS — Internation- 
ale Nederlanden Groep NV, 
which has been frustrated in at- 
tempts to take over Basque 
Bruxelles Lambert SA, has be- 
come the largest single share- 
holder of the Belgian bank. 

BBL said Monday that ING 
had acquired 17.75 percent of its 
voting rights, after Befco Invest- 
ments SA deposited its BBL 


shares at ING as guarantee for a 
financing agreement. The agree- 
ment. Much grants ING the vot- 
ing rights attached to Befco's 
shares, expires in February 1 998. 

ING held 11.02 percent of 
the voting rights before the 
Befco transfer, which added 
6.73 percent to ING's stake. 

While BBL said the opera- 
tion did not put in doubt the 
stability of its shareholder base. 


Groupe Bruxelles Lambert SA, 
the bank's holding company, 
said it wished to “to reaffirm its 
determination to maintain and 
defend the preponderant Bel- 
gian anchorage of the country's 
second largest private banking 
institution.'* 

Groupe Bruxelles directly 
owns 1238 percent of BBL and 
is part of a shareholders group 

I 


controlling 12.31 percent via 
Groupe Royal e Beige SA. 

BBL said Group Bruxelles 
would "continue to play its 
role.” It added, “The solidity of 
the Belgian anchor of BBL is 
not affected by the regrouping 
erf the voting capacity." 

BBL said it had been in- 
formed by ING the operation 
was carried out as part of an 
"equity accounting” operation. 


In Amsterdam, ENG shares 
fell 20 Dutch cents Monday, to 
8230 guilders ($46). In Brus- 
sels, BBL rose 35 Belgian 
francs, to 4220 ($129). 

BBL rejected a takeover bid 
by ING in 1992 saying the 
Dutch financial services com- 
pany did not place a high 
enough value on its assets. 

(Bloomberg, Reuters) 


SOGets 
U.K. Firm 
Over Rival 


Reuters 

LONDON —The giant U.S 
funeral group. Service Corp. In- 
ternational, won a takeover bat- 
tle for a similar British firm. 
Great Southern Group PLC, on 
Monday. 

After SCI raised its bid to 
£7.75 ($1 1.94) a share, Britain’s 
third-largest funeral business 
said its board would recom- 
mend the new offer, an increase 
of 95 pence. 

The company is terminating 
talks with SCTs rival, Canada's 
Loewen Group, which had 
emerged as a potential white 
knight to SCTs previously hos- 

The offer values Great 
Southern at £1129 million. 

Loewen is SCTs biggest rival 
in the North American funeral 
market It stepped mto the fray 
last Friday at the invitation of 
Great Southern, in what some 
British media speculated was a 
last-minute attempt by the 
Field family to fend off SCL 
But Loewen did not detail an 
offer price. 

SCL which now owns 21.6 
percent of Great Southern’s or- 
dinary share capital and 67.6 
percent of its convertible 
shares, still needs the approval 
erf Britain’s takeover regulators. 



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p agfc 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 9, 1994 


** 


MARKET diary 


Earnings Outlook 
Underpins Stocks 


J Camfihd by Our Staff From Dispatches 

■ NEW YORK — U.S. stocks 
Snapped a two-day slide Mon- 
day amid expectations of strong 
corporate earnings. Stability in 
Jbonds and the dollar also 
helped stocks, traders said. 

; The Dow Jones industrial av- 
erage climbed 6.79 points to 
3.753.8 h recouping abit of the 
.45.64- point loss of be previous 
two sessions. 

. Computer systems, drugs 
and international oils were 

U.S. Stocks 

among the market's biggest 
gainers, while retailers, health 
care and chemicals were among 
the largest dec liners. 

The report, released Friday of 
stronger- than -expected July job 
growth “underlines the solid 
momentum of the current econ- 
omy.” said Gail Dudack. mar- 
ket strategist at S. G. Warburg. 
“This is a good backdrop for 
earnings prospects for the sec- 
ond half of 1994." 

Gains were capped by con- 
cern that the sale this week of 
$40.25 billion in new Treasury 
securities might glut Lhe market 
and drive bond yields higher, 
creating competition for stocks, 
traders said. Anticipation of in- 


flation reports this week and 
the Federal Reserve policy 
meeting next week also limited 
the stock market's advance. 

Investors were encouraged 
by stability in the bond market, 
where prices rose as the dollar 
climbed to a six-week high 
against the yen amid optimism 
about progress in U.S.- Japan 
trade talks. 

The yield on the benchmark 
30-year bond fell as low as 7.50 
percent, down five basis points, 
after soaring 14 basis points on 
Friday’s jobs report. It closed at 
7.54 percent. 

Ten stocks rose for every nine 
that fell ou the New York Stock 
Exchange. Volume totaled 
217.67 milli on shares, down 
from 230.27 million Friday. 

Mesa Airlines plunged 3 7/16 
to 6 9/16. The commuter airline 
said its third-quarter net in- 
come dropped to 20 cents a 
share from 25 cents a year earli- 
er. _ 

Sterling Chemical rose 1ft to 
lift amid reports of tight sup- 
plies of some of the company's 
specialized products. 

Creative Technology fell 2ft 
to 1 7ft in heavy volume, and 
dealers said investors had been 
disappointed by its quarterly 
results. ( Bloomberg, AP) 


Trade Optimism Moves 
Dollar Up Against Yen 


Bloomberg Business I't'ems 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
rose to a six-week high against 
the yen Monday amid growing 
speculation that trade relations 
between the United States and 
Japan could improve. 

The UJS. currency closed at 
10 1 JO yen. up more’ than a yen 

Foreign Exchange 

from 100.20 yen Friday. It also 
closed at 1.5825 Deutsche 
marks, up from 1 J796 DM. 

It climbed to 101.80 yen at 
one point Monday, its highest 
level since June 24. 

The dollar has risen 5 percent 
since tumbling to a postwar low 
of 96.60 yen on July 12. 

More traders seem to have 
become convinced that Wash- 
ington and Tokyo will meet a 
Sept. 30 deadline for opening 
Japan to U.S. goods. 

"There's a perception in the 
market that the 60-day waiting 
period will lead to an agree- 
ment” said Jerry Egan, manag- 
ing director of foreign exchange 
at MTB Bank. 


“Yen weakness could contin- 
ue until a couple of weeks from 
the end of September, which is 
the deadline for them to come up 
with something." said Chris Fur- 
ness, currency strategist at the 
market consulting firm IDEA. 

Traders said there was talk 
that Japanese insurance compa- 
nies and other investors were 
buying dollars ahead of the 
Treasury's $40 billion quarterly 
refunding amid sentiment that 
U.S. assets were bound to ap- 
preciate. The refunding starts 
Tuesday with the three-year 
note sale. 

Some traders said support for 
the dollar was linked to hopes 
that the Federal Reserve would 
tighten short-term interest rates 
at their Monday meeting. 

The dollar strengthened 
against most other major cur- 
rencies, rising to 5.4195 French 
francs from 5.4090 francs and 
edging up to 1.3350 Swiss 
francs from 1.3335 francs. 

The British pound fell to 
$1.5395 from $1.5415. 


Via Aswdcikd fte« 


Aug. S 




The Dow 





Dow Jones Averages 


Open Mali Lew La* Cbw. 

Indus, 375882 3761.91 374037 -6J? 

Train 13W.M iStoXJ 158*X3 7^2 

I30U1 1306.20 1KSA5 130X14 


1 standard & Poor's Indexes 


WT 


NYSE Host Actives 


TelMex 

RJRNtrii 

Comonos 

PrTAmlT 

Merck 

Pepsic 

Fords 

Lowes s 

Cn lOrds 

cnrvsir 

ACvon 

GnMosr 

IBM 

McDnidi 

Synlajr 


VoL Mtoh 
4IMi 64* 
36U3 ft* 
32/17 34* 
27331 V„ 
34489 3014 
71106 31 V. 
30636 30’, 
20003 33* 
10019 14W 
19003 44* 
18993 91* 

14843 50Va 
14480 43* 
14303 24* 

14844 33* 


Law 

Last 

CM. 

62U 

63* 

+ Ml 

6* 

6* 

+ W 

34 

34* 

+ * 

V«t 

v« 


20 

30 Vi 

+ * 

20M 

31* 

+ * 

20 

30* 

** 

31* 

32* 

♦ 1 Vi 

14V, 

14* 

— * 

46* 

46* 

+ * 

W4 

90* 

— * 

50* 

50* 

+ * 

62* 

63* 

+ * 

76* 

26* 

+* 

22* 

22* 

— * 


industrials 

Transe. 

utilities 
Finance 
SP5W 
5P lOB 


Utah 

S 33 S 7 

38141 

15 M 1 

44.96 

458J0 

434X8 


Low apse 
532.18 533-46 
381.94 38101 
1 50.21 1049 
444$ 44.90 
45741 45749 
42299 454.19 


CtftE 
+128 
—242 
+ M1 
+<un 
+040 
+ 142 


NYSE Indexes 


HtBli Lew Last Os. 

Composite 253.05 25050 25249 *049 

Industrie* 311.73 31083 31145 -*077 

Transo. 34545 244.18 34442 —083 

Utility 21243 211.56 312.17 +035 

Finance 71278 21247 21146 +039 


NASDAQ Indexes 


Weh Lew Last Os- 

Opiums He 72032 71046 719.93 *1-25 

Industrials 721.72 72041 771-33 +145 

Bonks 76843 76642 7664S — 030 

insunsice 905.15 901.15 901.15 —3.03 

Rnance 9CL44 W17B 94147 -cue) 

Transft 72045 71640 71946 — X92 


AHEX Stock Index 


AMEX Most Actives 



VOL 

High 

Law 

Last 

Chg. 

RcvaiO a 

7122 

4* 

4 

A 

— * 

VkjcB 

53*2 

35* 

34* 

3SI, 

♦ * 

ChevSfts 

3746 

9* 

B* 

9* 

r * 

SPDR 

3Z7ft45’V u 

4SW,, 

asrh, 

+ Vu 

US Biascl 

3116 

5* 

5* 

S* 

— * 

NTNCom 

2634 

B* 

B* 

8* 

-* 

interDlg 

2479 

2"* 

2* 

2* 

—*• 

IvoxCp 

7463 

18 

17* 

18 

+ * 

Harkan 

2311 

1* 

1*. 

l"/u 

♦ w 

AMCpt 

7146 

26* 

25* 

26 

— 


NASDAQ Most Actives 



VoL 

Hit* 

Law 

Last 

Ch«. 

MesaAr 

67706 

7* 

6* 

6Vi, 

— 3Vu 

Intel 

33*67 

SB* 

56* 

5B 

— * 

CiSOD S 

33784 

21* 

20* 

21* 

+ * 

SnanBvs 

77537 

16* 

15* 

16 

+ * 

CrTchLS 

771 7B 

17* 

16 

17* 

—2* 

Ml celts 

31533 

53 

92 

53 

*Vt 

Melhanr 

1*990 14”*, 

16 

16>*h 

*"ll4 

NewfaNk 

18092 

30* 

29* 

30 V, 

* I'/* 

MO 

17411 

23* 

23* 

23* 

— * 

NextcfCm 

17239 

27* 

26* 

27* 

♦ W 

ValTech 

164*3 

5* 

4* 

4T/,i 

+ IV* 

SkySaen 

16471 

1* 

IV* 

1* 

+ Vu 

CrtioEn 

16460 

4* 

4* 

4* 

— V* 

Orades 

16398 37* 

36* 

37 

— * 

Anwn 

15762 

51* 

50* 

51 



Market Sales 


Commodity 
Aluminum, lb 

Today 

0649 

Prev. 

0645 


Today 

Prev. 

Capper electrolytic lb 
Iron FOB, tan 

1.11 

21380 

1.11 

213JM 


Close 

cons. 

Lead, to 

038 

0X8 

NYSE 

217X8 

279X9 

Silver, trov 02 

5.13 

016 

Amex 

11 JO 

16X7 

Steel (scrap), tan 

1)9X7 

119X7 

Nasdoa 

199X0 

23091 

Tin. to 

3X652 

3X752 

in millions. 



Zinc, to 

04673 

0X64 


Web Law Last am. 
441.67 44043 44140 +146 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


30 Bonds 
TO utilities 
10 Industrials 


dace ate 

9845 — 042 

9444 —0.16 

10246 + 0.11 


NYSE Diary 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total issues 
New Highs 
Mew Lows 


Close Prev. 

1169 794 

Ml 1341 

731 719 

2861 2054 

34 25 

48 46 


AMEX Diary 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total issues 
New Highs 
New lows 


289 

246 

798 

13 

14 


348 

313 

223 

784 

» 

10 


NASDAQ Diary 


Advanced 
Declined 
UnchOToed 
Taial issues 
New Highs 
Mew Laws 


1540 

1507 

2029 

5076 

60 

67 


1388 

1651 

2037 

3076 

53 

86 


Spot Commodities 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


Metals 

don 

BM Aik 

ALUMINUM Grad*} 

DoUMPornmMctiPi 
Soot 1439 JD 1430X0 

Fa-ward 145740 149940 

COPPER CATHODES CHN8 
Dalian per radTfctOD 
Scat 240240 240240 

Forward 240240 240340 

LEAD 

DoUor* per nWrtetoe 

Spot . £140 57280 

Forward 50940 50040 

NICKEL _ 

Do! ten per mdrtetog 
Spot 600000 601040 

Forward 609000 609540 

TIM 

Dollm per BMtrtetoa 
Spot 504500 505540 

Forward 512040 512S40 

ZINC (Special High erode) 
Dollars per nwtriclon 
Scot 43540 93640 

Forward XU* 99940 


Prev ion 
BM Ask 


143140 142240 
144840 144940 
Brads) 

240040 240140 
yiyiffl t 240440 


57940 58040 
50*40 57740 


607040 600040 
616040 617040 


503040 9DS40 
510000 510540 


93740 93840 

95940 96O0D 


Financial 

HMi Low One Chew 

3440 NTH STERLING (LIFFE) 

000080 -MS* IN PC* 

Sep 94.15 9449 94.13 +842 

rEr 9X42 93. 33 93.40 +846 

Mar 92JM 9274 9242 +046 

jS till ttfl 0U7 +040 

Sep 9241 9140 9240 + 049 

Dec 91.72 9141 9170 + 049 

MOT- 9149 9147 9149 +811 

j£j 91 JO 9140 91 P9 +048 

Sep 91.10 9145 91.10 +046 

DK 9048 98.92 + 087 

MOT 9079 9077 9078 +aBW 

jfi 9049 9045 0066 +044 

Eat. volume: 33,164. Open M,: 543491. 
3X40HTH EURODOLLARS f LIFFE) 
stnmiep-pteof lwpct 
Cap «U1 9440 9441 —041 

CMC M.U 94.18 WX9 — OJB 

MOT 9346 9346 9345 —841 

JDS 9344 9354 9153 Uncll. 

s«p N.T. N.T. 9325 —041 

ESI. volume: 206. Open int.: 7407. 
3XHONTH EUROMARKS ILIFFS) 

DMi raBUen - pis or 1M pet 
Sen 9547 9545 9546 —041 

Dec 9447 94.94 9454 —043 

MOT 9449 9446 9448 —042 

Jan 907 9473 943S —041 

See 909 906 9447 —040 

Dec 9342 9378 9341 —041 

Mar 9343 9160 9161 — 042 

M 9147 9143 9346 —041 

5ep 9332 9131 9130 —103 

Dec 9112 9112 9110 Unch. 

Mcr N.T. N.T. 9258 VJnch. 

Jan 9246 9241 9242 —041 

EsL volume: 46483. Open bd.: 798481 
1440 NTH PI BOH IMATIF) 


FF3 mraien -Bt»*tii«pcj 


Dec 


Jen 


94.14 

9348 

9165 

9144 

9122 

9103 

9249 


9446 

9448 

9184 

9360 

9340 

9118 

9258 

9243 


9447 —041 

9440 — 044 

9345 —043 

9160 —046 

9140 —045 

9118 — 004 

9258 —0.W 

9245 —043 


Est. volume: 2S451. Open InL: 191721. 
LONG GILT (LIFFE) 

XS84M - Pts A 32ntfs o( 108 Pd 
Sep 103-00 10243 102-21 +0-11 

Dec N.T. N.T. 10245 +0-11 

Est. volume: 31.101 Open Int.: 119X2*. 
GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND (LIFFE) 
DM 250400- ptS Ot IN PCt 
Sep 9139 9104 9108 — 843 

Dec 9266 9131 9135 —036 

Est. volume: 59460. Open Ini.: 177418. 
10-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MATIF) 
FF58C4N - FIS Of M0 pet 


Sop 

11686 

116X4 

116X6 

—0X4 

Dec 

11586 

115X2 

115XB 

—0X6 

Meur 

115.14 

115.14 

11586 

—0X6 

Jon 

N.T. 

N.T. 

114X8 

—0X6 


Est volume: 50462. Open Hit.: U428& 


Industrials 

HM Low Last Settle CldR 
GASOIL (IPE) 

UX. dollars per metric tea-lets of IN teas 
An 15475 157 JO 15150 15150 —440 

Sep 15840 15500 15550 15550 —440 

Oct 16175 15940 15250 15950 —125 

NOV 16250 16175 16240 16040 —340 


MR Lnr U» son* ewe 


Dec 

Jan 

Feb 


16575 16340 
16650 1667S 
16525 16575 
NHT 14275 16275 

SS tt £?: 

Eat. vote me: 20736. 


16445 14445 -2J0 
14550 16550 —275 
16525 14523 —200 
16275 162.75 —275 
N.T. 16175 —VS 
N.T. 16025 —100 
Open Int lfl&JM 


BRENT CRUDE OIL (IPE) 

UJ. dollon per oorraHots or UNO barms 
S*P 1876 1745 1747 1747 +04! 

Oct 1757 1747 1748 1770 +ai2 

17.77 - 17J1 1754 1756 +0.10 

17J9 1743 1743 17. 

174? 1740 1740 1? 

N.T.' N.T, 


Dec 

Jan 

Fed 

Meur 

fi 

JlY 

An 


+ 04? 
_ +045 

..... ILT. TfM UlKtL 

UM 16 Ji 16,50 1655 +045 

N.T. N.T. N.I. U43 UndL 

N.T. N.T. N.T. 1647 UactL 

ILT. ILT. N.T. 1646 Unch. 

N.T. NX K.T. 1645 Undb 

N.T. N.T. N.T. 1646 Unch. 


Est. vstome: 38461. Qptpfnt. 1708SJ 


Stock Indexes 

Men low dose cautt 
FTSEIM (LIFFE) 
ik rrr hntinr imkii 

Sep 31BSL0 317X0 31854 +24 

DOC 31933 31915 31915 +25 

Est. volume: 5,948. Open W.- 60458. 

CAC40 (MATIF) 

PP208 per Index point 

Am 218880 289943 211740 —240 

SeP 212240 210840 212440 — 2Jffl 

Oct ILT. N.T. N.T. Unch. 

Dec 2)5140 214240 215340 -240 

Mar 217540 217140 210140 —240 

EsL volume: 11476. Open ML: 63741. 

Sources: Merit, Associated Press. 
London tan Financial Futures Exchange, 
im Petroleum Exchange 


Dividends 


Company 


Per Amt Pay Rec 


IRREGULAR 


Fidel Asset Msr 
Fidelity Fund 
GovettCa ADR 
Nuveen SelTxFrS 
Prudrrtl RltvTr 


_ 43 W 

. 52 M 

b 4 MS 

_ 4375 8-16 

. 46 B-1S 


b-epprox amount per share. 

INCREASED 

KoJItfax Corn 0 465 8-22 

Schulte Sava Sirs Q 46 8-19 

Sun Bancorp O 45 826 

Third Find Q .115 8+6 

CORRECTION 

Caterpillar Inc ft-* 9-3 

Correc t ing pay dais. 

□ante Business MS M6 

RowWna pov date. 

STOCK SPLIT 
BAA PLCSfor IsHIL 

REGULAR 

Q 41 MS 

Q 47 MB 

Q .07 9 2 

86 M9 
J7 9-13 


M 

H 

9-11 

M 

W1 


9-M 

94 

9-9 

831 


AGCO Carp 
Arctco Inc 
Chart Indust 
Coach man ind 
Commerce Bncshrs 


DuPont CdaA 
Elblt Ltd 
FSM BixxtnWI 
General Motors 
Howkar SIdd Cda 
Irmovex Inc 
LabOnc Inc 
Nil atv Bncshrs 
Peerless Mtg 
Republic Sac Fin 
Research Inc 
Sabine Royalty 
Tele I lex Inc 
Tetaolobe Inc 
Temple-lntond 
Triton Fin A 
Western invRE 


g 475 1S-3 
. 46 826 

Q .12 - Mi 
Q JB 8-18 
fl 77 9-15 
Q 455 816 
Q .18 815 
Q 22 9-23 
Q .125 812 
Q 41 879 
Q 495 82 

U 4983 815 
Q .135 82S 
g 49 815 
Q 45 81 

S JOTS 812 
a 48 826 


81 
82 
812 
89 
820 
1831 
103 
81 
'810 
10-17 
831 
. 82 
W-7 
826 
82 
183 
899 
815 
830 
815 
838 
815 


o-anaoaj; a p ay ab le la Cmxflaa lands, 
nwnthlT; o-anwierly; s^eml-armwi) 


/ m- 


George Mi 



on Sony 


Reuters 

LONDON — The pop star George Michael 
filed an appeal Monday against a court decision 
that blocked his hopes" for a "divorce" from his 
record label, Sony. 

He has already run up legal bills totaling about 
£3 million l$5 million) in a bid to scrap his 15' 
year contract with Sony Corp. and has sworn he 
will never record for Sony again. 

The appeals court could rule that he must pay 
all the costs of the case so far. an estimated £6 
million to £7 million, if it decides against him. 

“He’s not looking at costs at this stage; he’s 


concentrating on getting the appeal through," his 
spokeswoman said, adding that Mr. Michael 
recognized that he might have to pay the entire 
bill. 

Mr. Michael, whose wealth has been estimated 
at £70 mfllton, said the contract amounted to 
"professional slavery” and argued that it re- 
strained trade under British law and violated 
European competition legislation. 

The High Court ruled against him in June after 
a six-month legal battle. Judge Jonathan Parker 
said he was satisfied the contract was “reason- 
able and fair." 



TGI Agrees to Acquire TeleCable 

® - , . _ TAU_/"nmrrninicatii 



Digital Equipment 
Realigns Businesses 

Reuters 

MAYNARD, Massachusetts 
— Digital Equipment Corp. on 
Monday announced a realign- 
ment it said would increase 
management accountability 
and return the company to sus- 
tained profitability^ ^ _ , 
The company said Gresham 
Brebach Jr. resigned as vice 
president and head of Digital 
Consulting to pursue other in- 
terests. 


tock-and-casb deal valued * o{ TCI 

TdeCable's shareholders wiflrecaw 41,666,661 ' shar« w 
Class A common stock plus $300 million liquidation value or 

at the option of its holders into 10 million TCI Class A cl mmon 

shares and is redeemable by TCI after five years. revenue 
• TeleCable, which operates in 15 U5, states, generates revenue 

of about $300 million. . 

Ddl Starts Making Portables Again 

NEW YORK (NYT) — A year after pulling its n °£book 
computers from the market, Dell Computer Corp. introduced two 
lines of the portable machines on Monday. 

The notebooks are the first designed by Dell since its abrupi 
withdrawal from the market in the summer of 1993. John jviecuca^ . 
reenn ted from Apple. Computer Inc., where be had headed devel- 
opment of the successful PowerBook line, concluded then mat 
DeO should start from scratch. 

The new Dell notebooks include the Latitude series, starting at 
51,399, and the highcr-peif orro ance Latitude XP senes, which 
starts at $3, 199. 

Wlndows^ Leads Software Sales Rise 

WASHINGTON (Reuters) —The Software Publisher Associa- 
tion, an industry trade group, said Monday that sales of personal 
computer software in North America had reached $1.49 billion in 
thefirst quarter of 1994, up 1 1.1 percent from the first quarter oF 
1994. 

Applications designed for Microsoft Corp.’s Windows operat- 
ing environment lead the surge, with sales rising 42.9 percent in 
the quarter, to 5898 minio n. 

' The association said 

declined 323 percear to <u<« tuuuvu, ww » *»«■.». — - -r« — 
Computer Inc.*s Macintosh totaled $259 milli on, up 17.0 percent. 

. •Micro so ft Corp. selected ICL PLC, a British computer compa- 
ny, to service ite products throughout Europe, ICL said. ICL will 
be responsible for maintenance, systems integration, consultancy, 
and training for Microsoft products. 

Fruit of the Loom Buys Rival Clothier 

CHICAGO (AF) — Frist Of the Loom Inc. said Monday it had 
purchased Daniel Young International Corp., which does busi- 
ness under the Pro Player apparel brand, for about $45 million. 

Daniel Young designs and markets dothing bearing the logos 
of professional and college sports teams and leagues. 

with the purchase. Fruit of the Loom holds licenses from every 
major VS. sports leagne, said William Farley, the chairman. 

Sara Lee Records Lees After Charge 

CHICAGO (Kmght-Ridder) — Sara Lee Corp. posted a $315 
millio n fourth-quarter loss Monday under the weight of a $495 
million restrnct uro^ char ge.' ^ 

.wouWdhramte between 8,000^ad^^oft^« , ^w 1 three years. 

The loss for the quarter that ended July 2 compares with net 
income of $183 mini on in the fourth quarter of 1993. Net sales for 
the fourth quarter rose 5.6 percent to $4.1 InBkm, the company said. 

For the year, Sara Lee posted earnings of $175 million, com- 
pared with $678 miHio n last year. Sales rose 6.6 percent to $153 
billion. 


W w k niJ BwOfllci . . . V 

■ - The Associated Press 

LOS ANGELES — "Gear and Present Danger" dominated the 
U. S. box office with a gross of $203 millio n over the weekend. 
Following are the Top 10 moneymakers, based on Friday ticket 
sales and estimated sales for Saturday and Sunday. 


.L -Clear and Presail Danger* 
2. *Ttit Music- 
X "Forrest Gumu" . 

L “Tt»a Uttfa Roscots" 
lTrv» Lta* 

LTIwatanr ■ 

7. -The Lion KW . 

X ’ll Could Happen to Vou“ 

*. ’Arams In lhe OatflahT 
IX “Spear 


t Paramount ) 
iNetrUneOnema) 
{Paramount) .. 
HMtuersat) 

fTw euWuff i Century Fox) 

(Warner Brothers) 

VHottDtsomri 
fTriStarj • 

(WaM Disney) 
(TmuitluOi Century Fax) 


. saasmUtian 
51 5J min ton 
SM5 million 
510 million 
WJ million 
17.1 million 
364 million 
*5 million 
524 million 
52 million 


6 


4 


9 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Agencc France Avne Aug. 8 


Amsterdam 

ABN Amro Hid 62 6240 
ACF Holding 39 JO 3940 
Aegon IN IK.™ 

Ahold 46.W* sum 

Akin NgM 223 Z19J0 

AMEV 75.90 7*40 

Bols-Wouonen 4060 3940 
CSM 6X60 68.90 

DSM 13940 140 

Elsevier 17X10 169ja 

Fokkrr 16J0 «4.30 

GW-BrocodOT 5040 50.40 
HBG 29X50 29E50 

Heine* on 238J0 23X30 
Hoogovms 7840 7830 

Hunler Doughra 794C 7970 
IHC Cotand 4040 4070 
Inter Mueller 8X50 8X20 
Inf I Nederland 8240 8240 
KUW 5440 55.90 

KNP BT 5040 5030 

KPN 4940 50.10 

Nediloyd 7J.I0 71.90 

Oce Grlnlen 7840 79 

Paklwed 52.70 5240 

Philips 5640 5540 

Polygram 8130 82*0 

Rohecn 11840 11840 

Rodamco 5530 5530 

Holltico 12070 12040 

Rorento B830 ES50 

Rovoi Dutch 20040 wjo 
S tork 49.10 4930 

Unilever 200.10 19* 

Van Ommeren 5240 sj 
VNU IB740 18740 

Woliers/Kluwer 12140 13040 
EOE Index : 42146 
Previous : *1947 


Brussels 

AG Fin 264 

Almanll WB 

Araed « 

Barca 2S2 

BBL 422 

Bekaert 2750 

cbr ran. 

CMB 254 

CNP 302 

Cocker! II 20 

CoOeno 602 

CoJruTl 731 

Deiham 13T 

Electrabel 59* 

Electron no 331 

GIB 145 

OBL___. m 

Gevaart 

Glawerbel 518 

immobel 310 

Krcdtotbonfc 713 

Masane 149 

Pelroflno I0SS 

Ptmertln 32* 

Rectlcel 54 

R ovale Betee 55* 

Soc Gen Bancme 854 
SocGenBelBteue Z329 Z33S 


Safina 
aelvny _ 

Tessa nderto 

Tractedel 

UCB 

Union Mlnlere 
Wogons Llts 
Current S 
Fmkm 


14625 145» 
1*050 15775 
10600 10700 
10325 10400 
25175 25000 
2500 2590 
7190 74J0 
Stack Index : 7751.12 
: 7737JI 


Frankfurt 


AEG 10310540 

Alcatel SEL 340 335 

Allianz Held 2472 2490 

Altana 623 620 

Aslto 1006 1015 

BASF 3264032540 

Bayer 36040369X0 

Bay. Hvpo bank *1* 4)6 

Bov VerelnsM. 44945140 
BBC 770 765 

BHF Bank 380 3BS 

BMW 063 C«3 

Commerzbank 337.10 338 

Continental 27027040 
Daimler Benz 040 03s 

DKWS50 50750040 

Dt Babcock 265JO266J0 
DfiutSCM Bank 73LM738JS 
Douglas 50040 501 

Dresdner Bank 30&40 mo 

FeWmueble 310 310 

F Kruno HMXtl 22150223.10 
Harpener 30 338 

Henk el 400 579 

Hocntlef 1 903 no 

Hoetftst 3524035440 

HOhmortn 046 068 

Horten 320217“ 

IWKA 388391. 

Kail Sale 1351; 

icarstaffl 595 ... 

Kaufhgf 512 515 

KMO 1304013240 

Kloecvner werke 141 14140 
Unde 92) 925 

Uttnonso 2I7402174S 
MAN 451 454 

“anjiwmonn *» JO 44940 

Metaiigaeli 2094020740 
Muendi Ruedt 29*5 3%s 

gorstne 875 09g 

Preusaag 480*7*40 

gW* 34740 340 

RWE 44B44*m 


dose Prev. 

Rlwlnmetall 329 330 

Sctwlng 94250 _9« 

Siemens M.3S69I.50 

Tbyssen 315 310 

Vorta 31* no 

Veba 5334052820 

VEW 355 355 

vtag 49120490.40 

Volkswagen 5153051/50 
Wella 1033 1034 

DAX Index : 218L67 
Prey tons : 2iMLM~ 
faz. Index JQ6.13 
Previous : 82744 


Helsinki 


Amor-Yhtvma 

134 

124 

EnsaGuizelt 

44.10 

43X0 

HuMamakl 

175 

176 

ILOJ=>. 

1070 

1070 

Kymmene 

123 

124 

Metro 

174 

175 

Nokia 

4*7 

502 

Pohlara 

67 

69 

Rwrta 

102 

101 

Stockmann 

220 

223 


15 



Hong Kong 

31.90 32J0 

12.90 1Z70 

37.90 3820 
3840 3940 
1140 1145 
1430 1O0 

55 5475 
3940 4040 
40.70 <740 
1470 1470 
2340 2340 
21 21.45 
21.10 21.15 
95.75 9575 
1145 11.75 
1565 1545 
1540 1545 
3540 36 

2370 23J0 
6275 6175 
2940 27.95 
1580 15*5 
1050 1045 
21.15 2145 
25 25X5 
5175 5175 
122 379 
6425 6575 
1270 1240 
375 375 
J0.90 3140 
1175 12 

1145 1140 
9537 47 


Bk East Asia 
Camay Pacific 
Cheung Kang 
China Light Pwr 
Dairy Farm Inti 
Hans Lung Dev 
Hang Seng Bank 
Henderson Land 
HK AJr Eng. 

HK China Gas 
HK Electric 
HK Land 
HK Realty Trusl 
HSBC Holding* 
HK Shang Mila 
HK Telecomm 
HK Ferry 
Hutch Whampoa 
Hvson Dev 
Jardine Math. 
Jardlne 5tr HU 
Kowloon Motor 
Mandarin Orient 
Miramar Hotel 
New world Dev 
SHK Proas 
Slehix 
Swire Poe A 
Tal Cheung Pros 
TVE 

Wharf HoW 
Wing On Co Inti 
winsor ina 




Johannesburg 

AECI 2* wen 

AJtecfi I IB 110 

Anglo Artier 250 K2 

Barlows 3340 3475 

Bivvoor 10 945 

Buffels 44 46 

1174011740 

Drlefanleln 65 4540 

Goiar 1170 1170 

GFSA 126 126 

Harmony 77 95.75 

HtehveW Stem 31 j] 

Kloof 5740 5740 

NedbankGrp 3375 men 

Rana ton rein 4875 4341$ 

Rusplat 99 98 

SA Brewg BUS 0773 

5t Helena *4 45 

Stool 3r40 2940 

western Deep 19140 193 

85 



doom 

Prmv. 

F tears 

1X7 

1X6 

Forte 

2X5 

2X7 

GEC 

Gen’l Acc 

287 

289 

6 

598 

Glaxo 

6.05 

6 

Grand Mel 

4X1 

4.14 

GRE 

1.90 

1.91 

Guinness 



GUS 



Hanson 



HJUsdown 



HSBC H logs 



ICI 



Inchcope 



Kingfisher 

517 

5.10 

Ladbroke 

1J1 

171 

Land Sec 


671 

La parte 


7.98 

Lasmo 


1X3 

Legal Gen Grp 


4X2 

UovdsBenk 


■fl 

Marks So 



MEPC 


tsi 

Natl Power 


472 

NatWest 


478 

NthWst Water 


5X9 

Pearson 

6X2 

045 

P&O 

786 

095 

Pllklngton 

1.97 

1.94 

PowerGen 

5X2 

5X5 

Prudential 

LIS 

3.18 

Rank Ora 
Reckltt Cal 

484 

<04 

016 

672 

Redkmd 

5X6 

5X7 

Rred InH 

876 

8X3 

Reuters 

487 

486 

RMC Group 

1015 

1012 


l.*9 

1.98 

Rodimn 1 until 

370 

171 

Rag,' Sew 

3S7 

193 

Salnsbury 

4X7 

427 

Seal Henan 

575 

518 


3.90 

190 


1X1 

121 

Severn Trent 

5x1 

572 

Shell 

7X9 

7X7 

Slebe 

679 

672 

Smith Nephew 

1x0 

1JB 

Smith tClls-.j B 

476 

476 

Smith (WH) 

483 

4X9 


324 

323 

Tate&Lvie 

4X3 

4X3 

Tesco 

2X5 

2X2 

Thorn EMI 

iaxa 

10X8 

Tank Ins 



TSB Group 

2.13 

289 






3X7 

Vodafone 

1.90 

189 


41X9 

41.13 

Wellcome 

677 

076 

Whitbread 

5X8 

526 

Williams !+:.'■» 

374 

371 

wliib Carraun 

1X0 

1X0 

P.T. 30 index : 2477 


Pravtaoi : 3(71 






Previous : m3. 

S 



London 


AUev Nan 

199 

199 

Allied Lyons 

595 

591 

ArloWlriglns 
Argyll Group 

28D 

2.92 

282 

2.77 


593 

6 

BAA 

4.73 

970 

BAe 

514 

51/ 

Bank Scotland 

187 

1X6 


5X3 

5X0 

Bass 

575 

573 

BAT 

42S 

4X6 

BET 

1.21 

1.32 

Blue Circle 

119 

121 

BOC Group 

786 

/XI 

Boots 

5X7 

5X1 

Bono ter 

471 

4X7 

BP 

486 

489 

Brit Airways 

4.18 

4JU 

Brit Gas 

ID 

7.79 

Brit Steel 

1X3 

1J7 

Bril Telecom 

383 

37? 

BTH 

US 

190 

Cable Wire 

4X4 

4X3 

Cadbury SOI 

4X6 

4X4 

Caradon 

UM 

108 

Coats Virol lo 

220 

272 




Courtoulds 

5X7 

5X0 

ECC Group 

190 

197 


423 


Eurotunnel 

119 

128 


Madrid 

BBV 3195 3100 

Bw Central HIsp. 2775 2755 

Barwo Santander 5380 5150 

Banesto 1110 1083 

CEPSA 3W 335B 

DTOMdas 2365 538 

Endesa *290 625U 

Ercros 105 105 

Iberdroki 956 9s» 

5*6*01 . 4275 4295 

Tafaacalera 3450 3525 

Telefonica 10*0 1850 

KMEZ%lT ,:m£r 


Milan 

Banco Comm 4630 4610 

BasTOOl 157 155 

Benetton group 22900 23000 

Clga 1100 1095 

CIR 2615 2605 

Cred itgi 7150 2150 

Enlchem 3000 3005 

Fertln 1950 1970 

FerflnRIsp 1230 1231 

Flat SPA 6010 6790 

Flnmec con 105 1840 1845 

Generali 41450 <1600 

F 27050 27800 

IFIL 6535 6640 

Italcem 12735 12790 

IIS!*®* „ w» 5400 

italmehiiiare 43400 445D0 

Mediobanca 1510a 120*0 

«ont*J1agn 1491 1465 

Olivetti 2295 2330 

Pirelli 5220 5200 

RAS 25300 25100 

Rinascente 1 0005 >0160 

Satoem 4160 4193 

San Poate Torino 97W 9490 
SIP 4480 4400 

SME 3845 3800 

Sola 24*0 3440 

standa 36900 36030 

Slot 5270 5260 

Tore A&sl Rise 27200 27950 

mib hides : im 
Prertons : 1117 


Montreal 

A Icon Aluminum 33U 34 

Bank Montreal 23 * zj* 

Bell Canada C 42 

Bombardier B 19W 19* 

Camator 18* 18* 

6 6 


Dominion Text A 
Donohue A 
FCA ln+i 
MacMillan Bl 
NattBk Canada 
Power Corn. 
Prmrtflo 
Quebec Tel 
Quebecor A 
Quebecor B 
Teteotabe 
VWeotron 


dose Prev. 1 


OohI 

Prev. 

7 

TVS 

Esselte-A 

104 

106 

12* 

12* 

Handelabanken 

Id® 

ID 

4.10 

4.10 

investor B 

181 

883. 

19* 

IB* 

Norsk Hydro 

263X0 

258 

Bto 

B% 

Procardia AF 

118 

119 

19W 

19* 

Sandvlk B 

120 

117 

6 

6 

SCA-a 

121 

119 

19W 

19* 

S-E Banken 

4878 

48 

18* 

18* 1 

Sfeandia F 

116 

116 

IBVfc 

18* i 

Skonska 

156 

158 

19* 

19* 1 

SKF 

153 

149 

12* 

,2* i 

Stare 

454 

440 

: 1911X4 1 

TnrilcborgBF 

108 

107 

1 


VOIvo BF 

787 

773 


Paris 



672 

670 


833 

830 

Alculet Aisthom 

656 

655 


Z74 269X0 


502 

475 


1319 

1320 

BMP 

245 

248 


650 

660 


863 

8/0 


2096 

MU 

CX.F. 

■.ilLl 1 

229 


115 11570 1 


1443 

1443 

Oments Franc 


315 

Club Med 

40940550 


423X0 

423 


10X5 

1090 


588 

588 


471.90 

470 


632 

650 

Latarae Copnee 


453 





551 

551 


1231 

1222 


877 

875 


120X0 

121 

Mlcftelln B 
Moulinex 

251X025180 
126 12580 




luA-I 

173 


F v »:1 

34* 


864 

86? 


949 

948 

Radlotechnlaue 

544 

548 


143 14190 

Rati St. Louis 

1635 

1625 

Sana*! 


HI 

Saint Gabain 


706 

S£.B. 


565 



613 



270 


17370 

174 


322 

323 

UAP. 

15815790 

VcuWffl 

287 

292 



Sao Paulo 


Banco da Brasil 

22.10 

21X0 

Banespc 

770 

8X4 

Brodesco 

788 


Brahma 

290 


Camio 

10470 9981 

Eletrabros 

284 

274 

■touoanca 

232 


Ufiftl 

339 

345 

Pmunoponcmo 

16X0 

1050 


127X9128.11 


0016 


Tstabras 

45X5 44.99 

Tetesa 

48044*70 

Usiminas 

170 

1.19 

Vale Rio Doce 

119.99 

114 

Vorlo 

N.T. 

9590 


45809 


Singapore 


Cere bos 

785 

7.05 

City Dev. 

7.10 

7X0 

DBS 

1120 

11X0 

FredefNttewt 

17 

17X0 

Gentlnp 

13X0 

13X0 

Golden Hope PI 

272 

2.73 

Haw Par 

120 

U2 

Hume Industrie 

625 

010 

Inchcope 

Kepael 

SXO 

10X0 

5X0 

1080 

KLKepana 

X84 

278 

Lum Chang 

1X9 

1X8 

Afcstavmt Sonkg 

9X5 

9.H 

OCBCtoreton 

14X0 

1410 

OUB 

6X0 

6X0 

OUE 

1X5 

8X0 

Setrtoawong 

11 

11.10 

ShangrllD 

5X0 

5X5 

SfmeDarbv 

474 

4X3 

SlA foreign 

1140 

1250 

5 ‘pore Land 

7X0 

/JO 


1020 

1010 

Sing steamship 


414 

JTpcrx Telecomm xa 

3X6 

Strelte Trading 
dob fere km 

3X8 

1190 

JX# 

14 

UOL 

223 

226 

^trajjs inro^tod. : 2267XS 


Stockholm 

AGA 6« JO 70 

AseoA 632 630 

Astro A 171 169 

Atlas Caaco 9650 9550 

Electrolux B 390 390 

Ericsson 42) 417 




.vaeridai : T97V.I* 


Sydney 



9.16 

9X0 


417 

421 

BMP 

19X8 

1VX0| 


3X3 

3X6 


0X6 

090 


426 

428 

Com Dim 

585 

5JN 

CRA 

IV 

1*86 

CSR 

484 

48/ 

Fosters Bre+s 

1.13 

1.14 

Goodman Field 

1X6 


ICI Australia 

11X0 

11X8 

Magellan 

1X5 

ITS 

MIM 

2.94 


Nat AuSI Bonk 

11X0 

11X81 


8X1 

0*5 


444 

4X0 1 

N Broken Hill 

3X2 

2X3: 

Poc Dunfao 

4X2 

460 

Pioneer inrl 



Nmndy Poseidon 

022 

223 


1X0 

1X3 


4 

3X5 

TNT 

2X5 

2X/ 

western Mining 

7X5 

/X4 

Westnac Banking 

4X2 

4X8 

wooaslde 

474 

478 

PRaarsMT" 8 " 1 " 


Tokyo 


Akal Eiedtr 
Asahi Chemical 
Asahl Glass 
Banket Tokyo 
Bridgestone 
Canon 
Casio 

Oai Nippon Print io*0 1090 
Dolma House 1-eTO U80 
Daiwa Sacurllles 1620 1610 
Fanuc 

Full Bonk 

Full Photo 
Fulitsu 
Hitachi 
Hirocni come 
Hondo 
Ito Yokado 
Itochu 

Japan Airlines 
Ko|lma 
Kansai Power 
KOMHafcl Steel 
Kirin Brewery 
Komatsu 
Kubota 

Kyocera . 

Matsu Elec Inds 1750 1760 
Matsu Elec Wks 1140 11JD 
Mitsubishi Sk 
Mitsubishi Kosel 
Mitsubishi Elec 
Mitsubishi Hev 
Mitsubishi Cora 
Mitsui and Co 
Mltsukosnl 
Mitsumi 
NEC 

NGK Insulators 

Nlkko Securities 1230 1200 
Nippon Kogaku 1029 1000 
NUwon ou 
Nippon Steel 
Nippon Yusen 
Nissan 
Nomura Soc 
NTT 


470 470 

775 776 

121 D 1200 
1550 1560 
1630 1640 
1760 1730 
1240 1230 


4420 4450 
“run 2300 
2270 2220 
1060 1050 
1010 IBfflB 
881 903 

1720 1720 
5210 5210 
713 720 

72B 743 

958 959 

2630 3600 
411 407 

1240 1220 
9S3 950 
744 734 

7430 7320 


2620 2510 
532 -532 
687 680 

aw aw 
1190 1210 
859 869 

1Q2t! ling 
1690 1730 
12X 1198 
1070 1070 


Toronto 

ANtJM Price 18V7 IS* 

Aspiico r 
Air Can 


Eagle 16H» 16* 

Air Canada 6* 69fc 

Alberta Energy Z1W 21W 

Am Bwrlck Res 30* 305k 

BCE 46* 4«* 

Bk Nova Scotia 25V. 25* 

BCGas 15* 15* 

BC Telecom 24* 24* 

Bramaiea 5* 026 

Brunswick 10* TO 

CAE 7* 7V. 

Camdev 480 480 

CIBC 3BV* 38fe 

Canadian Pacific 22* 22 

can Tire A mu 

Cantor 20 2CA 

Cara 185 IBB 

CCL Ind B *V. 9* 

aneplex 5 5 

Comlnco 22 'A 22* 

COnwest Expi 23* 24* 

CSAMotA 9* 9* 

Dofoico 22V. 21* 

DylexA 0J2 073 

Echo Bov Mines 15* 15* 

Egully silver A BM em 

FCA Inti 4.15 LIS 

Fed I nd A 7 7 

Fletcher Choil A 17* 17* . 
FPI 6V. 5* 

Gentro * 0X2 

Gulf Cda Res 6 6 

Hews Inti 12* 13 

Hemto Old Mines 12%. 12* 

HMlinaar 12K 12* 

H orsha m 19 19* 

Hudson's Bay 25* 25* 

Imasco 36 35* 

lira 37* 38 

IPL Energy 30V. 30* 

Jortnock 16* 16* 

Labatt 20 19* 

Lablaw Co 20* 30 

Mackenzie 7* B* 

Mam inti A 51* 52* 

Manle Leaf 12* 12 

Mariilme 23 V, 23 

Mark Res 9* 9* 

MoisonA 21 21* 

Homo Ind A 5* » 

Norondo Inc 25* 25* 

Narandn Forest 12 11* 

Norwi Energy 16* 16* 

Ntfin Telecom 45* 45* 

Nava Cara 12* 12* 

Oshawa 19* 19* 

Pagurln A 370 165 

Placer Dome 27* 28* 

Paco Petroleum 9* 9* 

PWA Cora 059 057 

Rayrock 14* 14* 

Renaissance 28* 29 

Rogers B 30* 20* 

Hammons _ 77 77 

Roval Baik Can 27* 27* 

Sceptre Res 17* r?* 

Scoffs How 0* 8* 

Seaorom 42* 42V. 

5*arsCan 7* 7* 

Shell Can 43 43* 

ii^ncarton im 12* 

SHLSvstemhse 7* 7* 

Southern 17* 17V. 

Spot Aerospace 15* 15* 

SWa>6 _ 0* 8* 

Talisman Energ 29* 29 

Tecka 22* 22* 

Thomson 15* 15* 

Toronto Domn 3E* 20 

Terstar B 24* 24* 

Transcdta Util 14* 1416 

TransCda Pipe 17* 17* 

TrlwnFinlA 4 lio 

Trimac H 15* 

I Unlcarp Energy IJ1 131 

B^SSs'TSSiA 175 " 


743 750 
36? 363 
653 647 

772 712 

2230 2230 
0510a 0540a 
Olvmnus Optical 1170 1170 


Pioneer 

Hah 

Sanyo Etoe 
Shore 
Shlmazu 
Shinetsu Cnem 
Sony 

Sumitomo 8k 
Sumitomo Chem 
Sum) Marine 
Sumitomo Metal 
TaiselCora 
Tabha Marine 
Takeda Cham 
TDK 
Tallin 

Tokyo Marine 
Tokyo Elec Pw 
Tgggan Printing 1490 1490 
Turov IML 778 775 

Toshiba 

Toyota 

YamaictilSec 
e:* TO 


Provim: 1650 


2860 2000 
960 960 
561 561 

1810 1810 
740 731 
2090 2090 
5930 5900 
2020 2010 
5*0 537 
927 928 

320 315 
672 667 

NA ILA. 
1340 1210 
4450 4390 
990 592 
1290 1270 
3000 3000 


767 775 

2150 2130 
BBS 05 


Zurich 


Adto Inti B ' 257 255 

Ahnutsse B new to to 
BBC Brwn Bov B 1289 1282 
ObaGetovB 022 m 
CSHoldlnasB 560 564 
Etektnm B 364 3u 
Fischer B 1510 1589 

interdluuwnt B 2155 2150 

«l m 

OerlHLBuehrle R 139J013 jjo 

mm mS ms 

Setra Republic 115 iu 
S andoe B 725 719 

sewrwtorB mm two 

Sutter pc 983 973 

SunralltonCB B 2090 2120 
Swiss Bnk CoreB NA 399 

Swiss Refrour r S62 568 

SwttWr R 017 800 

UgSB„ 1140 1150 

Wtotwthur B 692 S95 
Zurich AM B 1315 1300 
SBStaidBc;93g 

previous: Tift 


'll'* Mqr to subscribe 
in Belgium 

just call: Q 800 1753$ 


U.S. FUTURES 


Via Associated Pna 


Aug.8 


Swaan Season 
High Law 


Open High Lew Ckae Che OpJnt 


Grains 

WHEAT KBBT) UmtuinMfun-t 
3J7* IM SOPM 3X3* 2X6* 3X1 

345 109 Dec 94 147 3J0* 346* 

1*4* 127 MOTH 344 347 343* 

346* 116* May 95 349 149* 347 

142* 111 A895 3X1* 132* 3X1* 

CWC95 

Est soles H.0C-3 Prf's. sales 9,206 
FtTsapenM 60,989 ell 275 
WHEAT (KBOTJ MBBhu nWWnnm -i 
2S5* 3j(H*aw»4 344* 347 341* 

340 217* Dec 94 34H4 3J4* 341 

259* 325 Marys 343 344* 341* 

349* 17TMMay95 346 346 341 

1X3* 116*JulM 3X2* 3X2* 3X2 

1X3 129 5ep95 

Dec 95 

Est. Mies NA. FITS, sales «t54 
FiTi open Int 310*3 an 22 

CORN (COOT) MUDbunSiCkmiin- 

252V. 2.14 Sep«4 216* 222* 215* 

277 2J7 Dec 94 218* 223V. 117* 

282* 226 Mar 95 226* 2J» 2X6* 

285 122* MOV 93 133% 240V. 2X3 

2B5* 2X6* Jut 95 237*. 144* 2X7 

270* 2X9 Sep 95 145 245 344 

263 2X5* Dec 95 241* 247 241* 

All 9$ 

Est.sdas SUMO FWs. series 22458 
FrTs Open Int 21X07 off 192656 
SOYBEANS ICXOT) 


3X4* 14JM 

3^\4-a00* 3L55S 
154* -0.00* 9.145 
34B J 4 — DJD B7 
3X2 -OUOOV. 1,135 
142 ~0J»* 2 


X44K-4MMV. 15MB 
341*— 0X1 16,993 

3J2* 5>1B9 

345 *0X2* 418 

3X2 tOkOO* 389 
3X4 1 

341 1 


119* +0X2* 39X11 
2X2* +1X01 123X32 
2X1*+0JI3 24.926 

2X8* +0-83V. W, 169 
242* *201% 9,160 
344 +0X1 610 

345* *(UO* 4,920 
357 *101* 


7X5 

7X8* 

747* 

7JM 

7JM 

7JB* 

7j06* 

5.94* 

581 

640* 


21080 

20740 

20980 

20740 

20740 

207.06 

20680 

181J0 

18280 


5800 bu ciMnurn- dOMri MrbudHI 


5X1% Aug 94 574* 588* 574 

540*5apW 543* 477 542* 

451 Nov 94 547 449 546 

540 Jon 95 545* 576* 544 

58 9 Mor95 58 51! 58 

575UMoy9S 580 571* 540 

471*4495 585 586 585 

579 Aua 95 588 571 548 

577 Sep 95 588 581 586 

ST** Nov 95 589* 585* 548* 

JUN 

ESt.SCHS 50.000 Wl SM 27.974 
FrTs open kit 130X74 up 171 
SOYBEAN MEAL (CPOT) nohn-pgSanew 
22100 17340 Aug 94 17400 175.90 173X0 

1 72.1 D Sep 94 171 70 17480 17140 

17040 Oct 94 17180 17190 17080 

T7040DUC94 171170 17480 17070 

171 40 Jan 95 17180 17440 17148 

17380 Mar 95 17340 T7L10 173X0 

17480 MOV 95 17480 17780 17440 

175X0 Jm 95 17580 179JH 175.90 

17100 Aug M 17940 17940 17040 

17640 Sod 95 10080 10080 17B80 

Est sales 20800 fWiStte 15493 
Frfiopen W OAKS* I4> 593 
SOYBdAN OIL (Cairo AMb-ddnar 
3085 21 45 Aug 94 9140 

30X4 Z24BSBP94 34S 

2944 22.1003 94 24X0 

2887 2280DSC94 2195 

2845 2165 Jm 95 3195 

28X0 22.73 Mar » 2197 

2081 22.73 May 95 2190 

2745 3W0 Jul 95 2185 

27 JO 2275AUD9S 2175 

24J5 2283 Sep 9J 

2110 2X10 Oct +5 

ZUH 280 Dec 95 33,10 

BLttftK 31000 FtTLsdes 20423 
RTS open W 91922 oil 2168 


584 +087* 7419 

STD* +084V4 H44I 
543 vi m.aa 71x74 
571* +080* 11440 
5.30* +4UD 4460 
Sjsna +083* UM 
5.90* +083 5471 

580* +002* 128 

587* +003* 22 

5.92 +002* 2410 
682 +082 


17480 

173X0 

17X00 

172X0 

17180 

17480 

175X0 

177X0 

17840 

17840 


+0X0 0491 
+040 19498 
+040 VUR1 
+080 31,963 
+060 4427 
+060 4,97) 
+0X0 1178 
+ 1X0 1495 
+1J0 108 

+2J0 24 


24J4 

24X9 

34X4 

-412 

4.739 

un 

24X5 

2449 

-011 

22eia 

15,5771 


201 


-010 

WLtV? 

7X5D 

2407 

+0X4 36X35 


f]tt 

2405 

+005 

4344 


non 

2403 

+0X1 


24.15 

TIM 

2199 

-001 

3XU 

MXO 

<083 

23X6 

+004 

1X13 

2410 

2173 

ZL9B 

+410 

154 



2375 

*028 

50 



zus 

+410 

■1 

2370 

23.10 

ZLU 




Livestock 


CATTLE (CMER) AMto-amwIi. 

74.10 6570 Dct 94 7155 7382 7240 

74X0 £7X0 Dec 84 7180 71.90 7072 

74X5 67.90 Feb 95 7072 7092 6980 

75.10 6940 Apr 95 72X2 72X5 7175 

£9X0 6680 JIM 95 69X5 69XS 6080 

68.10 6L50AUO95 7L73 7245 7077 

EsLsctos 21,973 Fit's. sates 16460 
FrTs O pen Int 71101 Off T0SP 
naauTiuE (Cmorj 

8100 Tl.lOAUBM 01.10 81.10 7977 

8170 7L00 Sen 94 BUS BOSD 7872 

31 XS 70950084 79X0 79X0 7789 

8840 7140 Nov 94 BOM BOOS 7065 

8085 71 95 Jan 9J 79 JO 79J0 78X0 

76X0 72X5 MOV 9S 

8025 7745 Mar 96 77X0 77X0 76X0 

7680 7245 Apt K 76JS 7L5S 75J0 

9CMS 2J96 FlTOUtol 3,149 
Fri’i open kit 11413 Ofl 281 
HOGS (CMBU Uunte-mnrti. 

4975 3M00994 43X0 42X0 4140 

5050 J9JSOKM 4180 4145 41X5 

5080 3BJ0F9P9S 41X2 4140 4LW 

4080 3SJSAPT95 40X0 404) 4045 

47 JD OJSJunVS 45.10 4541 4505 

4580 43858695 4487 6680 6480 

46X5 62J0AdB9S 4642 4655 6682 

4080 39700(395 

E& sales WM Prt^Mta 6,993 
PrTsqMillnr 25X8? ell 377 
PORKSBUJE5 (CMER) 4U0SfeL-ampwl 
5940 2635 Aug 91 3UB X2.02 3382 

4180 Feb PS 6780 6785 6590 

4043 Mar 9S 67.15 67X0 4550 


6005 
60X0 
61.15 
5480 

52X5 4180AUB95 

Est. scria 2X03 K^e. series 1863 
RfflOpWlW 9X90 up 7 


4280 May 73 47X0 6780 
6125 JUTS 6787 6L» 


7120 

71X2 

70.17 

7180 

6980 

7142 


sens 

79.17 

78X1 

79.15 
7985 

75.15 
76X0 
75X7 


4125 

4181 

4180 

40X5 

45X2 

6680 

44-60 

4082 


MM 

66X5 

6100 


-8J7 3OL750 
-083 117H 
-075 9813 
—062 5835 
-0.10 IJU 
-08016810 


-1X2 3X54 
-185 2XS8 
— 1.11 2756 
-085 1781 
—1.10 767 


-4X3 

—071 


47X0 47 JB —0X0 


+8JI 12855 
+0X3 98«1 
+0X5 1836 
+0X0 1,107 
+015 416 

+010 .123 
1373 
2 


*280 1812 
-060 4532 
—080 2SS 
- 0.6 6 
57 

19 


Food 

C MOD W.TO fcn . ren ii ne> Ob 

2403 77J0DK* KLOO 2D4J0 1CU» UUO -2250 11823 

24480 7880 MOT 95 20680 2QLSD 20X0 2DU0 —680 5813 

24480 02X0 May 95 20780 207X0 20580 20580 — U» 

urn 3580 Jut 93 iiaoo 21080 mao nun —400 39 

CLOG 0980 SeP 95 19080 199X5 17180 T7M0 -3473 17826 

24280 81 80 Dee 95 21400 7M8D 21480 30980 -480 a 

Esr.scries 16891 Rfs, sates MR 
FiVsepwiM 39825 UP 012 





MTO 




Season Season 






Utah 

Um 

opwi 

Hklh 

Law 

One 

Chg 

OpJnt 

Hteh Low ■ Open 

non 

Low 

a» 

Chg OnJnt 

12X6 

1057 May 95 11X0 

nxo 

1173 

1176 

—009 


91180 92X20 Junto 92820 

92820 

92800 

92jna 

106X18 

12X2 

1057 Jut 9S 

1175 

1175 

11X9 

1149 

-005 

M to 

Est. sales 189X37 FrTs. sate 775X04 


11X0 

10570(195 

11X7 

11 JO 

TL47 

1141 

— 009 


FWsonanw iAin.ru up 

r/^iw 




11J0 

I0J8Mar?6 




11X4 

—0X9 

214 


11X6 

11X4 MavM 




11X0 

—0m 

5 

1X764 lXMQTepW L5420 

1X456 

1X566 

1X332 

-a 31X89 

Est. tec 

4715 RY4 soles 

10601 





1X79 1XSOOCK94 1X362 

1X400 

LS3S0 

1X360 

-28 766 

FMts open Int 111X30 

Off 542 





1X720 1X640 Mor 96 



1X340 

—SO 152 


COCOA (NCSE3 wmsoteun p -sswl 
1580 1041 Dec 94 1416 167 1388 

U0S 1077 Mar 95 145* 1460 1421 

1612 1878 May 95 1475 T47I W 

1400 1225 Jut « 

1611 1265SSP93 1365 13R 1338 

1633 1290 DM 95 

1676 1350 Mar 96 

EsL sales 16867 Frl's. scries 87W 
FrTs open Int 728TB oft 683 
ORANGE JUICE (NCTN) lUMfek-artlW 
13480 89. 10 Now 94 9U0 9980 93JS 

13280 9180 Jon 9S WL25 10240 10140 

13425 96J0MOT 95 M&75. WS75 . 10580 

114X5 9780 May 95 

11980 101.40 Jul 95 110X0 111.10 1HUD 

111.50 10580 Sep 95 9450 9370 9458 

11240 11780 Nov 95 

Jan 96 

Est. stria NA. Ftrs. sales 1X70 
Frriapwikit 22X10 aH 609 


1300 

1430 

1450 

1470 

1362 

1515 

1543 


9080 

VHXJ 

U£U 

nun 

nwo 

115.18 


125X19 
I 9X11 
! 2X36 
I 2X85 
125X73 
I 4X82 


+0130 vm 
+0X0 3X91 
+0X5 arm 
+080 
+080 
+040 11X60 
+0J0 — 

+0JD 


SUGAR-WORLD 11 (NCSK) nuns 
439 Oct 94 1185 ~ 


1240 

1110 


9.I76HBT 95 1184 


1187 

1187 


1171 

1179 


.par lb. 

1180 —0180 
11 JO -087 3400 


Metals 

HI GRADE COirai (NCMX) bWkb.adiwh 
116X0 76X0 Sep 96 107X5 109.10 107X5 UBXO 

115X0 7575 Dec 94 10770 10940 10770 10095 

111X0 7490 JknK 10880 10080 10880 TOOJO 

111X0 7X00 95 1O0M 

11370 7UBMar« 107X0 TOSXB H788 10SX5 

11140 7685 May 95 10670 107X0 10670 107J3 

11250 7800 Jul 75 I07JB 1D785 1B7JB 10475 

11680 7U0AWR5 10040 10840 108X5 toexo 

11005 79JQSep95 W595 

11585 75JOOd9S WA75 

11280 7775 Nov 95 10980 10980 106X0 108X5 

109X0 9UK) Dec 95 1 05-15 

moo buoxiiw - ious 

105.BB 42J0MCT-96 104.15 

11040 9L10AITN 107X0 

Mar 96 mu 

107X0 10670 Jan 96 107.15 

Est. sate 12800 Wuolo 10861 
FiTsauanM 46X71 off U2S 
SILVER (NOUQ s 

5508 ‘ 

590J 


S5 

6040 
6068 
6108 
6118 
see a 
<128 


PLATINUM 


mSAUOM • - BM 

3745 Sep 94 5128 5145 JNL5 51U 

00*4 5145 5165 5115 5137 

3008 Dec 94 5198 5215 5175 ' 5183 

4018 Jon 95 _ 3204 

4165 MorCS 5298 5298 OU fiZ68 

4188 Mur 95 5348 3M8 53U 5314 

4208 Jul 95 5298 5398 5298 5349 

49J830P95 5458 5*58 5458 342J! 

5J9JH3ec«5 5538 S538 5538 552-0 

5758 Jot 96 . 5538 

3B08MWM 5617 

587XM0V96 567X 

Jul 94 5744 

HUH Frf's.sflto 14133 
int 123X06 Off 1126 


<3980 25000 A£T « 

*27X0 427X9 Join 


26000 OU 94 40980 41280 «K.H 40000 
95 42180 msa 41180 4FUB 
' ■ 41380 41380 415X0 .41431 
95 417 JB 

CO LD (MOHX) WOmwqt-wricn* 

41580 341^ Aug 94 32780 37780 37640 32670. 
30980 3OU00OP94 • . 3777B 

41780 34680 Dri 94 379 JO 23080 379,» 27970 

426X0 34380 EtocM 3BU0 36370 aeixo ntxg 

M. 26130 Feb 95 33680 3B6XB 30S30 3U70 

jnj;: 3MX0 Aw 95 'MM 

42031 361X0 Jun 95 39270 392X9 392J0 392X0 

xizw maiAisK .. -w». 

41230 *il.OOOd93 399X6 

42980 4DOJODec95 403X0 40330 423 M3XB 

424XD 4IZWFOD96 «<780 

43080 41 (LX Aw 96 41870 

43080 41 389 JunM 4U70 

Est.stries MJ83 FfTs-SlriBS 2&H6 - 
Winpenlrt 1X591 up 294 


+175 25X95 
+1X0 12X17 
+145 341 

+140 265 

+140 2492 
+1X5 1862 
+1X0 ST4 
+183 1 

+1X0 621 

+1X6 623 

+1X0 513 

+1X0 BD 
+1X0 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY. AUGUST 9, 1994 


Page 11 


EUROPE 



British Air ways Net 


LONDON — British Air- 
ways said Monday that its first- 
quarto 1 earnin gs rose 22 per- 
cent, reflecting an increase in 
passengers and lower fuel 
prices. 

The company said pro® al- 
ter tax was £«5 million ($102 
million) for the three months 
ended June 30, compared with 


“T — v > “v*"!**'** miu 

£54 million Tor the 1993 period. 
Revenue rose to £169 bfllioa 
from £1.52 billion. 

Hie company said the lower 
value of the pound added £14 
million to costs such as fud and 
said there was some bunching 
of scheduled aircraft engine 
maintenance work in the quar- 
ter. 

But “passenger and cargo 
carryings continue to be strong, 
and prospects for the year re- 
main encouraging' 0 Sir Colin 
Marshall, the chai rman, said. 

Of lire rise in costs, he said, “I 

think we will see that evening 
out through the year." 

The number of 

rose 6.3 percent, to H 

on scheduled services, and 
growth in first class and other 
premium services was up 12 
percent, the company said. 

British Airways said its pas- 
senger fare yield for scheduled 


services^- the average fare paid 
by passengers for each kilome- 
ter flown — had risen 3.4 per- 
cent from they car-earlier quar- 
ter. J ' " • 

Cargo traffic was up 20 per- 
cent, to 171,000 tonnes. 

" The- company said average 
fud prices were down 13.5 per- 
cent, but spending on fuel and 
oil was down only 5 percent, 
reflecting increased traffic. 

Net bonowmgs feD by £201 
million in the quarter, reducing 
the carrier’s ratio of net debt to 
totd<^td to 56.9 percent, 2.7 

Employee costs rose 73 per- 
cent, to £429 million, as the av- 
erage number of staff increased 
to 50,768. 

The profit ' was in fine with 
analysis* forecasts, but the extra 
.costs dismayed the stock mar- 
ket.- British Airways’ shares 
dosed at 418 pence, down 12. 

British Airways has not made 
any decision on whether it 
should writeoff its $400 million 
stake in USAir Group Ino, 
which has said it cannot survive 
unless it cuts its costs. “I don't 
think we are very dose, to hav- 
ing to reach a decision on that,” 
Sir Cofin said. 

(AP t Reuters* Bloomberg) 


MMMAds Say Si, Taxmen Agree 


Bloomberg Business Seta 

MOSCOW — Russian tax investiga- 
tors seized about $500,000 of rubles from 
the MMM investment company but said 
Monday the company was free to re- 
open. 

MMM shut its doors last week and 
refused to honor its share-buyback guar- 
antee to protest the arrest of its presi- 
dent, Sergei Mavrodi, on tax-evasion 
charges in connection with another of his 
companies. Invest Consulting. A police 
spokesman said Mr, Mavrodi would re- 
main in custody for another week. 

The tax investigators said MMM was 
running a pyramid scheme, under which 
cash received from newer deposits is paid 
out as dividends to earlier depositors. 


Tbe scheme has not been declared illegal, 
although MMMs shares lost more than 
99 percent of their value at the end of 
July. 

Tbe Finance Ministry also lacks a 
false-advertising case against MMM be- 
cause tbe company changed its advertis- 
ing to comply with a presidential decree 
in June, an official said, 

MMM last week introduced a televi- 
sion advertisement featuring the Mexi- 
can star of Russia's favorite soap opera 
t elling investors “Si, Si” to buy MMM 
shares “to finance a new business or get 
tbe money to support a new baby,” the 
official said. 

“Evidently we will have to put up with 
this advertisement,” the police spokes- 
man said 


Over the weekend the police raided 
MMM headquarters and found a locked 
steel door on the third floor. MMM 
officials would not say what was behind 
the door and did not have a key. 

The police later broke the door down 
to find “more than I billion rubles of. 
let's say, black cash,” the police spokes- 
man said MMM officials could not ex- 
plain the origin of the money or provide 
bookkeeping records for it, he said 

"The tax police are in no measure in 
the way of the activities of MMM,” said 
Nikolai Medvedev of the tax investiga- 
tors. Moreover, he asserted representa- 
tives of tax authorities have several times 
offered to let MMM continue its transac- 
tions with shareholders. 


SaaiM&SadtcMPmfit 
Grows Amid Cost-Cutting 

Cotnp&ed by Our SbtfJ From Dispatches 

LONDON — Saatchi & Saatchi Co. said Monday its 
pretax profit rose 68 percent in the first half of 1994 as cost- 
cutting offset a decline in pending by two major diems. 

Saatchi said it earned £153 million ($24 million) before 
taxes in the six months, compared with £9.1 million in the 
1993 first half, but revenue feti to £379.4 milfion from £401.2 
mini on. 

Chrysler Corp. and Helene Curtis Industries Inc. moved 
the bulk of their accounts to other agencies, denting Saatchi’ s 
revenue by £16.8 million. 

The negative impact of currency fluctuations trimmed 
revenue by £3.7 milfion, Saatchi said. 

But the company added several large clients, including 
Compaq Computer Corp., Miller Brewing Co. and Qantas 
Airways Ltd, and die impact- from those wiflbe felt in 1995. 

-Analysts hailed thereswts as a sign the advertising industry 
had broken out of a five-year global dump. 

Shareholders agreed, bidding Saatchi up to a dose of 176 
pence, up 15, despite the connpany’s decision to continue to ' 
withhold a dividend payment. Saatchi has not paid a dividend 
since 1 992, but It said it .would conrider reinstating a dividend 
next year. v. .... ' (Bloomberg Reuters) 


EsabSays 
FirstrBalf 
Net Soared 


Bloomberg Business News 

STOCKHOLM — Esab AB, 
the Swedish maker of welding 
equipment, said Monday that 
its first-half prelax profit 
surged, causing its stock to 
jump as some investors bet that 
Charter PLC of Britain would 
have to raise its $400 millioa 
takeover bid. 

Charter, however, refused to 
budge, saying its bid was based 
on long-term earnings projec- 
tions and that one good report 
made no difference. 

But Esab shares rose 5 kronor 
an the Stockholm exchange, to 
355, 2.9 percent above Esab’s 
bid of 345 kronor. 

Esab said its pretax profit 
rose to 195 million kronor ($25 
million) in the first half from 23 
millio n kronor a year earlier. It 
died an upturn in the European 
welding industry, better sales 
outside Europe and lower fi- 
nancial costs. 

■ Smith Absorbs Charge 

Smith & Nephew PLC, a 
British health care products 
company, said it would take a 
pretax charge in the first half of 
£148 mini on ($228 million) on 
the sale of its unprofitable U-S. 
less unit to Allergan Corp., 
Bloomberg Business News re- 
ported from London. 


Banco Portugues Girds for Battle 


Reuters 

LISBON — Primary share- 
holders of Banco PortuguSs do 
Atl&ntico SA bid the stock up 
sharply Monday as they in- 
creased their stake to benefit 
from a takeover bid from Banco 
Comen^al Portugues SA. 

Banco Portugues shares fin- 
ished up 85 escudos at 2,670 
($165), a gain of more than 3 
percent. 

“Someone in the hard core of 
BPA is buying shares strongly, 
and this has led to heavy turn- 
over and a sharp rise in the 
share," a dealer said. 

That so-called hard core 
comprises about a dozen Portu- 
guese companies that together 
controlled 27 percent of the 
bank when Banco Comer^ial 


bid for a 40 percent stake in the 
recently privatized Banco Por- 
tuguSs two weeks ago. 

The bid, at 3,000 escudos a 
share, is worth 132 billion escu- 
dos but has yet to be approved 
by the government, which re- 
tains a 24 percent stake in 
Banco Portugu&s. 

“The hard core is taking seri- 
ously the possibility that the gov- 
ernment will approve BOP’s bid 
for BPA and does not want to be 
caught out,” one dealer said. 

Primary shareholders said m 
a joint statement July 28 that 
they would try to raise their 
stake in Banco Portugues to 
more than 40 percent to block 
tbe Banco Comerqial bid. 

They said this would be done 
by buying as many as 4 percent 


more shares on the open market 
and persuading other holders to 
join the group. 

If Banco ComeraaTs bid is 
successful, it would create the 
second-largest banking compa- 
ny, in asset terms, in Portugal. 
It would challenge Caixa Gcral 
de Deposiios for the top spot 
and command more than a 20 
percent market share. 

Meanwhile, the planned re- 
structuring of the state electric- 
ity firm, Electricidade de Portu- 
gal SA, has been delayed until 
September, its chairman said. 

EDP was to be restructured 
into a holding company in July, 
before the partial privatization 
of its power generating division 
in late 1994 or early 1995. 


Norsk Seeks to Revive Russian Gas Plan 


Reuters 

MOSCOW — The Norwegian oil and gas 
company Norsk Hydro AS said Monday it 
wanted to revive a multibillion-dollar project 
to develop the Shtokman natural gas field in 
the Barents Sea with Russia’s Gazprom. 

Torvild Aakvaag, chairman of Norsk Hy- 
dro, said he discussed this and other projects 
in Moscow last week with 01% N. Soskovets, 
the first deputy prime minister. 

“We are interested in reviving the Shtok- 
man project in which we were revolved two 
years ago,” the company's chief Moscow rep- 
resentative, Magne Reed, said. 

“We offered to participate in future activi- 
ties in this field whenever the Russians should 
decide to restart activities in the Barents Sea,” 
he said. 


The field, which has probable reserves of as 
much as 3 trillion cubic meters of gas, is 
expected to play a major role in supplying 
Europe. 

President Boris N. Yeltsin awarded rights 
to develop the Shtokman field to the Russian 
firm Rosshelf in late 1992. But the preyed, 
which required more than $10 billion in in- 
vestment. has made little progress since then. 

Rosshelf is 51 percent owned by Gazprom. 
Separately. Gazprom will probably take a 26 
percent stake in the East German chemical 
company Buna GmbH in two to three 
months. 

Dieter Vogel, head of Thyssen AG’s trad- 
ing and services division, said a preliminary 
agreement had already been negotiated with 
the Treuhand privatization agency. 


NYSE 

■Etmttay’sOtMinB 

Tables include the nationwide prices up to 
the closing on Vtfati Street and do not reflect 
late trades elsewhere. Via The Associated Press 

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Continued oa Page 12 


In ternatio nd RecnKftnent 

Every Thursday 
Contact Philip Omo 
Tel.: (331)46 37 9336 
Free [33 1) 46 3793 70 

or your nearest HI office 
or representative 


Claims and Disputes 
Against the 
United States 
Government 

PACE and ROSE 

ATTORNEYS AND COUNSELORS 

WASHINGTON □ c 
iZOSi 


L05 ANGELES 
,310. 2T7-2HOO 


On September 21 st, the IHT will publish the first in a 

two-part series of Special Reports on 

Infrastructure 
and Development 

Among the topics to be covered are: 

■ The Hnk between infrastructure projects and living 
standards in Asia. 

■ Chrta’s Three Gorges dam, the world's largest 
hydropower project 

■ The $20 billion Hong Kong airport. 

■ Power plants, road bufcfing and other 
projects in Indonesia. 


An extra 1.1 . . . 

vn8 be dtstnbutBd in Jakarta on October 17lh 
at the Work! Inf rastnxXuw Forvrn- Asia 1994, 
to which the IHT has been appointed 
the Official Pi&Bcation. 

For further Wbmafon, please contact BMMahder in Paris 

at (33-1) 46 37 93 78. fax: (33-1) 46 37 SO 44. 
INTERNATIONAL 


Investor’s Europe 


Frarikhkt 

QAX • ; 


London 

FTSE. 100 index 

■m— — rrr- 


..Farts-: ./ 

CAC 40: 





V Index ' 


- Amsterdcott ' ■= AEX 


Monday’ 
Cfose • 
421:36- 





.Briwsete...-' . 

Stock index' .. 


Frankfurt *- 

DAX "• ' 



| 

I 

Fimm--.. 

FAZ- 

826.13 . *27:84 " v 

Hefafukt •> 

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1,867,15 :• t^772l 'v:^54 ; 

London'" 

Financial Times 30.; 2<477,09 . OR* J 

•fcpodon/.,- 

ftseioo . 

3.17190 •; ;. 3,1675^ r+ai-A. ■■ 


©ensrai Index ... 

■ 322,67 ! 

; Milan 

MIB 

1,124.00 ■ : 1,137.00" - T.14 

.Pari* 

*S£c4o 

. 2^106^4 2,1G7 £7 ■ ' 

Stockholm . 

Affaersvaeriden 

1^70-14 J ,952.63-.;' *0.90 : 

Vienna ■ * . v 

Stock Index • 

463.47 . 462£S.:.„:jQAZ 

■Zurich'’-' '■ 

SSS 

■ ! ’33320 , 927-64 

Sources: Reuters. AFP 

IncmoDonal Herald Tribune 

Very briefly: 


• CarnaudMetalbox SA reported a 2.7 percent rise in second- 
quarter sales, to 6.49 billion French francs (SI billion), and 
attributed it to soft-drink sales in one of the hottest summers in 
decades. JQf Aquitaine SA increased its sales (o 105.48 billion 
francs in the first half from 102.67 billion francs a year earlier. 
Gaieties Lafayette sales fell to 13.7 billion francs in the six-month 
period from 13.8 billion francs a year earlier. 

• Greek Alpha Credit Bank’s half-year pretax net advanced 14 
percent, to 12.8 billion drachmas (S53 million) in 1994. 

• Italy’s retail sales at medium-sized and large stores in April were 
down 13 percent from April 1993, the first drop posted this year. 

• Banco Santander SA plans to increase its stake in First Fidelity 
Bancorp., Lawrenceville. New Jersey, to as much as 35 percent 
from 24.87 percent, tbe financial daily Cinco Dias reported. 

• Siemens AG will invest a further 100 million Deutsche marks 
($62 million) in its microelectronics center in Dresden. 

• Bayer AG's chairman. Manfred Schneider, said group sales 
should rise by as much as 5 percent annually, to well over 50 
billion DM by the year 2000. 

• News Corp-’s chairman , Rupert Murdoch, said be expected the 
German television channel Vox, in which he has a 49.9 percent 
stake, to achieve a profit within three years. 

• Smith & Nephew PLC has agreed to sell its U.S. lens business 
1 opt ex to Allergan Corp. for $1) million. 

• Ukraine's inflation rate was 2.1 percent in July, the lowest for 

three years. AFP. Reuters. Bloomberg, AFX Knighi-RidJer 


R F.’Ql JUST F O Is. I N f-O R. NA M ’I OS 


A WORLD-CLASS SITE 
NEEDS A WORLD-CLASS 
DEVELOPER. 

The Niagara Gateway Project 
Niagara Fails, Ontario, Canada. 

Niagara Falls. North America's most spectacular natural wonder, 
ft draws more than ten million visitors a year from North America, 
Europe and the Pacific Rim. 

Now, a 20 acre site, directly overlooking the world renowned 
Niagara Horseshoe Falls, is being assembled for development 
The Government of Ontario is seeking a developer to design, 
finance, construct and operate a multi-use tourist attraction. 
Various commercial and retail components could also be included. 
Total development costs are anticipated to be in the order of 
5C500 million. 

With more than 120 million people living within one day's 
drive of the Niagara Region, this is truly a significant development 
opportunity. 

The Government of Ontario intends to follow a two-stage 
selection process. The first involves the selection of a shortlist of 
developers based primarily on credentiafs.The second stage will 
be a detailed development proposal call. 

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To Launch 
Multimedia 
Services 

Btoombag Businas News 

HONG KOKG — Hong 
Kong Telecommunications 
Ltd. said Monday it would 
probably spend around 10 bil- 
lion Hong Kong dollars ($1 J29 
billion) in the next five years on 
upgrading its telecommunica- 
tions system so that it could 
launch a range of mul timedia 
services. 

The monopoly supplier of 
Hong Kong’s fixed-fink tele- 
phone services plans to intro? 
duce “video oh -demand” to cer- 
tain customers in the last 
quarter of 1995 and home shop- 
ping and banking the following 
year, said William -Lo, the head 
of its multimedia business, unit 

In five years, Hong Kong Te- 
lecom, which is controlled by 
Cable & Wireless PLC of Brit- 
ain, expects to have 90 percent 
of its subscribers wired for mul- 
timedia services, Mr. Lo said. 

Hong Kong Telecom’s aim is 
to get 200,000 subscribers for a 
yideo-on-demand service with- 
-in two years of .launch. 

' It has already signed agree- 
ments or is in talks with focal 
and international television and 
entertainment groups to supply 
programs for the trial 

Hong Kong Tdecqm has also 
had talks with supermarket 
chains and international de- 
partment store groups over the 
prospects for a none-shopping 
network, Mr. Lo said. 

Video on demand will allow 
subscribers to select movies 
from a menu displayed on their 
television screens and then use 
a remote-control handset to 
place their orders down a tele- 
phone line. The movies, stored 
on a giant computer system, 
will be transmitted along tele- 
phone lines into home decoder 
boxes connected to phone jacks 
and televirions. 

Similar projects are under- 
way in the United States and 
Singapore. 

■ Turner Goes lo Aria _ . 

The American media and en- 
tertainment company Turner 
Broadcasting System me. said it 
would launch a 24-hour cartoon . 
and movie service to the Asia- 
Pacific region Oct 6 via satellite 
•broadcast on the TNT and Car- 
lioon Network, Reuters repent- 
ed from Hong Kong. ■ 

The movies andcartoons wiD 
be subtitled and dubbed initially 
into Chinese and Thai with oth- 
er languages to be added later. 



on Bangkok Bourse 

to Open at a Premium 


... Bbombag.Buanea Nevs 
- BANGKOK - — Shares in Thailand’s 
largest civil engineering and construc- 
tion company are expected to open at a 
premmm when they begin trading Tues- 
day on the Stock Exchange of Thailand. 

ItaBan^Thai Development PLC shares 
are currency priced at about 220 baht 
- {$8.80): on the unofficial market, corn- 
pried tinth the 175 baht that institutional 
investors paid in July. 

“It’s clearly a prime company,” said 
..Mark Matthews, senior analyst for Capi- 
tal Nonxdra Securities. “The company 
has h strong track recard,- influence with- 
in Che government to get projects and the 
size it needs to cany them out." He rates 
it a “buy” ai any price up to 220 . 

■ ItaEan-Tbai Development last year 
had a 41 percent market share in domes- . 
tic construction sales, according to a re- 
port by Finance One PLC. 

Upon fisting, the company will be 
among the 15 largest on the exchange, 
easily surpassing the three other engi- 
neering companies: Christiam & Nielsen ' 
(Thailand) PLC, Sino-Thai En gine ering 
& Construction "PLC and Siam Syntec 
Construction PLC. 


“Ital-Thai is a grade above other con- 
tractors,” Mr. Matthews said. *Tt has a 
much more solid asset base." 

It is the only Thai firm capable or 
completing a major infrastructure pro- 
ject without the aid of a foreign partner, 
Mr. Matthews said. 

“Because they are Thai, they have an 
advantage in winning government con- 
tracts,” he said “Because they can do it 
alone, they don't have to split their earn- 
ings.” 

llalian-Thai Development has a 15 
percent slake in a $ 1 billion hydroelectric 
project in Laos* from which the company 
will draw revenue as an owner as well as 
the main contractor. 

That will be important if the company 
is to show profit growth over the next 
year or so. analysts said. 

Italian-Tbai Development’s biggest 
planned project is as lead contractor for 
an often-delayed Bangkok macs transit 
project being developed by the property 
developer Tanayong PLC The project 
has yet to get out oT the planning stage, 
nearly 30 months after toe government 
awarded the contract 


presi< 

Thai 


On Friday, Italian-Tbai Development 
said its net profit for the second quarter 
of 1994 declined 4S percent, to 202J 
million baht. The decline was caused 
mainly by delays in toe 14-mile (22 kilo- 
meter) elevated-train system for Bang- 
kok, toe company’s vice president, Cha- 
tichai Chuiima, said 

Premchai Kamasuia. the company's 
iresident, said last week that I tali an - 
i Development will invest 15 billion 
baht to complete its work on the system. 
Mr. Premchai also said Italian-Thai De- 
velopment may take an equity stake in 
the project, currently owned outright by 
Tanayong. 

Italian-Thai Development itself is a 
dosely held company, with toe Karna- 
suia family directly owning 61 percent 
and indirectly owning a further 29 per- 
cent. The remaining 10 percent was sold 
in the initial public offering in July. 

“Shares will be pretty illiquid” said 
Mr. Matthews. Tm sure toeyll be doing 
more issues and capital increases to raise 
money cheaply.” 

Mr. Premchai said this year’s net prof- 
it should be about 1.5 billion baht. 


Profit Folk U.S. Miners Back Australian Move 

At Creative 
Technology 


Reuters 

SINGAPORE — Shares of 
Creative Technology Ltd fell 
10 percent Monday, to 2830 
Singapore dollars ($19), on dis- 
• appointment over its fourth- 
quarter earnings, analysts said. 

The company, which is fisted 
on both the Singapore and the 
U.S. stock markets, is the 
world’s leading maker of cards 
used to enable computers to 
produce sounds.. . . 

■Although the full-year per- 
formance was impressive, with 
; a 104 percent rise in net profit, 
to 149 insUiori dollars, analysts 
said the- fourth-quarter figures 
were more indicative of growth 
prospects. 

Creative Technology said its 
fourth-quarter profit fell 12 
percent, to $15.7 minion. . 

T im CTnmg fhim, an analyst 
at Baring Securities, said the 
company earned less in the 
fourth quarter than expected 
and its margins fell to 30.6 per- 
cent in the fourth quarter from 
35.2 percent in. the third 
.Baring Securities has advised 
investors' to sell the company's - 
shares at their current level 


CatpMby Our Staff From Dispatches 

SYDNEY — American mine 
workers Monday threw their 
support behind Australian 
onions that have us-'ed their 
government to adopt a tougher 
stance on what they said were 
collusive pricing practices by 
Japan’s coal buyers. 

The United Mineworkers 
Federation accused Japan in a 
complaint lodged over the 
weekend of uring its cartels to 
artificially depress coal prices 
through market distortions. 

The unions said Japanese 
pricing had cost Australia's coal 
industry billions of dollars. 
Australia is the largest coal ex- 
porter in the world, supplying 
almost half of Japan’s needs. 


The United Mineworkers 
Union of America has launched 
a similar campaign in Washing- 
ton. 

“All coal exporting countries 
are harmed by toe practice of 
cartel buying by Japanese coal 
customers,” said toe president 
of toe US. union, Richard 
Trumka. 

Mr. Trumka also echoed toe 
view of Australian miners that 
the conduct of the Japanese 
buyers would be a violation of 
antitrust law in toe United 
States. 

The Australian union esti- 
mated that their nation’s failure 
to capitalize on its biggest ex- 
port had cost $23 billion over 
the past 20 years. 


Wing Tai Rules Oat Deal With Yeo 

Reuters ■ 

SINGAPORE — Wing Tai Holdings Lid. said Monday that 
Yeo Hiap Seng Ltd. would not have a role in developing a parcel 
of land it bought with Orchard Parade Holdings Ltd. 

Wing Tai and Orchard said last week they had jointly bought a 
pared erf land known as the Tien Wah Press site in northern 
Singapore for 218 million Singapore dollars ($145 million). 

Yeo Hiap said it was interested in participating in the purchase 
and development of the land, but WingTai said Monday that Yeo 
would nca be involved. : 

Orchard's parent company is toe largest shareholder of Yeo 
Hiap, which turned away a takeover bid from Wing Tai in May. 


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Japanese interests have 
bought into Australian mines 
with the aid of low-interest gov- 
ernment loans and increased 
mine capacity despite a world- 
wide oversupply. The union 
said Japanese interests could be 
working to ensure that the coal 
market is permanently oversup- 
plied to depress prices. 

(AFP, Knighi-Rutder) 


Australia 

Investigates 

QantasAir 

Reuters 

CANBERRA — Australia’s 
anti-monopoly watchdog said 
Monday it was investigating 
claims that Qantas Airways 
Ltd. had used its market domi- 
nance to stop a rival airline 
from flying to China. 

Australia Air International 
Ltd’s managing director, Colin 
Hendrick, said in a letter to the 
Trade Practices Commission 
that Qantas had pressured Aus- 
tralia Air’s underwriter into 
abandoning an initial public of- 
fering planned (0 raise 32 mil- 
lion Australian dollars (S24 mil- 
lion) to start the route. 

“The pressure was exerted on 
our lead underwriter.” Mr. 
Hendrick said. 

“The nature of the pressure 
has been detailed to the Trade 
Practices Commission," he 
said, adding that such evidence 
could not be made public. 

Qantas denied the charge. 

County NatWest Australia 
Lid. was the lead underwriter 
for the abandoned offering. 

The Australian government 
plans to float its 75 percent 
holding in Qantas in the first 
half of 1995. Underwriters for 
the issue have not yet been se- 
lected. 

The float, which is expected 
to raise about 2 billion dollars, 
will be one of the largest ever on 
the Australian exchange. 

Australia Air won rights to 
the weekly Sydney-Guangzbou- 
Bajing route in 1993. It had to 
raise 55 million dollars and 
start the service by July 1 1 this 
year to keep the rights. 


Investor’s Asia 




Hong Kong 
Hang Seng . 

m id 


Singapore . 
Straits Times 


Tokyo 
Nikkei 225' 



M A bTyj A’ 

1994 . 

Exchange Index 
Hong Kong Hang Seng 


•MTifTj'* m ' 

1994 


M AM'JJA 
1994 


Monday 

Close- 

9337.87 


Prev: «- s • 

Dose Change 

9,602:21 -0.67 


Singapore ' 

Straits Tunes 

2367.65 

2573.12 

•3.24 

Sydney ... . 

: AHOfdmanes 

2,061.10 

2)091.90 

- 0*2 

Tokyo . 

.Nikkei 225. 

20335.83 

20.521-70 

+0.55 

- Kuala Lumpur .Composite 

1^76^4 

1.089.15 

-1.18 

Bangkok 

SET 

1.414JW 

1,418.60 

-0.32 

Seoul .. ■ 

Composite Stock 

919.76 . 

93217 

-1.33 

Taipei . 

Wetted Price 

cios&d 

6.940.32 

- 

Manila „ 

PSE - 

2,884.03 

2,883.39 

+002 

Jakarta 

StoiA index 

472.41 

472 30 

-o.oe 

New ^Zealand 

NZSE-40 

2,106.62 

2.111.26 

-G.22 

Bombay 

Naltenanndex 

2.032L5S 

2.036.85 

-0.31 

Sources: Reuters. AFP 


lnlDTUi['.»ul ItaalJ Tribune 

Very briefly: 


Local Calls Help PLDT Net 

Bloomberg Business \e*s 

MANILA — Philippine Long Distance Telephone Co. said 
Monday its net income rose 0.4 percent in the first half as an 
aggressive expansion program paid off in higher local call 
revenue. 

The company earned 2.46 billion pesos ($94 million) in the 
half, up from 2.45 billion pesos in the 1993 first half, helped 
by a 32 percent jump in local calling revenue, to 2.71 billion 
pesos. 

Philippine Long Distance controls more than 90 percent of 
the country’s telephone lines and has spent about $2.5 billion 
since last year on a three-year plan to eliminate the backlog of 
orders for phone service. 

The company said earnings received 3 n additional boost 
from a nearly 9 percent increase in long distance revenue, to 
7.84 billion pesos. International calls revenue rose nearly 5 
percent from last year. 


• Petron Corp. officials said an auction of unrestricted shares in 
the company , which is the Philippines’ biggesi oil refiner, drew 
about 12 biliion pesos ($460 million) in bids. The auction was part 
of a government program to privatize Petron. 

• Singapore’s economy grew 10.5 percent in thefirsi six months of 
the year. Prime Minister Goh Cook Tong said, adding that the 
government would revise its growth forecast for the full year to 
between 9 percent and 10 percent, from 6 percent to 8 percent. 

• Hong Kongi’s gross domestic product rose 5.5 percent in the ! irst 
three months of 1994 from a year earlier. Economists expect the 
rate to hold for the year as a whole. 

• Western Milling Corp. said net profit for 1994 would crop about 
20 percent, to around 132 million Australian dollar.*. <S9S million s, 
because of low world price levels for nickel, petroleum and 
copper. 

• Qingling Motors Co- the latest Chinese company to seek a 
listing in Hong Kong, announced tha! an offering of 100 million 
shares was 22.5 times oversubscribed. 

• Three Gorges Development Corp. of China will raise capita! on 

international stock and bond markets for the construction of the 
Three Gorges Dam. Reuters. BU-nlvrg. Km«i:i-kMer. A FP 


CONSIDERED THE BEST AND MOST INNOVATIVE 
CREATOR OF ART OBJECTS SINCE FABERGE 

MANFRED WILD 

I .i ■klMiiiili-k-w.lk-i will | ik— - cm In. i In.* I'irsi Imiv m | K\V l' 

THE MAGIC OF GEMSTONES 

August 6- 10 a( the CARLTON HOTEL CANNES i.">- !■■ cm 

ON SHOW’ : A 15.000 C ARATS MWV F.IJiPHANT 
: C.l.A. i r/7>/!< ■//.■' 

For uion: information fiix BufTerfly (35) 95 58 07 43 


U.S. OPEN POLO CHAMPI 



CROQUET o 

HORSEBAC 

it’s NOT 

We thinlc some people may have the wrond idea ahuul polo. True, it s 
heen the favorite game of Kings and aristocrats for centuries, hut l ha l 
doesn't mean it's some afternoon tea party. 

ox the 


wor 


Id’s 


parry 

fas test 


ami most da nit rous sports. 


Ticket Prices 


Play Off Weekend i7th&i8th 
Play Off week day 20th&21st 
Finals weekend 24th & 25th 

week-Lonu pass 1 7th Thru 25th 


. Eas.T 5 ret: : 

PtSCUVED BLtACHEF 


In fact, polo ia one 
This fall, the 
Ll.S. Open Polo 
Championship 
returns, alter a forty 
year absence, to its 
original home on 

Lon£ Island. The finest players from five continents will compete in 
this tournament, beginning September 3, and culminating in linals 
week September 17-25 al Beth page Stale Park Polo Grounds. 
Meadownrook Polo Club invites you to come witness the grace and 
power of this ancient sport played by champions. 


• VVfST, SlMpT 
Vip’/Bo 



* price per Dai 
4 Seats Per- bo.» 


The U.S. Open Polo 
Chahpioship, 
Hosted by 
Meadowbrook polo Club, 
AT BETHPAGE STATE PARK. 

Long island. NY. 



=H = 5 ® 

* V v t -V 


To Order Tickets call 
TICKETMASTER! Z 1 2-3Q7.-7J 7_1 
For more info & to order 
vip boxes, corporate 
Tables or Hospitality 
tents Call: 1 -800-48 1 -POLO 


JB°B 


British airways 

Thr w 'fids bV'.Hirai- jirtnc* 


•k. A A 

— JV 

As pro v 




T *;': 


Page 14 


** 


NASDAQ 


Monday's 4 p-m. 

Tn« I a compiled by the AP. consists of the 1,000 
roost traded securities In terms of doflar value. It is 


updated twice a year. 



12 Worth 

WohLnw SWfc 


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ttv YW P£ 100s Mon Low Lotus! Orge 


IB 1 * SftAAONs 
3% 12 ABC Roll 


A 


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a _ 

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IWW. AESCos Alt X» 


- » 




15% 6 %aSk 
s, 12WAST 
2?>l MVjAdOevH 
SlMUftAekAms 
27 '*13 AcmeMot 
20ft 7ft Acta 
if% iftAdocUs jb 
22Vs UftABOOtCS 
26% IQ AtWohh 
37ft 20 AdtaSv .14 
JdftUftAOODeSS 70 
12% 4V,AdvPro 
lift 4V» AdwTIss 
46ft 36% AdvOrttfl 5 JO 
38% 25 AflvontB s 2a 
15 SHAwicyR 

16% aftAorteoa .10 
16% BftApaum 


14% iMAirMeth 
62 43 Ah 20 
21% 9'AAIrotec 
28ft 17% Abank 
19% 1? AldUas 
34%16>AAMV5 

20% 23 AlexfilO 

19% MtAEasR 
3% lftAIIASem 
14 7% All an Ph 

14 7ftAlnSemi 
32% 22% AllwaGo 
22% HftAlldHldB 
24% 1% Aloha 1 
35% TftAipnaEio 
39V, 21% Alter a 

24 ft 1 Oft Altrens 
n OViAmerOn 

Wk, 20% ABnkr 
20% nVkACTmVoy 

33 lOftACoilaid 
23% 1 5% AmFroht 

34 V* 253b AGreef S 

24% SftAHHhCDS 
26ft ISVbAMS 
17% 6%AAtedE 
22 12% AmMbSaf 

30% 14% APwrCv ■ 

20 15% Am Revo 

39% 22Y, AmSuor 
27 12% AmT eie 

15% 10% ATravel 
16% TftAmerCa* 
26% 19V* AmM 
52 31 Amgen 

15 S Amrion s 
33% Bft AmtehCo 
16% IIWAnchBcp 
17ft i Oft AncnGm 
42'. 19ft Andrew* 
21 V* 73 Andros 
30% 10% Artec 
30% 22 AppiaC 
18% 1 1 Aoisous 
25ft 1 1 Arteoec s 

25 T3% ApdDofl 

33 1 WApdlnov I 

52 28ftArtdMts 

21 lSWArbarOra 

25 1 %A/twrHl 

19 1 ftArchCm 
35% 26% ArgaGp 
33% 1 ft Aruoiy 
15% WArKBMT 
22% I % Armor 
22% 1 Arnold I 
24% ArtSfl 
13% 7% AshwrTtl 
46 24 ASDCtTl 
34 1 A20V6AcdOnA 
33% IVftAbdCmB 
20% 11 Artec S 
34% 27% Aston aF 
38% 21 % AltSeAlr 
29% 11 Atmols 
26% 16 AuBon 
9 Vm 4MAiraSv 
12% 3ftAuspex 
61% 37 Autodk 
34ftZ3%Autnlnd 
29ftl3ftAurotot* 
31% 16 AwWTcn 


123 14* 
307 18% 

11 45 17% 

10 112 14% 
_ 274 12 
31 124 35 
33 108 44 

- 63 11V. 

16 433 1714 

- 261 29% 

17 1 23% 

_ 52 13ft, 

1311346 16% 

33 1711 17% 
IB 6141 16% 
ID 1345 25% 
27 395 B% 

7 391 6% 

16 5590 19% 

- 3 14'A 

17 2 33V* 

27 £68 31V* 
> 390 5% 

.. 900 6% 

13 1742 31% 

14 1517 28% 

16 453 13% 
-. 515 12 
_ 102 11% 

- 155 3% 

_ 307 U 62 V. 
.. Ill 13% 

13 135 34% 

22 1647 12ft 
27 3447 31% 

17 AM 3% 
25 67B 14% 

14 101 S 2<Vu 

... 433 9% 

16 4S0 12% 

7 330 28% 

8 42 16% 

_ 67 2 

_ 199 9 

18 2742 25% 

12 242 IS 
77 1217 »% 

B 159 21% 
44 48 IW, 

16 63 12% 

29 636 23% 
16 1059 30 

9 39 • 

23 953 26% 
12 111 8% 
_ 143 15% 

24 5240 16 

13 4951 28 

_ 109 76% 

-. 113 12% 
12 2031 15% 

- 166 8 

20 214 21% 

1815762 51% 

16 274 7 

11 1212 ID 
11 2867 16% 
.. 776 15% 
27 1508 40% 

9 9S 17 
_ 3577 30’1 
21 12606 34 
41 873 16% 

29 logo 15 Vi 

_ 90 19% 

30 71 18% 

25 8301 47% 

23 40 21 

34 140 21% 

_ 318 15% 
8 17 29% 

81 101 15 

19 547 12% 
19 1464 21% 

15 154 20 

17 1664 15 


14ft 14% _ 

18% lPft* —Vi* 
17% 17% -ft 
14 14% — % 

11% 12 

34 34 -% 

43% 43%—% 
11 % 11 % — % 
16% 17U -ft 
28ft 29 — % 

22% 22% ♦ '*1* 
13 13 

15ft 16% -% 

17 17% 

16% 16ft -% 
25% 25% -% 

8ft 8% -. 

6% 6ft -% 

18 19% -ft 

14% 14% .„ 

33% 33% -ft 
29 31%-rlfh 

5 5% -ft 

5ft 6 —ft 
30% 30% — % 
27% 28 —ft 

12 12 —ft 
11% lift _ 
10ft lift -ft 

2% 7>’% -V ta 
62% 62ft -lft 

13 13% — % 

24ft 24% —ft 
12ft 12ft —ft 
28ft 31% -2ft 
25% 25% _ 

14ft 14% -ft 


2 *M 


12 33 14% 

_ 2256 33% 
1H 1603 


._ 23 4976 24ft 


17% 


26 2206 „ . 

3329 Wu 
IS 363 5ft 
21 2217 52% 
19 511 38% 
39 2366 15% 
23 1543 27% 


11% 12% -ft 
27% 20 —ft 
16ft 16ft — % 
1ft lft - 
Oft 8 Vi —ft 
24V* 25% -ft. 
14% 14% —ft 
57'* 58% -lft 
71ft 21% — 1 ft 
lSWilSOft — Vu 
12 12 
22% 22% —ft 
29ft 29% —ft 
5H 6 -v, 

26% 36ft -ft 
7% 7% — % 
ISVi 15% —ft 
15% 15% *U 
27% 27% -ft, 
25 25 —1% 

12'A 12% — V* 
IS 15ft _ 
7% 8 —VS 
20% 21ft -ft 
50ft 51 -ft. 
6ft 6% —ft 

9ft ID -% 
16% 16ft 
15% 15% -ft 
40 4DV a -ft* 
16ft 17 - ft 

20 30 -1ft 

33 33% -ft 

15% 16% -V. 
14% 15 -ft 
10% 19ft -ft 
10 18% - % 
45% 47% -ft 
20ft 20% -ft 
20ft 20ft —ft 
15 15ft -ft 
29 29 — V* 

14% Uft _ 
11% 12% -ft 

21 21ft -ft 

19ft 20 _ 

14% 14% _ 

99* ID 1 * -ft 

5£S%-^ 

25% 25% —ft 
13ft 14% -ft 
33ft 33ft -ft 
28ft 28 Vi _ 
22ft 23ft -ft 
16ft 16ft —ft 
8*u 8ft— V U 
4ft 5 

50ft 52 -ft 
2S 20% -% 
14% IS 
26% 27 —ft 


34%i8ft6Sfff T3T 
BHCFns 3)0 


35% 8% - 

24% 16 B1SYS 
71 40 V, BMC 5ft 

39% lift BMC Wl S 
27ft 15 BW1P 


29% ■% Baboon 
2Jftl5%Bakorj j06 


74ft 57% BcOnopfC 3.50 
4Sft 20 ft BncQrtlC -Mr 


24% I7VVL 

20%12%BkSaum M 

38% 31 ft Santa S2 

26% lift BonvnSv _ 

19 12ft Sanrft i M 

17% VftBcretfil 
7 2ftBatT«cn 


_ 20 2236 48% 

> 13 950 21 
25 176 5X1 16ft 

> 19 20 10% 

3 II 47 19 

- - 38 12ft 

3.1 10 32 32% 

55 _ 497 60ft 
IJ ~ 541 29% 

- 14 55 M 

2.1 12 3900U21M 


-ft 


^"iSSS. ,J0 


35% 21ft 

57% 44ft EMdBCP 
15ft 6%BaHMlc 
49% 21 % BeifSrt 

8V. 3%Benn5c 


48 32 Berkley 
26 BftBortucf 
29ft 14% BertPwr 


1456 15% 

j aa 343 is% 

_ 33 64 16ft 

_ 230 3ft 
X0 13x1144 61 
_ 40 7330 20ft 
_ 16 331 S4V. 
_ 13 256 10% 
_ 32 1361 25% 

1 3 17 37% 

- 14 1145 


-ft 

-ft 


»ft'9ftBiail .14 
32% 23% BtaOtfl 


... 11 103 15 

1J IS 54 11% 


35 26%BootBn • 1J4 
23ft 17% BobEvn 30 
25% 17% BookMfll 
27 13 Boomtwn 
20% 8 ft Bor ma 
51 32ftB0StOKA 
14ft 6ftBosrrc 
14% SftBoxEnB 
15% 5ft BrltoV 
52V* 1 1 BrdbdTc 
S9ft 31 ft BrOdSf 
21% 9%BroGour 
17% lOViBrTom 
13ft 6ft Brunos J4 

27ft 15% Button 


„ 63 3597 41% 
_ IS 1124 9% 

8 


30ft 30% —ft 
9% 10ft *% 
20 

47 47% -ft 

19 19ft— 1 

15% 15% —ft 
10ft 10% _ 

18% 18% -ft 
11% 11% —ft 
32 32ft —ft 
60 60% 

18% 29 
19% 20 
20ft 21 
33'-. 34 
14% 15ft 
15ft 15ft —ft 
15% 16 —ft 
3V U 3% _ 

60% 60% -ft 
27i« 27ft— lft 
53% 54ft -ft 

10 10 —ft 
24ft 34ft —ft 

7 7ft -ft 
37% 37% —ft 
8% 8% „ 
14% 14% -ft 

11 11% _ 

40% 41ft -ft. 

9ft 9% „ 


11 1052 34ft 
IJ IB 270 20% 
_ 29 278 22% 
_ 508 441 15% 
_ .. 5600 12% 
_ IS 845 41 
_ 31 472 9% 

» 43 213 9% 

_ 25 *70 11% 
_ _ 3498 20ft 
.. 50 1155 46% 
_ _ 224 lift 
_3B4 3 15% 

M 16 877 7% 

_ 22 3628 16% 


w SS!-ft 


34% 

20% 20% —ft 
23 22% -ft 

15ft 15ft —ft 
12% 12% -ft 
39V. 40ft — % 
9% 9% 

9% 9% —ft 
10% 11% -% 
II 18% 

45% 46% 

10% 10% 

15% 15% 

7% 7% 

15% 16% 


:fc 


AMEX 


Monday's Closing 

Tables Include the nationwide prices up to 
the closing on Wall Street and do not reflec 
date trades el sewhere. Via The Associated Press 


12 Month 
High Low Stock 


PV YM Pe 100* Htt Low Lotus! Ol 1 H6 


fiv 


, Jpf 1.75 6 J 

5 IftjAT 

26ft ll" AMtTi? Of 138 9'Jj 
IfttASR J3o 9 A 

16!% ATT F0 2J19 19 
, _ AdkO wn 

6’A 4 AdrnRsc 


7 a 4 i* 


ii% ^aS^SSc 

2% %AdvMedT 


10 3% AdtwW pt 
5% 2 AowPhQt 

«srasr 

4% lViAlrcoc 
5% 3%AMrtCtn 
% Vi*AlortCwt 
18% 16 AHooonn 1A4 
2% •ViiAHIn 
17% 4 AJIORan 
11% 7%AUouH 
6% 3 AlphoJn 

11 4%AtpinGr 
64 56% Alcoa pf 

7% WAirdiT 
1%, ft Amrttti 
14% 9%AFstP2 
20ftl*%AFstRT 
28% IS 1 * AmSilt 6 

iS^sw* 

14% 3%AIMB4 
16% 13% AIM 85 
14% lift AIM 86 n 
IS 11% AIM B8n 
49ft31%Alwaol 
18% 12% AmUst s 
22% 14% AMzaA 
14% 6% Arrfosn 
9% 6Y1 AREInv n 
12% THARertr 
5% 7% ASdE 
4% %AmSnrd 
13ft 6% Aimed 
2ft ftAmoaiwt 
14% 10 A m wo rt 
34ft 9ft Andrea _ 

6 lft atom tg _ 

15% % Ana Par I450c _ 

7% SftAHUtKO 
14% 5ft Aproon n _ 

10 6 ArrewA 

lift 3%Artivth 
4ft 2 Asrrotc _ 

12ft 7ft Atari _ 

7ft 5 ArtontH 
% ftAHtCM 
18ft 6ft Audvax 
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9% i AmW© 

2ft Tft.Axcon 



2ft 2% -ft 
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5ft 5ft — 

. . 7Vi -ft 

& - 
7ft 8 m 
2% 7Vh—V', 


Ale 


IS ... 
- 21 
3.1 IS 


.. 26 
8 7 17 


5% 2% BA HO 
17ft 11% BAT S 
82%/OftBHC 

25 IV Bootm -73 
11 5%Bakor 
5%3'V„Baldw 
23% IVftBanFd 1.91a 
149*10% Banstrg _ ... 

9% 7%BkSttn 22 22 M 
25%21ftBTcv7ftnl.B8 BA 
76ft2l%BT Cv7ft 1.90 BJ ... 
ft VpBarvvHI _. _. 

2ft 1 v,iBanvn5h 
23ft lift Bamwi .lie 

26ft 14ft Barr1_b 
20% 5%BoryRGs . 

21 lOftBovMea JO 
5 2'HiiBovOU 
6 ft J'ABSHK wt 
7H 3"/i t BSHK pwf 
3% 3V.iBSJpn wt 
3ft 2ftBS Jnnpwt 
36ft 29V. BSMRKn 2JJI 
ftBebnac 
26ft 15 BanaiE 
aft dftBenEve _ - 

104 HftBeraCa 2.00 b 2J - 
16ft dftBrtawaa _ -. 

Hi, v,iBalhCp 
23%l9ftB<nkMI 
19ft 10 Blofi A 
19 lOftBioRB 
3ft 1 ftOOhm 
3‘V,, l’ftBiseAOR 


12 TVh 
20 13% 
SO 77ft 
9 23ft 
33 5% 

313 5ft 
40 22ft 
7 11% 
i 8 
*60 22% 
11 23 
86 ft 


2 14 
_ 31 
... 25 
IJ 34 
-114 


TV* 

13ft 

77 

Z3ft 

5ft 

5 

25 

lift 

8 

21 % 

22ft 

ft 

l'V| 


l‘Vi* l'»|* . , 

6 18% 18ft 18ft -ft 


RJSs 

s a -% 

5% —% 
51* -ft 
22 —ft 
lift —ft 
I —ft 
21ft — % 
27ft - 
ft - 
l'Vf _ 


6J -. 


_ 19 


48 21ft 
1459 u 71 ft 
7! 19ft 
84 4% 

15 3ft 
11 4ft 
50 3ft 
10 2% 
38 31% 
288 ft 
10 25 
86 7V, 

1 88 


21 

20ft 

19% 

4Vij 

2ft 
4ft 
0 3% 
0 2 % 
31% 
'fti 


24% 

7% 


27ft -ft 
20% -ft 
19% — Vi 

2ft — ft 
4ft —ft 
3ft — %» 
2% —ft 
31% -% 
■V'* —ft 


25 ‘ -ft 
7% —ft 


J3r 


1J 22 
- 24 
.. 23 


143 

r r. 

6ft 

6V, 

—ft 



lft 

1Y» 


383 

21ft 

21 V* 

21% 


334 u 20 

19ft 

19% 

• % 


12 


15 ll'.VBCAIQ 
15ft IlftfiFLIQ 

14%11'ABNJIO 
14% 1M4BNYIQ 


13ft BftBOwVn 
3% lViSowmr 
28ft 1 7ft Bowne 


17ft 7%Brondn 


3ft 2v.,BroOCP 
3ft. lftBvthon 


1.05 

90 


« 

11% 

79c 

l; 

■u 

1 

lift 

79c 

A3 


22 

12% 

.71 

6J 


M 

lift 

29 

67 


14 

lift 

2J5e 

AS 

IT 

IS 

46 

70 

2.1 

16 


JO 

U 

24 

37 

41% 

1.24 

0,9 

1/ 

12 




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11% 

J6 

IA 

11 

9 

123 

90 




17 

183 

8% 




58 



10 


71 

Sft 

1.04 



S 



18 

10 

3Y„ 


I2ul9ft 19% 19Vi - 1 

29 lft, lft, ivy 

6 2ft 2ft, 2V„ 

lift 11% - ft 
11% 11% ... 
12% l7Vi . ft 
1T% 11% —V* 
11% 11% ._ 
45ft 45V, ... 

33ft 33ft —ft 
40% 40ft • ft 
14 14 -ft 

lift 11% . H 
2% 2‘ft* — ¥« 
22 22% - ft 

8% 8% —ft 
lift 13ft -ft 
4ft 5 -Vi. 
14ft 14ft • ft 
. 3V„ *ft— v„ 
33 IVa 1% lft —ft 


70ft ISftCfxCp ,84b 4.6 14 

7ft 4ft CM Fill ... B 

8% 7%CIM .54ell2 

9ft 4%CMICP ... 7 

3% I CSTEnt ... 

16ft 11 ftCVB Fn J2b 3.1 12 

5’* IftCVDFnn .. . 

IV, , *i,CXR •- 


51 18% 18 'A 18% - 

546 5% 5% 5% - 

25 7Vj 7 ft 7ft -ft 

431 7ft 6% 1 

301 I O ■>'u I 
18 13ft 15ft IS'* _. 

67 2ft l'*„ I'W„ 

25 ">* "A* 


18% lift Bui IDT 
16ft 10 CAI Wre 
33ft 21 ft CTEC 
10% 4%CAO 
32ft25%CadBv5 1J0* 

lift 5 ft Coen* 

17% SftCalOCflB 
7TO 9%C01MD 
aiftMftCpIMIc 

32 TOftCWiTOA 

90ft 59 Vi Carton I J0a 

20 UftCartnmr J6 

43% 23ft CrtJnHn 1 .12 

21 16 Career*, 

14ft SOftCorelJne 
19 lOUCmPlr 
13ft tacasms JO 
25 VftCasAm e 
16 10%CaamaOS 
21V. 5ftCi&MaoiC 
25 IftCostlEs 
19% 8 ColtlSir 
24% VftCOBOCn .16 
19 12 Celadon 
34ft 13ft Cel Wicl 
36ft 17ft CelKo 
20ft fVtCdlstor 
S2ft 39ftCelCfnA 
26ft 17ft CdCmPft 
34% 4% Cell^CS 
7d'u id center 
43 10 CentBim 

15% 6ft Cen near 

34 25ftCFit$k 1.1! 
19ft 8 Ceshln 
49Vs23ftCemer 
36ft 18ft Cerwee*r 43e 
14% SftOwmSh J39 

25 17ftCW0nFs AO 
IS 4%Owexen 
24%l3ftcnescK3 

19 a cnicoss 
dOft 31 ftOilPcom 
7ft 3%Oilp*Tc 
96 SOftCmrun 
lift SftOimmd* 

22V. 15 Odco 
61ft 50 OmFln 1 JS 
34ft 25 Ortas .17 
15 BftCircan 
44% 23% Cirrus 
40% 18% asms 

28 UftOMcmS 

21 ft is auocw 

a 22ftCstHtm 

42 25 Cobra 

41 ft 24 CocoBtl I JO 

34% 16 CoHexUj J9e 
28 11 Crone* s 

14% 7 ft Cronos g 
It 11 Cotiemt 
31% 17 Cokiaen -10e 
25ft HftCoWflcP M 
34ft 17 Comae 24 
25ft 14V.Comcs! S .» 

26 UftGmcvs J9 
21ft 1 5*i Commnet 

33 27ftCmcBMO A8 
27% ITftCmcFdl 

26 l2ftCamHISV 
26%20ftC0mpenc 22 
10% tuOnenl 

7 1 '. 7% Cm ocm 

24 10% Cm pDtS .10 
12% SftCrtNwfc 

48V* 21 Compuwr 
16% 8 Comven 

vft 2 1 .CcdCom 
30% 17% CancEFS 
ISVi S ConcHld 
49% 34 ' * Con Pro 1J8 

22 13 Contia 

22ftl4ftCoonB JO 
53% 2lftCoptovPh 
14% 7V.COPV1B1 

18 9 CorTher 

23'4 l4ftCorGabP 
54ft27%CortBs 

25 •ViOxnfC&S 
24 UMCorlmoa 
16% iViCorcJCp 

37% 9ft Coh CP JS 
74% 12ft Omtrv 1 
29%21ftCrterBrf 02 

24 8%CiTcM_s 
28 ID CradSvS 
32ft 20 CrdACPS 
33% SftOasCam 
39ft 30ft CuSnFr A0 
54ft 33%CumtiFd J8 
28 12ftOi«Cn 

25 lDftCvaneQ 
12% 5%CvanuE 
41% lBftCvrlx CP 
35V4 HftCyrtc 

8 ft 3%CvtRx 


._ 19 235 
- _ 233 
... 101 
14 1421 


IH 


SJ 12* 124 

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2 2TS 

... li 2646 

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1 i2 
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1.6 >3 991 

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- 11 1114 
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14 381 
... - 657 
.. _ 16 
... - 513 
462 

- II 1833 
_ _ 2330 

3J 11 397 
_ _ 755 

- 32 258 

1.9 _ 1302 
1.0 14 3452 

2 j 9 jn 

- 35 2971 

- 27 458 

- 19 1184 

>. 32 1054 
_ 23 340 
... 98 50S7 
_ 64 321 
_ - 70 

2,4 16 IK 
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W 1933784 

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3A 19 32 

IJ - 2686 

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2.9 7 719 
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J 1233 
J 3753 
_ _ 774 
22 11 717 
_ 9 88 

_ IS 1030 

3.6 10 1ST 

>116 1201 
> 10 51 

J 10 220 


12% 

10% 

22% 

7% 

20% 

ft 

13ft 

22% 

29ft 

87V. 

17ft 

38V* 

17ft 

,?a 

12 

u 

24% 

6 

12% 

•ft 

10ft 

17% 

15ft 

21% 

12 

51ft 

25% 

lift 

ISVi 

!3ft 

12 

32% 

10ft 

36% 

24 

9% 

29ft 

5'* 

17 

13ft 

40ft 

2ft 

59ft 

11 

19ft 

54 

31ft 

9ft 

28ft 

21ft 

20ft 

14% 

Uft 


lift 12 —ft 
10ft 10ft - 
22 22 — 
7ft 7ft— V- 
28ft 28ft -% 
6ft 6ft - 
Vft Vft 


lift lift— lft 
21% 22% -ft 


Bft 

10 

17 

14 


28ft 

20ft 

19ft 

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Page 16 


* 


LNTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 9, 1994 


SPORTS 


Christie Is Triumphant, 
But in Supporting Role 


By Ian Thomsen 

lntcnuufonal Herald Tribune 

HELSINKI — On the nighi 
Linford Christie furthered nis 
claim as Europe's greatest 
sprinter, the spectators in 
Olympic Stadium were heard 
chanting for Seppo. “Seppo,” 
they cried, “Seppo.” 

Christie might have thought 
he’d wandered into a Marx 
Brothers movie. As it was, his 
record-tying, third successive 
100-meter victory in the Euro- 
pean Championship ran head 
on into the men’s javelin com- 
petition, which, in this country, 
is very much like Zeppo trying 
to match wits with Groucho. In 
Finland, the javelin is Groucho. 

The prospective hero, the 
1987 world champion Seppo 
Raty, just one in a long line of 
Finnish javelin masters, ap- 
peared Monday wearing around 
his enormous girth a tank-top 
with enough material to outfit 
three children. He himself 
looked as if he had just been 
awakened after a hard night out. 

The crowd, which had 
bought all 40,000 tickets for this 
one night ahead of all the others 
— and not to see Christie, be 
assured — gathered in the shad- 
ow of the Olympic tower that is 
72 meters high, allegedly be- 
cause that is the distance which 
Matd Jarvinen threw to set the 
javdin world record in 1936. 

Three were in contention in 
the final round. Jan Ze lezny 
was the Czech Olympic and 
world champion as well as the 
world-record holder. He had 
never won the European Cham- 
pionship and now definitely 
wanted to here in the country 
that prizes javelin throwing so 
much — but his shoulder has 


troubled him all summer, and 
by not improving on his second 
throw of 82 J8 meters he would 
finish with the bronze medal. 

The leader since the second 
round, defending champion 
Steve BackJey of Britain, could 
not improve on his throw of 
85.20 meters, and so ihe crowd 
was left to cheer for Seppo, their 
mighty Seppo — with memories 
of the world championship in 
this stadium 1 1 years ago, when 
her final throw shot Tuna Lillak 
of Finland past the British lead- 
er, Fatima Whitbread. 

The javelin looked rather like 
a long, flimsy straw in Seppo's 
fingers and he hopped, sputter- 
ing, toward the line. The face 
was inflating around pursed 
lips like a balloon trying not to 
let itself out. He came to a skid- 
ding, unbalanced stop and his 
arms quivered like a tuning 
fork. The noise grew as the jave- 
lin came to earth — short. 

“The operated arm was hurt- 
ing so much that I hardly could 
hold the javelin,'' Raty said lat- 
er. “I couldn't throw any fur- 
ther” 

With Raty subdued to second 
place with his fifth-round throw 
of 82.90 meters, BackJey was 
left to celebrate in the infield 
amid polite applause — be- 
cause the people here, if only 
here, appreciate his craft. 

He served as a proper British 
segue to the 34-year-old Chris- 
tie, who had just relumed to 
competition after tearing his 
left hamstring July 15. He 
equaled the three successive 
100-meter titles won by Valeri 
Borzov of the Soviet Union in 
1969, 1971 and 1974. But theT- 
shirt Christie wore later pointed 


out that his three had been won 
over a nine-year period. 

Christie is growing very 
much alone by all means. Earli- 
er in the day it was revealed that 
teammate John Regis, favored 
to defend his title in the 200 
meters, had injured his left 
Achilles’ tendon. He hopes to 
return for the Commonwealth 
Games later this month; in the 
meantime, he will be missed in 
Christie’s other event the sprint 
relay — with Regis's logical re- 
placement Solomon Wariso, 
having been withdrawn this 
weekend after testing positive 
for a banned stimulant 

Yet Christie's responsibilities 
as British captain and the un- 
precedented old age of so great 
a champion registered only be- 
neath his eyes, the bags sagging 
and bouncing on every enor- 
mous stride. After three false 
starts, the second his doing, 
ihere was a bit of panic there 
too; and as the seconds pro- 
gressed he failed to characteris- 
tically burst far ahead of Geir 
Moen, the Norwegian who sil- 
vered in 10.20 seconds, or the 
third-place Russian in 1031, 
Alexander Prokhomovskiy. 

Christie won in 10.14 sec- 
onds, having promised to run 
only as fast as need be. In addi- 
tion to the three European ti- 
tles, he has won the Olympics 
and the world championship 
over the last two years, the lat- 
ter in a time just two one-hun- 
dredths of a second behind the 
recent world record of the 
American Leroy Burrell. The 
question is noL when Christie 
will slow down, but whether he 
will continue to improve. 

Irina Privalova of Russia 



Germany’s Team Gets 
The Point: Good-Bye 
To Basketball Medal 


won the women's 100 meters in 
1 1.02 seconds, en route to her 
anticipated 100-,200-meter 
double. Her main challenger, 
Zhanna Tranopolskaya of 
Ukraine, finished second in 
! 1.10, unable to match her own 
second-heat time Sunday or 
11.01 seconds. 

With a triple jump of 14.89 
meters, Anna Biryukova upset 


her favored Russian teammate, 
Inna Lasovskaya — she had a 
wind-aided 14.85 — to win that 
gold medal. Another Russian, 
the favored Mikhail Shchenni- 
kov, won the 20-kilometer walk 
in a championship record 1 
hour, 18 minutes, 45 seconds. 
37 seconds ahead of Yevgeniy 
Misyulya of Belarus. 

Defending champion and 


SCOREBOARD 


Major League Standings 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 

Era) Division 



1W 

L 

Pet. 

GB 

NuwYork 

69 

40 

633 

— 

Baltimore 

61 

48 

560 

8 

Boston 

54 

58 

682 


Taranto 

53 

58 

ATI 

17 

Detroit 

51 

60 

.459 

19 


Central Division 



Chicago 

65 

45 

591 

— 

Cleveland 

64 

46 

SO 

1 

Kansas City 

63 

49 

563 

3 

Milwaukee 

51 

60 

,459 

14W 

Minnesota 

50 

60 

A5S 

15 


west cnvhion 



Texas 

52 

59 

-468 

— 

Oakland 

50 

60 

■455 

ito 

Seattle 

45 

63 

-417 

5Vi 

Califamlci 

45 

67 

-402 

TVj 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 



East Division 




W 

L 

PCL 

OB 

Montreal 

71 

39 

445 

— 

Atlanta 

65 

45 

591 

6 

New York 

S3 

» 

-486 

17Vi 

Ptritodelidik] 

52 

59 

468 

19W 

Florida 

50 

61 

450 

71to 


Central PlvUoa 



Cincinnati 

65 

45 

591 

— 

Houston 

65 

47 

5M 

1 

Plttstx/rgti 

52 

58 

473 

13 

St. Louis 

» 

60 

45S 

15 

Chicago 

49 

61 

445 

16 


West Division 



Las Angeles 

56 

54 

509 

— 

San Francisco 52 

10 

464 

5 

Colorado 

51 

62 

451 

6VS 

Sai Diego 

45 

69 

JH 

13 


Sunday’s Line Scores 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 
The Associated Press 
First Gome 

Cleveland 010 ON #00—1 3 1 

Boston 000 301 OOx— 4 11 f 

Ogeo. Plunk 17) and Pena; Heskelfi. Rvan 
Wand Rowland. W—Heskettk 8-5. L— Ogea-D- 
1. 5» — Rvun (13). Second Game 
Oevefaad no 001 021 BIS— 13 io 1 
Boston no 520 M0 tio-io m z 

Morris, DIPoio («), Mesa (SI, Plunk (9). 
Russell (ID and 5. Alomar. Pena (II); Finn- 
void, Melendez (2). Bankhead 101. Fosses (B). 
K. Ryan («), Frotmirtti (II) and Berrytilll. 
W— Russell. 14. L — F rohwl rth, 0-2. HRs— Cle- 
veland. Belle (36). Boston. Fletcher (3), T Ins- 
lev (2). 

Detroit 131 wo 020-0 II 1 

Toronto OM 101 BID — 7 12 I 

Gullkfcsoa Gardiner (3). 5. Davis (7). 
Groom (*), Harris (9),Cadarai 19) and Tetfie- 
ton, Flaherty (81 ; Stewart, Gas! 1 1 la 1 7). Timlin 
(») and Borders- W-S. Davis, 2-3. L-Cndll*. 
5-2.Su— Cadaret (21. HRs— Detroit. Phillips 2 
(IB). Fielder (27). Gibson (23). Toronto. Moll- 
tor (14). Oterud (12). 

New York ooo m 0*0-4 11 i 

Minnesota 130 B00 «3x— 7 14 1 

KamlenleckL Murphy (6), Wlckman (7), 
Howe (S), Amanta (8) and Leyfflz. Stanley 
(61! Pulido, SchuUstrom (6), Trombley (6). 
Stevens (8), Aguilera (91 and Waibeck. 
W— Stevens, 4-2. L— Wlckman, 34. 5v — Agui- 
lera (22). HRs— Now York. O'Neill (21). Kelly 
131. 

Baltimore 040 000 003—4 13 0 

Milwaukee 200 OOO B01— 3 o 1 

Mussina. Le. Smith (91 and Hailes; Scanlon, 
Orosco (B), Henry (9j and Nilsson. W— Mus- 
sina, 16-5. L— Scanlon. 24 HR— Milwaukee. 
Ward (9). 

Seattle ooi loo no— lo u l 

i ary 2io no ooi— i n i 


Sal keld. King (5). Rlsley (51. Ayala (9>and 
Wilson; Cone. Brewer (7), Meocham (7) end 
Mavne. W— Rlsley. 84 L— Cone. 164 
H Rs— Seattle. Buhner 120) . Griffey J r. (30) , T. 
Martinez (181. Kansas City. Hamelin (241. 
Texas 8B0 010 020—3 S 0 

Oakland 501 B20 Nbt— 8 10 ■ 

Rogers. Carpenter (4), Howell (8) and I. 
Rodriguez; van PoopeLVinberg (B). Briscoe 
(B) and STHntooch. W — Van F’opneL 7-10. 
L — R oners, H4 HRs— Texas. I. Rodriguez 
(161. Strange (5). Oakland. R. Henderson (61. 
Neel 2 (15). Brasilia (14). 

Chicago MO 020 002 005—10 13 I 

California 28) Mo ooo ooo— 5 u i 

A. Fernandez. Cook (81, DeLeon (0) and 
LaVulHere; Letlwlch, B, Patterson. (5). 
Springer (81/ M. Leifer (10). Manrane (12); 
Grahe (12) and Myers, C. Turner (9). W— De- 
Leon. 3-Z L— Mogrcne, 24 HRs— Chicago. 
LaValliare (I). California. C Davis (26). 
Salmon (22), Myers (21. 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
Florida 001 800 0*1-2 4 I 

New York an no M9-0 3 i 

Bowen. Pena (Bl.Nan (91 and Natal: Smith. 
Mason (91 and Hundley. W — Bowen, 14 
L— Smith. 4-10. 5v— Non 115). HR— Florida, 
Colbrurm (5). 

Montreal in til 210-4 12 1 

Philadelphia m in 010-4 8 2 

HIIL Rolos (8) and Fleldier. Spehr (81 ; Mu- 
noz, Edens (B). Bottallco (9) and UebeiitwL 
W—HIU. 10-5. L— Munoz. 74 Sv— RoJas (1*). 
Atlanta on on 110-2 6 B 

tied man 1H Oil B0x-3 8 B 

Marcher. Bedraslan (8). Stanton (81 and 
Lopez; Schaurek. Brantley (8) and Dorset! 
W-Schourek. 7-2. L-Merckrr. H 
Sv — Brantlev (14). H R s A tlanta. M. Kelly 
(2). Cincinnati, Larkin (9), Mitchell (30), Dor- 
set! (5). 

San Diego 100 DU M0— 5 17 0 

Chicago on 001 000-1 4 2 

Krueger and Johnson; Foster, Crlm (5), 


Pall 17). Veres 19] and Parent. Wilkins (7). 
W— Krueger. 3-2. L— Faster, 34 HRs— San 
Diego, Gwvrm (12). Williams (ID. Chicago, 
Grace 161. 

St. Louis M m 300-4 12 I 

P HH h wg l i M2 012 HI-4 17 0 

Urtanl. Buckles (51. Palatini (4), Evers- 
gerd (B) ml McGrltf; white, Manzanillo (7). 
Dyer (7), Wagner (9) and SlaugM. 
W— Wagner, 74 L— Eversgerd. 24 
H R — Pittsburgh. Garcia (4). 

Las Angeles 211 OH 038-4 12 • 
an eei hi—) c • 
HersMser, Vbides C7). Td. Worrell (*) and 
Piazza; Gr. Karris S^Reed (8>.M.Munaz(9), 
Harkey (9) and Girardi. W— Hershber. 44 
-Ic-Gf- Harrl* 3-12. HRs— Las Angeles, Kar- 
ras 1131, H. Rodriguez (8). 

San Francisco t» HI M8-4 4 0 

Houston DM 100 OOP— 7 14 0 

Swift, Gomez (4), Burba (4), Frey (8>.Mon- 
hHeane (8) and Manwarlng; Drobek, Powell 
(8), To. Jonas (« tmd Servats. W— Drobefc.12- 
4. l— S wift. 8-7, Sv— To. Janes 14). HR— San 
Francisco. Bands (37). 

World Championships 

Sunday's Results 
Nicaragua M, Italy 6 
Australia ll, Colombia 4 
Dominican Republic 8, France 0 
Netherlands 7, Sweden 2 
South Korea 12. Puerto Rk» 3 
Panama 5. Canada 3 


Fred Coupler S19MOO 
Carer Povfn si 18580 
Greg Kraft, 557300 
Curtis Strange. 557-200 
Steve Pate, S57J00 
Ben Crenshaw, S3&225 
Keith Clearwater. S3IL22S 
Duffy Waldorf. S31.900 
Tam Lehman. S3I.900 
Fred Funk. Ell. 900 


72454548-270 
6445-70-71—272 
71 -7247-64—276 
71-704740—276 
71-674»4f-276 
72484945-277 
714749-70—277 
4947-7448—278 
7147-70-70 — 27B 
45-70-71-72—278 


nwv wi»jn« ) 4 •» 

■ 


'ax’sawc . . '-222 


LOS ANGELES OPEN 
: : •- ....HWS 

Berts Becker (21. Germany, del. Mark 
Woadfarde. Australia, 6-2, 6-2. 

TOSHIBA CLASSIC 
In Cartstnd. CMUoraki 
Final 

SfeNI Graf (1 1, Germany, del. Arantxa San- 
chez Vkarta (2), Spain, 51, 6-2. 


FRENCH FIRST DIVISION 
Sunday's Resadt 
Basttd, B Lyon, 1 

Standings: Lyon 7, Nantes 7, Bordeaux 7. 
Cannes 7. Sochoux 6, St. E llame EMarflgues 
SLens 4. Strasbourg A Bastki 4. Nice A Parls- 
Sainf Germain < Lille L Le Havre 3, Metz 3. 
Auxerre 2. Rennes 2, Monaco 1. Caen OL 


BuIckOpen 


J-.7TCTV3C 1 

J 1 . i rs 


T .. JKgP 


USA. pool and there's one 
moL lf we go into the side with 
Croatia, they haw a very pow- 
erful team and we’re in the 
same situation, only ihere are 
possibly two spots open- Never- 

__ _ _ thdess, we would have liked icf 

■that would decide . have won the game. f 

advanced to One learn which didn i care 
which pool it moved into was 
China, the definite surprise of 
the quarferfinalists. 

China beat Spain, 78-76,- 
Sunday, its best previous Finish 
in three World Championships' 
having been' ninth in 1986. It* 
was 14th in 1990; its best CHym- 


■’ The Associated Press 

‘ TORONTO — There 
. couldn't have been a more hdp- 
. less feeling than what ihe Ger- 
man players were experiencing: 
They were washing the 
between Greece arid Puerto 
the 


the quarterfinals of the World 
Championship of Basketball 
. If. Greece won, it and Germa- 
ny would advance under the 
three-team tiebreaker, each 
with/a -2-1 record. If Puerto 
Rico won by between five arid 
14 points, h and Greece would 


move on. If Puerto Rico wou-by. pic finish was 10th in 1 984. 


5 Marie ku Utender/AfEnoe F nna fr hwj 

Defending champion Steve BackJey of Britain upset Finland's favorite, Seppo Raty, and 
the world champion Jan Zelezny erf the Czech Republic to win the javelin cotnpetitoo. 


world silver-medalist Sabine 
Braun of Germany found her- 
self in second place after the 
first day of the heptathlon with 
3.823 points, three behind Svet- 
lana. Moskalets of Russia, who 
overtook Braun with a superior 
time of 23.77 seconds in the 200 
meters. That allowed. her. to 
make up 79 points. on Braun’s 
time of 24.60. 


BASEBALL' 

American League 

BOSTON— Recalled Todd Frohwlrtli. Pitch- 
er, from Pawtucket, I L. Activated Gar Fbm- 
votd, pitcher, (ram I5duv disabled 1 1st .Put 
Scott Caaaer. iMrd baseman, an TS-dov dis- 
abled List. retroactive lo Aug. 4. 

CLEVELAND— Sent Chod Ogeo, pHetier.lo 
Cb or lotte, IL Colled <a» Jerry Dtfdlo.pUtiieri 
from Qicrtotte. 

KANSAS CITY— Rut Dove Henderson, out- 
fieWer.on IS-doV disabled list. retroactive lo . 
July 30. Purchased contract ot Dwayne Ho- 
~nv; odt n ald tf. Rata Odxffia, aa. * " 
National League 

FLORIDA— Activated Ryan Bowen. pJtxJv 
er. from iSdav disabled list. 

HOUSTON— Atifvdled Andy StanUewtcx. 
JnfMder.from lSdov dtedbtod llsL Optioned 
Roberto Petaglne, InfteMer, to Tucson, PCL. 

NEW YORK— Activated Put* Smith, pfttii- 
er.trom 15-day disabled ffst. Put jaslasMan- 
zaatUa pI Itiwr. aa I5day disabled Hut, retra- 
octlve fa July 28. 

PHILADELPHIA— Activated Mariano 

Dunoon, hifleider, from dCMbted IM: gent 
Ricky -Battaiico, Plttiier, to Rcodktg. GL. 
BASKETBALL 

National BaNrcUmR AswcIcitlM 

MIAMI— Signed Matt Gctger.'cwitor. to 
matt! rear contract. 

MILWAUKEE— Stoned Marty Cofl kxv for- 
ward. la 2-rtor contract. 

MINNESOTA A nn o un ced me sale of tti* 
team to businessman Glen Taylor, pending 
NBA cemroval. 

FOOTBALL 


more than 14 points, it arid Ger- 
many worild still he in coriten- 
tiaafpr a medal. 

Prieito Rico led, 72^3, with 
30 seconds left Sunday. The 
Germans had to hope fpr a epu- 
pie of 3-pointers either way. In- 
stead, Greece dribbled out the 
dock until a foul was. called 
with' 4.8 seconds left The final 
margin was eight. ' - 

. *This is vexy bitter for the 
. learn,** said. GennaaY*s coach, 
Diik Bauermann. "We are the 
(mly-team in. the tournament 
who will not play in the medal 
round although we . have" won 
itwso §ames.^ - 

Said Greece’s coach. Maids 
Dedrinos: “We played under a 
lot of stress because the score 
was so relevant to us advancing. 
We found ourselves in a panic 
- atnarion, playing formore points 
to secure first or seriond place.” 
Said Puerto Rico's coach, 
Carlos Morales: “To say that 
we are happy to win this game 
would be an understatement. 
Whenever you have to wmT>y a 
certain number of points to get 
into the second round, it is very 
difficult,” - '* ■ 

As -champion of Pod ' D, 
Greece gained the quarterfinal 
group that does not mciride the 
United States. Thai group be- 
gan playing Mondaymgjdwitb 
Croatia facing China and 
Greece meeting Canada. 

I%y in tho other pod starts 
Tuesday night, with the U.S. 
team going against Australia 
while Russia faces Puerto Rica 
The United States, Croatia 
and Russia all finished the 
opening round wire 3-A records. 
After Russia beat Canada by 


The worst China can finish- 
here is ei ghth. Which is not bad 
for a. team that lost to the Unit- 
ed States by 55 points in the 
opening round, but beat Brazil 
and Spain. ; 

■ U.S.: 3 - 0 , and Still Iieing. 

The U.S. team, despite a 105- 
82 victory over Brazil, stilT 
trailed in the competition , 
against the original Dream: * 
Team, The New York Times: 
reported. 

' This team won its first three 
games by an average of 31 
points. In 1992, the U.S. Olym- 
pic team’s average- winning 
mar gin was 44 points. 

The margin of victory has be-1 
come an underlying theme — - 
and thorn — for Dream Teanl 
II, which has been attempting 
to play down comparison with 
its predecessor. 

Bat much of the cbmparisoir 
was fueled by these players — 
like the ever-ialkativc Reggie- 
Miller — who said that this 
team could beat that" of Bird,. 
Jordan and Johnson. *■ 

-the -United States, led bv' 
ShaquiUe O'Neal with 2T 
points, was never in trouble 
Sunday evening, quickly build- 
ing a double-digit lead and do- 
ing virtually anything it wanted’ 
with Brazil, (me of- the weaken 
teams here. " 

StiB — the rnaigin was only 
23pbaus. 

While the Brazilians were im- 
pressed with the Americans^ 
those who also played against 
Eheam Team I weren’t sure that 
this’ team was better — - or who:’ 
would win if the two evcrplayedl - 
“This tram is much stronger 

r n 21 r‘i«T 


! pUt 

group with the United States, 
the Russian forward Sergei 
Panov said, “I don’t think that 
the Canadian team showed 
their very best. There were some 
real options as lo which team 
went into which pooL” --■ 

. The top two teams in each 
quarterfinal pool move on to 
Saturday’s semifinals, and the 
United States is as safe a bet as 
can be found to be one of them. 

“We went into the game not 
knowing which way we would 
rather go, whether to go to the 
U.S.A. pool or with Croatia," 
said Canada’s coach, Ken 
Shields. ... " • \ 

“If we wot, we go into the 


Final (cores ana (mlngs SanOay from toe 
n.lmBlioa BvlekOpeaan ltM:7,1K^ranl,Pi'r- 
72 Waturf cfc Hills Country CM came In 
Grand Blanc. Ml eft tom. 


SECOND TEST 

England » Soun Attica. Last Oar 
Monday, at Leeds 
South AlrlcD 2nd Innings; 1158 
[Match was drawn) 


CINCINNATI— Claimed Stove Laftoa cor- 
neraack. off waivers (ram Arizona. 

KANSAS CITY — Terminated contract at 
Tony Casillas, defensive tackle, tor fbIBng to 
report la training camp. 


73-66 "Saturday rughf to wn Than Dreain Tcam r." said Jose 
Pod C but be pot mto the Yiaziiia. “But there’s something 

lacking there and I don’t know 
what it is. Maybe a philosophy 
or approach or character thar 
these guys don’t have." 

Who would win? 

“I don’t know," he said, “but 
Fd tike tobcin the front row to 
see the game. 1 ’ 

Miller said .that either way/ 
his team is in an impossible po- 
sition. 

“If we win by 50 people say 
‘You’re supposed to win.’ If wd 
win by 15 r they're going to be 
like, “Why aren’t you winning 
by 50?* So we’re in a no-win 
situation." 

Still, they are unlikely to lose" 
much at these championships. 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 


PEXLE 


I C 

J 



GOLIC 

L-, 

III; 

rn 


POLUCE 

ns 


ALFELN 


m: 

□□ 


teTcnnntni] 


Jumam mhCh o«R* MiCAt truism 
Ml war What manom maniM (ram lu >W4 — 
SHEAR PROFIT 


TO OUR READERS 
IN FRANCE 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 9, 1994 





il>* f i Ca 


Page 17 



fj.! 



For U.S. Golfers: 


Have Sympathy for Baseball’s Real Labor Force 



By Larry I>oroian 

■Mew Fcrft Tunes Seniu " 

. NEW YORK — Unprecedented occurrences 
always attract bated-breath attention in gotf, Jfrnd 
me sport is on the verge of one how as the PGA' 
Championship loomsthis week at Southern Hflls 
Country Oub in Tulsa, Oklaho ma .. . 

. Here is something to ponder? For the first time 
m golf history, the United States could be shut 
out in the major dianip ift ndti p); 

American players are 0 for .3 so -far in this 


By George Vecsey 

Mew York Tima Senior 

YORK — “Hey, Vecsey, what do you 
think, is there.going to be a strike?" 

The man works at one of the ball parks. He lives on 
the tips people give him 

“This could be a long one, huh?" the rnan asked. 
.“They could still be — ■■■■ 

'out next season, Vantaai* 

Poh? B 

-rye been a reporter _ — . 

too Long to get whipped around by labor or manage- 
ment during a contract dispute, but I nod my head 
and tell the guy, “Hey, with these people, you never 
Jcuow.T 




year’s majors, something that has never hap- • He and all the other wort 

pened before. In factTU-S. players have new ^ t ^. can ’ Vstaa . a few ^ 


even been 0 for 2 in the 60 years that aB four 
i professional major championships have been 

j contested. But this year, the victory list has an 

r i international accent: Josfe Maria Olazfibal of 

r i ^P ^ 11 “ ^ Masters; Ernie Els of South Africa 

; m the U.S. Open; Nick Price of Zimbabwe in the 

. ‘ , British Open. 

This trend has been on the way for the last 
decade American players mice dominated golf 
* j : the way th^ dtmrinate bad^balL in the decade 

erf 1965-74, U-S. born players were 31-9 in the' 
majors. From 1975 to *84, they were 33-7. But in 

Furthermore, players from outside the United 
States have won lOof the last II British Opens, 
six of the last seven Masters, the last UJS. Open 
. and two of the last four PGA Championships. 

“American golf," Paul Azinger y»ki last week, 
“is getting hammered.” 

Depending on who is asked, tins is either cause 
for concent or an overblown media creation. 
Golf is the most individual of sports, many 
golfers prefer to ignore the fact that the b alance 
^ of power — espma%attheverypinnac3eof the 
game — - has shif t ed dr amati ca l ly m (he rnajors- 
. “I haven’t lost much sleep over it,” Cnrtis 
Strange said “I haven’t lost any sleep over it It’s - 
not a foreign-U.SA. thins, anyway. We’re" all 
", .7 golfers. We all come from tne same backjoround. 
r ~ The general public thinks about it We don’t, 
they do. It’s just not that big a deal” 

But some players, especially those from the! 
generation of golfers whowere so dominant, 
drink it is a big deat Arnold Palmer told The 
Dallas Morning News recently that “we’ve lost 
can aggressiveness at winning golf tournaments." 

That is the sort of talk that really rankles other 
American players. Invariably, it leads to tfiscus- 
sions about how all the millions at stake on the 
PGA Tour create a check-cashing mentality 
among players who can makeneariy $ 210,000 a 
year with two top 10 finishes, as Phil HlaAmar 
did last year. 

Players who axe brought up in such a system, 
the theory goes, might lack the requisite hard 
edge necessary to deal with the rigors of winning 
a major. 

-- . . Others point to tire fact that foreign players, 

.*•$10 once played tpany fewer tournaments far 
hxuch less money, are used to mere difficult 
conditions and the necessity to win to make any 
• 7 money at alLlf they win once, they want more. 

“These gays an our tour win one' tournament, 
and theytake the Test of the year off.” one 
" veteran player said. ‘They're happy just to make 

some checks the rest of the way. 

The temptation to do that is these for many 
players. John Huston, 33, one of the better UJS. 
i ' w tour players, is an example. By March. he had 
, won one tournament arid 1386,800. He bad a 

third-place finish and two ties for ninth in five 
appearances before.be won the Doral-Ryder 
Open. Since then, he has one top 10 and has 
missed the cut in two out of three zugors. But he. 
is 10 th on the money list with $ 517 , 924 , so why 
worry? 

r The guarantees going into Tulsa are that it will 

be brutally hot, the rough will be high, the greens .. 
will be fast and the favorites will be foreign-bom. 

- - = Greg Norman, Price, Els, even a slumping Nick 
Faldo alT are bring mentioned before any Ameri- 
. can players. _ . 

Pavin, who has a good chance, might represent 
‘ the United States’ best chance. He at least dis- ' 

- plays a fighting attitude. 

“When we go into the majors, we’re all indi- 
vidual playersT” he said. “AD that matters to me 
is that u someone else wins, then it’s not me, and 
that bothers me — not what country be comes 
— — -* *" from." 

Fair enough. But if he doesn’t come from the . 
United Slates, then the PGA champion win be a 
first in golf history. He will be the first to 
produce a Foreign Slam, something, that would 
,i? r* not be too grand for U.S. golf. 

Fred Couples, recovering from a back immy 
i^nr kept trim from playing for almost four 
mouths, shot 7-under-par 65 in the third round 
Sunday morning, then a 68 in the afternoon to 
beat Corey Pavin by two strokes in the Buiek 
Open in Grand Blanc, Michigan, The Associated 
Press reported. 

Couples closed out his first victory this season 
with a birdie on the final hole, hitting his ap- 
proach less than two feet (60 centimeters) from 
the pin and m«Wng the putt for a 270 total. 

The 36 -hole finish was necessary because 
Thursday’s opening round was postponed by • 
rain. 



outride the Mels’ locker in the depths of 
. Stadium, 

“Watch out, workingmen coming through," they 
shout, mostly serious. They bustle for their bucks. 

So do the vendors:, lugging trays up and down the 
narrow afaies- So do the people who serve in the 
restaurants and the press rooms. So do the clubhouse 
men, who pick up the dirty laundry the players dump ■ 
on the floor, who hope the players remember to write 
a check in case they go out cm strike on Friday. 

The owners? I don’t believe a word they say. If 
they're not making enough money, let them sell their 
teams to some other rich people. 

I hate the idea erf the Pittsburgh Pirates, the team 
erf Honus Wagner and Roberto Clemente, possibly 
being moved to some nouveau Sun Belt oasis, but 
there is money out there for baseball teams. That 
tells me something. 

The players? By accepting aB the money the own- 
ers were tossing around like drunks on a binge, the 
players have long since moved out of the category of 


organized labor. If they haven’t saved enough money 
from their six- and seven-digit incomes to get by for a 
month or three, that’s their problem. 

T HE FANS? I’m not sure I identify with all this 
boycott talk. It’s been freedom "of choice all 
along. The fans pay their money for their own 
entertainment. The athletes actually hear the boos 
when they strike out or give up a home run. they 
sense (he fans’ ambiguous feelings toward them. If 
the fans knew how much contempt most professional 
athletes have for them, they would be horrified. 

The players perform. I’m not sure how much else 
they owe the fans. Being a role model? That’s just 
stuff the clubs and the sponsors and the agents made 
up. to make more money from the fans. 

Hie owners are business people, and the players 
are aB freelance entertainers, all of them out to make 
a buck at our expense. The worst thing the owners do 
is mooch tax breaks and renovated stadiums and new 
roadways from municipalities. 


The fans' tax dollars helped buy sports cars for 
millionaire athletes, but the fans knew that before 
this contract ran out. 

What’s the point in making a protest before the 
Thursday night deadline? My advice is, go catch one 
more game in person or on the tube. Enjoy it while 
you can. It could be a long time. And if there’s no 
baseball game come Friday, “We will get by,” as the 
Grateful Dead chant “We will survive,” 

We could take up reading again, as bizarre as that 
may sound. 

For the last 17 tennis fans left in the world, the 
US. Open is coming in three weeks. And a note to 
Italian television: I want the Pad ua-Sampd oria soc- 
cer game on Channel 31 on Sept. 4 in case Alexi 
Lalas plays in the opener. 

It’s been a great baseball season, and maybe it will 
end with a great big asterisk. If so. we all have real 
lives. Don’t we? 1 don’t care about the owners or the 
players, not one bit. I only care about the people at 
the ball park who work hard for dollar bills. 



Belle and Thon las 
In a Steamy Race 
For Triple Crown 


John Franco, theMets’ relief ace, still 
found friends among the fans in New York, 
above, although many expressed anger that 
the major league's players are likely to strike 
on Friday. In Denver, Orel Hershfcer, left, 
did not allow a bat until the sixth inning as Los 
Angeles won its third straight before 70,372 
and cfinched the tide in the National League 
West in the event die season is brought to a 
halt 


G«y C Cnkcy/Rcuen 


sidelines Bagwell Ducks. Then Delivers 

TT c c ni I ' 


U.S. Soccer Player Jones 
Signed % Coventry C% 

LONDON (Renters) — Cov- 
entry Chy erf the English Pre- 
mier League has signed the U.S. 
World Cup player Cobi Jones, 
three weeks after failing to land 
a teammate, Alexi Lalas. 

Coventry still has to work out 
a transfear fee with the UJS. fed- 
eration, but the midfielder, 24, 
who flew back to the United 
Slates on Monday, has signed a 
12-mouth contract with an op- 
tion for another two years. 

He will join another U.S. 
teammate, Roy Wegeric, who 
played for Coventry last season. 

Quotable 

Linford Christie, talking to 
L'Equroe about recognition at 
home: As a winner, Tm from 
Great Britain. If Tm beaten. 
Pm an athlete who runs for 
Great Britain. When I lose, 
Sometimes Fm even, known as a 
: native erf Jamaica.’ ” 


The Associated Press 

Jeff Bagwell got mad, then be got 
even. 

His RB) single sparked a four-run 
third inning as the Astros beat the 
San Francisco Giants, 7-4, on Sun- 
day night in Houston. 

With the score tied at 2-2 in the 
third, San Francisco’s starter, Bill 
Swift, pitched Bagwell high arid in- 
side, forcing the National League’s 
RBI leader to dude. 

“I don’t mind pitchers throwing up 
and in, bat I was upset at that pitch,” 
said Bagwell, who singled home a run 
cm the next pitch. 

“When you throw balls at my face, 
that’s not good pitching,” he said. 

The Giants’ manager. Dusty Bak- 
er, who wanted Swift to back Bagwell 
off the plate; said: “That probably 
fired him up a Httle. That’s how most 
good hitters are. There’s a fine line 
between coming inside and coining 
too far inside.” 

Bagwell's single extended his bit- 
ting streak to a career-high 17 games. 
It is the longest hitting streak by a 


Houston player since Kevin Bass hit 
safely in 20 straight in 1986. 

Ken Caminiti drove in two runs in 
the third inning as the Astros won for 
the sixth straight time. The Giants 
have lost six in a row. 

Barry Bonds hit his 37th homer for 
the Giants. Matt Williams, who hit 
his major-league-leading 42d on Sal- 

NI ROUNDUP "" 

urday, went 0-for-4 and had his hit- 
ting streak ended at 16 games. 

Pirates 6, Cardinals 5: Jay Bell 
mounded an RBI single up the mid- 
dle in the ninth against a drawn-in St. 
Louis infield, his fifth hit of the game 
host Pittsburgh to salvage 
game of the three-game se- 


the West in the event of a strike. 

Hershiser got 14 of the first 16 outs 
on grounders. Mike Kingery broke 
np ms no-hit bid with a one-out triple 
in the sixth. 

Min earlier games, reported in 
some Monday editions : 

Expos 6, Pbafies 4: Montreal as- 
sureed itself of being in first place in 
the East if a strike starts as Ken HOI 
became the league's first 16-game 
winner and Moiscs Alou tripled, 
doubled and singled and drove in 
two runs in Philadelphia. 

Reds 3, Braves 2: Kevin Mitchell 
hit his 30th homer, one of three by 



itmg. 

to retain sole possession of first place 
in the NL Central. 

Martins 2, Mete <h Ryan Bowen, 
making his first start in nearly three 
months, allowed just two hits in 7fe 
innings and scored the game’s first 
run as Florida won in New York. 

Padres 5, Cubs 1: Tony Gwynn 
went 3-for-5 with a homer, raising his 
m aj or- 1 eague-I eading average to J92 
as San Diego won in Chicago. 


6, Rockies 2: Orel Her- 
id not allow a hit until the 
and Eric Karros and 
iguez hit consecutive 
homers in the eighth as Los Angeles 
won its third straight in Denver be- 
fore 70,372 and clinched the title in 


The Associated Press 

While the Chicago White Sox 
and Cleveland Indians contend 
for playoff spots — should 
there ever be playoffs — Albert 
Belle and Frank Thomas are 
chasing something that might 
be even more special. 

With only a few days left be- 
fore the probable start erf a 
players’ strike, the White Sox 
held a one-game lead over 
Cleveland in the AL Central. 
And the gap between Belle and 
Thomas for a possible Triple 
Crown was just as dose. 

Belle, in his first at-bat since 
serving a seven-game suspen- 
sion, hit a home run far over the 
Green Monster at Fenway Park 
on Sunday. He wound op going 
3-for-7 and driving in three runs 
as Cleveland beat the Red Sox, 
15-10, in 12 innings for a dou- 
blebead er split. 

Belle, who was ejected in the 
I2th inning for arguing a fair- 
or-foul call, is batting 360 with 
36 home runs and 101 RBIs. 
Asked about his return, he said: 
“I ain’t talking, I ain’t talking.' 

Thomas hit a two-run double 
as Chicago defeated California 
in 12 innings. He left the game 
with a bruised middle finger on 
his left hand, but was not ex- 
pected to miss any action. 

Thomas is hitting .362 with 
38 homers and 101 RBIs. He 
leads the league in batting aver- 
age and is tied with Ken Griffey 
Jr. for the homer lead; Kirby 
Puckett leads the AL with 104 
RBIs. 

Omar Vizquel drove in six 
runs, including a bases-loaded 
triple in the 12th, for (he Indi- 
ans. 

In the opener, Carlos Rodri- 
guez went 5-for-5 with three 
doubles as the Red Sox won, 4- 
1. 

Belle, who finished out his 
suspension in the first game, hit 
a two-run homer to left field in 
the first inning of the nightcap. 
He singled home another run in 
the second 

Lee Tinsley bad four hits and 
drove in three runs for Boston. 
Indians center fielder Kenny 
Lofton made the play of the 
day, an over-th e-shoulder catch 
on Tom Branansky’s drive with 
the bases loaded in the second 
game: 

White Sox 10, Angels 5: 
Mike LaValliere tied the score 
in the ninth with his first borne 
run in nearly two years and vis- 
iting Chicago went on to beat 
California. 

Joey Cora singled home the 
go-ahead run in the 12th; he 
singled borne the tie-breaking 
run Saturday as the White Sox 
won by 16-10 in 10 innings. 

Thomas reached 100 RBIs 
for the fourth straight year. He 
hurt his finger on a pickoff play 
in the sixth inning and left the 
game. 


LaValliere connected for a 
two-run shot with one out in the 
ninth off Russ Springer. He last 
homer was Aug. 22, 1992, for 
Pittsburgh. 

Chili Davis. Tim Salmon and 
Greg Myers homered for Cali- 
fornia. Davis became the fourth 
switch-hitter with 250 career 
home runs. 

Ozzie Guillen opened the 
12th with a triple off Joe Ma- 
gnate and capped the burst with 
an RBI single. 

Athletics 8, Rangers 3: Oak- 
land pulled to IK games of AL 
West-leading Texas by com- 
pleting a three-game sweep at 

AL ROUNDUP 

home, while the Rangers lost 
for the sixth time m eight 
games. 

Rickey Henderson homered 
on the first pitch in the first 

S extending his record of 
homers to 66. Troy Neel 
hit two home runs for the A’s 
and Scott Brosius added a 
three-run shot 
Kenny Rogers was tagged for 
five runs in the first inning. He 
gave up all four home runs. 

Ned drove in three runs and 
scored three. The game ai the 
Coliseum drew 44,501, the Ath- 
letics’ largest crowd of the sea- 
son. 

Mariners 10, Royals 6: Ken 
Griffey hit his 38th homer as 
Seattle rallied in Kansas City. 

Griffey homered with two on 
and Tino Martinez hit his 1 8th 
during a six-run rally in the sev- 
enth inning. 

Jay Buhner hit his 20th 
iiomer and drove in four runs as 
the Mariners won for the fifth 
time in six games. They stopped 
Kansas City’s 14-game winning 
streak Saturday night- 

Twins 7, Yankees 6: Kent 
Hfbek’s two-ouL, two-run single 
in the eighth gave Minnesota its 
victory over visiting New York. 

The Twins scored three times 
in the eighth, with Kirby Puck- 
ett hitting a sacrifice fly before 
Hrbefc singled off Steve Howe. 

Hrbek also had an RBI dou- 
ble. He is batting 545 and has 
driven in seven runs in four 
games since announcing Thurs- 
day that he will retire at the end 
of the year. 

Orioles 6, Brewers 3: Mike 
Mussina won his 16 th game and 
Baltimore won in Milwaukee 
after Brady Anderson hit a two- 
run double in the second in- 
ning, tying it at 2, then stole 
third and scored on Jeffrey 
Hammonds’ single. 

■ In an earlier game, reported 
in some Monday editions: 

Tigers 8, Blue Jays 7: Kirk 
Gibson hit a two-run homer on 
a 3-0 pitch with two outs in the 
eighth and Detroit won in To- 
ronto. 


Europeans Making Inroads on LPGA 


The Associated Press 

STRATTON MOUNTAIN, Vermont 
— American men are not the only ones 


women having latmcneo men own inva- 
sion on the LPG A tour. . 

Nick Faldo, Nick Price, BernardLanger 
and Seve Ballesteros have been joined by 
Una Davte. Khte 'Alfreteon mi to 
lone Neumann m the rush for U.S. tales 

and dollars. ... 

The success of the Europ^n^^f- 
United States encouraged the women, vte 
could see the Amatos «« ■ t ■ 

Me,.’' said Suzanne Strodwick of England, 
IaS*year*s US. LPGA rookie of the year 

^OfiffiaUS. LPGA tournaments this 

ffi aSffSE’Sy ST tog 

Swede, is 13th. Ten yeas 
Ifiot Of talent 



mu ukic » . , 

Slrudwick, 29. said economic problems 


in the last five years had forced' more 
European women across the Atlantic. 

A few years ago, there were 28 tourna- 
ments on the European tour- Dwindling 
sponsors dropped the number to II last 
year. The average Eurpp«n purse for 
women was about $150,000, with about $3 
tpiBion in total prize money. In contrast, 
the U.S. LPGA tour has 38 events with $22 
million up for grabs. - . 

“You have to finish in the top 30 every 
wedkjust to break even,” Strudwick said of 
the shortened European tour. 

While *hat would be astounding on the 
LPGA tour, it’s not nearly as difficult for a 
top golfer in Europe. 

’Hhe standards are not as high,” Strud- 
wick said. “Before I came here, I hadn't 
missed acut in ttoeeyeais. In Europe the cut 
is at 5 to 10 over par; here, it can be 1 or Z," 

A player can still make a good living in 
Europe, “but if yon want to p rove y oarseff 
on a world scale, you have to crane here," 
Smidwick said. "Americans still have the 
best fidd, and of course the money is 

tremendous.’' . , . 

But, Strodwick said, the U.S. tour could 
lose many of the Europeans if their tour 

revives. , „ . 

“They won’t need to come here, sne 
said. “Because the standards are so high 


here, why struggle over here when you can 
make good money at home. 

“It's also a lot easier to get a sponsor in 
Europe, and that in itself will stop a lot of 
girls" from coining to the United States. 

The U-S. LPGA tour already loses the 
top Europeans for weeks at a time because 
they miss borne or they fed the pressure to 
support the European tour, Strudwick said. 

She and Carmine Pierce of England 
were the rally ones playing at Stratton. 
Many of the others returned for the Scot- 
tish Open, or to prepare for this week’s 
British Opea Some might not be back for 
months. "Four weeks over here at a time is 
about as modi as they can takeaway from 
home,” Strudwick said. 

The LPGA star Betsy King sees an inter- 
esting situation developing. 

“The more their tow develops, the more 
it will take away from our tour,” she said. 
“1 don't know if that helps us.” 

Lopez said, “I think theyH stay even if 
they develop their tour.” 

Regardless, such players as Davies and 
Atfredsson could play is Europe and still 
meet the UiL LPGA requirement to play 
in 15 tournaments. 

“They have the best of all possible 
worlds,” King said. “They can play the 
best tournaments there and here. 


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Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 9, 1994 


ART BUCHWALD 


The Smoking Rat 


W ASHINGTON — We’ve 
heard from everyone in- 
volved in the tobacco industry 
except the white rats used in the 
scientific experiments. 

One rat, an involuntary chain 
smoker, told me that he was 
almost certain the companies 
had doctored their cigarettes in 
an effort to en- 



courage addic- 
tion. 

Between 
coughing and 
gasping for air 
he said: “The 
white rats 
knew it, but 
they fed us 
sugary water 
to shut us up. 

They also told 
us that if an,___. 
the networks we w 
breast implants.” 

“What was your particular 
role in the experiments?” 

“The scientists wanted me to 
uy out a new variety of tobacco 
with ammo nia as an additive.” 
“Did you like it?” 

“I went crazy for it. 1 couldn't 


“It's almost impossible with 
everything the companies are 
putting into their products. I 
am proud to have played my 
part in raising the intake of tar 
and other ingredients that make 
smoking such a popular pas- 
time." 

“Do you find taste an impor- 
tant factor in the experiments?" 
I asked. 

“Yes, I do. I’ve been smoking 
all my life and I know good 
tobacco from junk tobacco. 
Some of the stuff they give me 
makes me sick.” 


Buchwald 


squealed to 
Id be given 


“Do you believe that non- 
smokers are out to abolish 
smoking all together?” 

“It wouldn’t surprise me. We 
have a lot of white rats around 
here who wouldn't mind if 
smoking were banished in this 
lab. The worst are the born- 
again rats who used to smoke 
but are now working with artifi- 
cial sweeteners. They're always 
complaining. " 

“They might have something 
scream about,” I said. Td 


to 


get enough so I ran around in 
i. the leaf really had a 


circles, 
punch to it.” 

"Why the ammonia?" 

“It releases the nicotine that 
causes the craving.” 

□ 


“Did they give it to all the 
rats?” 

“Just the smokers. The non- 
smokers hid in the back of their 
cages and pretended they were 
dead.” 

“Can a white rat who smokes 
ever quit?" 


hate to be in the same cage as a 
rat who smoked. When it comes 
to smoking, do white rats have 
preferences for one type of ciga- 
rette over another?” 
“Definitely. Female rats pre- 
fer Virginia Slims and males 
like mentholated cigarettes. I 
am a Mari boro white rat be- 
cause I like horses.” 


□ 


22d in line for die Hirone 

The Associated Press 

LONDON — Columbus 
George Donald Taylor has tak- 
en his place in the line of suc- 
cession to the British throne. 
The 
enTav 
and 

mother is 21st in the line of 
succession; her son is 22d. 


The white rat told me that the 
main purpose of the cigarette 
lab was to prove that the gov- 
ernment was wrong about the 
dangers of smoking. “I’ve been 
dted many times by tobacco 
exectives to prove that tobacco 
is safer than spring water. They 
took me to Washington for the 
hearings so the congressmen 
could see how harmless tobacco 
really is.” 


Preparing to Manage 



By John Rockwell 

New York Tima Service 


G ENEVA — There are those who 
believe that Hugues Gall is step- 
ping into an impossible situation. As 

r i » • ... j j! - r .1 _■ 




the designated director of the Paris 
Opera — he formally lakes over next 
August — Gall will inherit a quagmire 
that has bogged down administrators 
and cultural bureaucrats for most of 
this century, if not before. 

Since the 19th century, the Opera 
has been dogged by a declining tradi- 
tion of composition and singing, a 


‘ ; 

: ■' ■*: • ■> -M: " 


predilection to place soda! display 
over artistic accomplishment, a lack of 



illy 

’Have you ever felt that peo- 
ple you work for might be play- 


ing around with the statistics?’ 
“The thought never crossed 
my mind. If it ever came to that 
I'd ask to be transferred to the 
school asbestos experiments.” 


clear governmental policy and laby- 
rinthine, self-serving union rules. 

Now, in addition, there is the gran- 
diose, high-tech Opera Bastille, the 
“people's opera” that opened in 1989 
in time for the 200th anniversary of 
the French Revolution. It may indeed 
be popular in terms of attendance, but 
it is neither inexpensive nor efficient 

So why, one might ask, is Gall so 
calm about his prospects? The answer 
may lie in his personality, which ap- 
pears generously endowed with self- 
confidence, and in his long familiarity 
with the job he is about to assume. 

Although he has been an opera offi- 
cial for 23 years, Gall was trained in 
the classic French mann er as an all- 
purpose administrator. Now 54, he 
worked in the ministries of Agricul- 
ture and Education before being as- 
signed to the Ministry of Culture in 
1969, specializing in opera. 

He moved to the Optra itself in 
1971, and learned his craft as Rolf 
Liebermann’s trusted deputy, moving 
to Geneva in 1980 when Liebennann 
quit Paris. His nam e has since repeat- 
ally surfaced whenever the Optra had 
one of its periodic crises. 

He is taking it over with a revised 
structure that puts him on top. Previ- 
ously the president of the administra- 
tive council, a kind of board of direc- 
tors, was the true boss. 

That president was the flamboyant 
Pierre Bergfc, the head of the Yves 
Saint Laurent fashion firm. Now 
Bergfc is gone and the role of president 
has Been reduced to an advisory func- 
tion, with the director making the fi- 
nal decisions. One sign of change is 
that Gall has already taken over 
BergA’s lavish ninth-floor office at the 
Optra Bastille with its plush appoint- 
ments and stunning view. 

Gall’s first task after his appoint- 



porated smoothly .into the repertory. 


One of his first acts was tojetuson a 
quasi-festival for the 1994-95 season 


Hugues Gall: “I tike rates. I play the game with the cards I am given.” 


men t was announced last Summer was 
to prepare a formal report on the 
company. This was theoretically for 
the edification of Jacques Toubon, the 
Gaullist minister of culture, but it is 
also a blueprint of Gall’s intentions. 

The flagship theater is the Bastille, 
which is being tinkered with to im- 



machinery. 

Palais Gamier, now dosed for an ex- 
tensive renovation until early 1996. 

Altogether this is a huge operation, 
with the equivalent of a $130 million 
■tmmii budget in 1993, $86 million of 
it in direct state subsidy. 

In 1993, the company presented 148 
performances at the Bastille and 147 
at the Gamier. Gall wants to raise 
those numbers to 200 and 165, respcc- 

»D.. .l., _r 


ed there annually. Gall wants the big 
popular ballets to be given routinely 
at the Bastille, and smalter-scale op- 
eras and ballets at the Gamier. 

In conversation. Gall dgfmes his 
successes as an opera administrator 
almost exclusively in ffnainnql and 
managerial terms. 

“What I am proud o/ here in Gene- 
va is that after 15 years I will have 
presented 122 different operas,” he 
said, “and for not one moment was 
the budget surpassed. And remember. 


of ^ new,; revived or borrowed koo- 
ert Wilsbnprodnctions that bad been 
• plaimed byJBerge. Gall, paying grudg- 
ing respect in his report to thar artis- 
tic .virtues, criticized Wilson s ^au- 
bcrfldte” and “Butterfly” as expensive 
and incffiaenL . , . 

“Maybc what 1 1 will do won i be as 
glamorous as Bob Wilson’s ‘Butter- 
fly,’ ” he said. “But I’m going to build 
something that will- stand.” 

Efforts to reduce the l,70&4nember 
work force and rationalize work rules 
have- aroused the opposition of the 
unions, which are also suspicious of 
the Gamier renovation asaplot to 
dispense with still more workers. 

This saxring in Paris was marked by 
.a series of formally announccdjnten- 
tions to strike, which in the French 
management-labor ballet are almost 
always followed by the cancellation or 
the performances in question. 

Four performances of a new pro- 
duction of “Tosca” were thus affect-. 
■ ed, inrinriing one with PI4ado Do- 
mingo that was to have bear telecast 
live- to riant screens in Paris, and 40 
other French dries. Three perfor- 
mances of the ballet “La Bayadfcre 
were also" canceled, with an overall 
'loss o£S700,0G0.in ticket revenues. 

Although the unions attempted to 
drawrhim into the conflict. Gall has 
kqrt his distance. He has been com- 
muting toParis twodays awecJc since 
iastseason, nirri all the interim admin- 
istrators are his choices, yet be has 


hdd-lmdsdf above the fray. 

. In the negotiations that led to bis 

* « ^ 7~r .j. 


10 years ago the budget was twice 
-.I like rules. I play the 


tively. “For that land of money, we 
lould ‘ 


should have not only quality but also 
quantity,” he said. 

Since the opening of the Bastille, 
the Gamier has been the home of the 
ballet, with one smaller opera present- 


what it is now. 
game with the cards I am 

Needless to say, that self-assess- 
ment undervalues Gall’s artistic ac- 
complishments: his fresh eye for pro- 
ductions that are both, lively yet 
respectful of the work; a balanced yet 
lively choice of repertory, and an ear 
for talent that could be nurtured. 

To save money and meet a reason- 
able budget in Paris, Gall has targeted 
exotic, not easily repeatable operas 
and productions that can’t be inoor- 


: appointment, Gall made it dear that 
he wanted unequivocal authority. 
That is a potential source erf conflict 
not only -with Patrick Dupond, the 
ballet director, but especially with; 
Myung-Whnn Cht mg , Although nom- 
inally justmusic director, Qmng was 
given a lavish: hew contract by BergA 
and has —wniaH many of the func- 
tions of artistic director. 

' ! “Chung has raised the level of the' 
orchestra to ; perhaps the best in 
France,” Gail oon ccded. “They are 
pibud.to be good, now, and that’s an 
achtenpoent I hope I can find a mo- 
dus viveridi with mm. But I want to be 
the boss. Not just because of my ego, 
Wbebriise 1 know from my business 
that every decision baa conset- 
quences.” • • 


people 


'UmSmg'haBit 

And a Miss in Japan 


Disney's “Lion King" is ah# 
with Japanese movie audiences, 
but not with all Japanese. A 
leading Japanese cartoonist. 
Maddro Satonaka, has drafted 
a letterof complaint over paral- / 
Ids between the summer block- f 
buster andaJapan^T^serite 
from the 1960s called Kimba. 
the White Lion That series, 
shown in English m theUroied „ 
States beginning in 1966, was ’ , 
inspired by a comic book called ; r \- 
“Tb« Jungle Emperor by the 
late Osamu Tezuka. About 50 
Japanese cartoonists and 150 
others in related fic Ids haw 
signed a letter to be sent to 
Disney later this week, express- 
ing regret that Tezuka was not .. 
given proper recognition. Dis- 
ney has declined to com me n t . 

□ 


Michael Jackson, in Buda- 
pest to film a video for his latest 
album, has come to the rescue 
of a 2 -year-old Hungarian boy 
who needs a liver transplant. 
Jackson has told a Budapest 
hospital that he will buy the 
hospital a respirator and help 
pay for a transplant for the boy, 
the hospital’s director, Tama* 
Dizseri, said Monday. 

. . Q . 

Rocker Billy Idol is recover- 
ing from a drug overdose in Los 
Angeles after being released 
from the hospital, his pubbcisJL 
said. “My impression is that 
he’s feeling a lot of remorse and 


«h«me about the whole thing,” 
ikeswoman said. She 


the -r 

added that she did not know 
what he had been taking. 

□ 

Princess Diana is on Mar- 
tha’s Vineyard, but where is a 
mystery. “I understand she is 
on-island, but there’s no further 
information," said a Tisbury 
policeman. Meanwhile, Diana’s 
husband, Prince Chutes, is 


. i-s 
p_ : ; 

>*' 


V.* 


a few days cruising 
Crete. 


Aegean Sea off 


UVTERNATIOrVAL 

CLASSIFIED 

Appear* on Page 13 


WEATHER 


CROSSWORD 


Europe 


Forecast for Wednesday through Friday, as provided by Accu-Weather. Asia 


ACROSS 


Algaiva 

AnWMn 


CoptoWagan 
Con M So 
Dufafei 


Today 
High Low 
OF OF 
24/75 IB/81 
am 17/K 
2602 13/56 
33/91 64/76 

32 m am 
35* am 
am is* 
27* IB* 
30* 21/70 
22 m 13/59 
2904 21/70 
20* 12/63 
17/62 12* 


Fmittun 


nun 


HataMU 19* 

IMiU 31* 

LasPMtnu 27* 
22/71 

nun 


Murtch 


29/77 
26/79 
32* 
0*1 a 21/70 

Palma 30* 

Port* 30* 

Prague 20/79 

16/81 

Roma 36* 

Si Maiding 23/73 
Sm*h<*7T 19* 

BtmfaQutg 29* 

TaBnn 19* 

Vtoaea 31* 

26/79 
25/77 
Zurich 29* 


13* 

16* 

13* 

20* 

21/70 

16/91 

15* 

13* 

21/70 

16/61 

16* 

20* 

13* 

23/73 

19* 

15 * 

9M8 

21/70 

13* 

12 * 

17* 

13* 

22/71 


13* 

17/62 


Tomorrow 
W High l* W 
OF OF 

■ 25/77 10* «h 

• 23/73 17*2 (h 
pa 31* 16*1 ■ 

■ 36* 26/77 • 

■ 29* 21/71 I 
pC 37* 23/73 pc 
pa 27 * 17 * ah 
a 26/62 IB* r 

I 34* am pc 
pc 23/73 1BA>1 ah 

• 29* 23/73 PC 
DC 21/70 12/63 lh 

• II* 13* c 
S 36/97 21/70 pa 
pc 27* 16* lh 

• a 04 18/61 I 
pc 19* 18* pc 

■ 32* 22 m ■ 

■ 27* am ■ 
pa 23/73 17/62 I 

• 24/76 13* Oft 

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pc 26/79 18/BI (h 
pc 20* 17* I 

» 30* 20* pc 
tol 23/73 1407 pc 

■ 26* 23/73 l 

■ 29* 1407 r 

pc 29* 16* r 
po 14/67 9/48 pc 

• 36107 23/73 ■ 
PC 23/73 13* pc 
pc 19* 13* C 
t 32* 1601 r 
pc IB* 1407 pc 
pc 33/01 23/73 pc 
pe 26* 18* C 
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HI 

ElM 



■48s w-O* BSJUnaaaaato«» ^73 UnMoaorwtoy R 53 Haa »7 

^Ccto E23HO. ^ 


Ted Uf 
High Low 
C/P C/F 


w High 


sa 


•WOrtii 

SaaU 

Shanghai 

SnMHN 

Ta/pol 

Tokyo 


32* 23/73 
29* 21/70 
31* 26/70 
29* 24/75 
-M* 27* 
34* 23* 
30* 27* 

32* zun 

33/01 26/77 
33/01 27* 


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Low W 
c/F OF 
25/77 pe 
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26/70 po 
24 * ah 
27 * pc 
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25/77 pc 
27 * pc 


*1 33/91 

P0 31* 

1 31* 

30* 
I 84* 
pc 32* 
f 3801 
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sh 8301 
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Africa 


North America 

Hoavy thunderpionna will 
Book lh® Florida Poulniula 
on occasion tolar lhto wash. 
The Rockies will remain 
quite warm, but triers win be 
scattered thunderstorms. 
The East will hove mainly 
dry weather later this week 
with a gradual Increege In 
wBmnh and humktoy. 


Europe 

A slow-moving storm will 
bring widespread rains to 
western Europe later this 
week London end Paris wll 
have rain and cooler weather 
Wednesday and Thursday. 
Rome through Athena will 
sunny, very warn weather 
Bite week. Cooling thunder- 
storms will reach Geneva 
and Berftn Thursday. 


Asia 

The remnants of Typhoon 
Doug wU skin the east coast 
of China Wednesday, then 
head toward southwestern 
Korea Thursday and Friday. 
Tokyo will continue uninuol- 

3 1 dry and warm through Frt- 
ay. Manila wRI have Mat- 
tered rains thto weak while 


klglaia 
Cape Tom 

CaMbtenca 


TMa 


32 * 24/79 a 32 * 24/75 pc 
14/57 6/46 * 1601 B«a pa 

27 * 17 * a 28/70 19 * pa 
19 * 11 * 1 22/71 12 * pc 
27 * 23/73 ah 29 * 24/75 pa 
21/70 10 * pc 22/71 1203 pc 
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1 Buddy 
s Balance sheet 
listing 

10 Helper: Abbr. 
14 New Rochelle 
college 
is They fly In 

formation 

is Wife of — 
(Chaucer 
pilgrim] 
it Ordnance 
is Fill with glee 
is Out of the 
weather 


M Battle In which 
Lee defeated 
Pope 


ss Sunday talk: 
Abbr. 

M Activity 


as Fountain treat, 

for short 


i Battle In which 
Bragg defeated 
Rosecrans 


si Singer Coolldge 
eta). 

aa Comer • 


Mi 11th-century . 
date- . 

ae Heaven on earth 

37 Change 

9t Earthed. 

40 Marry 

41 Fkia poker 
holdings 

49 Hawks 

4» Bede In which 
Grant defeated 
Bragg 

40 John WDkea ‘ 
Booth, e.g. 

soTempesch. . 


Solution to Patxie at August 8 


North America 


Anctanga 


Hong Kong la warm with a 
imi 


fow ffiundenmnns. 


Middle East 


Latin America 


Oceania 


Auckland 

Sptwy 


13 * 409 til 13 * 7 M 4 pa 

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W Mgh Low 


W 

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32* 23/73 a 
34* 21/70 a 
32* 17* a 
2904 19* s 
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Cma 28* 1B04 pc 26* 1604 pc 

Lkra 1101 15* pc 1604 15* pc 

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nudejarafco 25/77 17*2 pc 25/77 19* pc 

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Houston 


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Logan ct rwrumry. pc -partly dourly, c-ctoudy. oh-ahoraa. UtondarUomw. mmUt. U-anow toariea, 
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34* 23/73 
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32* 25/77 
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po 23/73 13* pc 
a 31* 21/70 pc 
pe 29UB4 1501 a 
pe 25/79 17* C 
pc 34* 1601 pa 
pc 24/75 16* e 
pc 31* 24/75 po 
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Of Kama on a 
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U Battle In which 
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Burnside 
87 R e t rea d, e.g. 

M Go eking (with) 
■i Wrangler's pal 
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ea Some am heroic 
sj Mideast land 
04 Promontory 
Si Kilmer opus 
Oi NHIo's nothing 


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* I *« ujCOM • • •• 

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M Dumbarton — 

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90 Rick's beloved 
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•• narice' ' 



O New York rones Edited ty WillShonz. 


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COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER 


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8*196 

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- O 40 M 1 U-- 

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800-1111 

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000-117 

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0800 - 890-110 

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001 - 801-10 

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0039-111 


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009 -U 

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235-2872 

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0042000101 

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430-430 

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0080-102884 

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15 W 0-11 

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0019 - 991 - 1111 . 

UJL 

050 O«SMWll 

EUROPE 

Ukraine* 

8 * 100-11 

Armenia** 

&B. 14 U 1 

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Austria*"* 

022 - 903-011 

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‘flOO-OOJ 

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00 - 1800-0010 

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0042040101 

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426-801 

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8001-0010 

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0800 - 01 J-T 7 - 

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9800 - 100-10 

SaucKAmhh 

I-SOO-IO 

France 

190-0011 

■Tttrioey*. . 

00800-12277 


000^010 


0CU-0312 


980 - 11-0010 


Ilf 


119 


190 


190 


165 


123 


95-SOO-*32-t2-40 


174 

10!? 

191 


156 


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«MU1-U0 


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moo-ar’-awi 




l-«KWr2-»fl 


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kvfcmd*s 


opA-soo-oim : Age«t»r 


99WMI ■ BeMkL-to - 


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14 XXMT 3 i 2881 

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001 - 800 - 872-2881 

•AKto. Nevis 

. 14 WW 2-2881 

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510-0200 

Gabon* - 

OOarOOl 

Gambia* 

00111 

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0800-10 


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14004*0400 U/?lh-ia- 


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797-797 


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