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INTERNATIONAL 



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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


■#* 


Paris, Wednesday, August 10, 1994 


No. 34,663 



CRIME BUSTERS 


InEnghmd, Video CoponPatrol In Russia, a Show About Force 


By Steve Coll 

Washington Post Service 

KING'S LYNN, England Inside the wi 
pnek police headquarters of this placid Middle 
land market town. Sergeant Peter Thompson flips on 
his video recorder to demonstrate a hiah~tecimology 
enme-fightmg system that is the stuff of paranoid 
saen« fiction — and, it appears, a model for Brit- 
ain's future. 

On Sergeant Thompson's black-and-white moni- 
tor, alone woman walks nervously in the town center 
just before m i dn i g ht. Two teenagers in jackets 

*id Mohawk haircuts staSTh^One of thfteens 
shatters a shop window with his boot, snaps the aerial 
off a car, turns over a garbage can, pulls a piece of 
fried chicken from the refuse and cboxnps on it as die 
woman lodes on in alarm 
“That’s the quality of yob we’ve got in this town!” 
Sergeant Thompson cackled in djsgnst as h e watched,, 
using the En g l ish term for a fang 
But fear not. Suddenly, two policemen rush from 
(Hit of camera range, intercept the ruffians, wrestle 
the troublemaker under control and assure the wom- 
an she can gp on her way. 


TJiat videotaped arrest is but one of hundreds By Michael Specter 

made since 1992 with the aid of a video surveillance New York Times Smc* 

swtem that allows die King's Lynn police to peer LYUBERTSY, Russia — The dav started earlv 
with cameras mto the nooks and crannies of their with riot troops in black masks storming a bank and 

freeing six hostages. Soon after, paratroops dropped 
into a blazing house to capture three terrorists. 

Then men in combat gear ran a gauntlet — each 
carrying a moneybag in one hand and an automatic 
weapon in the other. Land Rovers dodged grenades. 
Sharpshooters fired from speeding cars at bank rob- 
bers. And all the while a popular band played blues in 
the background. 


• — — ■ - uu u wi niiiiiva vji 

town's public spaces, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 
52 weeks a year. 


Besides generating on-the-spot arrests, such perva- 
sive video surveillance has slashed property crane in 
the town center, saving hundreds of tho us ands of 
dollars in insurance losses. 

The Klim’s Lynn system is the most advanced 
example of a trend sweeping Britain. Rattled by 
rising street crime and unrestrained by a written 
constitution or an enshrined right to privacy, at least 
300 towns and counties around the country have 
installed or are planning pervasive video surveillance 
of public spaces to catch and deter c riminal*, accord- 
ing to Photo-Scan Ltd., a leading installer. 

The market for such systems in Britain has quadru- 
pled since 1989 to more than $200 million a year, 
according to the British Security Industry Associa- 
tion. 

The Home Office, which oversees Britain's police. 

See CAMERAS, Page 5 


Those ugly events, and many more like them, were 
part of “Kriminal Show 94,” the first public demon- 
stration of the increasing might of Russia's private 
security forces. 

Sponsored by nearly a dozen major b anks the 
competition was held in the woods of this city near 
Moscow, which has become famous for spawning one 
of the worid’s most a ggr essive Mafia gang*, as the 
R us s ian s call them. Crowded with spectators who 
came with their own bodyguards, “•K riminal Show 
94” was as much a sign of the times in Russia as 
Snickers bars, casinos or BMWs. 


No business of any kind that has large amounts of 
cash lying around can afford to operate without full, 
visible and heavily armed protectors in most major 
cities. Until recently, the majority of camouflage-clad 
security guards were hardly a match for the criminals. 
But if the sponsors of “Knminal Show 94” have their 
way, that will change. 

“With the Yeltsin anti-crime decree, all organiza- 
tions that try to slop criminals have increased their 
vigilance," said Valeri A. Shishkin, a senior official at 
one of Moscow's many new private security compa- 
nies. Mr. Shishkin served as chief “umpire" for the 
competition. 

“Normal people can't live quietly anymore,” he 
said, standing before the prizes for the best iMm<, an 
array of high-technology weapons. “We want to show 
that the government is not the onlv group that 
help protect R ussian citizens.” 

Private companies have started to compete with 
the police for many reasons: The Russian police are 
often poorly trained and are notoriously underpaid. 
They have provided little challenge to the mob. 

But this is dangerous new ground for Russia. In 

See BUSTERS, Page 5 


Syrians Hope 
To Sign Deal 
With Israel by 
End of Year 


New York rimes Service 

SHANNON, Ireland — American dip- 
lomats said Tuesday that President Hafez 
Assad of Syria still hoped to sign a peace 
agreement with Israel by the end of the 
year, a goal that has also been set by 
President Bill CEnton. ' - . - 

A senior administration official travel- 
ing with Secretary of State Warren M. 
Christopher said Mr. Assad had told the 
secretary that he stiH wanted to meet the 
objective he announced in January of 
achieving peace with Israel this year — a 
goal (hat many Middle East experts 
•^thought had slipped because of the slow 
pace of the peace tails. ”, w ' 

In his most detailed cotranentsyet about 
the Syrian-fsraeli tafia+ Mr. CSrfisibpher 
spoke of slow but steady progress .that was 
hard to describe in detiul Because the talks 
involved so many intricate, interlocking 
issues. 

in a news conference aboard his plane 
en route from Israel to w refueling stop in 
Ireland. Mr. Christopher added that the 
two sides “were not utterly self-absorbed.” 

“They were thinking about what the 
needs of the other party were,” be said. 

From Mr. Christ cipher’s remarks, it be- 
came clear that the early stages of the 
indirect peace talks were over, and that 
Israel and Syria had begun probing each 
other to determine what the other’s bottom 
line was — which issues were most impor- 
tant to the other side, and on which issues 
the other side might be most willing to 
compromise. 

Mr. Christopher and his aides indicated 
that the two sides had stopped playing a 
osychologica] game in which each dug in 
bid insisted the other make the first con- 
cession. 

Mr. Christopher, who was in Damascus 
and Jerusalem three weeks ago, said: “I 
felt my last trip had removed some of the 
major psychological barriers. There was 
less resting between the parties and more 
down-to-earth discussion. 

“I found in this conversation there was a 
very conscientious searching on both sides 
as to the needs of the other parties.” 

American officials have often said the 

See SYRIA, Page 5 



m b» MjihB lle AuNUlnl Piw 

FOREST OF ASHES — Residents of California's Garden Valley and Kelsey areas, near PlacerviQe in the Sierra Nevada foothills, surveying fire damage. 


Economic News Is Good, but Not Necessarily for Clinton 


By Richard Morin 

Washirgtcm Peat Service 

WASHINGTON — A booming econo- 
my has proved to be a political bust for 
President Bill Clinton, whose popularity 
continues to founder despite continued 
good economic news, according to the lat- 
est Washington Post/ ABC News polL 
Mr. CHmon’s overall job approval rat- 
ing stood at 47 percent in the latest survey, 
down from 56 percent just four months 


ago. And fewer than half of those inter- 
viewed said they approved of the job that 
Mr. Clinton has done handling the econo- 
my, a rating that has remained largely 
unchanged over the last 10 months despite 
good news on the deficit, inflation, jobs 
and unemployment 

That is not the only bad news in the 
survey for the administration. Fewer than 
four in 10 Americans approve of Mr. Clin- 
ton's handling of foreign affairs, and just 


half expect Mr. Clinton and Congress to 
make significant improvements in the na- 
tion’s health-care system. 

Even the good news is not that good. 
Most Americans think Whitewater is not 
an important issue. But nearly half of those 
surveyed think the president did some- 
thing wrong in connection with 
Whitewater, even if many are not sure 
exactly what, and a majority suspect that 
some of his senior staffers erred. 

With so many things appearing to be 


ig wrong, it is understandable that Mr. 
iton and his supporters are dismayed 
that be does not get more credit for one 
thing that is going right: the economy. 

“It is truly staggering the mismatch be- 
tween the public perceptions of the gov- 
ernment and the administration’s handling 
of the economy and the objective news on 
the economy,” said Thomas E Mann, di- 
rector of governmental studies at the 

See CLINTON, Page 5 


U.S. Signals 
Possible End 
To Trade Ban 
On Belgrade 

Christopher Sees Move 
To Close Bosnia Border 
As ‘Partially Effective 9 

By Steven Greenhouse 

New York Times Service 

SHANNON, Ireland — Secretary of 
State WaiTen M. Christopher said Tuesday 
that he would consider earing the trade 
embargo against Serbia if its five-day-old 
decision to cut off trade with Bosnia's 
Serbs proves effective. 

Praising Belgrade’s announcement that 
it was closing ns border as a way of pres- 
suring the Bosnian Serbs to accept a peace 
plan, Mr. Christopher told reporters that 
Serbia's move “has been at least partially 
effective.” 

But he said that more time would be 
needed to determine whether Serbia was 
strictly enforcing the announcement that 
President Slobodon Milosevic made last 
Thursday to close Serbia's border with 
Bosnia, except for food and medicine. 

In recent months, the United States has 
been far more resistant than the European 
powers and Russia to the idea of easing the 
trade sanctions against Serbia. At the same 
time, the White House, prodded by Con- 
gress, has hinted it would push to lift the 
arms embargo that is squeezing Bosnia's 
Muslims. 

The Bosnian Serbs have rejected the 
peace plan, and their leader, Radovan 
Karadzic, has vowed to fight on, even 
though Serbia has turned back hundreds of 
trucks seeking to cross into Bosnia. 

Talking to reporters aboard his plane en 
route from Israel to a refueling stop in 
Ireland. Mr. Christopher said, “If there is a 
substantial period of enforcement of the 
intention that was expressed, if the border 
was effectively closed and if the Bosnian 
Serbs seem to be deprived of important aid 
in war-making materials, there clearly 
would be a case for an easing of the sanc- 
tions.” 

Mr. Christopher added “I’ll not be one 
of the first to advocate that. I'd want to see 
a lot of solid evidence.” 

Generous logistic support from Serbia, 
including weapons, has been an important 
factor behind the Bosnian Serbs* ability to 
capture 72 percent of Bosnia. 

The secretary of state sounded like other 
Western officials who fear that the latest 
promise to dose the border could prove a 
hollow public relations gesture. 

“It will take some time to assess fully 
whether the closure of the border is effec- 
tive,” Mr. Christopher said. “It's a long 
border with a number of crossing points. 
All 1 can say is ihere are some encouraging 
early indications. But we will be very cau- 
tious before we express our final evalua- 
tion.” 

Eager to have the embargo lifted Mr. 
Milosevic ordered the border closure to 
signal to the United States and other major 
powers that Serbia wants peace and backs 
their efforts to pressure the Bosnian Serbs 
to accept the peace plan. Under the plan, 
formulated by the major powers, the Bos- 
nian Serbs would receive 49 percent of 
Bosnia, while the Muslim-Croatian alli- 
ance would get 51 percent. 

In July, Mr. Christopher and the foreign 
ministers of Britain. France, Germany and 
Russia threatened to move to tighten the 
embargo on Serbia within two weeks if it 
did not support the peace plan. 

Daniel Williams of The Washington Post 
reported earlier from Washington: 

Under a measure being worked out with 

See BOSNIA, Page 5 


France Widens Clampdown Against Algerian Militants 


Renters 

PARIS — France banned five Islamist 
publications on Tuesday and detained 36 
more people after a third nigh* of police 
roadblocks in Paris in a widening clamp- 
down on Algerian Muslim fundamental- 
ists. ...... 

An Interior Ministry order published in 
the Official Journal on Tuesday outlawed 
five foreign periodicals accused of contain- 
ing incitement to terrorism a g a ins t France. 

The crackdown was set off by the failing 
of five French officials by Istonuc greml- 
ins in Algiers last week, which led the 
government to intern without tnal 17 sus- 
pected Algerian fundamentalists. 


The military wing of the Islamic Salva- 
tion Front, outlawed in Algeria, has threat- 
ened to retaliate unless France frees the 
detainees. 

Citing “urgent grounds in the current 
context", the order signed by Interior Min- 
ister Charles Pasqua said the five periodi- 
cals, published in French or Arabic, were 
barred from distribution, circulation and 
sale in France. 

“Their distribution could endanger pub- 
lic order because of their violently anti- 
Western and anti-French tone and the 
calls for terrorism which they contain,” it 
said. 

The papas were identified as A1 Ansar, 


published in Warsaw by “supporters of 
Jihad or holy war in Algeria and else- 
where,” A1 Ribat, A1 Jihad, A1 Fatah al 
Moubine and Front Islantiste du Salut 

The Paris police said 36 people were 
detained during a third successive night of 
Spot checks on vehicles and pedestrians in 
railway stations, airports and key intersec- 
tions in the capital 

The latest arrests took to 109 the num- 
ber of people held for possible prosecution 
after being picked up on the streets since 
Saturday night. 

Altogether, 2,777 people and 1 ,434 vehi- 
cles were checked on Monday night Sever- 


al of those detained were foreigners held 
because of irregularities in their papers. 

On Monday, an Algerian-born science 
student was placed under investigation 
and remanded in custody after being ar- 
rested collecting an arms cache from a 
locker at a suburban Paris supermarket. 

The police said he was wanted in con- 
nection with a post office hold-up in the 
Rouen area last month. There was no sug- 
gestion that the incident was politically 
motivated. 

More than 4,000 Algerians have been 
killed in worsening civil strife since the 

See FRANCE, Page 5 


Kiosk 


Craxi Will Appeal to European Court 


PARIS (Reuters) — The disgraced 
former Italian prime minister Bettino 
Craxi, sentenced to 8V2 years in prison 
for fraud last month, vowed in a letter 
published on Tuesday to appeal to the 
European Court of Human Rights. 

Mr. Craxi. who has refused to return 
to Italy and is believed to be living at his 
vacation home in Tunisia, wrote to the 
French newspaper Le Monde. In the 
letter, he asserted that he had been 
convicted of offenses going back 14 


years that had been amnestied and were 
covered by the statute of limitations. 

“In no way do 1 intend to give up. I 
am preparing now to denounce my ac- 
cusers and my judges for grave viola- 
tions of the law which they committed 
deliberately and to go to' (he Italian 
appeal court and the European Court in 
Strasbourg," he wrote. 

Related Article ; Page 5 


Book Review 


Page 8. 



Cost of Secretly Funded Spy Site Leaves Senators Publicly Dismayed 


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...W0CFA Senegal.. -.960 C FA i 

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1 S^Tu3»iSuAM iUEur.JSt.t0 


By Tun Weiner 

New York Tima Soviet 

WASHINGTON — Senior members of the Serrate 
intelligence committee say they were shocked to find 
that a huge new spy satellite headquarters under 
construction outside Washington would cost $350 
mfllKHL They say the Pentagon and central Intelli- 
gence Agency b«d concealed the full expense of the 
project from them. 

“You’ve got to see it to believe it,” said Senator 
John Warner of Virginia, the ranking Republican on 
the committee. “I was absolutely astonished at the 
magni tude and the proportions of tins structure. 

The protect in question is a 1-miHion-square-foot 
complex near Chantilly, Virginia, close lo Dufies In- 
ternational Airport, being built to house 
contractors ana government workers employed by the 


National Reconnaissance Office, the nation’s most 
secret intelligence agency. 

[President Bill Clinton ordered Tuesday a full inves- 
tigation into the construction of a secret $310 million 
spy complex in Virginia and directed that the project 
be declassified, Reuters reported from Washington. 

[Mr. Clinton ordered tie director of Central Intelli- 
gence, R- James Woolsey, and the deputy defense 
secretary, John Deutch, to determine why Congress was 
not fully informed of the scope and cost of the complex 
being constructed in nearby Chantilly. Virginia.] 

The existence of the National Reconnaissance Of- 
fice was a state secret until late 1992, and almost 
nothing is known about it, other than its mission of 
building the nation’s spry satellites. Us annual budget, 
secretly appropriated, buried within the Pentagon's 
accounts in the so-called “black budget** and never 
publicly disclosed, has been estimated at $6 billion, or 


about three times the budget of the entire Slate De- 
partment 

It appears that the new complex was buried so 
deeply and concealed so successfully that the ranking 
members of the Senate intelligence committee were, in 
their words, “shocked and dismayed to learn” its real 
cost. They now say that the true sum was “never 
effectively disclosed to our committee.” 

Martin C. Faga, director of the National Recon- 
naissance Office from September 1989 to March 1993, 
said: “It was a stealthy course, of course — purpose- 
fully so. But that was a reason why it was discussed in 
detail with the intelligence committee.” Almost all of 
the briefings given to the Senate and House intelli- 


gence committees take place in secret. 

“I don't think there's any doubt the 
knew the facility was being built." Mr. Faga said in an 
interview. “We briefed them in '90. *91, "92. But that 


committee 


doesn't mean the committee understood what it was 
going to cost These are complex projects. It's perfect- 
ly plausible that folks were looking at pieces of the 
budget, not looking at other pieces, not seeing that 
there's an aggregate cost there. 1 can easily imagine 
that they did not recognize what was going on." 

The handful of private analysis who try to track the 
National Reconnaissance Office and its satellites ex- 
pressed astonishment at the committee's outcry. 

“There’s a third of a billion-dollar puzale palace out 
there in Virginia and nobody noticed? said John 
Pike, director of space policy at the Federation of 
American Scientists. “What we have here is a failure tc 
communicate.” 

The National Reconnaissance Office complex was 
begun in 1990 and is scheduled to be completed in 
1996. 



Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10, 1994 , 


Burundi’s Capital 
Shut for Second Day 

15 Die in Clashes as Envoys 
Fear a Repeat of Rwanda 


Reuters 

BUJUMBURA, Burundi — 
Strikes and clashes shut down 
Burundi's capital, Bujumbura, 
for a second day Tuesday, and 
authorities stepped up security 
as diplomats feared the country 
may follow neighbouring 
Rwanda down the path to con- 
flict. 

At least IS people have been 
killed in Burundi in two days of 
clashes involving, youths of the 
minority Tutsi tribe. 

Aid officials warned that 
their operations to help refu- 
gees in southwest Rwanda and 
eastern Zaire might be affected 
unless the security situation im- 
proved. 

A strike called by opposition 
groups and clashes by Tutsi 
protesting the arrest of their 
leaders brought Bujumbura to a 
complete halt, witnesses said. 

The government stepped up 
security, deploying hundreds of 
soldiers and policemen in the 
city center. Youths set up barri- 
cades with burning tires on 
roads downtown. 

The unrest was set off by the 
arrest of the opposition politi- 
cian Mathias Hltimana, leader 
of the Tutsi-led Party for the 
Reconciliation of the People. 

Witnesses said scores of peo- 
ple were wounded in the clashes 
that began Sunday and contin- 
ued the next day. They counted 
15 people killed. 

Bujumbura was calm Tues- 
day but markets, Hanks and 
shops were dosed. 

Burundi has the same ethnic 
mix as Rwanda: majority Hutu, 
minority Tutsi. 

Burundi’s Tutsi leadership 
was gradually yidding power to 
the Hutu over the last few years 
but renegade Tutsi soldiers 
murdered the country’s first 
Hutu president, Melchior Nda- 
daye, last October. 

His successor, Cyprien Nlar- 
yamira, also a Hutu, was killed 
m a plane crash with the Rwan- 
dan military strongman Juv6nal 
Habyarimana, in the Rwandan 
capital, Kigali, on April 6. 

■ New Violence Possible 

Barry James of the Interna- 
tional Herald Tribune reported 
earlier from Paris: 

Human-rights monitors and 
aid workers fear Burundi could 
also dissolve into violence, par- 
ticularly if the withdrawal of 
French troops from the security 
zone they have established in 
southwestern Rwanda is fol- 
lowed by a flight of Hutu refu- 
gees across the border into Bu- 
rundi. 

After assassinating Mr. Nda- 
daye, Tutsi troops carried out a 
campaign of repression against 
Hutu civilians, according to a 
recent report by a commission 
of inquiry set up by Human 

CBS Newsman 
Gets Cholera 

Reuters 

NEW YORK — A CBS 
newsman who helped save a 
Rwandan boy stricken with 
cholera caught the disease from 
him and had to be treated in a 
hospital, the network said. 

CBS News said its medical 
correspondent. Dr. Bob Araot, 
got the disease several days af- 
ter rescuing a 7-year-old boy 
outside Coma, Zaire, in late 
July. The boy had been left for 
dead. 

Dr. Araot said he contracted 
the disease by picking the youth 
up and taking him to a hospital, 
where he administered rehydra- 
tion therapy. The boy was re- 
leased after several days. 


UNIVERSITY DEGREE 

BACHELOR'S * MASTER'S * DOCTORATE 
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fine (3103071-6056 

F» a *nd iMafed rearne tori 

SHEE EVALUATION 

Pacific Western U n we n flyl 

2875 S. King Street Honolulu, Hi 9SE&6 



Rights/Watch Africa and sev- 
eral other human-rights moni- 
tors. 

“The array and police used 
excessive and unccessaiy force, 
including heavy machine guns 
of 14.5-mil imeter and 20-nhli- 
meter canons, armored vehicles 
and helicopters against a civil- 
ian population that was usually 
trying only to flee or to protect 
itself," the report said. 

About 50,000 people were 
killed, either by the army or in 
ethnic massacres and reprisals. 

The commission of inquiry 
discovered that much of Burun- 
di had been turned into a waste- 
land, abandoned by the popula- 
tion and guarded by heavily 
armed troops. Towns were de- 
stroyed and pillaged. Forests 
were burned to smoke out refu- 
gees. Schools, prisons and other 
communal buildings had been 
used to carry out mass execu- 
tions and massacres. 

The co mmi ssion said the 
army had recruited dviHans, in- 
cluding high school students, to 
take part in the killing and pil- 
laging. As in Rwanda, “rumor 
and myth were used to incite 
people to kill or justify their 

trifling s." 

Since the assassination, the 
commission added, “no effec- 
tive investigations or prosecu- 
tions have been undertaken to 
bring to justice those guilty of 
these massive human rights vio- 
lations." 




Raitcr. 


REM EMBERING THE BLAST — Gtris offering a prayer for atomic bomb victims 
at Nagasaki Cathedral on Tuesday, the 49th anniversary of the city’s bombing. 


Oil Union 
Steps Up 
Campaign 


WORLD BRIEFS 


Argentina Won’t Cut Ties With Iran 

100 people at ibe- offices of tbs w nroof involving 
It he otpdlcd but relations will not be 

and Defense Minis, er 

. °mT cSntftalnW any diplomatic measures taken in a hunj 
UCOS - Nuria's aam diplomatic relations as a reacuon, 

striking oil worked union said 

SSSEH2 German Charged mHIV Blood Case 


* 



eria 


Reuters 


to the detained presidential 
claimant Moshood 1 K. O. 
Abioia. 

‘We are intensifying our 


production and exports to force ^ (AFp) _ A court has 

of the AIDS virus. . _ . , 

The prosecution said Monday ftatthe 

a?«T * 1986 - i987 - 

mene. national prendeatof the ^ provedto be HlV-postne. ■ 

National Union of Petroleum five people became HIV- 
and Natural Gas Woricers. “We D f blood obtained from the 
don’t want mod 
into the pockets 


void man, whose 
its said to be “safe” 


_ after receiving transfusions 
uas w oncers. ~wc ^ Woo a obtained from me laooratory, and *J5Jr 

money to come m m-a investigators found that the laboratory tested only a small 
kets of the militaiy proportion of its blood products before putting them on the 

junta.” 

He gave no details of his 
union’s plans. “We cannot re- 
veal our strategy," he said. — — - Both sides 

nmnwx «««•» - to damp down on pretrial publicity, 
agreeing to discuss privately the contents of a 1 tnyswnouj jyeXlOT 
amtope and to keep secret Nicole Brown Simpson s medical 

recoff ^ s ' ..... appeared con- 


The 150,000-strong union be- 
gan the stnkeJuly 4 to demand 
the release of Mr. Abioia, wide- 
ly believed to have won last 
year’s annulled presidential 


Simpson Case Seeks to Cool Publicity 

Trw X 4Nr,FT ES (AV\ — Both rides in the O. J. Simpson 



After the hearing, attorneys — _ - . 

behind dosed doors to discuss the still-secret contents of the 
envelope. A deputy district attorney, Marcia Clark, Mid a public 
(Hi the evidence would be unfair to Mr. Simpson. The 
fen sc attorney, Robert Shapiro, agreed. 


UN Wary of New Exodus From Rwanda 


Reuters 

ROME — Up to 2 million more refugees 
could flee Rwanda if United Nations 
peacekeeping troops are not ready to take 
over when French forces withdraw in two 
weeks’ time, a senior UN official said 
Tuesday. 

The undersecretary-general lor humani- 
tarian affairs, Peter Hansen, called on UN 
members to be ready to take over when 
1200 French soldiers withdraw from the 
central African state on Aug. 22, when 
their two-month mandate expires. 

“If the international community is not 
ready to put its actions where its words are 
and prevent a breakdown of the situation 
in the southwest,” Mr. Hansen said, “it 
would create a vacuum that would lead to 
instability." 

“We could very well see an outflow of 
between I and 2 million displaced people 


going across the border into Bukavu," 
Zaire, he said in Rome. 

The French Foreign Ministry rebuffed 
renewed calls from the United Nations to 
delay its withdrawal 

“Our position remains as it was ex- 
pressed by the prime minister in Goma,” a 
ministry official said. “Conforming to our 
mandate under Security Council Resolu- 
tion 929, we will withdraw by Aug. 22." 

Nearly a million refugees fled across the 
border to Goma in eastern Zaire three 
weeks ago. Only a trickle have returned 
since the victory of the mainly Tutsi Rwan- 
da Patriotic Front in three months of civil 
war. 

Hundreds of thousands of Hutu, whose 
kinsmen have been widely blamed for the 
massacres of 500,000 Tutsi citizens and 
Hutu opponents of the ousted govern- 


ment, are sheltering in French-patrolled 
safe havens in southwestern Rwanda. 

■ r A New Worry 5 : Typhus 

The United Nations warned Tuesday of 
a possible typhus epidemic in a refugee 
camp for Rwandans in Zaire after 19 per- 
sons died with symptoms similar to those 
of the highly infectious disease. Agence 
Franco-Presse reported from Geneva. 

“We have a new worry," Sylvana Foa, 
spokeswoman for the UN High Commis- 
sioner for Refugees, said in describing the 
situation in the Muguna refugee camp, 
near Goma. 

“There are about 30patients in hospital 
this week who have high fever, red eyes, 
neurological' symptoms that are evidently 
symptoms of typhus," she said. Nineteen 
of the patients have already died. 


: later. 

The strike has disrupted do- 
mestic fuel supplies, hitting 
transport and business activity, 
and industry sources say it has 
cut crude oil production by at 
least 25 percent 
Mr. Abioia was arrested in-, 

June and chained with treason, 
for declaring himself president 
Officials of both unions, say. 
their membera are prepared for' 
a long strike. - 

“We are going to stay out for 
as king as the government re- 
fuses to swear in the acclaimed 
winner of the June'12 election,” 

Mr. Agamene said. -: 

Besides the industrial action, 
prodemocracy protests have 
shaken parts of the country and 
human rights groups say op to 
100 people have been Idled, 

pecaaUy in Mr. Abida's south- A . ir\»- • ■■ - n* 1 • it C 

west Yoraba region, including All* OlSCOtllltS JUS6 oMJTply 111 U-3. 

L tS 


act 


LUSAKA, Zambia (Reuters) — Angolan goven^ent negoua- 
tots signed an 1 1 -point procethiral agreement with U N IT A rebels 
on Tuesday but questions of power-sharing still stand in the wa>- 

^A^^NT^^Kjkeanaii, Jorge Valentim, and a government 
spokesman, Canrira HSgjno, said they were adopting the proce- 
dural accord an the modalities on national reconciliation before 
moving on to the next itian on the agenda: the security of UNIT A 

leaders. . , ... . „ 

“We arenot signing an agreement on national reconcuianon. 
said Mr. Valentim, “There are other issues still pending Wore 1 a 
full agreement can be reached m national reconciliation." Details 
of the 11-point agreement -were not made public. 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


National Democratic 
Coalition alliance backing Mr. 
Abioia called a temporary halt 
to protests in Lagos after dash- 
es between Yoraba yoaths and 
Igbo traders raised fears that. 


The youths were dying to 
force Igbo traders, from the 
east, to dose their stores in soli- 
darity with the protests. 


AIDS Scientists Returning to Basics 
As Search for New Drugs Hits Snags 


exi 


By Andrew Pollack 

New York Times Service 

YOKOHAMA, Japan — 
With efforts to develop new 
drugs and vaccines for AIDS 
r unnin g into obstacles, scien- 
tists are being forced to return 
to basic research to discover 
more about how the elusive vi- 
rus destroys the body’s immune 
system, scientists at the 10th 
International Conference on 
AIDS said here Tuesday. 

Dr. William E. Paul the re- 
cently appointed head of AIDS 
research in the United States, 
said that he will provide more 
federal funding for what he 
called the “revitalization and 
ion" of basic research on 
'o find the money, he 
■said he would trim spending on 
• clinical trials of potential new 
■ drugs by making the drug-test- 
ing efforts more efficient 

In a speech here outlining his 
new research agenda. Dr. Paul 
said that the “current inadequa- 
cy" of treatments for AIDS and 
lade of a vaccine are “largely 
due to die wide gaps in our 
understanding" of the disease. 

“If we do not provide innova- 
tive scientists with the resources 
and opportunities to attack the 
basic unsolved problems relat- 
ed to AIDS and HTV, we may 
find that a decade from now we 
are no further along in our 
struggle,” he said. 

The back- to- the- scientific- 
drawing- board theme is also ev- 


ident in die hallways and audi- 
toriums of the conference. The 
greatest interest is being paid 
not to potential new drags or 
vaccines, but to the fin dings of 
researchers who are unlocking, 
painstaking step by painstaking 
step, the basics about how the 
AIDS virus inflicts its damage 
on die body. 

Of particular interest here are 
studies of a seemingly mysteri- 
ous group, representing about 5 
to lOpcrcent of those infected 
by HIv, who have been able to 
live for 12 years or longer after 
infection while remaining 
healthy. 

Scientists hope that these so- 
called long-term nonprogres- 
sors, who can delay and possi- 
bly even avert what until now 
has been considered a certain 
death sentence, will hold the 
dues as to how AIDS works — 
and and how it can be stopped. 

So far the research is at an 
early stage, merely trying to an- 
swer the question of whether 
the nonprogressors are some- 
what different from other peo- 
ple or whether they are infected 
with a different type of virus. 

The answer may be both, Da- 
vid D. Ho, director of the Aar- 
on Diamond AIDS Research 
Center for the City of New 
York, said Tuesday. Long-term 
nonprogressors he studied had 
a strongly protective immune 
response against the AIDS vi- 
rus. But they also seemed to be 
infected with weak viruses. 


Scientists often say they have 
learned more about AIDS more 
t ha n about any other 
Now thqy are realizing 
their knowledge is still not very 
deep. 

AIDS activists, too, have 
changed their tune. In the mid- 
1980s they began pressing for 
more money and effort to be 
spent on treatments, even at the 
expense of long-term research. 

But now, some activist 
groups are once again pushing 
for more fundamental research. 

Explaining the shift, Mark 
Harrington of the Treatment 
Action Group in New York 
it in the 


Pilgrims at Spanish Shrine Refuse 
To Let Donations Go to Rwandans 

Reuters 

GRANADA Spain — About 3,000 pilgrims at the shrine 
of Saint Cayetano in Jolucar staged a protest and refused to' 
let the priest donate their collection money to Rwandan 
refugees, according to El Pais, the Madrid daily. 

Facing cries of “We need the money more than they do!" 
and “It’s not going to blacks!” the priest suspended Mass at 
the shrine an Sunday. 

“It’s useless to give Mass to people who will not behave as 
Christians," he said later. 

Worshippers, who pin banknotes on the saint’s robes dur- 
ing the annual pilgrimage to Jolucar, on Spain’s southern 
coast, had donated 700,000 pesetas (55,000). 


WASHINGTON (WP) — The lower fares that airlines are 
chaxnngwill apply to almost two-thirds of all flights of less than 
I;(XXrmnes by me cod of this year, according to a study by the 
American Express Airfare Managcment UniL 
The number df discounts represents a huge increase in a 
relatively short period of time; only 27 percent of such flights bad 
. ... ■ low fares in. Jnnel993, bnt 47 percent were covered this past June, 

degenerate mto . Lew fazes are defined byAmerican Express as at least 70 percent a 
emmc^KMence. less than preriousfyjjrcvailnig full coach fares. 

. The most dramatic increase in low fares — those available to 
any passenger at any time — " came witfi the introduction of the 
low-cost, low-fare phenomenon along the Eastern seaboard last 
year. These fares differ from the “sales" airlines often advertise in 
that they do not require advance purchase or carry other restric- 
: dons. For example, between June 1993 and June 1994, the average 
price of all tickets between Baltimorc-W ashingion International 
and Atlanta dropped from S179 to $153, and the typically higher 
fare charged business travelers dropped from $249 to 5169. 

. South Africa said aimed bands were tcaror i ring tourists and 
other Jravdera along main routes to ntighboring Mozambique. A 
Foreign Affairs official advised people to travel only in convoys, 
saying bandits were setting up roadbfocks, demanding money and 
sometimes shooting at these using the roads. (Reuters) 

7 Scattered laushfiies set by arsomsts m Corsica forced hundreds 
of people to flee homes arid campgrounds Tuesday. The wind- 
driven fires destroyed two homes and nearly 1,000 hectares (2J500 
acres> of brush in the southern corner of the French island in the 
Mediterranean. (AP) 

British MBdbmd Ahfine said it would start a four times daily 
service between London. Heathrow and Paris Orly, taking advan- 
tage of recently granted access rights into France. (Reuters) 

1 British tow operation will resume charter flights to Gambia on 
Aug 23, a month after the country's militaiy coup. (Reuters) 


dia Settles on Middle Course in Kashmir 


said that in the mid- to late- 
1980s there was a desperate 
need for some treatment, lead- 
ing to the impatience of those 
with AIDS. 

Now, however, there are four 


By John F. Bums 

New York Times Service 

NEW DELHI — The Indian govern- 
ment has followed a derision to pull its 
troops back from the hoHe&t M uslim 
shrine in Indian-controlled Kashmir with 
- , , , . a decision to extend for six more months 

approval drugs for AIDS m the powers undo- which it rules die disput- 

Urnted States, removing the mi- ^ territory 
mediate crisis. At the same 
time, the shortcomings of AZT 
and the three other drugs have 
become obvious. They do not 
cure the disease and lose their 
effectiveness after a year or two. 


to elections for a territorial government, 
have been deferred. 

Earlier this year, Mr. Rao’s advisers said 
they hoped the process could be begun by 
the fall, but attacks by the militants have 
forced the government to set back its time- 
table until next spring, at the earliest! 

Pakistan provides arms and money for 


Reuters 


CAIRO — Egypt’s popula- 
tion of 59 million will rise to 64 


Senior Indian officials said the two 
moves reflected the problem faring the 
government erf Prime Minister P. V. Nara- 
srmha Rao after four years of insurgency 
by Muslim militants in Kashmir. 

With divisions among his top advisers 
on the balance to be struck between seek- 
ing a military victory and a political settle- 
ment, Mr. Rao has apparently settled on a 
middle coarse. 



. , , In deciding Monday to extend the emer- 

muhon m the next six years, the gcncy powers, the Rao cabinet in effect 
Central Agency for Public Mo- acknowledged that the prime minister's 
bilizatioa and Statistics said hopes of starting what In dian officials call 
Tuesday. a * 2 political process" in Kashmir, leading 


trolled part • 

fedian officials had hqpedthat Pakistan 
might lessen tensions by quietly cutting 
back on support Jot the groups, several of 
which have said they are. fighting for the 
reunification of Kashmir as part of Paki- 
stan. But in recent weeks, Prune Minister' 
Benazir Bhutto of Pakistan has visited Pa- 
kistan-controlled Kashmir and strongly re- 
iterated support for the insurgency. 
.Relations between New Delhi and Is- 
lamabad have been further shaken by inci- 
dents m winch diplomats of the two coun- 
tries are said to have been roughed up by - 
pob'ce officers. 


Also, India announced over the week- 
end that it had arrested Abdul Rajak Me~ 
mon, a Bombay-born Muslim with strong 
links toffalristan. He is said to be a leading 
suspect in March 1993 bombings that 
killed more than 250 people in Bombay. ^ 

A flurry of optimism liver Kashmir was 
stated over the weekend, when Indian 
troops completed their pullback from 13 
sandbagged bunkers that ringed the Haz- 
ratbal Mosque in Srinagar, the summer 
capital of the state India cads J ammu and 
K a shmir . Muslims marched in celebration 
through the city after senior Indian offi- 
cials joined Muslim religious leaders in 
ceremonies thgt reopened the mosque to 
wra^pors, 1 '- 

Indias troops surrounded the shrine last 
fall, asserting that militant Muslim leaders 
had taken refuge and stored amis there. 
The standoff aided without violence when 
the mffitants surrendered after Indian offi- 
cials] 

be released. 


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Page 3 




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A. 


Officer Dies 
In a 



Hijacking 
In Cuba 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

MIAMI — A Cuban Navy 
lieutenant was killed in the hi- 
jacking of a vessel docked in the 
port of MarieL and four sailors 
were forced off the ship, -a Cu- 
ban diplomat said Tuesday. 

The hijacking came at a time 
of high U.S.-Cuban tensions, 
after President Fidel Castro’s 
renewal of a threat to flood the 
United States with Cuban im- 
migrants unless Washington 
changed its policy on accepting 
them. 

His threat had Florida offi- 
cials planning a statewide drill 
to prepare for a potential immi- 
gration emergency. Governor 
Lawton Chiles said state agen- 
cies would rehearse the state’s 
emergency refugee plan on 
Wednesday. 

Thirteen members of Flori- 
da’s congressional delegation 
met on Tuesday in Washington 
with State Department officials 
seeking greater protection of 
the Florida coast. "The whole 
thing is going to take a laige 
military and Coast Guard pres- 
ence in order to blockade the 
yachts and boats from going 
out,” said Representative Clay 
Shaw Jr_ a Republican. . •• . ■ 

Florida officials were caught 
off guard by the 1980 Marid 
boatHft, when about 125,000 
Cuban refugees, many of them 
mental patients or freed crimi- 
nals, arrived in Florida over a 
period of several months 
After Mr. Castro's threats, 
American officials said they 
were prepared to block any new- 
exodus of Cuban refugees, and 
the State Department said it 
would not tolerate any such 
move by Mr. Castro.. . . 

Nonetheless, a State Depart- 
ment spokesman said Tueday 
in Washington that the hijack- 
ing was part of a "disturbing 
trend” toward violence. 

The Cuban government re- 
ported Tuesday? hijacking to 
the U.S. government and de- 
manded the return of thosewho 
commandeered the vessel. 

"People that came from land 
boarded it and attacked and 
killed, this lieutenant,” aid Ra- 
fael Dausa, political officer of 
A e^Cub an . Interest: Sa^min 

boat, assaulted the boat and hi- 
jacked the vessel” 

The vessel left port Monday 
afternoon, stopped to pick up 
passengers and then headed far 
the United States, 90 miles (145 
kilometers) away, Mr Dausa 
said by telephone. 

He blamed "ddmqoents and 
vandals,” commonly used refer- 
ences to Cuban dissidents. - - 
“The United States should 
send back these hijackers be- 
cause this is a crime,” Mr. 
Dausa said. 

A U.S. government source 
identified the vessel as a mili- 
tary gunboat, but Mr. Dausa 
said it was a civilian vessel 
leased by the Cuban Navy. 

(AP, Reuters) 



Fi'nundii LLan< The AyomoieU Prr*. 


Mir. Castro, in Bogota for the inauguration of Ernesto Samper, retiterated his threat to 
flood the United States with Cuban immigrants unless Washington changed its policies. 


POLITICAL VOTES 


Clinton Team Bites Its Tongue A Judge for the White House? 


WASHINGTON — The White House has 
supported the' appointment of Kenneth W. 
Starr as Whitewater independent counsel, 
distancing the administration from comments 
made earlier by President Bill Chmon's per- 
sonal attorney that Mr. Starr was too partisan 
and should quit. * 

“Those are his comments,” the White 
House counsel, Lloyd N. Cutler, said of the 
comments by Robert S. Bennett the lawyer 
who is representing Mr. Clintpri.m.a s^yal 
harassment case. :Mr. Bennett said the apr 
pointment of Mr. Starr, a former judge with 
strong conservative credentials, created the 
“appearance of unfairness." • 

It is also the feeKng held privately in the 
White House, where dismay over the choice 
of Mr. Starr, a Bush and Reagan administra- 
tion offirialwhohas remained active in Re- 
publican Party politics; is widespread. Never- 
theless, top administration officials have 
concluded diatli would be counterproductive 
to complain about the ■appointment publicly. 

‘‘We have no reason to doubt the fair- 
mindedness of Ken Starr,” Mr. Cutler said. 

The contradictory statements mark the 
confusion still surrounding Friday’s surprise 
decision by. a three-judge panel to remove the 
previous special counsel, Robert B. Ftske Jr., 
after he was already six months and $2 mil- 
lion into his investigation of the ties between 
a failed Arkansas thrift and the Clintons’ 
personal and political finances. f WP) 


WASHINGTON — Abner J. Mikva. the 
chief judge of the federal appeals court in 
Washington, is the leading candidate to re- 
place Lloyd N. Cutler as the White House 
counsel, administration officials said. 

Judge Mikva, 68, served in the House of 
Representatives and the Illinois legislature 
before being named to the federal bench by 
President Jimmy Carter in 1979. His selection 
would offer President Bill Clinton both the 
stature of a well-respected federal judge and 
the political acumen that many in the White 
House believed was missing under Mr. Clin- 
ton's first counsel. Bernard W. Nussbuum. 

Mr. Cutler, a senior partner at a Washing- 
ton law. took over after Mr. Nussbaum re- 
signed in March amid a storm of proles! 
about his involvement in meetings between 
WhiteHouse and Treasury officials regarding 
a federal investigation of a Tailed thrift that 
touched on the Clintons. ( WP) 


Quote/Unquote 

John Pike of the Federation of American 
Scientists, referring lo the just-disclosed cost 
of a new spy satellite headquarters building; 
“There's a third of a billion-dollar puzzle 
palace out there in Virginia and nobody no- 
ticed? What we have here is a failure to 
communicate.” [Nl'TI 


Away From Politics 

• Priests in Florida have been named to be 
cautious after a caller vowed to kill 20 clergy- 
men in retaliation for the slangs of doctor 
and his driver outside an abortion dime. Paul 
Hitt, a former Presbyterian minister, was 
jailed on charges of murder and attempted 
murder. 

• A former high school valedictorian ca nd ida t e 

was seq fcncprf to Me in prison without the 
possibility of parole for the murder of a. 17- 
year-old honors student. Robert C h an , 19, 
was sentenced in Santa Ana, California, in the - 
1992 killing of Stuart A. Tay. Mr. Chan was 


one of five teenagers convicted of beating Mr. 

. Tay with baseball bats, pouring rubbing alco- 
hol down his throat and leaving him to die, 
bound and gagged, in a backyard grave. 

• A record 1277 climbers have seated Mount 
McKinley this summer, which at 20320 feet 
(6,194 meters) is North America’s tallest 
peak. 

• Researchers are investigating the sflt of the 

Penobscot River looking for the wrecks of 3S 
ships burned and scuttled in 1779 in one of 
the worst naval defeats in U.S. history. The 
35-ship Penobscot Expedition was a volun- 
teer fleet preparing for an attack on the Brit- 
ish fart at Casting Maine, during the Revolu- 
tionary War. AFT. LAT, Semen, AT 


I ‘ 


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Global Banking 
& Finance 

Among the topics to be covered are: 
g The value of the dollar, 
g The booming market for derivatives. 

■ The European Monetary Institute. 

m A global market for government bonds. 
m The outlook for Japanese banking. 

■ Investment prospects in Latin, Asian and other emerging 

markets. 

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For pipe smokers in over 
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Baren tobacco today and 
see how right they are. 


Mitchell Warns on a Health Bill Filibuster 


The Associated Press 

Washington — Republicans win 

pay a “huge political price” if they carry 
out a threat to block health-care legislation 
through a filibuster, the Senate majority 
leader, George J. Mitchell said Tuesday’ 

After decades of fitful starts and foiled 
attempts to devise a system of national 
health insurance, the Senate opened de- 
bate Tuesday on a Democratic hill de- 
signed to cover at least 95 percent of 
Americans by the turn of the century . 

To stop the momentum now. Mr. Mitch- 
ell said, would not be politically wise. 

“It's one thing to say: ‘We* don’t like 


your bill. Here's our alternative.’ ** Mr. 
Mitchell said on television. "In this case, 
what they're saying is we don’t want any- 
thing to happen and so we're going to 
prevent any vote on anything." 

"There will be a huge political price for 
anyone to pay for filibustering a health 
care bill." he said. 

Senator Phil Gramm, Republican of 
Texas, invoked the threat of a filibuster on 
Monday, saying that “no amount of fin- 
ger-pointing wUl stop me from opposing 
something that is an anathema to every- 
thing I believe is right for America." 

Another conservative. Senator Jesse 


Helms, Republican of North Carolina, in- 
troduced a resolution urging Congress to 
put off action until next year. Mr. Mitchell 
said they would vote on the amendment 
Wednesday morning. 

Democratic leaders remained intent on 
pushing a plan drafted by Mr. Mitchell 
and a companion bid in (he House through 
Congress this month before the lawmakers 
go home for a delayed summer break. 

President Bill Clinton, .meanwhile, was 
meeting at the While House on Tuesday 
with business leaders who have expressed 
support for employer contributions to 
health insurance, universal coverage and 
containment of medical costs. 


U.S. Rejects 
Ultimatum 
On Haiti 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — Secre- 
tary of Slate Warren M. Chris- 
topher said Tuesday that the 
United States would continue 
to press Haitian Army leaders 
to step down, but he stopped 
short of setting a deadline. 

Another American official 
said that a pledge on Monday 
of S15 million in aid to Haiti — 
most of which will be given only 
after the exited president, the 
Reverend Jean-Benrand Aris- 
tide, is back in control of the 
government — is an “unambig- 
uous signal” that the United 
States is committed lo restoring 
Father Aristide to power. 

In Shannon, Ireland, where 
he stopped on his return from 
the Mideast, Mr. Christopher 
said, “We are not giving them 
an ultimatum or setting a dead- 
line at the present time.” 

Deadlines tend to result in 
postponement of action until 
the deadline arrives, he said, 
adding the United States wants 
no delay. 

The United Nations has au- 
thorized the use of force to 
overthrow the Haitian Army 
leader. Lieutenant General 
Raoul Cidras, and restore Fa- 
ther Aristide to power. A U.S. 
Marine (ask force is stationed 
off Haiti's coast, but adminis- 
tration officials have said at 
least a month would be needed 
to prepare a multinational force 
for an invasion. 


Nathan Polowetzky Dies at 72, 
Veteran Associated Press Editor 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Nathan 
Polowetzky, 72, an Associated 
Press editor who was the “bea- 
con, scold and inspiration" to a 
generation of foreign corre- 
spondents and feature writers, 
has died in New York. 

Mr. Polowetzky. a foreign 
editor, business editor and 
Newsfeatures editor during his 
50-year AP career, died Sunday 
night, apparently of a heart at- 
tack, family members said. 

Louis D. Boccardi. AP presi- 
dent and chief executive officer, 
said, “Nate was an original. As 
foreign editor, he was a beacon, 
scold and inspiration to a gen- 
eration of foreign correspon- 
dents. As Newsfeatures editor, 
a post he held twice, be was a 
constant source of creative en- 
ergy.” 

» Mr. Polowetzky, bom in 
Harrison. New Jersey, went to 
work at the A P’s New York 
headquarters on D-Day. June 6, 
1944. after a stint in the army. 

Mr. Polowetzky was a de- 
manding and intense editor, a 
voracious reader and a knowl- 
edgeable collector of modem 
art and autographed first-edi- 
tion books. 

News of Mr. Polowetzky's 
death brought comments from 
colleagues and friends around 
the world. 

“Nate was a man of great 
warmth and great affection," 
said John Vinocur, executive 
editor of the International Her- 
ald Tribune, who worked under 


Mr. Polowetzky as a foreign 
correspondent for the AP. “He 
liked his job but he loved the 
people he worked with and 
made them fed it.” 

Edith Lederer, an AP foreign 
correspondent for 22 years and 
now based in London, said, “It 
was O.K. for him to yell at you. 
but heaven help anyone else 
who did. He vastly expanded 
the number of women corre- 
spondents and never hesitated 
to send them off to a hot spot if 
he thought they could do the 
job.” 

Peter Arnett, a CNN corre- 
spondent who won a Pulitzer 
Prize for his AP coverage of the 
Vietnam War. messaged from 
Pon-Au-Prince, Haiti: “Nate 
was a pal. a fellow collector, 
1 shall 


and 


miss him.’ 


Liu Haisu, 98. widely regard- 
ed as the founder of Chinese 
modem painting, died Sunday 
in Shanghai of a heart attack. 
Beijing newspapers reported 
Monday. 

Hidalgo Moya, 74. an archi- 
tect known for his painterly eye 
and engineering talent, died 
Wednesday of prostate cancer 
in Hastings, England, in the 
Conquest Hospital which was 
designed by his firm. 

Amy Jill Sacks, 39, an Emmy 
Award-winning producer rec- 
ognized for innovative sports 
production work, died of com- 
plications from lupus in Phila- 
delphia. Ms. Sacks was one of 
the first female sports produc- 
ers. She won Emmys for ABCs 


coverage of the 19S4 Summer 
Olympics and for two specials 
on the 1988 Winter Olympics. 
She was associate coordinating 
producer of ABCs Wide World 
of Sports from 1986 to 1989. 

Bert Freed, 74, a veteran ac- 
tor who appeared in such mov- 
ies as “Paths of Glory,” “Billy 
Jack” and “Halls of Montezu- 
ma” died of a heart attack near 
Vancouver. 

Clara Centuiaro, 81, whose 
elegant wedding and ball gowns 
made her a major fashion de- 
signer in the 1950s, died Satur- 
day in a Rome hospital. 

Leonid M. Leonov, 95, a 
prominent Russian writer and 
playwright, died Monday in 
Moscow, the ITAR-Tass news 
agency said. 

Taf Sofarin, 72, one of Nige- 
ria’s best-known social critics 
and educators and a vehement 
critic of military rule, died July 
27 in Ikenne in southwestern 
Nigeria, where be had a home. 

Dmitri Yakusiikm, 71, de- 
scribed as one of the top KGB 
agents in Washington in the late 
1970s and early 1980s, died 
Tuesday after a protracted ill- 
ness, the ITAR-Tass agency 
said. 

Benny Ong, 87, called by 
some the “Godfather of China- 
town,” died in Manhattan. Po- 
lice considered him the most 
powerful Chinese organized 
crime leaders in New York. 

(AP, AFP. NYT) 


For more than a century and a half, Patek Philippe has been known as 

the finest watch in the world. The reason is very simple. It is made 

differently. It is made using skills and techniques that others have lost 

or forgotten. It is made with attention to detail very few people would 

notice. It is made, we have to admit, with a total disregard for time. If 

a particular Patek Philippe 

movement requires four 

years of continuous work to 

bring to absolute perfection, 

we will take four years. The 

result will be a w 7 atch that 

is unlike any other. A watch 

that conveys quality from 

first glance and first touch. 

A watch with a distinction: 

generation after generation 

it has been worn, loved and 

collected by those who are 

very difficult to please; 

those who will only accept 

die best. For the day that 

you take delivery of vour 

• * • 

Patek Philippe, you will have 
acquired the best. Your watch 
will be a masterpiece, quietly 
reflecting your own values. 

A w atch that was made to 
be treasured. 




PATEK PHILIPPE 

GENEVE 


l*:iirk I’liilljijit- S. 

41. riu* <lii llliiuii*- 1211 Criirvn :? - Sw ii/rrluml 


* 


T- - ■ - i*. IMMll iV**! 







ANNOUNCEMENTS 


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Attention visitors 
from the U.5. i 

m 

IF you enjoy reading the 1HT 
when you travel, why not 
cfco get it at home ? 
Same-day delivery available 
in key Ui. cities. 

Can m 800 882 2884 

(in IfcwYrU a& 212 752 3890) 

Hml^SlIeribunc 



REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


GREAT BRITAIN 



PARIS AREA 


PARIS LA D9B4SE I 
HARMONE 


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DUBUN, EXHKBKH) CHAUBH1K 
and Guxie Service. 

Inland 353 SB 537749. 


FLATOm 
mm toms ok 

EXPO PORTE DE VBtSAIIlES 
From Hutios to five^oonr do fim. 
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Catt 05.345245 Tofl five 
or (33-1) 45 75 62 20 


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Fas Ji] 45 63 37 09 


92. MONTROUGE, near Pte. CHoans. 
character house. 170 sqm. -I- 60 
styn. garden, rwwfy redone. Beautiful 
Furniture. 4 bedrooms, 3 barfs. 
F15JB0L TdL CU « 70 18 84, 


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Hod-Mem! and law tairiow nontot 
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Tol 1-47 53 80 13 to 45 fft 75 77 


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CLABIDGE 

P0R 1 Wtfll OR MOK wgh dots 
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ad gz& Pens and jutxrm. 

Tel 1-46148211. Fax 14772 3096 


CHAMP DE MARS 

130SQJ&, HUH CXAS5, 
F2O,O0ONET. TO: MS 67 80 ft 


W1 Bar* I^tw 5o4»«Y . 

btoi fnsmfhe ^ 

8B 17275 500 & lt» 





REAL ESTATE 





[v/J f/\ 






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Paris area, fiOXOT-lM.OOO sq. ft 
Toxn/Quebec devtleper stw 
pint verturt partner 

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roaoe. | LOW COST FLIGHTS 

f.Mt 






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ACCESS VOYAGES 
THE BEST FARES TO 

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#4WT£L 3S15ACCKEVOYAGK 
Teh LYON 78 63 67 77 or 72 56 15 95 

BOOK NOW by phone wish mx& oord 
Govarvnere Lioanas 175111 


CiR.P. CONSTRUCTION RENOVATION PARTICULAR. 
PARIS. BUILDING RENOVATION COMPANY' 


Al! types oF work for your home or building 
in Paris, suburbs ana provinces 

OPEN IN AUGUST 

Free estimate - We speak English 
Tel/Fax: (1) 42 06 51 86.. 


tttMJwnaw.rouroTj^ 
fticaraani&rn. USA-Co' 0 ®”™*- 
Far- 972-2^43220, Amenooo knr/v. 


International 
HeraW Tribune 

■ ads mwfc 



PLANNING TO RUN A CLASSIFIED AD? 

•(lf463793fli: . • F«35T-1-457.73S2 . 753-3890 Tdfe 


EUROPE 

"SB®*? 

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be 58320938. . 

NBHHBAM)5eAmdBtdor», . 

Tel: 31 684108a 

be SMCttBBtVA.-'. " . - • / 

NORWAY A SWB»h T'V' 

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foe (47j 55913072.- • 


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UNIHJAaASBlWUEiSfoioh, 

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Foe 706 34 66 


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CANADA 

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AUSTRALIA 

MBSOURC: 

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BUSINESS MESSAGE CENTER 



IMPORT/EXPORT 


MAJOR UL5. EXPORT CO. 
hen conOaner load quannt» of dl 
typa of uwd darting. |eam - Grade A 
aaarted labels fka Leva, shoes - 
dress aid cajud. many 0107 more 
■ terra. Aba new name brand athletic 
shoes, braid none jeons, supermarket 
loads, cosmetio etc. 

U5A Tel 407437 9534/Fia> 407-4954639 


SUGAR 

. {fade A refined 
reasonably need 

any quality defiverad to world ports 
FAX (001) 508-750-0496 ISA 


VMTAGE CLOTHING: Levi's, d 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


Dd from die handset of yav fom 
852 172 75 SB - erter the code: 

) CrahCre* Oxd Gwfc Order 
B77-83 LEGAL ! 2nd travel doormens 
877-83 Dr.? FH3? MSc? Aerated I 
877-84 Orurth/Ordaned & Tax FREE ? 
Offshore Compaiy? r*» mel I ifcrt a 
□nitoble GongregcAon (Tax exeneMl] 
and be or dared Naturally everything 
is Uwn l rii le! The 'watdeower' oper- 
ate in 205 countries and ci bSara a? 
SfTf ore Tax ewem p ted Oul today and 
forget the mpsnsne Offshore compa- 
nies out of yov control Don't worry, 
its very eaw aid without but- and 
maybe- FH. Cash and Ge* Gwde b a 
Ssftng of over 48 red lenders and 
brok ers otter an interline reseu dr of 
2391 odvenisem en b in 23 newspaper*. 
A persona! experience with offshore 
Imaas & Funds. Resufcs GUARANTEED! 


Authentic Vintage dotting Company 
of America 



FOR SALE 

FnM Military Hospitd Units 

1 unit fa r 400 posents & 2 urits b 200 
potrrts US nxjnufactlire. pad&rd xi 
boxes. Beady for v ix i i ob e defewy la 
site raivwhere in tot world. Complete 
with all Surged equipemeni vaaxxn 
paded. beds, Urn fa s etc.-. Dentd 
mstruments, apparatus, new, pocked n 
original seaworthy sealed cases, 
bepeewn upon rnp»L 

Commerce h ri emoffond 


Group Lid., Span 

Fan (34) 52 78 67 16 A7B 57 29 


AVAILABLE CAPITAL 

Mid Emt aid Oner* capital sauces 
nvalabie fa xwc s i um is worldwi d e in 
red estate, bubness storHrps or debt 
consolidation. Long terns, heS rales, 
broker fees pad and protected. 

Fox yaw proposd summwy to: 

For East Irated— rt Group, toe 
Attn F to mdd B y t us enl 
Fan: (507) 63 5035 IPasann). 


INCORPORATE IN USA 

Ins tant Detowcxe eo ra oraftons Aba. 
office services, aircraft "N~ re ga tr u tion 
& yacht l eg n tniion. Goapany 
fannahon ary stole, offshore. 
VISA7MC/AMEX. foe mfa 
CorpAmrna, tac 

P.<5. Bob 811-H 
Dover. DE 19903-0811 
Tut 302-7364570 
Fan: 302-736-5620 


YOUR OWN COMPANY M 



SAVE INTL CALLS 

IfeMr SgnVp Offer- 

3RD MONTH FREE! 

Anywhere • Anytime • Worldwide 

Save 15% to 50% 

On Afl Inf! Cali 
AT&T Network 

Cal now to determine yo ur 
& axmectfat 24 bowv? days a week 

Call (US* 1-407-253-5454 

Cal us and wet od yew njjM bacU 

FAX: (US* 1-407-253-6130 

XT A TALKBACK 

500 N. LLS.1, Me&oume. R 32935 USA 
Aaxta Weftonet 
Offer axpZra Scptembv IS. 1994 


CAPITAL AVAILABLE 

A«Aile Oo Sdeded Brabw* fojxds 

- MeiU&SlOM 
* . No opfraiffees 


* - Short and big term. 

Fax wifire detoib of year project fa 


FUNDS AVAILABLE 

FOR 

AU. BUSNBS PROJECTS 

08 TOR 

LETTBS OF C8HXT 
BANX GUARANTEE 
OTHER A009FTA8LE COLLATERAL 

bakers Lcw nfeion guararteed 

Mmmuts MJPJL8. IQs 



AFRICA^KUSH BUSINESSMAN, 
resident Lagos, xi good paetxxi la 
repesvl yav imerast eg, refined ad 
ptoduefs. exatc amber, debt ccMcc- 



TELECOM- 


INTERNATIONAL CALLBACK 
High vofurae tolecwn dskfen or 
nets fa fii sereice program.. Contact 
•"TroraCoriL Tet «76640 Fax; 
(619) 487-6946 PSA. ’ 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


SIB11AVH. BUREAU, LTtk 
YOUR R4IBD4ATIONAL CCNCB1GE 
Anything and everytfog you may 
ream u> ony city in the me. 

New Tort Office 

TeL 201-216-1200 Fax: 2QI -216-1212 
faeernefc 201-2161212 

UNQUE ti SBfVKI 



2nd TRAVa DOCUMB4TS. Driving ft- 
canoes. GM 2 FOrideaus, VcxAogmrn, 
Athens 16671, Greece, far 8962152 


NEW I CAU. BUSTER BUSINESS home 
t el ep ho n e control*. Worldwide sales 
retyrired Genermo axnnwara. for 
27 11 705-1930. 


CAPITAL WANTED 


FHBfl WfWN fa Inge Ml 

•^ t 2 f Sife! 3p,2,73M ^ F3&3S7fcn SWKiTO? 


MMBMATRY AVAILABLE 

FORHNANONG 
of pwdxne of heavy eqaipmort, 
rarcrahs, merdrort ami pfeoiura 
ships, mdxstrid red estate: 

Broker's axnrinoe guaafeed 

b any mfdranbion 
Mmms MJLFXB. and Ce: 

- RNANCTAL NSTTIUnON 

fab 32-fS?ffi 4771 

IBEX 20277 


PROJECT HNANCE 
VBHURE CAPITAL 

m Mumaam USfSOOfiOO 

• hfe Mmonxim 

• Term Inn ■ • 

■ 6y**y Finance 

• Brokers Protected 

An^o American Group Fk 

Pox +4M 924 201377 


•• IMMBXATEB UNLUWTD ** 
Ccpte! axaloUe for 
AIL hratess projects! 

WN Hi $2 neL/no man. 

(717) 397-7490 (US FAX) 


i f gjjji ft n ' i 


BEVOLYMUS 

OR 

" SANTA MONCA 

IHestidooeHgh Security 
■ Yaw OTra 6AB Senecra 
(3IQ) 471-88S3/Fax (310) 453-6543 U5A 


m 


BUYING GOLD: 

non refried, in powder, 
Ekmofl^ froynertv. e»c_ 
AB«n*n«ie\ mdceoffen 
by car {32-21 534 11 52 
Edgiroi Tdiso 20277 . 


- C. IF-** 1 -!!'-’ 


*12-3429 


ESZSSC 2S23 

pirr, 


COMMERCIAL & INVESTMENT PROPERTIES! 


Ji, 


Tek 212702-4821 be 212W-5727 


OFFICES FOR SALE 


-RENTALS 


FUJI TO LET-614 


BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 


TENDER NOTICE 


INTERNATIONAL FRANCHISE OPPORTUNITIES 


OFFSHORE 

COMPANIES 

BY LAWYERS 

IMMIGRATION 

& TRUST EXPERTS 


OFFSHORE TRUSTS COMPANIES. 
BANK INTRODUCTIONS. NOMINEES 
& ADMINISTRATION BY UK LAWYERS 

■ BUSH (MIRES) 

£165.08 

■ ISLE OF HAN 

£195.80 

■ DELAWARE U£ 

£495M 

1 1 1 UN 

E395.BB 


■ B.T.L/FAMAMA £285.00 


"YJfeCC rt MM»inY FORAIATIOtfS 


LONDON OFFICE 

SCORPIO HOUSE, 102 SVD’JEY STBErl 
CHELSEA. 10KD0N SV.'S 6HJ 
~ 4-1-71 352 2274 
Ci— f 44-7J 373 96SS 


♦HOW TO LEGALLY* 
OBTAIN DUAL NATIONALIH' 

ftwaiti£'«rttoldu*Brind«rt'iftinirin8 
aunnc- eumuial dw Iw » El, (PREVHX5 
TAX PATTRl Jtri kpHj mid lbp. Bitnmncrjs 
j»d fwle. Pi'imcT the iiuder facu ebom m 
lu'ffl 1 and bin fc tawnc a le^al TAX RXIli. 

For soar FRKF BROCIlliREnnl PRI- 
VACY HEWS liTTER that u31 help 
make end recur* yntrr mnnry write In 
Rrape lat'l Lid. Bon 4302. 

Fmtyjdc Mime ■ Fme-aride 
P-— tifta- Crrdc - llinL' • ffW ftEE ■ U.K. 
Tri * 41 7IK 6117SI • Fas- ♦ « 70S WI.1S 


SCULPTURE WORLD™ 

Discover A Gold Mine In 
New Acrylic Sculpture Art 

You Transform 
Posters Into Art 
That Sells from 
Si 00 -S2.000+ 

Great Profit & 

Return Potential 
No Direct Sates 


AH Equipment/FuR Control 

Investment S 15 -S 25 ^ 00 usa t-mq 

716-691-1750 

FAX: 716-691-1766 



To realize a lucrative project for the 
production of raw material used in 
cosmetic and pharmaceutical products, 

a Swiss company is looking 
for partners investing 
US$15 Mio. incL USS 3 Mio. venture 
capital. 

Fur mn re information please mile hr 

ZRT Maschlnen AG, 

5036 Oberentfeidui, Switzeriand. 
Fax number +441/64/43W87. 




SEEKING BUYERS 
Very low prices - Very good quality 
Pteamr eanutet 
EHiMbhxnem CbcvsIBcr, 

46 roc Sxlnr-Rany, 76200 Dieppe, 
France - TtLi (33) 35 Oti ZO OO. 



mfm 

Old German 

Royal House 

Li offering a JntanriaUy sound 
personality the opportunity for 

adoption. 

Tel. +49-89-2015142 
Fax +49-89-2013597 


OFFSHORE BANKS 

• Mer dnni l/ u o M t m er c id bank 

• Accept deposits _ 

• Oasse A licence 

■ No qoqtft m Son requ in imenfa 

• No have or bwafies 
- To>d anonyro W y 

• Bearer shores OX 

• No min e e d i rectors OX 

• biinedfede d e th m ry 

• US$1 5.000 or S2S.CXW wi* a 
Bud company 

Guff or fax for free dekubl 
Ron Jensen 

LoafM TeL 71 3M 5157 Fnt 71 231 *928 
Ceasda TeL 804 842 8189 Fex M2 3179 




OFFSHORE COMPARES 
WSURANCE/REBfSUHANCE 


A8SS17INCOME PROTECTION 
62 years estobisffed - prwMng 
prafesssonai servtcea xrte ma tronaBy 
far b 8 types of bustoess. 




19 Pool Rood, Douglas, 
fae of Mea 1M1 iLS 

TeL'. 0624 626591 
Fax: 0624. 625126 
or London TeL: (71) 222 BBSS 
Fax (71) S3 1518. 




V.S, Attorneys 

Incmt-Uitfrr Nrndi nnr ^rculy Sotki in 
sD vi ii4H r.umWcT of ruoplru mnevmkv 
Yr itfftf Us wnh pbnoc i fu wire. 

>4T« xirkr< U< Hank aununo U5 nram 
in YTic a« ikrtrTiin iiinpinr fe-jal vnVs A 
a^»i>ii inr inituJmg uTC. market entry & 
UM % , 6hHi PltJto requrt oar fret hradnre. 
ntiUifr is fjiptoh 3 nmnjn 

Dr, Jur. Wlltlani A. Wright 
Attorney at Law 
1! > ( mpiraiMin .'H.'rvk'rs. In?, 

M.ki ftjJmivnl lirtre. Mnit ■!(). 
faLnmeiHii. Caltfurnu 'TStCI 
Ml Fax (USA) 916/783-3005 


2ND CITIZENSHIP 

available Ihrougli 100% legal Naturalization. 
Gwptae deHveiy in oo days. Iwestmems start 
at SI9.VH Full protection of your hinds. No 
payment tales yoa receive yoordoamients 
SWISS INVESTMENTS INC 
Fax: NL ++3U0.6730416 


Private Investors 
Grant private 
and business loans 
US S3 million and up. 
Capital immediately available. 

Lb firm Dr. Bernal, Dr. Gomez, 
Dr. Moreno & Partners 
Fax-nM 809 322 6694 


FOR SALE: Patent 

Oremey lie qrlran a t»L<i*ati>&. Mpftextcn 
rf |Miwneitc ■ J xccnfal 
InlcnHinUl IMtCtn n-JtWCfcd. 
hMMin mxrfl Urtvc & -ihcn 
HrarmriUt 

EjuMIjIubui chi, nl>n. ftritaror Afrtfta. 
tone Mn May. 7UM Diepyc trance 
Iri:0}l»e62eK. 


MCPL Realisations limited 
(In Administration) 
(Formerly Macdonald & Co. 
(Publishers) Limited) 



CITIZENSHIP 


US SI50XWIcoridom'mhmi punhasc plus 
foe provides immediate ciwenship m a 
lax free, English speaking Common 


OFFSHORE WORLDWIDE 
Ready made companies (shells) 
• full management 
•address services 

Arr factor 

INTERCOMPANY MANAGEMENT 
, JB.~— - P.O. Bee 16ft 9WJ Mnras 
kP liediiewwfe 
P S/^ Fax: 41 -75S7S 4062 
1L. B4K/979 


WELL FUNDED 
FOOD AND 

COMMODITY COMPANY 

based in USA/Canada seeks wed 
established agents wtih food and 
commodities experience Id work 
on commission basis in 
Northern Europe. Middle East 
Cyprus and Hong Kong 

FAX STYLE AND DETAILS TO: 

GftRLDf GTON SALES COMPANY 
519-944-8289 (Canada) 
or 519-948-5321 (Canada) 


H 


On 10th January 1992 MCPL 
Realisations limited (formerly 
called Macdonald & Co. (Pub- 
lishers) limited) ('MCPL') 
went into administration. 
MCPL changed its name from 
Macdonald & Go. (Publishers) 
Limited to MCPL Realisations 
Limited on 5 June 1992. MCPL 
is a direct wholly-owned 
subsidiary of Caxton Publi- 
shing Hoktings Limited, which 
itself is 90% owned by 
Maxwell Publishing Corpo- 
ration Limited, which in turn 
is a direct wholly-owned 
subsidiary of Maxwell 
Communications Corporation 
Pkr fin administration). 

By a Court Older dated 22 July 
1994, we, the administrators 
of MCPL were authorised to 
proceed with the production 
and implementation of a 
scheme of arrangement under 
section 425 of the Companies 
Act 1985 between MCPL and 
its creditors. The purpose of 
die proposed scheme wOl be 
to enable us to make 


dis tri b ut ions to those cred i tors 
wfao shall have notified then- 
claims to the Joint. Admi- 
nistrators by the date to be 
fixed. Creditors who fail to 
give such notification by that 
date may be treated as having 
waived any aixl all dathnsthey . 
may have against MCPL 
Whilst the proposed scheme 
is being prepared, we have 
been authorised to advertise 
for creditors and to agree 
claims. 

Any person claiming to be a , 
creditor of MCPL should 
contact us as soon as posable : 
and, in any event, by 30th 
September 1994 at Price 
Waterhouse (ref. AVI), 
No. I London Bridge, 
London 5E19QL 
CTeL No: 071-939 5650). 

Doted 5 August 1994 

Anthony Victor Lomas 

Peter Ryan Dcnsham 

Joint Adnrlnistrarom of MCPL 
Realisations Limited (for m erly ‘ 
called Macdonald & Co.' 
(Pub&shecs) Limited) j 

/ 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10, 1994 


Page S 


Monitors’ 
Success Is 
Debated in 
West Bank 


By Joel Greenberg 

Wrw York Tuna Strike . 

HEBRON, Israeli-Occupied 
West Bank — - An. intcpiational 
observer force has left Hebron 
three months after it was sent 
here to help restore. calm after 
the killing of 29 M uslim wor- 
shipers "by a Jewish settler. 

It was the only inte rnational 
force stationed in the occupied 
territories since Israel captured 
them in the 1967 Aiab-Israeti 
war, and the end of its teas kit 
questions about the effective- 
ness of such a force there. 

The Hebron observers, who 
left Monday; said they had 
helped reduce violence between 
Palestinians and Isradi soldiers 
and settlers; but Arab residents 
said the unarmed monitors had 
little effect because they la ckM 
police powers and could only 
send reports to an Isradi-Pales- 
tinian committee. 

Under its mandate, the force 
was supposed to promote a fed- 
ing of security among the Pales- 
tinians and monitor their safe- 
ty, while helping to ' restore 
normal life by reopening areas 
closed by the Israeli Army since 
the killings at the Tomb of the 
Patriarchs on Feb. 25. 

The army has shut Hebron’s 
vegetable market and barred 
Arab traffic from some down- 
town areas to prevent revenge 
attacks on adjacent Jewish en- 
claves, where about 400 settlers 
live among 100,000 Palestin- 
ians. The shrine has been dosed 
while the army installs new se- 


curity equipment. 

“The international 


— force 

helped reduce human rights vi- 
olations by the army and at- 
tacks by the settlers, but they 
did not achieve their main goal, 
which was to restore life to what 
it was before the massacre,'' 
said Mustafa Natshe, the. mayor 
of Hebron. 



vv- 

All MrAmol/Thc A<M«.-utcd Prc— 

FINAL COMEDOWN FOR EMBASSY IN BEIRUT — The onetime American 
Embassy in Lebanon being demoKsbed on Tuesday to make room for a new structure, 
more than 11 years after a striride track bomber assaxdied die building, killing 63 
people. After die attack, Washington moved its embassy to a snbwb of the capital. 


SYRIA: Both Sides Are Moving Slowly Toward a Compromise, U.S. Says 

the Syrian leader's latest thinking to Isra- 


CoatinBed from Page 1 


broad outlines of a peace accord were 
there: Israel has tentatively offered to 
withdraw from the Golan Heights in ex- 
change for a comprehensive peace with 
Syria. Myriad derails still need to -be 
worked out, however, about security ar- 
rangements, borders, the scope of a fall 
peace and the timin g of implementing a 
peace accord. - 

During Ins five-day trip to the Middle 
East — Ins fourth trip, to the region in three 
months — Mr. Christopher carried some 
new Israeli ideas to.Damascns and, after 
meeting with Ml Assad, conveyed some of 


ePs prime minister, Yitzhak Rabin. 
’There is 


a gpod deal for them to chew 
on as we leave the region.” Mr. Christo- 


pher said, noting that sizable gaps re- 
mained between the two sides. 


"Each ride,” the official said, “is trying 
to determine whether they can pay the 
price they are being asked far by the other 
and whether the price is worth it.” 


In a news conference on Monday, Mr. 
Rabin also indicated that he thought Mr. 
Assad was intent cm achieving peace. “Syr- 
ia wants peace,” he said. "The problem is 
the price, the timing, the timetables.” 

A senior official aboard Mr. Christo- 


Tbe senior official described the talks as 
“far more detailed than before,” adding 
that they had taken on a more probing 
character. 


obex's plane said that although Mr. Assad 
had in 


[indicated that he had made a strategic 
dunce for peace, the Syrian leader would 
not accept a peace at any price. 


“They’re not just trying to deal with 
each issue in isolation,” the -official said. 
“They're much more intent on seeing how 
each issue will fit together. It will be a 
time-consuming process.” 


— STEVEN GREENHOUSE 


CLINTON: 

Sinking Deeper 


BUSTERS: Russian Private Security Forces Grow 


Continued from Page 1 

Brookings Institution. Tt is one 
of the biggest mysteries of this 
administration-" 

Political scientists agree that 
presidents are usually rewarded 
by the public for economic 
good times and punished when 
times are bad. 

The survey and interviews 
with experts on the presidency 
also suggest that there may be 
other reasons for voters’ disqui- 
et with Mr. Clinton. 


“I have a suspicion that do- 
zens are getting conflicting 
measures through the media 
and their personal contacts,” 
said Michael Traugott, a 
cal scientist at the University of 
Michigan. “The gross economic 
data are generally good, but 
downsizing may have cost some 
friends and neighbors their 
jobs. The literature suggests 
that people are responding 
more to concerns about others 
than their own circumstances. 

Some say other issues may be 

crowding out the economic 
good news. “People's attention 
& not on the economy but else- 
where: Whitewater, Rwtmda, 
Bosnia, crime,” said, Richard 
Brody, a Stanford University 
political scientist- 


Gatined from Page 1 . . 

polls, people say they worry 
about crime more than any oth- 
er problem. President Boris N. 
Yeltsin issued a far-reaching 
anti-crime decree in Jane. But 
in a society suffused with — 
and sometimes seemingly run 
by — gangsters, the taric will 
not be simple. 

“This is riot meant to be a 
Mine or a joke,” said Alexander 
G. Azmolov, a deputy minister 
for education who was among 
the VIPs who attended the 
show. “Tins is a society that has 
never had to think of private 
security, or personal safety or 
random Now that has 

changed. So these people are 
here to show us that we can be 
prepared to battle criminals.” 

It is not entirely clear to most 


town of Mineralnye Vody — 
the fourth time since December 
that hostages had been seized 
there. Government forces 
stormed the bus the next day 
and five people died, including 
four hostages. 

The demonstration here, at a 
sort of survivalist camp for the 
guards of nouveau riche bank- 
as, was meant to show that 
Russia can stop aU that. Than 
were competitions In several 
categories: storming, banks to 
rescue hostages, killin g terror- 
ists without banning their pris- 
oners, and beating bad guys to a 

p td g « watched as a succes- 
sion of guards overpowered 


bank robbers. They assigned 
points based on technique, use 
of handcuffs, stealth, speed and 
shooting style. They judged as 
the contestants shot paint-filled 
bullets and stabbed, kicked and 
punched one another. 

One of the main events was 
the siege of a money exchange 
branch. Criminals surrounded 
guards as they walked toward 


the building carrying huge 
Each guard had 


cavil rights advocates here that 
Russu 


what Russia needs to confront 
crime are scores of highly pol- 
ished vigilante organizations — 
even the Guardian Angels have 
appeared on the scene — oper- 
ating as if they .were the police. 

Yet it is not hard to under- 
stand why such groups would 
receive applause. Street crime is 
stiff relatively new, but it is get- 
ting worse by the day. 

On July 2a, after the conclu- 
sion of these exercises, for in- 
stance, gu nm e n took over a bus. 
near tin southern Russia spa 


Requested in Espy Case 

The A ssociat ed Press 
WASHINGTON — Attor- 
ney General Janet Reno asked 
for the appointment of an inde- 
pendent counsel Tuesday to 
continue an investigation into 
whether Agriculture Secretary 
Mike Espy Illegally accepted 
gifts from people who do busi- 
ness with ms department 

Mr. Espy has been accused of 
taking gifts from Tyson Foods. 


moneybags, 
one minute to overcome and 
handcuff his auackcr. 

Money exchanges, as com- 
mon in Moscow as coffee shops 
in New York, are often in dark 
apartments or small offices, 
giimly guarded by a team with 
automatic rifles. It is hard to 
feel entirely safe in them. 

’That is why we chose that 
image,” said Aleksei H. Ve- 
lichko, one of the organizers. 
“We want everyone to know 


that these places are going to be 
safe if they hire the right 


teams. 

Maybe so. Private security 
costs a lot in Moscow now. 
Many guards are retired Soviet 
soldiers, and the best paid are 
these with combat experience 
in Afghanistan. But some com- 
panies have proved to be dis- 
honest — uniformed versions of 
the thugs they were hired to 
ward 


CAMERAS: An EngKsh Town Is Peering Into Its Nooks and Crannies 


OntimiedfromPfegel- 

; video survdllanoe 



is 

as “one <n •— — . — ° ~~v* 

constructive sppbcauons of 

the uCut 


constructive , 

new technology f 
agains t cnmeTas Jumor Home 
Minis ter David Maclean put 
in a recent speech. 

Closed-circuit television has 

long been used in Europe and 

.l. in monitor 


long OCCU U*** — r 

the United States to momtoi 

such vulnerable crime venuoas 

hsnlre rrtail Outlets, aHPOTtS 


s uen vumciau^ 1 * 1 — . 

banks, retail outlets, anportj 
and subway systems- Butm 
„ iii. has been 


Britain the concept has been 

emended to cover 

and city centers— parking lots, 

streets, h^b-ci^ne housing]^ 

iccts, industrial areas, sports 
AiimKiiM. erave- 


iects. moium" -r 

complexes, ctaefc*. Jf av& - 

yards and small alleyways. 

The British video p rojects are 

inspect the system, town offi- 
cials say. 


But civil libertarians fear that 
Britain is fulfilling the prophe- 
cies of Geoage OrwelTs novel 
“Nineteen 'Eighty-Four”, ™ 
which the writer warned against 
a to talitarian state in which an 
all-seeing Big Brother keeps an 
omniscient eye oh the ettizemy. 

With cameras all around, 
“there is a drilling effect which 
is quite difficult to put into tan- 
gible words or feelings,” said 
Atiya Lockwood of Britain’s 
National Council for Civil Lib- 
erties. “On the other hand, you 
have to balance it out agamst 
people feeling more comfort- 
able if therte in an area where 
they’re wanting alone.” 

Of greatest concern, Ms. 
Lockwood said, is -the ahseace 
of laws to govern the uses of 
video survoDance, access to 
tapes or the accountability of 
camera operators, who in most 
cases are private security guards 
hired ott contract by town gov- 
ernments. The ' Home Office 
says it hopes to publish non- 


. b inding guidelines on such is- 
sues this autumn. 

Britain is virtually alone in 
the field, industry executives 
and civil libertarians said. On 
the Continmt, laws enacted af- 
ter the experience of fascism 
and war during the 1930s and 
1940s sharply restrict all forms 
of electronic surveillance. The 
mere thought of what the Nazis 
might haw done with such cam- 
eras is enough to deter theii use, 
European civil hbertanans say. 

Public surveys in Britain de- 
pict ambivalence about the new 
systems. A dear majority ex- 
presses support for the use of 
video cameras to slop crime. 
But m one detailed survey, 4 out 
of 1 0 said they believed the new 
cameras would be used “to spy 
on people.” 

The King's Lynn experience 
suggests that video surveillance 
has a momentum aQ its own. 
Originally, there was no plan 
for such a large system here — 
it just grew as more sections of 


the town clamored to be includ- 
ed. 

The project began with seven 
fixed cameras in a burglary- 
plagued industrial park. Then, 
in 1992, it expanded to 32 cam- 
eras to stop crime in parking 
lots. To protect privacy, at first 
only stationary cameras were 
installed near residential areas. 
But today this town of 30,000 
has 60 cameras linked to its 
central surveillance command. 

Plans are afoot to expand the 
system even further. 

Yet Kill’s Lynn docs not 
have a serious crime problem 
compared with elsewhere in 
Britain. 


“What it comes down to is, 
there’s a perception of crime, a 
fear of crone, rather than actual 
crime,” said Barry Loftus, the 


Kmg> Lynn surveilance direc- 
tor. The syst 


has grown be- 
cause of the “feel-good factor 
it creates among the public, he 
said. 


Bosnian Muslims Rout Rebel Force 


By John Pomfret 

Washington Post Service 

SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Heraegovina — 
Muslim forces loyal to the Sarajevo gov- 
ernment routed Muslim rebels in north- 
west Bosnia on Tuesday, giving Bosnia’s 
army its biggest victory to date and moving 
to a dose the most bizarre chapter of this 
28-momh-oid war. United Nations offi- 
cials said. 


reported seeing Serbian tanks on Croatian 
turf firing ai government troops as they 
moved north but added that Serbian infan- 
try would have to get involved if they 
warned to save Mr. Abdic's men. 

The Jikdy fall of Mr. Abdic, a business- 


More than 7,000 Muslim civilians and 
fighters faithful to Fikrel Abdic, a Muslim 
renegade who abandoned the Bosnian gov- 
ernment last year to make peace with the 
Serbs, fled over Bosnia's border into terri- 
tory held by rebel Serbs in Croatia, a UN 
spokesman, Paul Risley. said in Zagreb. 
Croatia. They were escaping the Muslim 
government’s Fifth Corps, which had 
rolled to less than six miles from the Abdic 
stronghold of Velika Kladusa. 

Unless Croatian Serbian forces inter- 
vene and attack into Bosnia. Mr. Abdic is 
finished, said a Dutch Army major, Rob 
Annink, a spokesman for the UN Protec- 
tion Force in Bosnia. UN peacekeepers 


1 be likely lall oi Mr. adoic, a Dusiness- 
man who has grown tremendously rich 
playing all sides of Bosnia’s conflict by 
turning Bihac, a pocket of 300.000 Mus- 
lims, into a giant company town, marks a 
major step forward for Sarajevo’s govern- 
ment First jt will probably end a yearlong 
rebellion fostered in part by international 
peace negotiators seeking to pressure Sara- 
jevo to sign an old peace plan. 

Second, the victory, during which Mus- 
lim forces captured thousands of weapons, 
including heavy artillery, and hundreds of 
thousands of rounds of ammunition, all 
supplied by the Serbs, also means an im- 
pressive step forward for the Bosnian 
Army’s Fifth Corps, which for the last 1 1 
months has had to fight wars on two fronts 
—one against Mr. Abdic to the north and 
one against Bosnian Serbs in Banja Luka 
to the east and south. 

Major Annink said the Muslim victory 


here, and Muslim gains in battles against- 
Serbs in central Bosnia south of Vares and 
along the strategic Posavina corridor, are 
likely to embolden the Bosnian Army to 
continue fighting despite a UN assessment 
that it cannot regain much of the 70 per- 
cent of the country controlled by the Serbs. 


In late July the mosdy-Muslim govern- 
ment approved an international peace plan 
to divide Bosnia that Bosnian Serbs reject- 
ed, but UN officials said they believed 
Sarajevo was now more interested in fight- 
ing because momentum was on their side. 


■ UN Resumes Airlift 
The UN airlift into Sarajevo resumed 
Tuesday, relaxing a stranglehold that the 
Bosnian Serbs have clamped on the city. 
Reuters reported from Sarajevo. 

The airlift was stopped July 21 after a 
scries of incidents in which aircra/i came 
under fire at the airporL 


In Sarajevo, UN officials said the Bosni- 
i Serbs ha 


an Serbs had ordered a ban on the move- 
ment of UN military convoys Tuesday, 
apparently in an escalation of their war of 
nerves with the UN Protection Force. 


BOSNIA: 

Easing Embargo? 


Continued from Page 1 

Congress, the Clinton adminis- 
tration may appeal to the U air- 
ed Nations as early as Oct 15 to 
exempt the Muslim-led Bosnian 
government from a regional 
arms embargo, if Serbian sepa- 
ratists continue to reject the 
peace plan. 

If the UN Security Council 
refuses, the administration 
would return to Congress to 
discuss withdrawing from its 
role in the North Atlantic Trea- 
ty Organization as enforcer of 
the embargo. 

The course of action is con- 
tained in a proposed resolution 
that would be part of the de- 
fense budget authorization bill. 
The bill could be brought to a 
vole as early as this week. 

Setting a deadline on the 
Serbs would be a distinct depar- 
ture for the administration, 
which has been wary of laying 
down ultimatums. Washington 
is trying to get agreement from 
its allies and Russia to lift the 
embargo. 

President Bill Clinton has fa- 
vored lifting the arms embargo 
on the grounds that it penalizes 
the Muslims, whom be regards 
as victims of aggression. Con- 


Berlusconi Vows to Carry On 
With Controversial TV Ads 


A genet Fnmce-Presst 

ROME — Prime Minister 
Silvio Berlusconi's government 
on Tuesday vowed to pursue a 
controversial advertising cam- 


paign promoting the 
[ration’s achievements. 


Gianni Letta, secretary to the 
prime minister’s office, said 
that the 50-second television 
ads, launched amid much pro- 
tests on Saturday, were a means 
of “re-establishing links be- 
tween ritizens and institutions” 
that had been severed under 
previous governments. 

“Under the First Republic 
everyone deplored this gap be- 
tween public opinion and the 
government,” Mr. Letta said, 
stressing his intention to press 
ahead with the “information” 

camp ai g n. 

Berlusconi supporters have 
dubbed his administration the 
Second Republic. But there 
have been no formal constitu- 
tional changes since the Chris- 
tian Democra tic-dominated 
government was defeated in 


March elections by Mr. Berlus- 
coni's rightist coalition. 

Mr. Lena's comments came a 
day after Italy's state television 
station RAI announced that it 
was suspending broadcasts of 
the ads. 

After Mr. Berlusconi, who 
owns three television stations in 
Italy, launched the ads, opposi- 
tion parties immediately 
charged that they amounted to 
no more than propaganda for 
what has become an adminis- 
tration increasingly dogged by 
controversy. 

The Democratic Parly of the 
Left denounced the ads as “ab- 
surd and illegal” and demanded 
that they be banned. 

Even Umbeno Bossi. leader 
of the federalist Northern 
League and a member of Mr. 
Berlusconi's three-party coali- 
tion. criticized the ads. 

The broadcasts were stopped 
after Giuseppe Santaniello, the 
head of the national broadcast- 
ing watchdog, was asked to rule 
on their legality. He will have to 


decide within a month whether 
the ads breach laws under 
which state television has to 
broadcast government mes- 
sages in certain strictly defined 
cases. 

Mr. Letta attacked what be 
called “unjust” attempts to 
“distort the intentions of the 
government." 

He added that on about 50 
occasions former governments 
had used television advertising 
campaigns. 

The ads first show images of 
hospitals, syringes or rubbish 
dumps. Then an off-screen 
voice lists the achievements of 
Mr. Berlusconi's four-month 
administration: “Drugs: the 
creation of a national interven- 
tion fund against drugs, it’s 
done. . . . Health: free treat- 
ment extended to victims of 
chronic illnesses, it's done.” 

The ads end with the state- 
ment: “Citizens must be aware 
of these facts to exercise their 
rights,” followed by (he prime 
mini Stef’s symbol. 


gress has been pressing the ad- 
ministration to lift the embargo 


unilaterally. In June, the House 
voted to compel Mr. Clinton to 
break the etnbaigp, but the Sen- 
ate, by a tie vote, refused to go 
along. 

In an offensive last week, the 
Bosnian army overran the town 
of Pedgrad, capturing 1,000 of 
Abdic's troops and opening the 
wav to breaking the resistance 
of his remaining forces. 


Racial Attacks Erupt Across Germany 
While Neo-Nazi’s Sentence Is Disputed 


A German Court 
Allows Plutonium 
Plant to Proceed 


BONN (Reuters) — The 
German Administrative Court 
in Berlin gave the go-ahead 
Tuesday for a Siemens AG plu- 
tonium plant near Frankfurt, a 
project bogged down for three 
years by a legal battle with the 
local government. 

The Hesse government, a co- 
alition of the Social Democratic 
Party and the Greens, 
tbeplant on safety grount 

The Hesse environment min- 
ister, Joschka Fischer, said in a 
radio interview that he saw “an 
enormous proliferation risk” 
from plutonium, used in the 
manufacturing of nuclear 
weapons, particularly in view of 
unsettled political conditions in 
eastern Europe. 

Siemens said Tuesday that it 
would resume work on the 
plant and that production of 
mixed-oxide plutonium fuel 
rods could begin in two to three 
years. 

“Further moves toward com- 
pletion oi the plant can now 
proceed on a firm legal basis," a 
Siemens spokesman said. “But 
whether progress can be made 
depends on whether the Hesse 
government gives up its ob- 
structionist policies.” 


A genre Francc-Presse 

JUTERBOG, Germany — A 
series of racially motivated at- 
tacks and a dispute over the 
sentencing of the leader of the 
neo-Nazi movement sparked an 
uproar on Tuesday. 

Young rightist extremists at- 
tacked a group of tourists in 
J0terbo& in Eastern Germany, 
early Tuesday because a teen- 
ager of Turkish origin was part 
of their group, the police said. 

Three tourists, including the 
Turkish teenager, and one of 
the rightist youths were hurt, 
the police said. 

The police had earlier arrest- 
ed four youths for listening to 
neo-Nazi chants on a tape re- 
corder and waving the imperial 
flag, which is banned in the 
state of Brandenburg, in a Jo- 
terbog car park. 

The previous day, the police 
arrested four rightist extremists 
in Gotha, also in Eastern Ger- 
many, after they went on a ram- 


page in a service station and 
shouted “Heil Hitler!” 


In another incident, a fire- 
bomb destroyed a Turkish cul- 
tural center" in the southern 
German town of Sindelfmgen 
overnight. No one was hurd. 

Jewish and Gypsy communi- 
ty leaders, meanwhile, ex- 
pressed outrage at the “lenient” 
sentence given Gunter Deckert, 
the leader of the National Dem- 
ocratic Party, a neo-Nazi move- 
ment, after his trial in Mann- 
heim on charges erf inciting 
racial hatred. 

Mr. Deckert was given a one- 
year suspended sentence and 
fined for telling a 1991 rally of 
revisionists who deny the Holo- 
caust that it was impossible for 
the Germans to haw gassed 6 
million Jews to death during 
World War II. 

Newspaper reports said the 
judgment was accompanied by 
equivocal comments by the 
judges. 


The chairman of the council 
of German Jews, Ignatz Bubis, 
asked Chancellor Helmut Kohl 
to take a position on the judg- 
ment, the reports said. 

Germany's main Gypsy; 
body, the Central Gypsy Coun- 
cil. demanded the immediate' 
resignation of the presiding 
judge, Wolfgang Muller. 

The reports said Judge Midl- 
er had claimed in the judgment, 
that Mr. Deckert had “attempt- ' 
ed to strengthen the resistance 
of the German people to the. 
Jewish claims of the Holo- 
caust" 

In Magdeburg. Eastern Ger- 
many, the police chief who was 
heavily criticized for his appar- 
ent inaction during a vinous 
racially motivated attack on 
foreigners there earlier this year 
was retired on Tuesday, the re- .* 
gionaJ government said. 

Antoni us Stockmann was 
forced out of his post by the . 
regional government. 


FRANCE: Clampdown Against Algerians Widens 


CoBtmned from Page 1 
military intervened to cancel 
the run-off ballot in January 
1992 after Islamic hard-liners 
took a commanding lead on the 
first round. 

■ Boon Studies Exile’s Case 
Goman authorities are con- 
sidering measures agamst the 
top exiled leader of the out- 
lawed Islamic Salvation Front, 
Rabah Kebir. for breaking a 
ban on political activity, 
Agence France- Presse reported 
Tuesday in Bonn. 


Local authorities in the state 
of North Rhin e-Westphalia, 
where Mr. Kebir lives, were 
waiting for information from 
the Foreign Ministry in Bonn 
after the From official gave in- 
terviews to French reporters 
and sent a statement to AFP 
attacking France's policy on Al- 
geria. 

A local official in North 
Rhine-Westphalia said Mr. Ke- 


bir could face a $3,000 fine and 
other possible action once Bonn 
had given the state’s interior 
ministry “precise details of Mr. 
Kebir 5 s declarations to enable a 
decision to be taken.” 


Mr. Retail's political refugee 
status, granted in February, 


faces a challenge from the fed- 
eral government, which has ap- 
pealed against it. The courts are 
due to decide on the issue. 


On September 5th, the IHT will publish a 
Special Report on 


Aviation 


■ Developments of the GE9G, a new 
aircraft engine. 

■ Future of mergers and acquisitions in the 
industry. 

m Importance of the Chinese market in 
aircraft sales. 

■ Privatization of airports. 

■ Secrets of success for the European 
charter industry 


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INTERNATIONAL 




PUBLISHED with THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON TOST 


A Long Haul in Rwanda 


tribune So Back Come the Apparatekiks^^ m Europe 


Hie crisis in Rwanda may take years to 
resolve. Relief workers in Zaire, where a 
millio n Rwandans have fled, see little hope 
for a prompt return home by Hutu fearing 
reprisal massacres by Tutsi, who dominate 
the new government in Kigali Instead of 
getting better, matters could become 
worse, spreading conflict, hunger and up- 
rooted peoples through an entire region. 

It would be wise for the Clinton admin- 
istration to prepare Americans for what 
may be a very long haul in Central Africa. 
A small contingent of U.S. troops is al- 
ready assisting the UN operation in 
Rwanda, and Washington has promised to 
come up with $270 million in new aid. If 
the case is fairly made, if burdens are fairly 
shared with others, and if civil peace can 
be maintained, this is an effort that Ameri- 
cans can be persuaded to support. 

The immediate, compelling consider- 
ation is humanitarian. It affronts decency 
to do nothing as children starve in squalid 
refugee camps. But other interests are af- 
fected when 4 million people flee their 
homes, half of them across frontiers, in a 
country of just under 8 million people 
where, today, no food grows in vacated 
farms. Desperation mil breed new wars, 
sending shock waves through tense neigh- 
boring states, notably Burundi and Zaire. 

The fearful prospect of more upheavals 
calls out for energetic preventive diploma- 
cy. The place to start is Kigali, where a 
new government lacking even telephones, 
desks and offices rules a country lacking 
people. Creditably, the victorious Rwanda 
Patriotic Front has established a multipar- 
ty cabinet that is led by a president and 
prime minister who are both Hutu. But 
real power is hdd by minority Tutsi, nota- 
bly Vice President and Defense Minister 
Paul Kagame, who was the chief strategist 
of the rebel victory. The new regime is 
speaking the right words about reconcilia- 
tion- Yet these have to be set against the 


scattered killing s of returning Hutu and 
government plans to try thousands of civil- 
ians as war criminals. 

There could also be another nightmare 
if 300,000 Rwandans, mostly Hutu, flee a 
security zone created by French peace- 
keepers, who are due' to depart by Aug. 22. 
Keeping to that timetable is a problem, 
since the French are supposed to be re- 
placed by a 5,500-strong UN peacekeep- 
ing force. But less than a thousand Cana- 
dian and African troops are now in 
Rwanda, with the rest sdu to be trained to 
protect convoys and reassure returning 
villagers. A small contingent of U.S. 
troops is under U.S. command in Kigali 

By any measure, the prospects are grim: 
an untested new government, a collapse of 
basic services, reprisal killings, an impro- 
vised international force and a depopu- 
lated country, with Lhe planting season 
supposed to begin next month. 

Meantime, mingling with 2 million ref- 
ugees in Zaire and Tanzania are rem- 
nants of the defeated Rwandan army, 
including units responsible for the worst 
massacres. Commanders talk of regroup- 
ing and of border war from sanctuaries in 
Zaire; they threaten to shoot foreign re- 
lief workers who dare urge Rwandans to 
return home. And the same despicable 
radio station that clamored for Tutsi 
blood before the rebel victory continues 
its broadcasts from a mobile base. 

What could make an enormous differ- 
ence is a real international presence in 
Rwanda, to reassure and to witness. Now 
there are reports of killings in adjacent 
Burundi with a similar ethnic mix and 
with the same history of strife. The world 
had neither the means nor the wiD to 
respond in April the critical early stage of 
Rwanda’s descent into genocide. It has 
been a terrible learning process, and yet 
cruder lessons may lie ahead. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Abuses in South Korea 


For more than a month. South Korea 
has been waging a fierce campai g n against 
student radicals and labor militants with 
methods that have no place in a democrat- 
ic society. Washington has muted its pub- 
lic criticism in deference to Seoul’s anxi- 
eties over the North Korean nuclear 
program and the delicate succession to 
Kim fl Sung. But a month has elapsed 
since his death, and the repression shows 
no sign of abating, posing a far graver 
threat to democracy than any subversive 
scheme hatched in Pyongyang. South Ko- 
rea's true friends need to speak up. 

The crackdown began in June, amid a 
wave of labor unrest Riot police swept 
through factories making mass arrests. 
They also raided imiveraty campuses, ar- 
resting activist students for allegedly sup- 
porting North Korea. That charge falls 
under Seoul's fearsome National Security 
Law, which allows long sentences merely 
for expressing proscribed opinions. 

Things got even worse after Kim II Sung 
died on July 8. Radical students sought to 
travel north for the funeral and hold pub- 
lic memorial services in the South. These 
expressions of public sympathy for the 
man who started the Korean War out- 
raged Southern conservatives and led to 
intensified campus repression. 

Kim II Sung is widely reviled in the 
South, where families mourn the relatives 
and homes they lost in the war. More 
recently, the North has sponsored acts of 
terrorism and compels Seoul to remain on 


constant defense alert. Meanwhile, South 
Korea’s student radicals are notorious for 
their often sunplemmded politics and 
sometimes violent protest But suppressing 
speed] and locking people up for their 
unpopular opinions will not fortify South 
Korea against external danger. 

One reason the South has proved more 
successful than the North is that it has 
always been a more open society- But even 
in Seoul the word ‘'open” has been quali- 
fied. For years, military regimes encour- 
aged economic daring while maintaining 
tight control over political activities. 

That dichotomy broke down under 
pressure from domestic dissidents and, at 
crucial moments, from the United States. 
Since 1987, South Korea has moved to- 
ward full political democracy, since early 
last year, it has been led try a former 
dissident leader, Kim Young 

Presideat Kim should know better than 
to round up radicals under the National 
Security Law. The din ton administration 
earlier this year expressed its concerns 
about the law as well as its hope that 
Seoul would repeal it as soon as possible. 
More recently, Washington has lowered 
its voice on human rights issues in general 
and has seemed particularly reluctant to 
raise such issues with South Korea in the 
midst of the nuclear crisis. That reluc- 
tance has given Seoul exactly the wrong 
message. A fresh expression of American 
concern and hope is urgently needed. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


The Pope and Waldheim 


Since 1987, Kurt Waldheim, the for- 
mer Austrian president and United Na- 
tions secretary-general has been barred 
from entering the United States as a pri- 
vate citizen, and has been ostracized by 
much of the West His outcast status is 
well-deserved. During World War II he 
served as a decorated intelligence officer 
in German army units responsible for 
committing a series of atrocities and war 
crimes against civilians and prisoners of 
war. His duplicity about his wartime re- 
cord only compounded the dishonor. To- 
day this onetime uniformed servant of 
the Nazi onslaught in the Balkans wears a 
new mantle. It is one of legitimacy, be- 
stowed by Pope John Paul IL 

Last month, with little fanfare, in a 
ceremony at the Vatican Embassy in 
Vienna, Mr. Waldheim was awarded a 
papal knighthood of die Ordine Piano. 
It is said that the Vatican chose to be- 
stow the honor upon Mr. Waldheim, a 
prominent Catholic from a mostly Cath- 
olic country, for safeguarding human 
rights when he served with the United 
Nations. But for the Vatican to have 
done that for this man was to fall victim 
to parochialism of the worst kind. 

The papal honoree is the same man 
who, according to an Austrian govern- 


ment report prepared by an independent 
panel of historians, knew about and did 
nothing to stop atrocities against Jews. 
He is the same man Attorney General 
Edwin Meese blocked from entering the 
United States because of evidence that he 
provided intelligence and other support 
that enabled others to kill torture and 
deport people to slave labor camps. This 
is the same Mr. Waldheim who has not 
brought himself publicly to own up to his 
past, let alone apologize for his complic- 
ity in the things dime in German-occu- 
pied Yugoslavia and Greece. The Pope, it 
is said, turns no sinner away, bat to take 
in and honor as unrepentant a figure as 
Mr. Waldheim is to ask too much. 

Yet this is not the first time Kurt Wald- 
heim’s diplomatic isolation has been 
breached by the Vatican; he has been 
received there twice before. It is tragic 
that this embrace comes on the heels of 
the recently signed agreement between 
the Vatican and Israel establishing dip- 
lomatic relations after a period of great 
tension. The Pope’s condemnation of 
anti-Semitism and racism has been 
strong in the past. To honor the likes of 
Kurt Waldheim ignores history and sug- 
gests a terrible bund spot. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 



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N EW YORK — In Budapest, the 
newly elected leader of Hungary was 
t alking to me about strengthening the 
country's economy and drawing closer to 
the West He said sensible things that the 
prime minister of a country recovering 
from decades of Communist rule could 
be expected to say. 

All the while I felt astonishment and 
disappointment that this politician 

Free enterprise is dandy, but 


better off if you lose your job 
for a few years and see 


better sates pitch to Eastern 
Europe than capitalism has 
yet come up with, 

would be presiding in the office of the 
prime minuter at alL It was Eke t alkin g 
with the ghost of a nonbeloved departed. 

So I asked the question: Wasn’t 
Gyula Horn a little surprised to find 
hims elf in that office? After all he had 


By A. M. Rosenthal. 


of 1956, served in a militia that rounded 
up Hungarians who had fought against 
the country's Communist government 
and the invading Soviet army. He had 
been a lea ding member of the Commu- 
nist apparatus for decades. He was for- 
eign minis ter in the Co mm u n ist govern- 
ment that was thrown out four years ago 
in Hungary’s first free election. 

But on May 29 he and his party, now 
namgri Socialist, won the second election 
with a plump margin. The West is yawn- 
ingly and dangerously used to the idea. 

Among the 22 countries in the former 
Soviet Union or captive under its exceed- 
ingly evil empire in Central and Eastern' 
Europe, only five have dispensed with 
Communists in power or with a signifi- 
cant share of power. Adrian Karatcycky. 
executive director of Freedom House, 
has named those five in National Re- 
view: Albania, Armenia, the Czech Re- 
public, Estonia and Latvia. 

Two thin gs could not have been fore- 
told, I suggested to Mr. Horn: that com- 
munism would collapse so suddenly, and 
that politicians who hdd power under 
communism would be back in office so 
quickly — politicians like himself. . 

That is why I had come to Hungary. 


and could he please h<^'m6^ure it out- 

That put a chill xm the conversation for. 
awhile, oiuMr.Homkcpthis tamper. He 
said he had joined the mifrtia becansehe 
was forced to as a student And as foreign 
minister in 1989, be went on, be opened 
Hungary as & freedom route tb the West 
for East Europeans. 

But to Mr. Ham’s opponents a toughie 
he was, and a tbughie he risinams, not af 
gcbitle reformer. : . 

: Poking around, I f ound little ^disagree- 
ment about the reasons the SboaHists had 
won. The previous gpvcmxnmt almost - 
handed than the election. It was, seen as 
bumbling, high and mighty and riven. 

Also, the “Socialists" started with a 
powerfdvotirwbaw-T^theMpaTamtof ' 
Hungarians who had either been mem- 
bers of the old CammumsT Party or were 
married to them.'. . : y~; 

Two other reasons wd&t&r arid a 
peculiar complacency. The fear was that 
Hungarians could lose lhe : JC6annurii5t 
benefit they valued most; ffiey were nev- 
er unemployed long. Free-exrtcrprise is 
dandy, but the idea, that society -will be 
better off if you lose youTjcft) for a few 
years, sec your Irving standard decline 
and pension dwindle, fakes at better eco- 
nomic sales pitch to Eastern Europe 
than capitalism has yet come op with. 

Hungary's Communists, ex- and not so 
ex-, have no idea how to keep a free 


STri ZrX incumbent: B*tfd 
those fellows leave this pi** m a mess! 

. The complacency is the 
since few expect the Socialists Jo tiy to 
return to outright Martian, there is no 
danger of political repression. 

And in truth the greatest danger since 
' the last election seemed to be the racist 
• right- In this year's election, Hungarians 
sent it into pariiamentaiy oblivion 
; something to remember despite the dis- 
appointment of the return of the exes. 

But it was a fine sunny week m one of 

Europe’s most handsome cities. We lis- 
tened to Beethoven in a grove of trees. 
We dined at Gundd’s, a pure elegant 
. waltz of a restaurant I did not have the 
heart to lecture people who had suffered 
under Communists about the danger of 
returning them to office. 

But I did want to say what I can now. 
Throughout Eastern and Central Europe. 

. the ex-communists will be moved by 
ingfinc* and self-interest toward their 

own foiro irfsiare con txx^ and the corrup- 
tion of society and ethic ihatgoes with il 

The same old apparatchiks will then 
dominate government, business and poli- 
tics- That would be the great victory of 
the ghost people. 

The Nov York Times. 


China: The Military’s Rush to Profit Is a High-Risk Maneuver 


B ELTING — Although China’s 
defense spending has almost 
doubled in the past six years and 
the country’s leadership under 
Deng Xiaoping has minimized 
political interference in military 
affairs, the modernization of the 
armed forces is facing a threat 
from an unexpected quarter: the 
massive intrusion of the military 
into economic affairs. If un- 
checked, it will erode the capa- 
bility and professional integrity 
of the armed forces. 

The involvement of the mili- 
tary in economic activities is as 
old as the Chinese People's Army. 
However, under Mr. Deng’s eco- 
nomic reforms, it has become 
much more extensive than at any 
time in the past. Military com- 
mercial enterprise has branched 
out into areas that used to be 
strictly off-limits for ideological 
reasons. Today, the sole purpose 
of such activity is to make money. 


By Ellis Joffe 


The initial impetus for this 
change was given when the gov- 
ernment declared that modern- 
ization of the armed forces was 
one of its main policy objectives. 
But the proviso was added that 
any large-scale updating of weap- 
ons and equipment would be 
postponed until China attained 
substantial economic and techno- 
logical progress. 

This policy shaped the defense 
budget for most of the 1980s. 
Allocations hardly increased in 
absolute terms and dropped by 
about 50 percent as a portion of 
total spending. 

Although the defense budget 
has risen every year since then, 
Chinese mili tary officials Haim 
that the purchasing power of the 
army has not increased because 
of inflation.. The shortfalls af- 
fected the livlihood of troops as 


well as arms acquisition. To 
close the gap, the army was en- 
couraged to launch its own prof- 
it-making operations in every 
possible sector of the economy. 

In the freewheeling clima te 
created by Mr. Deng’s reforms, 
these operations grew rapidly. 
Over the last decade, the military 
ha« built a commercial empire 
the dimensions of which are 
probably not known even to the 
top commanders. Privately, offi- 
cials say the armed forces now 
run more than 20,000 produc- 
tion, industrial and service com- 
panies. Most major units in the 
army, navy and air force are re- 
ported to be involved in econom- 
ic activity. This includes owning 
factories and hotels, running 
mines and import-export firms, 
building airports, operating ci- 
vilian airlines, marketing agri- 


cultural produce, ferrying goods 
on navy ships, putting together : 
huge commercial conglomerates 
and «*JHng ariris. . 

These profit-making pursuits 
have gone far beyond the Emits 
foreseen or desired by the gov- 
ernment. They are hound to have 
a negative Impact. Commercial- 
ism has diverted army units from 
nrifitnry tasks. More ominously, 
it has given rise to a wide range 
of illegal activities. .... . 

Aware of these problems, CM- 
na’s military leadership has peri- 
odically issued regulations to 
tighten financial supervision and 
end abuses. However, such steps 
have' had Tittle practical effect 
because officers In the far-flung 
units of the armed forces did not 
implement them. They could do ' 
this because the high command 
has so fm refrained from mount- 
ing a fonxftd campaign . to crab 
the military's economic pursuits. 


Korea: The Hawkish Habit Warps Western Policy 


T OKYO — The debate over 
North Korea’s nuclear plans 
shows why Western diplomacy 
has tended to fad in Aria. 

There are two very opposed 
ways to look at the North Korean 
regime. The hawkish view says it 
started out in 1945 as a puppet of 
Soviet Stalinism and that with 
Stalin’s urging in 1953 it engaged 
in an act of blatant aggression 
against Lhe legitimate govern- 
ment of South Korea. 

Ever since, according to this 
view, the regime has been en- 
gaged in tenor and subversion 
against the South, while hoping 
for a chance to make yet one 
more attack and indulging in the 
most extreme kinds of Commu- 
nist repression and fanaticism. It 
is a rogue regime that should be 
confronted at every leveL 
The dovish view says other- 
wise. It says that in 1945 the Ko- 
rean Peninsula was divided arbi- 
trarily as an act of U.S.-Soviet 
expediency, and that the only 
group with political legitimacy at 
the time were the Communists 
(including the recently deceased 
Kim D Sung} thanks to their 


By Gregory Clark 


brave wfflingn'ess'to organize and 
fight against the cruel Japanese 
colonization before 1945. 

But UJS. intervention in 1945 
allowed the creation of a weak, 
corrupt anti-Communist regime 
in the South which immediately 
began to imprison and execute 
intellectuals and others with le- 
gitimate left-wing views. It also 
claimed to be the sole legal gov- 
ernment of the Korean Peninsula 
and backed up this claim with 
occasional military provocations 
against the North. 

In this situation the North had 
the right not just to reply to those 
provocations but also to invade. 
For, as the United States told the 
United Nations on Sept. 30. 1950, 
just after the successful Inchon 
landing, “The artificial barrier 
which has divided North and 
South Korea has no basis for exis- 
tence either in law or reason.” 

It was a classic civil war situa- 
tion, and, as in Rwanda, Yemen 
and a host of other divided na- 
tions, the West should have ac- 
cepted the result of that civil war 


as the only reasonable way to 
deride who should run the nation 
called Korea. But we didn’t and 
we intervened. What is more, we 
intervened with such brutal force 
as to guarantee a permanently 
traumatized regime, in the Norths 
We also assisted massively the 
recovery of the South, along with 
the emergence of anti^Ommni- 
nist hawks there detertiriped to 
get revenge against the North. 

In this view. North Korea has 
had no choice but to develop nu- 
clear weapons to guarantee its se- 
curity, particularly since the West' 
gave tacit agreement to Israel’s 
nuclear weapon development in a 
similar situation. 

As for North Korean sabotage 
tactics and fanaticism, we need to 
look below the surface; Sabotage 
specialists often have a free hand 
even in Western democracies. In 
any Communist regime, a Korean 
one especially, there is a big differ- 
ence between rhetoric and reality. 

And so on 

To most impartial Western stu- 
dents of Kwean affairs, the truth 


Convert Haitian Refugees Into Police 


W ASHINGTON — Invad- 
ing Haiti would be easy, 
since the country has the equi- 
valent of the Podunk Fire De- 
partment for a nnEtary. The 
hard part would be pacifying 
the country, and keeping it paci- 
fied, after an invasion pushed 
the thugs out of office. The solu- 
tion is staring us right in the 
face, although the policymakers 
cannot seem to see it. 

Right now there are thousands 
of Haitian refugees penned up in 
camps at Guanlrinamo an d else- 
where Among those refugees are 
plenty of able men and women 
who could be trained right on 
the ground where they are now 
languishing to be Haiti’s nation- 
al police force. 

Military officers who have 
done it say they could train such 
a force in the basics in three 
months. They suggest that a 
small cadre of police profes- 
sionals Should command, tram 
and stick with the force for at 
least two years. 

The United States has people 
qualified to train and command 
a Haitian police force. But it 
would be more politic to have 
the United Nations or the Orga- 
nization of American States hue 
a training cadre from another 
Caribbean nation such as the 
Bahamas. This would avoid the 
image of white colonialists run- 
ning the show one more time; 
France could be helpful here. 

The work would not be train- 
ing Haitian refugees to run at 
dummies with bayonets, set 
Claymore mines in ambushes or 
knock oat tanks. It would be 
training them in the basic police 


By George C. Wilson 


work that gives civilians the 
sense of security and hope (hat 
they need to get up in the morn- 
ing and puisne their dreams. 

U.S. Marines, with United 
Nations blessing, would do the 
invading and leave Haiti' after 
that job was done and civil au- 
thority was restored. (The Unit- 
ed States tried occupying Haiti 
from 1915 to 1934, with negative 
results. There is no cdncatTon in 
the second kick of a mule.) . 

Imag ine a group of smartly 
uniformed Haitian police per- 
sons, bright men and women, 
keeping gangsters off the docks, 
protecting politicians of all par- 
ties, patrolling neighborhoods, 
breaking up the riots that the 
deposed dictators would stage, 
guarding fanners as they took 
produce to market, responding 
to 91 1 calls, speaking at schools 
and evolving into role models. 

A trained, motivated, well- 
equipped national police force 
led by untouchables (not crooks 
doing the bidding of the politi- 
cians) could have a band, a soc- 
cer team, a baseball team. Sound 
corny? 1 went to Nicaragua at 
the height of its last rivfl war 
expecting to hear all about the 
contras from the people there, 
but all they wanted to talk about 
was American basebafl. Let’s lis- 
ten to the little people on tins 
one, not the power brokers. 

President Bill Clinton, as a 
precondition for asking marines 
to risk their lives, should obtain 
ironclad, public, UN-certified 
pledges from Jean-Bertrand 


Aristide that he will tolerate a 
national police fence with the 
independence of America’ s own 
FBI. Otherwise there should be 
no invasion to restore Father 
Aristide, the elected weadent 
of Haiti, to power. He is no' 
great humanitarian and proba- 
bly would not tolerate a farce of 
untouchables on his own. 

President Clinton is already 
trying to recruit a UN force to. 
ran Haiti after the invasion. But 
troopers who served in Somalia 
as part of the UN peacekeeping 
force report that the co mman d 
and control conflicts among the 
various nationalities woe far 
worse than admitted officially. 
The same kinds of "conflicts 
would arise in HaitL.Also, if the 
work were to become dangerous 
in Haiti, as it did in' Somalia, 
nations would puE their troops 
out. A Haitian police force 
would stay. It would be home. ■ 

What is the worst that could 
happen if the United States or 
the United Nations recruited, 
trained, equipped and officered a . 
Haitian police fence? Some of the 
Haitians would get killed. Father 
Aristide could go back on his 
pledges and abofish tittmdepen- 
dent force. The experiment could 
fail. All those things could hap- 
pen to any UN' force that Mr. 


lies somewhere between these two 
extremes. Some, may prefer the 
former,, some the latter. But that 
u not my print. 

jMjpoint is that when h cames 
to making diplomatic .and mili- 
tary derisions in the West about 
Korea, the odds are invariably 
stacked in the favor of the hawkr 
ish view, not because the decision 
. makers themselves areneccsSarily 
hawks but because the first rule of 
diplomacy, Cold War diplomacy 
at least, has been to. prepare for 
the worst possible scenario. 

. In. some situations — Berlin 
Wall or Cubas crises, for exam- 
ple, dr diplomacy against Stalin- 
ist Russia ''or, Qdtural Revolu- 
tion China . — ..this is not 
necessarily a bad rule. It can .be 
argued that while the hawkish 
route, right or wrong, has. its 
■risks, the dovish route may have 
even larger risks if proved 
wrong. Besides, tire hawk route . 
always has thebackstopof West- 
ern military supremacy even if it 
is proved wrong. 

■ But the North Korean situa- 
tion suggests otherwise; If die 
hawks did get it wrong, then their 
actions have done nothing else 
but guarantee that North Korea, 
would eventually feel it had no 
option but to go nuclear. So they 
now have to thneatcai war to pre- 
vent something that could easily 
have been settled over a roofer-: 
cmcc table years ago without any 
risk whatsoever. 

Worse; by not going to that 
table theyguaranteedan increas- 
ingly repressive North Korea, a . 
ferny repressive South Korea and 
a gross waste of resources and ' 
ma n power in a tragically divided 
nation during decades of intense 


■ In most 
and wxoii 
than most 
realize. Th 
tendon tor 


stan situations, right 
are more complex 
estem policymakers 
should pay more at- 
s dovish view. 


Immuakmal Herald Tribune. 


’*■ The reason is plain. The benefits 
from these activities are immediate 
and tangible. They ease financial 
' pressure on the mintary, providing 
U with funds and considerable in- 
fluence. They also help to improve 
living conditions of the troops and 
pay for arms purchases. The ill 
effects are not yet contidered visi- 
ble enough to warrant immediate 
and far-reaching countermeasures. 

However, the effects are corro- 
sive. One of the most serious is 
' widespread corruption. It takes 
many forms, such as bribery, em- 
bezzlement, smuggling or disobe- 
dience for fmnnoal gain. As a re- 
sult, the ethic of duty, which ties at 
the heart of military professional- 
ism, is bring destroyed. Troops 
who 'see the degeneration of their 
officere are beomhing demoralized. 
They axe bring diverted from train- 
ing arid otier essential missions. 

Economic entanglement is a di- 
rect danger to the professionalism 
of the officer corps. It weakens 
- discipline and fosters economic 
rivalries between units of the 
armed forces. The implications are 
ominous because discipline holds 
a m flit m y organization together. 

Such discipline becomes all the 
niOTt crucial as China enters an 
uncertain period of leadership 
. transition. Mr. Deng and other 
' revolutionary leaders have the 
■ '-statore -to' assert authority over 
imHtazy commanders. Thor suc- 
cessors will not 

. Theabfldyof future party lead- 
ers to control the military win rest 
j much more than at any time in the 
past cm the bedrock of organiza- 
tional dzsripfin& Yet tins is being 
undermined by the transformation 
of the Chinese military from a 
fighting force into an army that is 
• composed of “two systems," one 
military and one economic. 

. The writer, professor of Chinese 
studies at Hebrew University of 
Jerusalem, is author of “The Chi- 
nese Army After Mao” He con- 
tributed this comment to the Inter- 
national Herald Tribune. 

No Neat Korean Fix 

B ARRING a miraculous 
change in the regime, the 
North Koreans are not likely to 
.give up their platomum produc- 
tion potential during the 10 years 
•that would be required for con- 
structi on of replacement reactors. 
And they would likely want a 
sufficient stockpile of enriched 
uranium fuel so that they would 
not be at America’s mercy when 
those reactors do operate. 

In the end, what is wrong with 
the substitution proposal is that it 
presumes a level of goodwill on 
North Korea’s part that, were it 
present,, would obviate the need 
for the proposal If the North 
Koreans are mterested in dectric- 
ity, there are much cheaper, bet- 
ter arid safer ways to provide it. 

There are no neat technological 

fixes. What is needed is change in 
North Korea. 

— Victor Gilinsky, commenting 
in The Washington Post. 


The best thing that Could hap- 
pen would be that the United 
States would demonstrate a bet- 
ter to bdp countries in need. 

The writer is a retired farmer 
defense correspondent for The 
Washington Post, ' to which he 
contributed this comment 


EV OUR PAGES? 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


NEW ..YORK . — The . ’United 
States Government to-day [Aug. 
9] ofSdaBy reoogmzed the Re- 
public of Hawaii. The Hawaiian. 
Republic was bom on July 4, The 
last session of flw ttonstitritibnal- 
convention was held on JoN 3- 
and the' constitution 'adopted so 
that 'the due of Amoicamtide- 
. pendence might also betbe birth- 
day of the new Republic. 

1919: I^ior PoJand 

PARIS — Count Manrice Z&- 
mqyski. Minister of the Palish 
Republic to FranCe, presented his 
letters ot credence to President 
Poincare yesterday [Aug. 9J. This. 
is the first time Poland has had 
a. diplomatic representative in 
France since the eighteenth cen- 
tury. Count Zamoyski expressed, 
his personal pleasure at being the 
first to represeat jsr Prance die 


■power v*ich has been reborn in 
. faste n* Eu rope. Count Zamoyski 
^ large landowner and pos- 
sesses a wonderful coflection of 

w p &. ,mdalibr ^ of 

1944* Naming Falfl jg fc 

^J^™ t? CAN ad I a N 1ST 

- vARMK IN FRANCE — [From 
•^JNew York edition:] The™ 
armored columns of the Canadi- 
an Army’s offensive towaiti Fa- 
!*je stood about five and six 
mum respectively from that vital 

[Aug. 9], as 
appeared to be 
struMlmg to organize a last-ditch 
of the town. 

spearfwadingcol- 
^“Shed to^Sthin 
: fiw miles of Falaise last night, 

VjSj? 52?^ five-mile hmge 

- winch earned them throuah thr 


of BrettevUfe fe Rebel 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10, 1994 


Page 7- 


OPINION 


Europe Can Stage Parades 
But Can’t Act in Rwanda 

By - Philip H; • Gordon 

L ONDON — The European forognpdicy" is noi the dead letter 
* Union’sTecord in implementing it now appears. The Union should 
^coxtunonfopeign and security pel-, right now be preparing a joint mili- 
icy announced in grandiose fashion tnryTiunaaintarian force including 
at the 1991 Maastricht summit has -British, French,- German and Italian 
been- poor. It -started, on the wrong . troops to replace the French con tin- 
foot — with Germany wresting an geat scheduled for departure on 
agreement to recognize Croatia and Aug. 2 X The force should be given 
Slovenia from its reluctant. EU pan- a UN mandate and should take the 
— and has got tittle better since, lead, with the assistance of African 
Cooperation in Yugoslavia ha s 
been inconsistent; there have been 
disagreements about NATO’s role 
and about expanding the Union.- to 
the East; The European Union has 
been absent from the crises in Soma- 
lia, North Korea, and Haiti;, and the 
call for a corozoon European defense 


There is still a chance far 
the European Union to 
show that its 'common 
foreign policy 9 is not the 
dead letter it appears to be. 


policy has so far gone unanswered. 
Perhaps the greatest success for the 
policy so far was the marching of the 
five-nation Eurocorps down the 
Champs- Elysfes, where, however, no 
enemy troops were to be found, and 
no^tunnanharian aid was delivered. 

icy was its excessive ambition. TTbe 
perspectives, interests and habits of 
historic land former enemy) nations 
cannot be harmonized by decree. 
The institutional recipe invented at 
Maastricht — by vmich majority 
voting would be used for foreign 
policy in those areas where there 
was a consensus to use it — was 
a clever way of pretending to have 
adopted majority voting while pre- 
serving the principle of a national 
veto. (In effect, yon need a consen- 
sus to proceed without a consensus). 

Is the ccnmnbn foreign securi- 
ty policy empty? Not necessarily, but 
it will be if European leaders cannot 
muster the wiD to act when a problem 
that is crying out for a Enropean 
solution — Rwandan tragedy — is 
staring them in the face. - 

Rwanda is a classic case to which 
the theory and logic of (he common 
security and foreign policy should 
apply: Joint European action would 
spread the costs and risks . of a hu- 
manitarian or military intervention, 
reduce the suspicions of individual 
actors with potential national agen- 
das, provide a balance between 
countries too far away to "care and 
too dqseto berarpamrO;. ai^ ; bear 
a realistic chance that Emopcan; in- 
terests would be similar enough to 
hold the EUcoalition together. 

Yet when the Europeans had 
a chance Iast manth to act together 
to help con tain the tragedy ixzRwan- 
da, they stood aside with excuses and 
traded old recriminations about each 
other’s ulterior natives. Instead of 
sending peacekeepers, medical units 
or food, the EU leaden attacked the. 
problem with communiques. _ 

Now that the scale of the tragedy 
has shocked the United States into 
action and countries other than 


- troops, in creating the conditions for 
(he safe return home of the thousands 
of refugees that are now under threat 
in. .Zaire.. UN commanders have al- 
ready expressed concern about their 
ability to mam tain order and aid de- 
liveries if French troops depart with- 
out effective replacements. 

The European Union is well 
plnrrfyt to. undertake thi s vital mis- 
sion. A joint European intervention 
would help get around one of the 
biggest problems that plagued 
French efforts to create safe havens. 
Despite France's assertions that its 
mission was .purely humanitarian, 

, the Rwandan Patriotic Front did 
not believe that Paris would let its 
former Hum clients fall or be put on 
trial. .The Front’s justifiable suspi- 
cions make France the worst possi- 
ble single actor to intervene, and 
Paris should not be left alone to try 
to sort out the mess that Rwanda is 
bound to be in when France’s UN 
mandate rims out. The presence of 
other European countries, would 
take away the possibility that 
France was intervening to -serve its 
own interests in Africa. 

Rwanda is an ideal place for the 
German government to exercise its 
newly found freedom of maneuver 
in the wake of the Federal Constitu- 
tional Court’s recent decision to al- 
low the use oTBuodeswebr troops 
abroad. Television images of Ger- 
man soldiers helping tick and starv- 



Whatever Way You Slice It, 
This Is Sure a Fishy Story 


By Jan Hoffman 


children, clearing mines, and 
aiding housing would be helpful 
in improving historic images of the 
German military and in generating 
support for German peacekeeping 
or H umanitarian missions wi thin 
Germany and abroad. Beyond pub- 
lic relations, Germany’s large and 
well-equipped mflitaiy forces could 
make a very real contribution to 
Europe’s ability to deliver aid and or 
protect refugee zones. 

■ While none of the options for out- 
side intervention in Rwanda are per- 
fect or easy, the European option 
has many advantages over all the 
available alternatives. The United 
States is the most capable, best orga- 
nized, and most impartial outside 
force, but with Haiti, North Korea, 
and Bosnia on its plate, and after the 
Somalia disaster, no one should ex- 
pect the Americans to remain deep- 
ly engaged in a region where its 


national interests are not at stake. 

The United Nations, as we have 
seen in this crisis, is overburdened, 
too diverse, too bureaucratic, and 
lacking an autonomous military force 
or intelligence-gathering capabilities; 
it can only act when its member 
states are prepared to do so, and acts 
most effectively when it can delegate 
authority to a better-organized force. 

Neighboring African states have 
a useful role to play, but these states 
lack the political organization and 
military and economic resources to 
intervene without Western help, and 
in any case are subject to the same 
suspicions and realities of ulterior 
motives as France. 

Of all the potential outside actors 
in tins tmgpdy, the European Union 
has the best package of means, inter- 
ests, and organizational capabilities 
to sustain an effective mission. 

No one should believe an EU-led 


intervention in Rwanda after Aug. 22 
would be easy. There would be cer- 
tain costs and uncertain risks in- 
volved. But a successful demonstra- 
tion of Europe’s ability to act as one 
in Rwanda would not only do won- 
ders for the wounded psychology of 
European unity, it would proride the 
best chance around for putting 
Rwanda back together. 

Complaints that it is too soon or 
that Europe’s institutions or forces 
are not yet in place simply will not 
do. Europe should get on with its 
common foreign and security policy 
when it has the opportunity to do so. 
or it should stop talking about iu 

The writer is Carol Deane Senior 
Fellow in If.S. Strategic Studies at the 
International Institute for Strategic 
Studies in London and editor of Surviv- 
al. He contributed this comment to the 
International Herald Tribune. 


N EW YORK — This is a tale of 
art and commerce, of sex dis- 
crimination and smoked fish, of due 
process and Zabar's. the noted New 
York specialty grocery. 

On one side is a determined 
young woman seeking justice be- 
cause her salmon-slicing skills, she 
believes, have been impugned. 

On the other is her employer, who 
believes that anyone who mangles a 
nice piece of fish should not be paid 

MEANWHILE 

the same as more seasoned counter- 
pans — regardless of whether they 
all happen to be men. 

And making the determination 
whether Murray Klein fired Eleanor 
Wolper or whether she quit her job 
was Judge Dennis Aloysius Dooley. 

To generations of New York's 
slicers and buyers, an elegant sliver 
of fish is art on a waxed paper can- 
vas. It’s a stressful situation: in the 
demanding world of deli galleries, 
everyone’s a critic. 

The artist, however, is almost nev- 
er a woman. Mr. Klein. 71, a co- 
owner of Zabar’s, acknowledged 
this situation, but said that he was 
not to blame. “Women are sensitive 
about the smell of fish." he said. 
“Men aren’t. Women don’t like the 
stink on their clothes." 

Ms. Wolper, an earnest but easily 
flustered woman of 27, does not fit 
the image of a barrier breaker. 

But she has the fever. Raised on 
the Lower East Side, she would of- 
ten travel to Zabar’s to watch the 
salmon slicers. 

“I have an affinity for cutting 
salmon,” she said wistfully as she 
waited last week for her case to be 
called. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


IlieGiceaBevolnl^ 

Eric B. Ross (“A Malthusian Pre- 
mise Empties the Countryside ■/’ 
Opinion, Juty 5) and Jessica Math- 
ews C'A Small Price to Pay for Prov- 
ing Malthas Wrong," June 9) have 
discussed the Green Revolution in 
devdoping-country agriculture and 
the role of the Consultative Group 
on International Agricultural Re- 
search. or CGIAR. . 

" Mr. Ross is sharply critical of the 
Green Revolution and of CGIAR, 
which he says is turning its back on 
tbe^enornmuspotential of peasant 
agriculture ” Thus be urges a "re- 
deployment of global agricultural 
resources.” 

llie Green Revolution — the use 
of modem food-crop breeding 
techniques to boost agricultural 
productivity in developing coun- 
tries —is. for Mr. Ross but a West- 
ern plot that aims at curbing agrari- 
an reform, proletarianizing “rest- 
less peasants” and providing 
"harvests to subsidize the goals of 
urban industrial growth and export 
expansion.” goals that be says the 
West imposed cm the Third World. 


did not arrive, especially i 
ran Africa. Where the Gr 


as 


Was the Green Revolution, mid 
France have begun to send troops to * with it the creation of CGIAR, real- 
Rwanda, the opportunity for a Eu- ly a sinister Cold War plot designed 


ropean intervention may .seem lost 
(along with the lives an earficr inter- 
vention might have saved). 

In fact, there is still a chance for 
the European Union to get its act 
together and show that its “common 


to fight communism? Why should 
perfidious Gold Warriors have pur- 
sued "agrarian reform in reverse” to 
drive “peasants off the land”? 

Rural-urban migration, is strongest 
today where the . Green Revolution 


msub-Saha- 
reen Revolu- 
tion was most successful such as on 
the Indian subcontinent, migrant la- 
bor was attracted to the irrigated ar- 
eas with their intensive agriculture. 
Employment increased and small 
fanners benefited, after a short time, 
as large farmers, 
harvests of the Green Revo- 
lution especially benefited the poor, 
who spend up to SO percent of their 
income on food. Rice and wheat 
prices have declined by an average 
of 40 percent since the Green Revo- 
lution began, and nutrition of the 
poor has improved. Today the aver- 
age Asian consumes 16 percent 
more rice than in 1965. 

Have peasants been impoverished 
by agricultural modernization? No. 
The poorest farmers can be found 
where the scientists did not succeed 
in launching a Green Revolution — 
in the vast semi-arid zones of Africa, 
Aria and Latin America. Even there, 
science and better agricultural poli- 
cies are bringing gradual progress. 
During the last decade, Africa's 
food-crop yields rose by 3 percent, 
] percentage point better than dur- 
ing the two earlier decades. 

Mr. Ross says that “the West nev- 
er intended to secure the livelihood 
of peasants.” But in virtually all 
nonoil developing countries in Aria 
and Latin America that are now 
classed as newly industrialized, 
strong agricultural development 
preceded the current phase of rapid 


GDP growth and industrialization. 
Agriculture provided both the com- 
modity output and the effective de- 
mand needed to drive urban and 
industrial development. 

If a “redeployment of global agri- 
culture resources” is needed, it 
should be in favor of international 
and national research systems. Their 
work has consistently shown the 
highest impact per invested dollar of 
all Third World development activi- 
ties; it is an effective way to make 
developing agriculture sus tamable. 

A steady flow of improved tech- 
nologies for Food production will be 
needed to feed the world’s people in 
years ahead, while protecting natu- 
ral resources from overexploitation 
driven by poverty, inadequate fann- 
ing technology and. very often, in- 
appropriate policies. 

ALEXANDER von der OSTEN. 

Executive Secretary. 
Consultative Group on 
International Agricultural 
Research. Washington. 

Hie Devastation of Manila 

Regarding the report "Spin of 
Smithsonian’s Hiroshima Script Un- 
der Fire" (July 22}: 

Whiie I do not wish to ignore the 
destruction suffered by Hiroshima 
and Nagasaki in August 1945, I 
believe the Smithsonian Institu- 
tion's intention to feature those two 
cities in an exhibit is wrong because 


it unwarrantedly converts the ag- 
gressor into a victim of a war that 
Japan iinilateraJy launched, while at 
the same time ignoring the suffering 
of many cities invaded by Japanese 
military forces. 

In February 1945, Manila per- 
haps suffered even more destruction 
and loss of life than either of those 
two Japanese cities. 

In the words of the historian Wil- 
liam Manchester: “The devastation 
of Manila was one of the great trage- 
dies of World War II. Of Allied 
cities in those war years, only War- 
saw suffered more. Seventy percent 
of the utilities. 75 percent of the 
factories^ 80 percent of the southern 
residential district and 100 percent 
of the business district were razed.” 

In addition. 100.000 of Manila's 
civilian residents perished during 
the battle for the liberation of the 
city, which lasted from Feb. 3 lo 
March 3. Most were the victims of 
atrocities committed against hapless 
men, women and children by the 
defending Japanese forces. 

I would suggest that the Smithso- 
nian take advantage of the 50th an- 
niversary of VJ-Day to demonstrate 
the futility of war by exhibiting pho- 
tographs graphically showing the 
devastation and death suffered by 
cities throughout the Pacific theater 
of World War II. The exhibit could 
be called “The Tragedy of the Non- 
combatants of the Pacific War.” 
EDGAR RROHN Jr. 

Makalai, Philippines. 


In Defense of Earth 

Regarding “Do We Really Need to 
Start Bracing*" ( Opinion. Aug. 61 bv 
William Pfaff: 

Mr. Pfaff suggests that ii would 
be presumptuous of human beings 
to attempt to intercept a killer com- 
et on a collision course with Earth, 
since that would be thwarting 
God's will. Sturdier spirits would 
argue that since for the first lime in 
history we have the technology that 
should allow us to detect and inter- 
cept a comet which could destroy 
life on Earth. God clearly expects 
us to make good use or it. 

The recent bombardment of Ju- 
piter by fragments of the comet 
Shoemaker-Levy has resulted in a 
healthy reaction in the U.S. Con- 
gress. some of whose members 
would like to prevent a similar cat- 
aclysm here, however remote the 
prospect. In fact, creating a system 
to guard the Earth against such 
catastrophes should be a global re- 
sponsibility rather than a burden 
bom by one nation. 

Brian Jeffries. 

Editor and Publisher. 

AsiaPacific Space Report. 

Hong Kong. 

There is a much greater likeli- 
hood that volitional fife will disap- 
pear from this planet because of 
politics. 

WILLIAM W. MORGAN. 

Guildford. England. 


“I get chills thinking about it — 
it’s so beautiful to watch. And Za- 
bar’s was always the besL 

Even Mr. Klein said that for a 
beginner. Ms. Wolper was pretty 
good. The customers benefited, he 
said, because “she wasn't as rude as 
the men " 

But Mr. Klein and Ms. Wolper 
disagree about just how stylish a 
slicer she was. Once Mr. Klein 
scooped up a discarded salmon skin 
from a bucket, yelling at her because 
there was too much flesh lefL She 
had been, in the vernacular, hacking 
up the fish. 

“I said it wasn't my skin!” said 
Ms. Wolper, her cheeks flushing. 
"He told me to cairn down." 

Mr. Klein is so obsessed with Za- 
har's that he cannot understand why 
Ms. Wolper would quit her exalted 
post. But quit, he said, is what she 
did 

Ms. Wolper has two actions 
against Zahar’s. After, as she says. 
Mr. Klein fired her because she 
wasted too much fish and wanted 
too big a raise, she filed a claim of 
discrimination with the New York 
State Division of Human Rights. In 
it, she said she had been grossly 
underpaid. 

After she left, she collected unem- 
ployment benefits. In June; the slate 
Labor Department cut them off be- 
cause Zabar’s reported that she had 
left her job voluntarily. If she could 
not prove otherwise, she might have 
to return the $1,980 she had re- 
ceived 

A hearing on that decision was 
held last week at the department's 
Brooklyn office before Mr. Dooley, 
an administrative law judge. 

Mr. Klein and his lawyer, Eugene 
Eisner, showed up to challenge her 
appeal. Ms. Wolper, who could not 
afford a lawyer, but did bring her 
mother, Marjorie, a forceful woman 
who was very angry with Mr. Klein. 

Ms. Wolper testified that last fall 
she asked for a $6 raise lo $14. an 
hour — “it was supposed to be a 
bargaining position,” she whis- . 
pared. 

On Friday. April Fool's Day, the 
new rale finally came through: 50 
cents more an hour. Her mother told 
her to march back into Zahar's and 
talk to Mr. Klein. 

“1 lose money on you,” Ms. . 
Wolper testified that Mr. Klein 
yelled “You hack up the fish. Get 
out of my store.” 

Mr. Klein told a different story. _ 
He said the argument occurred on ' 
April 2. and so she must have quiL 
because he would never fire some- . 
one on a Saturday. “It's our busiest 
day,” he testified "1 only fire people . 
after the weekend.” Ms. Wolper re- . 
signed in a rage over her salary, he 
said leaving him perilously short- 
handed 

The judge announced that the dis- 
pute came down to this: he said she 
said. 

Within the month he would issue 
his decision, he continued based on 
an evaluation of each pony's de- ! 
meanor and testimony. The disap- 
pointed party had the right to ap- 
peal. 

Ms. Wolper and her mother, look- 
ing shellshocked left quickly. Mr. 
Klein, looking equally perturbed, 
lingered 

“You haven't been to my store?" 
he said to the judge in a wheedling 
lone. “There is one God and one 
Zahar's!” 

The New York Tunes. 


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international Herald Tribune 
Wednesday, , August 10, 1994 
Page8 


STAGE /ENTERTAINMENT 


6 New Circus’ Getting 
A Big Hand in France 


By John Rockwell 

New York Times Service 

A VIGNON. France — A young 
woman, an Indian dancer, sits at 
the edge of a round pool of black 
water. Floating candles ring the 
pool, but all else is dark. Magically, the 
floating can dies converge toward the wom- 
an. As each nudges up to the shore, she 
picks it up and blows it out. Just as she is 
about to extinguish the last candle, she 
hears a soft splashing sound, looks up and 
sees a huge brown horse and a robed rider 
with a long lance reflected in the water. 
She blows out the last candle, all is black- 
ness, and the vision is gone. 

But not gone entirely. It remains in the 
memories of the 1 .200 nightly spectators of 
the show “Chimere," by the Paris equestri- 
an circus and theater troupe Zmga.ro. 
“Chintere" was the hit of this summer's 
Avignon Festival. A two-hour panoply of 
images of India, “Chime re” blended con- 
ventional circus excitement (acrobats leap- 
ing on and off galloping horses, a clown) 
with moments — the best moments — that 
were indistinguishable from art 
Most of those moments involved Barta- 
bas, the founder and mastermind of Zin- 
garo. He is the mysterious knight at the 
outset At one point a black horse gallops 
across the pond, pursued by a running 
Bartabas spreading out his black cape like 
a bat. Then, after a moment's silence. Bar- 
tabas runs back through the gloom, pur- 
sued by the horse. 

Later, seated on a while stallion and 
wearing a costume that looks like a Rudi 
Gemrach topless dress, Bartabas gallops 
around the ring that surrounds the pool, 
the horse twisting its head and neck cho- 
rcographicaUy, and Bartabas stretching 
and curling ms torso, arms and fingers. 

This was an adult experience, though 
children would love it. It began at 10 P. M. 
and lasted to midnight. The scene outside 
the box office recalled opera premieres at 
their most hysterical with hundreds of peo- 
ple, inflamed by rapturous reviews in the 
national press, literally begging for tickets. 

People all over the world are likely to 
have a chance to see Zingaro's latest specta- 
cle. The Avignon Festival is over now. but 
aside from its projected two-season run at 
the company’s permanent theater in Paris, 
“Chimfere” is to tour Europe and Japan. 

Anyone who has seen the Cirque du So- 
ldi of Montreal knows how the art of the 
circus has evolved toward theater and 
dance. Some commentators have written 
about the Montreal company as unique, or 
the product of some strange synergy in the 
French-Canadian psyche. But despite its 
originality, the Cirque du Soldi might better 
be perceived as a satellite of the larger world 
of the Reach “new circus,” which has been 
transforming circus life here since the 1970s. 
“There was a big crisis for the circus in 


all of Europe in the '70s," said Bernard 
Thurin, director general of the Centre Na- 
tional des Arts du Cirque. The center, in 
Chaions-sur-Mame. east of Paris, houses 
the Ecole Superieure des Arts du Cirque, 
the main state circus school in France. 

There is also an undergraduate circus 
school in Rosny-sur-Bois in the eastern 
suburbs of Paris, also run by Thurin and 
supported by both the ministry and the 
city of Rosny. 

“After World War II," Thurin went on. 
“French circuses tried to copy the big 
American circuses. But in the '70s the num- 
ber of circuses and the number of spectators 
declined. There was competition from tele- 
vision, and the energy crisis made it expen- 
sive to heat and light big tents." 

Fortunately, outside forces were riding to 
the rescue, theater directors — above all 
Jerome Savaiy, who still calls his prosceni- 
um-theater directorial style “magic circus” 
— became fascinated with fusions between 
theater and circus. Choreographers were 
attracted, as were filmmakers and artists 
from the various forms of street theater that 
had proliferated in the wake of the leftist 
populist student uprisings of 1968. 

A little later, al umni of those uprisings 
infiltrated first the lower, then the upper 
reaches of the French cultural bureaucra- 
cy. The Minister of Culture began subsi- 
dizing circuses in 1979, when the right was 
still in power. But like so much else in 
French cultural life, the subsidies and pro- 
grams grew under the Socialist Jack Lang, 
and have continued under the Gaullist 
Jacques Toubon. 

Thurin mentioned three Lang circus ini- 
tiatives, two of which survive, mere are his 
schools and a circus documentation center 
in ChSlons. There was an attempt to create 
a state-supported circus troupe, but that 
foundered. Finally, there is a national cir- 
cus association, which disburses $2 milli on 
in annual government subsidies to 35 cir- 
cuses. Thurin’s schools get more than S3 
million a year. 


A MONG the best-known “new 
circuses,” which are also called 
“modem circuses" or “creative 
circuses,” are the Volifcre Dro- 
mesko, a brilliant bird circus based in 
Rennes that was a hit in Avignon last 
summer; Royal de Luxe, which created a 
50-foot giant at the celebration in Calais 
for the opening of the Eurotunnel to Eng- 
land; the Cirque Plume; the Cirque Ba- 
roque; and the Cirque Archaos, which with 
its Mad Max-style motorized vehicles re- 
calls the music-theater troupe La Fura dels 
Baus in Barcelona. 

The new circus has not supplanted the 
traditional circus in France. Family-domi- 
nated circuses, proud of their traditions 
and resistant to trendy innovations, still 
dominate the scene in terms of ticket sales. 



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Kristallnacht Parable: 
Miller’s 6 Broken Glass’ 


By Sheridan Morley 

International Herald Tribute 

L ONDON — Sometimes 1 think 
we don't deserve Arthur Miller, 
on either side of the Atlantic; in 
his native America, he is relegated 
to short or nonexistent Broadway runs 
while New York occupies itself with yet 
another musical revival Over here these 

BRfflSH THEATER 

are sneers about his “greatest living dra- 
matist” status; anyone got any other con- 
tenders? 

Miller’s “Broken Glass” (at the Nation- 
al) is a breath takingly brilliant exploration 
of the paralysis that overtook America in 
November 1938 as news of the Nazi perse- 
cution of the Jews just after Kristallnacht 
reached their Brooklyn cousins. 

Miller has chosen to give this paralysis a 
living form: a woman (Margot Leicester) 
suddenly finds that she cannot move her 
legs. Her husband (Henry Goodman as a 
later-life Willy Leman) and her doctor 
(Ken Stott) eventually understand that the 
paralysis is sexual and social as well as 
political and racial But cm the way to that 
discovery, “Broken Glass” travels through 
psychiatry, history and geography to give 
the analysis of a woman and a world in 
total moral breakdown. 

The eventual cure lies only in death, and 
not that of the patient Miller’s message 
here is that forgiveness and understanding 
are aO That we need, though a little love 
would not come amiss. The waste is of lives 
in Brooklyn as well as Berlin, and the 
destruction is of ourselves by ourselves. In 
its way, “Broken Glass" is as chilling a 
play as Miller has ever written. This play is 
a land of coda to much of Miller’s earlier 
writin g. It brines together themes of “After 


the Fair and “The American Clock" but 
sets them for cello rather than full orches- 
tra. Once again, his director, David 
Thacker, has done him proud. 

After the “radical re-evaluation” of “An 
Inspector Calls,” I began to fear that we 
would never get to seepure Priestley again. 
The great news from Chichester is therefore 
of Keith Baxter and “Dangerous Comer." 


Last summer, also on Chichester’s Minerva 
stage, it was Baxter who gave us enough 
“Rope” to satisfy those of us who thought 
we would never gel Patrick Hamilton back 
as a dramatist. 

Now, in an equally brilliant rediscovery, 
be gives us Priestley's earliest play, admit- 
tedly with both intervals taken out but in all 
other respects exactly as the dramatist wrote 
and would recognize it . Like “Rope,” this 
too is a murderous bisexual thriller even if 
the body has been longer dead. .' 

Baxter has assembled an infini tely stylish 
cast (Gayle Hunmcufi, Emily Raymond, 
Peter McEriezy, Christopher TimothyVand 
what they play is “Private Lives” laced with 
arsenic and old hate. Nobody here is sexual- 
ly what he pretends to be, and everyone 
(except an eccentric old novelist) has en- 
tered a liaison that is now so dangerous that 
it can only be unraveled by violence. 

Philip Prowse is a director who designs 
his own major productions, so for “Lady 
Windermere’s Fan" (Albeiy), we start with 
the sets: sumptuous drawing rooms, cur- 
tains and carpets so thick-that characters 
seem to be fighting their way through them 
and yet perfectly representative of Wilde’s 
already crumbling world, Kke a greenhouse 
in decay. This was, just over a century ago, 


led to ms downfalL It was also a moral 
comedy, both socialist and feminist in its 
own subversive way, and ProWse has right- 
ly seen it as a fable about an aristocracy in 
anguished ambivalence. 

Francesca Asms leads a powerhouse 
cast. Wilde’s “Good Woman” subtitle 
leaves us in no doubt how he feels about 
the notorious Mrs. Eriyrme, but Prowse 
suggests that their creator loathes the rest 
of ms characters more or less equally. The 
Dariingtons are both priggish and unfor- 
giving; Cedi Graham is a bloated old 
queen on the make; Tuppy is a buffoon, 
and it is only the “woman with a past” who 
has the grace and the dignity to uphold the 
old values of tolerance and forgiveness. 

Wilde's play moves from high-society 
comedy to the drama of a marriage in 
distress and as it does so one can, even 
here, find the shadows lengthening around 
Victorian society in general and Wilde's 
life in particular. 



Francesca Amos as Mrs. Eriyrme. 


‘Don Giovanni’ for ‘New’ Salzburg 


Man; Eotociaiid 

A scene from “ Chimere, ” the French 
equestrian theater spectacle. 


By Edward Rothstein 

New York Times Service 

S ALZBURG — On pa- 
per, the new production 
of Mozart's “Don Gio- 
vanni" at the Salzburg 
Festival looked like another in- 
triguing attempt by Gerard 
Mortier to shape a new artistic 
culture for this tradition-mind- 
ed town: a staging of Mozart's 
greatest opera by Patrice Chfir- 
eau, who in 1976 radically 
transformed Wagner’s “Ring” 
for Bayreuth. 

A Chfereau “Don Giovanni” 
also fit with other programming 
this season. Mortier, the festi- 
val’s artistic director, has been 
winning major political and ar- 
tistic battles here. His third sea- 
son has an almost pastoral 
character compared with the 
first two. 

But the old festival culture is 
still strong, and declarations of 
independence from thepast are 
still bang made. That is partly 
the point, for example, of the 
two Beethoven symphony cy- 
cles by the Chamber Orchestra 
or Europe conducted by Niko- 
laus Harnoncourt (Under Her- 
bert von Karajan such an epic 
series would have featured the 
Vienna Philharmonic.) 

So this “Don Giovanni” was 
meant to be a milestone in the 


new era: put Daniel Barenboim 
in the pit, have Chfcreau work 
his iconoclastic stage effects 
and cast Cecflia Barton as Za- 
lina to draw unsuspecting tradi- 
tionalists. There would be no 
risk of confusing this with the 
pseudonatnralistic “Don Gio- 
vanni” of the Karajan years. 

Unfortunately, while this 
production could hardly have 
been associated with the old 
Salzburg Festival h does not do 
much to create a firm founda- 
tion for the new one. 

The sets, by Richard Peduzzi, 
are meant to create an almost 
abstract background for the 
playing out or primal forces; 
they are flat, dimly lighted rep- 
resentations of characterless 
buildings and alleys in Don 
Giovanni’s Seville. Sections of 
the stage are elevated to create a 
bench, a table, the tomb of the 
Commendatore. There is no 
garden, no churchyard. The ef- 
fect is less of crisp restraint t ha n 
of unremitting tedium. “Don 
Giovanni” is an opera with 
light, color and shadow; hoe, 
all is dull and airicss. 

The intention was probably 
to let Chfireau work his magic 
with the characters, allowing 
them to stand out against the 
settings. Bui Oifereau, it turns 
out, has nothing very compel- 
ling to say. He has staged the 


drama as if ^ it were a conven- 

his cliaracterizhtions^ mix 
flash es of insight with crip pling 
contradictions. 

This is a physically aggressive 
Don, dressed m demonic black, 
not above pulling LejxncUo’s 
hair, physically grabbing Zer- 
Ima, putting Drama Anna in a 
headlock; mere is no convinc- 
ing reason why such a figure 
would be humbled enough by 
the Act 1 finale to be crawling, 
begging for mercy (he stands up 
far more bravely to the ghostly 
Commendatore). 

Donna Elvira seans to in- 
habit a symbolic imrvo^c one 
moment - — veiled in black, 
blindly writhing in agony — 
and act like a neurotic coquette 
the next. 

In the midst of all of this, 
Barenboim’s conducting of the 
Vi enna Philhar monic was exas- . 
pending. Tempos were languid 
and unsteady; rhythms were 
slack. He was obviously aiming 
for a somber effect, but Mozart 
creates that using dance steps 
and sensuous melody. 

T HERE were pleasures 
to be had in Ferruccio 
Furlanetto’s sleekly 
articulate Don, Matti 
Salmmen's creepy Commen da- 
tore and Bryn TerfeTs infec- 


tiously comic and lyrical Lepor- 
eDo. 

But Tbirtoh nearly stole the 
show with her almost fragrant 
innocence; she made Leila Cu- 

berii’s Donna Anna, Peter Seif- 

fert’s Don Ottavio and Andreas 
Kohn’s Masetto seem relatively 
characterless, as if they were 
items in a list of Don Giovan- 
nfs erotic conquests and rivals. 
Catherine Malfitano had some 
spark as Donna Elvira, but not 
enough consistency. 

.This production, winch Cher- 
eau is continuing to revise, em- 
phasizes, in fact, how risky the 
creation of a Jiew artistic cul- 
ture is. Though the festival's 
sales are said to be strong, there 
are. posters advertising “last- 
minute tickets” for nearly all 
programs; this would have been 
unheard of a few years ago. 

But there are triumphs to put 
beside this uninspired “Don 
Giovanni” like “The Rake's 
Progress.” And as a reminder of 
Salzburg at its best, there was a 
recital erf duets by Felicity Lon 
and Ann Murray, accompanied 
by Graham Johnson, at the Mo- 
zarteum. In this redial the me- 
lodic lines of Britten. Mendels- 
sohn, Rossini, Brahms, Gounod 
and Faure seemed effortlessly 
spun into translucent fabrics of 
sound. Mozart would have 
loved it 


BOOKS 


THE TRIBE OF TIGER: 
Cats and Their Culture 

By Elizabeth Marshall Thomas. 
IBustnded by Jared Taylor Wil- 
liams. 240 pages $20. Simon & 
Schuster. $20. 

Reviewed by Christopher 
Lehmann-Haupt 


I N many ways, cats are not as 
easy as dogs for people to 
make friends with, which may 
explain why Elizabeth Marshall 


Thomas’s new book, “The 
Tribe of Tiger: Cats and Their 
Culture,” does not have quite 
the warm appeal of her best- 
selling bode of last year, “The 
Hidden Life of Dogs.” 

But cats, too, have their con- 
siderable allure, as Thomas 
makes dear in her introdcctory 
reference to Christopher Smart, 
the 18th-century English poet 
who found daring his eight-year 
solitary confinement in a mad- 
house that his rally relief from 
loneliness and despair was pro- 
vided by the presence of his cat, 
Jeoffry. Smart devoted 75 radi- 
ant lines to Jeoffry in an other- 
wise endless, rambling poem, 
Thomas has taken the title erf 
her book from this poem be- 
cause while we tend to say “that 
tigers are a kind of cat rather 
than that cats are a kind of 
tiger, the fact is that cats and 
tigers do represent the two ex- 
tremes of one family, the alpha 
and omega of their kind.” 

This is important to see; 
Thomas stresses,, because what 
distinguishes all members of the 
cat family is that they are hunt- 
ers of meat Much about their 


behavior can be understood in 
this light, from their remarkable 
physical attributes to their mys- 
terious emotions. 

Because they are hunters, an 
ordinary house cat will attack 
anything from an adult deer to 
a loaf erf Italian bread, at least 
in the author’s own experience. 

It accounts for why “pound 
for pound, rats are by far the 
strongest animals many of us 
ever encounter,” why they rare- 
ly leave tracks, why their intes- 
tines are short — “since meat is 
e&ty to digest and doesn’t re- 
quire a long, heavy gut that 
would weigh a cat down” — 
and why a puma the author 
knew could catch a fly out of 
the air between the pads of its 
paws. 

Cats’ meat-eating explains 
why their territoriality resem- 
bles that of a randier raising 
cattle; wire males commit in- 
fanticide (to kill the kittens of 
the rivals they overcome is to 
dispose of inferior genes), and 
why pets present their owners 
with half-dead creatures (they 
are offering thorn lessons in 
how to kill). 

Even cats’ emotions can be 
traced to their meat hunting,. 
Thomas believes. 

“Many expressions of a caf s 
feelings seem deeply related to 
the rapture of live prey,”, she 
writes. “An excited,' happy; or 
much relieved cat may ambush 
and pounce upon whatever trig- 
gers its pleasure — something 
worth considering before get- , 
ting a large cat all worked ixp.” 

What is most surprising of all 
about her portrait is that con- 


trary to Rudyard Kipling, cats 
do not really walk by them- 
selves, waving their wild tails in 
the wet wild woods, but in fact 
are highly social 
They only, seem unsocial be- 
cause their system is less like 
dogs’ “ladderlike social ar- 
rangement” and “more like a 
wheel with a high-ranking cat 


on the hub and the others ar- 
ranged around the rim, all re- 
luctantly acknowledging the su- 
periority^! the despot but not 
necessarily measuring them- 
selves against each other ” 

Christopher Lehmann-Haupt 
is on the staff of The New York 
Times 


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International Herald Tribune , Wednesday , August 10, 1994 


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Page 9 



THE T RIB INDEX 



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Critic of Beijing Offers to Resign 


By Kevin Murphy 

Irttarnairtmal Herald Tribune 

HONG KONG -- Jimmy Lai, the 
retail and publishing maverick whose 
magazine recently attacked Prime Minis- 
ter Li Peng of China, offered Tuesday to 
resign as chairman and director of Gior- 
dano Holdings Ltd. after Beijing shut 
down a Giordano outlet 
Mr. Laps move generated strong inter- 
est in Hong Kong, where self-censorship 
in media and business aides has in- 


1975, bnt it said China’s closure of the 
Beijing store was an isolated event relat- 
ed to “certain licensing formalities." 

At first glance, the offer appeared 
more cosmetic than substantive, analysis 
said. Mr. Lai has played a nonexecutive 
role at Giordano since starting Next 
n u »gtt ? ?ne, which he plans to list on the 
Hong Kong exchange next year. 


“He may be tempted to concentrate 
the 


creased markedly as the colony ap- 
proaches the 1997 return to Chinese rule. 


‘It’s still too early to say how much 
Giordano has been hurt by this,” said 
Wilson Chow, an analyst with Schroder 
Securities (HK) Ltd. “But it can't help.” 
In a statement to the Hong Kong 
Stock Exchange, Giordano confirmed 
Mr. Lai’s offer to relinquish the chair- 
manship of a company he started in 


more on the media business now.” Mr. 
Chow said. “In terms of the day-to-day 
operations at Giordano, it wouldn't mat- 
ter too much if he resigned.” 

What’s more, analysts said they did 
not expect Mr. Lai to sell his 37 percent 
stake m Giordano nor his 49 percent 
bolding in its unlisted China affiliate. 


Ti^er, even if he does resign. 


Lai is famous for sneaking into 
Hong Kong from China as a youth and 
turning his ideas about customer service 


into a 5300 million- a-y ear operation 
growing quickly throughout Asia. 

He decided to start Next in response 
to the violent suppression of pro-democ- 
racy protests in Beijing's Tiananmen 
Square in 19S9. 

Since it first appeared three years ago, 
Next has become a best seller offering a 
gutsy menu of stories on local business 
corruption and activities of the triad 
crime syndicates while pulling few 
punches in its coverage of China. The 
editorial policy has brought death 
threats and fire tombing* from the triads 
and a libel suit last month from China. 

An article Mr. Lai wrote for Next last 
month criticized Mr. Li by name, calling 
him a “turtle's egg,” a grievous insult in 
Chinese. 

The potential of the huge China mar- 
ket has been slow to translate into profits 
for the casual clothes retailer. 


China and U.K. Agree on Hong Kong Airport 


Bloomberg Business News 

HONG KONG — China 
and Britain reached basic 
agreement on financing for 
Hong Kong’s $20 billion air- 
port, a Hong Kong govern- 
ment spokesman said Tuesr 


ajing’s top official on air- 
port matters, the director of 
the Hong Kong and Macao 
affairs office, Lu Ping, said 
China, basically agrees with 


Britain’s most recent propos- 
al, Hong Kong’s TVB televi- 
sion reported. 

A fourth financing propos- 
al, which Britain submitted to 
China in February, proposes 
funding construction of the 
airport and its railway link 
through 60.3 billion Hong 
Kong dollars ($7.8 billion) of 
government equity and 23 bil- 
lion dollars of debt 

“Lu also said China basi- 


cally agrees with raising the 
airport debt ceding to 23 bil- 
lion doDars, but he warned the 
British side to keep its word 
about the project, reiterating 
that the amount should be 
capped at 23 billion dollars 
and that the territory should 
dig deeper into its reserves,” 
TVB said. 

The sides are working on 
final wording that will allow 
the project to proceed, clear- 


ing one of the main disputes 
over the territory's reversion 
to Chinese control in 1997. 


China must approve the 
Funding package because the 
debt financing is likely to re- 
quire payments beyond 1997. 

A spokesman. John Elliot, 
said Britain and China still 
needed to iron out issues relat- 
ing mainly to the agreement's 
wording on maximum debt. 


Barclays Profit 
Triples on Cuts 
In Provisions 


Counted by Our Staff Firm Dispatches 

LONDON — Barclays PLC, 
Britain’s largest retail bank. 


said Tuesday its pretax profit in 
the first half tripled to £1.04 


billion (51.6 billion) as the Brit- 
ish economic recovery enabled 
it lo reduce provisions for bad 
debts. 

Andrew Buxton, the bank's 
chairman, said he was “optimis- 
tic we can keep up the progress 
in the second half.” 

Provision for bad debt fell 64 
percent, to £358 million. 

But neither the earnings in- 
crease nor a 23 percent increase 
in the company’s dividend im- 
pressed investors, who were dis- 
appointed by falling operating 
profit, lower net interest income 
and shrinking growth opportu- 
nities. 


Despite initial euphoria on 
the London Stock Exchange, 


where shares rose more than 3 
percent in early trading. Bar- 
days shares dosed Tuesday at 
568 pence, up only 4 pence. 

“A lot of the work has been 
done through the provision 
ride, and the concerns over un- 
derlying performance are still 


there," said Christopher Bur- 
vilL a fund manager at Guin- 
ness Flight Global Asset Man- 
agement. “The recovery ■ 
prospects are doubtful, and 
more will depend on action tak- 
en by the board.” 

The company boosted its 
first-half dividend to 8 pence 
from 6 3 pence in the first half 
of 1993. 

“The message on the divi- 
dend is that we want to be as 
generous as we can while safe- 
guarding the group’s capital po- 
sition," Mr. Buxton said. “We 
were able to accomplish both in 
the first half.” 

He said be hoped this meant 
a return to real dividend in- 
creases for shareholders. Bar- 
clays cut the dividend in 1992 
and left it unchanged last year. 

The first-half profit included 
a gain of £87 million from busi- 
ness disposals during the period 
and the reduction in bad-debt 
provisions. 

Stripping out these figures, 
pretax profit was £310 muHon, 
down 7 :5 percent from the pre- 
vious year. On an operating lev- 


lyear. Un an operating j 
el winch includes the one-time 


Cable Companies Move In on Telecommunications 


gains but does not eliminate 


provisions, profit fell 8 percent, 
to £1.23 billion. 


OlnurattlanaJ Herald Tribune 


Compiled by Ow Staff From Dispatches 

NEW YORK — Four of the largest 
UJS. cable television companies said 
Tuesday they would spend more than 52 
trillion for equipment this autumn in an 
effort to offer “one-stop” telecommuni- 
cations services to consumers. 

Chief executives of Cox Cable Com- 
munications Inc., Continental Cablevi- 
rion Inc., Comcast Carp, and Tele-Com- 
munications Inc. said they each 
intended to offer high-definition televi- 
sion, wireless telephone, video on de- 
mand, basic telephone and computer 
on-line services. 

The upgrades to their networks will 
allow them to compete directly with the 
seven regional Bell operating companies 


in the $90 billion -a-year local telephone 
market It now appears as if the two 
industries wiQ fight each other for cus- 
tomers, rather than cooperate on multi- 
media ventures. 


“We want to be one-stop shopping for 
communications customers,” said John 


.* !■:"'* VI • 




Malone, chairman of Tele-Communica- 
tions. He contended that a cable compa- 
ny such as Iris did not have the kind of 
“technical handicap” that the regional 
phone companies had. 

Mr. Malone acknowledged that it was 
ironic to be talking with fellow cable 
executives about consolidating the in- 
dustry. Just a few months ago, several 
cable companies were proposing alli- 
ances with phone companies in hopes of 


providing voice, data and video services 
to homes and businesses. 

“It’s a dynamic world, and I still don’t 
rule out anything,” Mr. Malone said. 

Last year. Bell Atlantic Corp., the 
Philadelphia-based Baby Bell, proposed 
to merge with Tele-Communications in 
a $21.4 billion transaction, and South- 
western Bell Corp. proposed to form a 
$4.9 billion joint venture with Cox. 

Both alliances fell through after the 
Federal Communications Commission 
imposed rollbacks totaling 17 percent 
on cable rates. 

The prospect of a tie-up among Amer- 
itech Corp.. BellSouth Corp., South- 
western Bell Corp. and Walt Disney Co„ 
announced Monday, shows that* U.S. 


phone companies no longer want to 
share the information superhighway 
with cable-TV rivals. 

Disney and the three regional phone 
companies said they were Holding talks 
on forming a venture to develop interac- 
tive entertainment and information ser- 
vices for American homes. 

“This bypasses the cable folks,” said 
Arthur Gruen of the media consultancy 
Wilkofsky Gruen Associates. 

The three companies serve about 50 
million customers and compete, along 
with other phone groups, with the cable- 
TV industry in building a system to 
deliver on-demand movies, electronic 
shopping and other futuristic services. 

(Bloomberg. Reuters) 


The company’s U.S. divirion . 
showed a major improvement, • 
benefiting from a steep fall in . 
provisions and in the amortiza- 
tion of mortgage servicing 

rights. 

Oliver Stocked, finance di- • 


rector, said people had “under- 
estimated the reci 


recovery in the 

U.S." 

“Barclays have a lot more 
work to do," said Tim Clarke, 
an analyst at Panmure Gordon, 
who rated the stock a “sell." 

“They had a much more trau- 
matic experience during the re- 
cession and haven’t yet got to 
the stage other banks have of 
pushing capital into developing 
the business," he said. 

( Bloomberg, Reuters) 


MEDIA MARKETS 


2 New Ways to Sell Smokes 


By Thomas Crampton 

International Hemld Tribune 

P ARIS — Small is not beautifulin the 
cigarette industry: About 99 percent 
of cigarettes worldwide are sold by 
multinationals or nationalized ciga- 
rette companies. Yet two small companies 
have succeeded in elbowing theirway into the 
$86 btfliem American ana British markets, 
ndng original but diametrically opposed sales 
tactics. 

“It’s not like rounding up cattle in the 
Grand Canyon. It’s not lute nangmgaround 
in a jungle fighting with crocodiles. Cigarette 
smokingis voy simple; ifsgoing to make you 
dead,” said B. J. Cunningham, president of 
London-based Enlightened Tobacco Co„ re- 
ferring to some recent cigarette advernse- 
meots. His company’s cigarettes, Death and 
Death lights, are sold in packets sporting a 
skull and crossbones. 

On the other hand. Natural An^ncan Cig- 
arettes use the imagery of the Old West, but 
seen from a different saddle. “The original 
concept for Natural American Spint products 
was based on traditional American Indian 
usage of tobacco in its natural static accord- 
ing to Robin Sommers, president of Santa re 
■tSiacco Co. This means that no unhealthy 
additives, reconstituted soap tobacco or 
chemically derived flavor enhancers are used. 

Small cigarette companies such as these 
make up an infinitesimal share of the wood 


bacco Co. and Santa Fe. they represent not 
even a percentage point,” he raid. 

To make headway in an industry that tends 
lo sell its products with advertising cam- 
paigns of striking similarity, these companies 
have moved ahead with marketing methods 
-counter to industry norms and — some would 
say — common sense. 

Mr. Cunningham of Enlightened Tobacco 
said Iris company was banking on truth to sell 
dgarettes:^Our cigarette is called Death, 
•they’re going to kill you, smoke these. 


i* is essentially what we’re say- 


*Choose 

mg." 

Initially there was difficulty in distribution 
because of the established companies. “It’s a 
classic oligopoly. Between them they control 
m excess of 95 percent market share,” Mr. 
Ctnuringiham said. “They’re in each other’s 


pockets, and they’re in bed with each other, 
and they don’t tike oi 


other people coming in 
and looking at their marketplace. Especially if 
the other person is carrying a skull and cross 
bones and called Death — and I can under- 
stand that” 

: But the brand appears to have moved be- 
yond the level of novelty. Sales have jumped 
from £30,000 ($46,200) a year in 1992 to a 
level projected to be £6 million this year, 
according to Mr. Cunningham. 

As for the taste of Death, it is a lot like 
. Benson and Hedges, Mr. Cunningham said. 

Any similari ty to the laxge commercial 
brands would be considered a failure by New 
Mexico-based Santa Fb Natural Tobacco. 
“The difference in taste may be attribut- 

See SMOKES, Page 11 


Fears of Fed 
Cut Interest 
In Bond Sale 


Bloomberg Business News 

NEW YORK — UJS. govern- 
ment bonds fell for a second 
day on Tuesday as market par- 
ticipants shied away from a 
Treasury debt sale amid expec- 
tations that the Federal Reserve 
was poised to raise rates. 

The benchmark 30-year UJS. 
Treasury bond closed at 84 
19/32, off 8/32 from Monday. 
The yield was quoted at 7.57 
percent, up three basis points 

The $17 billion three-year 
note sale, the first leg of the 
Treasury's $40 billion sale of 
notes and bonds this week, 
drew an average yield of 6.61 
percent, just above the 6.60 per- 
cent (hat was (be average mar- 
ket forecast. 

Traders said customers of 
major bond-trading companies 
were not inclined to buy debt 
because of two dements of un- 
certainty in the market. 

In addition to nervousness 
about a meeting of Federal Re- 
serve policymakers next week, 
inflation figures for July are 
scheduled to be released in a 
few days. 

“Customers appear to be 
genuinely disinterested.” said 
Bill Feezer, a trader at Sanwa 
Securities. 



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banking is more about people than 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10, 1994 


** 


market diary 


■ f . 

c . 
b 

V 

HI 

HE 

C 

LOSE 


Stocks Overcome 
Initial Rate Fears 


Cuiqnltd by Ow Staff From PUpataus 
NEW YORK — US. stocks 
posted a slight gain Tuesday as 
interest-rate jitters overshad- 
owed gains in chemicals and 
technology shares. 

Traders said stocks were also 
depressed by weak demand at 
the U.S. Treasury's sale of $40 
billion of new debt. 

The Dow Jones industrial av- 
erage of 30 stocks ended 1.95 


U.S. Stocks 


points higher at 3.755.76. De- 
clining issues outnumbered ad- 
vances by about 10 to 9 oa the 
New York Stock Exchange. 
Volume totaled 259.1 million 
shares. 

Stocks were pulled down by 
concern that next week’s Feder- 
al Reserve policy meeting 
would lead to higher interest 
rates. Dealers now await infla- 
tion data later in the week. 

The price of the benchmark 
30-year Treasury bond fell 


8/32. pushing its yield up to 
7.57 percent from 7.54 percent 

Exxon shares dropped % to 
58^ after the company's largest 
American petrochemical plant 
was rocked by a series of explo- 
sions and a fire. Other oil stocks 
weakened alongside Exxon. 

American Cyanamid shares 
rose 1 %. to 92%, after American 
Home Products said it would 
bypass Cyanamid executives 
and take its S8.5 billion bid 
straight to shareholders and the 
court system. 

Internationa] Business Ma- 
chines jumped 1 to 6 4!4 amid 
expectations of stronger sales of 
personal computers. Intel rose 
*. to 58%. 

Union Carbide climbed 1 to 
32%. 

Storage Technology fell 2 to 
37 on news that it would ac- 
quire the maker of data com- 
munications equipment in a 
stock swap. 

(Reuters. Bloomberg) 


Dollar Loses Its High 
On Lackluster Auction 


Bloomberg Business Nc*s 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
closed little changed against 
other major currencies Tues- 
day. retreating from the day’s 
highs after the Erst installment 
of the Treasury’s quarterly debt 
sale met with less enthusiastic 


Foreign Exchange 


buying than many traders had 
expected. 

Meantime, the Canadian dol- 
lar jumped to a two-month high 
against its U.S. counterpart af- 
ter a poll released last weekend 
showed waning separatist senti- 
ment in Canada. The U.S. cur- 
rency fell to 1.3724 Canadian 
dollars from Monday's closing 
price of 1.3773. 

Many traders sold dollars af- 
ter the Treasury’s sale of $17 
billion of three-year notes met 
with tepid demand. 

The dollar had risen in Lon- 
don during the morning amid 
speculation that the auction 
would go well. The US. curren- 


Pe 


cy closed at 1.5818 Deutsche 
marks, down from 1.5880 DM 
in London trading and from 
Monday’s 1.5825 DM closing in 
New York. 

Hie dollar also closed at 
101.295 yen, slightly down from 
101.500 yen Monday. 

Many traders are waiting to 
see how the rest of the Treasury 
sale goes this week. 

Traders are also waiting for 
trice reports scheduled for re- 
lease this week to see if the 
inflation rate is rising fast 
enough to prompt the Federal 
Reserve to raise interest rates. 

“By this time next week, we’ll 
have a much clearer picture of 
the U.S. economy,” said Paul 
Farrell, manager of strategic 
currency trading at Chase Man- 
hattan Bank. 

The dollar was slightly lower 
against other major Continen- 
tal currencies, finishing at 
5.4 190 French francs compared 
with 5.4195 and at 13340 Swiss 
francs after 1.3350. 

The British pound fell slight- 
ly to $1.5390 from $1.5395. 


Via AnodoMi Pkm 


An* 9 







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Standard ft Poors Indexes 


spin 

SF 500 

industrial* 

Tronsp. 

Utawei 

R/XOTCt 


NYSE Most Actives 


AC von 
9 JR Nob 

TeiMax 

EMC S 

Syntax 

ISM 

Merck 

Forts 

UCartt 

OcriPel 

RJR NbptC 

GKKO 

TrCOa 


<9 
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AmExP 


VoL Hltfi 
40017 73* 
0990 61* 
39351 <3* 
36356 IS* 
30594 23* 
29675 64% 
26890 31 
23615 30 V* 
2271 1 32* 
21Z23 21* 
20577 4* 
19837 I9W 
17224 17* 
17456 14* 
17376 27* 


Low 

Lost 

On. 


93 % 

+ 3 % 

6 U 

41 * 


43 % 

63 V. 

*% 

14 % 

14 % 

+ % 

22 % 

2 T% 

— % 

43 U 

44 % 

+ 1 % 

3 D% 

30 % 

+ % 

30 

30 % 

♦ % 

317 * 

32 % 

+ 1 % 

20 % 

21 % 

-% 

6 % 

6 % 


18 % 

)t% 

*% 

12 % 

17 % 

*** 

16 % 

16 % 


26 % 

27 % 

+ % 


NASDAQ Most Actives 


NfM* 5 v 

inert 

MnoAr 

DeKefr 

Gscos 

Mlcsfts 

AST 

RjvttFns 

MCI 

EKArt 

Novell 

Lotus 

Adairns 

SJcvSden 

NewOKOc 


VoL 

Hfeh 

Low 

Last 

Chg. 

i ll 

9 % 

8 % 

7 % 

-% 

r _, 'l 

S 7 % 

58 

S 7>4 

+ 1 % 

L-l 

7 % 

4 % 

7 

+%. 

Pinna 

SS 


• i% 

33717 22 % 

-*» 

25064 53 % 

52 % 

53 % 

+ % 

22827 

17 % 

14 

17 

*% 

27182 

14 % 

14 

14 V 4 

—•A 

21835 23 ’A 

23 % 

22 >V.t 

— Vu 

21679 

17 % 

15 V* 

17 

+ I'Vii 

20876 

14 % 

15 % 

IPVu 

— Vl, 

18771 

16 

34 

35 % 

- 1 % 

1 BS 24 

18 

14 % 

17 Wu 

-Wu 

17748 

1 % 

IVU 

1 % 

+ % 

17388 

31 % 

30 % 

30 % 

. % 


Dow Jones Averages 


Open W*b low Lent On. 


Indus 374 AW 37 S 807 3 M 3 JB 37 BJ 4 + 1 .W 
Troro T®£M 159830 15»07 1598 X 7 - 8 J 1 


uts ' 187.14 was ie.ll M -2 -i-K 

Comp 1 W 2 .U i 


13C1A2 1 MCB 0 -lisa 


Hfeb Low Lost cm. 


42452 4 42171 —008 
45 B. 1 t 456.66 457.79 +AW 
ron ffiu 533.53 -CLQ 7 

38*30 381 22 38*23 *125 
15909 159.73 159.11 -OJj 
45 B 4 44.77 45 j 0 O - 0.10 


NYSE Indexes 


Carrmovte 

todustrita* 

Trmgj. 

Utility 

Ftnarlce 

Melt 

2 S 3 JM 

311 X 2 

245.15 

* 12.17 

212 X 0 

Lew Lest Oa. 

252 X 9 252.96 — <LB 
310 X 8 311 X 0 +003 
20.94 36507 + 0 X 5 
211 ® 21101 — 05 * 
212.10 212 X 2 +0115 

NASDAQ Indexes 

Composite 

Induatriats 

Bonks 

Insurance 

Finance 

Tramp. 

H%h 

721 X 8 

72202 

767 ® 

90 *ca 

74308 

722.76 

Low Lott 

73011 731.11 
731 ® 722 X 2 
767.11 769 ® 
098 X 5 898 X 5 
940.92 741 X 8 
718.16 72032 

Ora. 

+ 064 
* 0 X 5 

- 10 Q 

*244 

AMEX Stock Index 


H*gft 

Low Lota 

Chg. 


442 J 4 

44104 442 X 2 

+ 062 

| Dow Jones Bond Averages 



Cto» 

OTOe 

2 a Banda 


98.11 


10 Utilities 


74 X 4 

+ 020 

10 Industrial! 


10107 

—0417 

NYSE Diary 


Adronctd 

One 

778 

Prey. 

11 ® 

Dottned 

1149 

942 

unchonped 

734 

730 

Total asues 

2861 

3841 

Ttaw Highs 

29 

34 

New Lows 

68 

48 


AMEX Most Actives 



VoL 

Htah 

Low 

Lost 

aw. 

QieySffs 

14233 

9 % 

9 

9 -Vp 

+Ve 

ViocB 

7648 

35 % 

35 Mi 

35 % 

+ % 

IvaxCo 

4941 

18 % 

17 % 

18 % 

+ % 

Vtacmrl 

4738 

4 M 

4 % 

4 % 

— v* 

XCLLId 

37 W 

1 % 

1 % 

IVu 

— M, 

NY Tim 

3389 

24 % 

24 % 

24 % 

— % 

RoyoJOP 

3335 

4 % 

4 

4 V„ 

+ 9 % 

VklC W 1 C 

2914 

7 /i. 

1 *Vii 

1 W„ 

♦ Vu 

TatiPet 

2755 

12 

11 % 

11 % 

+ % 

TopSrce 

2571 

4 % 

5 % 

4 % 

— % 


Market Sales 



Today 

PTOV. 


Close 

coal. 

NY 5 E 

257 ® 

265 X 4 


14 ® 

1*59 

Nasdoa 

23802 

22101 

In millions. 




AMEX Diary 


Advanced 


278 


U» 

Total Issum 

New metis 

NOW Lows 


245 

S 3 289 
34 I 245 

622 799 

14 13 

20 16 


NASDAQ Diary 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Tcttt issues 
New Highs 
New Lows 


1632 1540 
1497 1 507 
19*6 2029 
5075 5076 

a to 

87 47 


Spot Commodities 


CemmadH-r Today Put. 

Atomlnwn. B> £602 16*9 

Cooper etactrotyiic, lb 1.11 1.11 

Iran FOB. ton 71100 21100 

Leod.lt> 038 <03 

Stiver, troy at 5 . 1 * 5.13 

Steel (scrap). Ido 119.67 122 JK 

Tin. lb NA 1*652 

Zlncfa 84450 14646 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


Metals 


CM* 


ALUMINUM (Kjtai Grade) 
metric tea 


Preview 
BU Aft 


DeUurs per 

Seat 143600 143705 

Forword 144150 1464® 

COPPER CATHODES DM 
PCflBtlPTIPea-lcTBH 

Spot zmsa 738340 

Forward 239400 237700 

LEAD 

Ooltan per metric ton 
Spot 56500 56400 

Forward 5840 58400 

NICKEL 

Donors per metric too 
Spot 576000 577000 

Forward S8SU0 504000 

TIM 

Dollars per metric ton 
Spot 5S&M smw 

Forward 51M40 516500 

zinc (SPKM HM Crade} 

Spot OfflXO 729 JC 

Forward 73100 95200 


USX I. 
14570 Q l< 
Grade) 


yto Hf 240300 
240200 24000 


57100 57200 
58900 59000 


600000 401800 
609000 <07500 


504500 SDS5M 
512000 51 2500 


93 SJM 734*8 
95000 95900 


Financial 


9440 +007 

73 A 4 + 0 X 4 

9204 + 002 

923 + 0 X 1 

5 U —802 

%£ -tSs 

9108 — 002 
9009 —003 

9075 — 000 

9064 — 002 


Hiee Lew close change 
3 -MONTH STERLING (UFFE) 
■SOMN-pN ellN PCt 
SOP M 22 7417 

Dec 73 X 9 9341 

Mar 9200 9201 

Jen rut not 

See 9205 91.77 

Dec 9 U 6 9107 

Mar 91.52 9104 

JDW 9 L 32 9105 

sen 91.12 9107 

Dee 9093 9009 

Mar 9079 9075 

Jn 9069 9062 

Est. volume: 49023 . Open Irrt.: 544011 . 
MBONTH EURODOLLARS (LIFPE 1 
si miiuon - oft of mo wet 

& 

Mor 
Jew 

S *E» 7 . volume: <0 Open irit: 7,113 
3 -MONTH EUROMARKS (L 1 FPEJ 
DMl mnnon-Ptsotiiepct 
Sep 9507 950 * 99 X 7 +OD 1 

Dec 94,95 94.91 9*95 +001 

Mar 946 B 9462 9407 —001 

JOB *05 9409 

Sep 9407 9*02 

Dec Till 7175 

Mor 9361 9307 7141 


9401 

7*80 

94 ® 

N.T. 

N.T. 

9408 

N.T. 

N.T. 

9 X 83 

N.T. 

N.T. 

9801 

N.T. 

N.T. 

93 X 4 


7141 


Dec 


7145 —001 
7129 —001 


9110 9304 

. _ itS tui 

JM 7201 7201 9200—002 

Est volume: 86227 . Open bit.: 772 X 07 . 


9104 —DO* 
72.75 —003 


3-MO NTH Pi BOR (MATIF) 

Fra miniow - pis ettee prf 

S 4 P 7438 9429 


9400 


sS 


7399 

9273 

7147 

9324 


Jon 


9432 —005 

9*01 — 0 X 7 

7174 —an 
9148 — 0.12 
9127 — 0.13 

9104 — 80 * 

7207 —AH 
7170 — 0.13 


est. volume: < 2016 . Open Ini.: 194156 . 
LONG GILT O 0 FPEI 
« 3 MQ 0 - pH B ami Of 180 Pd 
Sep 102-34 101 - 2 * 101-27 — 0-26 

Dec HD -11 101-11 181-11 — 0 - 2 * 

Est volume: S& 439 . Open tot.: 123025 . 
GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND (LIFFC 1 
OM 25 MW-Pt 3 0 f 109 pet 
Sfp 9113 92 XB 9274 —004 

Dec 9206 9105 71.97 —008 

Est. volume: 12 X 641 Open tot.: 174541 
H-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MATIFl 

Frataxie- Pt* ot 1M net 

Sep 11404 11502 11576 — 0 X 0 

Dec 11503 1 1478 IK 90 —008 

Mor 11450 11436 11420 —006 

Ju N.T. N.T. 11302 —004 

Est volume: 167471 Open tot; 130486 . 


Industrials 


H(eb Low LON Settle Ctope 
GASOIL Cl PE 7 

ILS. dobars Per metric tow-lets o» 100 tows 
AM 132 X 5 15000 1 S 22 S 15225 + 073 

SfP 156 X 0 15450 15600 15375 + 025 

Ott 1 »J 0 158 X 5 159.58 15950 UtKll. 

MOV 14200 16000 14200 14200 UnCh. 


Hltai Low Lnxt Settle CU’pe 


Ju 

Feb 

Aw 

May 


14*00 14275 14400 164 X 0 —025 

14525 16400 16125 16100 —000 

16*75 14425 16475 16475 —050 

16400 16100 16400 16400 +125 

H.T. N.T. NT. 1*150 +175 

N.T. N.T. ILT. 16325 +300 


Est. volume: 1 X 700 . Open tot 104020 


BRENT CRUDE OIL IIPEJ , 

(LX dollars per MneHob ef 1088 barrels 
Sep 1805 1728 17 X 5 17 X 5 - 002 

Oct 17 X 2 1705 17 JS 1774 .+ 00 * 

Nov 1724 1707 170 * 1705 + 0 X 9 

Dec 1740 1701 170 * 1704 + 0.12 

JM 1706 I 7 J 0 17 X 2 17 ® +a» 

Feb N.T. N.T. M.T. 1722 + 0 .T? 

Mar 1746 17.15 17.15 17.15 +020 

Aar K.T. N.T. N.T. 17.13 +028 

Moy N.T. N.T. NX 1701 +020 


Jun NX. NX. N.T. 1706 + 0 XD 
N.T. N.T. NLT. 17 X 5 +820 


am N-t; n:t: n.t. 170* +020 
Est- volume: 38283 . Open tot 169294 


Stock Indexes 


F 7 SE 1 M (LfFFB) 
r Index new 


ttleti Lew QMS Ctidme 


03 

Sep 31780 31570 31740 —110 

Dec 31815 31815 31870 —110 

Mar 32000 32000 3207.5 +70 

Est volume: 1 1231 Open Int: 60713 . 
CAC 4 Q tMATin 

am** 0 ^ TmiS^aBixo 298*00 ~jsm 


21 T 70 O 207000 287100 —3208 
oa N.T. N.T. N.T. Uncn. 

DCC 214300 212000 715000 —3300 

Mar. 215800 215800 214700 —3300 

Est volume; 1 U 33 . Open tot: 41628 . 


Sources; Motif. Associated Press. 
London Inn Financial Foturas Exchange. 
Inti FWrotovm E x change , 


Dividends 


Company 


Per AM Pay -Rec 
STOCK 

Community FSt Bk b 10 % 9-2 M 2 


baoMecd la reoutatory oppravat 

REVERSE STOCK SPLIT 
NDE Environmental 1 tor W reverse split 
INCREASED 

Q 0725 M 9 N 
Q 07 8-18 0-24 


Bob Evans 
Tibet Hid* 


REGULAR 


AlCoStdDtv 

Am FstPartptEw 
Am FstTxEx Ml* 
Am FstTxBx MtO 2 
Bendas Inc 
Barnwell lr>d 
Bindley western 
Cbesapemw Carp 
CtoBotvBngia 
EahxiVCtmEx 
Eaton Van DcpBoa 

Eaton van Divers ' 


Q 05 - 8-22 9 -T 0 
M 0883 WI N 
W M Ml W 6 
M .0625 Ml 


E a in-V'Jm Eq uity 


Eotonvon L 

Eatonvan Fid Ex 
EatonVan Grvrtti 
EotonVan MrTetRet 
EatonVan MunIBd 
EotonVan SecFW 


Garun Inc 
Gen Motors E 
Gen Motors H 
Minnesota Minina 
Nature SunddM 
NcrwoK Grp 
PraspectStHllnw 
Putakl Furniture 
ReoubHc Cvpmim 
ScrippeEW 
ScrlppaHomard 
Superar Surgical 
TerooJetn Gto UT 
VOnaeSORders Ex 


G 

.175 

9-20 

K 70 D 

a 

05 

9-14 

9*0 



8-22 


a 

18 

10-17 

IT -75 


.18 

7-1 

9-15 

a 

AS 

7-14 

.£<30 


W 

9-14 

9 ® 

a 

JO 

9 - 1 * 

9^0 

Q 

jn 

9-15 

9-30 

a 

75 

9 -T 6 

9 ® 

a 

45 

9-14 

9-30 


03 

9-1 

9-30 

M 

034 

W 

8-15 

M 

051 

9-1 

7-15 

Q 

- SO 

9-16 

7-30 

M 

033 

8-15 

Ml 

M 

X 383 

8-15 

9-1 

a 

13 

801 

7-15 


® 

8-19 

MA 

a 

1 ? 

B -18 

9 X 0 

Q 

xa 

8-18 

9-10 


^ - - T-U. 

Q 05 8-17 8-29 

B 03 9-15 MO 

M 035 8-24 8-31 
.14 9-1 9-15 


Q X 5 Ml 9-15 

Q .11 8-26 7-9 

Q 20 8-26 9-9 


mbbtok amount per ADR. 

In 


„ 8-19 x _. 
05 8-17 Ml 
00 10-3 10-17 


WASHINGTON — KPMG Peat . M ^j^ ^fiJauSlsof 
ment $186.5 million Tuesday to . 10 their failure. * 

several savings-and-loan clients had contribu 

TL. !. l.«Kl several obtained receoriy by the 



. 177^1 tt tiAiv . “ *■_ 

Resdonal Bells Sue to Block AT&T 

YORK (Bloomberg) — Bell Arianoc Corp. 

t^iock AT&T C 0 ip,> 

bfflrariarauisition of McCaw Ceflnlar Conunniucanons In . 

Bdl operatmg Compames alleged mjbor 
filing Monday that the merger wSd ^infhrt severe ^ 

allSar competitors and have a^ai^^Jy 
rive effecTon^ Nynex and Bdl Adantic. The propo^ 
would combine }£, the largest U.S. ceflular 1 

AT&T, the largest U.S. long-distance provider and the largest 
U.S. largest maker of cellular network equipment- . 

Storage Tech Plans an Acquisitioii ?.■ 

LOUISVILLE. Colorado (Bloomberg) — ! 

StoraccTck share- Based oti current market prices, StorageTelr 
would be paying about $10^0 a share for Network System ■ ; 

The transaction, to bt carried out as a tax-free merger. would 
give StorageTek access to a technology called enterprise switching^ 
that c on solidates voice, data, . image and video tramc. . v 

Terra Will Buy Fertilizer Company 

SIOUX CITY. Iowa (Combined Dispatches) — Terra Indus-- 
tries Inc. smd Tuesday it would acquire Agricultural Minerals « j 
Chemicals Inc:, a producer d£ nitrogei fertilizers, for about ynx* 

million. ’• : . ~ 

Terra’s majority stodtholder, Minorco SA, has given Terra an.' 
option, to sell- it about 133 million shares 'at $7 -50 a share to 
finance part- of the purchase. This would increase Minorco s 
ownership stake 603 percent of ^ Terra's, common stock. _ *f 
Mino rco SA,a conroany controHedby South African in thesis- 
and based in Luxembourg, said tile acquisition would make Terra 
one of the largest producers of nitrogen fertilizer in North Amen-- 

rm and a Iwirimg malhari ril qtpplfer. (Bloomberg, .AFX^ 


Intel to Work "With Lotos on Video 


NEW. YORK (Kmght-Ridder) Lotus Development Corp. 

and Intel Corp. said Tuesday they would jointly marker and t . 
develop, data and video conf eren<ting products using Lotus Notes. 
and Inld’s Prc^hare technology. • • t 

Lotos and Intd will develop a range of products, including a 
Lotus Notes data conferencing product that will enable users to, 
work simultaneously on the same software application, the com- . 
parties said. 


Ciba Vision Buys New ProductLine f . 

•atlantal fReotersV — Cibft-GdKV - AG’s Ciba Vision unir- 


London Coffee Prices Back Down From 8-Year HL 


‘ATLANTA (Reuters) — CibarGdgy AG’s Oba Vision unit- 
said Tuesday it would buy the ophthalmic phannaceuticaf prod-' 
uct ting of Johnson & Johnson's Iolab ’Corp. : for about $300 
miffion. ' ‘ 1 ‘ •' • - ; ^ 

CSba said Iolab’s ephthaimic surgery business was not part ot 
the transaction. 


For investment information 


Read THE MONEY REPORT 
every Saturday in the IHT 


Reuters 

LONDON — Coffee prices, recently 
propelled to eight-year highs by two severe 
frosts in Brazil, slumped Tuesday as specu- 
lators gambled on wanner weather and 
took their profits. 

Traders, however, said the underlying 
market tone would stay firm because man- 
ufacturers were waiting to buy up coffee as 
prices drifted lower. 

On the London futures market Tuesday, 
coffee for November delivery was down 
$194, to $3,195 a ton. after dropping $160 


on Monday, it followed sharp overnight 
losses in New York. 


one 


Coffee is now 22 percent below a recent 
high of $4,085 reached in early July. 

“The market is very edgy at the mo- 
ment,'’ said one trader, adding that the 
manufacturers were still staying away as 
speculators and investment funds liquidat- 
ed positions. 

“We're not completely out of the woods 
yet where the frosts are concerned. You 
have to remember that it is stQZ January in 
the Southern Hemisphere and the weather 


forecasts can’t read too far ahead/ 
said. 

Another trader said the worry in Brazil 
now was not so much frosts as dry weather, 
which could compound the damage al- 
ready done. “They need rain in the next 
couple of weeks or else the crop could 
suffer even more,” he said. 

A more immediate indicator will be the 


U.S. Department of Agriculture’s report 
ed Fri- 


on frost damage due to be published 
day. Traders said they expected this first ' 
independent report to give a more conser- 
vative assessment of the damage. 


Omae Manhattan Com. said ft had launched its J348 million- 
offer for American Residential Holdm^ Corp. • •• ( Bloomberg , £ 


Synetic Inc. said it agreed to sdl its institutional pharmacy* 
business to Pharmacy Corp. of America, a unit of Beverly Enter- 
prises Inc, for -about $1073 nrillioa in cash. (Bloomberg) 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Apnce Franco Prone Aug. 9 


CioMPiwv. 


Amsterdam 


ABN Amro HM 41-40 42 

ACF HoKJIna 3 BJ 0 37.70 

Aegon 9900 100 

AhoW 46.90 *400 

Akro Nattol 22100 223 

AMEV 7500 7550 

BofvWeswmen * 0 J 0 SOM 

CS M 68-30 tBM 

DSM 1 * 0.50 139.30 

Elsevier ITO 173.10 

FokLei- 1620 1650 

Gtst-Brocodes 50.10 50*0 

HBG 27800 29800 

HMnefcat 22500 23070 

H ooo ov wno 77.10 7 R 30 

Himtrr Douglas 7900 7970 

IHC Catond *000 *000 

inter Mueller 83 8350 

mi l Nederiand 8100 82J0 

KLM 5140 54-40 

KUP BT *900 SO .* 0 

KPN SO *900 

NBdHOVO 71.90 71.10 

Oce Grlnten 7860 

Pokhoea 52.70 suo 

PWliPW 5500 54*0 

Potvarnm 77.70 81 X 0 

ROOM IlfJU 11800 

Rudoroco 5530 5500 

Rollnco IMM 120-70 

Rorento B 7 J 0 8020 

Rural OuMl 19800 20060 

Stork 47 47.10 

Unilever liASo mio 

vanOmmeren JUO 57^0 

VNU 18700 18700 

WoTfers/Khiwer 119 X 0 12160 

EOE.hKIex MI 40 J 
Previous : 42106 


RMtomeiall 
SctwrlfiB 
Stamm 
Thvsson 
Varta 
VeBo 
VEW 
Vlag 

Vtotomaaen 
Wirt In 

^5 


Brussels 


AG Fin 
Abnonll 
Artxd 
Barca 
3 BL 


3400 2440 
HA. 7980 
4810 *800 
2485 2520 
4290 *220 


__ erl 27025 27500 

CBR 12250 12075 

CMB 2*75 25*0 

CNP 2060 2020 

Coc+vrill 198 201 

Cobepa 4000 6020 

colruvt 7300 7310 

Demaize 1302 131 * 

Electron*! 5 W 0 S 9*0 

Eiectraftoa 3300 3310 

GIB I 486 1450 

GBL 4280 *280 

Gevawt 9730 9*00 

Gloverttal 5170 51 B 0 

Immctorl 3085 jioo 

KTKltotbcnK 7060 7150 

Mosane 7*72 1*5 

Petrotlna N A 10550 

Powerfln NA 32*0 

RUCNcel NA 546 

R ovale Beige NA 55*0 

SocGen Bouaue bsoo ss*o 
sk G en Beta Mue z 3 io 2325 
solloo NA. 14425 

Solvav NA 16050 

Twssenderlo NA 10600 

TracteM N A 10325 

UCB NA sirs 

Union Minlere 25*5 25m 

Wagons Uls NA 7170 


Current S tott : 7727 X 7 


prevten ; 


Frankfurt 


AEG 183 183 

Alcatel SEL M 9 3*0 

Allianz Hold 2428 2*72 
A Ilona 628 J 0 625 

ASM 1006 1006 

BASF I 23.*0 32600 

Barer 36734 SJ 0 

Bar. M mo bank 4070)1 414 

Bav Verutoabk 435 449 

BBC 770 770 

BMP Bonk 381 380 

BMW 840 863 

Commerzbank 33000337.10 

Continental 26800 270 
Daimler Bern 830 840 
Dews» 51300 507 

DT Babcock 26336 S 30 

Deutsche Bank 73073*00 

DOM >05 

Drescner Bank 3 W 388 J 9 
FeMmudile 310 310 

F KryppHoesch 22300 22300 
Harpener 3*0 3*3 

Henkel 59650 600 

Hodittef . 

Hoectat 349 X 035200 

Holanonn 8 M 866 

Horten 218 230 

IWKA 38500 388 

KollSah I* 1 M 

xarsrvat 5705 0 575 

Kouftnf 515 512 

KHD 13 X 30 IX JO 

KloecfcnerWerfc* W 161 
Umta 719 721 

Lulttianso 31*0021700 

MAN 443 451 

M ownes m ai i ii etresUB 

Metal m ea d I 2080020700 

Muench Rueck 2«0 TU6 
Porsche 852 875 

Pretesog 48330 <80 

PWA 24624700 

RWE 44700 448 


CJOMProv. 


330 327 
73794208 
68208 691 00 
31300 315 

31800 319 

SMJO 53300 
3 S 5 355 

40700*9130 
5110051 520 
1010 1033 


Helsinki 


Aroer-YtitvrnQ 126 134 


Enso-GufEeft 44.10 **. 70 
169 1 R 


1000 hxto 


Hutitomaki 

ICOX 1 . 

Mmmtne 130 

Metro 170 174 

NOkta 499 *97 

POhloio 67 67 

Keooki 99 107 

Stockmann 223 230 




Hong Kong 

Bk East Asia 31X0 3100 

Cathay Podflc 1270 12*0 

Cheung Kong 3700 37X0 
China LI tail Pwr 3840 38X0 
Dairy Farm Inrl 1100 1140 
Hons Luna Dev 1395 J*J0 
Httia Sena Bank 5400 ss 
Henderson Land 38X0 3909 
HK AIT Eng. 44.90 *8J0 

HK China Gas 142S 1+20 

HK Electric 2345 2300 

HK Land 2060 21 

hk Really Trust 21 2J.10 


HSBC HoMtogj 9475 9575 
ong Htis 


HK Stumg Htto 11 X 5 1105 
HK Telecomm 15.75 15 A 5 
HK Ferry 15 10*0 

Hutch Whompoo 3500 3560 
HysanDev 2275 2331 

JordtoeMath. 61.75 62.75 
Jonflne sir Hid 2900 2900 
y.owloan Motor 15 JO 1500 
Mandarin Orient iojo 1000 
Miramar Hotel 31 21.15 
New Worm Dev 2*05 25 

SHK Props 5025 51 X 5 
SMim 110 3 X 2 

SwIrePocA 61 J 5 6 *X 5 
Tal Cheung Pros 1200 12 J 0 
TVE 3 X 5 3 X 5 

Wharf Hold 3080 30 X 0 
Wing On Co inti MX 5 11 X 5 
Wlnsorind. 1100 1105 



Close Prey. 

Genl Acc 


6 



60 S 

Grand MM 


4 X 1 

GRE 

1 ® 

1 ® 


*44 

*46 

GUS 

£74 

£01 

Hanson 

203 

202 


1 X 5 

1 X 2 

HSBC Hldgs 

8.12 

803 

ICI 

806 

£65 


*85 

*05 

asBSET 

£17 

1.72 

£17 

1 X 1 

um Sec 

4 X 2 

60 S 


808 

£05 

Losmc 

1 ® 

105 


*42 

* 4 * 


5 X 8 

S® 

Motts Sp 

*32 

4 J 0 

ME PC 

475 

*76 


403 

*77 

Natwest 

*57 

*A 5 


£37 

£42 


60 S 

ft 

PA O 

705 

Pliklngtan 

1.96 

£60 

15 / 

£02 

Prudential 

3.13 

118 


*07 

*04 

ReckirtCul 

604 

*16 

Red tend 

£45 

£54 

Reed Inti 

£13 

£26 

Reuters 

*91 

* 0 / 

RMC Grouo 

10.12 

10.75 


155 

159 

Rtahmn (imtt> 

3 A 4 

170 

Royal seat 

354 

8 X 1 

802 


*23 



£25 

5 X 3 

Scat Power 

304 

190 


1 X 1 

1 X 1 


£60 

501 

Stoll 

7 X 6 

7 X 9 

Stato 

6 X 8 

6 X 9 


1 ® 

1 ® 


4 X 7 

4 X 6 

Smifli fWHJ 

404 

403 

Sun Alt lance 

3 X 2 

3 X 4 

Tate A Lyle 

*41 

*43 


2 XS 

245 

Thorn EMI 

1045 

KL 40 

Tomkins 

2 X 4 

201 

TSB Group 

2.14 

213 

Unilever 

KLA 3 

HUB 

Util Biscuits 

3 X 7 

3 X 7 

Vodutoto 

151 

1 ® 

War Loan 3 % 

* 14 * 

4107 


4 X 3 

6 X 7 

Whitbread 

£32 

£28 

WllltarnsHdes 

3 X 8 

3 X 4 

Wdta Corroon 

!.*« 

1 ® 


< 7*10 



To Oar Readers 
Stock prices for 
Johannesburg and 
Toronto were not 
available for this 
edition because of 
technical problems. 


London 

I Abbev Nol'l 196 

Allied Lyons 5.95 


brio Wiggins 
■K'l Group 


Argyll Group 
ASS Brit Foods 
BAA 
BAe 

Bonk Scotland 

Barclays 

Bass 

BAT 

BET 

Blue Circle 
BOC Group 
Soots 
Bowaier 
BP 

BtHAlnmm 
Brit Gcrs 
Brit Steel 
BritTeieeam 
BTR 

Coble wire 
Cadbury Sch 
Ca radon 
Coats viveiia 
Comm Union 
Courtaulus 
ECC Groun 
EntcrortseQii 
Eurotunnel 
Flsans 
Forte 
GEC 


209 

200 

an 

4.95 

103 

M 6 

5 X 2 

508 

421 

1.19 




507 

470 

409 

474 

206 

102 

177 

XT 

400 

407 

xas 

220 

505 

&47 

187 

421 

10 B 

106 

236 

208 


177 

5.9S 

270 

202 

493 

5.16 

1 J 7 

503 

5 J 5 

425 

1 X 1 

119 

706 

5 X 7 

471 

406 

4 » 

282 

103 

183 

185 


465 

104 

2 X 0 

500 

507 

300 

4 X 3 

3.19 

147 

2 X 5 

2 X 7 


ThomsoivCSF 172.10 173X0 
Total 32100 322 

UAP. 15405 HB 

hrotca 28600 287 


1 : 316840 


Madrid 


BBV 1170 3175 

Bco Control Him. 2775 777 S 


Bonco Santander 5878 

fill 1118 


3370 
is 2345 


Banesto 
CEPSA 

Oroaodot ._ — 

Endero 6330 6270 

Ercros 1 B 1 185 

itwrtJnao 7 » 956 

Rcpsol <200 *275 

Tabacaiero 3*70 3450 

TeMrtonkD 1825 1840 

JfeSSf!4r !B,i7 


Milan 


nca Comm 4545 <uo 
stool 150 157 

■' I group 22650 22900 

1093 1)00 


IR 

edital 
Inldtam 
Fertln 
Fertln Rba 
Flat SPA 
Finmeccanica 
Generali 
ipi 
IFIL 
tlalcem 
Itatoa 
itolmaoTiiore 
Mediobanca 
Mo nt edi s on 
Olivetti 
Plrotli 
RAS 

Rba wi tt 

Sotpem 


2520 2615 


2075 7150 


3000 
1988 1950 
1175 1230 
<640 6810 
1820 1840 
405 W 41450 
24650 27850 
6315 605 
122*0 12735 
5350 5430 
42000 43400 
14700 15100 
1447 1491 
2215 2295 

vl^M 

24000 2 S 300 
7800 10005 
4130 4760 


Son Paolo Torino 7640 9780 
SIP 4370 4190 

SME 3808 3*45 

Snla 2375 7460 

Standa 36250 34900 

Stet 5150 S 270 

ToroAssIRIsp 26(00 27200 




Montreal 


Aknn Aluminum 331 * 33 ^* 

Bonk Montreal 234 a TPm 

BeDConafO 461 b 42 

Bombardier B 30 ifta 

Cam trior 18 lOta 

Cascade N.T. 6 


Close P rev. 


Dominion 1 ext a 7 7 

Donohue A 12 V» 1210 

PShtfl 4 .IS 4 .W 

MacMillan B 1 19 1916 

Nall Bk Canada 9 V 6 846 

Power Corp- ITto > 7 ta 

Prawgc 6 6 

Quebec Tel 191 + 17 % 

Quebeeor A I 8 ta 1 BV 6 

guebecor 8 8 U 1816 

Telegtobe 1716 1946 

Vktaotron 12 V 6 12 V* 


Paris 


Accor 671 672 

Air Ltautdo *31 *33 

Alcatel Alsthom 645 656 

Axa 266 Z 74 

Bancalre JCteJ 49700 502 

BIC 1310 1319 

BNP 2*100 2*5 

Bouygues 650 650 

Danone 845 863 

Cor retour 2065 2096 

CCJ=. 223 X 0 22700 

Cor us 11*X0 115 

awgeurs 1428 1443 

aments Franc 315 319 

ClubMrt 40800 409 

EN-Amttaine 07 JOG 1*5 

EuroOlsner 1000 1005 

GeaEOUK 5 B 2 588 

Havas 47 D 471.90 

I metal 626 632 

LafaroeCome 44*45200 
L (Brand 6470 6690 

I- von. Eaux 50 551 

□real ILT 1194 1231 

L.VJNLH. 868 877 

Matra-HotJielte 1190012000 
Michel to B 248 X 0 25100 

Moulinex 12608 126 


Sydney 



7 X 5 

9.16 

ANZ 

*16 

*17 

BHP 

1902 

19 ® 

Borai 

Bougainville 

£ 

303 

006 

Cotas Myor 

4 X 4 

*26 

Comcico 

£08 

£05 

CRA 

19 ® 

19 

CSR 

4 ® 

1.13 

1 X 3 

Goodman Ftato 

106 

1 ® 

ICI Austrolta 

11 X 2 

11 ® 

Magellan 

15 S 

155 

MIM 

258 

Z94 

Nat Aust Bonk 

11 X 4 

11 X 0 

News Coro 

£96 

851 

Nine Network 

4 ® 

AM 

N Broken Hilt 

303 

302 

Pac Durnoo 

*45 

*S 

Pioneer Inti 

258 

297 

Nmndy PaseMan 

221 

222 


1 ® 

1 ® 


4 

4 

TNT 

266 

265 

Western Mining 

7 ® 

7 X 5 

WBStoaC Banking 

*60 


Wood side 

400 

*74 



Pralbas 552 

manner mu nr. 10 i 7 zx 

Pernod- Rbcnnl 346 348 X 0 

Peugeot as* u* 

Ptoault Print 939 949 

Rodftaechnlaue 529 5*4 


Rh-Poulenc A 14000 143 

Raft St. Louis 1617 1635 


5anofl 


SW 962 


Sqjnt Goto In TOO 710 


s f n 

Sta Generate 


550 


« 577 613 

S*WZ ___ 266.90 26600 




MarketQosed 
The stock market 
in Singapore was 
closed Tuesday for a 
holiday. 


Sao Paulo 


Banco do Brasil 21 X 8 22.10 

B«S*ta 700 7.70 

Brodesen 700 708 

Brohmo 270 290 

Ceroid 1 0010400 

Etotrobras 2 S 8 28* 

itaubonco 232 23 ? 

Ught 327 39 

Paro w o po nema 14 I60O 

Petrobrus 12200 m .*9 

SouzdCrus AGIO 6010 

Tetahras *6 *Sss 

Telesp 450 480 

UsJmlrws 1.18 1 X 0 

Vole Rio Don 119.9911909 
Vartg NA. 9500 




Stockholm 


AGA 67 6900 

AseoA 632 632 

1 Astro A 169 171 

Ailed Copco to 960 D 

Elect rqfus B 388 370 

Ericsson 430 421 

Essene-A in ids 

Handeisbaiken 97 100 

investor B 181 ibi 

Norsk Hydra 2650826850 
P record Id AF 120 118 

SawMkB 119 120 

SCA-A 117 121 

S-E Banfcen 46.10 48 X 0 

SkmSQ F 116 116 

SkapSAd 757 156 

SKF 154 153 

Stara 451 tss 

Treltaaorg BF 106 W 

Volvo BF m 7V 

Offissmsseu ’ m - , ‘ 


OaeePrev. 


Tokyo 


Akal Eloctr 
Asatil Chemical 
Asohi Glass 
Bank ot Tokyo 
Bridgestone 
Canon 
Costa 

Dai Nippon Print 
Datwa House 
Da two Securities 
Fame 
Full Bttik 


*71 470 

761 775 

1220 1210 
1560 155 ® 
1620 1630 
1758 1760 
12*0 12*0 
WIO 1890 
1490 1470 
1620 1428 


P13 


. JB*i 
Hitachi 
Hfiochl Cable 


Ita Yokocto 
Itochu 

Japan Airlines 
Kcllmo 
Konsal Power 
Kawasaki Steel 
KliinBi 
Komatsu 
Kubota 
Krocera 

Matsu Elec Inds 
Matsu Elec vn% 
Mltsubtstil Bk 
Mltsudtshl KBS 6 I 
Mitsubishi Elec 
Mitsubishi Hev 
Mltsu&tahJ Corp 
Mitsui and Co 
Mitsui Marine 
MltsukeaM 


2320 23*0 
2240 2 Z 7 U 
1060 1060 
lazo 1010 
884 an 

17*0 1720 

730 728 

2600 2630 
415 411 

1230 12*0 
946 953 

745 74 * 

7*90 7430 
1770 1750 
113 J 1140 
2620 2633 
535 532 

671 687 

806 810 
1200 1170 
6 S 9 859 


M 20 


CtaeeProv. 


Mitsumi 

NEC 

NGK insulators 
Nlkka Seen rules 
Nippon Koggku 
Nippon on 
Nippon Steal 
Nippon Yusen 
Nissan 
Nomura Sec 
NTT 

Olympus Optical 

Pioneer 

Ricoh 

Sanyo Elec 

Sharp 

5 hfmazu 

SMnetsuOiem 

Sony 

Sumltorna Sk 
Sumitomo Chem 
Sum I Marine 
Sum lloma Metal 
Totoel Corp 
TakedaChem 
TDK 
Telfht 

Tokyo Marine 
Tokyo Elec Pw 
TOCB 

Toray Ind. 
Todiiba 
Toyota 

ramaltaitsec 
a: x IN 


1710 1690 
1250 1230 
ISM 1070 
12*0 123 * 
10 » 1020 
765 7*3 

368 36 * 
657 653 

778 772 
2250 2230 
85700 85100 
1180 1170 
2940 2840 
973 768 

576 561 

182 D IBID 
738 740 

ZTXD 2090 
5900 5930 

zen? 2B2C 

5*4 540 

935 927 

323 320 

665 672 

1230 1240 
*550 4450 
50 590 

1270 1270 
3079 3000 
1500 1*90 
770 771 

776 767 

2170 2150 
885 ns 




1654 
Prevtoes : 1457 


Zurich 


AdJa Inti B 
AJlButeseBnew 
BBC Brym Boy B 1 
CtooGelgy B 
CSHaWtogsB 
ElefclrowB 
Fischer B 


257 


548 560 

363 36 * 

1505 1510 

2170 21 H 

jelroaU B P 5 W 

fcS^Sc R B ri 2 SS 

Nestle R 1182 1172 

Oerdfc. Buefirte R UOU 70 O 
ParaesaHMB 151a 150a 

Roche Hag PC 3 ® 5730 

Satro RejxiWlc 117 

Sandaz B 712 

KSUndleeB 
SutaerPC _ 

Surveillance B 71 IS 

SntssBnkCoTPB 376 

Swiss Rednsur R 548 

SwtooirR 830 . 

UBS B 1107 1140 

Winterthur B <83 692 

Zurich Ass B 1285 — 

SBsindc * : root 

PKMwt : 793 X 0 






ss 


1315 


For 

investment 

information 

read 


THE MONEY 
REPORT 


every 
Saturday 
in the 
IHT 


U.S. FUTURES 


VtaAaodotedFiM 


Aug.9 


Seasai Season 
rtgh Law 


Open Hksi Low Owe Chg OpJnt 


Grains 


WHEAT ^CBOT^ \nopu minimum- b 


10814 3xi — atrr/i 1*080 


1 W 14*<6 IAS*.— QJOVi n.ns 


1ST* lfl 2 Sep 9 * 304 

30 } 10 * Dec 9 * MOV. 

30 C /1 127 Mor 93 305 305 301 XSTA-OJBW 902 B 

106*1 IMVaMayTI 3 L**M 24 SV 6 1M 14616 - 062 % 617 

3 A 2 M 111 JiriTS 3 XZ 102 129 V. 300 -002 1,144 

DecTS 340 — 002 2 

EH. sales LOOO Morrestaes 8 X 0 
Manlopeniri 60006 aft 183 
WHEAT fKBOT) MOObu n*i 4 n«e»- MPiMrhtaN 
3 SS* UCVlSep W 344 % 345 14114 laft-OJO’A 14043 

1 J 7 HDBCW 2 JJ+. 302 348 % 149 ta— 0 X 2 H T7JU 

125 Mct -95 303 353 348 W 30 O’A-OQ 2 % SX 60 

121 Vi May 95 143 Va 145 % 342 342 M- 0 X 2 V, M 

LI 6 WJUI 75 3 X 0 3 X 0 3 J 7 W 3 X 0 — OB 2 393 

129 5 ep 75 33 * 1 

Dec 95 _ 341 1 

Est. sot® MA. Man's, setas 4431 
Atei'sapgntat 31130 UP » 

COON (CBOT) mb Du nMnm-eNmHrtwM 
19TM 2.14 Sep 9 * 2 X 0 3 JS 7.\7M i 1 * 54-00174 37.193 

■ 117 Dec 9 * 2 J 2 W 12316 221 221 * 4 - 0 X 1 12*062 

224 Mar 95 201 V. 2 X 2 1291 * 20095 — 0 X 1 25.111 

2 X 2 V.A 6 dv 7 S 2 X 8 23 S 3 * 206 H 2 X 7 »A- 0 X 1 10476 

2 X 6 WJul 75 2 « 2 ft 241 24014 241 H- 0 X 0 H. 90 M 

2 X 7 Slap 95 244 2441 A 243 243 +-AC 0 + 

10 SV 6 D«: 9 S J 45 L. 246 24 *Vi 24 *L— (LMVj 

JulfA 237 25116 257 237 +QJB 

Est iotas 2 S 00 D MoTOkSOtas 32 X 00 
Man's open W D 2 XS 5 UP (70748 
SOYBEANS (CBOT] UOOtwn* 


340 

309 V, 

34716 

1 XT* 

3X1 


2 X 7 

nay, 

205 

U» 

Wh 

241 


JS 


7 X 5 SXiSSbMXBH 5 X 316 SX 9 SX 2 V,_ 0 X 1 Ki 6336 


7X816 54016 Sep 7* 5X8 071 S46K> 54SH6-0X1 14X63 

7079, 531 NO* 76 50H6 544% 540 503M +0X0M 7X17* 

7X* 540 Jan 93 5X0 5X2 548 5X1 n *100'*, 11.138 

7X5 549 Mar 95 5X8 541 SX7H 5X014 *0X014 A®7 

TSSSn ITSHMoyHmH 548» 645 SXTh *H07t HB 
7X6 v« 5X115 Jul 95 187% 532 507 

574% 5X9 Aua95 

581 5X7 Sec 95 

630% 5X8% Nov 75 501 503% 501 

„ JU 96 

Easdes 30 X 00 Mars. setts 37320 
120 X 78 UP 4 M 


502 + 0 X 1 V. 5017 

501 % * 0 X 1 141 

5 X 8 % * 0 X 1 24 

593 % * 0 X 1 % 2043 
6 X 8 tax* 


I 7 UDAU 0 M 1740 B 17400 17200 17330 

210 X 0 771 40 Sop 7 * 17290 173 X 0 17190 173 X 0 

*700 ! 7 TL 0 QOcfW 171 X 0 17203 17 T 0 O 1720 ) 

209 X 0 17040 Dec 7 * 17100 17240 17130 172 to 

23700 171 00 Jon 95 17300 173 X 0 17100 173 X 0 

20700 173 X 06 W 95 17*30 17510 17490 J 749 B 

207 X 0 174.00 May 95 17500 176 X 0 175 XQ 17500 

20600 175 X 0 Jul 75 17700 177 X 0 177 X 0 1 7700 

18100 178 X 0 Aug 75 17990 

182 X 0 1*640 Sep 95 (2830 r 77 J 0 17839 177 X 0 

Est.SCtB 13 X 00 Marfs. sales 18 X 21 
Mart oeen krt MX 88 up 752 
SOYBEANOiL ICBOT) OSMu-Mnaeiakt. 

3045 21 45 Aug 9 J 2432 

3034 2240 SW 74 2430 

2904 22 . 100(394 2400 

28 X 7 2100 Dec 74 24 X 7 

as 2245 Jon 95 24 X 5 

2800 2293 MCT 9 S 34 X 5 

2293 Mcv 95 24 X 0 


— 709 * 
17087 


18 XM 
I 32013 
L 5 S 7 
SM 
1 3.115 
I 1417 

1 ns 

i 41 


27 XS 
27 X 0 

fin 

BID 

&?sates 11 X 00 Man't-sotas 
Mon'sooeniiv 87471 cfl 3331 


23 X 3 X 495 2390 

22.95 Aug 75 23 X 6 
2299 Sep 75 
23.10 DO 95 
2240 Dec 95 2 UD 


2*65 

2*20 

2 * 3 * 

— 0,10 

4 X 36 

3*65 

2*15 

3*29 

- 0 X 0 Z 10 B 7 

IL 4 < 

2194 

2*09 

- 0 X 1 

15 X 79 

06 X 4 

2*15 

1*15 

2275 

23 X 5 

2173 

SS 

23 X 0 

-a i 7 mi a 
— 0 J 5 *315 
— 0.13 * 73 ) 

2400 

an 

2185 

- 0.14 

as 

2192 

23 X 0 

2182 

—£14 

23 X 6 

23 X 6 

23 X 6 

— £14 

216 



2303 

— £12 

5 B 



21 X 5 

—AM 

1 

ZUO 

23 X 0 

Tl 9 n 

♦002 

2 


Livestock 


CATTUC (CMES 1 . 40 X 00 PC. canAnerb 


73X5 665QAU094 71X0 7U0 TLB 


74.10 65 X 0007 * 73 X 9 7335 

74 JS STXODeCf* 7101 71 JO 71.18 

7405 PJOFehK 7000 7040 7 X 17 

73.10 69 ^ Apt 95 72 X 0 7200 7190 

6903 6640 Jon 75 68 X 5 69.10 68 X 5 

66.00 67 X 5 MS 79 0.95 68 X 0 67 X 5 


Est.Bfe 123*4 /Won't sales 2 X 227 
wri epen w rxs* otr 2 W 3 
reEDFRCATTLfi (CMSU AUU.-waoe 


1065 

7195 

7107 

7000 

71.95 

68 X 7 

67 X 5 


—047 10.961 
— 009 30437 
• 0 X 5 13 X 13 
*au M 3 ) 
*mz Sai 
-an 1058 
207 


B305 71,10 AUB 9* 00X5 BR1S 7*40 


■1X0 71X0S«iM 77X5 77X0 7847 

7895 Od 94 78X5 78XS 77X5 


6105 


18 X 0 7240 NOV 94 17 X 0 77 X 0 78 X 0 

•095 7 Z 9 SJPTM 7803 780 ? 71 W 

SS ZZ’SSZ™ S3 ss 

7*90 71*5 Apr-76 7S3S 7540 7535 


Est. sales 1 X 70 fctart. solas 2 A «9 

jasTsa^" 


77 * 

78 X 1 

7700 

78 X 7 

2815 

7477 

JUfl 

7535 


— C 2 D 3 X 33 
-005 2 J» 
—002 1 X 47 
—038 1 X 18 
—000 66* 
— 0.18 23 

98 

-OJE 142 


10,746 oft 267 


4*41 ' *230 Aug 9* 4570 4513 4577 
49X5 »40OdM 4190 M 61X7 


ju 3 >A 50 eew <130 <1x3 < 1 X 0 

58 » oxun 4109 4105 41 X 5 

48 X 0 3835 APT 95 * 0 X 5 AL 35 3705 

4730 * 3 X 5 Jun *5 6.13 4115 4400 

45 X 9 a«JUl»S 4*45 4190 *440 

AijoK 

403 D 39 X 0 Oct 73 4036 4830 <815 

EsLWtes SJ 08 „M^L«ta 580 


4587 

4107 

4141 

41 X 7 

4 U 0 

45 m 

W0 

A 2 > 

40.15 


-+U 3 1721 
-038 12 X 73 
-UB 5742 
- 0.13 L 883 
— 8.15 1,177 
-000 456 

^UO 128 
27 

*811 2 


MrtltalW 25 JH IP 122 
(CM0O «jtabL-ep«Bvl 


POIBC BELLIES 
9.50 26334 


A*jg 94 3 *X 7 34 X 2 3102 

60 S aa5Z*S 4625 4600 

JOXZMvTS C 9 S 46 * 4538 


61.15 *2XBMOV« «X3 4670 469 


5400 4335 JUTS CM 4797 6730 

SUS " 

Est.Hgas 
ttartopaii 




3237 

4605 

4635 

* 6 X 5 

47.77 

4630 


-MS 1.192 
*030 6.180 
*465 32 

* 0 L 15 a 
* 0 X 7 43 

*030 U 


Food 


C 0 FKEC QKSB etata-nktak 

a® i«!w ms! uaxc 

34425 77,10 Dec 74 ITtOO 1*79 17830 

764 X 0 78 . 70 Mgr 75 MM 1 WB m 90 

36 UI 823 DMoy 95 JM 1 HO 0 WOO 

145.10 saxejHiw iwxo mjg moo 

17800 19800 503 95 11800 17808 W 8 X 0 

2000 8)J0Dk7S_^ 

EsLttas 12012 Mon'i.jtaSS MU 

oicsn 

1260 LOOStU 11 X 5 1197 11 X 1 


78230 

18639 

WUO 

17600 

mx* 

178 X 0 

18008 


♦ 3 X 0 OBJ 


*■295 U 062 


— 7 X 0 .. 
-7X0 1002 

-900 

a 

—280 3*0 


•MB 6)055 


Season Season 
High law 


Open Wi Lm* aose Oo OpAit 


1210 

12x6 

1202 

HAD 

HX 6 


Men's c 


9.17 Mar 75 11X8 1193 11X5 
1097 Mary 95 11X2 1105 1U0 

10570495 1101 11X7 1101 

10370075 1104. 045 1104 

10X3 Mir 76 
1136 May 76 
12012 Man 


11 X 7 

nx 3 

1107 

1105 

11 X 5 


1580 


1412 

1600 

MIT 

1633 

Iff* 

1505 


1270 Dec 7S 
USD Mar 76 


Martacenlta 

ORAKOejUia tNCTHl 15000 be.- ctm par 
134 XC O.lONsvM KM I BOM 9930 
12200 71 X 0 Jun 95 ItdflO 104 S 103 X 0 

124 X 5 9630 Mor 95 KI 73 D W 7 J 0 10630 

114 X 5 77 XDMoy 7 S 1025 Q 10930 10930 
119 X 0 1010)0495 112 X 0 11200 11280 

11 130 9450 Sep 95 7110 97 X 0 7110 

11230 IKXOMayTS. . . 

JtWlrt 

5f!P 9& 

EsLstaes 900 Man's. Staes 067 
MartapanM 22186 off 38 * 


b4JlS 

11 ® 

-All 

M 70 

UM 

1415 - 

+25 

1454 

1430 

14 ® 

*U 

146 S 

1 « 

T 4 M ' 

♦» 


MM. 

+18 

072 

un 

064 

1533 

+22 
• +18 



Ufl - 

+11 

1505 

1505 

-HOB 


16007 





-OM 36 J 7 B 
— «X 3 *377 
- 0 X 2 3 X 85 
-ox* I0n 
- 0 J 1 207 


1 XB 


10095 

104 X 0 

18708 

110 X 5 

I TLB 

7*95 
116 X 5 
1 MX 5 ~ 
I MAS . 


+ 7 X 


33B 
+ 1 X 5 XfB 
+ 1 X 5 2083 
+ 1 X 3 

+ 1 X 5 “ 2 J 2 
+ 130 11 X 76 


Metals 


M GRADE COPPER tHCMX} AMts-m 
11690 7470 Sep 74 1 DK 20 TO 80 O 107 X 0 

11120 7 573 Dec 94 108 X 3 108 X 0 10705 

111 X 0 7690 Jon 95 10820 TOBJO MUX 

HI JO TXODFtalTJ 

1 UX 0 73 X 0 Mar 73 W 7 X 0 M 7 X 0 1 U 7 JS 


76 X 3 May 95 
78000495 1 


W 6 X 5 ) 05 » 1052 
73 X 0 Am 95 . 107 X 5 10695 

79.10 Sep 95 

7520 Od 95 
77XSte/9J 
88X0 Dec 95 
BBJOJwiT* 

6270 Mar 96 

9L10Apr9* ... 

■ Ma/ 7 * 

106 X 00*1 96 10638 10638 10630 

EsL sales 9M0 Mgrt-«.pPes BX» 

Mart DPerUrt *6379 UP * 

StLVBt DKMX} Meim+-emM»W< 


107 J 0 . 



5540 
3709 
SI 63 
5 B 7 X 
5649 


SMXAugTI 
3763 SeP *4 I 


mODKM 5183 


5120 5173 51 2 X 


6065 
61 DX 
*150 
62 BX 
6120 
61 L0 
S87X 


*)XJa»J 5 
41 63 Mor 73 S 30 X 
* 14 XMoy 7 S 
420 X 0493 5413 


5259 5183 


49X0 Sep 95 

^HDk 9 S 


5413 5413 


JH 13 

5226 

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539 Xt 

57 X 8 JVI 76 
5 KUMO -96 
587 XMoy 94 
’ 7 * 

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94220 90 X 50 Mv 96 72910 92910 92160 92 X 90 —X 130966 

73.100 72490 X 41 76 72790 50 X 70 92 X 50 72700 -90186077 

Est. SMs NA. Mon's sales 714903 . . 

Man's o ppilnt 207 ? jtf off' 12878 
BRITISH POUND (CMBU seerpouta- IpaHKeauePHLOHl 
1 JG 4 7064 0 Sep ta 132*0 13400 13 X 18 13 I» - 0 JI.I 77 

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8 X 104 0 X 0 * 0 Dec 75 07115 0 X 115 07115 07151 
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opened 263*8 o» 22« 


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too 

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NA MOP’ASMS 47,171 
is? 75377 UP 2636 


.. .. . . *21 MBi 

0 jn 0135 *21 268 

0.010218 ,+I 1 28 

til' 1953 


0 X 470 0 X 498 

0 9840 OJBBJDeeW 0 X 581 0 X 526 07308 0 X 5 M 
axno 0 X 466 JurTS 0 X 566 

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♦I 1367 
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industrials 


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7030 H .00 Aug 9 * « 9 J 9 

■ *31 Oct 9 * TUBS 7100 . 709 C . 7 LJ? 
5938 Dec 9 * 78.15 7 U 0 . 78.15 7038 

S 750 MOT 75 7705 7205 7105 7100 


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77X5 

7115 

7855 

78 X 5 

7428 

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67 J 00 DeC 95 


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43500 348000094 40890 41290 40190 . “ 

4 aS 30 374 H 0 JO 17 S 41130 *1450 41130 

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4 Z 73 DJU 9 S 41930 419 J 0 <1933 _ 

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41190 « 330 Rfi 9 S 386.10 337 X 0 38*10 

41790 36 * 90 Apr 75 

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412 X 0 380 X 0 Aug 95 

43130 4019000 75 

42990 40090 Dec 75 4845 ) 404 JO 40698 

4 M 0 D 41290 F 8 b 96 

43090 * 18 X 0 Apr 96 

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76.10 7423 Dec 74 7403 

7595 7398 Mta 95 7434 

JW 75 . 

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118-08 91-19 DK 94 UD-U H 2 -U 101-27 102 - 04 — 13 73033 

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115 - 19 70-12 Jipi 95 108-28 100-28 100-17 . 10004 — 12 

112 - 15 9748 StafS 10047 10047 10040 . 10045 — U 

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75 X 20 70 X 60500 74 74 X 1 f M 01 O 74 X 70 9*810 

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9 


PaineWebber to Replace Executive 

NEW YORKl(BkxMnbex^ — PaineWebber Group Inc. said. 
Tuesday it would replace Joyce N. Fcnstexstock as the head of it £ 
subsidiary, bfitchdl Hutchhis Asset Rdanagement Inc. Tbe firm 
controls customer assets of about SSI btition. .. ... „ 

The move coines after PaineWebbers S268 million liailout of its 
premier, govenunent bond fixndbecause of trading losses. 

For the Record . : ' : i : : 


Stock Indexes 

iraBEf* vk «. ^ 
ss Sg5.a.ffl 

llR V0M« 4i 

w mss »ox 

Mon'iwmtnt S0D7 o«la 




Oonunodftf Indexes 

JM? isiBa 

2 «s:a 

OJ. Futures 15U1 ■ 

231 JS 


Com. Reaeordi 


Previous 

U2SS0 

209200 

1 S 0 J 3 

23105 


J d'PjtJ iSof 


1 





,v. 



■ j - 

-■y.r 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10, 1994 



Page 11 


EUROPE 


pe Coi 


i 1 1 n 


euv et 





ercial Union 
ictoire 


LONDON — .Britain’s lead- 
ing insurer, Commercial Union 
PLC, said Tuesday ii had 
agreed to buy its French coun- 
terpart, Groupe Victoire, for 
123 billion French francs ($2 
billion) from Compagnie de 
Suez. 

The deal will give Commer- 
cial Union a 5 percent share of 
the French life-insurance mar- 
ket and a 3 percent foothold in 
the general-insurance market 

Commercial Union said it 
planned to raise about £500 
million ($770 million} throu gh 
the sale of new stock, to raise 
£820 minion from new bank 
loans and to supply the rest 
from its cash reserves. 

CU said it would raise cash 
for the purchase through a 1- 
for-8 rigjbts issue at 475 pence a 
share, to bring in £3 22 million 
n?U 

In 1993, Victoire had consoli- 
dated net profit 0F33 billion 
francs, but 23 billion francs of 
(hat came from sales of assets. . 

Compagnie de Suez wO] use 
the cash it receives from the sale 
of Groupe. Victoire to invest 
further m financial services, 
Gerard Worms, the chairman 
said. 

• Separately, Commercial 


Union said its first-half profit 
nearly tripled, to £282 million 
from £66 nuDicm in the first six 
months of 1993. Total income 
from, premiums was. £3.08 bfl- 
Hoh, compared with £3.04 b3- 
fion. . 

The profit was , driven by a 
drop in underwriting losses, im- 
proved condi twnsin general in- 
surance in several k^ markets 
and sin increase in premhims. 

:• ' (Stouten, AFP) 

m Genera! Accident Profit . 

The British insurer General 
Accident PLC posted a sharp 
rise in first-half profit Tuesday 
and delivered an upbeat out- 
look on business in the United 
States and Europe, Reuters re- 
ported from London. 

tax jjrofit of £20^*^^on 
($313 million); compared with 
£124.7 miPi on a year earlier. 
Premium income rose to £238 
bilhon from £232 billion. 

"We are encouraged that 
positive signs of improvement 
are now beginning to show 
. thipU gh in bbth the United 
States and Europe despite diffi- 
cult market conditions,*’ the 
company’s chief executive, Nel- 
son Robertson, said.' 


Major Esab Holders 
Reject Charter’s Bid 

Xaaas 

STOCKHOLM! — The British industrial group Charter FLCs 
attempt to take over Esab AG of Sweden met resistance Tuesday 
when five Swedish shareholders controlling almost- 20 percent erf 
Esab’s votes xgected the offer. 

Opposition that began with Esab's trade unions spread to the 
company’s shareholders just three days before the 3.1 TriQiob 
kTOnor ($400 millian) bid for die world’s largest wddmg-eqnip- 
ment maker expires. 

The British firm, already assured of 52.7 percent of Esab, said it 
would not increase its bid and would consider its options further 
when it had actor count of acceptances cm Friday. Charter needs 
90 percent of the votes to take ovef Esab. ' 

• ‘Ttjust means that when we see exactly where we do stand, which 
will culy happen on Friday, ~we will have to consider our options. 
One Is to walk, away, and another is to accept whatever level of 
acceptances we get,” a Charter spokesman said. He said that 
walking away from the deal might be an extreme move. 

Led by the firm’s biggest .Swedish institutional shareholder, the 
state-run Fourth Pension Fund, two insurers, Skand ia Insurance 
Co. and Wasa Insurance; rite investment arm of bank Farcaings- 
banken and astate holding fund all rejected the bid. 

' They say the cash bid of 345 kronor a share underestimates 
strong current and future earnings potential and likely share rises. 

Swedish analysts said the most Hkdy option would be for 
Charter to raise its bid, with estimates for a sweetened bid ranging 
between 350 kronor and 450 kronor. . 


Germany 9 s Old-Time Economy 


By Rick Atkinson 

Washington Post Service 

BERLIN — For more than a century, 
Germany has embodied the economic 
adage that if you build a better mouse- 
trap the world win beat a path to your 
door. 

. Then what happens when the world 
economy changes? It has become far 
from certain that German mousetraps of 
the future will attract the export orders 
on winch the country's economy is 


Germany is reluctant to forsake the 
industries that have produced the 
world’s third-largesi economy, and yet it 
is coming to beHeve that sweeping 
change may be necessary. 

"The baric problem is that it’s an 
economy that is brilliantly geared to 
make die products of the late 19th and 
early 20th century: chemicals, machine 
tools, steel,” said W. Richard Smyser, 
author of "The German Economy.” 
But Chancellor Helmut Kohl has 
warned his fellow Germans that they are 
badly behind the- competition in such 


leading-edge technologies as computers, 
office technology and lasers. 

Konrad Seitz, the German ambassa- 
dor to Italy, adds genetic technology, 
solar energy and aeronautics to Mr 
Kohl's list,- while warning that Germany 
"is failing to make the jump from me- 
chanics to electronics and from chemis- 
try to biotechnology." 

Last year, Germany earned 604 billion 
Deutsche marks ($382 billion) from 
products sold abroad. One job in three is 
directly tied to exports. Yet Germany’s 
share of world exports in reccrn years Has 
declined more than that of any other big 
industrial nation. 

Germany has the highest labor costs 
and shortest working hours in the world. 
Emerging economies in Eastern Europe 
and Asia now churn out quality products 
at a fraction of the cost 

Equally alarming is the suspicion that 
Germany has slipped behind in many of 
the technologies that will count most in 
the future. As the world telecommunica- 
tions market tripled in value to $38 bil- 
lion between 1980 and 1990, the German 
share of that market plunged from 12S 


percent to 7 percent. In biotechnology. 
Germany is hardly a player. 

There are several reasons: 

• Links between universities and high- 
tech entrepreneurs are underdeveloped. 

• Research and development spend- 
ing is relatively paltry. 

• There is a lack of political will to 
eliminate huge subsidies for inefficient 
industries. Karl-Heinz Paque, senior 
economist at the World Economy Insti- 
tute in Kiel, said the S8.4 billion spent to 
subsidize coal mining in the last four 
years amounts to roughly $44,000 per 
miner annually. "You could send them 
home, make them civil servants doing 
nothing and it would still be cheaper for 
the whole economy.'’ 

• Venture capitalism and entrepre- 
neurship are rare. 

‘‘The German economy is therefore 
dominated by bank thinking,” Mr. 
Smyser said. “And banks are not ven- 
turesome in Germany. They’re not like 
these crazy Americans who will invest 
milli ons in start-up ventures despite 
knowing that four in five will go bust. 
But that fifth one — Ahh!” 


Analysts Pan PolyGram’s Profit Rise 


Bbcmberg Business News 

AMSTERDAM — Poly- 
Gram NV said Tuesday its net 
profit rase 14.7 percent, to 234 
million guilders ($131.8 mil- 
lioa), but analysts widely con- 
sidered the results lackluster, 
especially as it was boosted by a 
gam erf $100 million for its mov- 
ie hit “Four Weddings and a 
Funeral.” 

The Dutch music and film 
iucer, 75 percent owned by 
i Electronics NV, said the 
successes of hs U.S. “grunge” 
band Soandgaxdea, its female 
rap group Salt-n-Pcpa and rock 
star Bryan Adams had helped 
results as wdL 

*Tt* s amazing to see that their 
film income barely rose,” , said 


Andre Moons, analyst with 
CLN Oyens & Van Eegben. “It 
locks like they don’t have their 
costs under control yet” 
Operating income in the first 
half rose only 6.6 percent, to 
340 million guilders, as more of 
Poly Gram's entertainment 


products were sold at lower 
prices. 

PolyGram shares closed 4.1 
percent lower, at 77.1 guilders, 
after rising 7.1 percent last week 
in anticipation of the results. 
The result weighed on the 
Dutch market as a whole, where 


Fust Trading Is Queried 

AFP-Extd News 

ZURICH — The Zurich prosecutor’s office said Tuesday it 
had begun a preliminary investigation into whether insider 
trading took place before Grands Magazms Jelmoli SA’s 
announcement Friday of a takeover offer for the Swiss home 
appliances retailer Dipl, Ing. Fust AG. 

An official at the prosecutor s office was unable to give 
further details but confirmed an investigation was under way. 


stocks posted their biggest de- 
cline in more than a month. 

“The rise in operating profit 
of 6.6 percent dearly means an 
erosion of margins,” said Ed- 
win van Oosten. an analyst at 
Union Bank of Switzerland in 
London. “That’s what is disap- 
pointing the market.” 

PolyGram Iasi year an- 
nounced expansion plans for its 
film business and said it 
planned to have a continuous 
investment erf about $200 mfl- 
hoo in new films. Amanda 
WhitweD, a spokeswoman for 
the company in London, said 
its investment in f ilms totaled 
about $160 million at the end of 
June, up from 5120 million six 
months earlier. 


SMOKES: Competing Sales Approaches for Unconventional Products 


C uM t Bm e i 4fro«aPlage9 
ed to the absence of chemical 
components,” publicity materi- 
al rlfliwiK- 

Last year Natural American 
print’s sales woe near those of 
Enlightened Tobacco, at $10 
milli on — following, according 
to Mr. Sommers, a sales in- 
crease of 60 percent to 85 per- 
cent a year for the last six years. 


Initially the company grew 
the tobacco on Indian lands in 
New Mexico, but that put it in 
violation of tobacco quotas. 

Since then, they have bought 
conventionally grown Virginia 
tobacco selects) by a leaf deal- 
er. Added to their Pow-Wow 
blend are herbs that indude 
sage; red willow, bearbeny and 
yerba buena. 


Although this may sound as 
healthy as a granola bar, it is 
not, according to Dr. Alfred 
Mnnzer, a lung specialist and 
past president of the American 
Lung Association. “Thousands 
of compounds that cause cancer 
and are irritating to the respira- 
tory system, including carbon 
monoxide, are naturalh 
bacco,” he said. 


ly in to- 


A pack of Natural American 
Spirit filter cigarettes at No- 
where Natural Foods in Los 
Angdes costs S239. 

Santa Fe Natural Tobacco 
began selling its products in 
1987, but not until the publicity 
material focused on the addi- 
tive-free aspect did sales pick 
up. 


Investor’s Europe 



.iv:FrSE'1.00lrtd«5v CAC 40 r, W, 


•• 3|f .. /f-r 2S® - : ; ; ^ 

v ' : h - »'C; : ! 


Amaterdaro- ;.AEX> 


‘lyLLiL'iHi!""'.. ‘'iiM-liek ' * V A' ‘ 


Frankfurt 


QAX J 

v~* 






Leyton • 


& 


-mm-:?* 

■Paris CAP 4Q .. > 


Stockholm 

VRsnni 


Zurich 







;• >S<- 




Sources: Reuters, AFP 


lnloroHunl tfcnfcf Trflwne 


Very briefly: 


• Mo & Domsjoe AB of Sweden said pulp prices could rise to $700 
a tonne this autumn from $630 and could reach $840 in 1995. 

• The European Court of Justice has ruled that a 1992 agreement 
between the U3 authorities and the European Commission on 
anti-trust cooperation does not have the proper legal bans. 

• Internationale Nederianden Group NV said it wanted to raise its 
share of the voting rights in Basque Bruxelles Lambert SA to 20 
percent from 17.75 percent- 

• The Russian central bank chairman, Victor Geraschenko, said 
the ruble was too strong against the dollar because of the bank's 
policy of smoothing out exchange- rate fluctuations, a report said. 

• Britain’s visible trade with European Union and non-EU coun- 
tries was £1.03 billion ($1.6 billion) in defidi in May. compared 
with a revised £770 milli on deficit in April, the Central Statistical 
Office said. 

tiers ($732 
tral Bureau 


• The Dutch trade surplus widened to 13 billion 
million) in April from 1.2 billion a year earlier, the 
for Statistics said. 

• German cosmetics retailer] 
and wage costs caused first- 
percent to 34.8 million Deutsche : 
first half rose 33 percent to 133 billion DM. 



rents 
20.4 
in the 

AFX, Bloomberg 


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S u M 


A R Y O F T H E F IK A N C I A L YEAR 199 3 


GENERALI 

THE INSURER WITHOUT FRONTIERS. 


t. • • 


Group Business. The Generali Gronp has further 
strengthened its positions in the markets where itoper- 
ates by pursuing three strategies. These are the reor- 
ganisation of companies operating hi countries where 
the Group has long-standing traditions; beginning oper- 
ations in markets which offe interesting prospects; the 
signing of wide-reaching agreements with important 
international groups supported by the acquisition of sig- 
nificant minority share holdings. . . 

In this context, important moves have been carried out: 
agreements with the Madrid-based Banco Central 
Hispano and with the FIAT Group; acquisition of & 3% 
stake in Banca Commerciale Italians andooncentiation 
in the subsidiary Alleanza Assicarazioni of the shares 


held in Banco Ambrosiano Veneto. As fix as the initia- 
tives aiming at improving structures in various coun- 
tries are concerned, recent initiatives include the re- 
organization of the Group in Germany, Belgium and 
Argentina, and tile establishment of new companies in 
Portugal, Guernsey, Rumania and a Branch Office in the 
Czech Republic. Operations have also been boosted in 
Latin America, where the Grotq) acquired a controlling 
stake in an insurance company in Ecuador, strength- 
ened its presence in Peru by establishing a new subsid- 
iary that ranks second in the Peruvian insurance mar- 
ket, acquired an important insurance company in 
Colombia, and established a company that will manage 
the activity in tiie Argentinian petition funds sector. 


Parent Company Business. The Company continued 
its policy aiming at improving underwriting results 
by giving priority to the quality of the insurance port- 
folio and by limiting costs. 

Such a policy proved to be particularly incisive in the 
Italian market, where the Company writes 55* of the 
total volume of business and 70% of direct business. 
The implementation of careful risk-selection policies 
and portfolio reforms in these past three years have 
been pursued further and have brought about a sen- 
sible reduction of loss ratio in the Non-Life sector. 
This, and a 1% decrease in the cost ratio, have con- 
tributed to the significant improvement in the 
underwriting result in Italy, which, after many years, 


is almost in the black. On the other hand, direct 
business results abroad as well as reinsurance were 
still negative. Results from activities carried out in 
the financial sector, though, were satisfactory with a 
sharp growth in current income from investments as 
well as in the profits realized from trading opera- 
tions in major international stock exchanges, even 
though the contribution of extraordinary operations 
resulted in a lower amount. 

This year’s profit exceeded the one registered 
in 1992 by over ECU 16 m. despite the fact that 
changes in the accounting criteria affected the re- 
sult by ECU 57.6 m. and tax burden increased by 
ECU 58.1m. 





ASSETS (000 ECU)* 

Real estate and agricultural companies 
Fixed-interest securities 
Shares and equity participations 
Loans 

Deposits with Ceding Companies 
Bank deposits 

Accounts receivable and other assets 

Total 

LIABILITIES (000 ECU)* 

Provisions for insurance Cabilities 
Reinsurance deposits 
Other liabilities 

Minority shareholders’ interest . 
Shareholders’ surplus 
Profit for the year 

Total 


1993 


1992 


5,473,497 

25^99,087 

5,533,056 

2,342,652 

372,640 

2,140,772 

4,828,910 


5,161,320 

19,717,442 

4,672,985 

1,998,080 

396,675 

1,964,965 

4,347,375 


45,990,614 38,258,842 


35,812,221 
428,536 
3,814,829 
1,245,537 
4,369,784 
: 319,707 


29,560,643 

374,896 

2,533,131 

1,162,786 

4,326,083 

*381,303 


45,990,814 38,258,842 

• ECU L32£ 


« This statement consolidates 86 insurwice operating in 

agricultural companies- 


INVESTMENTS 

pflonoiBU) 


25.756 


1*91 


33, sn 


41,161 


INSURANCE FUNDS 
(dftaBtfion ___ 

29,560 


1W1 


35,812 


1953 


PREMIUMS 

HOMgfEcqB 


■ The profit for 1993 amounted 
to BCD 359.5 to., compared to 
ECU 364 m. in the prevfonsyear. 
Some utodffications carried out 
hi the accounting criteria af- 
fected the result for ECU 79.3 m. 
and so did a two-fbld increase in 
taxation. The Parent Company’s 
share of the profit amounted to 
ECU 319.7 m. compared to ECU 
301.3 m.in 1992. 

■ Consolidated premiums 
amounted to ECU 13,033J2 m. 
(+1085Q: 75^ from R7 member 
countries (Italy SOX); 16JX from 
Other European countries, and 
TXhsratnoD-Braopean countries. 
Premimns collected in Life busi- 
ness increased 9% to ECU 
5£82J hl, and 12BX to ECU 
7,800.7 th. in Non-Life business. 

■ Claims paid amounted to 
ECU 6,779.7 m 


■ Underwriting and administrative costs amounted to ECU 3,147.3 jn. 

Cost ratio at 27.3% followed last yeart trend. 

■ Investments rose to ECU 41,161.7 m. (+ 21.4%), against which prow- 
8 foH 5 for tasoranoe liabilities amounted to ECU 35£l22 nu 

• Inrestmott income reached ECU 3,813.4 m. compared to ECU 2,7928m. 
fil 1892 (+184%). 

■ Hie Groap’s overall stockholders 5 surplus amounted to ECU 5£7&5 rl, 
the share of the Parent Company is 78.4%. 


8,386 


(000 ECU)’ 

Premiums written 
Premiums ceded 

Net premiums 

Net Investment income 
Technical interest allocated to Life funds 
Insurance underwriting results 
Sundry income and expenditure 

Operating profit 


Exchange profit 

Unrealized capita) losses on securities 
Extraordinary taxes 

Total other Items 

Taxes on profits 


1993 1992 

5.122.690 4,613.254 
- 641 ,823 - 541.544 

4.480,867 4.071,710 


1,300.332 

1,111,546 

- 784,939 

-659,201 

-357,571 

-299,443 

- 66.921 

- 19,094 

90,981 

133.808 

JS 268,654 

208,081 

109,501 

130,449 

- 97,139 

-182,873 

- 15,229 

- 6,894 

265.787 

148,763 

-136,422 

- 78.329 


220,266 204,242 


Profit for the year 

* Afl fgums lave been tomisrlEd at tte rate ol exmanpe of £ 1 = ECU t .322 


■ Net profit amotmted lo ECU 220.3 m. compared to ECU 204" m. in 
1992. Modifications carried out in the arc minting criteria affected the 
remit by ECU 57.6 m. 

■ Premiums amounted to ECU 5,122.7 m. (+ !1¥); ECU 2,017.5 m. were 
in Life insurance and ECU 3,1052 m. in Non-Life. 


■ Claims paid totalled 
2,570.7 m. 


ECU 


MVESTMBfTS 

hfcrfaan 


13,502 


1992 


16,081 


1983 


INSURANCE FUNDS 

101 ECU) i 

’11,5171 


PREMIUMS 



Jl9»l 


4,613 


1982, 


■ Provisions Tor insurance li- 
abilities increased by ECU 
1,835.8 m. 

■ Underwriting and administra- 
tive costs totalled ECU 1,1 17.4 m. 

The incidence of costs on pre- 
miums fell in direct Italian busi- 
ness from 24$ In 1992 to 23%. 

■ Investments rose to ECU 
16,061.5 hl against which provi- 
sions for insurance liabilities 
amounted to ECU 12,300.7 m. 

■ Investment income totalled 
ECU 1,300.3 m. (+1791). 

■ Overall shareholders’ equity 
amounted to ECU 3,441.4 m. 

The surplus over the minimum 
solvency margin requirement is 
of ECU 1,217.2 m. for the Life 
sector and of ECU 1,180.2 m. for 
Non-Life. 

■ The dividend is 360 lire per share. 

■ In the annual general meeting, shareholders approved a free capital 
increase from Lire 1,457500 biffion to Lire 1,603-250 billion on the basis 
of one new share for every ten previously held. The new shares qualify 
for dividend from 1.1.1884. 

■ Chairman-Managing Director Eugenio Coppola di Canzano; Vice- 
Chairmen: Antoine Berahelm, Francesco Ctogano; Managing Director 
Gianfranco Gutty. 


rir.'4> •’ - -* iiv.v 'i 


13,728 


1993 


5,122: 


ISO 


Central Head Office In Trieste (Italy) 


. . Areentma, Austria, Belgian*, Brazil, Canada, Czech Republic, Colombia, 

The Gcneni, !®S! UI J^? fJ^Si^Gibraliar.cIS^r^n, Greece, Guatemala, Guernsey, Hong Kong. Hungary, Ireland, 
Denmark) fL; Ma ita, Mexico, Principality of Monaco, Netherlands, Panama, Peru, Portugal 

s£?«H£1£ln. Sw«~ri» nd, Turkey, United Arek Emi»t«e, United Stetee. 

Rumania, ban Marmo, 



11 IK INSl IRKK VrTrHOUT FRONTIERS. 








Page 12 











































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10, 1994 


Page 13 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


GATT Grace Period 
Possible for Beijing 


Reuters 

HONG KONG — China 
could be given a grace period 
before having to meet some 
conditions of membership in 
the General Agreement on Tar- 
iffs and Trade, a senior U.S. 
official said Tuesday. 

“We would recognize that in 
the GATT, they would have the 
right in certain areas to a transi- 
tion period before they’re ful- 
filling their obligations,” said 
Winston Lord, the U.S. assis- 
tant secretary of state for East 
Asian and Pacific affairs. 

Mr. Lord said during a visit 
to Hong Kong that the United 
States “staunchly” supported 
China's admission to GATT. 

Mr. Lord said China was 
“somewhere in between" being 
a developing country and an 
advanced country. 

Two weeks ago, during talks 
in Geneva on China’s re-entry 


to GATT. China argued that it 
was a developing country and 
that the United Suites should 
allow it to re-enter under the 
easier conditions that such 
countries are allowed. 

C hina was a founding mem- 
ber of GATT but withdrew af- 
ter the Communist takeover in 
1 949. It applied for rcadmission 
in 1986. 

“China is already an econom- 
ic powerhouse in many ways," 
Mr. Lord said, “so we have to 
strike a balance here.” 

■ China Asks Taiwan Access 

China wants Taiwan to lift 
restrictions on Chinese goods 
entering Taiwan, a Foreign 
Trade Ministry official said, ac- 
cording to the Xinhua news 
agency. 

The agency said China's 
trade deficit with Taiwan 
reached $526 billion last year. 


Vietnam to Curb Dollar Use 

Hidden Currency Must Go to Banks 


ConpUtd by Our Staff Fnm Dipetcha 

HANOI — Vietnam will 
restrict the use of the U.S. 
dollar and require companies 
to deposit foreign currency in 
bank accounts as a way of 
drawing money into its for- 
mal financial system, the offi- 
cial Vietnam News Agency 
said Tuesday. 

The aim of the measure, de- 
rided by prime Minister Vo 
Van Kiel, is to harness an esti- 
mated $600 milli on now circu- 
lating and to increase use of 
the Vietnamese dong. 

“Now people are keeping 
money under the mattress — 
we need to get it into the 
banks,” he said. 

The economist, a top gov- 
ernment planner, said he did 
not think the measure would 
affect the exchange rate. 

About 70 percent of the 


hard-currency turnover in 
Vietnam came from state 
companies, he said. 

The dollar has risen over 
the past year from about 
10,500 dong to the current 
rate of about 10,950. 

John Brinsden, country 
ma nger for Standard Char- 
tered Bank, said that if the 
measures meant people 
would have to sell dollars to 
buy dong, they ought stabi- 
lize the dong’s slide. 

Although the government 
does not want to “disrupt or 
destabilize the market,” Mr. 
Brinsden said, “they are send- 
ing a ■signal that they are going 
to progressively enforce this.” 

Businesses that now charge 
for their services in dollars 
will be required to accept 
dong, with only duty-free 
shops and at the airports and 


others authorized by the cen- 
tral bank taking foreign cur- 
rency, the report said. • - 

Vietnamese organizations 
involved in cjvif aviation, 
maritime trade, insurance, 
posts and telecommunica- 
tions, and foreign-La vested 
enterprises woald.be allowed 
to open bank accounts 
abroad. 

Western economists 
warned that Vietnam could 
not wean people off the dollar 
through legislation, but need- 
ed instead to build faith in its 
financial and banking system 
to draw in more money. 

“It’s a good idea for Viet- 
nam to regain some control 
over the currency, bat its go- 
ing to take two lo three years 
to work this through," one 
economist said. 

(Reuters, AFP) 



Investor’s Asia 


TOKYO -^Japanese compa- 
nies showed a st^mg growth in 
machfaeiy orders' m June, indi- 
cating companies are spending 
more to boost production, but 
concerns about the overall 
economy remain.' ' 
Private-sector machinery or- 
ders, excluding those from ship- 
yards and power firms, rose a 1 
seasonally adjusted. 12J5 per- 
cent, to 95(L6 bSfiou yen ($9.4 


Orders jumped 9.5 percent 
from 1 . June 1993, rantmg the- 
first year-on-year rise since Jan- 
uary. Machinery, orders had 
been tumbling suxee sud-1991. 

“Machinery orders- have 
stopped detaining, bat we can- 
not say that worries about the 
overall economy are all gone,” 
an agency o fficia l said. 

(Reuters, Bfaimbcrg) 





Sources: Reuters, AFP 


. .. .. 


bncrMiiraa! HcwM Trihaoe 


U.S. ’s China Wheat Sales Draw Fire 


Raders 

HONG KONG — The United States is hop- 
ing China will be eager to buy subsidized U.S. 
wheat this year, but other Western wheat-grow- 
ing nations are complaining about what they see 
as unfair U.S. trading practices. 

China pays $86 a metric ton for American 
wheat, a $44 discount from the general market 
price. This year, 3 milli on metric tons have been 
made available under the U.S. government’s Ex- 
port Enhancement Program. 

One analyst estimated (hat China would need 
to import as much as 10 milli on metric tons of 
wheat this year. 

Canada and Australia, China ’s major wheat 


suppliers, decline to reveal their prices, bat they 
say U.S. subsidies are cutting into their sales, 
lowering their farmers’ earnings. 

Often the world’s biggest wheat importer, Chi- 
na takes about 15 percent of world trade, usually 
giving about 60 percent of its business to Canada 
and 10 percent to Australia. 

Australia has already sold more than a million 
metric tons of wheat to China this year, accord- 
ing to Nigel Officer, the Australian Wheat 
Board’s director for North Asia. Sales in 1993 
totaled 550,000 tons. 

The Australians have beat watching China’ s 
stocks run low and had been hoping to see their 
sales rise accordingly. 


Du Pont Plans Rise 
In Outlays in China 

Bloomberg Business News 

BEIJING — Edgar 
Woolard, chairman of Du 
Pont Co., said Tuesday the 
firm planned to increase in- 
vestment in China by a fac- 
tor of five to 10 times “over 
the next few years.” 

He added that the com- 
pany was carrying on nego- 
tiations about 28 projects. 


Taman Eases Bank Curbs Very brleflY: 


TAIPEI — Taiwan on Tuesday announced the relaxation of 
limits on foreign bank branches and lifted restrictions on holding 
of Taiwan dollar-denonrinated deposits. 

Officials earlier said the move was designed to ease Taiwan's 
entry to the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade. 

The Foreign Ministry lifted rules preventing foreign banks from 
opening more than three branches a year. It also ended require- 
mentsthat foreign banks have trade relations with domestic banks 
for more than 10 years before they set up a branch. - 
The new rules require foreign banks setting up domestic 
brandies to be among the world’s top 500 in terror of assets or 
capital or to have a combined trading record with domestic banks 
of more than $1 bOHon in the past three years. 


• Shanghai's domestic stock market plunged 13.1 percent as 
investors cashed in profits after a weddong surge. 

• Itafian-Thn Development PLC, Thailand’s largest engineering 
company, ended its first day on the stock exchange at a 31 percent 
premium to its initial sale price. 

• Toshiba Corp. began, recycling plastic waste into fuel oil at a pilot 
plant south Tokyo, forecasting that commercial operations 
would be launched toward the end of the year. 

■ NesflfeSA said it had signed a joint-venture agreement to build 
an ice cream and yogurt factory in Tianjin, China. A Nestlfc unit is 
expected to invest about $65 million in the factory. 

■ Hitachi Ltd. said it would move nearly all its production of 
general-purpose motors to a Thai subsidiary to cut costs. 

Radas. Bloomberg, A FP. A FX 


NYSE 

Tuesday's dosing 

Tables Include the nationwide prices up to 
the closing an Wafl Street and do not reflect 
late trades elsewhere. Via The Associated Press 

(Continued) 


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Page 14 


NASDAQ 

■n,* Tuesday’s 4 i9.sn. 

nSL 5LS5? u * ted by IheAF, consists oi the 1.000 
moa * trailed securities in terns of dollar value. It is 
updated twice a year. 



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1 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10, 1994 


** 


l7Mon9i 
Hon low Stack 


Kv 


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High LMLlMOl’K 


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77V'. IS BWIP M 

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7IW ISWBakerJ J>6 
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30*6 8*1 Bo rind 
51 32' .BoilChck 

l«S 6*i BorJTc 
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1 2' ■. 6*6 Brunos 
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17 6060 m. 
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24 246. «*3 

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71% 22(6 «% 
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18% 18*6 *% 

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41 41 'A — *6 

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10% 10% 9*6 
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13*6 13*6 _ 

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16*6 17 
20V. 20% — % 
12% 12% _ 
54% 55*6 
12% 13 

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14% 15 .% 

74 74 — % 

15*6 18% »% 
3% ». _ 


39% M Rnienoi 
7796 14*6fl0etNY 
SS 45 FiflllT 
IB TWRgqleA 
79% 17 FitaNut 
12*6 7 RJBsnt 
35''', 78 RrsHer 6 
30 17’AFslAterl 
34% 31% FTATn 
38 lMFCdBn 
31%23%RAmCs 
77 TBWnFMIs 
19% OV,RFnO> 
31 V. Z3% FtHmv 
71% 6%FIPCM«i 
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31 9. 23*. F5eCC0 
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14 12 1019 
17 10 793 

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4 15 5 

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1 5 198 817 
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33% 33% 33% ,% 
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26% 26% 26 Vi — % 
25 74% 3C% — % 

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29% 29. 39*6 .. 

7% 6W 7’Iu — V» 

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30% 30% 30% — % 
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30% 19% TO'A _ 
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37% 36% 38*k -% 
18*6 16 18% *Yt 

13 11% 11% *% 


G-H 


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41*6 7*6GTi 
25 '6 9*iCdev 
49% 24 *4 Conner 

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24% 9%Gatetttt 
36*671 ViCnCrVW 
32*6 ISWGnNuir * 
31% 7 GmlUr 
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5% 2*6 Genus 

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23*6 ll%Gtov>G 

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70 II GdvFcm 
26% l9*6GatldP 
17*6 6%GraffPav 
28% 17%GmfeC 

19% 13V,GrtFnei 

4*6 lWGrosrnn 
15% 12*6 Grvphon 
19% 9% Guests 
S%19%GuHSou 
31*. 7 Gupta 
S% 34% GvTTfree 
31% 16V. HBOS 
40% IdWHooear 
35% 16 HarrBlnSc 
18% 17%HarpGe 
24% 19% Harvl ot 
27 17 HITMSy* 

2 S*. MWHHOnp 
25*6 13% HearlTc 
36*4 22%HrtlnoE 
16% 646H01BA 
1716 12%HelenTv 

31 lIMHeMt 
12 5%Hogoi 
12", 9 HnKger 
18% 6 HywdCa 
34% 4HHtyvrdEs 
35 15tVuHwcB^( 
18*6 9%KomcrM 
39 M%Hom«dc 
20*8 nvjHemeTBs 
34 34%Honlnd 
24% 12%Horr** 
15% lOWHugotE/i 

grli.BSSS" 

43% 16 Hurtco 
22% UWHuntfins 
41 19% HutchT 


_ 23 47 

JO X3 1116231 
_ 17 87 

_ 14 20 

_ 41 58 

_ _ 172 
_ 15 357 
_ 1214773 
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_ 38 1155 
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_ 3128 
_ 27 3054 
_ 41 90 
_ II 423 
~ _ 1111 
80 U 13 <81 
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.12 3 17 4593 

— _ 879 
_ 24 1253 
_ 16 934 
_ 17 385 
_ 14 113 

JO A0 18 349 
_ _ 119 
X 1.T 22 300 
_ _ 91 

_ - 228 
2K A 20 247 
_ _ 1211 
_ _ P 

- 23 257 

_ 24 

_ 426 

_ 33 586 

.16 Jk 39 1287 
» 3 10 1567 

_ II 3994 
JO 1-5 15x462 

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_ 19 1533 
_ 348 149 
_ 45 74 

.16 1.4 19 1B4 
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JO _ — 28 

_ 22 ZM 
_ 64 434 
_ 203 317 
_ 28 855 
_ 13 9X7 
_ 30 4434 
44 14 It 840 

_ 19 274 
_ _ 93 

_ _ 1400 
JO M 19 1154 
-08 AM W73 
M 3J 11 1251 
_ 16 789 


12% 12 12% *% 
M*t 23% jaw -% 
11% 10W 11% *% 
19*6 19V, 19% * U. 
47% 47 47V. — % 

12% 11% 11% —'4 
18% 18 V. 18 W — % 
15 14% 14% _ 

3DV. 30% 30% * % 
19% 18% 19% .% 
8*6 8 8% *46 

38*6 38'A 38*6 — *6 
9*6 89* 9*6 . H 

70 IB 1BV6 — 1 
4W 4*6 CVl *Vt 
29% 29% 29% *V6 
11 10% 10*6 _ 
40*6 60 % 60% — % 
I6'M 14% 1596-4-1%. 
18% 18 IBVu— Vu 
9% ■% 9*6 _ 

50 81% 49 — % 

6% 4% 6% _ 

12*6 IMA 12 —% 

13 12V, 17*6 _ 

20 V. 19*6 19% — % 
7 4*6 8% — V6 

»% 13% 18% — 1 W 
17 18*6 17 .% 

7% 7*6 7*6 — Vi 

20*6 19% 19*6 - 

7% 2% 7% .*% 

14% 18% 14% — % 
18% 17% 18% -Vi 
38 25% 25% — % 

17*6 11*6 11% - 

41*6 41% 41*6 — % 
79% 9V* 78*6 — % 
27% 26 27 — % 

79 Vi 28W 28% _ 

13% 13% 13*6 C4 

23% 22%Z2%— T - 
23*. 23% 23% — %» 
20V. 19*6 19*6 »% 
35 34% 35 .% 

11*6 11% 11% .% 
14*. 14% 14% — % 
20 V. 19*6 1916 — *6 
7% 7% 7% _ 

9V„ 9 9Vi* — V« 

7% 7% 7*6 _ 

31% 20 TO — *6 
27*6 22% 22% _ 

14% 14 14% — % 

29*6 27% 28% — 1 Vi 
12*6(111 11*6— % 
27 26% 27 .1 

1316 13% 1396 .96 
12% 12*6 17*6 _ 

15 14 14% — V a 

11% 18 18% — % 
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20% 20% 20*6 —96 
25% 24% 25% _ 


12 Worth 
Koh Low Stack 


9a 

Yld PE MBS 


Hgh LowLAstarge 


.12 


JB 


M 


US 


33% 18% Lance 

35%l7HLdmkGon 

27*413 LMtdnrS 
32% l4WLendsir 
18*6 3%LnsrmTc 
26% 12% Li ' 
riHlOViLl 

79*6 14% Ll 

70*6 UWLmaCo 
15% 9 LCCRMTS 
34% 1 7% Leeant 
25%18%LC6dOnS 
TO SWLAUSA 
18 llWLUIVtiKIS 
1 2/ VU1 WUnBnS 

25%14%unOTe» 

»% lSWLncTls 
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8W 4WLto«£ri 
11*6 4%L0J0dc 
17*6 6WLO«Ert 
27% 71 Lonwno 
MWliWLneSSK 
12% a'.vLnasm 
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__ . 1/ l/» 


AMEX 

Tuesday’* Closing 

Tables include the nationwide prices up to 
the closing on Wall Street end do not reflec 
Hate trades elsewhere. Via The Associated Press 


12 mpwi 

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Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10, 1994 


SPORTS 


An Evening’s Stroll Brings 
Much of Finland to Its Feet 


By Ian Thomsen 

International Herald Tribune 

HELSINKI — Sari Essayah 
went out for a 40-minute walk 
on this spectacular Tuesday 
evening, of the European Cham- 
pionships, and ail of Finland 
seemed to come out to meet her. 
Perhaps 30,000 had bought 
their way into the Olympic Sta- 
dium, and almost as many more 
were waiting outside along the 
streets; and still hundreds of 
thousands more were at home 
around their televisions. 

It was a summer’s evening to 
match all of those Scandinavian 
mornings last February, when 
the Norwegians came out of the 
forests to cheer their Olympic 
cross-country skiers. This was 
the mirror of that, but for the 
weather and implements. 

Essayah is Finland’s 27-year- 
old world champion in the 10- 
kilometer walk — an event sev- 
eral gears below the preceding 
generational successes of Finns 
Paavo Nurmi and Lasse Viren, 
whose images are posed in 
bronze and stone outside the 
stadium. 

The heiress walked past 
them, striding certain and disci- 
plined. one foot always on the 
ground per regulations, and 
amid the cheering and the noise 
the statues were ignored. The 
clouds in the extended northern 
dusk were a landscape as sure as 
the Norwegian mountains. 

Inside the stadium the people 
bad been watching on the giant 
TV screen as Essayah moved 
gradually, seasonally into the 


lead, and when the camera 
showed her approaching the 
stadium entrance they stood as 
if one to greet her. 

She came to a stop in a cham- 
pionship-record 42 minutes. 37 
seconds, and those behind — 
Ann a -Rita Sidoti of Finland 
(42:43) and Yelena Nikolayeva 
of Russia (42:43) — fell into her 
embrace. They seemed happy 
just to have walked with her. 

Then Essayah moved toward 
the stands, waving for a flag to 
hold and hundreds of them 
came to a waving salute: Take 
your pick. She marched around 
the track once more with the 
flag across her thin bare shoul- 
der, celebrating an event which 
never would have meant so 
much had she not made it hers. 

The heptathlon fell less hero- 
ically to the world silver-medal- 
ist, Sabine Braun of Germany. 
She had gone to bed Monday 
trailing Svetlana Moskalets of 
Russia by three points after un- 
characteristically running al- 
most a second behind Moska- 
lets in the 200 meters. 

A former long-jumper with a 
personal best of 6.70 meters, the 
29-year-old Braun figured to re- 
emerge in that event Tuesday 
morning — but she could man- 
age no better than 632 meters, 
no-jumping her third attempt. 
With only the javelin and 800 
meters remaining, she lay 42 
points behind Moskalets, who 
had jumped 6.44 meters. 

“We talked about it all last 
night and could not work out 
what was wrong," Braun said 


during the afternoon break. 
“This just isn’t my competi- 
tion.” 

Moskalets, however, failed to 
keep her first throw of the jave- 
lin in play. Watching her sec- 
ond attempt fall woefully short, 
she held her right elbow and 
came close to tears. The elbow 
was wrapped in tape for her 
third throw, but it did not help. 
Her best was only 37.94 meters, 
far behind Braun’s sub-par 
4834. Moskalets walked from 
the pit sobbing, having sunk to 
fifth place, where she would fin- 
ish with 6,308 points. 

Entering the 800 meters, the 
last event, Braun had only to 
hold a 32-point lead over the 
lanky second-place Hungarian, 
Rita Inancsi, who initially 
sprinted 20 meters ahead of 
Braun but was overtaken by tbe 
pack. Braun's time of 2:20.66 — 
“1 gave all,” she said — assured 
her of a threadbare victory with 
6,419 points, with Inancsi sec- 
ond in 6,404 and Urszula Wlo- 
darezyk of Poland third in 
6,322. 

Three other titles were decid- 
ed Tuesday. Stein ar Hoen of 
Norway won the high jump in 
235 meters, a championship re- 
cord which could not be 
matched by co-sflver-medalists 
Artur Partyka of Poland and 
Steve Smith of Britain, who 
managed 233. 

The 1,500 meters was won by 
the Olympic champion Fermin 
Cacho of Spain in a champion- 
ship-record 3:35.27, and he 
shared his victory lap with com- 


Russian Sprinter Latest to Depart 


The Associated Press 

HELSINKI — Russian sprinter Natalia Vor- 
onova. having tested positive for ephedrine. was 
withdrawn Tuesday from the European Champi- 
onships. officials from the sport's governing 
body m European announced. 

Voronova’s was on a list of eight names given 
by the European Athletics Association of ath- 
letes who failed drug tests. 

She was a member of the winning relay team at 
last year’s world championships and was to run 
here until she was withdrawn by her federation. 

Russian hammer throw Sergei Kirmasov was 
withdrawn Monday and faces a four-year ban 
for using steroids. 

The 29-year-old Voronova had used a sub- 
stance that contained ephedrine in a test carried 
out after a June meet in Granada, Spain. 

Last week Aham Ok eke, a Nigerian-bom Nor- 
wegian. was withdrawn from the championships 
after it was announced ihar he bad tested posi- 


tive following a Grand Prix meet in Stockholm, 
Sweden. 

Salomon Wariso. Britain’s 200-meter champi- 
on, was withdrawn by his federation after he 
failed a simil ar test for ephedrine. 

Ephedrines are contained in many over-the- 
counter medications but are banned in Olympic 
sports. 

Voronova, Wariso and Okeke were also on the 
list for ephedrine and were given a suspension of 
three months. Five other athletes — Marian 
Florea of Romania, Pjoty Perzylo of Poland, 
Vladimira Malatova of the Czech Republic. 
Hedvika Korosak of Slovenia and Ellen Kovacs 
of Romania — were also on the list. 

Kovacs was found to have used ephedrine and 
was withdrawn before the championships. 

The other four were found to have traces of 
illegal substances with steroid bases and were 
given four-year suspensions. 


Car Invades British Race, Cyclists Strike 


The Associated Press 

BLACKPOOL, England — 
-.very rider on the Tour of Brit- 
iin staged a 20-minute strike 
luring its second stage Tuesday 
if ter a car strayed on to the 
source and caused an accident 
vhen it drove into the race. 

The car’s driver allegedly dis- 
>beyed instructions to stop 
Tom two police motorcyclists. 


hit both of them and then 
forced the leaders of the 102- 
man field to swerve as the car 
came toward them at the 42- 
mile (67 kilometer) mark. 

Four riders crashed, with 
Adri van der Poel of the Neth- 
erlands and Oleg Kozlitine of 
Kazakhstan being forced to re- 
tire from the race. 

Tbe race arrived in Blackpool 


30 minutes late as the main 
group slowed to allow the in- 
jured riders to rejoin the field, 
and then stopped for their pro- 
test at the 82-mile marie. 

“Security is always a bit 
dodgy on this race.” Australia's 
Phil Anderson, the winner in 
1991 and 1993, said with blood 
running from his hip. knee and 
arm. 



Sabine Braun of Germany, left, racing Urszula Wlodare- 
zyk of Poland in the 800 on her way to winning heptathlon. 


patriot Isaac Viciosa, the silver- in 12.72 seconds, with Yuliya 
medalist in 3:36.01. Graudyn of Russia second and 

The 100-meter hurdles went Yordanka Donkova of Bulgaria 
to Svetla Dimitrova of Bulgaria third in the same time of 12.93. 

, sggpsq sypBggg y yrgymp 


# -m if 




For China, This Defeat Is a First Success 


By Harvey Araton 

Hem York Tunes Sendee 

TORONTO — One night 
during the first round of the ; 
world basketball champion- 1 
ships, the coaching staffs of the 
United -States and China sat- 
down to dinner,' and exchanged 
ideas. What the Chinese re- 
ceived were some training tips. 
What the Americans got was ~ 
some spicy food for thought- ' 
“Since the Dream Team 
played at the Olympics in Bar- 
celona, basketball in our coun- 
try has become very popular,* 
the Chinese coach, .Xmgquu 
Jiang, told Don Nelson and as- 
sistants through an interpreter.' 
“bn China right now, there are 
more people who play basket- 
ball than the entire population 
in all of Europe.” 

The Americans thought about 
that, and shook their heads. 

“Imagine the potential,” said 
Donn Nelson, son of the UJS. 
team's coach. 

With the most populous -na- 
tion in the world to choose 
from, the Chinese- have come 
here to announce their in ten- . 
tion of getting into the business 
of basketbalL Though they've 
mad** t remendo us strides-, in a . 
short while, it is not something 
that’s going to happen ovenrighL 
A day after their greatest in- 
ternational victory ever, the 
Chinese were crushed Monday 
night by Croatia, 10S-73, .in 


ihm maiden adventure into the 
second round of a tournament 
Qiinft has often qualified for 
only because the competition in 
Asia is next to none. .... 

Fortunately for Croatia, its 
mere 43 milli on atizens in- 
clude Toni Krikoc. Dino Radja 
arid the 7-foot, 1-inch (2.15-me- 
tex) Stoyfco Vrankowc, three 
players with National Basket- 
ball Assodation experience. 

Kukbc picked the . smaller 
Chinese defenders apart with 
15 assists and the Croats made 

ati^7*of*12 3-poimenf^ they 
won their fourth straight en 
route to a likely goto medal date 
Sunday against Dream.Team IL 
The Chinese stayed dose for 
a while in the first half, as the 
Croats played a loose man-to- 
man defense that China's best 
player, Hu Weidong, shot fades 
in. Re scored 22 of . his game- 
high 31 points (27 coating from 
behind the 3-point line) m the 
first half, but slowed down as 
Kukoc and Arijan Kimazec 
' ' him in the second, 

ridosg is the prize of .the 
Qtiaese team, a 6^6, 190- 
(86-kflogram) swingman 
Province who has 
a soft touch when he is left 
alone: At 23, he has been on the 
national team since 1992. 

. . “He’s one of the first young 
players they’ve had come up 
who has all the skills,” said toe 


ATP Loser in Germany 




TJkhiu, SUokowcnvi/Rciiurr 


Britain’s Sally Gunnell, who set the world record last year, 
cruised into the 400-meter hurdles semis in 55.17 seconds. 


The Associated Press 

MUNICH — In another 
Mow to tbe troubled game of 
tennis, the ATP Tour is losing 
one of its main television spon- 
sors. 

SAT-1, a private German ca- 
ble station, will not extend its 
contract with the ATP Tour 
when it expires next year, the 
station's bead of sports. Rein- 
hold Beckmann, said Tuesday. 

A rapid fall in ratings is forc- 
ing SAT-1 to drop tennis from 
its program, Beckmann said. 

“1 think the European mar- 
ket is finished,” he said.. “The 
times when TV stations were 
tbe milk cows are definitely 
over.” 

SAT-1 will continue to 
"broadcast only Two" tourna- 
ments from Germany, the ATP 
Tour World Championship in. 
Frankfurt and the Grand Slam 
Cup in Munich. 

Riding on tbe successes Of 
Boris Becker and Steffi Graf, 
tennis became very popular in 
Germany in the 1980s. Germa- 
ny hosts more than a dozen 
tournaments every year, in ad- 
dition to the ATP Tour’s sea- 
son-ending World Champion- 
ship. formerly known as the 
Masters. 

About 70 percent of ATP. 
Tour's television income came 
from Germany, Beckmann 
said. 

The abundance of tourna- 
ments has led to tennis satura- 


tion on television and the game 
is rapidly losing viewers. 1 

The ratings also fefl sharply 
for last year’s ATP Tour World 
Championships, a -tournament 
featuring the top eight players 
in the vrorid, Beckmann said. 

As a result, SAT-L forced the 
ATP to change the schedule of 
this year’s event by dropping 
the evening match dnting prime 
time playing all three daily 

matches in the afternoon. 

The first match du ring this 
year’s tournament Nov. 15-20 
will begin at 2 P.M_, three hours 
earlier, than in previous years. 


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younger Nelson. “They sre a 
kid like that come out or their 
junior program, and they re 
really excited about iL. 

During the Barcelona Olym- 
pics, Nason -ms an assistant 
£oacfa for Lithuania, based on 
his long-term friendship with 
Sanmas MarduUoms. who he 
helped recruit for the Golden 
State Warriors forhis father. 

The Lithuanian dormitory was 

next door to the one housing the 

Chinese team. Nelson struck up 
a casual friendship with Xing- 
-quu Xiang, and renewed it while 
he was scouting at the Goodwin 
Games in Sl Petersburg. 

At that competition, China 
lost by 40 points to Brazil, a 
t eam it opened this tournament 
by defeating. After losing by 51 
to the United States, China 
shocked Spain, advancing to 
the second round on tbe strength 
of. victories over traditionally 
good basketball countries. 

“We used the Goodwill 
Games as a warm-up to orna- 
ment,” Jiang said. . 

. WhOehi^team is young, with 
every player in bis early to mid- 
20s, it is certainly not big, or 
exceptionally quick- What Chi- 
na does have is a sweet, ample 
and patient offense played by 
what the senior Nelson-said is 
“the best passing team in the 
tournament.” 

From the U.S. coaches, the 
Chinese staff wasn’t looking for 
game strategy, or seeking to im- 
port 7-foot era. They told the 
Americans that there are more 
than enough big people in their 
country, especially in the north. 
-.“We asked the Americans 
about their training and about 
their junior players and their 
jurim coaches,” said Jiang. “We 
would like to send our junior 
playera and coaches to the Unit- 
ed States. We can exchange.” 

hi return, Donn Nelson said, 
the chances of a National Bas- 
ketball Association game being 
played in China are very good. 
The relationship makes sense, 
and doQara and cents. The Chi- 
nese playera get better. The 

- NBA market gets-bigger. . 

• In the other, quarterfinal 
played Monday nighL Greece 
beat Canada by 74-71, The As- 
sociated Press reported. 

Flaying before a crowd that 
was definitely on its side, 
Greece led by 72ri55.with 1:34 
\to-p4ay. ; then Canada’s- Kory 
Hallas- sank consecutive 3- 
pmntera to make it a one-point 
game with 52 seconds left 

Canada forced a turnover, 
but Rick Fox of the Boston Crit- 
ics lost the ball as he made a 
move toward the basket with 
about 13 seconds left Panagiotis 
Fassouias dunked with five sec- 
r ends left for the final margin. 

- Fanis Chris todoulo led 
Greece with 26 points and 10 
rebounds, while Hallas topped 
Canada with 20 points. 

In the classification round. 
Spam beat South Korea, 98-57; 
Argentina downed Egypt, 91- 
66; Brazil defeated Cuba, 82- 
76» and Germany beat Angola, 
86-76. 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


PEANUTS 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10, 1994 




{JfPJlJt £j» /lC/i 


Page 1' 





f If I didn’t 
have to keep my 
weight down. 

I’d probably be 
riding till I 
Was 60-’ 


By Joseph Durso : 

Affw York Tones Service 

SARATOGA SPRINGS, New Ybric— At W, he rode his 
first winners in the big leagues of thorougbbred.iacing. At 17, 
he was the leading apprentice jockey in the United States. At 

18, be woo tbe Kentucky Derby aboard A/firmed and swept 
the Triple Crown, and he was the youngest to do that, too. 

At 24, he became the leading jockey in England, the first 
American in 7 1 years to do that. By ib£ rime be was 27, he bad 
won the Epsom Derby twice. He is the only jockey in history 
. to win the Kentucky, Epsom, Irish, French and Italian Derbys. 

Now, at 34, Steve Can then is back home with his trophies 
and memories, and, still reaching for die stars ahead of his 
lime, he is the youngest person ever elected to the Racing Hall 
oT Fame. ' 

He was inducted Monday along with 74-year-old Emmy 
Croli, the trainer of star horses like Housebuster, Bet Twice 
and HctlyBuIl, and with storied horses of thepast, notably the 
fillyTa wee and the colt Arts and Letters. 

But for the crowd gathered under, the huge rent alongside 
the Hall of Fame, the spotlight of history fdl mainly on the 
riding prodigy who took his first giant strides as a visiting 
jockey at the old trade across Union Avenue. 

He ended his riding career in England last year because he 
was losing the battle against weight. In this country,' it would 
be impossible to ride regularly if you hit IIS pounds; in 
England, maybe 119. 

‘Tm 138 now,' 1 Cauthen acknowledged. “And T probably 
- won’t ride again, at least not 

here in the Slates. Maybe in 
Europe or Hong Kong. If the 
right offer came, I might But it 
hasn’t So, 1 doubt thatTD ride 

a gain 

“I mss riding. If I didn’t 
have to keep toy weight down 
to 118 or.soi Fd probably be 
riding till I was 60. Td be an- 
other Lester Piggott” 
Telescoping his career on 
— two continents, Cauthen add- 

ed; ‘Things happened to me very quickly. You have to reset 
your goals. On the plane flying here, I kept thinking of my 
first race in Saratoga when I was a kid. Tome, this was always 
the Big Apple. This is where I met Lenny Goodman, who 
became my agent This is where I took the path to Affirmed:'* 

Cauthen still has the look of an altar boy, but he is now an 
associate vice president of Turfway Part in Kentucky. Most- 
ly, heis the star of television commercials about racing. He is 
also the father of a 15-month-rid daughter and the owner of a 
300-acre farm in Verona, Kentucky, the town next to his 
childhood home in Walton. That was where he started to ride 
horses before graduating to small tracks like River Downs 
and soon to major tracks Hke Saratoga. 

“The Triple Crown stays in your mind,” he said, “because 
everything is at stakes We had those three great races against 
Alydar, starting with the Kentucky Derby, a couple of days 
after my 18th birthday.” 

But if he met success early in life, he also met adversity. He 
was injured in a spill at Saratoga, then tried his luck on the 
West Coast and lost 116 races in a row. He was also starting to 
grin weight 

“Business was getting a little slow,* he remembered, “and I 
knew I could ride in England at higher weights. So, when I got 
an offer to ride in Europe, it wasn’t a difficult derision.” 

The offer came from Rabat Sangster, 'me of the giants of 
British raring; and: ft took" Cauthen abroad far 14 years. He 
won more honors and titles, and finally derided to ooine home 
last year when his weight was rising and the money declining. 

“Actually," he said, “the slump in California led to a 
Messing in disguise. The European thing extended my career 
eight or 10 years. It was a great experience. It was the right 
step for me. Nobotfy forced me to go. The other jockeys 
weren't ganging up on me, the way some people thought. It 
was just the right tiring to do." 

He glanced around at the mountains flanking Saratoga, 
and said: “You never forget bow beautiful it is here When I 
came here from River Downs, I rode two horses." 

It was only 18 years since he arrived in Saratoga as an 
apprentice, and now he was baric as pan ri raring history and 
the newest member of the Hall of Fame, in a dazzHngly short 


time for one career. 

Hei _ . ... 

said: “I was 16 years old. I weighed about 


and 


A Case for Baseball’s Owners: Hard to Latch Onto 



By Ira Berkow 

New York Timer Service 

N EW YORK — I climbed into a taxicab in 
Manhattan one day recently and told the 
driver, “Yankee Stadium." 

He half-turned to me and in a foreign accem 
said, “Is that in New Jersey?" 

“Not yet, H I replied. 

One day, though, the Yankees may. as George 
Strinbrenner has 
indicated, wind Vantage 
up in a coveted Point 

spot in the New 

Jeraey swamps. If so, the New York Yankees will 
join such historic 19th-century major league 
baseball teams as the Providence Grays, the Troy 
(New York) Haymakers, the Newark Peppers, 
the Worcester (Massachusetts) Ruby Legs, the 
Louisville Eclipse, the Keokuk Westerns, the 
Wilmington (Delaware; Quick Steps and the 
Altoona Mountain City. 

Not to mention the 20th-century Brooklyn 
Dodgers, the New York Giants, the Boston and 
Milwaukee Braves, the Philadelphia and Kansas 
City Athletics, the Washington Senators (two 
versions) and dozens of other teams. All weighed 
their market places in the balance and found 


them wanting, and, like many businesses in simi- 
lar situations in the American free-emerprise 
system, either moved away or went out of 
business. 

The shuttling of teams is a harsh reality, but it 
is reality, something the baseball owners 6r today 
would rather not admit. 

The owners, on the verge Of forcing the players 
into a strike, have demanded that the players 
accept a salary cap, which would negate many of 
the rights for which the players have fought 
successfully in recent years. 

The owners contend they can’t continue like 
this — saying at first that 19 of the 28 teams are 
in the red, then changing that on Mondayy to 12 
to 14 money-losing clubs — but have been totally 
unconvincing to the players. This is unlike the 
National Basketball Association owners in 1984. 
who opened their books and proved to the satis- 
faction of the players* union that four franchises 
were about to fold, and the players thereby 
risked a loss of about 50 jobs. 

Baseball owners, with frequent turnover, con- 
tinue to sdl their franchises at ever higher prices, 
and the sport continues to expand. While the 
.owners say teams are losing money, especially 
the so-called small-market teams. Financial 


World Magazine, which tracks such goings-on. 
says this is fiction. 

The San Diego Padres, for one. made a profit 
of $4.1 million in 1993, according to Financial 
World. And the Pittsburgh Pirates, who went on 
the sales block last week — and immediately 
found at least two serious business groups ex- 
pressing interest — were reported to have made 
$4 milli on last year. 

N OWHERE IS IT decreed that a big league 
ball club must exist in a particular city. 
Instead, basic economics requires that one sets 
up shop at the busiest comer, a tradition baseball 
owners have followed religiously. 

For years, only 16 teams played in the major 
leagues. Of those 16, only 10 remain in the same 
city. The others moved on. Owners derided there 
was nothing inviolable about the national pastime. 
And the majors have ballooned to 28 teams. 

Owners, some of whom say with a straight face 
that they are caretakers of a national trust, insist 
that it would be terrible to lose franchises in 
smaller markets because of the history of those 
teams, and that it would damage the continuity 
of the game. A continuity, in fact, that the 
owners themselves have often changed — from 


franchise-hopping to the designated hiuer to 
artificial playmg surfaces. 

If small markets are a grievous problem, then 
why don’t the owners solve it among them selves 
with a greater degree of revenue-sharing — and 
not tie it to a players' salary cap? They could give 
visiting teams 40 to 50 percent of the gate instead 
of 20 percent, as in die American League, and 
about the same in the National. And George 
Strinbrenner, for example, could share, his $40 
million-a-year local television deal with, say. 
Milwaukee, which gets only about $5 million for 
its locally televised games. 

That’s because the large-market owners are 
playing like profiteers, the game they're best at. 
Have always been best at. And if a shift in 
population and jobs in Pittsburgh, for example, 
no longer allows it to support a baseball team, 
then metropolitan areas on the rise like Orlando, 
Charlotte, Norfolk and Phoenix are ready and 
willing to try. 

The Tampa-St. Petersburg area is so eager, in 
fact, that it built a domed stadium, and waits, 
like a maiden with trousseau at the ready. At last 
count, the Tampa Bay Baseball group had sold 
32,079 season ticket reservations. 

This is baseball business, also a national pas- 
time. And apparently a thriving one, at that. 



Expos Will Win It, 
The Braves Suggest 


Ajfch djik/Rnncf, 


As brother Sandy returned the pitch, Toronto's Roberto Atoms picked himself up. Cleveland also won the game, 6-1. 

After Latest NonrMeeting, an 'Air of Inevitability’ 


By Richard Justice 

Washittgtoa Pom I Service 

NEW YORK — Major league baseball's 
labor negotiations remained stalled as 
both sides acted as if no meaningful dis- 
cussions will take place in time to prevent 
the players from walking off the job after 
Thursday’s games. 

With the eighth work stoppage in 23 
years doting in, representatives of the 
players and owners met for about 90 min- 
utes Monday to discuss a host of non- 
economic issues, including matters such as 
grievance procedures and how to accrue 
service time in the pension plan. Nothing 
was settled, but then no one expected any- 
thing to be settled. 


“Nobody is going to strike over any 
issue that was discussed today." said Rich- 
ard Ravitch, chief negotiator Tor the own- 
ers. 

Indeed, the two tides remain so far apart 
on the central issue — a salary cap — that 
Friday’s strike seems inevitable. There was 
to be a series of group sessions Tuesday 
afternoon, but barring a change of heart, 
the next fuD bargaining session won't oc- 
cur until Wednesday — less than 48 hours 
before the strike is to begin. 

The head of the union. Donald Fehr. 
was even uncertain about a Wednesday 
meeting. Fehr described his side as “re- 
signed" to a strike, while Ravitch said he 


was "much less optimistic" than he had 
been. 

“I assume there’ll be a meeting if some- 
one thinks there’s something to talk 
about,” Fehr said. “There's nothing 
scheduled. There's an air of inevitability 
about all of this, just as there was in 1 98 1 " 
when players struck for 50 days. “There’s 
a feeling that we won’t reach an agree- 
ment without a work stoppage. 1 hope 
that turns out to be wrong because there's 
still time. With each passing day. there's 
less time." 

Said Ravitch: “Don and I both recog- 
nize that there are real fundamental differ- 
ences.” 


The Associated Press 

It had the ring of a conces- 
sion speech, and considering 
the way the Montreal Expos 
have been playing it seemed ap- 
propriate. 

“The Expos are having an 
awesome year, so now we're 
fighting to get the wild card." 
Fred McGriff said after hitting 
two home runs and driving in 
four runs as the Atlanta Braves 
were beating the Reds. 6-4, 
Monday night in Cincinnati. 

The victory did nothing to 
enhance Atlanta’s position in 
the NL East because the Expos 
won for the 18th time in 20 
games to maintain a six-game 
lead over the Braves. 

Steve Avery was looking 
ahead as far as possible with a 
strike looming Friday. 

“1 hope we can win the next 
three in Colorado and take our 
chances coming bade after the 
strike," he said after striking 
out a career-high 1 1 batters in 
eight shutout innings. “It’s a 
shame; I’m starting to throw 
the ball as good as 1 am and it's 
probably my last start of the 
year — I mean, for a while, 
anyway." 

Avery allowed just three hits 
but threw 1 18 pitches. So. sit- 
ting on a 6-0 lead, he look a seal 
to start the ninth and watched 
the thrill-a-minule Atlanta bull- 
pen do what it has done all 
season: make a game out of iL 

Mark Wohlers started the 
bottom of the ninth by giving 
up a walk and two hits, one 
Kevin Mitchell's RBI single. 
Mike Stanton came on and hit 
Hal Morris with an 0-2 pitch to 
load the bases. 

Greg McMichael relieved 
and got Reggie Sanders to fly 
oul Lenny Harris hit an RBI 
grounder before Thomas How- 


ard doubled sharply to the gap 
in left-center for two runs. 
Deion Sanders then grounded 
out, and McMichael had his 
21st save. 

The Reds’ third lofs in the 
four-game series cut their lead 
in the NL Central to a half- 
game over idle Houston. 

Expos 3, Pirates 2: Moises 
Alou's three-run homer put vis- 
iting Montreal 33 games over 
.500 for only the second time in 
franchise history. 

John Wetleland pitched the 
ninth for his 23d save, striking 
out Don Slaughl to end the 

NL ROUNDUP 

game with two men on to wrap 
up the Expos' fourth straight 
victory. 

Steve Cooke checked the Ex- 
pos on two hits until Marquis 
Grissom singled to start the 
sixth. Wil Cordero doubled 
ahead of Alou's 22d homer. 

Giants 5, Cubs 4; Todd Ben- 
zinger's pinch-hit homer with 
one out in the eighth in Chicago 
ended San Francisco's six-game 
losing streak. 

Rockies 7, Dockers 6: Charlie 
Hayes's RBI single capped a 
four-run rally in the ninth that 
beat visiting Los Angeles and 
ended Colorado's a five-game 
losing streak. The Dodgers got 
a two-run double from Mike 
Piazza in five-nm eighth fora 6 : 
3 lead. 

Cardinals II, Marlins 1: 
Todd Zeile hit two homers and 
drove in a career-high six runs 
as St Louis hand Florida its 
seventh straight loss at home. 

Met$3, PbflEes 2z Jim Linde- 
roan homered. doubled and 
scored twice as New York 
handed host Philadelphia its 
fifth straight loss- 


SCOREBOARD 


BASEBALL 


Major League Standings 

AMERICAN LEAOUE 



W L 

PCL 

OB 

Hew York 

70 40 

A 36 

— 

Baltimore 

61 49 

-555 

9 

Bouton 

Sf 59. 

jtto 

J7VS 

Toronto 

SI » 

A 73 

U 

Do Iron 

5V 61 

JB5 

20 


Central MAM 



Chicago 

66 45 

m 

— 1 

Cleveland 

iS 46 

-586 

1 

•KansosCItY 

63 SO 

-550 

4 

AUrwaukao 

53 66 

-464 

1410 

Mlnmsoto 

51 M 
WestDWfcdoa 

AX 

15 

Texas 

S3 60 

AM 

— 

OafctatKj 

SO 61 

AX 

m 

Seattle 

46 63 

A32 

4W 

CatHornla 

46 a 

AN 

6V*x 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
EactDteUtaa 



W L 

Pet. 

OB 

Montreal 

72 3» 

Am 

— 

A Malta 

66 45 

595 

6 

now Yam 

54 56 

AVt 

im 

PMMMpilta 

SI 60 

AM 

20ft 

Florida 

x a 

Control Mvisten 

466 

22ft 

ClnctanoH 

<5 46 

JU 

— 

Houston 

65 47 

-580 

ft 

Ptmauroh 

S2 » 

AX 

13 

SI. LOUlS 

51 60 

459 

14 

Chicago 

49 62 
WeifDfvtStOfl 

AO 

16 

l_w Angelos 

56 55 

JU 

— 

Sen Francisco 

53 6B 

Adf 

4 

Color ado 

52 63 

J56 

5ft 

San Otaoo 

45 » 

an 

12ft 

Monday’s Line Scores 



MEBICAN LEAOU* 

im m •»-* u • 
m m wo-* * • 

Hltv (». RusMlI 19) andS. Ato- 
ter. RWwW (W Qrttf Borttrs. 
I L— A. Latter. ^7. HtM— dew* 
(2D), Asmara ll>. 


MUwookae Mi «M CMNB-U O • 
Detroit M* Mi w-i Ii a 

Miranda. XMorcmfea (TJ. Orosco (8). Hen- 
ry <*) ond Ntteon. Vatte tt); BMctw. Boiw 
<71. Cadaraf OO ana Tottteton. Km* «J. 
W— Miranda, M. L— 8«*cher. 7-ti H Fft-Miv 
wMktc. Jdte 021. arfUo in. Js. Voter* In 
(Til. Odtrart, Fryman OB), Bautista (4). 
Bonmora Mi Mi te— * te ■ 

Near YoUt . Ml Mt Mi Tt-* 13 • 

S. p ornt mt teL Benitez UJ.PooVeOW, Elcte 
tom 1 10) and Ho/tos; HBcfacoc*. AuscnJo fS7, 
Murphy CM). Wldrmon OOJ, Howe (it) and 
Stanley. Makes OU. W H ow . M. L—Ektf 
I* on*, fri HR— New York, Stanley (17V- 
Benae Mi m IM— 8 f 1 

HBNMMta Mi Ml M»-4 M 1 

Trttcek. Forr (tXMeMndac (7). Fossos (81 
and Rowland; TMA WOTta TO. AteHtara 19) 
andVWitaeek.W-top«*iVi1^.L— TrlleetaM. 
S*— AnuBera OS). 

Seattle M3 M MO-H H • 

Tens art in Mr — 4 f s 

Fleming. Weds (3).Goaago (7) end D. WB- 
•on: Dettmer.Leary (5). Honeycutt (5I.WM- 
teskfe tt). Howetr m aw* L ftadrftraec. 
W— wens. l-B L— Dettmer, M. Sv-Caesog* 
ID. HRs— Seattle. Griffey Jft 139), Bohner 
(21), T. M o rt ta ei C!»>. Seta («V- 
K— car m» no iM i 4 l 

COUtanHo 0M Ml »»-i 9 ■ 

DeJesus. Belinda (I), Mognule n> and 
MKtarione; UnestanondMwrs. w-i-ono- 
Sten. ML L— OoJMUi. 3-1. HR-Colffomia. 
Salmon im 

CMoogo . iM Ml MV-4 11 • 

OaUm . HD DM IW-1 X 0 

j.McOowen and LuVaHfore; a Witt Acre 
(O.VMbersfTtEcMrsleymandStekAoctL 
w— JJAcOawott tt*. L-Vomerg M. 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
Montreal Mi Ml M-J * • 

ntwwvft M* «• «*-* « 1 

vteredta S«U CM. wettetand ffl and Web- 
star, Spetr ftl; Ooote Diwer W and 
SiauatiL W-Haredta, M. Lr-Caoka. 4-11. 
S^— yitettetand(2S].HR— MonmaLAIowRS). 
LMAAWfcB M M IIM 7 2 

Cgiorodo ,MT DTI M4— 7 13 1 

MfacfescanB rn.re. m. 

and Piazza Co. Hernandix »j; FraarwaM. 

Manor «).*. Mae ««- a RufftaW MM 
catena. WH*. RB*flnrMr L-Td.WOrmM.4-S. 


HRs— U»An»*tes,WQj*octiU2J.Cotanjdn,E. 

Young (7). 

11 I 

t ■ 

Avery, wotilers (», Stanton (iLMcMfctaw 
m and O’Brien; Roner.FortaeaolSI.J.Rut- 
fla (ALMcEtroy (7).Carrases (*) ondDorsett 
W— Averv.M. I — ROBOT.*-:. Sv— M cMkftoM 
im HRs— Atlanta. McGrtft 7 (321. JusNcs 
(W. 

New York Ml Ml Hi— 3 f • 

W l B te HtaMo IM IN i»-3 11 1 

a Jones. Franco (81 and Stinnett. Handley 
OT.-Da Jackson, SJocumd (I) and LWtertnaL 
W — B. Jones. 12-7. L— On. Jacksaa u*. 
Sv — Franco (»». HR-New York, Undeman 
Mi- 
st Louis NO 313 CM-11 14 1 

FMIdu Mt Mi MB— 1 < 1 

Cormier, Buckets (*) and Poenaai ; SdwkL 
R. Lewis (4), Jonrtstane (7V, Mathews (1) and 
Santiago. W— Cormier, 3-1 L-SMwM, V3. 
HRs— SL Louts, JaHertes (12). Zeile 2 (W>. 
San Francises Mi ssi stas to o 

Chicago IM M2 we— « n o 

Burkett, Fray m.MorWeone (71. Beck (8) 
and Mumming; BuMnger. R. Veres (7), P to- 
ne (7V. Crtai m. Otto (7) and Wlidns. 


sidelines McDowell’s Striking Farewell to Chisox? 


(2tK HR— Son Fr un eteote Benrinner (2). 


FOOTBALL 


NFL Preseason 


tuinrr cans 

Las Angeles Raktara 27, OaUos » 
MaedoyY Game 
Buffalo IX Wasblogtan II 


ladciram to Attempt 

Record in September 

BORDEAUX (Reuters) — 
Tour de France winner Miguel 
Indorain is to attempt to break 
the world hour record of Scots- 
man Graeme Obree in Bor- 
deaux in the first half of Sep- 
tember, an official of the 
Banesto cycling imw, Francis 
Laff argue, said Tuesday. 

He said the Spaniard had re- 
turned to training Monday. 

For the Record 

CbGn Campbell, 41, the NHL 
team’s top assistant the last two 
seasons, was named bead coach 
Tuesday of the New York 
Rangezs. (NYT) 

lan McIntosh, the Springbok 
coach criticized by national of- 
ficials, said he was ready lo step 
down in the interests of improv- 
ing Smith Africa's rugby union 
team. ( Reuters ) 


The Associated Press 

Jack McDowell admitted 
that it had crossed his mind that 
maybe he had just pitched his 
last game for (he Chicago White 
Sox. 

If so. it was a fitting farewell 
as he struck out 10, one shy of 
his career high, and threw' his 
fifth straight complete game in 
a 2-1 victory over the Athletics 
on Monday night in Oakland. 

Oztie Guillen, who singled in 
the ninth off Ed Vosberg. 
scored the winning run on Tun 
Raines’ RBI tingle. 

That kept the White Sox one 
game ahead of second-place 
Cleveland in the AL Central, 
while the A’s remained 1 Vi 
games behind Texas in the AL 
West but could be running out 
of time. 

Chicago has two games left 
and Oakland three, including a 


Thursday night contest against 
Seattle that is the last one be- 
fore Friday’s strike deadline. 

“Definitely, 1 thought about 
it. not while I was on the 
mound, but before and after the 
game."said McDowell, a 20- 

AL ROUNDUP 

game winner in each of the past 
two seasons “It’s a possibility, 
but 1 don’t know whether it’s a 
strong possibility. I feel like 
we’re still going to have time lo 
play baseball’' this season. 

Either way, he figures he is 
out of Chicago. 

“I don’t expect I’ll be back," 
said McDowell, who has 
clashed with White Sox man- 
agement and will become a free 
agent at the end of the year. 

Yankees 6, Orioles 5: Luis 
Polonia scored on Randy Ve- 
larde’s two-out tingle in the 


bottom of the llth as New 
York avoided its first three- 
game losing streak since July 4- 
6 and halted Baltimore's three- 
game winning streak. 

Mark Eichbom retired the 
first two batters in the I Ith be- 
fore wallung Polonia. Danny 
Tartabull was hit by a pitch 
before Velarde looped his win- 
ning single to right-center. 

Mariners 14, Rangers 4: Tino 
Martinez went 3-for-5 and 
drove in a career-high six runs, 
with Jay Buhner adding a two- 
run homer and run-scoring sin- 
gle, as Seattle won in Texas. 

Angels 6, Royals 1: Tim 
Salmon homered for the third 
straight game and Mark Lang- 
ston pitched a four-hitter as 
California handed visiting Kan- 
sas City its third straight loss 
after 14 consecutive victories. 

Indians 6, Bine Jays 1: Kenny 
Lofton tripled, doubled and 


singled, increasing his league- 
leading hit total to 159, and 
scored once during Cleveland’s 
victory in Toronto. 

TWins S, Red Sox 2: Matt 
Walbeck capped a three- run 
rally in the sixth with a two-run 
single and then Minnesota add- 
ed two runs in the seventh, the 
last coming on Kirby Puckett's 
single to right for his 105th RBI 
of the season, to beat visiting 
Boston. 

Browns 12, Tigers 4: John 
Jaha and Jeff drill o each hit 
three-run homers during a 10- 
run seventh as Milwaukee won 
easily in Detroit. 

It was the Brewers’ first dou- 
ble-digit inning since they 
scored 13 runs against Califor- 
nia on July 8, 1990. They got 
eight hits, three of (hero 
homers, off Tim Belcher and 
reliever Joe Boevcr. 


r 


cmarvtfitiNAi. 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10, 1994 


OBSERVER 


Baring the Skull 


The Hangover From a Year in Provence 


By Russell Baker 
XTEW YORK —Just when it 
IN looked as if Los Angeles 
had cinched the national nutti- 
ness championship, along 
comes dear old Dixie titillating 
American Inst for the clownish 
with an uproar about whether a 
female skull may he shaved 
bare as a brass doorknob. 

Naturally a law court has al- 
ready had to intervene. Where 
would American farce be with- 
out the courts? With this latest 
sensation, silliness connoisseurs 
who lie awake wondering if 
O. J. Simpson can get a fair trial 
with only $10 milli on to spend 
on lawyers now face the dawn 
wondering if Shannon Faulkner 
can get a fair haircut 
□ 

For people who haven’t 
tuned in lately to the mad dogs 
of talk radio, a summary of the 
facts: Shannon Faulkner is a 
young woman recently admit- 
ted by court order to the Cita- 
del in South Carolina, an all- 
male, college-level military 
academy. 

Boyish hazing rituals are pan 
of what has long passed for an 
educational program there. 
Traditional humiliations in- 
clude a “knob” haircut for all 
first-year students, and the 
school wanted Faulkner shaved 
as bald as everybody else. Its 
spokesman says the purpose is 
to “take every vestige of indi- 
viduality away from the mem- 
bers of the corps." 

Real military boot camps op- 
erate on the same theory, the 
aim being to destroy individual 
identity and turn unmanage- 
able civilians into efficient sol- 
diers, seamen and Marines. 

The justification: In these 
trades the ultimate purpose is to 


kill while avoiding being killed. 
This is serious work best done 
by highly organized groups of 
more or less interchangeable 
human parts. Individuality 
tends to be a handicap. 

□ 

Well, after the unwelcome 
Faulkner was court-ordered 
into The Gtadel the next ques- 
tion was about her haircut The 
school insisted on a full “knob." 


It was, said the school spokes- 
man, “part of the Citadd expe- 
rience,* which Faulkner had 
told the courts she wanted to 
enjoy. 

It turned out, however, that 
she can do without this part of 
the experience. Women at West 
Point are indulged with a short 
short cut; why couldn't Faulk- 
ner be? asked her lawyer. For 
yes, we were back in court 

again, this tim e with the judge 

being asked to apply the Con- 
stitution to bartering. “Only in 
America,” as comedians are al- 
ways saying. 

Bumper stickers appeared in 
Dude. **Sbave Shannon,” they 
said. Male chauvinist swine, not 
to mention just plain swine of 
both sexes, were delighted when 
the judge ruled that the school 
was “at liberty to treat the hair 
on her head the same way it 
treats the hair of every other 
cadet.” 

Feminists saw injustice. 
Talk-radio frothers frothed, 
and are frothing still no doubt, 
for this is the sort of issue that 
gratifies the American hunger 
for passionate emotional out- 
bursts about matters of abso- 
lutely no consequence. 

□ 

There are puzzlements here, 
though. One is why anybody — 
not just Faulkner, but anybody 
— wants to attend a military 
academy. It is tempting to con- 
clude that such a person — man 
or woman — deserves whatever 
is being dished out. 

Such contempt must be tem- 
pered, however, by the fact that 
General George C. Marshall, 
probably our finest soldier- 
statesman since George Wash- 
ington, came out of just such a 
school the Virginia Military In- 
stitute. 

Another question: Doesn’t 
the “knob” h umilia te male stu- 
dents as thoroughly as it does 
Faulkner? Why don’t feminists 
also protest on behalf of these 
wretched young men? 
Shouldn’t we all? It might even 
put a little iron in a few of the 
young male students. 

New York Tima Service 


By Sharon Waxman 

Washington Pest Service 

M ENERBES. France — Around 
late afternoon in the dusty heat 
of Provence the incessant tsk-tsking of 
the cicadas rises from its daytime hum 
to an angry evening whir. 

Even so, it can’t drown out the 
grousing in the Bar du Progrfes when 
the name Peter Mayle, best-selling au- 
thor of “A Year in Provence” — the 
man who made this village famous — 
is spoken. 

“Mayle?" snorts a tiny old man in a 
blue beret, sticking his nose back into 
his pastis. “Alors, don’t you talk to me 
about that one, eh, non.” 

The farmers at the bar, their faces 
burnt brick red and lined with crev- 
ices, nod vigorously into their been. 

“Nobody knows him here,” the bar- 
man, Auguste Gu, finally explains. 
“He came, he observed, he didn’t live 
with the people. He missed the point. 
Look, the least he could do was be 
complimentary. He didn’t need to 
come here and say it’s rotten.” 
What did Mayle write that was so 
terrible? “He said the bar was dirty, he 
said the dogs were full of fleas," says 
Michel a worker at the town hall “He 
criticized the butcher in Goult,” some- 
one else offers. 

Mayle’s book, an account of the 
British writer's attempt to make a life 
in the French countryside, has been 
translated into 17 languages and has 
sold dose to 3 million copies. But if it 
endeared this countryside to readers 
around the world, it didn't endear 
Mayle to the natives. 

“Are my glasses dirty? Did you 
catch fleas in here? Are the toilets 
really disgusting? Is the area by the 
window rotten?* rages Henriette Ca- 
zaneuve, owner with her husband, 
Georges, of the Bar du Progriis. “No. 
Please. If he wrote things that were 
true, that would be different.” 

No, Peter Mayle is not very popular 
in the Bar du Progr&s, which be de- 
scribed as “an interior decorator’s 
nightmar e,” And he isn’t too popular 
anywhere else in this community of 
1,100 inhabitants. 

Yvonne Dufour, who runs the 
town’s only groceiy, found the book 
“pretty egotisticaL” 

“All he talks about is himself, his 
stonemason, his plumber, his electri- 
cian. He said that we’re barbarians 
because we hunt — here everybody 
hunts. He earned his money off us, 
and then he disappeared.” 




t 


“He brought us tourists that were 
not at all necessary and he said bad 
things about Provence," sniffs an ele- 
gant shopper who lives in Paris and 
has a country house in M&nerbes. “We 
were perfectly content, and then he 
came and made money on our backs.” 

“What did you learn from this 
book? That we eat a lot, that we drink 
a lot, that everything happens slowly,” 
says MireQle Andrfe, the Mayles’ near- 
est neighbor. “He may be right He 
brings out all the faults of Mfenerbes. 
But He was in his pool and hammock 
all day long. Let him try a few days of 
work in the fields.” 

Indeed, the only people evidently 
willing to defend Mayle — the author 
and his wife, Jennie, having fled these 
parts last fall after six years and too 
many autograph hunters — are his 
farmer neighbors, Faustin and Hen- 
riette Andre, the big-hearted couple 


who figure large in the book and its 
sequel “Toujours Provence.” 

. ^People have to understand, . he’s a 
writer, said Fanstrn, sitting on his 
vine-treQised porch. He adds, as if in 
explanation: “We are as we are.” 
After the book came out in England 
in 1989, it was the English who came 
in droves, waving copies of the book, 
and — as the writer describes in “Ton- 
jours Provence” — inviting them- 
selves into the Mayies* living room. 
This year it’s the Japanese, who have 
bought more than 600,000 copies of 
“A Year in PTOverice” since spring. 

At the Bar du Progrfes, Cazaneuve 
has sold out his stock of ISO copies of 
the French-language version, pub- 
lished this year, in which Mayle 
changed the names of the characters. 
“Don’t confuse commerce with per- 
sonal feelings,” Cazaneuve explains. 

And what of the other characters? 
Where is Antoine Massot, the ifl-tem- 


Peter Mayle, the unpopular popuhrizer of Provence.. . 


pered hunter with the morbid jokes, 
the ferocious dogs and the recipe for 
fox? What ofMenicncd, the phfloso-" 
phffl>pliimber with thoughtful obser- 
vations such as, “Do you know that at 
any given moment during any day-ift 
the month of August there are 5,000 
people malting pipi in the sea?” 
Don't asL Massot, the village ec- 
centric mid a senn-reduse, is nowhere, 
to be found. Menicucd, now retired, 
has an unlisiedmumber and will never 
forgive Mayle for making him famous. 

What has Mayle to say about, the 
havoc he has- wreaked? The writer, 
who is new in the Bahamas finishing a 
bode about a dog, has no comment 
His agent however, protests in 1 his 
place. “There is a core of complaint, 

. but ii is not necessarily .otgective,” 

move to Provence to exploit the area. 
He didn’t even move there to write the 
book. He went there to write a noveL 
Peter simply loves Trance, and be had 
been saying- foryears that when he 
had res ou rces to do it, he'd go back to 
France and Hve there, winch is exactly 
what happened.” 

Atbase, it seems to be an enormous 
cultural misunderstanding. What 
Mayle meant as gentle humor, the 
locals' 1 took as insult 
For some, . Mayle was too kind. 
“People here will smile at you for two 
or three days until you spend a maxi- 
mum cf your money, then they l augh 
behind your : back," says Antoine 
Court dfc Gebdirr, a native of Paris 
who owns a hotel in nearby Lacoste. 
After 25 years here, he says, he is still 
considered a 7 foreigner. - 
“It’s true whaL’am the book. We’ve 
been waiting for a carpenter to finish 
our cabinets for seven years. And Fve 
changed, carpenters three times.” 
Whatever the reality, Mayle has put 
his house up for sale mid, Stein says, is 
deciding where he wants to live. ■. 

Meanwhile, at the gray flagstone 
house separated from the road by 
rows of grapevines and cherry trees, a 
real estate agent shows the bare interi- 
or to a French couple and their son. 

Are theyaware of the risks of own- . 
ing this house? The husband briskly 
nods. Then he purses his lips, annoyed 
at the intrusion. 

It wouldn’t be the last. At the other : 
end of the driveway two French cy- 
clists pause and peer toward the 
house. ^Peter Mayle?” they hope- 
fully. 


PEOPLE 


Golden Janet Jadarn 
Catches Vp to Aretha 

Janet Jackson has proved she . 

(jeserves a Httle R-E-S-P-E-C-T, ' 
at least as much as Aretha 
Franklin. Jackson has tied 

_ . t. P ,1.. iwet orvlrl nnnla 


records (more than 500,000 
cooks sold) by a female artist, 
Serial goldri^e.^ 
Time,: Any Race. The single 
holds the record for most weeks 
ifl— at the top of Billboard’s 
r&B chart. ... . Meanwhile, 
Michael Jackson and his wife; 
Lisa Marie Presley, left Buda- j 
pest aboard a private plane early 
Tuesday, avoiding reporters and 
photographers. Where next? 

. Superstar George Michael 
has relaunched his battle to free 
himself from his record compa- 
ny, filing an appeal in London 
of a High Court decision that 
had effectively bound him to ; 
Sony the year 2003. Mi- 
chad’s lawyer said royalties 
from safes of his records had 
earned Michael $25 million be- 
tween 1988 and-1993, compared .. 
to $145 million for Sony. 

□ 

The Walt Disney company 
has denied that it had used ma- 
terial from a 1960s Japanese 
cartoon series for its box-office 
hit “The Lion King." “Their 
cartoon did not influence our 
film at aH” said a spokesman, ,,, 
Howard Green, referring to theV t. 
scries inspired by the late 
Ozaam Tonka’s “The Jungle 
Emperor.” Green said the sto- 
ries were “completely differ- 
ent,” Both center on orphaned 
lkm princes — the Disney char- 
acter is named Simba, the Japa- . 
nese is Kimba —who lose their 
crowns to a wicked adult lion 
and then reclaim their thrones. 


President Nelson Mandela 
w£0 receive the Anne Frank 
Medal for helping steer South 
Africa away from apartheid, the 
Anne Frank Foundation in Am- 
sterdam sad Tuesday. 


INTERNATIONAL 

CLASSIFIED 

■ Appears on Page 4 


WEATHER 


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Forecast for Thursday through Saturday, as provided by Accu-Weatfwr. 






u 


WtL-'r?. 


I Unamnnabif 
ICoM 


UmaMnafaijr 

Hal 


North America 

Summer heat and humidity 
wil spread padualty into (w 
eastern United Slates. 
Including New York City, 
Boston and PhMamnb Into 
tWa week- Hot weather wK 
extend trom the sou them 
Rockies Into the southern 
Plains. Thunderstorms will 
be scattered trom Orlando to 
New Orleans. 


Europe 

A slow-moving storm will 
bring widespread rains to 
western France and north- 
west Spain taler this week. 
London and Pads will both 
have rain and cooler wealher 
Thursday. Sunshine will 
return by the weekend. 
Rome through Athens will 
have sunny, not weather late 
Oils week. 


Asia 

The remnanta ol Typhoon 
Doug will bring welcome 
rains lo Korea. Including 
Seoul laser this week. Japan 
win remain hot with a tew 
scattered thunderstorms In 
ihe west Manna wO hove a 
stretch of drier weather taler 
this week with some sun- 
shine. Hong Kong to Shang- 
hai wll have sca tt ered rains. 


Middle East 


Today T una tew 

Wflh Law W Htah Law W 
OF OF OF OF 
30/BB 34/75 t 32 /TO 24/75 ■ 

33/m 10/08 * 3&/*r ztm » 

28/83 17*2 « 31/88 19/99 ■ 
27*0 18*4 • 23/84 20*8 3 
38/100 1B«4 ip 39/10223/73 * 
43/100 20/79 S 43/10027*0 I 


39/ltS 23/73 * 
43/10927*0 i 


Latin America 

Today Tomorrow 

Htah Low W Mgl* Low W 
OF OF OF OF 
Bum Mica 13/5S S/43 pe 16*1 TM4 «h 

Caracas 27*0 20*8 pc 27 *0 21/70 pc 

Una 1B/B4 16*1 a 1B*4 16*9 pc 

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ffodaJoncm 26/79 18*4 pc M/77 10*4 pc 

SoWfego 21/70 7M4 s 20/68 7*4 a 


Today Tomorrow 

MtfS Low W Htah Low W 
GIF C/F OF CF 


Bangtail 

Bagno 

Hong Kang 


M0WS 31 me 23/73 I 31/OS 24/76 pc 

CapvTowi 14*7 409 pc 16*1 0/40 DO 

CamMm 28770 18*4 l 27/80 ions pc 

Hawv 20*8 11*2 t 22/71 12*3 pe 

Upa 27*0 23/73 oh 20*3 23/73 pc 

Itatabi 21/70 11*2 pe 22/71 12*3 pe 

Turn 38/100 24/75 1 37*0 24/75 ■ 


North America 

Anchowg. 20*8 1 


Qtcago 

Donvor 

DWfw 

Honolulu 

Houston 

Lm Anastas 


Lagamfcfraunrw, pc-par#/ ctaudy, c-ctautty. sh-shonera. Mhundarstonns, wain, stauw Sunfw, 
sn-snaw.Mce.W-Wes0wr AO rrapa, forecasts and data provided try Acco-Wsathcr, Inc. C IBM 


20*8 13/55 
32*9 21/70 
28*2 15*4 
22/71 17*2 
32*9 1609 
21/70 14*7 
29*4 23/73 
33*1 32/71 
32*0 20*8 
31*8 24/75 
21/70 14* r 
26/79 13*6 
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31*8 21/70 


pc 22/71 14*7 pc 
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1 32*9 24/75 sh 

* 27*0 fWW pc 
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pc 32*9 25/77 a 
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pc 42/10720*4 4 
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9 24/75 14*7 pc 
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pc 31/88 21/70 t 


ACROSS 

1 Luggage 
s Sneaking 
suspicion 
•Waist material 
13 Broadway aunt 

is "The Old 
Curiosity Shop’ 
heroine 

is Words of 
enlightenment 
it Everybody's 
opposite 
is Brickbat 


io Bear head, 
once 

so Sgt Friday’s 
comment at 

the office 

equipment 

store? 

•3 Check-cashing 
needs 

24 insuDstontial 
as Biblical Initials 
28 Lend a hand 
» Tour grp. 

as ’Mighty' a 

Rose* 


Sohdioii to Ptmde of August 9 








31 Big salmon 
oraerlora 
security firm? 
at Unvarnished 
38 ’Don’t tel me!* 
38 Goes it atone 

41 European 

48 — — the tosberg 
44 Part o( the cost 
of floor 
cove ring ? 

48 Canals 

47 Comic Philips 
4* High dudgeon 

so’ tall* 

■a Clock part 
54 Emulate 
ST Musical 

instrument that ' 
throws Troy 
A/kman fora 
tora7 

eo * never fly* 

*i Nobel chemist 
Harold 

S3 Championship 
aa Clock part 
«4 Clears (ol) 
as Have the halm 

as Grand Gta 

87 Crime battler of 
60's TV 
M Once, once 

DOWN 

1 Movie pooch 


CROSSWORD 

3 Wotsotto voce 
a Shine 

4 Wired 

l Actress Stevens 
# More than 
ennoble 

7 Erie site 
■ Writer de 
TocquevfHe' ' 

- i Eastern lute . 

10 Bushwhacker 

11 Where ends 
meet 

it That ship 
** Kind of price 
•1 Squirrels away 
22 Alphabet ■ 
quartet 

aaPookondfng 

87 Wife, to Caesar 

88 Vendi's stave girl 

30 London's 
running mate, . 

- 1936 

ai PotaiUTfist’a 
marks 

. . 38 Wheeling's rWar 

33 Out of style f 

34 Bats - E 

31 Suffix with pay 7 \ 

37 Local la 

40 Star in Virgo L 

43 Misgiving * 

43 Pitches. In a 


41 1989 Nancy BtStsifioWef, in at Ear spear ' 

“SESS35. .u«cw 

83 Gaping hoh* . as Wield . eo Wwds befexea^ 



AoztaliyEwMItatMto ^ • 

©Afew York Timet Edited by Will Short z. 


Travel in a world without borders, time zones 

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Australia 
China, PBC*«< 

Guam 

Hong Kong 

Indim» 

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Korea , 
Korea** 

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ASIA ■ Baly* m-1011 Brazil 

1-800-881-011 Liechtenstein* 135-00-11 flrita 

10811 Urtmanhi* 8*196 ~~ 

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France ~ 
Germany - 
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800-0011 Portugal* 

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235-2872 Slovakia ... 

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0800-100-10 Cyprus* - . . . 080- 90010 * Grenada* . 

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