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INTERNATIONAL 


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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 



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London, Thursday, August II, 1994 


No. 34,664 



e’s ‘Slap in the Face’ 




hr Hate Crime 


By Craig It Whitney 

New York Tinea Service • - 

BONN — - The German government, 
Jewish leaders and politicians of ail major 
parties heaped scorn Wednesday on a deci- 
sion by a Mannheim court to suspend the 
one-year -sentence of an extrenie-nij^it par- 
ty leader convicted of inciting racial hatred 
against Jews. 

The court, describing Gfinter A. Deck- 
art, the drazratan of the 5,000-member 
National Democratic Party, as » defeated 
family man and - a ^strong-willed, resp onst - 
ble personality; with clear principles who 
defends his potitical views with great dedi- 
cation,’* ruled that he probably would not 
repeat the crime publicity denying the 
existence of the Holocaust — now <hy* he 
knew it was against the law. . 

The court iornxi Mr. Deckert, an infra- ~ 
pentant German uhranarionaCst -all his 
adult life, guilty. But the understanding 
language it used to desoibe has resentment 
of Jens for demanding reparations for a 
crime he refused to recognize was “a si« p 
in the face of all victims of the Holocaust,” . 
Justice Minister Sabine Leaihenssery 
Schnarrenberger said Wednesday. 

A government spokesman said Chancel- 
lor HdmntKohl regretted the "bad sig- 
nals” stemming from the decision. The 
spokesman, Norbert Schaefer, said Mr. 
Kohl welcomed the fact that the Mann- 
heim public prosecutor had lodged an ap- 
peal. 

Hriner Geisslcr, a leading member of 
Mr. KohTs Christian Democratic Union, 
also denounced the ruling. 

"The decision proves, unfortunately, 
that right-wing radical thinking has also 
penetrated the thinking of a few judges, 
and the heads of somc pcople in German 
justice,” he said. “You can practically read 
the derision ns a legal guide to how to deny, 
the Holocaust and make anti-Semitic 
statements without fear of pumstanenL’’ . . 

fgnatz Bubis, chairman of the Central 


OwdcI of Jews in Germany, said the pre- 
siding judge, Wolfgang MOIIer, had put 
Mr. Deckert on a “pedestal” 

The same court found Mr. Deckert 
guilty in J 992 of inditing racial hatred after 
■ fie organized a meeting in Weinheim at 
which be translated and. embellished a 
speech casting doubt on the Holocaust by 
an American skeptic, Fred A. Leuch ter Jr. 
•_ Fattier -this year Germany’s highest 
court. ordered Mr. Deckert retried on 'the 
ground that he could be convicted only if 
he had publicly expressed views that were 
-dearly his own. Mr. Leucfrzer, who lives in 
Massachusetts, was also charged, but has 
not yet been tried. 

; In June the three-judge Mannheim court 
that convicted him retried Mr. Deckert, a 
51-year-old former high seboo! teacher. In 
its latest ruling, published this week, the 
court found no doubt that at the meeting, 
in November 1991, he had dearly violated 
German law by telling the audience that 
. the Holocaust was a myth perpetrated by 
“a parasitical peoplewbo were using a 
historical lie to muzzle and exploit Germa- 
ny.”.. . . 

The court rejected his appeal for acquit- 
tal but suspended Ms sentence in the ex- 
pectation mat be would be more careful 
next time. It alsorejectcd the view that Mr. 
Deckert should have been given a harsher 
sentence because of the more than 5,000 
. far-right attacks a gains t Jews, foreign asy- 
lmn-sedcereaad Turkish families that have 
taken 24 tives in Germany since 1992. 

"The entire trial produced no evidence 
that, the accused has ever called for vio- 
lence, and in the proceeding he expri 
and credibly distanced hims elf from 
occurrences,” the court said. 

Germany’s domestic security service, 
the Federal Office for the Protection of the 
Constitution, classified Mr. Deckerfs par- 
ty in its 1993 annual report as an extremist 

See RULING, Page S 



David Sahennan/Rcuim 

MEETING IN THE DESERT — Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin of Israel and the PLO chairman, Yasser Arafat, 
speaking at a press conference Wednesday in the Gaza Strip after holding talks at an Israeli military base. Page 5. 


U.S. Prepares 
Sea Blockade 


To Prevent 
Cuban Flight 


But Washington Seems 
Confident Castro Wbn’t 
Incite Massive Boatlift 


Risking China’s Wrath, U.S. Plans to Upgrade Taiwan Ties 


- -f %Patiiek*E Tyl6r r : 

- VewYmkTJneiSQrto ± . - •'<* 
WASHINGTON — President BiU Cfintoti is ex- 
pected to approve a policy change in the next Jew 
weeks and raisethe political standing of Taiwan, a 
step that is likely to anger Beijing. 

Administration officials said that the policy renew 
was on,ti»e presidents desk awaiting final choices on 
some options. But in its overall thrust, the new policy 
will recognize Taiwan’s growing economkr power in 
Asia and elevate the. status of its diplomats and 
business representatives. 


Brif H will leaW-Tarran's legal: position as an 
estranged -province of "one China” unchanged, thus 
continuing two decades of normalization with the 
Communist government in Beijing, which has claimed 
Taiwan’s seat on the UN Security Council and has 
persuaded dozens of countries to switch their diplo- 
matic allegiance to Beijing. 


The leadership in Beijing has reacted angrily to 
earlier attempts to bolster Taipei's diplomatic stand- 
ing, and there have been sharp recriminations over 
continuing American military sales to Taiwan. Ad- 


ririnis&atiob officials expressed hope that the new 
policy would draw only a mild rebuke. 

This week’s diplomatic breakthrough between Bei- 
jing and Taipei on accords relating to fishing and the 
return of airplane hijackers indicates that Beijing may 
have tried to preempt the administration with a dear 
signal that its dispute with Taiwan is an internal 
Chinese affair. 


One practical result of the policy change will be to 
make it easier for Taipei officials and diplomats to 


meet in U.S. government buildings to discuss trade, 
commerce, military assistance and other issues with 


American officials. It will also make it easier for 
offidals from Taiwan to visit the United States and 
for American officials to visit Taiwan. 

In an embarrassing episode in May. President Lee 
Teng-hui of Taiwan was not allowed to leave his 
airplane or sleep overnight on UJS. soil during a 
refueling stop in Hawaii on his way to Central Ameri- 
ca. The incident infuriated members of Congress, who 
have since invited Mr. Lee to visii their districts. 

Taiwan imported $16 billion in U.S. goods last 

See TAIWAN, Page 5 


Greenspan 



Rates Will Rise 


By Lawrence Malkin 

Intanatbmal Herald Tribune 

NEW YORK — Alan Greenspan, the 
chair man of the Federal Reserve Board, 
warned Wednesday against the dangers of 
falling behind inflation, apparently signal- 
ing that higher interest rates next week 
were a done deal. The only question was by 
how much. 

Mr. Greenspan testified before a House 
Commence wbcommittccmquhhxg into 
the reliability of economic statistics, and 
said their lists of shortxxnmngs were “de- 
prcssmgly long.” Therefore, by the time 
the government's price indexes show that 
inflation has actually taken hold, be 
warned, “many imbalances that are costly 
to rectify have developed already.” • - 

This was taken by Fed watchers on Wall 
Street as one marc sign that when the 
Federal Open Market . Committee meets 
Tuesday to dismiss monetary policy, it wm. 
raise interest rates by as much as MT* 
percentage point on the federal funds rate, 
which sets the wholesale cost of money m 
the U S. banking system and now stands al 

4.25 percent. , . 

Yields on 30-year Treasury bonds, 
which started the week at 7.53 f***? t ’ 
rose to 7-57 percent The threat of higher 
rates also took the shine off this weeks 
Treasury bond auctions, which mainly, 
drew wholesale buyers Tuesday and 

W 5STdSk; 

Deutsche trades here, 

day, and to 101.425 yen from 101295. 

lure of higher rales but by Mr. Great- 
span’s strongest statement of the day. in 
response to Congressonal 
about the currency and; noting that he 
said so before, the Fed Onunmm 


Imperiled Bangladeshi Author Escapes to Sweden 


The Asuxiated Prm 

STOCKHOLM — Tamila Nasrin, the Bangladeshi 
writer under a death threat from Islamic extremists, fled 
Wednesday to Sweden, where she went into hiding. 


government for having let Dr. Nasrin leave, and they 


threatened to topple the government unless she was 
and put on trial. 


brought back 
Swedish officials welcomed Dr. Nasrin. whose plight 
has been likened to that of Salman Rushdie, the Indian- 
born author who has spent years in seclusion since Iran 
called for his death. 

The Swedish zsudster of culture, Birgit Friggebo, said 


Dr. Nasrin had been “forced to leave her country for 
using her natural rights to write and say whatever she 
wants.” 

The only comment from the author on Wednesday 
came in a statement distributed by Sweden’s branch of 
the PEN international writers’ organization, which is 
hosting her. “I’ve come to Sweden." she was quoted as 
saying, “to rest and work.” 

Dr. Nasrin had spent two months in hiding in Ban- 
gladesh, where Muslim fundamentalists were infuriated 


by a newspaper article that quqted her as urging a 


revision or ute Koran. Extremist groups offered a 
$5,000 reward for her death. 


Dr. Nasrin, 32, has said she was misquoted. But she 
has called for changes in strict rules that limit many 
women in Bangladesh to housework and child-rearing. 

In Bangladesh, Abdul Kader Mollah, spokesman for 
Bangladesh’s leading fundamentalist party. Jamaat-e- 
lslami, said the government “will bave to pay a very 
heavy price” for allowing her to go. 

“If the government fails to bring her back to the 
country and put her on trial, the people will topple the 
government and put its leaders on trial Tor betraying the 
cause of Islam,” said Sbafiul AlamProdhan, spokesman 

See AUTHOR, Page 5 


By Daniel Williams 
and Ann Devroy 

Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — The White House 
believes that President Fidel Castro of 
Cuba will not spur a mass exodus of refu- 
gees to the United States, as he did in 1980. 
but Washington has prepared plans for a 
sea blockade off Florida in case he does. 

A senior U.S. official said Washington 
had received “what we take to be assur- 
ances" by Havana that an organized, gov- 
ernment- inri ted exodus is not planned. 
U.S. intelligence experts have presented 
the same conclusion. 

“We believe, and bave had external indi- 
cations to this effect, that something simi- 
lar to Marie! is not going to happen.” the 
senior official said. 

He was referring to the mass sailing of 
boats in 1980 from Mariel with 140.000 
Cubans, many of whom had been taken to 
the boats, at Mr. Castro’s orders, directly 
from prisons and menial hospitals. 

A U.S. government task force, formed 
last week, has reviewed contingency plans 
to blockade the Florida Straits to prevent 
vessels from leaving Florida to pick up 
Cubans, and to intercept any boats on 
their way from Cuba. 

Cubans reported a fourth hijacking 
Tuesday, a naval auxiliary vessel. The U.S. 
Coast Guard intercepted the craft at sea. 

Over the weekend, officials moved 
quickly to calm emotions in the large com- 
munity of Cubans in Miami, urging exile 
leaders to ignore any invitations from Mr. 
Castro to organize another boatli/L 

Faced with even a remote possibility of a 
flood of Cuban refugees. President Bill 
Clinton appears determined to avoid mis- 
takes of the kind laid to President Jimmy 
Carter during the 1980 exodus. 

That year. President Castro maneuvered 
his way out of domestic unrest over living 
conditions by channeling tens of thou- 
sands of Cubans to the United States. 

Mr. Castro supplied the refugees. Cuban 
exiles living in Florida supplied the vessels. 
At Mr. Castro's invitation, the craft con- 
verged on Mariel to pick up the Cubans. 

All this happened while Mr. Carter, who 
had declared his heart “open" to the refu- 
gees, looked on passively. The chaotic flow 
of boat people strained Florida and other 
communities and contributed to Mr. Car- 
ter’s downfall in the elections that year. 

Plans call for U.S. ships to seize vessels 
suspected of carrying refugees. If there is a 
mass influx, refugees would be moved 
quickly from Florida to camps elsewhere 
and Justice Department officials would 
rush to Florida to deal with critics. 

News agencies reported: 

Twenty-four Cubans who set out for 
Florida on a hijacked Cuban vessel were 
detained after being taken to Key WesL 

The Cuban government initially con- 
tended that a Cuban Navy lieutenant had 
been killed in the hijacking Tuesday and 
demanded that the escapees be returned as ' 
criminals. 

A U.S. Coast Guard officer said the 
refugees insisted no one had been killed, 
and Havana officials seemed to be backing 
off that allegation. (AP. Reuters) 



Argentina Seeks Arrest of 4 Iran Envoys 

Buenos Aires Investigation Traces Blast to Tehran Government 


tioktaw AnmltFi' Tbc Awcsurrf Prefe 

Judge Juan Jos£ Galeano m Buenos Aires after issuing arrest warrants. 


By Gabriel Escobar 

H-'ashing/art Part Servrce 

BUENOS AIRES — The Argentine 
judge who ordered the arrest of four Irani- 
an diplomats in connection with a July 18 
terrorist attack has based his case entirely 
on information provided by a former Ira- 
nian diplomat, a man who is under protec- 
tive custody in Venezuela and whose back- 
ground is still very much a mystery. 

Judge Juan Jose Galeano’s preliminary 
conclusions, delivered three weeks after a 
bomb leveled a Jewish center, offer a first 
look into the Argentine government's in- 
vestigation and, as predicted, place Iranian 
diplomats at the center or the worst terror- 
ist attack in the country’s history. 

Although Judge Galeano’s report is a 
preliminary finding, his request for the 


“capture” of Iranian diplomats immedi- 
ately raises the stakes of the investigation, 
for the first time establishing a legal link 
between the terrorist attack and (fie gov- 
ernment of Iran. Both the United States 
and Israel had blamed the attack on Islam- 
ic fundamentalists with ties to Tehran but 
had offered no evidence. 

President Carlos Saul Menem, who 
called Judge Galeano's investigation “ex- 
ceptional” and “spectacular,” said in a 
radio interview that the foreign ministry 
was assessing what actions to take against 
Iran and hinted its ambassador may be 
asked to leave. Tehran's ambassador here. 
Hadi Soleixnan Pour, was summoned by 
Foreign Minister Guido Di Telia tonight 
for a third consultation in as many weeks. 

Judge Galeano. an investigating magis- 


trate, concludes there is sufficient informa- 
tion to order the arrest of four fonner 
Iranian diplomats, based on the accounts 
of their activities provided by the infor- 
mant in Venezuela. The four — Ahmad 
AJIameh Falsafi. Mahvosfa Monsef Gho- 
lamreza, Akbar Parvaresch and Abbas 
Zarrabi Krorasani — are believed to be in 
Iran and are accused by the informant of 
being members of the terrorist group Hez- 
bollah, or Party of God. 

Judge Galeano’s report also concludes 
that the headquarters of the Argentine 
Jewish Mutual Association was leveled by 
a bomb placed inside a minivan, a tactic he 
said has been used by Hezbollah against 
Other targets around the world. The attack 
on the Jewish center, described as the 


See BOMB, Page 5 


Internet: Superhighway or 2-Lane Road? 


re- 


very crucial that we recognize that 


By Peter H. Lewis 

New York Times Service 


l"i. 


See RATES, Page 5 


Newsstand Prices, 


•35 c. 


Bahrain ..-CJOODin Wdto-. 

Cyprus C.£1.00 NiMTO JQJONaim 


JgNJCr. 




Finland.. — 11 F-M- Q O j ar ..„„&d0 Rials 

Gibraltar £0-85 Rea . irekmdlR£1.00 

Great BritainSQJS jaudf Arabia 9J0R 

Egypt EL P. 5)00 south Africa 

Jordan I JO U-A.E- 

Kenya.— K SH. ISO UAAW. CEinOSJ-JO 
Kuwait .500 FUs Zimbabwe. 73trO30M 


Has the Internet been over-hyped? 

. Even as cyberspace is bring touted as 
the hippest place to congregate since the 
origmaf Woodstock, some experts now 
contend that estimates of the number ofi 
people actively using the Internet web of 
computer networks may be grossly exag- 
gerated. 

There is still widespread agreement that 
the growth of the Internet, and the number 
of people using it, is exponential: It is 
viewed as doubling in size every year. But 
some network experts say the most com- 
monly dted numbers — 20 million to 30 


million users worldwide — may be many 
times too high. 

“Suppose there were really only 2 mil- 
lion or 3 million,” said John S. Quarter- 
mas, a highly regarded Internet demogra- 
pher in Austin, Texas. 

Mr. Quarterman, in an assessment po- 
tentially chilling to all the businesses bet- 
ting millions of dollars on the premise that 
they can sell advertising, information and 
products to the Internet masses, believes 
that his lower numbers may be a more 
accurate count of people who are active 
and reachable on the computer network. 

The latest comprehensive survey that 
attempts to estimate the Internet’s' reach 


discovered more than 3.2 million “host” 
computers capable of communicating di- 
rectly with other computers on the Inter- 
net 

The data, released law last week by the 
consultants Network Wizards of Menlo 
Park, California, marked a stunning in- 
crease of 1 million additional machines 
since the survey was last taken in January'. 

But while Mr. Quarterman and some 
other experts do not dispute this raw count 
of Internet computers, they take issue with 
the survey’s assumption that each of those 
machines represents an Internet port of 


See NET, Page 5 


Kiosk 


Russia-Moldova Pact on Troops’ Exit 


jSI 376S.7G 

_JS If 

3"! 

The Dollar 

NbwYwV 

Wed. dose 

pipvtousdose 

DM 

1.5844 

1.5818 

Pound 

1.5373 

1.539 

Yen 

101.425 

101.295 

FF 

5.4245 

5.419 

Book Review 


Page 4. 


KISHINEV, Moldova (Reuters) — 
Russia and Moldova said Wednesday 
they had agreed on a three-year timeta- 
ble for the withdrawal of an estimated 
15,000 Russian troops from the small 
southwestern former Soviet republic. 

Negotiators who initialed the draft 
agreement told a news conference in the 
Moldovan capital of Kishinev that the 
agreement would come into force as 


soon as the two governments had ap- 

... , - -» — 0 f 


proved the text and the leaders 
two states had signed it. 












Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST II, 1994 


Both Serbs and Muslims Are Threatened With Air Strikes 


WORLD BRIEFS 


By Chuck SudeLic 

iVfn York Tima Stmt e 

SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina — The 
United Nations military commander in Bosnia 
for the first Lime warned both Bosnian govern- 
ment and rebel Serbian officials of possible 
NATO air strikes in response to flagrant viola- 
tions of a weapons exclusion zone around Saraje- 
vo, UN and Bosnian officials said Wednesday. 

The warning came in a letter to Bosnian gov- 
ernment leaders and a local Serbian commander 
from the UN military commander in Sarajevo. 
Sir Michael Rose, after heavy artillery duels near 
the towns of Visoko. Breza and llijas on Tues- 
day. 

UN officials said Wednesday that the Serbs 
had been firing from within the 20-kilomeler 1 1 2- 
mile) zone at targets outside the zone with 
120mm mortars, 1 52mm howitzers and other 
weapons and had brought up a T-72 tank. 

The officials said the less-well-equipped Bos- 


nian Army forces had fired into Serbian-con- 
trolled areas of the exclusion zone with mortars, 
both from areas within and outside of the zone. 

The warning to the Bosnian government is 
ironic because the exclusion zone around Saraje- 
vo was established in a North Atlantic Treaty 
Organization ultimatum that was meant to end a 
22-month Serbian bombardment of Sarajevo. 

Western diplomats here expressed concern 
that the UN had in recent days proposed mea- 
sures that would hamper Bosnia’s legal anned 
forces from attempting lo take back territory 
seized by the Serbs. 

“We've got to be seen doing something." a UN 
official said Wednesday, adding that Lieutenant 
General Rose was satisfied that fighting had died 
down in the Visoko-Breza-Ilijas area and that no 
air strikes were planned. 

“The response to Rose’s sharp note to both 
sides appears to have calmed the situation," 
another UN official said, adding that the general 


was working to arrange a meeting with the com- 
manders of the Muslim-dominated Bosnian 
Army and the Serbs, General Rasim Delic and 
General Ratko Mladic. 

The North Atlantic Treaty Organization car- 
ried out an air strike against a Serbian anti-tank 
weapon on Friday in the first enforcement of the 
weapons exclusion zone since it took force in 
February. 

The zone applies to both the Serbian rebels 
and Bosnia's legal government UN officials said 
it was dear that General Rose had issued the 
warning as a reminder to the Muslims. 

The general’s warning is the clearest manifes- 
tation yet of the concern of UN officials here 
that a Muslim offensive southeast of the town of 
Vares might cause a major rupture in the exclu- 
sion zone, prompting NATO to carry out an air 
strike against the Serbs that could spiral out of 
control. 

UN offidals have complained since last week 


that the Bosnian Army was using the exclusion, 
zone to its tactical advantage around Visoko and . 
Breza in the offensive from Vares. 

The offensive, Bosnian Army officers said, is 
aimed at driving the Serbs from a key road 
running southward from the towns of TuzJa and 
Olovo. 

UN offidals have expressed concern for days 
that the Muslim offensive might trigger a mas- 
sive Serbian retaliation, including new attempts- 
by the Serbs to remove tanks and artillery pieces 
from UN-guarded weapons-collection centers 
inside the exclusion zone, 

A Serbian seizure of five heavy weapons from- 
a UN-guarded weapons depot inside the zone 
prompted General Rose to call in the demonstra- 
tion NATO air strike on Friday. 

General Rose has also called For placing Cana- 
dian peacekeepers between the advancing Mus- 
lims and the Serbian forces in the area.. But the . 
Muslims refused. 


Successor to Delors Answers Critics, 

. Insisting He’s ’European-Minded’ 

BRUSSELS (Reuters) — Jacques 

,o a 

trayed as the lowest-common-dencmnnator can nara ed last 

. — a remission, when he was namea last 



Burundi Pulls Back 
From Edge of Strife 


Compiled by Ow Staff Fn m Oupah.be 

BUJUMBURA, Burundi — 
Heavily armed troops tightened 
security in Burundi's . capital 
Wednesday after a two-day 
strike and ethnic clashes threat- 
ened lo tear the country apart 
and disrupted aid supplies to 
refugees from Rwanda. 

Life slowly returned to nor- 
mal in the capital and aid offi- 
cials said relief operations for 
refugees in Rwanda and eastern 
Zaire, halted by clashes in 
which 15 people were killed, 
were back on track. 

Some shops, a bank and a 
few markets reopened after 
dosing Monday and Tuesday 
and people trickled back to 
their offices in Bujumbura un- 
der guard of soldiers, policemen 
and gendarmes. But many resi- 
dents remained indoors. 

The defense minister. Colo- 
nel Gedeon Fyiroko. ordered 
the array late Tuesday to restore 
order, the BBC reported. 

In a statement on Burundi 
Radio, Colonel Fyiroko warned 
that the armed forces “intended 


fully to perform their role of 
protecting all citizens.” 

Troops with heavy machine 
guns were deployed at all en- 
trances to the city and in the 
northern suburbs. Bujumbura's 
hotbed of unrrest where Tutsi 
youths were engaged in anti- 
Hutu protests. 

“The situation is returning to 
normal," said Daniel Philippin, 
chief delegate of the Interna- 
tional Committee of the Red 
Cross. “People are coming back 
to their offices and there is 
some traffic on the road." 

Trouble was sparked by the 
arrest on Sunday of an opposi- 
tion politician, Mathias FDtr- 
mana, leader of the Tutsi-led 
Party for the Reconciliation of 
the People. 

The arrest coincided with a 
civil unrest campaign called by 
groups that accuse the govern- 
ment of oppressing the Hutu 
majority in Burundi. The accu- 
sation followed a campaign to 
confiscate arms in areas inhab- 
ited by Hutu. 

f Reuters. AFP) 



. -at 



bn WaUlr/ltuum. 

FRIGHT SCHOOL — A Scotsman perfecting his technique as a human scarecrow in Orkney, Scotland. The 
Scottish Natural Heritage plans to recruit people to attempt to scare off migratory Barnacle Geese that descend on 
Orkney every year. The geese, who are no longer fooled by traditional scarecrows, destroy acres of pastureland. 


At Zaire Refugee Clinic, Few Victories in Battle With Death 


By Jane Perlez 

.Vew York Tima Service 

KIBUMBA Zaire — The 
collectors of dead bodies ran up 
the hill to the Red Cross clinic 
with a bundle wrapped in the 
threads of a blue gingham dress 
they had found along the road. 
They had noticed faun breath- 
ing and instead of putting the 
bundle, a girl, on the truck for 
burial they carried her here. 

A few minutes later she was 
on the ground in the tent with 
the most serious cases, two doc- 
tors kneeling over her, a nurse 
at her side. 

"Good," said Dr. Lee Miller, 
as he felt her body. 

There was still life. But be- 
cause her blood pressure was so 
low it was difficult to find a vein 
in which to insert an intrave- 
nous drip. The doctors tried the 
tibia, ber groin, the peritoneal 
cavity in her abdomen, her 
neck. Finally a vein in ber left 
hand succumbed to the needle. 
“Get some penicillin solution," 
one of the doctors said to an 
orderly. 

The girl about 3, was just one 
of the 2,000 cases the staff at 
this makeshift 12-tent clinic 
would see as they tried to im- 
pose some order for yet another 
day of medkal services for the 
more than 200,000 refugees at 
the camp here. 


But it could hardly be called 
order as three doctors and four 
nurses flown in by the Red 
Cross and 10 Rwandan nurses 
struggled to keep up with the 
flood of pauents that had ap- 
peared by 1 1 AM. 

As the general health of the 
refugees has declined with the 
onset of dysentery, malnutri- 
tion and general weariness, the 
clinics that have been organized 
by the Red Crc«s and other 
agencies are overwhelmed. 
Cholera has almost disap- 
peared, but other scourges have 
appeared: acute dehydration, 
diarrhea, shigella dysentery, 
meningitis. 

As tension heightens in the 
camps because food is in such 
short supply, machete fights 
have started. There have been 
several cases of machete 
wounds every’ day for the Iasi 
few days. Four pauents came 
into this clinic on Friday with 


gunshot wounds after a Zairian 
soldier shot and killed a Rwan- 
dan refugee and wounded oth- 
ers. 

“I’ve been traveling the world 
for 15 years doing this — the 
Iran-lraq war, Somalia, Beirut, 
Chad during the Chad-Libyan 
war, and I*ve never seen any- 
thing like this,” said Dr. Fer- 
nando de la Victor Nobre, a 
Portuguese surgeon, who was 
operating in the trauma tent. 
“Medically, it is extremely diffi- 
cult because the poor people are 
exhausted and hungry. There’s 
a lot of injured people and a lot 
of old wounds.” 

Dr. de la Victor Nobre was 
cutting the gangrene out of the 
side of a woman's foot and had 
a cardboard box on the grass 
beside him as the disposal bin 
for bad tissue and the small toe 
he had to cut off. 

A small silver box of surgical 
tools — two pairs of scissors, a 


knife and a few other instru- 
ments — was at his side as he 
crouched on the ground beside 
the stretcher that served as an 
operating table. He had no gen- 
eral anesthetic and no blood 
supply on band. 

His patient Jacqueline Nytr- 
akomeye. had only a local anes- 
thetic. She was wide awake as 
the doctor cleaned away the 
layers of pus deep into the foot. 
She said nothing, even though 
his cutting and scraping caused 
her a lot of pain, the doctor 
said. 

“A few more days and I 
would have had to cut it here,” 
he said, indicating a position at 
her ankle. 

Outside Dr. de la Victor 
Nobre’s tent Tharcisse Hiri- 
raana, 25, sat with a dirty piece 
of material tied around his 
head, soaked with fresh blood 
flowing from a wound on the 
back or his skull. He had been 


struck with a machete as he and 
another man fought over a bag 
of food at the distribution of 
UN supplies on Sunday morn- 
ing. 

“We’ve had a few stabbings a 
day.” said Dr. Miller, an asso- 
ciate proFessor of pediatrics at 
the university of California 
Los Angeles who has volun- 
teered here. “Recently one per- 
son had an arm hanging oft” 

And then there is the con- 
stant flood of infectious cases, 
mostly dysentery and meningi- 
tis. 

The case of the 3-year-old giri 
was the most dramatic of the 
morning. And because ber 
prognosis seemed so poor, it 
raised questions about whether, 
with thousands of children and 
adults seeking help, so much 
time should be spent on this 
one. 

“I haven’t seen them so bor- 
derline; they usually have more 


Hutu Soldiers Kill Refugee Who Urged Return to Rwanda 


■4 genet Frame- Prase 

GOMA Zaire — A Rwandan refugee 
has been stoned to death by Hutu soldiers 
of the former Rwandan Army in a Zairian 
camp after calling on refugees to return 
home, the UN High Commissioner for 
Refugees said Wednesday. 

The refugee was killed iu Kibumba. 30 


kilometers (19 miles) north of Goma. by 
three uniformed soldiers from the former 
array who accused him of being “a spy 
working for the Rwanda Patriotic Front,” 
said Panos Mourn tzis. spokesman for the 
United Nations refugee agency. 

The Tu La -dominated Patriotic Front 
now governs Rwanda after a four-month 


ethnic bloodbath and is encouraging more 
than a million Rwandan refugees who fled 
to Zaire to return home. 

Relief organizations and UN agencies 
have denounced Hutu soldiers for ^propa- 
ganda" and “intimidation” in the Zairian 
camps around Goma, aimed at preventing 
the refugees from returning home. 


life,” said Dr. Miller, as the 
skeletal giri, suffering from se- 
vere malnutrition and an undi- 
agnosed infection, lay on the 
ground wrapped in blue plastic, 
the equivalent here of a sheet 
“The prognosis is horrendous 
and it is probably not thomost 
appropriate use of resources to 
(alee the time of, two doctors 
and a nurse. But it’s not easy to 
walk away.” 

The child had no known par- 
ents, and if she lived she would 
end up in one of the eight over- 
crowded orphanages created at 
the camps. 

But her survival was highly 
unlikely. The clinic is only a 
daytime operation. At 5 P.M^ 
the doctors, nurses and 30 
Rwandan volunteers leave and 
the patients who are able to go 
are sent back to their squalid 
huts. Their intravenous drips 
are unplugged and they are giv- 
en the solution to drink from 
the bag. 

Eight patients were in the 
tent overnight. The girl was the 
youngest For those like her 
with no relatives, the drips are 
kept running. A blanket is 
thrown over them and they are 
left alone at night 

The next morning, usually 
only half of the patients left 
overnight are alive, Dr. Miller- 
said. On Monday morning, the 
3-year-old giri died. 


France Bars Parachute Replay in Provence , U.S. Veterans Say 


European-minded man. All my benavior was pro- 

E ‘nfelways committed to a strong, PoUti^ _be 

said, citing his WOlk in helping negotiate both the Single Market 

the EU’s review of the Maa, 
tricht Treaty, a process likely to lead to bitter disputes over the 
bloc’s future. But he said he favored 

foreign policy and legal enforcement, and increasing the role of 
the European parliament in deciding EU legislation. 

France Detains 6 More Algerians 

PAWS (Reutere) —France interned six more suspected Algeri- 
an Muslim fundamentalists on Wednesday, raisrag u> -Jthe 
number seized since the slaying last week of five French govem- 
mexu employees in Algiers, the Interior Ministry saia. 

Tie action followed a fourth night of identity checks in ihe 
French capital. About 10,000 people have been subjected^ mot 
nlwifc Saturday and 149 have been detained, mostly for- 
eigners without proper residence documents. 

interior Minister Claries Pasqua said the crackdown was not 
about to ease, although he denied that it had any direct hnktotbe 
Algerian violence. Algeria, keen to show it was making progress in 
the bunt far the gunmen who killed three French gendarmes and 
two consular officials, announced that security services had iden- 
tified their leader as a man named Djemal Zitouni. 26, who it said 
: was an activist in the outlawed Islamic Salvation Front. 

Judge Opposes French AIDS Retrial 

PARIS (Reuters) — France’s senior judge said on Wednesday 
he would oppose a retrial for poisoning, of former officials 
already tried on lesser charges over the contamination of hemo- 
philiacs by AIDS- tain ted blood transfusions: 

Pierre Drai, first president of the Cour de Cassation, France s 
supreme court, told TF1 television that sending them back to 
court would be contrary to the very basis of the country's legal 
system. . . . 

Recently, an investigating magistrate opened fresh inquiries for 
poisoning a gains t two former health officials, Michel Garretla 
and Jean-Pierre Allain, who were jailed on relatively minor 
charges over the 1985 contamination of some 1,250 hemophiliacs 
by AIDS-tainted blood products. More than 400 have died. 

Clinton Aides to Meet With Bishops 

WASHINGTON (NYT) — Despite a disagreement on abor- 
tion, the United States has invited Roman Catholic bishops to 
meet with Clinton officials to explore other areas where they may. 
be able to reconcile their positions before a United Nations 
population conference next month in Cairo. 

Tire administration seems determined to play down the abor- 
tion issue and to emphasize areas where Washington and the 
Vatican share goals, even as the church attacks proposals support- 
ed by the United States. 

Timothy E. Wirth, undersecretary of state for global affairs,, 
conceded that it was unlikely the Vatican and ihe-aaminisiration. 
would agree on abortion. 

Fast Escape Averts Korea Tragedy 

SEOUL (AP) — A Korean Air jet bartered By gale-force winds' 
skidded off a runway after a forced landing Tuesday, but all 160 
people aboard escaped before the plane bust into flames. 

Tne pilot of the Airbus A-300 had tried unsuccessfully to abort 
the landing on the southern resort-island of Chqu- But winds 
slammed the jet to the ground and it rammed into a safety 
barricade at the end of the runway and caught fire, officials said. 

Within two the 152 vacationers andaght crcw mem- 

bers who had boarded in Seoul scrambled down an escape chute 
to safety, Korean Air offidals said. Nine people — all from South' 
Korea — were sGgJitly injured. ’ 

U.S. and North Korea Adjourn Talks 

GENEVA (AP) — The chiefs of the U.S. and North Korean 
delegations abruptly adjourned Wednesday during a third day of 
talks aimed at resolving a dispute over North Korea's nuclear 
program. 

A spokesman for the UJS. diplomatic mission said technical 
experts from the two sides would meet as necessary later in the 
day. But he said these were no plans for Robert L. Gallucci, head 
of the U.S. delegation, and Ms North Korean counterpart, Kang 
Sok Jo, to have everting negotiations as originally scheduled. 

UPDATE 

Rome Palace to Be Opened to Public 

ROME (Reuters) — Rome’s Quirinale Palace, built as a sum- 
mer retreat for Popes and now the seat of Italy’s president, will 
open to the public on Sundays starting in October, the palace 
announced Wednesday. - 

“The Quirinale has been open to visitors since 1993, but it was 
difficult for an ordinary citizen since people had to book in 
advance. We want everyone to be able to see the many outstand- 
ing works of art,” a spokesman said. 

An official statement said visitors would be able to tour some of 
the most richly appointed rooms of the palace, begun in 1573 by 
Pope Gregory XIII, between 9 AJvL and 1 P.M. on Sundays. 
Visits wfll be free. 


By Joseph Fitchett 

Internationa/ Herald Tribune 

PARIS — American veterans, who succeeded 
in making parachute jumps in Normandy during 
celebrations marking the 50th anniversary of 13- 
Day, accuse French authorities of blocking a 
simil ar jump this weekend during commemora- 
tions of the Allied invasion of southern France. 

Ken Shaker. 78, was among the former Ameri- 
can paratroopers who brushed aside official con- 
cern to jump in Normandy and he wants to 
repeat Lbe exploit in Provence, where early on 
Aug. 15, 1944. he jumped into occupied France 
ahead of the seaborne landing. 

But Mr. Shaker, along with four other veterans 
who traveled to France at their own expense for 


the occasion, said Wednesday that their jump 
arrangements had been blocked, apparently be- 
cause of official French disapproval 

“They saw all the publicity that attached to the 
jump of U.S. veterans in Normandy, and they're 
afraid of seeing us spoil their attempt to mini- 
mize the importance of U.S. forces in the land- 
ing," Mr. Shaker said in a telephone interview. 

He brushed aside claims by French officials 
and U.S. diplomats that conditions in Provence 
involved higher risks than those in Normandy 
because of unpredictable winds, rough terrain 
and helicopter traffic. A local parachute school, 
which canceled its agreement to the jump on a 
site it rents from Lhe government refused 
comment. 


French officials and the U.S. Embassy in Paris 
said that last-minute authorization was still a 
possibility, but insisted that the commemora- 
tions fully recognized the role of U.S. forces in 
the campaign that routed the Germans in a week. 

U.S. and British Army jump teams will stage 
precision drops. 

A top French military decoration will be given 
to Angelos Chalas, a retired petroleum engineer 
from Dallas. As a naval demolition specialist he 
belonged to an underwater sabotage team that 
swam ahead of the landing craft in Normandy 
and again in Provence. 

Despite this official tribute, a U.S. official 
acknowledged that the Provence ceremonies hod 
been shaped almost entirely by the French, with 


little involvement by Washington of the sort that 
helped ensure high American visibility during 
the events in Normandy attended by President 
Bill Clinton. 

In Provence, many of President Francois Mit- 
terrand's top-ranking guests will be African 
heads of state from former French colonies that 
provided much of the French-commanded forces 
in the landings. 

Spearheading the assault were paratroopers, 
including Mr. Shaker’s unit, the 509th Parachute 
Infantry Battalion. It fought in Italy at Anrio 
and Montecasrino and at the Ba 


in which only 
uninjured. 


50 of its 


! Battle of the Bulge, 
500 men survived 


dam a gin g Buildings, cutting power lines and forcing tourists to 
abandon flooded camping grounds. Gusts of winds reached 115 
kilometers (70 miles) an hour. (Reuters) 

British Airways plans to resume {fights to Beirut on Dec. 5. It 
stopped service 1 1 years ago. Flights to Amman, Jordan, which 
were stopped in March 1990, are scheduled to begin on the same 

(Reuters) 

Tno rases of cholera have been reported hi Alma-Ata, the capital 
of Kazakhstan, and' the cholera virus hac been found in a river 
winding through the city. Health Ministry offidals said Wednes- 
***- (Reuters) 

Ground staff workers of FUEppine Airlines clashed io Manila 
with security guards after a strike to protest the dismissal of union 
members involved in a June walkout- The airline said a flight to 
HongKong was canceled and several domestic flights were 
delayed. ; 511 (AP) 


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** 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 11, 1994 


Piage 3 


P. 



By Michael Weisskopf 

Washington Past Service 


-step’s proposals stripped of major corporate 
support 


WASHINGTON When health care reform ; Lertajnly; the bills retain some business back' 

was introduced last year, the idea split American |P8* but corporations that once led the crusade 
business into factions —some for, some against, - for , overhauling the system — such as the auto 


some scrambling to protect narrow interests. But 
as the long health care debate heads toward a 
conclusion, American business reached a 
consensus that no change is preferable to the two 
major bilk now before Congress- ' . 

This week the leaders of dozen's of business 
groups merged into embryonic super! obbies. 


enng or moving to- 
hording to informed 



james — * are now wav 
ward outright opposition, accoi 
.sources. 

JThe American. Association of Retired Per- 
sons, the largest U.S. organization for senior 
citizens, gave a major boost Wednesday to both 
Democratic health plans, wanting that their de- 
featwould Trill health reform ‘Tor years to come.” 
The Associated Press reported from 
Washington. 


health care reform will be dead for years to 
come."] 

“We‘d rather see no reform than bad reform.'* 
said Larry Atkins, a lobbyist for the Corporate 
Health Care Coalition, made up of 23 large 


nesses. Fortune 500 companies and the health 
industry groups would significantly raise the 
obstacles For the two tells. 

None of the groups openly advocates a “puil- 
the-piug” strategy, jargon for killing legislation 


tUSSSSSSSSSSiSSi 


one of the strategy sessions Tuesday. Mr. Atkins 
sat with the principal detractors of the adminis- 


tration plan. 

"As it became obvious that the Democratic 
leadership is not going to give up restructuring 
the health care system the way it wants, it pushed 

„ ** ■ _ - j a ^ . . . . , • - all of business off the fence for fear of what ihev 

ri^n i^Gephardt. DemocraTS^Ltmii^ • w [The 33 million-member association endorsed actually may get,” said John J. Motley, of the 

^ ljr ®P n b Missoun. Mr. Mitchell's and Mr. Gephardt’s plans. Al- National Federation of Independent Business, at 

tiwugft neither bill is perfect, said Eugene Lehr- a meeting called by the Senate minority leader, 
maun, president of the association, “They pro- Bob Ddle, Republican of Kansas, to oppose the 
vide the foundation for comprehensive health Mitchell bill. 

care for all Americans. If either bill is defeated. " The collaboration of Mr. Motley’s small busi- 


Many of the groups had embraced broadprm-' 
riples of reform, seme even supporting key ele- 
ments of President Bill CBnton’s plan* and their 
joint opposition leaves the Democratic leaden- 


ing tactics later. 

If a united business front stands, it would be a 
first in the health care debate. Prospects were 
initially bright for broad reform, but the commu- 
nity split into blocs and fought hard for the 
specific interests of one industry group or 
another. 

“Somehow the Democratic leadership has 
managed to unite the business groups in opposi- 
tion to their proposals, which is a remarkable 
accomplishment," said Sean Sullivan, the presi- 
dent of a coalition of large anti small businesses 
that collectively negotiate health plans. 


> IU$. 




I ruiV'.r 


Idlif!! :! 


'' 


, . P- 



Criticizes 
Senate BiU 
As Untested 

By Dana Priest 

‘ Washington Post Service •' 

WASHINGTON — HHlary 
Rodham CHmon deviated from 
the administration .script as 
Congress began' debate on 
health reform this week, calling 
the Senate leadership b£Q her 
husband has praised “an Un- 
tested approach.” 

She said a str o n g er House bflT 
' ’would have greater results in 
the immediate term for the peo- 
ple who need it most,” the unin- 
sured. 

President Bill Clinton has 
embraced both House and Sen- 
ate leadership bills, although 
they are quite different, and he 
has refused to express a prefer- 
ence. He said the plan of the 
Senate majority leader, George 
J. Mitchell of Maine, would 
achieve universal coverage and 
“guarantee health care that 
could never be taken away,” a 
claim Mr. Mitcfaefl hinnylf did 
not make. 

Speaking to repor te rs, Mrs. 
Clinton called Mr. MrtchdTs 
work “veiy admirable” but ex- 
pressed skepticism that itwo ukf 
work as advertised. Tbe biD re- 
lies on insurance reforms mid, 
government subsidies to pro- . 
ride coveriige'to .95 percent of « 
the population by. 2000. Failing . 
that, a requirement that em- 
ployers pay 50 pcrcem of the 
cost of insurance lot their emr 
ployees would be considered. 

The stronger Honse proposal 
would require employers to pay 
80 percent of thar worker^ in- 
surance costs immedialdy. 

Mr. Mitchell, she said, toe* 
the approach that “there are 
people m the Senate who hon- 
estly believe a voluntary mar ket 
reform, incentive-driven ap- 
proach will wort” If that' 
pens, "we should say ] 
we ought to be gratefuL’ 

But, she said,. “We owe the 
American people something be- 
sides an untested approach, 
which is, we owe them a date 
certain for evaluating our pro- 



In Mexico, Skepticism Reigns 

Disbelief Greets Vote Poll Showing a Rout 


■ ■ Wfay 1 . Bowd/Hk Aaocnttd Pre» 

Zapatista rebel recruits, with wooden “rifles,” standing 
guard at a convention of dissidents in the Mexican 
state of C&iapas. The 5,000 delegates appealed for a 
rote against the rating party in the Aug. 21 elections. 


By Tim Golden 

Afew York Times Service 

MEXICO CITY — With the approach of 
what is generally expected to be the most com- 
petitive presidential election in Mexico's mod- 
ern history, most opinion polls report that there 
is not that much of a race at all. 

The source of the paradox is this: Almost no 
Mexicans believe in the polls. 

Some of the latest surveys give the candidate 
of the governing Institutional Revolutionary 
Party, Ernesto Zedillo Ponce de Leon, more 
than a 20-point lead over his closest rival, 
Diego Fernandez de Cevallos of the right-of- 
cemer National Action Party. 

One relatively reputable national poll gives 
Mr. Zedillo a more modest advantage of 14 
points. Only one recent, study, of widely chal- 
lenged methodology, has shown an opposition 
candidate narrowly in the lead. 

Despite growing sophistication in the meth- 
ods of the surveyors, however, polls in Mexico 
remain a metaphor for the extraordinary de- 
gree of skepticism surrounding the political 
process. 

*The special problem in Mexico has nothing 
to do with the mechanics of doing the job.** said 
Warren Milofsky. a American pollster who is 
organizing both a national exit poll and a quick 


count of the results from the vote, on Aug 21. 
“The hard pan is convincing anybody.” 

Whether because the polls have been wrong 
or the election results fraudulent, the two have 
often diverged in the past. Before the 1988 
presidential election, nearly all of the major 
polls taken gave Carlos Salinas de Gortari 
between 6 and 1 1 percentage points more than 
the 50.3 percent of the vote he was finally 
accorded, and even that result is widely be- 
lieved to have been inflated by fraud. 

Newspapers influenced by or sympathetic to 
the government have not been above altering 
the findings of opinion surveys in order to 
proclaim wide support for the PRI, as the 
governing party is called. Pollsters say it is 
almost routine for some of their clients to 
withhold publication of studies they commis- 
sion if the results look bad for the government 
or its party. 

A spate of new laws and practices to protect 
against traditional methods of governing-party 
fraud have brought only a modest rise in peo- 
ple's confidence that their votes will count. 

Some political analysts and polling experts 
believe that the unreliability of Mexican sur- 
veys may be a consequence as well as a symp- 
tom of people’s lack of faith in their political 
system. 


Pied Piper of U.S.? 
Furor Over a Rat 

Politicians Rush to Aid Man 
Charged in Death of Rodent 


By Robert Hanley 

.\ew York Times Service 

HILLSIDE New Jersey 
— Frank Baiun lived a quiet 
life, except for a stint as a B- 
25 air gunner during World 
War II — until the day last 
month when be trapped and 
killed a rat that was the 

{ (rime suspect in raiding his 
Lule tomato patch here. 

For that crime, he was 
told, be could be sent to jail 
for six months and fined up 
to 51,250. 

Outrageous, public opin- 
ion said. Outrageous, public 
officials said as they rallied 
around tbe 69-year-old 
grandfather. 

The administrator of the 
Hillside Health Board, An- 
gelo Bonano, said Mr. Baiun 
deserved “a medaL” 

“We encourage people to 
kill rats because they cany 
disease;" Mr. Bonano said. 

The state senator who rep- 
resents Hillside, Wynona M. 
Lipman of Newark, has 
drafted an amendment to 
the state's animal-cruelty 
law, making it legal to kill 
rats, mice or any other ani- 
mals deemed by tbe. stale 
Health Department to pose 
a health threat. 

Tuesday, the Union 
County prosecutor, Andrew 
K. Ruotolo Jr., told the Hill- 
side municipal prosecutor, 
Christopher M. Howard, to 
drop all charges against Mr. 
Baiun, in effect absolving 
him of any wrongdoing. 

But Mr. Baiun doesn't 
want the charges dropped. 

He wants vindication, and 
maybe a little vengeance. 

His target is Lee Bern- 
stein, executive director of 


the Associated Humane So- 
ciety in Newark and tbe ani- 
mal-rights enforcement offi- 
cer who wrote Mr. Baiun 
two tickets Aug. 2 and told 
him that he-was in big trou- 
ble if convicted or charges of 
“needlessly abusing” and 
killing a rat caught in a cage 
designed for trapping squir- 
rels. 

“I want to have ray day in 
court,” Mr. Baiun said Tues- 
day at his kitchen table. “I 
want people to know this 
man abuses authority and 
should be curbed, what I 
did was with innocence, not 
with hatred or anger. If this 
doesn't go to court, what's to 
keep tius man from doing 
this again to anybody? I just 
want to let him squirm a 
little.” 

Mr. Bernstein seems to 
have retreated a bit 

“I think it's time we laid 
the matter to rest,” he said 
by telephone. “It’s gotten 
out of proportion. They're 
making him the hero and me 
the bad guy.” 

After all, Mr. Bernstein 
insisted, Mr. Baiun broke a 
law against cruelty to ani- 
mals. 

“The key is not what he 
did but how he did it,” Mr. 
Bernstein said. 

The rat. he said, was 
caught in a trap and de- 
served a “humane method of 
euthanasia.'* 

Mr. Baiun says this is all 
Monday-morning quarter- 
backing. He was worried on 
July 28 that the rat would 
escape and perhaps bite him, 
his 6-year-old twin grand- 
children who were visiting, 
or neighbors. 


A Heavenly Halo May Be Evidence of Dark Matter 


Rearers ■ 

: \ LONDON — A group of 
American astronomers has re- 
ported finding what, could be 
daik matter^a key missing com- 
^jonent of the universe, in a dis- 
tant galaxy. . 

- Theories say dark matter is 
different from normal, or bary- 
omc, matter and its existence is 
necessary to explain the behav- 
ior of the universe. 


Fenny Sackett of the Institute 
for Advanced Study in Prince- 
ton, New Jersey, said an exami- 
nation of a 

found strong evidence 
matter. •. 

While looking al the spiral 

O NGC5907, “we have 
that the galaxy is sur- 
rounded by a faint luminous 
halo,” she wrote in the latest 
issue of the British science jour- 


nal Nature, issued on Thursday. 

“Tbe intensity of light from 
this halo falls less steeply than 
any known luminous compo- 
nent of spiral galaxies, but is 
consistent with the distribution 
of dark mass inferred from the 
galaxy's rotation curve.” 

In other words, the galaxy 
acts as if it contains more mat- 
ter than can be accounted for 
by standard measurements. 


The report said the faint light 
could be coming from small 
bodies such as shrunken suns, 
made up of dark matter. 

Scientists believe dark matter 
must exist because the stars and 
galaxies move in such a way as 
to indicate gravity is coming 
from somewhere or something 
that cannot be seen with exist- 
ing instruments and technol- 
ogy. 


Until last week, when the 
Mitchell plan was announced 
and it became dear no stronger 

^rttite Housetibiad insisted on a 
defined date for insurance cov- 
erage. 

Mrs. Clinton maintained that 
there is “enormous reason to be 
both optimistic and confident 
about the outcome" in Con- 
gress and said the Clinton plan, 
which has been widely criti- 
cized. nonetheless “serves as & 
benchmark.” 

But she acknowledged “bow 

S heared and difficult a po- 
task this is” in an “overty 
information-loaded society.” 
Even President Franklin D. 
Rooseveh, who oversaw pas- 
sage of the landmark Social Se- 
curity legislation, “cGdti’t have 
to describe every jot and tittle" 
of that bfifl, she said. “He didn't 
have to carry around actuarial 
tables” or do “computer runs” 
on the different costs of cata- 
ract. surgery to convince the 
public of the need for change. 
“What 1 do not like," Mrs. 

Clinton said, “is the amount of 

hatred that is bong conveyed ■ 
and really injected into our po- 
litical system.” 

“This personal, virions ha- 
tred that for the time bring is 
being aimed al the president 
an<£to a lesser extent, myself, is 
very dangerous for ourponhcaj 
pw^die fa* 
couraang it should think long 
and hard about the conse- 
quences of such encourage- 
ment" . 

CHmon aides said afterward 
that Mrs. Clinton had been 
shaken by the hostile reception 
she received in July sbe 
spoke at a health care rally tin 
Seattle. At the meeting, police 
confiscated two guns from one 
man and a knife from another. 
Protesters carried signs saying 
“HeiJ Hillary” and other per- 
sonally derogate messages, 
and she had to turn up her mi- 
crophone full blast to be heard 
over their chants. 


POLITICAL VOTES 


CBnton 8— Ptemlml of Jones Suit 

LITTLE ROCK, Arkansas — President BiU Clinton asked a 
federal judge Wednesda y to dismiss a sexual harassment law- 
suit against him by a former Arkansas state employee on the 
ground of presidential immunity. 

The motion, filed in U.S. District Cram by bis lawyer. 
Robert S. Bennett, also asked the court to waive any statute of 
limitations so that Paula Corbin Jones could refile her lawsuit 
after he left office. 

A memorandum filed in support of the motion said, “Cogni- 
zant that no person is above the law, courts nevertheless have 
recognized that there is an overriding national interest in 
insulating the presidency from the distractions of private civil 
litigation, and in assuring that courts do not unduly intrude 
upon tbe functioning of the chief executive." The memo dtesa 
Supreme Court ruling in 1982 that gave President Richard 
Nixon immunity from, civil suits. . 

sal docu- 

,’s position, but no final decision 
has been made “The inclination is to file,” one senior official 
said. It would be unusual /or the department to remain absent 
from a case of such institutional importance to the presidency. 

But some. Justice officials worry that tbe high political 
profile of the Jones lawsuit runs the risk of making department 
lawyers lock as if they are acting out of political concern for 
thepreadent rather than because of the underlying legal issues. 
1 Mrs. Jaws alleges in her suit, filed May 6, that Mr. Clinton 
asked for oral sex in a Little Rock hotel room three years ago 
when be was governor and she was a state employee working 
on a state business promotion meeting at the hotel. (AP, WP) 


Democratic Chairman Is on the Way Out 

WASHINGTON — In another sign of Democratic disarray 
as the party enters the electoral season, the national party 
diaiiman, David C. Wilhelm, has disclosed that be will step 
down after the voting in November and that at the insistence of 
the White House be will play a limited role until then. 

Although he did not say so, Mr. Wilhelm’s allies said he was 
being eased out by Leon E. Panetta, who has been promising to 
improve the Democratic political operation since becoming 
White House chief of staff a few weeks ago. 


The Justice Department is considering filin; 
meets supporting Mr. Bennett’ 


Between now and election day, Nov. 8, a former congress- 
man, Tony Coelho, will function as a special volunteer adviser, 
acconiing to Mr. Wilhelm. In fact. Democratic politicians said, 
he will handle three of the most sensitive political roles: chief 
spokesman, top congressional liaison officer and senior strate- 
gist for the party. 

Mr. Coelho, like Mr. Panetta a former representative from 
Califo rnia, has been working quietly but intensively with his 
old colleague for almost a month in an effort to sharpen tbe 
White House message and improve poll resul is. ( N >Tj 


Quota /Unquote 

Senator Bob Kerrey, a Nebraska Democrat, on the failure to 
keep senators fully informed about plans for a $350 million 
headquarters building for a U.S. spy agency: “All the bad guys 
knew about this. It would take a really stupid enemy to miss 
this. The only people who didn't know about it were the 
American people.” (NYT) 


Away From Politics 


• Tbe man accused of murdering a doctor who performed 
abortions and another person has been indicted in Pensacola, 
Florida, on two counts of first-degree murder and one count 
of attempted first-degree murder. If convicted, Paul Hill. 40, 
could face the death sentence. 

• A U-S-jodge said that nearly 300 Chinese i&egal immigrants 

who s wam ash ore from Ihetr strideen freighter in New York in 

June are eligible for political asylum in the United States. 

• An «nwiifcnimt to fWh matTs dty charter that would have 
barred homosexuals from protection under Cincinnati’s hu- 
man rights lawhas been declared unconstitutional. The dty is 
expected to appeal 

• A Florida man was convicted of first-degree murder m the 
hired killing of Iris father. Tbe jury found Harry Glenn 
Newman guilty of hiring a neighbor to shoot his father, Grady 
Stiles, a carnival performer known as the “Lobster Boy.” 

• Time men charged in artoCtekai show horses for insurance 
money have pleaded guilty to mail fraud in Chicago. The 
investigation was sparked by the 1977 disappearance of Helen 
Vertices BracM horse owner and animal lover, who was slam 
be cause she. had .apparently learned of the horse-killing 
s ch eme and threatened to alert authorities. The three who 
entered guilty pleas were: Paul Valliere,43, Johnnie Youngb- 
lood, 32, and Steve Williamson, 51. 

• About 5500 checks worth $1Z* mnEon in relief aid to Us 

Angeles earthquake victims have been returned uncashed, 
mostly by people who didn’t ask lor the money or who were 
reimbursed by insurance companies- In some cases,, checks 
were returned by people who knowingly filed false claims but 
had second thoughts after some applicants were prosecuted 
for fraud, said George Thunc. spokesman fur the Federal 
Emergency Management Agency. ftmren. AP 




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Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 11, 1994 


Vatican’s Abortion Effort Splits Berlusconi Coalition 


The Aaoauied Press 

VATICAN CITY — A Vatican cam- 
paign to forge an anti-abortion alliance 
at a population conference in Cairo next 
month has put pressure on Italy, causing 
new strains in Prime Minister Silvio Ber- 
lusconi's coalition government. 

It has set one cabinet minis ter against 
another and brought demands that the 
government keep its hands off the coun- 
try's abortion law, one of the most liber- 
al in Europe. 

The issue came to a head on Wednes- 
day after the Vatican Radio broadcast 
an interview with Altero Malleoli in 
which the minister for the environment 


in the Berlusconi government called 
abortion a “type of homicide." 

Raffaele Costa, the minister of health, 
responded that he found it unacceptable 
“Unit someone who is exercising a right 
under the law should be called a murder- 
er." 

Italian officials have disclosed that- 
the Cairo conference was an issue dur- 
ing Foreign Minister Antonio Martino's 
talks at the Vatican last month. 

The Vatican has been mounting a 
huge lobbying effort for the United Na- 
tions Conference on Population and De- 
velopment, pressing the international 
community to write in a ; rision in the 


final document that would bar any pro- 
motion of abortion. 

The Vatican is counting on a coalition 
of Roman Catholic and Islamic coun- 
tries to rally to its side. 

Although Italy is overwhelmingly Ro- 
man Catholic, the legislature legalized 
abortion in 1978, permitting abortions 
virtually on demand in the first three 
months of pregnancy in state-run hospi- 
tals. As a concession to the church, doc- 
tors opposed to abortion can dedare 
themselves conscientious objectors and 
refuse to perform them. 

Mr. Matteoli, one of five cabinet min- 
isters from the neofascist National Alli- 


ance, said Italian policy in Cairo has not 
yet been decided but he believed that it 
would be close to his personal views. He 
is a member of the delegation. 

The head of the delegation, Antonio 
Guidi, minister of the family from Mr. 
Berlusconi’s Fozz a Italia movement, ap- 
peared sympathetic to the Vatican posi- 
tion. 

In an interview Wednesday in Cor- 
riere ddla Sera, Mr. Guidi said it was 
too early to spell out Italy’s stance at 
Cairo but “one point is already dean 
life, in whatever phase of its existence, is 
in itself richness.” 


Ancient Hoard 
In the Kremlin 

Ratios 

MOSCOW — Soldiers 
digging in the Kremlin 
foundations have stumbled 
on a cache of old silver 
coins. 

The head of archaeology 
for the Kremlin's museums, 
Tatyana Panova, said 
Wednesday that the coins. 
3,426 silver Russian ko- 
pecks and one Polish coin, 
were presumably buried in 
October 1612. 




BOOKS 


EUROPEAN 

TOPICS 

The Dutch fight Back 

In Tomato Battles 

Hothouse tomatoes from 
the Netherlands have gotten a 
bad name in some parts, and 
i (he Dutch are fighting mad 
J about it 

In Germany, the growing 
reputation of the Dutch fruit 
as being hard, watery and 
tasteless led to a 17 percent 
drop in purchases last year. 
Buyers have been turning to 


imports from Spain or Greece, 
more frequently vine-ripened. 

The Dutch say that if Ger- 
mans have a poor idea of their 
products, it is because retailers 
m Germany sometimes misla- 
bel good tomatoes from the 
Netherlands as German- 

grown 

To make their point Dutch 
growers staged a nationally 
televised taste test. Blindfold- 
ed consumers said the most 
succulent tomato was the Cap- 
ita, a Dutch variety, followed 
by Bon Appetit also from the 
Netherlands. A Spanish toma- 
to was third, followed by a 
genetically engineered French 
variety. 


Around Europe 

The special privileges of the 
Communist elite were one of 
the more entrenched — and 
resented — features of the old 
government in Bulgaria. Little 
has changed. Government 


low prices were a perquisite of 
the hard job of governing. But 
few in Bulgaria, where the dai- 
ly fare is economic crisis, 
agree. In a recent survey, 69 
percent called the special rates 
“unacceptable.” 

The Italian government has 


meat will decide next month. 

Liverpool politicians have 
rallied around the woman who 

is to be the next lord mayor 
after reports that she has a 
somewhat checkered past Pe- 
trona Lashley, S3, now the 
city’s deputy lord mayor, is 


ity of which happened 20 yearn 
ago” 

A small town in northern 
Sweden has deformed the Arc- 
tic Circle to attract tourists, 
according to the daily Dagens 
Nyheter. Travelers passing 
through Niskanpacae receive 


WHEN CHINA RULED 
THE SEAS: Tie Treasure 
Fleet of tie Dragon 
Tlrone, 1405-1433 
By Louise Loathes. 252 pages. 
S23. Simon & Schuster. 

Reviewed by 
Arthur- Waldron 

B etween 1405 and 1433 ' 

seven Ming dynasty naval 
f to t ffl a s , most under the cam'' 
rremd of Admiral Zheng He, a 
ffliniidi of Muslim origin, made 
voyages of trade and conquest 
to Southeast Aria and. die Indi- 
an Ocean, as far as the African 
coast. These voyages must be 
coanted among the great 
achievements — and enigmas 
—of the ChinesepasL 

Nothing l»tce Zheng's “trea- 
sure fleet” had been seen be- 
fore, anywhere: Its eight-mast- 
ed ships would have dwarfed 
the puny vessels with which die 


portions: of total numbers of 
Shis of all nations and relative 
dimensions of trade flows, as 
well as a sense of the degree to 
which periodic Ming interven- 
tions in Southeast Asian poll - 1 
ties made modi enduring dif- \ 
ference — none of which is ; 
systematically provided.) 
Judged against such rnforma- : 
tkw, Zheng’s voyages may ap-i 
pear less important than the; 


SunBariy, one may ask just , 
hw much the Zheng story can j 
tefl us about the main patterns j 
of Chinese histtxy. Zheng, after i 
all, was not a Chinese but a ■ 
Muslim of Mongol-Arab origin, • 

and the early Ming dynasty was, 

in many respects a continuation < 
of die p reading Mongol Yuan | 
dynasty. „ . „ ; 

About the cultural influences . 
that TTimg other seafarers • 

from China carried far over- ' 
yiw t however, Levatbes is ex- • 
tremely interesting. She ex- ' 
p lores ancient links with the ' 


Bloomberg 

RHCTimccc M P W S 


Reporters and Editors 

Bloomberg Business News, a 24-hour global news sendee, seeks reporters for 
bureaus in Europe, Asia and the Americas. 

Experienced newspaper and news agency desk editors are also sought for 
BBNTS London bureau. 

BBNTs strategy is to marry rhe highest quality journalism to cutring-edge 
forms of news distribution. In addition to written stories, BBN reporters also 
contribute to Bloomberg’s radio station, television programmes and business 
magazines. 

Qualified reporter and editor applicants will have three to five years 
experience in business journalism at a top newspaper or news service. Recenr 
college graduates will in some cases be hired for the reporting jobs. 

Reporters are sought for: 

* STOCKHOLM and COPENHAGEN - To cover company and market news 
in Sweden, Denmark, Norway and Finland. Fluency in Swedish and Danish is 
preferred but not required. 

* FRANKFURT - To cover German economy (experience required), 
companies and markets. Some knowledge of German is required. 

* LONDON - To cover the U.K. economy, company and market news. 

* ZURICH - To cover financial markets and companies in Switzerland. 

German fluency is required. 

* VIENNA - To cover financial markets and companies. 

* MOSCOW - An experienced, Russian speaking reporter to open bureau. 

* WARSAW - An experienced, Polish speaking reporter to open bureau. 

* DUBAI - A fluent Arab speaking reporter to cover business and financial 
news in the Gulf States. 

* TOKYO, SINGAPORE, JAKARTA and BOMBAY - To cover the markets, 
companies and economies of these countries. 

* CLE VELAND and CHICAGO - To cover companies and general business 
news in the regions. 

Interested applicants should send or fax resumes and any clips to 
The Freshman Consultancy in London, quoting reference IHT/4. 



m 


V: 


Consistent with a worldwide matrix organization, the poatnn 
will be based in Tokyo and wffl report to the VP/Managing 
Director in Tokyo and to the business unit VP in our office 
located in Willow Grove, Pennsylvania. 

The ideal candictae wiS have an undergraduate degree in 
Electrical or Mechanical Engineering and an MBA. We seek 
someone with 10+ years' experience in the semiconductor 
equipment industry with at least 3-5 of those years in Japan 
with a U.5. company or a U.S./Japan joint venture 
company. An affinity for king and working in Japan as wd 
as fluency in English and Japanese are required. 

Kulicke & Soffa Industries Inc offers a compensation and 
benefits package based on conpetitiire Japanes remunera- 
tion practices, and will reimburse relocation expenses to 
Japan. Qualified individuals should send their resume to: 
KULICKE & SOFFA INDUSTRIES. INC, Attn: Human 
Resources, Dept. MD-IH, 2101 Blair Mill Road, Willow 
Grove, PA 19Q90. We are an equal opportunity employer, 
M/F/D/V. 


Kulicke & Soffa 
Industries Inc 



The Freshman Consultancy, Coppeigate House, 16 Brune Street, London El 7NJ, U.K. 
Telephone: (44) 71-721 7361 Facsimile: (44) 71-721 7362 


i 

J 


i 


in A Milord, Exceptional 

The language 




I nfo Soft International. Inc. develops software products that help 
people enhance the quality of their written communication and 
use information and ideas more effectively. We specialize in the 
fields of computational linguistics, language-focused software 
engineering, and information-based technology. 

0 European Sales Manager 

You wd p fey a taw role in idenofyng. negotiating and ettung new and caning 
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mpiement safes arateges and account plans wtvft leal 10 new sates and 
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The e an e*os*ent opportunity for on individual vwh good knowledge of the 
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preferably n etecirtxvzk. software v office automation, succesfjl att^nmeit of 
annual sales quotas, exper er»:e n naaoandv seong. ac court planning and 
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other Europe.* 1 laiguage. 

We reward success with an exceflerr-xiripercation package 
ncftjcJng a compennw case salary and ereefcnt DeneJic. 

To apply, please send a resume aid cover 
tetter «k Manager. Human Resource*, 

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Street Boston. MA 02 11 6. USA FAX fn CjiH 

(617) 351-1 1 15. An Equal importunity 

BT **' !rS INTERNATIONAL 



Located in Now York is tnyittng 
applications tor 



The United Nations Secretariat Is 
seeking Senior Procurement 
Managers wirh extensive 
experience or the commecdd and 
International level In the 
negotiation and admin (station of 
complex procurement activities 
and connects (including 
peacekeeping operations) n the 
vote me of a pproxi m ately US S500 
Million per annum. Incumbent w* 
be managing a service or section 
of approximately 15 ra 30 
profeacnat procurement offlceis. 

Education: Advanced university 
degree in business/public 
administration. economics, 
commerce, law. or equivalent. 
Computer skills highly desirable 
16 ro 22 years of professional 
experience. FuS command of the 
English language essential: wottana 
knowledge of other UN official 
languages desirable. 

Remuneration: Depending on 
background ond experience, 
annual net solary ranges from US 
571.744 ro US S 79.940 (without 


UNITED NATIONS NATIONS IMES 

^ Jr 


UNITED NATIONS OFFICE IN NEW YORK 

DEPUTY CHIEF(P-5) 
SECURITY AND SAFETY SERVICE 

NEW YORK, NEW YORK 

The Office of Conference and Support Services has an opening for the 
position of Deputy Chief, Security and Safety Service, reporting to the 
Chief. Under the guidance of the Chief, incumbent tfireds and supervis- 
es the security and safety operation at New York Headquarters; Initiates 
and reviews operational plans for normal situations, special meeting 
events and anomalous circumstances dictated by international 
occurrences; develops and implements training programmes including 
the computerization of the Service; fiaferewSh the host country on secu- 
rity matters; participates In tong-term planning and in the recruitment of 
staff; supervises approximately 200 staff members and is Officer-in- 
Charge in the absence of (he Chief; plans and directs security 
arrangements at overseas duty stations and provides advice on the 
development of security and safety standards for aS duty stations. 
Requirements: Advanced university degree in criminal justice or 
equivalent in professional training and/or experience. Sixteen years of 
professional experience in the managerial aspects of Security Service 
which indudes at least 8 years In the field of law enforcement (dvflian or 
military police service). Experience as a senior officer (n the security, 
police or military police. Experience in an international setting is an 
advantage to maintain appropriate contacts with law enforcement 
agencies of dfiferent nationalities. Knowledge of computer programming. 
LAN and UNACS usefuL 
Qualified women are encouraged to apply. 

Remuneration: departing on professional background and experience, 
annual net salary from US$71 ,744 with dependents to US$77,409 with 
dependents, plus corresponding entittemants. Closing date for receipt of 
applications: 12 September, 1994. Applications with full curriculum vitae, 
bTckxSng salary history, birth date and nationality, should be sent to: 

Ur. Adnan T. Issa, Office of Human Resources Management, 
Room S-2500, United Nations, P.0. Box 20, New York, NY 10017, 
USA. Fax: (2T2) 963-3134. 


. Stewart Morgan, London- _ a 
“based art critic. and beadier, is - * 
reading “Dance Writing s" by 
_ Edwin Denby. 

“Den by describes what it is 
like to see people dancing in fife 
as wdl as in ballet halls, and how 
Americans walk vs. Europeans 
in the streets of New Yost 
Americans have a large territory 
around them vs. Europeans who 
view that as setf-aggrandizc- 
ment" (Erik Ipsen, IHT) 


BRIDGE 



ip a oc& z t d 'm ste end aim raktad 
prodotil -with at lacs! fiva yen cm* 
rianoa of world tied trade. Rwncy n 
Engfcn is nqaa«t Eo« European lory 
wages ap pr eod ta d. Kasdanca m 
Geneve with feoguect tnmatng. 

_ Placse send icwne to 
Gpfear 1 Ml 5335. PiUo*^ 
ewe paftfc 6*5, IZl 1 Geneva 3. 


SPEAK I GROW MCH 
Jan n amniqg Seff Bn p oiearwia ui 
seaDcs oomi u B K & earn JIOOK oom- 
am soa . Mwtagan & Rnood Drawn 
needed, ettn m to S30K Ems* treuS. 
Yau.iautf be an oikufcfe rm kte Wrfi 
a tvsSory ai etrwvHOH par mar. 
TaOT2-3KJ-550Q TjSA 

ETAUCLET 14 19W 


By Alan Truscott 

T HE Von Zedwitz team is 
led by Claire Toreay of 
Manhattan and includes 

< rfJS4anhali^ Tom 
Snnth of Greoiwidbk, Connecti- 
cut, arid Gene Saxe of Stam- 
ford, Connecticut. In the first 
stage of the final they won by 45 
imps against a hitherto unde- 
feated group consistrng of Jexry 
Goldberg of Yonkers; Bob 
Jaffa of Long Island City, and 
Jane DSteabeig, Jeff Rothstrin 
and Nancy Kalow, aB of Man- 
hattan. 

On the diagramed deal both 
teams fad briskly to three no- 
trump and West led the heart 
king. In each case West contin- 
ued wilh a low hearty and dum- 
my won with the qoeen. 

One declarer now took anim- 
mediate diamond fing s g and 
went down to quick defeat In 
the replay, Tomay did better 
with the South cards. He began 


of chibs m the hope that that 
smt would fnmisn Ins ninth 
.trick. It did -not, but he never- 
theless continued with the 


Judging the position correctly,* 
he cashed three spade winners; 
and led a heart. West was able 
to take three heart tricks, but 
bad to lead from the diamond* 
king at the fimsluTbe contract, 
succeeded, and the Tomay i 
team rained imps. Notice that, 
both west players erred at the 
second trick: if they had played 
tiro heart ace and a third round 
the contract would have been 
doomed, for there would have 
been no possibility of a throw- 
in. 


NORTH 

* R10 
OQ95 . 

0 J 1062 

♦ KQ85 

EAST 

AJ832 

7B3 

675 

+ J1Q642 
SOUTH (D) 

4 AQ6 
107 6 
O AQ94 

• A 9 7 


WEST 

♦ 9743 

^ AKJ42 

♦ KS3 

*7 


Both sides were vulnerable. The 
bidding: 

South West North East 

1 N.T. Pass 3 N.T. Pass 

Pass Pass- 



amend eight and a spade. West ted the heart ung. 


n “*"*™'* WHta. 

UVING IN THE U.S.? 
Now Printed in 
NewDrk 
For Same Day 
Delivery in Key Cfhes 

TO SUBSCRIBE, CALL 

1-800-882 2884 

(IN NEW YORK, CALL 212-752-3890) 















INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 11, 1994 


Page 5 




dfjji 


Cj * 1 1 Ca 




?* 


i 


In Arafat Meeting, Rabin Tries to Make Amends 


By Joe! Greenberg ' ^ : 

New York Times Service 

BRBZ CROSSING, Gaza Strip. — In an attempt 
to allay Palestinian concerns ova- ‘Israel's rap- 
prochement with Jordan, -Prime Minis ter Yitzhak 
Rabin met Wednesday with the Palestine Liberation 
Organization chairman, Yasser Arafat, and an- 
nounced accelerated talks to expand .Palestinian 
self-rule and bold elections in tbe West Bani and 
Gaza Strip. y • 

In a rare joint news conference after their 90- 
mmuie meeting at an Israeli military ba$e on the 
northern edge of the Gaza Strip, both leaders- tried 

Innmiivt o omn, >u.,^ i. j 


pledging to push ahead with their self-rule accord. 

israeh-PLO relations have been' strained since Mr. 
Rabin and Jordan's' King Hussein signed a dedara- 


ritm in Washington on July 25 that recognized 
Jordan’s role as the custodian of Muslim shrines in 
Jerusalem. 

Mr. Arafat, who claims Jerusalem as the capital of 
n future Palestinian state, had charged that the 
declaration violated his accord with Israel, which 
defers talks on Jerusalem to negotiations on a per- 
manent settlement- 

“"Definitely we have some differences,*’ Mr. Ara- 
fat said as Mr. Rabin stood by his side. “At the same 
' time, we have agreed to minimize all these differ- 
ences between both of us, starting from the question 
of Jerusalem, early empowerment, to the financing, 
to the donors and donations.'’ 

■ “Early empowerment" is a term for the transfer of 
authority to Palestinians in the "West Bank in five 


areas; education and culture, health, social welfare, 
tourism and taxation. The areas now are adminis- 
tered by the Israeli military government. 

Mr. Rabin announced that talks on the handover 
and on elections would be held next week at the Erez 
crossing. Followed by a meeting of a liaison commit- 
tee and, if necessary, another meeting with Mr. 
Arafat later this month. An Israeli official said the 
talks were intended to complete an accord on the 
transfer of authority. 

Next week, Mr. Rabin added. Israel would open 
to Palestinians four “safe passage" routes between 
the Gaza Strip and Jericho, the other area of Pales- 
tinian self-rule. Mr. Arafat had complained that the 
delay in opening the routes, which pass through 
Israel, had isolated him in Gaza. 


Jordan Braces, Happily, for an Invasion of Tourists 


. By Chris Hedges - \i- 

New York Tima. Serna: 

ARAVA CROSSING, Jordan — As the first 
sunburned visitors straggled toward his small trailer, 
lugging bulky backpacks and vinyl bags, the Jorda- 
nian border official placed a stack of free postcaids. 
on the shelf in front of hfm He also set oulva neat, 
collection of maps of Aqaba. 

“Here they come,” said the official,. Nidal Ali 
Mohammed. “1 hope my En glish will be O JC It is 
much better to be invaded by tourists than soldiers.” 

On Tuesday morhrng, in one of the tiny -moves 
that presage a new Middle East, Jo rdanian officials, 
for the first time in 46 years, innate*! that visitors 
coming from. Israel through the new Arava border . 
post have the green Hebrew exit stamp in their 
passports. 

It was a triumph of reality over illusion oh the first 
day of this border crossing connecting Jordan and 
Israel. 

Before Tuesday, anyone with an Israeli stamp in 
his passport who tried to enter Jordan was refused 
ad m i t tance. Some travelers used a second passport 
that did not have Israeli sti&nps. And those with only 
one passport were issued their entry and exit stamps 
by the Israelis cm special forms, which could oc 
discarded or hidden. 


But til these ruses were swept aside, like a great 
gust of fresh air, at this dusty, sweltering little strip 
of asphalt. Tourists, some oblivious to the twists and 
turns of history, others in awe of them, stood in line 
outside the whitewashed Israeli caravans, received 
•their Israeli exit stamps and walked a few hundred 
yards into Jordan. Altogether, about 70 people 
crossed from Israel into Jordan and 40 from Jordan 
into Israel on Tuesday. 

“Tins is major history and we want to be pan of 
it,” said Rodney Fund, who was visiting Israel from 
Miami with his sister Melody. 

Dozens of Israelis and Jo rdanians came to the " 
crossing to peer through the cyclone fencing and 
take pictures, but at the present time they cannot 
cross. And those who tried to use passports from 
other countries were stopped when their names were 
punched into commuters and they were shown to 
have dual citizenship. 

Lilly Cohen, who was bom in Israel and now lives 
in Denmark, stood with her husband, Michael, un- 
der a tin roof that protected visitors from the glare of 
the sun on the Israeli side. She had tried to get into 
Jordan on her Danish passport but had been refused 
entry. 

“As soon as I knew tbe border was open 1 came 
down,” she said. “I think of all theyears we have had 


war. This is a victory for the Jewish people. No one 
believed 10 years ago that we would ever have 
peace." 

Merchants on both sides moved in to reap the 
benefits. 

Michael Mosterd and Eva Daalder. who were 
vacationing from Amsterdam in Aqaba, just two 
miles from the border mossing, carried a bag of 
leaflets into Israel from the Petra International Ho- 
tel. They had promised the owner they would dis- 
tribute them on the streets of the Israel! resort town 
of Eilat, along with cards from the Captain’s Restau- 
rant. 

Paul Roberts, a British construction worker who 
has lived in Aqaba for two years and never visited 
Eilat, went into Israel and bought a bag of crois- 
sants . His friend, Francois Haese, bought several 
cans of Slim Fast 

“Well come over now to shop." Mr. Roberts said. 

The border crossing, which was built in the past 
four days, is open from 8 A.M. to 2 P.M. It is 
straddled by a mine field. The Israelis and Jordani- 
ans have white caravans set up on either side of the 
crossing and tourists must walk across a noman V 
land. Only vehicles with license plates from outside 
the Middle East can travel between the two coun- 
tries. 


High Hopes for a Cancer Drug 


Reuters 

LONDON — Scientists from 
the British charity Cancer Re- 
search Campaign said Wednes- 
day they had high hopes for a 
new anti-cancer drug, which 
they believe has the potential to 
treat lung cancer. 

The charity’s technology 
transfer arm. Cancer Research 
Campaign Technology, has 
signed a deal with tbe British 
biotechnology firm Xenova 
Group Pic. to develop the drug, 
DACA. 

“This drug may work where 


conventional chemotherapy 
fails, particularly in tumors fike 
King cancer where drag resis- 
tance builds up,** said Dr. Da- 
vid Secher, director of the chari- 
ty’s drug development program. 

In laboratory testa, low doses 
of the drug overcame two major 
types of resistance in various 
tumors, including advanced co- 
lon and skin cancers, the orga- 
nization said. 

Researchers believe the drug 
ootid be a boon for patients 
whose tumors have failed to re- 
spond to conventional drugs. 

Initial dimcal trials of the. 


drug started in Cambridge, 
England, last month. If success- 
ful, larger trials will take place 
next year, although the drug is 
not expected to reach the mar- 
ket before the end of the de- 
cade. 

The compound was discov- 
ered at the Auckland Cancer 
Society in New Zealand before 
being banded on to the British 
chanty for further investiga- 
tion. Under the deal with Xen- 
ova, the company receives 
worldwide commercial rights in 
exchange for payments of up to 
£1.7 mufion ($2.6 iraHi cm). 


Gene Splices for AIDS Babies 


The Associated Press ■ ■ 

YOKOHAMA, Japan— The 
youngest victims of AIDS will 
be among tbe first to receive its 
most dramatic new treatment, 
genetic manipulation to arm 
blood cells with a virus-killing 
protein, researchers' said 
Wednesday. 

The fact that scientists would 
even consider tinkering with the 
genetic makeup of newborns 
was seen by those attending tbe 
10th International Conference 
on AIDS as a sign of their frus- 
tration, even desperation, in 
findings therapies that work. 

HIV, the AIDS virus, has 
proved to be an amazingly wily 
enemy, able to change itself 
quickly. Despite years of work, 
no one has come up with an 
effective virus-killing medicine 
or vaccine. 

So scientists at the Japan 
conference have laid out strate- 


Wllliam Paul, head of the 
U.S. Office of AIDS Research, 
identified gene therapy as a 
promising area deserving feder- 
Tbese genes would combat the al support. He noted the "great 
virus by producing substances enthusiasm about the potential 
to disrupt >ts internal workings, of gene therapy to limit the ca- 


gies for gene therapy, their lat- 
est idea. These mostly involve 
inserting protective genes into 
the blood ceBs that HlV infects. 


HTV Mis by taking over a 
variety of critical white cells 
called helper cells. It turns them 
into virus factories and then de- 
stroys them. 

In one therapy, ceDs would 
get a poison gene that switches 
on only if the cells get infected, 
making them self-destruct be- 
fore they do more harm. 

Another therapy is to outfit 
closely related blood cells, 
called suppressor cells, with 
genes so they will make Lhe pro- 
tons that are- ordinarily pro- 
duced by helper cells. Tms way, 
the suppressor cells will at least 
partially take over the duties of 
their AIDS-stricken cousins. 



parity of cells to support the 
growth of the virus.” 

Among the approaches that 
appears to be closest to use is 
one for newborns developed by 
Flossie Woog-Staal and col- 
leagues at the University of Cal- 
ifornia at San Diego. It involves 
inserting into cells a gene from 
a virus found in tobacco plants 
that destroys the RNA — the 
material that controls cellular m * TWTA TAX 

TAIWAN: Upgraded Ties Planned 

She said she hoped to test the 


Jw Travrr/ Rnans 

ROCK CUMBERS — Workmen setting up the scaf- 
folding of a stage Wednesday at die site of the Wood- 
stock 25th anniversary concert, which begins Friday. 


approach within a year. The 
National Institutes of Health 
and the Food and Drug Admin- 
istration must approve it, 


Cootioaed from Page l 
year, double the amount im- 


ported by China. 

In a "while paper" in July, 
Taiwan's leadership called on 
Beijing “to face up to the fact 

BOMB: Iran Envoys Linked to Attack in Buenos Aires 

tack here, caDed the Oaleano “ents." Beijing considers Tai- 


CaitiBned from Pbge I 

worst terrorist act against Jews 
since the Holocaust, killed 
about 90 people and wounded 
more than 200. 

Although Judge Galeano’s 
report was widely hailed here, 
tbe wholesale reliance cm an in- 
formation from one source, 
whose background is still 
cloudy immediately raised a 


host of legal questions. For ex- 
ample, it is unclear whether the 
former Iranian diplomat, iden- 
tified as Manuchehr Motamer, 
will testify in judicial proceed- 
ings needed to advance the case 
or whether his information goes 
beyond the circumstantial evi- 
dence included in Judge Ga- 
leano’s report. 

On Wednesday Iran, which 
has denied any role in the at- 


accusations unfounded. 

News agencies reported: 

In addition to the four Irani- 
ans, three Argentine citizens, 
identified as Carlos Alberto 
TeUedin, Marcelo Fabian Jouce 
and Ariel Nitzcaner, are being 
sought for the “unlawful re- 
placement of the motor" of the 
vehicle that -the police believe 
was used in the bombing. 

(Reuten, AFP, AP) 


wan a renegade province and 
has never renounced the use of 
force if Taiwan's burgeoning in- 
dependence movement were to 
come to power and declare In- 
dependence. 

“Prior to unification,” the 
white paper states, “these two 
parts of China should have the 
right to participate alongside 
each other in the international 
community," including rep re- 


NET: Cornjmter Experts Scale Down Estimates of Number of Active Users 


entry for perhaps 10 

many as 1 million or more of those Inter- 
net ions, and the tnfflions of people who 
use than, may be walled off to much of the 
Dotential incoming traffic on the internet, 
M S in part iS response .to mounting 
concern over computer secunty- . 

If Mr. Quarterman s analysis is correct, 
his calculations furt her Mu r the ^cady 
notion that electronic culture and 


ered de rigueur for business cards today, 
and even the White House is “on the net.” 

The Internet is popular, all right. But is 
it a less dynamic force than we have all 
been led to believe? 

To be sure, there are those who contend 
that even the estimates of 20 million to 30 
million Internet users are too low, if one 
counts the users of smaller public and 
private computer networks, like America 
Online and Prodigy, that are linked to the 
Internet mainly to exchange electronic 
mail 


works and the Internet, allow network 
traffic to go out but block outside traffic 
from coming in. 

Mike Schwartz, an associate professor 
of computer science at the University of 
Colorado at Boulder, said a 1 992 survey of 
the Interact found that an estimated 35 
percent of all Interact computers were bar- 
ricaded behind firewalls. 

“If you start looking at Internet services 
that require interactivity, things like billing 
or accounting across the net, there might 


sentation in the United Nations 
and regional organizations. 
“Only when we set aside the 
sovereignty dispute will we un- 
tangle the knots that have 
bound us Tor the past 40 years 
or more and progress smoothly 
toward unification.” 

One of the most visible as- 
pects of the policy chaoge will 
be a name change for Taiwan’s 
offices in the United States; the 
current title. Coordination 
Council for North American 
Affairs, lacks any geographic 
reference to Taiwan. Taiwan of- 
ficials in Washington expect 
Mr. Clinton to select a new 
name, possibly Representative 
Office of Taiwan. 

Under the new policy, the 
Pentagon will be free to contin- 
ue aid to Taiwan’s militaiy 
without consultation with Bei- 
jing. It is not clear how this will 
be reconciled with an accord 
signed by Washington and Bei- 
jing in August 1982 that stipu- 
lates annual reductions in mili- 
tary assistance to Taiwan. 

The biggest violation of the 
agreement on military sales was 
in 1992 when President George 
Bush agreed to sell 150 F-}6 
fighters to Taiwan for $5.9 bil- 
lion. 





-Sww 

Rrfiqur Ribmjn, Rnv.r. 


The secret departure of Tasfima Nasrin, the Bangladeshi 
writer accused of insulting Islam, outraged militants. 


AUTHOR: 

Nasrin in Sweden 

Contianed from Page I 
for a coalition of 1 3 fundamen- 
talist groups. 

Hundreds of thousands of 
Bangladeshis, angered by what 
they consider Dr. Nasrin’s of- 
fense to Islam, have marched in 
Dhaka in recent weeks. 

She is charged by a Banglade- 
shi court with offending the re- 
ligious sentiments of Muslims, 
a crime that carries a maximum 
penalty of two years in prison. 

She" surrendered Aug. 3 and 
was granted bail. She was told 
she could visit other countries if 
she informed the judge. No trial 
date has been set. 

“She was free to go anywhere 
she liked and that’s what she 
did.” said the Bangladeshi 
home secretary. Azimuddin 
Ahmed. 

Dr. Nasrin, traveling on a 
tourist visa, arrived in Stock- 
holm around midday. 

Dr. Nasrin, a physician, an- 
gered Muslim activists last year 
with a novel, “Shame." that de- 
picted Muslim persecution of 
Bangladesh's Hindu minority. 


Jakarta Bears Down on Press 

Reports of Government Friction Alarm Regime 


By William Branigin 

Washington Post Senior 

JAKARTA — After a brief fling with limited 
political “openness, ” the Indonesian government 
is cracking down on local press coverage of 
sensitive issues, drawing sharp criticism from the 
country's growing middle class, human rights 
groups and the United Slates. 

The closure of three popular, privately owned 
newsweeklies by Indonesia's Information Minis- 
try in June triggered demonstrations that were 
broken up by riot police and soldiers. The arrest 
of 42 hunger-striking students last month 
prompted a strong public objection by the U.S. 
Embassy here. 

The protests resumed last Thursday when 
about 100 journalists demonstrated against the 
ban on the weeklies. 

Now the government is threatening to take 
action against several other leading publications 
for reporting on the crackdown, related demon- 
strations and recent unrest in the disputed Indo- 
nesian-ruled territory of East Timor. Among 
those warned were the Kompas daily, the Eng- 
lish-language Jakarta Post and a magazine on 
legal and social issues. Forum Keadilan. media 
sources said. 

In East Timor, a van belonging to a local 
newspaper was blown up July 23 in -an incident 
editors suspect was related to the paper’s cover- 
age of protests against Indonesian rule. Authori- 
ties denied responsibility. 

The closure of the weeklies followed their 
coverage of controversial stories, including Indo- 
nesia’s purchase of a fleet of former East Ger- 
man warships, labor strife and a major banking 
scandal that implicated senior officials. But it 
also appeared to reflect increasing touchiness 
about repons of dissension within the govern- 


ment of President Suharto, diplomats and jour- 
nalists said. 

Friction within the government is an especial- 
ly sensitive subject now because of the unre- 
solved issue of succession. 

Mr. Suhano, 73, a former army general who 
came to power in 1 966 and formally assumed the 
presidency two years later, is in his sixth five- 
year presidential term after unopposed elections 
in a rubber-stamp assembly. He has indicated 
that he may step down when his current terra 
expires in 1998, and it is unclear who might 
succeed him. 

The question has created uncertainty about 
the political stability of an authoritarian system 
that has presided over heady economic growth 
and attracted $28 billion in foreign investment 
since 1991 

The press crackdown began when the Infor- 
mation Ministry announced June 21 that it had 
revoked the publishing licenses of Tempo. Indo- 
nesia's biggest and most prestigious newsmaga- 
zine, and two other weeklies, Editor and a popu- 
lar investigative tabloid called DeTik. The 
government charged that the publications had 
violated the “Code of Ethics of Indonesian Jour- 
nalism," which bars publication of anything 
deemed harmful to the nation, social harmony, 
religion or common decency. 

The closures effectively’ ended the govern- 
ment’s year-old experiment with •’openness." a 
policy that appealed to Indonesia’s growing mid- 
dle class and was reflected chiefly in a less 
fettered press. 

“It looks as though press freedom in Indonesia 
is still a matter of personal whim," said Sidney 
Jones, (he director of Human Rights Watch/ A- 
ria. “None of these publications threatened na- 
tional security. They offended the politically 
powerful.” 


RATES: Greenspan Signals That a Raise k Imminent 


Continued from Page l 
since the dollar is the principal 
reserve currency and is em- 
ployed by a very substantial 
part of the world as sources of 
liquidity, it’s crucially impor- 
tant that lhe dollar be a strong 
and a viable currency.” 

Returns on dollar securities 
therefore have to be high 
enough to attract investors, he 
said. “Essentially it is the pur- 
pose of every central bank to 
ensure the stability of the cur- 
rency, and we think that is in 
fact the primary goal of the 
Federal Reserve.’’ 

Mr. Greenspan's remarks fol- 
lowed a series of strong eco- 
nomic indicators, but none 
more persistent than a steady 
half-year of job creation at an 
average of 325,000 new jobs a 
month. Mr. Greenspan himself 
has privately expressed concern 
that this is purling upward pres- 
sure on labor markets and raw 
materials prices, and while in- 
flation is not a problem yet. 
these pressures could prove a 
harbinger. Capacity constraints 
have already shown up in the 
automobile industry, which has 
benefited more than any indus- 
try except housing from the 
Fcai’s low rates. 

Three times in the past five 
days, Robert Parry, president of 
the San Francisco Federal Re- 
serve and the most outspoken 
inflation hawk on the Open 
Market Committee, has said 
that the economy has emerged 
from the recession in the past 18 
months “within range of the 
levels that most economists 
consider full utilization and ca- 
pacity.” 

In Toky o, Alan Blinder, Pres- 
ident Bill Clinton's new appoin- 
tee as vice chairman of the Fed. 


told the Nihon Keizai Shimbun 
that although there were no 
oven signs of inflation, the cur- 
rent growth rale of around 3.5 
percent was “too high and un- 
sustainable.” 

Robert DiCleraente. chief 
Fed watcher for Salomon 
Brothers Inc., said, “They all 
seem to be studying the same 


He forecast a rate in- 
of a half percentage 


scnpi. 
crease 
point 

David Jones, of Aubrey Lan- 
ston & Co., said he also expect- 
ed a 50 basis point rise next 
week so the Fed could get out of 
the way of the Congressional 
election campaign that ends 
Nov. 8. 


vague nouon But sue h links do not allow users to connect w pwpic, uc suu. u niure .uu 

commerce are just significant feu- more tameto^ erect one-way bamers. 

fttSSSSS- S3 S Internet, inetading impressive can use ate 

the myth 1“ “iSfS SenSne on the ones for conducting electronic commerce 
that will eventually uok every ^ ^ network, downloading video and 


or accounting across me net, mere tnigni -fWTTr TAT/*! nr * 1 n i 

be nicer ways todoit if yon could directly Kl j lJIV W: A buW HI the tOCB 
connect to people, he said. If more and T 


more limited.’ 

Also, Internet surveyors agree, there is 


Continued from Page 1 of the death of Hiller’s deputy, 
group that encouraged anti- Rudolf Hess, a state govern- 


"Coates that there are more than 20 ^ ™mp1ex infer- TcS 

^.!E^!W&*3S3Si "'Mainly, though, lhe disagnxmentis not 


Semitism and racism. ment minister said on Wednes- 

The judges said Mr. Deckert day, Reuters reported from 
was not an anti-Semite in the Bonn. 

racist Nazi sense, but a nation- Herbert Schnoor, interior 

SasSsSSas £* SaraiS ssr.MfSWs 

pung of computers on the network, typi- 
cally fewer than 30 percent respond. 

Despite his deflationary data, Mr. Quar- 
terman still predicts that the Internet will 
eventually achieve and surpass the size 
now widely credited to it But the future is 
not here yet, he says. 


roty^of the ^iion administration's pro- 
posed information superhighway- 


nHUUICiOilVU ui — 1 — -y 

■nesses and policymakers who are planning 
for a digital future where the Internet com- 
prises ***** of minions of interactive users 


Companies seeki ng to tap ava« sending and receiving all sorts of 

SMT&e riscof'firewalls,"’ or «- 

llltviu.. .. „ nmifimnt SSS&. 


A n Firewalls, which are secure computers 
in every U-S. erfy cA sgo ffican . , between an organization's internal net- 
iwibmiS electronic mail address « consid- DClwcm 


to make on Germany 50 years police and state and federal 
after World War II. governments about a week ago. 

M Rightist Rallies Curbed “There will not be a rally 
The German police are coor- anywhere in Germany," Mr. 
di nating action to prevent far- Schnoor told Goman radio, 
right extremist rallies planned “The brown ghost will not 
this weekend on the anniversary march through Germany.” 


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Page6 


THURSDAY, AUGUST 11, 1994 

opinion 


Hcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


The Crisis in Nigeria 


tribune Hurry to Prevent a Cambodian Epilogue in Rwanda 

THE WASHINGTON PORT » ^ C 


Oil and Democracy 

Strikes and protests in Nigeria's cities 
are a warning to its military rulers that 
the country’s allegiance to democracy re- 
mains strong. They are evidence that a 
rising number of Nigeria's people consid- 
er their present government to be illegit- 
imate. The generals annulled the elec- 
tion a year ago. and when, after many 
months, the apparent winner declared 
himself president, the generals threw 
him into prison on a charge of treason. 
One effect of this action is to remind the 
rest of the world that they have repeat- 
edly broken their promises to return 
Nigeria to elected civilian rule. 

The strikes in the oil industry have 
begun to raise the price of gasoline in the 
United States, but that is the least of it. If 
the price goes up a few pennies a gallon, 
it's Tor a good cause. The larger and more 
important issue is the effect that oil has 
had on Africa's most populous country. 

For the past two decades Nigeria, one 
of the world's biggest oil exporters, has 
experienced great political instability, 
spectacular corruption and, despite the 
oil revenues, deepening poverty. In that 
respect, Nigeria is hardly alone. When oil 
prices first shot up in the early 1970s, it 
seemed an extraordinary opportunity for 

Increase the Pressure 

Nigeria's military rulers have backed 
themselves into a box. They thought it a 
good idea to jail Moshood K. O. Abiola, 
the presumed winner of Nigeria’s can- 
celed presidential vote in June 1993, 
when he claimed the office two months 
ago. Mr. Abiola was charged with treason 
and held incommunicado. But behind 
bars he has become a symbol known to 
more people around the world than is 
General Sani Abacha, the faceless soldier 
who currently presides ova: Nigeria’s 
permanent government caste. 

After Mr. Abiola was detained in 
Abuja, Nigeria's political capital, strikes 
and demonstrations paralyzed Lagos, the 
commercial capital. In a clumsy attempt to 
foil the pro-democracy campaign, the mili- 
tary then offered to release Mir. Abiola on 
condition that he not talk to the press or 
address political rallies. When be refused, 
his defiance proved contagious. 

The normally unmilitant Nigerian La- 
bor Congress joined in a general strike 
sparked by workers in the pivotal oO 
industry. Now Nigeria's biggest produc- 
er. Anglo- Dutch Shell, has cut back pro- 


poor countries to strengthen their econo- 
mies. But a lot of that money has gone to 
finance wars — like Iraq’s with Iran, and 
its invasion of Kuwait — and tenorism. 

Nigeria is a prime example of a country 
that has fallen into the habit of depend- 
ing far too heavily on only one source of 
wealth — a source that prorides little 
employment for local labor. It is instruc- 
tive to compare it with Indonesia. In the 
1960s. Nigeria was substantially richer 
than Indonesia. Now, a generation later, 
although it has less oil, Indonesia's stan- 
dard of living is twice as high. It has paid 
much more attention to education. Its rul- 
ers have used ofl wealth to build other 
kinds of industry, creating jobs for a grow- 
ing and increasingly urban population. 

But Indonesia is no democracy — and 
remains even farther from it than Nige- 
ria. That is another thing about oil 
wealth. It has bought better schools and 
better medical care in some of the luckier 
oil-exporting countries. But nowhere has it 
bought better government, let alone de- 
mocracy. Among the oil-producing coun- 
tries, there has been no viable improve- 
ment in the quality of government since 
the great surge of oil wealth two decades 
ago — and in some countries, such as 
Nigeria, the change has been for the worse. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


duction, reducing national output by 
one-fifth. The response of the military 
rulers, mostly Hausas from the north, 
has been to blame unrest on radicals 
among Mr. Abiola’s Yoruba peoples — 
risking the very e thni c polarization that 
led in 1967 to a calamitous civil war with 
the Ibos in Biafra. 

The best evidence is that Nigerians 
are not buying. They know too well how 
their country has fared under corrupt 
and incompetent rulers who have squan- 
dered its oil wealth and presided over a 
decline in per capita income. 

On the whole, the Clinton administra- 
tion has responded wisely. Most foreign 
aid has been suspended, and new military 
sales have been barred. The Reverend 
Jesse Jackson spoke up strongly for the 
pro-democratic campaign during his re- 
cent visit to Nigeria. More pressure is 
plainly in order to free Mr. Abiola and 
give civ ilians a chance to govern. Taking 
that course can help prevent realization 
of Mr. Jackson's due prophecy that an 
upheaval in Nigeria. Africa's most popu- 
lous country, might “make Rwanda look 
like a birthday party." 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Fidel Castro may yet dump another 
big batch of boat people on southern 
Florida. It would be a cynical exploita- 
tion of human desperation to spite the 
United States. But Americans bring part 
of this possibility upon themselves. Re- 
gime repression is the first source of Cu- 
ban misery and flight, but the American 
embargo sharpens the pain. Washington 


limits legal migration to an ungenerous 
5,000 or so. This puts a premium on 
illegal migration under a Cold War refu- 


gee law admitting any arriving Cuban. 

The current troubles began last month, 
when Cubans hijacked a tugboat; authori- 
ties rammed it, drowning 32 people. Other 
Cubans hijacked a ferryboat and killed a 
policeman. These incidents fed into a pro- 
test demonstration last Friday in Havana 
rare in size (1, 000-plas) and also in that 
guns were part of the scene. The regime's 
response was predictably harsh. 

President Bill Clinton could stop boats 
from escaping from Cuba and keep Mi- 
ami-based boats from picking up passen- 
gers in Cuba (the 1980 Mariel tactic that 
Fidel Castro now threatens to repeat). 
But what to do with the people? To ignore 
Cubans fleeing c ommunism would rightly 
offend many Americans. To admit the 
refugees would risk overburdening parts of 
Florida. To admit them while barring Hai- 


tians would suggest an invidious decision. 

In fact, Mr. Clinton faces less a refugee 
question than a political question. There 
is an undeniable contradiction between 
squeezing the Castro regime and provid- 
ing adequately for people who are victims 
of the squeeze, and of the regime. This is 
one of the principal considerations that 
have led us to thmk the embargo is out- 
dated. It punishes innocent people and, 
by giving Fidel Castro a nationalist card, 
impedes political change. 

Any political change, of course. Mr. 
Castro will seek to exploit. Reform to him 
means loosening up economically while 
retaining political power — the Chinese 
model. But he is not only a dictator but 
an aging dictator ruling by a dead doc- 
trine over a people still capable of seeking 
its own liberation. 

If President Clinton has changed any 
of the anti-dialogue positions he took on 
Cuba during the 1992 election cam- 
paign. he has not let on. He needs to 
think anew. Scaling back the embargo 
could let the United States diminish 
rather than aggravate the desperation 
that feeds emigration. Meanwhile, 
Washington could explore with Havana 
ways to open wider the legal doors to 
leaving a captive country. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Comment 


No Iranian Moderates in Sight 

In 1985, the Iran-contra affair began 
with arms shipments to Iran in exchange 
for the release of an American hostage in 
Lebanon. The Reagan administration’s 
National Security Council convinced it- 
self that surreptitious dealing would 
strengthen the "moderates" in Tehran 
against the extremists. 

Nine years later, Iran stands infor- 
mally accused by Israeli and U.S. offi- 
cials of sponsoring new outbreaks of 
terrorism, notably bombings against 
Jewish targets in Argentina and Britain. 
Iranian influence in Hezbollah in Leba- 
non is still great. 

President Hashemi Rafsanjani, who 
probably did try to bring a pragmatic 


flexibility to the revolutionaryTegacy, is 
openly ridiculed. Economic reforms suni- 
iar to those of post-Soviet Eastern Eu- 
rope are in remission. The theocratic grip 
on the economy is growing. People are 
getting poorer and goods scarcer. 

GeopoliticaUy, Iran will be a major 
regional power as long as it exists, depres- 
sion notwithstanding. Its population 
dominates the Gulf and its oil reserves 
are the leading alternative to Saudi Ara- 
bia’s on world markets. But the hopes for 
realism in Tehran have receded rather 
than advanced. The mullahs are in charge 
and unchallenged. They consider the 
United States evil. Any UJS. policy that 
does not accept that premise is wild fan- 
tasy. now as much as nine years ago. 

— The Baltimore Sun. 



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B RUSSELS — The situation in 
Rwanda is beginning to have a dan- 
gerously dose resemblance to Cambo- 
dia in the 1980s, when humanitarian aid 
provided by the international communi- 
ty revived and boosted die Khmer 
Rouge war effort 

If the United Nations does not act 
immediately to ensure safe conditions 
for the return of the Rwandan refugees, 
it will be too late to prevent the authors 

1 

bi no circumstances should the 
humanitarian agencies use 
the former administration of 
Rwanda to hdpihem channel 
distributions of aid. 


of the genocide from asserting control 
over the refugees. This would inevitably 
lead to a flare-up of the conflict 

At the be ginning of 1979. the Khmer 
Rouge, responsible for the massacre of a 
million of their fellow Cambodians, fled 
from the advancing Vietnamese army. 
Using force and propaganda, they 
dragged along with them hundreds of 
thousands of refugees who were to expe- 
rience terrible f amin e before establish- 
ing themselves in camps along the bor- 
der with Thailand. 

The international community look 


By Alain Destexhe 


action (although more slowly than it 
does today), and thousands of Cambo- 
dians were saved from a certain death. 
However, the humanitarian effort also 
fed the Khmer Rouge and assured their 
control over the refugee population, en- 
abling them to cany on the battle for 
another 10 years. 

With each day that passes without the 
Rwandan refugees returning home, a 
similar scenario becomes more plausible. 
The army of the former Rwandan gov- 
ernment daily reinforces its control over 
the refugees. And with each daily im- 
provement in the aid effort to the camps 
m Gama, the refugees are less motivated 
to return home. As long as the situation 
in Rwanda is uncertain, they prefer to 
stay puL And who can blame them? 

In the refugee camps in Tanzania, the 
former village heads use the daily food 
distributions both to consolidate their 
power over the 300,000 Rwandans there 
and to discourage them from going back 
to their villages. 

The international humanitarian ef- 
fort, which is saving thousands of lives, 
is also rapidly sowing the seeds of a 
future conflict in which, as with the 
Khmer Rouge, the army of the former 
government will use its political control 
of hundreds of thousands of refugees 
and displaced people to legitimize its 
power. The international community, 


continuing to treat the crisis as an exclu- 
sively humanitarian issue, seems blind 
to the vicious circle that is fonning. 

The solution is not, of course, to cat 
aid to the refugees, nor to start forcing 
them to return. However, the United Na- 
tions and the main countries involved 
must act urgently bn three fronts. - 

First, in order to create an atmosphcre 
of security, the humanitarian effort must 
be increasingly directed from Kigali. It is 
also essential that at least two human 
rights observers be deployed in each ad- 
mmins trarive district in Rwanda. This 
would require a total of 300 observers, 
not 20 as has been foreseen so far. 

Second, those people who have been 
clearly identified as responsible for the 
genocide most not be allowed to contin- 
ue to exert such a strong influence in the 
camps in Zaire and Tanzania. In no 
circumstances should the humanitarian 
agencies use the former administration 
of Rwanda to help them channel distri- 
butions of aid. 

Third, the authors and perpetrators of 
the genocide must be put on trial very 
soon, whether before an international 
tribunal or before the new Rwandan au- 
thorities with support from the United 
Nations in order to ensure that justice is 
carried out fairly and impartially. The 
immediate effect of tins would be to 
diminish die standing of those responsi- 
ble for the genocide and create a prece- 
dent that might be seen as a warning to 
other potential tyrants. 


Such measures are perfectly feasible, 
and they would not cost a fortune. Un- 
fortum tidy, the United Nations has al- 
ways been one step bchmd in its reac- 
tions. It is presently trying to enforce 
Resolution 918 of May 17, which calls for 
the deployment of troops withm Rwan- 
da, even though the war has ended. 

The vast majority of the refugees will 
return home if the right conditions are 
ensured for them; people don't live for 
years in a refugee camp cut of choice. 
But if they do not go back, the world 
will be obfiged to continue giving aid to 
2 million people for years on end. the 
war will restart, and new aid victims will 
require further assistance. As m Cam- 
bodia, this could be the beginning of a 
vary long nightmare. 

The public worldwide has provided a 
very generous response to this crisis, 
despite the pessimistic predictions that 
the UN debacle in Somalia would cause 
“compassion fatigue." We must not let 
this generosity go to waste by political 
An urgent response is re- 
quired. There are only two possible sce- 
narios that can be envisaged over the 
next few weeks: either the refugees re- 
turn, or they dig in among the remnant 
of the former government's army. The 

last act r emains to be written. 

Dr. Destexhe is secretory-general of 
Mddecms Sans Fronliires ( Doctors With- 
out Borders). He contributed this comment 
to the International Herald Tribune. 


Ominous News for the Future of Press Freedom in Hong Kong 


H ONG KONG — For Hong- 
kong as it faces Chinese rule 
in 1997, the optimists among the 
more spirited exercisers of the 
rights of a free press have put 
their trust in the old Chinese 
adage “Heaven is high and the 
emperor is far away.” But it was 
the imperial message, “Tremble 
and obey." which came through 
loud and clear this week. 

The entrepreneurial publisher 
and retailer Jimmy Lai was 
forced to surrender control of his 
Giordano retailing empire as 
punishment for offending the 
“emperor,” Chinese Deputy 
Prime Minister Li Peng, through 
his Next magazine. 


By Philip Bowring 


Mr. Lai has been forced off 
the board of Giordano, a quoted 
company of which he owns 36 
percent, by partners. The Gior- 
dano store in Beijing has been 
temporarily closed while the 
board is refurbished. 

Next's combination of gloss, 
gossip and investigative journal- 
ism has quickly made it Hong 
Kong’s best read and most 
talked about magazine. It creat- 
ed a second fortune for Mr. Lai. 
whose first was based on casual 
fashion stores appealing to the 
same young, middle-class con- 
sumers who now also buy Next 


He has now been taught a 
public lesson that Hong Kong 
people have a choice: obedience 
or money-making. They may not 
be able to have it both ways. 

Much has been written and 
said about creeping self-censor- 
ship in the Hong Kong media. 
Worthy conferences, with dele- 
gates drawn from around the 
world, have been held to de- 
nounce it. The Hong Kong Jour- 
nalists Association has been run- 
ning an effective campaign to 
draw attention to the dangers as 
once respected, independent pub- 
lications have been bought up by 


businessmen dose to Beijing^ and 
others have changed their editori- 
al stance 180 degrees. 

But no thing — not even the 
jailing of Hong Kong journalists 
in China for allegedly stealing 
“state secrets” — has brought 
home the approaching realities of 
Hong Kong better than the mes- 
sage to the flamboyant Mr. Lai. 

So far he has lost little finan- 
cially, although bis prospects for 
floating Next on the stock market 
must nave receded. But the signs 
are that those who exercise their 
rights to a free press in Hong 
Kong may not be welcome to 
malcK money in China. Nobody 
needs reminding what that means 


when Hong Kong officially be- 
. comes part of China. 

Some are surprised that Mr. 
Lai was not punished earlier; 
perhaps his high profile provid- 
ed adefense of sorts. His attack 
on Li Peng was certainly crude 
and unsubtie — not the sort of 
thing to send journalists to the 
barricades. 

Next mil doubtless remain 
unabashed and continue to 
thrive on its existing formula. 
But the episode has shocked 
Hong Kong and will lead other 
owners of media not always re- 
spectful of the leaders in Beijing 
to ponder their fates. 

International Herald Tribune. 


The Extremists in Algeria’s Revolution May Have Gone Too Far 


P ARIS — Revolutions are hard 
on moderates. They usually 
turn into a straggle between the. 
most intransigent reactionaries 
and the most radical of the revo- 
lutionaries. That seems to be 
happening in Algeria, and the 

This primarily concerns 
Muslims . The people 
mostly in danger in 
Algeria are Algerians. 


result could feed the paranoia 
about Islamic fundamentalism 
already apparent in the United 
States and Western Europe. 

• The French are bracing them- 
selves right now for possible ter- 
rorist retaliation for the roundup 
of Algerian fundamentalist activ- 
ists that has been going on since 
the weekend. This action fol- 


By William Fluff 


lowed the murder in Algiers of 
five French nationals connected - 
to the embassy there. They were 
the latest of 57 foreigners mar- 
dered by Algerian fundamental- 
ists during the last 1 1 months. 

The French government is 
backing Algeria's army-backed 
dictatorship. American officials, 
happy to allow France the role of 
fundamentalism's “Great Satan." 
are urging the Algerian govern- 
ment to compromise with “mod- 
erate” fundamentalists. Algerian 
and French officials reply that 
they can’t find any. 

If the fundamentalists do win 
in Algeria, not only Algerians will 
have a problem. The proposition 
that we are doomed to decades of 
a “war of civilizations," as ad- 
vanced by the Harvard political 
scientist Samuel Huntington and 
taken up by many others, is mak- 
ing its way into the American as 


well as European consciousness 
In' a manner that unpleasantly re- 
calls the 1 9th century's paranoia 
"about the Yellow PfenL ~'^*"‘ J 
This ignores two basic*' punts 
about Islamic fundamentalism 
today. The first is that it primarily 
concerns Muslims, not the West 
The people mostly in danger in 
Algeria are Algerians. Hundreds 
of Algerian teachers, intellectu- 
als, editors and journalists, sol- 
ders and policemen, and ordinary 
people in the street have been 
murdered in the course of this 
struggle. The European victims of 
the affair are an aftertboughL 
The idea that the West is the. 
target of Islamic fundamental- 
ism incorporates a gross error. 

It is true that fundamentalism 
opposes Western culture as well 
as the West’s political influence. 
But the aim of the fundamental- 
ist movement is to drive the West 


European 
iner that ui 


Bad Medicine Doesn ’t Bother Some 



N EW YORK — There is a 
ragjng epidemic of medical 
incompetence and malpractice 
in America, but as the national 
debate over health care intensi- 
fies tiie most powerful elements 
of the health care industry are 
engaged in a cruel and sinister 
campaign to limi t the legal 
rights of malpractice victims. 

Lobbyists for doctors, hospi- 
tals, the insurance industry and 
others claim that they are fight- 
ing on behalf of malpractice 
“reform,’' but that is not so. 
True reform would be an effort 
to prevent malpractice. This so- 


Big-dme operators 
throughout the medical 
mdustryare cleaning 
up . But victims of 
medical malpractice are 
not cleaning up. 


called reform effort is geared 
solely toward preventing vic- 
tims (or their survivors) from 
collecting the damages they de- 
serve for the dreadful injuries 
they have suffered. 

The carnage from malprac- 
tice is astonishing. If you add up 
all the deaths each year from 
crime, from motor vehicle acci- 
dents and from fires, they will 
not equal the estimated 80,000 
people who die in hospitals an- 
nually from some form of medi- 
cal negligence or malpractice. 

That is a conservative esti- 
mate, and it applies only to 
hospital foul-ups. It does not 
take into account those who die 
at the hands of incompetent 
health providers in clinics, 
Medicaid mills, doctors' offices 
and elsewhere. 

Scores of thousands of pa- 


B j Bob Herbert 


dents each year are left para- 
lyzed, brain-damaged, blind or 
otherwise horribly disabled 
from malpractice. Most are nev- 
er adequately compensated. 

Yet virtually all the health 
care reform bills that are grow- 
ing like weeds in Congress con- 
tain provisions that would hin- 
der the ability of malpractice 
victims to recover damages. 
The exceptions are the single- 
payer bills in both the House 
and the Senate. 

The health care bill that 
emerged from the Senate Fi- 
nance Committee was particu- 
larly egregious in its approach 
to malpractice victims. That bill 
would put a $250,000 cap on 
damages that could be awarded 
for pain and suffering; would 
limit attorneys’ fees for plain- 
tiffs (but not for defendants), 
and would have required that 75 
percent of all punitive damages 
go to the state, not the plaintiff. 

Those are insidious proposals 
and they are still making the 
rounds in Congress. Caps on 
pain and suffering hurt the peo- 
ple most vulnerable to low- 
quality care — women, the el- 
derly and low-income people. 

There is no cap on compen- 
sation for lost income, which is 
a significant measure of pro- 
tection for wealthy victims of 
malpractice. But others, with- 
out the cushion of wealth, 
would be limited to the maxi- 
mum of $250,000 for even a 
lifetime of suffering. 

Mere Horan, an attorney 
with Public Citizen, a health 
advocacy group in Washing- 
ton, asserted; “What they’re 
saying is that if you don’t make 
a large income we’re not con- 
cerned about your disfigure- 
ment, your paralysis, your in- 
ability to bear children or the 


fact that you're in extreme pain 
and living on morphine for the 
rest of your life.” 

Medical industry representa- 
tives have complained for years 
that malpractice lawsuits have 
been a major factor in the surge 
of health care costs. It is a bogus 
argument Doctors, on average, 
spend 2.9 percent of their gross 
income .cm malpractice insur- 
ance, just a shade over the 23 
percent they pay for “profes- 
sional car upkeep." 

Meanwhile, insurance com- 
panies are cleaning up. Figures 
from 1991 showed that malprac- 
tice policies earned the compa- 
nies $1.4 biltion in profits. 

Big-time operators through- 
out the medical industry are 
cleaning up. Top executives of 
the leading health rare compa- 
nies often earn millions of dol- 
lars annually — in some cases, 
tens of millions. 

But medical malpractice vic- 
tims are not cleaning up. Only 
one out of 16 victims gets any- 
thing in the way of compensa- 
tion. Many refuse to sue be- 
cause they don’t want to Gght 
the phalanx of doctors who are 
sure to come to the aid of the 
defendant Some victims of mal- 
practice don’t even know they 
nave the right to sue. 

Of those who sue and are- 
awarded damages, very few re- 
ceive payments that are unjusti- 
fied, according to a study pub- 
lished two years ago in the 
"Annals of Internal Median e." 
Nevertheless, under the umbrel- 
la of reform, the assault on mal- 
practice victims continues. 

As the consumer advocate 
Ralph Nader noted: “All these 
health care bills have some sort 
of restriction on malpractice 
victims, and none of than have 
anything in the way of malprac- 
tice prevention, which tells you 
where the balance of power is/* 
The New York Times. 


and all of its works and pomps 
out of the Islamic world, so that 
its totalitarian version of godli- 
ness can reign there nmmpeded. 

No sane f nmfamenuilfa t wants 
- to conquer a Weston coun try 
'■filled with- those he considers in- 
fidels and pagans. 

The attacks on the West by 
Mamie f undamentalists fall into 
one of two categories. The first is 
punishment of the West for al- 
leged crimes against Islam. That 
is the reason American diplomats 
were taken hostage in Iran in 
1979; the United Stales had spon- 
sored the shah’s misconceived ef- 
forts to Westernize Iran. The 
United States is also the ally of 
Israel and supports moderate 
Muslim governments. That is 
why New York’s World Trade 
Center was bombed. 

The other motive for terrorism . 
has been to win release erf Islam- 
ic fundamentalists held prisoner 
in the West (or elsewhere, nota- 
bly in Kuwait) because of earlier 
acts of terrorism. Most of the 
Beirut kidnappings were black- 
mail for prisoner releases. Black- 
mail was the motive for the 1986 
bomb attacks in Paris. 

The next thing to understand 
about fundamentalism is thar in 
the long run it will faiL The turn- 
ing point may even have been 
reached last week. The move- 
ment will fail because its attempt 
to recreate a utopian version of 
the past simply won’t work. His- 
tory can’t be reversed. Algeria 
has no more chance of recreating 
a theocentric society than the 
West has of recreating the inte- 
grally religious Christendom of 
the 13th century. 

The turning point conceivably 
occurred last week with the an- 
nouncement by one of the Alge- 
rian terrorist groups that itxn- 
tends to kill students and 
teachers when secondary schools 
and universities resume tins fall 
The only schooling.it wants to 
permit is that conducted in strict 
Islamic religious institutions. 
This threat was accompanied by 
the murder of the director of the 


Agricultural Institute of the 
University of Blida, just south of 
Algiers. It was the latest in more 
than 15 recent murders of teach- 
ers: — some carried out inside the 
classroom itselJL, 

Islamic fundamentalism has 
made progress because it prom- 
ises improvement in the lives of 
ordinary people, after the abject 
failure of nationalism and “Arab 
Socialism." Those mostly pro- 
duced impoverished economies 
and military government, as in 
Algeria, or sordid personal dic- 
tatorships, as in Iraq, Syria and 
Libya. The Islamic fundamen- 
talists say that a return to strict 
religions observance will better 
people's lives. 

But people know that their 
children have no hope at all if 
they cannot be educated in the 
subjects that make the world go 
around. They know that agricul- 
tural research and education is 
essential to their countries' fu- 
tures. They understand that their 
children have to learn engineer 
ing, science, accounting, foreign 
languages and a variety of other 
practical subjects if they are t$ 
nave aery chance of betterment. 1 

Possibly tins , attack, and 
threat, were provocations. More 
plausible is that they were real 
and that the Islamic revolution in 
Algeria is being taken oyer by ith 
most extreme elements. j 

If that happens, the future acf' 
tuaUy looks brighter. After ex* , 
trennsm, the Terror, comes ratio* 
nal reaction and practicality, the. 
Therrmdor. It is just possible * 
admittedly, only possible — that 
the Algerian crisis approaches the 
beginning of its end. 

International Herald Tribune. 

Oleo Angela Times Syndicate. 


Letters Intended for publication j 
should be addressed "Letters to the 
Editor" and contain the writer’s 
signature, name and full address. 
Letters should be brief and arc 
subject to editing. We cannot be 
responsible for the return of umo- 
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IN OUR PAGES; 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO i 


1894r ServiatotheFare 

PARIS —Can it be that Servia is 
once more about to occupy the 
attention of the European Pow- 
ers?. Kmg Alexander win attain 
his nineteenth year on the 14th of 
this month, and it is. said that be 
means to signalise the occaskm 
by another coup d’Etat Were it. 
not that the boy King is accus- 
tomed to coups d’Etat from his 
infancy, the statement would be 
simply amusing. But, all things 
considered, iris to be feared that 
. the report is wdl founded. 

1919: Gentleman Thief 

PARE — The Paris police has 
just captured a gentleman bur- 
glar. Serge-Henri de Lenz was a 
frequent traveller on trains de 
luxe, and a patron of the great 
hotels. In reality he worked hard 
in them, stealing trunks and bags 
and robbing the bedrooms. After 


many visits to tango-teas and the- - 
atres, detectives found de Lenz 
removing tr unks from a fine lim- 
ousine at the door of his house; 
They allowed him to discharge 
the baggage, but when he started 
°ff they arrested him. ' ’ 

“1944: Nagasaki Bombed 

WASHINGTON — [From onr 
New York edition:] In their first ^ 
double strike against the vast Pa-™ 
ofic holdings of the Japanese, B- 
29 Superfortresses of the 20th 
Bomber Command attacked si- 
multaneously today [Aug. 10] in : ' 
mistrial targets in' the-Nagasaki 
ama and enemy oil refineries 
mom than 3,000 miles away. 
Nagasaki, a city of 250,000 which 
is one of Japan’s principal ship 
pmlding and repair centers, now 
joins toe sted ary of. Yawala on 
me hst of key strategic targets 
™a have fdt the punishing 
waght cf B-29 bombs. 


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lKLh *> /i<TA 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 1 1, 1994 

opinion 


XIMSHINGTON —The Clinton 
. admiaistiatian made a hash of 
il5 handling of Whitewater. But after 
last weekend it could be forgiven for 
waking that its fate is to face treble 
damages even for its good deeds. ' 
The adnmtistration, afoot belat- 
edly and under pressure, agreed to 
tM appointment of a special counsel 
to investigate the Whitewater mat- 
ter. Then, in June, the president 
signed a renewal of the independent 
counsel law, an act through winch 
Bill Clin loo put sharp limits on his 
power to affect investigations of his 
own administration 
Many Republicans hat^ the inde- 
pendent counsel law, ami the act had 


ion Moving 


ByE.J. Dionne Jr. 


; k*u> as the court said. 


! And Mr. Starr does havea 


I lapsed. So the voluntary appointment 
I of Whitewater counsel Robert Fiske 
i was not covered by the law. 

< In the meantime, Mr. Fiske re- 
| ported that he had found no grounds 
: to prosecute members of the adrnmis - 
i liation for obstructing justice or ofo- 
J erwise illegally messing around with 
J the Whitewater case. He knocked 
•.down all the zany conspiracy theo- 
rists and concluded that VincentFofr- 
ter, President Ctin ton’s deputy coun- 
sel, actually, did commit suicide, as 
the police concluded originally. 

Then came Friday’s stunning 
news: a threejudge court, led by a 
Reagan appointee, concluded that 
while there was no evidence that Mr. 
-Fiske had done a bad job, he should 
be replaced for the sake of appear- 
ances. To replace him, the court 
-.turned to Kenneth Starr, an intelli- 
gent conservative who served as the 
Bush administration's solicitor gen- 
eral and was a Reagan circuit court 
appointee. Mr. Stair has also long 
been on Republican dust lists for 
the Supreme Court 

Just imagine for a moment what 
the outcry from conservatives would 
have been if tbe Iran-contm special ' 
prosecutor had been a respected 
lawyer who had served in Democratic 

Calif ano, Walter MwadaSe or^Ttd 
Sorensen); or a potential liberal Su- 
preme Cant appointee Hike Laur- 
ence Tribe or Walter Deflmger) with 
a strong interest in seeing foe Demo- 
crats take back tbe White House, 

■ Republican Senator Phil Gramm 
criticized Robert Bennett, the Clin- 
tons’ personal lawyer, for saying Mr. 
Starr's - political background /made • 


bun ^appropriate for the special 
coonseTs job. But I have no doubt 
that : if the situation were reversed, 
Mr. Gramm would be the first to 
condemn the Dellingers and Tribes 
of the world as biased liberals intent 
on wrecking Republican administra- 
tions — and foe firing of the old 
special counsel as an unconscionable 
delay in the search for foe truth. . 

No metaphor, of course, is precise- 
ly accurate. The Clin tomans have a 
problem fo going after Mr.. Starr, 
since- be was once on Attorney Gen- 
eral Janet Reno's own short list as an 
alternative to Mr. Fiske. The inde- 
pendent counsel law is, as the court 
said, party about appearances. And 
Mr. Starr does have a reputation for 
integrity and decency. 

Bm think of the pressures on Mr. 
Starr from his conservative allies 
and friends. It has been argued that 
tbe Omtons could be well-served by 
his appoantment If someone of his 
badtground and philosophy dears 
them of wrongdoing, who wfil doubt 
him? The truth is that tbe truth 
doesn’t matter to tbe extreme Clin- 
toorbashers for whom Whitewater is 
and always has beat simply a means 
to wreckthe Clinton presidency. 


government against their opposition. 
The events of Whitewater occurred 
far away from Washington long be- 
fore Mr. Clinton became president 
Much, perhaps most, of what we now 
know about it was already known 
thanks to investigative reporters’ 
work before the 1992 election. 

Unless investigators find evi- 
dence of a roil crime, tbe matter 
should be put to rest — and the 
Clintons should help by making as 
much information public as fast as 
they legally can. 

Dragging out Whitewater end- 
lessly will make Clinton-haters, ex- 
treme partisans and right-wing ideo- 
logues very happy. Mr. Starr will be 
the toast of conservative circles if he 
lets this run on through, say, 1996. 
Conservatives will call it fodr re- 
venge for Iran-contra. What will 
take real courage is for Mr. Starr to 
stare down the ideologues and keep 
the investigation moving — know- 
ing that efficiency wQl bring only 
vilification from many of those who 
once sang his praises. 

The Washington Post. 



Watchhig Her in the Mirrors 
As if Support Were Required 


By William Derge 


/GAITHERSBURG. Maryland — 
W I dawdle in the parking lot, rif- 

_ . . ■ A P 


oj 


XK&H-C0>TtW6«B 





fling through my briefcase for some- 
thing 1 can hold on to: a book, a 
magazine, a note pad. This is, l know, 
like a child's need for a blanket or 
stuffed animal; I have never really 
lost that magical connection between 
the tensing of the hand muscles 
around a familiar object and its pow- 
er to ward off evil. But what "evil" do 
I face inside? A group of mothers 
who hover in the narrow hallway that 
leads into foe dance studio. 

Some of them knit, some of them 
nurse babies. And all of them talk. 
They talk mostly about their chi)- 


MEANWHILE 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Suppose Mr. Starr says that no, 
there was ho conspiracy behind Vin- 


Offenses at Buchemvaid 


cent Foster's death. Suppose he looks 
at Mr. Fiske's work carefully and 
decides that there is no reason to 
reopen foe. investigation of the ad- 
ministration’s handling of White- 
water. Woe unto poor Ken Starr. Tbe 
right wing win crane down on him 
wrth the vengeance it reserves for 
alleged “turncoats.” 

It is, of ranxr^e, true foal foe Clin- 
ton administration's crack damage 
enhancement team also helped keep 
this story alive. During foe congres- 
sional hearings, official* had to con- 
tradict. their own diaries and each 
other and, at times, themselves. The 
administration looked slippery and 
ineffectual at tbe same time. 

. This is an argument for taking a 
long look before leaping into dam- 
age control by asking not simply 
how things will look in tomorrow's 
purer but how matters will be 
judged in a month or a year or a 
decade; Surely that is one of foe 
central lessons of this week’s retro- 


spectives on the 20th anniversary of 
Richard Nixon's resignation. 


Richard Nixon's resignation. 

But Watergate also ought to put 
the Whitewater frenzy in its place; 
As far as Mr. Fiske’s Investigators 
could tell, Mr. Clinton’s men and 
women did not try to stop investiga- 
tions or court actions, let alone pay 
hush money or run dollars through 
Mexican bank accounts or manipu- 
late- the CIA or use the power of 


In “An Overreact j chi at Buehen- 
wald? Bonn Officials in Quandry” 
(JUT, Aug. 3) tbe reporter states that 
German officials, foreign diplomats 
and foe news media face foe ques- 
tion of whether a “minor act of van- 
dalism should be magnified into an 
international incident." 

Tbe report tells us that on July 23, 
22 neo-Nazi skinheads traveling in a 
chartered bus arrived at Buchen- 
wald, foe site of a Nazi death camp, 
and proceeded to shout “Sieg Hefl,” 

K ite Hitlerian stiff-armed salute, 
“a couple" of windows, over- 
turn a display from foe concentra- 
tion camp and threaten to set a su- 
pervisor on fire. 

No detailed knowledge of tbe law 
is necessary for readers to conclude 
that foe suggestion that this episode 
was a minor act of vandalism is 
misguided. Nevertheless, a list of 
possible criminal charges to which 
foe described behavior could give 
rise might be illuminating: aggravat- 
ed criminal trespass (Article 124, 
German Penal Code), breach of the 
peace (Article 125), two separate vi- 
olations of the provirion forbidding 
the use of symbols of unconstitu- 
tional organizations (Article 86a), 
two separate violations of causing 
damage to property in which foe 


Under German law these crimes 
are all misdemeanors, but four of 
them are punishable by up to three 
years' incarceration. 

While concern for the proper in- 
ternational response to minor acts 
of vandalism is legitimate, the 


choice of example in this instance is 
not. We are told that after the Bu- 


chenwald riot, foe Bonn government 
“voiced regret and shame " Is that 
an overreaction? 


E. SILVERMAN. 
Freiburg, Germany. 


public has a special interest (Article 
304X threatening conduct (Article 
241), disturbing the peace by threat- 


ening to commit crime (Article 126). 


Regarding "SAS's Japan Test 
Case " (Business/ finance, June 18) 
by Steven Brut!: 

The article refers to the excess 
costs of “lifetime employment” in 
Japan, as if someone had calculated 
what the economic costs would be 
in the short, mid- and long terms if 
all “redundant workers” were sud- 
denly removed from corporate pay- 
rolls. Even if such a study were 
possible, related social costs are far 
more difficult to ascertain. 

“Experts'* advocating the end of. 
lifetime employment do so because 
there are many unproductive work- 
ers being carried during tbe current 
recession. Employment cost savings 
are calculated statistically as the dif- 
ference between total payroll, in- 
cluding these workers, and total 
payroll with these workers removed. 


But without the security of life- 
time employment, the remnant after 
a purge would in fact cost signifi- 
cantly more per worker. The payroll 
costs of star performers will increase 
dramatically in a competitive em- 
ployment market, especially consid- 
ering the impact of an extremely 
progressive income tax system. 

Data show that foreign employers 
pay much more than their Japanese 
counterparts for the same employee. 
The differential is attributed to the 
perceived difference in employment 
security. SAS*s recent decision is go- 
ing to cost the foreign corporate 
community plenty. 

Star performers in Japan, of 
whom there are many, are severely 
underpaid compared with fellow 
workers in Japan and abroad. A 
large company that practices life- 
time employment can keep hordes 
of competent young men and wom- 
en chasing the elusive carrots of po- 
sition and power instead of paying 
them wages commensurate with 
their contributions to output. 

f think that corporate Japan is 
desperately trying to hang onto life- 
time employment because it serves it 
welL not because of any higher mor- 
al sense or “Japanese social con- 
tract” The short-term risk of pre- 
serving unproductive jobs is well 
worth the long-term savings from a 
totally committed work force. 


dren. But they also talk about health 
and money and sometimes politics. 
And once I listened to a couple 
of them bad-mouthing teachers. 
I didn’t tell them I was a teacher. 

There is a single bench in the hall- 
way, and the women take turns using 
it but I have never been able to 
divine the system they use to deter- 
mine who sits on the bench when. It 
wouldn't matter to me anyway. I 
stand throughout the entire class, 
near the door — my need for a quick 
means of escape almost as great as 
my need for something to hold on to. 


I once saw her escort a girl, who 
could not have been older than 6, off 
the dance floor, telling her that ii 
would probably be better for every- 
body if she didn't come back. I never 
found out what the girl had done. In 
any case, we never saw her again. 

When you understand what Miss 
Linda has to accomplish, you can 
see why she wields such power. 

i don't mean to say that children 
don't possess natural grace. Being a 
father of three, 1 see it every day. 
One of our favorite things to do at 
home is to put on music and engage 
in sustained free movement. (For 
some reason, we avoid the word 
“dance.") The only rule is that you 
try not to break anything or step on 
the cats. Tbe way children can pick 
up the rhythm and ride it is miracu- 


lous to me. 1 think — sadly — it is 
one of the first things to fall away 


There is one other father in the group, 
but he seems comfortable among the 


but he seems comfortable among the 
mothers. I am envious of his ease. He 
is a man of the '90s. I am just shy. 

The thing I hold on to today is 
a book of Rilke's poems. How 
much of it I will read is determined 
by very precise rules set down by 
my daughter, Frances, over the past 
three years of ballet classes. For 
example: If she is dancing within 
the opening made by the door so 
that foe can see me as well as I see 
her, then I am not permitted to do 
anything but watch her. This is only 
fair: my whole purpose in being 
here, after all. is to offer support. 

But if my view of her is by way of 
the mirrors that circle tbe studio, then 
I can engage in other activities if I 
choose. That usually means reading 

Some of the mothers copy down 
the dance steps their daughters are 
learning. 1 suppose it is so they can 
practice at home. But since 1 haven’t 


on the dubious road to maturity. 
Certainly, it was with me. 

But ballet isn’t “free movement." 
and although it is grace supreme, it 
is grace achieved unnaturally. 
Hence the stern yet gentle discipline 
of Miss Linda. It isn't outside of her 
methodology to grab a girl's leg in 
her hands and mold it inio position. 
The girls seem willing clay to her 
attempts to sculpt them. 

The recital is very long, and to 
leave before it is over, especially to 
leave immediately after your daugh- 
ter performs, is like asking for ketch- 
up in a five-star restaurant. But 1 
don't object to such rituals; ballet 
recitals for most of these girts will be 
the only time in their lives, save their 
weddings, when they partake in a 
fairy tale existence. If it falls to us 
parents to provide the footmen and 
chambermaids for foe princesses, 
then so be it; it is, after all, the only 
time for most of us, as well. 

So it is noljust what I can give my 


daughter. It is also what I can get 
out of it. In the mirrored walls of the 


seen anyone perform any better than 
Frances as a result of their mothers 


■' ! ••jt r r:- .. v -v. — ■■j.e • - 


LESLIE JOHN LOHMANN. 

Tokyo. 


having done so. I've concluded that 
it's probably a wasted effort or an 
overblown need to be in control. 

Not that there is any doubt who is 
in control here. “Miss Linda," as the 


dance studio, we watch our children 
become foe works or art we have 
known since conception that they 
were, but which the intrusions of the 
outside world so often veil. 

Out of the comer of one eye, l 
watch the image of ray daughter 
reflected from one mirror to anoth- 
er. I open ray Rilke and read: 

Bur to us, existence is still enchan- 
ted .. . A playing of pure forces that 
no one touches who does not kneel 
and marvel. 


The writer, a poet, teaches English 
s a second language at Gaithers- 


aii s refer to her with a respect bor- 
dering on adoration, runs a tight ship. 


as a second language at Gaithers- 
burg High School. He contributed 
this essay to The Washington Post. 


CROSSWORD 




ACROSS 

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the? MIDDLE EAST 
CJ EASTERN 
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© New York Tunes Edited by Will Sham. 


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INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


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(Continued From Page 13) 


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First an Invasion Route, Then a Lifeline to Ancient Jerusalem 


Geologists have found that the rock underlying Jerusalem is permeated by meandering natural water- 
curved fissures. Some may have been used as an invasion route. Some were later extended and 
connected to assure a water supply in time of siege. 



The New YoriiThnca 


Geology Unravels Biblical Puzzle 


By John Noble Wilford 

Mew York Times Service 




EW YORK — Under the oldest 
part of Jerusalem, the area called 
the City of David, a maze of 
tunnels and shafts runs through 
the rock and deep into biblical history. 

In ancient times, the people inside the 
ary walls depended on this system to de- 
liver water from the ever-flowing Gihon 
Spring outside, thus ensuring a dependable 
water supply in both war and peace. 


on the assumption that the tunnels were 
entirely man-made. Scholars should have 
consulted a geologist sooner. 

A comprehensive geological study of un- 
derground Jerusalem has recently shown 
that the c hann els and shafts were formed 
by natural forces tens of thousands of 


years ago. That means there may have 
been an underground passage through 


But nearly everything else about the old 
underground waterworks, especially its re- 


corded role in two pivotal events in the 
history of ancient Israel has left scholars 
shaking their heads in puzzlement. 

Archaeologists and biblical scholars 
have long wondered if it was these subter- 
ranean passages that enabled King David 
to capture Jerusalem 3,000 years ago. 

Biblical accounts suggest that David's 
general Joab, surprised the Jeburites, or 
Canaanites. by sneaking in through a hid- 
den passage. But did any of these tunnels 
exist then? Were the Canaanites or anyone 
else then capable of such excavations? 

Engineers have long noted that whoever 
built these passages seemed to go about the 
task in the most curious way, with no logic 
in the choice of some routes, slopes and 
dimensions of the tunnels and many osten- 
sible mistakes in design. 

Take Hezekiah's TunneL According to 
the Bible. King Hezeldah, expecting an 
attack and possibly a long siege by the 
Assyrians in the eighth century B. C., had a 
tunnel built to bring water from the spring 
to an open reservoir within the walled dry, 
which extends south of the Temple Mount. 


The siege occurred in 701 B. C. but 
failed, presumably in no small part be- 
■ cause of the tunnel and its secure water 
. supply. But why did the tunnel wind for 
1,748 feet (533 meters), when a straight 
line of 1,050 feet would have been suffi- 
cient and easier to build? 

Previous explanations had been based 


which Jo*b infiltrated the Cannanite city. 
And Hezdriah’s Tunnel is winding and 
irregular because the builders simply mod- 
ified a natural fissure. 

Dr. Dan Gill, a senior geologist with the 
Geological Survey of Israel first reported 
the discovery three years ago in the journal 
Science. Underlying the City of David, he 
found, is a well-developed karst system, a 
geological term for the irregular sinks, cav- 
erns mid channels caused by ground water 
seeping through underground rock, mainly 
limestone and dolomite. 

In the current issue of Biblical Archaeol- 
ogy Review, Dr. Gill has described the 
findings in more detail and discussed their 
implications for archaeological research 
ana biblical history. The geology, he said, 
provides “a simple, consistent and unified 
solution” to “ uost of the puzzles that have 
heretofore su-mped researchers." 

The extern and peculiarities erf the un- 
derground water system were discovered 
and expioied in the 19th century. The 
passages were all connected to Gihon 
Spring, the Old City’s sole source of fresh 
water and the reason that a city came to be 
built there. Modern Jerusalem's water sup- 
ply is piped in from Lake Tiberias. 

From Gihon Spring, which is in a cave, 
there runs a short, irregular tunnel leading 
to a vertical shaft that goes straight up 37 
feet This is called Watren's Shaft, after the 
British engineer Charles Warren, who ex- 
plored it in 1867. 

Sor eooe standing on a rock platform at 
the toy of the shaft could drop a bucket on 
a rope and draw up the cool water. A 
gently sloping tunnel and then a steeper 
one, connect the platform with an entry- 
way at the surface. Though the spring is a 



Although dolomite is more solid than 
limestone, cracks do occur under seismic 
stresses or at boundaries where different 
layers meet, and over time the erosion of 
water seeping along the fissures can leave 
substantial horizontal passages. Dr. Gill 
said. This could explain most of the anom- 
alies in Hezekiah's Tunnel especially its 
serpentine route and the varying height. 


Anti-Cancer Role for Silicone Implants? 


By Sandra Blakeslee 

New York Times Semce 




EW YORK — A small but pro- 
vocative study suggests that sili- 
cone- gel breast implants might 
help reduce the risk of breast can- 
cer in women who have used them for 
more than a decade, a scientist said. 

Dr. Leo Garrido, a researcher at Massa- 
chusetts General Hospital in Boston who 
explores the fate of silicone in breast-im- 
plant recipients, stressed that the finding 
was extremely preliminary. 

"It is premature to make any recommen- 
dations to women who are worried about 
tbeir implants,” Dr. Gam do said. “And it 
is impossible to say at this time how sili- 
cone might protect against cancer." 

Dr. Garrido described his research at a 
press conference organized by the Society 
of Magnetic Resonance, which is holding 
its annual meeting in San Francisco this 
week. 


In a telephone interview. Dr. Garrido 
offered a possible rationale for the mecha- 
nism by which silicone implants might 
lower the risk of breast cancer. "We know 
that silicone migrates to many pans of the 
body, including the liver," where it is prob- 
ably metabolized and broken down into 
smaller pieces, he said. 

Dr. Garrido said many small silicone 
compounds were biologically active, which 
means they can chemically interact with 
other molecules in the body. 

One form of silicone has been used as a 
drug to kill prostate cancer cells, he noted. 
Another can increase vaccine potency. 
Two epidemiological studies show that 
women with silicone-gel implants have a 
breast cancer rate that is 30 to 45 percent 
lower than expected, he said. 

In the research to be presented tins 
week. Dr. Garrido took blood plasma, 
which contains many proteins and ions, 
from eight women and put it into lest tubes 
containing breast cancer cells. Five wo- 
men had breast implants, so their plasma 


might also contain tiny silicone fragments. 

The plasma from three women who had 
had implants for more than 10 years killed 
all the cancer cells in 10 days, Dr. Garrido 
said, but the plasma from the other women 
did noL The other two women with im- 
plants had had them less than six years and 
showed no signs of leakage. 

It is possible that small silicone frag- 
ments might be converted by the body into 
compounds that kill cancer cells. Dr. Gar- 
rido said. Or women with implants might 
have permanently activated immune sys- 
tems — ever trying to rid the body ’ of 
foreign material — making those immune 
systems better at fighting cancer cells. 

Dr. Ganido said silicone might have 
good and bad effects. It might protect 
some women against breast cancer, but it 
also might increase the chance of develop- 
ing a crippling immune disorder. 

In complaints against implant manufac- 
turers, thousands of women with implants 
have argued that they have suffered such 
disorders. 


Ancient Mound Is Clue to the Sea 


By William J. Broad 

New York Tima Sorrier 




GW YORK — An uncommon 
assault on the mysterious depths 
of the sea is getting under wary as 
ships, matiTiftfi submersfbles and 
unmanned robots probe an eerie mound in 
Atlantic waters more than two miles deep. 

A mass of sulfurous ores the size of the 
Houston Astrodome, the mound was 
formed in the last 20,000 to 50,000 years by 
a kind of hidden volcanic action. 

The mound continues to grow as its 
towering chimneys emit thick black smoke 


ment, a Japanese submersible is wiring the 
mound with cameras and. sensors. 

The dimax of the work is to occur in 
October and November when the Resolu- 
tion, the flagship of the international 
ocean-drilling program, lowers a long pipe 
through the Atlantic to drill into the 
mound for a distance of upto three-tenths 
of a mile. 


saasssSES 




or TAG. 


and extraordinarily hot water measuring 


little outside the wall the entryway to 
Warren’s Shaft is safely inside. 

Another important component, Hezeki- 
ah s Tunnd, was rediscovered in 1837 by 
Edward Robinson, an American Oriental- 
ist. The t unn el drawing on the same 
spring, runs from the base of Warren's 
Shaft until it debouches in an open reser- 
voir known as the Pool of Siloaxn. 

An inscription on the tunnel wall writ- 
ten in ancient Hebrew script, tells how two 
teams digging from opposite ends man- 
aged to meet in the middle. That was an 
achievement that scholars found virtually 
inexplicable because of the tunnel’s wind- 
ing route, but the new finding s show that 
the workers were actually following and 
widening the route of existing passages. 

Systematic explorations were not re- 
newed until 1978. when the late Dr. Yigal 
Shiloh, an Israeli archaeologist, began re- 
search on the City of David. Dr. Gill the 
project’s chief geologist, re-examined the 
waterworks and in 1980 began to recog- 
nize a case of function following form. 


up to 685 degrees Fahrenheit, hot enough 
to melt tin or lead. Millions of sea anemo- 
nes and shrimp live atop the mound, con- 
tradicting the old view of the ocean floor as 
a biological desert 

A ship is soon to send a drill deep into 
the heart of the blistering-hot mass, 
searching for its innermost secrets. 

The goal is to better grasp the workings 
of deep volcanic vents uke this one, which 
first came to light 17 years ago. It turned 
out that their strange fauna lived not on 
sunlight, as most life ultimately does, but 
on microbes that ate malodorous com- 
pounds emitted by the hot vents, in partic- 
ular hydrogen sulfide. 

More generally, the work should help 
reveal some of the far-reaching effects of 
the deep vents: how they produce rich 
metallic ores (including gold), how Garth’s 
fiery interior heats the oceans and atmo- 
sphere (affecting dimate) and how far 
down microbes in the hot ocean crust live 
(possibly comprising a previously undis- 
covered realm). It might also shed light on 
how life itself got started. 

But f undamentals came first. 

"We don't know even baric information, 
like why the mound is located where it is,” 
said Dr. Richard Von Herzen, a senior 
scientist at the Woods Hole Oceanograph- 
ic Institution on Cape Cod, Massachu- 
setts, which is helping to coordinate the 
research. 

The mound, 2,000 miles (3,200 kflomc- 
ters) east of Miami on the Mid-Atlantic 
Ridge, is the biggest and deepest of the 
hot-vent fields known to dot the sub- 
merged chains of mountains that meander 
46,000 miles through the global deep like 
swum on a baseball 

A tram of American, Japanese and Euro- 
pean researchers embarked on a pioneering 
investigation of the mound in June and will 
complete its work next year. At the rao- 


Never before has a ship drilled into a 
deep, hot volcanic vent, and the prospect 
has put scientists in a state of high antici- 
pation. "Every inch will be'excdtm&" said 
Dr. Peter A. Rona, a marine geologist at 
Rutgers University in New Brunswick, 
New Jersey, who led the team that discov- 
ered the mound in 1985. “It’s an ideal 
natural lab because you have one coherent 
feature, one system, that’s large enough to 
accommodate multiple observations.” 

The deep was once thought of as geolog- 
ically dead and having only a thin popula- 
tion of bizarre fish, mainly scavengers liv- 
ing off a drizzle of detritus from above. 


tftte bora <tap*» r* , 

SJrS to be made mainly of non, copper 

snd its Surface was dear- 


to be made mainly or non, copper 

and its 

wSwinn with millions of crabs and Hind 

chl I mil- mm A 


I T turned out, however, that the ; 
is alive with volcanic fissures that 
form the ocean crust, circulate huge 
masses of sea water and feed unusual 
forms of life adapted to volcanic heat and 
chemistry. 

The oases of the deep are believed to 
form as sea water seem down tiny cracks 
around the volcanic assures, encounters 
molten rock and is heated to tabnperatures 
as high as 750 degrees Fahrenheit. The 
mineral-rich water wells up at seabed 
springs, which swarm with. microbes and 


S kftf?990 oceanographers asked f or TA G 
m te^etUiythe Joint Oceanographic 
Earth Sampling -or 
Joides, an international consortium of uni- 
versities, ocean institutions and gwera- 

M ^geodes. The goal was to matter 
the first time the inner workings of such 
volcanic vents. , 

After years of 

under way in June, when the Woods Hole 
ship Knorr made a detailed survey ofthe 
Atlantic mound, lowering long cablcs/ad- 
ea with robotic sonars, cameras and Ugnt- 
• . ; - - - Thu »n«i t<i create 



ness. ; 

The second phase began when the Japa- 
nese ship Yokosuka left Woods Hole m 
late July for the site carrying the Sjunkai 
6500, the world’s deepest-diving submers- 
ible. It is now wiring the mound with 
sensor packages. 



The Ne» Yoric Time. 


ENEATH the City of David, he 
found, lie two layers of rock, 
highly porous limestone on top 
of more impervious dolomite. 
Warren’s Shaft is a natural sinkhole that 
developed along a joint in the limestone. 
Its bottom narrows into a funnel-like 
shape, typical of a karetic sinkhole, and 
carbon dating of the calcium crust on its 
walls indicates an age of more than 40.000 
years. 

"This provides unequivocal evidence 
that the shaft could not have been dug by 
man," Dr. Gill wrote. 


Breaking a Schizophrenia Cycle 


By Daniel Goleman 

New York Times Semcr 




"holy i 
chilare 


EW YORK — She was 3l v the 
mother of two youitg 'children, . 
Mien she began to hear voices 
telling her that she was an a 
mission” and bad to sacrifice her 
ren by killing them. The voices 
stopped only after she was hospitalized 
for schizophrenia and given anti-psy- 
chotic medication. 

But after she returned home, she 
stopped taking her medication, say 
she no longer felt rick. The delusions i 
voices soon returned, and she was read- 
mitted to the hospital 
"The third time this happened, we 
convinced her to take an injectable 
form” of the medication, said Dr. Peter 
Weiden, the woman’s psychiatrist “Now 
she’s been well for a year and a half after 
leaving the hospital.” 

Dr. Weiden, chief of the Schizophren- 
ic Disorders Unit at Sl Luke’s-Roosevdt 
Hospital in Manhattan, is at the van- 
guard of a movement that is reviving an 
old idea: giving schizophrenic patients 
their medication in the form of injections 
that last 30 days, instead erf relying on 
the patients to take daily pills. 

Injectable medications for schizophre- 
nia, psychiatrists say, could sharply re- 
duce the number of patients who fail to 
take medication ana have acute psychot- 


ic episodes, ending up homeless or in 
what is called the “revolving door syn- 
drome” of repeated hospital admissions. 
.... . The: medications, called neuroleptics, 
have been standard -treatments for - 
schramhrenia. for decades. Thorazine 
and Haldol are two of the better known 
in the group. Haldol comes in an .inject- 
able form, but Thorazine does not 1 

“You’re going to reduce the number of 
relapses if you use injectable neurolep- 
tics," said Dr. Richard Jed Wyatt, chief 
of the neuropsychiatry branch at the 
National Institute of Mental Health. 
“You know the patient has gotten his 
medication," he said. “You don’t have to 
worry.” 

Advocates for people with schizophre- 
nia also support the use of the injectable, 
or what physicians call depot, neurolep- 
tics. Laurie Flynn, executive director of 
the National Alliance for the Mentally 
IH, called tbeir use a good idea for people 
who have trouble talcing their medicine. 
“It gets them off the downward spiral of 
relapse and readmisrion,” she said. 

More than a million people with 
schizophrenia are treated as outpatients 
in the United Stales each year, according 
to the National Institute of Mental 
Health. People with chronic schizophre- 
nia are typically on medications for years 
at a time. 


Dr. Weiden gave at the May meeting of 
the American Psychiatric Association. 

While some patients have relapses be- 
cause thdr medication is not effective, 
most rclapses occur when patients ho 
longer take thdr daily, phis. 


“About haif~ of pcople-with schiao- 
rina. their medication 


phrenia stop taking, 
each year. and three-quarters by the end 
of two years,” Dr. Weiden said. He add- 
ed that the failure to take medication is 
“a main reason why a third of patients 
released from hospitals never show up 
for their first appointment" 

With injectable medication. Dr. Wei- 
dea said, “we stand a much better chance 


of seeing the patient functioning two 
weeks later at their first outpatient clinic 


visit, rather than on the street or in the 
hospital emergency room during an epi- 
sode of acute sdnzpphrenic relapse.” 

Injectable neuroleptics were intro- 
duced in the United States about 20 
years ago but were poorly received. 

Dr. Weiden said errors were made in 
the doses, which were set to high- “Now 
that doses have been lowered, we find no 
more ride effects than with the oral ver- 


sion. 


But about half of those patients have 
relapses each year, according to a report 


The side effects erf neuroleptics can 
include a feeling of lethargy and restless- 
ness, and, over, many years, tardive dys- 
kinesia, in which muscles in voluntarily 
wriggle and writhe. The side effects are a 
major reason patients stop taking the 
neuroleptics. 


IN BRIEF 


FDA Approves AZT 
For Pregnant Women 

WASHINGTON (AP) — 
The U. S. government will al- 
low pregnant women with the 
AIDS virus to take the drug 
AZT to prevent spread of the 
disease to their babies. 

Burroughs Wellcome Co., 
maker of the drug marketed un- 
der the name Rjetrovir, an- 
nounced the Food and Drug 
Administration’s decision. It 
calls for women infected with 
HIV to receive capsules of Re- 
trovir during pregnancy and in- 
travenous injections of the drug 
during labor. The newborns 
would get Retrovir syrup. 

Federally funded tnals of 


AZT found that pregnant wom- 
en who used the drug after the 
14th week erf gestation reduced 
HIV transmission to their to- 
bies by two-thirds. 


its every August as Earth 
through 


Meteor Shower Due 
From Comet’s Debris 

BOSTON (AP) — Miss the 
comet crash on Jupiter? There’s 
another show coming, »nd it 
shouldn’t even require a tele- 
scope, at least on the West 
Coast of North America. 

The Persdd meteor shower is 
due to peak sometime after 
midnight Thursday. Clouds 
permitting, it will be seen best 
over North America. The show- 


er occurs i 

_ l chunks of debris 
left by the disintegrating Comet 
Swift-Tuttle. 

The peak should last two or 
three hours and be at its most 
intense around 5 A. ML Easton 
daylight time. 


YsHowstona Park 
Recovers Quickly 

KNOXVILLE, Tennessee 
(AP) — Yellowstone National 
Park has made a swift recovery 
from the devastating fins of. 
1988, according to the most de- 
tailed study yet on the after- 
math. . . 

The fires, which blaSrened 


about 36 percent of the park, 
raised concerns about perma- 
nent da mag e. Now, however, 
wildflowers, lodgepole pines 
and aspen seedlings are flour- 
ishing on the fire-scarred soil 
suggesting that the park’s re- 
covery is well under way. 

“The whole Yellowstone sys- 
tem responded very rapidly." 
said William Ro mm s of Fort 
Lewis College in Durango, Col- 
orado, at the annual meeting of 
the Ecological Society of Amer- 
ica and the American Institute 
of Biological Sciences. “Even in 
areas where all the plant cover 
was burned off, wi thin a couple 
of years there was fairly good 
plant cover.” 


CALLING ONE FOREIGN COUNTRY 


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herald Tribune! Thursday, August 'll, 7m 





Page 9 




THE TRIB INDEX: 115 . 22 HI 

Intemafional Herald Tribune World Sock Wex 
280 intwnaHwisfly tnvastable stocks Jroni25 cour™*® 3 * compnoa 
by Bloomberg Business Newa Jan. 1,1992 » 100- 
120 . —* ; . . ~ 


Nokia Phones Its Way to Success 

ByEriklpsen “^rSv^, 



Astar'P^ciftc 


Approx weighing; 32% 
Close: 132.04 Pw: 131 SB 


Approx, weighing: 37% 
Chsa: 11688 Pwrc t17JM 



By Erik Ipseo 

liatrno&ond Herald Tribune 

' The phones arc humming in Hdsmlri. 
At the world headquarters there of No- 
kia AB, the bicycle*tires-to-digiial- 
phones company, the tdecommumca- 
tions side of the business recently 
bounded past all other divisions to be- 
come its No. 1 money-spinner. 

' Powered by annual growth rates of 40 

percent and more, the phon« ade of 
Kdria has fulfilled its managers drearnot 
tranrfonnmg the company from an ob- 
scure Finnish congjomoate into a worw- 
beatmg tde a m u mmications corapaig. 

Since the beginning, of the year. No 
lpa' a telecommunications amts have won 
contracts including a $170 million mo- 
bile-phone job for AT&T Corp. m Amer- 
ica and entire cellular phone systems in 
Beijing and St. Petersburg. 

Nokia also announced in January a 
major leap onto the iirformaiion super- 
SSway with an nudknve to develop 
intelligent network systems with the 
computer maker Hewlett-Packard Co. 

Buoyed by that kind of perfonnance, 
Nokia last month became the 6»t Fto 


ADR 

is?— (preterreO) 


riwv Wednesday. During the same period, the 

•' company’s common stock has 

mSSSZk Ku U0495 


«K. Sf»V ; . ...'I 

k3fts?.’vfe ,e 


S Arirt* ' *■» !«■ 


raitsW won 1 mote 

xmtracu including a N70 million mo- $j|**SSpE- -flf -W 

nlc-phone job for ATST Corp. in Amcr- IMOKIA ~ 1 

ica and entire cellular phone systems in fv I , .& \ ■ 

Beijing and St. Petersburg. ■“S???, 

xirJrto also announced in January a > " y ’■ ; ='■ - 

SS.’tot^rfc international preferred stock offer, the 

^S rS HeS-Packard c °. ^^cver fSr a Furnish company. 

Nokia last month be^^e ^F^ risen almost 20 per- 
ish company ever listed “JeNwYwk pwitmy ^ ^ M7 g75 

r^rvork Stock Exchange on 


AS rewaiuy ■“ “ j’ — ... _ __ 

seen as a niche success story ^6™- 
bile phones, but not now. said E/an | 
Miller, an analyst with Lehman Brothers 
in London. “They had a lot to prove, and 

they have done it-" . - 

Life has not always .been so good*®* 
Nokia- Only three years ago its prospats 
looked bleak enough for the ccmpmys 
external directors to force major man- 
agement changes. ... 

Dragged into the red by its aJmS.®^" 
sumerSectronics arm andhy J?™?? 
pearance of its most mi>o^t martet, 
Se Soviet Union, Nokia s board wrned 
to a young group of executives whose 

aV Thf e nw group saw that developmg 
Nokia' s telecommunications business 
would be the key to success. Lade more 
than a decade ago Scandinavia, was the 
first region in the world to adopt a com- 
mon^tandard for mobile tdephones. 
and Nokia was qmck to take up the 
challenge by producing handsets and 
hase stations. ■ _ 

Today. mobUe phone companies 

See NOKIA, Page U 


Regulators Seek 
New System to 

Rate Derivatives 

By Lawrence Malkin ^SSd onihe bSan« sheets of 

Jntermiiional Herald Tribune banks and securities hOUSeS. As 

NEW YORK — Intonation- there is no agreed se- 
al bank regulators are moving method of comparing 

toward a new form of disclosure another to determine 

by dealers in denvauves that level ^ nsk. Working out a 

would use banks’ and secunues tcm could take years. 


yy — — - — . ■ me K.VU ui - - 

would use banks and secunues lcm could take years. 

firms’ own assessments of their * Beama; derivatives deals tn- 
positions to lei other invesiore ^ a variety of posiUOM in 
judge how risky it is to do bus- vafioU5 markets, often used to 
ness with them. ..... hedge exposure to other nsxs. 


posiuuiis w y— . . voive a vai 

judge how risky it is to do bus- varioU5 markets, often used to 
ness with them. ... hedge exposure to other nsxs. 

Some officials said a decision j s a danger that a few 

on a way to measure the nsks de f au j u could start a chain re^ 
involved with derivatives could lhat ^ould cnpple the 


invoiveu wiua ", 

come as early as next month at 
the Bank for International Set- 
tlements in Basel. . 

Just as in ordinary banking. 


mere is a ^6“ — , . „ 
defaults could start a cham re; 
action that would cnpple the 
world financial system. 

Derivatives are complex 
transactions derived hence 

r Mnu>nu>ni<i 


ucixujiLo ira.uaiu.uvai.-' — 

Just as in ordinary banking, ^pr na me — from movemenis 
too much business with too ^ suc h things as interest rates, 
many low-rated counterparties, currenc j es and commodities 
or serious mismatching of long- or jces and designed to hedge 
term and short-term credit v possib \ t losses when 


Nort)-. America 


Approx. «^6ng: 26% 
Close: 9420 PfWJ 8336 


Latin America 


Appoix wogrwg: » 
fitoset 132.44 Prev- 133.15 


| DU TOP Jrmmau 

Malaysia Looks Beyond Japan for <f^nol^y 

■ had al- transunsMOQ sysnnns. an > could turn to European oi 


i ox wiuw — -o — x nnces auu — - 

md term and short-term credit v po^ie losses when 

■ „ risks, could be a danger s*®— p^ces move unexpectedly. 

ues in derivatives trading. The by some companies 

problem is that because of their operator as bets with bor- 

rowrfmoney, they have ledj u> 

losses in the hundreds or mil- 
1 I _ lions when prices turn, ashap- 

C hnOlOfiTV pened this spring with Procrer 

UUV1V nJ & Gamble - Co. on an intowt 

rale swap and Metallgesdls- 

selves and warned that Kuala Lumpur djaft AG with oil futuitt- 
could turn to European or Bankers and th “ rep ^? 1 ^ 

companies if Mitsubishi continued to ^ been ^oriong with the 

hank staff and the allied Basel 
drag Its fee . , icnrvc chairman, y- Ranlrine SUDervi- 


rate swap -o— 

J w 1 wives and warned tnai is.uaia dhaft a q with oil futures. 

^ v v _) transmission systems, an analyst said ?Sniw European or American Rankers and their represaiia- 

By Michael Richardson Officials Wednesday... , ^ hetween Per- “mpaSS if MitsuS continued to lives have been woriringwthdw 

3 intenHokmai Herald Tribune USPD is ajomt v«im« Hrac its feeL bank staff and the aliurf Basel 

KUALA LUMPUR— Malaysia, dis- Peugeot Citroen SA m usahaan Otomobil Nasional and Diver- dr ^>. Ahmad, USPD’s chairman. Committee on Banking Supena- 

fflSo^Ja^Suc^ceto^ Benz AG in GfW ^Resources Bhd-, whrch ^ron how information migh 

toLitor-vehiSte tfldmJSsf and con- tors and Ford Motor Co. m th # sports modd and l arts Fren ^ b company would be bepubUshedperh^^rf^ 

cerned at the rising cost of Japanese United States. _ . . iroto’s assembler and distributor m M ^ ^ month, to give the market 

component imports, is looking to West- penisaha^Otr^bi^^ioi^ laysia. , he Malav- ^he joint venture is intended toman- y^ues of theu dmvauve hold- 

^WppUers to help develop its car formed in 1983, and its ‘ Mahathir bin M drnmad, the Um cars that will fill a gap between ^ ^d the credit standing of 



A M 


— "p » - 

_ ' . nhna, nnvtlirK nrt«- iwllirlp market. 


" 'Z'Z. ua** ' 

^K&ttnwr. H°na. Vo* end 

otherwise tfw tan lop stoc*a on backed 


the Proton to tne resi uj 

in lhe ‘value oT the yen, are likely oe stTong sales in Britain in the past cmrpte 
major beneficiaries of the new Malay- ^ yearSi but it is worried at the same 
S policy, officials and analysts say. time that a rapid nse in ite costs* 
Spurning traditional Japanese supph- j apa nese components over the past year 
erVPenisahaan Otomobil Nasional reduce the appeal of the car as a 

TUvt Malaysia’s main carmaker, said v alue-for-money buy. 


industrial Sectors 


Energy 

WUu 

Fteanca 

Senktt 


si^me minister, and his Fraicb 
counterpart, Edouard Balladur, were 
present at the signing. 

Mr Mahathir said that although Ma- 
lavsia wanted to retain its relationship 
with Mitsubishi 


The tomt venture is ~ values ui 

ufacture cars that will fill a gap between the ( 

ihe more powerful Proton range and a lh ]£ r partners, 
new small car with a Japanese engine -Everybody 
that is due to be launched for sale in ^mpmci " sa 
Malaysia this month. .. r . dealer. “The I 

This car, known as the KanciL is be- xal j t 50 thi 

. .. . 1 AfAimnKn KP- 


113.14 liaiB -OM 
125.48 125.70 -0-18 
11728 117.32 -QA3 
120.79 12088 -QjDS 


C^MCtooth ~T* 

RwliitwW ~ 

COBIWCOO^ 


ere, Peni^ihaan Otomobil Nasional reduce the appeal oimcuu^u 

. don ctaii «*«■■. Bhd.. Malaysia’s main carmaker, said value-for-money buy. 

■11787 11885 -08 3 recently that it planned to buy rar parte £ iast mouth in Paris, USPD Bhd., a 

191 Ra ^o i9 from European and American firms of- newly incorporated Ma^ystan coropa- 

13128 13183 rO. Bering lower prices. . ny, agned a memorandum of under- 

101.43 10086. 4087 Although majority held by Malaysian with the French company to 

,on % t«7i 40 j 49 government-controlled pnwtcs. the ma k e cars in Malaysia. 

— * 1 — : — - company is 17 percent owned by ^ a P a ° J * • ^ Citroen appears to be more willing 

*“**3? Mitsubishi group and conunues to rely MhsutMshTto transfer technology 

heavily on! ^ ^^^cularly Ac engine and 
parts. It^te established m 1983. . _ ^ 


lavsia warn™ This car. Known as "-““7“,:- 

with Mitsubishi through 1 built by Perusahaan Otomobil Ke 

gram, also want to lore fromtoe ^ 0 ^J joint venture between Ma 

French, for mstance m d^ign. {^an and Japanese compamtt u 

cn on. We don t want lO Mninr Co. has i 


Senktt 120.79 r^aa -vi» — company is 1/ percent ownpv 

- - .r.; ^.It ^estahliAcdml 

INTERNATIOHAL MANAGER — 

Akzo Nobel Matures Quickly 


Last month in Pans, uaru onu., « 
newly incorporated Malaysian compa- 
ny. signed a memorandum of under- 
idtog with the French company to 
mak e cars in Malaysia. 

* “Citroen appears to be more willing 

. w&l.; in tranter technology 


cation and so on. We don t wan which Japan’s Daihalsu Motor Co. has a 

remain bound to one source. _ ^ »»ercent interest. 

The development of . Mahathir’s enddsm of Mtt- 


^ d „=^-anauonaf^ racism of Mit- 

industry is a key part of ^bishi in March, KentaroShimai, gen* 

ment’s plan to make Malaga a y of Daihatsu, said he had 

industrialized country by 2020. assuran ces that the transfer of 

In March. Mr. Mahathusingledout Malaysia in the small -car 


gafisagsaaa aa ^ — — - 


By FerdinaDd Protzman 

Sew York Tones Serrice . . 

A B24HEM, Netheriands. — Akzo 
Nobel NV assumed its emporate 

5S£53SSa»SS 

to bufld nurfon 

fessa- 


tasr<ar^ 

SKTKHtEfe® GMCSHW 

ggseff^sssjsjs gg-o-af; 

C0MP#M* - ^ rAaaB i test week showed milUon to the doUar from 
Interim earo™? 5 : n the second lion last week, 

that Akzo Npbds n« mowne * Hie coupon is accep 


For Former Soviet States, Money in Chaos 

Georgia Free-Fall, Dniester and Russian Do-It-Yourself 

„ - - , .. huHpet bankno.es arrived in Tiraspol. ^ SUV °' 


E,vciyw u j 

computer.” said a London swap 
dealer. "The problem is to pre- 
sent it so that you don t give 
away proprietary information. 

One official said the disclo- 
sure would be related to how 
each firm conducts its own 
business and rates its own risk. 
“We have to compare banks 
with themselves.” be said. “We 
can’t use a general measure be- 
cause there is none. . 

Instead of comparing one 
bank or securities bouse with 
another, potential customers or 
traders would compare the lat- 
est report by any principal m a 
derivatives deal with a string oi 
its own previous reports and 
judge for itself whether it had 
moved into risky territory or 
was still sound enough to do 
business. 

“You can’t bofl it down to 
single numbers or an index. It 
has to be a matrix of expo- 

' sures.” said Neal Soss. who runs 

a hedge fund for Gilman Secu- 


T n ~i r r ttm / _ naS to DC a uu*v**« — r~ 

- aS-s, — — "SZ-tSiE* 

SSiSffi JjSUaBSK j!rSSSSiS: 

third of its tralue on the 1 bnu had been P™ 1 *® transnorted of them cranked out on increas- to ils value. It is worth just oresenl iLS report in its own de- 

wouid ta 


zeros to its value. It is worth just presen t its report in its own de- 

under 50 cents at the bank rate. \ aaCm How often these r^orts 
Meanwhile, across Russia, wou ]d be issued — wcek J>'; 
t 7 million rubles ($6,000) m mon ihlv, or quarterly — - is snll 


f u *' v, “ er ' weanesuay, nuu^ -7 — o— - ers a police oinciai across Russia, be issued — weewy, 

released last week showed million to the dollar from 1 - paid. Wednesday. 17 million rubles ($6,000) in monthly, or quarterly — is still 

mNobd? net income in the second lionlast --^ted in G*»rgja mlroduced the cou- Vyacheslav Zagryadsky, bankn otes was detected in a matter Tor discussion, but one 

^W48p^STbefore special pon at par to.the Rnsaan inible Dniesta RepubUc this week, accord- Official said regulators and 

5 milhSucoinpared with the ^te shops and Jo * last year, but ns currency hke - ^ g^d the coupons would ^ to ^ u, tenor Ministry. dealers wanted to have ' 

>eriod of 19^! Sales rose 5 percent to S^^used tol buy bear die portrait 0 * FOM^ ^At the roagiesr estimate ^at thing in place by the end of the 


fharees. to — — * — _ .. 

^^^}eriod of 1993. Sales rose 5 percent to 

S3 ibft^ma, Akzo Nobd’s executive vice 
^Stmftofeanoe, attributed the impr®- 

be supOTorio 
has cone very well, said mer 


Save not been paid their wages aSTunceS nuy R^an ^ 

f °A l ^^i bank official, Tey- P^“ m ^ L TbJS|S IMa^RSnblfe .'■' toe sepa- 

SSSffE^SSSS. SSL” 1 -“SLM. 

“o' 3lSS C-tb 120 tons of the new uses o!d Sove. ^bles wU, 

An 


icoai tw — . . 

notes are cuculating m Mos- 
cow,” said Yevgeny Tumanov, 
head of the police’s economic 
crimes department. 

According to Mr. Tumanov. 


a niauci ii#i ■ — ■ — - . 

official said regulators and 
dealers wanted to have s ? 1 ^' 
thing in place by the end of the 
year. 

■ Caier piDar Unit’s lass 

Caterpillar Financial Se_r- 

vices Corp. lost S13Jimilhonm 

the first six months of 1994 m 


According to Mr. Tumanov, the first six monins oi 
this typeof crime has bios- the derivatives markeu Bloom- 
somedsince high-quality pho- berg Business News reported 
tocopiers became available. The from Nashville. Tennessee. 

used bv counterfeiters The company, a unit or Cat- 

•>, T a m.ldT nt COU- 


h “ 

Senior managers focoJjing ^ those 

iS'.ssaS 1 "” 8 

Ste ^Wpercen. of coBbtarf 
sal«- few vears, the company reor- 

^ssasssss— ■ 


objective U to b»- 

N^^Americain Chicago, said AeronjMy 
™ji with an oral contracep- 


vear imac* «« 

3?4SSSfe?S 


On Cost-Cutting and wea 

The Atsodated Pnss lion reduction in income to pay 

CINCINNATI — Procter & ^ 

fiamble Co earned $406 mil- and dosed factories. 

brain its final Bm o^y gig ^> r * e gSSffoemHj 

^ t SJ2 !dcM “” 8 

with a SKH^nllion hoc denvauves 
loss of $1.22 billion in the same investments. 

oeriod a year ago- The 19931 ms That compares with a loss of 

was due mostly to aSli5M- S656 million last year. 


paper used by counterfeiters The company, a unit of Cat- 
Mmetimes is almost indisun- erpillar Inc. a maker oi co- 
guishable from the real thing. s imcnon machinery: 

“Metal threads are not used in cause it sold denvauves called 
mhiw because of the interest-rate caps and swap- 


lion, slightly lower than last m Counterf eiters favor 50, 000- 
Year’s $30.43 billion. ruble notes, worth about $25, 

The quarterly profit was near largest denomination in 

the high end of WaB Street pre^ RussiaL 

.. . — * r,amHe5 (Reuters. AP. Knight-Riddel 


Metal inreaos arc cause » ■ ■ — . .. 

Russian rubles because of the interest-rate caps and swqv 
cosi making counterfeiting tions” that would force 
much easier. 6 ^ piliar to make payments if to- 


me DIKII CU«J V-’* — * — — ", , 

dictions. Procter & G^nWes 
stock gained $1 .375, to $54,875. 


isl making couhi«iw«'*b lions uw» — - . . 

Kb easier. pillar to make payments if to- 

Counterf eiters favor 50,000- ier est rates rose, 
ible notes, worth about $25, “We are writing no more oi 
ie largest denomination m these kinds of contracts, sma 
usriaL Len Kuchan, director of mves- 

{ Rearers. AP. Knight -Ridder) tor relations. 


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5S of $1^2 billion in the same investments. . 

nod a year agp. The 19931 ms That compares with a loss or 

is due mostly to a $1.55 bil- j656 million last year. 

Sales in the fourth quarter 
— ™ grew 2 percent, to $7 JO billion. 

Procter & Gamble, the largest 
seller of household products in 

the United States, has been ai- : 

Au9 0 fected by competition from 
ECU cheaper generic products that I 

■rittp Franc VM ^ prompted many brand- , 

^ SK S3S name companies to cut their 

sw 2^2*. wvk price levels. 

•^ 4S The value of overseas sales 
was affected as stronger forragn 
nmwmmwMwww'' tawrencies were converted into 

dollars. The volume of P ro ^ u< jJ* 
that was sold rose 7 percent, 
imam company said. 

SET * * Procter & Gamble a£ 

mZm »* nounced its P 1 ^ 

lmikuhm 5% 5*w gram in July ^99^* ^ ® ,r 

K?wF^' 1148 t!ould eliminate 

^27* n * s! ^ MtTdose^^of its 147* factories 

wm mwpw* iJJ; |Sl within three years. 

EESSSSS g *j Ch^ Edwin 

Ettfourdiquaner^Usrepr^ 

uSSTaart 0^ retevo, comm ereum*. xalt & “significant progress 

Croon Lvonao^ OUT^t rCdUCUOD ob- 

QoU jSes” along wilh healthy 

Aji pm. or** growth in sales volume. 

S2S, SS SS Without ODC-dlM «Pfn^ 

»» -mo profit this year woidd have been 

US dollars per ounce. London *Me*H fix- 5^35 billion. Up from S Oil 
«ss.‘ Zurtctrand Mew Yort eecntmrundc** ,- die company 5810. 

ISmS sales were $30.30 bti- 


“Quadratua”. A solid gold watch 
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varan hMrtnM 
ymran ttWrtai* 


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ta QoU 

2 * » aJkL PJA. Cfl^e 

449 4X) jurto, 37B2S 37&» -MS 

Lnafam mao anao -us 

m 4fl0 NawYMK WU6 38240 -040 

^ [AS. cWfcJTs uer ounce, imnoeo eMesta ft* 
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Page IQ 


CNTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, T HURSDAY, AUGUST 11, 1 994 


** 


MARKET diary 


Stock Prices Gain 
As Worries Ease 


_ NEW YORK — Stocks rose 
Wednesday as worries ap- 
peared to ease about the second 
leg of a government refunding 
auction, this week’s inflation 
data and wend on Federal Re- 
serve monetary policy. 

Strong gains in technology 
and pharmaceutical stocks also 
supported the index. 

The Dow Jones industrial av- 
erage rose 11.00 points to 

UJ.«tocfcs 

3,766.76. Volume on the New 
York Stock Exchange was 
279.48 milli on shares. Advanc- 
ing shares outnumbered de- 
cliners by a 1 l-to-9 ratio. 

Statistics on July inflation 
and retail sales are due out 
Thursday and Friday. 

Analysts expect those read- 
ings will determine whether the 
Fed nudges interest rates higher 
for the fifth time this year when 
its policy-setting Federal Open 
Market Committee meets next 
week. 

Bond prices closed steady in 
spite of comments by Alan 
Greenspan, the chairman of the 


Federal Reserve, that stirred in- 
flation fears. The benchmark 
30-year issue was priced at 84 
18/32 For a yield of 7.57 per- 
cent, flat from Tuesday. 

Stock investors usually do 
not like to see interest rates rise 
because that increases the cost 
of money to companies and 
makes shares less appealing. 

Investors snapped up shares 
of drug stocks, as American 
Home Products' tender offer 
for American Cyanamid fueled, 
speculation about more take- 
overs. 

Merck rose 1 V4 to 32M, Pfizer 
climbed 114 to 6414, Schering- 
Plough rose 1 to 6714, and Up- 
john climbed 2 to 3534. 

Technology stocks rose for a 
second day, after the Semicon- 
ductor Industry Association 
said its July book-to-bill ratio 
had been better than expected 

Shares of Micron Technology 
soared 3% to 42V4, Texas Instru- 
ments surged 334 to 84, and In- 
tel climbed Vi to 5934. 

Novell was the most active 
stock, falling 11/16 to 15 after 
Goldman Sachs cut its rating. 

(AP, Bloomberg) 


Dollar Cuts Early Loss 
On Hopes of Rate Rise 


Bloomberg Business News 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
rose slightly against other major 
currencies Wednesday, cutting 
early losses amid speculation 
that tiie Federal Reserve was 
poised to raise interest rates. 

The doDar also was bolstered 
by the perception that Wednes- 
day’s second installment of a 
three-day Treasury debt sale 

F o f lgn isd ian gi 

went well, with 30-year bond 
prices unchanged on the day. 

Retail sales and producer- 
price figures for July due out 
Thursday should give investors 
hn idea whether the U.S. econo- 
my is growing fast enough to 
warrant a tightening in U.S. 
credit, analysts said. 

■ “Everyone is waiting for the 
numbers,'’ said Chris Iggo, in- 
ternational economist at Chase 
Manhattan Bank 
'■ Economists said the Fed’-s-- 
policy-makmg Federal Open 
Market .Committee was likely . 
to raise the rate on overnight 
bank loans at its meeting Tues- 
day. 

The dollar closed at 1.5844 


Deutsche marks, little changed 
from 1.5818 DM on Tuesday It 
dipped as low as 1.5727 DM 
earlier in the day. 

The dollar also steadied at 
101.425 yen after falling as low 
as 100.990 yen. It closed Tues- 
day at 101.300 yen. 

Lynn Tierney, a trader at 
Shawmut Bank of Boston, said 
many analysts were unsure how 
the dollar would perform after a 
rate increase. “It used to be that 
when rates rose, you just bought 
the dollar,” she said. “Now 
rates rise, Treasury bonds fall, 
and you sell the dollar.” 

Some traders attributed the 
dollar’s rebound to supportive 
comments from the Federal Re- 
serve Board’s chairman, Alan 
Greenspan. “It is very crucial 
that we recognize that the dollar 
is tbe reserve currency in the 
world,” Mr. Greenspan said in 
response to a question during 
congressional testimony. 

The dollar was little changed 
against other major currencies. 
It edged up to 5.4245 French 
TfrancaJrom 5.4190 francs and 
to U370 Swiss francs from 
1.3340 francs. 

The pound slipped to $1.5373 
from $1.5390. 



Dow Janos Av e r ages 


Open Hot W La* C» 

Indus 3739.97 3777 AS 37B.11 376474 +1160 
Trgra 1S90J6 1605X4 1S97.JS 78CSX9 +SJ2 
UU 18831 1X9J0 187.91 1B9J6 +079 
Camp 730353 WJM5 OH31 130W +427 


Standard A Poor’s Indexes 


m* low daw arm 

Industrials mg g&S +Ug 

Tramp, an. so 3 SLS 3 +oxo 

utilities is ? jo mao istju +ojs 

Finance 43.73 44X1 45.73 +0.73 

5P5W 44048 45730 46030 +237 

SP 700 43633 42271 <2532 + 2J1 


NYSE Indexes 


Composite 
Im fc nn i u b 
Tronte. 
LHBv 


MT 


NYSE Most Adiv« 



VaL MW) 

Law 

Last 

oe. 


53515 32% 

30% 

32% 

*1% 



28% 

28% 



34543 24% 

24 

24% 


MfcrTcs 

33327 42% 

30% 








GenBs 


0% 

48% 

—44 

Weirl 

28234 8% 

SVu 



NBerte 

K .1. J 

17% 

18 




84<A 




25000 33% 

32% 

33% 

♦ % 


22499 44% 

43% 

43% 



20730 15% 

14% 

15% 

tl, 

Mtekidtr 

20374 29% 

38% 

28% 



20037 35% 

34% 

35 

+ V, 

ACyan 

18*81 93% 

93% 




Law Last Ow. 

29437 23256 294.19 +133 
31248 31130 31154 +154 
74401 244J1 24444 +057 
412.17 21159 212111 +050 
21110 21233 21303 +031 


NASDAQ Most Actives 


NaveR 

KM 

DeOCptr 

Latus 

ErlcTADO 

QSCDS 

Ma 
MUCSflS 
LODSl 
DSC % 

VLSI 
Sytoases 
IrtoOv 


vbl hw> 

5S19S ISVj 
44780 60 Vi 
41274 331* 
41019 40% 
4)907 INte 
36746 22% 
34734 23 

aww 54 % 

26967 21 Vi 
2S698 23% 
25377 IS 
24650 42% 
24613 19% 
24142 l’Vu 
23286 51 


LOW Last 
14% 19 

57% 59% 

31% 32% 

35% 40% 

nvfa IAS] 
21% 21% 
22% 22Vu 
53% 54% 

20 21 
22% 23V* 

14% IWV* 
39% 42% 

17% 19% 


+ 1 % 


+ 1% 
+% 

+ 2 % 

+ 1 % 


AMEX Most Actives 


Nabors 

vkjcmrr 


spoavn 

Amfltil 

GctenB 

GreyLne 

ChrtMed 


VOL 

MOD 

LOW 

Last 

as. 

1171X 

9% 

9Un 

9% 

— % 

M 03 46Bu 

«P¥t« 

46%. 

+>%.. 

7880 

6% 

6% 

6W 

— % 

7516 

6999 

Si 1 

3% 

35% 


— *U 
+% 

6095 

3% 

2% 

3% 

+ <V|» 

4310 

6% 

6% 

6% 


00 

1% 

1 

1% 

— % 

3629 

6% 

5% 

5% 

— % 

3109 26% 

25% 

26% 

+ % 


NYSE 

Airm 


Cfc 
27948 
1012 


In million s. 


30931 

1752 

26725 


NASDAQ Indexes 


won 

Low Last as. 

COmpastte 

Induterkte 

Sava 

insures icu 

Finuncp 

Transp. 

727.93 

72S78 

772X0 

90563 

943X1 

73475 

72269 72761 *570 
724X5 72873 +4X6 
7*872 772X0 +362 
*9878 904X6 +561' 
942X0 941X1 +125 
77173 722-52 +164 

AMEX Stock loftox 


KWh 

Low Lai 

aw. I 


44461 

44262 443X7 +175 

Dow Joncn Bond Avofrogts 

TO Bonds 
10 Utilities 
10 induslrtote 


Close 

97X7 

93X1 

10264 

are* 

—ax 

—■833 

-+uA5 

NYSE Diary 



dose 

Pnv. 

Advanced 
Declined 
Unowneed 
Total issues 
New Highs 
New Lows 


1164 

944 

726 

2854 

47 

55 

974 

1145 

742 

2861 

29 

*4 

1 AMEX Diary 



Owe 

Prw. 

Advanced 
□echoed 
unczuxnoed 
Tata) issues 
NewHtahs 
New Laws 


210 

267 

249 

826 

15 

If 

280 

383 

259 

822 

14 

Z1 

NASDAQ Diary 



awe 

Prw. 

Advanced 
DKHned 
UnChanped 
Tatte issues 
NewHtahS 
New Laws 


1696 

1423 

1*13 

50B2 

88 

88 

1832 

1497 

1*46 

5D75 

. 5 
a 

Spot Conamodltl— 

Commodity 

AiumlnunvB) 

Cooper teedralytle. fe 
Iron FOB. tan 
Laod.a> 

Stiver, tray az 
Sled (scrap), tea 
Tin. lb 
zinc tt> 

Today 

0X55 

1.12 

21360 

■38 

5.15 

119X7 

NA 

0X818 

Frev. 

axs 

1.11 

21100 

Oft 

£14 

119X7 1 
0X850 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


Metals 


Bid Ask BW Ask 
aluminum (HWi erode) 

gsr- r,, ®r. 444» 

Forword 1<S5 MTLOC 1*6130 

coppc a cathoocs (nm orada> 

Oteters ear settle tee „„„ 

Soot 260250 261050 239260 

Porword MTftOO 2+1168 239600 

LEAD 

^""“^"SSLSO 56540 
Forward 57440 S74JD 58340 

NICKEL 

DtRnpB’iiwMelM 
Soot - 57240 573540 576040 

Forward 581540 501600 05060 

TIN 

DoOan oar metric tan 
Spat 570540 571540 308540 

Fwwerd 578540 510040 516000 

zme (Spodai nm orate) 
p^wiPvawMctaa 
Sear 93140 93288 92888 

Forward 95440 9SS40 05140. 




239MB 

239740 


96640 

58440 


577040 


516540 

92940 


Financial 

Hleh Low Dm 
3-MOMTH STERLING (UFTO 
GWX6*-ptsof IMpct 
Sop 9440 94.16 

Dec 9144 9137 

Mar 9286 9276 

JON 9237 9226 

Sap 9148 9149 

Dec 9144 •• 91X9 

Mar 91X2 9146 

Jwi 71.22 91.76 

50P SUM 9142 

Doc 90X5 90X1 

Mar POT 2 90 JO 

Jin 9842 9058 

EM. volume: 39X45. open hit: 542X1S. 
MMM1M EURODOLLAR* tLIFFE) 

SI 


*<» Ulj*. 

9 ia —am 

9244 UlKIL 
9336 —002 

9147 —an 

9145 —0X3 

9142 —003 
9122 — 0J» 
9144 — aw 

»a» —an 

9073 —002 

9841 —083 


SOP 

94X2 

94X1 

94X3 

+ 0X3 

Dec 

N.T. 

N.T. 

9*69 

+ 0X1 

Mar 

N.T. 

N.T. 

93X3 

UnteL 

Tea 

f*T. 

N.T. 

9151 

Unch. 


N.T. 

N.T. 

9123 

—am 

Est volume: 81 Open Ini.: 

m. 



UNO NTH 8U ROMANICS OJFFE1 


DM1 ndtiten 
Sop 

-ptioflMpcr 
95X9 9X65 

95X0 

+ 0X1 

Dec 

94X4 

94X3 

94X6 

+ 061 

Mar 

9470 

94X5 

9*60 

+ 061 

Joe 

9*36 

94X2 

94ft- 

+ 061 

tern 

MOV 

9465 

9467 

Unch. 

Dec 

9182 

9378 

X3J0 

Unch. 

Mgr 

93X2 

ns* 

93X1 

Unch. 

Jus 

9145 

9143 

9144 

— 0X1 

Sep 

93ft 

raft 

93ft 

— 0X3 

Dec 

9107 

93X8 

9366 

UikTL 

Mar 

N.T. 

N.T. 

92X2 

92X3 

—062 

Jn 

92X2 

92X0 

Unch. 


EM. volame: 50451. Opm bit: 791446. 
3-MONTH PI BOR CMATIF) 

FFS atnioa - ats of H* pet 


9*33 

via 

94X2 

Unch. 

94X5 

93ft 

9463 

+062 

93ft 

9166 

MTS 

+ 101- 

9152 

9145 

9169 

+ (L01 

93ft 

93ft 

Oft 

+ 062 

9368 

9361 

9265 

+ 061 

92X1 

92X5 

92X7 

Unde 

9273 

92X0 

9270 

Unch. 


Est volume: 30857. Open Int: 193,126. 
LONS SILT (LIFFEI 

63 1 888 -ptsBi nodi atm pet 

SOP 102-10 101-19 M2 ■m +0-72 

Dec 101-14 ltn-M Wl-24 + 0-13 

Est volume: 4L548 Open hit: 119491. 

GIRMAN GOVERNMENT BUND (UPFEJ 
dm man -pn of 188 pet 

SOP 9245 *243 9246 +046 

DOC 9283 9174 9179 +082 

Est volume: WQJB9. open Intx T74J54 
18-YEAR FRENCH OOV. BONDS (8AAT1R 
ptsef Wlpcf 

11688 1T5.+0 11572 —044 

11570 11446 71446 —044 

1M.TO 114.10 174.16 —064 

m N.T. N.T. 11138 —044 

EM. volume: 146742. Open InL: 132708. 


Industrials 


ISOM 15875 15348 ISIS +180 

15400 75475 75625 15625 + 048- 

16188 14000 15940 15940 Unch. 

7 6248 16825 16225 16280 UrKti 

16540 16250 16625 76425 +025 


HU Low Uwt MW Cfefee 


JOB 


16680 16375 IfiZ 16525 +075 
T, N.T. NT. >6475 linen/ 
16150 15375 . 15X25 —RTS 
9T NT. ■ NT. NT. 16650 +148 

or NlT. - NT. H.T. T6U0 +825 

E*. votvme; 22206 . Open hit W7AU 


as. i^ 


BRENT CRUDE OIL (1PE) ' 

IKS. dOBara PIT B u l l 111 Ml Of 1488 

SOP 1752 1748 1749- 1747 

OC . T7J1 Pft 1745 1745 

NOT 1748 17.0 1740 1740 

Dec 1745 1746 17JB 17X6 

1725 1721 1726 1720 

1727 17.18 T7J8 1731 

17 J8 1748 17* 1744 

NT. N.T, NT, 

SLT. N.T. 

Jn 
J ir 




1784 

NT. NX N.T. 1741 
NT. H,T. NT. 1459 
NT- XT. XT-- -1AJ9 
EM. volume: 0469. Dorn bit 171. 


—RIB 

—aw 

—aw 

—OI6 

— aw 
— an- 
—as 
—aw 
—an 
— 888 
—aw 

-045 


Stock Indexes 

- 

FTSEMtOJFFg 

» 31800 - 31554 31742 Until. 

■C 3M14 3RR0 3M» Undl. 

EX volume: WlONaIRi *8ft8L . 

CAC 48 fMATlP) 


oet ' 


201988 207288 20HS 

XT. XT. -Tj|X 


-O. njL - 

212680 212680 211280 — 8J0 

W . 213240 213240 .213940 -l* 

Est volume: 17221 Opbo tat: 52491. ■ 

Sources: Motif, Associated Promts 
London ton Ftnasc i e i Futures Exebmoo 
Inn Petroleum Exeb an oo 


IRRESULAR 
RA.T. Indn* C 823* +25 wa 

EnanbSA . c .1517 8-19 

WeUcnmtFLC c JT16 b-m 18-34 

&OPPTSX amount par ADX 


STOCK 


imedataQpp 


- 5* +25 9-19 


Da Nova Carpi for 10 reverse spin. 

' STOCK SPLIT 
OU*ran9ratR5tor 1 spot. 
PieMleK Inc5tar 4 wUL 
Total System 2 far .1 spat 


INCREASED 


Cob Com 
Leopotta. ptott 
Total Syatem 


B 425 S-Tf +30 
Q .16 B-26 9-15 
Q 445 9-22 KM 


CORRECTION 
ARCO 1997 DECS. d 4289 8-12 9-15 


CdnAhmioLoaf a 42 801 9-15 

to compMlon of 7 for 5 stack eon- 


tSt£S&° 


REGULAR 


AMwnFnKN 
Aftanv letlARB 
AILnerlca Secs 

Tr 


Atlanta GasU 


Balder Elec 
Cnca-Cota Battlias 
CslanMGas 
Co mm unity FsSlaeir 
Enron Corp 
Fit Brands Corp 
FXFlnBkstiratnc 
Hon Indue) 
MardtawacCo 
Mark Centers 
McDermott loH 
Mercury Gen 
Meredith Carp 
OeMeawi B Ga*i A . 
QuaetarCarp 
T ruXmark Corp 
VWRCor* 
WMXTactl 


Q 435 843 94 

Q MT5 9-2 1U 
31 Ml Ml 
M 845* 8-12 t-tS 
O 875 8-1* 9-1 

. 8125 f* 9-1* 
Q 42 8-1* 9-1 

a 22 8-25 9 -H 
Q M M. Ml 

8 25 846- 94 

815 9-1 9-15 

B .11 9+1 9-15 

Q .1375 9-1 940 

O 88 9-29 10-20 
e 88 9-16 16-1 

8 .11 . B-18 9-1 

' 85 94. 9-10 

. 86 8-18 849 

a 25 9-15 16-1 
Q .175 9-14 9-29 
Q .16 801 9+4 
O .1825 9-19 94 

Q 285 6-19 942 
Q .» 9-1 9-15 

Q M 6-ZJ 9+ 
G J5 941 106 


U.S./ATTHLCLOSE 


Greyhound Chief Executive Res igns 

sss f ^ wrf 

Schief — 

Greyhound e m erged from Chapter 1 1 bankruptcy prot 
October 1991. 


AT&T Pays for Eo Closing 

Bhombag Business News 

WASHINGTON — AT&T Corp. announced Wednesday 
that it would take a third-quarter charge of $50 million to $80 
million charge to dose its unit Eq Inc. 

On July 27, AT&T pulled the plug on the maker of personal 
communicators because of an inability to raise new capital. A 
company spokesman said that the charge would not affect its 
ability to meet earnings targets for the year. 

The spokesman declined to say how much AT&T had 
invested in Eo since its creation three years ago. Industry 
analysts estimated the company spent almost $100 million. 


Cyanamid Delays Bid Action 

Bloomberg Business News 

MADISON, New Jersey — Ameri can Cyanamid Co. urged 
shareholders Wednesday to delay a response to American Home 
Products Corp.’s $8 J billion buyout bid, while American Home 
threatened a proxy fight to oust Cyanannd's directors. 

In a Securities and Exchange Commission filing, American 
Home Products also described bow Cyanamid had resisted its 
overtures for weeks beforcit made its $9S-a-share offeFr '‘ 

Cyanamid, based in Wayne, New Jersey, meanwhile called for « ' , \ / 1 

shareholders to delay acting on American Home’-s unsolicited bid --'X0T ttl0 JxCOOrQ. 
until Cyanamid directors reviewed it 
American Home, whose products include the painkiller Advil, 
said in the SEC filing that its arsenal included the possibility of 
waging a proxy battle to replace Cyanamid directors. ' 


m dollars a year earlier-, l ne 

earlier results benefited £rom a 46-mfflioo-dollar tax ret*d<+ — - 
nue for the quarter increased 6.7 percent to 966 nnlhon dollars, 

ftl Foctiie first sk months, the airline’s 

do-Qaraiiom 279 milli on dollars a year earlier. Revenue increased 
9v4pacent to 1.87 WBion dollars, from 1.71 Whan dollars. 

U.S. Inflatio n Rate Steadies, for Now 

- WASHINGTON (AFF) — Leading LLS. economists largely 
believe inflation in the United States will remam stable at 2.7 
percdmin l994, according to a smyey rdeased W^negay 
The survey of 50 top economic forecasters by Eggert Economic 
Pnttwpy iyy ffhorai inflation projections were bdow what econo- 
mists consider a dangerous leveL The survey riiowed tjw econo- 
mists beBeved U.S. prices would rise 3.2 percent m 1995. _ 

Robot Eggert, who conducted the survey, said most eco nomists 
brf.' p wf riwt ’ consumer ' ^priccs can rise no more than 3.4 percent 
before triggering a cycle of higher inflation. 

Continental Says Italy Deal in Doubt 

.HOUSTON (AP) —Continental Airlines Inc. said Wednesday 
that regulatory delays could threaten its three-month-old partner- 
ship with Italian carrier AHtalia Airlines. 

The partnership is stalled because the UJS. Department of 
Transportation has yet to approve a code-sharing arrangement 
between the two airlines. Rival U:5. airimes have raised objections 
tr> the Continental- Alitalia ttrnmgwneht, saying it gives an advan- 
tage to.Contmeatal without opening the restrictive Italian market 
-to other carriers. 

“Wc are concerned tiiat the passage of time could jeopardize 
this affiance,” Charles T. Goo&bce, ContmentaTs executive vice 
president said. 

Venezuela Rescues Another Bank 

CARACAS (Reuters) — Venezuela will inject $294 million into 
Unnm de Venezuela and providc 5252 nriHicai in emergency loans 
to otim banks with Uquuhty problcans- 
The government announced the rescue padcage Tuesday, a day 
after it had seized the stra ggling .bank. Banco de Venezuela is 
ignth bank rffiad* have taEen over since January in a liquidity 
crimi that has cxacerbatcd Veneznda’s already severe recess on. 

Infonnatioa Minister Gufflczmo Alvarez Bajares said these 
measures represented “thede fina t h g sdutionto the problems that 
jhave been n unfaw ting the imiwwl fimmrial system.” 

Armeo Sdls Insurance Business 

PITTSBURGH (Bkxxnbcrg) — Armeo Ino, a Pittsburgh- 
based steelmaker, said V Wednesday it had, signed a definitive 
to sefl its ntsurancebnanesses for about $85 million to 


North Cantina. 

Armeo has been sdhng businesses an4eshingjoim ventures in 
an effort to focus on mala^stmiSesB and eScctucal steel 
Proceeds from the salewm be used to pty tiK drums filed with 
Annob*s tosnnmce snbricHaries that have .stopped writing, new 
policies and are bc^Jrqnirtaiiri^royi^id todays v - , 

• Toys V lb toe. mid it expected to opcn l40 ne* Books 'R* Us 
dqjartments by this autumn; the coatBrany cuzreotiy;bas more 
tiian 300 such departments in its Toys Us stcues. (Reuters) 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Aecnc* Fnro Prana Aub. 10 
OooaFnrv. 


Amsterdam 


ABN Amra Hid 
ACFHokllns 


AKzn Nobel 
AMEV 


6140 6140 
3820 3840 
IN >948 
-4740 4650 
22350 22140 
7650 7120 

M 3940 46.10 

CSM 68.10 6820 

D5M 144.10 14050 

EbNvtor T74 170 

FoMor 1040 1620 

Gtet-Bmcades 5080 5810 

-HBG 380 29850 

IWna Ka n 
UOOBOMOIN 8070 77.10 

Humor Douglas 8050 7950 

IHCCatand 
liUarMuener 
Inn Nederland 
KLM 


KNPBT 

KPN 

Nodltoytl 

OcaGflnlon 


PW «PS 


Hodam oo 
Ralbwo 


Parol Dutch 
Stork 
UnUevar 
von Om maran 
VNU 


6120 4048 
8250 83 

8180 8140 
5448 5340 
4920 4940 
5040 SO 
7140 7120 
7R9 7848 
5220 5220 
5550 3540 
7720 7720 
11740 1T740 
5520 5520 
12040 12020 
8740 8720 
79070 19040 
48.40 49 

19640 19440 
5248 5220 
18920 187 JO 


WaDerm/Khmar 13L10 11920 


Brussels 

2570 2600 



r Frankfurt 

AEG 18120 183 

Alcatel SEL 325 329 

AlllanZ Hold 2627 2428 

Atlana 63B62&50 

A Ska 1008 1006 

BASF 3222032340 , 

barer 366J0 J6»j 

Bay. Hypo bank 418407 JO 
Bay VaretaJbfc 461 435 

BBC 770 770 

BHF Balk 384 3B1 

BMW B4150 860 

Commarzbank 32920330J0 
Continental 2674026840 

OfiWBW »g rt 8 » 

3H1305U50 
25148 263 
iBank 723J0 730 

49049650 
‘Batik 3B 384 

M* 307 316 

HGRKh 22*4022150 
33S50 340 

IT SM5MJD 

Itef 907 905 

3*84034940 
860 866 

Horte* » » 

38438150 
13740 140 
57159050 
520 515 

13I130J0 

PVIRrfc* 16040 U9 

iflOonnamann 4 C20 4 47 

sg 

(Prassag 488 4 8330 




PWA 
RWE 

Rhatamefull 


264 216 
46266720 
329 330 



Helsinki 


Amor-Yhtyma 

Erao-Gufrrtl 

HuhtamaJd 

K4XP. 

Kytnmene 


Nokia 

FohtaJa 

Rasala 

Stoctonm 


126 

126- 

44 44.10 

170 

169 

1070 1030 

128 

130 

175 

170 

495 

499 

a 

0 

103 

99 

222 

222 




Hong Kong 

Bk East Alfa 3230 3T40 
Cathay Pacific 1285 12.90 
Chsuno Kong 3&50 3720 
China Uoht pwr 3*30 3160 
Dairy Farm Inn 11.60 1120 
Hang Luis Dev 1435 1325 
Hang Sang Hank 5520 5420 
Henderson Land 40.10 3820 
HK Air Ena 4120 46.90 
HK China Gas 1635 1435 
HK Electric 2325 Z3A5 
HK Land 2UB 2020 

HK Realty Trust 21.10 21 

HSBCHOWtROS 9935 9625 
HKSnangHtfe 1120 has 
HKT eleaimin 1605 1523 
HK Ferry ii20 15 

Hutch Wharnnoa 3640 3526 
Hyson DOV 23.15 2275 

Jardlne MORl 6335 6133 
JanttaB Sir HU 2920 2920 
Kawlaan Malar 15-10 1538 
Mandarin Ortont 1040 1030 
Miramar Hotel 2120 21 

New World Dev 2520 2423 
SHK Praps 5135 5035 

5tehnc 330 3.10 

SMlraPacA 6135 6175 
TW Cheung Piw 11.15 1250 
TVS 175 175 

Wharf Hold 3120 TOAD 
Wtaa On CO Inti 1180 1175 
Wlneor ML 1180 1120 

ssusteti""* 


GenlAcc 
Glaxo 
Grand Met 
GRE 
Guinness 
GUS 


HlUsdown 
HSBC HidBS 

ici 

inchcaae 

KlnfWier 

Ladhrokr 

UmdSec 


Lasmo ■ 

LtoalGen Gr 
Lloyds Bank 

Marks Sp 

MEPC^M 
nourD 
NctWestl 


Johannesburg 

AECI 
Attach 
Angle Amer 
Btniowi 
aiyvoor 
Buffets 
De Beers 
Drtetaoteta 
Gencor 
GFSA 
Harmony 
HWivekl Steel 
K l oo f 

Nedbont G rp 
RandtontBln 
Ruxptat 

SA Brews 
St Helena 
Sasel 

western Oeeo 


2650 
118 

256 

3329 33.50. 
1120 TO 
45 44T 

1192011720 
6835 65 

1120 1170 
128 126 
2775 27 

32 31 

61 5720 
34 3375 
4775 4835 
102 9? 

8820 5335 
65 44 

,34 3120 
1M19IJD 


8SSr?MBf" ,,J4 


London 


AMNVNan 
Allied Lyons 
ArloW&gli» 
Argyll whip 
A n Brit Poods 


Bank Scotland 
Berctavs 

Baa 

BAT 

BET 

BiueOrcte 
BOC Group 


Bowotar 

BP 

Bril Airways 
Brit Gas 
Brft sted 
BmTtieeam 
BTR 

CMown 

C tamunr 3ch 

Corodsn 

Coots Vtyella 

ConunUnlai 

Coortaukts 

ecc Group 

enterprise OH 

Eur o t u nnel 

Fbwra 

Font 

gEC 


4 

MS 

220 

Z78 

542 

4.96 

585 

145 

R64 

5L61 

433 

1.19 

172 

787 

ii 

6.12 

435 

242 

124 

Z81 

186 

646 

688 

326 

230 

526 

547 


3.10 

to 

247 


3.96 

5.95 

247 

2J0 

578 

ATS 

583 

146 

572 

526 
471 
1.19 
3J9 
748 
537 
470 
AW 
6.14 
246 
122 
279 

347 
428 
689 
US 
230 
525 

527 

349 

621 

348 
126 
236 
288 


PRO 
Pllklnetan 
PwerGen 
PrvdNitM 
Rank Ora 
Rsckltt Cal 
Rediand 
Reed Inti 
Reuters 
RMC Group 
Rolls Rove* 
Roltinwi (unit) 
Roto) Scot 

Sdrabury 
Scot Newcas 
Scot Power 


Severn Trenl 

.Shell 

Siebe 

Smttti Nephew 
Smith Kline B 
Smltti IWH) 
Sun A1 nance 
Tate A Lyle 
Tesco 
Than) EMI 
Tomkins 
TSB Group 
Unilever 
uw Biscuits 


war Loan 3% 
W e U cu n i e 
WM Thread 
Williams Hdgs 
Willis Carraan 
f.T. 


Clow 

Prey. 

■ 5X1 

598 

6ft 

All 

4ft 

420 

1X0 

1X0 

~ 'M 

446 

571 

S76 

2X7 

2X3 

174 

175 

7X5 

8.12 

8-55 

&X6 

475 

4X5 

575 

5.17 

1.70 

172, 

675 

672 

■ 1X4 

8X8 

1.55 

155 

» 4ft 

4X2 

554 

5X8 

130 

432 

475 

475 

4X2 

4X3 

r m 

<59 

5J7 

457 

451 

7 

765 

1X3 

1X6 

550 

560 

3.10 

3.15 

464 

467 

*69 

404 

560 

545 

875 

8.U 

4X2 

4.91 

9X7 

iai2 

262 

1X5 

1 1X3 

3X4 

3X1 

3X4 

872 

871, 

471 

423 

573 

375 

ITS 

3X4 

173 

171 

5X0 

560 

7ft 

7ft 

6.17 

678 

r 159 

158 

430 

477 

4X4 

4X4 

118 

372 

4ft 

441 

2ft 

243 

Klft 

K45 

137 

2X4 

Z13 

116 

1052 

10X3 

133 

539 

1X1 

IXT 

0ft 

4144 

6X0 

473 

5X4 

5X2 

1 189 

170 

1.55 

1ft 

UO*" 


Sex; 3187 



Madrid 

BBV 3165 3178 

Ben Control Hlsp. 2780 2775 

Banco Sont on di 5380 5370 

Bonesto 1120 1110 

CEPSA 3325 3343 

Draoadas 2340 2315 

E ndesa 6220 6230 

Ercros 186 IS1 

Kienjroia 941 950 

4190 4200 
Tdxwrtero 3545 3470 

Tetetenlea 1825 1825 


Milan 


Banco Comm 

gostoal 

Beoefl on group 

Clga 

OR 

Cred llal 

EnJOTe m 

Ferfln 

Ferfln Rho 

Flat SPA 

Finmeccanica 

j^menill 

IFIL 

itokem 

1 taigas 

italmabUlore 

Mediobanca 

Montedsan 

Olivetti 

Pirelli 

RA5 

Rtaaseente 
Satpecn 


4480 4565 
148 150 
22400 23650 
1082 1093 
2483 2520 
2058 2075 
2845 2980 
ISM 1MB 
1150 1175 
6575 6640 
1800 1820 
Altai 40500 
26900 26650 
OS 6315 
11990 TWO 
SOB 539 
41100 42000 
14900 14700 
1432 1447 
2175 2215. 
4W0 5020 
24550 24800 

57W HOD 

4030 4130 

Sen Paata Torino 9585 96*0 

IP 4325 OH 

SMB 3780 3800 

Snta nn 2375 

Simla 36293629 

■tet . 5100 5150 

TaraAlSiRISp 2640026808 


8saigs?i,r 


Montreal 


Alcan Aluminum 

Ira 

33% 

Sank Montreal 

MV! 

23% 

Sen c«n«ta 

46% 

46% 


20 

20 


17% 

18 


N.T. 

6 


7 

7- 

Donohue A 

12% 

im 


FCA Inti 
MoCMlItaaBl 
Natl Bk Canada 
Power Com 
Provlpa 
Quebec Tel 
Quebecer A 
B 




4.15 4.1 
19% 

9% 9% 
19* 19W 
6 

19% 19% 
XT. 18% 
18% 18% 
19% 19% 
12% 12% 
:19SU7 


Paris 



872 

671 





AlrUoukSe 

828 

831 





Alcatel Atoitam 

634 

265 

645 


Sydney 



49170497X0 

Amcor 


974 

975 

BIC 

1290 

1310 

AN2 


40 

416 

BNP 

239 341X0 

BHP 


19ft 

19X3 


447 

650 

Boren 


3ft 

3ft 

Danone 

80 

645 

Bougaimrllto 

0X8 

Oft 

Candour 

2090 

2063 

ICotesMyer 

473 

4 ft 


rrt mu m7n 

cerws 1144811478 

Oxirpeurs 1318 I 
ClmeilfS Franc 316J0 315 

aubMed 40i.«4oejo 

EH-Aauitalne 418.19 417J0 
Euro Disney KJO KUO 
Gen-Eaux 967 

. . 47050 470 

I metal 613 

Lafarge COppee 439 
Legrand 6480 6470 

Lyorv Eaux 538 543 

Oreal IL1 1195 11»» 

L-VJWJ-L 865 8(8 

Matra-Hachctte 117JB 119 JO 
MtcneilnB 249.90 24870 
Moollnex 12570 12550 

Paribas 37040 377jo 

_ ■ Wit 16430149.18 
Pernod-Rkurd 34620 
Peugeot 862 

Plneutt Print 927 939 

RacflaTetTwUaue 512 

RtvPouleoc A 14178 14060 


Comal cc 5 5J» 

CRA 19.16 1976 

CSR 6J0 CBS 

Fosters Brew l.n U3 

Goodman Field 144 146 

ICI Australia 1172 1172 

Magellan 175 US 

|6MM 2.98 258 

Nat Aast Book 1L18 1174 

News Coro 587 876 

Nine Network 655 650 

N Broken Httl 3J7 161 

PacDumop <52 655 

P l oei j r Wl 250 298 

(Ntnpdv Poseidon 272 271 

QCT R eso u rces 1 55 150 

iSactoS 401 4 

TNT 265 266 

^tem MWng 770 778 

W estp oc Banking <59 44a 

Woodslde 431 430 


Etafl-SL Louis 
Soned 

SoJntGotxrtn 

S£X 

Ste Generate 
Suez 

Thomson-CSF 

Total 

UAP. 

Valeo 


1611 1617 
959 960 

69B 700 

543 547 

992 397 

2622026670 
1707017210 
3Z7J0 32L5B 
151.40 15650 
291 




Sso Paulo 

Banco do Brasil 2170 2170 
741 7 40 

. 775 770 

Brahma 269 270 

Comte 9480 ISO 

Etetrobros 290 

Itautoonco 230 

Uebt 315 

Paranmnema . 16 16 


Tetesp 

Usiminas 

Vote RtoDoce 
Varlg 


1223012250 
5718 6810 
4573 46 

425 
1.17 1.18 
119119.99 
XA. 7578 
45133 


Singapore 

a 7js 

7 7.13 
IU8 1170 
1770 17 

1340 1348 
287 272 
3.18 370 


— Neove 
Genthtg 
Golden Hope PI 
Haw Par 
Hume industries 
Indicope 
Keivel 
KLKenons 
Lum Chang . 
Malayan Banks 
OCBCforatan 
QUB 
CUE 

Semhowang 
SronsrHa 
Skne Darby 
Sia foreign 
S ‘pore Land 
5 ■pore press 
Stag SMmstdp 
roore Teiecomm 
Straits Tradtag 
uob foreign 
UOL 


160 530 
1060 I860 
602 3J4 
149 149 
940 945 
1620 K3D 
670 670 
UO 035 
1070 11 

570 570 
672 674 
1370 1370 
775 770 
1630 1658 
606 614 
12 140 
jc 348 
1370 1350 
224 223. 
: 227651 


Stockholm 


ASA 
Aseo A 
Astra A 
Altos Ca — 
.tadrcHux B 
Ericsson 


6770 67 

631 632 

1619 169 

97 96 

384 388 

411 490 


Handetsaonkon 
investor B 
Nor* Hydra 
Procardia AF 
Sandvlk B 
SCA-A 
S-E Ban km 
SkoncSa F 
Skaroka 
SKF 
Stern 

Treilebara BF 
Volvo BF 
AWoerava ariaen : 1W7JS 
Previews : Twill 


OoeePrev. 

96 
177 181 
2423026559 
111 181 
120 119 

117 in 

4690 46.10 
114 116 

149 151 

153 154 

650 651 

103 186 

155 778 



dose 

Prev. 

j Toronto 


Abtttbl Price 

18X3 

1875 


16X8 

UTS 

Air Canada 

7 

6% 


21X8 2175 

Am Barrlck Res 

3025 30X3 

BCE 

46X3 

48% 

Bk Nova Scotia 

26.13 

25% 

BC Gas 

1475 

14% 

BC Tekram 

3488 

34X0 


4X0 

478 

Brunswick 

10 

10.13 

CAE 

7 

7 

Camdev 

S 

5 

CISC 

3081 

3825 




Tokyo 

AM Seetr 668 471 
A30IH Chemical 772 761 

AsaW Glass 1210 1220 
Ba% ef Tokyo uto 1560 
Bridgestone 1620 1420 
Carton 17® 1730 

costa 1278 12*0 

Dal Nippon Print 1930 wo 
Dalwa House 1480 K90 
Dahva Securities 1620 1620 
Faroe 4440 - , 

Full Bank 2320 2320 

Pu l Photo 2280 2248 

Fujitsu URO 1060 

Hitachi 1020 1020 

Hitachi Cable 893 884 

Honda 1740 1740 

Its Yofcodo 5290 5270 

tiochu 720 72D 

Japan Airlines 733 730 

KOllmc 965 966 

Kansol Power 2630 2M0 
Kawasaki Steel 418 415 
Klrtn Brewery 1230 1230 
Komatsu M 9*6 

Kutwta 749 746 

Kyocera 7440 7498 

Matsu Elec lads 1790 1770 
Matsu ElecWks 1140 1LJD 
MHaTOWllBk 2620 2620 
Mitsubishi Kase! 347 535 
ttUtMUNllEIOC 694 671 

Mitsubishi Hev BIO 806 
Mitsubishi Corp 1238 1288 


Mitsui and C0 
Mitsui Marine 
Mltsukafal 
Mitsumi 
NEC 

NGK Insutotors 

tUXko Securities I75D 1240 
N tenon Knaaku W30 1038 
N .toPcn Ofl 754 745 

Nippon Steel 270 368 

Ntaorri YOsai 661 657 

NtaB) 7S3 779 

NmuraSec 2M0 2250 
NTT __ 8580a MTtta 

Olympus Optlad 1H0 1180 

Planter 

WCcti 
SonroElec 
Sharp 
•Sfthnazu 
SNnet*u Chefr 
5aay 

Sumitomo Bk 
Somttarap Chem 
Suml Marine 
Sumitoma Metal 
~a!s4lCBn> 

TakedaChem 
TDK 
Tallin 

Tokyo Marine 

Tokyo Eke Pw 

Toopan Printing 1500 1508 

Taray Ind. 773 778 

Toshiba 748 774 

TOVDtO 7190 2178 

YtenaleM Ste 893 80S 

cxMft 

223 

I 


1 863 959 

815 823 

I860 1830 
1590 1710 
1260 1250 
1860 HUB 


2850 WO 
976 973 
583 574 
1810 1820 
729 738 
7130 77 20 
5980 5900 
2030 2010 
534 544 
923 935 

323 323 
665 665 
1220 1230 
4470 4530 
592 582 

USD 1270 
3050 3870 


Canarflan PodUc 2Z2S 2225 


Can Tire A 


Cara 
ca. ind B 
Cbieplex 
Com Inca 
Corniest Haul 
CSAMstA 


DylexA 

Echo Bay Mines 
Enutty Stiver A 

Ram 

Fed Ind A 

Fletcher Chall A 

FPI 

Genfra 

GuirCdaReS 

Heeslntl 

HemtoGW Mines 

Holiinoer 


Hudson’s 8aV 

Imasca 

Inca 

IPL Energy 
JwinDCfc 
Lohott 
LotSawCa 
Mackenzie 
Magna Inn A 
Monte Leot 
Mortthne 


A 

Ind A 
... jpe 

Noranda Forest 
Noreetl Energ y 
Nil »■ Telecom 
Nova Carp 


PagurtaA 


Pucu Petroleum 
PWA Corp 
Royrock 


togws B 
Rommara 
Royal Bait Can 


Shell Cim 

SheniH Gordon 

SHLSYStemhse 

Saumarn 


5 telco A 
Talteman Energ 
T edt B 
T homso n . 

Toronto Dctnn 
Torstar B 
Transatte mil 
TraneCdaPtoe 
Triton FM A 
Trlmae 

Untaarg Energy 

istssmi* 


11-2S 1075 
2D 20 
185 390 
7-38 9% 

5 5. 

71.75 21% * 
2188 24 

1050 10% 
2250 22% 

069 072 
1525 .15% 
080 078 
4.15 4J5 

681 7 

I7J8 1725 
A13 6% 
037 038 

6 6 
1235 1288 
1288 12% 
1283 T2J0 
1888 189b 
2535 2563 
3530 3599- 
3735 3763 
2988 30% 
1663 1663 

28 ft 
2038 20a 
763 7% 

5113 51 

1213 1235 
ZLS8 2025 
763 960 
2125 21% • 
588 5% 
2588 2SH . 
1188 lib 
1688 16JB ■ 
4635 45% 
1360 13 

19.13 1963 

330 338 . 
2763 2735 
925 9% 

059 058 
15 1435 . 

2788 28% 
2088 3038 
74 77% - 
2863 28 

1260 11% 

060 8% 
4025 42% 

763 7% 
4425 44 

1263 12% 

7 725 
1688 17.13 
1525 13.13 
060 038 
2988 2960 
2288 228* 
1535 15% 
20H 20% 
2488 34% 
1425 14% 

17.13 17% 
AW 195 • 

16.13 15% 
130 160 
.10 


Zurich 

Adta Inti B 250 2S7 

Alusoisse 8 new 686 486 

BBC BTwn Bov B 1285 1272 

a&o GetevH 814 812 

CS Holdings B 
ElektrawB 

RKMfB 
Interdbcsunt B 
jelmoll B 
-Landis Gvr R 
Moevenptafc B 
Nestte R 

oertDc&uehrteRWo uo 

PargemHUB 1500 1510 
Roctie Hdg PC 
safra Rasubflc 
Sands B 
ScWndterB 
5utter PC 

Survelllonce B 

Swiss BnfcCarpB 395 3N 
Swiss Rebtsar R S50 s« 
SwtBdrR 851 £0 

UBS B 1112 1109 

Winterthur B <88 683 
Zurich ASS fi 1288 T285 


544 _ 

368 3*3 

1510 1505 
2170 2178 
■95 895. 
790 797 

419 412 

1182 lie 


5640 5688 
114 117 
715 712 
mo 8050 
966 973 

21ft 2115 





U.S. FUTURES 


VlQ 


10 


Ken Low 


Open Utah Lew Oon Che OpJnt 


Grains 

IT «CBOT1 UODhinMnn-Mnw 

367% 368 SBP 94 329% 384 329V* 

165 109 DeC9U 1MV, 14*% 3 6» 

364% 127 Marts 362 15S% 360% 

OSSVS lUVi Marti 36D 145 

04» 111 JulfS 181% 381 330 

Dec 95 

Etf.srfes XA. Tim's. utex 111447 
Tue'scswnM 41,15* up 3*1 
WHEAT OCBOT) umumHw»4enw 
365% 33Z%Sap94 142 365% 141% 

360 llIVbDec** 368% 362 3M% 

369% 125 Mar 15 147% 122 367 

147% 321%Mc»f5 144% 364% 344% 

383% 116% JulTS 127 332 229 

383 129 Sep 95 

Dec?* 

EM. safes XA. TWLStees UH 
.Tue'sopenW 776*5 eft 535 
CORN (Chon menu nWWtwm. mtimr* 
262% 2.14 SWM 11* 319% 2.17% 

177 2J7 Dec 94 121% 221% 221% 

282% 224 Mar 95 280 233 130 

285 222% MOV 95 227 229 327 

285% 286% 84 95 261% 263% 261 

170% tJB Sep 95 263 264% 143 

263 225% Dec 95 164% 26*% 264% 

159% 267 Julft 

EX safes XA. TM'Atfes 19897 
TurtapwW 2112*4 Of ici 
SOYBEANS KSOT1 IMWtfk 
725 571 14 Aug 94 5J3 564% 

7JXV, 560% Sep *4 IOV. 5J1% 

767% 561 NOV *4 £64 565% 

72* 560 Jon 95 572 573% 

785 569 Mar95 580% 582% 

785% 175%May95 587% 558 

784% D*%Jul95 550% 59» 

574% £37 Aug *5 

£88 £77 SeptS 

660% 52*% taw 95 £93 357 

Jill 96 

EXsete* XA. Tim's. ccfles 22686 
Turtopenw injra up 6H 
SOYBEAN MEAL tCTOT) U0M»dBta«M 

man tTCJOauu** dibo otto d*to 

21000 1716DSenM 17280 T7110 17280 

207J1 17080 Oct 94 17380 17280 T71J0 

2W.00 1 7060 Dec 94 17280 T71D0 T7100 

2B760 171 60 Jen 95 1712D 17170 17250 

2&JB mJKMirtS 17501 77560 T74J0 

20780 17480 May 95 17663 17780 17660 

20680 17580 Jul 95 17780 17880 177ft 

1*180 17*85 Aug 95 

11288 17660 Sep 95 

Est safes XA. ItetShl 13827 
Toe’s open H BL209 ell St 
SOYBEAN Ofl. (CSOTl *aoaato-i 
3065 21 65 AIM 94 2*88 246 

3084 2288 S«) 94 2483 2484 

2964 22.100094 24.14 2444 

2387 2280 Dec 94 ZLM 229* ZV4B 

2&B 2265JWI95 2352 2353 2381 

2S80 2253 Mor 95 2US 2155 2385 

2S85 2253 May 95 2385 2355 2365 

2785 21808*95 2380 2153 2380 

2780 EL55AD095 2350 2350 217* 

*175 2255 Sep 95 2175 2X88 2173 

211* 33500095 . 

2380 22J0Dec95 

EX sales XA. -nM*s.estes 148*0 

Toe'S epenlnt VMS Ml 1726 


383% +0823* 14800 
367% +082 3SJ33 

364% +082% 9877 
369% +083% OS 
£33 4-BUS 1811 
360 3 


145% +063 M.140 

363 +882% 77ft* 


451 


362 +081% 

£64% +881% 

382 +082 401 

385 +481 1 

362 +IOT 1 


2.19% +081 3£984 

£23% +081% 18*865 
2-32% +082 25847 
18B% +081% 10525 
263% +881% 9806 
264% +081 699 

286%+8JIH6 *.964 
269% +060% 11 


£68% 

£0 

-0X0% 14X42 

111ft 

76X5MOV 95MOX0 

107X0 

10760 

M81D 

+ 1XS 

1670 

582% 

£83% -0X0% 71821 

11130 

7860X495 



107X0 

+1X5 

829 

570% 

571% 


118X1 

7530 Aug 95 10860 

10830 

100X0 

18878 

+170 


5X0 

3X0% 

4X8 

11*65 

79Jtt3*p93 



10450 

+1X5 

681 

£X7 

£W 

-0X0% 

3X99 

11365 

75X004795 10870 

10*70 10870 

109X1 

+1X5 

40 








10890 

109X5 




5X1 

-060% 

141 

T09JB 

SB600#c95 



TO570 

+1X5 

853 


5X0% +0X0% 

M 

1BB60 

■859 Jon 98 



10370 

+1X5 

® 

3X3 

3X3 

+8loi% 

2X27 

10560 

8270 MW 98 



10*70 

+1X5 

131 


6.10 

+862 


110X0 

91 JO Apr 9* 



UBX5 

+1X5 

151 






May 94 



10*40 

+1X3 


17360 +0.10 6,197 

17280 -080 19864 
17180 — 4L3D 106*4 
172.10 -080 32867 
17380 .4812 

17580 +B.18 &S 

17*60 +050 38*7 

17780 -Aft 1864 
17980 —080 125 

17780 -4ft 49 


. ._ -AM XB06 
24.13 —a.!* 20682 
3481 -00*75670 

2389 —081 33-52B 
3389 -08T 4595 

W — t Ml 

3890 +0JH 1516 
2190 +08* 1685 

2187 +111 217 

21® +117 50 

Z365 +030 1 

2161 +025 3 


Livestock 


CATTLE KMEM Atefer 

7285 6*60 Aug 96 7*65 

74.10 6£70Od*4 7280 

7480 O80Dec*4 7180 

7*35 arjOFteoTS )1Z7- 

7SJ0 STftAprtS 7150 

4960 54.40Jun« 6*87 

6US 6755teM«S . 

Estates 1AST TIM'S. «fes 



- . — IBft 7960 

STS 7UDStp9* 7*65 7jn TBjSO 

rus 7855 Od 9*' 7753 7885 7767 

Ja® 7260 taw 94 7165 79.70 7AH 

HK 7S5UBI9S 7UB 7130 7750 

7L» 7135MOV95 

8085 7265 War 96 76.10 76ft 76J0 

7660 7265 AAT 96 

EX sites 1811 Tue'L Mix 16- 
Tim's cpepW HE oil 59 


, . 4269 AIM 9* 4587 44.15 4560 

«JS 3960009* 4162 4IJS 4187 

Sm XftDKM 4185 41ft 4168 

Oft 3UBF«bH ilX tlB 4U7 

3U5Apf95 XIO 4060 4005 

<760 Oftjmfs 4430- 4US **90 

45ft Cftjmn 44ft 4*90 44ft 

lug 95 

460 JWC0O9S 40ft fft 40ft 

jx.nte* ** 

Toe'iapeni* Kill ott ms 


Sf JB Sift Ah 94 34ft 32ft 

JS SS S3 

Tue^-Bte* 2JO 

Tim's aeon H 7891 hr W 


427 

79.1» 

7881 

7987 

7U0 

7580 

76ft 

7565 


41ft 
4165 
41ft 
jom 
4585 
4 *47 
<135 


3247 

0.10 

XT? 

6*75 

AC 

0ft 


+860 2568 
+030 3,1*2 
+*82 ZJtS 
+080 1893 
+0.15 599 

+081 5* 

+ 885 90 

+AI8 145 


-08213634 
—087 Aft* 
-41ft 1691 
+987 MW 
+083 46T 

—Oft T32 
+008 V 
+020 3 


+160 90 

+035 6612 
+031 354 

42 

+043 66 

+060 14 


Food 


CORPS C WCSQ vjax-wtii 
ram 99805*09* 152ft 1PJD 

2 £S 7770 Dtc 9* 10ft gift 

Sum- nJOMMts mft nun 

3*M BftlWay « 19225 >9500 

SBM 8588 84 « I«ft JHft 

198ft 1X00 54P95 19460 1X50 

2Cft BlftDKK 19088 19188 

^SteS XA.^TH^SOte* 126* 

njGA^WOTLDl! (NC3E) IHMSB 


17480 
UIjOO 
1*560 . 
10ft 
19001 

mja 

nu 


177 AS 
10 JB 
10£» 
10ft 
flUD 

mft 

19130 


TUB6 

(K UJJ 

-Aft iffi. 
-980 U48 
-4ft » 
— L25 SS 

-Aft 30 


Utah Low 


Open Mob Low Close Che OpJnf 


1260 *89 OH 94 1180 

1280 9.17MOT95 TIJH 

1286 1067 May 93 1182 

T282 ‘1067X4 93 1164 

1190 10670095 116* 

me wftMcrte 

lift Tift May M 
Est sates XA. Tub's, oaks 
Jut's open Inf 11260 
COCOA {Mean Hmaktm 
1540 TOO Dec 94 14» 

1405 1 ( 177 Mar 95 1459 

1612 TO 7 *#*av 9 J M 0 
160 * 122 SJul« . 

1611 1265Sep 95 1363 

1631 ISO Dec 95 
104 129 Mrs* 96 

S 1505 Sep 96 
iotas XA. Tub's. 
tub's ooen ire 0691 
ORAN6EJUKE (NCI9B X 
13480 « 9 .WNov 94 9660 

13280 9380 Jnn 95 W 06 S 

12*25 966 DS 60 T 95 TO 480 

11*25 9788 May 95 10988 

11980 TOlft-MM 11180 
11160 9*50 S 4 p 95 9 U 3 

11260 inootawf* 

■knU 

Est. safes XA. SC ^bete. sales 735 
TlieteapenW 22679 up 0 


Tift TL79 1181 
11X9 TT60 11X4 
lift 1L7Z 11X2 
DJ4 Tlx* lift 
1163 1164 1163 
. TU5 

• lift 

12627 

■Stertei 

Ml 1428 1434 

1482 140 1400 

i«a 


7641 


15141 
130 13*3 

1K5 
15*3 
UB 


10160 9960 10065 
H460 mu TOUO 
10980 109JB M7X0 
11080 110ft 109X0 
9465 9165 *380 

113ft 
TOJi 

mxo 


+8»ajn 

+O0 366M 
+009 *.952 
+087 *U5 
+08* 160 
209 
5 


+19 2769 
+H 9601 
+22 3,114 
+» 26*5 
+19 28,115 
+22 432 
+22 1605 
♦ft 160 


33 ! % 

—330 2695' 


n.us 


Metals 

CNCMDQ sABfeKf-cfi 

iXW 74 ft 8ft 94 JTOft 109.10 103 10*95 +1ft 24.130 

11530 TSJSOecM 108.10 10960 10X0 18965 +1X5 13634 

1713 75.90 Jen 95 .10ft +1X5 30 

1113 7380 Fab 95 10X5 +130 

11330 71X0 Mar 95 10*60 108ft 1038 10860 " 



laoee tim's-sms ur 

lic* 4*,l» BIT 259 


1038 +165 ID 



94 

511604194 
3008 Dec M 5 228 
4018 Jan 95 
41 *5 Mar 95 5228 
4118May9S 5368 
4208X495 


£178 51431 


5328 

5368 




5758 Xxi 94 
JMUMerfi 
508 May 9& 


51*5 

51*9 

506 

52X1 

5292 

5X6 

540.1 

stu 


ms mo 5588 . 5552 


3ft 

980 TiM-l-SCtes 960 • 

W T2233 up 30 ' 

JM CNMBO awra-Mnw+i 
X*8BOdH 4143 41*80 414X0 
37*10 Jan 95 4183 41160 411X0 
V^OAM-W 42160 421ft CW8' 

<2230095 

2X30 TUe's.saies 28ZI ... 

mite 3*299 off ■ ' - 

0*00 0 Uo h up 

Xl-SIATOX 3773 37168 3776*.- 
3853Sep94 

344X00094 3HL30 3*180 379J0 

SOJODecW 383X0 

41180 303 Feb 15 30.18 

41780 34*50 Apr *5 3NUQ 398ft 39080 

4M60 361ft Jun 95 3Dft -39380 30238 

4050 30ft AIM W 
42780 4X160 Dec 95 

42460 4I2J0Feb96 
.41130 Apr 96 

4138CJun9* - . . . . 


+18 72X94 
+18 

+18 29^4* 
’ +18 

+18 480 
+18 

+18 X2M 
+ 18 ' 04 
+18 2.TO 
+18 

+(X 74 

+05 • 

+03 


+3JD1S6B2 
+2ft Uff 
+2M 1856 
+260 

+15p M3 



2ft) 


financial 

USTXNLLS triftlll siemtt-ptteftatbtf" 1 
?€6?teP« «83 9529 - 95ft 


96.10 

9585 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. THURSDAY, AUGUST 11, 1994 


Page 11 



Weak Bond Market 
Hurls Novo Profit 


Compiled br Our Staff Frm Dispcadtes 

COPENHAGEN — Novo 
Nordisk AS said Wednesday 4 
that its first-half profit fdl 8 
percent and said its full-year 
earnings would be lower than 
originally forecast because of a 
weak bond market and expan- 
sion costs. 

The pharmaceutical company 
said it earned 550 million kroner 
(588 m9HoQ> before taxes in the 
half* down from 595 nsIUoa kro- 
ner in the 1993 first half. 

The bottom line, was doited 
by a one-time charge of 88 mil- 
lion kroner for a planned merg- 
er of two U-S. subsidiaries next 
year and a loss of 75 million 
kroner on the company’s bond 
portfolio. 

Those factors offset a 15 per- 
cent rise in sales, to 6.58 billion Y 
kroner, as customers bought 
more from a more diversified 
product line. 


The results sent Novo’s 
shares tumbling 7 percent, or 46 
kroner, on 1 he Copenhagen 
bourse, to 620. 


The company, one of the 
worid’s top Insulin producers 
and the latest maker of indus- 
trial enzymes, said it no longer 
expected to meet its previous 
earnings forecasts, primarily 
because of faffing bond prices. 

previously, the company said 
it expected full-year pretax 
profit to top the 11 percent in- 
crease seen in 1993. 

On the plus sidt the compa- 
ny said sales at its health care 
division, which include insulin, 
h'lman growth hormone and 
birth control products, rose 15 
percent, led by strong gains in 
Japan and Germany. 

Sales in the enzymes division 
rose 14 percent. 

( Reuters, Bloomberg, AFX) 


WPP Capitalizing 


By Richard W. Stevenson 

New York Tunes Service 

LONDON — After years in which its 
survival seemed threatened by a bloated 
debt load and the pinch on marketing 
budgets caused by the recession, WPP 
Group PLC has generated a steady 
stream of good news the past 12 months. 

Clients began spending more on ad- 
vertising as recoveries took bold in the 
United States and Britain, boosting re- 
sults at J. Walter Thompson and Ogjlvy 
& Mather, WPP’s two biggest agencies. 

On Wednesday, WPP said its Tirst-half 
pretax profit rose 50 percent, to £36.2 
million (S56 million), as revenue rose 4 

PC ^oompany has shored up its balance 

sheet, in part through the sale late last 
year of Scab McCabe Stoves, another of 
its atymray. for $70 million. In May, 

Ogilvy scored one of the biggest account 
trains ever, when International Business 
Machines Carp, consolidated its account 
there with billings estimated between 
$400 million and $500 million. 

The advertising agencies have contin- 


ued to gam business, although the IBM 
account probably will not show up on 
the bottom line until next year, when 
heavy start-up costs — and offsetting 
losses of billings from IBM rivals esti- 

The company has 
shored up its balance 
sheet, but now it faces a 
possible stock dilution as 
banka exercise an 
option to sell. 

mated as high as $200 million —are out 
of the way. 

WPFs shares on the London Stock 
Exchange have reflected the company's 
turnaround, rising from a low of 22 
pence in 1992 to 89 pence at die end of 
last year. The shares closed Wednesday 
at 119.50, down 3 JO. 

Bui WPFs shares may have been re- 


strained recenilv. A consortium of 28 
banks that financed WPFs .equations 
of J. Walter Thompson, Ogilvy 
companies in the mid; 1980s agrad 
1992 to trade $272 million worth of mu 

for equity. _ 

A big block of that slock — 1902 
milli on shares, or 26.5 percent of the 
shares outstanding after the conversion 
— r«n be sold by the banks as of Sept. 1 
under their agreement with WPP. 

The bank group includes J.P. Morgan, 
Bankers Trust, Barclays Bank and Na- 
tional Westminster Bank. The banks in- 
dicated Iasi week that they planned to 
sell the shares to institutional investors 
in Britain and on the Continent in an 
offering led by Bankers Trust, Morgan 
and S.G. Warburg Securities. 

While investors have long known the 
sale was coming — the banks were al- 
lowed to sell 60 million shares last year 

and did so — some analysis said a fear 
that WPFs shares were being diluted 
had kept buyers on the sidelines lately, 
blunting what might have been further 
gains. 


Investor’s Eur ope 




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lntananonil Htnll t 


sred and Dresdner Net Rise. 




r, was held profit, conOSbutmg £182 million of the toi^profhfor all of SwT* 

iK invest- «>raL ^ AG , Germany's tons figure was . to^aimo^codafct-haUoet 

sjo^largcst bar*, said brisk do- 936.1 mdbqn DM. 

. p * unn f«V- 


ie Credito SA reported a narrower- interest raics. 
ban -expected loss. Standard's net interest income in- 

• Standard Chartered said first-half crease d £472 million from £470 mu- 
aretax profit was bolstered by lower j^, n a year earlier, while charges for 
bad-debt charges. Profit for the period doubtful debts dwindled to £69 

ended June 30 rose 39 percent to £237 m niirm from £128 million. 

The Aaa/Padfio 'reaoi 


j x percent . — nan 

marics ($659 million). Loan-loss provisions fell to 747.5 

Operating profit, which is b^orctax “ DM f ^ m 758 2 million DM in 

but includes nsk the 1993 firet half. Net interest income 

™ riTlJ^nU to 3.42 billion DM 


nded June 30 rose 39 percent to tMn million from £128 million. prietary trading, rose U. percent, coni- ^ ‘,rr ^ I ^ rcenL l0 3 42 billion DM 

170 milli on a year earner. ro aomiuaic 


! ne oanji, wmuu was taken over by 
Banco Santander SA in April, said net 
banking income was 38.7 billion pese- 
tas and operating profit was 58.6 bil- 
lion pesetas. Comparative data for 
1993 were not provided. 

(Bloomberg Reuters. AFX) 


Swissair Shares Get a lij 
tfSabenalink 


tin the 
laand 


Cmtpfledfy Oar Smff Fram Dispotcha 

ZURICH — Swissair shares have dimbed 11 
past week on talk that the airline may align wi~- 
Air France and hopes of an industry turnaround- 
U.S. and BritishSvestors are buying the Jf. 0 ^ 1 “S'?! 
and traders said, on expectations tlat dhance will be 
announced soon between Swissair and SabemL^_ 

“There is international speculation about a Sabena 88 ^*" 
mJt ^ SwS^said Borer, financial analjwt. 

vS to Zurich 

that Air France, which holds a substantial stake m Sabena. 

may become involved. . . . ... •_ f! r ~. half 

4*hen» said Wednesday that its earnings m me first nau 


LVMH Cashes In 


Cc*pfed by Our Staff From Dispatches 

PARIS — Strong demand for leather 
goods lifted sales at LVMH Mofit Hen- 
sessy Louis Vuitton SA by nearly 20 per- 
cent in the firet half of the year, the compa- 
ny said Wednesday. 

Compagnie Gfcn&rale des Etablisse- 
ments Micfaefin SCA, Peduney SA and. 
Saint Louis also said Wednesday their 
sales rose in die half. 

LVMH said its first-half sal« rose to 
12.0 billion French francs ($2 billion) from 
10.04 billion francs a year earlier. 

The company said its luggage and leather 
goods branch had seen a significant increase 


and that it had not always' been able to 
respond because of limited capacity. 

L*fnh<»r division sales rose to 3. 1 9 billion 
francs in the first half from 2.43 billion 
francs a year earlier, outstripping the com- 
pany’s champagne, cognac and perfume 
divisions. 

The company cut its price of cognac in 
Japan in March, which dented revenue but 
lifted volume. 

Didier Rabattu, analyst at Bacot AUain 
in Paris, said the price cut dearly had hit 
revenue. “Cognac sales were not as good as 
expected because of the Japanese pnee oil, 
which hit the second quarter, Mr. Ka- 
battu said, adding that cognac sales m 

China also had been weaker than expected. 


LVMH’s branded goods include MoSt & 
Chandon and Veuve Clicquot cham- 
pagnes, Hennessy cognac, Christian Dior 
perfumes and Louis Vuitton luggage. 

LVMH stock finished Wednesday at 
865 francs, down 3. 

Meanwhile. Micbelin said sales . rose to 
33.28 billion francs m the first half from 
30.62 billion francs in the l993 first h^ 
with a slight decrease in tire prices offset 
by a wider product range. 

Sales at Pechiney International, its 
packaging subsidiary that is the holding 
company for American National Can, rose 
to 17.74 billion francs from 17.03 billion 
francs. 

(Bloomberg AFX Knight-Ridder) 


• GKN PLC said T SS 

further growth in the 

. Phffips Electronics NV plans jjf STKlIion 

ductor production with the Netherlands. 

euOders ($281 million) at its plant in Nijmegen, uic 

ssss&t&ses 

• n am. 1 . jm gw said it would delay until next 
10 invoke i« 

^ority stake in the electronics, mustc and books i retatierFN AC. 
Sddety, C&G said. AWsAl .^. saw**, afx 



Bonn Assailed on EU Unit 

Bloomberg Business News 

?K^rioffice%4th less power than the current EU 
aoitoi righav fc^^n GcmaI1 tadiistry was the first 
real^^Sn MuTtr, orgamzatioa ro ertmze publicly 
Ur-vnn'c moves to rave EU members more control, 
^^^fi^^rticular proposals by Bonn that nation^ 

carteTauthori ties be empowered 10 grant exemptions r*. 
European restrictions. 


NOKIA* Telecommunications Business Brings Finnish Company Success 

I leUXOmnW do not ne «ssarily dent ofNolds Tel^mmureca- 


Continued from Page 9 
around the world boast 34 mil- 
lion subscribers, and analyst 
say tbe figure could reach isu 
million by the end of the de- 

cade. , 

Having been in on one ot tne 
great business booms of the de- 
cade from day one, Nokia has 
gone on to surprise just about 
everyone by parlaying its pio- 
neer status into that oT an in- 
dustry leader. 

Nokia's largest division pro- 
duces the newest digital mobile- 
phone handsets. The company 
now splits market share for the 
digital phones about evenly 
with its larger rivals LM Erics- 
son AB or Sweden and Ameri- 
ca's Motorola Inc. 

Even in the older analog 
handset market where the Japa- 
nese have made major mroaos 
in recent years, Nokia has 
steadily expanded its marxei 
share to roughly 20 percent. 

“It has one of the youngest 
and most imaginative manage- 
ments m the business, said An- 
nita Fairdl, an analyst wiih 
Merrill Lynch in London. 

' On the strength of N?kia s 
most recent results, Ms. Farrell 
recently raised her earnings es- 
timates for the full year by pear- 
ly 40 percent, to 29.2 markkaa a 
share pretax from 20.9 mark- 

kB Nokia’s pretax profit for the 
first four months of 1994 soared 


to 969 million markkaa on sales 
of 8.6 billion markkaa from 154 
million markkaa in tbe compa- 
rable period of 1993. 

Jorma Ollila, 43, attributes 
much of Nokia’s success to 
what he calls its “Finnishnesa, 
The former chief financial offi- 
cer and head of the mobile 
phone division took oyer as 
chief executive at the beginning 
of 1993. He credits Nokia s 
fleet-footedness in the mantel 
in part to its lack of hierarchies. 
“Finns don’t tolerate hierar- 
chies," he says. 

For Mr. Ollila that stands as 
both blessing and curse. “Tins 
is a very demanding crowd, ne 
says of his employees. “They do 
not give you the benefit of the 
doubt just because you are tbe 

CEO.” . . . 

He also points out that good 


results alone do not necessarily 
put him in good stead with his 
employees, in a company where 
even the newest employee calls 
the boss by his First name and 
expects candid answers to his or 
her questions. 

Mr. Ollila and his team must 
constantly press the flesh with 
their staff in a company that 
Nokia’s boss describes as thin 
on manuals and procedures. 

That lack of structure also 
applies horizontally, with dis- 
tractions among marketing, 
production, and research and 
development blurring at the 
edges. All three. Tor instance, 
are expected to co mmun icate 
directly with customers. 

“Technology is essential, but 
understanding the market and 
what it wants is really the driv- 
er," said Matti Alahuhta, presi- 


dent of Nokia Telecommunica- 
tions, the phone-systems arm. 
“We have to be good listeners. 

Some credit the firm’s roots 
in consumer electronic prod- 
ucts for what they see as an 
important edge for Nokia a 
sensitivity to market tastes and 
an ability to produce the right 
products at the right time and 

^Already Nokia makes hand- 
sets in Finland, Germany, the 
United States, Hong Kong and 
South Korea to service 90 na- 
tional markets. . 

Nokia executives also dismiss 
charges that they are too small 
to compete with the likes of 
Japan's NEC Corp. 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST II, 1994 


Page 13 


ASIA/PACIFIC 



LS 


Spur China Stocks 


. Compded by Our Siaff from DupaOha 

HONG KONG — China’s' : 
roller-coaster stock markets 
zoomed back tm Wednesday af- 
ter the official Shenzhen Special ~ 
Zone Daily provided de tails 
about market refor m s. 

“The newspaper article' pro- 
vided impetus, because it 
fleshed out details of the re- 
forms," said Zhang Yuyin, * 
trader with Shenzhen’s Pingan 
Insurance Co. 

The Shanghai index that re- 
flects shares reserved for Chi- 
nese buyers singed 1253 points, 
or 20 percent, lo 759.17 on near- 
record turnover valued at 9.7 tal- 
Uoa yuan (SI billion). The index 
has now climbed !3I percent in 


to big secnrines houses to sup- 
port thcmarkct, but no precise 
. figures have been revealed. 

The newspaper article spelled 
out seven reform measures, bat 
the Shanghai Securities News on 
'Wednesday quoted Gao Xiqmg, 
chief lawyer it the China Securi- 
txes R^daloiy Commission, 
who said parts of the declaim 
indicated a major change in the 
government's attitude and poli- 
cies and could be sidestepped. 

The. newspaper also quoted 
Mr. Gao as saying Chinese law 
and securities regulations, now 
being drafted, would have to be 
amended to allow credit to bro- 


thcjxast eight days, even though 


— —i percent Tuesday. 

In Shenzhen, the index of 
shares reserved for Chinese 
buyers rose 1 1 3 percent to 165- 
potnts on tumoverof 23 billion 
yuan. 

The Chinese government has 
announced plans to lend funds 


Seoul Stocks 
Rise as Bank 


Eases Policy 


Bloomberg Businas News 

SEOUL — Stock prices rose 
Wednesday after the Bank of 
Korea eased its grip on the na- 
tion's money supply and 
cleared the way for more insti- 
tutional investment in equities, 
traders said. 

“The central bank's decision 
was like a fresh shower for the 
stock market suffering from a 
drought of funds," said Cho 
Hytm Kwang, a trader at Coryo 
Securities Co. 

The Korea Composite Stock 
Price Index rose 12.71 points, dr 
1 J percent, to 930-21 points in 
slow trading of 21 million 
shares. 

Gainers outnumbered declin- 
ing slocks by about 4 to 1. 

A total of 118 issues rose by 
their daily limits. Under local 
securities regulations, stock 
prices can increase or decrease 
by only about 5 percent in one 
trading day. . . 

The Bank of Korea decided 
to ease its grip on the money 
supply after its anti-inflation 
policies had poshed up market, 
interest rates lo the highest: lev- 
els in a year. v 

The central: bank's demon', 
to loosen money supply low- 
ered the rate to 14 percent 
Wednesday. 

The overnight call money 
rate had been as high as 25 
percent in the past week as' fi- 
nancial institutions scrambled, 
to secure scarce funds. 


Henry Mok, a lecturer in cco- 
nxrancs at- the Chmese Universi- 
ty of Hong Kong, said the show 
of official concern for the mar- 
ket might be enough to buoy 
prices without further financial 
intervention. He also said he 
doubted funding would be 
available, ^adding that authori- 
ties might quietly shelve the 
plan. 

The latest details of the plan 
as outlined in the Shenzhen 
Special Zone Daily inducted 
measures to control the size of 
the market in A shares, which 
are traded in yuan and restrict-' 
ed toChmese investors, by ban- 
ning new issues ami limiting 
rights issues for two years. 
-Other; measures included 
lower transaction fees for trad- 
ing in both locally owned and 
foreigfr-owned shares and steps 
to encourage the emergence of 
large institutional investors, 
(Reuters, Bloomberg) 


Arnett Sets Its Sights on Asia 


Return 

SYDNEY — An sett Air- 
lines, Australia's most popu- 
lar domestic carrier, is rolling 
out an aggressive promotion 
strategy aimed at winning a 
slice of the rapidly growing 
Asian market from its rival, 
Qamas Airways Ltd. 

Ansett is starting service to 
Hong Kong and to Osaka's 


new Kansai Airport in Japan 
, and it is forging 


next month, 
tie-ups with regional carriers 
for future service in the re- 
gioa. 

But the lag question is how 
long and how much money it 
will take for Ansett to build a 
presence in the region rival- 
ing that of Qantas, whose 
name in world airline circles 
is virtually synonymous with 
Australia. 

“To move from a domestic 
operator to be as internation- 
ally recognized as Qantas. 
they have a long way to go," 
said Peter Harbison, .manag- 


ing director at BDW Aviation 
Services, a consulting film. 

Ansett Transport Indus- 
tries Ltd., the airline’s hold- 
ing company, is owned equal- 
ly by Rupert Murdoch's 
News Corp. and the Sydney 
transport group TNT Lid. 
The airline has no immediate 
pl a n* to hit the tarmac in Eu- 
rope or North America dur- 
ing its first big flight into the 
global airline industry. 

Graeme McMahon, An- 
sett's managing director and 
chief executive officer, said the 
airline would focus on Asia for 
its international push. 

“We’re going to continue 
our approach in the Asian re- 
gion, and therefore we don’t 


million Australian dollars 
($37 million) for ibe first year 
of the expansion, from its 
new Hong Kong and Osaka 
routes, and a small profit in 
the second year. 

The airline plans to add 
service to Singapore. Thai- 
land, South Korea and Ma- 
laysia after the service to 
Hong Kong and Japan is 
launched. Ansett also hopes 
to expand in Indonesia be- 
yond its current route to Bali. 

But starting such service al- 
most always entails initial 
losses. Ansett already has 
shelved plans to open routes 
in Malaysia, Singapore and 
South Korea around Septem- 
ber. 


expect to compete with Qan- 
rldwid 


las onJiworldwide basis, but 
we do^xpect to expand in the 
Asia region," Mr. McMahon 
said. 

He said he expected the air- 
line to post a loss of about 50 


Competition from Qantas, 
which has operated in the re- 
gion since the 1930s, prom- 
ises to be fierce. 


“We see Ansett as sort of a 
minnow." said David Row- 
ley, a spokesman for Qantas. 


Taiwan Boycott Caps Cathay Net 


Cenffttd by Our Swff From Dopadta 

HONG KONG — Cathay Pacific Airways 
Ltd. said Wednesday its first-half net profit 


rose a less-than-expected 18 percent because 
of a boycott by Taiwan of tours to China, 


overcapacity in the industry and Hong 
Kong’s high inflation. 

Hong Kong's main international airline, 
which is contxoBed by Swire Pacific Ltd., said 
it earned 803 million Hong Kong dollars 
($104 million) in the first six months of 1 994, 
up from 681 million dollars a year earlier. 

Cathay said revenue rose to 1239 billion 
dollars from 11.02 billion dollars. 


Rod Eddington, managing director of Ca- 
thay, warned that rising costs and an increase 
in flight capacity in Asia continued to haunt 
the region's airlines. 

He said Taiwan's boycott of tours to China 
bad cost Cathay between 50 million and 100 
million dollars. Although the boycott was 
called off at the end of May, the number of 
people traveling through Hong Kong to Chi- 
na from Taiwan has yet to return to previous 
levels. 

Analysts said the Taiwan- Hong Kong 


route usually accounted for 22 percent to 23 
percent of Cathay's operating profit. 


(Knight-Ridder, Bloomberg) 


Mieno Says 
Economy 
Is on Track 


Bloomberg Business «Vm 

TOKYO — The economy is 
heading toward recovery, al- 
though weak investment bv cor- 
porations and growing unem- 
ployment remain a concern. 
Yasushi Mieno, the Bank of Ja- 
pan's governor, said Wednesday. 

Mr. Mieno said the hot sum- 
mer in Japan appeared to have 
stimulated consumer spending, 
which economists view as the 
engine for the fragile recovery. 
But Mr. Mieno said that the 


benefits may be temporary and 
that possible water shortages 


Daiwa Loses Face, and a Big Bond Deal 


emptied bp Our Sufi Fmm Dapattha 

TOKYO -— In a rare and 
embarrassing setback for a Jap- 
anese brokerage, Dartia. Securi- 
ties Co. on Wednesday with- 
drew a 20 billion yen ($197 
million) bond issue for Petr 6 - 
fcos M&ricanos SA after other 
underwriters spurned the deal 
as too expensive. 


On Tuesday. Daiwa, the lead 
manager, indicated a coupon 
rate of 535 percent and asked 
potential co-managers to sug- 
gest prices at which they would 
underwrite the deal 


point, above the benchmark in- 
terbank rate. 


If issued at par, the yield on 
Peracx's braids would be 90 ba- 
sis points, or 0.9 percentage 


Thai drew objections from 
Daiwa's Big Four brokerage ri- 
vals as weO as from smaller un- 
derwriters, who said the bonds 
needed to yield 1 10 basis points 
above the interbank rate to at- 
tract investors. 


Suharto Family Bidding for Transit Job 


Ratten 

JAKARTA — Indonesia 
plans a rand-transit system to 
traffic congestion^-, arid 
' -companies 1 controlled, by three. 
^OfTresident Suharto's cbfldrea 
are in. the race to bufld it, the 
official Antara news agency 
said Wednesday. . 

. “A mass rapid-transport sys- 
tem has become an urgency to 
serve the vast majority of the 
public in the capital aty" the 
secretary-general of the Public 
Works Ministry, Ruslan 


Diwiryo, was quoted as saying. 
He did not say bow much the 
- system would cost. - 

/ 'Mr. Ru&3n;said‘ PT Bimati- 
taria Group, Hum puss and Ci-. 
tra Lamtoro Gung Persada. all 
controlled by children of Mr- 
Suharto, were among those in- 
terested in the project. 

Mr. Suharto's children have 
been accused of using political 
influence to build vast business 
tires in die last decade, 
itely, Thailand's cabi- 


net approved a $1.4 billion 
transit system for Bangkok af- 
ter ruling that the contract for 
: theprOjecz was legal, a govern- 
. 'meat official said Wednesday. 

iti a decision made Tuesday, 
the cabinet said changes made to 
the system's route were “within 
the scope of the original con- 
tract" and did not have to be 
submitted for fresh legal autho- 
rization. The route was changed 
because of protests about it us- 
ing up a portion of Bangkok's 
only large public park. 


Despite the protests, Daiwa 
launched the issue at par. No- 
mura Securities Cck, Nikko Se- 
curities Co. and Y amaichi Secu- 
rities Co. then refused to co- 
manage the deal. 

Tuesday evening, with the 
debt allocated to underwriters. 
Daiwa told the firms it was 
aborting the transaction. 

Daiwa seemed “to have ac- 
knowledged its own inability to 
sell off the deal," one market 
source said. 

Pemex said it had postponed 
the deal to protect investors. It 
said it would resume talks soon 
with Japanese banks to monitor 
themarkeL 

Japanese government bond 
prices have slid over the past 
three weeks, driving up yields 
and making it more difficult to 
arrange the related currency 
and interest-rate swaps that at- 
tract companies such as Pemex 
to borrow in Japan. 

(Bloomberg, Knigfit-Ridder) 


may slow factory production. 

He said the' central bank 
would continue to watch eco- 
nomic developments to monitor 
the pace and sustainability of 
the recovery. 

Noting the dollar's rebound 
against the yen, Mr. Mieno said 
exchange rates remained a con- 
cern for Japan. The country's 
economy is highly dependent 
on exports, and a stronger dol- 
lar increases the yen value of 
Japanese export sales. The dol- 
lar was fixed at 101.20 yen in 
Tokyo on Wednesday, as the 
U.S. currency continued to re- 
cover from historic lows below 
97 yen set last month. 

While lending by Japanese 
banks remains sluggish. Mr. 
Mieno said he believed that 
long-term and short-term lend- 
ing rates would eventually settle 
at appropriate levels for current 
economic conditions. 

Given the fragile nature of 
the recovery, the Bank of Japan 
has been walking a tightrope on 
monetary policy as it sets daily 
overnight interbank interest 
rates. The right steps will nur- 
ture recovery, but analysts 
warned that one wrong step 
could send the economy back 
into a uiilspin. 


Investor’s Asia 


Hong Kong 
Hang Seng 

11000 '-- 


Singapore 
Straits 


TktiaS. " 


Tokyri : : yr 



'1994 . 

Exchange hide* 


rrx 


HprigICong Hang Seng. 



Ctaee 
&.61&08 ’• 


Sydney 

ARGrdto&ifes 

2^86.80 •' .-5,49 ;' 

Tokyo 

Nikkei 225 . 

a»,17»45 20j59Q3Z:. *Q,e? J 

Kuate Lumpur Composite 

1 k 09t80 

Bangkok . 

BET" .... 

• 1,40732 • jjiOMRE, . 

Seoul 

. Composhe Stock 

93021 , 91730. ,,+ti39 

Taipei ‘ 

Weighted Price .. 

8,838Jrt • $94431 

Manila 

■PSE . . 

3^944.19. .2^37 42.14: 

Jakarta . % 

Stock index 

471417 469-92. -. +0.41 . 

New Zealand 

NZSE-40 

2JJ88.10 . 2.07632 +037. 

Bombay 

National hKtox 

2,063.49 . 2 JJ46.13 -+0.&. 

Sources: fleufers. AFP 

Imctnalional Mctakl Tnbtme 

Very briefly: 


China has become a member of the Nice Agreement, an interna- 
tional trademark protection group, in an effort to clean up its poor 
image on defending intellectual property. 

• TNT Ltd. and Ansett 1 Transport lndustpes Ltd were fined a total 
of 5.4 million Australian dollars ($4 million) by Australia's 
Federal Court for price-fixing in the air freight industry. 

• Tokyo real-estate prices fell in the April-June quarter: commer- 
cial real estate fell 6.8 percent from the previous quarter, while 
residential prices fell 2.7 percent 

• Diners Club International, the American charge-card group, has 
returned to Vietnam to take advantage of the country’s growing 
travel market; Indorina Bank will serve as its collecting agent 


• Toyota Motor Corp. has begun importing sheet glass from the 
American glassmaker Guardian Industries Corp.; Toyota import- 
ed $4.65 billion in U3. auto parts in its last financial year. 


• Alcatel Alstbom said its Belgian unit Alcatel Befl Co. won 36 
contracts worth 850 million French francs ($156 million) to 
supply 34 telephone exchanges to 24 Chinese provinces. 

• Kansai International Airport in western Japan, giving in to airline 
opposition, will not ask for a 10 percent premium in landing fees 
but will seek the same fees as those at Narita Airport, near Tokyo. 

(Bletenberg. A P. AFP. A F.VJ 


Taiwan Speeds Up 1 J rivatization 


Compiled by Our Suff From Dispatches 

TAIPEI — The government plans to speed 
its privatization program by offering shares in 
five companies totaling 26.6 billion Taiwan 
dollars ($1 billion) by June 1996, officials said 
Wednesday. 

Shares in Taiwan Fertilizer. China Steel. 
Yang Ming Marine Transportation. Farmers 
Bank of China and Chiao Tung Bank will be 
offered beginning in June 1995. they said. 

Taiwan’s cabinet in July 1989 pui 22 gov- 
ernment-owned companies on its privatiza- 
tion list 


The sales were expected to streamline the 
companies’ managements and cushion a fi- 
nancial crunch caused by the issuance of 1 
trillion dollars of bonds in the past few years. 

According to government statistics, public 
companies generated an estimated 80 billion 
dollars in revenue in fiscal 1994, accounting 
for 7.5 percent of total government income. 

Government enterprises have been under 
criticism Tor poor management and ineffi- 
ciency, with their returns on investment 
standing at an average 4.17 percent, conn 
pared with 1439 percent for privately run 
companies. (AFP, AFX) 


For investment infonriation 

read THE MONEY REPORT 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


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NASDAQ 

** 1 ■ 00 ° 

traded securities in tarns of doflar value, it is 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 11, 1994 


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Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 11, 199** 


a 


SPORTS 


An Irish Championship, 
Thanks to the Chinese 



By Ian Thomsen 

Iruermmtai Hmtfd Tribune 

HELSINKI — A mile re- 
mained in the two-woman race 
that would produce Sonia 
O'Sullivan's first major title, a 
3,000-meter event that was, 
oddly, all about China. 

Of all the thoughts that 
crossed her mind over all the 
dreamy childhood miles she ran 
across Ireland, surely the Chi- 
nese did not figure in them. 
O'Sullivan grew up to become 
Ireland's finest woman athlete, 
at 24 her stardom surpassed 
only by Jack Charlton's soccer 
players; with 800 meters to go 
Wednesday and no other rival 
in sight she took to running on 
the leader’s shoulder, to make 
sure Yvonne Murray of Britain 
realized that the Irish lass was 
in the neighborhood — a Chi- 
nese lesson for sure. 

In any other year but 1993, 
O’Sullivan would have become 
a world champion twice. In 
1993, however, running as the 
rest of the world has always 
sought to run, she was overtak- 


en by a Chinese horde fueled by 
daily marathon training, fresh 
turtle blood and whatever else. 


All this summer, as she was set- 
ting four records (world, Euro- 
pean and Irish) in three events 
over an 1 1-day period in July, 
she promised that the Chinese 
had strengthened her. 

Entering the final turn a half- 


step ahead of Murray, O'Sulli- 
van came out of it with a lead of 


8:36.48. with the Romanian 
Gabriels Szabo a distant third 
in a personal best of'8:40.08. 

Earlier in the evening. Lyu- 
bov Gurina brought to mind 
the world championships of 
1983, held in this stadium, when 
she won a silver medal in the 
800 meters for the Soviet 
Union. On Wednesday she re- 
turned to become the oldest Eu- 
ropean champion, at 37, run- 
ning now for Russia, and 
residing in Paris. 

Her chances improved last 
weekend when the OJyopic 
champion Ellen Van Langen of 
the Netherlands withdrew be- 
cause of a strained hamstring. 
The race began in front of a 
smaller crowd than met her 1 1 
years ago, on an evening cooled 
by morning rains, and Gurina 
held tiie lead entering the last 
turn. Down the stretch another 
former Soviet athlete, Natalia 
Dukhnova of Belarus, taller 
and nine years the younger, 
caught up and ran shoulder to 
shoulder with Gurina. One or 
the other figured to lever herself 
ahead, but their times were 
locked together: 1 :58.55. 

A computer matched the 
clocks against the photographs 
and it was decided that Gurina 
was champion. The two shared 
the victory lap, though this time 
Dukhnova deferred much more 
space to her elder. Another 
Russian. Lyudmila Rogachova, 
finished third in 1 :58.69. 

The 400-meter hurdles were 


controlled by Oleg Tverdokh- 
leb, who won in 48.06 seconds, 
a Ukrainian record. Stephane 
Diagana was overtaken at the 
last step to finish third in 48.23 
— it was France's first medal in 
four days of competition — be- 
hind Sven Nylauder, the Swede 
who earned his third European 
championship medal in nine 
years. Nylander’s silver-medal 
time of 4812 was a personal 
best as well as a national record, 
and he is 32 years old. 

like Wyludda of Germany 
defended her discus title with a 
throw of 68.72 meters, recover- 
ing in a major way from her 
placing of 11th in the world 
championships last year. Ellina 
Zvereva of Belarus was second 
in 64.46 and Mette Bergmann 
of Norway was third in 6434. 

In another of the events hum- 
bled by the absence of the out- 
side world, Ivailo Mladenov of 
Bulgaria won the long jump 
with a sixth and final attempt of 
8.09 meters, ahead of Milan 
Gombala of the Czech Repub- 
lic — whose best of 8.04 meters 
had been leading since the sec- 
ond round — and Koostantinos 
Koukodimos of Greece, third in 
8.01 meters. 

Arid in the latest of daily up- 
dates that have come to exag- 
gerate the importance of the 
British 100-meter relay, John 
Regis said he might run with the 
team Saturday while Colin 
Jackson announced his with- 
drawal. 



Iraerrunimai Herald Tribune 

L ONDON — How should we deal with these 
prima donnas, these soccer stats whose sala- 
ries, bonuses and advertizing monies make them 
more in a miflnte than a nrferee gets in a month 
of trying to control their outbursts? 

I am a fan of Rdm&rio, whose uninhibited 
talent and unquenchable spirit last month took 
the World Cap back to Brazil, where it belongs. 
And Eric Cantona, on his good days, transcends 
the En glish stage on which he performs. He is the 
catalyst to triumphs, to style, for which Man- 
chester United had labored a quarter of a 
century. 

There lies the dilemma. When they get above 
themselves, when they act as if right and wziongis- 
a prerogative, when they become laws unto 
themselves, who puts them in their pla ce? 

It is very simple. Authority, by name FIFA or 
those players’ fed- 

erations, is re- QqJ, # 


TbocarecoroedlficFIFA 
chib directors andcoacbe how uj control tter 
most precious commodities. Johan Crayff/Ro- 
mfcicfe manager ai Barcelona, has tnedtotate 
his wayward Brazilian bade to the training fidd 
under threat of dire financial penalty. 

Ales Ferguson, meanwhile, sodm.to indulge 
CmSa, to^se bis wiBful tack at another ■ 
Wes&tt aTs limb. “Love Eire' or hate faro, 
SSrtf delighted we have bzmT themw^r^d 
defiantly. “T 'hoc were tackles going m from 
behind which aren't supposed to happen, and l 
think when Eric feds there is an ngu^ agamst 
jinn he has to prove to the whole wand thathe s 

got to correct it.” •' ’ • 

Ferguson's first utterances are often as banal 
as thalJHfc rushes to protect his star. He thanks 
him for contributions that, I agree, ran .be en- 
trancing. But no, no, no, Ferguson. 'This is.no 
way to manage a public game. Aw Cantona, 

J last cm e/m does not feacn 


Huflhe. 

and standards of 

the game, whether the player be superstar or 
schoolboy. 

FIFA tins week has acted to protect the legacy 
of a much more tightly controlled, and conse- 
quently more expressive. World Cup. Long bans 
for villainy — notably against those dbowers 
Leonardo of Brazil and Mauro Tassotti of Italy 
—drove home the message that cheats mil not 
prosper. 

Excellent. On Tuesday, the English FA, re- 
nowned for its iconoclastic resistance to “for- 
eign'’ rule tampering, feD enthusiastically onside 
with FIFA. The FA circulated. a seven-point 
charter, from the highest Premier League stadi- 
um dub to the lowest school team, designed to 
protect the legacy of World Cup USA. . . 

If all is carried out we shall be cleansed of 
malicious fouls, of dissent, of encroaching tac- 
tics, of stupid actors feigning injury, even of rude 
words. Those who have profited for years by 
systematic dirty play are on a losing streak. 


innocence ot con tntioP. 

^tfs mv nature to react the way I dp," be told 
L’Equipc, the French, sports paper. «$ an in- 
stinct, and taken with people who are not happy 
about it.” ■ • - ' • , 

To hdl with everyone? Even those who would 
go to the gndt of the earth to argue an artiste's 
rights to protection against destruction? Even 
grownnps who dote on flair as if we were chil- 
dren? Even real cfaSdrea who take good and bad 
m&scrimmahtly from Cantona’s example? 

‘ Perhaps we w«e hasty to sprang to his side in 
Pasadena last month when a zealous policeman 
slapped handcuffs on him in the press area for 
speaking oat of tom. Prrhaps acouple of weeks 
m the coder might bate spared soccer that ugly 


may-care ai 


tude is leading his own young son. Or he might 
be a different, more responsible man at home. 


10 strides, which she then built 
into a victory of nearly five sec- 
onds because, if only in her 
imagination, she had stopped 
racing against the likes of 
Yvonne Murray a summer ago. 
She tore lonesome down the last 
straight as if escaping a pack of 
Chinese women. She won in a 
time of 8 minutes, 31.84 sec- 
onds, her smile betraying the 
secret. 

Murray was second in 


Mike Blake/ Reiners 

Sergei Bazarevkh scored 27 points hi Russia's 101-85 
defeat of Puerto Rico at the world championships. 


For how long? The leagues are setting up spies 
i the stands to observe and report on referees. 


U.S. - and Russia - Now 4-0 in Toronto 


lntomlKiMd Reuuihncitf 

Every Ihmdoy 
Contact Phi%> Omo 
Tel.: (33 1)4637 9336 
Rse (33 1)4*379370 
or your nearest HT office 
arqpnMkfw 


The Associated press 

TORONTO —There are still 
three unbeaten teams at the 
World Championship of Bas- 
ketball. 

There’s Dream Team II. the 
prohibitive favorite for the gold 
medal, and there’s Croatia, the 
heavy favorite for the silver. 

And, there’s Russia, a young 
twin that came into this tourna- 
ment off a fourth-place finish at 
the Goodwill Games. 

A 101-85 victory over Puerto 
Rico on Tuesday night in its 
first quarterfinal round-robin 


game gave Russia a 4-0 record, 
the same as the United Slates 
and Croatia. 

“I am the only player on our 
team who has played in a world 
championship," said Sergei Ba- 
zarevich, 29, who scored 27 
points. “What I was worried 
about was that 1 didn't think 
the younger players knew what 
it was tike on this level They 
have surprised me with the way 
they have played.” 

Russia already has done bet- 
ter than it did last month, when 
it lost to eventual gold medalist 


Puerto Rico in the semifinals 
and then to a team of U.S. colle- 
gians for the bronze. 

"At halftime at St. Peters- 
burg we were up by 13 points 
and Puerto Rico outscored us 
17-2 over the next 10 minutes,” 
Baz ar evic h said. "From my point 
of view, the second-half collapse 
was something almost impossi- 
ble to explain and we didn't 
have an explanation anyway.” 

Andrei Fetisov, a second- 
round draft pick the Boston 
Celtics traded to the Milwaukee 
Bucks, and Mikhail Mikhailov 


are two talented forwards, 
while Sergei Babkov is a fine 
outside shooter to complement 
Bazarevich’s driving ability. 

The U.S. team made 14 of 22 
3-pointers in its 130-74 rout of 
Australia. 

Reggie Miller scored 23 of his 
31 points in the first II minutes 
of the second half. He and' 
Mark Price both took six 3- 
point shots, and each made five. 

“The papers here said that 
outside shooting might be one 
of our weaknesses,” said fellow 
guard Kevin Johnson. "Reggie 
and Mark took it on themselves 


in the stands to observe and report on referees. 
Those scoring consistency low, those of failing 
sight or courage, will go. 

It may not happen quite as insensitively as 
FIFA’s ticket home from Dallas foe referees 
judged incompetent during the World Cup, but 
anyone who allows the new impetus to slip bade 
will become an ex arbitro. 

What has this to do with disciplining Rom&rio 
or Cantona? They have been naughty boys again 
before the new seasons even kick off in Spain and 
En gland- Rom&rio, as is his custom, has granted 
himself unsanctioned leave in Rio de Janeiro. 
Cantona, during a supposedly friendly match in 
Glasgow, took a vicious lack at a Rangers oppo- 
nent last weekend that no referee could respond 
to with anything less than a sending off. 

Moments earher. Cantona had been shown the 
cautionary yellow card for insolently turning hi$ 
back on the referee, Andrew Waddell, who was 

at temp tin g In calm th<- F renchman hie nppft. 

nent Waddell saw the red mist tiring, Cantona 
was too fired up to see the red card coming; 


R OMARIO, TOO, is a home bird. His World 
Cap was almost as angelic as bis looks, but 
now be is back to being a truant. Cruyff con- 
demns it as lacking respect for his Barcelona 
colleagues; Rom&rio’s wefl-rcbearsed retort is 
that teammates love him to death.wben be scores 
for them. 

Cruyff, forgetting his own rebelliousness as a 
player, feds personally insulted. He sees his 
authority being [art on the line. He tells the 
media that Rom&rio can stay away for good if he 
buys up has contract for 51 1.23 milHon. 

. Cheap talk Brazilians are throwing more than 
garlands at Rom&rio. Everyone knows he will 
wander bade,' sheepishly reptoteht, once he gets 
away.fnsxtbis beach bodmes. 


. ..And,! wonder; if Ram&rio’s inner barometer, 
is. not right tins once. After the way he ran 
tifateif iriifo thfe ground for Brazil after the 
house so closely following^: 

n^^ehcfidw^^holiday. Andmaj^e^Zniyff 
should havekuown that ' 

.... . -X* Hjm hmdxesmgtfTIm Tmwu 


Plans for Italian Grand l*rix Are Given Another Hat Tire 


Compiled by Ovr Staff From Dispatches 

MILAN — A plan to cut down trees at 
the Monza racetrack to improve safety for 
next month's Italian Grand Prix was ve- 
toed Wednesday by a local government 
official putting the Formula One race 
again in jeopardy. 

The Milan region's superintendent for 
environmental and architectural affairs. 
Lucia Gremmo, blocked the felling of 123 
trees along the racetrack's Grand Curve, a 
measure approved by the national govern- 
ment last week to extend a safety zone on 
what drivers consider a dangerous curve. 

Gramme's decision was made as about 
60 environmentalists rallied at the Milan- 


based Lombardy regional government 
headquarters to protest the destruction of 
the 200-year-old trees. 


Although the mayor of Monza plans to 
appeal the decision to a court, such an 
appeal cann ot be heard until Aug. 18, 
leaving little time before the Sept. 1 1 race. 

In Paris, FIA ordered the Benetton team- 
to appear before a hearing Ocl 19 to 
answer charges that a filter which would 
have prevented the flash fire that engulfed 
the car of Dutch driver Jos Verstappen at 
the German Grand Prix had been “deliber- 
ately removed.” 

Verstappen and three mechanics es- 


caped with superficial burns when the fire 
broke out during a refuelling stop. 

After studying a report from lntertech- 
mque, the French manufacturer of the 
Grand Prix refuelling equipment, FIA said 
in a statement: ‘The fuel spillage was 
caused by a valve failing to close properly. 
The valve was slow to close due to the 
presence of a foreign body. 

“The foreign body is believed to have 
reached the valve because a filter designed 
to eliminate the risk had been deliberately 
removed.” 

Under FIA rules, such equipment “must 
not be modified in any way whatsoever.” 
(AP, AFP, Reuters) 


to prove that wrong.” . 

Price got 17 points, making 
six of seven shots overall All 12 
members of the team are now 
shooting better than 50 percent 
from the field, and have sur- 
passed Dream Team Ts 1173 
average in the 1992 Olympics. 

Andrew Gaze led Australia 
with 23 points. 

Shaquiilc O’Neal, leading the 
UJ>. team with a 203 average, 
did not play the second half and 
finished with six points. He has 
been bothered by a stiff bade. 

In classification round 
games: Spain 94, Egypt 52; Ar- 
gentina 105, South Korea 83; 
Cuba 75, Angola 71; arid Ger- 
many 96, Brazil 76. 




The Associated Press 

RIO DE JANEIRO— Mario 
Zagalo, who coached Brazil to 
the World Cup title in 1970, was 
hired W ednesday to succeed 
Carlos Alberto Parreira as 
coach of the national team. 


Zagalo, 63, a player on the 
teams that won the World Cup 


teams that won the World Cup 
in 1958 and 1962, was Parreira’ s 
assistant this year as Brazil won 
its fourth title. This will be his 
third stint as coach. 


and Pete. Now there is only Za- 
galo.” . 

• Brazilian defender Ma- 
»mhn is to join the Spanish first 
division dub Valencia,' now 
coached by Parreira, in a one- 
season loan deal a dub spokes- 
man said. Mazcoho was re- 
leased by the Brazifian dub 
Palmeiras. 


T win continue the work we 
started,” Zagalo said. “Before 
this Cup there were only two 
three- time champions: myself . 


• Belgium World Cup de- 
fender Philippe Albert was 
bought by the F-n aKah dub 
Newcastle United for $33 mil- 
lion from the Belgian first divi- 
sion club Anderlecht and 
signed to a four-year contract. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST II, I** 


Page 17 




The Owners Are Playing With a Stacked Deck 


kel to small-market clubs, and to preserve dub rights- it 

ni other arrangements. The cap would forever, tne owners have indicated mat 


By Henry J. Aaron 
The writer, who is director of economic 
studies at the Brookings Institution, a re- 
search organization, was a player-appointed 
member of the committee to study the eco- 
nomic status of basehalL He wrote this for 
The Washington Post 
WASHINGTON — Major league base- 
ball owners and players seem bent on P re " 
serving their streak of fai l i n g to settle con- 
tr&ctdispuies without a work stoppage 
To understand what is going on, u ts 
necessary to recognize that three parses 
are involved, not just two. The three 
groups are the players, the owners of so- 
called large-market dubs and the owners 
of small-market dubs. The real antegO' 
nists are the players and the large-market 
dubs. Both are trying to win the support 
of, or at least a grudging alliance with, the 

owners of small-market clubs. 

Such large-market clubs as the Mets, 

Yankees, Cubs, While Sox and Dodgers 
have access to metropolitan areas that gen- 
erate large attendance and high local televi- 
sion revenues. These teams can pay large 
salaries and still make large profits. Small- 

markeidufaspay Wes when' they are really payments to 

on the average, tbandc .large dubs .mu ^ of Qlher businesses m 

because their gate recopts and local tdervv; omras ^ invol.od. Keeping 


reduce total player compensation and in- 
crease the revenues of small-market dubs. 

The reduction in overall player compen- 
sation would be larger ihan the amount 
h ang transferred from large-market to 
small- market dubs. This means that the 
profits of the large-market dubs would in- 
crease. Thus, the owners are asking that 
their players provide relief for small-market 
dubs plus a bonus for large-market ones. 

The players understandably consider 
this unfair. They point out that baseball as 
a whole has been profitable, even accord- 
ing to the teams’ own reports. Moreover, 
these reports understate baseball profits 
for at least three reasons: 

• Some clubs make sweetheart deals 
with TV. radio or cable networks that 
belong to the dub owners. The profits 
show up in the books of the media compa- 
ny, not those of the baseball team. 

• Some team profits are almost certainly 
being recorded as te am expenses. 

• Some clubs charge Far more to front 
office expenses than other clubs do. 

In this way, several million dollars a year 
per club may be classified as baseball ex- 


now spending by more than they stand to 
gain from increased revenue shanng. 

For other clubs, the result would be UtUe 
better than a wash. Owners in both or tn®e 
sion - revenues, ,u ‘ 52£,Tru! 10 lose more from a suite 

many years, should not Ibanfran a continuation of current rules. 

The sales prices of ^ tfrhe owners win and espccraUy .if 

&T r^b^^rio" rights they lose. While not natural dm** 
sell for fees and forgone revenues of ap- 


will go on for a good while longer. Expan 
sion revenues, which will continue for 


Sue Ogiodds Return 

In Chicago, some young fare had a message for the major league playeis. 


in 


sion re>^^^e anaIler, they have a hard 
rime makin g a profit- Many report losses. 

The fight is over what to do about this. 
The owners propose to cap salaries as a 
share of defined revenues, to transfer a 


proximatelv SI 00 million each. Existing 
dubs sell for similar or larger stuns. 

The hard evidence of the prices mat 
owners demand - and get - for baseball 
franchises destroys the claims that base- 
ball as a whole or most franchises are in 
financial difficulty. The contention that a 
salary cap is necessary to save baseball is 
simply indefensible. 

It is. however, quite understandable. 
Players as a group will earn about 51 
billion in 1994 if the season is completed. 
A salary cap that cut player salaries by 
one-fifth would increase team profits by 
S200 million. At a capitalization rate of 1U 
percent, such a cap would increase the 
value of baseball teams by about £2 bu- 
Uon, or more than $70 million per club. 

This gain would hot be equally divided, 
however. Some of the financially weaker 
dubs might not be able to survive an 
extended work stoppage. Others would ac- 
tually be hurt by the new arrangements 


players, these clubs want to negotiate a 
settlement without forcing a stopr*"*- 


reported team profits low is a great conve- 
nience when the owners solicit large stadium 
subsidies from slate or local governments. 
The owners neglect to include as income 


the revenues from fees paid for expansion- 


proposed by the owners. 

The reason is that the owners are also 
proposing that each dub must pay at least 
a minimum total amount in salary. Inis 
minim um exceeds what some clubs are 


Despite the general financial health of 
baseball, a few clubs are almost certainly 
losing money. One solution to the preplan 
is for the owners to centrally coordinate 
the marketing of television, a measure that 
would increase overall baseball TV reve- 
nues and prevent fat local TV contracts 

from magnifying revenue disparities 
among the dubs. Another would be to 
increase the share of gate receipts distrib- 
uted equally among the dubs. 

It is easy to understand why the owners 
of the highest-revenue dubs would not 
want to raw revenues to the lowest- reve- 
nue dubs. But it is hard to credit the daim 
that finan cial disparities threaten the com- 
petitive balance of baseball. ... 

Of the six clubs believed to have had the 
highest revenues in 1992 and 1993, two are 
playing less than .500 ball in 1994. Of the 
five dubs believed to have had the lowest 
revenues in 1992 and 1993. two are playing 
better than .500 ball, including the Expos, 
the team with the best record in the major 

lea BaSball is finandally and competitively 
alive and welL 



West 'Race 9 Tightens 


The Associated Press . . 

Because no one knows for 
sore when the season will end, 
and since the Texas Rangers 
have only one game left before 
the strike deadline; said their 
manager, Kevin Kennedy, *'111 - 
treat tomorrow like it’s all or 
nothing. Everybody will be in 
thebuSpen.” 

The Rangers, with an &-5 loss 
to the Seattle Mariners, as Tmo 

Martinez homered for the third 
straight game, dropped to a sear 

AL ROUNDUP ~~ 


son-worst mne games under 
300 Tuesday night But that 

was stiU good enough for a half- 

game lead over Oakland in the 
AL West • 

Texas’ last game before rn- 
day’s strike date would be 
played at home Wednesday 
night against the Mariners- The 
Athletics play Chicago on 
Wednesday afternoon and be- 
anie on Thursday night 
At 52-61, Texas has the same 
record as Detroit, which is last 
in the AL East, and Milwaukee, 
last in the AL Central. ’■ 
The Mariners, meanwhile, 

have won four in a row and they 

improved to 8-1 against the 
Rangers this season. Thai; 
pulled Seattle within Vh games 
of fust pl«* 


wing with a home run and Kan- 
sas Gty went on to win at Cali- 
fornia, ending a three-game 
losing streak that matched its 
longest of the season. 

Bo Jackson hit a two-run 
homer in the eighth that tied it 
for the Angels. But Macfarlane 
homered off Mark Later and 
Felix Jose and' Gary Gaetti fol- 
lowed with doubles. 

Orioles 6, Yankees 5: Brady 
Aider son’s two-rnn single 
drove in the winning run in the 
sixth as visiting Baltimore’s Ja- 
mie Moyer pitched in and out 
of trouble all game but man- 
aged to beat New York for the 
first time in his career. 

Bine Jays 12, Mans 5; Do- 
urinao Ccdeno drove tn three 
•runs and Toronto tied a season 
high with 17 hits against visiting 
Cleveland. 

." Every starter-4or -the 
Jays scored, wife Codeno, 

- Sprague and Mike Huff each 
getting three hits. 

Sandy Alomar, Paul Sorrento 
and Ruben Amaro each ho- 
mered for Cleveland. 

'.Tigers 10, Brewera 4: Cedi 
Fiddar hit a grand dam and 
two sacrifice flies, driving in a 
season-high six runs, as Detroit 
beat visiting Milwaukee. . 

Alan Trammell and Mickey 
Tettleton bit two-rnn homers 



Owners and Players 
Plan Strike Details 


Rjv SlubNebine/Rcott” 

their displeasure known. 


By Richard Justice 

Washington Pott Service 

NEW YORK — If there were 
any doubts remaining that ma- 
jor league baseball was headed 
for a strike Friday, they were all 
but erased when a scheduled 
negotiating session on noneco- 
nomic issues was abruptly can- 
celed by the owners in favor of 
one dealing with the mechanics 
of formally closing down the 
game. 

So with the players scheduled 
to go on strike after Thursday s 
games, the two sides huddled 
Tuesday to discuss matters such 
as who pays for transportation 
costs to get players home when 
the strike begins, whether in- 
jured playeis will continue to 
receive medical treatment dur- 
ing the strike, and whether 
players will be allowed to use 
club exercise equipment dunng 
the strike. , 

For about the only time in 
these negotiations, the sides 
quickly agreed to most issues. 


All * aiw* i --o __ | 

Reds Defeat Dodgers, Hike Lead to 1 Vx in Central 


“My concern about the ^ W^had four sm- 
strike is that it may not last long gles for the Tigers, 
and we have to be dose,” Seat- Twins 4, Red Sox 3: Pincb- 




tie’s Ken Griffey Jr. said. “We 
have a chance to get it dose. 

Athletics 4, White Sox 2: Ru- 
ben Sierra, haring twice struck 
out swinging earlier, homered 
during a three-run rally in the 
eighth that lifted Oakland over 
visiting Chicago. 

Frank Thomas of the White 
Sox was 0-for-8 in the first two 
games of the series at the Oak- 
land Coliseum, dropping Ins av- 
erage to .354. 

Royals 5. Angels 3: MBce 
Macfarlane opened the I ltn m- 


runner Pat Mahomes became 
the first AL pitcher to score a 
run this season, winning the 
«ime on Bosotn reliever Todd 
error in 
Metro- 


gjune on Bosotn 
Frobwirth’s throwing < 
ling at the 


the 12th inning 
dome. 

Mahomes made' his first 
pinch-running appearance m 
the majors, replacing Kent 
Hrbek, and scored his first run. 
The last AL pitcher to score was 
Erik Hanson, who did it twice 
last year as a pinch-runner for 
Seattle. 


The Associated Press 

There are many theories on 
how to hit a knuckleball, yet 
most baseball people insist that 
none work. 

Reggie Sanders of the Cin- 
cinnati Reds, who has some 
ideas of his own, pot one to use 
Tuesday night, and it led to the 
defeat of Los Angeles flutter- 
bailer Tom CandiottL 

“I told myself to stay back," 
Sanders said after hittmga two- 
run homer in a decisive five-run 


al League Central to H4 games 
over Houston as the Astros lost 
to San Diego. 

The Dodgers, despite a loss 
that evened their record al 50- 
56, lead San Francisco by three 
gflmes in the West with the 
baseball strike looming Friday. 

padres 4, Astros 3: Andy 
Ashby, who allowed six hits 

NL ROUNDUP 


($-51. who then left the game 
after hitting Bip Roberts with a 
pitch. Derek’s Bell’s infield hit 
off Mike Hampton later in the 
inning scored Ashby from ihiro. 

Tony Gwynn went 2-for-4 to 
raise his average to 393. 

Expos 4, Pirates 3: Visiting 
Montreal won for the 19ib time 
in 21 games as Marquis Gris- 
som halted a 2-for-25 slump by 
going 4-for-5 with two RBls. 

Since losing four straight to 
Sj m Francisco immediately af- 
ler the .All-Star break, the Ex- 


while striking out seven and 
fOTrth^J^ng tiiaTgave the Reds walking one in eight inning 

a 5-3 victory over the visiting, scored the go-ahead run m the pos t'rrr an d are 
Dodgere^With a knuckleball, eighth as visiting, San Du$o ov£?00 for the first 

JSrSt gp out and get ir. ended Houston's 5«^aiDe wm- 

You’ve got to let it come to you. nmg streak. urae 

Ashby angled to start the 
eighth against Shane Reynolds 


As a result, the Reds _ in- 
creased their lead in the Nation- 


ume 

Marlins 5, Cardinals 3: 
Chuck CarT 


two- run 


homer with one out in the bot- 
tom of the ninth to beat vi si Ling 
St. Louis. It was the first game- 
ending homer for the second- 
year Marlins, who ended a sev- 
en-game home losing streak. 

Phillies 5, Mets 1: Curt Schil- 
ling pitched a five-hitter against 
New York and Mariano Dun- 
can, who struck out four times 
Monday night, hit a two-run 
homer as Philadelphia, playing 
at home, ended a five-game los- 
ing streak. 

Lenny Dykstra. who had 
been in a 4-ror-28 slump, went 
3-for-4. 

Giants 3, Cubs 2: San Fran- 
cisco rallied to win when Dar- 
ren Lewis hit a iwo-run. bases- 
loaded single off Randy Myers 


in the ninth in 


with two out 
Chicago. 

Myers relieved that inning af- 
ter Steve Trachsel had held the 
Giants to five hits. Todd Ben- 
rin ge r singled with one out for 
his third hit- With two down, 
Myers walked pinch- hitters 
Darryl Strawberry and Steve 
Scarsone. 

Braves 7, Roddes 4: Fred 
McGriff hit a iwo-run homer 
and drove in three runs as At- 
lanta continued to dominate 
Colorado. 

McGriff’s third two-run 
homer in the last two games 


helped the 


record to 1 1-0 in Mile High Sta 
diuro. Overall, they have lost 
only once in 21 games against 
the second-year Rockies. 


The players will pay their own 
transportation costs. Th e cl *“ J . s 
will continue to provide medi- 
cal treatment. Players cannot 
use team property. 

“These are loose ends that 
must be tied up when you antio- 
ipaie a strike,” said Richard 
Raritch, the chief negotiator for 
the owners. “It’s customary to 
go over these matters and make 
sure things are taken care of.” 
The players and owners did 
agree to hold their first full bar- 
gaining session in six days on 
Wednesday morning. Bui the 
sides seemed so cemented into 
their positions that no one was 
expecting anything except more 
disagreements. 

“We’H give them an opportu- 
nity," said the union head, 
Donald Fehr. “If there’s not a 
lot new and different to talk 
about, it’ll be a short meeting. 

Mr. Raritch was no more op- 
timistic, saying, “There's been 
no substantive progress in the 
negotiations." . 

Once the strike begins, the 
argument becomes a test of 
wills. Several owners have spec- 
ulated that the strike could spill 
into next season and that their 
side, at least is prepared for it 

“The owners have always un- 
derestimated the strength of the 
union," Mr. Raritch said. “Be- 
lieve me, we don’t this time. I 
hope the players don’t underes- 
timate the unity the owners 
have this time. I hope they 
don’t Donald may have a vi- 
sion that there are owners on 
the phone with me all night ami 
day telling me to do X. Y and Z. 
Not a single owner has called 
me to suggest that we make any 
modification in our proposal. 
Not a single owner.” 
“Everything that has hap- 
pened so far suggests it’s going 


long the strong is going to be, 
the only answer you can give 
them is, ’As long as it takes. 


SCOREBOARD 


Major 


AMERICA*! LEAGUE 


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Toronto 

Boston 

Detr»l 

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Cleveland 
Kansas CHy 
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Tuesday** Results 
Australia X Dominican Republic D 
Panama 10. Untied Slates 4 
Taiwan 1L Columbia 1 
Cuba 12. NKaraaua 1 
Italy 15. France S 
South Kona A, Nemertantts 3 
jOPan H, Puerto Rico 4 

CemMaHaa ROoaO 
Sweden 6. Canada 3 


FIRST TEST 
Sri Lanka vs. PokBton 
Tsesdav. la Colombo (1st day) 
PakWon 1st mnkws: 297-4 

Wednesday, la Colonaio 
Srt Lanka 1st Innings: IH-4 


The PGA Field , Seen in a Crystal Ball 


By Larry Dorman 

Sev York Times Service 

TULSA, Oklahoma — It’s a risky 
business trying to pick a w uuie j' “™\ a 
field of 151 players in a .ff ,r . l0 ^^?“ L 
a task made chancier still when the tour- 
nament is the ProfessionalGolto;^ Asso- 
ciation Championship. 


that he is back to the form ihat made him 
one of the two best U.S. players. 

• Ernie Els, 24. has been feeling under 
the weather lately, but he’ll be ready by 
Thursday. He has missed the cut m two 
previous PGAs, which doesn’t mean a 
thing when viewed against his victory in 
the U.S. Open at Oakmonl in June. 
advantages are strength (to hil the bah 


magician’s haL par 5’s) and touch on the greens. 

In each of?he past six years, the PGA 9 Corey Parin. 34, b coming of a 
has been won by a player who had never second-pkee finish, and wo of^the last 


British Op«i (tied for 24th). and his 
straight driving should keep him on tne 
leader board this week. He putts so well 
that caddies have dubbed him "Boss or 
the Moss.” 

• David Edwards. 38, lives in Ed- 
mond, Oklahoma, 100 miles ( 160 kilome- 
ters) away, went to school at Oklahoma 
State. 65 miles away, and knows the lay 
or the land at Southern Hills. Maybe he’s 
a long shot, but he keeps getting better. 
Five Who C§n, but Won’t: 

Tom Watson, 44, did it again at the 


has been won by £ ™ fin- British Open - hit the bail great, putted 

SSSnw? bjMhe iSSood of P being SS ^md the week before they won. poorly down the stretch. Expect another 


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BASEBALL 
American Leant 

CALIFORNIA— 5em Andrew LAmAna. 

pitcher, to Vancouver. PCL. Recoiled Mike 
janes, pitcher, tram Vcnewor- 
CLEVELAND— Waived J«* Morrta.p!leh- 
or, tor his uncandtttonol re»o*e - 
DETROIT— Acflvotefl Mike Henneman. 
ptttner, from UKtov OlsaBlefl list. Optioned 
John FWMrtv. cal eher. lo Tole do. IL. 

KANSAS CITY— Put Daw Henderson, out- 

flekter.on IKtay flsaWod IW. retroaq»wto 
July 38. BoobM contract at Dwayne Hosey, 
auHMder. from Otmflia, AA. 

NEW YORK— Optioned SlertlnB HI ItaiCOCs. 

pitcher, to Coknnhue. IL. 

SEATTLE— Stoned Lee Guettermaa p«o»- 
er, to Catoory. PCL. Recalled Boh Welts, 
pitcher, from Calaory, PCL. Optioned Rooer 
SatkakL ofleher. to Cotoorv, 

TEXAS — R mulled James Hurst, pitcher, 
from TuKaTL. Sent John Dottmenotlcner, to 
Oklahoma City. AA. 

NafiMWl UM8» 

CINCINNATI— Recalled Kevki Jarvis, 
pltaier.from lndhmapolts.AA.Pwt Ertk Han- 
son. ptKher, on UHiay dho«#d n»t. 

NEW YORK— Sort Frank SemJnora 
Ken Greer. oRdwrs. red Shawn Hart, «d- 
fleMer. auirtgM to Noriott. IL. Stoned Kyle 
KassoL pHeher. and Sammy ftodriouei. 
catcher. 

FOOTBALL 

KsttoMd FootooB Leaeae 
ARIZONA— Apreed to terms wtth Owen 
LW. nmnkrs bock, on muUlvwar controca. 
ATLANTA— SIsned Jim Rttetter. offensive 
■ lineman, to 1 -vaav contract. _ 

GREEN BAY— Waived Keomboh* Cole- 
man. uneoocker, aw) Edale Bloke, sward. 


ished second 

The best player who hasn t won a major 
might just break through right here. 

but Won’t” win the vu a LDaDipiuu^u. H . ~ Nick Faldo. 37, was 32d al the Mas- 

Ten Who Can: . lere , missed the cut at the U.S. Open and 

• Gree Norman, 39, should do it this fought his way to a ue for eighth at me 

week The golf course, which requires B riSh Open after an opemng75*at 
wees- me gs- ec |U „ llw emu . . _ .M,alm for htftinP the wrong 


hen ..are the hslsof 

“Ten - Who Can” and Five Who Can, 
, the PGA Championship. 


Si> ^'accuracy off tee. ^ 
him. And he is overdue. Norman has 
foShSout of the top 10 just four tunes 
Sl5touniamenls tins year, and two of 
those finishes were n? ntgjn V*A gr 
18th in the Masters, hed for 1 1 th at tiie 
British Open). In last year’s PGA, he lost 
a playoff to Paul Azuiger. 


included a penalty for hitting 
ball. He’s back on the right tract 
though- He tied for 1 1th last week and is 
putting the ball better. 

• Tom Kite, 44, is aching to add an- 
other major to his resume. He tied for 
ninth when the PGA was played here 
last, in 1981 . 

Tom Lehman. 35. is emerging as a 


a Nick Price, 37, is. to borrow from a Tom Lehman. 35. is emerging as a 

Georee Jones, hotter than a $2 pisloL He fine player of difficult golf courses. He 
Knwo of his last three tourna- came in second at the Mastery and his 
menu and finished fourth in the other, -winning score of -0 under par at the 
T^ veara ago, hfwon his first major in Memonal was stunning. He has i the ma- 
Tulsa and Sice has won 15 times and jor-championship mentahty “ P 1 ^ 
fiSS^Mn SS top three on 25 occasions, 'patience -and drawee baL l off the tee. 


• Fred Couples, 34, has recovered 
from the back injury that surfacodm 
March. He won last week s Buick Open 
with a flourish, going 18 trnder par the 
last three rounds. His 7-iron to the final 
green that left a kick-in birdie showed 


winch should help him here. 

• Loren Roberts, 39, came within a 5- 
foot (ltt-meter) putt of winning the Ui. 

Open but has used the disappointment 
as a springboard rather than a ball and 
chain. He played very well at his first away in 


lieartbreaker here. 

• Bernhard Langer, 36. has just one 

lop 10 in a major since his Masters vic- 
tory last year. But he's still dangerous, if 
onlv for three rounds. , 

• Colin Montgomerie, 31. fell a P ar f m 
ihe Monday playoff at Oakmont. He has 
come close twice now in majors ana 
might come close again- 

• David Frost, 34, is one of those 
enigmatic players who has the ability to 
win majors but doesn’t. He missed the 
cut at the U.S. Open this year, then won 
the next week at Hartford- He then 
missed the cut at the British. Go figure. 

• Vijav Singh. 3 1 , is a pure ball striker 
and won the Scandinavian Open two 
weeks ago. He is not yet major champi- 
onship ready, but he could come close. 

Still if Norman plays the way hes 
capable, the way he played at the Players 
Championship, where he shot 24 under 
par, then everyone else will be playing 
For second place. He looks confident, 
sounds confident, and if the putts fall, 
the Shark will land the major that got 
1986 and 1993. 






CNTERNATIONAJL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 11, 1994 


planes and 25 

Huey hdicoD- 


ART BUCHWALD 


Looking for Di 

M ARTHA’S VINEYARD, Chowder when the knock came. 

Massachusetts — What' I opened the door to find four 
happened was that just when photographers, their cameras 
everyone had been reconciled aimed at ray bead, and three 


Mrs. Clinton had decided to graph, the Daily Mirror and the 
come back to the Vineyard for News of the World, who 
their vacation, word got out brushed past me. 
that Princess Di was already on “Where is she: one asked, 

the island. We discovered “She’s not here,” I said- 

only by aco- “Do you mind if we search 

dent when 14 the house?” another asked. 

DC- 1 0 air- BT \ .ySH “Be my guest," I told them. 

They spread out, looking in 
every closet and under the beds. 
One photographer went up to 
the attic and another to the 
basement. 

□ 

They came up empty except 
for three sleeping college stu- 
and reporters D n( j nra ij dents I forgot to throw out of 
from all the the house after my daug hter 

English newspapers, safled into had invited them to stay for 
the port of Vineyard Haven, Labor Day last year. 

Ibor bmoculare searching the taow sbe ’ s on the is- 

houses on snore. land," one of the photographers 

E said. “And we will find her. We 

DPs arm/al came as a com- have a saying on Fleet Street: 
plete surprise to us, although "The royal family can run, but 
we’re used to handling famous they can’t hide. 1 If you know 
people. (Barbra Streisand was what is good for you, you will 
on the island last year, and peo- tell us where she is.” 
pie didn’t miss a minute of their I was frightened. “If 1 knew, 
sunbathing.) But DPs arrival do you think I would keep it to 
was so world-shaking that even myself? I haven’t seen her — 
the blas& tennis players couldn’t and she never called me. For all 
get in their first serve. I know, she is really on Nan- 

I was home making clam tucket and started the rumor 

she was on the Vineyard to 

throw people off." 

The Di expert from the News 
Japanese Film Festival of the World said, **1 know her 

fT ~V_ every move. She put out the 

To He Held m Kyoto word she was going to Martha’s 
AgeKtFnwPr** Vmeyard to have everyone 

Tovvn th a „ isn think she was on Nantucket — 

TOKYO — More than 150 ±ea ^ came to Martha * s 

Vineyard at the last moment to 
ifin have us all fooled. The royal 

A 2, this ^ in Kyoto, the 
organizing committee said J 

■Wednesday. D 

The festival, which originated The photographers startedto 

in Tokyo, will be held in Kyoto eat my clam chowder so I detid- 
as one of the events commemo- ed it was time to get them to 
rating the 1,200th anniversary of leave. 

the founding of the western Jap- “You guys might try the nude 

anese city. The committee said beach at Lucy Vincent. We 
154 films would be shown, and have a saying on Martha’s Vine- 
prises would be awarded in two yard: ‘If you swim without a 
categories; the international bathing suit, you can run. but 
competition and young cinema, you can’t hide.' " 


Keeping the Musical Horizons Wide Open 


Huey helicop- 
ters started to 
buzz the 
beadles, and a 
fleet of landing 
craft, loaded 
with paparazzi 
and reporters « . mU 

from all the Bodmaki 

English newspapers, sailed into 
the port of Vineyard Haven, 
their binoculars searching the 
houses on shore. 

□ 

DPs anTval came as a com- 
plete surprise to us, although 
we’re used to handling famous 
people. (Barbra Streisand was 
on the island last year, and peo- 
ple didn’t miss a minute of their 
sunbathing.) But DPs arrival 
was so world-shaking that even 
the biasfc tennis players couldn’t 
get in their first serve. 

I was home making clam 


Japanese Film Festival 
To Be Held in Kyoto 

Agenee France- Preoc 

TOKYO — More than 150 
f ilms are entered in the seventh 
Tokyo international film festi- 
val, to be held from Sept. 24 to 
Oct 2, this year in Kyoto, the 
organizing committee said 
Wednesday. 

The festival, which originated 
in Tokyo, will be held in Kyoto 
as one of the events commemo- 
rating the 1,200th anniversary of 
the founding of the western Jap- 
anese city. The committee said 
154 films would be shown, and 
prizes would be awarded in two 
categories; the international 
competition and young cinema. 


By Mike Zwerin 

IniemuiotaJ ficnald Tribune. 

P ORI, Finland — Don Byron stumbled on the 
television interview by zapping in a hotel room 
on tlK road. The interviewee, a young African Amer- 
ican filmmake r, was asked about influences on his 
work and replied that for him “Raisin in the Sun” 
was the only important movie. Having expected 
perhaps “Kurosawa" or “Bergman," Byron was dis- 
appointed 

Is this what being a black artist comes down to? 
Byron asked himself. Not being interested in any- 
thing outside your own direct experience is some- 
how cool? That’s what makes a “good Brother?" 

“Bird and Coltrane were interested in all kinds of 
information," he said backstage at the Fori Jazz 
Festival, where his eight-piece klezmefband had just 
played the music of Mickey Katz for several thou-' 
sand people. He continued; “1 don’t think that kind 
of narrow vision does African Americans a service." 

An African American playing klezmer music has 
to have a wide vision indeed. Also a lonely one. 
Byron has put hims elf ip a situation where, at the 
very least, he cannot be sure of warm welcomes. 
There are no support groups. There is no precedent 
to fall back on, no history to cite. 

Klezmer is party and dance music that came out 
of the Jewish ghettos of Eastern Europe 400 years 
ago. In America, it developed into a mixture of 
Dixieland, Gypsy rhapsodies, plaintive Romanian 
dotnas and a soundtrack for a Betty Boop cartoon. 
Artie Shaw and Benny Goodman started out as 
klezmer musicians playing bar mitzvahs and wed- 
dings. ZXggy Hiram , Goodman’s star trumpeter, 
exhibited more obvious klezmer roots. There are 
some hip klezmer quotes on Shaw’s “Dr. Livings ton, 
2 Presume." American Uezmer took on certain char- 
acteristics of New Orleans jazz, music of another 
repressed minority. Byron, who says that his trom- 
bone player Gary Vafente plays klezmer with “that 
Charles Barkley first step," renews the genre much 
Hke the Dirty Dozen Brass Band renews the New 
Orleans tradition. 

Mickey Katz became a sort of King of Klezmer 
after making comic vocal noises on records by Spike 
Jones and His City Slickers. You may remember 
“Cocktails for Two." Katz adapted klezmer to the 
Broadway song form, and Boischt Belt taste. His 
Yiddish cowboy song “Haim Afen Range" was a hit 
in western Brooklyn. 

Byron chose to focus an Katz’s material rather 
than delve into Eastern European roots because he 
and Katz have their American background in com- 
mon and, having recorded Lps for major labels over 
a long period, Katz was more accessible. “If I go into 
a Yiddish record store," Byron says, “the very worst 
I have to deal with is some fat nerdy guv Research- 
ing in Yiddish libraries, I can get mujur w c j«i vibes." 

Attending the New England Conservatory in Bos- 
ton, Byron, who plays the clarinet, was a founding 
member of the conservatory’s klezmer band. They 
stayed together for seven years and cut several 
albums. One reason for their success was that it was 
rare to have an accomplished jazzman playing the 



Don Byron: Klezmer without a support group. 

difficult lead klezmer darinet parts usually played, 
by folky amateurs. His klezmer records get rave 
reviews. 

While going in and out of klezmer, Byron worked 
in a variety of musical styles as instrumentalist, 
arranger, composer and bandleader. He worked 
with Joe Henderson, David Murray, Hamiet Blu&ett 
and Bill FriseZL He recorded the music of Stephen 
Sondheim. With klezmer “plus a few supplements” 
he could make a living. Most of the people he went 
to music school with don’t play music at all any 
more. He does not take a musical living for gran tea. 


It has been said that finding new material is now 
more important than new- improvisations on old 
standards. By helping, revive the klezmer tradition, 
Byron seems’ to -have, solved his source-material 
problem. However -an African. American, playing 
Yiddish music Yfri«e ■nt fcayn are all white)- raises 
some questions that beg ' to- he answered. - 

Basically it comes down to this: Does aB music 
belong to everyone? /■ 

*T was intervwwedbya TV person who asked me: 
‘Why don’t you play hmhopFJJbe had just looked at 
^anddeadedwh^tiz^afbLackpasoiiI was; — 
what- my age' arid gppwk yyy would, lead' her to 
believe— and shesaperimposed that image on me. 
When somebody steps out of Time there’s usually an; 
uneasy buzz m the air. 

^Therete'* certain kind of -PC .about a blade 
person coming up to d; white person and saying: 
'You sure play good for a. white guy.* But X don’t see 
so-many Brothers cratering an that freedom we’re 
supposed to haveL Remember all the fuss When 
Living Color startedto play rock? A lot of Brouters 
think that Tracy Chapman and Bade should sing 
more like Aretha Franldinl There should be just as 
mndh diverrity open to African Americans as for 
white ones. 

“I grt really pat mnfojrig all the time from 

Jewish guys. like 'Yottceriamlyhave mastered the 
idiom.’ People with Euirip^>backgrouii^. expect 
to have the freedom to play'anytiring. Tty item, see 
how it fits — bines, rhythm and bluesy bebop, 
whatever. Bat Brothers are sepposed to play some 
kind of black music, period. Sure I mastered the 
idiom. Come on, man, don’t do me any f avors. I 
studied the roots of this music. I have sources, 
scores, books. I practiced hard. 

“Basically, the jazz worid is just about ^segregat- 
ed as the rest of America. You are never going to see 
a Brother in certain white bands. And there are 
blade, cats who never even .think about tire fact that 
everybody they work with' is black. There's all tins 
negative stuff going on, everybody knows it and 
nobody talks about it. Personally, I like who I Eke 
and work with who I ; want. My world is fairly 
integrated, but, remember, I play the darinet. Tm 
kind of a freak wherever I am.” 

' During tire swing era, darinet players were Eke 
guitar heros today. They were considered tire sexiest 
guys in the band, many of them became leaden. 
Today, the instrument is definitely not PC. Byron 
has prayed some baritone saxophone — with Mario 
Bauza, for example — but he prefers the darinet 
partly because he prefers the voice and also because 
“there are already too many-guys out there playing 
saxophones.” 

“Some eats I know tried to discredit Wynton 
[Marsalis]. They said, He’s a good classical player 
but he can’t really playjazz.’ Wynton could see that 
coming, and he just dulled it ouL He refused to talk - 
about his daasacal playing. Maybe he was right 
Maybe I should be more Eke that. Maybelshowln’t 
' be talking to you about klezmer. But I don’t have to 
not play klezmer to make somebody bdieve I can 
really play jazz when I*m not playing jazz." ... 


SnmdoosGounnand: 


A new Marten Braado biog- 
raphy portrays tire actor as a 
voracious eater who astdto 
break his diet by bawnfi 
Donald’s employees toss Big 
Macs over tire fence to him. 
“Brando: The Biography, by 
PHO- Msnso, is excerpted m the 
September issue of Vanity Fair 
25 is due out in October. On 
bad diet days, Brando paid Mo- 
DonakFs. workers to toss him 


forma- Brando aide. “You’d find 

.. -L. Mvrnmo SMWTCI 


LUC LUK» ***** “7-77*^ . 

Big Macs, french fries — the 
whole thing," Papke sa«L 
□ 

Hundr eds of tourists strolled 


aid Nixon museum m Y orba 
Lmda^Otitfonxia, to commemo- 
rate the 20th anniversary of his 
resignation from tire presidency 

duraig the Watergate scandaL “I 
staDY wanted to come. It’s a part 
of history," said BMrLw, 32. 
Nixon, who died on Aprfl 22, 
resigned on Aug- 9, 1974. - 
□ 

(y s and David Lettenuan 
have made it official: Immedi- 
ately after “Late Show with Da- 
vid Lettennaa" wfllTre “Late, 
T-a if show with Torn Snyder." 
Tom Snyder, a talk-show veter- 
an, had his b igge st impact on 
late-night television in the 1970s 
on NBC. Under his contract, 
Leaeaau i*s production compa- 
ny was given control of the show 
that would fallow his. 

□ 

White O. J. Simpsoa and his 
legions of attorneys prepare for 
trial, the folks at Fox studios 
are trying to get the movie on 
TV beforehand. The flick — 
once called “White Bronco" 
and now with the more sedate 
title ‘The O. J. Simpson Story” 
— will star Bobby Hosea and 
Jessica hick. Fax has put the 
movie on a crash production 
schedule that will aflow the film 
to be aired Sept. 13, a week 
before jury selection is to begin. 


HVTERNATIOIVAJL 

CLASSIFIED 

Appears on Pages 4 <fc 13 


Europe 


BnfapoH 
Ccpvhagan 
Curia CM Sol 
Min 
Edntugh 


Today 
Mgh tra 
CP OF 
S/77 18/64 
21 /7D 17(02 

atm lass 
arm 27«i 
28/82 21/70 
38(100 18/08 
23/77 14/67 
a/?/ nmi 
34/83 18/86 
24/73 14/57 
29/84 22/71 

ism am 

16(64 11(62 
32/80 18(64 
28/78 15159 
22/71 14(57 
106)8 13/E 
33/91 23/73 
27/00 22/71 
ZJ/73 17/62 
1B/B0 13/55 
25/70 14/57 
2MB HMM 
2405 16401 
23/73 13/56 
27480 lWM 
24/19 14*7 
28/79 22/71 
21 /TO 18481 
28/79 14/57 
12/53 7444 

34/93 20*8 
21/TO 13® 
20*5 12*3 
22/71 13*6 
10/86 144J7 
29/M 21/70 
26/70 16/61 
27/80 13/» 
23/73 14/67 


If Mgh la* w 
or of 
a 27/80 10/66 a 
I 21/TO 16/81 pc 
8 38/97 10*56 |C 

■ 36/10028/79 1 
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pc 33/81 18/64 I 

I 23/73 13/56 A 
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■ Z 9 IW 17482 pc 

■ 23m 12/63 ah 
a 31/88 zsm • 

■ 18484 11/52 ■ 

■ 16481 12/53 pc 
a 80/86 16*4 pc 
I 24/75 14/57 * 
■ft 24/76 14/57 pc 
c 19486 13E6 A 
• 36/07 23/73 i 
a 27/80 32m a 
pc 24/79 18484 a 

I 21 HO 19/55 pc 
pc 90/88 17/62 ■ 
pc 28/82 IM4 pc 
I TO (77 16*1 A 
A 23773 13/55 pc 
a 277BO 18*6 pc 

■ 23773 10/M A 
a 28192 24/75 pc 
I 2907 1407 pc 
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C UflS 9448 pc 

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C 20/88 1306 A 
a 28482 21/TO pc 
pc 23/73 18*1 pc 
pc 28/77 1305 pc 
I 25/77 14(57 PC 


Oceania 


• 4(57 6/45 A 1500 8/46 pc 

19406 10/50 pc 19486 9 M 6 pc 


WEATHER 


Forecast for Friday through Sunday, as provided by Accu-Weafrwr. 


WEEKEND DESTINATIONS 



[UnaonanAIr 

Hoi 


North America 

Hast and humfcSty wl» ease 
Into Now Ywk, Boston and 
PWadeftAta over the week- 
end. Thunderstorms will 
reach Detroit and Chicago 
Hits weekend, (allow ad by 
much cooler weather early 
naxt week. Chilly weathor 
wfl move into central Cana- 
da and the western Great 
LakB* Sunday. 


Europe 

A ehBy ok mam wB plunge 
BOuOiwnrri Into Scanonovta 
end northern Germany this 
weekend. A lasle oi loll 
weather win neat reaidanla 
from Oslo to Bertln arer the 
weekend. London and Ports 
will have sunny but coal 
weather ms weekend- Hot 
weather wB overspread the 

eastern Mediterranean. 


Asia 

Typhoon Elfie will bring 
heavy mins across OMrawn 
Flktay end hto the Shanghai 
area over the weekend. 
MeWy dry, hot weather wffl 
continue In Japan Into the 
weekend- Shwsra wi move 
tmo Mania by the weekend. 
Hong Kong will be partly 
sunny rarer Hie weekend wkh 
a tew stray showers. 


Tadqr 
Mgh Low 
CZF OF 
33671 23773 
31488 22/71 
31/88 27/80 
31/88 S /73 
31/88 27 M 0 
32/80 24/75 
33/01 26/82 
31/86 22/71 
33/91 25/77 
33/91 27 AO 


Mgtom 31488 23/73 » 31483 23/73 DC 

Cap- Tom 17/62 10/80 pc 17/62 7444 pc 

Cci a U ri C C 27/60 1 BA 4 * 28/62 1*406 PC 

Mm 10/68 1102 1 22m 12*5 pa 

Ugac 27480 23/73 A 28/62 24/75 pc 

Noted 31/76 11*2 PC 22/71 11*2 pc 

TuA 38/100 23/73 • 98/97 24 m « 


Middle East 


High Lee W Mpb U-* W 

OF OF OF OF 

31/68 s/73 s aarai asm • 
34/93 22/71 I 27/89 23/73 a 

25/82 17482 • 33A1 18484 a 

27/90 19486 ■ 31/58 21/70 a 

38/100 10/86 t 41/10623/73 1 

«t/1<77 24/76 8 43/100 27/80 a 


Latin America 

Today Tamonn* 

Midi Law W Mgh Law W 
OF OF C/F OF 

Bucnoc AJTm 16*1 8446 pc 18*4 8/48 pa 

Cm 31MB 28/79 pc 3Z/8B 29/70 pa 

time 17*2 16*1 pa 18A4 15150 pa 

MadooCXy 22m 12*3 pc 23/73 12*3 pc 

RbitoJwwia 23m 17*2 c 34/79 13/64 pa 

SartWpo 38/78 0446 i 21/76 0/43 pa 


LegwiCb s-sunny. pc -pm#/ cloudy, c-doudy. dMhonere. HhundarttomB. Ml*. jMnow fcaitas, 
sn-snow. Mca. W-Weath«. A3 wape. torecem aid d»8a provided by A e o uM wM h e r . Inc. C 1994 


North America 


Andmaga 19(85 12*3 

•M 32/80 21/76 

BDA41 26/79 16*4 

CNeago 34/76 17*7 

Owner 0« 14*7 

Drink 22/71 16481 

HoncMu 31*6 24/75 

Houalan 34*3 21/76 

LotAngataB 32*9 20/88 

HA 31*8 25/77 

M o narc h M/79 17(62 

MonM 23/73 12/53 

NUN 31/66 2*m 

NtwYnfc 28*2 30*8 

Rhoaohc 43/10010*4 

SnFm 2/71 1305 

Mk 29/77 0*8 

Tonao 24m 14*7 

WariA u MB 31*8 21/TO 


6 23773 1309 pc 
a 33/91 22/71 pc 
pc 23/73 16*1 pc 
C 38/79 m/B4 po 
I 32*9 1500 pc 
A 20*2 17482 pc 
po 31*8 34/75 pc 
pe 35*8 24m pc 
pc 28*4 I6M4 pc 
1 32419 25/77 A 

c 26/79 18*1 pc 
pc 22/71 12*3 pc 
• 33(91 25/77 « 
c 30/86 21/70 pe 
PC 42/K1729A4 pc 
a 22/71 14*7 pc 
a 34/79 14/57 pc 
A 35/77 10/50 pe 
A 31/88 22/71 pc 


Europa and Mdifl* East 

SAIL 

JHDAY 



L 


^ •- 

Europe and Mkhfia East 

SW 

HMUr 


byAcariffai 

HhOr.Ira 

S1994 

Location 

WOrthor 

High 

Low 

Wstar 

wav* 

Wind 

Location 



Low 

Wi*r 

Wow 

Wind 



T SF 

Tamp. 

OF 

TKnpi 

OF 

■Mvani 

(MMroa) 

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(PMimJ 

Speed 

Camas 

party sunny 

26/79 

18484 

28/79 

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■ E 

1020 

- Cannes' 

sunny . ■ 

ZriBO 

1MB8 

28/70 

i-e 

sa= 

12-25 

Deauuflte 

party sunny 

16/88 

17/82 

184B4 

1-2 

N 

1530 

. DaauvUa 

party sunny .. 

asm 

1 5S9 

18484 

i^ 

NE 

15-30 

ran Ini 

sumy 

29/84 

21/70 

asm 

0-1 

NE 

1225 

Fbnrinf 

- aurerjr 

28/82 

21/70 

26479 

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NE 

1020 

Malaga 

sunny 

29/84 

22/71 

25/77 

0-1 

BE 

1225 

Mrtage 

CogRori 

•wndaretonnr 

31/88 

23/73 

2079 

. 01 . 

b-w 

12-25 

CagUaii 

sunny 

34/03 

24/75 

27/BO 

0-1 

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1020. 

sunny 

dbudaantf«wi 

33491 

24/75 

27/30 

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w 

1020 

Faro 

party Sumy 

25/77 

18 (B* 

21/70 

*■« 

SW 

1520 

Fsro • 

27NU 

.19160 

2Q49B" 

1-2 

sw 

15-30 

Piraeus 

sunny 

37/88 

27/80 

27/80 

0-1 

NW 

12-25 

. Piraeus 

sumy 

38/100 

28479 

27/80 

0-1 

NW 

12-25 

Corfu 

sunny 

37/90 

23/73 

27/80 

0-1 

NW 

1525 

Corfu - - 

- sm my 

38497 

24/75 

27/80 

01 : 

NW 

35-30 

BriBtnon 

partly sunny 
party gunny 

19WB 

12/53 

17ZB2 

0-1 

W 

1525 

Brighton 

sunny 

. cioudsandsut 

22/71 

12153 

Ififfil 

i^ 

W 

2040 

Oatond 

21/70 

17/82 

2QIB8 

1-2 

N 

20-35 

Oarend - 

22/71 

15/59 

18/86 

1-2 

N 

2040 

Schwertnoan 

party sunny 

21/70 

17/82 

2QIBS 

1-2 

N 

20-40 

Schowningen 

clouds and sun 

22/71 

15/58 

20468 

1-2 

N 

25-60 

Sytt 

party sunny 

22/71 

18481 

21/70 

1-2 

N 

25-50 

syt 

pailV sunny 

22/71 

13(56 

21470 

1-2 

NW 

25-50 

Umir 

clouds and sun 

35/95 

24/75 

28/79 

1-2 

N 

2040 

Izmir 

sunny 

3097 

25/77 

asm 

■1-2 

N 

20-40 

Tel Aviv 

sunny 

31/88 

24/75 

27/80 

0-1 

SW 

1525 

- TaiAvV 

sunny - 

32/89. 

24/75 

27/80 

- Q=1 

SW 

12-22- 

Carfbhun and West Atlantic 







Carfeboan and West Atmdc 







Barbados 

sunny 

31/88 

23/73 

27780 

1-2 

ENE 

2035 

Barbados 

. sumy 

31/88 

2am 

27/80 

1-2 

ENE 

2035 

Kingston 

SLThomas 

ttnntoretomia 

sunny 

31/88 

33/91 

24/75 

23/73 

2802 

28/82 

12 

1-2 

E ' 
E 

25-50 ' 
25-35 

Kkjpeton 

Stfliomaa 

party sunny 
sumy 

32*9 

34/93 

2am 

asm 

28/82 

28/82 

. • 1-2 
1-2 

E 

E 

2550 

25-35 

Hamilton 

sunny 

32/89 

asm 

27/BO 

1-2 

SE 

2040 

Hamfton 

smny 

33/91 

asm 

23780 

- 1-2 

SE 

2035 


AsMPadfle 

Penang ctoudi and sun 32/89 

Phtiol ckwte and sun 33191 

Ban clouds and aun 32/89 

Cebu party sunny 32/89 

Palm Beach. Aus pareyatfmy 19468 
Bay oi Islands. NZ party sunny 22/71 
SWrahamo sunny 3HM 

Honohriu partly sunny 31/88 


Ori aw iw» 

0-1 SW IMS 

0-1 SW 12-25 

0- 1 SE 15-30 

1- 2 W 20-30 

1-2 SW 2500 

1-2 SE 2035 

0-1 25-45 


Aafa/Pacitk: 

Penang 

PhUW 

Bal 

Cebu 

Palm Beech. Aua. 


thunderetonas 


SW 10-20 


ffuidmtams ' 33491 

ssm 

20/84 

0-1 

SW 

15-25 

CkwdB aodsun 31*8 

asm 

2B/B4 

0-1 

SW 

12-25 

partly sunny 33491 

asm 

30/86 

Oi 

SE 

15i25. . 

sunny- 22/71 

13/55 

15481 

Oi 

W . 

1020 

ahewen - SOW 

12453 

18484 

T-2 

W 

3060 

. party sumy 31/88 
doudsandwn 31/88 

27/80 

29484 

1-2 

SE 

2040 

24 ns 

26479 

0-1 


25-45 


/ma* Access Numbers 
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2. Dial riw corresponding Anff Access Nundjer. 

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Ttavd in a world without borders, time zones 

or language barriers. 


COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER 
ASIA 


Imagine a world where you can call country to country as easily as you can from home. And 
reach the US. directly from over 125 countries. Converse with someone who doesn't speak your 
language, since its translated instantly. Call your dienes at 3 ajn. knowing they'll get the message in 
your voice at a more polite hour. All this is now possible with Afiar 1 

To use these services, dial the AES’ Access Number of the country you’re in and you’ll get all the 
help you need With these Access Numbers and your ABET Calling Card, international calling has never been easier. 

If you don’t have an ABET Calling Card or you’d like more information on AIXT global services, just call us using the 
convenient Access Numbers on your right 


!ARJ 


ei994AEsr 


AosnaHa 

Chin*, PBCw**; 

Gnam 

Hong Kong 

IvwH** 

Indonesia* 

Japan* 

Korea 
Korea** 
Mahyahr . 
New Zealand 

Swipwn* 

Singapore 
Sri Lanka 
Taiwan* 
Thailand* 


Armeniar 

Austria'*** 

IMgl m n ’ 

Bulgaria 

Croatia** 

CwbHcp 

ftwHIUfk* 

Bnhnf 

Prance 

Germany 

Greece* 

Himg afy* 

kdantf* 

Ireland 


l-B00^81-<m 

H 10811 

018-872 

800-1111 

000-117 

001-801-10 

■ 0039-111 

" ■" 009-11 

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- 800-0011 

000-911 

105-11 

235-2872 

attMmi-m 

430-430 

0080-10288-0 

0019-991-mi 

BUKOPE 

8*14111 

022-903-011 

0800-100-10 

00-1800-0010 

995fH»U. 

0042000101 

8001-0010 

9800-100-10 

19*-00ll 

01300010 

00-800-1311 

oo*-aoooim 

9994W1 

1-800-550000 


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CO UNTRY ACCESS NUMBER COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER 

ft«*y 172-1011 Brazil ” 00(Kfi010 

Uedtoe i iB«ie to ‘ 155QO-U ChDe 00*-0312 

Lithu a ni a* 8*1% Cohonbfe 980-11-0010 

Lu»=nibouig OaoCHJllI CosiaRJca*w 114 

- M a c ed on ia, F.YJL of 9»«0O4288 Bcuador* ~ 119 


Maha* 
Monaco* 
N eHurrlanda * 
Norway- - - 

Pcla*air»7 

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Stovlda 
Spainw . ■ 
Sweden* 
Sw i tzer la nd* 

ILK. 

Ukraine* 


MIDDLE EAST 


0800890-110 - SSalvadorti 

19*r001 1 Guatemala* 

00022-9111 Gnyanar**- . 

800-190-11 ~ Hondutaa*a 123 

(UOlHWHmi Mexico*** 95-800-462-4240 

05017-1- 288 I Wra«i|iwp(h.wj^ 1 J74 

01-80&428 8 Partanuw IO9 

1555042 Peru* 7 : ; jgi 

00-420-00101 m»tea^c~ ^ 

900-99-00-11 Uruguay ftWlO 

020-795-611 Venezuda'6 80^)11-120 

WIO-U CAKiBBEAN 

Q3QPO9-O011 Mana a 1-800-872-2881 

8*100-13 Bennudg* . i-SQQ^ ajz 

BEAST BtMafaVJ. 1-800-872-2881 

ft* 0-00 ! <^yman Islands l-8Q0- 872r2881 

08( 190010 Grenada* - s-- 1^00^73 ^881 
177-100-27^7 HaflT 003-800^72-2^ 

900*288 Jamaica** &S0&S72^2fflI 

— ...I?** 0 * «eai.Anta 001-800^72-2881 

-- 080(1011-77 StBns/N ewb - ' 1-900-672-2881 

1-800-10 T A BUT i • . ■ - 

_QO^OO-12277 Egypt* (Cairo) 510 47200 

^-. c Gaboa> 00*4)01 

Getntoh? . . oom 

001-800-206-1111 Kenya* (XUm 

— - — IAcri * • . 797-797 : 

- — — &800-11V2 SouihAaiOk : 0^00^94112? - 

*TlHkw mull* 


OOOHBOIO 

00*-0312 

980-11-0010 

114 

• - : 119 

190 

190. 


Bahrain 

Cyprus* 


British VI 


Saudi Arabia 
Ttefcey* 
UAE-* -- 


BtHMar 


I fcorf*OVt 

nk»taMerl«m. 


iDkimiteMnn- 


8OO-OO 1 Cayman Islands 

- 0669 0010 Grenada* " 
177-100-2 727 Hattf* 

900-28 8 JEaxnsricz** 

*26* 01 M- Aort ~ 
0800011-7 7 SLSus/Nevls - 

1-800- 10 ^ 

00-800-12277 Egypt* (Cairo) 
flOO -121 G*boa* - ~ 

&S fi amh i u' 


AMHHr^C 

001-800-200-1111 


555 Ubetb. 

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