Skip to main content

Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1994, France, English"

See other formats


N 


*4 


■<4 




"171Z 


■<rv* 



INTERNATIONAL 




PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


**■ 


Paris, Friday, August 12 , 1994 


No. 34,665 



By Aten Friedman 

International Herald Tribune 

ROME — Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi of 
Italy admitted in an interview that executives of Ms 
Emin vest business empire had paid bribes tdgOVcm- ’ 
ment tax officials. But he denied any personal in? 
volvement and claimed his company had Wm forced 
to make the payments. • ' ■ . — • ■' 

Brea king his sBence for the first- time about -the. 
corruption scandal that in recent weeks has erivd-' 
oped his media, retailing and publishing congkjmer-" 
ate and led to . the arrest of his brother Thir. 
Berlusconi sought, to play down the affair by te rming 
the sums of money paid to tax inspectors “ridteit- 
lously small." 

Mr. Bedusooni said: he p refe r red to. describe the 
payments, made oyer a number of years by Fininvest ' 
executives to officials of the Gtiardia di Ftnanza tax 
police,- as “extortion” rather than as bribes in the ■; 
traditional sense. 

^Thesc payments were ridiculously small m quant*- 
tatiye terms, ’ he' said.. “For a company that nas 50 
billion i lire a day of revenues, and pays one bflEon lire 
a day in taxes, these payments, based on what Ihave 


i, Berlusconi Weakens His Fragile Regime 


About Fininvest bribes: 

n For a company that has 50 billion lire a day of revenues, 
and pays one billion lire a day in taxes, these payments , 
based on what f have been told, became a necessity in order 
to delay and reduce the presence of officials who were 
interfering with the work of some companies in our group. " 

Is he a potential target of investigation? 

“There is. nothing that can touch me personally. ” 



Silvio Berlusconi 


been told, became a necessity in order to delay and 
reduce the presence of officials who were interfering 
with the work of some companies in our group." 

Mr. Berlusconi said his brother — who has told 
investigating magistrates in Milan that he authorized 
an off-the-books Fininvest stash fund of about 3 
billion lire ($2 million) for the payments — was a 
“victim of extortion.” 


During an hourlong conversation at his Rome 
office on Wednesday, the prime minister contended 
that he had been “shocked” when he learned recently 
of the payments. He insisted that as president of 
Fininvest until be entered politics last January, he 
had “no personal involvement” and had been kept 
“completely in the dark” about the slush fund and 
the payments. 


Asked whether he feared that he might become the 
target of Milan magistrates investigating corruption, 
Mr. Berlusconi said. “There is nothing that can 
touch me personally.” 

Mr. Berlusconi's admission could nonetheless lead 
to more controversy inside his already fragile gov- 
erning coalition, which includes the separatist-mind- 
ed Northern League and the neofasdst National 
Alliance. And it could create jitters on the Milan 
bourse, which has experienced a sharp drop in share 
prices as a result of squabbling among coalition 
members. Concern about the government's stability 
contributed to a slump in the lira to a record low of 
1,013 against the Deutsche mark on Thursday. 

Fininvest, which has annual revenues of 1 1.6 tril- 
lion lire, is by no means the only company under 
investigation for having bribed tax inspectors over 
the years. But the Fininvest probe has come perilous- 
ly close to the prime minister himself, and his admis- 
sion may also trigger further investigations on the 
part of prosecutors, whom Mr. Berlusconi has ac- 
cused of abusing their powers. 

In the interview with the International Herald 

See ITALY, Page 8 



Britain Offers 
To Cut Ulster 
Troop Patrols 

By James F. Clarity 

New York Times Service 

DUBLIN — In what appeared to be an 
important concession to tne outlawed Irish 
Republican Army, the chief of British se- 
curity in Northern Ireland said Thursday 
that Britain would reduce the number of 
troops on patrol if the IRA agreed to a 
cease-fire that ended a campaign of killing. 

The statement, by Sir Hugh Arinesley, 
chief of the Royal Ulster . Cohstabtriaiy, 
was immediately interpreted by Protestant 
political leaders as a concession. 

Analysts noted that the statement fit a 
pattern in which British officials first re- 
fuse to concede to IRA demands, then 
make conciliatory statements to indicate 
flexibility, then say that -there is nothing 
new or sensationalin such stat enynts . 

Bui Keh Magmnis, a if&nber of the 
British Parliament from Northern Ireland, 
and a security expert for the mainstream 
Ulster Unionist Party,: seemed to reflect 
the view of Protestant leaders; ..... 

He called for the resignation of Mr. 
Annesley, saying the chief constable's 
statement “is a boost to the IRA at a time 
when 1 think and others think they were 
almost without friends.” . 

The IRA, through its political wing, 
Sinn Fein, has insisted that an IRA cease- 
fire would have to be part of k general 
“demilitarization.” 

The British and Irish governments, in a 
* * * initiative in December, offered Sinn 



Jcjn-PiiJ Mi*jer’RcuHT* 


Troops Firs to Dispel A Zairian soldier menacing demonstrators who took to the streets in Goma on Thursday af ter iroops were reported to have 

; ■* killed five money changers. After troops dispersed crowds by firing in the air, Zaire said it would replace all its soldiers in 

Demonstrators in Zaire Goma. In a refugee camp across the Rwanda border, a Hutu family was crediting divine providence for its survival. Page 2. 


Fein a place at a negotiating table if the 
violence was ended. A mini mum of three 
months was later stipulated as necessary to 
make the cease-fire convincing. 

In recent weeks, officials with contacts 
in the IRA have said the outlawed guerrilla 
force was preparing to announce a cease- - 
fire in the next few wedks. 

The statement by Sr Hugh was seen in 
Dublin and Belfast as an attempt to en- 
courage the IRA to lay down its arms, 
which have killed 296 policemen and 648 
British troops since die guerrilla war began 
25 years ago.--' . .. 

Britain has 17,500 troops in Belfast 


Uganda University’s Demise Is a Lesson on Africa 


By Keith B. Riehburg 

Washington Port Service 

KAMPALA, Uganda — Back when Uganda was con- 
sidered “thepeari of Africa,” the prestigious Makerere 
University was the country's treasure. It was the most 
respected institution of higher learning in all of East 
Africa and home to some of the continent's most re- 
nowned scholars. ^ . 

.But two decades of political chaos, tribal bloodletting. 
dvQ war and. financial neglect have taken their toll The 
campus is nm-down. Overcrowded student dormitories 
look more like tenements. Books are outdated, computers 
scarce;' 

' The university can fiD only about half the available 
teaching slots because professors' salaries are so low. 


They average 5300 per month. Virtually all the professors 
supplement their pay with outside jobs, from running 
small shops, consulting for private businesses, or working 
on farms outside the capital One chemistry professor 
drives a taxicab to make ends meet 

This is another in a series of occasional articles dealing 
with the economic and social collapse of countries in Africa. 

“The salary is so low, who’s going to come here? 
Ugandans are running away,” said Joseph Carasco, a 
biochemistry professor and chairman of the university 
faculty union. “I feel very sad for the students now.’* 

Makerere’s is not a unique case. Its demise mirrors 
what African academics, economists and World Bank 


officials say is one of the continent’s most serious and 
neglected long-term crises: the near-total collapse of the 
system of higher education. 

Makerere fell victim to Uganda’s bloody posundepen- 
dence history: the ruthless dictatorship of ldi Amin, the 
Tanzanian invasion, the even more brutal dictatorship of 
Milton Obote, the civil war that brought Yoweri Muse- 
veni to power in 1986. Like all other Ugandan institu- 
tions, Makerere suffered. But to many in East Africa, the 
school's decline is even more dramatic, and sad. when 
viewed against its once-proud reputation for academic 
excellence. 

“Thai institution was clearly for many, many years 

See AFRICA, Page 8 


Kiosk 


House CoaUtion 
Halts Crime Bill 

WASHINGTON (AP) — In a 
stinging rebuke to the Clinton admin- 
istration, 41 coalition of Republicans, 
gun-control opponents and black law- 
makers Thursday rqecroda S33J, bil- 
lion crime bill package. 

The 225-to-2I0 vote on a procedur- 
al measure was preceded by what one 
Democratic leader called “trench war- 
fare" among lobbyists. 


Crossword 

Weather 



Moscow Court Acquits Last Defendant in 1991 Coup Attempt 


By Lee Hockstader 

- Washington Past Service 

MOSCOW — Three years after a coup 
attempt that failed but fed within months 
to the collapse erf the Soviet Union, a 
military court acted Thured : ~* u ' 

last defendant in the case. 

A fanner general, Valentin Varennikov, 
. 70, who once commanded all Soviet 
ground forces, was cleared of treason for 
his role in the plot to seize power from 


Mikhail S. Gorbachev, then president and 
Communist Party leader. 

The Military Collegium of the Russian 
Supreme Court, following the lead of the 
state prosecutor earlier this week, said 
there was no evidence that Mr. Varennikov 
had betrayed his country. It closed the 
case. 

Mr. Varennikov insisted all along that 
he had supported the coup, hoping to hold 
the Soviet Union together. He suggested 
that it was Mr. Gorbachev who should be 


tried for his role in undermining Soviet 
power. 

The former general was the last of a 
group of eight high Communist Party lead- 
ers and nine other conspirators who were 
involved in the plot against Mr. Gorba- 
chev. 

Three of the original plotters committed 
suicide shortly after the coup failed, one 
fell ill and 12 were pardoned by Parliament 
earlier this year, along with the leaders of 


the uprising Iasi October against- President 
Boris N. Yeltsin. 

Only Mr. Varennikov refused to accept 
a pardon, saying be wanted to be exonerat- 
ed in a court of law. 

Mr. Varennikov did not play a leading 
roles in the 1991 coup, which was plagued 
by disarray and drunkenness and was out- 
maneuvered by Mr. Yeltsin, then the lead- 

See COUP, Page 8 


Europeans 
Shudder as 
Interest Rates 
Bounce Up 

Investors Panic at Move 
By Sweden and Italy ; 

Is Recovery Cut Short? 


By Erik Ipsen 

International Herald Tribune 


% 


financial markets on Thursday by raising 
interest rates, sending bond and share 
prices tumbling across Europe as investors 
shuddered at the prospect that rates might 
have bottomed out 

“All of a sudden people are saying the 
party is over and that interest rates in 
Europe will now be going up,” said Mal- 
colm Barr, international economist at 
Chemical Bank in London. “Personally I 
do not believe it.” 

It was Stockholm that took the lead in 
turning sentiment. In the morning the 
Riksbank, the Swedish central bank, 
notched up interest rates in the first such 
move in Europe since the economic recov- 
ery began. 

Late in the day the Italians followed 
suit. It was the first rise in interest rates 
there since the currency crisis of Septem- 
ber 1992. That crisis ultimately saw both 
the lira and the pound forced out of the 
European currency grid. 

While economists across Europe contin- 
ued to forecast falling inflation, the al- 
ready jittery bond markets were far from 
reassured. As dealers scrambled to find the 
next country likely to follow Sweden’s 
lead, attention had quickly centered on 
Italy. Analysts noted that like Sweden, 
Italy has both a huge fiscal deficit and an 
undervalued currency. The central banks 
in both countries pushed up their whole- 
sale lending rates by half of a percentage 
point, to 8 percent in Sweden and to 75 
percent in Italy. 

Stock markets in both countries reacted 
by turning in the worst performances of 
any European markets on Thursday. The 
Italian stock market lost 1 .34 percent of its 
value, second only to Sweden's fall of near- 
ly 2 percent. 

The Italian losses came in spite of new 
figures showing that industrial production 
in June rose by a seasonally adjusted 4.4 
percent from levels recorded a year earlier. 

The moves by the central banks put 
pressure on the dollar amid fears that Eu- 
ropean currencies would benefit if the con- 
tinent’s interest rates began climbing. 

“The name of the game now is changing 
perceptions,” said Hung Tran, head of 
bond research at Deutsche Bank in Frank- 
fun. “The market is now looking for the 
next tightening move in Europe.” As re- 
cently as last month, bond markets bad 
begun to worry that interest rates might 
not fall as far as previously believed. 

That rapid-fire shift in expectations now 
carries potentially huge ramifications. 
Continental economies, where domestic 
demand remains weak and where what 
growth that does exist has come largely 
from exports, now face the threat of the 
added burden of higher interest rates. 

Figures released Thursday revealed a 
generally upbeat, but by no means robust 
picture. 'In France the government revised 
upward its figure for economic growth in 
the first quarter from 05 to 0.7 percent, 
growth that was largely attributed to in- 
ventory building rather than actual sales. 

In Spain, meanwhile, unemployment 
took its biggest dive in 1 7 years last month. 
It fell by a full half of a percentage point, 
but that’ decline still left 165 percent of the 
Spanish work force without jobs. 

Given Europe’s still modest growth fig- 
ures and the early stage of its recovery, 
most economists continued Thursday to 
insist that any further hikes in interest 
rates would not come until next year. Brit- 
ain, where the recovery is now in its second 
year, remains the exception. 

“The Swedish inflation outlook is not 
that different from that of the U.K.," not- 
ed Peter Fellner, chief gilts strategist for 
NatWest Markets. On the Continent, how- 
ever, Mr. Fellner said that Sweden’s move 
merely reinforced the already growing re- 
alization that interest rate cuts had “not 
much more room to fall, if any at all.” 

Analysts said that the outlook for U.S. 

See RATES, Page 10 


™ Down " 

15H6 J v 

■ ? 3750.90 .3 

The Dollar 

Nam Vox 



For Alghan Refugees, Life on the Moon 

— 1 Crowded Tent City Swelters in a Desert, Far From Water 


THift OcM 


DM 


1.56. 


prgrtouariQM , 

1.5844 


Pound 


1.S473 


1.5373 


Yen 


100125 


.101,425 


PF 


5.355 


5.4245 


Kipwsstand Prices. 


.#*' 


Andorra 9.00 FF Luxembourg *0 IL. Fr 

SSn:M 

IS; 

Sf 0 'j.SoLiri! Tuniwo ....VOW ^ 
LnrCmxmCFA TU^ T.^ - 

ffigfc-iSV* “sV IftrJfrW 


By John Dam ton 

Hew York Tima Service 

JALALABAD, Afghanistan —The Sar 
Shahi camp for people displaced by ibe 
war, a vast checkerboard of tents extend- 
ing as far as the eye can see, sits on a barren 
plateau. of rocks and gravel- It fries in the 
sweltering Afghan sun like eggs in a skillet 

Tbereisno known source of. water with- 
in an hour’s walk and scarcclya tree to cast 
the smallest patch of shade. The tempera- 
ture reaches 40 degrees centigrade (105 
Fahrenheit) these summer days. It is so hot 
that people just stay in their tents, almost 
too listless even to swat at flies. 

■ “Here it’s a desert, and there is nothing 
■ to do.just to sit and wait for rations, said 
Mohammed Akbar, 35. who lives in the 
camp with his wife and three children. His 
right hmd'Tcyedwith one of his few pos- 
sessions, a tape measure. “This is not a 
life.” 


The camp is home to 1 18,000 people and 
is growing by about 30 families a day. 
Almost all have fled from Kabul, the capi- 
tal 1 10 kilometers (70 miles) to the east, 
where fighting began again on Jan, 1 
among the various factions of mujahidin, 
who wore down Soviet troops into with- 
drawing in 1989 and toppled the Soviet- 
backed government in April 1991 

Their own feuding has been more de- 
structive than the Soviet era. In the previ- 
ous 12 years of guerrilla war, the capital 
remained largely intact. Now it is in rains 
from rocket attacks and street fighting as 
the forces of Prime Minister Gulbuddin 
Hekmatyar and President Burhanuddin 
Robbani struggle for control. 

More than 11,000 people have been 
killed and 500,000 left homeless in the last 
seven months. 

five years ago, the world was paying 
attention to what was Happening here. 


Two years ago, there was hope that the 
worlds largest concentration of refugees. 6 
miBion Afghans in Pakistan and Iran, 
would finall y return home, and 2.7 million 
eventually md. 

But the fighting has renewed and now it 
goes on in international obscurity. 

There are still 3.3 million refugees out- 
side Afghanistan — 1.5 million in Pakistan 
and l-S mini on in Iran. The return of 
refugees ebbed, and the tide started run- 
ning in the other direction. 

The huge camps outside Peshawar and 
Quetta in Pakistan, with ever-expanding 
numbers of adobe houses, electrical lines 
and health and educational services, have 
become tike established villages. 

The refugees there are integrating ever 
more deeply into the local economy or 
even sending family breadeamers flying 

See CAMP, Page 8 


Baseball Talks End in Futility 

Prepare for ‘Long One,’ Owner Says of a Strike 


By Richard Justice 

Washington Past Service 

NEW YORK — Major league base- 
ball’s labor negotiators seemingly sur- 
rendered to the inevitability of a shut- 
down Friday after a brief bargaining 
session produced little progress and a 
lot of anger. 

Asked about a players’ strike, one 
club owner said: “Be prepared for a 
long one.” 

The bargaining session. On Wednes- 
day. consisted mainly of Richard Ra- 
vi tch, chief negotiator for the owners, 
telling 13 members of the Baltimore 
Orioles, New York Yankees and Phila- 
delphia Phillies why his side had to have 
a proposal that includes a ceiling on pay 
— a salary cap — similar to the one 
adopted by the National Football 
League. 

The players responded that they 


would not accept a salary cap because it 
would restrict pay and free agency. And 
when the session ended, both sides took 
their cases into the court of public opin- 
ion via the press, which is where the real 
war is being waged in these final days. 

The players say they are increasingly 
frustrated because no baseball owners, 
team presidents or general managers 
are attending the sessions. 

"I believe the strike will last as long as 
there are no owners at the meetings.” 
said a pitcher for the Orioles. Mike 
Mussina. *‘We’re not talking to owners. 
We're talking to an ownership represen- 
tative, who as far as I know will be the 
only one making any money when 
thoe’s a strike." 

The players have said they must 
strike because the owners will declare 

See STRIKE, Page 17 





W^5^BiP!P!PftfS«3EffSS!5!!nTOODOOQSMt« I nm*«c»»: 



I 

I 

1 

I 

l 


i 


:j* 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 12, 1994 


* + 


Clinton Sets Oct. 15 Deadline to Act on Bosnia Embargo 


WORLD BRIEFS 


By Ruth Marcus 
and Daniel Willi am s 

Hainan; / wi Pott Service 

WASHINGTON — Under 
congressional pressure. Presi- 
dent Bill Clinton has for the 
first time set a deadline for ask- 
ing the United Nations to ex- 
empt the Muslim-led Bosnian 
government from a regional 
arms embargo, administration 
officials said. 

In a letter to the Senate 
Armed Services Committee 
chair man, Sam Nunn. Demo- 
crat of Georgia. Mr. Clinton 
said that if the separatist Bosni- 
an Serbs failed to accept an in- 
ternationally brokered peace 
proposal for Bosnia by Oct. 15, 
he would go to the UN before 
the end of October to ask that 
the embargo against the Mus- 
lims be lifted. 

[France and Britain said 
Thursday they would not op- 
pose a wove to lift the embargo 
a gains t the Bosnian Muslims, 
Agence France- Presse reported. 

[Foreign Minister Alain 
Juppe of France reiterated in a 
television interview that lifting 
the embargo would not be 
good, either for the UN forces 
on the ground in Bosnia, “or for 
peace," but that it could “be- 
come unavoidable." 

[Earlier Thursday, the British 
Foreign Office said Britain 
would abstain in any UN vote 
on lifting the arms embargo, 
reiterating that it would not use 
its veto.] 

Mr. Nunn called Mr. Clin- 
ton's willingness to set a date 
"very significant because it de- 
notes a seriousness of purpose" 


for acting if the Serbs continue 
to balk at accepting the plan, 
which effectively divides Bosnia 
in half. 

Mr. Clinton's letter came in 
the face of congressional agita- 
tion for more aggressive action 
to help the Muslims. 

In the letter, he argued that 
unilateral action to lift the em- 
bargo by Washington would 
strain relations with allies, jeop- 
ardize cooperation with Russia 
and increase the likelihood of 
U.S. military involvement U.S. 
officials warned it would also 
undermine UN sanctions else- 
where — on Iraq and Haiti, for 
example. 

Since shortly after taking of- 
fice, Mr. Clinton has advocated 
lifting the arms embargo but 
had aU but dropped the propos- 
al in the face of allied and Rus- 
sian resistance. Britain and 
France have opposed lifting the 
embargo, even by Security 
Council agreement for fear the 
war will spread. Russia, a tradi- 
tional ally of the Serbs, also 
opposes an action that would 
favor the Muslim side in the 
civil war. 

Now, however, with the 
peace plan on the table, the ad- 
ministration is hopeful either 
that increased pressure on the 
Serbs will convince them to sign 
the plan or that the allies and 
Russia will finally be willing to 
lift the embargo in the face of 
continued Serbian intransi- 
gence. 



Rabin Opens Jerusalem to PLO Aide 

TEsiWA t cx* — Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin gave j 


j — - - — 

JERUS ALEM f AF) — Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin gave a- 
top Palestinian ifiaal the green light on Thursday to visit 

an aide to Yasser Arafat, the Palestine Liberation OrganizatiOT s 
'leader, had permission to visit the city's Muslim shrrnes. Mr v 
Shaat h Is mim^CT^pSnning in the Palestinian authority m Gaza 
and the West Rank town of Jericho. , 

Hecaafiimed the go-ahestL. “Tliis ought to be 
we Alight to be able to see Jerusalem, to pray in Jerusalem, Mr. 

in &e Gaza Strip. The Pakstiinan autonomy < 

cSycanfintf to Gaza an/the West Bank town of Jencho. 


r. 


Senate Cuts Off Funds to Spy Project 


WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate, miffed at not Imowing 
about a 53 10 million budding for a secret spy agency, voted to halt 
further spending for the project until it Iranis more abouiii. 

The vote; coining days after members of the Senate intelligence 
committee publicly disclosed the project, reftects anger among 
lawmakers that work oquld have g one on for four years without 

^EariS^officiais representing the CIA and the Pentagon insist- 
ed they had fully disclosed to Congress the construction project,, 
which is to house the National Reconnaissance Office, the agency 
that operates the government's spy satellites. 


Paris Backs Eventual Algeria Voting 


fcirr Andiem/Rcnca 


A Bosnian soldier being buried Thursday in Sarajevo. He was killed in renewed fighting between Muslims and Serbs. 


Milosevic and Karadzic: ‘ One Has to Go’ 


PARIS (Reuters) — Foreign Minister Alain Juppe of France' 
denied Thursday that Paris .unconditionally supported the au- 
thorities in Algeria and said ihey should return the country to 
democracy as soon as it was practical. 

“There must be elections, he said in an interview on French 
televis io n. “When the moment is right, when conditions permit, 
the Algerian people must be able to express themselves." 

Mr! Juppd said he delivered the same message directly to 
Algeria’s president a week ago. 




Russia Republic 


■ UN Airlift Suspended 
UN officials suspended the 
airlift to the Bosnian capital, 
Sarajevo , after three UN air- 
craft were hit by gunfire. The 
Associated Press reported 


By Stephen Kinzer 


Nf*»’ York Times Service 


Expects Invasion 

MOSCOW (Reuters) — The 
leader of Russia's breakaway 
republic of Chechnya, facing 
increasing opposition from 
Moscow, ordered the mobiliza- 
tion Thursday of all men in the 
North Caucasus region to pre- 
vent a possible invasion. 

Itar-Tass news agency 
quoted an aide to the Chechen 
president. Dzhokhar Dudayev, 
a severe irritant to the Kre mlin 
since his election in 1991. as 
saying the order would be made 
public within hours. 

President Boris N. Yeltsin of 
Russia insisted Moscow would 
not use force to overthrow Mr. 
Dudayev, saying that would 
spark an uprising and unforgiv- 
ably high bloodshed in the Cau- 


Thursday from Sarajevo. 

The planes were hit on the 


ground at the Sarajevo airport, 
said Peter Kessler, a UN aid 
spokesman. There was no im- 
mediate word on who was sus- 
pected of firing the shots. 

The airlift was suspended 
more than three weeks ago after 
planes were hit by bullets be- 
lieved to have been fired from 
Serbian positions. It was re- 
sumed Tuesday. 

The incident was another 
sign of mounting tensions 
around Sarajevo. Serbs have 
tried to Lighten their siege of the 
city and Muslim-led govern- 
ment forces have gone on the 
offensive. 


BELGRADE — The two most promi- 
nent Serbian leaders are involved in a high- 
stakes confrontation so intense that it may 
result in a fall from power for one of them. 

When the president of Serbia. Slobodan 
Milosevic, announced last week that he 
was ending all political and economic sup- 
port for his Serbian allies in Bosnia-Herze- 
govina. he effectively severed his ties with 
tile Bosnian Serbian leader, Radovan Kar- 
adzic. 


Not everyone in Belgrade believes that a 
confrontation between Mr. Milosevic and 
Mr. Karadzic will come so soon, but few 
doubt that it will come. 


“There can’t be two top guys,” said 
Predrag Simic, director of the Institute for 
International Politics and Economics, an 
independent research center. “One of them 
has to go." 

Mr. Milosevic, a veteran Communist ap- 
paratchik and shrewd behind-the-scenes 


die, perhaps the only person in Bosnia 
powerful enough to depose Mr. Karadzic. 

General Mladic has not appeared in 
public in recent days, nor has be offered 
any reaction to Mr. Milosevic's decision 
last week to cut off siqjplies to his army. 
What he may be thinking or planning is a 
subject of heated speculation. 

General Mladic is known as a hard-line 
Serbian -narirmaiisr, and he has been on- 


Aspirin Blocks AIDS, Study Suggests 


fadingly loyal to Mr. Karadzic during 
more than two yea 


He is de mand ing that Mr. Karadzic ac- 
cept the latest international peace plan, 
knowing that United Nations diplomats 
are moving ahead with tighter sanctions 
that could have a devastating effect on 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


Serbia’s already crippled economy. 

The only way the Serbs in Belgrade can 


operator, holds a strong hand. He controls 
not only the Yugoslav Army, the Serbian 
police and broadcast outlets but also a far- 
flung network of party loyalists in Bosnia. 


casus. 


UN peacekeepers said as 
many as 3,000 Bosnian govern- 
ment troops have moved into a 
combat zone just north of Sara- 
jevo in the past two days. 


avoid such sanctions, diplomats say. is to 
persuade their Bosnian allies to accept the 
plan. 

“Milosevic has to get the Bosnian Serbs 
to sign the plan, and if this group won't 
sign it. he has to replace them." one Euro- 
pean diplomat said. “Something dramatic 
has to happen, and given the fact that the 
UN sanctions are going to be imposed this 
week or next week, it has to happen quick- 
ly.” 


“Milosevic is not the sort of man who 
gets himself into a fight like this without 
thinking it through and convincing himself 
that he can win,” said a foreign resident of 
Belgrade who closely observes politics. 

But Mr. Karadzic is not without weap- 
ons. He has been in touch with militant 
politicians in Serbia, and Monday he met 
with Patriarch Pa vie, bead of the Serbian 
Orthodox Church. 


two years of war in Bo&iia. Yet 
be has ties to Mr. Milosevic that go back 
much further. 

The relationship between Mr. Milosevic 
and Mr. Karadzic is often compared to 
that between Dr. Frankenstein and his 
monster. Mr. Milosevic plucked Mr. Kar- 
adzic from obscurity several years ago and 
helped engineer his rise to power, but he 
now finds be cannot control the figure he 
helped create. 

After Mr. Milosevic announced his deci- 
sion to cut off aid, Mr. Karadzic respond- 
ed life* a man confident of his position. 


WASHINGTON ^ cut ^^7^^" tube 

Sown AlDS, researchers said Thursday. 

In a study to be published Friday in the journal Science, Yale 
researchers found aspirin and its chemical precursor, sodium 
salicylate, work in part by blocking a protein called NF-kappaB, 
which plays a crucial role in triggering the body's frontline 
immune response. The researchers found that, by inhibiting NF- 
kappaB, aspirin substantially prevented the human inununodefi- 
riency virus, or HIV, which causes AIDS, from replicating itself.- 
The lead author of the article, Dr. Sankar Ghosh, emphasized, 
however, that "this is a preliminary laboratory study, and people 
should wait for clinical trials to see whether aspirin is shown to be 
beneficial in patients.” 


Korean Crash Laid to Pilots’ Dispute 


“It seems to us that we have to grow up. 

to be 


SEOUL (AF) — An argument between the pilot and co-pilot of 
a South Korean airbner over whether to abort a bad-weather 
landing may have been a factor in its crash, the police said 
Thursday. All liSO people on board escaped just before the plane 
burst into flamns- 

- The pilot of the Airbus A-300, Captain Barry Edward Woods, a 
Canadian, told the police that the co-pUot, Chung Chan Kyu, had 
suddenly attempted to abort the landing about 400 yards from the 


A key figure is the commander of the 
Bosnian Serbs' army. General Ratko Mla- 


to separate from our mother and 
older and adult," Mr. Karadzic said from 
his headquarters in Pale, Bosnia-Herzego- 
vina. “Now we are totally, totally alone. 
Only God is with ns.” 


end of die runway, causing the plane to skid, the police said. 
Mr. rhnng sard Captain Woods insisted on landing everi 


though there was not enough room on the runway after a sudden 
tailwind pushed the plane forward, according to the report Mr: 
Chung said he shouted to Captain Woods to abort but that the 
pilot ignored him. -J 


In an Orgy of Killing, ‘Providence’ Saved Rwandan 


By Raymond Bonner 

New York Tima Service 

NYARUSHISHI, Rwanda 
— Not long ago Samuel 
Ntawiniga ana his family lived 
in a three-bedroom house in Ki- 
gali, with a television, a video- 
cassette recorder and modem 
iliances in the kitchen. 
Ntawiniga had a good 


applui 



Roxal Plaza 


MONTREUX 




A lake legend. 
Like the one 
we're becoming. 

hotel right cm -the shore 
- ofLake Geneva. •: 


JB20 MONTREUX - SWITZERLAND 
TEL. 41-21/9635131 
FAX 41-21/9635637 


job: He was a senior financial 
officer in the American Embas- 
sy, where he had worked for 
eight years. 

These days, he and his family 
live under a plastic sheet like 
12,000 others in the refugee 
camp here. They sleep od straw 
mats, and his wife, Helene Mu- 
kabutera, cooks sweet potatoes 
and rice over an open fire. 

But Mr. Ntawiniga, 45, who 
has white flecks in his beard 
and wears a small pin on his 
shirt displaying the Rwandan 
and American flags, does not 
complain about his living con- 
ditions. 

Scores of his relatives, neigh- 
bors and friends have been 
killed in recent months, and he 
believes that he has survived 
only by divine providence. 

Mr. Ntawiniga’s story is the 
story of Rwanda since April — 
a nation on the run after a fren- 
zy of violence in which teas of 
thousands of Tutsi and moder- 
ate Hutu were killed. And yet 
there is compassion amid the 
carnage. 

The nightmare for Mr. 
Ntawiniga, and the country, be- 
gan on April 6, when President 
Juvenal Habyarimana died in a 
licious plane crash, 
was at home, in bed,” Mr. 


Ntawiniga recalled. “Around 
10 o'clock in the evening, one of 
my sons knocked on my bed- 
room door and said quietly, 
‘Papa, the president has been 
killed.' I thought. This is the 
end.' - 

Mr. Ntawiniga, a devout Sev- 
enth-Day Adventist, gathered 
his family together — his wife, 
three sons, two daughters and 
two gjrls orphaned by the civil 
war whom Mr. Ntawiniga and 
his wife had taken from a refu- 
gee camp a few months earlier. 

“We prayed,” he said. “The 
next morning the killing start- 
ed.” Soldiers from the presiden- 
tial guard, the elite unit of the 
Rwandan Army, went from 
house to house in the capitaL 

One of Mr. N la wmiga's 
neighbors was killed, but the 
man's wife and another woman 
escaped and sought refuge in 
Mr. Ntawiniga’s house. 

Mr. Ntawiniga and his wife 
are Hutu, but the women they 
rescued are Tutsi, which would 
have meant certain death for 
Mr. Ntawiniga if the soldiers 
and militiamen searching 
homes had found them. 


The militiamen ordered Mr. 
Ntawiniga ’s wife and children 
into one room, then went into 
his bedroom — “I was taking a 
nap,” he said — and took him 
outside. 


They accused Mr. Nlawinij 
of being a supporter of tl 
Rwanda Patriotic Front, the 
Tutsi-dominated rebel army, 
because he worked for the 
American Embassy. 

They also said that Mr. 
Ntawiniga and his wife looked 
like Tutsi, so they must be 
killed. Their mothers are indeed 
Tutsi, but their fathers are 
Hutu, which means that under 
the Rwandan classification sys- 
tem they are Hutu. 

The militiamen forced Mr. 
Ntawiniga to lie face down on 
the ground. Then one of them 
said, l Tm going to count to 
three, and then I am going to 
kill you.” Mr. Ntawiniga could 
hear his wife and children cry- 
ing inside. 

Mr. Ntawiniga asked to be 
allowed to pray. They allowed 
him to, then one counted, “One, 


two, three,” and pulled the trig- 
ger. 

He had fired into the ground 
next to Mr. Ntawiniga's head. 
“I don't know why.” Mr. 
Ntawiniga said. “I think they 
just wanted to intimidate me.” 

He said they demanded mon- 
ey from him, and because it was 
the start of the school year he 
had on hand his children's 
school fee — about $100 — and 
gave it to them. They also de- 
manded his car. He gave them 
the keys, but they left without 
the car. 


On Friday, April 8, two days 
after the violence began, the 
diplomatic community b egan 
to flee Kigali, the capitaL 
Mr. Ntawiniga derided to get 
his family out as well. The fam- 
ily fled to Gitarama, and were 
there when the Patriotic Front 
attacked in mid-June; A Rwan- 
dan Army soldier ordered Mr. 
Ntawiniga and his family to 
flee. 


“If you don’t leave. I will kill 
you,” Mr. Ntawiniga recalled 
the soldier saying. 


SUSJji 



Efl IVn-PAEtS 

THE OLDEST COCKTAIL BAR IN EUROPE m 
Just tell die taxi driver, “Sank roo doe rtoo " 

PARIS: 5, rue Ctaunou 
GENEVA : Confederation Center 
MS EUROPA : At Sea MONTREUX: Montreux Palace / 



“Providence saved me.” Mr. 

The next morning several mi- Grenade Hurts 7 in Burundi Capital 

litiamen searched Mr. Ntawini- * * 

ga's house. And that afternoon 
four more returned. 


The militias, which carried 
out most of the carnage in 
Rwanda ic April and May and 
still terrorize the people in this 
area, were formed by the coun- 
try’s two Hutu political parties, 
the National Republican Move- 
ment for Democracy and the 
more extremist Coalition for 
the Defense of the Republic. 


BUJUMBURA, Burundi 
(Reuters) — At least seven peo- 
ple were wounded Thursday 
when a grenade was hurled into 
ihe main market here, raising 
tears that Burundi would follow 
Rwanda into ethnic conflict. 

The attack took place despite 
a heavy military presence on the 
streets of the capital to quell 
ethnic unrest and strikes. It was 
not known who had thrown the 
grenade. 


The army moved quickly to 
head off further attacks and 


sealed off the northern suburb 
of Ngagara, a mainly Tutsi 
neighborhood where armed 
guerrillas were roaming. Mili- 
tants chanting “Iboro,” slang 
for “Kill the Hutu,” have 
threatened to step up their ac- 
tions to force the government 
into releasing leaders arrested 
for inciting violence. 


J . .*• • ' 

Weekend Events Mark 


Landings in Provence 


Itamtaiovd Herald Tribune 

PARIS — France is host to ceremonies this weekend 
recalling the World War II Allied landings in Provence 5Q 


years ago. Marked by U.S. warships calling at ports all along 
France s Mediterranean coast, the three-day commemora- 


tion, running 
will be 


the Assumption holiday on Monday, 
ited by a series of events. 

Bruce Williams, a correspondent for the Veterans of For- 
eign Wars of the United States, said the events would include: 
On Saturday, at 10 PJvL, a sound-and-light show on the 
beach at Ste. Maxims, near St Tropez, will recount the main 
events of ihe Allied campaign. 

On Sunday, warships from Britain, France and the United 
States will steam from ViDefranche to Toulon between 8 AM. 
and 5 P-M. At 2 1 A.M., President Francois Mitterrand and 
Secretary of the Navy John H. Dalton wfiQ salute the proces- 
sion from the deck of a French aircraft carrier during a flyover 
by U.S. and French aircraft At 4:30 PM. at La Motte, 
parachute teams from Britain, France and the United States 
wall conduct precision jumps in the drop zone used in 1944. 

On Monday, at Hyfcres, an air show will be open from 9 
AML to 6 PM. at the French naval air base. Ceremonies and 
flyovers w Ul be held in Dramont, where four US. veterans are 
to be decorated by France, and at 1 1 AM in Cavalaire, an 
event honoring French participation in the invasion. At 630 
P-M. in Dra gm g n an , an American memorial ceremony wili be 
field at the Rhdne American Cemetery, with more than 100 
U.S. veterans in attendance. 


Yets May Jump, Into Sea 


The Associated Press 
PARIS — Five US. veterans, whose plan to parachute onto 
French soil was refused, have received an offer of a consola- 


titm^ump from the French military — a drop into the sea. 


probably going to take them up on it It will be an 
interesting experience,” said Ken Shaker, 78, a company, 
camnunder in the 509th Parachute Infantry Regiment rtnrmg 


General Christian Piquemal confirmed that the French 
Army wiD, if the veterans agree quickly, give them some basic 
training and take them up in helicopters to 1300 feet. 


TRAVEL 

UPDATE 


U.K. Rail Strike 


£pr 


Starts, More Set 


LONDON (AFP) — Just 
hours before the start of a 24- 
hour stoppage at Thursday 
mi dnig h t, to be followed by 


stnQkes Monday and Tuesday. 
British railroad si gnalm en an- 




f = 


nounced another strike for Aug. 
22 starting at noon. 

The signalmen have been' 
staging weekly one- and two-* 
day strikes for nine weeks in 
tbrir pay dispute, disrupting 
train schedules. Seeking com- 
pensation for staff cuts, the 
4,500 signalmen demanded an 
1 1 percent hike in their salaiy," 
later revised to 5.7 percent ■ 


British Airways plans to' 
spend up to 5220 mfflfo n to up- 
grade in-flight enter tainmen t" 
and information. Passengers- 
will be able to rent a car, book 
hotel rooms and even gamble.. 
The system will be tested nextv 
year. ( Bloomberg f 


The Greek government- 
banned half of cars arid taxis 
from the heart of Athens on 


Thursday and Friday because 
of high pollution levels i 


— — ty . fvuuuvu n«>vi9 and high, ■ 
temperatures, expected to reach- 
42 degrees centigrade (107^ 
Fahrenheit). Hundreds of Atlax 
nians died in 1988 dnring a heat 
wave coupled with thick airpok 
ration. (Reuters)- 


The no-smoking bead nf 
Damp, Germany, has been de- 
clared a success. Town officials” 
also said the beach gets less fit-! 
ter than others. (Reuters) 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 12, 1994 


Page 3 




-TtiuT sr,. 

; e?t &»s gf 

L' tL’ B 


inton in the Fall Elections 


By Michael Wines 

• _• New York Times Service . 

WASHINGTON^*- Leon E. Panetta holds the 
rank, of While House chief of staff. As his very 
first change in the staff suggests, even that grand" 
title understates the job. ’ . r ' ' 

^^Panctta has yet to disdoa a lohg-nunwed' 
reshuffling of the White House, or even to hire 
his own staff. But this week he reshuffled oatshte 
the White House, japping a Mow Qttifontian, 
former Representative Tony L. Codho, in effect 
to run the Democratic Party through the fall 
elections. ; 

' ^ part, his mdve reflects an understanding ' 
mat President BUI Clinton’s a gp n tfa is a “dead 
fetter” if Democrats lose many seats in Congress, 
as a number of experts predict. 

-It also hints at the breadth and urgency of the 
political rescue operation Mr. Panetta is con-- 
duenng. With _lhe president’s popularity with 
voters s i nkin g in the polls, his legislative goals 
imperiled and Whitewater rearing its head yet 
again, any dramatic White House administrative: 
changes — changes Mr. Paneita pledged six 
weeks ago to make “earlier rather than Lacer” — 
await more urgent political duties. 

“There are some- fundamental problems that, 
need to be addressed now, the most important - 
being the president's legislative agenda,” «>«* a 
senior administration official close to Mr. Panei- 
ta. 

Should Mr. Clinton lose the summer’s battles 


Ld Congress, this. official said, the Hama?* to 
Democrats “would be considerable." 

^And so for now, the new chief of staff is also 
to new chief lobbyist, attending Democratic- 
; Whip meetings in Congress to find votes for 
health-care, enmeand trade bills. He is the chief 
tmago-maker, summoning consultants and polit- 
. j{<w fiends for advice on how to focus the pub- 
lics Tuzzy view of just what Mr. Clinton stands 
-lor. 

-■Perhaps most of all, he is trying to focus Mr. 

: Clinton hunself. He is reining in the many aidcs- 
without-portfolio who once had their fingers, 
and entire hands, in almost every Oval Office 
decision. 

.. . . And he is trying to get the president himself to 
stop talking so often, for so long and on so many 
topics. That may be one of the hardest of 


. Still, one would never know it by talking to the 
nftw chief of staff. Mr; Panetta taflrg about man- 
aging the most powerful office in ihe world in the 
blandest of bureaucratic lan gu a g e, 

. “What we’re involved in here is the need to 
make the transition from a campaign organiza- 
tion to a governing organization,” he said, “and 
that means greater discipline, greater lines of 
authority, greater focus on what needs to be 
done. Just the overall efficiency and effectiveness 
of the organization needs to be improved.” 

‘•V In. an interview this week in his White House 
office, a capacious affair decorated with Ansel 


Adams landscape photos, Mr. Panetta said one 
of Ids three priorities when he took on his new 
job on June 2S was to draw clear lines of respon- 
sibility among Mr. Clinton’s aides. 

“There has been a tendency to have a group of 
people trying to manage an issue who may not 
have been assigned mat responsibility under 
their job description," be said dryly. 

On any issue of note, Mr. Panetta said. White 
House advisers must now submit “decision 
memos” to him, for review and forwarding to the 
president, rather than bash out policy in the kind 
of open-ended give-and-take for which this 
White House became famous. 

A second priority, he said, is to ensure that 
aides do not “bypass the process" — skipping 
their bosses to lobby the president directly. Mr. 
Panetta has cut back aides* access. 

The final priority, said the nation’s most pow- 
erful chief operating officer, is to take control of 
salary increases from the management office. 

He also reviews Air Force One passenger lists 
to cull bangers-on from CHmon trips. And be has 
changed the 8 AM. staff meeting to half an hour 
earlier. 

Mr. Panetta said be had not decided when, or 
even whether, to reorganize the White House 
itself, much less who should be moved, promoted 
or let go. 

The White House did confirm on Wednesday 
that he and the president bad decided to replace 
the acting counsel, Lloyd N. Cutler, with Abner 


J. Mikva. dow chief judge of the U.S. Circuit 
Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia. 

But Mr. Cutler’s departure had been planned 
for weeks. 

Mr. Panetta’s description of White House 
days, while technically accurate, understates the 
potential impact of the changes he says he is 
making By Mr. Panetta’s description, two of Mr. 
Clinton's closest advisers and Arkansas friends, 
Bruce R. Lindsey and Thomas F. (Mack) 
McLarty 3d, have circumscribed duties. 

Mr. Lindsey, who has handled much of the 
political damage control stemming from Mr. 
Clinton’s days as governor of Arkansas, is now 
becoming a more general legal adviser. 

Mr. McLarty, the former chief of staff, now 
serves mostly as a liaison to the business world 
and to conservatives. 

A third free-ranging aide with an office next to 
Mr. Clinton, George Stephanopoulos, now acts 
as a deputy to Mr. Panetta, focusing on Congress 
and the day’s less urgent tasks. 

Mr. Panetta is reported to be considering 
changes in the White House communications 
staff, which handles public relations and the 
press, and also in the advance office, which helps 
plan Mr. Clinton’s trips. 

Virtually all these changes are rooted in real 
worry that the public is starting to write Mr. 
Clinton off — confused and wearied by his broad 
and shifting list of goals and his changing expla- 
nations of personal and political conduct. 


U.S. Vessels Poised 



1980 Exiles Oppose on Influx 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — The 
U.S. Coast Guard is poised to 
put more ships in the Caribbean 
quickly in response to any 


arose but only if they could- be 
spared. . Another possibility is 
□sing ships deployed off the 
U.S. East Coast, he said. 

Officials have been updating 


exodus from Cuba, the State contingency plans for 


Department said 'Hnirsday. with a mass influx of Cu&ms 
A press officer, David John- since President Fidel Castro 
son, said the Coast Guard warned Friday of that posabih- 
would play a central role in in- ty. In 1980, 125,000 Cubans 
terdictmg any influx of refugees Red to the United States dining 
in the Straits of Florida. the Marie! boatKft, swamping 

- Mr. Johnson gave no details, services in South Florida. 

But Representative Robert G. Attorney General Janet Reno 

Torricelli, Democrat of New said at a news conference that 
Jersey, chairman 0 f the House UJS. officials were workiDK with 

t- r - - an.! » ■ - u... ... 


mm 

- 


r mi ■ ? ;? 

| : - -- - ; 'f V'--- V 

k-Sfci ; '■ r 

1 1 * ■-* i '•£? • t - Jfrt ** * : -*i . 

KPt - v ** s , T - 




•;-r ‘3§|, 

lit / Wt w 

v ‘ . li: " ^ I® 


• j 

.#•$?■" \ I 




;-v.' Foreign Affairs subcommittee officials in Miami “to caution 
. . bn Inter-American affans, said Castro that he's not going to be 
•• • Wednesday that the Poitagon able to do a repeat of MaricL” 

; could quadruple its 12-veSsd WWiam Booth of The Wosh- 
- pattol m 36 hours if needed. mgr* Post reported earlier from 
, At the Pentagon, a spokes-. Miami- 
man, Dennis Bow, said 12 UJSL . *: Lui rw. a*. 
Navy ships were deployed off Preidait Castro threat- 

. Hain ajidi jra addjtiS five ano t ^ f 

I, IT fedeployed off Cuba if the need ^ 

* J ' ’ Cuban exiles insist- there is a 

- — vast difference between today 

« | m and 1980. 

,:j si Bomb tase $* 

cL . stroy our community," said Ce- 

. n p sax Oifio, the Dade County 

Mon} Before Lourt 

. T i .• happen agaim” 

■ In Argentina in «amg toe** to 

15 rescue family members was 


Navy shins were d^lpycd off 
Haiti and an additional five 
were in the ronthem Caribbean’ 
on anti-narcotics duty. . _ '. ... 

Mr. Boxx suggested that the 
vessels off Haiti and -in - the 
southern Caribbean could be 
redeployedoff Cuba if the need 


Bomb Case 



m-i ■ :Hi m,,) 

% ■#. - i ' 



Ji -«- 1 unban prev 


Cubans waiting for buses to take them around Havana Bay. Ferries have stopped running since some were hijacked. 


+. POLITICAL NOTES Hr 


Whitewater Head Worked for Clinton Foes 

WASHINGTON — Kenneth Starr, the newly appointed 
Whitewater prosecutor, was hired by a conservative women’s 
group earlier this year to submit a legal brief opposing 
President Bill Clinton’s claim of immunity in a sexual harass- 
ment lawsuit. He took on the task without a fee. 

Mr. Starr accepted the Independent Women's Forum as a 
client, his law firm confirmed Thursday. He usually charges 
about S4G0 an hour, according to sources in the legal commu- 
nity. 

It was previously known that Mr. Starr had been consider- 
ing writing a friend-of-the-court brief in the case of Paula 
Corbin Jones, a former Arkansas state worker. But his 
agreement to write tt for a conservative political group was 
not known. 

Mr. StarT, a Republican judge who argued the Bush 
administration's cases before the Supreme Court as solicitor 
general, was named last week to replace Robert Fiske Jr. as 
Head of the Whitewater investigation. 

Critics who have charged That Mr. Starr's Republican 
activities make him too partisan to investigate Mr. Clinton's 
financial affairs, seized on the latest revelation. (AP) 

Wo Peacekeeping Money in Defense Plan 

WASHINGTON — Congressional leaders have agreed on 
a defense budget of S263.8 billion that denies President Bill 
Clinton’s request for funds for international peacekeeping. 

The language in the bill, which has cleared a panel of 
House and Senate negoUators, urges Mr. Clinton to press 
Bosnian Serbs to accept a peace plan but deletes a require- 
ment to unilaterally lift the arms embargo on the Muslim-led 
Bosnian government. 

The lawmakers rejected Mr. Clinton’s request to transfer 
S300 million from the budget for international peacekeeping 
operations because of Pentagon criticism that it would mean 
a loss of control. 

The bill also gives a 2.6 percent pay increase to troops and 
military employees, more than the 1 .6 percent raise sought by 
the president. 

The panel refused to approve funds to keep the Stealth B-2 
bomber alive but did allot SI 25 million to study the need for 
bomber aircraft. (AFP) 

Mrs. Bush Reveals Her Pro-Choice Views 

NEW YORK — The former first lady. Barbara Bush, has 
said publicly for the first time that she is pro-dtoice on the 
question of abortion rights. 

In an interview to be broadcast on an ABC news program 
Sept. 9. Mrs. Bush said that while she refrained from discuss- 
ing her views when her husband was vice president and 
president, she discloses her pro-choice view in her forthcom- 
ing book. 

She said the subject of abortion had followed the couple 
through their political life. 

She also said that despite some reports, the former presi- 
dent had not changed his views on abortion during his 
political career. 

“He never was pro-choice.” she said. “He was always anti- 
abortion. For him. it's killing. I don't feel I can be judgmental 
with others.” (Reuters) 

Quote/Unquote 

In a taped interview never before seen, Richard Nixon 
recalls the trauma surrounding his resignation over the Wa- 
tergate scandal. The film, shown this week at the Nixon 
Library in Yorba Linda. California, records him saying that 
as the helicopter took off from the White House that last day 
to take him and his wife. Pat, to Air Force One, “I heard Mrs. 
Nixon, sitting next io me. speaking to no one in particular, 
say: Mi's so sad. It’s so sad.' ” ( WP ) 


As Economy Heats Up, Public Cools to Health Care Reform 


cannot let it 


n Argentina * ^ «> 

“ rescue family members was 

viewed as heroic. Today, it is 
^ widely seen as aiding the enemy 
BUENOS AIRES — With - ' by allowing Mr. Castro to free 


Argentine-Iranian ties at the 
breaking point, the Supreme 
Court here was poised to decide 
whether to take over the case of 
the branbiiig of a Jewish center 
that killed nearly 100 people. 
The judge investigating the 

- ' July 18 attack, which destroyed 
•r- the offices of Argentina’s two 
. - main Jewish groups, issued in- 

• - temational arrest warrants for 

four absent Iranian diplomats. 

- He also named three other 
"T Iranian Embassy employees as 
suspects. 

■ • • Under Argentina’s Constitu- 
■ lion, the Supreme Court is the 

- only tribunal empowered to 
deal with foreign diplomats. 

Judge Juan Jos& Galeano’s 
decision to order a worldwide 
. ' manhunt for the four, who were 

- ' named by a disaffected Iranian 

in Venezuelan custody, Manu- 
chehr Motaroer, sparked an ari- 

- gry exchange of protests be- 
t- - tween Tehran and Buenos Aires 

on Wednesday. 

Threatened with expulsion 
. T and summoned to the Argen- 
*.•* tine Foreign Ministry, the Ira- 
nian ambassador, Habi Sold- 
_ roan Pour, had to push his w$y 
. ' through a mob of journalists as 

’ he arrived late Wednesday. He 

stumbled and fell to his knees at 

• one point. 

He left tight-lipped less than 
an hour later, carrying a note 
from Foreign Minister Guido di 
Telia that rejected as intoler- 
able Tehran’s official protest 
President Carlos Sail 
Menem earher threatened to ex- 
pel the ambassador for Jrans 
purported role in the attack. 

In Tehran, Argentina s 
\chargfe d’affaires was sum- 
moned to the Iranian Foreigp 
Ministry twice — the second 
. time at 2 A.M. — and was told 
Jie four diplomats would sue 
for defamation. .... 

In New York, Iran's United 
. Nations mission issued a state* 
ment demanding that Argenti- 
na “present any evidence an- 
d/or documents it .possesses 
concerning the unfounded alle- 
gations against the four Iranian 
nationals." . . 

The four Iranians named by 
Judge Galeano were ail in Ar- 
gentina in an official capacity at 
/some stage. Their present 
•• whereabouts are not known. 


himself of. critics. 

But more importantly, many 
Cubans here, who have created 
their own version of an eco- 
nomic miracle, believe another 
influx would prove too costly. 

“It would be devastating for 
the economy,” said Xavier 
Suarez, a former mayor of Mi- 
ami. “That's the big one. South 
Florida just can’t take another. 
100,000 people.” 

So far, theU.S. Coast Guard 
reports no sign of boats heading 
from the United States to Cuba 
to pick up refugees. But raffs 


By David S. Broder 

Weshmpon Pm Serritx 

■ WASHINGTON — White House officials, 
surveying the battleground of health care reform, 
are beginning to suspect that President Bill Clin- 
ton’s top legislative priority may be the victim of 
his good fortune in presiding over an improving 
economy. 

'“What you see in the polling data,” a senior 
presidential advise r said, “is that people are less 
fearful about losing their jobs — and with them 
their health insurance; So their concern about 
health care is less. Ilfs not the sole factor, but it is 
a factor." 

When Mr. Clinton was shaping his health care 
proposal, most Americans said they were satis- 


fied with their own health care but thought, 
nonetheless, that the system needed a major 
overhauL 

In September, when Mr. Clinton introduced 
his health care plan, 56 percent of those polled by 
The Washington Post and ABC News approved 
of it; only 24 percent disapproved. By this June, 
opposition had increased to 53 percent, and 


support was down to 42 percent. But this explanation is viewed by others as, at But Mr. Blendon mentioned another factor. 

In that same span of lime, the consumer confi- best, a partial rationale for the difficulties beset- “Between September and last January, the ad- 
den ce index of the Conference Board rose from ting the health care initiative. ministration allowed opponents to frame the 

63.8 percent to 91.6 percent. The 28-poinl in- Robert J. Blendon, chairman of Harvard Uni- debate in a way that made reform seem more 
crease in economic optimism is close to the 29- verity's department of health policy and man- dangerous than the status quo,” he said. “The 
point jump in opposition to the Clinton health agement, said polls show roughly a 10- point view of the plan went from something fairly 
plan. decline in economic anxiety about loss of health benign to something that could be disruptive of 

White House senior officials are using these care coverage, enough to be a factor in the loss of the care we now get. 


figures to explain the political problems facing support for the Clinton administration plan but 
the administration's health initiative on Capitol not enough to explain it entirely. 

Hill. The president made “health care that’s always 

“In the long term, the problem of health care is there” a slogan for his plan. At a time of high 
still important to people,” a presidential aide economic anxiety, when recession and corporate 
said. But in the short term, the healthy economy restructurings made many workers nervous 
“takes away some of the push to get reform done about tbdrjob status, it seemed to have strong 
now” appeal. 

But this explanation is viewed by others as. at But Mr. Blendon mentioned another factor. 


best, a partial rationale for the difficulties beset- “Between September and last January, the ad- 
ting the health care initiative. ministration allowed opponents to frame the 

Robert J. Blendon, chairman of Harvard Uni- debate in a way that made reform seem more 


point jump in opposition to the Clinton health 
plan. 

White House senior officials are using these 


Mitchell Bill’s Coverage Guarantee Is a Minimum, Clinton Says 

By Adam Clymer universal coverage from the lives were available. None Mr. Chafee. the leader of a gling to devise a program with fished them 20 years ago. 

, Nnr York Tima Senior current level of 85 percent. emerged before he put his bill bipartisan Senate group that benefits sufficient to attract Hawaii requires employers to 

WASHINGTON TfCSi- n»it *h* nMndMt nM •„ « m r ran’t imonna _ T uict bar lun •/. R.J „ TV _^.l ..eft _r .1. I • 

dent Bill Clinton has said that 


universal coverage from the 
current level of 85 percent 


lives were available. None 
emerged before he put his bill 


But the president said in a in. T can't imagine — I just 
telephone interview that be ac- don't know what other al terns - 


some hijacked, con- he could not accept health care cepted the bill’s premise that “if lives there are.” 


tinue to move from the island legislation with less of aguaran- you can get 95 percent by the 


toward the United States. 


tee of universal coverage than 


n Capitol Hill, the Senate 
inoed its debate of the 


In the last two weeks, four in Senator George J. Mitchell’s 
Cuban vessels, including pas- bilL 

senger femes and. a navy craft. That bill would require em- 
have been seized by Cubans ployers to pay half the cost of 
desperate to leave. their workers' health insurance 


year 2000, that’s evidence you continued its debate of the 
can get to universal coverage Maine Democrat's b3i. with 
without a mandate" requiring Senator John H. Chafee, a 


employers to pay. 


Rhode Island Republican. 


desperate to leave. 


Twenty-six Cubans who fled if other measures did not reach amsm in case that fails. 


But, he insisted, “you have to striking a particularly concilia- 
have some sort of backup mech- toiy note; “I firmly believe that 


Mr. Chafee; the leader of a 
bipartisan Senate group that 
has been struggling to find a 
compromise on health care, 
praised Mr. Mitchell's handling 
of the employer payment issue, 
but identified several areas 
where he believed Mr. Mitchell 
should shift 

But other Republicans re- 
peatedly criticized what they 
called an excessive government 
role in the Mitchell bOL 
In the House, where debate is 
to begin next week, the effort to 


Democratic votes, without pay- pay 50 percent of their workers’ 
ing for them with taxes that insurance costs; os a result 96 
Republicans could not. siom- percent of the stale’s residents 
ach. have insurance and the state en- 

On the Senate floor. Demo- joys better health standards and 
era is lauded employer man- lower insurance rates than the 
dates in Hawaii, which estab- mainland. 


Guard culler in international been criticized by some liberals 
waters. as moving too slowly toward 


Away: From Politics 


• A wildfire forced the evacuation of 1^200 people in northern 
California, after it swept within a nifle (114 VQometers) of 
homes near the picturesque town of Columbia. About 25,000 
men and women were battling 33 major fires covering 320,000 
acres (130,000 hectares) in California, Washington, Oregon, 
Montana. Idaho, Utah, Nevada, Wyoming and Arizona. 

• It was arson that destroyed a rural Al a ba m a school amid 
protests over the principal's stand against interracial dates, 
investigators have determined. State Fire Marshal John Robi- 
son said authorities had no suspects. 

• CSHnp dm hronpor gffrker “Share Shannon’s Head" and a T- 
shirt emblazoned with “1,952 Bulldogs and 1 Bitch.” lawyers 
for the first, female cadet at The Citadel asked again that 
Shannon Faulkner's hair not be shaved. But a federal judge 
refused to reverse his’ ruling that barbers at the South Carolina 
college could proceed with the haircut. 

• An abortion cfinic says two key employees — a former 
mans ger and her -assistant — bad ties to the pro-life move- 
ment and tried to sabotage .the Greenville, South Carolina, 
business by scheduling false appointments, taking medical 
records ana driving up charges on the toll-free telephone line- 

• An armored-truck driver and her boyfriend have disap- 
peared from Vegas with SI million in cash. “We’re not 
going to eliminate foul play at this time,” a police officer said, 
“but all indications point to an embezzlement tbeft. 

• Three workers were killed and four others critically injured 
after inhaling fumes from a hydrogen sulfide gas leak at an 
(xl-orocessinz plan t north or Ventura, California, authorities 

««T ■ - Rnam.NYT.AP.MT 


ani-sm in case that fails.” the Senate has the courage and role in the Mitchell bin. 

Asked if there were any other the- wisdom to put partisanship In the House, where debate is 

approach that would substitute, aside, to enact health care re- to begin next week, the effort to 
he replied: “Everybody sat form with broad support, for introduce a bipartisan substi- 
around here breaking their the good of our country,” he tute was coming to a rocky con- 
brains over what other alterna- said. elusion. Its sponsors were strug- 

Warning by Mexican Leftists 

Resistance Threatened if Voting Is Fraudulent 

By Anthony DePalma ^8 that drew dabout 5,000 The delegates represent all 

delegates from leftist groups but the most violent elements of 


ask ihe buder... 




Vitrt ,min i j «»,f Hwg >»» »nr it ti fa. 


New York Times Sorrier 

SAN CRISTOBAL DE LAS 
CASAS, Mexico — Calling the 
long-ruling Institutional Revo- 
lutionary Party “die common 
enemy of us all” members of 
the rebel Zapatista National 
Liberation Army and represen- 
tatives of a broad spectrum of 
leftist groups have threatened 
to shut Mexico down if they 
perceive the presidential elec- 
tion, set for Aug. 21, to be 
fraudulent, as they say most 
previous national elections have 
been. 

“I can say dearly that if there 
is fraud, Mexico will have a 
period of civil resistance and we 
will head that resistance," said 
Jose Alvarez Icaza, a vice presi- 
dent of the National Democrat- 
ic Convention, a four-day gatb- 


througbout the country. 


the Mexican lefL Based on signs 


“We had great success here and posters evident everywhere, 
and now we have the structure most delegates favored Mr. 
from which to direct that resis- Cardenas over the other candi- 


tance. 

The rebels have made earlier 


dales. 

But openly endorsing him 


tiyeats to resume armed con- could have backfired, because , 
flict if they detect electoral the radical nature of some of 
fraud, and it is not certain that the groups would have scared 
the groups that came together off the middle-class voters 
for the convention are capable whom the candidate has been 
of coordinating a significant re- trying to win over since hi s cam- 


sistance. But their connection paign for president in 1988. 
to the rebels, whose uprising Mr. Cardenas's campaign ad- 
left more than 145 dead m Jan- risers have tried to distance him 
uary, gives their posturing more from the convention’s actions. 


resonance. " saying they had never actively 

In one of the most debated sought an endorsement. 

resolutions of the convention, 

the delegates decided not to . , _ 

openly endorse the candidacy tacrjbejnFron 

of Cuauhtemoc Gird en as of the jusi call, dl free, 

left-of -center Party of the Dem- 05 437 437 

ocratic Revolution. 


To subscribe In Franca 

just call, tall free, 

05 437 437 


On September 6th, the IHT will publish a 
Sponsored Section on 

The Shipping 
Industry 

Among the topics to be covered are: 

■ Possible alliance among four of the 
world's largest shipping companies. 

■ An analysis of technological advances. 

■ Effects of GATT on the shipping industry. 

■ Focus on the luxury cruise market 

■ Financing - the development of off-shore 

shipping funds. 

Reprints (rf this section w8 be efistributed at the 
Shpbu&SnQ. Machinery & Marine Technology Exh&xlon 
and Conference in Hamburg 
from SepJernoer27-October 1. 
fH)r further information, dease contact ^Mahder 
in Pans at (33-1) 46 3/ 93 78, lax: ( 33-1)46 3750 44 . 

IlcralbSKribunc 


FRIDAY, AUGUST 12, 1994 


OPINION 


. : y, 

'< •' K •••• 


Hcralb 




INTERNATIONAL 



eribunc 


piibi.lshfd *mi thk nkw York timmi aw rttti Washington wist 


Outdated Cuba Policy 


American officials joined in the de- 
served condemnation when 32 Cubans try- 
ing to escape their homeland drowned on 
July 13 after their ancient tugboat was 
bashed by a Cuban patrol boat* In Ha- 
vana, this was followed by the hijacking of 
three ferries by other Cubans trying to flee, 
and by sporadic riots in which demonstra- 
tors shouted “Down with Fidel!” Last 
weekend a furious Fidel Castro tried to 
-reverse course, declaring that he would 
slop putting obstacles “in the way of peo- 
ple who want to leave the country.” 

It was easy to inveigh against Mr. Cas- 
tro’s restrictive immigration policy as long 
as he conveniently kept his unhappy citi- 
zens at home, now he may be calling 
Washington's bluff, although at this point 
his intentions are far from dear. His words 
prompted an instant denunciation by the 
State Department spokesman, who called 
them a “ploy," a “cynical move” and “a 
replay of the Marie! boatlifL” 

In 1980, Mr. Castro encouraged an exo- 
dus from Mariel harbor that dumped 
123,000 Cuban refugees, including mur- 
derers and rapists, on Florida. Since then, 
“MarieT has been shorthand for the spite- 
ful use of desperate people as political 
pawns. Mariel did Cuba no good, created 
a judicial and penal nightmare in the Unit- 
ed Stales when sane Mariel refugees were 
held in federal jails, and set back by a 
decade hopes for more civil relations be- 
tween Havana and Washington. 

The United States is trapped in a self- 
made dil emma. Having demonized Mr. 
Castro for refusing to let Cubans emigrate, 
it now hopes he is only bluffing about 
opening the gates and causing another 
unmanageable tidal wave of immigrants. 

Successive presidents, beginning with 
Dwight Eisenhower, have imposed puni- 


tive economic sanctions against Cuba. But 
with the end of the Cold War, Mr. Castro 
erased to be a threat to U.S. security. The 
Soviet collapse exposed the My of Cuba’s 
lopsided dependence on sweetheart barter 
deals with the Communist bloc. Cuba’s 
economy has crumbled. Yet the U.S. re- 
sponse to these new circumstances was the 
enactment in 1992, with candidate Bill 
Clinton's blessing, of stiff a- trade sanc- 
tions, which even ban trade with Cuba by 
foreign subsidiaries of UJS. companies. 
These sanctions, the so-called Cuban De- 
mocracy Act, have indeed made life more 
wretched for ordinary Cubans, who now 
have economic as well as political reasons 
for fleeing their repressive poorhouse. 

And each Cuban who nukes it to Flor- 
ida automatically qualifies for permanent 
residence under special Cold War legisla- 
tion — a status denied Haitian refugees 
who also suffer from tyranny and pover- 
ty. Even hard-line anti-Castro Cuban ex- 
iles, who clamored for the Cuban Demo- 
cracy Act, cow plead with their poor 
co usins back home to remain calm and 
stay put, rather than risk an angry politi- 
cal backlash in Florida. 

America’s Cuba policy has been frozen 
in the past, kept there by presidents pan- 
deri ng to the most fanatical faction of the 
exile community in Florida. The humane 
and sensible way for the United States to 
avert a new Mariel is to ease sanctions, 
lift un-American curbs on travel to Cuba 
and permit more Cubans to immigrate 
legally, in return for a measure of politi- 
cal liberalization for the islanders. If a 
deal along these lines were offered to 
Fidel Castro, and if be scorned it, he 
would run the risk of opposition more 
serious than sporadic riots. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Democratic Palliative 


The Clinton administration has been 
having more than its share of political 
problems, not the least of them being 
Whitewater, the president’s drop in the 
polls and the resulting fact that many 
Democratic candidates are wary of Bill 
Clinton’s political embrace. And so on 
Tuesday, in a move apparently orchestrat- 
ed by the White House, came a solution: 
bring in Tony Codho, a skilled tactician 
who resigned from Congress a few years 
bade under an ethical cloud, as a special 
adviser. David Wilhelm, the national 
chairman, thereupon decided he was tired 
of challenges to his leadership and an- 
nounced that be was leaving in November. 

The Democrats haven’t done so well 
since Mr. Wilhelm took the helm at the 
Democratic National Committee. They 
lost last year’s governors' races in New 
Jersey and Virginia, they lost the mayor- 
alties in New York and Los Angeles, they 
got humiliated in a special Senate elec- 
tion in Texas. But while Mr. Wilhelm had 
his problems, he was not the prime mover 
behind the administration's political and 
policy decisions, which affect the politi- 
cal atmosphere far more than a party 
chairman does. There was once a time 
when a party chairman hired technicians 
to help out on the nitty-gritty of politics. 
But in Mr. Wilhelm’s case it was the 
tech n icians, the political consultants, who 
had the upper hand. He seemed destined 
to be the person who had to accept respon- 
sibility for the gambits that failed — such 


as a recent spate of television ads on health 
care that annoyed key Democratic sena- 
tors — while watching others take credit 
for the moves that succeeded. Mr. Wil- 
helm decided be had had enough. 

Mr. Coelho's ascendancy raises other 
questions. He is seen by Republicans as 
well as Democrats as a gifted politician. 
He is well-liked, and many of his former 
aides and colleagues now sit in the Clinton 
White House: But he resigned from the 
House in 1989 amid reports that he had 

E rofited from his political connections 
y purchasing S 100,000 in junk bonds 
through Michael Milken, and the firm of 
Drexel Burnham Lambert on money bor- 
rowed through a Democratic fund-raiser. 
Mr. Codho was a mastered 1980s-stylebig 
money fund-raising, the sort of thing Mr. 
Clinton has said he wanted to dean up. 
The Justice Department closed its probe of 
Mr. Coelho without taking action, and the 
White House has dearly calculated that 
his dulls outweigh whatever criticism his 
past may bring onto an administration 
already fighting off the problems of 
Whitewater and the investigation of Agri- 
culture Secretary Michael Espy. 

The White House needs order in its 
operations, as Chief of Staff Leon Panetta 
has acknowledged. But no one in the 
White House should assume that a new 
party chairman will solve its problems 
with the electorate. That is and always was 
Mr. Clinton's job, not Mr. Wilhelm's. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Yes, It’s Only Hair 


Like all high school seniors accepted 
by the colleges that head their lists. Shan- 
non Faulkner surely celebrated on the 
day the happy letter arrived from the 
Gtadel, a 151-year-oki South Carolina 
military college. The festivities were pre- 
mature. When the Citadel found out that 
the exemplary student it had admitted to 
its all-male nails was Ms. and not Mr. 
Faulkner, it rescinded her acceptance. 

She sued, reasoning correctly that since 
the school had state funding, it had no 
right to discriminate against her as a 
female. In January, a federal court al- 
lowed Shannon Faulkner to begin classes 
as a day student On July 22, a federal 
district judge, G Weston Houck, ruled 
that she be given a full place in the corps 
of cadets. On Aug. 15, she is scheduled to 
report to the campus and thus become 
the Citadel's first female cadet 

Then rarm the hair thing. 

Shaving a cadet's head in the name of 
group identity is de rigueur on entrance 
to the CitadeL Asked several weeks ago 
about the possibility of suffering that 
humiliation, Ms. Faulkner shrugged and 
said, “It’s only hair." True, she probably 
won’t look her best bald — bnt neither, it 
is safe to say, will the other first-year 
students. Certainly Judge Houck, who is 
concerned about other aspects of Shan- 
non Faulkner’s life on a 2,000-man cam- 
pus, is not concerned about the hair 


thing. “The Citadel,” he ruled, “is per- 
fectly at liberty to treat the hair on her 
head in the same way it treats the hair of 
evay other cadet” 

The judge is right Shaving Ms. Faulk- 
ner’s head is not, in these circumstances, 
a gender-specific humiliation — and any- 
one who would make it so is buying into 
some thoroughly retrograde notions 
about sexuality and stigmatization. 

Listen, for instance, to what Sandra 
Lynn Beber, a lawyer for the Justice De- 
partment said in asking Judge Houck to 
reconsider his ruling. “Under the guise of 
gender-neutral grooming policies, defen- 
dants would implement rules which alto- 
gether denigrate Ms. Faulkner's identify 
as a woman.” Her hair is part of Shannon 
Faulkner's identity as a woman? In say- 
ing so, Ms. Beber is echoing the senti- 
ments of those French who, 50 years ago, 
“punished” females who had been too 
friendly with the enemy by robbing them 
of their “crowning glory." 

Shannon Faulkner knows what a wom- 
an is. A woman is somebody who had to 
fight very hard to get into the publicly 
funded college of her choice — not be- 
cause she was not up to its acad emic 
standards but because it did not want her 
kind, the female kind, around. Further- 
more, she was right the first time — when 
she said “It’s only hair.” 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 



International Herald Tribune 

ESTABLISHED 1887 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 

RICHARD McCLEAN. Publisher A Chief Executive 
JOHN VTNOCUR. Exeunt Edtor & VrePremk* 

• WALTER WEULS. News bXtor • SAMUEL ABT, KATHERINE KNORR and 
CHARLES MTICHELNOIE, Deputy FAmn* CARLGEWIRTZ. Associate Edtor 

• ROBERT J. DONAHUE Edtoref&eEtStarial Pages* JONATHAN GAGE. Busmesstmd Finance EeBlor 

■ RENt BOND Y. Deputy PiMsher • JAMES McLEOD, Adorning Dwtdoc 

• JUANITA L CASPAR!. IntemOwnd Development Dutdtf • ROBERT FARR& CmuJam Director, Europe 

Ditixxwdc la Pubimmor: Richard D. Stamens 
Dirvdeur Adjoins de la Pubiicaaon: jQnharine P.Damw 


International Herald Tribune, 181 Avera«ChaHfvd>Gaiine. 92521 NeriDy-sr-Seinc. fiance. 
Tel : ( I )4W7Sm Fax : Ore.. 46J7D6 l 5I: Adv„ 4637.52. 12. toon* WT^eurokonvie 
Et&nrjnrAstr Michael Rkhanbai 5 Covert my Rd. Smgaporr 051 !. TeL 0)472-7768 Far (6Sl 274-21 M 
Mag, Dir. Asia. RalfD. KmncpM, 50 (faceorr RtL Hook Kmg. TeL 852-9222-1138 Fas 852-9222-1 190. 
Gel L Mp. German: T. Schiarr. Friedrichsu. 15 60123 FmrifurfM. TeL (Ott) 72 67 55. Far (069)727310 
Pm.lHL MkhaeiCnwm. 850 Dud Air. Nr* York N.Y. 10022 Td (212) 752-3890. Fas (212) 75587*5 
L'.K. Advertising Office: 6) LmgAcre. London WC2. Tel. (071) 836-4802. Fat: (071 J 240-2 254. 
SA. an capital de 1.200.000 F. RCS Nmttrre B 7 32021 126. Commission Paritaire No. 61337 
i? IVH. htrmmcnd HmUTrifanr. AB rights earned. ISSN: 02948352. 



The Sweatshops for 



N EW YORK — Summer is a 
time when children in the 
Western democracies look for 
jobs to earn some extra money 
before returning to school. But 
what about the 100 to 200 mil- 
lion children worldwide who 
work summer and winter, with 
no opportunities at all for 
schooling? According to the or- 
ganization Chfld-Rigbt World- 
wide, this number will reach 400 
million by the year 2000. 

Yet the U.S. Congress may 
soon agree to put the U.S. signa- 
ture to a worldwide trade agree- 
ment, the General Agreement on 
Tariffs and T rade, that locks this 
outrageous situation into place. 

While American children are 
in summer school or at camp, 
children as young as 3 and 4 are 
weaving carpets in Pakistan. The 
International Textile, Garment 
and Leather Workers’ Federa- 
tion has documented appalling 
conditions worldwide. 

In Karan, Pakistan, 5-year- 
old Shakeel works with 300 oth- 
er children from 6 A.ML to 7 
P.M. for less than 20 cents a 
day. A sign in his workplace 
says that any child caught 
sleeping will be fined 560. If 


By Jack Sbeinkman 


any of these children cry, they 
are beaten or forced to spend 
five days chained to the loom. 

Some children in India brand- 
ed like cattle by their employers; 
Last year in New Delhi, an 11- 
year-old working in a weaving 
factory had paraffin poured over 
his head and was set afire by his 
boss as a punishment ' 

When the Clinton administra- 
tion signed the North American 
Free Trade Agreement last year, 
it declared that workers' rights 
and environmental standards 
were as vital to a trade pact as 
narrow commercial concerns. 

Led by Trade Repres entati ve 
Mickey Kantor, administration 
officials advocated that protec-, 
lions for these rights be included 
in the GATT accord. Faced with 
opposition from countries whose 
competitive advantage derives 
from a low-wage labor pool, 
Washington did not prevaiL 

As soon as next week. Con- 
gress, working with the adminis- 
tration, could agree on a final 
version of legislation to cany 
out the accord. Congress then 
has 90 days to vote on the bill, 


with no option to make any 
changes — what is known as the 
fast-track procedure. 

By racing to carry out the ac- 
cord without toughening its la- 
bor standards. Congress and the 
administration are patting mil- 
lions of U.S. jobs at risk by link- 
ing the Americas economy to 
those of countries that lag dra- 
matically behind America in 
wages and work standards. 

supporting the agreement in. 
Its current form means support- 
ing the multinational corpora-' 
turns that roam the globe in 
search of ever lower labor costs 
and do not want to give up their 
right to rob children and young 
adults of their youth. 

Thus, setting h umani tarian 
work standards, as recognized 
by the International Labor Or- 
ganization, is not only the ethi- 
cal thing to do, it also makes 
economic sense. GATT should be 
revised to guarantee rights far 
children and parents just as law- 
makers seek to protect copy- 
rights, patents and other rights in 
the expanded global economy. ' 

If the current accord is ap- 


air 


proved by the United States and 
other member nations, there is a 
way it- can be strengthened. Af- 
ter it goe^into effect, GATT will 
put into place a World Trade 
Organization to oversee the new 
trade, rules.' This body should 
indude, mechanisms to enforce 



in an era when foreign policy is 
increasingly imertwmed wtb 
economic interests, the United 


States shouio use ua 
influence to protect American liv- 
ing standards wh3e unproving 
the tot of wcricecs abroad. 


the 


ens’ rights, including outlawing 
child labor, and set environmen- 
tal standards. 


Ama^mtaudChihingand 
Workers Union. ffeantribuieams 
comment to The New York Times. 


r-s-sv* 



ByrtNN GHAFFj 


i & Wrim Syndics* 



W ASHINGTON — If the 
opening Whitewater hear- 
ings proved anything, it is the 
abiding and sometimes intrusive 
interest that the Clinton White 
House takes in the administra- 
tion of justice. 

Early last year, the Clintons 
ordered Attorney General Janet 
Reno to take the unprecedented 
step of firing all UiL attorneys 
across the country and replacing 
them with deserving Democrats. 

We wondered then if the pri- 
mary purpose of that partisan 
purge was pure patronage or to 
delay the indictment of Represen- 
tative Dan Rostenkowski by Re- 
publican Jay Stephens in Wash- 
ington. Now we can logically 
surmise that the reason was to 
provide cover for the quick instal- 
lation of Bill Clintons campai gn 
worker and law student, Paula Ca- 
sey. as U.S. attorney in Little Rock 
to abort a potentially dangerous 
investigation into a fraudulent 
loan that benefited the Chitons. 
Ms. Casey apparently tried to. 


By William Satire 


and may be in trouble. At a recent 
appearance before the Senate Ju- 
djeaary Committee, Ms. Reno was 
asked by Aden Specter, a former 
prosecutor who takes his oversight 
responsibility seriously, “Would 
you continue a U.S. attorney oper- 
ating actively if that UiL attorney 
were the subject of a criminal in- 
vestigation?” Her answer was an 
evasive “That depends . . .” 
Senator Specter said Robert 
Fiske (frequently described in this 
space as “the non-independent 
counsel” and rightly replaced by 
the court) had confirmed that an 
investigation was under way “for 
obstruction of justice.” 

Clinton appointee Casey re- 
fused to reduce charges against, or 
grant immunity to, the Small Busi- 
ness Administration's David Hale; 
when given such an incentive by 
Mr. Fiske, Mr. Hale accused the 
Chitons of pressuring him to 
make a fraudulent 5300,000 loan, 
pan of wind) helped prop up their 


Whitewater investment. How any 
Clinton-appointed prosecutor un- 
der threat. of prosecution for abus- 
[ criminal 


accusations for political reasons 
can be continued by Omion Jus- 
tice to determine prosecutions 
boggles the mind, but is part of 
the pattern of keeping 
faces in troublesome places. 

Judiciary Senators Joseph Bi- 
den, Orrih Hatch and Specter, 
along with House Judiciary’s Jack 
Brooks, are unaware of a Clinton 
plan to revamp the Criminal Di- 
vision. Its pnrpose: partly to 
transfer power from Justice pro- 
fessionals to the all- Democratic 
U.S. attorneys, and mainly to re- 
package c urr ent operations to. 
make it appear that the Clintons 
are tough on crime. 

Jo Ann Harris, a respectable 
New York prosecutor, is the Crim- 
inal Division chief- (She, along 
with Bernard Nussbanm, recom- 
mended the hiring - of the gentle 


Mir. fiske, her former boss, after a 
tougher choice demanded assur- 
ance that White House counsel 
would not assert attorney-client 
privilege.) To the dismay of Justice 
professionals, her division is about 
to present itself as the nation's 
defender against violent crime. - 
For this public relations pur- 
pose, the divirion is to be reseo- 
tioned. Violent Grime is to- be 
split off from Terrorism and set 
up as a high-visibility unit under 
Mary IncontroTts firstforayinto 
publicity win be to dramatize 
crackdowns on violence arabor- 

tkmdinic8,wlri^fiaveapow<arfnl 1 

t appeal to a CKnton constxtmncyt 
The bureancxatical^bomefess 
Ter ro r ism would then be'sat'on 
the laps of the counterspies of In-' 

■ temal Security® asnaz 
National Security section, 
the name of the General litiga- 
tion section puts repoftera. >to 
deep, it w£D be abolish^ its tasks 
and personnel sprinkled around. 
Money Laundering,: no longer 
sexy, will be divvied up between 


ce a Bad Name 


Asset Forfeiture and Narcotics. 

The reason for today’s inride 
baseball is to show how the incli- 
nation to jazz up and jiggle justice 
is a Clinton tnul. Naming Day on 
Ninth Street by matriarchal man- 
agement may be merrily sffiy, but 
eoatroLof self-investiga- 
tion is dead wrong. 

Hence the hurried appoint- 
ment of Ms. Casey in Little feock; 
the presidential fury at those- . 
cusal of crony Roger Altman, 
where he could monitor inquiry 
into bank fraud in Little Rode; 
George Stephanopoutos’s mem- 
orable but resolutely unrcmein- 
bered “find a way to get rid of 
him” about Banquo’s ghost. Jay 
Stephens; and the Nussbaum- 
Hims selection, of friendly 
Fiske, now corrected by the 
courts, to Qintonite honor. 

- fa* this week’s eye-popping 
anatyjas by Michael Duffy, Time 
magazine calls this a “Culture of 
Deception.” It is giving Justice 
a baa name. - 

The New. York Times. 


la Germany, Such an 



F rankfurt — insulating 

the past in swaddling layers of 
artificiality is the newest trend in 
commemorating events in Ger- 
man history. Those responsible are 
not predominantly the unrecon- 
structed partisans of the bygone, 
nor the opponents of any form of 
remembrance, but rather the polit- 
ically correa Good Germans. The 
controversy surrounding the Me- 
morial for the Murdered Jews of 
Europe is a case in point. 

This memorial is to be erected in 
the center of Berlin on the rite of 
Hitler’s command bunker, in dose 
proximity to the area in which the 
most important of the new Ger- 
man government buildings will be 
located. The opening of lie memo- 
rial is planned fra: early 1996. 
Historical centers and memori- 


By Michael W olffsoim 


ais may be necessary in Israel, the 
United Stales and other countries 
where the Holocaust did not take 
place and where there is thus no 
particular, logical place to com- 
memorate the millions of mur- 
dered Jews. In Germany, such 
commemoration ought to take 
place at the historical rites where 
the crimes were committed (and, 
of course, at the sites erf the liqui- 
dation camps in Eastern Europe, 
Auschwitz in particular). These 
are places where the honors of the 
Nazi era become visible and pal- 
pable, places where the visitor 
must confront the past with heart 
and mind. The realities erf the 
historical sites demolish the “ar- 
guments” of those who seek to 


deny or diminish the Nazi crimes. 

In contrast. Holocaust memori- 
als in Germany and for Gomans 
can only be artifidaL Because they 
are necessarily art, they add an 
unnecessary layer of insulation, 
thus isolating the past rather than 
making it more accessible. - 

A central memorial in the Ger- 
man capital, we are told, is of 
inestimable value in connection 
with official visits from abroad. 
Stale guests will be able to lay 
a commemorative wrath at the 
memorial and can, within min- 
utes*. take up or resume their offi- 
cial business in the nearby gov- 
ernment ministries. How 
superficial! Historical remem- 
brance becomes just another entry 


The Lively Europe of Musing Minds 


B INI CALAF, Minorca, 
Spain — Despite all the ir- 
ritated complaints about Brus- 
sels and the Maastricht treaty, 
and the renewed exaltation of 
the nation and national identi- 
ties, there is such a thing as a 
European. Cees Nooicboom is 
one of them, a man profoundly 
imbued with the continent’s 
cultural texture and densely in- 
terwoven history. 

He is a Dutchman by pass- 
port and upbringing. But he is 
truly a modern-day European 
by experience and mentality, a 
person whose sense of life is 
stamped and shaped in the intri- 
cate, special way that is clearly 
European. No doubt this is part 
of toe reason, as weD as the 
crystalline, shimmering quality 
of his books, why he won the 
1993 European Literary Prize. 

Mr. Nooteboom happens to 
simmer on this bleached Span- 
ish island, so I picked up his 
latest novel, a slim little volume 
that be mtrigmngly, even mis- 
chievously, railed “The Follow- 
ing Story.” The title is also the 
last line of the tale, a way of 
saying that the questions, yearn- 
ings and doubts that make up 
the drama of human delight and 
distress go on forever. They are 
never resolved. Any ending is 
also another beginning. 

His characters here are teach- 
ers, a classical scholar, a poet 
who is also the sports coach 
married to the biology teacher, 
and a nubile student who helps 
tangle the knots of passion 
which bedevil them. They eat, 
and make love, and quarrel and 
travel, but there is no way to 
make a video or a comic strip 
about their feelings or how their 
minds work. 

The rich flavor comes from 
slow, subtle simmering, no fast 
food or hot peppers in this ap- 


By Flora Lewis 


p roach to the permanent human 
dilemmas. Yet they arc the same 
enduring, universal dilemmas 
that provoke fanaticism in some 
places, various religious funda- 
mentalisms, cold rationalism and 
hard science, myth and poetry. 

Mr. Nooteboom considers 
the paradox of time. It is unseiz- 
able. beyond grasp, not just 
fleeting but forever leaping 
wildly back and forth in our 
awareness with its sly tricks. 
And yet it is absolutely con- 
stant No matter what time it 
is, it is always now. 

That bothers his hero, the 
clumsy, dreamy classicist whom 
the students have mockingly 
nicknamed Socrates. The beau- 
tiful girl student is disturbed at 
his poignant, ardent retelling of 
the story of Socrates: death. She 
accuses him of hypocrisy, of de- 
liberate misleading 
She says, vehemently, “You 
don’t befieve it yourself, about 
the immortality of the soul.” 
“No” 

“Then why do you tell the 
story as if you did?” 

He replies, “The point is that 
we are capable of thinking 
about immortality. That is what 
sets us apart.” 

And later, on a voyage up the 
Amazon, a shipmate is musing 
about the view. “There’s some- 
thing cyclical about it, some- 
thing of eternal recurrence. Not 
that you believe in that sort erf 
or do you?” 

i hero replies. “Only in the 
case of animals.” (The reader is 
told that he was ^just making 
conversation.") 

“Why?” 

“Because they always return 
as themselves. You wouldn’t 
know the difference between a 


*rr‘ j ' 0 
thing, < 

The I 


pigeon from 1253 and a] 
day pigeon. They're the same 
pigeons. Either they are immor- 
tal. or they keep coming back.” 

Without being so awkwardly 
explicit, Mr. Nooteboom re- 
minds us that science, myth and 
religion, which seem locked in 
total conflict, which we are pre- 
pared to fight and die about, all 
stem from the same source. They 
repres en t our attempts to explain 
and underatand the world we live 
in, and to find a way to influence 
it through prayer or knowledge 
of nature, to make it respond to 
our needs and fears. 

The author introduces a Chi- 
nese professor, a man chased 
away from his homeland by the 
Cultural Revolution but not 
from his culture. The Chinese 
and the Dutch dassirist- trade 
ids and poetic traditions, 
are quite different and yet 
they' address the same ques- 
tions, the rise and setting of the 
sun, the stars in the sky, die 
personality of the seasons, the 
relation of life and death. 

What emerges ismot a synthe- 
sis but a consolation, and the 
wisdom of tolerance. Some old 
arguments are not to be settled 
— about body and soul, destiny 
and divinity. It is not a matter erf 
doubt versus faith, fact versus 
creed. It is about the need to 
entertain both, to accept that 
science and poetry cannot ex- 
clude each other given the hu- 
man condition, ana that there is 
no need to despair; because 
each offers those hopes which 
the other tends to deny. ‘ 

This is notan exclusively Eu- 
ropean attitude, but it is 
quintessential^ European. 
Quite apart from armies and 
banks and technology, it is a 
European strength and assur- 
ance of lively survival. 

© Flora Lewis 


on the daily schedule, to be ab- 
solved with logistical efficiency 
and as little loss of time as posa- 
bi& Fust » quick wreatb4aying 
ceremony apd then off to the “bat- 
tle of the buffer? The notion is 
not only tasteless, it is also cynical, 
even if the cynicism is unintended. 

The events of the past are best 
confronted at the historical rites. 
Many of them are within easy 
reach of Berlin: Sachsenhansen, 
arid Oranieabuxg, for cxample. 
What is more, .the sites of the 
worst crimes (Auschwitz and. the 
others in Poland) are much doser 
to the new-old capital <rf Berlin 
than they are to Bonn. Up to now, 
stale guests from Israel have gen- 
erally laid a commemorative 
wreath at Bergen-Belseai and were 
then flown by helicopter to Beam. 
Will it not be possible in the fu- 
ture to fly from Bergen-Bdsea (or 
Auschwitz) to Berlin? 

- Many politically correa Ger- 
mans automatically apply the 
strategy of insulation not only to 
the ronembrance of the crimes of 
the Nazi past but also in dealing 
with the neo-Nazis of the present 
Those who indiscriminately label 
anything on the opposing ride as 
“right-wing,” “Nazi,” or “anti- 
Semitic” not only overuse, abuse 
and trivialize historical toms. 
The unintended effect is to heap 
insulate— rather than isolate — 
the real Nazis and anti-Semites. 

Insulating the past is by no 
means limited to the murder of 
millions of Jews. It would 'seem 
that the Germans are able to face 
the memory of the Iron Curtain 
and the Botin Wall only when 
these are presented in small, eas- 
ily digestible portions, for.it is 
only m homeopathic bits and 
pieces that they have been al- 
lowed to remain standing. Of 
course the barriers had to be re^ 
moved, but with such Germanic - 


thoroughness, as to make it ap- 
pear that neither had ever exist- 
ed? With near total disappear- 
ance of the Berlin Wall, the 
memory of the sufferings it 
caused is thus packed in histori- 
cal insulation^ - : 

. On the other hand, numerous 
memorials to the heros of com- 
munism remain. Long after the 
fall erf. the Berlin Wall, Lenin 
sted us from his monument in 
: Bedim and a larger-than-life 
Karl Marx still glares down at 
visitors to Chemnitz and other 
cities. Is this the way to commem- 
orate the suffering caused by the 
German Communist state? These 
colossal (and artistically worth- 
less) glorifications of the Com- 
munist fathers wrap their crimes 
in historical insulation and render 
them harmless. As Shakespeare 
has Pcrfomus put it in Hamlet: 
“Though this be madness, yet 
there be method iu’t." 

The decision to build the cen- 
tral memorial in Botin has al-: 
ready been made, but let no one 
claim later that the consequence 
of insulating the past could riot 
have been foreseen. . 


The writer, a native of Israel, is 
professor . of modem history at the. 
University of 'the German Armed *j 
Forces In Munich and author qf. '■ 

■“ Eternal Guilt? Forty Years of Ger- 
man-J enrish -Israeli Relations, ” He 
contributed- th& cornmmt, adapted 
from a longer article m the Frank- 
furter ABganeihe Zatung, to the 
International Herald Tribune. 


letters Intended for. publication 
should be addressed “letters to the 
Editor^ and contain the writer’s 
signature, name and fiiB address, 
lottos should be brief "and art 
subject to editing. We cannot be 
nqnmiblefor the return of urao- 


m. OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1894s 

SHANGHAI — A Japanese at- 
tack was made Friday night [Aug. 
10] upon the Port Arthur naval 

(4qhrwi Vim* - 


that is not particularly durable, it 
would not be safe to leave off the 
suule. The foundation skirts for 


The bombardment lasted some 
time, but eventually the Japanese 

retired. No details are given of the 

losses an either ride. It is reported 
that 12,000 Japanese troops have 
Landed at Fusan and another 
body of $,000 men at Ytunsan. 
Bom these forces are now con- 
verging upon Seoul, with the obr 
ject of meeting the Chinese force 
advandngftoui'tfae noth. 

1919: Beads and a Smile 

PARIS — Evening dresses that 
are beinRshown at the autumn 
Fashion displays are as scant as 
bathing smls. They can best be 
described by the proverbial string 
of beads and a smile. In this case, 
as the brads depend ipon a string 


the knee, but the overskirt is long- 
er. Tbe very short effect; however, 
is mai nta in e d, for the overskirt is 
transparent. 

1944: Russian Advances 

J^N-DON t- [From our New, . 
York edition:] The. Red Army# 
yesterday [Aug. 1 1] drove fifteen 
end one-half rales through, the 
pennan lines in southern Estonia 
a renewed offensive aimed at', 
a force , of ‘possibly 
300,000 trapped Nazi Baltic 
tooeps, while other powerful So- 
viet units hurled back the enemy: 
o c a i 0 0-mile front northeast erf, 
Warsaw in a great wheeling roove- 
1B ® Q t dial swept to.witinn .fifteen, 
™3ra of German East Prussia* 
Both sides were -fi ghting - 'in ex-; 
bansting $umm« temperatures. !- 















.hi, ... 


nt 


ar 



‘ V 






»C' -i- 


, 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY. AUGUST 12, 1994 


Pages 


OPINION 



oo Well 


S AN DFEGO —4 Here, hard by 
Mexico, and with tte surf's con- - 
missions rbylhmicaly rernindiiia na- 
d y es of the west across which 
Asian immigrants i'ow'come as Eu- 
ropeans once . did jtcross the Allan- 
tic, the debate uiout immigration 
rages. It is sOting «j> witif raisunder- 
siandings, according u> WayneCor- 
the O^ner. for 
U.S.-Mexic3oStiiliffi at the TJ hi var- 
sity of California] San Die 


He believes ih u one of today’s 
problems may b< too modi rather 
than too iiflle **j samilaticHi.” Ccr-. 
tainlythe nighlm ire of many immi- 
grant parents is hat their dhildren 
are becoming toq much like the na.- 
tive populations mey arecloscst to. ‘ 
The alleged faille of, brTesstance' 
to, assimilation is the baas erf the . 

cultural, asdistinci-frdm (be eoonoih-, 
ic, criUdsra of current ittimigratiori..' 
But, Mr. Cornelius Sskx. Suppose to- ' 
day's immigrants were importing a 
dangerous cuHurevalue — ^say, adv<^ 
cacy of authoritaiian govaronenL ■ 
Or. more pointedly, he "says; Sup- 
pose native-bom Americans today 
had the I960" rate of illegitimate 
births, and immigrants wereimport- 
ing tbe soaring illegitimacy rates that 
native-born Amencansincw have (68 - 
percent for African-Americans, 30 
percent for society as a whole). Then 
the cultural critique of immigration 
would be~ understandable^ 


F. Will 

.'.J8ut One -.problem concerning to- 
days saysMr. Come- 

with domestic minorities," 
a CtoaUHon supported by other re- 
se^thpii'tbe other side of the conti- 
Jaenfcla^^ Haitian and other im- 
afisM-Miami; 

’'•'essay “Should Immi- 
^ published in 

ifr ^WK Interest, .Alejandro 
wateffCtf^dbns Hopkins University 
and;Miit Zboii of Louisiana State 
■ note that children of nonwhite im- 
migranisr usually live at close quar- 
ters sflthnmer-dty minority youths 
who, have: an “adversarial stance" 
toWmri &e ^svhite mainstream cul- 

mic:.A»d loaning those native cir- 
cles jo., jfifich they do have access 
may>prove'w ticket to permanent 
subordination and disadvantage. ” . 

Mr jCdn^ius concurs. “Pick your 
indicator,'" be says. School drop-out 
Tates? ljaviiyenieit m gangs? Indica- 
tors are apt to become worse as “as- 
srnuIation I, bf young inner-city immi- 
grants becomes “better.” 

. . Mr.,Q»Tjdius says America s aver- 
sion to iimnigration rises as the “first 
genexatkm effect” wanes among im- 
rnigran ts. Thai effect is the shaping of 
young pccple by conservative fam- 
ilies with, faith in education and the 
work ethic. Indeed, immigrant par- 


tETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


The Population Threat 

Population revisionists who say 
that demographic growth is “not the 
overwhelming affliction for devel- 
oping coun tries that some may have 
claimed" ( <r Wkeee Development and 
Population Meet.” Opinion, Avg. 6) 
have hardly broken new ground. 
How do they really differ from the 
Soviet, bloc and certain developing 
countries which 20 years' ago mam- 
tained that “development is the best 
contraceptive’’? Are. they all that dis- 
tant in their so-called new thinking 
from the Reagan-Bush era theorists 
who held that population growth was 
a neutral factor in development? . 

Meanwhile, our human numbers . 
soar by nearly 100 million 'per year, 
and 95 percent of that'growth oo 
curs in the poorest countries in the 
world,. Can the world really double 
the food production achieved from 
the beginning of .agricultural histo- 
ry until today withjn the next 3540 
years to accommodate tfaedoubling 
of its human population ‘greeted • 
within thattime frame? The revi- 
sionists may think so, but Nobel . 


Peace laureate Norman Borlaug, 
the, father of lhe Green Revolution, 
has very grave doubts. . 

If tbe next btOiori people join us in 
10 years* as expected, all develop- 
ment gams may be severely eroded, 
if not canceled altogether. We need 
to battle development obstacles si- 
multaneously, tot never at the ex- 
pense of bringing population into 
balance with, the environment and 
resource base of this planet 

WERNER FORNOS, 
.President. 

The Population Institute. 

- Washington. 

Standing Up in the Store 

Concerning A. M. Rosenthal's ar- 
ticle ^America Subsidizes China's 
Army".f£3pfmon, Aug. 6), why de- 
pend on the deacon of President Bill 
• CHnto n or any other politician re- 
garding China? If people are opposed 
to human rights abuses, let them boy- 
cott Chinese products. It's as easy as 
checking the “Made in China" label . 

. .. . BILL BELOW. 

Paris. 


aits in dries are terrified of what 
their children are apt to learn at 
school — sex, drugs, petty crime. 

The idea that millions of immi- 
grant parents are resisting assimila- 
tion is. Mr. Cornelius says, a myth, 
■ “Cultural maintenance" of the immi- 
grants’ old identity is more apt to be 
a goal of Anglo intellectuals than of 
immigrants. “Lack of English." says 
Mr. Cornelius, “is the single most 
important factor working against im- 
provement of immigrants' economic 
condition — and they know it.” 

Immigrant parents who remain 
monolingual do so primarily for two 
reasons. Working dawn to dusk, 
they are too exhausted to attend 
“ESL" (English as a second lan- 
- guage) classes. And there is an acute 
r shortage of such classes. 

The rising aversion to immigra- 
tion masks Americans’ ambiva- 
lence about immigration, ambiva- 
lence rooted in economic rather 
than cultural calculations. There al- 
ways will be, Mr. Cornelius says, 
jobs that “Americans do not raise 
their kids to do." It is, to say no 
more, rare to see an Anglo working 
in a car wash. Chances are. a non- 
Anglo will serve you in a Southern 
California restaurant - 
- There are similar realities in other 
industrial nations. Japan's 300.000 il- 
legal immigrants ore less than 05 
percent of the work force but are 
indispensable to the economy be- 
cause Japanese parents, even more 
than American parents, do not want 
their children performing some work 
that society wants performed. In 
Spain, child care is done largely by 
Dominicans and Peruvians. 

As America's population ages, the 
shortage of entry-level workers, espe- 
cially for small and medium-sized 
businesses, will deepen America's 
ambivalence about immigration. But 
Mr. Cornelius argues that if by “ef- 
fective control" of immigration we 
mean equilibrium between the supply 
of immigrants and the demand for 
their labor, we may have that now. 

There may be places (Los Angeles, 
for instance) and sectors ( agriculture ) 
where equilibrium does not exist, but 
nationally there is no large pool of 
unemployed immigrant labor. 

Americans, says Mr. Cornelius, . 
would prefer that immigrants do 
their jobs and then disappear at 
the.end of tbe day. But they won't, 
and Americans Won't do without 
the work that the immigrants do. 
So Americans, conflicted and with 
slightly guilty consciences about 
immigration, will, he says, contin- 
ue to be wrong — sometimes will- 
fully — about facts and their infer- 
ences from them. 

Washington Post Writers Group. 


Baseball' s Real Problem Is Loss of Panache 


B OSTON — Barring a miracle. 

major league baseball players 
will lay down their bats this Friday 
and strike for lbe fifth time in 23 
years. Beyond the obvious misfor- 
tune of interrupting a season rife 
with lively pennant races and trun- 
cating some astonishing home run 
totals compiled by supple young 
sluggers like Frank Thomas. Matt 
Williams and Ken Griffey Jr., the 
specter of this impending strike 
makes dear what has been true for 

MEANWHILE 

quite some lime. The national pas- 
time is making itself passe. 

For months now baseball fans 
have endured screeds and counter- 
screeds from Richard Ravitch 
(speaking for tbe owners) and 
Donald rehr (the players’ mouth- 
piece). We can hardly sympathize 
with baseball’s owners, Byzantine 
barons who are so eloquent in de- 
scribing their impending financial 
ruin and then so aloof concerning 
the particulars of their bookkeep- 
ing. Yet the players have displayed 
an equally grubby venality. 

The average major league salary 
is $1.2 million, while the lowest 
serf in the game earns $109,000 — 
a sum that most Americans would 
consider a spectacular annual in- 
come. Yes. the owners probably 
do treat the players like chattel, 
but to hear millionaires pleading 
poverty is a bit much. 


By Nicholas Dawidoff 


The particulars of the labor im- 
passe. however, are not baseball's 
real problem. Instead, this latest 
round of bickering is symptomatic 
of a game that has become so ob- 
sessed with money that it has all 
but lost its charm.’ 

Something is missing from 
modem baseball: a certain seduc- 
tive panache. For decades the 
game flourished in the popular 
imagination because beyond 
boasting superior hitters and 
pitchers, it was studded with char- 
acters. Not only was Babe Ruth 
a great player, he was the jovial 
“bambino/' an ebullient basher 
who joshed easily with reporters, 
happily guzzled hoc dogs and ded- 
icated home runs to sick children. 

Morris fMoej Berg, a mediocre 
catcher who had a lifetime batting 
average of .243 and hit a total of 
six home runs, was also a well- 
known and beloved figure who. as 
any 1930s barbershop habitue 
could have told you. “speaks a 
dozen languages and can’t hit in 
any of them." 

if his linguistic abilities were 
exaggerated by adoring colum- 
nists, other features of his very 
public persona were not. It is true 
that Mr. Berg entertained com- 
panions by holding forth on the 
origins of modern English usage, 
Latin dictionary in band, and that 



he was a terrific spy for the gov- 
ernment during World War II. 

Like Mr. Berg, the Dodgers of 
the 1950s. the Brooklyn boys of 
summer, cultivated an affection- 
ate press. And since journalists 
are tbe fans' eyes into the dugouL 
players like Carl Erskine and Roy 
Campanella were adored by- 
Americans in return. 

As the owners and players must 
r ealiz e, fans don't follow baseball 
because of any great fascination 
with collective bargaining agree- 
ments or pension fund payments. 
This is real-world stuff, dull and 
vaguely unsettling- We watch base- 
ball for the mixture of stunning 
athleticism and compelling person- 
ality thaL takes us away from our 
bankbooks and time cards. 

So while it is indecorous for play- 
ers and owners to be engaging in a 
spat over spoils which, after all. 
come from our more slender wal- 
lets, it is also unwise, because it 
diverts the game from its strength 
— fielding attractive personalities 
to whom we can become artached. 

Today, baseball has little truck 
with characters. 

Players stride into the clubhouse 
— which many of them refer to as 
their “office” — carrying brief- 
cases holding the telephone num- 
bers of their diamond brokers. 
They regard the media with undis- 
guised contempt, and baseball's 
dirty little secret is that the base- 
ball press corps mostly loathes 
them for it and leaps at the oppor- 
tunity to portray the players as 
puerile, sullen reprobates. 

A player like Vince Coleman 
does not help matters by comple- 
menting his less than incendiary 
batting average with a sudden 
urge to toss a firecracker at young 
fans in a stadium parking lot. as 
he did last year. 

Baseball players, who amass 
their fortunes on the strength of 
stiff ticket prices, also routinely 
ignore letters from children re- 
questing autographs. The players 
receive $7 or more per signature in 
formal signing sessions. 

If you don't think young baseball 
fans are becoming disaffected from 
tbe increasingly bland and opportu- 
nistic culture of baseball, have 
a word with my 10-year-old friend 
Ray TintorL If you ask Ray which 
baseball cards he and his friends 
covet these days, hell say: “Nobody 
collects baseball cards anymore. We 
collect basketball cards.” 

There’s the rub. While baseball's 
players and owners feud in front of 
the bank vault, another sport has 


no U red out how to conduct itself as 
a modem business wh; e retaining 
the chami that baseball onu had. 

Foundering not so long ago. pro- 
fessional basketball has been in- 
fused with charisma. Men lute 
Muggsv Bogues. Charles Barkley 
and Shaquitle O'Neal command sal- 
aries comparable to baseball play- 
ers'. but nobody thinks of them 
merely in terms of what they earn. 
Instead. Mr. Bogues is a brave 
whippet among gianls. Mr. Barkley 
an abrasive yet somewho appealing 
rascal and Mr. O’Neal a slam-dunk- 
ing savant. And basketball players 
seem accessible in u way that base- 
ball players do not They have most- 
ly congenial relations with the press, 
and happily speak the league man- 
tra "I love this same" in television 
promotional spots. 

Consequently, not only is bas- 
ketball wildly popular at the mo- 
ment the players are much in de- 
mand for major endorsement 
contracts, while Madison Avenue 
is largely indifferent to baseball. 

Advertisers must presume that 
nobody wants to hear from base- 
ball players. How else to explain 
why a player like the Red Sox 
pitcher Roger Clemens, one of the 
best ever to play in his position, is 
not helping us choose our sneakers 
and soft drinks? Instead of being a 
spokesman for his sport he is stri- 
dent and aloof off the field. 

The impression that ballplayers 
are out mostly for themselves is 
reinforced when a player like the 
Braves' first baseman Fred 
McGriff. who hit a pivotal home 
run in July's All-Star Game, re- 
sponds this way to a question 
about how he would have felt if the 
game had been canceled by a 
strike: “It turned out good for me." 

Baseball has lost its vision and 
so it is losing us. A lifelong baseball 
fan. I now find myself hastening to 
Madison Square Garden to watch 
die Kjiicks. and shunning Yankee 
and Shea Stadiums. 

To resurrect baseball, the players 
and the owners need to resolve (heir 
differences quickly and quietly. 
Then they should attend to die busi- 
ness of winning back their alienated 
audience 'iy turning on the charm. 
It doesn't take the brains of Moe 
Berg — or even Babe Ruth — to see 
that a game without personality will 
soon be a game without fans. 

The writer is author oj "The 
Catcher Was a Spy: The Mysteri- 
ous Life of Moe Berg. " He contrib- 
uted this comment to The New 
York Times. 


'nflf-fi fi 


BOOKS 


_ ‘ *: 
’ .1'* 


DAISY BATES IN THE " 
DESERT; One W Oman’s 
life Among ibo Aborigines 

By Julia Blackburn, 240 pages i 
S22. Pantheon 

Reviewed by Leslie Brody 

T HE facts are only scaffold- 
ing m Julia Blackburn’s hy- 
brid nonfiction book about tin 
Australian writer and traveler, 
“Daisy Bales in the Desert.” 
Employing unfussy, lyrical lan- 
guage. Brack burn concentrates 
on the collision of black and 
white, old and new cultures that 
underlies Bates's life among the 
aborigines. Part biography, part 
autobiography, part, novel- the 
book’s technique matches Ba- 
tes’s temperament — com- 
posed, deep and daring, seesaw- 
ing between Jane Austen, and 
Calamity Jane. Admitting up 
front tiiai most of Bales’s mem- 
ories' were at least; .etnbellish- 
menls- and more often entirely 
made up, Blackburn writes, 
■’ Daisy totes was a liar, of that I 
am sure, but (he extent and the 
exact details of her lies remain a 
difficult territory' for _ which no 
good maps have survival ” 

Born in I860, Btiles claimed 
to have come from, aa British- 
Irish aristocratic background. 
There was the family manor 
house; the doting father, the 
meeting with Queen Victoria 
when she was a little gjrL None 
of it checks out. In reality her 
Irish-Catholic family was poor. 
Her mother died when she was 
young, and her drunken father 
ran away with another woman. 
Bales arrived in Austraha in 
i 883 with nothing and proceed- 
ed to invent a life. 

Australian myths converged 
when she met and married Ed- 
win Henry Murrast- (better 
known as Breaker Morant). 
They drifted apart before ;the 
marriage was a year old, never 
divorced, and apparently Bates 
suppressed it. She married, 
again — a man named Bates — • 
then after five years in England 
by herself, (during which dine 
she dabbled in journalism, oc- 
cultism and- probably prostitu- 
tion) relumed only to leave-dull 
Mr. Bates and her long-neglect- 
v ed son permanently-, ■ 
c At 42, Bates moved mto a' 
tent in' the desert.:;She lived 
there among the aboriginal peo- 
ple of the Australian southern 
desert until her death ^'9 1. 

At the center of Blackburn's 
book is a axil and dreamy first- 
person narrative of BatesVlife 
m the desert, including a some- 
times paternalistic; often' ri- 
a’ohary interpretation of the 
events' and , -attitudes thaL dea- ' 
mated aboriginal cititiire. In a- 
lecture in 1933 (which may or 
may not have actually oc- 


WHAT THEY RE READING 


ndent of the 
assoa'a- 

tioPyhaSltgrtmishcd m ta Tenta- 
timderVeafe^byMaw Juppe. 

“Writtcar before Jtipp6 W 
came FiahcebF’forei^D minister, 
this is a fascinating uaight into 
this politician who appears cold 
and distant ULthe mediX but in 
this bode, reveals a much more 
human character, struggling 
with the temptation to abandon 
politics." iJohnBmuon, JHT) 



curred), Bates stunned her audi- 
ence by suggesting that whites 
take responsibility for the chaos 
they had caused in the lives q f 
the indigenous people of Aus- 
tralia and called for a corridor 
of land across Australia to be 
set aside for aborigines only. 
Her words were largely un- 
heard, or were met with the con- 
tempt and misunderstanding 
symbolic of the poor-savages 
mentality that polluted the age. 
- Blackburn takes the reader 
on .a guided tour through the 
imagination of a complicated, 
lonely, dramatic; elusive hero- 
ine, at odds with" her own cul- 


ture (occluded from the “best" 
society by class or gender or 
money).- She abandoned her 
own son but cared for hundreds 
Of ill and dying people. She pro- 
vided food to travelers, learned 
their language, nursed the sick 
with lime juice and olive oil. 
Loneliness unhinged her for a 
while, but she was magnificent- 
ly resilient against drought, rain 
and conformity — resigned but 
sever defeated, occasionally 
amused and often amusing. 

- “Who are you. Mis. Bates?'’ 
Blackburn writes. 

'T am Kabbarii, the white 
skinned grandmother. I am the 


Great White Queen of the Nev- 
er-Never and 1 have come from 
the land of the Dead to help my 
people in their hour of need. I 
am also a lady from a very good 
family, you see that immediate- 
ly of course, hear it in my voice. 
Several important men have 
wanted to many me including a 
Bishop and an English lord, but 
my destiny has kept me here." 

Bates is fascinating, but so is 
her biographer — more impre- 
sario than museum curator. 
Blackburn’s presentation of her 
somewhat mythic subject as a 
thinking, breathing woman in- 
cludes a collateral ramble 
through her own past. Some- 
times she transfers her dreams 
and adventures directly to 
Bates. And why not? Bates 
wasn’t boro great or brilliant or 
holy. She’s enthralling because 
she gets cranky, because she 
gets old. because as engendered 
by Blackburn her life is so vivid 
arid full and mysterious. Who 
can say what slie did or didn’t 
experience? 

Leslie Brody, a regular book 
reviewer for Elle magazine, 
wrote this for The Washington 
Post. 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Troscott 

B OTH North-South pairs 
reached four spades arid in 
one case, as Aown, the contract 
. was doubled. This contract ap- 
peats to have four losers, but m 
both cases the opening lead was 
the obvious top best honor, 
and this proved to be fatal to 
the defense. 

In four spades doubled. Win 
Yang Chang- of Pennsylvania 
wasSouth for the JedL Wool- 
sey. West for the Terminators, 
fnftrA to * dub - top late. 
South played low from the 
dummy and captured the jack 
with the ace. He then proceeded 
to strip the hearts from bis 
hand, "-png two trump entries 
to his hand in the process, fi- 
nally, he led the club queen 


from the dummy and East was 
eadplayed. He had to choose 
be tw ee n gyving a ruff and sluff 
or permitting dummy's dia- 
mond king to score. 

In the replay, Rob Gordon 
was South for the Terminators. 
He received a trump drift, and 
achieved tbe same result by 
st ripp ing hearts and throwing 
East in with a dub lead. But as 
he was not doubled, the Jedi 
gained 5 imps. 

Two unhappy West players 
discovered in tbe post-mortem 
that they could have beaten the 
game by avoiding the routine 
heart lead, preserving a crudal 
entry, and instead leading a mi- 
nor suit A dub lead, certainly 
unlikely, gives South no chance. 
After the diamond queen lead, 


covered by the king and ace. 
East can lead a heart and West 
can shift to dubs effectively. 

NORTH 
♦ A107532 
04 

0 K 10 8 4 
*Q3 


WEST 

♦ 6 

7AK72 
VQ J7 
*98642 


EAST 

* J 

CQ9S3 
O A932 
*K J75 


SOUTH (D) 

4 KQ984 
7 J 10 8S 
0 85 
♦ A 10 

Neither side was vulnerable. Tbe 
bidding; 

Scuib West North East 

1 4 Dbl. 4 ♦ DbL 

Pass Pass Pass 

West led the heart ace. 


TO OUR READERS 
IN GREAT BRITAIN 

It's never been easier to subscribe 
and save. Just call toll-free: 

0 800 89 5965 





■tjxb amBHxaaa 







There are tio easy names for the-kinds of service we^ gjven r ouLGardmernbefs over the years. 
"v" -gecause every day, everywhere: around tJie wor!d;sb' many, of our Service BepjKerifetives have gone 
‘ ■ beyond tfiejslC-beiping solve problems, rert just about losl Gards. o'r Ttip&ri 
• Cheques, bi* about the unpredictable nature of life itself. So ^eteryquYe y 

upriver TwKhfiflffa'paiidle^ wich^iT a 

"-there for youand rea^.to beot sennet Whatewri»rw to gjv&tt.. . 




it 1 * 


©1994 toamExpnarmdMrtBd Sentas 






- T ^e^^^ SKfiP2 o !!!!!!S( j Dt?QC20BBtst 


< fowl/ Herald Tribune 
\ \p~ay> August 12, 1994 
r rage 6 


•.NCW7HENV',;- - 
'.JFBELAMJ.r. {- - , 

£ -f_ i.-V." 

IREUWio^ ^ '" ' •; U 

2 J. 4 

]*?$%, r 

■'„S..7»*-,V»i »' 

^ .S*-?!*- } ’ 

- V i 

~ .= -•; UliiWltti ■ •■ 


The resort draws hordes of visitors, 
mostly for fish ’n* chips, bingo and roller 
coasters; the sea and sand are incidental . 




ENGLAND K 

Thames 

London^ 





iuoalhan Player far The Nr* Vnrfc Timet (2i: NYT map 


^*TsSr '**' 







•' ' 7. ■ 'jfrsL 


h&i ’** 


Sharing the Bounty of Provence 


By Patricia Welis 

International Herald Tribune 

S UNSHINE thyme, lamb, black 
truffles and wine are the hallmarks 
of Provencal cooking. Restaurants 
in this privileged region of France 
are at their best when they're small, hom- 
' ey, casual affairs, perfectly suited to the 
bounty and lifestyle of Provence. Here are 
some recent favorites. 

Six yean ago, Brigitte Pizzecco and 
, Pierre Rou by were drawn to the tiny hilltop 
village of Le Beaucel — near the village of 
Venasque and not far from Caroentras — 
by its natural, rustic charm. Ever since 
i opening day, their faithful international 
r list of diners seems to agree. While Piz- 
■ zecco tends the stove, Rouby sees to the 
small dining room, a no-frills spot that 
seats no more than 35 diners at a time. 

Pizzecco is a native of nearby Beaumes- 
de-Venise. where as one of six children she 
. eagerly took the job of family cook at a 
young age. Her passions are clearly trans- 
. mined to the food, for everything that 
- comes from the kitchen sparkles with par- 
1 ii cular attention to detail. The downside is 
that service ran be painstakingly slow, so 
don't bother with Aubeige do Beaucet if 
you’re the twitefay sort, or in a hurry. 

Rather, come with a healthy dose of 
patience, settle into a small windowside 
table with a view of the lavender and 
cyprus-filled valley below, and enjoy her 
personalized Provencal fare. On my last 
visit, daily offerings included a platter of 
fresh homemade ravioli filled with soft 
and tangy local goat cheese; a delicate 
wild mushroom tan rich with forward, 
woodsy flavors; a satisfying fricassee of 
Provencal rabbit, laden with tomatoes and 
herbs, and tender local lamb roasted with 
fresh herbs of Provence. 

But the varied menu doesn't stop at the 
borders of Provence: She’s just as adept 
with an earthy blood sausage ( boudin noir) 
served with apples and potatoes, or a 
southwestern duck from the Landes, 
roasted with a touch of sweet honey. 

Dual platters of cheeses — one of the 
young fresh goat cheese from the village 
of Le Beaucet, another filled with a mix of 


regional French cheese — come as part of 
the 150-franc ($27) fixed-price menu, and 
Rouby will make a face should you dec line 
fromage. The dessert selection is huge, 
and might include a seasonal clqfoutis of 
rhubarb or of red currants, fromage Mane 
served with a coulis or raspberries, or Pro- 
vencal nougat with an apricot sauce. 

For such a modest spot, the wine list is 
extensive and should provide some real 
discoveries. Try the always dependable Gi- 
gondas — deeply ruby and berry-rich — 
from Domaine du Cayron at 150 francs for 
the 1988; or a 1990 Rasteau Cdtes-du- 
RJb One- Villages from the Domaine de la 
Soumade, priced at just 90 francs. 

Marie-France Fel remembers the first 
“menu” she ever prepared, at the age of 9. 
The dinner consisted of roast chicken, 
fried potatoes and chocolate cake, served . 
to her family in the village of Vaison-la- 
Romaine. You haven't been able to drag 
her away from the stove since. 

Five years ago, she and her sommelier 
husband, Thierry, took over an already 
existing restaurant. La Table du Meunier, 
in the artist-colony village of Fontvieille 
not far from Arles. 

Quickly, they attracted artists, crafts- 
men and villagers, along with the many 
international travelers drawn by the sun- 
shine and energy of Provence. 


11.11 IBIS 


■ “Smells good,” said 9-year-old - 
Caitlin O’Connor as she. reached over 
to grab a handful of caterpillar 
crunch, a pan-fried mix of pecans, 
cumin, cayenne pepper and 
mealworms. Caitlin was one of about 
25-people who attended a bug- 
eating seminar at the Oregon Ridge 
Nature center in Maryland. A 
waxworm, anyone? “Kind of juicy, 
like a fruit candy with juice in the 
middle,” advised one of the young 
gourmands. 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


Their ample dining room — decorated 
in tones of brown, orange and stone — 
seats only 25 guests, the maximum num- 
ber a single cook can manage. Yet the 
energetic 28-year-old cook — who has a 
diploma from Gaston Lendtre’s school In 
Paris — is unflappable and heartened by 
the attention La Table du Meunier re- 
ceives from the locals. 

One regional specialty that's always on 
the menu — no matter the season — is* 
crespeou, a seven-layer omelet, each layer 
seasoned with a different herb or vegeta- 
ble. The prepared omelets are layered in a 
large round vessel then baked in a bain- 
marie. Once cooked and cooled, the om- 
elets a re served in cakelike wedges, with a 
fresh tomato coulis. The origins of the 
colorful dish: Farmers who spent a week 
each year walking their sheep from the 
mountains to the valley left home equipped 
with several variously flavored omelets, 
providing them a meal for day of the 
trek. (1 always wonder about the gour- 
mands who mij^ht eat two in a single day. 
mightily dwindling their stash of rations.) 

The outgoing Thierry, with his Auveig- 
nat -style handlebar mustache, will guide 
diners through the menu, suggesting per- 
haps roast quail with qli.ves._a saimon ga- 
leite with sorrel sauce, Marie-France’s pop- 
ular fish soup (enhanced with mid thyme 
and fennel), or a sturdy stew, a gardian de 
taureaux prepared with bull's meat. 

Desserts include simple tarts and cakes, 
and when it comes to wine, trust Thierry’s 
palate: You won't go wrong with the 
house Coteaux-d'Aix-ea- Provence from 
the Domaine de Costebonne from nearby 
Eygalifcres, a meaty red rich with the fla- 
vor of wild blackberries; or a newly dis- 
covered Ch&teauneuf du Pape, Lou Pata- 
calau, available ui both red and white. 

Auberge du Beaucet, 84210 Le Beaucet ; 
tel 90.66.1 0.82. Closed Sunday dinner and 
Monday. Credit card: Visa. 150-franc menu. 

La Table du Meunier, 42 Cours Hya- 
cinths Bellon, 13990 Fontvieille; tel: 
90.54.61.05. Menus at 95 and 145 francs. In 
summer, open daily. Off season, closed 
Tuesday evening and Wednesday. Credit 
card: Visa. A la carte, 150 francs, including 
service but not wine. 


HOTELS 


— F TO PARS. O UR PARiS^ 


The right locsyjpi 
The right pedJglei 
The right pr flgfe 
FF 1380 * 

*\ ,s 

1, RUE SCRIBE - 75009 PARIS 

r 

The right everyth! 

'Per couple per roOTi per rugfai, Mornlayi through 
bnakhsi inchided, efimm July 1 - August 31. L___ 
Cowart your travel agent or call os direct Tel: 33 (1 1 44 71 24 

tv 


hotdroom... 

slay in a 

Luxurious 2 Bedroom 
ApartmentSuitrf* 

TYaoeUngtoNew York? Discovcrtbe 
Ddmonko difference. Spacious, 
beaurifidlyappoxnsxionatxrud sin 
be dr oom Ap artme nt Suites in £be 


Itfg^jPSr. Jean de Luz 
H& ar 64500 France 

ISPHOTEL^ - ftESJDENCE 

V “tA RESERVE” 

Dbec&y on the ocean wHi 

panoramic view 



and 590} Street. 

Reserve mow for 
Special Summer Rates 
July I Thru Sept. 5 
Oae4tedroom - SI 55 *T«ue 
Tmo-Bedroom - $285 +Ta* 
TEL: 212-4864508 
FAX- 1-212-755-3779 


Rooms, sautes, flats day. week, math 

Tal: 50 26 04 24 -fiiUC 99 26 11 74 
a_. 10% REDUCTION ON 

ROOM BY SENDING THIS AD 


HOTELS 


CARIBBEAN 


By William E. Schmidt 

New York Times S&rke 


B lackpool, England — Even . 

by the dreary standards of so 
many British - beach resorts,. 
Blackpool is in .a league of its 
own. It hunches alongside the cold gray 
surf of the Irish Sea about 25 miles (40 ' 
kilometers) north of Liverpool -The -Euro- 
pean Union says the water is too dirty-for 
swimming and at the height of summer;the - 
beaches are sometimes deserted, except 
for the men in woolly hais'who are always - 
there offering rides to children bn shaggy : 
donkeys that plod listlessly up and down 
the sand. 

Yet this windswept curve of northern 
coastline endures as Britain's single most 
popular resort destination, a giddy tumble 
of neon, beachfront bed-and-breakfasts 
and Victorian odds and ends that this year 
is expected to draw 7 to. 8 million vaca- 
tioners, weekend revelers and convention- 
eers. Jostling. among the crowds along the 
seaside promenade or packed into the 
turn-of-tbe-century electric trams that rat- 
tle along the. beachfront, tire baric Blade- . 
pool tourist is British and probably from 
the north of England. There are families 
with children, pensioners, young adults 
outride throbbing discos nearly as big as 
Madison Square Garden. In the autumn, 
swarms of politicians come to Blackpool 
the ritual rite of major party conferences. 

Never mind the sharp winds and scud- 
ding clouds. Blackpool not only claims . 
more vacation beds than all of Portugal, 
and the largest concentration of roller 
coasters in Europe — 10 — but it has its 
own place in the history of post-industrial - 
Britain. Blackpool is lire worid's original ; 
blue collar resort, a Victorian era fantasy- 
land founded more than a century ago as a 
beachride diversion for the mill workers of 
England’s grimy industrial north. 

While no one really comes to Blackpool 
for the historical experience, this town of 
145,000 is celebrating its heritage, this 
summer. It is the centenary of the 518- 
foot, 9-inch (150-meter) Blackpool Tower, 
a half-sized pastiche of the Eiffel Tower, 
and Blackpool’s most famous landmark./ 
If many foreign visitors envision Eng- 
land as a kind of giant heritage theme park - 



■' of 'seat hedgerows and stately - homes, . 

Blackpool is the perfect antidote. The 
: promenade — how could it be called any- 
thing' hut the Golden Mfle? t 5 - is ardent? 
less sprawTirf f orame-teller booths, shops 
selling ally hats,- nightclubs,, game ar- 
cades, chip shops, bingo parlors, rides and 
sidesh ows, aU- suffused with the aromas of 
caramel com, state beer, fried Gish arid, 
twice a day, the Irish Sea At low tide. 

For aJiof this, Blackpool and its armies 
of loyal patrons mak e ho apologies. At its . 
tourist center, .Blackpool riiamdesriy de- 
scribes itself as “a culture-free zone,” and 
only the coldest fish cannot find some- 
- thing armiffvpg during a day trip — three 
and a half hours from London by train. 

. At Blackpool as at most British resorts, 
the sea is only a scenic backdrop, some- 
- thin g for the sun to disappear into at the 
end of a long summer cwdight- Only chil- 
dren and masochists ; actually use the 
beaches. The restplaymride tire Sandcas- 
tle Center, a giant indoor waterpark over- 
looking thesea, with heated artificial surf. 

Most viators wander over the water on 
one of Blackpool's three pieis, wonderful 
Victorian structures lined with benches. 
Each is a little city in itself, wjth restau- 
rants, and cavernous ..indoor theaters 
where a procession of slightly blue comics, 
including vaguely familiar stars of televi- 
sion sitcoms, turn out each summer to 
practice their stuff on the crowds, serving 
up music hall jokes, (“How’s the tongue 
salad?” *Tt speaks for itself.”), dance 
numbers and- such acts as a cannonball 
juggler. • 

Blackpool Tower, where Queen Eliza- 
beth n paid a visit July 22 to celebrate the 
anniversary of the monument, is now part 
of a larger beachfront attraction called 
-Tower World. For about SI2, $6 for chil- 


dren under 14, the visitor not .only gels to 
ride the high-speed elevator to the top of 
the tower but can also sample the amuse- 
ments inside the seven-stoiy. indoor 
theme park below. The best pan of Tower 
; World is .not the circus animals , awi ufe- 
size copies of dinosaur! but the baDroom, 
a wonderfully restored bit of Edwardiana 
where scores of graying couples gather to 
. waltz, samb a and twirl to ihe mighty 
WuiEtzer an organ that magically 
emerges, on cue, several times a day. 

■_ At . the south end of the. promenade is 
Pleasure Beach, the amusement park that 
is the' most popular tourist draw. Opened 
in 1896, the park has four splendid and 
■ wonderfully raidy wooden roller coasters 
— including the twin-track Grand Na- 
1 rional opened in 1935 —as well as one of 
the newest and tallest roller coasters, Big 
One, dosed in July after an accident in 
which 25 people suffered minor injuries. It 
is Expected to. reopen later this month. 

O DDLY, it is fall not summer, 
that is high season, when , the 
town and the promenade are 
tarted up with hundreds of thou- 
sands of lights. The Illu min ations, as they 
are known, were begun in 1925 as a way to 
stretch the season: So many cars and tour 
buses how descend on the Golden M2e, 
after dusk from Sept 2 to Nov. 6 this year, 
that the city has to reroute its regular 
beachride traffic. 

What is most remarkable about Black- 
pool in the end, is that people keep coming. 
Even in the ago of high-tech Disney-slyle 
res o r t s and competition from the Mediter- 
ranean, Blackpool has endured. 

Among most Londoners, Blackpool is 
regarded, if at all, as a kind of bad joke. But 
a Tew years ago, Matthew Parris, once a 
Conservative Member of Parliament and 
now a columnist for The Times of London, 
admitted he bad bear won over by the sheer 
energy ffld fun of the place. Its secret, he 
wrote, was self-evident. 

“Every bar and disco, every amusement 
arcade, every , shopfuf of fluffy toys and 
Simpsons doHs, every roller coaster ride 
and fortune told by Madame Petulengro, 
depends for its amu se m ent on an unspoken 
. pact between the town and its visitors.” he 
wrote. “We’re only here for the laughs:'” 


I f f i 9 I f l I II I f 




-A# 


* \:9 ' 


* . •"'/ • * ri . . .. i * J 





■.V ** . 





Tfw Llttto Rascris 

Directed by Penelope 
Spheeris. U. S. 

“Is that a cowlick, or are you 
just glad to see me?” Reba 
Me Entire asks Alfalfa (Bug 
Hall) in “The Little Rascals.” 
WeU, a cowlick is all it used 
to be. But this quaint materi- 
al has been dragged into the 
present, picking op an over- 
produced visual style and the 
occasional phrase like “bite 
me" or “boy toy ” Along the 
way, a little innocence is lost, 
and none of what’s gained is 
worth having. Visual ideas 
don’t get much simplex than 
those oF “The Little Rascals." 
which once depended on 
raffish children to behave in 
funny, precocious ways while 
the camera rolled. Now, on 
the big screen, the precocity 
becomes exaggerated and the 
children are aggressively cut- 
er. Most of the wide-eyed 


kiddie actors seen here have 
worked in commercials, 
which gjves “The Little Ras- 
cals” a s^ck,. adorable style 
devoid of spontaneity. If you 
can, stick around for the 
much funnier outtakes that 
accompany the dosing cred- 
its, with the kids behaving 
normally and Penelope 
Spheeris, the director, heard 
saying things like “Don’t 
lode at the camera, sweetie.” 
Spheeris, who once wittily 
chronicled the decline . of 
Western civilization (hr her 
two rock documentaries by 
that name) and is now in 
danger of becoming part of 
the process, had better luck 
with “The : BeveiJy Hflibil- 
lies.” There she could some- 
times wink at her material 
but “The Little Rascals” does 
too much winking of Its own. 
Celebrity cameos don’t im- 
prove matters; Donald 
Trump is among the funnier 


walk-ons in a group indud- 
ing Daryl. Hannah, Whoopi 
Goldberg ahd Md Brooks. 

* (Janet Mastin, PTYT) 

TTm Adventures of 
Prlscffla, Queen of the 
Desert -... • 

Directed by Stephan Elliott. 
Australia. 

Terence Stamp’s wistful blue 
eyes, so memorable for their 
look of martyred innocence 
in the 1962 screen version of 
“Billy Budd,” will now be re- 
membered in a distinctly dif- 
ferent way. peering .but from 
beneath heavy mascara and. 
bright eye shadow and be- 
bindalbngjluxuriantVercni- 
ica Lake hairdo. Stamp cuts a 
spectacular figure as a sar- 
donic transsexual named 
Bernadette, part of a- three- 
queen drag act on a‘ bus" tour 
through (he wilds of Austra- 
lia. Even oh his own^marvd- 


Scenes from “The Little 
Rascals " and ” The Adven- 
tures of Priscilla, Queen 
of the Desert, ” 


ously ladylike and loaded', 
•with sly, acerbic wisecracks,- 
he’s worth the price of admis- 
rion. And together, the trio of • 
Bernadette, Mitzi (Hugo'. 
Weaving) and Felicia (Guy 
Pearce) is enough to shale 
the kookaburras right out of 
the trees. Or to nude "the 
small-town mentality of the 
provinces, which is what Ste- 
phan EQfott’s flamboyantly 
colorful ' hew film is really 
about. For all its gtitter, this . 
is the fort of film in which 
everyone becomes happier 
and nicer by the final reel 
EUiott, as both writer and di- 
rector, readily oammunicates. 
his characters' outrageous 
appeal The _sght of three ' 

■ men dressed in spangles and ■ 
ostrich feathers while on a 
caniping trip, for instance, is 
a. measure of the filmmaker's 
wdl-dfivekjped sense of speo- 

. f Janet Maslin, N YT) 


LOW COST FLIGHTS 

ACCESS VOYAGES 
THE BEST FARES TO 
THE (NTED STATES 

and over 500 more dnfaatus world 
wide on <0 d Keren! scheduled c om ers. 

Id PARS 14 ) I 30 ? 02 or 42 71494 
Far 1-42 21 44 20 
WNTTEL 3615 ACCESJ/OYAGES 
Id LYON 78 M 67 77 or 73 56 15 95 

BOOK NQViLby done wd credt card 
Govemmrt Licence 175111 

WOS1DWIDE. Spud departin'dt^ 
lo«si svw toi economy arfare. 
Cm* cardv-pcwihle. Tet- Farit (!) 42. 
gg 1081 fc. 42 56.25 8? 

WOULD AVIATION - 5CHFN 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 





HtETTY MAS NEAR ARIES/ AMUE5. 
Sw i wiw pod 4 bednxna. Ccov 

falahie. Tet[rowrice5 (35W9B0676 


NYC F u mAed AparMend Stado, 1 & 
2 bodroan. Poly , w eldy. medWy. 
Fo» ddtt 212-5B2JJ99 Tet 582-2X«. 


TRAVEL FOR 


Hit 


BRHJGE A G&WAN LANGUAGE^rear 
Bona. Jnwahw aena by a monoqe» 
at home. FAX +4J.2641 31281 


LEBANON 



1 1rrational art 
s One of the 
Huxtablss 
to Summer 
getaway 

14 Not on the level 
isHacfio -related- - 

is Altaic 

(language 

group) 

17 Start of a quote 
by Will Durant 
20 Isaac or Howard 


21 Put into 
difficulties 

22 Old spy grp- 

24 ‘On Gokfen 
Pond" 
playwright 
Thompson - 

» Quote 
continued 

2i Prefix with ' 
valence 

ttJebJraf-Sabah. 

e-9- 

aa Take forcibly 


ROME, HOTEL Yia«0A •••• 
modern* rales, retfayrant, central 


HOLIDAY RENTALS 


SF-RARTHREMY, F.WJ_ OVH! 200 


YOU SAW THIS AD. 

Se» did nearly half 
a million readers for whom 
travel is a way of life 
Shouldn't you place 
ruur ml in the 

IMERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE? 


Sohitkm to Pmade of August 11 


nan sheds ssaa 
Baa Banacna aasa 
bqs HBSiUBaasBna 
□dqbdqq Haaaaa 
sasiin annas 

□DBQBaaaHQSH 
EHsaa aans ass 
□Eras bsssq asna 
□□a asatn sniaaa 
DassaiaaciaQna 
□□□so □□□aa 

□HBQaa mnaastaa 
.QBQQnaiaiaDso □□□ 
InmiaQ asaaEoa aaa 
□□□a dsoq aaa 


38 Local me , 

40 Storm heading ■ 

41 Pang 

42 Mount . „ 

43 Pedal pushers? 
45 Greek peak 

4® Quote 
continued 
4« Shaver-'. 

53 Pricing word . 

54 Touch a chord 
si Racket 

si End of the 

quote • 

•4 Crosses 
•a In heraldry, 
having smalt . 
projealons in 

theupper . 


••Distribute 
•TQtemour rival 


i Kind of money. 


1 Judo levels 

2 Much 
a Fawn 

4 Choice erf Paris 

5 Preserve 


e Blockhead 
TTheblueof • 

. baby.biues 
• Opfjosrte’of 
-gormanefiza . 
BSmafl posy 
ia Show rudeness - 
_tn traffic .- 

it Gladal 

formation - -. . 

12 Shocks of a sort 
MSpyofasori ■ 

ia Split sec. 
is ■‘Groory* 

23 i967Monkees 

■ ' ? onfl .' 

*s Yaks - . 

2 ® Drop 
2/ Real 

2 » JobnCrardTs .. 


sa Cabin fabric 
aoEsurtence 
3« Places for 
cSspteying . 
wares 

aConsiellatton . 
name 

se Optimistic 
37 They're. 

■ sometimes split 
as Arithmetic - 
. figure 


44 Easy mark ' 
473 tumped 

48 Advanced 

49 Babble 

so Kind of eagle. 


si Nary 

■2 Constrictor 


so Site of Galway 

Bay 


58 Noncommittal 
response ,. 
soGlveabaHyluL 
eo Surveyed 
•2 Bottom Brie 
S3 Mdse. 


SS 3 S IS* 1 * 

!!■■■ !!■■■■ HIM 
iniKIHHIliBlII 


S 5 S 1 I in hhh 

ail| ysis mi 

NidBI ill 

llllllil mil 

■■■■■■■hiuhi 

SS 58 38858 BBSS 


Anil Nr Noram G.lil^r 


New York Tones EOted by mil Shots. 



















'iSx> I 



International Herald Tribw^ 
Friday , August 12 . , 1994 
Page 7 



A Visit to Liu Shaoqi’s Retreat 


NmlaAKm.lHT 


By Sherry Buchanan 


A NN1NG HOT SPRINGS,Cbi- 
na r- We arrived at the Cominit- 
nisi Party guest house that had 1 
once been a summer residence 
of Liu Sbaoqi, the president of the Peo- 
ple's Republic of China who; during the 
dark days of the Cultural Revolution, was 
tortured and beaten by Red Guards and 
left to die without food or medical atten- 
tion in Kaifeng Prison. We were the only 
guests. 

There was nothing in the quiet Europe- 
an-style, gingerbread, pink stone house* 
with French windows trimmed in pale 
green, where Liu and his wife came to take 
the waters, to reflect on China's bloody 
and revolutionary past. At 2,000 meters . 
(6,500 feet), this could have been a comer 
of Switzerland, shaded by magnificent 
trees — unusual in colder dimates at such 
altitude — and tall bamboos. The air was 
cool and dry, with mountains in the dis- 
tance. 

We had left Kunming in the late after- 
noon, driving past Lake Dianchi, one of 
the largest lakes in China, and the dramat- 
ic cliffs of the Western Hills, as the light 
from a burnt-orange sun darkened the red 
soil of Yunnan. 

Amid this bucolic landscape, black 
smoke rose from Kunming's Dickensian 
steel complex as we drove past ugly con- 
crete dormitories, a satellite dish on every 
rooftop, the new opiate of the people. A 
few months ago, Beijing banned satellite 
dishes in an attempt to keep out foreign 
television programs, but 1 counted 169. 
from my Kunming hotel window alone; 

We pulled up at the highway toll gates 
and were routed through the mandatory 
car wash that costs a few extra yuan and is 
a source of revenue for the local govern- 
ment. Rich Chinese btiy special plates to ~ 
avoid the rough bristles of die antiquated 
car wash, wfucb tend to scrape tiff paint ;■/ 


At a popular roadside restaurant, our 
~ . Chinese host ordered a familiar feast in a 
region known for excellent food — warm 
goal cheese, smoked ham, three varieties 
of mushrooms (the region boasts 1 60 vari- 
eties), lilliputian green pumpkins stuffed 
with pork and lake shrimp — sweeter and 
tinier than North Sea crevettes. 

. : The room was full of heavy smoke from 
the rough cigarettes manufactured by the 
local money-spinner, the Yunnan Tobac- 
_ oo Company, which I was told, makes $2 
millio n a day and pays 10 billion renminbi 
in taxes to ^jing every year. Pa>oi!g taxes 
to the central government gives rich prov- 
inces freedom from Beijing, a state of 
affairs Yunnan has enjoyed thanks to its 
wealth and distance from the center. 

A power failure emptied the restaurant 
and we made our way to the gymnasium in 
Aiming to watch a string of future Nadia 
Comcmus, followed by 12 toddlers in 
white gym suits. With hair parted in the 
middle, girls and boys with red painted 
lips arid cheeks twisted and bent their 
limbs, eerily flawless in performances for 
children so young. 

Fifteen minutes later along a bumpy 
mountain road, leaving behind industrial 
Aiming, tall gates opened onto that small 
comer of Europe. 

The house with its veranda felt so famil- 
iar that it was disorienting in Yunnan’s 
otherwise uniquely Asian landscape: red- 
earthed high plateaus, dark gray sculp- 
tured limestone pillars of the Stone For- 
est, gentle terraced orchards and rich rice 
fields in the valleys, blue lakes so vast 
waves break on their beaches and tradi- 
tional baked-mud villages. The house was 
built by a Shanghai architect, part Swiss 
sanatorium, part maison de mature. 

] went up the creaky wooden staircase 
to the bedrooms. Inside, the past creeps 
through your bones: an ink bottle and two 
-wooden ink pens on the desk and cotton 


Sherrv Buchanan is a journalist based in 
ffdng jtong. 



MARK YOUR DIARY! 


As prospects for economic recovery brighten in the U.S, and Europe, 
investment activity in the public and private sectors is beginning to revive. 
The program for this timely conference will focus on three key sectors - 
telecommunications, transportation and energy. 

Our fflnstrions group of speakers will include: 

■ Martin Rangemann, European Commissioner and Former Minister of 
Economic Affairs, Germany 

■ Wolfgang Roth, Vice President, European Investment Bank 

■ * Marianne Henderson, V. P, Chief Financial Officer; Bell Atlantic 

■ Eberh&rd von Koerber, President, Asea Brown Boveri Europe Ltd. SA 

■ Henning Christophersen, V. P., European Commission 

■ Christopher Garnett, Commercial Director, Eurotunnel 

■ Claude Darmon, Managing Director, Transport Division, GEC-Alsthom 

■ Larry Irving, Assistant Secretary for Communications & Information, US. 
Department of Commerce 

■ Thierry Bandon, Deputy Vice-President, European Bank for Reconstruction 
and Development 

- a Greg C. Simon, Domestic Policy Advisor to A1 Gore, Vice President of the U.SA 

■ Arturo Israel, Transportation, Water and Urban Development Department, 
The World Bank 

■ Gunter Rearodt, Minister of the Economy, Germany 

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT: 

Brenda Erdmann Hagerty 

International Herald Tribune, 63 Long Acre, London WC2E 9JH 
Ttek (44 71 ) 836 4802 Fax: (44 71) 836 071 7 

SKADDEN 

ARPS 

SLATE «7* gk mwtMThiML.g# 

meagher & iicraiOs^fei&nbuiic. 

FLOIVt I* «• » «•* IMMIIH w 


The Sounds of Summer in Siena 


By David Stevens 

International Herald Tribute 


sheets thick and crisp as only old-fash- 
ioned laundering techniques can make 
them, a thermostat and two teacups with 
lids, a spittoon (which I mistook for a 
chamber pot) and a mosquito net. 

It was homey and comfortable and 
smelled a bit musty, like somebody’s lost 
childhood in boarding school or summer 
camp. The guest house is still used for 
military personnel needing a rest, or for 
the provincial brass to spend a restful 
Sunday afternoon. 

I had not expected that the Chinese 
leaders who led the People's Republic in 
anti-Western, crazed isolationism for 
dose to 30 years had lived in such perfect 
bourgeois style. Nor had I expected to 
have a midnight soak in the steaming hot 
bathing pods tiled in white and pastel 
blue, with walls painted a dark turquoise, 
where all powerful brings had dipped be- 
fore: the perfect place for discreet meet- 
ings for people in high places. 

I MMEDIATELY outside the gates 
of the bouse, the old world spell was 
broken by the garish marble and 
mirrored hotels, where China’s new 
rich spend 1,500 yuan a night (four times 
the average monthly salary) for weekends 
of karaoke, drinking and a few dips in the 
hot springs. Sunday strollers, men and 
women afike in straw hats with colorful 
polka-dotted ribbons, line up to shoot air 
guns at pink and blue balloon targets in 
the river. 

A sign of the changing times: Our Chi- 
nese breakfast companion said he was 
opening a finance company in Kunming 
and was planning to charge 30 percent 
interest — enough to build many new 
hotels in Anning. 


S IENA. Italy — “Siena for the Si- 
enese” reads a small sign someone 
posted on a building near the shell- 
shaped Piazza del Campo. al- 
though this ocher city in the Tuscan hills is 
far from drawing die hordes of sweating 
humanity that inundate, say, Venice. 

Except for July 2 and Aug. 16 each year, 
the dates on which crowds of tourists and 
even more Sienese jam the Campo for the 
Polio, die flamboyant medieval pageant 
that climaxes in the brief, no-holds- barred 
horse race exemplifying the rivalry of the 
comrade, the 17 divisions of the walled 
city. 

A more common daily sight in Siena's 
sloping and winding streets in July and 
August is that of musicians carrying their 
instruments — those that play portable 
ones — to and from the Palazzo Chigi 
Saracini. whose Gothic facade curves 
gracefully along a bend in Via di Citta. 

The palace is the seat of the Accademia 
Musicalc Chigi ana, founded in 1932 by 
Count Guido Chigi Saracini, in a modern 
display of Renaissance patronage, carried 
on now by the Monte dri Paschi di Siena 
bank (esL 1472). The main activity of the 


academy is an ensemble of master classes, 
in which a rigorously chosen number of 
young musicians are brought together 
with masters erf 1 their particular disci- 
plines. Added to this is a program of 
almost daily concerts in the surrounding 
area, involving academy teachers and pu- 
pils, including a one-week festival, the 
Set timan a Musicale Senese. 

The faculty always includes an array of 
outstanding instrumentalists. Also on 
Hand this vear are Ennio Morn cone, he of 
the Sergio Leone epics, for sessions on 
film music, and the tenor Carlo Bergonzi 
for an opera course that will cul min ate 
Aug r 30 in an “anthology” of Verdi's 
“Macbeth” drawn from both the 1847 
score and the more familiar 1 S65 revision. 

The festival week made musical history 
when it began in 1939 by ending the al- 
most total neglect of Vivaldi, and the 
Setiimana Musicale has remained faithful 
to Italian music off the beaten path. 

This year’s opening concert, for in- 
stance, offered what was described as the 
first complete modern performance of the 
four-chorus psalms by the early 17th-cen- 
tury friar Lodovico Grossi da Viadana, 
under Frans RrOggen, who heads the class 
in Baroque music. Other concerts featured 
chamber works by Italy’s major 20th-cen- 


tury composers, including Luigi Dallapic- 
cola, Alfredo Caselia, Gian Francesco 
Malipiero and Goffredo Petrassi (who cel- 
ebrated his 90th birthday this year). 

But there was also a Gogol program 
made up of Alfred Schnittke's suite for 
“Dead Souls" and another posthumous 
communiq ue from Shostakovich — a frag- 
ment of a planned opera of “The Gam- 
blers.” begun during World War II and 
put aside when the composer realized it 
would be not at all heroic or patriotic, and 
therefore doomed not to be performed. 

A singular charm of tbe festival is the 
matching, rometimes unlikely, of music 
and ate in a dry short on places for pubtic 
performance. The Sala del Mappamondo 
m the Palazzo Pubblico, with Simone 
Martini's “Macsti” and equestrian por- 
trait of Guidoricd da Fogliano on the 
walls, was a spectacular setting for Chris- 
topher Stembridge’s playing on a 1519 
organ, an instrument attributed to tbe 
imp robably aptly naTT1 ^ Giovanni Piffero 
(piffero, or piffaro, is the name of an early 
wind instrument, also of an organ stop). 

And Andrea Lucchesmi’s playing, as this 
year’s Chigi ana prizewinner, of Chopin 
nocturnes and Brahms intermezzos, floated 
eloquently in the night air from the open 
courtyard of SL Catherine of Siena's shrine. 


Ill ill! (Hill 



AUSTRIA 


Salzburg 

Salzburger Festspiete, tel: 43 ( 662) 
80-45. Continuing /To Aug. 31: in- 
duces performances of Stravinsky's 
"Oedipus Rex,” staged by Peter Sel- 
lars and directed by Kent Nagano. 


BELGIUM 


Bruges 

Groeningemuseum, tei: (50) 34- 
79-59. open daily. To Nov. 15'. 
"Hans Memiing: Five Centuries of 
Reality and Fiction.'' Brings togemer 
30 works by the Primitive Flemish 
painter as well as paintings, drawings 
and sculptures by his contemporar- 
ies in Bruges. 


BRITAIN 


Edinburgh 

Edinburgh International Festival, 
tel: 44 (31) 226-4001. Aug. 14 to 
Sept. 3: Features Beethoven's nine 
symphonies and aU thre piano con- 
certos, performed by Andres Schiff 
and the London Philharmonic under 
Bernard Haitink, and a performance 
at "Fidelio" by the Scottish Opera. 
The dance program presents the 
work of 20th-century choreogra- 
phers. 

National Gallery of Scotland, tel: 
(31) 332-2266. open daily. To Oct 
"Monet to Matisse: Landscape 


Sacrificial knife from 

Peru, in Metz, trance. recurrent theme in impressionism, 


Symbolism, Fauvism and Cubism 
bringing together works by Cezanne, 
van Gogh, Rousseau. Gauguin, De- 
launay and Picasso. 

Glyndeboume 

Glyndeboume Festival Opera, tel: 
(273) 813-813. Continuing/To 
Aug. 25: Performances of Mozart's 
“Don Giovanni" and Britten's "PetBr 
Grimes.” 

London 

Royal Academy of Arts, tel: (71 ) 
494-56-15, open daily. ContJnu- 
ing/To Oct. 2: “impressionism to 
Symbolism: The Belgian Avant- 
Garde 1880-1900.” 


FRANCE 

Mete 

Arsenal, tel: 44-78-25-00, open dai- 
ly. Continuing /To Oct. 2: "L'Or des 
Dteux, I'Or des Andes." 140 pieces 
of pre-Columbian jewelry from Peru, 
Ecuador and Columbia. 

Orange 

Theatre Romain. tel: 33 90-51-83- 
83. Aug. 13 to 27: Performances by 
the Kirov ballet and opera companies 
include Mussorgsky's "Boris Godu- 
nov," Verdi’s “Requiem" and two 
ballet evenings. 

Paris 

Musde du Louvre, tel: 40-20-51-51, 
closed Tuesdays. Continuing/To 
Sept 5: "La Reforme des Trois Car- 
rack Le Dessin a Bologne, 1560- 
1620. " 




Bayreuth 

Richard Wagner Fasrtspiele, tei: 49 
(921) 20-221. Continuing/To Aug. 
28: Giuseppe Sinopoli conducts 
‘■Parsifal," Daniel Barenboim 'Tris- 
tan und Isolde" and Pater Schneider 
"Der Ftiegende Hollander." 

ITALY ~~ 

Verona 

Verona Arena, tei: (45) 800-5151. 
Continuing/To Sept. 3: Perfor- 
mances of Verdi's "Aida." "Na- 
bucco,” and "Otelio.” Bellini’s 
"Norma" and Puccini's "La Bo- 
heme.” 

SWEDEN ~~~ 

DrottndngholRi 

Drottnmgholm Court Theatre, tel: 
46 (B) 660-82-25. Cantinulng/To 
Sept. 8: A new production of “Youth 
and Folly,’* by an 18th-century com- 
poser, Eduard Dupuy. 

UNITED STATES 
New York 

Metropolitan Museum of Art, tel: 
(212) 570-3951, closed Mondays, 
to Jan. 27: “Pharaoh's Gffts: Slone 
Vessels from Ancient Egypt." Alabas- 
ter, anhydride, obsidian vessels that 
served as cosmetic containers, fu- 
neral equipment and royal gifts. 


NEWS EVENTS WHICH COULD AFFECT 
YOUR UFE: 



FOLLOW THE WORLD EVERY DAY IN THE IHT 

off the 
cover price 


Subscribe now 
and save up to w 


■ v. !.. x ?: i. ■ rs 

CALL US TOLL-FREE 

AUSTRIA: 06608155 LUXEMBOURG: 08002703 
BELGIUM: 0 800 1 7538 SWITZERLAND: 155 57 57 
FRANCE 05437437 THE NETHSHANDS: 060225158 
GERMANY: 0130 8485 B5 UMTH) KINGDOM: 0800895965 
N THE US: (1)8008822884 
. •" . " ...£■ • ./ v :?■ i‘. *a. '*■ 

Or send in tbe coupon below. 


Subwiptian Haw A Savings cfl HT com Pita*. 


CaunoytCuiency 

12 month* 
42 month* 
FREE 

sim- 

SatortBn 
+ 1 month 
FREE 

3 month* 
*13 FREE 
Issues 

Audria 

A Sett 

6JJ00 

at^ . 

3A00 

1A0O 


aFr. 

14,000 


7.700 



D JO. 

3.400 


1.900 

1,050 

Rntand 

P.fcL 

2^00 


1 JOO 

700 


F.F. 

1.850 


1JOT 

690 

Gwwmj* 

DiA. 

700 


385 

210 

Ora* Britain 

£ 

210 


115 

05 

GfWtt 

a. 

75JD00 

' r.. 

4iaoo 

22,000 

Ireland 

ait 

230 

sar i • 

125 

68 

twy 

Lire 

500,000 


273.000 

150JXI0 


LFr. 

14.000 

■: .".it 

7.700 

4J00 

NaOwtarefc 

R 

770 


420 

230 

Norm 

NJO. 

3.500 


1.900 

1JJM 


47JOOO 


26,000 

14JJOO 

Stiain 

Ptt». 

48,000 


36A00 

14500 

-JUndcMv. Uatind 

PBB 

55.000 


27A00 

14500 


SJ&. 

3,100 


1.700 

900 

-handtiaSwv SJOj 

sjaa 


1&0Q 

1JU0 


SFr. 

610 


335 

185 


S 

485 


265 

148 

CEI. N. Africa, foriw 

FiwchAinon.MM 60 East 

s 

630 


345 

190 

OdTSsttss. Asia. Cgreref and 
South Anwca. Saudi Atika 

s 

780 


430 

235 


$ 

900 


495 

270 

-Inw artam. 


Yes, I wont to start receiving the HT . This is subscription torn ) prefer 

(check expropriate boxes): 

□ 12 months (364 issues in all with 52 bonus Issues). 12-8-94 
G 6 monti is ( 182 issues in di with 26 bonus issues). 

□ 3 month* (91 issues in di with 13 bonus issues]. 

□ My check is enclosed (payable to lha International Herald Tribune). 
D Please change my: □ American Express □ Diner* dub □ VISA 

□ MastarCcnl □ Eurocard □ Access 

Credit cord chcrgei vnl bo made in French Francs at arrant exchange n*s. 
CAAQACCT.NO. . 


.SIGNATURE. 


EXP. DATt 

FOfi BUST-ESS OtDBtS, PIEA5E NXAK YOUR ^1 NUMBS: 


[HTVAT rumbar. FR74732021 1261) 

□ Mr.n Mb □ MmFAMLYNAME. 


RR5TNAME . 


FBtMANENT ADDRESS.' D HOMED BUSTCSS. 


arr/coDE. 

axnm_ 

7EL 


.PAX- 


3tmlbm3jSk&ribune § 

ThiofisrwjwwAugisfJI. 1 W 4 , 


nmj»n» wnn tb* new imui ms uat tse wwmxcnm rout 


* 






/ 


Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 12,1994 


Gem lans Seize a 2d Shipment of Nuclear Material 



Carnbodui? 


By Craig R. Whitney 

New York limes Semce 

BONN — German authorities have discovered a 
second sample of weapons-grade nuclear material be- 
hcved to have been soured out of Russia for sale to 
foreten governments or terrorist groups interested in 
building atomic bombs, the police said Thursday. 

They said they had seized the material, 0.8 grams of 
highly enriched uranium-235, in Land&hut, Bavaria, in 
June and arrested five Czech and Slovak men and a 
German woman as suspects in what they surmise was 
an attempt to arrange a larger sale of uranium to 
someone who wanted to build a bomb. 

“This could turn into the most serious security 
threat since the end of the Cold War, and it is getting 
Steadily worse,” a high-ranking German official said. 
"We have not even begun to get it under control, and 
we won't unless we all — Americans, Europeans and 
Russians — work at it together." 


In May. the German police found one-fifth of an 
ounce of highly enriched plutonium-239 from Russia 
in the gamy of a German businessman in Tengen. 
near the Swiss border in southern Germany. 

The businessman, Adolf Jaekle, has been undo: 
arrest and has told investigators that other samples of 
uranium and plutonium from the former Soviet Union 
and Eastern Europe were on the market in Germany 
and Austria. 

But senior German officials say he has not yet led 
them to any prospective customers interested in buy- 
ing the plutonium, which is used in nuclear warheads. 
The authorities say they believe he was negotiating 
with Iraqi or Iranian contacts on a deal to put one or 
those countries in the position of being able to build a 
nuclear weapon. 

The uranium in the latest case was seized June 13. 
die police said, but they announced it only now so they 
could complete their investigations. The German 


woman, a real estate dealer, was arrested m her apart- 
ment only on Monday, police said, and was regarded 
as die ringleader. 

There was no apparent connection with the earlier 
plutonium case, but h was not clear whether the police 
had any leads to the woman’s prospective customers 
for the uranium. They did not release her name. 

“The latest discovery in Landshut shows that inter- 
national organized crime — a real atomic mafia — is it 
work here," said Gunther Beckstem, the Bavarian 
interior minister. German officials fear that former 
officers of the Soviet KGB secret police are involved in 
procuring the materials for sale abroad by criminal 
groups. 


UN-Ai 



lrture and Killing 


Russian officials denied that the plutonium found in 
Mr. Jaekle’S garage came from focuil 


lities in their coun- 
try. but German - experts have told the government 
here that they were certain it did- 


German Furor Grows 
Over Holocaust Case 


Reuters 

BONN — Three German 
judges who praised a far-right 
leader's character after sentenc- 
ing him for denying that the 
Holocaust took place may be 
shifted to other dudes, the pres- 
ident of the Mannheim court 
said Thursday. 


The furor over the case deep- 
ened, with calls for the defen- 
dant to be sent to jail for a 
debate in Parliament on the 
subject and for the three judges 
to be dismissed. 


Gunter Weber, the president 
of the court, said the outrage 
and possible consequences 
would probably be discussed at 
a meeting Monday, adding that 
the judges could be diverted to 


Arsonists Strike 
At German Turks 


Rouen 

BONN — Arsonists gutted a 
Turkish prayer room in the 
southern town of Singen early 
Thursday, the latest in a series 
of attacks that have made Turks 
in Germany fear for their safety 

again 

The attacks prompted wor- 
ries that a wave of neo-Nazi 
brutality that peaked in 1992 
and 1993 was again gathering 
pace. But security officials and 
Turks say the roots of the latest 
violence are much more com- 


other duties. “I hope it will not 
come to that," he said. 

Mr. Weber had earlier told 
the Berlin daily B.Z. that he 
questioned whether the judges 
could continue in their present 
functions for the time being be- 
cause of the controversy. 

“It can be assumed that sus- 
pected c riminals in the future 
will refer to the public debate 
and say: ‘We don’t want to be 
sentenced by these Nazi 
judges,’ " Mr. Weber said in an 
interview for Friday publica- 
tion. 

The court found Gunter 
Deckert leader of the far-right 
National Democratic Party, 
guilty in June of incitement to 
racial hatred for spreading the 
neo-Nazi view that there had 
been no gas chambers at the 
Auschwitz death camp. 

He was given a one-year sus- 
pended term and 10,000 mark 
($6,300) fine because it is a 
crime in Germany to publicly 
deny the existence of the Holo- 
caust 

Explaining the verdict on 
Tuesday, the court seemed to 
honor Mr. Deckert's convic- 
tions by saying he was “ mainl y 
motivated by his effort to 
strengthen the powers of resis- 
tance in Germany against the 
Jewish demands stemming 
from the Holocaust" 


pi ex, including rivalries among 
Kurdish and Turkish groups. 


It said Mr. Deckert “defends 
his political conviction, which is 
a matter of the heart to him. 
with great commitment and at 
the cost of substantial time and 
energy.” 



Bdxio ManhcM/Thc Aooctaiod Prew 

HAITIAN TRAINING — A paramilitary recruit learning to aim her rifle in Port-au- 
Prince as the possibility of a U.S. invasion grows. Hie UN special representative for 
Haiti, Dante Caputo, was reported considering a troubleshooting visit to the island. 


' r By Nate Thayer V . 

. Waihingat Post Service 

BATTAMBANG, Cambodia ' — A Cambodi- 
an military netwoik that terrorized political op- 
ponents during a United Nations-supervised 
election campaign last year has continued to 
murder, kidnap, extort and commit atrocities 
under the country's new coalition leadership, 
according to investigations by .the gcnnenmenl ' 
the United Nations and human, -rights 
organizations. 

Confidential UN and government documents- 
charge that senior znOitaiy officials m western 
Cambodia, including the commandos of elite 
intelligence units, have set up secret detention 
centers, tortured and killed prisoners 1 who were 

K».W rathont rfiarw mpagfrf m cmrih^fracbete 

and practiced cannibalism. . ry." 

The detention centers wore ordered dosed two 
years ago by a UN peacekeeping andadnaiustra- 
tive mission, but they have continued to operate 
as part erf a network that has turned inxm^ismgly 
from political repression to criminal money- 
making activities, the documents said. --? - ■ 

In one facility, at least 35 persons have been 
executed since August 1993.acx»nimgtotheUN 
Center for Human Rights based in. the capital, 
Phnom Penh. 

Soldiers involved in the network routinely ate 
parts of the bodies of execu te d prisoners mid 
forced other captives to clear mines, a confidential 
May 10 report compiled by (he UN Centersaid. 

Although the UN Center's findings have-been 
largely confirmed by other human nghes groups 
ana by the government's Military Prosecutor's 
Office, the coalition government has deebried to, 
press charges. .. 

Instead, it has denied that two dotentioBf^cilir- 
ties exist here and asserted that there is ‘fob 
witness or evidence to confirm" the execution of 
at least 35 people. . . . 


«, control ■gJffiSSSgi P"™ 1 *- 
leaders were involved in 

i Jias*eBr=.«rt3sr: 


7" 



H uman rights investigators said, the-network 
curtailed its abuses lately anridUNand 


thority tu vrfw*wv-*-T -- 

petty criminals and agents who fell from favor, 

^^S^rfncers belonged to the army of' ; 
Cambodia’s former Commux^ p 0 ^™®!* 
SE the UN-supervised elections m May 

^TheSmy was reconstituted as the Royal Cam- 
bodian Armed Forces, but 1*8* parts of it re 

Bain iniaict ouder the old leader^. 

In its May 10 report, the UN Center for 
.Human Rights said rt had “invited and 
documented a series of murders and other enrm- 
nal activities attributed to a military intelligence 
unit designated S-9I- - - • . 

The investigation established beyond a rea- 
sonable doubt that several of the highest military 
mufligence officers in the province , including 
the leadership of the agency, were directly re- 
sponsible for these murders.” 

In August 1993, a UN Transitional Authority 
report said that despite a UN operation to close a 
secret S-91 detention center a year earlier, the 
unit “once uses the same building for . 
interrogation and torture, continues to have the 
same leadership, and continues to conduct illegal 
activities including abduction, torture, and sum- 
mary killing.” 

The UN xq>ort, which. has been distributed to 
senior Cambodian government leaders, said top 
political, military and police authorities in Batia- 
mabang Province knew of these activities, but 

made no real effort to stop ihem. 


* 


had 

government inquiries. They '.said at. least-two 
persons were still illegally detained at afadMty at 
Ghheu Kman, about 20 miles northeast of this' 
western provincial capital. 

Another detention site, a room at the Battazo- 
bang provincial militaty headquarters, is appar- 
ently no longer in use, investigators said. - 


Cambodia has agreed to negotiate a gold ran- 
som payment to Khmer Rouge guerrillas for the 
- rdeaseof three Western hostages, a senior minis- 
ter said Thursday, according to a Reuters report 
from Phnom P enh. 

Khmer Rouge guerrillas have demanded 
Koldfoa 


* 

4* 


-~$46,000'm gold for the release of each hostage. 


Nasrin Still 


In Terror 9 
Friend Says 


ITALY: True, Bribes Were Paid, Berlusconi Admits, but They Were Just 6 a Drop in the Ocean’ 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches ' 
STOCKHOLM — Tasfcma 
Nasrin, the Bangladeshi writer 
who fled here Wednesday after 
threats on her life; is frightened 
and unhappy, according to' a 
friend who helped her, 

Gabi Gkicfarnann, a journal- 
ist and head of the Swedish 


branch of the PEN dab, the 
worldwide writers’ organize-, 
lion, said that Dr. Nasrin’s first 


Continued from Page 1 
Tribune, marking his first 100 
days in office, Mr. Berlusconi 
also made the following points: 

• He said 200,000 jobs had 
been created since his govern- 
ment took office in May and 
took credit for new laws that 
provide fiscal incentives for 
companies to hire workers and 
reinvest profits. 

• He promised to remain 
faithful to his campaign pledge 
to cut public spending “across 
the board,” and especially in 
the health care and pension sec- 
tors, in order to contain Italy’s 
runaway public sector budget 
deficit. He said details would be 
presented in September. 

• He reiterated a promise to 
introduce legislation next 
month that would create a blind 
trust in order to avoid conflicts 
of interest between his position 


as pi 
ershi 


pos 

rime minis ter and his own- 


up of Fininvest, which con- 
trols half of the Italian televi- 
sion market 

• He said that in bilateral 
meetings and during the recent 
Group of Seven summit meet- 
ing in Naples, he had forged 
“excellent, cordial and friendly 
relations" with President Bill 
Clinton, Chancellor Helmut 
Kohl of Germany and Prime 
Minister John Major of Britain. 


• He said that while he 
hoped his government would 
last for the full five years of the 
legislature, “this will depend on 
the behavior" of coalition part- 
ners. 

Mr. Berlusconi was particu- 
larly harsh in his criticism of the 
Italian and foreign press and of 
his leftist opposition in Parlia- 
ment. He said the Democratic 
Party of the Left, the former 
Communist Party, “has no seri- 
ous proposals, no strategy, no 
program, and is an orphan of 
the political faith of commu- 
nism, which history has con- 
demned definitively." 

He complained bitterly that 
the Italian and foreign press 
had been unremittingly hostile 
to his government, in an “irre- 
sponsible" manner. “Whoever 
speaks against our govern- 
ment," Mr. Berlusconi contend- 
ed, “is going against the inter- 
ests of the country, and at a 
time when we need to work se- 
renely for the future." 

Among those he claimed - 
were arrayed against his gov- 
ernment were not only print 
journalists but also a large num- 
ber of “left-wing” journalists at 
RAI, the state television net- 


lion of Fininvest, Mr. Berlus- 
coni acknowledged that pay- 
ments of any sort, even if 
extorted by tax inspectors as he 
contended, “should be con- 
demned, and I condemn them.” 
But he said that Frainvest’s 
payments should be seen “in 
the context of a general atmo- 
sphere of extortion" and that 
“the company's payments 
should not be considered crimi- 
nal because the company was 
not guilty, merely a victim.” 


eral metaphors in an attempt to would have sharply l im i te d the 
play down the Fininvest pay- abflity of magistrates to arrest 
ments. He said that for a group .and detain suspects before hav- 
with 40,000 employees, the in g charged them, 
amounts paid were equivalent The decree was withdrawn 
“to just one minute of revenues after the Milan, magistrates in- 
in a year" or “a drop in the vestigating Fininvest and other 


. Berlusconi then used sev- 


ocean, or, if you prefer, 1 liter of 
water in the whole Mediterra- 
nean Sea.” 

Looking to the future, he 
promised to pursue in the form 
of full-scale legislation the 
emergency decree law he signed 
and withdrew last month that 


Fininvest Lawyer Surrenders 


companies threatened to resign, 
and after critics claimed that it 
would benefit Paolo Berlusconi 
and such discredited politicians 
as Bettino Craxi, the former 
prime minister. Mr. Berlusconi 
declined to consider the decree 
an error, of either substance or 
timing, and said the idea of es- 
tablishing habeas corpus in Ita- 
ly “is sacrosanct and will re- 
main so.” 


words upon arrival in Sweden 
were, “It’s a relief to be hera.” 
“Tashma is very 
and frightened," Mr. Gk 
mann said. “Several death 
threats have been made against 
her. Now ifs our job to make 
sure she can relax here in Swe- 
den." 

Dr. Nasrin is in hiding under 


police protection. Bat she is free 
to make t 


she 


public appearances if 
wishes. Foreign Minister 


Simpson Has Surgery, 
Then Returns to Jail 


Rtmas 


LOS ANGELES — O^X. Sinqison, the former football star 
accused of muidetmgte ygfe.and a friend of hers, underwent 
lymph node smgery Thnraday at a hospital before being 
returned to his prison ceil ' . 

Dr. Robert Hnizengs oLCedars-Sinai Hospital said Mr. 
Simpson underwent “a j^anned minor surgical procedure," 
adding, The pnx»dure^^ per^nned without any compli- 
cations." - — ‘ • v -'-i‘ ’. 

Dr. Hnizcftga, a specjaf&in internal would not 

say what the surgery wasior, bat Mr. Simpson’s chief lawyer, 
Robert Shapiro, said that aft enlarged lymph node had been 
removed framik. Simpson's armpit, 

Mr. Sbqpirodid riot daborate.but enlarged lymph nodes in 
the armpit, neck or groin can indicate the presence of viral or 
bacterial infections even more serious diseases, such as 


cancer. 


Mr. Simpson, 47, has a history of lymph node problems. He 
reportedly underwent asmafeur surgical procedure about a 


week before bis arrest June 17. 

Dr. Hiiizenga said the surgery was successful. “The proce- 
dure was pe r f o r med without any complications." . 

Mr. SstEgKon hakpteadc^notg^yto the June 12 murders 
of his ex-wife, bficolefeq^ Sarpacm, and her friend, Ronald 
Gbhftftah^ 

They were stabbed and dashed to death outride Mrs. 
Simpson’s house in the Brentwood section of Los Angeles. 


, . * x 

> — 



Margaretha af Ugglas said. 
Mr. Gleid “ 


Gltachmann said, “The 
Swedish police are protecting 
Sbecai 


work, and also “a part of the 
financial elite." 


Returning to the invesiiga- 


Agence Frana-Prase 

MILAN — An Italian lawyer 
with Prime Minister Silvio Ber- 
lusconi’s media-based con- 
glomerate Fininvest, suspected 
of involvement in bribing finan- 
cial police, has turned himself 
in, a MU an court said Thursday. 

Magistrate Maria Cristina 
Forelo issued an arrest warrant 
against Massimo Benuti at the 
request of magistrates investi- 
gating Italy's wide-scale cor- 
ruption scandal. 

Mr. Benuti was denounced 
by a former financial police of- 
ficer and Fininvest tax adviser, 
Alberto Corrado, who was ar- 


rested Monday on charges of 
concealing business assets. 

According to Mr. Corrado, 
Mr. Bemiti asked him to per- 
suade his superior officer. Colo- 
nel Angelo Tanca, to overlook a 
bribe received from the Monda- 



problems and 
noted that “Italy is a country of 
great potential and talented en- 
trepreneurs, the economy is go- 
ing toward a positive phase and 
I think we will be the protago- 


dori publishing house, which is nists of a new economic mir- 
majority owned by Fininvest. ade." 

Paolo Berlusconi, the prime Asked what kind of govern- 
mi nister s brother, is under ment he would like to be lead- 
house arrest for his part in the ing a year from now, Mr. Ber- 
affair. He was accused by a Fin- 1 us coni sighed and said he 


invest tax expert of authorizing 
a $230,000 bribe to financial 
police to skim over the accounts 
of three Fininvest companies, 
including MondadorL 


wished for “a government that 
has achieved harmony and has 
begun to tackle the great struc- 
tural problems facing the coun- 
try.” 


AFRICA: University’s Fall a Lesson About Continent CAMP: Tent City in Fierce Terrain 


Continued from Page 1 
regarded as the Harvard of Af- 
rica.” said Makau wa Mutua, a 
Kenyan lawyer who directs 
Harvard Law School’s Human 
Rights Project. “If you look at 
the collapse of Makerere Uni- 
versity from the once revered 
institution that it was, you get a 
picture of the destruction of 
educational institutions in 
Uganda and beyond. What 
happened to Makerere is so in- 
dicative of what has happened 
to education in Africa. It’s pain- 
ful." 

Apolo Nsibambi, a political 
scientist and director of the Ma- 
kerere Institute of Social Re- 
search, said it was impossible to 
run Makerere efficiently “be- 
cause the state cannot fund uni- 
versity education.” He added, 
“You don’t have enough read- 
ing materials. We don’t have 
the tools. How can you teach 
when you don’t have the tools? 
It is a question nationally, but 
also regionally and continent- 
wide." 

Throughout the 1980s, Afri- 
ca’s university population 
boomed by 61 percent, but 
since then, African universities 
have been beset by funding cut- 
backs brought on by the conti- 
nent’s overall economic plunge. 

Be ginning in the latter half of 
the 1980s, total funding for 


higher education has dropped, 
and as a result student test 
scores have fallen, faculty sala- 
ries and living conditions have 
plummeted, research has di- 
minished and schools are find- 
ing it increasingly difficult to 
attract and retain the best Afri- 
can minds. 


At the lime of independent 
30 years ago, sub-Saharan Afri- 
ca, excluding white-run South 
Africa, had just six universities. 
When they became indepen- 
dent, some of the new African 
states had fewer than 100 uni- 
versity graduates among their 
citizenry. Zaire boasted just 16 
college graduates at indepen- 
dence, Burundi had none. 

In the 1980s, the number of 
universities in Africa rapidly 
expanded, and today there are 
more than 100. Enrollment 
grew from 337,000 students in 
1980 to about 542,700 students 
10 years later. 

But according to recent sta- 
tistics compiled by the UN 
Educational, Scientific and 
Cultural Organization, Africa 
stzU lags far behind the rest of 


doits for each 100,000 people; 
in Burkina Faso, 60; in Malawi, 
63; in Tanzania, 21; and in Mo- 
zambique, 16. 

The core of the problem is 
financing. Almost all universi- 
ties in Africa are fully funded 
by the state, and cash-strapped 
governments, faced with 
shrinking economic growth 
rates and many struggling un- 


condoned from Page I 


off to jobs in Arab countries on 
the Gulf with their families se- 
curely settled behind. Aid offi- 


Sar Shahi camp 10 miles oat- 
side Jalalabad. 

It is a and place to live, a 
sprawl of tents spread over six 
square miles of mo onlik e land- 


rials say that some win proba- scape: The site was chosen by 
never go home despite the thej&u/tz, the governing body of 


dear structural adjustment pro- 
of the International 


raetary Fund, can no longer 
afford the cost of subsidizing 
higher education. 

Coupled with the issue of 


leduled cut in international 
aid next year. 

“I have two sons and two 
grandsons,” said Malik Jader, 
70. a refugee with a flowing 
white beard who lives in Narir- 
bagh camp in Peshawar. “The 
sons earn 100 rupees a day and 
the grandsons 50 rupees. So I 
live like a king" 


local leaders, over the objec- 
tions of United Nations staff 
members, apparently because it 
was far enough out of town to 
keep problems at bay. 

“The worst thing js the heat," 
said Ala GuL 55. ‘That and the 
scorpions and the snakes. This 
is not a place to live.” 


her here, 9w can feel safe.” 

Before slipping out of Dhaka, 
Dr. Nasrin stayed in hiding af- 
ter June 4, when the govern- 
ment ordered her arrest on 
charges of insulting Islamic reli- 
gious feelings in a comment to 
an Indian newspaper. 

The Swedish Muslim Coun- 
cil, which represents about 
70,000 people, accused Dr. 
Nasrin of seeking to make mon- 
ey out of insulting Islam. ~ 

“She just wants to get well 
known and earn money on the 
back of hatred of Islam," said a 
council spokesman, Mahmoud 
Aidebe. 

But he said no demonstra- 
tions against her were planned 
here. 

In Dhaka, the first street 
tests since the writer left 
day drew about 1,500 people 
who chanted, “Tasfima Nasrin 
must be hanged!" 

Police cordoned off the area, 
but the demonstrators dis- 
persed peacefully. 

The police in Dhaka said 
Thursday that they had tight- 
ened security around the Swed- 
ish Embassy in Dhaka and the 
diplomatic missions of other 
countries that supported Dr. 
Nasrin. 

Earlier, the main Bangladeshi 
fundamentalist group, the Jar 
maat-c-Islami, warned the gov- 
ernment would have to “pay^ 
for allowing Dr. Nasrin to 
leave. It did not elaborate. 

(Reuters, AFP) 


et pro- 
files- 


Jackson Invoked the 5th 
On Abuse Issue in Suit 


The Associated Pros 

LOS ANGELES — 1 Michael Jackson invoked the Fifth 
Amendment on -the. question of alleged . child molestation 
when answering a lawsuit by five former bodyguards who. 
daim he fired them because they knew of tor activities with 
young boys. 

Tile five men filed their suit against Mr. Jackson in Novem- 
ber, saying they had been di s mi ssed without warning in 
February 1993 “so as to paint any of them as ‘disgruntled 
employees’ in any future investigation,” the lawsuit says. 

But in documents obtained this week. by The Ass oci at ed 
Press, Mr. Jackson denied the five had worked for him 
regulariy. The pop star,- who recently married Lisa Marie 
Presley, Elvis Presley’ s daughter, also has denied the alleca- 
tions of child abuse. 

Last year s boy, now 13, sued Mr. Jackson, d aiming he had 
molested him. That lawsuit was settled out of court for a 
reported $15 milhon, although Mr. Jackson has denied mo- 
lesting the boy. - 


AIDS Conference Ends 
With No Help in Sight 


The Associated Pm r 

YOKOHAMA, Japan —The 
gist of the 3,500 reports present- 
ed this week about the war on 
AIDS can be summed op in 
simple terms: There is no . cure 
for AIDS, no effective treat- 
ment, no vaccine. Nor will there 
be any time soon. ‘ 

“Anyone with HIV won’t 


meetings, too. The only one that 
surfaced _ since last year** big 
meeting in Berlin was the dis- 
covery that AIDS-infected 
vraaxB. can avoid passing the 
to their babies during 
fiAZL 


virus 

birth if they take the drug < 

Even this is a limited victory. 
Because the medicine is so ex- 


equaily touchy question of gov- ed that he would return tcfhls COUP: Moscow Closes 1991 Case 

eminent control Allowing uni- 


find much solace at this meet- P ensiVe ’ not help women 
ing,” said Dr. Mervyn Silver- m P 001 " countries, where the dis- 


versifies to become more self- 
supporting would reduce the 
power of governments to exert 
control. Granting academic 
freedom to universities seems 
anathema to a continent where 


home village once the fighting 
stopped and the land mines 
were cleared. “Overnight," he 
said. “I would even leave the 
beams of this house." 


Continued from Page l 
er of Russia. Mr. Yeltsin defied 
the coup and rallied resistance. 
Mr. Varennikov headed a 


Mr. Varennikov was com- 
mander of the troops that sup- 


man, the president of the Amer- 
ican Foundation for AIDS 
Research. 


. The tone of the lOth lnterna- 


pluralism is still struggling to 
m ’ 


md a firm foothold and where 
autocrats and military dictators 
have routinely viewed institutes 
of higher learning with suspi- 
cion, as breeding grounds for 


the world in the percentage of political discontent, 
its population attending uni ver- In authoritarian countries 


But he admitted that his 
grandchildren had adjusted to 
life in Pakistan and had even 
taken up Pakistani customs like 
playing cricket. 

To fry to stem the flow of 
new arrivals, Pakistan closed 
the border in mid-January. It is 


delegation from the coup lead- 
ers to talk with Mr. Gorbachev, 


pressed democracy demonstra- -tional Conference on AIDS, 
tors in VUmus, the Lithuanian which aided. Thursday, was re- 
capital, in January 1991. Four- strained from the start 
teen people -were killed and Afterfour days of ■pnnotrav 


who was vacationing at the time hundreds injured in the vio- tocosribn,^ the goal of con 


on the Black Sea coast. 

Mr. Gorbachev testified 
against- Mr. Varennikov. 

Vladimir Polyakov, a spokes- 
man for Mr. Gorbachev, de- 
nounced the decision to acquit 

« w t r -v i 


was widely de- 


fence, which 
nounced. 

In his final plea to the three 
judges of the military court. Ml 
V arennikov said: “In August' 
1941 1 gave a solemn oath to be 


ling HIV, the virus that 
AIDS, seemed as distant 
ever. ' ■ ■ 


as 


still possible For refugees to slip Mr. Varennikov, The Assooat- faithful to my motherland bo- mgs." said Dr. Anthony Fauci Rovemmem 
over along weB-wom routes off ed Press reported. “It can only fore leaving for the front to the director of the U.&Na2ra£ rallioiL ouageten 


“Breakthrough findings 
don t time thonselves to coin- 
cide with international meet- 


said Dr, Ant 


is most common. And 
some wony that AZT-resistant 
strains of the virus wfll grow so 
dominant that tins treatment 
eventually wiQ.be worthless. 

In fact, if any theme emerged 
from the meeting, it was the 
need to go bade to basics by 
exploring the innermost work- 
wgs of the virus and the body's 
complex response to it 

The mw head of the U.S. 
«fice of AIDS Research said 
that would be the focus of re- 
sea «* for which the federal 


> * 


\ 


sity. In the United States, there 
are 5,591 university students for 
every 100,000 Americans; in 
Canada, 5,102. In Uganda, 
there are just 100 university stu- 


such as Kenya, all research 
must be approved by the office 
of the president, and research 
topics are often rejected on na- 
tional security grounds. 


. S. -!• 
: 


the mam road or to bribe their 
way past border gourds. But for 
the most part they have stopped 
going to Pakistan, and many 
now settle here In the desolate 


be seen as a blessing for similar 
coups in the future.” he said, 
“ana a dangerous precedent 
which would encourage such at- 
tempts." 


al Institute of Allergy and In- 
fectious Diseases. 


fight fascism. In August 1991 1 
confronted another enemy who 

wanted to destroy my mother- Bui m the fidd of AIDS. — « >— - 

land. I have no regrets about breakthroughs are rare in the KrB2? aK,is research,” 
what I did. months between international rj^rin^ 3 ™ ^ PauI taM the 


eoipne.that wflj drive 
<a * tire AIDS research enter- 




. \ 

-■ *m. 


LJ* \£f> 


■IVT 











S' 


• ** 



d tln-3 
in rui! 


. fi- 
ner i- 


in 





;-S<\ 


.... 

•v.i.-VjSL £% 


•Syt 

*w ;;. 
;■*> '■ 
rZM 
8&£ 


^.Zp: 


lil 


Jjj* ijj* 




, Vv 1 * 


International Herald Tribune , ; Friday, /^giar 72, /P04 


?c,ge 9 





THE TRIB INDEX: 115 .. 

IntemarttonaJ Herald Tribune World Stock Index ©, composed of 
280 internationally investabte stocks from 25 countries, compiled 
by Bloomberg Business News. Jan. 1, 1992 = 100. 

120 ' ; ' 



: ■ ’'Z jP * 


World Index 

S; r hT*J cio-ii.’. 1*5.52 
Previous.: 115.22 


150 


M A 

M 

j ! s • a 

.... 1894 

i Asia-Pacific t 


Cufope 1 

Approx, weighting; 32% 
Close; 133.15 Prsv_- 132.04 

n 

Approx, weighting: 37% EBB! 

doss: 11632 Prev- 11&58 Qg| 



150 


130 


M A M J J A 
1934 

M A 

M - J 

J A 
1994 



m 

Approx, weighting: 26% EHES 

Close: 93.71 Prayj 94.20 

Approx, wagftkig: 5% 
|CkHK 131.04 Aw- 132.44- 

BIBB 

-§§§! 

W L 




eJ 






M 


A 

1994 


M 


M 


A 

1994 


■- A 
i£ WoddWw 

™e irxftu metis US. tUbr wives at suck* ire Tokyo, New York. London, and 
Argentina, Australia, Austria, Brig (urn, Brrnfl, Canada, Chita. Danmark, Fhtonct, 
Franco. Germany, Hong Kong, Italy, Mexico, Nethnhmds, New Zmtand, Norway, 
Singapore, Spabv Sweden, Swflzartand and Venezuela. . Aar Tokyo,. New York and 
London, tits ante* is composed ot The 20 top issues in terms ot market atftoBzatton, 
Otherwise the ten top stocks aretiacteed. 


1 Imhistrial Sectors | 


Thu. 

duo 

RDM. % 

dim. cfcaig* 


Hbl 

ClOM 

Pm: ' 
daw 

% 

change 

Energy 

112.83 

113.14 -0^7 

CapRalGoods 

117.63 

11727 

-0.03 

UHlilies 

12634 

125.48 tO.69 

ftwHOofah 

131.72 

131.38 

+026 

finance 

118.05 

11728 h-0-66 

Conemner Goods 

101.89 

101.43 

■*026 ' 

Services 

120.78 

120.79 -0.02 

Usceflannos 

132.15 

13236 

^0.16 

For more information about the index, a bookkdiaavaSabto tree charge. 

Write to Trib index, 181 Ave/Hie Charles da GauBe, 325S1 NeuSy Codex. France. 


Quiet Boom in Minus Gerais 

Brazilian Slate Now a Growth Leader 


By James Brooke 

,Vw Yer* Times Savin 

BETIM. Brazil — Assem- 
bly lines are running three 
shifts a day to propel Fiat 
Auiomovds SA past Ford 
Motor Co. and General Mo- 
tors Corp. as Brazil's second- 
largest carmaker. 

Smaller only than Volks- 
wagen AG in Brazil, Fiat rep- 
resents the flashy face of a 
lesser-known region that is 
quietly enjoying the highest 
industrial growth in South 
America. 

Along a 300-mile (460-kiio- 
meter) inland corridor link- 
ing the states of Minas Gerais 
and Sao Paulo, industrial ac- 
tivity is expanding at 10 per- 
cent a year, a pace seldom 
seen anywhere today outside 
coastal China. 

“This will be the main 
plant for producing Fiat's 
new world car," said Padfico 
Paoli, chief executive of the 
subsidiary. Betim is about 20 
miles west of the state capital 
of Belo Horizonte. 

Fiat of Brazil, already the 
Italian automaker's largest 
subsidiary, is investing SI bil- 
lion in expanding the plant 
here — four times the parent 
company's planned invest- 
ment at all other Fiat plants. 

This industrial surge has 
driven Minas Gerais past Rio 


dc Janeiro to become Brazil's 
No. 2 state economy, after 
that of Sao Paulo. 

Minas Gerais may be little 
known outside South Ameri- 
ca, yet its $4G billion econo- 
my and its 16 million people 
are comparable to the econo- 
my and population of Chile. 

U.S. investment has lagged 
behind that of Europeans. 


AStortte*: 
-:£tas#A' : 



Sr. 


NYT 

Even so, the score of Ameri- 
can corporations already op- 
erating in Minas Germs in- 
clude Alcoa, Cargill, General 
Electric, TRW Automotive 
and Union Carbide. 

Citibank and Bank of Bos- 
ton have offices in Belo Hori- 
zonte. American Airlines will 
inaugurate daily service be- 
tween Miami and Belo Hori- 
zonte in December. 


“It's a state the size of 
France, with an expanding 
economy " said Geoffrey H. 
Walser, a U.S. Commerce 
Department official in SSo 
Paulo. 

Underlying the state's 
growth is its longtime status 
as Brazil's mining and steel 
center. Minas Gerais, which 
means General Mines in Por- 
tuguese, produces 77 percent 
of the nation's iron ore. Nine 
privately run plants produce 
41 percent of the stedL 
While strikes close auto 

S lants around SSo Paulo per- 
aps once a year. Fiat has not 
had a strike hare in a decade. 

In March, a French-Brazil- 
ian group started to assemble 
JPX four-wheel- drive vehi- 
cles in Pouso Alegre. Tbe ve- 
hicle, which Peugeot sells in 
France, is produced with a 
Brazilian body and an im- 
ported Peugeot engine and 
transmission. The venture in- 
tends next year to make pick- 
ups and station wagons. 

The transportation bottle- 
neck is so bad that companies 
allot 24 hours for a tractor- 
trailer to go the 281 miles 
between Belo Horizonte and 
Sao Paulo. Six months ago, 
ground was broken on a $750 
million project to expand the 
road to four lanes, which 
could result in as much as 5)0 
billion in new investments 
along the corridor. 


Reed Elsevier and Philips 
Look for Acquisitions 
In U.S. Media Industry 


Compiled In Our Staff Fmtt Dispatches 

EINDHOVEN, Netherlands — Against a 
backdrop of American success in media enter- 
prises and a weak dollar, two big companies with 
Dutch roots said Thursday that they were look- 
ing for acquisitions in ihe United States. 

Along with favorable first- half earnings results 
that reflected an end to recession in Europe, 
Philips Electronics NV and Reed Elsevier PLC 
said they were seeking to add American software 
companies to their holdings. Other European 
companies also reported good earnings. (Page 11} 

The appetite for acquisitions is part of a trend 
toward consolidation in several industries, in- 
cluding those associated with the delivery sys- 
tems and data that comprise the information 
superhighway. B ankin g, defense and health care 
are other industries in which companies are join- 
ing, with a common element being the desire to 
increase competitiveness by amalgamating assets 
that have the potential to work well together. 

Meanwhile, with the dollar having weakened 
this year against major European currencies, 
American companies could be seen as bargains 
when compared with similar assets elsewhere. 

Reed Elsevier, a joint venture of the publishers 
Reed International PLC of Britain ana Elsevier 
NV of the Netherlands, said it had approached 
financial advisers of Mead Data Corp. and Ziff 
Communications Co. about buying the compa- 
nies. Ziff, a magazine publisher, has reportedly 
been put up for sale by the Ziff family, while Mead 
has said it was seeking a buyer for Mead Data 
Central Inc., a subsidiary that nuts tbe Nexis and 

See REED, Page 11 


Rising Coffee and Gas Prices Push Up U.S. Index 


etamnuimlHanidTribwa 


Compiled bp Ottr Staff From Dispatcher 

WASHINGTON — A sur^e in 
coffee prices and the largest gain in 
gasoline prices in almost four years 
fueled a 0 l 5 percent increase in 
wholesale prices in July, the govern- 
ment said Thursday. 

UJ>. retail sales, meanwhile, fell 
0.1 percent in July, marking the first 
decline in three months, tbe Com- 
merce Department said. 

The overall increase in the July 
producer price index was the largest 
since a similar gain in April 1993, a 
Labor Department spokeswoman 


said. But the core rate of the index, 
which excludes volatile food and 
energy costs, rose just 0.1 percent. 

“The headline number makes 
one's hair stand on end," said Rob- 
ert Dederick. chief economist at 
Northern Trust Co. in Chicago. 
“But the core rate suggests inflation 
remains capped in the bottle." 

For the first seven months of the 
year, wholesale price inflation was 
naming at a 22 percent annual rate, 
compared with 1.7 percent in the 
same period a year earlier and 0.2 
percent for ail of 1993. 


Alan Greenspan, chairman of the 
Federal Reserve Board, told Con- 
gress Wednesday the central bank 
had been placing less reliance on 
traditional inflation indicators such 
as the producer price index in its 
interest rate-setting deliberations. 

Even so, the larger-than-expected 
wholesale price increase — along 
with evidence of rising wages, labor 
shortages and higher industrial ma- 
terials costs — is likely to cause the 
Fed tci raise interest rates a fifth 
time this year to cool the economy 
and control inflation, analysis said. 


“We still have a strong economy" 
with little inflation, said Carl Pa- 
lash. chief economist at MCM Mon- 
ey Watch in New York. Although 
July retail sales declined, sales for 
May and June were revised upward 
and labor markets remained stable, 
he said. 

The Labor Department said ini- 
tial claims for jobless benefits rose 
to a seasonally adjusted 321,000 in 
Che woek ended Saturday. The gov- 
ernment is to report consumer 
prices for July on Friday. 

(Bloomberg, A P) 


Microchip Demand 
Raises Philips Net 

Compiled by Oar Staff From Dispatcher 

EINDHOVEN, Netherlands — Philips Elec- 
tronics NV said second-quarter profit soared as 
stringent cost-cutting helped all divisions and 
rising global d eman d for microchips boosted 
operating income from semiconductors. 

Tbe Dutch electronics giant was also helped 
by lower losses in Germany and better sales of 
televisions and components, partly because of 
the World Cup soccer tournament in the United 
Stales. Consumers in many of Philips's markets, 
notably Brazil, bought television sets because of 
the sports event. 

Profit from operations soared to 402 million 
guilders (5227 million} from 1 17 million guilders 
a year earlier, although net profit was down 
because of a one-time gain of 1.1 billion guilders 
in the year-earlier period. 

Second-quarter sales rose 6 percent, to 14 JO 
billion guilders from 13.49 billion guilders. 

Profit was supported by higher sales of con- 
sumer electronics goods and semiconductors, but 
the Professional Products & Systems unit contin- 
ued to show weakness. 

The consumer electronics division had a profit 
in the 1994 first half for the first time since 1991. 

The other big improvement came in semicon- 
ductors and components, where operating profit 
jumped to 328 million guilders from 248 million 
guilders a year earlier. 

Buoyed by economic recovery in Europe and 
strong demand in Asia and the Americas, Philips 
said it was more confident about business 
prospects. 

“There is reason to believe that this year's 
performance in terms of net income from normal 
business operations wfl] be substantially better 
than last year," it said. 

The Dutch group, which devised the compact 
disk and the audio tape, has for y ears had trouble 
profiting from its inventions while nimbler com- 
petitors thrived. 

After big losses in 1990 and 1992 it returned 
to a modest profit in 1993, aided by big cuts in 
debt and unproved cash management. 

“We are now moving out of the restructuring 
phase and into the revitalization phase. The huge 
amounts of money set aside to restructure the 
company are demonstrating their impact," said 
Dudley Eustace, finance director. 

(Reuters. Bloomberg, A?) 


WALL STREET WATCH 


Rocky Start for China ADR 


By Laurence Zuckerman 

New York Tima. Sernce 

N EW YORK — China, one of the 
world’s fastest-growing economies, 
is badly in need of more electricity, 
Its total output of 181 million kilo- 
watts is already 20 percent less than its de- 
mand, which is expected to grow by 17 mil- 
lion kilowatts a year for at least five years. 
Why, then, have American depositary re- 
ceipts for shares of Shandong Huaneng Pow- 
er Development Co„ which operates three 
power stations in China's second-fastest- 
growing province, been selling for less -than 
their offering price since they began trading 
on the NewYork Stock Exchange last week? 

Tbe answer reveals as much about China’s 
bid to attract international financing for its 
modernization as it does about Wall Street's 
desire to attract listings from China: The 
concerns of the investors who put up the 
money seem to have been overlooked, forgot: 
ten or lost between those two drives. 

Shandong Huaneng*s poor showing could 
damage China's efforts to raise money for 
infrastructure by lowering prices of- future 
initial share offerings. 

Shandong Huaneng’s rocky debut may also 
deal a blow to China s efforts to raise money 
to improve its infrastructure. Three more 
power companies are expected to be listed m 
New York and Hong Kong in the coming 
months. Unless Shandong Huaneng begins to 
trade above its offering price, those issues 
may have to settle for lower prices. 

“You clearly have to take this into mind 
and probably price accordingly,” said Antho- 
ny Cragg, who manages two international 


funds for Strong/ Corneliuson Capital Man- 
agement Inc. “I can't see now how it could 
not have an impact." 

Doubts about Shandong Huaneng, which 
is the first Chinese utility to be listed overseas, 
developed soon after its stock opened Aug. 4. 

More than 14 nuffion ADRs — or 60 per- 
cent of the total offering — traded on the first 
day. . 

Each American Depositary Receipt repre- 
sents 30 class N shares, which are special 
<toIlar-denommated shares made available to 
American investors. 

Though the ADRs closed at $1425 each, 
the same as (he offering price, rumors that CS 
First Bostcm. tbe issue’s lead underwriter, was 
supporting the price dented investor confi- 
dence. 

The stock finished at 514 on its second day 
of trading, indicating to some fund managers 
that CS Fust Boston was no longer willing to 


prop it up. More investors bailed out. 

Shandong Huaneng A 
down as low as $13-50, 


ADRs then drifted 
where they closed 
Tuesday. On Thursday, the shares closed at 
$14, up 12.5 cents. 

CS First Boston said that it could not 
.comment on the slock, citing regulations pro- 
hibiting an underwriter from commenting 
publicly about one of its deals until 25 days 
after it begins trading. 

Several analysts blamed the stock's weak 
performance in part on the fact that Shan- 
dong Huaneng is a company created just for 
this deal so that the ADRs, representing 30 
' it of the company’s equity, could be 
in New York. Three Chinese state- 

See ADR, Page 10 


Lai Resigns 
As Chairman 


Of Giordano 

Bbomberj’ Businas bins 

HONG KONG — Jimmy 
Lai has resigned as chairman or 
Giordano Holdings a week af- 
ter China closed the clothing 
retailer's Beijing store in appar- 
ent retribution for his criticism 
of the government. 

Mr. Lai resigned from tbe 
company he founded in 1981 
without pressure from China or 
his board, said Jimmy Chan, 
executive director at Giordano. 
The resignation was effective 
Wednesday. 

Chinese authorities closed 
Giordano's recently opened 
Beijing outlet, citing incomplete 
licensing arrangements. The 
move was widely seen as retri- 
bution for an attack on Chinese 
Prime Minister Li Peng made 
by Mr. Lai in his popular Hong 
Kong weekly magazine. Next, 
about a month ago. 

Mr. Lau said he had taken 
over as chairman and split Mr. 
Lai's voting rights on his 36 
percent stake between two exec- 
utive directors, Jimmy Chan 
and Raymond Cheung Mr. Lai 
will remain a passive investor, 
Mr. Chan said. 

“It’s not a bad thing for Lai 
to leave, as he wants to focus his 
attention on the media busi- 
ness," Mr. Lau said. 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


ftn nl wanm 


Frankfurt 

UMfltat") 


Cross Rated 

% I ELM. 

1X8 tw rt® 

BjHB ».W?S S® 

1 » MB 

isw 

L&jM JK® C® 

1,59100 7A4U* l-®* 

LSfllB ^ 

itw gjc was 
MM# 1 SU# *US 
UU Z1SK USM 
ijb zees o«a 
in tom *«* 

IMS* M* ^ 

Closings In Amsterdam LU**n 

ores at 3 rum. ... r„h„v 

a: To buy one eovndj b. To bur 

w tillable. 

Values 

CWTWW Wf* 

are*****- 
KowtCtm** 

Huno. forte* 
mrffcjn rupee 3 1 -® 
ladft-rtJP*® atl, £V 

Iran* “2? 

iwteUsMK- UK 
Kawtotidksar 
Motoy.rw- U5rt 


as 

um 


Milan 
Hear Vorit (b) 
Peru 
Tatoro 
Toronto 
Zurich 
1 ECU 
ISM 


Aug. 11 

fj=. un nFi u. U. y« CS Paata 

U2I U n- US’ UN UWI* UM UBS 1 

2M"USK — SUMS Ufll 2U7 UWP 

saw w iM USB- uw ums* t.iai iw 
inw WM3 Z7» SMU M to 1UKS Tlttl 
mm 2 iin» jus mm rax* wn 
si <5 — am * ms vwin uju usug 

SJSS UBUO U51t 313* V3I3 JDM25 UBS 1SXS 

__ hot 1 1S517 oju* vast um* it. w uc* 

iua ur an uw jsji — net um 

usi o a»* us* «**• u® uj»* — 

ua im* on nw* — u»* un uw* 

4507 ima lisa wst mm r m taw 

1MH wto 2S71* <7.OT 1.7314 U*3*J ISO 1SSH* 

Haw Yu* end Zurich, AriAH In other centers; Toronto 


t Deposits 




Aug. 11 

D-Mark 

Swiss 

Franc 

Sterling 

French 

Franc 

Yen 

ECU 

4fc5 

4UHUt 

5 ArSl. 

5 W5 ■- 

3 1 -2 

5 •■■5 

47fc-S 



5 -4 % 

n-2*b 

5 ”--5 • : 



Ste-6 

5'V5»- 

2Vi-2»b 


5 *v6 v. 

4 •.**•*• 


6 4. 

2 

6 -4 - 


Dollar 

1 month 
3 minim 
i months 

l war 5V5*. 

Shmok; Haulers, UoydsBU*. 


Key Money Rates 


United Stntw 

(Mnwmtrato 


Close P rev. Britain 


m donor: •- IMta ef too; UQ.: natmetut: f/A: not 


^thar Dollar 
Peri 

taw 
0*32 
11.13 
ow 

5MC3 

LWW 
5206 


C u rren cy 
ArgwiCpew 
AMtTPLS 
Jtatr.lfiWi. 
BratUrecd 
enters* mon 
Cnca koruna 
Dnaun krone 
Earn- pound 

Flo. markka 


COTTMCV 

Mix. pen 

HigMfeaas 

Norw.krane 

Pt*L p*fO ” 

POftskxtaty 
PortewOe 
Ron. ruble 
Snoot rival ‘ 
5M0-I 


Perl 

syri 

I ACT 
4.W 
34. 1? 
23941 
HU* 
SWJM 
ITS 

1.855 


Currency Pori 
8. Air. man Lilts 
& Kar.weo 60426 
S«Kd. Krona 7-8478 
Taiwan J ' 2M* 

Thai bob* 2SM 
TUrUADro 31277. 
UARdirtMun U727 
VMtz-MUv. IWjOO 


s-aoani cos 

Comm- KverM day* 

wnonto Treasury OHi 
M*or Twasarr Ml 
Mmar Treason oat* 
5*enr Treasury Me 
Moor Treason 1 not* 
io*ear Treasury *om 


3Yi 


Beak bare rate 

514 

5W 

7*4 

7V. 

CaPmouT 

414 

4>4 

4K 

4h 

Unoatt taterteak 

5Vb 

5U. 

4.14 

416 

3-mwm lata-wnk 

Sfo 

5 ^ 

5.M 

5 M 

i-ntaMh teterteude 

6V* 

Sew 

433 

■U2 

TtywrCllt 

454 

459 

538 

123 

France 

1 intervention rat** 



6-3J 

7JB 

7JM 

736 

744 

i7» 

417 

4W 

4« 

751 

ITS 

400 

5.00 

Call nanny 


5>i 

i-wtwtti hiNrtoB* 


l*W 

JKnontti interbcMi 

5*. 

54 

Finontti teterpank 

S*-- 

SXb 

19-rear OAT 

740 

IM 


■Htonr 4Mav «Way 
127M . 1JS79S UHQ 
HUM lttU5 10022 


F o r w ar d Rat®* ^ 

.utn 4M*v ttktim Cmeacf 

Co turner IJW ConnotaaoNKr 

PMwdStarUM J-j*! JJSW Jooanweyen 

6 * vhB:heilw,rt 1J3M 1-K* u “ 7 

a¥rt “ ,rBW! . . . -J . u wpuua Bonn tBnssew.- B uko C ommtrtMa ItoBaoo 

Sources: INO w* ,A/ve Z^,> (Par an Bonk U Tokyo (Tatvol; Pont Bank ot Canada 
tram Peutors and AP. ■ 


■inn— 

^^^Snrtemk 


Lambert rate 

Gan many 

l -Bunin mnrtxx* 
S^BfiaOi urturb—k 
4b « Hi tal a ba n * 
«■ rear Band 


l*. 

iv. 

2v» 

3 V. 
?«. 
445 


1* 

2 

2Vk 
2 v« 
4 m 


LOO LOO 
5JB Ut& 
LOO LOO 
5 JO LOO 

SMS 5J» 
7.13 7 JO 


Sources: Reuters, Bloomberg, tnorrm 
LrrtcfL Beak of Tokyo. Commentoaak. 

GreemrcH Montagu, CretSr Lyonnais. 

Gold 

AM. PM. Ort» 

Zurich 377 JO 377 JJ — OJS 

London 376J0 377 JO — R7D 

HewYOfK 381 JO 384J0 +U0 

Wi dollars Per ounce. London etflckrtfi*- 
tnou Zurich ana New York apenAid and etas- 
limprteesf Mew York Coma* (DrcemoerJ 
Source: Peulam 


STATE HOLDINM COMPANY 


PUBLIC ANNOUNCEMENT 

Banque INDOSUEZ Hungary Ltd., as advisor, acting on behalf of the State 
Holding Company, is launching a two round open tender for the sale of a 
portion of the state-owned shares and is offering for subscription newly 

issued shares of the 


Hungarocamion International Road Transport Company Limited 

The capital structure of the Company as of 31st December 1993 is: (HUF thousand) 

registered capital: 5,230,000 

capital reserves: 4.115453 

retained earnings: 17.530 

balance sheet profit: -51 6,558 

The ownership structure of the company is: 

State Holding Company: 96.61% 

Municipalities 3.39% 

According to the Law LIII/1992 of Hungary 25% + 1 vote has to remain permanently in the 

possession of the State Holding Company. 

Shares on offer: 

■ eqiity shares, each of HUF 10,000 face value totalling HUF 2,615,010,000 and representing a 
50% + 1 voting ownership. 

■ Offers which do not cover the whole block of 50% + 1 shares will not be accepted. 

■ Newly issued shares. 

The State Holding Company will give preference to investors who are prepared to subscribe for 

at least HUF 1.5 billion of additional capita!. 

A detailed description oLthe conditions of the tenders egg be found in the respective tender 

documents. 

For further information .contact 

Banque Indosuez Hungary 


State Holding Company 


Name: 

Mr. istvan Salgo. Mr. Olivier Glunti 

Telephone: 

(361)266 54 56 - 266 83 53 - 266 80 90 

Fax: 

(361)266-5231 

Name: 

Peter Bddonfai 

Telephone: 

(361) 267-6600 

Fax: 

(361) 267-6673 

and 

Benedek Belecz 

Telephone: 

(361)267 6600 


Please note that an information memorandum and fender documents will only be made 
available against the payment of $500 and signature to a confidentiality letter. 

This document does not constitute of form an offer to sell or soScitotlon of any offer to purchase any securities and is 
not for distribution in tn© United States. The otter will be made by way ot invitation to tender only and no circulation of 
any prospectus or tender will be made tn the United kingdom. The tender documents are not available to private 
customers or to any Individual who Is not a professional investor or o representative of a corporate entity. 


srsKs 


1 




- i sjw=Mm?#»s?swoo n .n,p 0 oPQpn ? iBi V> .> J . 


i 

! 


Page 10 


IINTERIVATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 12, 1994 


** 


MARKET DIARY 


Wall Street Skids 
On Rate-Rise Fears 


Via Astaoated Pn»+ 


Aug 1> 


Bloomberg Business .Vnu 
NEW YORK — U.S. stocks 
fell Thursday, ending a three- 
day rally, after a report showing 
thai producer prices rose in July 
stoked concern that the Federal 
Reserve would raise interest 
rates next week. 

The Dow Jones industrial av- 
erage closed down 15.86 points. 


U.S. Stocks 


at 3,750.90, About 13 shares fell 
for every nine that rose. 

Trading was active, as 275.66 
million shares changed hands 
on the New York Stock Ex- 
change. down slightly from 
279.48 million Wednesday. 

Concern about higher rates 
was exacerbated by weak de- 
mand at the final leg of the 
Treasury's quarterly debt sale. 
The benchmark 30-year bond 
fell to the lowest price in nearly 
a month as the yield rose to 7.6S 
percent from 7.57 percent 
Wednesday. 

Dealers said that investors 
also would be closely watching 
the consumer price index for 
July, scheduled for release Fri- 
day. for further signs of whether 
the centra] bank might vote to 


raise interest rates a fifth time 
this year when its Federal Open 
Market Committee meets Tues- 
day. 

“The big talk of the street at 
the moment is that the Fed will 
raise the discount rate 50 basis 
points,’' said Kenneth Ducey, 
director of trading at BT Bro- 
kerage. 

Europe's first interest-rate in- 
creases in two years and a stag- 
gering dollar helped fuel bonds' 
decline. 

Among the sharper shifts. 
Gap surged 446 to 41 K after the 
clothing retailer's second-quar- 


ter earnings rose sharply. 
Zemex fell I W to 10 ‘4 after 


the industrial minerals and ma- 
terials company said it filed a 
statement to offer 2.25 million 
more shares of common stock. 

Trico Products soared 6 V 1 to 
53 amid speculation of a take- 
over and expectations of strong 
second-quarter earnings for the 
auto-pans maker. 

ECC International, a maker 
of computer-controlled training 
simulators, saw its shares jump 
1% to 14% after it said earnings 
for its fourth quarter rose to 24 
cents a share from 4 cents a 
share a year earlier. 


The Dow 


Daily closings of the 
Dow Jones industrial average 



3500 


F Iff A M J J A 
1994 


Dow Jonas Averages 


open HWi low Lur o«. 


Indus 3746.12 3773J6 373673 37S0.TO — 11B4 
Trora 1404.03 140&B? 1M6J7 1S9XJ19 — 11J0 
UN 190.63 180-53 166.99 107.43 —1.71 

cams 1301.74 7 310.53 1204.74 I301J5 —743 


Standard A Poor’s Indexes 


NYSE Most Actives 


TefMex 

EwnWlh n 

Compaq 5 

Mercy 

Got 

MicrTcs 

UCarb 

Rrti 

GenOl 

IBM 

PTTAinrt 
Ofl tea 
GTE 
UoMin 
Ha usinrs 


VoL HWl 

Low 

Lost 

Ota. 

38455 A3W 

42>v 

43*4 

-•A 


20V, 

»v. 


33464 35*+ 

34 'V 

35 

— V* 

31334 32*4 

31*4 

32 

—’8 

26382 41 *4 

37*4 

41 

-4*4 

r i 

41*4 

42*4 

• V, 


33*4 

33*4 

*+* 

24445 XU* 

2+*4 

29*4 

— *4 

24138 4S'« 

47 V* 

47*4 

— *4 

23758 44*4 

43*4 

M* 4 

-*4 

22544 >'n 

Via 

I'm 

— Vm 

31203 27 

261(4 

2av> 

—V, 

19399 33 

32+4 

32*4 


18989 36V, 

344. 

35*4 

_n 

10473 37* • 

34*4 

37 

-3 


industrial, 
Tran sp. 
Utilities 
Finance 

SP 500 
SP 100 


Hion Law Clou Otye 
SPJO m* SWB-175 
36S34 3W83 38149 —13* 
16024 75057 >57.44 —042 
45J1 44.71 45J8-OU7 
46141 4S6JB 45088 — 142 
42040 42034 423.92 — U0 


NYSE Indexes 


High low urat Cha. 


Composite 

industrials 

Transa 

ut®tv 


75456 257.50 25131 —089 
31488 311.43 31247 —187 
345.60 24384 343.94 — 1JD 
372.25 21033 31183 — OJB 
21134 1I1.9« 31789 — 0 M 


NASDAQ Indexes 


Kali Law Lai Gig. 


Composite 

Industrials 

Banks 

insurance 

Finance 

Tramp. 


73184 72528 73825 -0.15 
730.74 725J9 72680 —188 

773.13 77004 77136 —089 

709.14 90132 707.14 + 586 
94653 94133 9*4.33 —187 
72184 71487 71782 —488 


AMEX Stock Index 


NASDAQ Most Actives 


RATES: Sweden and Italy Move 


Continued from Page 1 

interest rates remained un- 
changed by the events on 
Thursday. In the United States, 
the Federal Reserve's rate-set- 
ting Open Market Committee 
was scheduled to meet Tuesday. 
That meeting was expected to 
produce another rise in interest 


Foreign Exchange 


rates in a process that began 
with what was widely billed as a 
preemptive strike against infla- 
tion on Feb. 4. 

Statistics released Thursday 
showing a surprisingly strong 
0J percent rise in producer 
prices in July only added to the 
pressure on the Fed. 

In Sweden, the Riksbank 
governor. Urban Baecksiron. 
was careful to paint his move in 
similarly preemptive colors. He 
said that the bank had moved at 
“an early stage to counter a ten- 
dency to increased inflation." 

Analysts pointed to a weak 
krona as the key culprit. They 
noted that the weakness of the 


To our rea ders m Lu xembourg 

It’s never been easier to subscribe 
and save. Just caB toft-bee: 

0 800 2703 


currency had created an export 
boom and at the same time add- 
ed to inflation by driving up the 
cost of imports. 

Underlying the weakness in 
the Swedish currency have been 
growing concerns about the im- 
mense size of the government's 
budget deficit. Last year it 
stood at 13 percent of gross do- 
mestic product, the highest is 
Europe. 

■ Rate Rises Press Dollar 

The dollar tumbled against 
most other major currencies 
Thursday after interest-rate in- 
creases in Italy and Sweden 
convinced investors that Euro- 
pean rate cuts had come to an 
end. Bloomberg Business News 
reported. 

'flie dollar's loss against the 
Deutsche mark came amid ex- 
pectations that Germany would 
be the next to raise its interest 
rates. 

The dollar dosed in New 
York at 1 .5600 DM, down from 
1.5844 DM on Wednesday, and 
at 101.125 yen. down "from 
101.425 yen. .. 

The dollar also fell to 1.3130 
Swiss francs from 1.3370 francs 
and to 5.3550 French francs 
from 5.4245 francs. The British 
pound finished at $1.5473. up 
from $1-5373. 


Intel 

MCI 

Micsfts 

Sybase s 

LOOS 3 

Lotus 

EricT ADD 

Me many 

MLFBC 

OenCorr 

AptXeC 

Novell 

Seagate 

BosiChck 

T«HCmA 


VoL 

HWl 

LOW 

UW 

52649 61 'M 

59*4 

60*4 


II V» 

21*4 


56 

53*4 

55*4 


44 . 

41*4 

43’Vi* 

‘z-h 

22% 

20V, 

22 


42 V. 

39 ‘A 

41*4 

■il j 

1*. 

1*4 

HV„ 


16V* 

1 S*/w 

I5*V 


16 

I5V4 

16 


34 

314 

33 

24603 35*4 

33*4 

34Vu 


15*4 

IS 

lWu 


27*4 

25?4 

21 

v. tr • 1 - 

37 

37 


2314 

22*4 

22’/* 


a*. 

-ta 

— 'Vi. 
- 1 Vi 

-1116s 

-1 

— V B 


+ «.■„ 
— T 
— 1H 

—Vo 


AMEX Most Actives 



VoL 

HlPtl 

Law 

Lost 

am. 

IvaxCP 

9074 

19 V+ 

10 V* 

19 

'** 

ctwvsns 

8378 

9*4 

9*4 

9*4 

+ta 

SPOR 

8317 46 >V 

45 C/ h 

35W* 

— Vi. 

5 peel VS 

5749 

3 +i 

3>4 

3 V* 

+ *4 

Amdhl 

5337 

6*4 

6*4 

6*4 

... 

ViocB 

5291 

36*4 

36 

36 ’U 

— *4 

NY Tim 

4268 

24 V* 

23 "4 

2314 

— *4 

ChDevA 

3208 

2*4 

2 

TVS, 

— "u 

XCL. Ltd 

3012 

l’-e 

1*4 

Hi 


TWA vta 

2935 

W. 

IV.. 

IVu 

— *r H 


Market Sales 



Today 

Prev. 


Case 

cons. 

NYSE 

27586 

33625 

Amex 

16.94 

21.13 

Nasdoa 

29601 

32683 


HU Low Lett On. 

44A50 44386 44384 —071 


Dow Jones Bond Ave rages 


2D Bonn 
id utilities 
ID Industrials 


close am 

9783 —0.14 

9X93 +082 

10173 —DJI 


NYSE Diary 


Total Issues 
New Highs 
New Laws 


746 1IB6 

1381 941 

m 777 

2834 3654 

28 *7 

70 54 


AMEX Diary 


Cfew Prev. 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total Issues 
New Highs 
New Lows 


256 210 
277 168 
263 2*8 
BIS 826 


14 


]> 


15 


1* 


Previous NASDAQ Diary 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unch anged 
Total issues 
New Highs 
New lows 


dose 

1676 

1423 

1763 


1632 

1497 

1946 

5075 

S3 

87 


Spot Commodities 


Commodity Today 

Aluminum, lb 0855 

Coppw electrolytic. lb 1.12 

Iran FOB. Kan 21380 

.dtlb 038 

Silver, fray or 5.155 

Sled l scrap). Ion 11987 

Tin, lb 15353 

Zinc, lb 08623 


Prev. 

0855 

1.12 

21380 

OJB 

5.15 

11787 

15142 

04618 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


Metals 


ALUMI«UM£Wg f gr atfp) 


Close Previous 

AM Mi M A* 


Dalian per 

SsSt 1457-50 145880 144380 144480 

Forward UB5J0I 485JP W7QJ0 147180 

CORPS A CATHODES (High Grade) 

Dollars per metric toe 
Scot 2411* 24 14 JO 240230 240330 

Forward *»4» WMU» 241 MO 241180 

LEAD _ _ 

DBHm per metric ton 
Soot 553.H 55U0 H5J0 55630 

Forward 57780 57100 57480 57430 

NICKEL _ . 

OlHIws int mtlrtejtofl^ 

Spot 577080 578080 572580 573580 

Forward 305580 506580 5BT580 581100 

TIM 

Pollers per metric ton 
Soot 518080 518580 510580 511580 

Forward 525580 52610 0 518580 517080 

ZINC t Special HWr Grade) 

Datum per metric tea 

Spat 74480 74100 73180 73280 

Forward 76100 76980 75480 95580 


Financial 


MW* Low One Clww 
3+HONTH STERLING (L1FFE) 
OmON-PtSOfHOPCt 


Sea 

9A2S 

9*84 

94.13 

— 087 

Dec 

9389 

9323 

9385 

— Ml 

Mar 

9289 

92A4 

9X76 

— 606 

Jan 

9281 

9220 

9X28 

— OJOO 

Sep 

9281 

9185 

9187 

— OlO 

Dec 

9187 

9183 

918S 

— aw 

mar 

9184 

9IJ0 

9122 

— OlO 

Jm 

9180 

91.11 

91.12 

—aw 

Sep 

9TJJ2 

9082 

9093 

—on 

twe 

9085 

9U2 

W73 

—0.13 

Mar 

Jon 

55 

9061 

90JD 

9063 

9089 

— 610 
— 0.T2 

Est. volume: 67880. Opan 

kit,: 54X361. 



High 

Law 

Last 

Seme Chile 

Feb 


16675 

>6580 

16450 — 025 



16X75 

16380 

UIDO awAM 


16280 

14280 

w 

16625 —025 

May 

N.T. 

N.T. 

16080 —350 

Jane 

159JS 

15075 

15675 

15675 -080 


Est. volume: 11825. Open lid. 107,70 


BRENT CRUDE OIL CIPE) 

US. dellan per barreHeh of 1800 barret* 


Sap 

1782 

1786 

1789 

1789 

—MB 

oct 

>787 

1789 

1789 

17J2 

uti 

Nev 

>785 

1782 

1782 

T783 

— 027 

Dec 

1784 

17.15 

17.16 

17.16 

— 021 

Jem 

1786 

1784 

1784 

1784 

—026 

Feb 

1780 

1782 

1782 

1095 

-026 

Mar 

1697 

I6lM 

10# 

1090 

-083 

Apt 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1684 

—021 

MOV 

N-T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1681 

— 623 

Jm 

N.T, 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1078 

—023 

Jftt 

N.T. 

N.T, 

N.T. 

1076 

—023 

Aug 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1076 

-083 


EsL volume: 32834 . Open bit. 171860 


Stock Indexes 


i mm, aase mmBi 


M60NTH EURODOLLARS (UPFEJ 
Cl mllllan-ptseneopa 


Sep 

M86 

9486 

3484 

+ 081 

DOC 

94.14 

94.14 

94.11 

+ 002 

Mar 

N.T. 

N.T. 

9185 

+ 682 

Jua 

N.T. 

N.T. 

93.52 

+ 601 

Sep 

N.T. 

N.T. 

9X25 

+ 602 


HWl 

FTSE Me (LJFFE) 

IS per Index poM 
Sep 31010 31218 31468 -210 

Dec 31768 31483 3157.5 —308 

Mar N.T. N.T. 31773 — 260 

EsL volume: 17881 open ML: SOM. 
CAC40 (MATIF) 

FP2M per Index paler 

Ana 206600 204080 20080 — 3380 

Sep ZBTXOO MU9J0 305050 — 3X00 

Oct 207780 mlm 205730 . - 

Dec 211600 711680 207780 — 3380 

Mar 210980 210780 210680 — 3330 

Est. volume: 21141 Open ML: 63,121 


Sources: Motif, Associated Press, 
London Inti Financial Futures Bidiaam 
Inti Petroleum Excharme. 


u . S ./ATTI«CU5it 




Alaska turv Assesses Exxon Corp 



i 1 *i 
I l* 




than the $895 mU Uon that .nog 

for .the fishermen had sought, buj jj* * 

ma ximum tha t Exxon had contended it should p®, 

Tesuliing from America’s largest oil spflL . ' <ard cou [cf 

Attorneys for the fishermen had • J^g£ on foie next 


Hi 


rvumucys iw uic _ n : n +H** peXL 


Eat volume: A Open lut- 61 
MAOMTH EUROMARKS (LIPFB) 
DMI mblton-PMof WOpd 
SW 
Oec 


Jua 


Job 


95.10 

9484 

9580 

— 688 

9489 

9478 

9485 

—611 

9472 

NA 

9485 

— 613 

9489 

94.15 

9421 

—aw 

94.10 

9389 

9X93 

—614 

9X83 

93A5 

9387 

—613 

%% 

9387 

9387 

9386 

9320 

— 6.15 

— 616 

9329 

9X15 

9X12 

— 014 

93.14 

9X99 

9X92 

— 014 

9194 

9X85 

9X79 

— 014 

9X81 

9X70 

9286 

—014 


EsL volume: 201407. Open mt: 787791. 


3-MONTH PI BOR (MATIF) 



FFS ituBloa 

- ptIDf 188 Bd 



Sep 

9487 

9423 

9426 


Dec 

94.10 

9381 

9193 

—O10 

Mar 

9382 

9342 

9X66 

—089 


9X54 

932S 

9139 

— 610 


93L33 

9X11 

9X14 

—015 

Dec 

9389 

9X86 

9X90 

—015 

Mm- 

9X92 

9X69 

1X74 

—on 

Jon 

9X79 

9X54 

9X57 

—Oil 


Est. volume: 67807. Open InL: 171/401 


LONG GILT IUFFE) 
cS&Mi - pis & 32Mts of 110 1 


Sep HE- 17 10046 100-17 — 142 

Dec loz-oo 101-20 ioiha — 1-22 

Est volume: 71.764. open ML: 117825. 
GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND (UPPE) 
DM 25MM-M1 Of H6 PCI 

TUX) 91 JO 7186 —1.14 

Dec 92.10 9077 VQ83 — 1.T6 

EsL vatome: 160856 Open tatT 167/07. 
H-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MATIPJ 
PFmne-pHat w pet 

11688 1U82 11686 — 086 

115.16 114.00 11*80 —066 

■ 11436 11140 11X50 — 4U6 

Jan N.T. N.T. 11272 —066 

Esi. volume: 171140. Open ML: 120457. 


Industrials 


HM Lew Loaf Settle arae 
GASOIL (IPE3 

UJL donors per metrtc toa-tots efiee Ians 

15675 15580 15580 15X25 — 180 
Oct 19975 15050 15X73 15X75 — ATS 

NOV 16280 16125 14125 16125 —073 

DK 16425 16380 16X25 16380 — 075 

16380 14473 16425 16473 —030 


Dividends 


Par AJnf Par Roc 


INCREASED 


Central Va Bnlcstm . .15 047 9-15 

MDU Res Grp O AO 1-B ID-1 

Manufactured Home Q 2873 M0 10-14 

RU Carp 3 .15 9-30 10-15 

state AMD Flnl Q 85 74 MO 


INITIAL 


Starran Hauunp 

CORRECTION 


_ JB62S 8-22 182 


CMcarp adlpf H C .133 S-16 8-31 

c -correcting InHM payment repo rt ed Aug 
lHHv 


LIQUIDATING 
CatumWa RlEsftnv d 
d-10/40 a share, record and pay date an- 
nounced. 

REGULAR 


ABS Induet 
Allied Cot Cp 


Allegheny Ludlwn 

iflcmca Carp 


Avcmco I 
BtancarpNJ 
Betz Labs 

Dlocraft iris 

Brock Candy On 
Codimn Commun 


carpenter Tech Cp 
Cubic Carp 


Cora 

Eastern Co 
Farm Secur 
Frozen Fend 
Gen Housewares 
Hun no lord Bras 
Haenlg Group 
ID EX II Flex Inca 
IDCX Inca Phis 
IRTPrapartv 
lilbiovacorp 
instronCarp 
Core 
NatlC 


Lincoln Natl Cp 
P ioneer fim 
B ears Roebuck 
Spelllna EntGrp 
SrtwiDraM 
Storage Equities 
Storage Prop 
Trk» Bnahn 
uraro Shopping 
WorlttaR BUM Cp 


3 85 7-15 10-3 

20 7-16 730 
G .12 Ml M0 

§ J 1 730 1825 
JO 7-1 7-15 
Q 26 1847 > 1-10 
A .10 10-18 11-22 
O 84 824 77 

0 -85 8-17 .72 

Q AO 8-23 71 

3 JaS 717 8-31 
Q .115 S-S 715 
M 873 825 715 
0 83 824 71 

8 88 716 730 

873 79 722 

Q 825 716 730 
M 853 8-12 810 
M 866 712 8-10 
Q 21 822 71 

Q 20 18-10 11-1 
0 83 72 739 

Q m 9-1 715 
O 81 1710 11-1 
_ 85 722 *29 

Q /40 8-31 1 H 
Q 82 821 76 

83 842 


O 21 715-720 

Q 87 730 10-14 

Q .10 710 7S0 

Q 87 722 77 

a .is m va 


ment t i w o-nuurterty; : 


_ priper- 

ty owners and others, are seeking* $15 billion. 

Southwestern and McCaw in Talks • 

SAN ANTONIO, Texas CBloomberg) — ^^ik>ns Inc 
Corp. is negotiating with McCaw Cellular ^ ora ?'^ iar t j,e 
about theircdlular operations, a perean familiar win me 

cellular compamesrush 

hopes of providing nationwide services. The two compan . 

total of more than 5 milli on customers- 

^BeDAtotic Corp. and Nyn^Cotp- have said dw.wffl comtnne 
their wireless operations, while U S West Inc. and AirTouch have 
said they will combine their domestic cellular operations. 

Neutrogena Surges on Buyout Talk 

LOS ANGELES (Bloomberg) — Neutrogena Ccnp. shares rose 
more than 20 percent Thursday after the company announced late 
Wednesday that it was in discussions with a larger company that 

was interested in buying it. ' 1 „ c r . 

Neutrogena “is a chronic underperformer, said Scott Graham, 
a research official at Opp enh e im cr & Co. 

and NestlS SA- He added that he didn’t believe a bidding wai 
would erupt for the maker of specialty personal-care products. 
Neutrogena shares rose $4,875 to $26-50 in over-the-counter 
trading. ' 

Lac Board Shuns New Royal Oak Bid 

TORONTO (Bloomberg) — The board of Lac Minerals Ltd. 
recommended Thursday that shareholders reject a revised 2.4 
billion Canadian dollar ($2 billion) cash-and-share buyout bid 
from Royal Oak Mines Inc. ' . , 

Royal Oak increased its buyout offer Monday to either 5 
tTanartian dollars and two of its shares or 2.87 of its shares for each 
Lac share. The new offer is valued at about $16 JO a share, Th6 
company previously offered to pay 3.75 dollars and 1-75 shares for 
Lac. 

T jflg fTiairman James Pitblado said the board rejected the 
revised offer because of the “highly uncertain value" of Royal 
Oak’s shares and the high debt the new company would have. 1 




ADR: Hunger for Listings Lies Behind China Povoer-Plant Issue’s Struggle 


Heal’ Money Lowers Brazil Inflation : 

SAO PAULO (Bloomberg) — Brazil’s plan to curb inflation, 
based on the creation of a new currency, is working, according to 
an economist at Brazil's Institute for Economic Studies. 

- BraaTs new . currency, the real, is its fifth cunency in eight 
years. It entered circulation July 1. Monthly inflation fell to 6.95 
p er c en t in July from 50.75 percent in June. 

Inflation over a 30-day period ending in the first week of 
August slowed 1.27 percentage points .to 5.68 percent, said Juare£ 
Rizzieri, chief of Inflation studies at the institute. Inflation is likely 
to slow to about 4 percent next week and could register less than 2 
percent for August, Mr. Rizzieri said. 


Continued on Page 9 , 

owned companies own the oth- 
er 70 percent in the form of A 
shares, which are not yet openly 
traded in China. 

“The company wasn’t really 
a company,” said Sheldon 
Kasowitz. a utility analyst and 
director at Jardine Fleming 
Asia Research Ltd. in Hong 
Kong. "It was just a bunch of 
discrete plants that they tied a 
bow around and wrote a pro- 
spectus on." 


Mr. Kasowitz and other 
Hong Kong-based analysts 
have also charged that the New 
York Stock Exchange and 1 the 
Securities and Exchange Com- 
mission relaxed their listing 
standards for Shandong Huan- 
eng because they wanted more 
Chinese companies to come to 
New York. 

For example, the SEC only 
required the company to pro- 
vide one year's worth of audited 
accounts. In Hong Kong, which 


is competing with New York 
for Chinese listings, regulators 
require three years of audited 
accounts. 

Officials from both the SEC 
and the NYSE said that the 
company got no special treat- 
ment. The New York exchange 
said it had received one year of 
audited accounts and two addi- 
tional years of pro-forma ac- 
counts. 

The SEC said examining more 
than a single year's accounts 


would have been irrelevant be- 
cause the power stations were 
operating within state-owned 
entities. 

"We feel that we got the kind 
of disclosure that was relevant 
given the kind of environment 
in which this company existed,” 
Robert Bay less, associate direc- 
tor of corporation finance at the 
SEC, said. 

But the problems with Shan- 
dong Huaneng are more funda- 
mental. analysts say. 


For the Record 


J percent 

second-quarter earnings, to $13 million from S31 million a yeqr 
earlier. (Bloom ber^t 

America West Airlines Inc said Its reorganization plan hail 
been confirmed by UJS. Bankruptcy Court, setting the stage for 
the airline’s emergence from bankruptcy. (Knight- Bidder) 
Gap lire, said its secorui-quarter eanungs rose 55 percennw 
$44.4 million in the three months ended July 30. compared with 
$28.7 million a year earlier.. (A Pi 

PepsiCo Inc and Starbucks Corp- said they had agreed to a 
partnership to develop ready-to-drmk coffee-based beverages. 

(Reuters) 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Agra* France Km Aug. 11 


Amsterdam 


ABN Amro HIO 60.90 6130 
ACF Holding 


Aegon 
AiMd 
Akzo Nobel 
AMEV 

Bols-Wenonm 
CSM 
DSM 
Elsevier 
Fotcker 
Gtst-Broatoes 
HBG 
Heine ken 
Haogovera 
Hunter Donate, 
l HC Colons 
Inter Mueller 
Inti Nederland 
KLM 
KNP BT 
KPN 
Nedltoyd 
Oce Grtnten 
Paktioed 
Phlltas 
Polygram 
gobeeo 
Rodamco 
Rollnco 

Rorenlo 

Royal DllltJi 
Stork 
Unilever 
Van Ommetwi 

VNU ... . 

Walters/ Kluwer 11830 120,10 

mstnav 


38 3820 

77.70 100 
4730 47^ 

22240 22330 
7X60 7430 
40 3730 
6730 68.10 
14530 144.10 

171.70 174 
16-30 16/0 

51 5OJ0 
29850 3M 
msi -rr?v\ 

8130 00 JO 

83 BOM 
4180 4120 
83 8250 

80.10 0130 
5330 5480 

4? 4920 
5(1 SD38 
7020 7130 
78 7B5D 

52.10 5220 
5730 55.90 

78 77.90 
11820 11730 

55.10 SS30 
12130 12040 

57.10 8780 

195.70 19670 
4830 4830 
19X88 19430 
5350 5230 

191 189.90 


i Prev. 


RWE 

Rnelnmetall 

Sown ns 

Siemens 

TNyssen 

Varla 

Veba 

VEW 

Vlag 

Volkswagen 
Wei la 

DAX Index : n: 

ESBiD 


445 442 

330 329 

941 741 

68330 686 
3183031430 
320 317 

5323053X50 
373 335 

49X7048720 
512 511 
10163 1007 


Helsinki 


Amer-Yhtyma 

124 

126 

Ema-G utzvlt 

43J0 

44 

Huhtamakl 

>68 

170 

K.GP. 

980 1020 

Kvmmene 

125 

128 

Metro 

174 

175 

Nokia 

490 

495 

Pan tala 

67 

67 

Reao la 

101 

HO 

Stockmann 

230 

222 

HEX Index : 185X70 
Previous : 1076.19 



Brussels 


AG Fin 

Almanli 

ArtMd 

Barca 

BBL 

Bckocrt 

CBR 

CM8 

CNF 

cockerin 

Cotmn 

Ceiruvt 

DHhalze 

Elect rabef 

Electrafhw 

GIB 

GBL 

Gevaert 

Glaverbrl 

ImmabeJ 

Kreonmjank 

Masane 

Patraflna 

Pewerfln 

Racttcei 

Ftovale Beige 

SocGen Baxme 


2570 2570 
NA 8000 
4800 4030 
2505 2465 
4400 4325 
26650 26BZS 
12175 12230 
2330 2530 
2130 2130 
203 300 

600(1 <mn 

7308 7290 
1288 1292 
5790 5860 
3320 3295 
1454 1464 
4245 4260 
7790 9730 
5100 5060 
M50 3060 
6910 6970 
I486 1492 
10425 imao 

3250 3263 
540 544 

5250 5340 
8390 


Soflno 
Sol wav 
Tes5enderto 
Troclebel 
UCB 

union Mlnlere 
wagons Llts 
Currant Steen Index : 7677.16 
Pravloas ; 76EUM 



Frankfurt 


AEG 

Alcatel SEL 
All, on/ Held 
Aliana 
Aske 

BA5F 
Boyer 

Bav. Hypo bank 
Bo/ /erefnsbk 
BBC 

BHF Bank 
BMW 

Comrnentxmk 
ContinMtol 
Dolmler Benz 
Deaussa 
Dt Babcock 
Deutsctie Bank 
Dowlas . . ... 

□resdner Bank J8230 38s 
PeUmuetiie iosjo 307 
F KrutM Haescti 22730224 30 


178181.70 
326 323 

2410 2427 
632 *33 

1035 1000 
J22.S0322.70 
3668036680 
403 410 

440 441 

7B0 770 

381 Jft« 
866 06150 

323 379 JO 
36824780 
82330 827 
__ 50030230 
2613076130 
70672150 
49? 490 


Harpener 
Henket 
Hochllef 
H aeet u t 
Haimarm 
Horten 
IWKA 
Kali Salt 
Karslodl 
KauiTmt 
KHD 


33733530 
590 594 

916 907 

351 34830 
856 860 
216 215 
388 364 

P38IJ930 
594 591 

£27 520 
13130 131 


Kioeckner WtrV.c 16130 1«L» 


Hong Kong 

Bk East Alto 32.10 3120 
Camay Pad lie I2J5 1235 
CtMuna Kong 38 3BJ0 
China LhFit Pirr 3B.70 3930 
Dairy Farm Inri 1135 1160 
Hang Lung Dev 14 14J5 
Hang Seng Bank 54.75 5530 
Henderson Land 3930 40.10 
HK Air Eng. 3BJ® 4130 

HK China Gas 14 JB 14JS 

HK Electric 2L3S 2335 

HK Lond 20.73 21 JH 

HK Realty Trust 21JS 21.10 


HSBC Moldings 9X50 9X25 
.... MJ0 ,135 


HKShangHHs 

HK Telecomm 15.9a 
HK Ferry 1560 1320 

Hutch Whampoa 3640 36M 
Hvnm Dev 2230 2X15 
Jardine Math. 64 6X25 
Jardine Sir Hid 2961 79.9V 
Kowloon Molar 14.90 15.1B 
Mandarin Orient 1030 10.40 
Miramar Hotel 2iM 21XD 
New WerW Dev 
SHK Props 
Stelux 

Swire Poca ... _ 

Talj pieung Pna 11 JO 11.15 
TVE 175 3JS 

Wharf Hold 31.70 3130 

WlngOnCalnrt II JO 1 7 80 
Wlnsar InCL 11 JO 1130 


2535 2580 
51 JS 51.W 
X16 130 
5975 6175 




Johannesburg 


AECI 
Aitech 
Anglo Amer 
Barlows 
Btyvoar 
Butte is 
De Boars 
Drletantein 
Gen cur 
GF&A 
Harmony 
hkhiveW steel 

KlOOt 

NMtMnk Grp 
Randlonleln 
Rusplat 
SA Brews 
SI Helena 
Sosof 

Western Dees 
Camp 
Prevli 


2430 2430 
120 118 
259 254 

3330 3330 
1075 1130 
46 45 

1203011930 
6930 *835 
1260 1130 
126 128 
2650 27^ 

62 61 
3X30 34 

4930 4975 
105 102 

8875 8830 

46 65 

32.75 
197 



Oou Prev 

GEC 

XM 

X87 

Gem Acc 

572 

581 

Glaxo 

625 

626 

Grand Met 

420 

42* 

GRE 

185 

I.W 

Guinness 

446 

447 

GUS 

582 

4/1 

Hanson 

287 

28/ 

Hlllsdawn 

180 

17a 

HSBC Hldm 

786 

775 

ICI 

080 

655 

Inchcape 

476 

475 

KlnBflsher 

522 

525 

Uxtnroke 

188 

170 


684 

675 



604 

Las mo 

184 

185 

Legal Gen Gra 

453 

486 

LtavdsBrok 

545 

584 


422 

420 

MEPC 

483 

4.75 

Non Power 

475 

482 

NatWest 

449 

488 

NttiWst Water 

520 

525 


643 

657 

P60 

687 

7 

Pilklnotan 

172 

173 


550 

450 

Prudential 

3JJ9 

110 

Rank Ora 

X94 

404 

Reck In Col 

605 

609 

Radfand 

529 

530 

Read Inti 

OJM 

625 

Reuters 

L93 

4.92 

RMC Group 

989 

9.97 

Ralls Royce 

2 

Z02 

Rottimn (unltj 

389 

383 

Royal Scat 

X92 

371 

RTZ 

672 

6/2 

Solnsbury 

4.16 

421 

Scot Newcas 

417 

523 

Soot Power 

X91 

370 


123 

123 

Severn Trent 

547 

580 

Shell 

7.17 

729 

Slebe 

615 

617 



189 

5mlthKHne B 


4J0 

Smith (WHJ 

483 

484 

Sun Alliance 

321 

XIS 

Tate O Lyle 


*41 

Tesco 

244 

243 

Thorn EMI 


1042 

Tomkins 

X36 

X37 

TSB Group 

XI! 

X13 

Unilever 

1028 

1032 

Utd Biscuits 

321 

133 

Vbdatone 

187 

1.91 

War Loro 3Vi 

4186 

4128 

Wei lea me 

672 

6» 

whitareod 


544 

Wllttams Hdgs 

672 

38* 

Willis Corroon 

184 

135 

F.T.38 Index :»msa 


FjT^^: 313020 


Madrid 


BBV 3115 3165 

Bco Central HISP. 2735 2780 
Banco Santander 5240 5380 


1« 


1135 1120 
3290 
2260 

6190 

178 186 

921 «1 

4130 4190 
3450 3545 
IBIS 1825 


Banesta 

CEPSA 

Draoadas 

Endesa 

Ercros 

Iberdrola 

Repeal 

Tabocalera 

Teletan lea 


Milan 


London 


Abbey Natl 

Utah 


Unde 
Lulihama 
MAN 

Marines rnann 

Mdallgesell 

Muencn Rueck 

Poriche 

Preuuag 

PWA 


974 920 

70530 TOG 
43743730 
447.8044330 
70630 707 
2910 2930 

840 848 

J8530 488 jFIsonj 
24? 3*4 .Fane 


Lyons 
Aria Wtoolns 
Argyll Group 
Ass Brit Feeds 
BAA 
BAe 

Bank Sat land 

Barclays 

Dau 

BAT 

BET 

Blue Circle 
BOC Group 
Bats 

Bawdier 

BP 

Brit Airways 
Bril Gas 
Bril Steel 
Bril Telecom 
BTR 

Cable Wire 
Cadbury Sdi 
Carodon 
Coats Vivella 
Comm Union 
CourtouHJs 
ECC Group 
Enterprise Oil 
Eurotunnel 


in 

560 

233 

230 

532 

4.95 

535 

137 

148 

53# 

4 n 

1.17 

3.17 

7.15 
5J7 
<61 
430 
474 
237 
167 
177 
332 
477 
460 

in 

2J2 

567 

570 

185 

4.15 
2.93 
1.45 
13* 


195 

290 

7.78 

532 

4.96 

105 

135 

564 

Sal 

473 

1.19 

122 

767 

575 


4.17 
475 
232 
164 
X81 
336 
4 M 
468 
106 
270 
566 
•.At 
118 
420 
3.10 


] ■« j CaseodM 
3-37 Dominion 


Banco Comm 
Bastogi 

Benetton Broun 

Clpa 

CIS 

Cred Hal 

Enlchetn 

Feriln 

Farfln Rlsn 

Flat SPA 

Finmeccanica 

Generali 

IFI 

IFIL 

I to kern 

■taigas 

iiaimablitore 

Mediobanca 

Montedison 

Olivetti 

Pirelli 

RAS 

Rlnascente 
Sol pern 



Son Paola Torino 9430 9585 
SIP 43oa 432J 

SME 3740 3780. 

SntO 2250 2300 

Slandd ^KC 36250 

Stel 4990 5100 

Toro Aisi Rise 26050 2MOO 


MIB index :mi 


Prevhws : 


Montreal 


AiCM Aluminum 33hi 3318 
Bonk Montreal 23W 341? 
Bell Canada 
Bambonner B 
Cambtor 


Dominion Te/t a 


4616 441* 

TO-.k 20 

irv, ip* 

6 N.r. 

V* 7 


Donohue A 
FCAinn 
MacMillan Bl 
Nall Bk Canada 
Power Cora. 

Proviso 

Quebec Tel 
Quebecar A 
Quebecer B 
Telcolabe 
video! ran 


Close Prev. 
I3-*. 1216 


4.10 4.15 
IV 19W 
9VS 9(6 
1W6 l?Ti 
5^ 6 

1918 19«4 
189. 18V8 
I8H IBM 
1998 1916 
1218 1718 
Industrial I Irtoex : 192229 
Previous : I9A87 


Paris 


Accor 669 672 

Air Llaukle 830 BZ8 

Alcolel Alsthom 623 634 

AjtO 25930 265 

Boncolre (Clel 48230 J91J0 
BIC 
BNP 

Bourpues 
Dononr 

Correhxir 

C.C.F. 

Cerus 
Qiargeurs 
Ciments Franc 
Club Med 
EH-Aaultalne 
Euro Disney 
Gen. Eaux 
Havas 

Imetal _ _ 

Lafarge Capper 430 JO 439 
Learand 6230 6480 

Lyon. Eaux 533 338 

OreallL') 1173 1195 

L.VJ9LH. 868 865 

Matro+tochette 11770 717JO 
Michel In B 2*4.10 249.no 
Moulinex 12630 T2SJ0 

Paribas 360 370 40 

Pcchiney Inti 165A0 mM 
Pernod- HI cant 34230 3*4 20 
Peugeot 851 862 

Ptnouii Print 940 927 

Ratiolectintaue 515 512 

Rh-Poulmc A 13970 I4IJH 


1290 1290 
236.1D 239 

648 647 

B* B47 
2060 2090 
71930 22X50 
11X40 H4.40 
1382 1390 
31531630 
40460 401.10 
41680 41X10 
1040 1050 
561 567 

46970 47050 
610 613 


CtoM Prev. 


Esselt e-A 
Handel sbanken 
investor B 


Norsk Hydra 
laAF 


Procardia AF 
(Sandvik B 
SCA-A 
S-E Broken 
SkandloF 
Skonika 
'SKF 
Stora 

Treileborg BF 
Volvo BF 


102 1D6 

TO 96 
171 177 

25950 26250 
118 118 
117 120 

111 117 

41.90 4*90 
IKS 114 
145 149 
148 153 

446 450 
va 103 
151 1SS 


«5 JESsr^y”"- 77 


Sydney 


Raft St. Louis 
Sanofi 

Salnl Gobain 
SEA 

SteGenerale 

Suez 

Tliomsan-CSF 

Total 

UJLP. 

voteo 


1588 1611 
953 959 

683 698 

550 543 

581 592 

259 JO 26120 
165 1/0J0 
327 JO 32750 
148 151 M 
29040 291 


Previous : 2064.1 


Sao Paulo 


Broca do Brasil 21 JO 2170 

Bonesoo 740 741 

Brodesca 770 775 

Brahma 2604)1 3S» 

Cemto 9450 9680 

Eletrobros 282 290 

Itou banco 230 230 

Ughl 316 315 

Paranapcnema 1630 16 

Pelrotaras 
Sauza Cruz 
Telebras 
Telesa 
Usiminas 
Vole Rio DOC* 

VUrlg 

gmsH IMei : 43837 
Prrvtom : <3132 


I2230122L50 
5350 5310 
45.40 *5J0 
419 425 

1.15 1.17 
116 119 

NJL 9530 


Singapore 


Cerabos 
CIlYDev. 

DBS 

Fraser Neove 
Gcntlng 
Golden Hope pi 
how Par 


8 
7.10 
1130 1130 
17.70 17 JO 
1330 1X40 
191 137 
ua xis 


Hume industries 630 630 


Ineftcpoe 
Kernel 
KL Kepang 
Lum Chang 
Matavan Banks 
OCBC foreign 
OUB 
O UE 

Sembowana 
Siungrila 
5lme Darby 
SIA foreign 
SDare Land 
Sltore Press 
Sing Slewnship 
5'pore Teiecamm 350 157 

Straits Trading 330 142 

UOB foreign 14.10 1330 

UOL 274 124 


635 680 
It 1060 
406 432 
1/49 149 
9.95 960 
1440 14-20 
675 670 
030 060 
11.10 1030 
575 570 
*78 442 
1330 1330 
730 776 
1630 1650 
436 40b 


Strolls Timg^indj : 238QJU 


Pnrvtarj ; 


Stockholm 


AGA 

67 

*730 

asm a 

«2 

631 

Astra A 

170 

169 

Alias Copco 

9430 

97 

sieciraiu* B 

380 

36* 

Ericsson 

404 

411 


Amcor 

9.20 

924 

ANZ 

486 

All 

BHP 

1934 

l*3t 

Bocal 

333 

xst 

Bougainville 

086 

an 

Coles Mver 

423 

42^ 

Comal eo 

475 

5 

CRA 

19.16 

I9.lt 

CSR 

489 

4JH 

Fosters Brew 

1.13 

1.12 

Goodman Reid 

141 

14* 

ICI Australia 

1120 

>123 

Magellan 

1.95 

1.95 

MINI 

XV8 

in 

Not A«s» Bonk 


11.11 

News Cora 

649 

687 

Nine Network 

434 

435 

N Broken Hill 

336 

33/ 

Pac DunlOP 

441 

*32 

Pioneer inn 

X02 

X98 


220 

3 23 

OCT Resources 

180 

135 


484 

481 

TNT 


245 

western Minton 

7 

720 

wntnac Banking 

<30 

43V 

woodswc 

476 

481 

a-:“ 


Tokyo 

Akal Elecir 
AsoM Chemical 
Asotd Glass 
Bank of Tokyo 
Bri d g es tone 
Canon 

Casta 

Dal Nippon Print I960 1930 
Dalwo House 1490 MHO 
Daiwa Securities 7610 1620 
Fanuc — — 


461 468 
771 772 

1200 1210 
1560 >560 
1620 1620 
1750 1730 
1280 1270 


Fuji Bank 

Full Photo 

FulltSU 
Hitachi 
Hitachi Cable 

Hondo 

I to Yokada 
Itochu 

Japan Airlines 
Knlhna 
Kama! Power 
Kmresakl Steel 
Klrtn Brewery 
Komatsu 
Kubota 

Kyocera 

Matsu Elec Inds 1770 1780 
Matsu Elec Wks 1130 1140 
Mitsubishi Bk 2630 2630 
Mitsubishi Kosel 
Mitsubishi Elec 
Mitsubishi Hev 


2330 2320 
2240 2280 
1880 1080 
1000 1020 
899 m 
1750 1740 
5370 5280 
717 720 

735 73J 

966 965 
2650 2630 
416 411 

1220 1230 


75 B 
7400 7440 


548 5*7 
696 694 
803 BID 


Mitsubishi Carp 1230 1230 


863 843 
814 BIS 
1060 IW 
1530 1550 
1240 1240 


372 JR 
666 661 
WM .783 


Mitsui and Co 
Mitsui Marine 
Minukosni 

Mitsumi 
NEC 

NGK HBUiotore 1070 10a 
Nlkko Securities TWO 1250 
Nippon Kosaku 1020 1030 
Nippon Oil 
Niaeon Steel 
Nippon Yusen 
Nissan 

Nomura Sec 

NTT 86100 

Olympus Ootkol 1180 1160 
Pioneer 
Rtoan 
Sanyo Elec 
Sharp 
StUflWZU 
ShlnetsuChem 
Sony 

SumHemo Bk 
Sumitomo Chem 
Sunil Marine 
Sumitomo Metal 
TatseiCorp 
TakidaChem 
TDK 
Tetlln 

Tokw Marine 
Tokyo EM Pw 


2810 Z85C 
971 976 
582 583 

1800 1810 
739 729 
2140 2130 
6000 5900 
2010 2030 
554 554 

933 9J3 

334 323 

673 66 5 

1340 1220 
4540 4470 
601 £2 
1240 1255 
3080 3050 


Taopon Printing 1510 IS 


Tarav ind. 
Toshiba 
Toyota 

Yamatahisec 

a: » too 

NlUtot 225: 28821 


772 


7 * 2190 


2190 _ 
BOB 8to 


CtoM Prev. 


Toronto 


AbtltbF Prtcr 
Aonico Eagle 
Afr Canada 
Alberta Energy 
Am Barrtck Res 
BCE 

Bk Neva 5cotk> 
BC Gas 
BC Telecom 
Bra mo lea 
Brunswick 
CAE 


ST" 


BC 

Canadian Pacific 
Can Hrv A 
Cantor 
Cara 

CCL ind B 
ClnepieK 
Coin Inca 
Commit Ejcof 
CSA Mat A 
Dofasco 
Dvlex A 

Echo Bav Mines 
Eaultv Sliver A 
fca inti 
Fed Ind A 


10W IBM 
I6tt 16*6 
m 7 

31*6 21*6 
30*6 30V. 
46*6 46*6 
25*1 26J6 
14*6 14*6 
25 2496 
435 4J0 
10 10 
7 7 

m 30*6 

22 22W. 

10V> 1116 
19*6 20 

335 3J5 
9*6 9*6 

ASS 21*4 
23Vi ZF+ 
10*4 UKt 
23V4 22% 


0J2 0A9 
15*6 15V6 


a a 

6*6 6*6 


Fletcher CMi A 1716 17*6 


FPI 
Gentro 
Gull coa Res 
Hees Inti 


6W 616 
MO *6 
5*6 6 

13 12*6 


HemloGU Mines 179* 12*6 


12W 12*6 
11*6 18*6 
25» 25*4 
35 3SW 
37 37*6 
29*6 29*6 
16M 16*6 
19*4 20 

am an* 
7Vr 7*6 
S2ta 53W 
11*6 1266 
23* 2391 
9*o 9*6 

2196 2194 
5 » 5*6 

25*6 25*6 
11*6 11*6 
IMS. 16*6 
46 46*6 




Holllnger 
Horsham 
Hudson's Bav 
Imasco 
Inca 

IPL Energy 
Jannock 
Labatf 
LoblawCo 
Mackenzie 
Magna Inti A 
Mo ole Leal 
Marttime 
Mark Res 
Molson A 
Noma Ind A 
Naranda Inc 
Noranda Forest 
Naroen Energy 
Ntlm Telecom 
Novo Cora 
Oshawa 
Pogurtn A 
Placer Dome 
Paco Petroleum 
P WA Car p 
Hayrack 
Renaissance 
Rogers B 

Rathnmra 
Rovai Bank Can 
Sceatra Res 
Scoffs Hosp 
S eaprwn 
Scan COn 
Shell Can 
Sherrm Gordon 
SHL Systamhse 
Sautham 

SgorArrasaoce 

Talisman Enera 29v> 2W6 
TKk B 2216 22*6 

Thomson 
Toronto Domn 
Tontar B 
TransaltaUlU 
TransCda Pipe 
Trtlan Flnl A 
Trtnwc 

UMcarp Energy 


U.S. FUTURES 


VnAmdaicdhw 


* * 


Season Season 
HWl Low 


Own Htah low One Cho OoJnt 


Grams 


Hf*T tenon S4»»eu mkvnwro- tahn perlxuta 
337V6 MS Sep 94 123V, X3916 133'A 346 tOJZfV 14J67 

109 Dec 94 X48ta 154 147*» 340*6 *043 35432 

X27 MorB 334*9 140 33496 3J7W t0U02*4 9J5D 

HftMrMavJ « 34095 334 X« 342 i08BV4 441 

XII JM« 133 UW X32 34519 *80216 1430 

Decto _ X4SV> tOJHV. 

Est. sales KA wed's. scSes 7JS9 
Wed's openW 61/422 up 166 


X65 

334*9 

34699 

147k, 


WI*AT (KBOT1 UHkimHn>m-A6nweiFW 
X0219SeaM X45 X49V9 145 


33599 

XU, 1129s Dec 94 15296 334 

3399s 3JS marts 353 336 

3/1999 3419>aMay95 144 148 

nw, 1169s jm 93 132 

U3 129 Sep 95 

Dec 95 

4.944 


148*9 *0JB 1X789 
XB 33496 *102 'A 17/481 


133 


Est sates ha. wetrs.i _ 
Wed' s Open tat 373M up 79 


33794 154V4*OJB96 
144 147 tOJHV. 451 

131 133*6 *001*6 401 

137 +002 

144 +0JB 


177 

23299 

185 

28519 

2J096 

143 

239*4 


19*6 
3*6 170 
2896 27*6 
91* VIA 
838 039 

15 15 

2894 2796 

II ^ 

28W 28*6 
1296 1296 
8*6 896 
4116 4714 
7*4 766 

44>A 4496 
I2H 12*6 
796 7 

14*6 1416 
14*6 1596 
8*6 896 


1596 15ki 
20*6 20*6 
24*6 24*6 
14 1494 
17 1796 
ADS 4.10 
1896 1896 
130 1JD 


CORN loon MV Bunenunum- dwn ht|mM 
1979* 114 SflO 94 11996 220*1 11496 119 -OJI094 HJ43 

117 Dec94 124 224*6 222V. 223W *00094 123JWS 

134 233*6 2J196 232*4*00096 2X455 

232V. Mov « 13996 11096 138 23f +000 I A KL951 

2J6WJUI95 24396 244V. 2429A 24396+00096 9445 

239 Sap 95 24494 245*6 24496 244*6 .Mb’* 443 

13596 Dec 95 246*6 147*9 244 24596 4.993 

287 JM94 23799 II 

Ettsrtes na wed's, tales 27,181 
Wed's ooan 68 210327 oil M47 
SOYBEANS icaon MHH»>tamiit-dganMrbta4 
7-35 Xn<*Aua94 5J7 5SO*6 5J7 58S96 +00294 X448 

iU195ep94 544 X74*6 545 171 99 +08296 14435 

HI HS H>. 543*6 +00096 73392 

XU Jar 95 547 ±7t 54499 5729b +0»k, 12J1I4 

X89 Mar 95 577*6 584 574*6 58199+080*6 4J44 

1759sMav75 584 5.9296 514 01896 +08096 X105 

57av.j|||« 588 5.96V* 587*9 092*6 +08196 0448 

579 Aug 95 09196 +000*6 141 

HL SwS 590*6+08196 34 

57B*6Nov9S 5.94*9 681 593 5.97 +002 1443 

Jul94 &J2 +002 

Est. tales NA Wed’s, solas I8J7S 
WtodtsooenW 122456 up 478 
SOYBEAN MEAL ICBCm mm-Mnwo. 

5380 17230 Aug 94 171M 17480 17240 17290 -OJO 4,733 

2W80 171 40 Sep 9* 17180 17290 171 JO 171 JO —030 19,173 

noaiotfw 17180 17250 170J0 170.70 — aso io.mo 

T72MD«:W 171 80 173-10 17130 17130 -040 31 J94 

171^ Jan 95 171U 17X80 17100 17220 -480 4JD0 

17100Mqr95 T7A» 175J0 17340 17190 -4.10 5^1B 

17480 Mov 95 17540 17430 175J0 175JB -- 1J0 3437 

1753BJU95 17730 17830 17630 17680 -040 1481 

1 70.00 Aug 95 17940 17980 170.00 17100 —180 125 

1765DSap9S_ 12880 T7>80 17880 17180 +U0 49 

IJA. WtafAsdes 11400 


78096 

737*4 

784 

785 
785*6 
7.04*6 
094*4 
548 
630*6 


20730 
20980 
2D? 3D 
B730 
20780 
20480 
10130 
14200 


«Ws« 


Off 2857 


■ Ofl- (CBQT7 tun 

kn-aaiartaw 






j' «'■ 

2374 

2422 

+630 

3787 

2240 Sep 94 


I'f 1 B 

2X00 

2*44 

+631 20838 

22.100a 94 


t ' t. J 

2373' 

2437 




209 

2X61 



2285 Jon 93. 



2370 

ZOO 

+071 





2X70 

24.19 

+030 


22.93 MOV 95 


206 

2375 

3470 

+630 

3879 

2380 Jill 95 


2425 

2X45 

Z4.1S 

+621 

1 741 

2275AU095 



7480 

24.15 

+078 

23* 

2275 Sep 95 




3486 

+626 

51 





2175 

*oao 

1 

7“PDK9S. 




2X45 

+020 

3 


3045 

323i 

2934 
2U7 
2835 
2830 
2885 
2735 
2730 
24J5 
2210 

2330 

Est. soles na wed's, sales 14392 
wed's open in 47477 Off 104 


TSE^d^lMJ, 


Zurich 

AdhiinttB 250 25B 

Ahwdsse 0 1 new 497 8M 

BBC 81 -wn Bov B 1268 |3t5 


a 1 


IboGetovB 
-5 Holdings B 
E l efc tra m b 

Fischer B 
■nterdtoeaufti B 
Jelmoll B 
Landis Gyr R 
Moevenpick B 
Nestle R 

Oarlfk. Buehrte R 
FaroesaHIdB 
ftadjeHdgPC 
Satoo Republic 
Sandoz B 
Schindler B 
SuDerPC 
Suraeliionee B 
Swiss Bnk CornB 
Ewltt Rtahsir R 
Swissair R 
UBS B 

Winterthur B 
Zurich Ass B 


Previous : 92586 


820 HU 
538 541 

343 366 

1500 1510 
71711 2170 

g bk 

791 790 

415 419 
1180 1U2 
14314150 
1510 1500 
5445 5540 
116 114 

m 71 S 
8000 8000 
945 944 

3130 2120 
397 39$ 
551 550 

.«V 851 
1107 1112 
488 488 
>295 >288 


Prevfaes : I m 2 


H’s e<kqr h> gahscrOto 
b Great irM 
M qJ fo i fca fti 
0 <00 89 5965 



Livestock 




CATTLE 





7X0S 

ALSOAubM 7045 

7085 

>025 



1(455 1 

74.10 

61 70 Oct 9* 7380 

7340 

7X95 





6770 Dec 94 TITS 

7140 






07OFeb9S 7048 

7047 

7022 






7280 

71 JO 

71 JB 

-636 

692 ‘ 



8980 




17M i 

*880 

6773AU095 075 

075 

075 



213 ' 

| Estsdes 943* WOfLUHes 9840 





WWs open tat 70392 ofl 264 




‘ 

FEEDfff'CATTUe (CMER) 



I 



8650 

79 JO 

7970 

—632 

X910 1 

61.70 

71 80 Sen 94 7985 

79.10 

7665 




8175 

7095 Oct 94 7015 

7620 

7740 


—627 

27M 




7660 




RL95 

7X95 Jot 95 7615 

7615 

7770 

77.90 

—840 

534 1 

76J0 

7X25 May 95 7585 

TUB 

7600 


-4LH 


8075 

7X55 Mar 96 






76.90 

7145 Apt 95 75.90 

7690 

7545 



145 1 

Est. sole 

1.176 Wed’s, sale 

18M) 





1 wad's open Inr 10565 off 122 





HOGS (CMER} 40400 Os- cwana+tL 




* 

4644 


4680 





4975 

3840 Oct 9< *1 JS 

4175 

088 



3650 

39. 04 Due 7* 41.55 

4175 

045 

0J2 


6JU 1 

5680 

3680Feb9S 41.« 

41 JS 

41.U 

41J5 

>AU 

1.905 E 

4880 

3145 Apr 93 4040 

4045 

4070 

40J0 

+883 

1836 1 



4880 


MOO 




4X9SJ>li95 4477 

4480 

4470 

4*70 

+083 

137 I 


Aug 95 SUB 

43J) 

4X30 

4135 


27 I 

*039 

39 JO Od 95 



8)40 

+085 

4 1 

EsLsatos 

NA WetTLSda 

4.961 




1 

I Warsopaiinr 






POOCBELUES tasem JMaaav., 





59 JO 

2L3SAU7W 1180 

3380 

3280 

32.90 

-8J7 

•67 V 

«UH 

41 80 Feb 95 179 

179 

4615 

4580 

+ 4481 

6436 l 

*070 

4087 Mgr 9$ 4630 

4620 

4585 

45JI 

•+175 

375 1 

61.15 

4X00MOrfS 4625 

4640 

4625 

4656 

-028 

4 1 

SUN 

4X23 JM 73 080 

070 

0.00 


—170 

>5 1 

5X25 

41 JB Asia 95 



46J5 

—045 

14 l 

Est total 

2.120 wad'i.iofe 

2885 





| Wed's com W 7.799 up 0 





1 


Food 




1 

COFFEEC INCSB vtota^Miwa 



Ml 


8980 5en 9* 17X88 

1*5 

17375 

18485 

#7,® 

9833 A 

24475 

77. TO Dae 94 1M80 

10675 

17775 


• 6JS 16JH f. 


70.90 Mar +3 1KU0 

19180 

18180 


• 4.10 

9708 9 

VIM 

8150 MOV 95 U44B 

IB9JB 

W3L59 

191 JO 

•<J0 

14® E 

24110 

■580 JUTS IM 

1*780 

M4J0 

19150 

■ 4J0 

374 V 

19680 

9280MP® 1M1 

18600 

1*650 

193JD 

IIJS 

01 E 

14280 

81 80 DK 95 189 JO 

19180 

186ft! 

194J0 

*180 

344 9f 

EM. safes 

9809 WEtrtksatat 

11842 




9! 

Weirs BOOT in! 34778 Off 931 




K 

< SUGAR -WORLD 11 (NOE) llunK-am«v6 


94 


Season Season 
HBh Low 


open HU Low Oase OlO OnM 


1240 4390094 11.14 1285 1191 

1X10 9.I7MOTM 1134 1133 1131 

1284 1037 MOV 95 1134 1134 1175 

1282 J0J7JU19S 11.70 1132 1148 

1190 1HL570CI95 1133 1132 1145 

1130 *038 Mar 96 

1134 1 136 MaY 94 

Est. solas 19447 wad's, sdas ■ 7441 
wars open rt >1X40 up 43 


11« -089 41J11 

1130 —080 37,141 
1174 —034 9,194 
1L4» —086 iZD 
11J0 -083 14R) 
n JS —oho 20* 
1174 — 883 5 


Saoawi Stsaon 

Hlgtl Low 


Ckwn HWi Low Dose Cho Optai 


COCOA INCH WJ mwrlcMm-i omr tnn 
1041 Dec 94 1427 — ‘ 


1500 >041 Dec 94 las 14a ]4Z1 

IMS 1077 Mar 95 1444 1493 MSI 

1413 1078 May 95 1501 1506 1504 

1400 1225 JOI95 1500 1503 1503 

1411 1245 S8P 95 1373 1414 1369 

1433 MBS Die 95 1SSD 1550 ISO 

1674 1350 MOT 96 

ISOS _ 15Q5V-P96 
EsLtatos 1 2J33 WotTLsaiei 12X10 
WacTsopenlnt 49844 ofi 627 
ORANGE JUICE OiCTm lUHIo.omiw 
13480 89.10 NOV 94 94J0 9735 9370 

13280 9330AX195 10030 10130 9930 

12625 9430 MW 95 M45D UM30 103J0 

11625 9780 MOV 95 10880 10080 10880 

119X0 lOIAQJum 10930 10930 108.90 
11130 91 35 S«P 95 9193 9435 9240 

11240 11280 Nov 95 

Jon 94 

Estjfles NA^ftSri. soles 3322 
Wed’s open W 21393 off 382 


1459 

1490 

1510 

1530 

1407 

1373 

1403 

1» 


*25 29320 
+ 20 0.978 
+90 XM7 
+20 2365 
+24 14807 
*» 4385 
+20 1305 
+20 1JI7 


9570 —070 2J02 

993S -070 3300 

18130 -080 2313 

10780 -OJB 138 
10980 -080 232 

9245 -045 10445 
11380 -080 — 

11384 _oaa 

ill 


-080 10 


Metals 


W ORADE COPPER (NCMX) snta-an 
114.90 7470 Sep « 10635 110.10 10620 

7X75 Dec 94 10680 11625 10645 


11X20 

llljol 

111 JO 
11X70 
ini/fl 
11230 
11600 
Inaos 

11005 
111280 
1 109.00 
10U0 
10580 
1HL40 


7690 Jan 95 

7X00 Feb 95 


73J0Mdr9S 10880 10930 10830 
7435 MW« 10770 18770 H7J0 

70JJOJul95 

75L30AUOW 10973 10975 10975 
7?.105«>9S 

7X70 Oct 93 10980 11880 10X40 
77. 75 Nov 95 
MOO Dec 95 
8650 Jen 94 
5270 Mar 94 
91.10 AW 94 
MOV 94 

10630 Jlta 94 

Est. talas NA wwrs. rotes 9344 

wed's opan Mr 46249 up 149 

SKLVER (NCMX) UKUrOeoriironr* 


107 JO 


imrlk 

JRB 
11005 
WAS 
W94B 
10975 
10635 
107X5 
10975 
MLS 
109 JO 
MfJW 
10545 
105.15 
10US 
10680 
10425 
13780 


+ 090 2 

+140 T 

♦040 m 
+OS5 244 

+085 2393 
+025 13S3 
+0.15 SO 
+ 1JB 305 
+085 442 

*070 741 

♦040 401 

—AOS 853 
—085 S9 
—085 134 

+025 143 

—0.05 

+020 111 


SS60 

sms 

51651 

5978 

5448 


5293 5TU 


51X0 


S24JAUPW 
37X3 Sep 94 5100 

51IJ0O94 

3868 DeC 94 51X0 SOLO 
4018 JOT 95 _ 

4] 65 Mar 95 5B68 5H8 5748 

41 88 MOV 95 5368 508 8SX 

4208 Ail 95 
4928 Sap 95 

S-S'SS SS5J S440 5505 
5738 Jon 94 
3808MOT94 
5078MOV94 
Jut 94 

19800 Wed's, rotes 4JU 

Wed's open W 120208 oH 95 
PLATMUM INM Bl ) akwn.^wwiM'iii 
42580 34X00 Oct 94 41280 41780 41280 

37480 Jen 93 41Xj8 42080 4I5JB 
3908a Apr 95 41930 42258 41930 

41930 Juf 95 

47130 '42280 OafS 

EP. jdas NA WatTS-iOHs 2327 

Wed's open Inf J4J54 up u 


40X5 
1 4108 
4100 
14288 
4128 
6160 
SOD 


5198 

5262 

5228 

5278 

5297 

535.1 
5408 
5468 
aij 

541.1 
5461 
5788 
5765 
5028 


+S8 
+58 72834 
+59 

301,83 

+59 4309 

+g xoa 

+X9 

:s »» 

+09 77 

. +09 

+09 


41478 

41930 

42270 

42520 

42770 


+ 130 18317 
+ 170 U48 

s }MS 

+ 170 
+170 


>94 


381 80 


39730 

«1J0 




41110 

41770 


*!-» 1521 
' + >30 
+]■« 11217 
+>-• 91340 
+1^ 11354 
+ 1^ 4341 
+130 9391 
+ JO *313 
*130 1,197 
+ 188 

+ '■2 >219 
+ 170 

+ 170 2348 


Financial 


9432 Sap 94 9X27 9SJ0 9023 

9473 DOC 94 9439 9671 9433 

9X96 Mar!S 9424 966 *433 94J4 -685 xSl 
Am 95 . . 9484- —682 IB 

.1.198 


902S —083 17774 

M35 -085 9348 


'RUMpnj.aisASanMM iMsa 


. Woo’s, sates 27701 
19079 1 rfl 4629 


U25S 


101-41— >3 

100 -n- 1 : 


27326 
<4 
- 3 


99+30- 34 
99-11 - 24 
9644 — « 
98-11—24 
97-30- 24 


79343 

4374 

1330 

473 

SI 

40 

14 


□PAL BONDS ICBOTJ lUW(MBMM63SH««nMt 
64-13 Sap 9410-19 90-3) 69-20 99-00 — 15 
17-21 Doe 9459-20 09-21 15-23 (M3 — 15 


H.1M 

249 


903*9 Sep 94 94840 KW 9LHB 9,-00 -0419821 
*0 210 Dec 94 94.148 94.170 96840 94.110 -3844X3*3 


9X550 9IJWSCP9S 93J80 9X310 9X380 9X748 —4021X754 

*sm 91.WDec95 9X800 9X010 9 X9M 92750 -40156705 

MTS 90750 Mcf 94 9X910 938)0 92JOO 93820 — 40132J28 


-40106907 


IXUO 9X430 Am 94 9X810 92830 9X730 92740 

L^o L«S8!r« " 1 ! IS :]£ s 


Bt talas 21893 Wed’x rotes 6701 
WWTS open tat .3X50 uc 450 


07405 

67322 

07179 

07115 


67 *7 

82 1838 


SSS S2S ° Ln “ S - 72M 62231 —34 36890 

0700 67208 0.2214 -30 2827 

0JMMar95 07225 07225 07200 B7195 - -+n nu 

SaSSsSS 0/1“ OTlS 07125 07lS l2 ^ 
17,81 -■ ■‘ i 

Wfaf sapeninf mm up 473 

4h=acMAN MARK (D4BQ seer mark- lnPnianiucSmwnm , 

0A595 <L5400Sep94 66315 66430 401 Uffi ,19MR| 

64406 6SSUDecf4 64315 0A434 SL6M9 QMK Til 5jf] 

8^ 444,4 W. ^ - 

WOrf't cpen tar 94877 UP 579- 
JAPANESE YEN (CMCB) iprwi-lnnleueni 

VtaTiOtifniitf 7UI6 off 309 * 

nr!??? fpr ftac- 1 pumdua—n • 

S Elf™ » ss H 

Banaw" * 15 ? 



+«7 

♦ 09 6ll_ 
+93 m 
*95 20 

*91 1,1)1 


Industrials 


?HS S-222.% 7U5 7175 

2-25 59/®Dec©3 7078 71 JM m-ei 

2B.W 42J0MW9S 7170 72J0 7TM 

2LH 4480 May 95 7X53 7X00 72J3 

7MD 

WteTjapcn Inl <3857 Off 144 

HJO SdCS" 1 «“«-«— 

|| fisssss .as ss 

4LQGN0VM SUM- P a jj «n 

25 f SS2 S3 

£"S 53JO X25 S3 JO 

p asaa— — « 

S3 S-5 suo si jo 

Sjs nJa 51-70 51 

nas smSvs 

a* . 9270 Nov 95 


7177 

70JS 

7185 

7X60 

73J0 

7080 

7080 


+0.12 5840 
+ 633 24874 
+ 073 7,253 
+610 4JS4 
+003 

1.IM 


5X30 Jan 94- 
S?> 59 JO PW 96 

■ ■^sirai cmJna awima uagiM. 

SS '&&&% ,UB B ILK 

1649 1602 1W 

“80 1693 Dec 94 1|J7 16« 1*51 

JJjJ 1 5.15 JOT 95 1685 1654 i«5 

g pssz !S5 !u> fl 

1XM liw£Sv95 76M 16n 1675 

™ wsst ISS is S 

™ ■?« iS iSf 

J*" 17.15NUV95 

n {xS25« M M 

*U0_ lY72Jun94 

H suss'ss 

»« MJoSi9S S3 Sjn uu 

gM . ST. in Feb 95 S3 M J£5 


5185 

4675 

5080 

5180 

5380 

5115 

5185 

3X60 

5185 

51.00 

3070 

5085 

3X35 

S4.0S 

54.90 

55.W 

5580 


—085 824 

— 4LS9 3I4IJ 
-X30I0JW 
-4L55 13742 
-055 2981® 
—085 16,714 
-480 MMJ 
—085 6949 
-OSS 1.776 
-6B 2898 

-085 » 

-045 . 

— 045 17JI 
-085 
—085 » 



1644 

1689 

1888 

1637 

1624 
1611 
161! 
1606 
1604 
1667 
1609 
1611 
1613 
1615 
1617 
1619 
1672 

1625 

1638 
1627 


-030 7 Xfl& 
— OM 49. m 
— 075 35.973 
— 6Z3 44853 
— 622 Ujg 
-022 15877 
-072 14JZ4 

—071 4^57 
-031 9.998 

“H! “-ws 

-42^ 4JS4 

-021 , 
-OJ1 17.9i 
—031 

-021 T 
-031 t 
-021 11,99] 




5470 

51.95 

J7JS 

5540 

5695 


-099 39.S27 
-OUM87B 

-075I2JJJ 

-064 7,1\9 
-064 2853 
-071 ], W 


NA»e«™ Stock indexes 

vnsem 







w^comp^ oan 

as ffl" arss** 






Commodity Indexes 

,®S 

Reuters k! 7 -™ 

OJ-Ptmires 
Com - Rosairdi 


>52.14 

23180 


Previotts 

U>?i^ 

mm- 

> 5083 - 

231.32 










\ 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 12, 1994 


•rf - 


EUROPE 




races for Debut of Money Market Funds 


Investor’s Europe 


By Brandon Mitchener i 4 . 

Inunadtmal U trail Tribune 

FRANKFURT— TTKBondcsbank 1 
dislikes tbenu small savrings-and-loans 
fear than. and big banks, regard them ■ 
as a necessary evil But small German - 
investors are expected to flock to Ger- 
man money market funds over the. 
next few months. 

Long popular in : othCT countries, 
such funds became legal in Germany 
on Aug. I despite reservations that 
they might complicate the Bundes- 
bank’s control over monetary policy 
and destabilize the banking system. 

Lawmakers finally gave the so- 
called. Geldmarktfonds the go-ahead 
this summer after years of watching 
helplessly as German money fled to 
Luxembourg and other neighboring 


countries in search of higher returns 
arid greater liquidity. 

Now.ralher than sit back and watch 
foreign fund companies capture the 
.market Germany's biggest banks are 
scrambling for a piece of the action 
themselves. 

-It’s oftfea said that competition bc- 
tween. German bonks doesn’t work, 
but I think this shows that it does." 
saiit TcfcriTictsch, a spokesman for 
Coounuzbank AG. Germany's third- 

largest bant, ' 

A Commerzbank subsidiary that is 
one of. the-- first institutions to market 
the new funds nationally claims to 
have collected more than l billion 
Deutsche marks ($634 million) in in- 
vestors. .funds in little more than a 
week with "promises of a net return on 
Lavcstmept of 43 percent. 


Although that is only slightly better 
than the return on a onc-year lime 
deposit the no-load funds offer far 
greater liquidity. 

Mr. Picfsch said the overall market 
for German money market funds was 
expected to reach 1 S billion DM by the 
end of the year. 

Ironically. Commerzbank got the 
jump on other German banks by offer* 
ing a money market fund managed by 
its big subsidiary in Luxembourg, 
where approval for such instruments 
takes just two or three days. In Germa- 
ny. by contrast, it has been necessary 
to wait for approval from the country' s 
banking supervisors. 

Matthias Buizlaff, a spokesman for 
Deutsche GeseUschaft fur Wertpapier- 
spareo, a Deutsche Bank AG unit that 


is the country's biggest fund manage- 
ment company, said he hoped to get 
approval for two new money market 
funds within three weeks. 

“We fought for them to be allowed 
in Germany, and it doesn't help us if 
we put them in Luxembourg," he said. 

German banks in general and the 
country ' 5 hundreds of small savings 
and loan institutions in particular have 
good reason to fear the new funds, 
wherever they are based, because they 
will compete directly with the savings 
accounts and time deposits that are 
generally German banks’ cheapest 
sources of financing 

More than 1 trillion DM is thought 
to be parked in short-term lime depos- 
its and savings accounts. 

Banking sources said banks would 


eventually have to improve the terms 
on such accounts or face a mass exo- 
dus of funds that could weaken their 
balance sheets and ultimately their 
credit ratings. 

“At the moment it's still no prob- 
lem, because customer demand has 
been lax, but there’s a real danger if the 
idea catches on." said one savings- 
bank specialist who asked not to be 
identified. 

Possible reactions include an casing 
of the limit on what savings-accouni 
customers can withdraw during a 
month, reusing the interest paid on 
basic accounts or combinations of Ihe 
two. 

While volatility in money markets is 
expected to rise if the funds prove 
popular, the problem is less acute just 
now, because rales are falling. 



London 
FTSE 100 Index 



m a m Tj a 

1994 

Thursday 

Close 


y'j j A 
. ■ • 

Prev. * 

Close Change 


Lower Oil Prices 



. Corupdtd hr Ow Staff Firm Dispattftes . 

LONDON — Royal Dutch/ 
Shell Group said Thursday that 
weak crude oil prices helped 
shave 7 percent from its second- 
quarter net income on a cur- 
rent-cost baas. 

The Anglo-Dutch petroleum 
company said it earned £574 
million ($884 million) in the sec- 
ond quarto:, down from £619 
imUioa in the 1993 second quar- 
ter. The figures are based on 
current costs, -which take into 
aaxjum current prices for crude 
oil rather than prices at which 
inventories were acquired. 

Shell said the results included 
special charges of £133 million; 
ine company had special 
charges of £123 mifijon in the 
second quarter of 1993. It said 
the charges in the latest quarter 
stemmed from litigation, prop- 
erty losses, damage claims, 
write-offs of idle assets and the 
sale of a subsidiary. 

On a historic-cost basis, 
which takes into account the 
price of crude inventories at the 
rime they were acquired. Shell 
framed £673 miTIwvn, ojp from 
‘£575 million a year earner. 

Revenue dipped to £15.16 
billion from £15.64 billion. 

Shell’s shares fell in London 
and Amsterdam. In London, 
shares erf Shell Transport &' 
Trading Ox, the British arm of _ 
.the company, fell 12 peace to 
717. In Amsterdam, Royal 
Dutch Petroleum Co. fell to 


195.90 -griiMers ($111) from 
196.70. . 

Crude oil prices in the second 
quarter averaged $16.05 a bar- 
rel, $ 2 J 20 lower than a year ear- 
lier, based on prices for Brent 
blend. The price decline offset a 
rise in sales volume, the compa- 
ny said, and held, profit in die 
’ exploration and production di- 
vision to 016 million, down 
from £408 million a year earlier. 
“ The. manufacturing, marine 
arid marketing division earned 
£455 nrifiEon on a current-cost 
basis, down from £578 million, 
as lower product margins offset 
trigger sales of oil products. 

The chemical sector contin- 
ued to be unprofitable, posting 
a loss of £70 million, narrowed 
from £151 million in the 1993 
quarter. Thecompany said low- 
er operating costs and a 
strengthening market helped 
trim the loss. 

(Reuters, AFX, Knigfit-Ridder) 


European Recovery Begins to Show 


Compiled by Oar Staff From Dispatches 

Evidence of Europe's economic recov- 
ery is fast showing up on the bottom line, 
a range of major corporations reported 
Thursday. 

KLM Royal Dutch Airlines said net 
profit tripled in its latest quarter as total 
traffic jumped 12 percent, led by in- 
creased freight business. VESA AG, a 
German electricity and chemical compa- 
ny, said the economic upturn helped 
push first-half profit up 43 percent and 
would lead to a “sharp improvement” 
for the foil year. Recoveiy also boosted 
Britain’s Royal Insurance Holdings PLC 
and helped SKF AB, the Swedish ball- 
bearing maker, return to profit. 

But restructuring and other special 
items and price pressure in the health- 
care sector depressed results at Britain’s 
BOC Group PLC and Smith & Nephew 
PLC. 

• KLM: The Dutch flag carrier earned 
122 million guilders ($69 million) in its 
first quarter, up from 40 million guilders 
in the year-earlier period, on higher traf- 
fic and lower costs. 

The airline said revenue rose to 226 
bUUon guilders from 211 billion guil- 
ders, while unit costs fell 6 percent KLM 
said its load factor, which is the percent- 


age of available space occupied by 
freight or passengers, improved to 713 
percent from 71.4 percent. 

• VESA: The company had net in- 
come of 451 million Deutsche marks 
(5286 mfllian) in the first six months, up 
from 316 million DM in the 1993 first 
half, helped by strong electricity demand 
from Eastern Germany. 

Sales climbed 7 percent, to 35.48 bil- 
lion DM. while electricity sales rose 29 
percent. 

A one-time gab of 50 million DM 
from the sale of its Deutsche Hefewerke 
subsidiary was more than offset by 45 
milli on DM in shut -down costs and a 
120 millio n DM charge for a cost-man- 
agement program in the chemicals divi- 
sion. 

• SKF: The ball-bearing company 
said it earned 817 million kronor ($105 
million) before taxes in the first half, 
reversing from a loss of 469 million kro- 
nor in the first half of 1993, helped by a 
global recovery in the auto industry. 

SKF said its sales rose to 16.63 billion 
kronor in the first half from 1433 billion 
kronor in the 1993 first half. 

The rise in demand from the car and 
truck industry expanded faster b the 


second quarter than in the first Sales to 
automotive clients outstripped actual 
production, the company said. 

• Royal Insurance: An increase in 
British operations lifted Royal's first- 
half pretax profit to £191 million ($294 
million) from £52 million b the first half 
of 1993. 

Pretax profit at the general insurance 
unit in Bri tain climbed to £178 million 
from £28 million a year earlier. 

• BOO The maker of industrial gases 
and health equipment said a restructur- 
ing charge of £85 million helped drag its 
pretax profit down to £1693 million b 
the first rune months erf its financial year 
from £261.6 million in the year-earlier 
period. 

Die restructuring offset an increase in 
revenue to £246 billion from £228 bil- 
lion. 

• Smith & Nephew: The health-prod- 
ucts company had a pretax loss of £65.8 
million in the first half, mostly because 
of a £148 million charge for the sale of its 
Ioptex division. 

That compares with a pretax profit of 
£793 million in the first half of 1993. 
Smith & Nephew said sales rose margin- 
ally to £485.8 milli on from £4823 mil- 
lion. (Bloomberg Reuters, AFX) 


Amsterdam 

A EX 


41 /.OC 


Brussels 

Stock index 

7,677.16 

■?,688JB* 

-o.is 

Frankfurt 

OAX 

2,15528 

2,160=37 

.-024 

Frankfurt 

FAZ 

821.76 

B16.30 ... 

+0.67 

Helsinki 

HEX 

1,852.70 

1376.10 

-1J25 

London 

Fronds! Times 30 

2,460-50 

2.47820 

■—0-71 

-0,91 

London :■ 

FT§E100 • 

3,138^0 

3.167.00 

1 Madrid 

Canard index 

mei 

31856.. 

+0.52 

man 

■ MIB. 

1,081.00 

1, 090.00" 

-0.83 

j Paris- 

CAC40 

2^38.93 

2,064.17 

■■ * 1.22 
— - 2 — 

l Stockholm 

AHawsvaaMen 

1JM9.T7 

"1347.55 

■i*\ 

\ Vienna 

Stock index 

461 At 

46084 

+ 0.12 \ 

1 Zurich 

• sas 

924.63 

925.08 

-0.05 \ 

Sources: Reuters, AFP 


)Mcn»u«iul lleriUTnhunr 

Very briefly: 


Lloyds Revises Its Bid for Cheltenham 


Compiled by Oar Staff From DUpatdus 

LONDON -r- Lloyds Bank 
PLC said Thursday it had re- 
vised its £1.8 bQfion ($3 billion) 
offer for Cheltenham & 
Gloucester Budding Society to 
conform to a High Court ruling. 

The revision essentially of- 
fers more money to fewer share- 


holders. Under the revised of- 
fer, all qualifying shareholders 
wDl be paid £500, rather than 
just voting members as b the 
original offer. 

ChfJtenhflm said the revised 
plan closely followed the struc- 
ture of the original offer, an- 
nounced in April, but it must 


now exdude by law sharehold- 
ers of less than two years’ stand- 
ing and all borrowers. 

Chel tenham had sought to 
pay those members, but the 
court ruled that such payments 
were outside the terms of the 
Bud dbg Societies Act. 

(AFX, Bloomberg) 


NYSE 

Thiira«l«y*» Closing 

’ Tables Include the nationwide price* up to 
the dosing on WaH Street and do not reflect 
late trades elsewhere. Via The Associated Prass 


W»la»Boc* Bit YMPEWOi Krfi LamUjeStOfot 



J is si'-i 

at 

*ym 

ffc a. T t .'h —> 
JS m, SJfc 

«4I 

4|zfif 




%l l iS :£ 

n » >iK - 


-Pm ii 

PL 

ii 

ii 


n 


3* 


—3 


3 


^ ft £ ft 1 fh 

ffl g . m gH jjSfa jt 

ji * « » u « 2S « 




it 


S* S5S 


*: 


ii i 

£ ii ,87 5 




V, 1 ’£ 
i» 7 3 


?|is i* i* 


s I s 

m is 


lrre rn IW* 

i* n 

Nik Wtt m 

jg its 

1; p ** 
£ ieiS- 

I fsitt 

R » ; 

»H afi ah 


Jhow 

fcsjjp 

Ss§L 


vt K 


.ȣ ii r ra 

V$ &Hs£ 


in> m. 


r!t 


Yeltsin Sees 
Lesson in MMM 

Knight- Ridder 

MOSCOW — President 
Boris N. Yeltsb said inves- 
tors who had lost money in 
the MMM b vestment fund 
should not expect govern- 
ment help, Itar-Tass said 
Thursday. 

Mr. Yeltsin said the 
scandal would serve as “a 
good lesson for our peo- 
ple.” Meanwhile, authori- 
ties said they would file 
charges against Sergei 
Mavrodi, MMM’s presi- 
dent, who has been de- 
tabed for a week. 


REED: Dutch Concerns Seek U.S. Media Acquisitions 


Continued from Page 11 
Lexis electronic information 
services. Reed previously radi- 
cated bterest in both concerns. 

At Philips, the chief financial 
officer, Dudley Eustace, said 
the electronics concern wanted 
to buy a large media company. 
He said the acquisition would 
probably be in the United 
States because that is where the 
bulk of the industry was locat- 
ed. 

The company that Philips 
would look at would be largely 
active as a producer of software, 
such as film, music and other 
entertainment products, he said. 
Philips already controls P 6 N- 
Gram NV, a record company 
that has branched into movies. 


Mr. Eustace said acquisition 
plans were moving more slowly 
than Philips had expected but 
added that the search “reflects 
our criterion of making sure that 
what we buy is value for mon- 
ey.” He radicated a takeover 
would be financed with debt, 
noting Philips had a $2.5 billion 
credit tine. He also said Philips' 
current debt-toequity ratio was 
36:64 and that the company 
would be comfortable raisbg its 
borrowings to 40 percent 

Also on the financing front, 
the two parent companies of 
Reed Elsevier plan to list their 
shares on the New York Stock 
Exchange. 

“Fifty percent of our business 
is b North America b terms of 


BANQUE NATIONALS DE PARIS 

US$ 400,000.000,- floating rate notes 1984 doe 1995 
The rate of interest applicable to the interest period 
from August 10, 1994 to February 10. 1995 as 
determined by the reference agent is 5 .25% per annum 
namely US$ 268,33 per bond of US$ 10.000,-. 


r— JicralOti^&s&nbune — i 

LIVING EV THE U.S.? 

NOW PRINTED IN 
NEWV0RK 

For Same Day 
Delivery in key Cities 

TO SUBSCRIBE, CALL 

1-800-882 2884 

(IN NEW YORK, CALL 222-752-30901 


International 

Classified 

Marketplace 

• Monday 

International Conferences and Seminars 

• Tuesday 
Education Directory 

• Wednesday 

Business Message Center 

• Thursday 

International Recruitment 

• Friday 

Real Estate Marketplace, Holidays and Travel 

• Saturday 

Arts and Antiques 

Plus over 300 headings in International Classified 
Monday through Saturday 
For further information, contact Philip Oma in Paris: 
Tel: (33-1) 46 37 94 74 - Fax: (33-1) 46 37 52 12 

iirraUQ^&ibunr 


CURRENCY AND CAPITAL MARKET SERVICES 


Mi 




Currency Management Corporation Pic 

II Old Jewry - London RC2R8DU 
TeLi 071-865 0800 Fax: 071-972 0970 


FOREIGN EXCHANGE & GOLD 


24 Hour London Dealing Desk 
Competitive Rates S Daily Fax Sheet 

(Util fur furtljcr Inforimilitni f- brtH-f.u*rr 


Catch The Big Moves 

Commtrac. the computerised trading system is now available by fax. 
Commtrac covers over 75 commodities/financial futures/indicies 
with specific "Buy". “Seir or “Neutrar recommendations 

Request your 5-day free Mai by sending a fax 
to Carol on 0624 662272 int *44624 662272 


Signal 


o 130+ software applications O 
O RT DATA FROM StO A DAY O 
O Signal SOFTWARE GUIDE O 
Caff London: f 44+ (01 7T 231 3556 
tor your guide and Signal price list. 


SWIFT CALL COMMUNICATIONS 


LONDON - NEW YORK - LONDON 

PIUVATE VOICE CIRCUITS - £10K PER ANNUM. 

Calls to IBA - 20p per minute Japan/Hong Kong • 5&p per minute 


CALL- LONDON 071 48 8 2001. DUBLIN (01 ) 67 10 457 


FullerMoney ■ the Global Strategy Newsletter 


< -? v c::r:g uo: ; g:., i’WKi. cyrrrr.ces o. c 2 ~nv>-..ios ■n^jdivo -■■■ *e ri 

r-Ji'.'r Vor.ijv •, bv Hillei 'OI i'.'i.M,,': : a-,;'.!;;:- 1 f. 

rr--r.'h!y J nc'.e iv 5 l f VSS-22 e-.ow-s! 5 : !,n -i ftrcpO. 

rfSC! ,-r U3S22C d-.er.v^ *r cac. Cc!. %''■/*" =: 

Crcr: l-lti 7 Sv-b.-'o---- ‘.c-b-ji- V.' : R serj. UK 

To!- -jsrAcr: 7; ^ 39 ~-i>\ '07; ;n UP; c "«» <"i .’.2 - -C-i-t 





ECUTerniinvestPLC 
29 Chesham Place 
Belgravia 

London SW1X8HL 
Tel.: +71 2450088 
Fax: +71 235 6599. 
Member SPA 


FUTURES & OPTIONS BROKERS 


$32 


I < V ROUND 
'V*- TURN 

EXECUTION ONLY 


For further details OK bow to place your Usting contact: 
XML NICHOLSON In London 
TeL: (44) 7/ ».J6 4X02 -Fax f*4) 71 2402254 

Hcralb ^^ Sribanc 



Margined Foreign 
Exchange Trading 

Km. c'niii|X'iiliu* t.ttMo- - 1 ll**ur> 
’IVl.: + ii I SIR null' 
i ; .iv + 1 1 “i 


• Alcatel AJstbooi SA, a French tejecommunicaiions, transporta- 
tion and power-equipment company, said first-half sales rose 6 
percent, lo 78.06 billion French francs ($15 billion) from 73.63 
billion francs a year earlier, the company said. 

• Spanish-based banks' after-tax profits fell 11.9 percent in the 
first half of 1994, to 265.66 billion pesetas (S2 billion), compared 
with a year earlier, the Bankbg Association said. Loan loss 
provisions fell 26 percent as the economy improved. 

• Dutch bankbg and insurance giant fNG said the Polish govern- 
ment had approved its plans to open a life insurance unit. 

• Daimler-Benz AG said it raised its bvesimenis in environmental 
protection 15 percent b 1993, to 669 million Deutsche marks 
($422 million). 

• Banco Santander SA bought a 0.73 percent stake m Telefdnica 
de Esparto SA for 13.63 billion pesetas ($105 million) from La Caja 
de Aborros y Pensaones de Barcelona, the financial daily Expan- 
sion reported. 

• Fyffes PLC, an Irish fresh-fruit supplier, said it had acquired a 
70 percent slake b the German fruit distributor J.A. Kahl GmbH 
as part of its strategy to expand on the Continent. The price was 

not disclosed. (Reuters. Bloomberg. AP, 4 FXi 


operating profit and market, so 1 
think it is logical that we should 
increase our profile with U.S. 
bvestors,” said "Nigel Stapleton, 
deputy chairman of Reed Inter- 
national. 

Reed Elsevier is focusing on 
American busbess publishing. 
Mr. Stapleton said, ihe compa- 
ny already owns Cahnera Pub- 
lishing, which has about 80 titles, 
and the Official Airline Guides. 

“Ziff and Mead Data are both 
b business and professional 
publishbg. which is a high-pri- 
ority area, and North America 
geographically for us is a high 
priority,*’ said Mr. Stapleton. 

lAFX. Bloomberg Reuters ) 




r.efzr. 




I 


I 



Page 12 

NYSE 

- Thursday's Closing 

Tables include the nationwide prices up to 

iJ h l ?? s,n9 0,1 V * 1 ' stre ® Oonot reflect 
‘ate t rades elsewhere. Via The Associated Press 

(ConlnraecO ~ 

1* Month Si s 

jWiLButSnx* Qiv YldPE lBh hmi ujwuawtcn'oB 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 12, 1994 


13 Month 
wen uw swat 


□hr no PE IDO] HW UMLOMdCtfO* Htah Lo^ShX* 


D)v VM re TOO* HWi LowU*ctQi*BO 


12 Moran 
HMh Low Stock 


S, . 12 Month ■ 

caw vu PE. toot Htah LowLowrOi'9* High Low »go* 


i E»teo>pr j» >1 . 

afte- “ \j 


atyi ttilStw 

£ Ji 6’. P«tU 


’S fH ,« w 

.« p _» 

jo u s na % 
i « >5 j£b tfft 


*2.1 


gv, H<b mv, -v, 

M I-.. » 3 -* 

3S 25 ~!s 




MM 7/M 

*88 ft 


ssftgifr ,3 » 
§i-d sasEsr i£ 

ar .gicwi 3 

£g&» s 

§>■* sTicSo *o 

s?as& sf 
ts 

simqkxicicf tu 

Hesisss j® 

?4*hCilCBalH I* 

» * 
9"*QBr3l .12 
IShSnip' 

S WCMrSE 
cwmi 

vwgomc* asc 


a** *z jf - 

>■« <14 20 wh «i*i 47 (ilk —4 

- afi i*«* !*ta _3 
f* ,a N? Jit* WM *N ’4 
■ffe 23 - UJ 2(4 44*1 44 s< _',i 

S jf » I 1 jp Is -J 

35 b *8 Is 1 $ k -£ 

li; & £ % & a ? iT™ -S 

JS fl l| ,4 55m §5 3* ?K- S 

84 IjS a K2M B> ify, 25 - W 

i« *3 fi |g xvS nil »% -C 

W m 4.1 fly i«— <4% i». - * 

!_ i.n i> 13 s fa jisii fast. b><- — ••. 

pro 7 44 U .. 1200 ST «3 5fi —2 



« a « ; 
- " 

J( £2 J|»io 
J4 23 

.* a J 


sf vis J r i sf 

L i| 8«’| 


19*4 (O'* 19*. - St 


M \j _ ts» 2iyi hm zih -n w H m 

jo i jj «J 8 J£ h5 =5 »* 

*> p ’5. Si S5 ifH 2fa •’" aalrp 
si M z 1 »tt lift 9& -i g^SKsS 

is y - S ga aa -•-* Ss,Ss>^! 

la u . ifi a. fiv, HVk OIm 


12 a s i« w iX r =« saf^g36* *>* « IB S s 

""iwiaTSfa-c ii*>»K£. .1 R r? » 3 

¥ 4^ ^ *s !k Isa -i ts j.-> n s i 


y JB IJ 7 2»f 71H 

f, s J? *7 ^? U 

s ,|il ,» 


.rS I) r * ® Sf 4 

* ^ P 'i ^ p 

* Si n >, 35 


d 8 = 

M 1» - 


SfSf i 

^ ^ =5 J 

| 111 I 

ft WW - i 

|Jl=§ I 


^ 1 



R «ss;j 


00 3.1 - 23 

1.12 12 19 II 

*" i S’*? 


P=s 

J.iS 


?NMP 3 


^ ^ 8 S p r 

.js ^ is Wi Sa % 

jS» ( II 19 1J% ip, IMh -slh 

™ -4 Si % '!5 'E '!? -S 

* £ - 1 .r S is =5 


(I ion ij'-l fa'4 .. Sst»74t»F 

41V. (TMi 4111 _ 39«° Jowt 

35 Wi 73 sn nC< — v, 4i h JS'.'i i 


« i £!§*& fcn 

g-masesw '5 m n ■£ sa s i - n 


S s» 254« Coastal M li is 1374 

«* *• « js 

ivl .re ll i<4 


jo rj 11 jt a>4 ii 73 - n 

24 is 7 11 nit 13V1 in _ ift* ir’-. 

_ . 104 447 17*4 I7M l/H • <« l»lfe 

.40 1 J IS 1374 JO 1 . 30 »«. — •« 44 v , 21*4 

LI* It ,-. 74 MS MW 24K *7. TiV. Ill, 

. rt W 27'w 2IM SirS — H B« Hv. 

.78 ,2 fi s4 4" «s« 45 =5 S5 S' 4 

« IS irs W5 us fta 3 !* 

IfC J _ 2*4 IT*. 17*4 I7h _ 40 M*t 


2j;» 2r>.,£CJ=cmn 1st 3 - W life Mv, Mih — %h 

If^SSs" Jfi *3 ^ is US - 

185 !£iWt B r 2 '&* •** -« 

21% SiOraj^l 1 <4 to is *7«t &m. sS 94 .15 

11 . iu (lo||AS'n ^ iss 13<« iota nri — lv 



1 y B ss 
H B n 1 is 


.-5 3% laasaPn 



?fas5ss ‘fs j? 1 w «a 
a ssife iSs « = . s §« 


85 Si; ^ 

'!* 7*2 .w — * 


(WI. Jo 104 .. B4 4% MS 4*4 • Ik IS’m l3%Rt>Or 

iftnc; AS £.« . 147 ,•■! Ill 41% — >k IKS J gorlnSc. 

WSl J« Ej _ H3 7*» 7 7 .. 4i» M'SpOWVWI 

SnPTn A 74 „ 73 VVl 27 Vi avi _ 14 lSIsFilullOS 

gs&s - fi 7 ^ aa ax as: - ia 

|J2 7^ ” ,3 i « Sli Sti ifc B 185^ 

■mfis 34 1.7 3 2HA 71 3MS 3DU _ IT BVjFrCwSrf 

ITHBll 3.14 on _ 10 341s 24’-* 74*4 • 'A » TVl FrfcPr 

» ?i8 il .2 .sit 35 B5 -5 9SS K PRSSK 

PHY* il U II OS 70 V. TBS, Is — % S'4 JkFhUlM 

nlMi 5 48 in it 87 7t*s 2«(s 26*k * V. 31 PrMm 

rONL 1.13 8.1 <4 ISO III, Hv> Uh - W 7*4 4tsHn3-K-i 

(St 140 17 S MI4 M 21*4 2v. — V. 771, KVa FMCG 

!:f a r I pa is gs -% 

3 a js a = (so? as ga |ffc -5 a** i$i§| 

®orP 840 ri _ 4270 *3 » 54 71'., TanPMgS 


W S E ^ 

•js 15 » sii 

3» 18 It 'So 


8 ? I 

3 S il 

lOil 233 
_ M 774 

78 SB iisi 



fi ; '1 

3 


1.10b <7 Z 
3.14b 1,2 Z 

Hi 


Me 78 ^ 301 ms 12 
K^L 

** "5 i $ 18 0 


y SS3 II 

fili || 

3 t pits il 



g J5 z t 

1JD 32 ^ 3j 
M iS M 

irt> G __ 




IL'^l 

B! 1 iS 


23 n lid 

Sal 



-vs -a 



105 IP'sCwSprl 8J8 

j« v, co-SS xoa 

19 in CPSK 01c 


s*< 7<somfwi 

yi-Sst 


7j 2 S - J27? Ml,— 15 

* = 3 s* fit fli :j5 

AS 13 ~ ZtJ % ’Is f SV5 

Arrival Jfi io 14 71S 25*> MV, 2MS — V. 

gss » HH: J} E & 8' ^ S" nft 

wv*or .72 2J ft 8711 31 S 31 *, 3l*i —Is 


TV. .MsEMfff'T 

28 *t 21'sErcrait 


■I b = 3 s 

83» s2 S 1«S S*i 

ITSl'i! 



ItS 


r i u 

jp 1$ n d *% 
fT*tS. i32 E j 

i&’SMra 



3 S' 


^ g I 
ua rti Mi 


m 



w «t » 85 -a 

is il jj js ?j*r sr; =5 
^ li^o '| 8 4 < B ] Cl»:S 

7*'. 13'* CnvFn _ j« 33S 73*. 77*. n — >s 

7i»s ie *4 Siprotc |J( 72 - j 2 73 »*s »v, 

34*4 Console IS* 49 lS 1710 M'k 39V. 395 .■ 1 a 

jf' , I ^ I cnjmr _ _ it 34H !3*s |7*u fj}» • «s 

13's lj*«! 

'F'l'i: 


«rncu i »! 

S-kSsaSB’ — - - » a» S5 ?i> *5 


ft 's & [j sS! iS sa II 

mi _ 19 M 17 1184 13 >'« 

>Mkn - „ ve£ 11*4 11*4 Jits — W 

urn itt Ij . A) liv, 13*4 14<Z — V, 




Erv.f M V 

■Rtn 18 D „ 


a*A 1454 ft's — H 

‘ sSP=? 


IflMpliN ti 

, _ a* a jyt* it*4 _ IBM lA*Z 

18M 147 _ 84 n'<* Jus UVa — V. 74M 70*4 

a0 4J 1* 1143 13*4 Ink 13U —V, 249. Up 

im '* “ ,si ^ is 

a lU? fii pr :5 

.« i vis J. 2» -« %% 
'a S zo '8* 'jsS 'S's* ^ 

:: f % i&3& 231 JS, 


K S5 
iS IJSzS 


■a M * 
= J 


C C K*,; 
t d ¥ ¥ S 


JKe j zT 1S2 7*s FZ 

iJ7 33 « 1I1J ar' fiS 

*a R r. !E 2 ^ ** 


a « a 3 
ji'? 5 
a si* 

II!’ 

tjj ifi ts 

j 3 »■ 


W*S 20*4 SO*. - 'k 

't: -la 

tM; s; ft =5 

». s bS hS — M 



Sr IS 3 **. w’-.j 

|=® t:»4 

$ -5 ?7S 'ivsfc 


m <Ke _ - D. D. 

<m£ lw in .3 « s.i 


pP-| £A 

££s : £ |p 
c.fic’= 8 L 



! a e|| 

Jail 



f i so ill -1 

18 . 73 fi •»« 1st ?a zs 

§s« z ; ’fe T '& zS 

be sjsIs^sS^iS 

II? lilli 

!«>. - ^ r J? .7 tS _}*4 _ 


■3 1 

• 3 m 





0 |g 

*3 ™zTSo 


j- 1 11 s 

!. as *i z 
r * 3 a 

rsl 1 JO *3 |j 

’ US '3 ^ 

_ € a £- 


p 

* g* :g 

m 


n 1 * .u z s h m fa =3 ® 


a*5 So 

fc|H 

bsH 



as^ 


i S 5 


'a a « 


180 163 Z 

ija is n it 

JllJ 



r vW 
i 3 J f 



n Uj nil ? 

9 gi U n 

* ms a « 

r 80 13 » 

p % a I** 
I 1 d 3 jj, 

fill 

r n — -4 

o a s 8 

& : 1 \ \ 


*« .128 2 Z 



r “a ■» a 

i g 3 
^ 19: 

a 381 a n 

? n *3 M3 f? 

L ,J ® 10 « 

r* « ci : 


111 11 
ip 11 

S 88 ..a fifflSt 



i Si 




. 1 * fl 5 



if*. 

j'm yjkDrv] 
igv. 7*1 DrV 




■!* 2 1 ] 


« fl : 


Bsi 


35 fills' 


lUh Jjj u 9 TM 

fein ijo H * iB§ 

I ^Mf 

uni m t3 it S? 

r 'a k " J 

era s .48 2.4 i mu 

sr ,J * “ « 3 

Hi a & zs 

IaiBO Z IO Mj 


£ >S -« 

^ |p -« 

is IS t£ 

0*4 S*k —'4 

IP- 

IMS 17 


it ia r '-5 

s; ?p p =5 

I h OS h = 

33*4 By* S’* 

till 

5 I C :S 




J y I s 

2.12 *y g jj 

^ n 3 


1 .74 <"f 

z til 

_ Il 




3^ 


gffiSSSr d 

HlMHBIITlP 1 

fjSBS53?n fl 
cusssa, !j 


j* if a io 

.3 slH 


III 

jfS 




i*H 4*!£cAi*0 _ io Mt 

iKS iheiHS^iT i.i> tit (1 ini 

«$»■ “ 1 1 

3* 1‘N. El VOS n .. 7n 174 


*1 ti 8 883 

^ - 8 .a S 53 -* 

*3 I '® u $3 8S Ya *5 

ijs 10T _ vs? n*s i»is isis -S 


tS ; j i5f^n ^o a _ W« ®s Si 2a -z Bp 

•5 WpSS; !3S itS :. Jj II- !|*s If. “S Pg*- 

BSR"m« = IK]BB3 Ik 

t ? .. ^ li r ta ^ rSza 2 &g| 

fr*;S;'fe rt ,84 b 3j 3 £ 2 ? =S 

h:- i'.?E"»¥o i*o .8 1 * ziM S*s a-. »- _ jj. 


55*. u. EnOrin I.04P 72 ’J 95» OH *4*4 VM — (4 
«:* !S3 k"Wb 1*0 .8 is 23ft 5- a-. aS _ 

K> SMELoiuiaa «o u , (W is Hm HiJ — *s 

76*. I9 .i Enron 117 j.4 it 44 21 to * 4 H*s — V4 

w.io-Bmvc* „ _ v a | (n >K in! _ 


II z i 


s a fi 2 ® E 

: i S ITS & 


«/ MTOTW r.CBV 1*2 JO *Q* hja+* VUVj VTtt — 
MVoHhrH^A AjBQ AlJ W.M* 14% Vb livW ^ 

PC^p. £ “ l3 SSS f?K 

^ ^ 3 ^ il* ill ""* 
^ sissy ^si^iplspz:! 
Cfcinr^flljiKEK3 



8 fl( 


76V. 19.1 Eorwi 113 14 It 44 21 TOM SI*. _n 'S'* - - 1W$ IBM IB’s. Tli*k — *» 

M 13 *t “n sa VA is Jw%S9. I.» r* fillip pC ^-3“ 

.J vs J ”s j-. te - f&issgsj w as = i* le p*i is _« 

- ft ” J n« ^ £ z ^ H z J S? isa-5 


tAm 22»A rtcrwn 21 i.l 

2M* FT-n «nnt 

88 ^ '3 1 

fflS 158®,* : 

40 v. rf’s tSjvlnf » 1.76 34 


Z a KD 

z t '?2 

8 33 It l|j 


ft 1 ^ P Sw ® 

is 3TO 2 l rt d5 ft .« 

: '?2 ^ la -? 
? ts da ^ is-* 




J2 s3 g 

a?i 

IJt 33 « 


\ II I 

,n 4 3 1 
\ 

i u» *3 a 

t '**> ’»! - 


Ov nd « mbs 


m as, 
* a> : . 


P||?| 


»'a;. 

is? 

fi! 


LwfcaiwIWgi 


w 

i* VMWW 


I=* 

1 32 b« 


|1 |Fi 

■ ’-SS ’3 ® ■! 

tlsij 


* SJ 

<jS 3^ 

130 S3 fl 



m 



m m i 0. 
K; js S l * 

i * i t* 



i ■ j-gi: 

j. ii n 

III! 



j; ’Sg||| jj# |jj 

^ 1 1 13 S ^ 

Mill III 

S*.. mo is *B SS 



1:11 



' l'A a -a . 

? jo i3 -fl i 

o. it* *7 « 

: Uj' 

r '^s s a , 

,n «o. io3.fi- ; 


LoWLQHBlOrg. 

M3 


|*S UM Wg 
|| % 

1 £ 1 - Ic 
Si |r -« 

I'M* 3 

b- 8 *^ 




f i ■ o 

jf' 3 f|« 

8 il 


Mil 


MP 


<n% 

K» - R 
53 -IS « 




IDf UR <3 - 




IS*. Ism I 

li=? 


fe'i&fcsM 2 i? S 

n*. l7’-sF.IKRtl 70 I J 43 
)] ■« tViifKEm , ITS 

t 5'. 24’seMSo" * M 7.^ It 


18 H fo ssiJ p. §5 _J 

IJ*4 IDAHawlS m uw *28 l5*s 13 !2> •• 


?i'. 74’k Sofiya, i(fl 7.^ if Sr, 

P^We-'p -■ 

BJ85IS,** ™ „ ] 

86e 76 . s 

*.2l*«EauD. \U l.i » 7| 

Is is II ”2 

44' i 5?‘ - E4<fl' H *C ffl M3 ,i .1 


■mu wueoni-vc I.K i it ,wi m. g« 

U? ,*. P'« to J* V. 9'i 

l»'. U’. L-X.VOB V . 8 J07 16 ,i*s 

: 2 .- ??. *£ wS S 2 °i ill J' 72'> 73 *s 

!r* 1 ,-Ev**PTn Uv a 1*0 ij*. ,7K 

IQ 6 , <EVrlru< _ 60 »v, »<■, 


S 24VS 23ft 74 *s *4 

21 M 71 2l'k 

9 «'k A's 4>k 

W 37M 17's Ifv* *» 

f B'i 8 ' L =3 

»v, »<4 1S*S -'s 

■s •*., r. • '-.i 

bj* g« mm •> 

17* Hu, jf'S 32'k -«S 

K 0*4 9'i 9*4 

JO? 16 15*S 11*. —'•*, 

31 J3’> 73 Vs 77V. — k 

1*0 ijw 17*. 1/9. — 

60 »v, »'i O'* 


!« Sj» 


.1*4 /'iMmlOl 

if i'4 Hynm 


a 53 ’ |S P is 7s 

IMeI B isfcES 





8 d£ 

h> 



£ .i MP 


u ft ft is 

om >ik -3 

JS K =* 
BS IS -4 
8>‘33“* 


> 1 ^ 
1-40 23 « 


Mil ' 

p ji'a = j 

m 



!f:!?.:issfea 55? ‘.? S fe Sift Ik =3 ftiarj 


E.wMrm 

77' I '/'.E.CCIBI I 44 0.3 

I?:* iV.E.rjijr 111c 09 

I*,- JO *l-tRMin 07 b i 

J& E*c IM ID 

U . 1C E*-dPH 01 J 


MS ?r- isz mi _.-s 

1]J TO!. 1**4 Ml* 

J !>'• li'i IS' i 

149 li'» IS*. IS'. — ••■ 

*50 19*. »'■, J*v- . 


'79w VT*i(§P J. J 14 2047 299. 29M JtJS — H 

.f' 1 ; iMm Z - n| ifS 3® dS Tft 

ttlfftM » ? J J J Js tt Is .« 

isu^SS i a « ? ^ us Ik ua - 

k’ri^ *4 *h j? £ «,a *ss % =& 

k&r sb, is \i 

0 If-. <c^ Lit u 1} Jlf 24*. £)M H*4 — M 

OnSvtW'lr 84 j7 IS <tJ? Si'* ft ft -lli 

1 ftfess 38 S :: US sa S£ -T* 4 


941. IBM' Cp 

8 fW«. 

*? 9* 2« V I. f 


ftwss 38 18 

it l | *hi»«"7 J.JS 92 


BKBT 

PABC 


P 51® js Ss.pi 

FiSiBS CCi 


JS 1 J5» - w » 9-v. 


1 sup 

2 I a 5 1 
^ 3 •i ’I 8 


is ? 

■ Si ! 


Ml 81 20 
jo ft Z 


8 z i Sk ft ft =is 
B a ffl ® ig 



3*1 _*1 1 ISM 9*46 


fillr? 



313 



j€ 



- ’?« 


T-U 

JD 13 T9 




*^ 0 ' = 







*4 -lj* 

ft Zft 
5— l*k . 


i - 

SI-: 






FWoLm* M.T • 



Jai - 5 -Z. 


w*i-5 

*r •* ,JC 





*• j 8 

II| 

-no iJ B j 




ar* 



;a ii3 ? 



r 

Ills vCv 



J » i l V, 

Io 


ip i? i S .% HH :s . iig 1 ®! 


J If t 



I04M -li ■ 
*M US 




V>^J t>» |J^ 


•:•*•* r£WK*«* 



,UjJI D» 


li ?£> I 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 12, 1994 


2* i3 


ASIA/PAC^ 



Fund Managers 


Compiled by Our Staff Fram.Diqntdsd 

TAIPEI — The Securities 
and Exchange Commission -has 
launched an investigation of 
Taiwan’s 15 investment trust 
companies- oh -Suspicion, that, 
fund managers and outside • 
traders colluded to manipulate ■ 
share prices, industry execu-. 
lives said Thursday. . 

“They’re looking for collu- 
sion and manipulation,” said 
Kuo Shoou-min, a fund maaag- ' 
er with National investment 
Trust Co., adding 'that h is com- 
pany's trading records had been 
examined by the commission. 

Word of the investigation 
sent Taiwan shares plunging,, 
with the benchmark Weighed 
Price Index losing :2.13 percent - 
to finish at 6,692.02 points. : 
The commission declined to 
confirm it suspected fund man- 
agers and traders of colhi(£ng ' 
to manipulate stock prices. - 
Loraine Chen, chief of the 
division that oversees invest- 
ment trust companies, said the 
commission was involved in an 
annual review of tratfing "by in- 
vestment trusts. . * 
Investigators are looking at' 
company records in which .'in- 
vestment strategies are spelled 
out and comparing them with 


Traded made by individual fund 


nVe*te’ looking at whether 
thtir. investment decisions are 
inline wth -stated objectives,” 
.Ms. .Chen said. 

•;/. AianYeh, a fund 1 manager 
with Presdbat Investment Trust 
Corp^ said commission: officials 
hadMtited&sfirm and that the 
inquiry seemed to focus on trad- 
mgin -some individual stocks. 

:>/ The xommission’s. inyestiga- 
tiob follows" remarks by Linin 
-Day, whOv.heads the agency, 

. that stotk prices were “high.” 
His comments were taken by 
traders as a sign the commis- 
sion wanted to cool the markeL 

“Day’s -stateraent was the 
rir$t hmt id investors that the 
government h as seen enough,” 
said Ben Lee; an analyst at No- 
miira Securities 
‘ Other analysts said Mr. Day 
was only expressing a private 
opinion.' - 

•’ “The market is also nervous 
about continued measures by' 
the central bank, to tighten if- 
rjoidity iri the jfaee of inflation- - 
ary pressure,* said Hu Hou- 
stieoj£ a btokdr >t Universal. 
Securities.. 

(Bloomberg, Knight-Ridder) 


New Runners in Asian Space Race 


. By Michael Richardson 

_ Imemationft] Herald Tribune 

SINGAPORE — Taiwan and Singa- 
pore are discussing a joint venture to pm 
. a commercial satellite into space, a pro- 
ject that would put both countries m a 
select group of Asian states competing 
with Western countries for space busi- 
ness. ; 

An official -of the Taiwan government 
indicated that an agreement had been 
reached with Singapore to manufacture 
and pay for the launch of a regional 
satellite, which would meet growing de- 
mand for television and -telecommunica- 
tion. services in the Asia-Pacific region. 

Japan, China and India already make 
their own satellites, and South Korea has 
announced plans to do so. 

Steven Chen, bead of Taiwan’s Direc- 
torate General of Telecommunications, 
said the joint program with Singapore 
would cost $215 million, with each party 
paying half and dividing the 24 transpon- 
der channels on the satellite between 
them, Reuters reported from Taipei. 

“The two sides wtQ sign contracts in 
-October, and within three or four years 
we will complete manufacture and 
launch the- satellite,” Mr. Cben said. 

The government agency he heads has a 
monopoly on tfti«y«mmunira> tipTis in 
Taiwan. 

-Buta spokesman for Singapore Tele- 
com,/ the. country's recently privatized 
telecommunications company, said dis- 
cussions with Taiwan were “at a prelimi- 


nary stage." adding, “no formal agree- 
ment has been reached." 

Singapore previously considered ac- 
quiring its own satellite but chose instead 
to rely on spacecraft put up by regional 
and international operators. 

But with most other Southeast Asian 
countries getting their own commercial 
satellites and Asia in the middle of explo- 


Taxwan and Singapore 
are forging an alliance 
that would pat them in 
competition for high-tech 
space business. 


sive growth in satellite-based television 
and communications services, Singapore 
evidently has changed its mind. 

' “Any country that stays out of this 
market will lose out," said Brian Jeffries, 
editor of Asia-Pacific Space Report in 
Hong Kong. “If you want to be on the 
cutting edge of advanced technology, 
you nave to be in the space arena." 

As a precaution, Singapore is known 
to have applied some years ago to the 
International Telecommunications 
Union for orbital positions for any satel- 
lite h might want to launch. 


Mr. Chen said that because Taiwan 
was not a member of the union, w hich is 
a specialized agency of the United Na- 
tions. it could not gain access to an 
orbital slot by itself.* - 

Analysts said that if a deal between 
Taiwan and Singapore was finalized, it 
could involve joint purchase and opera- 
tion of a Western-made satellite as a first 
stage, with local manufacturing later. 

The two countries have close econom- 
ic and political ties, as well as a strong 
interest in developing high-technology 
industries including communications 
and satellite broadcasting. 

Mr. Jeffries said Taiwan had already 
put a program in place to acquire the 
know-now for building satellites, “so it 
makes sense for Singapore to share costs 
and join in with what Taiwan is doing on 
the manufacturing side." 

Under a government-funded space 
program costing S516 million. Taiwan 
plans to have three satellites in orbit by 
2006 for scientific research and commu- 
nications. 

In April, Taiwan’s National Science 
Council awarded a contract valued at 
$61 million to TRW Inc. of the United 
States to design and make the island's 
first satellite. 

Before the successful bidder was 
named, Yong Kay, deputy director of the 
National Space Program Office in Tai- 
wan's cabinet, said the most important 
factor in the final choice would be ''how- 
much technology these companies trans- 
fer to us." 


Economic Cooker Glows in Australia and Flames Out in China 


Canberra’s Jobless 
Show Sharp Drop 

AFP-Exud News / . ■ / 

SYDNEY — A drop in the July unemploy- 
ment rate that was larger than expected kindled 
speculation Thursday about a rise in interest 
rates, pushing the Australian dollar to its highest 
level this year and sparidng a sel-off in bonds. 

The Australian Bureau of Statistics said unem- 
ployment fell to a seasonally adjusted 9.5 percent . 
last month, the lowest rate in more than three 
years, from 10' percent in June. Total employ- 
ment rose 90,200 in July, the fourth largest in- 
crease onrecord. 

The results so exceeded forecasts that the 


statistics bureau put out a special statement 
saying it had rechecked its data. The data pro- 
pelled the Australian dollar to Its highest level 
this year, closing in Sydney at 74.65 U.S. cents, 
compared with 73.20 cents Wednesday. 

About 67,600 of the new jobs came in the part- 
time sector, with two-thirds of those going to 
women. Employment Minister Simon Crean said 
the increase was predominantly in services, par- 
ticularly communications and finance, with 
small and medium-sized industry also gaining,. 

. The surprise results prompted selling on the 
bond market and a rise in bank bills, which in 
turn pushed share prices lower. 

According to a Baker St Young broker, Alas 
Young,- employment figures have put the bond 
market “back into its spin about whether interest 
rates win go up sooner rather than later." 


Manufacturers Hurt 
By Beijing Damper 

Reuters 

BEUTNG — China said Thursday that its 
industrial slowdown was hitting manufacturers 
of consumer goods and industrial raw materials, 
causing inventories to soar and further lighten- 
ing a credit squeeze. 

For Deputy Prime Minister Zhu Rongji, the 
dilemma is to main tain the delicate balance be- 
tween growth and jobs on the one hand and 
inflation on the other. Mr. Zhu recently said 
inflation was the bigger threat 

The State Statistical Bureau reported Thurs- 
day that industrial output in July was 132 billion 


yuan ($15.35 billion), a year-on- year increase of 
15 percent with the figure for the first seven 
months at R84.8 billion yuan, up 15.7 percent. 
This meets Beijing’s guidelines. 

For many companies, however, it has hap- 
pened too quickly. 

Sales of industrial goods in the firsL seven 
months fell 15 percent from the like period of 
1993. July output of color television sets, radios, 
refrigerators and rice cookers fell by as much as 
30 percent Production of raw materials such as 
steel, copper, aluminium, dyes, cement and tim- 
ber dropped by as much as 22 percenL 

Inventories of 30 major sectors were 3 1 .6 bil- 
lion yuan higher at the end of July than at the 
end of last year. The price of grain in 35 major 
cities in June was 52 percent higher than a year 
earlier, and food in general was up 27.8 percent 


Malaysia Lifts Restrictions. 



Ctm^fedSf Oi* Staff JfaDhHttdta. . 

KUALA LUMPUR — Ma- 
laysia’s central bank lifted a. 
nearly sevm-mbutfr-oW.ban tin- 
the sale of short-term debt to 
foreigners Thursday, a move 
analysts said would strengthen 
both the Malaysian, ringgit and 
the stock market : " . .. 

Bank Negara imposed the 
ban this year to thwart foreign 
speculators who we*e betting 
on the' currency’s rise. ■. . 

The central bank previously 
dropped other restrictions im- 
posed this year, including a neg- 
ative interest rate on foreign- 
held ringgit accounts. , 


“ lire move was in line with the 
central bank’s policy of using a 
strong ringgit, rather than high 
interest rates, to fight inflation, 
analysts said.. •• 

‘Tie ringer was trading at 
39.05 cents in early New York 
trading Thursday, compared 
with 38.7ti cents Wednesday. 

' The move also was expected 
to boost Malaysian stocks. As 
foreigners buy Malaysian debt; 
brokers will put sane of that 
money into:, stocks, analysts 
said. 

* The KuaU Lumpur Compos- 
ite- Index rose 1.7 percent 
.Thursday. ^ RemerSt Bloomberg) 


Solomons Halts 
Firm 9 * Logging 

Bloomberg Business News 

- HONIARA, Solomon 1 
Islands —The government 
on Thursday suspended the 
logging license of .Sflvania 
Products, a subsdiary of 
the Malaysian conglomer- 
ate Kumpulan Emas Bhd. 

The action follows alle- 
gations that .Sflvania had 
engaged in illegal and dam- 
aging forestry practices, ac- 
cording to the government 
statement. 

Stivama’s. license for a 
timber venture at Marovp 
Lagoon in the Western: 
Province has been suspend- 
ed twice before. ' 


Aviation Takes Bite of Swire Profits 


Ratters 

HONG KONG — The trad- 
ing house of Swire Pacific Ltd. 
posted a 14 percent increase 
.Thursday in first-half 1994 net 
profit, to 2. 1 billion Hong Kong 
dollars, in line with downgrad- 
ed forecasts after Cathay Pacif- 
ic’s poorer results. 

Cathay Pacific Airways Ltd., 
held 503 percent by Swire, an- 
nounced first-half net of 803 
million dollars ($103 million) 
•Wednesday, falling short of 
forecasts. 

But analysis said they still 
expected Swire — which has 
interests in aviation, property, 
trading, insurance, shipping 
and industry — to bear out 
forecasts that full-year profit 


would rise more than 20 per- 
cent. 

Swire’;* properties and indus- 
tries divisions posted the stron- 
gest performances in the first 
half, although all six divisions 
registered increases, the group 
chairman, Peter Sutch, said. 

“Once we knew the Cathay 
results, we revised our Swire 
outlook, and the figures were as 
expected," -said John Hether- 
inglon of Asia Equities. 

Swire Pacific's beverages di- 
vision. its Taiwan car distribu- 
tion company, its marine ser- 
vices and its insurance 
underwriting interests also 
made significant contributions 
in the first half, Mr. Sutch said. 


One of the biggest Coca-Cola 
bottlers in Asia, Swire com- 
bined its Taiwan bottling inter- 
ests with its sc.fl drink divisions 
in Hong Kong, southern China 
and the United States during 
the first half. 

Mr. Sutch was cautious about 
the prospects for Hongkong 
Aircraft Engineering Co. and 
Cathay Pacific. 

“As the operating environ- 
ment for Cathay Pacific and 
HAECO is likely to continue to 
be difficult in the second half, 
opportunities for profit growth 
from the aviation division are 
limited, compared with the cor- 
responding period the previous 
year ” he said. 


Investor’s Asia 


Kong Kong 
Hang Seng 

11000 


Singapore 
Straits Times ': 



Tokyo 
NWtei 225: 

22K0-. ' 

2 m- 



l -- ■ fSOOO'“" •’ 


7oa& ‘iil a'TTj J 4 

1994 


2DW '^ am. O k.:. 

1864 . 


■ ^TFaISTj j * 

isw ■ ■ ■ - 


Exchange 

Index 

TkirecteyV 

-.Close - qtose Cham. 

Hcng Kong 

Hang Seng ■ ’ 

9,524.54. 9 filBJOS -007 

Singapore 

Straits Times.' . .. 

2,300-00 £276.50 *103 

Sydney 

An Ordinaries 

ffJOSIBO 2j>7&-50 *0-66 

Tokyo • 

Nikkei 225 

20^ij3s 20,;?a2a- + 0^5 

Kuala Lumpur Corrpoerts 

^ 1,111.48 1,092.80 +1.71 

Bangkok- 

-SET,.. 

1,425.49 1,407^2 +t.® 

Seoul 

Composite Slock 

938.1B 93021 +0.97 

Taipei 

• Weighted Price • 

- 6,692.02. • 6,83901 • -2.13 

Manila 

PSE 

2,975.09 2;944.19 +1.11 

Jakarta 

Stock index 

473-53 47UP +0.35 

New Zealand 

NZSE-40 

2,067.19 • 2.08S.10 *1-00 

Bombay 

Nationat index. - 

217&90 2.06149 +0.61 

Sources: Reuters. AFP 

liUcmali-nnJ HetaJdT/ihnw 

Very briefly: 


• Samsung Electronics Ok, South Korea's largest electronics 
maker, sam first-half profit more than quadrupled, to 285.64 
billion won ($355 million) from 56.2 billion, because of an 
increased shipments of semiconductors and personal computers. 

• Mercedes-Benz AG plans to invest hundreds of millions of 
dollars in China in the next few years, and Daimler-Benz AG. its 
parent company, is seeking a Shanghai exchange fisting, 

• Malaysian carmaker Perusahaan Ofomobtl National Bhd. has 
teamed up with two Japanese firms (o manufacture rubber auto- 
mobile parts, despite of Proton’s plans to start buying more parts 
from European and American companies. 

• Australian miner M1M Holdings Ltd. said it was still considering 
building a zinc smelter in Asia. It canceled a proposed smeller 
project this week with Nippon Mining & Metals Co. and Mitsui 
Mining & Smelting Co. because of the strong yen and low world 
zinc prices. 

• China will spend 30 billion yuan ($3.5 billion) by 2000 on airport 
expansion and construction in more than 20 major cities, the 
Beijing-backed Ta Kung Pao newspaper reported. 

• Hutchison Whampoa LuL's wholly owned Moorby International 

Ltd. unit agreed to subscribe in cash for a $42 million convertible 
redeemable note issued by Shell Electric Manufacturing (Hold- 
ings) Ltd.. Shell Electric said. f R tWe ^ a««t hi-RrMr. afp> 


On August 29th, the IHT will publish a 
Special Report on 

The Brazilian 
Economy 

Among the topics to be covered are: 

S Prospects for reform following 
the elections. 

■ The outlook for privatization. 

■ Brazil’s volatile stock markeL 

■ A look at the commodities driving 
the economy. 

■ Brazil's relations with Argentina, Uruguay 
and Paraguay. 

For more information, please contact 
Bill Mahder in Paris 

at (33-1) 46 37 93 78, fax: (33-1)46375044. 

^ t IV WTEKNVriUNU^ » 4 

iicralo s i§a&~C;nbunc 


> Ttuo «sa tb» M4MW.10W run 


REAL ESTATE MARKETPLACE 


HOUSESrmNG 


RESTONSBLE MBA SWOOtt Mb 
housebttng hi fare **orf Aug/Ser*. 
Wl hwd doom***. core ta te. 
-s taorfcmar, etc. Good 

.CdtafalSA 2IW77-8644. 


[AISACE, 30 KMJASO. 

Modw osiidry howe, t I S» K}JT* 
(owl, * bedroom, 2 hatbrootre, wo 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 

CANADA - 


, A1KKTA - WBTBWCANAM 

I Executive data erf 45 

west of Eriwarton on Jasper fart bt 
Lonctxopodb nefag orwo, 5 WS* 

htrting W*T 9»*andbcdi 
on site with bodf and wlwwl Wn® 
far hobby tew or ****** *> 

Canada* Sh BlT.JjJ- 

( 20 - . 


CARIBBEAN 


ST. KITTS, 

WEST 

I ot 143 acre ate wm bewwrotf. 
lortd das hotel & condrf W'^no 
mm A «® obotemeet Beech 
Broker 


rort 


TIL R 

(znj; 




As 

(211) 371-9T33 


MUnW. OyfWtoet 
I bath bwe, 

buUng *, 50? *»■ 
-'wa» few 


jjgteJ 


jwmwMuDei 
beCb/2 baths 
fceariy 


■a a ceM endjtudttfd Bta , 

ICDfUOMl, 


f'W'B/SXBtS' 

PROVINCE tome » tounPTO 
gnaa ' Three fadroans, W-Mte, 

B 

ft*** 

nJtm) 90 72 07 5S Bern** 


HUB PABADSE Vsy r--- F -- 
itorceng bouse a* »«** “W 
Wwe garden ‘hurt ■erf *'**- fc * 

teas. 7%. 




|^11229-10oaio« 7-apniM 


Feat S5 91 07 09 


FRENCH RIVIERA 



mtcnmetA 

St JEAN CAP fBKAT 

MSSS* 


targe 

lOSB. 


rJ 

m dw» gcrogs. mw gwen 

pwig *m oam ; to4» pod 
6m ocean to Anbeodk 


■M1V/A !855 


]9 Ekt4u GMral Ledarc 
o^iotevuua^ajfcwat 
Td (33) wot 0(13. Fear (33} S3 0111 96 


SPECTACUtAR NEW 

ihower, prm*j torn + 3t*drooras 
«th bolf 5S^V(C + 

AirSft dxr^. tfldsenatfe. 

mi, a opnsOTta owm 


Romantic 


it* 


HOTE-ffiSTMBttNT^ 

fegotifaf tadmyWy 3 0 (tin fan 
farter *3393 03 0631 


APWVATCP WW* 

■TeL P3| «;76<6 03 w 47 80 17 


QWNa sBis. pat txE 

gttggM* 


r5 42 33 Off W, fa* 03^32 0313 

5BU fa xoriee* 


raj cfA rtto- «*■ 

1 S SoMbailJ «fp Q3193N 925? 

sot - 


GERMANY 


EOR SALE; «al aWe fe.Cerewy 
0( FrencWinembouro herds. • 

2 hukfexp. cn. ’IJ 

within L5 

CM buthBeg aAotfe fer. ichooJ, 

officer,, mcnutoctaier, warehouse, el- 
d er cu ra homes dub etc 2nd trait h a 
ifo* home widi het»*4e pool on 
large fa* vwjh gorden + Irers. 2 gp- 
raoes + mwd endcaed 

eoqanes ta ftan AG, PO Scat w 
Q+«B6 Zurich FO+4VTJ71 71 


HtANKRWT Luxury Ptathowe. 
fid floor. 30K5 sr^A ptartenocH. 3 
bednxmB, farad dneg foo«V dfo, 
fireptace, gotneet tochen, emnd otf 
eoaUortnQ, sauna 4 wd pod. Al 
not cont&r in ndghbot- 

. hood. Aik 13M ^amnawon. 
fidurei & ffeordon crvaSaUe. Tefc 
U. -nude, 2t23fr36t7 USA: 


HOLLAND 


UNIQUE fW i ■ MtWNCE. 
AjMWtdom/r tad ur kjd i 13 ran. m*n 


«OFK5IONAL/SESJDfNTtAU 
‘ ‘ fam Herertgrochl, 

obput (SO 

fax 


UMC3W j pn*w»r. 

with 

17 niSkxs Iwjen « 


ITALY 


SCOQUBtA H ZOAGU. Agdri » 

If* GWf rf rv*3 behtMn fttrtoftw 
• 4 Start rwnwr yh totuy 2} 

* dervY (ondtninan on ro teo- Ik® 

with oottd riwr-3 b ed gM i fa 2 faing 
rooms, 2 bdh«^b**y wwl 

tarn. Mrawsde terrott ac iwgjg 
ndv reeved -ad cf A t-nek.7l3 
^Thwc4.fa a9aB3201S.- 


MONACO 


MONTE CAtlO 
nhiumf MMrtw n n t JO sqjn. 

AAGEDI 

7/9. Ud* Ateyfcf 
Tut33mi6BSbfiB3l93anU2 


MONACO -OHKB 

500 soxt - PBMEWCAJON 

Ptrt of Monaco - ff24,l£0^00 


(92J. PANORAMIC VEW 

taaMLY / M. BARBS, 51h Beer 

dff sq^TL, 2 room, bdayry. IMF 3782 


3*. MOUffETARD, freestone, 7 
roams, 63 sg*. mg 30 3m 

icyDt* a OKDnJwi prmTia & rroeo 

<2 sqjn. ^xdtn. Fl^SOJXXJ. Tek (IV 
(5651 221 oftoyn)dn6 2223 heme 


PARIS 6th, UKB4BOURG GARWi 
seSrg uroant tSna owner, Bd Op- 

COWV WteMPKMig VJO w, am poor, 
eacaledt m ndrio n r A«* bias buUng. 
Cat (33] 54 375117 nO«n to 2pnj 


METRO ECOtE MUTAIKE / la Mode 


MARAIS - Owner- IseBe 
. auniMtf in IS* emtoy 
W iqjn. Tet (1) 4274907? 




«qm. Tet 
(£5(54M. 


SPAIN 


BARCBOKA, sna> lofr fe <*3 port of 
- town, 60 «nn, bngK "tS“® fa* 
artel. Quid, tenors. i&fSOflOQ. Pcs- 
d(e rert/svnjfx Te! Bartdoro (3*- 3] 
4(3 3( 00. fa* 415 77 14 After Aug. 
TitfcdleiScodd. 04-31219 3(53 


DEYA, MAUDRCA. Cottage on 2500 
FW Vlwe Mrtna Qiwtahle, 
GdfffdcOA £51^7259231. 


KUTL ft 
3150K. < 


SWITZERLAND 


LAKE OTA & 

NmiNiSOin 


JMefa 


mi97S U 
BCHA1E15 
■ICST4H 


IB 

aUkNSJMWANA.de. 1 ta 5 hri- 
rooms,*. 200000 to 3J ran. 
REV AC LA. 

54 MonffiHBdM, W-I21 1 Grgm 2 
Trf 4122-7M1S tax 734 12 20 


SWI2BHAND. IAKE G8CVA *or f 
derfd Jde w de A oantan resortt 
Adhonzdtferi te lei to tarmn. b 
' be- rnoa d Towrmae 

opataenL Iwag - 2 Hedrorws, . 2 
bajhmflO, win terrace, 

. btsfwe.. flmfatg. SF I. . 

. Apartments m the mtMtcms. Leyan - 
riSl (a) 25 mb Marram. 
berwa ftom 5F 250jOOa, i Owd s^> 
.fin bbkfar. T* 41 21-063 (0 38. 
fm (121-968 10 51. 


APAS3MWT IN CAJmCW^NJA 
(w lota LugtK> but SMS5.1AX 
Kwt fcom owner SFr. U 
atfon. war accept toms. Am al 
t 41-91-664087. - 


USA. RESIDENTIAL ■ 


PARIS ft SUBURBS 


EXCB’nONAt 

•^THnap 


BSKSHKESL WSSAORWTIIWA 
Ftnhr Compwmd/Bed & Sredrfc to. 2 
tandr restored house* fam 1770 
31885 on 1®+ oeret Heoud. 
waterfall- pod, pood, wjtsrfifca 

pendde. Ardqtes *ro«jlw<, L 
ploGe bodeons, 5 tradroons «eh 
Wm «* pnw* b*s ad or- 
. conditioning. Jongfewood, 

looob's Nm ord skww- Oww 
famdT<*JIH5W«S 


Jenov 15 Mta. to NYC 

mbo Kredfy to The GA1AXY 


7000 Bhd. E GuderbemA^wer MoS 
Tends, to & Q*toor fads, 

1-2 & 3 Beioone & PentSoui« 

SB“ 

CCSFOSATE RELOCATION 



201-861-6777 

OPB4 7 DAYS PAX- 201-661-0677 


PALM BEACH, FLOW A 
OOAmONT ESTATE 

Stvoted on 280 ft. of tired 
frontoge, this irvTmeftcent tamily 
axppowto ‘ csosats 3 5X0 v* fi 
moat home, 1AOO wf ft. goesr hoese. 
law pod on tern court on 2 acre. 
53/WfXX] Jim MeConn 

McCam*Coyn*rwCbH* Eed EsWeJnc. 
Tetephone: f4Q7? 655^550 USA 
Foe (407)658-5068 


5CA8SDAUE « VTONTTf New York 
lady views of pond S geff count 
froni lbs 4 bedroom. 15 both Otormmg 
ColoritJ on B acre: 30 «wKs to New 
York City. EactBeri Khod lyJtem. dm 
cmfrian. Gourret ed-fe . Irtchen wdh 
dtyPght, gfestwaled sun roes, faniy 
roo m, ferory, dri.j doy roqm. Camd 
car urduunng Wd to sdsccd. trere 
porUion & diops. 5649^00. 


9U72M700 


MBRfTT 


800453X237 


URGE HORSE FARM 

Two 2-imdrxm gusc/wvarf quartan. 
firfi pond, indoor pod, sum, tocuza, 9 
broths, 4 fewtacas, Boa gm. morrr 
boil ms, bewn matste, security system, 
pfef-waw in wwrd dnam. li hrs 
non Chicago Loop, 5 mm. feed awl. 
Direct from owner. Hut sol US? li 
M. OB/huc +41-91-484 067. 


SA1E-K5AIE 

todermdC oa i au d a H ndulnd 
WesJem Stores USA 
Contact- low Office of R. Etdon 
. Europe Foe + 3T-43-2S5W7 
Ui^Fte +T-619-77fr5549 
. AofduK* far lead ndfn fe 
■ wn lg qlinn to tLx dso av u dohle 


CAiffQBtAs PASADENA IS minutes 
tan downtown Los Argdes Begwt 
Engfch Tatar erocune home. 3 feed- 
rooms, 3tt bats, gaden room, feft 
office, fang noan, formal drang 


room. 
feagaspa 


Svmg roan, fonnol d 


WML BBACM CONDa Decadcd 2 
bedroon>72 bdh wrih screened pot® 
Wffedanfl tapon ese ffrto vjfavae 
- bench access, al anenK &8J0& 
Gd *07/588-2915 lAV 


SANTA ft, «W MEXICO 59 acre 
• fan* caimouid. 4 haws, news. 
goJf. privacy, serenrty. security 

&9SffjSa M 4e fate 50598473a 


EAST HAMPTON. New house. 1 acre, 
5 bedrooms, pod. wdk to bench. 

usa farms ft ranches 


COLORADO ROCKIES- 1 0,500 ocre 
roncK Cfc« to sfa oreo,,yeonCMid 
recrecncn, exceSert deveteprnert po- 
Jertbo), cade jrtopq eA & deer 
Lone wde Land Brokerage. 
J03-63& 5040 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


BELdUM 


BRUSSHS, RACE STEPHANE, high 
dss Op Ortm am, 2 bedrooms, tnig, 
Ijtchen/'dmxj^ both room, shower 
room BF 25JOO + charges 4JOO. 
Tet- 02/539 11 0b • F» 02/539 OBOi 


GREAT BRITAIN 


HYDE PARK, buy (la. 1 bod. 
receptia) overfodcs pert, duvmg 
r & stud*. Anting £ urereqe 
per week. Tet <4 71 589 433T 


IRELAND 


STUDYING Iff DUBUN ifa summer .' yrl 
luxury qp t rtn cn ts m SocCh otfy. tv- 
Fox 353 I 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


17«v ETOCE, 3 ROOM APARTMB4T, 

45 igjtL from Sep*. )»., aairnnum I 
yea. FB.000 net TgL 147 66 80 7<. 


URGE LUXURIOUS, 4 BSJROOM 
aportmem, 7th, fuSy equeped & riw» 
term. Tet (3101 452-2280 USA 


RATOTH 

HHH.TOWBS 0« 

EXPO PORTE DE VBtSAlUB 

fr«e siudan lc- Ir- -e-room de lg«e. 
Dorty, wtekKr a inondit» 

Free shunte m>sf n> 
Eurocfeney-Lad 

Cdb 05.343.345 Tot free 
at (33-1 145 75 62 20 


Embassy Service 

YOUR REAL STATE 
AGENT IN PARIS 
Tel: (1) 47,20.30.05 


74 OtAMPS B.Y5EE5 

CLAB1DGE 

FOR 1 WEEK OR MORE hgh dau 
2 a 3*oom gp a frn gnp . RXIY 
ED. IMMEDIATE R£SRVM10G 
Td: (1) 44 13 33 33 


CACTALE • PAXHBtS 
homferded qudity i^aimert*. 
oH sees ftns end suburfee. 

Td 1-4614 821 1. Fax 1-4772 3096 


6th: 2 ROOMS FROM FR700 + 


LATIN QUARTO, 2-rocm RnJ in town 
house, eMiatoe, btchen-twih. cu 
mew. htono. Ormer Tel- 1-43 54 6! 


BARE, FONTAffiQtEAU. fine home, 
tvmq. 4 beds. 2 faahs. irudy, pod & 
pat FUfttQ. let ft; 42 73(0 22 


PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 


14th, 75 SQ.M. 2 BEDROOMS + 
terrors, *bJ rertovoted. swwy. qwe». 
FB000. Owner Londcn 71^35-2541 pm 


USA 


lew YORKAaw tslantta Gdd Court 

Fa rent-Huge 5 Bedoan. 4i both 
Ccfliempoiay Cdc-ixcl Inqiamd 
pod, drat commute to Mannaron. 
yOOO - UU BrorivJe ISUA 922-9800 


International 
Herald Tribune 
ads work 


U5JL 


V£.A. 


PARADISE 

Northern New England. VT-NH 
Economic conditjoTK create 
gnai opportunities for tesidemial 
buyers- seeking eaceptioiud. 
fine propenies. 

Quality, tranquillity, security 
and VALUE. 

Martha E. Dicbold Real Estate 
Lvmc. NH 03768 
603-79S48I6 Fi»: 60^-795-4222 


ILSJL 


DIRECT 

WATERFRONTS! 

UNIQUE & DRAMATIC 

Contemporary with walls oT glass, Mrm 
snilrs ft lumioae blhs. Deep water 
mooriaf. pvi ilocL heated in-grad pool, 
lraracd QC L up aia. y1. ■ - — J2395D0O 

“ISLAND PARADISE" 
S ummnd ed t)' water cn 3 6td Cot-stone 
English Manor Home W / 93F of direct 
sbwriinc. teated saR-»aw pod & dadt 
lo itmor 9ff yacht .. — — 55^9OJQ0 

TfONKlMy CtF RfLOOLTWJ? 

Gdl i» for <W nto"T ^*ctJ [toXiMrito in 
esc ]asi^x NY siburhan <rat 

COUNTRY PROPERTIES 

OFRYB-HARftlSON 

91+967-0059 

Better Homes * Cantata 


BANC ASSETS LIQUIDATION 

SALE: 60 ACRES ji iiw HOuSTon intercontinental airport 

(Z. 613.600 square la#n — S2 00 -r. n 1 i»caiCir>vj si S3. CO t-ei so If 'i 

-S" H-.t-rti-; i_i. s 'rpiJT* meKTT ) 

15*. (gents CMWii?flon 

rC I Ocj 'ec «n.*c irv,.-«i — ' f- 5 - ■Ta: ( 713 ) 780-1797 Fax:( 713)7804405 


SPAIN 


REAL ESTATE GUZMAN f 


MaifecIIa Best Address 


jandwniray 

I fcetons so lit fcsri rrcrdte* aro i aticmfer l 
I eadns ckh pool: taretf s« rt ws. fulh air I 
letaSuontaJ. 3 RhW 3 hoilrw 200 livap. 

1 offered path- tumhhrd. J 

i Z295PQC FfdgaolD i 

JJEL: 34 - 52-810102 - FAX: 3 *^ 2 - 8177 68 ; 


FRANCE 


Saint-Jean-Cap-Ferrat 

EXCEPTIONAL 

Straff naideoev of 15 apnmems 
Ironi 2 to 4 mom-:. Luuirinu* finings 
View mi sea & port 
From F 35.000 ihe sqjn. 

1 1 Avenue Denis SEMLRIA 


SWTREKLAW 


TOP or T H V WOllO 

liDQffy flats in very bed location, 
connected with 5-Star-Hotel. 

■ 4 rooms, 166 sq.m.. livmg/dining 
room. Fireplace, 3 bedrooms, 
2 bathrooms, kitchen. 

■ 2 rooms, 82 sq.m., fiving/dining 
room, fireplace. I bedroom, 
1 bathroom, kiidwn 

not furnished, long lets. 

Facsimile: +41 82-2 15 22 


Looking for 
property in 

Swiss real estate! Switzerland? 


Dfemc,pnlsfficRali^s?Ec*»grisabdbp 
quad; ^affiTE* and (fa!* Jjhb Ute Gaerato 
Momswi 4 ib nnrim resorts d Vlan. Verte, 

Das. GsB«i Ystj 3<1 nwB. 

A total jervies ncirfng mee: S yeei antral apol. 

low of pncperKS. t^retaacn, ^diira on 
mtmai&s. Qialbn aid dmc&tion. up scfOTt 
^^BKftnrw.taorteataqrteU 

CastxtKryyrJcnj 

CVG SA. 9M3 Oartd ffis - fRD amnia 
TbL41i- 2149E2SI0D> Fto: 41+21+962 8015 


CZECH BEPUBLIC 



UNIQUE IN pRAOUE - 
IN THE HEART Oh EUROPh 

Upper-ela" pL*nihau%e aparimenis. 

,0 ff residential area near 
Wenicsljs Sipiarc wnh a wwidv*rll»l 
view ovrr the rooftop- ul PragOL-: 
MaKonctu* apartment* wi'h ■’ 
kturcys. ft***" ? 1 ' U’ I-'- '* ( l m - l,,f ! 
notch furnishings such >P ,,a J 
staircase, open fireplace-. lar?s 
terraces and separate efevaior- _ 
Future - oriented resident u I 

arehiiecture that mccr- rnle matronal 
standard- and feaiures the l»ip« 
envfrannteoial cnoccj»*s " 
buildinits. e.e. -miafie eiMern 
rainwater, solar r«ill«i*»r- 3nd '* , d 

Ouwanding arc b | itrc ,u * - 1 
by the architect I«» Po'**» n - 

Builrtmc owner Fa. Pn-tav ’■ r - u -- 
Pmh- Ma nap riuent hy * Fcrcne/yA 
P? r ,nrrs Lid.. Procnian.ro ft S*>*. 

Franl.iur.rM a. " Jlcrmany 
Tel- MAM 










Page 14 


NASDAQ 

Thursday’s 4 p.m. 

*Ws Hst compiled Oy the AP. constats of the 1 .000 
nrast traded securities in terms of dollar value. It is 



1 


f«v?i 






































































Page 15 




w Trans Europe Fu 


imstL 

■ 

- nut 
10243 

UDflB 

P A Mk & Amatanfcmt 
1 AM 
R27 


SESSS 


aSMMNMBI 



-Ecu 



STS' 


Fund -Ecu 
DM DM 

f&i? 




-DM 


o Norm America. 
^Switzerland — 


4X57 — 
9933 

£g& 

S 

ttwan 

mm 

1196076 

its* 

14151)* 

W2*5S- 

2SUOJ 

Ut 

1241 

1M6657 

T26JES5. 

mm 

12245*8 

20121 

17XH 

mcuo 

23773 

ntn 

1304* 
7*31 


d For East USD * (OM. { 

tf Pot East USD BjO»> * 

tfWMJPYA« J 

!|gp! 

SBaSsaafft— „ 

9 

I ffirffir — 8 1407 

' — - 2197 


Aug.ii. 19 ® 4 


2U2U 

1X52* 

1*4030 

100*19 

IU419 

10592S 

185925 


Ibo 


MW 


■iim I i bIo tedl tH lri iiii e wry oiwolAownwppBMfcW.dJy; 


ESC PUMD MANAGERS (Jtntfl LTD 

V3 Seale St. SI Htfler ; 0534-36331 „ 

ESC TRADED CURRENCY FUNDLTD 

0 g bpim . . 1 pjgg 

iht^wSattohal i SEBmefund 


0 Loon Ttnn_ 


r«M J £i^ ra P 


wQ» 


wCottander FAustrtwi- 


r. Growth _S 


d Cl Emero ffatttti Ffl — -« 


ALPHA FUND MANAGEMENT, LTD^^B 
a PorEn-yiHe ML HapUtoa HM 11 Bontwdg 
w Alpha Aslo Hgrige [Auo 3) _J_ 
m Alpha | ■ M M 



nAOn 

mikUn 


a 


■r HetnH Jopai 


311—7 

TBtt- 

W* 

31* 


ms 




?RRAEA^«ASo5m 
wArrM Ame rican Quant M-4 
wArnU Asian M 
or Anal mm** 

ATL AS CAPITAL] 
wM|H 
■All 


SILAS ypfr ffSMJWQW^HT 


f interptfl Inti 
r MertMCbH 
intarmarkct 
mOoseA— 
mf 


12934 

1 15123 

m» 

9413 

93S5& 

4133* 

20*41 


13027 

7335 

lllffi 

172.14 

10025 

15129 

1074* 

s 

10366 
8 MB 
T72Z1 ' 
1DLS2E 
1BU7 
11212 
18779 


2121 * 

LTD 

9931 

- m 

577.14 

64938 

233728 

22437 


I CAPITAL INT ERNA 

w Capital Ian f ~ 


wto^l^SA— S 

CDC INTERNATIONAL - 


iTrWfiiiTr“ cc T7 »m* 

IV CEP Uani ■— ^728840 


182X12 
B15214 
1009 JO 

12253 

14037 

125950 

■90430 

5032 

15450 

006.13 


138.15 

4547 


ISf ftlH LttJS 082-4CT 10) 

w Erndhaoe mter Rate Strel JM 

wEmritageSeta Fur4_ J 

w Ermttage Aston Hvdu* F 0 -S 
wEnnttoge EoroHedneFd— DM 
w Ermltaoe Creshv Asia Fti_S 

EUROPA FUNK LIMITED 
0 American Eaudv Fund — 5 
0 American Onflow Ri nd .. . 5 

w Aston Bwff» Fd_ S 

lltY I 


3i jin 

(053942 

1W# 

4275 

930 

10J2 

19.18 

0.12 

1575 

an 

!£K 

12048 


advertisement 

international FUNDS 

10.12 
23171 
*4333 
4.1434 
23751 
25792 
4349S 
2M90 
23190 
13020 
1352* 


GT MANAMMEHTPUW71 »« A 

Si:?:gSSM^ 1 

w Gjl GtoSSTsmallCo Fd _J g* 

0 GlT. mvestmod Find— * W 

wBlT. Ne wft UB Countr.Fj -A *gj 

iSSS^^sts^^> 

GUINNtS FLIGHT GLBL5TOATEGY FD^ 

0 Managed Currenor— J 

0 nwwi HiTrrl * 

d Global Hh* Income Bond -3 
tf Gilt &£ Band 


iv Europe Grown Fund n.v._fi 
w Japan Diversified Fund— J 

ht Leveraged COP HOW— —0 
MERRILL LYNCH 
0 Doner Assets portfolio— » 

0 Prime Rote Portfolio -7 . 

MERRILL LYNCH SHORT-TERM 
WORLD INCOME PORTFOLIO 


6491 

55.12 

5937 

MB 

1040 


0 Class A. 

tfCnuB. 


0 Euro Klgh lnc Bend- 
a Global Eaoitv _. ... 


ev^rSt ^pit al Ha?) mrm 

m Evens! Conlta l loll Ltd—* „ '3*35 

FIDELITY mn. INY.SERVICES {L**J 

0 Discovery Fond 5 

d FarEotfFnnO— — — * ,£■*} 

0 FW.Aowr.Awn _ * 

■ _ 11125140 

3*31 
1939 
H39 
14.19 
U249 
44.02 


0 AmericonWueCWP. 
a Japan and PoaBc- 
0 UK. 




3038 

MJ5 

2L75 

1034 

run 

943* 

2273 

13437 

2*30 

13144 


SffibScYBOHDllR.ES 
AUSTRALIAN DOLLAR PORTFOUO 
0 Category A — AS 

CANAAN DOLLAR PORTFOLIO 
H C ategory A g 

CORTORATE HIGH INCOME PTFL 
0 doss A- 1 S 

0OQ5SA-2 % 

0 O 0 »B-l * 

0 Class B>1 


GUINNESS FLIGHT INTL ACQJM PD-., 
- n-ihrf-™«v Money. P» 


0 FhLARKr. values IV. 
0 Frontier Fima. 


3873! 

2111 

3*30 


d Global Ind Fund— J 
0 GWbaiSelactlonFi 
0 now Eunme Fund J 
tf Orient Fund... . — 

0 gj^jl 


Fund- 


FD AW* LTD 

•5^. _ 

3oi 


9J1 

1039 



crrmuist WM 

w^sM otyMortol- 
wCMkiWHiH 


' wdsfa-J 


BAHK BRUSSELS LAMB&RT (32-2> 547 MD I 


at Ctlfiperlarmanea PW ISA.— S 
iv Hie Gboa Esifii FBicfl__p"- 
COMGES T PHI 49 7BH1B 1 

i CF.E.MBBHHH 


0 BBL Invest - 

0 BBLInvrN For East. 
0 BBL Invest Asia 


0 BBL invert Lgln Amor. 

ssstaffcE— 


0 BBL Parrlmontat M-__LF 
0 Rf 2 tks Catti S-Mvdhim BEF BF 

SBaaMaw" 

d pm ILt lnv Euro-Hnnio — LF ■ 
^BS^S^Gwrasw 0W 72*614- 


-BF 040550 


mojx) 

*0271 
24857 
3*1*40 
Ml 41.0D 
12MCM 
517239 
301833 
12938 
141U30 
1027230 
342UKI 


IM* 

l»re 


_5F 


CONCERTO LIMITED 

^^&5 Ar 


9030 

124*44 

12*942 

145531 

164142 

UU* 

16177 

1242 am 

23043 

10171 

14241 

1439JB 

94.19 

501930 

23434 

19731 

T5M1 

147J2 

14SJ1 

9771 36 
987762 

254J9754 

U.15S34 

J£SS 

1 m 

103431 

ImS 

9128 


- - . - 11965 

FINMANAGEMBNT 5A-LU0«H(«13V»m) 

iv Delta Pr*ratomc«T>__--S im» 

Tel : London m 

d TUaerntnlan Invol Co SkuvS 2&5* 

0 amziiToc Invest Co Skpv_J 37JJ 

wColornblonlnyrit QaSfcnv J 17« 

d GHd Em Mfctslnv CoSleovA TAB 

d Indian InvnxT CnSkxw— —A 1150 

0 Latin Amer Ext ro Yleld FU i 9J7M 

0 Latin America Income Co_S 

BfcB^ay«Bsr 

mFMG N.AmerOl i Jjrtjr) — J 

m fmS EMGMCT rn AlY)-| 

L‘3r?^5Sf7SSi« J 

wGtrinHedsr II 


0 us Dollar HU Yd Bond — S 

StSS^tygwnlm : S 

wHaseidihMerDhi J 

-.pci * law 

HDF FINANCE.TMP3-1 |487**«&F« 


DEUTSCHE MARK PORTFOUO 

0 Category A dm 

0 Category B 
EUROPEAN 
d Class A-i. 

0 Class a* 2 _ 


1815 

T778 


1445 

1179 


1115 

1231 


m Pad Be ArDltraw Cg. 3 

m RJ- Courtrv WttdFd gr—j 
0 Regent GW Am GrinMy* 
d Regent GW Eu»Gr» Fd J 
0 Regent GBj WBJN-J 
0 Regent GW JW I 
0 Regent OW PQgtB asto—* 
tf Rioenf Gtoi gcae nw.g ; 

0 Regent GW »»««« S 

0 Regent GW TWer — * 

0 Rmem GWU k G rttiF 0 — 5 

iv Regent MagMA Fdl LM. > 

m Regent PnOflcHMFd J 

w RBoem Sri LgAoRL— -* 

iv Undervoluea abbs Ser i_3 

MB onJMOA^gertonLlWllO 224B24 

0RG Amertoe igM f S 

25S3SSs£L ® 

^T'tS”eRoSplD!^DC> 


103* 

1233*20 

969 

116* 


JSF 


1762 

no 

1439 

17-35 

1035 

1022 

!03l 

1149 

10J7 

98897 

1171 

964 

1033 

1031 

1031 


0 Class B-l 

0 OHffa-’ 

EUROPEAN BOND PORTFOLIO (UHI 

0 Close Arl DM 

0CMSSA-2 DM 


ivbahua LCF g*heOiWBd-S 

:liS=cST35^„ 

wObll-Vala 


> ■» « 

da Svrtet Franc Fd SF 

CIA » 


S^m^^j^°hzTunds wmm 



j®BaBF=r 

0 Ada PodflC— — 
d contlnenM Europr^ 

0 Developing Markets. 

0 Pronce- 


1361 

1123 

1065 

1231 

934 

1048 

1033 

14558 

1932 

5733 

12967 

B5J9 

1461 


wMwiflHived— 

w Mona Invest croteowice. FF 

I wYondkwtBl Oop Insfcs—— 
iv MofWiiveg Eme raGnmtw^ r 

HE?B*OONFtRfi»1IV U99W1H50 
/ Heptagon QLBFieid. 5 

EsHmaled Prices 

m Hennas European Fund__H 
mHermes Noriti American F« 
ra Humes Aslan Fun d. ■ - -j 

mHermq EHMwM fcriFvwLS 

RjHtrmesSJrntrwWs Fund — S 

mHermos HauwdFi miL S 

m Hermes Girtrt Fu»te^ 

m Hermes Bond Fu glj 
m Hermes Sleri lnB Fdl 
m Humes 


131091 I 

MOB 

1257.19 

ir»« 

12*139 


0 Class B-l 
0 OassB-2 


POUND STE RUNG PORTFOLIO 
0 Category A 1 


-Ecu 


90331 


M0S0 

29077 

S55 

*4565 
124336 

; 

aSS3s«gs»5- M1 

9*74 

INVE5CO l NTT. LTD, POB 27L JwMT 
Tel: 4453473114 
0 Maximum Income Fi*d — t 

sssssaas!=i 

S&* 5ft^gr z| 

0 "jS^wmSTFimd— 

s£S5T£srsa=| 

prSSuer s^ect funds' 

0 American Growth.— — — * 

0 American Enlenrlse 
0 Asm Tlgw Growth 
0 Donor Rewrve- 
0 European Growl 


USDoSuCR PORTFOLIO 
0 Category A. 


YEKPORTWOo” 


tf Category A. 


MU?ffSjRRENCY BOND PTFL 
0 CkmA 
0 Class B 


1534 

1535 


1132 

1X14 


2139 

1163 


gaaffiSg^ 

a PneauiiT FcHtgvcy y 

6 Priequity Fd-LathiAm— I 

a PHbona Find Ecu — f “ 

4 Prttoed Fund USD - j 
b Prlbcmd Fd HY Emer MktiS 

•vSeteetivelftwestSA— J 

b Source j 

w US Bond PftJS- 

nr Vortartu 


6238 

1014.99 

103045 

i MHn 

273*98 

*038 

96638 

11 * 

11*664 

1*1711 

13*367 

119321 

1113*4 

116.18* 

35X458 

ILJ2940 

9323*1 

1047X4 


llESSgS 1 

gggSSKS?!!: 

3 Siobot income--— 

}aaas== 

0 Emerging MM* F« me 
d |?S Oovcmmeni 

S&BbS03= 

Ubmkb»-" 

GROWTH PORTFOUO , 1193 

a Ctes a-i — i 173) 

0 ooss A-2 i 1573 

d Doss A 3 — t 1538 

0OQS5H s 1738 

?NCdScTORTFOL IO , 979 

0 ooss A — I 930 

3164 

1X78 
4167 
20*1 
5639 
227* 
1SJ1 
1*62 


* *^SS5sW LWJ 

3 ££@8353% 


0 DawmJQpgnHg fa* — - 

HSfSiMbsS-IE 

sisss»aS£^i 

!Bsar.SB>j=fl 

d Eml Metfi >W« p «l B --ito 
d Eml Spin ind. Plus A— 

0EmlUKI«M Hgft r 

S^triltoinv.WhEucfd J 

0 Europe W92. 

m FjKLP. pgntnitfl — — * 

w FalrfleW IrtYUd— — — 4 

w Fairfield Sentr y Ud — 1 

iv FoirfWd sirateglei Ltd — J 
rnFotum Fimfl- 


wJOkorto— 

Sewt^ger'selfund 


mFh^rdOvwansLM. 

w First Eoole Fimd— 

iv First Ecu LH 


0 Hong Kong. 
0 Jooon 
Korea 


d ptiHloameS- 

0 TnaUand- 

0 - - 


0 Indonesia-^ 
0 uSSUauMItT- 
0 China. 


?^^57 aiwanfijnd j 


ROTHV^llLD^BROUP EDMOND DE) 


own* 

LTTM 


-FF 


0 Germany — - 
I imerrwtfaoa L . 




wC&.isA! 

OgMSlNWSTIliRWr F UHDS ^ 

0 §p£tf IKDMSL— _ — DM 

d CS Portf Inc (Ur») A/B — Ut 

0 CS PorttlncSFR A_— 3F 

0 CS Porft lnc 5FR B $F 

.jaaaBiBfc^s 

a “ pSm bS ^Uni) a/B — l« 


— i 

UUMWINDOSUEZ 

SttoSSFuLFdSer.ia.BS 

sisssssf-ssififes' 

d IsAArian Grtnvffl Rm d^— S 
0 isa Japan Rm.Grawtti Fd-Y 
0 isa- P odflc Gold Fond- — * 

0 ISA Aslan Inooaic Fund * 

d indosuez. Korea Fund — } 

wShanoticd ran d - ■ — S 


0 CS Portf Bat 
d CS Portf 


SF 


. — .. Bui US1 

Portf Growth DM— DM 


■vHImakiyan IF 
iv Manila Fund 


Fund. 


■vMekieeaFar 

irSWhFund. 


0 ladaeuesHonoKqngFa 
0 Oriental Ventura lluot- 
0 North AmerionnTniN- 
0StngaP& Malay Trust- 
0 PodllcTrosL- 
0 Tasman Fued- 
0 JonmiFund 


b Mari France— — 

? Masi France**— — — f* 
Ir-rtnoy. larin America— J ■- 




non 

129.95 

n*» 
nun 
HUM 
U5YI3 
164577 
nenz 
11138* 
43500 
R2JH 
101X00 
1863 
. 11J5 ‘ 
T161 
1164 
2072 
3062 
1852 
57 J* 
5L30B 

am 

3*650 
M765 
37575 
*520 . 

nj*o 

3*630 

834 

. B43S 
9LM 
9347230 
514137 
5THM9 
IBM 


i Portf Gra [L**l A/B — L»| 
i Portf Growth SFR. SF 

iSSKgwSe^lf 

sssssS 

Manor Marlwt Fd *_J 


d 


S§g3JS5irS?±=f“ 

0 Scald Mine* B » 


111750 

171982 

im*x* 

105171 

95794*30 

96679 

TWL34 

9*8.18 

96472 

10*038 

95248230 

1007.94 

10K77 

■184857 


0 North AmericoJ 
0 Switzerland— J 
0 Unltvd Kingdom - 


RESERVE FUNK, 

SSZZWlBt— I - 

d French Franc— FF ■ 

0 Yen Reserve ■ — — 2 

GEFINOR FUNDS at, 

London :7I-4J9 41 7LGeneva:41^B 73555*1 

wSartflsh World Fund ■* 

» 

OEHESEE FUND Ltd 


0 Europea n Eakcrpriat-— - 8 

SSSSffi!^ 

0 UK Growth J 

iv doss A (Agar. Growth ikedLI* 



GED 


iSImrLMjL- 

iSSSSSfc 


!! Bonds 


-ECU 


Bond B 
ASSET MANAOEMEHT 

e funds ^ ^ ua/Hnua, 


4759461 

34897 

1062 

7BJJI 

1*339 

13835 

10(776 

138861 


A (Asor. Growth IM.11 

5 (Global Emrityt — ! 

iv Class C (Glahal Bend) 

ivCI^D (Ecu Bond)— — 


-Ecu 


177788 

266TO9 

26*80 

1 3800 

177D0 

97800 

*3500 

86000 

US 

55300 

*5K0 

96300 

53800 

55200 

15000 

43000 

73*80 

8150130 

12.15 

11 . 1 * 

1038 


US FEDE RALSEC URITfgS?T FL 

I 

BASIC VALUE PORTFOLIO 
d CkmA | 

CONVERTIBLE SECURITIES PTFL 

0OOMA J 

GLO&AL ALLOCATION PTFL JUSSI 
0 aossA — - — | 

GLOBAL EQUITY PORTFOLIO 
0 gras A — — * 

cuTO*Eoui-nr portfolio' 

0 CkmA 1 

uSSn M 8ERICA PORTFOUO 
0giwA — j 

PiSlHC EQUITY PORTFOLIO 
m CMOS A - 6 

WOrS) 1 NATURAL RESOURCES F 1111 - 

0 CkmA * 

0 Class B— — — 

DRAGON PORTFOLIO , 14 .„ 

S 3S!* — « i*68 

MERRILL LYNCH EMERGING MARKETS 

0 CkmA — * 1,J 9 

0 Class B . — - — — * 


0 Asto/Jaaan Emerg. Gjowihi 
iv Esorlt Eur Por ta lnv T it— EG. 
w Euraa 5tnm investm fd_Ecu 

0 Integral Fuhra- 5 

ISSSaassniTii, 

t Setedlon Hortem FF 

a vidolre Ariane. 


i7jn« 

138878 

10S.97D 

95b4t 

937 

MRU 

8147333 


1538 

1460 


1434 

1X98 


1X57 

1069 


1*59 

1*34 


ROTHSCHILPASSET MOMT ICJ) LTD 


SMRSWms 

:£S^wS lAmertcaJ =i 
Z ^GAM Edi MATS G-iSX.1 3 
w Ren GAM Em Mk» Lot AmJ 

:SSSg£g«liSK53s^ 

SftSSlceSMPadtlc 1 

w Republic G«ev Doi Inc — * 
wReaubficGnsevEurlnc — DM 

■v RePublk Lei Am Alloc. S 

w Republic Lot Am Argent — * 
w Republic Lot Am Bradl-— 8 

w RemWlc LM Am ftertea—S 
> Republic LM Am venex — | 

sM»IS5teAv. 

pi Co mm ander Fund ; 

mExoiarar Fund- 


138.72 
114.17 
144(9 
11976 
11427 
997* 
10572 
10069 
1482* 
11132 
15X30 
1029- 
NLII* 
9769 ■ 
9S6* • 
104*8- 
10X23- 
74M ' 
8759 

100605 

103304 


0 EquIIy Growth 

8iWEiB5K»_ 

0 B- Fund— — 

0 £- Fund. — 

0 j - Fund. — 

0 M- 


-SF 


S ilBzTSaTncoaie Fima_3F 

d UBZ world income Fund— Ecu 

0 UBZ Gold F und 1- 

0 UBZ NlBuan C on vert- 
0 Asia G rawth Convert S Ffl-S F 

0 UBZ SitoKuirr — | F 

d UBZ American Ea Fund— J 

w Artel Invest — * 

w Arm Invest — ’ 


iv Beck Invest - 
iv Bruclnvesr. 


1*31 

1867 

1830 

121738 

6445* 

379.18 

125*52 

1X4* 

5375 

12875 

12*59* 

121064 

117&65 

(0261 

11023 

11461 

9238 

9532 

18176 


mFlnt Fngiiwr Fimd. 

lafSSStea — .. 
i8Sailaiaga=L 

ia assaa tg=j 

KiFXC in vestmgi hLM— — » 

m GEM G cnorodon Eg d — j 
mGEM Generation Lt d j 

Bggrgj BfcwsEt 

SSjggj gB5=| - 

snassatB^. 

iv Globed 94 Fund LW SF. S F 

w Global AiPUroBeLtd— SF 

iv Gkdwl Fuluras Mgt Lid — * 
ivGonrwrd — 

mHemlmhere Neutral May 31* 

gBaa s^fftwcL 
yi ffasr ud ^=f 

z%fssLsm=s^ 

Z II 1-1R.R » 

X 


1133 


MERRILL LYHCH INC 1 PORTFOLIO 
d LkJSS A * IS 


0 JF ASEAN That— 

0 jFForEMfwrntTr. S 33.15 

0 JF GWwlCom ATr— 

0 JF Hong KMWjrtS- 
0 JF Jt»»i Sm. Co Tr_ 

0 JF Japan Trust 


11 Athol SUJauatokJ 
wGAMert r n , - . — 
iv GAM ArtdtrageW 
iv GAM ASEAN— | 
wGAMAostraltaj 
wGAMBartarad 


SgSKaSSStez^f 1 


wfiMMBi 
wGAMEurapean 
w 6AM France -■ 
w GAM PranCrwl 
w 6 am GAMCpl 


I High Yield J 

i Past Asia J 

l Japan ■ 

(Mone y MM3 1 

CtesFri 



M^fiSSSS^f 

~lF0A- FL 
»«tr 


ikAVE ENSUBSE-tCNEVA 


■vinWsecad- 


IALLIAI9CK-CRGT>IT BANK- 


‘^arasBri. 


nu* 

97.15 
8X1* 
97.1* 
IBJg 
USE 

ws 

i^ ^SSStzig , ^ 
SKKSpFKlitmff wS 

BAROJ»YSI»ITLTOI»NM«“» E " s 


s^B SgS=t p-- 

“ D *- tartrFF vt^r55s4F 



§=i. 


0 dSdSSSS!U 

wGA*Sl mealed MIN- Fd_ Is 
iv GAM Emery Mkts 
•VGAM MIH-birCPe , 

IV GAM MHFEuraPCl. 

Hr GAM MHKNollOt US — .. 

WGAMMHMJS— * 

wGAMTracBneDM JM* 

wOAMTradiitg US* .. j 

vGAM RetcUvevekie 
w GAM S election -- 
ivGAMSingapatnA 
vGAM SF SneT 
rGAMTyche. 


=3 


■r S aSSu* InvestirwnteT 


wGAMVa* 


gam Whiten* 




ophrap? 


34515 

njw 

3S 

2B79B 

ss 

134771. 


ESi&BsspO 1 —®-' 

IV Japan TadmologY. 

S j^i( ^Gatara tioii. ? 

iv Mohnnla 8. faw**™ * 

iv North Amerfan — — » 

wOctae»_FUi *f - ^ 

w Partn c Fund .- s- -_ - » 

. Inter ii u tloi u il Bund— * 

(Europe 


0 Enerptv-vwar ^ 

tf idi i i u ii iu Pl B i _ 

SeoratVatorlB-Dollar S - - 

l^iass&siEd- 

0 5rdffsw*raFWBd*_ 

0 cs Capita* ECU 3M0. 

SajWWffWP-e 

fi EElfi 


~ GAMWOrtJ)M«e— 1 

w GAM Bond Ug Ort——— | 

w GAM Bond U|S Special S 

IV GAM good SF- « 

w GAM Bond Yen — — Y 

iv GAM Bond DM ? 



;es^m — 5 
•88^8385=4 

w GW»t Shat FdCI A S 

-senenB 

spsSBBirf 


44520 

486.93 

4S2J2 

12464 

11267 

9492 

187635 

26139 

11136 

15494 

7505 

VZ&Jl 

10X44 

10X54 

18X45 

18069 

1001930 

1*036 

17332 

12631 

12736 

17138 

13438 

16662 

15752 

97434 

MB25 

*1538 

74962 

1-1774 

JJ232 

20064 

8653* 

12124 

19273 
68078 
14462 
184*1 
10169 
■463030 
11938 
15779 
14863 
14753 ' 
33634 
9931 
99X6 
W0J® 

ion* 

10139 
10531 
9936 
9X51 


0 jFMaJawkiTnjM 1 

0 JF Podflc lnc.Tr. — * 

jMmGOVETT MANT (LOMJ LTD 

— i 

■vGavett Moa Fid. USS 1 

ISGeor.Curr— — -S 

isGBUBcd.Hdge — -* 

JULIUS BAER GROUP 
0 Baerbond. 


1464 

1837 

5451MJ0 

13057* 

2737 

1265 

1971 


JSF 


O Eauibaer America- 
0 EgoRtaer Europe— 
1 5FR- BAER 


-SF 


0 LkwRwer- 


-SF 


0 Europe Band Fimd- pu 

0 Dollar Bond Find — 3 

d Alhlro Bond Fund - 

0 Swiss Bend Fund. 

0 DM Bond Fund-—- 

0 Convert Bond Fimd— — J SF 
0 Global Bond Fund- — —DM, 
d Euro Star* Fvad- 
0 US Slack FimX— - 

0 Pacific Stock Fund- 


0 Snto^ Stpck Fund- 


l Swiss smde- 


-5F 


0 Japan Stock Funfl- 


0 Genrai stock Fund -DM 

5 Korean Stock Fund. * 

0 Swiss Franc Cash — *F 

0 DM Cash Fund— 

0 ECU Cash FumL. 


_Ecu 


0 StefllnoCaih FVnd 
0 Dodar Cash F 


l Fivid- 


ns7 

174 

1288 

1X8314 

8*831* 

170X28- 

2C253- 

1434M* 

100X57- 

243X81 

2926*4 

227738 

14*68 

12X08 

1271* 

121 * 

11X50 

9150 

8X00 

13468 

13160 

13468 

158* 

14250 

99*830 

10*70 

0950 

1211* 

13*930 

1280* 

till* 

105X00 

1121 * 


MERRILL LYW3I MEXICAN INC PORT 
0 Mexican lnc S PM a A 1 

0 Mexican Inc » Ptfl OB— J 

0 Mexican lnc Peso Plfl a A 5 
0 Mexican Inc Pe* Ptfl O B 5 
MOMENTUM AM ET MAH* CEMENT 
wMmwantum Nayrille r Pyl-S 
m Momentum kalnbpw Fd — S 
mMomenhxn RxRR-U— — . — i 

SwM gtoS4*Kteftxmd Eur Era 

w WlHeffundPWBtarra Eiv— Era 

ivWlllertundk WgNrea Itehf-UI 

ivWIHarfunds-WJBerea NA — » 

M U LT I MANAGER K.V. 

m World Band Fund- Era 

m European EinAtkn Era 

m Japanese Equities — V 


SKAMDINAVISKA EHSKILDA BAN KEN 
S-E-B ANKER FUND . , 

0 EigaBo fe i ! 

gp^ranomm- 1 


line. 

0 Lotmmedet I 

0Vartde 


0 Japan Inc 
0 MU la Inc 


0 Sverige Inc. 

01' 


0 Tekrariaat Inc- 


8651 

11434 

B27Z 

15155 


0 Svtrtae Mrrielond in 
SKANDIFONDS 
0 Eautty InnAcc 

0 Eewly Inrijnc 

0 Eautty Glebtf 
0 Eauttv Nat r 
0 Eauttv Jc — 

0 EauRy I 


0 Eauttv UJC- 


mCcsh Enho nctme 

mArattrage-^H 


NIO^AiAPPLEGATE CAPITAL MGT 
iv NAFi«air Growth Fd S 

^’ISm^HOHGKONG) LTD 
m NCF USD. * B"Uh 


I4Z19 

135*6 


1062 


At NCF DEM. 
01 NCF CHF _ 
m NCF FRF_ 
»NCF JPY_ 
m NCF BEF. 


-DM 


-FF 


87158 

■92479 

<43965 

SH9S* 

2*780* 


*oSy j ^th Inc. — DM 

wOdev Eurap Growth Ace— DM 

■vOdev EuroGrthSterinc — S 
iv Oder Eura Grth Star Ace —£ 

OLYMPIA CAPITAL INTI- INC 
WHlUmn House. Hamilton MHM1L ^Bermuda 
Tel: 809 292-1 01 8 Fax: 809 215-005 
■v Finsbury Group 


13237 

139* 

14365 

14338 

5X84 

59* 


S^IFSS&SSeme^nc.. 

in Kay Giotxd Hedge— f 

mKev Hedge Fund me * 

psssa sau-^ 

b III Fund Lid. — * 


25042 

15069 


1165 


b inti Guaranteed Fund^ 

LHHuSSkN 1 BRCrrHERSWM«/M 
0 Askm Dragon Port HV A— 3 
0 Aslan Dragon Port NW B — J 
0 Global Advjmrs it NV A — s 
0 Global Advisors n NV B__l 
0 GlBbol Advisors Port NV <L3 
0 Global Advfsara Port NV B3 
0 Lobman CwAdv. A7B__-» 
0 PremtW Figures Adv A/B-5 
L1PPO INVESTMENTS^^ 


30*1* 

1143* 

1339.19 

173735 

969 

968 

1063 

KL42 

1X37 

1X38 

769 

975 


w Styrnota Stars Emerg M kts» 
w wmch. Easleni Dragon— J 
iv Which. Frontier———-—* 
iv Winch. Fut. Otvmpla Star _s 
w Winch. GiSecIncP IAJ — S 
iv Winch. Gi sec inc PMC) — * 
tv wmch. Hide lari MtWson-Era 

w Which. HIM InQ Ser D £ra 

iv Winch. King inti Ser F- . F cu 
I toncTL Hldg OW ^ 
iv Winch. Ros k. MuWLG * BdJ 
w WlntSiester Tttanivid_---_5 
OPT1GEST LU«MBOURG 
b OgitgesIGWFd-Ftkad inc-DM 
b ffilSS GW Fd-Gen Sldl FJ7M 

OPTIMA FUND 


221 31 
1*278 
91*37 

26351 

1*139 

932 

957 

150*5* 

177X37 

17*169 

103X89 

1X32 

3165 

1*3384 

1*518 


0 Eauttv Canttnental Europe J 
0 Eaulty Mct Mu rronean 5 

0 Eauttv North America 1 

d Eauttv For tot-—- — * 

0 tntl Emergina Markets— 3 

0 Bond Inti Act- * 

0 ®smt l art Ik- 
0 Band Europe 6 
0 Bond Europe IK- 
0 Band Sweden Aoc - 
0 Band Sweden mr 
0 Bond DEM AcC. 
d Bond DEM IK- 

0 BoK Dollar US Ace — } 

3 Bond Dollar US lnc } 

0 Curr. US Dollar. — . 8 

d Carr. SwedWt Kronor Sofc 

SOOETE GENE RALE GROUP 


^LU C S l F B UiiDTSFr 

:i^gsss^^D« 

IV SF Bonds C France FF 

iSF Bonds E<LB - 

iv SF Bands F Japan— 
iv SF Bands G Europe — 
wSF KS H World Wide- 
ly SF Bondi JBetBj uni— r 
■v sf Ea.K North Amertcn 
■v sf Ea.LW.Emwe 


56576* 

146* 

4234 

1*30 

31* 

12X58 
11.90 
23* 
176* 
1X31 
815* 
17* 
1*73 
1596 
1X8* 
2931 
1538 
1723759 
1664 


w SF Ea. M Podflc Basht__Y 
■v sf Eg. P Growth Coun#rte*6 
wSFEa.QG«*»»|tai 1 

ssteSiKfiWS, 
:U!!gfes=d ^ 

iv SAM/McGarr Hedge 3 11035 

iv sam opoortunttv — 
w SAM Oracle— 
w SAM strategy 
mAtanaSAM- 
iv GSAM Coma 


wDInhJturB. 
ivDtnv 


N DkH§ §c«_* Mrt 018 -j 

wDhtvest inti Fix lot Sirai— | 
•rjaghtycsi- * 


„ Mourtovat Commuted. 

w Moor Invest Eca 

nPutsor— — — 

w P uUor QvtrriY. ■ 

w Qinntlnvast- 
iv Quanttnvest i 

iv Stein Invest . 

iv Tudlnvesl. 


FiH^iowu! i*uxS^J 

w UBAM S Bond^_— 


235461 Z 
965* * 
18X761 Z 
143961 z 
117179 z 
181877 Z 
249763 z 
1857.16 Z 
94779 Z 
879 381 
B4XB3Z 
192739 Z 
«8239z 
1314*1 
352173 Z 
97X36 z 
1*08.17 Z 
183769 Z 
1*97.17 T 
240315 z 
13*671 I 
277772 Z 
1120* Z 
71774 Z 


h ILA-IGB 

b I LA- IGF 

b ILA-INL STTTT 

rasaaas^i 

O intertund SA— — * 

dlnttWhajklnri 

0 inveshjDWS— — r — 
w j«mn Podflc Fund 

wJoPwSrigoimiFimd. 
iv Kcnmor GWJwitait- 

w Konmar GumdMd - 


M35 
*35539 
1847876 
18MJ7 
71.91 
letjn 

U4 

154*00 

915158 

112 *1* 

>2817* 

97iS4 

>K2i 

10*56 

iixn 

*9265 

18*75 

»9|* 

1D15* 

132* 

144* 

18443 

7.18 

U77 

J01.ll 

1«3\ 

84918 

QUO 

124575 

V«.U 

5993779 

7967 

*4.18 

112 * 

13X77 

8553 

2742 

8*65 

70X36 

105477 

954.73 

92478 

53*574 

153962 

731* 

185X57 

X985 

127* 

KJt 

154&* 

12X961 

2663 

77134 

57S26M 

61271 

10366 

217.17 

23763 

8X21 

24547* 

9*737 

95139 

maxoa 

1264 

1129 

10* 

8369 

3160 


DM 


w UBAM PEM~Bond jrr -— OM 

w UBAM Emerging Growttt-S 

ivUBAM F RF BOtld FF 

iv UBAM Germany-. DM 

w UBAM Global Band Ecu 

wUBAMJopmt 


I1MLM I 
1121 J8X 
98776 z 
549X32 Z 
115134 Z 
143X141 
180*6*1 
9*364 
2897* Z 
115534 z 


Z UBAM I^fScIIB Asia — J , 

JnIoMk w Wirail^DrfNTMG 
“ ~j p 56* V 


d Amca- 
0 Bond- Invest 
0 Brlt-lnvcsl. 
0 Conac- 


-SF 


0 emtvert- Invest. 
0 D-Mark -Invest - 


0 Dollar- lnv — _ 
0 Eoergie-invest. 
0 ESPOC- 
0 Eurtt- 


0 Fansa— 
0 Frandt. 


143* V 
74* v 
132.70 V 
195* V 
10532 V 
1 1550 V 
171* V 

35450 V 

309* V 
21L5BV 


0 aioblnv 

0 Gakt-invest 


0 Gubtcn-lnvest- 
0 He Ivct Invest--. 
0 Holland-mvcsL. 

0 ItoC- 


3T 


0 japon-lnvesi- 
0 Padtlc-lnvest 
0 Softt 


0 Skomflnavten-lnvest 
0 Sterlliig- Invest — — — 
0 Swiss Fronc-invc* . 
0 Sana 


^Bff^tjygOTlcFun d 1 

b l5 Fawtte towt^Grawttrt 

mLn Jolla hit Grth Fd Lra — » 

iv Leal 5lcov — ? 

uiLev PBtorrnaocr HZ— — J 

StLSST iSKSs-==! 

mLWlntlHr", — * 

mLux mil Mgt Fd lm- . . . 6 
wLuxfund 


iv Matterhorn DtWiore Fd — I 

sas masaggH 

mMJM Intematlond Ltd S 

m Momentum GuHd Ltd * 

m Manl Btaic Hedge * 

wfMutltfutigm — 

0 New Millennium FuL Ltd— S 

O ttewbant DeoenhV CT... — 8 
mNMT Askm SeL Portfolio _S 

sgJgB Vflfe* 

m Ocwir s ' l Tii i c gte s Un dtad— S 
b Offshore ShomglM Ltd — s 
iv Old troiMl d* mri Ltd—— .; 
at Omega Oversea* Pwjtora -S 

mOuuenbelma r U6. Art J 

mootlmum Fund. -J 

wSradeFivt dLM— — — -J 

m Overtook Pvtornnicn— J 
mPadf RIM C9 » B V Aub 8— i 
mPan Fixed I ticFd.f Jg 811-JJ 
iiiPAN l m ernattonot Ltd J 

m Pw^ pWihoralMyr =" l« 
in PaniMn Fund LlmM— * 
fTiPororkw Fundi 


IS 

86.H 

TKJJ 

7143 

28337 

1153J5S 

IL07 

9173 

10221* 

*4164 

217263 

37.13 

153.18 
10525 
16131 

117173 

1017388 

1190* 

1263 

1X781 

151832 

139* 

14477 

806.18 
17* 
97J2 

162*063 
1994* 
115X08 
217* 
1267 
10333 
8X8* 
9971 
S£J® 
95061 
1295* 
32067 
171* 
107267 
1Z24 
136.95 
108862 
87* 
1623729 
1*467 
1725* 
11068 
208*67 , 

10662 E 
10X155 


SR GLOBAL FUND LTD 
m 5R European— — - 
mSR Asian. 


•V SvSSn SeL Fd InTI H 5h J 
w Svensta SeL Fd Jwmi— — * 

sHBEBBe^P 6 

:I^SSlS;SS^as=t* 

SWISS BANNCORP. — 

0 SBC Eq Ptfl-Nethwtands — FI 

0 SBC BmW Ptn^oten G. B_F1 

0 SBC Band Ptfl-Eeu A Era 

SircS3ES1?- e =ir 

StSiSS 35BL“«si^E. 

a^tamsgtig 

d SBCBondPtfrYen A- Y 


12X64 

11072 

11460 

12X27 

33664 

18461 

105* 

10658 


0 UBSAmlrica Lntjnc 

0 UBS As* New Horlnr 
0 UB5 Small C. Europe 
0 UBS Small C. Ernwe 
0 UBS Port HwSFR Inc 
0 UBS Part lnv SFR Cop G— S r 

0 UBS Port lnv Era lnc. SF 

0 UBS Part lnv Ecu Inc— — Era 

a UhS Part mv Ecu Cop G — SF 

0 UBS Pori lnv Ecu Cop G— ecu 
d ubS Pori lnv uss lnc— A. 
0 UBS Part lnv US* IK— — SF 
0 ubs Part lnv uss Cop G — sf 
0 UBSPnrl lnv USSCopG — | 
d UBS Pari lnv DM lnc — — sf 
0 UBS Pari lnv DM lnc— — DM 
0 UBS Port lnv DM CcpG— SF_ 
d UBS Part lnv DM Cop G. 

0 UB5 Port lnv Lit Ik 
0 UBS Pori lnv Lit Inc 



Pturiforex FF 

Pkirtvoieur — FF 

oiimrasUldlIZZs 
Smaller Cx- — S 
t Fund LM — S 


0 CS Fht*[JF7% 179*. 

FF - 


0 GAM CH Europe. 
0GAM<Ot|dM|U 
rf GAMiCHN 
SECREGISfl 
05 Bait 57th* 

g> GAM Europe] 
wGAMGtabMj 



—41-1-4 22 2iB& 
BDMZuricti^H 


9681 

1*364 

2*973 


I 132.11 

J 18876 


0CSFFgon0AJ 

0 CS FF Bond B-JH 

sgasssM 

LAS 


I*** 


E==R 


iBondB. 


0 § Short- T. Bond DM _ 

0 CS ShOrt-T. Bond DM B 

0 CS Short- T. Bond S A 

0 g Short-T. B o edSB — » 

0 CSSWjw FnxtcBangA sf 

0 CS Swiss Franc Bund B — — 5F 
5 S Euroreal 


DM 




j Latin Aotartca-. 
iv Currency Fima. 


iv Curtwcy Fimd Managed— S 

w Korea Fun d :m a — 5 

w BOD USSCcnh Fi»*i -* 

w SDD Ecu Cgtti F^*Ln: 5c 

w BDD Swiss Franc Xpih— — 
w BDD lid. Bond fjjn* U 5 L J 

S^wSJw&FWKLJ ' 

asXiass 


wBeU 

hI^R CASH 
f Franc FRF 
I France Ser 

I BS m==r 

IV Telecom Invest ■— — * 

INTER OPT1MOM 

wlrteraomt uSD- -* F 

w MuMdevtsts DM— — 




IN TER 5 T RATEG1 ^ 
wFrm 


_FF 


tf Europe <fci N*rd- 


m Europe 

w Europe du! 

w Japan 


dP 


;jSBs au. — , 
jgteagWfj Bgsx.. 

0 Mttltwnd FRF A 1DM 

0 wtBfiXjndFWOiCOPl Pi- 


615525 

50B65Q 

524*68 

S5-J8 

4X920 
ODU 5 
14DS27 
181*29 

iBsai® 

1000* 

W77A-5 


cm* 

04417 

urn 

9W.T8 

92964 


T7«2.g 

278160 

19417* 

1494.12 

1*4921 

1278X43 

102X9* 

140X51 

KWH* 

2839J 

1336® 

15W768 

1X1868 

1221 * 

11943* 

1274.16 

W» 

1W7W 

121375 

1SCTS4 

174771 

3*364 

14179*5 

s 

i «g» 

23579* 

10X614* 

141*7* 


CREDIT AGRI COLE 
^PrSdi USA/SAP] 

jBftro 

d ^ tlermegY. v 


Terro* GBP- 
iTarmeFRF- 


0 Court Terme ECU ecu 

SSBS5?B?^ 

ssffiSar* — 1 - 

0 ActtonsFn 


go^HuraAmertcainm—S 


I 


-Ef 




CanveriMv 
TetmaEcu- 
Trrtnt USD. 


KB.18 

15*21 

102 * 

15XT7 

26734 

29*62 

11463 


1865 

115*3* 

1164 

-ffif 

39* 

OP 

09X17 

19* 


4171 

144JC 

372174 

S449XM 

3768 

11978 

186* 

227769 

1362 

39* 

14974 

20X57 

14879 

2X25 

1764 

14374 


wGAM Eurob bA rr DM tg* 

u 

i 

•“HSralra ^ 

18X71 

972 
125365 
1X24 
968 

9870 
11 * 

1X5* 
11(962 

ri 


ffliaffiafSKS 

m JOVC Rf ltl _ 

w Asaon Fixed Ik Fd— — — * 

w IDR Money Morkei Fd « 

w USD Money Not kei Fd S 

w Indonesian Growth Fd * 

wLGJwanFd 


89 QueenswavXK 


861 
878 
12.72 
1X5* 
1968 
1X11 

571 

n* 

196850 
1L10 
1X05 


LLOYMMMK INT L IBAHAMAS1 Ud 

OBUFLKvTDICn 


0 Mutttcnrrency MEE l 

0 Dollar Modhim Term 

0 Dollar Long Twi^m 
0 Japanese Yen] 


0 Ptwnd Sterling 

0 Deutsche Mar* — 
d Dutch Ftorln — - — 
0 hy Eura Currencies- 
0 Swiss Front. 


d SwUNhittiOiTroncv -SF 

0 Earawcn Currency Era 

0 BetaSt Franc BF 

d Convertible. — * 

d French Fnxjc- 



3275 
2477 
2X14 
18*3* 
2*68 
1770 
U63 
1573 
1121 
12 * 
IX to 
1*59 
222* 
136» 
15* 
15771 
962 
107* 
1374 
1477 
1051 
11 * 
1X50 
9J97 
KUO 



(IRELAND) LTD 


S'PSSSaSluianEa S 

ggUD 

* 


SBKSBSE? . 

W Pacific BkritY -; 

wMcttlcumsKY j 


-DM 


W1M60 

317* 


1W3 

130S23 

471263 

9092 


O r? INVEST ) 

0 I ^ i Smin^ m£mt^ervi CK 5 

DSB TltortWntmAmMFd 

ijgg 
. iSSei 


1X32 




d swtss MumrjMdoid — — sf 
0 Swiss Front Sfwrt-Ternr — SF 

0 Canaan Doigfi »r — 9? 

d Dutch Florin Mum— FI 

0 Swfn Franc DhM Pay SP 

d CAD Moth cur. Dhr- c* 

d McdHerraswm Curr SF 

0 Deutschmark Short Ter m— DM ^ 

MALABAR CAP MGMT (Benneda) LTD 

mMalabarlnlT Fimd — S ix« 

MAH INTERNAT IONAL F UTURES 
m MW Limned -Ordhtorr — s 

mMInt LknttW- Income.-— 5 P-E 

U 

m MW GMUd-AU|WW S Mg 

mMWGMCwreKteZWH— -S WS 

DlAWO GLFlrKJJJ 5 *61 

s!BSB.i asz=i ij» 

■wasga asag sd 
igegane ssj § 

mAHLQwmwdl^Pyd » 

mAHL Qrrrencv Fond— — J g-ir 

Sahl 'a* 

5SSS?SSSSSK?ird iffl 

MARITTMie MAXAG EMEWT LTD 

73 Front a HawWon Straw* i (*91292 rat 
irttoritlme MR-Serior I Ltd J HOT* 

:aass§ag&sy L11 _ iss 
asiBssg jssr?fs^|v^j «, 

mOossA— — — * 

0 QassB 


w Optima Futnres_Fund- 
w Optimo GjaMFigd --T 
w Optimo PertgjjoFd Ltd — * 

ORBIT HX GROUP OF FUNDS 
0 Orbltex AstaPacFd * 

S8SBSSS?feH4 

sgasssasssris. 

''eJS&B™ L M j 

vS SSBff^. 

r ■ » 

0 Parvert USA B = » 

d PorveNJanonB - - Y 

0 Porven Asia Po« B 1 

0 Pnrvesl Europe B -f a 

0 Panrasl Holland B — £’ 

0 parvost Fnetca B_ .FF 

jEKsass5i?5=r 

dPorvertObO^MB D* 

0 Parvost OtfrYen B —- ' 

0 Parvost OWj-Golden B Fi 

0 Parvost QbU-Fronc B FF 

0 ParvestObii^erB- c 

0 Parvesf ObIFEcu B_ E« 

0 PorvatphiWehwB .LF 

0 Parvost 5-T Dollar B- 5 

0 Pervert S-T E gw* B §< 

d parvost S-T DEM B — — DJ 

0 pShS S-T FRF LB FI 

d Parvest S-T Bet Phis B- 
d paavest raobai B— 

0 Parvest lid Bond B — . 

0 Parvest DWHJroB-— 

0 pSvSlnl Equities B. 
d Parvest UK B_ 


1067 

1770 

1*M 

1367 

941 

7* 

1X79 


0 ParvwJ uSDPtoi-B 1 

0 Porvesl SrT CHF B— — *F 

0 Parvest OMFCimodo b — — CS 

0 Parvest OHLOKK B Dl 

PERMALGROUP 

t Drafckcr Growth N.V s 

1 

t MetW X Communcattons—s 

1 NoscaiLM — * 

PICTET- A C1JS- GROUP 

W PX.F UKVal lUnil-; S. 

W PXS Germavrt j LukJ — Dl 
W PJC.F NlrtTIKd (UK 
wPHF Vanber (Lux). 


-Pica 


11X92 

1US1 


w P.CF yojlMla ILu»l t =, 

iv PX-F VattranceU-ux) — —FF 
wP-U-F-Vadjand SFR (Lux) JF 
w P.U.F. VUbofld USD j Lint) -5 
w PJJ.P. Vatbana Era iLaxl-Era 

IV P.U J*. VttBWtd FRF tLoxl-FF 

w p JjS WtoU GBP t UIRl-Z 
£ p^jr.Valbond DEM (Li»l DM 

SHftBjne^asi 

tv PJjJ Eme ry MfcH .iUnO-s.__ 

y?ST:^5S2-«riS 

jHddvSStatlM — — | P | 

cm P6J. Bax lm Grand Caymmi 

®®8S53S 

m Premier Total Return Fd— s 
PUTNAM 


*22! 

*9*73 

4J588 

56174 

146885 

327 JM* 
5176247 
1396389 

874 

2365 

5949* 

74* 

2579 

14093 

127X71 

61978 

174145 

188179 

118174* 

1609.47 

198972 

15777 

131-16 

in™* 

121 * 

13262 

iSjg 

57763X00 

111.12 

9XB5 

9861 

25474 

116* 

971-14 

260364 

87667 
162978 
986 18 
128778 
100567 
187631 

*469 

97* 

28* 

9774* 

11606X80 

128X44 

285* 

22965 

181* 

94768 

9261 

290*9 

18X79 

120 * 

49*66 

20X53 

15X71 

IE* 


1562 

11-33 

IXM 

HIM 

391 

11871 

WS84 

_!* 

139X86 


0 Band PW: Yen B. 


:mmf-«- 


0SBCMMF-BFR- 
d SBC MMF- Cans. 


0 SBC DM Short-Term A_— DM 

d SBC DM Short -Ter m B DM 

0 SBC MMF - Dutch G —FI 

d SBC MMF - Ecu— EW 

0 SBC MMF - r - 


0 SHCMMF-FF- 
0 5BCMMF-U1— 

0 SBCMMF-PIMj 
0 SBC MMF - SrtiHHnB 
0 SBCMMF-Sle— “ 
d SBC MMF - SF 
0 SBC MMF- US- Dpnor 

0 SBCMMF-USL'II 

0 SBC MMF- Yen 


-Lit 


-Pfa 


118X96 

129688 

HO* 

145765 

947* 


0 SBC GlM-PTfl SF Grth- SF 

0 SBC GlOi-PItl Ecu Grth- — Era 
d SBC Glbi-Ptil USD Grth — J 

0 SBCGIW-Pttt SF Yld A 5F 

d SBC GIW-P»fl SF Yld B — SF 

0 SBC GfM-Pltt Era Yld A Era 

d SBC GM-PH1 Era Yld B — Eat 

0 SBC GIM-Ptfl USD Yld A — S 
0 SBC GBU-Ptfl USD Yld B— S 
0 SBC GtbLPtfl SF IK A SF 

3 


PACIFIC CONV STRATEGIES FD LTD 

yggs ■ -i n* 


0 Eneralng HHhSc Tnrtt— > * 
w PutnomSm. into. St Tn* J 
d Putnam Glob. High Growth 5 


LEY CAPITAL PARTNERS, LTD 


fflggSH 

mThe Daunflen Fd LM 


7455 


M^ltE 


rathe Dounhert 

SEBB«Er"M 

ssasasBKK"- 1 


0 Ptrtnoro Htet Inc. GNMA FrH 
0 Putnam lari Fund— - — J 
QUANTUM GROUP OF FUNDS 
wAlkm DeveMMW-— —J 
m Entering Growth Fd KV.J 
Fond N.V. » 

. indurtrtai— * 

i Ready Tryst — — - S 

J UKRiSity FW*d-5 

wOuaaor lan Rind ILV. } 

w Quoin Fund N.V. 


iasu augg s^l 

0 Ecu Bond SefecHOfi — J 
0 Florin goto S election^ 
d Froncevoty. ^^^ J 

sssss* 

10 lOerioVDlor-J 


1721* 

mg 

214* 

398* 

181355 

100* 

1I9J2 

101 * 

134* 

15777 

18X39 

159.1* 

18X32 

10652 

129.10 

54*65 

£7068 

94Z3* 

4968 

59* 

187270 

,3 £3 

110-19 

103805* 

113536* 

43*4* 

IT3845* 

4754JB 

110966 

1344*4 

744X7S 

381k* 

4*8304* 

1556X31 

S SSSH8 

3 70742* 

3237364 

2B6&02 

596X10 

729165 

211253 

MXM4* 

1162.97 

127460 

1192* 

1057* 

1191.91 

115X14 

1327.44 

10262 

1189.12 

m 

106460 

115X04 

95X70 

103661 

105768 

103957 

103630 

102269 

10ZU9 

1021.18 

101466 

114*67 

541* 

1812* 

34551 

2286* 

72468 

10121 

115* 


0 UBS Port litv Ltt Cop G 

0 UBS Port invUI CopG — L tt 
0 UBS Port lnv FF Ik— — SF 

0 UBS Port lnv FF Jnc— FF 

0 U BS Port ! nvFF Cog G SF 

0 UBS Port lnv FF Coo G— FF 

0 UBS MM nv^-USJ- * 

d UBS MM Invrit-tSl 1 

0 UBS MM InvW-Era Era 

0 UBSMMinvwl-Yjn — Y 

0 UBS MM lnv«j-U1— Ut 

0 UBSMMInvW-SFRA. 5F 

0 UBS MM nt^-SFR T SF 

0 UBS MM Invert-FF- FF 

0 UBSMM lltveS-HFL— FI 

0 UB5 MM Invcst- CqnS Cl 

0 UBS MM Inywd-BFR B F 
0 UBS Short Torm Inv-DM — DM 

0 UBS Band nv-Era A Era 

0 UBS Bond nv-E cut |fu 

0 UBS Bond nvSFR. SF 

d UBS Bond Inv-OM _pM 

0 UBS Bond Inv-Uf* * 

0 UBS RSs* Ertro'rtrtX-J 

0 UBS FI* Term Imf-Era 9*_Era 
0 UBS Fix Term InvFF 96— FF 

d UB5 Eq mv-j urane A. MJ 

0 UBS Ea inv-Eurone T- DM 


II 

193253 
2696950 
5*161 
10162 V 
1546* V 

las; 

9*61 V 
106977 V 
10l.lt V 


III 


0 UBS Eqimrt Od>_USAgj-^ F 


0 UBS Port I FI* Ik (SFRI- 
0 UBS Port I FI* IK DM1- 
0 UBS Port I Ft* IK lEcul- 
0 UBS Port I FI* Ik USSl. 


M 


0 UBS CO b hw-90/10 Germ— DM 
WORLDFOUO MUTUAL FUNDS 

0 t Dotty Income 1 

d dm Doily income 

d s Bond income 

d Non-S Band* 

0 &Iobal Dondi—- 

0 Global Batanred. — 

0 Global Equity— . - 

0 US Conservative Eram 

0U5Aor«iay Eqottfa- 
d Eurooeqn Eaumes — 

0 Podflc Equiti es 
0 Natural Reswrees — 


18X15 y 
10757 y 
10772 y 
234*3 V 
24658 Y 
11261V 
977? v 
101.14 y 

101* y 
9953y 
10006150 y 
40X35y 
i05*y 
12577 y 


nt 


' ~ DM 

Cora— — * 


Fund Ud. 




,2 ^S 

1477.10 

1*511^ 

1X71 


Spain Fd— 
HoWkioN.' 



BVI Ltd— 6 

sa Luxembourg; 


m Spirit Neutral Hld- 


w 5lefnhartt Fd Lfd — J 
w Stetnhordt Reultr Truet. 
m Stridor Fund . „ 

mSlramfOfWweLM 
d Sunset Gtabal IIIL^ 

d Sunset Gfotxd One 

m Sussex McGarr— — S 

•^ SSSS &S^ 

0 The lnrtUI^ ( Advb»rv_J 

m The J Fund B-YI-LW * 

w The JamwFiMg NY.— — S 
0 TTW M’A’M FdfKBV A—S 
d The M-A*R-S FUSlcav I — DM 

in The SeyrttotoRJ ua » 

m The smKT Band LM, |F 

m The Smort Brad Ltd » 

w Thema MM Futom.- — S 
m Tiger Sclee Hold mjMd-— J 
d TIIC IOTCI Jto. Fd Sleov-J 
b Tokyo (OTCI Ftmd Slaw— S 

w Tram GMbai rnvtLTd » 

0 Tronspodflc FuKL— — Y 

w Trtntty Futures Fd Ltd * 

ra Triumph l •* 

m Triumph IV——— — » 

w Tweedy Brown i nttgFR — 5F 
m Tweedy Browne Inrt av— * 

Brownrn.v. Q A--J 


Other Funds 

w ActtaWaoncf Slcnv. 
wAcUfinanceSJaw 

w Adtttrtum Ud ■ 


w Acttgert*? 0 Sirav- 
wAciivest InnStcav 
,Adefalde 


in Ad vanced LarUjFd LW- 

ssssssKsri 

w AIG Tahvmi FuiO^h 


DM 


pia 


a iwiymor 

d Japui (P ortfolio 


mi 6 
1R.T* 

20*1.49 
529 Jb 
3*171 
58272 * 
478271* 
25»3* 
11275 
11075 
S43J5 
TS60 
11658 


m Alexondni Glt4 invest Fd LI 
in Anna i nv e s tment- . ^ , •* 

iv AaaUa Internotlenpl Fund-J 
m ArfiAfln luv eN m en t J 

tv Argus Fund. Bohwc ed — S F 

■v Araus Furf “f 

d ANo Oceanio Fund * 

iv ASS (Global) AG — DM 

ra Associated inyesora lnc.— s 

iv Alhena Fund Ud- * 

zssa'aastefrf 

Z B ^tnterndtS mlJJ d— — » 

0 BUdiben-Marvat EEF . - - E ra 

d BlecronrGtbl Fd I Cayman IS 
0 Blecnor GtaboHBO wmas) l 

wBrac in terooHon ri -J r 

mCrtEurn LevorwiRl Ltd-6 
mCoPttoi Assu red In mc Fd — » 

d CB German index Fund DM 

ntCtotureFtoures— J 

mCanrtn Grow^Fund » 

raCWIhyi InH (BVI) Ltd 3 

iv China VNIaa. 


w Citadel Umlled. 
0 CM USA 


JF 


.FI 


3462 

184* 


M^Rw^TOEMElfTLTD 

w New Kare n Grow th Fd 1 

w Nova ud Pacfflc lnv Co — 4 


gcpa gasftgfc 

S l^Ssoi B^^«3GnZ|F 

rt Trn'nrart SrirTtit r Y 11798* 

T EMP LETONG^BALTFRATEO Y SKJkV 

d Gtaboi Growth—-. * JJS 

d DM GMbgl Grawbi — ?*» 

0 Smaller Companies S *"* 


iv CM I liivesmem Fund * 

mCxJumanHoidnM * 

iv Canttveat Obil Briu* CT— bf 
er Qrtt^iWIWId — - — DM 

Fond LM — j 


rvCutT-ConO^aW 

0D. Witter WW 

tvDX^C — 


WVte IvtTsl-i 


40497 

8286* 

00269 

wim 

2U5 

1051* 

9489 

9*78 

15777B) 

1376*8 

1174 

926X98 

55X76 

946.77 

125X16 

10*439 

I4H 

96772 

891.14 

997600 

71X36 

S47774 

173 

1X85 

11962 

32770 
760774 
4665 
219376* 
0* 
151 JK 
100X00 
S5J5D 
18287.79 
1036 
143* 
141.11 

man 

20761 

11562 

942X00 

1057SM 

47568 

2153 

79* 

138* 

689-71 

SKbK 

10X46 

2973 

30957 


w Tweedy Bra 
d UbaFuhires _ .. 

0 ubaFutures Ml*-- » 

1 Uthmo Growth FdLld— — » 
d u mbrell a Dtol Fund LM— J 

0 umbrella Fund Ltd — » 

w Uni Bond Fund- 

w uni Caeltal Allemoone— — DM 
w Uni Sopttal CanwrmijB— Era 
w UnhGlabDi Slaw DEM- — DM 

■vUnl-GMxd Slcav Era Era 

w UnFGtobal s*cnv FRF — -FF 
w unMSMto Slaw F5 SF 

iv UnPGIObrt Slcav USD. 

0 unlra Eautty Fuod- 
d unlca lnv. Fund — - 
m unttrodn CHF— — 
m Unitrodea CHF Reg 
m Unltrodes FRF 

mUnttrodes USD 

w Ursus InTI LM— 
mvotb 


m Vlcfor Fuhi rea iFund — -— 5 
b Voyager investment* PM — J 

iv Vuttura LM— — — ? 

m Write* wilder Inti Fd i 

•v Wilier J«n 


iv Wilier Soulh Emt/Wa S 

0 wm Global Fd B0. Ptfl Era 

0 win Global Fd Eg. Irtfl E“ 

d Wbi Global Fd to Pffl 5F 
0 World Bolon ced Fu nd XA-I 
m WorldwIdeL I nUteb — S 
iv WPG Farter Ohe« Part —6 
mWW Capital Grth Fd LM — 5 

ra Young j. — * F 

raZerttjyr Hedge Fund S 

mzweta inrt LM J 


7.94 

1271 


87143 

96571 

11D6.44 

94* 

1U5 

10*5 

20355 

21*50* 

1106504 

88748 

51060 

173.12 

963 

2174 

4777 

3391161 

*41* 

13057 

16565 

233X38 

365X57 

14946* 

12ai5 

12*5.90 

*44X79 

117353 

1114* 

717* 

MM 

1323* 

11496* 

143X1.1* 

131376 

551150 

13X61 

20454 

1X0432 

26MJ6 

842.45 

232* 

1X19 

14198 

12S57 

227* 

1114 

89.18 

16X7434 

99133 

19V* 

25656 

20090* 


Intemationd 

RewHhneyrf 

Every Thursday 
Contact 

Philip Oma 
Td.: 

(33 1 J 44 37 93 36 

Fax; 

(331)46 3793 70 
or your nearest 
IHT office 
or representative 


:BF-I 


Nate 


rs.-j 



Dutch Hortn; 


For information on how to list your fund, fax Simon OSBORN at (33-1) 46 37 21 33. 


(KMcaaonjEl 


Jhe conference, 
Europe’s leading energy forum, 
vifl be addressed by oil industry 
experts from the world over. 



OIL & MONEY 

London October l 7 & l $ 

The Oil Daily Group 


For farther information 
on the conference , please contact: 

Brenda Erdmann Hagerty 
International Herald Tribune 
63 Long Acre, London WC2E 9JH, England 
Tel: (44 71) 836 4802 
Fax: (44 71) 836 0717 



Page 16 


SPORTS 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 12, 1994 



Some Call It Greed 9 


Sieve Ccfcau Reuw- 


Cubs’ catcher Rick Wilkins, packing up at Wrigley Field. 

For Astros’ Bagwell, 
A Case of Bad Luck 


The Associated Press 

If there’s such a thing as a 
well-timed injury, Jeff Bag- 
well’s got one. 

Bagwell, the National 
League’s leading MVP candi- 
date, broke a bone in his left 
hand when he was hit by a pitch 
in the Houston Astros’ 3-1 vic- 
tory over the visiting San Diego 
Padres. 

Bagwell, who broke the same 
hand last season, will be side- 
lined three to five weeks, just in 
time for the players' strike. 

Bagwell, the major leagues' 
RBI leader, was struck by a 

NL ROUNDUP 

pitch from Andy Benes in the 
rhird inning - He left in the fifth 
inning after taking a called 
third strike and was taken to a 
hospital for X-rays, where it 
was discovered that he had a 
fracture in the fourth metacar- 
pal bone. Last year, he frac- 
tured the fifth metacarpal bone 
in the same hand. 

Steve Finley homered and 
Darryl KOe pitched six strong 
innings to lead the Astros with- 
in one-half game of first-place 
Cincinnati in the NL Central. 

Tony Gwynn went l-for-4 
with a single for San Diego and 
is batting .391. 

Finley broke a 1-1 tie in the 
fifth with his 12th homer. 

Giants 5, Cubs 2: In Chicago, 
Matt Williams, whose chase of 


Rqger Maris's home run record 
is jeopardized by the pending 
stnke, hit No. 43 and added a 
two-run double for San Fran- 
cisco. 

Williams, ending a 1 -for- 12 
slump, drove a pitch from Wil- 
lie Banks over the all in right- 
center leading off the second. 

William VanLandingham 
won his fifth decision in six out- 
ings, and Rod Beck finished for 
his 28th save this season and his 
40th in 40 opportunities dating 
to last year. 

Cardinals 12, Marlins 4: 
Omar Olivares pitched seven 
innings and hit his third career 
homer to lead Sl Louis to vic- 
tory in Miami. 

Tom Pagnozzi hit a two- run 
homer and Olivares followed 
with a solo homer in the sixth 
inning to knock out Dave 
Weathers, who lost his fifth 
consecutive decision. 

Ray Lankford bad three of 
the Cardinals’ 14 hits, including 
a bases-loaded triple. Ozzie 
Smith added four hits and two 
RBIs. 

Mels 6, Phillies 2: Joe Qrsu- 
lak singled in the go-ahead run 
in a three-run eighth-inning ral- 
ly to lift Bret Saberhagen and 
New York over Philadelphia, 
playing at home. 

Saberhagen allowed one ran 
and six hits in 7V5 innings. John 
Franco pitched the final 1% in- 
nings for his NL-leading 30th 
save. 


By Claire Smith 

Near York Tima Service • 

In a conversation with Donald Fehr, any 
topic is fair game, whether it is the Cuban 
missile crisis or theories on how the universe is 
put together. 

Such subjects often spice up the discourse 
when Fehr finds the conversation focusing too 
much on himself, as it does more and more as 
his union, at loggerheads with management 
over a proposed salary cap, prepares to strike 
after Thursday nights games. 

A work stoppage will cause many to vilify 
players as greedy. As the head of the Major 
League Base- 

XUILE32 Vantage 

Fehr knows Point 

this. And he 

knows it is his job to try to put a human face on 
the issues on behalf of more than 1,100 union 
members. 

“What baseball players have, in a way, is 
very fragile, because they are not protected by 
the antitrust laws and they have very short 
careers,” Fehr said in an interview at his New 
York office Tuesday. 

“So, in terms of fairness, their circumstances 
are the same as any other union and their 
employees. The stakes are a lot higher, because 
these people generate so much money. But still, 
you want to make sure that the right thing is 
done.” 

Fehr stopped, as if an internal alarm had 


sounded, a signal veteran Fehr-watchers know 
means a change of subject is at band. 

“What time is it?” be asked, his blue eyes 
suddenly flashing mischievously. 

Twenty minutes before noon, he was told. 
Fehr jumped from his chair, walked to a wall- 
mounted telephone and tapped into the public- 
address system. 

And he proceeded to inform his staff that a 
moment of silence would be needed in 20 
minutes “because.” he said with great solemni- 
ty, “it will be 20 years to the minute that 
President Nixon quit” 

Then Donald Fehr, the man the public sees 
only as a dour young intellect possessed of a 
Chuichfllian scowl but not one angle funny bone, 
stepped into a smDe that could light up Pluto. 

And in that instant, the myth of the humor- 
less architect of work stoppages ended. In its 
place stood a man with as many admirers as 
complexities. 

Richard Ravitch, the owners' chief negotia- 
tor, acknowledges as much. Even though Ra- 
vitch often describes Fehr as frustratingly rig- 
id, he also invariably uses words like honest, 
decent and bright when discussing the 46-year- 
old union leader. Then there are Fefar’s peers, 
who see a man molded by a big heart and an 
even bigger mind and an unswerving dedica- 


tion to his constituency. 

“He is a good-natured person who is willin g 
to tolerate foibles to a degree, but not repeti- 
tively,” Lauren Rich, an assistant general 
counsel for the players union, said. 



******* 
* 







Ra» Wt M»lrf Knin> 


It was a popular pop-fly: Orioles’ Jeffrey Hammonds, left, Mike Devereaux and Mailt 
McLetnore homed in and ultimately, McLemore caught it in a game with the Yankees. 


The Mets rallied in the eighth 
with a two-out rally off David 
West. 

Expos 4, Pirates 0: Pedro 
Martinez beat Pittsburgh 
quickly, pitching six-hit ball 
over 8% innings as streaking 
Montreal won for the 20th time 
in 22 games, in Pittsburgh. 

Marquis Grissom homered to 
start a three- run third inning as 
the Expos set a franchise record 
with their ninth consecutive 
road victory. 

Martinez benefited from 
three double plays in the first 
five innings to win his fifth con- 
secutive start. Moises Alou 


went 4-for-5 and drove in two 
runs for the Expos. 

Dodgers 6s Reds 3: In Cincin- 
nati, Eric Karros's leadoff 
homer sparked a four-run ninth 
inning rally as Los Angeles end- 
ed the Reds' late-imring invinci- 
bility. 

The Dodgers rallied after 
Cincinnati took a 3-2 lead in the 
bottom of the eighth on Thom- 
as Howard’s single off Ismael 
Valdes. The Reds were 50-0 
when they led after eight in- 
nings. 

Karros hit his 14th homer off 
Jeff Brantley, and Raul Mon- 


desi followed with a triple. 
Dave Hanson’s pinch-single off 
Chuck McElroy put the Dodg- 
ers ahead, and Los Angeles 
pulled away on Brett Butler’s 
KBI double and Delino De- 
Shields’ run-scoring single. 

Rockies L Braves 0: In Den- 
ver, Kevin Ritz and Steve Reed 
combined to shut out Atlanta 
through six innings before rain 
slopped the game. Dante Bi- 
chette doubled in the game’s 
only ran off Ton Glavinc. 

Despite struggling, Ritz 
blanked Atlanta for 5 % innings, 
allowing six hits with five walks 
and six strikeouts. 


“He truly is interested in what people think, ” 
Rich added. “BuT going in. you should also 
know you’re going to.be subjected to a rigorous 
examination. So you’d better be prepared be- 
cause he will cut you down otherwise.” ■ 
Fehr, hired as acting .executive director of. 
the union in 1983 and permanently appointed 
two years later, stepped into a rather large 
shadow cast by Marvin Miller.. He has since 
built his own formidable reputatioaaf ter hav- 
ing marshaled his players thro ugh ^ a two-day 
stnke in 1985 and a spring training lockout is 
1990. , 

Undo 1 Fehr’s tutelage, the union won $280 
million in damages from owners who were 
found to have colluded against free agents in 
the ’80s. And the players’ licensing business 
has mushroomed into a S60 miHion-a-year in- 
dustry on his watch. . - • . 

As the years have passed, Fehr has grown 
more comfortable with the news media. He is 
even given to tdfing jokes during news confer- 
ences now, something that was unheard of in 
1985. : . ' 

Fehr is also a sentimentalist when it comes to 
the game. 

“Donald is someone that baseball could 
work with,” said Fay Vincent, die last commis- 
sioner, who enjoyed cordial relations with the 
union. 

But Fefar’s bdief that. the players’ lot should 
improve alongside that of the game has often 
conflicted with the views of. conservative own- 
ers. Even moderate owners axe sometimes frus- 


trated when trying to persuade Fehr that true 
partnerships is possible. r. 

CoHusion did not help that cause. In fact it 
only reinforced in . Fehr die reason why he 
b ecame a -labor lawyer in the . first place. 

*Tve always had an .identification with the 
' people who are not the controlling elite,” he 
said. “I don’t know why that is,, but it sort of 
developed that way. It may have been a prod- 
uct of that, tone period." 

Th* delicious irony is that the wealth players 
have through Fehr’s efforts me an s they 
now oonki easily be confused with Young Re- 
publicans, yet they still loyally follow the unre- 
pentant _*6& activist from a middle-class back- 
ground in Kansas .City, Kansas. 

.. Fehr; not surprisngly, tends to play down 
his influenc e with the players. 

"All I can do is make recommendations.*’ he 
said. ?But I have discovered that most of the - 
tiiiift, if yon make an appeal to players’ better 
instincts — *wc think its the right thing to do’ 
— generally yea'll get a positive res po nse” 

. Hus success draws c rititasm even from out- 
side baseball’s realm. David. Stem, the commis- 
sioner of the National Basketball Association, 
took an unsolicited swipe at Fehr three years 
ago in a speech before the Association of 
Women in Sports Media convention. But 
r*haH<»s Grantham, head of the. NBA players 
association, never misses an opportunity to 
laud his counterpart, just as do many sports 
union leaders who recognize Fehr’s unparal- 
leled. successes. 


Look for White Sox and Indians 


The Associated Press 

If the regular season does not 
resume after a players’ strike, 
the Chicago White Sox proba- 
bly won’t mind. The same goes 
for the Cleveland Indians 

The Texas Rangers may not 
be quite so happy. 

Both the White Sox and Indi- 
ans won Wednesday to ensure 
themselves of slots in the ex- 
panded playoffs should the re-' 
mainder of the regular season 
be canceled. 

Chicago’s 2-1 victory, over 
Oakland, playing at home, gave 

AL ROUNDUP 

the White Sox a one-game lead 
over Cleveland in the American 
League Central, a margin that 
could not be closed before a 
strike because both teams had-. 
Thursday off. 

Texas, meanwhile, lost a 
chance to “clinch” the AL West 
when Seattle beat the Rangers, 
3-2. in 10 innings. Texas is only 
one-half game ahead of the 
Oakland Athletics, who were to 
play Seattle on Thursday night 
in the last game before the play- 
ers' planned walkout 

A victory would put the Ath- 
letics in a tie with Texas, which 
also was idle Thursday. 

“We knew Cleveland won, 
and we knew we had to win,” 
said Jason Bere, the winning 
pitcher. “We knew Oakland was 
going to play us tough because 
they’re in a race with Texas. We 
knew what was at stake.” 


Julio Franco drove in Chica- 
go’s first run and scored the go- 
ahead run on a wild pitch from 
Steve Ontiveros in the fourth 
inning for the White Sox. 

Bere, who hasn’t lost since 
June 18, wem5%innings,pitcfa- 
ing with runners on base in ev- 
ery timing W the first. - 
Ontiveros pitched a-fivptit- 
ter, but continued to suffer 
from lack of run supporu ln his 
six starts since the AO-Star 
break, Oakland has soared just 
17 tuns. ‘ \ * 

Though Chicago’s -victory 
locked the- Indiaas tir . second 
place, (hey cfinchcd the wOd- 
card spot with a 5?J victory over 
Toronto. 

Indians 5, Bine Jays 3t In 
Toronto, Jason Grimsfcy won 
for thefourth tjmemfivcjstarts. 
allowing seven hits ami two 
runs over fiftinrimgs: r *-- 

Jtin Thome had; three hitSi 
Omar Vizquel scored twice and 
Kenny Lofton stole bos 59th 
and 60th bases for Cleveland. 

Marinm3, Radcenl: IsAr- 
fington, Texas, Mike Blowers 
homered in the top of the 10th 
off of Tom Henkc. lt Was his 
ninth homer of the year. * 
Seattle, playing its 19th 
straight road game became of 
faffing ceding tiles at theKmg- 
dome, has won a season-high 
five straight and improved to 9~ 

1 this yearagainst Texas. 

Dgecs-4, B rown 0: David 
Wells pitched a three-hitter for: 
his first career shutout and fifth 
complete game this season, and 
Cecil Fielder drove in two runs. 


as Detroit beat visiting Milwau- 
kee. 

Orioles 8, Yankees 1: Rated I 
Palmeiro drove in five runs with •> 
four hits as Baltimore routed ’ 
Jimmy Key(I7-4) in New York. 

Palmeiro had two singles, a, 
two-run. double and a three-run . 
homer, while Ben McDonald 
held New York to five hits. Het 
struck out two and didn’t walk 
a batter in . 7Vi innings before] 
leaving with a infld cramp in his! 
qghxxoreanL-^v' 

TwtreI7,Red Sox 7: In Min- 
neapolis, Kirby Puckett drove, 
in seven runs with a grand slam* 
and. a three-run homer. The. 
Twins have thrir first five-game 
whirring streak of the year; the 
Red Sox have lost four straight * 

Puckett tagged Scott Bank-., 
head for his sixth career grand', 
slam to stake Jim Deshaies to »• 
big. lead. Rich- Rowland ho- , 
mered twice for Boston. 

Angels 2, Royals 1: In Anar 
horn, California, Gary DiSar- 
tina -drove- in --both California 
runs, including the game- win- 1 
ner with a single in the ninth, as 1 
Caltforaia edged Kansas City. • 

Tim Salman beat out an in- 
field single to open the ninth off; 
Tom Gordon, and Bo Jackson 
singled. Both runners advanced 
on Gordon’s wild pickoff 
throw, and J.T. Snow was in taj- •. 
titmaUy walked. ; 

Billy Brewer came on to' 
strike out pinch-hitter Rex* 
Hudler before DiSarcina greet-* 
ed Rusty Meacham with his; 
third hit of the game. 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 


1 HEW MNnBt. UKEPWtHS, 
SMtSM61UE9JVKE MC 
MWTHBW ftesnK Bt. LWE 
USKT, VOLTWL’TWW) 
THEWPRSTOttMtoEW 
HCPtAHET. USHT IS 
JGPWU WtBOEDW 

msifmif lU& 7 tklT tfcroi? 


m© SOKN6 qf oarcn, 
X. DROPPED A 
lEMMMfc OK Ttt kn VXBA 

nernwet wt wust. 

SWOTS SUPPS). 


























INTEKNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 12, 1994 


p «gel7 



SIR] 

A Lot of Anger 


an impose am unaateralry im- 
pose the salmy cap system dur- 
ing the off season. They are 
staking now, with 52 days re-: 
mooing in the regular season,.: 
because the owners have more 
to lose.-' .., 

The players have already col- 
lected most of their 1994 sala- 
ries , while owners wiB not get 
the final.$5 nuflion of thdr $75 
million national television 
money until after the Would Se- 
ries. • 

Bach side privately doubts 
that the other wiB remain uni- 
fied . throughout a Jong- work- 
stoppage, and when the session 
Wednesday teoke-ofJ, there was 
no prediction when there might 
be another meeting. 

“If there are reasons to have 
further meetings/’ , said the 
players' union leader, Donald 
rear, “if somebody has an idea, 
we’re prepared to meet and talk 
about ft. if not, there’s no pur- 
pose in having a meeting if the 
only reason is to say that you 
did.” ^ 

Mr. Ravitch had an equally 
t gloomy ' assessment. ’This was 
not a productive session 
Wednesday,” he said. T regret 
that very much. The stoke looks 
more likely than it did 24 hours 


as 

)U 


And then each side once 
mare crftfcwedl the other. Mb'. 
Fehr repeated earlier state- 
ments that this tight involved 
three parties: baseball’s large- 
market and smaltmarket dubs 
and the players. 

After failing , to agree to a 
more comprehensive revenue- 
sharing arrangement between 
poorer teams, such as tlm Pitts- 
burgh Pirates and Seattle Mari- 
and richer teams* such as 
the Toronto Blue Jays and Yan- 
kees, the owners formulated 
then portion: Big-market clubs 
emphasized that they would 
agree to share more of their 
profits only if they got some- 
thing in return — in this case, a 
pay ceding. 

In the beginning, Mr. Fehr 
said, the owners told the players 
that they needed a salary cap to 
keep several small-market 
teams from going bankrupt 

“We didn’t get frank . ac- . 
knowledgments that thdr pro-- 
posals are designed to Emit sal- 
v ary growth and put artitidal 
limits around free agency,” Mr. 
Fete sakL That- u the purpose 
of it That’s positive in the sense 
that it’s much more straightfor- 
ward.” 



Cotta Jackson of Britain, world-record holder in the 110-meter hurdles, led the field in a qualifier Thursday in Helsinki. 

Rough Start for Azinger, PGA Defender 


The Assadarai Pros 

TULSA, Oklahoma — Paul Azmgerti 
game went from bad to worse Thursday 
when he opened defense of his PGA na- 
tional championship with a 40 on the front 
side at the Southern H31s Country Club 
couraa. . ” ■ 

Azinger, whose Successful battle against- 
cancer gained the admiration: of millions of 
fans, was among die early starters in the 
first round of the last of golfs Big Four 
events this season. 

He received a warm ovation from the 
large gallery gathered around the first tee. 
But he had to work hard to save par bn the 
first hole after driving into the rough on 
the left of the first fairway.. He played his 
second short of the green birth got up and 
down far par. On the second, however, he 


again hit his tee shot to the left, caught a 
bunker with his second and made bogey. 

His troubles continued on the fourth 
with a 3-putt audit all went downhill from 
there. He also bogeyed he sixth, eighth and 
ninth, reaching the turn at 5 over par. 

Azinger was diagnosed with lymphoma, 
a form of cancer, in his right shoulder 
blade shortly after winning this title last 
year but successfully battled the disease 
and 'returned to competition only last 
week. 

Azinger was not alone in his early diffi- 
culties, however. Jade Nicklaus, 54, a five- 
time winner of this title, bogeyed 6 of the 
first seven holes and was 5 over par 
through eight. 

- With most of the 151 -man field still in 
the clubhouse awaiting thdr starting times. 


veteran Ben Crenshaw held the early lead. 
He was 3 under par through 12 holes after 
birdies on the 10th and 1 Tth. 

The anticipated foreign drive to com- 
plete an unprecedented sweep of golf's Big 
Four events developed early in the day, 
with Greg Norman of Australia and Cohn 
Montgomerie of Scotland among the early 
leaders. Norman was even par through 10 
holes. Montgomerie was 2 under through 
11. Sam Torrance of Scotland, was under 
through 13. 

. Joakiin 
second 

eagle-2 on 458-yard, par-4 
second hole. He was one under par at the 
turn, but dropped back with a double 
bogey on the 12th. 



SIDELINES 


Maradona Ordered to Stand Trial 

. BUENOS AIRES (AP) — Soccer star Diego Maradona must 
stand trial for shooting at reporters gathered around his villa with 
a compressed air rifle last February, a judge ruled Wednesday. 
" Maradona, 34, fac^ preliminary charges of “causing threats and 
injuries with a weapon,” according to the official news agency 
Tdam. The trial date has not been set. 

The schedcle&NoVr5 hea vyweig ht title fight between champion 
Michael Moaner and challenger George Foreman, 46, was 
scrapped Wednesday when the world Boxing Association refused 
to sanction the bout (LA-7) 


A N. Y. Giant’s Homecoming 


The Associated Press 

BERLIN — It’s homecoming 
for Michael Strahan, when the 
New York Giants play the San 
Diego Chargers on Saturday in 
the American Bowl in Germany. 

Strahan, a defensive end for 
the New York Giants, first came 
to Germany in 1981 as a service- 
man’s son and stayed until he 
left for college at Texas Southern 
and then married a German 


woman. He comes back regular- 
ly to visit his parents. 

But on this visit Strahan will 
be mixing business with plea- 
sure: be still has a starting job 
to nail down. 

The Giants hope the 6-foot-7, 
275-pound player can fill the 
opening at right end created by 
the team's switch from a 3-4 
defense to 4-2. 

The Giants lost nine starters 
off last year’s 11-5 squad. 


Privalova Increases Fame, 
Collecting 200-Meter Gold 


By Ian Thomsen 

Inumumal Herald Tnbmc 

HELSINKI — Another day, 
another druggie, and not a 
Bubka to be found. 


after testing positive for the am- came home nonctelantly « 

Dh^Sc mWarb, the Euro- 50.33 seconds, lfc seconds 
pean Athletic Association an- slower than her personal best 
nounced Thursday- Runner-up Svetlana Gon- 

lusaioucloull „. Bozhanova was m- cfaarenko of Russia made up 

The European Champion- tindy after jumping 14.58 me- bagarficant ground for a re- 
ships ride along nevertheless, ters in the tnplejump, 10 cenu- speciable tune of 5114, while 
for posterity’s Ske: for pole- meters short of a bronze medal. Phylis Smith of Britain wasde- 
vaull champion Radion Ga- She became the firat competing lighted with the bronze medal 
tauhiii of Russia. Thursday of- athlete to fail a test here — dial accompanied her perror- 

though eight others tested posi- 
tive for illegal drugs leading up 
to these championships. In July 


fered a gold medal without the 
pervasive influence of world-re- 
cord holder Sergei Bubka, ab- 
sent in his eternal search for 
ore lucrative hurdles to leap. 
For the likes of Irina Privalova, 
it meant sweeping up the sprint 
double on her way to the more 
competitive and lucrative — if 
not quite so historic — Golden 
4 meetings next week in Zurich 
and Brussels. 

But first, as ever, the druggie: 
26-year-old Sofia Bozhanova of 
Bulgaria was stripped of her 
fourth-place in Monday's triple 
jump and faces a four-year ban 


mance of 51.30. 

In the absence of defending 


to laese ^ champion John Regis of Bril- 

S5S552£Si? . «£**«**»•* 

This brought to mind Kanin 
Kiabbe, the German whose 
1990 European titles, in the 100 


Croatia Wins 
Over Canada, 
As US. Rolls 

Canpikdby Oar Staff Firm Dispatches 

TORONTO — Dino 
Radja scored 25 points and 
Tom Kukoc had 15 points 
and 12 assists as Croatia 
clinched a semifinal berth 
in the World Champion- 
ship of Basketball with a 
92-til victory over Canada. 

The loss, combined with 
Greece’s 77-61 victory over 
China on Wednesday 
ni gh t, eliminated Canada 
from medal contention. 

Radja, who plays for the 
Boston Celtics, scored 19 
points in the first half. 

Rick Fox, Radja’s team- 
mate on the Celtics, led 
Canada with 19 points. 

Reggie Miller staged an- 
other memorable shooting 
performance on Wednes- 
day night against Puerto 
Rico, bombing away for 26 
first-half points as the 
United States, ran away to 
a 134-83 victory. 

In the fourth game mat- 
chup, Russia defeated Aus- 
tralia, 103-76, to remain 
unbeaten. (AP, NYT ) 


and 200 meters, a double 
matched Thursday night by Pri- 
valova, were followed by posi- 
tive drug lest and a resulting 
legal wrangle that has effective- 
ly finished her career. 

But such consequences have 
nothing to do with Privalova, 
the 25-year-old Russian who 
two days earlier was winning 
her first major title in the 200 
meters. She leaves here a bigger 
star than when she arrived. A 
week earlier she had been held 
ud at customs by Finnish offi- 
cials who were locked in generic 
scrutiny of her Russian pass- 
port — until they looked up to 
see her patiently signing auto- 
graphs for other passengers. 

Yet Finland has seemed to 
unfetter her, free as it has been 
of her American rival, Gwen 
Torrence. Privalova clearly was 
in the lead soon after achieving 
full height, and the form of 
those in chase coming out of the 
turn removed the last him of 
suspense. Zhanna Tamopols- 
kaya of the Ukraine finished 
her own silver sprint-double 
with a time of 22.77 seconds, 
while Galina Malchugina of 
Russia was third in 22.90. 

Her victory was almost as 
devastating as the 400-meter 
run of Marie-Jos£ Perec of 
France. Elegantly and rather vi- 
ciously, the 24-year-old Olym- 
pic and world champion sprint- 
ed ahead at once so as nut to be 
confused in any way with the 
others. Training in California 
with the renowned John Smith, 
Perec is still seeking a new event 
to combat the boredom of this 
one. which she hasn't lost since 
taking third in these champion- 
ships four years ago. On Thurs- 
day she looked capable of being 
lured off of the runway as she 


die men's 200 meters was seized 
bv Geir Moen of Norway in 
26.30 seconds. The-25-year-old 
Moen, whose silver medal Tues- 
day in the 100 was Norway’s 
first sprint medal in these 
championships since 1946, 
seemed to draft Vladislav Dolo~ 
godin of the Ukraine out of the 
turn and into second place in 
20.47 seconds. Patrick Stevens 
of Belgium was third in 20.68. 

Down the stretch of the 
men's 400 meters, defending 
champion Reger Black surged 
even with British teammate 
Du'aine Ladejo — but the chal- 
lenge was all Black had. The 28- 
year-old silver medalist 
stomped home, flat-footed and 
near apparent delirium in 4510 
seconds, while Ladgo — five 
years the younger, and with 
childhood aspirations of play- 
ing in the National Basketball 
Association — shrugged up a 
smiling, cocktail-party pose no 
sooner than crossing the line in 
45.09 seconds. 

Each finalist in the pole vault 
might have drawn inspiration 
from the sign pasted the wall 
behind the landing pit which 
read: “Where’S Sergei?'* In 
Bubka’s absence, the 28-year- 
old Gataullin, who is a doctor, 
defended his 1990 title with a 
record vault of 6 meters, well 
short of Bubka’s 6. 14-meters 
world record. Olympic silver 
medalist Igor Trandenkov of 
Russia was second in 5.90, and 
Jean Galfictne of France lode 
third in 5.85. 

Vasiliy Sidorenko, a 33-year- 
old Russian welder, won the 
hammer throw with a personal- 
best this year of 81.10 meters in 
his third attempt, upsetting the 
defending champion and Olym- 
pic and world runner-up, Igor 
Astapkovich of Belarus, who 
could manage only 80.40 in his 
second round- 






_ jTV 


• i 
*1 


iT' 


I BASEBALL 


n 

Ma^or League Standings 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 
East Dtvftioo 

W L Pet. 
New York A) 42 ASS 

61 

Bottirooro 

43 *f 

jm 

. 7 

Toronto 

St « 

At* 

n 

Boston 

54 «) 

Mt 

i7ta 

Detroit 

53 41 

MS 

18 


Cnrtrol Division 



Qilcooo 

67 44 

jra 


aevetand 

M 47 

5M 

1. 

Kansas CHy 

M 51 

ssr 

4 

Minnesota 

S3 40 

AM 

M 

MltooukH 

52 62 

A56 

13ft 

Tenns 

west Dtvtsloo 
52 6! 

AS4 


Oakland 

51 42 

X51. 

ft 

Seattle 

48 43 

A 32 

2ft 

Calltomki 

47 68 

A 09 

5ft 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
East DMsIm 

W L PM- 
Montreal . 74 39 JE3 

6B 

Atlcnla 

47 46 

sn 

7 

Mm. York 

55 57 

jm 

Wft 

Phnadetpttkr 

S3 *1 

A 6 S 

,21ft 

Florhto 

51 43 

AO 

23ft 

Ondimati “ 

Centra* DMsfg* 
44 47 " 

JH 

_ 

Houston 

44 48 

jsn 

ft 

Plttstjunih 

52 61 

AW 

M 

St. Loots 

53 61 

AW 

14 

Chtooga 

4* 41 

AM 

17 

LasAnoete* 

WtestDtvtaWi 
57 54 

504 


San Francisco 

55 <0 

atb 

3 

Crtorodo 

. 53 • 63 

AO ■ 

5ft 

San Diego 

4« n 

J97 

12ft 

Wednesday’s Line Scores 


AMERICAN LEAGUE. _ 
OewHond *!■ «• **-* W * 

Toreros Ml •» Ml — * * * 

Grfmsfey. Wunfc (7} nf l»*i»f Ouzmtm. 
Castillo IS). Rtohetti {*> end Knorr. 
tV-Grfmstn>> 5-2 L— Gutman, «■«. 
Sv— Plonk m. 

OMw> ■ s • 

OrirMnd Ml MS MS-1 * 3 

an. DeLeon W, cook 07. A Hemondez 

(B) and LOVaMsre; OnltwasoodSteWiodi. 
K-fiem, ttZ tr-Offtfvem M. 3*-R.Mer- 
041. 


a • 

-Detroit MJ M.MM 5 * 

Banes and Nibmu W*Hs end Tettteton. 
w— Wens. 5-7. b-Banm. /I04. 

■amnan ; rm HI MH V • 
new York m m m— i 7 1 

MCDomU. WKs (B) tod Hod**; Key. Aw- 
sank) nu, MumatUM (•) and Nakn. 
W. McDonald. 14-7. Lr-Key, 1*4. HR— floifl- 
more, Palmeiro TO). 

in m we— 7 n • 
M vm Wfr-47 u o 
Nabtwte. Btokfteto te). e. Ft Howard w. 
Fi u ti wlr lii (5). Fcwos 17) and Rowtroidi De- 
NMfa* Trombley tth Willis (SI. SetwOsfiwn 
(*) cKlWoBack. W-OMMrtes.^12, L— Bank- 
head. 34 HRf-MInrasokv PuOtett 2 TO). 
Boston. M. viwdn 04). Rowtond 2 ID. 

W M WI-M 1 I 
«xe M MS %-4 6 • 

ffe iiinlewQ 
Convene, Khw (7). J. Nelson (7). Rtetev (M. 
Avaia IW and C. Howard, a Wtton CD; 

. BnoMvOUvar(fl).HerAe(9)andl.RodrbMZ. 
W-RMev.hLI — Henke,3*.5v— AVMo (W. 
Kama citv M » M»-l • i 

CaMonXe *n seo mv-4 ■ • 

Gordon, Bnnvw W.wveodvrr (V) mo Moc- 
farienei nntovand Mvero.W— Plnlev.HHft. 
L— Gordon, 1V7. 

NATIONAL. LEAGUE 
Sob Fraadsos m M M-f n i 
cmodvo , mm mt~a » * 

VarU-mdlnghaiTi, Hlckcrton (>), Bortm (8). 

Beck IT) and MunwiBs; Banks. Otto (4), 
Poll (TLPtcmc (f) and Wl Inins. W— Van Lan- 
<flnglm>. M. L— Banks, M2. Sv— Beck TO). 
HRs — WUrtona (4SI, Scansone (2). Qilcaaa. 

May an. 

Mm Yam «M «n *n-4 ll 1 

PMtodetoWu 'MS Ml -MV- 1 1 e 

sobartueen- Fnmor- fl»- and Hundivv; 
West. Slocumb W. Bortorf 19) . and Ue- 
bertnoL W-Saberhoaen. 144. L-WwL 4-ta 
Sv— Proaeo TO). . . : 

St. Loots M M 5H—X2 M 2 

Florida Mi m *to-4 t 1 

Dtfwares, StfeReN «), Hotmai W ond Ftoty 
ncBd: WedtienLJoteuwne (4).R. Lewis (7). 
Matnews m anosemtiaaa. W-ffllvorcs, W. 
L— Wmto ei j .ua. HRs— St. Loels, Penal 
W, OBvores TO. FtorMkv SReffleto to). 
Maatreaf MI MS MV-4 14 • 

FURWareh SM too tm~-9 6 S 

pj. MerttneL WetteiawJ Ito and Wsfatftr. 
Spew (to; Neoaie, Dewey (6), Mlcsfl (to and 
StaoeM. Morttoar. THL L-thogte, 7- 

T0. Sv— Wclteiand, (25). HR-Monfreal, Grts- 
mri mi. 


SOB Dteeo Ml MS MS-1 7 I 

Hoeatan Ml aw W»-» 4 0 

Bones, Tabaka (7). S. Sandero (U and Au»- 
itiub; KHaiToJanes (7) and Servals. W— Kile. 
9-6. L— Bum 4-14. Sw— To. Jones (51. 
MR — Houston, Finley tin. 

•M HI 014— 4 IS 1 

oh «n aw-d n a 

Ke. Gross, Valdes w. Td. worrdl (to aid 
Plaxsm Sml toy, Carrasco UI.LBranHev (to. 
McEiroy tn, J. Ruffin It) end Tauberue* 
W—V aides. 3-1. L— J. BrenHev. 4-4. 5v— Td. 
WtvTtil (TO HR— Las Angelas, Xorroe flto. 
Atlanta Oto eaa-a 4 2 

CMerade SM Wr' < a ft IuMmm. nrtta) 
GtovtaeondJ. lbooz; Rita, 5. Reed (6) and 
Stieattor. W— RltaJ-L L-Gkwine, WO. &v— 5. 
Reed'O). 

Ttie Mkfrael Jordan Watch 

WEDNESDAY'S GAME: Jordan went 0- 
lor-3 in too Barontf « victory against Knox- 
vUie. He walked once and struck out Bins 
tunes. He had three putouts, 

SEASON TO DATE: Jordan is batting .190 
(744or>JN) with 36 nxiStl&doubles, one triple, 
two home ram, 44 RBts.41 iwaib. ioi strike- 
outs ond 29 stolen txieea In 41 attempts. He h« 
1ST aurouts. Rve assists and W errors as an 
auttttoder. 


Italy 12. Tolwan > 

Panama &, Sweden 0 
Canada a. Jomn t 
United States 7. South Korea 5 
Netherlands 4. Puerto Rica 3 
Cuba 7, Australia 3 


RUST TEST 

SH Lanka vs. PabWan, third day 
Tharsday. to Cotoaito 
Pakistan 1st hmtnpsr 390 
Sri Lanka 1st toadies lOvomtotrt; 1534): 726 
Pakistan 2nd tart nos.- 238-2 


CANADIAN FOOTBALL LEAGUE 


J^ianese Leagues 


Batttmere 39. Hamilton IS 
Qrigary 2& Sacramento TI 


SOCCER 


European Scores 



Catarnt League 
W L T 

l*Ct. 

OB 

Yomhnri 

53 41 0 

S64 

-to 

dunidu 

48 46 D 

jm 

5 

Hrmstiin 

48 48 a 

jsaa 

6 

Hlrtotilmo 

44 48 Q 

xn 

8 

Yakutt 

44 48 • 

An 

8 

Yokohama 

43 49 0 

AO 

9 

TfcenBWts Resntts 
YOkohaiaa X Yornlurl 1 
anMidil 4, Yakut! £ 12 fambigs 
HlroaMma 4, Harohln 2 

PoOfte Lame 
W L T 

pet 

OB 

Ktatetss 

51 40 1 

540 

— 

Seihu 

SI « « 

556 

— 

Ortx 

49 40 1 

J51 

1 

Data! 

SI 42 1 

J48 

1 

Latte 

37 . 56 0 

JM 

15 

Ntanan Haro 35 56 3 

305 

ti 

TtuirsdoT** Result 
S*B» 7, Dolot 1 

World Championships 



CUP WINNERS’ CUP PRELIMINARIES 
Thursday"* Results 
PC Plrtn 3. Schoan 0 
Norma Tallinn 1, Meritor Bran* 4 
Fandok Babrutefc L Tirana 1 
Tfltow Tiraspol fll Omonto Nicosia t 
Ptorfano 2. shod Rovers 2 
Sod» Gflrrrf A. Oftmsfla Rfpa 0 
Viktoria Ztakev 1. 1FK Norrkaptoo 0 
CHAt/UHOW CUP PftELUHINARIBS 
Wednesday's Results 
SMoua Boehareat A Servant Geneva t 
AEK Athens 2. Gknaow Rangers 0 
Leota Warsaw 0, HoWuk SpW ) 

Ports St Germain 3, FC Vac o 
Sllketnre 0. Dynamo Kiev 0 
Avenir Beaaen 1. Catatasansy 5 

b a a^jUTiWM 


.Cotombla X Domtnicon Republic 5 
Nicaragua 4 France 0 


BASEBALL 
American Leaewe 

CHICAGO— Reassigned Stave Worrell and 
Tim Moor*, pitchers, from PH nee wtmam, 
Carolina Leosae to Blrmtooharn, Southern 
League. 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


BELGRAVIA 

orchids^ 

VOUJOti MHS GO«VA ZWICH 
VOOVMBief^ 
amnautmwBCOME 

UK m 589 5237 


4DA5TRUM 


ltowYmkOwWai 684-13W V 

i week. 


iNmuJN m^esp oris 

ft* JtSjSEhf* H aw YmK. VSA 
HbrarCMt Garth 


lONDONK^»Wi&«! 

Sm an 7U 5SP/VI ere* eon* 


MAYFAIR INTL 

LMdw &nrf 5W«ie> 071 727 47n 

ZUBCH_ r JW«WT 
AMETHYSTE hRI betoM 
'CM1 SWIPHHAM3 0696)0 2259. 

LONDON t»TWOW 6oort Service 
OBI KO 0B89 Craft Cards WdoHt 

CHB3ttBeon«ina . 

5 V fc °^EO®f !a " 



TH. AVIV, WCH SOOETY . 
Sfe?W§S2n)9ia Cm* caib. 

CWMTJtL BOOn SBMCE 
LONDON ■ 

PLEASE PH0t€ 071 2253314 

CAMNES k COrt D’AZUR 

MUNICH r WEtCO*E 
BCOCT&G^AfieCf. 
Pt£ASE CALL 089 --91 23 IA . 

■ VAND&MI • 11 • 

teadoB beat Sana ISeD/N U8 

• 

• • «MVA AUIANCE * * 

Escort Service twtjrwd. MtBSngto 

• 7ehfl22/3)l 073A 

CHA **252' " 

^SS*?3120i975(» ■ 

*ZURlCH*SUSAN* 
Esmrt Service 

Tdt'01 / 381 99 <8 


” OaeiTA MTHBMADONM •• 
Escort Service 

Tjt OB / 731 6352 - Ofr/aWM 


fSAMCRJKT ROW DQ 558 DORF 
(taraqt, baa Seneca. 


SWISS BtX*T Swjfca 
In SwtewfaBd (Qtal727230 
btomU ioncI +4T T7 71 123B_ 


CA1O0EAN ANGUS OF LONDON 

_ C0ET SBMCE ALL AREAS 
I -72U0Q craft anfa Qaapied 


** U 3 MXM • CMRHW 
laadon ttaateow C <awrt Bron 
SwunOTT 7 W WP 7 OBtfl CMOS 


OfNEVA * SHW0N * PAHS 
Exon Sorwce & ftmal 
TWi 022 / 3040 SPV. 


FRANKFURT A AREA 


FRANKFURT- 
f¥ro(a fitcort oad Twel Senxs. 
Heose roll MotAs 0161 /» V. ST1 


TO OUR 
READERS 
IN 

BELGIUM 

It's never 
been easier 
to subscribe 
and save. 
Just call 
toll-free: 

0 800 1 7538 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


TODAYS 

HOLIDAYS 
& TRAVEL 
SECTION 

Appears 
on Page 6 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


Attention visitors 
from the U.S. I 



If you enjoy reading the IHT 
when you travel, why not 
abo get H at home ? 
Same-day delivery available 
in key US. cities. 

Ul (1)800 882 2884 

(in NewYerfc nfl 212 752 3B») 

Hcfitl bl^to igribifiic 


ALCOHOLICS AN0NYM0U5 £n gbh 
daily. Tel: PARS 
5? & ROME <78 0320. 
IRT 5974265. 


MOVING 


0 


INTERDEAN 


TOR A FREE ESTIMATE CAli. 

PARS (1) 39201400 


IMPCHCT/EXPORT 


FOR 5 A 1 C fmE AMD DBS. to 
byge aaantrtoL far Bifonnutoi 
clean & 27-2T-969351. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


OFFSHORE COMPANIES 

* 750 READY MADE CQWANB 

* W* WIBOtXOONS 

* ACCOUNTING, IKAL & ADMN 

" (Cl A/O TRADf DOCUMENTATION 

* TQffHCNE £ MAL FOKWARXNG 

Tateptwro or to* to rnmdafr senicc 
reel ICO page rotor bodve 

6 CRA ASIA (JMJTED 
2 W 2 Soto of Amenta To»* 

Hoi court food. Ha ma K ong 

Tet +8525220172 
Fan +852 521U90 


IRISH N0N4S5OWT 
COMPANIES £195 

Ided tax-moktove veheto 
low profile, tot free & European. Svd- 
abte to k ui nft oonutaaicy 8 other 
aowtiei. Far rare e tka e nva oartKh 

®4 Mwpfcjr. Ptohr, S oyer ei gn 
way Serokm, 56 Riw 8 Hobi 
ItoUn 2, Mand 

Tet + 3 S 3 1 M 18490 Fn (Ml MW 


OfKHORE COMFAMES 
’ Free protEoond consvhatore 
' VtortrfwHltta 


• Wi oonfidenrol services 

• London i^rowrtcAve 

• Fufi adrrmdntion service 

ASTON CORPORATE TRUSTEES LID 
19 , Fed &wl Doucjka, Isle of Man 
Td. 004 426591 ro >0624 625136 


AVAILABLE CAPITAL 

EqMy or debt financing. A program 
totoed to your corporate newL 
Long tema. bed rotes, 
broker lees pod art protected, 
f ro your proposa l surnmoy (Or 
For Edit bnemvri Groups toe 
Attn; F in o stid Deportment 
hoc ( 507 ) A 3 5035 (Panama) 


TBflUE MAORNESY 
Temper) Production Machinery 
Colon Swob Forming Machine 
Canon ftd Mdcfn 
X fmstmd+udMg & Co. AG 

CH 86&5 Wogen b. tone 
Switzerland 

Tet (55| 28 31 41 Thr 875349 FAIU CH 
Tefcfac 55 28 42 60 


OASS A BANK m lot Free me with 
ednentSralnre ymw and edoUahed 
baring and wanties aococmts. US 
550 , 000 . InomerEaie ngfirfw. Co# 
Croato VM M 2 - 6 IC 9 or Fa.J 604 ) 
W 2-3179 or union 0?1 3?4 51 S ar 
FA* 071 237 992 E. 


DGSPUtAlBY SffiONG sw&sted on 
e to metfary to matol msrtd vide a 
100 % ononymoio, no reference* re- 
quoad fenl acawrr nraned wah an 
oR -shore company tabby in a zero 
taanon aredaxn UK *U 1 70 ° 
B 30138 


OFT 5 HOCE COMPANIES, tar hee 
brpdure or adnoe Tefc London 
44 8 ) 74 ) 1224 fac 44 8 ) 748 6558 


BUSINESS TRAVEL 


Wi gt o wn Ctoa frequwd Trotaftn 
R 5 Orrenl/Audrcfio/Amcn/No & So 
Araenca Saw yp to SOX No cou- 
i, no r e anatoo. Impend Canada 
"11-722) to 514-341 J99& 


pan. no « 
tat 51+341 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


SAVE INH .CALLS 

NewAWn 

3 RD MONTH ffiS! 

Anywhere • Any Hue • Worldwide 

Save 15% to 50% 

On AH bit*! Calls 
AT4T Network 

CM now to determine yo# 
nmaum depcea. «uy WPrt e<»o«. 
& OOrtMJtot 24 howw ctoy» o week 

Ca9 (Ui.1: 1-407-253-5454 

car U5 and well orf yew raN todU 

FAX: (USJ: 1-407-25W130 

HA TALKBACK 

SB K US.I. Atibowne, H. 33935 USA 
AaenCWefnnKl 
Offer ptpre 5 epAm 6 w IS. IV* 


$AVE ON 
International 
Phone Calls 

Now you t«*i cal the 
US. and vme os much a 


and mwd sutchoraes. 
AvcdoUe ei oil countries. 

CoS no* to ie#» and we how 
yOu can begpn sawing today. 

Lines open 24 horn 

ikallbacK 

Tel.- 1/206-284-8600 
Fox: 1/206-282-6666 

417 Second Amur* WeS 
SHrte.WA 96119 USA 


OFFSHORE COMPANIES 

• READY MADE CO». FUU ADMIN 

* TRADE DOCUMMS AMIL'C 

• BANW4G AND ACCOUNTING 

* OONA BUSINESS SERVICES 

Camera StaAa He to im m erhee 
services & company brochure. MACS 
UD. 3304 Sogga Comm. Or. 

148 Cbtmamhr Road W.. HcwglCorj 
Teh 652-8572380 Fan: 85MOT100 


CAPITAL AVAILABLE 


HJND5 AVAILABLE . 

TC* 

All BUSINESS PROJECTS 
09 FOR 

LETTKS OF OBUT 

BANK GUARANI® 

OTT® ACCEPTABIE COUATB1AL 

Breta s ccroression guvcmieed 

Mesdeon R Ce 

HNANC 1 AL WSTJTUTION 
Brunh -BQ£8JM 

Intomian hy hr J2 2-534 02 71 
a 33 - 2-538 47 91 
THE* 20277 


FINANCIAL SERVICES 


RJNDfNG PROBLEMS? 

Veniue Capid - Egwy Lows 
Red Estate ■ BvMiea 
jTerm 

Cofateto! 

Baricbie \ 
for i 

Bancor of Asm 

Gosnusnon wgnedwdy upon tandirg 
Broker s Comnnssan Awed 
(to (63-21 8)0-9204 
Tet (63-2] 8104570 or 8124429 


SERVICED OFFICES 


BRUSSELS - BELGIUM 

Toot office tefl snvkm 
Tot 32 - 2-534 85 54 
(to: 32-3534 02 77 


YOUR LONDON OFHCe 
AftodoHe, 5 oar. Bond Streel 
Tefc 44 71 499 9192 fto 71 499 7517 


NEW 

YOUR OfflCE IN PARIS 


: park . 1 

and pmondbed tetephane sennas. 

YOOR ADDRB5 near OPBtA lodai 
business address. Fcer'phone number. 

BUBO CUJB FRANCE MAOBHC 
12 Bid Mode ta ne ■ taro 
Tel 33- T-44 5 100 B0 fro 33- 1-44 51 80B I 


AUTO RENTALS 


CffilUKY S&F DRIVE 

RBMULT CUO: FF239/DAY 

AU. INCLUSIVE ■ N O HIDDE N EXTRAS 
In jixjc* or and o^pcrti m Hove 
Centrid retenmtign 
TEL- ( 33 - 1 ) 30 J 7 55.24 


KMT ROM DHia AUTO 

WmB4>. FT 515 
SPECIAL OHff ■ T DAYS: F 1500 
PARIS TEL |1) 45 87 27 04 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


XOPAY’S 

BEALESTA1E 

MABKETPLAGE 

Appears 
on Page IS 


CHAUFFEUR SERVICES 


OUBUN, fiXFBSWED CHAURBJR 
and Guide Somes, 
tr eland 3S3 88 537749. 


HEALTH/MEDICAL 

SERVICES 


PHARMACY/MEDICAl NEEDS 

Worldwide uprAed fan tram London 

Tel- 44 71 499 5397 (to 71 499 1513 


LEGAL SERVICES 


DIVORCE FAST. S295JXL P.O. Ban 
8040. Anton, CA 92802. CM/Fat 
(714) 9685695 USA. 


PLANNING TO RUN 
A CLASSIFIED AD? 

Piece your Ad quickly and easily, contact your 
nearest IHT office or representative with your text. 
You will be informed of fhe cost immediately, and 
once paymwit is mode your ad will appear within 
48 hours. Ail major Credit Cards Accepted. 


EUROPE 

FRANCE IHQfc Psra. 

Tot. (i 1 40 3? 93 85, 

Foe 11)4637 9370 
ffiMANF. AU5SUAGEMRAL 
EUROPE, FtoAW 
ld.J04Pf72575.< 
hcB69)72 73IO 
BE^UM A LUXEMBOURG 8rt«ek 
Tel 343 16 99. 343-1 9M 
Fa* 345^053 

Gfi&asicmusc Adm, 

W p«)45352Ji 
Fas 654 5513. 

DENMARK: ( 

Tel: 31. 

RMAMfc HtiariS. 

Td- 358 M 647412 
focdlZfUZ 
ITALY: Miro. 

Tel- 58315738. 
toe 583 2D938 
ICHBSAMK: Amtodam, 

Td. 31.20.6641060 
Far 31.20.6861374. 

NORWAY SSWH3B1- 


UNUH) STATES 


MW YORK: 


J 572-7212 

11*427175 

OflCAGO: 

Tel- 1312) 301-9393. 

Fto Cl? 201-9398 
TjFree:|K»l 535-MOB 
(OSAMSESc 
Td 


to:^|85IJS»_ 


: 18001648^739. 


IEMS: 
Td/toe 
ToSFrro 


496-9603. 

526 - 7857 . 


Td : 

toe j47i 55 913072. 
PORTUGAL liion, 

W 351 1-457-7393 
fto 351-1-457-7351 
SMMMaiH 
Td. 3508769. 
toe 3509257. 
SWnZBUMkFdfe. 

Td- (011)7263021 
Fa* (021)7263091. 
UNTIED KMGDQM: lander. 

Td; 1371)636 4602 
Few p71|2rfi) 2254 
Tder 263009. 


CANADA 

TORONTO: 

Td- WB) 633-6200. 

Foe (905) 633-2116 

MBPUEA5T 

UMIBIARASBttATE&Shaodi, 
Tel {06(35)133 

fro: m vmm 

Teto! 6fUM INMGtF. 

A51A/PAOflC 

HONGKONG: 

Td. {857)9222-1 169- 
Tlt: ollTOHMt 
Ft*c {553 9222-1)90. 
»*APai£: 

Td. 223 6478. 

Ito 224 1 566 
Ttoc1H749HT»4. 

JAMN: Tr*«x 
Td: 320)0? 10. 

7 k 036/3 F« 3201 0209 







Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 12, 1994 


OBSERVER 


Yes, Virginia, Fans 


By Russell Baker 

N EW YORK — Whai about 
the fans? Another baseball 
strike looms, and nobody cares 
about the fans. Not the players, 
whose average pay is over $1 
million a year. Players don’t 
care about the fans. 

Neither do the owners. To 
owners the fans are zQch. That’s 
what the fans mean to owners: 
zflch. 

Owners and players act as if 
there were no fans, as if the fans 
wane a myth invented by sports- 
writers for days when there is no 
rotator-cuff surgery to report, no 
pulled hamstring to lament, no 
mighty slugger to deplore for 
playing with corked bat, no 
multimillionaire owner to scold 
for speaking with forked tongue. 

Because of the players’ and 
owners’ indifference to the fans, 
many youngsters — the fans of 
the future — wonder if there 
really are any fans. 

□ 


Just the other day 1 had a 
letter from a little girl named 
Virginia, saying her friends tell 
her there are no fans, that the 
fans are just a fiction made up 


by sportswriters. 
“fwi 


wouldn’t want to grow up 
in a world without fans,” she 
writes. “Please tell me the truth 


itry’ 

ers performing thousands of 
miles away, he stretched out 
and has hardly moved since. 

□ 

That was the end of the real, 
life-size baseball team in your 
hometown. The fans got rid of it 
for you. 

Suppose there had been no 
fans, Virginia. You would now 
have to go out into the steamy 
air and sunshine and mix with 
people if you wanted to see 
baseball. You would have to 
look at three-dimensional, life- 
sized players. And not the best 
players either. 

Tell your doubting little 
friends, dear child, that there 
have always been fans. Remind 
them of the great DiMaggio. 
Joltin' Joe, the Yankee Clipper. 
Some say the finest baseball 
player of his age. 

One season he batted .346, hit 
46 home runs and batted in 167 
runs. And who was it who booed 
him for asking the Yankees to 
raise his salary to $40,000? 

Yes, Virginia, it was the fans. 
Without the fans there would 
have been no one to make the 
Yankee Clipper feel ashamed of 
hims elf for thinirinp he was 
worth $40,000 to the 


so that I may plan accordingly 
for the future.* 


Virginia, dear Virginia, pay 
no heed to your little friends. 
They have been infected, alas, 
by the attitude of baseball's 
owners and players. Of course 
there are fans. 

If there were no fans, a vital 
minor-league baseball system 
would exist all over the country, 
and you would have to gratify 
your appetite for baseball by 
watching a live baseball game 
played by real, life-size baseball 
players in your own little home- 
town. 

It was the fans, Virginia, who 
have saved you from this near- 
life experience. The natural 
habitat of the fan is the couch in 
front of his television set. 

When he discovered he didn’t 
have to go to the local ball park 
to see a game, but could hit the 
couch and see electronic pic- 


It was Yankee fans, too, who 
booed Roger Maris, the only 
player in history to hit 61 home 
runs in a season. Without fans 
to do the booing, Maris might 
have lost his humility. 

No fans, Virginia? You might 
as well say there are no drunks 
in the upper deck hurling pea- 
nuts and pouring beer on your 
head by the seventh inning. 


You might as well say there 
tea louts 


are no leather-lux 

unprintable words 


ingec 

shouting unprintable 
from safe distances at the out- 
fielders, no he-men in the 
bleachers hamming it up for 
their buddies with inflatable fe- 
male dolls. 

Yes, Virginia, the fans do ex- 
ist, just as surely as pulled ham- 
strings, tom rotator cuffs and 
rising taxes. Too bad, kid, but 
that’s baseball. 


New York Times Service 


Woodstock ’94: Great Vibes or Bi 


sn 


By Janny Scott 

New York Tunes Service 

D R. Robert Kauen missed the original Wood- 
stock festival. But be is attending the second 
one, in a rented RV. He's keeping an eye on his 
investment — $10,000 in the company with the pizza 
concession. The break-even point: 60,000 pies. 

Dolores O’Riordan had never heard of Wood- 
stock. Then someone asked her to sing at the 25th 
anniversary concert this weekend in Saugerties, New 
York. She decided to go, figuring that with so many 
people in one place, “it’ll be a great vibe." 
Country Joe McDonald was there. But he was not 


invited to Saugerties. He's 52 now, playing places 
tike the Seattle Zoo. As he sees it, trying to recapture 


Woodstock is laughable, tike chasing the wind. 

So what does it mean, this much-ballyhooed 
marking of another pop-cultural milestone, served 
up as a celebration but condemned as a sellout, a 
counterculture theme park with too many rules? 

“I don’t think there is any single answer,” said the 


poet Allen Ginsberg. “It could be both a continua- 
>irit of Woodstock and a co-pptation or 


lion of the spirit of ' 
a commercialization or a commodification of that 
spirit.” 

The official festival begins Friday on an 840-acre 
(340 hectares) compound in Saugerties, equipped with 
900 food booths, 1,100 phone booths, nearly 3,000 
portable toilets, its own health-care system, monetary 
system and a heavily-sneered-at code of rules banning 
everything from tent stakes to children. 

At last count, 163,559 of the 250,000 tickets had 
been sold, at $135 each, and sales were continuing. 

Katten is among the more senior Woodstock 
pilgrims. He is 57, a dentist from Cherry Hill, New 
Jersey. His musical tastes run more to Ella Fitzger- 
ald than Nine Inch Nails. But when a friend's 
brother got the Woodstock pizza contract and went 
looking for backers. Katten figured, “Why not7" 

Twenty-five years ago, he was an engineer with a 
defense-contracting job that kept him far removed 
from Vietnam and what he calls “the shenanigans of 
the era.” Driving to Vermont one August weekend, he 
got stuck in traffic on the New York State Thruway — 
bis brush with Woodstock, he later learned. 

This time around, he will be spending the week- 
end with thousands of people mostly younger than 
his own children, supervising pizzeria workers bused 
in from South Jersey, sleeping in a rented recreation- 
al vehicle with the other pizza investors and half- 
listening to bands with names like Porno for Fyros. 

“Fm not much into the rock," Katten confessed. 

Dolores O’Riordan is, though she was boro three 
years after Woodstock and her major musical influ- 
ence, as a child in Ireland, was Gregorian chant. 



She does like the idea erf the “big love-peace- 
human vibe” that she now understands the original 
Woodstock to have been. And she would not pass up 
a chance to play before such a huge crowd. Back in 
Ireland, O’Riordan said, the pope is the biggest draw 
— “bigger than rock ’n’ roll/’ 

For some Woodstock veterans, this weekend serves 
as a less-dian-egchflararing reminder rvf the passage of 
time and the evolution erf their world. The roster of 
dead musicians from die first festival is chining. 
David Crosby, who turns S3 this weekend, is one who 
made it — for which, he said, he is not ungrateful 


Front “N<tt Qrfta Dead, - Vd. I.fcjr GHben Sbchkmant Pie 

Diversified 


Crosby spent quite a few of the years since the 
firet festival addicted to ' 


Growing up in Ballybricken, near Limerick, she 
played the church organ. Her band, the Cranberries, 


made its first album one year ago. 

“I know Jimi Hendrix.” she offered genially, when 
asked about the original Woodstock bands. “To me. 
it's like all music from before my day. It's not a new 
revelation, as if a bunch of new young people were 
discovering something. It's been done. Tm not r 
that much into reliving the past.” 


i not really 


heroin and cocaine, 

mg 51,000 a day on drugs at the height of his habit. 

Now he is working a gain , touring and wmlring 
records with Stephen Stills and Graham Nash. Huy 
agreed to a return engagement at Woodstock, Crosby 
said, in part because they have an album coining out 
this weekend and are m the middle erf a 50-city tour. 

“I’m really incredibly happy to be playing music 
at this point and having it work,” said Crosby, who 
said he had been straight for eight and a half years 
and was getting comfortable with it. 

“If Fd known I was going to live this long, I would 
have taken better care erf me." 

Artie Kornfeld has been through a hegira of his 
own. One of the four original members of Wood- 
stock Ventures, organizers of the 1969 festival, he 
sold out his share and was not included when his 


former partners joined with Po;_ 

Entertainment to do Woodstock 

As Kornfeld tells it, he “became consumed by 
drugs” after Woodstock. After 1 6 years erf heavy use, 
he stopped in 1983. IBs wife of 14 years had died of 
an aneurysm, he said. Then, two months after Kora- 
fdd gave up drugs, his only child. died of a drug 
overdose at age 16. 

. Now he fives with his third, wife in a town house in 
suburban Los Angeles, managing musicians. “I'm 
back to the public golf course,” he said. He kept 
expecting his old partners to turn to him to help out 
with the anniversary. It didn’t happen.. 

So earlier tins week, Kornfeld sat alone in a 
Manhattan hold mean, fighting tire urge to go home. 
Barely able to afford the visit, he asked one of his 
former partners, couldn’t they put him to work? 

He said he was told to mill pack later. 

Country Joe McDonald has his own plans for this 
weekend He will be playing Saturday at a perfor- 
mance bam in the town of Woodstock, along with 
the Fugs, a folk satire band from the 1960s, and 
Ginsberg, who will be performing some of the poet- 
ry of wSlKam Blake that he has put to music. . 

Then on Sunday, McDonald intends to return to 
the Bethel farm where the 1969 festival was held. An 
anniversary concert planned there was canceled. Ait 
McDonald said: “T don’t care. Ilf there’s a P. A. 
system, if there’s not a P. A. system, I will go and 
perform.” 


PEOPLE 


UsT€^iorPhysu^um8 
Receive Reprimands 

Three prominent Los Ange-j 
les doctors have been repri- 
manded by the California Med- 
ical Board for falsifying records 
to cover up the massive 
amounts of addictive drugs they 
prescribed to Elizabeth Taylor * 
m the 1980s. Attorneys for the 
doctors Michael S- Gottfieh, * 
Michael J. Roth and WSffiam F. 
grfimw — said the reprimand 
really amo unted to an exon era- , * 
lion of thephyacians who were 
trying to control Tayloris pain 1 
ffy id kept inaccurate medical re- 
cords only to protect the actress 
from the piying eyes of tabloid 
r e p o rt e r s . An attorney for Gott- 
lieb," said, “This letter says 
nothing- It’s an administrative 
fig leaf cavering the board’s pri- ' 
vale parts. It ought to be la- ; 
beled a letter erf apology." 

□ 

' The actress MRhdle Pfeiffer 
and Jus husband, the TV pro- 
ducer David KeCey, have a new- 
born sem, John Henry. They also : 
have a 17 -month-old daughter. . 

□ 

An Indian court has blocked - . 
the retease of a Tamil-language " 
film based on the assassination - 
of former Prime Minister Rajiv 
Gandtt. A federal censor board ’ 
argues that the film, “Kuttra ■- 
Pathrigai,” eulogizes Sri Lan- . ' 
lea’s Liberation Tigers of Tamil „ ■ • 
F^am, which India holds re- ... 
sponsible far the 1991 slaying. 

P 

The conductor Seiji Ozawa 
and the jazz trumpeter Wynton 
Marsatia are joining forces to 
make an educational television 
series for dnldrim. In “Marsalis 
cm Music,” which will be shown - 
oss public TV, the two will draw 
on Doth jazz and classical styles ’ 
to explain the basics of music. ' 

□ ; 

President Nelson Mandela : :: 
has received Malaysia’s most ; c 
prestigious award the Tim Abd- . 
ul Razak Award. Mandela’s - 
daughter, Zirai, accepted the^- 
award for him in Kuala Lumpur. 


l! 

IT 


imraWAIIONAL 

CLASSIFIED 

Appear* on Tapes 6, 13 «fr 17 


WEATHER 


WEEKEND DESTINATIONS 


Europe 


Forecast for Saturday through Monday, as provided by Accu -Weather. Asia 




iDaiSei 
CMbOi 
Etflrtugh 

Frankfurt 


MkIU 

Utan 

Moko* 

Uriah 


Today 
High Low 
OF Clf 
2842 IB/M 
21/70 WIST 
35196 17/82 
38/100 8S/77 
fflWZ 22m 
32 m 17/® 
72m 13/BG 
22/71 13/53 
30/88 17/82 
23/73 1306 
31/88 24/76 

17/82 10/80 
2904 16/01 
22/71 14/87 
22/71 14*7 
1004 13/88 
38/87 23/78 
38/79 21/70 
24/75 17/82 
21/70 11/52 
30/88 17/82 
28/78 17/82 
28/73 17/82 


fVjiw 

SlPCtantug 


28/78 18/84 
22/71 11/52 
28/82 23/73 
22/71 18/88 
21/70 13/55 
13/55 8/48 

32/M 18/84 
18)88 14)57 
18/88 14)67 
21/70 13/56 
17/82 1407 
27/80 20188 
3008 16/BI 
24/78 1306 
21/70 14/87 


W Mgh 
OF 

■ 28/84 
pa 1008 

■ 38/87 

• 3403 

• 30/06 
pc 5108 
ah 21/70 
pc 22/71 
#1 28/82 
PC 19AM 
t 32/89 
a 18/84 

• 18/81 

• aim 
ah 22/71 
a 28/79 
ah 19/88 
a M/83 
a 28/79 

• 27/80 
pc 21/70 

• 34/83 
a 29/84 
rti 2700 
I 23/73 

■ 28/82 
Ml 1806 

• 2904 
*1 24/75 
I 23/75 
pc 1508 
■ 31/88 

t 22 m 

pc 19/68 
I 24/78 
■h 19/86 

pc 2802 

I 23/73 
i sam 
I 29/77 


Low « 
OF 

2008 pe 
1601 *h 
1702 pc 
24/78 pc 
23m a 
1601 pe 
1203 e 
1407 *1 
1601 pc 
1102 ih 
24/75 a 
1203 pc 

1305 c 
1804 » 
1203 a 
14fl7 c 
1102 pc 
21/70 pa 

22m • 

1804 c 
1308 a 
1804 pa 
1804 * 
1801 pc 
1303 pe 
1808 ■ 
9/48 C 
24/78 a 
1407 c 
1203 pc 
1102 pa 
2008 1 
1203 pc 
9/48 pc 

1306 c 

1102 pe 
21/70 a 
14/87 pc 
1102 pc 
1407 c 



North America 

Warm weather along the 
East Coast Dlls weekend wfl 
be k)fi owed by dry and much 
cooler weather Monday. 
Detroit and Chicago will 
have cfiMy weather Sunday 
Wo Monday. An early frost 6 
possible in northern Min- 
nesota. Amarllo to Phoenix 
will remain warmer man nor- 
mal this weekend. 


Europe 

A cNDy air masa wd plunge 
southward Into Soandtoavia 
and northern Germany this 
weekend. A taate of fall 
weather wffl meet residents 
from Oslo to Berlin over the 
weekend. Cool weather in 
Paris end London flib week- 
end wfl give way to warmer 
weather Monday. Moscow 
wll be wet and oool. 


Asia 

Typhoon Elite will move by 
south of Japan this week- 
end. Heavy rains and gusty 
winds may brush Kyushu, 
but die main island of Hon- 
shu, including Tokyo, will 
have hot, dry weather the 
nod several days. Mter sev- 
eral days of ary weather, 
showers may return to Mani- 
la this weekend. 


Asia 


Trin 

Tomorrow 


Wgii 

Low 

W Bitfi 

Law W 


OF 

CIF 

OF 

OF 

Bangkok 

33)01 

23/73 

pa 33)61 

28/77 pe 

Bafng 

32X88 

22/71 

pe 31/88 

21/70 pe 

Hong Kong 

31)66 

26/78 

* 3148 

26/79 Hi 

Mi 

Sana 

24/76 pc aim 

24 /7S ah 

NwMil 

32/BB 

27)60 

1 33 <61 

27160 pc 

Soou) 

33/BI 

27/BO 

e 33/61 

27)80 pe 

Shangha/ 

SW1 

28412 

*h 334)1 

27180 po 

SngoDan 

30 tm 

22/71 

pc 31/68 

23)73 pc 

TJpai 

33/81 

24/75 

pe 33)91 

25/77 pc 

Tokyo 

33<B1 

27)60 

pc 33/61 

27/60 pa 

Africa 

Mgltn 

31/W 

23/73 

■ 32 <66 

24/75 pc 

C^wToran 

13«3 

5/41 

*1 18/61 

7/44 pa 

CBnMmra 

28 m 

19*8 

• mm 

1BZB8 pc 

Ham 

20/m 

11452 

1 22/71 

12/33 pc 

Ugoa 

27/80 

23/73 

rfi 28** 

24/75 pc 


21/70 

OHS 

pc 22)71 

12133 pc 

Tiri» 

3B/67 

21/70 

8 35/83 

23/73 pc 

North America 


SATURDAY 



SUNDAY 


fmcew and data 




Europe and Mhkfle East 


Europe end Middle East 



Ondmagc 

Mima 


21/70 12/53 
31/98 22/71 


pe 21/70 13/66 rti 
DC 31/88 21/70 DC 


Location 

Weatber 

Mflh 

Law 

PUT 

Ultoya 

Wind 

Location 

WSattar 

Ugh 

Low 

Water 

Wave 

Wind 



Tamp. 

OF 

Tamp. 

OF 

Temp. 

OF 

Hoidts 

(Metres) 

■Speed 

frph) 



’s? "sr 

Temp, 

C7F 

HaMifa 

(Mama) 

Spaad 

(kpb) 

Cannaa 

pBrtfyauraiy 

20/79 

18764 

28/78 

1-2 

E 

1020 

Cam 

sunny 

27/80 

18/88 

28779 

'vO " 

5E 

12-25 • •• 

DmuvBo 

parity sunny 

1008 

12753 

18/84 

1-2 

N 

15-80 

Daauvfla 

partly sunny 

21/70 

n/52 

18764 

1-0 

NE 

1K30 ; • 

Rim In) 

sunny 

20784 

19768 

28/79 

0-1 

NE 

1205 

Rimini 

sunny 

28/82 

2068 

28779 

0-1 

NE 

10-00 

Malaga 

sunny 

297B4 

22771 

25777 

0-1 

SE 

12-25 

Malaga 

thundemtonna 

31/88 

23/72 

26/78 

0-1 

SW 

12« " 

Cagliari 

sunny 

34783 

24/75 

Z7/B0 

CM 

W 

1000 

Cavort 

sunny 

ckaxfaandsun 

38791 

2479 

27/80 

0-1 

w 

1020 V 

Fsra 

partly sunny 

asm 

1M4 

21/70 

1-2 

SW - 

15-30 

F«ra 

27/80 

10/85 . 

20768 

i-a 

SW 

18-30' . 

Piraeus 

sunny 

37708 

27760 

27/80 

0-1 

NW 

1205 

Pfraaus 

sunny 

38/100 

28/78 

.27780 

0-1 

NW 

12-3' 

Corfu 

sunny 

37/86 

23/73 

27/80 

0-1 

NW 

19-25 

Corfu 

sunny 

3097 

24 m 

27/80 

0-1 

NW 

1030 

Brighton 

partly atmy 

10786 

1203 

1702 

1-2 

W 

15-30 

Britfwn 

sunny 

dauraandfun 

20*68 

11/62 

- 18761 

- 0-1 

W 

10-20 

Ootend 

partly sunny 

21/70 

11/52 

20788 

1-2 

N 

2009 

Ostand 

22/71 

10760 

19/Bfl 

1-2 

N 

2040 - 

Schevoningen 

partly sunny 

20788 

10(60 

2008 

i-a 

N 

20-40 

Scfwvanlngan 

clouds and aan 

1068 

BM8 - 

1B/64 

■MB 

N 

2530 : ■ 

&ytt 

party sunny 

20768 

10760 

2O0B 

1-2 

N 

2540 . 

Sy* 

partly ounoy 

20768 

1060 

.16/84 

i-a 

NW 

2530 

tanlr 

clouds and sun 

36/06 

24/73 

28/79 

1-2 

N 

2040 

Izmir 

. - sunny 

.38797 

asm 

2670 

1-2 

N 

2040 . 

Tel Aviv 

sunny 

31)68 

24/75 

277BO 

0-1 

SW 

1509 

TaiAvs/ 

aiaiy 

32780 

24/76 

27/80 

0-1 

SW 

12-22 


Caribbean and Well Atlantic 


Caribbean end Want Attitfc 


Middle East 


Latin America 


Oceania 

AudOmd 18/01 7/44 pc 16*1 B/40 pc 

Sydnoy 18*4 8/46 pc 16/61 7/44 pc 


Mu 

Grin 

Donwxin 

Janmfarn 


nywft 


Trier 

Mgh Lora W 
OF OF 
32/88 23/73 I 
36/85 22/71 c 
31/68 1780 9 
26)62 19/96 ■ 

38/100 21 m ■ 

<1/107 24/75 I 


Mgh 
OF or 

33/91 29/77 I 
38/100 23/73 ■ 
33/91 20498 ■ 
31/96 21/70 * 
42/10724/76 • 
44/11127)80 * 


W 


Today 

Mgh Low W Hfp 
C/P OF OF OF 

Buanoa Aim 21/70 8/46 t 17/82 8/43 c 

CaraoH 27/80 1740 pc 28/82 17/82 pc 

Una 17/82 16411 pc 18*4 15/59 pc 

MaxfeaCHy 23/73 12)53 pc 23/73 12/63 pc 

Rbrijanalra 29)84 1 7«2 pc 24/78 18*4 pc 

Sariago 16/88 5MT pc 10/81 3/37 pc 


Legonch mnny, pc-penty (Soupy. ccfoudy, OMhomra. Hiundoratorms. Main, stanow Aries, 
mvsnow, Mee. W-WsOMr. AO maps, fomcacta and data provided by AooH/HMniMr, he. Q 1B94 


Barton 

Chkrags 

26 m ig/60 pc 26464 20*8 pc 
27*0 21 m pc 26/84 18*1 pc 

Barbados 

sunny 

31/B8 

23773 

27/BO 

1-8 

ENE 

2039' 

Barbados 

sumy 

31*8 

asm- 

27*0 

1-8 

ENE 

20-35 . 


Daw 

32*8 16/61 pc 33*1 14/57 pc 

Kingston 

SLimmos 

thundorewmis 

31/88 

24/75 

28782 

1-2 

E 

25-50 

Kingston 

ELlnomna 

partly suray 

32/89 

asm 

28*2 

1-2 

E 

25-50 


OrtM* 

27/80 16*8 pc 26*2 17/82 pc 

sunny 

33/91 

23/73 

28/B2 

i-a 

E 

2535 

sumy 

3(793 

25/77 

2S782 

1-2 

E 

23-39 

-- 

HnUi 


Hamilton 

sunny 

32789 

asm 

27/80 

1-8 

SE 

2040 

Hamilton 

awwiy 

33761 

asm 

27/80 

.1-2 

SE 

2035 


LoiAngrtM 

Miami 

32/88 20*8 I 28/84 18/88 ■ 
30*6 20/78 t 32*3 35/77 l 

Aaia/Pacfflc 








AsWPadfic 











Panang 

PhukM 

ctoudsandsun 

3Z789 

asm 

2984 

0-1 

SW 

1020 

Penang 

thunderstorms 

31788 

24/75 

20*4 

Ol 

SW 

1020 




ckxxlsandsun 

337B1 

asm 

2984 

0-1 

SW 

15-25 

PhutaB - 

Owndstatorms 

33(91 

a/77 

29KB4 

Ol 

SW 

15-25 


NewYorit 


Baft 

ctoudsandsun 

32789 

asm 

29784 

0-1 

SW 

12-25 

Bell 

ctoudsandflun 

31*8 

22/71 

29784 

oi 

SW 

12-25 


nwnSx 

*2)107 26*2 pc 40/10*30*6 pc 

Cabu 

party sunny 
partly Bimy 

32788 

24/75 

30786 

0-1 

SE. 

IMG 

Cebu •• 

partHyaumy 

38/91 

23m 

30786 

Ol 

SE 

IMS 


San Fan. 

22/71 1355 o 22/71 14/57 pe 

Palm Beach, Aus 

20«8 

0748 

17*2 

1-2 

w 

2035 

Palm Beach, Aus- 

sunny 

.17*2 

11*2 

16*1 

Ol 

w 

1020 


ToraMo 

28/79 1457 pc 25/77 1457 pc 
25/77 10*0 pc 26/78 13/55 pc 

Bay of Islands, NZ 
Shtrahama 

partly simy 
partly sunny 
portly sumy 

22/71 

32/89 

15/89 

27780 

18*1 

28782 

1-8 

1-2 

SW 

SE 

25-90 

2035 

Bay of Islands, NZ 
Shtrahama 

showaia • • 
thunderstorms 

21/70 

31*8 

14757 

27*0 

15*9 

29784 

1-8 

1-2 

w 

SE 

3050 

2040 

■J 

WjuLLiA." 


Hanoi uk) 

31/88 

24/75 

2678 

0-1 

ENE 

2045 

Honolulu 

ckmdaandsun 

31788 

24/75 

28/79 - 

Ol 

ENE 

2545' 





Travel in a world without borders, time zones 

or language barriers. 


ABET Access Numbers 
How to can around the world. 

1. Using the chart below, find the country you are calling tram. 

2. Dial the corresponding ABff Access Number. 


3. An ABET English-speaking Operator or voice prompt will ask fbrebe phone numberypu wish to call or connect you to a 
customer service representative. 1 


To receive yourfroe wallet card of /O^AccessNuiTiber^ just dMtheacaanunibwof 
thecouniiy yotfre in and ask forOjstantx Service. 


COUNTR Y ACCESS NUMBfcK COUNTRY ACCESS N UMBER COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER 

Italy* — - 


ASIA 


Australia 


China, PEG*** 


1-300-881-011 Liechtenstein* 


172-1011 Brazil 


10811 Lithuania* 


155-00-11 ChHe_ 


000-0010 


Guam 


Hong Kong 


018-872 Luxembourg 


8*196 Cohuubia 


OOa-0312 


0«XH»H COsaHfcaTa 


980-11-0010 


India* 


800-im M a ce do nia , F.YJL of 9»8004Z88 Ecuador 


114 


000-117 Malm * 


Indonesia* 


001-801-10 Monaco* 


0300-890-110 . HSrivadora 


119 


Japan* 


Korea 


0039-111 Netfaodanda* 


19 a- 00 U Guatemala* 


190 


1&WH144 


009*11 Norway 


06-022-9111 Guyana*** 


190 


ir 


800- 190- ix Honduras 4 * 


165 


Malaysia* 


0*010-4800111 MexicOAAA 


123 


New Zealand 


05017-1-288 NkaragiM (Managua) 


95-800-462-4240 


pHTUp pl ry p * 


01-800-4288 Panama* 


Saipan* 


155-5042 Peru* 


174 

109 



:qmigcmt ;•:} Imagine a world where you can call country to country as easily as you can from home. And 

reach the US. directly from over 125 countries. Converse with someone who doesn’t speak your 
language, since it’s translated instantly. Call your clients at 3 a.m. knowing they'll get the message in 
your voice at a more polite hour. All this is now possible with ATS3: 1 

To use these services, dial the AfiSET Access Number of the country you’re in and you’ll get all the 
help you need. With these Access Numbers and your AKT Calling Card, international calling has never been easier. 

If you don’t have an AUST Calling Card or you’d like more information on ABET global services, just call us using the 
convenient Access Numbers on your right 



Singapore 


08-420-00101 Sa rinmu ev 


191 


Sri Lanka. 


900-99-00-11 . Uruguay 


156 


Poland*# " 

8000011 Portugal* 

000-911 Romania 
105-31 Buaria*tMa8CPw3 

235-2872 Slovakia 

800-0111-111 Spain* 

'430-430 Sweden’ • 

0080-10288 0 S w Uiei loml * 

0019-991-1111 UJg, 

— — - EUMgg— Ukraine 8*100-11 Bemmc fa* I-8CXV872-2881 

Armenia’* 8*14111 “ MD0DU3EA 5r ~ _ 1-800-872-2881 

— “ B1 BdttehVJ. 1-800-872-2881 


Taiwan* 


020- 795-611 Venezuela** •. 


.004)410 


Thailand* 


155-00-11 


0500-89-0011 Badnmn 


CARIBBEAN 


80-011-120 


1-800-672-2881 


Austria**** 


Belgium* 


022-9054)11 Bahrain 


Bulgaria 


080010010 Cyprus* 


800001 Cayman Mantfa 1-800-872-2881 


0018000010 brad 


080-90010 


Croatia** 


99-300011 - Kuwait 


177-1002727 H* 


1-600-872-2681 


Denmark* 


00-42000101 Lebanon CBdna) 


600288 juDgioF 


2S£ 001-800-972-2883 


Finland* 


8001-QoiQ Qatar 


430601 ifetkAntfl" 


. 0-800-872-3881 


980010010 Saudi Arabia 


0800 - 011.77 Stgtoa/Ncvh 


France 


Germany 


19*4)011 Turkey* 


l-SOO-lQ 


001-800672-2881 
■ 1-800-872^2881 1 


01500010 UAJL* 


° 0 ' 800 ' 12277 ijypf’CCrinfl 

nm _ _ ■ — . 


AFRICA 


\ # T * 

• * V 


Greece* 


ITmig iuy 1 

Iceland"* 


000002311 


AMERICAS 


WOm Gabon* 


510*0200 


Gtmhhr 


00*001 


Aigeffliaw 001-800-200-T m 

999001 Belize# = — 


00111 


0800-10 


© 1994 AKT 





L 

'■■S 





■CB-IV- • -W.T. re,- -