Skip to main content

Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1994, France, English"

See other formats


INTERNATIONAL 



PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 




Paris, Monday, August 15, 1994 


No. J4.667 



Day of Defeat i 
ByFacingUp 
To the Truth 


By T. R. Reid V ' 

Washington PoaStrria . 

TOKYO — ' With solemn chants apd . 
funereal dirges, Japan the 49th 

anniversary of its defeat in World War n 
on Monday. And yet the causes and objec-;, 
tives of that war are aiill being fought 
here. 

In most of the world, the history books, 
leave little question that Japan was- an 
aggressor in world War Du Japan invaded 
China in the 1930s and then drastically 
broadened the Pacific conflict on Dec. 7, 
1941, with a series of surprise attacks that 
battered the U.S. Navy at Pearl Harbor 
and other Asian targets. 

For decades, that aspect of Japan’s role 
was largely ignored bore. Textbooks/mn- 
seurns, and memorial sites focused mainly _ 
on (he suffering the Japanese people en-" 
dured when their enemies fought bade! 

In recent years, Japan has been swept 
by far-reaching political, economic and 
social change. One important aspect of 
that change has been a moch greater will- 
ingness by the Japanese to /ace up to their 
responsibility for World War II. 

The history texts used in schools here 
now present a picture of Japanese agres- 
sion, both in East Asia and at Pearl 

See JAPAN, Page 5 



REMEMBRANCE — French sailors aboard the aircraft carrier Foch 
bolding American, French and British Bags Sunday to recall the 1944 landing 


on the Riviera to bolster invasion forces advancing from Normandy 
the 400,000 troops were 300,000 from France’s African empire. 


PrjIlj.BruIni 

. Among 
Page 5. 






Shipment Yet From Russia 


By Craig R. Whitney 

New York Tima Service 

MUNICH — The German police have 
made the biggestsejzure yet of weapons- 
quaiity nud ear materials smuggled from 
Russia, calling rtThe most unsettling indi- 
cation to date of a well-organized criminal 
conspiracy to provide buyers with the abil- 
ity to build a bomb. 

The precise quantity of the confiscated - 
material was not known, but some reports 
indicated that 100 io 300 grams bad been 
seized. The mmeriaL hi^ily radioactive 
pluh3atumS39,the prinmTi&kfoffiteihate* - 


rial of atomic warheads, was seized 
. Wednesday at Munich Internationa] Air- 
port in baggage from a Lufthansa German 
Airlines flight from Moscow, officials said. 

Three men bcHeved to have been couri- 
ers, two Spaniards and a Colombian, were 
. arrested, an official said. 

“Further details cannot be revealed be- 
cause of ongoing investigations.** the Ba- 
varian state police said in a statement 
What the German authorities were most 
worried about an official said, was that 
maverick Russian scientific or security, 
jjprsonnriricwld be masterminding an op-. 
; nation to sell stolen bomb-grade materials 


to foreign countries or terrorist organiza- 
tions that wanted them for building nucle- 
ar weapons. 

A Russian deputy minister of atomic 
energy, Viktor A. Sidorenko, was also a 
passenger on the plane, according to the 
news magazine Der SpiegeJ. which said he 
was coming to talk with Bavarian officials 
about edvih an nuclear projects. 

But neither the police announcement 
nor other officials asked about the case 
mentioned Mr. Sidorenko, and police 
Spokesmen would not say whether they 
were investigating- a possible connection 
between him and the three passengers who 


had been arrested. A spokesman for the 
federal government refused to comment. 

Gennadi N. Bogacbov. a duty officer at 
the Russian Ministry of Atomic Energy, 
said Saturday that “no losses of plutonium 
have been registered at any of our facili- 
ties-'*' 

Mr. Bogachov said the Russian govern- 
ment was not persuaded the plutonium 
found in Germany was in fact Russian, 
adding, **We have very tight security at all 
our facilities.” 

He confirmed that Mr. Sidorenko was 
■ on thr same flight to Germany as the 
suspected couriers, but he said that there 


was “no connection*' between lbe three 
men and the deputy minister. He said that 
Mr. Sidorenko had flown to Germany on 
official business, but that he did not know 
his exact purpose or whereabouts. 

The seizure was the third that the Ger- 
man authorities had announced this sum- 
mer involving small amounts of enriched 
radioactive materials capable of being 
used in nuclear warheads. 

The two earlier ones involved much 
smaller amounts of fissionable materials, 
said to have been samples provided by 

See BOMB, Page 5 


How to Save a Presidency 

After Defeat, Clinton IBooks for Fixes 


ByAnnDwroy 
and Dari Balz 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — In a presidency 
with a string of bad stretches, the last 
weeks have been as bad -as it gets. .. 

Health-care reform. President Bill 
Clinton’s signature domestic effort, is. 
trapped in a partisan and ideological 
morass. The shocking derailment of the 
crime biB in the House symbolized a 
president so weak that, members of his- 
own party felt safe voting against him. 

A series of other embarrassments 
Whitewater hearings and a. new inde- 
pendent counsel investigating the con- 
troversy, a potential scandal involving 
Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy and 
an open rift between the White House 
and the Democratic Party chief — have 
dominated coverage of the presidency . 
all month. ...... 

Even before the most recent series of 
setbacks, an intensely frustrated Mr. 
Clinton told associates that he knew his 
presidency had gone seriously off track 
and knew he must do something. . 

Mr. Ctinton, according to an asso- 
ciate, is now going through much the 
same process he did during an earlier 
crisis point in his political life — - after 
his defeat for re-election as governor of 


Arkansas 14 years ago. He is re-examin- 
ing his most basic approaches to gov- 
erning . 

Associates describe Mr. Clinton as 
having struggled through a period of 
mtense anger and bi tt e rn ess, combined 
with a belief that no president had been 
. as mis treated by the news media and by 
partisan opponents. - 

Mr. Clinton, associates say, has come 
to the realization that whatever the out- 

, , NEWS ANALYSIS 

tide reasons for his troubles, they are 
not going to go away, so the only salva- 
tion rests with him. 

The installation of Leon E. Panetta as 
the new chief of staff is one sign of the 
derision to change. Another has been 
the first week of a president who stays 
“on message” — talking about the issue 
of the day instead of turning to whatev- 
er' topic he is asked about 

Critics are likely to scoff at such ef- 
forts. They contend Mr. Chnton’s prob- 
lems are the result of things that go 
much deeper - — that he is too liberal, 
that people are too suspicious of his 
character or that he is too inexpCTienced 
and indecisive to govern effectively. 

Nonetheless, the burst of activity by 

See CLINTON, Page 3 


Rwanda ; Why Were So Many Butchers? 


By Raymond Bonner 

New York Toner Service 

KIBUYE, Rwanda — Inside the Roman 
Catholic church here, a stone edifice with a 
rectangular bell tower high on a promon- 
tory jutting into Lake Kivu, several thou- 
sand Tutsi men. women and children 
sought sanctuary in April when the killing 
started. 

But a mob of several hundred Hulu 
men, some in uniforms with rifles but most 
in civilian clothes with clubs and machetes, 
had no respect for the church or for life. 

The killing began about 10 A.M.: by 
early afternoon, blood and bodies covered 
the cement floor of the church, the small 
side chapels and even the confessional 


booths. Then the killers went off to drink 
beer. - 

The next day, the mob moved on to the 
soccer stadium, less than a mile away in 
this small, grubby town with only one din 
road running through iL More than 7 .000 
Tutsi were gathered there. The soldiers 
fired rifle grenades into the crowd, and 
then the militia swarmed over it 

The violence in Kibuye was neither ran- 
dom nor spontaneous, and the United Na- 
tions has opened an investigation into 
massacres like these in the hope of trying 
the main culprits for what it calls acts of 
genocide in Rwanda. 

Trials by international tribunals could 
yield some detailed answers on how the 


ngs' 

outside world is struggling for an answer to 
the more troubling question of why so 
many people in Rwandan towns look pan 
— or stood by passively — when friends, 
neighbors and children were butchered. 

In Kibuye. some of the survivors are 
pondering the same issue. The massacres 
here were “the last step** in eliminating the 
Tutsi in the province of Kibuye, Augustin 
Karara. the mayor of this provincial capi- 
tal. said last week. 

He said that the mob bad tried to force 
him to join the rampage but that he had 

See RWANDA. Page 5 


Woodstock Redux: A Muddy Free-For-All 


Fishing Crisis in World’s Oceans 

90 Nations at UN Conference to Consider Limits 


— -w— — a * 

Iceland to India, from Namibia to 


By- Azrne Swardsoo 

Washington Pau Service 

TORONTO — The oceans, long 
bought to hold mdumted bounty, -are 
styini 

Jroml ... 

Norway, fish catches are 
rear, worldwide,, the global marine cai 
ias been declining in fits and starts since 
989, after increasing fivefold between 
,950 and 1989. 

New fishing technology, lax regulation, 
i hodgepodge, of conflicting government 
oKdes and an overall failure to manage 
he world's marine resources have com- 
lined to accelerate the decline of fish 
rocks around the globe. 


Newsstand Prices 


■ra P.DOFF Luxembourg tfL.Fr 

»s 11.20 FF AAOrOOO.-..«.12 Dh 

pon.-LiWCFA Qatar ADORtate 

5000 Reunion.. ..11 -20 FF 

-a .9.00 FF Saudi Arabia ..9.00 R. 

i .960 CFA Seneflat...^60CFA 

fi 300 or. Spam -20QPTAS 

.. ,.2,600 Ure Tunisia — 1-000 Dm 
:oosi .1.120 CFA Turkey -T.I-^WC 

n” JD UA.E .flJODlrh 

toil ...USSlJO U.S. Mil. (Eur.) 11.10 


Monday, more than 90 nations are to 
meet at a United Nations conference and 
try to create limits on international fishing. 

-In 1992, the Iasi year for winch figures 
are available, 90.9 million tons of fish came 
from the oceans, down nearly 5 percent 
from the peak in 1989. About 60 percent of 
the fish types tracked by the UN Food and 
Agriculture Organization are categorized 
as fully exploited, overexploited or deplet- 
ed. 

Meanwhile, the world population — the 
people who would eat those fish — is 
growing. On a per capita basis, the global 
catch cf fish from all sources fell from 42.8 
pounds m 1988 to 39.7 pounds in 1992. 

Climate rfmng pa and otherlocal condi- 
tions account for some of (his redu ction, 
but one reason predominates: overfishing. 

“It is a crisis, and it's one nobody really 
paid attention to until recently,” said Chris 
Newton, chief of the fishety information, 
data and statistics service of the Food and 
Agriculture Organization. 

The absolute figures mask decreases 
that experts believe are even more disturb- 
ing. Five low-value species ■ — only one of 
them eaten by humans, the rest used for 

See FISH, Page $ 



J*v Tr»«t. Rivtft, 

A couple sharing a hup with their daughters and waiting for the music to start 


By Marc Fisher 
and Richard Leiby 

Part Service 

SAUGERTIES. New York — On the 
final day of Woodstock *94 — a mudfesi 
that drove thousands home exhausted, wet 
and hungry — the precision-packaged con- 
cert became on Sunday what its critics had 
always wanted: a sloppy be-in of free mu- 
sic and harmony. 

If the festival’s organizers set too many 
rules or turned the site into a merchandis- 
ing mart, nature evened the score, dousing 
Winston Farm with all-day rains lhat 
swamped the vast tent cities, washed out 
roads and slowed food and transportation 
services to a crawl. 

The early exodus of nearly 300,000 rock 
fans from the rural concert site eased orga- 
nizers* concerns about a monumental. 25- 
hour push to clear the area. 

The Allman Brothers Band played in the 
background as a steady river of kids filled 
country lanes, choosing the long road 
home over the wet wait for Bob Dylan, 
Spin Doctors and Santana, among other 
blockbuster final acts. 

The New York State police reported the 
death of a 20-year-old Ohio man from a 
ruptured spleen, but a spokesman. Lieu- 
tenant James O’Donnell, said the festival 
had produced “remarkably few casualties 
or arrests.” He registered only 14 arrests, 
nearly all for minor offenses, such as a 
mother and son found sleeping in a local 
resident's shed. 

“They look awfully tired out there," 
Lieutenant O’Donnell said. “The rain took 
a lot out of them.” 

Local officials had been so worried 
about security that Ulster County had 
spent $340,000 to add a dormitory onto its 
jaiL The facility was not used this week- 
end, the police said. 

“This was the ultimate test of the youn- 
ger generation," said a concert organizer. 
John Scher, the president of Polygram Di- 
versified Entertainment. “Under pretty 

See WOODSTOCK, Page 3 


Seoul Offers 
To Provide 
Reactors for 
North Korea 

South’s Conciliation Bid 
Reinforces Geneva Pact 
Of U.S. and Pyongyang 

By Andrew Pollack 

Vph- York Times Service 

SEOUL — President Kim Young Sam 
will offer to supply North Korea with 
modern nuclear power plants on Monday, 
a step lhat could help bring about a suc- 
cessful conclusion to the agreement on 
North Korea's nuclear program reached in 
Geneva on Saturday. 

The offer was contained in the prepared 
text of a modestly conciliatory speech in 
which Mr. Kim outlined his vision Tor 
reunification of the Korean Peninsula. 
They were his first substantive remarks on 
relations with North Korea since the death 
last month of that nation's leader, Kim II 
Sung. 

Both the lone of the speech, in which he 
calls for the two nations to “immediately 
stop slandering each other," and the offer 
of light-water nuclear reactors could help 
pave the way for the two Koreas to resume 
their dialogue, although it was not clear 
how North Korea would respond. 

“If and when the North guarantees the 
transparency of its nuclear activities, we 
are ready to support their development of 
the peaceful use of nuclear energy, includ- 
ing light-water nuclear reactor construc- 
tion, by providing them with the necessary 
capital and technology," Mr. Kim said in 
the speech, according to an English trans- 
lation provided by the government. 

“This could well become the very first 
joint project for national development, 
leading to the establishment of a single 
community of the Korean people," he said. 

In the Geneva agreement, reached be- 
tween North Korea and the United States, 
Pyongyang said it would freeze or aban- 
don activities that could lead to the pro- 
duction of plutonium, which can be used 
for nuclear weapons, ft also said it would 
remain a party to the Nuclear Nonprolifer- 
ation Treaty. 

In return, Washington said it would 
move toward establishing diplomatic rela- 
tions with Pyongyang and would arrange 
to provide light-water nuclear reactors to 
replace North Korea's existing graphite 
reactors, which produce more of the type 
of plutonium lhat can be made into weap- 
ons. 

In his speech Monday on the holiday 
that is celebrated in both Koreas as the 
anniversary of Lhe end of Japan's colonial 
rule, Mr. Kim made it clear that South 
Korea wanted to play a central role in 
providing the light-water technology to the 
North, provided the North agrees to be 
open about its nuclear program. 

While South Korea has expressed its 
willingness to supply the reactors before. 
Mr. Karo’s was the niost direct and official 
offer. 

Officials here said ih3i the United States 
was now leaning toward having the reac- 
tors, which are expected to cost $4 billion, 
supplied by South Korea raiber than by 
Russia, as had been initially envisioned. 

North Korea would prefer a Russian 
reactor because it has experience dealing 
with Russia and because it does not want 
to be dependent on technology from its 
enemy in the South. 

North Korea apparently has not yet 
agreed to accept the South Korean reac- 
tors. Still, in an interview with Reuters on 
Saturday. Kang Sok Ju. North Korea’s 
deputy foreign minister and chief negotia- 
tor in Geneva, said his nation did not rule 
out South Korean reactors. 

Mr. Kim has not yet commented on the 
Geneva agreement and the advance text of 
his speech, written before Saturday, point- 
edly fails to mention the negotiations 
there. A government spokesman said Sun- 
day that text was not expected to be 
changed to include Geneva. 

Some analysis here say the government 
wants to play down the Geneva accord 
because South Korea was not directly in- 
volved in the negotiations. Some people 
here see the talks in Geneva as an attempt 
by North Korea to isolate the South by 
dealing directly with Washington. “There 

See KOREA, Page 5 


Kiosk 


Price Captures 
PGA Golf Title 

TULSA, Oklahoma <AP) — Nick 
Price of Zimbabwe became the first 
man in 12 years to win consecutive 
major golf tournaments, running 
away from the field Sunday with a 3- 
under-par 67 for a six-shot victory in 
the U.S. PGA Championship. 

Price finished with a 1 1 -under 269. 
His margin of victory over Corey Pa- 
vin was one shot short of the record 
set by Jack Nicklaus in 1980. 

Earlier story on Page 13 

U.S. Wins Basketball Gold 

TORONTO (Reuters) —The Unit- 
ed States won the 12th world basket- 
bail championship on Sunday by de- 
feating Russia. 137-91. Croatia took 
the bronze by beating Greece. 78-60. 

Earlier story on Page JJ 





», • 


{ .... 


Page 2 


** 


*r 



Manfred Womer, NATO Civilian Head, Dies in Brussels 


WORLD BRIEFS ■ <!> 1 


By Craig R. Whitney 

•Vew York Times Service 

Manfred WSmer, 59, the first 
German to occupy the highest 
civilian post in the North At- 
lantic Treaty Organization, 
died Saturday of cancer at his 
home in Brussels. 

Mr. Womer, who was bom in 
Stuttgart, was committed to the 
idea that European and North 
American security were insepa- 
rable, and he was involved in 
military policy most of his life. 

He volunteered to serve in 
the West German armed forces 
and qualified for a jet fighter 
pilot's wings while serving as a 
member of Parliament in Bonn 
starting in the mid-1960s. 

Mr. WOraer, who spoke flu- 
ent Fnglisli and French, suc- 
ceeded Lord Carrington of Brit- 
ain as secret ary -general of 
NATO in July 1988 after serv- 
ing as the Goman defense min- 
ister for six years. 

His popularity among the al- 
lies at NATO headquarters in 
Brussels, and the strong politi- 
cal backing he received from 
Chancellor Helmut Kohl in 
Bonn, led the alliance members 
lo extend his tenure twice. 

In April 1992, he underwent 
the first of three major opera- 
tions for intestinal cancer. Jog- 
ging and hiking had kept him 
trim, but by the end of 1993 he 
had wasted away so much that 
he began talking openly about 
his illness, joking that his doc- 
tors had put him on a “deli- 
cious" diet of carrot juice, rice 



firm supporter of dose ties with 
the United States. 

After Mr. Kohl became chan- 
cellor in 1982, he made Mr. 
WOraer defense minister. 


PoFpa gff c / Rciitcfx 

Manfred Wdrner was the first German to hold the senior civilian position in NATO. 


and vegetables instead of meat, 
potatoes and wine. 

Mr. Womer began his politi- 
cal career as a lawyer m the 
slate legislature of his native 
Baden-WOrttemberg. He stud- 
ied law in Heidelberg, Paris, 
Munich and Stuttgart, obtain- 
ing a doctorate of laws in Stutt- 
gart in 1961 after writing a dis- 
sertation on criminal 
prosecution involving military 


personnel stationed in allied 
countries. 

A member of the Christian 
Democratic Union party since 
1956, he won a seat in the feder- 
al Parliament in 1965, quickly 
makin g a name for hirnsriF as a 


military expert and joining an 
s fighte 


air force fighter squadron the 
following year. 

With the Christian Demo- 
crats in opposition during the 


1970s, Mr. WSmer served as 
their chief military spokesman 
and became a member of the 
national leadership of the party. 

From 1978 to 1982, as the 
Social Democrats moved to- 
ward the left and opposition 
grew to U.S. plans to deploy 
medium-range nuclear missiles 
in Germany to counter Soviet 
forces in Eastern Europe, Mr. 
Womer became known as a 


administration's arms built 
despite widespread skepticism 
about it in Germany. 

But at the end of 1983, Mr. 
Warner made a misstep that 
damaged his domestic political 
career when he dismissed a 
four-star German general, 
Gfinter Kiessling, as deputy 
commander of NATO on the 
ground that security checks had 
shown he supposedly frequent- 
ed homosexual gathering places 
and was subject to Communist 
b lackmail 

General Kiessling denied any 
homosexual contacts, dis- 
proved the charge and was rein- 
stated in 1984. By then, Mr. 
Wbmeris critics were calling for 
his head. 

Chancellor Kohl stood by 
him and Mr. WSmer carried on, 
arguing after the UJS. and Sovi- 
et leaders agreed in late 1987 to 
remove all intermediate-range 
nuclear forces that NATO 
needled instead to strengthen its 
conventional forces. 

He was also an architect of 
increased French-German co- 
operation to strengthen Eu- 
rope’s contribution to its own 
defense, and he supported the 
French-German brigade, out 
side NATO, whose formation 
was announced in 1987 despite 
considerable UJS. misgivings. 


Enough time had gone by 
then that the NATO members 
were ready to consider giving 
Germary, which provided the 
bulk of the European military 
forces that the affianoe had at 
its disposal, the right to the 
highest civilian p0SL 

Mr. WSmer was chosen at 
the end of 1987 and became 
secaretary-genera] the next Jtdy 

fie is survived by his wife, 
Elfiriede Remsch, a journalist, 
and her son, Marc. 

Toby Rowland, 77, an Ameri- 
can-born impresario who ran 
some of the best known theaters 

in London, died Tuesday of 
cancer in London. His first pro- 
duction was in New York in 
1938. He moved to London in 
1950. 

Yedufia Mooseaego, 88, the 
grand rabbi of Morocco, died 
Thursday in Fez. He was head 
of the Moroccan rabbinic tribu- 
nals. 


G unmen Kill an Israeli in Gaza Strip 

GAZA (Reuters) — MusSm gunmen killed an foaehand 

wonnded at least six othenm the GazaStnp<»Sim^y rcpmaI 

Palmctmiim miemllflS who died in asnoot-oul 



_ r iriii Said to Block Colon Cancer 

PHILADELPHIA (Reuters) —Aspirin, which has been shown 
to help reduce the risk of heart disease, also helps prevent colon 

1> M^&l33*5E£ of JnKn*! Medicine 
reported that people who had taken aspinn twice or mere per 
week .f or a tongperiod were significantly less bkdy w be diag- 
nosed with rit^rKdon or rectal cancer. Cokm and rectal cancer 
are among the most common and deadly forms of the disease. 

The study conducted by researchers at the Harvard Medical 
School andFoston’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital, found that 

among those who had taken regular aspirin doses the longest — at 

least roar years — the relative risk of colon or rectal cancer 
was 38 percent of that of nonaspinn users. 


ulU 


Benjamin F. Price, 74, a war 
correspondent withthe raflltaiy 

newspaper Stars^Stri^m SettO Form DutA 


and later picture editor of The 
New Yonc Herald Tribune, 
died Friday of heart failure in 
Charlotte, VermonL 
Walter BrazneB, 86, an air- 
line pilot who started 
cpenHDockpit biplanes in IS 
and retired as the commander 
of a fleet of jetliners 40 years 
later, died Thursday of a stroke 
in Longboat Key, Florida. 


IKE HAGUE (AFP) — The outgoing Finance Minister, Wim 
Kok, has received a filial go-ahead from the three new coalition 
partners to form a new g ov e rnm ent. He will discuss the division of 
ministerial posts among the partners on Monday, his spokesman 
added. 

The new government is expected to be sworn m by Quasi 
Beatrix next week. Its program calls for record budget cuts of $9.4 
billion by 1998; of which, two thirds would come from the state 


budget and the rest from social security. 

The .new coalition is based on legislative elections May 3, m 


Western Leaders Face a Challenge in Replacing Alliance Chief 


Rollers 

BRUSSELS — Western leaders face a difficult 
task in finding someone to replace Manfred 
Wdrner as NATO secretary-general. 

Mr. WBrner was the First German to head the 
North Atlantic Treaty Organization since it was 
founded 45 years ago, and he beld the job for six 
years. 

Barely one month after a bruising battle to 
find a successor to Jacques Delors as president of 
the European Commission, European allies, the 
United States and Canada must agree now on a 
candidate For the NATO job. 

The United States, the 16-nation alliance's 
senior member, commands the military wing of 


NATO, but a European has always held the 
political post. 

Mr. Wdrner’s replacement will need strong 
leadership and diplomatic skills at a time when 
NATO is deeply involved in Bosnia and in trying 
to build security across Europe — new roles the 
former West German defense minister 
championed. 

Defense Minister Relus Ter Beek of the Neth- 
erlands said Sunday that it was not yet the right 
time to take up the issue, but he acknowledged 
that replacing Mr. Wdrner would not be easy. 

“It is important that the void be has left should 
be Filled quickly,” Mr. Ter Beek said. 

His leadership, including a drive for far-reach- 
ing cooperation with former Warsaw Pact foes, 


was widely respected. Tributes flowed in from 
the United States, Germany, Britain, Italy, Por- 
tugal Belgium and the Netherlands. 

Two nam es have emerged as possible succes- 
sors — Thorvald Stoltenberg, a former Norwe- 
gian foreign minister who is the United Nations 
peace mediator in the Balkans conflict, and a 
former Italian prime minister, Giuliano Amato. 

NATO is now cooperating with the United 
Nations in the former Yugoslavia, and diplomats 
say Mr. Stoltenberg would be a good candidate 
for that reason. 

Mr. Amato has not been dragged into the 
corruption scandal that humbled many of the 
country's top politicians. Italy has had the top 
NATO job. 


Diplomats said that, as a Socialist, Mr. Amato 
is also suitably distanced from international con- 
cern over the extreme-right members of Italy’s 
new coalition government. 

The outgoing Dutch prime minister, Ruud 
Lubbers, who failed in Ms efforts to succeed Mr. 
Delors at the European Commission, has also 
been mentioned. But a spokesman for Mr. Lub- 
bers said he would probably not be a candidate. 

Other names mentioned indude the British 
foreign secretary, Douglas Hurd; the British de- 
fense secretary, Malcolm Rifkxnd, and the Bel- 
gian foreign minister, Willy Claes. 

The deputy secretary-general of NATO, Ser- 
gio Balanzino, an Italian career official will head 
Die alliance until a successor is found. 


which the Christian Democrats and Labor lost their majority. 
Ruud Lubbers’ center-left cabinet has governed since the elec- 
tions. If Mr. Kok becomes prime minister, he will be the fourth 
Socialist hrawi of government since the end of World War II. 

French Security Dragnet in 2d Week 

PARIS (AFP) —The French police kept up a security crack- 
down on suspected Islamic militants for the ei ghth str aight night, 
as authorities continued to defy threats from extremist Algerian 
groups that vowed attacks on France. 

.The police said 2,317 people were stopped overnight in Paris 
and that 84 were handed over to detectives for further question- 
ing. An estimated 22,000 people have been checked so far in the 


crackdown was announced by Interior Minister Charles 
Pasqna after Wamfe f undame ntalis t s murdered five French gen- 
darmes and consular staff in Algeria- The Islamic Salvation Army, 
the armed wing of Algeria's banned Islamic Salvation Front 
threatened reprisals unless detainees Were released. 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


Shrugging Off Poll 9 Kohl and Scharping Fight On 


New York Tima Sermr 


BONN — In March, when public 


opinion polls showed his party so far 
dot possibly 


behind that it could not possibly win 
general elections in October, Chancel- 
lor Helmut Kohl laughed and said 
that they were wrong, that he was 
going to win anyway. 


This month, the polls are predicting 
Allensbach 


that he will. The respected Allensbac 
Institute, in a poll published in the 
Frankfurter Allgemrine Zeitung last 
week, said the governing coalition 
would have won over 50 percent of the 
vote if the elections had been held the 
previous weekend. 

But with the Oct. 16 vote still two 
months off, neither Mr. Kohl nor his 
Social Democratic opponent, Rudolf 
Scharping, is acting as though the out- 
come is a foregone conclusion. 


Social Democrats unveDed election 
posters proclaiming “Look Forward 
to Change, Germany!” 

Mr. Kohl interrupted his vacation 
in Austria to campaign at Baltic-' Sea 
resorts in Eastern Germany, where he 
promised voters disappointed by the 
slow pace of recovery from the eco- 
nomic collapse of communism that 
prosperity was bound to come eventu- 
ally. 


Mr. Scharping told his supporters 
en chancel- 


that Mr. Kohl who has been < 
lor since 1982, was “no longer up to 
the demands of his office,” and the 


The Allensbach poll of 1.000 peo- 
ple across the country at the end of 
July, found that 40.9 percent of those 
surveyed said they would vote for Mr. 
Kohl’s Christian Democrats, while 
support for the Social Democrats had 
dwindled to 32.7 percent, almost an 
exact reversal of the situation six 
months ago. 

The junior partner in the governing 
coalition, the Free Democrats, would 
get 93 percent of the vote, according 
to the same poll or almost double 


what they won in elections for the 
European Parliament in June. 

Mr. Kohl is used to being the under- 
dog, having come from behind to win 
the last-three elections, r 5 

The .Social Democrats, ^martyi of 
whom flirted with leftist -and -pacifist- 
views while in opposition, have opted 
for a light-hearted, nonideological ap- 
proach in their posters, with the em- 
phasis on the candidate. 

“Kohl?” an elderly woman asks on 
one of them. “I prefer something a bit 
younger, myself.” 

Trying bard to re-establish an im- 
age of political moderation, the Social 
Democrats are promising budget cots 
and tax increases for some to pay for 
unification, but under Mr. Scharping, 
they say, the rich would pay more of 
their fair share. 

The government would impose a 73 
percent income tax surcharge on all 
taxpayers next year, while the Social 
Democrats would free low-income 


ayers and raise the surcharge for 
higher earners. 

Until this summer, Mr. 
was the front-runner, but as the 
man economy has begun to -emerge 
(from’' 'recession, just as Mr. Kohl-pre- 
'dicted.it would, the opposition’s Tor- 
tunes have waned. 

Mr. Scharping has also acknowl- 
edged making tactical blunders. Many 
thought he sounded like a sore loser 
after his party’s candidate for Genna- 
dy’s ceremonial presidency, Johannes 
Ran, lost to Mr. Kohl’s choice, Ro- 
man Herzog, in May. The opponent 
he had to defeat, Mr. Scharping re- 
minded himself, was not Mr. Herzog 
but Mr. Kohl 

Some politicians were also sur- 
prised during a recent beat wave when 
he endorsed a nationwide speed limit 
of 130 kilometers, or 80 mfles, an hour 
ou the autobahn, where in many 
places there are no speed limits . 

—CRAIG R. WHITNEY 


Berlusconi 
Makes Up 
With Critic 


Sihanouk Warns on Cambodia Perils 


Serbs and Muslims Agree to Ban Sniping in Sarajevo 


Roden 

SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herze- 
govina — Bosnia’s rival Serbs 
and Muslims signed a United 
Nations-brokered accord Sun- 
day to halt sniping in Sarajevo 
within 24 hours and pledged to 
patrol high-risk areas with UN 
peacekeepers to stop marksmen 
who disobeyed. 

“The sides shall undertake 
within 24 hours to issue public- 
ly orders which explicitly forbid 
sniping activities against mili- 


tary personnel, civilians and 
UN personnel in the Sarajevo 
region,” the agreement said. 

The two sides also agreed 
verbally to end shooting attacks 
around the Sarajevo airport. 


which have shut down the UN 
humanitarian airlift to the city, 
a UN spokesman said. There 
was no immediate word when 
the air bridge would resume. 

Gunfire halted the airlift 


Thursday, only two days after 
the effort resumed following an 
18-day break caused by shoot- 
ing blamed on Serbs. 


The accord was signed by top 
officii ' 


Serbian and Muslim officials 


and the United Nations. The 
sides pledged to Form joint pa- 
trols with the UN Protection 
Force to flush out and prose- 
cute as criminals sn i pe r s dis- 
obeying orders. 


Bonn Arrests 6 os Extremists Near Buchenwald 


Compiled by Our Staff From thspauhes 


UNIVERSITY DEGREE 

I bachelor's • master's* doctorate 
ForiAtakLte^Aca&rrfcBepetkrtx 
ThoufrCamertertHomBStoty 
CS10>«71-O3OG©ct23 
Vac £310)471-0456 



Fax or send dstafed ream for 
FREE EVALUATION 


I Pddfic Western Univeraty| 

2875 S. King Street HonoUu, Hi &B26 


ERFURT, Germany — Po- 
lice thwarted what appears to 
have been another attempt by 
neo-Nazis to desecrate the 


World War II German death 
camp at Buchenwald, officials 
said Sunday. 

Six men, aged 16 to 20, wore 
detained near the memorial late 


pa ask the buder... 


'fjr 


jJj/Ca*U 

Vbtrt tmm m 7,1 umml it u h 


S • I - N - G-A-P-O-B-E 


Saturday carrying far-right ex- 
tremist propaganda, raising 
suspicions they had planned to 
distribute the leaflets at the for- 
mer camp, the police said. A 
police guardhouse was set up at 
Buchenwald after neo-Nazis 
rampaged through the memori- 
al three weeks ago. 

Earlier, the police arrested 
about 100 neo-Nazis and car- 
ried out random road checks 
across Germany to damp down 
on demonstrations commemo- 
rating the death of Hitler’s dep- 
uty, Rudolf Hess. 


The authorities banned 30 
events that had been scheduled 
fen Saturday in memory of 
Hess’s suicide, on Aug. 17, 


1987, at 93 in a Berlin prison. 

i life sen- 


He had been serving a 

tence for war crimes. S imilar 
protests last year saw hundreds 
mar ch through Fulda. 

Most of those detained were 
in eastern and northern Germa- 
ny. They were held ou suspicion 
of planning to attend demon- 
strations. Most were remanded 
in custody, police said. 

(Reuters, AP) 


. " *. ; Beaten _i* t. ■ 

HOME — A reconcfliafion 
between Prime Minister SSvio 
Berlusconi and his Northern 
League coalition ally may pro- 
tect the lira from further beat- 
ing, but fears lingered Sunday 
over how long the peace would 
lasL 

The first test of how effective 
the Northern League leader, 
Umberto Bossd, and Mr. Berlus- 
coni have been m calming wide- 
spread concern about the gov- 
ernment will come Monday 
with the reopening of financial 
markets in London. Those m 
Italy w£D be dosed for a holi- 
day. 

Faced with growing panic on 
Thursday, the Bank of Italy 
tried to prep up the lira with a 
half -point increase in its dis- 
count rate, to 7JS percent But 
the move apparently backfired, 
with investors driving the cur- 
rency even lower the next day. 

Their arms draped around 
each other’s shoulders, Mr. Ber- 
lusconi and Mr. Bossi oh Satur- 
day pledged their commitment 
to stable government and bur- 
ied their differences. 

“These are the pictures that 
are supposed to persuade Wall 
Street to stop soling the lira,” 
the state television said Sunday 
as it showed the two walking on 
the grounds of Mr, Berlusconi's 
villa in Arcore, near Milan. 

The reconciliation occurred 
after a week of fears that ten- 
sions would tear Mr. Bedns- 
confs coalition apart These 
fears led to the Era’s collapse 
Friday to a record 1,030 per 
German nnHf- 

But many asked whether the 
scenes of coalition harmony 
were not just another media of- 
fensive to pap& over the cracks 
in Mr. BennsconFs coalition af- 
ter the lira’s “Black Friday.” 


PHNOM PENH (AFP) — King Norodom Sihanouk ha ' 
warned foreigners about the dangere of traveling in Cambodia 
“Let me appeal to foreigners who come to Cambodia to be ver ; 
prudent every time they travel into the interior of my unfortunat " ; 
country,” said the king, in a statement sent from Beijing where h 
is undergoing cancer treatment 
“One should avoid pleasure trips because Cambodia is a coun 
try at civil wax; and there4s.inscccrityJn many of the region: > 
province diitricts and jMber plaCe^he added. .’JlTl * i 

Foreigners should rcavcLanly wSe&ft is absolutely necessary, hr* fc Utw4 
said, and then, they should inform Cambodian authorities. 

Guangdong Province In China is to introduce a 72-honr visa-fre ■ 
entry for foreign visitors later this year to increase tourism, th 
Xinhua press agency reported. (AFT. 

China has outlined an ambitious plan to bufld or renovate abou 
60 airports to keep pace with a fast-growing demand for domesti 
air traveL 

Air OiiiairiHlhdc.Bc9qgto Japan’s northeastern dty of Sends _- 
bqpbHring Sept 9, the news agency Jiji Tsushin-Sha reported. Ai 
Cmna: also serves Tokyo, Osaka and Fukuoka. (Bloomberg 
Hte Netherlands has scrapped Europe’s first experimental cat 
pool lane after a court ruled that it was illegal to discrurdnat 
against lone drivers. (Reuters 

Jordan has quadrupled the cost of visiting die ancient city c . 

Petra from $7 to $28 in a bid to raise $10 million to increas 
services for an anticipated flood of tourists following the openin 
of its border with lsrael. (AFP) " 


1 


Tliis Week’s Holidays 



religious holidays: 

MONDAY: Andorra, Axwutin*. Austria, Bdttiom, Beam, Butina Fas 
BahmdvCtmbMD. Central African RepnbEc, Chile. Colombia, Congo, Costa RfcV- 
Croatia, Cyprus, France, Gabon, Gambia, Greece. Guatemala, Guinea, Haiti, Iadi 
Italy, tinny Coast, Lebanon, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malta, M- 
naco. Panama, Paraguay. Poland, Portugal, Rwanda, Senega), Slovenia, Sou 
Kora, Spain, Tahiti, Togo, Vatican City. Venezuela. 

TUESDAY: Do mri acin Republic, Vatican City. 

WEDNESDAY: Gabon, Indonesia. Vatican City. 

FRIDAY: Afghanistan. 

SATURDAY: Hungary, Malaysia, Morocco, Sri Lanka. 

Sources : J.P. Morgan, Reuters. 


A Cigar Worth Millions to Gambler 

The Associated Pros 


ATLANTIC CitY, New Jersey — A surgeon’s pen chan t 
/ with an $8.5 million jackpot, a 


for cigars paid off in a big way ... 
record for this casino resort city. 

Forced to leave a nonsmoking blackjack table in Bally’s 
Gr and Casino Hold, Dr. Frank Oliveto moved to a $1 slot 
machine Saturday to play for a Megabncks jackpot. When 
someone drops a dollar, m any of the 186 MegabudK slot 

2Pv5 ^^dkdj^^ascs. 

54 ’, played about $80 and won back 
mahlv S35 before hitm.* ti u..'^ He received the first of 


To call from country to country, or to the U.S., dial the WorldPhone® number of the country you're calling from. 


(Available from public card phonos only.] fZ 

001-800-333-1 m 


Encourage 
Talks Between 
Countries 



022-903-012 

i-sww52a-1000 

800002 

0800-10012 

1-800-623-W3* 

0-800-2222 

000-8012 

1-900-888-8000 

1-300-624-1000 

0QT-O31B 

580-16*0001 

162 

OSQ4OO00 

00-42*000112 


Denmark! CD* 

80014022 

Iceland* 

396402 

Dominican Rapubile 

1400-7514824 

ban* 

(Special Phones Only! 

Ecuadnrt- 

170 

. ManifeCCi 

140045-1001 

EgypUCO* 


break DQ 

177-160-2727 

iOutaxJe of Cairo, cBal 02 flrttj 

3564770 

ftelytcq* 

172-1022 

B Salvador* 

1S5 

Jamaica 

800474-7000 

HnlandlCQ* 

9800-10240 

Kenya . 


Fteneeica* 

19T40-78 ■ 

lAvaHaWv from mo« motor cfrie&J 080011 

Gambia* 

00-149 

Kuwait 

80040800424/ 

GarmanyiCQ 

01304012 

LabamxuCO 

600424 


(Outaid* of Managua.'tfia! 02 fiat! 186 

PtorwsytCO* . 800-19912 

Panama 108 

Military Basas 2810-106 

Paraguay* 008-11-800 

Pwu {Ounrida of Lima, dial 190 SraU 001-190 


{Umhad availability In a a s tam Germany*) 
GnwKrtCO* 00000-1211 

Grenada* 1-600424-8721 

Guatemala* 169 

HaMWCH- 001-800-444-1234 

Honduras* 0OT-800474-7OOO 

HungaryiCQ* arr-80041411 


(Outside of Beirut dial 01 firnj 425-036* 

UachtenstamftQ* 1554222 

tumanbourg 08004112 

Marieo* 95400474-7000 

MonaoKCat 18 t40-19 

Motherlands CO* 06422-91^22 

Msthartanda A i Wan c q * 001400950.1022 


PotemKO 
PanugaAcq 
Puaito MeoKO 
OatanCO* 
RomantyCQ* 

BimlataCH-- 

San Marinotco* 
Saudi Arabia 

Slovak RapuWtiCQ 
Sooth AfrkWCO ' 


Ov -01 -04-300-222 
- 05-017-1234 

1-8004884000 
0800412-77 
01-400-1800 
8T1 0400-487-7222 
172-1022 
1400-11 
00-42-000172 
.0800494011 


90M94014 

gff f.. 020-756422 

5*r*!* nd<ca * 1554222 

fMHVI 

TxMdanafToUflo (SpacM PhonaaCWyt 
004001-1177 

JSSaJ, r n L i__t 8V10413 

ussisssr 

To an the US, using BT 0800494222t 
1° U ;S-‘« n0 MERCURY 0K»4M222t 

To cnl anywhere other 
than the U.S. ftfiniumfumt 

avaBabteJ (So25 

14004884000 

Vatican CJiyfCQ 172-1022 

800-11144 


VanamaleH. 


Use your MCI Cud,* 1 local telephone card or call coHacL_all at the same low rates. 
(CC1 OMiritiY ttHMonoy csffino available. May not be avaflaWa tortrom all IroamKional loendana. Certain 
- ^ v i; rearfathua apply* Limited availability. ▼ Wait for tecond dof tone. A AvaUabte tan LADATEL public 
phones only. Rate depend* on cad origin In Mexico, t International comrounjcailo na ca nter. * Not 
availaWa from public pay phonaa. ♦ Public phonea may ragtrira depodc of coin or phono ward for (Sal tone. 



Rom MO 


Let It Take You Around The World 


Imprime par Offprint. 73 rue de I'Evangite, 73018 Paris. 






a( 




1 Uk 


n2di. 



j 


-; .r** 1 


S35‘ 


, 1 


I NTERN ATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, AUGUST 15, 1994 




By Paul F. Horvitz • . 

ItUerruaUfoai fferaki Tribune ' ■ 

WASHINGTON — President BIB dmtou ; 
and. leading Republicans remained locked Sun-i 
day in a fiercely 'pgjtiWn battle over crittie- 
control legislation. As the While Houser sough t to 
revive the measure in the House; prospects for ii 
weakened in the Senate. . ' 

The S3&-billion spending plan has- now be- 
come the focus of. some of the most bitter accusa- 
tions leveled in recent yeara ’ ; - r 

On Sunday, Representative Newt Gingrich* 
the House Republican leader from Georgia, ac- 
cused Mr. Clinton of “mudslinging and miscbar- 
acterization" following two da ys in which the 
president in tum heatedly blamed Republicans 


and the powerful gun-owners* lobby for derailing 
the crime legislation. - 
On the Senate side, Bob Dole, the Republican 
leader from Kansas, said in a broadcast inter- 
view on Sunday thar his party now saw serious 
Haws in the bill, which would dispense more than 
S3F billion for police and prisons and the re- 
mainder for preventive social programs. 

_ He all but ruled out his party’s support, even 
though most of the bill’s key dements passed the 
Senate earlier this year. 

Underlying the debate is a deadly serious 
political straggle aimed at winning votes in the 
congressioii alelecti ons this November. 

According to many political analysts. Mr. 
CHnton’s centrist approach on crime has suc- 
ceeded in making the Democratic Party seem 


rt for Fierce Battle on Crime BUI 


tough on crime, at the expense of Republicans, 
who have long been the party of crime control. 

Recent polls suggest fear of crime i$ now the 
leading concern of most Americans, surpassing 
economic worries. 

At a Maryland church on Sunday, Mr. Clinton 
said he saw petty politics at work in Congress 
and be asked the congregation, “Pray Tor me." 

“We don’t have a bigger problem ihan the 
violence that is eating the heart out of this 
country,” he said. 

Many independent analysis see in the Repub- 
lican congressional tactics an eagerness to pre- 
vent the president from claiming victory in either 
crime control or health care before November. 
Republicans deny this. 


Mr. Gingrich estimated Sunday that if Mr. 
Clinton has a favorable six weeks before the 
elections. Republicans will gain 20 to 30 seats in 
the 435-seat House. 

If not, Republicans could gain 50 to 70 seats, 
he said. 

In Mr. Clinton’s view, the National Rifle As- 
sociation, America’s premier gun lobby, joined 
forces with Republican leaders to create a “trick" 
vote in the House late Thursday. In that vote, the 
House narrowly rejected a procedure that would 
have pul the anti-crime bill up for a vote. 

Calling the vote a trick is "nonsense," Mr. 
Gingrich said. 

Of the president he added: "He seems to be in 
hiding, working from the left and attacking the 
right." 



But Cardenas Calls Polls Poor Predictors 


By Anthony DePalma : - 

Sew York Times Service 

MEXICO CITY — Painted 
with derogatory slogans, the 
dark coffin was bcsrne above 
the beads of thousands who 
had come to root for the' de- 
mise of Mexico’s long-govern- 
ing party and for the victory of 
the leftist candidate; Cuauhte- 
moc Cdrdenas, in the -presi- 
dential election next weekend. 

Despite the crowd’s enthu- 
siasm, and the outpouring of 
emotion at the candidate’s ral- 
lies all over Mexico in these 
last days before the. election, 
(mils and other measures of 
support indicated that it might 
be Mr. Cardenas’s chances of 
being elected president that 
will be interred Aug. 21, not 
the Institutional Revolution- 
ary Party, which "his con- 
trolled Mexico for 65 years. 

Although the governing 
party, known as the PRLhas 
become a target of pablic out- 
rage this 'year ■— blamed; for ' 
conditions that led to'trgaer- ' 
rilla uprising iir the' poor 1 
southern state of Chiapas, sus- 
pected of being involved in the 
assassination of its own prea- . 
dential candidate in March, 
and denounced for the loss of 
thousands of jobs — Mr. Car- 
denas’s anti-PRI -campaign 
has simply not taken off. 

Graciela Rodriguez, . 47, 
who lives in the Mexico City 
suburb of Ecatepec, represents 
Mr. Cardenas’s hopes and also 


his disappointments. She said 
she had voied for the PRI in 
the 1988 election but definite- 
ly would not vote for the party 
again, saying its policies had 
brought more violence and 
poverty. Yet,; though she had 
come to his rally, she had not 
made up her mind about Him. 

*He represents an option to 
change the country," she said, 
“but I’m worried about what 
the change will bring." 

In an interview (mi his cam- 
paign bus last week, Mr. Car- 
denas, 60, dismissed any sug- 
gestion that his campaign had 
faltered. . 

“The response of the people 
doesn’t indicate' a campaign 
with only 7 percent,” he said, 
refearring to the level of sup- 
port that some opinion polls 
have said he has among voters. 
In fact, ini r e ce nt days Mr. 
C&xdenas has been backed by 
a number -of intellectuals- and 
: (politicians, indad- 
a former 1 legislator of the 
' governing b^rty,’ Demetrio 
Sodi de laTIjeha. • • • • 

“I don’t bdieve in the num- . 
bers,” Mr. Sodi de le Tjjera 
said of the poIls.Tn 1988. at 
the final hour the people de- 
cided in their own way how to 
vote. In Mexico, polling isn’t 
part of the culture. People are 
afraid to answer how they 
reaByfeeL". . 

Mr. . Cardenas’s candidacy 
has stirred, some - concern in 
Mexico because hie has aggres- 


sively challenged the validity 
of the electoral process itself, 
often asserting that the PRI 
government was preparing a 
huge and sophisticated opera- 
tion to steal the election. 

Mr. Cardenas has warned 
that Mexico wiU be shut down 
by a campaign of civil resis- 
tance if fraud is committed. 

"We will never call for vio- 
lence,” be said. “There won’t 
be violence unless the govern- 
ment wants to have it The 
government has everything in 
its own hands to avoid a con- 
frontation, if it only respects 
the votes.” 

Polling in Mexico is still un- 
proven, but the more reliable 
voter preference surveys re~ 

. leased last week all placed Mr. 

. Cardenas third place, with no 
more than 13 percent of the 
vote: The polls showed the 
PRI’s candidate; Ernesto Ze- 
dillo Ponce de L6on, comfort- 
. ably in firsts. with Diego Fer- 
nandez. de_ .CevaUos, of the. 
rigbt-of-center ‘ National Ac- 
. bon Party, in second. 

■ Poll Leader Holds Bafly 

Mr. Zedillo massed hun- 
dreds of thousands of support- 
ers in the capital for a dosing 
campaign rally Sunday, prom- 
ising a dean and decisive vic- 
tory, The Associated Press re- 
ported from Mexico City. 

Speaking from a podium 
overlooking the packed crowd 
in the vast square known as 



Sikij (~oUuvud/ Rrolcrv 

Cuauhtemoc C&rdenas waving at a Mexico City rally. 


the ZOcalo, Mr. Zedillo said: 
“Here is our political strength. 
We come together in strength 
as a great party.” 

The pro-government net- 
work Televisa showed the pla- 


za overflowing and said that at 
least 300,000 people were 
there. The police had no inde- 
pendent count, but the gather- 
ing rivaled crowds at opposi- 
tion rallies on Saturday. 



s oi Another Bomb 


«tj'»A ,r: 'iu:i ,» 


Compiled bf Our Sw# irsra tiapmeha 

BUENOS AIRES — With 
hospitals standing tty on red 
alert. President Carlos Sadi 
Menem is urging Argentines to 
remain calm despite warnings 
from Israel and oxbere about a 
possible new attack in the after- 
math of the explosion that 
killed nearly 100 people last 
month- : -y 

“I ask people to go bst living . 
normally," Mr. Menem- said jn 
a radio interview broadcast 
over the" weekend. “One mu^t 
keep working as usual, extept 


one has to be a bit more careful 
now.”'- 

After a week in which Argen- 
tina accused four former Irani- 
an diplomats of taking part in 
the bonabing here last' month of 
a building- housing Jewish 
groups, the holiday weekend 
was expected to provide a 
break. ' 

Instead, police officers with 
dogs stood guard outside syna- 
gogues. Armored police vehi- 
cles wCrfe pariced outside Jewish 
schobb hi Bherios - Aires after 
■Mr. government an- 


nounced that it had been 
warned a new attack might be 
imminent. 

The government said hospi- 
tal emergency rooms through- 
out the city were on top alert 
and that 30 rescuers trained to 
shore up buildings and sift 
through rabble were on stand- 
by. Civil defense teams went on 
alert. Crews for two helicopters 
and two planes were on ca IL 

A spokeswoman for Argenti- 
na’s largest Jewish organization 
.said many residents of the main 
Jewish section — known as Par- 


te Once, or District 1 1 — had 
canceled outings and were stay- 
ingindoors. 

The warning on Friday of 
new attacks, which was rein- 
forced by Israel and intelligence 
agencies from other countries, 
put Argentines on edge, waiting 
for the thunder of a bomb any 
minute — or never. 

“It’s a really difficult situa- 
tion," said Carlos Alvarez, a 
leftist politician. “How can you 
ever tell it’s safe to relax this 
slate of alert, of tension?” 

The government, meanwhile. 


said it would maintain ties with 
Iran despite accusations linking 
Iranian diplomats to the deadly 
July 18 bombing. 

Argentina is seeking seven 
Iranians, including three diplo- 
mats, for the attack on the Ar- 
gentine Jewish Mutual Associa- 
tion that left 95 people dead, 10 
missing and 250 injured. 

Iran threatened Saturday to 
break off ties with Argentina 
and said it would take legal ac- 
tion against those who acc u sed 
Iranians in the bombing 

(Reuters, NYT. AFP ) 


WOODSTOCK: The2S-Year Reunion Turns Wet and Muddy, but the Kids Are AH Right 


Gantianed from Page 1 
trying conditions, everybody 
seems to begetting along welL” 
WoodstocVs gates bad long 
since been trampled, and the 
1.000-man “Peace Patrol” secu- 
rity force had diminished in 
number and spirit Still, ' Mr. 
Scher insisted, “There are some 
people getting in for free, but 
it’s not a free concert” Organiz- 
ers said they had sold about 

190.000 tickets, but the police 
estimated a crowd of about 

300.000 at its peak Saturday. 
Some fans were still arriving 

Sunday afternoon. “We came 
spur of the moment” said Win 


Adams, 24* of Nashua, New 
Hampshire, ^bo left home at 5 
Ail Sunday. 

“We . were watching it on 
MTV and we said, ‘Let’s 
said his friend Corey 
19. - - 

Though some survivors of the 
long, messy weekend regretted 
having shelled out big bucks 
when many of those around 
them walked right in, others 
welcomed ah corners. 

“No, Tin not mad. I smoked 
a lot of weed,*! said Mona 
Ciocca, 27, ' of Boston, who 
spent S135 for her ticket. 

Some fans took advantage of 


the weather, competing in new 
sports events such as mud slid- 
ing. The mosh pits — the jam- 
packed stagefront lakes of mud 
where kids danced and passed 
one another over their heads — 
was generating a 100-patiem- 
per-hour flow to medical facili- 
ties. Doctors handled more 
than 7,000 injuries, many of 
them twisted or broken ankles 
from slips in the mud. 

But even the best-prepared 
were at the mercy of the 2,800 
portable toilets that became the 
most loathed element of the 
Woodstock experience; Orga- 
nizers said they bad trouble get- 


ting waste-suctioning tracks 
through clogged roads. 

Jn the town of Saugerlies, 
population 20,000, which had 
been promised a financial bo- 
nanza by Woodstock promot- 
ers, most residents said they got 
what they bargained for, de- 
spite snarled streets and mas- 
sive mounds of trash. 

“It’s a mess and the rain is a 
shame." said Sheila McCarthy, 
a court clerk. “But it’s given this 
town more excitement than it’s 
ever seen, and even our prison- 
ers have been very friendly.” 

The county police were so 
worried about local backlash 


Iasi week that they went door to 
door reminding residents that it 
was not legal to sboot someone 
who inadvertently stepped on 
private property. 

Even before the music ended 
early Monday, the myth of 
Woodstock was larger than the 
reality. 

“By next month, there’ll be 
millions of people who say they 
were at Woodstock,” said Joel 
Rosenman, a concert promoter. 

And you can bet that some- 
where, somebody is already 
hawking “I Survived Wood- 
stock ‘94” T-shirts, S19.95 while 
they last 


CLINTON: 

Re-examination 

Continued from Page 1 

the White House to try to revive 
the crime legislation jeopar- 
dized by an unexpected defeat 
on a procedural vote Thursday 
is cited by officials as evidence 
of bow he will begin to repair 
his problems. 

But more sober officials ac- 
knowledge that Mr. Clinton’s 
casting himself once more as 
“the Comeback Kid" has mo- 
mentary advantages but is the 
easy pan of what be and his 
campaign-oriented White 
House have always done best: 
quick -turn around events. 

What’s harder and rarely 
done in the Clinton White 
House, they acknowledge, is 
sustaining day-to-day govern- 
ing when there is no TV -dram a 
conflict such as taking on the 
National Rifle Association. 

Mr. Clinton has told asso- 
ciates he misunderstood the im- 
portance of the “public presi- 
dency" as compared with the 
actual formulation of policy 
and getting it implemented. 
That, one aide said, is “a so- 
phisticated way of saying he has 
not known how to have a con- 
tinuing conversation with the 
American people about who he 
is and what he stands for." 

He has told associates that he 
believes this is both his fault 
and the fault of the times. The 
While House adheres tena- 
ciously to the view that presi- 
dents nowadays are overinter- 
p re led. politically “gamed” and 
cynically analyzed in the media 
before the viewers, listeners or 
readers get an adequate chance 
to hear what they are saying. 

They cite a variety of aca- 
demic studies, articles and ana- 
lyses of network news and ma- 
jor newspapers. 

Mr. Clinton is said to believe 
that a sour and cynical mood 
among ordinary Americans has 
contributed to his problems. He 
attributes that to historic 
trends, arguing, as he did in a 
speech to Democratic candi- 
dates last week, that postwar 
periods that lacked common 
American purpose produced vi- 
olent strains. 

Tony L. Coelho, a former 
congressman now assigned an 
advisory role to the party and 
White House, stud Mr. Clinton 
understood that he had to act 
like a president, not a prime 
minister, to begin fixing his 
presidency. 

Beyond that, Mr. Coelho 
cited the most common com- 
plaint among Democrats about 
the Clinton operation — lack of 
discipline. 

Democratic insiders and neu- 
tral analysis say it will not be 
easy — and might not be possi- 
ble 20 months into the term and 
three months before the mid- 
term elections — to do signifi- 
cant repairs unless there are 
some cataclysmic events. 

Recent history is littered with 
presidencies that tried signifi- 
cant midcourse corrections, al- 
though most were past the half- 
way point in their terms when 
they sensed serious trouble. 


BOOKS 


* POLITICAL NOTES* 


Don’t Bet on a Health Care Compromise 

WASHINGTON — The Senate's leading Democrat and 
Republican lore into each other's health care plans Sunday, 
casting more doubt on their ability to forge an agreement this 
year to reform the medical system. 

"Is there an opportunity for compromise? Maybe,” Sena- 
tor Bob Dole of Kansas, the minority leader, said on an NBC 
news program. 

Sitting elbow-io-clbow with the majority leader. Senator 
George J. Mitchell of Maine. Mr. Dole said Mr. Mitchell's 
sweeping proposal amounted to government-run health care. 

Mr. Mitchell said offerings by Mr. Dole and other Repub- 
licans would do too little to provide health care coverage to 
all Americans. He chided Republican lawmakers for accept- 
ing a government-based insurance plan for their own health 
care, yet refusing the same for other citizens. 

In another sign of the health care divide. Senator Bob 
Kerrey, a Nebraska Democrat, said Mr. Mitchells bill did 
not contain costs and gave too much power to Washington. 
Pledging to heavily amend the bill. Mr. Kerrey suggested that 
the Senate might need to override a Clinton veto. 

Another Democrat. Senator David L. Boren of Oklahoma, 
said of Mr. Mitchell's bill. "I think it's dead, and we can't 
even amend it." [AP) 


New Furor Over Whitewater Prosecutor 

WASHINGTON — A partisan furor has developed over 
the appointment of Kenneth W. Starr as the Whitewater 
independent prosecutor, with Democratic senators demand- 
ing a public accounting of Mr. Starr's recent political activi- 
ties and attacking the Impartiality of the head of the three- 
judge pond that picked him. 

Some senators have expressed shock at news that Judge 
David B. Semclle. the head of the three-judge appellate panel 
that named Mr. Starr, had lunch on July 14 with Senator 
Lauch Faircloth, a conservative Republican of North Caroli- 
na, while i be panel was considering its choice. Mr. Faircloth 
was an outspoken leader of efforts to remove Robert B. Fiske 
Jr. as the Whitewater prosecutor. 

Some senior Democrats, frustrated that the independent 
counsel law contains no route for appealing the panel’s 
choice, have discussed the possibility of seeking a disciplinary 
review of Judge Sentelle’s conduct. 

The outcry over Judge Sentelle is the latest twist to follow 
the panel's surprise announcement that it was replacing Mr. 
Fiske because his appointment by Attorney General Janet M. 
Reno could compromise his independence. 

Democrats complained first about Mr. Starr’s conservative 
Republican background, then about his public opposition to 
President Bill Clinton's claim of immunity in a sexual harass- 
ment suit against him. and finally about the contacts between 
Judge Sentelle and Senator Faircloth. two old friends and 
fellow conservatives from North Carolina. ( N YT ) 

Clinton Aides Say Atman Will Quit Soon 

WASHINGTON — Deputy Treasury Secretary Roger C. 
Altman, under heavy Congressional criticism for his testimo- 
ny on the Whitewater investigation, is expected to step down 
from his post in the next week to 10 days, administration 
officials said. 

But a Treasury official speaking for Mr. Altman said he 
had not yet decided whether he was willing to resign and had 
not been asked to do so. The administration officials said 
there was a small chance that Mr. Altman would be offered 
another government position. 

Jean E. Hanson, the Treasury Department's general coun- 
sel, is also expected to resign, the administration officials 
said, and the exact timing of Mr. Altman's departure will 
depend partly on when she steps down. 

Ms. Hanson was also" criticized by both' Democrats and' 
Republicans during the recent Whitewater hearing-; fpr_her 
role in the White House-Treasury discussions about the 
investigation of Madison Guaranty Savings & Loan, which 
was run by James B. McDougal. a business partner of the 
Clintons in the Whitewater real estate development. < NYT) 

Quote/Unqiiote 

Senator Christopher J. Dodd. Democrat of Connecticut, 
on the Republican strategy — stall, without giving the im- 
pression of stalling — in opposing health-care legislation: 
“This is what you call a good old-fashioned filibuster.” 

f U 'Pl 


Away From Politics 


• The military services are wasting matrons of dollars a year 
keeping open unneeded recruiting stations, some so unpro- 
ductive that they sign up an average of just one recruit a year. 

• The number Of violent or Illegal incidents reported in New 
York City schools rose nearly 2b percent in the last year. More 
than 17.000 incidents, ranging from vandalism to robbery, 
were reported between July 1, 1993, and June 30, 1994. 

• Three oof of every four times that Los Angeles police 
officers fire their weapons, superiors fault them for life- 
threatening mistakes that warrant retraining or discipline. 

• In a case that highfights the complicity of white-collar 
bankers in the cocaine trade, a former officer of an American 
Express Co. subsidiary has been sentenced io 10 years in 
prison for laundering the profits of a top Mexican drug lord. 

• Left at home without supervision, eight small children died 
in an early morning house fire Sunday in Carbondale, Illinois. 

• One of Braz3*s most prominent businessmen and his wife 

were among three people killed when a helicopter crashed on 
its way to Atlantic City, New Jersey, from New York City. 
Mathias Machiline, 61, was the owner of the Grupo Machiline 
electronics company. ap. lat. syt. Reuien. wp 


BRIDGE 


I 


PARIS AFTER THE LIB- 
ERATION: 1944-1949 

By Anthony Beevor and Artemis 
Cooper. 468 pages.. $27.50. 
Doubleday. . . _ . 

Reviewed by Ted Morgan. 

N a politically stable country 
_ like the Unite! States, a per- 
son can' live his or her entire 
adult life as a Republican or a 
Democrat But the dilemma for 
France during and after World 
War II was that people were 
repeatedly asked to declare 
their allegiances in a swiftly’ 
changing political landscape. 
Were they for Ffctain or de 
Gaulle? Were they in theReris- 
tance or in the collaboration, or- 
someplace in between? Was. 


“life as. usual” an implicit term 
of collaboration? After the war, 
were tbey Ganflists or Commu- 
nists or Socialists or Christian 
Democrats? If Communists, 
did they toe the Soviet Hue? If 
non-Commtmists, were they 
pro-American? 

Such a wilderness of choices 
and sub-choices was not condu- 
cive to continuity in govern- 
ment Instead, during the five 
years, covered in “Paris After 
the liberation," the political 
turbulence resulted in a perma- 
nent stale of crisis. 

When de Gaulle liberated 
Paris in August 1944 and set up 
a' provisional government, hr 
found it convenient to invent 
two myths — that Vichy bad 
been an aberration and that 
France as a nation had resisted 


WHAT THEY'RE READING 


■ •B3I Cosby, the television 
and film star, is reading U A 
Documentary History of the Ne- 
gro People in the United States" 
by Herbert C. Aptbeker. 

“I have just finished the two 
latest volumes, 5 and 6, which 
cover the second World War 
and the war in Vietnam. They 
are excellently written and very 
enjoyable to read." 

( John BrunUm, IHT) 



IQOURREAPBKMVIgM/^ 

You can receive the IHT hand delivered 
to your home or office on the day of publication. 
Jusfcall toll-free; 0660-81 o5 ... . 
or fax; 06(569-1 7541 3 


die Germans. Vichy was in fact 
the legal continuation of the 
Third Republic. 

As for the Resistance, it was 
not, according to the Germans, 
a military factor to be reckoned 
with. But de GauOe, who was 
never mote than the leader of 
one British-backed faction in a 
small but fragmented Resis- 
tance movement, had to pre- 
tend that he was the single lead- 
er of a large national 
movement, which entitled him 
to govern France. 

In fact de Gaulle in 1944 was 
more of an aberration than Pe- 


uun. for be had not been elected 
to any office. He declared him- 
self the provisional president of 
a transition government which 
held its first election in October 
1945 — for a Constituent As- 
sembly that would draft the 
constitution for a Fourth Re- 
public, as well as act as a legisla- 
ture in the meantime. In this 
election, the Communists came 
in ahead of the other parties 
with 26 percent of the vote. As a 
result, when de Gaulle formed 
his second provisional govern- 
ment, he was forced to cake five 
Communist ministers into his 
cabinet. 


But the general didn't wait 
for the new constitution to be 
drafted and ratified. In January 
1946 he resigned in what 
seemed to be a fit of pique; 
basically, be was temperamen- 
tally incapable of accepting the 
limitations of the parliamentary 
government he saw coming. 

After his departure, the 
Fourth Republic was bora, in 
November 1946. It took up 
where the Third had left off in 
1940, with many of the same 
men, as though there bad been 
no wartime interruption. But 
there was one crucial differ- 
ence, France now had the meet 
powerful Communist Party in 
Western Europe. 

The amazing thing, as shown 
in the best parts of this layer 
cake of a book, was that the 
much-maligned Fourth Repub- 
lic succeeded in isolating the 
Comm unis ts and purging them 
from the police and the gen- 
darmes. In May 1947. Prime 
Minister Paul Ramadier dis- 
missed the five Communist 
ministers from His government 
A month later came the an- 
nouncement of the Marshall 
Plan. 

The Communists, however. 


were far more troublesome out- 
ride the government than in iL 
The aim of the party, as ordered 
by Stalin in September 1947, 
was to destabilize the Fourth 
jublic with strikes and riots, 
fn 1947 and 1948, France was 
a Cold War battleground, as the 
Communists carried out (heir 
strategy of sabotaging the econ- 
omy and dividing the nation. 
But the Fourth Republic gov- 
ernments held fast. 

In February 1948 the Com- 
munist takeover of Czechoslo- 
vakia frightened Congress into 
approving the Marshall Plan. 
As American goods began to 
arrive in France, there were 
fewer grievances for the Com- 
munists to take advantage of. 
The turnaround came in 1949 
with the end of rationing for 
bread and dairy products. 
When the standard of living im- 
proved, the Marshall Plan be- 
came too popular for the Com- 
munists io criticize. 


Ted Morgan, the author of 
“FDR” and “An Uncertain 
Hour: Hie French, the Germans, 
the Jews, and the City of Lyon. 
1940-45 ," wrote this for The 
Washington Pqsl 


By Alan Truscott 

N OBODY quite knows how 
to bid a band with a nine- 
card suit, which is a tactical 
rather than a technical prob- 
lem. West chose to bid slowly 
and allow himself to be pushed, 
a strategy that experts often 
adopt with a freakish band. 
This might have worked: It 
would have been a understand- 
able if South had doubled six 
diamonds. That contract would 
succeed even if South led a 
tramp, either immediately or 
after cashing the spade ace. 
East could take a dub finesse 
and then ruff a club. 

But South continued to six 
hearts, which turned out to be a 
good decision. A club lead 
against six hearts doubled 
would have led to a quick two- 
trick defeat, but West opened 
the door with the lead of the 
diamond king. 

After ruffing the opening 
lead in the dummy, it was 
tempting to cash the heart king. 
This would have succeeded 
against any normal trump split, 
but the bidding and final dou- 
ble made South suspect that 
West had all the missing 
trumps. She made the winning 


play by leading to the spade 
ace, ruffing the remaining dia- 
mond, and leading spades. East 
could not ruff, so all the club 
losers were discarded safely and 
a club was ruffed. 

That left South and West 
with five trumps each, and 
South, clearly a future star, 
cashed the ace and led the seven 
to endplay West. East was left 
to regret the failure to persevere 
to seven diamonds, down one. 


NORTH (D) 

* K Q J 10 7 
O K3 

i i — 

4k K J 9 762 

WEST EAST 

*98642 *5 

™ 964 i *A~Ql»75t3t 

J? *AQ10 

SOUTH 

* A3 

O A Q J 8 7 5 

■>as 
4>sS 4 

Nortti sad South were vulnerable. 


The bidding: 
North East 

South 

West 

I* 

2 v 

2$ 

Pass 

2* 

30 


Pass 

3* 

4 0 

40 

5 $ 

5<? 

Sv 

6 r 

DM. 

Pass 

Pass 

Pass 






West lee Hie diamond lung. 






f orTJ | ft C*P 







Page4 


MONDAY, AUGUST 15, 1994 

OPINION 


Beralh 


INTERNATIONAL 

Sf. . 


PVKI.ISHM W'fTK THK NfM \l)Hk 11UKS VNU IHK YV\>mMiTCI> PffffT 


(tnbttUC Back to Hayek: Collectivism Still Leads to Serfdom 

THK U,UlilMiT(l> HIST ,/ V 


A False Start in Italy 


Italy has not yet started the rebuilding 
of its politics; indeed, the intended cor- 
nerstone of the new edifice may be fatally 
cracked. Prime Minister Silvio Berlus- 
coni's admission in this newspaper on 
Friday that his Flninvest business empire 
had paid bribes to tax officials not only 
casts doubt on his government's ability to 


claim that Italy is, at long last, in clean 
hands. It has also made it harder for Italy 
to run an efficient economic policy. 

Mr. Berlusconi argued that the amount 
of bribe money his brother Paolo has said 
Fminvest paid out was small by compari- 
son with what F inin vest earns. That is a 
devious defense. The sum that Paolo 
mentioned, S2 million, is not pocket 
money. And to the prime minister's asser- 
tion that h: did not know about it the 
unavoidable answer is that he should 
have. After all the revelations about Ita- 
ly's era of scandals, the man who has 
promised a clean start needs, like Cae- 
sar’s wife, to be above suspicion. 

Such thoughts almost certainly help to 
explain what happened in Italy’s markets 
at the week’s end. On Thursday the Bank 
of Italy, anxious about the weakness of the 
lira, raised its interest rate. On Friday the 
lira, instead of duly rising, went on falling. 
The stock market fell, too, worried by the 
squeeze that higher interest rates impose 
on economic growth and also, presumably, 
by what the Berlusconis' confession means 
for the hope of stable government. 

A stable democracy in Italy, as in any 
country, requires the voters to be able to 
trust both of the groups of politicians, left 
and right, who offer to govern. Only then 
can they pick the one whose policies they 


ian economy is in many ways starting to 
look much healthier. But the flush will 
pale again if Italy does not get a grip on 
its budget deficit and its rapidly growing 
public debt. Not to be the European 
Union's biggest debtor will call for pain- 
ful decisions, not least about pension 
cuts; but decisions there must be as soon 
as Italy gets back from vacation. 

If those two things are not done it will 
be belter to begin the building job all over 
again. Italian voters, it is said, do not want 
two elections in one year. That sounds like 
the opinion of politicians unprepared lo 
Tace their judgment. I talians want a new 
politics. If their first attempt did not work, 
they will not mind trying again. 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 


prefer. Italy’s voters on the whole trust the 
left's honesty but still have doubts about 


left s honesty but still have doubts about 
its policies. They prefer the right's ideas 
but still, with reason, reserve their trust 


Crackdown in Indonesia 


President Suharto of Indonesia, now 
serving his sixth rive-year term, spoke 
encouragingly on his re-election last year 
about the need for more “democratiza- 
tion." The country's bolder and livelier 
publications took him at his word, and 
for a brief, heady period there were actu- 
ally articles on such forbidden topics as 
human rights abuses in the former Portu- 
guese colony of East Timor and who 
might succeed the aging president That 
was not what Mr. Suharto had in mind. A 
few weeks ago, two respected magazines 
and a popular tabloid were banned; clo- 
sure threats were sent to various news- 
papers, their apparent offense being to 
report critically about a government de- 
cision to spend $1.1 billion on a fleet of 
decrepit East German warships. 

When a magazine called Forum report- 
ed on this press crackdown, another 
sharp warning emanated from Director- 
General Subrata of the Ministry of Infor- 
mation, explaining that Forum did not 
fully comprehend the meaning of press 
freedom in Indonesia. The inference is 
plain: Indonesia's press is free to guess 
what it can write about The press is cer- 
tainly free to quote Mr. Suharto's call for 
more openness, but it should understand 
that the president does not really mean 
what he says. The spirit of the situation is 
admirably caught by Ring Lardner's 


quote, “ 'Shut up,' he explained." All this 
is becoming a matter of more acute con- 
cern to the United States. 

In November, President BUI Clinton is 
due to attend a meeting of Asian and 
Pacific leaders that Mr. Suharto will host 
in Jakarta. It is hard to see bow he can 
avoid referring to Indonesia's lawless 
1975 invasion and subsequent annex- 
ation of East Timor, where war and pri- 
vation have killed as many as 200,000 
people, nearly a third of its former popu- 
lation. A new crackdown is under way, 
and Bishop Carlos Felipe Belo, the terri- 
tory's Roman Catholic leader, told a press 
agency in July. “East Timor is like bell.” 
Dismayed by such reports, the U.S. Con- 
gress voted last month, with the support of 
the Clinton administration, to ban the sale 
of small weapons, light arms and crowd- 
control equipment to Indonesia-r 

This fails, short of the wider ban urged 
by Senators Patrick Leahy of Vermont 
and RusseU Fein gold of Wisconsin, but it 
is the first time any such restrictions have 
been imposed on Indonesia, a major cus- 
tomer in Ibe arms bazaar. The interesting 
question is how Mr. Clinton will deal with 
this come November, and whether the 
Indonesian press, or what is left of it will 
be free to report what the president of the 
United States says on Indonesian so 0. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Debating the Enola Gay 


The Enola Gay aircraft from which 
atomic bombs were dropped on Japan is 
by its nature an evocative, emotionally 
powerful object No matter what kind of 
exhibition surrounds the plane when it 
goes on display at the National Air and 
Space Museum later this year — if it does 


fered detailed and substantive criticism 
of the initial plan, which they said was 
emotionally rigged to create an ami-nu- 
clear perspective and to present Japan 
overwhelmingly as a victim country fight- 


ing only to preserve its “culture.’ 

Pro- 1945 narrative about Japanese ag- 
gression was omitted, they stud, and asper- 
sions (including of racism) were cast on 
U.S. government motives to a degree that 
went past any “analytic" recital of the 
fads. The museum tacitly acknowledged 
some of these failings when it promised 
extensive revisions, but it has not come 
through. What is going on? 

Mr. Harwit, director of a museum loved 
for its enthusiastic presentations of Ameri- 
can technical triumphs, cannot be taxed 
with reflexive hostility toward the Enola 
Gay. He was instrumental in getting the 
artifact restored after years of neglect and 
in ar rangin g any anniversary display at alL 
What the tenor of the debate suggests 
instead is a curatorial inability to perceive 
that political opinions are embedded in the 
exhibit, or to identify them as such — 
(pinions, rather than universal “objec- 
tive" assumptions that all thinking people 
must necessarily share. This confusion is 
increasingly common in academia and 
owes much to the fashionable and wrong 
notion that objectivity is unattainable any- 
way and that all presentations of complex 
issues must be politically tendentious. It is 
a notion that roust be fought — above all 
by institutions such as the Smithsonian. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


— spectators will respond with strong 
feelings about the end of World War II 


feelings about the end of World War II 
and the start of the nuclear age. That is 
no reason to shy away from an Enola Gay 
exhibit; on the contrary. But it is also not 
the real reason why the museum is in so 
much trouble over its plans so far, or why 
criticism continues to intensify despite 
one round of revisions completed and 
more promised. The two sides are talking 
past each other, and it is the Smithsonian 
that needs to do more listening. 

The museum’s director, Martin Har- 
wit, writes (IHT Opinion, Aug. 8 ) that the 
exhibitors faced a “dilemma" because of 
“two divergent but widely held views" of 
the dropping of the bomb: one that he 
describes as a patriotic consensus that the 
act was necessary and heroic, and the 
other, “more analytical” taking account 
of the horrors of nuclear war. “We have 
found no way," he concluded, “to exhibit 
the Enola Gay and satisfy everyone.” 

But Mr. Harwit's terms betray the as- 
sumption that has rightly made critics so 
unhappy, namely, that the difference be- 
tween turn and his critics is not simply 
one of political opinion but of intellectual 
sophistication. This naturally rankles 
with veterans and other groups that of- 



Intemational Herald Tribune 

ESTABLISHED 1 7X7 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 
C'l-Chtiirnurn 

RICHARD McCLEAN. PuMuher d Chief Exet olive 
JOHN V|NOCl'R.£wtM»pfiftr» i5 \ve Pitsdert 

• WALTER WELLS, ,Vp»s &&,*■ • SAMVEL ABT. KATHERINE KNORR and 
CHARLES MfTCHELMORE. De/nm El&bm • CARLGEWTRTZ.Aiaxje&’fl&ur 

• ROBERT J. DONAHUE ExSh<rtf the Edunmi Puirt • JONATHAN GAGE. Business and Fincnr Editor 

• RENE BONDY. Oqmn WiAr # JAMES McLEOD. AiA'amm# DurOir 

■JUANITA L CaSPARL Inumaitakd Ai rA jhktu Dunir/r ■ ROBERT FARRlL Dutnor. Europe 

DiiMcuriirti PitNkuluHL Rtchunf [). ftmnkftt 
IKrrrteui Adjtmti Je ki PuHk arum: Katharine P. Darrtm- 


Internal*™] Herald Trihunt IX I A*Lm*Charicvdc-rimllc.V252! Neuilly-»ur-Seine. Franuc. 
Tel. : II l4637.93.il). Fax : Cire.. 4(07.1)65 1 . AiN- 4bJ15l I i Iwoikc IHTfocuwkufiuc 


EiBnefitr Ada. Mriurf Rkhtml** 1 5 Gmw/uy fiL Swepwr **51 1. Ttl t(6l 472-77NL Fax: /A5j 274-2J54 
Hmt. Thr Aim. Rulf I). KnaupM. .*» rjWniwfii. Hunt K<«s. TeL XSWer/Mt Fa r KE-E T-//W 
lira Mvr. Ctvnan: T. S hhtirt TnednrlMr 15 WW Fntijttn/M. TeL liJWl 72 (*755. Fas Jtfty 72 7J lu 
| ftwC'A. Mkhri Cmn. 77sW.4i.-_ Nn YtuL .VI MG2 Tti. i2I2l 752 .Vfltt far 1 2Cl 75VOO 
! V.K. AJu-niWK uflh 'r r>.< inns Arrr. Ln»<J.u WC2. 7W. M?h Fax. t07l) 24*1-2254 

j A.A. tw capital ,h 1 .2tn>.nnii F RC'i Annum B 7J2»2/J2 r > Cammitwin Fnriutirr ,Y/». t> 1 5X7 
v /wj . hVenayxbd Nrniil Titixmr AB mj/u nun n! (KV: II2WU52. 



N EW YORK — Nearly a quarter of a 
century ago, I wrote an introduction 


Italy has not yet constructed a plausi- 
ble new right to replace the dishonored 
old one. The Berlusconi government's 
component pans still squabble with each 
other far too much. And Mr. Berlusconi's 
own actions — his attempt to let corrup- 
tion suspects out of jail his repealed 
blurring of the line that should separate 
prime minister from businessman — have 
in less than four months seriously weak- 
ened his credibility. 

Two things have to be done soon, or 
Italy will need to start all over again. One 
is the unmistakable detachment of Mr. 
Berlusconi from the Fininvest empire: No 
successful rich businessman can ever shed 
all his financial influence; but, to the ex- 
tent that it can be done, Mr. Berlusconi's 
present and past have to be divorced in a 
way that Italy can believe in. That means a 
separation whose terms are approved of 
by, say, two-thirds of Parliament. 

The other necessity is that the quarrel- 
ing components of the Berlusconi gov- 
ernment should agree, without further 
delay, on a proper budget plan. The Ital- 


1 ^ century ago, I wrote an introduction 
to a new German edition of “The Road 
to Serfdom.” That introduction is equal- 
ly relevant to this 50th anniversary edi- 
tion, I herewith quote from it before 
adding a few comments. 

□ 

Over the years, I have made it a prac- 
tice to inquire of believers in individual- 
ism bow they came to depart from the 
collectivist orthodoxy of our times. For 
years, the most frequent answer was a 
reference to this book. 

Hayek's remarkable and vigorous tract 
was a revelation particularly to ibe young 
men and women who had been in the 
armed forces during the war. Their recent 
experience had enhanced their apprecia- 
tion of the value and meaning of individ- 
ual freedom. In addition, they had ob- 
served a collectivist organization in action. 


By Milton Friedman 

Fifty years after Friedrich von Hayek warned of the failure of collectivism, in ‘‘The Road 
w Serfdom, " the University of Chicago is publishing a new edition of the economics 
classic Mr. Friedman, who wrote the introduction to a 1971 German edition of the book. 


has updated his essay. Excerpts from the new introduction follow. 


seeking profits instead of exercising so- 
cial responsibility and of course also re- 
quiring expanded government programs 
to protect the consumer, not least from 
himself; of the welfare or poverty crisis 
— “poverty in the midst of plenty,” 
though what is now described as poverty 
would have been regarded as plenty 
when that slogan was first widely used. 

Now as then, the promotion of collec- 
tivism is combined with the profession of 


individualist values. Experience with big 
government has strengthened this discor- 
dant strand. There is wide protest against 
the “establishment"; an incredible con- 
formity in the protest against conformi- 
ty; a widespread demand for freedom to 
“do one's own thing,” for individual life- 
styles, for participatory democracy. 

As Hayek so persuasively demon- 
strates, these values require an individ- 
ualistic society. They can be achieved 
only in a liberal order in which govern- 
ment activity is limited primarily to es- 
tablishing the framework with which in- 
dividuals are free to pursue their own 
objectives. The free market is the only 
mechanism that has ever been discovered 
for achieving participatory democracy. 

Unfortunately, the relation between 


Today we hear little of “central plan- 
ing,” of “production for use.” of the 


ning,” of “production for use,” of the 
need for “conscious direction” of soci- 
ety’s resources. Instead the talk is of the 
urban crisis — solvable, it is said, only by 
vastly expanded government programs; 
of tbe environmental crises — produced, 
it is said, by rapacious businessmen who 
must be forced to discharge their social 
responsibility instead of “simply” oper- 
ating their enterprises to make the most 
profit and requiring also, it is said, vastly 
expanded government programs; of the 
consumer crisis — false values stimulated 
by the self-same rapacious businessmen 


the ends and the means remains widely 
misunderstood. Many of those who pro- 
fess the most individualistic objectives 
support collectivist means without recog- 
nizing the contradiction. 

It is tempting to believe, that social 
evils arise from the activities ctf evil men 
and that if <mly good men (like ourselves, 
naturally) wielded power, all would be 
well. That view requires only emotion 
and self-praise. To understand why it is 
that “good” men in positions of power 
will produce evil, while the ordinary man 
without power but able to engage in 
voluntary cooperation with his neighbors 
will produce good, requires analysis and 
thought, subordinating the emotions to 
the rational faculty ... 

The emphasis [has] shifted from gov- 
emroen tally administrated production 
activities to indirect regulation of sup- 
posedly private enterprises and even, 
more to governmental t rans fer progr ams. 
involving extracting taxes .from some in 
order to make grants to others — aO in 
the name of equality and the eradication 
of poverty but in practice producing an 
erratic and contradictory melange of 
subsidies to special-interest groups. 

As a result, the fraction of the national 


income bong spent by governments has 
continued to mount. 

Yet experience in the past quarter- 
century has strongly confirmed the va- 
lidity of Hayek’s central insight that 
coordination of men's activities throug 
central direction and through voluntary 
cooperation are roads going in ve *Y 
f great directions: the first to serfdom, 
the second to freedom. 

□ . 

In 1994, there is wide agreement that 
socialism is a failure, capitalism a suc- 
cess. The fall of the Berta Wall the 
collapse of communism behind the Iron 
r„rtam and the changing character of 
China have reduced the defenders of a 
Marxian-type collectivism to a small, 
hardy band concentrated in Western uni- 
versities. Yet this apparent conversion of 
the intellectual community to what might 
be called a Hayddan view is deceptive. 

While the talk is about free markets and 
private property (it is more respectable 
than it was a few decades ago to defend 
near complete laissez-faire), the bulk of 
the intellectual community almost auto- 
matically favors any expansion of govern- 
ment power so long as it is advertised as a 
way to protect individuals from big bad 
corporations, relieve poverty, protect the 
environment or promote “equality.” The 
talk of a nnrinnaT program of health care 
in America provides a striking example. 
The intellectuals may have learned the 
words but they do sot yet have the tune. 

The New. York Tima. 


The Japanese Security Debate Gets an Untimely but Firm Nudge 


T OKYO — The timing Of the 
release of a recent retjort to 


X release of a recent report to 
the government on Japan's future 
security role could hardly have 
been worse for its authors, who 
called for new global responsi- 
bilities and fresh defense com- 
mitments. It would be a brave 
Japanese politician who wel- 
comed such proposals just after 
the country commemorated the 
American atomic bombing of 
Hiroshima and Nagasaki that 
forced Japan to surrender at the 
end of the World War II. 

Prime Minister Tomiichi Mur- 
ayama was quick to indicate that 
this was a hot potato which he 
would leave well alone. He is like- 
ly to move with extreme caution 
in an area where his own Socialist 
Party is divided. 

He recently reversed a long- 
standing pillar of left-wing dog- 
ma by accepting the constitution- 
ality of Japan's military, known 
euphemesricaJJy as the Self-De- 
fense Forces. He will be wary of 


By Roger Buckley 


opening himself to fresh charges 
of ideological apostasy. 

The weekend resignation of 
Shin Sakurai, director-general of 
the Environmental Agency, after 
his comments playing down Ja- 
pan's wartime guilt outraged 
Asian neighbors, will strengthen 
Mr. Murayama’s hand in resist- 
ing any pressure from the Liberal 
Democratic Party in his coalition 
government to adopt recommen- 


The study council recommend- 
ed a selective increase in Japan’s 
military capabilities, including 
acquisition of long-hanl trans- 
ports for tbe air fence for peace- 
keeping and humanitarian relief 

operations, backed by in-flight 
refueling tankers. Such equip- 
ment was taboo under previous 
governments because the military 
was bound to a strict defensive 


cy, the 1960 U.S.- Japan Security 
Treaty, be strengthened and that 


dations in the report by the De- 
fense Problems Study Council a 
panel of nine industrialists, aca- 
demics and retired civil servants 
formed in February by then Prime 
Minister Morihiro Hosokawa to 


posture and could not possess 
hardware that might be used for 


report back to government. 
Mr. Sakurai who had mil 


Mr. Sakurai who had ministe- 
rial rank, is an LDP member. His 
demise will likely make other par- 
ty members cautious about say- 
ing anything more that would up- 
set pacifist sentiment in Japan, at 
least for the time being. 


hardware that might be used for 
offensive purposes abroad. 

The council said that in future 
the army should take part in all 
forms of United Nations peace- 
keeping, even in operations that 
might involve battles with war- 
ring factions. Under present law, 
passed after fierce debate in 1992, 
Japanese military peacekeepers 
are limited to noncombat duties. 

The panel also recommended 
that tbe cornerstone of Japan’s 
post- World War II defense poti- 


Japan take on added responsibil- 
ity in bilateral security ties, such 
as in research and production of 
military hardware. 

Such proposals were anathema 
to the Socialists until they joined 
the LDP in the coalition govern- 
ment. Reservations still run deep. 
For the moment, it is unlikely 
that the electorate wiD want the 
government to endorse any of die 
more controversial, recommenda- 
tions of the study conned. 

Yet there is likely to be a sig- 
nificant trickle-down effect from 
the report. The media have been 
careful to approach the council's 
findings in a more evenhanded 
m ann er than they did with simi- 
lar reports in the past. They are 
urging Mr. Murayama to en- 
courage debate within his party 
and discussion with the LDP on 
the recommendations. 

Mr. Murayama has dragged his 
party quite a distance already to- 


ward acceptance of a more active 
foreign policy. The still uncertain 
ablation on tbe Korean Peninsu- 
la is a reminder to all Japanese 
that pacifism and economic aid 
are not by themselves sufficient 
guarantees of national security. 

The study council urged the 
country to “extricate itself from 
its security policy of the past that 
was, if anything, passive, and 
henceforth play an active role in 
sha ping a new order” in Asia and 
the woncLBit by bit, that message 
may be sinking in. As it does, 
Japan’s friends abroad should be 
careful to watdi from tbe sidelines, 
remembering that this is essential- 
ly a domestic debate in which 
outride advice would be unwel- 
come and.counterproductive. 


The writer, who teaches history 
at the International Christian Uni- 
versity in Tokyo, is author of 
“U.S.-Japan- Alliance Diplomacy, 
1945-1990.** .He contributed this 
comment lo the Herald Tribune 


e to 


in a 


P ARIS — It now is essential to 
be serious about Africa. The 


By William Pfaff 


Con radian darknesses produced 
in culturally ravaged and uproot- 
ed African societies during the 
years since decolonization have 
been a taboo subject among Amer- 
icans and Europeans. To continue 
with that now will make us all 
accomplices to genocide, and not 
only lo genocide in Rwanda. 

Rwanda is merely the latest ca- 
tastrophe. Burundi may be the 
next — tomorrow. Zaire is an 
entrenched horror of social disin- 
tegration and corruption. Soma- 
lia, Liberia and Siena Leone are 
enclaves of mindless violence, po- 
litical anarchy and wariordism. 
Angola, Mozambique and Ethio- 
pia are ravaged victims of totally 
seif-interested American. Soviet, 
Cuban and South African poli- 
cies, by which the outside powers 
fought their ideological wars with 
African proxies and mercenaries. 


Once promising Kenya, Nigeria 
and Ivory Coast ore in decline. 
The democracy movement, which 
in the last three years produced a 
series of national conferences to 
end dictatorship, is foundering. 

What can be done? Africans 
themselves now are saying there 
has to be a disinterested recoloni- 
zation of countries manifestly in- 
capable of governing themselves. 
The Kenyan historian Ali Mazrui 
wants the old League of Nations 
Trusteeship system restored, with 
Asian and African nations among 
those appointed to govern by the 
United Nations, under the gen- 
eral guidance of a council of ma- 
jor African states, possessing a 
peacekeeping army. 

However, the feasibility of one- 
nation trusteeship seems to me 
slight, and the prospect that any 
single nation would take on such 


a thankless responsibility seems 
to me zero. Some kind of interna- 


tionalist UN trusteeship seems 


equally unlikely. The United Na- 
tions is already vastly overbur- 


tions is already vastly overbur- 
dened. It has the greatest difficul- 
ty finding peacekeeping troops. It 
is all but bankrupt, the United 
States the principal defaulter on 
pledged payments. It has no ap- 
paratus for actually governing a 
country, and the politicking of its 
membership makes it almost im- 
possible that it could create one. 

What is left? Let me ask several 
questions. Who is responsible for 
this catastrophe? Answer; the Eu- 
ropean powers, who colonized 
Africa in the 19th century oat of 
an immensely complex mixture of 
good and bad motives, thereby 
destroying Africa’s existing social 
and political systems, its custom- 
ary institutions and law. 


Following that, in response to 
the Africans’ natural demands for 
freedom and the antroolonialisL 
Zeitgeist of tbe 1950s and ’60s. 
and under intense U.S. and Com- 
munist pressures, the Europeans 
withdrew. They left a narrow 
elite of Western-educated lead- 
ers in control, committed to 
mostly irrelevant ideologies and 
ambitions, in countries totally 
lacking politically responsible 
middle cusses, the “civil society" 
that makes democracy possible. 

Next question: Who outride « 
Africa has an urgent material in- 
terest in Africa’s salvation? An- - 
swen the Europeans. Besides the 


body is competent to deal sympa- 
thetically with these countries, 
the Europeans are. 

How could this be done? No 
European government in its right 
mind would today undertake the 
recolonization of a former colo- 
ny. But the European Union as a 
whole — which insists that it 


fact that Europe is the principal 
consumer erf African mineral and 
agricultural exports, Africa’s 
foundering means that hundreds 
of thousands, even millions more 
desperate people are attempting 
to get out of Africa to places 
where they can find order, jobs. 


could collectively assume the re- 
sponsibility of cooperating with 
Africans themselves to arrest the 
continent’s decline and put it 
back on a progressive course. 

Europeans could form a coop- 
erative Trust Authority with Afri- 
cans to restore order, a regime of 
political and social rights, and to 
rebuild health and education in- 
stitutions, develop national eco- 
nomic infrastructures and install 
competent administrations. 


security, a future. Their scarcely 
controllable migration toward 
Europe already has created im- 
mense social problems and seri- 
ouspolitical tensions. • 

Third question: Who is compe- 
tent to administer Africa? Not the 
United Nations or the United 
States. Somalia was a dramatic 
demonstration of that, Italian 
and French peaedreepers wanted 
the United States ana the United 
Nations against their miscon- 
ceived attempt to impose Ameri- 
can-style solutions. 

The Italians know Somalia, 
just as the French know West and 
Central Africa, the British East 
Africa and the Portuguese Ango- 
la and Mozambique. They know 
the laogoages; they have not only 
former colonial administrators 
but specialists and scholars con- 
cerned with these regions. If any- 


is would be a 50-year pro- 
ject, possibly even a century-long 
one. But it could mean salvation 
for Africa and a deeply construc- 
tive accompKshment lor Europe- 
ans. That it would eventually end 
would have to be understood from 
the start The Europeans would be 
saying to the Africans: We began 
this modernization journey with 
you — now wc are rejoining you to 


Yes, the Pope Has Done a Bad Thing 


N EW YORK — Wait, wait 
as Ions as you can before 


IN as long as you can before 
you write a word. It is an impor- 
tant story and lots of people will 
be touchy about it — you are 
already. Give yourself plenty of 
time. Then see if you still think 
it is important and upsetting. 

Journalists often say they wish 
they had that luxury, but, poor 
us, we have to rush into print. 
Actually, we work quickly be- 
cause that is our purpose in life. 
Providing information and opin- 
ion as soon as professionally 
possible, without lime censor- 
ship, has plain value. 

Because of travel and vaca- 
tion, I had plenty of time to 
think and inquire into the deci- 
sion by Pope John Paul II to 
give a papal knighthood to Kurt 
Waldheim. Tbe result is, I find 
myself more and more sickened 
at what I think is one of the 
more callous personal decisions 
made by a respected world lead- 
er in years. It is contemptuous 
of historical reality. It is insult- 


By A. M. Rosenthal 


ing to the opinions and emo- 
tions erf the living and to the 
memory of the dead. 

Yes, 1 know about the efforts 
this Pope has made to improve 
CathoLic-Jewisb relations, his 
recent recognition of Israel and 
his appearances at Holocaust 
ceremonials. Like other Jews, I 
rush to acknowledge them. 

Hiank you. But the Pope now 
forces us to realize that his pre- 
vious honors to Kurt Waldheim 
— receiving him officially when 
ibe only other chief of state who 
would do so was the king of 
Jordan — were not simply a mat- 
ter of mistaken diplomatic nice- 


ty. Tbe knighthood makes it in- 
escapably dear that the Pope's 
purpose has been to rescue Mr. 
Waldheim from his own past 

Mr. Waldheim was an insig- 
nificant UN secretary-general 
and an insignificant Austrian 
officer in the German army. But 
he served as an intelligence offi- 
cer in that army during its Bal- 
kan massacres. He knew what 
was going on. He was put on the 
war c riminal list soon after the 
war. He was never apprehended 
— he lied industriously to con- 
ceal his record. The lies allowed 
him to become secretary-general. 

Even after his record was re- 
vealed, he was elected president 
of Austria. He is hardly a perse- 
cuted refugee needing papal 
succor and honor. The Vatican 
declines to discuss motive. For- 
giveness? Shouldn’t that come 
after contrition? If Mr. Wald- 
heim has expressed contrition, 
the world should know. 

Why did the Pope do this bad 
thing? Does it matter much? It 
could have been simply arro- 
gance. He wanted it, so he did iL 

I hope and believe that this 
will not destroy attempts to build 
bridges betwren Catholics and 
Jews. Too many Jews long for it- 
Too many Catholics love their 
religion enough to honor it by 
seeking amity with other faiths. 

Then what is the damage in 
what the Pope did? Why should 
Jews and non-Jews refuse to 
pass it over? Why should the 
heart be heavy? 

The reason is in the terrible 


ordinariness of this znan Wald- 
heim. Kurt Waldheim was just 
one more member of the Ger- 
man war machine, military and 
civilian, who knew what was go- 
ing On. For every Schindler 
there were millions of Gormans, 
Austrians and other Europeans 
who also understood what was 


happening and did nothing. 
The world does not pun 


The world does not pursue 
those people or even know their 
names. Too late, too many. 
Some; like Kurt Waldheim, es- 
caped by lying. But he was dis>- 
covered, trapped by his promi- 
nence. That is why what the 
Pope did is staggering. He hon- 
ored the one man who had come 
to be known throughout the 
world as symbolizing all the in- 
formed, participating, unpun- 
ished witnesses. 

These days it is becoming 
uncouth to talk about things 


Finally, there need be no mor- 
alization or condescension in this. 
The Europeans can aim say to 
Africans, as they can say to Rwan- 
dans today: “Yon co mmi t geno- 
ddle? You practice ethnic murder? 
You are divided by hysterical trib- 
ahsms? Join the dub. We know all 
about that. We’ve been worse than 
you. Let’s now cooperate to find 
our way in common out of this 
slough of Despond." 

International Herald Tribune. 

© Los Angeles Tones Syndicate. 


IN OUR PAGES; 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


like witnessing andparticipat 
ing. President Bill Clinton pro 


tng. President Bui Clinton pro- 
claimed Germany America's 
special partner, and nobody was 
crude enough to mention the 
murdered — not as a rebuke to 
Germany, heavens no, but sim- 
ply as a matter of remembrance, 
love, duty, whatever. 

The Pope’s honor to Kurt 
Waldheim is part of that wall of 


politesse being built around the 
past. 1 do not dunk the Pope has 


any moral right to grant civil 
pardon and honor to the partici- 
pating witnesses, to waive at 
least public contrition. Chris- 
tians have no moral right to say it 
is a matter for the Jews to pro- 
test Jews have no right to say, as 
some do, hush, not so loud. 

The New York Times. 


1894: Merely Rejoicing 

PARIS — jibe Herald says in an 
editorial:] In spile of apprehen- 
sions caused by previous rumors, 
yesterday [Aug. 14| seems to have 
passed off quietly in the Balkans. 
In Servia the eighteenth birthday 
of King Alexander wias celebrated 
and in Bulgaria there were rejoic- 
ings to celebrate the seventh an- 
niversaty of the accession of 
Prince Ferdinand. In days gone 
by these two coincident anniver- 
saries would have sufficed to have 
caused* burning of powder. If any 
was burnt yesterday it was merely 
as a sign of rdoiemg. But if it is 

hands of children lest they should 
hurt themselves^ the same thing 
may be said of young nationalities. _ 


their decisions on the autumn 
fashions. The last few days have 
proved that the American buyers 
wifi not leave Paris completely 
*gusted with the lengthof the 
starts, for one of the oldest lead- 
French fashion world 
has shown some long skirts, 
some of his evening dresses are 
long, almost touching the 


1919: Long Is Beautiful 

PARIS — The last of the rue de la 
Paix dress- makers have given 


194 & A Kennedy Kifle< 

BOSTON —[From our New Yoi 
^ cutenanl tosepb 1 
twenty^V 
son the former Ambassadi 
Jo j-he Court of St. James, has bee 

SsKrasft 

Qeam were not given. 






sirlii 


; STOCK 


I > \&P 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, AUGUST 15, 1994 


Page 5 


** 


France Honors AiHcans Who Had Key Role in 1944 Tendings 


By Jonathan Randal 

WasfttttgmPartScntce 

aboard the aircraft carrier 

FOCH — The French government treated repre- 
sentatives of its onetime far-flung African em- 
pire on Sunday to a seafood lirncb and a naval 
review in the Mediterranean to thankthem for 
helping liberate France 50 years ago. • 

Washed down with vintage white Burgundy, 
red Bordeaux and champagne , The Junch^marked 
the opening of celebrations marking' the 1944 
landing in Provence and. France's effort to re- 
establish itself as a major power after its humili- 
ating defeatby Germany in 1940. 

As a reminder of the preponderant role that 
U.S. and British naval and air power, played in 
the Mediterranean landings, seven U.~S. and two 
British ships took part in the 32-vessel review off 
Saint Raphael, near the. beaches that were as-, 
saulted on Aug. 15. 

French and UJS. warplanes roared overhead, 
to the delight of people aboard a swarm of 
pleasure boats accompanying the naval vessels. 

But if Prince Andrew represented the British 


crown and Nayy Secretary John B. Dalton the 
Clinton administration, it was the African guests 
who were meant by President Francis Mitter- 
rand to be the stars of the festivities. 

Fourteen African heads of slate were for the 
first time invited to a major French military 
occasion, and North Africa was represented by 
the Moroccan heir apparent. Prince Sidi Mo- 
hammed, Tunisia's defense minister and even 
beleaguered Algeria’s ambassador to Paris. 

The naval review also served as a reminder to 
younger French citizens that metropolitan 
•France provided only a relative handful of the 
300,000 soldiers who landed on Riviera beaches 
alongside 1 00.000 Americans and Britons. 

These “overseas Frenchmen," as colonial sub- 
'ts were called after World War li. suffered 
ivy casualties. 

Tough Muslim troops from Algeria, Morocco 
and Tunisia, often led by French settlers in 
North Africa, made up the lion’s share of the the 
French contingent. In addition there were 18.000 
black African troops in the 9th Colonial Infantry 


Division, one of the seven divisions under Gener- 
al Jean de Lattre de Tassigny. 

Many more black African troops eventually 
took part in the French Army's rapid push from 
the Mediterranean to eastern France. But in 
November 1944, most were sent home for rea- 
sons mixing political with military 
considerations. 

French military historians have suggested ibe 
“whitening” of die French Army, as it was offi- 
cially called, was prompted by a desire to show 
that France itself could field an army and not 
rely on colonial troops at a time when the Ameri- 
cans and British questioned France’s claims lo 
big power status. 

Other reasons often cited was French concern 
that tbdr black African troops had picked up too 
many ideas about independence from American 
black troops — who were still relegated to segre- 
gated units — and fears that the sight of a 
prostrate France could have destroyed respect 
for the “mother country," as the French thought 
of themselves. 


Some black African and North African troops 
stayed on in the army, righting their way into 
Germany by the end of the war in May 1945, 
while others took pan in France's subsequent 
colonial wars in Indochina and Algeria. 

Veterans of France’s colonial army played key 
roles in the 1954-1962 Algerian war for indepen- 
dence and President de Gaulle granted black 
Africa independence partly out of fear of setting 
off yet another revolt there unless he did so. 

Pensions to this day remain a sore point with 
many veterans. Youssef Diop of Senegal told a 
French radio station Sunday, for example, that 
France still was treating its black African veter- 
ans shabbily, complaining they were considered 
as “former lackeys." 

With just such complaints — and the Sunday 
luncheon — in mind, die French government last 
week raised African veterans’ pensions by 20 
percent — and added another 10 percent for 
those seriously wounded during their service. 

Africans pointed out that the number of veter- 
ans had declined from 400.000 to only 65.000. 


U.S. Cautious on North Korean Accord 


By Steven Greenhouse 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — Clinton adminis- 
tration officials are expressing caution 
about the accord it reached with North 
Korea to settle the dispute over its nuclear 
program, saying that North Korea has a 
lot to do to win the diplomatic recognition 
promised in the agreement 

The officials also said that major differ- ' 
ences remained that could dentil the agree- 
merit, in which the United States said it 
was prepared to establish closer diplomat- 
ic and economic ties in exchange for North 
Korea’s promise to freeze its nuclear pro- ~ 
gram and to stop reprocessing nudear fuel 
into weapons- grade material. 

“Progress has been made, but the lion’s 
share of work is before us,” said a White 
House official. “Well judge the North Ko- 
reans by their performance.” 

Concerned that the North Koreans 
might fail to deliver on some of their prom- 
ises. as has happened several times before, 
administration officials declined over the 
weekend lo trumpet the agreement as a 
major breakthrough. 


In interviews, several administration of- 
. fidals sent strong signals to- North Korea 
that if it was serious about notmalizing 
relations and increasing trade with the 
- West, it had to demonstrate through con- 
crete actions that it was prepared to halt its 
program to separate the plutonium needed 
for nudear weapons or lo develop the 


.“very important here is that between 
now and when we meet them a gp in on 
Sept. 23 in Geneva — that the freeze re- 
jnain,” a senior a dminis tration official 
said. “No reprocessing, no refueling (heir 
reactor.” Ana, he said, inspectors from the 
International Atomic Energy Agency must 
be allowed to remain. 

In the accord, signed early Saturday in 
Geneva, North Korea committed itself to 
ban all nudear weapons and to remain a 
member of the Nudear Nonproliferation 
Treaty, which limits the spread of nudear 
weapons. 

it also agreed to halt indefinitely all 
reprocessing of nudear fuel and forgo the 
reprocessing of 8,000 spent uranium fuel 
rods already extracted from a reactor, a 


process that would help it separate more 
plutonium. 

■ Korean Sees New Era 

R. Jeffrey Smith of The Washington Post 
reported earlier from Geneva: 

A senior North Korean official said that 
the nudear accord with the United States 
would help forge a new era of normal 
relations between the two countries by 
establishing a basis for enhanced “trust 
and confidence” on nudear issues and 
other matters. 

In a rare interview, Deputy Foreign 
Minister Kang Sok Ju, the chief North 
Korean negotiator on nuclear matters, 
hailed the two-page statement of under- 
standing approved by the U.S. and North 
Korean governments as an expression of 
“our clear intentions to resolve our nudear 
issue.” 

Mr. Kang declined to express confi- 
dence that all disputes left unresolved by a 
week of discussions here could be settled, 
but be said all would be addressed in 
discussions with U.S. technical experts in 
coining weeks. 


KOREA: 

Offer of Reactors 

Continued from Page 1 

is a sense of feeling left out,” 
said Yang Song OiuK a profes- 
sor of political science at 
Kyunghee University in Seoul. 

In his speech, Mr. Kim said 
he was ready for talks with the 
North but stopped short of call- 
ing for a rescheduling of the 
summit meeting that was slated 
for July 25 but postponed after 
Kim II Sung's death. 

“Our doors are always open 
for dialogue with the North at 
any place and any time.*’ Mr. 
Kim said. He said the two foes 
must “build up military trust 

The president dearly wants 
lo be directly involved in the 
resolution of rhe nuclear prob- 
lem. Moreover, government of- 
fidals here regard building up 
North Korea’s electric power 
system as an investment for the 
future. 


Seoul Students 
Battle Riot Police 

Agerxr France- Preae 

SEOUL — Dozens were in- 
jured in fighting between riot 
policemen and radical students 
Sunday when police tried to 
storm a university campus to 
block a pro-North Korea rally. 
“Many were injured on both 
sides,” said an AFP photogra- 
pher. 

Witnesses said the students, 
armed with rocks and steel bars, 
surrounded a contingent of riot 
policemen who had entered the 
Seoul National University cam- 
pus, took away their equipment 
and left them’badly beaten. By 
midnight, the students still held 
about 30 policemen captive, an- 
other AFP photographer said. 

The students were attempt- 
ing for the second straight day 
to stage a rally to coincide with 
one in North Korea. The rally 
had been banned because of its 
pro-North Korean stance. 


RWANDA; Why Did So Many Participatem the Butchery or Stand By? 


Coofmaed from Page 1. 

refused. Perhaps by virtue of his position, 
the mayor was not killed. 

Other men joined against their will, to 
save their own lives, they said, or in a few 
cases the lives of Tutsi. . 

Evode Micomyiza, a 33-year-old civics 
teacher, said he stood on the hill at the east 
end of the soccer stadium that day with a 
dub in his hand as other men chopped and 
clubbed defenseless men, women and chil- 
dren. 

Mr. Micomyiza said that he had not 
killed anyone and that he had gone along 
only because a gang heading to ihe-stadi--/ 
urn hadsaM-thayif higdtoiKrtjogrtl^fe 
their “w6ifc,”fxt was proof that fie waTa ' 
supporter of the Rwanda Patriotic Front, 
the Tutsi-led rebel army. 

“We were forced to move with the killers 
in order not to be killed,” he said. 

When the carnage was over, Mr. Mico=- 
myiza said, he saw the bodies of three Tntsi 
who only a few days earlier he had been 
harboring in his house. 

“Everyone had to participate,” said Ber- 
nard Ndutiye, a Lutheran minister here. 
“To prove that you weren’t RPF, you had 
to walk around with a dub. Being a pastor 
was not an excuse. They said, ‘Yon can 
have religion afterwards.’’ ” 


One day, a gang came to Mr. Ndutiye’s 
house and found three Tutsi children he 
was protecting. The children were his chil- 
dren's playmates. The gang clubbed one of 
the Tutsi boys to death before his eyes. 
After that, Mr. Ndutiye said, he agreed to 
take up a machete, but he said he had never 
killed anyone and had eventually found 
that if he feigned sickness, the gangs would 
leave Him alone. 

What came over this nation last April 
and May, when hundreds of thousands of 
Tutsi were slaughtered? Why did educated 
men like. Mr. Ndutiye and Mr. Mic omyiza 

their Tutsi wives, as many did? 

Hbtv could Hutu men who were protect- 
ing Tutsi children go to other villages and 
kill Tutsi, as recounted by Mr. Ndutiye 
and Mr. Micomyiza? 

“The same questions you’re asking I'm 
asking myself,” said Mr. Ndutiye, the min- 
ister in Kabuye, who is also the head of the 
Evangelical Lutheran Church of Germany 
in Rwanda. “I haven’t found the answers. 
There are times when you lose faith. Some- 
times we think God has abandoned Rwan- 
da and allowed the devil to enter the souls 
Of our people.” . 


At the moment a few things seem clear. 
It was not random violence that engulfed 
this country. 

“Five hundred thousand people aren't 
killed by a bunch of guys with machetes,” 
says Lieutenant Colonel Erik de Staben- 
rath, a French military officer who has 
informally investigated' the massacres in 
this area. 

Land is often cited as the root cause of 
the killings — that Hutu and Tutsi killed 
each other to keep the land they had or to 
take over the land of others. While this is 
one ofthc world's most densely populated . 
* douhtriesT ahdYural peasants make up tfie ‘ 
bulk of the population, that explanation is 
not complete. 

Others point to long-simmering resent- 
ment between the Hutu majority and the 
Tutsi minority. But ethnic differences be- 
tween the two are slight — they speak the 
same language and have intermarried for 
so many generations that many Rwandans 
do not know if another person is a Hutu or 
aTutsi. 

Another explanation is that the violence 
arose out of a struggle for political power. 
“It is a problem of Hutu and Tutsi and 
power sharing,” said Mr. Ndutive. 


Tutsi Leaders Attempt 
To Stem Hutu Exodus 


BOMB: Germans Intercept Largest Plutonium Shipment Yet From Russia 


Continued trim Page I 

Ru ssian sources to Gentian intermediaries 
who tried to sell them on the black maricet 
In May, the German authorities found a 
fifth of an ounce erf very pure plutonium 
239 in the garage of a German traveling 
salesman, AdolfJaekle, near the Swiss bor- 
der. 

Mr. Jaekle remains under arrest, but the 
police have been unable to find an Iraqi 
operative with whom they believe Mr. Jac- 
kie was working on a deal for Iraq 'to 
acquire plutonium to build an atomic 
bomb. 


Analysis convinced the Germans that 
tiie plutonium sample could have come 
only from a processing plant in Russia, 
and officials said they were far from satis- 
fied with the response of the Russian au- 
thorities to their pleas for urgent action to 
identify and eliminate the security breach. 

The Bavarian police announced Thurs- 
day that they had seized a .028-ounce sam- 
ple of enriched uranium 235 in Landshut 
on June 13. But they kept the discovery 
quiet until they arrested a German woman 
who, they said, was the ringleader of an- 
other c riminal organization. A Czech man 


and four Slovaks have also been arrested in 
that case. 

Officials said they were certain that this 
material too, bad originated in Russia and 
had been provided to the German woman, 
a real estate broker, as a sample to con- 
vince prospective buyers that there was 
more where it came from. Whom she was 
dealing with has not been revealed. 

But Russian officials have regularly said 
that they have had no evidence of any theft 
of weapons-grade nuclear materials or ma- 
terials from power plants or military nucle- 
ar rites. 


Crmptkd Nr Our Staff From Dispalchc r 

K1BUNGO. Rwanda — In a 
campaign by the Tutsi-domi- 
nated government to stem a 
new exodus of mainly Hutu ref- 
ugees after a scheduled French 
pullout Aug 22. Interior Minis- 
ter Seth Sen das bon ga and other 
leaders visited the French-de- 
clared security zone in south- 
western Rwanda on ^unday. _ 
''Other leaders, including 
President Pasteur Bizimungu, 
Prime Minister Faustin Twagi- 
ramungu, and Defense Minister 
Paul Kagame, were on a tour of 
refugee camps aimed at reassur- 
ing frightened Hutu that the 
new authorities would not harm 
them if they returned home. 

The Tutsi-dominated Rwan- 
da Patriotic From overthrew 
the former government last 
month after a bloody ethnic 
conflict and look control. 

Fear of retribution by the 
rebel force for the crimes com- 
mitted against ethnic Tutsi and 
moderate Hulu has stopped 
many Hutu from returning to 
their homes in Rwanda. 

On Saturday, aid officials in 
Kigali said thousands of Rwan- 
dans had left an area around 
Kibuye, in the French zone, and 
headed south, sparking fears of 
a fresh exodus of refugees to 
neighboring Burundi and Zaire. 

Relief agencies have warned 
of a possible fresh exodus of the 
2.4 milli on people sheltering in 
the zone when France next 
week pulls out the 1.400 troops 
it sent to the region. 

Prime Minister Edouard Bal- 
ladur said Sunday that French 


troops would keep to the sched- 
uled Aug. 22 deadline. 

“We said at the end of July 
that we accepted a delay to 
Aug. 22,” he said in a radio 
interview. “We do not intend to 
extend the deadline beyond 
that date." 

On Sunday, aid officials in 
Ngozi. in northern Burundi, 
said about 2.000 Rwandan 
-Hum-refugees had been arriv- 
ing in Burundi daily since Aug. 
8, fleeing what they described 
as revenge attacks by Rwanda 
Patriotic Front soldiers. 

(AFP. Reuters) 


Grenade Hurts 9 
On Burundi Bus 

Reuters 

BUJUMBURA, Burundi — 
Nine passengers received seri- 
ous injuries when a hand gre- 
nade was thrown at a bus in a 
suburb of this capital city. 
There was no immediate claim 
of responsibility for the grenade 
attack on Saturday, the second 
in three days in the capital 

The United Nations has ex- 
pressed concern over increasing 
insecurity in Burundi, raising 
fears of widespread violence be- 
tween the country’s Tutsi mi- 
nority and the Hutu majority. 

Heavily armed troops were 
deployed last week in Bujum- 
bura after a two-day strike and 
ethnic clashes in which 15 peo- 
ple were killed. The unrest was 
sparked by the arrest Aug. 7 of 
an opposition politician. 


Filipinos Protest 
Contraceptives 


Return 

MANILA — In one of the 
biggest protests here since 
President Ferdinand E. 
Marcos was ousted, hun- 
dreds of thousands of people 
rallied on Sunday against a 
“global dictatorship” delug- 
ing the Third World with 
contraceptives. 

Pro-life campaigners 
heeded the Roman CaLholic 
Church's call by gathering in 
a central park to oppose a 
government campaign to cut 
this impoverished country’s 
high population growth. 

Cardinal Jaime Sin and 
former President Corazon 
C. Aquino led the protest by 
burning sex magazines and a 
copy of a document expect- 
ed to be presented at next 
month’s international meet- 
ing on population in Cairo, 
which the church said would 
promote contraception and 
abortion. 

A church spokesman esti- 
mated the crowd at 1 mil- 
lion. but the official police 
estimate was a maximum of 

220.000. about half of them 
schoolchildren. 

Either way, it was one of 
the biggest demonstrations 
since Mr. Marcos was 
ousted in 1986. A similar 
church-organized protest in 
Cebu City drew a crowd of 

50.000. 

The Manila rally was pan 
of the church's campaign to 
force the government to re- 


treat from its pro-birth con- 
trol stance before the Cairo 
conference. 

Cardinal Sin called on the 
Philippines to boycott the 
Cairo meeting and con- 
demned the imposition of 
alien cultural values on Fili- 
pinos. 

“We reject Use cultural ar- 
rogance of this super world 
body that shamelessly 
tampers with our cherished 
values according to the prag- 
matics of its own demo- 
graphic goals,” he said. 

Placards condemned the 
Cairo meeting as the devil’s 
work. 

Cardinal Sin, echoing the 
Vatican's campaign against 
the conference, called on 
God to “protect us in this 
global war against our ba- 
bies and our children, to lib- 
erate us from the shackles of 
this new global dictator- 
ship.’’ 

He accused this “arrogant 
dictatorship'' of swamping 
the Philippines and the en- 
tire developing world with a 
“deluge of contraceptive 
drugs and instruments.” 

Much of his anger was di- 
rected at President Fidel V. 
Ramos's government, which 
has taken on the might of the 
church in Asia’s only nation 
with a Christian majority by 
refusing to back down on its 
campaign to promote popu- 
lation control. 


JAPAN: Fresh Look at Aggression 


Continued from Page 1 

bor, that matches fairly closely 
what American textbooks say. 
And Japanese political leaders 
have been more outspoken 
about admitting Japan's war 
crimes in Asia and apologizing 
to the victims and their survi- 
vors. 

Not every politician has 
made this intellectual shift, 
however. Just this weekend, a 
conservative veteran. Shin Sa- 
kurai, was forced to resign from 
the national cabinet after he ca- 
sually declared that Japan had 
had no aggressive intent and 
that its brutal colonization of 
East Asia had actually been 
good for the Asian nations. 

One of the most useful places 
to see Japan's new attitude to- 
ward the war is in a number of 
new museums that do not 
mince words when it comes to 
explaining who started the war 
in the Pacific. 

War museums recently built 
in Osaka, Kyoto, Kawasaki. 
Saiiama and Okinawa all deal 
forthrightly with Japan's ag- 
gressive strategy, its harsh and 
often murderous treatment of 
conquered Asian peoples and 
its refusal to surrender until the 
United Slates unleashed nucle- 
ar weapons. 

Jn addition, the atomic bomb 
museum at Hiroshima, which 
previously focused strictly on 
the suffering there following the 
explosion of history’s first nu- 
clear weapon, has added a new 
wing, popularly known as the 
“aggression corner," which 
helps explain to people why the 
United States felt it necessary 
to use the atomic bomb. A new 
museum to be opened at Naga- 
saki in time for the 50th anni- 
versary of the Nagasaki bomb 
also will deal extensively with 
Japan’s war role. 

Perhaps the best known of 
the new wave of war museums 
is the Kyoto Museum for World 
Peace, erected in the ancient 
capita] of Japan by Ritsumei- 


kan University, a private insti- 
tution. The museum occupies a 
handsome new building on the 
edge of the campus, and its dis- 
plays include both wartime arti- 
facts and high-tech virtual reali- 
ty displays, including a chilling 
demonstration of what would 
have resulted had an atomic 
bomb fallen on Kyoto. 

The first exhibit hall in the 
Kyoto Museum makes it clear 
that Japan itself was responsi- 
ble for the war and the resulting 
suffering in Japan. 

“In World War II, Japan at- 
tacked the nations of Asia and 
the Pacific,” the display de- 
clares. “As a result, America 
responded with air raids on 
Japanese cities. These were not 
independent events. They are 
all part of World War II in the 
Pacific.” 

This historical connection is" 
a given in history books, but jn 
Japan it used lo be common to 
treat Japan’s colonization of 
Asia and its war against the 
United States as completely 
separate. The former was 
known as “the China War," or 
“the Greater East Asian War.” 
while the war against the Unit- 
ed States was called “the Pacific 
War.” 

Bui the Kyoto Museum re- 
jects these distinctions, instead 
referring throughout to “the 15- 
Year War,” meaning the period 
from Japan’s invasion of China 
to the final surrender in 1945. 

But self-critical style is not 
the only approach. While the 
various “aggression museums" 
are spreading their message, the 
national government is moving 
ahead with plans for a giant 
$120 million war museum that 
will reportedly portray World 
War II as something Japan 
should be proud of. 

The proposed “War Victims’ 
Peace Commemoration Prayer 
Hall” is being built in Tokyo 
□ext to Yasukuni Shrine, a 
shrine of the Shinto religion 
that honors Japanese soldiers 
killed in World War II. 


FISH; At Last, World Tries to Deal With the Concern That the Ocean 9 s Bounty Is Running Out Fast 


Continued fnw Page! 
nal feed — have accounted for the 
re growth in the marine catch since 

i some places, the fish are literally 
ling out. The Canadian government, 
nstance, has closed the once bountiful 
mtic fisheries around the Grand Banks . 
lewfoumfland because so few northern 
are left. The closings have cost about 
OOjobs. „ ■ _ 

ussia, Japan, China, South Korea, Po- 
I and the United States have agreed to 
'o-year moratorium on fishing in tte 
jghnut hole” of international waters 
reen Russia and Alaska for fear they 
overfishing Alaska pollock, 
fhis issue has really blown up in crar 


faces in the last couple of years,” said 
Michael Sutton, vice president for U.S. 
programs at the Wond Wildlife Fund. 
“ThiV is not tike rhinos, tigers, elephants 
aid bears. If you deplete fish populations, 
yoa threaten the marine ecosystem and the 
communities that depend on the fish.” 

Most fish consumers may be unaware of 
the depletion, especially because super- 
market seafood counters remain full of 
mari ne delicacies. But it has drawn the 
attention of bureaucrats, academics and 

- environmentalists. 

’ .The roots of the current crisis, experts 
say, reach back to . the middle and late 
1970s, when nations around the world be- 
gan" fighting what they saw as incursions 
by foreign Ashing vessels. Their solution: 


to extend their economic sovereignty to 
200 miles (325 kilometers) beyond their 
shores, where before they had controlled 
no more than 12 miles. These actions were 
later ratified by the 1982 Law of the Sea. 

In this way, nations gained autonomy 
over a greater number of the fish in the 
ocean — nearly 90 percent. But at the same 
time, countries around the world expanded 
their fishing fleets dramatically. From 
1970 to 1989, the size of the global fishing 
fleet nearly doubled, according to the 
Food and Agriculture Organization. To- 
day, 41 percent of all ships are fishing 
vessels;, there are more than 3 million of 
them. 

Not only are there more boats, but the 
boats are better at catching fish Nylon- 


based twines increase the strength of nets, 
while mechanized hauling gear increases 
their capacity. It is not uncommon for ibe 
net dragged behind a 300-fool (90-meter) 
trawler to far exceed the size of the ship 
that is pulling it; the largest nets can pull in 
60,000 pounds (27,000 kilograms) of fish in 
one catch. 

Technology has also helped fishing ves- 
sels find fish and get to where they are. The 
bridge of a modern trawler bristles with 
16-color sonar displays, radar, computer 
databases and other devices that allow the 
crew to determine not only the location of 
schools of fish but also their type and size. 

Large-scale fishing operations also use 
airplanes or helicopters to belp them locate 
their prey. 


“The industrialization of hunting and 
gathering is a contradiction in terms.” said 
Elizabeth Mann Borgese, chair of the In- 
ternational Ocean Institute in Halifax, 
Nova Scotia. “It is simply untenable. We 
are destroying our resources.” But the 
Food and Agriculture Organization does 
not blame technology as much as it blames 
the rules laid down by governments to 
manage their territorial waters. 

Part of the problem is ibat fish do not 
conveniently confine themselves to watery 
national borders. Since the high seas are 
recognized as belonging to all, there is 
perpetual open season on the species, such 
as tuna and swordfish, that migrate 
throughout international waters. 

Few limits have been set on the interna- 
tional fish catch. Where restrictions do 
exist, fishing vessels often avoid them by 
converting their registry to that of a nation 


that is not a member of a regional group 
that has agreed to set limits. 

The fleets, in other words, go to a lot of 
trouble to catch fish freely — which is 
ironic, considering the fact that so few of 
them actually make money. 

The Food and Agriculture Organization 
estimates that it cost about $92 billion to 
operate the global fishing fleet in 1989, the 
most recent year for which there are fig- 
ures. Revenue, on the other hand, was only 
$70 billion; much of the difference is made 
up by subsidies from governments to those 
who fish and those who build fishing 
boats. 

The 12-nation European Union, for in- 
stance, spends about $580 million in annu- 
al fishing subsidies, according to the UN 
agency, while Norway alone lays out about 
5150 million. 


CALLING ONE FOREIGN COUNTRY 

FROM ANOTHER <5 NO 

SECRET 

WITH THESE SIMPLE AC CESS 

CODES. 


COUNTRIES 


ACCESS NUMBERS 


AFRICA 

Kpaya J 

South AMcn + 

AMERICAS 

AljaMM 

Fo6» JPII poy chonet) O 

Pelmo 

Brazil 


Chfla 

CatoaiMa- Garfish 
CofemUn-SponbJ' 

CoUaCica + 

EruortM i! 

♦ 

Guamafa 4 
Hrnidinat A 

F^aaiva 

faepd, Ac 
'*wu « 

PtMrtO Rico -" 
Ui*.- 

US. Virgin Islands — 

Ui.jpnyio 

Vc*tr.Tp4n (ojlrji 
tmirla • Snmnli 


oso-i: 

0400994001 

mi-ao-fTMiii 

555 

■4 

ceoo-im 

0000016 

T40M77-U06 

(WW7 

960-130410 

460.130-110 

ltd 

171 

191 

194 

QQI-RQO >?l«m 
« amt" Arm 
161 
IIS 

ow-c-esi 

i% 

MDMTT’HHBS 

1400477-6000 

1400677-6000 

0CNI7 
moiiu-o 
m mi t 


COUNTRIES ACCESS NUMBERS 


ASIA 

Aawrkan Samoa 


China »+ 

Ho* Kong 
Haag Kang A 
bdn + 

Indatwtlo 
JOKJr. ♦ 

taper' 4 

Koran ♦* 

Kona} 

Kona + 

Kara J 

Macao <.< 

HUoyiia + 

16** .’rakJirf 

Mtfppina* 

rhOmamlCMCamJ^ 
PhBptmt (PUTO 


Tinian and Koto *11 


To 

I Mi'-anrt i 

CARIBBEAN 

Anlignj v 

A»'»iw 

Bohimai 


633-1000 
006-551 M0 
1-600461-677 
1 0S-13 
•0O-IB77 
OH 

000-137 
001-601-1 S 

odp n: 

>»tr. 

009-16 

550-fOHE 

0039-13 

650-OWL 

6000016 

OCT** 

105-0) 

T 02411 
105-16 
235-0333 
1-335-0333 
SOOC i" 1” 
0080-190677 

'in ijj:' 

i roo .a) 

1-600- 3*9-51 n 


COUNTRIES 


ACCESS NUMBERS 


BaM«3 

BitTTitfdo 

BritUiVagrntiL A 
Daanairan bpvLIc A 

Jo"a<o \- 
lleitiarlarzii Aniille, * 

SllmS 
Si )><e 

I'fl'datf J loiuga t 

EUROPE 

Ankfa* 

Belgium* 

Bulgaria 6 

Ctrr-'. *12 

Caacfc Republic* 


I'm ill* * 

Owntany + 
Grace + 
Hungary >♦ 
Iceland +ii 
Inland + 

IWjr + 

LiacMtncMa ♦ 
Lithuania » 
luionbuva 
(teams 4 
Nethariondt ♦ 
Norway t 

Poland + 


1-800-877-4000 
l-SOU QHr-» 
1-800677-6000 
1-800751.7677 
i Kti r"- 8 ntt' 
QQl Stt-ltf-llll 
187 

i d» jr u^g 

n 

022-903-014 
078.1141014 
00600-1010 
OSOTOM 
00424187.187 
8001-0677 
98001-0284 
19*00*7 
01300013 
008-001-411 
009B0O0I-677 
999-003 
1400-55-3001 
172-1877 
1334777 
8*197 
OHO 01 1 > 
19*0067 
00*022-4119 
800-19477 
0010-4 BOOHS 


It ,1 


-mr- > .•—-■-'1*1 


1(M4> ■* Hi-' *■ ■ 

■4. MB IlM. (Mill !«■ 


rfcra. ' ■*”» -.-at.. r-*~ m -- I miBV UM ebb- * 

■ 1 ■ Or— -rli — I* «. I— 1 ■--! 


v*,!-.,..-., -b— ■ Mr*. V01 I'«WJ.*I, 1 4-- (.'if. 4n!i'.,i|h-,i "11*1' AiOpi i 

I... ..... ii_ i . 1 .- 1 . 1 . uH.-— ,al, t-.." • ■■■ 


1*1 [|- J -— 

A ‘ itrdui'i*' n.i*K*, iA-.il 


COUNTRIES 

ACCESS NUMBERS 

Partial + 

05017-1477 

Bomaiun *11 

01-800-0877 

Ruuia+U 

8-095-155-6133 

Eiruia (Malawi + 

1554133 



Spain 

000-996013 

5w«diti * 

020-799-01 1 

Switzarload + 

1 55-9777 

Uutad Kingdom IMerorryJ ■ 

0500-890677 

Unifad Kingdom (BT) 

0800490677 

United Kingdom A 


Vatican City + 


MIDDLE EAST 

3564777 


177-102-2727 


xu — 



T-lr. * 

iVSt) . -M" 

U*V4liAfai4M| » 

.-tf' 1.V 

New - Bulgaria A 

00-800-1010 

Iceland tQ 

999-003 

•• Egypt -AjU 

356-4/77 


jtjSiiiliS 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, AUGUST 15, 1994 


WEEKLY INTERNATIONAL BOND PRICES 


fronted by 05 First Boston 
Limited, London, Tel: (071) 
516 40 25. Prices may vary 
#*ording to market conditions 
®nd other factors. Aug. 12 



Oi. 

face Cpn 


rns BJO 
ff« OLID 


■5?& ate 
m w 

™ ate 

m. an 











93* JK 
19* 


BW U7 
#E» UJ 


«H Vf 
9i* m 
tm a7? 


mt w 
wn ote 


im 

am ui 


Business 


ui 


Every Wednesday 
Contact 
Philip Oma 

Tel.: (33 1)46 37 93 36 
Fax: (33 1 ) 46 37 93 70 
or your nearest IHT office 
or representative 


NASDAQ NATIONAL MARKET 


Consolidated trading for week 
ended Friday, Aug. 12. 


Sabs 

stacks Div ym 100s Mail Law dse Owe 


Sales I Sales I Sales I Sabs 

Stocks Div ym I DOs Wan Low Che Owe Stocks Dtv YU IDOsHtoii Law On Owe Stocks Div Yld lDOshfic* Law Che Owe] stocks at* YU MOSHfeto Law die Owe 


Series 

Slacks Dtv YU lOOsHVoh Low Ose Owe 


Soles 

Stocks Div YM lOOsHWn Law dot Owe 




IM 10V. - 

IS 

♦ I*. 



3 soul?" ibS. ib", *vU 

3 1 IS. av. BVm . H 






14 V, 1M 
5* 6V. 



□rewin 

Orodi- 

□revere M 




‘luV.I 


im 


2*3 


FutfOns SB 




lEEBEESSEESlEESSS 1 
































































































itvSwV - ' v . • ’. 

Sfmffllpss 

Jfjj .■_•■% s' 

«l5K.!i ; 'A&wsy'i '3t/£iL£. 


International Herald Tribune, Monday, August 15, 1994 * 




•w— : a, !mii 
. .. : - <vM^r. 


'■s'* .•■?■>».» *=?■•" 
v; - y.¥ ! .“~ : - "■ 


Page 7 


into 


y < 

' ^ V- 

7 

? Vs! /. 

r ^ 

w .. * 


CAPITAL MARKETS 

Canada Bonds Get a Boost 
As Jitters Ease on Quebec 


ByAnn&ocfcleinHSt v- - -wj ~ 

SpoMtoAeHmddmme : V^MTSTill^ 

M ONTREAL — The Canadian bond market, the ” V/Ut-lU. t 

?* ya^hy ttcenay ic- c^UbyCS^F. 
ceived a boost from polls showing that the mdepen- riTT 
dence-minded Parti Q^bteois may not be as dose to *Jr2riL I iillS l ? 
victory in the upcoming Quebec Sections as had 
previously beeaj pxcdiPted. ,, . ounon by overvaJ 

■pM country’s bond market hit its weakestpoint this year in May £, £ 

and June as European and Japanese investors, who were worried partnerships,, the i. 
that Fiendi^pealang Qnefaec would seek to sgwrate from the rest eminent saod, aca 
of Canada, cut bade on Canadian holdings. - Sumiay m 

According to Toronto-based — ■■ ■■ As a result, ford 

brokerage Bums Fiy, foreign Ewmomfc realitv will haw claimed too h 
purchasers bought onfy 17.5 per- ^CGQOJmCTeasaymU ^ ^ 

cent of all Canadian federal, Bit Qnfhac voters. the State Admimstr 

provincial and corporate bonds - - >• ■ ; -• - - ■ soection of Import 

issued ni the first half of 1994, fW titiS i 

compared with 56 percent of net new issues in all of 1993. The the newspaper. 
United States remains the only net purchaser this year. Some ofthe fore 

*T believe that those who thought Canada was too hot too handle q?y i defrauded th 
have already sold,” said Sherry Cooper, chief economist at Bums counterparts by l 
^“Thc markets are now behaving a lot better than expected.’* outdated and crervi 
, Jflr* 15 , ““ hen^wnark. 30-year Canada bond jumped from a meat and technolos 
1994 low of 7.08 percent in January to 936 percent' on June 21 and maid. 
were quoted at 9.20 percent last week, Thespreadfor 30-year bonds “Such iT Wwl act 

between Canad a and the United States narrowed to 170 basis fritted by some fo 
points ilast week from a maximum of 207 in late June. tors not only under 

While some of the improvement has been due to a new poll xts & 
showing that Quebec's governing Liberal Rarty is ca t c fim g up to the ChintL-but also hu 
opposition Pam Qpfibficois m the run-up to the SepL 12 election, ests 5 tiuar Chines 
spreads had narrowed even before the survey’s release. the W eeidv nuoted ■ 


early August, showed the Parti Qoib&ois. tmh a two percentage 
point lead over the federalist Liberals compared with 10 points in 
mid-July. The findings the Canadiaii dollar to jump about 

half a cent. 

UntD the new poll, most political and eoonoxoic analysts were 
predicting a surefire separatist victory, but cuxiemrpolls indicate it 
wiD be defeated. “My guess is that vo'ers in Quebec will be 
confronted with economic reality and there win bea *m> vote,” Ms. 
Cooper said. 

That doesn’t mean that mtexnaticmal investors have no grounds 
to worry about their Canadian bonds, said Brian Neysmith, presi- 
dent of the Canadian Bond Rating Service. He said the September 
elections and the possible referendum were minor issues compared 
with the “absolute borrowing tenge Canada has gone cat over the 
past decade.” 

Even with economic recovery well under way, the federal govern- 
ment’s net debt continues to increase at a rate greater than econom- 
ic growth in 1994 and 1995 and is budgeted to grow at 7.8 percent, 
up from 33 percent ' 

Carl Gewirtz is on vacation. 



THE TRIB INDEX 


lntdmaBbn& fferakS Tribune;'*’** 
WorkJ Stock Index, composed 
of280aitemationaty/hv»slabte it® 
stocks from 25 countries, 
compiled by EUoomb&g . 117 
Business News. . 

lie 

Weekending August 12, 
daily dosings. 

Jan. 1992= 100. 115 

135 A*rfto/p»cwc rag 11& 

134 118 
t m .f K,. M.. . • 117 


F M T W T F 

Worth America BB» 





F M T W T - F 




F M T W T 


F M T;W; T F 


Industrial Sectoral/Weekend dose ■ 

msm usm % ’• 00 m asm % 

Energy 113.4911338 -034 C apftal Goods il7J51ia7B -1.44 
UtH ffies 1282B 124.79 *120 RawMatariato 13148131^8 -0J0 
Fiowce 117.36 11&54 -1,00 Coowmier Goods 102113 10091 -ft21 
Services 120X3 121^8 -0.78 Wsce Banooiig 131J1132.7S -096 

The ktdect neks U& rioter v* bos o/ stocks h m Tokyo, Itew York, Urindoo, and 

«*!»»» 

‘ ‘ ekmmatendHt^Tieuw 

CURRENCY RATES ~ 

JSyMC Ratal Au 9- 12 

cross tiBwa ^ fji. lw tm aJ. sa. y« cs tori- 

_ _ L ua in uw» — iw- J «j7s w u« 

******* v* *2 Utt uw aw — -*“*» «w 2 M acr 
yw*. — urn wns* urn u«- wn. ua« ues tnw 

*"***"?, MW l»1 l Mm 3C*» *w .«» 15WI vx* MU# 

^J2 mo. 2UO ta* TOK ua fun ntw- ws — 

u5 5S ttfS »* 1 WI wu. an I,wa 

2 n£r n T£o BBS UKS IMS 3UI UB an UD 02 

m«V<X*W -- ™ jSS. uw ' MW '4MK IW MW t««* 

pmU U) w n un W — nn am 

™ ,« JM iw i» us* turn mw» tub ise* — w®* 

ijm usa uwms ua xm. tan tam i»a w* 

S S S tw» ^ ‘“w- Mim m ,MM 

’ , .f^im 7 *Miaaft>flBtfZM , >cMPeMatlnpW>er'owfwYi 

ana moor; •: W» rflfr "* «*** ** 

moOttblA 

OUw DoRar VaRM« . ^ pm-i cmw ws 

'% cwiwcf gSSL. Sts AWfM i3M S.Afc.rwi in« 

• AreBatWB0 STwwS M-awwl*. wm S.Kar.«M 1 B 30 

&af»r«.s UH« Hnaai w*, «ww.krtM *JWS teWLlnw* 7*02 

Bmar«* awm potehriotr S»W. TMImM 2S«. 

ttmaevw ^ nnescwfe w* . Twawiifce m 

caAicwww “Saww. aaaz «»» uabawmbi S£ST 

omhtv*m 4-tto ££ sooa moi w , v»whw. iwd 

sss? 3 ^. ssrrsr"® **.* « 


Forward Rates 


China Sees 
Foul Play in 
Foreign 
Ventures 

' CcnpilfdbpOw S!$f Frm Daposka 

BEUING — Foreign compa- 
nies have fleeced Cbm of $10 
billion by overvaluing assets 
when setting up joint venture 
partnerships, the Chinese gov- 
ernment said, according to a 
report Sunday in the official 
China Daily. 

As a result, foreign partners 
have claimed too large a share 
of profits from joint ventures, 
the State Administration for In- 
s pcctio n of ImpOTt and Export 

the newspaper. 

Some of the foreign partners 
also defrauded their Chinese 
counterparts by transferring 
outdated and overvalued equip- 
ment and technology, the paper 
said. 

“Such illegal activities com- 
mitted by same foreign inves- 
tors not only undermine the as- 
sets of their joint ventures in 
China, but also hurt the inter- 
ests of their Chinese partners,” 
the weekly quoted an unidenti- 
fied official as saying. 

China is one of the world's 
fasting growing investment tar- 
gets for foreign companies, with 
an estimated 47,000 joint ven- 
tures. 

In the first six months of the 
year, the world’s businesses 
.poured S14.7 billion into the 
country, 55 percent more than a 
year earlier. 

The administration began 
evaluating foreign joint ven- 
tures in 1991 based on the en- 
terprise's original applications 
to work in Chma J the paper 
said. 

Chinese investigations of 
4,000 cases assessed foreign 
equipment with a stated value 
of $13 bfiHon as actually being 
•worth $900 minion, and the au- 
thorities helped Chinese firms 
recoup $400 milHott in compen- 
sation , the newspaper said. 

China now has 47,000 joint 
ventures. 

(Bloomberg AFP) 


A Rate Rise Backfires 

Sweden and Italy Not Likely to be Copied 


By Eriklpsen 

Jnumaiieml Herald Tribune 

LONDON — In the wake of the surprise 
increase in Swedish and Italian interest rales 
last week, at least one thing is dean If you 
want to defend your currency, don't raise 
your rates. 

“It doesn’t seem to work," observed Ian 
Harnett, an economist tor SodHb Gbnbralc 
Strauss Turnbull in London. The fall of the 
lira and the krona accelerated after the inter- 
est rate rises. 

Most economists said interest rates else- 
where in Europe will not be affected by the 
moves. They insisted that the messy mix of 
weak currencies, political instability, and in- 
flationary pressures faced by Sweden and 
Italy were unique. 

Unfortunately for Europe's policymakers, 
that view is not shared by the bond markets. 
Long-term interest rates were driven sharply 
higher last week by investors fretting that the 
example set by Sweden and Italy could prove 
irresistible to other countries eager to do the 
right thing and quash inflationary pressures. 

The fear gripping the markets is that a 
string of surprisingly strong growth figures 
posted fry many European countries in recent 
days will soon force central bankers to apply 
the monetary brakes. In the eyes of many 
investors, last week's moves by Stockholm 
and Rome only served to shorten the wait 

“The markets are factoring in very strong 
recoveries in Europe,” said Gerard Lyons, 
chief economist at DKB International. While 
such strong economic rebounds would be 
good for what a3s Europe — namely, high 


unemployment — investors are betting that it 
would also bring back inflation, 

Late Last month, most analysts were still 
looking forward to Germany’s next rate cut, 
possibly coming; as early as this week. But 
now, with recent data showing German un- 
employment holding steady, and industrial 
production and capital spending surprisingly 
strong, those bullish forecasts have been 
chucked out the window. 

“We changed our view a week ago.” said 
Giinther Thumann, senior economist at Salo- 
mon Brothers in Frankfurt. Mr. Thumaxm 
now sees German interest rates on hold this 
year and headed up in 1995, in spite of his 
predictions for steadily falling inflation 
throughout the period. 

While that shift now mirrors the consensus 
among analysts, investors see even that as still 
far too optimistic. Futures prices for short- 
term German interest rates indicate the mar- 
ket now expects German rates to begin a slow 
rise later this year and accelerate their climb 
next year. The moves by Sweden and Italy 
have fed the market's fears. 

One thing investors and analysts do agree 
on is that governments r emain loath this early 
in the economic cycle to risk endangering the 
upturn by jacking up the cost of borrowing. 
“With unemployment rates dose to 13 per- 
cent, the French do not want to raise interest 
rates,” said James Mitchell, an economist at 
Deutsche Bank in London. It is a problem 
and a reluctance widespread on the Conti- 
nent 

Economists said they expected Europe's 

See RATES, Page 10 


AT&T Signg 
$4 Billion Deal 
With Saudis 


Canadian Insurer Shut Down 


The Assodmed Press 

TORONTO — Federal regu- 
lators have seized control of one 
of Canada's largest and oldest 
insurers, saying it had insuffi- 
cient assets to protect policy- 
holders and creditors. 

The seizure followed failed 
attempts to find financial back- 
ing from other Canadian and 
U.S. insurers for Confederation 
Life Insurance Co., which post- 
ed aloss of $21 million last year 
after investing heavily in com- 
mercial real estate. Tee compa- 
ny is owned by its policyholders 
and has operations in Canada, 
the United States and Britain. 


High-Tech Tackles 
High Altitudes 


MALL] 

BUSINESS 




<ggrsL^_. 3 SS S S SS i mr <-5S 1** uw 

PMHis»rta jjhs taas mwhw was .«■« 

P** g* nWf * HS, un* 


By James Hansen 

Special to the Herald Tribune 

. COURMAYEUR, Italy — 
Mountain climbing is a child of 
the industrial revoluticmu 

But most of the higb-end 
tools of Alpine climbing — 
crampons, ice axes and the ice 
and rock pitons they are used 
with — are still made by hand 
at small, 
highly spe- 
cialized 
firms using 
state-of-the- 
art forging 
technianes 
and sophisti- 
cated alloys. 

There are only about ten of 
these little companies in the 
world, many founded by former 
climbers. The oldest of them is 
I talian . Grivel Mont Blanc has 
been building climbing equip- 
ment since 1818. 

The company makes just two 
products: ice axes and cram- 
pons — sets of spikes buckled 
onto climbing boots to provide 
traction cm glaciers and other 
icy mountain surfaces. 

Last year, Grivel Mont 
Blanc's staff of 15 made 18,000 
ice axes and about 20,000 pairs 
of crampons. They are big fish 
in a small, but growing pond. 

Gioachino Gobbi, who owns 
the company, said it had reve- 
nue of about 3 billion Hre ($2 
million) last year. He estimated 
that Grivd has as much as 25 
percent of the world market in 
climb ing irons. 

Roughly 1,000 shops around 
the globe supply the company’s 
highly specialized products to 
climbers who bet their life on 
every pi ton and are inclined to 
seek the best, even if it most 
come from a tiny town of about 
4,000 tucked in the Italian Alps. 

“Courmayeur is an absurd 
place to try to manufacture 
anything." Mr. Gobbi said. The 
winding mountain roads that 
reach the village are a challenge 
even in summer, “and when the 
trucks come to deliver the 20- 
ton lots of steel we use, some 
law of nature requires we have a 
meter and a half of fresh snow. 1 ’ 

Still, the commercial advan- 
tage of sitting at the foot of 
Mont Blanc may outweigh the 
practical drawbacks. “Very few 
sports have a recognized Mec- 
ca,” Mr. Gobbi said. “Mont 
Blanc is where sport climbing 
was invented.” 

Bored with running a sporting 
goods store, Mr. Gobbi bought 
me co mp any from Che Grivel 
family in 1982. Though Grivel 
ice axes and crampons equipped 


The company's collapse is one 
of the largest insurance compa- 
ny failures in North America. 

Federal regulators took con- 
trol of the 123-year-old Toron- 
to-based company and asked 
that it be liquidated. The com- 
pany’s offices will remain open 
tor business while buyers are 
sought for its policies and other 
assets, but customers wiD not be 
able to buy new policies or cash 
in existing ones. 

In Lansing Michigan. Insur- 
ance Commissioner David Dyk- 
house said he had asked a court to 
keep Confederation from trans- 
ferring about $8 billion in US 


policyholders' money from its 
American brandies to Canada. 

Michigan is considered the 
"port of entry" for Confedera- 
tion's operations in the United 
States. 

Canadian policyholders are 
partially protected through 
CompCorp., an industry- 
backed compensation fund. 

The seizure also shut down 
Confederation Trust, a subsid- 
iary of Confederation Life that 
operates like a bank. Deposi- 
tors there are protected — up to 
a limit — by the Canada Depos- 
it Insurance Corp„ which in- 
sures bank and trust deposits. 


GwfKtof by Our Stuff From Dispatches 

RIYADH, Saudi Arabia — 
AT&T Carp, signed a $4 billion 
contract — the biggest in tele- 
communications history outside 
the United States — 16 expand 
and modernize Saudi Arabia's 
communications network. 

Under the contract with the 
Ministry of Posts. Telegraphs 
and Telecommunications of 
Saudi Arabia. AT&T will sup- 
ply 1.5 million digital phone 
lines, digital switching, fiber- 
optic lines, wireless products 
and training projects to up- 
grade the Middle East country's 
phone system. 

Known as the Telephone Ex- 
pansion Prqject-6. it is expected 
to be completed by the begin- 
ning of the next decade. It will 
double the capacity of Saudi 
Arabia’s existing facilities, pro- 
viding new local, toll and inter- 
national services. 

The contract, awarded in 
May, came after strong lobby- 
ing by Lhe U.S. government. 

AT&T competed for the con- 
tract against the world's other 
leading makers of telecom- 
munications equipment, in- 
cluding Northern Telecom Ltd. 
of Canada, LM Ericsson AB of 
Sweden, NEC Corp. of Japan, 
Alcatel NV of France and Sie- 
mens AG of Germany. 

Dr. Alawi Darwish Kayyal, 
the minis ter of posts, telegraphs 
and telecommunications, and 


AT&T Chairman Robert E Al- 
len signed the contract, in cere- 
monies on Saturday in Riyadh. 

“We envision much more 
than the installation of a king- 
dom-wide network, " Mr. Allen 
said. “This project and related 
objectives offer substantial eco- 
nomic growth potential to this 
burgeoning region, and AT&T 
promises its full support as a 
committed partner to this ef- 
fort." 

AT&T said it also signed an 
agreement, outlining the tele- 
communication giant’s plans to 
assist Saudi Arabia to develop its 
own telecommunications indus- 
try, primarily by establishing lo- 
cal engineering and manufactur- 
ing partnerships. 

AT&T said partnership dis- 
cussions are under way with 
three Saudi companies: Ad- 
vanced Electronics Co„ to man- 
ufacture electronic circuit packs 
and serve as a production center 
in the Middle East; Internation- 
al Systems Engineering, to pro- 
vide' network management and 
software-related sendees; and 
Saudi Cable Co_ 10 engineer, 
• manufacture and make copper 
and optical fiber apparatus. 

AT&T and its Saudi partner 
A.S. Bugshan & Bros, signed a 
separate contract to provide a 
wireless network based on the 
global mobile communications 
standard. 


BeU Atlantic Plans Cutbacks 


Bloomberg Business News 

PHILADELPHIA — Beil 
Atlantic Corp. plans to an- 
nounce on Tuesday a series of 
aggressive cost cuts, office dos- 
ings, job eliminations and ac- 
counting changes. 

The moves, disclosed in an 
internal memo, continue BeU 
Atlantic's efforts to slash its 


costs, which already are among 
the lowest in the industry. 

The announcement comes as 
Bell Atlantic is bracing for in- 
creased competition in the local 
telephone market while it si- 
multaneously seeks to offer ca- 
ble television services. The 
memo cites competition as the 
driving force behind the 
changes. 


the first dimbers to reach the top 
of the world’s three highest 
mountains — Everest, K2 and 
Kanchenjunga — the company 
had fallen on hard times. 

“My friends and family 
thought I had gone mad — ana 
I suppose they were right,” Mr. 
Gobbi said. u It's hard to think 
of a less promising market. 
There are just not very many 
people in toe world who climb 
mountains — and there proba- 
bly never wfll be, because you 
can die doing it and most peo- 
ple don’t like fatal risk.” 

He said the key to the compa- 
ny’s survival was developing a 
distribution network. “The only 
way to do that was to allow our 
distributors to make more mon- 
ey than we do out of this busi- 
ness.” 

The worldwide market for 
dhnbing irons probably is wonh 
about $30 million annually, be 
estimated. “The niche we’re in is 
so small it's not worth the trou- 
ble to big competitors.” 

The specialized process and 
expertise required to make each 
implement also helps keep large 
competitors away, he said. 

“The working parts of our 
products are all forged from a 
chrome-molybdenum-steel al- 
loy made specially for us in 
Germany ” he said. The alloy is 
similar to that used to make 
field artillery pieces. 

There is a tiny, barely visible 
nick on the bead of each ice axe 
that leaves the Grivel factory. 
That’s left by the diamond 
point of a hardness tester. “We 
test each single piece because 
somebody’s Hfe will depend on 
it," Mr. Gobbi said. “Though 
we’re very small, we have the 
same requirements as the aero- 
nautics industry. The only ac- 
ceptable failure rate is zero.” 

GriveFs biggest markets are 
Western Europe and North 
America, bat the fastest growth 
is in Asia. 

The company also is expect- 
ing great things from Eastern 
Europe, in part because climb- 
ing is a relatively inexpensive 
sport. “You don’t even have ho- 
ld bills when you’re on the 
mountain,” Mr. Gobbi said, 
adding that fully outfitting a 
climber with the best equip- 
ment costs less than compara- 
ble equipment for a skier, “and 
there’s no lift ticket.” 

Grivel expects sales to peak 
ai about 5 billion lire. “After 
that, there's no point in being 
any bigger. The marginal cost 
of gaming more market share 
would wipe out profits.” 


STATE HOLDING COMPANY 


PUBLIC ANNOUNCEMENT 

Banque INDOSUEZ Hungary Ltd., as advisor, acting on behalf of the State 
Holding Company, is launching a two round open tender for the sale of a 
portion of the state-owned shares and is offering for subscription newly 

issued shares of the 


Hunaarocamion International Road Transport Company Limited 


The capital structure of the Company as of 31st December 1993 Is: (HUF thousand) 

registered capital: 5,230,000 

capital reserves: 4,1 1 5,453 

retained earnings: 17,530 

balance sheet profit: -5 1 6.558 

The ownership structure of the company is: 

State Holding Company: 96.61% 

Municipalities 3.39% 

According to the Law UII/1992 of Hungary 25% + 1 vote has to remain permanently in the 

possession of the State Holding Company. 

Shares on offer: 

■ equity shares, each of HUF 10.000 face value totalling HUF 2,615,010.000 and representing a 
50% + 1 voting ownership. 

■ Offers which do not cover the whole block of 50% + 1 shares will not be accepted. 

■ Newly issued shares. 

The State Holding Company will give preference to investors who are prepared to subscribe for 

at least HUF 1.5 billion of additional capital. 


State Holding Company 


Banque Indosuez Hungary Name: Mr. istvbn Salg6, Mr. Olivier Giunti 

Telephone: (361 ) 266 54 56 - 266 83 83 - 266 80 90 

Fax: (361)266-5231 

State Holding Company Name: Peter Badonfai 

Telephone: (361) 267-6600 

Fax: (361)267-6673 

and Benedek Belecz 

Telephone: (36 1 ) 267 6600 

Please note that an information memorandum and tender documents will only be made 
available against lhe payment of S500 and signature to a confidentiality letter. 

This document does not constitute or form on offer to sell or soBcitation of ony offer to purchase any securities and fe 
not for distribution in the United States. The otter will be made by way of invitation to tender only and no circulation of 
any prospectus or tender will be made in the United Kingdom. The tender documents ate not available to private 
exstomers or to any in dividual who b not a professional Investor or a representative of a corporate entity. 



crsTTf ift c*{ 








' _ > 


*age8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, AUGUST 15, 1994 


Friday. Aug. 12. 


Close of trading Friday, 


GfPNaiiw WUr IGrottoim WUy 
M Nome Lost CJigoi Fa Nome Lost chge 


AAtMutuofc 
BMp 9X0 
CoGre 1447 + .14 I 

MunBd n lQJS —Ml 

SajOfilK 9.23 +xst 

BaS&Bn 1471 >315 
CopGrn 31.73 -J6 
GMeMn 1404 
GAvlncn H97 
HQBdn 1114 -.01 
TiFBan 17.18 — -JJ9 
AST Funds 
Emerge 1142 -Jl 
H.HI 1814-03 
R. TF 1074 — .03 
Gwftilnp 1072 '.11 
ytaincp 11^4 — JJ2 
AF LaCan n 9.97 +39 
AHA Funds 
Baton n 11.92 ~04 
Full 9 JO —At 
Urn 1009 —in 
AIM Fundi: 

AcjGv p 9X0 — jtn 
24.94 >J0 
I5J8 >.10 


AgrsvD 

BaiAp 

Chart o 
Consflp 

GOSCP 

GrffiBI 

Gritip 


H_YkiAp 


HYldBl 

incoD 

ume p 

UnMp 

MuBp 

5ummT 

TeCTp 

TFlnt 

UKIp 

UfflBI 

vaoBr 

Vatwp 


1836 -09 
080 -06 
1889 >49 
9X2 — ill 
1042 >78 

><wg --s 

9X8 — 313 
978 — j02 

im —03 

1377 —.10 
9.93 
8.10 —03 
9JI >71 
iox4 — in 
104? —02 
13X1 — .03 
1151 — j» 
2177 .76 
217- >77 




AttMtg 973 
IrnMtg n 9X2 —01 


InflLian 1032 — il! 
MtgSocn 1040 —01 
ARK Funds 


CnpGrn "9.96 >.18 
Grincan 


nun -79 

Income 954 
ASM Fan 9X9 + M 
A VEST A: 

Boianced 1707 *06 
EaGro 1879 ..13 
Ealncom 1872 ..10 
income 1580 —02 
Accessor Funds 
IntFxIn n 11X4—01 
AccMortgUXB 
ShtlntFx 1178 
Aairnlnx 14.18 — .10 
AcmFdx 1372 - 01 
AdsnCap 2072 >.13 
AdvCBaip 10.11 .10 
AduCRetP 9J8 >02 
Advesf Adwwfr 
Govt np 8.99 * .01 
Gwltinp 16J5 -.16 
HYBdP 86B-JM 
tneonp 1274 - 02 
MuGdNal 979 —04 
Spdnp 19X8 .09 
Strallnc 1203 
Aetna Advisor? 

Aetna! 1052 +05 
Band! 974—01 
GnncomtlO® +.06 
imtGrl 11X3— .11 
TaxFree 970 —03 
Aetna Sete* 

Aetna n 10J4 .04 
AsianGrn S.«9 —Of 
Bond n 975 
Govt 9xl 
Growth 10X9 -.15 
Grwinco 1009 +.07 
irmaro 11x5 —11 
SrnCoGf 1001 


AJur Funds: 

Growth t I«X9 -02 


incGrr 1177 -71 
MidCpGr tl 1.44 -77 
SmCaor 20X2 - X2 
ABanceCm 
Afianoep 471 -M 


Baton p* 1371 -02 
BdortB t 


14.05 -08 


GvTibd 

GvTICp 

Grtncp 

Grincp 


ExdlFd 113.93 -1.44 
FdMgAo 1207 
FMaan 1208 
Gt&Ap 1IXI -01 
GlEdSDn 1170 — 02 
GlEaCnp 1100 —02 
GfGvAn 8.13 —04 
GIGvBan 8.14—07 
®GvCo Ml -07 
GWkIAd 9X7 -04 
GHWdoB np9.47 —04 
OMgbCni>9X8 —04 
GvSrtp 9JJI -01 
GvScfin g.93 
GvScCp 9.91 —01 
GvTg97p 1111 
GvTIAd 877 —01 
B77 —01 
827 —01 
12X8 *09 
12X8 .08 
HorbAp 1198 +.04 
KartjBp am +04 
HiYMIrrv A pS.17 —01 
HiYWBp 4.18 —01 
MuBAb 9.94 —02 
MunBBp 9.94—03 
Pace Ac 1172 +.12 
PoceB p 1173 +.12 
RoEstAp 974 -.03 
ReEstBp 974 —02 
ReGstCp 974 —02 
TQ-CYApHLSQ —03 
TEHP7B pi 079 —03 
Tax ExIA pi 105 — 03 
TxEIBp 1105 —02 
TXMSAo 974 — Ol 
UlilAP 8X3 
UtilBD 8X3 
American Funds 
AmBolpx 12.15 —04 
Antes D 12.19 +74 
AmMutl P2175 +.14 
BandFdp 13.19 —02 
CadnBI p 3272 +.10 
QjnWMp 15.12 —72 
CapWGr 18.16 —07 
EUPOCD 22.14 —73 
Fdtnvp HUB 
Govt p 1113 —02 
GwthFd p 26.79 +J0 
HI Trst p 1400 —04 
IncoFdp 1X64 * 05 
IntBdo 1371 —01 
InvCoAp 1878 +.14 
LlrfTEBd 1401 —03 


NwECdri P1485 +g 


MewPer p 1544 ... 

SmCuW p 22.94 +72 
TaxExMpll 57 —04 
TxExCApl571 —05 
T<ExMOpl407— 07 
TxExVApl574 — .05 
WstiMuf pl704 +7) 
AmGwtti 9® +04 

iob 

AmerSntt Funds 
Growth 478 +07 
Income 21XS +.19 
Trifle* 15X4 >.17 
APIGrpnf 1275 +.11 
Ant Perf or m . __ 

Bond 971 
Eauitv 11-53 +07 
IntBd 1070 >01 
tnfmTxF 1073 —03 
AmUttFd n 2078 —07 
AmwvMut 770 +07 
AnairtShTGv972 +OI 
Analytic <1 72 m +04 
AnchCao 19.99 +77 
AlttttmGr nplOTS +.12 
Aqtrila Funds 
AZ TF 1073 —04 
CO TF 10.1 B —03 
HI TF 11.14 —03 
KY TF 1073 -.03 
NrgnsJTF 9 JO —04 
OR TF 1072-03 
TuFUT 9X0 —02 
AtenasFund: 

Balance n 9X1 * 04 
Eqlncrt 9X7 +09 
Frincn 9J1 
Arch Funds 
Bat 901 +05 
EmGrttl 11-51 -.14 
GauCotp 9.90 —02 
Grolnc 1X94 +.14 
MoTF 11 07 —03 
US Gov 1072 —01 
AmtsJttB n 874 -.U 
AttanlaGrp 10.94 +07 


, ntaGrp 1 

BondAP 1X79 - 07 Alta Foods 
‘ vlnv 1079 —.01 CAInsA 9.97 —02 
dBP 1278 -061 CaMunlA 10O1 — 04 
1X78 -06 1 GvtSecA 9X5 +.01 
. 1770 +74 GroIncA 1172 +OI 

HDGtflBp 878 -73 NaMurKA 10X1 —05 
1179 + .16 BB&T Funds 
7X3 -.OJ BofTrn 9X8 -04 


UWIJH. +u 

GwfltFp 24 
GwthBt 20 
GrincSP 2 
GffnvB 


GrolncTnllTS +.10 


7X3 —01 
7X3 —01 
X31 >01 

70.58 +.17 
2470 +71 

20.58 +.18 
270 + 01 

IIJ5 -03 

1/tOOBldC 9.83 +03 
inMAp _ 

ImMuB 9.52 

irtsMCp 9JQ _ . __ 

IntIA p 1X72 —10 BFMShOu n 972 — Ol 
InttB 1871 —.11 BJBGIAa lioa— 14 
MrtgAD 8X1 . BJBJEaAp 1176 — 17 

MrtoBp 8X0-OU8NY 


ItUGovTn 
NOltfTBn 9X5 
SIGaYTn 9X9 
BEA Funds 
EMkEf 23X4 >70 
inNEq 2071 *03 
Mu nffld 74.97 — M 
ShttXirOl n4.94 


MrlgCp 8X0—01 Ea Inert 10X7 
MtgTrAp 9X3 — 01 IntGovt 976 
MJpTBP 9X3—02. NYTEn 9.92 
MtoTrCP 9X3— 02 


-04 




.. .tin 1 

ns? 

MCAAP 9. 89 — 04 
MuCABp 9X« -.041 
AViCACp 9X9 —04 
MuFLCp 9.01 —05 
ICATA 1X49 — 


AAullCAB 1X49 
MINBp 9X7 
MuOHCp 974 


MuNJBp 973 —04 
MuNJCP 973 —04 


_ ;p 973 

IWNTYA 974 


-04 

MuNYBp 974 —05 
MuNYCP 974 —04 
NMuA p 9X7 —.04 
NtIMllCP 9X7 —04 
NEurAp 1X75— .18 
NEurBn 1X50—18 
NAGvA 8X8 — 10 
NAGvBP 8X9 —.10 
NAGvC 8X8 — .10 
PrGrthA pll.70 -1B 
PrGrthBpUXO -.18 
QusrAp ?1X? -43 
ST /Ala D 8.70 —08 
STMIbl 8.70 —08 
TectiP 26.W+174 
Wldlncp 1X8 
WMPMvBpiOJl _ 
Amsoulti Funds 
BalancexllXl +06 
80 ad* 10.4a — MS 
Eauitv x 14.92 +.14 
Gvtln v 978 —05 
UdMtS , 10.15 —.04 
ReaEqc 14X8 +07 
Amanalnc 1274 —03 
•■Fids 
9JB -.08 

9J4 -Ol 

EstCoGr nlSXB >75 
Growth n 1X78 +71 
11.91 


Bataan Group: 

iSSIfn" 1%-*'. 

Enterpjn 16X5 -OB 
EntTpn 1474 + 01 

sr n 

TaxFrLn 877 —04 
UMBBn KL77 
' Hrf n 977 +.02 


GrpHnme WUv 
FdNome Last Chge 


NYMunn Ull 09 

IntlValn 1702- 
Berwyn Rj ni7.94 • 
Berwvnincnlljfi+jB 

Bdand 10.13 

Eqaay »X4 
Eplntex 1044 • 
Fixed me 976—01 
QuqntEc 9.91 +.11 
STRjtlnc 970 +.01 
SCMufil 10X8 -04 
BtaKtard Funds 
AmerEqn 9x4 +.14 


GtCrnp KUO —03 
PrcMnt 870 —11 
ST Gin 1-76 —.01 
sTBondn Ml 
BdEndow 14X1 +02 
Brinson Funds 
Bri«n<5t» 10-40 —01 
BrfnsGIBf 9J6 — 08 
NUS©*Y 9X9 —07 
Bmdriwn n 24X3 *73 
BmdvwBI 14.41 
Bruce n 97.58 —01 
Brond^tn 1072—01 
BunafwGp: 

Gtolnc np 874 —02 
GcJdlnv npl6J37 —.10 
GovtSec nnUXl —03 
Mulncp 15X2—08 
QuatGttip 13J9 +.15 
SpEaP 18X4 —05 
USOvsnp 872—03 
Burnham p 20X7 +71 
C&SRItvn 3X17 —17 
CGMFUldS 
AmerTF 975—02 
CopDevn 24X4 +XB 
Fxdlncn 1075 —.10 
MuH n 26.91 + 04 
Reattyn 9X7 
Calmosp 1276 +04 


CXOAogGr92.il — 09 
CATFin 1X16 


_ . . —03 

CoBomto Trust; 
Crilncn 1X04 —.08 
Corns n 1073 —01 
SXPSOOn 11X5 +.13 
S&PMid UXO +.19 
CaivartGrouie 
Ariel 27.95 +.10 
ArieiAc 21X1 -.15 


1872 
16.10 —01 
10.16 —02 
10X7 —02 
28.92 +.19 
15X0 —02 
20X1 +70 


15X4 —04 


GIObEq 
Ineo 
MBCAI 
Mutlnt 
Social P 
Socfld 
5aCEn 

TxFLTdn 10x7 
T<R.ng 1470 
T*FVT ' _ 

USGov 1199 —Ol 
ComSridge Fds 
CopGtA 14X3 +73 
GvInA 1X91 
GwthA 14X4 +70 
IncGcA 1131 —02 
AAutncA 1A59 —M 
CcvCrB 1 14J5 +72 
GvinBt 1X92 
CwfhBf 1472 +J0 
IrtcGrBt 1571 -03 
Mu incBt 1461 — 06 
Cap64fcldxnllo5 +.13 
mif4eDo Rusttmore: 
EntgGrn 1073 +.18 
Grwtti 11 57 +.19 
8X4 -OS 


-.11 


...... sw 1 

Gvflnc 4X2 
MedRs 17X5 +53 
M3and 7079 -.13 
MJCT>an 873 +.02 
US Trend 12X1 >.14 
(Mnd FuniOy: 
AggGffi Px< +72 
Balanced 9.91 +03 
Fund 12X2 -05 
GovtOWto 8.05 
CorUCa 1X97 +.03 
CamanOHTE 9X7 —01 
Centura Funds 
EoGrwCn 9.46 -05 
FedSIrtCn 9.96 
NCTFn 9.94 — 02 
CentumGP 8XS +06 
CnlrySItrn 2374 - 73 
OtCmBC 13X6 +.04 
OtSfirth 1X93 +53 
CHestnt 144.61+1X3 
OricMIlwrn 144.45 +.14 
OtufabGrin 16X0 -.13 
Chubb TR 14X6 >08 
Oippern 49x5 +.43 
Cotoniat Funds 
Cc4TE A 7.04—01 


ConTE A 774 


FedSec 10^3 — Ol 


71 TEA 773 —.03 
FurtdA 507+04 
GlbEqA 12X8 —03 
GrwttiAp 13J7 -71 
HiYIdA 452 -02 
Income A p4.l4 —02 
IntGrA 10J0 —12 
757 —Ol 

4 xi —or 
4.99 -01 


MATxA 
Ml TEA 
MNTEA 




OttTE A 
SmSlkp 
SUlIncA 


12X5 -09 



JPP 1909 -J8 

Dev p 2233 +71 

BT: 

ImtAstM n9Xl >05 
InstEdlx nlOX2 -.1 
IrtvInTTFri 10.02 


ImBondn 9M -01 
InltStXn 1309 —.15 


SmC oGr nl X97 +72 
Ambassador lav: 

Band n 976 —01 

EstCoGr n 1 5.67 +75 
Grwtti n 1X24 -71 
IncaBdn 1 CLO 1 
IntBondn 9.40 +.01 
IntGIVn 1106 —.16 
MITFBdn 973 —02 
SmCuCr m?.96 +73 
TFBdn 1005 —03 
TFIntBdnl0.16 — 02 
Ambassador Ret A: 
Band t 974 —01 
EstCoGr 1SX6 +75 
Grwtti 1X26 +71 
IrtBond 9X0 + 01 
InttSffc 1306 —16 


omCoGT 1276 +73 
TFlnt Bd I 10.16 —02 


Amcore Vintage: 
Eaaitv 10X7 +.12 
Frlnco 9.70 -Ol 
IntdlTF 9X1 — Ol 
Amer AAdvunt insH 
Baton n 1275 +.08 
Grlncon 1404 -.13 
IntiEotv n 1X67 —09 
LWTrmn 974 _ xi 


American Aadvant AMR STTreasn 975 — Ol 


Batanced 1275 
Gwlnc 14.04 -.13 
InflEa 1247 — JJ9 
Limil Tm 97J -01 
AmerCapttot 
CirtSTAp 15X7 -.13 
CrrtsiBp 15X7 +.13 
CpBdBo 6X2 -01 
CoroBdAp6Xl -01 
EmGrCp 2197 -X9 
EGA o 2119 +.57 
EmGrBp 22.70 +X9 
EntAn 11.90 -70 
ErdBp 11X0 -.19 
EitfC P 11X4 +.19 
EatYlncA P5.41 +03 
EqlncBt 5X0-03 
EqlncC P 5X0 -03 


InstEalx nlO-62 -.12 
lmlntTFnlO.02 —03 
InvEpApp n972 +.19 
InvIniEq nl409 —.10 
IrwLGvt n 976 — Ol 
Invlltil n 9X6 —06 
InvEoUn 1D.56 +.11 
B aronAst n 2,1.1 0 +.12 
Barnett Funds: 
BOSCVfn 75L50 +.12 
Fixedl n 975 —03 
3tlTmBd n9X2 —03 
VI Inti 1X78—15 
BascomBal 2274 +.15 
THeidsiratt 
Yield 978 
_.ndn 9X3 —01 
Equity 10X8 >.14 
BavFunds Invest: 
STYieldn 978 
Bond n 9X3—01 
Equity n 10X8 +.13 
BeocHlIl 28.1 B +75 
BSEmgObt B70 J +.04 
D en eh mot* Funds 
Balanced n 9X9 +09 
BorOAn 1BOO +.02 
DM>An 1070 +.13 
EqldxA n 10X4 +.12 
FocGrAnia02 +.13 
IntlBdAn 2018 —18 
IrtlKSTAn 1071 —10 
St® urn laoo 
SIBdAn 19.82 +03 
SmCOtA 10.93 +.13 
USGvAn 19X0 +02 
USTIOxA 01974 
Benlum Group: 
AtfiGovn 9X8 —.02 
CaTFJrt 1000 —02 
CoFRnn 9X3 —01 


CaTFSn 10.10 —01 
CdTFHn 8.97 —04 


Q4TF1. n 1079 —05 
EaGro n 11.98 +.11 
EurBdn 10X6—11 
GNMAn 10.18 
Gddinn 1175 —05 
IrcGron 1475 -.12 
LTreas n 8.98 — 04 
NITFln 1055—03 
NITFUrt 1170 —04 


Tor 1995 n 94X7 +.11 
TartOOO it 67 J9 —03 
Tor20Q5n 4M5 
TartOiDn 32X5 —73 
Tor2015n 2408 -71 
TarSHOn 14X4 —73 
TNolen lOJi 
UHHncon 9X6 


Berger Group: 
loopn 1504 


74 

MM Prt 1178 +06 
SrrtCOGf X46 +07 
Bernstein Fds 
GvShDunll40 
ShIDurn 1278 — Ol 
IntDurn 1272 —.01 
CaMun 1118 —03 


DtvMunn 1309 


4X8 ^ 

709 —01 
17 JO +70 

473 —04 

TxExA p 1304 —04 
TxIrtsAp 7.96—02 
USGrA 11X3 -.19 
USGvA 4X0 
UttlAD 1X09 —10 
CATEBI 704 —01 
CTTEBI 736 —02 
FedScB I 1QJ3 —Ol 
FLTxBt 773 —JO 
FundB 1 8.06 + JO 

GBtEaB 12X5-02 
Gwttfit 1371 +70 
HYMuBt 9.77 —.02 
HYSecBI 452 —02 


Grp Name WUy 
FdNome Lari Ogc 


. AiSn 9.9? -J>1 
FdSTn 958 —01 
Trust: 

ApvEan 1074 +.19 
Eqtyi rtca n 9.99 +.14 
GaviSecn 9X2 —01 
OG Investor: 

EqtOty 10X1 +12 
Govtinca 9X5 
LTGcvt 9X7 +OI 
Muni Inc 1004 —05 
Dean Witten 
AmVnI t 2102 +79 
QdTxFrl 1X39 -JW 
CoPGrat 1173 +09 
Convtt 1053 


Dlvlnl 

SB)' 

GStOivI 


Himsct 

WYW 

MuA2t 

Intmdt 

UdMuni 

MuCAt 

MUFL f 

MUNJ! 

MUOHP 

MuhPAt 


Strati 

Ten Ex 

USGvtl 

UtBn 

vdAdt 

WWlnc 


DvGttlt 1474 >74 

_ 3075 +.18 

9J4 —or 
1X97 —07 
X73 -.04 
.. 1154 tOl 

liar 10.14 -.02 

858 -02 
9XB +77 
7.00 -03 

1006 —05 
9.46 —02 
956 -02 

1007 -04 
1079— 04 
10.15 —.06 
1X15 —O* 

. 1071 -05 

NYTxFI 1176—04 
NtRst 11X5 — ra 
PacGrl 21.08 +07 
PrcMt 1055 -06 
Promferp 8X2+01 
SeiMuo I1X7—OJ 
Managed 110X4 + .03 
ST Bd 955 — 01 
ST US P 9X4 
~ 14X8 >10 

11X4 -05 
8X4 —02 
1300 —06 
2008 +.18 

854 -01 

WldWdt 1886—06 
TCBalp 9X3 >01 
TCCort 11.92 +08 
TCIncp 1004-01 
TCLatl 12X4 +09 
TCNortp 970 — Ol 
TCSCnt 8X6 +.12 

DeiGrptarit 

□eel I 16X2 +05 
D«wrl 18.00 +03 
Died 3474 +75 
Diehl 6X1 —02 
TsvRsJ 977 —01 
DefcnrareGraup: 
Trend P 11X2 +.14 
value p 19X9 —03 
Deicapp 2473 >75 
Dean p 14X1 +05 
DecTRp 1270 +.07 
Dei aw p 1778 -03 
InttEqp 1270— .11 
DetehAp 4X1 — 02 
USGovtP 7.91 -02 
TreasA p 977 —01 
TxUSAP 1201 —02 
TxInsAp 10.98 —01 
TxIntAp 1076 — Ot 
TrPnAp 828 —02 
DeFPoded Trust: 
DetEq 1302 +08 
Gtatnx 9.66 —OS 
fntlEq 1308 —.10 

nirllhni nillll r~ its 
unnQianficn rus 

InMVal n 1054 —.06 
USLrg 1190 >.15 
USSrrt 875 + 03 
US 6-10 ri 1177 +.11 
JODann 28X8 +02 
UK n 24.40 +74 
Coitln 1574 —13 
DEAR IE-4 1858 +03 
Fixd nx 100.97 —72 
Gffid 98.12 —72 
Gavin 100X4 +06 
IrttGv 106-W —01 
InrtHBM 1204 -06 
LCadnt 12X3 -08 
PacRIm 17X5 -79 
USLgVal 10X2 >0! 
USSmVd 1154 +04 


Incomes 0.14 — .02 
IntGrB 10X4 —13 
MAJxB t 7 57 — Ol 


Na1Res8HX63 —09 
NYTxBl 6.88—02 


OH TxB 1 709 —01 
SmlStkB 1708 +79 


itVB _ 

StrttnBl 473 —06 
T*ExB t 1104—04 
TEIrtsB I 7.96 —02 
USGrBt 1175 +.18 

asf' —.10 

CMundda Funds 
Batancen 17X4 +05 
ComSthn 15X5 +07 


Rxedn 
Govt 
Gritin 
InHSIkn 
Muni rt 


1253 —01 
814 

11X9 —03 

ReEEqn 1151 >08 
SpecJn 1974 >70 
Common Sense: 

Govt 1071 —01 
Grolnc 15X5 +.18 
Growth 1104 +.17 
MunB 1375 —03 
Compass Conte 
Eqtvlnco 1199 +03 
Fxdln 10.10 —02 
Growth 10.94 >06 
IWtEq 1471 —.12 


InflH 

MunBd 

NjMun 

Shrttnl 


1077 —II 
1077 —02 
10X8 -02 
1070 + 01 


P UX2 +08 
GwthA p 1250 +.11 
InFflAp 857 —01 
NW SOAP 14X2 +.17 
TxExAp 7X2 —04 
USGvA P 9.97—01 
Conestoga Funds 
Equity 14X9 +.14 

I nan 1QJK 

UUtwvat 1078 +01 
Conn Mutual: 

G avtfc 1008 —01 
Grwtti x 1503 —02 
incomes 9X3 
TotRefx 1x07 — 01 
CGCapMktFds 
EmoMkt n 8.72 +05 
IntrFxn 7X0 
IntfEq n 10X1 —16 
IntIFKR 8.18 —07 
LgGrwit 9X2 +.14 


LaVeln 970 
MtgBkdn 7X7 +OI 


Muni n BOO —03 
SmGrwn 11X3 +X7 
SmValn 872+07 
TtlRtnn 7X5 
Copley n 19X7 —10 
CorvPunds: 

BolonAn 1006 +.05 
2175 +72 
903 —13 
9 AS +.14 
9X4 

fnttGrAn U87 —09 
VolEqBpn 13.14 +.19 
CowenOpA 12X6 +.14 
CowentGrAll77 +.10 
CrabbeHasoK 
AslAB p 12.94 +02 
Equity P 1476 + 07 
ORMWIN1273 —JO 
_Spegaln 13X0 +76 
OestFiavls T rust 
Bondn 9X2 
51 Bd i» 9X4 
ScEqn 1DX8 +07 
Value n It 09 +08 
VAMu n 976 —02 


4473 -78 

fncamen 11.15 
Stock n 54.91 +59 
Domsodal 1278 -.19 
Dreman Funds 
Corrtm 1478 +76 
Hfttn 16X1 +77 

SmCpVcOnllTO +.15 
Dreyfus: 

A Bondn 13X1 —01 
Aprecnp 1455 +.17 
AssetAln1277 +08 
Baincd 1350 -.10 
CoJTx n 14X8—07 
Cailittn 1307 —03 
CTlntn 1296—02 
Dreyfus 1252 +09 
EdHtttd II JO —.13 
FL Inin 1304 —05 
GNMA rv 1479 +02 
GnCA 1306 -.07 
GMBd p 1454 —05 
GNYp 1958 — J7 
Grincn 14X5 +.13 
GwthOpnlQ73 +03 
InsMun npl7Xl —09 
In term n 1375—04 
rnterEq p 15X7 —06 
InvGNn 1459 
MAIntn 12X6 —03 
AAA Tax n 15X8 -09 
MunBd n 1271 —05 
NJ Inf n 1208—05 
*■' -04 


Gra Name Wktr 
Fd None Lari Oge 


AADTuFt 1818 — m 
NJTxFI 1074 —03 
AlYTxFt 10X5 —04 
NcMAAlint 9X1 —04 
jJCTxFl 9X9— « 
OHUOt 975 —03 
QMTxFl 1075 —04 
WTxFT I0LO1 —04 
PATxFt 1075 —J4 
RITxFI 979 —04 
STGbJt 830—09 
SCTxFt 9X7 -06 
mrrxFi 9.93 — x+ 
TJCTxFI 1811 -JH 
TotPtoK 855 —06 
VATxFI 1805 —01 
WVTxFt 978 —0* 
Eaton VTmdMoni*,, 
CNnaD 1508 +.13 


EVStk 
Growth p 
tncBosP 
ImSoP 
MunBd 
STTsvP 
' _ IP 


1213 -09 
7.71 -06 
802 — « 
1899 +79 
971 —X2 
54^ *-M 
7^1 +70 

1874—01 

Tradfnv »4X4 —M 
TrodTotl p 7.88 — W 
EdlpEan 1278 +74 
EcnpBri 1861 +.18 
Enwiatd Funds 
B4lnrin I8g +06 
EmEdt 1173 +.13 
Eulnstn 1178 +.14 
FLTxEA 1058 —04 
FLTxEI n 1058 —.05 
MgdBdl n 9.84 —02 
SmCapIn 9.44 +74 
USGov A 1803 
USGcvtn 1002 

BSff JMtB 



Gwthnp 

Grincp 

HYBdP 

InltGrp 

SmCo 

TElncP 


C — 1—> Funds ,, 

Evrvnn 1455 +.14 
Found n 1274 >09 
GtoRen 1376 + 08 
Grolnc n 15X2 +.14 
UdMidn 2844 +79 
AAunCA It 1807 — Ol 
MoniF n 1819 —Ol 
MuniNat n 9.91 — 04 
Retire n li.ll +04 
TotRtn 1872 +08 
ExcelMidas 355 — X* 
EacolsJor ttstt 
BotarKBd 7.18 >04 
EaGrawttt 776 +.12 
EOlndex 770 +OB 
Exlrrv+Sp 777 —.03 
FAMVoirt 2807 +.11 


BtChiot 1879 +.14 
Growth I 1293 
HiGrBdt 1801 — Ol 
HIYBdt 9.98 
AAanadl 1151 —02 
FF8 Lexicon: 

CopApp 1171 +08 
Fxdln 9.92 —Ol 
IrttGv 971 
SetVdue pi 1X5 +.10 
SmCoGr n 10.89 +06 
FFB Eq 1078 +.13 
FFBNJ 1850 —03 
FFTW Funds 
US Short 9.93 
WW Fxdln 9.40 -04 
WW ShTm 9.92 
FAAB Funds 
DivECp 1153 +.10 


Dive 1 

InIGCp 

IntGI 

MITFO 

MITFI 


1153 +.10 
9.92 
9.92 

1830 —02 
1830 —02 


FPA Funds 
Ccmit 19X5 >77 
Nervine 70X5 +.01 
Pa mint 1409 -05 
Peren 2150 +.19 
Fairmtn 24.60 +X3 
Fascionan 17X2 +.10 


Grp Nome WUy 
FdNcrrtfl Last age 


SS?r r HS :s 


r 


„.iri7. 

Elearr 1J72 >X4 

US& r r 

Enviror 1076 *.1J 



riEV 49 P » 

RegSnA 

RaaDr 

^Tr f 


AAedDrir 20x0 >59 
NatGasr 954 +02 
PnP*rr 19X4 >.15 
PrecMnTrl7X7 

r 1954 -.77 

*JO 

>J7 

_ . >1X2 

Teieeomr37.w +76 
Trans r 2159 +07 
Ut»r 3575 +.W 
Rd eBySpvton 

®S*S, n iK=S 

CTHYnr 1075 —04 
CAIntrm n 9X6 —03 
FL Mum 10X9 —04 
GNMAn 9J8 >02 
Govlnn 9.93 —02 
HioMn m 11X4 —06 
InWIun 979 —03 
InvGrBdn 9M —03 

LTCn 1053 
MO Mum 958 —3)5 

Munlnr 10O1 —m 
NJHYr 11X94 —03 
NYHYm 180 — ^ 
NY intern 9J0 — ^ 
PAHY m 182B —02 
Snttncn 9JH —.05 
SlnlGv n 9.5 
SnttnMun 9X1 — 01 
RduCapn 1871 +.15 
sewaustrart 
EuroEq 3875 
Pacfisn 40.04 
Sm Co 1179 +.12 
■na=si 10.14 -01 

RnBorGv t 1077 —01 
RnHorAAurlOJ2 —06 
Rrst Amer Fds A: 
AslAilP 10X1 -07 
Baton p 10X7 +315 
Equity P 16-54 —05 
EqldXP ]072 +.12 
FvdlnCP 1055 —01 
GavBdP ’07 - 

1 mine p ?X7 +01 
lldl p 1074 —03 
Lfdfnc 9.84 +0! 
AAtgSeCP 9X0 
MunBdP 10X0 - 

RedEqp 1270 + 73 
Stock P 1470 +.IS 
RrsT Amer Pds C 
AstAlln laxi +0| 
B<dancenlOX7 +3)5 
iql«n 10X9 +.12 
Fvdlncn 1054 —01 
GovBdn 9 .07 - 

inttnen 9.47 +01 
tnhmstn 1074 —04 
Ltd men 9X4 >01 
MtgSecn 9X0 - 

MunBd! n 1079 —01 
RegEql n 1219 +72 
SpecEq n 1454 —315 
SSfn 1449 +.14 
Rrri Amer Motw* 
DivrGrp 8X7 +3)4 
Banco p 9X8 >02 
Mongmcp9-S >01 
FstBceJG 9.19 +OI 
Fsteoglnr 15.15 +3)2 
FrstFdE 1077 >3)9 
FrstFdTot 9X1 -01 
PlHwMu 1073 —.03 
First ai ra store 
BIQltap 15X4 +.15 


ArmSSpn 9X3 
Arm in 9X3 
ExehFtfn 7220 


FtgriSn 

RTllsn 

FGROn 

FHYTn 

FITISn 

F1TS5P 


+ .Tt 


NJMunn 1300 

Rfmiroi 1U4 —05 
NY Tax n 14.94 —05 

ST^incpa 11X8 —01 


S!SSSr„ , ?^+^ 

U5T Int 1242 —02 
'Lng 1402-05 



—06 
—05 
—a 4 

401 —05 

5X7—08 

P M^-Ol 
Growth p 40X2 — X2 
Income p 1378 —05 
InvA 2003 +06 
InvBt 19X0 +05 
DuttPEhR nlOOO 
DuunwMuhx* 

IntGov n 973 
KYTFn 778 —02 
KYSMfn 5.19 
EBI Funds 
Equity P 6846 >.70 
Ffevp 5M8 +XJ 
Income p 4671 
Muflflxp 3975 +.10 
ESCSIrtnA 9X0 —OS 
Ecton V Classic: 

China p 8X7 >04 
FL Ltdo 952 — 3)2 
Govt p 970 
NattUdp 9X6 — -02 
NaTIMWtP 9.16 — 05 
Eaton V Mandhon: 
CALIdt 103)2 — 3D 
China t 12X3 +.10 
Irofial 1899 >^ 
R_Ltdt iaia — 03 
MALM I 9.97 —03 
MI Lid r 9X6 — 317 
NatflJdt 10.15— 03 
NJLtdl nun —02 
NYUdl 1006—0 
PALM 1 1811—03 

ALTXF* 1815-04 


AZTxFt 1829—04 


r.<Ft 1006 —04 

CglMunil 9X2 —3)3 
COTxFt 9.91 —314 
CTTrft 9.94-05 
Eqlnl 1073 + 02 
FtoTxFt 10X4 — 06 
GATxFt 974 —03 
GovtOblt 9X9 
HMncr 7.11 —02 
KYTxFt 9X0 —04 
LATxF 1 9X4 -03 

MDTxFt 9.98 —05 
MATxFt 10.18 —3D 
MITxFt 1812—3)3 
MNTvF t 9.95 —04 
MSTxFt 977 -03 


1829 
8.72 —01 
213)5 +3D 
8 X6 —02 
9X8 —01 

9.88 —Ol 

FsigtiSn 1830 +01 
FstohtSSplOTO +01 
FSTn 2575 +03 
FSTISSp 872 —01 
GnmatSn 1078 —03 
GnmaSp 1078 — 3)3 
FH^Sp 1079 
IMT IS 10X3—03 
MidCrs 1079 +.17 
ModAarnl811 +03 
MgdGfn 1811 +.01 
MfldGronll09 +.03 
Mgdlncn 1804 +01 
MaxCap 1177 +.14 
Minicnpn1172 +.14 
SurtTerm 1815 -02 
USGOVtn 9X4 —312 
STMT SS pi 81 S— 312 
SBF An 1425 +01 
RdeBYAdvisar: 
EqPGR 2819 +51 
EaPInCA 16.08 +08 
GtilResc 1772 + 03 
GavIrrvAp 9.17 —01 
GrwCpp 026317 +79 
HlMuAp 11X4 —314 
HTYIdApnllT* — 03 
In cGtp 1X75 —07 
LMTERAP9.93 — JU 
LtdTBRA 10X0 —05 
LtdTEI 9.93 -03 
Ovsea P 1810—16 
ST FI C 952 —03 
StntfOPAp20.10 +3)7 
Pktooty msfiiut 
EsPGln 2849 +J2 
EqPtl n 181 B +08 
IShlGv •' 9.42 


LI Bln 10X1 —.05 
fidefltv ftwest 


AarTF rn 11 J8 —3)3 
AMarn 1458 
AMgrGrnlX79 +3)5 
AMgrinn 1071 +OI 
Balanc 1272 —.08 
BJueOl 2574 >54 
CAlnsn 9X4 —04 
CATFn 11.18—04 
Cttooda n 1479 +09 
CcesApO 1X64 _ 

CocIrKarr 9.15 —03 
Conors) 185816 >272 
Contra 3804 +74 
CnvSecn 15X0 +.15 
Destiny! n 17X5 +70 
Destiny I In 28X9 +73 


DisEqn 1874 +74 
□ivennh n!277 —.11 


DivGlhn 11X2 >.13 
EmgGrarlsXS >X 7 
EmrMW 1810 +.18 
Equtlnc 3125 +.14 
tin 1970 >377 
17.11 +.19 
1 nil 60 —3)4 
Europe 2812 —15 
ExchFd riQ177 + 1X9 
iFd n 1854 +.14 
1070 *xn 
1824 *3)2 
1072 —09 
1200 —13 
951 —04 
27X8 +54 
2277 +.16 
1173 -04 
InsMun n 1172 —03 
IniSdn 1002 —30 
InterGvt n 978 
IntSGrl n 17X1 -72 
tnvGfln 7.10 —30 
Japan nr 14X8 —03 
Lot Am r 15X1 — JD 
LtdMun 9.36 — 30 
LowPrr 1776 +.11 
MITFn 7172—03 
MNTFn 1862 —.03 


Mageflan 4451 +1.12 
Mfcflndm 


- W34X0 __ 

MATFn 11.19 — JD 
MkJCaon 1071 +72 
Mtoe Seen 1857 -03 
Muncrtn 7.97—02 
NYHYn 1174 —03 
NYlnsn 1172 —03 
NewMldnl814 +71 
NewMill 1179 +.16 
OTC 22X7 +J4 
C»TFn 11.12—04 
Ovrsean 29.10 —75 
PacBasn 1958 +09 
Puritan 1X04 — 02 
RsalEst n 13X1 —06 
RetGrn 1815 +.18 
ShtTBdn 892 —04 
STWkJn 974 —06 
SmallCcp 1813 +74 
SE Asia nrl 377 + 09 
SflcSIcrj 19.1! +77 
SlrOppl 2075 +08 
Trend n 5447 -74 
USB I n 1827 —Ol 
Util Inc n 14X1 +JD 
vahw n 4379 +.12 
Wrkfw 13X8—07 
FUefity SelacJs 
Aire 1472— .12 

AmGotor 2071 —10 
Autor 2274 -3)4 
Biotech r 24.13 +03 
Brdal r 2898 + 70 
Broker r 1*73 —ID 
Chwnr 3453 +.15 
Compr 26X5 + 1.10 



PAJEja 

igSWiS-LS 

1157 +.14 
1 572 — Ol 
12-12 —04 


+ .18 


+ .10 


TatRerp 
Utiimeop 

VATFP 

FirstMut 865 
Plrri Omaha: 

Equity n 1888 
Fxdtocn 943 
SiFxfnn 9X6 +01 
FPDvAstP 1254 +3)9 
FP MuBdP HX4 — JQ 
First Priority: 
EquityTrnlOxa >04 
FkdlncTT 971 —01 
LtdMGv 9.71 
Flrri Union: 

BaTTn 1 
BtoCttl 1 
8a IB p It 

FLMurtiC 972 
FxInBp 9X1 
FjdnT n 9X1 




—05 

MnBdTn 9X5 
NCMunCI 952 —06 
USGvtBp 97S-0I 
USGvtCr 975 - 01 
UWItvCt 9X7 >.05 
VaJueBp 17.93 >.15 
VoiueC tn 17X2 +.15 
ValueTn 17.94 +.16 
Flog 


EmGlhp 1154 +54 


Intlnp 9.i> 
IntTrp 13X0 —.17 



Gra Name WUy 

FdNan# Last Oise 


Grp Nome WUy 
FdNwne Lari Chge 



Kissm 

R-TFp 1172—03 
GATFp 1152 -M 
GJGvnvrp 811 —08 
GStMttig 1862 -352 
GUfllp 12.19 -04 
GaMp 1472 —.11 
Growth P 1478 +.12 



GraName WWr 


I Norm Lari Oge 


NAniGrinntXl +.10 
Pc&vdniaoo —04 
WorLSdn 977 —08 


HYTFp 1079 — SO 


IDIOJO _ 
P Z22 — 01 
11X4 — & 
975-02 

am 

LATFp 1104-02 
MDTFP ! 853—04 



Ma»TF 1179 
MtohTFpllTS ■ 


MNtrts j]X4 — g 


MO TF p 11X2 
NJTF 1177 
NYlnsp 1875 ... 
NY Tax p 1151 —IQ 
NCTFP 1174 * 


SMP’ltif. 


PacGrwthtfXS 
PATFp 1816 ■ 
PremRtp 672 
PRTFp 1172 
51 Gov 1813 


TA 


p 1808 


TxA<«Yp813 —02 
TXTFp 1172 —03 


USGdvp 659 +J01 
Utatlesp 860—11 
VATFp 1170 —03 
FMdUriMedTR 

RtsLHvp 14X3 4.13 


RtSDlVP 1463 
FronkSn Tempt 
GermGvtpi2-95 +3a 
GiobCur P1377 +03 
HCTTJCWP135C +.10 
H/lncCurpl772— 01 


950 


Bondn 

Global n 13.15—02 
Growth n 1889 +.12 
ttdlGrn 9J5 +.82 
CA lilt 10X6 — 04 
FWdTn nli 





1574 +OI 
972 —08 
pf 115:1 —03 

rtri Funds 

CAMunnp 707 —07 
NYMwtnpl02 —311 
US Gov ft 1X5 — 02 
GAM Foods 
Global 132X7 +.17 
inn 19823 —50 
195X4 —25 


Divtrrid nl408 +J» 
Gtobdn 1773—01 

income n 1899 —01 
S85Lngnl891 —02 
5X5 PM n 3670 +56 
TaxEx 11J7— X3 
Trusts n 3391 +56 




8S#r- w 



1174 +XJ 
9,13 +2l 
*' T7 


977 -315 
10X2 —03 
9X1 +3)1 
n 9X3 +.10 
1805 +.11 
12J» +.12 

15X1 +70 

Home5aPA 1254 +.17 
HcmridBdn iCO 
HamsdVI isjd +3« 


H orogWin ZO^ 


1271 

Hummeri n aaxB —m 
H ummrG 2157 +J1 
HypSD 184 -JH 
HypSD2 9.16 — S 
LAATrGf 1852 +.19 


Brimpn 
Bend pn 


9XS +JDB 
BX8 —02 
>51 

+X1 

1352 +X1 
1195 —06 
9.09 —01 
in 13X3 +3)4 

1 rip 20.1 6 +74 

Resrvpn 9.95 

11X0 +3) 7 


Grincp 

HTJFdf 


2GidbAp 1570 — M 

“■'“ip«37« 

:p14X4 +72 

t 1171 —03 

2I0CFIAP 9X3 
ld»3 1452 +71 
1 8X4 —01 



msrTEp 

mip 

MOdRp 

Massp 




MN* 




NY1 _ 
NewOp 
Ovap 
PrccMtp 


G+ctxVC 19X0 —82 
IncorrteCnllXO— 02 
IntlEoOn 15X1 —.13 
StraC 1573 +JM 
USEaDn 1X10 +.15 
GE USE 1X08 +.15 
USEqA 1X07 +.15! 

GITtovsk 

EaSocn 19X5 —07 I 
TFNoltn 9.97 —jn I 
TxFrVAn1875 -30* 

GT Global: 

Amer p 18X4 +X3 
EmMkt 1774 +.18 
EmMIdB 17.14 +.17 
Europe p 18X3 —71 
EuroB 1874 —31 
GvfncA 8X3 —15 
GvfncB BX3 —16 
GflncAp 815—3)5 
GrlncB 815 —05 
HhCrB 1832 +X5 
HHncB 1277 +.08 
HilncA 1279 >3B 
HlthCr p 18X3 +X4 
inKp 113D-JH 
IntlS 10.93 —3)8 
Jcpotp 1359 —313 
Jmy)GrS137S — 3D 
LatAmG 2379 +.11 1 
LatAmGB23X7 +.11 
POCifp 1819 +JD 
PaCitB 14X6 >JD 
StratAp 10X2 —11 
Strata 10X1 —.11 


EqurtPf P 1164 +.11 
Extnnp am —02 
Fedlncp 4X4 +3)1 
GtobBdp 849—05 
GtoGr D 892 +JC 
Growth p 17X7 +54 
WYdTEp ^1 

1877 —12 
1155 +JB 
575 —03 
577—73 
XI 7 —02 
12.16 >51 
814 —3D 
13X7 +.18 
577 —03 

774 —.10 

Progmp 881 +3M 
Select p &£ 3 —sa 
Stockp 19X8 +3)4 
strAggt 13X0 +52 
StrEqt 9X7 +3M 
Strlncf 5X8 —02 
SlrSTt X8 
SirWGt 575 —76 
TEBndP 3X3 — 02 
UfiftoCP 839 —XI 
Si Fends 

Muni pn 1819 —J05 
NoAmp 970 >.02 

TratP 9X2 —01 

tndOneGT 975 
ufepeodaoc* Cot 
DoooriP 1092 +53 
SmtGVtP 9X3— XI 
TRBdP 9X8 
TR Grp 1158 +.10 
InvRerii 4X5 tJB 


US Gvt 


11X0 +X1 
1817 >3D 
9X4 —01 


Dynmp 1804 +.15 
EnvtnpnllXf +.18 
Energy n 1034 —jn 
Errvttnn 454 +X8 
Europen 1313 —24 
FinSvcn 1560 +X4 
Gokin 578 —05 
Growth rgi il» +78 
HltttScn 3258 +X2 
HIYUtto 673 —72 
Indiras roil 155 +.03 
IntGov n 1813 —XI 
IrrtJGrn 1751 —11 
Leieuren 2171 +50 
PacBasn 1883 +.04 
Sell ram no 817 —XI 
StlTrSdp 9X4 
TxFreenp1557 —02 
Techn 2258 +X4 
TaIRtn 1850 +.16 
USGovtnp 7JB —02 
Uttln 977 >-03 
ValEq 1773 +.19 
InvTrCvtfit 177 — 3M 


TrfeB 17317 +3)4 ilSlriFdnP 14J9 +.11 


USMgBt *71 +XI 
ilxErifE 1241 >.10 

“ ia* +S 

143)0 — XI 

975 +X1 

MotfTSn 10X2 —01 
MiMUttH 9X9 _ 

10X3 +X7 



.VaEatti 



Gro Nome WUv 
FdNome Lari Ore 


SJSSfcr*® 


>xi 


tMimPUl — 

9.92 — X4 

;p 


Keystone AirtorA: 

Au Inept 972 —07 


FQAA 


HrEGA 

VtttGrA 

imdA 

WriiSA. 




GvSCt 

10.94 —03 
TkFCI 953 —01 

^M-U+X? 

ARMJnsJAIIX) +3X3 

tins :fi 

n 14X3 —os 

lEaCn 1864 — v05 
1859—3)5 

11.98 — X4 

GtlFxA 11.98 —04 
GvtAl 13X2 —02 
IntFlA 11X0 —02 

Baton n 1377 +3)4 
Equttyn 14X4 +X4 
Lnttnc 970 —01 
IntlEa 1254 — U 
NYTFnp ia 
USGvn 9. 

Laurel Investor: 
CcpAp 2T 
rtasp ] 

lntP lp 1 

T^dp 1)7) — ID 
LporelTrari: 

Balncdn 9.92 +3)9 
tntmlnn 1835 —01 
S&PSXIn 10.14 +.12 
Stock n 18X0 +.18 


+X1 



Equity 


SmCtto 

lS|Yd 

LedenNY 


1459 +.15 
1134 — 1! 
11.10— XX 
1817 +70 
1429 +3)2 
9X3—05 
7X4 —3M 


LeebPern 1054 +XI 


AmerLdp 9SS +3)4 


GbIGoWp 9JS —3D 


Gvttnd IIP 
HiYWp 143)9—01 
InvGr no 9X4 
MdTFp 15X8—05 
PATFP 1579 —06 
Spirrvnp 20X3 +5* 


SdFrinrp 14^-04 


TotRetnp ... 

Vorrrnpl 9X4+36 

UnTluQ nwMV 

RFftGvA 9.92 
SelGrSiBt 9X4 *JU 
Sh purGv A 9.94 

' oivSecn^Ew +3)9 
CLdr 1884 +3)6 
GNMAn 7X3 +X1 
Global n 1458 —3)9 
Gotofdn 678 —SB 
Gttllncn 1813 >X3 
Intln 113)7—11 
SI Govfn 975 —01 


WUwp 

WldwB 


1775 —OB | 
17.10 


Bondn 


ABCp 103)7 —JB9 
ASSHr* 23.14 +.13 
CdnvScpnl1X4 —XI 
Eqirtcp 1154 +.04 
GilntCPn 1057 +3) 8 
GiConvn 1053 +X1 
GfTei D 1814 +J» 
Growth np2272 +78 
SmCaPG 1676 +X9 
Vrfuep 12X3 >XB 
GakLryl 


9X2—01 

. . 

InpEatyn 1092 -57 
SdEatvn tax* 


1077 —04 
P 18.18 


1 — M 

:P ISiSlS 




P 1054 —.02 

MITE A P 11.24 —.05 
MO TEA D 10X0 —05 
MITECP1173 -3)5 
NCTEAp 9.99— M 
NMTEp 958 —07 
NYTEp 1052 —3)4 
OHTEAP 11.13 —05 
OHTECp 11.13 — .05 
PATEAp 1800 —05 
TnTEAp 1071 —SU 
UtflAB 9X6 —315 
VATEAp 1828 — X3 
Flex Fuads: 

Bond no 1926 
Gtottipn 979 —XI 
Growthnpi3.il +X1 
Moirtdpnt 556 
Fontaine n 1057 +J» 
Fortis Funds: 

AslAilP 13.94 >.18 
CapApp ZLtfl >59 
Otoitlp 17X0 +59 
FtWP 2857 +X2 
GfbGrihP 13X6 +X8 
Gtr/TRp 800 —XI 
Grwthp 2*59 +77 
KYId p 816 — X3 
TF MN 1818 -3)5 
TF Nat 1054 — JM 
US GW 895 —01 
Fortress btvdfc 
AdiRt t 955 >X1 
Bondr 9Ji —X) 
EalraFSt 1175 +X3 
GISI m 854 —3D 
Munlnc 1x10X6 —3)9 
NYMunit 9.99 —3)6 
OHFortp 1893 — JM. 
UHlr 1236 >X2 1 
44 Wall Eq 814 +X9 
Forum Funds: 

IrtvSnd 1815 -XI 
ME Bnd 1834 —m 
TaxSvr 1079 — JH 
Founders Group: 

Bainp 883 >3)7 
BJueChP npi.46 +.10 
Discvp 18U > 73 
Fmtrnp 2Sxe +57 
GavSeC 9.08 —02 
Grwtti np 1168 +79 
n 10x1 —01 




BtoBlCBdWl8HjJ6 


Ertterprn 2159 . 


FedTxEx n871 — X2 


1950 ">53 
1414 +.17 



.a® 

tipTT-Sj 




l imJr 

no 2458 
..ton 1372 
imede Funds: 
Eouflvn 1897 +.14 
IntGov n 9.99 +JTI 
intn 141? -.13 
Munlntn 1802 —XI 
SmCapn 1359 +.17 
otreg a A^^ ^>66 — jn 

G 25SrthTl3r , ?M 

CttoGr 7559 >.J2 
Gtolnc 13L44 —09 
Grlnc 16X4 +.14 
InttEq 1659 —01 
Muni Inc 1358 -JB 
SeiEa 15J0 +.17 
SmaCaP 1972 + J7 
Gokbnan Sachs Insb 
AtfiGv 9X0 _ 

GavAfl 9X0 
StlrtTF 950 —01 
ST Gov 970 — .01 
GavStend 20X9 >X1 
GWEqtYn 2262 +.19 
Govntt Funds: 

DvtpBd 822 +X1 
ErngMk 1752 + 74 
GlGvIn 844 —13 
InttEq 1119 —3D 
PfcStg 9.48 -55 
SmCos 1570 +34 



P 1415 +57 
P 14X5 +57 
7X1 +.16 

777 +.15 

StrtncAp 7X0 — 3H 
STrlncB 7XC — 04 
TaxExP 1840 — JM 


EslVri pn 21X7 +X4 
Govfncp 12X2 —377 
OHTFP 1255 — JJ7 




pn 


7J7 -72 
17X5 > 


.. TE 979— .02 

GHNaJTE 10.08 —04 
Groens p mgi4U + jjb 
G rfflifiGrtn 11.17 +.12 
Guardian Fuads: 
ASAJIac 1829 +.12 
GBGktfl 1364 -.14 
Bondn 11X9 >X2 
PmkAv Z753 +.14 
Stock n 27.91 *.14 
TaxSx 9.11 — X4 
US Govt 967 

1829 +.13 

Hanover tnv Ms: 
BIOiGrl laiO +.12 

SJ^Gri 9^ 
USGvl 951 —01 


Wk)wGrpl7X5 >X9 

Fountain Square Fd* , 

Balanced 9 jo +J35 Harbor FWutx 
GovtSec 960 -.01 ! Bo»U 1062 +3)2 
MWOm 1819 +J»I CopApp n 1X12 >75 


950 +X1 
9.71 +X7 


QudBd 
QualGr 
rnnidin Group: 

AGE Ffl p 265 — XI 
AAUSp 958 —XI 
AR5 ” 

ALTFp 


1277 +.19 
2551 —09 
1175 -3)9 
SWOurn 890 +jn 
— . Value n 1350 +.17 
975 —01 :HavgnFdntl<134 +X3 
1152 -.03 I Hecrtland Fds: 


AZTFp ll.ij — JH 
Ballrrvp 22X5 +55 
CAHYBdp ? M — 03 
Colins p 11X3 —3D 
CAIntermW74 -JD 
ColTFr p 7X8 —XI 


USGWp 974 
Vatuep 2126 +JK 
W1 TxF 965 —05 
Hercules FaaA 
EuroVI n 1053 —08 
LAmVal n!054 >.11 


J wbkdw 1 rwric 
AVTech 1830 —3)6 

GtobAp 1351 —sa 
l 1151 —03 
875—04 
. 1835 *55 

>ch 17.11 *64 
GoUA 1450 -.02 
GotoBT 14X8 —02 
PocBos 15X4 —06 
PocfiasS 15X0 
RBBkA 2862 +.17 
RgBkBr 2853 +.17 
J Hancock 5cverga: 
AchA 1170 +.13 
AchBt 11X5 +.13 
BrtAp 1815 +3H 
Baffin. 1815 +XS 
BondAP 1428 —02 
BttodS 1428 —02 
InvAp 1454 +.12 
tovB p 1*53 +.12 
USGvA p 953 —03 
USGvBf 952 —03 
J&VB4 1Z67 *m 
KSMut 11.9* —05 
KSIMunU 11X7 -03 
Koutmannr331 +X4 

"sass-w . 

BtueQipA181D +71 
CafifTxA 7.17— 3M 
□MncriA 50* — X2 
EnvSve 1820 +.19 


TEBdn 1816—02 
witEm “ 


135* +J» 

•ApllTO +01 
P 1176 +03 

, r xi ais 


LtdMup V. ... 

NYMunp 952—02 
NOtMup 963 —.62 
NAmerp 454 >3)3 

liSTS 

14X7 +.17 

GrinAp 9X5 -t-lu 
MAS 2875-21 
MIB 2879 —21 
MoUStar Funds _ 
CoApI 1876 +59 


OiinaAt 

Chtnae 

(vyEflA 

GrihAp 


WUy 
Nam Lari Ore 


GroName 


DtvtNt 
KvTTAn 
EmGTA 
EqjndN I 
EqMA 


ISSft 


952 
972 
0X1 
1X9 +.13 
170 +.14 
172 *M 
0X0 +.11 
10J39 


Corn! 

opBar 

EqJd* 


TxFBt 

TntRtt 

V0Jt 


1259 
774 *jCfi 
143)6 +.16 
1155 
803 . 

tl(L37 — IT 
968 —01 
1479 +79 
1576 +51 


Spein 37 JO +5 




IntMton 15X5—13 
51 Band 1930— JD 
lnl9JB 


ttrflEqn 3750 


70.71 — jj 


Fxdtoc 960 —01 
NYTF WL73— 0? 

STFtoftC 965 
TREq 1844 +.19 
Mark Twnbi Fds 
Equity 9X6 +.17 
Fxdlncm W —01 
958 — JM 


Equity ~ 1812 +3)7 
Ftodncm 973 
irdFidn 9X9 
VAMuBd 973 -3Q 


952 

GfhlnA 970 . . 


Bain 

Eqtoc 

Gvttncn 

bttBdi 


954 +3)9 


IntTxF 967 —02 
MidCann 978 +3)9 
ST toco 972 +X1 


ST toe rt 
Stock rt 
ValEq n 


967 

978 _. 

972 >0. 
977 +.14 
1068 *J» 


Mathers n 14*9 +JJ3 


Equity pnT 364 +.14 
income f 1816 — m 

Laureatpn»X4 +01 

6tentG4he 1828 +05 
MentSIrn 1T.92 +74 
MenierFd MQ59 +3H 
MerxSann 2498 +.10 
MerraLmchA 
AmerinA 896 +3M 
A^RAp 950 
AZMA 1831 .. . 
Bc6A 1163 +3M 
BesVlA* 23JM —XI 
CA1MA 9X7 —04 
CatMnA 1174 —3)6 
C&«A 2775 +.07 
Cansuttp 1815 — 03 
CpHiA 771 —01 
OnvGdA 1893 —05 
CeJTA 1101 —as 
DevCcto 1X38 +.12 
ErtSW 7X90 +3 ) 9 
EuraA 15X5 —74 
FedSecAp956 — Xi 
FLMA 97* —04 
FdFTA 13.90 +77 
G4A1A 1375 —07 
GBdA 9.13 —09 
10X2 +JM 




OCvA 
GtHdA 
GiRSA 153)1 —09 
GtotSmA 1801 
GtUtA 1849—14 
GrtRA 17X8 +53 
HeatthA 3X1 +3M 
Insttnp 970 —01 
InttEqA 11X* —03 
AUMuA 9.71 —SIS 


MNMuA 1820 —05 


LatAmA 16X4 
MnJraA 7X0 


MunUdA 9X6—01 


MutnTrA 

MNailA 

NJMA 

NYMnA 

POCA 

PAMA 

PtTOA 

^A 

TXMA 


9X5 _ 

10.12 — 0 * 

1054 — 0* 



AmerinBt 894 
AZMBt 1831 


Baffit 1173 +3H 
BOS VS tx 22X2 — TO 
CalMnBi 1175 





Gtolnc 

10x0—02 

IVp 976— as 

*= p 2* - 
Funds: 

n 7.10 — Jn 
2572 —3D 
Ravin 2810 +315 
Uttln 1054 +3D 
LonglfPFn 1900 
LnngtfSCn 1357 

LoomH SoyteE 

Bondn 1070 +X1 
GtoBdn 950 —31 
Growth n 1253 +.19 
Gr&tnn 1898 +5* 
InttEq n 1805 —70 
SmCapn 1897 +75 
Lard Abf Comet: 
B<2)ehTr 468 + XI 
ttaTTFTr 454 —02 
USGavtp 454 —01 
Lord Abbrifc _ 
Affffldp 1879 +.10 
BondDtb P 9.14 +X1 
DevriGttip9X3 >7? 


^1990 P ]436 *.]1 


FLTXA 

GWncA 

GrthA 

HiYieia 

InOtoA 

toHA 

MuiA 

NYTkA 

OHTFA 

Hefirel 

Retire? 

RettreJ 

Reilre4 

Retires 

STGtob 


180* — JDS 
843 —3)5 
1272 + 75 
778 —XI 
814 

law — 0* 
9X5 — JM 
1844 —05 
9X9 — X4 
1892 +.11 
1857 +.10 
1808 +X8 
9.12 + sa 
877 *S7S 
XB7 —3)6 
SmCoEqA 553 +.10 
TechA 1816 +X5 
TXTFA 1807 —06 
TctfRetA 9JK +09 
US Govt A 899 +JH 
USMIgA X92 +X1 

Dvln&t 56? —02 
GrthBt 1269 +75 
HTiTdBt 777 —SO 
KIPSTGI xeS-05 

Shtuitt 806 +jn 
SmCroBf 851 +X7 
TotRtSt 904 +.10 


j _^'alup 1271 +.10 
GtEqp 1894 +01 
GUncp 815—05 
GawSecp 269—0) 
TaxFrp 10X1 —03 
TFCTp 9XB —05 
TxFrCdplOXa — JM 
TFFLp 449 -SB 
TFMOP 499—02 
TFNJ P 5315 —01 
TaxNYp 1075 —05 
TFTXp 975 —04 
TFPAp 4B5 —02 
TF HI p 4X0 —02 
TFM) 475 —02 
TFWAp 4X0—02 
Vc4uAp pp 1167 +.13 
Uriberan Bret 
BroHlYdx 894 
Fund 17^ +70 
Inoome 827 —01 
Muni 819 —02 
OpoGr _ 970 +73 
MA5 FUnds 
Balanced nil. 
EmerGrillS 
Equity n 21. 
Fkdmlln ia _ 
Fwttncn 113)2 —02 
GhlBd 

GiFxin 180* —10 
HY Secs n 8X4 —01 
InttEq n 1468 - 

InWTxto »XT_— 13 


CA1MB .... 
OnvGdB 1893 —OS 

CprTBt 11 JD —05 

DT09BP 1479 +48 



9.13 

1887 ... 

1569 —09 
^ 11801 
GIDIBr "1264-— 15 
GriRBt 1702 +50 

m.ia.* 

It 1175 
1301 

- iSt 

It 1077 
It 971 
It 1070 
7510—1 
MnUtBt 9X6 
MutotB 9X5 —03 
MNCdSt iai2 — 0* 
NJMBt 1854 —04 
NYMnBt 11.05 —.05 
NCMBt 1806 — .0* 
OHMBI 1078—05 
“1 1970 —06 
2811 —06 
1889 -JH 



+.18 


AstAUnf 1101 —01 
QMAppf 1 


GWJAfl 1831 —TO 
GvfTAn 964 —02 
GvttNI 964—02 
OlMUTAn 968 —03 
UltEqjnr 1851 —08 
btf&TApIlX* — 08 
AtoBTAn 9X4 —111 
WSlp 18S0— 03 
MDITA 1850— B 
MBSTAn 9. 
MubiTA ir 
MunlAp li 
SiGvIAp 
SIGvICt 

TAH 404 
in 964 ~ 



STMlCt 964 
SQTAn 1070 _ 

StFTAn 958 —02 
TJOTAn 9.9* —04 
Votudnt 1363 +.12 
VOluelApl364 +.13 
VriueTA 13X4 +.12 
VAITAn 10X2 



GroName ' WUy. 
FdNome Lte Ore 


AsStAp 1063 +J06 
ATLAP 1SS +70 

H£*i_ 

OnTcA 93)8 +.14 
_ rAp 19X1 
rAp 9.19 
Tt 1174 +.10 
1003 —07 
1877 +44 

9.96 —03 





NatnFd 

tjtGwtt) 

TVFre t 9X0 

t J j0-| V _j 1 IL . 

^ AMT^d hS^ +73 
Gen m &01 *xa 

SSSMSg +^ 

LtdMatn 9X5—01 

1076 


New Altar 
NewCnti 


009 + 05 
1061 +70 
369 +J7 

^+3a 
+72 


Attar 2977 > 

....’SXSfL* 
m&f* 1 * 


■02 

+06 

BdtncA 1)75 
CATFAp 738— SB 
CopGrA p 1445 +71 
GtobGApn.U —08 
GrOBAp 1863 +.12 
GvScAp 10X1 —01 
GwthA P 1812 +317 
t-BncAp 97| 
bttEoAp IxS 
UdTrm AMX3 
MossT Apt 551 


' —03 


anrAp 1278 +72 
TxExA P 774 —01 


VahjeA p 774 +JH 
BaicnB t UX4 +06 
CapGrfet 1475 +70 
ttSoBt 1X38 —05 
StarBp 1878 +72 
VatueB 7X0 +JH 
NewUSAp 1174 +07 
IcboiesGruBpc 
Nkhain 50X1 +64 
Nchlta 2588 +72 

^n" i^g +XS 




— 1270 +.19 
CW*ainB1277*.19 
EmgGrA 1165 +73 
EmgGrB 1150 +^ 

IncGrB 1367 +JJ* 
WWGfB 1506 +03 
WWgr 1578 +J3 
Nomura n 1879 +04 
North Am Funds: 
AstABCpnll.ll +04 
GtGro 1477 —79 
GrwthCpril482 +.11 
GrlncCpnl279 +02 
USGWAP963 > 
NeinvGrn 2494 +74 
NelnvTrn 1817 —01 


Rxlnn 977 —01 
GrSjn 1823 +04 
JncEqn 9X4 
ln1TaxExn9X8 —02 
tnBFxlnn 9X4—10 




JB1QX1 __ 
SelEqn 10X3 +.13 
SmCpGrn 9X0 +3)8 
TxExPtn 9.95—04 
USGaWn 9X5 


961 —0! 
. .961 

A 961 — 3D 

GWIncTr 8X2 —08 
GWloCA 8X2—08 
InaeneTr 9X2 —06 
InaeneA 9X3 —04 
TFtttcA 953 —03 
TFlncT 953 —03 
VtouGrA 1775 >06 
VatoGrT 1774 +04 
MmeaFimh: 
CAlftS* 1812— 0? 


CAVal * 1812—09 




FL VC* It 978—10 
InsMun x 1071 —10 
MDValx 976 
MAInsx 

MAVrix __ 

MlVdX 1800 —10 
MunBdx B.95 —07 
NJVdX 9.94—07 
NY Ins X 1806—09 
NY Val X 1813 -JH 
GHValx 1807 —09 
PA Val X 9X2-09 
VAValx 9X8—08 

ova 






..'02 —01 
n 9X8 —01 
1057 —03 
1972 +.15 
Trust 

nlXlB +.10 
1579 +.18 


17.W-02 


Grtof 

Mgtijfa 


rtf 


1890 


—06 


C a pA pA 
CaoApB 
COPApC 
EqlncA 
EqlncC 
EqbtvriA ’ 


LttfitorFI n78T7 +07 
1808 *sa 


Ml TAP 
NUGAp 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


(Continued From Page 13) 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


BELGRAVIA 


ORCHIDS 

LONDON PAHS GENEVA ZUUCH 
ESCORT AG8KY 
CBBJJT CARDS WaCOME 


UK 071 589 5237 


ffiTBmnONAl SCOUTS 

Sum- WOrtotndo 
ret 2 13-765-7896 New York, USA 
Atqor Crettf Cards Accepted 


.MAYFAIR INTL 

London Exert Service an 777 4712 


NEW YORK CITY 


brort Sen** [212)65*1306 <y 
“ 7 <S7*yf* 


(212)679-57* 


la veett 


1.0M30N BRAZfUAN Escort 

Serve* 071 72* 5997/91 - atdo anh 


O4&SEABC0RTSBMC& 

51 Beovchooipl Place. London SW1 

T*&1 584 6513 


CANNS 8 COTE D'AZUR 
luxembcwq fccort Agency 
OwSt Cant Dirf tafl +3S24M297 


*“ ZURKH " VIOLET •• 
Escort Sena. Gedf cards accepted. 
Tot Q77 / 63 S3 32. 


• * * vstNoamr • • • 

London Emt Senica 08S0 i 


CHARMEINTL 

Exnrt Agency 

AwierdoB. +3120X975064 


KMGHTSMBDa ESCORTS" 
“"New York USA~* 

Td 1^00^5434** jjjflddmde Service 


STOCKHOLM 

ESCOSf SBMCE 
TEL 08 fSTBZf 


•• GB4EVA WTBWATONAL *• 
Esaxr 5en*ce 

Tel: 022 / 731 43 52 • 077/^9290 


FKANKFUTT KQLN DLGS&OOKF 
oIowb. baxl Servee. 
069-473294 


*• LONDON ‘ CARIBBEAN ’ . 

London Hnrihraw Griw idt Exart' 
Service 071 794 9077 OSKT CA8DS 


MUNICH-WELCOME 

BCORT A OUDE AGENCY. 
PLEASE CALL 089 • 91 23 14. 


- GBHA ALLIANCE " 

Ejccrt SerwcB rod Travel. Mddngual 
Tefc 022 / 311 


FRANKFURT 4 AIRPORT 

d txeos &axt Service 
TeF 069-552221. 


FRANKFURT 

Princess Escort an) Travel Service. 
Hease aJ Mobfc 0161726 32 572 


1IAB0N5 OF FMK LANE 
LONDON ESCOBTSBiVICI 
Ta. 071 376 1227 


VBMA-PAHS-BVSA-ZURKH 

EUROOINTACT Inti Esaxr + Tnw* 
5emCB. Col Y*mt +43-1-310 63 19. 


’ZUKICH'SUSAN* 
esaxt Sarae 
ret Of 7 381 99 48 


TO OUR 


READERS 


IN 

LUXEMBOURG 


It's never 
been easier 
to subscribe 
and save. 
Just call 
toll-free: 


0 800 2703 


Mfg8kFc ti 

MunFxJ 1874 
PAFKdrtn 1839 — XS 
SelEqn 17X4 +.19 
SetFl n 9.9S —02 
anCpVlnl7Xl +71 

VtS#n 1 Z66 +33 

1166+08 
1844 +74 
p 12X3—02 

A p 1753 +61 

GrOpAp 1101 +.18 
GvLJAp 861 

%23&Z2 : 

HIlncAP 4X8 —01 
LldMAp 7.10 +01 
OTCAp 802 +00 

RschAp 13X4 +X4 
SedAp 12X1 +09 

m. iJSts 

m* ® +^ 

WoGvAp 11.13 —04 
WbGrA 1463 —3D 
WdT0tAPl863 —04 
MuBdA 7042 —03 
MuWA 883 —01 
MuLtA 7X6 -01 
MuALAp10»— K 
MuARAP 975 —ffl 
MuCAAp 5X1 —SB 
Mt£LAp 964— TO 
MuGAA p!836 — ca 
MuMAAPlMI — W 
MUMDAP1087— M 


961 +X7 
9M >66 

!%:£ 
t* 

EqlnvCP 1278 +.13 
GovSacA 454—01 
HilncA XT* —41 

mincS *73 —At 

IrdlSaAp 1893 —04 
■ B 1050 —06 
P 1895—06 


lidFxin f 813 -315 
MBOAsfB 840 +03 
ModArfA 863 +03 
MgdAstC 864 +04 
TaxExA 7X0 - 

TxEXB 7X0 
MlMutttc 1050 


LowDurn 904 ... 

One Group: 

AsetABp 900 +04 

- ~ 1106 +.11 

rzttf* 

9X4 

_ P 9X9 —02 
IncEa _ 1376 +J9 
incameBd 9X4 —01 

!BW i& 5 -o 

InttEqn 13X8 —14 
LoCoGr 1175 +06 
LoCoVal 1174 +0* 
LtVal 1834 
OH Mu, 1062 —03 
ShTrrtGIn 863 -08 
SmCoGr 1461 +.13 
TFBdA 969—01 
lDCancc 956 —01 
VMCorNC 18 0*— 04 

t §^pT272 +.13 
CATE A Pi 03)6 —05 
ChpHYP 12X1 “ 


NYTxAP 1824 — 06 
ip 1841 +J5 
\P 2X3 



EuGrflt ;?X3 


GrihBt 1881 >^5 


1U5 

i&or 

106* ... 
7X3 —05 

\'M 

I 1812 +.14 
I ZZ3 

11824 +jn 

908 —.10 
841 —JB 
106* —DS 



15X4 +X0 
11X7 +X* 
0 9X3 +.13 
19XT +77 
9X8 —19 
1065 +JM 

S+fi 

90S —03 

NYDOp 10X6 —M 
MMDp 1004 —05 
STGvtDp 2X3 
SmCttoO 1824 +JQ2 
SKDm 908 —11 

USGOp eg 


P^Stl 

PappSSt 


—03 



nxU57— g 


krtCte 1354 
fntGvtnx 960 . 

UdMTC 955— S4 
Ml Mr C 185*— M 
MuBd C 10X0 —04 
SmCapC 20X8 +07 
RpUdmIwA: 

AX 1889 +05 
~ 9X9 —06 

13X9 +X8 

JnCX 9X6—05 

ME 0* 1357 —02 

1X0 ^06 

SmCao 7039 +07 
PamBcin ixxs +.13 
Parnassus 3269 +X2 

^•+.18 
_ k 1331 +X7 

50 173)5 +XI 

PmcWoridnlUB +X2 
ftjysanBtn 1 167 +08 
PttochTBd 9X2 —01 
PeoctVTEQ 9XS +.10 
Pescon 1104 +.15 
PhnCwA 

PAMunip 1087 —A* 
Ecdn&n 11X9 +07 

iSlp&l n S + 1? 

gfftCpn 976 + ‘ _ 
5TR I rt 974 
Perm Fort Foods: 

5508 +08 
11X4 +.13 
460 +02 





„ - WUy 
Nan* Lott ore 



968 _ 

1161 +04 
11X8 +05 
9X1 - . 
18» — 0* 
14X0 +.15 


EqutAp 14X0 +.15 

aais--M* 3 r 


GtAstA 

GAM 

GWnAp 


1X0—01 
11X7—05 
850 —ST 


GtDoAp IZtl +72 
HTYtdAp 803 —01 


InVerAp 1104 +-05 
XMKAp 088 +.14 
AtaKA 1071 —03 
PttgfA 1898 — W 
SraAp 856—0* 
1X8 Ap 9X9—04 

ARgCnetJUl +03 
CB&tof 11X2 —04 
EoutBnt M.13 *M 


ssx 

GNMAjtl 



GvinBtfn 860—Xl 
OvOcon. 9X0- •_ 

JnfGif . or— js 

hSSliit n§ +^K 

. im +33 
PocG rS M73 —04 
ST»B 856 —OB 
Sroffit 1301 +05 
MunArzt 1169 —04 
M0R.A 933— M 
MUGOI 17.11 — XS 
MunHYB 11871 —04 

SStt'JS&=£ 

AlWWlnt 1153 — as 
MjnMtt 1167—05 
MunlModtUX7— S3 


MuNCt 


1008'— 05 
1073—04 
163—05 
165 —ns 
TQ35— 04 
1*58 —07 
IXS— XI 

.11X5—01 

USGvtnt 966—03 
UHBt 10X4—04 


MuPnt 

MMtoll 

Stoictre 


1004 +M 

Bain 1104 +X3 
GthSttcn 1175 +X2 
toaxmn- 951 — JH 
WtSfKn >5.1* —22 
Sfddxn TL22 +.13 


ArfiAn 1820 
AmGvAp 829 +01 




.834 +02 




&*>'&**- 
AZTE 880—02 

CATItAp 819 —03 
&rfrartp79J3 +.12 
COAT 4160 — 08 
DrvGrp 935 +7 1 
DvrtnA pxl W — 7* 
EqlnAp 8BQ +3)5 
EuGrAp 12X6 —10 
sSnpjf 9X3 
FUTxA 8X1 

SR® - "* 

^S?p p 

HBhAp 2703 

tiBB&VSzai 

IncmAp 464 —3)1 
IrivAD 700 +.ia 
MntoAp 800 +04 

«p W 

MunlAp 
MnTxUp 



MunlAp 071 
874 


NtRsAp UXO ^+J 


CroNem# ^^mSSu UNCW. 


WUy 


FdNome Lari C3re 




USfiov 

9JB» +■«! 

Hip 

aaFSWaf 

gSglte66 +09 
STBdTrn J7B - 
ShTTrTr n9X4 +01 
VgUncTnllft +J6 
VaUndP 1102 +.10 



CdTFrnlT 04 — g 
EwAvn 13.96 *32 

“in 1*03 



SS^ n '^1 -I 

e S&tn 9 32 -0> 
SpTrGWn 9X2 - 

LSOmn 86* 

US^frn ll.« -01 

WrWOWn 905 T09 . 


n ?S +« XSSSUr* 
n 979 > 07!VSgMaj4F*„ 




AstAfla »3l +^[ 

^SiSS^i 

jHgW -i 

31— 

m +X8t Fnd to cm nlFXp— 08 


jrertnn T.17 —02 
nlin >.07 
1673 +79 
n 6SB +03 
22-M 

9Jt —05 
115* *37 
1034 —.03 

an —.02 
9.78-03 
90S 



NW n 1266 +70 



MATSOJOTI jj.. 


.8=*' 



9J9 — 

Mflndx W64-SI 
N«TPBn9* — 03 
1 000 r 1268 +75 
• » TFBdP J09 —33 

Snow + lf 

SchwarcV 1007 *71 
ScohMdl 15.13 


117* +.10 
1134 +02 

950—01 

Stortnrst Funds 
Gowmb 10 . - 

Oucevto 9X5 — fll 



+.10 

1.93—05 

141 If 
1*00- 

3469 — W 

GISmCD UK > 
Goto O 12X3 —07 
Grwtncn 1765 +.11 
income n 1373 +0J 
Intemod n**X3 —15 
lnflBdn 1166—34 
l_MAmrr2255 —19 

KSBffiMqir 

JtolTFn 1877 - 
MMS ,8X7 — 03 
fTYTxn 1824- 
OHTxn 1X62 - 

^SGrn 15^* +xi 
ffSondnllJS - 
STGtllO HLB3 —07 
TxFHYn H5* —M 
Value n 1X81 +.10 
ZeraOOOrr 1164 

S ®?** ! liS8.+08 

1757 +.18 
Bend UUf-+01 

*&&*"&-* 

60S +05 
954 —02 
659 +03 



S1» M „ 

gffi 1 

taiertn W - 
Mumn 822,- 02 

srsawtRcwnto 

iSiS 

9X5 +X3 
978 +73 
9X4 +X3 


A/nShsnpMJ* +.12 

9X5 +.18 


FrontterA 1077 +3J 
CgpFdA 1*72 +27 
COTfcA 7X0—03 
OnStfcA_ tia +09 

1461 +38 

>14.19 + 06 

FLTxA 7.43 -05 
GATxA 702 —03 


GtoBraTrtDXI +X4 
GEmgD 10X7 +M 


NJTXA I 

IMStWii 


NVDgAp 

Oicfcp 


1842 


OhTWlp 873— M 


PATE 

^P P 

TFHYA 

flSSR* 

USGVA p 
UtflAp 

VslaAp • 

^t P . 
Bt 
AABaBt 
AAChBt 


900- 



5^31 

AR5+A 

AK5II 


751 —IB 
869—03 
4X4—03 


IXscFdP 3360 +51 
DfecavBf ~ 


ACR3SGW 9.90 
Govtp 9X0 
IntGvp 1827 — 3J1 
LeshJfUA 7060 —02 
LeshTsyA 858 — 04 
OH TF 1178 -06 
TFtatp 1071 -3D 
Monettu 1893 +72 
MonettMC 1251 +08 


If. 


FxlnT 20X9 
GorthT Z406 
IriEqT 2260 
Mtgeic 7X2 —07 
OhTFT 21.15 —03 
SBdT 1957 >01 
MantrGWP 875 —11 
McnitrSlP 14X1 +05 


Montgomery Fds 
EmaMn 




GtobOpp P1355 —.12 
Growth n 1892 +70 
<rtstEMktN894 +54 
tnlKmQtoltM -II 

SmCapn 1402 +X7 


AstonGrA 17X3 +09 
17.10 +06 
. 1261 —12 
nlXXI—12 




MuNCAp 
MuNYAplDXi — TO 


mm?*-* 


1825 —02 

MllVAAPlUB — 03 
LttIB 7.1 3 +01 

CaoGBT 1374 +06 
Band B 12x2-01 


17X2 +60 
810 —04 


II 
tfinBf 
intmB I 
MAITB 
OTCB 
MJGB 
RschS 
sedBt 


I 4*0 


972 

809—04 
11X1 >08 
7.94 +79 
1034 +73 
1119 +X* 
12X4 +JB 

& 

W^aB I ]4§-^g 
WoOvB 1108 —07 
WaGrB 1454 —01 

WaTota 1040 — M 

Murnet 854 — 02 


When MB +.1* 
Sflttocn 1812 +X9 
SDtGrwn 10® +.12 
StoAPn 1358 +79 


AsitAI 1125 +09 
Fwsnan 961 — an 

wyi- . +■» 


9 M +08 
?J9 -01 


MMPxWit 9-. 
MSBFdfl 1701 +04 
ModcandcGf* 


gmnft 951 +04 
Ftoram 1006 
“ ' _ tn971 —06 
nid03— 06 
T855 

.>111) +06 

*AC«flrvnJ2.1B —15 

EmGr 1*67 +X3 
&nMkf 1837 +X0 
EnWBtDWn867 >79 
EqGrn 11X4 +.18 
Fkdfnc 9.99 —01 
GgqtV 1199 >09 
Grsdnn 1814 — ia 
MYWlI ?O05— 02 
hdlSCn 14»— 06 
1559 —11 
_. 01817 

._.Bn 848 —18 
VidoeEqnlilO +.12 

scy 3 n 1052 +m 

^AjhtertcrTipM.17 — 05 
1035 +.14 
1853 +32 


It 33X9 +51 
EqlncA p 97* +03 
EgtocBr 973 +02 
GtSop 1867 +6B 
OGTD 15.10 -05 
GJobEnvplQJM) +03 
GtabTOAp 37.14 —53 
GtoikBt 34K7—.14 
Gold o 1377—12 
HiYWA. 1350 
MYlcfflr 1364 —04 
InsTEAp 14X1 —05 
UdrTEp 14X4 —01 
InvGrAp 1834 —01 



126* —01 
60* 


McoCop 11X6 +01 
STMM1I 762 —01 
- 

BaCf An 1071 +03 
EaAaAn TL® +03 
EaGrAn 1070 +07 
EqtnA 1894 +05 
FxdlnA 901 —01 
totmGvAn9X1 —01 
NJMuAn 1827 —02 
STInvAn 9X6 
POotlntEB 15X1 —10 
PatftotEAnTSXa— TO 
Pionctr Fund: 
ArrHitcoTr p973 —01 
Bandp 905 —02 
BqttlCP 1467 +08 
CagJrp 1400 +.16 

Growth p 11/ 
income p 9. 


Eunpap J?09 —35 
PiorirFap 


!p 23X0 +.17 
PinMBd plOJM —04 
WIG r 2205— M 
PlorrBp 19X4 +.16 
PloThreepi9J7 +.17 
ST toe in 


lnvGTAP 1834 ■ 
LTGavAplOS) 
LTGovB 11051 


MnStCA 7)06— 07 
M5lncGrA21J4 +71 
MStoGrC 121.14 +.19 


MtpjncA 1378 
NYTaxA( 


.pi 2.1 5 —3)4 

NYTxStn 12.16 —04 
Opp« 1101 +.U 
PA TEA(rH73 —04 
Sfid AP 3333 +63 
SrincAp 479— m 
StrlraBt 4X0 —01 
^TJAPAXP-Ol 


SttnGTAP 8^4 +05 


StrlnvAp 476—01 
Toroetp 2150 +60 
T\mtf . 964—04 
TxFrAP 9X7 —03 
TjmejJ 15X0 +74 


TotRtAp 815 +01 
TotfMBfe 810 +01 


9X5 _ 

1*70 +05 


AstAIA 1167 +J09 
CATFA 1880 —04 
MutncA 1000 — 0* 
SlrotGrA 1838 +3B 
ST Govt 5002 —02 
USGvIA 1004— 3D 
VRGA 958 +32 
PBBrrtEG JJJ9 +38 
PBHGGrn 1374 +64 
PFAMCDFih.- 


CesApn 

DivLown 


833 +08 

w » 

1569+3)7 
1X4 +.14 
J>71 +78 
976 —05 


MtnWGS 

ftAuOBrttt _ 


Beacon n 33.13 +.15 
Dtscnvrv 1870 +02 
QUOfffln 2869 +02 
Smsn M SI +UK 

MW* HWnB 

Enhlndl 103)6 +01 
Eauftyl p 1374 +.14 
FxOMplOXD —01 
OHTEIP 1852-04 
TatAiMt 1008 —01 
Trwslp 


EatttvR P 1377 +.14 
NOTVrnrf 934 — 84 


NWfl. Narttotor 


KYidA 

rA 


MufllA 
NYU 


Bond 


IrntHEq 
MuttA 
STT^ 


4X9 —HI 
18U +04 
mm +0« 
452 —01 
Fdt 

’HI “■* 

>68 

137* +64 
1074 _ 

13X2 +.l3 
11X5 +05 
1003 +01 
12X4 +.10 
1269 +.19 


Nfflrvj 

NrfmFtirefc 
AtfRJIAp 963 
AClRTTAn 962 
BaHNt 11^ +48 
Bear An 1851 *08 
CpGTAn 1170 +.1* 
&}htip 1)75 +73 


Eqtocn 

train ... 

ModBeSn 969 —01 
MWCdD 1352 +XQ 
SmCpG 1838 +00 
SrnCpV 12X4 +08 
UttStltn 900 +03 
PIMCD Ponds: 
TotXntn ?S9 —01 
TRtll 8X4—02 

UraDurn 


LDII 
ShortTn 
Frgnn 
Globe* n 
HlYM 
Grwtti n 
LTUSG 
PNC' 


97* —03 





EmerGr 1861 


+07 
+61 

Gown 864 —01 
Grtnc 1831 +72 
InstGv _ a79 —09 
InstGvAtfi 9X7 +03 
MNTE 1845—05 
NotlTE 1060 -JO* 
POcSutG 13L74 >.04 
Sector p- 1475 +78 
Vditoj 


AAGrtet 875 +04 

CATxSt 8W— JR 
CortvBt 19J04 +J0 
DtVGB 970 +.10 
DvrlnBtX 1164 —15 
EuGrGT 1264—10 

13X7 +08 
2764 +X7 
1817—03 
t 664 — 01 



Grtoc 1*2 +X4 
ttitEq 10X9—08 
Numeric 15X5 > 
Bari4wn015X2 + 
Quest For Vidua: 

CATE 1067— 05 
Fund 1260 +71 


Gtq 
GrtncA 
UrvQlrv 
NoflTE 
NYTE 
&5? rt 

Sa?®* 

USGOV 
RBBGWp 
RSI Trust 
AdBd- 
Core 
BriGr . 
ttdBd 
STF 

vote 
RdnbMn 
P 


14X3 
9.96 +05 
1803 —04 
1856—3)4 
1870—05 
19X4 SJQ 
13X0 +.15 
1103—02 
968 . . 


2624 _ 

35X7 +62 
33X4 +X1 
25X4 +0T 
18X7 +01 
2669 +64 
813 +04 
130* +04 


Value p 18X9 

?s%L vs 


18® +X4 


... +01 

PtanrTNtx 1816-02 


BdKn 

BcflcCri 


21X5 +00 
__ .. 34X4 

EOtodX 3X70 +07 

fSS&X -• ,0 

MSSt.n28B2 +^ 

ST Bondn 1809 

3671 +79 
n9X3 _ 


1056 +06 

Fxtflnn 902 
Growth n 13X4 +X4 
Win 1206—16 
ST Gov n 977 - _ 

Vah*n ^ 1173 +.11 

Pricr Funds 
AdRJS *62 
BaW» 1163 +05 
BKNG 11.19 +.13 
CafTxn 9X1 —04 
CaoAprn 130? +315 
DrvGron llXB +04 
Eqlncn 1890 +.18 
EaHhcn 1305 +75 
Europen 1264—12 
FEFn MJ1 —.13 
H-lnsiranlCLOS — 02 
GNWn 9® _ 

SkT" 12^ 

Growth n 2057 +.15 
Gwthton >843 +77 
HTYWn 816 
Income n 860 ^-02 
IrtHBdn 9® —11 
IntJDten 17X3—01 
totSttcn 1260—10 


_ Boi 11X3 +3® 
CiflEq USX +08 
DSDv 113)5 +06 
DS/LM 965 +01 
FrAAspc 1837 +.17 
ICMSC 1833 +.lp 

iraEql829- 

Pfdn9J6 


— fXS 
1764 +X3 

4X9 +09 

inoameA 1X73 +JU 
tocameD 13®- +06 
(nHA 17X2 —14 
toltD 1702 — 1* 
LATkA 807 . 

MattTXA 774—06 

703 — O* 

839 —0* 


MOTxA 

8S® 1 

NYT*A 

NCTxA 

PATxA 


**z5S 


7X2 




?S-05 
764 —05 
802— M 

■SSiS 

775 —03 

(JSGutAP 871 —01 
KYSdAp 8X9 —01 

*M 
807 +01 
IP 2900 +X4 
P 501 +07 

3P 962 +01 

Growth P. 15X9 +79 
PATFP 12® —03 
TF Incp 13322—03 
WOddP 0X5 —09 
- In 1470 >02 
S812+0O 

i^aS*+® 
mil® +;» 

rtn 

n ~1J9 



'■2 
957 

>057. +.10 
n 10X0 *73 
ah 

AMUB —03 
.PI0X3 — 333 
QdncAp 909 — 1> 
BriGrA p T151 —19 
FUnsAp 964 —05 
GrtncA p 1173 +07 
GrawthAnllXl +.14 



HSST 

GthCn 
InvTrAp 
toYTYB 
IrtvTrC 
tovTYD 
N YTFA P 

NYTTC 709 —jn 

KS9B p k9 iS 

StrModr 9.13 +® 


11X4—02 

i£ ::l 3 o 

BX2 >.11 

feS::]8 


7 g -® 


Arrdndn 
Assoc n 
invest n 


1® 

69 +31 

1.11 +01 

§3£tt„"’K5SS 

“ HyWonn \\M~m 
Incomcn 938 — in 

PnmeBjrtJxs —in 
spidn 22X7 +.12 
SbocZn 2303 +X3 
TaHRaT HX25X3 —13 
Ynglnvn 9.95 
FDndte 
n 9.19—01 
11X7 +.0* 
n 952 +.1* 
p 130* +X1 
93S +.01 


Hr 

wrMThnpiil? +M 

S»aRVSla 

CATFAP18® — M 


1822 +.13 


_ 1824 +.13 

®ssr =s 

1PTFAP 1861 —0? 
InTFBt 18®-® 
MunfflApM® —37 
MuntoBi 14® —07 
PATFAD187* —08 
PATFBt 1873—08 
STGtAp 803 — M 
ST GIB f 8® —06 
StoJnAp 11.93 —09 

tZfMI UA2—0S 

UlIIBt 13X1 +02 

^'l^+iOJ 
DepBstn 8307+1® 

DtverLn 171X2 +2.10 
Ebas 20053 +2.?? 
ExFd 2*607 +3^ 
FdEx 1*2.17 +207 
SxFld 12854 *67 


976 —01 

AdmLTn 9J 
AdmSTn 907 - 

Asset An 1187 +07 
ConvTn 1104 +0? 
Eqlncn >307 +.15 
Explorer r>43. 12 >72 
Ntoreann >1X4 +.15 
FYnvpn 196? +04 


Cjucrrin- 1572 +.16 


LMG avAn 965 
VakAAomen^H 


1366 +.12 


_ n2(X3 —39 
n 2061 +.12 
—12 


Ariwan hum +0) 
ArnUHn >006 + 06 
:nULl3 +02 
I 1764—02 



MdidBdh 9® — 04 
Ooptray 


n2> 64 +.14 

STBondn 972 

Wg&TS 

ISSSSK-^^ 

1502 +.11 
p 455 

FMSeSPlOJK 
WncAP 7^ —01 


HHncBP 


—02 




+39 

51567 +78 

kpllXl 

TEInaB . 11X2 —SB 
usgva • tn . _ 

USGvBp 802 _ 


Mured n' 979 

-st :.;i 


inttGrAp 11.18 . 
NatMUAoMte 


07090—03 
STOAP 23) —IQ 
STHB3IA P 238 ' . 

LTSGovAp 9X7 —01 


■tnl832 
■■pn 9X3 
UShxTn 9.92 
VtdEcdlnnxiTffll 
ValEaTn 1104 +06 
VAMuT n10J9 — 04] 
■ vaMunlt 1839 
5MftiaPBmK ■ 
Europe 10.15 —15 

rereren 770* +02 

■1070 +.T3 



in 9® +01 

SlrSTRn 103)5 +0> 
SttBoln 939 +05 
SfarSTFn 901 +01 
Stars n T1X1 +07 


TSWWJ 1864-2® 
RchTttopn 


i TUB +® 


AsiaTT 1809—01 
BdlYn .939 +33 
GFWnTrman— n 
©wfhrrn 7809 +09 

■ 9>a +.12 
n 962 —01 
rn»60 +JB 
01846 +00 
.. 14J0 +00 

■> 

MMOtoP2832 +01 
SocAWD 2674 . - 

RirauBd 904 — 3Q 
RtotcoSk 12.15 +.11 
RJvartnE 11.14 +.06 
g vrae GV I 930 +01 



939 ■ 
9® 


—01 


■TNMuObHH 

B u h+it y ia S N |9 l PW B 

Srtfrcn 1)00—24 

■■■>73 


Japratn... 1J® — 0] 


LatAmn 


McEMn 504 

MdTxFrn 9 ®. 


—01 


MidC3apnl662 +.19 
N«wAmn25Xtl +07 
N Asian 936 >30 
New&nnZl.iB —01 
Nw+ttznnl53Il +37 
NiTFn 1857—0* 
NtTxFn 1033 _03 

Oft n 8fi 
STBdn 40Q 
STGton 6X9 — m 
- ~ - 1*69 +® 


Smcvi 


■WiB 


n 

TFInsIn 

TxFrSIn 

USW — _ 

US Long 9® —03 

P%3r'' n \®7& 



SS^Jt 


Coptnca 

CoroSd 


2103 >05 
7.11 —02 

li®:® 

pjsa^ +J1 

AProsrtt 103)5 - 

Balance T177 +02 
CATF 1856 — 07 
Bqvra 1201 +03 


HvAdi 13X5 +.13 
GOWPlt 9.19 —01 

^IWPI U73 +.13 
_.TB»rt 876 —02 
PrtnMBS 9® +37 
PrincarFnds: 

BOp 1206 +.18 

Q«Aae 28)9. +.18 

gff* 

Growth 9® +X5 
Manned 1265 +05 
TE BO 11®— 04 
9® —10 
7 60 —01 

.. - 01 

RFMMupir — 

Aw toy 


nor ■ 

ProarsVl 182 
PlFFvtfltKn95 


BdGrowpUXZ >0B 
RoMlip 17®— OB 
LfCNYp 3X2—01 


S^SSLrA: 

CgjApA 1323 >® 
S5vtA- 1158— .10 
IncGroAPllDO +JM 
IncRBtA 965 +01 
toMA 1820—11 
MoGoytA U.07 +02 
MuGUfA 12.17 —01 
MuFLA 1272 — JD 
MuLMA 851 ._ 

MunMA 1320—01 


MuNJA 1116—01 
MuNYA 1275—® 


5HTSY 

USGvtA 

USAP 


430 
>273 +® 
-11X5 —13 




.... +® 

13® +0* 

» SS=:?? 

Sa M nwaroA “ 
AISGVA.P 9® 
AdwrAp 7637 +31 
AoGrAp 2506 +X4 


AggAp 11® +08 


P 1239. +.18 
Tejln 110X8 +1® 
AzMuAp 903 — 03 
CaMuAP 1568 — 06 


WvsSHncp770 — ^ 


FdVolAp 823 . 
QobBdA 1*77 —10 
G«A*P .2972 — 26 
glnAP 9.92 +36 
HilncA 1 »06 —07 
WCAA 817. IjB 
totfrlYA 8X0 —03 
UdMup 0® —0] 


Trtnfln 

TtUS 


13X0 +.10 
3309 - 

2964 +X2 


STTgy n 9.9? — 0] 


9.90 —01 

STCcrpn 1851 
ITTsryn 9.95 - 

GNMAn 9® +01 
rrcoran 9X5 — oi 

\ts=s 

i 9X2 -01 
. 973 —01 
950 - 

. 1057 +0B 

IdxSOOn 4360 +69 
IndxExtn 1892 +72 
kJxTotn 11X1 +.13 

idxGren io® +.17 
MbrVoln 1165 +.04 
Mxsmc 15X3 +.19 
ktxEMkt 102.13 +.10 
idxEurn 12X5 —IB 

MxPocn 1201 +06 
toxtnstn **.02 +50 
MuHTYdnlOXl -04 
Munition 12.93 —04 
MuLtdn 1055—01 
MuLong nl050 — JB 
Uubton 11.90 -JM 
MurShtn 156* —03 
CAlrBlT n 10.03 -03 
CAlTOLT nlD62— 0* 
H-tosn HL26— 04 
tUlnsn 11.11 —05 

OWran 11® 

PATns n 1077 — 8* 
gfnre r 15.91 -® 
SpGotdr 13® + jn 
3=Htthr 34X4 +79 
spum to® — on 


TO® —OS . 


LBgOn M.9B +Jf. 


mjm — ia 
Wailriyn 1812 
WaOnn 


UMDnn 2822 +.10 
WndB-n 1*6* +.1* • 
Wndsfl 17® +.18 


Muni nr 
RFFB*! 


407—® 
9.14 , 

1113 +.11 
894 -01 

„ t 1673 +X1 

rpFS >i® +0* 
RPFCv 1851 —01 
VfctorVFWKN:^ 

an 




105 +05 

10X3 

9® —01 
_rLS7 +3S 
t 31X6 +x* 
pnl2X6 I: J2 




._ .os 

11® —01 
. p 9.94 +.01 
..Iron II® —02 

«ssssrp^“ 

AZlns 10® —03 
CO TF 10.15 -04 

w- 


IntMu - 12® —03 
UriTIn 1107 _ 

UdCal 1250—02 
LtdGWp 12.15 
UdMOTipraX* — 03 
NMtnt 12 38—33 
13® +X6 



1844 +.18 

1074 - " 
961 —01 
9X0—01 
Funds: 

1075 +.12 
, . _in9X6 — 01 

.. Mimn 9® — 03 
.Si Govt n 9X5 +0> 


978 

11 ® +.12 
939-33 
24® +71 
2301 +69 
11® +39 
11.11 +® 
15X4 +3M 

STB— JJ2 

\TFAp 9.99 Z® 
731 

TJB — 01 
731 —05 
=t 9X4—03 


SSJttp-»-» 


•12X7— ® 


M0MUAP1553 —^6 


GvSegn 

Grin 


9X5 

1074 +3>5 

_MMWpr 11 72 +® 
Rare* PtradK 
Rmayto 877 *02 

ELS** 

KUwlwcpn 

ArrtSasn 11_. 
USGLgn 9JB —05 
US torn 8X1 —01 
MDTF.n 1851 —05 
VATFn 1078 —04 
Funds: 

10® +.19 
9.11 +X* 
07X1—05 
18T6 —12 
9XS— 15 
1854—01 



7 JO +.12 

>xi 

SBFtmdt 
fiafcncp 1139 +.12 
Band np 1821 —02 
" f P 9 ® —ffl 

*M**i 

m . _ 

P9® +01 

St Snap jgj.>J» 



loNRxin pniaxi— 02 


1829—01 


^.Jnp 9X6 _ 

toll p 1893—® 


Eqtocira 1811 +.15 

- -- +. l | 




S mCq ppnT204 +X1 


np 1065 +® 
m 1811 +.17 
815 +33 

STTftiadK 
Grlttnc 3*93 >J0 


MoMuApIZXS 

NiMpA p 1237 

NWMUAP 14X7 — 06 
19®— 27 
PfTRA 1575 +JM 

„ UWAp 13.18 —11 

Sre U jBnwSl iiM i B: 
ApGriB t 24SS +32 
Appjet 11® +JJ7 
GaM^f .15® — 356 




gJTPBt 1469—21 
gxwjf t 9 a — « 
FdVrtBt 820 +317 

Wi &=& 

a 51 

HHncBt 1136—37 

ILI!* —17 

1W^=S2 

PtAUBI 19.13 —28 
PrmTRBt>i75 +3M 
>» 17X1 +70 
16X5 +36 
„ +.18 
333 —04 
13.18—11 


ttivQAP 834—® 
TFBdA 1004 —03 
TFBrfflt 1003 —04 

KSP 950 —Ol 
MP199 6 951-01 
Feb97 9® 
7rtov97 9® . 

TJttnerGEnllXB +.18 
2+BWfyGV 1233 — 36 
— Cantonr. ■ 

Hnvn 1565 +.7* 
n 1662 +Xfi 
n 2203 +36 
9X4 +sa 
n565 +® 

LTBoiidn 9.12—03 
Select n 37X5 >xs 

?-?e -01 



n 1821 —02 




PmRetn 

111 

e 

smBrshG 0 90s 


Goto 11.17 +sn 
Intnl 2370 

& itfia 

pmGr 12X3 —IQ 

9® Z 

1801 

sss* ’*» ;S 

Jg "’ K tS 
ij), 


inl80S +X1 
1111285 +03 
180* —03 
M.10 +02 
930 -.01 
839—01 
1847 +.10 
I|as +38 

Jngomin 1158 Jl® 



TxB-1 



-- 12® —03 
Tn 12X4— 04 




—03 

1204 +® 


f-g +01 
IS + - 14 

9X7 +® 
19X2 +.15 

n-S +M 

.872 — 01 
1872-07 
—Of 
877 —QS 
837 _ 

8^ —fll 

„ 

i asa**-"" 

Aeeumu«v7J4 +j» 

5SJ 



CopApp n 13® +.1? 
BnGttin 


2059 +XB 

Fixdtacn 9.71 


GtoMF’xd n 1850 — 08 
Grtoc n 1199 >X1 


InlEou n 2057 +02 

a « +j : 

NYMpninlOX2 —02 

VlS^SSr:^ 

Dtvtoc ll® —01 

Govt 9X4 — 04 

Grtoc 22.14 +^ 


Gwm,_ 10178+13 


QuottEqn 5X9 +05 
fudo-n 21 


2891 +® 

WedzFValn 962 +® 


MtotaVUn MS 






X9.91 


1844 —sa 

LTM 979 —01 
ModVal 12® +X0 
OB TE 1605 — 05 
BOlnvIn 1B0S +03 
Basynn 71® +3)5 


«. Mit 


n io® +® 
__.-Dln15.99 +® 
STGOWt >835 +01 
BalinvRpl83)3 +04 
GNMARP15J4 +01 


WdooRp 16® 1+64 
STGevMplSXS +01 


7.03 +.04 


Banna 

Eotnst 

Irttfldf 9X9 
B^vc 700 +04 
EbSvs - +® 

9X9 —03 


“jyg 



>p 1874 +JP 
1079 —ns 

9® —05 

!Gov 9® —03 


in 9® —01 
WtoGrtn iojs +04 
WtoMTp 970—in 
VWnGltn 1350 +05 
WlnAGto 1553 + 74 



ScTte 


si.m *m 

a = 4 ? 

6g-3X 

*S5 *■** 

7,02 — » 
-STS -01 
1877 +X7 
7 34. +JB 
14X0 +® 


u!SS!S5^*S 


nlttJT— 01 

"Sg^ . 








iirl 


\’JT0CJ 


8‘i 




+>; 



ft ® +. i 5 


ZSAppA 18ia +3 



AooC 1404 +® 
MAC 11X4—01 
GVC . ?78 —at 


zsfc" 1U3 *M 






\jSu& 






f - 




..-ill ff W ; Ef Wft- 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, AUGUST 15, 1994- 


Page 9 


>pirit 


New Intemational Bond issues 

Cwnpikd by Laurence Desriettes 

fewer Amount ^ Coup. ^ 

(mnbns) “*■ : %■ 

Flowing Hf Notoe . ' r! '~ " 

AlPS 94-1 $372 - 2004 Hw-- - — ••• . — " te»spfcin3ttaneh6 


The Rate Debate Within the Fed’s Marble Halls 


Westfaefiscta 

bfypothBkenbank 

Royal Bank of 
Scotand 

FteecMtoopone 

AlPS 94-1 


Banco Ganodero 
Bayerische 

Landesbank 

LB Rheinland Pfcdz 

World Bonk 
WestLB Europe 

lrt'1 Nederland ’ 
Group 

European Investment 
Bank 


DM500- 1999 fiber I0&C2 . . — 


£150 1998 0j» W0.' — 


$410 2004 — ■ 


$125 1999' W'99iN-.— 
$200 1998^' 7 •101.3* 


$300 1997 6K 99.592 — 


$200- 1999 
m.l50 t 0Q& 1998 
0=500 - 2004- 


m 9TJW; 
10^r r 101-«' 

7% 99.225 


a 200: 2004 Wk 101 ^ 99 ^0 
.C$200 2004 9)6 101.52 .99.25 


■ tew spfit in 3 benches, paying berwnnOiO end 1.15 ow 1- 
monih IjIw, with average Irf* rongmg from-K3 to 5.1 jews 
fws 0 375 Id 0575% Denmten $100,000. 

B/ others Ml) 

IntoraP w£ be the Imornh bbor. NonoUoblB. Peas 0J0% 
(Boymiedw H yp ot hfllc e n mV d Wecfeel Bank} 

Ow 6month Libor. NonosBaWo. Fees 0 .25%-, Denanwrtkw 
£100,000. p.G. WorburgJ 


teoeipfitifti tranches, to yield between 1.05 ond 163 ow 
Treasuries, with overage fife ranging from 2. J to 47 years. 
Foes 0375 to (175% Denonmabons $100,000. (Lehman BncaK- 
«s ktf'L) 

Semiannually. Redeemable O 9H26 in 1997. Fee* nw da- 
dosed. (Gdbcmfc IntX) 

^offered a» 99.94. Nonoalbfah. Fee* IK* (We Sonic 

Corp4 

NoncaBoble. Fees 0.1875%. Denominations SI 0,000. {Lehamn 
Brothers WL) . 

SecniannuoSy. NoaodBaU*. Fen 1JK% (Norawa twTJ 

Nonco fab le. Fees IKK, pwia Bark Ctxp.1 

Reaffated at 98.60. Noncofable. Fungible with outttonefing 
issue, tmng total anoont to 1 bAon guilders. Fees 1%. (IMG 
Bank} 

Reoffend at 99. *22. Noncofable. Fees 2%. (Bwdayt de 
•Zoeto Wedd) 

Reoffered at 99.845. NoncoUaUe. Fees 2%. fPonbas Cental 
Markets) 


By Lawrence Malkin 

Imemenoad Herald Tribune 

NEW YORK — On Tuesday morn- 
ing al 9 A.M„ a grave group Of men and 
women will file m to a huge conference 
room at the marble headquarters of the 
Board of Governors of the Federal Re- 
serve System on Constitution Avenue, a 
few hundred yards from the Potomac 
River in a district of Washington known 
coincidentally but appropriately as Fog- 
gy Bottom. 

After they seat themselves around an 
oval conference table more than 20 feet 
long, seven governors of the Federal 

U.S. CREDIT MARKETS "" 

Reserve Board, including the newest, 
Janet Yellco, a Clinton appointee just 
sworn in, and twelve regional Reserve 
Bank presidents, five of whom join the 
board's voting on a rotating basis, wfl] 
sum their debate on monetary policy. 

According to one of the most senior 
participants, it actually “is a discussion 
among colleagues as a matter of courte- 
sy. We like to have eye contact-” A score 
of staff economists, who are highly es- 
teemed and commensurately paid but 
could probably triple their six-figure sal- 
aries cm Wall Street at any moment, sit 
against the beige walls, speaking only 
when spoken to by their superiors. 

Chairman Alan Greenspan sets the 


agenda, then guides and sums up the 
debate, which by all accounts is infor- 
mal and occasionally robust. Regional 
presidents contribute views from across 
the country that may have escaped 
Washington. Mr. Greenspan told Con- 
gress last week that despite a lifetime 
spent studying government statistics, he 
is skeptical of their precision. This, be 
said, had led him and the board increas- 
ingly to look for anecdotal evidence of 
economic activity so they can catch in- 
flation before it escapes from the bottle. 

Probably by lunchtime, the twelve 
voting members of the Federal Open 
Market Committee will have decided on 
the monetary policy of the United States 
for the next six weeks. In this case, the 
question they face is whether to raise the 
federal funds rate, which sets the whole- 
sale exist of money Tor banks, by one- 
quarter of a percentage point or ode-half 
— technically known as 25 or 50 basis 
points — or to do nothing at alL 

They also have to decide whether to 
make an announcement as they have 
done after the past four meetings, creat- 
ing what amounts to a precedent al- 
though no one at the Fed would admit it. 

For much of this month, members of 
the committee have been sending out 
signals with the uniformity of a Greek 
chorus. The dirge goes like this: After 
the lagging stimulus of declining interest 
rates, which was finally withdrawn when 


the Fed began raising them for the first 
time in five years on Feb. 4, the U.S. 
economy now is running close to capaci- 
ty. The labor market is tightening and 
the unmistakable signs of Inflation can 
be read in rising commodity prices if not 
yet in consumers' pocketbooks. 

Latest to lake up the chant was Gov- 
ernor John LaWare. a former Boston 
banker, who told his former colleagues 
on Friday that the economy was close to 
full employment and he saw “some sig- 
nificant job shortages,'' which would im- 
ply wage inflation down the line. 

“They all sound amazingly scripted." 
David Wyss of DRI/McGraw Hill said 
of the recent Fed statements. Even the 
White House has programmed another 
rate rise into its second-half economic 
forecasts. So that should settle it: Rates 
are going up again. Not necessarily. 

The big Wall Street bond houses lean 
toward predicting a 50-basis-point in- 
crease. Salomon Brothers Inc. argued in 
its weekly Comments on Credit that the 
previous rate increases have not yet 
slowed the economy, and its chief Fed 
watcher, Robert DiClemente, said: 
“We've been waiting three months since 
the last one and Greenspan already told 
us two or three times that he'll do it." 

But it also is not hard to cite conflict- 
ing and confusing trends that counsel 
inaction, and Aubrey Zaffuto, who runs 
her own consulting' firm, put forward 


eleven of them: a declining federal hud- 
get deficit; subdued retail and wholesale 
inflation while commodity prices re- 
bound; restrained wage demands: hous- 
ing and auto markets softening as inter- 
est rates rise; rising inventories likely to 
weigh on growth; a third quarter off to 
weak Stan; employment strong but may 
ease; more costly health care if reforms 
pass; strong capital spending: high con- 
sumer confidence and two new board 
members appointed by President BUI 
Clinton. “Conclusion." she wrote in her 
weekly letter to clients. “No change in 
rates this lime." 

And what does the Fed say? Nothing 
officially, but one of the senior staff who 
sits along the wall confided: “I’ve been 
going to these meetings for 20 years and. 
Believe me. 1 never can predict how 
they’ll come oul’’ 

■ Bond Market Waiting for Action 

Treasury bond traders will focus on 
the Fed this week, and a rate increase 
would probably be supponive to prices 
even though rate increases Lend to un- 
dermine the value of outstanding bonds, 
news agencies reported. 

The new long bond sold by the Trea- 
sury on Thursday finished the week at a 
yield of 7.50 percent, down from the 
average 7.56 percent it garnered when ii 
was sold. It closed Friday at par. or 100. 
after having been auctioned at 99.256. 

(Bloomberg, Kniglu-Ridder) 


Mb$ 100 2000 9% 10134 ' Nonenfloble, Foes 7%. fllwdoy* de Zoete Wedd) 


Credh Local de ' a«$10Q "2000' 9* " 101% , - — . 

France . 

Ford Crecfit Auttrdia aw$75 1 999 9% .101,64 . ~ 

Queensland Treasury Audi 100 1997 4ft 91JW — 

Corp. ’ ' 

AusJraficn Wheat YlO,OQO 1997 3!4 100 : — 

Board ‘ ' : ' . , ' • 

Int'l Finance Corp. Y 20,000 1997 314 10G.13r 99.95 


9% : 101.64 ■ 

4W 91 sm — . 


YIO^JOO 1997 314 100 . — 


IB Rheinland Pfahe 
Nova Scotia 


Y10.000 1997 

Y 15,000 2014 


33) 100 — ■ 

51 h. -100 — 


Nonoafiobfa. Fat* 2%. |Mocquoric Bqnkj 

" Somianmxdly. NonoaUabl*. Fms 1%V Danomi nations 
AutfOOXl (Nomura faflj 

Noneotobte. Fms not cfadosed Dananmotion 100 raffiai 
(CS Fint Boston.) . 

Noneolafata. Fern 0. 1875V Dwiownations 100 inOon yen. 
(FOy Infl FncnceJ 

Noncdtable. Fee* not tfedowd (Satomon Brothers Inti) 

Cafiable et par from 2004. Private pla ce ment. Fees not 
dsdosed. Denominations 1 mttcfl yen. (Yanmchi ktfl] 


Privatization Goes to Prison China Office Prices Skyrocket 


U.S. Airlines Ignite Fare War 


By Adam Bryant 

New York TUnss Service 

NEW YORK — Several big UJS. airlines have 
decided to cut fares by as much as 50 percent on 
flights this fall, adding to a string of recent air 
fare sales. 

Although the airlines are having a busy sum- 
mer, the fare sales suggest that carriers are not 
selling as many seals as they would like fear the 
fall, industry analysts said 

“At this rate, the airlines may soon start pay- 
ing passengers to fly," said Julius Maldutis. an 
airline stock analyst for Salomon Brothers Inc. 
“Even so, there may be limited capacity available 
at these low fares." 

Continental Airlines began fire latest sale 
Thursday. American, United, USAir arid Trans 
World Airlines said they would match the fares 
on most routes. 


The reduced fares are for domestic travel from 
Aug; 27 to Dec. 10, and. tickets must be pur- 
chased .by Aug. 26. Fare cuts are available for 
international flights from Sept. 5 to Dec. 10. 

In (he past 30 days, big amines have offered a 
new sale every week, said Tom Parsons, editor of 
Best Fares Discount Travel Magazine. 

, The predictable rhythm of fare specials has 
made it easier for vacationers to reserve tickets 
with some confidence that they are buying at the 
right time. . 

- In recent months, analysts have suggested that 
travelers wait until discounts reach at least 30 


percent before buying tickets for a planned trip. 

Despite the pattern of fare wars, the number of 
specials recently has surprised some analysis. 

Tri the past 12 years," Mr. Parsons said, “I 
cannot remember this many different fare sales 
m a 30-day period." 


WORLD STOCKS IN REVIEW 


Vfa AgMCT 

-lB .1. 

Amsterdam 


Amsterdam shares fell last 
week after a sharp drop on Fri- 
day, which left the EOE index - 
at 414.43 points, down more 
than five points ^from 419.67 the 
week before. 

The rise in Swedish and Ital- 
ian interest rates depressed the 
market. But better-than-eqjecf- 
ed UJS. economic data limited 
the losses, brokers said. 

Shares in the foods group 
Unileyer, which published 
strong half-year results, slipped 
0.10 guilders over the week to 
195.90. 

The electronics group Philips 
rose 1J0 guilders to 57.30 gml- 
dere, and the oil group Royal 
Dutch/SheQ dipped to -193.00 
guilders. 

Frankfurt 

German shares were de- 
pressed by a slide in bond prices 
and dipped further when Italy 
and. Sweden raised their interest 
rates. _ 

The DAX index of 30 leading 
shares closed at 2,124.68 points 
Friday, a fall of 2-75 percent in 
. a week. _ 

The moves by the Bank of 
Italy and the Riksbank of Swe- 
den to increase interest rates 
raised fears on the market that 
other European central banks 
might follow. 

Banks were . hard hit, with 
Deutsche Bank dropping 45.20 
Deutsche marks to 693 2D DM. 
Commerzbank fell . 18 DM to 
320, and Dresdner Bank 
dropped 11 DM to 379 DM. 

Daimler-Benz dropped 33 JO 
DM to 801.80 DM, and AlHam 
dropped 128 DM to 2,362 DM. 

Among car manufacturers, 
VW shed 1170 DM to 504.80 
DM and BMW lost 7 DM to 
855. . . . 

Cyclicals were the only 

shares that managed to weather 

the market slide. VESA, which 
posted a 42.7 percent increase 
in net profits in 
months of the year, rose 930 
DM to 53730. Thyss* m- 
Creased730 DMto 31730 DM, 
Preussag 1-80 DM to 481.00 
DM and Krupp 230 DM to 
226.00 DM. 

Hong Kong 

Hong Kong stock pricefrieU 
41 .43 percent on renewed rears 
the United States might raise its 

rates. _ . , . , 

The Hang Seng Index lost 
137.65 points to close at 
9,464.56 Friday- • 

Awrawdaayvolffl*fdl“ 
4.084 billion Hong Kong ooj- 
lare from the previous week s 
5.493 billion. .. . 

Most blue-chips suffered 

losses during 

Hongkong Bank fell 4 -^ol- 
lars to 91 30 dollars on fears of 


' a poor earning! report, while 
Hongkong Land shed 90 cents 
Fell last to 2035 dcfllars. 
icinFrir Jardine Matheson rose 2 dol- 

E index - tors, to 6335 dollare. Swire Pa- 
il move dfic fell '7 dollars, to 58.75, on 
i9.67 the poor profits. 


London 


■ Concerns that UJS. and Eu- 
ropean interest rates are headed 
higher depressed the London 
market. Brit those worries were 
slightly, eased after the U.S. 
consumer priceindex indicated 
lower^ihaniis^ected mflation- 


The Financial Times- Stock 
Exchange 100-share index 
closed at 33423 points Friday, 
registering a weekly loss of 03 
percent. ' 

. Statistics showing the prices 
of British manufactured prod- 
ucts were unchanged in July 
betoed the market, but a record 
£683 million rise in consumer 
credits was considered bearish. 

. British Airways fell 5 pence 
to 424 pence despite a 39.6 per- 
cent rise in first-quarter pretax 
. profits —analysts had expected 
better results. ■ 

Sharesiu Barclays rose on the 
bank's record half-year profits 
of more than. £L billion, but 
then dropped 12 pence; to 547 
on profit-taking. 

Milan 

The rocky performance of 
Prime Nfinisier Silvio Berlus- 
coni dominated the Milan stock 
market again tost week, pushing 
the hfibtd inde* down 73 per- 
cent to 10,347 points. 

The political uncertainty 
caused the lira to slump on in- 
ternational money markets. 

- . To stem the bra’s slide, the 
Bank of Italy raised its discount 
rate to 73 from 7.0 percent, but 
the move was counterproduc- 
tive, sending the lira even lower 
Friday. 

Carmaker Fiat fell 838 per- 
cent to 6^67 lire, clothes group 
Benetton lost 7.45 percent to 
21,184 fire, and the Comit 
banking group fell 935 percent 
to4347'tirc. 

Paris 

Paris shares fefl tost week, on 
theEurc^eanraleincreasesand 
os inflation worries. 

The market's main indicator, 
the CAG40 index, M 4.7 per- 
cent to 2,006.95 points from 
2,107.07 the week before. 


j^wfh; creating fears of infia- 
tion. 

The institute dismissed the 
fears but dealers stayed con- 
vinced rates would be increased 
at (be first hint of higher prices. 

Singapore 

Unlike the Hong Kong and 
European markets, shares in 
Singapore rose last week with 
heavy buying by institutional 
and retail investors lifting activ- 
ity after a quiet fortnight. 

The key market indicator, the 
Straits Times Industrials index, 
soared 44.67 points to 2317.79 
points. 

Dealers said interest focused 
on Malaysian stocks. 

Sentiment was boosted by 
the Malaysian central bank’s 
announcement that it was lift- 
ing the ban on foreign invest- 
ments m short-term debt instru- 
ments. 

Total volume for the holiday- 
shortened week was 13 billion 
shares from 998.2 million 
shares the week before. 

Singapore Press Holdings 
jumped 1.80 dollars to 28.80 


wed: because the market is 
dosed Monday for a religious 
holiday. 

The market’s July rally was 
brought to a halt by forecasts 
from the INSEE economic in- 
stitute of strtmger-fiiaiKKptta.- 
ed first-quarter economic 


Tokyo 

Share prices continued their 
upward trend on the Tokyo 
Stock Exchange last week, de- 
spite profit-taking on Friday 
triggered by the appreciation of 
the yen against the dollar. 

The Nikkei Stock Average of 
225 selected issues dosed the 
week at 20,663.83, up 142.13 
points or 0.7 percent from a 
week earlier. 

Foreign investors were buy- 
ing low-priced issues, including 
chemicals and steelmakers. 

On Friday, the Nikkei index 
lost more than 150 points as the 
yen's renewed strength against 
the dollar triggered sales of 
some export-oriented issues, 
traders said. 

Steelmakers were higher, 
with Nippon Steel climbing 8 
yen to 371 yen, and Kawasaki 
Stcd'up 7 yen to 414 yen. 

Automakers also finned. 
Honda Motor edged up 10 yen 
to 1,730 yen, Nissan Motor rose 
8 yen to 790 yea and Toyota 
Motor 40 yen to 2,170 yen. 

Zurich 

Zurich shares slipped at the 
end of the week, with the Swiss 
performance Index falling 1 13 
points, or 0.6 percent, to 
1,715.03. 

The threat of a more general- 
ized rise in rates around Europe 
weighed heavily on financial 
shares, dealers said-. 

UBS fell 55 Swiss francs to 
1,095. CS Holding lost 394 to 
531 and SBC lost five to 33. 
Both groups are to aimounce 
their half-year results this week. 


By Anthony Ramirez 

.Vw York Tuna Semtx 

NASHVILLE, Tennessee — 
Ernest Anderson cocks back his 
shining bald bead and smiles a 
gap-toothed smile as he talks 
about crime, punishment and 
private emerpnse. 

“I am a career criminal,” Mr. 
Anderson said. Then, (he 35- 
year-old convict goes on to de- 
scribe the Iasi decade of his life, 
years filled with gunplay, drug 
dealing and struggling, often 
unsuccessfully, with what he 
calls "my anger problem." He 
has spent most of those years in 
prison, five different ones. 

Seasoned criminals like him 
account for the majority of the 
1 million people locked up in 
state and federal prisons today 
— five times the number two 
decades aga But Mr. Anderson 
is one of a small but growing 
number of prisoners, less than 2 
percent of inmates, who are be- 
ing guarded, fed and put 
through rehabilitation programs 
run not fay the government, but 
by private companies. 

So far, this veteran consumer 
of prison services sounds satis- 
fied. “Until this facility, with 
this facility’s programs, 1 have 
not been given the opportunity 
to turn my life around,” Mr. 
Anderson said. 

..His current' readence._' the 
-Metro-Davidson Detention Fa-- 
dirty in Nashville, is managed 
by the Corrections Corp. of 
America, the largest company 
in the business of running for- 
profit prisons. 

Private prisons are not new; 
they date back to colonial 
times. But by the 1950s, prison- 
er-abuse scandals at private fa- 
cilities led to the public admin- 
istration of prisons. The 
private-prison movement re- 
vived in the early 19S0s, but 
grew slowly for years. 

But while the private-prison 
business has critics and a checker- 
ed past, its future seems bright. 
The $33 billion crime bill that is 
stalled, for now, in Congress 
would have accelerated the indus- 
try’s growth even more with more 
than $10 biffian for prison con- 
struction, some of which would 
have gone to private prisons. 


Disney Pulls Film 
Until Holidays 

New York Tuna Service 

LOS ANGELES — Walt 
Disney Co. has decided to pull 
“The Lion King" from movie 
theaters at the end of next 
month, even though the hit ani- 
mated film is still drawing 
crowds and could continue to 
do so through the fall. 

But moviegoers will still have 
another chance for a taste of this 
year's biggest box-office hit: 
Disney, in an unusual marketing 
move, is trying to bottle up de- 
mand for “The Lion King” until 
the big holiday movie-going sea- 
son — and make up for not 
having a new animated release 
for Thanksgiving for the first 
time in several years. I 

As such, the film will be re- j 
released in late November. 



Contact: Kathleen HuO. NBA*. 
Washington, D.C, USA. 

Teuaaziny^i&t 
Fax: ( 2021 802-5552 


Still, the industry's optimism 
remains unshaken, explained 
mainly by the unchecked US. 
problems of crime and over- 
crowded state and federal pris- 
ons. The need to control govern- 
ment spending makes privately 
managed prisons look like an in- 
creasingly attractive alternative. 

The reputation of the $250 
million-a-year private- prison 
business has also improved late- 
ly. The industry is still small, 
with nearly a score of little com- 
panies in the field. But the rwo 
largest companies. Corrections 
Corp- and Waekenhm Correc- 
tions Corp-, which went public 
last month, hold more than half 
of the private-prison population. 

Policy experts say these com- 

S ' 5 manage a wide range of 
ties and are developing inno- 
vative drug-rehabilitation, educa- 
tional and job-training programs. 

Leading the industry is the 
Corrections Corp. of America, 
based in Nashville. Its 23 prisons 
under contract in seven states 
house about a third of the pris- 
oners in the United States who 
are now held in private facilities. 
Last year, the company's profits 
rose 57 percent to $4 million on 
revenues of $100 million. 

This year. Corrections 
Cotp.’s Income rose 30 percent 
during tiie first half, and ana- 
lysts predict further, growth, 
Over the next two years, the 
company's 13.000 beds under 
contract should increase by 85 
percent and profits should more 
than double, estimates William 
Oliver, an analyst at Equitable 
Securities in Nashville. Correc- 
tions Corp.'s share price more 
than doubled in the Iasi year, 
dosing Friday at $15.75. 

The company also lias been 
able to win over some former 
critics with its ability to cut 
costs and offer ample prison 
services. Policy analysts and 
prisoner advocates worry that 
private contractors, like Correc- 
tions Corp, will run hare-bones 
prisons to maximize profits. Af- 
ter all, private operators are 
paid a flat per-day fee for each 
prisoner. 

But so far, these experts say 
that Corrections Corp. has sur- 


prised them and prompted 
them to rethink at least the 
Nashville company's version of 
prison privatization. 

William C. La Rowe, director 
of the Texas Center for Correc- 
tional Services, a prisoners' 
rights group, says he was once a 
fierce opponent of prison priva- 
tization and of Corrections 
Corp. But Mr. La Rowe, who 
has made unannounced visits to 
Texas prisons for years, likes 
what he has seen. 

“At Corrections Corporation 
prisons you don’t have the at- 
mosphere of impending vio- 
lence that you have in a state 
prison." Mr. La Rowe said. “If 
Corrections Corporation ran 
more prisons, I am sure you’d 
see an increase in savings and a 
decrease in violence." 

Euromarls 
A* a Glance 

Eurobond Yields 

Aub.13 Aim. 5 VrMBhYrMw 


US. S. to* term m 7.83 
lLS.«.minUnn 7M 732 
05. t short ierui ijf &JA 
PoDMtSOtfSn* BBS US 
Fiwt tomes US 7JB 
itoflnllre 1039 1033 

OfWrtti krona SOI 7M 
SwtKMt ton* WJB 1831 


7J4 6JI 
7 an 53S 
ui m 
US 124 
730 SB 
1037 »Jl 
U1 420 
I0LJH 7JW 
8JV *.1S 
7JM &B1 
1M ' SJ8 
Ml 

&JM 5.W 
4B U7 



I 

turns 1 

Ntot 

HnittM* 

£13850 M4KU0 3UI34D 27.I18J0 

Convert. 

43150 

5306 15000 

157490 

FlUb 

6.WU0 

79240 2SJ79J0 

44*940 

ECP 

62900 

940740 1 055041 7142040 

TOW 

2348030 2S0Z7.1O *348040 54412J0 

Source: EurocJetjr. Cadet 


Libor Ratos 


Aug. 12 


l-tnonto Mosalb 

+06016 

us. < 

4 It/M 

< 14/74 

5% 

Dortxdie oxrt 5 

6 

tint 

PouMsttriteg 56/16 

SWli 

tft 

Freacklraae 

5 nnt 

513/U 

6+ 

ECU 

tint 

tint 

6% 

Te* 

HIS 

73/14 

7% 

Sources: Uoyds Bonk, Reuters. 



This week’s topics: 

o Japan's Big Industrial Selloff 
o Boeing Cuts A New Deal In Asia 
o Spain's Phone Company Goes Latin 
O U.S. Tourists: Oh Say Can We Spend 
o Russia: Nose Cones to Ice Cream Cones 

Wow available at your newsstand! 

BusinessWeek International 
14, av tronefty, CH-1006 Lausanne Tel. 41-21-617-4411 
For subscriptions call UK 44-628-23431 Hong Kong 852-523-2933 


OCTOBER 4, 5 & 6 

National BastoessAhoaft^ssodatioo 
47 & Annual Meeting & Convention 


OCTOBER 17-20 j 

The American 
Dietetic Association (ADA) 

AIM’s TTthAraral wamgand Exhibtoi wit 
oddnaihe danenc dynamtsd loda/s health 
£ 2 »rfarfeiplMwtioarecS)a^^«^ 
forrfiediefBdcspidesacn U will inauda otaete 
, onfunsesriduaiy nends. updatescnihelaea 
StSentBcTOaidi andpracuce ledmanesara 
anaftbinnwilh newly im companies as- 
piayiflgsaecfcte-art fssovft-s. sqi^pnert. 
ted p mrtiitp; and edncaitcnai tools 

Contact Cerri A Sahotore, CEM 
TeL 3 12/899-0040 
Fax: 3 1 2/899-0008 


FEB, lfr-18 

Societies tn Crisis 
and Mental Health 


eamiuss ®id soanapaswill aamnethe 
menial health efleos on society d 
Unanptemem . fmrntpaon and Victence 
EwopeanSoaal Minisuies and 
In emsorel Socel Oronoucns uriemnee 
ocarnes sect soaaily-awaie Ccmwws » 


NEW ORLEANS, LA, USA ORLANDO, FLORIDA USA 


sohe these pedtons. 

QmtKt Mercme Communication 
International. 

TeJ,- 133 - 1 ) « 09 17 70 
Fav 133 - 1 145 63 25 66 

PARIS 


Bloomberg Butinas News 

BELTING — A rush by foreign 
companies to establish represen- 
tative offices here has pushed 
rents up sharply and prices are 
beading even higher, a Construc- 
tion Ministry official said. 

Xu Xiaoqing told the official 
China Daily on Sunday that the 
price of office space has risen 
between 30 percent and 40 per- 
cent in the past year. Rents are 
likely to rise another 10 percent 
to 15 percent this year and 20 
percent next year, Mr. Xu said. 


Potential demand for office 
space remains high. Only 2.600 
of 6,500 foreign companies that 
registered in the capital last 
year have opened offices. 

Beijing's real estate market is 
largely a seller's domain be- 
cause there is little high-class 
office space available. 

Monthly rental for a West- 
ern-style office now runs about 
S50 a' square meter, with the 
prestigious China World Trade 
Center charging up to S70 a 
square meter. 




Money Rates 



AUS. 5 

OiVe 

United state* Aus. 12 

Aug. 5 

134701 

+058% 

Discount rale 

3't 

3’i 

18943 

-074% 

Prime rale 

7 m 

7'-m 

159623 

+ 077% 

Federal funds rate 

*'* 

4 3.' 16 

42117 

+ 182% 

Japan 



45749 
532.1 B 
25250 

+ 1.06% 
+ 1.17% 
+ 090% 

Discount/ 

Call money 

3-month interbank 
Garmoav 

IV 

2'« 

2'. 

14* 

200 

2 3/16 

11 6750 
247150 

—180% 
—021 % 

6.00 

400 

Lombard 

Coll money 

5.00 

540 

70522. 

+ 04* % 

3-monih interbank 

Brttnln 

SJU 

5JOO 

2.18476 

—276% 

Bank base rate 

S*«4 

5‘.* 

Call money 

4% 

S 00 

940271 

—143% 

3-montti Interbank 5 ll/lo 

5 11/16 



Go U Aus. 72 

Alto 5 

Clfge 

43270 

—051% 

London pm. 11x5 37870 

37050 

— 070% 


ecu,i«Micno ui u sj* o.ia | 

ECU. RKka torn 7M IjB 7JH &B1 

CofcS 731 «4 IM - 638 

«Al *31 *31 M* 

Hi* » W WM 5.W 

Yob 431 *32 432 33/ 

Source: Luxemoauro Stock Exchange. 

Weekly Sales a n 

pilr .w ¥ wrttN 

Ccdri Enodrar 

* Hool S NWS 
stnntoft 37-00 15130 3M30 M37.1D 

C MM HO - 30.10 43150 

FENS - - 40* 4*10 

ECP 4302.18 wa*0 1)336* 175730 

Toted 43030 107740 0.146* 838070 


Las* Week’s Markets 

All figures are as of close of trotting Fiidav 

Stock Indexes Money Rates 

United Stole* Aug. 12 Aus. S OiVe United Stnlw 

DJ Indus. 174071 17470? +OJ8 % Discount rale 

□J Util. 1BS.97 18943 —024% Prime rale 

DJ Trans. 140040 159623 + 027% Federal Funds rale 

SOP 100 42442 42117 +082% japan 

SIP 500 441.94 457J19 + 1-06 % r“ m . 

SAPInd 53840 532-1 B +1.17% 

NYSECP 25477 25250 + 090% SZaXZrttank 

Orttotn Gnrmrav 

FTSE100 114230 114750 —040% 

FT 30 14*180 147U» —021% Lombard 

jgwn Coll monev 

Nikkei 225 20444. 20572. +04«% >man lh interbank 

Sannow 

DAX 112448 118476 —276% Ban*, base rale 

noon Komi P alt "? H y [ . . 

HongSw 944456 940771 -143% *«nontt, InlerbanV 

World Au 

M5CIP 62950 43770 —051% London pm. 11x5 37 

WtorfcF Index From Morwn Stonier Capital Inti 


AUGUST 22-27 

19 4 4 

TOE LIBERATION OF PARIS 

Following the success of the 
Normandy landings in early June 1944, 

Allied troops continued fighting throughout 
the summer across the north of France, 
finally reaching the outskirts of Paris. 

In the last days of August, as the 
Allies approached the city, the unarmed 
population of Paris - reinforced by a small 
number of armed resistance fighters - rose 
against the occupying German forces. In 
four days of street battles and general 
insurrection, Paris was liberated. 

To commemorate these dramatic 
days, we will reproduce the six front pages 
from the New York Herald Tribune chronicl- 
ing the week of August 22 through 27. 

Events covered in that same 
extraordinary week include the liberation of 
Marseille, Grenoble, Le Havre and Rouen, 
plus an exclusive report following the 
liberation of Florence. You’ll follow the 
reports day-by-day from the Herald 
Tribune’s award-winning team of war 
correspondents. 

Don't miss the International Herald 
Tribune’s special commemorative series 
starting Monday, August 22nd. 


INTEKtoUlUPUL * 




ribunc. 


nw<u *"T'i nre nu mo wo m ■twa.-rat nn 


I A»*riegB>lwrEa4.G»fmuMi UwMilH-UK j * *" ' g— ; 

1 Jte* eg Vko* to Trap Nw- Auw Lk J 

| Frmrb Troup- Within 3 Hilo of Mar*rilli* ijBfegaa f 










U) 

9 ; 


Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, AUGUST 15, 1994 


The Week Ahead: World Economic Calendar, Aug. 15-20 


A scncame or ins *ee*'s ecfrWmtc ant 
Unanagi events, CompritKl lot ItK Interna- 
tiona i Herafa Tribune by Bloomberg Bust- 
mssiunvs 

A3la-Pacfflc 

• Aug. IS Hong Kong Monetary Au- 
Ihontyra how tender for the sxtfi issue ot 
two-year exchange fund notes 
Tokyo Ministry of international Trade 
and industry announces revaeo industn- 
al production figures for June 
Earnings expected China Overseas 
Land and Investment, Hang Seng Bank, 
HSBC Holdmgs and South See Develop- 
ment Co 

•Aug. 16 Hong Kong Unemployment 
data for Ao»- June 1 934 
Tokyo Japan Iron and Steel Federation 
releases July steel production. 

Sri Lanka National elections 

■ Aug. 17 Hong Kong Shares in Chi- 
na's state-controlled Qinglmg Molars, 
which assembles isuzu trucks and mini- 
buses. begin trading on the Hong Kong 
Stock exchange after me company s ini- 
tial public offering ot snares 

■ Aug. IB Canberra Housing financing 
data tor June. Forecast Gain ot 2 percent. 
Canberra Corporate profits lor June 
quarter. 

Sydney Westp* Bank leading index for 
June 

■ Aug 19 Darwin Prime Minister Paul 
Keating and Treasurer Raton Wilks host 
Council of Australian Governments meet- 
ing. All state premiers to attend. Topic 
The economy. 


Hong Kong cnfere-oiwwfw data tor 
manufacturers for June 

Europe 

• Aug. 15 Amsterdam June produoer 
price tnde*. 

Frankfurt Bundesbank, releases August 
report. 

Helsinki July consumer price index. 
Forecast: Up 1 B percent in year 
Expected sometime this week 
Brussels January industrial production. 
Frankfurt July wholesale pme index. 
Forecast- Up 0-3 percent. 

Amsterdam July unemployment rate. 
Forecast. Up 02 percent. 

Frankfurt July producer price index. 
Forecast. Up 0.1 pPrcem in month, up 0.4 
percent in year 
Zurich July trade balance. 

Frankfurt July 14-3 from fourth-quarter 
base. Forecast Up 03 percent In month, 
up 10.x percent hi year. 

Stockholm June retail sate. Forecast 
Up 0 J percent in year. 

• Aug. 16 Frankfurt Details of Treu- 
h and an stall five-year bond auction an- 
nounced. 

London July public- sect or borrowing 
requirement. Forecast Li. 5 triHkm. 
London Confederation of British Indus- 
try releases its survey ol dfetnbuttve 
trades. 

Paris Bank of France securities repur- 
chase tender Outlook: 56.4 billion French 
hranca of securities repurchase agree- 
ments expiring. 

Paris Weekly treasury bill auction. 


SKmMnfm July consumer price index. 
Forecast- Up 2.9 percent in year, 
a Aug 1? Frankfurt BKB dose tor 
Treuhandanstait five year bond. 

Helsinki 1995 budget tdlis begm. 
London Juty ratal price index. Forecast. 

Down 0.2 percent m month, up 2.6 per- 
cent in year. 

London July retail price index minus 
mortgage Interest payments. Forecast 
Up 2.5 percent in year. 

London July unemployment. Forecast. 
Down 18,000- 

London June average earnings. Fore- 
cast: Up 3 75 percent in year 
London June unit wage costa. Forecast 
Up 1.5 percent in year 
a Aug 1 8 Frankfurt Bundesbank cen- 
tral council meeting. 

London July retafl sales Forecast: Up 
0.3 percent in month, up 3.7 percent In 
yoar. 

Stockholm July unemployment rate. 
Forecast 8 9 percent, 
s Aug. 19 Amsterdam June industrial 


Amsterdam June rated safes. 

Ports June industrial production. Fore- 
cast Up 03 percenL 
Paris June manufacturing production. 
Forecast- Up 03 percent. 

Stockholm July trade balance. Fore- 
cast: 8.D billion kronor. 


Americas 

■ Aug. 15 Washington 
session all week. 


Congress in 


Washington July maustnst prvcuaton 
and capacity utuuadoa 
Washington Federal Home Loon Bank 

announces suctions. 

• Aug. 16 Washington July houartg 
starts mid building permits. 

Washington Federal Open Market Com- 
mittee meeting. 

RtodeJffltetre Tne central bank expect- 
ed fa auction 28-day debt central bank 
notes. Outlook: Rales to me from 4.72 
percent. 

Mexico City The central bank an- 
nounces results ol its weekly bona auc- 
tion. Outlook. Rotes down Pom 7.10 per- 
cent 

• Aug. 17 Ottawa June’s rwtMy sur- 
vey ot manulactunng. 

Ottawa The Canadian govemmeni wffl 
sell fire-year bonds in its quarterly mic- 
tion. 

■ Aug. IB PMadtipMa The Phriadel- 
phia Federal Reserve releases its monthly 

survey ol economic activity tor August. 
Washington June merchandise trade. 
Ottawa June's nemauonai trade re- 
port. 

Washington The Labor Department re- 
ports initial weekly state unemployment 
compensation insurance dams. 
W ashi ngton The Treasury Department 
reports weekly money Supply. 

• Aug. 19 Washington The Treasury 
Department reports July budget 
Ottawa Consumer price index tor July. 

Washington The Federal Reserve re- 
leases its weekly report of assets and 
Bounties ol U S. commercial banks. 


RATES: Higher Rates in Italy (md Stx^den Are Not Necessarily a Trend 


Continued from Page 1 

central bankers to resist pres- 
sures for pre-emptive strikes 
a gains t inflation in their econo- 
mies, holding short-term inter- 
est rates firm. But long-term 
rates are beyond central bank- 
ers' control- And in the long end 
of the market, the moves have 
already been dramatic. In 
France, 10-year bond rates now 
stand at 7.85 percent, up from 
6.94 percent three months ago. 
In Germany, they are now 7.27 
percent versus 6.62 percent in 
May. 

Typically, rising long-term 


interest rates hit particularly 
hard at bousing construction 
and business investment plans. 
Mr. Thumann, however, said 
that in the current environment 
ol steeply rising corporate prof- 
its, the impact on investments 
should prove negligible. - - 

The Continent’s two largest 
economies are generally expect- 
ed to shrug on the impact of 
last week’s interest rate moves 
by Sweden and Italy, and even 
the broader increases forced by 
jittery bond markets. For oth- 
ers. the impact of last week’s 
events is less certain. 


Some analysis noted that of- 
ficials in H en mart and. Italy r 
Europe’s fastest-growing econ- 
omies ’at present, could face 
greato pressure to tighten up 
monetary policy. Others predict 
.that. .Finland. and Norway may 
Ke forced to take some action to' 
stay, competitive with their 
neighbor Sweden, in light of the 
fall in value of the krona. Such 
action would probably, take the 

rather t h a n of copycat rate in- 
creases — rate rises normally 
being the step taken to buoy & 
currency rather than sink it. 

In - Britain, where recovery 


w taken root sooner than any- 
where else in Europe, hope or 
further interest rate cuts fin- 
ished months ago. TJie Bank of 
Eaojknd has been leaning to- 
ward higher interest rates since 
mid-summer, an inclination not 
yet shared by the Treasury. An- 
alysts are belling that policy- 
makers will raise the cost of 
borrowing in the next three 
months. “Monetary policy is as 

loose as it has ever been at this 

stage of an economic cycle, 
said Me. Harnett of Strauss 
TwnbulL “It is too late for a 
preemptive strike against infla- 
tion here.” 


NASDAQ NATIONAL MARKET 


Consolidated trading for week 
ended Friday, Aug. 12. 
(Continued) 


Div yw IPOs Hfeh Low Cfee Owe 


On October 6th, the IHT will publish a Special 
Report on 

The Automotive 
Industry 

Among the topics to be covered are: 

■ The auto industry's dream of a “global car. 

■ Efforts to develop a cost-effective electric car. 

■ The latest safety features available 
in current models. 

■ A strong comeback for the American 
car industry. 

■ Major players in the China market 

This supplement wiB coincide with the "Mondial de 
r Automobile" show, which wiB he held in Paris from 
September 29th to October 9th. 

For further information, please contact BiB Mahder 
in Paris at (33- 1)46 37 93 78. fax: (33-1) 46375044. 

-yfr 4 W IVTFRMT10ML Ffett» « 4 

it cral o rj ,^erib un e 


International 

Classified 

Marketplace 

• Monday 

International Conferences and Seminars 

• Tuesday 
Education Directory 

• Wednesday 

Business Message Center 

• Thursday 

International Recruitment 

• Friday 

Real Estate Marketplace, Holidays and Travel 

• Saturday 

Arts and Antiques 

Plus over 300 headings in International Classified 
Monday through Saturday 
For further information, contact Philip Oma in Paris: 
Tel: (33-1) 46 37 94 74 - Fax: (33-1) 46 37 52 12 

Hcralb^SErtbunc 


GanWwl 

GonOHo 

Gander 

vIGoUm 

GardDen 

Gomel 

Gartner 

GCSOreCS 

GafeFA 

GOlllTOOG 

GtwllcP 

GlwyOn 

Geariwd 

GeW 

GnCrHIt 

Genet. Tc 

GenaMed 

GnAMRes 

GnBncf 

GnCom 

GflCpt 

GnMaO 

GnNutrs 

Gnftm 

Geneses 

GeneThr 

Ganefl wt 

Gwietlnst 

Genian 

Gem vie 

Genua 

Genuowt 

Genta 

Gentex 

Genus 

Genrvm 

Gerawt 

Genzv wl 

GeniyTr 

Geadvn 

GAfasan 

GaBnd 

GeoTk 

Geowarks 

GeriMed 

GrmSv 

GtoPOCk 

GibrStl 

CAwG 

GttLOW 

GtoOTr 

GitaiSat 

GflblA 

Gilead 

GtaftBI 

GtarBc 


Gtenayr; 

Gtondfa. 



LEBANESE REPUBLIC 

COUNCIL FOR DEVELOPMENT AND RECONSTRUCTION 

TUNNEL HARET HREIK - SAND'S 
INVITATION FOR TENDERING 

In tk scope of Beirut Southern Suburbs UtifitJes Uppiitup, and according to Che Law No. 046/ dated 12/7/1993. the 
Council for Development and Reconstruction invites qualified contractors for tendering for the execution of Harrt Hrrik - 
Sand's kennel to discharge the storm water in Beirut Southern Suburbs. 

The main world tnctode the following : — — 

1- A Tmniei from HARET HREIK to HORSn EL KAlTL,S80in.,lpfi^.approx^witiiaif fauide.dmi^r Uj^nieter.^mL , 

2- A Tunnel from HORSH EL KATIL toward the sea with 965m long approx-, and an inside circular diameter 3.6m. 

3- A rectangular Box advert bom the aid of the Tunnel to the sea with 530m long approx* and an internal Cross 
section with a width of 5m, and a depth of &2m- 

4- A rectangular Box advert from Bfr El Abed to the entrance ofthetmmel at HaretHrdk, 900m long approx-, and an 
Inside drcHlar diameter of 3.6m. 

5- Special Complementary structures for the timnel such as : the entrance of the tunnel at Haret Hrrik, the junction 
between Haret Hrrik tunnel and Sand's Tmmd at Horsh El Katil, Che transition section between the circular section 
of the timnel and the rectangular box culverts, the sea outlet near the Sand’s beach, and other s tru c tu re s. 

6- The Complementary Works includes : reconstruction of roads, sanitary sewers, storm water sewers, side walks and 
others works resulting from the execution of the project. 

The tenderers should meet the conditions specified in the tender documents related to the project. 

Some of these conditions are : 

A- The contractor has executed daring the last 20 years for the Lebanese contractors, and during the last 5 years 
for the foreign contractors, systems of underground urban utilities in the same importance of the current 
project whkh technics tmmd works not less than 3000 meter long and not less than 3 meter In diameter. 

B- The earth works and the box adverts executed by the contractor in the last 20 years for the Lebanese 
contractors, and the last 5 years for the foreign contractors, thonld amount for not less than twenty live ndDion 
Lis. dollars which indades a sbtgle Box advert project for not less than One mfflioD U.S. dollars. 

In the case of joint ventures between different contractors, at least one of the contractors in the group has to meet the 
conditions stated above in the paragraphs A and B, provided that all the contractors within the joint venture have executed 
works during the last 20 years for the Lebanese contractors, and during the last five years for the foreign contractors, 
■mounting for not less than five mOBan U.S. dollars. 

Tenders mast be submitted inside two separate sealed envelopes : 

The first envelope dud contain the completed qualification documents contained in the Tender Documents for this 
purpose and any other supporting documents proving the technical and financial ability and experience of the 
Contractor. The second envelope shall contain the commercial proposal. 

The Trader C ommitt ee shall proceed, in a public session on Friday 14 October 1994, with the opening of the first 
envelope only and establish the abfifty and experience of the Contractors. The Committee shall retain otdy those 
Contractors who qualify to execute the Project and shaD return the Tender Documents of those Contractors who do 
not qualify. 

The Tender Committee shall then open the second envelope of only those Contractors who have qualified publicly at a 
date and thne to be auuouuced in due time. 

Contractors who wish to participate In this Tender are invited to collect the relevant Tender Documents against a sum 
of U.S. dollars (S 5000) in the Form of a banker's certified Cheque in the name of the Council for Development and 
Reconstruction at the offices of C.D.IL, during official working hours as of Friday, August 12, 1994 at the following 
address : 

The Conucfl for Development and Reconstruction 
Tafiet Al-Sarqy 
Beirut - Lebanon 

Tenders are to be sub mitt ed at the above address not later than 12:00 hours noon Beirut local time at the offices of 
C.D.R. on Friday October 14, 1994 


GoOdms 

GdyFcm 



33 7A 9 13W 13V, 13* _ 

_ ms b 7% 8 * v, 

I 1085 13* 1J 12% ~% 
_ 344 X 3% 4 + * 

BO Uiaium 33V, 24ft Alft 
_ la»0 life 10*1 11% +Yt 

_ iia an M m —vs 

_ 32S5H 4 4% — V, 

_ 656 20* um 3»fe - 

" 314 3*. 3Vi 356 —V, 

. 17 * IJ Iffl life 10 Vi 11 — fe 

_ B5J 4Vi 3<* 3J4 — » 

_ 1130 5 M Ok — W, 
_ 4X lUit Jh fe — th 
_ 3033 IVh M Wu — >Vu 
_ 263 11* 10V> II — « 

_ 481 Jfe 3K 3fe - 

_ 340 Mb 9 9VS — fe 

_ 140 3V. 3Ui 3fe _ 

_ 331148% 4BW -fe 
092 13M life 12U — Vk 
_ 453919H 17M IV +lto 
..40001 1SW law 15*5 *1V5 
Ml A3 45 ID 3 * 10 10V« —'A 

% 25; 

_ 343 81* 4 0 —’m 

« 1383am 29* 32 -Ufa 
_ 3931 TV. 2'A 2»u — 

_ 9490 Sfe 7fe SVC t» B 
_ 383 1819 I5 Vm 15ft— ata 

jAO 2.1 347 19V. I8V9 19 ♦** 

_ 3970 4fe 4fe 4» -fe 

_ 2B9 Bfe Mi BU 

.13* ail I1M 4 4 — *k 

_ 10193 2<y, 17fe IMS +19 
36 12.0 131 1M 111 1 _ 

1 JO a 3.1 103 3B1&37V, 38M, + » 

3097 11 B 10 »lfe 

_ 5914 1M 14 

„ 1140 38* 38'A 38M - 

_ 1287 2VS 2W 

„ 3953 S 4M 4ft _ 
_ 33777 10V, fift 9W —'A 
_ 1983 79* l'A 2fe +fe 
_ 411 Mk 6 - 

_ 9860 10 30 — Vi 

_ 5411 S 4*V AV, 4-W 
_ 5696 30V, 29 M'& * *. 

Z 914 life 10V, 11V, -,114 

_ 328 Mh AW 6ft - 

„ ffll 4 4Vfc 

JB 4.1 22 M, 6W tWjf—Wn 

Me Z0 392146 31 21* 

_ 46 5* S 3 

_ 10130 11H UFA 10»* .. 

_ 1216 7 6 6W *V» 

.. 912 2V* 2Vm 2*4 +U 

M 1.0x2674 61 MU. <®ft ♦*'. 
„ 658 7 6* 6* — 1A 

16813 11* 13 +ta 

>10 15 587816* 14¥» 16 ♦ 1* 

.12 J 20340 IB* ITS 18 —Vi 
_ 10 5*i 5VS 5V4 —'A 

_ 256013V, 12* 12* — * 
JO 54 x 148 15V, 14* 14* — * 
- 362510V, 8* ID* +* 

_ 161 5* 4* 4* — * 

.48 □ 2-7 25 IB* 17* 17* _ 

_ 356590* 48* SI *Yi 

_ 17710Vu 10 10 — » 

I B55I9W19 19* ** 

_ 7905 6 * 5* 6* _ 

_ 4907 l*u ' 

1670 6* 

„ 2160 2* 

AS 84 152 7* 

52 IWm 1* l«Wn <-iV M 
J04b J 7134 7* 6* 7W — * 
_ 1180 3V> 7'A 2Vu * fei 
AOalJl 38 33V, 31* 33* +* 
_ 346 14V, 13* 14* *1 
„ 7008 12* 10* II* — 
.12 1J1 79313 II* II* — 

_ 522 13 12* 13 
_ 53 5 4* 4* — * 

80 3S 6343 21* 19* 20* ♦ * 

_ 45611* 10* 10* -* 
Mo 16 316 24* 23* 23* — W 
_ 399 2* 2* 2* ♦ * 

_ 105S 7* 6* 7 i * 

_ 499 5* 4* 4* I * 

X 1.94 7J0 1128* 27* 27* I* 

JO 1.1 3866 30* 17* It'A— 2 
32 2.7 19311* 11* 11* 

... 1441 3 2* 2* — * 

_. 702 14Vu 1 3 1 V„ 1 3> Vu — ¥u 

.07 J 232 11* 10V. W* I V, 
_ 11153 Vh l/a V m 
JO 3.1 483 18* 15* 16 i* 

__ ji 

_ 1786 17* 16* 1 7'A I * 
_. 628 7V, 7_ 7* — * 

lJMt 82 361622* 2PA 23*1* 
_ 506 3* 2* 3 . ♦ * 
1 _ lilflfc 9* 9* — * 
SO 12 433 19 17 18* • 1 

.13 P 2.4 46 5* 5* 5* — * 

_ 4536 10* 9* 10* < 

M IA 11718'A 17* 17* — * 
JO* ,4 13078 20* 19* IV* I* 
_ 7102 5 4 * 5 i-* 

I _ 1494 1* 1* 1* — * 

.. 388 5* 4* 5 — * 

_ 7881 * Vu * — « 
SO 2 A 53033* 33fe 33* » * 
125 IS 119 183 1» 177*— 4* 

_ «« 7* 7* 7* *'V» 

_ 3146 6* 6* Mk —'A 

„ 4371 2* 2* 2* ♦* 

_ 1003 6* 5* 614 _ 

_ 237 12* 12 12* ♦* 

_ 69 9* H B » <A 

_ 333 ** 8* 8* — * 

M 1.6 50131* 30* 30* — * 
_ 76512* 11* 12* i* 
_ 313 14* 14* 14* — * 
162818* 17* 18* <■* 
_ 14786 8* 7* 7* — * 
_ 798 26 t5* 25* «■* 

_ *M16* IS 15V. +* 
_ 3626 12* 11* 12* +* 
M 2A 177 25* 33* 25*11* 
_ 6937*5 41* 44* +2* 


sen 

Div Yld lHKWofi low an On 



- 9S57 30 

24% 



HvoiPnr 

- SOTS'*, 


3»u - 

-ift, 1 


5J6 J.-Ua 


4ft 

— 'Al 






NydcAtti 

615 6* 

5% 

5% 







HVdr7tSft 



Wn 

■ ” 

1 I 

1 



Z3 


I -ST AT 
IBAH 

ico me 

ICOBf Ulf 
to OS 
mi Moo 

IDUCmi 


♦ft 


* *9 B _ 

6* 6* ♦ * 

2 2 * +* 

7 7 —ft 


CURRENCY AND CAPITAL MARKET SERVICES 


Cuhkkvo Management Corporation Plc 
11 Old Jewry - London EC2R 8DU 
TeL 0^1^65 0800 Faxz 071-972 0970 



FOREIGN EXCHANGE & GOLD 


24 Hour London Dealing Desk 
Competitive Rates & Daily Fax Sheet 
Call ft/r further information & brochure 



Catch The Big Moves 

Commtrac, the computerised trading system is now available by fax. 
Commtrac covers over 75 oammodities/Tmancial futures/indides 
with specific “Buy\ “Self or ‘Neutral" recommendations 

Request your S-day free trial by sending a fax 

to Carol on 0624 662272 Int +44624 662272 


hhott 

HA4.C 

HBOS 

HCCins 
HD Veit 
HE1 Mn 

MFFnc 

HMGWd 

HMNFlf 

MPSC 

HUBCO 

HUBCOpf 

HocJis 

HatJoo 

sn j, 

HaUmkCa 

HaOmicHI 

HfflwdOl 

HhvtiE 

HmDHm 

HamltnBc 

HomFn 

HqmpGp 

HanOHU 

nonoeA 

Haprtnass 

nWOrro 
FtturiarFsS 
HfdpAs 
Hcrfeys 
| |,„ 

normal 

HarteSvu 

HorvFor 

Ho- vino 

HoIItwv 

HousQi 

HovenB 

Hovrfld 

Hovarty 

HowXB 

HowkC 

HowtFn 

HHM3V 

HHMSyS 

HBflPwr 

HBtiRak 

HUMetr 

HIHWttrrt 

HUCrtm 

HCUnwt 

HClmwIB 

HttCmp 

Hmwjyn 

HflHxtvTc 

HltwMns 

HwlTc 

HrtWire 

HctHB 

IMM . 

Hotoem, 

Ha fefiTr 

Hasan 

HeBxTes 

Hamasura 

HnryJkx. 

KarMie 

HrtoFds 


„ 279 9* 8* 9* +1 
_ 195 6* 5* 6* +* 

.16 J B831 29* 28* 29* <- * 
_ KBS 21* 20* 21* «-l* 

_ 152 4 3* 3* i* 

_ 374 5* 4* 5* «■* 

M 13 85 36* 25* 25* — * 

-14551 7 6* 6* — W 

_ 1738 13 12* 13 - 

„ 46 3* 3* 3* ♦ * 

M 2JB X777 21* 20* 21* +U 

.188 J 182 23* 22 23 — * 

.14 1.1 SI 15* U 14 — 1* 

_ 648 7* 7* 7ft *'A 

30 J 5581 » 96 28* +* 

_ 209 15* 14* 14* — W 

_ 10612* 12 12 — •* 

_ 1219 19* 19 19* —Vk 

J2. 335 170 2ft 2ft 2* _ 

_ 10 13* 13* 13* _ 

_ 189 6* 6* 6* * ft 

- 5357 29* 28* 29 +* 

_ 724 4Vit 3* 4ft 

_ 178 7* 6* 7 — ' ft 

32 33 81 2«* 28* 28* —ft 

„ 788 7ft 7* 7ft +* 
_ 371310* 9 9* — * 

_ 8898 13 12* 12* _ 

33m 13 9517* 18* 17ft ♦ ft 

- 284 4 5* 6 - 

549 21* 20* 21* 


■ I* 


Signal 


O 130+ software applications ° 
O RT DATA FROM $10 A DAY O 
O Signal SOFTWARE GUIDE 0 
Can London: C 44+ (0) 71 231 3556 
lor your guide and Signal price 6sL 


SWIFTCALL COMMUNICATION'S 


LONDON - NEW YORK - LONDON 
PRIVATE VOICE dRO ITTS - &10K PHFLANNUM 
| Calls to DSA - 20p per mimiffi Japan/Ho g Kong- 5op per mining 

CALL: LONDON 071 488 2001, DUBLIN (01) 67 10 457 


FullerMoney - the Global Strategy Newsletter 

Ccvorina bondi. >!ccL'i. currenc:t?i & CDTimcdi: «. inducing wf’^re - :j in-vj-.l 
fijIlerV.cney is written cy Davie Fuller tor ir.isrr, a serial ;-,v-s".:jri ic r.cr'.".-. 
irtcnlri'y. Si:in!p issce ft 5 cr USS/2, cmuci £ • 5c in UK tu''cno. nr: 


L i 8'j-or UaiJsJ 
Anc’v7.;s L*d, 
Id. Loi'ia’an T .l - 43 ‘ 


'.v~'!ow street 
’61 !C7i in L 




mm 



FUTURES Sc OPTIONS BROKERS 


$32 


ROUND 

TURN 


EXECUTION ONLY 


For further details Off bmr to place your testing contact: 
WILL NICHOLSON in London 
TeL- (*4) 71 836 48 02 -Fax: (44) 71 2402254 

T f i k iMrrsiwnu m •« 

iicraIo E ^^(bnbunc. 



Commodities 
on the Move 
Time to Speculate? 

Call Philip O'Neill 
Tel.: + 44 71 529 3333 
Fax: + 4*1 71 3^9 3019 


HberSv 

WPIOfalS 

Knonfi 

HtoKfle 

Mrsai 

HDmc 

HdLQPVfc 

Hoentg 

Hoooi 


HlvwdEs 

HhMdPk 

HtwdPpf 

Udt&c 

HetoPrina 

HottnB 

HonBon 

HmFcBN* 

HFMD 

HFdSvF 

HmPrt 

HmSFLs 

HmeSW 

HmoTTieo 

HmeThwi 

Homcri* 

Hmearp 

HORMdC 

HmowG 

HmtwBc 

HomeTBi 

Horuna 

MarzBcp 

HaranBk 

Hentok 

HenM 


M 3JB ... 

JMo A 1345 21* 20 20* — * 

30 1-5x176013* 13* 13* -»* 

_ 500 5ft 5* 5* +ft 

.170 Ul 146 17* 17 17 - 

_ 17812* 12 12* 

_ 4851 14 13 13ft — * 

JOo S3 166 3ft 3ft 3* +W 
_ 1610 6ft 6* 6* —ft 
_ 2078 17* 16* 17* +* 
J6D3J 25917* 16* 16*— 1 
Jfl 12X133313* 12* 12* — * 
JC 2.6 1295 20* 19* 19* — * 
,14b 2.1 228 7 6 6Ufe +Vu 

_ 28 6* 5* 5ft _ 

_ 100412 11* lift —ft 

_ 52823* 22ft 22*— 1* 

_ 18813* 12* 13 —ft 

_ 854 7 6* 6ft —ft 

_ 7864 5ft 5ft Sft — * 

= ”»* & ft-"" 

_ 909 2 1* 1* —V* 

_ 1203 2* 1* 1ft —ft 
-1405124* 23ft 24* Hft 

- T2B5 6ft 6* 4ft - 

_ 6612* 11* 12 +* 

- 24522* 21* 21* - 

_ MID 20* 19* 3)* -* 

_ 207 35 33* 35 *1 

- 76010* 10 10ft - 

.06 j zn 12* lift 12ft +i 

.16 1J 1225513ft 11* 12ft -l*i 

_ 17* 7ft 7ft ,* 

_ 1892 10* 10 10 _ 

33e 2.1 6810*, 10 10ft »ft 

_ 505 15 14ft 14ft _ 

_ 169 6V< &ft 6 —ft 
M 14 2400 27* 24 27 ml 

_ 19167 Bft 7* 71/ha—iVu 
30 23 220 9ft 8* 8ft — * 

32 3.6 511020ft 79ft 20 — * 

M 1.6 2S2B,, 26 27* +1* 

J6 1.9 43 18* 18* 18* _ 

_ 199 4* 4*/« 4* —Yi 

290 7ft 6W 6ft —ft 

_ 134 18Vu 17* 1BV„ 4-Vu 

— " 1617 11 10ft 10* — 'i 
_ 10 V, ft ft _ 

_ 355 Bft 7* 7ft —ft 

.16 LS 5011* 11 11 —ft 

- 5623* 23 23V, 

421 531 195 Sft 8ft Sft 4ft 

_ SB 4* 3* 3* _ 

_ 13110* 9* 9* — U 

■10a 12 216 4* 4ft 4* 1ft 

,T7c2j( 23J4S TYj 7ft 7* —ft 
_ 98 1* lVu 1VW _ 

M - H5 »ft Bft <¥a 

- 875 8 7ft 8 ** 

_ 352221* 19* 21* -1* 
_ M53 22* 22ft 22* — * 

■70 06 402 19ft 19ft 19ft -ft 
_ 8787 14ft 12 12ft +ft 
_ 34 19* 18ft 19* „ 

„ 332 7 6* 6ft 

JO 18 4821* 20ft 21 »ft 

30 \A 223 22 28* 28 lift 

_ 363 5W 5 5ft — * 

A6bU 1417* 17* 17* —ft 
M 4.9 xW 12* lift 12* +ft 
AS 12 292 16 15ft 16 _ 

_ 3S2 IS* 14ft 14* —ft 

_ tart 6V, 8ft 8ft —Vt, 
1865 Vs Vu Via — Ma 
_ 670814* lift 12ft— 1* 
_ 4015 13HI4**lft 

_ 1798 29* 26* 27ft— 2ft 

* “ W ?2 W , 3 a H -5 

_ 11238 12* II 12<<V — * 
M 1^x1973 27 26 36ft — Vu 

Jle 1A 9SS - - - 

33b 2LA 243 14 

^ 16943 14 
.lie 26 637 4ft 
_ 46 7ft 


IECEIC 

IFR 

IGLOO 

I GEN 

IHOPCp 

II- VI 

IIS 

ILCTC 

UWP 

■MRS 

IPLSv 

lOSott 

KGTc 

I5G tnrl 

itoTech 

IVFAm 

ivfpi 

ivipoo 

twe 

teat 

IWniSua 

Lm ogEn 

imaatfnd 
Imai ii 
imcncCp 
knefne 

knocor 

ImuLoo 
Imu 


_ 344 Sft 2ft 

_ 606 5ft 4ft . _ 

S3 3020* 20* 20ft 4-ft 
_ 1B40 4 3ft TO tft 
_ 601 11* ID* 11 _ 

_ 55391 9>/a Bft Bft +V* 
„ 1374 2* 2* 2"*, —Yu 

_ 685B30>4 29ft 30 -ft 
_ 3483 13* 11* 13ft *1* 
_ 289 7* 4* 7* ** 

_ 1790 4* 4 4* ♦* 

_ 2098 6* 5* 5* —ft 
_ 2100 28ft » 2B* -2 

_ 346 4ft 3ft 4ft • * 

_ 6991 4* 3ft 4* - * 

_ 2435 B’/a 7* Bft +ft 

_ 37851'Vii 1ft 1>V» +* 

_ 1889 36 2J.ft 25* ♦* 
_ 789 3ft 3ft 3ft —ft 

_ 193 7ft 6* 7 —ft 

z £7- » 3S: .« 

_ 6 bft 6ft 6ft - 

_ 25 rif* ft Hfe - 

40 i _ 272 2ft 2* 2ft * ft 

_ 133315 13* 15 *ft 

140 7J> 839 20ft 18* 18*— 1W 
_ 936 lft 1 
. _ 215 8* 8 

_ 2239 Sft 7* 

_ <*>; 9ft ; 

„ 3175 IVd 1*1 
_ 1666 9* 9* 


ft *"r 

iftZS 


5* 5* 


_ 552 6 

_ 3310 9ft 6* 

_ 972 4ft 3* 4ft —ft 
_ 8576 Bft 7ft Oft +ft 
_ 177314ft 13ft 13* -ft 
_ 57 15* 13ft 14 

_ 1015 3* 3 

_ 39S I* I* _ 

Inwec 1 - 3463 17* 16* 17* —ft 

ImpCrU 1.741 2.9 113312ft 10ft 11* 
UiFaaj - 7479 19* 15* 17*— 1* 

3565^ lft 2ft 


bn ii nan 

ununftsp 

Irramx 

Irrumx wt 

Imunmd 

ImpdSvl 




Inocom 

Inbrand 
tocoNin 
IndBfiHM 
IndBkMA 

IndBkMl JO 
inamv 3 a 
(ncITolM 
IndiFdS ^0 
IndUtd iO 
locBooNV 

Ktacous JO 

todusHW 

IndHwIA 

uxtSd 

IndTm 

tnftiBrds 

■nlnfnft 

HUOjOiT 

intodats 
IntoAm 
mtalntl 
InIRsc 
btfoReG 


_ 5321 ; 


Bft -9* 


MuTecti 

InolMict 

inRarfh 


I nwrp 

Imieitlvii « 

lrw«ot»c4a t — 

Inodtowl 
IraiovQX 
Inotek 
Inputs 

IraoFn 

Iradco 
InStoVS 
InsJIE -05 
msUMri .14 
InSUTc 
InsAut 
Intaorocr 
IninaCrc 
IntoOw 
MdMc 
I ntSOSr 

imsvs 


7J3 

13 


„„ ,, IMm. 

_ 560 3* 29V, 

Me J 7 Sft 2ft 2ft _ 
_ 3558 «ft 6* 6* -ft 

16 36 22* 22 22* +* 

1.7 66 14ft 13* 14ft +ft 

■ _ 1191 1* 1*i lVu - 

17 XITI 16ft 15ft 16ft + * 

23 15 22ft 22ft 22ft —ft 

_ 2346 14* O* 14* +* 
1.9 5 16 16 16 — * 

- 627 3 2* Zft — * 

_ 140 ft Via ft - 

_ 62 24 22 23 ♦* 

_ 57 6* SV, 5 * 6ft 

_ 7285 29* 29 29* .6* 

_ 1282 20* 25* 27* *2* 
_ 70 3Vit 3ft 3 >Via — 9b 

_ 49B 3 2ft 2ft ' _ 
_ 195 9* 8 «* ♦* 

- 231 8ft 8* Sft * ft 

_ 13438 12* 11* 12* - 

_ 41 M2 II ft 19* 2008 a ♦ life 
_ 1326 3ft Sft 2* —ft 
_ 7Xf 1* lft, 1ft _ 

M 5-4 18® 12ft lift 12ft 6ft 
_ 191 6* 5* 6ft 6ft 
_ 354 5ft 4ft 5ft 6* 
_ 9 18* IS* 18*— 3* 

889 1ft 1* 1* —Vi, 
799 6ft Cft 6ft 
_ _ 97B 1ft * 1 +*» 

32 23 xS 12 9 7ft B* 6ft 

- 116 1*. 1 I —ft 

_ 15188 W* 16W n lift 
_ 3709 17* 16 17 _ 

.. 44525 S3* 23ft —ft 

169 7* 7ft 7* * ft 

231 2ft 9* 2* 

589 W* 9ft 10* * 1 
1223 13* 12ft 13* •* 
_ 172235ft 34 34* —ft 

- 778 7ft TV, 7ft —ft 

- 1018 Nlft 9ft 10ft lft 

-83685 21* 16* 21 63* 

_ 5415 8* 8 8* 6 1 

_ 1860 22* 20ft 22 *2 

— SIS II* I Oft II* ,* 

HWHWH 

Intel 3*a -420110661* 56ft dOVu + TW, 

hfewl'9 — ij •-OM4IHNW 12* 

MtSrwtA ' ' ' -13046 2ft 3ft 2’A - 

UltSrwIB — 7126 1ft I'M* 1'VW . — 

-. 17456 7* 7 7 — Vb 

M 23x31749 15ft 13ft 15* « 1ft 

- 2660 Bft 7ft 74ft — Wu 

JO 23 262 13ft 13ft 13ft _ 

I 4V« 4ft, 4 Vh • V« 
_ 22S2 6ft 5ft 6ft —ft 
.18 23 400 9 IV, lft —ft 

- 81 9* 9ft 9ft — 1 
-36 1 J 60821 20ft 20ft — 1 
M 2.1*1051 12* lift 11* — 1 L_ 
.16 3J 492 4ft 4ft 4ft —ft 

_ 3309 3ft 3ft 3ft 

- S79 7ft 6* 7ft *ft 

_ 559610 9* 10 6* 

_ 326360ft 99 Ml ,* 
. 611423ft 71ft 21ft— lh 
-18491 3ft 2* Sft + ft 
_ 1442 5* 4* 5* 61 

- 121614ft 13* 14ft. Aft 

- 863 7* 6* 7* +1* 

.16 32 1R7 5ft 4* 5 —ft 

_ 8300 3ft 2* 2ft — V* 
4257 23ft 21ft 23* *lft 

- 2101 17 15* 16ft —ft 

117ft 17ft 17ft +1 

- 383523ft 21* 22* Aft 

- 11 9* 8* 8ft —ft 

- 826 lft lVu lft, — Vu 

_ T149 8 * 7ft 7ft —ft 
J 272 2ft »< 2ft — * 
_ 164 10ft 10ft SBft -Aft 

_ 1378 Sft 4* Sft. —ft 

- 9610 6* 6 6*a —Via 

_ . JO 2 2 2'- 

- 25 6ft S* 5* 

- 585 10* 9* io Aft 

_ 656 6ft 5ft- 6ft Aft 
_ 176 6ft 5* 5Vu — V H 
_ 48 2* 1* TV, „ 

_ 221512* lift 12ft — * 

1J 131913* nfe 13* a* 
_. 310 2* 2ft 2ft - 

- 3874 9ft Bft 9 

- 7560 40ft 34ft 39ft +4* 
jne _ 1433 28* 27ft Bft Aft 

- 1014 10ft 9ft 9ft —ft 

SO 23 x704 23 21ft 23 a* 
.08 3 32 Bft 8* Bft Aft 

1384 2V h 2*. 2* Alt 
37 25 21 24ft — * 

30 up*, up*. 10 ft Aft 

131 17ft 17W 17ft —ft 
75 22* 71* 22ft — 'A 
_ 89 9ft 8ft 9ft a* 

_ 1104 Sft 4ft 5ft +»* 
_ 392 17ft 16ft 16ft —ft 
_ 7516*, 14ft 16* a lft 

- 178 18* 17* IF* —ft 

A 9210 306* 710 + 2* 

_ 110918ft 17 18* a* 

_ 1029 7* 6 7 Aft 


Sda _ 

Safe i 

Soda Dfw Yld TOQiHWi Law cue Otoe 

KSai----- =9SW®»i£ 

■me '- - 13613% lift >9% 

MrSSa> J4 U 1926* 36 26% * % 

3* 36S 52 53 Al* 

mHuK -L34 A3 x 1 Ul Al 33 32 32% >% 

MmSb .12 IS Ml 8 7* 7ft —ft 

Menflnf 3*b2A 34010% 10 ID -fe 

1 : • 1- u 



I JTr 14 


17ft 17ft Aft 
_ 19 30 Al 

11* 10* 11 +» 
155 3ft 3* 3ft A* 
9432* 31* 3Zft a* 


ilhMs 

M 23 4820. 

JB S 



75^* lift 12* 


_ 13497 5* S _ S 

, _ 61 14* 

.12 l3 4203 


Mo 23 


LnmRXi 
Lancer » .12 
Lance J6 

a .. 

LdmkBc . t 

ass.-^- 

Lcnnef . 
LftmOc. 
Ltt^KT 
LetcrPr. 
LrartnTc 


LmoCo 

Uomra 

LigSotu 


T8n ly® 

“F-il 

Sft 5* — 

21ft 22ft a 1 

3 M8 37ft TSV. 36* 

5J2 116419 18ft If* Aft 
_ 871 14 12 Mi 13* Al* 

z WWW "5 

^ raw 23* 19ft Bft -rift 
I 1755 19ft 17ft T9ft A lft 
„ 349631 29ft 31 ♦* 

_ 642810* 8* 9% Al 
_ 2228 10ft Sft 10 *7* 

- 1297ZW. 1* lft— 1 

r *700 w'* 18ft i3k a£ 
5 lift lift lift —ft 
_ rm 4* 4ft 4ft . ■ — 
M Si 41123* 32ft 23* Aft 
.12 1.1 5» lift 11 lift _ 

_ 43 7ft 4ft 6ft —ft 

_ 65310ft 9ft TO Aft 

_ 321228* Z7% 27ft —ft 
" - 216314 13ft 13ft — 

_ 118310ft I- 
„ 465 Bft ‘ 

aa i ti 49a Bft _ 

_ 1503 14ft 13* Oft A* 
JB C A 13412ft lift lift - 
_ 21 822 24* 22* 73 —ft 


23 


10ft TO* Aft 

% K-45 


_ 525 4ft 


4* 


UbrtVTC 


LfHoan 


IntrTef 

InlwSvg 

Intern 

miNlwffc 

Introuo 

Intfercel 

InKdBk 

bibldn 

hifeitc 

Win 

imerttm 


infeHli 

iroortm 

mtrleal 

■Mfettna 

IntrOn 

IntmetC 


IrOCcXn 
InKMe 
InOarA 
InDdrB 
InrtmaB 
hit Jen 
hitPir 
InWast 
IntRsh JQ 
inlSemTc .10 
iraTcm. 
Inimu 
iramwtB 
MptWB 


Intport) 
IntscCpt 
IntCDt wt 
limralv 
B im rons JO 
InMsB 
IntvoiDe 
Intuil 
Invoore 
invTeen 
InvBnki 
tnvTM 


hXMjNtl 

IpSCD 

(ruauai 

kwnFns 

isco 

iste 

ISOtTKtX 

IsriLd 

HhocBc 

HoYakd 

ttron 

IworXs 


J4 3J 
AB _ 
St 33 
36 1J> 
JOb 2J 


l J9e 


J&JSn 

JBRS1 

JGInd 

JLG 

JMCGO 


- 1818 13^ lib 12ft 


_ 1036 4ft 3* 4 —ft 
_ 57 1* lft lft A* 
.10. A 190%. 34* 35* Al 
.071 _ 321 2ft 2ft. 2'A 

_ 40 12 lift lift —ft 

JSBFri JO 3J1 1S42 26ft 26* 26ft a* 
298 6 5* 5* _ 

59 0* 7ft B —ft 
10 6ft » 6ft —ft 
82 Oft 12ft 13* Aft 
6 5W» 5* 5 Wd +*, 
11013ft 13ft 13ft — * 
435 Bft B* B* —ft 
171 2 1ft 2 — * 

_ 1T6 Sft Bft Bft _ 

_ 521 * * ft —ft 

_ 1591 10* 10ft 10* Aft 
30 A 1700 35ft 34 35ft *lft 
AH 3J) 244 22* 21* 22ft Aft 

Sll* IO* lift Aft 

_ 246 19 18ft 18ft — * 

_ TB190 19* IB 18 —ft 
_ 39S B 1 .* 7* 8 -Aft 
„ 2064 9 7ft Sft Al* 

■ 

_ 1561 2«ft 23 24ft a 1 
„ 474 15ft 14 14* a ft 

„ 491 15* 14ft 14ft Aft 
___ __ .10 \A 1511 7ft M 7* —ft 

JkHBrafll _ 301 7* 6ft 6ft —ft 

JOSlyn 1 JO 43 2880 32 25* Z7* A2* 

js^wi * “wip 1 
SF .16 IaSH^WiT itt^S 


Jacbgj 30 3J 
JacorCwt - 

JacorCm _ 

Jranesnbi Jle3J 
JosmlM - 

Jasons — 

jetMn ill 

JettrGP 


MUMjn 

jefChra 

JeRmrt 

JenfCv 

JetFrms 

Jmar 

JWA 

JonnanA 

JmiCH 

JonelA 

JanesM 


23 30 Al 

13 13* — * 
II* 19ft— 1* 
4 4ft A * 
7 7ft — V„ 
Sft 6 a* 
12ft 12ft a* 

14 15 »* 


1.1 467619 18 18* 

A 3064 36 21 25 >1 

10 826321* 20* 21* * * 

_ 56 2ft 2H 2* — * 


KSwiU JB 
K-tei 
K8KC0P 

KLA 
KULM 
KTron 

KcMbt J081 
KOrtRSC 

M *9 2197 9* 


Kamanpl 3J5 
KmlcakS 
KetvCM 
KeMKpf 232 
KeOySA 37 


A 751 22ft 22 22ft a* 

— 44 5ft 4ft 4ft —ft 

_ 9) 9ft 9 9ft —ft 

_ 1083442ft 38ft 40 Al 

- *%\l Vft 

i T % 

_8ft 9 a* 


KeavSB 
Kernel 

Kariafecti 
Kentdicr 167 
KanfU _ 
KiMyG 
KentEnt 
KvMed 
Kerici 
Kevfin 
KewnSc 
K«yPrd 
KevTecti 
KevTm 
Knfn 
KevsHrl 

KVnbol 
KndrLwt 
KneJrLr 
Kinetic 
KlIMM 
Kinross 
Klrsehn 
Kletnrt 
KnopaV 
KmrtW 
KOda 
KoflMS 


7J 1041ft 41* 41ft »1 

- 219 18 ft 17ft 17ft —ft 
5264 7ft 6ft 7ft 

9J 996 28* 27 28ft Al . 
2 A 3046 30ft 29 30* Alft 

2.0 68 31ft 29 31ft— lft 
_ 4851 17ft 17 17* _ 

_ 7002 IS* 13* 15 Alft 

IB 2595 19 17* 19 Alft 

_ 532 1* WU lft, —ft 
_ 69519* 12 » —ft 

_ 12 22 20ft 21* A* 

_ 111 7* 6ft 64ft — * 
_ 7854 17 16* 16* -Aft 

„ 371 2V- 2Vu 2*. Aft 
_ 13 3* 3* 3* AVu 

_ 604 4ft 4ft 4ft -j£ 

- 466 4* 5* 6* A* 
_' 1406 Bft 7 TV, Aft 

1 JB AS 1041 39ft 38 38ft 


Kamag 

Kanin 

KOSS 

Kronen 

Krus 

KrrttCI 


1JU 3J 14733* 31ft 32ft — % 
M 3J 4347 23 lift 27* a* 

» 8B1 5* 6* Aft 

_ 460815* 14ft 15ft a* 

.15 3.9 2317 4 3ft 3* _ 

.10 36 659 2* 7* 7ft a ft 

_ 1098 4 3ft 3 v£ AV» 

- 161 10* 10 10ft — 
1 _. 998 17* 12ft 17* a 4* 

66 36 8720 18ft 19ft A* 

-1MZZ 7* 6* 7ft a* 

- 141 7* 6* 7 ’ - 

_ . 43 15ft 15. 15 —ft 

_ 1450 (ft ft ft 

74 ft ft V. 

-27071 24ft SBft 23ft Alft 

- 2Sffl 16ft 14 16ft A| 

_ 181 10ft 10 TO* —ft 

_ 17317ft 16ft 17ft a* 

.171 46 130 3* 3* 3* 

_ 438 8ft 8 8* 


» 3 =a 

SS8 §*Ai- 

68 26 23B W* 17* Wi A * 
,60a 2.1 24928* 26ft 28 Al - 
60a L8 22B33 32ft 32* +* 
JB Z8 - 99 9* 9* ** Aft 
J8a26 231237ft 30ft31W8A>fc 
_ 35T51A 4ft 4* Aft 

I 1389 2-6 1* lft a* 

Udak' . - 3io7 2ft )>fc 2* — m 

Udakwic _ 10 1* nC lft 
LleTcti JO 1JL 4318 77 T7ft — 

^ 'Elftl ?*?»% 

30 23 495-13 12ft 12ft Aft 

_ 3777 }2KUrl2Sfe 727 Aft 

Linares - 7718 71ft 21 XI* —ft 

UncFd ” 171 15ft 15* 1M — * 

UneSH 160 2J 10954ft 54ft 54* — 

Linens J2 3J 168916* 15 U +* 

UndtH - ■ _ as 4ft m 4 Aft 

l^ c ■“ 

ttr* '* ,2 f irii'-S 

tisss? fir T i,2sr 

■ ” ”l 6 ft M* Sft — * 


M-Wtnm 
MG Prod 
MAFBcs 
MARC 
MBLA 
MCJ 

MOL Into 
MDTGp 
MFBGP 
MFR1 
MFSOn 
MGl.Ptr 
MHMeyer 
MK Gold 

MKRoH 

MLFBC 
MLX 
MMJ 
MRIMot 
MRSTch 

MRVCm 

MRVwf 
MSGorr 
MSBBcp 
MTCS 
MTITch 
MTLInc 
MTS 
MDnnd 
MBb. 
MocxScc 
MocicFn 
Mocromd 
Madge 
AtadGE 
AMgPhr 
Magd 
MadSft 
AAaamP 
MognoBs 34 


15 a* 

. Jft 7* 

- 1314 22 21ft 

_ 15 9* Bft 

MB ftb — 

6ft 6ft —ft 

5 5 — ft 

13 13 — * 

_ . 7 7 —ft 

_1 34ft ZB 33ft Aft, 

Wft 9 IQ A* 

M« S 9*42 6ft 5ft 6ft a* 

. lift M 4ft —ft 

JM« J 69615 14 14ft —ft 



-44791 16ft 15ft 16 
_ 115 7ft 6ft 6* —ft 
1 36 21 4* 4* 4* —ft 

_ 432 4ft 3* 3ft — U 
_ 7OT 7* 6ft 7 — 

- 939 8 7ft, 7ft —ft 

— 1899 2ft Z* 2* —ft 

_ 1109 24. 23* 34 _ 

26 14821% 20* 21ft _ 

issr-iB* 1 - 


7S9 IJJfc bft 


3% t ■ rt fe 


56 73 33524*22 24*. Aft 
60 2.0 31831ft 30ft 30ft A* 
60 - 32214* 13ft 13ft Aft 

— 1261 2ft 2ft 2H _ 
_ 249 Sft S*fu 5* —9m 

- 199711* 10% 10*— 1 


.12 


1J8 


_ 329711* 10* 11* Aft* 
5J> 17432* 31ft 3lft - , 
-11632 2* 2ft 7ft A* . 
_ 618 5ft 4* 4* —ft 

_ 1827 Sft Bft 8* Alft 
_ 3053 MW 2* 78 _ 

16 11321 19*21 Al* 


MooGp J6 * 3JX3477 21 20% 20* 

MarfTChl • - -J56 4ft 


Mt*3S>£ _ 6197 7ft 6* 7ft Aft 

MdfeSt ■ _ 2672 4% Sft 4ft* —ft, 

~ 281 16ft 16% 16ft —ft 
586 20* 19* 19ft —'A 
452 3* H6 3ft —ft 
5 4ft 4ft 4ft Aft 

- 1 3ft 3ft 3ft— 1 
-■ 517 9ft 8* 8*' —ft 

- 56717 15* 16 —ft 

23 1376 12* 12 -12* Aft 

- 559312 Bft 11* A* 
_ 3153 Sft 4* 5 

- 352 9* 8* 8* — * 
_ 3922 5* 4ft 4Wu —ft, 
_ 15484 18ft 16* 189 m + TV 

35 208 17ft 16ft “ 

' _ 431312ft lift 


Mria .12 

V5& 


MOttidB 


.10 

.12 


_. 5496 4ft 3* 3ft —W 
_1B381 9* 7* »ft ** 
_ JMD 5ft 4* Sft * ft 

- 267B13 10ft 13 ♦ 2ft 

s lissmi 20 22ft lift 

—173118 7ft Aft Aft —Jft 

- 12 2ft 2ft 3ft 

_ 135 12 lift 11% —% 

-9745816ft 15ft 15*— 4*1* 
6 3317* 16* 17% -ft 

J 15gl7. l*ft 


|7% 15* 16% —ft 


JOb 16 ~~72 fbft io% ifift Aft 
KS _ 709 U 14* 15ft t ft 

SSSeS i J2tn3 rn u* iz 12 -% 

MmM — 430 9 8% Bft — 

MfcSrtfe - "1553 3 2*Vu 2Wu aUj, 

JO 16 5*W 13 12ft 12ft *ft 

SSi u» if 

SS «° ■* wa?ga-w^w 

iitgft SS -5 

Z 

-14570 25 20* 24ft ♦ 4ft 



- 4107 
-14105 36 
_ 2163 6* 

_ 347 Sft 

_ 1524 4ft 

- MW 5ft 4ft 
_ 3191 Sft Sft 


?8* 13ft + 2ft 
2* 7* —Vi. 

32* 3? Al- 

tSS S w I 

K Aii 

Z 138 7* Aft ift -% 

Z I4TO » m < ~vS 

- vua 7* m 7* * lft 

rjSJSU 

-“«¥*? 

- 6444 13ft 12ft 13 Aft 
_ 3174 29* 26ft 28ft *1* 
_ 185312ft 11* lift 


--»#«* as 


AiOcSmm 
Micsrts 
Mkrtak- 
MbM 
MkJC&SV 
MjgCort B 

assaSfS 

MdOm 64 36^^ 14* M* -* 
M^oue 30 23 16811% 11 lift _• 
Hmaaw - T JJ5 u X25217* 16 16* '* 

-158713 lift 12* Alft 
JUfe JX104622 21% 21% —ft 

JB 160007 29* 2BH 29* A* 
JO 16 31534 31ft 31 % — 2 

- 489 ID* 9ft 10 —ft 

-11176 3* 3 3* —ft 

- 44 3* 3 3 - 

- 3014 12 11* lift — * 

IB 484 27ft 26* 36*— I 
_ 690924* 22* 22ft — Jft 
_ 30593* M* 3* Aft 

- . 37 11% 10* lift a* 

10 j£745ft 43* 45%Al»r 
36 7 25* 23* 24* A* 

-115516*, 6ft 6Vu A Vu 
_ 0516 lft 1 <*i lfei, - 

- 370 TO*' 10% 10ft +% 

370615 13 14* A 1* 

~7612* 12 12 —1 

17317 15* 16* a1 

24 19* IBM 18* Aft 
4173ft 172*172% — * 
„ 43«* 

164 47 „ 

— 141862'. . . 

- 72 1* 


46fctt> 
MMwGr | 
iMOwrin 

ssssar 


MKWSt ■ 

MtortRs 


JB 26 


.92 


■MWJX 

MfeMV 39 

assTm 

pad 

MtMTal | 
mdUw 




i jic 5 


- 242 


6% Aft 


*tI?* S* 21ft 



asssr 

MonCosn 


1* I* —ft 
__ ... Sft A* ♦* 
JO 2J" 900 T'A 4* 6*Vh aV, 
S2 16 467A29 27* 28V, Aft, 

- an i* ift i* *i% 

- 374516* 15 16* Al 

- ton 6* S* 6* A* 

.1 415241% 39% 40% - 

.1 4912 38* 37 37* A % 

-1443023ft 17% 20* a 3ft 

- . 162 7* Aft A* —% 

- 15515 14% 14% 

- 4230 7ft 
_ KR2 3W 
_ S3 

- 221 7* 


S r *:a 


isifki 



N-VkuW _ — 

NAB Alt 160*286 
NACRft 16 6 

NA1TCS ' J31 7.1 
NBSC ■ J2^2J1 

NBTBCP 66b 10 
NO Bd* 

NDC - 

NEC 668 J 
J2 ij 


J»e 



3 3* 

_k* Mft K*- 
6 _ 15* IS* 
17*17«ft, 
W* lft 


1J0A41J 
68 1.9 


20* 19* A 
. 7 «* Aft 

6* 6% Aft 
■J 4* 4* 4* 
360 32* 31* 31* 
247 5% 4* 4% 
22ft 2ft 2ft 
,1024ft 24 24ft 


1 1042 6% 


XXX 


MobiSICB ,12e 3 
Atekte ,16a J 
Motton 

Montrn t - 
MonhUa - 

MarMrtSt 

Mephie — 

MartiFh J8 
Maromr 
MmNG 
Mrafet 
McxDrt 

MartnertH 

SSS& * 


IWM A 1‘VH 
17% A* 

_ _ .... 11* — Vu 

MKTwetal S6 36 14528 27* 27ft A * 

MarkVH - 109612% 10 10*— 1* 

MarV«l _ 60243 41ft 42 

Mirot _ 459 1* lft 1* — * 

MaqB _ 8716% 15* 16* . - 

Mariam - 143811* 10* 11* A* 

MratfiB 64 A3 8710* 10 10% - 

MrahSu 64 3J 11911* 11 11* _ 

Mantfes . 60 36 SMoaoft an 20v» — Vu 

MorstiFn _ 4i id* 10 W%' - 

Mortek - 484 9 8% 8* 

Milton - 2919 18 19 Al 

iWxIOjI - 1014 8% 7* 8* — W 

MdFdBc 62 1J 40328 27* 27* —ft 

MoStond .W« 6 923216ft llKi MlAAlft 
MoaonOIXlS 23 28 50 47% 50 A3 

Moxxbk M 23 52942% 40 42ft A* 

Make - 7*1 S* 7ft - 7ft —ft 

Matowai Jl7e 6 1231 20 20 — 1 

MttfOsIT _ 15686 2ft IVu 2ft —ft 

MatrxPti . - 96911* 10% 11* Al* 

Me6rxSv _ 7557 7* 5ft 8% — T 

MatUiwIrt - 49*16% T3 15* a% 

MalttiwSr . - 1313 3* 24% a* AVu 

MOMS’ - 217 9 8* 8* —ft 

_ 633 »* 7ft 8 — 

- 740913* 12% 13* A* 

- 207V 11* 10* lift — * 

zS&r£i.6s 

- 9674 5* 4% 5 A* 

69t 6.1 ^-84 8* 8 3 • —ft 

_ 96710 9% 10 A % 

- S 10* ID 10 — * 

- 909-11% 10% lOWu —Vij 

_ 15 5 5 5 - 

- . 10 7- . 7 -7- aVu 

-JS? 9ft 8% *% a* 

_ 30577 STrilu 51ft Sft — % 
19411* Iff* 10*. 


IWoKrtrit. 

MaxkpGo 

IWaxiGwr 

Maxtm 

Maxtor 


MaxwUSh 
MayflCo 
MayflGrv 
Maynor 

MoyU 

M cAfe e- 
MoCow 

Hi 

“ ant & 'ss :S 

_ 66 1* lft 1* - 

- 3582 5% 4% 5% - 

- 91 7 M H —ft 

~ ,23,™ Tfe +H 

- — ISO 
_ 5012 

- 2772.. 

- 4649 6 4* Sft 

! _ 1449 2% lft lft - 

,-15 1-1 'IS MW 14% +J 
168 2J 19738* 28 38% a% 

- 3005 Bft 7’A 7% —ft 

- BOO 2* 1% 1* -ft 

- 2202 20% 18* 19 A* 
! 7*u 2ft 2ft — £ 


McGrtb ■ 

vases, 

Modhmn. 


MMfc*4l 

*wto| 


1 ™ rv» /■ All 

ICftR.it 


MedaArtl 

vtNfedWl 

MBtfQri 

Mddrwt. 

MddDv 

MedCfcy 

Sfto- 

MadTem 

IXI 


- 1015 ...„ 

- ja 5% 

- m * 


68 11 


5 su 

ft ft IV 

1*0^ rf 72* 


346 7 


m SB Sw _ 4671 14* 14% 14% — % 


_ 12311 


10* A% 




a5 


= jflr 


- 8477 6 _ 

> 1S 


MoflenP 


MentejrJ 
MMW) 
Mentor 
MwrtGr 
NVC flhs 


J4065.^ifi 3ft 4 

= Sfc*R + S 

- 6471 72* 11% 12% Aft | 


t£5l 

NNBCfl 
NPCA 
. NPC8 
■NPSPIWJ 

nsbo> 

NSAtot 

NSC . 

NSOBc 
NVIEW 

NYO. _ — 

Ntoxsn _ 121 

NrariTa wt _ 268 5 4% 4% 

NamTai JHe .1 65413* 12% 12% 

Nomic - 123 S* 8 8* 

J2 46 2Sia & 

NBaS lJKa 16 M% Sft 

NaJSev _ M 18 16% 16% 

™-,- lJniULB 118 15& 15?l 

NCTy&l J» 10 1343 41* 43 

NtCmQcs 60 £7 . 24222* 21% 21ft 
Ntdoto- 36 -3.1 199913 11* 11* 

NBVCnw - 111211 10% 10ft 

NJDentox — 19 B 7* 7* 

Nraoyps 7586 34% 33% 34>V,, 

N«Gyw1 _ 16021 19% 21 

NolHm* _ m 6* 6 6* 

NfrHlt _ 77S 2* 2 2* 

NWnas J7r 2J mis 12*13 

KISS' 

NnlKV _ 14M V* 8* 9% 

NnBtaal — 357 5 4* 4* 

NI Santt 36 2.1 312* 12% 12%- 

JK«Jns St 33 117* 17ft 17* 

NTaxn — 2243 6 Sft 5ft 

NTedl JC* 1.1 115 2* 2ft 2* 


NCBVian 

NtWnLf 

Nfmda 

Nawucr 

NatWMr 

NaturFd 

NatrSt* 

NetrSun 

Nauticns 

Navarro 

NavyGp 


NrtsnT 

Nearxs 


Nmwwt 


~ ^ , 5* 5ft 

_ 91 38% 35 36* 

_ 180315% ,*ft MV. 

- MW* f* V* 

~ laaV* 

13 i & % 

- 201617* l« 17 

- 6238 27% 26ft 26* 
6 2196 19ft 18% 19 

= % s 

_ 2590 17% 13* m, 
4* 5 
3* 4 
IjFA 15* 
6* 7ft 
4* 4* 


< 7 * 10 
7* 9% 
12 13 

7ft 9 
11% 11M 
3* 3ft 
4* 5* 
5 6'A 


Matrix — 625 5 

JJwfcCrnp _ 1713 4 

ESS* . 

Mdcunet _ 468 5ft 

N'rfctoinf ZJU 1LT 225 19 

MwWferf _ 4495 9% 

NlwkSx _ cu 13 

MwWv ~9f^ai9% 

K Z ^ 

- 215 5* 

Naircn - 6in 6* » 

KSSS ■" ® -a 

■“ £5 4®BT9% m% xv 
.MeWHra -He l J 97 212% 9% lz 1 

KjhT™ “ J H W 

EJisL. - a i6ft i6 i6i 

KSwS z B mii% {SS % 

FMivcur jo 2.1 384 19 4W 41 

- n5r A gia lwiaip 
"'•Wto — 2181 17 15ft ii: 

" A 6ft 4\ 

IS8D57 27* 7S*, w 

sagH st, ,i ssr a ss 

***& 11913 7* ** 6« 

4,1 S-55^ 1 3*‘a a s 

- 7W 6ft 6 6 

- 6272 l'A, jft <v 

in 'SS?* ™ 37 

' 2 246 56 S4ft s* 

•93701943% 43 4f 

- «gl5 14% 14' 
-.StoW 18% IB 1 

5 1 gft & ,? 

36% 37 
56 56 

S* 64 

17 ir 

6* 7\ 

TVi a 

7* — 


NldlRA 


NWDfPf 128 


J6 

A0 


Noraid 

Nardsn 


NarreV 


J» 


NABiO 
NAWotetl 
NGSncshs 

J^eSv .I 3 r 

WSwiU 1||]J 4 

HSSSL ,« gioS»w 

KSSSS' 112 “ 

vago n * SK 

u. 1330 7ft 

so £5 “*5 }“*)& ]* 

EffflS, ’■» M 50930% 39* 29 

KSS^ = ^ ii 

espr-iWSBIl 

(Omtinaed on page II) 



















ia Peris 


By Marie Masks . ' V 

Washingion Ptzt Service . • ■ ‘ 

WASHINGTON — The representaJrves 
for baseball's owners -andLplayers met with 
federal mediators in separate sessions 3n 
New- York, -but ihece-remams no.cod.'iin.:; 
sight to the players’ fcw-day-oW strike. Tbe - 
two sides did not speak to each' other and' 
■have no. nego tiati ng mgeriiign^ crfadHfatt, 
and they continued to exchange verbal jabs. 

“There was nothing that came up that, 
suggests anything isabout to chan gem the . 
circumstances,” Donald Fehr, -ihePfeyers. 
Association chief, said by telephone after 
the union’s hourlong session Saturday with : 
representatives erf the Federal Mediation-, 
and Conciliation Service and a Labor De^ 
partment official. 

“The strike will continue because' the 
owners don’t want to deal with the players 
and don't want -to find real solutions,” 
Fehr added. • ■ 

Following his session with, mediators cud . 
Saturday, the owners’ chief labor negatia- ; ■ 
tor, Richard Ravitch,said: “Mediation 
can be very, very helpful in resolving dis^ 
putes. It’s not a p anace a ” 

The problem with tbe mediation is that 
neither side is willing to submit to binding 
arbitration. So, the imsdiators only ran parr y 
messages, nag and cajole. They cannot force : 


r sefflemenL In 1981, mediator Kenneth 
-Moffett was unable to get baseball's players 
.owne! 1 ^ to reach an agreement until the 
sroee had gone 50 days. 

AsTsotb sides point oat, communication 
.1^. p ot, the problem. Each side listing to 
the other is saying. The sides just 
don’t agree with what is being said, and 

>]ur» annu m h p to k. _ • 


these appears to be no com pr o mise posi- 
tion as long as the owners insist on install- 
ing a salary cap and the players veh ement- 
lyc^poseone. 

- “Don and 1 have had no problem mikin g 
with each other,” Ravitch said. 

•• There are no barcamino tworvic crhtvi. 


Another 14 games were canceled Satur- 
day in baseball's eighth work subpage since 
1972, bringing the two-day total to 28. 

The strike is threatening to wipe out the 
final 52 days and 669 games of what was 
shaping up to be one of baseball’s most 
thrilling seasons in recent memory. The 
World Series could be canceled for the first 
time since 1904. 


— ■ — ^ 

idea, although Ravitch said be expects the 
two sides to meet this week. It appears that 
the. next negotiating session won't come 
before Wednesday. 

."The talks are at a standstill, and the 
hostility between the two rides has built up 
t& & level that could impede the process 


greatly. This gap in negotiations, it seems, 
is a cooling-off period as much as anything 
efcel 

“I have not been surprised by anythingin 
these negotiations except that they would be 
low enough to withhold the pension mon- 
ey,” said Fehr, referring to the owners’ re- 
fusal to make a $7.59 mflfion payment to the 
players’ pension fund on Aug. 1. 


anything in 
ey would be 
nrion mon- 
owners’ re- 


“It’s a very lonely weekend for me,” said 
Bud Selig, the Milwaukee Brewers* owner 
and acting commisstoner. “Pm a fan. But 
we have a problem. Whose fault it is doesn’t 
matter anymore. We just can’t ignore it” 
The owners say baseball will suffer in- 
dustrywide losses of $100 million this year, 
and they must find a way to bring players* 
salaries under control 
They’ve proposed a system that includes 
a salary floor and a salary ceiling for each 
team, and guarantees the players SO per- 
cent of the game’s revenues. But the play- 
ers are making 58 percent of baseball’s 
revenues this year, and they’re opposed to 
changes in a system in winch the average 
player salary has grown to nearly S1J2 
million per year. They say they’re being 
dragged unnecessarily into what should be 
a debate among the owners about how to 
redistribute revenues to subsidize the 
game’s snwill-TWflrVw t frams 



l.uu Schnmtl RcuhT. 


HANDS-ON FOOTBALL — Kenyon Rasbeed of the Nevr York Giants, hindered by San Diego Chargers* Darren 
Carrington, left, and Dwayne Harper, daring rite American Bowl in Berlin over the weekend. Tbe Giants won, 28-20. 


Jordan Out I ANew Tune: Take Me Out to the (Minor League) Ball Game 


The Associated Press 

HUNTSVILLE, Ala- 
bama — Michael Jordan 
was going to miss his first 
nationally televised baseball 
appearance Sunday night. 

Jordan sal oat Satur- 
day’s game for theBirming- 
haxn Barons because of the . 
injury suffered Friday, 
when he missed a diving 
catch. The injury is expect- 
ed to sideline him for at 
least five days. - 

He will have tests Man- 
day, said Larry Monroe, 
farm director for the parent 
Chicago White Sox. 

The ESPN network 
scheduled Jordan’s gamp 
after the major league 
strike wiped out' the 
planned Toronto; at New 
York telecast. 


By Ira Berkow 

JietvYork Thna Service 

ONEONTA, New York — At the 
ballpark last mght these weren’t any 
signs saying, “Down with the Strike.” 
Nor any saying. “Up Theirs,’’ either. 

At the ballpark last night, under 
the sparse fights, under a starry, sum- 
mer sky just made for baseball, fans 
had came to. enjoy,. of all things, a' 
baseball game,; including, when the 
seventh inning rolled- around, the 
time-honored seventh-inning stretch. 

The small crowd in shirtsleeves du- 


tbc weekend, minor league parks like 
Damaschke Rdd here In the foothills 
of the CatskQl Mountains abounded 
with pitchers hurting, hitters swinging, 
runners Dying, managers jawing, um- 
pires emoting, fens chemng booing, 
downing hot dogs; soft drinks and a 
powdered pastry called bled dough. 

Another kind of dough was on the 
minds of the striking players and 
their chesty owners. And, for that 
TtwHftr, anoth er lrind of Cap 


rose, and on the scratchy pub- 
iress system a taped rendition 


lie address system a taped rendition 
of “Take Me Out to the Ball Game” 


Tins game took place between the 
Yankees, in their traditional navy blue 
caps and pin stripes,' and the Astros, in 

wnianm^Tbe OneonS^Yankees^d 
the Anbum Astros, Gass A versons 
of their parent chibs. Parents, it hap- 
peas/who are on strik e^ ^ ^ ^ 

ice Stadium and^am^^Yards and 
Cdnnskey Fade remained dark over 


because in the end it will benefit us if 
we ever get up there,” said Derek 
Shumpert, 18, a center fielder for 
Oneonta. “But I'm not that knowl- 
edgeable about the issues. 1 don’t 
thank any of us here really are. We’re 
all too busy working to move up and 
out OT here.” 

“It’s a shame, but my husband, 
Hugh, and 1 don’t care that much 
about those big leaguers and those 
owners,” said Mary Vaughan, sitting 
along the third-base line. 

“We come out here and have a 
good time. And, you know, most of 
the fans never boo the home team 


kids, not like big league fans. No 
sense in yelling at the lads — you can 
see how hard they're trying. We do 
yell at the umps, though-” 

John Nader is the general manager 
of the Oneonta Yankees, whose small 
office contains several pictures of 
Don Mattingly, the first baseman of 
the Bronx Yankees. 

Like 20 other current big leaguers, 
Mattingly started his professional ca- 
reer in Oneonta, as an 18-year-old 
outfielder in 1979. 

“Our phone has been ringing off the 
book since all this strike stuff Nader 
said. “People are calling and asking, 
'How do we get there,’ and asking 
about what games are coming up.” 

“They want to know how much 
ticket prices are. I tell them, three- 
and-a-quarter for adults, two-and-a- 
quarter for children. And parking is 
free. They can’t believe iL" 

It wasn’t a great crowd for the 
game — only about 250 people 
bought tickets at the turnstile, in a 
ballpark that seats about 2J>00 — 
perhaps because tbe skies had been 
threatening earlier, or the Woodstock 


revival some 75 miles (120 kilome- 
ters) away kept people from traveling 
in the general vicinity, or perhaps 
because it wasn't “Free Night.” 

As in most minor league opera- 
tions, the ballpark and the communi- 
ty are dosely knit. The local banks or 
car dealerships or other businesses 
buy out the park for a night, or 
nights, and everyone in town can 
come in free. The night before, the 
crowd was estimated at the capacity. 

The ballpark is a pleasure. It was 
was built in 1906 and is set in 100 
acres of a public park. 

Behind it are an abundance of 
trees, the dark outline of mountains, 
and, all around, tbe sweet smell of 
grass and the agreeably balmy night. 

“People like it in minor league 
parks because you’re usually so close 
to the field,” said Nader. “You can 
almost talk with the players. And 
people come and talk to each other. 
Like neighbors. It’s a friendly atmo- 
sphere.” 

Leonard Sutiiff agrees. 

“You can see them improve from 
one game to the next," said Sutiiff. 


the groundskeeper who is employed 
by the city’s parks department 
He said be wasn’t old enough to 
remember when Babe Ruth hit a 
homer over the right-field fence here 


during a barnstorming game in 1920. 
but, like most Oncontans. be is aware 


but, like most On eon tans, he is aware 
of it as part of the local legend. 

The Yankees took a 5-0 lead after 
two innings. The Astro pitcher, a 
lanky youngster named Joe Lopez, 
appeared depressed as he comes back 
to the small blue dngouL His pitching 
coach. Don Alexander, stopped him 
at ihe step. 

“The five runs have already 
scored,” he said. “You can’t take 
them off the board. Your job is don’t 
give up anymore. O.K.? Nice job.” 

The pitcher, head hanging, nod- 
ded. 

There were some errors in the 
game. There were some spectacular 


plays. Tbe difference between these 
kids and the big leaguers, say people 


kee shortstop. “But what I’ve learned 
is bow much 1 have to learn.” 

The Astros’ Lopez settled down 
and held the Yankees scoreless until 
the seventh inning, when he was tak- 
en out of the game. 

There was also, jubilantly, for the 
home team fans, an argument be- 
tween the Astro manager and the 
plate umpire. 

“Throw the bum out.” called a par- 
tisan Oneonta fan. But Manny Acta, 
the manager, returned to his third- 
base coaching spot without further 
inddenL 

At the other end, Ken Dominguez, 
tbe Yankee manager, a successor io 
B uck Sho waiter, who managed in 
Oneonta in 1983 and 1986. was more 
or less pulling his hair out as the Yan- 
kees lost the lead, and the game, 8-6. 

The players filed off the field and 
the fans filed out of the ballpark. 


kids and the big leaguers, say people 
like Nader, is consistency. 

“I thought I knew the game before 
I got here.” said Ryan Beeney. a Yan- 


Soon the old ballpark was dark, like 
Yankee Stadium. Except that Sunday 


Yankee Stadium. Except that Sunday 
the lights would be aglow again in 
Damaschke Field and another ball- 
game begun. 


NASDAQ NATIONAL MARKET 


GW YU tOUHtob U» OH. CHOC 


Dt» YU. WsXriilM OK Owe 


Sale. - I 

D*v YU IBO&Hsh Low Die Chop I 


Consolidated trading lor week 
ended Friday, Aug. 12.- . 


ended Friday. Aug. 12. 
(CoathmedS) 


Div YU TOO* Haft Low Ou CUM 


•Novmhc 

Novell 

Novtas 

Novwi 

.Novum 

.Nowsca 

NuHrzS 

NuVbn 

r-UWrt 

NuWlf* 

XucMrt 

NudSet 

NuKateA 

Nunar 

Numrac 

-NYCRpf 

.Nvcor 


_ SM flt 
_123777lAV*i 
_18 371*14* 
_ 2Wllto 

-T 10* 4V, 

JOb _ MW* 


nk sw — 
14V SSVk. — jt 
am 4i -2U 
uw m* +j% 


_ 247M 

JO IJ 7V> 
_ TO <M> 


iw 13* 




, - 70 ,a J 

.14 4,1 375 3Y, 


1414 MW 
M TTI* 


If 

i&^a 

m 


Seda. ON YU MOiHlgli Uw Oti Ow 

ttatovn _ 435 314 3 3 —VC. 

PrVvWl* . -S3. IJ n 32V. 30V, 31 .♦%* 

AD- 44 1U 1«% 13 _ 

ParWx _ _ HM M M —5 

PDlOrtl* i oSSBlBW 17%S liVfc *-’4 

Pns&m _ 145 714-44% 7W *Vt 

pwSivrt _ ra w 4% 

PHofTis _ 421 SV, 5V4 SVi *VS 

BQutt0ft: . _ _3M13% 13 1£% +j5 

M : 32 V. iVfc 

Pavco - 3M» 8V. B V, 

SSSS*- 

pwmt jq favi imS w» — w 

p*re**m - ZSM j 4 —Vl 

sssa - :-srsL*«i 


JO 1.4 41 n, 

1JW T9 35V, 
M 7J.**3B5S’A 
_ 459 41% 
_ 4471 ? 

_ 14445 17 
- IS3 » 


.« Jxzxn T7V. 
M X5 140717V. 
_ J 40 KU 

A4U1A 7274% 

_ 13093 |V% 
_35W25W 


32 34% >3 

MVS 25V. S4b 

yv* -> 

SV, 4V, . V, 

MVS M% < 2W 

}% 

14 MW * % 
4’A 4%h _ 

41% 4 VS — >V* 
W ]W 


| RockTMl 
> RKMCH 
i RockVSh 
RooCantl 


RsvW^n ( 
RsvDFpf 




J0 IJ 43B17VJ 
_ i7 ««.s 
_ 238 11 
_ 405227VS 
M 23x27543 17W 
US 5.1 41 MVS 

- 42 4VS 

.12 5 44525 

_ 307 VS 

.lOe 1 4041 15*. 
_ 1151 S 
_ 1748 17%. 
40 23 1424% 


am 34i% -*144 


_ 1B038 45VS 
- 644 5 

_ 2803111% 
_ 76 4VS 


RuMrtf 

RMrolMet 

RvonDcfc 


M 34 1517TM- 
3J5 42 1006 S» 
581 64 44 71% 

- 177 74% 
8M 7Vi 

_ 77313 

- 2535 15V. 
J*a J to 44* 

-11554 64% 


144% 17'% ^ 

111% I2W 'ft 
10'A 101% —4% 
26V. 27%k ' 1W 
16 >6'/. —45 

63 63VS— IJ4 
6*A 64% —'A 
23 24 i V% 

»u T* _ 
V. Vp — "d 
14*6 1& ' I 
44S 44% . \% 

>«%< 174% "A 

341% levs i 2 
TVS 8 .W 
l»Mr 1746 i J% 
51 524 m >4% 

M 44% —4% 
51% 64% — 1V% 

11** 11%T— TivU 

144% IS — L. 
4 « — V% 

6 64% MS 


_ 52 J>% 74% 7*% — % 


_ 1038 12V, lOV. 13 

>48 IJ ISO 2%W 254m 36'S 

_ 346 4*% 61% 61% 


5HBl1 DIM 

Sunsunwt 

IS^*P,X75 


Uwr Che Owe 


• Sum 

ON YU lOfeKW 


Sab 

Of- YId lOOsWoh 


JO JJ 3704 10 v. 10 


mn%U _ 425 11V. 111% n.4% >»% 

ikon .116 2% 44% 54% ■ J% 

yweo Mo J2 6S2I 341% 231% 25V, — 

ybax _ 4305 12V. 114% m% -4% 

vawtA _ 604 2'- 1V» n H •'■h 

moil _ 46 44% 41% 4V% — !% 

nm*»T - 4 H£ I <4 I>% . >.% 

nrnifld .16 22 *7 71% 7 71% I Vi 

nttlF - 4644 30 27V, 28'%— 1 


-44585164% 1*44 »S44 —to 

- 4802 I2V> 10'% 114% • 1% 

- 734 7 444 64% — 

_ 4747 14V. 12 I3J% I IV. 

54« 134S 124% 121% • W 
_ 1416 ?'j% 81% 7'* • 11% 

_ 715 2”. 34% 2V» — 4r, 

_ 2548 3W 3H 31%. >7% 

_ 345 13'f. 17V, 131% —4% 

_ 3802 4% VS 4% ,V% 

_ »11 1«A *** 1V P 

. . 44S V C V% 1» 


SunwTs 

SvMMoc 

SuoTech 

Suoercul 

SuoertH 

Suonex 

sensed 

St^rfrm 

SunLsr 

SunjTc 

SurvTc 
StsoHTis 1J0 
Sumzsc 
SwiKTs 


_ 357 4% 
_ 433 74% 

134 1 21 


- 81071KS 1244. 


3 .1 35* 231% 22W 231* +1A 
JO Z3 ■ 73 18V% 18.. 181% +V% 


- 454 181A 

_ 251346 

-20762 2146 

- Will* 

- 633 24* 
JO J 773 2346 


t _ 343 7V% 

,T80> 1J0 11 l07 77.Hr 


-CSFlnC 

OokHJIl 

Ociaocn 

T3deflC3A 

WjLOO 

■SSSSer 

OtaDom 

OkM«nt 

oidLvme 


- 747 13 

- 7 144 

- 97 44% 

J& 1JX131S2BW 

• z-flSSt 

M 2J . 5224% 
.10 - .115 91% 

- MS TA 

- 175 746 
-• 111 3*fc 
- 12743 14 

- 23671 10V. 
_ M5122, 

■ =,0^^ 
iJS H 21SSS 

JO ) J 4612 
._ 81121* 

- 551 20 V, 


12 W, _ 
144 116 —16. 
64% -«4 — Vi 
m%iw B — wi. 
11%. 134% 4lV% 
2646 2«%— 14% 


^15 


1 Pe^t -S 2^ 3333 u . >2* — W 

PnopHld J6b2j6 734'* 361% 3*V% _ 


114% -^% 


2714 - 

M -11* 
12 *1 
114 111S -J*. 


1J6 34 VT634VS 
-03% J J77UH6 
.72 24 I7334V% 

JO 2.1 168 421% 


10*4 .*44 

Sv%— 3W 

5 T® 


-OtrmPn . 


— BS5 5V% 
2JOO JJ 37 7646 
_ 3*413 

- 209 1644 

- B7W 516 




TAD 36 11 

- 7933 5' S 

- 1855 IWb 


12 U% 44 

1614 M14 _ 

446 51% ~W 
2644 3 64 6 -I V* 
8V, 7 —14% 

131% 13 . *V% 
3416 38 +14% 

25»% 259% +4% 
24% 245 *4% 

13VS Ul% -4% 
38 28 —Hu 

2 S>M 24 -K 


- 465 6V, 

2J1 277 6% 

- 686161% 

- 757 224% 

- 5S55 

■ 428 33% 

- 54 a* 


%6 =5 
S J* tli* 


2144 22 —VS 


Omda 
Onwm f 
Orlnix 

St 

tWrOfflS 

OUiBA 

OshKTS 

OsWW 

DsTBOIdl 

OrtrT* 3 

oumaiKs 

•Outw 

QutfKGrP 

□umus 

OxMRW 


- 2/28 17V* 

- 3838 12 

- 1*2 13 . 

... 801 54% 

_ 1545 M 
„ 5172 1*9% 


3414 381% *1W 
2*% 3 —*% 


r. .«a 

_ 608 54% 


173 


W SBP-r£ 

346 3* —IS 
16MM$4 

5 s & :s 

k. Si ts 

4V6 44% —4% 
Aim —IS 
IS is*- -4% 
104% 11 Vu *»%. 
74% 0 •> 

3» » *¥■ 
31 311% —4* 


K 76 b 26 734'* 361% 341S - 

i j. i? ^i%i%i% + “ 
* 

53*6154% 11 121% +11% 

Mtrowr . . . 776 7696 16 781% *M 

Period - 19*22- 21 214% — 16 1 

'SBr-. 

Periaas-.. -.2000113 m* 13 >4% 

ThSmi -. 253 10V. 946 746 _ 

fw&oa - m 5US 644 5 914 

FWcaAn -152613 12 13 _ 

piirl_I>o - 1283 84% 746 B —46 

Pelroo, - 10*1046 1D» 101% —81, 

PetDv..- i.. 636 7nft, 1«% 14% • _ 

PlriGeo* ■ - _ 718*17 17V% 17. +14% 

PtHeal A S 65. 151 81% 71% «W 
fWrflH . L13 £« 78314* 8? 31 —1 

ZSSZU.. . * 1 % 

PeWMT - ---7*5101% 7V% iov% *-v, 

PMmMkt 4737 101% 9 VS 10 'A 

PttamAB . — 397415% 141% MWm— *%, 

PhrmMa • - - TT9B 101% 9*4 10 — 1% 

SSs . E 

RtOJacob J5 SO >089 7J6 81% 9 *1% 

PtmxTC •• - — -3235 546 646 546 t n 

PTKJtaC - 26 *16 £ *1% 6-1% 

etttrtWHc ... - 1002 M4 3^ 34* 

Pfrtrtfl - - -■ 168B17V. 1846 17 _ 

PtivCor -1072630 2546 30 *2» 

“PTryCA* ■ ■ —26286 2016 1BVS 1744 _ 

PMvQ* r im 25 416 aw *W 

«IVW«r -. 3416 231* 20 2M* ♦**% 

PflYA] . t - *91 61% 6 616 _ 

tea - ao,.33.2^w^-g 

PfildF*-. J6 Si .- 317 14. l7„-*-3 

wSfS* 1 20- 1 avsSw“Ii| 

MV- % 

pjdf^ JO XI. 51 2644 2616 361A — M. 
PInffljl 33 &?% 5VS i 


_ 51 77 21% 

_ 677J546 

.151 25 369 54% 

- 128313 

• — 4444 81% 

- 1012 3 


- 6314 124 

i v&vr 

- 166 34% 


JB lj5 1116211% 
- 1541 174% 


RJ= More - 461 74% 

RFSHU M H 757*18 
RHNB .« jF .4*171% 
»3cs Fn t - raw 


RPfA • J2 3J) 
«sfw. jo is 


54% 6 _ 

161% 1714 7 16 
3314 234% *-V5 



- 4336 74% 

- 77* 6W 
-14446194% 

- 5 44% 

.1* 9 757 144% 

28 15x1273 211% 

_ 573 151* 

_ V7I1W 

- 4*14 51% 

.10 1.1 77 7 

J2eZ6 80 941 

- 335 m. 

,11 J 287 131% 

-aim 74% 


«■* 81% *4% 

MY* t W 

7 VS —1% 
M —4% 

a 101% -\% ! 

414 446 4 7<% 

I 

15V, >546 ' V% 

cf is 

18 lB'A— I 'A 


j& f sj .?% 

11144 Jlh 11V, . V* 


SonocoA Jt M 

SonocPpf 225 45 


121% 131% tW- ! 
7W 71% — «%, 

84% 746 *46 


VrtcfrG J0O4J 
SeoThr lJ»e 4.7 

IS^Sh i 

SoMinrl 05 4J 


1% JB 

2448 746 «'% 64. —4% 


SrOsfTc 

SvtxneS 

Svbron 

Svhrtn 

SvfvnLm 

Syfnntc 

Svmix 

Snrmetric 

Synoptic 

Srnalay JO 

Svnbia 

Syncor 


IKS? 

Syneosvs 

SvnHo 


- 717 7V% 
1*6 U 737155'/. 

- 2461316 

- 134517 

- Soar 26V, 

- 2103144* 

- 76114% 

- 73*3 131% 

- 190517 
.12 IJ S73 BVS 
JO 1.3 14251 32 
.16 U 143412*% 
JO IJ 1390 211% 


SSSlfo 2 EJgS9*VStt?Z 

SouvwdJ - 486 3V% 2*% 3 


SYUShw .12 


_ 343 54% 

- 41 84% 

41 3742411 

_ 346 77 VS 

_ 4879 37 
_ 278 91* 

- 115 31% 

_ 1831 74% 

-119747 44V. 
_. 42625 

- 268 10V, 

_ 1*41 1716 
-31907 131% 
_ 124 10VS 

_ 2426 7 
-3632514 V* 

21 X7441PM, 
_ 475 >4% 

_ 1083 7 

- 133 344 

- 6778 44% 
17*4 1544 

-11830 411% 

- 38B 3 

- 1628 >4% 
.7 8716 1446 
-14377 8 
_ 303 20 

- 212* 141% 

- 1357 54% 


•%„ ■>;„ — v„ 
7" 7*2 -46 
28 28 - 
141% 181s '14% 
121% 12V, — 4% 
f 71% ' Is 

5Y. *4% ' 4* 

104% 111, I 1V% 
1246 U'S — W 
4 44% — V* 

2'V 2V% — »» 

9V5 10 IS 
34i 4 *1* 

746 71* —'a 
23V, 2416 1 4% 
25 26 —IV, 

341% 3SJ%— IV* 
846 BV. —4% 
3 3 — V» 

on ts* 1 'A 

37V, ajv% .34% 
3*16 3416 —V, 
04% 10’s 1 •* 
IS 1 * 1**6 — '6 
114% 13 *116 

10 IOV3 . *4 
* 84% -1* 

I3\%I3W U < Vu 
It’S 1846 .1* 


»<% 184% *16 
M% 3'S *** 

34% 36% 


_ 779 1516 

- 844 44% 
J46 J 5*11'* 

_ 571 131% 

JO 3J 3 17 
_ 7103 M 

- 870 16 

-23143 5V. 
_ 772 5V, 
_ 133 I 

_ 324711V, 
_ 13259 34% 
_ 1284 3V 
_ 3*3 54* 

_ 138 121% 

_ 1*33 4V* 

- 13M 54% 

_ 310 13* 

- 84 41% 

- 467 12*6 
32 23 %33714'S 

1.00 o 141 23U 
.40 2J 467 171* 
20 29 21*1 71% 
_ 2888 71% 
7 516 
_ 2235 41% 
_ 1680 6**» 
20 1.4 WM46 
J8 J 7*00341% 


131, 14 '6 
4V. 4V, 
10 101 % 


41 W'T 
15 15 

41% SW 


ll'% II'm 
4'6 41% 
»% 8> 
13'« 134% 
3V 3h 
116, 114* 
13*. 1*1% 
>24% 231% 
174% IB 
61% 7 
6V, 6V. 
5»% 5'S 
4 Si 44% 
3 5 


— *4 

—2 VISX 
. 4% VilolSon 
—V. VrtlfA 
• 1> VjVsa^ 

—1% vhm» 

— ■% vmork 

- VoMnf 
— '% Volvo s 

- Vtet 

-I I 


... 417 21% 

:. sSo 1% 

J7e J 7471046 


_ 1031 10*. 
_ 3253 5 
.. 2578 13%. 

— 3369 17 V, 


7V, 746 
141% 14'% 
IS 2S 
5S 5S 
17 ITS 
7W 10 
I0V% 104, 
41% 44% 
13 134% 

IS 17S 
!» 18Vs 
17 17V, 

51% 4»% 


4*6. 


38 4116 -41% 

21* 3 

31% 36% .. 

1316 MA. *V, 
7V% TV, ♦ Vu 
184% I8J* — •% 
14'* 144% 

5*6 SUfa —Va 




53V, 551% *1% 
101% 1J1% —V3 
T6 161% —4% 
341* 2b %* .146 
12 i486 *7 

11 111* 41% 


SwoNts UM 


'-Me 51 662 24V, 234* 2H* _ 


111* 1316 ♦11/6 
161* 16Vr — 16 , 


- ^33 416 

-1^ » 

- 44 31* 


- 31701146 

r 'if? 4W 

- 4307 &Va 


Ege- 



1 •* " 


ja 23 *aS?iig 

J*t 4J i4iii^ 


3316 2346 ♦%% 

v& 

r 

48% 5V* +J* 
24* aw +1* 
34*% as —4% 
im* us* — v* 

1 <n «« 

*46 446 - 

214%. 3>% ♦%% 

16 lY _ 

34% 4V6 4-16 
14% 1S% ♦%% 
181% 181% —16 
IL I»6 


JO 1A 276 17 
-20 1.7 567 12 

28 1 J 333 17>4 

■“ e ; ft's* 

- 4266 la VS 


111% 124% * V% 
211% 214% 

1716 174% ♦'£ 
2 2 — W 



-04 3-5 1 30 30 30 *2V* 

.12 1.7 653 74% 6 7 *16 

JO 4J 5310 TV. 10 *>6 

.100 IJ 5131 70S 79% 10 —4% 

_ 1*10211% 20 211% *4% 


J056 J 4386 1646 14 'A 16 -14% 

- 27 5V% S 5 —IS 

- 1615101% 71% 10'^ -'Vu 

- 17 8 71% 8 *1* 

_ 557 70’- 7’J 746 — •* 

- 1764 SV% 44% 46% - 

_ ISTSWa ria — Vb 


TAT Tc t 
TAT wr 
TBC 

TOUT 

TFCEnf 

THQ 


_ 3740 44% 
_ 27 S 

- 1557 10V. 
1.7 583 224* 

- 155 41% 

_ 1434 3V% 

- 2738 1316 

- 71512V. 

- 5566 «■ 

- 3076 6V* 


34% 346 ♦ 4% 
1% IS *1% 
9*% 10'A *6% 
2216 224% * U . 
34% 4V% *4%' 
316 3a, * a. 
11V, lift *Vu 
lift 121% - 


UNSLB 

USConl 
USMmc^ 
USUTO 
USLOfK, 
U5Wlre 
USAJtol 
USA Tr si 

LISMX ■ 

USTCP 

uhpoc I 

imraksl 

LWroVt»l 

UltraStep 

UnlcoAH 

umtrce 


JO 1.9 369 271% 
JOB 2J 314 33 V, 
JOB 15 5207 54* 
_ 90 41% 


|V% V 

94* 10H —9% 


- 1213 346 

- 25601316 

- 603 71% 

- 617 12 

- W 2ft 

- 339 1% 


9 10 ♦* 

51% 516 — V4 
1646 1846 ♦ IV% 
57* 616 *4% 

34% 316 - 


_ 1S7S w» r/p •„ — V B 

- 517612ft 12V, 12V* _ 

- 146 111 2ft 2ft —ft 

- 7532 10ft 9 10ft «1 

- B332 I ft 106, 2 ->% 

- IMS 44% 3ft 416 - ft 

- 139 B 6ft 7ft *46 

_ 733 5 1 V— 5*4%, 51% -Vu 


- 19*0 6ft 

- 2155171% 

- 323 6ft 
1*51 84* 


30 13 497617V, 161% 16ft —16 

- 261 4V. 4 4 _ 

- 1175 4ft 3ft 344 —1% 

- 649317ft 16ft 17ft * ft 

- 16232 34 30 33ft « 11% 

- 26 Vu ft. ft. — 

- 21S ft 1% 16 —ft 

- 1496 ft V, ft. — Vu 

_ 3M3 2 116 1ft —ft 

- 86 IIS 7ft 81% _ 

_ 3529 SV» 4ft 5 — Vu 

_ 2437 6 5ft 54* - ft 

_ 8882 lWi. 1ft. 144 - 

_ *02 >6. *3 ft. »V» 

- 1813 3'A TY u 3*u - ft 

—13*03 UW II lift —4% 

_ 1814 4ft 3ft 41% —ft 

-1363517ft 15ft 17V, *!ft 

M 33 286021 10’* lOft -ft 

_ 1833 18 17 18 -1 

81 lift 11 II —1ft 

M J 2463 151. 144, 141% —4% 


12 'A 1216 - 

. U 14ft —14 

WWtSBf 


- 3739 26ft 

- 1*9 201% 
JO J 473 26ft 

_ 17104446 

- 3670 23ft 
S JO U lfflW* 

M '£ »'iA 
_ 551246 


644 7ft —ft 
11 lift ♦ ft 
21% 2ft _ 
14 ft - 
6ft 6ft —ft 
21 VS 23ft +4% 
201% 201% *16 
251% 26W _ 

43ft 4416 _ 

23 234% —ft 

25ft 25ft - 



- 1164 35 

- 733 ft 

- 1562 4ft 
_ 213614ft 

UD 13 SL*3*ft 


, 1716 1746 -ft 
10 10 —4% 

7ft 174% —ft 


& +4* 


I 937612% 


PtoWS - *. 17Vu lift +lft 


- 117 4 
LOO O IB a 27 


13ft 16 6ft 
35ft 36ft *ft 
1216 129% -ft 
131* 14 4ft 
8ft 8ft — 34% 
3H 4 ♦ft 


_ 5177 4ft 
Z 7815 rs 

- « 3M 15ft 

1J0 B Jj *$}& 

M 15 nSiJL. 

— 1£5I01% 

I JO 3J *27337 


16ft 17 -« 

616 64%. — ft. 
lift 12ft .ft 
34ft J£V% —ft 
416 4<% — V* 
11 11 — 1 % 
32 35 - 1 ‘A 

616 7ft -6% 
> 2. - 



- 8*7 >Vu 

ij TQiil 

- 36 4 1 * 

- 1202 13V, 

- 51 lift 

- 1850 3ft 

- 226! 51* 

- ZJM «V« 

- 1847 2Tf 

- 87 4ft 

- 723 6ft 


- 717613ft 

-21587 1 8’.'. 

TdtmH J6 SJ 14101% 
TeOvw - 795 946 

TehCpm - 336 8ft 

TocnSof - ISO 61% 

T#cnolM - 2»7 14 

Tecnntx - 784 54% 

Teams joaij 1037 504% 
TecumA JOa U 5071 52ft 


41% 4U-, — 
111S 11V* —ft 
lift 159% tft 
5V, PV,— 'Vu 
95 97 *1 


usse* 

StOTtcJl 

SfcxtflAu 


- J79 2ft 7*% 21% ♦ ft 

- 125 v M »u Vu -Vu 

_ 1| ft ft ft -Ji» 
-11(07 27 34 77 * 24% 


Il4W27^ 27?, 3SA6 *vS 
_ J73 8 7ft 7U —W 



rJB® 

I 258911* 


24ft 23 ♦*» 

Mft Mft— 1ft 
- — lift . t.'A 
65ft -8 . 
lift-*? 


PtoMN - - 

Plenum 1.12 4J 
Pl*nt ' _ 


146 646 7ft Hk 

1.12 4J 304 26ft. 25ft 3» - 

- 35 lift 10ft m* -ft 

JO IJ 2062246 21ft 2246 * 7% 

- 12291*1% 12ft l*ft +1 

■-vf ^ :5 

38 18 ft -*5 


P&F. 

PAM _ 
PCPOCS 
■PCSxc 
PCAInt 
POSv 
PDA 
«5K ^ 

PDKwrtB 
PUffpt 
PO&Pin 
*>nA Anri 
PwlCCWM 
PMRCp 
PMTSvc 
PSBHoU 
P5C 

PARE CP 
PJYREPf 
PocRim 
POCOT 
S.pocwwn 
PocBrtis 

PoeCr^ ‘ 
Puctwrf 

oScRenao 

PoclICA 

P0CHCB 

POCOPB 

Pose* 4 

Poanos 

POfTlJi 

Pelted 

Pomrop* 

porweo 

Ponlcft 

PoniM* 

PBPOJOtVl 

Pardian 

PwPbJ_ 

PprmTCB 

Parcdcc 

PornBu 

PortiC 

ParKOP 


S3 ft 
■ ffl “ 6 £ 15 

- 2637 IH 

M ic5 

- 269 SW 
- ' — l«5 6ft 

'*•” iSSf 

— 12054 tft 

■**» iSV? 

JO 1-2 46«2«ft 
aM *-1 
>"«:! 

413 59% 

.* sj 

jB A^SSttl 

- ♦» 71% 
Z 718328 

- 7538 91% 
_ 1573 7%p 

SO 2.6 13819 

‘ r "SSvf 

- -S3 

. 1377 3ft 
—25*37 7716 
_ 1047316ft 
W »V|. 
786231% 
_ 483141* 


ft ftifi, 



jb 4J -S»i% m% 

-■ea-ft a 

— 1*78 Hi - ft T ft. ♦ J* 


ft ft' - 
ft ft-^S 
« « -2 
pft 3 

is lift ■« 

%■%'-!* 
46ft «» -■-» 

JH 3* ’ J% 
10 10 —ft 
69% 6ft - 
13ft 134% —ft 

Wl% ft . *>.» 


Posflrvrf 

Potass 

PeoanSv 

asssL 

•Wtrson 



= ®SS 


- 1843 28ft 
_ lift 

Zl^M 94V 

-raw «* 


■ - KSA 

— 1270 TO 

— 762 18 


J2 U 312013ft 


JUm I J 7601 416 
J5 7J £»* 

- 7916ft 
23 U 95 6ft 

- 1243 9ft 


_ 1*78 IW -8% MU ♦ }f 
- 6516ft Sft » — ft 
to a ms* 44* 44% -y% 


PWrSU to2fflO«p5. Mft ■OW*4H» 

b».-- iaiWia 

PrmAnes - 30*4 2ft 1* H* - 


PnnAne* - ^ Jfc »> - 

Pnnroe ... _ Ml 174% Mft ' - 

Ptma? - A 2J - ; diiv u 17 - 

Ha ■" “-aa £ 

sss? -ffla R a : ;s 

SS i :*■ 

i 15ft 14ft 14 


Prices s — 2B656 15ft Mft KW. - 

PrRST '3JB 7JS27W3aft 33 34ft 1 «ft 


ResOml 

RnWne 

Reentndl 

Rcseundl 

RescAm 

Rsefioc 

m*M| 

sssJ 

R*nx " 
RMSHtfS 

gavPtPB 

ftcxSixiSI 

Rewwni 

Rcuo I 

P46*Wk*| 

RTieomr 

Rbflm 


1746 13 *ft 
10 W -ft 
25 38ft *3ft 
16ft 17ft *ft 1 
SV* 6ft *V% 
846 846 —ft 
3*% « -fl* 
34* 2ft —ft 
»ft «*■ *ft| 

17 171% ♦%* 

13 13ft —Vu 


_77«09 37ft 

* 

- 1006 4>6 
_ 21314 

36 3J 2 Jft 
_ 69 V* 

Jt 3J »»ft 

^ 27 Jjljft 

_ 177 2ft 

J8 1.9 U51S 
■12t3J 66 4" 

- 88717ft 


Ba g= 


3^4 Mb 

WW = 

8ft 8ft -ft 
IV, 8V% *1 
W4% TJM - MS 
8ft v *n 

WPtSS 

4ft 5ft »ft 

ms 

8 ft 8 ft —ft 
6ft 6ft —ft 
4ft 5 t ft 
5ft 5ft - 
IV* 1ft ift 
3ft 4' -I 
4ft 4ft *ft 
131S M —ft 
2ft Tft * ft I 
TO 104% 1 ft 
lift 21ft -3ft 


JIT 53 V 


_ 4676 71% 
164 Uft 
3 1415 9ft 


= »K 

= aiat 

- 1585 5ft 

- 172 5ft 

- <IMft 

_ 3855 4ft 
.16 33 W 4ft 
» * WM 

_ 406 2ft 


5ft sw* .Vb 
8ft 8ft —ft 


PKMSB 269 86 36231ft 3046 31 -ft 

SgR # •“ SSIi|-*T*=S 

PrSnat^ . • “ UV* 14ft *«* 

P?KS»» • 32874*6 26. V s 


-8ft 8ft —ft 

«6 4 &— lft 

Bft 9 ft -ft 


ssssvtii tfjsasftiBt 


l Pr^SSls 33 a 
nrtranx — UOS. 1 


S" n . Z 
% »=» 
A&t -* 


to 16929 8 6 6ft — 1 

„ 7471 IQ V, 716 m * ft 
.9 12652616 2346 Hft •!> 


PreSbo . J4 .9 12652616 2346 Hft > lft 
5^5? - 3103 3416 30ft 9ft ' 2ft 

5S -- 


■ Sr, Tin "7% 

«»■!$ 

iX‘ 

134. 139% • ft 


4J8. 10 916 7ft -I 

66 aft B Bft -ftl 

. — 473 8 71* B ■ ft. I 

-■ £317221% 20ft 214* -ft ; 
■_ SOU 3 2ft 2ft —ft 
• -- 472 716 7ft 7V* „ 


Rkttds 

Riddell 

RUbNt 

RrtiMa 

Raisin 

Rtmooe 

Riant! 

Rival 

RlwFer 

HwOatt 

RvreCP 

RwrNn 

nxjdSv 

RwiB 

RstnQ» 

RobMvf 

Robcc 

g» 


_ 3806104% 

- 1717221% 

- 83 4 

- 214 646 

- 565 2 



1.12 41 MSJini 
to 37 5 

- 2122ft 
_ 4149 5 

ziG'r 

_ 1435 7 

- 138910ft 
_■ 1TS7 3ft 
_ 181919ft 

- 1337 8ft 

_ 1518 

_ 1345 1 

J4 34 9808 25 
_ 649 4 


naicsrt 
Rock Sod 
RqcmFvi 


«. 10S 716 

_ 162 ■ 
1J0 2J 7W8ttft 
J8 3U 49715ft 
100 6.0 4164% 

JO U 4620 
_ 45* IRS. 
_ ■ 512 9 
.. 2673 29ft 
Jt ZJxUOS iV 1 
- 2647 4 
_ 3533 17** 
JJS it S»»ft 
10*3 * 
1JDB4J 143 


5 *ft Hft 
1 ft 2 .ft 
lift 131* I ft 
19ft 201% «4% 
3*V% 34ft —ft 
16 16ft 1 ft 
7 /%% • ft 

Tft 7ft I ft 
mt 41ft 1 1ft 
P 14ft —1% 


1«% 16ft —ft 
lift 1PA —ft 
11% lAft ‘ Vu 
Sft 8ft —ft 
261% 2BV* • 1ft 
5ft 5ft -ft 
5 SV* - 
iTft m, -»H 


ShNlrtB 

Shtob 

SSVAVsB 

SmeCw* 

Stntadgs 

SWWPns 

ShOrriO ■ 

snexetu 

SiMscn 

ShuUAHl 

Siertm ■ 

SterTcn 

SerToc 

swnoC 

SterrOal 


- 1393 6ft 

- 11571216 

_ 67311ft 

JO 3J 31 19 V. 
_ 58 7ft 

- 20012 

_ 387 Tft 

>. wun 

Jt 3J 17 17 
_ 970110 
_ 3376 7 

= BHS 

_ 349 2V. 
J8B2J 117223 
.. 734*21 
> 8654 13ft 

- 42410 
_ 336 3ft 
_ 204 S 

— 10B24 7 


iry« mi — »■ 
33 331? ' ft 

By* 9 ‘1% 

43 43 —4ft 


SJamcSrU 

SonTTaeS 

swuOfi 

StlicVTyH 


33 u 10457 3?w 
to 727 a 


JO 20ft — V. 

3JJ% 34»% i ?, 
74ft 35ft 46* 
IS 1 ,'. 15ft— 1 
lift 15ft - 
4 4ft 
IS 14 . ft 

9ft 91% —’A 
2ft Tft -ft 
31 3 *1% 

27 29 *2 

1816 -ft 
14 15 H 

47 47ft— 1 

'lft 1ft —1% 
14 IS 
4 4 —ft 

II lift— I 
TV. IV. -Mu 

2 :v% .1% 

27 32 

4ft 4ft 
21 21 

4ft 5 *6 

15ft J7lk * )U 
4ft. 4ft — *u 

6 6ft Tft 

8ft 99* *m 
24% 3 —ft 
M 19H < ft 
8ft lft .ft 
lift lift —ft 
7ft 8 «ft 
?3ft 23ft— 1ft 
3ft 4 ,Ju 
5ft 6 .V* 

101% lift 1 ft 
t«6 lift * lft, 
19 19 —ft 

*ft tft _ 
71ft lift ♦* 
9ft 9ft ■ ft 
17ft 20V* 

1736 18ft , ft 
IB »ft tft 
tft 8ft -ft 
60s. 7ft -ft' 

ptf* »£ ■ i% 

22%% 22ft —ft 
14 SO ■ 3ft 

a lift • 2ft 
9ft -ft 
3 3ft (ft 
4ft 4ft _ 
4ft 5 -2 

30ft 31ft >1 


StoTd _ 171815 13'/* 13ft ^6 

SWlAul JO U 201 1«% 14 14ft —ft , 

atsesm J U 4218 17V, 17ft —ft 

SIRia JO 2 J *0 T«6 lift M*» "ft ] 

StaArl _ BB5 79* £ft 7 ♦ ft 1 

SloSffios JO U 11794 40%, J9*% 37ft — V. ■ 
SKtnCas „ 3219 12ft 70'-% l W% -f* 1 

SJKiiVn _ 7* Bft S’S 8ft —ft 

StoelTcn .08 J 181318ft 14ft lift— IW 

5dWVo „ 547 I3'4 12ft 13ft -ft. 

SWWVOS _ 338316 1SV% 16 *ft 

siefft to 316 21 17 17ft —ft! 

STsrBcj J8 13 323 41 38ft 40 ^ * ft 1 

sJmS? M 23 Sllft 14ft 17V* *'% 


_ J 17 JVu 
_ 15 Bft 

_ 1307 TO. 
567S lift 

Zsaraaft 

= "3W 

. 4928 5ft 

I 

_37TO6 36ft 


TetroTcs 
Tetro 

T«vo 


SWPViWA _ 46813ft lift 13 

SlrtFpt 1JI 6J 190 27ft 26ft 27ft • J% 


tolOMBlOft 

JO .1 97>315Vi. 
to 17511 
_ 23001 27ft 
J* 2.9 Z7645ft 
„ 876/ 20ft 
_ 1517 TOW 
JSe .9 x9254 31% 

* “ 39 12ft 

r W& 

z 


I7ft IBIS * 1 
24 24'% to 

l 6 4ft lY“ 

Sft Bft ♦ ft 
Tft 7ft —V. 
V. iVu *v« 

Ai 

, 3 ^ iV -v5 

17ft 1BH *ft 
3 3ft - 
2ft 4ft ♦ lft 
Vu ft *Vu 
20ft a -1 

13ft lift .7% 
1SV1 18ft *3ft 
10ft 1016 
9 Tft 
Tft 716 ♦'% 

6 6 — Vi» 

121% 13ft »lft 
SV* 5ft 

47ft SOft '2ft 
47ft Sift *1 
3ft 3ft — V C 
7ft 7ft —ft 
6ft 7'A - 

ioft 10ft — ft 

aft* »" — vU 

23 23 ft— lft 

67 67 _ 

4ft 4ft M — Vu 

7 94% ♦%% 

Tft 3ft » ft 
31 35H ♦4ft 

3ft 4 —ft 


I I '■ 
UnBnkof 

KSSSn 

UP%8 ME 
UnSurlcni 


- 47 5 

_ 651 J 10ft 
_ 331 3ft 

_ 73 8 

to 103 20 
_ 19*4 2ft 
„ 181413ft 
2267 Bft 
_ 316 7 
_ 205 IJ 

3*6*9* 

-07 U 402 4ft 
.12 .9 1737 13ft 

to 3077 3'% 

_ 5998 59% 

_ 1036 2V, 
1.40 44 1)19 30V, 
2.W B-5 483 24ft 


25ft 26ft- 
a a 

SV* 5ft 
4ft 4ft 
36%, 37 
16ft 17'% 
3ft 3ft 
4*S S 
91% 10’-, 
3ft 3ft 
Tft 7ft 
19ft 19'% 
3ft 21% 


WO40 2-40 
J2 

WPiGn, 

- Ml 

1 W§FS Pl i2S 

SST 

WVSFn 04 1 

wockCor 

WainBk 

WMDni .40 

WaP.tm 

WbllDtXa 

WollSDI 

Wtfcn, J4 

WaodGD 

Wong Lab 

WongL wl 

WOTTTtC 


_ 1554 6 51% 

5-7 553 40ft 40 

... 718 15 14ft 
14 91191 21ft 191% 
_ I/O 2?* 2ft 


„ 3238 lift 10ft 
84 278 26ft 25ft 
. 52* 4 3ft 
27 S'.i 4« 


WlMSBs .» 

, WM5B MC2J8 
WMSB W06.00 
WMSSDfEl.90 
WcnWW 
Warrln 

wmsrPti 
waffsins 33 
WnuPi J* 
WaweTec 
Wnvetmi 
Waver 44 
WebcMnd 
Wb*«=n -52 
Wedco I.IOl 
WeiMt 
WelDill 

HVIIMS! 

WeMHS 
Wemer .10 
We^bant. 44 
WUCMCA 
WsTCstFL JO 
WMCxtOR .16 
WffMar 
WNeyrtn 40 
WstOne s .72 
WArr-Bc 48 
WesicQB JO 
! WstcM* 
Weirerted ,10o 
! WTBotts Mr 
I WUBeet 
WiPR J0e 
WftdlcTc 
WstnObF 
; WsmPb 
WBWorr 
wwfan 
I WstSYs 
wopBc 

I WsIwOn 
I WorSfol 
I Wcvco JO 


2ft 21% 
1*2 IJ 
7ft 8ft 
6ft Bft 
12ft 14 
22 ft 2* 

4 

12ft 111% 
2ft ?ft. 
5ft Sft 
3 2 ft 


2-0 12 77 

I4J 17 71% 
B.1 483 aft 

. 873 18ft 
. 6 A 2 lft 


Mfl 

UnCo*F* 

\S8%h 

UTdim.a 

IINBNJ 


1.04 4J 4£3 25V* 
48 XS 412 25ft 
1JX) 57 324 17ft 

40 1.1 517237 
.16 1 J 562 14 
148 2-2 S 41 
_. SIB Tft 
to 511 26ft 
. _ 2288 13ft 

140b 10 340 33ft 


34ft 24ft 
3*V» M's 
7 1 

3JV% 33 
IT’S 1B%% 

7ft 8ft 

Jft 5 v, 
34ft 25 
241% 35ft 
16ft 17*S 
34 35 

13ft 13ft 
JO 40 


jouao si ,?ft —}% 

JS J 55085 37ft 3* 34W— '*£1 
04 3 207! aft 21ft 73ft ■ ft 

„ 157121% 17 ISW —>* 

_ 7577 12V. lift >Sft * ft 

.. 1B2 10ft 10 10ft , ft 

_ 7670ft » JOft - 

_ 24723 34ft 30ft D 'lft 

. 3M 4*% 4ft 4ft 'ft 

_ 2*77 1 ft W , T 


TherD 00 

z 

TnomMA J8 1.7 771 17ft 


S TrgtC p . 304 « 

smcpwi _ 2*77 1 

sywna 1.10 5.1 956 22 

strobef _ *42 3’ 


2*77 1 ft ft - 

LI 956 22 21 21ft * 1% 

_ *62 3ft 3 3 — 

14353 7ft 8ft 7ft 

J 12307 37 30’S 32 1 11% 




SfryMr JPe J 12307 32 30ft 32 (lft 
SiunEn _ MO 51% 4ft 4ft —ft 

yunoi _ 2171 1% 'fts ‘ft! —ft, 

SuDMier _ B9S S'- 4ft 4ft —ft 

Slfificp 1J0 I J 1067ft %7ft 67ft 
SobBnCP X 7J *337 15ft UP. 15 —A 
Sieaxjry _ 1634 6ft 4-s t’m • ft 

5uf®nc 48 2.B 27 25 23ft J«% -lft 
iuUOra _ 534 16ft M'% 15** - 

Som*o jo 13 lS524ft Wft * *• 

SumdOPl 103 XT 431 231% 23 Z3ft - 

SummoF _ 4138V* n'% 'S'* ‘'JJ 

surmnos .. si* 5ft 41* sj* * ft 

Sunwdl _ 305 7 1* 414 6 1 * —ft 

SWWJWA .14 lj«3341l lift* TO? 4 
sumae J4 3J 9H5 221% 21 »ft 
SumgTX 36 1.9 99 18ft Sft *ft ' £ 

Sarmcni _ mwitv* is ij -ft 

3*««rc _ 40/2 39ft 94ft 28ft ' J!" 


Tirol 2J09 6.7 599 3!'% 

JB IJ 109924ft 
_ 65*14 S3*. 
_ 820 tft 
_ 342215ft 
_ 31617ft 
77 3’* 
_ 1M1 "ft 
_ 55 61% 

_ 7187121% 
TlBddAO J* IJ Bft 

jssar 40. ~j 

ToAosMO _ 3643 4 

Tm* pic 57« U 130415V* 
TOOPS JB 44 8827 4ft 
TOPsApl _ S» »ft 

TorRoy _ 47 4ft 

TotCbrrf „ 1570 13W 

T«ITbI 1.771104 10 IMfc 

TourrAir J*e A 130' 9ft 
T nr Aida _ 27)36 13ft 

TraeoryU - 75 Sft 

Trocor _ 158* 73% 


12ft 14ft .lft 
10ft 10ft —1% 
22ft 35ft Oft 

40>S Oft • ft 
189* 19« -ft 
Tft 9ft —ft 
27ft 27Wu — V* 
13ft 13ft —ft 
12 1 * 12V. *ft 
lift 13ft *1 
Jft 4 —V* 

Mi » 

10ft Wft —ft 
12 ft 12 ft — '.% 

I Sft 16*% —V* 
30ft 31ft _ 
24 54ft —ft 
491% 57*4 - 2 . 

12 ft 12 ** ♦%%. 
3 3 -ft I 


USBcOR 
USBnnt 
U5 Em- 
us Fod 
us Him* 
USPoofna 
US Ro« 
usTru 
USKJW! 
unTeUv 
uravideo 
UWWstr 

n 

UN vox 

UnvElc 

UnivPtr 

unvHU 

UnvMw 

Urrvtm 

UnwSai* 

UnuSIdM 

(MvBUbT 


J 4 3J xBVIBft 
J8 3J 2014/ 77ft 
UD 8LI 114 25ft 
_ 122 4ft 

to B9211 
J4 2.161B04 4IV, 

> 36 41% 

11616 31 ft 
1D0 3.9 60S 51ft 
JO O 40>3 «*, 

- MS3ft 
_ 7359 IBM 
_ 3156 29ft 

.11 4 251 27ft 

140 3-3 xl 0806 49 
_ 1IJ0 61% 

- 220) Aft 

J» J 630 7ft 


UtVnOut 

uromed 

USBPn 

UtMiMed 

Uttx 


1J0 AS 11318ft 
61 4V» 


_ 1857 22V* 
_ 6W 4ft 
1J0 3.9 503 26 


26ft Wlu ■ 
13ft 13ft 
33'% 331% 
Bft 89* 

18 lift - 
361% 97V„- 
24ft 25ft 
3V. .*1% . 
12ft ir*u 
37ft 40ft ■ 
3ft 4 
36V* 30ft - 
50ft 51V* 
Tft 9ft 
51ft 51ft — 
161% 18 < 
21V, 23 
26ft 26V. 
46ft 48 - 
5 5V» - 

Sft 5ft 
7V, 71% 
21% 2ft 
6ft 6ft . 
IIS lft. . 
2'% W> . 
9 9 

3S3S 37-s , 
17V, lBV, 

4 Bft 
70'* 31 - 

4ft 4ft 
IS 25ft 
8H Bft 
3ft 3V, 


!»KS? 

wruiacftr 

! WlutHXls 


l WlxXCrH 
l WNflftv 
WUU.U 
IWnyJAs 43 

1 WHtmi ,w 

WmSonS 
WBmTr 1JB 
1 WtnORNr 
. Winsior 

I WissiFu 

WintteraH Xio 
WintfipRs M 


WbcCT s 
weWm 


t* a :& 


9%% IT .11% 
4ft 4ft - ft 
T5ft 1616 ,1 
61ft BI’%— Jft 
3ft 3ft —ft 
14ft U-Vu ,V. 
S*% 5ft —J* 
7ft 8 'ft 


3ft 31% —ft 


5un6no> 1J0 33 M31Vi » 31V% ' 


_ 7a 11% 
- 307 7ft 
_ 129013 


4V% 4ft —Vu 
lft lft -ft 

7ft 7* -ft 
II 12ft 1 lft 


SMUnH _ 18 » 23ft 33*,— 3 

SiMMic _456639S', 234%24'ft, ' I'f* 

SunSM _ 517 Bft 4 <*« • J 

Sun TV M J 4352 9". 8ft Bft ■ ft 

SWlMd „ 32 Jft 7ft 7ft -ft 

SurrSov — 254 7 r * 45? — ^ 

Sunsvpi I JO 8.6 ITS 131* 13ft 13 ft ~ 

g» Mi a ”4 

“ mfft 5 M jft -ft 
SunrTc _ U70 Jft 2 Sft " 


TioeSiw 
TratcAu 
TmsF«* 

TmLso 

TmMut 

Tran In 

TmsWsI 
TmNiur 
Tmsmt 
Trrmed v 
rmma 

Tovnl to 

TranstxGs _ 

Tnusc — • - 
TmrtdHH 
T*KUHWI 
TrovPYl _ 

Treador -U 1.1 
TrendLin _ 


J6 14 266 16 
- 3E7 3> 


7JW 13 —v* 

17 17 —ft 

9 9ft . ft 
11V* lift _ 
5ft 5ft -Hh 
7ft 7ft —ft 
25 26 -1 
14ft 14ft . v* 
15ft 15ft - 
3ft 3ft —ft 


: 


_ 552 ?ft 

- 1006 lift 

” - 

_ 3077 13ft 
_ 1254 53 
. 3135 31% 
61 lift 
L5 3 15V. 
_ 3242 9 
_ 199* Bft 
_ 77 9V» 

1.1 514ft 


10V% II —ft 
lft lft -ft 
Z 2 —l* 

10ft lift < ft 
3V. 3ft 1ft 
WA 13ft ■ 3ft 
2114 2? — 1 


Vdk« 
VcXvSy 

ValBCor 

VrtrraiT 

ValAdCm 

VfiTVts A 

VaMJet 

Vgroa 

VwMex 

Varitm 

Vorfpn s 

VirSort 

vouabn 

veaBk 

VedreTe 

Vengou 

Vtnfrdx 

Vencty 

vwoum 

Vadlna 

Vortm 

vr&» 

VTreaov 
Versa 
Vesitr 
V*rtc«C 


_ 59 4ft 

_ 5M23 I Jft 
JO 34 1 lift 

JO SJ 1194 9 
ina )J> 75 IDft 

to S2499 5’S 
_ 681! 

_ 111 Sft 
32 3.1 26B815V* 
JO IJ 253 16ft 
„ 1551 2ft 
- 3698 6ft 


= J»S S 

- l3MWu 
_ 716 16ft 

_ 1665 BV, 
tfl 97520ft 
_ 138 16ft 
_ 438 5ft 
_ *75 ISli 

» 13186 3Yu 


— »n 
_ 1665 Bft 
JO SJ 99580ft 
_ 138 16ft 


lft 2ft 
lift lift 


15ft 15ft —ft 


Tiwck ‘ 1 JO 2J 'ot 3*5 


iwum 

TrtC« 


Bft 9 
3ft 4 
2ft 2ft 
14ft U'6 
12 12V, 

37V* 37 IS 
221% 24ft 
3ft 2ft, 


VctCl Am 
VMAfnxut 
Vi ooene 

vtcai 

VlQjr 
V0cor*> 
VJOEn 


» 'JIM 4Tu 

_ 16723 22 ft 
to 68 3ft 
28 13 1 tft 

_193*4 7J 
_ &$ 3 10V, 
40 2.9 56321 

_ 306 6 

-360 34 34.4 

- 381 6ft 

_ 671 11 
_ 373615 

- 235 6ft 
_ 496 1ft 
_ I TO? 4ft 
_ 1106 8%. 
_ 8744264% 

- 1433151% 
-52 1.9 192837ft 

- 235 7ft 

- 425 3 

_ 401910ft 
_ IV 3ft 
_ 4941 lift 
_ 349236ft 
_ 8 Bft 


3ft 3*. 
13 I5V U . 
11V, lift 
Bft 74* 

9 Vi 10ft 
>4% 34% 

10 10'% 

2 9ft 
144% 15 
ISft 16ft 
2 34* 

5ft 6 
31 Z»% 

37ft 30ft 
S% 54% 
15ft loft 
7ft 0 
!?ft 171% 
15ft 15V, 
4ft £ 
12ft 12ft 
3V 4 
Wu W, 
17ft 21 
7ft 31% 
Sft 8ft 
19 30’S 

9ft 10 
20ft 20ft 
4ft Sft 
13ft 14 

6 6 
TOW 10ft 
11 14ft 
64% Bft 
lft I ft 
3S 4 


I WonOwre 
wwaru 34 
WlliCan 36 

i WMACP 
| WortRfa .13 
I Worthas 40 
Wyman 


3 70 16'S lift 

_ 2647 10'.* 9ft 
_ 10 5 5 

1.9 510 214* JOft : 
_ 3258 Tft 64* 

_ 4576 35ft 33ft . 
_ 172 12ft 13 

2.0 453 1?4% 13 

_. 975 9V. Bft 
_ 1266 11ft lift 
_ 151 54. 54% 

1700 Bft 3ft 
_ 466 9 8ft 

3.9 283531V, 21ft : 

- 837 Bft 4ft 

34 13929 31'.% 301% : 

8.9 ISO 2aft 25ft : 
63 lXWft 77ft 1 
BJ 81 33ft 23ft 

_ 26 ?'% 9 

-. 38 2 lft 

_. 9693 20ft 18ft 
J 2716 76 ft 25 

1.1 5860 23ft 214* 1 
_ 3596 7ft 7 

_ 713 7ft 6ft 

23 153 174% 16ft 

-. 1206 IS 13ft 

2- 2 2210 24ft 33ft 
7J 34 17ft 12 

_. 787 Sft 3 

- 89*24 22ft 

_ 1470 18 17 

_361M20ft 19ft 

4 6198 25 23ft 
3J 40 77ft 27 

- 116 'ft ft, 

1.7 471106. lift 

1.9 747 8V. BV. 
to 31 IPft 17ft . 

14 39 24ft 24ft 

23 4334 31 30ft 
2J 722 31 30ft 
2 J 111 11 ' 

-.15303 14ft lift, 
.7 *612 14ft 14 
19 208 1 54. 15 

to 118 Bft 6ft 
24, 3 31 31 

- 1139 8'.. Jft 

- 2338 18V. 18 
-12341 12ft 10 
to 2281 25 a 
to 2073 5 "!u Sft 
to 1383131. 1 3'S 

- 26 3ft J'V„ 

to 77*5 SV, Bft 
_ 43% 21% 9V, 

2.7 72 31 ST'S 

_ 86 Bm» 8ft 

- 118 35 34 

2J 1B1 2741 27 

_ 7343 15'S 144. 
._ 1075 7ft *4. 

_ 7974 131. lift 
_ 311 14ft lift 

IJ 137 43 41ft 
2J 10774 48V, 46ft , 
_ 7764 35' i 31ft : 

4.1 1587 27 2*' « ' 

_ IS23 «* 5ft 

.. 144*6 »■ „ S' ■■ 

_ « 84% BV. 

5 1)70 H Vi IO 1 -. 

.7 213 lift 10V; 

_. 2944 JO 38ft , 

IJ 234 16ft lift 
._ 7046 17 15 

23 13615ft )4ft 

19 4* 59ft 28 V. 

_ 469 70". I* 

1.1 1028 104. 10 

3- 0 721621 19 ft 

_ 756 7 4M> 


—ft I XOMA 
- X Rile 
-ft x«iNei 

*»% Xenovcun 
» v* Xl cor 
-lft X*nx 
- lft Xircom 
.1Y, Xpettie 
—ft Kotor 
*W I XVtaaJc 
—ft Xroto« 

.ft 


_ 4181 2ft 
J 78*29'. 
.. 8037 914 
... a3 
_ 2418 W. 
„ 2236337ft 
^ 13394 17ft 
_ 3332 17ft 
_ W lft 
_ 137*18*-. 
757 16ft 


2', Sft 
27ft 29 
714 9ft 

8 a 
11 . 2 
36 37ft ■ 
16ft 17ft 
14 17 

lft PS 
16 16 - 
1S'S 15>* 


334*. M 
14W 141% 
2*1% 27'* 
Bft 7ft 
74% 21% 
94% 9ft 
3ft 3ft 
16 18ft 
249% Bft 
Bft «'% 


—ft I 

• ft i 

—ft YgllBuyCP .94 
- lft Yesom 
, T'7 VurJ^n *0 
— V. VodlPV 
_ Younker 
•IV* _ 

C ~I - 

' - ' 7Sevn 
-WlZoteCP 
—ft ZOIPCP'VI 

• 3%, rwmo 
—■% Zeoru 
—ft ZeoLtsts 

_. Zeoi 

■ 4% zaoo 
>3 zma 

—ft ZiCttBCP 1.12 

■ ft Zim 
—v« ToHMcd 
—ft ZdMi 
—ft ZoupTI 

■ ft Zvtad 
> lft ZV90 

_ Zvnaxis 

• 1 i Zvtec 


45 5247 1' ft 20ft 20ft 
- 10 lft 'ft lft 

3J 7719ft 18ft IB'S 

6156 54 A, S 
" 4401 18 l*ft n‘% 


_ 156 I7t% 
15031 9'. 
133 3'.. 
_ JBS S'. 
.. 5169 39 

- 23426 70ft 

_ 24?7 3ft 
_ 665132'* 
_ 83 7 

Z.9 76* J»' , 

_ 3/89 5V* 
.. 3069 IP. 
... 161 13V, 

- 1854 8 
_ 4014 2V„ 

- >088 6‘-. 

„ 524 2ft 

_ U 1 10 


14ft 17 
Bft 4Vu 
Sft 3 
7'.', 8". 
35ft V u 
15ftl9"'u 
3ft 3ft 
27 30ft 
14% l'*u 
37 
4ft 5 
9‘ , 10 
ii i: 
75% 7 •% 
J'ft IW 
5ft 6 
lft 2 

9ft Tft 












tzt oa;iW3r: ^ 




Page 12 



SPORTS 


Defeat for Croatia 
Puts Russia and U.S. 
In Basketball Final 


Reuters 

TORONTO — Even before 
the first jump ball at the World 
Championship of Basketball, it 
was tough to find anyone who 
thought Croatia wouldn't make 
it to the gold medal game on 


Sunday. Except the Russian 
Beic 


lav. 


coach, Sergei 

Two days before the opening 
game on Aug. 4, the U.S. coach 
Don Nelson, the Canadian 
coach Ken Shields and several 
U.S. players, including Reggie 
Miller and Alonzo Mourning, 
predicted the United States and 
Croatia would meet in the final. 

But in Saturday’s semifinal, 
Russia upset Croatia, 66-64, to 
earn the right to meet the Unit- 
ed States in the final. Croatia 
will Lake on Greece for the 
bronze medal. 

“First of all, we are all ex- 
tremely happy. We were the 
only people who sincerely be- 
lieved we could be in the finals 
of the world championship,” 
said Belov. “It took a lot of 
convincing for three months of 
coaching this team to take it to 
the championship game.” 

The United States took a 6-0 
record into Saturday's semifinal 
contest against Greece and ad- 
vanced, to no one’s surprise, 
with a 97-58 victory. Croatia also 
had a perfect 6-0 record going 
into its game against Russia, 


which was 5-1. Russia’s only loss 
was cm Friday night to the U.S. 
Dream Team II, 1 1 1-94. 

Asked after the defeat wheth- 
er his team had taken the Rots-, 
sians too lightly. Giuseppe Gier- 
gia, the Croatian coach, said: 
“We have always had this prob- 
lem with Russia. The Russian 
team, it's always a good team.” 

Croatia finished third in the 
1993 European championship, 
losing to Russia, 84-76, in the 
s emifinals . The Croaiians went 
on to beat Greece, their oppo- 
nents here in Toronto, 99-59, to 
win the bronze medal. 

The Croatian forward Toni 
Kukoc, of the Chicago Bulls, 
was a member of the Y ugoslavi- 
an team that won the 1990 
world championship gold med- 
aL His teammate, Dino Radja. 
of the Boston Celtics, was in- 
jured and did not play at the 
last world championship. Both 
Croatian stars had off-nights 
against Russia. 

Asked whether he was angry or 
frustrated at fading to advance to 
the gold medal game Giergia 
said: “No. 1 don't think we are 
an gr y or stuff like that. In sports 
these are losers and winners.” 

Had Croatia earned a berth 
against the United States, it 
would have been a rematch be- 
tween the gold and silver med- 
alists from the 1992 Olympics. 



Cuban Makes Leap to Freedom 


By Harvey Araton 

New York Times Service 

TORONTO —The leap to what is per- 
ceived as freedom, to a life beyond abject 
poverty, is not as easy as one would t h ink . 
The last time Richard Matienzo tried, nine 
months ago in Ponce, Puerto Rico, he 
could not make his legs cany him across 
the invisible border. - 

He was supposed to defect from Cuba 
with a teammate from the national basket- 
ball team. Audits GudbcrL Matienzo's fa- 
ther, Julio, had flown in from Philadelphia. 
Julio Matienzo defected from Cuba in 
1980, when Richard was 1 1. The son cried 
when he saw Ins father, but the emotional 
tug-of-war was then temporarily won by 
those he would have left behind. His moth- 
er. His brother. Two sisters. A young son 
and his pregnant girlfriend, who would 
soon give birth to a second boy. 

And though it is difficult for a society 
that rewards its athletes with multimillions 
to fatho m, there were his teammates and 
fans across Cuba, where he would, upon 


Interview, the gray New 

. /orker aaiotoobik be rode in spai away 
suddenly when its driver spotted only a 
repocterind a man holding camera equip- 
ment otd front Jordan had slipped inside 


lion, Matienzo answered: “I am nobody to 
go and judge Andres’s personal decision.! 
am not a judge of any human being.’' . 

The Cuban coach, Miguel Calderon G6- 

too, read Matienzo's comments in the — — - ----- , 

newspaper, and confronted his leading scor- the had lotto fear a moment, -an d had o 
erandrebmmder later that day. “He said, contact the driver by cdlular telephone to 
‘When the Caban KGB gets bdd of this, 
yoar career will be over,’ ” Matienzo said. “I 
was shocked. I didn’t think I said anything. 

In the end. aren’t we just human beings?” 

Matienzo decided his basketball career, 
the one goal the state allowed him from 


1 was bom witk nothing. 
I don’t want a lot. 

Just what I earn.’ 


Guibert’s defection, be the best remaining 


player, albeit one who said he lived wit 
his famil y in a one-room shade and whose 
salary was the equivalent of $1 a month. 

“And I was scared,” Matienzo said dur- 
ing an interview Saturday, having finally 
made the leap last Wednesday, only to be 
joined by a teammate, Augusto Ducruesne, 
late Friday nig ht, while Cuban officials 
were preoccupied watching the U.S. 
Dream Team defeat the Russians in the 
World Basketball Championships. "T was 
scared for myself, for my family, for what 
would happen to theta” 

It was following Guibert’s defection last 


Nov. 30 in Puerto Rico, during another 
that Mari' 




Croatia's Dino Radja, foreground, pressured by Mikhail 
Mikhailov during the semifinal, which Russia won, 66-64. 


tour namen t in Argentina, that Matienzo, a 
6-foot-6-inch (1.98-meter) center, realized 
that his window of opportunity was likely 
closing. When an Argentine journalist 
asked for his reaction to Guibert’s defec- 


cbOdhood, would soon be. taken, leaving 
him with no education beyond 10th grade, 
no money, no hope of creating what he 
called “a stable life” for his dnldrea. His. 
family made it easier, demanding that be 
defect, if given the chance. His' 43-year-old 
mother went as far as to threaten suicide, he 
said, if he returned again to Havana. 

A local Cuban businessman, Alfredo 
Jordan, established contact withMafienzo 
early in the tournament. He walked out of 
the team’s hotel Wednesday night and 
slipped into a van. Jordan, who also assist- 
ed m the defection of Duquesne, said he 
did not expect major problems with Cana- 
dian immigration authorities, who have 
already interviewed Matienzo. Jordan said 
he was looking into rumors that four more 
Cuban players were ready to defect 

There is concern bordering on paranoia 
that representatives of the Cuban govern- 
ment in Toronto mayattempt to wMsk the 
players backto Cuba. Saturday, when Ma- 
tienzo arrived at a downtown hotel for a 


assure tomit was safe to return: 

-When Matienzo left the team’s hotel he 
had only tire T-shirt, shorts and sneakers 
that he wore. Believing he was plan nin g to 
leave; Cuban team officials left signs wher- 
ever he went that usually read: "A revolu- 
tionary doesn’t leave the country." Then 
they confiscated his clothes. Sat u rday, he 
wore a dark sweater, blue jeans and a 
Toronto Blue Jays baseball cap. 

When Jordan and his associates took 
Matienzo shopping on Friday, be cried 
when he saw the stacks of socks in a tall 
total’s clothing store. In Cuba, he said, he 
could onWaffcwd one pair. 

“I was boon with nothing,. I don't want a 
lot. tn« the minimum, just what I earn, but 
the government didn’t even give that.” 

1 He - told of the night his team in the 
Cuban. league won the national title; and 
he was named most valuable player. He 
was congratulated by all the Cuban sports 
officials, then left to stand by a bus stop 
with his girttriend and baby, the officials 
waving as . they sped by in their cars. The 
bus never came. They walked 216 hours 
home, Matienzo carrying his trophy. 

He has not yet reached his father in 
Philadelphia, but he has spoken by tele- 
phone to. his mother in Havana. Guibert 
told him from Minneapolis, where he will 
try out for the Minnesota Timberwolves in 
the fall, “don’t look back.’' 

- What Mat^nzo%lqdai$ forward to is 
to settle here, polish his skills perhaps one 
day play for the Toronto Raptors. 

Matienzo’s message to the Cuban team- 
mates he’s left behind: “F hope they make 
the best out of everything.” 


SCOREBOARD 


SIDELINES 


Japanese Leagues 


and 2d slotan Man In 43altonwta. He has 14$ 
exjtovts. Uve assist* amt 10 errors as arr out- 
ftoktar. 


Control League 



Ml 

L 

T 

Pet. 

GB 

Yamlurl 

56 

41 

0 

577 

— 

Chunktil 

51 

46 

a 

.526 

5 

Hanstiln 

« 

51 

0 

485 

9 

Hiroshima 

46 

49 

0 

484 

V 

Yakult 

45 

5D 

0 

474 

10 

Yokohama 

43 

52 

0 

453 

12 


Jr. r.-.T’f: i =- - 

NFL Preseason 


Saturday's desalts 
Yomhjrl 4 Hanshin 0 

Chum dil 12. Yokohama 2 
Hiroshima 8. Yakult 7. 14 Inning* 
Sunday's Results 
Yomhjrl 1. Hanshin 0 
Chunkjil X Yokohama 1 
Yakult n. Hiroshima 0 

Pacific League 



W 

L 

T 

PeL 

OB 

Sribu 

53 

41 

0 

564 

— 

Orix 

51 

40 

2 

550 

It 

Kiofetw . 

. 51 

42 * 

2 

SO 

103 

Dalri 

52 

44 

1 

-54! 

2 

Ntoeon Ham 

37 

57 

3 

•397 

16 

Lotte 

38 

58 

0 

-396 

16 


Friday* Gamas 
Atlanta 27. Buffalo 7 
San Francisco 2a Denver 3 
Kansas Cttv 17. Washington 14 
Saturday's Games 
N.Y. Grants 28. son Diego » 
Pittsburgh 27. LA. Raiders 17 
Seattle 20, Tampa Bay 6 
Indianapolis 2a Cincinnati 21 
Cleveland 14. Detroit 7 
N.Y. Jets 34. Philadelphia 24 
Miami 31. Green Bov 24 
Minnesota 21. New Orleans 17 
Chicago la Arizona 0 
New England 28. LA. Rams 10 


FRENCH FIRST DIVISION 
Friday's Results 
Coen a Monaco 1 

Satirdcnrs Result* 

Montpellier 1. Lens 2 
St Etienne X Strasbourg 0 
Lyon I. Metz 0 
Auxerre X Bast I a 1 
Ulle 1. Nantes 2 
Paris-51. Germain 1, Sochuux 1 
Nice 2 Cannes 1 
Rennes X Bordeaux 0 
Martfoues % Le Havre 1 
Standings: Lvan 10 points, Nantes HLSalnt- 
Etienne B. Mcrha ues 8, Lens 7. Sochaux 7, Nice 
7. Cannes 7. Bordeaux 7. Auxerre & PorlvSt. 
Germain X Romas £ Baal la 4. Strasbourg 4 
Monaco 4. Lille 4. Le Havre 3. Metz 3. Coot 0. 
Montpellier ft 


FllttoakH Brazil*; Marie Blundell. Britain. 6 
Constructors* Standiass: Benetton Ford 81; 
Ferrari 52; williams Renault 4*; McLaren 
Peugeot 17; Jordan Hart 14; Ltoler Renault 
II; Tyrrell Yamcfio it; Souber Mercedes 10; 
F ootwork Ford I: Minardi Ford S 


Leeds Classic 




CFL Standings 




Bat u rday? i Results 
Lotte 14. Selbu 5 
Orix X Kintetsu 5. 12 lnnina& he 
Nippon Ham 0. Dale! 8 

Sunday** Results 
Selbu 12 Lotte 3 
Nloaon Ham 9, DqJd 3 
Orix i. KMtelMi 2 


Baltimore 

Winnipeg 

Ottawa 

Taranto 

Hamilton 

Shreveport 


n Division 
L T PF 


Hungarian Grand Prix 


Results in the Ol-kltomeSw (144 mile*) 
world Om cede root oo Sunday; t.Gftstfuoa 
BorioiamL Holy. Mapgl (mi 4 hours 3 win- 
utes 29 seconds; X Vlatriieslav Ekimav, Rus- 
sia. WordPerfect, same time; X Bo Hamburg- 
er, Denmark. TVM. 11 seconds behind; 4. 
Frankie Andrea U5, Motorola. 13 seconds 
behind; & Laurent oufaux, S witz er land. 
ONCE. same time; K Massimo GMrotta. I laly, 
ZG-MottH.sJ.; 7, Maximilian Sctondrt ilaly, 
GS-MG MoollHco. lL K. Gkxmi Foresln. Ita- 
ly, Lomore-PinorlQ, sj.; 9. Sieve Swart. New 
Zealand. Motorola, if 10. Ftavio Vanzefla. 

. Italy. GB-MG Masllflco, 8.I.. 


184 

311 

200 

191 

136 

106 


PA PH 
1738 
2248 
20*4 
2254 
1912 
2260 


W es t er n Dieisioa 
5 1 0 244 


World Championships 


Semif in als 
Saturday's Resalts 
Cuba tx Nicaragua 1 
South Korea 9. Jeocm 0 


The Michael Jordan Watch 


BrlfjColumbta 
Coigorv 5 1 0 

Edmonton 4 2 0 1 

Socromento 3 3 0 i 

Las Vegas 3 3 0' 

Saskatchewan 3 3 0 1 

Friday's Gome 

Saskatchewan 20, Edmonton 7 
Saturday's Game 
Las Veaas 49, Shreveport is 


17410 

11610 

1358 

1726 

1606 

156 6 


SATURDAY'S GAME: Jordon sat out Sat- 
urday night's game tar the Barons tn Hunts- 
ville because ot the Inlury sustained the previ- 
ous night. 

SEASON TO DATE: Jordan Is batting .192 
(76-tor-396! with 37 run* 16 doubles, one triple, 
two home runs. 44 RBI, 42 walks. 103 strikeouts 


ATP Cbtunpienshto 
SemHtaol* 

Michael Chang (4), Ui del David Whea- 
ton. (7.5*64.6-4; Stefan Edbcrg (2). Sweden. 
deL Mlchae* Sttch. Germany. M. 7-6 (841. 


Results Sunday after 77 laps os the U» 
kilometer CZ46-raife) Huagaroriag ci rc u it, 
wttli driver, ccoBfrv, make of car, lops com- 
pleted, rrasou out (where available} and win- 
ner's etaPsed time and average meed: 1, Mi- 
chael Set ki m cri w. Germany. B enetton Ford. 
77. 1 hour, 48 minutes. 00.185 seconds, wflh an 
overage speed of 169.737 kph H«237mph>; X 
Damon HJJl Britain, Williams Renault. 77, 
1:4>:21JII2; X Jos Verstappav Netherlands. 
Benetton FonL77, 1:49; 10514 ;4.Marfin Brui*- 
dfe. Britain. McLaren Peugeot. 7*. 1 :47:38J09 
(cBd not finish; dasslf lad os final car an lap 77 
at race endj. 

5. Mark Blundell Brltabi Tyrrell Yamaha. 
76; 4. Oliver Pan I s. France. Ltoler Renoult,74; 
7, Michele A I bo reta I laly. Minardi Font, 75; X 
Erik Camas, France. Larrousse Ford. 75; 9. 
Olivier Beretla. France. Larrousse Ford. 75; 
IX Eric Bernard. France. Uoler Renault. 75. 

Oriverr Standings: 1. Michael Schu- 
macher, Germany 76 points; X Dmnon Hill. 
Britain, 45; X Gerhard Berger. Austria, 27; 4, 
jean AiesL Francs. 19; X Rubens BarrichelkL 
Brazil. 10; 6. Martin Brand le. Britain. 9; 7, 
Mika Hakklnea Fkikma 8; X Olivier Ponte. 
France. 7; 9, Nicola LarinL Italy, 6; Chrtsttan 


y a i re — ; y ; *Y.g 


FIRST TEST 

Ptddstax vs. Srt Lanka, 418 day 
Saturday, la Cotanbo 
Paktstan 2nd tantogs: 31 1M 
Sri Lanka Sat imkias: 181-9 
(Paktstan wins bv 301 rural 




BASEBALL 
American League 
National Leagge 

PHILADELPHIA— ophOTed Mike Lie- 
berthal, catcher, to Scranton-Wiikcs Barra. IL 
SAN FRANCISCO— Optioned Will lorn van- 
Lanaingham. pitrtfer, to Phoenix, PCL 
BASKETBALL 

National BaanfMI Association 
ATLANTA— Stoned Jim Lev guard, to 2- 

PORTLANP Named Dick Mortar 
I ant coach. 

FOOTBALL 


and Chuck Bradtay, ofienstve linemen; Jake 
Kefchner.auorterbodr,- ftyan Bentombunm- 
nlng back; Elbcrl Turner, wide receiver, mid 
Jev Phillips, defensive back. 
CLEVELAND— signed Doug Danson.suad. 
DALLAS W tel sad KenHarrito wide rgestew r . 
DENVER— Signed Leonard RuSMtL ran- 
nlng back, to err-rear contract ft e l ea sed 
Robert Detclno, running bade 
GREEN BAY— Waived NMootm Shewed 
de f e n sive lineman. 

KANSAS CITY— Waived David Tmodwen, 
Pfa cehk tee r. ana Ruse McCufiougH c dt endve 
flnemon. Stoned Tom NevOte, guard; Tray 
Rldglry.detandve tackle j and Wafer CorroU. 
wide receiver. Wofvod Pott Evtxa. nghl wd. 

LA. RAIDERS— Waived Rickey Dixon. de- 
fensive back, and James Hill running back. 
Re-stoned Lester Ridley, d efensi v e bock, and 
Tim Rather, defensive end. Warren Power* 
defensive end. retired. 

MIAMI— Stoned Ramie WooHorh. line- 
backer. to 3-year con Ira cl and Keith Bwvfe 
feMbodutaHwr umt ikj ex t e n si on, wali tad 
Reggie Brawn, wide receives. 

NEW ENGLAND— Acmilrea Leroy Thomp- 
' sorwnmnlrw back, from PtttsburgtrtartUhire 
- «mmhi< i » » » . ReiinauJshed the rights to 
Le on ard Russell, running bock 
NEW ORLEANS Re signed Franklin 
Thomas, fight end. Waived Brandon Hamll- 
hn cn rae rtoid L Stoned Cart Lea, defensive 
back, to 2-year contract. Claimed Patt Evans; 
light end. oft waive r s tram Kansas City. , 
PHILADELPHIA— Released David Dap- 
fels. wide receiver, and KUnt Hafl. tackle. 

SAN FRANCISCO— Agreed to terms wKh 
Rtokgy Jackson, linebacker. Stoned Stave 
Brooks and Tim Burton, tight ends, and Da- 
mien RussrilOTtety. Waived Jerone Davison, 
running bock, and Walt Comebell, defensive 
tackle. Roost Craig, running back, rerired. 

TAMPA BA Y W otvodtc o l tl lotele kvn ow l - 
er; Marias Paw, safety; Mark Vtoslc, guar- 
torbock; Paul WMto. cc rneriwrt u Germaine 
Williams, hilBxx*; Butch Hadrrot and Corev 
Warm wMs receivers. Agreed to tanra with 
Tretd DIHer. quortarhack. on Bvear contract. 
Stoned Errtd Rhetr, rurodng back, to 4yem 
conirad 

HOCKEY 

Natfeuul Hockey Leases 
PALLAS- Received Peter z exel center. 


DETROIT— EtewdNUhe Krartelnysta. tar- 
want and Alike ftw i n, defeneeman. la F 
year cuu t ruc t s . Signed Bali Rouse, defe ns e 
man. to mutttyear contract 
EDMONTON— Namad George Burnett 


Bowe-Mathis Fi^ttRaled No-Contest 


FLORIDA— Re-stoned Brent Severyn. dc- 
tenseman,ond Bob BooglMiMxfefcnseman, to 
mutttyaar -axitracL 

HARTFORD— Amounted aftlllatfan with 
Richmond Renegades 6CHL 

LOS ANGELES— Acquired Rustan Batvr- 
OTku defensenmu and a 1996 s econd- rau nd 
d raft cholCeHrom Winnipeg for Brent Thomp- 
saadHBnwnaL Named Dave Tartar asri»- 
ttoit to Itie general ma nager . 

PLY. ISLANDERS— Agreed to terms wtth 
Andy Stickler and Kto MOfer. forwards; 
Gary DInean and Milan Tlrtrr. d el a ns e ni on; 
and Frank P le t r ongrio. goaltender. 

PITTSBURGH— Stoned Joe Dzfeddc, left 
wfng and Tomas S an d etiu m. right wing. 
Signed Jett Christian, left whw. to mufityear 
contract and Jon>mirJa8r,rtohtwtno,tomul- 
-rilydar TMttlroct extension, r t”cr« ns-ij. 

ST. LOU is — Resumed Rick Zomfxkdrieitee- 
nxgvta mut U ye u i us i i a a. 5tanecrr6 fly Twfat 
' detu i s em uu lef t wine, to mutttyeor cnMiucL. 

VANCOUVER— AnxnxiCKl toot Pd Qukn 
presldenrqndgeneralmai iuM er , y4nreUnaubh. 
his duties as coodk. Named Rid Lay coach. 


ATLANTIC CITY, New Jeisey (Keutacs) — Former heavy- 
weight champion Riddick Bowk’s return to the ring for the first 
tune since losing his title ended in a no-contest against Buster 
t&thisJr. 

Bowe sent Mathis to his ri^t knee with an overhand right and a 
left hook with less than a nmmte left in tire fourth round. With 
' Matins down on his knee and referee Arthur Mercante about to 
step in to separate die fighters, Bowe sent Mathis to his back with 
a sweeping right. 

Mercante appeared ready to award tire bout to. Bowe when 
Lany Hazard, head of the New Jersey Athletic Control Board, 
altered the ring and ruled the Sght a no-bontest, which will not 
count in the records, because of Bowe’s intentional foul 


Rothenbere Re-elected in Soccer 


CINCINNATI— Wofvod Donnell Johnson 


and Grwit AAorshalL rtohl wing, from Itta.TO- 
ronto as compensation lor stoning MlkcCralg, 
right wins. 


COLLEGE 

ARIZONA STATE— Named Keruieto 

Safer men's a s ste tmrt baskettxill coach. 

BAYLO R — W a n ed Brad A u try inetTSc 
toot basketball coach. 

DEPAUL — Dismissed Oetafig 
guard, tram men'rbasfcefboll loam fardfed- 
Pllnary reasons. 

FLORIDA— Announced SMPenriaa of Ter- 
rene* Fay, running back, far 19M season. 

FORDHAM-Apnounosd lhat OxrBt Dovto 
nxmtng boric wlH transfer trem WbconNn. - 

HOLY CROSS N am e d Bill Raynor men's 
basketball casdi 

MIAM I - N ame d SDas MCKkmto metre aw- 
ststant basketball coach. 

OREGO N - A nnounced that Rich Brooks, 
football coach, will reUnqubb Ms duties as 
athletic director. 


SAN DlBGO (AP> ~ Alan Rb*exiberg.wh&headed'ih«l 1994 
World Cup, has been* re-elected' preadeat of - the UjS. Soccer 
Federation^ • ; 

’ Ro then berg won another four-year term at theUSSFs annual 
general meeting TriioLhe defeated the USSF treasurer, Richard 
Groff, on the second baQoL Rotheabeig won 53.4 percent of the 
vote, and Groff toe* 46^ percent. 


For the Record 


LousLoyt, the president of the South African Rugby Football 
Union, confirmed Sunday that be was resigning bis position and 
that of chairman of the 1995 World Cup to be played in South 
Africa. * • (Reuters) 

Mark Davis of England shot a course-record 8-under-par 64 on 
Sunday, for a 270 total, to win the Austrian Open in Hangschlag 
by two strokes over. Philip Walton of .Ireland. (AP) 

John Kershaw Stevenson, 79, who co-owned the.Detroit Lions 
from 1948 to 1965, died of tang cancer at his home in Bloomfield 
mis. Michigan. 







DENNIS THE MENACE 


PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 


LOFEN 


me 

m 



CUNEL 


t 



CRYLEE 


~nr 

JL 

HALINE 


mrc 



An swor horn: 


■[na’Qui 


JwnOks AMRT CABLE 


Ansvw ooaoro&yioavaaOta — 

mali pfwcnce 


TO OUR REAPERS 
IN BELGIUM 

It’s never been easier 
to subscribe 
and save. 

Jt^ call toll-free 
0 800 1 7538 


--I. -jaiA.lv- JsSfx. 




\ 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD lRIBUNE, MONDAY. AUGUST 15, 1994 



i*a 


ia Peril- 


ikz& : 


By Larry Dorman 

fftw York Times Service 

TULSA, Oklahoma— A pre- 
dictable thing happened 6 b the' 
way to Nick Price’s coronation 


«ouxse played tougher. And it 
was kind of a strange feeling 
pkying with a five-stroke lead 
in a major championship. It was 
a difficult situation.” 


■Price, who began the day Sat- 
urday with a five-stroke lead, 
found himself stuck in neutral. 
He shot an even-par round of 70: 
and the rest of the field closed in 
to set up what could be a frantic 
final-round chase here at South- 
ern Hills Country Club. 

After finishing the day exact- 
ly where be started it, at 8 under 


par. Price went into Sunday’s 
final round with a three-stroke 
lead over Jay Haas and a four- 
stroke advantage over Corey 
Pavia and Phi) Mickefcon. 

“Nick didn’t run away with 
it,” said Haas, who survived his 
second triple bogey of the tour- 


nament and fought back with a 
round of 68. “Fortunately for 
the rest of us, we’re still on the 
same page.” 

There are a variety of names 
on that page now. Greg Nor- 
man, Ben Crenshaw and J ohn 
Coed: are wi thin striking dis- 
tance at three-under 207. 

If Price, 37, is to follow last' 
month's victory in the British 
Open and win his second major 
championship of the year — 

• and become the first player to 
win back-to-back majors sm ce 
Tom Watson won the U.S. and 
British Opens in 1982 — he’s 
going to have to work far it 

Not that he didn’t wodemt- 
Saturday, a sweltering day. — 94 
degrees Fahrenheit (34 centi- 
grade). With the back of his shirt 
and his pants drenched from the 
trek across the Southern Hills 
steam bath, Price ground out par 
after par and offset two bogeys 
with two birdies. 

He didn’t do it with the pure 
ball-striking he had displayed 
during the first two rounds, 
where the South African-born 
Price missed just four fairways 
and steered dear of all 88 
Southern Hills bunkers. He did 

it with thesbortgame. L . ... v; „ ...... 

On Saturday, nice spent as " 
much time irt the. sand ha maoy.7 
Miami Beach ■. tourists., hitting- 
five greenade traps and one fair- 
. way bunker. But he came out of 
it looking like Gary Player, suc- 
cessfully getting up and down 
five times, onoe far birdie. 

*‘I know I didn't play as well 
as I did the two previous days,” 
Price said, “but X think the golf 


persevered,” he said. “1 
did what I had to da Hopefully, 
today was the one bad round 
Pm. going to have, and I got 
away with even par.” 

While Price was resolutely 
grinding away, there were all 
sorts of tbotnes going on. Pa- 
vm bounced, back from a dou- 
bfo-bogey at. the 1 4th hole with 
successive drip-ins, from 30 feet 
(9 meters) for birdie at the 16th 
hole and 40 feet for par at the 
17th., Haas rebounded from a 
trjple bogey at the 15th bole 
with consecutive birdies at the 
16th and 17th. 

And then there was Norman, 
still ranked I In the world, 
doing his Great White Shark 


by Price in the ranking only if 
Price wins and Norman does 
not finish higher than fourth. 

Norman, didn’t exactly 
charge into contention — he 
went 10 holes, before his first 
birdie of the day — but the 


Australian moved steadily and 
relentlessly toward Price, like a 
shark dreung a swimmer. As 
Price was treading water, Nor- 
man birdied the Ihhhole from 
five feet, the 13th hole from 
eight feet and' the ISth hole 
from five feet. ■ 

After two and a half rounds 
of .frustration, Norman finally 
bad made some progress. And 
he was dearly buoyed by the 
opportunity, however remote it 
r emains, of catching his good 
friend Price. ' 

“You’ve always got to give 
yourself a chance,” Norman 
said. “I’ve got a chance and 
that’s a good feeling. I’ve 
played very well mid haven’t 
gotten aiolout of it. That gives 
me an even better feeling. 



v. r ,- PH - •• 



L- 


lUnrC.Cuta/RniKi'. 

Nick Price in a familiar stance: Blasting out of a trap. 


Scores After 3d Round 


Scares oflbr (ho third round of me *17 mtt- 
.Ifon PGA ChomplonsWp, piovetf an me if 34- 
roro. vor-TS Southern HIM* Counter Club 


Tm going out for the win,” 
Norman said *Tm not playing 
for second I don’t think Nidde 
isgoing to back off. I think Fm 
going to have.to shopt 64 or 65 
to have a chance to van.” 
.^PHvin, whp jsfttthmg toxhed . ; 
the label of ,?thej>est player 
who hasn’t won a major,” said; 
*Tm sure somebody could 
catch him. “But they’d have to 
play awfully wed If be goes out 
ana shoots a reaDy good score, 
it’s going to be ddficulL If he 
goes out and shoots another 70, 
he certainly can get caught.” 


MR* Prfee 4 
Jov Ham 
Phil Mfcketson 
Canty Paubi 
John Cook 
Ban Crenshaw 
Grap. Norman 
Tom Watson - 
Loren Roberts 
MrflStunaa. . 
Emte-ets — • . 
Jma Marta Oitaabai 
Oulo Parry 
Gta> Day 
Start Endnohm 
Tam Kit* 

David Frost 
Mark McNulty 
Rfchord Zefcal 
BontfwnJ Longer 
Lorry Mtee 
Barry Luna 
Nick fie Mo 


a-ts-70-ya 
71-46-46—205 
S8-7I ^47—206 
nfi67-4*~206 

71- 67-49—207 
7fr67-J0— 207 

■ 77-69-47— 207 
WHM» 
*yrcWn4*-3» 
, . . _7^ 7*44-20* 

46-7V69-2M 

.. 

70*9-70-209 

7&49-70-a09 

73-70^4-301 

72- 6449—209 

70- 71-69— 21 B 
72-64-70—210 
77-67-67 — 71 1 

71- 71-47 — 211 

72- 72-47—211 
70-73-64-211 
1347-71—211 


KHk Trtptoft 
G4I Morgan 
Fuzzy ZeeUer 
Jumbo Oznkl 
MAje ierfnoer 
Hal Irwin 
Curtis Strom 
Tom Lehman 
BIH Glosson 
CUV. welbrtna 
Sotn Torrence 
Loanle dements 
"QWr iBomw WI • 
Bob Bmrtf - ' 

Org g Kraft 
(Ofl woosnam 
Frank MabHo 
Stable McConWar 
Crate Stocfier 
Worn* Grady 
Mark McCumber 
Todd Smith 
Chip Bock 
Tom Dolby 
Fulton Altem 
Lomy wodkins 


David Gtltord 
John Inman 


7149-71—211 
71-44-73 — 712 
49-7T-7J— 217 
71-49-72—212 
77-4449-21? 
744944—212 
73-7144-21? 

73- 7144-212 

71- 7344-212 
49-73-74—212 
49-7549-713 

74- 7449-213 
47-74-70—213 

72- 71--70-2I3 
744970-213 
4472-73-213 
7247-74—213 
7444-73-213 
70-70-74—714 
7344-71—714 

73- 70-71—214 
7449-71—214 

7370- 72-214 
734473-214 
7447-24—215 
49-7373-215 

7371- 72—215 
49-7373-215 
70-72-73-215 


Schumacher Wins in Hungary 


BUDAPEST — Michael 
Schumacher ignored the prob- 
lems besetting his Benetton 
team to win the Hu ng a ri a n 
Grand Prix on Sunday and in- 
crease his advantage over Da- 
mon H0) in this year’s Formula 
One title race to 31 points. 

Sch umache r swept aside aH . 
the recent controversy sur- 
rounding himself- and the Eng- 
lish -Italian team by dominating 
a straightforward race in warm 
sunshine. 

The 25 -year-old German was 
mar ginally slower than his Brit- 
ish rival HID, in a Williams, off 
the starting grid but forced his 
way back into the lead at the 
first comer and that d o mi na te d 
the rest of the 77-lap race. 

Despite being required to 
make three pit slops for fresh 
tires and fun, Schumacher was 
never troubled and H3I led only 
for a brief run of 10 laps after 
the first Schumacher stop. - 

HTH came home second, 20.8 
seconds behind Schumacher, 
and was followed by Jos Vcf- 
stappen of the ' 1 Netherlands, 
third in the second Benetton, 
his best result in Formula One 
and the perfect way to return to 

action after the trauma of his 
fireball experience in Germany 
two weeks ago. 

Verstappen was fortunate to 
inheri t his first podium finish 
on the final lap when Martin 
Brnndle of Britain idled to a 
halt in his McLaren. Brundte 
finish ed up fourth, ahead offo- 
low Briton Mark Blundell in a 
Tyrrell and Olivier Pams of 
France, six* for Ligier. 

Schumacher, racing under 
appeal against his two-race ban 


Benetton Says Faulty Part 
Caused Fire in Germany 


Pater Senior 
Kenny Perry 
Anuraw Mm 
Bruce Fletstor 
BIKy Mayfair 
David Edward# 
Ronald McOooual 
Fern i C ou ples 
Payne 5IWW1 . 
Hal Sutton 
Prod Funk 
Neal Lancaster 
Dicky PrWe 


BUDAPEST — A faulty part in the refueling rig used by 
Benetton may have caused the Gash fire tha (engulfed Jos 
Verstappen at the German Grand Prix, the team said Sunday. 
In a statement that contradicted the claims made by Inter- 


by all the teams, Benetton said. “The most Hkely cause of the 
fire at Hockenheam was a faulty part in the refuelling valve.” 

Benetton has daimed consistently that its does not believe 
that the removal of a filter from the rig was the cause of the 
fire, as Intertecfamque and the International Motoring Feder- 
ation said last week. 

Benetton has been summoned to appear before the FIA’s 
world motor sport council cm Oct. 19 to defend itself against a 
charge that it ulegally and deliberately removed the filter. 

The team also faces an appeal on behalf of Michael Schu- 
macher against a two-race ban for ignoring a black flag at the 
British Grand Prix. 

Benetton’s latest statement in a war of words with FIA said 


Joy Con Bioko 
DucOry Hart 
Tommy Notollmo 
Brad Faxon 
Raymond Fiord 
Halims MoshM 
Donnie Ha m mond 
6 b tv Andrade 
Brian Hsrarfnoor 
Sandy Lyto 
Fofloo to qoaMtr 
Bob Ackerman 


74- 71-70—215 
7447JTJ— 2TS 
7374-71— 215 
754473-215 
737371—214 
737074—216 
7449-72-217 
94-74-75 — 2)7 
737372—277 
744372-717 
7449-72-217 
737373-217 
7549-72—217 
7371-73-217 
7371-74—317 
7371-75— 211 
737374-214 
737373-211 
493373-318 
7471.74-219 
7449-74-219 
71-71-74—220 
77-65-71— ?» 

75- 7474—221 


that the independent accident-analysis company that the 
team invited to Took into the accident had been refused 


Oavts LOW IK 
Jabn Daly 

llah^l4U 
-Jtwta ftTorajnur 

Bred Bryant 
Tony Johnstone 
Lorry Nelson 
Jim Gallaoher. Jr. 
Mark CatcnveccWo 
Naicn Henke 

Scott Hoch 
MflOC Gove 
Darren Kestner 
Joaklm Ho earencn 
Tod Trvbo 
Dave Barr 
JJm McGovern 

Mark James 


drawings of Intertechni que’s valve components. 


and six-point penalty for ignor 
ing a black flag at Silverstoae in. 
early July now has 76 points in 
the championship and Hill 45. 

Schumacher was hugged by 
the team boss, Fiavio Briaiore, 
at the finish and showed pure 


in Hockenheun two weeks ago 
when he retired^ it was a great 
moment of celebration, which 
produced ^Spontaneous party 
on the trade below th e podium. 

“I would not Say this is the 
most satisfying victory of my 
career, but it is certainly the 
most important;” said Schu- 
macher afterward. “I really 
wanted to be in this position 
two weeks ago, but 1 am still 
young enough to have another 
chance to win my home race.” 

* He added: “It is fabulous to 
win like thisfor all the German 
fans who have traveled to this 
race and for the team too to 
have Jos in third place.” 

Schumacher made it obvious 
that he was delighted that the 
\*nm } charged last week with 


tampering with their refueling 
rigs before the Ill-fated German 
Grand Prix. had delivered the 


delight as he punched the air to 
his flag-waving anny of sup- 

^On the podium, Schumacher 
could not resist literally jump- 
ing with joy as the top three 
began their champagne celebra- 
tions. _ 

For the visiting German 
Sch umac her fans. SO frustrated 


perfect answer to their critics by 
fini s hin g first and third. 

Hill, who made two pit stops 
to Schumacher's three was in a 
disappointed mood. He admit- 
ted be was unable to hold Schu- 
macher off at the start because 
he was on the dirtier side of the 
track and had to brake earlier. 

Once ahead, at the opening 


comer where he went round the 
outside, Schumacher led every 
lap exorot for laps 18 to 26, 
when H±H was in front, on his 
way to a comfortable win. 

Three cars were forced into 
retirement at the first corner ; 
including the two Jordans, after 
an accident involving Briton 
Eddie Irvine and Brazilian Ru- 
bens Banicbello, in the Jor- 
dans, and Japanese Ukyo Ka- 
tyama in a Tyrrell 

Both Ferraris driven by Aus- 
trian Gerhard Berger and 
F renchman Jean Alesi were 
forced lo retire, as was David 
Coulthard of Britain in the sec- 
ond WUHains after spinning 
and crashing out after 59 laps of 
the 77-lap . race. 

, “I- really wished 1 had fin- 
ished in litis position two weeks 
ago in Germany,” said Schu- 
macher. 

“I made a good start, but 
then I had too much wheelspin 
and Damon was able to pull 


alongside going into Che first 
corner. In fact, be was slightly 


ahead. ~ 

“But i knew that if I stayed 
alongside I would be okay 
through the next comer and 
that’s how it worked ouL” 


Andor* ft n W and 
Scott Hnvacn 
Ire Boko-Flndi 
Mitt Hrtrei 
Gary hoWzbtb 
Mark Brooks 
Rob Philo, Jr. 
Slava Lotvarv 
BoD Twov 

VHav small 

Pout AiSsgor 
DavM Graham 
Johc Deform 
WOlt Ctiotunon 
Bab Laftr 
Jhn white 
WesSnrtm 
Constantino Races 
Jock NicMous 
Hubert Green 
Rust Cochran 

Rfck F ebr 
Gresa Jones 
Robert Hart 
John D ormel 
Lonnie NMsen 
Mel Baum 
Jem Huston 
John Lee 
Jerry Mb 
B ren Ogle 
Dsmr He aler 
Rad N octant* 
jenwFameutfc 
Barry Redmond 
Rfck Acftjn 
Bryce Zobrtskl 
Arnold Palmer 
Bred Sbariy 
PM» Oaktey 
Patrick O'Brien 
jwn 

Thomas Grey 
jl i_ Lewd* 

-Seva Baltaatarai 
Win PrentE 
Kevin Caslwnan 
scan 5teaer 
Sfeue Smilho 
Tom Cleaver 
Eddie Teresa 
seen wuioms 
Miguel Btamen 
Scotl MflMtan 
Georoe Bowmen 


7374— 144 
7373 — 144 
7373-144 

7373— 144 

7374— 144 
76-75-144 
7371—146 
737V- 144 
7749-144 
74-72—144 

7375 — 147 
7473-147 

7375— 147 
7374—147 
72-75—147 
74-73— >47 

7376— 147 
7374—147 

71- 76—147 

74- 71—147 

7374— 147 

75- 73—141 

74- 74—146 

75- 73—146 

75- 73-146 

78- 70—148 

76- 73—147 

72- 77—149 

77- 72—149 
75-79—149 
75-74-149 
75-74—149 

7375— 149 
75-75—150 
77-73-150 
81-49 — 150 

72- 73-150 

7377— 750 

79- 71—150 
74-76-150 
7370-150 
71-79-ISO 
71-79— UO 
74-74-150 

7376- 156 

7377- 150 
77-74—151 

70-73-157 

77-74—151 

74- 77— Ul 

75- 76-151 
77-74-151 
74-77—151 
7373-W 

7375— 158 

7376— IB 

76- 74-152 

W-74-153 

79-74-153 

77- 74 — 15} 

74- 77—153 

73- 73— IB 
TWO— IB 
77-77 — 154 
76-76-151 

76- 76-154 

75- 79 — 154 
61-94— IB 
83-74-157 

77- 80—157 

78- 79-157 
77-01—120 
83-26 — ISO 

79- 79-ia 
17-86-175 


Marathon Sweep for Spanish 


By Ian Thomsen 

International Herald Tribune 

HELSINKI — The world's 
best were hardly challenged. 
Tew new international stars 
were introduced and not a 
world record was set as the once 






glorious European Champion- 
ships ended Sunday in these 
gorgeous surroundings. 

After eight days of unevent- ■ 
fni victories and little sign of 
new blood, one must question . j 
the event’s significance when it 
goes to Budapest in 1998. . 

In the absence of great indi- 
vidual achievement, the Span- 
ish team accomplished the un- • "■ 
precedented Sunday — 
sweeping the medals in the 
mens marathon. That had nev- 
er occurred in a major champi- I 

onship; neither had Spain ever 
won a championship marathon, j 







' ■ * if "; 

-V- 

■ ■ - .=■ 


Since gold medalist Martin 
Fiz made his marathon debut in 
Helsinki last year — “just to get 
used to the weather and the 
conditions,” he said — the 
Spaniards had been priming for 
this event After three months 
of team training, followed by 30 
kilometers run largely at a Por- 
tuguese pace, the three Span- 
iards broke free while effective- 
ly pinning down the favored 
Briton, Richard Nerurkar, who 
look fourth in 2:1 1:56 and was 
rather flattered. 

“They were talking with the 
Portuguese runners," Nerurkar 
said of the Spaniards. “I wasn't 
close enough to hear exactly 
what they were saying, but 
there were plenty of mentions 
of Nerurkar.” 

With Alberto Juzdado third in 
a personal best 2:11:18. Diego 
Garcia second in 2:10:46. and 
the 31-year-old Fiz winning in a 
championship-record 2:10:31, 
the Spanish at once grabbed 
more than a third of their right 
medals (three gold) over the long 
week. Russia, competing inde- 
pendently for the fust time, led 
all nations with 10 golds (and 2S 
modafe overall). The team of 
Britain and Northern Ireland 
was next with six gold medals 
(13 overall); Germany (14 med- 
als) won five titles and France 
(nine) took four. 



TVlIv EftiWw Tl»- 4-.,iikil Pi**. 

Martin Fiz, bade to camera, and Diego Garcia, marathon gold and silver medalists. 


seconds. Britain’s Rob Den- 
mark was the runoerup in 
13:37.50, admittedly outsmart- 
ed by Baumann. 

The women's 1,500 meters 
had taken on an even slower 
pace until the beQ came into 
view — when 42-year-old Yeka- 
terina Podkopayeva of Russia 
burst out of last place and up to 
the front, onto the shoulder of 
her compatriot and the leader. 
Lyudmila Rogacbova. At last 
the pace quickened but Roga- 
cheva, the 1992 Olympic silver 
medalist, was resolved to win in 
4:18.93. Over the final steps 


of her first child in Februajy. 
went out at 1.90 meters. 


Andrea Benvenuu of Italy 
won the men’s 800 meters in 
1:46.12, outiricking the Norwe- 
gian Vebjom Rodal (1:46.53). 


France had been denied a 
second gold just minutes before 
when former European junior 
champion Denis Kapustin of 
Russia made the biggest leap of 
his life with 17.55 meters on his 


The French team, anchored by attempt to take the triple 
Olympic, world and European jnmp title from Serge Helan of 
champion Marie-Jose Perec. Prance. 


4x400-meier relay in a There was also a surprise in 


French record of 3:22.34, while the women’s sprint relay final 
the British team — with silver- with Germany winnin g the gold 


medalist Roger Black and to deny Irina PrrvaJova her 
champion Du'aine Ladejo run- third gold following her 100 


c last two legs — won the and 200 individual titles. 


men’s relay in 2:59.13. 

The discus was won by vladi- 


Russia was beaten into sec- 
ond place after a poor baton 
exchange involving Marina 


Podkopayeva realized that she mu- Dubrovshchik. a 22-year- exchange involving Marina 
would not become the oldest old Belarussian, with a throw of Tr&ndenkova and anchorwom- 
European champion ever, and 64.78 meters. Lars Riedel of an Privalova. 

Z *f2 d 5» Germany’s women still had 

of her long career. a bjjbacL e 1JJ w 

(nm< D«»in>.N. ^ ik.;, r.S 

Later, the photo finish would 


capture her stariag to her right day's events: 
at Kelly Holmes of Britain, who Linford C 


Reuters reported on Saiur- 


at Kelly Holmes or Britain, who 
lunged past the dumbfounded 


Unford Christie was denied 
the chance of winning more 


Podkopayeva in 4: 1 9.30 — medals than anv other man in 
beating her to the silver medal the history of these champion- 


by 7 one-hundredths of a sec- 
ond. 


(nine) look four. by 7 one-hundredths of a sec- ships when two of his British 

Spain also swept three of the ond - teammates, Tony Jarreu and 

men's distance events with the Britta Bilac of Slovenia won ^ arrcn Brailhwaite. dropped 

exception of the 5,000 metere. her first major high-jump title t “ e Baton in the sprint relay 

in which Abel Anion — Spain's at a national-record 2.00 me- semifinal. 


champion in the 10,000 meters ters, surprising silver-medalist Eduard Hamalainen of Be- 
a week earlier — rook third Yelena Gulyayev of Russia larus blew the chanceoLcerlain 
Sunday in 13:38.04. (1.9 6), who had d omina ted un- gold in the decathlon by a mis- 

Slowly and tactically (a reci- uTBflac knocked her out’ Nele take in the 1 10-meler hurdles, 
pe for the week), the 5,000 wit- Zilinskiene jumped 1.93 meters yielding the title to Alain Blon- 
nessed the resurgence of 29- to win the first European medal del of France. The silver medal 


Germany's women still had 
to withstand a superb final leg 
from Privalova to win their first 
sprint title since the traumas 
surrounding the suspension of 
Kairin Krabbe for doping. 

The French sprint relay team 
retained the title in the men’s 
4xI00m relay in the absence of 
Britain, the hot pre-competition 
favorites and the highly fancied 
Russians who were disqualified 
for two false starts in the final. 

It was also a day to remember 
for Portugal who scored a con- 
vincing one-two in the women's 


gold in the decathlon by a mis- 1 10.000 final with Fernanda Ri- 
take in the 1 10-meler hurdles. ' beiro taking the gold medal and 


nessed the resurgence of 29- 


y ear-old Dieter Baumann, the for Lithuania. Heike Henkel, 
1992 German Olympic champi- the 30-year-old Olympic chani- 


on. who kicked out of the final pion, who returned to compcti- 
Lnm to win in a lazy 13:36.93 non last month after the birth 


del of France. The silver medal 
went to Henrik Dagard. 

Blondel’s final tally was 
8,453 points with Dagard ai 
8,362. 


Conceicao Ferreira the silver. 

There was no surprise in the 
men’s shot put final with Alex- 
ander Klimenko leading a 
Ukrainian clean sweep of the 
medals. 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


Attention visitors 
from the U.S. ! 


IRISH N0N-RE5DENT 
COMPARES £195 


AAMEWOBC FOR PROFIT, the m- 
proved verpon pf total quckty w 
OgrfnM that wort. Privatf irtTWW, 
far the exsaAvF. Phone & Fw: 0049 
7939 1200 


ycu> NOME IN PASS 


LEGAL SERVICES 


Meet kBra*afaanc« vehefas: 
lore profit, toe bee A EwuprofL Sail* 
ofal* far mxkig, <o nwAoner & after 
oOwlieL Far renectoi e ur«a cortoo- 


CAPITAL AVAILABLE 


NTSlURBiS 

Uuury reraab S late 
31 me de Mcnrzau, Paro 7WC6 


DIVORCE EAST. «95j00. P 
8W0. Anfteai. CA 92802. ' 
(714} 9668695 USA. 


Tel; (1)45 63 17 77 



Efch M urphy , Dredor, Swti ig n 
Company Sfavkn, 56 Etewga w 
5qacn, Dofifa Z. MawL 


Tab -4353 ) 6613490 Ere 6613493 


FUNDS AVAUABIE 

FW 

AU BUSI7«SS PROJECTS 
06 FOR 

LEITBS OF CSffilT 
8AMT GUARANTEES 
OTHa ACCFPTABIE CCUATHA1. 


HWv HtJBJTfc Rerjng br 1 yea from 
1st Srprernba. Cwmang 4 rcure, 6rh 
floor, petiy real views, modem 
kudien. heftroors. lioen >ocm. pari- 


LOW COST FUGHTS 


mg. No (rfr. F7.C03 dwrges & pertmg 
rnduded- Tetr m 42 4o 31 7a 


EMPLOYMENT 


ACC5S VOYAGES 
THE BEST FARES TO 
1HE UNITED STATES 


If you enjoy reading ibe WT 
when you hovel, why not 
obo get it at home ? 
Seme-day delivery avaflable 
in key Ui. cities. 


AVAILABLE CAPITAL 


Bicker's suwlwiu i guar nnte o d 


CaB m 800 882 2884 

(■> Nrer Tori erf 2T2 752 3890} 


Sources of copfal avalatilr for 
ave s wrefa wtriMe M efttfe, 
busmess S»1 ire or refirorce. 
long iw na • oefl rotes • broker feu 
para end pnkoel 

Far foul oroposd hnaary la 
Far Brf far ortmiN Groups foe. 

Alfa: Fime Kiel B reftM 
fee (507) 63 5039|towfaa). 


Mrearers MJ.PXB. 3 Cft 
RNANOAL INSTITUTION 
Brosrfi - B&G1UM 
I n for m rf on by far 32-7534 02 77 
or 32 2 538 47 91 
TBfX. TSW 


EDL’CATIONAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


and orer 500 more defarahom vreld- 
wide an 40 Mtttn scfnkted nmn. 


B4GUSH TSAOdS, rfagual. rurpen- 
mced. WHtme. legd c« Fmncicl 
knowledre preferred. T*k Cybde 
lorqve ■ fee Q) 4^ )&26 


Tet PABS 1-40 13 02 02 or 42 21 46 94 
fa* ! -42 7 ) 44 20 

MIMTH; 3615 ACCESSVOTAGB 
Tet LYON 78 6367 77 or 72 56 1595 


AUTO RENTALS 


BOOK MCW by pfere wft ere* aid 
Garermarv tkence: 7751 II 


&rnLib^Sfe£ribtmc 


QR5H03E COfWAMB 
’ Free profess-ond cor&iftcfart 
’ Worldwide ineopareaiefls 


MU SCH0N. The mi refined of al 
ties, in ZLfcCH exdiunelr - 
WBNBaaT* - leaSnaererts Here - 

13. Bcftrtafctr 01-211^ 5P 

A1COHOUCS ANONYMOUS Errfsh 
racking meetea doiy. Tef PAHS 
5| 44j4 » <3, SOME 678 0320. 
RANCPURr 5374266. 


i tj — > ■ — i : 

njM connopfra KrtKfl 

1 hJ rJwbWoh swvini 


COmUMBIE DRAFTS 
BACKS) BY CASK 

* (sued ji You Now 

* Confirme d by Moor HI Bor*, 
to Prove Avoifafakty d Funds 

* Racked by Priwer bwesten 

M CAPITAL SUPPORT COUP. 

US. (714) 757-1070 fe« 757-1270 


CB4TURY SEF DOVE 


RENAULT OK* FF239/OAY 

AU INCLUSIVE -NO HIDDEN EXJSAS 
V> met 0» aha and arporri m France 
Cental menioaan: 

IHj (33-1) 30J755 JA 


wosmvrax. Spead depaiure d He 
fawefl ere tfccount: economy drtere. 
Ciedil car* poddn. Tet Paris P] 42 
B910B1 Fa,42S625 B2 
WORLD AVIATION - SOEXAED 
FUGHTS. Id bjsiress. economy d 
tjwesr fares. Id JFT Pom 014755)313 


ASTON CtWOBAlE T9USTEB OD 


19 , Fed Rood. Dougim. bfa d Mon 
Tet 0624 626991 Fi 0634 625126 


FINANCIAL SERVICES 


MOVING 


DBPBATRY SEEKING sredred or 
utfefu«bar> id ffiofta£ world vndft o 
100% anonytooia, no n fe w c o re- 
qured bank acto ortf Twwfld with cn 
off-shorn zotnptxry facAy in a tero 


PRIME BAMC 




GUARANTEE 

Venture Caprtd Busnen finance 


PLANNING TO RUN 
A CLASSIFIED AD? 


feed Ear Lana Term finance 
red finredaTGuarrerees 
Al Types d Projeaj 
No Ccw a on Until Funded 




flrdcen Protected 


RB’RBENTATTVE 
Needed M 00 ai baacn fat us 
m the pfaceangd Urese 
financing appfecoftons. 


Ploce your Ad quickly and easily, contact your 
nearest 1HT office or representative with your text. 
You will be informed of the cost immediately, and 
once payment is mode your ad will appear within 
48 hairs. AD major Credit Cards Accepted. 


BUSINESS SERVICES _ 


BtANCEHQfcte* 
Id 11)4*3793 


UN1TH> STATES 


0 i /AT£7fO£/4/V 


F0RX ns ESTIMATE CAU 
PARIS (1139201400 


$AVE ON 
International 


fa . en u red (fanfare 
1631 T Yerteru BM.. Seite 999 
Enaae, Cdffemia 91436 LLSJL 
Tetafa 651355 Vencre ISA 
Fax No.: (8181 90W698 
Tl L. (818) 7S9JM71 


SERVICED OFFICES 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


Phone Calls 


0FF5H08E C0MPANES 


• I5D ffiADY MADE COMPANIES 

* Sank enteoductons 


Now you an as iv 
UA red sow a rtwfi os 
6 5* oa mper ed to heal p to* 
ampnu or erfrno an pkft 
CtJ fron hare, efna c* nwefc 
redavad wrqhagei. 
AmdoUe n rf coudnes. 


BRLSSaS - BRGtUM 

Your office 3 rf icrvicn 
Tet 32-2-534 85 54 
Few 32-2-534 02 77 


rots London oma 

AHardeble, 5 star, tend Sweet 
Id- 44 71 *99 9192 Fnt 71 49975)7 


* 1C* AKO TKMX DOCUMSVTATJON 

• TBffHONE & MAIL F0«W«(D3O 


Cdi now Ear rates end lee tew 
you an begft «»ing today- 


Tetephone or fas fa ewrefcft terdte 
end 100 page cokw bradree 


Una open 7* Vues. 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


OQA ASAUWTH) 
2402 Bank d To* 




kallback 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


M +W5220T72 
Fre= +B3 S2T1190 


CLASS A BAW in to. fa* 
adreiordne srerien 
b on trm awl wtnrtt l» 

J»OT. bMKdote rrarafa. CJ 

safc5isa«sw 

FAX ©1 23T 993B. 


Tet 1/206-284-8600 
fax: im-T -6666 


417 Second Avenue WcP 
SeaBte, WA9BU9 USA 


FLATOTH. 

BHB.TQWBOK 
SCPO FORTE OEVBSIUUSS 

horn Sutfes B five-roam de krxt 
Doty, reetty or mortWy 
Free dwtrte lennce u 
EeroduevUnd 
Ce* 0L345J4S Trf free 
Or (33-1 )45 75 62 20 


Id (1)46 3793 R5t 
Fat (114637 93 70. 
GSMAWAUSn&A A CENTRAL 

1^^77675. 

F<t (069)7273 10 
eaGRM&UJXBeaURG (Irusdi 
T(L- 343 18.99. 343-1914 
Fac 34641353 
GR&CE&CYPBUS: Afeera, 

Tel. (3)}19535246 
Foe <554 55(3 

FNAND: Hefaiji, 

W- 358(01 647412 
F«6121111 
HALT: Mfano, 

W- 58315738 
Fw 583 20938 
tCIHBlAND&Airaledoni. 
iy 31 » 68410®. 

Fax. 3i 20 6881374 
NORWAY &SWB»t 
firenn Nremy. 

TW ■" (47) 55 913P7D 
Fck (47(55 913CP2 
PORUGAl: faten. 

T«t, 351-1-45^-7203 
3JM J57-735? 
SPANMafak). 

W 3L5G8789 
Fat 35Q9257 
SWRZaiAFftPuk 
Id (02117285021 
FreJ07I)7M30‘71. 
UKISICfeXWM: tendon. 
W:|07IJ 836 4802 
Fare (571)240 7254 
Tefal. 162009 


NEW YORK: 

lei -KISJ 75*3890. 
fat (21 2J 755-6785 
Tel fare (80)5727212 
Tte 427 175 

WCACOt 

Tel (3121 201-9393. 


For 131 2) 201-9398 
Tdl Free- (8M) 535-6208 


IOSANGOES: 

Tel- (2131850-8339 
F« (213851-1508 
TJ he (8031848^739 
SXA&Houflon. 

w/fot|7i34»«m 
T J Fret ( 8001 526 - 7857 . 


CANADA 


TORONTO: 

TeL (9051 833-6200 
Fax. (905) 833-21 16 


MIDDLE EAST 


UM!H> AKAB BWATESSrefa*. 
W ( 06)351133 
fe.-fci6j3748M0 
TtU 68484 IRNGlf 


ASIA/PAOHC 


HONS KONG: 

TJ I8S2W227 M88 
tU 6»}7(l WTHX 
Pol 1852) 9322-1 190 
SWGAPOSfc _ 

tel .2236478 

Fax 724 1566 
Met 28749 HT5K 


iAMMTcteo. 
leL 37011 


lrf. 3201 02 10 
I)C J33A73. Frr 3; 


Fx 32010209 







)r‘ ■; 
MS ! 



Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, AUGUST 15, 1994 


Partygoing Writer’s Struggle With Words 


By Bob Morris 

Sot York Tuna Service 

N EW YORK — It's lunchtime at 
Michael's on West 55th Street, 
just a manuscript’s throw away from 
the offices of the William Morris 
and International Creative 
tent. 

Michael’s is as Los Angeles as Man- 
hattan gets. Aiiy and spare as a piece of 
virgin white writing paper, it is, along 
with 44 at the Royaiton and the Grill 
Room of the Four Seasons, a place 
where publishing pooh-bahs and celeb- 
rity authors cany on, pretending not to 
notice who else is around. 

Click. The notoriously noLiceable 
Fran Lebowitz, looking the essence of 
cool in white shirt and vest, blazer and 
jeans, lights a cigarette. It's about her 
fifth, and she hasn't ordered lunch yet. 

With pink hands that are surpris- 
ingly tiny for someone so adept at 
smacking society around, she holds 
her Marlboro Light and inhales in a 
way that has the I-dare-you-even-to- 
raise- an -eyebrow quality of an artist, 
rods star or teenager. 

“I feel very stimulated by ciga- 
rettes,” says Lebowitz, who smokes 
two packs a day, most of them while 
she’s talking or writing. “Nicotine has 
that effect on me. That's what it's 
supposed to do. It's a drug. Drugs 
work. Thai's why people take them. 
Sometimes when I don’t fed well, 
someone will tell me to try drinking 
some daffodil tea. I tell them. ‘No, I 
think m take tetracycline, thank you.’ 
It works faster. Like cigarettes. They 
get to the point. The words are in the 
cigarettes. 

Smoking is one topic on a stunning- 
ly long list of thing s that concern the 
professionally deadpan author, who is 
43 and views writing as “a rarefied 
form of a tantrum.’' 

A self-described reactionary who 
was a friend of Malcolm Forbes and 
who goes to fancy parties with musi- 
cians, artists and limousine- liberals 
including Bany Diller. Diane von 
Furstenberg and Calvin Klein, her ap- 
peal comes from her ability to lam- 
poon any trend of the day in the most 
politically incorrect manner possible. 

“I don’t understand this scandal 
about nicotine in cigarettes,’' she says. 
“What did we think they were full of? 
Vitamin C and calcium? This second- 
hand smoke issue is a fraud. What 
about secondhand car exhaust? No- 
body seems to care about that." 
She leans back, takes a long pull 



Sometime author Fran Lebowitz, left, with Diane von Furstenberg. 


from her cigarette and exhales as if she 
were giving a little gift to the world. 
Then she orders lunch. 

But she isn't finished with pollution 
and personal space. “I was living in 
Princeton for the past year, and the 
lawn mowers are incredibly noisy 
there," she says. 

“They spew all kinds of stuff into the 
air. And leaf blowers. They blow the 
leaves to one place, and a few seconds 
later, that big leaf blower in the sky 
blows than back. When 1 was a child, 
we had leaf raking, which was quiet. 

“I had gone to Princeton to work 
because it was too noisy here. But 
those lawn mowers and leaf blowers 
were driving me out of my mind I 
called the police and asked if there 
was a way to gel everybody to mow 
their lawns on the same day. They 


have elaborate recycling in Princeton. 
You practically have to file your gar- 
bage by color. So I thought, ‘Why 
can’t we have lawn mowing days?' I 
came back to the city. It'll be quiet 
here because everyone goes away in 
the summer. Also, there’s so little lawn 
mowing. That’s an added attraction." 

Lebowitz grew up in Morristown, 
New Jersey, where her parents owned 
a furniture store. She says she's glad to 
have been kicked out of high school 
for “nonspecific surliness" because it 
gave her more time for reading. She 
moved Lo New York not long after 
that, driving a cab and doing other 
odd jobs before landing a column at 
Andy Warhol's magazine. Interview. 

Lebowitz’s dour columns in Inter- 
view and Mademoiselle in the early 
1970s and her two best-selling books 
of sardonic essays, “Metropolitan 


Life” (1974) and “Social Studies" 
(1981), earned her a lot of money, 
which she says is gone. They also won 
her the attention she thrives on today. 
She’s constantly quoted and pic- 

% 


lured in magazines, but her Output as 


a writer is practically mL Unlike 
Dorothy Parker, Truman Capote and 
James Thurber, who struggled with 
writer’s block at the end of their ca- 
reers, she elevated her sloth to an 
almost mythic level early on. “I don't 
write fast enough to require a word 
processor,” she once told The Paris 
Review. 

It’s only in the last two years that 
Lebowitz has broken through an II- 
year writer’s block that kept her from 
collecting much of the large advance 
she agreed on with Random House to 
write a novel called “Exterior Signs of 
Wealth,” which she describes simply 
as “unfinished." 

‘Tve never met anyone who even 
comes close to me in laziness,” 
Lebowitz says. “I would have made a 
perfect heiress. I enjoy lounging. And 
reading. The other problem I have is 
fear of writing. The act of writing puts 
you in confrontation with youredf, 
which is why I think writers assidu- 
ously avoid writing. The number of 
alcoholic writers makes a lot of sense 
because if you're going to be face to 
face with yourself, maybe it’s better 
that you don't recognize that person." 
(She ’herself doesn’t drink because she 
has hypoglycemia.) 

She says the only thing she likes less 
than writing is exercising, which she 
does because her doctor says it’s the 
only way she can keep smoking and 
not aggravate her bronchitis. 

“It’s the only time I wish I was 
writing, because at least you can sit 
down,” she says. 

It seems strange that someone so at 
odds with her craft decided on it as a 
child. “Until I was about 7, 1 thought 
books were just there, like trees,” she 
says. “When I learned that people 
actually wrote them, I wanted to. too. 
because all children aspire to rnhmman 
feats like flying. Most people grow up 
to realize they can't fly. Writers are 
people who don’t grow up to realize 
they can’t be God." 

To pay for her large midtown apart- 
ment (“Since owning an apartment, 
Tve discovered I have the soul of a 
renter,” she says), Lebowitz has relied 
on lecture fees. (“I'm the Willy Loman 
of literature, slogging through air- 
ports.”) 


LANGUAGE 



By James Gorman 


ference 

year-old who is articulate enough to use 1% 
words but young enough that he has opt yet 
wrestled language to the ground, this was a big 
subject. He pretty mneb lad the idea of testicles, 
so the main points we covered in- discussion 
were: 

1. The nature of tentacles -^flexible snakdike 
arms (suckers optional). 

2. Who has tentacles —octopuses, not boys. 

3. Who has testicles — boys, not octopuses, 

although, without really investigating inverte- 
brate biology, who knows? ' ' . 

This is my favorite kind of conversation, eclec- 
tic enough to include science and language, but 
grounded in real life. You seldom get to have 
talks like this with grown-ups. They tend to riiinV 
they know what words mean, unless they have 
small children themselves. 

Every housdiold with children has its own 
micro-dialect, created by the young as tteystmn- 
ble oyer new words. In our house, the pressed 
juice of apples win forever be known us apple 
spider, a poetic innovation by my older daughter. 
A common spice used to make hot apple spKter is 
known to us as-dmanonononon, thanks to my 
younger daughter. These little changes in the 
common tongue brought about by children's 
mistakes are unexpectedly exhilarating. Ifs as if . 
most grown-ups are locked into a linguistic gray 
flannel suit until children set them free. Without 
their influence, its as hard to say, “Mmmm, 
rimanonononon,” as you sprinkle it on your 
oatmeal (or opemo, in our house) as it is to lie on 
the floor and provide the voices as the bear 
makes friends with the tiger. . .. 

So I was disappointed to read in one of the 
many magazine articles advising nervous parents 
on language development that it’s best not to use 
big words with children. I couldn’t disagree 
more. Big words, particularly big words misused 


or misunderstood, are one of the main- joys of 
being a parent Plus, mistakes are good for you. 
Ijwnning how to use them is at the heart of 
poetry, science (e.g, penicillin), and psychoanal- 
ysis. And it’s through mistakes that , children 

and life. 


sing my son various songs at night, almost all 
inappropriate for a 3 -year-old, and his qqesttons 
about them frequently keep us up way past his 
bedtime. One, about falling in love with a wait- 
ress in a Colorado diner, contains the phrase 
“Lyin’ next to Katie, on that old Navajo -rug.” 
Danny heard the song many times and one night 
finally asked: “Is it a nice lion ora mean lion?” 
This occasioned a discussion of love, and lions, 
and lying down next to loved ones, and why ’ 
Mommy and Daddy sleep next to each other 
while Danny is unjustly stuck in his own room. 

Another subject that has come up is fire. The 
same song includes a reference to coffee that 


rally assumed that the coffee started tte * ( 


This was one- metaphor that defied explanation 
to a toddler. Defeated, I amply said that that 
wasn’t ‘what Wide was singing about. 

But the occasional defeat is no reason to Stick to 
am ple words and songs about ducks. Even with- 
out the teaming opportunities, dunk bow muefl 
poorer life would be without the memory of auia- 
mii amderstandmg s of song lyrics. 1 thought 
“poeoyin motion” was “Oh, a tree, in motion. 

Wordplay of a different sort characterizes 
“Seinfdd.”The television show is wdlknownfOT 

— - frean^he episode involving a 
bet on who could abstain the longest from mas- 
turbating. The real linguistic lure of Seinfeld, 
however, is. not the invented phrases but the use 
of understatement and indirection, of not saying 
much of anything while making everything per- 
fectly clear. 

JERRY: What’s the matter? 

GEORGE: My .mother caught me. 

JERRY: Caught you? Doing what? 

GEORGE: You know. ... I was alone. 

ELAINE: You mean? 

GEORGE: Uh4mh. 

This, of course, is the beginning of the mastur- 
bation episode. And much ofthe saying-witbout- 
saying-it on Seinfeld is simply a time-honored 
way to talk about sex without talking about it. 
It’s really the opposite of -the language of chil- 
dren — -abstract, not concrete; all connotation, 
no denotation. A'chOd can watch a racy Seinfeld 
episode and not understand a word — or rather 
nnHwqanfi every word tut not have a clue as to 
what’s going on, fit fact, at the highest level of 
Semf e kfish, wmtls are the vehicles of meaning 
only in the sense that a truck loaded with hens is 
the vehicle of chickens. Which, if I remember 
right, were immortalized in the- old pop song 
“Poultry in Motion.” Poultry? What? 

James Gorman is an etRtor of The New York 
Times Magazine. William Safire is on vacation. 

New York Times Service 

MpMnOl^AL 
CLASSIFIED 

Appears on Page 1 3 


WEATHER 


CROSSWORD 


Europe 


Totfcv 


Tomorrow 


Wfjh 

Low 

W 

HM> 

Low W 


C/F 

OF 


OF 

OF 


28*2 

18*4 

* 

28*2 

21/70 c 

AitKtanfem 

21/70 

13*5 


23/73 

15*9 pe 

AnlM 

35*5 

17*2 

1 

31*0 

14/67 pc 

Athens 

38/100 26/77 


34/93 

22/71 B 

Barca*™ 

31*8 

24/76 


31*9 

22/71 1 

Betarade 

28/82 

12*3 


27/80 

17*2 a 

BAdo 

21/70 

11*2 

Sh 22/71 

13*5 a 

Ekuuete 

23/73 

11*2 

■ 

24/75 

13/53 pc 


24/75 

13*5 

i 

25/77 

17*2 A 

Ccogiihayn 

21/70 

11*2 


21/70 

13*5 pc 

CodiCMSd 

31*8 

34/76 


32/99 


Dublin 

1B*4 

11*2 


17«2 

0/46 dl 

Edhburgh 

16*1 

13*5 

ah 

17*2 

11/52 ah 

Florence 

32*8 

16*1 

■ 

31*9 

19*6 pc 

FnmUcit 

23/73 

13*6 


25/77 

15*9 pc 

Genova 

26/TC 

14*7 

a 

29*2 

16*1 S 

MulikiU 

18*4 

13*5 

i 

17*2 

11*2 pc 

Martas 

33*1 

22/71 


30*6 

18*4 S 

LnPafem 

28/79 

21/70 

% 

28/79 

22/71 a 

Lisbon 

29*2 

17*2 

n 

27/80 

19*6 C 


23/73 

lira? 

a 

23/73 

13*5 pc 

UwWd 

34/93 

19*0 

■ 

34/93 

!B*4 pc 

Mm 

29*4 

i/«a 


30*0 

19*6 S 

• Moooow 

23/73 

12*3 

ah 

22/71 

12*3 ah 

Month 

22/71 

9/48 

B 

23/73 

14*7 s 

Men 

29*4 

19*6 

• 

29*4 

19*0 a 

CMo 

23/73 

10*0 


21/70 

12*3 pc 

P**ne 

30*8 

25*7 


29*4 

23/73 1 

Ratio 

26/79 

13*5 

» 

27*0 

15/59 pc 


20*8 

11*2 


73/73 

14*7 6 


14/57 

10*0 oh 

14*7 

8146 pc 

Homo 

33*1 

19*6 

fi 

32*9 

21/70 pc 

El PwnrrHon 30*9 

13*6 1 

20*8 

9/48 •»! 

SKKUntn 

23/73 

11/SS 


21/70 

11*2 pc 

Smnboug 

25/77 

10*0 

« 

26/79 

14*7 ■ 

Tsfin 

17*2 

14*7 

i 

16*1 

12*3 pc 

Vanic* 

28*2 

19*4 

B 

28*2 

22/71 ( 

Vnnrm 

23/73 

11/62 


22/71 

18*1 S 

Warsaw 

20*8 

12*3 

ah 

23/73 

12*3 a 

Zurich 

28/79 

12*3 

fi 

27*0 

18*1 a 

Oceania 

AuMmJ 

18*1 

11*2 


16*1 

9/48 ah 

Sydrey 

10*1 

7/44 

F* 

18*1 

8/46 pe 


Forecast for Tuesday through Thursday, as provided by Accu- Weather. Asia 



Today 

M|*I Low W High 
Cff OF OF 

. 3ZVBS 
pc 30/86 
1 31/W 

pc 31 
I XM» 
I JWB? 
ill 33191 
pc aim 

I 33*91 
pc 34/93 


Law W 

OF 

34/75 pc 
lam pc 

nn pc 

34/76 pe 
26/79 « 
24/75 Jh 
27/80 pe 
23/73 pc 
26/77 pe 

irna pc 


J Willi n 

North America 

Sunshine w*l warm Canada 
and the United Stales l ram 
the Great Lakes to the 
Atlantic Seaboard Tuesday. 
By Thursday there w* be a 
tew showers about. Showery 
rains wfir wel the Carolinas 
lo the eastern GuH at Mexi- 
co. Bfeiering heal wil buld 
nearly to the sea in Califor- 
nia. 


Europe 

Showers will break out 
begkinmg Tuesday m much 
of U K and Franoe. A day of 
warm sun wfll be followed by 
showers in Germany. 
Switzerland. Belgium end 
Neihertands. Sunshine will 
heal Spam through Greece 
Tuesday: scattered thtzxJer- 
storms may erupt at mid- 
week m Italy. 


Hawy 

Snow 


Asia 

Hains will quell the heat m 
Korea Tuesday kflowed by 
moderate warmlh Most of 
Japan writ swelter through at 
least midweek. Much of 
China, such as Beryng and 
Shanghai, will have normal 
lale-summer heal with sun. 
Steamy Hang Kong. Taipei 
and Singapore w<H have ht- 
or-mtss Ihunder st orms. 


Africa 

Alpn 

33*1 

23/73 

s 

32*9 

23/73 pc 

Gape Town 

17*2 

7 '44 

a 

17*2 

9/46 pc 

Casattanca 

27 /BO 

18*4 

G 

2B.1C 

20*8 pc 

Hamw 

20*6 

11*2 

1 

22/71 

12*3 pc 


28*2 

23/73 

ah 

28/82 

23/73 pc 

MatoM 

21/70 

11*2 

ah 

22/71 

12*3 pc 

Tun* 

38/100 23/73 

* 

37/90 

24/75 f 


North America 


Anchorage 


Middle East 


Latin America 


ftamscw 

JsiuMtan 


Today 
High Lew W High 
OF OF 
32/89 2507 
3800023/73 
34193 19*98 
31 IBB 21/70 
45/113 24/75 
A?f107 24/75 


Low W 
OF OF 
32/89 74/75 1 
39/102 73/73 ■ 
38/9 7 20*0 1 
7U9I 21/70 > 
44/11125/77 ■ 
*3/109 28/78 B 


Today 

High Low W High Low W 
OF OF or OF 

Buotkm Ajnra 12/53 3/37 pc 12/53 S/41 s 

Caracas 31/88 26/79 pe 32*9 JO m pc 

Linn 16*4 18*1 a 1BC4 15/59 pc 

MwocoCKy 22/71 12/53 pe 23/73 13*5 pc 

RkutaJanoko 31*8 19*6 pc 28*2 19*6 pe 

S /rtago 16*1 4/39 s 19/W 7144 pe 


Boston 

CHcaps 

Dam 

CWn* 

HoroMu 

Houston 

Los Angelas 

Mrart 

Mnraupdb 

UonKW 

Nassau 

Now Yolk 


Hlya* 

Legend: s- sunny, pc -party ctaudy, o-doudy. sh-showsrs, MnunUHrslnrtns. r-ran, si-snow Bums, 
sn-snow. Lfce. W-Wfeainer AH maps, forecasts and dMa prev</M by Accu-Waathw, bic.£1B94 


Son Fran 
Sauna 
Tamo 
Wertngtan 


21/70 13*5 
28/78 17*7 
2S/77 16*1 
24/75 14*7 
28/84 14*7 
23.73 13*5 
30*6 73/73 
32*9 18*4 
37/98 26/79 
32/89 24/75 
26/79 16*1 
20*8 10*0 
31 *6 24/75 
26/78 17*2 
43/10929*4 
27i-0O 13*5 
23/73 12/53 
20*8 B-'40 

25/77 16*1 


e 20*8 12*3 pe 
* 78/82 19*5 pc 
pc 24/75 I6/B1 pc 
S 28/79 17*2 « 
S 33/91 W*t ■ 

1 24/73 14/57 pc 
pc 30*6 24.73 pc 
I 33191 22/71 pc 
pc 38/10022/71 s 
I 32*9 25/77 l 
s 27*0 18*1 3 

sh 22/71 11/58 pc 
pc 32*9 25/77 pc 
s 25/77 18*4 pe 
pc 41/10631*8 pe 
f 24/75 15*9 ■ 
c. 23/73 14/57 pc 
pc 24/75 13*5 pc 
pc 27*0 18*4 pe 


ACROSS 

i Protection In a 
purse 

5 Start as a trip 

fi Actor Max 

Sydow 

14 Lawyer 
Dershowitz 

t5 Dragon's prey 

16 Author Levin 

17 Ex-heavyweight 
champ 

is Galley slave's 
tool 


» * been 

had!’ . 

21 Bad grades 

22 'is that so?' 

24 Colonist 

2 « Rock's 

Vanilli 

27 Brit. rr?t work 

28 In angular - 
sailed ships 

so Penal name 

33 Hotel lobby 

34 "left — — — etn 
Berliner" 

38 "Famous" ' 
cookie man 


Solution to Pnzdc of Aug- 12 


CJ 

□ 

□□ 

u 

a 

EQ 

□ 

E 

ULU 

LI 

a 

LJUi 



37 Lmie bits 
so Dumb ox 
30 Fourposter 
40 Linen shades 
-41 Leafy shelter 
42 Small seals 

44 Journalist Nettie 

45 Get nd of. in 
slang 

46 Deejay's need 
so Los Angeles 
i-uPteyw.,.** 
sa Orbit period , 

53 Lumberjack's 
tool 

54 Singer — — 
Rose 

ss Noble acts 

sa time 

(golfer's 
starting point) 
so Niagara Falls 
craft? 

so "Java" player At 
61 * day now 

«2 The ’E" of 
H.RJE. 

63 Chocolate- 
cove red 
morsels 


DOWN 

i Baseball's 
Roger 


a Extant 

2 Middy opponent 
. 4 Epilogue 

s Ran the show 

6 Almighty 

7 Lobster eaters' 
accessories 

a Hubbub. 

.9 Second drafts 
io Pew attachment 
it A concert- . 

.. piaster holds it 

12 Kind of vaccine. . 
is Not any 
ia Ambtaonfess 
one 

23 Pub drink 
ea Stocking parts 
2s Yucaten people 
28 Name in 
computer -• 
software 
2» 7D, e.g. 
ao Early Beatles 
describer - • 
si "flag Mop" 
brothers 

32 Legendary 
bluesman 

33 Onward 

3s Neitheris mate 

37 It sometimes 

comes in bars 

38 Cassidy 
portrayer 
William 


40 Uganda airport 

4 t Boombox 
sound 

43jazzdate J 
44 Long-b&red 
pooch 



j— 

s 

■ 

u~ 




vr~ 




sr 



ff 

Si" 



5 


40 Witch, at times 
<r Firm cloth 

oa&tiivB 
48 Schick «aL 

so Disk contents 
fr 


-31 The yoke's on 
them 

92 Cosmonaut 
Gagarin 

5 « Dada founder 
57 — - Na Na 

TT 



AWi t, hW l%n p ' 

-O New York Times Edited by~WM Shortz 


Ttavel in a world without borders, time zones 

or language barriers. 



Imagine a world where you can call country to country as easily as you can from home. And 
reach the U.S. directly from over 125 countries. Converse with someone who doesn’t speak your 
j language, since it’s translated instantly. Call your clients at 3 am knowing they’ll get the message in 

your voice at a more polite hour. All this is now possible with /OKI 1 

To use these “ervices, dial the AKT Access Number of the country you're in and you’ll get all the 
help you need With these Access Numbers and your AKET Calling Card international calling has never been easier. 

If you don’t have an ABET Calling Card or you’d like more information on AKT global services, just call us using the 
convenient Access Numbers on your right. 





AOS' Access Numbers ... 

How to can around the wqrid..' . 

1 , Using die chart below, find die country you are calling from. 

2. Dia l die corresponding ABST Access Number. . 

i An AKT English-speaking Operator or voice prompt will ask for the pbone number you wlstuo call or connect you co a 
customer service representative. 

To receive your free waflet caTOdT/a^AaoessNuiBba^ justdM theaaxsmimberaf 
the country ywflreioanclask for Customer Service. 


COUNTRY 

ACXXSS NUMBER 

COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER COUNTRY 

ACCESS NUMBER 


ASIA 

Italy* 

172-1011 BnaR 

0008010 

Australia 

1800-881-011 

' 7iwhtenan4Yi* 

15500-11 Chfle 

00*-0312 

China, PRC*** 

10811 

HllinaniiiA . 

8*196 CohnnWa 

980-11-0010 

Guam 

018-872 

Luxembourg • 

OOOOOUl - -CosctBica** 

114 

Hong Kong 

800-1111 

Macedonia. F.YJL of 998004288 Ecuador* 

119 

India* 

000-117 

Malta* 

0800090-110 ElSalvadofte 

190 

Indonesia* 

001-801-10 

Mnnare* . 

19*0011 Guatemahr 

190 

Japan* 

0039-111 

8 far 

rtnnrrmnor 

060220111 Gnyaoar* 4 

165 

Korea 

009-11 

Norway 

800-190-11 Honduras^ 

123 

Korea** 

11* 

Poland**** 

0*0104800111 Mexico*** 

95-8004624240 

Malaysia* 

800-0011 

PortogaP - 

05017-1-288 Nlraragna (Mmagial 

New Zealand 

000911 

ThMmnih 

: 010004288 Panama* 

109 

PWl^pplnral 

105*11 

Bna8ia**CMo*co«Or 

155O042 -Penr-. -. ' ■ -■ 

191 

Seipao* 

235-2872 

Slovalda 

00420-00101 Suriname 

156 

Singapore 

800-0111-111 

Spain* 

900-9900-11 Uruguay • 

00-0410 

Sri Lanka 

430-430 

Sweden* 

020-795OU Venezuela** 

80-0 11-120 

Taiwan* 

0080-10288-0 

awtaeriand* . 

15500-11 .... UARDIKRAM 

Thailand* 

0019'991-lUl 

UJL 

0500090011 Iteham— 

1-800-872-2881 

EUROPE 

Ukndne* 

8*100-11 Bermuda"- 

1-800-872-2R8T 

Armenia** 

B*l4lll 

v MIDDLE EAST BddshVl 

1 -800-872-2881 

Anatria~** 

022-903-011 

Bahwlii 

800-001 Cayman Islands 

Z-800872.2RR1 

Helghim* 

0600-100-10 

Cyprus* . 

080-90010 -Grenada" 

1-800-872-2881 

Bulgaria 

00-1800-0010 

land 

177 - 100-2727 Had" 

UU1-8C&872-MIW 

Croatia** 

99-38-0011 

Kuwait 

80CL288 Jamaica^ 

0-000872-7881 

Czech Hep 

00-420-00101 

Lebanon (BdrnQ 

426001 NetiLAota 

001-800872.78*1 

Denmark* 

8001-0010 

Qatar 

0800011-77 SLEtHS/Ncvls 

l‘8008722»n 

Finland* 

9800-100-10 

SsnfiAnUa 

1-800-10 . AFRICA ■ 

France 

19*-0011 

Itufcey* 

00000-32277 Hmcrcrinl 

510-02SK) 

Germany 

. 0130-0010 

UAL* .... 

800^121 ' Gabon* . 

00*801 

Greece* 

00800-1311 

AMERICAS Gambia” 

— • 00111 

Icebmhi 

999-001 

OOXZC+ 

555 - Siberia 

0800-10 

797-797 

Ireland 

1-800-550000 

Bdhria* 

W0M112 South Africa 

' raotMfeoun 


•tUt CattnpOidmxyfSaMlkbli! tad comma. AM WbrldOotwa^Semce . -MtytwbejvrihN e ftomew^ tAuoe. 

KaPpB« ttbg« y'. - - 

msaM Cnn mcr | n l o awWor/flUTaMPfacef mg ptai«n iMflncHldunac •manfirttebmc 

necdon far canny to arcoBlnB. oo^TtaTEtaWtexflnniOanai. 

^PSA Mf ca'I o i L rbBrallA fern 4t the roaflckaltedaboTc.- . AAKriMcomldilnK 


SlWJ-iXKT 





gmVSHftig i 


i