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INTERNATIONAL 


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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


** 


Paris, Tuesday, August 16, 1994 


No. 34,668 


Germans Find Clues 



They Trace Seized Plutonium'- 239 
To Criminals With Ties to Russia 


By Craig R. Whitney 

New York Tima Service 

MUNICH — Ger man authorities 
said Monday that 300 to 350 grams of- 
phi ionium-239 seized from a suspected 
smuggler who flew in from Moscow was 
part of a four-kilogram S250-mfllion 
deal proposed by a criminal group they 
believed had connections to members of 
Russian security services. 

. “The material did not come from a 
civilian commercial reactor,” said the 
Bavarian interior minister, Gflnther 
BecksteiiL “The strong assumption is 
that it was specially produced for use in 
weapons.” 

Without effective Russian controls, 
Mr. fieckstein said, “We assume that 
such material will continue to come on 
the market in future.” • 


A German expert said that it would 
take 6 to 10 kilograms of plutonium to 
build a bomb, depending on the purity 
of the material. The seized materia! was 
87 percent pure, on the low side but 
enough to indicate that the smugglers 
could deliver sufficient material to con- 
struct a weapon* according to the ex- 
pert, Dr. Helmut Zdring, an environ- 
mental official. 


An aide to QiancfflorHefaimt Kohl, 
Bemd Sdmtidbauer, will Gy to Moscow 
this week to urge President Boris N. 
Yeltsin to order tighter security. 

A spokesman fen* Mr. Kohl also re- 
jected Russian assertions that the Ger- 
mans had not sent them information to 
buttress Boon's elanm that the plutoni- 
um seized here last week end in an 


. unrelated incident near the Swiss bor- 
' derin May had come from Russia. 

. . A spokesman for the Russian Atomic 
Energy Ministry, Georgi Kaurov, also 
aid in Moscow on Monday, "We have 
had no thefts of plutonium 239.” The 
Germans believe this statement is 
meaningless because they think ah Rus- 
sian nuclear security has -collapsed. 

. .. Providing details on the latest seizure 
of smuggled weapons-grade nuclear 
materials — the third the Germans have 
made in four months — Bavarian law- 
enforcement officials described it as the 
biggest in the world since the collapse of 
the. Soviet bloc. 

■■ They called for urgent international 
action to deal with a threat that could 
enable a terrorist group or a maverick 
state to buy enough for a bomb. 

They identified the prime suspect ar- 
rested in the case as Justiniano Torres, a 
38-year-old Colombian from BogotA 
who lived and studied in Moscow and 
brought the plutonium from there last 
week. 

Two older Spanish men, a 60-year- 
old mechanic identified only as Javier 
B. from Sain Sebastidn, and a 49-year- 
old builder named Julio O. from Navar- 
ra — both from the terrorism-plagued 
Basque region — were arrested with 
him. A fourth Spanish suspect, said to 
be in France, is being sought. 

None of them had known criminal 
reocmb^accordira to the German inves- 
tors, who said they had no idea who 
Torres’s contacts in Moscow or 


See BOMB, Page 4 


Carlos’s Run of Terror Is Ended; 


He Faces Murder Trial in France 


Sudan Grabs 


Long-Sought 

Guerrilla 


By Alan Riding 

New York Tunes Sermx 

PARIS — The Venezuelan-born inter- 
national terrorist known as Carlos, blamed 
for dozens of bombings and murders 
across Western Europe in the 1970s and 
*8 0s, was arrested m Sudan and flown 
secretly to France on Monday. 

Interior Minister Charles Pasqua said 
HKch Ramirez S&nchez, 44, would go on 
trial here for crimes committed in France. 

"He is one of the most well-known and 
most dangerous criminals in the world,”. 
Mr. Pasqua said with evident satisfaction. 

Carioro most daring action involved the 
kidnapping of 1 1 oil ministers attending a 
meeting of the Organization of Petroleum 
Exporting Countries in Vienna in Decem- 
ber 1975. Three people died in the inci- 
dent, but the terrorist and his group were 
flown to Algeria and released 

His name was variously linked to guer- 


rilla bands in Japan, Germany, Spain and 
:losely associated 



Ireland but he was most cl 
with Arab terrorist groups. Until the col- 
lapse of communism in Eastern Europe, he 
was also reportedly protected by East Ger- 
many, Hungary and Czechoslovakia. 

Most recently, he was thought to be 
living in Damascus with his wife, Magdale- 
na Kopp, a former member of Germany's 
Baader-Mrinhof gang who spent three 
years in prison in France in the early 1 980s 
on charges of possessing explosives. 

The arrest of Carlos is a significant po- 
litical coup for France's hard-line interior 
minister, who over the post two weeks has 
been leading a much-publicized campaign 



Philippi' Wnjozcr'Rruicn 

Interior Minister Charles Pasqua of France announcing Monday that die terrorist known as Carlos was in custody. 


Tutsi Deserved to Ihe, Politician Says, 

ft 

'■tT'- 


to round up Algerians living in France who 
Algeria's outlawed Islamic Salva- 


At Last the Jackal’s Time Has Passed 


support Aigeris 

t. He launched the offensive after 


-*■ — - v-r'w; 


-By Jane Perlez 

New York Tima Savtce 


Mr. Karen’s point of view is particular- 
ly powerful not only because of 


RUTSHURU, Zmre lb understand 
what drove the massacres of hundreds of 
thousands of Tutsi in Rwanda, one need 
only listen to Francois Karera, a senior 
politician in the former Hutu-dominated 
government, who says the killings were, 
justified. 


bis posi- 
tion - — ho was mayor of Kigali front 1975 
to 1990 and then moved to the job of 


prefect of the capital and its surrounding 
; -—but because of his 


"The Tutsi are originally bad," said Mr. 
Karera, who as the prefect of greater Kiga- 
li the capital, was the chief ad min istrator 
for 937,000 people. “They are murderers. 
The Tutsi have given the white people then 
daughters. Physically, they^ are weak — 
look at their arms and their legs. No lutsi 
can build; they are too weak. They just 
command. The others work.” 


These are some of -the crude slurs deliv- 
ered with chortles by Mr. Karera as.he sat 
in a garden filled with crimson bougainvil- 
lea exotic palms at his rented cottage 
heTe. 


The invective is based on the traditional 
stereotypes — the Hutu, shorter; the Tutsi, 
taller and mare slender — and the fact that 
in the 1600s the minority Tutsi oonquered 
the majority Hutu and ruled them until 35 
years ago. 


The Hutu were determined, Mr. Karera 
-^said, not to allow the Tutsi to repeat histo- 
ry and slay the Hutu as they had 400 years 
ago and again in 1959 and 1972. In April 
and May, an estimated 500,000 Tutsi were 
killed; the United Nations has caHerf it 
genocide. 


provinces — but because or ms age. 

Now 55, Mr. Karera was 20 and a young 
teacher in 1959 when the Hutu rose up for 
the first time against their rulers, the cattle- 
driving Tutsi, who arrived from northern 
Afxica400 years ago and conquered the 
agrarian Hutu. 

It is to the people like Mr. Karera, who 
displayed intractable prejudices, that the 
mostly Hum masses of refugees listen 
when it conns to the question of returning 
home.. There is no way home, Mr, Karera 
said, until the new government set up by 
the Tutsi-dominated Rwanda Patriotic 
Front shares power cm the basis of popula- 
tion. 

“That’s democracy,” he said. His goal 
could be achieved by negotiation, he said, 
but if it is not, the refugees will return by 
farce with the backing of the overthrown 
gcwernroeul’s army now in Zaire. 

; . “lf the reasons are just, the massacres 
are justified,” Mr. Karera said emphatical- 
ly, pushing his arm in the air to make the 
point. “In war you don't consider the con- 
sequences, you consider the causes.” For 
this reason, he said, he is not worried that 
the United Nations is establishing tribu- 
nals to investigate the massacres and try 
suspects. 

“We cannot use that word genocide. 


tion Front. 

Islamic extremists killed five French citi- 
zens in Algeria. 

Mr. Pasqua said thatFrench intelligence 
officers -wire tipped oft ear i y this year that 
Carlos had entered Sudan under a false 
name with a false diplomatic passport He 
said that after this information was con- 
firmed, it was conveyed to the Sudanese 
authorities with a request for his arrest. 

“Yesterday morning, the Sudanese au- 
thorities told us that they had identified 
Carlos beyond all doubt and were ready to 
respond immediately to the arrest war- 
rants issued by French judicial authori- 
ties,” Mr. Pasqua said, adding that Carlos 
arrived at the Viilacoublay military airport 
near Paris at 10 A-M. Monday. 

After two hours of interrogation in the 
headquarters of the DST, France’s coun- 
terintdhgencc agency, Carlos was taken to 
La Santfc prison in Paris. He is expected to 
appear before Fiance's main anti-terrorist 
investigating judge, Jean-Louis Bnigui&re. 
on Tuesday. 

In Khartoum, Sudan's interior minister, 
Tayeb Ibrahim Mohammed Khier, said in 
a statement that Carlos was carrying a 
false diplomatic passport from an uniden- 
tified Arab country and was among a 
group suspected of planning attacks on 
foreign institutions in the Sudanese capi- 
tal 

Mr. Khier said the group's aim was for 
Sudan to be blamed for supporting inter- 
national terrorism. Sudan's Islamic funda- 
mentalist government has been accused by 
both Egypt and the United States of sup- 
porting Islamic extremists, a charge denied 
by the regime headed by Lieutenant Gen- 
sal Omar Hassan Ahmad Bashir. 

Sudan’s government spokesman, Abu- 
bakcr Shingjeti, told the Associated Press 
that Carlos was arrested “in the past few 


By Joseph Fitchets 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — The capture of Carlos marks 
the end of an era of international terrorism 
ihat began as urban guerrilla movements 
in the 1960s and ended as murder-for-hire 
in the 1980s. 

Although the world's most wanted ter- 
rorist, Carlos the Jackal, had escaped ar- 
rest for years, he was running in ever 
decreasing circles as government after gov- 
ernment, finally even Libya and Iraq, 
found him too not to hold. 

In fact, the pressure on Carlos had neu- 
tralized his operations for years, and his 


capture puts a symbolic end to a brand or 
terrorism that was effectively pul out of 
business in the 1980s. 

In that sense. Carious arwt serves as a 
reminder of the change in Western govem- 


At that time, terrorism appeared to be 
pan of the permanem political landscape, 
like the Cold War. 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


ments’ policies that dramatically reduced 
the potential of terrorism as an instrument 
of covert warfare between nations. 

The Reagan administration precipitated 
tougher altitudes throughout the West by 
declaring all-out war on terrorism in the 
early 1980s. 


But Washington authorized foreign kid- 
nappings of suspected terrorists, bombed 
Libya for harboring terrorists and changed 
international attitudes and jurisprudence 
to view terrorism as a crime, not a political 
act. The international isolation of Libya 
because of its refusal to extradite the sus- 
pected Lockerbie bombers would have 
been unlikely in the 1970s. 

Following the U.S. lead, European 


See TERROR, Page 4 


See HUTU, Page 4 


See CARLOS, Page 4 



Where Carlos Has Struck 

Terrorist attacks in which Carlos was believed to have been involved: 


Cades in Sudan before Ns arrest. 


1973: Wounding of Edward Sieff, whose family controlled Marks & Spencer 
stores, in London. 

1974: Takeover of the French Embassy in The Hague. 

1975: Killing of two French intelligence agents who were investigating attacks 
on planes of Israel's El Al airline at Paris’s Orly Airport. 

An attack on OPEC headquarters in Vienna in which three people were 
killed and 1 1 taken hostage. The cartel's oil ministers were taken to 
North Africa in a hijacked plane and held for a ransom of Si billion. 

1976: Hijacking of an Air France jetliner to Entebbe, Uganda. 

1982: Bombing of the Paris-Toulouse express train in which six people were killed 
and 15 wounded. 

Bombing near the Champs-Elysees in Paris that killed a pregnant 
woman and wounded 63 other people. 

1983: Bombings in Marseille's main railroad terminal and on the Marseille-Paris 
express that killed five people and wounded 50. 

Bombing of French cultural center in West Berlin that killed one person and 
wounded 23. 


Photos . 1 ReutenmFP 


Source:AP 


Kiosk 


2 German Judges 
To Be Replaced 





BONN (Reuters) — Two German 
judges at the center of a controversy 
over a ruling that appeared to show 
sympathy for a far-right leader's anti- 
Semitic views will be replaced, court 
officials said Monday. 

Wolfgang Mflllex and Rainer Orlet 
will be replaced immediately, the court 
said, because of “long-tom Alness.” 


Beginning today, the crossword puxle 
has a permanent spot on the next to last 
page, or Page 17 in this issue. The new' 
location will make working the puzzle 
more convenient — if not necessarily any 



Mnahira Hamm/Remm 


easier. 


IN MEMORY — Emperor AkObito 
and' Empress Micmko bowing 
Monday in memory of those who 
ified in World War IL Page 5. 


Bad-Check Artists Forge Ahead on Personal Computers 


By Saul Hansell 

New York Tima Soviet 


prolifer 

-desktop publishing has brought a new 
growth industry: the counterfeiting of vir- 
tually undetectable fraudulent checks that 
banks and law enforcement officials say 
could cost the U.S. economy 51 billion this 
year. 


Perpetrators of this fast-growing kind of 


check fraud are using the same inexpensive 
personal computers with sophisticated 
graphics capabilities that transformed the 
way millions of legitimate businesses pro- 
duce newsletters and advertising. 

But the criminals are feeding their com- 
puters images of legitimate checks drawn 
cm legitimate accounts. They change the 
date, the name of the payee and sometimes 
the check number, ana make dozens of 
copies of the fake on a laser printer loaded 


with check paper, which can be bought at 
most stationery stores. 

In a particularly brazen case, a Los An- 
geles-based gang has been roaming the 
country cashing fake payroll checks at 
banks, bank and law enforcement officials 
said. 

In the next few weeks. 12 members of 
the gang will be sentenced in U.S. District 
Court in Charlotte, North Carolina, for 
their involvement in passing thousands of 


bad checks in the Southeast, totaling more 
than $2 million. 


“They have hit all over the country," 
Jessie Wood, an investigator with the Se- 
cret Service in Charlotte, said. "They were 
in Boston last week with exactly the same 
kind of scheme.” 

The American Bankers Association soys 
desktop publishing counterfeits are the 


See FORGERY, Page 11 


Free at Last, Russian Tourists Flock to See the West 


Newsstand Prices 


Andorra 9.D0FF Luxembourg 60 L.Fr 

Antilles 11.20 FF MoroCCO.....».12Dh 

Cameroon ..MOD CFA Qatar .—..8.00 Riais 

Egypt E. P. 5000 Reunion ,„.US0FF 

France 9-00 FF Saudi AraMaJMBR. 

Gabon 960 CFA Senegal -.JW 'CFA 

Greece too Dr. Spain .....zpoPTAS 

Italy 2JM Ure Tunisia. ....1.000 1 Din 

ivory Coast .1.120 CFA Turkey :.T .y&OOB 

Jordan 1 JO U-A.E 8.50 Dirh 

aa .USStJ0. as. MU. (Ear.) 51.10 


Lebanon 


Dow Jones 





-MPtki 




DM 


1.5522 


1J51S 


Pound 


1.545 


1.5465 


YW! 


100.43 


100.17 


FF 


5,3265 


5.3225 


By Lee Hockstader 

Wahington Pmt Semce 

MOSCOW — Thrilled as schoolchildren on their first 
field trip, the three Russian women in Knc for Aeroflot 
Flight 253 to Paris on a recent morning could hardly 
contain themselves. One was a teacher, the second a 
doctor and the third a young police officer. 

All were on their way to the French capital for the first 
time. 

‘Tve never even been abroad before. I can’t even 
imagine iO said Svetlana Kuznetsova, 22, who, with her 
elaborately coiffed blond hair, best blouse and freshly 


‘And 



going 
38, a high school 


uy perfume,* 

chemistry teacher in Siberia who had 


Olga Mashnova, 


never been further from home than Bulgaria, 
cosmetics. And see the Eiffel Tower." 

Like the hordes of American tourists who flocked to 
Europe after World War IL parading new wealth and 
indelicate manners before astonished and sometimes 
appalled locals, Russians are invading Europe this sum- 
mer by die tens of thousands. The last time so many 
Russians tromped across Europe was in 1945, when they 
fought their way to Berlin. 

Throngs of Russians, many on cut-rate tours, are 
wandering open-mouthed up the Champs-Elysees. snap- 
ping photos of the changing of the guard at Buckingham 
Palace and swooning from sunstroke at the Coliseum. 

Some of the travelers no doubt are gangsters and hot- 
shot young Nznesmeny, peeling Si 00 bills off fat billfolds 
and snapping up snazzy real estate, luxury cars and the 


latest haute couture. To be sure, a week in Paris is out of 
reach for a large majority of Russians, who must struggle 
to get by on tiny salaries and pensions. 


Traveling abroad remains doubly difficult for most 
Russians because of staggering government red tape, 
including still-required security approval, which means 
that getting a passport can lake months. 


But many of those heading westward this summer are 
not wealthy or well connected. They are simply comfort- 
able, determined, lucky or coirupt enough to have saved 
the several hundred dollars necessary for a week s pack- 
age to the city of iheir dreams. Waning inline fw the 
Aeroflot flighL with their cheap luggage and starry-eyed 


See RUSSIANS, Page 4 





1 



V 




»r 






rsafcsias^.- . 




Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 16,1994 


** 


Post- Womer NATO Unlikely to Overcome Paralysis 


WORLD BRIEFS 


By Joseph Fitchett 

faiemaimal Herald Tribune 

PARIS — No matter who succeeds Manfred 
W&naer as secretary-general of NATO, the alli- 
ance stands scant chance of surmounting the 
scmiparalysis that has overtaken the security 
policies of the member states, officials 
acknowledge. 

With the Clinton administration showing little 
interest in exerting leadership on security issues, 
the leading European allies are deeply at odds 
about the direction NATO should take. 

All these governments see NATO as indis- 
pensable, crucial even to prospects for French- 
German hopes of greater military cooperation 
among the Europeans themselves. But disputes 
about the direction of cooperation in Europe — 
displayed last month in public bickering about 
the choice of a new European Union head — 
loom as large over how to deluxe a vigorous 
future for the trans-Atlantic alliance. 

In his five years as secretary-general, Manfred 
Wbrner grew in stature from a rather stiff former 
Ger man defense minister into a personal and 
political force behind the scenes in alliance coun- 
cils. He refused to step down despite the worsen- 
ing cancer that killed him Friday, partly in hopes 


that his own courage in staying on the job might 
shame allied governments* into t aking NATO 
more seriously. 

At a marathon meeting in August 1993 about 
using NATO warplanes in Bosnia, the diplomat- 
ic deadlock was finally broken when Mr. Womer 
made an emotional plea for action, saying that he 


istration is considering unilaterally lifting the 
arms embargo there. Such a step would threaten 
the allied security cooperation that is NATO's, 
justification. 

NATO’s failure to produce a Western consen- 


sus about what to do zu Bosnia, a U.S. policy- 

lea fears 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


had left his sickbed to preside over what he saw 
as a critical decision for the alliance’s future. 

Mr. Womer, while obliged to follow a policy 
line set by governments, insisted vigorously be- 
hind the scenes that NATO should seize the 
opportunity to intervene in the former \ ugosla- 
via and demonstrate that it could preserve stabil- 
ity in Europe when the United Nations had 
visibly failed. 

But Mr. Worners vision of NATO's survival 
has gradually lost ground to a less risky approach 
centered on a political opening to the ex-com- 
munist countries in Eastern Europe and (he 
former Soviet Union. 

Although NATO remains committed to a 
peacekeeping role in Bosnia, the Clinton admin- 


maker said this weekend, has sharpened fears 
among East Europeans about their own security 
and driven the alliance to offer political reassur- 
ances to them, known as the Partnership for 
Peace. 

The overture has been backed by Germany 
and the United Stales to give visibility to NATO 
as a force for Western action in stabuizing East- 
ern Europe. 

A UJS. official in Europe conceded Monday 
that NATO’s initial emphasis on mflitary-to- 
miliiary cooperation with East European nations 
— which could quietly prepare the way for inter- 
vention in a crisis —has started losing headway. 

The slide toward dwindling attention to 
NATO wfll be hard for Mr. Worrier's successor 
to reverse, even if allied governments manage to 
choose a strong candidate in a selection process 
likely to be largely in the hands of Europeans 
Tyrant of the disinterest in Washington. 

One man stands out as a successor with the 


best imaginable qualifications: Germany’s de- 
fense minister, Volker ROhe. A forceful politi- 
cian, Mr. Rohe has been influential in promoting 
an international security role for Germany, the 
country holding the key to a stronger Europe. 

The diplo mats who dted Mr. Rime said, how- 
ever, that he was a remote outsider for the post, 
not because of objections to seeing a German 
succeed his own countryman bnt because Mr. 
Rube's national political ambitions. 

A second strong candidate is Hans van den 
Broek, a former Dutch foreign minister. Mr. 
Brock has been a forceful advocate of a stronger 
NATO, well liked in Washington and London.. 
But Goman leaders might fed obliged to back 
French challenges to a man viewed in Paris as 
lukewarm on European military cooperation. 

Despite the strong British role in NATO. Lon- 
don is currently too isolated in Europe for any- 
one from Britain to have an easy shot at job. 

Without strong U.S. pressure behind a strong 
candidate, the final choice could come down to 
Thorvald Stoltenbert a former Norwegian for- 
dgn minister, and Giniiano Amato, a former 
Italian prime minister who has escaped the scan- 
dal engulfing so many of that nation's . 
politicians. 


f ■" 

J 


Snip ing Persists in Parts of Sarajevo 
Despite die Serb-Muslim Agreement 




British Rail Network 
Again Shut by Strike 

2 Days of Travel Disruption 
Hit Vacationers and Freight 


By W illiam Schmidt 

Neu York Tones Serrice 

LONDON — Striking signal 
workers shut down Britain’s 
railroads again Monday, the be- 
ginning of a two-day work stop- 
page that is the latest round in a 
10- week-old dispute that has 
frustrated summer travelers 
and wreaked havoc with freight 
shipments. 

Rail officials using supervi- 
sors said they managed to keep 
one in three scheduled trains 
running Monday, but platforms 
in many of London's mainline 
stations were all but deserted, 
as both tourists and travelers 
scrambled for other ways to get 
around the country. 

At freight depots across Brit- 
ain, and along lines leading to 
the recently opened rail tunnel 
beneath the English Channel, 
shippers were using trucks to 
move perishable cargoes. 

There is little sign that either 
side is ready to give ground in 
the dispute, which has stirred 
memories of the kind of bitter 
labor turmoil that paralyzed 
Britain during the 1960s and 
1970s. The dispute already has 
lasted longer than any other 
since Britain’s rail network was 
nationalized in 1947. 

The leaders of Rail track, the 
stale-owned company set up 
earlier this year to operate Brit- 
ain’s track and signal system, 
vowed Monday they would not 
put any more pay offers on the 
bargaining table. “We’ve made 
all the offers we can make,” said 
Robert Horton, chairman of 
Rail track. “We are not pre- 
pared to pay to open negotia- 
tions.” 

Members of the Rail, Mari- 
time and Transport Union, 
which represents signal work- 
ers, said they would continue 
the periodic one- and two-day 
strikes until the government 
agrees to put up a larger pay 
settlement, including rewards 
for increased productivity, as a 
basis for new talks. 

The 48-hour work stoppage 
b eginnin g Monday came on the 
heds of a 24-hour strike on Fri- 
day, crippling travel during the 
heart of the August vacation 
season. 


Since June IS. workers have 
mounted seven 24- hour strikes, 
and two 48- hour strikes. An- 
other daylong stoppage has 
been planned For Aug. 22. 

At least ooe public opinioa 
poll appearing in a Sunday 
newspaper suggests that public 
sympathy may be more wi th the 
strikers than with the govern- 
ment. 

According to the survey in 
the Mail on Sunday by Market 
A Opinion Research Interna- 
tional, 54 percent of 750 people 
questioned by telephone Iasi 
week said the government 
should make a move to break 
the deadlock by offering to pay 
more money to the strikers. 

At the same time, 56 percent 
of those surveyed said they sid- 
ed with the strikers over the 
government. 

As a result of that poll, the 
opposition Labor Party called 
on the Conservative govern- 
ment late Sunday to do more to 
bring an end to the dispute. “It 
is time this Tory government 
adopted Winstou Churchill’s 
motto: Trust the People,' " said 
Frank Dobson, Labors spokes- 
man on transportation issues. 
“Their judgment is right. The 
government should pay up and 
settle the strike.” 

Rail track says it has offered 
the signal workers a 7 2 percent 
wage increase between April 
and October this year, and a 
final package that will provide 


increases up to 10 percent, as 
‘ holidays and 


well as improved 
sick pay. 



William King, 78, shaking hands with local people on Monday in Cavalaire, France, after the commemorative jranp. 


U.S. Vets Mark Invasion With a Splash 


The Associated Press 

CAVALAIRE, France — Overcoming 
red tape and old age, four former U.S. 
paratroopers dropped gently into the 
Mediterranean on Monday to mark the 
50th anniversary of the Allied invasion 
of southern France in World War It, 

Thousands of vacationers standing in 
waist-high water lined this Riviera beach 
and applauded as the veterans jumped 
from a French Army helicopter under 
billowing domed parachutes from 400 
meters (1,300 feet). They were picked up 
by French sailors in speedboats. 

As fireworks, colored smoke bombs 
and noisemakers erupted in the crystal- 
blue skies, the veterans came ashore in a 
re-enactment of the landings and were 
greeted by local officials. 

“Vive les veterans!," townspeople 


shouted from their balconies as the vets, 
who had time to change into dry uni- 
forms, paraded down the packed streets. 
People lined up to touch them, shake 
hands and present gifts. 

“It’s like 50 years ago,” said Leslie 
Green, 71, of Selma, California. “We got 
a warm welcome then, too.” 

Mr. Green was joined by William 
King, 78, of Long Island, Virginia; An- 
gelo Poliuto, 80, of Farmington Hills, 
Michigan; and Ken Shaker, 78, of San 
Ditto, California- A fifth veteran, Ever- 
ett Hall, 75, suffered a sudden case of 
dysentery and was unable to jump. 

The jump, approved only after weeks 
of discussions, was the most dramatic 
event in two days of commemorations of 
Operation Dragoon, the invasion of 
southern France by U.S. and French 


troops 10 weeks after D-Day in Norman- 
dy. 

“It feels great,” said Mr. Shaker, who 
led a tough struggle to get his men air- 
borne. “It’s a big relief we finally got to 
do it. 

“There's always a worry when you 
prepare for a jump, and none of ns had 
ever jumped over water before. Pntiqiflgr 
experience, once you strap the chute on, 
a sort of calm comes over you.” - 

All die men except Mr. PoKuto, who 
was taken prisoner at Anzio, fought in 
Operation Dragoon, and all are former 
members of the 509th Parachute Infan- 
try Regiment. They dedicated Monday's 
event to a planeload of comrades that 
disappeared over the sea during the inva- 
sion. Twenty young French paratroopers 
followed the Americans into the water. 


Life Might Be Worse Without Him, Berlusconi Says 


The Associated Press 

ROME — Harried by a 
plunging lira and weak finan- 
cial markets. Prime Minister 
Silvio Berlusconi tried Monday 
to make his critics worry about 
life without him, predicting that 
unrest and economic disorder 
would result if he were forced to 
resign. 

During a three-day holiday 
weekend, Mr. Berlusconi began 


a crusade both to win over a 
highly critical coalition ally and 
to persuade the Italian people 
that any prime minister but 
himself would spell disaster for 
a country hit simultaneously by 
an economic crisis and political 
corruption scandals. 

in a television interview with 
RAI state TV, Mr. Berlusconi 
reiterated his view, laid out late 
Sunday night at a news confer- 


ence, that disorder would fol- 
low if political squabbling 
farced him to resign. 

He also called unthinkable 
any return to an “institutional 
government,” meaning the ap- 
pointment of a nonpolitical 
prime minister such as his pre- 
decessor, Carlo Gampu 

That possibility “would go 
against the wQl of the citizens 
and thus this can — I really 


believe it — lead to economic 
disorders and also real unrest;” 
Mr. Berlusconi said. 

Mr. Berlusconi indicated that 
his peace pact with the North- 
ern League leader, Umberto 
Bossi, might not be enough to 
stop speculation rocking Italy’s 
markets. 

Mr. Berlusconi invited Mr. 
Bossi to his villa for a ni gh t of 
talks that ended at dawn Satur- 


day. On Friday, the lira had 
plunged to a new record low 
against the German mark fol- 
lowing speculation whether (he 
conserative, three-month-old 
coalition would survive Mr. 
Boss's steady attacks. 

The Milan stock market also 
took a sharp dive Friday. Ital- 
ian markets were closed on 
Monday for the Assumption 
holiday. 



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Council of Churches Backs UN’s Population View 


By Robert L. Kroon 

Special to ike Herald Tribune 

GENEVA — Rejecting the 
Vatican's campaign against 
birth control by use of contra- 
ceptives, the World Council of 
Churches has endorsed a land- 
mark United Nations project 
for stabilizing the world’s spi- 
raling population. 

The UN document, support- 
ed by the United States and 
other Western governments, 
will serve as the main guideline 
for the Cairo conference next 
month on population and de- 
velopment. 

The Geneva-based World 
Council is an affiliation of 324 


Protestant and Orthodox 
churches and speaks for the 
vast majority of the Christian 
world’s non-Roman Catholics. 

Mr. Konrad Raiser, general 
secretary of the World Council 
of Churches, criticized an asser- 
tion by Pope John Paul n that 
the Cairo conference document 
favored promiscuity, abortion 
and homosexual relationships. 

Last week, the Pope's views 
received strong support from 
Islamic leaders in Cairo and 
Tehran, threatening consensus 
on a broad-based conference 
approach to stabilizing the 
world population. 

In a statement distributed by 


the Ecumenical Press Service, 
Mr. Raiser questioned the “wis- 
dom” of what he termed the 
Vatican's obstructionist cam- 
paign. 

Mr. Raiser, a leading Ger- 
man Protestant scholar, said he 
wondered “if this was the best 
way for the Vatican to defend 
its outspoken position." 

“More recognition for the di- 
versity of responses and convic- 
tions on population matters 
would have done a greater ser- 
vice to Christian witness,” he 
said. 

Unlike the Vatican, the 
World Council of Churches has 
no decision-making authority 


on doctrinal matters and works 
through moral persuasion. 

“Protestant churches are es- 
sentially democratic and synod- 
al, arising from the belief m the 
priesthood of all believers,” Mr. 
Raiser said. “Therefore, we can- 
not accept a ruling by a bishop 
as the final word. Bat the Holy 
See wfll participate as a govern- 
ment delegation in the confer- 
ence, playing a political role 
and using pressure to make oth- 
ers accept a certain line.” 

In response to the Vatican's 
criticism erf the UN’s popula- 
tion document as being “in- 
spired by American feminists,” 
Mr. Raiser said he felt women 


were rightfully “skeptical erf a 
top-down approach which is 
characteristically mascnline.” 

Mr. Raiser praised the UN’s 
preparatory document for 
showing “increasing aware- 
ness” of women’s views. In this 
context, he declared that con- 
traception waa* acceptable to 
the vast majority of Protestant 
churches, although they might 
differ over methods. 

But be conceded that the eth- 
ics of abortion were more am- 
biguous and difficult. “Abor- 
tion issues are tearing 
Protestant churches apart. Eke 
the Roman Cath o lic Church,” 
he said. 


SARAJEVO. Bosnia-: 
sisted here Monday after a 



— Sniper fire per- 
il to end the 

scourge took effect, said a UN spokesman. Major Rob Annink. 

Marksmen preying primarily on craHans on both sides were 
supposed to stop firing Monday morning under the UN-mediated 
anti-sniping accord, bat shooting was reported later ia two dis- 
tricts oLthe cky. There were no reports of injuries, . 

The UN spokesman said shots rang put in two Serb-controlled 
suburbs on tne southwest fringes of the Bosnian capital, which is 
surrounded by rebel Serbs. - - 

The Holiday Inn area near the dty center, long plagued by 
Serbian sniper fire from surrounding hifis, was quiet before and 
after the took effect, with pedestrians walking undis- 

turbed past exposed intersections. 


Bangladeshi Author to Accept Award 

« a 4 ana 'T t; — tlia ah 


STOCKHOLM (AP) — Taslima N asrin, the Bangladeshi au- 
thdrwha took rcfugein Sweden last week, will emerge from hiding 
to receive an award on Thursday, the news agency Tidningamas 
Tdegrambyra reported Monday. 

The Kurt TuJcfioIsky Prize traditionally is given to writers who 
follow pacifist ideals. She fled death threats in Bangladesh from 
Muslim extremists enraved bv her caBs for change? in Islamic law. 


“She wants to wmk and we are happy ' to havener as our guest' 
said .Gab* deichmann, dmtnnaw of Sweden's branch of _ tfaje 
in ternational writer’s group PEN, which announced her selection. 



General’s Party Leads in Guatemala 

GUATEMALA CITY (Reutere) — The party of the former 
dictator Ffrain Rios Montt. promising to stamp out crime and 
corruption, headed toward victory as Marly complete results 
carocm from Sunday’s congressional elections. 

Although tire Guatemalan Republican Front Led by General 
Rios Montt is ^ unlikely to win a majority in the new Congress, 
results showed it well ahead of its closest rival, the pro-business 
Party for National Advancement 

With 95 percent of the votes counted, the Supreme Electoral 
Tribunal said the Republican Front had won 33 percent of the 
vote, followed by the Party for National Advancement with 25 
percent. The Christian Democrat Party trailed with 11 percent 
Partly because of extremely heavy rains, less than a quarter of the 
electorate voted. 


Woodstock *94 Ends in Muddy Fun 

SAUGERTIES, New York (Readers) — Woodstock *94 ended 
early Monday ranch as it began, with good humor by fo ” c * rn ' A 
organizational chaos. “The food was overpriced but 

t - ----- ** DwU Honan a r-rdH : 


fans amid 

, r the atmo- 

i was great,” said Rachel Range, a 20-year-old student at 

State University in Oiria 

The ever-present mud kept everyone talking- After severe 
storms Saturday and early Sunday, the 840-acre (335-hectare) site 
was a sea of bi o wn sKme. Doctors reported hundreds of broken 
bones, and sprains from those who lost their- footing. 

Despite the tensions caused by die bad weather and organiza- 
tional problems, the crowd, estimated at nearly 350.000 people at 
its peak, proved to be virtually fire of violence. There were only 18 
arrests contacted with the three-day. festival and only four on the 
grounds. ■ 


i MjS* 


Gunmen E31 2 Chinese in Algieis 


TUNIS (Reuters) —Two Chinese expatriate workers woe shot 
to death in. their car an Monday in a suburb of Algiers, a 
spokesman at the Qmnesc Embassy there said. 

Theidentity of the gunmen was unclear, but Muslim fundamen- 
talist militants fighting to topple Algeria’s army-backed govern- 
ment have told foreigners to leave the country and have threat., 
ened to kill those who remain. 

At least 58 foreigners bavebeen fitted in Algeria since Septem- 
ber in attacks blamed on the ft^wlMnentglist* A diplomat at the ' 
y, contacted by telephone from Tunis, said the dead men 
for a Chinese hydraulics company. 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


Md^BavageS&edsfalaiids 


ATHENS (AP) — Fire fighters on five islands battled wildfires 
Monday that have destroyed laige areas of farm oops and pine 
forests as a severe heatwave gripped Greece. 

Fire-fighting aircraft dumped tons of sea water on wildfires on 
the northeastern Aegean islands of Lesvos, Thassos and Chics 
while special mobile units battled blazes on Corf u and at Aegina 
in the Saronic Gulf near Athens. Officials said most of fixe fires 
were started by discarded cigarettes. 

A cholera outbreak in the southern Russian region of Dagestan 
has killed 14 people and 478 people are suffering from tbe disease. 
Five towns m Dagestan were declared quarantine zones this 
month after an outbreak of cholera among pilgrims returning 
bom Saudi Arabia. (Reuters) 

BangedesH cities were paralyzed Monday by a six-hour nation- 
wide stake called by the opposition A warm League to press for a 
trial of gmerals responsible for a 1975 coup. (Afi) 

Foreign Thitors to apopniar site in Vietnam, the 3, 000 islands^ 
Ha Long Bay, wfll be able to roam the area for the first time by 
>lanie. Until now, tourists have only been, able to visit the bai 
its steep limestone islets by boat. -• 




ebay 


Crocks in Some British Concordes 


LONDON - British Airways says it has found hairlin e j 
cracks inside the wings of its seven supersonic Concorde *1 
aircraft but that there is no safety threat and that the planes 
wfll stay m the air. 

^siwtan airworthiness issue,” an airline spokesman said, 
no implication for the safe opera- * 


The spokesman said that two of the seven jets with wing 
cradcs had been repaired, and that the Ovfl A-vaation Author- 
tSSdaft? that tfeotfaers could fly as long as they were 


“P*-***® mi™ found a crack of four inches (10 centime- * 

tens) zn a spar near the back of one plane and then similar bat 

smaBor cracks m the others, dose to where the delta wing 
joins the fuselage, the spokesman said. 








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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 16, 1994 


Page 3 



tV 


■ rf V 


•?i u. 


i a i 


u-pt. 


THE AMERICAS/ 




Now, Racial and Ethnic Minorities Are Fleeing Central Cities for Suburbs 


By Karen De Witt 

■V«w York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — After decades in 
.which America's cities worried primarily 
about white flight, cities are now facing the 
.increasingly rapid departure to the sub- 
urbs of middle- and working-class minor- 
ity members. 

No longer the discrete, homogenous 
“Leave it to Beaver" bedroom comrauni- 
. M'cs of the 1 950s. the suburban destinations 
.of minorities now constitute a broad 
patchwork that includes inner suburbs, 
large suburban cities, office parks, retail 
centers and even low-density rural territo- 
ry. according to W illiam H. Frey, a demog- 
rapher at the University of Michigan who 
specializes in racial distribution patterns. 

Some experts think the pattern of subur- 
-banization may also be more complex be- 
1 Cause of the diverse racial and ethnic mi- 
nority groups involved and because race- 


space dynamics will play out across the 
new suburban communities in the sprawl- 
ing, Jess dense sections of the South and 
West. 

Indeed, minorities experienced a higher 
percentage of growth in the suburbs than 
in the central cities, the 1990 census 
showed. From 1980 to 1990, the black 
population in the suburbs grew by 34.4 
percent, while the Hispanic population 
grew by 69.3 percent and the Asian popu- 
lation by 125.9 percent. By contrast, the 
white population in the suburbs increased 
by 92 percent. 

“Minority suburbanization took off in 
the 1980s both as the black middle class 
came into its own and as more assimilated 
Latinos and Asians translated their moves 
up the socioeconomic ladder into a subur- 
ban life style," Mr. Frey said. 

Though the actual numbers of minor- 
ities in the suburbs are small compared 


with the overall suburban population, poli- 
cy makers and urban planners say the 
suburbanization of minorities has impor- 
tant implications for the inner dues, for 
national urban policy and for the suburbs. 

Members of minority groups, like others 
who choose to flee the cities, move to the 
suburbs for a variety of reasons: afford- 
able housing, better schools, lower cost of 
living and amenities like space and green- 
ery. But most often they say they move to 
escape the violence and incivility associat- 
ed with center dries. 

Michael and Verna Frazier of Washing- 
ton recently joined the exodus to the sub- 
urbs. Black professionals who reveled in 
living where the population was predomi- 
nantly black and middle class, they were 
committed urban dwellers who had ex- 
pected to raise their two daughters in the 
city. Then came a predawn burglarv last 
fall. ’ 


“I heard them and they heard me. and >*■> 
they left." said Mr. Frazier. ^ professor of 
political science at Howard University 
here. “But our physical safety had been 
jeopardized. That did it for uy" 

Today, the Fraziers live in nearby Tem- 
ple Hills. Maryland. 

Some sociologists contend that the de- 
parture of more affluent minorities to the 
suburbs from inner-city neighborhoods is 
simply adding to urban deterioration. 

“It's a major problem for urban Ameri- 
ca." said Vincent Lane, chairman of the 
Chicago Housing Authority. ■'Suhuroan- 
izaiion isn't about race now: it’s about 
class. Nobody wants to be around poor 
people, because of ail the problems that go 
along with poor people: poor schools, un- 
safe streets, gangs." 

Over the last decade. Washington's pop- 


ulation declined by nearly 100.000, to 
600.000 today. The ioss of blacks from the 
city was nearly three times as great as for 
whites — 17.800 black households, as 
against 6.200 white. 

Washington is unusual in that college- 
educated blacks led the exodus to the sub- 
urbs ahead of any other group. Indeed. 
14.2 percent left from 1980 to 1990. 

During that same period nationwide, the 
number of blacks living in the suburbs 
increased to $ million from 5.9 million, a 
34.4 percent increase. 

“What is going on i.% not so much black 
suburbanization as black middle-class 
suburbanization," Mr. Frey said. 

Nor is the move limited to the black 
middle da*s. People of Hispanic descent 
as well 2S Asian-. Americans experienced 
overall higher rates of suburbanization 
than did Slacks during the same period. 


often viewing the city only as a stepping 
stone to the suburbs. 

Nationally, from 1980 to 1*90. the num- 
ber of Hispanic* living in the suburbs rose 
to S.7 million from 5.1 million, an increase 
of 3.6 million. The number of Hispanic 
people living in cities grew to 1 1.5 million 
in 199*) from 7.8 million in 1980, an in- 
crease of 3.7 million, or 47.5 percent. Dur- 
ing the same 1980-90 period, the suburban 
Asian population grew by 2 million, to 3.5 
million from 1.5 million in 19X0. or by 
125.9 percent. 

Nationally, the suburbs still remain 
mostly white, with minorities constituting 
4 1 percent of the ccniral-ciiy populations 
and less than 18 percent of ’the suburban 
population. About 95 million whites lived 
in the suburbs in 1990. as against 87 mil- 
lion in 1980. a 9.2 percent increase. 


AL \OTESjE 




Pole Denies Stalling on Health Care 

WASHINGTON — Bob Dole, the leader of the Senate's 
minority Republicans, denied Monday that Republicans 
were stalling the health-care debate, but said they want to tell 
their side of the story. 

“I don’t think there')] be any votes today" Mr. Dole said. 
“I'm not sure there are going to be any votes tomorrow.** 
Bui, he added, “We’re not in a filibuster, we're not trying to 
delay." 

He said he was worried that a bad bill would be passed. 
“What-I don’t want to see happen is enough Republicans peel 
off to pass a terrible bill." said Mr. Dole, a Kansas Republi- 
can. “’What t’d like to see is enough Democrats peel off to 
stop a terrible bill.” 

He said a bipartisan group of senators led by Senator John 
Chafee, Republican of Rhode Island, has “a lot more in 
common” with his bill than with one put forward by George 
J. Mitchell, the Senate majority leader. Mr. Dole's bill in- 
cludes insurance reforms and subsidies for the poorest Amer- 
icans, but has no mandates or taxes. But, he said, the group is 
not talking to him. only to Mr. Mitchell. 

On Sunday. Dole indicated compromise might still be 
possible. 

“Is there an opportunity for compromise? Maybe." he said 
during a television interview. 

(AP) 


Support for (Another) Rival Health Plan 

WASHINGTON — The largest lobby of small-business 
owners announced its support over the weekend for the 
health care plan put forth Thursday by Representative Jim 
Cooper. Democrat of Tennessee, and nine other conservative 
Democrats and Republicans. 

Jack Fans, president of the National Federation of Inde- 
pendent Business, which represents 600,000 small-business 
ow ners and has been extremely active in the formation of the 
bill, praised the proposal as “the most viable” alternative to 
other proposals, particularly the plan offered by Representa- 
tive Richard A. Gephardt of Missouri, the House majority 
leader. 


Foes Willing to Try Again on Crime Bill 




The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — The 
White House and a Republican 
leader of Congress said Mon- 
day that they were willing to 
work together to pass a crime 
bill but renewed their dispute 
over who would have to com- 
promise and just bow much. 

“The president was disap- 
pointed with this loss, but we 
are not going to walk away from 
this fight.” pledged the 'White 


House chief of staff. Leon E. 
Panelta. 

“I think we’ll pass a crime 
bilL" said the House Republi- 
can whip. Newt Gingrich of 
Georgia. 

Trying to shame lawmakers 
into passing the crime bill. Pres- 
ident Bill Clinton on Sunday 
had urged Congress to set aside 
petty politics and strike at the 
violence that “is eating the 
heart out of this country." 


The White House rebounded 
from last week’s surprise set- 
back to the S33 billion bill with 
an aggressive campaign to woo 
wayward lawmakers. On Mon- 
day. Mr. Clinton was to contin- 
ue his effort, bringing relatives 
of crime victims to the Rose 
Garden to keep pressure on 
Congress. 

Mr. Panetta. appearing on 
NBC, said that “over ihe week- 
end we urged the Repub Lean 


Cubans Try to Seize a Ship 

Hundreds on Tanker Demand to Go to U.S. 


“Small-business owners want market-based health care 
reform with no employer, mandates.” a key feature of the 
Cooper plan, he said. The Gephardt plan would require 
employers to pay 80 percent of their workers’ costs. 

John Motley, the federation's chief lobbyist, said Sunday 
that the group was stopping short of endorsing the bill. But 
on a scale of 1 to 100. he said, the Cooper plan would rate a 
90. “and well do everything we can to see it get through the 
process." fNYT) 


Reuters 

MARIEL Cuba — About 
500 Cubans demanding lo go to 
the United Slates occupied a 
foreign oil tanker here, officials 
said Monday, prompting Presi- 
dent Fidel Castro to visit the 
port, west of Havana. 

Hundreds of police officers 
and members of militia units 
were deployed at the port, and 
two navy patrol boats were in 
the harbor to prevent the tank- 
er. identified as the Maltese- 
flagged Jussara, from leaving. 

State radio quoted local offi- 
cials as saying that 500 people, 
including many women and 
children, had boarded the tank- 
er. 

The radio said Mr. Castro 
visited the scene late Sunday, 
staying until the early hours of 
Monday to get firsthand details 
of the incident. 

The standoff in Marie! came 
as the U.S. Coast Guard report- 
ed that it had helped 37 1 Cuban 
refugees reach snore in Florida 

:st 


State radio quoted the Com- 
munist Panv first secretary in 
Mariel, Esteban Alfaro, as say- 
ing about 200 people of the 
group were from the town itself 
and the rest were from other 
parts of Havana Province. 

The occupation of the tanker 
began Sunday after a ceremony 
honoring a navy lieutenant re- 
ported to have been slain dur- 
ing the seizure of a vessel last 
week- ihe Interior Ministry 
said. 

The ministiy said the asylum 
seekers arrived at the port, 40 
kilometers (25 miles) west of the 
capital, while the Jussara was 
docked. It said they boarded 
the ship “with the apparent 
complicity of the Greek cap- 
tain." 

The ministry said the latest 
incident created a “complex sit- 
uation 1 ” because if the boat were 
allowed to depart “such an ac- 
tion would set a bad precedent 
and could jeopardize maritime 
transport the supplying of fuel 


ported to have been killed last 
week and harshly criticized the 
United States for encouraging 
dangerous escapes to Florida. 

The asylum-seekers appar- 
ently took advantage of the sit- 
uation with a large crowd at the 
port and boarded the Jussara 
“while revolutionary forces 
having participated in the cere- 
mony were going home." 

The number of Cubans flee- 
ing their country in boats and 
raSis has increased steadily in 
the last two weeks, since Presi- 
dent Castro threatened to open 
Cuba's ports to anyone who 
wants to leave. 


leadership to meet with the 
Democratic leadership and talk 
with each other about what 
needs to be done in bring this 
crime bill back to Lhe floor.” 
But he said se-.eraJ kev ele- 
ments. “particularly the ban on 
assault weapons." are vital. 

Mr. Gingrich, also appearing 
on NBC. said. "I think the pres- 
ident ought to meet with Re- 
publicans leaders and see if we 
can craft a bipartisan compro- 
mise." but he reiterated his 
complaint that the bill contains 
“social pork.” 

House Speaker Thomas S. 
Foley. Democrat of Washing- 
ton. appearing on CBS. hinted 
that some programs offering 
youths an alternative to crime 
were negotiable. “If we have to 
pay the'price to take out some 
good programs to satisfy the 
critics. I’m not opposed to do- 
ing that ,’* he told CNN. 

Backers said the bill would 
put 100.000 more police on the 
streets, build more prisons and 
jails, finance crime-prevention 
programs and require life Im- 
prisonment for certain three- 
time violent offenders. 

Mr. Paneua told CBS that 
lawmakers “ought to be 
ashamed of themselves.” and 
insisted that Mr. Clinton will 
push forward on the bill. 

Mr. Clinton, speaking Sun- 
day to a mostly black congrega- 
tion at a church in Maryland, 
said the prevention programs 


— •. , W -V \ 


pr.-p>y*. 

S'- ■. ■ ■ 



W.r M. ‘.jn.t PoiI.t- 

President and Mrs. Clinton arriving back at the White 
House Monday from the Camp David presidential retreat 


are designed to “offer a hand of 
hope," giving youngsters alter- 
natives to violence through bas- 
ketball, swimming and anti- 
drug programs. 

His speech was designed to 


court members of the Congres- 
sional Black Caucus who voted 
against the crime bill Thursday, 
forming an unusual alliance 
with gun-control foes and Re- 
publicans. 


| Quote/Unquote 

j Senator Bob Packwood, Republican of Oregon, on Demo- 
■1 era ts’ pleas for the passage of a health bill: “In essence, every 
j one of their opening statements was that littie Nellie is tied to 
.1 the railroad tracks, and the train is coming down the track. 

1 and the train is going to cut ofT her legs and she does not have 
' any insurance coverage. And the solution of the Democrats is 
[ to 'make sure she is insured. 1 think thesolution of the 

I Republicans would be to try to stop the train.” ( NYT) 

l 

three-day total since the MarieJ and obtaining goods for the 
boatlift of 1980. population.” 

On Monday, dozens of peo- The statement noted that the 
pie could be seen moving latest incident came after Secre- 
around on the deck of the Jus- tary of State Warren M. Chris- 

sara. The area around the ship lopher said the United States 

was sealed off by security would continue to receive Cu- 
forces. bans who had left their home- 

At one point, at least nine land illegally, 
jeeps carrying police drove to- At the Sunday ceremony, au- 
wards the dock area. thorities honored the officer re- 


Away From Politics 

j • An anti-abortion extremist, who has advocated killing abor- 
tion providers as “justifiable homicide,” pleaded not guilty in 
Pensacola, Florida, to charges that he violated the new federal 
clinic-protection law in the killing of a doctor and a volunteer 
escort. Paul Hill's court-appointed lawyer said he planned to 
challenge the constitutionality of the law. 

• Nearly 1,000 demonstrators sang and payed as they marched 
on North Dakota's only abortion clinic, in Fargo. Bishop 
James S. Sullivan, a Roman Catholic, ignored criticism by the 
clinic’s administrator, Jane Bovard, who called the march 
“incredibly irresponsible'' in view of the killings in Florida. 

• A sand ctiff coflapsed onto children at a park on the Lake Erie 
shoreline near London, Ontario. Four boys died. Police said 

the children were digging into the base of the cliff when it 
toppled onto them. 

• A Los Angeles suburb may be die only place in the United 
States where people cannot even smoke in their own back- 
yards. In Rolling Hills, an outright ban on smoking has been in 
effect since 1978 and was largely unenforced, but police began 
hanHmg out leaflets warning that anyone caught lighting up 
outdoors faces a SI, 000 fine and six months in jaiL 

• Police fired tear gas into an apartment building in Garfield 
Heights, Ohio, lo flush out a man suspected of shooting three 
police officers and a tenant. The tenant and one officer died. 
Harry Mitts. 44, who told police he had “enough ammo to hold 
you off all night long," surrendered after six hours. 

<P. Reuters 


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Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 16, 1994 


No New Self-Rule if Militants 


Are Not Stopped, Rabin Warns 


By Caryle Murphy 

Washington Par Service 

KISSUFlM, Gaza Strip — Prime Minister 
Yitzhak Rabin warned Monday that Palestin- 
ian self-rule would not be expanded until 
Palestinian authorities took stiff er measures 
to curb Islamic militant attacks against Israe- 
lis. 

His threat came a day after guerrillas of the 
Islamic Resistance Movement, or Hamas, 
shot dead an Israeli civilian — the first killed 
in Gaza since autonomy began last May — 
and wounded six others in attacks on a road 
leading to a large Jewish settlement there. 

The Pales uni an self-rule government in 
Gaza moved quickly after Sunday's attacks, 
condemning the “irresponsible acts of Ha- 
mas” and rounding up about 40 activist of 
the movement for questioning, according to 
Hamas sources. Officials also announced 
moves to confiscate illegal weapons. 

Mr. Rabin's remarks, along with an Israeli 
decision to postpone the scheduled Monday 
opening of free passage between Gaza and the 
other self-rule area of Jericho in the West 
Bank, appear aimed at pressuring the Pales- 
tinian leader, Yasser Arafat, to move against 
Hamas. 

It is a task Mr. Arafat had hoped to avoid, 
because direct confrontation between his loy- 
alist police force and Hamas militan ts could 
degenerate into in Lra- Palestinian righting. It 
could also expose Mr. Arafat to accusations 
that he has become Israel's "policeman" 
against other Palestinians. 

Mr. Rabin spoke to reporters after an early 
morning visit to Gush Katif settlement and 
just before Israeli and Palestinian negotiators 
began huddling again for talks on extending 
the autonomous area. 


He stressed that those discussions would 
continue but added -that "we will not seL a 
date to implement” any agreements reached 
unless measures are taken against those at- 
tacking Israelis. 

“We expect and we demand the Palestinian 
Authority to take measures to prevent, or to 
make a real effort to cope with, this threat," 
Mr. Rabin said. “We consider it their respon- 
sibility They are not doing it” 

“They can do much better," he said. “It is 
inconceivable that we will continue the pro- 
cess if we won't see a serious effort” to deal 
with Hamas. 

Despite Mr. Rabin's statement — un- 
doubtedly also designed to reinforce his 
tough image with the Israeli public — Israeli 
military and civilian officials have expressed 
satisfaction with the lower level of violence in 
Gaza and the West Bank since self-rule be- 


Some of the officials had praised the per- 
formance of the Palestinian police despite 
logistic and equipment shortages and a lack 
of training. 

Since Palestinian police took up their du- 
ties May 18, three Israeli soldiers have been 
killed in shootings. Hamas has taken respon- 
sibility for the slayings, and Palestinian police 
have not arrested any suspects. 

A fourth soldier died from wounds received 
during a day of rioting by Palestinian workers 
frustrated over delays at a checkpoint into 
Israel. Two Palestinians were killed that day. 

Hamas’s political wing has said it would 
use only nonviolent means to oppose the self- 
rule accord and over the past two months has 
worked openly with secular groups that also 
reject the deal But its military wing has 
vowed to continue violent attacks on Israeli 
targets. 


U.S. Welcomes Sudan’s Role 


Khartoum Has Been Listed as Terror Sponsor 


Reuien 

WASHINGTON — The United States ap- 
plauded France on Monday for apprehending 
the guerrilla known as Carlos, and said Sudan’s 
involvement in the arrest was a welcome sign 
from a nation Washington regards as fostering 
terrorism. 

"Obviously, we applaud the government of 
France for its resolute efforts to bring to justice 
one of the most notorious terrorists of the past 20 
years,” said the State Department spokesman, 
Mike McCurry. 

“The arrest of Carlos serves notice to all ter- 
rorists that their crimes will not go unpunished 
or forgotten by the international community.” 
Mr. McCurry said. 

Carlos, one alias for the guerrilla who was 
bom mich Ramirez Sdnchez in Venezuela, was 
detained Sunday in Sudan and turned over to 


he was being held Monday. 

“We appreciate Sudan's actions,” Mr. 
McCurry said, adding that this could mark the 
be ginning of a Sudanese move “to distance itself 
from international terrorism.” 


TERROR: International Pressure Finally Paid Off 


Continued from Page 1 


countries also adopted increas- 
ingly uncompromising altitudes 
on terrorism. France, which had 
especially focused on Carlos be- 
cause of his murders of French 
counterintelligence operatives, 
ended its covert arrangements 
with Palestinian and Italian ter- 
rorists, under which they were 
left untouched in exchange for 
immunity for French targets. 

The last cover for this genera- 
tion of international terrorists 
disappeared with the collapse 
of the Soviet system, which 
swept away the regimes that of- 
fered funding, intelligence and 
safe haven to known terrorists, 
many of whom had connections 
to Soviet intelligence. 


Carlos epitomized this gener- 
ation of high-profile, elusive 
operatives, who, by the 1980s, 
had become what one U.S. spe- 
cialist calls “designer terror- 
ists,” meaning that the name 


alone of the Red Brigades or 
Baader-Memhof, Abu Nidal or 
Carlos was supposed to conjure 
up images of political combats 
that long ago lost their mass 
appeal. 

In Europe and in the Middle 
East, claims of political oppres- 
sion have lost their resonance 
thanks to the resilience of dem- 
ocratic societies and. more re- 
cently, the peace momentum 
between Palestinians and Israe- 
lis. As popular fervor waned, 
notorious terrorists found 
themselves exposed to growing 
risk as their sponsors and pro- 
tectors came under internation- 
al pressure. 

Of course, the arrest of Car- 
los only ends a chapter of inter- 
national violence in which kid- 
napping a group of oil ministers 
or the passengers of a big pas- 
senger jet smacked of the class 
struggle. 

His seizure does not put an 
end to international violence 


CARLOS: Long-Sought Guerrilla Is Caught in Sudan 


Couthmed from Page 1 
days” along with several others, 
but he refused to say how many 
more people were detained or to 
disclose their identities. 

Mr. Shingieti said the group 
first stayed in a top Khartoum 
hotel, then rented an apart- 
ment, where they were kept un- 
der surveillance because “they 
were not conducting any kind 


of activity to justify their pres- 
ence in Sudan.” He said some 


ence in Sudan.” He said some 
of the group moved in and out 
of Sudan, but not the man with 
the diplomatic passport. 


“He made some international 
calls, which were monitored by 
the security group.” the Suda- 
nese official went on, “and that 
confirmed the suspicion over 
his intentions.” He added that 
France subsequently informed 
Sudan that it suspected Carlos 
had entered the country, while 
Interpol formally requested his 
arrest. 

France’s counterintelligence 
service has long had a special 
interest in capturing Carlos be- 
cause he killed two of its agents 
when they were about to arrest 


Did Syria Provide a Tip 
To France and Sudan? 


By Paul F. Horvitz 

International Herald Tribune 

WASHINGTON — A lead- 
ing American expert on coun- 
terterrorism said Monday that 
Syria might have tipped off 
French and Sudanese officials 

to the whereabouts of the ter- 
rorist Carlos as a gesture to- 
ward Middle East peace efforts. 

Robert H. Kupperman, who 
led the first interagency studies 
on terrorism for the U.S. gov- 
ernment, said in an interview 
that Carlos had been under the 
protection of Hafez Assad, the 
Syrian president, for years. 

Syria has long been listed by 
the Stale Department as one of 
several nations that aid and 
harbor terrorists, a situation 
that has complicated U.S.-Syri- 
an relations and efforts toward 
a comprehensive Middle East 
peace settlement. 


“1 think Assad wants closer 
ties to the United States and 
Israel,” Mr. Kupperman said. 


As a gesture, he said, Mr. 
Assad might have arranged to 
tip of r the Sudanese and French 
that Carlos, who real name is 
fiich Ramirez S&nchez, was go- 
ing to Sudan. 


“I think he was set up by 
Assad,” Mr. Kupperman said 
“He was under Assad's protec- 
tion for years, living in Damas- 
cus.” 


If the French had tracked 
down Carlos on their own, 
“they would have killed him,” 
Mr. Kupperman surmised. 


Sudan is another nation on 
the State Depanmen I’s tenor- 
ism list and, he added, “The 
Sudanese don't like being on 
the terrorism list either.” 


him in Paris in June 197S. For 
this crime, which he admitted in 
an interview with a Paris-based 
Arab-language magazine in 
1979, Carlos was sentenced in 
absentia to life imprisonment in 
1992. 

An arrest warrant was also 
issued for his involvement in a 
car bombing in Paris in April 
1982 in which one person was 
killed and 70 wounded. Mr. 
Pasqua said terrorist actions or- 
ganized or carried out by Carlos 
had killed 15 people and in- 
jured 200 more in France alone. 
“Around the world, Carlos him- 
self claims responsibility for the 
death of 83 people," he said. 

With Mr. Pasqua refusing to 
provide many details of the op- 
eration, however, there was in- 
evitably a flurry of speculation 
here about why Sudan's govern- 
ment had agreed to hand over 
Carlos and about whether 
France had made any secret 
deal with Khartoum. 

Israeli military officials re- 
cently claimed that Iran's intel- 
ligence chief. Ali Fallahiyan, 
had been holding secret talks 
with his French and German 
counterparts with a view to 
pledging an end to Iranian- 
backed terrorism in France and 
Germany in exchange for debt 
relief, economic aid and the re- 
lease of Iranians facing terrorist 
charges. 

Last December, France un- 
expectedly released two Irani- 
ans who were wanted in Swit- 
zerland for the 1990 murder of 
Kazein Rajavi, an Iranian op- 
position leader. At present, 
three Iranians are awaiting trial 
here for the 1991 murder of 
Shahpur Bakhtiar, a former Ira- 
nian prime minister. 


U.S . Fears Pyongyang May Opt to Restart Reactor 


By R. Jeffrey Smith . 

Washington Past Sorrier 

GENEVA — Senior U.S. and North 
Korean officials must resolve a long list 
of nuclear topics at talks beginning next 
month, or Pyongyang may decide to 
restart a nuclear reactor to produce plu- 
tonium for potential use in nuclear 
arms, U.S. officials disclosed Monday. 

The officials said they were optimistic 
the two sides can meet the deadline, or it 
could also be extended. But the fact that 
North Korea has said it will delay re- 
starting the reactor only through the 
talks beginning Sept 23 helps explain 
U.S. caution in forecasting the outcome 
of the Washington- Pyongyang nuclear 
accord reached last week. 

Officials on both sides win be under 
substantia] pressure in the next month 
or so to develop detailed plans for estab- 
lishing the first diplomatic representa- 
tion in their respective capitals and pro- 
viding for the disposition of an 


nan dug and constructing two new 
Western-style reactors in North Korea, 


Western-style reactors in North Korea, 
a project that may cost $4 billion. 

Although the South Korean president 
Monday promised major financial and 
fftehnifail accicfanw* U.S. officials aTC 
still contemplating a fund-raising tour 
of allied capitals in Asia and elsewhere. 


Washington offered to provide alter- 
native energy sources. U.S. officials said 


Pyongyang wanted to keep the option of 
restarting the reactor open as bargaining 
leverage. “Well have to revisit that is- 
sue” next month, a senior official saud. 


They also are working on a plan to 
brief Congress, which has the right to 
review the transfer to North Korea of 
any South Korean nudear plant compo- 
nents derived from U.S. technology, as 
well as to review the direct participation 
of any U.S. firms. 

U.S. law bars the transfer of aid or 
know-how if North Korea fails to com- 
ply fully with international nuclear-in- 
spection requirements, a potential stum- 
bling block. 

Without a more detailed understand- 
ing on the reactor issue and related ener- 
gy questions, officials said. North Korea 
could decide to restart the 25-megawatt 
reactor at its Yougbyon nuclear com- 
plex. Last week. North Korean negotia- 
tors said its power was needed to help 
heat the surrounding area this winter. 


estimated 8,000 plutonium-laden reac- 
tor fuel rods in North Korea. 


However, the prindpal U.S. task will 
be to work out a detailed plan for fi- 


The plan to build the so-called fight- 
water reactors thus looms as the most 
complex and politically significant part 
of the deal. If Washington can figure out 
a way to assure North Korea now that 
the reactors will be completed a decade 
from now. North Korea will immediate- 
ly halt its construction of two other 
reactors that, could produce abundant 
plutonium for nuclear aims. 

North Korea has also pledged to seal 
its facility for reprocessing fuel rods if it 
gets the new reactors, and U.S. officials 
are optimistic that it may eventually 
agree to scrap the facility altogether. 

Washington favors this deal, Assis-y 
tant Secretary of State Robert Gallucci 
explained, because the light-water reac- 
tors are less suited to plutonium produc- 
tion than the graphite reactors North 
Korea is now building. 


US lawmakers may not be 
ea£rS ship to North Kora thc kuii of 
Sar lefliook : Washington 

wantTto preventfian from buying and 
using to develop nuclear ramortisc that 
uSl aid possible bomWiuilduig. Be- 
cause the reactor deal is not nsk-frec — 
it gives North Korea continued access to 
fi5 rods that could be used w make 
plutonium - the administra- 

tion wiD have some selling to do. on 
Capitol HiB. 


Washington must also fi|ureoutv^al 
sort of assurance will satisfy North Ko- 
rea that the reactor deal will not go sour. 

By promising North Korea it would 
wok out winch countries will paruci- 
pate in the reactor project, Washington 
took on the awkward task of deciding 
bow much money each must provide. 


In addition to counting on major help 
from South Korea. Washington is also 
interested in getting aid from Japan and 
China. France and Britain also have also 
shown interest in helping resolve the 


UN Hoping 
To Avert 
Hutu Flood 



By Steve Vogel 

Washington Past Service 

KIGALI, Rwanda — En- 
couraged by the latest reports 
from southwestern Rwanda, 
UN officials expressed opti- 
mism on Monday that a feared 
mass exodus of refugees into 
Zaire could be averted, bat they 
warned that the situation re- 
mained so uncertain that a pan- 
ic flight triggering a humanitar- 
ian disaster could start at any 
time. 




Interpol agents for extradition to France, where 




However. Mr. McCurry said there was no 
thought now to removing Sudan from the list of 
countries designated as sponsors of international 
terrorism by the U.S. government 
In Khartoum, government officials urged the 
United States to remove Sudan from the list 


Sudan was added a year ago for granting 
sanctuary to such organizations as Hezbollah 
and Palestine Islamic Jihad, according to the 
State Department’s latest report on “Patterns of 
Global Terrorism.’' 

The move cut off U.S. aid to Sudan. 


While several thousand refu- 
gees a day are crossing into the 
Bukavu region of Zaire, in larg- 
er numbers than in the past no 
movement dose to the scale 
which inundated Gama last 
month is yet in the offing, ac- 
cording to senior officials in the 
UN Rwanda emergency office. 

The biegest concern is that * la^MMaHcr/RniR) 

reports ofretribution against A Foreign Legionnaire inspecting the bags erf Rwandan refugees Monday at Cyangngooo the Rwanda-Zaire border. 
Hutu who stay in Rwanda, true ... 

or untrue, could drive hundreds 

b!l h S- d rf a ^ theboni ' r HUTU: A Politician Justifies Genocide Against the ‘Originally Bad’ Tutsi 




against ordinary people. Ter- 
rorism, experts say. holds new 
threats because of the vulnera- 
bility of modem societies to 
technologically skilled sabo- 
teurs. 


New paymasters abound. As 
shown by recent bombings 
against Jewish targets in Bue- 
nos Aires and London, funda- 
mentalist Muslim groups, with 
reported backing from Iran, Su- 
dan and other states, can draw 
on many zealots to form suicide 
squads for attacks anywhere in 
the world. Breakaway ethnic 
groups in the former Soviet 
Union may resort to terrorism, 
including nuclear blackmail, 
against Moscow. 


“Remember in Goma it all 
happened in a period of 72 
hours,” said Charles Petri, dep- 
uty director of the UN Rwanda 
office, referring to the more 
than I million refugees who 
poured into the region near that 
Zairian dry in July only to face 
death by disease. 

With one week remaining be- 
fore French troops are sched- 
uled to pull out of the security 
zone they established in south- 
western Rwanda and are re- 
placed by around 2,000 UN 
troops, largely from African na- 
tions, many refugees and indig- 
enous residents of the zone ap- 
pear to be undecided on 
whether to stay in Rwanda. 


Contimed from Page I 


because there are numerous surviving," 
Mr. Karera said. “They are using the word 
genocide considering the number of Tutsi 
who were killed.” 


Now one of the wealthiest refugees in 
Zaire, Mr. Karera arrived herein his white 
Japanese pickup with 13 members of his 
extended family and his servants. A son 
drove the family’s Peugeot sedan. Mr. Kar- 
era left behind several houses in Kigali. 


Most of his constituents are squatting in 
camps farther south toward Goma, where 
food rations are meager and water is 
scarce. 


To illustrate his antipathy to the Tutsi, 
Mr. Karera told the folk) wing story. “I was 
talking the other day to a representative of 
the United Nations High Commissioner 
far Refugees. I said: O.K_, you say the 
Tutsi are good. But that’s like telling me, 
‘You are white,’ when 1 am black.” 

The Tu tsi, who were seerrto be more like 1 
Europeans because of their height and 
slighter physique, were favored by the Bel- 
gian colonial administrators; but in 1959 
the Belgians changed their policy, helped 
get rid of the Tata king and encouraged 
the formation of a Hutu government. 

A UN referendum in 1961 sealed the 
fare of Tutsi rule when tire over whelmingl y 


Hutu population voted in favor of a Hum- 
run republic. During tins period, tens of 
thousands of Tutsi were slain by Hutu — 
or “shortened,” according to a common 
Hutu description of the lolling of Tutsi. 

But Mr. Karera interprets the 1959 peri- 
od as one when he, as a young educated 
Hutu,was “hunted** by Tutsifor daring io 
aspire to a higher standing than being a 
peasant fanner. 

Since gaining power in the eariy 1960s, 
the Hutu have always been nervous that 
the Tutsi would again rule them. 

Now, with the victory of the Rwanda 
Patriotic Front, the worst fears of the Hutu 
have come true. 


What has disappeared is a 
form of terrorism, characteris- 
tic of the late Cold War, waged 
by operatives who were identi- 
fied in the West but able to hide 
in Soviet satellites in Eastern 
Europe or the Arab world. 


In part, this is because of un- 
certainty about how those who 
have made the journey home 
already have fared. “There have 
been people here who left for 
Kigali, but didn't show up," 
said Veneranda Gatavazi, a 
nurse from Kigali now in refuge 
in the French protection zone. 
“Nobody has come back and 
said, ‘Everything is O JL,’ so we 
are wondering what happened.” 


Some Nigeria Unions Quit Mass Strike 


Reuters 

LAGOS — The strike by Ni- 
gerian ofl workers in support of 
-Moshood K.O. Abiola, the un- 
declared winner of an annulled 
presidential election last year, 
entered its seventh week on 
Monday, but some other strik- 
ing unions ended their stop- 
pages. 


Reflecting the indecision, re- 
lief officials said that many erf 


those in the protection zone ap- 
peared to be waiting until the 


peared to be waiting until the 
last minute before beginning 
the trek to Zaire. 


“Our strike is still on, and we 
will stay out until the govern- 


ment shows commitment to 
meeting all our demands,” said 
Bola Owodunni, president of 
the white collar oil workers 
union, Pengassan. 

Many union leaders and as- 
sociates of Mr. Abiola, a 
wealthy businessman, are opti- 
mistic that the government will 
drop treason charges against 
him on Tuesday to ease the ten- 
sion that has gripped Nigeria 
rince he was arrested in June. 


Mr. Abiola was arrested for 
proclaiming himself president 
in defiance of Nigeria's military 
rulers. 


The ofl unions want him in- 
stalled as head of state. 


Bank employees m Lagos re- 
turned to work for the first time 
since July 12 when the Lagos 
branch or the umbrella Nigeria 
Labor Congress began a strike 
in protest against the govern- 


ment’s handling of the coun- 
try’s political crisis. 

But most banks in Lagos, Ni- 
geria’s commercial center, re- 
mained closed. Bank officials 
said they lacked cash to meet 
the demands of depositors un- 
able to make withdrawals for 
more than a month. 

“We are waiting for ’money 
from the central bank to allow 
us to open for business,” an 
official at one bank said. 


Several factors are contribut- 
ing to the second thoughts 
many Hutu have an seeking ref- 
uge in Zaire. 


BOMB: Germans Report Major Nudear Smuggling Conspiracy in Russia 


One is the government cam- 
paign in which senior members 
of the new Rwandan govern- 
ment have come to the south- 
west region to pledge that there 
will be no retribution against 
Hutu who did not participate in 
murdering the estimated 
500,000 Tutsi who died in three 
months of vicious bloodletting 
beginning in April 


uNBBnra Iran jrage t 
elsewhere in Russia were and 
had not been in direct contact 
with police or security officials 
there to pursue the investiga- 
tion further. 

“It might be underpaid Rus- 
sian scientists are the people 
who are selling the material,” 
Mr. Becks tem said. “It might be 


people from the security of the 
former KGB, or Russian securi- 


Another is a realization 
among some of the potential 
refugees of the hardships they 
will face in Bukavu. 


former KGB, or Russian securi- 
ty authorities might be in- 
volved.” 

Bavarian investigators said at 
a news conference Monday that 
an undercover operative made 
contact with Mr. Tones in Mu- 
nich in July after receiving a tip 


on July 19 from German intelli- 
gence that a Spanish-Colombi- 
an group was looking for buyers 
for a large quantity of plutoni- 
um-239 from Russia. 

The Germans made contact 
with Mr. Torres and Julio O. on 
July 25, they said, and in a hotel 
near Munich’s mam railway 
station he provided them with a 
lead container holding what be 


said was a “sample” of the plu- 
tonium he could deliver, at 5250 
million for four kilograms. 

The sample, inside an alumi- 
num capsule and wrapped in 
aluminum foil, turned out un- 
der analysis to be .24 grams, a 
tiny fraction of an ounce, of 86 


to 87 percent pure plutonium- 
239, mixed with uranium-238. 

A tiny speck of the fine pow- 
der can cause lung cancer in 
anyone who inhales it, and a 
sm al l amount in the water sup- 
ply of a large city could loll 
hundreds of thousands of peo- 
ple. 

Last Monday, joined by Ja- 
vier members of the group 
met again with the undercover 
agents, posing as ‘business- 
men,” in the hotel, offering a 
200-gram sample of lithium-6, a 
material that can be used to 
make neutron bomba. 

Mr. Torres, one of the others 
revealed" then; was in Moscow 


but would be arriving in Mu- 
nich with 500 grams of plutoni-^ 
urn on a Lufthansa flight late** 
Wednesday afternoon. 

_ When the hardsbefied black 
vinyl suitcase Mr. Torres had 
checked in at Sheremetyevo 
Airport at Moscow was unload- 
ed, the experts found that it was 
emitting a tiny amount of gam- 
ma-ray radiation — not enough 
to pose a threat to other passen- 
gers, but enough to make the 
investigators scan it. 

When they did, they detected 
a shielded cylinder inside, 
enough evidence to arrest Mr. 
Tones and his companion after, 
he claimed, the bag. 


RUSSIANS: Iron Curtain Gone, Tourists Jam Aeroflot Flights to See Paris and EuroDisney 


Contimed from Page 1 


excitement, these Russians 
seem positively middle-class. 

“The distance between Mos- 
cow and Paris used to be greater 
than the distance between Mos- 
cow and the moon,” raid Olga 
Lutovzuova, who runs one of 
the dozens of travel agencies 
that have sprouted in recent 
months. “But now a journey in- 
cluding round-trip air fare from 
Moscow is S700 to 51,000 for a 
week in Paris. A lot of Russians 
can afford tins now.” 

For many, a week's trip in 
Western Europe is not much 
more expensive than a vacation 
at a health spa or hotel in the 
sunny republics of the former 
Soviet Union. Popular summer 
tourist spots on the Black Sica or 
in the Baltic republics used to 
cost a pittance for people with 
the right connections. 


Now these resorts charge 
high prices, and they want hard 
currency. But they don’t usually 
provide great service so many 
Russians are asking, “Why not 
go to Europe?”. 

The British report they issued 
53,604 tourist visas to Russians 
by the end of July this year — a 
63 percent increase over the 
same period last year. Italy, 
Spain, Germany and Greece are 
receiving reeded numbers of 
Russian tourists. 

The French Embassy in Mos- 
cow, which has been receiving 
700 visa applications a day for 
the last few weeks, is swamped. 
By contrast, in all of 1988, just 
2,700 Russian tourists went to 
France. 

Alexandre Keltchewsky. a 
French diplomat here, said: 
“Two or three years ago the 
Russian presence in Paris was 


completely unnoticeable. And 
now when you are w allrin g the 
streets in Paris you can hear 
Russian speech all over the 
place. This is a completely new 
situation.” 


geopolitics and poverty for as 
long as anyone can remember. 


Weston Europe is not the 
only destination. Eastern Eu- 
rope, especially Bulgaria, is 
popular and relatively cheap. 
The United States Embassy m 
Moscow granted 2,492 tourist 
visas last month. Many more 
thousands, perhaps more mer- 
chants titan tourists, are on 
shopping sprees to places ill a 
Poland, Turkey, China and Du- 
bai. 


“Every Russian is trying to 

visualize a fairy tale,” said Miss 

Lutovinova, the travel agent. 
“A trip abroad is a kind of big 
event in his life. People have 


Russian -lan guage guidebooks 
are now available. 

Stilk some Russians require 


been deprived of comfort for so 
long. Even if they don’t buy 
anything, they're happy just to 
.be in these beautiful shops 
where you can find everything" 


a tv 

how to behave while in Paris, 
travel agents say. 

For one thing, there’s the 
food. Fen- the Russian palate, 
matted on mystery meat, fatty 
soups and bland potato ana 


“Paris is a dream for many 
Russians,” said Mr. Kelt- 


chewsky, the French diplomat 
“The first dollars they earn, 
they spend It to travel to Paris ” 


■_ But Western Europe, espe- 
cially Paris, is the dream desti- 
nation, a place that exerts an 
almost m agical draw for a peo- 
ple who had been confined 
within their own borders, plus 
the Warsaw Pact nations, by 


The French have tried to be 
accommodating, up to a point. 
Decent hotels are offering good 
deals. At Charles de Gaulle Air- 
port, public address announce- 
ments are made in Russian for 
arriving Aeroflot flights. At 
newsstands around the city. 


escargots can be a tittle ow» 

w helming * 

“Our tourists like fast food 
and McDonald's," raid Miss 
Lutovinova. “We don’t have 
this culture of food." 

“^ e have to warn people at 
buffets not to eat 10 sausages, 
eggs and . then fill their 
pockets, she said. “We have to 
be on the lookout for Ukraini- 
■ans who like to take cured port 
fat with them, drink vodka and 
sing songs in their hotel 
rooms." 


\£j> 









ysssLaasK* t-r ~ r-.~; 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 16, 1994 


Page 5 







)'* 

*$V &*'[&* 


LjmeSbiftynhe'AwKiMal Pro* 

lieutenant General Rabid C&fras, one of Hahfs military 
rulers, obserriu the Feast off the Assuoption on Monday 
at the Roman CathoCc Cathedral in Pwt-An-Firniee. 

Targeted Haitians 
Await Call to U.S. 


By Rick Bragg 

. New York Tutta Service \ - 

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti 
The people at the safe house 
were, broken, maimed, grieving 
and in hiding, afraid of .being, 
dragged away and IdQed. But 


with a.bitter smiles were.iitper- 
feet order. ' . A. v 

Willie Jean-Baptiste, dressed' 
in his best clothes in ease this 
was iheday he finally got to flee 
to file safety of the United 
States^ adjusted ids tie with a 
tftfipiiw f ha n d' that had been 
pounded repeatedly with a pis- 
tol butt . • 

He is pn&of hundreds of po- 
litical refugees hiding in safe 
housesln and aroumTPort-au- ‘ 
Prince, people who have all the 
properly signed and stamped 
documents needed to leavemi- 
tL • '• 

Since 1992, Haitians have 
been told to apply as pohtical . 
refugees at the UiL Embassy 
here, and not to risk their fives 
at sea. Now an estimated SOD 
are trapped.. 

“Papers, but no transporta- 
tion,” said Mr. Jean-Baptiste. 

Threats of an invasion, by the 
United States to reinstate Hai- 
ti’s deposed and exiled presi- 
dent, file Reverend Jcan-Ber- 
trand Aristide, have closed the 
country’s borders, shut fee jfir- 
pon to •afcK*t M traffic and 
made it virtually impossible to 
get out of the country. 

Stanley Schragov a spokes- 
man for the U Embassy, said 
the embassy was trying to ar- 
rangpflightiorofiiCTtranspor- 
utkm by way of the Dominican 
Republic to get the 800 out of 
the country. *It is a matter off 
great concern to us,” he sail - 

Mr. Jean-Baptiste shared a 
concrete floor and a tin roof 
with about a hundred other 
people in hiding. Ch)6e to him, a 
man scratched his chin with a 
finger that did not have a fin- • 

gftpiflil. 


For Honest Election 


By Tim Golden 

New York Tana Service 

MEXICO CITY — - As ever, 
he hurries around the country, 
snipping ribbons cm new high- 
ways, forgiving farm loans to 
peasants, preaching a gospel of 
Mexican change. But in the twi- 
light of his power. President 
Carlos Safinas de Gortaxi has a 
new religion. 

Having sought for most of his 
adminis tration to bold back 
pressure for greater democracy, 
in order to carry out sweeping 
economic changes without 
jeopardizing his party’s 65-year 
hold on power, neadeat Safi- 
nas is now embracing d em a n ds 
for political reform. 

With the approach of elec- 
tions next Sunday, he has called 
on officials to refrainfram the 
sort of fraud that stained , his 
own presidency, pressed for 
more impartiality from the tele- 
vision networks that Save often 
been his propagandists, 'and 
made peace with some of his 
tatter critics. 

Perhaps most important, he 
has repeated again and a gain 
that he will observe a basic 
democratic mandate: that las 
gone untested in Mexico since 
his Institutional Revolutionary 
Party, the PRI, was formed m 
1929V Mr. Salinas, who is 
barred from re*«tection under 
the constitution, says he will 
i turn over power to whoever 

wins a fafr vote regardless of the 
party the victor represents. 

“I am very attentive to the 
complaints of the opposition 




Japanese Honor Their War Dead — the Criminals, Too 


By James Stemgold 

New York Tima Service 

TOKYO — The scene Monday morning at the 
Yasuknni Shrine, the austere religious monu- 
ment to Japan’s war dead, was reassuringly fa- 
miliar: Most of the same rightists, organized 
crime groups -and agpd soldiers in old uniforms 
who parade every year to mark the anniversary 
of Japan’s World War II surrender declared 
.again that Japan's aggression was just and then 
posed sternly like extras in a samurai drama for 
the curious and the throngs of photographers. 

But the very ordinariness ot one aspect of the 
ritual this year is what made it so unsettling to 
some Japanese. As usual, a handful of conserva- 
tive cabinet ministers defied a high court ruling 
by openly worshiping at file shrine, which at one 


time was at the heart of Japan's fanatical emper- 
or worship. 

The problem is that those ministers, upholding 
the ambiguous status quo, are members of what 
Japan's new Socialist prime, minister has insisted 
.will be a “dovish” -government committed to 
fundamental change. 

The prime minister. Tomb chi Murayama. re- 
fused to visit the shrine and bad urged his cabi- 
net, a coalition of conservatives and leftists, not 
to go either. He told a gathering Monday, which 
included the emperor, that Japan caused “tragic 
sacrifices beyond, description” with its war-time 
aggression, and he offered “heartfelt condo- 
lences” to the families of the survivors. 

Meanwhile, people like Ryu taro Hashimoto. 
the conservative minister for international trade 
and industry, worshiped at Lhe Yasukuni Shrine. 


where seven Gass A war criminals are enshrined. 

A day earlier, the minister for environmental 
affairs had been forced to resign after declaring 
that Japan’s war-time attacks, which took an 
estimated 20 million lives, actually aided Asians. 

That confusing mix of events provided the 
backdrop to what is expected to be a long period 
of reflection. Monday marked the 49th anniver- 
sary of the end of the war, and already the 
buildup to next year’s half-century mark has 
produced a media frenzy of reminiscences, re- 
flections and debates on Japan’s responsibility 
for the war and whether it can finally break free 
from the emotional pull of those bleak years. 

Many of the articles and programs depict a 
Japan so distant as to be unrecognizable. Photo- 
graphs show a devastated country and city dwell- 
ers so poor they packed open trains so they could 


go to the countryside and swap old dothes for 
sweet potatoes. Families are seen looking long- 
ingly at shops with unimaginable luxuries, like 
refrigerators and toasters. 

Hie expectation that Japan was preparing to 
use the uext year to move beyond its doubts was 
bolstered by the loss of power last summer by the 
Liberal Democrats, who had governed since 
1955. A coalition promising to clean up political 
corruption and reform the cosseted economy 
took office, then stumbled through a frustrating 
year of modest change. 

In June, the Liberal Democrats stunned just 
about everyone when they regained power by 
joining a coalition with their ideological foes, the 
Socialists. The Liberal Democrats, Japan’s most 
conservative party, embraced the agenda for 
change because it had grown so popular. 


Russians Fire on 2 Japanese Fishing Vessels and Seize One 


Sitting near them, Simone 
Sentrose seemed unmarked, im^ 
til she lifted, the back . of her 
shirt to show two bullet holes. 
In a far comer, Jean Fagenes, 
who says his name is on ahst of 

SE hut wait. 

Anne-Marie Charles, a few 
feet away from Miss Sentrose, 
said, her' teeth had been 
punched out by soldiers when 
she went to search for her hus- 
band. He was dragged from her 
home last year and is still miss- 
ing. 

The embassy had arranged to 
get about 100 out an one of the 
- last Air France flights, but the 
refugees were bumped from the 
passenger list by paying cus- 
tomers.. 

■ Venezuela hdik^e 

James Brooke of The New 
York Times reported from Cara- 
cas: . 

With most Latin American 
twtiniM opposed to.a U.S. mili- 
tary invasion of.Haiti, Venezue- 
la is planning to. send a group of 
regional foreign ministers to 
Port-au-Prince to try to per- 
suade the country’s military rul- 
ers to step down arid go into 
odlCL 

“We call it a Latin American 
solution for a Latin American 
problem,” said Venezuela's for- 
eign ngnister, Miguel Angel 
Burdfi Rivas, of the proposal 
that won wide support at a 
meeting of regional foreign 
ministers in TJogoth last week. 
“The idea had universal accep- 
tance.” 

. But a US. diplomat said the 
final peace effort “should come 
from the United Nations, rath- 
er than let some wdl-intcn- 
tioxted group get suckercd into 
smother leva, of negotiations.” 
The United Nations is expected 
to send its own envoy to Port- 
au-Prince next week to deliver 
an ultimatum to Haiti’s de facto 
rulers. 


The Associated Press ■ 

MOSCOW - — A Russian patrol vessel opened 
fire Monday with automatic weapons on two 
Japanese fishing boats near the Kuril Islands, 
■wounding at least one Japanese crewman, offi- 
cials said 

It was believed to be the first time a Russian 
patrol ship had fired on Japanese fishing boats in 
the disputed waters. 

There was no immediate comment from Ja- 
pan. 

. Russian patrol ship No. 915 spotted the Japa- 
nese boats 13 kilometers (7 miles) inride Russian 
territorial waters, said Alexander Suvorov, a bor- 
derguards spokesman in Moscow. 

The incident occurred near Anuchin Island, 
part of the Kuril chain under Russian control 


since the four southernmost islands were seized 
from Japan at the end of World War II. 

The Russian ship sent a radio message and 
then spotlight signals demanding that the fishing 
boats stop, Russian officials said. When the 
boats refused, the Russian vessel fired warning 
shots into the air and then fired at the boats, they 
said. 

- Russian guards boarded one of the Japanese 
vessels and found a crewman slightly wounded. 
Mr. Suvorov added. The Russians detained the 
crew and towed the boat into a nearby harbor. 

The other boat left the area, the Russian offi- 
cial said. 

Russia has repeatedly warned Japan that it 
would take such action. 


“Japanese boats were sailing straight ahead 
into our waters, impudently ignoring all com- 
mands to stop,” Mr. Suvorov said. “I think that 
this incident will be a good lesson for the 
poachers.” 

The dispute over the Kuril Islands is the main 
obstacle to improved relations between Russia 
and Japan. 

Mr. Suvorov said Russia was ready to sign an 
agreement on joint exploration of the area's 
fishing reserves, but the Japanese have refused. 

Russian officials have said that Japanese fish- 
ing boats enter Russian waters near the Kurils 
thousands of times every year. The area yields 
about one-fourth of Russia's total catch. 

Since March. Russia has increased patrols. 


Japanese boats have committed 12 violations in 
the area this month, always with two or more 
boats entering Russian waters together, said 
Lieutenant Vi tali Sedykh, the commander of the 
Pacific Border Guards. 

In the last three days, Russian vessels fired 
warning shots three times, but that did not stop 
the violations, he said. “It was a forced measure, 
taken after all other options have been exhaust- 
ed,” General Sedykh said of the shooting. “From 
now on, we will act like that” 

Japan demands that what it calls the Northern 
Territories be given back and refuses in the 
meantime to sign alonnal peace treaty. The issue 
has stalled Japanese aid and wide-scale econom- 
ic cooperation. 



■ . »»*_ • I 




■ -A y : c^v > 


1 : **.7*rT V- --'rTi- ■- 





-> * V * > r ; >>;* pm” 


cepting what he can no longer 
resist is a subject of intense de- 
bate here. Yet both proposi- 
tions may be largely true. 

Somewhat fike Mikhail S. 
Gorbachev, the former Soviet 
leader who, he believes, com- 
promised the restructuring of 
his own revolutionary society 
with an immoderate political 
opening, Mr. Salinas has found 
himse lf overtaken fins year by 
fences he eacmnagied both de- 
liberately and inadvertently. 

AX age 46, he is also fighting 
to protect itis kgacyas one of 
Mexico’s most important mod- 
ernizers, and to preserve his 
chances for a good job. 

The Mericao leader is among 
the favorites to lead the new 
World Trade Organization 
when it formally supplants the 
General Agreement on Tariffs 
and Trade m Geneva next year. 

Officials of the Ginton ad- 
ministration and some other 
key foreign governments say 
they are enthusiastic about Mr. 
Safinas, bat would be hard 
pressed to support ium for the 
post if Mexico's election is 
mured by fraud. ■ 

“He has realized that be will 
cinfc or swim with the election, 
that other things -have not 
worked out and now he genu- 
indy wants to fbc h ■ — in a good 
sense,” said Jorge- G. Castan- 
eda, a Mexican writer who is 
among the usually harsh Salinas 
. aides with whom the president 
has repaired relations. 

Mr. Salmas argued in the in- 
terview that more rign i fic a ni 
than tbe tinnqg of the latest 

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_ (iiclii. iin omnitnl in r*»njmKlinn with Air f-ninw. S’uhjtrl nboint 

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ical occasion or 

























Page 6 


TUESDAY, AUGUST 16, 1994 

OPINION 


Hcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



rtHIIMO.fi Mini rill’. Vf« MUCK IIMKN \MI niK WASHINGTON HIST 


StibuUC Helping to Etch a New Landscape in the Middle East 


A Start With North Korea 


Nuclear diplomacy between the Unit- 
ed States and North Korea made promis- 
ing gains in an accord reached on Friday 
in Geneva. The agreement not only as- 
sures that a temporary freeze in the 
North's nuclear program will remain in 
place until talks resume in September, it 
also sketches a road map to a lasting 
solution. It will take more hard work by 
negotiators to work out the details and 
leave Korea nuclear-free. But the agree- 
ment is an encouraging sign that North 
Korea is putting the brakes on its nuclear 
program even under its new leadership. 

For two years, international inspectors 
verify, Pyongyang has kept its pledge not 
to reprocess spent nuclear fuel and ex- 
tract plutonium for use in bombs. Now it 
has gone further. The objects of immedi- 
ate concern in Washington were the 8.000 
spent fuel rods that the North provocative- 
ly removed from its reactor m May. The 
rods are starting to corrode in the cooling 
ponds where they are stored. The North 
will now arrange' to put them in dry stor- 
age under international inspection. That 
postpones the need to reprocess them and 
allows more time to consummate an agree- 
ment that would prevent them from ever 
being used for bomb-making. 

Such an agreement may well be fore- 
shadowed by Friday's accord. The North 
pledged not to refuel the reactor for now, 
preventing more spent fuel from being 
generated. It will also ball construction of 
two larger reactors capable of expanding 
its output of spent fuel and seal its facility 
for reprocessing that fuel These steps, 
the North has agreed, will all be verifiable 
by international inspection. 

In return, the United States agreed to 


allowed special inspections to determine 
how much spent fuel it may have diverted 


Do Better by Taiwan 


In May, the president of Taiwan, on his 
way to Central America, touched down in 
Hawaii, where he hoped to spend the 
night. American authorities refused to let 


fishing rights. He termed this success, 
correctly, “a major breakthrough.*' The 


him off the plane. They were anxious not 
to offend the other China, the Commu- 
nist regime in Beijing. It is an absurd and 
demeaning posture, becoming more so as 
relations change and develop between the 
two Chinas themselves. 

The Clinton administration says it is 
working on a broad review of China poli- 
cy. To hasten it along, the Senate has, 
three times this summer, attached to 
money bills riders that would require ihe 
government to issue visas to Taiwanese 
officials; on one recent occasion the vote 
was 94 to 0. The State Department has 
been hard at work to persuade the House 
to take these riders out as fast as the 
Senate puts them in. This effort is misdi- 
rected. It is inappropriate to allow the 
People’s Republic of China, meaning 
Beijing, to exercise a veto over the United 
States' relations with other governments. 

The United States is in danger of pro- 
tecting the tradition of keepingTaiwan at 
arm's length more rigidly than Beijing 
itself does. In recent years, relations be- 
tween the mainland and the island have 
been growing steadily. A senior official 
from Beijing has now visited Taiwan to 
negotiate agreements on repatriation of 
hijackers and illegal immigrants, and on 


People’s Republic is prepared to deal 
openly and directly with Taiwan on the 
daily routine business of governments — 
but the United States continues to refuse 
to let Taiwanese officials set foot on 
American son to discuss business of im- 
portance to both governments. 

Why? It is not because America has no 
interests there. Taiwan, with its 20 mil- 
lion people, is almost twice as big a mar- 
ket for American exports as the People’s 
Republic with 1.2 billion. Fifteen years 
ago. when the United States adopted its 
present policy toward Taiwan, it did so 
for reasons of political expediency: to 
solidify its relationship with the main- 
land. Two developments have made that 
arran gemen t, never one of which the 
United States could exactly be proud, 
outmoded and ripe for change. 

One is that Taiwan has traveled a long 
way up the road toward genuine democra- 
cy, so that it is a quite different place. The 
other is that communications and rela- 
tions between Taiwan and the mainland 
government that the United States was 
seeking to appease have dramatically 
changed- Those are differences that Amer- 
icans should not continue to ignore. The 
current review of the administration's atti- 
tudes toward Taiwan is long overdue. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Health Care Maneuvers 


The health care bill introduced in the 
House of Representatives by a bipartisan 
group of conservative Democrats and 
moderate Republicans is a disappoint- 
ment It falls far short of universal cover- 
age and goes only partway toward creat- 
ing competitive health care markets that 
might control costs. The bill offered by 


the majority leader, Richard Gephardt 
the only other bill that has a chance to 


the only other bill that has a chance to 
pass, is also badly designed; it could 
eventually destroy private insurance and 
put everyone's health care under a Medi- 
care-like program subject to the w hims of 
congressional committees. Yet under rales 
of debate that the leadership is on the 
verge of adopting it would be extremely 
difficult to make either bill better. 

Under the proposed “King of the Hill” 
procedure, health bills will be voted upon 
in pre-set order, with Mr. Gephardt's lead- 
ership bill apt to go last. Several bills might 
pass or all of them might fan. But of those 
approved, whichever passes last will be 
declared the victor — even if a bill passed 
earlier had more “yes” votes. Worse still, 
no bill could be amended, unless the spon- 
sors endorsed the amendment This proce- 
dure makes it likely that the House will 
pass either no bill or a defective bill whose 
worst features cannot be changed. 

To avoid that fate, the leadership needs 
to adopt rules that would allow members 
to amend bills so that debate in the House 
matches the constructive process now tak- 
ing place in the Senate. 

The bipartisan group started with a bill 
written by Jim Cooper, Democrat of Ten- 
nessee, and made it significantly worse. 


Republicans extracted heavy concessions 
because (hey knew that Mr. Cooper was 
unwilling to jump ship to join forces with 
Mr. Gephardt. The bipartisan bill does 
not fix the Cooper bill's major flaw — its 
lade of an employer mandate or any other 
way to move to universal coverage. 

The bill waters down Mr. Cooper’s 
market reforms: for example, it elimi- 
nates his proposed tax on high-cost poli- 
cies, an essential feature of a bill that 
purports to use market forces to control 
costs. And it eliminates tax increases, 
even one on tobacco, so that it generates 
tittle money to provide subsidies to the 
poor. In part that is why the bill would 
leave more than 20 million uninsured. 

Still, the group left intact some of the 
good features of the Cooper bQL The 
bipartisan bill would, for example, re- 
quire employers who decide to help pay 
their workers’ premiums to give all work- 
ers the same amount instead, of spending 
more to subsidize workers who choose 
expensive policies. The bifl would also 
eventually require stales to set up pur- 
chasing cooperatives wherever private 
parties do not create one. Cooperatives 
are the key to driving hard bargains with 
health plans to keep costs down. 

So far, fortunately, neither bill has near- 
ly enough votes to pass. A posable way 
out is to combine the best of both bills, 
then go further, by i mpr oving the market 
reforms. But before the House can begin 
to create an acceptable tall, members need 
the freedom to amend the bills that their 
leaders will put before them. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


wjlb 


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W ASHINGTON — By the end of 
1996. Secretary of State Warren 


end the North's diplomatic and economic 
isolation. The two sides will exchange 
liaison offices, a first step toward U.S. 
diplomatic recognition of North Korea. 

South Korea's president has now con- 
firmed his promise to build light-water 
reactors, with Japanese financing, to re- 
place the North’s graphite models. These 
reactors are less liable to be used to gener- 
ate plutonium usable in bombs than are 
the current reactors. The United States 
will help meet the North's electricity needs 
while its reactors are bring replaced. 

The North has not yet agreed to give 
up the 8.000 spent fuel rods removed 
from its reactor at Yongbyon or to forgo 
refueling its reactor forever. Nor has it 


in 1989. But the North did pledge to 
remain a party to the Nuclear Nonprolif- 
eration Treaty and allow full access to all 
its nuclear sites as part of a final resolu- 
tion. That is the key to eventually unlock- 
ing its nuclear past. In return, the United 
States would offer security assurances, 
including a pledge not to redeploy nucle- 
ar arms to South Korea. 

The new government in North Korea 
has defied the pessimists by beginning to 
turn the temporary freeze of its nuclear 
program into a permanent one. The 
promising accord is a rebuff to those in 
Washington and Seoul who were pre- 
pared to undermine the new regime in 
Pyongyang and risk brin ging the nuclear 
crisis to a bofl. It brings credit to the 

Clinton adminis tration, which had the 
courage to rgect such hawkish counsel 
and pursue diplomacy. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


VY 1996, Secretary of State Waixen 
Christopher said, it is “entirely possible” 
that Israel will be at peace with all its 
neighbors. "It would have seemed vision- 
ary," he said, “but not at the pace at 
which things are going.” 

In a conversation in his office, the 
secretary was strikingly upbeat on the 
possibility of peace between Israel and 
Syria, for a generation the bitterest of 
enemies. On a Middle East tour from 
which he had just returned, he again 
shuttled between Jerusalem and Damas- 
cus, Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Ra- 
bin and Syrian President Hafez Assad. 

M I think they both want peace," Mr. 
Christopher said. “And a warm peace: 
trade, tourism . . . 

“In Assad and Rabin you have the 
two toughest and most experienced ne- 
gotiators in the Middle East. It's an 
existential thing for both, so they are 
very careful in examining things. 

“Assad does that out loud: for five 
hours in my last visit with him. ‘What 
does Rabin mean by this? 1 Sometimes I 
don’t know, and I say I'll have to ask. 
Rabin internalizes. 


By Anthony Lewis 


“Up to this last trip there was a psy- 
chological barrier. I believe they've bro- 
ken through, discussing the concrete el- 
ements — die nature of peace, with- 
drawal, security. They're all inter- 
twined, and the parties have different 
views on how they should fit together. 
There are still big gaps." 


That description of what is happening, 
especially the scene with Mr. Assad, 
makes one thing clear about the onrush- 
ing peace process. The American role is 
ffs sff ntiali and Mr. Christopher bag TnW»n 
on that responsibility himself. 

Critics of President Bill Clinton's for- 
eign policy have made Mr. Christopher a 
target I have been critical of such things 
as the policy on Bosnia. But Mr. Christo- 
pher brings to the Middle East the quali- 
ties that made him such a superb negotia- 
tor in the Iran hostage crisis: first-rate 
legal skills, patience, commitment 

As an example of the crucial Ameri- 
can role in the region, the secretary 
mentioned an arrangement that he bro- 
kered last year to stop rocket attacks on 


northern Israel from Hezbollah forces . 
in Lebanon. In return for a halt, Israel 
agreed not to attack beyond its security 
zone in southern Lebanon. 

As Mr. Christopher was oh his way to 
the Middle East just now, an Israeli 
pilot in error hit a civilian, target and 
killed 10 people. Israel apologized, but 
Hezbollah launched three waves of 
rockets. Mr. Christopher appealed to 
the Syrians to help stop what threatened 
to derail the negotiations. 

The Syrians “said they would make a 
maximum effort,*’ Mr. Christopher said. 
“They obviously have some- capacity to 
influence Hezbollah - — how great l*m not 

sure.” The rocket attacks stopped. 

A Syrian-Isradi deal, if it -comes, 
.would have to overcome much internal 
resistance: Syrians reluctant to accept Is- 
rael, Israelis reluctant to give op.the Go- 
lan Heights. “Assad thinks it will take a 
lot of preparation,” Mr. Christopher said. 
“They 4 vc been through so much condi- 
tioning the other way. But in time ...” 

Mr. Assad has evidently started that 
preparation. Syrian television and news- 
papers played up the peace ceremony 
between Prune Minister Rabin and King 


Hussein erf Jordan — a remarkable shrft 


pSestinians, Mr.Chnstopber 
said he was urging oounines that had 
pledged aid to start projects m Gaza 
immediately, and at the same time urgmg 
on PLO rhaSrmaxi Yasser Arafat the 
financial “accountability and transpar- 
ency” that donors e?g>ec u. . 

Democracy and human ngnts are grow- 
ing concents among Palestinians. Mr. 
Arafat troubled many by closing the news- 
paper An Nahar for being “pro-Jordam- 
51™ rlum Yar honnine a WKraV 


S’ — and then by banning a widely 
respected columnist, Dapud Knttab, for 
signing a petition against the dosing. Mr. 

raised the question of 


1.111 — — » 

press freedom with Mr. Ararat. ■ 
■Then there is the question of elections 
in the West Bank and Gaza. Mr. Christo- 


pher said: “That wifi be an. area where. 
Mr. Arafat willrcquire c onstant urging, 
to respond to the thust for representation 
among the Palestinians." 

Over all, Mr. Christopher said, “The 
Middle East landscape is being trans- 
formed. are now accepted. . The 

isolation is vanishing.” 

The New York Tones. 


At a Critical Moment, NATO Now Needs Another Heavy Mover 


B RUSSELS — The death on 
Saturday of NATO’s secre- 
tary-general, Manfred W5mer, 
surprised no one. He had been 
suffering from cancer of the co- 
lon for more than two years, and 
his repealed forecasts of an in- 
vigorated return to duty in Sep- 
tember were believed only offi- 
cially. But his disappearance at 
this critical moment for the alli- 
ance will pose unusual problems. 

Without the threat of a mass 
. attack on Western Europe, NA- 
TO’s baric raison d’etre of a mili- 
tary force as a permanent West- 
ern security guarantee has 
become increasingly difficult to 
justify. Yet with waning Ameri- 
can interest in Europe and the 
prospect of a common European 
foreign and security policy van- 
ishing over the horizon, the alli- 
ance is more essential than ever. 

NATO has therefore been 
looking for a perceptible mission 
for some three years. It is now 
gradually emerging as that of a 
military arm of the international 
community in attempting to stem 
post- Cold War instability by pro- 
viding multinational force de- 
ments for peacekeeping, peace- 
making and humanitarian tasks. 


By Frederick Bonnart 


contender appears to be the out- 

O Dutch prime minister; 

-Lubbers, who narrowly 
missed the presidency of the Eu- 
ropean Gxnhassion. 

The prospect before the select- 
ed randiriati- is daunting. In the 
present uncertain international 
climate, the need for & security 
anchor is evident; However, 
NATO is criticized for the failure 
to stem the Yugoslav fiasco, the 
lack of enthusiasm for active in- 
tervention in any crisis further 
east, and its a ppa r ent irrelevance 
to the African tragedies. 

The responsibility far such fail- 
ures does art lie with the organiza- 
tion. What is lacking is the will to 
deal with Such crises , and for tins 
the blame lies squarely on the 
shooktos of the governments of 
(he countries able to do so. Britain, 
France, Germany and, most of all, 
the United States have, ihe re- 
sources and the ability to make the 
international, community cope 
with such crises. But none of than 
sc a ns to possess leaders with tiie 
vision and ability to co n vi nc e their 
population of tire need. 

It is dear dial any major inter- 
national action must m the future 
•be carried out by the United Na- 


Such muirinahVwml elements 
must necessarily include forces 
from nomnember countries. NA- 
TO’s primary internal objective 
therefore is to adapt its structure 
for such duties while, externally, 
establishing links with likely part- 
ners. At the same time, it must 
mam tain the cohesion of its pre- 
sent membership, which is the ba- 
sis of its strength. 

That is the military rationale 
of the Partnership for Peace pro- 
gram. Without becoming full 
members, cooperating countries 
establish formal links by means 
of which their aimed forces will 
be able to familiarize themselves 
with NATO procedures and or- 
ganizations, harmonize their 
own new military structures and 
thus make it possible to adapt 
them for joint work. This consti- 
tutes a mammoth task. 

In all this, Manfred Warner was 
a prime mover. The first two years 
after betook over from Lord Car- 
rington in July 1988 seemed rou- 
tine and undistinguished. His 
chance came with the end of the 
Cold War. Having long been a 
conventional supporter of NA- 


TO’s deterrent doctrines, he was 
quick to sense the new dimate and 
the need to mm forma 1 enames 
into acceptable partners. 

He followed up all possible ini- 
tiatives toward increased contacts 
and set in motion a number of 
them: He helped to maintain the 
momentum for this ♦ask among 
member nations and was listened 
to with respect. A large part of 
NATO's internati onal staff has 
been converted from planning for 
general war to establishing and 
increasing contacts with the new 
partner countries. 

Much will therefore depend on 
Mr. Werner’s successor. The 
choke is not easy at present, al- 
though it is limited by cotain 
automatic inhibitions: the United 
States has both of the major mili- 
tary commander-in-chief posts, 
France and Spain do not partica- 
pate in the integrated military 
structure, Greece and Turkey mu- 
tually disqualify each other, Ice- 
land has do armed forces, and 
Luxembourg has only tiny ones. 

Naturally, no candidates have 
been presented, but the field is 
unusually large. The strongest 


turns. But it is equally dear that 
the United Nations has neither 
the means nor the oiganization to 
do so. A restructured NATO, 
combined with its cooperation 
partners (in particular Russia), 
could serve the United Nations to 
achieve vastly betterresults. 

NATO has sufficient organiza- 
tional flexibility for such arrange- 
ments, but all operations would 
have to be genuinriy international 
Member countries would there: 
foie have to accept command sys- 
tems for. their forces under non- 
NATO chiefs, who could, fa 
instance, also be Russian. This de- 
cisioa would require considerable 
resolution and de terminat ion. 

A NATO secretary-general can- 
not engender SUCh resolution. But 
he can hdp by exposing the prob- 
lem, clarifying the options and eu- 
couragmg beads of governments 
to shoulder the burden. 

Furthermore, his message must 
penetrate to the parliaments and 


ner countries, so that difficult de- 
cisions are generally understood 
and accepted. This will be the 


greatest challenge for Mr. 

WOrners successor. 


fOcnefs successor. 
International Herald Tribane. 


High Stakes in India: Economic Reform With Democracy 


W ASHINGTON — U.S. of- 
ficials sometimes olav 


YY ficials sometimes play 
down the significance of India 
and adopt a dismissive aLtitude 
to its raucous parliamentary be- 
havior. But precisely because In- 
dia has a functioning democra- 
cy, it makes at least as much 
difference if Indian reforms suc- 
ceed as it does in China. India 
matters, and the West cannot 
afford to ignore iL 

India has embraced economic 
reform. With its population of 
900 million, it is the world's sec- 
ond largest market With a mid- 
dle class of some 250 million and 
an economy that is being dereg- 
ulated and opened to the outside 
world, there is much to attract 
the foreign investor and trader. 

Like the once dosed countries 
of Easton Europe and unlike 
China, India offers skills and 
markets that are more attuned to 
the practices of the WesL Indi- 
ans only have chips on their 


By Sh ekhar Gupta and Gerald Segal 


shoulders about the West, where 
Chinese have boulders. 

India also matters in strategic 
and military terms, for it is a 
subcontinent of relative stability 
in an unstable arc from (he Arab 
world through General Asia. 

Many once thought that India 
would tear itself apart with sepa- 
ratist movements. Yet the plu- 
ralist politics of the unified state 
still hold. Even in the unlikely 
event that the disputed territoiy 
of Kashmir were lost, India 
would probably remain intact. It 
is its neighbors that are most 
likely to be ripped apart by reli- 
gious and ethiuc tensions. 

The West has a major stake in 
seeing that India remains a force 
for stability. A sensible India 
can help calm P akistan, make 
cooler heads prevail in Central 
Asia, ease Southeast Asian fears 
about Indian naval expansion 


into the region, and limit Chi- 
nese ambitions in the Indian 
Ocean. An India that negotiates 
arms control and confidence 
building agreements with Paki- 
stan and China helps teach those 
countries the virtues of compro- 
mise and mature foreign policy. 

However, the most important 
stake the West has in a reform- 
ing India is in the political and 
ideological realm. India is at- 
tempting something more com- 
plex than what is bong tried in 
Eastern Europe and China. It is 
changing its economy with an 
already existing democracy. For 
those in the West who ten East ■ 
Asia and Eastern Europe that 
democracy is needed to sustain 
economic reform in the long 
term, it is imperative that India 
not fail and prove the propo- 
nents of demcwracy wrong. 

India is already undergoing 


the trials of economic reform in 
a climate of democratic politics. 
There are unscrupulous oipposi-; 
tion politicians who change 
policies just for the sake of op- 
posing the government Some 
equally cynical self-seeking pol- 
iurians in the ruling Congress 
Party have built fortunes from a 
controlled economy and are 
now worried that their network . 
of patronage is being unraveled - 
by reform. And there are trade 
unionists who see reform as a 
-threat to job security 

Economic reform in a demo- 
cratic developing state requires 
different pokey responses from 
the West and international insti- 
tutions. The challenge is to un- 
denmne blockades to reform in 
the opposition, the bureaucracy, 
the trade unions and other vest- 
ed interests. The West must 
think far more in terms of incen- 
tives and much less in terms of 
sanctions and penalties. 


Tills is not to say that inter- 
national lending institutions 
should abandon their program 
to liberalize the. Indian econo- 
my — far from it But the means 
of achieving the goal will have 
to help the government over- 
come the unholy coalition of 
anti-reform forces. 

India is moving ini the right 
direction. Now is the time to 
help the groups most interested 
in opening its econonfy to per- 
suade tbor compatriots that 
they have much to gain from 
joining the international eco- 
nomic community. The stakes 
arc high ~ a triumph for both 
prosperity and democracy. 


. Mr. Gupta is the senior editor 
of the fortnightiy magazine India 
Today. Mr. Segal is a senior fel- 
low at the International Institute 
for Strategic Studies in London. 
They contributed this comment to 
the International Herald Tribune. 


The Time Has Come to Demilitarize America’s Research F unding 


J'r 


•iTIUlI 


iyse 


WF I -rtJfciTtf 


W ASHINGTON — For half a 
century, science and tech- 


YY century, science and tech- 
nology at America’s elite universi- 


By Robert Kuttner 


ties have had a powerful ally in the 
Pentagon. Starting in World War 
II, then via the Cold War, the 
military has pumped hundreds of 
billions of research dollars into in- 
stitutions such as the Massachu- 
setts Institute of Technology, Har- 
vard, Stanford, Berkeley, Cal Tech 
and Carnegie-MeHon. 

Although the Pentagon spends 
a lot of money developing weap- 
ons, most of these research dol- 
lars have not been tied explicitly 
to military projects. They have 
funded basic research in areas of 
science and technology that Pen- 
tagon scientists hoped would 


Pentagon research funding to 
universities by a stunning 62 per- 
cent. The committee took S900 
million from the administration's 
SI. 47 billion budget request, and 
the full House concurred. 

Last week, after heavy lobby- 
ing by universities, the Senate 


Appropriations Committee vot- 
ed to restore all but S8I million 


of the cut. The full Senate is 
expected to go along, setting the 
stage for a battle in House-Sen- 
ate conference. 


The House pursued the deeper 
1 partly for budgetary reasons 


eventually yield military payoffs. 

According to the National Sci- 
ence Foundation, the Pentagon 
pays for an astonishing 80 per- 
cent of government-sponsored 
research in electrical engineer- 
ing, 77 percent in materials sci- 
ences, 54 percent ia computer 
sciences. Much of this money 
comes in the form of research 
grants and contracts that include 
funding for research assistants 
and postdoctoral fellows — the 
next generation of scientists and 
engineers- 

With the Cold War over, the 
Pentagon budget shrinking and 
other budget categories limited 
fay deficit reduction, this reliable 
flow of funds is suddenly under 
assaulL The Clinton administra- 
tion, with both a president and a 
idee president strongly commit- 
ted to science and technology 
leadership, has sought to exempt 
university research from defense 
funding cuts. 

But in June the House Appro- 
priations Committee voted to cut 


cut partly for budgetary reasons 
but also because of a feud bo- 
tween the Pennsylvania Demo- 
crat John P. Murtha, chairman 
of the House subcommittee re- 
sponsible for defense appropria- 
tions, and the California Demo- 
crat George E. Brown Jr„ who 
heads the House Science, Space 
and Technology Committee. 

Representative Brown favors 
research allocated according to a 
“peer-review” process. Repre- 
sentative Murtha prefers con- 


sen tative Murtha prefers con- 
gressional earmarking, which 
treats the research appropria- 
tions as pork barrel. 

In fiscal year 1993, Mr. Mur- 
tha goL Congress to earmark S38 
million in military projects for 
universities in or near his dis- 
trict, including Mount Aloysius 
College, Saint Frands College 
and Penn State. Congressional 
sources say the deep cut was Mr. 
Murtha's retribution for Mr. 
Brown's attacks on earmarking. 

But even if this proposed cut is 
partly restored, higher education 
can no longer count on reliable 
research funding as a by-product 
of the Cold War. Federally fund- 


ed university research is under 
attack from other quarters as 
well During the Cold War, gov- 
ernment research agencies al- 
lowed universities and other 
contractors generous allowances 
for “overhead" beyond the 
amount of actual grants. 

Overhead sometimes nearly 
equaled the amount of the grant 
itself. For example, if MIT got a 
$10 million contract to study 
composite materials, it could 
tack on, say, another $5 million 
ext the premise that the research 
project cost the university mon- 
ey for light, heat, administrative 
salaries and miscellaneous costs. 
The Pentagon went along with 
this delicate fiction because it 
knew that a strong university 
base in science and engineering 
was useful to the nation's long- 
term lead in defense. 

But with the end of the Cold 
War and the beginning, of the., 
fiscal squeeze, the Office of 
Management and Budget has 
twice tightened its regulations, 
cracking down on what universi- 
ties can claim-as overhead. This . 
makes sense to green-eyeshade 
types, but it overlooks the broad- 
er tacit purpose of generous 
overhead as disguised general 
support to technical education; : 

Of course, it would be better- 
for Congress to decide forth- 
rightly that university research is . 
worth supporting for Us. own 
sake, not just for a defense mis- 
sion that no longer exists. As 
part of the conversion from a 
Cold War footing. Congress 
should logically increase nonmili- 
taiy research support But (hat 
does not seem to be in the cards. 


Although nonmilitary funding 
for science and technology is in- 


creasing modestly, such fundin g 
for universities is not Indeed, the 
Commerce Department’s new 


Advanced Technology Program, 
a flagship post-Gold War nro- 


a flagship post-Cold War pro- 
gram, funds private corporations; 
universities are explicitly prohib- 
ited from applying. Other federal 
research support is basically flat. 

Because of Lhe deep national 
bias against government involve- 
ment m die private economy, a 
lot of good things were done in 
the past half-century only be- 
cause they could invoke the mag- 


ic words “national defense.” For 
instance, Dwight Eisenhower 
was able to sell a conservative 
Congress on the biggest public 
works program everbecause he 
could call it the “National De- 
fense Highway Act." (It turned 
out that die interstate roads 
could accommodate ordinary 
' motorists as well as tanks.) 

With the Cold War behind it, 
America had better acknowledge 
a civilian rationale for needed 
federal research outlays or it will 
lose a lot of national benefits 
that it once. cloaked in khalri. 

• Washington Post Writers Group. 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1894* T > the Guillotine 


PARIS— By lhe tune the Herald 
reaches its readers tins morning 
[Aug. 16J, Casserio will have paid 
aB he co^ of the immeose debt 
he owed to society as the mur- 
derer of President Carnot. It ap- 
pears. from a special despatch 
from Lyons to the Figaro that 
the condemned man has weafc- 


cision was taken owing to the 
recent increase and character of 
tiie crimes committed by Sinn 
Feiners in County Clare, and the 
renewal erf outrages in further- 
ance of the Sinn Feiners* avowed 
policy, to overthrow constitu- 
tional government in Ireland. 


1944 a TRe Fourth Front 


ened considerably during the 
last few days r and has, to some 
extent, refrained from striking 
■ that altitude of arrogance which 
has characterised his demeanor 

'since he committed his crime. 


1919; 


. kajme — [From our New York - 
raitiom] Thousands of American, f. 
French and British troops, fonn- 
mg a fourth front against Adolf 
Hula’s withering strength, drove 
northward through southern 
™ce r tonight [Aug. 15] after a 
sea and air-borne invasion early 


LONDON — The Govenuncnt’s 
proclamation issued last' night 
[Aug. 14] from Dublin Castle sup- 
pressing Sinn Fan and kindred 
organizations iii County Clare 
seems to have brought the whole. 
Irish problem to a head. The de- 


^Mediterranean coast between 
Mareeflleand Nice. The exact Io- 
cations-of the Allied land ings was 
re^aletLThe Germans said 
■ focal point of the landings 
was near Si Raphael 


r ''Sit- -i— •.AP-K-LfJstft-r.- - ‘ --■•■*4 









n 


i 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 16, 1994 


PINION 


Page 7 


To Cut the Voters Out 


••• 


TT7ASHTNGTON — Deanes 
YY crats accuse Republicans 
of delaying crime and health 
bills to xnake' Pisadcait JSD 
Clinton lode bad But the truth 
is that Democrats are rushing to 
judgment to avoid haring- 1 to 
heed the voice of thepeoplc in 
an election only 12 weeks away. 

The. crime •bin, temporarily 
stymied by the gun lobby, is far 
from dead- That Is not merely 
because a president and a major- 
ity leadership can use puissant. 

year’s “Don't InH^my* young 
presidency" — to snatch bade 
the votes oT enough of the 58 
recalcitrant House Democrats to : 
save the party from gridto^aw. 

More to the political point, 
the crime bill bias a'good chance 
of passage because it has' been 
presented as a “tough 10 mea- 
sure, with prison-building, 
death-penalty- and cop-subsidy 
dements emphasized, while its 
“soft” root-casuistry — multi- 
billion dollar social spending on 
midnight basketball — has 
been dWopIayed-The bib ex- 
emplifies heavy-spending con- 
servatism, an oxymoron hard to 
beat. The health care push, on 
the contrary, is now seen by 
voters for what it is: a return 
to Great Sodetyism. 

Hillary Clinton anointed 
elite task forces, working in se- 
cret, to concoct a government 
takeover of a seventh of the 
American economy, financed 
by cigarette smoke and mirrors. 
Eighteen months later, with her 
grandiose scheme widely derid- 
ed and the pubfc eating for 
sober second thought, her gurus 
have gone underground aim not 
even her husband espouses the 
misbegotten “Clinton plan.” 

The ship of government 
health care is now frantically 
jettisoning baggage, to stay 
afloat in Congress. Democrats 
in Lhe House are waiting to see 
how many bags of taxes and 
coercive controls the Senate 
will toss overboard 

For George Mitchell, the 
swan-singing Democratic lead- 
er in the Senate, timing has be- 
come everything. Never, mind 
waiting for the Congressional 
Budget Office to cost out the 
latest bills; forget about serious 
debate of a Republican alterna- 
tive, the sensible Dole-Pack- 
wood insurance reform. 

The reason for his urgency: 
Mr. Mitchell believes the Dem- 
ocrats wOl lose three or four , 
Senate setfsjb]. NoyerutK^JJc 
must get that legislation into 
harbor before the liberal ship 
sinks, an event scheduled, for 
Election Day. Massive change 
must be irreversible before the 
anticipated reverses. ... . . 

His own bill, with its em- 
ployer mandate and 1.75 per- 
cent tax on everybody’s health 
insurance premium, is not in- 
tended to be passed. Despite 
White House blather about 
th us- far-no- further, Mr. 
Mitchell’s first faDbadc porir 
tion was launched as a biD to set 
up a compromise with a group 
headed by Republican Senator 
John Chafee of Rhode Island. 

Mr. Chafee.has been placed 
at the head of a bipartisan 
group that has labeled itself 
“mainstream,” not so subtly, 
suggesting that conservative 
opposition to |ovemment- 
dominated medicine is extrem- 


ist. Ommpudy, he is uring'Mr. 
MitchdL’s liberal bill as Ms 
. lodestar; meanwhile. Bob Dole 
is having fits because die rene- 
gade Republicans refuse to 
consider the; conservative al- 
ternative. That signals a 
bfitcbeS-Ghafee setup. 

Beware -the fikefy deal: Mr. 
Chafee’s rump group comes up 
with a-BKXhfied Mitchell bill, 
giving the Democrats enough 
votes to invoice cloture on any 
.filibuster. Then the House 
would pass a Clmtonite bill, 
puffiag-lhe House-Senate con- 
Jcaees. bade to; the left, which 
Mr. Cntifon would sign in the 
Renim ; ri£Hlre ; ComelMkfi& Kid. 
(Or;- if Mr.-Chafee’s fixes are 
minor enough, the House would 
pasStbe'EbCralScnate bill.) 

To prevent tins deal, Mr. 
Cbafee’s Republican col- 
leagues are tieffing him: “If we 
can prove how baa this Mitth- 
dl bill is indebate and stop it, 
we wfll take control of the Sen- 
. ate and offer health insurance 
reformin the spring.” 

If Air: Mitchell and Mr. 
Chafee cannot ram their main- 
streamhner through the Senate 
in a week re so, the House may 
go home to campaign. Demo- 
cratic liberals fear that expres- 
sion of the popular wifi. That 
explain? their iush to health 
judgment. Republicans — even 


The Refugee Crisis 

Wothank you for your front- 
page coverage of the magnitude 
of the world refugee crisis (“UN 
Swarmed by a World Awash 
With Refugees*" Aug 9). Per- 
haps the public should be in- 
formed that, as frontline work- 
ers for refugees, we, the staff of 
the UN High Commissioner for 
Refugees (UNHCR), marched 
out in Geneva and demonstrat- 
ed in front of the Palais des 
Nations on April 22 to draw the 
attention of world leaders to 
our dismay at what we consid- 
ered pohtcal indifference to the 
untom misery and the. carnage 
of uprooted h»tnan beings in 
many parts, of the world. 

* That spontaneous move was 
lhe first time that United Na- 
tions staff took to the streets to 
express their intense anger and 
fr us trati on at political leaders 
and at. the apparent unwilling- 
ncssreAmiaaty of governments . 
to respond m an effective and 
coherent masnerto the spiraling 
starafrier. of czvifians and aid 
workers. Two UNHCR staff 
members have been shot and 
kfikd in 1994 and 12 lost then- 
lives in 1993 in the tine of duty. 

-frrthc wake of the Rwandan 
tragedy, hundreds of UNHCR 
stall meznebers have volun- 
teered to go .and serve in the 
crisis centers. Also, our col- . 
leagues from all over the world 
have decided to donate one' 
day’s salary ns a symbolic ges- 
ture of shared commitment to 
alleviate the misery of the 
Rwandan refugees. 

We know that the fundamen- 
tal questions raised in the arti- 
cle about thetfim&iishiiig will of 
the international community to 
cope with the worsening world 
-refugee problem will not be an- 
swered by meris*wards re sym~ 



Some Guys Ploy Ball for Fun 


nonoonservatives like Mr. Cha- 
fee — should want volets to have 
a chance to influence the out- 
come of the most far-reaching 
legislation since the New Deal 


bolic gestures. Concerted and 
innovative action by govern- 
ments and political leaders is 
needed to address the root 
causes, as is the provision of the 
necessary resources to UNHCR 
and other aid agencies so that 
$uch human suffering can be 
avoided in the future. 

NASR ISHAK. 

Chairman of the 
Staff Council 
.UN High Co mmissi oner for 
Refugees. Geneva. 

Extreme Opinions 

Regarding the report “After 
Kilting?, France Seizes 16 Alge- 
rians" (First edition, Aug 6.): 

It is hardly consistent with 
France's honored libertarian 
traditions to rebuke govern- 
ments which, in the name of 
freedom and democracy, refuse 
tg Q^isor_spcechor opinions. ... 

If extremists in the United 


For business women 
going places, 
here’s the place 
to stop. 


THE LANDMARK 

OF BANGKOK 

• . ; a. ^ - ‘ 

s u-yyyw t • 

runMianuiMil 

158 Sukhumvit Rd., Bangkok 101 10, Thailand. 

Fax «562> 253-4259 Tel (662) 254- 0404 

77, l . Landmark qf London is tbe Royal Lancaster Hotel 


Democrats deny that the real reason for forcing congres- 
hurry is to make the president sional action on health care 
look leaderly, and thereby to is inescapable: to beat the vot- 
help Democrats avert losses in ers to the punch, 
this fall’s election. But their The New York Times. 


UTTERS TO THE EDITOR 


States, Britain or Germany 
break the law, they should be 
Charged and tried. If they do 
not, they are entitled to exer- 
cise the freedom of expression 
summed up in Article 19 of the 
UN Universal Declaration of 
Human Rights: the right to 
seek, receive and impart opin- 
ions freely, without regard to 
national borders. 

CATHERINE DRUCKER. 

London. 


Deeply Held Beliefs 

Regarding “From America's 
Own Ayatollahs, a Chilling 
Message" (Opinion, July 16) by 
Anthony Lewis: 

The writer’s attempt to dis- 
tort the true beliefs of the reli- 
gious broadcaster Pat Robert- 
son is another effort to 
marginalize people of faith. 

. In this case, Mr. Lewis obyir 
ously believes that America 


faces some sort of crisis be- 
cause Pat Robertson has deep- 
ly held religious beliefs and ex- 
ercises his citizenship through 
politics. 

You will not find a stronger 
advocate of Lhe U.S. constitu- 
tion than Pat Robertson. To 
suggest that he is one of tbe 
leaders of the Christian right 
who want to “substitute their 
vision of a religious polity for 
the secular system of govern- 
ment” is absolutely absurd. 

Pat Robertson strongly en- 
dorses the separation of church 
and slate; but stands firm in 
his constitutional right to ex- 
press himself freely. He em- 
braces a democracy grounded 
in Judeo-Christian principles 
— not a theocracy. He is not 
trying to force his religious be- 
liefs on anyone. 

Another columnist, Charles 
Krauthammer, recently opined 
■in-. The. Washington Post .that 
religious conservatives are 


W ashington — as i sit 

here in the basement 
workroom on a Wednesday 
night, writing this column on 
my home computer, a Dodgers- 
Reds game is on the television, 
with the sound turned off. It is 
soothing to glance up and see 
the familiar rituals — Ray 
Knight Hashing signs from the 
third base coach's box. Todd 
Worrell fussing with the resin 
bag — that I have seen other 
players and coaches perform 
over tbe decades since my fa- 
ther took me to my first game at 
Wrigley Reid in Chicago. 

It is hard to imagine that 
baseball may be over for the 
year, shut down by a players’ 
strike that is the eighth such 
stoppage in the last 23 years. 

The '80s were supposed to be 
the Decade of Greed, but here 
we are, alm ost halfway through 
the supposed sobering,- up '90s, 
and baseball cannot figure out 
bow to divide the pie between 
owners and players without a 
strike. Major league revenues 
top SI .8 billion. Players' salaries 
average over $1 mUlion. There 
are 28 teams and 700 players to 
split this fortune; and they can't 
work it out? Give me a break! 

When Donald Fehr and Rich- 
ard Ravitch, representing the 
players and the owners, respec- 
tively, appeared on NBC-TYs 
“Meet the Press" on Aug 7. they 
came across as smug studied 
performers, adept at talking past 
each other. A few minutes later. 


“members of a diverse commu- 
nity sharing a simple if nostal- 
gic agenda: reluming America 
to the cultural condition and 
social values of the immediate 
postwar era.” 

For them “that means two- 
parent families, schools with 
authority, limited government, 
a culture not yet drenched in 
sex and violence.” 

Mr. Krauthammer under- 
stands the true intentions of the 
so-called Christian right. 

GENE KAPP. 

Vice President, 
Public Relations. 
The Christian Broadcasting 
Network. 

Virginia Beach, Virginia. 

Australia Took Action 

The report “West Takes a 
New Tack to Fight Child Sex 
Trade Overseas” (IHT, July 14) 
states that “one of the most 
sweeping proposals [to combat 


BOOKS 


WHISPERS; 

The Voices of Paranoia 

By Ronald JC SiegeL 310 pages. 
$23. Crown. 

Reviewed by 
David N. Neubauer 

I T is difficult to imagine the 
mental life of someone with 
a mental disorder. This is true 
particularly when the person 
has psychotic symptoms and 
experiences distortions of reali- 
ty. Paranoid individuals, for ex- 
ample, tend to view the outside 
world with a very narrow focus. 
They have a constant expecta- 
tion that people will take ad- 
vantage of them, and they are 
always looking for confirma- 
tion of this assumption. They 
scan their environment. They 
readily misinterpret meaning- 
less coincidences as having 
great significance. These mis- 
perceptions and misinterpreta- 
tions can range from excessive 
suspiciousness to grand delu- 
sional schemes of conspiracy. 

Abnormal mental experi- 
ences — perceptions, interpre- 
tations and subsequent beha- 
viors — are the interest of 
Ronald K. Siegel a UCLA re- 
search psychologist who has 
previously explored this territo- 
ry in his books “Intoxication" 
and “Fire in the Brain.” His 
new book, “Whispers: The 
Voices of Paranoia,” is an ac- 
count of his adventures while 
investigating the lives and men- 
tal experiences of several fasci- 
nating characters. 

Siegel presents a brief history 
of theories related to paranoia 
and quickly moves on to de- 
scribing his own encounters 
with paranoid individuals. A 


WHAT THEY'RE READING 


• Rolf Seebnann-Eggebert, 

chief correspondent for NDR 
television in Germany, is reading 1 
“Der Stechtin ” (1899) by Theo- 
dor Fontane. 

“This is the 10th time I’ve read 
it. I compare myself to Fontane 
in many ways, since I'm about to 
move to London as a correspon- 
dent and Fontane spent most of 
his life there.” 

(Michael Katlenbach, IHT) 




few of the subjects contacted 
him because of his work in tbe 
area of abnormal mental expe- 
rience. But in a majority of the 
cases the subjects were tbe de- 
fendants in c riminal proceed- 
ings for which Siegel was serv- 
ing as an expert witness. 

Siegel does not offer simple 
rlininfll histories of his subjects. 
He is a skilled writer who effec- 
tively takes us into the paranoid 
world of each individual. 
Throughout the book, Siegel is 
telling us the story of his own 
involvement with his cases. It is 
a story that is always interest- 
ing, often exciting, sometimes 
erotic and occasionally grue- 
some and horrific. It can alio be 
quite humorous. 

Reading “Whispers” is like 
reading about an exotic and 
dangerous travel adventure. His 
journey, of course, is into the 
world of the mind. Siegel really 
seems to want, at least tempo- 
rarily, to feel and think like his 
subjects. The reader can enjoy 
the thrillin g tale from the com- 
fort of his chair and be glad that 
he is not actually there with the 
author. 

In his quest to discover and 


experience tbe paranoia of bis 
subjects. Siege! goes to surpris- 
ing lengths. These take him far 
beyond the safety of his office. 


By Robert Byrne 

T HE championship quarter- 
final match between Boris 
Gulko and Nigel Short was or- 
ganized by the Professional 
Chess Association. 

Short switches between 3 
Nc3 and 3 e5 against the Caro- 
Kann Defense, giving his oppo- 
nents no advance warning. 

Gulko chose tbe Nimzovicb 
Variation with 4...Nd7, which 
prepares 5„.Ngf6 without wor- 
rying about doubled pawns. To 
work against an exchange of 
knights, Short selected 6 Ng5. 

With 6_Nd5 7 Nlf3 h6 8 Ne4 
Nb6 9 Bb3 Bf5 10 Qe2, Black 
would have gotten his queen 
bishop out, yet White would 
have achieved slightly superior 
development. After 6...e6 7 
Qe2, Black cannot continue 
with routine development like 
7_.Be7? because of 8 Nf7! Kf7 9 


He meets people at strange 
times and places. He moves in 
with subjects for days at a time. 
He even subjects himself to hor- 
rible physical and psychological 
conditions in his attempt to 
simulate the circumstances of 
various crimes. With such ex- 
periments he is able to find 
within himself paranoid charac- 
teristics that extreme condi- 
tions might induce in any of us. 

Among Siegel's subjects are a 
physicist convinced he is being 
harassed by electromagnetic en- 
ergy from a satellite targeted at 
him, an elderly woman certain 
that a radio device has been 
implanted in a dental filling, 
ana a young woman positive 
that tile random placement of 


By David S, Broder 


on CBS-TVs “Sunday Morn- 
ing” show, a feature an the mi- 
nor league Su Paid, Minnesota, 
Saints showed the other side of 
the picture — a third-generation 
owner with the storied name of 
Veeck sharing the joy of his tail- 
gating fans in the simple zest of 
bong out at the ball game. 

The contrast drove home the 
price that we Americans pay for 

MEANWHILE 

our high-pressure, high-dollar, 
top-level athletics. Television 
has made the audiences so im- 
mense, the incomes so enor- 
mous, that the simple enjoy- 
ment of the sport has become 
a perishable quality. 

As you may have gathered, 
I like sports, and watch a lot of 
games, in person and on the 
tube. This year it has struck me 
that the best times 1 had were at 
the least professional games. 

Last fall f saw the 100th re- 
vival of the Battle for the 
Monon Bell, a football rivalry 
between two neighboring cen- 
tral Indiana liberal arts col- 
leges, Wabash and DePauw. 
The game was played on a mild 
but drizzlv Saturday in Green- 


Mr. Broder wrote this column 
on Aug 10. The baseball strike 
began on Friday, Aug 12 


pedophilia] was adopted by the 
lower house of Australia’s Par- 
liament earlier this year and is 
awaiting passage by the upper 
house.” In fact, the bill referred 
to was passed by both houses of 
Parliament on June 30. 

In its desire to attack pedo- 
philia, the government drafted a 
bill that put the normal rights of 
an accused at serious risk. Fortu- 
nately, the government was sen- 
sible enough to allow tbe bill to 
go before one of Parliament's 
legal and constitutional affairs 
committees and to accept most 
of tbe committee's recommen- 
dations. Thai having been done, 
the opposition was pleased to 
support the aims of the legisla- 
tion, and we hope it acts as an 
effective deterrent. 

AMANDA VANSTONE 
Adelaide, Australia. 
Senator Vanstone holds the 
attorney general and minister 
for justice positions in the Liber- 
al Party’s shadow cabinet. 


silverware and flowers in a res- 
taurant contains professions of 
love from a co-worker. There is 
a chess enthusiast with an ar- 
mament of high-caliber and 
martial-arts weapons strategi- 
cally rigged in and around his 
trailer. A frantic man has con- 
vinced his family that tiny bugs 
have infested their skin. A 
woman confuses reality with 
the story of a movie on televi- 
sion and becomes terrified that 
evil is invading her home. 

In several cases it is clear that 
cocaine or another stimulant 
has played a major role in the 
development of the paranoia 
The outcome of the paranoid 
psychosis is relatively benign 
in a few of the cases; however, it 


CHESS 


Qe6 Kg6 10 Bd3 Kh5 1 1 Qb3 
mate. 

On 7...NW 8 Bb3, Black can- 
not safely pluck a pawn with 
8...Qd4? because 9 Nlf3 Qg4 
(9._Bb4 10 c3 Bc3 11 Kfl! Qc5 
12 Be3 Qa5 13 be Qc3 14 Rcl 
Qa5 15 Bc5 gives Black three 


Q M 0 m 

wfi 

■nVi* 3 




SHonT/wwre 
Position after 26... 


pawns for a piece but White 
obtains powerful attacking 
chances) 10 Nf7! breaks up the 
black position. 

On 16 Bd4, Gulko prevented 
17 Ne5 by I6...Ng4. But Short 
countered sharply with 17 Nd2! 
Gulko retreated with 17...Nf6. 

After 18 Khl 0-0 19 Bf6 gf, it 
must have seemed to Gulko as 
though he was safe enough with 
his powerful king bishop to 
guard his splintered kingside. 
but Short soon showed that he 
could reveal hidden problems. 
After 20 Qg4 Kh7 21 Ne4, 
Gulko could not play 2I...Be5? 
because 22 Nf6! Bfo 23 Bc2 
Kh8 24 Qe4 permits no defense 
to the threat of 25 Qh7 mate. 

After 2 6— Bh 8, Gulko had 
presumably reached the forma- 
tion he had put his trust in. but 
it was just then that Short re- 
leased 27 Ng5! The sacrificed 


castle, and almost everyone got 
to the stadium the old-fash- 
ioned way: They walked. You 
could buy a hot dog and soft 
drink, at noninflated prices, 
right under the stands. 

At halftime, veterans of past 
battles — bulky guys with vary- 
ing degrees of spryness — came 
on the field from opposing ride- 
lines, wearing their school col- 
ors. They shook bands and chat- 
ted with the guys they had once 
opposed. Tradition,' nostalgia, 
every good feeling overflowed. 

The other event came just 
a month ago. while 1 was visit- 
ing grandchildren in Connecti- 
cut. The New Haven Ravens 
were playing Binghamton, and 
three generations of Broders 
trooped off happily to see the 
game. As in Greencastle, ac- 
cess was easy, prices right and 
the crowd of about 6,000 en- 
thusiastic in pounding the met- 
al flooring at the old Yale ball- 
park every time a Raven got 
a hit or made a good catch. 

1 am not sure we saw any 
future Ripkens or Griffeys or 
Keys, but we saw a home-team 
homer, several smoothly exe- 
cuted double plays and few 
mental gaffes or booled halls. 
Management had ingeniously 
provided some kind of give- 
away or fan-participation con- 
test at every half-inning break, 
so the entertainment never 
stopped. Daniel and Made- 
leine, who are a little young to 
appreciate all the nuances of 
the game, were much taken with 
Rally Raven, the bird-costumed 
mascot-cheerleader, and 
snacked their way contentedly 
through the evening. 

At neither of these occasions 
were there off-field tantrums, 
threats or controversies to cloud 
your enjoyment of the game. So 
far as I know, none of the play- 
ers held out so long that he 
missed the start of training 
camp, as the Redskins' new $19 
million quarterback did. Nor 
was any of them dumped uncer- 
emoniously onto the free agent 
market after a marvelous career, 
as happened with the Redskins' 
Art Monk this year. 

The whole pattern of today’s 
professional sports — players 
switching teams every time they 
can get an extra milli on, teams 
switching rides every time they 
spot a richer television market — 
turns off the fans. Maybe we’d 
be better off just amputating the 
top of the professional leagues 

— where salaries, revenues and 
egps all have inflated out of sight 

— and getting bade to where 
both players and fans remember 
it’s supposed to be fun. 

The Washington Post. 


is horribly tragic in others. 

“Whispers” is an intelligent 
book written for a general audi- 
ence that should be of great 
interest to the professional as 
welL The insights provided by 
Siegel's experiences will help 
anyone better imagine the men- 
tal life of the paranoid individ- 
ual. And if anyone wants con- 
vincing evidence for the 
potential dangers of cocaine 
and other stimulants, this book 
supplies it rather dramatically. 

David N. Neubauer. who is on 
the faculty of the Depanmem of 
Psychiatry and Behavioral Sci- 
ences at Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity Medical School wrote this 
for The Washington Post. 


knight could not have let Short 
play 28 Nf6! Kg6 29 Qg5 mate. 

The only other attempt at de- 
fense, 27...Kg6, was also futile 
in view of 28 Rd3! f6 f28...Bb5 
29 Rg3 Bfl 30 Ne4 Kh7 31 Nhf6 
Bf6 32 Nf6 Kh8 33 Qb6 maw is 
no better) 29 Ne6 Be6 30 Be6 
Qc5 31 Rg3 Kh7 32 Qh3. Gulko 
gave up. 

CARO-KANN DEFENSE 


White 

Bloch 

White 

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Gulko 

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17 Nd2 

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27 N’bS 

Resigns 




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Frankenstein and Fries? Interactive Restaurants Loom 


N EW YORK — It's already pos- 
sible, on 57th Street and its en- 
virons, to eat a burger while 
gazing at Dorothy’s dress from 
“The Wizard of Oz,” or while genuflecting 
before Jimi Hendrix’s Fender Stratocaster, 
or while eyeing Elvis’s 1957 Harley- David- 
son amid the sound of rewing engines. 

Come fall, however, it also will be possi- 
ble to eat a burger while Frankenstein’s 
monster descends on a slab from the ceil- 
ing and framed portraits watch with mov- 
ing eyes. 

And by spring, in this same sector of 
Manhattan, the burger will come with a 
side of interactive video: Diners will elec- 
tronically insert themselves into episodes 
of old sitcoms or sports championships, 
and watch the results on tableside screens. 

A proliferation of theme restaurants and 
entertainment-oriented retailing is trans- 
forming several blacks of 57th Street and 
its intersecting avenues. 

“You have to have more to offer than 
just food on a plate,” explains the restaura- 


By Paula Span 

Washington Pott Service 


teur David Ledennan, the David of Da- 
vid's Cookies. He and his brother — plus 
celeb investors such as the producer Steven 
Bochco and the designer Nicole Miller — 
plan to open a 12,Q00-square-foo! (1,100- 
square-meter) TV-themed eatery across 
from Radio City Music Hall next spring. 

Nearly all these enterprises either have 
outposts around the country and the globe 
or expect to begin cloning themselves 
soon. In fact, one of the business attrac- 
tions of this midtown corridor is its proven 
role as an incubator. 

“It’s easier to get press and build fanfare 
if you have an opening right in the heart of 
the Theme Capital of America,” says Jerry 
Kouveras, vice president of Eerie Entertain- 
ment Its five-story Jekyil & Hyde Club, 
with a horror-mystery motif and actors who 
play roles as opposed to waiting tables, is 
scheduled to open cm Sixth Avenue just 
above 57ih in October. “It’s easier to launch 
yourself as an international corporation 
than if you launch at a mall on Long Island. 
We want that upscale image.” 

Theme restaurants have been around 
before. But the current crop is distin- 
guished by massive size, an emphasis on 
merchandising (logo-bearing shirts, caps 


and boxer shorts can account for 40 per- 
cent to 50 percent of gross sales, according 
to Nation’s Restaurant News), and con- 
nections with pop culture. 

The trailblazer was the Hard Rock Caffe, 
which opened on 57th Street a decade ago. 
(The London and L. A. Hard Rocks pre- 
ceded it.) The Grst Planet Hollywood 
opened virtually across 57th Street in late 
1991. With their hundreds of seats, show 
biz decor, celebrity-heavy events and on- 
site retail stores, they set the patterns that 
others now mimic. 


occupies 30,000 square feet and attracts 
20,000 shoppers a day. 


It doesn’t serve burgers, but it does sell 
Tweety Bird golf bags (for S495), produc- 
tion cels from Warner Bros, cartoons (av- 
eraging $350 to $1,500) and an endless 
variety of T-shirts and appliqufed baseball 
caps. It’s full of video screens, quickly 


There will be about a hundred Studio 
Stores in operation by year-end, though 
most will lack a glass elevator whose ascent 
is propelled by the Man of SXeeL 


Harley). “Lots of action, lots of things to 

see, lots of video screens, and the motorcy- 


cles are fascinating. 

The JekyD & Hyde Club’s planned fall 
debut wffl be followed by Television City 
(though a suit by CBS, which claims to 
have trademarked that phrase, may force a 
rhwng e in nomenclature). Lede r m an , the 
restaurateur, can see it now: patrons order- 
ing via TV screav .stars of “Leave It to 
Beaver” and “Gffligari’s Island” greeting 
giusft fans morphing themselves into 
NBA stars on video and then going home 
with T-shirts depicting their one-on-one 
jousts with Michael Jordan. He’s. talking 
$12 million to SIS millio n in sales the first 
year and is negotiating for more locations 
a year before the first restaurant opens. 


becoming de rigueur in such settings, and 
the Bat Jet descends every half-hour to 
battle with videotaped baddies. 


Both rely heavily on tourists and thus 
benefit from the thousands of hotel rooms 
within strolling distance. And both have 
metastasized: the current worldwide tally 
is 42 Hard Rock Caffes (including Reykja- 
vik and Kuala Lumpur) and 14 Planet 
Hollywoods (including Hong Kong), with 
no end in sight. 

Two new entries joined the Street of 
Themes last falL The Warner Bros. Studio 
Stores found in suburban malls average 
7,000 to 10.000 square feet The one that 


“I guess Pm just a child that never grew 
up; I think it’s great” was the thumbs-up 
from Netta Bloom, a dance teacher from 
Tel Aviv, who emerged the other day with 
a denim jacket featuring the whole Looney 
Tunes gang. “You need some fun in life.” 


So far there is only one Hariey-David- 
son Caffe, a block below 57th Street, but its 
owner hopes to remedy that shortly. It can 
fit 400 dmere and a number of historic 
motorcycles into its chrome-heavy “inter- 
active environment,” which has hosted a 
“Baywatch” bathing suit contest and 
Howard Stem’s book party (attended by 
Ins fans, the Bunafuocos). 


“It’s fun for die kids,” said Barli Wake- 
field, a local who'd brought her 5-year-old. 
son for the second time (and had just spent 
nine bucks for a photo of him atop a 




And Virtual Nightclubbing, Too 


opened at 57th and Fifth Avenue, with 
van Qeef & Arpels on the opposite comer 


By Elizab eth Benedict 

New York Tones Service 


Van Qeef & Arpels on the opposite comer 
and Chanel and Hermfes down the block. 


AUGUST 22-27 

19 4 4 

THE UBERATION OF PARIS 



T HIS winter, when you’re up for a 
wild night on the town, you might 
slither through the second-story 
window of a nightclub in the Soho 
district of London packed with live grows, 
famous people, fashions shows, art exhibi- 
tions and a melange of offbeat videos. 

it won't be necessary to call a travel 
agent, however, or even a cab. Just switch 
on a computer equipped with a CD-ROM 
drive or a TV with a CD player and slip into 
the world’s first nightclub on a disk. • 


agemeat, whose graphic designers and for- 
mer video-games programmers hare been 
working to create a product that combines 
the newest interactive technology with the 
cutting-edge techno and ambient sounds 
that dominate London’s dub scene. 

Musicians will include the Shamen, 


on the gritty, grainy streets of Soho (filmed 
with a camcorder), then dick-walk around 
the comer into the dub’s vast, cartoonlike 3- 
D interior. ' 


Aphex Twin, Mixmaster Morris and Duma 
- McBroom — British electronic artists little 


Following the success of the 
Normandy landings in early June 1944, 
Allied troops continued fighting throughout 
the summer across the north of France, 
finally reaching the outskirts of Paris. 

In the last days of August, as the 
Allies approached the city, the unarmed 
population of Paris - reinforced by a small 
number of armed resistance fighters - rose 
against the occupying German forces. In 
four days of street battles and general 
insurrection, Paris was liberated. 

To commemorate these dramatic 
days, we will reproduce the six front pages 
from the New York Herald Tribune chronicl- 
ing the week of August 22 through 27. 

Events covered in that same 
extraordinary week include the liberation of 
Marseille, Grenoble, Le Havre and Rouen, 
plus an exclusive report following the 
liberation of Florence. You’ll follow the 
reports day-by-day from the Herald 
Tribune’s award-winning team of war 
correspondents. 

Don't miss the International Herald 
Tribune’s special commemorative series 
starting Monday, August 22nd. 


Called “The Virtual Nightclub," it will 
offer a kaleidoscopic swath of London nigh 1 
life in high-resolution computer graphics. 

“ The Virtual Nightclub’ is somewhere 
between MTV and a video game.” says 
James Plummer, director of Prospect Man- 


McBroom — British electronic artists little 
known in the United States but whose ap- 
peal the creators hope will catch on, the way 
an earlier generation caught on to the Bea- 
tles and the Rolling Stones. 

“The Virtual Nightclub,’ adds Plummer, 
is a new promotional space for the latest 
music, but it's also a state of mind, a sensi- 
bility attuned to this new inner world that 
computers make possible for people to ex- 
perience without taking drugs.” 

Whatever it is, the interactive dement 
allows viewers to use a mouse to navigate 
their way around as they choose. They begin 


Cbddpg on bright blue floor space wiB 
take them to the art gallery, mixing room or 
driH-oot room, where people recover after a 
frantically paced night on tire dance floor. 
CSdoog on a painting hanging in the gallery 
can transform it instantly into a quick-time 
video of Jimi Hendrix in conceit. 


If “The Virtual Nightclub” in London 
catches on, Rummer and his colleagues 
have ambitions to create dubs based on 
other dries, with New. York And Tokyo 


topping the list. 

' For now, though, “The Virtual Night- 
club” exists only on demonstration disks. 
The prototype * on a European tour to pick 
up sponsors and fans on big screens at 
electronic arts festivals. 


turn Of 


■hil 


Scouting Out the Family History in Italy 


By Susan Lumsden 


F lorence — sud- 
denly, abroad, it’s in- 
teresting to be Italian, 
says (Count Luigi 
Guelphi Camaiani, owner of It- 
aly's largest private heraldic 
and genealogical library. 

“while there has always been 
a certain interest in genealogy 
here, 85 percent of our inquiries 
now come from I tali an- Ameri- 
cans, including South Ameri- 
cans,” said Camaiani. 60, scion 
of one of Italy’s oldest families. 


Stallone obviously had some- 
thing to do with horses, says 
Camaiani. He added that wiule 
the Romans, like Caius Julius 
Caesar, used several names, it 
wasn’t until the Venetians more 
than a 1,000 years later that 
surnames began to be used in 
Italy. 


Family trees didn’t begin un- 
thc U th century, says Ca- 


They indude the governor of 
New York state, Mario Cuomo, 


Jtc 


EVTERJVATIONAL i 




Vibune 


New York state, Mario Cuomo, 
who also ordered a painting of 
the Cuomo family crest, says 
Camaiani. The Cuomo family 
from CasteUammare di Stabia 
near Naples had several distin- 
guished members in the 18th 
century, according to Ca- 
maiani 

Other seekers of roots in the 
15th-century Palazzo Guelphi 
Camaini on the Via Santo Spir- 
ito have been the actor Sylves- 
ter Stallone and the director 
Martin Scorsese. 

Generally, the older and 
more established the family, the 
more the name is related to 
place. Most names, though, are 
taken from the father, like Gio- 
vannmi (Johnson). Others come 
from the trade like Fabbri 
(Smith). 


til the II th century, says Ca- 
maiani, because surnames 
didn’t exist before then. Siena 
was the first city to start baptis- 
mal records about 1380. By the 
Council of Trent (1545-63) ev- 
erybody in Italy had to be bap- 
tized, married and die with two 
names. After that, genealogy 
becomes easier. 


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While most Christians took 
their fathers’ names, some 
adopted their nicknames. 
Hence, Belli (the beautiful 
ones), Boonamici (good 
friends) or Gambaoorta (short 
leg). Jews usually adopted the 
names of their cities, said Ca- 
miani. The Guelphi Camaiani 
had long since taken theirs from 
the Pope’s faction, the Guelphs, 
who descended from Bavaria to 
Boigo San Sepulcro in 1030. 

Faustina Camaiani the last 
of her line, married a Guelphi in 
1652, thereby doubling the fam- 
ily name and fortune: 

One thing Carnianj cannot do 
is re-create a family. “Some 
people arrive^ here in .tears 
searching is vain for their fam- 
ily,” he said. “If they don’t 
know the name of their father, 
their mother or their birthplace, 
it’s impossible.” 

Successful callers are often 
antique dealers and museum 
curators indentifying old paint- 
ings and furniture from the he- 
raldic crests of donors inscribed 
on the works. 



SosztaL 

Camaiani clem members, from left, Pier-Francesco, Count Luigi and Stefano. 


The names of the new Italian 
political leaders provide some- 
thing of an insight If Carlo 
Scogoamiglio is a tongue twist- 
er, it is because the new presi- 
dent rtf the Italian Senate prob- 
ably descends from a 17th- 
century alliance of the Scogna, 
Cogna and Migfio families, says 
Camaiani. 

Gianfranco Fini, leader of 
the neofasezst National Alli- 
ance, can lay claim to the “fine” 
old Florentine and Ferrarese 
dynasty of poets and philoso- 
phers. The family crest of Una- 


" r 'W: 




The 

Most Luxurious 
Beach and Golf 
Resort in Europe 


NEW FALL 
COLLECTION 


ESCAIM 


berto Bossl leader of the popu- 
list Northern League features a 
charging bufl. 

Camaiani' apologized for 
having nothing in the files for 
Silvio Berlusconi, the prime 
minister, nor for Irene Pivetti of 
the League, at 31 the youngest 
head of the Italian Chamber Of 
Deputies. 

“Every family has a history, 
however simple,” says Ca- 


maiani. whose grandfather 
Gndpho, a notary, founded the 
library in 1877. From heraldry, 
the aristocratic study of coats 
and arms, be expanded into ge- 
nealogy, the study of family de- 
scent 

' A member of the Interna- 
tional Genealogical Associa- 
tion,' the library contains about 

7.000 historical volumes and' 

5.000 files, including ones of 
families forced to leave the 
poorer south and Veneto region 
in search of a living. Tuscans 
have not migrated in any num- 
bers, says Camaiani ... 

“A genealogical library is a 
detective agency in time,'” says 
.Camaini “and Italians are 
strong in genealogy. There's 
never been a 'revolution hoe; 

therefore no toppled statues, 

and worse,' burned libraries of 
■ an aristocratic past 

“There's still a strong link to 
antiquity. The oldest families 
date from '.Charlemagne, 


crowned Holy Roman Emperor : 
in 800 A. D. Strictly, the empire * 
lasted until 1806 when Napo- 
lfeon forced the abdication of _ 
his new future father-in-law, 
the Habsburg emperor Franz 
n. That’s a long time.” 

In 1987, Camaiani founded , 
the Institute of the Holy Ro- 
man Empire to help pave the 
cultural way to a united Eu- 
rope. Its 373 members are of 
noble, and notable, families. 
Cari Gustav XVI of Sweden is a 
member of the honorary com- 
mittee. Cardinal Josef Giemp of 
Boland is protector. 

.. “ntere are principles that are 
neither progressive nor conser- 
vative wit pertain to human na- 
ture. This uni te d Europe can 
odst only with a united politic: . 
Political unity depends on cuT .. 
tuial unity. And culture begins 
al home, in the family;" Ca- * 
ysiatii cited Otto Habsbufg. - 
descendant of the imperial fam- ^ 


r 

V ‘ ■ 






Tel: (351-89)501999 
Fax: (351-89) SO 1 950 
Albufeira , Algarve 
PORTUGAL 


In Paris 

Also, Sales 
on Summer Collection 

Marie-Martine 


By and how an elected deputy 

Of the Eumnfian'Parli M wwit 


8, rue de Sevres, 

Paris 6th 


TO OUR READERS IN VIENNA AND IN SALZB tffiG 

. You can receive the 1HT hand delivered 
to your home or office on the day of publication. 
Just call toll-free: 0660-8155 
or fax: 06069-175413 


of the European "Parliament. i 
Is tit mo Genealogico Ita- * 
hano, Via Santo Spirito 27,- 
Florence. 50125, Tek 55- ■ 
213090: fax 55-289643. Qpen ; 
Tuesday and Friday from 9 . 
A. M. to soon. 


Susan Lumsden writes abort ], 
the arts from Florence. 




tit* !&£> 










i msms*: 




** 




THE TUB INDEX 1 1 5.42^ 

International Herald Tribune World stock Index ©, composed of 
280 'mtemationalty investaWe stocks from 25 countries, compiled 
by Bloomberg Business News. Jan. 1, 1992= 100. 

120— , ; : ■ - _ 



150 


Asia/P.icific 


Appro*, welghtngr 32% 
Ctoea 132L29 Prw.: 132-32 


Europe | 


• Apprat psjiteV 37% 

Ctask US.®' PIwj 115.74 

Bi 


130 






ijzMMsk 



The index tracks U.S. defer nbtv at stocks In Tokyo, Nnr York, London, and 
Aiyndkia, Anetrefla, Austria Belgium. BnzA, Canada, ChOa, DenmarK FMond, 
Franco, Germany, Hong Kong, IMy, Undca, Nothodanda, Now Zoadand, Norway, 
Skigapora, Spain. 0 — dan, Saftrartend and Vanaznaia. For Tokyo, New York and 
London, tha ndwt b composed of 9w 20 top Issues in bams of market capkaBzatlon, 

,s*mnm*M Wu, tom inp o~ WmrOoW 


1 Industrial Sectors 1 


Uhl Ptev. % 

dote Etoee drage . . 

tom. teeth 
tome dm 

% 

drag* 

Energy 

113.16 113.48 -029 CNWOoode ■ 

117.62 117JK 

-■*049 

MUM 

127.11 1202B. 48E5 HmUnertab 

13239 13148 

-*038 

Finance 

11720 H7J8 -014 Conwmr flood*. 

-102.10 102.13 

-033 

Services 

12052 120.43 4007 Mte-teW* ’ ■ 

43133 13131 

•*009 

For mom Information obouttiie index, a booklet is tsvaBabioftOB at charge. 

Wnte to Trib Index, 181 Avenue Ctsariesde Qatie. 82521 NeuayCedex. France. 



i-; 


atom* w 

fiP-w; 



Id 









^-1- ■ 

% s, ; 


International Herald Tribune, Tuesday, August 16, 1994 


Page 9 


Clothier’s CEO Shows Who’s Boss 


By Brandon Mitchener 

International Herald Tribune 

COLOGNE — Peter Littmaim’s com- 
bination of jackets, slacks and ties mir- 
rors the new appearance of Hugo Boss 
AG, the company he runs: loose, luxuri- 
ous and successful 

While some German fashion bouses 
bob in the wake of reckless expansion in 
the 1980s, Mr. Littmann’s improved Hu- 
go Boss is on its way back to financial 
health as a result of drifting j production to 
Eastern Europe and moving into new 
markets, both geographical and stylistic. 

The company’s profit was up 17 per- 
cent in the first half of this year, at 26.4 
nuDion Deutsche mar ks ($17 million), on 
sales of 395 million DM. Analysts say 
the bottom line appears safely in tire 
blade even though the profit rise is ex- 
pected to flatten as the year wears on. 

The company's pretax return on sales, 
at 11 percent, is extraordinarily high, yet 
revenue has been shrinking since it 
peaked at just under 1 billion DM in 
1991. The rising profit margin reflects 
cost-cutting as well as demand in Asia 
and the Americas. 

One key strategy has been Mr. Litt- 
mann’s decision to split the concern into 
three divisions, which some observers 
initially said threatened to alienate tradi- 
tional customers. But the move is having 
the opposite effect. 

Indeed, retailers who said Hugo Boss 


had become too conventional are giving 
the company a second chance with its 
two new collections, Hugo and Baldes- 
sarini, and the stares say both the new 
lines and the company’s flagship Boss 
collection benefit from having narrower 
focuses. While Boss is for the traditional 
business-executive market, the Hugo line 
is aimed at the fashion-conscious and 
Baldessarini is a new high-end brand. 

Karl -Heinz Annas, who owns a chain 
of men's clothing stores throughout Ger- 
■ymg Hu. 


many that 
clothing 
begin sei 
products as 
com 


carrying Hugo Boss 
years ago, said be would 
upmarket Baldessarini 
the spring collection. "The 
* its approach, and 


the Baldesarini line fits in perfectly with 
our strategy,” he said. 

“Boss has become much more fashion- 
able as a result of Hugo,” Mr. Littmann 
said at a men’s fashion fair here last week. 

A corporate turnaround artist and mar- 
keting professor who found success selling 
porcelain and carpets, Mr. littmann pre- 
dicted Hugo and Baldessarini would sell 
clothes worth around 25 milli on DM in 
1994 and double sales every season until 
they accounted for 25 percent of overall 
revenue, or more than 200 milli on DM. 

The spring collection of Hugo, which 
Mr. littmann said had proved popular in 
Germany, Britain and Asia, features vari- 
ations on soldier and sailor style and 
loose, comfortable suits, vests and jeans 


that apparently are popular with women 
thanks to sometimes unisex cuts. 

Honey-colored jackets, floral ties and 
supple leather jackets were more typical 
of Baldessarini, which is named after the 
company’s chief designer. Werner Baldes- 
sarini, who is also its vice president. 

Boss, meanwhile, remains a Mercedes- 
Benz among men's business clothing and 
is therefore relatively immune to the eco- 
nomic climate in Europe. In addition, 
the division is profiting from one-third- 
lower production costs in Slovenia. Ro- 
mania and tite Czech Republic. 

Mr. Littmann and Italy’s Manifattura 
Lane G. Marzotto, a wool fabric giant 
that bought a 50.4 percent slake in Hugo 
Boss in 1991, are banking on the new 
collections and presentation bringing 
new flair to a well-known name that 
expanded too quickly in the 1980s and 
suffered from saturation and quality 
problems as a result. 

Now, as it retrenches in Europe and 
the Americas, the company is expanding 
aggressively in Asia. It just opened a new 
Hugo store in Singapore and plans Boss 
stores in Beijing and Shanghai this year 
and in the Philippines and South Korea 
over the next two years. 

It is also launchin g lines of Boss un- 
derwear and swimwear. 

“Everything should fall into place for 

See BOSS, Page 11 


Tansil Sentenced in Bapindo Scandal 


Reuters 

JAKARTA — Eddy Tansil, the main 
figure in Indonesia’s multimiQion-doIlar 
Bapindo banking scam, was sentenced 
Monday to 17 years in jail and fined 30 
million rupiah ($13,000). 

Mr. Tansil, a Chirmsc b usinessman, alsn 
was ordered to pay compensation of 500 
billion rupiah after being convicted of 
fraud and forgery in connection with ob- 
taining loans from the PT Bank Pemban- 
Indonesia, or Bapindo, a state-run 


jOtotomaboral Herald Trtitein 


Jakarta's Central District Court also or- 
dered Mr. Tansil to hand over some of his 
property to oover losses at Bapindo. 

“The charges against you have been 
proven," Chief Judge Sutrisno told Mr. 
Tansil 

Mr. Tansil is one of six people lacing 
trial over $450 million in losses incurred try 
Bapindo on letters of credit extended to his 
Golden Key group, which has interests in 
petrochemicals. 


It was the second verdict handed down 
in the case. Maman Suparman, a junior 
Bapindo executive, was sentenced in July 
to nine years in jail and fined 15 million 
rupiah. 

The Bapindo case has riveted the Indo- 
nesian public because man y top govern- 
ment officials were called as witnesses, 
including Admiral Sudomo, head of Presi- 
dent Suharto's supreme advisory council. 

Reports have suggested that more 
charges are to come m the case, possibly 
involving high-ranking government offi- 
cials. 

Two former Bapindo directors have al- 
ready appeared in court on charges connect- 
ed with the fraud, and another two are due 
to appear in coming weeks. 

Johannes Sumarlin, a former finance 
minister, and Nasniddin Sumintapura. a 
former junior finance minister, are sched- 
uled to appear as witnesses. Evidence un- 
covered during Mr. Tansii's trial may be 
used to implicate others, the judge said. 


Beijing Blurs 
Line Between 
A and B Shares 


“Documents that have been seized can 
be used as evidence in other cases,” he said 
without elaborating. 

Mr. Tamil's attorney, Gani Djemal, 
said his client was a victim of a case with 
wider political overtones. 

“He is a political victim. There are pot 
only legal matters here but also political 
influence,” Mr. Djemal said. 

Prosecutors had asked that Mr. Tansil 
be jailed for life and fined $370 million. 
Spectators who packed the courtroom ap- 
plauded after the sentence was read, and 
Mr. Tansil was protected by police wield- 
ing rattan sticks. 

Mr. Djemal said his client would decide 
within three days whether he would appeal 
the verdict. 

He said Mr. TansQ had already offered 
to hand government control of his eight 
companies, valued at 12 trillion rupiah, to 
the government. 

“We made this offer before today's 
judgment,*’ Mr. Djemal said. 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

SHANGHAI — China un- 
veiled legislation Monday that 
opens the way to local invest- 
ment in the B share market, 
previously limited to foreigners, 
in a move that further blurs the 
distinction between B shares 
domestically traded A shares. 

The new law also proposes to 
limit foreign ownership of Chi- 
nese listed companies to 35 per- 
cent. There was no previous 
limi t on foreign ownership of B 
shares, except that B shares had 
to account for 25 percent of 
total shares issued by a compa- 
ny, said a Hong Kong analyst. 

In practice, Chinese investors 
already invest heavily in B 
shares, which are traded in bard 
currency. 

But the China Securities 
newspaper said legislation now 
before the Slate Council, or 
cabinet, could put such invest- 
ment on a legal footing. It said 
the law would come into effect 
soon but did not give a timeta- 
ble. 

The China Securities Regula- 
tory Commission announced 
this month that joint Chinese- 
foreign fund management firms 
would be set up to attract over- 
seas money into domestically 
traded A shares. 

It also said $1 billion of new 
B shares would be listed this 
year, an ambitious target that 
would triple the size or the ex- 
isting markets. 

Beijing has said all along it 
wanted to merge the A and B 
markets but has maintained 
that this cannot happen until 
the yuan is fully convertible, 
probably sometime around 
2000. 

At the same time, it is explor- 
ing ways of pushing the timeta- 
ble forward and of getting 
around the foreign exchange 
problem to strengthen both A 
and B markets. 

The proposal to allow foreign 
funds into A shares was an- 


nounced as part of a rescue 
package for the Shan ghai and 
Shenzhen A markets, which re- 
sponded by more than doubling 
in value in a single week. 

Under the new legislation, to 
be attached to China’s corpo- 
rate law, securities authorities 
would have power to approve 
new categories of investors in 
the B market, now reserved for 
overseas institutional funds. 

“This wil] make it easier in 
the future for Chinese nationals 
to invest in hard currency 
shares.” the newspaper said. 

(Reuters, Knighl-Ridder) 


China Says It 
Won’t Approve 
New CD Plants 

Bloomberg Business News 

BEIJING — In a bid to 
appease critics of its copy- 
right practices, China said 
it would not approve new 
foreign-funded production 
lines to make compact discs 
and laser discs, the official 
Legal Daily said Monday. 

The paper said the order 
was contained in a circular 
issued by the Ministry of 
Foreign Trade and Eco- 
nomic Cooperation and the 
audio and visual products 
department of the State 
A dmini stration for Press 
and Publication. 

The circular also said ex- 
isting factories would not 
be allowed to expand, the 
paper reported. 

The illegal pirating of in- 
tellectual property by Chi- 
nese companies has been of 
concern to the United 
States, which says it loses as 
much as $1 billion a year 
because of fake software 
and audio-visual products. 


STOCKS 


New Zealand’s Bumpy Road 


By Simon Bradwefi 

Remm 

W ELLINGTON —The New Zea- 
land stock market is expected to 
rally in coming months, but an 
uncertain political scene and de- 
pendence on the performance of overseas 
markets couWLhmit gains, analysts say. 

“The economic picture here is good, the 
political picture is unknown,” said DonTurk- 
lagtoa of Cavfll White Securities Ltd. - - 
Politics have threatened to take t he loc al 
spotli gh t «noe a hung Parliament was narrowly 
avoided in the November general elections and 
theNational Party government . was returned to 
power with just a one-seat majority. 

Financial markets have been unsteady re- 
cently, affected by a series of close polls and 
fins weAend’s by-election in which the cobr - , 
seevative National Party escaped with a nar- 
ow victory to hold on to its aim majority. 


ante years. to come,** Mr. Tuzkington sard. 
The country isgradnaHy changing its post- 
al system from first-past-the-post voting to 
Jerman -style mixed member proportional 
presentation. The changing political stnm- 
are, likely to favor smaller parties, could 
rove to be a drag on the market. - 

An added fear is the economic straiegyof 
he Alliance party, which emerged in the by- 
lection as the most likely qppommt to the 
National Party in the next general ejection. • 
The Allian ce promises to raise taxes for the 
[ch and modify the Reserve Barfc Act, s«a 
s a cornerstone for New ZealantTs low infla- 


tion of recent years. The party’s manifesto is a 
“horrific document for financial markets,” 
according to John Rattray, equities director 
at brokerage Ord Mmnett. 

Observers also said overseas markets would 
have a major bearing oh the local bourse’s 
performance. 

Of particular interest is the UR. Treasury 
bond market and the direction of interest rates. 

The U.S. Federal Reserve may raise inter- 
est rates this week, which, typically causes a 
fall in bond and stock prices. 

‘ “In the short run, it’s a slightly confused 
- J picture, and because of that we’re going to be 
dictated to by the rest of the work) to a fair 
* extent,” said Mr. Rattray. 

But Mr. Rattray says a rise in short-term 
interest rates is not inherently negative for 
equity markets, as it dampens the more dam- 
! aging long-term possibility of an overheating 
economy. 

Economic firndomwitals in New Zealand 
are seen as solid, and should be reflected in 
company profits. 

. : The New Zealand economy grew by 53 
percent in the year to March, while inflation 
stands ax only 1.1 percent. 

While the horizon might be clouded with 
uncertainty, the way is sml clear for the share 
market to rally before the end of the year. 

Mr. Turkington of Cavfll White Securities 
said that the NZSE-40 stock index “has got 
scope to rise a couple of hundred points” in 
the next four months. 

- - The index finished up 25.70 points at 
2,097.64 Monday, weD below its high for the 
year of 2,444.80. 

Reginald Dale is on vacation. 


Bett Atlantic 
Sets Charge 
And Job Cuts 

Bloomberg Business News 

PHILADELPHIA — Bell 
Atlantic Corp. detailed plans 
Monday to take after-tax 
charges totaling $2.3 billion and 
cut 5,600 jobs, or 7.7 percent of 
its work force. 

The company said the charges 
would result in a loss for the 
third quarter and for the year. 

The bulk of the charges, 
$2,15 billion, is related to the 
discontinuance of regulatory 
accounting and the revaluation 
of its telephone plant- 

job cuts will cost the compa- 
ny $100 million, and 535 mil- 
lion to $45 million will cover Lhe 
company’s plans to exit certain 
investments. The company said 
the job cuts would occur over 
the next three years. 

Bell Atlantic said the charges 
would help it prepare for in- 
creased competition in its core 
local phone market while allow- 
ing it to enter new markets such 
as cable television. 

“These initiatives are major 
steps in an aggressive, multiyear 
campaign to respond to compe- 
tition in our traditional markets 
and to enter new higb-growth 
markets to enhance share-own- 
er value,” the company's chair- 
man, Raymond W. Smith, said. 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


Croaa Rates 


s 

LM 


s ML 
IM VOS 


(01 


ms aw — 
ues — uw 

— ueo ubj 

iM a» 

us uw use 
l , n IBflB UMS 
UM UW UK 

MW IM IV 

\m d ar dom . London. 


Aug. 15 

ie. un OF) ft#». 3LF. Yen O Pwe» 

iff) IBM* 14»“ IMS urns- UE8 UOP 

' CMOl 

in ms* I»> CMS* im isw* um un* 
m uBUh aw can un . bui «a u*ji 


Eurocurrency Deposits 


Swiss 

Franc 


French 

Franc 


Yen 


Aug. IS 


ecu 


Ckged 

sjus unit ua nan urn «u un ran 


wn Ml StSI 1UR MS 12% MW 

usn uc 1 BJT2 tea- urn u»»* — 

VMS a i*2 • un ua* — - uw* tsa mar 

usii usui un wm um mm um own 

u. na is a u. im um um *a 

Saw. nn erxt2drkA lbdasalntdberce/lttrs; Toronto 


Dollar OhMsrlc Franc StsfUns 

1 mtHHh 4 V. A 4*r4* K tta 5 SrS V. 2 W 5 

3 month* 4 mM «fc 49*6 4 »W4 K 5V5H SSWW. 2 *v2 t, 6 -h! >. 

A mom*. sa-SWi MV$ * 'ft-Wh 5 V5*. 5V4V 7% -2* 6 'VA 

1 yw 9frSA 5W.-5* 6 VS «. 4 VSm M fc 2VJ-2* MM* 

Sources: StetAm Lloyds Bank. 

Baht cmUkxUUe to /nterbcnkdnxisttsafSJ mNOon minimum (artocNtderrH. 


^ b ; To tm one denari •: wmotWDsHdL: obt duohds NJLs not 


Bar Values 

Currency «rs C™» 

JO Moe* Kora* Tjm H.XmdamlS 

M2* *—*«“**. 

tt«0 It***"*®* 
tSTt IndwrWtah ItUJj* 

OM tihht r*Lr— 

lism* wn*U«"h- 
urn tonwWfttoW 

5.154 Motor. ftM- 



Per* 

S. A® - , rand 3JB45 
SLKbrwoo KC3D 
SwWLferaa 7.7*1 
TdMBl *49 

That baht 2WW 
TUrkHR tira 31130. 
UAEdtfMtn MW 
Venn. body. W&» 


— . — cmrrmer JMbjt fMBV WHtoY 

■e* miMv usi* ubi un* 

istarifam U*U Jgi Sonwrw ** 

S£ 35 

*** * ** ***** eBook IBmadsI; Bam QutmarOole irattano 

«wr INC fto* Tokyo (ToknU Rond Bonk of Canada 

nh Aaron France , .if-, .wr ii~ 

reel.- udFODRl. now *“■***" 


Kay Homy Rates . 

United States ctooe Pratt. 

Dtscamtndc 

Prime rate » J* 

Federal fra* 

MIMA cm 

Com ra. poser Ul Am 5.T0 i.1® 

JNnoaA TMosnY Mt 

lwtarTraaonrbn IM 

>tear Treawrr note *£ 

MwTnaRTMH 
.MnarTrwra&VMf* 

ttwrTmiufyMie TM 7a 

yknacTnounboon 

MerrHUjrw* Ready amet 3-“ : ' W 


1« 

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3 V. 2 f» 
tUL 2Vt 
7M 2*. 
no. iul 

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am un 
SlOS sms 
SB5 185 
SLID 5.15 
7J1 T* 


MKaadrato 
Call toMwr 
F n Wto Me t * 


Brtttrtn 

hank base ndo SV. SV> 

Call money 4V «b 

Httontt Mertaak 5 h. 5V 

SennA taferbaak 5v Sh 

trasatfc Mortal* ** 

tS-rear8Ht BJ7 &7I 

Franc* 

interanHan rate UM SJOO 

CaU money Osd. 51* 

1-awnAMBtasii - 5te 

3-monlblBtutaM — 5V 

FmoMbtotertew — 5* 

TIWtOAT — 7J3 

Scorers; Reuters, Bloomberg. Merritt 
Limcft. Bonk of Tokyo. Ctunmtrzoank, 
Graeaweit AtantooiL Cnatt Lvomuds. 


QoW 


lHwarSowraMMt bond 


AM. 

PM. 

Ch<ge 

37635 

377 JB 

— 145 

3M45 

37W0 

— 140 

381 JX) 

38240 

+ H.W 


CnBtoaray 
MnnA tntertash 
MtoanMeihrak 
Oenento In te tteM * 
iFresrhwd . 


Zurich 
London 
New York 
US. dollars per ounce. London ottldal Hx- 
tags; Zorich and Now York naming and dos- 
Cno Odens; New York Comex (DecemoerJ 
Source: Reuters. 


Quite simply the Royal Oak, 


iUDEMARS KGUET 

Tbe muster watchmaker. 


h'i»r intiimmipin .mil lui.ilii^ui;. plc.iv.. »nw '*■ 
\iuknurs X lie l.-«* u- Ui:i— u\ mmi.xtI.iiuI 

Td II Jl HI 5 * T> l'.l\ II il *- 1 ' 








jHKRIiSfe*. 




Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 16, 1994 


*.* 


Market diary 


Wall Street Falls, 
But Heinz Climbs 


Vie AuecKned ftw 


Aug 15 


Compiled by Cur Stuff From Dupniiita j n g considered as a takeover 
NEW YORK — U.S. stocks target by the Anglo- Dutch con- 
fell Monday on a late selling sumer products giant Unilever, 
wave as investors braced for a A spokeswoman at the maker of 
possible rise in U.S. interest Heinz catsup, Starkist tuna and 
rates. But drug and food shares other food products declined to 
climbed amid speculation of comment on the rumors, 
takeovers, with HJ. Heinz ac- Caterpiiiargained I. to 1061*, 
live on reports that Unilever after a constructive July sales 

report, while Merck rose ft. to 


11.5. Stocks 


was targeting it Tor a takeover. 

Equities traded within nar- 
row ranges most of the day. The 
Federal Reserve's policy-setting 
Federal Open Market Commit- 
tee meets Tuesday. It is expect- 
ed the committee will consider 
raising rates for the fifth time 
this year to forestall inflation. 

The Dow Jones industrial av- 
erage ended 8.42 points lower, 
to 3,760.29. Gainers took a 
slight lead over losers on the 
New York Stock Exchange, 
where volume was 223.2 million 
shares. 

Release of the industrial pro- 
duction figures, which showed a 
0.2 percent increase in July and 
was the 14th straight monthly 
advance, incited a brief flurry 
of selling in the bond market. 

The benchmark 30-year U.S. 
Treasury bond was priced at 99 
30/32, for a yield of 7.50 per- 
cent. up from 7.48 percent Fri- 
day. 

H_J. Heinz gained ft, to 37ft. 
on reports the company was be- 


33ft, amid a generally buoyant 
pharmaceutical sector. Svntex 
climbed ft, to 217s. 

Biotechnology stocks also 
rose broadly, with Gensia Phar- 
maceuticals up 2ft, to 1 l*i. 

Caremark International was 
up ft at 21ft after agreeing to 
purchase most of the assets of 
Friendly Hills Healthcare Net- 
work in Southern California. 
American Homepaiient rose ft, 
to 58ft on higher second-quar- 
ter earnings. 

Lotus Development shares 
soared 2, to 44. after an analyst 
at Dean Witter Reynolds re- 
peated a buy recommendation 
on the stock, saying a soon-to- 
be-released version of the com- 
pany's Notes communication 
software would boost growth. 

Intel, the world’s largest in- 
dependent maker of computer 
microprocessors, rose 13/16, to 
61, after news that it might 
spend about $2 billion in the 
next few years to build a new 
plant and expand an existing 
one in Oregon. 

fAP. Knighl-Ridder ; Bloomberg) 


The Dow 


Daily dosings of the 

Dow Jones Industrial average 

4000 



F MAM J J A 

1984- ■’ ■■ 


Dow Jones Averages 


Own High Low LH Ota. 


Incut 377*2 I 3781.33 V& W 37*039 
Tram 1602X7 lUUf 1596X6 160113 -153 
uta iw a iso i4 i «p* lmn — au 
Coma 1310.10 131Q33 1305-53 >306.57 —170 


Standard & Poor’s Indexes 


industrials 
Tramp. 
Utilities 
Flmtt 
SP 500 
SP 100 


High ue CteM Ofae 
54076 S3775 53775 — 065 
332.* 390.44 334.90 — I.M 
16030 15937 15973-055 
<573 4574 4575 — 070 
46X34 44131 44133 —071 
43779 425.43 42573 -1.19 


NYSE Indexes 


Mob Law Last Cha. 


Composite 

Industrials 

Tiroes. 

Utility 


25537 25476 25432 —0.7S 
31530 31X99 31442 —032 
34467 24X57 34X70 -774 
212 JJ 711.61 211.73 —033 
714.21 21163 31X74 -079 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


Metals 


hha Low Last Settle <W*e- 


Pre*fcj» 
Bid Ask 


240000 240X00 240000 240900 
24HOO 241100 ■■■■■■ 


261200 211X00 


HIT 


NYSE Most Actives 


Dollar Mired in Range 
Before Fed Meeting 


Bloomberg Business News 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
slipped against European cur- 
rencies but was little changed 
against the yen Monday as in- 
vestors took positions before 
the Federal Open Market Com- 
mittee meeting Tuesday. 

But dealers said a quarter- 
point rise would have little ef- 
fect on the dollar because so 
many traders expected it to 


Foreign Exchange 


happen. “It feels like it’s almost 
a done deal," said Lynn Tier- 


ney. a vice president at Shaw- 
of Bos i 


raise rates, they said. Higher 
interest rates make a currency 
more attractive by increasing 
the return offered to investors 
holding it 

But dealers warned that the 
dollar could be vulnerable to 
setbacks even if the Fed does 
raise rates, analysts said. 

“The dollar’s given a sad per- 
formance even though people 
have been gradually revising 
their forecasts up to a half-point 
Fed hike.” said Jouni Kokko, 
international economist at S. G. 
Warburg. “A quarter-point 
would now come as a disap- 
pointment and be seen as a lack 



VaL Mgt 

Law 

Last 

06. 

GenEls 

31173 48U 

47V, 

It'S 

- v. 

Synfp* 

35526 221k 

21 N. 

21’* 

- W 

Te(Me« 

21634 647* 

63H 

63H 

■ ! * 

War Mart 

19518 24 

23*. 

23 s * 


cocoa 

19349 45V. 

44!'. 

44'* 


Fords 

I779g 2978 

2M* 

29W 


JonnJn 

17460 49*1 

48H 

49 Vs 

-1* 

RJRNob 

16935 6V. 

61* 

6 s . 

• 1* 

Heinz 

1691] 38W 

16V. 

J6 J '« 

— V* 

AirTchn 

16120 27V. 

m 

271* 

* to 

GTE 

15477 33!* 

3716 

33 

♦5* 

GnMotr 

14935 50’. 

441* 

49** 

— ■* 

Compaqs 

14387 35<4 

34 tj 

35 

- '* 

PhiLMr 

14146 55V, 

55 

55N 

... 

AT&T 

14184 538k 

53'. 

53!. 

— ** 


NASDAQ Indexes 


Low Lend COT- 


Composite 

Industrials 

Banks 

Insurance 

Ftrtnce 

Transp. 


73XH 73077 731.77 -036 
731.92 73070 73137 —0.04 
77632 77338 77430 '0.18 
91X71 91139 91277 -X12 
944.01 94270 94X36 -1.14 
72X77 71 457 71BJ7 —279 


AMEX Stock Index 


Kgh Law Last COT. 
44439 44230 44332 —038 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Cfrae 
Bid AM 
ALUMINUM (Hbk Grad*} 

SoS" ,P#f, "lS£o B l4S4JO 146100 144X00 
Forward 14B3U3Q I4B4XQ 149000 149100 
COPPBH C ATHOD ES (HOB OlBW 
DOffOY] Mf iWWCJOfl 

g8r^-SSr M 55670 557.58 
Farmed 56050 569-00 57X00 57X50 

NICKEL 

Donors per mefrictoo 
Soot 528X00 559X00 569X00 570500 

Forward 567500 568000 578100 579500 

TIN 

Mian per metric toil 
Spot 51 HOC 513500 517000 518000 

Forward 520000 521X00 524500 525000 

ZINC (Special High Ondi) 

Denars per metric ton 

Spot 93900 94000 94300 94400 

Forward 96300 96X50 96700 94RJB 


Financial 



MM 

.Law 

Owe 

Change 

3-MONTH 5TERUHO (UFFE) 
<580080 - pts at 180 PC) 


Sen 

94X6 

93X7 

93.99 

Unch. 

Dec 

9029 

9119 

9019 

— OX* 

Mar 

KM 

9058 

92X9 

— 0X5 

Jea 

82.18 

92X9 

92X9 

— 0X7 

Sea 

91 J3 

91XS 

41X5 

— 010 

Dec 

91X4 

91 J1 

91X2 

—011 

Mar 

91.19 

91X8 

91X9 

—011 

JM 

9CJ2 

90.80 

9090 

— 0.T2 

Sep 

9080 

9073 

9071 

— 0.12 

Dec 

90A3 

9CLS5 

90X4 

— 011 

Mae 

9041 

90X1 

90X1 

— 013 

Jtn 

9132 

9029 

90J0 

—012 


s 


BRENT CRUDE OIL (IW 

US. dollars per bsrreMots of LUO barrels 

17.14 1&7B 1430 1455 —046 

17.12 16B5 

1706 1642 

&B IS 

1670 MOO 
1679 1453 


Dee 


Feb 

Mar 

Apr 

Mm 

Jot 

JtT 

ABB 


16.97 

1495 

an 

an 

MOB 


1452 1452 

r. M.T, 


N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 


N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 


Ed. volume: 4X308. 


1481- -HUM 
1478 +0.17 
1672 +0.18 
1460 +030 
. .. 1400 +O.W 

1449 -1635 +0.14 
1452 1439 +033 

H.T, 1434 +0,12 
N.T. 1433 +0J2 
N.T. 1431 +0.12 
N.T. 1431 +E12 
Opanlntr 17MB 


Slock Indexes 



HM 

tow. 

Cloc* aumge 

FTSE 188 (UFFE) 
OS per Index point 




JT74X 

3144X 

31520 

— 7J 

Dec 

3177X 

31720 

31&5X 

— 71 

Mar 

N.T. 

N.T. 

J1B5J 

— 7X 


EsL relume: STM. Open MxMJM. 

The Motif was doseo Monday tarahothtay. 


Sources: Motif. Associated ■ Press. 
London OOI Financial Futures ExtSnsnae. 
mn Petroleum Eochonoo. 



Industrial Production Rose in July 

WASHINGTON -J<on*ly^o^ f ®, a ng 

Federal Re- 

^j^^X^dence to justify pushing interest 


increased . v . ... . . 

serve board members more evidence 
raw higher, analysts said Mangy , ioa index ra* a med- 
iae Federal Reserve s in June. . 

« 94 Fed looks at whether 


inflation, the Fed looxs at wnetner 
‘ factories are reaching the produce «oogh 


lactones are reaching me -- -■ . - — ^ i n< j USIria j 

goods to fulfill autidputed 1 dffl«nd . 4-b» ■ “ 


Dhrtdands 


Par Ant Pay Roc 
IRREGULAR 


Est volume: 19A69. Open Ini- 541472. 
3-MONTH EURODOLLARS (UFFE) 

SI mUMoa - Pt» aMM pd 


NASDAQ Most Actives 



VOL 

tfigh 

Low 

LOS* 

Chg. 

Oscn s 

31981 

22 

2IH 

27 

- V* 

Gensia 

13480 

12W 

n* 

1114 

- 2to 

AuraSy 

12355 

7to 

/to 

TV* 

IVl t 

Intel 

11S4J 

61 

40Vk 

61 

• ntu 

Mlcslts 

11181 

ssto 

541* 

541* 

—v* 

TetCmA 

10193 23 s * 

23 

73 V. 

+ ■* 

Melr»ro 

9490 15>Vn 

14+* 

I5to 



Lotus 

8879 

44 

42 

44 

-2 

KusMJc 

844C 

IN. 

l^B 

1OT, 


APwrCVS 

7803 

17to 

161* 

17 

—U 

Ecoven 

7043 

7>* 

6'Vf. 

7V* 

+ i* 

IntaOv 

6124 

21 1'J 

21 

21 H 

* *6 

Maqtood 

5930 

7W 

1H 

IV. 

—2to 

SunMiC 

5333 

251* 

MVk 

25V* 

+ iv H 

Novell 

5278 

15V* 

ISM. 

ISV<t 

+ v* 


AMEX Most Actives 



VOL 

Mgn 

Law 

Lost 

COT. 

Nabors 

7130 

6to 

6V* 

6to 

♦ to 

fvaxCo 

5762 

!4to 

Iflto 

I9V6 


ALC 

5191 

34 

33 to 

33 to 

—to 

ChevSfts 

3375 

9H 

9U 

98k 

+ •* 

5PDR 

3259 +6W- 

46V* 

46V* 

</* 

Vrocfi 

3031 

36to 

35". 

36to 

-to 

Sundwn 

2759 

16V* 

16'A 

16H 

-28* 

RavrtOg 

2755 

4V* 

4 

4 

— '/* 

X CL Ltd 

2592 

IVk 

1V D 

IV* 

— 1 '» 

Vtacm rt 

2294 

4'* 

4 

4V. 

-V* 


Market Sales 


Today 

dote 


HI Bonds 
10 Utilities 
10 mdusfrioH 


9733 — 119 

9LD1 +611 

181-44 —049 


NYSE Diary 


Advanced 

1060 

1236 

DetSrert 

1047 

845 

Unchanged 

761 

752 

Total issues 

28(8 

2833 

N«w Highs 

35 

23 

New Lows 

43 

44 


AMEX Diary 


Owe R». 


Advonoad 
Defined 
Unctranerd 
Total issues 
New mat’s 
New Lows 


230 776 

020 257 

250 743 

800 776 

17 14 

13 17 


NASDAQ Diary 


Advanced 

Detuned 


Total issues 

New Won?. 
New Lows 


1540 1749 

7506 1316 

2022 2026 
5068 son 
34 77 

31 73 


Spot Commodities 


NYSE 

Amex 


7154 

22760 


29*64 
16.93 
249 JO 


commodity 

Today 

Prev. 

Aluminum, lb 

066 

0662 

Copper otectrairttc Hb 

1.13 

l.U 

Iran FOB. ion 

21100 

213X0 

Lead, lb 

038 

038 

Silver, trey e< 

5.065 

5.105 

Steel [scran), ton 

119X7 

119X7 

Tin. lb 

3X219 

3X353 

Zinc. B> 

04641 

0X641 


Sep 

94X5 

94X3 

94X4 


96.13 

94,13 

94.13 

Mar 

93X8 

93X8 

93X7 


N.T. 


93X3 

Sen 

NLT. 

N.T. 

9126 

Esi. volume: 170 Open inf.; 

I7S. 


un 

nm 


— 0.03 

— 0X1 


XMOPfTM EUR0MARK5 (L1FFE) 
DM1 mWaa-PtsoMOOpct 


Sep 

95X2 

94.99 

95X0 

Dec 

9684 

94X0 

94X2 

Mar 

94X4 

94X0 

94X3 

Jon 

94.19 

94.15 

94.18 

Sep 

93X7 

93X3 

9186 

Dec 

9159 

93X6 

9059 

Mcr 

93X9 

9038 

9038 


9118 

9017 

9018 

Sot 

KT. 

H.T. 

93.02 

Dec 

92X1 

9281 

92X3 

Mar 

N.T. 

N.T. 

92.70 

Jon 

N.T. 

N.T. 

92X6 


+ 0X2 
+ 402 
+ 0X3 
+ 0X2 
Unch. 
+ 0X2 
+ 0X1 
—061 


Unch. 
UlKfL 

— am 

Est. volume: 4L594. Open bit.: 800324 


LONG CILTCUFFEj ^ 


■30886 • Pts A XMds o*188 Kt 
SOP 700-31 100-11 190-71 —0-01 

Dec 100X9 100X5 100X6 — 0X2 

Est. volume: 14651 Open bit: 1 14621 
GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND (UFFE) 

DM 250880 -Pts Of 180 PCi 

Sop 91X2 91 JB 91X1 —0X7 

Die 9073 9058 9064 —070 

ESI. volume: 44171 Open Int.: T70447. 


Industrials 

Lost seme ClOTe 


HWl LOW 

uxfdoflircplr metric teo+ota otiao te«* 

§5 iss iss iss i£8=is 

Not Ub5 SxO 15775 15775 - LOO 

Dec 16075 159X0 15975 15950 — 075 

Sax 16175 16025 16175 141-25 —1X0 

M N.T. N.T. N.T 16150 -05D 

MOT 160X0 15973 160X0 16000 — 025 

Apr ILT. N.T. N.T. 158X0 +075 

May H.T. N.T. N.T. 157X0 N.T. 

JUM 156X5 >56X0 15125 15400 —025 

Est. volume: 11X38. Onen lid. 94728 


Eller* iWTrmTr 
El Inc ADR 
: Ids Prop SA 

REIT 

Price REIT B 
C-apprax ran! Per AD R. 


. X47? 9-15 9-30 
C .144 MO 12-14 
C X5 4 704 


INCREASED 


Da Km Cp 
N oise Com 


S J7 6-25 9-6 

X7S 9-23 Jfl-3 


Fad Screw Wka 


60 96 10-3 


PoxarCp 

UWBCPtn 


_ 25% 8-30 
_ 10% *■» 


OMITTED 


Airship Inti ud 


Aided Gop ff CP 
Amar Bol Fd 
Amor Blltrtte lac 
Ancmgel ShpHld 
Art Isttc Greet 
Autoclave Engln 
Automatic Dal Proc 
Brad lev REIT 
CirPotar Pptvn 
Citlzoos Ban AAd 
Currant Inco Sis 
DeKclb Genetic B 
Fedl Screw Wfcs 
FstAust Prmloc 
Ghimte GoW 
Marteyrvllle Natl 
Hyper 2005 ln» 
Modem Controls 
Mock- Austin Inc 
Muveen [John) Co 

Penn Engineer OMJg 

FI, ■ i-ti , p-,1 1 Cwa 

Kuuumrr an 

Sands ROOOTt 
Se/toman OftyMun 



Cp 

Ind 
Rile cp 

_Cp 

TrmwlcKGrp 
UtdBcpInc 
Washlnoton REIT 
WIndmere Corp 
oapprax amt per ADR. 


REGULAR 

Q 25 t-tt Ml 
Q M 8-12 8-15 
G X375 9-26 10-10 
C S3 9-1 10-7 
Q £23 9-1 9-15 

Q X6 8-31 9-15 
O .15 9-16 10-1 
Q .16 9-79 9-30 
O 375 HI 11-1 
Q _27 9-6 9-30 

8 23 Ml 9-15 

70 8-36 9-9 

Q JO W 143 
M X825 8X1 9-16 
S M 9-13 9X0 
Q .16 9-16 9-30 
M X62S 8-22 8-31 
Q OS 11-4 11-18 

8 X45 9-15 136 
.16 9-1 9-15 

§ 75 9-15 136 

X5 10-W 11-1 
a X3 6-22 9-16 
M Jim M2 8-29 
M X7 8-22 8-29 
Q .13 825 9-13 
0 X25 9-30 10-14 
Q X9S 8-26 9-15 
B 745 9-1 13-1 

a 75 M2 9X8 
a XS Mf 49 
Q 23 9-16 9X0 
_ XS 9-1 9-15 


&oas w ,wm opacity, the same as I 

Ste Xuftouriug sted. pupT p™** 15 “ d P em,tet " n 

produtas all rose to over 90 peroenu 

Paramount Helps Viacom Earnings 

NEW YORK. (Bloomberg) — Viacom Inc. said Monday i ts 
*** ^ its acqutsiUQn of Para- 
mount ^ CS Inc. and a $267 milhongain from selling 
its stake in the Lifetime cable tdevisj on e etw 
Net income rose to £221.7 million, or JI.44 a staMrmn 141.6 
mfflion, or .35 cents a share, a year eyher. R^CTueatthe 
entertainment and media company 

S496 maHoa For the first half. Viacom recorded a loss of 523-4 
million, after net income of $122^ million a year earlier. 

The most recent results reflect 50.2 percent o^nerehip of 
Paramount as of March I. Third-quarter results will reflect full 
ownership of Paramount effective July 7, the company said. 


Accounting Firms Alter Legal Status 

NEW YORK (Bloombera) — KPMG Peal Marwick and De» 
loitte & Touche are reorganizing tbeir partnerships to give indi- 
vidual partners more protection against lawsuits, the accounting 
firms said Monday. . . _ 

The moves bring to five the number of major accounting firms 
to change into limited liability partnerships. Ernst & Young, •’nee 
Waterhouse and Coopers & Lybrand became bruited -liability 
partnerships two weeks ago. A spokesman for Peal Marwick said 
the firm was changing its status “to provide partners protection 


for their personal assets. 

Arthur Andersen will make a similar move next month, a 


spokesman. Jack Ruane, said. 

Kmart Profit Fell in 2nd Quarter 


TROY, Michigan (Combined Dispatches) — Kmart Corp. said. 


Monday its profit fell nearly 8 percent in the second quarter.; 
reflecting continued troubles at the com] 


company’s discount stores. 

The second-largest UJST retailer said it earned $94 million in the 
quarter, down from $102 million a year earlier. Second-quarter 
consolidated sa tes rose 4.6 percent to S8JS3 billion from $8.44 
billion a year ago. For the first half, Kmart said profit slid 10.4 
percent to SI 12 milli on from $125 million. First-half 1994 sales 
rose S.4 percent to $16.64 billion. 

Kmar t mid its directors would meet Tuesday morning amid 
speculation that a plan to deal with the company's specialty stores 
may emerge. - (AP, Bloomberg) 


American Home lifts Cyanamid Bid 


mm Bank of Boston. 

The dollar closed at 1.5522 
Deutsche marks, down from 
1.5572 DM Friday, at 1.3030 
Swiss francs, down from 1.3265 
francs, and at 5.3265 French 
francs, down from 5.3400 
francs. It closed at 100.13 yen. 
little changed from 100.15 yen 
on Friday. 

Stronger-th an -expected U.S. 
capacity utilization figures for 
July reinforced the perception 
that the economy is growing 
quickly enough for bottlenecks 
in supply to develop, analysts 
said. 

If the Federal Reserve Board 
views that as likely to fuel infla- 
tion, it will be more inclined to 


of resolve on the Fed’s part. 

the tai 


The Fed has raised the target 
for the federal funds rate, which 
sets the wholesale cost of funds 
for banks, four times since Feb. 
4, to 4.25 percent. 

The dollar has been under- 
mined by speculation that Euro- 
pean interest rates are close to 
their bottom for this economic 
cycle. That sentiment was fueled 
by moves by Italy and Sweden 
last week to raise rates. 

Prospects for higher rates in 
Europe dilute the attraction of 
rising U.S. rates. 

“The mark’s been strong, 
based on the view that German 
rates are now going up,” said 
Julian Callow, an economist at 
Kleinwort Benson Securities. 


Securities Slump Takes 
Further Toll on Merrill 


Bbnmberg Business News 

NEW YORK — Merrill Lynch & Co., the largest U.S. 
securities firm, said Monday that its average weekly revenue, 
net of interest, fell 14 percent in the first five weeks of the 
current quarter from its average in the second quarter. 

“Financial markets continued to weaken in July 1994. 
leading to lower volumes in many business areas,” Merrill 
said in a quarterly report filed with the Securities and Ex- 
change Commission. The decline in business “negatively 
affected net revenues,” Merrill said. 

The company had net revenue of $24 billion in the second 
quarter, or an average of $185 million a week. A 14 percent 
decline from that amount would put Merrill’s average weekly 
net revenue at S159 million. 

Wall Street’s results are declining because the three-year 
rally in the bond market slopped abruptly in February, when 
the Federal Reserve began raising interest rates. 

Merrill’s second-quarter profit fell 27 percent to $252 
million, or $1 . 1 8 a share, from $345 million, or $ 1 .52 a share, a 
year earlier. Lehman Brothers Holdings Inc., the world’s 
fourth-largest underwriter of stocks and bonds, reported a 79 
percent decline in second-quarter profit. 


Texas Instruments Adds 
Capacity to Six Plants 


Bloomberg Business News 

DALLAS — Texas Instruments Inc. said Monday that it had 


NEW YORK (Knigbt-Ridder) — American Home Products 
Corp. said Monday that it was raising its offer to buy American 
Cyanamid Co. to $100 a share from $95 if Cyanamid agrees to the 
deal by the close of business on Tuesday. 

But if . Cyanamid does not accept the sweetened bid. Home 
Products will proceed with its pending tender offer at $95 a share. 
Last week Cyanamid urged its shareholders to hold off tendering 
tbeir shares until it could study the bid further. 


choscD subsidiaries of GTE Corp. and Southwestern Bell Corp. to 


provide advanced telecommunications services for six Texas 
plants starting in the fourth quarter. 


WMkMtf Boor Office 


The Associated Press 

* GTE and Southwestern Bdl already serve the Texas I astro- LOS ANGELES— “Oear and Present DMgca-“dominated the 
men Is plants in their operating regions, but the two companies U.S. box office again with a grass of $15.7 million over the 
have not yet provided joint service of the type Texas Instruments weekend- Following are the Top 10 moneymakere, based on 
requires. “They can deliver significantly more capacity at margin- Friday ticket sales and estimated sales for Saturday and Sunday; 


ally lower cost,” said a Texas Instruments manager. 

While most oT the initial use of the upgraded system will be for 
transmitting complex technical and manufacturing data, the com- 
pany also plans to add videoconferencing and other'servicesl 
Once the Texas plants are booked up, the company wants to 
add connections to its factories outside the United States, includ- 
ing ftaly, Japan, Taiwan and Singapore. 


1. "Otar and Pmnt Danoor- 

2. -Forrest Gump" 

i-nwMii*- 

4. -Tlw Little Rascals’ 

- 5. TrtSJ U*jr - - 

6, -Tn (tw Array Now" ' 

7. -ThaUaiiXl»iB- 

LThaCUanr 

1-ltCauM Happen to you" • 

(•.’Aims In ihs OuHMd" 


tParamouotl 
{Now Uno ctotma) 
Miahmsai} 

■ - - ■» , ■*— »• 

"1 I WUH VL 181 1NIBUI T 

(HoUywoodPietunra) 
(WattDhnmn - 
JWamef BarihotSJ 
{ TriStar > 
fWartOfaneW 


5157 million 
114 minim 
197 million 
177 minion 
*- 8A9mWian 
S&StnlHIan 
56 million 

. ex ml r Hon 

*4.1 million 

* 2.1 minim 


U.S. FUTURES 


Vio AModOTd 9m 


Aug. IS 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Agenco Frmce Pibsm Aug. IS 


Amsterdam 


ABN Amro Hid 59.90 40.10 
ACF Holding 3870 37.90 
Asoon 
Ahold 

Aicro Nonet 
AMEV 

Bols-Wessoncn 
.CSM 


97X0 9&60 
4680 4690 
21150 21870 
72X0 73.10 
40-90 40-50 


DSM 
E hauler 
Fokker 

Gist-Brocades 
HBG 
Helnakan 
HooBoyam 
Hunter Douglas 
IHC Caland 
inter Mustier 
(nil Nederland 
KLM 
KNF BT 
KPN 
NeOHoyd 

Ocr Grtnten 

Pc* hoed 

Philip* 

Porvorom 

Rotoeco 

Rodamco 

Rot Inca 

Rorotrto 

Royal Dutch 

Stork 

Unilever 

VanOmmeren 

VNU 

waiter s/Kluwer 


67 JO 67X0 
- 14450 


142.70 

171.10 1714# 
1670 1620 
49X0 50.10 
29650 29450 

23630 23450 

8150 8050 
85 83 

4T 41 
8250 8250 
79X0 7750 
5350 5350 
49X0 48.70 
49X0 49.70 
70.70 69X0 
77X0 77X0 
52.90 5120 




77 JO 
11650 11650 
55.10 55.10 
119X0 II9X0 
86 86X0 
193.30 193 

48.90 4850 

19650 195X0 
5160 53 

192.90 194 
119 11850 


EOE Index : 415.11 
Previous : 414X3 


OaeProv. 


Rhekunetall 
Scherlno 
Siemens 
Ttrnsen 
Varta 
vena 
VEW 


V w£wwwfi 


Volk 

walls 


3Z7 327 

957250 945 

6755067X10 
32631750 
320 319 

5*853750 
374 369 
4895048550 
506504X0 
HDD 1075 






Helsinki 


Amer-Yhtyma 

Enso-Gufzelt 

Hutilarnakl 
K JtXP. 
Kymmene 
Metro 
Nokia 
Pohlota 
Rapa la 
Stockmann 


121 

124 

42 

4250 

160 

165 

9.40 

9X0 

126 

125 

167 

173 

488 

490 

66 

(7 

9BJ0 

89 

230 

ZB 


HBW 


Markets Gosed 
Stock markeu in 
Brussels, Madrid, 
Milan and Paris 
were dosed Monday 
for a holiday. 


Frankfurt 


17617250 
345 330 
2357 2342 
639 


1000 7005 


AEG 

Alcatel SEL 
Aiffanj Hold 
Allans 
Asko 

BASF 32250 31 

Bayer 362X03S9. 

Bay. Hypo bank 405 4U 

BoyVeretnsbk 432 <31 

BBC 760 775 

BHF Bonk 381 3» 

BMW 854 855 

Commerzbank 317 320 

Conlbmtta) 26150 282 

Daimler Benz B06801X0 

Demssa 49549150 

01 Babcock 258257X0 

Deutsche Bank 6965069120 

Oauotos 495 49550 

□resdner Bank 38020 379 

FeWmuehle 305 305 

F Kruno Hoesch 230 226 


Hong Kong 

Bk East Asia 31.90 31.90 
Cathov Pacific 1255 1245 
Cheuna Kona 3750 37X0 
Ollnq Light Pen 38.90 3880 
; Dairy Farm InM 11 JO 1155 
Hang Luna Dev 1x8$ 1X95 
Hang Seng Bonk ss 54.75 
Henderson LOTH 40 39 JO 
HK Air Eng. 3950 3950 
HK China Gas 1450 1450 
HK Electric 7X80 2435 
HK Land 20X5 2055 

HK Realty Trust 21.20 2155 
H5BC Holdings 91 9150 
HK Strong HtK 11JS 11X0 
HK Telecomm 15.90 15X0 
HK Ferry 1555 1555 

Hutch Whampoa 3650 3650 
HrsanOev 22.m 2294 

Jaralna Math, 6175 6X50 
Jar dine Str HM 3040 29X5 
Kowloon Motor 15 14.90 
Monderln Orient 10.15 10.15 
Mhramor Hotel 2055 21.10 
New World Dev 2SX0 25X0 
SHK Props 51 51.2S 

Slelux X16 X15 

Swire Poe A 6025 S8J5 
Tal Cheung Pros 10X5 11.10 
TVE XB8 3X3 

WharfHidcl 31.10 31X0 
Wing On Co mil 11.70 11 x 0 
Wlnsor Ind ,1X5 11X5 


Harpancr 

Henkel 

Modified 

Hoechst 

Halzmorai 


IWKA 
KollSOlZ 
Knrslodl 
KouRiOf 
KHD 



Ktoeckiw werke 161X0160X0 
Linde TO 919 

Lufthansa mssamsa 

MAN 44150 434 

Mannesm on n 445 441 

MekrilMxIl 10650190X0 
MuenehRweck 2960 2850 


Porsche 

Preussog 

PWA 

bwe 


849 842 

479.70 481 
250 24a 
44444ft to 


Johannesburg 


AECl 
AJtech 
Anglo Amer 
Bortows 
Birvoor 
Buttes 
De Beers 
OrletaiMM 
Geneor 
GF5A 
Hormony 
Hloti veld Steel 
Kloof 

Ncdbank Grp 
Rand fan leln 
Pina lot 
SA Brews 
St Helena 
Scsoi 

Western Deep 


2X75 2450 
ns ns 

252 255 

33 3X25 

1X75 10 

45 46 

115 119 
66 6X50 
1250 12JD 
124 126 
2550 2650 
32 31 J5 
dl 82 

34 3350 
47 4X25 

10150 HO 
87.75 88 

4650 NA 
3051 31 

190 196 

fM?Mf S» :S7MJ,# 


London 


Abbey Natl 
Allied Lyons 


ArtaWMgin 
II Cm 


Argyll Group 
ass am Foods 


X93 

5.91 

2J8 

2J2 

ill 


X97 

5X1 

2X1 

X73 

SX2 


BAA 

BAe 

Bank Scotland 

Barclays 

Bass 

BAT 

BET 

Blue Circle 
BOC Group 
Beets 
Buxroter 
BP 

Brit Airways 
Brit Gas 
Brit Sleel 
Brtt Telecom 
BTR 

CoW* Wire 
CndhurySeh 
Coradon 
Coats VI Villa 
Comm Union 
Caurtaulds 
ECC Group 
enterprise Oil 
Eurotunnel 

F Isons 
Forte 
GEC 

Gen'l Aec 

Glaxo 

Grand Met 

ORE 

Guinness 

GU5 

Hanson 

HIlbdCNMn 

hsbc Hidgs 
ICl 


Kingfleher 
Lad broke 
LondSec 
Laportg 

Lqhtw 

LraalGenGrp 
Lloyds Bwik 
Marks 5C 
MEPC 
Not! Power 
NatWesl 
NttiWn Water 
Pearson 
P8.0 


Wlklngton 

ParrerOon 


Prudential 
Rank Ora 
Reckllt Col 
Radland 
Reed Inti 
Reuters 
RMC Group 

Rolls Royce 
Rgthmn limit) 
Roval Scot 
RTZ 

Salnstmrv 
ScotNewcas 
Scot P ower 
Sean 

Severn Trent 

Shell 

SJehe 

Smith Nephew 
SmlltiKllne B 
Smtln (WHI 
5un Allkince 
Tote & Lyle 
Test* 

Thom EMI 

Tomkins 
TSBGroup 
Unilever 
uwHisaiHs 
Vodo+xie 
War Lean 3 V* 
Wellcome 
Whitbread 
Williams Hdgs 
Willis Corrom 
-T. 38 Index 


Clara Prev. 

5 

4X2 

a 

1X4 

1X6 

143 

5X8 

SJ4 

5X9 

4X3 

438 

1.18 

012 

H* 

7J4 

733 

5J5 

333 

4X2 

4X3 

4.13 

411 

4.19 

424 

2X5 

2X9 

ixa 

1X1 

176 

175 

175 

436 

J2 

4X6 

468 

098 

098 

235 

234 

544 

5X3 

534 

133 

1X0 

181 

4X9 

4.11 

2X9 

087 

1X5 

1X7 

039 

2J6 

2X4 

280 

5X0 

5X3 

630 

826 

438 

436 

1X0 

’■S 

459 

453 

5X1 

5X0 

2X5 

2X5 

1J8 

L21 

7X4 

7J1 

037 

8X3 

481 

479 

532 

015 

1J0 

TXT 

6X1 

6X8 

030 

005 

1X3 

1X3 

4X2 

4X3 

538 

5X3 

434 

431 

4X8 

456 

4J8 

474 

463 

4X0 

SJ0 

037 

*35 

630 

687 

*3 

1.92 

1X2 

5X0 

5X6 

11D 

111 

199 

194 

633 

637 

538 

533 

0OS 

BX3 

4X2 

492 

9X5 

9X6 

1.98 

1.98 

072 

172 

093 

0*4 

833 

8JB 

432 

419 

533 

025 

3X1 

3X1 

1.22 

M3 

536 

5X8 

735 

7.18 

588 

405 

1X6 

1X4 

430 

430 

4X2 

4X4 

015 

017 

451 

450 

2X2 

1024 

& 

235 

2X8 

288 

Ztl 

IMS 

1094 

337 

038 

146 

1X8 

r >, ■ 









Montreal 


Atey i AlunUnum 32% 33Vh 
Borm isuntn a 23» 24 

BeflConado 
Bombardier B 
Camtilar 
Cascades 
Dominion Torn a 
D onohue a 
FCAI ntT 
MacMillan B1 
Nall Bk Cmotio 


46» 4Z4K 
30W 289h 
17 VS 1716 
5W 515 
6VS 6*6 
IM 131b 
A10 410 
l»e 19 
9* 9\k 


Close Prev. 


Power Corp. 


I9« I9»s 

sm rv. 

IP'S 19W 
IB'S 18V. 
I8W IB's 
18% 19 

12 12% 


Quebec Tel 
Quebecor A 
Quebecor B 
TeteoloOr 

Vldeatron 


To Oar Readers 

Sao Paulo stock 
prices were not 
available for this 
edition because of 
technical problems. 


Singapore 

Carebos XftS 6 

aiv Dev. 7.10 7 

DBS 11 11X0 

Fraser Neove 17.70 17X0 
Genttns 13X0 ixbo 

GoMen Hope PI 2X1 286 
Haw Par 122 X37 

Hume Industries 6X5 655 
Inchccpe 
Keopel 
KLKBiong 
Lum Chang 
Malayan Banks 
OCBC foreign 
DUB 
OUE 

Sembovnmg 
ShanarUa 
Sin* Darcy 
5IA foreign 

S'poreLond 
S'pare Press 
Sing Steamship — 

5 ‘core Telecomm 152 150 

Straits Trading 352 152 

UOB foreign 14 14.10 

UOL 23* 123 

straits Times lad. : 230135 
Prevfcws : 23T7J7 


5J5 SX5 
T1 11 
4 4X6 

156 1 -59 

9X0 9.90 
14.10 1440 
655 655 
8X0 850 
1150 HAD 
X20 5JD 
423 06 
71X0 13X5 
7X5 7X0 
166C 17 

4X2 4X6 


Stockholm 


AGA 
ASeaA 
Astra A 
AUCS Cc . 
Electrolux B 
Ericsson 

Esaeite-A 
H unoe t stanken 
investor B 
Norsk Hydro 

PraeordloAF 
Sandvik B 
SCA-A 
S-E Banked 
Stand la F 
Skanska 
SKF 

Stare 

TreUeborg BP 
Volvo BF 


6550 65g 
620 6T5 

163 MS 
8950 92 

IT! 376 
395 
100 
88 
166 


102 
87 
164 
255502545D 
114 114 

113 116 

110 no 

41X0 42 

105 1117 

139 141 
137 


432 437 
9550 9750 
149 148 

KSSEfffi a# 1 ™ 


Amcor 

ANZ 

BHP 

Bcrol 

BOOTOkivtlle 
ColKMver 
Coma I ca 
CRA 
CSR 

Fosters Brew 
Goodman Field 
ICl Australia 
Magellan 


Sydney 

Ml 9.17 
All 4X6 
19X4 1954 
148 3X7 


426 425 
690 692 
19.18 19X6 
668 669 
1.12 1.12 
158 157 
11X4 11X4 
1.95 1.95 


Close Prey. 


X96 Z97 
11X4 10.98 
67S 870 
654 4 53 
3X5 152 


MIM 

Not Aust Bank 
Nevrs Coro 

Nine Network 

N Broken Hill 
Poe Dunlop 
Pioneer mtl - 

Nmndy Poseidon 2.15 2.19 
OCT Resources 158 157 

Sartos 3X5 L98 

TIIT 257 252 

Western Mining 721 7X5 
Westooc Bulking 650 4X6 
Woods! 0e 676 678 


3 3X1 




Tokyo 

Akoi Electr 465 460 

Ajahl Chemical 777 7BC 

Asahl Glass 1220 1220 

Bank of Tokyo 1560 1B0 

Bridgestone 1610 16K> 

Canon 1730 1750 

Casio T2S0 1250 

Dol Ntopon Print 1940 1920 

Dalwa House 1480 1430 

Dalwa Securities 1580 1570 

Fonuc 4480 44D0 

Full Bank 


air* 0 


Jlfsw 
Hitachi 
Hilochi cable 


Ito Yokoda 
Ibxhu 

Jaocn Airlines 

Karima 

Kansal Power 
Kawasaki Steel 

Kirin Brewery 

Komatsu 
Kubota 
Kyocera 
Matsu Eieclnds 
Matsu ElecWks 
Mitsubishi Bk 
Mitsubishi Kasai 
Mitsubishi Elec 
Mitsubishi Hev 
Mitsubishi Carp 
Mitsui and Co 
Mitsui Marine 
MttsukosM 
Mitsumi 
NEC 

NGK Insulators 
Nlkico Securities 
Nippon Koaaku 
Nippon Oil 
Nippon Steel 
Nippon Yusen 
Nissan 
NOTiurpSec 
NTT 


Olympus Optical 1160 1170 


Pioneer 

Ricoh 

SoiyoEiec 

Share 

SWmcshj 

ShlnetsuChem 

Sony 

Sumitomo Bk 

Sumitomo Chem 

Suml Marine 

5umitanoMetd 

TciselCorp 

TcAedaCtwm 

TDK 

Toflin 

Tokyo Marine 
Tokyo Elec Pw 
Toppon Printing 
Torav ind 
Toshiba 
Toyota 
YomofcfiiSec 
p.-jf m 
mM73S\ 


Toronto 


AWiasi price 
Agtucs Eagle 
AlrCwioda 
Alberta Bnerav 
Am Barrtck Res 
BCE 

Bk Nova Scotia 




Te l ec o m 


IB 18 
164* 14H 

27W 21M 
30V. 3W* 
Wt 46*i 
26V* 25H 
14W 144* 
25V6 2S«* 


Close Prev. 


Brunswick iov» 10 

CAE 71* 7 

Camdev 6AS 4J0 

CIBC 318* 3146 

Canadian Pacific TPU 2181 


Con Tire A 

Cantor 

Cara 

CCL Ind B 
Cbiepiex 
Comtnco 
Canwest E*Pl 
CSAMgtA 


101* 1W 
20 '6 20V* 
4 4 

9 ST* 

4X0 4X0 

2195 2Hfe 
231* 234* 

10 10'A 
22*1 2245 
170 OJO 

15 141% 
0X0 0J9 
4 615 
64 61* 


DylexA 

Echo Bay Mines 
Eouttv Sliver A 
fca mu 

Fed Ind A _ _ 

Fletcher Chall A T7*4 178* 

FPI 6V5 6Vj 

Gentra oxo 0.41 

GuH Cda Res 515 

Hees I nil 13<% 13 

Hcmlo Gld Mines 128k 124* 

Hoillnger 128* 124* 

Horsham ISIS Iff*, 

Hudson's Boy 26V. 75*5 

Imasco 35V; 3581 

loco 36V. 368k 

IPL Energy 294s 30 

Jcsinock I58i 16 

Lobatt 20V* 191* 

UrtlawCO 20H 2045 

Mackenzie 7Ya 74k 

Magna Irtt A 51W 524* 

Maple Leaf 12 12 

Maritime 239* 23 V: 

Mark Res 9S5 9V5 

Mol son A 21 21 

Noma ind A 5U S8 

Norondo me 2S4* 3% 

Noranda Fares! 118* 118* 

Noreen Energy ist* 14V* 

Nlhn Telecom 469* 464* 

Nova Core 13 131* 

Oshawc ir* lffK. 

PagurlnA 38k 3X0 

Placer Dome 274* Z7Vi 

Poca Petroleum e w* 

PWA Carp 057 QJ8 

Royroek IS4* 15** 

Rmalssrttor 284fc 284* 

Rogers B 2i\k 21«* 

Rothmans 76 7544 

Royal Bank Can 34* 2BW 

Scecfre Res 724* 724* 

S cott's Ho ot BV. 88* 

Seagram 424» Ov* 

SeorsCan 7V. 7U. 

Shell Can 437* <JV* 

Sherri M Oordon 12V6 12V. 

SHL Systemhse 7V* 716 


16»4 16>* 


138k 144* 
SWrn A *4* IV* 

Tofhmcn Enera 29*% 2984 

Tecfc B 22V. 22V. 

Thomson 15 1 * isvs 

Tofvita Domn 204s jdvi 

Torstor B 24W 344* 

Troraoiio Ulil 14 14V* 

TransCdo Ploe 17 1714 

Triton Flni A 195 lffi 

Trlmoc 16 16Vk 

Unlcorp Energy 155 I JO 


JSMiur* 


Zurich 


Adlo Inti B 246 244 

Alusulsse 8 new 687 658 
BBCBrwnBovB 1272 1271 
Cttw Gem B — 

C5 Holdings B 
BlektnwB 
F tetter B _ 

mrerdlscount B 
JetmMIS 
LmOsGyrR 
MoevwiPlckB 

Nestti R 

Oertlk. Buehrte R 14650 141 JO 
Porsesa Hid B 1510 1510 
Rocho HOT PC 
5afro Republic 
SandnB 
stjurener b 
S utler PC 
Surveiftonee 6 
sedsiBnk Cores 


827 816 
523 531 
3SJ 355 
1490 1495 
2165 2160 
US OH 
775 786 
407 407 
1172 1174 


5695 5630 
113 114 

715 713 
7900 7975 
TO 960 
2090 2100 
394 384 




UBS B 
wmermur B 
Zurich Ass B 


860 855 

1087 ms 
673 676 

1271 T27S 




Season Season 

HWi Low (toen 

MOT 

Low 

Close COT 

OpJnt 


Grains 








3XTm 

3X2 SOT 94 1409 

147 

3X0 

3A6V, +00416 14034 

1X5 

3X9 Dec 94 056 

Iflto 

154V. 

3X2 

♦OXSto 30154 

064V, 

02/ Ma-95 147Vi 

070 

lOT 1 * 

1X9-6 lOJSW 10220 

XS 

116toMor95 156 

162 

1SS*> 

3X1 

•OJM’i 

725 

ICk 

11) toJ 95 33Bto 

141 

3J7V, 

141 

+0X7)4 

7J7D 


Dec 95 



3XB 

+0A2N 

2 

ESLiales NA FrTs.«leS 

16059 





Fri'sOoenW 62X05 off 75* 






oOarsparbuUMl 


155V, 

102toSOT94 152to 

157V, 

151 to 

3J7 

+0X3V, 1X168 

XB% 

1125, Dec 94 360 

1645k 

3X9 

164W +00316 19,773 

Jxi to 

125 Mar 95 163 to 

065 

159V5 

3XA 

• OXJto 

5X54 

051 

121 to Mav 95 152* 

3X4 

1S2V, 

3X4 

+0X3 

456 

148 

XlttoAJtS 3X6 

141 

136 

141 


478 

3X8 

129 Sot 95 



043 

♦CUB 


160W 

240toD«c95 



3X2 

+103 

1 

EstXrtes NA. Ftfs. rales 






FrTsopenW >9.133 un 10D 





CORN 

(CBOT) SAOi btj rnVWTXjiTV. 03 

x»a»l 




7- 97V, 

014 Sot 94 017 

01716 

01416 

217V, 

34X47 

077 

017 DSC94 019* 

02O>6 

0181k 

220 

—0X016122X70 

182V: 

225 Mar 94 139 

23916 

02716 

JJTto-ODOto 26,172 

2X5 

032toMOy 95 035% 

13Sto 

23414 

2X516-4101 

10843 

IXJto 

2J6toJU95 239 Vi 

040 

23816 

240 

-0X1 

9,905 

ZJOto 

039 SOT 93 2X1 

241 to 

04OM 

2X1 Vi— 0X1 

H7 

2X3 

03StoDec9S 043 

243 to 

243 

axsto-oxoto 

5.1 1! 

0SHk 

057 M 94 



257to— OXOto 

It 

EB-Ws NA Fri LScteS 

25X53 





FfTsccenrt 209X06 Off 354 





SOTOAB (CBOT) moor 

mbttmuro- ooaor 



735 

SJIViAug 94 5JDto 

5X4 

579 

S7T/.--aQ4to 

4X61 

7JT/S 

5X0to5OT94 5X8 

5X9 

5X4 Vi 

5X516—005 

14,118 

7X7to 

SJ1 Mcv5M SJ9 

059» 

5X5 

15715-004 

74*f> 

7X4 

5X0 Jen 95 5X7 

5X4 

Sflto 

SX616-4LB8to 10628 

7X5 

5X9 Mar 95 SJ 6to 

577 

573 

575to— OJNto 

4X94 

7JSto 

SJStoMay 93 5X3 

583 

5X016 

18316 -08114 

0185 

7X6» 

SJ3M,M9S 5X8 

5X8 

SJ4 

086 

-OJHIft 

SJOb 

094to 

5J9 Aug 95 5X8 

5X8 

SJSto 

SXSti-lUink 

Ml 

5X8 

5J7 Sot 95 



588 

-0X1 to 

24 

6J0to 

578toNav9S 194 

SMto 

SVIto 

5J2 

-0X416 

0733 


Jul 96 



A07 



Est. rates NA Fit's, soles 

34,757 





Fn'scpenrt 122.M3 Off 365 





SOY BEAN MEAL (CBOT) NOkm-i 

Won par ton 



223X0 

17230 Aug 94 17098 

173X0 

17170 

172XC 

— 0TO 

0929 

210X0 

171X0 SOT 94 171X8 

17) JO 

178X0 

mxt 

-0.10 19.TB1 

207 JO 

170800094 170X0 

170X90 

169X0 

17071 

—030 11X00 

709 JO 

i/botokw msn 

171 JO 

r/ow 

(71 JO 

-JLW32JWB 

rn jo 

171X8 Jon 95 171X1 

171 JO 

171.10 

171X8 

—0X0 

4X53 

207X3 

773X0 Mor 93 I73JD 

17400 

17080 

174X0 


5X42 

207X0 

174X0 May 95 174JD 

175X0 

17410 

175X0 


3X70 

206X0 

17130 JO 9S 176X0 

77730 

175X0 

T7X9C 

+040 

1X48 

181 30 

I7BXDAua95 177X0 

177X0 

T74J0 

177X0 

*iuo 

125 

782X0 

176X05OT9S 177X0 

177X0 

177X0 

177X0 

—419 

49 

Etf.sdes NA FrTs. rates 

10026 





FrrtopenW 82X7/ up 1016 





SOYBEAN (ML (CBOT) nuOTOT-ag 




3065 

71X5 Aw 94 2437 

2437 

2403 

3404 

-OJ9 

014 

3034 

204) SOT 94 2425 

3423 

2195 

24X1 

—0X2 20X71 

29 J4 

221000 94 34X0 

2411 

2386 

2191 

-0X0 15.918 

38X7 

20OODec94 2097 

24X0 

2375 

2379 

-038X931 

28X5 

22X5 Jan 95 2292 

2395 

1378 

23X0 

— oje- 

4X51- 

2030 

2293 Mir 95 23J2 

2395 

23X0 

23X1 

— 0J6 

5.166 

2805 

22J3MOV95 2093 

2195 

2178 

23X1 

-036 

4X0* 

Z7XS 




2079 

— OJd 

1.933 

27 JB 

2095 Aug 95 ZL75 

2375 

2375 

2375 

-037 

SI 

2475 

2095 Sep 95 2190 

2190 

2170 

2171 

— 0J7 

51 

ZLU 

21160095 



23X5 

-020 

1 

2X20 

J2JDEPC9S ZLSO 

2050 

2158 

ZLM 


3 

Est.sOes NA FiTLsales 

142S 





FtVSOPoilrt B9J04 Off 95/ 







Livestock 




CATTLE HMBt) «W*w- 


to 




7005 

(iXOAugW 7097 

71 .W 

69 JO 

70X0 

—097 

7X57 

74.10 

617000 9* 7015 

7037 

7020 

7222 

-OSS31X9S 

700 

6728 Dec 94 71X5 

71X2 

70X0 

7023 

-1.10 141*4 

7435 

67 JO Rb »5 70*0 

7042 

69X5 

69X7 

-030 

9,780 



7772 

7075 

70X7 

-9X5 

6X79 

8938 

66X0 Jun 95 68X0 

6870 

075 

4775 

-085 

1X22 

<000 

£7X2 AuO 95 SS 

0X2 

46X0 

UXO 

— U» 

239 

EsLsctns 10980 Frfv pxci 

6399 





FrTsmnM 7L12I off 6 






FEED Bt CATTLE (CMBt) 

0400 B4- ems PCT n. 





8017 

78X5 


-095 

2X03 

61 JO 

rixbSOTT* Ttxo 

7877 

77.M 

77.15 

—1X5 

0176 



7820 

74X8 

74X5 

-097 

2X45 ■ 


704ONOV94 78X5 

78.95 

77X0 

77X2 

-083 

1X76 

8095 

7295 JOT 95 77X0 

77.B 

76X0 

76.9S 

—0*5 

»l 

7630 

7125 MW « 75X5 

7010 

74X0 

7450 

-031 

27 

B.25 

72X5 MX 96 74.15 

74.45 

71* 

7LOT 

-073 

91 


■ 704SAPT 96 75X0 

7180 

7485 

7485 

—OXS 

IB 

Est. HOT 

2X49 RTS.501B3 

1X41 




“ 

Fri's aaen kit 10513 up V 






HOGS fCMEtt 





46X5 

42X0 AW M 45X5 

45X0 

44J2 

45X0 

—020 

1X20 



41X0 

4025 

4033 

-065 11X14 

SLSP 

39X5 Dec 94 40X7 

40X7 

4022 

40J i 

-W* 

1X45 

5080 

3L«FfbW 4030 

4092 

40X0 

40X3 

—cue 

1,994 

48X0 

3USAV9S SS3 

7PJ5 

39X7 

1977 

-Oflf 

J57 


4075 JUP 95 OLSt 

44X0 

4445 

44X7 

—0.13 

475 

4600 

4195 M 93 4120 

4409 

4420 

4433 

-023 

m 


401OAUB9S 4005 

43JB 



-015 

IS 

4050 

3? 700^95 



40J0 

— O0S 

ID 

Estw« 4X10 Fmscto 

L784 





-rfsauBifnt 23X81 up n 






PORKBajjes (CMBU 40X60 n-twiwl 

b. 




JOS AW 94 32X2 

3055 

3172 

31.77 

-095 

578 


41JBFS095 4605 

46X5 

4417 

4012 

—073 

*793 


40X2itoSf« *SXJ 

*«« 

4475 



403 


<Z.«6kry» 46X8 

4LI0 

4110 


-0X5 

45 

y nn 

£125 Jul 95 4635 

44JS- 

46J0 

4477 

-4X8 

•0 


4IJ0AUO93 



4iA 

— I.W 


Est. rales 2X71 Frfi.raOT 






=»9sot«iW 7X23 OT 214 








Season Sean 
MBh Low 


Open Hen Low Ckae Chg OpJnt 


I1JD —0.12 9JB7 
ILS 11X1 -0.14 UM 

11X7 11X7 -4U9 1566 
11.19 —O0» 217 

1123 -am 5 


COFFEE C (NOE) 9JBk*-<a«Nrk 

moo wxosotm 191x0 1952s won mao «njo axsv 

36425 77.10D6C84 18SX0 . 199JD 193X0 188X5 yCUO 165Z7 

24CM rtW»*rfS 19345 I9L6S N3X5 19X65 >6X0 5XM 

16C40 B2J0MayVS 194X0 66X0 1.916 

245.10 SSJMJmM N4J5 *680 415 

imoo 18550 Sep 95 195 l2S * 6X8 

3(2X0 B I JO Dec 85 196X0 *4X0 311 

Ed. sties 9,136 Ft+virtas 6.986 

RTsopinU 33X02 off 674 

SUGAR-WORLD 11 tNCSQ num*».- cefUtwtx 

1240 4390094 11X5 11J7 1144 11X1 —0X» 9X70 

12.10 9.17Mcr 95 11J1 • HJ3 T14S ‘ TIJI" -0L11 38X30 

12X6 1057 MOV 95 UJ7 11J7 1140 “ “ 

12X2 10573X93 11J1 1U1 

II JO 18L570d9S 11X2 11X3 

11X0 lDXBMre96 11.18 1128 11.18 

11X6 11X6 May 96 

EsLwtes 16X75 FWc. soles 62M 
Firs o pen mi hum off W67 
COCOA (IKSQ ornttavinto 
15M 10(1 Dk 94 1463 1470 U52 

1603 1077*60-95 Mf IM Mi 

1612 1078 May 93 1310 1510 1509 

WO 7225X495 U2J H3J 15B 

1611 U65Stp9S 1415 1418 1399 

1633 1290 Dec 95 1577 1577 1571 

1676 1330 Mar 96 

1505 15)3 Sep 96 

EsL sales 103S5 Fri*s.sc6es 1&354 
FrTsreenint 69X46 up 68 
OtUNDEJUKE (NCTIO H OTP OT, c wu wrk 
134X0 89.10 Nov M 97X0 JUS 96JS 98J0 *1X0 4X81 

132X0 93X0 Jan 95 100X5 IBLB 10OS> 102X0 »UD 4X93 

13433 96X0 Mar 9S 10425 10550 10425 MSJ0 -*1J0 1X15 

11425 97X0 May 95 10BJ0 +TJ0 858 

119X8 101X0 JM 95 11090 *TJ0 

111X0 91X5 Sep 95 94X0 9SX0 9150. 9545 +1J0 9275 

11240 11 2X0 Nov 95 U4J0 tlJD: 

Jon 96 T14J0 *1X0 

SOT 96 . 112X0 *1X0 

EsLMtes NLA. Frilsto 1X39 
nrsopenM 22251 UP 231 


1457 

>491 

1511 

1531 


1576 

1599 

1551 


—TS 32X37 
—8 10421 
—8 3X73 
-4 2287 
—16 13479 


—a 1400 

—8 UC 


Medals 


•* GRADE COPPER (NCMX) sMt^Murk 


116X0 

11528 

111J0 

nijo 

11170 

JUjOT 

112X0 

116X0 

11005 

>11X5 

112X0 

109X0 

108X0 

nsxo 

1 1040 


10720 


517X 

S97X 

564X 


606X 
41 OX 
6I5X 


Food 


7080 Sep 94 10840 109X5 HUS >0840 *015 21,932 

7U5DS94 10045 109JD N84B 10845 -020 15290 
76.90 Jan 95 ne.15 —040 377 

73X0 Feb 93 107X5 —043 357 

73X0 Mw 95 10070 107X0 10745 —030 2207 

76XSMoy75 10645 —040 >XM 

70X04495 *0343 —070 80 

7520AUO95 10080 108X0 10040 M840 *015 302 

79.10 Sep 95 10445 -080 (40 

7J20CW9S 10073 10075 10075 10053 777 

7725 New 95 10010 109,10 109.10 10050 —015 555 

8BX0DOC9S 10345 -0X0 151 

BLSOJanW 102X5 -0J0 59 

6220 Mar 96 WLC —090 134 

91. 10 Apr 96 106XS —0X5 143 

May 8t . . unxo — lxs 

^ — 0(5 Til 

Ert. sales NA. FiTt sates 7J51 
FWtopeninr 66277 off 318 
3R.VE0I (NCAUO MROTOTOT iw rlork 
«0fl SH5Aug94 . 3062... +02 

511X0094 309J *02 

3800 Dee 94 5110 5162 11 IX 5M3 . *U 

4QtXJ0n95 3164 *02 

41 62 Mar 95 S22X me 51 9X . SOB. *02 7X38 

4100 May 95 S25X 5222 S25J .5272 . >01 
420XJ495 • 532J Xllt 

483XSep9S S05X 509J SOLO 5072 *02 69X95 

»XOec95 1400 BOX 545X 5474 —02 2,136 

S75XJ(Z196 3504 -03 

5000 M» 96 554X 3800 SUJT 556 X -02 

587XMay96 3610 — 02 

A494 3492 -02 

a.iOlH HA. FigtoaOTs 33472 
Frfs seen tor 122,12s otf 5Si 
PLATBflM (NMSq SNf^wnwn.'.. . 

«4D 340000094 411X0 415X0 411X0 412X0 *0X0 10464 

4M» £4*Jan95 41450 418X0 414X0 416J0 *0X0 3X06 

SS5** lr,S -419 JO 418X0 <20X6 *120 1X31 

427X0 419X0 Jul 95 enut + i.ia 

431X1 422X0 Od 95 . (ISM +1.18 

Effl.taies NA. FrPs , stSos 23tJ 
ATSOPOTW 34X06 UP 22 
®0 LXI (now nonta>Nknwiwu 

341 JO Aug 94 32450 37450 374m 1720 +U» 344 

6LOOOC94 377X0 379X0 97 JB 379X0 +1X0 9X0 

3OX0 Dec 94 311X0 382X0 3TM 282X0 +0X0 93X80 

36050 Feb 95 41X0 41X0 4L80 3SSJ0 +0X0 11X06 

364X1 Apr 95 .. . 4027—792.17 6X31 

36126 Jut 95 38250 +0J0 9X81 

1805OAug8S ■ 38010 +0M 4J50 

xnX0O995 399X0 +0X0 

<BjaOK95 402.90 «2J0 ABJ0 40JJD *0X0 5X19 

41 09 RB 96 1 407X0 tOJO 

41020 Apr 96 bl JO ,0X0 1J40 

413X0 Jun 96 4IR40 +090 3X65 

6S.K80S NA. FffS.SOi« 38,134 
FrrsoaenH 156282 up 2CU 


.tenon Season 
Moh Lav 


Open High Low Close COT OnJnt 


1.555 


115-19 90-12 Jun 93 M0-17 700-1B 100-09 100-17 - 03 
ESC sales NA EH’LSOIb 508X90 . 

Frfsopai int 450207 up 25 06 

MWia P AL B O ND S (COOT} Slow, tean-anASrakal lespa 
95-17 00-13 SOT 94 90- II 90X7 90-15 90-16 - 04 21.544 

91-17 87-21 Dee 84 88-23 89-27 88-19 88-19 - ID 383 

EsLsXds NA Fri’s. sales 1X30 
FcrsopgsH 11X78 ett im 
EURODOLLARS tauER) U nAuvrim loaxo 
9190 902105094 94X50 MX® 94X30 94X40 -20432X05 

95100 98L71OD0C94 90140 94.150 90120 90140 -10472.739 

9SM0 90340 Nlor 95 93XM 93X90 93X60 93X80 -M335X39 

90730 8071 B too 95 91SB 93560 91530 93JM —10253X91 

90X» 9UIIIS8P9S 92280 93280 92250 50270 -30211X47 

OTJM 9LTOOOec95 92X90 9Z990 92X60 92.900 -80152,927 

90220 90750 AOrM 92X10 92X10 92X00 92X80 —30131X53 

90180 92X20 Jun 96 92290 92X00 92J70 92J0O —30100X34 

E0UW HA Fli'l.OTlH 481,152 
RTsQpbiM 2X20X90 up Z3403 

BRITISH POUND (OUR) 

1 J64 - 1X440 SOT W 1X440 1X456 1X400 1X412 -44 XUB 

1X7M 1X500 Dec 94 1X400 1X420 L53HJ IJJ90 -38 856 

EsLsoOT' NA R+L rales 8X20 
ftTsopwiH -34X32 up SO 

GANAUMt DOLLAR (CMERJ spwor- IpotolOTuuhHAMl 
OJMO 02068 Sep 94 07334 072 *5 07234 OJZM *7 34X13 

07670 02038 Dec 94 07214 07230 0771+ 07330 +7 1747 

0JS22 0X890 ton 85 CJT75 0J175 07175 07175 *16 389 

ann O7M0Dec95 0709S 07095 07095 07095 +7 5 

Estates NA Fi+ixales in) 

RTsopenW 31X86 Off 174 

eaauNMMK KMBO iiOTDOTk-ledWmaliiaaM 
06S6S 05601 Sot 94 06440 06457 06434 06441 +4100X44 

04606 05590 Dec 94 0X44S 0X157 0X434 0X440 «| SJ03 

Est. sixes NA Fit’s, satos JQX37 

Wsopentot 107X76 UP- 4498 

MPANE5EYBI (CMER) lowywv I mMMuNaiUmgn 
MW Migj lOlt 00100191111 002200088801X10012 +13 65.108 

0*rcgPQB»g»OC94 001 80400010010001 Bffnwil 0085 +15 6X46 

Mi0775un doosot 9s oownnxiosuDXiasnunajas — 17 33 

ea-Mot KA.-Rfi.nln 33X64 
FrftipanM 73X80 up 1W . 

WlttrmWC [CMBO tvu u trc- iMrtwauaium 
0JB17 066OOSOT9I 07674 07496 0J662 0706 +9 44X87 

OJ840 0(885 tec 94 02482 07788 07680 07485 *2 1,79 

BJ7X 0J43OMar9i 07780 5J7H 07700 07720 +14 39 

gyote NA Fri’s. ale* 21X49 

FrrsepwM 46.178 up nts 


Industrial 


61 2X 
4100 
S87X 


41500 

417X0 

0050 

411X0 

4DJB 


412X0 

41130 

428JM 

4MJ0 


jy»na 


Financial 


ffT.anxx ujibq li ra* wia 

MOT MOTSarW 9125 9129 9S22 912J ffX» 

MUDecM 94X7 9447 .KM MX7 ,-OBJ 9X02 
».*Mes NA Wfcwie* ixn 
Frl s own Int 31.U6 up 20H 

^ BOn WMBPk ■liIb»k6IQUB 
110. 95102-19 SopMIM-01 104-015100-285103-31 — 02 10X0 
104-18 MI-26 Dec 9410-089103X99 TO45 18HD- 02 16X13 
Es.aaiei rm FtTlotot 50031' 

Fri’sepenlnr IB4.18O off 4139 

myr. treasury toon MOTk-piMOMM 

J23J grS »+« 18J-3T 784X1- at 220000 

IfSIS* 2 * IMC1410M1 MUD TOOT 1DHB-. M 31X99 
1)1-0 100^9 Mar 99102-10 102-10 102-00 182-TO 66 

ES-BSet HA FrTkHiH 120X06 

FrYjoBenlnt 251.736 off 4J72^ 

W TREASURY BOHH ICBOT7 B— « I OTdM aewnwcl 
"-'J SepM 102-20 10M7 102-13 102-30- 05 SUM 

] QIC ** 101-30 lOS-ffl W1-I9 TO1-2S-. 07 91X0} 

116-20 90-10 Mar 99101 -05 181-07 100-20 TOI-tB-* 0 4,933 


COTTON 1 tNCTN) kMto-wkpvki' 

78X0 0X1 OdM 0X7 67 J0 0X7 0X7 —2X0 5J4* 

S9OTDOT94. 46X9 1655 66X5 66X5 -2X0 26X11 

* 2 £ ,l t Brts 47X5 48X0 0X5 0X5 -2X0 7. TO 

!££ 2 s * 4448 - 3J0 *^ 7 
7175 70X0X493 69X0 69X0 68 JO 69X7 —1.83 

7L70 68X00095 66X5 6BX0 66X0 18X5 —015 


<8X2 *QX2 1.106 


+0OT 30X28 
*0141 21,993 
*0X6 14X21 
+0X9 30X95 
+ 034 16X45 
+0X9 6X64 
+0X4 7X08 
+0X1 1X41 
*0X4 2X84 
+ 0X4 4X50 
+ 0X9 5X0 


72X0 48X0 Dec 95 0X0 « iw **J 5 

NA Fri*s. rales MM 
open Jnt ojn afl u 

WMHl) OMH-WPCM 
0.17 43X0 Sot 94 4010 49 JO e» xn 49.05 

2-* M-WO094 «MU M 

U) 46X0NovK 5073 51X5 5040 5090 

»£ 46X0DCCW 51X5 5ZOT ■ 91 J4 SS 

A25 .4235Jon95 52X0 SLW erai SLID 

SL» X7JSFOT95 52J5 5JJ0 BXB M 

0X0 47X0 Mar 85 BB Si e5 

K.15 4X05 Air 95 51X5 SLOT 5LM 

54X0 47XOMPy95-SOJO 5U0 SU0 50X0 

51X0 . 4U9Jun9S 50X0 5050 JCJ0 m 

54X0 47X5 to} 95 11.10 51.10 50X0 50X0 

f«»6M NA Fl+V rales 404H 
Fr+«Mntat 147409 BP «|5 
UGHTSVm CRUDE (KMsa IXWMA- 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 16, 1994 


Page 11 


]■* 

[iflfr 


LONDON — HSBC Hott- 
ings PLC said Monday that its - 
pretax profit rose 24 percesL'to 
£1.46 hiffion ($125 bEBiori). in 
the first half of the year, but the 
results were denied by an 86 
percent collapse in trading 
profit 

Sir William Pnrves. die chair - - 
man, said HSBC — the parent 
company of Hongkong & 
Shanghai Banking Carp, and 
Midland Bank PLC of Britain 
— ' would not be taking large 
positions in dealing operations 
until trading conditions im- 
proved. 

Dealing income - pl umm eted - 
to £73 million from g22-.mil-- 
lion after the UA, interest rate 
rises beginning in February, 
which threw bond markets into 
a slump. 

“We will not run significant' 
positions until we see markets 
that are.. Jess . unpredictable,’’ - 
Mr. Pnrves said. 

HSBC's subsidiary Midland 
Bank, whose Midland Global 
Markets accounts for most of 
the trading income, saw last 
year’s £296 million dealing profit 
turn into a £6 million loss. 

“We were-positioned for the . 
rate hike, but not for die ovtxre- 
action in Europe, particularly: 
in the bond markets," Mr. 
Pnrves said. “It was an excep- 
tionally difficult first -half.” 


Union Urges Midland Strike 

Coupled by Our Staff Fnm Dt^midta 

LONDON — Britain's largest banking union said Monday it 
was urgoig 20,000 staffat HSBC Holdings PLCs Midland Bank 
unit to cany oot a series of onc-day strikes after rejecting a 125 
percent pay increase offered by the hanV : 

The Banking and Insurance Finance Union said. “Fortunes are 
bong made at toe Midland, but the staff only get a 125 percent 
share,” a union spokeswoman said. The union seeks a pay raise of 
more than 3 percent. 

HSBC bad recordprofii last year of £2.58 billion, boosted by an 
£844 miBidir contribution from Midland, which it acquired two 
years ago. 

After the bank’s announcement Monday of first-half pretax 
profit of £443 million, the union called for Midland to make a new 
pay offer. Midland’s staff is due to complete voting Aug. 26 on 
whether to strike. (Reuters, AFX) 


HSBC’s cost-income ratio, a 
key measure of efficiency, wors- 
ened to 59.4 percent from 5 7.7 
percent because of lower trea- 
sury profits at Midland and 
Hongkong & Shanghai Bank- 
ing. But it was .below 60 per- 
cent, the level the group has set 

as sn acceptable max im um . 

“The British economy looks a 
bit patchy to me,” Mr. Pnrves 
said. *X2eariy there is some 
growth in the right direction, 
but these are worries about in- 
flation coming back and talk of 
interest rates ticking up. I hope 
they don’t tide up too soon.” 


He said the economy in 
North America, where HSBC 
owns Marine Midland Banks 
Inc. and Hongkong Bank of 
Canada, was “moving swiftly,” 
while growth in Hong Kong 
was running at 5 percent. 

The group derives 59 percent 
of its attributable profit from 
Hongkong Bank and its major- 
ity-owned Hang Seng Bank Ltd. 

“As we look forward into the 
areas in which we operate, the 
outlook is more encouraging 
than it was a year ago,” he said. 

The bank raised its dividend 
14 percent, to 8 pence a share. 


In London trading, HSBC 
shares fell 27 pence, to 744. 

In Asia, Hongkong Bank re- 
ported slightly higher attribut- 
able profit of 0-66 billion Hong 
Kong dollars ($867 million) for 
the first six months, compared 
with 637 Ullioa a year earlier. 

It said the result included 
Hongkong Bank's 613 percent 
holding in Hang Seng Bank, 
which reported a profit of 3.1 1 
billion dollars, an increase of 13 
percent from a year earlier. 

Hongkong Bank Malaysia re- 
ported an attributable profit of 
101 million ringgit ($40 mil- 
lion), compared with 65 million 
ringgit in the first half of 1993 
by the Malaysian branches of 
Hongkong Bank, which were 
transferred to the company Jan. 
1. 

In the United States, Maxine 
Midland reported an attribut- 
able profit of $1 10 million com- 
pared with $79 million, a rise of 
39 percent. 

The British Bank of the Mid- 
dle East reported an attribut- 
able profit of £21 million for the 
first six months, compared with 

£30 millinn 

Hongkong Bank of Canada 
reported an attributable profit 
OI 42 mfllinn Ca nailiim d ollars 

($30.4 million) for the six 
months ended April 30. - 

f. Bloomberg, Reuters, AFP) 


ISS Earnings Rise, but Stock Drops 


CompUedby Owr Staff Fnm Dispatches 

COPENHAGEN — ISS-lntemational Ser- 
vice System AS said Monday its first-half 
pretax profit jumped 67 percent helped by 
rising rales and a strong contribution from 
Natronal Cleaning Group, the UJL competi- 
tor it bought last year. 

ISS said it earned 235 million kroner ($38 
million) in the half, up from 141 mflHonin the 
1993 first half, whue rales rose nearly 23 
percent, to 7 .25 billion kroner. 

But the cleaning company said its operat- 
ing profit for the full year would be about 
steady with that of 1993, causing shareholders 
to bail out of the stock. In Copenhagen, ISS 
shares tumbled more than lO percent, to 197 
kroner from 220 kroner. 

“This is very disappointing,” said Lars Al-.. 
mind Hansen, an analyst with Jyske Bank. ASl. 
“It is more than a year since ISS bought 
NCG, and it said the whole merger process 
should be completed in 1993. We expected 
the net profit ratio would improve.” 

ISS said part of the reason for its cautious 
full-year outlook was Unit profit fell in Brazil, 
one of its largest markets. Profit margins in 


NYSE 

. Monday's Closing / . 

Tables include the natonwide prices op to 
the closing on Wen Street amt do n« reflect 
late trades elsewhere. Vis The Assoc ia ted Press 


Sweden slipped, further undermining the out- 
look, it said. 

But the company said results in the rest of 
Scandinavia were “highly improving,” while 
sales rose about 12 percent in the rest of 
Europe. 

Nevertheless, Mr. Hansen said be would 
revise downward his 1994 profit forecast to 
280 million kroner after tax, not counting 
one- time income from the sales of its energy 
mgnagptpm l and Hnm service units this year. 
Previously, Jyske Bank expected the company 
to post net profit of 325 million kroner ex- 
cluding the one-time items. 

ISS said it planned to continue its strategy 
of stren gthening its worldwide cleaning oper- 
ations while divesting itself of units not cen- 
tral to its core activities in the fields of clean- 
ing, hospital and airport service. 

- .The company also said it was still consider- 
ing listing American depository receipts on 
the New York Stock Exchange. ISS originally 
wanted to list in New York m mid-May but 
postponed the listing because it said market 
conditions were unfavorable. 

(Bloomberg, AFX, Reuters) 


Insurer Rejects 
Extended Charter 
Offer for Esab 

CompUedby Ow Staff Fnm Dispatches 

STOCKHOLM — Wasa In- 
surance said Monday it would 
not accept an extended offer for 
Swedish welding concern F«ih 
AG from Britain’s Charter PLC 

"The extension doesn’t 
change anything,’’ a Wasa 
spokesman said. Wasa, one of 
several minority shareholders 
holding up Charter’s takeover 
bid, bolds 42 percent of Esab’s 
capital and 4.7 percent of the 
voting rights. 

Charter said earlier it bad ex- 
tended its bid for Esab until 
Aug. 26 but did not increase the 
bid price of 345 kronor a share, 
or 3.1 billion kronor ($396 mil- 
lion), a price some Esab holders 
say is too low. 

As of Friday, Charter held 
shares representing 573 per- 
cent of the votes in Esab. 

(Reuters. Bloomberg) 


DN vw re 10 b Hall Low Used Ctfoe 


Bundesbank Feeds 
Hopes of Rate Cut 

Reisers 

FRANKFURT — The Bundesbank said Monday that 
Germany’s M-3 money supply was likely to grow by more 
than the central bank’s target rate this year, for the third year 
in a row, but it still sounded an upbeat note on prospects for 
lower inflation. 

The central bank said in its August monthly report that M- 
3, which grew at an annual rate of 11.4 percent in June, had 
already passed its target range of 4 percent to 6 percent 
growth that was set for all of 1994. 

“M-3 would have to fall by half a percentage point in the 
remainder of the year for this year’s goal to be reached,” the 
report said. “This does not seem likely from the current 
perspective." 

But the Bundesbank gave an optimistic assessment of the 
near-term outlook for inflation, saying that all forecasts 
indicated that the rate would slow further after falling to 2.9 
percent last month from an average of 42 perc e nt in 1993. 

“A look at the development of the consumer price index 
currently gives general grounds for optimism for the foresee- 
able future,” it said. 

Analysts say the prospects for slowing inflation and a 
slowing money-supply trend will lead the Bundesbank to 
lower its 6 percent Lombard rate and 43 percent discount 
rate soon, although many say a cut this week is unlikely. 

The Bundesbank council resumes its regular meetings, 
which are held every two weeks, on Thursday after a four- 
week summer break. It last lowered its Lombard and discount 
rates May 13. 

Holger Fahrinkrug, economist at UBS in Frankfurt, said 
that another rate cut was “likdy by September, taking the 
discount rate to 4 percent from 43 percent” as a result of the 
good inflation and M-3 figures. 

“Although we would not rule out entirely that such a step 
might come op as early as this week, we think it is more likdy 
to come at one of the subsequent meetings,” he added. 

But some form of decision on the Bundesbank’s key mon- 
ey-market rate, the repo or securities-repurchase rate, is 
virtually certain at this week’s meeting, as the last of series of 
money market tenders at a fixed interest rate of 4.85 percent 
will beset this week. 

■ Bonn Raises Its GDP Growth Forecast 

Economics Minister Gunter Rexrodt said the government 
had increased upward its forecast for growth in German gross 
domestic product to between 2 percent and 2.5 percent, 
Knigbt-Ridder reported from Frankfurt. 

It previously forecast a rise of 1 percent to 13 percent. 


Hoechst Develops Filter 
For Ozone, Shares Soar 


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Compiled by Our Staff Fnm Dupacha 

FRANKFURT — Hoechst 
AG said Monday it had devd- 
oped a substance that could fil- 
ter out the damaging effects of 
ozone inside buddings and ve- 
hicles — and increase the com- 
pany’s annual sales by about 
500 million Deutsche marks 
($323 million). 

The company's shares soared 
23 percent and dosed at 356.00 
DM. 

Hoechst said it expected to 
sell the powdery substance, 
called noXon, to manufacturers 
of filters and masks. 

NoXon works by transform- 
ing ozone molecules into ordi- 
nary oxygen as air passes 
through a recyclable filter. 
Hoechst said. 

“The product will come onto 
the market in the next one to 
one and a half years,” said 
Hartmut Vcnnen. a spokesman. 

“We aim to have a whole 
family of noXons,” Mr. Vennen 
said. 

The company expects sales to 
reach 200 million DM in two 
' ears and 500 million DM in 
Four to five years, a spokeswom- 
an said. 

Mr. Vennen said Hoechst re- 
searchers discovered noXon 's 
properties 18 months ago. The 
company set up a small produc- 
tion site for noXon in Frank- 
furt. 

Initially, Hoechst expects the 
market for the filters to be pub- 


Frankfurt 

DAX. 

23® 



M AM J J A 
1994 


London 
FTSH .100 Index 

‘ 3S30 -- 

m 

33007 .. .. 

1 ^:' : 

1994 


Exchange 


Amsterdam 
Brussels ' 

Frankfurt ‘ 
Frankfurt. 
Helsinki 
London ' 
London 
Madrid 
. ftfitair . ‘ 
Parts . ' v -' 
Stockholm-.- 
VfenrtB ■ 

Zurich : .7 


AEX 

Stock Index 

OAX . 

eAz 

HEX 


. Pari? 
ndex CAC40 / 

2400 :■ ■ 

2300 

' 2 100 Vv\ Jt" 

\ J • 

r--- m- ■ ■ .■■■ 

f J J 

1994 • 

Monday ■ Prev. %-•. 

Close Close Chang 

415.18 : '414.43 . +0.18 

Closed. 7.600.50 - - 

2,13834 . 2,124.43 +0.68 

807 M . 804.51 ' +0.31 

1,807.14 1,822.06 -0B2 


RnaruSal Times 30 2^74.80 2,465.80 +03$ 


FTSE 100 
General Index 

-MB . ■'■■■. 

CAC40 
ABaersvaertden 
Stock Index 
SSS . • 


3,142^0 . 3,142.30: UndL 
Closed.. 1 -31137 ■ : 

Closed 1,04 JjD0 

Closed 2,006.95 
1^59.48 1.88U9 : -1.15 

Closed- 457.18 . - 

92&41 . 92131.' ■ -0.12 

liurmolmruJ HcrakJ Tnhmc 


lie buildings such as hospitals, 
schools and offices. Eventually, 
it hopes to reach private homes. 

Hoechst’s spokesman for the 
product, Hermann Schaap, said 
the material would cost around 
150 DM a kilogram and already 
has been tested by Daimler- 
Benz AG, Volkswagen AG. 
Swissair AG and Deutsche 
Lufthansa AG. 

While the ozone layer in the 
upper atmosphere protects the 
Earth, at ground level high con- 
centrations of ozone — a toxic 
gas resulting from pollution — 
can damage the lungs and cause 
breathing problems and skin ir- 
ritation. 

“Although noXon will not 
get rid of the source of the 
ozone problem, it will provide 
help to those, such as the elderly 
ana children, who suffer as a 
result,” the company said. 

Analysts said they were ex- 
amining bow likely it was that 
other companies would be able 
to bring something similar onto 
the market 

Mr. Vennen said noXon was 
exclusive to Hoechst and that no 
rival patents had been registered. 

Two of Germany’s largest 
chemical companies. BASF AG 
and Bayer AG, said they had 
not developed anything similar: 
as far as is known, neither have 
Imperial Chemical Industries 
PLC or BOC Group PLC Brit- 
ain’s two largest chemical com- 
panies. (Bloomberg, Reuters) 


Sources: Hetrtd/s, AFP ImctniIiiiiuJ Hmld Tritaw 

Very briefly: 

• Reed Elsevier PLC, the Anglo-Dutch publishing group, said it 
would pay Peter Davis, its former co-chairman who left in June 
after a boardroom dash, more than £625,000 ($966,000) for loss of 
contract It will also add contributions to his pension in a deal it 
said was worth as much as to £13 million. 

• Siemens Transportation Systems said a consortium led by its 
parent Siemens AG won an order from Germany's federal train 
network for 50 high-speed trains. 

• Finland’s industrial production rose 1 1.9 percent in June from 
the same month a year earlier. 

• Dutch producer prices in June were down 0.1 perceat from May 
and were unchanged from June 1993. 

• France’s Prime Minister Edouard Ballad ur said the privatization 
of Renault had not yet been dedded but said a decision would be 
made in September. 

• Bank of Ireland said it had sold its subsidiary British Credit 
Trust; the price was not disclosed. 

• Hoogovens NY’s Chairman Maarten van Veen said the company 
was not seeking takeover or merger partners after losing out on a 
bid to acquire KKdmer Stahl GmbH, Het Finandeele Dagblad 
reported. He said Hoogovens might build a new steel plant within 
the next few years, possibly in Mexico. 

• Zeneca Group PLC said it had launched its best-selling Zesiril 
heart drug in China for the treatment of hypertension and 
congestive heart failure. 

• Norway posted a trade surplus of 5.67 billion kroner (S829 

million) in July. Reuen. afx. Afeunta* afp 


Hanson Plans to Spin Off 
Erd Toy making Division 

Compiled hy Our Staff From Dispatches 

LONDON — Hanson PLCs U.S. unit. Hanson Industries, 
said Monday it planned to float its Ertl Co. toy-making 
subsidiary, resulting in a $200 million gain for Hanson. 

David Clarke, the chief executive of Hanson Industries, 
said Hanson would retain 37 percent of the common stock of 
Ertl, which makes die-cast replicas, toys, television-advertised 
promotional toys and plastic model kits. 

Mr. Clarke said Ertl had filed a registration statement with 
the Securities and Exchange Commission for an initial public 
offering of 8.5 million shares of its common stock at an 
estimated offering price of $16 a share. 

He said the offering was expected in the autumn of this 
year, “subject to satisfactory market conditions." 

(AFX Bloomberg ) 

U BOspedition Plans to Sell Allantic Container Division 

Bilspedition AB plans to sell 83 percent of its Atlantic 
Container Line subsidiary, reducing its debt by 735 million 
kronor ($94 million), Bloomberg Business News reported 
from Copenhagen. . 

The sale, which would provide Atlantic Container with 
between 350 milli on kronor and 450 million kronor in fresh 
capital, also would reduce Bilspedition's total assets by 1.3 
billion kroner and result in a one-time charge of 76 million 
kronor. _ , . . 

The Swedish company said Atlantic Container would be 
listed on the Oslo stock exchange, giving the former subsid- 
iary the financial base to become a fully independent compa- 
ny.' 


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Omtinaed firm Page 9 
Boss in 1995," said Katharma 
Anette Stroh, an equities ana- 
lyst at Schroder Milnchmeyer 
Haigst in Frankfurt. “With the 
German economy improving. 
Boss's sales should increase 3.5 
percent, to 880 million DM. 
Earnings will outgrow sales,” 
she predicted. 

Some analysts expect a 40 
percent increase in earnings per 
share over the next two years. 

Net profits at the Metzingen- 
based company, adjusted for a 
one-time tax benefit, rose H 


percent in 1993, to 48.6 million 
DM, on sales of 8463 million 
DM, an 1 1 percent fall from a 
year earlier. Unadjusted, net 
profit hit a record 763 million 
DM. 

In 1994, “we're trying to 
make the right revalues, not the 
greatest possible revenues" said 
Mr. Littmann. explaining that 
the company was being selec- 
tive as to how and where it 
allowed Hugo and Baldessarini 
to be sold. 

The main reasons 1994 earn- 
ings are unlikely to rise signifi- 


cantly above 1 993’s are extraor- 
dinary expenses associated with 
relocating production and high- 
er marketing costs for Hugo 
and Baldessarini. 

Much of the expansion in 
Asia and production shift to- 
ward Eastern Europe, as well as 
the initial drive behind the new 
collections, is the work of Mr. 
littmann, the charismatic son 
of a Prague lawyer who came to 
Germany in 1968 with 30 DM 
in his pocket. 

After studying mechanical 


engineering and business, he 
worked his way toward man- 
agement recognition at Girmes; 
a leading German carpet mak- 
er, Rosenthal AG, a well- 
known porcelain company that 
he helped restructure; and Vor- 
werk & Co., another carpet 
company where he spent 12 
years before switching to Hugo 
Boss. 

At Vorwerk, too. Mr. Litl- 
mann raised eyebrows with an 
eventually successful idea to 
make and market “signed” de- 
signer carpets. 


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Continued on Page 12 


Continued from P^e I 

No. 1 crime problem facing banks. Pay- 
roll-check «ams are only one of the myri- 
ad check-fraud schemes plaguing not only 
| banks but retailers. 

Crooks also commonly counterfeit large 
corporate checks, deposit them in a bank 
account — either an existing one or a new 
account opened by the crook or by an 
accomplice — and then draw on them. 
Around the country, an increasing number 
of criminals are cashing bad checks in 
supermarkets, department stores and other 
retail outlets. 

“We’ll cash a payroll check if a customer 
spends 10 percent of it with us,” said Angie 
Spoto, vice president of treasury opera- 
tions at Ames Department Stores Inc., a 
discount department store chain based in 
Rocky HSU, Connecticut, with 300 stores in 
14 Northeast states. “It generates sales for 
us.” 

But it also generates losses. Of its $500 
million in sales to people who paid by 
check in 1991, Ames wrote off 1.8 percent 
because of fraud. This year, it expects to 
cut that loss by half by installing check- 
reading devices at all of its 3,200 cash 


registers. The check-readers are linked to a 
national data base of deadbeats main- 
tained by Deluxe Corp^ a check-printing 
company. 

In California, the center of counterfeit- 
ing activity, transactions involving fraudu- 
lent checks rose fivefold last year at Wells 
Fargo Bank alone. In New York state. 
Chemical Banking Corp. reported a 50 
percent increase so far this year. 

Most bad-check crooks operate in 
gangs, but individual entrepreneurship 
also abounds. John S. H aileron, a self- 
employed computer programmer who 
used to work at a payroll-check processing 
company, has been accused of passing 
□early 100 bad checks he made with a 
software program for businesses called 
Create-a-Oieck. He will be tried as early as 
next week in Franklin County Court in 
Columbus. Ohio. 

“Everything we see is computer-generat- 
ed, so the items are a little bit belter — 
actually quite a bit better — than they used 
to be," said Ed Lindsey, a detective in the 
bunco-forgery division of the Los Angeles 
Police Department. “It started getting out 


of hand three years ago and now it's gone 
beyond that It's out of control." 

The problem is that commonly available 
computers can seamlessly merge images, 
creating seemingly official documents, 
even ones laden with elaborate decoration 
and “authenticated” with stamps and sig- 
natures. And the comer copy shop now has 
a machine that can make such a realistic 
color facsimile of a dollar bill that the 
government is changing the currency's de- 
sign. 

It is far easier to counterfeit checks than 
cash. For one thing, there is no standard 
check design. Indeed, more and more busi- 
nesses are saving bank-check fees by print- 
ing their own checks on standard office 
laser primers. 

These printers, of course, are also avail- 
able to crooks, as are inexpensive scanners 
and graphics software to copy corporate 
logos and check designs. 

“The information on your bank account 
is as av aila ble as every check you write, 
said Mary £ D’Agostino, a vice presidenl 
and loss prevention manager Tor Wells 
Fargo. 



I cyrT* *<? trM 






























































































lmwm 

■■■'■■‘■'I 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 16, 1994 


Page 13 


firm i 


ers 


For Japan Tobacco 


Compiled by Ow Staff From Disputrha 

TOKYO — Individual inves- 
tors were the most -aggressive 
bidders Monday at the govern- 
ment's auction of Japan Tobac- 
co Inc. shares, ignoring pleas by - 
anti-smoking groups to refrain 
from buying the issue. 

The government is selling ; 
666,666 shares of the world's 
founh-largsst tobacco company, 
and the sale will set the price of 
436.000 more shares to be listed 
on stock exchanges in Tokyo, 
Osaka and Nagoya on Oct 27. ' 

Brokers said individual in- 
vestors had been bidding be- 
tween 1.0 million yen and 1.2 
million yen a share (510,000 to 
$12,000), although some placed 
bids as high as 1.5 million yen. 
At those prices, the company 
would be valued at $20 billion 
or more, on the bads of its 2 
million shares outstanding. 

Institutional investors, by 
contrast, were mostly absent 
from the bidding, in large pan 
because of concern about the 
future of tobacco company 
earnings, brokers said. 

A broker at Jardine Fleming 
Securities said swiKd<ai)estic in- . 
stitutional investors would bid 
for the shares, partly because rtf' 
government pressure on them to 
take part in the auction. 

“But interest is really sub- 
dued,” the Jardine broker said. 
Institutions fear tbe company's 
earnings will suffer as more 
people give up smoking for 
health reasons and as foreign 
tobacco gains Dooularity 


among young Japanese, he said. 
Foreigners have steered clear of 
the auction for. precisely those 
reasons, he added. 

But individuals had other 
ideas. 

“Individual investors are in- 
terested in the listing of JT 
shares because they think at the 
moment it's the best way to 
make money,'' said Hiroyuki 
Tanaka, a broker at Cosmo Se- 
curities... . 

The Tokyo-based company 
does business in. 47 countries, 
mostly in East Asia, and em- 
ploys 23,700 people in opera- 
tions that also include medicine 
and real estate. It reported prof- 
it of 15.9 billion yen on sales of 
2.7 triUioc yen in tbe year ended 
March 3.1.- 

(Reuters. AP. AFP) 

■ IDO Expects to Post Loss 

Nippon Jdou Tsuschin Carp, 
said Monday that investments 
in digital cellular telephone ser- 
vices would cause it to post a 
loss of more than 1.0 bilion yen 
for the cmrent financial year, 
ending in March 1995, Reuters 
reported. . - 

The investment and debt to- 
taling 230 billion yen will keep 
the cellular phone company 
from posting a profit until 
1998-99, itsSd. . 

Tbe company also said 
Toyota Motor Corp. would be- 
come its top shareholder after 
OcL 1, when Nippon Idou dou- 
bles its capital to about 22.91 
trillion yen. 


U.K. Sells More to Malaysia 


Reuters 

KUALA LUMPUR — British exports to 
Malaysia rose 81 percent in the first six 
months of this year despite Kuala Lumpur's 
ban on British business, the British High 
Commission said Monday. 

In fact, the ban may be hurting Malaysian 
businesses, according to the High Commis- 
sion's figures, which said Malaysia's exports 
to the United Kingdom fell 25 percent in the 
six months- 

According to the data, British exports to 
Malaysia rose to £666 million (SI billion), 
compared with £367.7 million in the first half 
of 1993, while Malaysia's exports to Britain's 
declined to £580.6 million from £769.7 mil- 
lion. 

Malaysia, angered over newspaper reports 
alleging corruption in British- Malaysian 
trade, announced in February it was barring 
British businesses from Malaysian govern- 
ment contracts. 

Prime Minister Mahathir bin Mohamad 


has said the government would end the ban 
when tbe British press “stops printing lies.” 

Both Malaysian and British officials have 
stressed, however, that the ban only applied 
to government contracts. 

Malaysia's ambassador to Britain. Kamar- 
uddin Abu, said last week that the ban — 
which could cost British business billions of 
pounds in lost contracts over the next few 
years — had had no effect on private-sector 
dealings between the two countries. 

Diplomats say tbe surge in British exports 
to Malaysia is partly a result of heavy equip- 
ment and supplies being brought in to build 
the Pergau Dam. The. dam itself has played a 
part in the strained relations between Britain 
and Malaysia, which gained its independence 
from Britain in 1957. 

Malaysian officials objected to press and 
parliamentary investigations into links be- 
tween a British loan for the Pergau project 
and Malaysia’s purchase of £1 billion of Brit- 
ish defense equipment in 1988. 


Price Waterhouse Sued in Australia 


Compiled by Ow Staff From Dtspatdvs 

ADELAIDE, Australia — 
The South Australian govern- 
ment on Monday filed a $1.1 
billion Australian dollar ($817 
million) claim against Price 
Waterhouse for its alleged in- 
volvement in the collapse of 
South Australia's State Bank. 

Price Waterhouse was the au- 
ditor of Beneficial Finance, a 
State Bank unit, which lost 
around 1 billion dollars in the 
late 1980s and early 1990s, al- 
most half the State Bank 
group’s 3 2 billion -dollar loss. 

The claim relates to Price 
Waterhouse’s 1988 and 1989 
audits of Beneficial 

Bill Small, chairman of Price 


Waterhouse said the claim was 
without merit and the company 
would “vigorously defend” the 
suit. 

“This is yet another attempt 
to make the auditors pay for the 
negligence of the directors, man- 
agement and ultimately, in this 
case, the slate government of the 
time, solely because of the insur- 
ance cover auditors arc farced to 
carry” Mr. Small said. 

A stale auditor-general’s re- 
port released last year said that 
Beneficial’s executives had been 
guilty of some of tbe largest 
corporate excesses of the 1 980s. 

Mr. Small said the final re- 
port of a Royal Commission 
mto the State Bank case said the 


losses had been “solely a conse- 
quence of poor lending and in- 
vestment decisions” and that 
the 1988 and 1989 audits were 
“appropriate and adequate.*’ 

Monday was the last day pro- 
ceedings could be issued, and 
the state government started 
the proceedings in the South 
Australian Supreme Court. It is 
the third such action the gov- 
ernment has taken to recover 
some of the money lost in the 
State Bank collapse. 

In March, proceedings began 
against eight former directors 
of the bank and their insurer, 
FAI, for unspecified damages, 
(AFP, Reuters) 


Regulators 
Investigate 
Petron Sale 

A FP-Exiel News 

MANILA — The Securities 
and Exchange Commission said 
Monday it was investigating 
whether executives of Petron 
Corp- had reduced the number 
of shares offered to the public 
without proper disclosure. 

Rosario Lopez, head of the 
commission, said she would in- 
vestigate allegations thaL Petron 
executives had blocked off 50 
million shares of the company's 
initial public offering for them- 
selves. 

“There could be a failure of 
disclosure on this matter,” Ms. 
Lopez said, adding that hearings 
were scheduled for this week. 

Under the original terras of 
the offering, Petron said it 
would sell 1 billion shares, rep- 
resenting a 20 percent stake in 
the company. Of these, 600 mil- 
lion were to be reserved for do- 
mestic investors at a fixed price 
of 9 pesos a share (31 cents), 
100 million would be offered to 
employees of Petron and its 
parent, Philippine National Oil 
Co., ard 300 million would be 
auctioned off to for foreign in- 
vestors. 

Ms. Lopez said Peiron had 
scaled down individual alloca- 
tions to 1,600 shares for each 
domestic investor from 5.000 
because tbe offering was over- 
subscribed. But she said Petron 
executives never informed the 
commission that they would get 
bigger allocations. 

Petron executives were not 
available for comment. 


Investor’s Asia 


Hong Kong 

Singapore 

Tokyo 

Hang Seng 

Straits Times 

Nikkei 225 

11000 

2400 

22000 

i 


23001 ■ fAd J 

m h / 

9000 n/V^’ 

22b\ r - y* 

Ww 

m - 

2100 U 

■ 19000. ■: 

m'a'm j J a 

2000 M AM j J A 

18050 M A'M 


Exchange Index 

Hong Kong Hang Seng 

Singapore^ Straits Times 

Sydney A/j Ordinaries 

Tokyo Nikkei 225 

Kuala Lumpur Composite 

Bangkok SET 

Seoul Composite Stock 

Taipei Weighted Pdce~ 

Manila PSE' ' T~ 

r Jakarta Stock Index 


New Zealand NZSE-40 

Bombay Nattonal lndex ~ 

Sources: Reuters. AFP 


Monday 

Close 

9,486.13 

2^01.75 

2,055.70 

20.626.33 

ijmio 

1,453.41 

Closed " 

6,54357 

3,005.95 

478.03 

2,097-64 

Ckteed 


Prev. ...% . 
Close • Change 
9,464.56 +0.23 

2,317.79 -0.63 

2.051.90 +0.19 

20,663.83 -0.18 
1,10529 -T.lT 

1,425.49 - +1^6 

msT T7 

8.563.91 -0.31 

3.007.36 ■ -0.05 
474.99 -TO.64" 

2,071.94 -+1.24 
2,122.33 ~ 

Inlcmaui'iul Herald TnNiiK 


Very briefly; 

• Japan’s motor vehicle output is likely to fall behind that of the 
United States for the first time since 1979, the newspaper Nihon 
Keizai said, citing sluggish domestic sales and the sLroog yen. 

• Francis Yuen, former chief executive of the Hong Kong slock 
exchange and now the head of Seapower Resources International 
Lid. and Seapower International Holdings UtL, denied allegations 
of improper share dealings. 

■ Taiwan's foreign exchange reserves grew to a record 90.14 billion 
Taiwan dollars ($3 billion) at the end of June. 

• Japan revised its industrial production for June to a 2.7 percent 
gain from a previously reported 2.0 percent rise. 

• Japan and the European Union agreed to accept each other's 
certification standards for some products, mostly building materi- 
als and medical equipment, as early as 1996. 

Bloomberg. Reuters. AP, AFX. Krught- Ridder 


I ~ 

I £ 
I * 

M? 


Malaysia’s Bata 
Will Try On 
Something Else 

Bl o omberg Bmmexs News 

KUALA LUMPUR — 
The Securities Commission 
has approved a restructur- 
ing by the shoe company 
Bata (Malaysia) Bhd. in 
which it will transform it- 
self into a telecommunica- 
tions company, Bata’s 
management said. 

Bata, a subsidiary of a 
shoe company based in 
Canada, will sell its shoe 
business for 174.3 million 
ringgit ($68 mil lion) to 
Western Investments & 
Trading Co, already a ma- 
jor shareholder. It will then 
pay 202 million ringgit to 
buy a stake in FCW Indus- 


Cables, Wires & Metal 
Manufacturing BhtL, from 
Ekran Bhd. 


Propel Soars in First Day of Trading 


Wharf Defends Its Cable-TV Monopoly 


Bloomberg Basinas Hens 

KUALA LUMPUR — Propel, a road-build- 
ing company that has a 30-year contract to 
maintain Malaysia’s first superhighway, soared 
in its first day of trading on the Kuala Lumpur 
Stock Exchange on Monday as investors scram- 
bled to buy into Malaysia's growing 
infrastructure. 

The stock of the company, whose full name is 
Projek Penydenggarraan Lebuhraya Bhd, start- 
ed trading at 530 ringgit ($2.07) a share, more 
than double the price of 2.60 price at which it was 
sold to the public. The stock ended 1 higher at 
630. 

“I think die buyers of -tins stock should be 
extremely ecstatic," said Steven Wong, a strategist 
at UMBC Securities. “The price is probably more 
than if s worth on a purely fundamental basis." 

. PropeLs July public offering of 8,750,000 
shares was 60 times oversubscribed. 

Propel was formed to carry out routine main- 
tenance work on tbe North-South Expressway, 
which is bemgbmlt by Projek Lebuhraya Utara 
Selatan Bhd. Thai company is jointly owned by- 
Faber Group and United Engineers (Malaysia) 
BhtL, both of which belong to a business group 
with strong connections to the leading political 
party.' • 


United Engineers owns a 56 percent stake in 
Propel. 

Propel signed the 30-year maintenance con- 
tract for the expressway in 1988, guaranteeing 
revenue of 32,000 ringgit per kilometer per year 
on the 808-kilometer (500-mile) road That 
comes to about 25,9 million ringgit annually, 
about 40 percent of the company’s total revenue 
in 1993. 

“I see it as a steady performer, since it has a 
long-tens contract,” said Loo Boon How, re- 
search manager at TA Securities. 

Propel posted pretax profit of 7.7 million ring- 
git in 1993, on sales of 64.7 million ringgit, 
according to the company's prospectus for the 
share offering. The company projects pretax 
profit will rise to 1 1.4 million ringgit this year. 

Analysts say the stock is a way to invest in the 
public-works business. The Malaysian govern- 
ment will have spent more than 9 billion ringgit 
on road improvements by the end of its current 
five-year plan in 1995 and 53 billion ringgit by 
2010, according to figures in the company 
prospectus. 

But some analysts say there are better ways 
than Propel to enter Malaysia's booming infra- 
structure industry. 


On October 4th, the IHTwill publish a 
Special Report on 

Global Banking 
& Finance 

Among the topics to be covered are: 

■ The value of the dollar. 

■ The booming market for derivatives. 

■ The European Monetary Institute. 

■ The outlook for Japanese banking. 

■ Investment prospects in Latin, Asian 
and other emerging markets. 







International 

Classified 

Marketplace 

Monday 

International Conferences and Seminars 

Tuesday 

Education Directory 

Wednesday 

Business Message Center 

Thursday 

International Recruitment 

'Friday 




Saturday 

Arts and Antiques 


Plus over 300 headings in International Classified 



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CALL; LONDON 071 488 2001, DUBLIN (01) 67 10 457 


FUTURES a OPTIONS BROKERS 

ROUND 
TURN 

EXECUTION ONLY 




Commodities 
on the Move 
Time to Speculate? 

Lull Philip O'Neill 
Tel.: + 44 71 .42*) y y 
Fax: + 44 71 .129 3919 


Bloomberg Business News 

HONG KONG — Hoag Kong’s sole ca- 
ble-television operator. Wharf Cable Ltd, is 
asking the government to stop Hong Kong 
Telecommunications Ltd from launching a 
video-on-demand service before July I, 1996. 

Wharf Cable said Monday its exclusive 
three-year franchise to provide a subscription 
television service in Hong Kong would be 
breached if Hongkong Telecom’s plan to pro- 
vide video on demand was allowed to go 
ahead before that date. 

“It would be regrettable if any other opera- 


tors offered pay television without being reg- 
ulated as such.” Wharf, which is pan of the 
conglomerate Wharf (Holdings) Ltd., said. 
“It would make a mockery of the authority of 
government.” 

Hongkong Telecom is planning trial runs 
in December for video on demand which 
allows subscribers to select movies from a 
menu displayed on their television screens 
and place orders via phone lines. 

If the trials are successful, it plans to offer 
the service beginning in the last quartev or 
1995. 


ADVERTISEMEiYT 

MARK & SPENCER PLC 

(cpb* ) 

The undersigned announces that as 
from August 24. IW1 al Kas- 
Associatie N.Y_ Syntidraal 172, 
Amsterdam, dir.cprunn. 45 of the 
CDR* Marks A Spencer pic. will be 
naiUfalr with D Ik. -LS9 per COR, 
repr. 25 shares (re final dividend for 
the year ended 31.03.1994 of 6,7ppor 
share) Tax-credit Pst. 0.41875 = IJfls. 
1.14 per CDR. Nrm- residents or the 
United Kingdom ran only riaim this 
lax credit vlien the relevant tax 
treaty meets this facility. 

AMSTERDAM DEPOSITARY 
COMPANY N.V. 
Amsterdam, August 10. J994. 



ZERO TO 40 IN SECONDS. 
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Tents Call: i-8O0-4Bi_-pQLO 


«*» f 


A 

r\ <• p re v 










Page X 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 16, 1994 


** 


NASDAQ 

Monday's 4 p.m. 

This list compiled by the AP. consists of the 1,000 
most traded securities in terms of dollar value. It Is 
updated twice a year. 


Ufflorfji 

Mon LOW STOCK 


5b 

On YUPE ins High LMLOMaai'ge 


.» » 
.13a .9 9 


... 31 
_ 34 


.16 

JO 


MU SHAAONa 
Mis 13 ABCRd* 

30 14% AST Bid 
U>4 12% ACC QJ 

24 9ftAC5Ens 
<2 MftACXTC 
47 Vi 3? ADCTd 
17% lOftAESOm 
23%15%AESCns 
3lftl9'AAKSleel 
23 'i IS Vi APS Hid 
W 6% ASK 

33 ISftAST 

»ft UVjAfctwvH 

Ji%12ftAdoims 

27'., 13 Acmetnm 
2014 714 Add 
14% itoAdocLB 

22 Vj 13’%AdaotC5 
26W 10 AflSIPh ft 
3T4 20 AcBoSv 

34 Vj liUAOoWSv 
I2ft iWAdvPra 

11 'A 4V.AOWT1S5 

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MV, 25 AovantBs .24 
16% 10 Aonicoo .lOe 
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63ft 45ft Akza 
21% 9'*AJantec 
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19% 1 1 H AhUlo s 
34ft Mto Aldus 
3A'i>22 AlexBU 
19% 6ftAlia&R 
3ft IftAJLASem 
i< 7%AJ.onPn 

16 7ft AbiSoml 
37% 22% AHIedGa 
72ft 1 3ft AlkbfldO 

MV, 1U Alpha? 

35ft 7% Alancflra 
39ft 21% Altera 

34Vg I Oft Altrari 
92 46% AmerOn 

30%20%ABnKr __ __ 

19% ITOACkHVoy .14 1.0 43 

33 lOftACollnid 24 lJ 17 
22% 1 5ft AmFrptil 
34to 25ft AGfBat S 56 
24ft 5*» AHimcpi 
269i 15ft AMS 
17Vi 6%AMedE 

23 13'/* AmMDM 

Mft Mft APwrCvs 
29 liViArnRasla 
39'.k 22Vj AmSupr 
27 1 2\k AmToto 

1594 10W ATravel 
16*4 7% AmerCQS 
36% 79ft AmfCd J4 
53% 31 Vi Amaen 
15 5 Amnons 

339a Bft AmfchCp J8 
MftllHAnchBOP 

17 V« K-» j AficnGm 
42'-i 197s Andrew s 
21 Vi 13 Andros 

31 lriAmec 

3Bft22 AppIoC AS 

IBVkll AIM Sou 3 JB 

25% 1 1 Aptafieei JM 

25 1394 ApdDotl 

33 11% Apdlnaw 1 

52 nViApMMlS __ 

21 15%ArborDni J4 1J2 23 

25 12%ArtX*HI „ 23 

19 13%ArcflCm 

35V] 26toArt»oGp 
33% 12ftArtXKV 
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2294 16V4 Armor 
729a 18 Arnold 1 
24% 7 Arlsfl 
13% 7% ADlWlUl 
46 24 ASpCfTl 

34'*2lftAsdCmA 
33'. 4 209a AsdCmB 

20 V. 11 Asms 
349.27V«AStnrioF 
38% 71% All Se Air 
29% 11 Almels 
26% 16 AuBon 
9*i. av, AuroSy 


_ 21 165 14% 14 149* -Vi 

1994 .. 

10 17 1694 17 ♦% 

99 14% 1394 13*4 — Vi 

104 12% 12 12% -W 

1 34% 34% 34% _ 

31 449k 44 44% —94 

_ 257 llVid 10% 1094 —94 

JBI 63 15 838 16 1596 15% - % 

... 210 29 28% 29 

_ 17 89 23% 22% 23 + % 

- 13 

_ 14 1295 1794 17% 17% — »u 

_ 34 572 1894 17% 1BV. *94 

„ 19 1168 17% 17 17% -to 

_. 9 203 3414 24% 24%— 1 

_ 25 10 7ft 7* 744— % 

AS 7.1 7 48 696 6% 694 - % 

_ 17 1344 19% 19% 1994 — % 

- ._ 185 1496 14% 14% — W 

_ 34% - 

A 79 3146 3396 JW* 33% — % 

- - 234 6% S% 6to -Vi 

_ _ 1577 6% 6% 6% _ 

A 14 MS 3194 31% 31% + 'A 

A 14 35 28% 28 28% —ft 

J _ 128 12% 11% 11% —Vi 

... 289 1296 12V. 12’4 — lVt 

_ 34 7%» 2*14 7*4 — % 

1.744 24— 38 42% 62% 42 9a *to 

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.40 U 13 63 25 2494 25 - 

_ 24 3743 14% 1394 13% -Vi 

_ 29 429 33% 329a 32% — % 

AB X5 17 240 25% 25% 25% — % 

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1.9 16 1281 29% 29 29 — % 

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_ 12 89 8% 7% 7% - 

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_ - 12 16 1596 1594 — % 

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57%44%Be<iBa> 

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26 aviBonud 
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3044 8%Bortnd 
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14% 8%BmEnB 
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52% 11 BrdbdTc 
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27% 15% 



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_ 70 4198 
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- 37 840 

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-228 660 

3J 16 188 
- 22 681 


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9% 9% _ 

20 % 20 % .. 
49% 50% — % 
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16 16% - 
10 % 10 % +% 
1896 1844 — Vu 
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32% 32% —44 
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27%25%CadbvS 
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174% 846Caiawie 

23% mcaStti 

31% lOWCaWlic 

32 20'.4CWmA 
90% 59%Canonl 

20 14%Conmttr 

A2%M%CranHns 

21 lS'AOatww 
14% 5>i'ii Caroline 
191*1 044 CdrsPir 
1316 9% Caseys 1 
25 9'’.CasAm i 
36 l3%CaunoD3 
21V4 SViCasMoak: 
25 TACOSTIES 
1994 8 CathSIr 
24% 9 Camca 

If 12 Cdadan 
34%i3%S«iia 
36% MViSfipro 
2046 9%Cdlsttir 
52%40V.CaCmA 
31 18 CMCdlPR 
2496 496C0UrTC5 
24% 14 CentCd 
43 10 Centarm 
15% 6%Centacsr 
34 254*CRaBk 
19% 8 BMn 
49% 23%Orner 
36V. IBV.tovrcer 
14% BViSrmSh 

25 17%CWOnFs 
15 4'A Checkers 

24% 13%Omsck s 
19 8 Chfcoss 

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7% 3%OSpsTc 
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22% 15 Odco 
61% SO OnnFin 
34% 25 OmtB 

15 8% Orton 
4444 1396 Orn/s 
4044 189* dseos 
28 1144air»erns 
21% 13 OiiOCar 
a 22%CsrHRn 
44% 25 cobra 
41% 34 CocaBK 
2494 14 CaOoxta 
28 li Cdrimi 
14% 7%Coeri(Hfl 

16 11 Cohort!! 
31% 17 CaoCKti 
25% l7toCc*trBcp 
34% 17 Camair 
28W 14% Comal s 

26 1446 Cric SP S 

22% iS'iCOmimvf 

33 27%Crnca440 
27Vi 17ViCmcPdl 
26 12V.C0mHiSv 
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18% 9'ACn-lpm. 

7% 2%Cmccm 

24 10%CmpOt s 
1296 5%Q>INwk 
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1616 B Comverm 

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30% 17%ConcEF5 
15% 5 ConcHld 

22 13 Contra 
2294 1416 Coars B 
539* 21 % Copley Ph 

23% I4%Co«5abF 
54’A 27%Cartfls 

25 9%6Core<CP& 

26 1294CDrtmoa 
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36% 13 Ctfnirvs 
29%21%CrkrBd 
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33% BViCrosCom 
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56% 33%CunibFd 
28 12%CUslOi 
25% 13 CronaO 
12% 5%CvvnuS 
4196 IB%CvrixCp 
35’<.11%Cvrk 
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I .. 632 10 

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JM } 16 163 12 

_ 9 444 12% 

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595 94% 
_ 14 167 12 
2 SI 96 

_. _. OX 31 
_ _. 142 1396 

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- ... 4968 1396 

1.12 1A II 32 32% 

_ 70 12% 

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A3e 2.0 ... 70 Jl% 

JJ9 1 A 13 607 9% 

A0 ZB 9 m 22V. 

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_ 27 159 17% 

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- 66 21 11% 

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1J28 2A 16 27 54',’. 

.17 .5 28 150 31% 

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_ 1931981 22 

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- 29 327 44 

1.00 3.5 X 10 28% 

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A0 2.9 7 497 21% 

JM 1 A 18 975 2496 

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50 IS ~ 218 MV. 

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JM X2W9 11% 

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J32 .1 27 574 23% 

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A8 1A 15 65 54 

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18% 18% — % 
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31 to 31 to —to 
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56 56 

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43 UtoScJGcne _ 

26%l5 , 7.5cn*x 52 “ 

19% 4%ScreBd 5 - 

»% 15% 5C011S - 

28%16toS«>oate - 

15% JMSrehCap _ 

519*34 SacCap 
916 StoSeprocr - 

70 lltoSeturt - 

pfc ltoSaauai — 

a 

26% 10 StMMGP 
19% BtoSfmrW 
17% S Showbiz - 

x%204*snuroard JR 2A 
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20 31* _ 

55% X J3 U 

13% 9% - 

41 19% t j»a J 


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96 30963096 '' 

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16 872 23% 2396 Xto - 

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13 H 09* 8to B%— % 

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8 M 7% 796 796 * jS ' 

X207 73 229* 229* — % 


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11 tw 10<* • 

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JOS# 3 19 190 I«96 


21» 2116 +« 

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its 

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M 16 M 
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-15 331 TO 


9 9 

379* 38%+*%,- 
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3096 30% —to 
39 39 — 

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AMEX 

Monday's Closing 

Tables Include the nationwide pncoa up to 
the dosing on Wall Street and do not refleo 
Hate trades elsewhere. Via The Associated Press 


12 

Hieb Low Swcfc 


ON YU pe 1001 HUH Low Latest Qt'ae 


«to 8 AIM Sir a 2 

Mk Vi AM in wt 
14% 9WAMC . . _ _ 

26% 22 ARMFpfZJB 97 - 

7l%6«S^Fd aift” - 

89* 4 ACkCOm 
5 3%AgpeU 
3 Vi, ltoAOJtm 
6% 4 Adintoc 
6% 2 AdvFln 
16% 9%AdvMOP 

io’* aMAdlviSd^ 

5% 2 AtfvPhOt 
3'u 2%Aerason 
16% 7toAjrWS 
4% l%Alrcoa 

SB 1JU _ 

181*16 AHooann 1A4 8.1 - 

2% nruAmn — - 

llto 4 AlkJRsh 

»» 

11 496AlplnGr 

sr 

l</u toAmhim 

20 'm 16Vi apopt 

25% Ml . 

30 iStoAmL 
Bto 7toAmEC05 

liVu 1 Vi AlExpl 
14% 3%AIMB4 

16 V. 13% AIM B5 

1496 11% AIM 86 n 
15 1 1 % AIM M/1 

52 3H*Aiiraei 
189* 12% Am List 3 
229* 149* AMaA 

21 ft* 14% AflWeB 
14% frvtAxiiPaBn 

49e MAmStird 

5 WuATecnC 
13% frVkAmpm 

21k 'uAmpad Wl 
34% 9% Anmua 

6 USAnoMlp 

15% % Ana Par 1450c - 1 

7% 3'k AnubCO _ 19 

14% SftApmnn - - 

II V. 64*ArkRs - X 

10 6 Aitom/A - 13 

12% TiArtwIh _ 16 

49u 2 ASIrotc _ 33 

121* 2% Atari _ _ 

7% S Anantte ,05e A 11 

to toAtlsCM - - 

18% 6'4 Audvtw _ 8 

3Vi. VuAudre _ - 

9% A AurorEI _ 16 

2% 2Vu Aecpn _ _ 



7% 7% — l. 

2% 29k —to 


HUh Low Stack 


Dhr Via PE IPtt H* LBwLcXMOl'X 


BAM Mr _ _ 

SBHO - - 

BATS J8e 5A _ 
BHC 21 

BMP Be A8 2A 13 

BadarM 73 3J IS 
Baker - _ 

Batdw _ 75 

BanFd 1.91 e IL7 17 
BT CV/Vi n)AB 8A - 

3Tcv7% lie BJ - 
BattyHI - - 

W = 5] 
aavMN E JO ia § 

Bayou ... 113 

awK p«» . -■ - 

asMRKn un AA _ 
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aeimac - .-j 

aengiE i* 

2J»e 27 Z 

JBrlAg 
_ 24 

IAS 92 Z 

J90 U - 
2.05e 4.4 12 

JO 2.1 16 
AD U 24 
A5 1.1 X 
Odle IX BJ 17 
WVal ... _ 

wmr - 11 

MTH-nl JJffl 7.9 -. 
mw 36 IA 9 
idRE M 75 18 
m*1 JB 1.7 16 
mdyw 57elM 
jena l.M 7.4 
x*CP _ 19 

Won - 4 


aft A 


OPIvn 

kBI09 


fMeiH 

junlA 


X IV, 
61 21* 

15 13% 
is n% 
33 269* 

7 22% 
131 5% 

69 5 
82 22% 

IX 71% 
108 23V. 

X >6, 

10 l'Vu 
61 21% 

11 % 

104 209* 

10 18to 

25 4% 

73 4% 

42 33% 

55 2%, 

51 Wi. 
27 24% 

156 7% 

9 91 
787 6% 

11 2196 
810U21 M 

13u20 
484 1 

16 1196 
1 1196 

56 4696 
7u34 

140 41% 
l5u42 

52 1496 
1 1116 

70 296 
4 39 

38 22H 
150 Bto 
104 I6V6 
1W 5% 
25 14% 
X 3% 
131 IVi, 


,l* 71' 

Xto 221 

U*S i>« 


1>?U 1*» _ 

2% 2tVu — Vu 
139k 13% —V* 
779* 779* — ^ to 
264k 2616 —to 
22% »% +Vk 
5% 5% _ 

219* 71% _ 

~ ' 22% — % 
%,-toi 

21 ~ 21 V % “ 

20% X% ZKi 
IBto 11% ‘to 
496 4to — Vi| 

33'A 33% +to 

3 J % +¥ “ 

2496 249* - 

296 7V, —to 
90 91 »1 

6% 6% —to 
319* 219* —V. 
20 21 to + 14k 

20 JO ‘4k 
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llto 111* - 

119* 119* —% 
Xto 46% * to 
34 M -to 

409* 40% —to 
41 IA 41V. —to 
141* 14% ... 

1196 11% - 

29k 29* _ 

X 38 — I 
22 22% — % 
8% BVj _. 
I Sto I6to ♦% 
4% 5 —to 
U 14% • to 
3% 3to _ 
Ito ltfu 


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Mb *7 14 
.. 7 

84*11.2 -. 
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IFn J3b 2.1 12 
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nrsn — 

Ml JO J 7 


H 

18% 

18 

IB — % 

85 

1M 

5% 

7ft 

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5% ■ 
7ft 

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49 

6% 

6% 

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333 

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lft 

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10 

16% 

15% 

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41 

l'V„ 

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713 

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ttft 

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a 

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1% "u Cat prop _ 

31%, lVuCadan - 

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249* WkgSnbrx JO J 
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11 CnpRI3 1.68 14L5 


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6 496CPCda 

fiiSSBtf 

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20% 3% 

7% 6% 

81* 6% 

49 M% 

279*1596 



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A8 7.1 
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25V, llto Comptolc 
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lOto «%C0nrfB 


„ /toContMn 
73 3%Comirsn 

'vt ?%SrtK n 

9 6toCourtld 

5jS .MkOUsAm 
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17% 12% Curt co 
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41* toCvcornm 



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8 73% 23% 2396 _ 

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20 10% 1094 109* _ 

S3 11% 1116 111* —VS 

9% 8% 9V6 ‘V. 

or 22 21% 21% — Vi 

n w wwzj 

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^ - 
179* ITto 1TV6 _ 
89* 896 89* —to 

9to 89* 9 +% 

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536 XV* 259* 259* —9* 
1396 1396 1396 —to 
94* 9'A 996 + 46 

309* 299* 30% —9* 
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.. 416 +Vu 

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479* 469* 479* +Vl 
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996 996 - 

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12% 12% ‘to 
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1194 12 -to 

39k ,39k -to 

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17 17 —to 

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llto 18 18 ‘9* 

347 u IB. 17 1 * 17% ‘Vk 

1 2% TI I. 2% ‘to, 

5B4 29* 2Vu 3<r„—>fu 


is XSw'S 

3% 7*DOfcofan 
Bh 6. DanOM 
4% PADafamt 
109* 4toDatoram 
796 2P r uDavslr 
4 ItoDavStwT 
Bto 5%Daxor 
IX* 7%Decorat 
8% 5'iDeiEIc 
27% 1/toDevnE 
S’.. 2'V>, Dtog A 
5% 2%Dtoa B 
Sto WuDiWcan 

,TBi ^BBSS 

19% 9%Dbnarics 

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lOto ZtoDryCci 
11% StoDrvfMu 
11% 9%DryfNY 
59* 29*Ducom 
119* BtoOupiex 
6 3%Dycmnn 

179* UtoEsteCe 

4ato32%EchGFpf 

15% BHEcnoBay 
169* 9%ecriEn 
llto TtoEdts/o 
B* ltoEdHek 
47% Xto Elan 
329* 15% Eton wt 
36% 309* Elan un 

10*4 t+VFlaorad 
89* 2toEISinar 
9% 896E1SWH1 
6to StoEmpCar 
Mto 25% EN5C Pf 
19V, 9'*ENSCOs 
13% 7V.EnoBx 
21% 7%EnzoBi 
XtolStoEpRope 
16% lavkEacmi 
llto WiEaGIM 
WH »%6aGtti3 
18% 109*EqiiU5ll 
8% IMEscasn 
I5to l39*Esaev 
2** J+EiixFn 
13% StoEULwA 
16ft fito EfzLav 
l'Vu 96EvrJenn 
Xto 16% Excel 
3Yu I94FPA 
36% 31% Foblnds 
15 7V*FdcCM 
399*14 nbroa 
79% 62’A Finn 
19 V, 129*Fi«HB 
14% 9toRAusl 

11% OtoFAuspr 

79* 4%FlCntrt 
22 17'AFCtzOsn 
165 132V*FlEfno 
10% 7 PifaeT 
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g litoFtopUi 
32. 224*RukP 
44% 34 For J*c A 

52%»toPer*iLh 

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4% «%Fri,REn 

£ 

5% svSFreSvi 


_S=fc£- 


_ _ 145 

„ „ so 
„ _ 16 
_ 39 61 

-191 255 

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- _ 429 

._ X 

X 


11 


2% 

8 

3% 

5% 

3% 

11* 

696 


-24 ZB B 148 12. 
431 7J 14 IX 
.12 A 73 
_ 14 
_ 13 


_ 112 

49a - IX 



ito ?to 
7% 7** 
3% 33*, 
4% 59k 
3% 39* 
19* 19* 

6% 69* 
llto 11% 
5% 5ft 
20% 21 
4to ito 
4% 4% 
1V„ IV,. 
29* 2% 


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40 4% 

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_ 34 106 16% 169* 169* 
_ 10 297 5 4% 41* 

_ _ 65 2to 2%, 2% 

1J7 115 _ 100 11 11 11 

X 16 15^6 15% 


8% Bto Bto 
9% 99* 91k 

9% 9% 9% 

4'Yu 4"/u *Vu 
421 9 Bto 9 

66 4% 3% Sto- 
ll* 1%, 1% ,]% 


-to 
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78 739 II 10% 109. 

- » 10% 10ft 30% 

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54 2% Sto 2% 

582 339* 33ft 33% 

20 19 18% 19 

41 24 236. 239* 

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99 3% 3% 3J6 

113 816 8% 8% 

5 69* 6% 4% 

_ 82 28ft M 28% 

_ 1803 16% 159* 16% 

_ 6 7% 79k 7ft 

_ 1669 10% 9 ft 9% 

_ 590 18% 17% IB% 

_ 9 14% 14% 14% 

_ 63 9% 9% 9% 

_ 44 9ft 9ft 9% 

4 14 14 14 

93 2 IV. 1% 

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I07u:>Vm 2Vu l’Vu 

21 81* 7% 7% 

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B7 16% 151a 15% 

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JTa 3J3 _ 216 10% ra% M« 

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■He 2J _ 15 22 21U 211* —to 

340 1.5 11 1 159 158 158 

.. .. 175 8% B Bft ‘ft 

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8 17% 17% 17% —ft 

« 29% 79ft 29% —ft 

17 36’/, 3*to 36% -to 


_ 24 

48e 54 I 


140 5J _ 


MO li/ _ 
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48D 4.9 - 

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J8e 34 ll 
JSe 2.9 13 

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♦ ft 

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,« 

Hieh Low stock 


OR VU PE MO* HUH Low Latest OYm 


IStollftFrlsclii^ JJb 1.9 16 110 13 1294 ITto 

39* 7% From Adi .11 38 14 X20 2to 2ft 2% -Vk 



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44% 

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171* lift 

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iJSBb 

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7 SUGmTUn 

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15% 14 HMilncn 

2"% WHaicD 

339* 2516 HollvQ? 
lTftiitoHmera 
19 5ft Honda 
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18ft 7%HavnEn 
9% sikHowtak 


12 113 816 81* Bft 

15 161* 161* 16ft — 

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‘ ~ 199*dl9ft 19ft — 

- 6% 6_. *ft— | 

S ^Ulk 

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13 "■ 


4ft .446 -J* 


14% 15, 

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7ft 7% —ft 
16ft 16ft —ft 
15 15ft +ft 
294 24* —ft 
... lift 12, +ft 
12% -13to 13ft _ 

«t8 

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4% 4ft _ 
IVu 1% +ft 

a S-% 

44* 44* _ 

6ft 6% +ft 
10ft 10ft +ft 
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a 1251 30% 309* 30% —to 

27 27 3Vu 3Vi 3to— »u 

11 20 14ft lift lift — V* 

_ 614 9* "A, _ 

160 1ft 1 Vu IV* +V a 
a i 9% m 9% — % 

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17 5 2ft 

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137 16 Vi 

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10 58 81* 

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27 27 —ft 

13ft 131* ♦% 
1594 16 —to 
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7ft 7ft —to 


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lift 6ftincvlen 
lift 9ViiiwtMk> 
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894 iftlrtstGC 

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levs. 109* IntPtyp ,12a _ _ IIS 15% 
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lift 6%jQKmn - - ioi u 12’A, 


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l.BO _ _ 159 30 
Me 13 _ 12 18 

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M 


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13 Bft Janet nr 

lift 6%WPhA 

18% 6%K«yOG 
199% TftKewma 
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11% 696L50 Ind 
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27% 1 2ft Lancer 
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111 7% 

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10 5ft 
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206 171* 

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: 

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6 25% 
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60 4 

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20 96 

63 18% 

“ 10 312 «5 

9 ib 

27 1ft 


42% 42% —to 
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The program for the conference 
will focus on three key sectors: 

telecommunications, 
transportation and energy. 


INVESTING IN NEW 
INFRASTRUCTURE FOR EUROPE 


SKADDEN 

ARPS 

slate 

MEAGHER & 
FLOW! 


BERLIN ■ NOVEMBER 3 & 4 

HcralOE&ribunc 


For further information on the 
conference, please contact: 

Brenda Erdmann Hagerry 
International Herald Tribune 
63 Long Acre. London WC2E ‘>}H. England 
Tel: (44 71) 836 48112 
Fax: (44 71) 836 <>717 



































































































Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 16, 19*1 


SPORTS 


In Case of a Season Washout, 
Clubs Will End Up Big Losers 


Bv Murray Chass 

Site York Tiros Service 

NEW YORK — On an in- 
dustry-wide basis, the 28 major 

league clubs will lose more 

money in gate receipts, conces- 
sions and parking — 5300 mil- 
lion — than they will save in 
players' salaries — S260 million 
. — it the strike wipes out the rest 
of the season. 

The strike forced cancella- 
tion of the third full stale of 14 
games on Sunday, bringing to 
42 the number missed out of 
669 that remained on the sched- 
ule when the players walked oul 
last Friday. 

The National and American 
Leagues were expected to an- 
nounce Monday that all games 


are canceled until further no- 
tice. 

In reaching three days, the 
strike surpassed the two-day 
walkout in August 1985 and be- 
came the third longest in-sea- 
son strike, surpassed by the 50- 
day strike of 1981 and the 1972 
strike that was settled on what 
would have been the ninth day 
of the season. 

At an average salary of SI -2 
million, the figure used by 
Richard Ravitch. the owners’ 
chief labor executive, the 763 
players on strike are losing $5 
million a day. If no more games 
are played, they would lose a 
total of S260 million. 

According to a study by The 
New York Times, if no more 


No Middle Ground 
In Sight in Strike 

By Mark Maske 

Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — Major league baseball’s labor negotiations 
remained on hold while a third day of games were wiped out by 
the players' strike. 

As of late Sunday, representatives for the owners and the 
players had not spoxen to one another for two straight days. 'Hie 
two sides say they expect to get together for a bargaining session 
this week, but it may not come before Wednesday. 

Everyone in baseball is braced for a long struggle. Donald Fehr. 
the Players Association chief, has begun to compare the current 
mood to the atmosphere that surrounded the players’ 50-day 
strike in 1981. 

The owners’ leaders, meanwhile, are insisting that recent com- 
ments by the Baltimore Orioles’ Peter .Angelos, the New York 
Yankees’ George Steinbrenner. the Colorado Rockies’ Jerry 
McMorris and die Cincinnati Reds’ Marge Schott are not signs 
their resolve is crumbling. 

The cooling-off period from last week’s testy confrontations 
continued. Fehr said he planned to make only a brief stop at his 
New York office to son through his mail. The owners’ chief 
negotiator. Richard Ravitch. had no plans to be in his office. The 
interim commissioner. Bud Selig. had a wedding to attend. 

The two sides last met on Friday, a session called by the union 
to restate its revenue-sharing suggestions to the owners. On 
Saturday. Ravitch and Fehr and their entourages met separately 
with three representatives from the Federal Mediation and Con- 
ciliation Service and one Labor Department official. But a Labor 
Department spokesman said the agency was only “monitoring the 
situation” at this point, and Fehr indicated Saturday that he did 
not believe baseball would be dealing with a single mediator any 
time soon. 

It appears that there is no middle ground at this point. The 
owners say at least a dozen teams were projected to lose money 
this year under baseball's salary structure, and they must find a 
way to bring player salaries under control. They have proposed a 
’ system that includes a salary floor and ceiling for each club and 
guarantees the players 50 percent of the game’s revenues. Sources 
say the owners would be flexible on what is counted as revenues 
and probably would be willing to give the players as much as 55 to 
60 percent of the revenues in their salary cap plan. 

But the players are making 58 percent of baseball's revenues 
this year, and they are opposed to changes in a system in which the 
average player salary has grown to nearly $1.2 million per year. 
They say they do not believe the financial information being 
provided by the owners, and they insist they are being dragged 
•' unnecessarily into what should be a debate among the owners 
about how to redistribute revenues to subsidize the game's small- 
market teams. 

Fehr said, “I have no reason to believe anything of significance 
will occur anytime soon.” 

Angelos. Steinbrenner, McMorris and their large-market breth- 
ren say they could live with a labor agreement without a salary 
cap, but they may have waited loo long to speak out. 

Now that the strike has begun, it will take 21 owners to approve 
a labor agreement (as opposed to 15 before the strike began). And 
the small-market owners, those who need revenue sharing and a 
salary cap the most, have enough votes to block ratification of any 
settlement not to their liking. 


games are played, clubs would 
lose S225 million in gate re- 
ceipts and 575 million in park- 
ing, concessions and advertis- 
ing. leaving them with $40 
million less revenue than mon- 
ey saved in unpaid salaries. 

That loss will escalate when 
lost television and radio reve- 
nue and other revenues are 
added. 

A lawyer involved in the dis- 
puze esti mazed Sunday that a 
strike lasting the rest of the sea- 
son could result in lost revenues 
of $400 million to $500 million 
to the clubs after unpaid player 
salaries are figured into the fi- 
nancial mix. 

The $225 million in lost gate 
receipts is based on each team’s 
average attendance at the time 
the strike started, the number of 
remaining home dates and the 
average ticket price. Revenue 
lost from parking, concessions 
and advertising is based on a 
rule-of-thumb figure of one- 
third of gate receipts. 

In the latest report compiled 
by an accounting firm from the 
dubs' financial data, for the 
1992 season, revenues from 
those three items represented 
34.4 percent of gate receipts. 

One person who studies base- 
ball's finances believes that the 
ratio could rise shaiply this sea- 
son. possibly ending up be- 
tween 40 percent and 50 per- 
cent If that is so. the owners 
would face even greater losses 
of revenue. 

Attendance totals would vary 
as the season neared the end, 
with higher attendances expect- 
ed for teams in contention for 
division championships or 
wild-card spots and smaller 
crowds anticipated for teams 
that were out of the race. 

The Toronto Blue Jays, who 
lead the American League in 
attendance, stand to lose the 
most at the gate. Their 22 re- 
maining home games could 
have been expected to produce 
$16 milli on in ticket sales, 
which means they stand to suf- 
fer the largest loss in ticket 
revenues of the 28 teams. 

The Atlanta Braves, with an 
average attendance of 47.023 
and 26 remaining home dates, 
face the largest losses in ticket 
revenue in the National League. 
$14.67 million. 

The home teams do not get to 
keep all of the money from their 
ticket sales. The visiting team in 
the American League receives 
20 percent, and the visitor in the 
National League gets 43 cents 
on each ticket over SI. 

The disparity in those shares 
has become a subject of dis- 
pute in these talks. The union 
has proposed that the National 
League “come into the 20th 
Century” and adopt the Amer- 
ican League practice, but the 
league always has resisted 
change despite the fact that 
some of the teams said to be 
the neediest — San Diego, 
Pittsburgh and Montreal — 
play in that league. 




' ’ 

Wrx?*- 'v: ’i.-f-i--'. - 

AJ Befannen/Tbc Aooamat Pro 

Chang Breezes Past Edberg 

Michael Chang (above), the fourth seed, repeated : 
as chanqiion of tire Thriftway ATP Championship in 
Mason, Ohio, beating a shockingly bad Stefan 
Edberg, 6-2, 7-5. “I just could not find the range on 

the court,” Edberg said of his 29 unforced errors. 


Luyt Withdraws Resignation From Rugby 


Compiled hy Our Staff From Dispatches 

JOHANNESBURG — The president of 
South Africa's rugby union and organizer 
of the 1995 Rugby World Cup agreed to 
withdraw his resignation on Monday after 
a plea from a government official. 

Louis Luyt had said Sunday that he 
would quit because of a dispute over the 
management of the national team. But a 
plea from Sport Minister Steve Tshwete 
convinced him to remain, Luyt said Mon- 
day. 

Interviewed on Radio 702, he said he 
had decided to “forgive but never forget” 
the criticisms that had caused him to resign 
in the first place. 

Luyt stunned the sport Sunday when he 
announced that he would step down as 
head of the South African Rugby Football 
Union after just five months in the post 

The dispute over team management fol- 
lowed South Africa's tour of New Zealand. 


during which prop forward Johan le Roux 
was caught on film biting the ear of New 
Zealand’s captain, Sean Fitzpatrick. Le 
Roux was suspended from rugby until 
1996, and the tour ended Aug. 6. South 
Africa lost two of the tests; the third was 
declared a draw. 

Afterward, Luyt said Manager Jannie 
Engelbrecht ana Coach Ian McIntosh 
should be fired and that le Roux should 
never play rugby for South Africa again . 
Rugby officials opted to keep Engelbrecht 
and McIntosh in charge of the team. 

Luyt’s resignation would have been a 
blow to South Africa's plans to host the 
1995 World Cup and establish itself as a 
world leader in the sport after years of 
isolation because of apartheid. South Afri- 
ca was banned from world rugby in 1981 
because of apartheid and was readmitted 
in 1992. 

' After an emergency meeting tasting al- 


most four hoars, the tngby union’s senior 
vice president; Mtuldti George, said eight 
of the 10 executive members had endorsed 
Tshwete’s attempt to make Luyt dtange 

lws mind. . ... 


him not to resign but it depended on the 
executive committee’s decision. 

“The full executive committee called on 
Dr. Luyt to withdraw his intended resigna- 
tion,’* George said in a statement. “Two 
executive members, that is Masson and 
Parkinson, did not support the majority 
decision of the executive.* 1 
■Ronnie Masson is chairman of the 
Western Provinoe Rugby Football Union, 
and Keith Parkinson is his Natal counter- 
part. - . - 

“The name of SARFU has been dam- 
aged and until the damage is repaired, we 
can't really move forward,” George ssod. 

(Reuters, AP) 


Champ Obree 
Disqualified 
In Cycling 

Coapikd by Of*. Staff Front Dispatches 

PALERMO, Sicily -- 
Graeme Obree of Britain, the 
defending world pursuit cham- 
pion, was disqualified Monday 
in q ualif ying heats for his irreg- 
ular racing position and re- 
moved from the world track cy- 
cling championships . 

Obree, whose tuck position 
was banned in May by the In- 
ternational Cycling Union, was 
punished for ignoring warnings 
about his position, which re- 
sembles that of a downhill side-. 

The peculiar racing position 
and a special, homemade bike 
allowed Obree to set a world 
one-hour record of 52.713 kilo- 
meters (32.76 miles) in Bor- 
deaux in ApriL 

The British cydist also set a 
world record of four minutes. 
22.668 seconds in the world 
4,000-meter pursuit at Hamar, 
Norway, last year. 

“Obree was disqualified for 
ignoring, twice, the jury warn- 
ings about his position,” a 
championship spokesman said. 

“I was told one hour before 
the start that there must be a 
certain clearance' between my 
chest and the handlebars, 
Obree said. -“No distance was 
given, aud it was like a high 
jump without the bar. 

“No measurement has been 
defined. It is all pretty vague, 
but officials told me that there 
would be two warnings and 
then disqualification. I knew 
that they wane out to get me.” 

Obree’s completed his quali- 
fying run, in the opening day of 
the World Championships, in 
4:32.698 minutes, 33 seconds 
dower than his British rival 
Chris Boardxnan. 

Board man, the Olympic 
champion, led qualifying runs 
in 4:29.332, at an average speed 
of 53.466 Jcph. 

He's die favorite to win the 
world tide in Tuesday's final at 
Palermo Velodrome following 
Obree’s disqualification. 

(Reuters, AP) 


SIDELINES 


SCOREBOARD 


Navratilova Won’t Play at U.S. Open 

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) — Martina Navratilova has an- 
nounced that she will not compete in the U.S. Open, which begins 
Aug. 29. 

Navratilova, who has won four U.S. Open singles titles, said, 
“My 37-year-old body is telling me to play on indoor surfaces, and I 
think it’s time to listen.** 

Navratilova plans to retire from singles competition at the end of 
the year. That means her last career Grand Slam match was her loss 
in the Wimbledon final to Conchita Martinez of Spain last month. 

Italian Grand Prix Is Reinstated 

PARIS (Reuters) — The Italian Grand Prix has been reinstated 
on the Formula One calendar after a proposal to modify the Monza 
circuit, the International Motoring Federation said Monday. 

FIA said Friday that it was canceling the race, scheduled for Sept 
1 1, because of doubts over whether the Italian authorities would 
carry out safety work. Changes to the circuit were required to bring 
it into line with safety measures introduced after the deaths of 
Ayrton Senna and Roland Ratzenberger at the San Marino Grand 
Prix at the Italian circuit of Imola in May. 


Croatia AGnterM 


ATP CHAMPIONSHIP 
la Maien, Obfa ~ ■ 

Final 

Michael Chons M), United States, def. Ste- 
fan Edberg 12), Sweden, M, 74 


Alex O'Brien. United State* and Sancton 
Stalls. Australia del. Wayne Ferreira, South 
Africa, and Mark Kratzmm Australia, OS 
(7-41. 6-& 6-1 

VIROMIA SLIMS OF LOS ANGCLZ5 
Final 

Amy Frazier (10). United States, def. Ann 
GraMman (U), United States, 6-1, 64. 

Doubles pis*! 

JuOe Hakxd and Nathalie Tomtat (A), 
Franca det Jana Novotna. Qedi Republic, 
and LHo Raymond at. U-S. 6-1, 06. 6-1. 


BASKETBALL 


World Championships 


volte 
Ootd Medof 
United States 137, Ruesta 91 


Sta w du rl Retattf 
UBiPtaoe 
- Cuba 75, Angola <7 

tm no ce 

South Korea 76. Egypt 49 
. nth Place 
Brazil 91, Gerntmiy 71 • 

Ntate Ptaae 
Argentina 74 Spain 6S 

Sunday's Reetatt 


Perafce-i inter Vt-0, 83; t,' TMbv Cordon. 
United Statu. Leto-Fard Coeworth XB, D; S, 
JMdioei Awfratu, united SWIM. Revnard- 
Fard Cawwrtb - 

6, Adrian Ferna n de z . Mexico. RevnortHF 
marVB-QJB; 7. Nigel Monwll, England, Lalo- 
ftettCuworift xa m A RaufBotaei. flrazH. 
Loto-Ford Cojworth XB, Kb t, JaCbma VItte- 
native, Canada. Reynard- Ford Cantorth XB. 
tit ltt Morto Andretti. United States. Lata- 

Ford GoMiwrtti xa. a. 


Canada IOC China 76 
ns i 

Australia Nt Puerto Rice 83 


AUTO RACING 


Indy Car World Series 

The ordv of flute* Sunday at the Miner 
eonebtelMBMIiitfpcte'raceaMkiMM- 
OMoSgorti C*r ce u r w, wHfa driver, country, 
typoofcer.t uee cnm gte ted e nd wtan er *i n ve r 
ate mad: 1, Al Umar Jr- United States. 
PaMte-llmor VS-D, 83. 110387 tnph <177413 
kofi); Z Paul Tracv. Canada, Pmke-lbnar 
VMX 83; X Emerson Ftttlpakfl. Brazil 


BASEBALL 


WoridChamplonshlps 


antnpfamUp Game 
Cuba A. South Korea l 

Third Place Game 
Jaaaa A Nleoragua 1 


TRANSITIONS 


. FOOTBALL 
Naiteeal P NBdi League 
DENVE R — Signed Leonard RussetL rvtv 
ntog back, to Hoar contract. Released Rob- 
ert Detatan. running back. 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 




WS TUB BOOK. 
BSiM A BEST 
SB1ER? WSHC 
MJTOCft WON K 

NUTZER? WD 
HEWBHIOBt 


I ONH VWT SKWESWr 
OWE URMX ti&XMQVED. 

are tosze nw umnoftr 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 16, 1994 


Page 17 





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The Birdies Sing: There’s Price, and Everyone Else 


By Larry Dorman 

New York Times Soviet ... . . . 
TULSA. Oklahoma — Tn >Ko Imal 



Price whose 269 total broke the 
1964 PGA Championship record, by 
rwo'strbkes ~ became the first player 
to win'back-to-back major cbaxoplon- 
wod the U.S. 


It was the original Dream Team 
against Angola. Any Super Bowl with 
Buffalo; Secretarial at the Belmont. It 
was Nick Price, doing what he wanted: 
when he wanted and how he wanted, 
writing by six strokes over Corey Ba- 
vin in the PGA Championship and 
st andi n g bead and shoulders above . 
anybody in the game. 

“Pve always wanted to be No. 1 ” 
said Price. “Deep down I’ve 

wanted that. But if you thint that way 
you can sometimes lose sight of play- 
ing golf tournaments and what it take? 
to win them." 

Price, 37 years old, did exactly what it 
took Sunday. He shot a final-round 67 
for a total of 269 and Look his second 
sugar championship of the year, his 
third victory in his last four starts,his 
sixth 1994 tournament victory and his . 
second PGA Championship. 

By adding this to'his -wetbry at the 
British Open last month at Tumbcrry, 


r -__ Country Club, ana f 

^ Ie . s ^‘ e °® game is- this; There is - He got there" by starting fast and 
Niue nice and there is everybody ekei-;-hovtr .looking back, by conducting a. 

baBrSttildng dime and by clearly dem- 
onstrating why he is the undisputed 
No. 1 primer in the world rankings. 

Hewasrianply too good, and eveay- 
oneknewit 

“Ifelt Tike I won the B Flight to- 
day,” saidTavin, who didn't birdie a 
hole unt3 the 15th and dosed with a 
69. “Nick made it impossible to have 
any hope out. there today. He played 
unbelievable golf.” 

This vtctmy began at the beginning. 
By the time Price, who led wire to wire, 
stepped to the first tee Sunday, Greg 
Neuman already had bridled the first 
two holes, pulling within three strokes 
of the lead. If ever there was an early 
opportunity to choke, this was it But 
Price didn’t miss a fairway on the 
front, binfied three holes and bad a 
seven-stroke lead by the mm. 


Price, who also won the 1992 PGA 
Championship, at Bellerive Country 
Club m SL Louis, Missouri. *Tm just 
so proud of the way I played. I really 
thought Greg, was going to shoot a low 
round, maybe a 6? or 64, and when I 
saw that he was two-under through 
three boles, I said to myself, ’You’re 
going to have to play some golf to- 


^That front nine today was proba- 
bly the best nine holes of my life,*' said 


The golf that Price played was some- 
thing with which the rest of the field 
was only vaguely f amiliar . He played 
the first two holes with solid pars and 
then whipped his approach stmt at the 
third bole seven feet beyond the flag- 
stick. The ball spun back to 1 % feeL 

That was his first of three birdies on 
the front side, six birdies for the day, 
arid it served notice that Price was not 
about to crack. 

“I put my nose down and played 
those first four boles as well as I could,” 
said the South African- bom Price, who 
keeps- a residence in Orlando, Florida. 
“Thai really alleviated a lot of the pres- 
sure and a lot of the nerves.” 

He hirdied the fourth hole, nailing a 
pitching wedge to within four feet. 

Norman heard the roars, and a few 
minutes later he heard something that 
might have thrown him off just enough 


to end whatever slim chance be had of 
catching Price. On the tee at the 614- 
yard, par-5 Fifth, Norman was inches 
away from impact when a fan 
screamed, “You the man!” 

Norman flinched and drove the ball 
into the rough. 

John Cook, Norman's playing part- 
ner, questioned the fan’s intelligence. 
Neuman glared at him, but said noth- 
ing. His concentration broken. Nor- 
man hit his next shot into a tree limb, 
the ball ricocheted right and Norman 
wound up bogeying the hole. There 
was no room for bogeys if Norman had 
any hope. He would nave had to shoot 
62 just to tie. He wound up shooting 
70. 

*‘I didn’t know if there was going to 
be any way to catch Nickie,” Norman 
said. “I saw him in the locker room 
and his eyes were so big, it looked like 
Raymond Floyd. He should be proud- 
It takes a lot to win from start to 
finish like he's done. He really de- 
serves it” 

Price’s victory completed the unprec- 
edented occurrence of four foreign- 
born players winning the Masters, U.S. 
Open, British Open and PGA Champi- 
onship. He overpowered Pavin and. the 
best young American player, Phil Mick- 


elson, 24, who shot 70 and finished 
seven shots back. 

Mickelson was duly impressed. 
“Nick played awesome.” said Mickel- 
son, whose season was interrupted by a 
broken leg suffered in a skiing accident 
in March. “I’m going to do my best to 
lake him out skiing next year.” 

That was a little joke- So, in fact, was 
the ease with which Price bandied the 
field here. He had putted the bumpy, 
spiked-up greens at Southern Hills as 
well as anyone in the field — except 
Pavin — averaging 27.75 strokes per 
round He bad not missed more than 
four fairways during any round and his 
worst outing, the shaky 70 of Saturday, 
was way behind him as be strolled up 
the fairway to the last hole. 

Price, who would pick up a check for 
S3 10,000 in a few minutes, decided it 
was time to make his own humorous 
aside. He turned to his caddie. Jeff 
Medlen, and said: “Lemme see. I think 
I’ve got nine putts to win.” 

He three-putted from 45 feet, and the 
only thing he lost by doing it was a 
share of Jack NickJaus’s record for larg- 
est victory margin, set in 1980. 

What be gained was a whole lot more. 
Price is the undisputed king of golf. No 
one else is dose. 





Dream On: A New Invitation List 


By Harvey Araton 

New York Times Sendee 

TORONTO — It got the job 
done, but this was not a memo- 
rable UJS. team, no Dream 
Team, not in performance, style 
or grace! Upon reflection, sev- 
eral of its players wished it had 
never been so dubbed 
Derrick Coleman, who had 
better get used to name changes 
as the Nets are discussing a 


Alonzo Mounting, left, and Shaquille O’Neal. 


thinks the team should 
been allowed its own identity. 

“Young Gtms, or something,” 
he said “Dream Team II wasn’t 
really fair. No sequel, Eke Rocky 
or Rambo, is ever as good" 

■ - Coleman said most of the 
players were headed to Detroit, 
to a dub called Legends, for a 
celebration of the UJS. victory 
in the World Championship of 
Basketball. But Shaquille O'N- 


eal said: “We’re not legends, 
yet. But some day, we will be.” 

USA Basketball can’t wait 
that long. A year from now it 
has to choose its 1996 Olympic 
team for the Games in Atlanta. 

Based on performance, li- 
ability and whai Coach Don 
Nelson and staff have been say- 
ing, publicly and privately, here 
is an unofficial player ranking 
and each player's chances of 
being invited back: 

1. SHAQUILLE O’NEAL: 
Absolutely unstoppable, a 76 
percent shooter. IBs full-court 
dribble and slam against Aus- 
tralia was the play of the tour- 
nament, and his on-court per- 
sonality, by comparison to 
others, was playful. I know HI 
be asked back.” he said With- 
out a doubt 

2. REGGIE MILLER: 
Dropped in 3-pointers as if they 


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Bonner 


C3DBB aasaaa aan 
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so Merit 

si Town near 
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92 Dream pictures 
artist 

St Hiatus 

SS Legendary 
Giant 


were layups. A true NBA char- 
acter who also conforms to 
team play. Write him in. 

3. JOE DUMARS: Quiet, in- 
tense, intelligent pro is not the 
stopper he once was, but can 
still Tind the basket in a hurry. 
However at 31, not a good bet 
to be back. 

4. MARK PRICE: As long as 
the international 3-point line is 
so invitingly close, pure quick- 
trigger bombers like Miller and 
Price are essential to discourage 
gan g-defending the likes of 
O’Neal. Rice, though, was a 40 
percent shooter, is 30, fragile, 
and playing on a surgically re- 
paired knee. Questionable. 

5. SHAWN KEMP: A pow- 
erful force in the international 
game, because of his explosive- 
ness and big man’s ability to 
run the floor. Definite. 

6. ALONZO MOURN rNG: 
Struggled with international 
rules — wider lane, less hands- 
on defense, etc. — but played 
very hard and is such a good 
athlete that he can’t hurt a 
team. On-court attitude was at 
times needlessly abrasive but 
coaches think he will grow up. 

7^KEVIN JOHNSON: 
Though be didn’t shoot the ball 
well from the perimeter, his 
penetration was excellent But 


Tim Hardaway will get auto- 
matic berth if he's healthy. 

8. DERRICK COLEMAN: 
D.C was. at times, the best U.S. 
forward. Played hard, but prac- 
tice effort and trash mentality 
turned off coaches and will 
make the committee nervous. 
Chances are 50-50. 

9. DAN MAJERLE: When 
the team was picked last sum- 
mer. he seemed like an obvious 
dhoice. Tough defender. Slash- 
ing driver with great 3- pom l 
range. Then he lost his shot, 
which he began to depend on 
too much. Still hasn't found iL 
Unless he does this coming sea- 
son, forget iL 

10. DOMINIQUE WIL- 
KINS: Had terrible practices, 
didn't guard anyone, but didn't 
bother anyone as long as he 
played and got the ball. But he's 
34. Say good-bye, Nique. 

11. STEVE SMITH: Didn’t 
offend anyone buL as be has in 
Miami the past couple of years, 
didn't live up to billing either. 
No way. 

12. LARRY JOHNSON: 
Last, and least. Back problems 
have stolen his explosiveness. 
Coaches hated his attitude. He 
was out the moment he dunked 
against Australia, then caressed 
himself for 15 seconds in front of 
the camera while play continued. 



Paul I RjiiwdV Agcncc Fnnct-lrcvc 

Nick Price, the winner by six at the PGA Championship. 

Final PGA Scores 


Pinal scorn and oamlnH Sunday of the SI J 
million PGA Champloruailp an Itta &S3»-vard, 
par-70 Southern mils Country Club course; 


Nk* Price. KWLOOO 
Corev Pavin. n 60000 
Phil Mlckebab SWUM 
Nick Faldo. S7&MJ 
Grog Norman. S7A447 
John Cook. 174467 
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BUI Gkissoiv S1B466 
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W avne Grady. SM5B 
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Bab Boyd. SM9 
Letmle dementi. 18491 
Sam Torrance. 9L4H 
(Min Montgomerie. S7M0 
CMp Beck. S7A00 


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Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 16, 1994 


ART BUCHWALD 


Fitting In the Clintons 


Miami Tries Out Life as Tinseltown on the Atlantic 


M ARTHA’S VINEYARD, 
Massachusetts — Presi- 



IVl Massachusetts — Presi- 
dent and Mrs: Clinton are com- 
ing to Martha’s Vineyard and I 
am besieged with queries as 
to how Vine- 
yarders should 
behave toward 
them. 

The first 
thing is to be 
yourself. You 
don’t have to 
bow or curtsy 
when you meet 
them, unless 

they are walk- n , . . 

mg down the Buchwald 

street with Princess Di. Proto- 
col demands that you don't 
speak to the Clintons until they 
speak to you. 

If they say “Hi,” you might 
say something like, “Mr. Presi- 
dent, although I voted for you, 
it doesn’t mean that your Secret 
Servicemen have a right to park 
in my driveway 

Or, “If you really want to do 


you is Lloyd Cutler’s job as le- 
gal counsel to the president, 
and that really doesn’t go any- 
where. 


By Vernon Silver 

New York Tima Semce 


are our actors* our producers, our 


M IAMI — Maneuvering his Harrier jet 
around skyscrapers as only an action 



Since the president is a golf- 
er, he will probably ask you to 
play with him. There is nothing 
wrong in accepting unless you 
have promised your wife to 
clean out the garage at the same 
time. In that case, in order not 
to disappoint her, you should 
tell the president you’ll fit him 
in later. 


something for this country, 
Mrs. Clinton, you would make 


Mrs. Clinton, you would make 
sure everyone who sailed here 
in the New York Regatta on 
their yachts could afford health 
insurance.” 


Hillary is especially curious 
about people. You could offer 
to take her to a lobster hatchery 
where they are trying to find 
ways to make lobsters larger so 
people can eat more of them 
without getting melted butter 
over their clothes. Also you 
could ask Mrs. Clinton if she 
would like to visit the Martha's 
Vineyard Stock Exchange in the 
financial district of Chilmark 
where islanders trade in sea gull 
eggs and whale futures and dis- 
counted jellyfish bonds. 

□ 


1VJL around skyscrapers as only an action 
hero can, Arnold Schwarzenegger blows away 
the terrorists, rescues the girl (his character's 
teenage daughter) and saves humanity from 
nuclear destruction. 

Many stories below, downtown Miami 
cranes its neck to watch. The scene, with its 
backdrop of Biscayne Bay and the Miami 
skyline, not only helped make “True Lies” a 
blockbuster, but it struck another blow for 
the oily’s newest self-description. Miami, for 
some reason, is always changing its nickname. 

A few fashion models were spotted on its 
beaches, and some local boosters touted the 
town as “Manhattan South.” A couple of 
downtown artists in cafes ogled the models, 
and South Beach styled itself SoBe. 

The foreign tourists flocked in to find the 
sun, the models and the downtown artists, 
and Miami was slapped with another label: 
the American Riviera. Now Miamians have 
found their town yet one more title — Holly- 
wood East — and they have reason to hope 
this year’s label will stick. 

During die last year, they’ve seen not only 
Schwarzenegger shooting it out over the Mi- 
ami skyline but also “Ace Ventura: Pet De- 


tective” (Jim Carrey) tracking the missing 
Miami Dolphins mascot through South 



come, -said Tony Gold- 
man, a New Ycdcer who is chairman of the 
South Beach Marketing Council and owns 
hotels in Miami Beach as well as restaurants 
in SoHo. . _ . , 


“Yon, don’t just open your genie’s bottle 
nd the MGM studios are located there. 


and the MOM studios are located there, 
Goldman said. “But I believe that the indus- 
try has looked at South Florida as a very 
viable alternative.” . . 

- Not only does Miami have attractive loca- 
tions and a growing infrastructure to provide 
produ ction services, but it has the intangible 
lure of being a celebrity playgroup 
“A lot of stars that are digging the new life 
style can steer the'dedrion makers to come to 
their new temtoiy,” Goldman said. 

For Stallone, mainug a movie in M iam i was 
convenient in part because he has a house 


here, not far from one owned by Madonna. 
Convenience is also provided by the local 

• l' l mat. 


•if 


The Clintons have been here 
before, so they know how im- 
portant it is to have a standby 
reservation to get on the ferry in 
time for Chelsea to get back to 
school If you have one of your 
own that you would like to [pve 
them, don’t expect any favors in 
return. The most they can offer 


U. S. Hiatus for 'lion King 9 

Nrw York Tima Sariee 


LOS ANGELES — Walt 
Disney Co. says it will pull the 
hit animated film “The Lion 
King” out of U.S. movie the- 
aters on Sept. 23 and re-release 
it in late November. In an un- 
usual marketing move, Disney 
is trying to bottle up demand 
for the film until the big year- 
end holiday movie-going season 
— and make up for not having a 
new animated release for 
Thanksgiving for the first rime 
in several years. 


The fact that you are in con- 
versation with them does not 
mean you should take advan- 
tage of the relationship. These 
are a few subjects it would not 
be a good idea io bring up: 

Whitewater — or any other 
kind of water they sell in the 
supermarket. 

Haiti, as in: “Mr. President, 
will you invade Haiti before or 
after your vacation on Martha’s 
Vineyard?” 

Republicans, as in: “Mr. 
President, do you think the 
sharks in Congress are more fe- 
rocious than the ones swim- 
ming off the shore of Nantuck- 
et?" 

Polls: “Mr. President, the 


polls show that you are slipping 
in popularity. Do you think u 


in popularity. Do you think if 
you caught a 40-pound bass in 
the Vineyard Sound that people 
would have more confidence in 
you?” 

Senator Gramm: “Mrs. Clin- 
ton, if you were told all the 
clams around your house were 
inedible and would make some- 
one sick — would you invite 
Senator Gramm to a c lam 
chowder dinn er?’’ 


Miami Dolphins mascot through South 
Beach. Wesley Snipes, in town to firm his sky- 
diving thriller “Drop Zone,” made headlines 
with a real-life police chase, and local news 
telecasts had nightly reports from the filming 
of Sean Connery's next vehicle, “Just Cause,” 
in which he jumps a car across an open 
drawbridge on a causeway to Miami Beach. 

Local politicians, like Maurice Ferre, a 
Dade County commissioner, said they love 
the attention. “Everybody seems to be en- 
thused with the idea that Miami is up on the 
screen,” said Ferre, who lobbies producers to 
make movies here. 

As the blockbusters add up (Sylvester Stal- 
lone's action thriller “The Specialist” just 
finished shooting here, as did “The Perez 
Family,*’ with Marisa Tomet, a story of the 
1980 Mari el boatlift), Miami is filled with 
Hollywood hopes, even if it sometimes looks 
like nothing more than the next stage of a 
longtime identity crisis. 

Remember, this is a city, sometimes known 
as Havana North or Casablanca West, where 
the penchant for self-comparison is so strong 
that not long ago, when a few local bands 
made it big, the title Seattle South bounced 
around briefly. 


Bmqe W. Tainan/ Pammonai 

Wesley Snipes and Yancy Butler above the Miami skyline in the thriller “Drop Zone.” 


Spamsb-language news media, whether or not 
the city stays in Hollywood’s favor. The Tele- 
mundo ana Univision networks have head- 
quarters here, as does MTV Latino. 

And while city officials gush with provin- 
cial hopes of beating Los Angeles at its own 
game, some important industry players are 
actually making deals that could turn Miami, 
now Just the location of the moment, into a 
legitimate production center. 

The biggest such proposal is for a 50-acre 
waterfront site that could handle both the 
location work unique to Miami and the interi- 
or shots that make a film complete. The 


project, backed by Stallone, the Holl' 
producer Jerry Weintraub and the ! 


Although the comparisons to Hollywood 
can be silly, there are signs that Miami may 
find an enduring niche in the movie and 
television businesses. Miami's Latin Ameri- 
can links could make it a center for the 


producer Jerry Weintraub and the Miami 
musician FrnTli n Estefan, would include post- 
production facilities as well as a back-lot 
attraction for the public. 

“It's a good place to make movies — the 
weather's good,” said Weintraub, who is pro- 
ducing Stallone's “Specialist." 

“Hollywood’s not going away,” he added. 
“Not everybody’s going to Florida to make 
movies. But they’ll get their share. All they 
need down there is a studio facility, which 
we’re working on.” 


dian city, Miami has attracted producers with 
its low cost of doing business, ffr frbin the 
New York and Hollywood unions. Florida’s 
right-to-woric law allows union productions 
to hire nonnnion workers at a fraction of what 
they would be paid elsewhere, sad Paul Laza- 
rus, director or the motion picture program at 
the University of Miami. 

However, Imamus said, in show business, 
image can be as important as cost, and Mi- 
ami’s success largely depends on tow hip it 
remains. “For the moment it is a congenial 
place to- make pictures, like Santa Fe is and 
like Texas was. 

“Some of that will inevitably disappear 
when the heat oa South Florida and Miami 
Beach goes away. You don’t stay white-hot as 
a destination point for the indeterminate fu- 
ture.” 

However, Lazarus said, “We’re not going 
to ever, in my lifetime, become competitive 
with Los Angeles, and probably not with New 

York.” The problem, he said, is a lack of local 

talent that forces moviemakers to import 
workers from Hollywood. 

“What have you got in Florida? You' have ". 
no creative community, certainly no film 
community,” Lazarus said. “Yes, you can . 


government, which accommodated the mak- 
ers of “JustCause” by dosing the main cause- 
way to South Beach for several weekmghts 
last month, forcing motorists to detour. _ 

. Another draw is the diversity of locations. 
“It’s not just Miami.” he said. “It’s a pop to 
the Keys, a pop to the Everglades, a pop to 
Florida’s west coast. There’s a lot of. different 
looks and tremendous water.” 

The makers of “Drop Zone,” for example, 
used the Keys far tropical scenes, then moved 
the crew just a few miles north, to a pine- 
coveted area near Miami, to scenes meant to 
be the Virginia suburbs near- Washington. In 
“True Lies*’ the finale erupts with a shoot-out 
near Key West, a car chase on the Seven Mfle 
Bridge and a dogfight over Miami 

With about one major movie bring made in 
Miami each month, the pyrotechnics can only 
be good for tire region’s economy, which 
depends on tourism, said Jeff Peel, the acting 
director of tire Miaim-Dade Office of Film, 
Television and Print. 

- “That’s the kind at exposure that no one 
fan afford to buy,” he said. “Some mom and 


in Peoria seeing ‘True Lies’ might say, 
‘Let’s go there!’ ‘Just Cause’ is doing the same 
thing with the car jumping over the bridge.” 

- But are images of terrorism and car chases 
really whatMuuni needs to draw tourists? 

“That was the argument with ‘Miami 
Vice,’ ” Peel said. ■“ 'Gee, everybody’s going 
to think we’re drug dealers and killers here.’ 1 
think viewers are more sophisticated than 
that. They know it’s fiction. It makes it a city 
of the world rather than some sleepy South- 
ern town at the tip of Florida.” * 

And no matter how long they call this 
Hollywood East, Peel admitted the real Hol- 
lywood w31 remain tire center of the movie 
and television business. That is, of course, 
“until Galifonua falls into the ocean.” 


appropriate. 


crew up a major picture in terms of grips and 
gaffers, but where are our directors? Where 


WEATHER 


PEOPLE 


Forecast for Wednesday through Friday, as provided by Accu-Weather. 


Capth w i 

CMaMSal 

Di4*i 

Edntugh 


Today 

High Law W 

nc nc 
25/52 16/54 ■ 
22/71 1 M 1 • 
31/58 11/82 • 
SOT 21/73 ■ 
31/83 22/71 ■ 
27/80 12183 « 
21/70 11132 nc 
28/78 16<58 a 
28/77 14157 pc 
21/70 IV 52 pc 

at m torn a 

17/82 10190 c 
1BJB1 12*53 ah 
31/88 IB/88 a 
22/71 11/52 c 
27/50 17/02 a 

10/84 10/30 pg 
31/88 18*4 a 
28/79 21/70 a 
27/93 18/81 a 
29/73 12/83 a 
34/83 18/38 a 
29/54 21/70 a 
18/88 12/83 | 
23/73 13/88 a 



Today 

High Lew 
OF Of 


SSXog 


31/88 34/75 
32/88 1 ft/64 
31/88 28/71 
30/oe asm 
33/81 2700 
3301 23/73 
3301 27/00 
3108 22/71 
3108 25/77 
3108 22/71 


Qint Eastwood wiD be crossing “The 
Bridges of Madison County” with Meryl 
Streep. Streep will play the lonely Iowa 
farm wife who has a brief affair with the 
photqiournaJist that Eastwood will play in 
the film version of the popular novel by 
Robert James Waller. East- 
wood wQl direct, and Steven Spielberg will 
be executive producer, Warner Bros. said. 
□ 


]Unaaaaonrt4y 
| Cold 


C8to 2V 70 72/83 a 

Fatal 3108 25/73 | 

Part* 2700 1500 a 

Pngua 22/71 11/82 pc 

Raytyavlt 1308 10/50 l 

Homs 3308 21/70 a 

El FOOnhuq >804 8MI i 

SttetaAn 1804 10/50 pc 

Swboug 2700 1808 ■ 

Tdta 10/81 12*3 pc 

Varica 2802 2100 a 

Vk*ra 22/71 13*8 pc 

Vtaaa* 21/70 11/52 ah 

batch 28/78 1801 a 


North America 
Sm/ottsflng hoot will remain 
across the Southwest later 
this week. San Francisco. 
Los Angeles and San Diego 
will be warm, but a sea 
breeze will keep ihe heat 
well biland. Tropical moisture 
wlfl spread up Uie Eastern 
Seaboard later this week. 
Heavy rains may reach as 
tar north as New York City. 


Europe 


A aeries of storms moving 
across the northern British 


across the northern British 
Isles Into western Scandi- 
navia «rfll be accompanied 
by periods of rain the second 
hall ol this week. Showers 


end gusty winds will cross 
the southern British Isles. 
Paris will be breezy with 
some sunshine, bui (he 
week may end with showers. 


Asia 

A tew s how o re and thunder- 
storms may Irtm me heal a 
bk <n Japan We dne sd ay, but 
heal may return late In die 
week. Southeastern China 
will be humid with locally 
heavy rains. Tropical Slorm 
Fred wW probably strengthen 
Wo a typhoon by (aie this 
week as H continues west- 
northwest toward Taiwan. 


Capa Toon 


33*1 23/73 C 32 *B 23/73 pc 
15** 7 HI • ISMS 8/4 8 pc 

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20*8 1103 c 22/71 11*2 pc 
3B/KE 24/75 pc 38/10024/75 S 


North America 


Mldcfle East 


Latin America 


Today Tomorrow 

togh Low W High low W 


Mgb LOW W M0> low If 


HboUj 
H ouwan 
Lo« Angct ro 


34*3 24/75 ■ 34*3 24/79 • 
39/102 23/73 f 38/10022/71 ■ 


Oceania 

AuddSnd 1SAB 7«4 «fl M/57 7M4 pc 
Sydney 10*1 7/44 pc 18*1 7/44 pc 


43/1(77 19*6 a 41/70811*4 a 
32*0 21/70 a 32*8 20*8 a 


44/111 34/75 a 45/113 23/73 a 
42007 24/76 ■ 44/11127*0 a 


» OF Of C/F 
Burnt sbaa 13*6 3*7 a ISfli 8 MS pc 

Qaraeaa 31*8 36/79 pc 32*9 20/79 pc 

Lfrna 10*64 18*1 pc 18*4 IE/59 pc 

Itafcocar 23/73 12*3 pc 24/75 13*8 t 

flbdajwwko 28*9 18*4 pc 28/77 19*0 pc 

Sanfego 19*0 8M3 pc 17*3 200 pc 


Lasianit s-sumy, Dc-twtfydoujy, c-daudy. sMvmgrs, t-nmderstxms. r-rah. afcrow Hurries. 
si*srKm,t-lca.W-Weatiw. AB maps, forecasts end data provided by AcatWeo&wr, Ins. C 


21/70 14*7 
27*0 20*8 
24/75 17*2 
28*2 17*2 
33*1 15/58 
27*0 17*2 
29*4 23/73 
31*1 21/70 
38*7 23/73 
83*1 24/75 
28*2 17*2 
24/75 11*2 
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27*0 18*4 
41/108 28*4 
27*0 13*6 
22/71 13*8 
74/75 13*5 
28*2 20*8 


pc 21/70 1290 pc 
t 20*2 21/70 th 
a 25/77 17*2 pc 
9 29*4 17*2 pc 
a 34*3 (0*1 a 
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pc 31*8 24/75 pc 
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a 38/100 21/70 pc 
pc 83*1 25/77 b 
pc 29*4 18*4 pe 
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pc 32*9 25/77 l 
a 29*4 20*8 pc 
pc 41/10831*8 pc 
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C 23/73 13*5 pc 
pc 25/77 l&*8 pc 
pc 2 BA< 21/70 ah 


Princess Diana held talks with Writer 
Oonkfre aboard yachts off Martha’s Vine- 
yard, Massachusetts to discuss arranging a 
television documentary about her life, 
Britain’s Mail on Sunday newspaper re- 
ported. The Mail, quoting what it called 
friends of the princess, said the documen- 
tary would be her response to a 2£-hour 
interview with Prince Charles by the jour- 
nalist Jonathan DimWeby that was broad- 
cast two months ago. In that interview, 
Charles admitted adultery after the break- 
down of his marriage to Diana. 

O 

Just when it seemed that Barbra Strei- 
sand was coming out of the quietest period 
in her career, she’s locked herself up again. 
Streisand is editing tapes from her 26- 
concert tour for an upcoming special on 


Home Box Office. Other footage showing 
how Streisand overcame 28 years of stage 
fright also might be included. Tire twp- 
hour program, “Barbra Streisand: The 
Concert,” is to be aired on Sunday in tire 
U.S. 

a , . . 

Two Iranian .films, Ibrahim F onnesh’ s 
“Khomreh” mid Kyamsh Ayyurfs “Aba- 1 
dani-ha,” were awarded first and second 
prize respectively at tire Locarno film festi- 
val Third prize went to the film “Kosure” 
by Christine Carrfere of France. French 
actresses . Bernadette Latent and Bn Be 
Oder shared a special prize for their role in 
Marion Vernoux’s “personne ne ro’aime.” 
The Chinese filmmaker Zhou Xiaowen was 



l*n Wakfic/JfcwUn 


riven the jury’s special prize for his film 

W" 


John Bobbitt wants the kitchen knife 
that his wife, Loreua, used to cut off his 
penis as well as tire photographs taken 
during the nine-hour operation to reattach 
iL “We’d like to get them out of the files,” 
said Bobbitt’s lawyer, Gregory Murphy in 
Manassas, Virginia. He complained that 
some photos had found their way to the 
media. Judge LeRoy F. MDIette Jr. said 


.HIGH-STEPPING — Drum Mqjor 
Ian McOeecban of the Territorial 
Pipe Band gives singer Eartha Kitt a 
lift as the Edinburgh Festival opened. 


the pictures must remain cm file as evi- 
dence, but did order them sealed. MflJette, 
who is handling the couple's divorce, put 
off ruling on tire request for the knife and 
other items of mantel property until own- 
ership is determined. 


Travel in a world without borders, time zones 

or language barriers. 


AKT Access Numbera 
How to call around trie world " 

1. Using the chan below. find the counny you are calling from. 

1 Dial the corresponding /OST Access Number. 

3. to English-speaking Operate* or voice prompt wiU ask far the phone masher you wish id cafl or cornea you to a 

customer service represeiKadve. 

To motive your free wallet cacdof ABEft Acce* Numbers, lost dial the access number of 
the country youVe ki and ask for Oistomer Service. 


COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER 


AnaaaHa 
China, PBO»* 
Guam 
Hong Kong 
India# 
Indonesia* 

Japan* 

Korea 


lTa bT . . 172-1011 Bnafi 

1-800-881-011 Ucchtenraetn * 155-00-11 rwt. 

10011 Uthramia* '• 8*196 Qojumhfc " 

018-872 lurombraag 0-800 0111 CosaRJcaV 

gOO -1111 Macedonia, F.YJL of 99-8004288 . Ecuador* 


000-117 Malta* . 
001 - 801-10 Monaco* 


Malaysia* 
New Zealand 


0039-13 1 ttahafands* 
009-H Norway 
11 * Poland**** 
800-0011 Portugal* 
000-911 Romania * 


Singapore 
Sri Lanka 
Taiwan* - 
Thailand* 


105-11 Boggfe-tB 
235-2872 Slovakia 


800-0X11-111 Spain* 
430430 Sweden* 
0080-10288-0 S w t u e iU nd* 


0800-890-110 H Salvador* = 

19*0011 Guatemala* ~ 

06 - 022 - 9 H 1 -' Guyana*** ~ 

8 00 - 190-11 - Ho nduras 
0 * 010 - 480-0111 ^ 

05017 - 1 - 288 . Nicaragua Qfansgoa) 
01 - 800- 4288 P anama ■ — 

155- 5042 Pern* - ! ■ — 

00 - 420-0 0101 S m Sm mb 
900 - 99 - 00 -11 Uruguay 
020 - 795-611 Venezuela** 


0008010 

QQa -0312 

980 - 11-0010 

114 

119 

190 

190 

163 
1 23 

95-800-462-4240 
0 . 174' 


'109 

191 

156 

00-0410 

- 80 - 011-120 


.001*991-1111 UJL 


EUROPE 


caaftgQpyt | Imagine a world where you can call country to country as easily as you can from home. And 

lhe u s - direc^y fr° m over 1 countries. Converse with someone who doesn’t speak your 
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Armenia** 

AaatriaT*** 

Belgium* 

Bulgaria 

CwMriar*~~ 

QcdiBep 

Denmark* 

Finland* 

Prance 

Germany ' 

G reece* 

Htag wy 

Icetanchi 

Ireland 


«r jggMl CARIBBEAN 

_ : 0500^0011 Mmwi 1-800-872-2881 

— — Tlfcr| * 1 ^. -6*100-11 Bermuda^ - t -800-872-2881 

- tmntEZAsr BBv x . ,«««■ 

— sggggg gggjn Boo- ooi cayman Islands . iS SStSSSSi 

OtoO-lOO-lO Cyprus* 080-90010 -Grenada*. l-SnSmawi ' 

.JfrlgttHXnO Bgld 177-100-2727 W 

993 80011 Swg 800-288 . Jamaica'*' 7 O-BQGnfn-MSl 

°^ 4a(MW101 426 -801 N^An tU om-mtum-ren 

ggfflP £2 £— i • • t»»<a i*77 sL ' kWNevfa ■ .. ... 

3800-100-10 Saudi Arabia 1-800-10 Vrx 

19*0011 Ttgfcey* 00-800-1227 7 

0130-0010 UAL* 80 0-121 . GOtw 

00-800-1311 T AMERICAS ~~ Cfetfuir 

OftA-BOfrOHM Argentina* 002-80(V200-Hii *'** 

9994301 Bdfee* ~ . 555 Liberia ; 

1-800-5504)00 BolMa* (M30Q.1112 . temttAfife 


Egypt* (Cabbi 
800-121 . Gabon* ‘ ' 


AT&T 


p a»WBiw u w^ dartrci Ui/ 5{h a ii i. Tnp witai 75ccut«aaklpctafciadin* *<alencilir(iwif^ 

hwdnHhecuuiviy tmeareofibat. Nat y« minhi 

AIK DSMttw“5ervtrehjvalUfc from s#dwcwattrtoa»rd3hove. AftwHuempdaSlone ■ 

nruiaaafrba4*5cntaUfanwfa^iKnttMpnsBkinki(tvCTi40liii- . aAftom public tfam.nni]. • 


510-0200 

80*001 

00111 

0800-10 

797-797 

0^0(^99-0123 


2 JW4.J0KT