Skip to main content

Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1994, France, English"

See other formats


X: 


Hcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 



im--. 


i Jr ' ' 

\ 


X 

mlt £. . 





J f 



■** 


Paris, Wednesday, August 17, 1994 


No. 34,669 


U.S. Rates 
Head Up in 
Tough Swipe 
At Inflation 

Wall Street Welcomes 
Fed’s Half-Point Rise ,■ 
Bond Market Surges 

By Lawrence Malkin 

IrtlcrmtlianaJ Herald Tribune 

NEW YORK — The Federal Reserve 
Board jacked up short-term interest rates 
by half of a percentage point Tuesday, the 
maximum amount expected, sending a 
- strong signal that it would take a tough line 
against inflation. 

The decisive move implied that the cen- 
tral bank now planned to stay off stage for 
some time — probably through the No- 
vember midterm elections — and let the 
! weight of this year’s rate rises continue 
slowing the momentum of the economic 
' growth before inflation can take hold. 

The federal funds rate, which sets banks' 

■ wholesale cost of money, was raised to 4.73 
percent from 4.23 percent, marking the 
fifth increase since February. In market 

; terms, this is a rise of SO basis points, or SO 
hundredths of a full percentage point. 

Financial markets worldwide held their 
. collective breath as they bet on a rate rise. 
The dollar, the Treasury bond market, and 
stock markets in the United States and 

■ Europe moved in narrow trading ranges 
before the announcement. After the Fed 
signaled its intentions, the price of the 
benchmark 30-year U.S. Treasury bond 
surged 1 20/32 point, to 101 19/32, send- 
ing the yield tumbling to 7.37 percent from 
7.50 percent Monday. 

Stocks were similarly invigorated, with 
the blue-chip issues posting strong gains, 
and the dollar also got a leg up. (Page 10) 

In the money markets, major banks 
. raised iheir prime rates SO basis points to 
7.75 percent, which means higher credit 
card and business loan rates. 

The central bank sent an unmistakable 
signal because the seven members of the 
Federal Reserve Board also announced a 
50- basis-point rise in the discount rate to 4 

■ percent, a largely symbolic move since 
banks only go to the" discount window in 
emergencies. 

A statement after the regular meeting of . 
i»*v ’v-.;,- .via-^ci Committee, which is 
composed of the board's seven governors 
and its 12 regional bank presidents, said it 
had decided to raise rates "to keep infla- 
tionarj pressures contained and thereby 
foster "sustainable economic growth." 

"These measures were taken against the 
background of evidence of continuing 
strength ir. the economic expansion and 
high levels of resource utilization.** it said. 

Even though quarterly rates of growth 
have come down from last winter's over- 
heated annua! rate of about 7 percent. Lhey 
stii! have not slowed to the range just 
above 2.5 percent that the Fed has indicat- 
ed it thinks is more sustainable. 

Inflation rales now are about 3 percent, 
and the red has indicated that about 2 

See RATES, Page 5 


Carlos 9 a Facade of Faded Legends 


By Tun Weiner 

New York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — Though he came 
to personify terrorism in the 1970s, “Car- 
los the Jackal” spent most of the last 
decade drinking whisky in an apartment 
in downtown Damascus, living off his 
reputation as the Scarlet Pimpernel of 
international terrorism. 

At the time of bis arrest in Sudan, 
Carlos had become a pathetic relic of a 
bygone era, a burned-out Marxist-Le- 
rnnis t of no use to anyone, even the most 
radical of states Lhat sponsor terrorism, 
according to past and present intelli- 
gence officials. 

Even in his prime, they said, he did not 


do half the thing s ascribed to him by 
Western intelligence services and the 
press. 

“He’s been a sad figure for the last 
several years, by all reports an alcoholic, 

dr eaming the dreams of his youth with- 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

out a hope of support,” said Vincent 
Cannistraro, a former counterterrorism 
chief at the CIA. “A whisky-swilling 
Communist who doesn’t believe in God 
isn't much use to any Islamic govern- 
ment. He was somewhat of a folk hero 
because operations woe ascribed to him 


when no one knew who else to ascribe 
them to, due to a lack of knowledge.” 

Directly implicated in at least 15 
deaths, wanted in France for Che murder 
of two counterintelligence officers, and. 
stifl best-known for taking the OPEC oil 
ministers hostage in Vienna in 1975, Car- 
los was nonetheless a mediocre terrorist 
who bungled many of his missions, said 
Brian Jenkins, a terrorism expert with 
Kroll Associates, an investigative firm 
He was “a terrorist celebrity who had 
a vast number of actions attributed to 
him which were purely nonsense, 77 Mr. 
Jenkins said. “There was a tendency to 

See RELIC, Page 5 . 



<■ Ja.t|«kBnma/Thr Aunpand Ficm 

The police taking up positions Tuesday as a prison velucle l tralKpprtillg Carios ^jlproacted ^ P»^ coal , ^ * 

Tm Still Alive, and for a Long Time’ 


By Alan Riding 

New York Tuna Scmcc 

PARIS — There were reports he was 
wasted by dissolute living, his own law- 
yer said he was drugged before being 
extradited to France, but the interna- 
tional terrorist known as Carlos in fact 
seemed quite chirpy Tuesday when he 
appeared before a judge for probably the 
first time in his life. 

After spending a night in prison, he 
was taken handcuffed and under heavy 
guard to the Palais de Justice office of 


France's top anti-terrorist judge, Jean- 
Louis Bruguifere. Witnesses said he re- 
marked on the assault rifles carried by 
his escorts- “They are good,** he said. 

When Mr. Bruguiire appeared, be ex- 
claimed: "Ah, here's the judge, bow are 
you?” 

"And you?" asked the judge. 

“I'm still alive, and for a long time to 
come," said Carlos, whose real name is 
Illich Ramirez Sincbez. Nodding toward 
the judge, he then turned to his guards 
and added: “He is a star.” 


But after two hours of dosed^door 
interrogation, during which he was ar- 
raigned for planning a bombing that 
killed one peraon and injured 63 in Paris 
in 1982, one witness said the 44-year-old 
Venezuelan-born extremist “emerged 
less smiling than when he entered." 

Although Carlos carried out terrorism 
in Germany, Britain and Austria, France 
was the single greatest victim of his vio- 
lence. Two years ago, he was sentenced 

See CARLOS, Page 5 



After 4th Arrest, Authorities Point 
To Breakdown of Moscow Controls 


. ' By Craig R. Whitney 1 

New York Times Serrice 

BONN — Gentian authorities have 
made yet another seizure of. highly toxic 
weapons-grade material— the fourth since . 

. May — believed to have been smuggled 
from the former. Soviet Union, a prosecu- 
tor in the northern- city of .Bremen dis- 
closed Tuesday. ... 

A 34-year-old German man was arrest- 
ed there Friday for crying to sell a tiny 
sample of 0.0$ -millig rams - — a few grains 
-701 plutonium-239 mixed. with othqr sub- 
stances to a journalist who reported the 
attempt to anthorities, according to Bre- 
men’s chief .prosecutor, Hans-Georg von 
Bock urid PotadbL . •" 

The plutonium was accompanied by a 
certificate from a Moscow institute mat 
the Germans, identified as the All-Soviet 
Isotope Association, Mr. von Bock und 
PoLacn said in a telephone interview. Hie' 
arrested man was reportedly offering po- 
tential buyers between 34 and 30 capsules 
of similar samples ofplntonium as well as ' 
108 kilograms, or 231.6 pounds, of urani- 
um-238, winch is not used in bombs. 

Russian authorities have denied that 
they are missing any. plutonium-239, the 
fissionable material in nuclear war- 


Tbe Bremen prosecutor said that au- 
thorities there had no indication that the 
arrested German man had any connection 
with two Spanish men ' and a Colombian 
arrested in Munich on Aug: H) after smug- 
gling hj more than 300 grams of weapons- 
quahty plutonium-239- on a flight from 
Mosoow. '..-j' - 
The Munich seizure, by far the largest of 
highly radioactive material snuggled out 
of the former Soviet Union since it col- 
lapsed at the end of 1991, -'has sent the 
German government into a state of alarm. 
Officials believe the Spanish-Colombian 
operation Tiad good enough, connections 
with Russian sources to make good on the 
rest of what was offered as a four-kilo- 
gram, $250-milliaa deal.. That would be 


- about half of what it would take to build a 
bomb. 

■ Chancellor Helmut Kohl will send a 
senior aide, Berad Schmid bauer, to Mos- 
cow this week to discuss with President 
Boris N. Yeltsin the implications of the 
discovery that so much extremely toxic 
and: dangerous radioactive material is in 
the^ands of criminals. 

' German authorities simply do not be- 
lieve the Russians any longer have a func- 

- tin ning control system for these substances 

and their denials out of hand, 

though they also allow that some material 
could be coming from other former Soviet 
■lands lflfft Ukraine or Belarus, or from 
Eastern Europe. 

But the Germans also say they know 
next to nothing about the “nuclear mafia” 
that is trading in the material. 

. AH they know about the Colombian who 
smuggled the plutoninm in a suitcase to 
Munich, Justiniano Torres, 38, is that he 
mew up in Bogota and had lived for years 
m Moscow as a student Law enforcement 
authorities in Munich identified a second 
man arrested with him last week as Javier 
B. and said that he was a mechanic. 

Police did not reveal his last name for 
security reasons, but the Spanish newspa- 
per El Pais identified him as Javier B. 
Arratibei, a 60-year-old Basque industrial- 
ist from San Sebastian. 

The third arrested man was identified as 
Julio 0„ 49, a builder or contractor said to 
be from Navarra, also in the Basque re- 
gion, and bebeved to have extensive Rus- 
sian contacts. 

A fourth suspect, a Spanish man the 
authorities did not identify, is bring sought 
in France, according to the Munich inves- 
tigators who said Monday that the three 
arrested suspects had yet to be thoroughly 
questioned about their Russian contacts 
and their other possible customers. 

What is particularly alarming is the 
number and variety of the criminal organi- 
zations operating in Germany, apparently 

See BOMB, Page 5 


Seized Nuclear Materials 
Traced to Russian Sites 


Washin^icm Pan Serrice 

-VIENNA — Western nuclear scientists 
conducting an urgent investigation into 
(he origins of three batches of smuggled 
bomb-grade nuclear materials seized in 
Germany have found evidence that the 
materials came from specific Russian nu- 
clear weapon facilities, according to offi- 
cials familiar with the work. 

In one case the scientists have zeroed in 
on a laboratory at a Russian nuclear com- 



J bus- Paul Mivucf'ltailtfr* 

EXHAUSTED RWANDANS — Refugees awaiting food Tuesday in 
Zaire. Fearful, 140 Rwandans called off a return to their homes. Page 5. 


The Big Drain* in Sub- Saharan Africa 

Billions in Aid Fail to Eradicate Ghana’s Poisonous Gully 


By Steve Coll to his Godson Environmental Organiza- 

washmpon Past Sernce don, which is trying to dean up Nima. 

ACCRA, Ghana — In dreadlocks and “Look. There it is.” 
sunglasses, the revolutionary turned envi- The Big Drain is what shantytown resi- 
ro omental activist named Jonny Nash Lar- dents call this gully. It begins as a rainfall 
yea leads a morning march through the catchment behind the Accra airport, winds 
□arrow red-day alleys of Nima, this West 


;est shantytown, 
‘ migrants live in 


African capital's i 
where more than 200,' 
energetic squalor. 

A ragged line of curious youth and local 
elders trails Mr. Laiyea as he passes beer- 
brewers and commeal-makers over boiling 
vats, produce-traders haggling over piles 
erf fruit, wood- sellers, children and the 
ubiquitous gatherings of young men who 
call themselves “the Horrors,” “Down- 
town Manhattan," “Brooklyn City,” “the 
Bronx,” or, proudly, “Nebraska.” 

At the bottom of a hill, Mr. Laiyea 
pauses. The parade shuffles to a halt. 
Ahead lies a sprawling, rat-infested, trash- 
filled, disease-ridden gully whose wretched 
stream is (he shantytown’s main waterway. 

“You ask what prompted us to form our 
organization,” Mr. Lafyea said, referring 


This is another in a series of occasional 
articles dealing with the economic and social 
collapse of countries in Africa. 

through dense urban slums and effluent- 
dumping factories and finally empties its 
swill into the Odaw River, the Korle La- 
goon and the Atlantic. Shanty dwellers, 
fishermen, fish, birds, trees and rich tropi- 
cal plants are all victims of its poisons. 

Listing environmental rehabilitation as 
a key priority, Western donor governments 
and multilateral agencies allocated $1.1 
billion in aid and credits to Ghana in 1993 
and have pledged another $1.1 billion this 
year. Yet, neither they nor the Ghanaian 
government have even been able to rid 
Nima of its most obvious and most dan- 


environmental hazard, the Big 


Why they have failed is a story that 
illustrates a broad and complex environ- 
mental crisis afflicting sub-Saharan Africa 
as the century turns. This wider crisis 
might also aptly be called “the big drain.” 

Under pressures such as rapid urbaniza- 
tion, .population growth and civil conflict, 
sub-Saharan Africa is losing forest, water, 
biological, energy and agricultural re- 
sources at an alarming rate. 

Per-caprta food production has declined 
Steadily for two decades. Freshwater re- 
serves are disappearing faster than any- 
where else in the world, according to the 
UN Environment Program. Forests — the 
source of about three-quarters of Africa’s 
energy supplies — are v anishing at a rate 
of 1.7 percent a year, twice the Third 
World average, according to the UN Food 
and Agriculture Organization. 

Dryland fanning areas in Malt Burkina 

See AFRICA, Page 5 


plex called Arzamas-16, a once-secrot rite 
that is part of a vast network of nuclear 
weapons facilities in the former Soviet 
Union, they said. 

In the most recent case, involving the 
seizure of more than 300 grams of plutoni- 
um at the Munich airport last week, pre- 
liminary lab results point to plutonium 
reprocessing facilities at top-security Rus- 
sian military installations, they added. 

The evidence available so far suggests 
that none of the seized nuclear materials 
came directly from Russian nuclear war- 
heads, although more work on this ques- 
tion remains to be done. 

But each of the three batches appears to 
have come from auxiliary nuclear fuel and 
enrichment facilities inside Russian mili- 
nuclear complexes, according to offi- 
1 f amiliar with the investigation. 

The emerging evidence has shaken the 
assumption of many nuclear proliferation 
specialists that while Russia’s civilian nu- 
clear facilities might be chaotic and vulner- 
able to low-grade thefts, its military nucle- 
ar .network was firmly intact. 

“The common wisdom from me was that 
the mili tary establishment was still in 
charge” at key Russian nuclear facilities, 
said one senior official familiar with the 
investigation. “Now we can’t be so sure.” 

The key laboratory analysis is being car- 
ried out mainly by Gorman nuclear scien- 
tists at the European Trans-Uranium In- 
stitute in Karlsruhe, but the results of their 
tests are being passed to scientists else- 
where in Europe and in the United States 
for further review and investigation, offi- 
cials said. 

Moscow has confirmed to the Interna- 
tional Atomic Energy Agency that one 
thwarted theft of three kilograms of weap- 
ons-grade uranium occurred in St Peters- 
burg this summer, according to people 

See PLUTONIUM, Page 5 


China Stock Market Spawns a Dynasty 


Newsstand Prices 


Andorra FF 

Antilles 11.20 FF 

Cameroon ..1.400 CF* 
Egypt E.P.SOOO 

France 9.WFF 

Gabon 960 Cr A 

Greece 300 Dr. 

Italy 2.400 Lire 

Ivory Coast U20CFA 

Jordan 1 Jp 

Lebanon ...USS 1-50 


Luxembourg 60 L. Fr 

Morocco 12 Dh 

Qatar 6.00 Rials 

Reunion ....11.20 FF 
Saudi Arabia ..9.00 R. 

Senegal 960 CFA 

Spain 200 PTAS 

Tunisia ....1.000 Din 
Turkey ..T L. 35.000 

U.A.E 8.50 Dirh 

U.5. Mil. iEur.l SI. 10 


| DovvJones ■ 1 


... Up 

: 24.28 

3784 57 

The Doliar 

NwYofk. 

' 4 -c ■ " 

v '» > -A 

■} • * 

,.»■ Si* 

.. . £■' ■ .. 

Tufla. etoM 

0.13% g 

115.57 pj 

pro vl«|S ek»w 

DM 

1.5615 

1.5522 

Pound 

1.5395 

1 545 

Yen 

100.485 

100.13 


FF 


5.354 


5.3205 


By Steven Mufson 

ttWrtngton Pan Service 

SHANGHAI — Guan Jinsbeng is bullish on China. 

And why not? Six years ago, the former student of French 
literature and son of a Jiangxi Province farmer started a compa- 
ny with no staff and an office in an unused industrial warehouse. 
Now, he runs the closest thing to Merrill Lynch in China: a 
securities house with 1,500 employees, about S800 million in 
assets, a 34-story building under construction and a brisk busi- 
ness selling stocks to investors in China and overseas. 

“The Chinese people have a gift for gambling and taking 
risks,” said Mr. Guan, 47, president and chief executive officer of 
Shanghai International Securities Co. Like Charles Merrill who 
said he would bring Wall Street to Main Street, Mr. Guan is 
building a nationwide network of retail offices and is already 


His future is tied closely to the reforms. In (he eyes of China's 
raters, the stock market is still an experiment And the fates of 
the companies listed on the stock exchange depend heavily on 
the thrust of economic policy. 

“ir the government cannot give a dear sense of direction about 
where the economy is going to move, then people don't know 
what to do with the stock market,” said Huan Guoceng, senior 
economist for J.P. Morgan Bank in Hong Kong. “So far the 
government has not been giving a very clear indication of where 
it’s going” 

But 

vagaries 


( people like Mr. Guan have long been subject to the 
ies of Qunese politics. 


peddling stocks in 20 Chinese dries. 
Mr.Gi 


man’s story is not just a personal or corporate tale. It is 
interwoven with the story of China's economic reform efforts. 
His company’s growth would have been impossible without the 
elements or private enterprise the government brought to a 
“sodalist market” economy, and without good relations with 
public officials. 



university 
tayearlater 

... program was considered a “green- 

house for revisionism,” spent five years working in textile fac- 
tories and on farms in the Shanghai area. But he continued io 
read French and, when improved Chinese relations with France 

See CHINA, Page 13 


Kiosk 


UN Aide Hints at End 
To Bosnia Embargo 

UNITED NATIONS, New York 
(Reuters) — The UN mediator Thor- 
vald Stolteaberg said Tuesday that 
lifting the arms embargo against the 
Bosnian Muslims “could be helpful” 
provided it was done as a result of a 
Security Council decision and not uni- 
laterally. 

He said he had no doubt that a 
border dosing ordered by Yugoslavia 
to pressure the Bosnian Serbs to ac- 
cept an international peace plan 
would be effective, although President 
. Slobodan Milosevic of Serbia had re- 
jected the idea of border monitors. 

Related article. Page 5 


Books 

Crossword 




ii e: 


t t: 

I 111 


1. .' * 
k'- -T 
r-v ■ 

&*::-■ 


^ ■ 





Page2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17, 1994 


$ 


Tokyo 

Protests 


Moscow Acts to Strengthen Ties to Nationalists 


t®RLD BRIEFS 


Shooting 


Moscow Defends 
Attack Off Kurils 


MOSCOW — Russia and Ja- 
pan traded angry charges Tues- 
day after a Russian patrol boat 
had opened fire on a Japanese 
fishing boat in disputed waters. 

Moscow launched legal pro- 
ceedings against the captain of 
the boat that was hit Monday 
by Russian gunfire off the dis- 
puted Kuril Islands. Russian 
officials also defended the ac- 
tion of naval border guards. 

In Tokyo, a Foreign Ministry 
spokesman said its ambassador 
to Moscow, Koji Watanabe, 
had complained to a Russian 
Foreign Ministry official, call- 
ing the incident “extremely re- 
grettable." 

He said a similar incident 
had taken place in November. 

Russian authorities said bor- 
der guards opened fire on the 
Kia-Mam, one of two boats 
caught poaching Monday 1 1 ki- 
lometers inside Russian waters 


By Steven Erianger 

New York Times Service 

MOSCOW — The Russian government is moving 
on several fronts to shore up political support with 
nationalists and darify its policy toward the newly 
independent countries of the f oncer Soviet Union. 

These moves represent the latest indications that 
President Boris N. Yeltsin is moving to the political 
center and trying to co-opt his divided nationalist 
opposition- 

Iii Chechenia, in southern Russia, the Yeltsin 
government is trying to undermine the government 
of a former air force general, Dzhokar Dudayev, 
who declared independence two years ago and har- 
bors many leaders of organized crime. Mr. Dudayev 
has called for a general mobilization. 

While ruling out using force, Mr. Yeltsin has 
thrown money and support behind rebels in the 
north of the small mountainous province of 12 
milli on. Yeltsin aides call for new elections, but 
want Chechenia to drop its claims of independence 
and start obeying Moscow. 

In Moldova, the former Soviet republic between 
Romania and Ukraine, Russia has finally agreed on 
a three-year timetable for withdrawing its troops, 
who have been based there since the 18th century. 


In the former Yugoslavia, having considerably 
aided Western efforts to get Serbia to enforce an 
embargo against the Bosnian Serbs, Moscow is now 
pressing harder to lift UN sanctions against Serbia, 
as Mr. Yeltsin’s nationalist opponents have been 
demanding. 

Officials are preparing a policy statement that 
would by to link Moscow's relations with the states 
of the former Soviet Union to their treatment of 
Russian minorities. 

A draft decree would create a commission to 
oversee the condition of the 23 million or so ethmc 
Russians stiQ living outside Russia proper. The 
Moscow Times reported. 

Two weeks ago the newspaper Kommersant re- 
ported that Deputy Prime Munster Sergei M, Shak- 
rai, who lost his post as nationalities minister in 
May, would head the commission. 

These decrees are still unsigned and may not be in 
their final form. But drafts were released by a 
nationalist lobbyist, Dmitri Rogozin, who heads a 
movement called the Congress of Russian Commu- 
nities. 

A Yeltsin spokesman refused to comment on any 
unsigned decrees, noting only that “Russians 
abroad" were a top priority for the government. 


Mr. Yeltsin has been outspoken in bis defease of 
Russians outside Russia for two years now, well 
before Vladimir V. Zhirinovsky won nearly 24 per- 
cent of the party-preference vole in parliamentary 
elections in December. 

The new decrees would not seem to chang e gov- 
ernment policy, which has been moderate in prac- 
tice, but put a stronger spotlight on Mr. Yeltsin's 
patriotic and nationalist credentials. : 

Mr. Yeltsin is even takinga Volga River cruise for 
a week to talk to “common voters in an informal 
atmosphere," his aides say. 

Any similarities to the extended train trip across 
the country by the novelist Alexander I. Solzheni- 
tsyn, who stopped to talk to ordinary Russians 
about their lives, are of course . wholly comddentaL 

It must also be coincidental that Mr. YdtsinV 
former vice president, Alexander V. Rutskoi, who 
led the revolt against him last October and was then 
pardoned by Parliament, has just announced plans 
to visit 62 Russian towns to kick off his own unoffi- 
cial presidential campaign. 

Elections for Parliament and president are sched- 
uled for June 1996, although various officials dose 
to Mr. Yeltsin have been suggesting postponing 
them until 1998. 


Israel and Jordan Sign Export Pact 

AMMAN (Reuters) — * Israel and Jordan haw imtialed an 

agreeaSsUto exported ntiffioa worth <*,*2* 

the occupied West Bank this year, Jordan s chief peace nego tor, 

"Fayez Tarawneh, sdd Tuesday. . ^ 


wcQECupm — 

Tayez Tarawneh, said Tuesday. m five davs of 

The pact is the first tangible sign ofpiUP«« «« 
negotiations at a Dead Sea hotel to wwk 
damnation and water, key items on the road towards a full peace 

' to the Jordanian news agency Petra. Mr. Tarawneh 

sridthepact regulated the entry and quantities of Jordjmm 
■ goods mdroiSxfcties to Palestinian areas still under Israeli 


occupation. 


H a i tians Protest at U.S. Navy Base 


One crew member, named in 
Tokyo as Norik azu Nakoshi, 
25, was injured in the spine. 
Russian officials said he was 
recovering after medical treat- 
ment. 


The Japanese boat was de- 
tained and towed to Krabovaya 
bay on Shikotan, one of the 
four Kuril islands seized by So- 
viet troops from Japan at the 
end of World War 2L 


The dispute over the islands 
has defied solution despite the 


end of the Cold War and Rus- 
sia's desire to win Japanese in- 
vestment in its huge unexploit- 
ed Far East territories. 

Vice Admiral Nikolai Ku- 
dinov, a senior naval border 
guard c ommander , said in Mos- 
cow that the Russian vessel 
opened fire after the two Japa- 
nese boats had refused to heed 
wanting shots and made “dan- 
gerous maneuvers” as they tried 
to head for home. 

“When we find a boat with 
no flag and no identification we 
have no doubt this could affect 
our security and we have to ful- 
fill our responsibilities," Admi- 
ral Kudinov said. 

A Foreign Ministry spokes- 
man, Grigori Kararin, said at a 
news briefing that Deputy For- 
eign Minister Alexander Panov 
had summoned Mr. Watanabe 
and told him that Tokyo should 
take steps “to prevent future 
such incidents.” 

Mr. Karasin said Moscow 
had on several occasions pro- 
posed that joint steps be taken 
to stop poaching, including co- 
operation between Russian bor- 
der guards and the Japanese 
Navy. 

The Interfax news agency 
said Mr. Panov had refused to 
accept a reciprocal protest from 
Mr. Watanabe. 

But the Japanese Foreign 
Ministry in Tokyo quoted Mr. 
Watanabe as tefimg Mr. Panov: 
“This is the second incident 
since last November. This is ex- 
tremely regrettable.” 

The Japanese said that the 
captain of a Japanese trawler 
had been shot in the thigh in 
November. 

Moscow in April adopted a 
tougher line over the issue, an- 
nouncing a crackdown involv- 
ing warships and aircraft to pre- 
vent operations by high-speed 
Japanese boats. 

Moscow attacked Japanese 
forces in Manchuria in 1945 
and occupied the islands after 
the Japanese surrender. Japan 
demands that the is lands be giv- 
en bade and refuses in the 
meantime to sign a formal 
peace treaty. 



Sri Lanka Is Tense 


WASHINGTON (AP) — A violent demonstration, by 750 
Haitian refugees at * U-S: Navy base in Oiba_ reflects growing 

lftMO Haitians there, a Pentagon 

^D^^^ltofa Pentagon spokesman, said the administration 

(fid not bdieve the incident, which cook pfa« 
a wider cyde of violence at Guanteramo Bay Naval Base, But he 
acknowledged that frustrations among the Ha^aas 
Twenty American military policemen and 45 H a itian s were in- 
Mr. Boxx said no Haitian boat refugees had been spotted 
fleeing then- homeland since Aug. 5, when 88 were picked up and 
tsJceoto Guantknamow He called. this evidence that Haitians have 

4.. that thnrnnlv diflltCC rtf g^trring asylum 1H the 


■ted States is to stay in Haiti to request it. 


After National Vote 


Poles Promote Comnmnist-Era Spy 


By John F. Bums 

New York Times Service 

COLOMBO — Sri Lanka’s 
17 million people were bracing 
Tuesday for the results of a 
closely contested general elec- 
tion that has been one of the 
most violent since the island na- 
tion sained independence from 
Britain in 1948. 

Reports from across the is- 
land indicated there had been 
only scattered clashes at voting 
stations. But after a monthlong 
election cam paign in which at 
least 18 people were killed and 
hundreds injured, the. govern- 
ment placed 50,000 troops and 
police on alert and imposed a 
round-the-dock curfew. 


tion groups, the People’s Alli- 
ance. 

Many political analysts pre- 
dicted that none of the parties 
would gain a majority m the 
225-seat assembly. That would 
open the way to in tense jockey- 
ing for support from among 


The situation is complicated 
by the political system here, un- 
der which ultimate power rests 
with an executive president. 


currently DJL Wnetunga, lead- 
er of the United National Party, 


Early Tuesday, in a daring 
raid by underwater comman- 
dos, the rebel group known as 
the Tamil Tigers attached lim- 
pet mines to a navy vessel at the 
k aafccsan thurai naval base on 
the Jaffna Peninsula, causing 
an explosion that ripped the 
vessel apart and killed at least 
two sailors. 


An election worker in Colombo, carrying a ballot box, with a police escort 


A final election result is ex- 
pected Wednesday, and it 
seems likely to be dose. 

The contest lies between the 
governing United National Par- 
sou vungau/Thr A««oiod he« ty, which has heW power for 17 
ice escort years, and a coalition of opposi- 


er of the United National Party, 
whose term does not expire un- 
til February. 

Even if the opposition vans, 
its candidate to become prune 
minister, Chandrika Bandaran- 
aiitft Knmaratunga, has-- said 
that she will continue with the 
free market economic policies 
that were adopted after her. 
mother. Prime Minister Sirir 
mavo Bandaranaike, was de- 
feated in the 1977 election. 

Mis. Knmaratunga, who was 
a self-avowed Marxist in her 
student days in Paris, has said 
site will put a “human face”on 
the policies of the United Na- 
tional Party government, which 
have produced growth rates in 
recent years of 5 to 7 percent a 


WARSAW (AP) — Poland’s best-known Co mm u n ist-era spy, 
Marian Zacfcarski. once sentenced to life imprisonment m the 
United Stales, was named head of Poland’s civilian intelligence 
service, the media said Tuesday, surprising Parliament members 

Mr. Zachardri, now 43. was sentenced by a 
Los Angeles court to life in prison for conspiring to collect and * 
pass on military information to another owmtry. He- collected 
information on the .UJS.-made B-I bomber, F-15 fighter and 
Patriot rockets fa - Polish intelligence. After four years m prison 
he was exchanged, with flute other Communist woe spies, for 25 
officers of the Western intelligence services caught in Eastern 

^Between 1975 and 198LMr. Zaduuski lived and worked in the 
United States as head of the Pdisb- American. Machinery Corpo- 

ratio n Pn lwnm , tmsadm Pile Grove Vlllafo HtUKUS. which bopght 

Polish precision and electric machinery, but bis mam task was 
gathering classified information. : 


Frankfurt Police Identify Victims : 

FRANKFURT (Reuters) — Six victims found strangled inj a 
Frankfun brothel have been identified as four prostitutes from 
the former Soviet XJnkm and a Hungarian couple who owned the 

high-class sex dub, police said on Tuesday. The. owners woe 
Gabor Bartos, 55, and his wife Ingrid, 48. Police said the four 
• women were between 18 and 30. ... 

AD were found strangled on. Monday in- the brothel m- a 
residenti al area near Frankfurt’s banking district. There were ho 
saps of forced entry orviofancearid pd&cesmd the attack had the 
hSmarks nf a nrofessmaal-taffing-w at least two petmte- v 


Police said they had no dues to the identity of the attackers. 
Goman media speculated tharthe motive feir the killings may be 
ganglan d rivalry and dial the Russian mafia may be involved.' 


Red Cross Tells of Suffering in Kabul 


recent years of 5 to 7 percent a 
year. 

But she has said that there 
will be no return to widespread 
nationalization. 


w“j ■v w “ w > r ... accmcu uvai la 

P§£E Culture Courses Help GIs in New Cambodia Role .SaB 


By William Branigm 

Washington Pat Service 

PHNOM PENH — The VS. Anny is 
back in Indochina. 

A 44-member team of military engi- 
neers and Special Forces trainers last 
month became the first U.S. military 
mission in Indochina — apart from a 
United Nations peacekeeping operation 
and personnel searching for missing in 
action — since the Vietnam War ended 
in 1975. 

■Hie team is providing the first direct 
training and military aid to the Cambo- 
dian Army in more than 20 years, in- 
structing Cambodian officers in mine 
clearing and road braiding. 

The approach is decidedly more sensi- 
tive than the last time U.S. troops were 
in the region. 

Before arriving here last month, mem- 
bers of the U.S. team took (rash courses 
in Cambodian culture, lang ua ge and 
customs. To avoid problems of protocol 
with trainees who might outrank them, 
the Americans are wearing no insignia 
of rank. 

“The first step is to build rapport,” 
said Jason Smith, 28, a Special Forces 


officer from Vermont “We want to 
show we care and that we’re walling to 
leant the language. This is a new country 
for us.” 

He said be was pleased to be part of 
the first training team to come back to 
Indochina. “I think there’s a lot of good 
work that needs to be done, and Tm glad 
we’re getting a second chance." he said. 

In some ways, the effort is a dry run 
for possible future military aid to the 
Cambodian Army, which has suffered 
serious setbacks in recent fighting with 
Khmer Rouge guerrillas. 

The United States and several other 
countries, including Australia and 
France, are considering helping the gov- 
ernment reform the Royal Cambodian 
Armed Forces, as the meager of the 
previous Communist Party-led army 
and two small non-Communist resis- 
tance factions is known. 


Leaders put the armed forces 
strength at 130,000 troops, but Western 
analysts believe it is closer to 90,000. 
Nobody, including the Cambodian high 
command, knows for sure. 

What is known is that the army has 
1.800 generals and 10,000 colonels. 
There are three officers for every enlist- 
ed man. The armed forces are to be 
trimmed to 70,000, keeping about 100 
generals. 

Phnom Penh wants the United States 
and other countries to provide arms, but 
the potential donors agree that the army 
must be reformed first so materiel can 
be used effectively and not be sold to the 
Khmer Rouge, as happens now. 

Major Russ Berkoff, head of the 
tr aining missi on, said that if the Cambo- 
dian armed forces show commitment, 
the United States will probably continue 


will conclude their training of 47 Cam- 
bodian officers with a 26-day road con- 
struction exercise near the capital US 
soldiers of the 1st Special Forces Group, 
based in Okinawa, are training 45 Cam- 
bodian officers in minc-dearing and 
leadership techniques. 

After decades of war and upheaval, 
Cambodia is laced with up to 10 million 
mines, according to the Cambodian 
Mine Action Center, an agency set up by 
the United Nations. 


Israel Refuses General’s Extradition ■ 


JERUSALEM (AP) — Israel has informed the Unhed States 
that it win not extradite a former air force officer accused of 
accepting millions of dollars in kickbacks from American firms 


This new army has been torn by cor- 
ruption and incompetence and bur- 


to provide help. 
To minimize 


dated with a top-heavy officer corps 
and thousands of “ghost soldiers" who 


exist only on paper while commanders 
pocket their pay. 


To minimize the risk of attack by 
Khmer Rouge guerrillas, who have 
threatened to retaliate against nations 
aiding the government, the U.S. trainers 
stick close to Phnom Penh. 

Members of the UJS. Army’s 84th 
Engineer Battalion, based in Hawaii, 


■ Cambodia to Pay Ransom 
The Cambodian government has 
agreed to pay a $ 1 50,000 ransom to free 
three hostages — from Australia, Britain 
and France — being held by Khmer 
Rouge guerrillas, a senior army com- 
mander said Tuesday, according to a 
Reuters report from Cambodia. 

lieutenant General Sok Bunsoeun, 
deputy commander of the Third Mili- 
tary Region, said Prime Minister Prince 
Norodom Ranariddh had given the offi- 
cials overseeing the negotiations 
“$150,000 to secure the release of three 
foreigners who were taken hostage by. 
the Khmer Rouge.” 


a former brigadier general sentenced to 13 years in jail in 1991. 

'“We have told diem, before they submittedanV formal extradi- 
tion request, that we would not comply because he was an Israeli 
citizen when the crimes were carried out,” she said. 


For the Record 


Indo n esia. has~ withhel d the d bti i hu t i on of two editions of the 
International Herald Tribune, an industry official said Tuesday. 
The weekend edition, which mduded a stray on repression in East 
Timor, was withheld; so was the Monday edition, which carried a 
New York Times editorial criticizing the June crackdown on 
Indonesia’s press and events in East Tnndr. ( Reuters ) 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


Delays Are Up on European Flights 

DD T TO CM * f n /IV \ : n m. . . - . 


Seoul Is Hopeful on Easing Tensions With North 


The Associated Press 


toward reunification. South 


OSLO — Easing tensions Korea’s foreign m i n i s ter said 
with North Korea over nuclear hoe Tuesday. 


UNIVERSITY DE6REE 

BACHELOR'S • UASTBj’s • DOCTORS 7E 
FcrVltoK UBandAcacbrnkBpatonca 
TlroughCo nM rWr tHome Sbjty 
(3100 471 - 0306 ext 23 
■flgSK. Fata C 31 QQ 471-6456 

ff&SgW F«oraonddatafcdi»8i*T»Jor 


weapons could help dissipate a “I can see some light at the 


legacy of fear and be a first step end of a long and torturous tun- 


nel,” Foreign Minister Han 
Sung Joo said about the recent 
UJS--North Korea agreement 
that outlined ways to end the 
conflict over Pyongyang’s al- 
leged nuclear weapons. 


Mr. Han said that although 
the Koreas were still technically 


at war, he did not bdieve it was 
unrealistic to think about reuni- 
fication. 


h* ask the butter.. 




Pacific Western Uiriyasify 

2875 S. King Street HonoUu.MS68as 


1 Ww» ttrwicc tt etjtiiwc mmmt it tt it. 


S-I-N.C- A-P-O-R-E 


He said his country was will- 
ing to join international efforts 
I to convert North Korea’s power 
plants to safer nuclear technol- 
ogy. He also said South Korea 
was considering supplying the 
North with electricity until the 
safer nuclear plants are on line. 


“It will be a difficult process 
reintegrate, but I don’t think 


to reintegrate, but I don t think 
it will be impossible,” he told 
reporters here during a swing 
through Scandinavia. 


But he added that South Ko- 
rea was not sure who was lead- 
ing the North since the death of 
Kun II Sung. Mr. Kim’s son. 


Kim Jong 0, has been seeking 
to consolidate power. 

Mr. Han also criticized 
North Korea for encouraging 
subversive activities against the . 

South and ins piring thousands 

of rioting leftist students. 

At least 1,200 students were 
arrested and 200 people injured 
daring a government crack- 
down tins weekend. The stu- 
dents demand closer ties with 
North Korea and the withdraw- 
al of 36,000 UJS. troops sta- 
tioned in South Korea. 


BRUSSELS (Reuters) — -European flights are facing increased 
delays after a two-year period of improvement, the Association# 
European Aidmes said Tuesday. 

During the first half of 1994, 1 El percent of intra-European 
flights were late by 15 narrates or more; “reasonably good” figures 
and down on t he sa me period last year, the association said. 

“The improvement was all in the first quarter, however, with a 
s teady d eterioration since then,”, the association added. The 
increased congestion, excludes effects of the French air traffic 
controllers* strike, which began in July. ’ 


British nfl sign a l workers went on strike Tuesday for the 12th 
day Since eady June: .o - (Reuter*} 


The Sudanese government Ins wanted of possible floods as 
severe as those of August 1988, which were the worst in four 
decades. An Irrigation Ministry statement said the Blue Nile at 
the Ethiopian border had risen above its 1988 level. (Af) 
FStynine people in Sprin werekffied traffic accidents over the 
holiday weekend, the national traffic department said. (AP) 
Fire damaged radar equipment at the Kuala Lumpur interda- 
tonal airport, disraptingseores of flights in the last three days, 
Malaysia* transport minister. Ling LiongSik, said. (AP) 


To call from country to country, or to the U.S., dial the World Phone® number of the country you're caliing from. 

ua DmnrafMCCb 8001-0022 fcefandt 999-002 NtcmnalCC) - ' - 


INDUCE 

Better Foreign 
Relations 


Antigua 

(Available from public 
Argentina* 

Austria (CCH 
Bahamas 

Bahrain 
BalghoniCCU 
Bermuda -f- 
BoDvia* 

Brazil 

Canada(CC) 

Cayman Islands 

CNtotCC) 

GofombialCQ# 

Costa Rica* 

Cyprus* 

Czech RapobfictCC) 


card phones only.] #2 
001-800-033-1111 
022-903-012 
1-800-624-1000 
B00-D02 
0800-10012 
1-80to234484 
0-800-2222 
000-8012 
1-800*888-8000 
1-800-624-1000 
DOT -03 16 
330- 16-0001 
162 
080-90000 
0042-000112 


DamnarfcfCC)* 
Dominican Rapubfic 
Ecuador* 

Egypt! CCI* 

(Outside of Cairo, dial 

El Salvador* 

KnIand(CC}4 

ErancalCCU 

Gambia* 

GermanyiCC) 

(Limited availability in 
GreeceiCC)* 
Granada* 
Guatemala* 

Haiti iCC)4- 
Honduras-t- 
HungarylCC)* 


8001-0022 

1-800-751-662* 

no 


02 first) 355-6770 
195 

9800-102-80 
19V-0Q-19 
00-1-99 
01300012 
eastern Germany.) 

008001211 

1-800624-8721 

188 

001 -800-444-1234 
001-800674-7000 
00 ▼■80001411 


Iceland* . 990002 

bwrr (Sped a i Phones Only) 

MamUCQ 1-80068-1001 

braeUCC) 177-1502727 

Kaly(CC>* 172-1022 

Jamaica 800-674-7000 

Kenya 

(Available from most major cities.) 08001 1 
Kuwait 800 - MO [800-62 4) 

LabanonlCQ 800-624 

(Outside of Beirut, dial 01 first) 42S-036+ 
LiechtensteiniCd* 156-0222 

Luxembourg 08004)112 

MexfeoA 95400-674-7000 

Monaco! CQ* 19T-00-19 

NethertandstCQ* 08-022-91-22 

Netherl a nds AntiBeelCCH- 001-300-950-1022 


NfcamguatCC) 

(Outside of Managua, 

NorwqrfCQ# 

Panama 

Mit&ary Bases 

Pngoy4- 

Pent (Outside of Uma, 

Poland! CC) 

PortugaKCC) 

Puerto RIcolCO 
Qatari CO* 

Romania (CCI-j- 

RusrfalCCH- 
San MarinofCC}* 
StoKE Arabia 
Slovak Republic (CQ 
South Africa (CQ 


dtai 02 fireU 166 
. 800-19972 

1 '108 
2S1CM08 
008-11-600 
<881190 fir*J . 001*190 
’ QT-07-0 4-800-222 
0S-01 7-1 234 
1-800-888-8000 
0800-012-77 
01-800-1800 
8T10-B0Q ■497-7222 
' 172-1022 
1-800-11 
00-42-000112 
-.080039-0011 


SpatalCQ . 900-99-0014' 

020-795-922 

SttftzaffandCCCfr •' 1 56-0222 

SyiWCO oeoo* 

TrinMad ft Tobago (Special Phonee Onlyt* 
Ttnkaya 00-8001-1177, 

. Ukralne+ ST1O013, 

Untied Arab Emirates 800-111 

Unftsd KuBdomtCO 

To caO the U.S. rating 8T 0800-8&-Q22Z* 

% caS the U5r using MERCURY 0500894222* 

To can anywhere other 41 ' 

-than the U.S. 0500-800600 

uraguay (Collect not trvaitobta.) 000-412, 

U S.Wr tfntatordiriCQ - t -300-888-9000. 

Vatican CitylCd 172-1022 

Venezuela I » . . 800-1114-0. 





Use your MCI Cart," local telephone card or caU coMoct all at the same tow rates. 
|CQ Countryto-couniry calling available. May not be available taffrom bB intemetioMl locations. Certain ' 
restrictions apply. -I- Limited avail sb3iry. ▼ wait tor second dial tone. * AvaBebte from LAQATEL pubBc 
phenes only. Rata depends on call origin in Mexico, t JmemaflomH commurwamon* carrier. * Not eveil- 
atrie from public pay phones. * Public phones may require deposit of coin or phone card lor dial rone. 




WoqwBii 


r omr 


JC Let-lt Take You Around The World 

Prom MO 


Imprime par Offprint. 73 rue dc f'Evaagik. 7?<Wf Paris. 







KABUL, Afghanistan (Reuters) ^-The International Connnjt- 
tee of the Red Cross said Tuesday that WO pcaplebad been killed 
and 900 wounded in. an upangc of f ighti n g m find around tljis 
Afghan capital in thc last 10 days. 

“People’s houses, public buildings and a number of hospital® 
have been hit,” the organization said ill a statement, which 
accus ed rival factions of indiscriminate air and artillery strikes. 

The organization said the^^^ce patting the forces of Presh 
deni Burnanuddin Rabbani against those of Prime Minister 
Gulbuddin Hekmatyar and a northern warlord. General' Abdul 
Rashid Dostum, had caused the highest number of casualties since 
a two-week bout of fighting in January; 












INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17 , 1994 



Si t - ,j> ‘ 



Page 3 


L^v. 


By JaneGross 

, and Ronald Smothers ; 

Sete York Timet Service ’ 

W EDO WEE, Alabama — Thistwo- 

* 'stoplight town is America’s latest civil 
. rights crucible, a speck on the map 

\ between Atlanta' and Br rmnigharn Am 
. 'has been riven by racial tenaorim the 
' six months since a white, high school . 
principal threatened to cancel the 
prom to'prevent interiacial dating and 
was accused of teHing a mixed-race' 

* student that her birth was a mistake. 

The challenge. of Hnkmd Humpte 
. ties, 55, iheprindjial to. the inexorable 
tide of sodiu integration here and las' 

. disputed exchange with the student,' 
-,,Revonda Bowen, 17, have uncovered 
-deep racial divisions long hidden in 
"Wedowee, a hamlet known for the easy 
^‘friendships among its 800 residents 
and for the huge bass in its local lake. 

The big bass are stiQ jumping in 
k -Lake Wedowee, but blacks ana whites 
- , axe looking at each other through nar- 
_ , rowed eyes these 'days outside the 
county courthouse, the grocery and the 
flower shop on Mam Street — and 
especially around the -charred busk of 
the high school, which was set afire by 
arsonists. 

" “It seems tike 1 a different place 
-’now,” said Ms. Bowen, who won a' 
‘-$25,000 settlement from the school 
district after hear confrontation with 

* Mr. Humphries but has since seen 


e in an Alabama Hamlet 




u is: 


some of her relationships come unrav- 
eled amid Ore tumult. “Everything was 
quiet before. Jtfow you can see every- 
thing. hear everything. Everything's 
out mihe open." 

The racial tempest that began in 
February at Randolph County High 
School looks on. the surface like a re- 
play of anguished decades past It has 
riled blacks, unsettled whites, turned 
school . board meetings into radal 
.shouting matches and led to bomb 
threats, school boycotts and sound and 
. fury from the National Association for 
the Advancement of Colored People 
and the Ku KJux KJan. 

- The four-block downtown is abustie 
with crusading civil rights lawyers and 
curious journalists. The outsiders are 
welcomed “by many of the blacks, who 


are tired of having to hold their tongue 
when treated with condescension or 
contempt, but given a cold shoulder by 


most of the whites, who were well 
saved by the status quo. 

On Aug. 7, in the dead of sight, this 
situation exploded with the torching of 
the high school by an unidentified ar- 
sonist. Now Mr. Humphries, after 
months of support from the school 
board, has. been reassigned to the cen- 
tral^ office and kept from the school 


Justice Department And federal mar- 
shals are parked under the pecan trees 
that shade the Bowens’ home at the 


end of a dirt road, protecting the fam- 
ily from threats that thdr’s will be the 
next place to burn. 

But on deeper inspection, these 
stock characters and plot from a by- 
gone era give way to the here-and-now, 
to the stirrings of the New South. Even 
in this east Alabama backwater, where 
un apologetic racists hold power and 

'The red tights don’t 
all quit working when an 
interracial couple 
drives through town.’ 

Terry Graham, mayor of 
Wedowee, Alabama 

blacks learn early not to speak their 
mind, the two races govern together, 
go to the same school without resort- 
ing to private segregated academies, 
live next door to each other and even 
date and marry with little public op- 
probrium. 

Ms. Bowen’s relationship with a 
white boy and the marriage of her 
white father and blade mother are not 
extraordinary events here, say many of 
the more than three d o ze n people in- 
terviewed here. “Black and white kids 
ride to the Dairy Queen together, they 


go to ball games and most people don’t 
think anything of it," Mayor Terry 
Graham said. “It’s prevalent! it occurs, 
it happens. The red lights don’t all quit 
working when an interracial couple 
drives through town. This is 1994. 
We’re out in the country, but we gel 
TV. We know what’s accepted." 

As with so many taboos in Ameri- 
can society, interracial dating is toler- 
ated best when it is not discussed. Mr. 
Humphries insisted on talking about it 
at a February assembly he called after 
a fight between black and white girls, 
which seemed inspired by a cross- ra- 
cial romance, and the confiscation of a 
.38-caliber pistol, the first gun ever 
found at the school, from one of the 
boys involved in the original dispute. 

Many details of that assembly are 
under dispute, but not Mr. Humph- 
ries’ conviction that the prom ought to 
be canceled. Tor fear of violence, if any 
student planned on bringing a date of 
another race, a decision that the super- 
intendent reversed the next day. Ms. 
Bowen was one of several students 
who told Mr. Humphries she had such 
a date, and she asked the principal 
whom he suggested a girl with a white 
father and black mother should choose 
as an escort. 

By her account, the principal said 
her parents had made a “mistake" in 
having her. Mr. Humphries has denied 
the accusation but has declined further 


comment because of pending litigation 
against him and the school district by 
the Justice Department The case, one 
of several fedora! challenges to Wedo- 
wee’s compliance with a 1970 desegre- 
gation plan, was filed after the Bowen 

incident 

Mr. Humphries had ruled Randolph 
County High School with an iron hand 
until its destruction last week. 

To whites, the principal seemed a 
bulwark against anarchy, a strong 
leader who used the wooden paddles in 
his office to keep the violence common 
elsewhere out or their school But most 
blacks considered him a vestige of the 
Old South, chosen so whites would not 
fed threatened by integration. 

Black parents, in keeping with the 
old social code, usually swallowed 
their grievances. 

But the insult Mr. Humphries was 
accused of leveling at the mixed-race 
girl tapped a vein of anger among 
blacks, who account for about a third 
of the town's population. 

“There was a lot of hidden racism 
here before the incident.” said the Rev- 
erend Henry Sterling, a black pastor 
who is a leader of the protests. “But 
you could pass through and not know 
the tension. There wasn’t a problem as 
long as blacks stayed in their place. 
But now the blacks have risen up, and 
it has drawn a line through the middle 
of the community." 




. "7 jj-ji ■'f J lijf ‘ 

<?.[ -itS v tv- ~ 



Clinton Shifts on Crime Bill 

After Stem Words, He Now Talks, Softly, of Compromise 




■ ■■ . . Robot F. B&JtyfTbc Aniciaicd Prat. 

DOIN’ THE SARDINE STRETCH — Sardine packers loosening up during one of 
their twice-daily exercise breaks at the Stinson Seafood plant in Bath, Maine. The 
company hope the. excerdses vriH help cut down on repetiti ve -stress injuries. 


Away From Politics 


• Heavy ram and Ugh muds blocked roads, 
flooded coastal areas and knocked out dcc^ 

• SkSfftg Ibrahim Siddig AK, the alleged ring- 
leader. pf the Feb. 26, 1993, Worid Trade 
Centex .bombing plot, has decided not to 
cooperate with the government Prosecutors 
had wanted him to testify against 12 other 
men accused in the -plot, which killed six 
people and icifuredzapre than 1,000. . 

• fllegalaBensmnstrevealthefrandocunient- 

ed status to get government-funded emergen- 


cy medical services and pregnancy care in 
California, a state appeals conn ruled. 

* A oneryear-old New Yiorit Gty boy having 
his diaper changed by bis mother was killed 
by a- stray bullet from a gunfight outride the 
family’s house; which had been the target of 
repeated complaints from neighbors about 
raucous activity and drug dealing. 

• ThetlS. Border Patrol will add 250 more 
agents to the Texas-Mexico border as an 
effort to stem the tide of illegal immigrants 
enters its. second year. AP. Return. NYT 


By Ann Devroy 
and Kenneth J. Cooper 

Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — Presi- 
dent Bill Clinton has turned 
from four days of attacks on 
Republicans over crime legisla- 
tion to more soothing words of 
bipartisanship as the adminis- 
tration seeks compromises that 
would produce the eight votes 
needed to revive the bill. 

None of the 19 House Re- 
publicans the White House is 
targeting to change votes has 
indicated that the attacks by 
Mr. Clinton and his team had 
produced the desired result. 

But officials said they were 
open to compromise on pans of 
the crime bill, which may affect 
.some votes. 

Of the 58 House Democrats 
who deserted the White House 
on the 225-to-210 procedural 
vote Thursday that blocked the 
hifl. some members of the Black 
Caucus were hinting they might 
bow to White House appeals, 
officials said. They included 
Representative Charles B. Ran- 
gel of New York. 

The crime bill has taken on 
vast political and symbolic im- 
portance for Mr. Clinton, what- 
ever its actual effect on crime 


might be. Senior aides are argu- 
ing that if the president turns 
Thursday’s defeat into victory, 
it will give his faltering presi- 
dency new life. 

Virtually everyone in the ad- 
ministration is working on the 
issue. That includes Hillary 
Rodham Clinton, whose previ- 
ous appearances have been al- 
most exclusively in the health 
care arena. 

The president has little on his 
schedule ail week — a week the 
While House had thought 
would be devoted to health care 
— except lobbying for the anti- 
crime legislation . 

[Mr. Clinton ordered Leon E 
Panetta, his chief of staff to go 
to Capitol Hill on Tuesday and 
help Democratic leaders sal- 
vage his crime bill. The Associ- 
ated Press reported. The White 
House press secretary. Dee Dee 
Myers, said Mr. Clinton 
planned to lobby some lawmak- 
ers by telephone and other in 
Oval Office meetings- Mr. Pa- 
netta was to meet with the 
Democratic leadership.) 

The question of how much 
Mr. Clinton would compromise 
was in doubt, but the moderate 
Republicans who voted with 
the White House offered sug- 


gestions on bow he could pick 
up more Republican voles — 
mainly by t rimming some of the 
bill's spending and strengthen- 
ing two provisions. 

One provirion would tough- 
en prosecutions for rape. The 
other would require community 
notification when a repeat sexu- 
al offender was released from 
prison and moved into a neigh- 
borhood. 

Republicans also want the 
cost of the bill now put at $30 
billion, to be reduced. 

After months of focusing on 
death penalty and prison provi- 
sions, Republicans have turned 
to attacking the bill's crime pre- 
vention programs as wastefuL 

On Monday, the president 
invited families of highly publi- 
cized victims of crime to a Rose 
Garden ceremony in which he 
said the crime bill is about pro- 
tecting Americans, not about 
politics. 

Marc KJaas. father of a Cali- 
fornia kidnap- murder victim, 
Polly Klaas; Steven Sposato, 
whose wife, Jody, was killed in a 
shooting spree, and Janice 
Payne, whose 9-year-old son 
was killed only days after he 
wrote a letter to Mr. Clin ion 
about his fear of crime, were 
present. All urged passage of 
the legislation. 


■No Violence 
As Cubans 
Leave Ship 


Senate Creeps Closer to First Votes on Health Care 


; ‘ MARIEL, Cuba — Several 
hundred Cubans who had tried 
.. .to, go. tojhe_Uiuj«l^tatc&.by, 
rushing onto an oil tanker at die 
port here have left the vessel 
voluntarily, state television 
said. . 

The daylong occupation of 
. the Maltese-flagged Jussara 
"ended without violence. 

State television quoted the 
.. Interior Ministry as saying that 

investigations would be opened 
into the responsibility for the 
incident, particularly of' the 
» -Greek captain of the vessel 
,who was not named, and of 
some of the crew members. . 

. ti The company that owns the- 
■’ ship, Jussara Shipping Compa- 
ny Ltd. Piraeus, denied that the 
ea prnin was being questi oned 
’-but said several Cuban crew 
-J members were taken into custo- 
dy on suspicion of aiding the 
-“people who rushed the tanker. 

A 3-year-old boy was badly 
.. hurt in the rush ■ to gist on the 

- .vessel Officials quoted by the 
•state news agency AIN said he. 

' suffered a skull fracture after 
' Tailing from his unde’s arms.; 

- Jussara Shipping Co. said 

■ that 1,000 people, not the 700 
' esiima ted by the Cuban govem- 
, mem, had stormed the boat 

The group occupying the 
! tanker began leaving the vessel 

■ early Monday. Authorities had 
; promised them they would not 

face reprisals. 

president Fidel Castro vist- 
’ ed MarieHatc Sunday w get 
i firsthand details of the affair. 
Tugboat workers hdd the 
vesseftied to the dock, accord- 
| ing to state television, wipe* 

■ praised neighbors and relatives 
1 of those who boarded the boat, 

! some of whom went to urge me 

1 group to leave the boat. 

It was not clear how the occu- 
• pation of the Jussara was «ga- 
! tiized. One young man laying 
the boat said that be had joined 

people going to the lanko 1 after 

hearing about it from "people 
in the street-** {Reuters, APj_ 


The Asjadaird Pros 

WASHINGTON — The 
Senate braced for a ’health re- 
form showdown Tuesday as Re- 
publicans considered allowing 
the first votes on the bill backed 
by the majority leader, George 
J. Mitchell of Maine. 

A bipartisan group of 20 or 
more senators readied a com- 
promise that could mean trim-, 
rnzng the bill’s benefits. 

One week into the debate. 
Republican senators indicated 
they nfightWrap uptheir open- 
ing statements and start intro- 
ducing. amendments likely to 
take even longer. 

Mr. Mitchell in a rare move, 
threatened tri keep the Senate in 
session around the dock unless 
Republicans stopped talking 


Lymph Node 
Not Cancerous, 
Simpson Told 

The Antedated Pros 

LOS ANGELES — O J. 
Simpson docs not have can- 
cer, his dotforannounced. 

Dr. Robert Huizenga 
said that a lymph node re- 
moved from Mr- Simpson’s 
armpit last week was “ab- 
normally large" but that no 
cancer was found. 

. Lab studies will contin- 
ue, the doctor said, in order 
to find the cause of the ab- 
normality. . 

The former football star, 
who has been charged with 
murdering his former wife 
Nicole Brown Simpson and 
her friend Ronald L. Gold- 
man, was tested for cancer 
because he was suffering 
from night sweats and 
swelling of the lymph nodes 

Swollen lymph nodes in 
the armpit, neck or groin 
can indicate the presence of 
a wide iange of viral or bac- 
terial infections, or more 
serious diseases, such as 
cancer- Mr. Simpson, 47. 
al so has a family nistray of 


and cleared the way for votes to 
begin later Tuesday. 

Nearly a score of senators 
from both parties known as the 
“mainstream coalition" met be- 
hind dosed doors to fashion a 
sweeping package of amend- 
ments to present to both Mr. 
Mitchell and the minority lead- 
er, Bob Dole of Kansas. 

Participants said thribr main 
concern was coming up with a 
way to slow the growth of 
health spending. But Senator 
John B. Breaux, Democrat of 
Louisiana, said they were also 
seeking to reduce the size of the 
benefit package. 

Adam Cfymer of The Hew 
York Times reported earlier 
from Washington: 

Mr. Mitchell has never forced 
an all-night session in his six 


years as majority leader. But he 
vowed to do so if no votes on 
amendments were allowed 
Tuesday. 

“Those senators who want to 
delay," he said, “are simply go- 
ing to have to be here around 
the dock to do it.” 

The Senate was remarkably 
still as he made his announce- 
ment Monday, with 60 or so 
members standing silently and 
listening. The minority leader, 
Bob Dole of Kansas, had re- 
fused to agree to a timetable for 
voting on amendments to the 
Mitchell bill Mr. Dole left the 
Capitol before Mr. Mitchell 
spoke, and his office said he 
would have no comment. 

But Senator Bob Packwood, 
Republican of Oregon, who is 
managing the opposition forces 


on the Mitchell bill insisted, 
“This is not a question of de- 
lay." 

Without getting 60 votes to 
end debate, the majority leader, 
could not force Republicans to 
let votes be held. 

Senator Phil Gramm, Repub- 
lican of Texas, made it dear 
that at least some Republicans 
were far from embarrassment 
over any delays in Ube vote. He 
told Mr. Mitchell that once 
“amendments come, they will 
come in a torrent," suggesting 
another route that senators can 
take to stall progress on a bill. 

While Mr. Mitchell’s an- 
nouncement dramatized the di- 
visions over the bill the “main- 
stream coalition” was working 
to bridge the gaps. 

But the group appeared un- 


certain about whether it wanted 
to present a whole new bill or 
just a series of amendments, 
which Mr. Mitchell would find 
more welcome. 

It seemed inclined to call for 
eliminating provisions in the 
Mitchell biU to create a pre- 
scription-drug benefit under 
Medicare and give aid to states 
for long-term care; Mr. Mitch- 
ell's supporters consider both 
provisions essential. 

One supporter of the biparti- 
san group, John C. Danforth, 
told fellow senators, “Right 
now, we are hopelessly bogged 
down." The Missouri Republi- 
can said the only solution was 
to “regroup and attempt io 
come out with a consensus pro- 
posal” 


+ POLITICAL NOTES * 


Judges Fear Overload of Health Cases 

WASHINGTON — An organization representing U.S. 
federal judges has expressed concern that the health care bills 
pending in Congress would generate a flood of litigation by 
people trying to enforce new rights to medical benefits and 
insurance payments. The judges said they were worried that 
many of those disputes would end up in federal courts. 

The organization, the Judicial Conference of the United 
States, took no position for or against the legislation, which is 
intended to control health costs and widen access to health 
insurance. 

“Policy decisions concerning health care reform are proper- 
ly within the province of the other branches of government." 
it said. 

But the judges noted that federal courts were already 
inundated with drug cases, whir* have caused delays for civil 
cases in many regions. The anti-crime bill now pending in 
Congress would give federal courts jurisdiction over many 
additional offenses, including gang violence. 

The Judicial Conference laid out four principles that it said 
would guarantee that disputes over health benefits were 
resolved efficiently, without clogging federal courts. In gener- 
al it said, these disputes should be handled through adminis- 
trative proceedings and then, if necessary, in state courts. 

President Bill Clinton's health care plan and the bills 
offered by the Democratic leadership are, in many ways, 
inconsistent with the judges' recommendations. For example, 
the bills would give consumers more immediate access to 
federal courts than the judges consider appropriate. 

Gwen Gam pel president of Congressional Consultants, a 


care suggested that the federal courts would not be flooded 
with new lawsuits. But Barbara J. Rothstein. the chief judge of 
the U.S. District Court in Seattle and the chairman of the 
Judicial Conference subcommittee on health care, said any 
bill guaranteeing a right to health care or health insurance 
would increase litigation. 

“It could have a drastic impact on the courts,” she said in 
an interview. “That’s what we’re concerned about." (NYT) 


Where There's Smoke, It’s Political Fire 

WASHINGTON — In the special interest struggle over 
health care legislation, the tobacco lobby has done better than 
most. Starting out as a major target of the Clinton administra- 
tion. it has managed to scale down proposals for tobacco lax 
increases dramatically in both houses of Congress- 

Emboldened by success, the lobby's chief Democratic 
benefactor in the Senate — the majority whip, Wendell H. 
Ford, Democrat of Kentucky — is using his formidable 
powers to stave off a comeback by anti-smoking forces, 
informed sources said. 

Faring plans % several senators led by Senator Paul 
Simon. Democrat of Illinois, to seek higher tobacco taxes in 
floor amendments, Mr. Ford is resorting to political arm- 
twisting typical of such heavily lobbied issues, the sources 
said. According to those sources. Ford aides have threatened 
to derail certain Simon projects, including an ethanol pro- 
gram favored by Illinois corn farmers and an initiative for 
Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport. The aides also have 
mentioned legislative reprisals against Senator Frank R- Tau- 
ten berg. Democrat of New Jersey, a Simon ally on tobacco 
control 

Mr. Ford represents one of the biggest tobacco producing 
slates. Tobacco interests have contributed $90,000 to his 
campaigns since 1985. according to the National Library on 
Money and Politics. 

A Ford spokesman acknowledged calls by the senator's 
staff to check on the status of tobacco tax amendments. But 
he insisted the communications were not threatening “That 
was farthest from our minds." he said. “Senator Ford's office 
doesn't operate that way." 

At issue is how much Congress can wring from lobacco 
sales to help finance health insurance for more Americans. 
The proposal has economic appeal as a ready source of 
revenue, but touches a political nerve. 

The bloc of tobacco country lawmakers is large and cohe- 
sive enough to make up the margin of victory on many issues 
in both houses, increasing the leverage of the lobby on 
tobacco legislation. (WP) 

Whitewater Case Initiator l» Suspended 

WASHINGTON — An investigator at the Treasury De- 
partment agency who began the inquiry into a failed Arkan- 
sas savings and loan that has erupted into the Whitewater 
investigation was placed on paid leave while she undergoes an 
internal review of her conduct, an agency official said. 

The employee, L. Jean Lewis, was suspended along with 
two other investigators at the Resolution Trust Corp.. which, 
as the federal agency managing the savings and loan bailouts, 
examines failed financial institutions to determine whether 
anyone is legally liable for their collapse, said Stephen Kat- 
sanos, the agency’s spokesman. 

But the reason behind the move was unclear, and Mr. 
Katsanos, citing a concern for privacy, said he could not 
describe the nature of the accusations. 

The action was questioned by Representative Jim Leach of 
Iowa, who has led Republican rfforts in the House to investi- 
gate Whitewater. fN YD 

Quote/ Unquote 

Vice President A1 Gore, speaking in Rosemont, Illinois, on 
the need to reform government: “The bureaucracy and the 
red tape and the unnecessary rules and regulations and the 
nonsense and the stupid procedures that have imprisoned 
good men and women who want to get the job done — all that 
stuff has to be fixed. This is really an urgent task. People who 
think it’s just words — get out of the way." f WP) 


Tehran Recalls Envoy in Argentina 

It Denounces ‘Baseless Allegations’ of Role in Bombing 


The Associated Press 

NICOSIA — Iran an- 
nounced Tuesday that it had 
recalled its ambassador from 
Buenos Aires for consultations 
in a dispute over allegations 
that I ranians were behind a 
bomb that killed 95 people and 
wounded more than 200. 

The Tehran Radio, moni- 
tored here; quoted a source at 
the Foreign Ministry as saying 
the recall of Hadi Soleiman 
pour “follows the spread of cer- 
tain baseless allegations and 
propaganda against the Islamic 
Republic of Iran and our coun- 
try's officials and diplomats, by 
sows of Argentine media and 
organizations.” 


[Argentina recalled its am- 
bassador to Tehran hours after 
Iran called home its envoy, 
Agence France-Presse reported 
from Buenos Aires. 

[The Argentine Foreign Min- 
istry said that Mario Quadri del 
Castillo was being summoned 
for consultations, the second 
time he had been called home 
since the blast.] 

[Deputy Foreign Minister 
Fernando Petrella acknowl- 
edged that bilateral relations 
were under considerable strain. 
“I would say that relations con- 
tinue to be very tense," he told 
Radio del Plata.] 

An Argentine federal judge, 
Juan Jos6 Galeano, has directed 


that four Iranians, all working 
at the Iranian Embassy, be held 
for questioning in the bombing 
and he named three other Irani- 
ans as suspects. 

Tehran has denied involve- 
ment and sought to discredit an 
Iranian defector, Manuchehr 
Motamer, whose testimony 
formed the basis of Judge Ga- 
Jeano's indictments. 

The head of Iran’s judiciaiy. 
Ayatollah Mohammad Yazdi, 
said that four Iranian diplomats 
named by Judge Galeano were 
suing for defamation. 


U.S. Questions Jakarta Arrest 



JAKARTA — The U.S, Em- 
bassy in Jakarta expressed con- 
cern Tuesday over the arrest of 
the head of Indonesia’s largest 
independent labor union and 
said his case. may come up in 
dialogue over a bilateral trade 
privilege. 


Much tar Pakpahan, whose 
Indonesia Welfare Labor 
Union is not recognized by the 
government, was arrested in Ja- 
karta on Saturday in connec- 
tion with racially charged riots 
in April that left at least one 
ethnic Chinese businessman 
dead. 


Ambassador Lapel Flags* 
GnS Worid Cm Colotion 
FostUWMm iy-100* USjWnada 
Any tog mtx + d& tamrti y octogo 
Factory Mrfntosato to quafited 
Ttiur Operator*. Also retsO. 
TUECOs Inc. 101 Bai AlTDlM 
tow MKonl. CT 06776. USA. 
(203)350-7446 • F» (203) 350-5334 


Rate the world's best restaurants 
with Patricia Wells. 

The IHT's restaurant critic has set out 
on a rare and ambitious gastronomic journey, a 
search for the 10 best restaurants in the world. 

She will be rating, in montb-to-month 
articles, the top restaurants from region to 
region, and comparing them to one another. 

Whether it's the best in dim sum, 
delicious but secret sushi bars or the finest of 
French tables, she will guide readers with 
articles about inexpensive restaurants as well 
as the grand ones in the world's major cities. 

She wifi also share her tips on how to select 
- qualky restaurants in unfamiliar territory. 

D° n ’t miss this series. 

COMNG SEPTEMBER 19th 


Patricia Wells is the author of The Food 
Guide to Paris, now in its 
third edition. 



crpj trrc*p 






_T> rnMp| 


Plage 4 


IOTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17, 1994 


£ 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


LEGAL SERVICES 


US tMHUeHATlOW SECOND TRAVEL 
DoMTwms,'Cfl-j>Kre Banking . Frf 


bul Bw ft low Society 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


Anocwtfan tn Umatoidi 
dti Avocoti at da Bamrao 


M 852 177 75 500 ei ook i» cafe 

Pffl Us* da avKrti inteirajtKnajx 
87792 Lists da awns et obonoemenn 
Hotcfc daffare pour arocoh et 
infra ruunarn 


ucnmns/un-^nom Ban*™ . n* 

logoi tepfejenutfion by forced Did frc* (he htodvs of your tat 
Ametiean Amney/RiD Etuunfl. JnJ B52 172 75 500 8 . ente» the cods: 
Contort- Fdxard P Ga/bahc, SVy ! Inti tawjn i Duetto ry 
Aitcrncrol-Uw*. 3 Belfaida Meho 87792 Lawyer fe&ng & 

Cento* 1*7501, Betbeida, Maryland P79B to<w Bturap Ho te l* & mfe 
2S» [USAJ M X 1-983 309. 


1 BQONL I>» feet* tareforate ufl. 

I Ltreeri refeaion r, Swrzertand re 
| trie tearing men s flora. | 

B rftfofar- 11 Zench 01-211 27 50. 


PARIS & SUBURBS 


E MIBFAX W9K5S MKHA LID. 


Attention visitors 
from the U.S. ! 


PARS 1ST 

V04JOM&OONCO8De aBEa 


74C4MKPSB.YSB5 

CLABIDGE 


WOOD AVIATION.- .SQfflULffit 
RIGHR. ht canary tf 

fanes) free). TriffTfe* 11147561313 


III 46> 59 & ROME 
niAfKHjgT 577^65. 

MOVING 


WOBOWSE Speed dqxrim * fa! 
bwefl evar duiMk eftMm arfak: 
Crwfe gd pa u Mt- TA Fora m 42 
8910 81 fa* 4256 Zte 1 



FRENCH RIVIERA 




.. iifwd to •**, * briw* 4 


156 SQJrt. end 162 SOJn. 
Wwcei®£ SATIS Td: (I) 45 03 78 78 


Canadian Buffoon Immigration 


bttod Qtwfinicnl popuntt we 

"SSP? -SFv s ?m, p -a„S: 


NTBff AX BUSINESS MBXA UD. 


luiueri, Ipadra *> Otufai ohtm 
shp. Cdl B. femrth 6 M S7&W5 
rforererf. Far DM PWB79. 


HKQ. Ardwn, CA 72002, C aB/fax 
1714) 9*8695 USA. 



Wfcs 


|0/N7;£RD£/}iV 


USA RESIDENTIAL 


tSTCTROTJMt- 


FORAREEPlMA’iCAU 


AUTOMOBILE MARKET 


REAMS ARE ADVBB 


latfaeaa. 


that fii« Inlmmatiantd 
Herald Tribune comet fa 
held responsible for letter 
diMita g n ioe u md ■»!»• 
tuft of b a muX oas stem- 
ming from a dve rt is ement* 
whkh appear in our paper. 
Hit therefore recommend- 
ed that read ers make ap- 
propriate inquiries before 
sendmg anymoney or en- 
tering into any binding 


Alfred EscfoSIreeMO 
CH B027 Zietch 
Ttx: 81 5? IS. Far OIWB 76 » 
Toi oi/aos76io 
now TA*-FWEE UNO 
ALL LEADING UAH£3 
Sara day loyMuDuu cossete. 
renswatte tftf » 3 roan 
Wo ateo register c» wtfri 
(rotted) toreipi in* -hoe) ptados. 


Worldwide Vehicle 
Supplies ltd 

{EXT 1982) 


If you enjoy reoang the IHT 
when you travel, why not 
also ge* it at home ? 
Some-day delivery available 


PAH5 [1] 39201400 


HOMESHP. $mafl 8 mAh mom, 
Ir rj y g* . oor wortJwda Cel Oerfie 
pS?r*2 B1 1881 (near Opera; 


LARGE HORSE FARM 

Two 2*edroout 0 *rf/wvo"l quwwv 
fih pond, wdoor poot lOvna, paaa. 9 
tofts. 4 nrepbees, 8 <ar gxvp, ear/ 
buit re, hob nwbfc, wirty ndn^ 
du wdeo in md orecho®. 1-5 to 
faw OflMBO Iflop, 5 FVA. tood ajporL 
Dtred fiom owner. Mai id US$ )3 
MA. Co&'lat +41-91-684 087. 


CAPfTALE • MJF7NBCS 
Hvd^idcad queEtjp tratiM, 

(A nn Pt*B a«J sutolB. 
M-1-4AM 1211. fa* 1-4774 8096 



PLANNING TO RUN A CIASSWED AD? 


in key U.S. cities. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


ATK WORIDWIS TAX RE CARS. 

Export + flippng * r coon often of 
new & used can. ATK Wf TenvdMa 
40. 2730 Btaadnfl. Betawm. Phon* 
a 6455C02. Tete*. 3! MS; Far (3) 
6457109. ATK. me 1959. 


BUtnnLSaxBMILHDI 
BMW 318i Cat nil- 26 .695 (LHDl 
MfTS7A|£R0 J.O VO- 96.000 IRHDJ 
ItHEROKEESE LTD. S20325 iRHDl 
F/PBOBECT24V: S19.«5 |LHD( 
MERCEDES Cl» SawSS ((LHDl 


Cdl II ) 800 882 2884 

(in AtawV erk a£ 312 753 3890) 


HOLLAND 


flenUb^safa£ribunc 


| UNIQUE IVIPI RESIDENCE. 

Amflerdtm/Ntrtieifen d i (5 rain, ftooj 


REAL ESTATE 
TO KENT/SHARE 

GREAT BRITAIN 

KENSINGTON £35/nwW ion 
u u mf uej lll nea ihcd & liunsw 


EMPLOYMENT 


CUROPE 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
WANTED 




1UKET:(det 
TaL23I 
. foe 247 


A5UVPAOHC 


tod faot. 443 + 180 torn. For color 
Dtochute ool +31 251B5Z48 or 


71835-1611 fo 71^30036 
PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


GBMAN LADY voted man bwotfui 
nodot 1990 vdh sxshd PS-siak 
seek awnmumf at FR7PA or nepra- 
uttobvTTd +49-5085-1426 


ANXXRfctt: 20 Hi , , 
Fisc 20 264. 


UNRB3KNGDQ6k Ionian. 


faL 071 836 4802 
7*c 262009 be 240225*. 


■"T&*S£ 

Itsc (8599222-1190. 


EDUCATIONAL 
POSmONS AVAILABLE 


MDDUEAST 


AUTO RENTALS 


TRANSCO B&GRJM 

Tie fargefl car export co r i ^ a ny 


• WVS SUPPLY NEW AND 
USED OUALTTY VEHICLES. 

• FULL PARTS AND LABOUR 
WARRANTY ON ALL NEW 
AND USED VEHICLES. 


BAREME AS 24 
on 17 AOUF 1994 
ftn Hon TV* to devise locate 
(traducBon cbponHe or darondd 

Jemplace 1 <b batbno 


51837 HJROFR4ANCL 
ISRAEL 


EAMAT HASHAROH endwnc Td- 
Aviv tutob. Sp o riou i -rffla, ofaoU 260 
syn. o f Ivghefl fleradarfl. on 1,000 


CaflURY SHF DRIVE 


i Eunye far the pq fl X yemv 
AI mc+es and models. 


R94AULT CUO: FF239/DAY 

ALL INCLUSIVE - NOHDO&* EXTRAS 
In mqa> atm and exports m France 
Cetoaf resennflm: 

TEL (33-1) 30-37 J 5 . 24 


AI mdes and models 
boon sd&veqistic n wn. 
y^png - nsuance 
Eiropean. African & US. specs 


Trwgeo, 51 Vosse-sefanar., 
Tel 

telex 35207 Trans B. 


RBir FROM DHtGI AUTO 

WESC3JD: FF 515 
SPECIAL OFFS ■ 7 DAYS FF 1500 
PACES TEL (1) 45 87 27 04 


FRH) OPBTT RACING WORlDVfH* 


• WORLDWIDE SHIPPING 
AVAIL ABLE AT 
COMPETITIVE RATES. 

• ONE YEAR TAX-FREE 
PLATES ON ALL NEW 
VEHICLES. 

• GUARANTEED BEST PRICE 
ON UKE FOR LUCE 
QUOTATIONS. 

• 23 OFFICES WORLDWIDE 


FRANCE tone q en FF/1 - WA 18A% 
GO: liv FOO*: 1,97 

SC97:4X2 ‘ 


iQjn. plot, wde flarey, 4 bedroom, 
garage, beaumi gtxdan. ArtAiSt y 


FOO*: 1,97 
SC5? : *M 


' S1L oS0% nK "^:% S 


negoSoUe. $1.4 itiBcra. 
9725-S8568S. 

MONACO 


$1.4 miSon. brail toe 


FUT07S 

BIFH. TOWER OR 
EXPO PORTE DEVHHAI11ES 
From StlxSai Id faftroom de kne. 
DaSy, weedy ot mortHy. 

Free dwde service m 
E vafeiry+and 
Cdb 05^45.345 TeNFrM 
or (23-1 ) 45 75 62 20 


B4GUSH SCHOOL seek mien mother 
tongue Engfah leaden. Wot* permt 
obtodmy, tuB-kme ban. Ffao* erf 
foal-44 09 99 22. 


BSjGtMftlUXMOW&Bnaeek 
faL- 343.7B.99.343-19U 
fx 3460351 


DOMESTIC 

POSmONS AVAILABLE 


G8HCE4 CTPRUSc Mm 
TeL: (30)16535244 
Fax: 4545512 


IS8AHJ. Tel Aviv. 

13797^9-586245, 
9729-586246 
Foe 9729-585681 

ttroAwanuE&stojdv 

fcti06pm 


“ Pt^|4I32399. 
■ftc 1185171 ADUN. 
fic|91-2S 413 7395. 


NJOFBA: Idtofafoat 

eng 

Fx.- {52-2 1)573 6077. 


AGBKE CHAMPS BYSBS 


NANNY FOR 2 YEAR OID. 6 nerds 
Grope 6 taanffa US. USD 1 J00 a 
pones Mto 1 yecr. Hs 493129-2888. 

LOW COST FLIGHTS 


DENMARK: Gi 
TeL; 31 42 


mUMEHbUq. 

TeL 358 W 647412 
Fcsc 6121112 


|0UBUCOFYEMa+5of7a > 
iJ/Fto P67-1) 21704& 


lc 133673. fie 32 01 02 09. 


AFRICA 


imuriMtoo. 

ToL- 58315738. 


EGYPT: Cairo 


HUaSMtKBrad*. 
TeL 523 628 
F*-' 568 3933 _ 
Tk: 248IH NSK 


AIUMAOM Zone C DM71 • TVA 15fl% 
00:0.97 FOD*:043 

SC97: 1/4 


FOO*; 0/3 
SC5P i 1^2 


MONTE CARLO 


BELGIQUE rat Wl - TV* 2,50% 
GO-. 2075 FOD-: 956 

SC97: 29^4 SCSP : 27,30 


“CARfF DW: saperb 3 loom 

S ierV, (46 sqJTL writ) a big tamer. 


H wrinCrb n furred rad apj lum 43, 

readeakd «a, 3 raatuhs and matt 


1*58315738. 
foe 583 20930. 


Uj 34 99 838 
S.: 2I274VCPCDUN. 
foe 3444 429. 


Tet (1)42 25 32 25 

Fax (!) 4$ 63 37 09 


NewU-Sj-nodek FreeEurapemOeivHY I 

BMW540iAb8(/bBiTradKin.CDS40,4w 


BMW5t0iAWkybBiTrodian.CD$40,900 
BMW31 BiCnbriole«Bdtxfito/t5a.921 
topGrtmrfDiadieeLiiTrtedVB J31 59) 


Suzob Vtora4X45aitapABS pe 511.991 
foAocTraraAm Treat b ode d S25997 


AUTO SHIPPING 


SAVE ON CAR SHPFWG AMESCO, 


Knhb«tr 2 Antwerp Bdaiva To/ from 
US, Afnoa. Reaubr Koto rfra Free 


US, Afnoa. R*auter I 
hotel. T1 37/3/231-4: 


fodacTrareAffi Trace boded 525.997 
Far to quota m other vehdes 
Phorral .201-32711 II fa»1.201-3278722 

U.S. CARS AT U.S. PRICES 
Absolute large) gl e am S bwefl 
prim guaranteed an eny New or 
Uted cure, tnida 8 Harley Davdsonr. 

Contact Dave: 1813844-0832 USA 


Contact us far our brochure on 
hand bulft ‘factory quality* 
exotic reproductions. All 
vehicles come with parts 
warranty, and a guaranteed 
buy back offer 

We also require Range Rove's 
4WD"s and other quality 
vehicles for cash. 


E5PAGNE en PTAS/I ■ TVA 15J» 
^7^39 SC5Pi97J0 


aAAGEDI 


ACCESS VOTAGB 
THE BEST FARES TO 
TK UNITED STATES 


NBHERUM&fanfla'dto, 
TdL 31 2D 6841080. 
foe 31 206881374. 


WWMfcMfleitafa 
M-632B924476 
Foe 632 Bid 4876 (Dtod), 


NORTH AMERICA 


■ Usoje ity h an a t t 


7A> Bd* t Vouira. A«3«C0 Mma 
Tri3392 IS 59 SC ha 33-93 50 1947 


Ready to move in 

nef+tine and kne kouoous I 


nad4Herre and kroe koaxiaus homes 
BAngod stdf enwmg the befl serwee. 


ad over 500 mare deUbtafa e wodd- 
wide on 40 dftoent tdedded ccniers. 


NORWAY A SWH»fc 

foe if) 55913072. - 


NEWYCCK: 

TeL- 12121 753-3090. Tel Sew 
(800 572-7212 Tk 427175 
hc212-73S87BS 


SWGAFOtt, Sbgapom. 

Uj 223 6478. 
foe 224 1566. 
WeeJ8749HlSM 


PQOUGAblhbto. 

UL351-1-457-: 


TeU (44) 71 295 2655 
Fuc (44) 71 580 4729 


VS8MA, AUSTRIA. Teh 713-3374. 
Are you sad or warred? Lonely or 
depressed? Are you desxring or **- 
ddo/i It heka to loll ohoot n. Phone 
b total wtec e. 
Mon. to. 9:30 an - I pm and every 
day 630 an - 10 an. 


SWITZERLAND 


De Groourt Associates 

W 1-47 52 80 13 Fan 45 51 7S 77 


Tel PARK 140 13 02 02 or 42 31 4694 
foe 142 21 44® 

MNTTEL 3615 ACCSSVOYAG65 
Tab LYON 78 63 S 77 or 72 56 15 95 


Ul- 351-1-457-7293. 
fax: 351-1 ■457-7352. 


QKAGO: 




17677390 

)76D052 


TeL- DT3 201-9393. 
foe 31 2J0 1-9396. 
ToahtwaOt+5356200 


SWtMotW, 
TeL 3506789 
fie 3509257. 


LHBMABcrofa 
{77164. 367^1< 
57-9166. 


CANADA 


A Sj^lS*S^S?^WE r 'T>« WVAUDB - 60 « »m. APA RTMBjT, 
RS). Dtoa tom owner SFr. 12 2 moms + br^ d roa in g raon, Bthl 

mfcn. W3 oca** lenre. Ffaree cdl Boor with bddoy, equeped kikhen. 
+41 -91 -684087. Free end August T«fcTiS5*675 1 


BOOK NOW by done with ciecSf card 
Goverrvnert licence: 175111 


SWnZBMMkFfafe 
UL-(021)726&2I. 
72B3091: 


foe (9^ 833-21 16 


AUSIRAIIA 


MB0OOOC 



ATTENTION EXECUTIVES 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


FOR SALE: 


Pifbllfh raur butimti 
nteuuae m the tmanuelanei 


than a third of a ml 


of whom are m btnlaeaa 
and Industry, wB read ft. 
Jusr fax n (Pari* 33-1- 
40379370} before 10 am. 
ensuring that we can fax 
you boar, mdhata which 
mafar aecEY and you wbfi 
to dxxge ft to, the nun^ar 
and expiration date, and 
your message eon a ppe a r 
within 40 hours. Please 
aba Indude your address 
and telephone number tor 
oar tow. 


INTERFAX BUSINESS MEDIA © 
Did from the htodset of your tor 
tod 852 172 75 500 &*rtm the cadet: 
&7B3 OehCtati Card Guide 
87783 LEGAL! 2nd Travd Document 
87783 Dr.? PUR M5c? Acoedtecfl 
677B4 Owrdt/Onfcened & Tax Free 


MMStayHos^Unfe 

i wd for 400 ptoettb & 1 ixds for 200 


U5. mamtoctune, padfod m 
ndy far Br u neda fo drfvery fa 


foe crywhere in the world. Conjiela 
with c4 sura cd oqubemert vncwxn 
padmd. be*. bkv*«ta foe — Da*d 
asounentj, cgipfoatus, new. packad r 
oocpnfo seaworthy laded cores. 

Impethcn upon letynt 


OSTRICH OWM3BHP (me dher red 
mas + hdj A leaheri). Ut us 
Mkoducs you to It* proraer og*- 
w ve fl ra en l of the 90‘s, fads ore 
maxed, and ra toofled an a Tea* 
ranch. ExceW returns expected. Crf 
BI 7/5956909 USA (24 M leave 
tebpfxme and far numberv 


{7785 How to earn 541)00 a day? 

I 87785 ‘Fly now - pay tier" WoHddub 
Ofishare Company 2 Nat md l flfot a 
Chantatfa Ccwgregonan (Tax exetnpmfl 

tod be ordared Ntoxcfty everytlvng 

ft ehrxitableJ The 'Wafchtower" oper- 
ates in 205 countries and rf BAons of 
5FR ore ns exen^tedl LEGAL 2nd 
Travel DocunenL Inexpetove tod m 1 
week from Ihe Antes to yow house. 
Cash tod Crack) Cad Gixde ft a bteig 
of 48 red lenders, after to rterawe 
■mux d i of 2391 och in 23 newspapers. 
Donl pay Frorf-up or Broker fee be- 
let rearWi +ts aude! How to earn 
$4,000 0 day? The besl Handbook ever 
available on die marked "Hie Tnxh n 
Stronger them fiction'. The, book mdws 
dreams trad Aho yours.' 
far a Btnrntet e rang at dl INTB5FAX 
Consumer & user tod how to sutoenbe 
enter code: 20800 


IMPORT/EXPORT 


SUGAR 

grade "A " refined 
reasonably pneed 

any quanUy defiver ed to world ports 
FAX ( 001) 508-7500496 UA 


| Commerce hrtemflfi o od 




STB TVAVB. BlftSAU, UD. I 
YOU? WTaNATIONAL CONOatGE 
Anytting tod everythmg you noy 
raouire m toy dry in the world 
New York Office 

Tek 201-216-1200 Fax:201.216-1212 

Internet: 201-216-1212 
IMGUE M SERVICE 


VENTURE CAPITAL 


PROJECT fMANCE 


U5$ 3M and up fore fonefad 

aBg& gfc ! 

flto+upe - e eyto don - < W*f> 


USA 215657211 


AVAIA61E CAPITAL 


Mri East and Orient capdd sources 
avafable far mvertra efo s worldwide in 
red estate, baseless startups or debt 
co rao idnftcn. Lang terms, befl nfts, 
broker fees pdd and proted-d. 

Fto yaw proposd sunxnanr to 
for East I m er toix: ) Croup, toe 
Artec Ffotobd Depwtment 
fax: (SO 7] a $035 ( Ifa— a). 


CLA55 A BANC in tax free venue with 
ud i nxfou iive servos and eaablehed 
banting tod sectotras accounts. US 
$50,000. Invnedkfle fronsfer. Crf 
Canada (604) 9426169 or Fax (604) 
942-317? or London 071 394 5157 or 

FAX 071 231 9928 

2ND CITIZENSHIP AVAILABLE 


NEW. Crf BuflerBaness/ Home reto 
phone cortrrfer world «nde sdes/ 
xmsimert required Fax IntT +27 11 

886 W27. 

OFFSHORE COMPANESc JIO, 1/5 
Church Street, Dougtos. We of Mon. 
Tel: D6741 62 Fax: 0624 629661 


through 100% kgd nfowdrafoian. 
Concrete deivery m 90 days. Invest- 
ts at $19600. Frf proteefron 


fad TRAVB OOCUMBH5. Dnvrag E- 
fences. GM. 2 foUeoas, Vorfoann, 
Athens 16671. Greece. Fax B962T52 
OFFSHORE COMPAMES. fo free 
brochure or advice TeL Ionian 
44 B1 741 1224 Free- 44 91 748 6556 
US PAOCAGED FOODS SHIPPS) <6- 


neats Awn at 519500. Frf pralerton 
of your funk- No paymert udess you 
■ecerve your doaxnents. Swai Invefl 
Inc. Fax N. -» f 31J06730416 
UNITED INVESTMENT TRUST 


red to you! Ten Presxere Tiodng 
Co Free Catdoq Fax 806792-8275 U5 
SAFE OFFSHORE BANONG. AD ao 
courts exempt from ony tatnn. Ida: 
FOB 6. 5575AE LuyfagesteL NL 
LOAIC, HftOS AVAILABLE to rf 
butoess proieca. krfe FOB 6 5575 
, AE LuytsgesteL Nedrerlonds. 

SCRAP SIS. WANTS) Iredwito) 
sfvra ex railway fines) C 4 F hxfia 
Prinapafe ertr. hn* IK 81 851 7UD 


(HONG KONGL Afohenncnted Bar* 
Drafts avalaUe to provide funds to 
borrow er s who hove bark irfoterd 
as seavrty. Hease fax 852-537-5665 or 
write to- 7lh Floor, Bank of America 

Tower, Coord Hung Kong 

DESPERATELY SEBONG swftdred on 
xenraedory to marfcel world wide o 
108% anonymous, no leto encs le- 
ctured had account banned with to 
affohae ccrxpcrry Fociry m a zero 
l oxrt ion juraacnon UK +44 1 7W 

830138 

FAMOUS RlVBtSBE RESTAURANT 
Befl posrton in Giert Britan Boatful 
bui c n mmei C Ml toatoon. A Ide line 
oppartafoy to aoquee a preneer 
buaaen thraurf rfovemert. far deals 
Fax 44 711 831 


VINTAGE OOTHING: Inf:, rf 


rides & grades. Conjuror & overdyes, 
aso Lee & Wronhr. for (212) 302- 
54 76, Tet ^ [212) 302 -723 0 USA 
Authentic Yrilogr Oodxng Company 


C LAIMS ARE BBNG BROUGHT 
agcxnfl a legs radhnaeood 


_ , Hgha) Cato favour obie 
deauens n Germany ore already 
exifong and a mdfcrtjband axnpany 
s readied to pay □ me ret u rn of 
DEMX0M. 


USB) LEVIS SOl'ft Sire & j«x> 
packets. Top qurfty, farae tscrtlhn 
Me m ihe USA. Tel: 9l0t733-1500 

Fax. 510/233-1583 USA 

GENERIC OGARETTK, American 
bW toboan, lowest paces, private 
bbrf.q ovodaUe. Fax USA- 1-305- 
47+M&. 


A ptoner ready to inesr DEM 25 M a 
requred to enable matters to proceed 
further. The atone* wi receive 50% 
af ihe end result wfach w4i be to* 
free re the doxn a being prccessed 
through a Guermey company. 


FALLS CHURCH. VIRGINIA 
SUBURBAN WASH NG TON, D.C 
LWfTB) FAJTNBSHP 
SUBURBAN OFFICE PROJECT 
$50,000 US. DOLLAR 
MMMUM INVESTMe^T 
25% RETURN 
TEL (7031 359-2444 
FAX=J7C3) 359-2449 
Inremtoond Redhp & hvesnert tec. 


YOUR OWN COMPANY IN 


OSMIUM 18? ISOTOPE 


reef emjtxne* id. Tek + 401 210 2060. 
Fau +401 211 0019. ond state if 


U5H) LEVI 50 TS- Quafay lean 
■faed from USA Rdfable bippfier. 
Frau 503/6280749 USA 
IMPORT ANYTHING FROM USA on 
90 dqys open ae*. Tek (909) 369- 
9594, toWB 276-1561 USA 
DOMMCAN OGARS, HAM) MADE, 


For farther i n fanatoon wrxtf mwefled 

63 Lcv^ Ace, lancfan. WOE9W 
tagerher with proof of Iheir finaad 
obily. 


SWITZOIAND 

ZURICH-ZIIG-UIZBOI 

ARTH-GOt flAlf 

COM1DEA AG. BAARB5IRASSE 36 
046300 2UG. Tek +4142 21 32 88 
Fax: +41 42 2210 49 



thrtwgh priwrie Treat. 


VENTURE CAPITA! 

• Mramen USfStyOOO 
'NbMomm 
•T erra Lotos 
‘fafafom 

* BrSran Protected 

Anglo Amvfaae Groefl Flc 



^SSS&asMser-tnarif. 


Fax +44 924 201377 


CONRSMB) VENTURE CAPITAL 
Cadi or. eqtwaknfs for h te n i flfan d 
Baras Prajeto. S1-S100 ML USD. 
Td 4CWBM0SB Fax 407-48W664 US 


ovdtoifa ao daiy, wSfcer monAly 
fcasfa fVwatoox port SreroWtf 
end peraoirfxad figlephone senmeA 


FORWARD PROJECT OUT1RC 
NOW TO 


INVESTMENT SUS5E SA 

Bdtftftoftja B6. ETAGE 5 
Zurich 8001 Switartoid. 


FINANCIAL SERVICES 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


TOURAOOtBESS MW OPBUL lfl does 
btancft addrexS- fot/phone puefaff. 


. MMO CLUB FRANCE MADBHNE 
: QHtf Atodefare.-fo* 9lh 

^33-1-44 51 »» Fto33.V-4451 8081 


RJNDB4G FROBIBAS? 

Vertore Capital ■ Equity loam 


RJND5 AVAILABLE 

ALL BUSTfr^ PROJECTS 
CR FOR 

LEITBB OFCJSXT 
BAMC GUARANTS5 
OTHER ACCHTABLE GOUAIBML 


hnenang - Long Terra 
flerd St^xirtedGuarafoem. 


. VBfTLME CAFHAL 
Anrfctfa from 

- Okie idSai US. Doftis pint 
'repowment tone Three to Ten wan. 
tSTnT + 55W434S3/43W7 
• foe NT, + 595*5-43449, . . 
BT.MAMHB^ 


TOUftOPfCEKSWZBBAND 
ZURFOVCHUR- We aft* Modem 


2U8KH/CHUR- We afto tohfdem 

ore W riwo tod sraaretafaf senna, 
tepmeetahve ondpoqnrfi dnerfe. 


adrabSIfnUQta^taedwd 


BnfaUe M e nrtwi to non hxxfing 
to vdMe praiads rartotod by: 


CAPITAL WANTED 


Broker's m regao n g u a nrfaed 


SELL COMMHN3AL LOANS Up to 5 
iidfi uu 1 Good careaetsion. O’Neil 
Harrow, far 44 71 734 4166 


BUCK FRM MARS seeb foraefag & 
araduen Far arm poched feenre 
Her dxxrt fernih & flreets of. NYC. 
Same fb foug e that. Serious oxjanes. 
718529^347516773^827 USA. * 


Mianoaer RLLFJLR. t Ge 
HNANOAL N5TTIUT1CM 


fa virfle prajeds mto^ d by: 

Bcwcor of Aag ^ 

Corenfancm acred ody upon Forafin^ 
Brokers Ccmsifljoa Assured. 

Pan (63-21 B1D-92S4 
Td: (63-2) IIG&70 or 812-3429 


30% PR ANNUM RBUMS t+ 
Gem Sane Mcetet $ 5^00 ndraaar 
nvastnerfl Tek 41A60W033 Graadti 


! Far 41 £1 -223340. 


CURRENCIES 


tefaraafanby fax 322- 534 02 77 
or £-2-53fr Q 91 i . 

tea ran 


CAPITAL AVAILABLE 


TELECOM. 


tNTEHIATIONAL BNXNG 

Di Mated Canptoy. 

30 Y*«i ei Ran. 


ramBOYUGGOID: . 

BspEfe'- 

X/ Jryfarp22]S34H52 
BelgnaLTmc 20277 ' 


BEVB0.YHB1S 

OR 

- •'•••Mflft MONICA • • 

Bresugm+fah Security 
IfoerCme&AB Sonhco 


INTERNATIONAL CALLBACK 
Hgh veknne telecom r&nributas or 
users for frf service mogrtna Contort 
TramCom. Tet 16150 «76640 Fan 
(6191 4876946 USA 


CONHRMABLE DRAFTS WTBNATIONAL LEASWG 


FBIANCBIG 

• Vertere Coped 

• Bavnea Loans • 


BUMCH7 Germany red MOSCOW/ 
- ' W oFfa ptonanent base/ 
addmm + senioes. 
GmbH 70. Box 


SHAABIA TEXME FACTORY PO Bax 
TIB Ondtotito, Sudan. Fa and Tel 


SBL AN DtCRHMBiE countafen 
de tort or pen. foich works with 143 
iffaert currencies Tek 914-425-1935. 

Fere 914-425-1443 USA 

wn SOCIETY OP FTNANOBB 
Professoral menbershp nfovrorfi fa 


(61H 4876946 USA 

BUSINESS SERVICES 


OH=5HORE COMPANIES 


BACKS) BY CASH 

■ breed in Yrrer Nrare 

• Ctoforeed by Motor bel Berks 
to ftove Avatobiry of fan* 

• Baked by fiiveie eivestors 

H CAPITAL SUPPORT COUP. 

Ui (714) 757-1070 foe 7S7-1270 


IMMBMAT&Y AVAILABLE 

FOR RN6NCWG 
of pech ose d_ heavy n t ariprat nl. 
orroofo, merrhad tod prepare 
ships, reduflnd red mate 


• Convnerod End Efld 
• No Advance Fees 


PURCHASE l SA1£ 

rf axrencfa. Id onurfuu 




by fax (32-2] 534 16 88 
Bdgram. Irfw 2C277 


aCC fONDMGOIOUP 

TH: J94J9W USA 
FAX. 407 J9M568 USA 


NMd WASHfaWOK DjC A More? 
i Onto sx» red a I xervtos as 
sde on Peareyhrono 
baric cost. Tek 202- 


SERVICED OFFICES 


Brokers enmrairean (mated 


LONDON MARBLE ARCH Med, for. 
' W M Tdre W , serviced afters. 
W71 TOmioi PrerTl 724 5766 


finest tohnccc e. bw retos, vafame 
ides only Fa USA 1^0547+3866. 




BUMDanweean arm 
S, volume rates ody. lor 


ESTABUSkCD SOMAN COMPANY 
X) buBdng afocnatxxi and forfty 
fotoow emert s erfs itw restor to finaae 
prrefaet development retd erporooo 
pfaft. Only sound and aedfale offers 
tereaefled. Mranm mvefltned 1 Mo. 
DM. Flene write to Box 3686 LHT„ 
FTiednchs*. 15. D60323 Frankfurt/ 
Moat, Germoty 


249 II 76209. twees finaong houses 
to ovrd 3 mfon US dolors to com- 
ftoting iflAta i rf ib modem ori- 
rrteefepto ertfan sprang fine. 


M tare Players, file V -Mated fbato. 
7D4-2525907 FAX: 704-251-5061 LS*i 


BEADY MADE COsJUU. ADMIN 
1 TRADE DOCUMENTS AND L/C 
- BANONG AM) ACCOUNT*** 

■ CWNA 9U5B4ESS 58MCES 


far toy infanneeiaa 

Mnr'irei M-LPXB. red Ge. 
FftfiANOACWSmunON 
faeredi - BBGRfM 

foe 32-2-534 02 77 S 32-2-53B <7 91 
IBEX 20277 


AFBCA-B4GU5H BlISINeSSMAN. 
resident logos. in goad position to 
represent yon faterefl eg, refined rf 


GRANT-LOANS far toagn firms set- 
ht'g up optrotaB ii W Eufopew 
Urvort MQ Fare 44 1926 451150 Tet 
44 1926 311075 


products, eaofac amber, debt cdtec- 
tan. troetoj. Fa (UK) 44 B) 30 2202 


WANTED flock fats (racrietafcte ei 
German). Jades. Oo/htog and 
shoes. Hs. afto on FAX: *49-761- 
277980 5LA 


Contort Stella Ho for eivnediate 
(mas & eompany brochure. 

NACS TO, 3304 Snoga Creem. Or. 
148 Cornre ight Ro od Hong Koog. 
Tek B53-S72380 Fox: 852-8572100 


IMMHXATL A UNUMFTH) ' 
Capita andade fa 
ALL fauMMi prafedsl 
MN US. $2 itaL/no tn 


RNANCNG AVAILABLE 


BRUS5BS • BBiGIUM 

. Yoer aftaArf eeaafcM 


Tet 32-2^534 85 54 
Free 32-2-534 0277 


WWR' UMKM- OHKE 
AffonfaUe, 5 ■ star. Band Street 
Jet. 44 71 499 9192 fax. 71 4997517 




TOW ORfCTK LONDON 7Qp per 


All COMMERCIAL. PROK 1 S 




^ U 


(7T7) ismen (us. faxj 


FUNDS AVAIIAME to «re ncrenfiret 
of fare* debenture ntoreire* jPBG"^ 
FBN’ATrf: 205/664-7350, Fan 205/ 
63M508USA- 


NORES 

NADONA L BUSINESS . . 
REPOKnNG BUREAU 

Tek 2127BM82I foe ZI2&S7<57Z7 



LONDON WT BUSMENS CB4TRE AI 
to ftp A W boon ba»s. Tek UK (44) 
: ?1^3540fflFa.(44) 71 935 7979,~ 
MONTREAL- CANADA. YOW tffto 
■w»* efagradtr farnadxd & serviced. 
Tet SMffiM Free 51+27+5076 


BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 


TENDER NOTICE 


The First in Asia 


PRE-FABRICATED 

BATHROOM 

In Concrete Structure 


OFFSHORE 

COMPANIES 


Tax-Free ILS. 




BV LAWYERS 


ExceOent for Hotels 
& Apartments 
Technology Transfer 
From Germany 
We are looking for Investors 
and Partners 

to manufacture this product 
for the Asia Pacific markets 


IMMIGRATION 

& TRUST EXPERTS 


OFFSHORE TRUSTS. COMPANIES. 
BANK INTRODUCTIONS, NOMINEES 
& ADMINISTRATION BY UK LAWYERS 


l”. Vi'h-.'.n' '.H'.’.Ii-if'.itrt. 1 


■ IRISH 0MHS) 

■ ISLE OF MUM 


E165M 

£iaSJ8 


Interested Parties, please call: 

Mrs Daiss or Mr Wong 
Tel: (65) 733 7900 
Fax: (65) 733 8660 



bcomrtxxfot Nendi ore jpeoatiy Smrc ia 
il 50 Sues. GturtjJOT rf rmrpfcic atmrsMt. 
We rffer U5: adrteere web phnec & fa xroce. 
office serrices. Ui bank moans l' 5. uiucu 
i o ttne ts dnaas. coo^tetr legal wrote* ft 
iMisUBce. ledudiog OTC market enuy 4 
xTOBgrtax. Rase ye^eest ot fnr broefame. 
itattie to Eogfisb k Gam. 

Or. Jut. William A. Wright 
Attorney at Law 
IU Oxpoaboe Scrrica. Inc. 

3430 Balmoral Drive. Suae -in. 
Sacramento, Cafifomb 9^821 
—3 Fax (USA) 916/783-3005 e= 


Old German 

Royal House 


!s cjfcring a finandally *>utid 
personality ifie opportunity to 
obtain a title of 
NOBILITY. 


OFFSHORE WORLDWIDE 
Ready made companies (sfaeQs) 

• full management 

• address services 

Fnrfndrer 

INTERCOMPANY MANAGEMENT 
[sL, PO. Box 160, 9493 Mreucn 

Ijcctrenstcfa 

Fere 41-75-373 4062 
IVj deer 1979 


To realize a lucrative project for die 1 
production of raw material used in 
cosmelkandphamaceutksJpnidncfe, . 

a Swiss company is looking 
for partners investing 
US$15 Mio. incL USS 3 M5o. vratme 
capital 

For ttuw in formation please writ to: 

ZRT Maschinen AG, 

5036 OberentfeWen, Swilaeriand: 
Fax nambec ++43A4/43’20*87. 


MGPL Realisations limited 


(^Administraiibn) 
(Formerly Macdonald & Go. 
(Publishers) limited) 


iTel. +49-89-20 15142 
I Fax +49-89-2013597 


INTERNATIONAL 
FRANCHISE 
OPPORTUNITIES 


TELECOMMUNICATIONS 


LONDON OFFICE 

SCORPIO HflUSF. 102 STONFr STREET 
CHELSEA. L0K0CK SV/3 S«J 
~ 44-71 332 2272 

ft Cia| 44-71 373 9683 A 


lOFFSHORE BANKS 


■ Morehortt/ooramardal beeik 

■ Accept deposits 

• Oases A bcence 

• No quotificorion requtomenls 
« No foxes or bvafres 

• Total anonymity 

• bearer shares OJC 

• Nominee dmecton O.K. 

• l in n ted fo l e defaery 

• US$ 15,000 or 125,000 relh a 

trust company 


OFFSHORE COMPANIES 
INSURANCE/REINSURANCE 
, COMPANIES OFFSHORE BANKS 
ASSET/INCOME PROTECTION 


62 years established - providing 
pro f essi ona l services Mematrortfilty 
tor a* types of business. 
ASTON CORPORATE 
TRUSTEES 
19 Peel Road. Douglas, 

Isle rf Man. IMl 4LS 
Tel: 0624 626591 
Fax. 0624 625126 
or London Ttel - (71) 222 6868 
Fa* (71) 233 1519 


Caff or fax hr free details! 

Ron Jensen 


SCULPTURE WORLD™ 

Discover A Gold Mine in 
New Acrylic Sculpture Art 

You Transform |^K7~'Vpf 
Posters Into Art 
That Sells from 
SI 00 -S 2 , 000 + 

Return Potential 

KoUvrf&ln 

AS EtfwpmenUFuH Central 

Investment SI 5- 525,000 u^a (-aws 

716-691-1750 

FAX: 716-691-1766 


FOR SALE: PAtwt 


Cmxxrarat it* «Jca«r r l pp-5rt“**es. 

J praenrehe a :«anjst 
Inicrrtuonxl Patent re^flered 
PeftWry wi set! Iicercri rehco 


Zsumum^ 


V tew Ray. T62M ncepc y 
Tdj(3c4»fB6S01 


Sandwiches & Salads 
8,500 Stores Open in 
15 Countries 

Master Franchises 
Available 


Save over 50% on phone 
calls compared to local 
phone companies. 
Cad for rates - 
• Lines open 24 hours. 
Tel 1-206-284-8600 
Fax 1-206-292-6666 


VERY LARGE WINE, COGNAC i 
& CHAMPAGNE EXPORXEBS 


zkallback 


1 419 Scored Ave W - SeaOte. WA. 981 19 -USA] 


SEEKING BUYERS 
Vfcry km prices - very Rood quality 


London TeL 71 3 M 5157 fas 71 231 9928 
Canada T«l. 804 942 Bits Fax 942 3178 


OFFSHORE 
MERCHANT RANK 


Offered for sale ind. licence 
or possibility' of new start-ups. 

Uw firm Dr. Bcnuf, Dr. Owner, 
Dr. Moreno & Partners 
Fax-n B *l 809 122 6694 


* HOW TO LEGALLY* 
OBTAIN DUAL NATIONALITY 

[)iir,.tr Ac items ul dul nfmotn «iA orer 100 
..naim? uanDimi riu* terms t EL IPRFVXBJS 
TAX PAYFRl jib) IcpH) aned utnpnsnnaU 
jtd hs-'-lr bi'CMtt ibr ir-rln Ixu abnrf lax 
hrcu and bi% li- tenor a Irpl TAX LXD£ 

For jnuv F REF. HRtK IIURb and PRI- 
VACY - NEWS LETTVW Hut »B help 
make and reran jnor mmuv wrfle to: 
Snipe Inti IjA ll<n 4JUJ- 
Ivvcsl-ak Ibew hvenvite 
R.ralmlv I VJk H»i» RHN3: ■ U K. 
Tit • 44 TirtfttlTM I j* *+J8rth4|1I3 


U5 5150/00 amdonnnimn i purdwc phis 
fee provida immediate anzawup m a 
(ax tree, English speaking Common- 
wealth tout by (not Antigua). Principals 
orihdrkHTeraonljr.pIflKQWtod: 

Maritime International Ltd. 
P.O. Box 1302 , 43C Reddiffe Street 
Sl John's Antigua, West Indies. 

Fajc(80W«2r27l8. 


EetabBeExmeot CbcvrfBeft 
46 me Salm-Rexxxy, 76200 Dieppe, 
_ Ftmce - TeLi (33) 35 06 20 00, _ 


COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE 


On 10th January 1992 MCPL 
Re al is a t ions Untiled (formerly 
called Macdonald & Co. (Pid> 
Ushers) limited) ("MCPL") 
went Into administration. 
MCPL changed its name fiom 
Macdonald & Co. (Pubfohcre) 
limited to MCPL Realisations 
Limited on 5 June 1992. MCPL 
is a direct wholly-owned 
subsidiary of Caxton PubE- 
shfog H oldings IJmftffl rei (|(f 4 i 

itself is 9096 owned by 
MaxweE Publishing Corpo- 
ration limited, which in turn 
is a direct wholly-owned 
subsidiary of Maxwell 
Communications Corporation 
Re (in administration). 

By a Cduit Older dated 22 July 
1994, we, the administrators 
of MCPL were authorised to 
proceed with the production 
and implementation of a 
scheme of arrangement under 
section 425 of die Companies ' 
Act' 1985 between MOT. and 
its creditors. The purpose of 
the proposed scheme wffl be 
to enable us to make 


distributions to those creditors 
who shall have notified their 
claims to the joint. Admi- 
nistrators by the date to be 
fixed. Creditors who fail to 
give such notification by that 
date may be (rate! as having 
waived any aqd all cfahns they 
may have against MCPL. 
White the proposed scheme 
is being prepared, we have 
been authorised to advertise 
for creditors and to agree 

rtoim< -- 

Any person claiming to be a 
creditor of MCPL should 
contact us as soon as possfcle 
and, in any.event, by 30th 
September 1994 at Price 
Waterhouse <ref. AVI), 
No. . 1 London. Bridge, 
London SET 9QL. • 

CTeL No: 071-939 5650). 

Dated 5 August 1994 
Anthony Victor L omae 




Joint Administrators of MCPL 
Kea&atSOfu limited (formerly 
called Macdonald & Co. 

(PubBshcn) limited) > 


2ND CITIZENSHIP 

available thro# 100% legal Namaliution 
Complete defoaj teOOdajS. lavoaretwsart 
at SI9.5Q0 Full protection ol jou funds. No 
payrnew wfess uw tetiw jwrdoamaots. 
SWISS INVESTMENTS INC. 
Fax: NL ++31^0.6730416 


For Sale In Brazil 

Urbanisation for house 
construction near to Taubat€ 
US$2,000,000, - with pay- 
back of fall amount after 15 
years, through Swiss insu- 
rance company, tax free. 

Please write to- 


LAND AND BUILDING LEASED TO XTRA SUPERMARKET WITH 
ITS IS YEAR LONG TERM NET LEASE, WITH ADDITIONAL 
OPTIONS TOR RENEWAL TERMS. RWMENTS GUARANTEED BY 
U.S. GROCERY CHAW WITH SALES OF MORE THAN $13 
BILLION. CURRBfT ANNUAL NET INCOME OF $507,000 WHICH 
WILL INCREASE TO MORE THAN $600,000 ANNUALLY PLUS 336 
OF SALES OVER $40 MILLION. 7.053 SQUARE MEIERS IN THE. 
HEART OF CORAL GABLES ON 3L35 HECTARES. 


C Iffintotdldi real Vemaktnp AG 
P.0: Box 87. Ofarerttefaen. &tfreii*d 

Fan* ttfiAMTOOT 


TOR «P B4C1C^E_AfTO_g|l^WWWmW_WWrTE on TO 


Established Player 
nv International Communications 
Seeking Partner to Conduct Research on 
Consumer Views of Blue-chip Corporators 

Write to: Box D419 


\&D 

















<=S 


Mi 


1 * , c vsa 


* ru 


*r 


«. 7 :. «* 


*.!%. J? • 

H J . 1 ®- 

f A .«»- 





A * ** 


v> 






, * 




i.^3E ^:352^?3!^a£Fy^^s2!*^ i ii£ia-. 


** 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17, 1994 


Page 5 





By Joseph Fltchett. 

*WnwiW ftbntf TWfcnc ..•»•. 
PARIS — With Carlos behind bars 
after a 20-year manhunt, France was 
confronted Tuesday with worries about a 
terrorist backlash and concern about 
diplomatic problems 'with countries Is^ 
Me to be embarrassed by the secrets of a? 
^*7 figure m international terrorism. _ 
Any doubt wasdrownedby the “sier- 
iff s pride” shown irrinterviews by Interi- 
or Minister Charles Parana, a senior con- 
servative politician and Taw-trad-order 
proponent whose inteHjgence service re- 
lentlessly hunted down the world's most, 
wanted terrorist 

In bagging a trophy terrorist,- Mri ft»- 
anced Ms domestic political 
lout and cam&into possession of infoir-- 
mation that other Western-countries and- : 
many Arab governments would Wky- to . 
have access to. • 

The intriguing questions, these diplo- 
mais said, are why Carlos was aban- 
doned by his Arab sponsors and how he 
will be treated in the West: " ' -v> 

In hand ing Mm over, Sudan may have, 
hoped to improve its image abroad, a 


erous Secrets 

/ As a Western diplomat put it, “Carlos 

«h 7! ramnii^A a* * -_Al .mm 


win provide a symbolic settlement of the 
Arabs’ te — ’• * 


qua 

clou: 


ton for the time bring. Sudan’s g e stur e 
would not, by itself, be enough to remove 
it from the Hst of terrorist nations,' a 
State Department spokesman -said. \ 
More significantly, officials said, Su- 
dan must have consulted other Arab re- 
gimes, mchiding Syria, and their accord 
signaled an interest in T m ty i n g quarrels 
over past terrorism: 


- - — terrorist account with the West, 
with the ftench making sure that be does 
... not m ake embarrassing public disclo- 
sures about countries mat everyone 
-" > wants to 1 treat kindly now." • 

. Mr. Pasqua vigorously ejected sug- 
gestions that France had made a deal 
* with- Sudan's anti-Western regime. A 
Bizis newspaper said France was so ea- 
ger to capture Caries that it provided 

- covert assistance to Sudan’s campaign to 
put down a revolt in its southern region. 

' Acknowledging the possible threat of 
terrorist operations in France to free 
...Carlos, Mr. Pasqua said that France had 
taken all the necessary precautions. 

• -. Western intelligence specialists said 
/ .that the international attention sur- 
rounding Carlos’s capture was overdue 
•- recognition of France’s tougher anti-ter- 
r resist line in recent years. 

These -sources played down risks to 
France. “If the French saw Carlos as 

- anything other than a political gold 
mine, they would have arranged not to 
have Mm on their hands,” a Washington 
•official -said. 

Agreeing, European officials said that 


the sources of support had dried up in 
ndEas 


• ‘ the Middle East and Eastern Europe that 

xompUce — 


enabled Carlos to free his accnmp...., — 
Magdalena Kopp, now Ms wife — from a 
French prison m the mid-1980s. 

- Most intelligence specialists forecast 
versions of a scenario in which Carlos is 
-put away for years in France without 


making sensational public disclosures. 

Instead, the information he gathered 
during years as a hired gun for outlaw 
governments and high-level internation- 
al desperado will become part of 
Frances trove of facts to trade with 
other governments. 

Carlos will be tried for crimes in 
France, including the killing of two 
French counterintelligence agents in 

1975 and a 1982 bombing near the 
Champs-HysSes thai killed one person 
and wounded 63. 

A guilty verdict would put him in 
prison for years. 

While the authorities of allied nations 
want to interrogate Caries — Britain’s 
Scotland Yard has already said it does — 
a French prison sentence would block 
extradition demands by other countries 
while he served his term. 

France has 13 other convicted or sus- 
pected terrorists in prison, some for 
more than a decade, but none has given a 
public picture of terrorist activities by 
Iran or other Middle Eastern govern- 
ments. . 

Similarly, spy chiefs in ex-Communisi 
countries such as former East Germany 
have provided few open disclosures 
about terrorist activities. 

Their information, passed through in- 
telligence channels, may have helped 
bring about the demise of Carlos, de- 
scribed Tuesday by a French official as 
“a database” about terrorists of his era 
still at large. 


Serbs Fire 
UN-Held 
Gun Near 
Sarajevo 


SARAJEVO. Bosnia-Herze- 
govina — Bosnian Serbs fired at 
Bosnian government forces 
with an anti-aircraft gun sup- 
posedly under UN control in an 
arms- safekeeping depot near 
Sarajevo, a UN military spokes- 
man said Tuesday. 


The incident was provoked 
by a machine-gun barrage into 
the Bare weapons-storage point 
from Bosnian Army positions 
not far away and was the latest 
in a series that have eroded the 


integrity of a 20 -kHoraeier ( 12 - 
UN security zone around 


CARLOS: Tm Still Alive, and for a Long Time to Come / Judge k Told 


Coa&aaBiimmPaffi l 

in absentia to life imprisonment 
for murdering two. French secu- 
rity agents here in 1975, and 
more charges are likely to be 
brought against Mm.. 

France was also the country 
that most stubbornly -pursued 
him, following — ana occasion- 
ally losing— his trail for almost 
two decades and eventually 
tracking Mm .down yearly this 
year hiding in Sudan under a 
false name. After lengthy nego- 
tiations, Sudan arrested Mm 
Sunday and handed Mm over to. 


who 


French security agents, 
flew Mm to Paris. 

Frendrnewspapere were rife 
with speculation Tuesday over 
what Sudan’s Islamic funda- 
mentalist regime was given in 
return f or dehvering Carlos. Le 
Monde wondered whether the 
arrest could be linked to 
France’s derision in December 
to free. two. Iranians who were 
wanted for murder in Switzer- 
land. '“-■■■■ 


satellite photographs identify- 
ing the positions of anti-govern- 
ment raw! forces in southern 
Sudan. It also said that France 
arranged for Sudanese troops to 
cross the Central African Re- 
public into southern Sudan. 


liberation in turn claimed 
that France, provided the mfli- 
tary regime in Khartoum with. 


. But Interior Minister Charles 
Pasqna insisted that there was 
no trade-off, dismissin g these 
reports as “disinformation” 
ana suggesting instead that Su- 
dan, which is on the State De- 
partment's list of states spon- 
soring terrorism, was simply 
eager to improve its image. 


RELIC : Carlos, d Facade of Faded Terrorist Legends 


Continued from Page 1 


attribute to Mm every act of 
terrorist infamy that had oc- 
curred in the past 30-years.’" - 

Contrary to many press ac- 
counts, fanner A mencan and 
Israeli intelligence officials 
said, Carlos played no part in 
the killing s of Israeli athletes at 
the 1972 Olympics in Munich; 
which were carried oat by Black 
September, a Palestinian group. 

By Carlos’s, own account, in 
interviewsbfe ga^S'to ATab and * 
British joumafists, Ms first mis- 
sion was a botched attempt to 
assassinate Edward -Siexf, .a 
London businessman and vice 


to Mr. Steffis apartment in Jan- 
uary 1974- and fired a pistol in 
his face, but only wounded him. 

In August 1974, he killed two 
persons when be tossed a bomb 
into a Paris drugstore. His aim, 
he said, was to put pressure on 
French deating with Japanese 
terrorists who had seized- the 
French Embassy in The Hague. 

Then, be said, he made a 
mess of Ms next operation, at 
Orly Airport outride Paris. He 
shot arocket-propefled grenade 
at an El A1 airimer in January 


assault on the 1975 meeting of 
the Organization of Petroleum 
EiqxMtmg Countries. 


The operation extorted tens 
of millions of doUaxs in ransom 
and guaranteed Carlos's celeb- 
rity. Yet, it was the last thing he 
(fid that earned him a starring 
role on the world’s stage. 


1975,-bt^Mta-Yugaslav gane 


president ofihe Zionist Federa- 
tion of Great Britain. He went 


mstead. lhea he shot and 3 
two French security officers in- 
vestij^ting the attack, he said. 

His next operation was his 
only zeal success: an audacious 


The next attacks that can be 
rdiably ascribed to him were 
bombings of a train and a rail- 
way station in France in 1982. 
They were aimed at forcing the 
French to release Ms lover, a 
German radical named Magda- 
lena Kopp, who had been ar- 
rested in a Peugeot filled with 
explosives. They were reunited 
in Damascus in 1985. 


Khartoum has also stated that 
it made no deal with France. 

Carios began Ms terrorist ca- 
reer as a member or the Popular 
Front for the Liberation of Pal- 
estine and was later linked to 
terror groups in Japan, Germa- 
ny and Spain. But he did not 
target Israel directly, and bis 
most famous action was the 
kidnapping of 1 1 oil ministers 
attending a meeting of the Or- 
ganization of Petroleum Ex- 
porting Countries in Vienna in 
1975. 

Carlos was accompanied dur- 
ing his interrogation by a law- 
yer, Mourad Oussedik, who 
said that Carlos had been “kid- 
napped 1 ” because France had 
filed no formal extradition re- 
quest The lawyer said Suda- 
nese agents “threw themselves 
on him, neutralized him, 
drugged him and tied him up” 
before he was handed over to 
French security agents at the 
Khartoum airport 

It was later announced that 
Carlos would be defended by 
France’s most controversial 
lawyer, Jacques Vergis, a for- 
mer Communist who defended 
the Nazi war criminal Klaus 
Barbie during Ms trial in Lyon 
in 1987. Mr. Barbie died in 1991 
while serving a life sentence. 

In 1982, Mr. Vergfcs also de- 
fended Magdalena Kopp, who 
later married Carlos, on charges 
of possessing explosives. She 
served three years in prison. 


mile) 

Sarajevo. 

There were no reported inju- 
ries. The United Nations Pro- 
tection Force protested to both 
sides over the incident, which 
underscored the fragility of the 
exclusion zone and poor securi- 
ty around nine UN sites con- 
taining 281 heavy weapons be- 
longing to Bosnian Serbs. 

The humanitarian airlift to 
Sarajevo resumed Tuesday after 
being suspended because of 
sniper attacks on UN planes. 

The airlift, on which the 
380,000 residents of the rebel 
Serb-besieged Bosnian capital 
are almost totally dependent 
for their supplies, was suspend- 
ed July 20 after five planes were 
Mt by gunfire. It resumed for 
three bours Aug. 5. before 
NATO planes struck Serbian 
targets, and two days last week, 
before being suspended again 
because of the sniper fire. 

A total of 15 relief planes 
were expected to touch down 


Tuesday at Sarajevo airport. 


On Sunday, Sarajevo’s be- 
siegers and the Muslim-led Bos- 
nian government signed an 
agreement banning snipers, 
who recently resumed deadly 
attacks on civilians after a 
break of several months. 

The two sides also pledged 
verbally to stop shooting at 
planes bringing food into the 
Bosnian capital. 

Also Tuesday, thousands of 
Croats displaced by rebel Serbs 
ended their 47-day-old block- 
ade of UN traffic in and out of 
the Serb-controlled territory. 

“As of this morning, aS but 
two of the 19 crossing points 
into the UN Protected Areas 
are opened,” said Paul Risley, 
UN spokesman in the Croatian 
capital, Zagreb. “We welcome 
tins improvement-” 

(Reuters, AFP. AP) 


Judge Quits 
Abiola Case 
La Nigeria 


AFRICA: Billions in Aid Foil to Heal the Continent’s Sub-Saharan Scars 


: Continued from Page 1 

Faso and .Botswana are succumbing 
steadily to the Sahara and Kalahari de- 
serts- - 

Other devdoping regions such as Asia 
also must cope with a continuing net loss 


Ream 

ABUJA, Nigeria- — The 
judge in the treason trial of the 
opposition politician Moshood 
K.O. AWoto walked off the case 
Tuesday, dashing umonespeo- 
larions that the chief would be 
freed and prolonging Nigeria’s 
crippling political crisis. 

C 8 l workers unions, whose &- 
week-oJd strike has paralyzed 
industry and transport in the 
country, quickly said they 
would continue their action. 

“We are going to intensify 
the strike until Awola and other 
political detainees are uncomfi- 
tionally released,” Ken Nare- 
bor, deputy general secretary of 
one of the two onions, said. 

Judge Mohammed Mustapha 
excused himself from the case, 
a packed court in the 
capital, Abuja, “It has 
a my desire to see that the 
_^flsed gels unhindered j jus- 
tice. Now it is clear from all the 


of resources* especially arable land and 
r. The difference in Africa is 



Z 


utterances that' they have no 
confidence in me.” 

His withdrawal is bound to 
delay the trial, as a new judge 
will have to be appointed. 

Chief Abiola waved as he en- 
tered the court. He embraced 
his wives, family and friends 
and laughed when the judge 
read out the charges erf artempi- 
' 5 to overthrow the military 

Jer, General Saai Abacha. 
Security police baser led him 

away. - ■ .. ■ • 

There was no sign that the 
authorities were ready to drop 
charges against the media mag- 
nate, who is widely bdSeved to 
have' won last year’s a nnu l le d 
pres ide ntial election. His arrest, 
after he proclaimed himself 
president in June, touched off 
strikes and riots. 

The Nigeria Labor Congress 
was shocked by the . judge’s 
withdrawal, its president, ras- 
cal Bafyau, said. 

The congress, which called 
off a two-day general strike to 
negotiate Chief Abiola Vre- 
lease, wfl! be under pressure to 
resume the stoppage. ■ 
The oil workers strike, which 
began July 4, has choked off ' 
fuel deliveries in much of the 
country- 


usable water. r — 

that economic productivity is not rising 
quickly enough toinake up for the losses or 
toprovide funds for regeneration. 

Indeed, in per-capita terms, _ the sub- 
Saharan African economy is s hrinking . 

In the aftermath of events such as the 
1992 UNHSporisqred Earth Summit, Afri- 
can governments and Western donors have 
. renewed their commitment to reverse these 
trends. More than $2 billion has been 
pledged to a World Bank-managed Global 
Environmental Faritity. 

Yet, even as they prepare to write their 
rfrarks, donors describe many African gov- 
ernments as far too weak to implement 
such projects effectively. Moreover, even 
in countries such as Ghana, where the 
economy has-been growing robustly for a . 

wnA the government is relatively 
strong; Africans and outside donors often 
disagree about basic questions. 

African leaders and leftist African intel- 
lectuals jwgw- frequently that the industri- 
alized world is too interested in trees and 
not interested enough in people. 

“The West — the North — has its ideas 
of environmental problems,” said Quisti- 
na E. Amoako -Nuama, Ghana's minister 
for environment, science and technology. 
“Biodiversity should be preserved. Tropi- 
cal forests should not be cut. Industries 
should not pollute- Yes, we agree with aD 
that. 

“But you mJan this Nima prohtera, she 
continued, referring to the Big Drain. She 
said that biodiversity can be conserved if 
soda] -problems upstream are solved. “The 
World Bank, the Global Environmental 
Facility don’t understand that” 

“A lot of people like to make the case 
that p ro te c tin g me African environment is 
something the North wants to do forjtsdf 
a n d they are going to profit from it, said 
Robert Tfflman, the World Bank's director 
of envitoomental assessments for Africa. 
‘Thai’s nonsense. The people who are go- 


ing to profit most from protecting the 
environment are the Africans themselves. 
Until they see that, all the money coming 
from the North is going to be wasted.” 

Between the poles of this debate, a rela- 
tively small but growing number of Afri- 
cans, energized by recent global enthusi- 
asm for environmental causes, seeks 
modest solutions on the local level. 

Nrma’s voluntary, community-generat- 
ed Godson Environmental Organization is 
one example. The difficulty is that at the 
grass roots, Africa’s environmental crisis 
looks no more solvable than it does in 
government mini s tries or at international 
aid headquarters. 

Consider the circumstances surrounding 
Nima’s putrid gully. AB agree that the 


putnt 

problem here is not poverty per se. Indeed, 
fa 


for all its degradation, Nima bustles with 
economic activity and ambition. Instead, 
the trouble arises from broken, dysfunc- 
tional connections among government, 
slum residents, the land and available re- 
sources. 

When migrants first came here a genera- 
tion ago, tribal chiefs allocated co m m un al 
lands in the traditional way. The new arriv- 
al paid the chief a tribute, threw a stone, 
marked off the distance of his throw and 
started building. 

With independence in 1957, the Ghana- 
ian government declared that all land be- 
longed to the state. It effectively stripped 
the old chiefs of influence and introduced 
new land systems to compete with tradi- 
tion. But the government was never strong 
enough to impose its writ on the ground. 

Three decades on, as the number of 
urban migrants grows ever larger, the re- 
sult is a nearly total breakdown in land 
management, rising conflicts over land use 
and paralysis in urban government. 

In Nima, for instance, Ghana’s govern- 
ment initially sought to solve the Big Drain 
problem by accepting donated German 
garbage tracks, installing a few skiffs near 
the waterway and charging about 2 cents 
for each bucket of waste dumped in the 
bins by slum residents. 

Several of the trades have broken down 
for lack of maintenance. Residents see no 
reason to pay for trash removal service 
when they can dump waste in the gully for 
free. 


So Accra's daily production of 900 tons 
of waste mainly ends up in its stinking, 
poisoned watercourses. 

The obvious solution — taxing residents 
and providing waste removal service with 
the revenues — has not been feasible be- 
cause local governments in Ghana are un- 
able to collect taxes effectively. 

And because land ownership is so un- 
clear and so fraught with conflict, slum 
residents tend not to see themselves as 
long-term landowners responsible for up- 
keep. 

The generally corrupt, finance-starved 
central governments that are the legacy of 
decades of despotic rale and economic 
decline in modi of sub-Saharan Africa 
wily aggravate the situation, many Afri- 
cans, Western aid officials and environ- 
mental activists say. 

Rapid deforestation in tropical West Af- 
rica, where trees are being cut for subsis- 
tence and for export faster than in any 
other region in the world, partly stems 
from profit-malting collusion among Afri- 
can politicians, local loggers and interna- 
tional timber companies, according to 
Western aid officials, environmental activ- 
ists such as Friends of the Earth and evi- 
dence presented in prosecutions by the 
Ghanaian government. 

There is at least one important area 
where African environmental manage- 
ment appears to be improving — the effort 
to control population growth. 


Sub-Saharan Africa’s population is 
. each year, fast- 


growing at about 3 percent t 
er than in any other region. Two decades 
ago, only a handful of African govern- 
ments pushed population-control pro- 
grams. Today about 40 African govern- 
ments are actively trying to control rates of 
population growth. Some are succeeding. 

Preliminary results from a 1994 joint 
Ghanaian-U.S. survey show a sharp de- 
cline in Ghana’s population-growth rates, 
U.S. aid officials said. Kenya’s growth rate 
has fallen almost by half since the 1970s. 

“In Africa, what we need are a few 
demonstrations, some success stories,” 
said ecologist Edward S. Ayensu, who 
chaired the Smithsonian Institute's botany 
department in Washington for a decade. 
“It’s a long time since independence. We 
cannot blame anybody.” 



A Bosnian Serb manning an observation post, equipped with field glasses, near Sarajevo. 


where the United Nations Pro- 
tection Force hopes to arrange 
trols with the mainly Muslim 
ian Army on one side of 


the runway and Bosnian Serbi- 
an forces on the other side. 


Threatened, 
Rwandans 
Call Off 
Trip Home 


Italians Suspect 
Anti-Semitic Aim 


In Assisi Attack 


RAXES: Watt Street Cheers Federal Reserve’s Tough Stance on Inflation £ 


Continued from Page 1 

percent is really something dose to zero 
because statistics are skewed and also take 
halo account pric* changes for quality im- 
provements. 

The latest statistics showed that the Fed 
had both cause to rase rates and leeway to 
dost* 

On Monday the central bank’s own in- 
dex of industrial production rose (12 per- 


cent, a modest gam but also the 14th con- 
secutive monthly increase. 

As it met Tuesday, the Fed got word 
from the Commerce Department that 
housing starts had picked up by 4.7 per- 
cent in July after a 9.4 percent drop in 
June. ’ ■ 

The key point about the moderate gain 
in bousing starts is that it showed Fed 
governors that the shoe* of higher mort- 
gage rates had begun to wear off and had 


not put the rate-sensitive housing market 
into a free-falL This further supports the 
Fed’s view that higher rates "are not hurt- 
ing any major sector in a big way,” said 
Astrid Adolf son, of MCM Moneywatch. 

For the Clinton administration, there 
was little to do but grin and bear it. Trea- 
sury Secretary Lloyd Bentsen and the chief 
White House economist, Laura D' Andrea 
Tyson, issued a statement saying they re- 
spected the Fed’s independence . 


Reuters 

ASSISI, Italy — Three 
youths have slashed the face of 
a Norwegian Jewish woman in 
this town in central Italy in 
what appeared to be an anti- 
Semitic attack, the police re- 
ported Tuesday. 

Myriam Geelmuydn, 44, a 
writer who has lived here since 
1988, said the youths grabbed 
her by the hair while one 
slashed her cheek with a knife 
and another tore off her Star of 
David necklace in the assault 
on Monday night. 

“They shouied, ‘Dirty Jew! 
Go home!* ” she said. The 
wound required three stitches. 
The police in Assisi, the birth- 
ilace of St. Francis and a site of 

oman Catholic pilgrimage, 
said the attackers were believed 
to be Italians. 

Opposition politicians have 
said the presence of the neofas- 
rist-led National Alliance in It- 
aly’s coalition government is 
encouraging violence. The core 


encouraging 
party of the National Alliance 
is the Italian Social Movement, 
which traces its roots to Musso- 
lini, 


PLUTONIUM: Made in Russia 


Reuters 

GENEVA — More than 140 
Rwandans, who were due to 
have been the first refugees to 
voluntarily return home from 
Zaire, called off the trip after 
they were threatened with death 
as collaborators, UN officials 
said on Tuesday. 

The office of the UN High 
Commissioner for Refugees 
also it was closely watching 
the situation in the French 
“safe haven” near the Zairean 
border, where Rwandan Hutu 
have been massing. 

Aid officials say they fear the 
French withdrawal from south- 
west Rwanda Aug. 22 will spark 
a fresh exodus across the fron- 
tier to the Zairian town of Bu- 
kavu, already flooded with 
320,000 Rwandan refugees and 
short of food and water. 

A spokeswoman, Sylvana 
Foa, said 144 Rwandans were 
to have been repatriated by 
truck on Tuesday morning from 
Mugunga, a refugee camp west 
of Goma which holds 250,000 
people. 

“They came to us today and 
said they had been threatened 
they would be killed if they ac- 
tually went ahead and repatri- 
ated — they would be killed as 
being collaborators of the 
Rwandan Patriotic Front,” she 
told a news briefing in Geneva. 

“They asked us to call off the 
repatriation," she added. “They 
were told by the elders if they 
went ahead it would be consid- 
ered collaboration. Intimida- 
tion does still continue in the 
camps.” 

Many Hutu who fled abroad 
are terrified that the front, 
which won Rwanda's civil war, 
will wreak revenge for massa- 
cres of 500,000 Tutsi and mod- 
erate Hutu attributed to the de- 
feated Hutu administration. 

She said that between 2,000 
and 3,000 refugees appeared to 
be crossing daily into Bukavu, 
up from 300 during the week- 
end. 


Continued from Page I 
familiar with the matter. But 
Russia has yet offered no de- 
tails about the three German 
cases involving bomb-grade 
materials because it has yet to 
receive a detailed lab analysis, 
these people said. 

Meantime, German police 
and Western intelligence agen- 
cies are trying to trace the sup- 
ply networks of 10 suspects now 
imprisoned in Germany in the 
three cases, which are apparent- 
ly unrelated. 

They are also looking for any 
potential buyers of smuggled 
weapons-grade materials in the 
transactions. But German po- 
lice and government officials 
say that so far, they have no 
firm evidence that such bomb 
buyers — other than undercov- 
er officers in sting operations — 
ever existed. 

On the scientific side of the 
investigation, nuclear physicists 
are developing detailed atomic 
profiles of the plutonium and 
uranium seized, as wdl as pro- 
files of the other elements that 
were mixed into the three smug- 
gled batches. These scientific 
profiles are typically called 
“fingerprints” or “signatures” 
and can provide strong indica- 
tions as to where the batches of 
nuclear material originated. 

The most intensive lab inves- 
tigations in Karlsruhe this week 
sak to unravel the full profile 
of the 300 to 350 grams of plu- 
tonium-239 seized from the two 
Spaniards and one Colombian 
arrested in Munich. The trio 
traveled to Germany on a flight 
from Moscow. 

The Bavarian police an- 
nounced Monday that lab tests 
had shown the plutonium-239 
was enriched to 87.2 percent, 
somewhat less than normal for 
a plutonium- based bomb. Oth- 
er officials f amili ar with the 
work cite additional evidence 


overcome, said one official, ex- 
pressing relief at the discovery 
of the plutonium-240. 

Also, the batch is in powder 
form, not metal. This also sug- 
gests it came from reprocessing, 
not a warhead, because if the 
smugglers bad access to pluto- 
nium-239 in metal form, there 
would be little reason to grind it 
back into a powder. The metal 
form would be just as easy to 
smuggle and more valuable. 

Even stronger evidence of 
leaks from Russian military nu- 
clear facilities is available in an- 
other smuggling case, the first 
of the three recent seizures of 
highly enriched nuclear materi- 
als in Germany, officials in- 
volved said. 

That case began in May when 
German police investigating an 
alleged local counterfeiter and 
traveling salesman named 
Adolf JSkle seized a 62-gram 
batch of mixed nuclear and 
nonnuclear materials from Ms 
garage. 

Within the mixed batch sci- 
entists later found about six 
grams of virtually pure plutoni- 
um-239. 

The plutonium had an un- 
usual profile, however. The plu- 
tonium-239 isotope was present 
in 99.7 percent of the batch, a 
very Mgh degree of purity — 
higher than is typical in plutoni- 
um-based nuclear weapons. 
The rest was small amounts of 
four other plutonium isotopes 
— 238, 240, 241 and 242. 

— STEVE COIX 


BOMB: 

‘Nuclear Mafia ? 


Continued from Page 1 


suggesting that the sample 
unenotfre 


because of its proximity to the 
source of supply and the ready 
market. 


came not from a Russian nucle- 
ar warhead but from a plutoni- 
um reprocessing plant at a Rus- 
sian military nuclear complex. 

Besides the high amounts of 
plutonium-239, the Munich 
batch contains about 10 percent 
of plutonium-240, an isotope 
that prevents nuclear bombs 
from working properly, these 
officials said. Its presence in 
such large quantities suggests 
the plutonium came from a mil- 
itary reprocessing plant, not a 
warhead, they said. 

“I thought, ‘My God, it’s still 
a sizable amount of poison’” 
for any nuclear bomb maker to 


An undercover police agent 
interviewed but identified only 
as “Peter” by German televi- 
sion news said Tuesday, “There 
is a nuclear mafia which is now 
largely situated in the German- 
speaking area. This circle of 
people is ideally suited because 
it has maintained excellent con- 
tacts with the former Soviet 
Union.” 

The agent said that some of 
the materials were smuggled in 
by boat from the Baltic Sea. 

Russians have not been the 
middlemen in any of the deals 
disrupted by German authori- 
ties so far. 






PARIS 2nd 

PARIS 7* 


AUX LYONNAIS 

hadtaeA bL4o cooking in ou*«wic 1900 
decor Evcefletil wines 4 mineral waters. 
3?. rue 5(. More 1(M 1)42 9665 04. 

THOUMIEUX 

Specialities ol the South-West Ctmht de 
.canard & «mou kt ou con fir de canad Air 
COndMoned. Open everyday ur i? 

76 rue St-Oomnque. F**-' U) 47.05.49J5 
Nb» btrafcdes TemincI 



PARC 15th 


in jhe oxenina. Sporidiries red soman. 
dot. IO.,. je 3 , A3rfrTd-a7A264.«r 

LE WESTERN 

11» Reference laien 


PARIS Mi 

AimriGon & Te**fev s peoafcfi. 


NEW FURSTENBERG 

American ratanranl of 3ffs 

Tow. Guacunck, TCone, PJb. Lurch menu 
68 FF. 7 days end Iran 8 am to 2 

Pof»y Efxm Menu mxhng a 
choice of •Joncn end main couw 
with coffee and bownw 

FFT50 «Sdr"isl 

P*is Wkm 18. OV When. Td 4? 73 <72 00 


am. Foc>ng Si.-GeranairdetPres. 22, rw 
Gukume ApoSnait Tel: (1 1 42*6.00.88. 

IF PETTI ZINC 

Hm tanauc Rutaunrt 

Fating Wee 5sGennainde>ft6s Tnxfaad 

PARIS im 


CHEZ FRED 

OnecflfcobtoFtomsclfbm, . 


atone. Good vdue for mann. Mewwncd 
in evciy guide. It, rue SoinlBenoii. 
T.:426i J270.Openei«rjMJoyuii(J2am 

LE CLOS SA1NTE-MARIE 

and to flowered tamm, _ 


LEMUNKHE 

The Brasserie of d» 20?*. 
SpcdaWcs «tfs hra, 'choucane', seafood. 

on 0 pedestrian waft. Calm otoaspneie. 
TrodibW cuisine. WOT Etenk wid Ptvte 
Maillol. 1. place Charles Tel.. 

46.27 J3.37. 


Op» ctay day, m 2 a m 7. me SaW 
B«* WngS Gemrtivderfiei 

Td.-aioi 12 jo. 

VIENNA 


KEKVANSARAY l 

Turkish ft toll spdetas, laW ter. fe«J 
seafood restowotf. Mehfertt-P- 

Td : 5128843. « r oondtenei SOm. Opera. 
texp3 w ft 6 pJH.-lo*v, e«*p» Suntfay. 
Cjoen hcedoyv 


YUGARAJ 

Haled cb he bed h&n rnstotfoni in Franca 
by 4» leodmg nudes fair condtffcxwfl. 14, 
ruobajpJmtT.- 



v ‘" 


1 










Page 6 


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17, 1994 

OPINION 


Ucralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



tribune When the Rulers Go to War With Their Own People 


n m.LsiiH> vs mi run m« kirk timls \m» thk washiw:ti^ mkt 


Lilt the Bosnia Embargo 


Spurred by the Senate. President Bill 
Clinton has finally promised to promote 
the Bosnian policy he claims to have Fa- 
vored all along. He has set a late October 
deadline for the Bosnian Serbs to accept 
unconditionally the latest International 
peace plan. If they refuse, he says, he will 
ask the UN Security Council to lift the 
perverse arms embargo against the Bosni- 
an government. The embargo has unfair- 
ly frozen a huge imbalance in favor of the 
Bosnian Serbs. At the start of the war, 
Serbian forces seized heavy weapons 
from Lhe old Yugoslav army's Bosnian 
storage depots. Then they used those 
weapons to besiege refugee-crammed cit- 
ies like Sarajevo and Gorazde. 

Mr. Clinton set his deadline to discour- 
age senators from voting to lift the embar- 
go unilaterally. That could damage U.S. 
interests by tempting others to violate 
United Nations embargoes that Washing- 
ton supports, like those against Haiti, Iraq 


and Libya. Still a Senate majority last 
week approved an amendment to the de- 


fense appropriations bill that would lift 
the Bosnian embargo unilaterally by Nov. 
15. The effect is likely symbolic, since no 
such amendment was attached to the 
House version. But since a House majority 
previously voted to lift the embargo, the 
administration is now under pressure Lo 
get results in the Security Council. 

The issue should never have come to a 
Capitol Hill showdown. Lifting Lhe arms 
embargo is the policy President Clinton 


Be Wary of North Korea 


Negotiating nuclear policy with North 
Korea is a strange and eerie process. The 
United States and its friends are not en- 
tirely sure who is really in charge there, or 
what he for they) might really wanL Nu- 
clear energy is not suited to the economic 
needs of an extremely poor country, but 
the North Koreans are determined to have 
reactors for what they claim are peaceful 
purposes, and make dear that the only 
open question is which kind. The alterna- 
tive to these discussions is lo revert to the 
positions of last spring, in which the Unit- 
ed States fitfully threatened sanctions and 
North Korea fitfully threatened war. In 
these circumstances, the preliminary deal 
they have now struck represents at least 
movement in the right direction — al- 
though wall-to-wall caveats are required. 

The dangers are obvious. North Korea 
has promised not to produce more pluto- 
nium. from which it could make nuclear 
weapons — in addition to the one or two 
that the CIA thinks it may already possess. 
It also says it will ahandon two reactors, 
now under construction, that could pro- 
duce much more plutonium. In response. 
Washington has agreed to move toward 
normal diplomatic relations and to help 
North Korea build two big reactors of the 


type widely used in the advanced industri- 
al countries. The U.S. negotiators defend 


this concession by pointing out that these 
light-water reactors would produce less 
plutonium than the graphite reactors that 
the North Koreans are building They also 
argue that it would take nearly 10 yean to 
build the light-water reactors and that in 
that rima man y thing s can happen in 
North Korea. They are counting on a 
closer involvement with South Korea and 
Japan, which would apparently bear most 
of the heavy costs of these projects. 

It would be crucial to ensure that not 
only legally but physically North Korea 
could not break its commitments — that 
the new reactors would be built into a 
system that could not be severed along 
national boundaries. That needs to be a 
central purpose of these talks. 

One further objection is that the new 
reactors would constitute a multibillion- 
dollar bribe to desist from violating past 
promises. This unsettling truth cannot be 
wished or talked away. It is an unhappy 
circumstance that implies at least two im- 
peratives for Lhe American negotiators. 
One is that they find ways to ensure that 
they are not setting a precedent for Iran or 
Libya. The other is that they gel real, 
demonstrable and enforceable results for 
any such deal, which is to say that they 
make sure the outcome would be worth iu 
— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


The Nuclear Have-Nots 


What security assurances should the 
United States offer to countries like North 
Korea if they give up their efforts to ac- 
quire nuclear weapons? Win it refrain 
from using nuclear threats against them? 
Will it press the United Nations lo come to 
their aid if they are threatened by other 
nuclear powers? These questions need to 
be addressed in the Clinton administra- 
tion's review of nuclear policy now nearing 
completion. Finding the right answers 
could prove critical to current efforts by 
the administration to curb the spread of 
nuclear arms in Korea and elsewhere. 

It usually takes a serious security threat 
to prompt countries to develop nuclear 
anus. In most cases lo date, nuclear threats 
fed nuclear ambitions. Feeling menaced 
by a nuclear-armed rival set off chain 
reactions to acquire nuclear anus in the 
Soviet Union, Britain and France; and 
later in China, India and Pakistan. Slates 
like Argentina, Brazil and South Africa, 
which started down the nuclear path with- 
out feeling in nuclear peril subsequently 
gave up their nuclear ambitions. 

With that historical pattern in mind, 
efforts to curb the spread of nuclear arms 
need to satisfy the security concerns of 
their potential possessors. One way is to 
provide countries that renounce nuclear 
arms with adequate security assurances, 
like guaranteeing never to threaten them 
with nuclear weapons and pledging aid if 
others make such threats a gains t them. In 
recent years the United Slates has given 
Ukraine and Kazakhstan such assurances 
as part of deals to disarm. The issue of 
assurances has also arisen in negotiations 
to ban nuclear testing and is likely to come 
up next year when the Nuclear Nonprolif- 
eration Treaty is scheduled to be extended. 

That treaty itself contains no such assur- 
ances. Instead, after it was concluded in 
1968, the United Slates, Britain and the 
Soviet Union made identical declarations 


to seek “immediate" action by the UN 
Security Council to assist any state that 
signed the treaty if it were attacked or 
threatened by a nuclear power. 

But the United States refused to give up 
the option of threatening to use its nuclear 
arms, even against an adversary that was 
not nuclear-armed, until 1978. Only then 
did it renounce use of nuclear arms against 
states that signed the nonproliferation 
treaty or any other international accord 
not to acquire nuclear arms. But it made 
an exception for countries like Poland and 
India, which had nuclear-armed allies. 

That exception applied to North Korea 
as well. The United States could drop the 
exception in North Korea's case in return 
for a verifiable end to its nuclear program. 
That would reflect the reality that North 
Korea’s security pact with the former Sovi- 
et Union is dead and (hat it has no nuclear 
guarantee from China. Moreover, the 
United States and South Korea have am- 
ple conventional deterrent against the 
North. What sense does it make to threat- 
en a country with nuclear attack while 
trying to coax it out of nuclear arming? 

To induce stales to ban nuclear tests 
and extend the nonproliferation treaty, 
Washington might take a step toward no 
first use of nuclear arms. That is best not 
done as part of either treaty because it 
would delay their completion. But the 
United States could seek a joint declara- 
tion with Russia, China, Britain and 
France not to use or threaten to use 
nuclear arms against any state that is 
observing international treaties barring 
weapons of mass destruction. 

Given its superiority in conventional 
arms, the United States can afford to give 
up nuclear threats against non-nuclear 
slates. Preventing the spread of midear 
arms makes the United States more secure 
than retaining the threat to use them. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 



International Herald Tribune 

ESTABLISHED HW7 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Cn-CI\uirmen 

RICHARD McCLEAN. Puhli\hcr A Chief Lxi\uthv 
JOHN VINOCUR.fiwcwfiif ££jor A Vix President 

• Walter wells.*™ • samuel abt. kathhune KNORRwd 

CHARLES MmCHELMORE. Deputy Edit. m • CARL GEWIRTZ Asmote BEur 

• ROBERT ). DONAHUE, Erfm* i/rfr Etlitnnd Puyes •JONATHAN GAGE, Business and Finance Editor 

• RENE BONDY. Dijniiv PuNnher • JAMES MclEOO, Atbmiunfl Dirnw 
•JUANITA I. CASPAR!, hUtm ttunilDei t* tomnr* ROBERT FARRE, Ctmdiant Director. Europe 

Din , Inirdr hi PuNh. mum: RuhnrdD. Smtmrms 
Hmnettr Adjoint tlr I, t PiHieutuai: Kmhnrinr P Dum u- 


InusTuUiroJ HeiuklTnhmu. IKI AwsiUL , Oiarifr^<iiulic.V252I Neuilly-sur-Seine. Prance. 

Fax : Cnu. 46.171 165 1 ; Aih-.. 46 3752. 1 1 \tmxtO. IF-TTfeteurotomie 


hhhir fi r tv*» Mk faW Bh lumtv»L 5 Ltaerrhtn fit, Shtnuimrr l6l I. Td ft&l 472-77611 FdS |65j 274-1W 
Mi k I Hr Am M I). AwwfiiW. SKMmrwr At. Ht «s ton*. Td K52-V222-IHK file KSMG22/M 
t in .Vip urnuim: T fiWttv. Irtninhilr lx W2S tnmtjitn/H. Jti ffftW 72 67 55. Eitc lOWj 71 7} 10 
Pm.CS Mklk «■/ L'.nni Sfu ThMAie. Vin ML NY. Jf*C2. Td. CI2l ZH-.fiWft Fov 12121 TSSJTtt 
t h Af/tertnitiit i H fiw hint; .•!< re. LuUiitw IR2. T'l. tVTJl HJA-INNS. Act." {071} 240-22x4^ 

V..4. ,iii < iipthil di /JW.'W h HCS X, intern H 7 .121121126 Cummisiitin Puniairr No. hfSi 7 
• Ivtl farwn*kd Hmil 7W«* . Alht&B frwml ASK ICWJWC 


By David Keen 


says he prefers. But amid mumbling by the 
administration’s foreign policy team, Eu- 
ropean preferences for enforced partition 
schemes involving large numbers of out- 
side troops always carried the day. 

Last month tne United States, Russia, 
Germany, France and Britain drew up yet 
another partition map and warned both 
sides to accept it unconditionally or face 
concerted pressure. The Bosnian govern- 
ment accepted and i be Bosnian Serbs re- 
fused. The five were divided on what to do, 
and neither Mr. Clinton nor Secretary of 
State Warren Christopher pressed for ac- 
tion. Instead of lifting the embargo, the 
five wagged their fingers once more. 

Now, unless the Bosnian Serbs unex- 
pectedly accept the plan, the issue will 
move to the Security CounciL Britain and 
France will resist lifting the embargo. But, 
confronted with a strong administration 
position, backed by congressional threats 
of unilateral sanction-busting, they might 
go along. Russia will also resist But Mos- 
cow is now exasperated with the Bosnian 
Serbs’ duplicity and recalcitrance. It could 
agree to lift the embargo, especially if the 
Security Council could also grant sanction 
relief to Serbia — possible if Belgrade 
makes good on its recently announced 
cutoff of its Bosnian cousins. 

The Clinton a rt minis tration now has ev- 
ery reason to argue powerfully for lifting 
the arms embargo in the Security CounciL 
May it at last be up to the task. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


tastrophe, and evidence, if it 
was needed, that Africa has still 
not shaken the sickness of fam- 
ine and violence. The vast 
growth in spending on emer- 
gency relief has neither ad- 
dressed the causes of humanitar- 
ian disasters nor ensured effective 
aid for their victims. 

Probably nothing will change 
until the world acknowledges 
that famine and violence are 


typically manipulated by those 
who expect to benefit from them. 

The scandalous inaction of for- 
eign governments and the United 
Nations in Rwanda reflected a 
readiness to perceive the violence 
as "mindless," a product of "age- 
old tribal enmities.” Such preju- 
dice, combined with a focus on 
aiding refugees, has obscured the 
urgent need to constrain — and 
now to punish. — members of a 
governing Hutu clique who cyni- 
cally incited ethnic violence; 

Tne international inaction has 
disturbing precedents. Elsewhere 
in Africa, donor governments 
have neglected the functions of 
violence and of famine itself, al- 
lowing the un trammeled manipu- 
lation of hunger. While Tutsi 
have simply beat massacred, oth- 
er groups have been starved. As- 


saults on the food supply hove 
become a key military strategy in 
Africa’s civil wars. Governments 
have sought to deprive rebel 
movements of recruits, support 
and civilian "cover" by desooy- 
ing local economies and forcing 
the exodus of civilians. 

In northern Ethiopia, south- 
ern Sudan and north-central 
Mozambique, raids by govern- 
ment forces and associated mili- 
tias on food crops were supple- 
mented by restrictions on trade 
and relief shipments, forcing mi- 
gration from rebel areas. 

With governments and rebels 
competing for control of the 
people, the international agen- 
cies' habitual pleas that relief be 
"politically neutral” have re- 
peatedly fallen on deaf ears. 

During the Ethiopian famine 
in 1984 and 1985, the worst hit 
province, Tigre, with a third of 
the affected population, received 
only 5 percent of the relief food. 
It was no coincidence that Tigre 
was a rebel stronghold. 

In Sudan’s famine from 1986 
to 1988, the region that suffered 
most, Bahr al Gbazal (again, a 
rebel stronghold), received less 
than 2 percent of tie relief food. 

These distortions, partly attrib- 
utable to the government's in- 


timidation of aid agencies and 
dishonest assessments of need, 
continue. In 1994, relief has been 
stymied by government anny ad- 
vances, bombings of relief camps 
and bans on aid flights to camps 
□ear the Ugandan border. 

Famine is also a tool oTeco- : 
comic engineering. In Ethiopia, 
the government’s denial of relief 
to the needy was meant not only 
to quell the rebellion but also to 
force hundreds of thousands of. 
people to resettle farther south, 
where their labor was needed on 
state farms. In Sudan, depopu- 
lating the south has offered the 
prospect of access to oil there. 

So often associated with the 
desert, famine has also strode 
areas of rains and rivers, where 
there are resources to exploit In 
Somalia, the fertile region be- 
tween the Juba and ShebeUe riv- 
ers was raided by former Presi- 
dent Mohammed Sad Bane's 
troops as well as by competing 
dans. Tempted by the prospect 
of land grabs and political 
spoils, merchants fmanred raids 
and backed attacks on relief 
shipments, deepening famine 
and boosting their profits. 

The benefits of famine can 
also include access td diverted 
relief, a vital resource when 


much of the economy has been 
destroyed. In Somalia, extract- 
ing relief and “protection mon- 
ey* from aid agencies became 
big business. In Ethiopia, Su- 
dan and Mozambique, relief be- 
came a key source of foreign- 
currency to help finance war. 

While, relief organizations, 
gain, justifiable satisfaction, 
from nursing people back to 
health -in controlled environ- 
ments, they need to be aware of 
(heir-role in this wider manipu- 
lation of suffering* That means 
taking seriously a correspond- 
ing obligation . to speak out 
about abuses and provide aid in 
politically sensitive areas. 

Since private agencies often 
reasonably fear expulsion, the 
obligation of the Umted Nations 
and donor governments is par- 
ticularly great. Yet they have 
typically kept quiet about 
abuses on td media coverage has 
forced their hand. 

In Ethiopia and Sudan, do- 
nors and the United Nations 
were conspicuously silent. Dar- 
ing a peak- in Sudan’s 1987-88 
famine, they turned a blind eye 
to militia raids, slavery, relief 
diversion and use of relief trains 
for military goods. By letting the 
government hijack aid ship- 
ments, donors encouraged the 
rebel attacks on them. These at- 


tacks were then avd as “securi- 
ty obstacles" to aid to the soiuh. 

The proliferation of smlttias 
makes focusing aid. more diffi- 


cult and peace agreements more 
fragile. Yet with reduced super- 


fragile. Yet with reduced super- 
power support and increasing 

economic austerity, govern- 
ments under pressure may find 

the use of private militias to put 

down political discontent par- 
ticularly tempting. 

As sane elites turn to exploit- 
ing their own populations, it be- 
comes doubly important to re- 
duce the pressure of debt and 
austerity programs on African 
governments and to. address the 
poverty, uneven develop mem 
aiwt crumbling state , protection 
that create ready recruits for the 

resurgent ipniture- Channeling 

aid through local civilian institu- 
tions, as human rights organiza- 
tions like African Rights have 
urged, can nourish alternative 
sources of authority to lure peo- 
ple away from the warlords. 

But the find step is simply to 
rorr yg niTt* that some leaders are 
wining to use famine and vio- 
lence for their own cynical ends. 


The writer, a research officer 
at Oxford University, is author of 
“The Benefits of Famine." He 


“The Benefits of Famine.” He 
contributed this comment to The 
Hew York Tones. 


Human Rights Monitors Can Help Bring Peace to Rwanda 


G ENEVA — This Wednesday 1 leave 
for Kigali to ensure the speedy and 


VJ for Kigali to ensure the speedy and 
effective deployment, and fall opera- 
tional capability, of 26 human rights 
monitors and observers in Rwanda. The 
presence of this small but effective hu- 
man rights mechanism to investigate 
massacres that have already occurred, 
as well as reports of violations now, can 
provide the key to a prompt return of 
hundreds of thousands of refugees and 
displaced people to their homes. 

As France withdraws its troops from 
Rwanda, early deployment of human 
rights monitors and their action aimed at 
confidence bunding and reconciliation 
are urgently needed. 

This human rights effort follows the 
appointment of a special rapporteur by 
the Commission on Human Rights dur- 
ing its special session in April, and the 
creation, in July by the Security Council 
and Secretary- General Butros Butros 
Ghali of a Commission of Experts to 
examine grave breaches of international 
humanitarian law. 

At the behest of the members of the 
Commission on Human Rights, 1 set up 
a team of human rights field officers to 
work in close cooperation with the UN 
Assistance Mission for Rwanda and 


By Jose Ayala Lasso 


The writer is the United Nations high 
commissioner for human rights. 


other UN agencies and programs. 

The mission of the field officers is to 


assist the special rapporteur in carrying 
out his mandate to report on the human 
rights situation in Rwanda — taking into 
account root causes and responsibilities 
for human rights violations — and to 
systematically gather information on vio- 
lations of human rights and humanitar- 
ian law, and on such acts that may consti- 
tute war crimes and genocide: 

The field operation began its work in 
early June, when the first two human 
rights field officers were deployed. Three 
others are being dispatched in the next 
few days, and one more is expected to 
join them in the coming weeks. Together 
with the 20 human rights monitors sup- 
porting the Commission of Experts, a 
total of 26 human rights specialists will 
be fully deployed soon in Rwanda. 

In order to enhance the work of the 
Commission of Experts, which con- 
vened in Geneva on Monday for the 
first time, teams of two human rights 
monitors will be placed in each of the 10 
districts of Rwanda, supported by local 
staff. Their role will include: 

• Monitoring the return of refugees 
and displacedpersons. 


• Building relationships of trust so 
that reliable information is provided, 
thus countering the effects of inflamma- 
tory and racist propaganda. 

• Raising human rights awareness 
among the population and the local au- 
thorities. 

• Assisting in the process of discov- 
ering, recording and investigating mas- 
sacres that may have taken place. ' 

• Facilitating political dialogue and 
local-level conflict resolution. 

The human rights monitors will close- 
ly coordinate their activities with those 
already being earned out by the UN 
High Comissioner for Refugees, the UN 
Assistance Mission in Rwanda and oth- 
er UN agencies, as well, as nongovern- 
mental agencies in Rwanda. They will 
also facilitate the humanitarian effort 
by nongovernmental organizations. - 

The investigative work of the moni- 
tors will involve mostly collecting, in 
conditions of absolute confidentiality, 
witnesses* accounts and other evidence 
of human rights violations. 

The resulting dossiers are to be pre- 
pared in such a way that they could be 
used for prosecutions by an internation- 
al tribunal or by national courts. 

There cannot be peace in Rwanda 
without reconciliation, and there wflt 
not be reconciliation without establish 


ing the facts and circumstances of the 
recent massacres and identifying and 
prosecuting those responsible. 

Indeed, an international tribunal act- 
ing speedily and prosecuting those indi- 
viduals identified by the Commission of 
Experts on the basis of the information 
gathered by thehsman rights monitors, 
may avert tbefear of reprisals and focus 
die energies of everyvaean che overrid- 
ing interest of- reconstruction and na- 
tional solidarity. . 

The funds made available through the 
regular budget to the high oosnntissioiier 
for human rights are not s u f fi cient to 
support the expanded fidfd operation in 
Rwanda. That is why I appealed on Aug. 
2 fm: S2. 1 culikm over an nntiaLpenod of 
six months to establish ajoetwork of 
monitors and provide appropriate coor- 
dination <£ human rigpis activities in 
Rwanda, as well as the related logistical 
and communication eq ui pme n t, ffhe ap- 
peal was part of a consolidated UN ap- 


peal for more thaa-J5430 million for 
Rwanda.) As of today, less than half 
that amount fcasrbeextptcdged. 

Wc arc struggling to find the neces- 
sary equipment and vehicles for - the 
monilora to work in the field. Is not $2. 1 


nullian worth the human rights contri- 

hufimt th (mmk 


burton to peace in Rwanda? 

Internetihndt fia^Tyibi^ - 


The Galilean New World Offers an 




W ASHINGTON —The world 
is gripped by opposing 
forces: a revolution that dethrones 
the United States as the center of 
the international system, and a re- 
version toward ancient prejudices. 
The revolution presents an oppor- 
tunity for global peace that must 
be seized quickly if the reversion 
is to be baited. 

The Cold War forced peoples 
to stop in their tracks and await 
the results of a contest beyond 
their control With the victory of 
the West, they are now free to join 
the march of time. But in too 
much of the world, new freedom 
is being wasted in the settlement 
of old scores. In the Balkans, the 


By Peter F. Krogh 


Caucasus, Kashmir and other 
places the dock is being turned 
back as tribes revisit ancient pre- 
u dices. The death toll mounts. 

Meanwhile, an earthshaking 
revolution has occurred that 
will, sooner rather than later, 
hold the entire world in its sway. 

The implications of that revo- 
lution, which is driven by the 
collapse of communism and the 
dissolution of the world’s largest 
and potentially richest country, 
have not been fully grasped. 

It helps to compare this 
change to the Galilean discover- 
ies demonstrating that the earth 


was not the center of the cosmos. 
The cosmos, according to Gali- 
leo. had no center. That discovery 
required a fundamental reorien- 
tation of humankind’s relation- 
ship to this planet and precipi- 
tated wholesale challenges to 
traditional authority. 

That is what is happening to- 
day in the international system. 

In the Gold War period, the 
United States was the center of 
the system. Most of the world 
rotated around il either in opposi- 
tion to Soviet expanrion or in 
acceptance of the political eco- 
nomic and moral strength of the 


Don 9 t Be Calm About the Holocaust 


United States. This latter choice 
was simplified, even compelled, 
by the macabre, alternative of 
godless communism. 

Now that communism is no 
longer the alternative, the rest of 
the world need not rotate around 
the United States. There are a 
number of possible centers, with 
their different belief systeins, dif- 
ferent conceptions . <rf bow hu- 
mans rdate to thc universe 1 — 
different religions, cultures, civili- 
zations, norms of personal behav- 
ior and familial loyalty: 

- Gaifleo’s revolutionary vision, 
applied to contemporary affairs, 
opens up a new world of global 
relationships, including those 
based upon greater tolerance and 
acceptance of the ' accumulated 
knowledge Of various cultures. 
The concomitant counterrevolu- 
tion, hauling the world bade to- 


based on collaborative undertak- 
ings and guarantees. - 

Such institutions include glob- 
al and regional trading regimes, 
security regimes and regimes for 
protecting human rights and the 
earth’s environment. 

New market economies must be 
rapidly incotporated into the liber- 
al trading partnerships of the 
West; struggling new democracies 
must be brought into regional se- 
curity arrangements; a flat-out 
effort must he made to strengthen 
the United Nations — including 
the establishment and empower- 
ment of a rapid-deployment 
peacemaking and peacekeeping 
trace, trained as a multinational 


By Robert B. Goldmann 


B REMEN — “There is 
something at issue here 


XJ something at issue here 
that is so painful even now 
that, as we can see, it is not 
possible to consider it calmly.” 
The “something” is the Holo- 
caust. The comment is from an 
editorial in one of Germany’s 
most distinguished newspapers. 

The German media, along 
with those of other countries, 
have made much of the com- 
ments of a judge in Mannheim 
who showed understanding for 
a neo-Nazi who denies the Ho- 
locaust The man not only be- 
lieves that the mass murder of 6 
milli on Jews was a technical im- 
possibility, be goes on to blame 
tiie Jews for insisting, 50 years 
later, that it happened. 

The judge died, with apparent 
agreement, the neo-Nazi’s anger 
at Jews who “use the Holocaust" 
to make financial political and 
moral claims on Germany. In 
short the Holocaust did not take 
place, and because it did not 
what are these Jews ddng press- 
ing Germans to admit it and 
even to pay them something? 

The judge, explaining a lenient 
sentence for a man convicted of 
incitement to racial hatred by 
publicly denying the Holocaust 
deemed him to have a strong 
character, to be a good family 
man, and to hold his Holocaust- 
denying convictions so deeply 
that it is a matter of the heart 
The editorial writer asks: isn’t 
it unfortunate that we can’t dis- 
cuss this subject calmly? 

No, it’s not There are sub- 
jects that not only cannot but 
□ever should be discussed calm- 


ly, and among them, perhaps 
first and foremost in this centu- 


ry, is the Holocaust For the 
Holocaust was such madness, 
such an unprecedented crime 
that shame, fury, horror and 
other emotions that are the op- 
posite of calm are the only pos- 
sible response of decent people. 

And that is how the main- 
stream of German public opin- 
ion has reacted. Had it not the 
German people’s continuing ef- 
forts to grapple with the enor- 
mity of what Hitler did in their 
parents* and grandparents’ name 
would be badly set back. 

The saving grace of what hap- 
pened in that Mannheim court 
on Aug. 9 is that 50 years after- 
ward Jews get a response from 
the leaders and tne opinion 
makers of Germany that shouts 
“No!” The reaction of disbelief 
and disgust crossed party and 
all other kinds of lines. 

The most hurtful thing about 
that judge’s reasoning in grant- 
ing leniency is that he never 
seemed to understand the spe- 
cial quality of the crime he was 
dealing with. The man who 
stood before him was not anoth- 
er rapist, burglar, even murder- 
er, requiring the court to look 
into background, previous be- 
havior, reputation in the com 1 
m unity. The convicted man in 
this case was someone who, in ' 
denying the attempted extermi- 
nation of a people, had commit- 
ted treason against his people, 
against die moral framework 
that holds our societies togeth- 
er, against humanity itself. 

To show sympathy toward 
this man. or lo suggest that peo- 
ple ought to discuss the case 
calmly, is to misread bistopL 
And in doing so, it is to cruelly 


interfere with the difficult, pain- 
ful effort of teachers, preachers 
and parents to remember, to 
honor the memory of the 6 mil- 
lion, to inculcate not guilt but 
responsibility — the responsi- 
bility to face the horror that was 
committed, and to thus learn 
from it the lessons, that help 
make sure that it will never hap- 
pen again to any people. 

Today and for years to come, 
Germans are involved in this 
process. A good citizen owes it 
to his fellow citizens not to dis- 
rupt this process. The real and 
meaningful “matter of the 
heart" is drawing the lessons 
from the ashes — not asserting 
that there were no ashes. - 
But there is something else, 
less spectacular than deniaL It is 
boredom, mixed with annoy-' 
ance at the “constant talk about 
Auschwitz," as a Goman was 
overheard to say a few days ago. ' 
Such folks need to think some 
more. There is nothing to be 
bored about when one people 
decides to annihilate another 
just because the victims are 
what they are — Jews or Mus- 
lims or Hutu or Tutsi Next 
time, my bored or annoyed 
friend, it might be you, and 
there would be absolutely noth- 
ing boring about thaL 
Boredom, calm, understand- 
ing are not fra the Holocaust 
Deep anger, disgust and rejec- 
tion are what it generates among 
decent people. It does so today, 
half a century later, and it still 
will balf a century from now. 

- Tbe point - is not to satisfy 
Jewish insistence, nor to expiate 
guilt two or three generations 
later, but to serve one’s very 
own interest and the world's. 
International Herald Tribune. 


ward* oTdprqudices, works in op- 
position to this possibiHtY. 


position to this possibility. 

That countenevohition can be 
effectivdy resisted and reversed by 
acting creatively and magnam- 

sented by tbs Gali^aC r^roluOoa 
The opportunity must be seized 
with the vigor and generous com- 
mitment that distinguished Ameri- 
can leadership after World War If. 

The times demand, however, a 
different brand of American lead- 
ership, one that heeds Pierre Teil- 
hard de Chardin’s admonition to 
“lay _ aside the ancient prejudices 
and bufld the earth." Ibis cannot 
be done by fiat or by unilateral 
action. It .can be done only by 
strengthening and widening in- 
ternational institutions that are 


Equally important will be glob- 
al educational initiatives of suffi- 
cient magnitude to overcome ig- 
norance and intolerance. Such 
initiatives should be based rat 
strategic - alliances between the 
most enlightened, h umanis tic de- 
ments and institutions in the 
world, collaborating to harness 
new information technologies to 
the requirements of intercultural 
education. The objective will be to 
replace ignorance with knowledge. 

For Americans, this effort 
should begin at home. Informed 
and generous American leader- 
ship of the Galilean revolution in 
world affairs will be indispens- 
able to its success. 


The writer is dean of the Walsh 
School of Foreign Service, at 
Georgetown University. He con- 
tributed this comment to the Inter- 
national Herald Tribune. 


EN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1894; Suffrage Denied 


NEW YORK — The New York 
State Constitutional Convention 
has rejected a proposed amend- 
ment providing for female suf- 
frage. A very vigorous campaign 
was mged by the women of New 
York in favor of striking the wend 
“male” from the State Constitu- 
tion, so that all. women should be 
allowed to vote and enjoy ail the 
privileges panted by the Constitu- 
tion to citizens of the other sex. 
Petitions were circulated through, 
out the Stale and received 2723), 
signatures from 162,156 men and 
1 10,074 women of all classes. 


the asking. The deleterious effects 
of alcohol on sodety form the 
object of a letter by the jurymen 
of tiie Assises of the Seine De- 
partment to the Minister erf Jus- 
tice- These jurors say that out of 
the seventeen cases inscribed on 
the docket for the second half of 
July, fourteen were heard, and in 
ten of them alcohol was the ini- 
tial if not the only, c a u s e of the 
crimes that were judged. 


J 


k j* r 


.V. 's 

* t 


1944; 


1919: Evils of the Botde 


PARIS — There is little or no 
ooal in France. Sugar is compara- 
tively rare; tobacco likewise, but 
there is alcohol Drinks have gone 
up in price like many other 
things, but they may be had for 


WASHINGTON — [From, oar 
New York edition:] An indirect 
a dm ission that Germany now re- 
alizes it has lost the war, coupled 
with an appeal for mild peace 
f® 008 * was transmitted tonight 
IAub. 16] by the Goman radio, 
waaungton observers interpret- 
ed :tbe broadcast as-the start of a 
pace offensive as a result of the 
mihtary reverses the Nazis are 
suffering on all fronts. 



f&p 




Page 7 


V£tf! 3 : , -. . . . , 



■ik 


lie 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17, 1994 


opinion 


®si$sw oo ^’ 




viKLl&attN 
&er^QMe 
WSTfNCE 
0EMSHMC 
ifolUiS 
GMi' 


The dintonites’ Behavior Isn’t Funny 


TT7ASHJNGTON — Meg Green- 
YV field, editorial page editor at 
The Washington. Post, writes cm the 
Whitewater affair: “There is a sense 
in which this is an administration of 
dodgem-ear drivers, merrily bump- 
ing into each other as they swirl 
around the ring on what look to be 
their own individually plotted 
courses — until someone gets hurt." 

It is an apt image that takes into 
its embrace not only a crowd of 
feckless Clintonians but: 

• The federal judiciary, which has 
demonstrated that a Socrates does 
not necessarily lurk behind eveay 
black robe. In an act worthy of the 
Marx brothers, a three-judge panel 
announces that in order to restore 
public faith in the “nonpartisan” 
investigation of Whitewater, h has 


For all the crudities and 
black humor of these 
hearings, they have raised 
public consciousness about 
government institutions 
and the significance of the 
Whitewater affair. 


replaced Special Counsel Robert 
Fiske. a political nobody, with Ken- 
neth Starr, an ardent Republican. 
He was George Bush's solicitor gen- 
eral, is eager to see Dan Qaayle in 
the White House and has sided with 
Paula Jones in her court claim that 
President Bill Clinton is not immune 
from her sexual harassment lawsuit. 

The paneTs presiding judge, David 
SenteOe, was appointed to the federal 
appeals court in Washington by Ron- 
ald Reagan at the strong urging of 
Judge Sen tell c's chum. Republican 
Senator Jesse Helms of North Caroli- 
na. Once on the court. Judge Sentdle 
wrote the majority opinion overturn- 
ing the conviction for Iran-contra 
crimes of Oliver Noth, who is now 
the Republican candidate for the 
Senate in Virginia. Their choice of 
Judge Starr, the judges said, was dic- 
tated by the importance of the “ap- 
pearance of independence.” 

• Thai was, no doubt, the rationale 
of the Resolution Trust Corp. _ when it 
approved another highly partisan Re- 
publican, Jay Stephens, as special 
counsel in RTCs civil suit 8gainst 
Madison Guaranty Savings & Loan. 


. By Richard Harwood 

the collapsed Arkansas thrift whose 
owner, James McDougal, was a part- 
ner of the Clintons in the Whitewater 
real estate venture. Before taking the 
job, Mr. Stephens, an embittered for- 
mer federal prosecutor in the District 
of Columbia, was considered a po- 
tential candidate for the Republican 
Party’s senatorial nomination in Vir- 
ginia. He was summarily fired from 
his prosecutor’s job when Mr. Clin- 
ton entered the White House. 

• Congress, of course, has been 
addicted to farce from its first session 
in 1789, when it locked the doors to 
conduct its business in secret. Its rep- 
utation as a theater of the absurd has 
been much enhanced by its 
Whitewater hearings. 

The House investigative commit- 
tee is commanded by Henry Gonza- 
lez, whose gavel is in the service of the 
White House; pounding down any 
committee member with the temerity 
to ask a pertinent question. He has 
a firm ally in Representative Maxine 
Waters, a gqntidady from California, 
whose profound and memorable con- 
tribution to the inquiry was a primal 
scream aimed at a colleague on the 
committee: “Shut up!” 

There is perhaps less farce but 
neater irony in the Senate, where 
the Banking Committee chairman. 
Don Riegle, presides over the 
Whitewater matter, which grew out 
of Madison Guarantee's collapse. 
He has competence in that area, 
having escaped the censure of the 
Senate as one of the “Keating 5” 
senators who went to hat before fed- 
eral regulators for Charles Keating. - 
Mr. Keating ran Lincoln Savings & 
Loan in California, which collapsed 
at a $2 billion cost to taxpayers. 

The senior Republican on the 
committee, Alfonse D’ Amato of 
New York, has been particularly 
censorious of the ethical behavior of 
Whitewater witnesses who have 
come before him. He has expertise 
m that area, having beat the subject 
in 1991 of a Senate Ethics Commit- 
tee investigation into the strange 
case of his brother, Armand. The 
senator allowed his brother to use 
one of his Senate offices to conduct 
certain business affairs. Armand 
D’Amato's chief business was lob- 
bying for defense contractors. His 
work has been suspended since his 
federal conviction last year for mail 
fraud. The central charge was that 
a defense contractor (Unisys) paid 
him $120,000 to provide access to 
his brother, the senator. Armand 


Letters intended for publication 
should be addressed ", Letters to the 
Editor" and contain the writer's sig- 
nature. name and full address. Let- 
ters should be brief and are stifea to 
editing We cannot be responsible for 
the rettan of unsolicited manuscripts. 


Think About It: Killer Comets Are Out There 


D’Amato is now in a federal penal 
institution. The senator got a nonfa- 
tal rebuke from the Ethics Commit- 
tee and now lectures on morality. 

For all the crudities, ironies and 
blade humor of these hearings, they 
have raised the public’s conscious- 
ness about government institutions 
.and about the significance of the 
Whitewater affair. Despite vast me- 
dia coverage, most people have not 
understood what Whitewater is all 
about We are now beginning to real- 
ize that some of the dong s it is about 
are character, truth and lies, disloyal- 
ties and saving your own skin. 

The behavior of the Clintonites 
ranght up in this affair has been 
disillusioning, to say the least, a reali- 
ty we in the newspaper business have 
not succeeded in conveying as dearly 
as events in the hearing rooms. These 
young people had come to Washing- 
ton as members of the New Meritoc- 
racy, the “best and the brightest,” 
educated in the finest schools, recipi- 
ents of Rhodes scholarships and fel- 
lowships galore. They were latter-day 
Keanedyites who, sadly, have shown 
more panic than grace under pres- 
sure. They have lied to or about one 
another — even in their diaries if 
their testimony is to believed. 

The “laxness” of officials from 
Treasury and the White House in 
engaging in “indiscreet” and "inap- 
propriate” consultations on 
Whitewater was dismissed by the 
White House counsel, Lloyd Cutler, 
as of no more significance than vio- 
lating the House Banking Commit- 
tee rule forbidding “food or drink in 
this committee room.” He also said 
“these contacts had no impact on 
the real world.” In other words, it 
was a kind of dodgem-car game. 

In the past, critics of the media 
including myself, have written that 
the Whitewater coverage some- 
times has been excessive, misguid- 
ed or unfounded. The hearings 
have opened our eyes. They have 
revealed things about the character 
and fiber of important people in 
the Clinton administration, they 
have instructed us in the real mean- 
ings of “partisanship” and doubt- 
less have exacerbated the public's 
cynicism about the political class. 

The Washington Post. 


At 0946 GMT on the morning of 
11 September, in the exceptionally 
beautiful summer of the year 2077, 
most of the inhabitants of Europe 
saw a dazzling fireball appear in the 
eastern sky. ... 

Moving at 50 kilometers a second, 
a thousand tons of rock and metal 
impacted on the plains of northern 
Italy, destroying in a few flaming mo- 
ments the labor of centuries. 

The cities of Padua and Verona 
were wiped from the face of the 
Earth; and the last glories of Venice 
sank forever beneath the sea as the 
waters of the Adriatic came thunder- 
ing landward after the hammer blow 
from space. . . . 

After the initial shock, mankind re- 
acted with a determination and a unity 
that no earlier age could have shown. 
Such a disaster, it was realized, might 
not occur again for a thousand years — 
but it might occur tomorrow.' ...So 
began Project Spaceguard. 

— “Rendezvous with Rama,” 1973 

C OLOMBO — Soon after the last 
fragments of the comet Shoe- 
maker-Levy 9 crashed into Jupiter 
last month, the monsoon skies above 
my home in Colombo cleared mo- 
mentarily and I hurried to set up my 
14-inch Celestron telescope. 

I didn't really expect to see any- 
thing, so 1 could hardly believe my 
eyes when I dearly observed a line of 
dark braises spread out across the 
planet's southern hemisphere. 

Some im agin ative souls suggested 
that the comet might have a cata- 
strophic impact on Jupiter, but its 
effect will be largely cosmetic. And it 
will certainly have no effect on Earth, 
despite the inevitable alarmist warn- 
ings by religious fanatics. 

But the spectacular collision be- 
tween the newly discovered comet 
with the solar system’s largest plan- 
et has brought sudden new atten- 
tion to a genuine threat: the chance 
that a rogue comet or asteroid 


By Arthur C. Clarke 

could strike Earth, with possibly 
devastating consequences. 

As a result, the fictional '‘Project 
Spaceguard” I described in my 
1973 novel will now begin in reality 
if Congress approves an amend- 
ment to the 1994 NASA authoriza- 
tion bill requesting the space agen- 
cy to identify and catalogue within 
10 years “the orbital characteristics 
of all comets and asteroids gre3ier 
than one kilometer in diameter in 
orbit around the Sun that cross the 
orbit of the Earth.” 

Though this amendment was 
prompted by the Shoemaker-Levy 

MEANWHILE 

comet, it is really the result of an 
“International Near-Earth-Object 
Detection Workshop” organized by 
the National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration in 1992. With a nod 
to “Rendezvous with Rama," the 
official report of this workshop was 
entitled the Spaceguard Survey. 

I wonder what Thomas Jefferson 
would have thought of these develop- 
ments, in view of his famous remark 
on hearing of a meteorite landing in 
New England: “I'd rather believe 
that two Yankee professors lied than 
that stones fell from the sky.” 

Certainly no one could have 
imagined how quickly and how dra- 
matically a cosmic event so appar- 
ently removed from everyday affairs 
would become prime-time news. 

In view of the number of collisions 
in this century alone — most notably, 
a comet or asteroid that exploded to 
1908 in Siberia with the force of 20 
hydrogen bombs — there is a very 
good case for a global survey of the 
possible danger, particularly as the 
shared cost among nations would be 
negligible compared with most na- 
tional defense budgets. 


(Historians might also be advised 
to undertake some surveying. Just as 
the numerous meteor-impact craters 
on Earth were never found until we 
started looking for them, so there 
may have been disasters in history 
that have been misinterpreted. Sod- 
om and Gomorrah have a good 
claim to be meteorite casualties. 
How many others are there?) 

Many people would probably pre- 
fer not to know of impending cosmic 
doom, if nothing could be done to 
avert iL Yet given sufficient warning 
time — which we hope Spaceguard 
would provide — we should be able 
to develop the technology necessary 
to ward off, or even destroy, such 
intruders from outer space. 

There are at least three ways in 
which oncoming asteroids, or their 
coraetary cousins, might be de- 
flected. The first is the brute force 
approach: nuke the beast. A suffi- 
ciently large bomb — probably in 
the gigaton class, or the equivalent 
of about a billion tons of high ex- 
plosive — could split an intruder 
into many fragments. 

This would not necessarily be 
a good thing, because some of the 
pieces might still be heading straight 
toward us. The atmosphere, however, 
would burn up most of the smaller 
fragments, and at least instead of 
massive devastation in one area there 
might be minima) damage spread 
over numerous sites. Needless to say, 
such a preemptive strike is advocated 
by enthusiastic and currently under- 
employed bomb designers. 

Perhaps a better solution is one 
I adopted in another novel, “The 
Hammer of God,” in which a poten- 
tial killer asteroid is detected a year 
before it will collide with Earth, giv- 
ing astronauts barely enough time to 
make a rendezvous and deflect it into 
a harmless orbit by mounting rocket 
thrusters on its surface. 

Given enough warning time — at 
least several years — this could be 


done with very modest amounts of 
power. An initial deflection of only a 
few centimeters, at the beginning of a 
multimillion-kilometer journey, 
could ensure that the asteroid steered 
well clear of us. 

Although the orbit of a solid body 
like an asteroid can be calculated 
centuries in advance (once the object 
has been discovered) the rocket- 
thruster solution might not work so 
well with comets. These flying ice- 
bergs warm up as they approach the 
sun and begin to vent gas. The result- 
ing “jet propulsion” makes their fu- 
ture position uncertain, so if we ever 
have to deflect an oncoming comet, 
we would have to allow 
a very significant safety margin. 

An even more elegant solution has 
been proposed by scientists at NASA 
and elsewhere: “solar sailing.” The 
plan would be to attach 
a huge lightweight mirror of metal 
foil to the comet or asteroid, captur- 
ing the minute but continuous pres- 
sure exerted by sunlight. Unfortu- 
nately, the acceleration produced by 
this feeble pressure would be so mini- 
mal that years, even decades, of 
warning time might be required. 

All these solutions would require a 
vast investment in new technology. 
But people who say “Why waste 
money on space?” should remember 
tiie dinosaurs, whose extinction it is 
now widely believed was caused — or 
at least accelerated — by the impact 
of a giant meteorite around 65 mil- 
lion years ago. 

And NASA's increased commit- 
ment to identifying threatening 
bodies in space could have another 
benefit: It could give new inspira- 
tion to America's flagging space 
program, and restore some of the 
lost magic of the Age of Apollo. 

The writer, author of “2001: A 
Space Odyssey . " invented the com- 
munications satellite. He contributea 
this essay to The New York Times. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Seoul and the Radicals 

Regarding the editorial “Abuse in 
South Korea" (Opinion, Aug 10): 

Recognizing that South Korea 
has moved to full democracy, the 
editorial criticized, nonetheless, the 
methods by which South Korea 
counters student radicals and labor 
militants, and uiged the U.S. gov- 
ernment to speak ouL 

There are two separate but related 
series of incidents involved in what 
the editorial called “suppressing 
speech and locking people up for 
their unpopular opinions,” one deal- 
ing with labor unrest, the other with 
student radicals. 

Formerly, there was a wide mix- 
ture of elements engaged in the stu- 
dent and labor movements. Once 
democratization was achieved, those 
remaining in the movements became 
a radicalized minority. Since the in- 
ception of the civilian government 
in 1993, the authorities have been 
lenient, sometimes to such an extent 
as to tolerate even their nonsubver- 
sive illegal activities. 

South Korean labor militants typi- 
cally lake over their workplace dur- 
ing strikes. This is unlawful in South 
Korea, and the police have acted to 
remove strikers. Most South Koreans 
have hailed the measures taken by the 
government as being like those taken 
By President Ronald Reagan in deal- 
ing with U.S. air controllers and by 
Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher 
with militant, striking miners. 

The editorial correctly pouted out 


the notoriety of the radical students. 
They deny the legitimacy and even 
the existence not only of the govern- 
ment but of the country itself. They 
express their views viclenty. The po- 
lice raid on university campuses, re- 
flecting the public mood, was pre- 
ventive — with warrants to search 
out and capture those outlaws and 
their unlawful arms. 

Furthermore, the student radicals 
proved to be not just “fellow travel- 
ers” but obedient to the directives of 
the Communist Party of North Ko- 
rea, an enemy technically at war 
with South Korea. This is surely a 
matter of life and death for the more 
than 44 million South Koreans and 
the entire Korean people. 

If one argues that the word 
“open" in connection with the South 
Korean government has been quali- 
fied, I would agree. It is the same in 
any democracy: qualification is jus- 
tifiable for such reasons as national 
security and social justice. 

With a bellicose regime 20 miles 
from its capital, what county could 
tolerate those who, in cooperation 
with the belligerent enemy, deny the 
legitimacy of a popularly elected 
government and of the country it- 
self? That is why the civilian govern- 
ment decided to maintain the Na- 
tional Security Law in a revised 
form: no democratic government 
can responsibly permit collabora- 
tion with the regime of an implaca- 
ble. undemocratic enemy. 

PARK JIN HO. 

Singapore. 


Harmful Expression 

Regarding “Imperiled Bangladeshi 
A uthor Escapes to Sweden ” lA ug. II) 
and “Judge's ‘Slap in the Face' for 
Holocaust Victims” (Aug. JJ): 

You repon that the Swedish minis- 
ter of culture defends Taslima Nas- 
rin's “natural rights to say and write 
whatever she wants.” Vet on the 
same page we read of the (entirely 
justified) international furor and an- 
ger caused by the case of Gunter A. 
Dicken. who made a speech casting 
doubt on the Holocaust. Will the 
Swedish minister now rush to defend 
Mr. Dickert's “natural rights” to say 
whatever he wants, or is there some 
kind of double standard at work? 

The truth is that there is no such 
thing as absolute freedom of expres- 
sion. It all depends on the context 
and on the content of what is said or 
written. In this respect. Taslima 
Nasrin’s writings fall much more 
closely into the category of “harmful 
speech” than is recognized. 

O. R. JAIGIRDAR. 

Paris. 

The lesson of the Taslima Nasrin 
affair is that the spread of religious 
fundamentalism of any kind jeop- 
ardizes human dignity and creates 
panic in society. 

MIR MONAZ HAQUE 
Berlin. 

We must allow all members of the 
international community the same 
right of expression, and” hold all to 


the same level of accountability for 
their actions. Sadly, today the inter- 
national community is more dis- 
posed to action against words and 
mere words against actions, as Bos- 
nia and Rwanda attest. 

RANDAL W. TAJER. 

Paris. 

Take a Dekko at This Chit 

Regarding ““ Benefits of Borrow- 
ing Le Bon Mot ” (Features. July 25): 

The writer asserts that Indians 
“torment the English language” 
even more than Americans do. The 
ludicrous but undeniable reality of 
the matter is that English, as spoken 
in rich, influential, while-majority 
countries such as the United States. 
Britain. Australia and New Zealand, 
is fashionable and more widely ac- 
cepted largely because of the clout 
that these countries enjoy in all 
spheres. In other words, if we Indi- 
ans were rich, we'd be “in." 

Language is everyone's prerogative 
and develops differently across the 
world. And “prepone” is not the only 
word Indian English has given to 
other anglophones. For linguistic 
pundits, here is my advice: The next 
rime you put your jodhpurs on to go 
for a chukker. stop off to muneb a 
chutney sandwich, take a good dekko 
at this chit and ponder over whether 
we Indians are pariahs. If you can't 
figure it out, blame it on bad karma 
PA DMA RAO. 

New Delhi. 





\ 




ZTT Sheraton. When you're away from home, there's no better place to settle in for the night. We 
have everything business travelers need including ITT Sheraton Club International, which helps you 
earn free travel around the world. We also offer AfiSff service to help you get home. With XESff, you 
can call the U.S. and over 75 different countries around the world. So you can leave a message at the 

STAYING IS A PLEASURE. 

SO IS GETTING HOME. 

office. Call a friend in France. Or say goodnight to some pretty special people back home. With such 
fine service and more than 400 hotels and resorts worldwide, naturally, staying at ITT Sheraron is a 
pleasure. For reservations, call your travel professional or ITT Sheraton. 


*rcrfgMTftggr Servicr fa avagaMc from all the countries lislcxl bduw. jg3g"Wprid Coonoct™ Service b, available from and to ihc oxuntraot Ifcqi-U in Niltl 


'Austria— (I22-V03.0H 

■ Belgium O HOti-1 00*10 

Bulgaria (»- 1800 -0010 

•r.vpn» - .080-90010 

Czech Republic ...ntM2i>-uoiot 

’Egypt ioiho sio-oiixi 

'Egypt Uhtfi“*C*lml..n2-SltMCfl0 


France 

Germany.. 

• Greece 

■ Hungary ... 

Israel 

Kenya 5 

Lithuania'. 


19*0011 

U150-UOW 

00-800-1311 

-.177-100-2727 

.(SKno-w 

JU1«)6 


* Netherlands 0h-u22-<JI 1 1 

MaodJ** ' CUOlU-lSO-U) } 1 

Portugal .OW17-I-2H8 

Romania ni-MXJ.-tS* 

* Russia 1 ufcaaxul lVi-5tH2 

'Hirfeey. G0-»XM2JT 

United Kingdom (flun-W-iUI I 


■ phi •xv rv\p ,rv o Mi . » cjnl 

* * |Jo( OKHMUil 1 1 fn*t) nifY UvM' hr«i V 

* vasii Miml iful Kmc. 

. Max nu tvnuJbMc htmi nm 
•: : PiMl- plurrx rcniwv kvul nan [Ui iiutm 
llin mvh itx- cil iWaiii ai 

• Ni« bxbSiMw (nail pufifc. ph <V- 


To reach AGEE ifcrf the acccm Niumher nf the cutmuy youhr calling from. For a cumptew fca «»f AT&T Acccv. Number*, call I KW» 351-1 1 ill. «u. "ir. 





Sheraton 











International Herald Tribune 
Wednesday , August 17. 1994 
Page 8 


STAGE /ENTERTAINMENT 


4 



. sumr.- 


A scene from Dario Fo's production of “ LTtaliana in A l gen” at Pesaro. 


By Ken Shulman 

P ESARO, Italy — This city on the 
Adriatic, birthplace of Gioacchino 
Rossini and custodian of his musi- 
cal legacy, can afford the artistic 
license of entrusting “LTtaliana in Algeri," 
the opening production of this year’s festi- 
val, to an audacious and irreverent man of 
the theater, Dario Fo. 

“We are not the cathedral of Rossini." 
says Gianfranco M ariotii, the Pesaro phy- 
sician who founded the Rossini Opera Fes- 
tival and is still its superintendant. “If 
anything, we are an arena for debate and 
experimentation. There are many ways to 
interpret his music, and Dario Fo’s is one 
of them.** 

Conceived in 1969, after Mariotti was 


“thunderstruck** by La Scaia’s productions 
of “II Barbiere di Siviglia” and “La Cener- 
entola,” conducted by Claudio Abbado, 
the Rossini Opera Festival was bom only 
in 1980. For its first decade, the festival's 
primary function was putting on stage the 
recovery and restoration work of the Ros- 
sini Foundation and its ongoing critical 
edition of the operas. 

Beginning with “La Gazza Ladra." the 
opera that in 18 1 8 inaugurated what is now 
Pesaro’ s Tealro Rossini, many long dor- 
mant Rossini operas have been brought 
back to life and the festival has become 
headquarters for the interpretation and 
performance of his music. 

“Rossini composed 40 operas in his 
life," says Marioui. “But 1 5 years ago, only 
three or four of them were known. The 


music of Verdi, for example, has always 
been performed. There is a long tradition 
behind iu and a gradual, constant evolu- 
tion. The music of Rossini was buried 
beneath a layer of ashes, like the frescoes 
of Pompeii.” 

Having exhumed the bulk of Rossini’s 
music and set a standard for its interpreta- 
tion, the Rossini Opera Festival can now 
throw off the role of archaeologist. Mar- 
iotti and his colleagues now attempt to 
make Rossini consonant with a contempo- 
rary public. Enter Dario Fo, one of the 
pillars of Italian contemporary theater, to 
stage “LTtaliana.” 

“I have no experience with traditional 
lyric theater, and even less patience with 
melodrama,” says Fo, whose only previous 
experience with opera was also with Rossi- 
ni, his 1 993 staging of “11 Barbiere” seen in 
Amsterdam and Paris. 

“The characters in Verdi’s operas re- 
mind me of marionettes. Nobody changes. 
Instead, in Rossini, there is irony, sarcasm, 
cyndsm. And there is action, action that at 
times takes precedence over the music. It’s 
all in the score. Anybody with a little ear 
will realize that Rossini wrote his music to 
support the action on stage, and not to 
dominate it.” 

It would be hard for any music to domi- 
nate the teeming spectacle of Fo’s “L’lta- 
liana.” Pulling every theatrical trick out of 
his fertile mind, Fo has peopled the stage 
with troupes of acrobats, jugglers, cyclists, 
strippers, and at one point with the Italian 
nauonal soccer team. One gels the feeling 
that he would like to have Jennifer Lar- 
roore — the excellent Isabella, the I talian 
girl in Algiers — turn a cartwheel or two 
between arias. Instead, the dozens of danc- 
ers and extras leap and tumble for the 
protagonists, miming, illustrating, and 
sometimes mocking their words and mu- 
sic. In many ways, Fo's Rossini is more 
carnival thgn opera. 

“My idea was to restore the comic struc- 
tures that were gradually removed from 
Rossini over the years,” explains Fo, who 
spent six months designing the sets, props 
and costumes for the Pesaro show/The 
original program for ‘LTtaliana in Algeri’ 
lists eight dancers, 10 comic dancers, along 
with clowns, mimes and acrobats. My in- 
terpretation is merely an unpacking of all 
the unnecessary baggage that this opera 
has accumulated, and is based on thorough 
research. If Rossini didn't mean for it to be 
funny, why did he call it a comic opera?” 

Enthusiastically received by the sellout 
opening-night audience of 950 at the Tea- 
tro Rossini, Fo's staging got a more tepid 
response from some critics, some com- 
plaining that the explosive theatrics had 
drowned out the music. 

The festival which runs through Aug. 
29, includes stagings of the operas “Semir- 
amide” (with Cecilia Gasdia in the title 
role) and “LTnganno Felice," and perfor- 
mances of the Stabat Mater, along with 
orchestral and chamber concerts, seminars 
and workshops. 

Ken Shulman is an American writer based 
in Italy. 


THE LIBERATION OF PARIS 


HrraUlcgfifc»iErtbimr 'S3' 

American Orelr Hoi* in SnA itta it Sdnr; 
Irearb Troo^ Storm Ionian. Flciil inClj; 
M omp Bi im T Sav»'Eod of W«r L» in Sptf 



.is.;. Kna lQgjj££»£r1 bunt L ££ T 
Aioeriw W Ea'iUnaiai hjoHUcOfll 
Urhe .\nrlb na Wue to Trap Nm*> .tan: 
Ireat l i Troop- V'ilh'D 3 Mifc> of MaraOr 






]Hrialft«j££Sto-3rifaiinc ‘SK? 

RmmAiJna*-AnM>TiinM«n*/Ki<riTTn3tK 
IMCl .\Jnnrli < rruip.Siil be 
UarMpfllruidl^rrBoMrKdLWJRiKlH'inm, 



AUGUST 22-27 
19 4 4 

Following the success of 
the Normandy landings in 
early June 1944, Allied 
troops continued fighting 
throughout the summer 
across the north of France, 
finally reaching the 
outskirts of Paris. 

In the last days of 
August, as the Allies 
approached the city, the 
unarmed population of 
Paris - reinforced by a 
small number of armed 
resistance fighters - nose 
against the occupying 
German forces. In four 
days of street battles and 
general insurrection, 
Paris was liberated. 

To commemorate these 
dramatic days, we will 
reproduce the six front 
pages from the New York 
Herald Tribune chronicl- 
ing the week of August 
22 through 27. 

Events covered in that 
same extraordinary week 
include the liberation of 
Marseille, Grenoble, Le 
Havre and Rouen, plus 
an exclusive report 
following the liberation of 
Florence. You’ll follow the 
reports day-by-day from 
the Herald Tribune’s 
award-winning team of 
war correspondents. 


>tccaU<d^fear(tnmr l 5s £• 

Frtsrti W BrprtJ ia flmrt uflVtV: 
Gap Qa<n)! nTSrir, Mari rf For 0*1: 

AmcrtnoTnap, Rrportrd atSwvw Baarirr 



^ HrcaUi jjtbnnt >££• 
American* Circle ftn* ia SoalibtiT Seine; 
fimrfa Troup. Stonn Talon. Fipbl in Gty. 



Eliza’s Songs, a Voice 



By William Grimes 

Hew York Times Sentce 

N EW YORK— “My Fair Lady,” 
a confection of a Him, had a 
touch of bitterness to the taste 
when it was made in 1964. Julie 
Andrews created the role of Eliza Doolittle 
on Broadway, but the film role went to 
Audrey Hepburn. Hepburn, who had war- 
bled sweetly in “Breakfast at Tiffany’s,” 
expected to sing her way through the great 
Lemer and Loewe songs, but her voice was 
dubbed. 

Andrews got her own back when she won 
the Oscar for best actress for “Mary Pop* 
pins” that year. And now Hepburn wiQ get a 
utile justice as wefl. In tie course of restor- 
ing “My Fair Lady,” two 51m conservators 
have discovered some of the vocal tracks she 
recorded in pre-production and, using a 
little sleight of hand, have rescued two of 
the recordings from oblivion, “Wouldn’t It 
Be Loverly” and “Show Me.” 

And when the fully restored 51m is 
shown for the first time at a benefit at the 
Ziegfeld Theatre in New York on Sept. 19, 
the Hepburn version of "Wouldn’t It Be 
Loverly” will play as the final credits roll 
The Hepburn tracks resurfaced during a 
one-year, $750,000 frame-by-frame resto- 
ration of the film by James C. Katz and 
Robert A. Harris, who restored “Sparta- 
cus” three years ago. The restoration was 
commissioned by CBS, which financed the 
Broadway m usical and gained possession 
of the film materials in 1971 from Warner 
Brothers. Warner had bought the film 
rights for $5 milli on in 1964, a staggering 
sum at the time. 

CBS plans to rerelease the film in select- 
ed markets and produce 30th anniversary 
laser-disk and videotape versions that in- 
clude some of the archival material that 
Katz and Harris have unearthed. 

The first public screening in the U. S. is 
Sept 21. 

The film, a smash hit in 1964, has had a 
tough existence over the last 30 years. In 
January, when Katz went out to the CBS 
vaults in Van Nuys, California, he found 
that most of the material Warner Brothers 
turned over to CBS had been thrown away. 


LONDON THEATER 


. *£,>, -j 



M\ <\ Hi '. ': 



. . He AitocttBd m 

Audrey Hepburn in ‘Fair Lady. " 

What remained, several thousand cans 
of film in 10 rooms, did not look promis- 
ing. For (me thing, most of the cans lay in 
piles on the floor, having beta dislodged 
by the big quake of Jan. 17. Katz had to 
crowbar Ms way into the vaults. 

So many duplicate prints had been made 
from the original negative that it began 
falling apart as soon as it was removed 
from the can. 


‘Sisters Rosensweig’ Falls Flat 


By Sheridan Morley 

International Herald Tribune 

L ONDON — Wendy Wasser- 
stein's “The Sisters Rosensweig” 
is that amazing and considerable 
rarity, a new play still on Broad- 
way after more than two years. It is also 
now at the Greenwich in a new production' 
by F -Jehad . Blakemore with an .all-local 
cast who, although in my view all of them 
vastly superior to the American originals, 
still manage to point up the failings of the 
drama while celebrating its commercial 
viability. 

To put it crudely, this is Chekhov for the 
matinee matrons. Three sisters, all Ameri- 
can. gather in London to celebrate a family 
birthday and check on each other’s profes- 
sional marital medical and sexual for- 
tunes. There's the responsible one who’s 
gone into banking (Janet Suzman), the 
daffy one who has become a minor radio 
agony aunt (Maureen Lip man) and the 
ambitious one wbo had to forsake report- 
ing for travel journalism when the troubles 
got too close (Lynda Bellingham). All are 
| delineated with all the care of a writer who 
knows precisely when to simply tug the 
I heartstrings and when to start tying them 
in little knots. 

All of them have secret agonies. They 
may not want, like their all-too-apparcnt 
Chekhovian models, to get to Moscow but 
they would like to get some men. One of 
them is twice-divorced already, another 
has a husband who has forsaken her for 
Raymond Chandler fantasies, and the 


third falls in love with homosexuals or at 
least with one curiously obnoxious gay 
British stage director. 

It is not that Wasscrstein’s characters 
are unreal or that her London setting is in 
any way implausible. If anything, we have 
too much here of the real thing . Conversa- 
tions that can be heard at most upmarket 
West London dinner parties are pursued to 
their relentlessly banal conclusions. Sure, 
this is a conversation piece, but a play 
needs to be about something more than 
two hours. In this case I have a terrible . 
feeling that what we are meant to be 
watching is bonding, a process whereby 
the sisters at last crane to know; each other. 
But watching people bond is rather like 
watching paint dry. It takes a while, and at 
the end all that has happened is what you 
thought was probably going to happen in 
the first place. 

What we have is also relentlessly fed- 
good. Characters raise issues of the mo- 
ment from famine to AIDS, rather in the 
manner of New York waiters listing from 
memory their dishes of the day. Nothing 
really ever gets resolved. Only Lipman’s 
relentless vaudeville keeps the show on the 
road, balanced precariously even then over . 
a swamp of sisterly sentimentality. 

Wasserstein has written three great roles 
for women in midlife crisis. Given that 
there are still few such roles around, her 
play has been rightly welcomed by Equity 
members on both sides of the Atlantic. But 
she has not written much of a play toframe 
them in. Hot asters periodically beg each 
other not to turn them into cliches or 


drama-queens, but as they have precious ■ 
little else to be on stage, the danger is; 
always there: 

The trouble with most anthology shows; 
is tint they are nearly always celebrations; 
of somebody who has just been celebrated 
somewhere dsc: All credit therefore to' 
Alan Strachan the deviser, and Wendy- 
Toye the director, for taking the King's 
Head back to Flanders, and Swann. “Un- 
der Their Hats** is a joyous tribute, and the' 
first ever, to one of the most remarkable of! 
a& postwar showbiz pbeaomena. 

Michael Flanders was a bearded, ami-! 
. able giant of a man who had wanted to be; 
an actor but was condemned by polio to a| 
wheelchair; Donald Swann, who only died- 
a few months ago, was a sometimes inita-' 
ble, piano-playing pixie with a Messianic- 
dctermmatKm to spread the gospel To-; 
gether for only 10 years from 1956, they, 
formed a stage double-act that survived* 
marathon inns in the West End and, morel 
surprisingly , on Broadway . 

In fact, Hce all great Englishmen, they; 
behaved as if they were foreign observers, 
of a green and pleasant land going grayer 
by the hour. Their songs (Flanders wordsj 
Swann music) were almost never sung by 
others for they were unique, rueful la-’ 
meats. “Greensleeves” wonderfully ex- 
plains how the royalties still go to royalty.; 

. The “Gnu” and “Hippo” songs may be 
familiar, but the best of Flanders and! 
Swarm fits in their musical speeches about- 
a vanishing world; for the King’s Head,; 
Moray Watson and Suzie Blake lead a cast! 
of piano-playing eccentrics in fine form. ' 


Don’t miss the International Herald Tribune’s 
special commemorative series starting Monday, August 22nd. 


IINTKRJYVnONAL 


BOOKS 


LAST GO ROUND 

By Ken Kesey with Ken Babbs. 
238 pages. 821.95. Viking. 

Reviewed by 
David Nicholson 

T HE events in Ken Kesey’s 
new book actually hap- 
pened. Wefl, sort of, which is 
why “Last Go Round” is fiction 
and not history. As he writes in 
the acknowledgments, apolo- 
gizing to the citizens of Pendle- 
ton, Oregon, where the book is 
set: “If we offend the facts with 
our tall tale, pray accept our 
contrition and our excuse: A 
short little stub of a tale just 
would not serve.” 

Readers looking for the epic 
sweep of Kesey’s “Sometimes a 
Great Notion” or the mordant 
humor of “One Flew Over the 
Cuckoo's Nest” won’t find it 
here. What they will find is 
something of a period piece, 
part “real dime western,” as the 
title of one chapter has it, part 
minstrel show, filled with cour- 
teous cowboys, silent Indians 
and a black wrangler as tough 
■as Nat Love or Bill Pickett It’s 
a surprisingly good read 
The story takes place over 
several days in 1911. Jonathan 
Lee Spain of Tennessee, 
“scarcely seventeen, bright- 
eyed as a babe, and nearly as 
naive,” is riding in a railroad 
stock car with his horse. His 
provisions finished except for 
the last of the yams given him 
by a great-aunt weeks before, 
Spain is on his way to the Pen- 
dleton Round Up. 

“I was gonna rove north, I 
vowed, and keep on a-roving till 
I reached whatever real frontier 


was still left in our swiftly set- 
tling naripn. ” 

Soon Spain acquires two 
companions. One is an “Indian, 
thin and straight, wearing a 
flat-brim hat and a thin-lipped 
scowl” the other a “black-man 
with a grin as merry as his part- 
ner’s was somber.” The Indian 
is Jackson Sundown. The black 
man is George Fletcher, and the 
two are en route to Pendleton to 
compete in the Round Up. Fust 
prize for the cowboy champion 
is a hand-tooled saddle with 
“polished turquoise- and-stlver 
inlay . . . [that] cost more 
than three hundred dollars.” 
Young Jonathan Lee Spain bets 
a hundred dollars on himself to 
win, even before he enters the 
rodeo. 

Over the next few days Spun 


BEST SELLERS 


Tbe Ne*T«t Toes 

Tins Kst is based oo reports from mar ihan 
U00 boofcstcre ihrongbooi tbe United Sun. 
Weeks oo fin me tux necessariJy comeauhr. 

FICTION 

Ttk Lm Wafa 

WMk HI m Lfe» 

1 THE GIFT, by Danielle Stcci I 3 

2 THE CHAMBER, by John 

Grisham 2 10 

3 THE CELESTTNE PROPHE- 
CY. by taws Redfidd 3 24 

4 THE BRIDGES OF MADI- 
SON COUNTY, by Robot . . 

lames Waller 4 105 

5 POLITICALLY CORRECT 
BEDTIME STORIES, by 

James Finn Gamer 6. 4. 

■ 6 EVERYTHING TO GAIN. 

by Barbara Taylor Bradford . 6 4 

7 THE ALIENIST, by Gik*> 

Carr — 7 IK 

S THE CROSSING, by Comae 
McCarthy ID S 

9 DISNEY'S THE LION 
KJNG. adapted by Don Fer- 
guson 8 2 

!0 UNDUE INFLUENCE, by 
Sieve Martini 9 3 


tells us what happened, and 
which of the three cowboys won 
die saddle. There are plenty of 
rodeoing details. Mostly, 
though, Spain has adventures. 

There’s also a subplot involv- 
ing Buffalo Bill Cody and 
Frank.. Gotch, a murderous 
wrestler offering a thousand 
dollars to anyone who can stay 
in the ring with him for 10 min- 
utes. *■ 

In between there’s the rodeo, 
where Spain amasses enough 
pants to seriously challenge 
Fletcher and Sundown for the 
title. . 

As a further bonus, there are 
two sections of photographs 
from the Pendleton Round up. 

A reviewer inclined to quib- 
ble-might ask whether Fletcher 


1 11 REMEMBER ME, by Man 

FEsjflsCtark _ 12 16 

12 pLSYme for the 

ASHES, by Efizabcib Gconc II 3 

13 INCA GOLD, by C Set 

Ogder ~ 14 J4 

14 THEUAY AFTER TOMOR- 
ROW, by Alla n Fobam — . 12 

15 THE WATERWORKS, by E. 

L. Doctorow 13 7 

NONFICTION 

- 1 EMBRACED • BY THE 
LIGHT, by Beay J. Eadie wife 
Curtb Trite — 1 66 

2 THE AGENDA, by Bob 

Woodward 2 8 

3 THE BOOK OF VIRTUES. 

- by WflEam 1 Be nnett 4 34 

4 MIDNIGHT IN THE GAR- 
DEN OF GOOD AND EVIL. 

by Join Berendt : , „ J 23 

5 MOON SHOT, by Alan Sbep- 

aid and DcfceShyton with Jay 
Baxbicemd How ard Benedict 3 5 

6 MOTHERLESS- DAUGH- 
TERS, by H ope E ddman 7-3 

7 SAVED BY THE LIGHT, by 
Damson Brinkley with Paul 

Perry — 6 17 


isn’t something of a caricature 
as Kesey and co-author Ken; 
Babbs depict him, alternating 
between servility and arro- 
gance. Such a reviewer might 
ask w hether Kesey and Babbs 
weren’t courting disaster by in-! 
eluding the photographs. There 
are; times, with the movie$ 
"Tombstone” and “Geronimo” 
as evidence, when the real story 
is more exciting than the made-! 
up one. 

. No matter. “Last Go Round’ 1 
is great fun. And, like a tall tale 
told round a campfire, it sticks 
to the imagination long after 
the reader’s done. 

David Nicholson reviews book 
ngularfy for The Washington 
Post. 


ssoul mates, by nomas 

Moore 12 31 

9 LIFE OF THE PARTY, by 

“attjs3£g5= .! 1 

"law; \ 

12 K WOT 

MAKING THIS UP. by Dave ^ , 

14 7 : 

■"SSttSfh !: 

Baabcth Marshall T han,* 0 * j. 

15 2SL A ^ m * ** Rnthfc 

'^MISCELLANEOUS 
1 mtchen wrra 

, IT . 
I ;; 



“The negative was scratched, the splices f 

were faffing apart, and there were nous- 
able mainnties!” said Haris, who worked 

on the restoration of Abd Gance’s Napo- 

Iton” and David Leans “Lawrence of 

Arabia." , .. . . . 

The three coter-separatwns, which had 
to be recombined for the foB-color version - 

of the film, wmescriou^ydef ecu ve,m part £ 

because Warner Brothers had for some r 
reason, begun running off duplicates be- 
fore it made tbe separations. 

Mostof the Iabd& on the cans hadfafien 
off , so their contents were a_ mystery. To 
make matters worse, as Katz inspected the 
trove, the vaults were rocked by two 
mighty aftershocks, and film cans went 
flying When the dust settled, . Katz re- 
moved “My Fair Lady” to afilm lab, and 
he and Harris embarked on the arduous; 
process of sorting through (he ca ns , cor- 
recting color, fixing ripped dm and filling 

■f5ey also interviewed members of the- 
original production to obtain tec hni c al in-; 
formation, notably from Gene Allen, set. 
designer, and John Burnett, an assistant; 
film editor. 

Film restoration poses a touchy diplo-- ✓- 
an tic problem. In the past, the studios; r* 
discarded vast quantities of material that 
has turned out to be valuable, either finan- ; 
dally or historically. In many cases, the; 
material has found ns way into the collec- 
tors’ immli “The studios regard these peo- 
ple as thieves,” Katz said. . 

Katz and Harris’s company, Film Pre- ; f 
serve, can walk the shaky line between the ; 
two hostile parties, plumbing the studio ■ 
archives ana library collections with one ; 
hand and reaching out to the underground . 
network of collectors with the other. 

It was a collector who came up with the ; 
Hepburn songs, which no one knew mast- 
ed. “We found umpteenth-generation ; 
tracks of Audrey doing the worst takes 
possible, almost like & blooper red,” Har- • 
ris said. By picking out the best bits of the ; 
outtakes, the two men were able to pro- 
duce two complete songs. 

The rmtored film wiu retain the tinging. 

Y$ood in “West*S5de Slory”and Deborah ; 

Kerr in “The King and L” 


fPlS 


■ill 




tiS£ 













? d 


it 




International Herald Tribune, Wednesday, August J 7, 1994 


v-w^aV" : 


S» 

Page 9 



THE TRIB INDEX: 115 . 57 ® 

International HerakJ Tribune World Stock Index ©, composed of 
Z80 internationally inva stable stocks from 25 countries, compiled 
by Bloomberg Business News. Jan. 1. 1992= 100. 

120 — 






m 

H Asiar'Pacifk: 


Europe 


Affmx.weishSn^3S% 

Close: 132-00 Prav.; 13229 

150 ■ 

s 

Approx wBi^stag: 37% . 
CiOSC 1 1 5.47 FiBV- 115^2 

SI 






H 

I-- - <r^r. 

m 


A 

1994 

HBHH 


HNortri America 


Latin America 


Approx, waiting: 26% 

Oose 95X17 Ptbvj 94.35 

150 

M 

Appox.migUbiy.5% 
Qose: 137.43 PlW: 136.14 




w 



1 



M A M J. • J 

A* 

M A M J 

J A 


Worftftndn 


IBM 


1994 


The index tacks US. dator values of stocks Ik Tokyo, Nw York; London, and 
AigonfEna, At m raBa. Auatrte, Belgium, Bmfl, Canada, Chflo, DaomarV, FMand, 
Franca, Gannanjr. Hong Kong, kaifr, Mexico, NoGMrisnda, Nm Zaaiand, Norway, 
SJngapor*, Spain, Sw ede n, O wtoorte nd and VanazoaiK. For Tokyo, Naur York and 
London. ff» index Is composed of the SO top Issues In forma td markot eapHaBalkn 
erfterwise the ten lop stocks ere tracked 


1 Industrial Sectors 1 


ire. Pm. & 

don don dunj> 


. Tm. 

don 

ftWRi 

dost 

■tad 

Eirngr 

112.70- 113.16 4X41 

CapM Goods 

117J7 

117J62 

-04M 

unite 

127^5 127.11 +0.35 

RntetorMs . 

. 132£8 

132-39 

4022 

Rmnce 

117.13 W2Q -0-06 

Coosuawr Goods 

102.75 

102.10 

40.64 

SqtWcm 

120.66: 120.52 -tO.12 

. MscabaoDOB . 

131-51 

131.63 

-0.09 

for morelnlofToaBcin&ovttfm MBx,aboatdellsava>abiBfrBBof(d^Tge. . 

Write to Tdb Max, 1B1 AntmChufas t/a GauBe, 92521 NeuBy Codex. Franca. 


Cancer 
Scare Hits 
Schering 

Firm Is Asked 
To Retest 2 Drugs 


© International HemH Tribune 


BERLIN — Schering AG's 
stock price fell Tuesday after 
German health authorities asked 
the pha rmaceu tical giant to per- 
form new tests cm two erf its best- 
sdling drugs because of suspi- 
cions they may cause cancer. 

The two drugs are marketed 
throughout Europe under the 
names Androcur and Diane 35. 

Diane, which traditionally has 
been used as a contraceptive pill 
but lately is increasingly used for 
the treatment of acne, has bean 
on the market since 1980. An- 
drocur, which is used in the 
treatment of prostate cancer, has 
been sold since 1970. 

A Schering spokesman said 
the company had no plans to 
withdraw the drags from the 
market. 

Schering’s stock ended at 
915.00 Deutsche marks ($572) 
Tuesday, down from 957.50 
DM. 

Both drugs contain a sub- 
stance called cypoteron-ace- 
tate, which according to a 
spokeswoman at the Federal 
Institute for Medication and 
Medical Products may alter the 
DNA Structure Of mammals . 
She said scientists had done 
test-tube experiments on the 
side effects of the active sub- 
stance on human liver cells. 

Earlier tests on rodents bad 
aroused suspicions about a pos- 
sible carcinogenic effect mom 
cyproteron-acetate, she said. 

But Ralf Harenberg, the 
Schering spokesman, said the 
company's view was that “you 
can't make any connection to 
humans from those tests.” 

He said Schering sold about 
400 miBioD DM of the drags 
annually, about 15 percent of 
last year’s total sales. 

( Reuters, Bloomberg) 


The Treadmill Speeds Up 

U.S. Enters Era of Three-Job Household 


By Louis Uchitelle 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — When Robin Thornburg 
lost hex job as a $25,000-a-year paralegal, she 
was scared. 

Her husband, David, an office clerk, made 
barely enough to cover the groceries and the 
rent on their $700-a-month apartment in Ar- 
lington, Virginia. So she is trying to make up 
the lost income by working two jobs — as a 
full-time cleric fox a loan company and a part- 
time bookkeeper for a company that rents out 
bodyguards. 

“It kind of stinks, the two of us having so 
many jobs,” said Mrs. Thornburg, who at age 
24 matches her former pay of $600 a week, 
but works 55 hours to earn it. “You argue 
about money and about hours, and on top of 
everything, we are both trying to get through 
college. We go different ways too much.” 

The Thornburgs are not alone. If the 1970s 
and 1 980s saw women entering the American 
labor force in huge numbers, giving rise lo the 
two-earner family, the current decade often 
sees one of these earners taking on a second 
job, giving rise to the three-job marriage. 

Labor Department surveys of multiple job- 
holders, which this year for the first time are 
being compiled every month, give statistical 
underpinning to a trend that had been dis- 
cernible largely through anecdote. 

Today, 7 million Americans, or 6 percent of 
the work force, have 15 million jobs. Most 


multiple jobholders are married, and nearly 
as many are women as men. 

No other country approaches the United 
States in multiple jobholders. 

Before this year, the Labor Department’s 
Bureau of Labor Statistics had counted multi- 
ple jobholders only periodically, with the last 
survey in 1991 and the previous one in 1989. 

Until the 1980s, those soundings showed, 
most dual jobholders were men with full-time 
employment who moonlighted part rinse 
Now almost as many women are dual job- 
holders. They, too, usually combine full-time 
and part-time work, the new monthly surveys 
show, although women are more likely than 
men to hold two part-time jobs. 

Some of the three-job couples go this route 
because one spouse wants to break into a new 
line of work that is more satisfying or better- 
paying. But the biggest portion, more than 40 
percent, take the extra work top ay bills, these 
and other Labor Department surveys show. 

Wage stagnation has played a big role in 
pushing married people into so much work, 
economists say. For three decades after 
World War II, incomes mostly rose, but in the 
early 1970s, the progress stopped. Since then 
80 percent of UJS. households have failed to 
gain ground. 

For many people, their latest “raise” had to 
come from taking an extra job. Labor Secre- 
tary Robert B. Reich said he had seen the 
phenomenon frequently. “It is symptomatic 
of the erosion of relatively well-paying em- 
ployment," he said 


American Home 
Causes No Stir 
At Cyanamid 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — American 
Home Products Corp.’s sweet- 
ened SlOO-a-share offer for 
American Cyanaraid Co. 
prompted a jump in Cyan amid 
shares Tuesday, but not enough 
to indicate a competing bidder 
was on the horizon. 

Cyanamid rose $2,875 in New 
York Stock Exchange trading, 
but its price of S93.75 remained 
below American Home’s earlier 
$95-a -share offer. 

The stock price indicated in- 
vestors did not believe another 
company would be able to beat 
out American Home for control 
of Cyanamid, said analyst Jack 
Lamberton of NatWest Securi- 
ties in New York. 

American Home gave Cy ana- 
mid only until the close of busi- 
ness Tuesday to decide whether 
to take the new offer, a move 
that analysts said was designed 
to wrap up a deal quickly and 
close out other suitors. 

If the Cyanamid board, 
which was holding a regular 
meeting Tuesday, gave no an- 


China Now Calls Giordano 'Model’ Fin 


Bloomberg Business News 

BEIJING — The Chinese 
appears to have given the Hong 


its stamp of approval, six days after the 
company's outspoken chairman, Jimmy 


Lai, agreed to resigi^fram his post. 

edition of the 
ly, the moutb- 


An article in the Tuesday o 
Economic Information Daily, 


piece of China's cabinet, the State Council, 
praised what it called the “Giordano mod- 
el” of retailing for the benefits h had 
brought to the southern city of Guangzhou. 

Last week, Beijing's Industry and Com- 
merce Department closed Giordano's 
month-old outlet in the capital, alleging it 
had not been not properly registered. 
Hong Kong analysts interpreted tbs move 


as retaliation for Mr. Lai's criticism of the 
government. 

In a June edition of Mr. LaTs Next maga- 
zine, published in Hong Kong, Mr. Lai 
attacked Chinese Premier Li Peng for his 
role in ordering ranks to crush pro-democ- 
racy protests in Beijing in 1989. 

Two days after China closed the store, 
Mr. Lai resigned as chairman, a move that 
seems to have appeased Beijing. But Gior- 
dano is still considering how to handle Mr. 
Lai's 36 percent stake in the company. 

According to the paper, Giordano 
whipped up a “whirlwind” in the retail 
sector after it opened its first Guangzhou 
outlet at the end of 1992 in a joint venture 
with two Chinese partners. 

The paper said Giordano had become a 


model for cooperation between Chinese 
and foreign partners. 

Giordano says it plans to open 20 to 25 
stores in China soon. 

“The Giordano model already has had 
its positive effects as a way of cooperation 
to mutual benefits," Cai Hanhua. deputy 
director of the business division of 
Guangzhou Bureau of Commerce, told the 
newspaper. Giordano had also taught oth- 
er businesses in the city about modern 
management systems, open floor shop- 
ping, computerized sales and good service, 
he said. 

Other “lessons" of the Giordano model 
include store sales, uniformed assistants 
and well-laid out stores that created a 
comfortable shopping environment. 


swer, the offer was to revert to 
the 595-a-share bid of Aug. 2. 

Nearly two hours after the 
stock market closed, no re- 
sponse from Cyanamid had 
been reported. 

American Home's new offer 
is equivalent to $9 billion, based 
on Cyanamid's number of 
shares outstanding, up from the 
previous offer of $8.5 billion. 

Wall Street had been rife with 
rumors that another company 
would come in to top the $95 
offer for the drug and chemical 
manufacturer that has become 
the target in the biggest takeover 
attempt in the drag business. 

David Saks, a drug industry 
analyst with Gruntal & Co. in 
New York, said American 
Home’s offer was simply “icing 
on the cake" to try to persuade 
Cyanamid to accept quickly, 
“when you want to acquire a 
house mat’s not for sale, you 
have to offer a price that makes 
it acceptable for sale, and that’s 
never cheap,” he said 

Before American Home’s 
first bid, Cyanamid reportedly 
was considering an asset swap 
with the British dnigmaker 
SmithKline Beecham PLC. The 
swap would have handed over 
Cyanamid's prescription-drug 
and consumer-brand businesses 
for SmithKline's vaccine and 
animal-health businesses. 

American Home, a leading 
maker of pharmaceuticals and 
food, has said a combined com- 
pany would be better able to 
compete in the health-care in- 
dustry. Profits at drug, medical- 
equipment and hospital compa- 
nies have fallen in recent years, 
mostly because of pressure to 
curb prices. 

Last week, American Home 
took its original $95 offer di- 
rectly to Cyanamid sharehold- 
ers when it began a tender offer. 

Cyanamid urged its share- 
holders against immediately ac- 
cepting the tender offer and 
asked them to wait until they 
heard from the board. 



. ; Its tui'rftt " H ■ 'E fl*» : 



By Daniel TUles 

Special to Ac Herald Tribune 

N J-W YORK --Tilings are not 
so tough these days for lowly 
Brand X. Major brands of an 
makes, shapes and sizes that 
have spent years and billions of dollars 
building long-term consumer loyally by 
asserting their superior qualities are 
watching their franchises diminish in 
many parts of the woridL 
The enemy is not so modi their brand- 
ed competitors as private-label and 
store-name brands — products once do- ~ 
tided as cheap, low-quality generics, but 
today typically packaged attractively 
and tasting or performing as well as, if_ 
not better than, the brand-name goods. 
Moreover, they are almost always less 
expensive, winch for everything from 
branded soap to nuts, is the crux of the 
problem,. 

A recent study by the advertising 
agency Bates USA tided, “These Prices 
Arc Killing Us!” helps point out just 
how serious the problem of price-based 
retail competition has become for brand- 
name goods. . 

fating data from Oppenheimer & Co. 
data, Bates said private-label brands' 
unit share of UJS. supermarket sales for 
consumer packaged goods had grown 
from 14.6 percent in 19S7 to 18-2 percent 
in 1992. when drugstore’ chains, mass 
merchandisers and crab stores are added, 
the private-label share jumps to 23 per- 
cent. The percentage is even higher-in 
Canada, Britain and some other Europe- 
an countries. . • 

Supermajkei-label sales in the two 
largest British chains — Sainsbury and. 


Tesco — - account for 35 percent of total 
sales in the country, said Mark Lund, 
Client Services Director at Still Price 
Lintas in London. “In many categories, 
the Sainsbury name is the most trusted 
name of all,” he said. “It’s not like this in 
other countries.” 

Stifl. most indications are that the 
bend between brand-name products and 
consumers — a tacit promise by manu- 
facturers of consistent, superior perfor- 


* Once performance 
expectations of house 
brands are equal to 
those of brand-name 
products, the decision 
by the consumer is made 
on price.’ 

Frank Assam nm, chief executive 
of Bates USA. 


znance in exchange for a premium price 
— ! have been eroded is many product 
categories. 

One reason is that retail chains such as 
Sainsbury in Britain and Loblaw in Can- 
ada have become better marketers of 
their own low-priced products, through 
their own stores as well as independent 
retailers. 

“This is a very serious issue,” says 
Frank Assumma, chief executive of 
Bates USA. “Once performance expecta- 
tions of house brands are equal to those 


of brand-name products, the decision by 
the consumer is made on price.” 

The price differential need not be large 
to result in a private-label success story. 
“We’ve tried to position Loblaw’s Presi- 
dent's Choice, Djcadent Chocolate Chip 
Cookie just below national brands on 
price but with better taste,” said Mary 
Moore, director of public affairs for 
D'Agostino, a supermarket chain with 24 
stores in New York. “It's the leading 
cookie product in the category for us. 

If private-label brands have succeeded 
in stealing significant market share in 
numerous categories by combining high 
quality with reduced prices, part of the 
blame goes to the manufacturers of 
brand-name goods themselves. Many of 
them also produce private-label brands 
for retailers to make more efficient use of 
their production lines and beef up prof- 
its. 

According to Bates, the consulting 
group MCA found that almost 80 per- 
cent of U.S. manufacturers supply pri- 
vate-label goods “in categories where 
they have a major presence.” 

Companies such as Philip Morris Cos. 
and Ralcorp Holding Inn, formerly part 
of Ralston Purina, have made or contin- 
ue to make private-label products that 
then compete with their own national 
brands. 

Ralcorp, the fourtb-Uugest maker of 
ready-to-eat cereal after Kellogg’s, Gen- 
eral Mills and Post/Nabisco, nas a 10 
percent share of the $8 billion category 
m the United States, a company spokes- 
man said. A 4 percent share comes from 

See BRANDS, Page 10 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


Cross Rates 

t i Mi M. Urn Wl W=- 

imj us ua ssm mow* — i*a- 

SB IM& SLW* UUS WRU* tun ■— ■ 

rrimtliirt ISJS zJMS — 82W ww* was IBM* 

TEi u -- uo «w wsua un mm 

M nw w.« w WM 2 

- 1Bm Ufia 2 MX UBS V)3I nws 

— ISHf UflS 5JH UM3B U50 3UT 

TokM IMI mil Wt Ui Ul >2? 

I *” ),. uaa JJZrt BJB USB MB* W «*■* 

; s w a. ™ » «« 

OMtoAmewdonuLaad** 

* w— ■« 

tnuHabb. 

t Other Dollar Value* 

Cunwv PW% "j** 

AnKMLwM »*»> 

JMntroU ism mrwKonv* W* 

Awxr.xM. lows H-b.1— « “ 

■ram red ■» » 

CHHnnn a *» *f-™**> 

OtnMknM JS5 

w- am MM** g* 

NanwHM S.W* 


Aug. 16 

5JL YM CS Peseta 

ujf im* l» ues* 
us wm run 
.is»* van u*- 

3MZ BUTS zm MM2 

ims tan?' nw — 
lh7jb urn uszw nan 
lstm mas u» nus 
4011 53)44* U7& OU* 
jus — nil ares 

UM . U»“ — HO* 
— taw* tour use* 
uni m2 » uk i5SJ° 
uh KS59i torn new* 

;.&> otoer centers; Toronto 
HA: net quoad; ha: not 


Eurocurrancy Deposits 

Swiss 

Dollar D-Marfc Fremc 

Starting 

Frwdi 

Franc 

Yon 

Aug. 16 

ECU 

1 mantb 

•flM* 

4 

AMU 

S Hr§ H, 

5»Wta 

2rwdtk 


Smontbs 

dths 

4V4 


SVHM 

5 

2v»2w. 

WWl 

6 mouth* 

5V. -P* 


4Y4n 


9W 

2*w1 

6 t-6 V. 

t year 


SMHPA 



6 VHS v. 

2 Kr2 ”-w 

6 ^ 


Scare**-' Llonts Bonk 

ttateumtiBeakleb Interbank deposits of SimOon mMmom (oreqvhvbnt). 


Cormier Per* 
MM.POO MS 
ILZHtaNtt 14141 ' 

HanKlowur «s? 
mn.PGM atW 
MtttaZWY WO.. 
PortcscwM ISMS 
two. ruble 7IT7J1Q 
Saadi rfref US 
VM.S IJttS 


CvrrMCV Port 
S. Air. rood 153*5 
S.Kar.woa tUX 
Sved.knxw M2S3 
Taiwan t VM 

nxjJtwM 2MB 

TafWcbllra 31130. 
UAfidktau 34727 
Vbms-MHv. IWtt 


Kay Money Rates 

United Slates Clow 

DUcoom rote 3 J* 

Prim rale TbfPi 

Federal moo * 

XnanfBCW 

Comm, poor no dm MS 

MMdfe-rrnMryblll 
Woor Trtoanf OW it# 

s-vm Treasury not* MS 

*war Treasury iota “| 

MmarTreaurrMto 
ltyoar Treasury iota * 

X-rrar Tremor t#*s TX 

Merrill LyadtMdov Beany ohm 1M 


Prev. Britain 


3% 

Bank beat rate 

5V. 

5tt 

7% 

Callnnnnr 

Sit 

4m, 

4 h 

vawmb irntracntt 

SK. 

5M. 

4» 

MnwiHiinJBrtonk 

5ta 

5% 

ilO 



m 

AM 

NHrearOllt 

BJ7 

177 

S3* 

France 

intemnnan rata 

5.00 

5JM 


caRmoaer 

Si i 



Hncnrt taJortra* 

5* 

S9» 

7J0 

in 


Sh 


fr4Ma0i tattrtank 

m 

sta 

HhrearOAT 

7M 

773 


ForwartBnte* ^ currency sway 

terrencr ***» awwSonosaar Ml» MW >200/ 

hnlMidM 1537J um " . .I nun ant mn no 

0 HSSS 01 UM S J-paowore- WLS m 

rj_ ■ 1JJJ1 t-3077 I.W* 

-m* 

t 


it rear Gawnmurt I 
Sonwamr 


1% 
2K, 
Vf> 
2 S iul 
2% 240 

444 fta 


ltt 

240 

2fc 






6JK &00 
495 4.W 

MB MB 
5JB5 MB 

no 

7.M *121 


Sources; Reuters, Btoomberg, Merrill 
Lvnen , Book of Tot re, CommertUanhi 
Gn u nweU Montagu, CrdcW Lrvmob. 

Gold 

Zurich 
London 
Mew Vorfc 
UA dollan our ounce. London offlekd ftx- 
lnos;Zunetiand Nutt York opening mack*- 
Inu prices; Mew York Comer tDueamberj 
Source: Reuters. 


AM. 

PM. 

cmK 

376J95 

37475 

—am 

37&40 

37AJ0 

-030 

sin 

3HW 

+050 


Banking Clients Have Always Expected 
Outstanding Personal Service. 
Today They Find It With Us. 



D uring the Renaissance, 
trusted advisors helped 
administer the finances 
and protect the interests of private 
individuals. The role demanded 
judgment, commitment and skill. 

Today, clients find thar same 
personal service at Republic 
National Bank. We believe that 
banking is more about people than 
numbers- It’s about the shared val- 
ues and common goals that forge 
strong bonds between banker and 


client. It's also about building for 
the future, keeping assets secure 
tor the generations to come. 

This client focus has contrib- 
uted to our leading position in 
private banking. As a subsidiary 
of Safira Republic Holdings S.A. 
and an affiliate of Republic New 
York Corporation, we’re part of 
a global group with more than 
US$5 billion in capital and more 
than US$50 billion in assets. 
These assets continue to grow 


substantially, a testament to the 
group's strong balance sheers, risk- 
averse orientation and century-old 
heritage. 

All banks in the group are 
locally managed, attuned to the 
language and culrure of their cus- 
tomers. They share j philosophy 
that emphasises lasting relation- 
ships and mutual mist. Those 
values were once the foundation 
of banking. At Republic, they 
have been and always will be. 


REPUBLIC NATIONAL RANK 
OF NEW YORK ( SUISSE ) SA 


ASAFKASAMK 

TIMELESS VALUES. TRADITIONAL STRENGTH. 


HEAD OFFICE GENEVA 1204 ' Z. PLACE DU LAC ■ TEL i022i 705 55 55- F0BEX: lOZZl 70S 55 50 AND GENEVA 1201 - Z. RUE D ft. ALFRED-VINCENY 1 CORNER 
QUA 1 DU moWT-BLANCi BRANCHES: LUGANO 6901 • ». VIA CANOUA ■ TEL i09li 23 B5 32 ■ ZURICH 8039 • StOCKERSTRASSE 37 ■ TEL. .01' 2M 18 18 > 
GUERNSEY * RUE DU PRE - ST. PETER PORT • TEL (431 1 711 761 AFFILIATE REPUBLIC NATIONAL BANK OF NEW T0RK IN NEW TOHA OTHER IDCATWWIS.- 
GIBRALTAR • GUERNSEY ■ LONDON ■ LUXEMBOURG ■ MILAN • MONTE CARLO ■ PARIS ■ BEVERLY HILLS * CAYMAN ISLANDS • LOS ANGELES 1 MEXICO CITY • MIAMI * 
MONTREAL • NASSAU ■ NEW YORK * BUENOS AIRES ' CARACAS ■ MONTEVIDEO ■ PUNTA DEL ESTE - RIO DE JANEIRO • SANTIAGO - BEIRUT ' BEIJING ■ HONG KONG • 

JAKARTA ■ SINGAPORE ■ TAIPEI - TOKYO 


l 


GST 1 ^ 





Page 10 

MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17, 1994 


U.S./A T THE C LOSE 


Blue Chips Revive 
Alter Early Slump 


Via Aiiseatrt teeii 


Dow Jones Averages 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


average 

' ' • : 


Opw High Lew Led Ag. 


Metals 


Lad Nfflc CUV 


Indus 2767X1 3700.13 37A&A4 2784X7 - MJ8 
TrSS, lio5*0 1«;X»lI9a*01»LW -1« 
US 1BL44 1 89.96 .188*4 Wig -}•* 


One Preview 

Bid A* BM ASk 

ALUMINU M I Wel l Grade) 

More per mjrtrtctee^^ I4S4J30 1454X0 
Forward U&JJ3 tmso USUH U&LQt 
COPPER CATHODES {HtghGfPM} 

Denar* eer metrtc ton 
Spot 23WX0 2395X0 240UU 2*&M 

Forrrend WQ5J0 24HJ0 JHW W1M0 

LEAD 

Delian per metric ton _ „ 

Seat 55UD 5SMD XSOjOO 551.00 

Femora 573J50 S74JX) 56850 56950 

NICKEL 

W , " r Tfln» SSB5JB 556550 
Foment 5*5050 5*7050 5*7550 5*6050 

TIN 

Dolton per metric ton 
seer si«uu 515050 Siam 513550 

Forward 58050 579050 58050 58050 

ZINC (SpOCM HM Grade) 

Detar* ear mrtrtc ton 

Spot 9*150 9*3-50 93650 940X0 

Forward 96550 96650 9*3.00 9*150 


Corns 1308.94 131131 130163 131353 -666 


Bloomberg Business Sews 

NEW YORK — U.S. stocks 
posted strong gains Tuesday af- 
ter the Federal Reserve raised 
key lending rates by half a per- 
centage point, reinforcing con- 
fidence that economic growth 


Stocks were also boosted by a 
rally in the bond market where 
yields on the Treasury’s bench- 
mark 30-year bond dropped to 
131 percent from 7.50 percent 
Monday. Bonds posted their 
largest gains since July 29. 


U.S. Stocks 


will stay moderate and corpo- 
rate earnings will continue to 
expand. 

Retailers and electronic 
stocks were favored, as major 
companies reported strong 
earnings. 

The Dow Jones industrial av- 
erage closed 24.28 poults higher 
at 3,784.57 after initially f ailin g 
nearly 20 points. 

There were roughly four gain- 
ers for every shares shares that 
fell, while volume surged to 
304.5 million shares from 2232 
million Monday. 

Stock prices’will continue to 
gain “because people have wor- 
ried about the interest-rate fac- 
tor long enough,” said Thom 
Brown, managing director at 
Rutherford. Brown & Gather* 
wood. He said investors would 
now focus on the corporate 
earnings picture, which “looks 
pretty good.” 


“This half-point increase 
should go toward slowing the 
economy down,” said Gil 
Knight, fund manager at ASB 
Capital Management Inc. in 
Washington. “The Fed’s work 
is done for the time being, the 
economy isn’t falling apart, and 
that's good Tor stocks." 

Among retailers, Dayton- 
Hudson climbed P4 to 85 W, 
Wal-Mart rose Vi to 2414, and 
Home Depot jumped 2% to 
44%. 

PepsiCo surged PA to 32W. 
The soft-drink maker said it 
would resume buying back its 
shares, less than a month after it 
said it had stopped. Coca-Cola 
climbed 1% to 45%. 

Compaq rose 1% to 36% after 
announcing price cuts of as 
much as 22 percent on its per- 
sonal computers to gain market 
share in the fall sales season. 

Intel rose % to 61. 



Standard ft Poor's Indexes 


3810 V I: 


Industrials 
Tranm. 
Utilities 
Finance 
SP 500 
SP IN 


HMI LAw Cfett CVm 
542.se 53657 54171 4- *.94 
38M* 37950 38130 + 1X0 
15939 158.10 15950 +057 
45.90 4516 4557 +0*2 
46520 *959 **551 +335 
410*2 474-47 *7959 +*44 


! NYSE Indexes 


Composite 
| I ndustr ials 

I ' Tronsa. 
Utility 
Finance 


25*37 253.93 25635 -1J3 
31649 31154 31657 -2XS 
74* -2D 7*357 74446 -058 
71124 J1053 711-99 -057 
71*08 71X30 71553 -157 


1*035 15958 
16225 1*155 
1*2.73 1*250 
1*13$ 16125 
N.T. N.T, 
N.T. N.T. 
15750 15*35 


Est. volume: 11550. 


1*055 14050 +150 
16750 1*250 + 0135 
1*273 1*250 +158 
16125 1*125 + 1*5 
N.T. 15975 +1.75 
N.T. .15873 +1JS 
15635 15475 + 035 
GOBI hit. 99X47 


BRENT CRUDE OIL (IPE1 . 

115. Potters per boire+iets of LAN barrets 


Sep 

1768 

1678 

16*2 

16*2 

— 005 

OO 

17.15 

1660 

1660 

1660 

— 035 

NW 

1768 

1663 

1665 

1664 

—031 

Dec 

1764 

16.78 

1678 

' 1671 

— 0.T? 

Jan 

1668 

1678 

1670 

1673 

-ant 

Feb 

16.91 

1663 

1663 

1661 

— our 

Mar 

16*8 

1662 

1662 

1662 

+0*3 

apt 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

U62 

+an 

May 

N.T. 

N.T, 

N.T.' 

1662 

+av* 

Jan 

N.T, 

N.T. 

NX 

N.T. 

1663 

+ 618 

Jty 

N.T, 

N.T. 

1665 

+ 622 

Aaa 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T, 

1667 

+ 62* 


Scott to Sell Office and Reduce 

PHILADELPHIA (Bloomberg) — 1 &JP* rC {j^ q d uarters 

day it would cut iu» staff $400 million 

complex as part of a restructtmpg aimed at saving 

“"South, ^bert J. Dunlap. Scott's ch^ma^nce April 

said he would cut 10.500 jobs this y^x - will move 
predecessor’s plan to cut 8-300 jobs tn three , location 

its remaimng&dquartere staff to a stdl-undeienmned locauon 

in the Philadelphia area. 


Barrick and Royal Oak Challenge Lac 

TnnAvrm Di^ilarl Amnimi) Banick Resources 


TORONTO (Knight-Ridder) — American Barrick R^unres 
as joined RoyaJ Oak Mines in its bid to have the Ontano 


Esi. volume: 47330. Ooenlnt 1785*5 


Financial 


F M A M J d 
1994 


NASDAQ l«id®J 


HM Low CktM Change 
* MONTH STERLING (LIFFE) 
anuM-ottoi iwpci 


Stock Indexes 


Low Lost 0*0. 


NYSE Most Actives 


Composite 
Irtou shots 

Banks 

iiKuranee 


73X64 73053 7356* -235 
735X1 730.94 73SJ1 -3X7 
7PM 77*59 775.59 —1.81 
91118 91046 91191 —0.98 
44601 9*5.99 W.T? —1.90 
79050 71*35 730.11 -058 


Merck 
WtdAAart 
Camcoa s 
HmeCop 

McOrtds 
T eUtox 
Hewi Pk 
JoftnJn 
GfiMatr 
Fort s 
GenElt 

AC van 

Panic 

Pervwv 

TavRU 


Low Last 

33 334. 

23*. 2*‘i 

25'.. Jaft 
47V. 44ft 
3S*u 26' ■ 

43’. i *4'.i 
B4ft 07ft 
48'. 49ft 
49 V, 51 ft 
?9ft »ft 
4S 4. 4S”, 

«3H 931. 

31ft 37’. 
47 47 

341. J5ft 


AMEX Stock Index 


High LOW Lena dig. 
4*197 44158 40.6* -054 


Sea 9*0* 4451 9*53 + 054 

Dec 9327 9321 9323 + CUH 

Mar 9256 9252 9253 +05* 

Job 92.15 92.12 «212 +053 

5ea 9132 9158 9131 +05* 

Dec 91,40 91J5 915* +05* 

MOT 91.16 91.10 91.13 + 004 

Jon 90.98 9091 90.94 +054 

Sea 9077 9075 9034 +053 

Dec 9051 9059 4040 +OS6 

Mar 9057 90.45 90*5 +054 

Jun 9041 9022 9QJ5 +055 

Est. volume: 32512 Open InL: 5*0523. 
MIONTH EURODOLLARS (LIFFE) 

Si mlinoa - pt» of in Pet 


HMi LOW Oasm Change 

FTSS 108 (LIFFE) 

CS per index poll* 

S8P 31895 31515 31535 +15 

MC N.T. N.T. J166X +15 

Mar N.T. N.T. 31865 +15 

Est. volume; *366. Open InL; 59300. 

CAC *0 (MAT IF) 

mu, 

Sep 204258 282458 2D2150 —550 ! 

O a 70*150 20*450 703150 —550 

Dec ZB4X9 2854X0 2050X0 —550 

MOT N.T. N.T. 207750 —MO 

Ejl volume: iix71.0penJnh: 6S 5*4. 


Dow Jones Bond Aver ag es 


SdP 

N.T. 

N.T. 

94*6 

DSC 

N.T. 

N.T. 

94.15 

Mar 

N.T. 

N.T. 

93.90 

jar 

N.T. 

N.T. 

9156 

See 

N.T. 

N.T. 

9320 


Sources: Mo ilf. Associated Press. 
London Inti Financial Futures Exchange, 
Inn Petroleum Exchange. 


20 Bonos 
ID UlUIUtn 
18 Industrials 


97.9* +023 

WJD +027 

101.98 +0*5 


NASDAQ Most Actives NYSE Diary 


Dollar’s Gains Limited 
As Dealers Take Profits 


VOL 

High 

LOW 

Last 

Chg. 

61138 

27ft 

21ft 

Z2ft 

-ft 

35411 

Sift 

53ft 

»4ft 

- 7li 

3433* 

62 

SO'., 

6l-m 


31505 

54ft 

53ft 

56ft 

-3ft 

30712 

2?*» 

22ft 

27+ •, 


28851 

15ft 

14ft 

15 

i. 

78397 ;>'ft 

22ft 

23ft 

-ft 

25788 27* r. 

70'* 

22 

- 1ft 

25755 43 ft 

42', 

44ft 

- '•) 

22758 

54'., 

52ft 

S3"... 


22510 

3ft 

3ft 

3ft 

— 

21751 

24 ft 

23 

24ft 

- l r ft 

T0704 

1ft 

V. 

l'ft 

— y>. 

20426 

33ft 

31'. , 

33'-.. 

-ft 

18819 

76 ft 

25ft 

26','u 

•ft 


Advanced 
De cl ined 
Unchanged 
Total Issues 
New Hiatts 
New lows 


12*8 106* 
923 1IH0 
*01 785 

2881 2M9 

55 25 


Est. volume: 0. Ooen Hit.: 178. 

3-MONTH EUROMARKS (LIFFE) 
DMlraHHan-pfstelWPCf 
Saa ociu moo 9553 +853 

94J37 HM +0.02 

Mar 9*57 9453 94X4 +051 

JOE 9*33 94.19 9*31 +653 

Sep 9332 9357 93.90 +654 

Dec 9145 9160 9162 + 053 

Mar 9143 9139 93X1 +053 

Jim 934* 9117 9121 +053 

In 9155 9351 9103 + 051 

Dec 9183 9251 728* +0.01 

Mar 92J0 92*0 9271 +0,01 

Jun N.T. 9LT. 9257 +051 

Est volume: 52569. open Int.: 79133& 
l-MONTH PIBOR (MATIF) 


Dividends 


Per Amt 
IRREGULAR 


Hshvlcf Steel ADR 
Karstonv AmTF 
Liberty TnnTr*»9 
Revl CorftjCrulse 
westmMne ADR 


AMEX Diary 


AMEX Most Actives 


Advanced 
Declined 
Ltnchonoed 
Tone issues 
NewHIpfts 
New Lows 


756 237 

318 221 

25B 747 

837 BOO 

II 17 

25 13 


- tee at 100 pet 
94.15 <MJB 

94.14 

+ 066 

9177 

9370 

9176 

+ 067 

9350 

93X4 

93X8 

+ 6JJ4 

93*4 

93*0 

93*3 

+ 063 

nja 

9217 

92*9 

+0*1 

9278 

9173 

9276 

Unth. 

9263 

9258 

9268 

+ 0*2 

92X5 

92X0 

92X4 

+ 602 


c-ooprox amt per ADR. 

STOCK 

Cainscoinc . 5* 

STOCK SPLIT 
S & T Bcp 2 tor 1 split. 

CORRECTION 

Ascribe Corp d 8-18 

(FrevtotOBdate. 


8-19 10-18 
825 90 

8-34 9-1 

9-1 9-29 
8-19 P-2 


AFP Exiei Sews 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
rose sharply across, the board 
Tuesday after the Federal Re- 
serve Board increased both the 
federal funds rate and the dis- 
count rate by half a percentage 


Foreign Exchange 


point — and then the U.S. cur- 
rency settled back to earlier lev- 
els in a (lurry of profit-taking. 

One dealer said that the dol- 
lar's initial rise was a “knee- 
jerk" reaction. 

“The market had already 
priced in a 50- basis-point in- 
crease. so I don’t think we can 
get a big rally,” Shunji Tsuda. a 
trader at Tokai Bank. said. 

The dollar jumped as high as 
1.5680 Deutsche marks imme- 
diately after the Fed’s rate an- 
nouncement before receding on 


profit-taking, dealers and ana 
lysis said. The dollar closed a 


lysis said. The dollar closed at 
1 .56 1 5 DM. up from 13522 


DM on Monday. 

Traders said activity picked 
up immediately after the Fed’s 
action. 


“The Fed’s action was a very 
aggressive move,” said Earl 
Johnson, senior dealer at Harris 
Trust Savings Bank. 

Although the market had 
priced in at least a 25 basis 
point, or one-quarter of a per- 
centage point, rise in the federal 
funds rate. Mr. Johnson said 
the full 50 basis points com- 
bined with the discount-rate ac- 
tion had not been discounted in 
the market. 

The rally was short-lived, 
however, as players quickly 
took profits at the higher levels. 
“Profit-taking and a generally 
negative dollar sentiment crept 
back into the market,” Win 
Thin of MCM CuirencyWatch 
said. 

The U.S. currency was higher 
against other major currencies. 

Against the yen, it rose slight- 
ly to 100.49 from Monday’s 
100.13 dose. The dollar also 
rose to 1.31 14 Swiss francs from 
1.3030 and to 5.3540 French 
francs from 5.3265. 

The pound fdl to S 1.5395 
from J 1.5415. 


SPDR 

RovofOo 

wmtro 

InterOig 

Eon Bov 

Nabors 

VxxB 

OwvSfts 

Sped Vis 

IvaxCp 


VaL 

Hteb 

LOW 

Lost 

a*. 

1005 4*"-'u 

*6*3 

464'ft 

mV* 

S3M 

4 

31. 

3-Vu 

’'•I 

SI 66 

13ft 

12ft 

13 

• .4 

4824 

2v h 

2 

2ft 


4670 

10ft 

10ft 

10’. 


4227 

6ft 

61, 

6ft 

OT. 

3428 

36 ft 

35ft 

36 

— 1 Kk 

3134 

9ft 

9ft 

9ft 

—'A 

3102 

27. 

?'.T 

2ft 

— 1* 

2679 

19ft 

19 

19V, 

.. 


NASDAQ Diary 


Advanced 

Declined 

Unchanged 

Total issues 
New Highs 
New Laws 


1547 1560 
1573 T506 
19*9 2022 


Dec 9278 9273 9276 Unch. 

MOT 9263 9258 928* +052 

Jen 92*5 *240 92*4 +852 

Est. volume: *05*4. Open Int.: 19+552 
LONG GILT (LIFFE) 

BM00 • PG a Starts Of IN pet 
Sep 101-11 100-21 101-04 + 0-15 

Dee 1TO-2D 100-11 100-22 +0-16 

Est. votuma: 50A4LOpen InL; 11*678. 
GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND (LIFFE) 
dm nsjm - ga oi no pci 
S ep *259 Visa 7154 +041 

Dec 91.16 9068 915* +080 

Est. volume: 8*752. Open Ini.: 167.107. 

16- YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MATIF) 


FtnSecAsaurWd 


CNB Rnl 
Horleyjvllte Notl 


PF58QAW 

ptso< 18B pet 
11470 11466 

11*60 

+ 056 

Dec 

11374 

113*4 

113.76 

+ 056 


I125B 

112X0 

113.0 


Jan 

N.T. 

N.T. 




Spot Commodities 


Est. volume: 9250V. Open int. r 13*505. 


Market Sales 


NYSE 30+46 

Ames 1*05 

Nosdoa 272.19 

In millions. 


Commodity 
Aluminum, lb 
Copper electrolytic, lb 
Iron FOB.Ien 

i ib 

Sliver, trey or 
Steel (seres). Ion 
Tin, lb 
Zinc, to 


Industrials 


..I'll! HMI LOW Lot settle Cti'gc 

1 fS GASOIL (IPE) 

5JM5 IL&. dona-seer metric kn»4etsoU08 tons 

1 1987 Sep 15350 15155 15250 15275 +150 

1521* S3 15*50 155.00 15*25 15*25 +125 

0.4641 NOV 15950 157.75 15825 15850 +075 


Borders Lf HIM 
CCP Irrsur 
Cigna HlincSfts 
Conseco Inc 
E«wi table Iowa 
Exktc Co 
Fsi FediSvsGe 
Fred's Inc 
Frontier Irtsur 
Golnsca Inc 
GoorOsman Prod 
HoncDCkJ IncSeCS 
HancockJ Inv 
KC Sttlrn Ind 
Keystone AmEa 
Keystone AmGvSec 
Keystone CustBl 
Keystone Ousts* 
Mooney Rlty Tr 
Old Kent Ftol 
Purototor Prod 
SY Bcp Inc 
Sdadt Homes Ce 


7-16 10-1 

7- 20 10-3 

8- 26 75 

9- 20 10-3 
M 7-20 

8- 22 9-6 

9- 1S 103 
9-1 7-15 
M 10-20 

9-30 10-14 
9-13 +27 
9-2* 9-30 
9-26 M0 
8-26 *20 
B-2S 9-7 
8-25 77 

8-25 97 

8-2S 97 

7-16 M0 
0-2* 7-15 
031 9-15 
Ml 10-1 
023 M 


has joined RoyalOak Mines in i » bid to have the Uniarw 
Securities Commission dissolve Lae Minerals Ltd. s shareholder 
rights plan, the company said Tuesday. 

The commission has scheduled a hearing Thursday to consider 
the requests. Royal Oak and Banick have made separate bias to 
takeover Lac Royal Oak’s 2.4 billion Canadian dollar ($2 billion) 
offer expires Friday. “ ‘ . 

A shareholder rights plan, or "poison pill ts an anti-takeover 
measure by which a company allows its shareholders to pu> 
additional shares at a deep discount to the current market value, 
making the takeover bid. more costly. 

Hewlett-Packard Records Higher Net 

PALO ALTO, California (Bloomberg) — Hewlett-Packard Co., 
the second-largest U.S. computer maker, said Tuesday that strong 
internatio nal sales- helped lift its third-quarter profit 28 percent. 

Earnings rose to" $347 milli on from $271 million a year earlier. 
Revenue rose 22 percent, to $6.05 billion. In the nine months, net 
income rose 28 percent, to $1.12 billion, while revenue rose -3 
percent, to $17.99 billion. 

U.S. Retailers’ Earnings Rise Sharply 

NEW YORK (Bloomberg) — Four top U.S retailers reported 
strong'second-quarter earnings Tuesday. 

•Wal-Mart Stores Inc. posted a 14 percent earnings increase 
and 23 percent rise for the quarter. Net income rose to $564.8 
million from $495.9 million a year earlier. Total sales rose to $ 1 *J.9 
billion from $16.2 billion. 

•J.C Penney Co. said second-quarter net income rose 1/ 
percent, to $132 milli on, while revenue rose 7 percent, to $4-4 
billion. 

•Dayton Hudson Corp. said its second-quarter earnings more 
than doubled, to $49. million from $24 million a year earlier. 
Revenue increased 12 percent, to $4.8 billion. In the first half, 
Dayton. Hudson earn ed $88 milli on, up from $54 million a year 
earlier. Revenue for the half increased 1 1 percent to $9.27 billion. 

•Home Depot Ino, the largest U.S. home-improvement retailer, 
said its second-quarter net increased 32 percent, to-$l78 million 
from $134.4 mil lion, while sales rose 34 percent, to $329 billion. 
For the six-month period, net rose to $317.7 million from $241.3 
million a year earlier, while total sales, increased 33 percent to 
$6.16 billion. - . 


Kmart Plans to Sell 3 Subsidiaries 


Ur: q-wo-tarty; mhiMmnI 


BRANDS : Private-Label Goods Cause Big Brands to Reconsider Strategy 

Continued from Page 9 While the Bates research ac- goods have not yet achieved a goods in Asia seem to be avoid- 


Con tinned from Page 9 
its nationally branded Chex 
and Cookie Crisp cereals, but 
the majority of the revenue now 
comes from its growing private- 
label business. 

“Our unique reason for being 
is private-label.” the spokes- 
man said. He said Ralcorp had 
even started making a private- 
label Chex-like cereal in re- 
sponse to demand from grocers. 
“Both will exist side by side and 
prosper.” he predicted of the 
company's competing products. 


While the Bates research ac- 
knowledged that store-brand 
production might make sense 
for certain manufacturers, it 
nevertheless called the practice 


a “long-term strategic loser” as 
brand-name manufacturers are 


brand-name manufacturers are 
forced to either improve their 
national brand's quality or cut 
prices — both affecting profit 
margins — to remain competi- 
tive. Manufacturers must ask 
“if it makes sense for them,” 
Mr. Assumma said. 

One area where private-label 


goods have not yet achieved a 
significant presence is the Aria- 
Pacific region. Retail store con- 
centration there is weaker, so 
own-label distribution is not 
nearly as common as in North 
America and Europe, said Rod 
Wright, chairman of the Asia- 
Pacific region for the advertis- 
ing agency OgQvy & Mather. 

He said Australia, Singapore 
and Hong Kong were excep- 
tions, with all having moderate 
levels of store-brand penetra- 
tion. But makers of brand-name 


mg private-label production, 
said Vicente D. Her re r a , vice 


said Vicente D. Her re r a , vice 
president and brewing group 
marketing director for San Mi- 
guel Corp. in Manila. “From 
our vantage point, the presence 
of such brands is not felt zn the 
Asian region,” he said. 

Brands that succeed at imple- 
menting these and other mar- 
keting steps stiB have a great 
deal of equity to fall back on 
and should continue to prosper, 
the report argues. 


TROY, Michigan (AP) — Kmart Corp., trying another avenue 
for raising cash for its struggling discount stores, said Tuesday it 
would sell majority stakes mthree specialty store divisions to the 
public. 

Kmart will offer to the public at least a 51 percent slake in 
Borders-Walden Croup, The Sports Authority and OfficeMax. 
The three subsidiaries reported improved second-quarter earnings 
Monday, while KinartV flagship discount stores continued to 
report lagging profit. 

OfficeMax will be die first stock to be offered, within the next 
few weeks, Kmart said. The board was still reviewing alternatives 
about the company’s Builders Square home improvement divi- 
sion. the company said. 


TGI Bids for Madison Square Garden 

NEW YORK (Reuters) ■— Tde-Communi cations Inc. said 
Tuesday it bid for Viacom Inc.’s Madison Square Garden arena. 
Knicks and Rangers sports teams and a cable-TV operation. 

Sources said Tele-Communications was competing with at least 
one other offer and that the bidding^hofijd^^ £Jj legion. They 
said ITT Coip. and Cablevision Systems bad submitted^ joint bid 
for the Madison Square Garden assets. ' 

Tde-Communications did notdisdose-the size ofjts bid, but it 
did say it submitted the offer without partners. 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


U.S. FUTURES 


Season Season 

Hah Low 


Open mgi Law One die OaW 


Season Season 
Hlpli Lour 


Open Htfi Loot dose Ow Optal 


Agancc Franca From Aug. 16 


VaAaodoledFiai 


Open Higft Low Oase Che OpJrt 


Amsterdam 


ABN Amro Hid 
ACF Holding 
Aegon 
Ahold 
Abo Nobel 
AMEV 

Bols-Wessoncn 

C5M 

DSM 


Fokker 

Gill-Brocades 

HBG 

Heine ken 

Hoagowens 

Hunter Douglas 

IHC Coland 

Inter Mueller 

Inn Nederland 

klm 

r.NP BT 

kpn 

Nediiovd 

Oce Grlnten 

p ok hoed 

Philips 

Polygram 

Robeco 

Rodamca 

Pallnco 

Rarenlo 

Rorol Dutch 

Stone 

Unilever 

von Ommeren 

VNU 

Wolterv'KIuwer 
EOE inde* : AMR 
Previous : 415.11 


Rnetametal! 3Z7 327 Gen i Acc 

Schertng 915957.5a «ua 

Siemens 679J0675J0 Grand Met 

Thvssen 32020 326 GRE 

VaJia 325 320 Guinness 

Veba 54730 548 GUS 

VEW 38230 374 Hanson 

VI 00 *8948930 Hlllsdown 

Volkswagen 509.40 506 HSBC Hides 

Wella 10*3 1(00 ICI 

DAX index : 7KL14 IndiaiFg 

rsEM SSw 

Lsoorte 

Losmo 

Helsinki 

Amer-Ytitvma 122 121 /wtartSse* 1 * 

Erao-Gufxelt 47.10 42 MEPC 

s sr BM E £ X&zr 

jftr™ n? m ^rs,* owr 

Nokia **1 OB pso 

Poh'oln £ *S Pilklnglon 

?. eoo J° ,2 PowrrGen 

Stockmann 3*0 230 Prudential 

HEX Index : 182039 Rank Oro 

Previous : 1807.14 Bede Iff Col 


CamMor 1716 1717 ftnnlrl.nl^. 

Cascade* 5V> 5vs StOCKTlOlm 

Dominion Tex* A 6*6 6vj AGA 


Da nohue A 
FCA liffl 
MacMillan Bl 


1316 13V. Ai_ A 
1^2 ASra A 

’S? ’S! Atlas Cooco 


Toyota 

Yama tetri Sec 

a: xiot. 

Nikkei 225 : 29786 


2180 21*0 

880 070 


Grains 


SUGAR-WORLD 11 (NCSB 

mmidxan 


DVK 



95520 

90*60 5ep M 

*4600 

94990 

94770 

94650 

420671 

1260 

439 Oct M 

11.90 

1165 

1165 


1)69 

♦008 58750 

95.110 

- 90710 Dec 94 

94140 

946SB 

90650 

90*20 

♦ 80468,964 

1210 

9.17MOT9S 

lljtt 

1169 

11 J* 


1165 

+009 0.10 

9SL50O 

90*4) Marta 93680 

94140 

OM 

93670 

♦ 90333*84 

1206 

1057 MOV 95 

1178 

1162 

1171 


1179 

-00 

9646 

94730 

90J10 JOT 95 

93500 

507*0 



+ 100 254255 

1ZQ2 

105 Jul 95 

1171 

1176 

1171 


1172 

♦00 

3*66 

94550 

91*105epta 

93*70 

92X20 

93*50 

9X3B0 

♦ 110211573 

1150 

TO50cr95 





1157 

+010 

1679 

94*80 

9I.M0DK9S 

92680 

93.158 

92.960 

93JW 

♦ 1HH5U06 

1160 

T06SMar96 

11*9 

11*9 

11*i 


T1JH 

♦ 801 

217 

94320 

90700 Mcr 96 92500 

93.100 

92660 


♦ 110131*83 

11-56 

1166 May 96 





11*4 

♦401 

5 

83,188'. 

92620 Junta 

9I7W 

92680 

92770 

92600 

♦ 110100.760 


Natl Bk Cmodu 7% TVs 

Power Corp. IFk. 17% Fr^OTi 

Proviso Sit 5V. liiSte-A 


Prowlgo 

Quebec Tel 

Quebecor A 19V. ins iSSST 

Quebecor B I* Iff* Hydro 

Teleglobe 1* IB>k PromrttoAF 

Vldeatran 12 12 

Industrials Index : 19*833 SCA-A 

Previous : 193136 5-6 Banken 

Siondio F 
SkanskO 

« — ; SKF 

Paris 5wro 

Accor *53 6*0 

AlrLWuwle 819 824 ^ „ 

AJB6telAls.hon. 6M 600 


Hondetsbonken 


Toronto 


AMflM Price 
Agnlca Ecaite 
Air Canada 
Albedo Energy 
Am Barrick Res 


IBM 18 
16M 16M 
7V. 7 M 

2 IP* 21M 
JH* 30 V. 


I WHEAT fCBOT) VMkimirknm-iMnMrMM 
I 3JT4I X02 Sec 94 L47 152W 145H 353V. - UD* 030 

1*3 Vlt Drew 162 3*8 3*1 A45H ,00314 25.931 

370 127 Marti 1*9 Vj 174Vj 168*1 373%. *QJM 103W 

X62 ll«V>May9S 1*3 3*8 3*1%. 3*6%k »O0SV3 772 

3*n% 111 JU95 Ml 340 1*1 U»*IUm 1*23 

Dec 95 156V, -0A4Vi 2 

Est. sales l BUM warrs.»*es 15/U0 
Mon 's ope n W * 1.96* Otl 5*1 
WHEAT KBOTJ UUhimiMUii-McnOBkiaM 


Est.se*«s 14*12 HnTsj*] TL57I 
Men’s ope n In? 111321 off 810 
COCOA (NCSE) llnekliln-iavUi 


479475J0 
1270 1256 


Brussels 


AG Fin 
Almanll 
Arced 
Bar co 
BBL 
Bekoert 
CBS 

CIAB 
CNP 
Coc»*nil 
Cobeoa 
Culruvl 
Dei ho i*o 
Electrobrt 
Electroflno 
GIB 
GBL 
Gevoert 
GlOvercel 
immobel 

KredieRxsA 

Masane 
Petrofina 
Powedln 
Recllcrl 
Rovoie Beige 
SocGen Banuue 
SoeGen Belglaue 
Safina 
Sol i/a y 
Tenenderia 
Tractebef 
UCB 

union Miniere 
weaonsLits 
Current Stock Index : 766SA5 
Previous : 760050 


Hong Kong 

Bk East Asia 31*0 
Cathay Pod tic 12J0 
Cheung Kong 3770 
China Light Pwr 3U0 
Dairy Form tall 11.75 
l Hang Lung Dew 13*5 
Hang Seng Bank 5273 
Henderson Land 40.20 
HK Air Eng. 38.90 

HK China Gas U75 

HK Electric 2* 

HK Land 20JS 

HK Realty Trust 20*0 

HSBC Holdings 8* 
HKSnangHiis 11*5 
hk Telecomm i5io 

HK Ferry 15 

Huicti Whomooa 36 
Hyson Dew 2270 
Jor dine Math. 63*0 
Jerdlne Str Hid 29.95 
Kowloon Motor 15*5 
Mandarin Orient 10.10 
Miramar Haiei 2o*o 
New World Dew 25*0 
SHK Proas 51 JO 

Sleluir 116 

Swire Poc A 57.7 S 
Tal Cheung Pros 1070 
TVE 188 

Wharf Hold 31 

Wing On Co llttl 1 1*0 
Wlnsor Ind. I1.*0 


Ronk Ora 
Reckltt Cot 
Redtand 
Peed inti 
Reuters 
PMC Grotto 
Polls Royer 
Rotrunn limit) 

Royal Scot 
RT2 

SolnsCury 
Scot Nawcm 
Scot Power 
Sears 

Severn Trent 

Shell 

Slebe 

Smith Nephew 
Smith Kline B 
Smith IWH) 
Sun Alliance 
Tale ft Lvte 
Tesco 
Thom EMI 
Tomkins 
TSB Gruun 
Unilever 
UhJ Biscuits 


Axo 

Bcncalre (Cle) 

BIC 

BNP 

Bouygues 
Danone 
Car retour 
CCF. 31170 21480 

Cerus 117.70 11*80 

Chargeurs 139* 133* 

Orncms Franc 309 311 

Club Med 393*0 398 

Elt-Aauttalne 428*0 411*0 

Euro Disney 10*5 W.70 

Gen. Eaux 


BCE *7kk 464b 

Bk Nova Scotia 2ffA 26V, 

BC Gas 14V: 

BC Telecom 2SV, 25s, 

Bramaleo 535 S'* 

Brunswick 10 10Hs 

CAE 7W 7Vk 

Camdev A 4*5 

CISC 31% 3Pg 

ConocEcm Podflc 22 214» 


357V, 

2JBftSeo94 

:lh 

363ft 

IP 

341ft ♦ 060ft 12X71 

164ft 

117ft Dec *4 

365 

370 

154ft 

168ft +0JN 

19644 

365 

125 Marti 

165ft 

370 

16<ft 

169ft +CL05 

4745 

154 

«lftMov9S36flft 

361 

35Sft 

361 *807 

450 


116ft Jul 95 

341 ft 

147ft 

141ft 

36e ♦005 

479 

3X0 

129 Septa 




348 * 805 

3 

360ft 

360 ft Dec ta 




357 - 805 

1 


1580 

1041 DOC 94 

1456 

1501 

1456 

MM 

1405 

1077 Mar 95 

1491 

1532 

1490 

1521 

1612 

1078 May 95 

1530 

ISC 

1530 

15*1 

1680 

1225 Jul VS 

1543 

1543 

1543 

15KT 

150 

1B2E Septa 

140/ 

1445 

1401 

1432 

1633 

1290 Dec ta 

IW3 

1590 

li/3 


1676 

13S0Ator96 

IMS 

1610 

160* 

lias 

1568 

1223 May 96 

1640 

1641 

1636 

1650 

1505 

15DSSOP96 




1581 


♦31 3L977 
+3010*83 
+30 3,1*3 

+» i433 
♦26 10*88 
♦30 A*36 
♦20 1*00 


E*»tes 8101663 Man’s. sola 228,9*3 

Man'sapanM 7J03M3 «0 16827 

BRfTtSH POUW (CMJSt) inw me- imtar maw tBinoi 

1-5744 IA*«SN>W 1-5*08 1*466 1*320 LSM - -20 32^33 

1^40 1*500 Dec 94 1*338 1*440 1*280 1*370 -16 854 

1*720 I *640 Mart* 1*324 1*390 1*250 1*3*0 -16 154 

Est. soles 16*60 Man'k.KdM 4473 

Man’s open Ini 3X7*1 off 801 


Est. soles 17.127 Man’s, sales KJ-245 
Mon’s open Int 68,907 all 439 
DRANCEJUCE (NCIN) ISAOm-arawl 


63? Sydney 

20W ffi6 4 

21170 21480 4 

’So Si Bougatwiae o 

ILL CdesMyer 4 

408*0411*0 CRA >,CS IB 

10*5 10.70 rS 

*6So*aSS I 


9.11 921 

4.00 All 
19-22 17*4 
XU 146 
0-93 086 
AH A24 
A90 <90 
10.94 19.10 
4*2 4*0 
1D9 1.12 


Con Tire A 

Ccnfor 

Cara 

CCL Ind B 
Ctneolex 
Comlnco 
Com*es» Exol 
CSAMglA 


livy itHv 
2IWr 20'S 
4.TU 4 

9H * 

ASS ABO 
22 5l>g 
24k. 23+, 
10 10 
2J+% 22^ 
0.71 O.W 


Estsdes MA Man's. sdes LON 

Men's open M 30.997 oh 136 

CORN icncn UBOBununuiwTt-aaaarEaWDwM 

2VJ'J 114 Sea 94 XI7>* ZirA Z17%» 2.19 .0*11% 32*71 

IP 2.17 Dec 9* UV* 12 9 SJOV, L21V. -OUT- 122,799 

2*2Vi 131 McrfS 129V. 2J0»k 129% 1X^*001*6 26*45 

2*5 UTVtMav 95 2JS’6 1311. 235* 131 V, -OO) IQXS 

2A5V] 2J6V.JU9! 2*0 V* 24 It X40H 1 2*1 ■* *001 to 10. TO 

2.70'rr L3? Sap 95 2*2W IQV, 2*2'.', 2*3 *0011. 7*0 

2*1 2*5WDec9S lOL 2*5 2XH+ 2*5 »OB1>, SXB 

Ef. sales 24*w Marts sales 21*67 

Mon’s open Int 203*95 off 911 

5DYTCASI5 toon SACDbumwmim- OBSartHrUiShei 


134*0 (9.10 Now 94 9073 99*0 96*0 

132*0 91*0 Jal 95 102.10 ttajo W*S 

12*25 9A50M<F95 1KJD 19S50 ISAM 

11425 97*0Moy95 107.90 107*0 100*0 

1 19*0 I01.40JUI9S 1KL50 11050 HO50 

134*0 86.05 5flP 95 »5*0 9970 92*5 

112*0 1T7XNOV95 

-tei 96 

Sep 96 112-50 112*0 112*0 
Estsote 3*00 Marts sates 1.905 
Mon’s open M 22,189 off 162 


— 2X Am 
-2*5 2*88 
— 260 


Metals 


IrSntni vn Goodrrw Field IJ4 IX 

t™ 1 ? - —^2 ICI Australia 11.06 11*4 

Lot^seCoppee 4*1*0*27*0 Mcgellcr 1.95 1*5 

*22 Ml* 295 296 

Oreai Fl"* 1^? 1^ ^ 

LVALM. 853 851 Hi 

Motro+tocheH* 121 119 EJ BrokerHIH 1*5 

Mtehetm B 246*0 2*270 p4 ou^k» A3I A40 

Mounnex 118123*0 W 


PtaPeermn 297 3 

pSISSZv inH iS?sn Nmcdv Poseiden 21* 21s 

OCT Resources 1^5 ija 


Echo Bov Mines 155a 15 

Eoutty Sliver A 0*3 080 
FCA MN Alt) 4 

Fed Ind A 7 67* 

Fletcher CMI A 1746 171* 
FPI 6*t 66= 

Centra ag o*0 

Golf COa Res 5% 5Vi 
Hees tint m 13^ 

Hemle Gld Mines I29h 12*. 


Peugeot 8S2 BS3 fNT US z a 

Si 52 western Mining 7*7 7*1 
nhSSUSnS* ,vjn m wwtp° cBcnnng a*i A50 

Rh-POUiertC A 136*0 13510 Wocdside A75 A76 


War Loan 3'^ 
Wellcome 
Whitbread 
wi W omgHdgs 
Willis Corroan 


Rh- Poulenc A 136*013510 wocrfaSe <JS A 

RoH. St. Louis 1540 1557 

Sarxrfl 73) 744 PBF* - 

teml rwuwiU, AM ATI rrevsoos . 7P5 5. 7 9 


Sanad 

Satnl Goooln 
S.E.B. 

Ste Generate 
Sue 


660 671 

544 544 I 

562 565 

25130 254*0 


w5^^ :3,47J0 


ThomsnrvCSF 165 90 1*8,10 I Akal Electr 


Tokyo 


Madrid 


Total 

DAP. I 

Vcdea 

CAC 40 Index 
Previous : 2B96J5 


Johannesburg 

AECI 2A2S Z 

Alfech 118 

Anglo Amer 252 


Barlows 

Qivvaar 

Butfeis 

De Beers 

Drletanreln 

Gencor 

GF5A 

Harmony 


2A2S 2175 Banes to 
118 118 EepsA 

>S ^ g!3S“ 

1175 10 J5 Erwra 

IH*0 1?l SET 

*5*0 66 Tabacatert 


BBV 3040 3085 

Ben Central HHp. 2*65 2745 
Banco Santander So TO SM0 
Bones lo 1135 1115 


1775 3300 
2115 21S 
ACID 8060 
172 170 

899 702 

3930 *025 
3370 3500 
1800 1810 


316-90 319*0 Asotli Chemicrl 782 777 

14550 14AJ0 ASatli Glass 1230 1220 

Bonk Of Tckyg 1580 15*0 

■ sints Bridgestone 1610 1*10 

. «..« canon 1740 1 750 

Casio 1250 1250 

Ed Nipecn Print 1550 19*0 

jlo Dmwo House 1*W i*80 

' „ Dafwe Securities tsso iseo 

20*0 21 Fanuc 4450 4480 

7*9 7*5 Fuw Bank X40 2333 

7 JO 7*0 Fuii Photo 2710 2210 


Magna Inti A 
Maple Leaf 
Maritime 
Work Res 
MotsonA 
Noma ind A 
Moranda Inc 


Saopaulo g®^; 

Banco do Brasil 20*0 21 Fanuc 

Banesna 7*9 7*5 Fun Ba 

Srodesco 7J0 7.40 Fuii Ph 

Brahma 270 2*0 Fmltsu 

ComlB 10*0 99*9 HlroeJll 

Elelrcbm 321 2B9 HltnOii 

Itoubanco 


245 237 Hondo 

330 319 I Ita YefcOdC 


ranapanema 14*0 l«*0 j ilochv 


High weld Steel 3125 32 


Frankfurt 


179J0 176 
348*0 330 

2309 2357 
641*0 639 
99* 1000 


AEG 

Alcatel SEL 
Aiitgnj Hgid 
Airona 
Asko 
BASF 

Bayer joahjouw 

Bay. ttvpo Dank *0<JO *D5 
Boy veretnsok TO *32 
BBC 775 780 

BHF Bank 379 381 

BMW 853 85* 

Commerzbank 317.20 317 

Coallnenlat 27D265J0 
Dolmler Bern 80A20 806 
Deairssc 490*0 *95 

Df 3COCOCK 2*0 458 

Deutsche Bank 70*494*5 
Dougiai J99J0 495 

Dresoncr Bank 

FeWfflueMe 30 950 305 

F Krijop Hoesch 23080 00 
Hcrsener 329*0 330 


Kloof 

Nedbank Grp 
Rondtontein 
RujpJgt 
SA Brews 
St Helena 
Sasof 

Western Deep 






London 


Abbev Nat'i 
Allied Lyons 
Arlo Wiggins 
Argyll Group 


61 41 

4475 47 Milan 

JOT 101-50 Alteon ro 

87*0 87.75 Assltalto 

Auiosrode prlv 
Bcn Agrlcotturo 

1»0 190 Bco Commer i(al 

: 5794*1 Bco Naz Lavoro 
BcaPoo Novara 

Banco dl Roma 

kn Bco AmDrosiana 

1,1 Bco Nopgii rise 

3*9 193 B e netton 

5.93 5.91 Crsdlta liallano 

2 JO 178 Enlcnem Aug 

2.7* 177 Ferlln 


Petrabros 

Souza Cruz 

Telebros 

Tefeso 

Usiminas 

vole Rio Docs 

Vorrg 


1070 187D 
W 994 
900 B7S 
T77? 1700 
S2M 5260 
719 719 

753 7i* 
9T& 953 

24-03 2640 


Bovespa Index : 47*41 
previous : 45*71 


128*0174*0 jepen Airlines 
5.900 57TO Kolimo 

47*0 *580 Konsai Power 2640 2440 

*35 423 KovrasaklSIeel 422 418 

1.24 1.16 Kirin Brewery 1220 T2T0 

125 119 Komatsu 940 935 1 

110 93 Kubota 743 738 

74*1 Kyocera 7380 JJTO 

Matsu Elec IMS 1739 1729 

Matsu elec Wks 1130 1130 

Mltsmxsh. Bk 3460 3633 


Singapore Mitsubishi 557 550 

cerebos 8.10 8K £2 & 

ary Dev. 7J0 7.T0 MFsiOhtli Hev 803 880 

DBS 11.10 it JWtsu&tsni Carp 13*9 1539 

I Fraser weave 17*0 17 JO MllsuiataCa 844 840 

Genllng 13.70 13*9 Mlrsci Marine 787 7*3 


HoUlnger 12H 17H 

Horsham 19 is^j 

Hudson's Bov 36* 76'-. 

Imasco 35^2 35Vj 

Into 364k 361* 

IPL Energy 29V; 29+k 

Joonock 16', 1S=» 

Lobatt 30 28<a 

Lobiow Co 30U; XTN 

Mockanzto 7Vi r-i 

Mogno Inti A 53 Vj 51*? 

Mopte Leaf 134b 12 

Maritime 3*^ 23’h 

work Res 9Vi yvs 

Motoon A 31 21 

Noma ind A 5Vi S'* 

Maranda Inc 254+ 2£te 

f+oranda Forest 13 11^ 

Norcen Energy 151+ 154a 

Nthn Telecom 484* *6? a 

NOVO COTP I3!« 13 

Oshown 10J+ lSts 

Pogur+n A MS A. 

Placer Dome 27’„ 27s* 

Ftoco Petroleum 9 9 

pwa Corp 0*5 0*7 

Rayroek V6 154+ 

Peneissance tips 284+ 

Rooms B 214+ 71*. 

Rottwnons 75 76 

Rortri Bank Can Sfl’Te 2S4 b 

Sceptre Res 12=A MVi 

scotrs Hosp a'*T bu 

Seogrom 43^, 42^. 

Setxs Cm Vm rg 

Shell Can u *31+ 

Sherrllt Gordon 12V. 12*. 

SHL Svstemhse 7 7W 

Southern 17 l£fc 

Soar Aerospac e in ux, 

StrtcuA , 8V2 nag 

Tousmgp energ »Vs »*s 

Teck B 22H 2 1 -* 

Trenrson tsij is'-t 

Toronto Domn 287b 3VU> 

Torhtor B 3448 24'g 

Transotto util l«k l* 

TransCdaPtoa 14T» 17 

Triton Fbtl A leo 195 

Trtmoc 16 ia 


Norcen Energy 
Nthn Telecom 
novo Corp 
Oshowo 
Pogurtn A 
Placer Dome 
Poco Petroleum 

PWA Corp 
Rayroek 
Peno usance 


7JS SiTlUAugf* LE 186 18IW SKTs.OAfV, 4*64 

1M'\ 160+j Sop 94 168 171 S68 544% • Dfllrt IM6! 

7J7V, 151 Nw94 SJ9 Vj 14?% 558% 1B14 -001% 744+0 

7*4 160 Jon 95 168ft 178H 167ft 167% -OD! 0*95 

70S 1*9 Marti 178 U9ft 17*ft SJW. -SO I 'A L6D 

7JJ5'i 175'.-Mav9S 144ft 186ft 183 183 -OOTft 3J47 

7D6ft 178ftJul95 i« 190ft 148 141 -0JS 1916 

19T+ 179 AU0 95 197 192 187 187 - 081ft 144 

18) IT SksVS 189ft -081ft 34 

6*CVi 178ftfto*9S 193 196ft 193 184^ -082% 2287 

Jul «6 6.10 -083 

EstSOfcB aCCO MVfswm 3.144 

WonsaoenM 122,745 up 297 

SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOT1 IXm-aiff,prn 

2HXO 171 7IJAUBW I73J0 I74JTJ 17100 174.20 -180 1356 

71080 17020 Sep +4 172.10 17380 17210 17270 -190 19.671 

207*0 169800394 17180 17380 17180 171.70 -180 IIJH 

709.X ira. 10 Dec 94 171*0 173J0 17180 17210 - 080 32657 

207*1 |7|.IOJ0i9S 17380 17380 17190 173.10 -1J0 4,9*5 

207*0 17280 Mar 95 17480 17150 17483 17480 - 080 5,731 

JQ7X 174.X May 9S T7680 17680 175-70 17170 -470 3829 

20680 17130 Jul 95 177*3 1 70 58 17780 17780 -dtO 1861 

10150 T76-SC Auu +1 178-50 17950 174*0 17850 -180 127 

137-00 l7A50Sep9S 17980 179*3 17BJ0 I7LS0 -180 51 

Efl srt® 108CD Man’s, sclei 11.214 

r.WsopeninJ 83*74 is 647 

SOYBEAN OIL ICBOT) teOODbwateBspw Nans 

1085 71.65 Aug 94 2418 2413 24.10 74,17 - 0.0 2831 

30*4 72.ffl 5eo94 7410 74.16 2*83 2487 -086 20.197 

7954 22 10 Cctta M C2 7*06 7X91 21.97 . 086 11143 

2B87 2280 Dec 94 2386 2197 2180 2184 - 083 34837 

28*5 2255830 95 ZUB 2392 Z382 2384 .084 4.9*5 

350 2293MCT95 23.90 2393 2184 2166 - 0105 1267 

7085 72-93 MOV 95 2388 21» 2382 2384 -982 4805 l 

2785 23 BOW 95 23JO 2190 2178 7302 .883 1877 

2750 2276 Aug 95 2388 2180 2175 2380 -085 233 ' 

2*75 27*5Se(>7S 2175 *084 51 

am n.!DOd« 23 ss j 

2150 2280 Dec 95 2145 -085 2 

en.sates S8X Mon'S sates 10848 

Man's <sen art C8821 Off 1033 


M GRADE COFFER (NCMX) Anta^cXinrb. 
1IU0 7480S4P94 10190 10980 107*0 10680 

11120 7175 Dec 94 10870 TOBJ0 1(785 108.10 

11150 7L90J<n9S 10780 

11150 73WFct>95 107 JB 

11370 73.XMCT-95 107*0 W770 10770 KI750 

III.® 7685MOV95 ' 106*0 

117*0 78XJUTS 10810 10810 lt&69 USJ0 

11800 7830 Aug 95 10820 10030 188 TO 10815 

11805 79.WSBP9S 104*0 

11585 7SJ0CW95 18850 10850 108*0 10805 

112*0 77.75 Nov 95 10820 10830 10820 108 HI 

10950 8800 Dec 95 IM.U 

10800 SB-50 Jon 96 103*6 

10800 SX1DM3-96 TELU 

M0*9 9l.l0Apr» 10680 

May 96 102*5 

107*0 10630 Jiat 96 1Q6JS 

Est. sates 7*00 Man's, sates 7*56 
MarYsoowiIrt 46*9 1» 63 
SILVER (NCMX) 5*69 iray at- e+nls par vbvk 
mo 5M*Aug« 

6180 493*sep74 9 OJ) 5189 502* 

517.0 51T*Oa» 

5778 30O*OeCM 514* 5228 SHU) 

5648 401* Jon 95 

6040 4165MOT95 S280 5290 519* 

606* 41 80 Mav 95 

6180 4780 Jul 95 539* SB* 5280 

54L0 532* Sop 95 5)6* 541* - 532* 

6M8 S39J)Dec95 549A 5»9* SB* 

612.0 5780 Jan 96 

6180 5540 Mar 96 

SOA SB7JMOV96 

Est.+ctas 22*00 Mart. 13.9*6 • 

Mot ft open bit 122*73 up 448 


— 03S 16*46! 
-8*5 378 

-835 319 

-025 2*35 
-805 1D64 
+ 025 838 

— 845 226 
♦ 0/J5 £62 

-8*0 874 

-040 560 

.0*5 «51 

-0*5 59 

♦0*5 134 

-815 143 

♦IMS 

♦810 111 


CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMEK) l«r*-lHM«MhMin 
8J7» O T M f SEpM 07231 87258 07331 0725* -16 34*95 

87670 OJtOaDacM 87215 07247 871T5 0723* *17 3*37 

87605 (LTtBOMoryS 07215 07322 07210 07220 ‘18 69S 

07577 0*9WJun95 07181 +19 397 

07179 0AP6SSep95 07130 .07153 0J1JB 07155 +20 87 

87120 07B4ODec9S CL717I *21 9 

&tKrt« 5,117 Moi'LsalB 3*09 
Mcrtft open tar 3»jl5 up 929 

peWAANMAWC 1OHB0 I larnM-lp+NnkHM 

865W 0*600 Sep 94 06*41 06405 86370 06421 — » 98093 

06«6 mWODecM 06422 06490 043W 86423 -30 8603 

069B : B-5*» JOT 95 86435 06435 86435 06444 -20 51 

06SSI 0*347 Sep 95 —20 9 

8659S OJB10MOT96 06464 06466 08484 064X1 -20 1612 

Edjdes 25,129 Mon's. Kies 23*81 
Mon’s nurnfnt 105*68 rtl 2308 
JAPANESE YEN (CMSU sp«ym- 1 mm+iuaHi 
Q0104 mm9<8w »94 001 001080100381100990118 1)09981 —32 63*78 
80T049tt U>»5Z SDpc94 am HOro.Qll)O9BtLOiai200jn oca —32 6.914 
0-m 00080097768 X195 8010318 —34 2U 

Qjnff773LOKI200Sai95 8010301 —34 35 

Om»MllWWe8IWr96 08W129 -33 1.1S 

EsLSDta HA. Mon's. sate* 9*08 
Mon's open Ini 71620 Off I9H 


SWESS FRANC (CMBh uptwlmtauiam 
^|T7 0660050 W 07OT 07737 07601 87*52 -24 44*78 

07840 06885 Dec 94 07*73 07754 Q7«8 87665 -73 1.749 

OTIB) 07*66 -km 95 07713 —23 15 

077» 07420 Mar 96 07700 07753 0700 07688 —23 66 

EsLWteS 30,9*3 Man’s. sales 13*60 
Man’s open M 46*88 up 310 - 


Industrials 


♦15 

♦IS <8*08 
♦3* 

+ 36 32*44 
♦ 18 

♦36 7*66 
+36 X990 
♦ 36 

1,141 
♦36 2.146 
+36 

+36 270 

♦36 

+36 


aniONJ CNOftO gnbL-amiwh 

7060 99.51 Oct 9+ 67.40 6820 6687 

2'S I 5E M 4880 *7.05 *5*0 

78.15 62*0 Mar 95 6830 6840 £7*6 

TLB £400 Mav 95 £9.15 S93S 6835 

J875 69-30 -U 95 0.95 70*0 0*0 

7470 6489 Oct 95 0JO 0Jg 0*5 

g*» . 6f25Dec95 4810 6830 4772 

^Jfles 17*00 Mm’s, udes 8589 
MOTsopenkrt 48*74 up 579 


4779 ,073 5*32 

fj. tn 4+JJJ7 31*02 

6&B5 *0.20 

6885 t825 4*29 

063 +038 X003 

6895 +030 418 

£830 +821 1.142 


MOTsopenlra 41*74 up 579 
HEATW008. (NMER) OOMKrt-CMsptel 
K40 CJ0AUO94 SIJO 5130 5075 


PLATINUM (NMER! 90 kayo.- Stem ppmem 
43560 3680000 9* 4U5D 41560 <UJ» 414*0 

43550 3748D Jot 95 41760 <1800 *15-50 '41760 

CBM 0060 Ate 95 47000 48000 40800 43060 

42760 419 50 J* VS KOX 

CUB 422 0C OO *5 48640 

EsLieteS NA MOTs sates 2.117 
MviftopanM 83*18 0B 488 
GOLD (NCtUQ WUpyac^daior+D+rlrByp*- 
41560 3nJ0AugM 377*0 377*0 37560 

m00 37860 Sep 94 

417.00 144600094 37810 38880 37760 

42860 jGjBDecM 31168 38110 38830 

41160 36150 Fell 95 38880 3B6J0 388110 

41760 36460 Ate 95 38060 30760 31760 

42850 36160 JOT 95 39160 39360 39160 

4T2-5D 3B850AOT95 J9560 39560 398)0 

41130 4S1660cf9S 

49960 4D05DDee95 402J0 48250 48238 

42850 412JDF«96 

43060 41860 Apr 96 

43800 43360 Jun 96 

Est. mes 8)600 Mon'S urn iio« 

Man's acefr int ISLsa all 300 


Livestock 


13ft 

12V, 

CATTLfi 

(CMfiU XLCCOBk- 

wtnarti 


a'-i 

Bft 

7205 

6550 AIS 94 

«75 

0.75 

B4J0 

68X7 

*3ft 

47ft 

71 10 

657000 90 

7710 

7115 

71*5 

ns 

7ft 

7ft 

741) 

te.ioDecte 

raoo 

703 

0*5 

7005 

44 

Oft 

7«5 

67.90 Feb 95 

<940 

696! 

69.15 

4*JS 

12ft 

12*- 

75.10 

teXl Aorta 

70.90 

7100 

70X5 

7077 

7 

7ft 

69 JO 

£460 Junta 

67*0 

asi 

<715 

6767 

17 

Ifrft 

«/+! 

4660 /tog 95 4*80 

44.90 

5465 

66,70 

Iff*! 

13ft 

Ea sates 

17J94 Marti v*tr. 15659 


avs 

ft 

ABoh'.fldenirt 71X73 

W 1395 




— ».n 76 a 

—855 32*10 
-817 15,135 
-9.12 10,163 
-810 6.165 


F£ED6R CATTLE (CMS?) K6CD.cs.- cr^-.wrb. 


22H 

22*- 



78X5 

78X5 

780? 

78X7 




15ft 

4i.n 

H 00 Sep 94 

7682 



7690 

-ois 


ZV.’a 

»V, 

61 35 

70*5 Oct 94 

;ajo 

74X0 

7U0 

76*4 

-0 10 

2X33 

m 

24ft 

8800 

7260 Nm, 94 

77X0 

77X0 

77 SO 

77« 

-022 

1.97S 

14+1 

14 

»ta 

72.95 *n 95 

7145 

16X5 

7640 

7647 

-a« 

537 

14V 

17 

7330 


7400 

74.15 

TIM 

7407 



a» 

3-ta 

90*5 

TUStfGtti 

7540 

7S« 

7100 

75.10 

-03 

W 

16 

16 

7490 

72.45 Ate 94 

7460 

7480 


T4JJ 

—650 

157 


+860 17*38 
♦070 3*51 
♦890 1*85 
♦1*0 451 

♦ 1*0 


*89 278 

♦850 3 

♦ 850 10*71 
♦060 91*21 
♦850 13*93 
♦050 +343 
*850 9*84 
+ 0JB 4*99 

♦ 850 ijnj 
♦06B 5*17 
+060 
♦058 
*850 


Financial 


Golden Hope PI uo 261 ftbttwkoihj 


130 122 I Mitsumi 


AssBrlf Foods 5£5 560 1 £!?!*» 


Hume Industries 8*5 845 1 NEC 


5 Financ Agraiiid 
4 92 Finmeccanica 


Bank Scotland 161 )« I Fandlarla_spa 


Henkel 

Hoctiiief 

Hoectot 

Ht rii monn 

Horten 

IVtfKA 

Kali 5a tz 

Korsladt 

Kauttaf 

KHO 


591 585 

980 930 
3» 356 
682 048 
214 214 

39S 33? | 

1385013760 1 

sw sra 
52 520 
131129*0 


Kkwoner Werke 160M160 
Linde 04160 930 

Lufthansa 207200*0 

MAN 44144160 

Mannesmann 445*0 44S 

Metoiigeseli 1982018*50 

Muencn Rueck 2085 MW 

Porsche 330 B47 

Preussag 477 70479.70 

PWA 234 250 

RWE 443 444 


i Barclays 
Boss 
BAT 
BET 

Blue Circle 
BOC Group 
Boots 
Bowler 
BP 

Brit Airways 
Brit Gas 
Bril Steel 
Brit T e l e c o m 
BTR 

Cable Wire 
Cadbury Sett 
Ca radon 


5*7 5*3 S'?™™” A5*lc 

SJi 5.74 IrlL 

i3i tJS Ifokementl 

i.» i.n IS5S. 

114 3.12 JAerilabancn 

76? 734 Montedison 

5J5 5*5 g!' 1 *? 1 

460 AH Wreni »a 

4.12 4.13 gAS 

4.14 Al? " ln< S£2 , te 

287 2*5 San Paolo Torino 

16? 160 SIP 

3.77 3J6 5ME. . 

177 175 Sntabpd 

4*5 4*6 

4*7 444 Slei 

365 2.98 Toro ASS It 


787 J« 
1033 1040 
1560 1530 
1210 1219 




ineneope 5*0 575 NGK imuletors 1070 1070 

Keaae I HJO li Mkkp Securities 1220 1210 

KLKcpano 4*4 4 Nippon Kogoku 3030 1010 

Lum Chong 1-W >66 Nippon Oil 757 757 

Moloyori Bonks 9.90 980 Niccon Steel 375 372 

OCBC foreign «?B 7A15 «k*on Ywscn 663 658 

§ UB 6*5 6-15 Nissan 799 792 

UE 860 860 Nomura Sec HtO 2230 

Sembawang 1160 11*0 NTT E570aSS70a 


Zurich 


Stangrlki 
Slme Darby 


757 757 

375 372 
663 658 

779 772 

2260 2230 
8570a 8570a 


Adia Inti B 253 246 

Aiusulwe B new 488 487 
BBCBrwiBovB 1259 1273 
Ubo Gelgv B 824 827 
CS Hokflnas B 531 533 

Etektrow B 335 352 

, Fischer B 1510 14+0 


SOS 5*0 I Olympus Oat icsl 1170 1160 


interdhcsunl B 2160 2165 


5IA foreign 
Share Land 
5'Dore Press 


4*6 4*8 Pioneer 
1360 1360 Ricoh 
7*0 7*5 Sanyo Etee 
1660 1660 Short 


Ing SrmmrjhfP 1W I 5hlm«u 


2760 27<h 
970 9*2 
M 570 
I KM 1800 
720 733 


Pore Telecomm 150 15 1 shtnenu Chem 2100 gw 


Coals VIveHa Z24 125 MI8TEL : W»6 


Straits Times tod. : 
Previous : 3391*3 


Comm Union 
Courtoukls 
ECC GravP 


Enterprise Oil 4.04 469 


|*S 5*4 Previous : 103*7 

J JO 5J4 
360 360 


Montreal 


Eurolunnei 

Flsons 

Forte 

GSC 


?■?? 2.99 Iplcap Aluminum 33ft 32ft 

1*7 1*5 1 Bank Montreal 24ft 23ft 

2*2 2** BeN Canada 42k» 4sh 

2.92 2*4 1 Bombardier B 20 2Dft 


Strain Trading 360 362 Son t 5950 5930 

UOBtorelsh <4*0 M Sumitomo Bk 2020 7000 

UOL 2*3 224 Sumitomo Cham 572 554 

Straits Timas Ind. 1 230867 Sum! Marine 93? 92) 

ssasfs!s-“ t ° s« §* jg 

TakcdaChcm 1210 BH 

- TDK 6430 *370 

Tallin 400 595 

To subscribe in Germany Tokyo Marine 120 1260 

- — - ■ Tokyo Elec P* 3930 3510 

jug ccU-tefl free. Tappan n-mtlna 1510 l|10 

0^30 84 S5 B5 iSStol. W TO 


671 665 

1310 1S10 
6430 4370 
600 595 

120 7240 


775 770 

757 759 I, 


Jgftnoll B 8W 865 

Left*? Or rR 773 775 

MoevenuckB 07 407 

Nestle R 1186 1172 

OtetK Bue+wht R 14614660 
Poroesa Hid B 1510 ISIS 

RochiHdg PC 5720 5695 

Sofro Republic 114 It] 

sonata B 709 ns 

Schindler B 7125 7)00 

SuOer PC 958 958 

Surveillance B 2090 2090 

Swiss BnV Corps 297 394 

5wtss Relnsur R M3 343 

Swissair R 863 860 

UBS B 1113 1087 

Winterthur B 677 473 

Zurich ASS B 1275 1271 

SBS Index : 72462 
Previous : 928.41 


Est. sates VSU MOT?, sain 2.127 
MOTsooenM 111*71 oil 33k 
HOGS (CMEU SUBM-crhortB 
4661 42.50 AUS 94 4il0 454J 4J60 4SJ0 

075 39*30094 4060 40*2 39*5 4000 

3JJ0 3765 DSC 94 42.13 4025 0*5 067 

5080 3163 Feb 95 4058 4060 0*0 4UB 

MM 38 OS Apr 95 FJS 39 *5 395B 3968 

£7 JO 0*5 An 95 4140 44 57 44*0 44*7 

JIM 4if5 jui os "5 *5*3 **£ 

43*0 43J»Auo95 £L«3 4U» OH 42*5 

3BJD 39.7000 95 4023 40*5 40.10 AID 

Est. sates 6*20 MOTs-Mta 5.40 
MOTs own Ira 24.144 up 283 
PORXBELUES (CMERl terttBi-amperfe 
S9J0 26*5 Aug 94 BJB 31*3 3053 3055 


-AID 1*93 
-OS 11.947 
—4*5 6*80 
-023 1.918 
— C.I3 1.313 
-OI0 480 

-a io mo 

-005 38 

-0.10 10 


US T. BILLS (CMER) »1 mgs+n- mte Item. 

9A« MAISaoW 93*2 95*7 95.17 9521 17*79 

94.10 HZDecVi 9144 9181 9464 94*4 +ILB7 9*40 

95*5 0*8 Mar 9S 94*7 9U4 9US 9U6 +0*9 2*15 

, , JWI« 9U3 . +0*6 IB 

E9MR3 3,973 MOTS. SOM 2*17 
MOTiapenW 30773 off 394 . 


57.17 4360 Sap 94 4960 49 JO iBJD 

57*0 4190 Od 94 0*o 5tt» «A0 

SUB 4680 Nw 94 allS 5ft® 

59 JB 4680 Dec 94 57JH 52*5 51*0 

£Z25 1125 Jan 95 1150 Slta 52*0 

<7J5Ftb96 5135 53*S PUS 

S'?? X«5 tor9S a40 a -’° n-W 

B.15 <UK Acres 5070 5070 50-70 

5150 4679 Jun 95 ■ 56*0 mxe . otJO 

S5SSS aw S'- 10 si-® 

p i-wSS-w S3JD Sot m 

»*» 59J0PSb94 

^jeaes 30.724 Matftiohs 0SJ97 
Mot ft op en Int l«*40 up 7701 
UGHT5WST CRUDE WUBO l«6hm.d 
tan 1A50 Sip 94 1127 Ifljg 

g PSS-ta luB JS r,s 

™ fcggS $1 8 IrS 

I960 15*8 Feb 93 18-08 M.10 17*4 

2*4 SS US SS 

g gn s jss § 

+nin ]7-W5epW hLOS 18.13 17*4 

tata *65) Dec 93 18.14 18.17 I860 

®A8 1722 Jun 96 18*6 10*6 18*4 

Kj'ijSSiS .2S * SS4 0,1 ,m 6 

WtEAICT«SOL« (HM BU uau-i 
S’® «0S»94 SsSoSmUM 

£-90 0.1000 M JJJ6 S3J0 5160 

5! S5EJ2** 5070 stjo as 

3425 54.90 stS 

Sff “30J?"91 556g was S3 

Xft 51. to Feb 95 5150 54.50 51*6 

Morrft ooen ira 77 *w gtf« M 


—OI2 973 
-OJ6 *»,+»» 
— 052 22.721 
— 0-52 I&1M 
—0*7 31*79 
-0*2 17,1» 
-037 7601 
-032 7*87 
—0*7 2,198 
-0*7 7,133 
-017 4*80 
—0112 5*91 
-012 
— ai7 5D1 
—013 

—OI3 1*0 
—OI3 


—051 53611 
—0*9 74-795 
-031 37*93 
-024 41714 
— 0.16 26*37 
-003 14*19 
♦OB9 14*98 


♦014 10*24 
♦013 19,176 
+012 4,171 


-Ota 17.70 
+00811*05 


54.92 +009 32*71 
51J3 -030 19*95 

S0*+ -41*7 13655 

an _on 7,741 
54.57 — (HM 3*43 
5115 +065 2.134 


5YR. TREASURY (CBOD 

ID- KTO- 1 ? S«p94l0J-30S ID«-S I8M0 104.1$ ♦ 14 166,985 
104-18 101-24 Dec 94HM7IHD-23S KD07 10WJ t 16 20*33 
Cst xvea 62.090 Mom. sales AM 
mot ft ooen ire i«7*ib up one 


18TR.TTCMURY ICB071 siwxeontei telRtertMW 
HI W-W 5ep94n60t 108-30 184-Ot W-8 ♦ 27 21860 


114 113 

709 ns 
7825 7900 
.958 9S8 


6CJU 41 JB Feb 95 4165 4175 43i: *117 

40*0 4062 Mar 95 4146 4170 4265 4265 

41.15 4200 MOV 95 1175 8569 O-g 43*1 

WOO 8103695 8S.75 4180 4*27 4*70 

2*5 4160 Aug 95 , _ 4**o 

Esi. sates 3.UD MOTssAf 1*H 
Mot's open tot 7,964 IIP W 


-1*2 SOB 
-OOO 6.915 
-260 381 

-1.93 E 
-1.57 « 

-’K 1* 


COFFEE c (NCSE) „ 

77460 £d_S05ea94 19100 19*60 169*0 

3405 7710DeC« 194*5 19L00 19*03 

74*60 78.90 IMor 99 11050 199^ WSK 

74*40 n*0MarH2OOW 3W» »»» 

7*310 B& 00 Jul 95 38025 30025 MD.75 

19860 10350 SeoH 201*5 5i*5 

2*260 8160 Dec 95 302W 2 3&SD 

Eg. soles 9674 MOT'S. SOBS 9*06 
YsnsoaenM 33JA1 rfl 3*1 


—205 7.7» 
—165 17*37 
-563 5610 
• 400 1.932 
-600 425 

i660 129 

♦BOB 361 


114-31 mms Dec 94 103-02 KO-3) 103-0 103-38 + B 31,958 
111-07 raws Mar 95 WMB +. 28 67 

105-23 99-30 Jun 95 102-09 ♦ 28 3 

101-04 100-17 5ea?; 101-31 * 9 

Ed. sates ITS. 170 Monft-sdos X6U 
Man's open 2e 2 «60 off 2*7 

US^ TREASURY BONDS CC8DT) iB«o-staa.aw 4ttL SPOT a too »oi 
lio-as 90-12 SCP«* lBB-U 10+62 B2-14 101-80 +1U 328*83 

118-08 91-19 D« W 101 -H 103-09 101-24 HD-08 +114 91*75 

116-20 90-20 Mte 95101-14 HB-1* 101-13 102-17 +1 U 4645 

« W-13 Jun 95 100-19 UMS W0-W HH-ta +114 1*99 

I 7-15 97-28 Septa UO-Ot HS-0+ 100-06 HMff +IU £74 

1J-W 97-H Oecta NO-24 +114 » 

114-06 98-23 Marti 16069 +1U *9 

WO- 70 94-13 Junta 99L30 99-2* 99-20 99-20 *11* 1* 

ajtei 575680 MOTs, sates 1»« 

MOT 5 open tot 43S6M Off 1*923 

MUMCffALBONK (CBOD UBBiHteteBMrtmM 
95.17 14-13 Sep 94 90-14 91-02 90-14 91-31 +101 21*35 

n-17 87-21 DuC 94 89-21 RM1 Ml 90-71 +101 30 

EAsotes 4*00 MOTs. sates 1*56 
Man’s acenirt 2TJ3S is I0K7 
EUROOOLLAffS KMBt) itnBMnrtnoa 


stock indexes 

S’ comp, (onew »wtedte 

«120 436J5Seo9£ *416. ^0 WJD *££*? +3*8196.918 

^ ISIS *5?“ +M0 30691 

« 5525 tMS ^ 

Eg-SOT* NJL itor*:^ * 3W 


fSQggnW TBfiO * up" 1U( 

25760 

U9 WOT WOT S 1 ® 2SA55 +160 3619 

».» SuoSSta *** Jg-S *!•» 

BMO 25(50 Junta *! ot 

^Mte* NA Motl sates 1,157 * ,J0 

MOTs awn tot 3610 Mfn 


Commodity Indexes 

tSB ilf 

CMkRaSdi ia-?s 


• t » ^ 4 

t , 

,.tt > 1 




O' V&P 


MTSE 


)OSP. I I+i-fcr*-* 






! ** 

I _ 



INTERNATIONAL herald TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17, 1994 


Philips Venture 


Forging a Trilingual Frigate 

Europe Moves to Integrate Arms Industry 


EINDHOVEN, Netherlands 
Three companies said Tues- 
day they were plazxning-a joint 
venture that would allow cable 

television companies to offer 
individualized programming, 
such as video cm demand and 
pay per view, across Europe. 

The partners in the venture 
are Philips Electronics NV, 
with a 45 percent stake. Royal 
PIT Nederland NV, with 35 
percent, and Graff Pay-Per- 
View lna, with 20 percent. 
Graff operates 11 pay-per-view 
channels in the United States 
and delivers programming to 
cable operators there. 


Unilever Guts 
Price of Omo 
InSoapWar 

Rearers 

ROTTERDAM —Unil- 
ever said Tuesday it had cut 
the price of its Omo Power 
washing powder by more 
than half in the Nether- 
lands, as sales were hurt by 
a bitter soap war with rival 
Procter & Gamble Co. 

The Anglo- Dutch food 
giant will refund Dutch 
customers 10 guilders 
($5.70) of Omo's 17 goAder 
purchase price until Thurs- 
day, a spokesman said. 
“When our competitor 
started spreading rumors 
about the product, of 
course this was damaging 
to consumer confidence,* 
the spokesman 

Unilever spent $171 mil- 
lion developing Omo Pow- 
er, called Persil Power in 
Britain, and set aside a 
massive advertising budget 
in a bid to win leadership 
from P&G in the European 
washing-powder market. 

But allegations from its 
U.S. rival that the new 
product damaged clothes 
after repeated washings 
forced Unilever to adjust 
the formula and reopen its 
marketing. 


The companies would not say 
how much they had invested. 

The Dutch cable-TV operator 
Casema, which is 7 6 percent 
owned by Royal PTT, will be the 
first customer- “I think there is 
demand for more individual 
choices," said Tan Vanderiaan, a 
spokesman far Casema, which 
controls 22 percent of the na- 
tional market "This will help us 
serve our customers better." 

Other European customers 
will follow, said Philips, which 
also is in the cable-TV market 
This year. Philips Media and 
UJS--based United Internation- 
al Holdings Inc. said they 
planned to jointly own, develop 
and operate cable-television 
businesses in Europe. 

Philips said thc latest venture 
would begin marketing pay- 
per-view, video-on-demandand 
specialized channels to cable 
operators next month. The ca- 
ble-TV companies that will pro- 
vide thepTOgr ammfng will offer 
special video packages to cable 
subscribers hue this year or in 
early 1995. 

Videoon demand allows tele- 
vision viewers to choose indi- 
vidual movies or other pro- 
grams. Pay-per-view services 
allow incfividuals to buy “tick- 
ets" to view movies, sports con- 
tests, concerts and other events 
cm television. 

Analysts said the venture was 
not likely to contribute much to 
the partners’ sales or profit in 
the next few years. “I’m not 
changing any forecasts for 
now, said Steven Vrofijk, an 
analyst with Crfedit Lyonnais 
Securities in Amsterdam. 

The venture does help Phi- 
lips’s campaign to beef up its 
media business. "This will help 
Philips in establishing itself as a 
multimedia business,” Mr. Vro- 
lijksaid. 


By Richard W. Stevenson 

New York Times Server 

LONDON — Each needing a new destroy- 
er for its navy, Italy, France and Britain set 
aside tradition for common sense last month 
and agreed to build the warships together. 
They awarded contracts that could run as 
high as $12 billion to a consortium of ship- 
building, electronics and armaments compa- 
nies from tiie three nations. 

“It wiH allow all three countries to benefit 
from better economies of scale as well as from 
pooling the technologies of three highly in- 
dustrialized countries,” said Italian Defense 
Minister Cesare PrevilL 

The Euroftigate program, as it is known, is 
being driven partly by the European Union’s 
attempts at greater coordination in foreign 
and military policy. Lending encouragement 
is the experience with Airbus, the multina- 
tional commercial jetliner that has made Eu- 
rope competitive in civil aviation. 

European governments can no longer af- 
ford to develop three new fighter planes as the 
United States concentrates its efforts on one, 
the F-22. No longer does it make sense to 
buDd three different tanks, or to keep British 
or Spanish suppliers, for example, from com- 
peting for French contracts. 

“If they’re going to survive, they have to 
move rapidly,” said Paul Cornish, a military 
industry analyst at the Royal Institute of 
Internationa] Affairs in London. “European 
industry has realized that if it does not get 


itself together and pull its socks up, it will lose 
out to the U.S.” 

In the United States, military contractors 
have consolidated with breathtaking speed. 
Some companies, such as General Dynamics 
Corp., are selling themselves chunk by chunk, 
while others, such as Grumman Corp., have 
been sold entirely. And those that, like Lock- 
heed Corp.. have survived the shakeout have 
emerged bigger and stronger and more eager 
than ever to compete for business. 

For reasons of security, history, pride and 
jobs, European governments have tended to 
support national military contracting indus- 
tries even when it might have been cheaper to 
buy abroad. In many cases — particularly in 
France — the biggest contractors remain 
state-owned. 

“It’s hard to merge a government-owned 
company with a privately owned company,” 
said Keith Hodgkiason, an analyst at Leh- 
man Brothers in London. 

In addition to the Eurofrigate program, 
two of the biggest collaborative programs are 
the $50 billion European fighter aircraft pro- 
ject involving Germany, Britain, Italy and 
Spain and a proposed military transport 
plane that would be built in France, Germa- 
ny, Spain and Britain. 

France and Germany are to build an ar- 
mored personnel carrier together, and those 
two nations plus the Netherlands and Italy 
are collaborating on developing a military 
helicopter. 


Volatile Markets Cut Swiss Bank Net 


Conpikd by Our staff From Dispatches “I’m really shocked." said “cautiously optimistic about 

ZURICH — Swiss Bank Madeleine Hofmann, bank an- prospects for the second half." 
Corp. said Tuesday its first-half alyst at Credit Suisse in Zurich, though those would depend 
net consolidated profit fell 39 “It’s far below my worst expec- “mainly on financial market 
percent because of a drop in rations.” trends.” 

trading income and weaker in- Nonetheless. Swiss Bank’s (Bloomberg. AFP, AFX) 

terest eannngs. stock rose to 397 francs Tues- _ 


“cautiously optimistic about 


net consolidated profit fell 39 
percent because of a drop in 
trading income and weaker in- 
terest earnings. 


“m ainl y on financial market 
trends." 

(Bloomberg. AFP, AFX) 


The bank earned 438 million day from 394. ■ iron nonute man fuses 

Swiss francs ($336 million) in The bank said income from Den norske Bank AS's firs t- 
the half, down from 719 million commissions rose 1 1 percent, to half earning s jumped to 1.47 
francs in the first half of 1993, 1.34 million francs, reflecting billion kroner ($215 million) 
as turbulent financial markets continuing strong investment from 204 million kroner in the 
shaved 63 percent from trading activity. 1993 first Half , helped by gains 

income, holding it to 537 mil- Improved economic condi- in foreign exchange and securi- 


Den Norske Profit Rises 

Den norske Bank AS’s first- 


income, holding it to 537 mil- 
lion francs. 


ments fall 53 percent, to 585 


. Swiss Bank said trading in write-downs and value adjus 

On the Amsterdam Stock Ex- and interest-rate instru- ments fall 53 percent, to 51 

ange, Philips shares rose Lto ments suffered from adverse million francs, the bank said. 

^ orauHaons. wh?c in- Operating expenditure „ 
’ come from trading in foreign down less than 1 percent, pt 

[soon Tuesday, Philips said exchange and European eqm- sonnd costs fell 6 percent, at 
s in talks to acquire Regina ties exceeded expectations. non personnel costs rose 9.7 p< 
a vacuum cleaner maker Continuing pressure on mar- cent to 783 milli on francs. Ta 
1 in Atlanta. Regina em- gins saw interest income drop 15 es fell 29 percent, to 154 millii 
» about 1,000 and has an- percent, to 1.37 billion francs, francs. 


commissions rose 1 1 percent, to half earnings jumped to 1.47 
1.34 million francs, reflecting billion kroner ($215 million) 
continuing strong investment from 204 million kroner in the 
activity. 1993 first half, helped by gains 

Improved economic condi- ip foreign exchange and securi- 
lions and borrower quality saw ties trading, news agencies re- 
write-downs and value adjust- ported from Oslo. 


The bank said it had no net 
loan losses and nonperforming 


Also on Tuesday, Philips said exchange and European equi- 
rt was in talks to acquire Regina ties exceeded expectations. 

Co n a vacuum cleaner maker Continuing pressure on mar- 
based in Atlanta. Regina em- gjns saw interest income drop 15 
ploys about 1,000 and has an- percent, to 1.37 billion francs, 
nual sales of about $200 mil- even though provisions to cover 
lion. (Bloomberg, AFX) unpaid interest were lower. 


Operating expenditure was feU to 8 4 billion kroner as 
down less than 1 percent, per- ? f Jun * 30 £ om ,0 - 4 bfll,on 
sound costs fefl 6 percent, and kroner 31 - 


non personnel costs rose 9.7 per- 
cent to 783 milli on francs. Tax- 


The bank said its income on 
trading in foreign exchange. 


es fell 29 percent, to 154 million bonds and financial instru- 


francs. ments was particularly high last 

The country’s third-biggest year because of a sharp drop in 
banking company said it was interest rates. (AFX. Reuters) 


TiTT 


EtV VtOPE JOOs 


LowLHEgQfn* 


Oh> YM PE 1HB 


Tuesday’* Closing 

Tables Include the natforwida prices up to 
the dosing on Wan Street and do not reflect 
late trades elsewhere. Via The Associated Press 


12 Month 
MghUMrODC* 


9s 

to e wwi 



Page 11 




Hanson Net 
Rose in 
3d Quarter 

Compiled by Ovr Staff From Dupatfft* 

LONDON — The Anglo- 
American industrial conglom- 
erate Hanson PLC said Tues- 
day that third-quarter pretax 
profit rose 10.2 percent, as an 
upturn in business followed last 
year’s strike at Peabody Coal 
Co. in the United States. 

Pretax profit in the three 
months ended June 30 was £282 
million ($436 million', on sales 
of £177 billion. Last year, when 
the results were hit by the US. 
coal strike, Hanson reported 
pretax profit of £256 million on 
sales of £131 billion. 

The three-month figures in- 
cluded what Hanson called 
“very satisfying" figures from 
Quantum Chemical Co., the 
U.S. polythene and propane 
maker that Hanson bought last 
year. Quantum posted £46 mil- 
lion in profit and had sales of 
£344 million. 

Hanson said net income rose 
14.4 percent, to £214 million, 
compared with £187 million in 
the 1993 period. 

The company was hit by an 
interest charge of £57 million in 
the third quarter, up from a 
charge of just £1 milli on in the 
1993 period, and a loss of about 
£10 million in foreign exchange. 

The increase in interest 
charges, flagged by the compa- 
ny at the time of its annual 
report, results from a differen- 
tial between certain U.S. and 
British interest rates and the ad- 
ditional costs of acquisitions. 

“The results reflect an im- 
proving trend and that the 
brighter picture evident at the 
halfway stage has now been 
confirmed,” said Derek Bon- 
ham, chief executive. 

Hanson said it would raise its 
quarterly dividend to 3.00 
pence from 2.85 pence a share. 

A strike at Peabody Coal that 
ended in December cost thi 
company £80 million in the 
nine-month period just ended, 
compared with £50 million a 
year earlier. 

“There were no real surprises 
with the results, and they came 
in at the lower end of expecta- 
tions,” said Ian Hilliker. an an- 
alyst with NatWesl Securities in 
London. He saw little reason to 
change generally upbeat fore- 
casts. 

(Bloomberg, AP, Reuters) 


Frankfurt 

DAX 



aw - 


1900 y" a ifi” j‘j a 


London : ■ 
FTSE 100 Index 


3300. -••• 

3M0 -■■■■■• 


M A M J7'A 


. ■ Paris .. 
CAC 40‘ 

•2300 


"j.- 

2000 \ : R 

\m - .V- 

1s30 'm rirmr 

1994 


Exchange ' ' Index 


A msterdam 

Brussels 

Frankfurt 

Frankfurt 

Helsinki 

London 

London • 

Madrid 

Mian ' 

Paris 

Stockholm 
Vienna ■ 
Zurich 


■ index . .. Tuesday 

Close 

AEX 417.07 

Stock Index .. . 7,605.45 

DAX .. 2,143.14 

FAZ 611.98 

HEX 1320.99- 

Financial Times 30 2,474.60 
FTSE 100 ■■ 3,147.30" 

General Index 310.47 

“MB' ' 1,056JMr 

CAC 40 2,012-35 

AhaersvaBiKten : 14T71A1 
Stock Index ■ NA. 

SBS . 924,52 


310.47 

1.05&00 

2,012-35 

1,871.41 

NLA. 

924,52 


Sources: Reuters, AFP 


Close ‘ Change 
415.18 ' +0.46 
7,600.50 -+0.07 
2,138 84 • +0.20 
807.04 *0.61 

1,807.14 *6:77 

2,474:80 -o.ot 

3,14220 +0.16 

311.57 -035 

1,041.00 .+1.44 

2,006.95 +0.27 

1359.48 +0.64 

457,13 

920.41 . +0.46 
InicnuliiHut HciAJ Tnhjac 


Slow Diamond Demand 
Cuts Into De Beers Profit 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

JOHANNESBURG — De Beers Consolidated Mines Lid., 
the world's largest seller of rough diamonds, said Tuesday 
that profit in the first half of 1994 fell 3 percent amid lower 
sales and higher stockpiles of unsold diamonds. 

The diamond cartel said it earned $341 million before taxes 
in Ihe six months, down from $353 million in vhe 1993 first 
half. Results reflect earnings of De Beers Consolidated, with 
its minin g, investments in Sou lb Africa, and De Beers Cenie- 1 
nary AG, the Swiss unit that operates mines outside South 
Africa. . ... 

The results are stated based on earnings m South African 
rand and U.S. dollars. 

The company said sales fell to $460 million from $482 
million a year earlier, while taxes rose nearly 15 percent, to 
$101 million. 

Higher stockpiles of diamonds meant that De Beers sold 
more low-profit gems, said Peter Davey. an analyst at Frankel 
Pollack Vinderine. He said stockpiles rose to about $3.8 
billion from $3.1 billion a year earlier. 

I \ De Beers said it expected second-half sales to fall from 
I fust-half levels, mirroring the pattern seen last year. 

( Bloomberg, AFX Reuters) 


One-Time Gain Lifts Electrolux Net 

Compiled by Our Stiff) Front Dispatches 

STOCKHOLM — Electrolux AB. the maker of household 
appliances, said first-half profit soared because of one-time gains 
and belter market conditions. 

profit after net financial items rose to 4.44 billion kronor (S570 
million) from 605 million kronor in the first half of 1993, and sales 
rose to 55.56 billion kronor from 49.65 billion kronor. 

The profit included a one-time gain of 2.78 billion kronor from 
the sale of units, particularly from its car safety products company 
Autoliv, which was spun off in a bourse listing. 

(Reuters, Bloomberg) 


Very briefly; 

• Sedgwick Group PLC. one of the world's largest marine insur- 
ance brokers. reported pretax profit of £63.4 million {$98 million) 
in the first half of 1 994, up 14 percent from 1995 amid a shaip rise 
in worldwide fee and brokerage income. 

• Standard & Poor’s Corp: said it confirmed its B-plus rating of the 
long-term foreign currency debt of Turkey and has removed it 
from CreditWatch where it was placed on March 22. S&P said the 
rating outlook was stable. 

• Deutsche Aerospace AG said that Alcatel Alstbom SA of France 
has joined it and Aerospatiale in talks about forming a company to 
build satellites, a move that could lead to the world's ihird-largest 
satellite maker. 

• Lisbon’s stock exchange said bids for as much as 80 percent of 
Portugal's state-owned Banco Pinto e Sotto Mayor SA must be 
submitted by OcL 3. 

• Sanofi SA's purchase of the prescription drug operations of 
Sanofi Winthrop, a joint venture between Sanofi and Eastman 
Kodak Co., was cleared by the European Commission. 

• Sulzer AG said it reached an agreement to sell 70 percent of its 
information technology services unit Sulzer Informatic AG to the 
Swiss unit of International Business Machines Corp. 

» Bowater PLC said it bought a private engineering company, 
W.H. Smith & Sons (Extrusions) Ltd., for as much as £39.8 
million. The purchase price includes a payment of £34.8 million 
and a further £5 million dependent on future performance. 

■ Owners Abroad Group PLC said it planned to change its name to 
First Choice Holidays after a review of its brand and marketing 
strategy revealed low consumer awareness of its main brands. 

• Spain’s producer prices rose 0.4 percent in June from Mav and 
were up 4.3 percent from June 1993. Rgmm Bloomheftm i FF . afx 


U.S. $500,000,000 

A National Westminster Bank 

(Incorporated in England with limited liability) 
Primary Capital FRNs (Series M B”) 

In accordance with the provisions of the Notes, notice is hereby 
given that for the six months interest period from August 16. 1994 to 
February 16, 1995 the Notes will carry an Interest Rate ol 
5.5625% per annum. The interest payable on the relevant interest 
payment date, February 16. 1995 against Coupon No. 20 will be 
U.S. S2.843.06 and U.S. $284.31 respectively for Notes In 
denominations of U.S. SI 00.000 and U.S. $10,000. 

By: The Chase Manhattan Bank, N.A. 

London. Agent Bank 

Aug ust16, 1994 


On September 5th, the IHT will publish a 
Special Report on 

Aviation 

■ Developments of the GE90, a new 
aircraft engine. 

■ Future of mergers and acquisitions in the 
industry. 

■ Importance of the Chinese market in 
aircraft sates. 

■ Privatization of airports. 

■ Secrets of success for the European 
charter industry. 

An extra 3,000 copies of the newspaper win be distributed 
at the Famborough Air Show on the same day. 

For more information about this Special Report, 
please contact Bill Mehder in Paris 
at (33-1) 46 37 93 78, fax: (33-1) 46375044. 

■rp* 4 W INTERNATIONA! « 4 


CURRENCY AND CAPITAL MARKET SERVICES 




Currency Management Corporation Plc 

11 Okt Jewry - London EC2R 8DU 
TeL 071-865 0800 Fax: 071-972 097 0 


FORTH* 


iXCHANGE 


m 

-S 

1 J.. IJV, •>» 

U<V -1* 

ill 

Irl 

)M» >1% — .W 

SSiSZa 

jj a •* * 

iS isTii 
«*- 

MB’* 

*BS di 

is B 


24 Hour London Dealing Desk 
Competitive Rates & Dally Fax Sheet 
Call for further information & brochure 


Signal 


» 130+ software appfceatons O 

> RT DATA FROM $10 A DAY O 

> Signal SOFTWARE GUIDE © 
Call London: C 44+ (Q) 71 231 3558 
lor your guide and Signal price fet 


Catch The Big Moves 

Commfrac. the computerised trading system is now available by tax. 
Commtrac covers over 75 commodities/financiai fulures/indicies 
with specific “Buy". "Seir or “NeutraT recommendations 

Request your 5-day tree trial by sending a fax 
to Carol on 0624 662272 inf + 44624 662272 


SWIFT CALL COMMUNICATIONS 


PRIVATE VOICE CIRCUIT S - PER.ASQSLM. 
Calk to USA - 20p per minute Japan/Bong Kong -56p per tolonlg 


LONDON - NEW YORK - LONDON 


CALL* LONDON 071 488 2001, DUBLIN (01) 67 10 457 


FullerMoney - the Global Strategy Newsletter 

6ocki. o.MTcr.:.-e< * •nc ; cir'§ .wet,. - ■ 

?Z 5 by Jn^ono; ' 

ovorttiv. Siciic ML-cEbc-r l.Si+i. f.riiuc. ; -_ 


O-.sf? AncRvS'i •' 
Tc' ;=r ~zr. 71 - 43 V 


■ 3 rd C;y. Sail: tv: ci 
> .IcJ'jfcrs. 

.rCoi "ok 2', -£29 4956 



ECUTerminwstPlC 
29 Cheaham Race 
Belgravia 

London SW1X8HL 
TeL: +71 245 0088 
Fat +71 235 8599. 
Member SF A 


FUTURES & OPTIONS BROKERS 


ROUND 
TURN 

EXECUTION ONLY 



For further details on bow to place your listing contact 
WILL NICHOLSON tn London 
TeL- (44) 71 836 48 02 -Fax: (44) 71 240 2254 

Jicrolb^^^Sribune. 


MEMBER SFA 


Commodities 
on the Move 
Time to Speculate? 

Gill Philip O'Neill 
Td.: + 44 71 3-‘> 3333 
Fax; + 4-i “1 329 3919 



(JTTFl *C\ i(V d\ 

















































































































. ■ '_■ -t -,\.£~^; ; - 


"N * 


INTERN ATIOIVAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17, 1994 


Page 13 

ASIA/PACIFIC 


ion Unemployed in 2000 


° arS wFn" Dafatdta ■ ... — the migrant rural workers who gravi- 

HONG KONG — China- said Tues- tate io the city- for part-time employ- 
day that despite a sui^g.ecohony,. the. meat and -are mostly unemployed. 

Ti? s0 " r . t0 268 "nie Labor Mtnisuys report indireci- 
£ the C “ tm3 ' ~7 *■ ly acfeowWged ihe mideneportin* 

P'W 1 *' Officials now put the number of such 

ejtr - i ■ 56 million to fiO million. 

i , flT, B ° ?? p essnmsttc official em- Provincial leaders say the figure could 
ploymMi projection yet published, the be as high as 100 mflhon. ^ * 

Labor Mimstry said it exiweted 200 m3- ' - *n . 

lion to be out of work inraral regions v f woricers have 
and 68 nuliion in the cities by the year China s fast-developing 

2000, when the population of S? cmcs . <hmn 8 the ^ )asl decade - 
expected to total 13 billion, die official : China once guaranteed workers Kfe- 
Xmhua News Agency reported. time 'employment, but in its uim to a 

By the end of 1994, the official unan^" ***&& economy, Beijing has encouraged 


will not find other employment, the offi- 
cial report admitted. 

Meanwhile, Chinese central bank of- 
ficials this week are holding meetings at 
a seaside resort that economists say 
could lead to higher interest rates. 


economically, though it also would cany 
substantial political risks. 

“We think China needs to raise inter- 
est rates by 500 basis points, because 
real interest rates are now about nega- 
tive 6 percent,” said Ho Cheuk-yuet. 

■ />L' t ■T'l • * 


Hong Kong’s influential Chinese-lan- head of China research at Credit Lyon- 
guage Ming Pao Daily News on Tuesday nais Securities. 


quoted an unidentified source as saying 
officials at the meeting had already re- 
solved to raise rates this year to help 
curb inflation. 

China last raised interest rates in May 


“Raising interest rates by that much, 
however, would kill China's state enter- 
prises," Mr. Ho said. Slate firms owed 
each other 360.4 billion yuan (S41 bil- 
lion) at the end of June, making a 78 


ployment total in China will jump by 1 staterowned companies to cut back, 
million, toa total of 5 million, as bloated : , : Tjsbs.of.infllions of employees 1 
state compames slash their work forces.- unprofitable state enterprises are 
But analysts have long said that Beijing peeled tojoin China’s jobless lines it 


and July of 1993. The official rate for percent increase in debt in 12 months, 
working capital loans is currently just The state-run China Daily also re- 
short of If percent, the same as the rate ported that in an effort to stem urban 


ioklv 


grossly underestimated the size of the 
country’s so-called floating population 


Workers Set 
To Return 
At Hyundai 

Agotct Francf-Pmje 

SEOUL — The. labor union 
at South Korea’s largest shop- 
yard, Hyundai Heavy Indus- 
, tries Co., agreed Tuesday to re- 
sume work Thursday after the 
company- unilaterally ended a 
costly lockout. • 

But the union leader, Lee 
Kap Ryong, warned that dis- 
putes could break out again at 
(he shipyard in Ulsan if the 
company refused to accept 
union demands. 

The agreement to return to 
work came shortly after the 
shipyard's president, Kim 
Chung Kuk, ended a 28-day 
lockout and urged uncondition- 
al resumption of negotiations. 

“Both the company and 
workers have been seriously hit 
by the drawn-out labor dispute, 
while our suppliers and the lo- 
cal economy are on the verge of 
bankruptcy," Mr. Kim said. 


tfAtVtnonW-ri rrmnwnL* tZrtZT ^ & “ ort of 1 1 percent, the same as the rate ported that in an effort to stem urban 
state-owned companre to cut back. for one-year lime deposits. Encroachment on farmland, Beijing 

Tens of . millions of employees from With China's inflation rate still hover- would crack down on “rampant approv- 
unprofitable state enterprises are ex- mg around 20 percent and growth at 11.6 al” of real-estate developments. Curbing 
peeled tojoin China’s jobless lines in- the percent between the first half of 1993 and property speculation has been a goal of 
co ming decade. Despite annual ecosom- the first half of this year, economists say China’s efforts to reduce inflation, 
ic growth of around 10 percent, most raising interest rates would make sense (Knight -Bidder, Reuters, Bloomberg) 


Bloomberg Business News 

. . TOKYO — ; Predicting a rally. in ILS. 
and European stocks, Morgan Stanley 
Group Ina said Tuesday that one of its 
leading strategists. Barton Big gs, had 
changed his model portfolio of global 
equities, cutting the proportion of Japa- 
nese stocks to .20 percent from 30 per- 
cent. 

Of the 10 percentage points in the 
portfolio moved away from Japanese 
stocks, four were added to UJS. stocks, 
three to European stocks and three to 
“emerging markets,” said Alexander 
Kinmont, the- securities firm’s strategist 
in Tokyo. 

Biggs, chairman of Morgan Stanley 
Asset Management, has a reputation for 
moving markets. His comment in Sep- 
tember 1993 that he was “maximum 


bullish” on China helped propel Hong 
Kong’s benchmark Hang Seng Index to 
what was then a peak of 9,73334 points 
on Nov. 15. He changed his view later 
that week, and the index subsequently 
fell below 9,000. 

News of Mr. Biggs's change of heart 
on Tokyo stocks was one reason the 
Japanese government encouraged pen- 
sion and postal savings funds into the 
Tokyo stock market Tuesday, traders 
and analysts said. 

The Nikkei 225 stock index rose 0.78 
percent Tuesday, to end at 20,78636. 

Asked whether Tuesday’s announce- 
ment would lead Morgan Stanley to sell 
Japanese stocks, John ADtire, president 
of Morgan Stanley Investment Advisory 
in Japan said, “Not at afl.” 


uamcer 

an s Share ^ 


Mr. Kimont added, “The idea that 
because we’re lowering Japan’s weight- 
ing we’re selling huge amounts of Japa- 
nese stock is completely wrong.” 

Mr. Kinmont described Japan’s rating 
at Morgan Stanley as “neutral,” in line 
with its contribution to world gross do- 
mestic product. 

Some analysts said it would not matter 
what Morgan Stanley thought, because 
foreign investors were already pulling 
out of Japanese stocks and Japanese in- 
vestors were waiting to buy them. 

Fernando Gueler, a trader at Baring 
Securities said that over the next few 
weeks, “you’ll probably see foreigners as 
net sellers, and then Japanese public 
funds and Japanese corporate investors 
will come in and buy." 


Chief Offers 
To Leave 
Goodman 

Bloomberg Business Hews 

SYDNEY — The embattled 
Australian food group Good- 
man Fielder Ltd. said Tuesday 
that Chair man John Studdy 
was prepared to quit to stave off 
a revolt by major shareholders. 

But several major institution- 
al holders, such as the Austra- 
lian Mutual Provident Society, 
said that may not be enough. 

Leigh Hall, deputy managing 
director of AMP Investments, 
said shareholders wanted addi- 
tional changes. 

The announcement followed 
a meeting between the board 
and the company's three largest 
Australian shareholders: AMP, 
Bankers Trust and the State Su- 
perannuation Authority of New 
-South Wales. 

The board also said it was 
prepared to consider the former 
Unilever chairman, Jon Peter- 
son, and the former Mars Aria 
chairman, Ken Neil sen, as new 
members. 

The turmoil surrounding 
Goodman’s management and 
board flared last year and led to 
the departure of the chief exec- 
utive, Michael NugenL 


Investor’s Asia 


Hong. Kong 
Hang Seng 
11000.,-;. 


Singapore. 

. Straits Times ' 

• 24QQ - 


7- — - 


Nikkei 225 

ms r ~ 


: 180Kh~*-^4 - 


'm'a iX j JA ‘ M A tfVjA 

1994 .. .1994 . . .." 1994. ■ . ' 

mnge Index'. ■■■'.- • Tuesday.' . Prev,. • * 

Closet ...Close ^Change 

Kong Kong ■. Haibg $eng j ' ' 9,366^2 ' 9,486.13 -156 

: ' Singapore : ' ' St^ Time's /; 

" Sydney ' "' M . OrcOnsulds:. 2J4tM» ' -£055.70 -0,7$; ; 

TOkyp ,. : . Z Nikkei 225 , - 20,78636 20.626.33 +0.78 

I la Lupipur : Composite ’ "i.irarta^ 1,092.80 +1.41 
igkoit'-; •• SET '.. 


; .Composite Stock' '■ 939.90 " ' ' 944.61 ' ' 
Weighted. Price • • 6,583.90 6,543.57~ 


3,011.60 

48330- 

2J08237 

2,i29JS6 


3,005.95 ; +0.19 
478.03 .- '.+1.17. 
2^97.64 CflTfr 
2,(22.33- 5 

Interna lhkuI I IcraM Tritwoc 


gling as it seeks to refocus on 
core food activities after a di- 
versification spree in the 1980& 
The failure of Goodman's* 
board and the institutions to 
reach agreement over board 
changes have made a special 
shareholder meeting appear in- 
creasingly likely, to consider re- 
vamping the board. 


Ku ala Luynpur : Composite • 
Bangkok-; SET 
Seoul ;.CofflppriieSto 

Taipei / _ ' Weighted. Price 

Manila V y, PS£ 
Jakarta'" S^ick Index 
New'zealand '.M2SE-40 : ' ' 
Bombay ' National Index 

Sources: Reuters. AFP 

Very briefly: 


• Hino Motors Ltd, a Japanese truck manufacturer and a Toyota 
Motor Corp- affiliate, will halt production of small cars it made 
under the Toyota brand in late August, Jtji Press said. 

• F.H- Fau1 ding & Cd, an Australian drug company, said it would 
buy a 90 percent interest in Merrywise Co. of Hong Kong, a 
manufacturing and distribution business in China, for S30 million. 

• Procter & Gamble Co. signed a memorandum of understanding 
with a Vietnamese chemical firm, Pbuong Dong, to form a joint 
venture to manufacture and market its products in Vietnam. 

• Evergreen Marine Corp. of Taiwan said it would sign a contract 
next month with General Electric Co. of China to build a container 
terminal in Zhang Jia port in Jiangsu Province. 

iAFP.AFX. Bloomberg, Knighi- Riddcr) 



Cathay to Revamp Airport in China 


Ccufikd bf Otr Staff From Dispatches 

HONG KONG — Cathay Pacific Airways 
Ltd. said Tuesday that it had signed an agree- 
ment to form a joint venture valued at 1.1 billion 
Hong Kong dollars ($142 million) to help man- 
age and develop Xiamen airport in China. 

The airport, winch is the fourth-largest in 


Co., a unit in which Cathay holds a 25 percent 
stake; are already developing a joint aircraft 
maintenance facility at Xiamen. Operations are 
expected to start in late 1995. 

The airport handled 2.6 million passengers in 
1993, and the number is expected to exceed 3 


The workers are seeking Chi£ r^ i^adS ^ ^^Tt?uc^ million in the current year. 

*** terminal and the extension of the AFF^ Bloomberg} 

runway to handle Boring 747s and other large ■ Thai Airways’ Profit Nearfy Triples 
proved working conditions. Thai Airways International said itTpretax 

After the company locked < Cathay said it would put up one- third of the profit nearly tripled from a year earlier, to 3.07 
them out in July, workers 1.1 bflfioa dollars. billion baht ($123 million), in (he nine months 

staged sit-ins, camped on die The joint venture will develop airport infra- ended June 30, Agence France- Pres se reported 
grounds cr occupied cranes and structure, ground-service equipment and aspects 
other facilities. of passenger handlin g, Catnay said. 

Company officials said the In addition to providing equity, Cathay Padf- 
strike had already caused in ic will contribute management skills and offer 
_ losses totaling S660 znSlion, in- training to local airport staff. 

* eluding $270 mQHon inmissed “This is the first investment by a nonmainland 
exports. The shipyard also said airline in China’s aviation infrastructure.” said 
it had missed out on twopoten- David Turnbull, a deputy m anagin g director of 
tial projects valuedrat$750xn3- Cathay. - ■: 

lion, and one manager said the The agreement is subject to approval from the 
company had lost 'much of its- Chinese authorities. 


it and aspects from Bangkok. 


^eluding $270 nnBiqn in missed 
exports. The shipyard also said 
it had missed out on two poten- 
tial projects vahredat $750 mil- 
lion, and one manager said the 
company had lost 'much of its 
international competitiveness. • 


of passenger handling, Cathay said. The company attributed the large increase to a 

fir addition to providing equity, Cathay Padf- rise in passenger traffic at the beginning of the 
ic w31 contribute management skills and offer year that raised its average cabin load factor to 
treating to local airport staff. 69 percent from 64 percent 

“This is the first investment by a nonmainland The flag carrier had revenue of 47.15 billion 

airline in China’s aviation infrastructure,” said baht in the nine-month period, up 63 percent 
David Turnbull, a deputy mana gi n g director of from a year earlier. 

Cathay. - - In the quarter that ended June 30, the airline’s 

The agreement is subject to approval from the revenue was 14.14 billion baht, up 63 percent 
Chinese authorities. from the year-earlier quarter, and its net profit 

Cathay and Hong Kong Aircraft Engineering was calculated as 27 million baht, up 3. 1 percent. 


CHINA: Entrepreneur Builds a Dynasty Amid Booming Stock Markets 


Coaffined ftwn ftgt 1 
created a demand for French 
speakers, Mr. Guan returned to 
school. 

“One way the Cultural Revo- 
lution shaped my view is that no 
matter how society changes, ev- 
erybody should remain inde- 
pendent thinkers,” he said. At 
the same time, he added, the 
Cultural Revolution “helped 
make up my mind to stay far 
away from pobtics.” 

When he finished graduate 
school in the late 1970s. there 
was little demand for a French 
literature professor. Mr. Guan 
joined the Shanghai Interna- 
tional Trust and. Investment 
Co„ a holding company set up 
by the Shang hai municipal gov- 
ernment to invest in jemat ven- 
tures with foreign compa ni es. 

He studied finance and law 
in Belgium under a fellowship 
Afrom the European Union and 
An 1986 returned to a Shan ghai 


and stale pension funds, which — now have seats on the ex- 
then gave him more than $1 change. 


ntiXfion to start his company! 


His first busmess coup m- naiRd its nearest domestic ri- was a stunning display of how a 
wived government bonds. At vals, Haitong Securities, backed government ruling can throw 
(he time, the Finance Ministry bv ^ Rfmk nf rj0mm ,. nicfl _ 


now have seats on the ex- Shanghai exchange did an 
ange- abrupt about-face and soared 

Mr. Gunn's firm has domi- 30 P«cent in a single day. It 


me ura^me rnumce jvumwoy by ^ of Comn^njca. uie entire market into reverse, 

paid such low mterestxates that of Shenyin Se- “The stock market is a casino 

the govanment forced people comities Co., backed by the In- at this point,” said Norman Gi- 
lo buy bonds as part of thpr dustrial and Commercial Bank vant, an American lawyer based 
salanes when it Granted toraise in Shanghai. “People are not 

fa 1993. Shanghai Inttma- myestmg m.somajun^- 


mediate cadi, especially in Chi- 
na’s poorer interim: provinces. 


dustrial and Commercial Bank vant, an American lawyer based 
of China. in Shanghai. “People are not 

In 1993, Shanghai Interna- investing in sound fundamen- 
ticmal was the lead underwriter ^especially when hard facts 


to nearly 70 percent of new A are hard to come by. People 

were wming 10 sen me oonos at Aasxs It houoi., t~, 0 punt m and out, creating an 

dMCoante langmg from 40 per- Sf SH 5 * if ™ unhaathy volatility. But I sup- 


worried about bang left behind 
as “special economic zones” in 
the southernmost provinces at- 
tracted billions of foreign dol- 
lars. 

Mr. Guan deftly marshaled 
political support from the head 
of the local branch of the Peo- 
ple’s Bank of China and the 
influential former mayor of 
Shanghai, and won a license . 
from the head office of the Peo- 
ple’s Bank to open a securities 
firm, even though there was no 

stock market. 

With the head of the Shang- 
hai branch of the People's Bank 
sitting beside him for symbolic 
support, Mr. Guan made a 
pitch to nine state companies 


c^SOtS. WPCI ~ snail H<^ Kong unhealthy volatility. But I sup- 

Mr Guanandhis 12 enrolov- deal®* and launched a mutual P 05 ® any developing secamnes 
Mr. u» m ana tos u employ „ market goes through its Dodge 

ees traveled to various prow- ™ . l citvdavs.” 

inces and bought bonds, which *“*« mvestors to the Shanghai o . . 

Despite its success, Slunghai 

a ^ Y * «!■ Shanghai 

stoA market is not for the famt _ competition, fo early 1992, 
ofheart * there were only 20 securities 

Z When the market opened in finns; now there are 500. For- 
° ent twSc- cllS " late 1991, Chinese stood in line dgn firms barred fimn trading 

for days to raster for the right in A shares warn to deal directly 
„ 10 shares. In the first half of with domestic Chinese clients, 

1992 ' the Shanghai index raising the daunting possibility 
toowns^mcompmna. ^h so^ ^ ^ 4 50 percent that Shanghai International 
shares (nwlcfl mto two catego- T n W / )n( t half- itnluneed 72 rmilrt rmp Hnv an hmd-tn-hKUl 


maricet Despite its success, Shanghai 

_ International faces what Mr. 

Yet, playing the Shanghai - a aim situation” 

stock market is not for the faint _ competition. In early 1992, 
of heart. there were only 20 securities 

When the market opened in finns; now there are 500. For- 
late 1991, Chinese stood in line dgn firms barred from trading 
for days to register for the right in A shares warn to deal directly 
to buy shares. In the first half of with domestic Chinese clients, 
1992, the Shanghai index raising the daunting possibility 
soared more than 450 percent that Shanghai International I 


111 thc second half, it plunged 72 could one day go head-to-head 

shares Men onlvtotmichaseby drop ^ 13 “■*. Meanwhile, the firm cannot 

toartsopm otuy topurcnase oy mves tors mto panic. ^ people fast enough for its 


shans open only topurcliase by ^y^v^^pMic. 

°In 8, December 1990, the The firm insulates itself from 

Shanghai Securities Exchange ? sast ^ 
openSits first trading floor m to pay for stock m fuILNo buy- 
vrimthad cnce been, the ball- “£ on margin is allowed, 
room of the Astor House Hotel But this year has not been 
on tiie bank of the Suzhou Riv- much better for market stabl- 
er. Now, the exchange has seven ity. Stock prices fell 70 percent 


many investors mto panic. train people fast enough for its 
The firm insulates itself from expanding business. The aver- 
disaster by requiring its clients age age of its employees is 25 i 


to pay for stock in fuIL No buy- years, so they do not compose a 
mg on margin is allowed. team that can bring a wealth of 

But this year has not been experience and perspective to 
much better for market stabil- c ^ icnl5 * 
ity. Stock prices f ell 70 percent Then there is the $ 120 million 
from January through the end headquarters Shanghai Interna- 


trading floors with 3,100 seats, from January through the aid headquarters Shanghai lntema- 
Shang- In addition -to Chinese firms, of July. This month, cheered by tional is building on a muddy 
i’s Bank four from the United States — a government suspension of lot across the Huangpu River 


four from the United States — a government suspension of lot across the Huangpu River 
Goldman Sachs ft Gx, Merrill new issues of stock and its from the elegant but dilapidai- 
Lynch ft Go, Bear, Stearns ft pledge to open up the market to ed Bund that was once Shang- 
Gx, and Morgan Stanley & Co. more foreign investment, the hai*s financial center. 




SEPTEMBER 21-24, 1994 • BALLIOL COLLEGE • OXFORD 

Renowned scholars and corporate leaders assess 
the global business climate 

Three days to refresh your mind. A creative blending of business and intellectual 
perspectives. A chance to challenge conventional wisdom and gain new insights. 
These arc the opportunities presented by the annual International Business 
Outlook conference. 

The calm and reflective atmosphere of Oxford University provides an 
ideal setting from w-hich to view the challenges of this increasingly complex 
business environment. 

The conference closes with a special dinner at Blenheim Palace. Our 
distinguished guest speakers will be: 

F. W. de Klerk 

EXECUTIVE DEPUTY PRESIDENT OF SOUTH AFRICA 

Rudd Lubbers 

PRIME MINISTER OF THE NETHERLANDS 


Hcralb^^feSribunc 



detail 






c places 


COT**- 1 


fdroann * Y.o'O'Z. 

_ .1 ..nl’. D- 1 


OXFORD ANALYTICA 


sruwiRS OF THF. Rf.ENHEIM PALACE 
BANQUET WILL INCLUDE: 
COOPERS & LVBRAMJ. 
CIHSnX. DUNN & CRUTCHF.R 
AND THE LIPPO GROUP. 





COUNTRIES 

ACCESS NUMBER5 

AFRICA 


Kenyan 

0800-12 

SmOhAhka* 


AMERICAS 


Aigcndua 

tOi.BDO-TP-lil) 

Bofar* [HoralJ 

Si* 

leloe |PTT pay phvwj 0 

■4 


08003333 

BrmA 

axwoft 

Ca— «*a- 

140047-UM 

Cfcfl* 

00*0317 

CafamOfa-EnglM. 

*80.130410 

CnlomMa - Sptfah 

980.136-110 

*■ 

163 

Ecuria V 

171 

El5oiw4rf« + 

191 

Guatemala ♦ 

1« 

HomtmA 

0JIWI21XW 

Mawko 

«4B0477»IXl 

Managua 

161 

fimiua 

Hi 

fymQiBt Ao 

OR <2-800 

faa J 

194 

PhjnMw- 

1-800477-8000 


U5. Virgia bfendl -* 

1400477-8000 

Ungtmye • 

QD0<17 

VMB»sla 

800-1 II 14 

VimvuHo &pDMh 

XQllll l 



.. Ivw-Ml .Mir 

r?jr I •, -1-J, 



COUNTRIES 


ASIA 

AnMriniii Sanaa 
AiHtmMu 


KaagJCang 
Haag Kong A 
huflo + 
huhouk 
Ibood * 

Japan * 

Kama H 
Km) 

Karan + 

Komi I 
Mauuo 
Mala y »jo + 

Mew Jgqtap o 
PUEppiaM (ETMartonn 
(PtiflCom) 
pMBpp4w*» (non 
Saipan 

Tinian and Kdm +U 

Sn»ja&:iip i 

Tidwano 
Ttartiari \ 

CARIBBEAN 

Vhyuon 

rWhfua- 


ACCESS NUMBERS 


S33-I000 

OQU3IMO 

1-100-1*1-877 

100-13 

880-IW7 

Oil 

000-137 
OOl-tDMJ 
(03* 131 
ootLiusn 

DO*- 1ft 
SSOfONE 
0039-13 
S50-WAL 

oeoo-121 

8000014 
0»W 
10M1 
103-41 1 
105-14 
9330333 
10330333 
B0».1T7.|77 
oaio.140877 
001 »W 13.B71 

w 

1-300084.31 1 1 


COUNTRIES 


taWal 

Be> ^<da 

Bo»i»b Viigin hL A 
Dooiinicnn RepuUk 4 

Ja'aicn’i- 
Npiheik"4< eeiilfa, * 

St.Udo3 
5> Into 

Intidad & T 06090 o 

EUROPE 

AaMo + 


BularataA 
C«p*in +u 
CxMfclapuMta* 
Danraarti + 
Finland * 


Hangary <+ 
kataml +U 
Manl + 

Baly + 

tira j ifanriatfl -4- 
UlKuaaia 5 
luiawjb.-1-ig 

Mnuai 

H>ffi.rinnil, I 
Noniny + 
foiatW * 


ACCESS NUMBERS 


10000774000 
1 <>: :mf - 

10000770000 
1000751 OB77 

:.®3-S r, -8M0 
«n W«-iiii 

187 

l.gaoir.i^e 


023003014 
078-11-4014 
00000.1010 
CWW01 
0043087-187 
80010877 
9*60- 10784 
1440017 
0130-0013 
000001-411 
00*80001077 
990003 
1 -B00-33-7001 
173-1877 
1530777 
8*197 
0800 0115 
1940087 
0M02M1I9 
BOO-19477 
0010-48001)9 


COUNTRIES 

ACCESS NUMBERS 

Portugal + 

0501 7-1-877 

Somalia +U 

01-8004877 

Russia HUl 

4493-1 SS8I33 

Buuia (Moscow) + 

IS 5-6 133 

Son Marino * 

172-1877 

Sgoia 

900-9*4013 

Sweden * 

020-79*41 1 

Switiorlond * 

1 S5-9777 

Unfad Kingdom (Meraury) \ 

0500490477 

UnM Kingdom |6T] 

0800490477 

United Kingdom J 

0500400400 

Vatican Ciy + 

172-1877 

MIDDLE EAST 


Egypt +s 

154-8777 

ll|i|< *• 

177.102-2727 

Kims" 

*X'” 

MvCl 

l.sM U 

* 

7*j£C"l 1 

L'mifd Aro L . * 

«U'i' 



WoridCufUSm 


n.,,nl V |,i.nihUi .VOMCA»L-*wj l. tlw Gk i-J i.hiIib,, -*«l_ t« 
rid^ :*»na*n|Ja- ffiihdi a ufci«ni*v Mnl k lGi*ivdv C«liif 


irv c^ 






Page 14- 




































































































The conference, 
Europe's leading energy forum, 
will be addressed by oil industry 
experts from the world over. 


a> 


OIL & MONEY 

London ■ October l 7 & 18 

The Oil Daily Group Hcralb^^.®nbunc 


Brenda Erdmann Hagerty 
International Herald Tribune 
63 Long Acre, London WC2E 9JH, England 
Tel: (44 71) 836 4802 
Fax: (44 71) 836 0717 































































































■ Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17,1 994 


SPORTS 


Track Showdown at Zurich Meet 



By Marc Bloom 

film York Times Senior 

NEW YORK — How great is Noured- 
dine Morceli, the Algerian world record- 
holder in the mile? Can Bob Kennedy, the 
improving American distance man. meet 
the challenge of a race that has the depth of 
an Olympic final? 

Both questions will be answered in Zu- 
rich on Wednesday evening at the Welt- 
klas se Meet, the premier track and Held 
event of the year. Morceli and Kennedy 
are headliners in a 5.000-meter field that is 
so extraordinary it could overshadow the 
100-meter showdown. 

The American Leroy Burrell and the 
Olympic gold medalist, Linford Christie of 
Britain, will be there for the 100-meter 
event But Carl Lewis, two-time Olympic 
gold medalist and three-time world cham- 
pion, withdrew late Monday after doctors 
advised that a mineral deficiency caused 
by infection could cause muscle damage. 

Morceli, 24, is aiming for the world 
record of 12 minutes 56.96 seconds set in 
June by Haile Gebresilasie of Ethiopia. 
Kennedy, 23, hopes to better the American 
record of 13:01.15 set in 1985 bv the South 


African- bora Sydney Maxes. 




Noureddine Morceli of Algeria. 


Keula-- 


“Sub- 13:00 is my goal" Kennedy said 
by telephone from his European training 
base in Teddington, England. “1 think I"m 
ready to pop one. There’s no bolding back 
now ” 

This summer, Kennedy entered a select 
circle of distance stars with personal-best 
runs of 13:05.93 in Lille, France, and 
13:02.93 in Oslo. Both times, he placed a 
close second to Khalid Skah of Morocco, 
the 1992 Olympic champion in the 10,000 
meters, who is also in the Zurich field. 

Morceli has bean the world's top miler 
for four years. He holds the world record 
in both the mile (3:44.39) and 1.500 meters 
(3:28.86). and on Aug. 2 in Monte Carlo, 


he shattered the world 3,000-meter mark' 
by 3.85 seconds with an astounding 
7:25.11 performance. 

In Monte Carlo, Morceli sprinted the 
final 400-meter lap in 57.0 seconds, the last 
200 in 26.8. He defeated Gebresilasie by 
more than 12 seconds. 

If Morceli achieves his goal, he will 
become only the third man in history to 
hold world records in the mile and 5,000. 
The others are Paavo Nurmi of Finland 
and G under Haag of Sweden. 

The two events demand different skills 
and competitive instincts. The mile re- 
quires great bursts of speed and the finish- 
ing kick of a sprinter. The 5,000 requires 
sustained speed, covering 12.5 laps, plus 
the strength of a marathoner. 

Morceli appears to have it all "Realisti- 
cally,” said Kennedy, “he could run 

12:50.” 

Zurich is the place to do it. It has a new. 
fast Mondo track, the same surface that 
was used at the 1992 Barcelona Olympics. 
Letzignmd Stadium will be filled to capac- 
ity with 8,000 seated spectators and 13,000 
on their feet, embracing the athletes with 
nonstop cheering. 

Joining Morceli, Kennedy and Skah in 
the 5,000 are two Kenyans, William Sigei, 
who set the world 10,000 record (26:52^23) 
last month, and Ismael Kirui, who won the 
1993 world 5,000 title at the age of 18. 



In England, Kennedy, a four- time Na- 
Collegiate Athletic Association 


tional 

champion at Indiana University, has been 
tr aining with Sigei and other Kenyans. 
Kennedy is prepared for a torrid pace. *TU 
go with it and see what happens,” he said. 

A world-record attempt will also be 
made in the women's 800 meters by unde- 
feated Maria Mutola of Mozambique, who 
is based in Eugene; Oregon. Mutola, 21, 
has a best of 1:55.43. The world record is 
1:53.28, set in 1983 by Jarmila Kratochvi- 
lova of Czechoslovakia. 


Members of the Scottish cycling team casting long shadows during a practice for the Commonwealth 

Hard Times for 


' ■■■ 

Audi rtak/fteuwr* 

Games. 



Return r 


SIDELINES 


Jordan Injury Found to Be Minor 


BIRMINGHAM. Alabama — The injury to Michael Jordan’s 
left shoulder is a strained rotator cuff and is not considered 
serious, a doctor said after examining him. 

Jordan, the former basketball superstar turned minor league 
baseball player, underwent a magnetic resonance ima gin g exami- 
nation on Monday. 

“Michael’s left shoulder injury resulted in a mild strain of the 
rotator cuff and a mild sprain of the shoulder capsule,” said Dr. 
James Andrews, an orthopedic specialist who has treated other 


Richer or Retired ? 
More on Mansell 


VICTORIA, British Columbia — 
South Africa's return to the Common- 
wealth Games has failed to generate sell- 
out crowds in this genteel Canadian city. 

A large team from the republic has 
boosted the entry to a record 64 nations, 
but with around half the 360,000 tickets 
for the Games, which begin Thursday, 
still unsold, some competitors face the 
prospect of performing before sparse 
crowds. 

Although organizers had to scale 


down plans for extravagant opening and 
in Victoria's harbor, 


top athletes including Charles Barkley and Bo Jackson. 

outfielder for the Class AA Birmingham Barons, is 


Jordan, an 
to be re-evaluated next Monday. 


Ex-Kings Aide Arraigned in Fraud 


LOS ANGELES (AP) — A former top aide to Bruce McNall, 
the Los Angeles Kings' president, was arraigned on federal 
charges and is expected to be among several people named in an 
alleged $138 milli on bank loan scheme. 

The Los Angeles Times reported in its Tuesday editions that 
McNall was actively negotiating a plea agreement in the matter 
and is likely to reach a deal with federal prosecutors this week. 

Joanna Orehek, a former vice president and controller of 
McNall's chief holding company, McNall Sports and Entertain- 
ment Inc., appeared in U.S. magistrate court in Los Angeles to 
hear charges of conspiracy, wire fraud and aiding and abetting. 
Her lawyer indicated that she would plead guilty to the charges 
st her. 


against 

For the Record 


Ken Griffey Sr. will join the coaching staff of the minor-league 
fo 


Bellingham Mariners for the remainder of the team's Northwest 
League season, the Seattle Mariners said. (AP) 

The Kg Ten will hold its first postseason tournament for 
women's basketball next March in Indianapolis. The Indianapolis 
Star reported. (AP) 

The Argentine World Cup striker Claudio Caniggia signed for 
the Portuguese team Benfica on Tuesday for one season. (Reuters) 


UEFA banned the Turkish champion, Galatasaray, from ^play- 


ing its retum-Ieg European Champions' Cup game at home 
because of fan violence at the first-leg game in Luxembourg last 
week. (A Pi 


The Associated Fras 

LONDON — Depending on 
whom you believe, Nigel Man- 
sell is either about to sign one of 
the richest contracts in sports 
history or be put out to pasture. 

Several British newspapers 
reported Tuesday that Mansell, 
the former Formula One and 
Indy-car champion, has agreed 
to a three-year, £30 million ($46 
million) deal to drive for the 
Wniiams-Renault team starling 
in 1995. 

But other papers reported (hat 
the team chairman, Frank Wil- 
liams, has soured on the idea of 
having Mansell return, and that 
Mansell’s current Indy-car team, 
Newman- Haas, is already plan- 
ning on replacing him in its driv- 
er lineup for next year. 

That would leave retirement 
as a likely scenario for the 41- 
year-old driver, the reports said. 

The people most likely in the 
know weren’t shedding any 
tight on the latest rumors. 

“It's complete and pure spec- 
ulation,’’ a Williams spokes- 
woman, Barbara Pryzdatek, 
said. “We don't where the sto- 
ries have popped up from.” 

Pryzdatek denied that any 
contract had been signed for 
Mansell to return next year, al- 
though she reaffirmed previous 


comments made by Williams 
that “there is a possibility” that 
Mansell would drive the final 
three Formula One races of the 
current season. 

“Mansell returns," was the 
headline in the Daily Mail, 
which, tike some other papers, 
worked its story around a quote 
from a Newman-Haas team 
member, Bert Thomas. 

“We believe a deal has been 
done between Carl Haas and 
Formula One and it will be left 
to him to make the announce- 
ment shortly,” Thomas was 
quoted as saying. “We're close 
to fi nalizing a deal with Carl for 
next year, which would allow us 
to announce the driver lineup 
for 1995 ” 

Such speculation surround- 
ing Mansell has become a fa- 
miliar fixture of the current 
Formula One season since the 
death of Williams driver Ayr- 
ton Senna at the San Marino 
Grand Prix on May 1. 

After two months of rumors 
and amid much hype, Mansell 
eventually signed a one-race 
deal, worth a reported $1 mil- 
lion, to drive for Williams at the 
French Grand Prix on July 3, a 
race that did not conflict with 
his Indy-car schedule. Mansell 
performed well in qualifying, 
but failed to finish the race. 


closing ceremonies 
they hope the event, estimated to cost 
160 milli on Canadian dollars (SI 15 mil- 
lion), will help revive a sense of purpose 
among former members of the British 
Empire. 

Amy Hart, spokeswoman for the 
Games, said: “The Commonwealth 
Games is a celebration of our common 
traditions. The focus is not to just see 
who can win the most medals. It’s about 
coming together.” 


Namibia, which gained its indepen- 
dence in 1990, makes its Games debut, 
and Hong Kong, which is to revert to 
Chinese control in 1997, makes its last 
appearance. 

The survival of the Games is an 
achievement for the Commonwealth. 
The Games were -said to be oh the verge 
of extinction after African countries 
boycotted them in Edinburgh in 1986 to 
protest Britain’s policy of tolerance of 
South Africa's apartheid regime. 

The Games have languished in the 
shadow of sports events tike the Olym- 
pics. Slack ticket rales are but one sign 
that many citizens increasingly view the 
Commonwealth as irrelevant ‘ . 

Athletes will compete m 10 official 
sports. Australian swimmers like Kieran 
Perkins and Rebecca- Brown, British. 
Olympic and world champion sprinter 
Linford Christie, and Kenya’s accom- 
plished distance runners will be the big- 
gest draws. 

But the specter of drugs loomed after 
Udeme Ekpeyong of Nigeria was sent 
home when stimulants were found in his 


suitcase. The incident fanned fears of a 
repeat of the problems at the 1 990 Auck- 
land Games, when three weightlif ters 
were stripped of medals after testing pos- 
itive. 

Australia, which headed the medals 
table last time, and England are expected 
to dominate again;- Gahada hopes that 
home advantage will boost its big team. 

fjmaria wfll have the biggest contin- 
gent at the Games with 277 athletes, 
while the Maldives, Malta and Montser- 
rat are sending only two competitors 
each.. • ■ • 

■Nations participating range- in size 
from India, population 860 million, to 
Norfolk Island in the South Pacific, 
which is sending 15 of its 1,800 inhabit- 
ants. 

The federal and provincial govern- 
ments are contributing more than 107 
. millio n Canadian dotiarStO help Stage 

the event Despite poor ticket sales, the 
or g ani zers say, the Games will not lose 


money tike its predecessors in Edinburgh 
and Auckland because nearly all the 


because nearly all 
money has already been, raised. 


eft 


SCOREBOARD 


TENNIS- 






the 


Mn an I be ATP 


NFLPreseason 


Tuesday's Results 
Date! 7, Seflw t - ■ “ 

Orix 6, Lotte I 

Kftitetso IK-Nlnpoa Horn f 


Tttor Roto* Aug. W: 
P*te Sampras 
Serai Brosuara 
Stefan Edbera 
Goron ivoilaevfc 
Michael Sllcfl 
Michael Owns 
Andrei Medvedev 
Boris Becker 
Yevgeny Kafelnikov 
Tom Martin 


vutasa 

51,357,499 

SIMMS 

S9D9J73 

589*741 

S«M.t9S 

S7T7.MM 

S475J73 

M7U63 

164743/ 


Monday's flaw 
Houston A> Dallas 0 


TRANSITIONS 


nmm 

Japanese Leagues 


. basfbah. 

American League ; 

SEATTLE — Signed James Roweon, awf- 
fiekkr, and Eric OMonl. Pitcher. 


Central Lea ea e 



W 

L 

T 

Pef 

GB 

Yamiurl 

57 

41 

V 

JR 

— 

otuntew 

51 

<7 

a 

JJfl 

4’ 

HansMn 

49 

51 

a 

.490 

9 

Hiroshima 

47 

49 

« 

MS 

9 

Yokohama 

44 

53 

0 

ABM 

12 

Yakut! 

44 


0 

ASS 

13 


Steve TrochseL 


Money teaderxm ttie IH*A Toot thrown Itie 
POA Chcqi Pl o ns Mp. which ended Aog. 14: 


Cr«g Norman 
Nick Price 
Corey Pnvtn 


S1.79S.1M 
31.156927 
S 794305 


Tuesday's Resatts 
Yomturt 1, Ctnmkhi 0 
Hiroshima XL Yokohama Z 
Harahfn X Ynkutt z 15 bedim 
Pacific Lnm 


Tom Lehman 

5 789,414 


W 

L 

T 

Pet 

GB 

Loren Roberts 

S 77MB 

Orix 

52 

40 

2 

-545 

— 

Hale rrwtn 

S 701.954 

Seteu 

S3 

42 

0 

-559 

V» 

Jeff Maaoert 

S 57*543 

Kintetsu 

52 

42 

2 

553 

1 

Jose Maria Ofaeabaf 

S 589409 

DaW 

53 

44 

1 

SU 

Ite 

Fuav ZoeUer 

5 07483 

Lotte 

38 

59 

0 

392 

Wft 

Ben Crenshaw 

S 548457 

N logon Ham 

37 

58 

3 

J89 

14VT 


CHICAGO— Optioned. 

Ditcher, to lam, AA. . 

FOOTBALL-' 

Naflenaf Foetboa Leopoe ' 

ARIZON A R ele as ed Chuck C*dL lately, 
and Dorian McKtanev. ttpht and. 

ATLANTA-Wotved CHot Johnson, elide re- 
ceiver.- Tim Paulk. linebacker; Mike 
RuaiMer. canter; Lemuel Simon, comer - 
' back: David WlUchw. defensive end. and 
Lance Zdaa, Buort. 

BUFFALO— Waived PM! Bryant, rwedn# 
bade 

Cincinnati— waived Regale Rembert 
and Patrick Rotrtnsan, wide receivers. 

CLEVELAND— Waived Hanna Hewitt, of. 
tensive tackle; Bobby dive and DavW Jonai 
wide rece i vers. 

DETROIT— Resigned Mark Rodenhauser, 


LA. RAMS— Released Mitchell Price and 
DovM Wilson, -detensiva backs. 

MIAMI W aived Johnny Dixon, safety; 
Todd Dlxan, .wide receiver, and - aSHten 
Quarles, Onebocker. 

Ml NNESOTAr-WDlved DavW PoaLcorner- 
badu Al Naga, defensive ends Chris Creams, 
safety; Tracy Boktaftensivellnaman; Tony 
Lease! me, tight end end Phil Brown, running 
bade. 

NEW ENGLAND— Waived Scott 5 toon, 
kicker; Bernard Basham, defensive end; 
Jean Boyd, safety; Bill Durkin, guard; Don 
RayhaMbnosetDckte,- Eric Stephens, comer- 
bock and Jcrred Wash barton, running bock. 


NEW ORLEANS— Claimed Part Evans, 
ttoht etvL off waivers from Kansas 
atvwofvcd Brad Lebo. Quarterback. 

N.Y. GIANTS— Signed Jar rod Bunch, full- 

hmji, • - 

SAN DIEGO— Claimed Atahonm Taylor, 
defensive tackle, off waivers from Denver. 

SAN FRANCISCO— Waived Anthony Boll, 
Hnebacfcor; Tim Eurtotv tight end; and Dar- 
rel Crawford, linebacker. Signed Darin Jor- 
don. linebacker. 

TAMPA BAY— Waived Joe AlHson, kkker. 
WASHINGTON— Wtafved Nate Dtnoel, line- 
backer; Pierre Wllsom, defensive tackle; 
Guv Earle. offensive tackle; WBIte Hlndid Iff. 
wide receiver; Jeff Jocks, kicker, and Rich- 
art Fain, eomertaack. 


r 

2 - - 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 




TO OUR REAPERS 
IN BELGIUM 

IPs never been easier 
to subscribe 
and save. 

Just call toll-free 
0 800 1 7538 


— .> .*-> - -.t.j.-w ... . .... ,v r >v 


\JrPjJ) v£& 



T t 








r»- 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17, 1994 


Page 17 





ring From Latest 



By Thomas George .- 

N ew York Timer Service 

NEW YORK —The Chica- 
go Bears were 12-3, were a Su- 
per Bowl favorite and ' they 
were playing at home inttie 
National Football Conference 
championship .game against 
the San Francisco 49ers. This 
was the 1988 National Foot- 
ball League season.. It was 
snowy and; frigid at Soldier 
Field. ■ 

Bears Weather. 

That afternoon, the 49ers 
produced one of ihe most im- 
pressive road playoff victories 
in league history, executing a 
28-3 victoiyeri route to the last 
of three Super Bowl titles won ! 
by Coach Bill Walsh of the 
49ers. 

And the icy add outside 
barely matched the stone-cold, 
postgame glare of Mike Ditto, 
the Bears’ coach. . - 

“The old silver-haired guy, he 
got his,” Ditto said 
“But well have oar _ 

He shouldn’t be too comfort- 
able.” 

Walsh got wind of tins and 
responded: "Who won? Case 
dosed.” 

Ditto and Walsh, and tiuar 
teams met frequently in. the 
1980s and the league- was al- 
ways better for it Besides field- 
ing competitive and in teresting 
teams, their sideline and off- 
the-field battles of wit were air 
ways entertaining Same f or 
Gibbs vs. Parcells. Or Johnson 
vs. Ryan. Or Wychc vs. Glan- 
viUe. 

In this era of immense 
change in the NFL; with quar- 
terbacks moving in a quick 
shuffle and so many 
ers following suit, the 
coaching fraternity, too* has un- 
dergone drastic change. .... 

The first game of this presear 
son? The Hall of Fame game. 
Atlanta vs. San Diego. June 
Jones vs. Bobby Ross. 

Plenty of fans do not know 
June from July. Or Bobby from. 
Betsy. Twenty of the 28 coach- 
es in this league (omitting the 
two expansion teams) have not 
been with their current dubs 
through four complete 
-sons;-. • 


. If teams are a reflection of 
tbeircoach, we arestfll looking 
in the mirror. We are waiting 
. for new rivalries. Healthy ones 
•add. color 'arid ' spice to the 
game.' They: are essential, 
where will the new ones come 
from? . 

j Jones v&Ross? 

“Smne of those coaches you 
mentioned 1 have followed for 
some time and have great re- 
spect for ” Jones said. “They all 
lave had- great impact in the 
NFL. 

- - “The new. breed of coaches 
fed they «»» nah> riwtiTar con- 
tributions. Atleast, we heme so. 
Borne rivahra will naturally de* 
vdop from Incidents that hap- 
pen through the course of the 
season. Tbe is something that 
will take .of itself. IPs the 
nature of the game.” 



Dtnm Omjtjinc.iThe Aonruicd Prt* 

The Oilers slogged their way to a 6-0 defeat of the Cowboys on a muddy field at an exhibition game in Mexico City. 

Season VTheme: American Golf Is Grand Slammed 


. By Lmy. Dorman 

New York Tuna Service 

I F there were any lingering notions 
that American golf might salvage a 
vestige of Its former preem in ence this 
year, they were erased ihispas! weekend 
m the PGA Championship coronation 
march of Nick Price. 

“His CTtmpeflirig and do minating pa- 
rade to his second straight major cham- 

an gn rriamytirm maA 


. to the 
that had been 
taking dupe 
throughout me . Point 
1994 season. ' 

And that theme is that American golf 
just got Grand Slammed. 

Never before had the United States 
fa3ed;to produce a single winner in one 
of the mqor championships. It would be 
' st retching it to say tins is like the 
State Texas not producing a single aH- 
America football player, but the stretch 
would only be a slight one; 

Josfe Maria Olaz&bal of Spain began 
the fareigmslam with his victory at the 
Masters. Thai was followed by the play- 
off victory of Ernie Els, a Sooth African, 
in the U.S. Open at Oakmont and that 
was followed by Price’s sweep of the 
final two majors,- the British Open at 


Tamberry and the PGA at Southern 
Hills in Tulsa. 

Whether this is a long-term trend or 
merely an abberational blip on the golf 
radar screen is unclear at this point. But 
it is certainly worth a closer look. 

To say that golf is an individual game 
— “The majors aren’t team events,* the 
PGA runner-up, Corey Paris, said — is 
true as far as it goes. But it misses the 
lL 

_ it now, 10 of the top 15 players in 
the world are from somewhere other 
than America. Fred Couples is the only 
American in the top five; Paul Azinger, 
just bade to gplf after a battle with 
cancer, is the only other American in the 
top 10. 

The Sony world rankings have some 
flaws, but they are the only ranking 
system extant. When the results in the 
major championships are viewed in tan- 
dem with the ranking s, the inescapable 
conclusion is that American golf is pro- 
ducing fewer world-class players than 
the rest of the world. 

This is not, as some American golfers 
have suggested, merely a creation of a 
golf media in search of an easy angle or 
some xenophobic hallucination. 

Scan the top five finishers of the last 
two majors of the year for American 
names and you find only Fuzzy Zodler 


at the British Open and Pavin, Phil 
Mlckdson and John Cook at the PGA. 
There are five foreign-born players in 
the top five at the British and three at 
the PGA. . 

It is fair to point out that Price, the 
No. 1 player in the world, and Greg 
Norman of Australia, ranked No. 2, 
both live and compete in the United 
States and are regular PGA Tour mem- 
bers. 

There also are rumblings thai Nick 
Faldo of Britain, the No. 3 player, is 
pondering a much more extensive U.S. 
schedule next year, one that might in- 
dude PGA Tour membership. It could 
be argued that the PGA Tour has served 
as the training ground for them. 

“Greg and 1 have played 12 years on 
this Tour,” Price said. “I mean, you 
can't classify us as total foreigners, even 
though we’re not American-born. We’re 
not total foreigners. We've learned so 
much of oar golf here and in Europe.” 

Perhaps. But they were not bom and 
raised in this system. They did not 
come up through the ranks of junior 
golf, go on to college and through the 
mini -fours and work their way on to the 
all-exempt tour. That the top 125 play- 
ers are guaranteed playing privileges 
for next season is a reward for medioc- 


rity that does not promote a win-at-all- 
costs attitude. 

With all this said, there are some posi- 
tive signs for America. The play of 
Mickelson, 24, was encouraging. He has 
now finished tied for sixth and third in 
two PGA Championship appearances, 
and there is no reason not to believe that 
— if he avoids the complacency that can 
accompany quick riches and celebrity — 
he could ripen into a world-class per- 
former. 


And Cook might just be coming into 
his prime as a player at the age of 36. His 
top-five finishes this year at both the 
U.S. Open and the PGA, and his sec- 
ond-place finish at the 1992 British 
Open, suggest he is one of America's 
potential major championship winners. 

Couples, 34. appears recovered from 
an early-season back injury. Azinger will 
be back to his former level soon. The 
emergence of Tom Lehman. 35. is wel- 
come. Loren Roberts, 39, came so close 
at the U.S. Open and was the best Amer- 
ican performer of all in the majors. He 
was tied for fifth at Augusta, second at 
the U.S. Open, tied for 24th at the Brit- 
ish and lied for ninth at the PGA. Curtis 
Strange, fourth at the Open and 19th at 
the PGA. also is headed in the right 
direction: 


Baseball Strike: 
Just What Is the 

Average Salary? 


By Murray Chass 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Richard Ra- 
vitch, the baseball owners' chief 
labor executive, has used the 
figure so often during the own- 
ers' labor dispute with the play- 
ers that $1.2 million has become 
indelibly imprinted on the 
minds of fans, who would rath- 
er hear baseball people talk 
about 61 and .400. 

In his comments about the 
clubs* quest for cost control, 
Ravitch has used the average 
salary of $1.2 million to show 
bow well off the players are 
and how well off they would 
continue to be under the limit 
the owners want to place on 
salary payrolls. 

But $12 millio n is just what 
Ravitch says it is — the average. 
Closer examination of salaries 
for the 1994 season casts a dif- 
ferent tight on what players earn. 

• The median salary is 
$500,000. Of the 746 players on 
opening-day rasters or on the 
disabled list, 363 earn less than 
$500,000, 361 earn more than 
$500,000 and 22 make precisely 
that amount 

• The average salary itself is 
somewhat misleading because 
237 players earn more than $1 2 
milli on and 507 earn less (two 
are right at that figure). 

• Just as they disagree on the 
economic system baseball 
should have, tire two sides view 
these figures differently. Ra- 
vitch said they strengthen the 
clubs’ position that fewer play- 
ers are making more of the 
money. Gene Orza, the union's 
associate general counsel, said 
the rising median salary shows 
precisely the opposite. ' 

They made their comments 
on the fourth day of the strike, 
when not much rise was hap- 
pening. For the third successive 
day. the two sides did not meet 
and did not speak to each other 
by telephone. They scheduled 
no meetings. 

“I don’t know what's in the 
immediate future,” Ravitch 
said in response to a question, 
“but in these matters, things 
can change within the hour I'm 
waiting to hear from the federal 


mediators about when they 
want to meet again.” 

There were two strike-related 
developments Monday. 

The league offices an- 
nounced that games wiB be can- 
cried on a day-to-day basis 
“but should not be considered 
canceled until the day” the 
games were scheduled to be 
played. Four games were added 
to the canceled list Monday, 
bringing to 46 the number 
missed. 

In the other development, the 
number of players on strike fell 
to 762 from 763 when the Chi- 
cago Cubs optioned Steve 
Trachse], a rookie starting 
pitcher, to Iowa of the Ameri- 
can Association. 

With a $112,000 salary, 
$3,000 above the minimum, 
Traehsd, who compiled a 9-7 
record in 22 starts for the Cubs 
before the strike, is one of the 
players below the median. 

This season's median is up 
significantly from the median 
of $397,500 at the end of last 
season, but both the median 
and the average drop from 
opening day to the end because 
teams generally wind up with 
more minimum -salaried players 
on their rosters as the season 
progresses and they fill in for 
players on the disabled list. 

Asked about the difference 
between the average and the 
median this season, Ravitch 
said: “I think to contrast the 
two prints out very dramatical- 
ly what is happening in base- 
ball. With each year, fewer and 
fewer players get a larger per- 
centage of the take. Each tells a 
story and together they tell a 
fuller story.” 

“He has always said Ike fact 
that the median is going down 
is an illustration of the fact 
that fewer players are making 
more money,” Orza said. “If 
it’s going up, it’s counter to the 
proposition he’s trying to 
espouse. If it’s going up, it 
means we’ve ceased to see few- 
er and fewer players getting 
more and more money. But I 
don’t know if you can compare 
the medians until we have the 
final figures in.” 


CROSSWORD 


ACROSS 

i Funeral stand 
sUck 

•A little /rig W 
musk: - “ - ■ 

ixUtamatzoh 
ie Delta's creator 


irietb-cantmy 
monarch, mo 
farreSariy? *' 
reTrtoutary . 

ao Residents at 

Mashed . 
asm 

aa Miss Merkel 



is Baby food 
as terns that are - 
- P«9d : 
aa Overwhelms ' . 
34 Shah Johan's 
budding site 
as Solve base 
je Ennoble 

is lake Ontario 
outlet, too 

. tamUfeirfy? 
•ttlrvflan follower 
43-nrsHcky 
44 Tangent’s 
cousin 

4* Shenanigans 
47 Frond holder 
4* fl makes towels 
plushy ■ 
windy 500 
advertiser * • 
a* Actress 
Thompson 
- S4 Avertable, as 
retail goods 
se BBl coflector 

S3 Architectural 
refinement, too 
famSarfy? 

•a Press tor 
«s Took orders. In 
Sway. 

«7 By and by 
«a Bygone platters 
•e Those for 


DOWN ' 

1 Bara skin 
* Concerning, at 

~ tew 

3 Robt- .. 

4 Singer Heteo 

rAWetfc- 
supporter? . 


e Against 
7 Indian leader 
’ • Actress Qarr 
» Vicinage 
ie Map out 
il Goes down 

is ‘Do, - — .a 
female...' 

14 Kind of reality 
is Academic heads 
It Beaver, tar one 
» Turkish bigwig 
34 In addition 
as Art safe item 
*7 Wrap name 
as Chafed places 
aoW.W.lifoe 
M Know-it-all 
aa Full assemblies 
33 1 


3s *Tha King ’ 

37 Aforetime 

40 University of 
Arizona site 

41 Surrenderor 
44 Last Item? 

4* Verdun's river 
sf Jafl-retoed 
ssOvereager 
S4 Greenish-blue 
M Crank 

so Utah's state 
flower 

STAdutt-to-be 

saSmaHcut 

as Letters from 
Wan Street 

ei Parmenides's 

birthplace 

sz Stop lights 
ee Como's " — - 

Impossible’ 



© New York Times Edited by Will Shortz- 


Solution to Prado of Ang, 16 


□□0 aansQH anna 
nan naosaa anna 
i3O0 □aaasaaaaaa 
Baas ama 0000130 
ansnsaa anna 
□B0E3 □□aaanaa 
□anas aaaaa 00 a 
Q 00 Q QQE13Q aaaa 
□as Q9DQQ aaoao 
00000003 !!□□□ 

□300 aasasaa 
BQoaaQ 00a aaa0 
□□Baaaaaaaa aaa 

0000 QDQQtHQ 000 

0000 0 Qaa 0 Q aaa 


ESCORTS * GUIDES 


BELGRAVIA 

ORCHIDS 

CREDIT CARDS MBC0ME 

UK 071 589 5237 


MBNOONAlBam 

■ Stnkr • Wo/kM* 

Ttt 7mKp» 

Major CmbOtAAetzfted 


Mwt Escort Sorvico of NYC 

2TM2M100 
Major Craft Cgf* 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


(Continued From Page 4) 


new roac air 

'6oartSm"oijMM*rl306or 

pm OMM£7oo**<i '■wt 


MAYFAIR INTV 

tafoitarlMa.tinnTril 


lONDQNMfflJWJ'wrt 

Swire ffl 72* fflBWl-ortert 


sroaoKXM 

SSMGE 

TEL-D6 7SBJ 


CANNB 8 COVE I7AZUK 

QrtSS SSlSHiw 


•• ZUBQI *• VKXK •• 

T*fc 0 * 7/083 32 . 


• • • M B— IT * * * 

Union Start Senke &04H 741 


OSSA ESCORT SMttL . 

51 


CARIBBEAN ANGBS OF LONDON 

BCOfiT SBMQ Ml ASEA 5 
OT- 2 PJM 7 ort anfa onart 


MUNICH ’WELCOME 
ESCORT SCRJR «»Cf. 

WEASEOmOBF-VT 3314. 


QBCVA A1UANCE ” 

Esart Service cod Tfami MSaaai 

Teh 022/ 311 07 24. 


•CBEVA • QMOS * PAHS* 

Etaxt Service 

M 522/731 90 81 


NUMEftO UNO ESCORT AGENCY 
FRANKFURT ■ WBBADei 
IB. MOf B17ZWW8 OR 


~ GENEVA MtEMAUONAL ** 
Escort Stroa 

TeL 022/ 731 6353- 077/25WBQ 


UABON5 OF MIK 1ANE 

UJNXJN ESCORT SBMCE 
TC; 071 374137 


VBOU-PAHS'WYHA'BJIBCH 

EUEOCCNTACT W1 hart + TrewL 
Senita CM Wo +0-1-310 63 19. 

•ZUilCH*SUSAN* 


Tttm/xinu 


OHBflAL ESCORT SBMCE 

10 MX 3 N 

FtEASE PHONE 071325 3314 


•• LOffoON ' CMMRAN *- 

Inchon Heathrow Gtfw d Start 
Service 071 <35 1002 OBXT CARDS 


LONDON -SAIAH 

ExurtSarviet 
Tit Ml 969 Ml 5. 


* FRANKFURT * 

Prims ban and Trovd Soviet. 

fteertMofcfc 0161726 32 573 

INUNCFUST ttJW MSSBPORF 

J area, Bcort Soviet. 


ZUUOI 

Etcsrf! 

V7Q 


EaaxlSmm 

’5112 


raaLYHUS 


TO OUR READERS IN BELGIUM 

It's never been easier to subscribe 
and save. Just call toll-free : 

0 800 1 7538 



The International 
Herald Tribune and 
Hilton International 
combine two great offers 
to bring you 
one incredible deal. 

Y ou couldn't pick a better time to begin reading the 
International Herald Tribune every day. Because 
from now until September 30, 1 994, when you 
subscribe to the IHT, you’ll be getting the world’s 
most comprehensive global newspaper at a saving 
of up to 47% off the cover price. That means a 
bonus of up to 52 free issues! 

What’s more, as a subscriber to the IHT, you’ll 
receive a special “2 for 1” weekend offer at Hilton 
Internationa! hotels in 27 exciting cities including 
Paris, Munich, Amsterdam and Rome and even as 
far afield as Istanbul, Cairo and Cyprus. 

With this offer, guests can spend two weekend 
nights at participating Hilton International hotels for 
the price of a single night including full buffet 
breakfast service and tax. 

And, as a new,subscriber to the IHT, you'll 
receive a bottle of wine in your room as a special 
thank-you. 

So send in your coupon today and discover 
Europe with Hilton International and the IHT - at 
incredible savings. 


Hcral b'Sl^ Sribttttf ft 


INTERNATIONAL 

77ms otter &peBs September 30 . 7994 and ssvafetfe to new svbscri&s only. 



Striccnpun Raws A Savings cfl IHT am Mom. 


Coumry/Cunency 

12 months 
«- 2 ntootlw 
FREE 

B3 


Austro A. Seri. 

6,000 

37 

3,300 

Belgum 

B.Fr. 

14,000 

36 

7.700 

Denmark 

D.Kr. 

M00 

33 

1,900 

Finland 

F.M. 

2,400 

40 

1,300 

France 


1,950 

40 

1J170 

Germany* 

DM. 

700 

32 

385 

Gteal Britain 

£ 

210 

32 

115 

Greece 

Dr. 

75,000 

26 

41,000 

Ireland 

on. 

230 

37 

125 

|?nR3HS8SQj 

Lire 

500,000 

47 

275,000 


LFr. 

14,000 

36 

7.700 

Netherlands 

n. 

770 

40 

420 

Norway 

MKr. 

3,500 

36 

1800 

Portugal 

Esc. 

47, TOO 

38 

26800 

Spain 

Pfas. 

IEI 

34 

26800 

- hand deSv. Madrid 

Ptas. 

55,000 

24 

27800 

Sweden (airmail) 

S.Kr. 

3,100 

34 

1,700 

Bi rf- iTTRrflT 


3£00 

26 

IfiOO 

Switzerland 

S.Fr. 

610 

44 

335 

Rest 0 ! Europe ex CE1 

S 

485 

- 

2S5 

CB, N. Africa, former 

French African, Middle East $ 

630 

_ 

345 

Gtdf States, Asia. Central and 
South America $ 

780 

_ 

430 

Rest of Africa 

* 

900 

— 

435 

* For information concerning hand-delivery in major German 
cities call toll free IHT Germany at 01 30-84 85 B5 or fax 
(069) 175.413. 

Under German regulations, a 2-week tree period is granted 
for aB new orders. 


I I YE5, please send itw detaili of the spedd Hibon 
hi tem u t iun d *2 lor 1“ weekend offer. 

I YES. I want one outstanding daily news source. 

This is rfw HT subscription term 1 prsler 
Ichedc appropriate boxes): 

D 12 months {364 issues in aJJ wiffi 52 bonus issues). 

□ 6 months 1 182 issues oH wfAi 2 6 bonus issues). 

3 Aty check is endased 

[payable to Are fntemalional Herald Triune). 

EH Please change my credit curd account: 

□ American Express □ Diners Oub Q VISA 

□ MasterCard □ Eurocord □ Access 

Credit c ard ch arges will be mode in French Francs of current 
exchange tries. 


CAH5ACCT. NO- 
EXP. DATE 


SIGNATURE 

FCRUBffCSS ORDERS. PlEASEl-CICATE YOUR VAff NUMBER: 


IHT VAT nunfer FR7A73202T1261) 

□ Mr.O MnG Miss FAMaY NAME. 


FUST NAME 


PERMANENT ADDRESS, u HOMED BUSKSS. 


arr/ccoe. 


COUNTRY 


TEL 


FAX. 


Return >our oonnieied coupon te StAs cnplirn Mcnog er. 

181 Avenue p** Ort*. fom*. 

Fm 3X1 AA 37 06 5t- Tel: 33.1 46 37 93 ST ^ 7^.94 




















































































•2 U^y.< WP W^.(^*ww»» 

~ - -i-'li -^irl <*- 



Page 18 


EVTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17,1994 


OBSERVER 


Living Watergate Down 


By Russell Baker 

N EW YORK — A prison 
term would surely have 
been the salvation of Richard 
Nixon. The truth became ap- 
parent as that rich assortment 
of aging ex-jailbirds marched 
through the parlor last week in 
the TV documentary history ti- 
tled “Watergate.” 

These were the men who did 
the time because in different 
ways they had done the crime 
for the president 
Yet now, a generation later, 
they seemed not just at peace 
with themselves about what had 
once been painful humiliation, 
but actually pleased with the 
celebrity status conferred by as- 
sociation with such a famous 
moment in history. 

□ 

Long ago these old gentle- 
men had youthful White House 
staffers, political factotums and 
officially licensed intelligence 
rogues. In two words, not much. 

Watergate, however, had giv- 
en the old Nixon crowd an en- 
during claim on fame. They had 
been on the front line of history. 
When Fred Emery, who made 
this remarkable film, asked them 
to appear in the fullness of their 
age to recall the follies of their 
youth, they turned out en masse. 

There was once-bqyish John 
Dean, one of political scoundrel- 
dom’s all-time, champion whis- 
tle-blowers, now as stately and 
pl ump as Buck Mulligan and as 
dull as a lecturer in mechanical 
physics. John Ehrlichman 
passed through and even H. R. 
(Bob) Haldeman sat for the cam- 
era, though he must have been 
fatally HI when he did iL 
How to explain to the back- 
ward-baseball-cap crowd what 
giants these two once were? 
They were arrogance personi- 
fied. Yet both took the fall for 
Nixon. 


Howard Hunt of the CIA’s 
famously ill-fitting red wig was 
there. So was James McCord, 
who burgled for his country, 
not always legally, wisely or too 
welL And Chuck Colson: bold, 
brash, colorful-talking Chuck 
Colson famous for idling peo- 
ple he’d run over his own grand- 
mother to serve Richard Nixon. 

They all took the fall too. 
along with John Mitchell, Nix- 
on's close friend and once attor- 
ney general, now long dead and 
unavailable for Emery's cam- 
era. 

If you remembered this 
crowd in its youth, you were apt 
to marvel at how age and a little 
prison can improve a man. If 
not of purely serene spirit about 
their roles in Watergate, they 
bad obviously put it bebina 
them, enabling them to discuss 
it with detachment and dis- 
tance, and even to smile, some 
of them, about its grosser ab- 
surdities. 

□ 


Ultra-loyal Gordon Liddy 
appeared looking hardly a year 
older than the day he offered to 
stand on a street comer so he 
could be shot by drive- by assas- 
sins to atone for botching a 
piece of the job. 


Their interviews were liberal- 
ly intercut with scenes of Nixon 
bong interviewed by David 
Frost. The contrast was star- 
tling. 

Nixon, the one member of 
the group who had been denied 
jail’s enrichment, was obviously 
neither detached nor distant 
about Watergate. The Frost in- 
terview showed him still emo- 
tionally bent under the tonnage 
of iL He could speak critically 
of his Watergate involvement, 
but the body language spoke, to 
the contrary, of a man in deep 
deni&L 

On camera his fellow con- 
spirators seem to have put old 
sms behind them and gone on 
with their lives, as people put 
behind them the deaths of loved 
ones in order to keep living. 
Perhaps only prison could have 
granted Nixon the same release. 

Instead he spent 20 years 
churning out books, splitting 
hairs with interviewers, hunting 
opportunities to pose as elder 
statesman. Yet he never seemed 
to find the peace bis jailbird 
colleagues disclosed to Emery’s 
camera. 


Sew York Times Service 


Taking New Looks 
At the Art of Today 


Mr.' 4 ;. 

" • ■ . a.**.. .1- 




. v i'irvV:«5f 

••• 


Catherine David, head of 
the next Documents, hi the 
Jeride Panme is Paris. 


By Michael Kimmelman 

iVew York Tima Soviet 


P ARIS — No exhibition of con- 
temporary art is more important 
or more eagerly anticipated than Do- 
ormen ta, the giant survey held every 
five years or so in Kassel, Germany. 

But recent Documents have also 
been giant disappointments. When a 
relatively little-known French cura- 
tor was chosen in March to bead the 
next one, in 1997, it was not only 
surprising; it suggested the possibili- 
ty of tangible change for the show. 

That person, Catherine David, has 
been a curator at the Galerie Nation- 
ale du Jeu de Paume in Paris since 
1990, after nine years as a curator at 
the Centre Pompidou. 

Past commissioners of Documents 
have all been men. Handi cappers 
had made Kasper Kbnig, a well- 
known and respected curator from 
Frankfurt, a favorite for the job that 
eventually went to- David, who was a 
long shot at best. 

“Suddenly I have hundreds of 
friends,” jokes David, 39, during an 
interview. She is a friendly, energetic 
woman with long, dark hair and a 
fixed stare, who talks in bursts, be- 
tween puffs on a cigarette. 

“It’s as if Documents were a fair, 
and some people just assume they 
can get in if they want to, so they 
write me to ask what they do to make 
sure they’re included.” 

This was the first time an indepen- 
dent juty, instead of officials from 
Kassel, chose the commissioner. 
Kathy Halbreich, director of the 
Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, 
who was on the jury, say's its goal was 
to find a young curator. 

She has traveled widely and her 
range is from the acknowledged mas- 
ters to “those artists who may just be 
coming of age in Far-flung coun- 
tries,” Halbreich says. “She’s sober, 
thoughtful, global in her thinking in 
terms of the range of media as well as 
aesthetically.” 

Indeed, David is not an ideologue 
or easy to pigeonhole. She talks a lot 
about film as well as art She is inter- 
ested in video and photography. 

At the Jeu de Paume and else- 
where, she has organized exhibitions 
about Israeli and Brazilian cinema as 
well as retrospectives of such artists 


as the Belgian Marcel Broodthaers, 
the Brazilian Hdio Oitidca and the 
American Eva Hesse. She has done 
shows of numerous contemporaries. 
She is known for having a special 
interest in Latin American culture. 
She studied Spanish and Portuguese 
at the Sorbonne and wrote her thesis 
on Wifredo Lam. 

The next Documenta will be the 
10th. The first one, in 1955, grew 
partly out of the Cold War and was 
an effort to introduce international 
developments in modem art to West 
Germany, only then recovering cul- 
turally from the effects of the Nazi 
era. toe show also provided a forum 
for new art from around the world 
when big traveling exhibitions were 
far less common than they are today. 

By die 1970s, Documenta had be- 
come at least as influential as the 
Venice Biennale. In principle it was 
more coherent. Its selection of artists 
did not depend upon committees 
from different nations; instead, a 
head curator, or commissioner, was 
supposed to bring order to the show. 

The reality was sometimes differ- 
ent The last Documenta, in 1992, 
organized by Jan Hoet, a flamboy- 
ant, sel f- apgwtndiwng museum direc- 
tor from Belgium (now, aptly, an 
aspiring politician), was inconsistent, 
poorly installed and without clear 
purpose. Tt was also immense. At a 
cost of $11 million, it included 200 
artists from nearly 40 countries. 

This time the jury was “looking for 
something that put the spectacle 
back in the art and not in the organiz- 
ing of the art,” Halbreich says. 

“I’m not a star, not an actor, and 
this is not show business,” David 
says. The last Documenta was “just 
one more big exhibition, without a 
function,” she adds. “Nothing was 
done to collaborate with the artists. 
You can't collaborate with ISO art- 
ists, of course, but with specific art- 
ists and projects you have to be faith- 
ful to them and work closely with 
them for a long time. Collaboration 
can’t be improvised.” 

Her goal is to broaden the exhibi- 
tion, to make it more international 
and at the same time to re-examine 
the premises of a global survey. 

“We’re no longer in a postwar 
North America-Europe dialogue. 


• .'/• . ; : .*• ... 


/•V • 


1 it’s not paradoxical,’ open and asking 


questions.’ 

Sbe is years away from naming 




v VO IV; V 

*5 

SXttfts 







* >-ir . 


Rete Capeflnunn/Dic Wochc 


and we must open up, somehow. 
What do we mean by international? 
Without neocolonial attitudes? Do- 
cumenta should be a way of address- 
ing these questions — not necessarily 
solving them but at least addressing 
them.” 

Her openness comes through in 
conversation. She speaks erf the man- 
darin abstractions of a Robert Ry- 
man in the same breath as the psy- 


chologically charged -multimedia 
works of a Bruce Nauruan. 

“I think Ryman is as contempo- 
rary as Nauman. I don’t agree with 
the etiquette of political art, which is 
becoming internationalized- apd is 
particularly strong in the United 
States. I thmk bang dosed to Ryman 
is itself potiticaL A certain range .of- 
potiticai art for me is doing exactly 
the opposite of what art should do; 


artists for Documenta, only saying 
she will look especially at those who 
were not represented previously. 
“We 'are not obliged to a gigantic 
scale,’* she insists. At the same time 
we obviously can’t be so small that 
the show, is like a little laboratory 
cxperimenl We must work with the 
spaces we are given at Kassel. 

Documenta, which in .1997 will 
have a budget of $13 million, is pre- 
sented in several eclectic buildings 
clustered near the city’s center: “You 
have to deal with these idiosyncratic, 
heterogeneous spaces,” she says,, 
“not in a mqgalomamacal way but in 
terms of how things belong together . 
and how to work with, not against,- 
the spaces, sometimes with site^spe- 
dfic art. YoO have to find spaces -for 
intimate works and also for confron- 
tational, works, to be very attentive to 
the heeds Of the works. It's also im- 
portant to keep space, open for sur- 
prises; you can t make a Documenta 
-with.' a ’rigid program ’and exclude 
great works just because they don’t 
fit in with me program.” 1 
• ; David, nonetheless, has certain is- 
sues in mind. One is the changing 
dynamic between center and. periph- 
ery. die idea that co n te mp orary art is 
no longer just about Western Europe 
and New York City, the traditional 
centers, but increasingly about thd 
rest .of the world too. . 

' Another issue is public versus pri- 
vate. “They are two dimensions of 
contemporary life,” she says. “One 
has todo with intimac y ana. private . 
" space, while the other has to do with 
the city and everything else that dis- 
turbs and im ping es ‘ Upon private 

»P ’ • 

■ SpACC 

It is onty a coincidence, she thinks. 

that she was named at the same time, 
that Jean Clair, director of the Music 
Picasso in Paris, was picked to head- 
the visual arts component Of next- 
year’s Venice Biennale, the first time 
that job has gone to a non-Italian.. 

“I hope both committees chose os ' 
becanse-they were interested in inde- 
pendent.&nd fresh perspectives,” she 
said. “At least that’s what I want to 
bring to Documenta.” 


9. 


V"' 




a 




rOvt 


WEATHER 


PEOPLE 


Europe 


Forecast for Thursday through Saturday, as provided by Accu-Weather. Asia 


MM 

Man 


■ CMSd 
OMn 
EM# 


SSE* 

nun* 

SI PMntwB 


Stmbaurg 

TOm 

v«n 


Today 

Mgt 1M « 
OF OF 
29 AM 2MB a 
22/71 14*7 I 
20/79 7/44 • 

32/09 22/71 • 
29*4 20*8 ■ 
33*1 10*1 t 
34/75 13*0 pc 
23/73 11*2 I 
32*9 17/IE E 
21/70 13*5 pc 
32*9 24/75 S 
10*1 12153 pc 
15*9 12*3 I 
32*0 17*2 pc 
24/7S 14*7 pc 
26/79 11/52 pc 
10*1 9/48 pc 

31*0 17*2 1 
27*0 22/71 B 
28*2 18*4 ■ 
19*8 1D*0 I 
33*1 15*9 ■ 
31*8 18*1 pc 
19*0 11*2 *1 
38/79 12*3 I 
31*8 18*1 pc 
20*8 12/53 
29*4 21/70 4 
22/71 11*2 111 
25/77 14/57 * 
13*6 11*2 c 
33*1 20*8 f 
17*2 7/44 c 

18*4 9/48 pc 

28/79 9/48 I 

17*2 9/48 pe 

28*2 20*8 pc 
27*0 18*1 ■ 
22/71 13*8 e 
24/75 11*2 I 


IVJ 







(Odd 


Hot 


I H«y 
1 5no» 


North America 

Swell Bring heal wi» remain 
across Jlw Sourhwesi taro 
ihio week. A wind off IhB 
ocean wB pwem San Fran- 
cisco and Los Angeles from 
lummg out hoi The remains 
of Tropical Storm Beryl will 
spread up the Eastern 
Seaboard laie this week. 
Heavy rains may reach as 
tar north os New Yof* c*y. 


Europe 

The northern British Isles 
and western ScamSnevia vat 
have periods of rain late this 
week. Showers and gusty 
«wnds wW mM throutfi Lon- 
don. Paris wB be breezy wkh 
some sunshine, but there 
may be a shower Friday. 
Heal win spread from Spain 
into southern Fiance by the 
and ol the wwefc. 


Asia 

Japan w* be vary warm and 
steamy law this week, tail 
not qute as hoi as recently. 
Heal which will burid across 
central end eastern China 
and will reach Peking and 
Shanghai by Saturday. 
Typhoon Fred wffl eonimue 
to move westward and may 
threaten Taiwan a Okinawa 
fay Saturday. 


Aria 


TbOm Tamm 



Low W High 

Low W 


OF 

OF OF 

OF 


32/99 

2«/n t 32*6 

25777 pc 


31*8 

19*8 S 31 *8 

21/70 pc 

Hang Kong 

31*8 

20/79 A 31*8 

28/79 1 

Uarata 

32 *B 

24/75 pc 31*8 

24/75 1 

NraOcM 

31*8 

27*0 1 32® 

26/79 1 

Seoul 

32*9 

27/80 pc 32® 

27.80 pc 

ShwghM 

32*9 

20/79 c 32*9 

ae-79 pc 


31/88 

22/71 pc 31/88 

23/73 pc 


31*8 

27*0 1 32/89 

ae/79 pc 

Tokyo 

34*3 

27*0 pc 34*3 

27*0 * 

Africa 

AlgwfS 

32*9 

23-93 pc 30*88 

73/73 pc 

Cjpe fc-»i 

18/64 

8/46 1 17*2 

4/30 pc 

CaoUbra 

28*2 

19*6 3 28*82 

20*8 pc 

/fcnm 

19/66 

11*2 1 22/71 

12/53 PC 


27*0 

23/73 - 28*2 

24/75 pc 

rtocoM 

19*6 

11/52 ril 22*71 

12*53 pc 

Tula 

39/10223/73 ■ 3**3 

22/71 pc 

North America 


Qng> 


Middle East 


Latin America 


Today 


Oceania 


*U*M 

si*wy 


14*7 

17*2 


8/43 pc 
7/44 pc T7*2 


14/67 


Um 


C/F CJF 
34*3 24/75 
38/10020*8 
36*6 17*2 
32*9 19.88 
43/109 ora 
43/108 24/75 


Ta 

•ago Um 
C/F C8= 
33*1 24/75 s 
36*7 22/71 • 
33*1 18*4 f 
31*8 20*8 f 
42/107 23/73 1 
44/11127*0 • 


Today 

Mtfi Low It High LOW W 

of ae of of 

17*2 8M3 9 17*2 8*46 pc 

29*4 20*8 pc 28*2 21/70 pc 

Um IB/84 18*1 pc 18*4 IVES pc 

MwdooOr 23/73 14*7 I 24/75 1J*SS I 

nodajwwoo 23/73 18*4 pc 24/75 18»« PC 

18*4 S/41 pc 16*1 2.35 pc 


7/44 pc 

am */> 


Legend: s-amy. pc-party cloudy, c-doudy, Wi-Aowws. I -thunderstorms, r-ren. stwww fumes. 
sn-enow.Mce.w-WMBw>. A»m^8, fore ca sts id dtaaprovtdad by AcwW*adier. toe- C 1894 


24/75 14*7 
28*9 IBM 
28/79 19*8 
29** 18*4 
31*8 14*7 
27*0 17*2 
29*4 23/73 

3S/97 23/73 

LoaAngetre 34*0 a/71 
Hand 32*9 24.75 

za*s ie*i 

22/71 12*3 
32*9 24/75 
26/79 20*8 
*in08 29*4 
24/75 13/55 
a»71 13*6 
25/77 15*e 
27/ W SifTO 


Hem yak 

Rmfw 

Swiftwi 

SaWOa 

Tone 


pe 22/71 IMS PC 
1 29*4 21/70 pc 

pe 23/73 19*5 r 
pe 29*4 17*2 pc 
pc 34/93 18*1 f 
pc 29*2 17*2 PC 
pc JIM 94/75 pc 
t J5/9S 23/73 s 
s 33*1 20*8 pc 
I 33*1 26/77 pc 
1 29*4 18*4 pe 

pe a/71 11/52 (h 
1 33*1 28/79 « 

rfi 28*2 20*8 ih 
S 41/10850*8 4 
a 24/75 14/57 9 
C 24/75 14 *7 pc 
pc 23/73 ie«r *■ 
*/> 30/SB Sim pc 


As they have every year since 1977, the 
faithful flocked to Memphis for a week of 
grieving and grooving to mark the Aug. 16 
anniversary of Elvis Presley’s death. The 
most somber event of El vis Week, a can- 
dlelight vigD by his grave at his Graceland 
estate, drew an estimated 12,000 fans. 
Many fans carried single red roses, bou- 
quets of flowers or other small offerings. 
For Debbie Grise of Lewisbuig, Kentucky, 
it was a teddy bear “I’ve brought him one 
for the past eight years.” . . . Four-year- 
old Bela Farfcas of Hungary, who suffers 
from a congenital liver disease, has arrived 
in Brussels for a liver transplant that will 
be paid for by Michael Jackson. Jackson, 
who was in Budapest earlier this month 
with his wife Lisa Marie Presley, promised 
after seeing Bela that his Heal the World 
Foundation would pay the child's medical 
costs. • 

O 

The word spread like wildfire after the 
London tabloid Daily Mail reprated that 
Walter Crookite was going to do an inter- 
view and documentary with Princess Di- 
ana after meeting with the princess to work 
out details on yachts off Martha’s Vine- 
yard. But don’t get your hopes up. Cron- 


kite unequivocally denies it, says Joe Peyr- 
onnin, CBS News prime-time vice 
presidenL He told Newsday that Craniate 
phoned to say he had never met Di and 
that he was not doing an -interview. 


DameOe Mitterrand, 69, has left the hos- 
pital in Paris where she underwent a heart 
by-pass operation a month ago. She wfll - 
convalesce with her husband. President 
Francois Mitterrand, in their country home 
in Latcbe, France. The 77-year-old presi- 
dent underwent a second prostate cancer 
operation in July. . 

Actor Janies Caan, 53. is “doing great” in 
a drug rehabilitation center that he entered 
more than two weeks ago. says his spokes- 
man Pari Bloch. Bloch wouldn’t say what 
kind of drug habit Caan was bang treated 
for or where. Caan has been the subject of 
two criminal investigations. Los Angeles 
prosecutors said he will not be charged over 
an incident in March in which he allegedly 
pulled a gun on rap ringer Derek Lee But 
he is still being investigated over an alleged 
beating of a female companion, Leesa Ro- 
land. in May. . 



CHARGED — I'fight-diib-boimcer- 
tnmed-actor Mkkcy Romke, 44, has 
been charged m A misdemeanor spou- 
sal abase for Imodting down bis wife. 
Cane Otis, and hkkmgner at an office 
in 


Travel in a world without borders, time zones 

or language barriers. 


AJffiTAcceasNumbas 
How to cafl around the world. 

1 . Uang the chan bekw. find the country you are calling tan. 

2. Dul the corresponding AEST Access Number. 

3 . An AI^Eagttsh-speaklag Operator or vote prompt wfll ask for die pbooenimiber you wfsb id raH or connect vou to a 

cussomer service representative 

TorecdveyourfreewaHet card or /QBH* Access Num&eisjust dial the axessnumberaT 
the ocxintryj’txi’rc in and adc for Customer Service. 



couhrmy access number country acce ss number country access number 

• Italy- 


ACTA 


172-10X1 Brad 


Australia 


i-soo- 881 -oil Ueeto u s ietn * 


China, PBCeee 


155-00-11 Chile 


000-8010 


10611 


Gram 


Hongkong 


India* 


018-872 hnembourg Q- 80 (H ?111 

M a nrrift u fai , F.YJL oi 9»60a4288 


8*196 Columbia 


OQa-0312 


soo-mi 


Costa RJca*e 


980-11-0010 


114 


000-117 Mate* 


001-801-10 


Japan’ 


0039-U1 


Bfomco* 

Ncthcrbndr* 


Ecuador*- 
0900890110 El Salvador* 


119 


009-11 Norway, 


19a-0011 

06-022-9111 Guyana— 


190 


11* Poland**** 


800-190-11 Hondora/T* 


190 

165 


Malaysia* 


New Zealand 


800-0011 Pormgar 


0*010-4800111 MedcoAAA 


123 


000911 


05017-1-288 NfcaragB (Manugm) 


95-800-462-4240 


Philippines* 


Saipan* 


105-11 BowlatMoecow> 


01-800-4288 Panama* 


235-2872 Slovakia 


155-5042 Peru* 


174 

109 


Singapore 


Sri Lanka 


8000111-111 Spain* 

Swelea* 


0Q42PQQ101 Suriname 


191 


430430 


900-900011 Uruguay 


156 



Imagine a world where you can call country to country as easily as you can from home. And 
reach the US. directly from over 125 countries. Converse with someone who doesn’t speak your 
language, since it's translated instantly. Call your clients at 3 a.m. knowing they'll get the message in 
your voice at a more polire hour. All this is now posable with AEScD 

To use these services, dial the AI2T Access Number of the country you’re in and you’ll get afl the 
help you need With these Access Numbers and your AT&T Calling Card international calling has never been easier. 

If you don’t have an ART Calling Card or you’d like more information on AIST global services, just call us using the 


convenient Access Numbers on your right. 



Taiwan* 


0088-102884) 


QSO-Tgs^ll Venezuela* ■ 


004)410 


Thailand* 


0019-991-1111 UK. 


155-00-11 


80011-120 


EUROPE 


Ukra2mr 


0500494)011 Bahamas 


CARIBBEAN 


Aanenhr 


8*14111 


MIDDLE EAST 


8 * 100-12 Bennuda* 


1-800872-2881 


Austria — 


Belgium* 


022-90*4)11 Bahrain 


British VX. 


.1-000-872-2881 


1-800-872-2881 


Bulgaria 


0800-100-10 Cyprus*. 


Cayman Triandis .. 1-800-673-2881 


00-18004)010 bred 


08090010 Grenada* 


C rams’* 


9W8-0011 Kuwait 


177-100-2727 Haitf 


I -800-872-2881 


Czech Kcp 


00420-00101 Lebanon CBdnxt) 


800-288 Jamaica** 


001-800972-2883 


0-800-672-2881 


De nmar k* 


8001-0010 Qatar 


426,801 MMOMTMSii 


Hnland' 

9800-100-10 

Saudi Arabia 

1-800-10 

France 

19*0011 

Turkey* . .. . 

00-800-12277 

Germany 

01304)010 

UAE.*. . 

800-121 

Greece* 

00-800-1311 

AMERICAS 

Hungary* 

OQa-800-01111 

Argentina* 

001-800-200-1111 

k&m&M 

999003 

Belize*: 

555 


^ 00r ° 11 " 77 SLOg/Nevis ■ 1-800872-2881 


AFRICA 


Gabon* 

Gambia* 


510-0200 






1M 


h 


00x4)01 


00111 


1-800-550-000 Bofrla* 


Liberia 


0800-10 


0*00-1112 SonthAfrica 


797-797 






0-800-9901 Z3 


iftfCnMlnhlUllbUIT * *■ ' B h va a nrvtir m liw-il - 

worid Goraecr pdas cot« rfittff C5AJXrca*ac<rtn*i*URk«l dwjr ' ♦ 


anfflBApirecf vavi lvftB y Sfc ftin.aaiectai/WifcMlatae*' 
CBrb nauaKiJw^fcMWiiahfBreraa^npMuaB nranM MwreHOhD. aaFmn potato jAemuav.i 


dnouCih ibFaS duMoa 


V 


== weandtbcadui 

TV4k7i(km-ii«{i8Kr(tepn«cireiiinreflhArdd6V(teito8r. Ham “Wptam mafkni. 4adarf 


■Hr 


£ lOOi.W 


V 


MmmmSi 




d*Jj t-je \£j>