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INTERNATIONA 



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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


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Paris, Friday, August 19, 1994 


No. 34,67) 




Rwanda Pledgt 


By Steve Vogci 

WashlngtanPaa Service 

. KIGALI, Rwanda — Hie government said 'Thursday 
tnat II intended to occupy the h iHnapitarian prorcctinn 
zone in southwestern Rwanda after French soldiers 
depart Monday, but it saidirwotild coordinate with the 
United Nations before xnovingits troops. ih-. 

“We want to occupy all Rwanda,'" Prime Minister 
Twagiramungu said at a news conference. “In- 
deed. for the credibility of the goveramenivjye have to 
occupy all of Rwanda. But we will not attack: the zone.” 

The prune m i nis ter added^ "“Everything Ttas to be 
done ui coordination with the UN." 

Officials with the United Nations have been con- 


cerned that a movement into the “safe zone" by Tutsi 
soldiers of the Rwanda Patriotic Front would heighten 
rears of retribution against Hutu refugees and inhabit- 
ants of the region and accelerate their flow into Zaire. 

■ The UN special representative for Rwanda, Shahar- 
var Khan, said he had received assurances from the 
government that it would seek UN approval before 


moving its troops into the zone. 
MnKhan sai<2 ! 


the government had agreed that UN 

troops would be responsible for security in the zone. 


been reported. “They expect us 
ion," he said. “I 


to bring abbot a law-and-order situation,’ 
gpt this very dearly from the prime minister." 

Mr. Khan said that with the arrival this week of a 


battalion of Ethiopian soldiers, the United Nations was 
ready to lake control of the zone with a force of over 
2,000 troops largely from African nations. 

“We are. ready on the ground.” be said. “But frankly, 
we would have been happier with a few more days." 

Wire services reported : 

Mr. Twagiramungu's remarks about occupying the 
“safe zone" seemed certain to increase the fears of the 
hundreds of thousands of Hutu there. 

The zone was set up by France two months ago under 
a UN mandate, both to protect Rwandans from attacks 
by the former Hutu government and to stop the ad- 


See RWANDA Page 8 


' • • >v - V 



_ m . ~ , •. ■ - • ; . • V.mup. I IK- .Wu»l rrw. 

Rwandan refugees canying firewood Tharsday at the Kunbmnha camp near Coma, Zaire, as they made preparations for the beginning of the rainy season. 


Bonn Wants Help 
To Stop Plutoni um 


Tests of Matter Germans Seek 
Seized in May Global Effort 


Point to Russia ‘Beyond El 7 


By Steve Coll 

Washington Past Service 

LONDON — European officials re- 
sponsible for testing the smuggled weap~ 
ons-grade nuclear materials recently seized 


in Germany said Thursday that at least 
'i almost certainly came from Rus- 


one batch i . 

ria, and they identified three military- 
linked R ussian nuclear sites as the proba- 
ble sources. 


utom- 



■ Ompded by Ow Staff From Dapmthes 

GAZA — Yasser Arafat, tire Palestine 
Liberation : Organization leader,- said 
Thursday that be would prevent Islamic 
“terrorists" from attacking Israelis in Gaza 
and Jericho. 


But Mr. Arafat, 


to reporters 


after meeting leftist Israeli legidators in 
Gaza, made it dear that be wanted to 
avoid open warfare with his chief Palcstin- 
vaL He 


fighters- “I am going to prevent them from 
doing any terrorist action." 

'Mr. Arafat did hot elaborate in com- 
ments broadcast on Israel Radio on how 
be would stop Islamic militant attacks that 
have killed six Israelis since self-rule began 
inthe Gaza Strip and Jericho three months 


tan nva 


lamas. 


“I am not going to fight Hamas terror- 
ists," he said in English, uring a term Israel 
used to employ to describe Iris own PLO 


... Israel has demanded that the Palestinian 
self-rule authority take action against 
Muslim- fundamentalist groups behind the 

In Alexandria, Egypt, on Wednesday, 
Israel’s foreign minister, Shimon Peres, 


said Israel and the PLO had agreed on 
moves to curb, violence by Islamic oppo- 
nents of the lsrael-PLO peace accord. 

Mr. Peres said after talks with the PLO 
negotiator, Nabii Shaath, (hat Israel ex- 
pected the Palestinian police “to get hold 
of those who are terrorizing innocent peo- 
ple and send them to court." 

In Gaza on Thursday, the PLO’s police 
chief in the area said Palestinian factions 
could be plunged into strife like that dur- 
ing the civil war in Beirut if Hamas and 
other opposition groups did not stop at- 
tacking Israel. 


“We do not want another Beirut, and 1 
ask our brothers in Hamas and Islamic 
Jihad to realize this well," Major General 
Nasr Youssef said. “We have obligations 
to fulfill and we are now at the very end of 
our flexibility." 

Palestinians in Gaza say the authority 
has spent the last three months trying to 
avoid conflict with militants by saying it 
was unable to fully control the security 
situation. 

In a statement broadcast Thursday on 


In a case involving six ; 
um-239 seized from a German tra 
salesman in May, there is “a very 
probability" that the material was pro- 
duced in a weapons factory or an auxiliary 
enrichment plant in Russia, said Wilhelm 
Gmelin, the director of safeguards at Eura- 
tom, the nuclear regulatory agency of the 
European Union. 

Mr. Gmelin. in a telephone interview, 
added that in two other cases involving 
smuggled weapons-grade material, Eura- 
tom scientists continued to presume that 
the material was also or Russian origin. 
But he said it would probably be a week or 
two before Eura tom could be definite 
about its findings in these two cases or be 
specific about suspected rites of origin. 

One of the cases is the most disturbing 
yet. the seizure of 300 to 350 grams of 
weapons-grade plutonium in Munich Iasi 
week. 

“It’s coming from Russia. O.K.," said 
Georges Herbillon, the chid* of staff in 
Euratom’s safeguards division, but, he 
added, not necessarily from the same place 
as the other cases. 

Mr. Gmelin said that although there was 
no evidence that (he large Munich batch 
had come directly from a nuclear warhead, 
the lab work to dale also indicated it was 
not “logical or reasonable" to think the 
plutonium had come from a civilian nucle- 
ar power facility in the former Eastern 
bloc. 

Other European officials, reiterating 
what they had said earlier this week, added 
that their best guess remained that the 
Munich material came from auxiliary en- 
richment or reprocessing facilities at nu- 
clear sites that are supervised by or linked 
to the Russian military. The officials re- 
quested anonymity. 

Mr. Herbillon said that Euratom scien- 
tists believed they had narrowed the origin 
of the six-gram batch of highly pure pluto 
nium-239 to one of three nuclear sites in 
Russia: Arzamas. Chelyabinsk or Ekate- 
rinburg. 

Arzamas-16 is a once-secrei. military- 


supervised nuclear weapons complex 

rnead 


where nuclear warhead design, ware 
assembly and disassembly are carried out, 
according to the May 1994 “Nuclear 


See TERROR, Page 8 


See SOURCE, Page 8 


Washington Cool to Florida Plea for Help 

Flood of Cuban Refugees Does Not Alarm Attorney General 


The Associated Pros 

WASHINGTON — Faced with a 
steadily increasing flow of refugees from 
Cuba, the CHntbii administration roasted 
pleas Thursday from Florida for stronger 
action to stem-the tide. 

Governor Lawton Chiles, speaking in 
Key West, had declared a state of emer- 
gency. He urged the federal government to 
release S7S million in emergency funds for 
dealing with problems caused by the refu- 
gees, and requested more ships to interdict 
boats and rafts coming from Cuba. 

But Attorney General Janet Reno insist- 
ed the administration was m a na g in g the 
problem “in an orderly way and without, 
disruption." She gave a cool response to 
Mr. Chiles’s appeals for money and shits. 

Ms. Reno's assessment was criticized in 
turn by Senator Bob Graham of Florida. 

“I disagree with the attorney general,’*' 
the Democrat said. “No community of the 
scale of Key West can accommodate the 
refugees pouring into the Florida Keys." 

After the 1980 Marie! boatfift, in which 



federal and state officials together 


William Booth and Daniel Williams of 
The Washington Post reported earlier from 
Washington: 


an emergency .plan to avert a repeat. 
The plan mcl 


udes using navy vessels to 
intercept Cubans before they reach U.S. 


waters and qualify fen- automatic refugee 
status. It also calls 


for tough measures to 
it Cuban-Americans from sailing to 
aba to pick up refugees. 

Ms. Reno reiterated the administration 
position that “vessels that appear to be 
bound to Cuba may be stopped and 
boarded and may be seized." She pointed 
ait that one such boat had been seized and 
its crew was in jaiL 

But rite gave no indication that the ad- 
ministration was prepared to give Mr. 
Qnles the money he wanted or that it was 
ready, to use Navy vessels to intercept 
refugees outside U.S. waters. 

- The number of Cuban refugees picked 

up by tire Coast Guard has dim bed each 
day this week, reaching 537 Wednesday, 
the highest single-day total since 1980. 


The growing wave of Cuban rafters flee- 
ing their island illustrates the fun dame ntal 
conflict at the heart of the administration’s 
Cuba policy: It professes to discourage the 
refugee flow even while in practice it lures 
rafters into the deadly waters. 


Washington repeatedly has warned Mr. 
Castro not to unleash an exodus and 
threatened to seize boats from Florida that 
to pick up refugees in Cuba. Bui 


the administration is powerless to stem the 
flow as long as Mr, Castro is willing to let 
them go and there are Cuban vessels to 
carry 


Only an unprecedented decision to re- 
turn refugees forcibly might discourage 


Cubans from malting the dangerous cross- 
ing, but such a move would be politically 


See CUBA, Page 8 



Kiosk 


Gorbachev Plans 


A Political Effort 


Return 


MOSCOW (AFP) — Former Presi- 
dent Mikhail S. Gorbachev an- 
nounced plans Thursday to create a 
political movement to serve as an al- 
ternative to Russia's sharply polarized 
political forces. 

In remarks carried by the Itar-Tass 
press agency on the eve of the third 
anniversary of the aborted coup 
against him, Mr. Gorbachev, 63, said 
the movement, to be called Democrat- 
ic Alternative, would be “powerful." 
He gave no details on when it would 
be set up, what its platform would be 
or what role he intended to play in it. 

Mr. Gorbachev also predicted that 
policy directions following the legisla- 
tive elections last December, when 


100 DAYS — President Nelson 
Mandela of South Africa in Parlia- 
ment on Thursday, marking has 
first 100 days in office. Page 2. 


hard-line nationalists won a suige of 
liticaT ten- 


support, would heighten politic 
sions. "The forces of yesterday will 
waste no time in taking advantage of 
that to take power,” he said. 


Dow Jones 


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Down 
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The Dollar 

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1.5402 


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38.595 


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550 


5.3275 


Midnight Basketball: Crime- Bill ‘Pork’ or Lifesaver? 


Newsstand Prices 


Andorra .....9.00 FF 

Antilles 11.20 FF 

Comeroon..l-400CFA 

Egypt E.P.5Q00 

France 9.00 FF 

Gabon 960 CFA 

Greece .300 Dr. 

Holy &UD Lire 

I why Coast .1.12# CFA 

Jordon ,...1 JO 

Lebanon ...USS150 


Luxembourg 60 L Fr 
Morocco. ...... .12 Db 

Qatar ......8.00 Rials 

Reunion — 11.20 FF 
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Senegal 960 CFA 

Spain ..... .200 PTAS 

Tunisia Din 

Turkey ..T.L. 35,000 

LLA.E ASODifh 

U.S. Mil. 'Eur.) SI. 10- 


Ry Joe Donnelly 

Washington Past Service 

BOWIE, Maryland —The lOth-sceded Laurel Bridge 
Club clawed through the basketball league's playoffs and 
was set to battle for the championship. The competition 
an d camaraderie had the pearly 200 in attendance buzz- 
ing. 

Only for a moment, as a woman prayed through a 
microphone, did the crowd grow silenL “Lord, will you 
also remember those who are not in attendance, those 
who were cut down in the prime of their lives," she said, 
her voice reverberating around the gym of Bowie State 
College. 

This was Midnight Basketball, a national program 
started in Glenarden, Maryland, to give young men an 
alternative to late nights on the streets, to keep them 
from getting killed. ' . , „ . , 

fa the final seconds, the underdog Laurel Bndge Club 
lost to lire Richmond American Raiders, 84-80. But in 


“It's about providing opportunity for young adults to 
escape drugs and the streets and get on with their lives." 
President George Bush said in 1991, when he named it 
his 124th Point of Light 


In recent days. Midnight Basketball has been used to 
criticize the S7 billion in crime-prevention programs that 
are part or President Bill Clinton's S30 billion crime bill. 
Final action on tire bill was stalled last week after 
Republicans attacked the funds for prevention programs 


as excessive. 


In House debate, several called the bill's $40 million 
commitment to njghnime sports leagues the essence of 
politicalpork. Funding would begin with S3 million in 
fiscal 1996 and grow to $10 million in fiscal 2000. 


and would allow the bill to come before both the House 
and Senate. 

For the “at-risk" youths the program is designed to 
help, Midnight Basketball embodies its slogan. 

“The Alternative — this says it all," said Anthony 
Cowan, 24, the coach of Laurel Bridge Club and a former 
player, referring ro the motto. “It gives us a choice. When 
I played, it taught me leadership and discipline." 

“At the same time that I was playing midnight league," 
Mr. Cowan said monrents before his team took the floor, 
“I had three of my friends get locked up. Who’s to say 
that 1 wouldn’t have been with them?" 


Midnight Basketball began in 1986 as one worried 


The Republican attacks 


to have been success- 


town manager’s response to escalating crime. By study- 
[&. G. Van Standifer learned dial trouble 


the words of a supporter, “The last thing Midnight 
Basketball is about is basketball." 


appear 

ful in winning a concession from Mr. Ginion to reduce 
social programs by 5 percent and to transfer that money 
into law enforcement. The compromise would apparent- 
ly save most of ihe funding for nighttime sports leagues 


ing crime reports, -« »■>«, hv«viv 

in GIcnarden increased during the summer months and 
that most of the crimes were committed between 10 P.M. 
and 2 A.M. He devised the league as a way of getting 


See MIDNIGHT, Page 8 




3 


1 


Complied by Our Staff From Dispatches 

BONN — Germany said Thursday that 
only international cooperation going be- 
yond the European Union could crack an 
emerging underground market in nuclear 
contraband from the former Soviet Union. 

“This new phenomenon cannot be mas- 
tered by one country alone," said Interior 
Minister Manfred Kamher of the four 
samples of smuggled plutonium-239 and 
enriched uranium seized in Germany in 
the last four months. 

“We need international cooperation go- 
ing even beyond the European Union," he 
sard. “Security measures in the countries 
where these materials are produced must 
also be strengthened." 

In Berlin, meanwhile, authorities de- 
clined to elaborate on a statement that the 
police had found evidence of a planned or 
maybe even successful shipment of pluto- 
nium to Pakistan during raids of seven 
apartments around the city on Wednes- 
day. The Pakistani government denied that 
it was linked to any conspiracy to smuggle 
plutonium. 

In Moscow, as government officials con- 
tinued to accuse the Western press of sen- 
sationalism, Russian nuclear officials con- 
ceded on Thursday that there was no 
foolproof way to safeguard weapons-grade 
plutonium. 

“A sman man can cheat any system," 
said Yuri Rogozhin, spokesman for Rus- 
sia’s nuclear regulatory agency. 

But the Russians insisted that they had 
prevented any such thefts. They did an- 
nounce, however, that the police had 
mounted an operation to catch three men 
trying to sell radioactive material. 


A SL Petersburg police spokesman. Igor 
Komissarov, said the three were detained 


in Kaliningrad on Aug. 12 as they tried to 
sell undercover agents a container of the 
radioactive material. He said the three men 
had tried previously to sell the 60-kilogram 
( 130-pouud) container to a number of for- 


eigners. including Poles and Germans. 


revelation of the six-day-old arrests 
seemed a dear sign Moscow wanted to 
show it was being vigilant. 

A U.S. offidal said in Washington on 


Thursday that the plutonium seized in 


Germany in the last four months was not 
weapons grade and probably came from a 
research reactor. “We cannot confirm that 
the materia] comes from Russia," she said. 
“We are quite certain, however, that it does 
not come from a nuclear weapon or a 
nuclear weapon-related activity. What has 
been found has been typically in very small 
quantities, more recently larger quantities 
but still well below the level required for a 
nudear bomb and also typically not what 
we would consider weapons grade.” 

The German Interior Ministry said EU 
interior ministers would discuss the prob- 
lem with their counterparts from Eastern 
Europe in Berlin on Sept. 7-8 during an 
informal EU meeting. 

The announcement of the meeting came 
as Chancellor Helmut Kohl's top mtelli- 


See BOMB, Page 8 


Vatican Pleas 
To Islam Raise 
Fears in West 


■Vc'w York Times Service 

ROME — The Vatican’s tactic of ap- 
pealing to Islamic leaders for support in its 
campaign against a United Nations docu- 
ment on population control has begun to 
draw criticism in the West, where govern- 
ments fear that the Vatican will allv itself 


with radical Islamic forces. 

Seeking to head off approval of abortion 
rights ana sexual freedom at a forthcoming 
world population conference, the Vatican 
has been seeking support from radical and 
fundamentalist governments and groups 
in Islamic countries, including Iran and 
Libya. 

Less than a month before representa- 
tives of 180 nations are scheduled to meet 
in Cairo to discuss a draft document that 
lays down guidelines for avoiding a popu- 
lation explosion, the Vatican has acknowl- 
edged that its envoys have met recently 
with officials in Tehran and Tripoli. 

They said the meetings were part of a 
widespread effort to gain support for its 

S tion to language on women's rights. 

ng reproductive rights, in the pre- 
liminary draft, which is supported by the 
United'Staies and many United Nations 
population experts. 

Vatican officials say the papal envoy in 
Tehran, Monsignor Romeo Panciroli. met 
recently with Iranian officials, but denied 
that they had made any pact with Iran's 
radical Islamic leaders to oppose passage 
of the UN population document. 

The denial came after news reports from 
Tehran quoted a senior Iranian govern- 
ment offidal as saying the Vatican bad 
Iran’s “full endorsement'' on the issue. 


week bv the official Libyan press agency 
JANA' that Vatican diplomats were sup- 


See VATICAN, Page 8 


Perhaps more striking was a report this 

t. I .L _ I I !L...« ancc i)omrv i 





Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 1994 


** 


New Cases 

Against 

Carlos 

Charges Sought 
In Railroad Blasts 


Canpiled by Our Stuff From Dtspaicha 

PARIS — Two more cases 
will be reopened to try Carlos 
for terrorist attacks against the 
French railroads in the 1980s, 
Justice Minister Pierre Mfchaig- 
nerie said Thursday. 

Carlos, one of the world’s 
roost-wanted terrorists, was de- 
tained in Sudan on Sunday and 
handed over to France. He was 
arraigned Tuesday for a 1982 
bombing just off the Champs- 
Elysees that killed one person 
and injured 63. 

The justice minister's move 
Thursday came after a call 
Wednesday by the special anti- 
terrorist judge, Jean-Louis Bru- 
guiere, who is handling the Car- 
los prosecution. The judge will 
try to implicate Carlos in two 
attacks in the 1980s on the basis 
of files passed on by Germany 
from the former East German 
secret police, the Stasi. 

The cases expected to bring 
new charges against the 44- 
year-old Venezuelan concern 
the March 1982 bombing of a 
Toulouse-Paris express train 
and a December 1983 bomb at- 
tack on Marseille's main train 
station. Each attack killed five 
people. 

The guerrilla has been sen- 
tenced in absentia to life in jail 
for killing two French counter- 
intelligence agents in 1975. But 
magistrates and victims' fam- 
ilies want him to face trial on 
other counts. Interior Minister 
Charles Pasqua says he has 
killed 83 people worldwide, at 
least 15 of them in France. 

According to the French 
magazine Le Point, quoting 
Stasi files, the attack on the 
Toulouse-Paris express was a 
failed attempt to kill Mayor 
Jacques Chirac of Paris, who 
had been due to travel on the 
train. 

Both that case and the attack 
on the Marseille station were 
abandoned by examining mag- 
istrates because there was insuf- 
ficient evidence to send a sus- 
pect for trial. 

Judge Brugui&re, who exam- 
ined Stasi documents in Hunga- 
ry last year, will travel to Benin 
in September to examine all 
Stasi documents concerning 
Carlos. 

One of Carlos’s lawyers, 
Mourad Oussedik, said Carlos 
had nothing to do with the two 
cases reopened Thursday. 

(AP. Reuters, AFP) 


Earthquake Kills 
At Least 147 in 
Northern Algeria 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

ALGIERS — An earthquake 
struck northwest Algeria early 
Thursday, killing at least 147 
people as they slept and spread- 
ing panic through villages and 
towns in the Mascara region. 

The quake, which hit about 
400 kilometers (250 miles} west 
of Algiers, registered a magni- 
tude of 5.6 on the Richter stale, 
according to the Algerian Cen- 
ter for Astrophysical Research. 
At least 289 people were in- 
jured, local rescue officials said. 

Several aftershocks occurred, 
the strongest of which had a 
magnitude of 5.1. There was 
considerable damage to build- 
ings and property, and from 
8,000 to 10,000 people were left 
without shelter, according to 
rescue officials, quoted on na- 
tional radio. 

Hardest hit were Bou Hani- 
Fia, a hot springs resort, and 
Bou Henni, the radio said. The 
quake also struck the city of 
Mascara and was felt in Oran, 
the regional capital on the coast 
about 100 kilometers north of 

(Reuters, AP) 




WORLD BRIEFS 


Greater Serbia’ Card Polish Ex-Spy Resigns After Outcry 

WARSAW' C Renters) — A former Co mmuni st-spy who was put 
cfcmSof Poland’s avil inidligence three days arraigned 
iiirsdav after an outcry that Ms nomination would threaten the 


jDcqwe> Rrinm'Th: AwwiM Pnsw. 

Mourad Oussedik, a defense lawyer, leaving La Sant6 prison m Paris Thursday after 
visiting his client, Carlos, who has been charged with complicity in a 1982 car bombing. 


Compiled bv Oar Staff From Dispatches 

SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herze- 
govina — In another slap at 
world opinion, Bosnian Serbian 
leaders announced Thursday 
that they would formally seek 
to link their territories with Ser- 
bia and Montenegro. 

The move appeared timed to 
increase opposition to an. inter- 
nationally negotiated Bosnian 
peace plan accepted by the re- 
public's Croats and Muslims 
but vehemently opposed by the 
Bosnian Serbian leadership. 

With most Bosnian Serbs ap- 
pearing opposed to the peace 
plan, which would strip them of . 
nearly a third of the 70 percent 
of Bosnia they now ho!d,'thetr 
leaders have said they would 
abide by the results of an Aug. 
27-28 referendum on its fate. 

The announcement Thursday 
on the planned union' of Serbi- 
an lands, carried by the Bosnian 
Serbian news agency Srna, 
seemed to be an attempt to 
churn up even more opposition 
to the p lan. 

Srna quoted Momcilo Krajis- 
nik, an aide to Radovan Karad- 
zic, leader of the Bosnian Serbs, 
as saying that Bosnian Serbs 
and their rebel brethren in Cro- 
atia would formally ask Serbia 
and Montenegro for permission 
to join them and create “Great- 
er Serbia.” 

But Mr. Krajisnik, who made 
the comments at an assembly of 
Bosnian Serbs in Pale, south- 
west of Sarajevo, seemed to be 
speaking mostly for effect. 

President Slobodan Milose- 
vic of Serbia is unlikely to ea- 


Rwanda Aid Workers Cope With Horror 


By Jane Perlez 

New York Times Service 

GOMA, Zaire — On her first day of 
work among the Rwandan refugees, Sara 
Rossi, a 28-year-old Swiss nurse, faced 
2,500 sick and injured people sprawled 
on file tennis courts and around the 
grounds of a sports complex here. A 
virtual mountain of 500 dead bodies lay 
nearby. There was one other nurse, no 
running water, and few medical tools. 

“When 1 came, I thought I could not 
deal with it,” Miss Rossi said. 

Months before, as a nurse in Rwanda, 
she had seen the mutilated bodies and 
treated the hacked victims of the massa- 
cres. Now, among those pleading with 
her for succor were possibly some of the 
killers and certainly some of their com- 
rades. 

“1 had seen what they had done,” she 
said. “But it was not possible to think 
about iL You stay here, and you do what 
you can.” 

The warriors of disaster relief like 
Miss Rossi share certain qualities: en- 
durance, common sense, even-handed- 
ness, a sense of humor, as well as the 
essential ingredient of professional sidlL 

As the plight of the Rwandan refugees 
unfolded, the frontline aid agencies — 
the International Committee of the Red 
Cross, Doctors Without Borders, Oxfam, 
Irish Concern — flew in their most sea- 
soned workers. But the magnitude of the 
situation was such that the leaders of the 


teams kept a careful watch on their 
workers and provided professional assis- 
tance to ensure that they did not crack 
under the pressure 

At the Doctors Without Borders com- 
pound, three specialists were brought in 
to talk with aid workers Mien they re- 
turned from the camps at night. Guide- 
lines dealing with stress were circulated: 
to feel guilty was normal, sleepless nights 
were likely. 

For Miss Rossi, who worked for Doc- 
tors Without Borders in Rwanda before 
joining the Red Cross, hundreds died 
before her eyes at the height of the chol- 
era crisis. To keep her resolve. Miss Ros- 
si said she relied on “my mentality.” 

“I talk a lot.” she said. “I don’t keep all 
the information inside. You have people 
who don't talk, they crack. It's very im- 
portant to talk, and we area very united 
team.” 

The Red Cross has a reputation for 
working in the toughest arenas, particu- 
larly war situations, and with people like 
the Rwandan soldiers, whom some other 
agencies choose not to deal with. 

Until three years ago. the Red Cross 
did not bother too much with psycholog- 
ical support for its workers. 

But this has changed with the conflicts 
in the former Yugoslavia. Liberia. Soma- 
lia, and now Rwanda. Two Swiss dele- 

g ites who witnessed the mass killing of 
wandans in April and May, and who 
were in Red Cross ambulances when 


Tutsi patients were dragged out by Hutu 
militia, have been given psychiatric treat- 
ment in Switzerland, Red Cross officials 
say. 

“Hie stress is immense, but part of our 
job is to learn to be humble and to know 
that you are not going to save the whole 
of humanity,” said Johanna Grombach, 
31, head of the agency's 30-member team 
here “What is important is to know that 
it is not our fault That if people are 
dying it is because of war, and we must 
understand that the responsibility for the 
problem is the war.” 

Miss Grombach, who has worked with 
the Red Cross in Croatia. Central Asia, 
and South Africa, says she has a bottom- 
line rule for what makes a good aid 
worker: “They shouldn't have too great a 
heart If you want to save the world, 
forget it We don’t need people who are 
too empathetic. We need professionals.” 

■ Japan to Send Soldiers 

Japan announced Thursday that it 
would send soldiers to countries border- 
ing Rwanda to help refugees, the first 
overseas relief mission by its military, 
Reuters reported from Tokyo. 

“There is no more comprehensive way 
for Japan to afford relief,” Deputy Chief 
Cabinet Secretary Nobuo lshihara said. 
The announcement followed agreement 
on the mission on Wednesday by the 
three parties in the ruling coalition. 

Mr. lshihara gave no details of the size 
of the contingent or when it would leave. 


Mandela Is Upbeat on First 100 Days 


Mascara. 


By Paul Taylor 

Washington Post Service 

CAPE TOWN — One hun- 
dred days into his presidency. 
Nelson Mandela pronounced 
himself satisfied on Thursday 
with the pace and scope of 
South Africa's political social 
and economic transforms lion. 

“Our nation has succeeded to 
handle its problems with great 
wisdom,” Mr. Mandela said in 
a stock-taking speech to Parlia- 
ment “We have a government 
that has brought together bitter 
enemies into a constructive re- 
lationship.” He added, “We 
have a government that is in 
control and whose programs 
are on course.” 

The upbeat assessment is 
shared by Mr. Mandela’s con- 
stituents. In a Gallup/Mar- 


kinor poll published here 
Thursday, 75 percent of Indi- 
ans, 70 percent of blacks, 63 
percent of so-called coloreds 
and 58 percent of whites said 
they thought the new govern- 
ment was doing wdL Nearly 
two-thirds of all South Africans 
also said they thought race rela- 
tions had improved. 

But despite the widespread 
good win, these early days after 
South Africa's rebirth into a 
multiracial democracy have 
been notable more for what has 
not happened than for what 
has. 

On the positive side, the pre- 
election spoilers who had made 
the campaign such a dicey and 
dangerous affair, ranging from 
rightist Afrikaners to tradition- 
alist Zulus to hard-line security 


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force members, have barely reg- 
istered a murmur of complaint 
about the new order. 

On the negative side, the 
hoped-for post-apartheid in- 
vestment boom has not materi- 
alized, the nation’s crime rate 
has not dropped, and the new 
government has not yet begun 
to deliver on its ambitious plans 
to build houses, water ana sew- 
er systems and health clinics for 
the masses victimized by apart- 
heid. 

“We’ve had to get to know 
what government is,” said Jay 
Naidoo, a minister without 
portfolio and former union 
leader who is in charge of coor- 
dinating the administration’s 
reconstruction and develop- 
ment program. “I not only had 
no portfolio. I had no job de- 
scription and no staff. We’re all 
on a steep learning curve here.” 

Mr. Mandela took credit on 
Thursday for achieving some of 
his short-term goals, such as 
providing free health care for 
poor children under six and 
pregnant mothers. 

On the other hand, he ac- 
knowledged that this new ser- 
vice has left many health clinics 


around the country unable to 
cope with the increased traffic. 
Meantime, the centerpiece of 
his administration’s reconstruc- 
tion program, building 1 mil- 
liw new homes over five years, 
is already bogged down by fi- 
nancing and local complica- 
tions. 

Whatever his record on deliv- 
ering the goods, Mr. Mandela 
has received high marks for the 
tone of statesmanship and spirit 
of reconciliation he has brought 
to the national unity govern- 
ment. Editorials in the conser- 
vative white press now routine- 
ly praise him, as does the man 
who was his most bitter pre- 
election rival the head of the 
inlcHtha Freedom Party, Man- 
gosuthu ButhdezL 

“I don't think he could have 
done better,” said Chief Buthe- 
lezi, who is now the minister of 
home affairs. “He has per- 
formed very well as a father 
figure and a head of govern- 
ment.” 

At age 76, Mr. Mandela has 
kept up a blistering pace, taking 
time off only for a cataract op- 
eration last month that im- 
proved his vision. 


dorse any such union just two 
weeks after breaking nil formal 
ties with the Bosnian Serbs. He 
wants to get crushing UN sanc- 
tions lifted on the Serbian-dom- 
inated remnants of Yugoslavia. 

A United Nations aid offi- 
cial meanwhile, said Thursday . 
that Bosnian Seths had with- 
drawn permission for urgent 
evacuation of sick women and 
children from the eastern MuSr 
lim enclave of Gorazde, endan- 
gering theirlives. 

Peter Kessler, spokesman for 
the UN High Commissioner for 
Refugees, said Bosnian Serbs 
once again had tried to link the 
Gorazde evacuations to release 
of prisoners by the warring 
sides. This is “totally unaccept- 
able,” Mr. Kessler said. ‘'There 
are people who need to get out, 

and they are in danger of dying 

if they don’t” 

The Bosnian Serbs bad also 
informed UN officials that, 
starting Thursday, no convoys 
supplying UN personnel would 
be allowed to pass without rav- 
ing the Serbs fuel But a UN 
spokesman. Major Dacre 
Holloway, said their convoys 
were running without any prob- 
lems Thursday morning. 

In another development, sev- 
eral artillery rounds hit the Du- 
brovnik airport in southern 
Croatia on Thursday, a UN 
spokesman said. 

The Croatian Army told the 
UN Protection Force that six 
artillery rounds had fallen near 
the runway. A 76mm shell hit 
the runway, according to a 
spokesman. (AP. AFP) - 


in 

Thursday after an outcry — 
country's relations with the West. _ . 

Marian Zachaiski, sentenced to hfe nnpnsonment by a Los 
Angetes court in 1981 overespionage dzaiges aiKl lata released m 
aspyswap; said he was quitting because he did not want to 

^TdoSnw^tto^ a source of conflicts among Poles ati a time 
when Poland most needs cooperation and agreemmt, he saii 
Mr. Zacharski is believed to have taken secret plats of Hawk and 



Russia Jails 3 Japanese f or Poaching 

TOKYO (AP) — Three Japanese fishermen caught by Russian 
authorities in disputed waters earlier this year have beat sen- 
tenced to 15 months in prison for poaching. Japans Foreign 


masanon oawauo, ■ - — r . - ■ 

ca ptains of three vessels found operating m waters ofttheKuni 
Tsianrfg, which Russia seized from Japan at the end of World War 
IL . received the sentences. The. Foreign. Ministry said the ships 
were in February 'and the sentences' handed down last 

mouth on Sfoflrotan, one of the disputed islands. Hie ministry said 
it was informed of the sentences only. .‘Wednesday, but did not 

a Russian patrol drip fired on two Japanese 
vessels, injuring the captain of one. That incident has led to a 
flurry of protests and exchanges between Moscow and Tokyo. 

Nasrin Is Honored by Swedish Group 

STOCKHOLM CAP) — The feminist author Taslirna Nasrin, 
threatened with death toy Muslim extremists in her native Bangla- 
desh, caine out of seclusion here Thursday and promised to 
continue her fight against “fundamentalist insanity. 

Dr. Nasrin, who went into hiding after arriving here Aug. 10, 
spoke at a ceremony where the Swedish PEN Club awarded her 

tfc RurtTuchtrisky Prize for literature. “I have a dream, a dream 

of a world without inequality and oppression, where women could 
be strong in their own nght, and enjoy dignity and independence, 
Dr. Nasrin said. . , . , . . 

Since she left Bangladesh, Dr. Nasnn said, her family has faced 
“daily death threats.” She said her family members had no special 

protection, but did not plan to join her abroad. She indicated she 

would return home, but not soon. 

Dutch Meld Malaysia Bans f Weak’ Men From TV 

KUALA LUMPUR (Reuters) — Malaysia is banning effemi- 
nate men from ap pe ari n g on television became it fears such 
“weaklings" could derail tSe country's industrialization drive, the 
information minister, Mohammed Rahmat, said Thursday. 

“When a man behaves Eke a woman, we fear he will become 
nonproductive later,” he told a news conference. “We want our 
people to be strong, to workhard. When you're a man, show 
you’re a man.” 

By way of example, the minister mentioned two Malaysian 
television programs that are no longer being broadcast One 
featured two men dressed as wdrneh, and the other, loosely based 
on the UA situation comedy “Three’s Company,” included an 

effeminate male character. •_ 


Left-Right 

Coalition 


CompHed by Our Steff From Dl^dtdux . 

THE HAGUE— Wim Kok, 
the Dutch Labor Party leader, 
formed the Netherlands’ first 
government coalition of left 
and right Thursday, bringing to 
an end an elaborate political 
courtship played out over three 
and a half months. 

The new coalition — dubbed 
“purple” because of its mix of 
party colors — unites the prime 
minister’s leftist Labor Party, 
the free-market Liberals and 
the reformist Democrats 66. 

The new government will be 
sworn, in by Queen Beatrix on 
Monday, officials said. It sig- 
nals an end to nearly right de- 
cades of Christian Democrat 
dominance, most recently un- 
der Prune Minister Ruud Lub- 
bers, whose party goes into op- 
position for the first time since 
1918 after it was defeated in 
general elections in May. 

Labor lost seats in the elec- 
tions but emerged the largest 
party in the Parliament. 

Weeks of talks aimed at 
forming a workable govern- 
ment proved fruitless, prompt- 
ing Queen Beatrix to intervene 
last month and ask Mr. Kok to 
single-handedly draw up a pro- 
gram for government 

For some, the purple partner- 
ship promises a new spirit end- 
ing years of gray Dutch govern- 
ment. Others see it as merely a 
fragile coalition of convenience; 

Mr. Kok finalized the list of 
14 cabinet posts with the lead- 
ers of the other two coalition 
partners. He will have two dep- 
uty prime ministers: Hans Dijk- 
stal a free-market Liberal and 
longtime advocate of the left- 
right coalition, and Hans van 
Mierlo, the D66 leader. 

Mr. Dijkstal will also be inte- 
rior minister, and Mr. Van 
Mierlo foreign minister. 

The new government enters 
office pledging political reform 
combined with an austere eco- 
nomic package aimed at cutting 
unemployment and t rimmin g 
the budget deficit 

Spending will be cut by 18 
billion guilders (SI0J billion) 
over the next four years through 
reductions in health care, state 
pensions and child benefits. 

There are plans to create 
350,000 jobs by 1998 as long as 
the economy recovers — the. 
Dutch jobless total is currently 
expected to top 600,000 by the 
end of 1994. (Reuters. AFP) 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


'Aerpflop’ Promises Better Service 

. MOSCOW (Reuters) —The Russian airline Aeroflot, reacting 
to Western criticism, has promised to improve its services, put 
passengers up in hotels if planes ran late and increase the number 
of international destinations. 

But officials from Aeroflot Russian International Airlines, a 
branch of the state monopoly of Soviet days, say its new status as a 
joint-stock company owned by the state and staff wifi not change 
its obligation to the government “About 30 percent of our 
international routes are not viable, but we have no plans to dose 
these flights now that we are a joint-stock company,” the airline's 
general director, Vladimir Tikhonov, said. 

Aeroflot, dubbed “Acroflop” by disfilusioned passengers, has a 
reputation for poor service and delays.- Western organizations 
have issued a series of increasingly desperate warnings about 
using Russian airlines or flying in or over the territory of the 
former Soviet Union. - 

Hundreds of resta urant s in popubr ftaSan tourist areas have 
failed hygiene tests, the police said. Health inspectors cautioned 
500 restaurant owners and issued fines for 788 infringements for 
dirty kitchens and poor food storage. (Reuters) 

British Petroleum plans to add seven gas stations, for a total of 
12, by 1 996 to its network in the Grech Republic, the Prague daily 
newspaper Rude Pravo reported. ' (Bloomberg) 

South African Afcrwayswffl fly (Erectly to Bangkok and onward 
twice a week from 
A Monday 
burg and 

start in Johannesburg and fly to Bangkok and Singapore." (AFP) 
Ro manian airport workers have postponed a one-day strike set 
for Thursday until Aug. 27, the Transport Minis try said. (Reuters) 



Riot Narrowly Averts Crash 
In Kuala Lumpur Radar Fire 

Reuters 

KUALA LUMPUR — An airline pilot suddenly aborted 
la n d ing his Boeing 737 to avoid crashing into another passen- 
ger jet at Kuala Lumpur's international airport, aviation 
officials said on Thursday. 

They said Tuesday's near collision, reported by the pilot, 
was doe to fire damag e to a radar system. Flights have been 
driayed sinceSmdayafte fire damaged the system at the 

Officials said the Malaysian Airline System pilot had to 
abort landing his Boeing 737-400, on a flight from Jakarta, 
within seconds to avoid crashing into a Taiwanese Eva Air 
Boring 767-300. 

Aimne staff mtanbers later said the pilot was merely opting 
to do a routine dreuit before InnrTing 

The fire was the thud at the airport in two years. Prime 
Minister Mahathir bin Mohamad said Thursday that the 
blaze had tarnished the country's image. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 1994 


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NO-GO — An exhaust cloud 
.less titan, a second before blast-off. 

Away From Politics 


- * — JorSnppcr/Roaun 

over file space shuttle Endeavour after Its tauncbtng was aborted Thursday 
countdown had reached zero, but a fuel pump apparently had overheated. 


• Helped by cooler temperatures and 
gentler winds, fire fighters have sur- 
rounded and controlled half the fire 
burning in the hills near San Luis Obispo 
on the central California coast 

• Flash-flood w arni ngs were in effect 
throughout the Carohnas. adding to the 
fears of residents already sorting through 
the damage caused by several tornadoes. 
Meanwhile; the third tropical storm of 
the season neared hnmeane strength -s 
it made its wry . across the Atlantic. 

• Prosecutors in Sl Loris dismissed ter- 
rorism charges against a death-row in- 


mate convicted of murdering his daugh- 
ter based on evidence uncovered by the 
FBI while it monitored his pro-Palestin- 
ian activities. Zian Isa and his wife 
•stabbed their daughter to death in 1989 
because she had turned her bade on Pal- 
estinian ways. 

• The district attorney in Alameda Comi- 
ty, California, has filed felony charges 
against an employee of the Lawrence 
Livermore National Laboratory who al- 
legedly used lab computers to store and 
distribute pornography. 

• The coffee that sptBed on Stella lie- 


beck was hot — so hot that a jury award- 
ed the 81-year-old woman $2.9 million in 
damages. In February 1992, she bought a 
take-out cup of coffee at a McDonald’s 
restaurant in New Mexico. While she 
was driving, it spilled and she sustained 
third-degree burns. 

• The stars are tiffing on the Hollywood 
Walk of Fame. The Los Angeles Metro- 
politan Transportation Authority con- 
finned that boring under Hollywood 
Boulevard for a new underground rail 
service had caused the Walk of Fame to 
bocldeand crack, afp, ap. lat. nyt. Roam 


POLITICAL \OTES 


Willing Mudtftes Texas Vote 

HOUSTON — A federal judicial pan- 
el has thrown Texas politics into turmoil 
less than three months before the No- 
vember election by ruling that three odd- 
ly shaped congressional districts in 
Houston and Dallas were unconstitu- 
tional because they were created solely 
to protect minorities. The judges or- 
dered the districts redrawn. 

The immediate effect of the ruling was 
confusion. A spokesman for die Texas 
attorney - general _«aid it was unclear 
whether trie decision could be over- 
turned, or at feast delayed, on appeal or 
whether the -Texas LegjsVature would be. 
forced into special session to redraw the 
districts. : ' 

If the state has to redraw., the lines 
now,- many candidates will find that they 
campaigned in neighborhoods where 
residents are no longer able to vote for 
them. And any redrawing would affect 
many more than the three districts at 
issue in the lawsuit- ' 

The ruling arose, from a suit filed by 
some Republicans who contended that 
the drawing of tines to help ensure the 
election of blade and Hispanic candi- 
dates was an unconstitutional act of ra- . 
cial gerrymandering, fn ruling, the 
judicial panel concluded that the dis- 
tricts “bearthe odious imprint of racial 
apartheid." ; 

For years, state and U.S. courts had 
accepted such districts as a way to in- 
crease minority voting power under the 
U.S. Voting Rights Act 

Earlier mis month, a meandering, 

! 60-mile-long (260-k2ometer) district in 
North Caro&a was upheld by a U.S. 
court. The district, in places no wider 
than an inters late highway that winds 
through it, is “ugly," the court said, but 
it found it nonetheless constitutionally 


drawn to help remedy past discrimina- 
tion against blacks. . 

. A decision last year by the U.S. Su- 
preme Court, however. appeared, to 
open the way for challenges to districts 
that are drawn solely to promote the 
election of minorities. (NYT) 


Worth Widens TV Campaign 

. WASHINGTON — Oliver L. North 
is preparing to run television commer- 
cials outside Virginia for his U .S. .Senate 
campaign -in that state, a fund-raising 
tactic that apparently has never been 
tried by a congressional candidate. 

Aides to Mr. North said they were 
producing a low-cost. 30-minute televi- 
sion show touting his candidacy and 
were searching for stations to air it in 
Texas and Arkansas late this month, if 
•the “infomercial” proves profitable 
there, they say, they will probably ex- 
pand its audience to other states. 

“There is no precedent for this,** said 
Norman Omstein. a political scientist at 
the American 'Enterprise Institute. But 
“be added that “if this works for North, 
you can bet it won't be the last time we 
see it.” (WP) 

House Passes MlBtary Bin 

WASHINGTON —.The House has 
approved a $264 billion military budget 
despite objections from conservatives 
that it wfll barely meet U.S. military 
needs. The bill provides for a $2.8 billion 
increase in spending, but after adjust- 
ment for inflation, that translates to a 
cut of just under I percent 

Representative Gerakl B. Solomon, a 
Republican from New York, charged 
that the bill was pushing the United. 
States toward "unilateral disarma- 
ment.” But liberals argued that the cuts 


were warranted. “The Cold War is 
over,** said Representative Ronald V. 
Dellums. Democrat of California. “The 
Berlin Wall is down.” (AFP) 

Hew Whi tewate r Casualty 

WASHINGTON - The Treasury 
Department's lop lawyer. Jean E. Han- 
son. resigned Thursday, the second 
Whitewater casualty in as many days. 
Her decision followed that of Deputy 
Secretary Roger C. Altman. 

- Lawmakers had questioned the verac- 
ity ' of both officials at congressional 
hearings on the Whitewater affair, which 
involves President Bill Clinton's past 
business dealings. Treasury Secretary 
Lloyd Bentsen. who accepted Ms. Han- 
son’s resignation with regret, said he had 
recommended that she be succeeded as 
general counsel by Edward S. Knight, 
his executive secretary and adviser. 

He also recommended that Mr. Alt- 
man be replaced by Frank N. Newman, 
the undersecretary for finance. Mr. 
Newman, a veteran of the banking in- 
dustry who joined the Treasury Depart- 
ment last year, has been guiding policy 
in management of the public debt, regu- 
lation of financial institutions and other 
domestic financial matters. 

Quote/Uaguote 

Representative Cleo Fields, a Louisi- 
ana Democrat who was one of three 
black congressmen to agree under pres- 
sure from President Bill Clinton not to 
block the president's crime bill from be- 
ing brought to the House floor for de- 
late: “I cannot in my conscience vote for 
a crime bill that has 60 different death 
penalties. But I will give the Congress 
and the American people the opportuni- 
ty to debate the crime bin." (AP) 


Elias Canetti, Nobel Prize Author, Is Dead 


The Associated Press 

ZURICH — Elias Canetti, 
che reclusive writer and fugitive 
from Nazism who won tbcl981 
Nobel Prize is Literature, has 
died, a relative said Thursday. 
He was 89. - - 

Mr. Canetti, a Bulgarian- 
born British citizen who wrote 
in German, died Sunday, said 
the relative, who asked not to be. 
identified. He was buried 
Wednesday in a" place of honor, 
beside the grave of the Irish 
author James Joyce in theFIun- 
tera cemetery, said Zurich’s 
mayor, Josef Estermann. The 
cause of death was not dis- 
closed. 

Mr. Canetti went into hiding 
after being named winner of the 
Nobel prize for writings. -tha 
the Nobel committee said were 
"marked by a broad outlook, a 
wealth of ideas and artistic 
power." 

The Swedish Academy, 
which administers the prize, lik- 
ened Mr. Canetti to Dostoevsky 
and European writers of the 
Nearly 20th cenuiiy whom head- 
mired, including Franz Kafka. 

Emerging from Ms seclusion 
in the early 1980s, Mr. Canem 
denounced the nuclear arms 
buildup as "utter madness." 

Mr. Canetti began writing 
dramas and novels in the early 
1930s, but developed a wide fol- 
lowing among German readers 
only in 1960 with the puWica- 
tion of the first volume of his 
major work, “Crowds and Pow- 
er.” 





EGas Canetti, who received 
Ms Nobd prize ini 1981 . 


In a rare meeting with report- 
ers; in 1981, he noted that a 
theme common to his writings 
was "the importance of crowds 
in modem fife, the. terrifying 
importance of power which is in 


Austria, Mr. Canetti. of Span- 
ish-Jewish descent, left Vienna 
in late 1938 and went to Paris 
and then to London, where he 
worked as a free-lance writer 
and was granted a British pass- 
port. . 

Later he maintained homes 
in London and Zurich. 

Yeshayahn Ltiborritz, 91, 
Israeli Philosopher 

JERUSALEM, (Reuters) — 
Yeshayahu Leibowitz, 91, Isra- 
el's most famous philosopher 

and a critic of the occupation of 

the West Bank and Gaza Strip, 
died of cardiac arrest Thursday 
in Jerusalem. 

"Professor Leibowitz was 
one of the greatest figures in the 
life of the Jewish people and the 
state of Israel for generations,” 
President Ezer Weizman said in 
a statement. 

A religious scholar with doc- 
torates in medicine, biochemis- 
try and philosophy, the Latvi- 


an-born Mr. Leibowitz — 
dubbed Israel’s “prophet of 
rage” — refused the country’s 
most prestigious prize in 1993 
after Prime Minister Yitzhak 
Rabin said he would boycott 
the ceremony. 

In sharp contrast to the pub- 
lic's initial euphoria at Israel’s 
lightning victory in the 1967 
Middle East war, Mr. Leibowitz 
warned that the occupation of 
the Gaza Strip and the West 
Bank could spell the downfall 
of the Jewish state. 

Calhoficos Vazgen L 85, 

Led Armenian Christians 

YEREVAN, Armenia (AP) 
— Caiholicos Vazgen L 85, the 
spiritual leader of Armenian 
Christians, died Thursday of 
cancer. 

He was patriarch of the Ar- 
menian Apostolic Church. 

CathoJieos Vazgen, bora Le- 
von Karapet Palchian in 1908 
in Bucharest, died at bis villa in 
the Armenian capital, Yerevan. 


A nightmarish novel “Auto 
da Fer which he wrote in the 
early 1930s; was not published 
in Vienna until 1963. But his 
drama, “The. Wedding,” was 
published in ; 1932 and two years 
later he completed “Comedy of 
Vanity.'' • . - 

Mr. Canetti also distin- 
guished himself as an. essayist. 
dramatist, aphorisl and theoret- 
ical thinker. 

After the Nazi takeover of 


Gains in Science and Math 


WASHINGTON — Ameri- 
can students have gained al- 
most a full grade level in science 
proficiency, and math scores 
have risen too, since the 1983 
report "A Nation at Risk” de- 
scribed a crisis in American 
schools, the Education Depart- 
ment has found. 

But there were no gains in 
reading and writing stalls, the 


department said, and overall 
achievement levels were far be- 
low national goals. 

A long-standing gap in the 
achievement levels or white and 
minority students is continuing, 
according to a irends-in-educa- 
tioa report. The slow but steady 
progress made by minority stu- 
dents in the early 1980s has 
stalled. 


A Blow to Bipartisan Health Plan 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — Senators trying to 
nudge health reform toward a bipartisan 
middle ground got what they called “so- 
bering” news Thursday on the likely costs 
of their proposals. 

A self-styled “mainstream" coalition of 
10 Democratic and 9 Republican senators 
had hoped during the day to present a 
package of amendments to a bill proposed 
by the Senate majority leader, George J. 
Mitchell, Democrat of Maine. 

But members seemed downcast after 
their briefing by Robert Reischauer. the 
director of the Congressional Budget Of- 
fice. 

Should the senators’ effort unravel, it 
could be a blow to the overall Senate 
health reform effort, since many consider a 
compromise tike theirs the best chance of 
getting a bill through the chamber. 

Mr. Reischauer reportedly told the sena- 


tors that they would either have to radical- 
ly scale back the. subsidies they hoped to 
offer or else find some way of bringing in a 
lot of money to pay for them. 

“lt was a dash of the cold water of 
reality,” Senator David L. Boren, Demo- 
crat of Oklahoma, said of the briefing. 

Ute group is trying to broaden its base 
by talking to a more conservative bloc of 
senators who back a lean health bill 
The Mitchell bill would result in health 
coverage for 95 percent of Americans, up 
from 85 percent today. The bipartisan 
group's bill was patterned on a proposal 
from the Senate Finance Committee, 
which the budget office said would cover 
92 percent of Americans. 

But Senator Pete V. Domenid. Republi- 
can of New Mexico, who, along with Sena- 
tor Sam Nunn, Democrat of Georgia, sup- 
ports a bill without tax increases or 
requirements that employers buy insur- 


ance for their workers, said, “The more we 
listen, the more we find insoluble prob- 
lems, problems that could in fact cause the 
cure to be worse than the disease." 

Senator John H. Chafee. a Republican 
of Rhode Island and the leader of the 
mainstream group, admitted that “there’s 
clearly some sentiment in that direction." 
But, he added, “I certainly don't want to 
throw in the towel yet.” 

He called the meeting with Mr. Reis- 
chauer “sobering." 

“The mood is toward scaling things 
down,” Mr. Chafee said of subsidies, add- 
ing that the senators also wanted “a greater 
effort at cost containment-" 

Senator John B. Breaux, Democrat of 
Louisiana, said of possible ground be- 
tween the Nunn-Domemci group and the 
mainstream group: “We’re trying to form 
a marriage. It may have to be a shotgun 
wedding.” 


Power Play by the Gun Lobby? 

Complexities of Clinton’s Defeat on Crime 


By Thomas B. Rosenstiel 
and Dwight Morris 

Lea Angela Tunes Serna 

WASHINGTON — As Pres- 
ident Bill Clinton tries to sal- 
vage his stalled crime bill by 
raffing against the National Ri- 
fle Association, a larger ques- 
tion is emerging. Just how in- 
strumental was the gun lobby in 
engineering one of the adminis- 
tration’s most important politi- 
cal defeats? 

The answer appears to be 
more complicated than the 
president paints iL 

There are two groups of 
House members who combined 
to stall the bill: Republicans 
who on partisan or financial 
grounds opposed the many so- 
cial programs and those who 
cannot support the ban on as- 
sault weapons contained in the 
legislation. 

Even if all gun lobby sup- 
porters had voted against him. 
Mr. Clinton still could have 
won the vote last week if he had 
kept others in his camp, most 
notably 19 Republicans who 
support gun control. 

The president failed with the 
gun-control supporters for rea- 
sons that had nothing to do 
with the political “trick” that he 
has attributed to the Rifle Asso- 
ciation’s lobbying. 

Despite some critical legisla- 
tive defeats in recent years, the 
group still has great reach. Op- 
position to gun control remains 
a powerful movement in many 
parts of the country. 

Roughly half of the 42 House 
Democrats who bad approved 


the crime bill in April but voted 
last week to keep the legislation 
from coming to a final vote did 
so because the bQl now includes 
the assault weapons ban. All 
those members already have re- 
ceived substantial contribu- 
tions from the gun lobby this 
year. Federal Election Commis- 
sion records show. 

Of those, half were from Tex- 
as. One Texan, Representative 
Charles Wilson, a Democrat, 
said opposing the association 
there is like “putting a gun in 
your mouth.” 

Twenty-two of the 55 Repub- 
licans who had once supported 
the bill, then voted against it, 
also have received large contri- 
butions from the gun lobby. 

The Rifle Association spent 
nearly $5 million on congressio- 
nal campaigns in 1992 by giving 
to candidates directly and by 
spending money to support spe- 
cific candidates but without any 
formal link to the campaign. So 
far this year, its groups have 
contributed nearly $ l million. 

But perhaps even more than 
its money, the lobby remains 
powerful because it is well orga- 
nized and its members are vocal 
in what the group calls its “zero 
tolerance" for gun control. 

Another block of resistance 
was 10 members of the Con- 
gressional Black Caucus. They 
did not vole for the bill because 
it did not include anti-discrimi- 
nation mandates in the applica- 
tion of the death penalty. 

■ Yet Hotter Horse-Trading 

Katharine Q. Seelye of The 


New York Tunes reported earlier 
from Washington: 

Three members of the Con- 
gressional Black Caucus, giving 
in to presidential pressure, said 
they now would vote with the 
administration on moving the 
crime bill to the floor, and the 
White House chief of staff, 
Leon E. Panetta, was optimistic 
enough to predict as early vote. 

But others were more cau- 
tious. 

“It looks more doable today 
than it has for the last week," 
said Charles E. Scb inner. Dem- 
ocrat of New York, who pushed 
much of the legislation through 
the House. “But anyone who 
says definitively that it’s going 
to happen isn't a student of re- 
cent history.” 

It was not certain, however, 
whether the three Black Caucus 
members would vote for the bill 
once it reaches a final floor 
vote. 

Meetings continued, with 
congressional leaders hashing 
out details of concessions that 
would win them the eight votes 
they need to reverse last week's 
vote. Under discussion were 
cuts in prevention programs 
and protection from sexual 
predators and a possible modi- 
fication in the ban on assault 
weapons. 

Christopher Shays of Con- 
necticut. a leader of 1 1 Republi- 
can representatives who backed 
the bill last week, said that the 
group demands Si billion to $2 
billion in cuts in crime preven- 
tion programs in the package. 


Poll Puts 
Clinton at 
Low Point 

Reuters 

WASHINGTON — 
President Bill Clinton’s dis- 
approval rating rose to a 
high of 52 percent in the 
latest Gallup Poll. 

Only 39 percent of 1,011 
adults surveyed Monday 
and Tuesday said they ap- 
proved of the way Mr. Clin- 
ton was doing his job, down 
10 percentage points from 
two months ago. The poll 
has a margin of error of 
three percentage points. 

Mr. Clinton is experienc- 
ing a particularly bad patch 
with the surprise rgection 
of his crime bill last week 
and the struggle to redeem 
his campaign promise of 
guaranteeing health care 
benefits for every Ameri- 
can. 

A majority of respon- 
dents in the poll, conducted 
for CNN7USA Today, re- 
fused to give the president 
credit for improving the 
U.S. economy. 

Fifty-seven percent dis- 
approved of the way he was 
dealing with health care, 
while 35 percent thought he 
was on the ri|hl track. 

On the crime problem, 
42 percent favored his ap- 
proach and 46 percent were 
opposed. The poll showed 
that Americans over- 
whelmingly supported pas- 
sage of the’ bill with its ban 
on assault weapons intact. 


Simpson Defense An gr y 
Over Unshared Evidence 


By Michael Janofsky 

Net* York Tunes Senior 

LOS ANGELES — Lawyers 
for OJ. Simpson have accused 
prosecutors of denying them ac- 
cess to blood samples that po- 
lice have had since Mr. Simp- 
son's former wife and her friend 
were stabbed to death two 
months ago. 

In a pretrial bearing that in- 
cluded angry exchanges and 
personal attacks between the 
two sides, prosecutors told 
Judge Lance A I to of Los An- 
geles County Superior Court 
that the samples — two drops 
of blood — had been on a Ust of 
evidence but that the police de- 
partment had not sent them 
with other samples to a Mary- 
land laboratory for DNA test- 
ing. 

Defense lawyers said that 
meant genetic tests of some 
blood samples might not be 
ready in time for the trial. They 
accused the prosecution of vio- 
lating a court order, saying that 
the delay limited the amount of 
evidence the prosecution was 
required to share. 

The judge in Mr. Simpson’s 
preliminary hearing last month 
ordered prosecutors to set aside 
10 percent of all samples for the 
defense to do its own testing 

The issue of DNA blood test- 
ing is critical to both sides, and 
Wednesday’s exchanges reflect- 
ed the rising pressure with the 
trial scheduled to start Sept. 19. 

A defense lawyer, Gerald F. 


Uebnen. called the delay in 
sharing evidence “a shell game” 
by the prosecutors. 

Marcia Clark, the deputy dis- 
trict attorney who is leading the 
prosecution, called Mr. Ud- 
men’s assertions “hypocritical 
rambKngs.” She told the court 
that prosecutors had done their 
brat to ensure that the defense 
got its required share of all 
blood samples. 

Mr. Simpson has pleaded not 
guilty to charges of first-degree 
murder in the stabbing deaths 
of Nicole Brown Stepson and 
Ronald L. Goldman. 

Without a witness to the kill- 
ings. prosecutors have built 
their case on circumstantial evi- 
dence, including blood samples. 

Laboratories are able to ex- 
amine blood for genetic mark- 
ers that can, at the least, rule 
out some people as suspects. 


For investment i nformation, 
read 


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in the IHT. 




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Page 4 


FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 1994 

OPINION 


licralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



PMIMMIt.ll WITH TIIK NEW YORK T 1 WKS AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


Who’s Against Inflation? 


Srtbunc Oppose Iranian and Other Extremists , Not AU Islam 

TH* V% A^UINCTf M 9€)KT * * ... 


True, there are few signs of rising infla- 
tion on the American horizon, but plenty 
of signs that the economy is running close 
to full capacity, if it were allowed to 
exceed its capacity, inflation would soon 
accelerate. Investors' fears would send 
interest rates shooting upward, and die 
economy would tip into a recession, as it 
did in 1990. That is why the Federal 
Reserve has again tried to stay ahead of 
the game with a preemptive increase in 
short-term interest rates to slow the eco- 
nomy a little. And that is why the Clinton 
administration is supporting it. 

The idea is to try to keep the economy 
on a steady course, without the usual 
surges and dips, to gel through the election 
year 1996 and perhaps through the whole 
decade without another recession. The cir- 
cumstances are as favorable as they are 
ever likely to be. There is little prospect of 
the kind of tremendous worldwide boom 
that generated the troubles of the 1970s. 
The deficit is declining. Unemployment 
has fallen dramatically this year and is 
already down in the range that the admin- 
istration expected to reach only in 1996. 

That raises an interesting question. Bill 
Clinton complains that be is not getting 
the credit he deserves for a highly effective 
economic policy. A lot of possible reasons 


have been suggested. While employment is 
way up, incomes have been flat for most 
people, and for those on the bottom half of 
the ladder they have been falling for a long 
time. Some regions of the country, notably 
the West Coast, are recovering much more 
slowly than others. Cuts in defense spend- 
ing and restructuring in business corpora- 
tions have cost the jobs of many thousands 
who thought they were secure for life. 

But perhaps there is something else as 
well. A lot of people seem to be ambivalent 
about inflation. Economists warn, with a 
wealth of evidence, that it only leads to 
high unemployment and deep pain. But 
people often associate it with other things 
— rapid, if illusionary, pay increases and 
magical reduction of personal debts. There 
is no one of prominence in American 
politics who actually favors inflation, but 
there are a good many who are prepared to 
take far greater risks with it than President 
Clinton is — let alone the Federal Reserve. 
Nearly all of the congressional complaints 
about the latest interest rate increases are 
coming from Democrats. Paradoxically, 
the tight grip on inflation that is the key to 
Mr. Clinton's economic success may also 
be part of the explanation for the chorus of 
complaints from his own party. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Kenneth Starr Should Go 


When a special Washington court re- 
placed Robert Fiske with Kenneth Starr 
as Whitewater independent counsel two 
weeks ago. the judges specifically cited 
the need for the appearance, as well as 
the reality, of impartial justice. But it is 
now clear that the chairman of that 
panel. Judge David Sentelle, violated 
the court's own standard for purity of 
appearances by meeting with a senator 
eager to have the court dump Mr. Fiske 
as counsel. For that reasoo, the appoint- 
ment of Mr. Starr is fatally tainted. 

This situation was brought about by 
Judge SenteUe's flamboyantly bad judg- 
ment in meeting with Senator Lauch 
Faircloth and another Clinton opponent. 
Senator Jesse Helms. At the time. Judge 
Sentelle and his two colleagues on the 
court were considering the appointment 
of a new prosecutor. Mr. Starr is in no 
way to blame for this untoward meeting, 
but he has to recognize that a cloud of 
political favoritism now hangs over his 
appointment and will undermine public 
confidence in iL As a matter of public 
service and personal honor, he should 
resign the appointment. 

The independent counsel law. recently 
renewed, is designed to make sure that 
federal investigations involving high gov- 
ernment officials — in this case President 
and Mrs. Clinton — are evenhanded and 
appear so. Yet last month, while the court 
was studying whether to keep Mr. Fiske or 
make its own choice. Judge Sentelle 
lunched with Senator Faircloth, leader of a 
group pressing the Justice Department to 
remove Mr. Fiske. Joining them in the 
Senate dining room was Senator Helms. 
Judge SenteUe’s political pairon and one 
of the Clintons' most outspoken foes in 
Congress. They all deny discussing the 
pending appointment But the public must 
not be asked to take such matters on faith, 
any more than it should have to take on 
faith thai all the suspicious circumstances 
of Whitewater were innocuous coinci- 
dence. A crisis of political confidence can- 
not be cured by an inquiry that has the 
look of political coUusion. 

In regard to public confidence, there is 
another troubling circumstance. It now 


emerges that Mr. Starr was working on a 
legal brief for a conservative women’s 
organization opposing Bill Clinton in the 
Paula Jones sexual harassment lawsuit 
against him. Mr. Starr’s legal view, that 
the president enjoyed no constitutional 
immunity from the suit for alleged ac- 
tions when governor of Arkansas, had 
been weU known. But by undertaking the 
friend-of-the-court brief Mr. Starr passed 
from public commentator to litigating 
opponem of the president, a clear conflict 
with his independent counsel assignment. 
Although his firm has ended its participa- 
tion in the Jones case. Mr. Starr’s original 
decision to take it on further blemishes 
the appearance of impartiality that his 
present assignment requires. 

Replacing Mr. Fiske was a reasonable 
step. His own appearance of impartiality 
was beclouded by the fact that he had 
been recruited by Attorney General Janet 
Reno. Indeed, the court placed such a high 
value on appearance that it said its only 
reason for replacing him was the need to 
provide “an apparent as well as an actual 
independence on the part of the counseL” 

By that standard, the Starr appointment 
cannot stand, nor should Judge Sentelle 
participate in the naming of a new counsel. 
He can step aside and leuve the matter to 
his colleagues. Failing that, the chief jus- 
tice ought to name a new chairman for 
the panel to replace Judge Sentelle. 

At the time of the Starr appointment 
two weeks ago. the editorial page of The 
New York Times applauded the court's 
decision, and it retains respect for Mr. 
Starr’s service as solicitor general. But his 
appointment now lodes terrible under 
the law and the ethical precepts that the 
judges say they recognize. The appear- 
ance of impartial justice is not some fin- 
icky rule or etiquette but the essence of 
justice itself. Moreover, Mr. Clinton and 
others in the administration deserve a 
prosecutor who cannot be accused either 
of favoring them or of being tied too 
closely to their opponents. Mr. Starr, 
rightly proud of an honorable career, 
stands in the way of justice as long as he 
clings to this unfortunate assi gnmen t. 

— THE HEW YORK TIMES 


French Needed in Rwanda 


On Monday Rwanda will face yet an- 
other potential crisis if France keeps to its 
plan to complete withdrawal of its peace- 
keepers by then. Most of those 2J00 
troops have been protecting a security 
zone in southwestern Rwanda where more 
than 600,000 people, mostly Hutu, have 
fled, fearing reprisal killings by a new 
Tutsi-dominated government. Observers 
fear that as the French leave, so will the 
unprotected Hutu, making a second hu- 
man wave across the border into Zaire, 
where some 800.000 refugees already lan- 
guish in disease-ridden, makeshift camps. 

But, unlike the last Rwandan exodus, 
this one can be foreseen. An obvious 
preventive step would be to persuade 
France to stay until a planned United 
Nations peacekeeping force, made up of 
Lroops from African nations, can be as- 
sembled — a matter of weeks, not 
months. Objections to a longer French 
stay, however, arise not in Paris, although 
there is a clamor to bring the Lroops home, 
but among suspicious leaders of the new 
regime in Kigali Its agreement is essential, 
but its distrust is understandable. 

It was the French, after all. who 
trained the predominantly Hutu army 
responsible for the mass killings of Tutsi 


and moderate Hutu in April, after the 
presidents of Rwanda and neighboring 
Burundi were killed in an unexplained air 
crash. As the sheer horror of these geno- 
cidal massacres sank in, only France was 
prepared to intervene effectively. 

There were credible fears that France 
would try to rescue its Hutu former clients 
from certain defeat in a civil war or. worse, 
try to protect perpetrators of genocide 
from war crimes trials. Still, for lack of any 
other volunteers, the Security Council ap- 
proved a 60-day intervention by France, 
solely for humanitarian purposes. 

By general agreement, France's tough 
paratroopers did not take sides, and the 
French presence saved thousands of lives. 
Yet fears of a secret French agenda per- 
sist, especially among leaders of the vic- 
torious Rwanda Patriotic Front, who un- 
til now have demanded that French 
troops leave the security zone. 

It is only the timing, and not the princi- 
ple, of the French pullout that is in dis- 
pute. A new Rwandan government eager 
to reassure terrified Hutu would add to 
its credibility by agreeing to a continued 
French presence in the security zone until 
a multinational force is fully deployed. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


international Herald Tribune 

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L ONDON — The demand by Judge 
t Juan Jose Gakano in Argentina that 
four Iranian diplomats be arrested in con- 
nection with the bombing in Buenos Aires 
on July 18 again highlights the rale of Iran 
in international terrorism. 

Over the years. Western response to 
contacts between Iranian diplomats and 
European extremist groups, and to assas- 
sinations of Iranian dissidents in several 
European countries, has been fragmented 
and weak, belying the notion of belliger- 
ence against proven supporters of extrem- 
ist action. Western double standards have 
allowed economic interests to dictate a 
dual policy toward Iran: condemnation of 
its support for radical movements, and on 
the trade Front business as usual , 

Iranian links with extreme Islamic 
groups in the Middle East have support- 
ed political campaigns. Add to this 
Iran's recent procurement of conven- 
tional and unconventional arms, which 
has created a climate of mistrust and 
arms race in the region. While claiming 
to favor a “good neighbor policy, " Iran 
occupies thnre islands belonging to the 
United Arab Emirates. This is seen by 
its neighbors as but one example of 
Tehran's expansionist aims. 

In recent years the Iranian president, 
Hashemi Raisa njani. has been portrayed 


By Omar A1 Hassan 


as a pragmatist or moderate, yet Iranian 
involvement in murder and terror has 
gone on. No doubt Mr. Rafsanjani — 
who once shared a prison cell with Aya- 
tollah RuhoDah Khomeini and was one 
of his closest associates — has distanced 
himself from what has been going on. 
There is evidence that he has moved 
away from his former mentor's dream of 
exporting the Islamic revolution. 

However, continued evidence of Irani- 
an links with many of the world’s extrem- 
ist groups reflects internal differences 
within Iranian politics that stretch out 
into the country’s diplomatic missions. 
The Foreign and Interior ministries have 
different agendas, the former tending to- 
ward Mr. Rafs&njanfs moderate line 
while the latter are implicated in the 
country’s more extreme actions. Add the 
Ministry of Intelligence and Security, 
linked to meetings with European ex- 
tremist groups, and there is a cocktail of 
competing factions with separate agendas. 

The response of the world in general 
and the west in particular should at last 
be to put narrow national interests aside 
and unite to defeat the radical elements 
within Iran and international terrorism. 


Immediate action should be taken 
against Iranian diplomats involved in ne- 
farious activities; Iranian visitors, in- 
cluding officials, should be. carefully 
watched in all they do. The tune has 
come for plain talk and firmer action, 
demonstrating that the West under- 
stands how Iranian radicals have used 
the Islamic faith as a cover for covert 
operations, exposing the millions of de- 
cent and caring Muslims to opprobrium 
that they ill deserve. 

Hie West should realize that Islam is 
not a threat. It is important to under- 
stand that Iran is not the sole represen- 
tative of Islam in the world. Iran has a 
population of 45 million, compared 
with the 1.2 billion population of the 
Muslim world. Arid it is a minority 
within the government who make the 
headlines and become misperceived as 
representatives not just of Iranian feel- 
ing but of Islam as well. 

The international community, indud- ' 
ing the Muslim world, should unite 
against all forms of extremism, wherev- 
er it comes from. Support should be 
voiced for President Rafsanjani and his 
more moderate backers in Iran, provid- 
ed he denounces and eliminates terror- 
ism; distances himself from radical 
groups in Iran and the rest of die world; 


curtails the procurement of arms; de- 
nounces expansionist tendencies; re- 
turns the three islands to the Emirates, 
and applies more attention to economic 
problems, aimed at the improvement of 
living standards for all Iranians. 

As long as Iranian politics remain fac- 
tionalizea there will be no hope of sever- 
ing the links to extremist organizations, 
and incidents such as those in Buenos 
Aires and London wfll continue to occur. 

The West has not helped with occa- 
sions of accommodation to radical Is- 
lamic leaders, the United States has 
spoken with radicals in its embassies in 
some Arab countries. This is not to say 
that dialogue should be discouraged, but 
■when this leads to the granting of politi- 
cal asylum to extremist leaders, itgjves 
more credence to the extremist cause. 

What is required, along with joint ef- 
forts to combat extremists, is action to 
isolate the violent dements that use Is- 
lam as a tool from die vast majority for 
whom Islam is as it should be, a faith. 

77ur writer is chairman of the Gulf Cen- 
ter for Strategic Studies and a former 
ambassador of he League of Arab States 
to the Unitea Kingdom and Ireland. He 
contributed this comment to the Inter- 
national Herald Tribune. 


The United States Backs the Process of Eur opean Integration 


B russels —The u.s.-Enro- 

pean Union s ummi t meeting 
in Berlin last month deserves 
more attention than it has re- 
ceived. The meeting, involving 
President Bill Clinton, the Euro- 
pean Commission president, Jac- 
ques Delors, and Chancellor Hel- 
mut Kohl of Germany (in his 
capacity as head of the EU's ro- 
tating presidency), satisfied a re- 
quirement of the 1990 Trans- Al- 
lan tic Declaration for a bi ennial 
session at Lhe highest level But it 
was far from ordinary or routine. 

Mr. Clinton used the meeting 
to send the clearest message that 
any American president has given 
of unequivocal support for the 
historic process of European inte- 
gration. He stressed his firm com- 
mitment not only to the Europe- 
an Union as a fact of life but to a 
stronger, more self-reliant and, at 
times, more independent Europe 
as a positive force for Americans. 

The president and his adminis- 
tration conceive that a more unit- 
ed Europe comes not at the ex- 
pense of our bilateral ties but in 
their augmentation. Such a Eu- 


By Stuart E. Eizenstat 

Ambassador Eizenstat is the U.S. representative to the European Union. 


rope is in our national security 
interests for a variety of reasons. 

• The European Union rein- 
forces Europe’s democratic im- 
pulse. Greece, Spain and Portugal 
were encouraged to shed dictator- 
ships by the prospect of member- 
ship. Germany’s healthy democra- 
cy has found a home imbedded in 
and surrounded by other demo- 
cracies. This, in turn, produces a 
more stable European continent. 

• The European Union is the 
major vehicle for French-German 
reconciliation. Twice in this cen- 
tury, American lives and treasure 
have been spent in wars between 
Germany and France. 

• The Union provides a com- 
mon address for more and more of 
America’s business with Europe, 
thus simplifying decision-making. 
As difficult as the Uruguay Round 
negotiations were and as formida- 
ble an interlocutor as the Union 
presented in Sir Leon Brittan, hav- 
ing one person who spoke for 12 


countries made it easier to reach 
the historic agreement than if we 
had been forced to conduct multi- 
ple separate negotiations. 

• The stronger European eco- 
nomy has made Europe a more 
attractive location for American 
in vestment But this aspect of the 
European Union has broader sig- 
nificance. As President Clinton 
has stated, in the post-Cold War 
world, economics is a critical ele- 
ment of national security policy, 
which cannot be neatly separated 
from traditional security concerns. 
The European Union, as a source 
of assistance to its neighbors and 
to other regions of the globe, has a 
major role to play. 

An important dement in this 
largely unreported s ummi t meet- 
ing was its emphasis on the new 
democracies or Central and East- 
era Europe. President Clinton 
spelled out a clear vision in Berlin 
of the need for a divided Europe 
to be made whole. 


EU member states pulled them- 
selves from the ashes of World 
War n with U.S. assistance. The. 
president sees the vital importance 
of now extending Western Eu- 
rope’s quality of life to those who 
are emerging from communism’s 
rubble. Ways and means for more 
outreach, to the East woe dis- 
cussed at the summit, for example 
the need for improved market ac- 
cess for goods from these nations, 
and greater Western investment. 

Third, the three leaders found 
a formula to torn vriiat have been 
largely episodic semiannual 
events, with little continuity, into 
more substantive, interconnected 
sessions; which can make impor- 
tant decisions. . . 

To provide follow-up to BerQn, 
U S--EU experts' groups ax a se- 
nior level are being set up, 
chargedwith making policy re- 
commendations for the next sum- 
mit, in the first half of 1995 under 
the French presidency. 

These expert groups are to fo- 
cus on bow die United States and. 
the European Union can jointly 
strengthen the economies and de- 


mocracies of Central and Eastern 
Europe; and on how the United 
States and the Union can better 
-relate to each other in the new 
areas of Union competence under 
the Maastricht treaty, with em- 

r is on foreign policy and on 
fight against international 
crime and narcotics. 

. The eventual form that the 
Union takes is up to its member 
states and ultimately its citizens. 
But neither is the United States a 
bystander. We have a stake in the 
outcome of the great debate 
about Europe's future. We sup- 
port a. more cohesive common 
foreign poBcy, an independent Eu- 
ropean defense pillar in coordina- 
•’ turn with NATO, and more effi- 
cient decision-making procedures. 

Practical issues of importance 
to average Americans and Euro- 
peans were discussed in Berlin, 
from cooperation against orga- 
nized crime to how to create more 
: jobs and economic growth. 

It is now up to the Union to 
show .that it can meet these heavy 
responsibilities. 

■ International Herald Tribune. 


The Case lor Giving NATO an American Secretary-General 


B RUSSELS — Ten years ago, 
in a strategic era that seems 
light-years away, Henry Kissin- 
ger suggested a major innovation 
in NATO’s personnel policy: on 
the retirement of the incumbent 
secretary-general. Lord Carring- 
ton, the alliance's top political 
post should go to an American; 
the position of Supreme Allied 
Commander Europe, always held 
by an American, should be as- 
signed to a European. 

The proposal attracted media 
attention but made little headway 
in alliance capitals. It was an idea 
whose time had clearly not yet 
come. When Lord Carrington de- 
parted in 1988, his place was tak- 
en by Manfred Worner, the sev- 
enth in a series of distinguished 
European secretaries-general. 

As leaders gather for Mr. War- 
ner’s funeral in Brussels this Fri- 
day, the names of possible suoces- 


By David M. Law 


sors that are circulating are 
without exception West European. 
Nevertheless; there are good rear 
sons for member countries to take 
a fresh look at personnel options. 

The system in place is a product 
of the Cold War. The East-West 
conflict required NATO to deploy 
massive military might as insur- 
ance against possible aggression 
by the Warsaw PacL America was 
the alliance's leading nuclear pow- 
er, its forces were the largest of 
any member country. To have an 
American in NATO's top military 
position was strategically sensible. 
So indispensable was the com- 
mander's nationality to the credi- 
bility of deterrence that NATO’s 
political leadership was invariably 
entrusted to a European. 

While the tandem of American 
commander and European secre- 


tary-general reflected the politi- 
co-military realities of the Cold 
War, they do not give adequate 
expression to the strategic setting. 
that has succeeded iL 

With the collapse of Soviet 
power, the United States is no 
longer generally prepared to take 
Lhe lead in European security. 
With the changes that the United 
States has bear effecting in its 
force structure, it no longer can. 

The many years of ambiguity 
in the American attitude toward 
European integration are over. 
Washington now has a strong 
stake in seeing West Europeans 
organize their resources and their 
decision- making jjj a way which 
allows them to take the lead in 
dealing with their security. 

To be sure, a reversal of Euro- 
pean and American roles might 


__ presence by no 

Personal Diaries Should Star Private 

m/ North American 


W ASHINGTON — Like ev- 
eryone else, I smacked my 
lips at the revelations in a Trea- 
sury aide's diary of the president 
bring “furious” at a friend's deci- 
sion to remove himself from the 
Whi tewater line of fire. 

Like everyone else. I derided 
the aide's ludicrous attempts to 
wriggle away from his written 
record — as, for example, in his 
description of a high official's 
attempt to deceive a Senate 
committee with half-truths as 
“gracefully ducking” questions. 

And. like everybody else, I 
missed the central point of the 
exercise: What right does Con- 
gress — or the cops, for that 
matter — have to pry into any- 
body’s personal diary? 

The young diarist, Joshua 
Steiner, showed in one entry the 
fear now felt by anyone in pub- 
lic life who dares express private 
thoughts in a personal journal; 
“Been battling w / the RTC/ Ma- 
dison. Wrote two pages about 
what’s been going on, suddenly 
realized that I could be subpoe- 
naed like Packwood and the 
most innocuous comments could 
be taken out of contexL So on 
that subject, nothing," 

In the pursuit of wrongdoing, 
we are doing wrong. Under the 
guise of enforcing ethics, well- 
meaning zealots in Congress 
have fixed their eyes on hitherto 
inviolate private diaries; by so 
doing, they are undermining the 
Fourth Amendment right to 
protection against unreasonable 
search and seizure and Fifth 
Amendment protection against 
self-incrimination. 

This despite the court’s 1977 
decision that of tire 42 million 
pages of documents and 880 


By William Safire 


tapes seized from Richard Nix- 
on, the Diciabdts he dictated 
each evening constituted a pri- 
vate diary that had to be re- 
turned to him forthwith. Be- 
cause the Supreme Court in 1984 
stripped away Fifth Amendment 
protection for business records, 
the diary snoopers argue that any 
thoughts that we have written 
down can be used against us. 

We need not be absolutist on 
the sanctity of what the French 
call le journal intime: if police can 
show grounds for suspicion that 
a terrorist’s diary contains plans 
to blow up a buildi n g, a judge 
can reasonably order it exam- 
ined. Bat in the case that chilled 
Josh Steiner into writing “on that 
subject, nothing’’ (UB. Senate 
versus Packwood), Judge Thom- 
as Jackson ruled that the Ethics 
Committee's interest in main- 
taining “public confidence in the 
Senate as an institution" made 
its search for any kind of miscon- 
duct regardless of relevance to 
original charges, "reasonable.’’ 

This gave staffers license to 
rummage through thousands of 
pages of the intimate details of 
five years of Bob Packwood *s 
life, fishing for anything that 
could be used against him on 
any subjecL 

That outrageous ruling, ob- 
tained by an Ethics Committee 
more intent on satisfying a few 
soreheads than on protecting 
every American’s privacy, set 
the precedent that has turned 
W ash in gto n into an open city 
Tor diary snoops. 

It is not as if diaries represent- 
ed irrefutable evidence. Rarely 


does the diarist put down exactly 
what he beard immediately after- 
ward; more often, it is a first- 
draft impression of what he 
thinks happened. 

When Mr. Steiner writes that 
"Harold and George then called 
to say that BC was furious,” 
how do we know that Mr. lakes 
and Mr. Stephanopoulos had 
just seen the president blowing 
up? Hearsay. 

Although always self-serving 
and often too sloppy to be evi- 
dence, diaries of public officials 
help us estimate “how it really 
was." I once drew together the 
diary entries of three Lincoln 
cabinet members, plus the raw 
notes of the secretary of war and 
the diary of his portrait painter, 
to get a rough idea of what hap- 
pened in the cabinet meeting of 
July 22, 1862. which diseased 
the Emancipation Proclamation. 

Such primary sources about 
administrations to come are be- 
ing denied us by Congress. 
Asked by a sympathetic inquisi- 
tor after bis ordeal if be was still 
keeping a diary, the young Clin- 
ton diarist breathed, “No. sir." 
Everybody laughed. 

Historians aren't laughing. 
Ordinary Americans who buy 
the 5 million blank diaries sola 
every year with the expectation 
that their intimate notes will be 
inviolate aren’t laughing. 

All of us — muckrakers, so- 
Ions and would-be diarists — 
should take a serious look at the 
rush to break the seal of tbeself- 
confessionaL Just as our home is 
our castle, our mind is our citadel 
of privacy — and so should be 
cur mind’s most intimate expres- 
sions in a personal diary. 

The New York Times. 


smack of gamble at a time when 
renationahzatkm of -European se- 
curity policies threatens. Inte- 
grated Europe is far from enjoy- 
ing a military profile as sig- 
nificant in the continent’s new 
strategic environment as Ameri- 
ca's was in the old. . 1 

On the other hand, there is lit- 
tle to be grilled in perpetuating 
past patterns of leadership. The 
alliance finds itself at a bifurca- 
tion point. One path leads toward 
decay, the other toward restruc- 
tured responsibilities. The selec- 
tion of an American as Manfred 
Werner’s successor would signal 
the preparedness of member 
countries to move in the second 
direction, bringing several ad- 
vantages in (be process. 

• Appointing an American as 
secretriy-general and a European 
as supreme co mman der would 
give symbolic weight to the 
changed UJS. rede. It would un- 
derscore that a smaller troop 
presence by no means indicates 
waning political interest, and that 
the political dimension of the 
North American contribution has 
become more important than the 
military one. 

• It would facilitate efforts to 
ensure complementary coopera- 
tion between NATO and the in- 
stitutions of European integra- 
tion. Dialogue between an 
American secretary-general and 
the European secretary-general of 
the Western European Union 
would be much more genuinely 
trans-Atlantic than have been the 
exchanges between tire German 
and Dutch incumbents in the last 
few years. An American in the 
NATO slot would be less per- 
ceived as a competitor of the 
WEU secretary-general and the 
EU Commission president, and 
more as a natural partner. 


• Military cooperation be- 
tween North American and Euro- 
pean forces would be facilitated. 
The nomination of a European 
commander would favor the 
“separable but not separate” ap- 
proach to forces assignable to 
NATO or WEU missions. 

• Any remaining rationale for 
France’s traditional reluctance to 
allow its forces to serve under 
NATO (that is, American) com- 
mand would vanish. With Ameri- 
cans in the posts of NATO secre- 
tary-general and deputy com- 
mander, similar U.S. reservations 
could likely be overcome. 

• The appointment of an 
American secretary-general would 
contribute to a better understand- 
ing in Europe of issues of direct 
significance to the security of the 
Western Hemisphere. The days 
are past when a direct threat, other 
than (hat of a .nuclear attack, to the 
North American continent could 
be considered implausible. 

To judge by the wrangling over 
Jacques DeJors’s succession as 
Commission president, NATO’s 
European members would have a 
hard time agreeing on one of their 
own to follow Manfred W6rner. 
An American successor with im- 
peccably pro-European-integra- 
tion credentials could save the day. 

Over tire longer term, an Amer- 
ican secretary-general could hdp 
salvage the- chances of breathing 
new life into what is s till the 
world’s most distinguished demo- 
cratic club. 

The writer, a Canadian political 
anafyst at the European Center for 
International Security in Stern- 
berg, Bavaria, is a forma- head of 
policy planning in the Political Af- 
fairs Division at NATO. He con- 
tributed this comment to the Inter- 
national Herald Tribune. 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1894 ; Centreboard Lost 

COWES ■ — Unless a search is" 
suooessful, tire VigOant will not 
race in the Lord Wolverton’s Cop 
for many days to come. Her cen- 
treboard lies in three fathoms of 
water on the Mouse Ledge Rock, 
just off the Needles; and all the 
king's horses and all the king’s 
men cannot replace it in under 
two weeks, unless it can be found 
and raised to the surface by the 
diver who was at once sent in 
search of Jx. . 

1919: SiimFem Attack 

LONDON — Shin Fan contin- 
ues to carry out its policy of out- 
rage, but it is dear that the Irish 
executive is in a position, to quell 
any further trouble with tire forces 
placed at its disposal. The latest 
rioting reported is at Ca3tieblaney, 
County Monaghan, where mem- 
bers of the Ancient Order of Hi- 


bernians were attacked. They were 
bolding a dance when a strong 
gang of Sinn Feiners made an on- 
slaught on the building and 
smashed all the windows. The 
dances escaped in wild confusion. 

1944: Can to Resistance 

LONDON — [From our New 
York edition:] General Rene Co- 
ebet, commander erf the French 
Forces of the Interior in the a 
southern zone of France, ordered r 
his men today [Aug. 18] to “go 
overdo immediate and total ac- 
tion aga inst the Ge rm a ns in ten 
departments. General Codwt’s 
order said: "This crowni n g action 
°* operations you have 

earned out in recent mo nths is 
nex ssaty m these zones to reduce 
me Gomans to impotence and 
deprive than of the ibmm of op- 
posing the Allied troops. The 

hour has come to avenge our dead 
and to conquer.” 








UNTERINATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 1994 


Page 5 







i 


OPINION 


% 


-Tat 


rt'lieis 


Of Warriors, Evil or Callow, and Four Old Paratroopers 


P ARIS — The youngest- of the four veter- 
ans of iheU.S. 509th Parachute Infantry 
Regiment who jumped over southern France 
last Monday, celebrating the 50th anniversary 
of the wartime fanrfwiff ther^ is 71 years ola. 
The oldest is 80. That isj^raty impressive. . 

The French authorities would not let them 
jump over land because - erratic, summer 
winds and the sunbaked earth make it too 
dangerous. The A me rican airborne veterans 
who jumped in Normandy in June were 
landing on rainsoaked ground, but one ot 
them Donethdess was injured after wbal is 
known as a “streamer” — - a failure, of the . 
parachute to fully deploy. So Monday’s jump 
was into the Mediterranean; where frogmen 
and boats were waiting. - 
But why would men who by now ought to 
be in rocking chairs choose instead .to leap 
out of an aircraft, something recognized even 
in military circles aaa decidedly unnat ural 
thing to wish ho do. The veterans said it was 
to honor dead comrades from the 509th. But 
certainly there was in it a strong motive of 
doing it just for the hdl of it 
However, there is more. For most people, 
war is the most important dong that ever - 
happens to them. They never entirety get over 
it. For those who actually see combat, it is. 
probably the most terrible experienceof their . 
life, but it is something else as well: in an 


By William Pfaff 

equally terrible way, it is the most exhilarating 
and liberating experience they ever have. 

There is testimony to this not only among 
professional soldiers but in units of the mili- 
tary resenre, made up of civilian volunteers, 

■ ana particularly those of parachute or com- 
mando-type forces. Certainly in the 1950s, 
when I had brief acquaintance with the mat- 
. ter, these were likely to be composed more or 
Jess equally of older men who had actually 
seen action in previous wars, and had not got 
Over it, and young men who thought going to 
war would be romantic. 

. The older men mostly were doing deeply 
uninteresting jobs in civilian life. In the army 
reserve they were clinging to a time when 
they bad, in a profound or even primitive 
way, felt themselves fully men. 1 knew one 
who had been among the Rangers who scaled 
the Pointe du Hoc in Normandy on D-Day. 
Life had seemed pointless ever after. 

' Among the young, the motivation was not 
that different, except that Lhey were aspi- 
rants to manhood. There was,' even to the 
amateur psychologist's eye, an evident inci- 
dence of sexual insecurity or ambiguousness, 
and there was a disproportionate representa- 
tion of blacks and Hispanics. Everybody, old 


or young, had something he needed to prove. 

All in some way were trying to be what 
they were not. J. Glenn Gray, a professional 
philosopher who served as an infantryman in 
Europe during the World War n, writes of a 
Frenchwoman active in the Resistance who 
said to him: “I do not love war or want it to 
return. But at least It made me fed alive, as 
I have not felt alive before or since-'’ 

Mr. Gray’s two books of reflections on 
combat — “The ■Warriors," published in 
1959, and “On Understanding Violence 
Philosophically and Other Essays.” which 
came out in 1970 — have assured him a place 
among the very small number of people who 
deserve to be called military philosophers. 
War. he says, is an intensification of life and 
at the same time an escape from life. All else 
goes into suspension while what otherwise is 
forbidden becomes the purpose of existence. 

Mr. Gray writes of “the delight in destruc- 
tion” that battle provides, the sheer spectacle 
of it and the satisfaction it produces, an 
“evil” satisfaction, he says, that “appears to 
surpass mere human malice and to demand 
explanation in cosmological and religious 
terms." Contemplating Yugoslavia and 
Rwanda, who will say otherwise? 

It is also the negation of life, which is an 
element in the sensation or intensified exis- 
tence it produces. The Japanese novelist Yu- 


kio Mishima wrote — with satisfaction, as he 
was a masochist — that in war “the death 
impulse was 100 percent liberated,” adding 
that “the way of the Samurai is death.” 

The 19th century French military philoso- 
pher Alfred de Vigny describes the gratu- 
itousness of the soldier’s existence as simul- 
taneously victim and executioner. That is his 
servitude. Obedience to what society de- 
mands of him is his grandeur. 

It was Robert E. Lee, of course, who said 
that “It is well that war is so terrible — we 
would grow too fond of it.” That would be 
an incomprehensible remark if what Mr. 
Gray says about the pleasures of war were 
not true. It is the deepest reason why the 
casual resort to war, to the violent solution, 
is so reckless. War opens the door to a dark 
room; nobody knows what will be found 
there — as Hitler himself remarked. 

This is a considerable burden of reflec- 
tion to heap upon the splendid feat of four 
septuagenarian troopers. It is inspired by 
the significance of their act, as a wholly 
gratuitous assertion or life — not only 
against the death of comrades past, but 
; against remembered death itself, in their 
jump lay grandeur, even though the four 
would probably not put that word to it. 

International Herald Tribune. 

C Las Angeles Times Syndicate. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Downsizing forPeace - 

Regarding “ Carving Up Africa 
Isn’t the Way to Help” . (Opinion, 
Aug. 9) by Pauline Baker: . 

Redrawing borders .and downsiz- 
ing countries is not a panaoe&rbut it 
can alleviate tremendous ethnic, eco- 
nomic and political pressures, and 
promote peace and democracy. 

The writer contends that “Africa 
is too integrated to be retziba&ed, 
too poor to be chopped up further 
into beggar republics.” To the con- 
trary, much of Africa is already dis- 
integrated and retribahzed. It sim- 
ply remains to establish new borders 


in appropriate places to formally 
acknowledge the fact. 

. .Even industrialized countries 
struggle to zmnntam equilibrium in 
their economies, governments and 
societies. To believe that gigantic Af- 
rican countries can effectively govern 
and administer market economies is 
wishful dunking in the extreme. 

Dictators and demagogues can 
arise in any nation, large or small 
But the best way to restrict tyranny is 
by carving much of Africa into small- 
er, manageable pieces. 

: GORDON FRISCH. 

Santa Fe. New Mexico. 


Waldheim’s Knighthood 

In response to the report "Pope 
Offends Jews by Granting Waldheim 
a knighthood”' (July 29): 

Pope John Paul U not only of- 
fended Jews but also all those who 
fought the Nazis. The knighthood 
for Kurt Waldheim was announced 
three weeks after the Vatican and 
Israel established full diplomatic 
relations. The Vatican knew that 
this would have been an impedi- 
ment to mutual recognition. 

Israel should recall its ambassa- 
dor until the Vatican reverses this 
action, and, if it does not, it should 


A Reunion, Youthful Ideals and, Indeed, a Better World 


Nineteen men and women in their 
40$ and 50s gathered late last month 
at a private home in the. village of 
Vouniatades on Corfu. Boisterous 
greetings, embraces and . reminis- 
cences gave way to a moment of 
silence as they remembered Johan 
Jorgen Holst, the line foreign minis- 
ter of Norway. Mr. Holst, Eke them, 
had participated in the New Yotk 
Herald Tribune Youth Forum, a 
program involving high school stu- 
dents from around the world. He 
died in January, just months after 
brokering the talks that led to the 
Israel-PLO peace agreement. 

Forum participants, about 900 in 
all from 1947 to 1972, went to the 
United States after writing essays. 
Most enunciated youthful ideals 
and hopes for a better world Mr. 
Holst participated in 1956. 

Jordan AizogkHvhoct of the first 
international reunion of Youth Fo- 
rum alumni, recalled Mr. Holst's 
helping rede in another Youth Fo- 
rum four years later, particdlariy 
during “a oouple of serious disagree- 
ments” between delegates. OnCj 
over the. Middle East, involved an 


Israeli and a Sudanese. The other, 
over a provocative song, took place 
between a Ceylonese and a West 
German. “Johan Holst took it on 
himself to play peacemaker, listen- 
ing patiently to one, then to the 
other; bringing the protagonists to- 
gether, again listening, explaining 
and reconciling. It took hours, but 
eventually the two pairs of fellow 
delegates understood each other,- 
were friends.” 

Thirty-three years later, Mr. Holst 
was peacemaker again. The secret 
talks in Norway between Israel and 
the PLO composed 13 sessions over 
nine months, during which there 
were several informal meetings- Mr. 
Holst gave this insight in an article 
for The Delegate, the newsletter of 
Youth Fonno alumni: 

“We did not want to replicate 
traditional conference diplomacy but 
created instead an informal, human 
setting wherein the parties would not 
only talk but also walk, eat, drink, 
laugh and despair together. Before 
and after rounds they were invited 
into my house for consultation and 
in order to include them in the 


human warmth of a private home.” 

The reunion at Mr. Arzoglou’s 
home, I kourti (The Courtyard), was 
a meeting of friends and of minds, 
not a business session. Participants 
came from 26 countries. Among 
them woe an ambassador, civil ser- 
vants, architects, homemakers, teach- 
ers, administrators, journalists, trans- 
lators and business executives. 

Decisions were made about an 
informal organization to maintain 
contact, future reunions, and a 
search for a way to pass on the 
benefit of the Youth Forum experi- 
ence to future generations. Mr. Ar- 
zoglou plans to make his home 
available for a week each year to 
Youth Forum alumni and friends. 

JACOB O. AKINDELE, 
PETER H. L. LIM. 

Corfu, Greece. 

Mr. Akindele was a participant 
from Nigeria in the 1967 Youth Fo- 
rum. Mr. Lim was a participant in 
1957 from Singapore. Gerry Bray 
(Rhodesia, I960) helped to organize 
the international reunion. Alumni 
are invited to contact Mr. Bray at 
330 E. 38th Si., Apt 27L. New 
York, New York, 10016. 


sever diplomatic relations. Let the 
Vatican and the Pope suffer the 
embarrassment they deserve. 

EDUARDO SCHAMESOHN. 

Annemasse, France. 

It was a pleasure to read Richard 
Cohen's wise and measured commen- 
tary cm the knighthood ("Now It’s 
Waldheim the Knight, Courtesy of a 
Forgetful Vatican ” Opinion, July 30). 
However, I am not sure that the term 
“forgetful” applies to the Vatican. 
I am curious to know what it was that 
the wily Austrian did — or left un- 
done — to make the Vatican decide 
that he “deserved” this honor. 

P. VUYK. 

Breganzona. Switzerland. 

More Than a Survivor 

Regarding “ Keep Watching Hus- 
sein the Survivor” (Opinion, July 28) 
by Jim Hoag/and: 

True, King Hussein is a survivor 
and one of the best around, but that 
is not what makes him unique. His 
uniqueness lies in his gift for sur- 
vival (in a rather tough neighbor- 
hood) coupled with his overwhelm- 
ing decency and benevolence. 
These virtues have not oaly allowed 
Jordan to survive for the last 40 
years. They have also created a bea- 
con of stability among the stormy 
seas of the Middle East. 

When Mr. Hoag] and writes that 
King Hussein is concerned not with 
peace but with national interest, he 
is making a distinction without a 
difference. Jordan's peace is the re- 
gion’s as well. 

F1RAS RAAD. 

Amman, Jordan. 

Surrounded by Men 

In response to “ Woman Cadet 
Loses Flea to Save Hair” Aug 3: 

Shannon Faulkner should have 
been in the Women's Army Corps 


during World War II. Hair had to be 
off — way off — the collar, with as 
much under the “hobby” hat as pos- 
sible. As for the 2,000 male cadets at 
the Citadel we didn’t have time to 
count the number of men we were 
surrounded by in Europe. 

“We" were four WAC officers 
bedded down in a horse stable at 
Southhampton. England, in Febru- 
ary 1945. The camp was an embar- 
kation center for thousands of GIs 
headed for France — as we were. 
Amenities? No heat and nothing 
but running water in troughs, cots, 
plenty of blankets and hay for ma- 
trasses if wanted (we didn’t). MPs 
at all entrances. 

Later in France, at war's end, in 
the redeployment camps (named — 
oh, horrors — for the popular-brand 
cigarettes) the amenities went like 
this: Wait until all four needed a 
nature break; report to camp com- 
mander, camp commander calls 
MPs; MPs escort us to camp latrine: 
MPs dear out men, and we enter, 
MPs surround lent with fixed bayo- 
nets; men outside, wanting in, make 
unprintable comments; report back 
to camp commander, who makes no 
comments; unanimous decision to 
use the woods — damn the mines. 

As for equal education, women do 
not have to invade every man’s 
world under the sun for that. Such 
an idea is an insult to every women’s 
organization. Never in my 80 years 
have I felt inferior to any male. 
I believe Shannon Faulkner just 
wants to be the woman who broke 
into one of the last male bastions. 

If she is not accepted by the men 
at the Citadel, she can blame her- 
self. As I told my WAC platoon in 
Germany, September 1945 to May 
1947, when we were surrounded by 
tens of thousands of GIs: “It’s up 
to you. Men may harass women. 
They don’t harass ladies. 

ELEANOR MENZEL-GIFFORD. 

Oberstdorf, Germany. 


A New Yorker Can Feel 
At Home in Asia Minor 


By Michael T. Kaufman 


N EW YORK — Life is strange. 

even on vacation. There 1 was 
forsaking this column for the one 
1 was silting on. a lovely Ionic mod- 
el long toppled and lying on its side 
in the shade of a fig tree in Ephesus, 
which is in Turkey. Birds were chirp- 
ing and the morning, air was turning 
hoi. The holiday was working I was 
not thinking about New York. 

Then a tour passed to fracture 
solitude. It was French, but two of 
its members wore shirts emblazoned 

MEANWHILE 

with insignia of New York. One said 
“TTie New York Tigers,” the other 
said “Manhattan Central.” 

For just a second, 1 thought 1 
should point out that there are no 
New York Tigers. None of the 
French tourists wore shirts saying 
“Paris," or for that matter “Ber- 
lin," “Rio" or “Tokyo.” 

That batch of tourist gave way 
to groups of Germans, Italians, 
Japanese and Israelis; with each 
cluster came more signs of New 
York on shirts and hats. 

These were not souvenirs from 
the city, but rather garments using 
the name of our town as a symbol 
for the center of everything, the 
happening place, the belly button 
of universal consciousness. 

Ephesus itself was for many cen- 
turies just that kind of town, but 
nobody lives there any more. It 
made you think. 

The guide books say Ephesus 
was one of the seven wonders of the 
ancient world. It was the capital of 
the Roman province of Asia. It had 
been a major Greek settlement with 
a temple to Artemis four times larg- 
er than the Parthenon in Athens . 
Later it became the early center of 
Christianity. 

A New Yorker walking through 
its streets, past the remnants of 
libraries, temples, brothels and pub- 
lic privies, past the theaters and he- 
roic statues, has no trouble relating 
to its lapsed pride and grandeur. 

Clearly, Ephesus had been the 
Big Fig. Obviously, if you could 
have made it there you could have 
made it anywhere. 

Croesus," the rich king of the Lyd- 
ians, ruled there, and so did Cyrus 
of the Persians and then Alexander 
the Great, who rebuilt the temple 
that mad Herostratus burned 
down. St. Paul came to preach and 
St. John wrote his gospel there. 
Next to Ephesus, almost everyplace 
else was Bridgeport. 

So what happened? Where did 
everyone go? 

As 1 sat under the fig tree, some 
New York thoughts occurred. May- 
be all the Ephesians moved to the 
suburbs. Maybe after a null enni urn 
or so of seeing foreigners with “Eph- 
esus Tigers” on their togas, the citi- 
zens grew concerned about quality 
of life issues and headed elsewhere. 

Maybe it would be a good idea 
for some foundation to send New 
York's thimderers and major carni- 
vores to Ephesus to shrink the hu- 
bris quotient. At about this time, a 
local approached. 

“From which place are you,” 


asked the man who introduced 
himself as Cedran. “Oh. New York, 
it is the dream of my life to go 
there," he said. 

Yes, he said, he knew why Ephe- 
sus was deserted. The place had not 
been destroyed by earthquake or 
devastated by epidemic. It turned 
out that the Menderes River cut 
itself a new channel leaving the 
city's old Aegean port high and dry. 
Cut off from the sea, the popula- 
tion gradually left. 

The news was a relief. The Hud- 
son. after all was not likely to lake 
a left turn at Cold Spring any time 
soon. Maybe we still have some 
eons of glory ahead of us. 

Of course, we could be bypassed 
by the new information highway. 
Would foreigners want to wear 
“New York” on their shirts if the 
new happening place turned out to 
be the Net? 

Cedran interrupted my worries, 
asking if he could show me some- 
thing “Look." he whispered con- 
spiratorially, pouring several coins 
from a cigarette packet into my 
hand. “These are at least 2,000 
years old." 

Amazingly, ah the coins were in 
fine condition, their detail sharp, 
their lettering legible. With a 
straight face, Cedran explained he 
had found them in a very dry area. 
“See. this one has Alexander the 
Great and this one has the Virgin 
Mary,” he said. 

1 asked why all his coins had 
images of figures that even stupid 
people could identify. He smiled 
and answered, "They are only 10 
dollars each." 

I thought of offering him a part- 
nership in a bridge I owned in ex- 
change for the coins, but I decided I 
liked his story and gave him the 
money. He put it into his pocket. 

“O.K-" ne then said, “you are 
right about the coins. They are 
fakes, but because you are such a 
sman man from New York, 2 will 
now show you something real. 

“See this ring? It is 2,000 years 
old. See how rusty is the band? The 
woman's head in the stone is Aph- 
rodite. Only $20.” 

Suddenly, my spirits soared in 
true urban solidarity. 

1 was among my own kind. The 
last man in Ephesus was a three- 
card- monte man with world-class 
street smarts and Broadway brass. 
He didn’t need to wear “New 
York" on his shirt but he deserved 
to walk among us. His civilization 
was hardly dead. 

Never mind the glory that was 
Greece or the grandeur that was 
Rome. Cedran of Ephesus made me 
feel right at home. 

This is one of Mr. Kaufman’s regu- 
lar “ About New York” columns in 
The New York Times. 


Letters intended for publication 
should be addressed “ Letters to the 
Editor” and contain the writer’s sig- 
nature, name and full address. Let- 
ten should be brief and are sutfea to 
editing We cannot be respcnsNe Jcr 
die return of unsolicited manuscripts. 



REAL ESTATE MARKETPLACE 


REAL ESTATE 

FOR SALE 


owns sms uixmaux bake 

terlgzSSA 

42 23 matte (331-02 02 12 

CANADA 

OWNBt SS15 ImoriMH vMo Wml 
Coo dAttiys. Ftnomwc jot view, 
pS, oWhddna. F« (3319361 92 2 

ALBERTA - Y*5T«N CANADA 
Ettcutrra anoa of 45 HA ariy 2S hn 
wed of Edmonton on Jagw Pork Ed. 
Landscaped, "*08 .awa. 5 horut 
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taring w« gene and tntk ftwh 
an sito wahtawi andwdtofrnd. Heal 
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J l.tXD.DW Cdiv Brochure ovaitofaie. 

£3! IPtJISJSnu 


ITALY 

SCOGUBUt M ZOAGti. dtuded in 
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& 5etoh levitate, owner sefc Irouy 2 
daw condcvjwwro on the aco trort 
wilh cwM wwl 3 Iwhooraj, 2 Msg 
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rtoubk gcragi, baodt atom, srtn 60 
sam, wetawefa tanace and hanmng 
goden carved out of the rack. 315 
njii. in total fro 3MZ3 32015. 

FRENCH iRIViatA 


IP | 

CARIBBEAN 


ST. WHS, 
WEST PMjBS 

20 or 14) ocre pie wocarorf. 
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feme & to. obrosnwnl. Matffy Baocb 

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12121 tATSSS 
{2121 371-V133 

RBKHRM&A 

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APATOffidWtUX DLKBl 
farge Ung roam, 3 baaeoroe 3 bath 
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jwg Area odcbs* to A* pod. 
ray occasa to the beodv 
WV/AT855 

19, BU du GWrefLedatc ' 
0S3H) BEWJUELW«M« 

Tel {3^9301 01 afaspaj 93 DM1 » 

MONACO 

MONTE CARLO 

3 »OOM APAemmr Wta we 
derU view meftoahng AtonteOvta 
ond/hebexha B taUMl 12) 

AAGEDI 

7/9. Bd fhs.MMb* **%*!£ £}*g** 
TU33-9Z 165939 fm 337350 1942 

SPKIACUARFCT 

.ssssm 

Tatafttos mow salt wlh M.bndt, 
ihower, mean terrace + 3 bedrooni 
show*. WC +lm»afar * 
s&fe show, fakhtndto. State of *e 
rrttfoo^swasdv^AgcoitflictoHB. 
IhdWiic tw*"3 :*l*. 0 * r -. 
totd»n ffiohtfl 4nnd Iwyjw- 

m tea iwot pool NtWjOa 

rttosaEvdsfr 

Waterfront + goMnmed iwato ha* 

nahh. S1.9M. ft. Brows. 4© -852-0328 

MONTE CABLO 

• New project widi th^o to Srown 
upM inserts wcitaUe. PonaronK VSSW. 

•-owiBair* 

SSUGMaUBAT 


PASS A SUBURBS 

by* 

too eohn 0*1 rendatoN erea 


EXCffnONAL 

SAwnwwz • 

sagas 

wiffi »perb Jniiw® ^ 
pmoak Miens owrOadtl and fay. 

StJiqiB, 2 ftWTH, bdx^Y- 1-44 71 87 82 

novmcE 06460^** * to*"®* 

Ssr^rsffis 

BPPB!Tf33j«680Bri 


Uh. MMWTAm tMA, 2 
63 ltyn, 30i^3m 

high aftnqs. very bn#tT, 

Rononfic **• 

HOTS. - KBTAURANT 

HeouidU budmuitof 30 niha be* 
Not B rooras/<) JMt3. P**ba*wt 
nnftien. Frondi/W! Aartelt foe* 
Bqpafafaii. Fro owner ol 33-^3030631 


iiiiii 

VMDG& SO KMS W 

ml w, t ha. tend EflM «oe« + 

sssag s 

mmM 

amvaiepakwh 

T*(35?476filHBfa*«€»19 

SPAIN 

UPBJSB-iSS 

O pari or «* ow* 

'ssssan 

gtle rentAMdp. Tel Sorado* |3*4I 
^34 00. Fte4t5 7 t&.Ate_ft«9- 
21«t tdB « SporiA |3*-35 219 3453 


net A, MUlCffCA. Cottage on 2500 
5am. Prim Wage Mfling. Owkfabfc. 
ttSX. CpB/FoTOSA [51^725-9231. 


SWITZERLAND 


LAKE GENEVA & 
HOim RESORTS 



SZ Man&ffite* CH-121 1 Gmnt 
Tel 4122-734 15 40. Fax 734 12 20 


VHLARS, prahnous new 2 bed duplex 
apateenf, Vff + 2 Wamm. 
garage, dose to Dealer aid jbhra, 
ffl cij ii Ine rt wew. AJ qae boor from 
Geneva SFr 800000- Gontad owner 
Mr Mariotti in Villon. Tots 
41ZS35.1&B5 


USA GENERAL 


1500 AORS FOR 5A1E 150 mfet 
(ran New Yak Gty m the 
beauriW G nS Mountain 
home rented. 


woodanj, 2 pan*, end 
of springs good tor 



number 

Of tarings goad lor borifew dinhne 
water. Stag US S2JUUXU Genet 1 
me terras avbufe. Write or Fix to 
Mtndde Fans, 224 W. 30th St. New 
Yah. NY 10001 fan pi2) 239-0632. 


USA RESIDENTIAL 


15 NGn. to NYC 
Come Kreefly to The GALAXY 
7000 Bvd. E GuUerten/towrar Mel 
Tennis, h & Outdoor Pooh, Oub 
1 J ft 3 Bedrooms & PWhMm 

smals £L 

SMB J20JX4 . 

GOtfOfiATCffiOCWON 



201-861-6777 

OPEN 7 DAYS fax 201-8610637 


NYC/PokAv*. At86St. 4 Rooms 

Prewar Oawc 6 On Porir 

Bore prewar m M sennae wmeng at 
ft**, Grijcw* mortto W lea* to as 
twerwed room with woodbwtwig 
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with dressing urea, 2 addtana! 

anffiisc; 

Asking JTSSJSffi). 

in. Ewkswv 


DOUGLAS aUMAN 


MUR BEACH CONDO. Oenrand 2 
butasm/? bob with soeiaud poio 
overlooking Jqaw* 
beodi mess, cfl tmria 5915Q0. 
Q#4fl>/aa»151JSA. 


SANTA IE WW MBOCO 59 ocre 
fcsniy coMpound, 4 homes, wru, 


PA1M BEACH FLORIDA 
OCEANFRONT ESTATE 

Situated on 280 H. of tfired beach 
frontage, thft aaaviBcenl fomihr 
compound corauti of 5,800 iq. PL 
nan house, 1 EDO eq. ft gued home, 
far* pool and term court on 2 acres. 
59700,000 Jim McCann 

McCannCoTnerWOorke Seal Esi&ejnc 
Telephone: M071 655-6550 USA 
Far HOT] 659-5068 


NYC/tts EAST 


* TBKAG5 


Fabulous Penthouse Condo 

This 2700 so ft peirfhaose is one of a 
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Good deot 

Mane Banco 212-891-7063 

DOUGLAS BJJMAN 


IAJCX1A, CA-ARCHnKnURAL 
Digest, Otwwrort Eddie. Best kmrnn 

KHAN WB1S, CA. Bsfcmfc, Country 
Oub, rnoonitoe house, pool & garden 
deagned ov M is hoei Toytor. fun wired, 
bea tocokon ft condton. Col to. Fna. 
Frio ft Ceu 1415} 931 -4500 * 150. USA. 


CAUFOMA: PASADENA 15 minutes 


from downtown Lot Angeles. Began* 
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MANHATTAN - WBT fiTTH ST. 
Unique 3 bedroom duplex, huge Wien 
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weodfawning firwtaoe, kage 
kitchen wm potaBiotnsl sK 

ocoarament coB Qiq 379-913 


i** 1 * . 

country 

. ... . For 

Old 3*9132 USA. 


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S bedrooms, pod. waft to beads 
J1A5M. QjfFda USA 


sa 


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B ‘ ,ni ■ 'sab&vtiik 

FAX.- 717-SC-9M2 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


PROVENCE IARGE DETACHED 
house with dtaaoa. Seeps & A._. 
abb week 27 August al » 5e0mb* 
F2,500/week tnclumro. Tel 133] 
07 43 93 B a f« 031075 06 6 1 

GERMANY 


tVANKfUXT luxurious 3 U2 room 
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«* view of cade 95 sqA in 2 
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GREAT BRITAIN 



HOLLAND 


AMSTERDAM any BO sqm. cportnwni 
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IRELAND 


S1UDMNO M DUBUN fho sumnw/yrt 
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PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


PARIS LA DEFENSE 1 
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Tub 133-1] 41 25 Ifi 16 
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Tefc (33-11 4S 75 62 20 

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fadng HnHd CONCORDE 1AFATETTE 

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SAMT WOfH. 4 ROOMS, 2 bads- 
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CA91TA1E • PARTNERS 
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Embassy Service 
YOUR REAL ESTATE 
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Tel: (1) 47.20.30.05 

USA 


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5000 - LSI Brookvie J516) 922-9600 


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Si 

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YOU SAW 

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worldwide 

Shouldn't you 
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in the 

INTERNATIONAL 

HERALD 

TRIBUNE? 


SWITZERLAND 



Looking for 
property in 


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Cats, GstoadV** art not 

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[TEL: M-SMU0UB - FAX; 34-52-817788 


International 

Herald Tribune 

ads work 


GERMANY 


A RARITY 

Beautiful villa 

in an idyllic park with old trees, top location in Frankfurt 

Romaniic designer villa, among*! other things with cantilever, technical- 
mechanical sieei construction; 310 sq.m, float space; high quality method of 
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frames. 2 bathrooms with whirlpools. 2 small bathrooms 
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spiral staircase, swivelling and extendible solar collector demons, 
roof lance (icing towards the south, balconies all around the 
house and a lookout platform, and much more. 

Purchase price: DM 4 million 

Energy-saving design wilh solar collectors, wind generator and waier 
purification planL The basemeni level can be used for commarial piupases. 

Only for serious prusjKcthe Imers: no real-estate agents. 

Box number 3688, IHT, 

Friedrichstr. 15, 60323 Frankfurt, Germany, Fax + 49-69-72 73 10 




FRANKFURT 

Excellent building site. 2.700 sq.m.. 5 min. to (he city, absolute top location, 
plans show very elegant architecture. Purchase price DM 4,5 milUon. 
Only for serious prospective buyers’, no real-estate agents. 

Box .2687, IHT, Friedrichstr. IS, 6A323 Frankfurt, Germany, Fax +49-69-72 73 10 


CZECH REPUBLIC 



UNIQUE IN PRAGUE - 
IN THE HEART OF EUROPE 


Upper-cta&i peotbouve apartment*, 
downtown, (op residential area near 
Wence&las Square with a wonderful 
view o»cr the rooftops of Praguer 
Maisonette apartments with 3 
noreys. from 30 10 1 35 »qm. lop 
no<eh furnishings such as spiral 
staircase, open fireplaces, large 
terraces and separate elevators. 
Fuiurc-oricmcd residential 
architecture that meets international 
standards and features the latest 
(oriraaieMtil concepts for 
buildings, e g. storage cistern for 
rainwater, solar collectors and wind 
energy. 

Outstanding architectural design 
by the arcbftect Ivan Povazan. 

Building owner Fa. Posfav s.r.o., 
Pnha Management by v. Ferenczy & 
Partners Ltd., Presentation & Sale. 
Frankfnn/Main. Germany 
Tel; 00 49 09 - b40* 8092. 

Fa*; 00 49 -69- 64 0884 7p 


sv*:: 


f 


I 





TP'MSWHtm*:- HHt'-eri; 


/ 


International Herald Tribune 
Friday, August 19. 1994 
Page 6 



S & 



Parma • 


EMIUA- BO i° 9 “ % 

ROMAGNA Ravenna. ■ _ «. 


Dozza 


SAN MARINO 


SceT^mi AnuMin 'AlbiMik fur The Ntf* Yofl Time. NYT I 


Dozza features Rocca Sforzesca castle and wall paintings; this is a detail of “Farm Life ” on arch on the Via de A micis. 


On City Walls, a Modern Museum 


D OZZA, Italy — When I heard 
about Dozza several years ago. a 
friend told me to expect graffiti. 
The next day. when we arrived, 
in the tiny medieval town, 32 kilometers 
(20 miles) south of Bologna. I found paint- 
ed walls of elegant, extravagant propor- 
tions. Dozza has been covered with fres- 
coes of all types, left over the last few 
decades by more than 200 artists from 
Italy and around the world. 

Since 1960, Dozza has held a biennial 
international art festival called Muro Di- 
pinto, or painted wall, and a special town 
council invites half a dozen artists to trans- 
form its streets into a museum of modern 
frescoes. On a return visit to Dozza this 
spring, I stood before a playful 19S1 fresco 
titled “Homage to Manet," by the French 
painters Hubert Rivej and Etienne Coilot, 
in the Piazza Carducci. Here, the Impres- 
sionist’s well-known “Dijeuner sur 
l’Herbe” is reset in Roman ruins, a keen 
indication of Dozza’s telescoping of the 
past Though the city's wails have been 
covered with art in recent years, the fres- 
coes themselves, in a hodgepodge of styles. 


By James Sturz 


a week of work tempered with revelry. 
When the artists leave, their murals re- 
main. most of them indefinitely. A few of 
the more delicate ones are moved inside; 
every other year, a number of the outdoor 
frescoes are restored. 

Dozza is surrounded by vineyards, so 
it's not surprising that many of Dozza's 
frescoes focus on harvest themes. .Along 
the Via XX Seltembre. a portico is covered 
by the delightful 1 98 1 fresco “The Angel of 
the Harvest.” by the Paduan painter Paolo 
Meneghesso. An archway nearby, in a 
multitude of colors, depicts a Cubist idyll. 
“Farm Life” (1983). by Riccardo 
Schweizer. a painter from Trent. 


R OUGHLY halfway down the 
Via XX Setlembre. the most 
striking fresco. “Figures" (1973). 
by the Milanese painter Remo 
Brindisi, envelops an archway over the 
street. Poised beside a Renaissance campa- 
nile. Brindisi’s abstract faces — in peach, 
yellow and pink — flank both sides of a 
clock, and glance idly over the Piazza Zotti 
and Dozza's City Hall. At the base of the 
campanile, a 13th-century parish church. 
Santa Maria Assunta, has been construct- 
ed on Romanesque ruins. 

Three rooms of the church’s rectory- 
have been converted into a tiny museum of 
religious art. which houses a collection of 
30 burnished reliquaries, along with a 
grouping of 16th-cenuny ceramics from 
Faenza, a nearby town. 

Past Santa Maria Assunta. and count- 
less more frescoes, the Via XX Scttembre 
and the Via De Amicis converge at the 
Piazzale del Prato di Rocca. A drawbridge 
leads beyond the main tower and into the 
castle. During the warmer months, its 
moat is filled with green grass and daisies. 

Inside the Rocca Sforzesca, the Pinaco- 
teca (picture gallery) of the Muro Dipinto. 
occupying one room, displays sketches of 


depict myriad eras. 

Dozza’s first houses were erected in the 
ninth century. In 1086, Bolognese con- 
querors built a wall around the city, and 
later constructed a fortress, now a magnifi- 
cent castle, the Rocca Sforzesca. at the 
town's summit. For centuries, the castle 
and town, at the foothills of the Apennine 
mountains, were the subjects of battles 
between the families of Bologna and 
Imola, a town 6 kilometers east of Dozza. 
In 1564, the Vatican interceded, settling 
the feud by awarding the castle to a Bolo- 
gnese family, which then held it until 1960. 
When there were no longer any heirs, the 
castle was ceded to the city, and in an 
effort to attract visitors to Dozza the first 
frescoes were added the same year. 

Today, a 17th-century entryway of soft 
red brick on the town’s northern edge 
welcomes visitors to the historic center. 
There are only 5,000 residents in this town 
in the Emilia-Romagna region, and the 
historic center is home to just 600. 

In the past, the Muro Dipinto has at- 
tracted artists from throughout Europe as 
well as from Biazil and China. During the 
most recent festival, last September, artists 
from only Emilia-Romagna participated. 
As a ritualized precursor to each biennial, 
the unadorned sections of Dozza's rough 
walls are sanded in preparation for the 
newest frescoes, which are painted during 


I Inevitably. Woodstock redux 
produced a David Lei term an list of 
things overheard. Try these: “Run 
for your lives. Rush Limbaugh's in 
the mosh pit!" and “This must be 
the bad add! I could've sworn you 
said Lisa Marie Presley married 
Michael Jackson!” 


the visiting artists' frescoes. (In the gallery 
there are also a few frescoes that were 
stripped from buildings when they began 
to deteriorate.) The Rocca Sforzesca was 
built in 1250, and then enlarged and re- 
structured through the laie 1400s. In the 
17th century, the interiors of numerous 
castles throughout Italy were transformed 
into palazzos. and the Rocca Sforzesca 
followed suit. Nevertheless, once inside 
Dozza's fortress, it is surprising to find a 
quiet Renaissance courtyard with white- 
columned porticoes and two loggias. 

An assortment of rooms reveal furnish- 
ings, tapestries, portraits and armor, some 
dating to the 1500s, when the Campeggi 
and Malvczzi families of Bologna took 
control of the castle. The bedrooms have 
walls more than 4 meters (13 feet) thick. 
On the ground floor Is one of the best 
preserved medieval kitchens in Emilia-Ro- 
magna, stiU outfitted with original cook- 
ware, ovens, tables and stools. A rustic 
farm-life museum occupies a series of 
rooms nearby. 

In the dungeons are iron collars, a pillo- 
ry and trap doors. In one dungeon, just 
beneath a trap door, iron spears jut from 
the walls of a shaft, angled upward to 
harpoon the condemned. Elsewhere, the 
graffiti of prisoners (some of it from the 
16th century and protected by glass) are 
scratched into the walls. . 

The most alluring part of the castle’s 
dungeons is a section, converted in 1970 
into a wine cellar, where nearly 500 variet- 
ies of Emilia-Romagna's wines are dis- 
played. Since 1978 the cellar has been the 
seat of regional wine promotion and tast- 
ings are often offered there: 

Emilia-Romagna is Italy's fourth-larg- 
est regional wine producer, after Sicily, 
Veneto and Apulia. And local producers 
make one of Italy's finest whites, Albana 
di Romagna — one of just 13 Italian wines 
to have earned the coveted government 
guarantee Denominazione di Oiigine Con- 
trollata e Garanlita. Although Albana was 
the first of the countiy's whites to win the 
distinction, it is hardly Dozza's only offer- 
ing. The red Sangiovese di Romagna. Lanv- 
brusco. Barbers and sweet Cagnina. and 
the white Trebbiano, Sauvignon and Mal- 
vasia. along with assorted Pinots, are all 
Emilia-Romagna n specialties. The wines 
are all for sale at the castle. 

The next Muro Dipinto will take place 
in September 1995. The Festa di Arzdore, 
a food and crafts fair, runs Sept. 1 to 4. 


James Sturz. who often writes about Italy, 
wrote this for The New York Times. 


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Osaka’s Single-Building Airport 


* •. » 
1 i;:i* 


By Paul Goldberger 

tfnv York Tima Sender 


O SAKA, Japan — It may Finally 
have happened — an airport that 
is as important a piece of monu- 
mental architecture as the great 
train stations. That it should have been 
built in Japan, a country that never had any 
great train stations to speak of and where 
civic pride in transportation has always 
been a matter of efficiency, not monumen- 
tal! ty, merely adds a level of paradox to this 
unusual project, which would have been 
startling enough anywhere. 

For the new Kansai International Air- 
port, scheduled to open Sept. 4, was built 
on a 1 , 300 -acre man-made island two 
miles out in Osaka Bay. It was designed by 
Renzo Piano, the Italian architect who ’ 
first came to public attention through his 
design, with Richard Rogers, for the Cen- 
tre Pompidou in Paris. The airport has 
been somewhat controversial as a work of 
engineering, given that the island took five 
years to construct, ate up at least $4 billion 
of the project’s total S14 billion cost, and 
as soon as it was finished began to sink. 

But now that the sinking has been halted 
— and the huge bills it generated left for the 
airport to recover through what axe expect- 
ed to be the highest landing fees and con- 
cession costs of any airport w the wodd — 
Kansai can be seen for what it is, which is 
the most impressive attempt to make a 
work of architecture out of an airport since 
Eero Saarinen’s Dulles International was 
finished outside Washington in 1962. 

Piano has spent most of his career try- 
ing to merge nigh technology with com- 
fortable environments. He is an architect 
of gentle, consistent reason who loves 
both spectacular technological effect and 
human scale. Most airports, of course; 
possess neither. It is Piano's great achieve- 
ment that be has provided some of both. 

The design, which was the winning en- 
try in an international competition held in 
1988. rejects the current fashion for break- 
ing up large airports into multiple build- 
ings and includes everything — terminals, 
concourses and gates — under a single 
roof. It is no small roof: the central por- 
tion, containing the main te rminal, has a 
spectacular swooping curve supported by 
graceful white steel trusses, while glass 
concourse wings containing the gates 
stretch out for a mile. 

The building is so long that the distant 
gates are reached by a train that runs 
along the outside of the concourse, mak- 
ing the structure no more truly compact, 
in the end, than most other new airports. 
But the achievement is nonetheless real, 
and threefold: the place is rationally orga- 
nized, it is logically connected to neigh- 
boring cities (30- minute express train to 
Osaka, 30-minute hydrofoil to Kobe), and 
it provides an architectural experience 
that is stunning. 

The organization was largely dictated by 
Aeroports de Paris, designers of the curious 
doughnut-shaped structure of Charles de 


Gaulle outride Paris- These consultants un- 
derstood that an airport is an .-intricate 
system for moving people "to and From 
airplanes, airplanes to and from thcair, and 
cars and trains to and from itself. - 

For all the airports that have been built, 
few have contributed much worthwhile 
thought to die notion of layout, but this 
one does, with a plan that against all odds 
gives the user some memorable architec- 
tural moments. 

Or ai least scone users. The four-story 
main ter minal building has beea designed 
as a sandwich, with domestic Rights han- 
dled on two middle Boors and interna- 
tional flights departing from the top floor 
and arriving at the bottom, litis means, 
that the lyrical curves of Piano’s trusses, 
the building's finest architectural dement, 
are seem only .by departing international 
passengers. 

All passengers do pass through, a low- 
story atrium, railed the canyon, at the en- 
trance to the terminal, however, and of 
course they all end up in the long glass 
concourse. But for domestic users, it is this 
glass-roofed “canyon,” painted a rusty 
apricot and filled with trees, that will be the 
one monumental space to be experienced. 




I TS a pity that more people will not 
go to the intematkmal departure hall, 
where Piano's love of technology and 
his fondness for creating relaxed, nat- 
ural forms have their finest moment: the 
splendid, energetic space under the great 
metal trusses. Here, the curving concrete 
forms that. Eero Saarinen experimented 
with as a symbol of flight mature into 
something tighter, more tensile, more 


The halTs undulating profileis an exquisite 
curve, as fight and graceful as a glider lilting 
softly over the landscape. And it yields a 


pieces of white fabric that deflect air and, at : 


night, become light reflectors. 
For all the effort that went ii 


For all the effort that went into creating 
a rational system of organization for this 
airport, movement within it remains com- 
plex and at times confusing. There is an 
elaborate information system with touch 
video screens in both Japanese and Eng- 
lish, but even with this electronic crutch 
many viators Will still be puzzled, since 
the movement between levels and from 
the main terminal area down the long 
wings to the gates has plenty of twists and 
turns, despite its logic on paper. 

The long, long, long, glass-enclosed 
concourse that contains the gates is ap- 
pealing in each of its parts, since from 
every point along its length there is plenty 
of tight, wideKmen space and a wonderful 
view out to the landing field. But the 
whole is less than, the sum of these parts^ 
since there is no dear, open view downthc 
length of the concourse: it is blocked by 
partitions for security, separatioiis be-, 
tween arriving and departing passengers, , 
and stairs from various levels. Practical 
necessity has intruded upon what, could . 
have been the bindings ip$)s ^spectacular 
architectural space of aB. V 



,-1*1 


Osaka terminal stretches for a mile. 


iis si vis $s i is 



Whoopi Goldberg and Tina Mqforino go poolside in a scene from “Cortina, Corrina 


S Hjwhit'Ncu Life 


Corrina, Corrina 

Directed by Jessie Nelson. 
U.S. 


Jessie Nelson, who wrote 
and directed the semi-aato- 
biographical “Corrina, Cor- 
rina.” based (he title charac- 
ter on a 70-year-old 
housekeeper who helped to 
raise her after her mother 
died. Somewhere along the 
way,- the housekeeper be- 
came 40 years younger and 
the role became earmarked 
for Whoopi Goldberg, who 
inherited all the material’s 
built-in confusion. Goldberg 
gives a lovely, measured per- 
formance as a woman rising 
to a tricky challenge. But she 
doesn’t quite succeed in 
making sense of this loose- 
knit story. Well-educated 
and skilled in the art of ama- 
teur psychoanalysis, Corrina 
is glaringly overqualified for 
her domestic job. But she 
needs the work, so she signs 
on with the grieving Singer 
family and finds herself 
drawn both to troubled little 
Molly (Tina Majorino) and 
to Manny (Ray Liotta), 
Molly's lonely father. Soon 
Manny begins to notice this 
housekeeper's exceptional 
talents. To a film that pro- 


ceeds as leisurely therapy- 
drama, Corrina’s scenes 
with Molly provide the most 
lender moments. Fortunate- 
ly, “Corrina, Corrina” is 
bolstered by these two ac- 
tresses and some well-drawn 
secondary characters in Cor- 
rina's family (with Jenifer 


Lewis playing her 
sister, and Curtis WlD^uhs 
as a lively liule nephew). It’s 
also helped by hugely evoca- 
tive pecod decor. “Corrina, 
Cornua’* is also loaded with 


nostalgic props that convey 
the repressed, fastidious cul- 


the repressed, fastidious cul- 
tural atmosphere in which 
the st«y takes place. 

(Janet Maslin, NYT) 


Soma Pab 


Directed by Alessandro D*A - 
kttrL Italy 

Everything about Gina and 
Riccardo seems to be abso- 
lutdy normal. She works at 
the post office. He drives a 
bus m Rome. Together they 
live in a modest apartment 


with their four-year-old 
daughter in a fife of struggle; 
sacrifice. and modest goals. 
Then Gina begins to receive 
love letters from a certain 
Saverio, one a day, arousing 
the jealousy of Riccardo and 


her own curiosity. Saverio 
- dims out to be a hyper- sen- 
alive young man with seri- 
ons emotional problems 
stemming from the rfwt h of 
his father. As his psycholo- 
gist explains to Riccardo, 
Saverio is not stupid, but 
perhaps too smart. He lives 
“Senza Pdle," or without 
skin, unable to maintain his 
equilibrium in the whirl of. 
passions, stimuli and soli- 
tude that surround him. 
Gina and Riccardo try to 
off or Saverio company and 
solace. But their efforts take 
a heavy toil on Saverio, and 
on their own relationship, 
“Senza Pdle” is an unpre- 
tenuous yet powerful jam. 
Anna Galiena is excellent as 
the public servant and moth- 
er who is stm too attractive 
for the subdued lifestyle she 
. has .chosen. And Kim Rossi 
Stuart offers a convincing^ 
haunting performance as her 

del u d e d and alienated guhor 
Saverio. 

(Km Shubnan, IHT) 


Iy satirized that it’s parody- 
proof by now. More likely. 
Airheads” just isn’t funny 
enough to get the job done. 
“Airheads” tells what hap- 
pens — not much — when 
three rock-star wannabes 
brandish toy guns and take 
over a radio station, de- 
manding that their demo 
tape be played on the air. 
Ibe ideahas anarchic possi- 
bilities, but the film itself is 


awfully tame. With a cast of 
| ’ appealing actors and enough 
gags to make a terrific two- 
minute trailer,- “Airheads" 
may took like a lot more fun 
than it is. Indeed, it starts 
promisingly, then begins to 
meander and never stops. 
Having introduced the char- 
acters- and set up the basic 
situation, tire director Mi- 
chael Lehmann and the 
screenwriter Rich Wiikes 
. seem almost to have bailed 
out in midmovie. Part of the 
problem is unavoidable: 
once Chazz (Brendan Fra- 
ser), Rex (Steve Buscemij 
and Pip. (Adam Sandler) 
take over the radio station, 
they have no real demands 
to make and the movie no- 
where to go. 

(Janet Maslin. NYT) 


AlriMMdS 

Directed by Michael Leh- 
mann. US. 


Maybe the rock ’a’, roll 
world has been so thorougb- 


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si •I'.-i-i'-’.),.- 



Could This Be the Year for German Reds? 


By Craig R. Whitney 

;■' /New York 72ras Soviet ■ 



morning. spent sweating on toe steep 
slopes of the Ahr River valley, thinning 
ootinslpmbJ rioir grapes. 


/// ni§ win 


summer ... 
heatwave 


ERNAU,' Germany Wer- *■ ygipijitPBCui is the variety tha^ pm such 
aor Nadcd is one of the few. Burgundy towns as Vosne-Romaa6e on 
pewle ni' .Q ns country who the rasp. Here in T>emau, a village of 
woke mieve^ inonnijg this, hfcH-^mbered houses with vines rismg in 
iwnnn «to* **>• .w-w—. m^curicdraws from both banks of the 


•p m . t L w m j " — nmgi I TUI a tavui uvtu UBUftd Vi LUC 

it began at the end of June * wSldmg Ahr, it is called Spatburgimdcr, 
lk lust' vet'. *. "fate^inesHUK Rnrmndhr. 


wouldn't break just yet 
He is a winemaker incite Rhineland, 
and in a gray, cool dtimafie that often 
seems to skip summer "altogether. 'this 
year's blue skies and almosi Medrierra- 


laie-ripening Burgundy, 

No maser what the Germans call it, it 
scerajmhkety that Dernau win ever be 
mentioned in the same breath with 
: Vosno-Romante. But this summer, the 


- - ■ ■ . — z — ~ — : nnuo-nuuiauoc. out mis summer, IHc 

n^n warmth pxoimse. a vmtage of the, ■ goal of producing a xwanorahte German 
u- b f rm }8 w f a;t her disasters, lor n»d wine seems at least at tainable^ 
which there i& still pfcnty of.time. • v .. .-•>.% . . . 

rr"** Y* ** 1 *? - “We -grow the same grape varieties, 


— aihmbw .ttiumvu, aiv W1U IKMl.an 

the hickbe can get to realise his dream: 
to produce a. German red wine as rich 
and robust as Burgundy-. • / * .. 

“Why not?” NadreLsauToa a recent 


Mllliywp oo J-U 

af&i^dlixig it quits _ 

retreating to the coolness of his cellars. 
“If we-do our jobs right, we ought to be 
able to make wines that bear compari- 
son, with tbedrs.” 


“Red wine has been an orphan child 
in Germany for years," he said. “Most 
growers produced white wine, and what 
red wine they made tended to be thin 
and sweet, not up to international stan- 
dards at aU.” But this is now changing, 
and today 1,500 growers are producing 
red wine in Germany, he said. 

The secret of producing better wine, 
said Michael Adelmann, a colleague of 
NaekeFs in the Wurttemberg region, is 
being more selective. 

The Ahr is perhaps Germany’s brat 
known red wine region, though tradi- 
tionally much Ahr wine has been thin, 
sweet, and more pink than red. small 
amounts of red are also produced in 
other German wine regions. 

By far most German wine is white, 
and in the Rhine and Mosel regions 
most of it is made from the distinctive 
riesHng grape. 

For many German wines, both red 
and white, 1993 was a superb vintage, 
although July and August were c obi and 


not nearly as sunny as this summer has 
been so far — but they followed an 
early, warm spring. 

“This year the fruit came out in the 
middle of June, and the grapes should 
start turning color soon,” Adelmann 
said. Bui he is not as optimistic as Nae- 
kcL Hail damaged his vines on the last 
weekend of July, which will probably 
reduce his harvest by more than 25 per- 
cent, he said. 

Between thunderstorms, hail, 
drought, insects, early frost, and rains at 
harvest time, Naekel was asked, why 
does any German winemaker even try to 
brat the odds? 


“There’s hardly any profession left 
where an individual can produce a prod- 
uct by his own efforts,” he said. “But 1 
can look at a bottle of wine and thinv, ‘i 
have made this with my own hands.’ A 


vintner does practically everything, 
the shape of the bottle to 


from choosing 
designing the label to Bottling the wine.” 


Around the W orld : Be Your Own Magellan 


By Roger CoDis . 

International Herald Tribune 


save 


T HERFSaninductablelogicto 
flying around the-world if you 
already need to go halfway. A. 
round-the-world ticket can 
i up to 40 percent on the cost of a 
round-trip: in first, - business or 
economy class. If you’re flying, say, 
from London or New York to Tokyo, or 
Los Angeles to. Sydney, you might as 
well keep going, stopping oft at half a. 
dozen places along toe way . It’s a great 
way to combine business and pleasure. 

But not every business traveler want* 
U> be a latter-day ^ Magellan- A good 
travel agent can construct partial RTW 
fares, enabling yon just to orde destina- 


trips. No backtracking (you are some- 
times allowed side trips, or you can buy 
add-ansj and you cannot stop over more 
.. than once anywhere. You must book the 
firttleg 14 days ahead. Then you can 
change flights as often as you like and 
change. routing for a nominal charge. 
You must make at least three stopovers. 
Typically jyou're allowed two stopovers 
vin Asia» t*o in the Pacific and three in 
North America. 


Tit /rifiut frtnhr 


dons in the North or South Pacific from 
Europe or North America, or a round- 
trip three-quarters of the way around 
the world, by usin g a c ombinati on of 
airlines mid discounted one-way “sector 
fares ” Sector fares are normally valid 
for a year and can be open-dated. ■ 

RTW fares make sense if you’re flying 
at least halfway around toe world in 
either direction. A London-Tokyo 
round-trip in business cAass costs £3,420 
(about $5,250). You can buy a RTW fare 
in business dass in London for less than 
£2,000 with a galaxy of destinations in 
the United States and Asia thrown in. 

However there are stricter conditions ' 
for RTW fares than for normal roand- 


Tbere are two types of RTW fare: 
standard itineraries, either at published 
prices or discounted through consolida- 
tors, and customized fares constructed 
. for a particular itinerary, which ought 
be a mix of published and discounted 
fares. Prices range from less than $1,500 
in economy (unto four stopovers) to 
$7,500 in first dass for a choice of 470 
destinations. A northern hemisphere 
RTW is typically about 30 percent 
cheaper than a southern routing. 

You can buy RTW tickets in most 
countries, though prices vary. A British 
Airways/ U SAir/ Quotas combination, 
eastbound or westbound and including 
Australasia, costs $5,000 in business 
class and $2,900 in economy if you buy 
it in New York; in London it costs the 
equivalent of $2,464 in economy (no 
business fare is quoted in London). In 
Sydney, toe same ticket is $4,100 in 
business dass and $2,080 in economy. If 
you are based in New York, the answer 
might be to buy a round-trip to London, 
and start your RTW trip from there. 

London offers. a vast choice of itiner- 


aries and prices for RTW fares. Trail- 
finders can sell you London-Istanbul- 
Bangkok-Smgapore-Tokyo-Honolulu- 
Boston-Londou with Turkish Airlines as 
far as Singapore and Northwest there- 
after for £790 in economy. Wexas Travel 
in London quotes London-Singapore- 
Houg Kong- Sydney- W ellingt on- Hono- 
lulu-Los Angeles (on Qantas)-London 
(Continental} for £1,200 in economy. A 
combination of business class on Qantas 
and economy on Continental will cost 
£2,700. 

One thing to bear in mind is that parts 
of Africa, South America and the Carib- 
bean are not as wdl served with flights 
as North America, Europe, the Middle 
East, India, and Asia. 

The Northwest /South African Air- 
ways RTW fare allows you to combine 
South Africa, toe North Pacific and the 
United States. For example London- 
Johannesbuig-Hong Kong-Tokyo-Seat- 
ile-Los Angeles- London costs £2,416 in 
business class and £1,172 in economy. 
Aerolineas Argeminas/British Airways 
combines London-Rio de Jandro-Bue- 
nos Aires- Auckland-Syd ney- Singap ore 
(or Bangkok)- London for £3,342 in 
business class and £2,127 in economy. 

One way to include South America in 
a RTW itinerary is to make a side trip 
from Los Angeles. San Diego or Miami. 

Circle Pacific fares, similar to RTW 
fares, are a good alternative if you want 
to visit several places around the Pacific 
Rim. A CP fare that starts and ends on 
the West Coast of the United States 
costs S5JS0Q in first class. $4,500 in busi- 


ness class, and $2,500 in economy. Some 
airlines include a flight from your home 
city to toe West Coast gateway. From 


London, you can buy a CP fare taking in 
Toky 


Bqjing, Tokyo, Taipei and Hong Kong 
for £900 in economy. 

North American travelers who make 
at least one trip a year to Europe and 
one to Asia should consider buying a 
round-trip ticket from London to toe 
Far East via the United States. You first 
need to get to London. Then you can use 
the round-trip ticket to return to the 
United States, stop over in your home 
city, take a round-trip to Asia, and stop 
over again at home. You that have up to 
12 months to return to London and start 
again. This is toe equivalent of two 
round-trips from the United States: one 
to Asia and one to Europe. 

I N London, Bridge the World 
Travel, a specialist in discounted 
business-class fares, suggests this 
itinerary: London-Boston-Los 
Angeles-Tokyo-Hong Kong-Seoul-Ho- 
nolulu-Seattle-Boston-London. You 
would travel all the way with Northwest 
in business dass (first class within the 
States), except for Cathay Pacific (in 
economy) between Hong Kong and 
Seoul, for £2,870. 

Tbe art of shopping for RTW deals is 
first to dedde where you must go. then 
where you might want to go, and when. 
Use the RTW rules to combine separate 
trips on one ticket. But be realistic. 
Think what you can achieve in the time 
available. All you need is a desk-top 
globe and a good travd agent. 



“Der Deuiseba Spiesser Argert Sicrt: 
Retrospewive Raoul Hausmsnn 
1 886-1 97i 250 works by the Aus- 
Iriarvbornamsl (1886-1971), a rep- 
resent rv-e figure of Berlin Dadaism 
around 191B. 

Bonn 

Kunst- und Ausstellungshalle. lei: 
(238) 9171-200. Conflnuirtg/To 
Oct. 16: "Europe, Europa: Das Jahr- 
fiundert der Avamgarde in Mittei- und 
Osteuropa." A muflHjisclplinary ex- 
hibition at 700 works by 200 painters 
and sculptors from Central and East- 
ern Europe. 


IRELAND 


Dublin 

The Irish Museum of Modern Art, 
tel: 671-8666. closed Mondays. To 
Aug. 28: "Andre Masson: Surrealist 
Drawings. 1 925- 1 965. " 45 watercol- 
□rs, Ink drawings and "automatic" 
drawings. 


ITALY 


Florence 

Palazzo Prtti, tel: (55 ) 294-279, 
dosed Mondays. To Sept. 11: “Te- 
son Reali di Dammarca: Federico IV 
ed ii Vlaggio a Firenze nei 1709." 
Furniture, gold cutlery and goblets, 
porcelain tea sets, ivories, glass and 
clothes which once belonged 10 
Frederick IV. The exhibition recreates 
the atmosphere at the time ot the 
Danish King's visit to Florence as a 
guest of Cosimo III de' Mecfiri. 


PORTUGAL 


Lisbon 


Memlirtg’s “Madonna and Child,” in Bruges. Belgium. 


Museu Nacional do Azuielo. tel: 

3. TO Oct. 


BELGIUM 


Bruges 

Groenlngemuseum, tel: (50) 34- 


79-59. open daily. To Nov. 15: 
r Ftv 


“Hans Memling - Five Centuries ol 
Reality and Fiction: " 1994 marks the 
500th anniversary ot the Flemish 
primitive artist arid brings together 
approximately 30 works by Memling 
and paintings, drawings and sculp- 
tures by his contemporaries in 
Bruges. The exhibition also features 
15th-century tumiiure, carpets, jew- 
elry and clothes. 


BRITAIN 


open daily. "Europe. I5th-I8th Cen- 
turies." The museum's collections of 
European applied arts irom the Re- 
naissance to the French Revolution 
are re-displayed in two new galleries. 
Among the highlights are collections 
ol Venetian glass. Italian majolica, 
Elizabethan and Huguenot silver as 
well as European porcelain from 
Meissen. Sevres, Capodimonte and 
Chelsea. 

National Gallery, tel: (71) 839- 
3526. open daily. Continuing/To 
Sept. 4: Casper David Friednch to 
Ferdinand Hodler: A Romantic Tradi- 
tion." TOO paintings and 40 drawings 
from a private collection of German. 
Swiss and Austrian art. 


814-7747. closed Mondays. 

16: "A Inftuenda Oriental na Cera- 
mics Portuguese do SeculO XII." 
Documents the influence of Arabic, 
Indo- Portuguese, Mogul and Chi- 
nese styles on the motifs used for the 
decoration of aiulejos. 


SWITZERLAND 


Edinburgh 


Scottish National Portrait Gallery, 
y. To 


FRANCE 


Id: (3T ) 332-2266. open daily. To 
Nov. 6: "Visions ol lhe Ottoman Em- 
pire." Orientalist works including ro- 
mantic creations by painters who. 
like Delacroix, imagined the East as a 
place ol decadence, sensuality and 
mystery: more realistic paintings by 
painters like David Roberts and Wil- 
liam Holman Hunt, and photographs 
by 19th-century arusts like Maxime 
Du Camp. 

London 

British Museum, l«: ( 71 > 580-1788. 


Parts 

Centre Georges Pompidou, tel: 44- 
78-12-33, closed Tuesdays. Contin- 
uing/To Oct. 3: "Joseph Beuys" 
Drawings, Objects, sculptures and 
more than 70 insiallalions by lhe con- 
troversial artist. 


Lausanne 

Musde Ofympique, tel: (21) 621- 
6511, open daily. To Sept. 4: "MlrO: 
Maher and Colour." 40 bronze sculp- 
tures -and 13 graphic works on vari- 
ous subjects dating back to the 
1960s. 

Martigny 

Fondation Pierre Giannada. tel: 
(26) 22-39-78. open daily. Conti n- 
ulng/To Nov. 1: "De Matisse a Pi- 
casso." 80 paintings, drawings and 
sculptures by 20th-century artists in- 
cluding works by Bonnard, Matisse, 
Braque, Picasso, Balthus and Cha- 
gall. 


SOUTH AMERICAN TOUR 


GERMANY 


Berlin 

Berfinische Galerfe. tel: (2» 54-86- 
763. closed Mondays. To Oct. 12: 


Orchestra National de Lille. Will 
perform works by Berlioz and Saim- 
Saens. under the baton c.1 Jean- 
Claude Casadesus, with Beatrice 
Uria-Monzon, soloist, in Rtode Janei- 
ro i Aug. 31 ) and Sao Paulo (Sept, 
t ); Rosario, Argentina (Sept. 4) and 
Buenos Aires (Sept. 6, 71; Montevi- 
deo (Sept. 8i; Santiago fSept. 12} 


THE POLITICS OF DIS- 
POSSESSION: The Strug- 
gle for Palestmun Self-De- 
termination, 1969-1994, 


WHAT THEY'RE READING 


By Edward W. Said 450 pages. 
527.50. Pantheon. 


Reviewed by 
Michael Lemear 


r J 1 HERE’S less to celebrate in 


the peace accord between 
Israel and toe PLO (ban meets - 
toe cyo, according to Edwarii 
Said. While tens of thousands of 
Palestinian. jubilantly cheer' 
Yasser ArafaPs recent visit to 
Gaza, Said rqects Arafat’s char- 
acterization of the agreement as 
“the peace of the brave” and sees 
it instead as a fate! betrayal .of 
Palestinian dreams, “an mstio- 
ment of Palestinian surrender, a 
Palestinian Versailles’’ negotiat- 
ed by a PLO leadership increas- 
ingly om of touch with the needs 
of the Palestinian people. 

Warning of tbe dangers of un- 
democratic rule by Arafat and 
bis coterie, Said has a prescrip- 
tion: “Palestinians slKXudthank . 
the men in Tunis for their past 
contributions, bat they should 
then take toe next logical step 
and demand that they resign.” 


•John GalBaao, a British 
fashion designer, is reading 
" Dressed to Kitr by Colin Mc- 
DowefiL 

“I fiiid.it interesting, eco- 
nanuoin the way it is written, I 
like, the way he analyzes 

things ” ‘ 

• (Elis Gtorgakakis. IHT) 



■ Said is a respected English 
professor at Colombia Univer- 
sity arid' his powerful assaults 
on Weston intellectual arro- 
gance in ite attempts to frame 
ah expeiience frozn the stand- 
point of Western colonial needs 
have helped shape toe thinking 
of scholars and intellectuals. 
Moreover, Said was an adviser 
to Arafat, the chairman of the 
Palestine liberation Organiza- 
tion, and one of toe mottwran- 
inent spokesmen of the Pales- 
tinian National Council in the 
United States. 


According to Said, the agree- 
ment provides neither sever- 


Him 


By Alan Truscott 

I N toe diagramed deal, sitting ' 
South was Chuck Lamprey, 
a bridge teacher who has won 
many major titles. 

He bid briskly to six hearts, a 
contract that appeals to depend 
primarily on solving the prob- 
lem of the diamond queen. 
When West led a trump and the 
dummy appeared, be asked 
himse lf why no one had lad 
spades. If either opponent bdd 
a seven-card suit he would sure- 
ly have taken pre-emptive ac- 
tion on the first round, so a 6-5 
division was a virtual' certainty. 


mal finesse, was doomed, so 
Lamprey put up his diamond 
ace, cashed his! dub winners 
and led another diamond. 


As he expected. West had to 
win and had no more dubs. He 
had fco lead a spade, giving a 
raff and duff, and South dis~ 
of a dub loser and made 
slam. , 


Moral: When 
makes his first 
him to have chosen from a 

SurL 


eignty nor real freedom but 
rather a method for dividing the 
Palestinian people, providing 
them with very minimal auton- 
omy in a series of independent 
cantons prohibited from co- 
alescing into an independent 
Palestinian state capable of ex- 
ercising tbe minimal right of 
sdf-detenmnation. Said dies 
estimates that existing Israeli 
settlements, plus the land desig- 
nated for expropriation by a 
Rabin government still com- 
mitted to maintaining and sup- 
porting tbe settlements, 
amount to more than 55 percent 
of the total land area of toe 
occupied territories. 

Said’s rage is intensified by 
the failure of American media to 
give the American public any 
serious understanding of the suf- 
fering the Palestinians have en- 
dured. “In 1948,” he informs us, 
“my entire family was turned 
into a scattering of refugees, 
none of whose alder members 
ever recovered from the trauma. 

“Since toe occupation began 
in 1967, tbe Palestinian people 
have had no political rights at 
all; since toe intifada began in 
late 1987 until toe end of June 
1991, 983 have been killed by 
toe Israeli military (this is three 
times toe number of blacks 
killed by South African troops 
under apartheid for toe same 
length of time); more than 


120,000 wounded and beaten, 
and 15,000 [made] political 
prisoners in continuous incar- 
ceration, most of them without 
benefit or trial, defense, re- 
prieve or even a charge, more 
than 112,000 trees have been 
uprooted, and 1,882 houses 
have been punitively demol- 
ished; at least 50 percent of Pal- 
estinian land has been confis- 
cated, and more than 220 Israeli 
settlements established, all by 
force of Israeli arms, or by offi- 
cial Israeli policy . . . thou- 
sands of days of total twenty- 
four-hour curfew have confined 
almost two million unarmed 
and essentially defenseless civil- 
ians to their houses.” 

It is a tragic record, and one 
that many American and Israeli 
Jews want to rectify. But SaicFs 
rage blinds him to 'Palestinians’ 
responsibility in co-crealing 
this tragedy, and his own rejec- 
tiooism in 1994 scans to repeat 
toe unwillingness of Palestin- 
ians in 1947 to accept a parti- 
tion plan that would have given 
than less than they wanted, but 
nevertheless something. 

Israel deserves credit for toe 
official recognition of 2993. 
Said's book should help us un- 
derstand why even that coura- 
geous move by Rabin cannot 
succeed if it ends up, as Said 
believes it likely wifi, not in gen- 
uine statehood but in a more 
sophisticated form of economic 
and political domination. Yet 
since Said grudgingly acknowl- 
edges in the epilogue that the 
accords might lead to indepen- 
dence, he would have done bet- 
ter to focus Jess attention on 
denouncing them and more on 
what could be done to buQd sup- 
port in Israel for an extension of 
the forces of reconcOiatioo. 


Michael Lerner . ; editor of Tik- 
visn Cri- 


Jewi 


km : A B. 
tiqite of Politics. Culture and So- 
ciety, wrote this for The 
Washington Post 


Tbe first aide was won with 
the heart ace, and a heart was 
led to dummy’s queen. East 
jfcrew a club, and South was 
surprised. Why would East- 
throw a chib- when be could 
have spitted a spade? The only 
explanation was that East had 
at least as many dubs as spades. 


East had shown up with one 
heart, and South hoped for an 
original 5- 1-2-5 distribution on 
his right. He led to the spade 
ace and returned to dummy’s 
diamond king- When he ted an- 
other diamond and East fol- 
lowed, he was sure that he had 
seen all East’s red cards. A nor-. 


NORTH 

♦ 5 

OQJfl-76 
. 0 K863 
AX53' 

WEST(D) EAST 

AQ1D6632 4KJB74 

0102 14 

OQW7' .4*0- 

*W4 • 

SOUTH 

♦ A 

UAK853 
4 A J52 
*AB7 ’ 


Neither side was vulnerable. The 
bidding: 

West North East' South 

Pass Past Pass lO 

Pass 40 Pass 11 , 

pus Pus Pus 

. We* led tha heart two. 


TH HV4J. i 



WttWWelVrV.WfcT— 


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r 






New Deal in Asia Arms Sales 


Eastern Nations Put the Squeeze on the West 


By Michael Richardson 

Jnlemwonai Herald Tribune 

KUALA LUMPUR — East Asian coun- 
tries, intent on acquiring advanced technol- 
ogy for their military and civilian industries, 
are increasingly using major aims purchases 
as leverage to pin favorable deals from U.S., ■ 
Russian and West European suppliers. 

Those suppliers may be hurting themselves 
in the long run, analysts say, because such 
technology transfers will in time help die 
Asian countries pin the capacity to build 
modem weapons themselves. 

Cuts in mili tary budgets in the West and in 
Russia have hit mOiiaiy manufacturers hard, 
making them more ready to deal. This has 
allowed Asian nations, many of which are 
modernizing their armed forces, to play sup- 
pliers off against one another to gain access to 
new technology and production processes. 

“Gone are the days of straightforward pro- 
curement," Najib Kazak, .the Malaysian de- 
fense minister, said in an interview. 

“In every sizable defense purchase we make 


today," he said, “we incorporate provisions 
ndt 


for offset arrangements, and we have become 
quite innovative in widening the scope of our 
purchases.” These deals include technology, 
subcontracting work and other concessions, 
he said. 

Such arrangements are being demanded by 
Japan, South Korea, China, Taiwan, Indone- 
sia, Singapore and Malaysia, all of which are 
developing aerospace or military industries, 
to offset the cost of arms purchases. 

In one such deal, completed in June, Ma- 


laysia played Russia off'against the United 
States. It was thus able to bring < 


j ring down costs, 
get late-model weapons and gam substantial 
offsets in a $600 million contract for the 
purchase of 18 Russian MiG-29 fighters. 

This followed the order of eight Fa- 18s 
from McDonnell Douglas Corp. of the Unit- 
ed States, which Malaysian officials said cost 
about as much as the Russian deal. 

Mr. Najib said the value of offsets negotiat- 
ed with McDonnell Douglas amounted to 
about $250 milli on and that offsets under the 
Russian deal were worth $220 milli on. 

Both are designed to help Malaysia develop 
its fledgling aerospace industry and provide 
subcontracting work to Malaysian compa- 
nies. 

Russian suppliers are required to set up a 
joint-venture service center for the MiG-29s 
in Malaysia and to establish ventures with 
Malaysian companies to produce compo- 
nents or provide training and maintenance 
services. 

Malaysia is the first non-Communist coun- 
try in East Asia to buy Ruarian military 
aircraft. Analysts said that Russian competi- 


tion made it virtually impossible for rival U.S. 
and European arms exporters to come to any 
agreement on limiting offsets. 

For suppliers, then, these arrangements are 
becoming increasingly onerous. 

The u.S. General Accounting Office, an 
official watchdog on government spending, 
said recently that the decline of the American 
military industry was being hastened by side 
deals m foreign anns-sale contracts that 
transfer technology or place part of the work 
abroad. 

Such agreements “are hurting our country 
and taking jobs away,” said Representative 
Cardiss Collins, an minois Democrat and 
chairwoman of a House committee that has 
been scrutinizing aims sales. 

In the long term the intense sales rivalry 
between military exporters, some Western 
critics say, may be undermining their compet- 
itive position and weakening prospects for 
arms control 

The real danger is not in the export of 
finished weapons to East Asia but in technol- 
ogy transfers that will permit states in the 
region to build the next generation of weap- 
ons, says the latest annual strategic survey for 
the International Institute for Strategic Stud- 
ies in London. 

“What may emerge." the institute warns, 
“are countries which have serious tensions 
with their neighbors and are increasingly free 
of the constraints imposed by Euro-Atlantic 
aims exporters.” 

East Asian officials reject this view. They 
say the region’s growing military self-suffi- 
ciency will contribute to stability. Some of the 
new military technology mil also benefit ci- 
vilian industry, they add 

In another sign of the increased leverage of 
East Asian countries over Western arms sup- 
pliers, Singapore Aerospace, an arm of the 
government-controlled Singapore Technol- 
ogies group, announced Tuesday that it 
would set up a joint-venture company with 
the Russian Academy of Sciences. 

The initial aim of the company, to be based 
in Singapore, wifi be to develop and commer- 
cialize Russian research relating to military 
and civilian aircraft, but it may reach beyond 
that. 

Taiwan announced last month that it 
would begin producing parts later this year 
for F-16 fighters under a contract with the 
maker, Lockheed Corp. of the United States, 
worth $40 milli on. 

Under an agreement signed just over a year 
ago, Lockheed agreed to transfer technolog)' 
to Taiwan and help it establish a factory to 
repair F-16 warplanes. Taiwanese officials 
said the deal would be worth about $600 
million over 10 years. 


Reuters 


COLOMBO — The opposition leader, Chan- 
rfrflra B andura nailc e Kumaratunga. who has 
promised to hold unconditional talks to end Sri 
Lanka’s civil war, was poised Thursday to be- 
come prime minister, 17 years after her mother 
left that office. 

President Dingjri Banda Wijetunga invited her 
People’s Alliance to form a government after it 
defeated the ruling United National Party in 
general elections Tuesday. A presidential spokes- 
man said the new government would be sworn in 
on Friday. The new Parliament will be convened 
Aug. 25, he said. 

Mrs. Kumaratunga said before the election 
that one of her priorities would be to end the war 
with the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam, who 
are fighting for a separate state for minority 
Tamils in the north and east. 

[The Tamil Tigers welcomed the new govern- 
ment and said they were ready to open peace 


talks, Agence France- Press reported from Co- 
lombo. “We are very, very willing and pleased to 
talk to Cbandrika and have a negotiated settle^ 
meat,” Anton Raja, a London-bored spokesman 
for the separatist group, said in an interview with 
BBC radio. He said the question of the Tigers 
Laying down arms would have to be discussed at 
the negotiating table.] 


A few weeks later, her mother, Sirimavo Ban- 
daraiurike, became the first woman in the world 
to be elected a national leader. Mrs. Bandara- 
naike served as prime minister twice: 1960-65 
and 1970-77. 


RWANDA: Pledge to Cooperate 


Cootiinied from Page 1 
vanoe of the rebel Rwanda Pa- 
triotic Front 

The Front is now in control 
of the country, from which mil- 
lions of people have fled. It says 
it will not exact revenge for the 
Hutu slaughter of at least half a 
million people, mostly Tutsi, 
beginning in ApriL 

Mr. Twagiramungu, himself 
a Hutu, heads a government ap- 
proved by the From. 

The French mil hand over 
surveillance of the zone to 
mainly African soldiers of the 
United Nations Assistance 
Mission in Rwanda. 

On Wednesday, about 130 
French soldiers left the town of 
Gikongoro in the zone, and 
control of about one-third of 
the area was transferred to 
Ghanaian UN peacekeepers. 
But Rwandans in the zone, in 
the southwest of their countiy, 
fear that the African force will 
not be able to guarantee their 
safety. 

Some 2.4 million Rwandans 
live in ihe area, including up to 
800,000 who fled there from 
elsewhere in the country during 
the dvil war. 

Mr. Twagiramungu said the 


zone had not enjoyed safety un- 
acn 


der the French presence. He 
said the Hum militia “has con- 
tinued to kill and terrorize the 
population.” 

^Factories, schools and hos- 
pitals have been looted and de- 
stroyed, and the people contin- 
ued to flee,” he said. 

Mr. Twagiramungu said his 
main priority was to encourage 
people to return home so he 
could begin the task of rebuild- 
ing. But be admitted that it was 
proving a hard task, despite vis- 
its to the zone by three of his 
ministers on Tuesday and 
Thursday to persuade Hutu 
that they would be safe. 

Thousands of Hutu are al- 
ready leaving and heading into 
eastern Zaire. On Thursday, the 
UN Rwanda Emergency Office 
reported further movements 


TERROR: 

Arafat Pledge 


CoetHmed from Page 1 


Prime Minister Yitzhak Ra- 
bin of Israel said Thursday that 
the Palestinian authority had 
yet to do its utmost to prevent 
attacks on Israelis. 


and said that up to a quarter of 
"left some 


the population had 
regions. 

Aid officials fear that panic 
coukl bring an exodus like that 
in which 1 million Rwandans 
flooded into the Zairian border 
town of Goma last month. 
Most are still there, despite ap- 
palling conditions. Diseases 
have killed 27,000 of them. 


CUBA: Florida Appeals for Help 


Cootiinied from Page 1 
explosive, administration offi- 
cials acknowledged. 

Slate Department officials 
said they see no sign that Mr. 
Castro has yet opened his coast- 
line to unrestricted exits, as he 
has threatened to da Bui the 
officials report that Cuba's 
coastal and land police are let- 
ting small groups leave unha- 
rassed. 

The Cuban Adjustment Act 
of 1966 grants refugee status to 
any Cuban who makes it the 
United Stales. 

Administration officials hint- 
ed that they might order Coast 
Guard cutters to turn able-bod- 
ied vessels around and send 


them back to Cuba. But when 
pressed, they admitted the poli- 
tics of such a move would be 
hazardous. 


Rafters interviewed in Miami 
and Key West said they knew 
that if they made it to the Unit- 
ed States, they would be wel- 
comed- 


Settling the issue directly 
with Mr. Castro seems not to be 
an option. President Clinton, 
who is on a long-term mission 
to woo Cuban-American vot- 
ers, seems unwilling to take the 
political risk of opening talks 
on such issues as food deliver- 
ies, which might make life un- 
der the dictatorship more toler- 
able. 


Earlier Thursday, Mr. Peres 
and Mr. Shaath, meeting in Al- 
exandria, said that education 
and cultural affairs would be 
turned over to the Palestinians 
on Aug. 29. 

The transfer will be the first 
extension of self-rule outside 
Gaza and Jericho. Israel and 
the PLO agreed to limited au- 
tonomy for Gaza and Jericho in 
their accord signed in May in 
Cairo. (AFP, AP, Reuters) 


Army Acts 
To Seal Off 


Union Sites 


In Nigeria 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

LAGOS — The police sealed 
off the headquarters of Nige- 
ria's three main labor groups on 
Thursday in another attempt by 
the military government to take 


over pro-democracy unions 
the nation 


that have paralyzed 
with strikes. 

Squads of police also were 
stationed at major intersections 
and bus terminals around La- 
gos, the center of the anti-mili- 
tary movement. 


But violence erupted else- 
where. About 5,000 pi 


Change of Guard in Sri Lanka 


Mrs. Kumaratunga is untried on the national 
political scene. 

In 1959, when she was 14, her father. Prime 
Minister Solomon Dias Banda ranaike. was as- 
sassinated by a Buddhist monk allegedly con- 
nected with a company the prime minister had 
decided to nationalize. 


people 

chanting anti-government slo- 
gans rioted in Benin, 245 kilo- 
meters (150 miles) east of La- 
gos, and set ablaze a hotel 
owned by Labor Minister Sam- 
uel Ogbemudia. 

In Kaduna, the political cen- 
ter of northern Nigeria, hun- 
dreds of people marched 
through the city in protest. 

Labor leaders said they were 
ignoring an announcement 
Wednesday by the bead of the 
military government. General 
Sani Abacha, that he would re- 
place the leaders of the two oil 
unions and the 5- million-mem- 
ber Nigeria Labor Congress 
with his own administrators. 

“We will fight to the last,” 
said Frank Kokori. general sec- 
retary of the National Union of 
Petroleum and Natural Gas 
Workers. “We must halt this 
arbitrary dictatorship." He said 
union leaders would meet se- 
cretly to plan a united response. 

The country has been in crisis 
since the militar y annulled a 
June 1993 presidential election 
apparently won by Moshood 
ICO. Abiola, a businessman. 

Mr. Abiola was arrested after 
declaring himself president to 
mark the fust anniversary of 
the election. Oil workers went 
on strike in protest on July 4. 

In his Wednesday broadcast. 
General Abacha said he would 
not Tree Mr. Abiola, who is on 
trial for treason, saying that de- 
cision would be up to military- 
appointed judges. 

General Abacha has been un- 
able to contain the effects of the 
strike. Nigeria’s oil exports 
have been cut in half, and there 
have been growing signs of an 
organized campaign of violence 
against the dictatorship. 

Oil industry sources said that 
whether workers would return 
to their jobs would not be 
known until Monday. 

Industry sources said Thurs- 
day that tankers were still load- 
ing at Nigeria’s largest termi- 
nals and there had been no 
immediate signs of an increase 
in strike action. (AP, Reuters) 





Vtodhmr Matai hi/ Agence France-Prene 


PLOWSHAJRES-TO-BE — A Russian senby guarding SS-18 missiles waiting to be destroy ed in Sinwatikha, war 
Nizhni Novgorod. Twenty-two of the missiles, which were each armed with 10 nuclear warheads, have been destroyed. 


What It Takes to Build an A-Bomb 


Ne*> York Tunes Service 


Obtaining a sufficient quantity of plutoni- 
um or highly enriched uranium may be the 
most difficult task facing a would-be bomb 
builder, but it is hardly the only chal l enge. 
Equally essential are a design, high explosives 
and advanced electronic equipment 


bombs are hollow spheres of plutonium, not 
quite concentrated enough to constitute the. 
“critical mass” needed to sustain a ch ain 


reaction. Conventional explosives, detonated 
with precise timing , squeeze the mass together 
quickly at the same instant that another de- 


The designs of bombs in government arse- 
nals, which aim to get the most explosive 
force from a quantity of fuel, are secret But 
the general principles for making a fission 
weapon are widely known among scientists. 
In 1978. an undergraduate at Princeton Uni- 
versity submitted a bomb design as a paper in 
a physics class; the UJ>. government said it 
would work and classified his paper. 

At the core of the simplest plutonium 


quickly 

vice in the bomb introduces neutrons to set 
off the chain reaction. 

Ur anium bombs can be erven simpler; the 
first one, which was not even field-tested 
before it was dropped on- Hiroshima 49 years 
ago this month, used something resembling 
an artillery piece to merge two masses of 
uranium and create a critical mass. 

A would-be bomb builder would also have 
to procure electronic devices. The sale of 
these devices are closely monitored by West- 
ern governments. . 


SOURCE: 




Pointing to Russia 


Confined from Page 1 


Weapon and Sensitive Export 
“ jubHshed by 


Status Report,” pubfist 
the Carnegie Endowment for 
International Peace and the 
Monterey Institute of Interna- 
tional Studies. 

Arzamas-1 6’s laboratories 
ftlan perform pure scientific re- 
search -with a wide variety of 
applications, as do comparable 
- U.S. nuclear weapons laborato- 
ries, according to European of- 
ficials and analysts. 

Chelyabinsk is a similar com- 
plex, containing plutonium and 
tritium production reactors, 
it fuel reprocessing and nu- 


x 


- rt ■’ ‘ 


fuel production equip- 


BOMB: Bonn Urges International Effort Beyoind EU 


Continued from Page 1 


gence aide, Bemd Schmid- 
bauer, prepared for a weekend 
trip to Moscow intended to 
forge closer cooperation be- 
tween Moscow and Bonn. 

Mr. Schmidbauer told ZDF 
television that the seizures of 
plutonium-239, an essential ele- 
ment in atomic weapons, and 
highly enriched uranium were 
only “the tip of the iceberg." 

“There have been about 300 
seizures of such nuclear materi- 
al in many countries in Europe, 
the least of all in Germany," be 
said. 


But the finds in Germany are 
the fust reported cases of weap- 
ons-grade material being smug- 
gled since the collapse of the 
former Soviet Union- 

Members of Parliament in 
Bonn, speaking after a meeting 
with Mr. Schmidbauer, said 
that developing nations seeking 
a nuclear capability seemed to 
be the final buyers in the shad- 
owy deals. 

“There are no indications 
that the buyers are terrorists or 
other people,” said Johannes 
Geister, a member of the parlia- 
mentary control commission 
that discussed nuclear smug- 


with Mr. Schmidbauer. 
can say is that they are 


states that want to 
atomic weapons,” be told ARD 
television on Wednesday. . ■ 
Berlin police made no anests. 
or seizures of radioactive mate- 
rials in their raids on Wednes- 
day. But Frank Thid, spokes- 
man for the city's Justice 
Ministry, said theyfounddocu- 
ments suggesting “thatplnteni- 
urn has been transported to Pa- 
kistan or that a transport was 
about to be made.** 

A Pakistani, two Poles and a 
German were questioned and 
later released. 


mmt that “is fed from 
. cycles, the nrititaiy and the ci- 
vilian," a European official 
said." 

Among several interlinked 
nuclear weapons facilities, in- 
cluding a warhead assembly 
plant, Ekaterinburg contains a 
scientific research institute with 
several -nuclear reactors and 
equipment to make highly en- 
riched nuclear fuel A gas cen- 


trifuge facility in the complex is 
i Surd susp< 


Iranian state radio, Hamas 
warned Mr. Arafat against dis- 
arming its militants. “If the dis- 
armament of Hamas members 
is aimed at stopping anti-Zion- 
ist operations, the people of 
Palestine will fight against au- 
tonomy just as they fought 
against the occupation,” said a 
Hamas spokesman, Ib rahim 
Ghoshe, speaking from Am- 
man, Jor dan _ 


“We know the Palestinians 
are still not working as energeti- 
cally as we would expect from 
them to preserve law and public 
order in Gaza and Jericho," Mr. 
Rabin said on Israel Radio. 
"They have the power to do 
more than they are doing” 

Israeli Army radio quoted 
Mr. Arafat as telling the legisla- 
tors that the Hamas activists 
who carried out a fatal attack 
Sunday were like Baruch Gold- 
stein, the Jewish settler who 
massacred 29 Palestinians in a 
Hebron mosque on Feb. 25. 

Mr. Arafat was also quoted 
as saying that Israel had offered 
to release all Palestinian securi- 
ty prisoners in exchange for a 
general amnesty for Palestin- 
ians who collaborated with Is- 
rael in the past. Mr. Arafat was 
considering the offer, the radio 
said. 


Seoul Intensities Crackdowns 


Beleaguered Students Perceive Police State Mentality 


By Andrew Pollack 

New York Tunes Service 

SEOUL — Kim Young 
Don. a 23-year-old senior at 
Sogang University, spent last 
weekend at a “pan-national” 
rally with thousands of other 
students, calling for reunifi- 
cation of the Korean Penin- 
sula and the expulsion of U.S. 
troops from South Korea. 

The police tried to break 
up the rally and clashed with 
students armed with sticks 
and stones. About 200 people 
were injured. Finally the po- 
lice dispersed the crowd by 
pouring tear-gas fluid on 
them from helicopters. 

[South Korean police offi- 
cers on Thursday formally 
charged 193 of the demon- 
strators with breaking nation- 
al security legislation. Agence 
France- Presse reported from 
Seoul.] 

"We do not think of the 
government as a democratic 
government,” Mr. Kim said. 
“If it were a real democratic 
government, people could 
come out with different 
views.” 

The student, a mass com- 
munications major, said the 
police were looking for him 
because he recently wrote an 
article praising the late North 
Korean leader, Kim n Sung. 
Such an act is illegal in South 
Korea. 


There is not a lot of sympa- 
thy in South Korea for such 
views on Kim II Sung. But 
some critics are beginning to 
question whether South Ko- 
rea should be pursuing stu- 
dents for expressing their 
opinions. 

The crackdowns, which 
have intensified since the 
North Korean president’s 
death last month, come as 
prospects are growing for an 
improvement in relations be- 
tween the two Koreas. One 
sign was the agreement 
reached last weekend be- 
tween the United States and 
North Korea on Pyongyang’s 
suspected nuclear weapons 
program. 

On the same day the dem- 
onstrators were gassed by he- 
licopter for espousing reunifi- 
cation, President Kim Young 
Sam proclaimed in a speech 
that “the Korean people can- 
not live divided forever.” He 
offered aid to North Korea if 
it would change its ways. 

The South has triumphed 
in the economic contest with 
the Communist North. But 
instead of basking in its vic- 
tory, some critics say, the 
South remains locked in a 
Cold War rivalry that com- 
pels it to act like a police 
State, harming its reputation 
abroad. 

The South Korean govern- 


ment maintains that the stu- 
dents and other dissidents are 
being directed by North Ko- 
rea to destabilize the South 
and often initiate violence 
Monday, radicals in Kwang- 
ju, a city in the southwest, 
bombed a police station. 

South Korea has along tra- 
dition of violent protests by 
students, and the spraying rtf 
tear gas is almost a political 
rite of passage. 

“Many of the good officials 
in our government have been 
demonstrators," said Koo 
Bon Tae, assistant minister of 
the National Unification 
Board. 

The protests have helped 
bring about democratic 
changes in South Korea. By 
all accounts, since the elec- 


tion a year and a half ago of 
! Young 


Kim Young Sam, the first ci- 
vilian president in more than 
three decades, the student 
movement has lost some of its 


vigor. 

Souk say it is 
that President Kim, wno was 
himself a dissident fighting 
the military dictatorships that 
once ruled South Korea, 
should be so harsh on the 
students. Some analysts here 
say it is simply politics. Con- 
servatives who revile North 
Korea and Kim II Sung form 
the base of support for Presi- 
dent Kim. 


In Islamabad, the Pakistani 
government denied on Thurs- 
day that it was linked to any 
conspiracy to smuggle plutoni- 
um from Germany. “We regret 
the statement made by Bonin 
state officials regarding an al- 
leged plot to ship^phitonhun to 
Pakistan," the Foreign Ministry 
said. “We note that no arrests 
have been made and no radio- 
active material 
“suspicion’ has bear 

“We categorically deny that 
any agency of the government 
of Pakistan has attempted to 
acquire the plutonium,” H said. 

German press reports said 
Thursday that North Korea or 
Iraq were to be supplied with 
wcapons-gradc plutonium by a 
German businessman from 
whom the German authorities 
seized such material in May. 


(Reuters, AP, AFP) 


the third suspected site bf the 
ptutonium’5 origin. 

... Here asm, similar complexes, 
tie said, “t have the impression 
that the distinction between ci- 
vilian and mflitaxy in Russia is 
hot all that elaborated.” 

The Clinton administration 
said Wednesday that it had no 
evidence to suggest any of the 
smuggled materials seized in 
Germany had come from Rus- 
sian nuclear weapons sites. 

The trans-Atlantic confusion 
-appears to arise at least in part 
from differences in interpreta- 
tion and emphasis among the 
wide range of nuclear scientists 
reviewing the results of highly 
complex tests. Testing of the 
seized materials is being done at 
Eura tom’s laboratory in Karls- 
ruhe, Germany. Both sides 
agree, however, that there is no 
evidence that any of the batches 
came directly from Russian nu- 
clear warheads. 

The scientific investigations 
are proceeding amid intense po- 
litical and diplomatic activity 
around the-smug^ing issue. 

European officials have gen- 
erally taken a hawkish fine, 
stressing the urgency of Rus- 
sian action against smugglers of 
weapons- grade materials. 


STREET 


il i.» > 


WIlGANi Concerns in the West 


■ i. 


Cbutfeued from Page 1 

porting Libya in its efforts to 
resolve, differences with West- 


Libya in the bombing of a 
American World Airways jet 
over Lockerbie, Scotland, in 
1988. 

The press agency finked this 
supposed Vatican asastance to 
Libya’s .condemnation of the 
Cairo document. 

The Vatican acknowledged it 
had had discussions with Liby- 
an officials, but denied there 
had been any quid pro quo ar- 
rangement. 


on 


Pope John Paul n has caflcd 

i -the'' 


MIDNIGHT: Republicans Attack Popular Program 


Coathmed from Page 1 
young people off the streets'and 
into something productive dur- 
ing those dangerous hours. 

Mr. Standifer died in 1992. 
but his idea grew. Now, there 
are Midnight Basketball 
leagues in 50 cities across the 
counUy and in Puerto Rico. 
About 900,000 youths partici- 
pate, according to Karen Stan- 
difer, his daughter-in-law. 

Stan Hebert, national direc- 
tor of Midnight Basketball Inc., 
said money in the crime bill 
would go toward establishing 
nighttime basketball leagues in 
more cities, finance expansion 
of existing leagues, many of 
which have more people inter- 


ested in playing than funds can 
support, and pay for uniforms, 
security, gym rental and educa- 
tional programs. 

The police chief of Prince 
Georges County, David B. 
Mitchell, who attended Tues- 
day night’s finals along with 
Representative Steny H. Hoyer, 
Democrat of Maryland, de- 
fends the program. 


little guidance in with its dose 
of diversion. Players are re- 
quired to attend weekly work- 
shops on everything from goal 
planning to sexually transmit- 
ted diseases. 

The local Midnight Basket- 
ball program gets by on a 


Georges 


grant i 
County 


leaders of the world's 
major religions, including Is- 
lam, and the principal -secular, 
slates to oppose the wording bf 
the UN document. But Vatican 
officials strenuously deny that 
they are seeking an affian ce 
with Islamic governments. 

' In another sign of success in 
the Vatican's campaign, leaders 
of the Al Azhar university in 
Cairo, a leading center bf Islam- 
ic learning, last week de- 
nounced the proposed United 
Nations document as offensive 
to Islam. 


and what it 


“The First year it was iraplc- 
iienardt 


men ted in Glenarden. in 1986. 
it reduced crime " he said. “I 
can tell you this much. If it were 
not for Midnight Basketball, we 
would have greater violence.” 

The program is designed to 
do more than sweep young peo- 
ple off the streets. It sneaks a 


can scrape up in corporate 
i. Karen 


, Standifer, 
iwarfed by the young men to 
whom die handed trophies and . 
certificates Tuesday night, said 
the league would continue, with 
or without crime-bill dollars. 

But with those dollars, she 
said, “we could offer our young 
men so much more.” 


Though the statement did not 
explicitly r 


ltural imperialism and a de- 
terminedly anti- Islamic force. 

.Indeed, in recent years the 
papacy has conducted an active 
diplomatic campaign in Islamic 
co untrie s, largely to protect the 
interests of Christian minor- 
ities. 

The UN document and the 
Cairo conference, which is 
scheduled for Sept. 5 to 13, are 
designed to urge countries to 
address population questions 
with renewed urgency, 
f g rammes strategies 

latiQa^whrel is expected**!© 
reach 8 j 5 trillion by the yeaij 
2025, up from 5.6 billion now, 
according to the 1994 report of 
the UN Populations Fund,! 
which was released Wednesday 
in London. 

The draft document for the 
Cairo conference, which en- 
compasses such topics as wom- 
en’s rights and teenage sexual-* 
ityi was bound to be 
controversial in the socially/ 1 
conservative- Islamic world. 

Is l a m ic radicals have begun 
using the conference to assail 
secular Arab 



mention the Vatican 
or" its- views, some of its lan- 
guage closely paralleled papal 
condemnations of the UN doo- 
nmenfs wording. 

Cooperation between the 
Vatican and Islamic radicals 
would be unusual because 
many of the radicals regularly 
vilify the Vatican in their pro- 


tion minister, maucr jvumnin,' 
sought to calm Islamic fears by. 
stressing. that the draft docu- 
ment did not violate Islamic 1 
morality. But in its statement^ 
Al Azhar said the document 
condoned extramarital sex and 
®asy abortion. 


“ 







lj* f &P 














N 



trr. 


« 'C s 


** 



#i' .^kwi.*? 

International Herald Tribune, Friday, August 19, 1994 


Page 9 



THE TRIB INDEX: 116 _ 

IntemaSonaJ Herald Tribune World Stock Index O, composed of 
280 internationally Investabte stocksfrom 25 .countries, complied 
by Bfcjomberg Business News. Jan. 1, 1992 =100. 
i2o~ — • ; 



M A 

M 

J - J - A 

. _ 1994 

| Asia/PaciHe 


Europe j 

. Approx. wetgbSng: 32% . 

Ckea 13439 Prw_-132JE 

B 

Approx wetyting: 37% . Ml 
ciosk iiaaaPw-- »a» 







““ M - A M J J 

A 

M A M J J A 
1994 

■ North America 


Latin America 

Approx weVtinp 26% 

Ctase: 94.55 Prev-: 85.10 ' 
150 


Appmx vetytinp 5% Bl 

Ctose: 141 AlPnvj 14083 QQ| 



77w txtex frocks US. aWfcr uetoes of stocks te Tofcyo, Nmr York, London, and 
Argentina, AnMi, Austria. Belgium, Brad, Canada, CNh, Donrarfe. Finland, 
Francs, Germany, Hong Kong, Italy, Mexico, Nattmtexfe, New Zealand Norway. 
Singapore, Spall), Sweden. CwlUarland and Venezuela. For Tokyo. Ns w York and 
London foe Max is cantxisad c* thu SD trp bargain tom>s of maria* capSa toe ticn, 
otherwise 2» ten tpp Mocks am tracked. 


| Industrial Sectors 1 


W* Pm. % 

Thu.' 

Pm. 

% 


eta* don eftng* - 

dan 

dan 

dmp 

Eiwgjr 

113.01 113.49 -0.42 ClpMGoo* 

11885 

11&2B 

+081 

unties 

130.05 129.43 -048 flnrlfcMata 

13388 

13387 

-0.14 

Ffawnea 

11880 11805 +084 Cnrenner Good* 

103.69 

10381 

+086 

Sanfctt 

.121.76 121 J4 +0.18 Waotimnm 

13281 

13289 

+0.17 

For mote hihxrriatbnaboal the MBX.abootM issva3sUefrgeofcbame. 


Write to Trib Index, 181 Annua Chutes deGauBe, 92521 NeuttyCedex, Fiance. 


OkaomeBomlFUmklTribuno 


India 

Pledges 

Reform 

Currency Bides 
On Verge of Shift 

By Kevin Murphy 

Inunrntkmal Herald Tribune 

NEW DELHI — Marking; an 
important step in its ambitious 
economic reform program, In- 
dia will complete apledge to the 
make the rupee fully convert- 
ible for most nonmvestmeat 
transactions "in the next few 
days," Finance Munster Man- 
mohan Singh said Thursday. 

“We promised we would 
make the currency convertible 
on current accounts, and we are 
about to do it,” Mr. Singh said. 
He parried growing criticism 
that India's economic meta- 
morphosis has lost momentum. 
“We will declare it formally in 
the next few days," he said. 

The policy shift removes the 
final restrictions on foreign ex- 
change transactions for trade, 
travel and consumer purchases, 
but leaves intact a system where 
government approval is required 
for remittance of investments 
and large-scale capital flows. 

“In two years' time, if our 
fiscal system responds well, 
then we will move in stages to- 
ward full capital convertiblity.” 
said Mr. Singh, who has steered 
India's economy from near 
bankruptcy to one where its 
currency has now become too 
strong for its own good. 

Three years after economic 
crisis prompted Mr. Singh and 
Prime Minister P. V. Narasimba 
Rao’s Congress Party to re- 
structure a heavily regulated 
economy with strong socialist 
overtones. 

Moves to lower tariffs and 
taxes, reform antiquated bank- 
ing and financial systems, pri- 
vatize parts of India’s massive 
public sector and-dismantle the 
“permit rag" system for private 
business that interfered in near- 
ly every aspect of industry, have 
prompted Mr. Singh to predict 

See INDIA, Page 11 


WALLSTREET WATCH 


What is Synergy Worth? 


By Floyd Norris 

New Yak Times Service . 

N EW YORK — If a company agrees 
to buy something fen 60 percent 
more than its market rvalue, does 
that make its stock worth more or 
less (ban it was before? In the case of Ameri- 
can Home Product^ the answer is more. 

Its successful bear bug of American Cyana- 
mid will cost it $9-7 billion in cash, or $3.6 
billion more than American Cyanamkl was 
worth before American Home Products made 
its intentions known era Aug. 2. ' 

percent o^^thc* market value of American 
Home Products* suxk before the takeover bid 
was initiated. If investees thought that they 
had fairly valued both companies before the 
deal, logic would indicate that American' 
Home Products* stock should plunge by 
about that percentage. 

But nothing of tbeldud has happened. Wall 
Street has pronounced this deal a good one 
for American Home Products. The compa- 
ny’s shares closed at $58,875 on the New 
York Stock Exchange on Thursday, down 
37.5 cents on the day but up $1,375 since 
Americas Home Products’ first bid for Amer- 
ican Cyan amid. • 

Nor was American Cyanamaf s stock ndicu- 
lously depressed before the deal It had risen 31 
percent smee the end of 1993 —partly because 
of leaks that a deal was in the works — -and was 
approaching the company's previous record 
price of nearly $67 a snare, set in 1991. 

That American Home Products’ stock 
could rise after the company paid a big premi- 
um is a tribute to the willingness of investors 


to again believe in synergy, as well as to the 
fact that American HomeProducts was hard- 
ly trading at a premium before the deal. 

- The company has been criticized on Wall 
Street for ineffective research in its effort to 
find new drugs. Its stock is now trading at 12 
times of the last 12 months, a modest 

multiple that reflects doubt on Wall Street 
about the company’s growth prospects. 

“We believe there will be significant syner- 
gies,” John R. Stafford, the chairman and 
chief executive of American Home Products, 
said. He pointed to combined research ef- 
forts, which he said might accomplish the 
same results witii less spending, and to sav- 
ings from combining marketing operations. 

The immediate effect of this deal, with its 
heavy interest charges, will be to dilute Amer- 
ican Home Products’ earnings- But Kristine 
Bryan, who follows the company for S.G. 
Warburg, said that even without synergy, the 
company would see its earnings per share 
recover to last year’s levels by 1996, adding 
that this could hapjjen as early as next year if 
there were savings m marketing costs. 

Wall Street wiD soon turn to other deals, 
happy with its profits from this one — a good 
deal for takeover speculators because Ameri- 
can Home Products was somehow persuaded 
to raise its bid to 5101 a share, from $95 a 
share, despite an absence of other bidders. 
The last price is more than double what the 
shares fetched only three months ago. 

But for shareholders of American Home 
Products, happiness will come only if this 
proves to be a case where American Cyana- 
mid was grossly undervalued before the bid- 
der appeared. If that is to be the case, some of 
its coming products will have to be big hits. 


YoHoHo and a PrinceHit 

U.S. Says China Is Vast Nest ol CD Pirates 


By Philip Shenon 

New York Tima Service 

SUZHOU, China --There 
is no telephone listing for the 
Suzhou Polydisk Factory. 
Visitors at the gate of the 
modem plant — sheathed in 
blue reflecting glass and rose 
marble — are met by an un- 
smiling guard who asi« them 
to leave. Now. 

“No photographs!" he says 
angrily, not far from a bid- 


board quoting China's su- 
preme leader, Deng Xiao- 
ping: “Science and 

technology are the No. 1 pro- 
ductive force." 

According to investigators 
working for American re- 
cording companies, the Suz- 
hou factory's owners are 
among the biggest pirates of 
compact disks in Asia. 

The United States esti- 
mates that Chinese piracy of 


copyrighted American prop- 
erty has cost its companies 
and performing artists about 
SI billion yearly. 

Little more than two 
months after President Bill 
Clinton renewed special trad- 
ing privileges for China, his 
administration is threatening 
to impose sanctions unless 
China closes 26 compact-disk 

See PIRACY, Page II 


Beijing Unit to Study 'Invisible’ Assets 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

BEIJING — China has established a na- 
tional agency to evaluate what it called “in- 
visible” assets such as the market value of 
patents, trademarks and copyrights, the Chi- 
na Daily said Thursday. 

The Liancheng Assets Investment Firm, 
formed by the Patent Office of China, began 
operations Wednesday as the country’s lead- 
ing authority on calculating the value of tech- 
nology, business credit, franchise rights, leas- 
ing rights and other types of so-called 
invisible assets. 

Evaluation of such assets had been the 
responsibility of local offices, which lacked 
the ability to provide national assessments. 


The liancheng director, Liu Wutaag, said 
his agency would handle all major evaluation 
work across the country. 

The lack of protection afforded to these 
invisible assets has resulted in losses of more 
than 500 bilHon yuan ($58 billion), the news- 
paper said. 

Beijing is engaged in a bitter dispute over 
protection of intellectual property rights with 
the United Stales, which has taken a first step 
toward imposing sanctions. 

In recent weeks China has tried to show 
that it is doing something to curb the pirates. 

f Bloomberg, AFX) 


Bundesbank 
Holds Back 
On Bate Action 


Even Banks Abandon Bonds 


By Carl Gewirtz 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Banks played a 
major role in trying to stabilize 
bond prices early this year, buy- 
ing securities when everyone 
else was selling, but even they 
appear to have withdrawn from 
the market after having suf- 
fered laqge losses, the Bank for 

International Settlements re- probably large in' the second 


tors’ sales of securities than they 
bad been in the first quarter. 

“Indeed, second-quarter data 
for some countries snow net do- 
mestic securities sales by 
banks." 

However, given develop- 
ments in the currency markets, 
the BIS estimates that “cross- 
border net basking flows were 


ported Thursday. 

The Basel-based institution, 
which monitors international 
banking and financial market 
developments, credits the banks 
for helping to steady the dollar 
by shifting deposits to the Unit- 
ed States. This activity was 
heavy during the Hist three 
months of the year and appears 
to have continued during the 
second quarter. 

Prdiroinaiy data for the sec- 
ond quarter, the BIS said in its 
analysis of firet-quarter activity, 
indicate that “banks appear to 
have been considerably less ac- 
tive as counterparties to inves- 


quarter. 

Although the dollar dropped 
8 percent against the yen in the 
first quarter, the fall presum- 
ably would have been Digger if 
Japanese banks had not export- 
ed a record $77 5 billion during 
the period. That amount was 
“nearly equivalent to the sum of 
the surplus on current account 
and of net inflows of portfolio, 
direct investment and other 
capital" 

The bulk of this outflow re- 
flected a $59.1 billion repay- 
ment of loans by banks in Ja- 
pan and $18.4 billion 
represented “large-scale rede- 


I of the country’s 
foreign exchange inflows." 

Banks in Japan increased 
their lending to U.S. banks by 
$13.4 billion “thus contributing 
to the financing of the external 
imbalance between the two 
countries,” the BIS noted. 

In all, U.S. banks imported 
$34.8 billion during the first 
quarter. “The inflows reflected 
not only banks' purchases of 
UJ5. securities sold by interna- 
tional investors, but also the re- 
depositing of foreign exchange 
reserves held by certain foreign 
authorities." die report said. 

In the second quarter, the 
dollar fell another 23 percent 
against the yen. 

The dollar’s fall against the 
Deutsche mark totaled 10.3 
percent, and the bulk of this — 
6.8 percent — occurred in the 
second quarter. 

While the report does not es- 
timate the amount of bonds 
that banks bought in the first 

See BANKS, Page 10 


By Brandon Mitchener 

fntenuaional Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — The 
Bundesbank on Thursday left 
German monetary policy on 
hold for at least another two 
weeks, although it had several 
plausible reasons to nudge the 
country’s interest rates lower. 

The central bank left its key 
discount unchanged at 43 per- 
cent and its Lombard rate at 6 
percent, dashing hopes of quick 
economic stimulus. It also sur- 
prised many analysts by setting 
its securities repurchase rate at 
4.85 percent for another two 
weeks as well. 

The discount rate sets the 
floor on shon-term rates, while 
the Lombard rate is effectively 
the ceiling. The market-sensi- 
tive repo rate, which is usually 
determined by auction, has 
been locked at 4.85 percent for 
four weeks. 

European stocks and bonds 
and the dollar fell in the wake of 
the Bundesbank announce- 
ment, which came amid publi- 
cation of several economic indi- 
cators the central bank might 
otherwise have used to justify a 
change in rates. The Bundes- 
bank last cut its discount and 
Lombard rates May 13. 

Economists said a recent 


slowdown in inflation and in 
inflationary money supply 
growth were apparently not 
enough to command the 
Bundesbank’s immediate atten- 
tion. 

“They're under no great pres- 
sure to do anything, so they did 
something that keeps their op- 
tions open," said Richard Reid, 
senior economist in Germany 
with UBS Phillips & Drew. 

“1 think they'll wait for more 
inflation figures and data on the 
economy" before considering 
another easing, agreed Stefan 
Schneider, an economist with 
S. G. Warburg in Frankfurt. 
"Markets are extremely vola- 
tile, and the Bundesbank is 
probably doing well to ply a 
steady course." 

Despite its stand-pat stance, 
the Bundesbank was doubtless 
encouraged by another decline 
in its principal barometer of in- 
flation, M-3 money supply 
growth, to 9.9 percent in July 
from 11.4 percent in June ana 
13.4 percent in May. It was the 
first time the seasonally adjust- 
ed figure had been in single dig- 
its since December. M-3 in- 
cludes cash in circulation, sight 
deposits, time deposits under 

See RATES, Page 10 


U.S. Trade Gap Narrowed in June 


Compiled hy Our Staff From Dispatches 

WASHINGTON — The 
U.S. trade deficit narrowed for 
the first time in three months in 
June, edging down to $937 bil- 
lion from a revised $9.52 billion 
in May, the government said 
Thursday. 

Exports rose 3.6 percent, or 
$2 billion, to a record $58.17 
billion, led by sales of aircraft, 
telecommunications and com- 

Renewed inflation fears jolt both 
bonds and stocks. Page 1ft. 

puter equipment. Imports grew 
2.8 percent, or $1.86 billion, to 
$6734 billion. 

Most of the import gain re- 
flected rising oil prices, but, 
added Commerce Secretary 
Ronald H. Brown, “the volume 


March, an unsettling develop- 
ment as the SepL 30 deadline 
approaches for possible puni- 
tive U.S. trade sanctions 
against Tokyo. The deficits 
with the European Union and 
China also grew in June. 

The strong June export figure, 
along with recent increases in 
retail sales and retail inventories, 
suggests that the government 
may need to revise upward its 
estimate of economic growth in 
the second quarter, said Robert 
Dederick, chief economist at 
Northern Trust Co. 

At the current pace, the 1994 
trade deficit is on target to 
surge to about $141 billion, the 
largest since 1987, a Commerce 
Department analyst said. 

The merchandise trade defi- 
cit with China widened to $2.46 


In Lhe North American free 
trade zone, the trade surplus 
with Mexico shrank to $198 
milli on in June from $353 mil- 
lion in May. 

(Bloomberg, A P) 


Volkswagen Narrows 
Loss on Higher Sales 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatcher 

WOLFSBURG, Germany — Volkswagen AG. Europe's 
largest automaker, said Thursday it had returned to profit- 
ability in the second quarter and had reported a sharply 
narrower loss for the first half of the year as sales improved, 

The company said it earned 133 million Deutsche marks 
($86 million) in the three months. For the first six months of 
1994, VW lost 209 million DM, compared with a loss of 1.6 
billion DM billion in the same period a year earlier. 

Sales in the first half rose to 40.88 billion DM from 38.41 
billion DM, boosted by rising overseas demand, while domes- 
tic demand began to recover from last year’s downturn. 

Sales In France, Denmark and Spain got a boost from 
government incentive programs to dispose of old cars and 
purchase new ones.In the United States, sales more than 
doubled to 56.570 units. 

The better-than-expected improvement reflects a recovery 
in Europe's auto market, which shrank 15 percent last year. 

Although VW continues to forecast a breakeven result in 
the group for 1994, analysts said the group net profit figure 
could reach between 300 million and 340 million DM. 

They cite the company's aggressive cost-cutting measures 
as well as a pick up in demand for cars as the key factors 
behind the group’s huge swing out of losses this year. 

Keith Ashworth-Lord, an analyst at Daiwa Institute in 
London, said, “There are still a number of questions over the 
company, although it's probably the besL recovery stock in the 
industry." 

Volkswagen share prices ended at 508.50 DM, down from 
513.00 on Wednesday. (AP, Reuters, Bloomberg) 


of ofl imports also increased to ^9° dming june from $232 
;«e iitoKocf ” biluon m 


its highest level ever. 

“Strong growth of imports of 
capital goods suggests that the 
capacity is expanding, and the 
continuing increases in exports 
in spite of sluggish growth 
abroad suggests that U.S. com- 
petitiveness is strong,” Mr. 
Brown said. 

The trade deficit in goods 
with Japan was the largest since 


May as imports 
climbed 16 percent to a record 
high. 

The trade deficit with the Eu- 
ropean Union widened to $132 
billion in June from $988 mil- 
lion in May. Although the econ- 
omies of western Europe are 
recovering from recession, traf- 
fic in U.S.-made goods declined 
in June. 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


Crots Rates Aug. ib 

I ( DM. FF. Ura OJF1 W. IF, w CT HKh 

Imifcrrtnm US 241 MB 540 • UK ’ US* U9 US* 

sS m sue usr xbb-mk — aue asm am sue- 

ESJSSrt Tie* ura — urn asm- um urn* ura i»* un uw 

,-r __ a X ttm was um *a van ten znt axu* 

-mm «u * at* un* we um tut man* «uu — - 
3Z,” ,«,« iguAs at» — mn nuts un* is ns usuo tub 

SSvorktM — una Uffl uuaio- IBB u uw n» w M 

NMYOtttN _ ^ ftSMf* U6 U0 un SWI* U93 U»* 

una tSOO 4152 Wl UE SW* 3*® 7*55 ■ — 72X UM 

I*". 1 , w un i» osm- nw u»* u w um- — u** 

ISST S um IM DM Old* w* am* — ub* asm uas* 

inm ua M ua u« ussn 1 M SWJ WU mm uw uffl 

ISM IS 0WJ 0311 W 

CMWf to Amsterdam Itow rare, London one, Zorich. HM U adwr canton; Toronto 
round: b: To bur one dodorr unlH U MW HA: nat mated; *A: 

mfg HB Wn 

'buwr Daiter VrIors 

Currency PWi 
Ortckdrac. SUM 

hmkwi txm 

HMHLftrtHf TK* 

MMbivmi 31.M 
m «.iww> tvau 
irtmc MS* 

Wad tsm. XOK 
Omani Anar GJStt 
MaJa«.riM. ZB St 


Eurocurrency DeposKs 

Swtu 

Donor D-Mark Franc 

Sterling 

French 

Franc 

Yen 

Aug. 18 

ecu 

1 month 


4V-49h 

♦4ft 

S’*** 

S *-4 *- 

2 w2 »- 


3 month* 

4K-5 

4 1*4 

4MV, 

5 VS* 

5*lrS». 

2«r2V- 


4 months 


47%-5 

4ft4ft 



2VV2-. 

UM'A 

inar 

DkJU 

5avS+V 

4*4 Ih 




4*4* 


Sources; Reuters, uoras flout 

flutes airtfcaMr (o interbank deeadts of a mttdon mhdanm tv equhaOeM). 


Key Monty Ratos 


Cormocr 


luatnLi 

MUr.xMN. 

■mdlfttfl 

mbit 

CmhksraM 

MMiferm 

emt.Rmnd 


Port 

asm 

us* 

won 

IPO 

USD 

3UM 

4.M4 


Currency **r» 
MO.MM ' UD 
MLZeofenMll 1*0 
Wrw.mM MOSS 
HUM UK 

paattncMV rasa. 
Perttsam isos 
fetcinMe muff 
Santflrtval 373 
Stas 


Currency PW* 

S. Aft", rand 1S» 
"UCor.ma 80370 
swadftrm 7JM3I 
Taiwan £ 2U7 

TbalMIM S B2 

Turtt*Hra 11330- 
1 v am atrium isnr 

Vmo.MHv. 1WLD0 



Close Prey. 
3 Vs 3ft 

7* 7*i 

IH COO 
4J38 434 

545 Sffi 
I 4J2 4J6 

sat «s 

\ 4.19 6.15 

£M M4 
> iW US 

» 7.27 7.17 

id 7M 7 JO 

Kcourmetisi 3J0 

1% 1* 
2JQ um 

2K 

214 714 


ftrttntn 


Bank mm rale 

M 

5ft 

Can mein 

4ft 

540 

Vfimm WarfeaA 

5 ft 

5ft 

ImMtft Interbank 

5ft 

5ft 

♦aoRmtotertaak 

MB 

5ft 

10-ytir Gflt 

France 

Ui 

Ml 

lirtWvenHM rate 

540 

540 

CaB money 

5ft 

5 ft 

1 -month lainn>n 

5ft 

5ft 

Vntaatt hrtertxmK 

5ft 

5ft 

♦moan MtertanR 

5ft 

Sft 

10 -year oat 

745 

7J3 

Source s; Reuter s, 

I 

I 

1 

to 

Lynch, Bank at Tokyo, Camnertbank, 
Greenmail Montagu. Crdau Lytmnus. 


Gold 


JONfloy fW WW 

ism ut* 4 i.wn 

R.M 9W1 9X30 


Forward Ratos 

SSm* u5 i.ww 

SSSS2 13C7 ism *■ 

t nil. iLiniu 1 S» L2MS UK 

iNUewoK runiktarutsftsJ: Banco Ca umt mvt a ieiieaana 

(Tanuimi; IMF tsom. other dutotom Neman moMr, 


♦niKMItt Ut&fOTRK , 

2ft 

Sft 


AM. 

PM. 

arw 

lljyaar Gayamment band 



larkh 

378JB 

3BL58 

+ 115 

Oonaamr 



Comtoa 

mss 

3BQM 

+ 145 

Una hart rot* 

(M 

6JOO 

New York 

30240 

315.90 

+340 


Gent 

i-« ^[jimupir 


sraa u» 

5JB 5JB0 
5.05 SJB 
724 721 


US. dotton ear ounce. LandonoffWQiftx- 
ktus; ZUNOi and New York onenina and dos- 
toaartasu New vert comer iDecemax.l 
Source: Re idem. 


Whatk in a Name? 
Not £11.5 Billion, 
Reports Lloyd’s 

Bloomberg Business News 

LONDON — Lloyd’s of 
London is looking for £1 1 .5 bil- 
lion of underwriting capacity 
for 1995, but the so-called 
names who have to supply the 
funds say they do not expect 
more than £103 billion to be 
available. 

“I’ll be gobsmacked if 
names’s capacity is £103 billion 
($16 million),” said Chris 
Hitchings, insurance analyst at 
UBS Ltd. 

Mr. Brawn added that man- 
aging agents for Lloyd's insur- 
ance syndicates were talking to 
merchant banks. 

Alistair Kelsey of the corpo- 
rate membership unit at Lloyd’s 
said there may be an additional 
£100 million to £200 million 
from corporate investors this 
year. 


+ 


HELLENIC REPUBLIC 

MINISTRY OF TOURISM 


INVITATION TO SHOW INTEREST IN THE 
DEVELOPMENT OF CASINO AND MARINA ENTERPRISES 
IN THE LAND AND SEA AREA OF PHLISVOS, ATTIKI 


(Ministerial Decision 13*4/1994 
Government Gazette 615B/T994) 

Interested parties are hereby Invited to take delivery of the particulars of a 
competff ion for the award to the highest bidder of the development of the sea and 
land areas of Phllsvos, Attiki, as those are defined in the joint ministerial deci- 
sion of the Ministers of Tourism and of Environment, Planning and Public Works 
(Joint Ministerial Decision 73637994, Government Gazette 827/5/79941. 

The development of the following Installations and buildings is permitted in 
the land area, in accordance with the site construction terms laid down by the 
ioint ministerial decision: 

[a] Construction of marina management offices and marina support premises. 
El A 4000 - seat conference centre. 

E] A luxury hotel with a maximum capacity of 300 beds. 
m A casino with a total floor area of T8.000 square meters. 

El Open-air car parks to international specifications. 

03 Landscaping of the surrounding gardens and other omementaJ work. 

In the sea area, the award will provide for completion of the work already In 
progress and the construction and operation of the marina to international speci- 
fications. 

The competition will be conducted under the terms and conditions laid down 
by decision of the Minister of Tourism no. 920A994 (Government Gazette 422B), 
in conjunction with Law 2206/94, Article 57 of Law 222 4/94, and Low 2760/1993, 
Article 30ffsi as those have been supplemented by decision no. 1364/1994 of the 
minister of Tourism and Joint Ministerial Decision no. 7363/1994. 

investors wishing to take part in the competition may obtain the necessary 
defails as of the date of publication of the present notice in the Press, from the 
following address: 

MINISTRY OF TOURISM 

SECRETARIAT OF THE INTERNATIONAL COMPETITION FOR THE 

CONCESSION OF CASINO LICENSES TO THE HIGHEST BIDDERS 
2 Amerikis Sf. Tel.: 3221239 - Fax: 3232605 
5fll floor, Offices 57 7-57 S 
105 64 Athens, Greece. 





i 






Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 1994 




market diary 


Tumbling Bonds 
Force Stocks Down 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

NEW YORK -Stocks fol- 
lowed bonds lower Thursday 
after a regional economic report 
reignhed inflation fears. 

Even technology stocks, 
which had been buoyant after a 
sharp runup in International 
Business Machines, lost steam. 
The Dow Jones industrial aver- 

U.S. Stocks 

age closed 21.05 points lower at 
3.155.43. Declining issues led 
advancers by about 7 to 5 on 
the New York Stock Exchange. 

The price of the benchmark 
30-year Treasuiy bond tumbled 
1 5/32 point, to 100 3/32. for a 
yield of 7.49 percent, up from 
7.39 percent 

Bonds were pressured by a 
Philadelphia Federal Reserve 
report that said prices paid by 
manufacturers in eastern Penn- 
sylvania, Delaware and south- 
ern New Jersey rose to a five- 
year high in July, while the 
gauge of prices paid to them 
also rose sharply. 

The report fueled fears that 
the Federal Reserve’s half-per- 
centagc-point increase in short- 


term interest rates Tuesday 
would not be enough to curb 
inflation and that the central 
bank would have to tighten 
credit wain, possibly as soon as 
September. 

Cyclical stocks and those de- 
pendent on lower interest rates 
fell, including General Motors, 
which lost 1 to 50, and Ford, 
which fell % to 29%. 

Among individual issues, 
IBM rose 1% to 66 % in active 
trading after Merrill Lynch 
raised its earnings estimate for 
the company’s third quarter. 

Coca-Cola rose 1% to 47% 
after the investor Warren Buf- 
fett disclosed Wednesday he 
had bought 4.9 million more 
shares of the company, raising 
his slake to 7.75 percent. 

Lotus Development plunged 
4 7/16 to 41 5/ 16 after an ana- 
lyst at Adams, Harkncss & Hill 
cut its earnings estimate for the 
software maker. 

Mylan Labs jumped 2% to 
26% cm a buy recommendation 
from Kidder Peabody. 

LM Ericsson's American de- 
spositary receipts rose 2% to 54 
after the company reported 
strong earnings for the first 
half. (AP, Bloomberg, Reuters) 




Ajj. 18 


RATES: Bundesbank Sits Still 


Continued from Page 9 
four years and most savings ac- 
counts. 

The main reason for July’s 
deceleration in money supply 
growth, the Bundesbank noted 
with evident pleasure, was 
“suiging monetary capital for- 
mation,” a move into the kind 
of long-term investments that 
do not fuel inflation. 

Many economists have ar- 
gued that the Bundesbank's im- 

Forelgn Exchange 

position of relatively high 
short-term interest rates follow- 
ing German unification back- 
fired by encouraging a shift 
from long-term investments to 
shorter-term instruments, 
which are counted in M-3 and 
are thought to fuel inflation. 

The Bundesbank singled out 
that phenomenon as a new sub- 
ject for its preventive monetary 
medicine in April and had been 
waiting for signs that its efforts 
would have the desired effect 

On Wednesday, the Frank- 
furter Allgemeine Zeitung 
quoted an unidentified central 


bank governor as saying Ger- 
many’s parliamentary elections 
on Oct 16 might indirectly en- 
courage the Bundesbank to cut 
interest rates sooner than it oth- 
erwise would have. 

“We can’t cut interest rates 
two or three weeks before the 
elections, because that could 
leave the impression we favor a 
certain political camp,” be was 
quoted as saying. 

■ Dollar Under Pressure 

The dollar fell more than a 
yen Thursday in New York af- 
ter the United States reported 
its widest trade deficit with Ja- 
pan since March, raising con- 
cern that Japanese exporters 
would sell dollars, Bloomberg 
Business News reported. 

Concern about the deficit 
grew when Commerce Secre- 
tary Ronald H. Brown called 
the trade gap “way too high.” 

The dollar ended at 98.595 
yen, down from 100.14 yen 
Wednesday, and at 1.5437 
Deutsche marks, down from 
1 .55 16 DM. It also fell to 5 3000 
French francs from 53275 and 
to 1.2965 Swiss francs from 
13035. The British pound rose 
to SI 3492 from $13415. 


The Dow 



F tt A M J J A 

vast. 


Dow Jones Averages 


Open Utah Low Lata Ora. 

Indus 3749.48 3776.08 3747.28 3751.0—21.05 
Trans 161103 1 41 1 J7 1 PI .1 7 1 583.70 — 1 7.94 
Util 187.12 187.78 1B6J7 1844* — 1 08 
Coma im.2j ijuJ7 imir i*nji— lum 


S t an da r d A Door’s Indexes 


Industrials 

Trans* 

utilities 

Pfaance 

SPS80 

SP 1D0 


HU# Lew O me CTTge 
SCM SOUS 5*2.10 — 1J4 
RR 375J2 J7X01 —5.96 

158.15 15633 15645 — 1.50 
45.72 4544 4549—033 

05.17 *4130 *6117 -100 

490.16 426.98 427*2—234 


NYSE Indexes 


Composite 

industrials 

Trann, 

Utility 

Fmanca 


HW> Law Lad dm. 

25640 255.10 250*7 —an 
317** 315.76 31634 —0.70 
24405 241.22 24144 —111 
JII.04 808.97 20931 — 1.73 
315.13 714*1 214.14 —a» 


IKT 


NYSE Most Actives 



VOL HtOb 

Low 

Lost 

Chs. 

TelMev 

43019 ASft 

44ft 

65ft 

V. 

IBM 


OSH 

U>4 

-1H 

CocaO 


46ft 

47* 

-1ft 

Genes 

39909 47ft 

46ft 

47ft 

—ft 

Merck 

31892 34ft 

33ft 

33ft 

—ft 

Fords 

32787 30ft 

29ft 

29ft 

—ft 

Mylan 

71807 26ft 

24ft 

26 ft 

-2ft 

Com paws 

30078 37ft 

37 

J7V. 


AT&T 

30010 53ft 

52 V) 

STft 

—ft 

GnMotr 

19767 51ft 

49ft 

50 

—1 

Glaxo 

19751 19ft 

19ft 

19ft 

-ft 

ACvon 


96 

96 

— V. 

Chrvter 


<7ft 

47ft 

-1 

JavTeti 


lift 

lift 

- 1ft 

Pfieer 

18(66 Mte 

66ft 

60ft 

- IVj 


NASDAQ Most Actives 


SeMtadia 
CISCO 5 
Lotus 
Intel 

MIc sfls* 

Amgen 

LDDSl 

Mow! 

ChrmSi 

Crudes 

SkySOen 

TdCmA 

ErtcTd 

3Com 


VOL Mob 

Law 

Last 

Ota. 

1U5213 Pm 

4 

7V„ 


71933 24ft 

23 ft 

23ft 


65903 45 

40ft 

41V., 

-67, , 

53554 64ft 

62ft 

6 3»m 


38861 17 

16ft 

16ft 

♦ ft 

38200 56ft 

55ft 

55ft 

— H 

37102 57ft 

54ft 

55ft 



27229 I5W 
26754 896 
26586 41 
74276 ft 
24012 zm 
23341 55 
23048 5946 


23 V* 
149b 
75. 
39 Vi 
4a 
23% 
53'* 
57 1 * 


B'.. 
40 Vi 
li 
294 
54 
599, 


- 2 ta 


AMEX Most Actives 


V0L Hfh Law Last Oft 


XCLLM 

9749 

IV* 

Tftt 

1'ft 

—ft 

SPOR 

6300 46V* 

44' Ve 

46-'%. 

—Vi 

NY Tim 

6050 24ft 

2* 

24ft 



GrsyLne 

5787 

5ft 

4ft 

4ft 

— ft 

TSF 

5078 

6 

5ft 

6 

-ft 

ToeSree 

4828 

Oft 

6 

6ft 

- 

RovceOg 

6757 

4Vft 

3-V., 

4 


PegGM 

4686 

14ft 

14ft 

14ft 

- ft 

EcnoBoy 

4490 

lift 

11 

11 

-ft 

VkJCB 

4291 

36ft 

35'i 

35+4 

—ft 


Market Seles 


Today 


NYSE 

Amox 


1588 

29573 


3764)9 

17JZ2 

33531 


NASDAQ Indexes 


Composite 

mdusn-ioB 

Bantu 

Insurance 

finance 

Tramp. 


Mteti 

Low 

Lost 

Chu. 

744.51 

74000 

741.38 

—128 

74X14 

73900 

73900 

—109 

776-49 

77404 

775.9J 

—038 

973 77 

716.05 

9214* 

-407 

951.96 

948.95 

951.9* 

♦ X27 

72X40 

719.09 

71 9 JO 

-1.04 


AMEX Stock Index 


tflgti Low Lost Ora. 
444.95 44038 44155 —139 


Dow Jones Bond A 


20 Bonds 
Hi Utilities 
10 Industrials 


Cfttae 


9786 — t 


NYSE Diary 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total issues 
NewHfefts 

New Lows 


888 

1303 

671 

2863 

43 

33 


1190 

963 

707 

2860 

63 

25 


AMEX Diary 


Advened 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total issues 
New mans 
Now Lows 


246 

336 

241 

823 

14 

14 


305 

246 

241 

812 

16 

14 


NASDAQ Diary 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total issues. 
New Highs 
New Lows 


1537 

1580 

1948 

5093 

105 

S3 


1707 

1383 

1918 

5088 

131 

58 


Spot Commodities 


Commodity Today Pm. 

Aluminum, lb 0A64 0658 

Copper elect r olytic lb 1.13 1.13 

iron FOB, ion 21308 213.98 

LeacLRs 038 038 

Silver, troy az 5.165 5125 

Steel I scrap). Ion 11707 J 19.67 

Tin. lb 33667 35203 

Zinc, lb 04652 64641 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


Metals 


Srward 


dose Prevlow 

BM Ash BM Ask 

ALUMINUM OIWlCfwM) 

Dolton per metric Ion 
5P0t 3461,50 146250 14050 144950 

forward 14968B 14*1.00 T47L00 147850 

PPHR CATHODM (HUB OrwW 
pet nwmc ton 

241150 241100 239950 140150 
242590 242600 241142) 24T2JW 

LEAD 

Pallors per m et r i c l u n 

SMt 57450 57550 547JW SUM 

Forward S9200 5S3J10 58100 58600 

NICKEL 

DoUwi pgr metric im 

577550 578100 561100 561&JU 
.. . JS60JM 5B7DJOO 570600 57MLM 

TIN 

DOHoniw iratrlc ton 
Spot 5223410 523500 51B5L00 519600 

Forward 530X00 5310JW 5245J0 527030 

ZINC especial MSB erode) 

Dolton per metric ion 

S«0t 9*550 94650 93950 94050 

Forward 969.00 970410 9644)0 9654)0 


Financial 

HWl LOW CMM CIKmsc 
8*160 NTH STERLING (LIFFE) 

(509590- Ptso< TtOpd 


SCP 

M21 

94.14 

94.18 

+002 

Dec 

9302 

9323 

9X31 

—005 

Mot 

9176 

9158 

9164 

—0.10 

Jun 

9125 

rm, 

03.10 

■ —0.12 

Sep 

91 J9 

9102 

9106 

— 0.12 

Dec 

9101 

9125 

9129 

-012 

Mar 

9120 

9096 

9UM 

—015 

jun 

9101 

SB40 

9003 

—0.17 

Sep 

9078 

9043 

9006 

—017 

Dec 

9061 

90*8 

9050 

—017 

Mar 

9003 

9037 

9029 

— 0.16 

Jan 

m«g 

9023 

SM 

— 0.13 

Est. volume: TUBS. Open Int: 537.031. 


3-MONTH EURODOLLARS (UFFB7 

n mutton -pis or m pa 
sep 
Dee 
Mar 
JHO 

“ILt. 


9407 

9407 

9407 

—002 

N.T. 

N.T. 

9420 

—OH 

N.T. 

N.T. 

9305 

— 009 

N.T. 

H.T. 

*302 

— 0.11 

N.T. 

N.T. 

9135 

— 010 

ie: 50 Open Int.: 

: «Mu 



SCP 

95.13 

9501 

9S04 

— 002 

DOC 

94.93 

9400 

9403 

— 003 

Mar 

MAS 

9408 

9402 

—005 

JOT 

9407 

94.11 

94.15 

— 006 

Sen 

9004 

7X78 

9300 

— 0J» 

doc 

9X65 

9300 

9X52 

— 007 

MO- 

9301 

9X30 

9X32 

— 007 

JOT 

9321 

93.11 

9X11 

— 007 

SOP 

9301 

9X93 

9X04 

— 007 

Dec 

9202 

9X78 

9224 

— 008 

Mar 

9X67 

9X67 

9Z63 

— 006 

JOT 

9202 

9X09 

9308 

— 007 


Eta. volume: T76061 Open ML: 789497. 

Sep 9433 94.17 96T7 —043 


Dec 

MOT 

Job 


9342 

9152 

9023 

9256 

9255 

9255 

9239 


9366 

9338 

93419 

9253 

9259 

9244 

9138 


9334 — B06 

9345 — tUJ7 

93.15 — SU59 

9258 —0.10 

9263 —0.11 

9248 —0L10 

9251 —0.11 


Eta. volume: 79489. Open lnt_- 195598. 
LONG GILT tumn 
SS8480 • Pts A 33nds of 188 pet 
Sep 101-16 10046 100-19 —042 

Dec 10745 10040 10049 —040 

EM. volume: 70700 Open ML: 111587. 
GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND I LIP PH} 
DM 29MM - pts of 100 pet 
Sop 9152 9158 9147 + 0.13 

Dec mM 9055 9052 +0.15 

Eta. volume: 181535. Open ML: 1695S5 
10- YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MATIF) 
FF50M08 - Pta ollEO 3d 


SOP 

11428 

11304 

11332 

—090 

Dec 

113.18 

11224 

11X48 

—008 

M«r 

11X54 

111.96 

11104 

—008 

Jot 

N.T. 

N.T. 

11122 

—0.90 


Est. volume: 2251 XI. Open ML: 130Z7OL 


Industrials 

Hkt Low Lata Self It arte 
GASOIL fIFE) 

U5L donors per metric ton-lot* of loo-tans 
SOP 15323 15250 15225 15325 + 225 

Oct 15750 155.75 15600 15635 + 240 

MO* 15925 15800 15X75 13X75 +225 

Dec 16100 16025 16025 16050 + 225 


Jan 

Feb 

Mar 

& 


him low Lem some arts 

18300 141.75 1622S 16125 +225 





16125 16. _ . 

N.T. N.T. N.T. 1. 

N.T. N.T. N.T. I; 

15725 15650 15059 . 

Est volume: KU46 . open Ini. itt.192 
HINT CRUDE OIL tlPEJ 
ulaoUWi Mil 1 Uui uHoH 0* 1 J00 DaiToti 
OO 17.10 1054 1456 1425 —049 

Nov 17.10 1643 1063 108* —044 

PM 174)6 1627 1068 1048 -037 

Jan 174)1 1646 1AM MM —024 

Feb 1625 M90 1625 IAS -0A 

Mdr 16J0 1A80 1A80 1AM -020 

a— • N.T. NX N.T. 1A50 —020 

MOD 1AM 1AM 1045— MB 
N.T. N.T. N.T, 1AM —020 

N.T. N.T. N.T. 1AM —020 

N.T. N.T. N.T. 1A50 — 020 

N.T. N.T. N.T. 1050 -030 


May 

Jun 

Jl* 

AW 

Sop 


Eta. volume: 33S4 . 0«n hd. 1&W 


Stock Indaxss 

Him Low Close Cfiaape 

FTSE IN (LIFFE) 

05 per liidn pom 

SCP 32183 31 0941 31994 ' — U 

Dee 32240 32144) 32134) — 8J) 

Mur N.T. N.T. 32314 _ —84 

Eta. volume: 11438. Open Int.; 6X430. 

CAC 40 [MATIF} ' 

S5? ,, * r 301MB —304* 

Sen mejp am. mun —as 

Oct 205400 2832.50 203100 — 304B 

DOC N.T. N.T. 2B5X5D — 30.00 

Mar 209620 209620 20104)0 —29250 

Eta. volume: 19.721. Open Inlj 646ZL 

Sau rcos: Motif. Associated Press, 
London ton Ptnaoetot Futuna Cxtttana* 
toft Pwtrotovm Exctronoo. 


Dfvfdands 


Com petty 


Per Amt Per Rk 


IRREGULAR 


sample Inti 

FstFmtBCOOdlbtD 
PrueR EoFdA 

PrwnloPdC C 2675 

UJ8 FlrwodlPfB . J6 

Weils FuTBO odlpSB _ 27172 

olnctodes 2075 cop gains. 



STOCK 


Chester ValBcp 


. 5% 941 9-22 


STOCK SPLIT 
Harley Davidson 2 Air 1 split. 
Safeguard Scl 2 tori spilt. 

INCREASED 
Beneficial Co Q 43 

Flnoi Inc Q IDO 

Fta Charter Ca U -U 

Harley Ddvklson Q 4)1 

wesbo n cotac Q 32 


M 9-30 
P6 9-16 
9-33 W-17 
8-29 9-12 
M W-1 


CORRECTION 


Club Med Inc. . 
(KorrecttaB dotes. 


Acordla Inc 
Amor Bk Conn 
Barnett Bks Inc 
Cent Reserve Uto 

FAB Indus 
FctFedFlM KV 
FLEataCoataind 
Gib Util FdA 
GttUtH FdB 
Gib Util FdC 
HIYM Plus Fd 

jes intcblmrA 

KeHvSvsB 
NBTBCDtaC 
Nontstrom Inc 
Northrop Grummo, 
OMo Casualty 
Pinnacle Hnf Svs 
Pruco GibYidRj 
Rvksid GTP 
si John Knits 
Samson EnetSVLP 
Sprbras Indus 
Sterli ng Bcn__ 
woshNigton Enor 
wrlgiev (Wm) Jr 


.15 8-26 9-M 


S I s 



monthly; a-warrertr; i semi muni 


U.S./ATTH1CLOSE 


Garden Bids C3imb Above $1 Billion 

NEW YORK ITT Cotp. and Cablcvision Systems Inc. have 

jointly offered more than 51 billion for Viacom Inc. s ^ MadisOT 



SSuSSSTJ : ^ 

lnc..has offered about SlWHton. 



theater, the New Yoxk Knicks 
Rangers hockey team. . 

Nike Sees Quarter Belaid Estimates 

NEW YORK (Knight-Ridder) — Nike Inc, said Thursday jt 
expects net income for its first fiscal quarter ending Aug. 31 tofall 
bdow estimates because of a sharp decline in inventories ana 

now expects quarter earnings 
between $135 and $1.45 a mare: In the comparable period ol 
1993, Nike earned $1.49 a share. ' 

Nikesaid itsU-S. inventory has shrunk to its lowest level m live 

years. 

Harnischfeger to Buy Firm for Stock 

PITTSBURGH (Bloomberg) — Harnischf^er Industries In^ 

underground n rrni n g machinery and pollution-con tr ol systems, 
for common stock valued at about $4133 millioii- 
The acquisition would make Harnischfeger a leading manufac- 
turer of mining eqnrpmeol and create a company with annual 
revenue of about $2 raUion. 

Joy shareholders will receive 03652 Harnischfeger shares for 
each ^hare of Joy common stock. 

Brazil and Bolivia Sign Pipeline Pact 

BRASILIA, Brazil (AP) —Brazil and Bolivia agreed Thursday 
to build a $5 billion pipeline to cany Bolivian natural gas to 
Brazilian^ industry. 

The. agreement ended a last-minute impasse over how to share 
ownership of the project. The signing was a victory for Bolivia, 
which won a larger ownership share by threatening to pull out 


Brazil's government oil monopoly Petrobras wBl own 51 per- 
cent, and 25 percent wfll go to the BTB consortium, comprising of 
Broken Hill Proprietary Co. of Australia, U.S.-based Tenneco and 
British Gas. The pipeline will cany 8 million cubic meters (280 
milli on cubic feet) of gas a day from Bolivia to Brazil. 

Steep Charge Hurts Woohvorth’s Net 

CHICAGO (Combined Dispatches) — Woolworth Corp. post- 
ed a steep second-quarter loss which was fueled by a $30-mulion 
dollar charge and by weakness in the retailer’s German opera- 
tions. the company Thursday. 

Woolworth posted a $42 million loss in the quarter compared to 
a loss of $10 motion a year ago. Sales dropped 18 percent to $1.88 
b3Bon.Thecompany took thechargp for dosing its Wooloo stores 
in Canada.' ' 

The company posted a kss of $80 milli on for the first six 
months, more man double its S34 million loss last year. Sales fell 
18 percent to S3.64 billion. 


year, aa 
(Reuters, Knight-Ridder) 


BANKS: Stung by Losses, Banks Abandon the World’s Bond Markets Hormel Foods Ports Improved Net 


Continued from Page 9 
three months of the year, it 
notes that banks in Germany 
and France were “major benefi- 
ciaries of Lhe shift of interna- 
tional investors from securities 
holdings to deposits. As a re- 
sult, there were unprecedented 
net inflows through the domes- 
tic banking systems" of $47.7 
billion in Germany and $37.1 
billion in France. 

These capital inflows far ex- 
ceeded the outflow via the cur- 


rent account and other invest- 
ment flows, contributing to the 
relative strength of the Deut- 
sche mark and the franc on ex- 
change markets. 

The report shows a near bal- 
ance in Japanese inflow and 
outflow of capital, suggesting 
that the rise of the yen. which 
began in earnest after a mid- 
February breakdown in trade 
talks with the United States, 
was a reassessment of political 
risk rather than an imbalance 


between supply and demand. 

Overall, the BIS estimated 
that net international bank 
credit increased by $95 billion 
in the first quarter, a sharp in- 
crease over any three-month pe- 
riod last year. 

■ Bonds Hit Danske Profit 

Den Danske Bank said 
Thursday that a drop in the 
value of its bond portfolio 
helped slash its profit 85 per- 
cent in the first half, news agen- 


AUSTIN, Minnesota (Bloomberg) — Hormel Foods Corp. 
from Copenha- recorded an 11 .percent rise in thud-quarter net income, the 
company said Thurs&y. 

Net income rose to $20. 1 million, from $18.1 million a year ago. 
Revenue increased 93 percort tb $741.1 million. 

Joel Johnson, chief executive, singled out Spam luncheon meat, 
Hormel chid, Dinty Moore stew. Mary Kitchen hash, and Chi- 
OhTs Mexican sauces as. the company’s most profitable brands. 


cies reported 
gen. 

Danske. the largest bank in 
Denmark, said it earned 349 
million kroner ($56 million) in 
the half. It posted portfolio 
losses of 719 million kroner, 
mainly because of a sharp fall in 
Danish bond prices. 

The market volatility pushed 
most of Danske's competitors 
into the red, including Spare- 
kassen Bikuben AS. 

(Reuters, Bloomberg) 


For the Record 


Boatmen's Bamcsbares Inc. ssud.it agree* tcrbiry.-iWcathen 
Banking Corp. in a 1-for-l stock swap valued at $595 .‘million. 
Worthcn is the second-largest banking company in Arkansas. 
Boatmen's is Missouri’s largest hanking company. ( Bloomberg) 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


A0onc* France Prone Aug. IB 
QntPrav. 


Amsterdam 

ABN Amro Hid 6860 60.90 
ACF Holding 39.10 39 

Aegon 99.10 99.10 

AftaM 4660 47 JO 

A WO Nobel 217.90 22S 

AMEV 73JB TUB 

Bofa-Wessonen 61,40 41.70 
49.W 69. TO 
14440 14X60 
17038 171 

1630 1630 

50 50 

297 290 

2*0.50 2*1.90 
7930 81 JO 




Elsevier 
FOfckcr 
GKI-Brocodes 
HBG 
Helneken 

Hoogowen* 

Hunter DouglM BOO 8460 
IHC Coland *030 *04*0 
inter Mueller 8130 S2J0 
mil Nederland 77.90 tvjm 
KLM 5190 5420 

KNP BT 4930 £8 

KPN 5OS0 SUtfffl 

Nedlloytt 6X60 6460 

OCT Grin ten 77.70 77.40 

Pakhoed S13D 51*8 

PtlUtaS 5730 5820 

Polvoram 76 7600 

Rodeco in 11730 

Rodamco 55 55,10 

HOllnao 120*® 121 

Rorento 8530 86.10 

Royol Dutch 189.90 192 

Stork *6-55 48.90 

Unilever 19730 19930 

von Ommeren 52JO 5470 
VNU 189JO 191 

WcMters/KJuwer 118 11850 
EOE Index : 41417 
Previous : 41730 


OaoeProv. 



Helsinki 


Amer-Ytltymn 

Ensa-Gutxtal 

Huhtamakl 

K.OJ*. 

Kymtnene 

Mnra 

Nokia 

Pah lota 

Reeola 

Stock mono 


120 122 
42.10 4t 
155 156 
9.90 930 
125 126 

1*3 163 

513 *91 

67 65 

99 98-10 
236 238 


RM »" 


Brussels 


AG Fin 

Almanil 

Artied 

Borco 

BBL 

Bekoert 

CBR 

CMB 

CNP 

Cock trill 

Cotwo 

Coiruvt 

Denralze 

Elcctrobet 

Eletaraflna 

GIB 

GBL 

Gevaert 

Gtaverbel 


Kredietbank 

Mosane 

Petraflna 

Povwrfln 

Recticel 

Hwaie Beige 


2560 2580 
7890 HA 
4800 45Q 
2520 2465 
*290 4305 
1WW 26550 
11975 12125 
2540 2655 

2085 3080 

300 203 

5880 5940 
7310 7290 

1262 1274 

5760 5860 
3200 3290 
1432 1436 
4190 4240 
9660 9660 
5230 5230 
3045 3045 
6810 6040 
1486 1490 
W325 10325 
3160 3250 
526 536 

51*0 5200 


5oc Gen Banaue 8300 8300 
See Gen Betgtaue 2255 3265 


Soflra 
Saturn 
Te s a e nderio 
Troclebei 
UCB 

union Mmiere 
Wagons Lite 


14050 14250 
15500 15750 
10580 10600 

10025 10175 

Z5275 25075 

2560 2570 

7000 N.T. 


%&&**&&* :M " M 


Frankfurt 


AEG 

Alcatel SEL 
AinsnzHoid 

Aliena 

Asks 

BASF 

Bayer 

Bov Hypo bank 


17018050 
340 336 

2368 2394 
66250655 JO 
1010 995 
SAW 329.70 
36*366.70 
411 410 


Bov i/ereinsbk rpSO 430 


BBC 
BHF Bank 
BMW 

Commerzbank 
Continental 
Daimler Benz 
Deotrtsa 
Dl Babcock 
Deutsche Bank 
Douglas 


77576050 
383 382 

84350 854 

324 322 

27227120 
88981350 

492-30 *90 

360 260 

703 702 JO 
SIS 515 


□resdner Bank 391*0 3*3 


FeRimuehie 
F Krupa Hoescfi 
Moraener 
Henkel 
Heeniiet 
Hoechsl 
Hoizmann 
Horten 
iWKA 
Kan5aiz 
KanfBdt 
Kauftwf 

KHO 


305 305 
228 229 SO 
340 339 

588 595 
9K 965 
3SO356J0 
862 866 
312J021250 
J94 3»3 

119 ISt 
591 592 

523 533 

129J0129J0 


Hong Kong 

Bk East Asia 31 JO 31 JO 
Cathay Potafta 1ZSS 1243 
Chewra Kong 37 JO 3740 
China Llonr Pwr 3 *.iq j/m 

Oornr Farm Inll 1145 114SS 
Hong Lung Dev mu 13 JO 
HangSenaBank 5135 5*35 
Henderson Land 43 41. 80 
HK Air Erw. 3880 3949 

hk China Gas 14J5 1*40 

HK Electric 2*75 2*75 

HK Land 20 2035 

HK Realty Trust 20J» 20 la0 

HSBC Holdings 8X50 BHJ5 

HK Strang Hits His 11.90 

HK Tetecomm 16JG 1*20 
HK Ferry 1530 ii2i 

Hutch Whameaa 3680 3*60 
Hyson Dev 2X15 22.90 

Jordtnc Math. 65-M *4.73 
Jardlne Sir Hid 39.70 30.10 
Kowloon Malar 1540 15JM 
Mandarin Orient 1DJ55 10_50 
(Miramar Hotel 20J5 20.50 
New world Dev 2SJ0 2615 
SHK Props 5X25 5X75 

StekM 118 118 

Swtra Pac A 61 61 JS 

Tal Cheung Pros 10-95 iQJ5 
TVE 388 388 

mw9HMd 3180 3210 
Wing On CO Infl 11-75 11J5 
wimor ina. 1130 11.90 
[J4 : 951889 


ClaNPrev. 


Oast Pm. 


FHons 

Forte 

GEC 

Ganl Acc 

Glaxo 

Grand Mel 

GRE 

Guinness 

GUS 

Hanson 

Hlllsdown 

HSBC hldgs 

ICI 

Inchcane 

KbigfitaMr 

Ladbrake 

Lond Sec 

Lanorie 

Lajmo 

Legal Gen Grp 
Ltavds Bank 
Marks So 
ME PC 
Non Power 
NaTWesI 
NitiWjt Wotor 
Pearson 
PLO 
PIIMnglan 
PowerGen 
Prudent lol 
Rank Ora 
Recfcitl Cal 
RMkmd 
Reed Inti 
Reuters 
RMC Group 
Rolls Ravce 
Rnttimn (unit] 
Rovol SCM 
RTZ 

Sainsburv 
Scot Ntrwara 
Scot Power 
Sears 

Severn Trent 

Shell 

sietoe 

Smith Nenhew 
SmlthKIIne B 
Smith fWH) 
S«i Alliance 
Tate B Lvle 
Tosco 
Thorn EMI 
Tomkins 
TSB Group 
Unilever 
Utd Btsculb 
Vodafone 
Wor Loan 3Vj 
Wellcome 
Whiteread 
Williams Hdgs 
Willis Cocroon 
F.T.3B Index 


147 

243 

3JM 

5J1 

636 

« 

*71 

674 

256 

12 ® 

745 

8.19 
485 
62* 
IJI 
653 
882 
147 
*53 

5 41 
443 
447 
602 
*76 

542 
630 
7XQ 
147 
5.77 
216 
482 
640 
624 
611 
586 
947 

2 

4 

199 

B62 

442 

645 

485 

1.19 
575 

7.19 
682 
149 
441 
477 
X22 


149 

248 

299 


Montreal 


411 Bell Canada 
1115 Bombardier 8 
4*7 Combtar 
5_73 Ca s cades 
2x1 Dominion 
tjy Donohue A 
FCAlnn 

S MacMillan Bl 
Sn Natl Bk Canada 
5jB Po»wr Corp. 

12 Kr- 

72 SSSSffi 

TetogJobe 

601 
*77 
547 


33ft 


AGA 

61 


24ft 

34ft 




42ft 

C 

Astro A 

163 

163 

IVft 

a 


8900 8*00 


i/ 

Electrolux B 

373 

371 


6/a 


418 

402 

/ft 

/ft 


99 


IJft 

13ft 


87 8600 


4ft 


164 


18% 

lKft 


7555035600 


9ft 


120 


19ft 

19ft 




* 

5ft 

SCA-A 

109 

HU 

18ft 

19ft 

S-EBraifcen 

4X30 4100 




108 



19ft 


138 

138 



SKF 

139 


lift 

lift 





Tretleborg BF 

9700 9700 



Volvo BF 

146 

149 


Paris 

7 ~ [Accor 670 674 

AlrLkraide 809 821 

I«I"*«1 « ■«* ». . . 612 614 


680 

3.16 


| Alcatel Attahom 
Axa 


257.®} 240 

AW gfpW^tCte) 47^46340 


8.13 

581 

«43 

281 


BIC 
BNP 

Bouvaues 

Danone 

Carre lour 

GCF. 

Ceno 

Chorgeuri 


1300 1311 
23148 21490 
630 640 

844 B50 

2077 3085 
207 217 

11811840 
1414 1416 


Clmants Franc 305.10 310 

Club Med 41480 400 

. EH-Anuttalne 40*90415.10 

¥S Euro Disney 11135 

1 Gen. Eoux 536 543 


«J7 

543 


246 246 

HL57 1036 
236 238 

210 213 

11.17 1138 

143 345 


536 

Havas 467.10 *67 

1 metal »s so 

Lafarge Cop pee 447.40 451.90 
Legrand 6310 6550 

, Lyon. Eoux 525 535 

JS | areal (L'J 1155 1177 

K5 LVJAM. 854 867 

JJ; Matro-Hachetle 11640 11*20 
Mlchetln B 246J0 249 

Moulinex 
Paribas 
Pechlnev Inti 


659 

7.23 

689 

180 

430 


... __ , Peugeot 

907 Tm Plnoull Prtnt 
418& *163 Roaiotechnique 


673 

367 


Raff. St. Louis 
Smofl 

5afol Gabain 


, - SS S.EJB. 

Shi Generale 
Suez 

Ttxnraofl-CSF 

Total 
UAP. 

Valeo 


11600 

121 

35200 36030 

15720 

16* 

33X50 

332 

851 

845 

930 

929 

SIS 

STS 

13513800 

1570 

1S7S 

923 

932 

681 

686 

547 

540 

563 

572 

25620 

258 


162 16580 
316.10 31610 
146*0 147 

2 NLS 0 2*020 


Johannesburg 


AECI 
Altecti 
Anglo Amer 
Barlows 
Blyvoar 
Bwffeis 
De Boers 
Driefonletn 
Gencor 
GFSA 
Harmony 

Hiohveld steel 

Kkwt 

Nedbonk Grp 
RandtonVo 
Ruulat 
SA Brews 
Sasol 

western Deed 


3*25 3425 
11B 130 

2H254J0 
31.7S 32 

HUB 1275 
4580 NA 
112 112 
6625 6*50 
1285 1260 
13612*13 
75 Ol HQ 

32 22 


3* 

*250 

101 

80 

3273 


London 


Klaeckner Wert *15750 160 


Linde 
Lufthansa 
MAN 

Mannesmaim 

Metaiiaeseii 

Muensn Hueo 

Porsche 

Preussag 

PWA 

RWE 


939 Ml 
:iS8071*50 
448 453 

453*5X50 
191 184-50 
3H5S 2875 
B35 860 
<8130 485 

7 56 50 7 56 51 1 
*50.70 <51 


Abbey Main 

196 

197 

Allied Lyons 

5.7B 


Aria W logins 

273 

377 

Argyll Group 

203 

176 

a« Brtt Foods 

502 


BAA 

5.19 

511 

BA* 

4.99 

505 

Bonk Scotland 

1.96 

193 

Barclays 

158 

559 

Bass 

506 

in 

BAT 

*26 

4.7ft 

BET 

121 

131 

Blue Circle 

106 

111 

IOC Grown 

722 

700 

Boots 

139 

1*1 

Bo water 

406 

403 

BP 

407 

4.10 

Bril Airways 

4.18 

(.14 

SfltGm 

194 

2.93 

Brit Steel 

U4 

100 

Brtt Telecom 

103 

381 

BTR 

376 

303 

zabte Wire 

40/ 

409 

^tdourvSch 

*06 

4.73 

la radon 

X99 

301 

Mat s Vi veils 

229 

2.39 

lomrn Union 

142 

526 

tourtgum 

500 

508 


109 

190 


197 

197 

Eurotunnel 

110 

3J5 


Madrid 




BBV 3000 3030 

BCD Central HtSP. 2640 2660 
Bmco Scntonder SOSO 5120 
Boies to 
CEPSA 


1090 11ZS ®®° ^ aU *° 

3290 3380 Bonco do Brasil 21.90 2040 
Dragados 2100 2115 Baflenra BJH 084 

Endeso 5850 5880 Bradesea K70 0.15 

Ercras 169 171 Brahma 26027*97 

iberdraia 899 8)2 Cemig 10747 107 

Remo) <823 3*55 ElelrobnE 338 338 

Tabacolcra 3200 3300 Hatibgnai 251 251 

Tetefonloa 1775 1775 Light 355.01 

: Panmmmetna 15 15 




Milan 


Petrabras 
Souza Crux 
Tetetsroi 
Teieso 
Usiminas 
voteRfoDoce 

Vorto 




Alteanza 

Astaiaila 

Autostrada prlv 1560 153* 

Bca Agrladlura 27*5 2700 
BOO commer llol 3550 4225 
Beo Naz LOvom 12650 I27ID 
Ben Poo Novoro 9300 9300 

Banco di Romo 18*0 1750 

Ba> Amoroslano 4110 3965 CereOas 
Bai Noooilrbo 1295 1200 City Dev. 
Benetton 22300 32300 gB® 

Credtto itaitaM 2000 1790 Fraser Neave 
EnlcnemAuo 2710 3000 Genting 


T4I40 143 

6010 6010 
47 

434 437 

144 188 
133I33J0 
13602 110 


Fortin 
Flatsaa 
Flnonz Agralna 
F in me cc anica 
Fondtortosne 


Singapore 

840 BJ0 
785 780 
11.10 11.10 
17 JO 1720 
14 40 1*10 

S 2 


1740 1730 Golden Hope PI 
*rm 6210 How Par _ 

8000 7000 Hume Industries *65 6*0 


1670 1710 I [htatwpe 
11080 10555 


Generali Asaic 39000 38250 XL Kwortg 


5800 5700 LutnOianB 

11288 11330 Wotayon Banka 
4900 <05 OCBC foretan 

22)0 2M5 Synbpwo ng 
3625 2615 Sharwita 
23*00 32700 Slme Dcrttv 
9200 8765 SiA Foreten 
San Pablo Torino 73*0 7270 5HareLand 
5iP 4190 *115 Press 

SME 3610 3580 Sing Steatmhlo ... . . 

Sniahpd 21M 2115 jjwreTeiecptnm 346 2« 

Standa 36200 36250 Straits Trading 348 341 

Slot 4935 4810 UOB foreign 15 1*60 

Toro Assfc 25300 25000 UOL 228 22* 


IFIL 
italcementt 
I taigas 

-iiirisu 11 
M*l III IWIIl V 

Atanredlson 

Otlyettl 

PireUlsaa 

«A5 

Rtaoscenfe 




5J0 545 
11 JO 1180 
Ata *08 
IJI 1J1 
9.95 785 
1*70 14 

645 645 
880 840 
12 11J0 
5 5.10 
*58 *42 
1380 1170 
740 780 
1*90 17.10 
*29 *16 


Close Prev. 1 


Stockholm 


Toshiba 
Toyota 
YamatcM See 


Clou Prev. 


890 8*0 


Toronto 




173b 18 

16*b I6 Vj 
7Vb TVS 
71 

30*b MV. 
*66k 465b 
255b 26*b 
Utb 143b 
25Wi 25M 
53b 53i 

10 lOte 
7Vb 7 
480 *70 

^ 3»b 319b 

Canodton Poctftc 31b ZPI 


Asnleo Eagle 


BC Gas 
BC Tetecon 
Bramoieo 
Brunswick 
CAE 
Comdev 
Cl BC 


Sydney 


Amcor 

9J7 

921 

ANZ 

408 

4JH 

BHP 

1904 


Boral 

X*8 

306 

Bougainville 

193 

198 

CoiesMyer 

423 

422 

Comaico 

405 

4L90 

CRA 

IMS 

1926 

CSR 

470 


Festers Brew 

1.11 

108 

Gcoomon Field 

105 

1J9 


11 


Maawlcn 

1.95 

1.95 

MIM 

296 

XW 

Nat Aim Bank 

1074 

1190 

Mews Com 

192 

808 

Mine Netesurk 

448 

400 

M Broken Hin 

160 


Pac OwHap 

428 

400 

Pioneer mri 

307 

304 




3CT Resources 

106 

107 

Sraitos 

192 

195 

TNT 

202 


AteSlem Mining 

706 

7J8 


402 

407 

woodside 

400 

401 

All onflaortn tad* 
Prgrtoos : 2059 JO 

S : 2H6J0 


Con Tire A 

Center 

Corn 

CCLIndB 
aneplex 
Comlnco 
Conweta Esd 
CSA Mat A 
Dotasco 
DylcxA 


llta 111 b 
19 T99k 
385 X9S 

9Vj 03* 

S *95 
716b 21V, 
23M 24 V. 
ID 1 * 10 
ZPO 229b 
0J6 27* 


Tokyo 


Akal Electr <75 470 

AsrtU Chemlcol 005 795 
Asaht G»ss 1280 nm 
Bra* of Tokyo 1570 1500 
Bridgestone 1610 IstO 
Canon 1760 1760 

Casio TOT 1260 

Dai Nlpaan Print 1733 17*0 
Daiwo House isin 1500 
Daiwa Securities 1620 1620 
Fonuc 4570 4360 

Fuji Bank 2330 2330 

Fnii Photo 2200 2190 

FultfSU 1100 llff) 

Hitachi 1010 1900 

Hitachi CcMe no aw 

Hondo 1730 1728 

Ho Vokodo 5000 5260 

Itaetw 719 7® 

JODOnAirtlnM 773 760 

Kollmo 717 W0 

Kmreoi Power 2*38 

Kawasaki stnl 417 423 
Klrtn Brewery 1210 1210 
Komatsu 955 951 

Kubota 742 750 

Kvacero 7430 7460 

Matsu Elec IndS 1750 T760 
Matsu Elec wks 1120 1120 
Mitsubishi Bk 3630 2660 
MlteubtsM Karat 562 565 

Mitsubishi Elec 695 6N 
Mitsubishi Hev 814 Bil 
MiHubitad Cara 13*0 1240 
Mitsui and Cs 883 878 

Mitsui Marine — 

MltSUftOShi 

NUtsuml 

NEC 

NGK Insuteters 1000 1060 


Echo Bov Mtaes iSto 15 

Eauity Silver A 082 080 

FCA Inti 4 4 

Fed Ind A 6% 6^ 

Fletcher Owl I A 17%. 17* 

FPI 6 64k 

Centra 089 040 

Gutt Cda Rtts S’* 5V: 

" ~ i Inti i» 12te 

Hecnlo GkJ Mines uve n»b 

Hotlfnger ITte 12*b 

Horsham 199b 18*b 

Hudson’s Bay 27V, ttv, 

imasca 36U, 3«v. 

Inco 36U 364b 

I PL Energy 29* 29V. 

Jatmoefc iste 16'* 

LabaH 19*h 174, 

LabtawCo 20 V* 2M 

Mackenzie tv» 7Vj 

Moona inti A 52Vb 53 

Maale Leaf 12U UM 

Maritime 2SV. 24 'u 

Mark Res 9Va 9VS 

Matson A 2lte 21M1 

Noma Ind A 5 tab. 

Nargndolnc 25^. 25^ 

Norando Forest 11*1 12 

Moreen Energy 17 15ft 

Nttm Telecom 47ft 47ft 

Nora Corp 13 13ft 

Dshawo 18ft 18ft 

Pogurta A 385 190 

Placer Dome 28 27c, 

Poco P etroleum 9 9 

PWACorp 056 057 

Rayrnck 14% 15ft 

Rena i ssa n ce 28ft 28ft 

Rogers B 22ft 22ft 

Rammonj 76 75 

Rovol Bank Can 28ft 21ft 

S cnofn s Res lift lift 

ScMtftHasp BU 8ft 

Seagram 4Zft 4]ft 

Sears Can 7ft Tl 

Shell Can 43ft 44 

Shtrrttt Gordon 12 12ft 

5HL Svtfen lhs e 6ft 7 

Southam 16ft l«ft 

Sow Aerajpoce 13ft 13 

States A 8K. Bft 

Talisman Energ 29ft 27ft 


Teck 8 
Thomson 
Toronto Damn 
TontarB 
TransaitaUtU 
TransCda Pipe 
Triton FlnfA 
Triune 

Unicom Energy 

~ eSj 

10*0 1 M 0 * 

1570 1S60 

m im 1 Zurich 


22ft 22V: 
15ft 15ft 
20 ft 
23ft 2*>.'4 
Uft Uft 
17 17ft 
ISO 100 
15ft 15ft 
'AS 1*3 


Nlkko Securities 1230 lZEfi AtBolnJIB 257 256 

Ntacon Kcgaku 1020 UQ0 Ahoutsse B new 680 tSB 

Nippon OH 756 7S4 BBC Bom Bov B IZ1S 1250 

Nippon Sleet 37* 375 ClboGetoy 0 8J5 827 

Nissan Yosen 6*2 60S CS Holdings 0 5*9 5* 9 

Nissan BID 804 EMh-gie B 350 353 

Nomura See 2330 2300 fischarB i$)0 1530 

NTT 8790a 8K0O Intardisaiunt 0 2230 3170 

Of rttpus Optical 1170 1170 JetmoU B 920 Bft 

Pioneer 2300 2780 Landis Gy r R 750 7 m 

Ricoh 973 *74 Moevenptck 0 <10 437 

Sonya EteC 573 573 . , _ mi U93 

Shorn 1850 1810 Oerrik.Bueftrte R inuoJO 

Shtmara 726 737 PargraoHIda 1510 15J0 

Shine tsuChem 2110 2100 RncheHqp PC 5720 3015 

Sorry 5*90 5900 Satra Reoutiflc 114 i M 

Sum! tamo Bk 2010 2020 SravJW B W ns 

Sumitomo Chem 575 573 Schindter B 7900 73ft 

Suml Marine 9S2 9*5 Sulier PC „ 945 960 

Sumitomo Metal 339 34 fwvetMonceB 2105 2110 

Tohel Com 682 672 jwftsBnkCorPtt 374 370 

Takeda Chem 1240 1710 a wtesR ejnsurR 551 ssa 

TDK 4*30 4*60 Swtaalr R |M 

Tallin 597 604 Ufl5B„ 1110 1122 

Tokyo Marine 13*0 12*0 675 690 

Tokyo EKc Pw 3tno 3050 Zurich Ass B 1288 1295 

Toppon Printing 1510 1510 SOS Index : 92343 
Tqray in* 776 703 , Previous : ttUT 


U.S. FUTURES 


Vlo Auodotod Proa 



Aug. IB 

Season Season 





Low Open H0h Law 

Oho Ow 

CtoJMt 


Grains 







10} SOP +4 1475, X4*ft 145 


308 

10* Dec 9* 163ft 1450, 14] 



X27 MorW 172 173 709 

172>S 


168 

XlfiViMovtS 165ft 167 163ft 


1*6 

111 A* VS 144ft 146ft 143 

X45ft 


ISTTi 

15S Dec 95 157 307 157 



1 Est. stees 14000 Wed’s, sates 15261 




I Wed's open inf 6*287 UP bit 







J02ft 

107ft Sep 9* 109ft 160ft 306ft 


XJD 



170 

125 Mar 95 146ft X67ft 164 



161 

121 ft May 95 158 3J» 306V 



Wj 

3-16 1 /, Jt4 95 X43ft 145 1AJ 



145ft 

J2? Sep9S 



160ft 

300ft Dec 95 




Est. sates na Wed's, stees 6021 




VWimiOBi 41178 UP 572 










XM Sep 94 X20ft X2lft 220 






ISTn 

136 Shorn 223 2J|ft 1 3)ft 



X32ft«Vay95X3» XJ»V, 227ft 

938 



X36ftJte95 243ft X43ft X42 




239 Sep *5 X45ft X45ft 14* 




USftDecta X47ft !«'<. 206ft 









Est. sates 2X000 Wed’s sales 23002 




wart Open ->tf 308.123 IB 1003 




SOYBEANS (CBOT) mmrngnv 



SJI'«AOBW 190 X97 




701V, 

SAT-jSepT* STlVi SJS 523 

5.76ft 




551 Nov** 56* 549ft 503ft 




500 Jen 95 573ft 5JTft 572ft 




549 Mar 95 583 SJ87 581ft 

S85ft 



525 ft May 95 189 593V: 509 

5J!ft 



/J*ft 

SJBftJWta 595 598 193 


~cuo 







506 

527 Sea 95 5«6 596 596 




600ft 

528ft Nov 95 *01 603 599 

001ft 


X9U 



417ft 



Est. sates 26000 Wedi sates 29095 




Wed’s open mr 132025 oft 413 




SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOT) invn.<MauarUi 



22100 

T7T.70AUH V4 178.00 17800 I74A0 




21000 

17080 Sep M I76J0 17*01 174.40 



30708 




20900 

UaiODecM D5I0 17530 17300 

17X10 


30700 

171.10Jan9S 17500 17400 17430 




20700 

I7180MOT93 17700 17800 176. H 




20700 

17400 May 95 17800 I7U0 17700 

17X60 



20600 

17130 Jui *5 18X00 18000 17900 




181 JO 

)7*uSDAua9S 18000 18100 18000 




10X00 

17400 Sea 95 




Est. soles U0OO wed's, sates 33011 




Wed-samninf B4JS7 uo 811 




t SOYBEAN (XL (CBOT) •OOOOItH-O'iEcrmotr lDOtta, 



3005 

21 05 Aug 9* 2AM 3*05 2439 

2452 



3XM 

2X40 Sep W HJ5 2*05 2427 

2442 


2954 

2X10 Oct 94 3429 2*28 3412 



2U7 

2200 Dec 9* 2400 24.14 2191 

240* 

-0.0+ 35.126 

2805 

2X45 Jan 95 3(05 2405 2193 

2405 



TUB 

2X!3Mor*5 2308 3408 2392 


«n eo 


28.05 

2X93 Mov 95 33.97 3405 2W8 

2199 



2705 

300 Jui 95 2195 2407 2350 

2197 



270) 

2X90AUQ95 2X90 2194 2X85 

2Xta 

— xfli 


UJS 


2X66 



2X10 





ZXJD 

2X80 Dec 95 




Est. stees 10.000 wars, stees a 418 




| Wed's open inf B 80X6 up 4)8 





Livestock 




CATTLE 





7305 

U0OAuo94 6807 6925 6805 




74H) 

65JDOd9« 7105 7220 7102 

7185 


7430 

67 JO Dec M 70.12 7002 7X10 

7027 

• X10I4J4* < 

7425 

6750 Frt) 95 6903 6905 W.O 

6902 


TS.W 

9MPerK 7UB 71.17 ID.9S 

nm 

*Xtt 

fuTO 4 


660OJWI95 *705 *417 6705 

6005 




6600 Aug 95 67.15 67.1S 6700 

07 AO 


2M * 

Eta.stfe 

10576 Wed’s, stees 9,182 




W«rs0PMM 7105* UP <B 




h ntfi 




8108 

7l.10AugM 7X17 1X47 7X12 

7X30 

_Jim 

?im * 


7100 Son 9* 7000 7705 70*0 

7097 

-ftro 



7X9500 9* 7000 7075 7025 

7047 



86.00 

7X*0Nto'*t 77 JJ 77 JB 7705 

7700 

— ora 

ttm M 

H.K 

7255 J: 95 7035 7005 7035 

7045 

— xio 


1025 

7205 MOT 95 75J5 7525 7115 

7X15 

-005 

134 


72/S Apr 95 7*70 7470 74*0 

nun 

+0.10 

166 

7*20 

7125 May 95 

74J0 


41 \ 


1021 wedft. sates IJ71 













42J0AUD94 *575 4175 4520 

4502 

♦005 

1JU& 


390000 94 400 *003 3902 

3985 



39J5DecV4 4000 4X02 3905 

4XU5 

-XI 7 

7, 2H « 


3X80 Feb 95 4X05 40JB *002 

40.15 

-412 



38 85 Aorta 39.90 39.ta 3930 

39.40 


IJ92 1 

*700 

*175 Am 9S 4480 8180 4430 

405 

—MB 

*85 l 


(195 JUl 95 4435 4405 4435 

4435 

-410 

>34 ? 


4Z.7DAUS9S 4205 4205 4ZJS 

C75 

♦XBS 

a * 


39.70 OCI95 4X10 4X10 39 JO 

39.90 

— «JB 

n ; 

Est. safes 

0671 Weds sates 1868 




Wad’s 24025 <8> DO 




PORK BELLIES (CMER) «M fat.- rants irarfe 



9900 

2X35 Aug H 3120 32JD 3180 

31 JB 

♦ in 

361 J 


41jNFcl}95 *320 4132 42J0 

CU 

♦140 

'.153 l 

60JB 

4X02 Mar 95 4X40 4X15 <235 

4X85 

♦xta 

316 E 


CUOMavta C.H ca 5 CIO 

CIO 

>1.10 

a yj 

S4JU 

CM Jlrf 95 4158 4470 4150 

4470 

•1J0 

i» s* 


41 JO AUQ 95 4X18 4125 <175 

4125 

-1.1! 

14 I 


1,998 wed's, item JJW 




MrtOteiW 7,«7 UO 126 





Food 

COFPOSC (NCSQ MOOto-raraocrto 
Z74M 6830 See 9* I7U0 IBSH UBJO 18275 ,1* *467 

77, 10 Dec 94 1KU5 ltlJO M 3M IMJ0 .*55 17.723 

78.90 Mar 95 IPJ i#*M W» IftJO -2.70 5J4S 

DJOMavn 1B9J0 19150 WJO 19TJS -12S 245* 

6100 All 95 18279 18271 11275 192*5 -210 SR 

U5J03M9S 19X55 -1J0 235 


3*425 

344*0 

M440 

2*5.10 

OT 2 S 

70.00 


II JODecfl^ _ 

Eta. rates Mta WMftltaM 1 U.308 
WfCsaomtat 32*0 ah <0*9 


■9**0 -1.90 267 


Season Season 
Htoh Low 


0P*n Htoh Law dose da OoJat 


Season Seaton 
Hleb Low 


Oeen High Low Ckne' Ol* Oplre 


SUGAR-WORLD 11 (NCSQ I tuna Wv-ccra two. 


1X60 OtOdW 11.10 121* 11J0 

1210 9.I7MOT 95 1U5 1207 11A5 

110* ML57Movt5 I LSI 1108 IIA1 
1202 1257 JUH 1175 1L92 1175 

1150 1257 Oct 95 1142 1143 1143 

1140 1 046 Mar 96 1TJ5 T1J7 11J0 

tlJ* II.IIMOVH 

Eastern 37JN Wao's.steES 9J1S 
Wed's ope n lw 1 1*523 Oh 111 
ODOOA UK5E1 MiMneiww-tMriBi 
150 HUD Sep 9* 13*3 1420 CW> 

1580 10(1 Dec 9* 14*1 1471 1441 

M05 10776*0-95 1482 .1886 UBBT 

1672 1078 Mov 95 1J14 1530 1514 

1600 12Z5Julf5 

1540 '155550*95 

1633 1290 Dec 9S 

14M 1350 MorW 

1*42 TZtSMovft 

Est. soles 7478 wed's, ftees 126*6 
Wetfs open [m 47,145 oh SOB 
ORANSBJUKE (NCTN) UUNis- rates kw-bl 
mat auusepM 9X35 9*10 nra tass 

13440 89.10 Nov W M4B 97 JO 9640 9740 

'32M WOO Jan 95 TOO® 10170 102*0 10145 

13*75 9648 Star 95 10X90 10440 10X50 W425 

J142S 97 JO May 95 10700 10740 Tta.DO 1(87 JS 

119 00 im>ajul95 109-25 

11240 11209 Nw 93 11340 11X4B 112*0 11X25 

Jan 96 11x25 

U2SS 11240 Sep 96 nU5 

EsLstees NA. Wod'xstees 912 
Wed’s open int 717*0 off 2M 


1211 

1206 

11.9* 

I17T 

.1178 

1147 

IU 1 


1E2 

154* 

1566 

15*1 

1614 

1615 


*226 52575 
tOM 4)483 
HUD 9435 
HL20 3416 
*220 1472 
HLI7 217 
.1217 . 5 


*3 2483 
+ 18 42321 
>7 12993 
+ 11 3J23 
til 2409 
♦11 1JD5 
+11 *462 
♦11 1414 
+11 IB 


♦ 225 2151 
♦040 M73 
♦023 4J36 
+015 2511 
♦215 854 

♦215 
+015 
♦215 
+M5 


95470 m«50p 94 94899 94490 94460 94471 

95.188 907T0D9C94 9*3*0 9*2*0 94.180 **H0 

9SJ80 90240 Mur 95 94400 94020 9X930 9X930 

94730 OOTHJunft 9X670 9X670 9X600 9X610 

94558 9U10*P9S 9X450 9X350 91430 9X330 

94480 71.100 Dec 95 9X490 9X100 9X0*0 50440 

9*420 92790 MvM 9X010 93414 92JS0 92460 

nm 9X630AXI 56 92900 92400 9X830 92440 

Est. sates NA. Wed's, sales 597,136 
WecTsaoenM 27X2018 off Min 
BRniJH POUND (CMER) inrwwl-lpMlweil 
MMOSs+M 14414 1J5T2 14«B 14506 

14760 L4S80DOCM 1J42D 1-5500 IJSm 1-5484 

14720 145*0 Mar 9* 1-090 1J45D 14N0 14*54 

Est. soles 11A70 Wed's, stees 649* 

WArsopenint .3*40 alt 23 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMBU twOr- rnaU Motes sMOOt 
0-7760 

07670 
07*05 
07522 
07180- 
07120 
Est.: 


—18*22411 
—70*62.977 
-5030.591 
—90255421 
-J0Q2T5AH 
—100)56409 
—100 13X698 
— IWW9734 


9* 3X923 

+M IJ0B 
♦ 0 * 


OJOMSSPM 07 255 07260 072(2 07248 —13 35.155 

07033 Dec 94 07338 (L724D 07231 07334 —13.3722 

OTOD Mares 27223 07323 07215 OTTO —13 940 

2499071X195 07200 07200 07200 07193 -13 

2ffl*S5»« 07161 -13 86 

OJtWOoeW 07128 _« 9 

- J X497 WfcS *. sales 7.179 
Wed's OPtol Iflt 40785 Up 331 

ICMBRJ sew mail- iMeMutesneui 
H522S*t W “IS ® L4 * a B * a? 0A486 ♦43I02J77 

XHMDecW 26470 26S00 06445 B6489 ♦** fc370 

OJ7MOJ1X19S 04507 +43 g 

0634734P9S . - 06517 +« 9 

2Nn«M° fM 2* 472 26*5 04472 26497 +43 1615 


Metals 

HI GRADG COPPER Q4CMX} S54M bv-raaM Mr ll. 

11M0 7*90 Sep 94 10970 IWjOO 10255 109.30 -<U 0 19730 

£5°*“ ,W - 2D rojB tun W5J0 ♦&1S17766 

11170 7.iS}JanBS 109.10 *215 378 

111-30 7X00 Feb 95 NUB +215 172 

11370 7X00Mir95 10870 10870 N23S 10860 *025 2755 

11168 7665 May 95 TD770 +07S IJIM 

11X50 78.00 All 95 W.W *221 #58 

11200 7UDAua93 10M8 ID95B H9JS W968 1#3 

n.rasepn 10230 vaas to 

Tuopafs 109 jo -ass szi 


IIU5 

11X30 

10960 

I08JB 

ioud 

11060 

107 JO 


7775 Nov H 
#200 Dec 95 
B25DJai96 
*X70Mar96 
91.10 Ara 96 
May 96 
U6J0AX191 


10960 

103JQ 

NU0 

WJ0 

10225 

10*05 

mug 


*210 
♦225 
♦ 075 
+225 
♦225 
*225 
+025 


582 

551 

0 


86595 
06450 

06595 

EsLkAbs 4X281 Wed's. sates 31376 
Wed-SoMMlrt 110JM aft 133 
JMPANOSEYEN [CM EK) Ira rv,. 

6x577 

OOlOnaLOOmBMCf* 0010100201034000101 0001I1B24S +168 6.913 
“^oMM-mrasjo-cnosSiSioio ^ 

2dlD773UJia2O05eP 93 2010499 

20ID5600L009680Mra 9620102220JliaMl m o im tnam 
Eta. Sotos 3LS93 W«rs.safcs 
Wed's men Int 71681 oft 759 
SWKPSWC ICMBO Ipr +mc iiioMewtelUW 
522 26*00 SeP 94 8 7670 27730 27*63 07728 

n£2 XfE’ErH wno nj,lS 074 » St7« 

27180 .274*6 Jun 95 1177*7 

OOTO^ BTCOMorM via 

Est. sates 71,194 Wed's, sates 16666 
two's open kb 44.966 OHW* 


♦174 3*8 

♦179 35 

♦171 1608 


♦40 63.10 
♦40 17X4 
+M 15 
+60 


Industrials 


5190 

5110 

Hi 

♦40 4X731 
+45 

+40 37.1*3 
+«J 

son 

B90 


42X0 

53U 

+ 4 2 7063 


5378 

i; i 


SCO 

54X0 

r^ra 




547J 





♦49 2.194 


5225 Aug 94 . 5125 +45 

■TOO Sen « 511 J - 

SILSOa** 

3BUIDec9< 5WJ 
401.0 Jan 95 
4145 Mar 95 5320 
6120 May 95 537J 
*220 Jut 95 5360 
53X550095 
5390 Dec OS 

S7SAJtel96 JS596 

SSUMorM 565J 

5*X0 *4ay 96 , jag 

Jill 9* 5723 

Est.i tees 2X000 Wed's. stees 14.973 
Wed's open W 122711 uo BT\ 

5X2*w S ..rae-srare 8 v» 

*1LOO 4] 250 411 JO. 41630 

WUJJJUnVi 4123) 41200 <1200 4T9J0 

439.00 392D0Asir95 4ZU0 <2X00 «"■ 42X70 

S3 SS1SSSSS5 



GOLD (NGM)0 Bo nvaL>ODaera per borax 


OOTPONJ 1 (NCTNJ sunken cents parte. 
te60 njlOctW 67 JB 69J0 fl75 

£ M ® 7 ' “ 

7215 6X50Mar*5 *BJ0 *7 00 

72S MJQJVWyW 075 

njs 0JO609S 7250 7035 

7470 *480 Oct 95 69J0 0.15 


67 JO 
4250 
060 
7240 
0 JO 


*2*1 6220 


♦49 
♦49 
+49 
*49 1JD2 


♦ 420 22433 
+430 Ajar 
r*JB 160* 
♦AJ8 *52 
♦470 


WM . 66J5DQC95 0220 

y***- **n turn 

Wftrsopwiint 5IJ4* up jpg 

HEATWeOSL 

57.17 <1005*119* mM 5210m£ 

2-5 <*JOOctW 5065 5230 

»J0 4400 NouM 51.55 51_73 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 1994 


Page 11 

EUROPE 


Lilt Profit 
At Ericsson 


Airbus Prepares to Take Off 

Europe’s Jet Maker Seeks Half of Market 


BASF Profit Soars 
But Share Tumbles 


Frankfurt 

dax : :: 


■■-S. ? 
7 1 

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STOCKHOLM— LM Erics- 
son AB said Thursday that 
strong sales, particolariv in the 
radio communications division, 
helped lift first-half earnings 78 
percent. -■ 

The telecommunications 
company earned 223 billion 
kronor ($290 nriHion) before, 
taxes in the six months, up {tom. 
1.29 billion in the first naif of 
1993. ' 

Ericsson’s sales rose 33 per- 
cent, to 36.51 billion kronor, 
with much of the increase com- 
ing in the second quarter as new 
orders rose 19 percent, to 4034 
billion kronor. 

Radio communications sales 
increased 60 percent daring die 
period, with the division now 
accounting for half of Erics- 
son's order bookings and nearly 
half of consolidated sales. 

Ericsson said its largest mar- 
ket was the United States, with 
1 1 percent of sales, followed by 
Sweden, Italy, Britain and Chi- 
na. 

The company predicted or- 
ders would rise 20 percent this 
year, resulting in “considerably 
better” profit than in 1993. 

Ericsson's results exceeded 
most analysts' expectations, 
and the company’s shares rose 
to 418 krona from 402. 

(Bloomberg, AFX) 

■ Swedish Stocks Rise . 

Stock prices rose after com- 
ments by an opposition Social 
Democratic Party leader eased 
market concern about the par- 
ty’s plans for the economy - 
should it come to power, news 
agencies reported. 

The benchmark ABaersvaeri- 
den index rose 1.02 percent, to 
1,902.92 points, after Goeran 
Pcrsson, the Social Democrats' 
shadow finance minister, said 
the opposition’s manifesto con- 
tained a number of concrete, 
savings proposals. 

The party is due to present its 
platform Friday, and reports 
that it might contain measures 
that would restrain the econo- 
my had caused markets to drop. 

Also on Thursday, the gov- 
ernment said the number of un- 
employed people in Sweden 
rose 20,000 in My from June, 

( raising the jobless rate to 8.8 
» percent from 8.5 percent. 

(AFX, Knighz-Ridder) 


By Richard M. Werotraub 

' ' Washmgioa Peat Service 

WASHINGTON — If John Leahy has his 
way, Europe's Airbus Industrie will stop 
thinking Eke a stepchild of international aero- 
space manufacturing and start acting like the 
big- time player it has become. 

As the. first American to step into the top 
management-ranks of (he European consor- 
tium m a decade, the New York native will 
have his say Sept. 1 as Airbus’s senior vice 
president conanerrial, responsible for world- 
wide sakvpriring and strategic planning. 

[On Thursday, Nicholas R. Tomassetti, 
who previously worked for McDonnell Doug- 
las COrpv was named president and chief 
Operating officer of Airbus Industrie erf North 
America too, the Associated Press reported 
from Washington.] 

Mr. Leahy _ said that when Airbus was es- 
tablisbed m J 968, the company aimed to 
capture 30 percent of the world market for 
largp commercial planes, a goal that “seemed 
almost unattainable.” But, be said, “We’ve 
exceeded that.” 

“Our goal now is 50 percent,” he said, with 
the other half going to U.S. manufacturers — 
primarily Boeingl “There’s no reason we can’t 

... During Mr- Leahy's rise to president of 
Herndon, Virginia-based Airbus Industrie of 


North America Inc. in the past nine years, 
Airbus planes have entered the fleets of most 
major airlines, although they still arc junior to 
Boeing and McDonnell Douglas. Airbus’s 
staying power will be tested over the next year 
as airlines review their fleets as pan of the cosi- 
cutting storm sweeping over the industry. 

But Mr. Leahy said Airbus was well-posi- 
tioned to ride what could be a wave of orders 
for new planes once the airlines work their 
way out of die financial doldrums. 

Airbus goes head-to-head with Boeing on 
just about every size aircraft, and Mr. Leahy 
said that in some new technologies, Boeing 
has been playing catch-up. 

Toulouse, France-based Airbus Industrie 
doesn't actually make the planes it sells but 
coordinates their manufacture by the partner 
companies: Aerospatiale of France, Deutsche 
Aerospace of Germany, British Aerospace of 
Britain and CASA of Spain. 

For years. U.S. manufacturers have com- 
plained that Airbus not rally has been subsi- 
dized by the governments of its member com- 
panies but that those governments have 
weighed in, sometimes at the highest levels, in 
support of Airbus sales. While the U.S. gov- 
ernment has offered occasional help to its 
manufacturers, it never has been as active as 
under the current administration. 


Bloomberg Bunnesj Vrus 

LUDWIGSHAFEN, Ger- 
many — BASF AG, the firvt of 
Germany’s three major chemi- 
cal companies to report results, 
said Thursday that pretax profit 
rose 41 percent in the first half, 
to 683 million Deutsche marks 
(S438 million). 

But investors bad expected 
more, and BASF shares fell 3 
DM, to 326.50. 

Many analysts had expected 
midyear profit would rise more 
than 50 percent at Germany’s 
largest maker of mass-market 
chemicals. 

“We were expecting at least a 
50 percent increase in pretax 
profit," said Karl Wagner, an 
analyst with Dresdner Interna- 
tional Research Institute 
GmbH. 

BASF said a lower corporate 
tax rate helped BASF more 
than double its profit in the first 
half, to 425 million DM from 
199 million DM in the first half 
of 1993. 

BASF said sales in the first 
half rose 6.5 percent, to 21.68 
billion DM. It also said pretax 


36 percent, to 334 million DM. 
while second-quarter sales rose 
9 percent, to 1 1.07 billion DM. 

The company said domestic 
sales in the first half fell 2 per- 
cent, to 5.96 billion DM. BASF 
sales in Europe as a whole, in- 
cluding Germany, rose 6 per- 
cent. to 13.7 billion DM. in the 
first half. Other regions and 
nearly all production areas in- 
creased sales. 

Sales in North America rose 
5.4 percent in the period, to 4.53 
billion DM. sales in Latin 
America climbed 8.6 percent, to 
1.27 billion DM. and in Asia. 
Australia and Africa, rose 7.6 
percent, to 2.19 billion DM. 

■ Henkel Profit Rises 11% 

The household chemicals 
group Henkel KGaA said its 
first-half pretax profit rose 11 
percent, to 364 million DM. 
from a year earlier, while sales 
were virtually unchanged a! 
7.06 billion DM. Agence 
France- Presse reported from 
Dusseldorf. 

Sales in Europe fell 3 percent, 
while those in the rest of the 



London * 

FTSE 100 Index 

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1994* • • 


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Sources: Reuters, AFP 

Very briefly: 


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[nicnuiinrjl Herald Trihine 


profit in the second quarter rose world climbed 1 1 percent. 


• Nestte SA said it had taken a 92 percent stake in the French 
mineral water company Sources du Col Saint-Jean SA. 

• Thomson SA’s issued and guaranteed debt was downgraded by 
Standard & Poor’s ADEF rating agency because of the group's 
links to Cr&fit Lyonnais, which is suffering sharp losses. 

• Veha AG is considering a posable quotation of its shares on Wall 
Street, Finance Director Kurt Lauk was quoted as saying. 

• Deutsche BA LuftfahrtgeseUscbaft GmbH said it had rejected a 
spcooperation deal offered by (he German regional airline Euro- 
wings Lnftverkebrs AG. 

• Royal Van Ommeren NV. a Dutch shipping and tank storage 
company, said operating profit in the first half surged to 26.5 
milli on guilders ($15 million) from 10.1 million guilders a year 
earlier on improvements in the European oil tank storage market 
and cost-cutting. 

• Commerzbank AG of Germany said it had purchased a stake of 
about 20 percent in the Polish bank Rozwoju Eksportu. 

• Switzerland posted a record current account surplus of 27 billion 
francs ($21 billion) in 1993, up 5.8 billion francs from 1992. 
Merchandise trade contributed 2.9 billion francs, compared with 
a deficit of 1 billion francs in 1992, while services contributed 14.3 
billion, compared with 12.9 billion francs a year earlier. 

• Wofters Ktower NV of the Netherlands said it had acquired 
Simon & Schuster Young Books of Britain. The price was not 
disclosed. 

• Norsk Hydro AS said it agreed to the sale of its Danish oil and 
gas exploration unit, including its license rights on the Danish 
continental shelf, to a unit of Amerada Hess Corp. 

Reuters. AFX. AFP. BhMmherg. Kmghl-Ridder 


Losses Rise, but Fokker Sees Soft landing in ’96 Scherin s Stands 

B By Its Two Drugs 

- Jteuterj The result was much worse guilders on a sale and lease- The financial restruciurine J 0 


_ Jtatury The result was much worse 

AMSTERDAM — Fokker than expected, but the company 
NV, the Dutch airplane manu- said it had reached a turri- 
facturer, said Thursday that its around point In 1993 the corn- 


loss climbed :54 percent in the 
first haH of 1994 after hefty 
charges that it said would pave 


any had a net loss of 460 mil- 
30 guilders. 

The first half of 1994 was 


the way fra* profitability by helped by an extraordinary gain 
1996. of 195 million guilders, com- 

Tbe net loss was 196 million pared with a 90 minion-guilder 
guilders {SI 13 million), com- extraordinary charge last year, 
pared with 127 million guilders Fokker said this was the bal- 
ls the first half of 1993. ance of income of 420 million 


The financial restructuring 
back arrangement for its pat- also included a convertible loan 
ents and a charge of 225 million from Deutsche Aerospace and 
guilders for reorganization. the formation of a separate 

company to run leasing. 

The sale and lease-back ar- 
rangement was part of a capital Fokker said the first signs of 
injection totaling some 2 billion recovery in the aircraft market 
guilders from the Daimler-Benz seemed to be emerging. In the 
unit Deutsche Aerospace and first half of 1994, it signed coa- 


the Netherlands government. 
Fokker is SI percent owned by 
Germany’s Daimler-Benz. 


tracts to deliver 10 Fokker 100s. 
14 Fokker 50s, seven Fokker 
70s and four Fokker 60s. 


A Second Russian Investment House Shuts Its Doors 


Compiled by Our Staff Fnm Dispatches 

MOSCOW — Directors of the Rus- 
sian investment company Russky Dom 
Sellings, or Russian House of Selling, 
fled the country after shutting down op- 
erations, a Russian lax police spokesman 
said Thursday. 

RDS is the second Russian investment 
company this month to shut down and 
wipe out the savings of millions of inves- 
tors. MMM, an investment company 
that government officials labeled a pyra- 
mid scheme, collapsed at the end of July 


and shut down this month after its chair- 
man was jailed. 

“The founders of RDS aren't in Rus- 
sia now,” said Nikolai Medvedev, a 
spokesman for the Russian tax police. 
'They’re in the Baltic countries or in 
Argentina." 

RDS suspended operations Saturday, 
dung chaos in Russia’s financial sector. 
Its widespread television and newspaper 
advertisements had promised 13 million 
investors five rubles a day for every 1.000 
rubles (47 cents) invested in the company. 


Meanwhile, the jailed head of MMM. 
Sergei Mavrodi, said Thursday that all of 
the company’s offices should reopen for 
trading on Monday. Mr. Mavrodi is be- 
ing held on charges of tax fraud. 

RDS’s troubles with the law began 18 
months ago. In early 1993 a Russian 
court ruled that RDS had no license to 
trade securities or accept investments. 
The central bank published an official 
warning to investors that RDS was oper- 
ating illegally. (Bloomberg. AFP ) 


Complied by Our Staff From Dispatches 

BERLIN — Schcring AG 
said Thursday it saw no cancer 
risk from the active substance 
in two of its best-selling hor- 
mone drugs. Androcur and 
Diane 35. and called German 
drug authorities’ reaction inap- 
propriate. 

The Federal Institute for 
Medication and Medical Prod- 
ucts said Tuesday that tests on 
human cells had reinforced the 
suspicion that cyproleron ace- 
tate could cause cancer. 

The institute has asked 
Schering to submit any research 
or test results on the drugs bv 
Sept. 19. 

The company said the insti- 
tute's findings aid not lake into 
account two decades of Scher- 
ing’s experience with cypro- 
teron acetate. 

(Bloomberg. Reuters) 


PIRACY: U.S. Says CD Bootleggers Thrive in China 


NYSE 

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- — — - — ■ ■ - 1 - * Continued from Page 9 

factories and curbs rampant pi- 
I l\| 1 1 A • racy of videotapes, audio tapes. 

-*-*■ ’■k^AfAe computer software and books. 

i oi In June, Washington gave Beij- 

£illl€S I TT6 anijting ing six months to resolve the 


Continued from Page 9 


piracy' issue. 

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an economic growth rate nese counterparts last month, 
“above 5 percent" this year. lhc U S. trade represen- 

M tative. Charlene Barshefsky. 

Nonethel®^ sipufirami de- jn Bcijinra that although 
lays in implemenung new p^i- chi M J* lecl ^ 

reluctanM to “Give us five years to end this 

unions resistant to reforms and .» s » : no h. n 


mem did not close down the 
factory in this city about 75 
miles (120 kilometers) west of 
Shanghai even after officials 
discovered it was pirating 
works by American singer 
Whitney Houston and Hong 
Kong pop stars ringing in Can- 
tonese, among many others. 

Mr. Giouw said the federa- 
tion filed suit ia a Chinese court 
against a Taiwan businessman. 
Shih Hua Luk, who was alleg- 
edly making compact disks w 
Suzhou and at another plant in 
Hangzhou. 

Mr. Shib’s lawyer in Shang- 


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surplus workers in a bloated zjf- ... f solve' these The Suzhou factoiys owners 

public industrial sector have b!ems in five vears . ^en I & d respond to requests for 
prompted doubts about the [hink we wiU have done a good interviews, 
government s appetite for con- - ^ ~ Ms. Barshefsky said that Ctu- 

tinued reforms. while the dubbing on some , na ’ s compact-disk factories 

“He's constrained now.” cassette tapes bootlegged in bav e a production capacity ot 
Orokar Goswairri of the Indian can sound sloppy, the about 75 ™llioo disks a year 

Statistical Institute said in ref- n Ua lirv of China’s pirated com- f a t l virtually every one of 
erence to the widespread belief pact through digital tech- the disks produced in China 
that Mr. Singh’s ability to im- n ofogy approaches that of le- W3 f pirated, 
plement change and control gjiimate disks at a far lower Industry officials said most 
deficit spending will be ham- price. ° r the compact disk factories in 

tiered bv a national election still . „ ... . . .. , , China were joint ventures with 

atleast 18 months away. , Io BeiJtog.puuted disks of investors from Hong Kong or 
“There is little basis' for any best-selling albums sell in street Taiwan who had sought part- 
such conclusion,” Mr. Singh markets for about 5— ners among the relatives of offi- 

said. “After three vears of re- ^*In China, there are very few cials of the ruling Communist 

ats that are not involved Party. 

ant piracy," said J.C, Paul Ewing, vice president 
regional director of the and regional director of Warner 
tional Federation of the Music International in Hong 
raphic Industry. Kong, said the Chinese fac- 

3iouw said the govern- tones were able to make pirated 


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forms, the Indian economy has CD plants that are not involved 
come out of its crisis and the in blatant piracy," said J.C, 
real economy is now onto a Giouw, regional director of the 
higher growth path, with the International Federation of the 
promise that in years to come Phonographic Industry, 
things will improve further." Mr. Giouw said the gpvem- 


In Beijing, pirated disks of 
best-selling albums sell in street 
markets for about $2. 

“In China, there are very few 


disks within days of the release 
of major recordings. Only a few 
weeks after the spring release of 
a new hit single by Prince. “The 
Most Beautiful Girl in the 
World," the song was turning 
up on pirated disks in Hong 
Kong. 

Neil Turkewitz, senior vice 
president of the Recording In- 
dustry Association of America, 
said iiS. recording companies 
found it difficult to do business 
in China because of laws that 
restricted the distribution of re- 
cordings. 

Yet the U.S. recordings are 
being reproduced illegally by 
the tens of millions, with the 
Chinese government continuing 
to grant import concessions for 
the machinery needed to make 
the compact disks, he said. 

“Things are happening much 
too slowly," said Diane Stnir- 
oldo, a spokeswoman for the 
Business Software Alliance. 

The alliance estimated that 
95 percent of all the software 
used in China is pirated and 
that the resulting losses to 
American software companies 
totaled more than 5300 million 
last year. 


See our 

Business Message Center 

every Wednesday 


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international herald tribune, Friday, august 19, 1994 


■atio. 


1 iit n 


New Zealand 
Politician 
Depresses 
Stock Prices 

Bloomberg Bittiness News 

WELLINGTON — New 
Zealand’s stock market was 
pulled down Thursday by a 
leading opposition pdfitadan’s 
remarks that f inancial markets 
were filled with ignorant yup- 
pies and foreign investment was 
“fair-weather money.” 

Jim Anderton, head of tb? . 
Alliance coalition that narrowly 
lost a key parliamentary byrieo- 
tion last week,, also said the 
stock market was like a caano 
and had nothing to do with ev-“ 
eryday life. 

His remarks, because of his 
apparently growing popularity 
in the country, helped pull . the. 
New Zealand Stoat Exchange 
40-share index down 0.19 per- 
cent, to 2,09738. 

Finance Minister Bill Birch 
denounced his remarks, saying 
Mr. Anderlon’s “macho ram- 
blings” showed a “reckless dis- 
regard for the welfare of ordi- 
nary New Zealanders and a 
youth meat watching too many 
John Wayne movies." 

In an interview with local 
newspapers, Mr. Anderton said 
he would not be concerned if 
foreign investors — who own 
about 40 percent of the coun- 
try’s stocks — left. 

“New Zealanders have to 
know this is fair-weather money 
and it’s speculative,” he said: 
“As soon as it suits that money, 
to leave, it will. Yon don’t build 
a long-term future for your 
country on that money. 

“Let me just soy to those yup- 
pies in the markets, what they 
don’t know about politics ana 
the economy would £GB the En- 
cyclopaedia Britamrica 10 times 
over. - - 

Mr. Anderton also said un- 
employment and stagnating 
wages, not central bank poli- 
cies, had caused the country’s 
low inflation. 

The government announced - 
that New Zealand 1 s unemploy- 
ment rate fell to a four-year low 
of 8.4 percent in the second 
quarter from 9.0 percent in the 
previous quarter. 

Economists, wbohad expect- 
ed the rate to fall only to about 
8.8 percent, pointed out that the 
participation rate, which jobs-.. 
' sures the number of people in 
the work force and those actively 
seeking work, was down slightly. 


, 22, Is Heir- Apparent 


The Associated Press 

SYDNEY'-- Rupert Murdoch on 
Thursday named his son, Lachlan Mur- 
doch, as general manager of Queensland 
Newspapers, a move analysis said made 


' chairman and chief executive will take 
over at Queensland on Monday, said 
Kea Cowley, head of News Corp.’s Aua- 
, traHan operations. 

When he was 22 in 1953. Rupert Mur- 
doch took over a now-defunct tabloid in 
Adelaide, The News. The company he 
now runs is a ld bOlion Australian dollar 


($12 billion) empire that spans the globe 
and includes newspapers, book publish- 
ing, satellite television and film studios. 

“It is definite succession planning," a 
media analyst said. “Rupert Murdoch 
has said he has a desire to leave a legacy 
for his family. That legacy would be one 
of the most powerful communications 
companies in the world.” 

Another analyst said Mr. Murdoch 
was testing his EOT in newspapers before 
giving him a larger responsibility in the 
worldwide communications business. 


lais, after earnings of 991.6 million dollars 
in the cine months aided March 31. 

Mr. Murdoch has repeatedly stated his 
desire for his family to retain control of 
News Corp. Last year he proposed intro- 
ducing shares with extra voting rights 
that would have allowed him to pursue 
expansion plans without diluting voting 
control 

But that proposal was opposed by ma- 
jor institutional shareholders and was 
finally withdrawn. 

Lachlan Murdoch, a recent graduate 
of Princeton University, is die second of 


News Cap. is expected to post full- three children of Rupert Murdoch and 
year profit of more than 12 bilion dol- his second wife, Anna. 


'Premium’ Imports Lower Japan’s Beer Prices 


By TJL Reid 

WasJungton PoaSerrux 

; TOKYO— -The vending ma- 
chine outside theMasumoto Li- 
quor Store in Tokyo's Shibuya 
section is a-mirirboosm of the 
revolutionary changes brewing 
in Japan’s beer market. 

- T iW- tens of thousands of 
other wmr-hinca all over Japan 
this vending machine sells beer, 
wine,’ sake and whiskey in vari- 
ous cans and bottles. 

Bat what is revolutionary is 
that page competition has bro- 


whiie, there’s a bargain brand: a Japan these days has been a so- been a problem for Japan’s do- 
can of Budweaser, which sells called price revolution. Jap a- mestic brewers. A record-set- 
for less than $1 in the United nese consumers have become ring beat wave hit the country 
States, is $220. price-conscious, and manufac- this summer, and beer sales are 


been a problem for Japan’s do- 
mestic brewers. A record-set- 


S tales, is $220. price-conscious, and manufac- 

Lflce many other products in turers ignore this at their peril. 


Japan these days, beer has been 


ur turers ignore this at their peril, breaking records. The big Japa- 
en The brewers learned fast, nese brewers are producing at 
to. Faced with a price increase on capacity, 
its domestic beer, major retailers p 
and CTmsmaU liquor stores bo- 

a- gan pushnm cheaper imports, to faC etb e fact that 

n- Japan s biggest convenience- ± suddenly competing 

™ “ST agS* foreign b^werTShasI 

to seEfing Miller Ice beer from the ’ _T3T w, 

of ESS States at $1.78 a can, an c °2L arc much lower. 


km oat among the different nobody ever cut prices. 


swept up in a bargain boom. Faced with a price increase on 
triggered by low-priced imports domestic beer, major retailers 
sold at new discount stores. and even small liquor stores be~ 
For d e cades, the beer busi- gan pushing cheaper imports, 
ness here was marked by gen- Japan’s biggest convenience- 
ted competition among die big store chain, 7 -eleven, began 
brewers: Kirin, Asahi, Sapporo sailing Miller Ice beer from the 
and Suntory. Every borne of United Slates at $1.78 a can, an 
every brand cost the same, and amount still considered a dis- 


brands of beer in the machine. 

Some Japanese brands still 
cost $220 for a standard 12- 
ounce can, and some “premi- 
um” "brands cost $2.40. Mean- 


12 obody ever cut pnees. count price in Japan. 

AH four big brewers raised The brands that Americans 
their paces m lockstep this living here have considered 
spring when the federal liquor “premium" beers — such as 


MEM Gets Atlas Stake 
After Three-Way Deal 

. . Compiled by Our Sutff From Dispatches 

SYDNEY — • MIM Holdings Ltd. said Thursday it had 
taken an 11 percent stake in Atlas Carp., a U.S. gold mining 
: company, after Atlas bought MB^Ts slake in a third company. 
. Granges Inc. of Canada. 

MIM said it bought shares and warrants valued 21 $11 
millio n at the request of Allas. “They requested us to take up 
: equity and we did,” a MIM spokesman said. 

Alias recently acquired MEM'S 37.4 percent share of 
Granges, and to partly fund that purchase it launched a $50 
minion rights issue. Atlas is discussing a merger with Granges, 
Dakota Mining Co and Hycioft Resources & Development 
Corp. 

Atlas has a 19 percent stake in Dakota and owns 502 
percent of Hycroft. A four-way merger would result in a 
“well-financed and widely held intermediate-sized North 
American gold producer,” Atlas said. 

With the sale of the Granges stake, MI M’s remaining major 
investment in Canada is an 8.65 percent stake in the Cominco 
Ltd. zinc mine in British Columbia. 

(Knighi-Ridder, AFX. Bloomberg) 


spring when the federal Hquor “premium" beers — such as 
tax went up. Miller, Heineken and Carlsberg 

One of the changes sweeping — are the discount beers here. 

; • This year should see the first 

significant growth in imports’ 
share of Japan’s beer market 
i] nD Analysts say it should grow fur- 

.lAdS tjUUkU ther as consumers come to 

think of Coots, Carlsberg and 
if/ TTk f the like as the low-priced way to 

W WJIV 1 quench their thirst 

T J The biggest import success is 

„ r . .. . . • Bndweiser, which says it con- 

^ t /Vu a •# k a ttok a b°ut 60 percent of Ja- 

f L >f *“ d P c llrsd f> ■*. V d pan's foragn-boTnartal. 

bsCotp. a U.S.*oIdnumng thTSoniam, He rash of 

[NfTs slake in a third company, iow _ priced Sports has not 


costs are much lower. 

“The price increase that the 
four Japanese brewers imposed 
earlier this year is gang to turn 
out to be a major marketing 
flop” Hiroshi Nakamura of the 
Distribution Economics Insti- 
tute said 

■ Tsingtao Profit Rises 63 % 

China’s Tsingtao Brewery 
said net profit rose 63 percent 
in the first six months because 
of increased productivity, 
Bloomberg Business News re- 
ported from Hong Kong. 

Tsingtao reported profit of 
1121 million yuan (513 mil- 
lion), compared with 68.9 mil- 
lion yuan a year earlier, and 
said sales rose 5 percent, to 
609-5 million yuan. 


Page 13 

ASIA/PACIFIC 


Sony Says 
Strong Yen 
Cut Profit 


Bloomberg Business Sews 

TOKYO — Sony Corp. on 
Thursday blamed the strong 
yen for" a 39 percent fall in 
group pretax profit in the three 
months ended June 30. The 
company continued to show 
optimism, however, that profit 
and sales for the year ending in 
March 1995 would rise. 

The consumer electronics 
and entertainment conglomer- 
ate posted group pretax profit 
for the period of 23.58 billion 
yen ($235 million), down from 
38.6 billion yen in the compara- 
ble period last year. Sales rose 
4 3 percent, to 864.5 billion yen. 

Nearly 75 percent of Sony’s 
sales are overseas in dollars, 
and revenue must be converted 
back to yen. Thus a fall in the 
value of the dollar cuts profit 

“Our profit would have been 
43 billion yen more if it wasn’t 
for the yen,” said Tsnnao Ha- 
shimoto, Sony’s executive dep- 
uty president He said the com- 
pany was also hit by weaker 
European currencies, especially 
the British pound. 

The dollar was worth around 
103 yen in the first quarter of 
this year, down from 1 10 yen in 
the first quarter of 1993. Today, 
a dollar buys around 100 yen. 

Mr. Hashimoto said the com- 
pany saw no need to alter its 
forecast for the year. Sony said 
in June that it expected group 
pretax profit to come to 125 
billion yen, up 22 percent on the 
year, while sales will rise 7 per- 
cent, to 3.99 trillion yen. 

First-quarter sales rose in all 
areas of Sony’s business except 
videocassette recorders. Sales in 
Japan were up 3.9 percent to 
24438 billion yea, while over- 
seas sales rose 43 percent In- 
come from the music business 
rose. Revenue from movies fell 
4.3 percent 


HbjtcfKorig 

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Straits times 


Tokyo 

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.Jafca ffet ... „Stoek Index . 

New z^Hj'TyizseTo 
■ Swribay^'V 
Sources Reuters, AFP 

Very briefly: 


• Taiwan ended a 45-year ban on local banks dealing with their 
mainl and Chinese counterparts, as five banks were cleared to 
operate on the mainl and! through overseas subsidiaries. 

• A UJS.-Australian consortium led by Custom Coals Corp. and 
MRLL&L, a subsidiary of China Strategic Holdings Group, signed 
a deal to spend $888.6 million building an 800-kilometer (500- 
miles) coal slurry pipeline, the world’s longest in China, where 
coal provides 85 percent of the country’s energy. 

• Samsung Aerospace Industries Ltd., a unit of the Samsung 
group, wifi lead a consortium to produce South Korea’s first 
midsized aircraft, a Trade Ministry official said. 

• Claremont Petroleum NL of Australia and its Beach Petroleum 
NL subsidiary signed an agreement with North Korea for oil and 
gas exploration in that country. 

• Taiwan investors took up at feast 97 percent of a I9S miliion- 
share offering by state-run China Steel Corp. this month, accord- 
ing to the lead underwriter, China Development Corp. The Eco- 
nomics Ministry is p lannin g to reduce its holding in the company. 

• WJ> & H.O. WEBs LctL, an Australian tobacco company, said it 
would return 99 milli on Australian dollars ($73 million) to share- 
holders because of the company’s strong financial position and 


surplus funds. 


Asia Securities Reports Inquiry by Unnamed Investors 


Bloomberg Business News 

HONG KONG — Asia Securities In- 
ternational Ltd. said Thursday that un- 
identified investors were interested in 
buying control of the real estate, invest- 
ment and securities company. 

Asia Securities is controlled by Lippo 
Ltd. The managing director. Jesse 
Leung, said the board had been told of 


inquiries from independent third parties 
interested in buying nearly 51 percent of 
the company’s issued share capital. 

At Asia Securities' current stock price, 
a stake of that size would be valued at 
703.9 million Hong Kong dollars ($91 
million). 

The announcement noted recent ru- 


mors that a private company , Bill boss 
Assets Ltd., had been trying to acquire 
control of Asia Securities. But Mr. Leung 
said the approach in question had not 
been from Billboss. 

Shares in Asia Securities, which were 
trading at 243 dollars on Aug. 1, rose to 
close Wednesday at 2.48 dollars but lost 
9 cents Thursday to 2J9 dollars. 


AFP, AP. Bloomberg, Reuters 


Taiwan Posts Strong Growth 

Agence Fronce-Preae 

TAIPEI — Taiwan's econo- 
my grew 6.1 percent in the three 
months ended in June from the 
year-earlier quarter, officials 
said Thursday. 

The rate surpassed previous 
forecasts. Economists attribut- 
ed the strong growth to im- 
provement in exports, private 
consumption and industrial 
production. 


'c~ 

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AUGUST 22-27 
19 4 4 

Following the success of 
the Normandy landings in 
early June 1944, Allied 
troops continued fighting 
throughout the summer 
across the north of France, 
finally reaching the 
outskirts of Paris. 

In the last days of 
August, as the Aides 
approached the city, the 
unarmed population of 
Paris - reinforced by a 
small number of armed 
resistance fighters - rose 
against the occupying 
German forces. In four 
days of street battles and 
general insurrection, 
Paris was liberated. 

To commemorate these 
dramatic days, we will 
reproduce the six front 
pages from the New York 
Herald Tribune chronicl- 
ing the week of August 
22 through 27. 

Events covered in that 
same extraordinary week 
include the liberation of 
Marseille, Grenoble, Le 
Havre and Rouen, plus 
an exclusive report 
following the liberation of 
Florence. You’ll follow the 
reports day-by-day from 
the Herald Tribune’s 
award-winning team of 
war correspondents. 



Don’t miss the International Herald Tribune’s 
special commemorative series starting Monday, August 22nd. 


INTKRiWTIONM. 











- ■•• .»•.• - - •.-•«-■■■, a -.-Si 'fa.t x *--'■' ■% ■* ■-'». *• "■ *• •■ .' - -■’• "" 


Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 1994 


NASDAQ 

Thursday’s 4 p.m. 

TO* list compiled by the AP, consists of the 1,000 
most traded securities In terms of dollar value. It is 1 £ 
updated twice a year. | U 


1! Varan Sw. 

Hgh Low Ewefc Olv Via PE IBS H«h Law Latest Qi'vb 




































































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 1994 


Page 15 



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International 

BficruHineftt 

Every Thursday 
Contact 
Philip Oma 
Tel.: 

(331} 44 37 93 36 

Fax: 

(331)46 37 93 70 
or youf nearest 
IHT office 

ex' representative 


For information on how to list your 


fund, fax Simon OSBORN at (33-1) 46 37 21 33. 




— V I rn.’Tl 




Attend this major 


international conference to 
meet and question the regions 
Ucv decision-makers. 


THE MIDDLE EAST 
EASTERN MEDITERRANEAN 

ASTIR PALACE HOTEL. VOULI AGMENI, NEAR ATHENS 
10-1 1 OCTOBER, 199-i 

Hcralb^^Enbuiic 



FOR FURTHER DKTAILS 
PLEASK CONTACT: 


Mona Cowan. Inicrnalinnal HcraUI Inlnmc 
K5 Iconic Acre. London WClM-'UII. UK 


Tel: HA 7\ ) (Soli aM2 

Fax: HA ”U 0/ 1/ 










w»t. 


1 


I 






-j. .... 



Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 1994 


SPORTS 


4i-'. - 


For Clown Prince , 
Last Hurrah at 74 

51 Seasons of Baseball Burlesque 


By Marc Fisher 

Washington Post Service 

NEW BRITAIN, Connecticut — The 
Clown Prince of Baseball w alks with a 


lumbering gait and a bit of a stoop. 
When he’s hauling his ancient duffel 


When he’s hauling his ancient duffel 
bag, hand-stenciled with his name and 
title, he grimaces with every step. 

But when he reaches the entrance to 
Beehive Field, he straightens up, sticks 
his face in the door and bellows: “Have 
no fear. Big Nose is here!" 

The reception room of (he New Brit- 
ain Red Sox, a Class AA minor league 
team in the Boston organization, is emp- 
ty. No one greets the Gown Prince on 
this August afternoon, three hours be- 
fore a meaningless Eastern League 
matchup between the high-flying Bowie 
Baysox and the hapless home team, 
grumbling under the indignity of a six- 
game losing streak. 

No matter. Max Patkin has been 
around long enough, half a century in 
the game, to know the rule: Never let a 


'At the ballpark. I’m 
always on. I make people 
laugh, it makes me feel 
better. I had a sad life. 9 


good line go to waste. Come to think of 
it, he’s not one to toss away a lousy line 
either. So he charges on. into the next 
office: “Have no fear. Big Nose is here!” 

Pa tkin. 74, is joking through the final 
days of his last full season, his 51st 
s umme r in the minors, where only the 
umpires can call a strike. The million- 
aires are off h unting and fishin g while 
federal mediators try to save the big- 
league game. But Parkin's act goes on: 
He travels around the country on senior 
citizen fares, mimicking the players, tak- 
ing his turn at bat ana then running up 
the third base line. 

“What the hell didja expect, Robert 
Radford?” he shouts at the startled Brit- 
Sox staff. He sticks out his lone top 
tooth: “I got a new toothbrush — with 
one bristle. One bristle, one tooth: get it? 
Joke. JOKE!” 

By now, the whole front office, all five 
of them, gathers around Patkin. He digs 


through his bag and pulls out a video- 
tape, his own highlights show. He pops 


tape, his own highligh ts show. He pops 
it on, and everyone watches and laughs: 

Here's Max dancing on the field in 
1951, wearing the unifoim of the St. 
Louis Browns. And here he is in his 
trademark oversize costume with the 
question mark on the bade, a 1969 Mon- 
treal Expos multicolored cap cocked 
sideways on his head. Patkin dances his 
neck-popping, head-jerking, shoulder- 
rolling, arm-flailing, elbow-shooting 
chicken number. He shouts, “What a 
town! Spent a month here one night.” 

Then, his most famous bit, the geyser. 
He chugs a can of water, takes his place 
in the first base coach’s box, and over 
the course of the next inning occasional- 
ly throws back his head and sprays a fine 
mist into the air. He does it again, waits. 


“How do you do that?" one young 
intern asks. 

The Gown Prince beams. 

Max Patkin is baseball's Willy Lo- 
man, a salesman who is known in every 
burg. He roams America's small towns, 
drawing a few hundred extra folks to 
rickety wooden ballparks where a few 
phenoms wait to be discovered by big- 
league scouts while most of the players 
scowl and fret, their diamond drams 
already spoiled. 

Patkin is largely unknown in big cit- 
ies. But in places such as New Iberia, 
Louisiana, “where the mosquitoes were 
so big, they thought my nose was a 
landing field,” the Clown Prince is 
somebody. WeU, somebody enough to 
sell some seats. 

“Max does pretty good,” says Gerry 
Berthiaume, the New Britain general 
manager. “Kids like him. Parents know 

him" 

For $2,000 a night, teams can buy 
baseball's final burlesque act, the last 
vestige of the coarse carnival that show- 
men like Bfll Veeck and Charlie Finley 
brought to the game. The end of the 
road is near. He used to do 100 dates a 
season. He’s down to 45 and plans only 
the occasional spot show next year. 

He has three teeth, one on top, two 
below. His ankles are so swollen that his 
right arch has collapsed. His knees are 
full of fluid, so bashed and bowed it’s 
hard to tell the kneecaps from the lumps 
on the sides of his legs. And when he 
comes off the field after batting, Patkin 
sits wheezing on the bench, zoned out 
while he waits for his heart to recover 
from the trauma. 

He's nearly bald. He has a ring of thin, 
gray hair, a bronzed pate and deep crev- 
ices in his leathery face. He looks like 
Lyndon B. Johnson with half a pound of 
siloed turkey rotted up and slapped onto 
his face where his nose should oe. 

He met Babe Ruth and played a gains t 
Grover Oeveland Alexander. He was a 
minor leaguer himself, winning 14 and 
losing 13 over three seasons before an 
arm injury forced him into the coach's 
box. He first r ealize d he could make a 
crowd laugh when Joe DiMaggio hit a 
homer off him and Patkin fell in behind 
the slugger, mimicking his loping gait 
around the base paths. 

“I’m tired, tired, tired," Patkin says. 
But he can't quit. Late at night, when he 
has nothing to do but watch the lube 
and wait for the next show, be is frank: 
“This keeps me young. I can't take the 
pipe and slippers. I quit. I'll die." 

“I'm a nice guy," Patkin says. "The 
only one I make fun of is me. At the 
ballpark. I'm always on. But I'm two 
people. I'm not a bona fide clown, but 
I'm trying to bring something out of me. 

I make people laugh, it makes me feel 
better. I had a sad life, lonely life." 

Now it’s Yankee Stadium, the last 
day. In 12 hours, the strike begins. Mil- 



By QaireSmith, ... 

Nt» York Tima Service 

NEW YORK — A hiccup. Thai’s what the 
two-day strike, of 19&5 was, as far as major- 
league baseball players wesre concerned. When 
the settlement; came; majorleaguas put on their 

A doubleheader here, a doubiebe^CT^t^ere, 
and the gaps in the . schedules were filled. The 
players and own- 

ere bad their sea- ‘ - 

sons restored I ?!!? 86 Kjl 
and . their, post- ... ■ 

season guaran- ■ 

teed, causing all to lire happily ever after, oral 
least until .collusion and the 1990 lockout 
occurred. 

The current .strike is no longer a hiccup. Even 
if it came to a screeching ban today, no-games 
could be played tomorrow. 

Not if the owners caused the divisive salary 
cap issue to disappear immediately and begged 
players to 'come back: " ' - 


’. Then there are the IpgisticsL If the players and 
owners warfrto rettle today; they. Kkely couldn’t 
reassemble for at least two' days. Most players 
have gone home, some to Latin American 
countries. . . • . 

And jn another vivid reminder that this is not 


yoor father’s umori, some players are vacationing 
m nlsrts like' Hawaii and ElirOM. “We - told 


"m places like Hawaii and Europe. We- told 
jbenw fWefre on strike, so go and.enjoy your- 
selves, but just be aware of the situation, 
Bernazard said. 

, “We did tell them to stay physically fit,” he 
added.,.: 

Still, .players have not held informal team 
wottootslor fear of sending, the wrong message 
about resolve. . 

' Thus, the longer the work stoppage, the great- 
. er the deed for a su mm ertime verson of spring 
- training. And, just like salary tap disputes, its 
. fengtirwitt become an issue at the bargaining 
tablet’.' -.. - t , 

“This is going to have to be negotiated,” Bep 
nazard s»dL "Some players aregoing to want one 
thing; some are going to want other things: 
Teams »b«t. are in' contention, management may 
want something else." 

;Afl toe discussions are- .academic, at this 
point, of bourse, especially since baseball negoti-j 
ators have not met since Friday. . . - 

Stitt, Bernazard said, “In my personal opinion, 
you need ibaut two or three days for every week 1 
younfiss. The first week, you Couldget by with 
two days,.'even though, some would like three; 
especially die pitchers. But two weeks in, you'd 
pidbably need five days instead of four.” 

Therein lies the rub. Matty aspects of the long- 
est mrseason strike can be compared to this one, 
but a major demerit in 1994 stands alone. And 
that is tins strike’s placement On the calendar. 
."The" 1981 season resumed with the All-Sjar 
Game, played Aug; 9. This strike started with 
only 52 days left in the season. 

' Thus, the point of no return, when not enough 
time is left to save even tire postseason, is likely 
to be just past mid-September. 

“Idan’t think, " Bernazard said, “we’re going 
to be playing the World Series in December." 


a a hiccup. Even 

today, no-games 


Not if the players decided to chock. 28 years of 
in, accent the mother of all rollbacks and took 


gain, accept the mother of att rollbacks and took 
batting practice on the planes as' they wirigpd 
their way back to wade. . 

No, major-leagne baseball' has -passed -the 
point of no return- without-ccmscquenccs. Now 
that the strike is going into the 7th day, neither 


the safety of players nor die quality of play can 
be assured. Not without time and. concerted 


Slew MBkr/Tbc AwKmd Pro* Tut Tbt Mtahmsten bi 

The show goes on in the minor leagues, with Max Parkin's weD-wora act 


be assured. Not without time arid, concerted 
effort before the first pitch. - 

At least that’s what the union contends, just as 
it did when the players negotiated a nine-day 
reconditioning period after the 50-day strike m 
1981. = 

That work period was a ratio of about 5 to l,” 
said Tony Bernazard, who was an infielder in 
1981 and is now an executive with the Major 
League Baseball Players Association. That is, 
one day for about every five days missed.” 

Such a period is -needed for reasons of safety, 
say the players, because, too much time has 
passed to rat facing or throwing fastbatts, ran-_ 
mug bases or running down fly balls in the alleys. ' 


lionaire players in alligator boots stride 
across the plush purple carpet There's 


sprays. And when you think he couldn't 
possibly have anything left in his mouth. 


possibly have anything left in his mouth, 
be sprays again, and again. Old Faithful 
explodes 15 or 20 times most nights; his 
record is 40. Even on video, the bit 
amazes the staff. 


across the plush purple carpet There's 
piped -in Muzak, security guards, a staff 
that keeps on coming. The door opens: 
“Have no fear, Big Nose is here!" 

The players busy talking to the New 
York Times and ABC News do not 
glance up. Only Don Mattingly, the gra- 
cious veteran who still loves the game as 
a rookie does, comes over. “Max, long 
time," he says. “I seen you first time in 


Greensboro, 1979. When I was a kid, I 
watched you in Indiana. Evansville.” 

It's an off day for Patkin. Tomorrow 
he's in Connecticut the New Haven 
Ravens versus the Trenton Thunder. 
But be wants to see Yankee Stadium one 
last time, and he wants to visit the team’s 
owner, George Steinbrenner, one of the 
last big-league bosses who hired him. 

The old-timers commiserate with Pat- 
kin about the strike. The millionaires 
won't even look at him, but that doesn't 
stop him. Chi the field, the Gown Prince 
steps over to the visiting Toronto Blue 
Jays, limbering up for the game. “1 wrote 
a book." Patkin shouts. “It’s a best-seller. 
In my home. That’s a joke. A JOKE!" 

Finally, the players crack up. involun- 
tarily. These guys would sooner file a 
grievance than allow some down to kiss 
them when they step up to the plate. 

Bade inside, the Yankee staff is quiver- 
ing. The Boss is in the stadium. That 
means office halls must be clear. No 
stragglers, no reporters. After a Yankee 
executive vouches for Patkin, a nervous 
receptionist allows him to wait in the 
lobby. “It’s O.K_ he’ll want to see me." 
Patkin says, explaining that he used to 
work for Steinbrenner. 

After an hour, the Boss arrives, sees 
someone in his lobby and scowls. He 
turns toward an aide, perhaps to issue an 
execution order. But then, a double take. 
“Max?" Steinbrenner says, easing into a 
smile. Alarmed aides relax. Within mo- 
ments, Patkin is ushered into the Boss’s 
private office. 


“When I was a kid growing up in 
Cleveland, you could be sure of only a 
few things," Steinbrenner says, “like 
Max Patkin coming in every summer to 
put on a meat show and draw a good 
crowd. When I came here, our atten- 
dance was horrible and we had a lousy 
team. 1 was thinking of things we could 
do to liven it up, and I thought of Max. 
Kids love Max." 

Baseball, Steinbrenner says, has got- 
ten too slick. “I know, I know," be says. 
“People can point to me as one reason 
for the commercialism. And if we as 
owners don't want Max's kind of levity, 
then shame on us. Shame on us all if we 
don’t want to pul a little more humility 
in the game.” 

The Prince is in the Gown Hall of 
Fame. He has won more awards than he 
can count. But he pines for one more, a 
ticket to the real Hall in Coopers town. 
That prize would prove he was more than 
a down, that be was a part of baseball. 

So Patkin keeps on barnstorming, 
staying alive. After each show, he sells 
autographed baseball cards, at $1 each. 
Anything else — shirts, caps, hands — 
he signs for free. 

At Beehive Field, be sold 225 cards and 
42 copies of The Clown Prince of Base- 
ball," his autobiography. The baseball 
card money, a plastic bag full of $1 trills, 
pays his bus fare. Over the next couple of 
weeks, Patkin will play Watertown, Con- 
necticut; Augusta, New Jersey; Portland, 
Maine; Amarillo, Texas; Omaha, Ne- 
braska; Bowie, Maryland, and Reading, 
Pennsylvania. In January, he will be 75. 


Meanwhile, Fans Are Fuming 


By Athelia Knight 

Washington Pan Sertice 

WASHINGTON — It’s Day 
7 of the baseball strike,and fans 
across the United Stales are fed 


emption and the players "had 
suppOTtedihe legislatida. . : .. 

" Lastwcek, Senators TToward 
Metzenb'aum, Democrat of, 
CBnl and Orrin Hatch, Republi- 
can of Utah, introduced similar 
legislation that would timrt the 
antitrust exemption and permit 
rite players to Sue the owners if 
the owners impose a salary asp. 

Bindley Stillman, legislative 
counsel of the Consumer Feder- 
ation of America, said his orga- 
nization andXoJ ton’s group are 
not taking safes. . 

The feet that die baseball, 
players are on the right side of 
this isstre is just their good luck,” 
he said. S tillman said his .group 
“has fought evoy antitrust ex- 
emption ut eveiy industry in this 
country whether, it’s insurance, 
health care, baseball Antitrust 
exemptions hurt consumers." <• 

■ A Second Senate BSD ' 

Senator Dermis DeCoocioi, 
Democrat of Arizona, has intro- 
duced legislation that would es- 
tablish a five-member- major 
league baseball commission con- 
sisting of three baseball fan * 
chosen by die president, one 
baseball player and one owner, 
The Associated. Press reported. 


up. They're signing petitions. 
"They’re calling hotlines. And 
they're using the information 
highway to organize. 

“The baseball strike has 
awakened a sleeping giant; the 
American sports fan lobby," 
Adam Kolton, executive direc- 
tor of the New York-based 
Sports Fans United, said at a 
news conference at the Nation- 
al Press Gub. • . 

Kolton’s group, which has 
3,000 members, and the Coo* 
sumer Federation of America, 
with 50 million members, are 
launching a petition drive to get 
Congress to repeal baseball’s 
antitrust exemption. 

“I think there is a tremen- 
dous feeling of anger, resent- 
ment, and people want to chan- 
nel that toward some positive 
action.” be said. 

In June, the Senate Judiciary 
Committee defeated legislation 
that would have lifted the anti- 
trust exemption in matters re- 
lating to labor. Baseball is the 
only sport with an antitrust ex- 


it would conduct binding ar-r 
bitration to . settle disagree- 
ments between players and 
owners and regulate expansion, 
ticket prices, stadium financing, 
television revenues, marketing 
arid merchandising. 

. The need for this authority 
has never been more clear than 


it is today” DeConcini said. 
“This is the eighth work stop; 
page in the past 22 seasons. Od 4. 
viousiy, baseball cannot put its* 


own house in order;" . ‘ 

"The total of canceled games 
rose to 86 - Thursday, matching, 
the' 1972 strike for the second- 
longest walkout behind 1981, 
when 712games were wiped out. 

- The Union head,. Donald 
Fehr, and. management's nego- 
tiator, Richard Ravifch, said 
Wednesday that no negotiating 
sessions are scheduled. 

As the strike enters its sev- 
enth day, teams are starting to 
make cutbacks. The Montreal 
Expos announced that 35 em- 
ployees were sent on vacation 
and will be laid off when their 
vacations end, and the New 
York Yankees said Wednesday 
that more than half the staff of 
100 was sent on vacation. 


DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 


..AND SOME PENCILS, SOME 
PAPER, A PEN AND A 
LOOSE-LEAF BINDER. 


'CAN *00 THINK OF > 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 1994 


Page 17 



For Bud Ldesliga, 



rove 
In a New Season 


The Associated Pna , ' 

FRANKFURT — The 
1994-95 Bundesliga season 
kicks off this weekend with . 
both teams and fans anxious. u> 
ease the memory of GerinanyV 
disappointing showing' at the ' 
World Cnp. 

. The teams have done their 
part, spending 100 milEon Deut- 
sche marks, or $6A5 million, on 
new playere, mdudmg Bay cm 
Munich's purchase of the 
French striker Jean-Pierrc P&piu 
from AC Milan 

The fans have responded by 
buying advance and Season 
tickets in record numbers, put- 
ting the league on course to 
break attendance marks if the 
trend holds. 

To add to tbe.exdtcinent, the 
referees have been instructed to 
follow the offensive-minded., 
rule changes applied during the 
World Cup. 

All of which points to a season . 
wjh more goals and a shorter 
period.of moummgfor the Gexv 
man team that lost to Bulgaria in 
the World Cup quarterfinals in 
the United States. 

. Once again, Bayou Munich 
will be the team to beat. The 
Bavarians, who won the league 
title for a record 13th time last 
season, went shopping in the 
offseason and look to be eves 
stronger. 

In addition to Papin, the 
team acquired the Swiss for- 
ward Alain Sutter from relegat- 
ed Bundesliga rival Nuremberg. 
Bayern also claimed one of 
Germany's top goalkeepers; Ol- 
iver Kami, from Karisnzhe.: . . 

“I think it will be easier to 
score in the Bundesliga than in 
Italy,” Papin said. “In Germa- 
ny, they play more offensively 
and forwards have more space. 7 ’ 

Papin is musing a knee injury 
and Sutter also is injured and 
both may miss Saturday’s open- 
er against Bochum, which re- 
turns to the first division 
strengthened by the signing of 
the U-S. World * 

Wynalda. 

Bayern also went abroad for 
a new coach. Franz Becken- 
ba? *sr stepped down after guid- 
ing the team to the title, so Bay- 
ern hired Giovanni Trapattoni, 


the experienced Italian coach, 
fonnedy of Juventos: . 

Bayern still 1 has veterans 
Lothar Matfhfius, the Brazffian 

the Co^mj^^trSa^AdoIfo 
Valencia, who appears likely to 
lose his place in the smarting 11. 

Yet the new formidable lineup 
got off to an imrtisptaops start. 
’ After a successful preseasecu that 
included a .3-0 victory over Bar- 
celona, Bayern suffered a stun- 
ning defeat to an amateur team 
last weekend in the fint round of 
the Gexxnan Cupt - ' v ‘ 

Expected to ave Bayern a 
.strong mn far tlse Biadesliga 
.title will be Boiussia Dort- 
mnrid, whichspentTnare than 
Bayern . and now- .boasts four 
Goman, internationals hired 
back from Italy: Stefan Reuter, 
Matthias Sammer, Karlheinz 
Riedle and. the. latest addition, 
midfielder Andreas MOller, 
bought from Juventas in tan- 
dem with Julio C£sar, the Bra- 
zilian sweeper. 

- With Swiss striker Sttphane 
Chapuisat and Danish star 
Flemming Povlsen, Dortmund 
once again shbuld be among the 
contenders after finishing 
fourth last year. . 

Bayer Leverkusen, third last 
year, added to its rosier the de- 
fensive midfielder Tom Dooley, 
who returns to the Bundesliga 
after a stint with die TJ-S. na- 
tional team. - . 

.. Kaiserslautern surprised pun- 
dits by finishing second last year 

and giving Bayern a scare late in 
.the season. The team bought sev- 
eral German players and still has 
the- Swiss midfielder CSriaco 
Sforza. 

Karlsruhe went on a shop- 
ping spree and landed a big 
coup by sjgoixte German inter- 
national midfielder Thomas 
HSsster from Roma, though 
team officials werenot happy to 
learn that Hfissler was caught 
driving drunk this week and has 
had ins license suspended „ 

Emtracht Frankfurt, which 
dropped to fifth after leading 
early last season, kept the Gha- 
naian striker Anthony Yeboah, 
who shared the scoring title 
with Kaiserslautern ’ s Stefan 
Kuntz with 18 goals. 



A Little Bit of Hollywood 
At Zurich Track Spectacle 


Agrfxt Francr-ftc* 

linfonl Christie, surging ahead of Americans Jon Drummond, right, and Leroy Burrell. 


By Ian Thomsen 

fntenunkmal Herald Tribune 

BRUSSELS — It's like this 
in Hollywood, when they hire 
too many stars for one plot. The 
making of the movie grows 
more outrageous than the mov- 
ie itself. 

Twenty-three of the world’s 
fastest men were given eight 
lanes to share Wednesday night 
in Zurich. Before the sun came 
up Thursday, the fastest one 
had been ground to a halt; his 
American teammate had gone 
home complaining of vast injus- 
tice; a persistent thunderstorm 
had sogged everyone down to 
10- second pace, with the cham- 
pion from Britain celebrating 
much like the Americans be so 
detests; and to finish it all off, 
the American De nnis Mitchell 
and his brother reportedly had 
beaten up a rival Nigerian 
sprinter in the lobby of the offi- 
cial meeting hotel 

All of this was packed in a 
100-meler final won magnifi- 
cently try Linford Christie of 
Bri tain in 10.05 seconds. The 
organizers had spent $400,000 
to mount an attempt on the 
world record; instead, the field 
only served to define the 34- 
year-old Christie in his own 
terms, as the world’s greatest 
sprinter a g ainst pressure. Hav- 
ing peaked weD past the normal 
retirement age, he remains inse- 
cure of his reputation — as if 
one major loss to the Americans 
somehow would revoke his vali- 
dation as Olympic and world 


SCOREBOARD 


BASEBALL 


Japanese Leahies 



N L 

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JM 16 
392 17 


Result! 

SeOwZ Met 1 
Lotto £ Orix 0 
Nippon Ham A KMatsu 4 


CFL Standings 


Bottom Dtvttton 
W L T 


Winnipeg 

Bolttmare 

Toronto 

Ottawa 

Hamilton 

Shreveport 


Western Division 
BrttCahmMa S JO 

Calgary 5 I o 

Edmonton 4 2 0 

LasVepas 3 3 0 


PF PA Pts 
287 225 W 
1B4 173 0 
191 225 4 
201 250 4 
135 191 2 
105 226 0 

344 174 10 
238 116 10 
157 135 8 
185 140 6 


Sdtttal mo w on 3 3 0 149 156 6 

Sa cr a m e n to 3 3 0 134 172 A 

Mfefeesdor* Sane 
Winnipeg 46. Ottawa 1 


INTERNATIONAL FRIENDLIES 
France 2. Czech Republic 2 
Sweden 4. Lithuania 2 
Denmark 2. Finland 1 
Austria 0. Russia 3 


BASEBALL 
Monona! League 

MONTREAL— Named Bill Gdveti, direc- 
tornf Ptoyer d e velopme n t, and Meoi HunHrta- 
toa obi slant director at Plover development. 
Fired Kent OofttUt director of minor league 
operations; ana Herm Siarratte. director at 
minor league Bald operations. 


BASKETBALL 

National Basketball Association 
MINNESOTA— Bred Sidney Lowe, coach, 
and Jim Brewer and Chuck Davisson, assis- 
tant coach es . 

FOOTBALL 

National Football League 
DALLAS— Waived Tim DanW, wide receiv- 
er; James Parrish, o ff e ns ive tackle; Grco 
Srhanx Hrfrt end; AMt Burch, safety; Keifh 
Wanner, tackle; Mark Mama running back; 
Gabriel Otadl pa, defensive tackle; and Richie 
Cunningham, pfocekicker. 

DENVER— Waived Shawn Moore, quarter- 
back. and Todd Jones, offensive lineman. 


822E3K 


sJSST. 




THIRD TEST 

England vs. soutb Africa, nra day 
Honda* in London 
South Africa let innings: 326* 


champion, making those titles a 
pair of flukes. So he seems to 
approach every major race as if 
H were a heavyweight fight: lose 
once and he loses everything. 

The idea of a man running so 
fast in his mid-30s is unprece- 
dented, but he seems to be 
proof that age isn't the factor so 
much as the loss of will. Success 
tends to weaken champions of 
his age, but Christie waited a 
long time for it aiid he still 
doesn’t seem to trust it — and 
deep down, he has to wonder 
how much longer his body will 
hold up. 

The wind and rain should 
slow down a big man like Chris- 
tie, but he ran as if it mi°hl be 
his last race, and no one in the 
world can match him for that 
attitude. When it was done, his 
furies came out in a prolonged 
wave of chest-thumping and 
Muhammad Ali-ish boasting 
But you figure, once he stops 
behaving like that, his demise 
will probably follow quickly. 

The race undid Leroy Bur- 
rell, who until news of his' injury 
was being accused of reacting 
poorly to the championship 
pressures that fuel Christie. Six 
weeks after setting the world 
record of 9.85 seconds, Burrell 
reportedly felt pain in his right 
foot at ihe start of his heal 
Wednesday, which explains his 
bad start. Then he ran 10.39 
seconds for seventh place in the 
final. Afterward, a Swiss doctor 
sent him on the next plane 
home to California, advising 
hire not to test his sore tendon 
again this season. Apparently. 
Burrell will take that advice. 

After his heat, however, he 
protested the decision that ini- 
tially cost him the eighth and 
last spot in the final. Having 
recovered from his bad start, he 
officially pulled even with Ar.- 
dre Cason, the two finishing a 
joint third in their heat in 9.30 
seconds. Cason went from 
psyching himself up for the 
world's premiere final — to los- 
ing his place to Burrell on a coin 
flip. Cason was not at all happy 
with this system of justice. 

Mitchell was fourth in 10.23 
seconds. A few hours later, in the 
lobby of the Hotel Nova Park, 
the meeting’s official hotel, he 
ran into Olapade Adeniken of 
Nigeria, who had beaten Mitch- 


ell to third by one one-hun- 
dredth of a second. Since a Fan 
A/rican-USA meeting in North 
Carolina last week, Mitchell had 
been steaming over comments 
allegedly made about his wife 
and mother by Adeniken. 

The Nigerian, who denied 
saying such things, required 
two stitches above the eye after 
Mitchell and his brother — ac- 
cording to the admittedly hear- 
say version of Wilfried Meert. 
director of the Friday meet 
here, — fought him in the lob- 
by. By Thursday night, as these 
stories do. the story had grown 
to become a three-on-one at- 
tack by Mitchell and friends, 
with Mitchell inflicting the 
most damage by supposedly 
kicking Adeniken in the head. 
Mitchell did not return a phone 
call to his hotel here Thursday. 

The Zurich meeting director. 
Andreas Brugger. huddled with 
Mitchell and Adeniken later 
Thursday, and they reportedly 
agreed to share the blame and 
declare the incident over. None- 
theless, the international athlet- 
ic federation (IAAF) reserves 
its right to suspend the athletes 
pending an inquiry. 

So the Golden Four of Grand 
Pri\ meetings were to continue 
here Friday, with only a few 
survivors among the 23 sprint- 
ers in Zurich — no Burrell, no 
Cason, and surely no Adeniken. 
who was forced to withdraw for 
medical reasons. But Mitchell 
promised to be here, as did 
Christie, who, at this rate, may 
soon run out of the rivals who 
drive him. 


Center Signs 
With N J. Nets 

EAST RUTHERFORD, 
New Jersey <AP) — Yinka 
Dare came to terms Thurs- 
day with the New Jersey 
Nets, signing a multiyear 
pact, estimated between $9 
million and $10 million 
over five or six years. 

The 7-fool- 1, 265-pound 
center left George Washing- 
ton University after his 
sophomore year and was the 
1 4th pick in the June draft 


CROSSWORD 


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Page 18 


EVTERJVATIOWAJL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 1994 


OBSERVER 


Pity Poor Bill Clinton 


By Russel] Baker 

N EW YORK — A bunch of 
old-timers who had got 
into the Geritol the other night 
started arguing about which 
was the most brutal beating 
they had ever seen laid onto 
some poor, miserable, wretched 
president of the United States. 

This was a natural outgrowth 
of somebody saying he had nev- 
er seen a president subjected to 
abuse as cruel, unrelenting and 
bloody-minded as Gin ton is un- 
dergoing. Cries of “Nonsense!" 
and “Pish tush!" as well as 
“Pshaw!" and "Horsefeathers!" 
greeted this statement. 

One of the younger ancients 
said Clinton's ordeal by Dole, 
Gingrich, Limbaugh, the Wall 
Street Journal, and Hany and 
Louise was a Girl Scout jambo- 
ree compared with what Presi- 
dent Nixon had undergone. 

Then of course somebody else 
said, “True, but Nixon earned 
his, whereas Clinton hasn't even 
been accused yet of telling the 
CIA to tell the FBI to shut down 
any burglary investigations that 
might embarrass him." 

Jimmy Carter's agony was 
cited, including the defection of 
the Kennedy crowd, leading to 
the abortive attempt by Ted 
Kennedy to beat him out of the 
nomination for Term Two, 
which prompted Carter to use a 
vulgar synonym for that part of 
Kennedy which he proposed to 
whip. 

Yes, older old-timers assert- 
ed the case for Lyndon John- 
son. “So hated he didn't even 
dare appear in public,” was the 
line the LBJ man culled from 
crumbling newspaper dips. 

□ 


sleeping through the presiden- 
cy, and of not even recognizing 
members of his own cabinet?” 

The aged gentlemen waited 
for the strolling youth to stroll 
on to the next thing, for the 
wisdom of age had taught them 
there was no folly greater than 
spiring to enlighten the young 
before age had placed humility 
in their hearts and gray hairs in 
their mustaches. This was the 
wisdom of the incomparable 
James Thurber, who had said, 
“Youth must be served, fre- 
quently stuffed with chestnuts.” 

What the old-timers did not 
bother to tell the stroller was that 
Reagan had never actually been 
president, but had merdy been 
acting the role of president, 
which required him only to talk 
and act presidential, not to stay 
awake or learn the names of the 
people who were running thin g s . 

O 


Present Incumbent Clinton 
had been one of those collegiate 
people. Who knows? Maybe he 
even joined the chant sometime, 
somewhere. If so, what a deli- 
ciously dreadful irony to find 
himself now being torn to pieces 
by political vampires, newspaper 
columnists, Alfouse D' Amato, 
the mad dogs of talk radio. 


A mere youth strolled by say- 
it about Ronald Rea- 


ing, "What 
gan? Wasn't it pretty awful hav- 
ing everybody accusing him of 


A decrepit ruin brought every- 
body back to real presidents by 
croaking that the assault on 
Clinton was nothing compared 
with the horrors Hany Truman 
had experienced. Republicans of 
every stripe, from antediluvian 
mossbacks to internationalist 
moneybags, were merciless. 
Mainstream Democrats prayed 
for heroic General Eisenhower 
to take their nomination from 
the ghastly Hany. 

I dozed off as they reached 
Roosevelt and dreamed of the 
war-horse in the Book of Job, 
probably because the writer 
Gerald Johnson once compared 
its zest for combat to FDR’s 
delight in having at his enemies: 

“He paweth in the valley, and 
rejoiceui in his strength; he 
goeth on to meet the aimed 
men. He mocketh at fear, and is 
not affrighted. ... He 
swalloweth the ground with 
fierceness and rage. ... He 
saith among the trumpets, Ha, 
Ha; and he smelieth the battle 
afar off, the thunder of the cap- 
tains, the shouting." 

One thing old men often for- 
get is that in youth they had zest 
for the battle. President Clinton 
may need some youth pills. 


New York Times Service 


Of Bass Playing, Mustaches and Creativity 


By Mike Zwerrn 

international Herald Tribune 

P ARIS — Commenting on explod- 
ing multiplicity of choice, John 
Cage said: “First we had the Mona 
Lisa, now we also have the Mona Lisa 
with a mustache.” 

In the 1970s and 1980s, it looked 
like the acoustic bass was in the pro- 
cess of being buried behind that hairy 
monster the Fender electric. There 
was a lot of moaning and dire predic- 
tions on the part of clean-shaven pur- 
ists and musicologists. 

The electric wizard Jaco Pastorius 
helped the trend by proclaiming him- 
self “the best," and he wasn’t far off. 
He had legions of talented followers. 
Everybody plugged in. Top-notch jazz 
acoustic bass players like Steve Swal- 
low switched to electric. Bass players 
were happy not to have to lug around 
that beautiful but awkward, fragile, 
expensive and now, thank goodness, 
“out-of-date” coffin. 

The last nail seemed to be driven 
into it with the invention of the acous- 
tic electric bass, which looks like an 
electric but vibrates acoustically. At 
more or less the same time, the Japa- 
nese invented an electric piano that 
sounded acoustic. The mustache was 
growing a mustache. 

Then, in the ’90s, bass players like 
Stanley Clarke (after playing with 
Click Corea) and Dave Holland (after 
Miles Davis) went bade to their first 
love. More and more beginners chose 
the upright once more. After all, there 
is nothing like the physical joy of 
digging resonance out of aged wood. 
The electric bass became basically for 
rock only. Now you can go through a 
weeklong jazz festival and not hear 
one Fender. The acoustic is even en- 
joying a comeback in rock, witness 
MTv*a successful "Unplugged" se- 
ries. I suspect that it all has something 
to do with the general search for eco- 
logical virtue — jogging, health foods, 
safety belts, vitamins, no smoking. 

Marcus Miller, however, who is oth- 
erwise at least as ecological as the next 
guy, remains one of the few un- 
abashed electric bass masters. He was 
never tempted by the upright, perhaps 
because majoring on clarinet in New 
York’s High School of Music and Art 
(he still plays it) satiated his acoustic 
habit. 

At 33, Miller already has an impor- 
tant career behind him. If the final 
balance sheet had to be drawn up 



Marcus Milter looking for “connections to your sold. 


ChroiianRAM 


today, he would probably be remem- 
bered primarily for having produced, 
composed, arranged and played on 
“Tutu," certainly one of Miles Davis's 
10 best albums. 


Miller became a studio musician at 
16. The piano player Wynton Kdty 
was his father’s cousin. Kdly died at 39 
from too much of what Marcus Miller 
calls the “real jazz life." His parents did 
not want that for him. They had 
worked hard to get him an education, 
but they saw tms passion and they 
knew they couldn't and shouldn’t dis- 
courage it. They talked him into staying 
in school as long as possible 
While in Queens Collage, New 
York, Miller became so in demand 
that he found himself turning down 


highly paid recording sessions to go to 
class. He was afraid he v 


was reliable and he could swing. He 
cut class to work with George Benson. 
Roberta Flack, McCoy Tyner. There 
were no musical situations he could 
not fit into. Finally, he dropped oat of 
school and, as they say, “disappeared” 
into the studios, which is like disap- 
pearing into a bank vault 
He produced Grammy-wmnicg re- 
cords for David Sanborn, produced 
albums or wrote material for the YeL- 
lowjackets, A1 Jarreau, Spyro Gyra, 
Aretha Franklin and Luther Vandross. 
His latest album “The Sun Don’t Lie" 

his mnlSS^ 1 |Mreer? “wS^yau 
want to do an album as a bass player, 
it’s essential to have the ability to com- 
pose and arrange. Otherwise, it’s very 
hard to create a proper forum.'* 


would be a 
flash-in- the-pan, "one of tnose kids 
with a youthful beat that people want- 
ed for awhile and after it became no 
longer hip they were out." He was 
afraid he would become “disposable." 
He wanted to learn as much as possi- 
ble to avoid that For Miller, however, 
it was not a question of being in 
vogue. He was working because he 
could read music, he was smart, he 


He w as on staff with the “Saturday 
Night Live” television show band. 
Tms job involved a lot of hanging 
around while the comedians got their 
together. Bandmate Howard 


acts 


looked, at the ceiling as at a distant 
and impossible adventure: . • 

“Y6aL I dream about those days. I 
envy the guys who came up when you 
could play with Monk over here, Col- 
trane over there. I grew up in Brook- 
lyn and was raised in Queens and I 
was too young but at the same time in 
New York you used to be able to hear 
Wes Montgomery and Cannonball 
Addericy on the same nidttr.The 
names rolled off his tongue like saints. 

: He continued; “Thera are very good 
m usicians today, but I haven’t heard 
any thing realty overpowering in a long 
time. I guess it has to do with, the age we 

live in. Despite the drugs, the ’60s was 
one of the most creative periods in. 
American history. People were reacting 
to the Eisenhower ’50s. Or maybe the 
drugs had -something to do wi th ^ 

bitionTto the print where they' tried 
things that otherwise would, not. have 
occurred to them. Nowadays, we're not 
willing to. . . ’we' mea ning the musi- 
cians at my generation. : . we arc not 
willing; to to sell our souls to get to that . 
creativity point. 

"So what I do is work on trying to 
put myself in that space without the 
drugs. It can be dene but it’s much 
harder that way. Fw example, Itiy and 
write mnac early m the meaning before ". 
all those daily details come down 'bn- 
you. Or before I go to sleep. Quincy 
Jones was idling me about what he 
called the ‘Alpha state.’ It’s when your 
inhibitions haven't solidified yet. Like 
in the middle of the night you get tfaese- 
ideas winch once you’re fully awake 
your mind won’t allow you to take 
seriously. You tdl yourself That’ll nev- 
er work.' But if you follow those con- 
nections through, they ™ gj ht mm out 
to be connections to your souL •' - 

“Quincy said: ‘When that muse 
comes to you in the middle of the 
night, get your butt out of bed because 
if you don't it’s going to move on 
down the street to the next guy’s house 
and he'll get up.*" 

IT all of this seems like too much 
nostalgia for the days when the bad 
times rolled, be reassured. Ih : the 
words of Richie Havens: 


Johnson (whose four-tuba group ac- 
companied Taj Mahal in the '60s) told 
Miller stories about 52d Street, Bird- 
land and being an the road with big 
bands. Considering what he missed. 
Miller’s eyes became misty and he 


In the ' 50s the world wot dumb. 

In the ' 60s we war hip.- 
In the *7fly and '80s we tried to figure 
out what that mean t - 
In the *90s we're back to the '50s. so you 
haven't missed anything ” - 


PEOPLE 


(Joing h Going to Court 
In Paris Opera Dispute 


Mytmg-Whun Chung, ue 
conductor who was fired last 
week as music director of the 
Paris Opkea, says he is suing the 
management for breach of con- 
tract. He was dismissed in what 
'the Optra's management called 
a dispute over the length and 
salary increases in the contract, 
saying he had rejected ail. pro- 
posals. Chung stressed he 
would not accept an out-of- 
court settlement because he 
wanted a “public debate" on 
die Tne-Op&a has en- 
gaged three, conductors — St- 
i mfOTf - Young, Muatdo Benhu 
and Alain Lombard — to con- 
duct in his place. • 

□ . 

Jota Paul Getty 2d will stand 
by his offer to donate £1 million 
to . keep "The Three Graces" 
statue from going to the Getty 
Museum in California, the Vic- 
toria and Albert Museum says. 
Getty, who threatened to drop 
the offer, relented after Tunotfay 
CBffosd, director of the National 
Galleries of Scotland, apoio- 


t If! 

1 P 


Bor 


> a 




ij?T ^ 1 i , 
ft 


■ related to a family feud. 

□ 

Queen Elizabeth II has! 
opened Canada’s first new uni-, 
vexsity in 25 years in Prince. 
George, British Columbia-. 
.... Prince IVIip visited the; 
province^ Khutzeymateen V4-! 
fey, which was declared & griz- 
zty bear sanctuary. 

□ 

Elizabeth Taylor is suing. 
NBCfor $10 m3han to block the 
broadcast of a muriserics based! 
on a book that contends she was 
beaten by three of hex seven hus- 
bands MBs* Todd, NBcky HB- 
ton and Richard Barton. 

□ 

Seymoer Hash and publish- 
ers Faber & Faber accepted 
large damages Thursday from 
Britain's Duly Mirror newspa- 
per in on out-of-court settle- 


v ■ .c 


j - ■ 

* 

j. ■' 




v.‘- 


by the late Robert Maxwefl.' 
case was over Mirror attacks in! 
1991 against Hersh and his book 
“The Samson Option,” in which; 
he said Maxwell had had links- 
with Israeli intelligence. 


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16*8 

c 

Me* 

27*0 

18*4 


29 ** 

21/70 


ora 

IB** 

14*7 

r 

22/71 

10*0 

oh 

P»ln« 

29*4 

24/75 

a 

30*8 

2879 


Pans 

24/75 

13 « 

c 

2 */ 7 S 

18*1 

c 

Fisgus 

19*8 

12*8 

ih 

22/71 

14/57 

c 


1**7 

9/48 


1**7 

B <*8 


Rd™ 

31*8 

18 / 8 * 


32*9 

21/70 


Si. PWanSMU 18/84 

B/*e 

D 

21/70 

1243 

pc 


18 ** 

13*5 


19*8 

11/52 

c 

SwuOCuti 

22/71 

12*3 


2 »/ 7 S 

18*1 

c 

T*»nn 

> 7*2 

13*5 


10*8 

13*5 


Vma 

28/79 

20 «B 


29 ** 

23/73 


VWnna 

10*8 

1**7 

e 

23/73 

18*1 

c 


HMM 

/ 2*3 

i 

22/71 

7 tae 

c 

Zuncl 

22/71 

1**7 

*8 

28/79 

i 7 *a 

pe 

Oceania 

Auctions 

15/59 

«<■*« 

■n 

18*1 

7/44 


Slfcroy 

18 ** 

B /*0 

Ml 

19*8 

11« pc 


Forecast for Saturday through Monday, as provided by Accu-Waather. Asia 



Jastiaam 


K**»» 

Snow 


North America 
The central end eastern 
Rodtiee wH continue to have 
hoi weather Saturday Into 
Monday. Cooling aea 
breezes wM reach Los Ange- 
les and San Francisco. The 
Northeast wiB have typical 
summer warmth and humkf- 
ty Saturday. Thunderstorm* 
Sunday «vW be followed by 
cootaf weather Monday. 


Europe 

Condon through Pahs will 
hove dry, pleasant weather 
this weekend Into Monday. 
Spain wtt have sunny, warm 
weather. A bed of sunny, hot 
weather will stretch from 
Home to Athens. A slow- 
moving storm will bring 
damp, coal weather from 
Warsaw to Moscow Satur- 
day Mo Monday. 


Asia 

Typhoon Fred wd approac h 
east-centra! China eeity nest 
week. Western Japan 
through Beijing will be dry 
and hoi Saturday Into Mon- 
day. The extreme heat will 
move sway horn Tokyo this 
weekend. However. Seoul 
through Beijing will remain 
sunny and quite warm. Mani- 
la wlB hove a few answers. 


Asia 




Tdtoohdw 


w* 

Low 

W 

High 

Low W 


OF 

OF 


OF 

C/P 

BsngN* 

33*1 

24/75 

Ml 

33*1 

2475 PC 

Barag 

2 B«* 

19*6 


29*4 

20/68 pc 

Hong Kong 

31.98 

26.79 


3180 

2679 PC 

Manta 

32-99 

2*/75 


31 *8 

23/73 pc 


31*6 

27*0 

1 

32*9 

28*3 PC 

SCO/ 

32*9 

23-73 pc 

31*9 

2170 ah 

aungnai 

32*9 

25/77 


32*9 

25/79 DC 

SngapcKe 

32*9 

3170 


32*3 

23 73 pe 

Taw 

32 «9 

23'73 


32*3 

24/75 pc 

Tokyo 

31-88 

24<75 

t 

3189 

24/75 pc 

Africa 

Aktare 

30*8 

23/71 

, 

31 . TO 

24.-75 PC 


12*3 

*/39 

DC 

14*7 

8-48 pc 


28 fB 

19*6 pc 27 «J 

19*6 pc 

Harare 

19*8 

12*53 

| 

21/79 

12/53 DC 

Lagos 

27*0 

2373 

1 

28*2 

23/73 DC 

Nanoa 

21/70 

11*2 

on 

22 / 7 i 

IIS! DC 

Tuna 

32*0 

18*4 

t 

32*9 22/77 pc 


SATURDAY 



‘ SUNDAY 


AI tomcasB and data praMM'*';"' 
0yAecu-Waaiwr.lnc«M994 [ '*• 


Europe and Middle East 


North America 


Anchorage 

Mira 

Bouon 

Cnceoo 


Middle East 


Latin America 




“ 



Today 




High Low 

W 

High Low W 


TOg*' 

Low 


Wflh 

Law W 


or of 


OF OF 


OF 

C 7 F 


OF 

OF 

BWns 



33*1 24/75 s 

Buwiot/tea 

17.82 

a< 4 c 


17.82 

3 .*? e 

CM* 

34*3 20*8 


36*7 23/73 ■ 

Caracas 

27.80 

20.86 

DC 

27-80 

21/70 dc 

Damascus 

31*8 18*1 


31 *6 16*4 i 

Urns 

16*4 

18*1 

FS 

16*4 

16*1 DC 

JSi!®a!wn 

28.82 17 *2 


2384 30*6 ■ 

MawoCnv 

22/71 

12-53 

EC 

24.76 

1355 1 

Luxor 

30-102 19*8 


40/104 23/73 l 

RndsJsnara 36.72 

18*4 

DC 

29 32 

19 86 • 

Riyadh 

* 4.111 34.75 


43 / 10926/79 ■ 

Bsraago 

1986 

643 

• 

2 I/ 7 C 

6 43 pc 

Lmnd: a-nniy. pc -party ctaudy.c-doudy Mi-aiwaras. Hhundaratonns. rron. sLancw Hume*. 

arvanow, Ho. W-WoMhw. 

AB map*, tomcasts and data pravtdad by Accu-Weethar, Inc. ; 1894 


Dans 
HcnCUU 
HUM 
Lea AngM* 
Mum 

ttraeui 


Nn Vert 


SmFen 

S wab 

Toronto 

Wart upon 


211*0 13.06 
32 ‘OB 21-70 
27.00 10*4 
3040 1742 
28*1 M/SF 
ZB .04 180’ 
290* 23/73 
3700 33<73 
30-08 1808 
3208 28/79 
28/70 13/98 

28- 79 ISOO 
32.09 2*. 7S 

29- 0* 2’ '70 
*1 106 20.0* 
22/71 13185 
2*75 13-85 
25/77 1702 
31 4B 23.71 


pc 184 * 11/32 C 
■ 33/91 23/73 PC 
PC 28/82 IB'S* PC 
I 2*175 1*157 pc 
OC 37 SS t* 57 pe 
PC 2*78 1 */S 7 1 
PC 31/88 25/77 pc 
( 3700 2*75 9 
pc 2s e* ism pc 
pc 3289 24.78 pc 
t 24/73 14 57 * 

C 28-02 19(91 pc 
SC 33 91 ZB/70 PC 
oc 31-08 22/71 pc 
SC 42-107 298 * t 
• 22 < 7 l 14 57 pc 
PC 22 - 7 t 13,35 * 
□c 28 79 18(91 t 
SC 32-00 2373 pc 


Location 

Wtoatiier 

High 

Low 

(fetor 

Wave 

Wind 



Temp. 

Temp. 

Temp. 

Heights 

Speed 



C/F 

OF 

OF 

(Metros) 

(kph) 

Cannes 

party suraiy 

27 /BO 

18/64 

28/79 

1-2 

N 

10-20 

Deauvde 

party sunny 

23/73 

13/55 

19/68 

1-2 

W 

? 5-30 

Rstbih 

sunny 

26 / 7 S 

20/68 

27.80 

0-1 

NE 

12-25 

Malaga 

sunny 

32/89 

24/75 

27 /BO 

0-1 

SE 

12-25 

Cagban 

sunny 

32/89 

22/71 

27/80 

0-1 

W 

10-20 

Faio 

parity sumy 

29/84 

19/66 

22/71 

1-2 

sw 

15-30 

Piraeus 

sunny 

33/91 

23/73 

27/80 

0-1 

NW 

12-25 

Corfu 

sumy 

32/88 

20/88 

27 /BO 

- 0-1 

NVf 

15-25 

Brighton 

party sunny 

21/70 

V 48 

16 /SI 

1-2 

W 

15-30 

Ostend 

peiliy sumy 

21/70 

14/57 

18 /B 6 

1-2 . 

N 

20-35 

Schavewngen 

party sumy 

21/70 

14/57 

18(84 

1-2 

N 

20-40 

9 yff 

party sumy 

iaea 

12/53 

184)4 

f-Z 

N 

25-60 

Izmir 

douds end sun 

33/91 

22/71 

28/82 

1-2 

N 

20-40 

Tel Aim/ 

sunny 

31/88 

24/76 

28/82 

0-1 

SW 

15*5 

Caribbean and Weart Atlantic 







Barbados 

partly sunny 

31/88 

24/75 

28/82 

2-4 

ETC 

30-50 

Ktogston 

party sunny 

31/88 

2373 

28/82 

1-2 

E 

25-50 

St .Thomas 

party sunny 

33/91 

24/75 

28/82 

2-4 

E 

25-46 

HamWon 

aunty 

30/88 

24/75 

28/82 

1-2 

SE 

2040 

AoWPadflc 








Penang 

douds and wn 

31/88 

21/70 

20/84 

0-1 

SW 

10-20 

Phuket 

douds and suv 33191 

24/75 

28/84 

0 -T 

SW 

IMS 

BaH 

tiouita am tun 

31/88 

2 B 7 i 

2 OT 4 

O-J 

SW 

1225 

Cebu 

party sumy 

33/91 

24/75 

30/88 

0-1 

SE 

15-30 

Palm Beach, Aua 

party sumy 

21/70 

11/52 

18/84 

1-2 

W 

1530 

Bay of Islands. NZ 

party sumy 

23.73 

14/57 

17 ffiZ 

1-2 

w 

20 - 40 . 

Shfmhama 

partly sumy 

31 X 18 

24/75 

28/82 

1-2 

SE 

20-35 

HonahJki 

party sumy 

30/88 

24/75 

28/78 

1-2 

ENE 

25-46 


Europe and Middle East 
Location 


Camas 
OaauuSe - 

Rhidnl 

Malaga 

Cagwrt 

Faro 

Pneus 

Corfu 

Brighton 

Dsttnd 

Schaveningen 

& 

TetAvtv 


•umy 

partly atniy 


F- 


sunny 

ti ra ide ra tom w 


snsmy 

douds aitdeun 
euro? 
sursv "• 
sunny 

douds and sun 
douds and sun 

parity sunny 

sunny 

sunny 


High 

. tow 

Wrier 

mm 

in 

bd*' 

ET"- ' v 

-Temp. 

Tempi. 

Temp. 

Heights 

Spaed 

V— — 

OF 

OF 

OF 

(Metres) 

(kph) 


28/82 

21/70 

26/79 

1-2 

N 

12-25 I 


22/71 

17/62 

18/64 

1-2 

NE 

15-30 1 

i • 

29/84 

23/73 

2700 

0-1 

NE 

10-20 


32/89 

23/73 

27/80 

0-1 

SW 

12-25 


33/91 

24/75 

27/80 

0-1 

W 

10-20 


28/82 

20458 

22/71 

1-2 

SW 

15-30 

t 

33/91 

24/75 

27/80 

0-1 

NW 

12 - 25 . ■ 


32/88 

23/73 

Z 7/80 

0-1 

NW 

15-30 


20/88 

12/53 

18/61 

0-1 

w 

10-20 


21/70 

18/81 

18 /B 4 

1-2 

N 

20-40 


21/70 

10/61 

18/54 

1-2 

N 

»S 0 


tows 

13/55 

18/64 

W 

NW 

25-50 . 

:■» * - . 

33/81 

24/75 

28/82 

1-2 

N 

20-40 

,, - 

31/88 

24/75 

28/82 

0-1 

sw 

12-22 



Caribbean and Weet Attantfc . 


Barbados 
Kbwaton 
St. Thomas 
Hamilton 


douds and sun 31/88 
partly umy 33 /fll 
party nnny - 32 / 89 ' 
sunny .. 31/88 


24/75 

24 / 7 ? 

BS/77 

24 /re 


28/02 25 

28/82 1-2 

28/82 2-4 

28/82 1-2 


ENE 35-50 

E 25-60 _ - 

E 25-60 rr-‘. 

SE 20-35 J*. 


Asta/Pacillc 


Penang 
PhUket 
Ba > 

Cebu 

Palm Beach, Aus. 
Bey at Monde. NZ. 
Brorahema 
Honokiu 


party sunny 
sunny 


partly sumy 


32/89 

van 

28/84 

0-1 

SW 

10-20 

"i. 

33/91 

2ATTS 

28/84 

0-1 

sw 

16-25 


31/88 

asm 

ssm 

0-1 

sw 

12-25 


32/89 

asm 

tone 

0-1 

SE 

1 M 5 


23/73 

12/68 

18«4 

0-1 

NE 

12-22 

- 

avm 

. 14/57 

17/82 . 

1-2 

WSW 30-50 

4 , - • 

31/88 

24/re 

28/84 

1-2 

SE 

20-40 

'■-.t - 

31/88 

24/75 

26/79 

1-2 

ENE 

25-45 

•V •— . 


Travel in a world without borders, time zones 

or language barriers. 


ABET Access Numbers. ^ 

How to call around the world 

1 , U/Jns ibe chart below, find the country you are calling from. 

2. Dtal the corresponding AKT Access Number. 

3- An AQ£T Engllsh-spealdng Operator or voice prompt ivfll ask far the phooc number you wish to call or connect you to a 
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AT&T 


COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER 

COUNTRY ACCESS NUBdBER COUNTRY 

ACCESS NUMBER 

ASIA 

Italy* 

172-1011. Until 

0004010 

Australia 

1-800-881-011 


155-00-11 Chile 

00a -03 12 

China, PRC*** 

10811 

Mtlmenla, 

8*396 CotambU 

980-11-0010 

Guam 

018-872 

Luxembourg 

- - - 0-800-0111 Cos»Hca*ri 

114 

Hong Kong 

800-1111 

Macedonia, F.YJLaf 99-800-4288 Ecuador* 

119 

India* 

000-117 

Malta* 

0800-890-110 flSalvadorti .. 

190 

Indonesia* 

001-801-10 

Monaco* 

191-0011 Guarenak* 

190 

Japan* 

0039-m 

nciiwiinnr 

064722-9131 Guyana*** • 

165 

Korea 

009-11 

Norway 

800-390-11 Honduras'* 

.123 

SonaiA 

11* 

Fatoatf-*** 

0*010-4800111 Mexico*** 

95-SXJ-462-4Z40 

Mabtydr 

8000011 

Portngal* 

- 05017-1-288 NkatragoaCMmaasna) 174 

New Zealand 

000-911 

Ptvmenlii 

> OT-800-4288... PansjMri - - 

109 

PhlHppincr 

109*11 

HD9Bia~TMcac0W) 

.1554042 . PlenX* 

191 

Salpasr 

235-2872 

SEovalda 

00-420-00101 . Suriname 

156 

Singapore 

800-0111-111 

Spain* 

’ 9004MJM1 Uruguay 

' 00-0410 

Sri Lanka 

430-430 

Sweden* 

020r795?U . Vtoeaida*B 

80011-120 

Taiwan* 

0080-10288-0 


155-00-11 CARIBBEAN 

Thailand* 

0QIM91-1U1 

UJL 

0500-89-0011 Bahonme 

1-800-872-2881 

EUROPE 

Ukraine* 

’. 8 * 100-11 Bermuda* ! 

1-800-872-2881 

Armenia** - 

8*14111 

- MIDEtilEASr - BdddiVl 

> 1-800-872-2881 

Austria**" 

022-903-011 

Bahrain 

800-001 Cayman Wanda 

1-800-872-288] 

Belgium’ 

0800-100-10 

Cypma* 

060-90010 Grenada* 

1-800-872-2881 

Bulgaria 

00-1800-0010 

Teranl 

377-100-2727 HtiT ' 

001-800-972-2883 

Croatia** 

99-38-0011 

Kuwait 

• - . - -800-288 ■■ Jamaica** • • 

-• ■ 0«XV872-Z881 

CeecfaBep 

00-4204)0101 

Lebanon (Beirut) 

426801 NedkAntil 

001-800^72-2881 

Denmark* 

8001-0010 

Qatar 

0800-011-77 ScKtes/Neris 

1-800-872-2881 

Finland* 

9800-100-10 

Saudi Arabia 

■ 1400-10 - :- AFRICA . 

France 

19*0011 

Turkey* 

00-800-12277 Egypt*(Odro) 

5100200 

Ger tmttf 

0130-0010 

UAL* 

800-121 Gdbtuf 

OOa-OOU 

Greece* 

00-800-1311 

AMERICAS Gambia* 

ooiir 

Hiurgmy . 

OOa-900-OUU 

Argentma* 

ooi-sixMownr -Ktaw* - 

0800-10 

(cebncfa . 

99M01 

Belize* 

555 Uberbt, .. 

797-797 

Ireland 

1-800-550000 

Bolivia* 

0-8O0-1U2 South Africa 

040099^125 



• •(*>■. 
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