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INTERNATIONAL 



(tribune 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 




Paris, Monday, August 22, 1994 


No. 34,673 


Zaire Lets 
Hutu Enter 
As French 
Withdraw 


By Keith Richburg 

Washington Post Service - 

BUKAVU, Zaire — As. France ended 
its two-month military intervention 'in 
Rwanda on Sunday, thousands of Hutu 
frying to flee their country found Zairian 
troops blocking a narrow wooden bridge : 
over the Ruzizi River that serves as the 
main crossing point into Zaire from the 
town of Cyangugu. ■" 

At midday, however, Zaire related 
and opened 'another bridge crossing, 
about 10 kilometers (6 miles) south, after 
officials of the United Nations High 
Commissioner for Refugees agreed that 
the Rwandans coming across the border 
would be immediately trucked to remote 
refugee camp sites and 1 not allowed to. 
settle in the center of Bukavu, which is. ■ 
already overflowing with refugees. 

With the French presence in the so- . 
called humanitarian protection zone ’ 
ending, the Hutu were afraid of reprisals 
by the Tutsi-dominated Rwanda Patriot! 
Front, which deposed a Hutu govern- 
ment in a civil, war earlier this summer. 
However; UN forces are scheduled to 
take control of the zone; in southwestern 
Rwanda, and the new government has 
pledged not to invade. 

By nightfall, few Rwandans had made 
the three-hour walk to the second, open 
bridge crossing, many apparently not 

See RWANDA, Page 4 



hitnik Jr NiW»m ‘Rruln. 

A. Zairian soldier firing into the air Sunday to force back Hutu refugees trying to flee from Rwanda over a bridge across the Ruzizi River at Bukavu. 


Germany Links Economic Aid for Russia to Nuclear Control 


Ageaee Frmce-Pnsse 

BONN . — Fearing that it will become 
the crossroads of international traffic in 
nudear materials. Germany has threat- 
ened to make economic aid to Russia de- 
pendent on Moscow's cooperation in 
fighting the illegal and menacing trade. 

“Our financial aid to Russia wifi depend 
on Moscow’s willingness toccttperate with 
us in the fight againsl the iutcfoatimal 
smuggling (M nuclear tnaierials,^ Finance 
Minister Theo Waigel said in an interview 
published Sunday by BOd-am-Sonstag. 


“I hope other industrialized countries 
wfl] align themselves with us," he said. 

Chancellor Helmut Kohl reportedly 
wrote two letters on the subject last week 
to President Boris N. Yeltsin and on Satur- 

Less p fa p nam or mnhnn is needed for 
bombs. • Questions about Affies. Page 4. 

day sent a speaal cnvoy , Bcmd Schnrid- 
baner, to try to obtain cooperation from 
Russian authorities in tbe fight against 
nudear contraband. 


Germany is by far the West's major 
donor to Russia. In 1989 it gave financial 
aid worth some 90 billion German marks 
($36 billion) to the former Soviet republics. 
But a large proportion of this aid was in 
the form of export-credii guarantees. 

Mr. Waigel also announced that he had 
ordered a strengthening of customs con- 
trols to detect radioactive material. “The 
customs officers have lightweight appara- 
tus to measure radioactivity, notably at the 
airports." he said. He said he had also 
asked for tests of a heavy mobile unit. 


In one of his letters to Mr. Yeltsin. Mr. 
Kohl reportedly called on the Russian 
president to ensure that “no fissionable 
material wanders round the world." the 
weekly paper reported. 

Steven Erlanger of The New York Times 
reported earlier from Moscow ; 

Senior German experts presented evi- 
dence to Russian officials here Saturday to 
support their contention that weapons- 
grade nuclear materials seized in Germany 
were produced in tbe former Soviet Union. 

After three seizures of highly enriched 


nuclear material in the last four months, 
including a cache of 10.5 ounces of pluto- 
nium 239 in Munich last week, the German 
delegation was sent to Moscow to present 
tbrir evidence on the origin of the material 
and discuss ways to prevent smuggling. 

Russian officials have denied that any 
weapons-grade nudear material is missing 
from Russian military stockpiles, while 
German officials have said that some or 
the material is from Russian nuclear lab- 
oratories linked to military weapons pro- 
duction. 




Mexicans Vote 
With Wary Eye 
On Ballot Boxes 

MEXICO CITY (Reuters) — Mil- 
lions of Mexicans turned out to vote 
Sunday in a national election that 
could be the country’s closest wear. 

As many as 70 percent of tbe coun- 
try's 45.7 million registered voters 
were expected to cast ballots in the 
high-stakes election that many feared 
could erupt into violence if there was 
widespread fraud. 

By comparison, only 48 percent of 
registered voters cast ballots in the last 
presidential ejection, in 1988. Most 
opinion polls predicted a victory for 
Ernesto Zedillo Ponce de Ledn, the 
candidate of the ruling Institutional 
Revolutionary Party. 

House Advances 
Anti-Crime Bill 

WASHINGTON (AP) — A $30.2 
billion anti-crime package survived a 
crucial test vote cm Sunday that sent 
the compromise measure to the Door 
for formal debate. 

The House approved the procedur- 
al motion by a 239-189 vote just 10 
days after it defeated a similar move 
that prevented consideration of a 
533.5 billion version — handing Presi- 
dent Bill Clinton a major defeat. 

( Earlier article, Page 3.) 


Bridge 


Page 7. 


With Rise in the Mercury, Japan’s Economy Warms Up 


By Steven Brull 

IniernaHmaJ Herald Tribute 

TOKYO — Economists seldom admit to an interest in 
hot air, but tins summer’s scorching weather has inspired 
a serious debate about the climate’s impact on consumer 
spending, an activity that will determine whether Ja- 
pan’s economy continues to grow at a snail's pace or 
accelerates into recovery. 

The record heat and sun have spurred a boom in sales 


of air conditioners, beer, clothing and other goods, 
leading optimists to believe that Japanese consumer 
spending, finally in gear after three years of recession, 
will make a sustained comeback. If so, economic growth 
could rise to 1 .5 percent in the year through March, and 
more than 3 percent the next year. 

The pessimists respond that Japanese consumers, 
whose activity comprises about 60 percent of Japan's 
economy, are likely to revert to a cautious attitude as 


soon as the impact of this summer's heat and tax cuts 
abates. In this scenario, economic growth could be below 
1 percent this fiscal year and scarcely better the next. 

“The weather's been playing a major role in boosting 
the numbers," said Michael HarweiL chief economist at 
Smith New Court Securities (Japan) Ltd. “But a lot of 
people are taken aback and asking how much of this is 

See JAPAN, Page 4 


Deng Legacy: Will It Last? 

On 90th Birthday, Succession a Mystery ||§f 


By Steven Mufson 

- - Washington Post Service 

BEIJING —He is the ultimate survivor. 
Bom during the waning years of the Qing 
Dynasty, Deng Xiaoping has witnessed 
civil war, Japanese invasion. Communist 
revolution and intraparty fratricide. 

He. has survived three political purges 
and a passion for cigarettes. 

Now Mr. Deng has survived the passage 
of another year. On Monday, he turns 90. 

The celebration of Mr. Deng’s birthday, 
however, has only fueled speculation 
about what will happen to China when the 
patriarch finally tfaes. 

Unlike the death of Communist China's 
first leader, Mao Zedong, the eventual 
death of Mr. Drag will leave no gap in the 
ranks of government. He consolidated 
power in 1978 and relinquished his last 
lonnal post — as chairman of the Central 
Military Commission — in 1990. 

But his passing will create a political 
vacuum. Although he criticized Mao’s cult 
of personality and vowed to lead China 
into a more institutionalized political sys- 


tem, Mr. Deng has relied on his personal 
stature and influence to steer politics. 

When he mumbles something in his 
thick Sichuanese accent and ins daughter 
translates it into an endorsement of faster 
economic growth, everything from mone- 
tary policy to party congress proceedings is 
affected. 

The political system remains frozen by 
his desire to keep power tightly in the 
hands of the Communist Party, in sharp 
contrast to the free-wheeling economy, 
where Mr. Drag has flung open the doors 
to individual initiative, market forces and 
foreign investment 

But it remains unclear how durable his 
1 will be. 

far one thing, the 1989 Tiananmen 
Square massacre, when Mr. Deng ordered 
troops to open fire on pro-democracy dem- 
onstrators, remains unresolved in the 
minds of many Chinese. 

“There's a view that dissidents don’t 
want to talk about politics because they are 
so busy making money,” said Professor 

See DENG, Page 4 



Milo Onn-'Thc Axwicuud Pres* 


A poster in Shenzhen of Deng Xiaoping, whose birthday is fueling speculation. 


1944, When Allied Flags Began to Appew 


By Dominique Lapierre 

Special to the Herald Tribute 

In the summer of 1 944. Parisians stayrf 
me. The war was raging on French sou, 
d no one was able to leave Paris for the 
iditional country vacation. 


newsstand Prices 


Andorra.. ,00 FF 
Antilles... .-11 .20 FF 
Cameroon ..1 .400 CPA 

E9VDT E.P.5000 

France 9.00 FF 

Saben 960 CF A 

Greece .300 Dr. 

Italy -2,603 Lire 

Ivory Coast .U29CFA 

Jordan... I JD 

.ebonon ...USS1.50 


Luxenibaurg40L.Fr 

Morocco 12 Dh 

Qatar 8.00 Rials 

Reunion....!) JO FF 

Saudi Arabia ..9.00 R. 

Senegal 960CFA 

Spain ^OOPTAS 

Tunisia ....1.000 Din 
Turkey ..T.L.3S,00a 

U.A-E 8.50 Dlrh 

U.S. MiLCEur.IiUfl 


Most schools were open. Thousands of 
people sunbathed along the Sa n e. Bicycles 
and horsecarts filled the streets. There 
were no buses or taxis. The M6tro dosed 
from 1 1 AM. to 3 PAL every workday and 
was out of service all weekend. 

rite dty was virtually without 
gas and electricity, housewives had learned 
to cook their families’ sparse food over 
makeshift tin stoves fueled with paper 
balls. Paris was hungry. 

To cope with the scarcity of food, the 
city had become a big country village. 
People awoke each rooming to the crowing 
of roosters from bathtubs, broom closets, 
rooftop pens, garrets and spare rooms. 

r.ifce many of my schoolfriends, J raised 
rabbits on our apartment’s balcony. To 
feed them, I crept out every morning be- 


fare school to chop a few forbidden blades 
of grass in nearby public parks. 

Black-and-white wooden signs had ap- 
peared that summer at the main intersec- 
tions of the dty. “Ztir Normandie From," 

Everywhere, jubilant 
crowds invaded the streets 
to acclaim the liberators. 

it said. But that direction was not too 
popular among those Germans still in Par- 
is. Most of the military convoys that came 
through the city were, in fact, going the 
other way — east. 

Our favorite game after school was to 
rush to post ourselves along the routes of 


these convoys and count (he various vehi- 
cles in this withdrawal. There were even 
camouflaged carts drawn by horses. 

■ Trucks were taking away the military 
pe rsonn el who had occupied. Paris for four 
yean. Standing in the back, souris grises 
were crying and waving handkerchiefs. 
(Parisians called the German women aux- 
iliaries “gray mice" because of their drab 
uniforms.) Some of the men shouted that 
they would be back for Christinas. 

A few French collaborators were among 
those leaving. One day, 1 saw the grocer of 
our street climb into one of the trucks. 
During the whole occupation, she had 
served — in priority and without ration 
cards — the German soldiers living in our 
neighborhood. 

But the most astonishing sight of all was 


the stream of loot flowing out with the 
Germans. Paris was being emptied by the 
truckloads of bathtubs, bidets, rugs, tele- 
phones, radio sets and furniture. 

The Germans burned some of what they 
could not take with them. The sky soon 
became black with smoke from fires 
spreading ashes of tons of archives and 
documents. 

For the people of the French capital 
this intense activity was a sign of the immi- 
nent departure of all Germans. Soon, 
French and Allied flags began to appear at 
windows. 

This premature manifestation unleashed 
the wrath of the occupiers. Innocent citi- 
zens were executed, Nazi soldiers were still 

See PARIS, Page 7 


A Blockade 
Of Cuba Is 
An Option, 
U.S. Warns 

Pressures Are Expanded 
In Hope of Producing 
Democratic Reforms 

By Ann Devroy 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — The Clinton ad- 
ministration expanded its public pressure 
on Fidel Castro to move toward democrat- 
ic change in Cuba on Sunday while offi- 
cials worked with third countries to pro- 
vide safe haven to Cubans who continued 
to flee by sea in large numbers. 

The White House chief of staff, Leon E. 
Panel i a, said in a broadcast interview on 
Sunday that blockading Cuba was an op- 
tion to force Mr. Castro to move toward 
democratic reform, but senior officials im- 
mediately said the option was not under 
active consideration. 

“This is much more a statement of fact 
than something that is being actively con- 
sidered," a senior official said. “It is a 
hypothetical. If there were dramatic 
changes, it could be considered." 

Among those who support imposing a 
blockade on Cuba is a Representative 
Robert G. Torricelli, Democrat of New 
Jersey. “If Castro continues hostility 
against this United Slates and to abuse 
human rights internally in Cuba, he is 
providing legitimate reasons for a block- 
ade." he said. 

“The pace of events is going to quicken, 
and you could see large-scale civil distur- 
bances,’’ Mr. Torricelli said. ‘There is a 
significantly greater chance of a blockade 
if Castro continues to tighten security." 

Mr. Panetia. questioned about further 
efforts to isolate Cuba economically, said a 
U.S. blockade was “obviously one of the 
options that we would look at in the future 
as we see whether or not Castro begins to 
make some legitimate movements toward 
democracy." 

A senior official, commenting after Mr. 
Panel la’s interview on an ABC News pro- 
gram. said the administration's major ef- 
fort now was dealing with the fleeing Cu- 
bans, whose numbers “remain 
significant." 

He said the administration continued to 
be optimistic that the Cuban refugees, tike 
the Haitian refugees last month, would 
stop taking to the sea once they under- 
stand the doors to the United States “will 
be shut if they come by sea, but open if 
they use legal immigration processes" in 
Cuba. 

Dial message, the official said, took 
more than a week to change tbe tide in 
Haiti and will take as long in Cuba as well. 

Mr. Panetia accused Mr. Castro of de- 
liberately sending Cubans to sea to force 
the United States to relax its trade embar- 
go, imposed in 1963. 

“We have got to continue to pm pres- 
sure on Castro because the problem here is 
not the problem of refugees, it's not the 
problem of migrants, it’s the problem with- 
in the Castro regime, " he said. 

President Bill Clinton, seeking to stop 

See CUBA, Page 4 


Flier Miles: 

No Longer Just 
Good in the Air 


By Adam Bryant 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Call them the Green 
Stamps of the 1990s. 

Frequent-flier miles, created by the air- 
lines 13 years ago to win the loyalty of 
business passengers, are increasingly being 
redeemed for things other than free flights. 

American Express recently signed up 
five big hotel chains that accept miles 
earned by cardholders. At the Marriott 
Marquis in Manhattan, for example, 
13,000 miles (21,000 kilometers) buys a 
night’s stay. American Airlines will start a 
similar hotel program next month. 

Since last year. Diners Club has allowed 
its cardholders to cash in their miles for 
savings bonds, restaurant meals and mer- 
chandise from a variety of catalogues, 
from a pinball machine from the Sharper 
Image to a chocolate-chip bundt cake from 
the Dessert of the Month Cub. 

Spending 52,000 with the card, for in- 
stance, can earn enough miles to buy a $50 
savings bond or a Mickey Mouse watch. 

With British Airways, miles can be re- 
deemed for cruises; a" $500 certificate for 
Cunard cruise travel can be had for SO, 000 
miles. And for the philanthropic, members 
of many frequent-flier clubs can contrib- 
ute their certificates for free travel to a 
number of charities. 

The introduction of new ways to spend 
frequent-flier miles has been accompanied 
by new ways to earn them. After airlines 
began offering miles, credit-card compa- 
nies and telephone companies, eager for 
more business, began paying the airlines 
for the privilege of offering miles to their 
customers. 

Now other businesses are striking deals 
with the airlines, too: Buy a Berlitz lan- 
guage course and get 1,000 miles on Amer- 
ican Airlines. 

American also disclosed last week that it 

See MILES, Page 4 












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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, AUGUST 22, 1994 





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- Raipur Ariwaiu Rerun 

VIGIL AT THE RIVER — Villagers crowding the bank of the Meghna River at Chandpur, Bangladesh, Sunday as they wait for word of relatives 
missing after a ferry accident. Of the more than 300 people aboard, about 60 survived. Rescuers found four bodies bat say the rest likely drowned. 

India’s Sterilization Plan Assailed as ‘Inhuman’ 


By Molly Moore 

Washington Post Service 

SARSAWA, India — In the steriliza- 
tion season, women arrive at the school- 
house here by the jeepload. They lie on 
makeshift operating tables where a doc- 
tor dedicates a total of 45 seconds to 
each patient — slitting open the belly, 
inserting a laparoscope, tying the fallo- 
pian tubes, dipping the laparoscope into 
a pail of lukewarm water and then mov- 
ing on to the nest patient 

A nurse stitches the patient’s wound, 
slaps an adhesive pad across the sutures 
ana sends the woman to the recovery 
room, a dim ward where dozens of wom- 
en lie side by side on the concrete floor, 
fillin g the room with the low moans and 
quavering wails of excruciating pain. 

“I did it out of helplessness," said 
Kamlesh Mahipa], a 30-year-old mother 
of six, as she lay beneath a worn red 
blanket two hours after her operation. 
"We've had so many children, and we 
are so poor we can’t look after them 
well. And I expect some reward for this. 


I expect a house.' 
To the Indian t 


To the Indian government, Mrs. Ma- 
hipal and the other village women lying 
on the schoolroom floor in this dusty 
north Indian town re p r esent the success 
of the countiVs population control pro- 
gram: 4.1 minion women were sterilized 
last year. 


But to many of India's medical offi- 
cers and other critics, these women ex- 
emplify India’s failure to slow the 
world’s highest population growth rate. 
The critics say the sterilization program 
is inhuman because it relies on quotas, 
targets, bribes and frequently coercion, 
ana in the end does little to curb popula- 
tion growth. 

According to the government, 43 per- 
cent of all couples in India practice birth 
control; of them, more than 70 percent 
do so by having the wife sterilized. 

Most of the women are poor and 
illiterate, and most are lured to govern- 
ment sterilization climes and camps 
with promises of houses, land or loans 
by government officials under intense 
pressure to meet sterilization quotas. 
Most already have had more than three 
children or are nearing the end of their 
childbearing years. Most will return to 
(heir villages within three hours of the 
operation and will receive little or no 
follow-up medical care, despite infec- 
tion and pain. 

"I call it downright body sna tching ,” 
said Ashish Bose, one of India's most 
prominent social scientists and a mem- 
ber of a recent government commission 
studying India’s population problem. 
"Family planning has degenerated into 
quotas, and human beings have become 
targets.” 


As governments and aid organiza- 
tions worldwide focus on the Interna- 
tional Conference on Population and 
Development in Cairo, which opens 
Sept 5, many groups, including the 
Washington-based Population Action 
International, have labeled India “the 
world’s most critical country.” 

India, which has 900 million people, is 
putting more babies on the planet each 
year than any other country. 

Altho ug h India has made significant 
gains in lowering overall birthrates, de- 
creasing mortality rates, increasing liter- 
acy rates and raising per capita income 
in the past 40 years, the sheer size of its 
population is obliterating many of its 
successes. Today, in sheer numbers, In- 
dia has more illiterate people, more peo- 
ple living below the poverty line and 
more births than ever before. 

"The high growth rate will interfere 
with everything — economic develop- 
ment, the environment, the quality of 
life,” said Mumtaz Ahmad Owaisy, the 
secretary of the Family Planning Associ- 
ation of India. "The government will 
have to take drastic action.” 

But the government has been unwill- 
ing or unable to move on many fronts. 
Many politicians today fear the mere 
mention of the phrase "population con- 
trol having been unnerved by wide- 
spread outrage over the g/ovemment's 


draconian policy of forced sterilization 
of men in the mid-1970s during emer- 
gency rule imposed by Prime Minister 
Indira Gandhi. 

The gove rnmen t has marie only half- 
hearted attempts to increase the use of 
birth control pills, intrauterine devices 
and condoms, and those few efforts have 
been undercut by the poor quality of 
government-made products, frequent 
supply shortages, poorly trained health- 
care workers and the isolation of vast 
numbers of villages, which makes regu- 
lar distribution and health care difficult. 

Instead, the government has focused 
on what it considers its simplest and 
surest method of population control: 
s terilizati on of women. The Indian gov- 
ernment emphasizes that its program is 
voluntary, unlike that of neighboring 
niTTm. But many government and medi- 
cal officials, bom inside and outside 
India, question the "voluntary” nature 
of the program and say the single-mind- 
ed focus on sterilization has contributed 
to the failure to curb the country's spi- 
raling growth rate. 

"The entire system needs to be 
changed," said a frustrated Rajesh Ku- 
mar Goyal, a doctor who helps adminis- 
ter the sterilization program in the Saha- 
ranpur district on the western edge of 
Uttar Pradesh. "You can't control the 
population by sterilization." 


By John Pomfret 

Washington Past Service 

SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herze- 
govina — Tens of thousands of 
refugees fled from northwestern 
Bosnia Sunday as Muslim 
forces loyal to the Sarajevo gov- 
ernment routed Muslim rebels, 
ending s yearlong uprising of a 
renegade businessman, Hkret 
Abdic, UN officials said. 

Unconfirmed" reports placed 
the number of people fleeing 
the region around Ydzka Kla- 
dusa at 20,000, and growing. 

A UN civil affairs official 
said Mr. Abdic had escaped to a 
Serbian district in neighboring 
Croatia, Reuters reported from 
Zagreb, the Croatian capital. 

But thousands of his Muslim 
followers were trapped in no- 
man*s4and between Croatian 
soldiers and rebel Serbs. UN 
officials spoke of a desperate 
need for water. 

Mr. Abdic’s defeat marks tire 

most important military success 
for the mostly-Moslim army 
since Bosnia’s war began more 
than two years ago. His fall, 
coupled with a renewed alliance 
between Muslims and Croats in 
Bosnia, in essence returns this 
battered country to autumn 
1992, when Muslims and 
Croats were fighting the Serbs. 

But while the Bosnian Army 
has made strides since 1992, 
when Croats split with their 
erstwhile allies m a failed .at- 
tempt to create a Croatian state 
in western Bosnia, neither alone 
nor with the Croats has it 
shown any signs of being able 
to beat the Sobs. 

The Muslim conquest of: all 
die Bihac pocket also marks a 
significant victory for the Bos-' 
nian Army’s 5th Corps. While 
hemmed in by Mr. Abdic’s 
forces to the north and two ene- 
my Serbian factions to the east, 
south and west, the corps suc- 
ceeded in routing the rebels. 


US$1 4,000,000 



Cold War Radios Feel Pinch 

Free Europe and Liberty Reel From Big Cuts 



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The way the world's going 


By Craig R- Whitney 

New York Times Service 

MUNICH — Radio Free Eu- 
rope and Radio Liberty, the sta- 
tions financed by the United 
States government that broad- 
cast to Eastern Europe and the 
Soviet Union for most of the 
Cold War, are reding from 
what has happened to them in 
the last two years. 

First, the Clinton administra- 
tion sprang the news that it 
would eliminate the stations’ 
S21 1 million budget in 1995. 

Then, after President Vaclav 
Havel of the Czech Republic 
and other leaders in the new 
democracies pleaded that the 
stations be saved because they 
considered their broadcasts ir- 
replaceable, the administration 
and Congress agreed to contin- 
ue financing them, but only if 
they consolidated with the 
Voice of America, with a bud- 
get ceiling of 575 million. 

Now the stations are prepar- 
ing to move next June to Prague 
from Munich, where they have 
been since the Central Intelli- 


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gence Agency established them 
in 1951. Mr. Havel offered the 
former Parliament budding just 
off "Wenceslas Square virtually 
rent-free, and Mr. Clinton ac- 
cepted in July. 

“If Congress gives the go- 
ahead, we will start negotia- 
tions fora lease and be ready to 
move in after a minimum of 
renovation,” said Kevin Klose, 
the president of Radio Free 
Europe/ Radio Liberty Inc., the 
independent corporation that 
runs the stations. 

Mr. Klose, 53, a former Mos- 
cow correspondent for The 
Washington Post, became pres- 
ident of the Munich operation 
this summer after a tumultuous 
series of executive shifts. One of 
his predecessors, William W. 
Marsh, resigned because he op- 
posed the move to Prague, as 
did many of the stations’ 1,000 
or so employees here — down 
from 1,809 when the Beilin 
Wall fell in 1989. 

There is plenty of anxiety 
about job security. Mr. Klose 
estimated that there would be 


jobs for only about 400 people 
in ftqguei and that many , of 
those would be hired locally. 

Most of the people who pre- 
pare the broadcasts in 19 lan- 
guages — 22 before broadcasts 
to Hungary and Afghanistan 
were recently dropped — are 
rinigrts who settled in Munich 
over the years from Russia, 
Ukraine and other places from 
Kyrgyzstan to Poland. Many do 
not speak German and will find 
it difficult to get jobs here. 

Under German law, laid-ofT 
employees are entitled to com- 
pensation unless they can ad- 
lea pensions. The employees’ 
council began negotiations ear- 
lier this year asking for 5275 
million to pay people who are 
laid off or agree to leave. 

The stations’ research opera- 
tion was privatized earlier this 
year under an agreement with a 
foundation funded by George 
Soros, the multimillionaire phi- 
lanthropist and financier. Re- 
named the Open Media Re- 
search Institute, it will begin 
operations in Prague in Octo- 
ber. 


KSSfiSLted ptatonta&omitt nuclear ^power phateiomafc 
jnuctear bombs. But the North has refused 

the two sites are mihtaiy instaRabons ay 1 that 

off - limi ts to inspection. 

Vatican Honors Wife of Waldheim 


VIENNA {API — A papal honor has been accoraeawMewae 
of Kurt Waldheim, after an uproar overs 


The papal nuncio in Vienna, Arditashop Donato 
awarded Mr. Waldheim’s wfe, Efisabetb, the Prt 


wife, Efisabetb, the Pro Ecderia et 

Pontifice Cross, in reawnition to her services 

rhnrrfi, the daily Neae Kronen Zenung reported am* 

da 'jfhe distinguished award erf knighthood in the ^year-old 

Order of RusKaocorded Mr. Waldham by tte nunaoMy 6 
angered Jews in Israel and elsewhere, who consider Mr. Waldhenn 
a war-criminal for his service in a Goman Army unit implicated nr 
atrocities and anti- Jewish actions. 

IRA Plan to Call Truce Is Reported 

LONDON (Reuters) — The Irish Republican Army is prepar- 
ing jo announce an indefinite cease-fire in its batue to face' 
Bntaln from Northern Ireland, perhaps as soon as this week, The 
-Observer reported Sunday. The newspaper said all units of the 
guerrilla group M been briefed. - 
Rumors of a pending IRA cease-fire have been .heard for weeks* 
The British ana Irish governments are d emandin g a permanent 
.. cease-fire in wtf n m for giving the IRA’s political wing, Sinn Fem, . 
a place at peace talks. 

Senior police and security officials have said they wul respond, 
to a temporary but long-lasting cease-fire with a corresponding. 

it) the number of their troops. Protestant groups say they 
win match any IRA cease-fire. 

Germans Detain 40 Hess Backers 

BONN (Reuters) — The German police said they detained 
about 40 rightist extremists over the weekend to stop them from 
bolding' rallies to commemorate the seventh anniversary of the 
suicide in prison of Hitler’s deputy, Rudolf Hess. 

The axrests followed police success a week earlier in thwarting a 
wave of neo-Nazi a nn iversary rallies with a heavy presence m 
highways and borders and at railway stations. _ 

The police in the eastern town of Gotha said two men had 
beaten and kicked a 41-year-old man from Azerbaijan uncon- 
scious when be tried to step in to settle a dispute. The police said 
the attackers, aged 17 and 18, had been detained and appeared to 
belong to the rightist movement. 

TRAVEL UPDATE 

Saudi Airport Is Grounded for Now 

MANAMA, Bahrain (Reuters) — Saudi Arabia has built a 52 
billion international airport near the eastern-ail city of Dhahran 
but has yet to emeu it because no foods have been allocated for its 
operation, the Saudi Gazette said Sunday. 

Hue Saudi newspaper quoted a source at the International 
Airport Project, -the state agency-iundfing the development, as . 
having said that the opening would be announced once the money 
had been allocated. The airport is to be called the King Fahd 
International Airport. 

' Visitors to historic English ivqperties spent £192 raffioo (S297 • 
minion) last year, up 8, percent from 1992, the English Tourist 
Beard said. Westminster Abbey in London was the most visited 
rite, with an estimated 23 million visitois. (Reuters) 

A fourth typhoon bo two months strode Taiwan on Sunday, 
leaving three people dead. Much of the island was paralyzed by - 
the heavy rains and high winds. (Reuters) 

Eighteen centimeters of rain fieO in Tokyo over the weekend, 
flooding streets and homes and triggering mud slides. (Reuters) 
The Kuala Lumpur atenufioiri tiipotfa radar system, badly 
damaged in a fire last week, is not expected to be back in- 
operation until next month. But radar coverage is expected to 
resume next week, through theRoyal Malaysian Air Force's new . 
air defense radar. (Reuters) 

Has ^feek’s Holidays 

Banking and government offices will be closed or services 
curtailed m the following countries and their- dependencies this' 
week because of natianaTand religious holidays: 

WEDNESDAY: Georgia, Liberia, Ukraine. 

THURSDAY: Uruguay. 

FRIDAY: Namibia. 

SATURDAY: Bong Kong. 

Sources: JJP. Morgan, Reuters. • 


PLO Offers Israel a Trade-Off on Recognition 




Hewers 

TUNIS — Yasser Arafat's 
Fatah group plans to insist that 
Israel recognize a Palestinian 
state if it wants the PLO to 
purge its charter of clauses that 
deny Israel’s right to exist 
Sakhr Abu Nizar, a member 


** ask the butler... 




*ktrt remit is •mjtbin 


l-N-G-A-P-Q.R-E 

WEMflNC VKIMKUP iSMWR WVJ 

mraiaAiriR 


of Fatah’s central committee, 
said the decision was made here 
Saturday night at a meeting led 
by the PLO leader. 

“The charter cannot be 
amended without Israel's recog- 
nition of a Palestinian state,” 
Mr. Abu Nizar said Sunday. 
“We cannot recognize Israel's 
right to exist without reciproca- 
tion. which is Israel’s recogni- 
tion of the existence of a Pales- 
tinian state." 

Prime Minister Yitzhak Ra- 
bin of Israel insisted last week, 
after a meeting in Gaza with 
Mr. Arafat, that the Palestine 
Liberation Organization set a 
firm date for convening the Pal- 


estine National Council, the 
Palestinians’, pariiament-in-ex- 
3c. to amend the charter. 

."Our derision was that Israe- 
li forces should first redeploy in 
the West Bank, be replaced by 
Palestinian police, that there 
would be elections, then the. 
Palestine National Conned 
would meet and discuss both 
the. charter’s amenritflgfl t and 
the proclamation of the Pales- 
tinian’s state independence,” j 
Mr. Abu Nizar sardT ^ 

“If Israel does not recognize 
the establishment of a Palestin- 
ian state with East Jerusalem as 
a capital, then there would not 
be any decision to caned the 


clauses of the charter calling for 
the liberation of Palestine," he 
added. 

According to the rules erf the 
UJL-hrokered peace process, 
Israel and the Pales tinians are 
not to discuss the issue of a 
Palestinian state until talks on 
the fi nal status of the occupied 
territories begin after two years 
of Palestinian self-rule, in May 
1996. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, AUGUST 22, 1994- 



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WASHINGTON - T^erao- 

cratic leaders delayed action 
early Sunday on Ainajar. crime 
bill because off"- uncertainty 
whether there was enough sup- 
port in the House to pass it m : 
the face ofia last-nrarate blitzhy^ 
ihegun lobby. . . ... 

The bill, one of President B&L 
Clinton’s priority legislative 
goals, indudes a ban on 19 
types of. assault weapons.' 

A bipartisan .group. was re- 
working the. measure and trim- 
ming costs projected in the. bill 
in an effort lb pick ^ addition- 
al Republican votes. ,. . > : . 

But Representative Vic Fazio. . 
of California, a senior member 
of the Democratic leadership of 
the House of Representatives, 
said: “The issue is really com- 
ing down to guns, whether or ; ■ 
not we will have an assault 


Mr. Fazio said lie hoped the 
bfluon bill 


for the $30 

be suffidait to win, but 
officials expressed concern in 
public, whether - there were 
enough votes-' 1 
r The delay in- the vote, which 
had beea^exTOCted:after mid- 
night .Saturday, was said to 


weapons ban as part of this 
bill” . • ' 


He said the National Rifle 
Association was mounting an. 
intense campaign against the 
bin, and for a new stripped- 
down measure that does not 
contain the weapons ban. ' 

Mr. Clinton has strongly op- 
posed any suggestion of remov- 
ing dial provision from the tall. 


have been due to tome uniden- 
tified problems, as well as fa- 
tigue amqeog . the negotiators. 

Debate on an earlier version 
of the bffl . wasi blocked in a 
procedural vote an Aug. 1 1. 

Key Democrats and a group 
of R^pubBcauswoiked through 
Friday night; and Saturday, 
with only a few hours' break, to 
try to fashion a measure that 
would win -enough' support 
from Repubticans- 

Participants in the negotia- 
tions indicated thai the ques- 
tion of teallocation of money 
between programs had been 
tentatively settled. .. 

' Crime prevention programs 
that hadbecubarshly criticized 
by tonsarvatiVes took a big cut 
Negotiators reduced spending 
on these programs by S2.5 bfl- 
Hon, leaving a total of $6.8 bil- 
lion, which includes $870 mil- 
lion for drug courts 



Ousted at NAACP 


Bipartisan Health Plan Would Backfire 9 Groups Agree 


By Robert Pear 

New York Tones Service 

Washington — Business 

groups and labor unions say that a 
bipartisan health care proposal being 
offered by a group of nearly 20 sena- 
tors would create perverse, unintend- 
ed incentives for employees now pro- 
viding health insurance to drop it. 

In addition; the proposal has cre- 
ated an odd alliance between the 
AFL-CIO, a longtime crusader for 
national health insurance, and Sena- 
tor Phil Gramm, Republican of Tex- 
as, a conservative to whom such pro- 
posals are anathema. 


The bipartisan proposal, an- 
nounced Friday by Senators John H. 
Chafee, Republican of Rhode Island, 
and John B. Breaux, Democrat of 
Louisiana, illustrates both the advan- 
tages and the pitfalls of attempts to 
find a middle ground. 

The proposal avoids the most po- 
litically contentious dements of the 
plans offered by President Bill Clin- 
ton and by the Democratic leaders of 
the House and Senate It would not 


require employers to pay for employ- 
ee health benefits. 


Senator George Mitchell. Demo- 
crat of Maine and the majority lead- 


er, said he would study the Chafee 
group's suggestions and decide 
whether to accept any of them. 

Bui the reactions of those to the 
left and the right of the “mainstream 
coalition/* as the group is known, 
suggest that efforts to gain some 
votes may cost others. 

Instead of employer mandates, the 
bipartisan proposal encourages 
states to fona insurance purchasing 
cooperatives. It would provide bil- 
lions of dollars in federal subsidies to 
help low-income people buy private 
insurance. 

Self-employed people and workers 


who received no coverage from their 
employers could take tax deductions 
for the full cost of insurance premi- 
ums covering the standard package 
of health benefits. 

Richard Smith, the director of 
health policy at the Association of 
Private Pension and Welfare Plans, a 
trade group composed mainly of 
Fortune 500 companies, said Satur- 
day, “The big consequence of this 
proposal is there’s a real possibility 
that a lot of employers will drop 
insurance they now provide to em- 
ployees. 

“Employers now offering coverage 


would give employees cash instead,” 
Mr. Smith continued. ‘‘The employ- 
ees could buy coverage at group rates 
with tax-free dollars. A lot of youn- 


ger, healthier employees will bail out 
take th 


the cash, not the 


of the market, 
insurance.” 

Senator Paul Welistone, Democrat 
of Minnesota, expressed similar con- 
cerns about the new proposal. “Sub- 
sidies and tax deductions for individ- 
uals. with no employer contribution 
required, would result in employers' 
reducing coverage while enjoying a 
government-subsidized bailout/’ Mr. 
Wellstone said. 


Q & A: Why Socialized Medicine Won’t Be Adopted in the U.S. 


Joseph White of the Brookings In- 
stitution in Washington, AC, is the 
author of a forthcoming study, “Com- 
peting Solutions: American Health 
Care Proposals anti the International 
Experience." With debate raging in 
Congress on various health care bills, 
he spoke last week with Lawrence 
Malkin of the International Herald 
Tribune. 


Q. What prevents the United 
States from universalizing health 
care, which has long been been ac- 
complished by every industrialized 
country except South Africa? 


interest and the ideological rhetoric 
of liberty and capitalism. 

Add to that an extremely complex 
political system which is constitu- 
tionally designed to make it very 
hard to pass reforms of any son. 
When other countries first built their 
systems, health care was a much 
smaller part of their economy, and 
ours. But now it represents 14 per 
cent of the U.S. economy — almost 
twice the European average — so the 
stakes for the potential losers are 
much greater. 


They made a choice to try something 
that looked much more like the pri- 
vate market: the presided has al- 
ways spoken about private insurance 
that can never be taken away. 

The problem is that there is no way 
to guarantee that everybody has pri- 
vate insurance without much of the 
same regulation, redistribution of in- 
come, and employer insurance re- 
quirements that exist in the more 
straightforward, internationally 
standard approach. 


Q. What not try to set up a social 
or national insurance system as in 
Europe? 


A. We have much stronger conser- 
vative and anti-government forces. 
It’s not that the we don’t value social 
solidarity, as that phrase is used in 
Germany and France — after all, we 
have government old-age pensions 
and health care for people over 65. 
But solidarity is not a dear majority 
position, and the opponents’ argu- 
ments are strongly based on financial 


A In the United Stales as in most 
of the world, solidarity grows out of 
the workplace, but oar system broke 
down as private insurers competed 
for (he business of employee groups. 
The Clinton administration did not 
believe that straightforward govern- 
ment programs using public bureau- 
cracy could pass Congress, and they 
may not believe in them anyway. 


Q. The original Clinton adminis- 
tration plan proposed something 
called managed competition with 
spending limits. What happened to 
it? 

A It confused everybody and did 
not buy any extra votes in Congress. 
It was like the latest reform notion in 
the Netherlands: Everybody will 
choose between insurers competing 
on quality within a system in which 
the total amount of money is capped. 
They've bad great trouble imple- 
menting it seriously in Holland; in 


the nature of things some patients 
will be healthier than others, so com- 
panies bid for the young, healthy 
patients. But that is just a very small 
part of the problems the clinton Ad- 
ministration faced in one big lump. 

Q. What are they? 

A. First, BUI Clinton has to con- 
vince tens of millions of Americans 
to help pay for tens of millions of 
other Americans; that's redistribu- 
tion to those too poor to pay their full 
share. He has to change private in- 
surers into public utilities without 
calling them that. He has to create a 
system (hat everybody is required to 
join and then see that they pay for it. 
He has to create a system of cost 
control from the ground up. and to 
do that he either has to impose clear 
government regulation or try compe- 
tition. He preferred the rhetoric of 
competition, which has never worked 
before. 


cost of care when you really need it. 
Once you have insurance, price and 
therefore market competition can't 
really exist among health providers 
because the patients don't care about 


costs. The providers can compete on 
; to offe 


Q. Why not? 

A The whole point of health insur- 
ance is to eliminate worry about the 


trying to oFfer more services, but that 
doesn't reduce costs. The solution in 
other countries has been either to 
control the capacity of the system 
and put only as many people in the 
hospital as you have beds to hold 
them, or to regulate through fees or 
budgets the actual amount of money 
that an insurance system will hand 
out 

The American idea has been to 
create separate, private regulated 
structures, called managed care orga- 
nizations, but the patients haven't 
wanted to join them, the doctors 
haven't wanted to work for them, 
and when the plans become effective 
at controlling costs, patients will 
have limited choices, and a large 
amount of overhead will go to the 
control structure instead of going to 
medical care. 


By Edward Walsh 

Washington Pea Service ' 

BALTIMORE ; — Benjamin 
F. Chavis Jr„ besieged. by alle- 
gations of personal misconduct 
and financial mismanagement, 
has apparently been ousted 
from his post as executive direc- 
tor of the NAACP. 

Rodney A Orange; the presi- 
dent of the Baltimore NAACP 
chapter, said Saturday outside 
the organization’s national 
headquarters here that the ded- 
sion tofireMr. Chavis had been 
made by the board 6f the Na- 
tional Association for the Ad- 
vancement of Colored People. 

Officials of thenafional orga- 
nization ~ ’ "~ J,: 

ate" 


faced daring its 85-year history. 

The. immediate cause of the 
board meeting and the crisis at- 
mosphere within the NAACP 
was the disclosure last month 
chat Mr. Chavis had committed 
as much as $332,400 in NAACP 
funds to settle a sex discrimina- 
tion complaint by a former em- 
ployee, Mary R StanseL 

That disclosure quickly led to 
renewed criticism of Mr. Cha- 
vis’s financial stewardship and 
of his courtship of Louis Far- 
rakhan, the Nation of Islam 
leader, and other Mack nation- 
■aEstS/who traditionally have 
sot been dose to the NAACP. 


Linus Pauling, Double Nobel Winner, Dies 


aw me 


By Richard Severo of the century. That was the ready published 50 papers 

New York Tma Service determination of the structure based on original chemical re- 

Linus C. Pauling, 93, a bril- of DNA, or deoxyribonucleic search and had risen to a full 
liant chemist and an untiring arid, the genetic material in all professorship at the California 
political activist who received living organisms. Institute of Technology. 


was “devoted to providing an 
apologia for the Moscow point 
of view.” 


Mr. Chavis’s troubles ap~ 
ded mo immedi- peared to . deepen, eadier tins 
fibm'htt ! 'SeveraI Week'with reports that a second 1 


young supporters of Mr. Chavis 
said they had been told erf his 
ouster- aadwere-^tomraged.” 

Mr. Orange said that senti- 
ment against ML Chavis mi (he 
board had been so overwhelm- 
ing that there was no. need to 
count the formal vote. 

Mr. Chavis, who was named 
executive director in April 
1993, had vowed to fight to 
keep his job at the bdm of the 
nation’s oldest and hugest cm! 
rights organization. • ' ‘ 

The combination of personal, 
financial and political: factors 
swirling around Mr. Chavis, 46, 
brought the NAACP to one of 
the most severe crises it has 


former employee, Susan Tis- 
dale^ had accused him of sexual 
harassment and was preparing 
to file a lawsuit. But at a news 
conference here Friday, she re- 
tracted the sexual harassment 
allegation and said that her 
“employment concerns”, bad 
been resolved without any mon- 
etary compensation. 

At the same news conference, 
Mr. Chavis lashed out at Ms 
detractors, contending that he 
was the victim of an orchestrat- 


ed -campaign by internal 
NAACP critics and “substan- 


tial forces outside the NAACP 
and outside the African-Ameri- 
can community .** 


one Nobel Prize for chemistry 
and another for peace, died Fri- 
day of cancer at nis ranch in the 
Big Sur area of Northern Cali- 
fornia. 

Mr. Pauling received the 
prize for chemistry in 1954 as a 
result of his research into the 
nature of the chemical bond, 
the forcc that gives atoms, the 
cohesiveness to form the mole- 
cules that in turn become the 
basis of all physical matter. 

In 1962, at age 61, Mr. Pau- 
ling received the Nobel Peace 
Pnzc. The award’s citation ac- 
claimed him for his work since 
1 946 “not only against the test- 
ing of nuclear weapons, not 
only against the spread of 
these armaments, not only 
against their very use, but 
against all warfare as a means 
of salving international con- 
flicts.” 

Mr. Pauling was also credit- 
ed with having provided a 
powerful impetus to others in 


To those who eventually 
won the race to solve DNA. 
Mr. Pauling was seen at the 
time as the closest rival Had 
he been the victor, he no doubt 
would have been the recipient 
of a third Nobel Prize. 

Mr. Pauling's scientific ge- 
nius was accompanied by a 
strong penchaqt for dissent. . 

He touched. , off a debate 
among scientists in his later 
years, for example, by vigor- 
ously advocating that vitamin 
C, if taken in large enough 
doses, would build up the im- 
mune system in humans and 
protect them against infectious 
diseases. 

In the 1950s he was a prima- 
ry shaper of the anti-nudear- 
tesling movement, and he .was 
actively involved in the anti- 
war movement in the 1960s. 

By the time Mr. Pauling re- 
ceived the chemistry prize at 
the age of 53, he had long been 
recognized as a chemist’s 


achieving what many regard as chemist, 
the microbiological discovery By the age of 30 he had al- 


His years at the institute, 
from 1927 to 1963, marked the 
most productive period of his 
professional career. 

Throughout the 1930s. Mr. 
Pauling used quantum me- 
chanics, the theoretical frame- 
work that explains the struc- 
ture of the atom and the 
motion of atomic particles, to 
investigate • chemical bonding. 
He asserted that the ’“reso- 
nance.” or internal vibrations, 
of atoms gave molecules their 
ephesiveness. 

By 1949, Mr. Pauling had 
declared himself an advocate 
of peace, and be helped orga- 
nize a Congress for Peace, held 
in Mexico City. His colleagues 
in this venture included 
W.E.B. Du Bois, the educator 
and writer; Paul Robeson, the 
singer and actor; Charlie 
Chaplin, the comedian, and O. 
John Rogge, a former assistant 
U.S. attorney general. 

The State Department de- 
nounced the group as “Mos- 
cow-directed,” asserting that it 


Mr. Pauling incurred the 
suspicion of Senator Joseph R. 
McCarthy, who was chairman 
of Senate" Permanent Subcom- 
mittee on Investigations. 


The Wisconsin Republican 
accused Mr. Pauling of havin, 
a “well-nigh incredible” recon 
of membership in Communist 
front organizations. Mr. Pau- 
ling denied under oath that he 
bad ever been a Communist. 


Partly as a result of the sena- 
tor’s attack, the State Depart- 
ment denied Mr. Pauling a 
passport in April 1952, holding 
that it would be contrary to 
national interest to permit him 
to travel abroad. 


By July 1952. after a number 
of attempts, Mr. Pauling man- 
aged to obtain a “limited pass- 
port” for travel to Britain and 
France. In 1954, he received an 
unrestricted passport so he 
could travel to Stockholm to 
receive his first Nobel Prize. 


POLITICAL NOTES 


For Clinton, Growing Inquiry 

WASHINGTON — In the weeks be- 
fore be was replaced as the independent 


counsel investigating the Whitewater 
case. Robert B. Fiske Jr. substantially 
expanded his inquiry into a broad ex- 
amination of the way Bill Clinton had 
financed his political career, particularly 
his 1990 campaign for governor of Ar- 
kansas, witnesses and outside lawyers 
familiar with the inquiry say. . 

What began as a smaller investigation 
into the personal finances of Mr. Clin- 
ton and ms wife; Hillary — in particular . 
their real-estate partnership with a sav- 
ings and loan operator from 1978 
through the mid-1980s — has now 
grows to include several hundred thou- 
sand dollars in personal loans that the 
couple obtained for campaigns and oth- 
er political activities. 

It is not clear how far this new line of 
inquiry has proceeded or whether it will 
result in any charges. But the broader 
focus raises the prospect of a longer 
investigation, one concerned not only 
with Mr. Clinton's distant past but also 
with his more recent political , life. 

.And the examination into the 1990 
campaign is subjecting one of his closest 


White House aides, Bruce R. Lindsey, 
who was the 1990 campaign’s treasurer, 
to new scrutiny. 

One previously undisclosed focus of 
■ the inquiry, is the relationship between 
Mr. Clinton's 1990 campaign and the 
small Perry County Bank in rural Ar- 
kansas, run by a longtime political asso- 
ciate of Mr. Clinton, which lent the Clin- 
tons $ 180 , 000 . 

According to the lawyers and witness- 
es familiar ~with the case, Mr. Fiske, 
before being succeeded two weeks ago 
by Kenneth W. Starr, had been tracing 
more thin 550,000 in cash that the bank 
provided to the campaign. He was also 
trying to determine why the bank did 
not report all the cash transfers to the 
Internal Revenue Service under a federal 
law that requires the reporting of any 
cash transaction over 510,000. 

Mr. Fiske found evidence that Mr. 
Lindsey had been involved in some of 
these cash transactions, those familiar 
with the inquiry also said. 


fully comply therewith,” the letter said. 
“1 believe it did so.” 

Finally, investigators have asked 
bankers about a separate campaign-re- 
lated account at the bank totaling 
S35,000 that Mr. Clinton was allowed to 
keep after closing out the books on the 
campaign, according to witnesses and 
lawyers who have talked with the inves- 
tigators. (HYT) 


Gore Suffers Tendon Injury 


WASHINGTON ■— Doctors repaired 
Vice President Ai Gore’s Achilles' ten- 
don on Saturday night after he tore it 
while playing basketball earlier in the 
day. Two orthopedic surgeons per- 
formed the operation, which took 70 
minutes at Betti esda Naval Hospital in 
suburban Maryland. 

Mr. Gore was listed in stable condi- 
tion. (AP) 


Quote/Unquote 


-In a letter to The New York Times, 
Mr. Lindsey said that “cash withdraw- 
als” had been made in support of “get 
out the vote” efforts by the campaign. 
The campaign “was mindful of its obli- 
gations under the law and attempted to 


President Bill Clinton at a news con- 
ference: **I like the tough fight, so this is 
an exhilarating period for me. I like the 
big challenges, t think we're all put on 
this earth to try to make a difference." 

INYT) 


U.S. Court Urges 
Harsher Terms 
In King Beating 


Around 1960. Mr. Pauling 
began a campaign to obtain 
the signatures of scientists op- 
posed to nuclear testing. A to- 
tal of 11,021 scientists in 49 
countries signed the petitions. 



Thr ViAMW Prw 

In 1991 Pauling was still active in research, at age 90. 


Away From Polities 


• A arcus elephant went wOd, kffling a 
trainer and injuring a dozen people m 
Honolulu. Police ctoaed . Je ammsd 
through the streets and finally killed it 
with seven rifle shots. The elephant be- 
gan its rampage as the curtain opened on 
the day’s last act at Circus International, 
authorities said. “All of a- sudden, the 


of a destructive device. If convicted, she 
laces up. to 10 years in jail and a fine of 
$250,000. She is scheduled to appear in 
court Monday. 


commissioned in Mayport, Florida, after 

38 years of duty. The ship saw duty in the 

GuH of Tonkin during the Vietnam War, 

Sant kicked' the trainer into the are- the Cuban cSS 

na” said Ann-Marie Pesa. who was m crisis and the Guff Ww. The Saratoga 
thr audience. The then stomped on was the second earner buflt after World 
a second handler who tried to help the War H and the axth U.S. itotear 
first man. “All of a sudden people start : : the name. If $4.5 “ 

SnSrins away, children ^scream- the next few months, the 106 Moottor 

sw the blood,” she said. : is destined to become a floating naval 


• A bomb planted at a, 
hood dime iirSL Albans, Vamont, led to 
the arrest of Helen Virginia Ames, 33, 
who was charged with illegal possession 


museum in Jacksonville. 

• A passenger ship ended a five-day 
voyage abruptly on Friday aftef * 
fire moke out near its main deck, and the 


gleaming while cruiser moved to a mid- 
town pier is New York harbor and dis- 
charged more than 1,000 passengers. The 
41-year-old ship, the Regal Empress, 
winch was finishing a cruise to New 
England and Canada, was greeted short- 
ly after 8 AM. at Pier 88 by a cavalcade 
of fire trucks, police cruisers, and ambu- 
lances. Fifteen minor injures were re- 
ported, fire officials said. 

• About 250 gafloos of highly trade 
rocket fuel leaked from a ruptured hose 
in Cape Canaveral, Florida, creating an 
orange cloud that drifted out to sea. The 
air force was preparing a Titan rocket for 
launch with a secret military satellite 
when the accident occurred. Officials 
still hoped to launch the Titan on Thurs- 
day as planned. 


AP. NYT 


New York-Timej Service 

LOS ANGELES — A federal 
appeals court has ruled that the 
prison terms given two Los An- 
geles police officers for the 199 1 
beating of Rodney King were 
too lenient 

In a unanimo us decision, a 
three-judge panel of the 9th 
U.S. Circuit Conn of Appeals 
in San Francisco upheld the civ- 
il-rights convictions of the offi- 
cers, Stacey Koon and Laur- 
ence Powell and ordered the 
trial judge in the case to recon- 
sider the two-and-a-half-year 
sentences he imposed Iasi year. 

The appeals court said the 
sentences were well below fed- 
eral guidelines. 

Lawyers for the wo officers 
appealed the convictions. Pros- 
ecutors appealed the sentences. 
which were handed down by 
Judge John Davies of U.S. Dis- 
trict Court in Los Angeles. 

The four officers involved in 
the videotape beating, which 
began when Mr. King was 
stopped for weeding, are white. 
Mr. King is black. 


TENDER NOTICE 

MANAGED LEASED LINE NETWORK IN HUNGARY 


The HUNGARIAN TELECOMMUNICATIONS CO. LTD. (HTC) now invites sealed bids for the 
supply and supervision of installation of a Managed Leased line Network (MLLN) in Hungary. 

The MLLN, scheduled to be executed in 1995-96, will be a new, country- wide, digital, centrally 
managed overlay network to fulfill HTC’s business customers’ leased line demands for their 

with :n i lit#-' innui 


corporate networks. The MLLN will operate on HIC's existing digital transmission (PDHl 

“ • E3 interfaces. 


If 

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HOTEL METRO POLE 
GENEVE 
&nce 185a 

A PRIVILEGED PLACE! 

The only Grand Hotel 
located in the heart of 
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Air conditioned. 


3d. quefi Gsneral-Gulsan 
1211 Geneva 3 
reL- (41-22] 311 134d 
Teto: 421550 - ftw 31 1 13 ® 


infrastructure through El and optionally i 
Planned service features of the overlay network are: 

- End-to-end managed digital leased line services from sub-rate to super-rate transparent data 
speeds, framed EO, El and fractional El services, analogue voice transmission with signalling. 

- The above range of services shall be extended in the near future with frame relay. ATM access. 
LAN-to-LAN, VPN (Virtual Private Networking) and other value added services for data, 
voice, video and multi-media application facilities. 

Bidders are required to offer fully integrated system-solutions, based on a single Network 
Management System, 1/0 DXC's, flexible multiplexers and local loop driving amf terminating 


equipment. The complete MLLN project will include 54 nodes country-side and 2* nodes in 

ikh 19 ar 


Budapest by the end of 1996, of which 19 and & nodes, respectively, shall b? established by the end 


Interested companies and consortia, who have the capability to complete this project max inspect 
tH Tender Documents and may purchase them from 1 st September, 1994 at the tollowing address; 


1NTELTRADE CO. LTD. 

Ms. Marta Gabriella Toth, Sales Executive 
Budapest, U, Medve utca 25-29., 1027 Hungary 
Tel: (+36-1) 201-0054 
Fax: (+36-1) 201-0017 or 201-0008 

upon payment of a non-refundable fee of USD 400 (domestic companies shall pay Hl’F 44,1X10). 
Remittances shall be made to the account # 217-98931 /2949-008 kept by Inleltrade Co. Ltd. with 
Citibank Budapest The following reference shall be made. 

Tender No.: IT-204/TMG 


The tender documents will be available upon presentation of the receipt of the effected remittance. 
Bidder may ask for mailing the Tender Documents lo his address, if he sends the above receipt to 
Intel trade and undertakes lo pay the mailing costs. 

Bids shall be delivered to the above address not later than 1 1:00 n.rn on 1st November. I9W. 


Ail bids shall be accompanied by a bid security of not less than 300,000 USD or its equivalent in any 
freely convertible currency. 


Only those bidders will proceed to the evaluation of their bids who meet the posLjualilication 
criteria which is stipulated in the Tender Documents. 


T 3 - 


T 


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« E 

3 

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-he 

it 









Page + 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, AUGUST 22, 1994 



Canto TfcoOCfr-Hasicfi/TlK Aanaaicd Pm 

Two Cuban refugee children playing near barrier inside U.S. detention center in Miami. 

RWANDA: Zaire Relents as Hutu Flood the Border 


Continued from Page 1 
believing that they would be al- 
lowed to cross. 

The UN refugee agency's 
agreement with Zairian officials 
seemed unlikely to resolve the 
dispute. UN officials conceded 
that they had insufficient trucks 
available to transport the esti- 
mated 50,000 Rwandans wait- 
ing at Cyangugu or stretched 
out along the road on the way. 

Zairian offi cials said they 
were concerned that Bukavu, 
already home to an estimated 
100,000 Rwandans camped 
with the cattle and goat herds in 
the center of town, not be the 
site of a catastrophe of disease 
and death like the one that 
struck Goma, another Zairian 
border town farther north on 
the shores of Lake Kivu. 

“We don't want another 
Goma — at all costs, we must 
prevent that," said Maliyabu 
Misa, the Zairian chief magis- 
trate for the Bukavu region. In 


homeland might cause the tiny 
Ruzizi River bridge to collapse. 

Kris Janowski, the UN refu- 
gee spokesman in Bukavu, said 
officials agreed that forcing the 
refugees to walk the added kilo- 
meters to the new crossing 
point would thin their ranks 
and create a more manageable 
flow. 

The scene at the border ini- 


agency bad agreed to Zaire’s 
request to pick the refugees up 
in trucks and take them to the 
new sites. 

But he had difficulty explain- 
ing the logic of the UN’s agree- 
ing to transport tens of thou- 
sands of Rwandans out of their 
country at the same time that it 
was providing a peacekeeping 
force to secure the southwestern 


daily seemed likely to degener- zone and convince refugees that 


ate into a bloody confrontation, 
as refugees appeared to be arm- 
ing themselves with sticks. UN 
peacekeepers from Ethiopia, in 


CUBA: 

A Blockade? 

Gmtmued from Page 1 

the flow, reversed nearly 30 
years of U.S. policy on Friday 
by ordering that Cubans be de- 
tained at sea and sent to the 
U.S. mili tary base at Guantana- 
mo, Cuba. 

On Saturday, after pressure 
by Cuban-American leaders 
who said punitive actions 
should be aimed not only at the 
refugees but also at the Castro 
regime, he announced a set of 
economic steps. Among the 
steps were blocking the flow of 
U.S. dollars to Cuba, restricting 
charter flights between the 
United Stales and Cuba, limit- 
ing gifts from Americans to Cu- 
bans, and increasing anti-Cas- 
tro radio broadcasts into Cuba. 

Administration officials said 
the Saturday-to-Sun day-morn- 
ing total of Cubans picked up at 
sea was near 1 , 200 , and by mid- 
day Sunday there was only a 
minor decrease. 

Officials said the United 
States did not want to keep the 
Cuban refugees at Guantanamo 
for any extended period, and 
for that reason was urgently ne- 
gotiating with third countries, 
like Suriname, to proride them 
long-term safe haven. 

In addition, Guantanamo is 
rapidly filling up, with space for 
about 5,000 to 6,000 Cubans, 
since 14,000 Haitians are al- 
ready in a separate detention 
camp there. 

A senior official said that a 
base on the Turks and Caicos 
Islands, which was put in place 
to hold 2000 Haitians, was 
ready to open for Cubans. 

■ No Caban Response 

Paul F. Honitz of the Interna- 
tional Herald Tribune reported 


it was safe enough for them to from Washington: 


stay. 

Other relief agencies were 
sharply critical of the UN 


their first operation, appeared agreement to ease the Rwandan 
unable or unwilling to stop the exodus. 


thousands of Rwandans from 


don't think this border 


pushing their way onto the tiny should be opened.** said Mike 


wooden bridge. 

The agreement between the 


McDonagh, the Rwandan di- 
rector of the Irish charity Con- 


tra te for the Bukavu region. In vision. Mr. Morjane said at a 
addition, UN officials said, news briefing on the bridge that 
they were concerned that a two new refugee sites had been 
stampede of tens of thousands found in Zaire to accommodate 
of Rwandans fleeing their 100,000 Rwandans and that the 


United Nations and Zaire to cent. “Normally, a refugee is 
reopen the second crossing, the persecuted and the prose- 
called Ruzizi I!, was announced cuted who flees into another 
by Kama! Morjane. director of country. But nobody’s chasing 
the refugee agency’s Africa di- these people. 


“They’re safe. They don’t 
think they’re safe, but they're 
safe. It's much easier to feed 
them and shelter them over 
there.’* 


The latest U.S. policy shifts 
on Cuba remained controver- 
sial both among Cub an- Ameri- 
cans in Florida and with mem- 
bers erf Congress. 

There was no immediate re- 
action from Cuban officials to 
the talk of blockades, which are 
often seen as acts of war. 

But the Castro government 
vehemently objected over the 
weekend to the U.S. detention 
plan and to the cutoff of pay- 
ments from relatives, money 
that American officials say 
adds S500 million to S600 mil- 
lion a year in hard currency to 
the strapped Cuban economy. 


MILES: To Cash In Credits , Frequent-Fliers No Longer Have to Take Off 


Continued Iron Page 1 

had signed up 2,000 restaurants nation- 
wide, including the Russian Tea Room in 
New York, for a new dining-for-miles pro- 
motion that it will begin testing in the New 
York metropolitan area next month. 

Sometimes, frequent-flier miles are nei- 
ther earned nor spent on anything remote- 
ly connected with airline travel. Miles 
earned by eating a rich meal at a restaurant 
can be cashed in toward an exercise ma- 
chine to work off the meaL 

“Frequent-flier miles, in many ways, 
have become an alternative currency," said 
David Rdbstein, a professor (rf marketing 
at the Wharton School at the University of 
Pennsylvania. 

Members of frequent-flier programs 
now earn an average of about 40 percent of 
their miles without flying, and redeem 
about 10 percent of their miles for thin gs 
other than free trips, according to Inside 
Flyer, a magazine based in Colorado 
Springs, Colorado, that offers tips to fre- 
quent fliers. 

Industry experts say these percentages 
will undoubtedly grow because airlines are 
expected to announce in coming months 
□ew ways to both earn and trade in miles. 

Indeed, frequent-flier miles are begin- 
ning to resemble Green Stamps, a promo- 


tion that flourished in the 1950s and 1960s 
when businesses from supermarkets to gas 
stations awarded the stamps to their cus- 
tomers. who pasted them into books and 
redeemed them for catalogue merchandise. 

More kinds of businesses now offer fre- 
quent-flier miles because they increase 
sales enough to more than offset the costs. 
Typically, these businesses pay the airlines 
two cents for each m3e they award to 
customers. 

“Miles is a sexy word” to customers, 
said Randy Petersen, who publishes Inside 
Flyer. “It gets a lot of attention.” 

For a loss-plagued airline industry, the 
selling of miles to marketing partners has 
become a rapidly growing source of reve- 
nue. 

Credit-card companies affiliated with 
airlines offer miles because they, too, are 
trying to win customers. Both the airlines 
and the businesses that offer miles also 
benefit by sharing computerized lists of 
their best customers, to help in future pro- 
motions. 

For consumers, the new sources of miles 
seem to offer many benefits. But it is 
unclear bow these promotions affect air- 
line ticket prices, because fares tend to be 
determined by traffic levels and competi- 
tive pressures on individual routes. But 
one thing is dean Airlines see mileage 


promotions as a way to build customer 
loyalty in an industry where service levels 
are often similar. 

Among the earliest businesses to Knk 
themselves to frequent-flier dubs were 
travel-related companies. Rental-car agen- 
cies, for example, have long offered mile- 
age to frequent fliers. 

But many of today’s links have nothing 
to do with travel. 

Diners Qub, which for some years has 
offered merchandise through its own cata- 
logue as a reward for using the card, has 
expanded its offerings to include merchan- 
dise from other catalogues. 

The card company also gives the roughly 
2 percent of its customers who have 
charged more than $ 100,000 over time the 
choice of ordering just about anything they 
want. Diners Qub determines the value of 
the mileage credit and applies it toward 
that purchase. 

Customers have requested and received, 
among other things, a customized moun- 
tain bike, a grand piano and a car the 
Orient Express for a family reunion. One 
customer wanted to cash in his miles to 
spend three hours with Barbra Streisand; a 
Diners Qub spokesman. Walter Sanders, 
said a person representing Ms. Streisand 
“was less than enthusiastic” about the re- 
quest 


JAPAN: With Rise in the Mercury, Economic Growth Is Climbing, Too 


Continued from Page 1 
for real?" The question is im- 
portant because unlike previous 
Japanese recoveries, which were 
led by exports or business in- 
vestment, this time it is Japa- 
nese consumers who must play 
the leading role. 

That is because with the yen 
worth more than a penny, sig- 
nificant export growth is impos- 
sible. The comparative advan- 
tage of Japanese exporters is 
declining; also, a big increase in 
exports would be politically un- 
tenable, leading to further in- 
creases in the value of the yen. 
In July, export volumes fell 0.5 
percent 

An increase in capital spend- 
ing, which represents about 18 
percent of the economy, is 


equally unthinkable. Japanese 
companies remain saddled with 
excess production capacity 
built up in the 1980s. The ca- 
pacity utilization rate among 
Japanese manufacturers re- 
mains just above 70 percent far 
below the 80 percent threshold 
that has historically signaled 
fresh spending, said Don Kim- 
ball, senior economist at Mitsu- 
bishi Bank. 

The optimists point to recent 
signs that the Japanese consum- 
er will carry the day. In addition 
to heat-wave-related consump- 
tion, sales of passenger cars and 
videorecorders have been rising 
Since April, while household 
consumption, although still be- 


“The consumption recover}' 
should be sustainable,” Salo- 
mon Brothers said in a recent 
report ~Eveu after the impact 
of the hot weather fades, an 
upturn in the labor market, im- 
proved consumer confidence 
and the next tranche of income 
tax cuts at year-end likely will 
support consumption.” 


But others caution that the 
data so far are too scanty to 
predict a consumer-led recov- 
ery. “There’s a lot of optimism 
that is probably unwarranted, 
based more on hope than fact" 
Mr. Kimball said. 

Mineko Sasaki -Smith, econo- 
mist at Morgan Stanley in To- 
kyo, argued that the Japanese 


The American brokerage said economy has begun a cyclical 
a one-degree rise in average recovery, but growth will re- 
temperature between August main modest until structural 
and September boosts ship- problems are tackled and the 
ments of household appliances government deregulates the 
by 10.4 percentage points. Bev- economy, 
erage and clothing sales also Among the structural prob- 
rise. An additional 10 hours of lems: 


sunshine during the period 
tends to add about 03 percent- 


low year-earlier levels, was age points to year-to-year 


higher in May and June. 


growth in consumption. 


• A banking system bur- 
dened by bad debts and staffed 
with loan officers wary of lend- 
ing to all but the most credit- 
worthy customers. 

] • Excess capacity in manu- 

: farnning and labor that is com- 
| pe fling continued declines in 


By William J. Broad dear arms and materials. Many experts 

New York Tunes Serrke said the old rules were dangerously out 

NEW YORK —The amount of pluto- ofdate even if the new proposals were 
nium or uranium needed to make a nu- 100 rest rictrve. - „ 

clear bomb is so much less than generally • B s important to have this debate 
believed that new safeguards must be Secretory Hazd O’Leary said m 

adopted worldwide to tighten defenses an interview. Any number of people 
against criminal diversion of materials, have the impression that the smaller the 
experts argue in a new proposal. me under con Jol, the better we are m 

For plutonium, the experts saw the the long term. . 

official threshold of danger should be Her agency oversees the nation s nu- 
lowered from 8 kilograms (17.6 pounds) dear.ars^al and plays aceamti role m 
to 1 kilogram. limiting the spread of nuclear weapons. 

They also propose an eightfold reduo- , R«*aid L. Garwin, a physicist who 
don for uranium, the other main fuel of has long advised the fedcralgpvemment. 

on nuclear-arms matters, suggested that 
The experts, from the Natural Re- revisions should fafl somewhere between 
sources Defense Council, a private group theold rules and the new proposals, 
known for its nuclear expertise, wrote Nearly, he said, “the amificant 
the federal government and the United qpanMy of plutonium should be tow- 
Natioos last week to urge such down- ** to four Idk^ams and per- 
ward revisions. haps somewhat less, if it is to represent 

At a news conference Monday in *** “w*®* that is hazardous.” 
Washington, the group is to make those WHKani J. Quirk, a nuclear-weapon 
letters public along with a report arguing expert at the Lawrence Livermore Na- 
for the proposed changes. tional Laboratory in California, said that 

The new proposals cast a harsh light for the moment the exact figure was less 
on recent seizures in Germany of atomic important than a public discussion, 
materials that are believed to have been “Whether the right number is four or 
smuggled out of Russia, making the one or two kilograms, it probably makes 
amoun ts look quite serious. One deal sense to lower the current number if it’s . 
reportedly broken up by German an- feasible economically,” he said. “I think 
thorities was to have involved four ldlo- it’s the right thing to start the debate and 
grams of weapon-usable plutonium in then people can decide what they want to 
return for $250 million. do.” 

Thomas B. Cochran, a senior scientist Budding a nuclear bomb is known to 

at the Natural Resources Defease Coun- get progressively more difficult as small- 
cil and a co-author of die report, said: er amounts of fissionable material are 
“The criteria now in use are out of date, used, the smallest requiring great exper- 
tech rurally erroneous and dearly dan- tise and special gear thought to belong 
gerous in light of the recent seizures." only to advanced nuclear states. In addi- 
Resistance to the proposals is Hkdy, tion, the power of the bomb blast de- 
however, because enhanced safeguards creases. 

could be costly to enforce and might Nevertheless, 50 years of experimenta- 

hamper or cripple some use of plutonium tion have allowed the United States and 
for the proauction of nuclear power other nudear nations to make powerful 
overseas. bombs in remarkably small packages. 

The plan is also controversial because . In the 1960s, the United States stock- 
tile minimal amounts of material needed piled a bazooka-type weapon known as 
to make a bomb have long been class- the Davy Crockett, whose miniatur e 
fled top-secret. atomic warhead weighed 51 pounds and 

Even so, arms expats said they wd- had a power equal to 22 tons of high 
corned the airing of the issue by die explosive. At its core, the plutonium 
council, which favors strict limi ts on nu- probably wdghed several pounds.. 


In the 1950s and. 1960s. amid a push 

oned an international system whereby 
safeguards would be applied to the han- 
dlmeand shipment of all bads of nude-, 
ar materials to guard again st diversion*; ' • 
. The safeguards were enforced by an 
aim of- the United Nations known as the . 
International Atomic Energy Agency* or.- . 
IAEA, based in Vienna. 

The IAEA says the approximate 
amounts of fissionable material needed 
for a single nudear weapon are S kuo-. 
mams of ptatonrmn, 8 kilograms of ur* . . . 
mam 233, or 25 kilograms for uranium 
highly mri^Jwvi .in tfie 235 isotope. 

Tftiese figures, known as threshouL- 
amounts or significant quantifies, are 
used to establirft a wide range of indus- 
trial safeguards meant to deter an d 
tect the diversion of materials from 
peaceful purposes. to the making of nu^:. . 
dear warheads. 

Thus, the Natural Resources Defense 
Cooncflig proposing the eightfold reduc- 
- tion in these categories. For instance, the 
th resho ld amount of plutonium would . 
drop from eight kilograms to one kilo-, 
gram. 

Mr. Cochran, who is a physicist, sam 
in an interview that his organization's 
proposed revision of the traditional fig- -- 
liras was based on his c alc u lati ons, a 
dfiiff reading of documents and state- 
ments and talks with experts who spoke 
on 'the condition of anonymity. 

Mr. Cochran said one kflogram of piu* 
fowfirm could be fashioned by a skilled 
designer into a bomb with a blast equal 
to 1,000 tons of high explosive. 

“Detoaated in or above a city center, 
one such ‘small’ weapon would be suffi- 
cient to cause severe blast- damage over 
roughly* 40-btock area, and many thou- 
sands more would hkdy die from the 
ensuing fire and radiation effects," said 
Christopher E. Paine, a co-author of the 
council* report. 

In comparison, the bomb that the . 
United States dropped on Hiroshima in 
1945 had a blast equal to about 15,000 J 
tons of high explosive. I 


Fears About Allies’ Atom Programs 


By David E. Sanger 

New York Times Service 

TOKYO — If the collapse of nudear 
controls in Russia poses the near-term 
threat that terrorists could seize plutoni- 
um to make nudear weapons, longer- 
tenn fears arise from nuclear energy pro- 
grams launched by America's closest 
allies: Japan, Britain and France. 

Over the next two decades these coun- 
tries, as well as Russia, plan to increase 
the world’s stockpiles of plutonium 
greatly. They are producing it to fuel a 
generation of nuclear power plants 
whose time has never quite come. 

And in the process they are deflating 
the post-Cold War optimism that the 
world’s supply of bomb-usable materials 
would drastically shrink. Moreover, the 
race to produce plutonium for energy is 
also sustaining a rationale that nnrf^y 
aspirants Hke North Korea have used to 
justify building nudear energy installa- 
tions that can quickly be turned to weap- 
ons production. 

The plutonium can be used to fuel 
existing reactors, in place of uranium, 
but also for planned breeder reactors, 
nudear plants that were first conceived 
with enormous en thus asm, as a virtually 
self-sustaining source of electric power. 
These reactors bum nudear fuel while 
“breeding” more, and for decades 
seemed to offer a solution to two major 
problems at once. 

By recycling fuel, breeders would cut 
down on the amount of nudear waste 
that would otherwise have to be buried 
or sunk in the ocean. And at first blush, 
the technology promised billions of dol- 
lars in savings. 

But the long-promised economies 
have evaporated, and the spread of 
weapons projects in the last several years 
— in North Korea, Iraq, Pakistan and 
elsewhere — has only underscored the 
inherent dangers of a world energy sys- 
tem based on rccyded plutonium. 

Nudear weapon science is every- 
where, it is now dear, and the greatest 
obstacle to bomb production is not 
know-how. but access to plutonium or 
highly enriched u ranium — materials 
which, under the energy strategies being 
pursued by several countries, wSl remain 
m plentiful supply. 

The new supplies of separated plutoni- 
um are the result of “reprocessing” — 
extraction of plutonium and uranium 
from the spent fuel of conventional nu- 
dear power plants. Because the extrac- 
tion of plutonium is rapidly outpacing 
the building of the breeder reactors it 
was intended to fuel a surplus of pluto- 
nium is building 

The International Atomic Energy 
Agency estimates that there are now over 
100 tons of separated civilian plutonium 
stockpiled around the world. Most of it is 
stored in Britain, France and Russia. 


Japan plans to obtain 50 tons more 
over the next 15 years, mainly produced 
in European plants, and and within sev- 
en years it plans to open up a huge new 
reprocessing plant of its own. If diverted 
to weapons use, those supplies could 
produce thousands of nudear weapons. 

WhBe officials in several countries 
concede that the breeder-reactor strategy 
is wildly uneconomical today, they say 
that the world will tbank'fhem one day 
when uranium — the. fud for ordinary 
reactors — becomes scarce and expen- 
sive. * 7 . ‘ 

Similar views are voiced in France, 
Britain and Russia. But critics assert that 
officials in Japan and elsewhere are sim- 
ply justifying expensive programs that 
have already created large vested inter- 
ests. 

The rise of a “plntorihnn economy" 
has created several new th reats. 

Britain and France arc nudear powers 
already, but Japan’s repeated insistence 
that it would never use its stockpile to 
make nudear weapons haveleft its Asian 
neighbors unconvinced. 

The main fear is that a huge commerce 
in plutonium would be a ripe target for 
that by terrorists or countries secretly 
desiring to build nudear weapons. . 

Moreover, the spread of reprocessing 
technology creates a. justification for 
countries that want to make nudear 
weapons to follow suit, under the guise 
erf conducting energy research or devel- 
oping energy sources. 

The multibillion dollar plutonium 
trade between Europe and Japan has 
cast the United States in an enormously 
uncomfortable position. The United 
States stopped reprocessing nuclear ma- 
terials for civilian use 17 years ago, dur- 
ing the Carter Ad mini s trati on, for fear 
that it would speed the spread of plutoni- 
um. 

Though file Japanese are the most vo- 
ciferous advocates of breeder reactor 
technology these days, their program 
was not born in Tokyo. It was Washing- 
ton's idea. 

As soon as the American occupation 
ended in the early 1950s, Japan became 
ripe ground for the “Atoms for Peace” 
project. With no oil reserves of its own, 
even a country with a profound nudear 
allergy felt it had little other choice. 

And in 1966, jnstas conventional, ura- 
nium-burning nudear power plants woe 
springing up along the sea coast, .the 
government formally declared that it 
would start a major project to create self- 
sufficient breeder reactors. 

But by the 1970s, amid worries about 
the spread of nuclear technology and 
dear evidence that the breeder reactors 
would be several times more costly than 
conventional reactors, America’s pro- 


' But by that time Tokyo had assembled 
a classic industrial consortium: A gov- 
ernment-backed company, called the 
Power Reactin' and Nudear Fuel Devd- 
opmenl Corporation, was created to co- 
ordinate reprocessing and to develop the 
. use of plutonium as'a fueL 

Tliis spring, after decades of planning , 
japan finally fired, up the $5 billion 
Motto breeder reactor, named for the 
Buddhist god of wisdom. But by the time 
it opened the wisdom was unda fire: 
Unmmm prices have been so low Jar so 
long that thereactor will be an incredibly 
expensive source of power, in a country 
.that already produces the world’s most 

- expensive electricity. - 

• Ground has been broken for a $7 bfl- 

- Hon reprocessing plant that would take 
nudear waste- from around the country 
and tnm.it into plutonium for re-bum-. 

Japan has also invested more than $3 
baKon in reprocessing installations in 
Sdlafield, England and Le Hague, 
France, that are already operating. For 
several years, Japan has been exporting 
almost all of its nudear waste halfway 
around the world, though so far only one 
shipment erf plutonium fuel derived from 
it has come back. 

In short order, Japan has become a 
vital customer for the Europeans. Origi- 
nally, the European re processing instal- 
lations woe supposed to produce fuel for 
European breeder reactors and conven- 
tional reactors using MOX, a mixed- 
oxide fud that combines uranium 
plutonium. But gradually, that vision has 
crumbled. • 

After a long dispute, the Germans, 
who began breeder work in 1956, can- 
celed their plans after a series of techni- 
cal problems. The British, after experi- 
menting with small reactors, decided in 
1988 to cod their major projects, and 
they are unwilling' to invest heavily in 
plans for a European breeder for fear j 
there would be no c ommer cial custom- I 
era. i 

The Frendi have been more enthusias- 
tic. Buttheirtronfaile-riddea plant, called 
Superphemx, a model for Monju, was 25 
times more expensive than a convention- 
al reactor. It was forced to shut down in 
1990 because of extensive leaks in its 
sodium cooling system and only recently 
limped back mio service. 

Though the customers are fewer and 
fewe r; reprocessing is continuin g at a 
rapid, pace. After years of legal delays, 
Britam just opened its giant Thorp re- 
processing center. 


ear evidence that the breeder reactors France’s competing reprocessing cen- 
euld be several times more costly than ter at Le Hague now takes in 130 to 140 
uven tional reactors, America’s pro- tons , of nudear waste a month. and pro- 
am went into decline. Congress duces 1 1 tons of plntoninm from it anrm- 
opped tbe last financing for a breeder ally . But mush of the waste and the 
reactor in 1983. pfnuanumsit in storage, awaiting a use 


DENG: On His 90th Birthday, Questions About leadership Succession 


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FEB. 16-18 

Societies in Crisis 
and Mental Health 


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□ued declines in Continued from Page 1 

; business investment and raising Andrew Nathan of Columbia University, a 
the specter of future job losses, specialist on China. “But the is so 
• The strong yen, which has ciecp over Tiananmen Square. People are 
eroded manufacturers' compar- just biding their moment." 
ative advantage and accelerated For another, in the last 16 years, as 

offshore production of corapo- potiPV &as swung between political open- 
ne nts. mg and crackdown, between economic re~ 

These problems could be fom “d retrenchment, Mr. Deng's own 
worked through in several prestige has been the uniting force behind 
years, economists say, but the ® coalition of conservatives and reformers, 
economy will be unable to ex- ^ become of these competing 

panri near its 4 percent poten- factions after Mr. Deng is gone? 
tial unless the government de- A coalition of three key leaders forms 
regulates to stimulate growth in the core of the government, and many see 
new sectors such as telecom- the three of them continuing ^to hold sway, 
m unications and bouang and at least for a transitional period, 
lowers prices on food to give - Zemin holds tire titles of party 

consumers more spending paw- chair man, president and chairman erf the 
er. Central Military Commission. A Soviet- 

“Ia the long tun, Japan will trained electrical engineer, Mr. Jiang, 68 , 
be a ferocious competitor, but has no military expe rience, a weakness 
[ it’s going to take a while long- considering the power of the army. 

; er,” Mr. Kimball said. Thougi Mr. Jiang has been trying to 


mj. x'wig, many uoum uis umaauny. or inree protest leaders. 

jSKCTHf WEBB: 

A^prwniMtij U P«g ,66 th= prime 

minister. Mr. Li, a Soviet-trained engineer his no-nonsense style ^7*P eo P lclor 

shi, 

son of former Prime Minister Zhou EbJai, Nal,onal 

Mr. Ii has support among the graduates ctf grass inl^Shehc^SnSl? °*** ^*P® 0r 
Soviet bloc universities who hwd many key 

posts in the bureaucracy. Cre ? en hals 

Because he was the government’s prinri- in the govexmw&iL yS? ™ Btai Y ekments 
pal spokesman after the Tiananmen theyb^Ste^tmn^iSSv^® 1 ? 81 ? 
Square massacre, Mr. Ii is tarred by the to m* force to dea * on 

crackdown. When he suffered heart trou- But non* 989 protests. 


uufwi uiw, uui«Huua wuy uviu urnuy UffCnCe anmmtllc 

posts in the bureaucracy. SwwOJkS 8 Cre ? en hals 

Because he was the government's prinri- in the goveanirauiL yS? ™ Btai Y efements 
pal spokesman after the Tiananmen 

Square massacre, Mr. Ii is tarred by the to nse force to decuaon 

crackdown. When he suffered heart trou- But none c^the^S^K ] 1 
Wes later, the economic portfolio was tak- Mr. Daw’s dour. leaders have 

6,1 awjjyfrom him, supposedly on atempo- partin his revolufio^c^K^x^ 
racy basis. went on the 1934^r^L Cr ^^^ S ' 

Deputy Prime Minister Zhu Rongi, 66 , of passage for the thenfc 

tot* over as economic czar. As mayor of they fled from mrfSf 8 COCT atio p when 
Shanghai in J989, he persuaded demon- .revolution. ““arci&nent during the 





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MONDAY, AUGUST 22, 1994 


OPINION 


Heralb 


INTERNATIONAL 




tribune P°P 1 ^ at * on Economics: The Sensible View Goes Unheard 


PUBLISHED Him Till-. M- W VI IRK TIMES VM1 Tllk ttASHIMUTON POST 


Trials for War Crimes 


Not since the the Nuremberg trials of 
high-ranking Nazis after World War II 
have there been international war crimes 
trials, but now two new instances loom. 
In The Hague, preparations long in the 
works to try genocide suspects in the 
former Yugoslavia may produce indict- 
ments in the next few months. The gov- 
ernment of Rwanda says it supports an 
international tribunal to judge these ac- 
cused of genocide in its tribal wars. 

No public policy question is more sen- 
sitive politically and morally than how 
societies recompose themselves after pro- 
found conflict. At one pole is a pressing 
requirement for justice to respect the 
dead, individ ualize the guilt and deter 
future crimes. At the other pole is a no 
less pressing requirement for reconcilia- 
tion; the establishing of accountability 
should heal not sail old wounds. 

It is the suggestion of genocide, the 
ultimate war crime, that has driven the 
atrocities in Yugoslavia and Rwanda to 
formal international concern. War crimes 
below the genocide level are commonly 
treated within the political system of the 
affected country. 

In Argentina, for instance, coup lead- 
ers were held criminally accountable. In 
Ethiopia, 400 decision-makers accused of 
special terrorist activities are bring tried. 
In El Salvador, consensus has supported 
the uncovering of crimes but not the pun- 


In the former Yugoslavia, a Europe 
that thought itself beyond Nazi-like 
atrocities compensated somewhat for its 
initial passivity by approving the tribunal 
now moving forward, already funded and 
staffed, in The Hague. But serious ques- 
tions remain. At what level of responsi- 
bility will prosecutions be sought? How 
will the suspects' presence in court be 
ensured? Will some leading suspects es- 
cape prosecution by virtue of their bar- 
gaining power as political leaders? 

In Rwanda, the victorious rebel govern- 
ment moved to the idea of as internati onal 
tribunal with the encouragement of out- 
siders wary of its inclination to conduct its 
own trials. It has to be seen whether inter- 
national parties will be able to help Rwan- 
da manage the challenging transition from 
wielding the threat of judicial retribution 
during the slaughter to actually making 
just prosecutions happen in peace. 

The Nuremberg trials worked because, 
although the victors ran them, they ran 
them fairly, and because the offenses 
charged were undeniably evil. There are 
twists on this pattern in Yugoslavia and in 
Rwanda, so it is not possible to be sure 
that the contemplated trials, if and when 
they come, will respond adequately to the 
unspeakable desecration of dvQizaiion’s 
dearest values. But that should be the goaL 
— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


No Arms Trade Policy 


The Clinton administration has yet to 
announce a policy oa arms sales. Under 
this administration, the United States is 
dominating the market for arms as no 
other country has in recent history. The 
American share of new arms deals in the 
Third World soared to 73 percent in 1993 
from 56 percent in 1992. Given the dra- 
matic rise, the failure to develop a policy 
is truly a missed opportunity. 

The United States could use its mar- 
ket dominance to try to get other leading 
producer countries to agree to restrain 
the arms trade. It could offer to limit its 
own sales in return for similar restraint 
from other countries, starting with the 
sale of the most advanced weapons to 
the world's most volatile region — the 
Middle East. Instead, the two largest 
sales for 1993 — 80 percent of the total 
— went to that region. Saudi Arabia 


bought 72 F-15 jet fighters from Mc- 
Donnell Douglas for $9.5 billion, and 
Kuwait bought 256 M1-A2 tanks from 
General Dynamics for $2.2 billion. 


With slowed Pentagon procurement, 
the defense industry cannot expect to 
fend off decline by pushing its products 
abroad. U.S. sales to the Third World 
increased just slightly in 1993, to $14.8 
billion from $14.6 billion the previous 
year. That is because the global arms 
market is shrinking. Third World arms 
purchases totaled $20.4 billion in 1993. 
down 22 percent from 1992 and well 
below the 1988 peak of $61.5 billion. 

As a result, the U.S. arms industry is 
certain to face further consolidation and 
shrinkage. That could reduce the little 
competition left in defense contracting 
and shut down critical parts of the supply 
pipeline. The Pentagon needs to study 
whether it should take a more active role 
in managing that shrinkage. 

It might conclude that it is best left to 
the dictates of the market. But, as with 
overall sales trends, having no policy 
seems to be administration policy. And 
that is not necessarily the best policy. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Cuban refugees picked up at sea will 
now be taken to Guantanamo Bay. Pres- 
ident Bill Qinton says, rather than to 
Miami. This new policy' has a hasty and 


temporary look to it. 
The idea is to prevc 


The idea is to prevent a sudden deluge 
; of boat people pouring into Florida. But 
there are already more than 14,000 Hai- 
tian refugees at Guanidnamo, where the 
■ atmosphere seems to be deteriorating. 
There have been two recent fights in 
which American military police have 
been injured. The administration needs 
to look beyond this stopgap reaction and 
think about the longer future. 

The flow of refugees from Cuba and 
Haiti is being aggravated by the Ameri- 
can sanctions on those two countries. The 
purpose is to force bad governments out 
of power, but the only effect so far has 
been to increase the general misery to a 
point at which people are ready to take 
their chances on rickety little boats and 
rafts. The Cuban economy is declining 
fasl now that the country is no longer 
getting Soviet aid. 

It is time to begin offering Cuba, step 
by cautious step, relaxation of the sanc- 
tions in return for enforcement of civil 
liberties and progress toward democracy. 
The solution to the refugee crisis is not 
more bunks at Guantanamo but a sense 
of hope in Cuba itself. At least at his 
press conference on Friday, Mr. Clinton 
was not ready to talk about that, and on 


Saturday he announced new sanctions 
designed to punish Fidel Castro. 

Since the administration accepts trade 
as a valid and useful lever to improve 
conditions in China, why not in Cuba? 
The circumstances are different, Mr. 
Clinton brusquely replied on Friday. 
Does Fidel Castro have to depart before 
the United States will move toward nor- 
mal relations? Mr. Clinton brushed the 
question away by saying that in a demo- 
cracy it is up to the people to decide. Tine, 
but Cuba is not a democracy. The United 
States has an opportunity to influence 
developments there in this last phase of the 
Castro reign. It needs to find ways to open 
a dialogue not with Mr. Castro but with 
the other 1 1 million Cubans, who now 
have no means of expressing their despair 
but to set sail toward Florida. 

Conditions in Haiti are less promising 
than in Cuba, but even there the United 
States needs to start talking about condi- 
tions for relaxing the sanctions. Haiti's 
progress toward democracy is not likely 
to be rapid, but it will be surer if the 
initiative comes from Haitians rather 
than from American soldiers. 

For the moment, the stream of refu- 
gees to Florida has been diminished. But 
the United States is degraded when it 
uses its ships to help Caribbean strong- 
men keep their much abused people im- 
prisoned in these countries. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Comment 


Destroying the Jobs Ladder 


Just about every major social problem 
we have today, from our soaring crime rate 
and the decay of our urban areas to the rise 
of poverty and homelessness, can be 
traced to one factor: the decline of the 
number of decent-paying, entry-level jobs 
for people of limited skills. 

Those jobs used to offer immigrants and 
disadvantaged Americans a ladder up into 
the middle class — jobs that paid enough 
for them to raise families and send their 
kids to college. Today, however, economi- 
cally disadvantaged Americans have little 


choice but to accept work, when they can 
find it, from the expanding sector of em- 
ployers who have concocted every con- 
ceivable method of keeping wages down 
and workers powerless. And it’s all in the 
name of “competitiveness.*' 

There are no jobs which natural law 
ordains as inherently poorly paid and de- 
void of benefits or security. Before trade 
unionism brought civilization to the mines 
and mills of America, those jobs were just 
as cheap and just as bad as those in what is 
now called the “low-paid service sector.” 
— Lane Kirkland, president of theAFL- 
CIO, quoted in The Washington Post 




International Herald Tribune 

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fr 10*1. bucnmn-JHcnitt Triune. M nidus rr* ned ISSN ■ (CUMR52 


C HEVY CHASE, Maryland 
— The reaction of the Ro- 


ishing of criminals. Plainly, it depends. 
In the former Yugoslavia, a Europe 


Vy — The reaction of the Ro- 
man Catholic Church to the com- 
ing United Nations Population 
Fund conference in Cairo is a 
monumental political blunder. 
The Vatican should not have 
mentioned abortion and contra- 
ception. It should have stuck to 
the subject of the conference — 
population control. 

Pope John Paul II could simply 
have said that human life is the 
ultimate value and that interfer- 
ing with reproductive liberty is a 
crime. But the church, like its crit- 
ics, is drawn to the abortion wars 
like moth to a flame. 

Thus it allows the opponents 
of true reproductive freedom to 
steal the issue of personal liberty 
and thereby take the moral high 
ground. By so doing, it is sub- 
verting its own larger — and ad- 
mirable — goals. 

Some militant f eminis ts have 
decided that while Pope John 
Paul II is trying to force them to 
have children they don't want. 
Population Fund programs are 
not what women need. So the 
conference, which will start in 
Cairo on Sept. 5, has already 
become a free-for-all. 

But the bureaucracy will get its 
way — population control the 
central theme of the conference. 

This is crystal clear in “objec- 
tives” in the “draft final docu- 
ment” (written, of course, long 
before the conference begins): 
“to achieve and maintain a har- 
monious balance between popu- 
lation and resources.” 

Governments would achieve 
the harmony by “curbing unsus- 
tainable population growth” and 
“reducing excessive resource con- 
sumption.” This aim, euphemisti- 
cally called “population stabiliza- 
tion” and cloaked under verbiage 
about “family planning,” has 
been affirmed by Timothy E. 
Wirth, the U.S. undersecretary of 
state for global affairs. He bluntly 
talks about “population controL” 
and President Bui Clinton explic- 
itly backs this goaL 

Attaining this goal means gov- 
ernment policies that will propa- 
gandize, bribe and coerce couples 
to have fewer children than tney 
would otherwise choose to have. 

The world's leading example of 
population control is C hina. Its 
“family pl annin g^ 1 one-child poli- 
cy is pure coercion. It includes 
forcing intrauterine devices into 
the wombs of 100 million women 
against their will; mandatory X- 
rays every three months to ensure 
that the devices have not been re- 
moved, causing who knows what 
genetic damage; coercion to abort 


By Julian L. Simon 


The population activists now 
use their influence with the State 
Department to finance popula- 
tion-control programs in Africa 
with U.S. aid and to bribe African 


governments into cooperating. 

Now comes the Pope to get into 
a well-publicized argument with 
President Gin ton about abortion 
and contraception. 

Non-Catholics, and even some 
Catholics like Frances Kissling. 
president of Catholics for a Free 
Choice, interpret the Pope's state- 
ments as amounting to coercion 
of Catholics to have more chil- 
dren than they would like to have. 

Jane Fonda — Washington’s 
“special goodwill ambassador” to 
the UN Population Fund — has 
decided tha t the church is the bo- 
geyman in the matter. And Moth- 
er Jones magazine writes: “The 
Vatican's dark marriage to Islam 
has kept birth control off the inter- 
national agenda. Meanwhile, the 
population bomb is ticking.” 

This has two tragic effects. The 
attack on the Pope deflects atten- 
tion from the real enemy — the 
Chinese, who coerce; the Indo- 
nesians, who use heavy-handed 
communal “persuasion.” and the 
UN Population Fund, which or- 
chestrates population controL 

Second, the Pope’s message 
against governmental coercion, 
and in favor of life, is lost entire- 


ly. Instead of being heard as the 
defender of the most basic human 
values, he is seen as the villain of 
the conference. 

There is a terrible irony here. 
The church has been, the leading, 
institution which celebrates hu- 
man life as such and asserts that, 
enabling a new person to enjoy 
life is a good in itself. It does not 
urge people to have more children 
than a couple want and can af- 
ford. It recognizes the human lim- 
itations of a family’s resources 
and energies. It does, however, 
hope that people w31 decide to 
have additional children, and it 
cheers when they do. 

Most important, it recognizes 
that one family’s having more 
chil dren does not make - another 
family poorer in the world's 
goods. This 'conclusion is sup- 
ported by two. decades of research . 
by population economists. 

The Vatican’s problem is that 
no matter what it says about oth- 
er matters, a few words about 
abortion and contraception get 
all the attention. In the United 
States' position paper at the 1984 
papulation conference in Mexico 
City, there were just a few sen- 
tences opposing abortion, bat for 
all practical purposes they were 
the only ones that mattered. This 
is what the Vatican is up against. 

The church is also up against a 


deep-rooted anti-Catholicism 
that is triggered' by the popula- 
tion issue and distorts the think- 
ing of even the clearest-minded 
people. The church’s great mes- 
sage about the value of life^ets 
lost to many (including my fel-. 
low Jews) amid these quarrels 
and recriminations about abor- 
tion and contraception.' ... 

The church is the only partici- 
pant in these proceedings -that .', 
gets it right about the economics 
of population growth and eco- 
nomic devdopment • 

A supposed, rationale for 
''population stabilization" is 


that lower . population growth 
brines about faster economic 


brings about faster economic 
growth. But tbe fact is that this, 
proposition — mainstream wis- 
dom until the early 1980s — has 
been proved false. - 
In the 1980s, there ws a U- 
turn in the consensus of popula- 
tion economists about the effects 


of population growth. In 1986, 

tiie National Research Council of 


tbeNational Research Council of 
the UJS. National Academy of 
Sciences almost completely re-, 
versed the worried view it had 
expressed in 1971. Its report not- 
ed that there was no statistical 
evidence of a negative connection 
between population increase and 
economic growth. And it said, 
“The scarcity of exhaustible re- 
sources is at most a minor re- 
straint on economic growth.”' 

Tins shift has gone imacknow- 


The writer, who conducts re- 
search on population economics, is 
a professor of business administra- 
tion at the University of Maryland. 
He contributed this comment to 
The New York Times. 


Rome Shouldn’t Be Allied Wi 


W ASHINGTON — Against all odds, 
the Vatican has topped its recent act 


W the Vatican has topped its recent act 
of awarding Kurt Waldheim a papal knight- 
hood. The Holy See’s diplomats have sought 
out Iran and Libya as ideological soul mates 


By Jim Hoagland 


in the fight against United Nations efforts 
to spread birth control in the Third World. 


if women get pregnant anyway, 
and economic punishment if cou- 
ples evade the abortionist. 

Most of the population estab- 
lishment, which backs the Cairo 
show, applauds China’s programs. 
The population-control advocates 
arc forever apologizing that, yes, 
there was coercion in the past, "but 
the abuses were local and unau- 
thorized and no longer occur. This 
was again revealed as a lie by the 
recent Chinese law to prevent the 
“floating population” from having 
the children they want. 


to spread birth control in the Third World. 

Owning Iran, Libya and other radical 
Islamic regimes on this issue is bad politics, 
bad diplomacy and bad judgment. The Vati- 
can thus finds a moral nndir below even the 
feting of the Austrian ex-president and ex- 
Nazi trooper Waldheim. 

Earlier this month. Pope John Paul II 
sent special envoys to Tehran and Tripoli 
to rally support lor the church’s strong 
opposition to the United Nations Confer- 
ence on Population and Development, to 
be held in Cairo from Sept. 5 to 12. The 
Vatican kept quiet about these trips. The 
the rogue regimes of Iran’s ayatollahs and 
M ourn mar Gadhafi publicized the meet- 
ings for their own malicious purposes. 

Throughout history, the Vatican has had 
to sup with the devil. Its spokesmen assure 
Western nations that it has again used a 
sufficiently long spoon — that it seeks no 
alliance with the radicals, and its envoys 
offered them no political comfort 

But that view underestimates the political 
nature of the struggle for control being 
waged across the Islamic wodd. The Vati- 
can risks interjecting itself — on the wrong 
side — in that sharpening struggle by mak- 
ing common cause with Islamic extremists. 

In the Vatican’s viewpoint, the worldwide 
struggle over abortion and birth control 
seems to take immediate precedence over 
the political struggles in Egypt, Algeria, Ma- 
laysia and other countries where Muslim 


fundamentalists want to sweep away secular 
governments and install theocracies. 

Spokesmen for the ayatollahs welcome 
this approach. The Iranian newspaper 
Abrar quoted an official as having said after 
meeting a-papal envoy on Aug. 1: “The 
future war is between the religious and the 
materialists. Collaboration between reli- 
gious governments in support of outlawing 
abortion is a fine beginning for the concep- 
tion of collaboration in other fields^” . . 

Libya’s official press agency, JANA, also 
welcomed “collaboration.” In a dispatch 
quoted in The New York Times on Aug. 18, 
it claimed that the Vatican agreed to help 
Libya resolve its confrontation with West- 
ern governments over the bombing of Pan 
Am Flight 103 in 1988. Libya in return 
would support the Vatican position con- 
demning a draft accord on reproductive 
rights to be presented in Cairo.- 

The Vatican denies that a deal was struck. 
But Tripoli reaps propaganda value froqi 
the papal envoy’s visit in any event. Such 
contacts implicitly undermine the Western 
effort to isolate Colonel Gadhafi andfince 
him to turn over for trial the Libytm agents, 
who sabotaged the Pan Am flight. • 

The Cairo conference, to be attended by 
representatives of 180 countries, is. sup- 


posed to draft a 20-year plan to control 
world population. The UN bureaucracy* 


world population. The UN bureaucracy, 
strongly supported by the Clinton admin- 
istration, has produced a pro-feminist 


agenda devoted to “empowering” women 
to exercise control on family planning and 
reproductive rights. 


: The Vatican says the agenda will pro- 
mote abortion and homosexuality. 

While it has been busy treating abortion 
as -a' religious issue on which its pronounce- 
ments cannot be challenged, the other side 
in the Cairo debate has tended to treat 
abortion as a secular political issue that has 
already slmpcd out of the church's controL 

Por the Qinton administration and UN 
bureaucrats, the Cairo conference is a de- 
bate and lobbying effort. For the Vatican. 
Cairo is war. The Pope's men have made 
this dear -by seeking foxhole companions 
in Tripoli and Tehran. 

- To avoid turning the Cairo conference 
into a battleground on which everyone is 
harmed, both sides in this argument need to 
reassess. The Vatican needs to recognize the 

- political implications of a religiously in- 
spired campaign to embarrass governments 
that support population control - and to em- 
brace anti-abortion zealots of all stripes. 
Sinking moderate Islamic governments can 
only harm Christianity's ability to exist in 
the Middle East, Africa and Asia. 

On the other side, tile United Nations and 
Washington need to recognize' how deeply 
the church and others fed about birth con- 
trol and abortion. These issues cannot be 
treated merely as secular matters to be de- 
termined in bureaucratic debate and a vote. 

Underestimating the force of religion in 
world affairs, as the Clinton administration 
tends to do, is as bad as underestimating the 
poliucal consequences of a jihad oh abor- 
tion,. winch the Vatican seems tempted to 
conduct in Cairo. Tlus two-sided single- 
mindedness is a recipe for a political and 
religious disaster of hdstoiic proportion. 

The Washington Post. 


In Asia, Too, Different Countries Have Different Population Needs 


H ONG KONG — Pay homage 
to gradualism and modera- 


XX to gradualism and modera- 
tion. As the world gears up for 
another taDcfest about controlling 
the “threat” of population growth, 
the rich would do better to think 
more selfishly — and realistically 
— about their own situation. Not 
just tiie old rich, either. 

The new rich of East Asia, who 
are now benefiting more than 
they often realize from their own 
past stunning successes in slaying 
the population “threat," will "face 
even more serious dilemmas than 
those currently confronting an 
aging Europe. ” 

It is becoming increasingly ap- 
parent that too few people can be 
as big a danger as too many, and 
that an overly rapid rale of 
change, especially one imposed 
from above, can store up horren- 
dous problems for the future. 

Population pressures are dear- 
ly behind many current miseries 
around the world. Rwanda’s 7 
million people, almost all depen- 
dent on the land, lived in a coun- 
try smaller than Belgium and still 
growing at 3 percent a year. It is 
not difficult to argue that Land 
pressure is as important as ethnic 
rivalries in causing periodic bouts 
of mass bloodletting. 

It is hard not to see a similar 
connection between population 
pressures and the rivil wars which 
have rent Yemen. Or in the war- 
fare between Iran and Iraq, or 
indeed the ferment which, despite 
progress in resolving the Palestine 
injustice, afflicts the Middle East. 
Iran, Iraq, Syria and Saudi Ara- 
bia all have some of the highest 
fertility rates in the world and 
populations growing at well over 
3 percent a year. Algeria is not far 
behind at almost 3 percent 

Contrast those with arguably 
problematic Asian countries like 
the Philippines and India, or 
higfa-fendily Latin countries like 


By Philip Bowring 


Brazil and Mexico. In ail these, 
rates of increase were never more 
than 2J percent and are now 
down to 2 percent and falling. 

There could scarcely be a more 
dangerous chasm in the world 
than that between the southern 
and northern shores of the Medi- 
terranean. Fertility in Italy and 
Spain has fallen so sharply that 
already more people are dying 
than being bom. Projections put 
the French population, currently 
58 million, at 55 million by 2025 
and subsequently falling to 45 
million. Germany looks much the 
same, although the process of 
change has been slower. 

One can reasonably argue that 
the absolute number is irrele- 
vant But the process of change 
is the problem. It implies that 
the percentage of dependents 
will reach extraordinarily high 
levels in Western Europe, a bur- 
den on society much greater than 
that imposed by high levels of 
dependent children in some de- 
veloping countries. 

Much of Southern and Eastern 
Europe and Russia desperately 
needs very soon much higher 
birthrates or controlled inward 
migration as in Canada, where 
traditional population growth 
policies offset low fertility. They 
need it as least as desperately as 
Algeria needs the opposite. 

That is oot to say they will not 
get it. Demographic trends are 
notoriously fickle. Birthrates in 
Northern Europe, once very low, 
are picking up. Algeria and Syria 
may get sudden doses of the fac- 
tors which lower birthrates else- 
where: education of women, ris- 
ing life expectancy, falling child 
mortality, urbanization, jobs for 
women, or sheer brute govern- 
ment directive. But not h ing can 
be assumed to right itself.' 


Bring Down Fertility and Immigration m America 


P RESENT immigration and fertility patterns place the United 
Slates on the path to a population of 397 million by 2050 and 492 
million in 2 100. More than 90 percent of that growth will be a direct 
result of post-2000 immigration. 

In other woids, immigration policies place the United States in a 
league with the ruinous population growth patterns of countries like 
India and Bangladesh. We find the idea of another doubling of U.S. 
population thoroughly frightening. 

— Undsev Grant and Leon F. Bouvier, in the Los Angeles Tunes. 


Are things so much better bal- 
anced here in Asia? The answer is 
“yes. but ... ” 

Japan’s fertility rate is on a par 
with Germany’s, and population 
will start to faH soon after the 
turn of tiie century. National 
awareness of the problem exists, 
but neither a higher birthrate nor 
deliberate immigration is in sight 

South Korea, Taiwan, Hoag 
Kong and Singapore will face 
even more rapid transitions to old 
age as the very sharp reductions 
in birthrates of the 1960s work 
their way through. Although total 
populations (assuming no immi- 
gration) will continue to grow 
slowly for several decades, and 
dependency ratios will keep fall- 
ing until around 2,000 for Taiwan 
and South Korea, by 2020 more 
than 20 percent of South Koreans 
will be over 60, compared with 7 
percent now. As fertility in South 
Korea. Taiwan and Hong Kong is 
no higher than in Western Europe, 
future shocks could be severe. 

At least these countries have 
m ana g ed afall in fertility without 
overt pressure or sexual imbal- 
ance. But China is storing up a 
future of war. polyandry or mo- 
nasticism. 

Drastic, state-enforced mea- 
sures have cut the fertility rate 
by 60 percent, and population 
growth is now little more than 1 
percent a year. But the combina- 
tion of one-child families and a 
patriarchal society which gives 
priority to male children has re- 
sulted in widespread abortion of 
female fetuses. The resulting pro- 
spect is of serious sex imbalance, 
with perhaps 5 percent of young 
males unable to find mates. - 

This problem will start to hurt 
within a decade. Thus, although 
China may feel that it is in the 
process of solving its total popu- 
lation problem, the crude way of 
achieving such a drastic change in 
fertility may cause problems that 
are equally severe. 

Of course, government policy 
may change. Or state injunctions 
may be increasingly ignored- in 
this as in other ways. Bat a low 
birthrate and male preference 
may become the norm, whatever 
the government says. 

Likewise in India, official ef- 


forts to prevent sex testing of fe- 
tuses seem unlikely to be very 
effective while society puts a laige 
premium on male children. How- 
ever, India’s higher fertility rates 
make sex bias less dangerous than 
in low-fertility China. 

While the Asian giants con- 
front the demographic dangers of 


patriarchal systems, much of 
Southeast Asia is emoying the 


Southeast Asia is enjoying the 
benefits of matriarchal systems 
which have survived over the cen- 
turies despite overlays of import- 
ed religions and ideologies. Fe- 
male children have been equally 
valued, reflecting their economic 
position. Fertility rates woe nev- 
er at the levels now seen in Africa 
and the Middle East, and have 
been falling steadily, nudged a 
little by government: programs 
but more by education and em- 
ployment opportunities. 

In Thailand, almost as many 
girls as boys attend secondary 
school. Indonesia is not far be- 
hind. Even Burma, an economic 
failure, has seen a steady fall in 
fertility as education for women 
has improved. 

Although population-obsessed 
experts at the World Bank con- 
tinue td berate even Thailand for 


being in the “earlier stages of 
fertility decline,” in fact most of 
Southeast Asia — Vietnam and 
the Philippines could be excep- 
tions — is showing balance and 
moderation. 

Annual rates of population in- 
crease are down to 1.6 percent in 
Thailand and Indonesia, and fer- 
tility is falling faster. These coun- 
tries should avoid the pitfalls of 
unbridled population growth out- 
stripping natural and capital re- 
sources, or creating equally prob- 
lematic imbalances in the age or 
sex structure. 

Many countries in Southeast 
Asia have the advantage of natu- 
ral resource endowments and can 
do without authoritarian anti-na- 
tal programs. Likewise much of 
Latin American can afford much 
higher population density than it 
currently has, and thus can take a 
gradualist approach. 

Whatever the merits of ulti- 
mately reaching some global op- 
timum, excessive anti- and pro- 
na t al ism are the sides of the 
same coin that sent Goths, Mon- 
gols and Vikings off on their 
travels -to ma ssa c re others rather 
than each other. 

International Heraid Tribune. 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND SO- YEARS' Acn 


1894s Worse Than Rgg 1944: Seine Reached 


PARIS -r- A BerEn telegram says 
the Hamburger Nachrichten is 
authorised to contradict the state- 


ment put into Prince Bismarck’s 
mouth. The old Chancellor 
warmly denies: that be ever said 
that the AnardusK ought to be 
pained up and treated like his 
■pigs at Varan, and when his at- 
tention was drawn to this .state- 
ment he exclaimed: “I should 


never have thought of insulting 
my pigs by such a comparison.” . 


1919; Baci From France 


NEW YORK— Wearing Victory 
ribbons with six stars,. the first 
troops of- the Third Division (Reg- 
ulars), theontyAmerican division 

to takepart max major offensives, 
returned yesterday [Aug. 19] on 
tbe troqp transport Agamemnon. 
Thedivirion is best known a$ “The 
Defenders of the Marne.” 


a $^Rican ad- 
VANCED FORCES AT THE 
RIVER SEINE — [From our 
New York edition:] The Seine, 
wdudi flows through the center 
of Pans, has been reached and 
crossed by fast-moving Ameri- 
can forces. The crossfogs were 
made not at Paris but to the 
northwest in the vicinity of Man- 
tes. By assuming control of the 
strategic Seine, , the Americans 
are further cutting possible 
routes of «cape for the fleeing 
German divisions. Despite 
heavy rain and pitch darkness, 
the erodings of the river began 
armufengbt and by this morning 
.[Aug, 21 } the Americans were in 
cpmplae control of their objec- 
tives. Over mght the Americans 
bad separated the Germans in 
Noimandy from the Germans in 

pUJ? The of Gen- 
eral Patton s army is staggering. 


U 1 


Tedged by the media, by environ- 
mental organizations and by the 
agencies that foster population 
control around the world. 

..While the Reagan administra- 
tion built tius body of scientific 
fact into its 1984 stand at the 
world population conference, the 
Bosh adminis tration did nothing 
to carry it (Hit in policy, and the 
.Clinton administration turns a 
blind. eye to it. Now the-UN Pop- 
ulation Fund has carefully pre- 
vented mainstream population 
economists from participating in 
preparations for the conference. 

So what will we get in Cairo? 
Lots of acrimonious feminist 
rhetoric against tiie church and 
white males, providing an enjoy- 
able occasion for the women and 
fine sound bites for the media, 
•phis heartburn for the Vatican 
and maybe a lesson for the future. 

And we’ll get quiet success for 
the population controllers and 
UN bureaucrats who want to 
force women in poor countries to 
have fewer children than they 
want to bear — with no benefit to 
the economies and environments 
that these establishment mem- 
bers claim to be improving. 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY. AUGUST 22, 1994 



** 


•V 7 




-fliv 




From the Liberation of Paris, Potent Myth of National Unity Arose 


By Joseph Fitchew 

Imenmhmd Herald Tribute 

PARIS —French histoiy i^ made in Paris, so the 
city’s liberation was hound- to demand better poHu- 
cal theatrics than a' simple Gentian withdrawal. 

By the time the act of surrender was' signed in a 
billiard room. at police headquarters rat Aug. 23, 
1944, the salvation of Paris had riveted "the world's 
' nation and shaped postwar France’s place is 
est, its relations with Communism -and sense 


in Paris, as a 
L eary’s center, 


the , 

of its natkmal identity. 

The story of the 

lone French tank . , 

contains an extraordinarily potent partial charge; 
perhaps because it was. virtually the only French 
victory in the war. 

^rn speeches, parades and street dancing on Thurs- 

xnost agnificant^mia^m of the EbCTatitm: the 
myth of national unity that General Charles De 
Gaulle artfully contrived, ffis gnalj he -wrote later, 
was to lift Frenchmens 7 "opinion of themselves for 
several generations” after a war in' which too modi 
of the population 1 collaborated entlmgiiigticimy - ' 

To raise national morale,- the liberation’s main 
traits fit a classic recipe: a mixture of revolutionary 
barricades and block parties in the streets,' in step 
with a Parisian lineage of insurrection that started at 

the Bastille in 1789. - ' v , .-••• 

Today, that cathartic week SO years ago is being 


revisited by the French press in a frenzy without 
parallel in any other Allied country’s evocations of 
the war. 

No one more than General de Gaulle felt the 
nation’s need for a watershed event to help people 
move on from a historic nightmare. France had had 
a bad war: it was the only anti- Axis belligerent to 
strike a deal to cooperate with Hitler. Worse, France 
was the scene of bloody civil conflict between deter- 
mined, often small Resistance movements and col- 
. laborators . who had maliciously turned on their 
' fellow countrymen. 

The key to breaking this vicious cycle was Paris. A 
popular plebiscite in the capital would confer legiti- 
macy instantly on the new ruler that France desper- 
ately needed. 

Winning it was no feat of arms. Paris was a 
strategic liability for the Allied armies racing past 
the capital and aiming to cross the Seine before 
German forces could make a defensive stand. A 


freed Paris would consume supplies needed by 

I the Rhine bridges 


- American tanks racing - toward 
and Germany- 

General de Gaulle argued insistently for dispatch- 
ing a French armored column under General Le- 
Cterc to force a quick German surrender, arguing 
that the Allies cculd not risk leaving Paris in the 
hands of the German, occupiers, who might exact a 
horrendous toll on the population. 

If the occupiers fled, Communist resistance fac- 


tions would exploit the power vacuum, and General 
de Gaulle feared an orgy of vigilante justice liable to 
breed more bad blood among the French — the 
and head-shavings that were eventually 
on more than 10,000 French in the epura- 
non salvage later in 1944. 

Worst, General de Gaulle worried, internecine 
squabbling would open the way to an occupation: 
the Allies nad already primed currency over stamped 
“AMGOT" for “American Military Government.** 
Washington hoped that the Vichy regime of Marshal 
Philippe P6tain might simply surrender. 

General de Gaulle countered by simply insisting 
that the Vichy regime had never existed legitimately. 
Consistently, he explained that his Free France 
movement had incarnated the wartime nation, con- 
veniently ignoring the parliamentary vote of full 
powers to Marshal Potato. 

This attitude, dictated by General de Gaulle's 
determination for France to be treated as a world 
power despite its collapse in ] 940, stamped ambigu- 
ity and tensions on bis relations with the Americans. 

In August, Allied forces burst out of the Norman- 
dy pocket, suddenly reducing politics to timing. 
Wait too long to turn against the Germans and you 
risked getting no credit. A premature move could be 
fatal: firing squads executed a group of schoolboys 
four days before the end. 

On Aug. 18, the Communists issued a call to arms. 
French policemen — odious during the occupation 


— raised the tricolor at their headquarters and 
barricaded themselves inside. 

Railwayman blocked German trains in rnnnds so 
they could not bring in reinforcements or ferry out 
escaping troops. Nearly 600 barricades went up in 
Paris streets. Skirmishes broke out, often involving a 
single German tank. 

Paris did not risk the fate of the Warsaw uprising, 
where the Red Army halted to let the German 
m destroy the city — and underground Polish 


unist leaders. Thai episode, roughly coindd- 

ted General de 


ing with the Paris battle, consolidat 
Gaulle’s view that France could work with Moscow 
because the Kremlin would always sacrifice the 
French Communist Party for Russia's own national 
interests. 

But there was a parallel with Warsaw in well- 
grounded Allied fears that Hitler wanted to raze 
Paris. The risk persuaded the allies to move on the 
city. 

By the time General de Gaulle arrived on Aug. 24, 
more than 3,000 Parisians had been killed, enough 
for the general to lionize Paris as a self-liberated city. 
He recognized, as Antony Beevor and Artemis Coo- 
per wrote in a just-published book, “Paris After the 
Liberation,” the “value of the myth that the rising 
had created.” 

It could help the French sublimate historic shame 
that could hold the nation in paralyzing thrall. 

The icon of this extraordinary happening was his 


progress the next day down the Champs-Elystes. 
parting a sea of delirious Parisians who were faying 
eyes on the man who had existed only as a voice of 
hope. When a burst of sniper fire scattered the 
crowd, combat-wise leaders at the procession’s head 
kept right on walking toward Notre Dame. What is 
remembered, however, is the majestically unbending 
figure of the general. 

General de Gaulle, in all his utterances that day, 
emphasized his goal of “uniting everyone in a surge 
of national pride” — an attitude that swiftly dis- 
tanced him from the Resistance, including his own 
followers. They wanted justice: General de Gaulle 
wanted a people to rule, including PfetainistS. The 
Resistance would be a free-masomy in postwar 
France, not a junta. 

Sensing General de Gaulle's message, even the 
chic arrondissements, which had tended to be more 
collaborationist than working-class neighborhoods, 
were swept up in what became a citywide party. 

Pamiennes on wooden clogs swayed like high- 
spirited models, their short skirts revealing legs in 
painted stockings. Bottles emerged from hiding 
places. Starting the day as sightseers at a battle, 
people danced the night away. Liberating the Ritz 
Hotel bar, Ernest Hemingway looked over his shoul- 
der at his personal armv and ordered “martinis for 
50.” 

As the celebrations ignited in Paris, the country 
started on the road to recovery. 


In One Suburb^ a Special Perch 

l^ifness Recalls Bells andButtets on Avenue de Neuilfy 


By Thomas Fuller 

iRt&rwional Herald Tribune 

ASNIERES, France — -Louis BiDard sat 
perched on a crimson couch in his apartment, 
in this Paris suburb and told of the day, 50 
years ago, when all the' church bdls began to 

% 


“Everyone went to their windows,” he said, 
his animated face making him look younger 
than his 80 years. “And little by little we saw 
them arrive, first motorcycles and then 
tanks.** 

“As if by magic, French, American and 
British flags were draped outside people’s 
windows,” he said. “The Marseillaise was 
playing from every buflding." . 

Mr. Billard's pbrch on that day, Aug. 25, 
1944, was the window of his third-floor apart- 
ment at 183 Avenue de NemDy, now the 
headquarters of the Internationa] Herald Tri- 
bune. 

Today, as in 1944, Neuilly-sur-Seine is an 
affluent suburb of Paris bordering the Bois de 


Boulogne. But NeuiBy’s main thoroughfare is 

de NeuiDy. 


no longer Mr. Billard’s Avenue de Nemiiy. 
The street was renamed Avenue Charles de 
Gaulle and now serves as the main aitery 
connecting Pains with the nearby business 
center of La Defense. 

As he looked' down onto the Avenue de 
Ncailly 50 years ago. Mr. Bfllard remembers, 
instead of the noise of cars and motorcycles 
he heard gunfire from Che nearby roofs. 

“There were still, even tiren^ collaborators; 


they weren’t yet aU eliminated," he said. “Sev- 
eral t 


of them fixed on the troops passing by 
below; Two soldiers were fairh» seriously hit, 
and 1 dunk one oLtbem died. 


“But the troops had anti-tank guns mount- 
ed on ’a platform,” he said, his eyes flickering 


with animation as if he was back in his old 
apartment standing at the window witnessing 
v the scene below. 

“They saw where the shooting was coming 
from, aimed the gun and fired a shot,” he 
stud. “That was the last we heard. Finished. A 
. fire started, and the firemen came.” 

Before the liberation, Mr. BiHard and his 
wife spent four and a half years of countless 
hushed conversations with neighbors, of lis- 
tening to clandestine news broadcasts from 
London, four and a half years of many trips 
l^bicyde to the farms around Paris in search 
of fruit and vegetables. 

“Despite everything, with our radios we 
listened,” he said, referring to the broadcasts 
from London during the summer of 1944. 

. “We knew what was happening. We knew 
that the battle was practically won. You won 
it.” He meant the Americans and the Battle of 
Nonnandy. 

The thought of D-Day soldiers running up 
a beach triggered a personal memory; “Sever- 
al years after the war,” he said, “I went with 
my daughter — I wanted to see where 1 had 
done my military service.” at a time before the 
war. 

“I. did my military service at SL-Avold.” he 
said slowly, referring to a town in eastern 
France near Metz. He paused. 

“St-Avold.” He sat upright and stared 
straight ahead. Silence. His eyelids drooped 
with a tear. 

“It’s horrible,” he said. “When l saw the 
cemetery of the Americans there, it was huge. 
General Patton was buried there. It was huge. 
It was huge, crosses as far as the eye can see. 
Having' known SL-Avbld miidr differently, 
when I saw that I said to my daughter, ’Come, 

f Mi pa * T* 



nr ; ry ■ ;.v v. j . *;x 


let's leave.’ It was too much to handle.’ 1 


Louis Bffiartfs liberation perspective on Aug. 25, 1944. 


Ex-Mitterrand Aide Describes a Plot 
To Assassinate Carlos’s Lawyer in ’80s 


Return 

PARIS — A former aide to 
President Francois Mitterrand 
said Sunday that he had been 
entrusted in the early 1980s to 
assassinate Jacques Verges, the 
lawyer now defending the cap- 
tured terrorist “Carlos the 
Jackal.” 

Captain Paul Barril a for- 
mer member of an elite anti- 
terrorism unit, told the televi- 
sion channel TF1 that the 
French president had known 
about the plot. 

After a week of charges and 
countercharges, Mr. Verges 
has begun to eclipse his notori- 
ous client in the eyes of Lhe 
French press. Carlos, a Vene- 
zuelan whose real name is Il- 
licit Ramirez Sinchez, was 
seized a week ago in Sudan and 
jailed in Paris. 

News organizations have 
delved into the archives of 
Stasi. the former East Germa- 
ny secret service, which suggest 
that the attorney has long been 
close to Carlos. 

Mr. Vergts spoke of a plot 
against his life last week, say- 
ing he had been informed 
about it by Captain Barril in 
1991. 

Captain Barril, asked by the 
television interviewer if it was 
true that he had been instruct- 
ed to assassinate the lawyer, 
answered: “I cannot deny Ver- 


ge's statement In 1982-83. 
Verges was at the center of all 
terrorist contacts, including 
Carlos. He was a priority tar- 
get" 

In 1982, Mr. Vergfes was de- 
fending Carlos's girlfriend. 
Magdalena Kopp, a member of 
Germany’s Red Army Faction, 
who was later jailed for carry- 
ing arms and explosives. 

Asked if Mr. Mitterrand bad 
authorized the plot to murder 
Mr. Verges, as the attorney as- 
serted in an interview with the 
newspaper France-Soir. Cap- 
lain Bam) answered: 

“He knew about it. No in- 
struction is ever given in such 
cases. They are too delicate to 
commit to paper. Instead, 
carte blanche is given." 

No comment was immedi- 
ately available from Mr. Mit- 
terrand’s office on Captain 
Barril 's remarks. 

The Elysee Palace has re- 
fused to comment on the alle- 
gations made by Mr. Verges 
last week. 


The files have been variously 
quoted as branding Mr. Verg&s 
an “operational member” of 
Carlos's group and implicating 
him in an attack on a French 
nuclear plant in 1982. He has 
denied the allegations, de- 
nouncing what be called a 
“Stasi disinformation cam- 
paign” 

In an interview published by 
the weekly Le Journal du Di- 
manche. ’ Interior Minister 
Charles Pasqua. the architect 
of Carlos's seizure, said the 
guerrilla would betray his 
friends as he faced li/e behind 
bars. 


Explaining the reason for 
plot. Captain Barril said. 


the pi 

"Because terrorists were pro- 
tected by stales, we were 
forced to use means which are 
not in the penal code.” 

French newspapers, quoting 
Stasi files, have made a string 
of allegations against Mr. 
Verges since Carlos’s arrest. 


“Many people would like to 
see him dead,” Mr. Pasqua 
said, adding that he was cer- 
tain Carlos would name 
names, including accomplices 
who provided him with infor- 
mation and who carried out his 
propaganda. 

Carlos faces legal proceed- 
ings for three bombings in the 
1 980s, including a car bombing 
in Paris that killed a woman in 
1982. 


The two other cases are the 
bombing of a Paris-Toulouse 
train in 1982, which killed five 
people, and an attack on a 
Marseilles railway station in 
1 983, which also left five peo- 
ple dead. 


PARIS: War- Weary People Were at the limits of Endurance When Allied liberation Troops Sent Occupying Germans Running With Their Loot 


Confined iron Page 1 


the 


very much present in the city, as French 
citizens discovered Aug. 19 when they at- 
tempted an insnrrection to liberate the 
city. 


A few days later, the tacks of the Free 
French Secxuzd Armored Division and sol- 
diers of the UJS. 4th Infantry Divirion 
liberated Paris after some very tough fight- 
ing. 

Everywhere, jubilant crowds invaded 


the streets and avenues to acclaim 
liberators. 

I had managed to escape my parents' 
vigilance to run to the Champs- Dysfes. 
An American tank with a big white star 
painted on its flank had just stopped in 
front of the Grand Palais. I saw a blond 
giant, Ms fatigues all covered with grease 
and dost, emerge from the turret My first 
American! 

I was overwhelmed with happiness and 
emotion. 1 began to run toward turn. I 


wanted to teQ him our joy. our gratitude, 
our love But as I was running. I suddenly 
realized that I wouldn’t know what to say 
to him because I didn’t speak any English. 
In my school, we had been forced to learn 
German during the war. 

As I arrived in front of the tall, s milin g 
American, I suddenly remembered 1 did 
know at least two words in the language of 
Shakespeare. I shouted to him, “Corned 
beef!” 

He burst out laughing, climbed onto his 


tank, and disappeared inside to emerge 
immediately with a huge box of corned 
beef, which he presented me as the most 
glorious of all trophies. 

And what a trophy it was indeed for a 
young Parisian schoolboy who had not 
seen meat for many months! 


The following day. Aug. 26, the most 
fantastic spectacle filled my schoolboy 
eyes: the triumphant parade of liberation 
on the Champs-Hysees, at its head the 


proud and tall General Charles de Gaulle, 
the man whose voice we heard on the radio 
during four years of German occupation. 

All along the world’s most beautiful 
avenue, it was one big ocean of 2 million 
cheering people. Crowds lined the roofs, 
windows, balconies, trees, lampposts and 
packed the sidewalks, screaming General 
de Gaulle's name as be walked by. Little 
girls ducked out into the avenue to hand 
him bouquets, which he passed to the men 
behind him. 


A whole city was pouring its love over 
the man who bad been the incarnation of 
hope, the symbol of victory, during more 
than four years of Nazi tyranny. 


Dominique Lapierre. co-author with 
Larry Collins of the best-selling book “Is 
Pais Burning T and a native of Paris, was 
13 years old when the city was liberated He 
wrote this for the International Herald Tri- 
bune. 


BOOKS 


BRIDGE 


THE GOLD WAS: 
A History 


By Martin Walker. 392 pages. 
$30. John Macrae/ Henry HolL 


Reviewed by 
Herbert Mitgang 


In a highly readable book, 
. “The Cold War ” Martin Walk- 
er grapples with most of these 
questions without - necessarily 
answering them. He examines 
almost half a century of con- 
frontation between the United 
States and the Soviet Union. 


WHAT THEY'RE READING 


T HE Cold War was an ideo- 
logical war, a weapons war 
and an economic war. It lasted 
longer than World War l. 
World War 1] and the Korean 
and Vietnam wars combined 
Now that only one of the ad- 
versaries remains a superpower. 
Western historians are warring 
over several theoretical ques- 
tions: When did the Cold War, 
begin? Was the Soviet Union 
alone responsible or should 
some of the blame be shared by 
the United Stales? Can any 
American administration take 
credit for “winning” the CoW 
War? Was the Cold War avoid- 
able or were the United States . 
and the Soviet Union, in the 
phrase of the disarmament ex- 
pert Paul C Wanike, two apes 
on a treadmill? . 


His- book smites both sides 
wiiti long-forgotten details 
about the. distrust that caused 
Washington and Moscow to de- 
stroy their wartime alliance the 
mqmentNazi Germany was de- 


feated. He writes from strength: 

/die 


• Sirio Maccioni. owner of 
New York’s Le Cirque restau- 
rant. is reading *7 Padroni del 
Mondo ” by Enzo Biagi. 

“This book tells how Europe- 
ans are always enchanted by 
America, as long as they don't go 
there and spoil their dreams. It is 
in Italian because I read one 
week Italian, followed by a week 
of German, then English — the 
best way to keep your languages 
up." t John Brunton, 1HT) 



visionisi history, yet at limes he 
seems inclined 'to see the bright, 
neo-Orwellian, side of the Cold 
War. What I found most star- 
tling was his cool emphasis on 
the positive economic achieve- 
ments of the Cold War. 


used to improve living stan- 
dards instead of sophisticated 
armaments and the environ- 
mental damage caused by 
chemical weapons and aerial 
bombing. Korea and Vietnam 
were not PX-Iand. 


Writing about the two major 
wars in Korea and Vietnam 
during the Cold War era, he 
makes much of the fact that 
“America’s Cold War defense 
budgets also pumped invest- 
ment into Lhe now-booming 
economies of the Pacific Rim. 


now the U.S. bureau chief of 
London newspaper The Guard- 
ian, he also reported from Mos- 
cow and wrote “The Waking 
Giant: Gorbachev and Peres- 
troika." 


Walker begins his fairly even- 
handed Survey with the 1945 
Yalta conference of the Allied 
leaders, to agree on war strategy 
against Germany and Japan 
arid settle the broad outlines of 
peace. He then covers the effect 
of the dropping of the atomic 
bombs and the buildup of terri- 
fying nuclear arsenals, satellites 


in space, the Cuban missile cri- 
sis during the Kennedy presi- 
dency, the U.S. loss in Vietnam, 
the policy of containment, the 
demise and revival of d&tente, 
Mikhail S. Gorbachev and the 
end of the Cold War. 


might sustain the war-battered 
Communist government. 


Throughout “The Cold 
War." lhe author delivers tell- 
ing scenes of conflict in Wash- 
ington between statesmen who 
wanted to trust the Soviet 
Union and those who were op- 
posed to any postwar aid that 


Recent revisionist historians 
have shifted some or lhe fault 
for the Cold War to American 
rigidity. Yet nothing in the Sta- 
lin record — as exposed by 
Kremlin leaders themselves — 
offered hope for a renewal of 
the wartime alliance or democ- 
ratization in the Soviet Union 
and its satellites, which were 
held in line by Russian tanks. 


Japan's economic miracle can 
be dated with some precision to 
the efrect of the Korean War, 
when Japan became the main 
base for the U.S. war effort." 


Again, on the Vietnam War, he 
says “Japanese Hondas and ste- 
reos and radios packed the PX 
stores on the American bases." 


Walker's book isn’t quite re- 


This sanguine interpretation 
neglects the human side of the 
equation: the millions of mili- 
tary and civilian casualties in 
both wars, the waste of re- 
sources that might have been 


On the tantalizing question 
of whether the Cold War was 
inevitable. Walker writes: “It is 
just possible, had Roosevelt 
lived, and had there been no 
stricken Europe between them, 
no Western European Allies 
still festooned in embarrassing 
colonial entanglements, and in 
a most prickly pride, that the 
Cold War might not have got 
under way. But Roosevelt was 
dead, the Americans had the 
monopoly of the bomb and Eu- 
rope sprawled between the vic- 
tors. to be occupied, rescued or 
fought over." 

There are enough ifs here to 
render even guesswork futile, 
but the author’s speculation is 
pleasing to contemplate. 


Herbert Mitgang is on the 
staff of The New York Times. 


By Alan Truscott 

O N the diagramed deal from 
the Grand National Team 
final, Larry Cohen as South ar- 
rived in six spades after his op- 
ponents bad bid clubs vigorous- 
ly. North’s double of two dubs 
was a support double, promis- 
ing three-card support for 
spades. After an opening club 
lead, ruffed in the dummy, he 
faced a difficult problem. 

He found an interesting solu- 
tion by leading (he spade nine 
from the dummy. Jeff Meck- 
stroih as East ducked after con- 
siderable thought, and the 
queen won in the closed hand. 
It appeared to South that if he 
ruffed his remaining club, he 
would have difficulty in han- 
dling East’s remaining small 
spade. As it happens, that play 
would have succeeded because 
the fall of the diamond ten per- 
mits a second entry to the 
closed hand in that suit. 

Instead. South led the heart 
queen for a finesse be expected 
to win. and this won the trick 
when West did not cover (cov- 
ering would perhaps have been 
better, but South could have 


survived). He then ruffed his 
remaining club with the spade 
ace, led to the diamond ace and 
drove out (be spade king. Again 
the diamond nine was the vital 
entry to draw the missing trump 
and make the slam. The signifi- 
cance of the heart play, taking 
away East's only heart, would 
have been clearer if that player 
had held four diamonds, head- 
ed by the ten he could not have 
prevented from reaching his 
band to draw the missing 
trump. 

NORTH (D) 

* A 98 

J 873 
0 KQ J 42 

WEST ~ EAST 

• 5 A K43 

P K 8 5 4 2 

0 10 0 S 7 6 5 

* A K W G 3 2 *J »754 

SOUTH 

* Q J 10 7 6 2 
<?Q6 

O A 93 
*Q 8 

Both sides were vulnerable. The 


i 


bidding: 

North 

East 

South 

West 

I 17 

Pass 

1 s 

2 ♦ 

DbL 

1* 

4 S 

5* 

8 0 

Pass 

6* 

Pass 

Piss 

PBM 



Wart led trie club king- 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, AUGUST 22, 1994 


// 


vv 


PLATINUM 


CHANEL 


'JVy*** 


















INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, AUGUST 22, 1994 


> * 




II 


NEW 


YORK 


TJBE WEATHER 

Today 1 Ckadyv itMcn in late 
iflntuu or even big 
Til— >■■■■» X M utir. Mo, Ml ■». n 

OeuSnl Bapon os 23 

" • • . • • . 



tribune I ss’ r 


Vdu 13 VNa 35,709 


CW*rt*M. 1344, 

■ *•* TMfe Trttaaa 1 m. 


TUESDAY, AUGUST 22. 1844 


• THBII » CZMTS- 
In Nn T«rfc 0*7 




in Smash Over Seine; 
Storm Toulon, Fight in City; 
ornery Says ‘End of War Is in 




% 




;• V 
Wi 


Peace Parley 
Backs Small 
States 9 Bights 

U. S-, Britain and Russia 
Declare World Security 
Wifl Be a Tads for AD 

Must Be Backed Up 
ByF orceJHulIHoldsj 

British Delegate Urges 
Speed for Organisation 
Before the War Ends 


Tam af 


sMMMWMla mt opening 
'aga U 


WiUkieand Dulles Discuss Role Toulon Forts 
Of V.S.in Assuring Wo rldOrder pj erce( j ^ 2 

FrenchDrives 


Joint Statement After 90-Minute Non-Partisan 
Conference Gives No Indication of Willkie’a 
■ Position on Dewey-Bricker Ticket 


Alter an hour and a hairs con- 
ference yesterday between Wendell 
I* wmue. the 1M0 Republican 
Presidential candidate, and John 
Poster Dulles, chief adviser on for- 
eign affairs to Governor Thomas 
X. Dewey, tire. ,2044 Republican 
Presidential candidate. It was 
noudeerf In a brief lotat statement 
that |t was the common desire of 
llr. Wfflkie and Mr. Dulles that 
ttaa united States should play 
constructive and responsible part 
In' assuring world order, 

There was little else of a detailed 
nature as to the ground covered in 


their exchange of views on inter- 
national affairs, yet, despite the 
brevity of the statement, it was 
specifically emphasised that there 
was so interest in the canvcna- 
tfcms for any particular candidate. 
It was thought that the tut* 
might bring forth some hint an 
Mr. WODde’s attitude toward the 
Dewey-Bricker Republican ticket. 


By Bert Andrews 

WASHINGTON. Aug. flL— 

Thirty-sfac representatives of the 
United States, Great Britain , and 
Russia sat down today at a large 
U-shaped table in the spacious 
"mm, room of the <"«w|Ww known 
as Dumbarton Oaks and heard 
Ih dr three leading spokesman 
voice the hope and the belief that 
through Chair erptorafiosy efforts 
mankind win at i»»g bat make- a 
start on the rood to 
peace. 

For thrir keynote the dBegates 
bad aaeutanreg of Cordell Hull. 

Secretary of State; Ambassador) 

Andrei A. Gromyko, chairman of 
the Russian group, and Sir Alex- 
ander CUdogan, head of the Brit- 
ish delegation, on the fohowtag 
major points; 

That all peaea-Jovtaie nations, 

Ug and Bttte alike, wifi be part- 
in whatever warld security 
organization stems from the cur- 
rent prdmtBBty talks, with rw- 
spaufidttUee allocated to each ac- 
cording to its powers. 

Need of Speag Stressed 

That the organ ire tim wm seek 
anangemats for peaceful settle- 
ment of totematinoal disputes] button to sedving those vital prota- 
and tor the Joint nae of force, if J terns and sedving them in a new 

way— I mean a way which pro- 
vides not dotes hut Jobs for aJL“ 
Governor Dewey said that the 
great reoord of eco n om i c stability 
achieved by organised labor in 
New Yack, with the co-operation 
at the state administration and 
of .-the state's Industry, can be 
duplicated mi a national basis. 

The convention, on Wednesday, 
is expected to indorse the candi- 
dacy of President Roosevelt for a 
fourth term, but a number of in- 
(CtmUnuedonpaffeJJ. cabana 2 > 


The statement, however, leaves 
that question still unanswered. 

The Joint statement read: 

“We have conferred extensively 
about the various international 
problems bearing on world organi- 
zation to assure lasting peace. 

“There was a full exchange of 
views not animated by partisan 
co nrirtnation nor having to do 
with any candidacy, but by the 
desire of both of us that the 
United States should play a con- 
structive and responsible part in 
‘{assuring world order.** 

The meeting took place at Mr 
iDuBes’s home, at 12 Bast Ninety- 
first Street, and lasted from 4:4S| 
MLte 5:15 p. m. It had been 
suggested by Governor Dewey, who 
said be desteed to obtain all points 
of view in the formulation of a 
[harmonious foreign policy. 

Mr. Dulles la leaving for Wash 
f Continued on pope II, eofanui; 


DeweyDedares 
| Jobs, Not Doles, 
Are Labor Goal 

Message to State A. F. of L. 
Aaka Peace Preparations; 
Commended by Murray 

By Paul Tobenkin 
SYRACUSE. Aug. X— Gover- 
nor Thomas B. Dewey. In a; 
message read today at the opening 
of the eighty-flzat annual conven- 
tion of the New York State Feder- 
ation of lobar, said that In facing 
the task of averting unemploy- 
ment. now and after the war, “the 
nation will be counting cm the 
American labor movement and Us 
leaders to make a major contri- 


te prevent or suppress 
threats to the peace tar breaches of, 
the peace by aggressors of the! 
Nari-Ptoetot type. 

That the conferees “must work 
tost and wen," as Sir Alexander 
phrased ft, so that some sort of 
world organisation can be created 
“■oon**— before the war ends; and 
not delayed “until the problems of 
P*»oe confront ns with an their! 
I n s i st ency ." 

As If competitively eager to still] 
any u ne asy fans at too much big- 
nation . domination — fears tbati 
were put Into words a tew days 
ago py Governor Thomas E. 
Dewey d New York, the Republi- 
can Presidential candidate — all 
ttaa makers emphasized and re- 
emphasised that the interests of 
little nations would be well 
safeguarded. 

“No one wishes to impose some 
ORXAT POWER DICTATORSHIP 
« the zest Of tile watt." said Sir 

Alexander. «n4 he )i bm»w ami- 
talteed in Me manu sc ript the three 
words he didn't like. 

Enattw gemtons to Begin 

*Tt cannot be emphasised too 
often that the principle of the 
ao ma ign .eqnatity of AH, peace- 
loving states . . oust consti- 

tute toe. foundation.** said Secre- 
tary nwn surd ht hftw n under- 
lined the word "alP in his paper. 

"Member* of each an oraaniza- 
tkm can be all big and small frec- 
dom-lorfng countries of the werid." 
said Ambassador Gromyko, who 
let the wards uaderttoe and capi- 
talise thansStves. 

Utter, when tiwir opening state- 
trrmtlnued on page 2B. eeimna tJ 


Moscow Radio 
Reports Troops 
In East Prussia 

Broadcast Places Russians 
in Pre-War Germany; 
Battle for Warsaw On 


DeLattre’s Divisions Also 
Are Closer to Marseille, 
Fight With Great Spirit 

Foe’s Escape Line 
;0n Coast Menaced 

U. S. Units Make Contact 
WithMaquis ; Beachhead 
Growing, Airfield Bnilt 


(I TIU xmMiU frm 

LONDON. Aug. 22 CTuesday).— 
The Moscow radio. In a broadcast 
recorded by Reuters, asserted to- 
day that Russian troops were op- 
erating an East Prussian tsoU — the 
first time that Soviet forces have 
penetrated inside the borders of 
pre-war Germany In this conflict 

Warsaw Line Cracked 
nmvaMfrc *» 

LONDON. Aug. 22 (Tuesday).— 
Russian tank, infantry and artil- 
lery forces yesterday crac k ed the 
m ain Nazi defense tine northeast 
ol Warsaw, sweeping one to six 
miles across the Bialystok- Warsaw 
railroad on a twenty-two-mile 
front in a drive to outflank the 
embattled Polish capital. 

“A tense ba tt l e for Warsaw Is in 
progress,** the Moscow radio said 
early today, and the Soviet high 
comm a n d announced that Russian 
troops had seized more than fifty 
towns and settlements In a break- 

fConttaaed on page 6, cobms 6) 


By Russell Hill 

to WlralM, i*fJM HtraU THSmmt 
~nrlm nil m. t»i> n>m !■! 
ROME. Aug. 21.— General Jean 
de Latin de Tasrigny’s French di- 
visions are fighting with great etan 
la the battle for the first cities of 
metropolitan France they have 
been given the honor to liberate. 
(They have entered the western and 
northern sections of the fartless of 
Toulon and are approaching the 
town of Aubagne. less t han nine 
mBcs from Marseille. France* sec 
and city, ft was announced at 
Allied forces headquarters tonight. 

Italian's defenses w e re pierced 
following a drive In two concentric 
arcs, with the pivot at Sollies- 
Pont, which took the French 
around north of the city onto Ute 
first of two roads to Marseille. The 
read was cut at Le Bcainset, seven 
mites northwest of Toulon, and at! 
Cuges-les-FIns. eight miles farther 
on. The only escape route then re- 
maining to the Germans was the 
coast road to Marseille, but this 
city also has been threatened with 
being cut off since yesterday, when 
an Allied force reached the out- 
skirts of Aix-en-Provence. 



Patton Heads 
For Old War’s 
Battlefields 


Swift Crossings of Seine 
May Force Naas to Fall 
Back to Somme Area 

Drive Also Is Made 
Toward Robot Base 


* M *d* li 4»g> MnpMl* 

AMERICANS ADVANCE ON RI VIERA — Troop* marching inland from a South France bench head 


"Pays to Advertise!” 

ISA wi4 » atfWto ow* »* Safi**: 

tat. manat* 4 mum, tots *n 

teyiv»>n«jT». ala ■*& om or *U. tot 
tor ydot. u wait cf»fe OXo.lv unx 
... — - nwter. 


“Sold property this week. I ta- 
iteve ft pays W sdvtrtiiB So jour 
paper." 

Many raaa on a wy pflead farms 
an adfutiaul Ha the zeal etttt* 
aanmau flam day to nay. Slake is 
a baBK to read ebem wey day. 


wsmiw 


no mXi 

tar OrVaU. 

ituMktate 


News on Inside Pages 


WAR 

Jtatrtote bold Boobson in Dra- 
guteen as coHahorator. Page 2 
U. 8. ptones . dropped arms for 
patriots before invarionPige 3 
German admiral shot four days 
before BMera invasion. Fage3 
ADled landings were "still a 
dream" to * French girl JPagsY 
Allies to sign agreements tomor- 
row on French rule. Page 3 
Washington is blamed lor negli- 
gence at Pearl Harbor. Page 4 
Japanese cruiser' is sunk off 
China by U. 8. plane. Page 5 
XJ. 8. mission's arrival cheers 
Chinese Communists. Page 5 
Cossack describes his ordeal In a 
Nazi "death wagon." Page 7 
Bed Cross flies whole blood to 
E uro pe's Mttte fronts. Pare 14 
War communiques. Page 6 

rotaries 

Dewey discusses plan for cam- 
paign speech In lfalneitoga II 
BrowaeB sees Roosevelt's trip as 
part of his -campaign. Page II 
Hannegan calls meeting of Dem- 
ocratic state leaders. Page U 
SPORTS 

Yankees best Tigers. 5—1. gain- 
ing in 3d- place fight Page 27 
Giants down Cubs, 4— 3, as Um~ 
bartil hits z home rtmsPace 17 
Pirates beat Dodgers, s— 7. in 
play-off; 7-rd la loth. Page 17 
Ed Furgol toads with 67 as Tam 
o* Shan ter guff opens. Page 17 
Trierarch wins over Great Rush 
at Belmont. Page IS 

Overseas Letter M LaneyPagcl? 


Toinosr ax nil ii won ui ww- 1 

ssssusst 


CITY AND VICINITY 
Gripshoba to sail on first trip of 
the war to Goteboeg. Page 4 
Alain Gerbault, yachtsman and 
tennis star . is dead. Page 10 

Cbestey will be given a hearing 
today on his ouster. Page 15 
Barge skipper. 83, sails on third 
matrimonial voyage. Page IS 
U. 8. marshals uncover 6.468 
pairs of nylon hosiery. Page IS 
Blind boy, 9, feels and smells 
thrills of Coney ride. Page 15 
Parole board, to bear Hines's 
second appeal today. Page 15 
Amateurs show garden produce 
at Fate In the Sky. Page 16 
40.000.000 A. E.P. Yule parcels to 
go through New York. Page 16 
Housing board ready to begin 
3 projects after war. Page 23 
NATIONAL 

Bill relaxing ban on soldiers' po- 
litical reading signed. Page 7 
Mustering out of 2,000,000 men 
seen after Nazis fall. Page 7 
House passes plan to curb Navy 
ship and base transfen-Fage 9 
Roosevelt stoves off Nelson's 
threatened resignation. Page 9 
Chinese to offer a big -power plan 
to keep the peace. Page 26 
EDITORIALS AND MISCELLANY 


Fashions 


P*ge 

Editorials ....121 
Major Eliot. . .35) Pood 
ID Short, .... .IS 

Bridge IS 

Webster 25 

“Mr. and Mia. "241 
Nature Story. .Iff 

Puzzle 351 

Books 11 


Page 

is' 

Society 13 

I Amusements. 3, 9 
'Fresh Air... ..24 
Real estate. . .23 

Radio 23 

Obituaries ...10 
Financial ..28-22 


RaoU'i N> # Bui I» Tri mw H iab 
iMMtf d. .imO H la Jfsgulss Dtcwi. 


- Naval Gnus Found Fort 
The drive Into Toulon was pre- 
ceded by an intensive naval bom- 
bardment of the fortress, in which 
two battleships and six cruises, 
including the French battleship 
Lorraine, took part. Beg toning at 
10 a. m. yesterday. 1.480 rounds 
re fired from naval guns oq 
targets In the harbor city with 
"good result," naval headquarters 
a n n o unce d. 

Other vessels of the bombarding 
force included the British cruisers 
Aurora and Blade Prince and the 
Prtnch cruisers Emile Berlin and 
Le Fan Usque. The second battle- 
ship was unidentified- German 
E-boats attacked the force after 
dark but were said to have been 
driven off. one being sunk and 
another driven ashore on fire. 

The previous day. Friday. Toulon 
had already been subjected to 
( Continued on page 2. column 6) 


Rommel Death 
Story Told by a 
[French Mayor 

S.y, He Treated m Field 
Marshal WhoDiedJalyl8; 
Body Flown to Germany 


■> Tkt L'KM rm, 

UVAROT SDR VIE. Normandy. 
Aug. 21. — A German field marshal 
who probably was Erwin Rommel 
died of a fractured skull about 3 
a. m. July 18 in a hospital at 1 
Beraay, near the Seine River, the 
Mayor ol this town said today. 

The Mayor. Marcel Leseene, Is! 
also the druggist of Uvarot. and 
he was called to treat a German 
field marshal for severe wounds 
received when his car was 
hurtling into a ditch a few miles 
from here by an Allied plane the 
afternoon of July 17. All local 
evidence tends to support the 
theory that It was Rommel, the 
erstwhile "Desert Fox." 

Evidence gathered today indi- 
cated that the officer died with- 
out regaining consciousness and 
that the Germans made great ef- 
forts to hush up the affair. It was 
indicated that the body was flown 
seemly to Berlin for burial. 

t Recent reports from Normandy 
had quoted German prisoners as 
saying Rommel was killed, and 
Berlin has not mentioned Rommel 
lor weeks.! 

The man believed to have been 
Rommel was injured either in 
crash or In an attempt to spring 
from the fast-moving car. 

Over a luncheon table in a lUtic 
(Continued on page 23. column 3/ 


Montgomery Calls Nazi Defeat 
‘ Definite , Complete, Decisive ’ 

In Message to Troops He Says Normandy Disaster 
Robs Foe o£ Striking Power, Calls on Army to 
‘Finish Off the Business in Record Time* 

Bp The Press 

WITH BRITISH TROOPS IN FRANCE. Aug. 21.— General Sir 
Bernard L. Montgomery told his troops tonight: “The end of the 
war is In sight. Let us finish off the business In record time." 

* 

French Patriots 
Take Over All 
Spanish Border 

Officers in Army Uniforms 
Hoist Flag at Hendaye as 
Last Nazi Post Gives Up 


9th Air Force Ousts 3 Reporters 
For Failure to ‘Play Up’ Flyers 


By Jack Tait 

B* Trfe]»fc«ac Fr»n temOan 
CoWFItsbt. JWL Mew Trtrt Trttunc Ik. 
NINTH D. S. AIR FORCE 
HEADQUARTERS. France. Aug. 
21. — Four correspondents accredit 
ed to the 9th Air Force in France 
have been ordered to leave this 
theater of war, apparently be- 
cause their work has not measured 
up to standards set by publicity- 
minded 9th Air Force officers in 
Uie higher ranks. 

The order is the aftermath of a 
long series of threats indulged in 
by certain public relations officers 
of the air force. Correspondents 
have been told that they must 
confine the bulk of their activities 
to coverage of 9th Air Force news. 
{Those who did not, it was made 
dear, would have to seek re- 
assignment elsewhere. 

It may, of course, be a coinci- 
dence that three of the corre- 
spondents ordered to return to 
London found a great deal of news 
la ITance other than air news, 
and wrote it. These correspond- 
ents are Stanley Frank, of 'Thej 
New York Post": Gordon Gam- 


towye uw axaimro shoot nr, hr«- 
t®* ttettt U— TKrtr an lit MOW* treat 
Twtaleww -KilMir MM lada* at th« 
Anar Atttn. Tattler prices— Ai*L 


mack, of "The Des Moines Reg- 
ister." and Lee McCardell. of “The 
Baltimore Sun.” An artist. John 
Grotb. of "Parade." also was told 
to leave France. 

The three newspaper men are. 
all veterans. Gamma ck and Mc- 
C&rdell both worked in the Medi- 
terranean theater in the early 
stages of operations there. 

Ninth Air Force officers in 
charge of publicity have made it 
plain to correspondents here that 
they are more interested in pro- 
moting their own unit than they 
are to getting war news out or this 
Cheater to readers in the United 
States. 

We. at first, were inclined to 
treat the threats made against 
some of the correspondents here 
as a Joke. It seemed Inconceivable 
that one group engaged in this! 
war would consider publicity for! 
itself more precious than giving! 
the United Suites the story of this 
war, whether it be the air story, 
the ground! story or a combination 
of both. 

In the ease of the Tour men re- 
r Continued on pope 18, column t) 


TODAY lit nuU Ml nnauet at (»• 
Zau unfold on U» »cr«j» « Uw A«U»f . 
Hi klOK'i Xaar *i*rrint AvuM' 
CKWia and Harks* DWUm.- A4M. 


hni4MNiit«rrui 

XRUN, Spain. Aug. 2I.~ Uni- 
formed officers of the French 
Army took possession of the in- 
ternational bridge at Hendaye at 
5:30 p. m. today in the name of 
the French Co mmi tte e of National 
Liberation, thus completing French, 
occupation of the frontier with 

Spain. 

Germans Give Up to French 
IRUN. Aug. 21 (UP) .—The 
French flag was hoisted tonight on 
the French ride of the interna- 
tional bridge at Hendaye. and Ger- 
man customs guards handed over, 
control to the French. 

The German local commander 
crossed the bridge in Iron to say 
farewell to Colonel Ortega. Spanish 
commander in the frontier area, 
then returned to France, while 
French guards saluted Spanish 
frontier auth orities. 

Paris "Liberating Itself" 
LONDON. Aug. 21 — Preach 

Forces of the Interior now are 
( Continued on page 23, coisma 32 


Montgomery's special message 
said the German armies in north- 
west France had suffered a decisive 
defeat, and “there will be many 
surprises in store for the fleeing 
remnants. 1 * 

The text of the message follows: 
“Oh Aug. 11 I spoke to officers 
and men of the Allied armies in 
northwest Prance. I said we must 
'write off* the powerful German 
force that was causing us so much 
trouble. We must finish with It 
once and for all and so hasten the 
end of the war. And today, ten 
days later, it has been done- 
"The German armies in north- 
west Fkance have suffered a de- 
cisive defeat. The destruction of 
enemy personnel and equipment 
in and about the so-called Nor- 
mandy pocket has been terrific. 
And it is still going on. Any 
enemy units that manage to get 
away still will not be in lit con- 
dition to fight again for months. 
There are still many surprises in 
store for the fleeing remnants. 

"The victory has been definite, 
complete and decisive. 

“As soldiers we all wont to pay 
our tribute to the Allied air forces. 

Z doubt If ever in the history or 
war air forces have had such 
opportunities or have taken such 
good advantage of them. The 
brave and brilliant work or the 
pilots has aroused our greatest 
admiration. Without their sup- 
port we soldiers could have 
achieved no success. 

"Where all have done well, it is 
(Continued on page J 8, column BJ 


Allied Cruisers Shell Bayonne, 
Foe Reported Abandoning Port 


t( The diitdiM Fmt 

XRUN. Spain. Aug. 21.— Three 
Allied light cruisers shelled Ger- 
man defenses at Bayonne. France, 
before dawn today for more than 
an hour, and after they departed 
loud expiations could be heard as 
the Germans apparently proceeded 
to destroy their remaining fortifi- 
cations there. 

The German fortress wall south 
of Bayonne is reported no longer 
to exist. The Germans were said 
to have withdrawn from there last 
night, leaving their defense works 
In ruins. 

The shelling of Bayonne, which 
is only eighteen miles from Iron, 
took place after the cruisers had 
patrolled the coast south of Bor- 
deaux in an evident attempt Go 
feel out the German defenses. 


tou Nfvn saw wBy M'lirviM u 


Bocew Tracy* la ICOiri nnaauc nti»- 
inu *TM Sivhui iChu." Next sttne- 
u*a at ta* ctnltai fbuin.— aon. 


Only light fire was drawn from 
German batteries near Bayonne. 

A fog lifted as the cruisers ap- 
proached and their progress was 
plainly visible from the Spanish 
coast. They shelled the coastline 

methodically, and from splashes in _ 

the water It was evident that the!*g 0 Jhritineruauis'were upproach- 


Ameri cans Are Enlarging 
Bridgeheads on 2 Sides 
of Revolt-Tom Paris 

By Joseph Driscoll 

Or Wlrttua la tka Strut* THboa a 
Coprrfcbt. UU Hi* MtAtattlK 
WITH AMERICAN ADVANCED 
FORCES AT THE RIVER SEINE . 
France. Aug. 2L— The Seine, 
which flows through the center of 
Paris, has been reached and 
crossed by fast-moving American 
forces. 

The crossings were made not at 
Faria but to the northwest, in the 
vicinity of Mantez, in the Depart- 
ment of Seine-et-Olse. Mantes la 
about thirty-four mila from Paris. 

In one of the moat daring moves 
since the break-through in ttw 
hedgerow country around Goat- 
lances, Normandy^ three weeks 
ago. infantry forces of ttaa Ameri- 
can 3d Army, under ttatauii 
General George 8. Patton Jr, 
geared for speed and punch, pene- 
trated to the Seine and ertahUsbed 
bridgeheads on either shore with- 
out encountering much opposition. 

Americans Flanking Faria 
The importance of the move Is 
obvious to any cue who has bear 
reading of German indecWcp at 
Paris and of desperate German 
attempts to escape through toe 
Falaise-Argentan gap. beyond 
which, originally, remnants of 
twenty enemy divisions were be- 
lieved pocketed. By assuming con- 
trol of the strategic Seine, the 
Americans are outflanking Faria 
and further <i)t_Hng pm o d hii 
routes of escape for the fleeing 
German divisions. 

[Noting that a fl an e * was 

being maintained regarding Allied 
operations around Paris, an Asso- 
ciated press dispatch said Amer- 
ican forces bad crossed the Setae 
in the Fontainebleau area, thirty- 
five miles southeast of Paris, 
against weak German resistance, 
but that fierce fighting was tn 
progress around the Mantes 
bridgeheads and near Vernon, fif- 
teen mites northwest of Mantes. 

[The Berlin radio said tha 
Americans enlarged their Mantes 
bridgeheads "in « ma li measure" 
and were attacking with strong 
forces “continuously strengthened 
by bringing up new troops."! 

American forces which only a 
few days ago had pressed beyond 
Chartres and Dreux fanned out to 
the Seine with a swiftness and in 
a strength chat must have amazed 
the faltering Germans. Despite 
heavy rain and pitch darkness, 
the crossings of the river began at 
midnight and by morning the 
Americans were In complete con- 
trol of their objectives. 

German Force* Separated 
An American commander da- 
scribed it as one of the most diffi- 
cult military tasks ever accom- 
plished. Over night the rt mermans 
had separated the Germans in 
Normandy from the Germans in 
the Faria area. 

The pace of General Pat ton's 
army is staggering. Three weeks 


Germans were returning the fire. 
No hits by the German guns were 
observed. 

Meanwhile. an American motor- 
ized column was reported 165 miles 
northwest of Bayonne and about 
130 miles south of Nantes 1 which 
is on the Loire River!, after pass- 
ing through Angouleroe. on a route 
leading to the Spanish border, 
without encountering any enemy 
resistance. The Americans were 
said in border reports to have re- 
ceived a joyous welcome. 


tag the River See and the hilly 
city of Avranches- A week ago 
G. 1/s were bathing In the River 
Sarthe between Le Ma ns an d 
Alencon. Today this correspond- 
ent sew Americans crossing tb* 
Setae and others plunging in iBC 
_ cooling dip. Where the Ameri- 
cans will be swimming next Sun- 
day is anybody's guess. 

The enemy has been deprived of 
one more river. &nd some observ- 
ers think he may have to tali back 
to the Somme area, as in the fire* 


AT ]»:M A. W. THIS XOXN1.VG Of 
b[ the A* lor Tbeauv often (or Uu World 
Premier* of a mi picture — void'll 
TcebalcvWr Mumab ’*Kiaiacr'.<— Ad ft }r» «*»*». *** 

V New York HeraH Tflbuns. Reprinted wm permission 


i t o BE PBaHIP; MCW, ku 
■■Ktamor--wUh R oarid Colorn «**»• 

Dittrich la g«fMW 

m Tftr* 


werM 

ire." TUu-Mn 


THE LIBERATION OF PARIS - 
AUGUST 22-27, 1944 
In the last days of August, as the 
Allies approached the city, the unarmed 
population of Paris - reinforced by a small 

* . i J vohi ctotinn fiarlifprc rncp 



IN THE NEW YORK HERALD TRIBUNE 


days of street battles and general 
insurrection. Paris was liberated. To 

.1 V . 



commemorate these dramatic days, the 
International Herald Tribune is reproducing the 




Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, AUGUST 22, 1994 


_n - ,fer . -i-'.aMMihii' 




WEEKLY INTERNATIONAL BOND PRICES 


Provided by CS First Boston 
Limited. London. Tet: (071) 
516 40 25. Prices may vary 
according to market conditions 
and other factors. Aug. 19. 



Canadan Dollars 


iMugr 


Cm aaot PrkvYMTrsr 


AMWVTSVDXBU. 95 
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Aid Ctrl Bk 9 9 97 

AustrloMov M 02 
Austria Mot Th a 
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Bare Carp Aug At *7 
BOW Hyp* Jul7» 98 
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aov veveDec n, n 
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BciiCanjun 12*6 00 
Bell Can Jun 8ft ID 
Bell Cot May 9ft 06 
BeilCanejui 8ft •n 

8efl Con E _M 10ft 99 
Belt Cm E Mur 0 9B 
Bell Con E Nov 9ft 96 
BftlConEOCI 10ft M 

Beil Coratto 9ft ft 
Bk Atom May fft ft 
BkMontnOd Wft ft 

BnrnFln 10ft Vi 
BngBkAtr 6ft 97 
Bng Bk Alls 
BnoAug 


7ft 00 
6ft 97 
7ft 03 
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Bft 03 
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7ft 94 
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tW)» 
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10ft 98 


Bnp Apr 
Bnp Doc 
Bnp Dec 
BnP Feb 
Bnp Feb 

Bnp Jun 
BnpJlA 
Boo Jut 
Bo) Mar 
Bo) Oct 
Bot5ep 

BP Ante Apr 

BP/umr Aim ion oi 
BP AmtrJun 9ft 02 
BCMfoMov lift 0B 
Br Cal Mia Nov 7ft 03 
BrCaiMun JunTft 01 
BrcoiiMiOFeblOft 01 
BrOrtuntaJunlQ M 
Br CoBimb Jon 7ft 03 
Bx Cal May 9ft ft 
Br COi May 9ft 97 
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Br CPhimb Sep 7ft 15 
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Br GC3 Pic M« toft 98 
BreasPicOct 9ft 01 
Cod Wheat Dec 7ft 97 
Can Nat Rl 9ft ft 
CarlptoDec 8ft 97 
Cd Jut 10ft M 

Crt Quebec AprWi 97 
CcJ Quebec Oct7ft to 
Clba Carp Od 9ft M 
ObcJon 9ft 97 
CflcaAiw 10ft 94 
CnrJul 8ft 97 

Or Mar 7ft ft 
Car Mar m ft 
CnrMay Bft 01 
Car Oct W K 

Combine Feb 8ft 97 
Confed Tnr Jun9ft 97 
M 


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Cr Local Aub 7ft 


Cr Local Dec 7ft 97 
C- Local Feb 7ft W 
Cr Local Jon 7 04 

Cr Loan MOV loft 95 
Cr Load Mm bp. <b 
Cr Local Mar eft 08 
Cr Local Sep 6Vt ft 

Cr Lvonn Apr | Vt ft 
Cr LvOnnJo) 18ft *6 
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DofcnMr B, OcffW 81 
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DbFInBvJat 7ft 98 
Db Fin Nv Apr 7ft 98 
DbFtnNvFeb Mk 01 
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Denmark Feb 7ft ft 


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101ft Ml +37 
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93ft 8® +26 
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•7ft 888 +15 

8 ft 177 +» 
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92ft 9.11 +32 
101ft 192 +79 
«ft 9.47 +73 
lllft 984 +48 
91ft 1022 +78 
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98ft »J3 +79 
103V. 974 488 

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nift 195 m 
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102 758 +45 

94 9.14 +71 

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99ft 172 +21 
94 ft 981 +16 
95ft 96] +46 
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«»ft 982 +73 
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110ft 7-42 +47 
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101 863+66 

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96ft 883 +15 
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101 B69 +43 

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93* 958 +36 
94ft 90S +31 
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47ft 965 +47 
79V* 974 +48 
93ft 877 +20 
98ft 895 +52 
102ft 863 +47 

toft 833 +30 
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61ft 969 +57 
97ft 864 +50 
99ft 96S 454 
104 973 +33 

96ft 870 +32 
94ft 902 +31 
94ft 907 +33 
703ft 965 +42 
85ft 973 +7 

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1*6 95 IK 701 +47 

IV. 98 9B 884 +10 

9ft » 182ft 9.16 +® 

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EuroHma TOftM HHft 8J0 +41 

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10ft 95 101ft 4.78 +24 

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6ft 96 96ft 8J7 +47 
Bft 95 180ft in +38 

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7ft 97 95ft 891 +37 
7ft 98 Mft 9J4 +SB 
np. 97 81ft 8n +41 

9 98 «ft 9J3 +53 

Ford Cr Mar IM 96 lUft 851 +M 
FerUM Cr Aug II 94 103ft 9JQ +S3 

FardMCrOd lDft 94 11 

Ford Cdo Jun Uft 9$ II 
Ford Can Jul 1 98 

Fart OSa Nov 9ft <* 

Ga* Metro Od 13ft 94 

Gee Mar 7ft 98 . 

Gee Canada Ju0 99 9285S 9P7 +21 

CncCPa Nov 7ft 98 94 899 +19 

Coce 6 99 87ft 4.H +31 

Gear Aug Bft 94 94* 834 +15 

We 98 102ft 9J2 +58 

lift 95 lB3ft 764 +29 
Bft 95 100ft 7X +15 

6ft 96 9Sft 854 +21 
T7% 95 H0ft 767 +30 

10 96 107ft ID +22 

8 97 98 88# +29 

8 96 97050 9JM +30 

»ft 97 103 871 +31 

7 97 9*16 1*3 +18 

7ft 98 95ft BM +36 

8 99 96ft aes +9 

9 97 Wtt 963 +7B 

6ft 9f flft 898 +19 
10ft W 100ft 7.19 +77 

ID 96 Kffft 851 +61 




jjh +4? 
9T- ax +26 


GeccApr 

GeccDec 

GeccDec 

GeccDec 

GeccJul 

GeccJun 

Geo: Jun 

GeoeJon 

GecCMor 

GeccMav 

GeecMtn 

GeccMav 

GeccMav 

GcccNev 

GeccOd 

GeccSce 


GMACCda AuglO 95 1011b 7 JO +« 

GMACCdaMv 7 99 90ft 9J6 +73 
GMACCda Mtir+ft 99 99 963 +7* 


GMACCdaSeplIft 95 103ft 7J* +41 

' ' - 97 9Sft 9J6 +78 


GMACCda SepTft ^ 

Guinn PtcOd ft 9B 101ft 966 +47 
HrkPo Rn Feb+ft 04 82ft 961 +15 
>rat> Aug m 94 103ft 862 +43 

IcdbJOT 9 02 97ft 967 +31 

ladbNav 7ft 03 *7 9X1 +16 

I bm Cdo Jan II 96 102ft 853 +49 

IbmCdaMav 13ft « 104ft 7® +41 

IbmCdaOd 17ft 95 100ft 7-75 +49 


I bm Cdo Sep *8^ 96 101ft Ml +94 


Ibm inti Dec _ . .. 
Ibm inti Mar t*k 98 
Jbrd 
Ibrd 

Ibrd Apr 

Ibrd Jffl 
ibrd Mov 
Ibrd May 
Ibrd Mar 
Ibrd Nov 
Ibrd Oct 
Ibrd Oct 
Ibrd Sop 
lie Aim 


99 947 +74 

97ft 166 +73 


9 96 10U150 8X0 +20 

1ft O 93ft 9X2 +71 

6* n 99ft 889 +15 

10ft 99 181ft AM +18 

13ft 95 104ft 7.11 +44 

HA 96 8»ft 856 +46 

7ft 98 95ft 184 +11 

lift 95 103ft 762 +38 

11 94 106ft 665 +43 

4ft fl flft 884 +4 

9 96 IBDft 163 ++2 

7ft n 95ft 963 +26 

Oct K) 94 100ft A5S -188 

High try So 7ft 02 9gft 95s +37 

JOT Jut m 95 103ft 7-29 +41 

JtCMOT 1ft n 93ft 9JB +37 

Jam Inc Mar 6ft 04 Blft 9.94 +64 

KdaoIAk-Jul 8 03 89ft 974 +52 

Kansat EftDedft 94 9W. 883 +s 


atue< 


Ctvi Mar Pnte lid 


Sad 

Tt>r 


4ft 18 

7* 98 
lift 95 
Bft 99' 
Aft 84 
M 97 
H 01 


9Bk 1AI +4 
94ft 895 +tt 
HHft 751 +« 
77* 966 +16 
83ft 927 +1 

998* 8AS +25 
IBft 963 +39 
U»ft 966 +31 
mt A4» ++ 

102ft 9J3 +42 
102ft 8SD +a 
Mft 868 +1 

107 875 +47 

101 954 +77 

100ft 7.17 +75 
99ft 897 +41 
9lft 899 +20 
182ft 862 +54 
94 965 +** 

96ft Ml +51 
99ft 9JJ7 +*1 
*18 *JM +81 
IBM m +89 
93k I8M +94 
102ft 862 +71 
98ft 963 +115 
102ft 7 M +44 
93 1824 +11B 


unooBOd 
KfwIdtFeb 
KfWlntlAW 
Ktw InttDec 
Ktwlntt Feb 
Khv Inti Mir 
KtWlflHMOr 
Klw Inti Mov 9ft Q2 
KtwlnHNpv I 97 
Kyisnu Eie oetMft 01 
LkbApr toft 96 
LttFMMoy 7 97 

MPCSCmMoy 10ft 96 
Monltobo 99k 90 

MMbmSeP raw 94 
Mil Tomato 8ft 97 
MlnnesotoOcf iYt 98 
Mobil AujI Mov K)ft 96 
Mobil Can 7ft «< 

Mobil Con Jon M 91 
Modi Can Mov 9 97 

Mooli Nr Feb Bft 97 
MontreTMFeplOk 9S 
Montreal Dec 9 02 

Madreai 11 94 

MontMdFeo 9 97 

MantraatMav lift 95 
Montreal Mar f 03 ._ . 

MantrtDVIl UftTSUOSSP 754 +74 
Mid* Den Aar 7ft 98 u* tos +31 
NotlnvBkJul 7ft 98 95 +JJ7 +D 

NBC Nov 9* 96 101 JH) 9.16 +89 
NeSHttiRIOd 4ft 98 91ft 880 +1 

New Bmyvrk lift 95 
Nw Bruns Feb 10ft 01 
Nw Bruns Jan 12 95 
nm Bruns mov 9k 9g 
Nw Bruns Mar 9U 02 
N« Bruns Npv 10ft 90 
NwBruftSft) »W ft 

NwZeatndDecSft v* . _ 

ttw Zednd Jun 10ft 9S tgzjOSB 13V +65 
NMtaundld Jul*ft 90 98ft 9J0 +94 
Newfound Id Bk 03 

7ft 98 

7ft (8 
IUL 9p 
7ft 98 
Bft 03 
7ft 90 
lift 95 
Mft 94 
Bft 97 
7ft N 
IDW 01 
10ft 99 
It* 95 
fft 97 
I0W 99 
9 Oi 
9 97 

tSft 99 


1029b 7J9 +43 
105ft ?3S +52 
101* 7J0 +57 
99V; 9J7 +42 
97ft 972 +57 
109* M4 +185 
<02* 875 +53 
95ft 848 +16 


91ft 1022 +99 
Mft 892 +91 
«ft 898 +26 
84* 442 +4? 
95ft 883 +10 
93ft 952 +31 

94ft 900 +21 
101 ft 6.99 +54 
WJft 162 +« 
99k 881 +38 
Hft 907 +K 
laJft 951 +67 
M3* »JI +42 
KUft ;jo +0 
«Vi SS9 +30 
103ft 928 t-O 
97ft 9.47 +31 
100ft 823 +26 
IDS* 975 +42 
Mft 842 +37 
103ft 9.14 +62 

p* nun *77 


Nib Fab 
Nib MOT 
Nib Sen 
Norway Feb 

Norway Jan 

Norway Od 
Nava Sea) 

Nt&TAua 
III 8 T Jun 
NtlTJwn 
Ni&TMar 
MAT Od 
OkOAug 
OkbDec 
OkbJut 
OkbJun 
OkbMav 
OM tty Mar 
Ontario Pr Apr MW 96 
Ontario Pr Apr 14k 9S 

OnWta Pr DkT* S3 

Ontario Pr Feb 7ft 24 81099 962 +18 
Ontarta Pr J16 Mft 91 104 9J3 +57 

Ontario Pr Mar* 83 
Ontario Pr Od 7* SI 
Ontario Pv Sep ID 94 
Ontario Pr Sep 7k OS 
Osaka GasOd 10k 94 

OtbmaJim to* 01 
Ottawa Mar aft 03 
Peel MuifcrOd 9ft 01 
PraderAup 1Mb 01 
Prud Fund Dec I* 95 
PnntFdMov M 96 
Prud Fd May *ft 97 
Prud Fund Od 10 94 

PAAup ID* 81 

OuOTPC Apr Mft 06 

Quebec Aue lift M 
Dec 7ft 53 
Feb *ft 00 

8»U 


ksuar 


Cin Met Pncr rk) 


Sbd 

T.j, 


4* 98 
7* M 
Bk 99 
7 08 

W*98 

a so 
7ft 98 
7* 97 
IBS 96 

Hft or 
4 9S 
10*94 
11 99 

»k 95 
9k 02 
Ft 03 
10ft 96 
10k M 


Stadcfiebn JiJ 10U. *6 
Stockholm Oct 4k 98 
MedwestAw 4ft V 
Sweden 
Sweden Dec 
Sweden Dec 
S w ede n Doc 
Sawdan Jun 
SwadnMov 
TetesotOd 
Tenco Aug 
TeocnDec 
Tina Jun 
ToraamMln 
TardemOct 
Toronto Feb 
Toronto Jut 
TorsntoJMmr 
Toronto Mar 
Total 3a Jun 
TMCCAua — 
Tavata Can Jun7k 98 
TMCCMOT 9 97 

TMCCMor 
TMCCAua 
TMCCDec 
TMCCDec 
TMCC Dec 
Tavata Mac Ju>8 *4 
Tavata MeeOetlOk 94 
TnvataMccoetTk ts 
U bSAinISep <k 97 
UbsFlnSBi 
vencouv 
Vdicauver 
VansavAua 
VtannaMar 
Vlt De MOM 
VII Mont 

Vwlatl Jun 

WeshbCurSeptaft 97 
W+Stb lert TUL 94 
Winnipeg May 8ft CD 
ZKBAudMar 7* 98 
Tib 3* Feb 4k 94 


Hik 

92ft 

Hft 

98ft 

98ft 

Hft 

79ft 

184ft 

91k 

90k 

Hft 

lask 

104ft 

94 

100ft 

105ft 

M2k 

99k 

94ft 

WZft 

H3ft 

93k 


Mb 98 

lift 95 
B 95 
» 97 

6W 97 


ID H 
10k 81 

11* n 

10*96 

7ft 98 
lift 94 
10*98 
Hft 95 


93ft 

104050 

99ft 

99ft 

•3ft 

99k 

180k 

101k 

10ft 

IDOft 

IB 

W2 

1X0* 

Mft 

103ft 

im 

102 

B ft 

oik 

Hft 

97ft 


889 +53 
9.18 +31 
U2 +25 
867 +14 
867 +13 
9JN +18 
973 +« 
9.13 +31 
9j» +75 
HJt +158 
BAS +31 
8JT +47 

954 +47 
7.72 +67 
6.99 +57 
969 +48 
758 +<S 
952 +47 

955 +33 
in +es 
MS +24 
9.12 +37 
9JI9 +42 
954 +01 

760 +32 
813 +54 
«JB +34 

873 +4 

834 +r 

894 +51 
784 +40 

874 +13 
879 +36 
959 +50 

761 +38 
883 +44 
9.11 +38 
891 +94 
9.74 +99 
7.17 +60 
9.10 +51 
862 +7V 
9J8 +72 
901 +24 
821 +61 


ECU Straights 


Con Mot Price VkrTrlr 


90ft 760 +5B 
100k 968 +57 
102ft 899 +36 
83 983 +55 

102* 882 +3 
103* 9 3T +57 
92ft »J4 +52 
M2ft 969 +67 
rosft 981 +72 
100k 765 +30 
101* 171 +43 
1 00ft 891 4+1 
102ft 860 +36 
106ft 9 jN +J1 
102* 944 +79 
107k 975 +77 
ask 1071 +96 

96k 9J5 +83 
1 01* 7JD +41 

... TO 978+78 

City 9» 96 M1JJ50 MS +T> 

QwMcCItv 9 97 toft 961 +IS 

Quebec Hvd Ap9 97 98* 963 +109 

Quebec HvdFbll 94 ms* 969 +4* 
Quebec Hyd JuNk «6 100ft *65 +4* 

Quebec Hvd JT 7 84 Mk 979 +63 

OutbrCHdMv MW to Wlft 778 +42 
Quebec Hyd Mr Iff* 01 1841b 973 +48 
Quebec HdMy 9ft 81 to* 963 +7J 
Quebec Hyd Ot II* 88 107U. 9JW -Hf> 

Quebec PTD9 9 97 99k 962 466 

RobOOkAUB 7* W 102ft 9J5 +5 

RobOOkDec 7ft 99 92650 9J36 +15 
Rabobfc Jun Bft 96 HOk 878 +16 
ROTdtAMov 7 97 toft 866 6 

Robot* Mar 7ft 98 9109 889 +14 
RbcJdn 9ft 97 
SataOd 7k S3 
SOahDec 8 97 

SbwAPT M 95 
SecvOcJ 7ft 02 
SekMav Up. 95 
Sc* Apr IB* to 
SckAua 8 


Sek 


HWt BTt +57 
B6ft 965 +40 
94k 9.19 +51 
101ft 7.14 +63 
88ft 1887 +89 

.» S » 

•6ft 988 +31 


np. 99 4109 951 +43 


160 9-91 +273 

103* 770 +43 
101 ft 899 +51 
9S 941+73 
V3ft *62 +25 


Shea Can May 11 
Shell CdiOd 11*95 
SmObkCevAp 9ft 97 
Sad Dec ** 99 

SndSflP 6* 97 .... 

Sacaen Tv Jul 10ft 95 102858 768 +42 

I 181AM KOVj 891 +«• 

■ Aug ** 03 
j Feb 10U D 
. »JUl 9 02 

BBKNmrSap 7ft 83 


87k 1829 +105 
91 1131 +818 

94* 10-Da +89 
86ft 960 +54 


Abb Fin Mov . ... 

Abbey Not Aug f8ft 95 182* 
Abbav Nan Sep 9ft 96 lB3ft 
Aegon Od r> B IW 
Aerospatto SeaVW to 108848 
ADNIcdrApr 9 95 M8k 

AsfWOgOd 18ft to HB* 
Art Core. Aug 7* 98 9*k 

Austria No* fft to M Oft 
BeigiimiMar 9k to HD* 
BeUitti Co Feb 5* 99 toft 
Bice Feb 7k to WO* 
BJct Mcv * 99 183k 

BtoLWAug 9Vb to 101* 
BMRnBvNavTk 94 101084 
Bk Greece May Wft n T81 .dk 
suHttsfnkMary 96 iffift 
Bng B* Apr Bk 97 102ft 

Bnp Aue Bk to 106 
BPAfflerMar Sk «9 mft 
Cord I Inc Nov 8* to 100 
CnrWtoOd 7* » 100* 

5* 94 10QJ1TI 
5ft 81 Hft 
lDft to 1834*0 
8* 99 102* 

« 88 HOW 

7* to MOft 

•ft 95 mft 

9* to 101ft 
fft 95 M2ft 
4* W toft 
4* 01 90* 

9 01 HD* 


Cba Aug 
Ces* Feb 
Cna Jut 
Cna Jut 
Cna Jun 
Cna Mov 
CnaaJun 
Coajan 
Coo Jun 
Coe Mar 
Goo No* 
Coe rvov 


420 +30 
769 +» 
463 +39 
721 +19 
768 +1D 
7jb +y> 
725 +99 
462 +39 
723 -C 
597 +5 

490 +3 

765 +10 

761 +1* 
863 +24 

762 +» 
753 +29 
965 +220 
487 +111 
751 +16 
474 +2M 
826 +69 
862 +202 
499 +46 
SJ99 +13 
751 

468 +29 
8T9 +39 
811 +44 

454 +24 
454 +19 
818 +15 
456 +30 

818 +(3 

819 +25 


Cacnbanc Jun 9* 96 HDft 
ComboncJun TV. 98 toft 
Corrrtxjnc Sep 6ft 99 92* 

CormBkSeo S*. 94 104692 
Cooen Tet Mar H* 95 too 
CBPertaOHMar * 97 160ft 

Cr Fancier Apr 9* to Wlft 
Cr Fonder apt 7ft 96 99ft 
Cr Fonder Aag tOft 96 T94* 

Cr Fender Dec 9H 99 KB* 
Cr Fonder Ju I 9 96 102ft 

Cr Fonder Mars* w Wi 
Cr Local Aug 9 95 1B2JW 

cr Load Dec 9 * 94 idixtm 
C r Local Dec SIS 99 89817 
cr Local Feb id* to raift 
Cr Lacs* Jan Oft 97 102JI75 
Cr Local Od no. 01 5«* 

Cr Loco) Sea 6 to 91017 
Cr LvonaMoy 9 to 182* 
Crttari Dec 10k N lOlVb 
Cr Natl Dec low 95 103* 

Cr Natl Jun 6ft 95 Ml* 
Cr Suisse Aug 9W to 102k 
Creiflao Os Mart* to 102k 
CredltansT Dec 8* 94 luoft 
On MOV Ik to 101ft 
Daimler BzSep9k 96 1SU)99 
Db Ag Dec KJW to 103* 


“ :s 


737 ... 

831 +84 
ajn +50 
423 +J7 
9 IM +361 
724 +39 
660 +20 

720 +28 
763 +68 
807 +25 

721 VCk 

EM +4C 

462 +19 
421 +S 
763 +1 

624 +14 
769 +18 
834 +38 
4iX +34 
728 +» 
426 435 
762 +34 
446 +30 
453 +9 

766 +58 
445 +50 
441 +1D 
743 +24 
484 +19 


Cpn Mat Price 


Drew) As Aug 10k to 183233 443 +>9 
EbrdMor 4 99 « 725 


97 
■k to 
«ft 94 


7k to 
914 98 
6 80 


Bk » HZ* 768 +19 
H to 182ft 480 +3* 
7k M 168ft 724 +» 
- - 101* 728 +9 

99k 850 +19! 

98k 7.13 +B 

7k 98 106 7.1! -59 

Bk 99 I0U56 809 +39 
rsftoi mw 887 +16 

WkK 182ft 429 +14 

Bk OT MM 763 -12 

9k 98 183ft 6J8 +8 
8* 99 V0 1ft 744 +9 

100ft 7.13 +28 

IWft 729 +11 

_ .. 93 764 -44 

9* K Hik 629 +16 
7ft 96 TOD* 7JM +13 

9 99 183ft -7.97 +20 

9V, 99 !05ft 744 +1 

9W 95 101 ft 819 +10 

8 96 108ft 7X8 +» 

« H tWft T4* +3 
7* 97 100U 748 +19 

10 99 HTft 7.75 

8ft 99 101ft 759 +7? 
10 01 IHJft 753 -7 

9 0! UKD65 827 +30 

7k to 100ft 664 +14 
Bft to !Q2k 7J4 +38 
f 97 TOSS 7XJ +4 
6ft 98 95* 764 +20 

7ft 00 97ft 822 +3! 
7ft 93 Wft 623 +U 
Bk 97 Wlft 748 +U 

182ft 801 +® 

HOft 818 +30 

_ .. 100ft 747 +M 

Oft 95 102040 86S +18 

_ W 97 1» 72 -M 

Ekssertfln Fee 8* to Kr2Xt58 720 +£ 
EksportfnMaylDft 95 T»k 857 +K 
EkePwr Jul H)ft 95 103k 859 +19 
Elec Fwr Sen *k to in » 729 + 9 
tor dam Apr 7k 97 *Jft 747 +W 
EurtffamJul 7k « 9Pft 745 +33 
Eursflma Juo id* to tc* +54 +ri 
EurtfirttaVOT 7k 95 W&ft 624 +15 
EuraflmgMar 7k 97 99W 747 +34 

EuraflmaS 8k 99 WIOM 810 +B 
EuMsatMgr Bk 97 HTft 723 +39 
EuWSOtMov 7k 98 98* 943 +19 

Grim Bonk Od 16k to 105ft 669 +34 
Erim Bor* 00-9 96 10502! 762 +19 

P-EJCJun VW 95 lff7 ft 451 +25 
FCTTDVfcJtXl 10k 98 1S5ft 808 +44 
FWandFeO Bk n urift 74S +9 

Finland Feb Bft 07 Mft B.W +VI 
RnhmdMar 9* 98 WSk 7 ja +14 
FWondMor * to 110071 7JS +34 
Finland Oct 10* to 182* iM +64 
Rrdand Od 8* 81 103ft 7.99 +5 

Forsawrta Feofft to WK% 7oi +W 
GoecFeb I* 97 Wlft 745 +U 

GeccSep 7ft 98 99k 723 -41 

GraCarvAug 10 94 100X09 814 +9 
Gctherdwra Jn fft 97 TP2ft 774 +44 
Id FklNvMar 11 to 102ft 474 +55 
Ibm lull Jon 9* to urn* td/f +3 
Ibm InN Nov 9ft 94 100ft 544 


EdrdOd 
Ecsc Aim 
esc apt 
EcscJdi 
E eseOd 

Idt AW 

ISSS 

E4C Apr 
EOT Dec 
EseFob 
ESC Fob 
Esc Mgr 
EOT Mar 

RE 

E 0) Aar 

E8>Apr 

ElBDec 

El D Feb 

EH Fob 

EfcJbfi 

Eft) Jut 

ElbJon 

EtaJui 

Ed) Jan 

Eft) Jut 

ElbMoV 

ClbMor 

EHMffy 

EWMov 

EibMor 

EH Nov 

EB>Na* 

i»o7 

i££ 

E»Feo 


11W H 

8 98 


Ibrd Apr 
ibrd Jen 
Ibrd Jut 
lord Jon 
lord May 
IhrdOd 


Fm 97 181ft 750 +14 

fft 95 180ft 6.17 +14 

Iff* to IB* 451 +14 
lOSFft 723 +4 

73ft 816 +34 


7* 97 
£ft 01 


fft to HI* 432 +14 


Iceland Mar 6k to Wt wsi -33 


jml tntlMay H*«4 ]0fiflM 4d + -H4 


IndSkFlnOct 9 to 100634 833 ... 

Hdasua 9k 96 mft 7X4 +5* 

mtaSMsOd 6* 90 92ft 857 +84 

IB* 94 H»ft 467 +15 

ion « wift 435 +» 

71b N Hlft np. 


uvhM 
irekmd Jan 
IretOTdMav 
Ireland Mor 
I retard Od 
Italy Apr 
■ta>y Jd 
Italy May 
Italy Mar 


i ft 100X64 7X6 +19 


101* 808 +34 
lllft 8X9 +1* 
Ht* 763 +19 
Mk 755 +58 

tea 923 +11B 


... to 

w*eo 
iffk 97 
IUL 98 

9* 11 

Jon HtgbwyJ urift to KBft 721 +13 
JapHJahwvOI 8* to 1BW 7X3 +19 

JOTJOl 10ft K H3* 670 +79 

JdbOd ffft 97 ion 75* +19 

JahosaaJMorV 97 1 0X056 767 +29 
Mw Apr Iff* 95 mft 629 +14 

Khv Inti Feb 8ft 97 H!W 7.45 +14 

KtwIntlMoy 9. 96 TO* 7.14 +» 


KamannvFeb 8* 97 181k lo* +74 


Keanavivjun vk to 
Kamwiav Jun • 99 

LkbAug 
Lib Jun 


101* . . 

1 02ft 820 «4ff 


9* 94 raft 762 +M 
9 to 101k 667 +14 


LkbOd * 94 100W 6.19 +38 

UdJ Dec Ik 94 lOIJft 453 +55 


MlftUt All Od ff* 95 HO* 73) +1! 


.... 7X8 

8Tb 7.19 +H 
103ft 7.45 +33 
ID 92B +194 
93* 7X8 +91 
tS* 1049 +369 
108k 438 +38 


MUgbfcDonFebT* 97 
MtgbkDenMv nn. 98 
MOTUFlnOTiOd+k to 
NocflnMor 10* «7 
NctlnvBkOd 8 90 

Natt Hung Sen 18 to 

Neogas Dec 9k H ... 

N Zed bid Jun 18k 97 107* 767 Yi+ 

NZeatadOd 7k to T01JB7 672 +19 
Hlb Feb •* 9* W3* 7.13 +33 

KiCOTiMtrJW 7ft » 99* 757 +68 

NorwOVJul 9 96 in* 722 -5 

Nt T Jun B* 97 nn* 8X6 +45 
OkbAPr IIB»K KCft 6J7 +14 

OWc Nor 7* to 100ft 767 +22 
Outokumpu Ac I to 1001137 7X3 +48 

POTTKOOBkJuM «8 92* 811 +96 

Ptdbro 8 Feb *ft to m* 750 +6* 

Quebec Hvd JH9W 99 H3* 839 +59 

Robot* Mov 9k 95 HI* 467 +19 


DBFH1NVM0TB* 99 

DnNonkeJisi rift 99 

DanmorkApe M OB 
Denmark Jun 8* to 
DU) Ned Jot 7% 97 
RobabkMoy 7ft to 
ScrtaJan 7* 97 
SenngRpkRf 9S 
Stab Mar Bft 97 
Sr* Dec «k H 
58kF8b 7. 9$ 
SfcVtMl JUl 4 60 

SfidFxb Bk 07 
SftctJun 9 99 

SndMor » 01 
SoedevrMOT 7* to 

SocdevrTrb 11*95 
Spain May inn 
SaabiMav 9 to 
stti Africa Feb Wk 97 
Stoat Mm Mov 9* to 

SwMtaank Mtn 9k 96 

SwtdtnDec 9ft H 
Sweden Jun 
SwtonMcry 
S w eden Mc v 
Sweden Oct 

Total SaOc! 

Turkey Mov 
UBnSeg 
Ut Govt JOT 
Uk Govt jgn 
Uk Govt Jot — 

Uk Tran Feb 9k 01 
wumyMw 91% 95 
WaQiPaSMorB* 98 


Pound Starling 


spa 

Cna Mat Prior rWTrsv 


Abbey Ngtl Fet)13k 8S 
AbOev S to Jon 16k B2 
Abbey Stg May 8k 04 
Aitaev TsyAugt 99 
AKier TsyAor 8 (Q 
Abbey Tsy Jun 7k to 
AOT Apr 11 01 

AMbJul 
Aide Mar 

All LM APT 
AilLetcJan 

AHLetcOcf 

Amp Uk Jut 
Ang Water X* 6 ft 90 
Argyll Grp Martft 80 
AtfdagOd Wk 81 
Austria Jul 9 04 

Austria Mar 10k f* 
Barclays Dec WW 97 
BordaysFeb 4H B4 
Bardontiov 72k 97 


11* 01 
10ft 99 
Tib to 
7k M 
13*99 
lift 01 


BOV Hreo Feb low 97 
BovHvpoNov 7k 97 
Bov Hypo Od 6 99 

Boy Land Feb Bft 03 
Bee lac Jan Bk 98 
Bk Greece Jut 9k 03 
Bng Bk apt 7k 00 
BngBkAuo 7k 03 
Bnp Dec 8* 99 
BocSreup Feb 4k 04 
BP Anar Jun 9ft 98 
BFAtrilAor 11*01 
Br Airways Mr TO to 

Br Gas Pic Feta 12k to 

Br Gas Ptc Mar 7k H 
Br Gas Pic Marl** 81 
Br&M Ptc Mart* 03 

Sr Gas Pic Nov 388 97 

BtFinBvFeb ita « 
oi pic Mar np. (B 
BtPICSec 7ft 03 
CGJun 7* 98 
CDbtawtreMar iffk 02 
Cafe Fla Mar 7* to 
Cap Mar HMffi 
OmbuEIAag 4* 99 
CntFeb 10 97 

Cam Union Mr TO* 82 
CORiKKAoDecr to 
ComrtkDec 4* 99 
ContoAtf* Mar •* 03 
Cr Fonder Aug7k to 
Cr LOCO) Apr 10*96 
Cr Local Dec 7k 98 
Cr Local Jun ffft 64 
Cr Laos) Mar na (71 
QbFln NvDec 7W “ 


Ob Fin Nv Feb u. n 


Denmark Aug .. 
Denmark Jan lift 00 
Denmark Sen IT* *4 
OepWFtaNav 7ft 83 
DeutAOJn 12k 95 
Dlxort Tsv Fd»7lfc 04 
Drejd FJnDec 8 99 

DsJBanVAoe 7k to 
DsIBOT+Aug 9W 02 
DWFtnNvAugt 99 


Ecsc Mar 
ER> Apr 
EH) Alta 
El) DM 
El) F0b 
ElbJut 

Elb Jun 
ElbMar 
E lb MOV 


1I7W 97 

13 98 
8 99 

7 to 


3ft" 


'*9 

■ 

7 98 

9 IB 


HZ* 8X2 +19 
B3ft 950 +70 
93* 9X4 +46 
88ft 9JB +*9 
91V+ 958 «1 
♦6ft +35 
HTk 925 +53 
188* 954 +81 
104ft 923 +70 
Wft 115 +32 
UOtt *38 4€7 

114ft 95B +87 
W8ft 936 +93 
91* 9.11 +*i 
94* 96* +47 
TOSJH2 925 +52 
99 9.15 -Mi 

904* 9JJ3 +» 
KOft 9X7 +70 
(Uk 950 +40 
W9* 9X6 +70 
93ft IBS +33 
Ml* 838 +82 
96k BJO +15 
*7* 9JU +37 
94ft 964 +48 
97* 9X9 +47 

90* 1141 +9*7 
92* 9X2 +21 
90* 92S +34 
*8* 9.13 +62 
82* 945 +76 
tor* 9X3 +59 
107* 955 +73 
101* 921 +86 
101* 822 +39 
96* 8X6 +8 

188ft 949 +88 
91062 9J1 +34 
97* *43 +8 

81* *53 +54 

S 94I +44 
9X5 +13 
96ft 8X9 +41 
100ft 947 +74 
94* 9.17 +70 
J86k 925 +63 
91* 9JH +65 
103 *57 +5B 

KMft 9X1 +to 
toft 888 +44 
8P4 9X1 +30 
91X62 It 15 +217 
96* 877 +27 
15*k 7X4 +2 

94* 848 +M 
94ft 927 +42 
S5ft 963 +M 

95* 843 +11 

55ft 946 +6* 
93ft 848 +19 
109ft 927 +52 
M8k 7X7 +14 
85ft 9XS +81 
lflft 822 +31 
84X82 1844 +158 
■ 8X4+34 

98* 833 +36 
fff* «46 462 
toft 8X1 +18 
73* 9.46 +57 
104* 652 ++♦ 
177V. 8X4 +37 
19* 642 +6 

94X63 848 +18 
1UX62 9 X7 +» 
105ft 9X4 +59 
toft 9.12 +H 
toft 856 +7 

9914 9X8 +• 


EbNOv 


Elb Feb U 97 
EtePprtftiNgv7W » 


19k to 

»k « 
7k to 
8ft 99 
B 99 
Ilk H 
7ft 98 
na 00 
01 


7k 04 
7k to 
Mk 99 

nk or 
n 99 
k u 

Ilk K 


EuroltiTH r£ V 7* to 
EurattmaNov 11*99 
ExbnBkMmr KW 31 
FtaianaApr 0 03 

Finland Mar. 9k 97 
FfnlondOct 

RMOTdOd 
FdrtePfcJul 
GeccDee 
GoccDec 
G8OTD8C 
turns® 

GvKaDK 

ayfeos® 

Gefcn Seo . .. 

Gutfn PicDec 7k 97 
Guinn Pic Jot Wft *7 
HfflfoADec 7k to 
HolltaBKFp 7k H 
HoSftrc Bs Dec 7* to 
Holton Bo Feb 6k to 
HsmmmanGtTft 33 
Homan PIcOctiDft 97 
HetabaFln 7k W 
H8WMFlnOec7ft to 
H me 103 Mav Ilk 98 
HSbcKkFjsJul Ilk 02 
KsKHldas UftK 
ladbrtffv 
Ibrd Doe 
Ibrd Feb 
Ibrd Feb 
IbrBMor 
Iceland May 
IdSffli 
IkbHn Bv Doc 4ft 99 
JOT Od 7 00 

JtcMor 6k to 
jam Lowfsjmlffft to 
KOTBDiEleAprTVb 98 
KturlntlJul 7k to 

KtwintlNov 8ft 04 
Ktwlntt S® Hft fft 
KWSltaElOKa 9J 
LodbrokaA® S* n 
LcsmoPkJun 9k 99 
LbSdiUnFgMXi M 
Ldn Elec Mar 8 03 

LaedsSsacAprTOk n 
loads BS Dot 7k 97 
Leeds BS Mov 7k to 
UoydsPtcMar7k « 
Macs Care Jun 8ft B 
Mod I Carp Jul 9ft 99 
Ms Fin Dec 7k to 
Mont Fin Jun *k 97 
MutDOtGre 7* M 
Ned inw Bk Dec 6ft 99 
NottanwtfNov 6k 9* 
NcManwdHov Uk 00 
Mott Grid Mar 7ft to 
Nan Hone Aug » 03 

Nat Power Marlffft 01 
NatfUorBs W 97 
NaCprevBs 5* M 
Nat west 6*ay lift 01 
N zeatad Apt 9ft 95 
NZeatndNov 9 98 
Nib Aug 7ft to 
Norril Hvd Feb 9ft 03 
WTMov 10* 01 

NAOlCePNovfk S3 
Htnumtuia Febfk is 
OfcbJul 9k 02 

■Ontario Pr Feb ilk 01 
Ontario Pr Jut 9* 02 
0*arioPrS4P8* 00 
Osaka GasAutBft 03 
Peareon 3t Ftb Wft 02 
FIBctnPlcXw 7k to 
PcwereenMor 8* (S 
POT APT 10ft 01 

OuebKHvdAPlIk oi 
Quebec Hyd Dc 6ft to 
RbsPteMer 8ft 04 


80ft 0X9 +15 
IB* 040 +46 
98* 8X7 +38 
9NK 859 +7 

tOfft 923 +54 
104* 9J9 +57 
71ft IB +69 
HZk 655 +5Z 
1Mb 9X3 +53 
toft 9.14 +3! 
«k 1846 +152 
«ft 840 +9 

0ft u +« 


97k 15 ^ 


IDO* 879 ... 
Mb 830 +19 
■S7k 925 +54 
lC4ft 951 +60 
96k 867 +31 
104ft 89 450 
HO B3Q +09 
Hk 922 +rt 
to 8X9 +08 
Slk 948 +57 

u* nst +18* 

103* 818 +53 
. Hk 822 +21 
93k 9X2 +50 
nne m +u 
mk 9X2 +89 
109ft 9X2 +89 
57W tJB +24 
95k BJ3 +11 
184k 9JB +53 
IMS 9X8 +13 
m US 452 
Mk 9X0 +73 
181* 044 +42 
Otft 9.14 +46 
Mft 8X1 -1 

Ml. +22 
163ft 9.U +75 
Mb 860 +21 
m uj +iB 
Bft 9.M +3B 
IWft 9JS +53 
98X52 186 +17 
toft 1853 +160 
95ft 10X5 +010 
81k 851 +41 
71* 9M +43 
KC* 751 +TM 
Wft i7> 

Hft 9X8 +9 
45X52 9X4 495 
94ft 749 +54 
IT *34+79 
75k 8X4 +14 
Hlft 874 +58 
85ft 7X4 +73 
88X82 7JM +12 
87ft 7J* +47 
115ft 10X1 +11* 
96X62 847 +21 
87* 7231 +538 
104ft 744 +82 
HO* SJ3 +41 
97* 9Af +fft 
Iff* 9X9 +97 
weft IX +63 
9M6 893 +62 
98* 823 +06 
90ft 1SX4+1D6 
Wf* 744 +4B 
87* 103 +W 
97ft 9X7 +70 


1SS UtJS 


Rons Hare MM me 98 
Rovol las Mar 9* ID 
Rtz 1 IK Dec 7ft to 
SdnOTanrMor in 95 
Samp Inc Jan 7ft 0* 
SbabApr 7ft to 
SBCCaym Feb an. 01 
SekMar Hft 94 
Severn In* Jut lift 99 
Savtrn TM Mfollft 01 
SkoWUaCoOctn 98 
SmHbkCOT 7ft « 
Jmtttit Cap Bft to 
SHiEMcPMar Ulft 02 
SuedwestDec 8ft 0! 
Sweden Dec 7ft 97 
Sweden Dec 7 98 

Sweden Doc 6k 79 
Sweden Jut 7ft 00 
Sweden Mar nft 95 
SwedwiMov 8ft 9+ 
TeecoJun 11 01 

TeecaMcv 7ft 98 
TtewPtcFeb (k 83 
Tesco Ptc JOT Mft (2 
Thomas FbiNvtok 01 
Ttvfewtod 0 99 

Tavata Rn Jan li 9* 
siinUBvAua 7k id 
31 Ptc Oct TON 01 
TsvVKJel Bft 03 
UnitavPIcDec 7ft to 
VtcPuWAug fft 99 
PWlliWtrMar H* 62 
Vfestto Cur Wo Bft B 
ftootw Bs S® 7 to 
Mooter Dec 11*01 
MtwFtaMor 7ft 06 
XeroK tied Jul K 83 


®b 956 +54 
Mft 9 28 +68 
91ft 801+57 
184ft 9X8 +80 
SO* 9X1 +)« 
95* 9X7 480 
108* 923 +51 
186ft 9X6 +9QS 
90* 9J0 +79 
81* 9X1 +71 
UBft 7X2+97 
105k 7^ +97. 
96* HL53 +158 
93ft 9.17 +65 


Yen Straw* 


Mur 


Cpn Mat Price VldTnw 


AdbFeb 5 
AdbF® S 
AfdbNov 4ft 
AM) Nov « 
. pjdnagMr 6 
AsfbwgMr .4 
Austria Feb 5ft 
Austria Feb 5k 
AurtriaOct 6k 
■ Austria oa M 
Austria 5m 5k 
Austria Sep Xk 

as r 

Si i 

6* 

Coe Mr X* 
Cob Mr Mb 
Or Fonder Aug+ft 
CrloaXJun 7 
Cr Load Jim T 
CrLocotOct 6 
CrUscBtOet 6 
Cr Natl Ntn 8ft 
Cr Nan Nov 8k 
Db Fin Jul « 
Db Fin Jul 4* 
Denmark Jan 7 
Denmark Jen 7 
BbraNav 4k 
EbrdNav 4k 


433 -U 


Od 5* 

«BFOT 4* 

a 

as 

QOMOy 6* 
an Mr 4ft 

EJbMnv « 

Eta Hew S* 

Eta Nov a 
EtbOd 4k 

EtaOd 4k 
EBrotkOd Mb 
ExttabkOd 4ft 
EjdmbkTrtA Mb 
ExMibk TnA 4ft 
FlnlndJan 6 
FMnUm a 
FMmdMr 8ft 
PlntandMr 4K 
HdtlaxBlDc 6 
HoBtaxBsDc 6 


loOTOc 

ladhDc 

laOTtTC 

WOT DC 

todbFeb 

W*PM) 

irtJtn 

tadbJw 

WOT Jun 

msijua 

sssi 

Ibnt Apr 
ibrd Aug 
iDrt Apr 
Ibrd Aw 
IDrt DC 
IDrt POT 
IbrtJm 
writ Jun 
wrtJun 
IDrt Jin 
IDrt Mr 
HrtMr 
IDrt Oct 




fflrtOct 
WrtOd 6 

iwr-W g 


JtatvJul 


SF s 


^Joct 5 

6k 

JOTSCP » 
KfwinO Jun 7 
Ktwlntt Jun 7 
Kferintl Nov 6 
Ktwlntt Nov A 
ixndwttMr 3* 

Narwav Apr 5ft 
NorworAnr » 
Norway Feb g- 
NorwavPob SJ 
MIT Sep » 

s;s a 

SSK 

QOTSm 4k 
Ontario PrOd oft 
Ontario PrOd M 
pSG«EtS«P7 
Poc Gas El Sea 7 
p5etoEISfe>7 
Port ftp Feb « 
Part Rep fot <* 


-Bft. g 

Spain Mr 5ft 

SSiMr 5ft 

sss^s a 


International 


Recruitment 


HI* .848 ^+64 


85k 1021--. _. 
94* 7X7 +80 
Sk 946 ++4 
103ft 7X7 +14 
TOBKi 925 +70i 
H9k IS +H- 
KO* 8X7 +1041 
TS* 9JB +6V 
96ft 9X9 +58 
10334 951 +fi’ 
95* 944 +64 
97X62 854 +JJ 
93ft 8X9. +37 
88k 9X6 +38 

Tift an +31 

Hlk Li) +01 
HI* 8X0 +17 
188 923 .+51 

95ft 84f 
9434 9X6 
M3k 94; ... 
184k 859 +74 
943* 945 +81 
108 951 +261 

8M 9X1 +M , 
KBk 950 +7* 
94* 9X1 +47 
96X5? 840 -4 

USA 940 +84 
HSk 9X8 +24 
94k 941 +56. 
733* 9X4 +54 
107k HX8 +m 
H* 943 +74 
91k 10X5 +131 


IS 


Every Thursday 
Confacf Philip Oma 
Tel.: (33 1)46 37 93 36 
Fax: (33 1 ) 46 37 93 70 
or your nearest IHT office 
or representative 


NASDAQ NATIONAL MARKET 


Consolidated trading for week 
ended Friday, Aug. 19. 


Sokn 

Dlv YW 100s High Low CM Owe 


X9e J 


20 IX 


.120 


_ 1 


105 4 3V, 3V, 

14*9 11 Iff* 10ft — ft 
180815ft )3ft 14V. -ft 
259 13ft 13 13 —ft 

3233 19ft 18ft 19'.» -ft 
700 14ft lift Mft -2ft 
Mft 13ft 133* -ft 
17ft 15ft 15ft— 1ft 


X 3010 14ft 13* Mft ._ 
_ 17*9 123* Mft 13ft -ft 


<3 ft 


xa 


Bft 


345ft _ 

433 13ft 12 

... 82 Bft 8ft ... 

.4 20210ft 1? 18V, -lft 

_ 423 Bft »ft 7* —ft 

„ 40«0llft ID'-. Mft —v, 

481 Al 8=261714 15ft Mft —ft 


27ft 28ft— 1ft 


XO 33 5)9 25ft 23ft Mft 

>25 31ft 24V. -W, 


4ft 


AOTTOS 

AarnRit 


Abmis 
A&orrvJ 

AbloTel 
Abrumj 
Abrccas 
AtnlEnl 

acc«i 

AcesMii 
Warns 
AcoiSW 
AceCsh 
Aorta 
ACMT A 
toner Am 

Aon 

Art Pert 
ActPr Mt 
ActVoic 
AOfrom 

AflEOJl 

AttoOO 

AdontcS 
Admota 
Atwpn h 

Ados-/ .16 
AOToeSy 2# 

AfJIron 

AOvHIt 

WvflWS 

AdvOr 

AdvLOg 

AdMKVv 

AOT47JIR 

AdvPolv 

AcfuPro 

AdwSem 

AdvTLlj 

AdwTrt) 

AdvT.ii 
Advanros 20 
AdvorHfi 4 24 
AdvBcp 
Aaautm 
A cram 
Agtnum 
Atvma, 

AgSvcss 
AflfHag -loe 
Agoum 
AgriDyn 
AitEjd 34 
AlrMetn 

AirSen wt 
AirSen 
AirS vs 

Auirun .12 
Atttm 
Atara 
AlamoGp 


.. 10345 .. 

_ 146 4Vi 3V; . . 

_ 14513ft 13 13 

•.62057 183* 15ft 17 -1ft 
.. 585 3ft 3ft 3ft -'ft 

- 200 1ft «ft 1ft 

JO 3X71843 fft 7ft 8 —1ft 
X8 J. BM 13ft 12 13ft -1 

X6 5 41 123* 12 13k 

_ 742 6ft 5V, 

_ 5056 19ft 17 

40 2J 211519ft M 
_ 786 7ft 6 

., 23W 0ft 7 

.12 2.1 41 8* 5ft 


_. 347 111, 9 

_. 2315 2 1ft, 


18ft - l+u 
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7ft —I 
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_ . . l_'ft, - ft 

_ 49 Jft 2ft 2ft —ft 

_ 389 10ft W. 10 

.41337 19 Mft 19 -2ft 
_. 16756 12ft 1 1 12* 

-. 46* 7ft 1 7 ft - ft 

-32 20 938 16 15ft 16 - ft 

_ 1941 9ft Bft 9 -ft 

- 1897 25ft 23ft Mft— I 

_ 5831 fft 7ft 9ft -ft 

_ 200 5ft 4ft 4'ft, —5* 

_ 306 k ft ~"b 

_ 354 21 20ft 20ft —ft 

, 4463 27 23 ft 25ft -ft 

48 7.1 3332 6ft 6'.. 6ft -ft 

- 120 4V, 4ft 4ft - ft 

_44009 2l'.. is ?Oft -7'. I 
_ 179 14', 13 13ft - ft 

... 2 M2 1SW 13ft 15 - ft 

J 487 35» . Hft 35ft - I ft I £™row 
X44IB9M';, T» Hft - 3 IZSSL 
.. 3857 23 70ft 21ft _ 

_ 1362 34 71ft 22ft -I 
_ 2087 73V| 18ft 19ft— 2-Vi4 ! 

... 1733 I0H 9* 7'. —ft - 
_. »M 4V, 31. 4V„ -*, I 

-693 4 5ft 5ft —ft . ££££? 

. 5185 Jft Jft 3V., .. , 

_ 1490 4ft 3'¥i, 4ft - ft 232?r. 
_ 2541 6ft 5 8 - « I At * SOU s 


Stacks 


SalK 

Dlv Y)d lOOirtgn low die Owe 


AmEdoc 
AElCmp 
AmFO JO 

AFiltm 1X0 
Afnt=rgh1 
A Greet S J6 

AM incus 

wnomroi 

AHomsir _ 

AJndF J4 jj 

ArntnPt wi 
AminPis 


_. 8*3 2 ft 2ft 2ft < ft 
_ a>3 BV, 8 8ft » ft 

1.7 2179 12V, lift lift —ft 

3.7 30 78 77 27ft —ft 


_ 2738 24ft 22ft 24^ *lft 


AmUeol 2.16 X9 38 =4 ft 


1.916699 30 28k — , .. 

_ 3503 6ft 5ft 6ft > ■*.. 
.. 16194 1’ft, 1ft 1V n —Up 
_ 12*0 17 Mft Itft i 1ft 
_ 274 Bft Bft 8ft _ 

!J 34 II'-, 10ft 10ft 

._ 2419 ft 

_ 6882 Pft, tgf _l* ■ '> 



V- iy 

lft» ** 

Mft 23ft 24V 

26 


5 —1 


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I2ft 10ft Ilk 

_ 119 2V„ lTft l'V„ 

_. 79657 19ft 15ft 18ft 
_ 563MVV 13ft 14 
J4 3.6 459 7 


iKs 


_ x 

_. 3595 

-. 2027 8ft 7k - 
_ 1578 18k 15ft Mft ♦ V, 

_ 1808 13 lift Ilk— 1ft 
UO 4.4 305 51ft 49ft 50ft —ft 

• 3ft 

n'ft :s 

& K* in 

28ft Mft Mft -2k 

*& % :a ^5 

4ft 4 4ft —ft 

1 - Mif 5ft fc-Ifc 
X4e 1.0 1713 3<ft, 3>Vi4 3"j — V ta 
43 «k 43 - V, 

_ S40 4V,. 3ft 4 -ft 

_. 715 9 7ft 8k - ft 

-. 81813ft llh 13 -Ift 

IX 137023ft 20ft 23ft 
_ 104772 57ft 49k 55ft -4ft, 

- 13* r* I* rv„ -V, 

_ 5 20 20 20 — k 

2J5 1326 Bk 7k 8 — k 

.. 20S5 7 5k 6ft —Vi 
_ 121 1ft 1ft, lk —V, 

X 8573 Iff Bk 9V, _ 

_. 587 9k 8 8 -IV, 

IX 196 17 16ft 16k — V, 

- 2266 » I 9 — k 

_ 907 Ik 6k 8 -IV. . - J . -. 

- 441 16 TSk 15k - k 1 % 

1 » 54 Mk 13k Mk - ft I Barra 

1 BcwetBs 

BareWM 


Soles 

Div Yid I0(h W Law Che Owo 


Stocks 


Sales 

Dtv YU iah MOT Law Cbe Out , 


Stacks 


Sates 

Dtv rid im High Law □* Owe 


IX *3)1 5k 5 5' ft > ft. 

_ 54 4ft 3k 4ft ' k 

_ l«8 25ft 23» 25ft • Ik 

3X AJ 25 'V 23ft 74ft— I 
1.0 1254 III, 30 ilk • Ik 

X 1006 1 0k fft 10k, ■ "ft 

_ 2561 4k 3Y, 4k — V.t 
- 3172 20k 20 301. . k 

__ 39 4", 4 4ft . ft 
-HIM Sift 47 SO’, i ?ft 

• V, 


.. 2860 21k IS 21 
... 219 13 12'/. 17ft 


z .s? «• 


- - 4k 

.. 1436 Vi, ft 

.. 100S " u V„ n;., • ft 

dt it 

- 547 Ik r . J' . — • 

40 23 Hri 16V, Mk Mk 

rftffirfc W .ft 

.. 130 10k fft fft — k 

_ 70 17ft lift 111, >k 

_ 2224 7k 6ft 7 

180 V„ v„ V„ -■> 


BrtGour 

BrTom 

Brunos 

BrvrUMw 

BacLAm 

Buckle 

BuaCret 

B^un 

BurrBr 

Busnfic 

Bober 

i w 


_ 5131 14k 10*, M .3V, ennmol 
... 5003 1 12ft 17k— Jft OimpPr 

3.6)3538 8 7 7ft —ft I Champp 

IX 1133V, Ilk 33ft — k OtttoJn 
30 0ft 8ft _ “ 

_ 30513k 13 13k —ft 

_ 9493 17k 15ft 17V, . IV, 

_ 1761 9k 8k 9*i —ft 

_ 783 12ft lift 17k —ft 

_ 3365 Ik 1+r l”» • "e 

_ 6X3 9ft 8k 8k • '.i 

5134* . 37ft 34 .ft 


95T 5 "ft 9.,, Wu — ft 1 
301, 78k 28k — 1ft 


1 5ff .. 

231 6k 6 



-V* 


_ *05 1? 10ft Uk .ft 
.. 434874k 27 23 -ft 


3 jfo iTC 

4 37 8* 7k 7k —ft 
1.6 *351 IS’.', 14k 14k i V. 

. 1908 14k 17 ft 14 

_ 2133 13ft lift 13 
_ 117 !J», lift 17ft 


23 — > 

I JO 3X "^7 35™ 33 " 35 .3'* 

... 7*6 5k 4k 5>. — k ; 

1.38 11 1064 44 41’, 43k lift 1 

_ 440S38V, 32ft 28k .4ft 
> Ik 61, Ok • Ik 
' If ft 71 ft. Ik 


Chestvs 





_ 240 3 :■*, 3IV M —Vi. 
_ 5ffI2ft 11k Uk —ft 


SKuT 


331 15ft 14k IS* - I 
329 14 13k 14 -V„ 


^423 _7k Ik 2ft — k I §?If* rl 


_ 171 5 4ft 5 

117 9ft 8 8ft -ft 

. 1X0 3.1 699 33k 32 I7k -ft 

p* 109 8J 547 36ft 25k 25V, . ft 

BlClSO 56 1416 63k 60 62 .Ik 

•OK 2A IJ 8517 15V. 15ft — 

X8 IS 118 37 25 25 • 1 

— — - 132 51, A'.l 4k — k 

BncGaliC JOr IX 5769 29k 28ft 29 • k . 

“ “ IXBblO 51 35k 34 35k • lk CP AC 

XO 3.0 3076V, 75V. 76k _ 1 CP* 

_ 1807 22ft 19V, 21 ft . |ft | CPI Aero 
•96a 6J 337 16 14k 15*.', —ft I CPI Wt 

X2 2_5 7710 71ft 19ft 20k _ ! CSBFn 

.40 1.4 81 29 28 28 —1 ! QF HU 

.40 IX 2924 28 25k77l„ - I "ft 

X* 1.5 W16ft Mft 14V. -lft 

.10 IX 382 7ft 6 7 -k 

_. 97 9k 8k 9 — k 

_ 10 7'., 9 9—1 

M 2.9 633 14 13k 13ft - k 

40 2.0 69 71 Mft 20’. -ft 

.60 3Xc217fl2Aft 23 lift -'.V 
J3 IX 202034k, 33 33ft - 'V 
_ 117 7k 2’. 2ft —ft; 

- *81 I'Ve lk. lv.« 

M 9A U99 4k 4ft - ft I 

_ 17697 17k 14*. M*. -1ft 
X8 X 917015k 15ft IS’, —ft 
_. 225 7k 6k 7ft -k 

_ 336 Ilk 9 10ft ' I 

_ 417519’ . 15k 17V, - lft 
147 3k 2k — 


60 2.6 At 23ft 73 23 Ik 

_ 3 3k 2k 3k 1 k 

76*15 17 14k ,+. 


336 36k ?Jft Mk-,k 


: Wtt-OTt-ib; 




j Mft lift 16ft —ft J BsTnA _ 1757 Bk 8ft 8ft —ft 

1.1 640 28k 27 ft WV9, - ,fU'3'/. 1J* '2',. -k 

_ 1174 17 ISk 16V, -Ik 5 a sE*u[ _ 1879 10’. 9 9k -ft 

_ 30 5 4 5 -ft BassetlF XO ?.B *1568791. 79 29 _*. 

M ZD 777 20ft 19k 19ft — | gatTerti _ 3771 Jw.. »» Jft, - 

1 _ 9 Ik Ik lft —ft ! BayRIdgg _ M6J 14». Mft I4> 

_ 969144ft 39k 43ft -3k . |OvVV, 

' DOVWtS 



2 * 


_ 3325 T»h 1 2k 
„ 1472 3k 3k 3 
_ 44 9Y, Ik 9 

26 17134k 33k 34k • ft 

3.1 17 39 36k J7k -lft 

_. 2154 6k 5k * _ 

X6 7X 113 17k T0V, 12k .Jft 

XI 13 41 36’ '• 26V, 3*k —lft 

:: £& r* Sk t4 

,23elJ 259 15*. 15 15k ■ Vb 

_ 432 23k 22k 73k —ft 

- 209 9k 9V, -ft 

_ 468 23V, 22 22V, -ft 

_ 58512 10k lift -1 

- 137 / 6ft 4ft —ft 

_ 578 M i:v, 14 - ft 

- 697 7ft *k 6k —ft 
1X11212 1891 5ft 4k 5 —ft 

_ 20 7 6ft 6k _ 

8360 10ft 75. fft -2Vu CDijBkg J4 
TXOe S3 685 29' . 38 29 * \i 1 amins 

“ -35! c v “ > | M 

- 3985 5 4 4ft -lit GincBc 

U 4990 ( 7*. 16 17 _ OayErig 

_ 1881 7ft 8k 8 <Vh • V» I " 

_ 127 I 7ft 7ft —ft . 

_ 10797 1 1'b Bft 10k -lft 
2006 4 k 3ft 4ft -ft 
2.9 198 Mft 18’i 19 -k 


20 9 1073 21k 23 .lft 

_ 383 4V. 4 4ft —ft 

- 04 6 Sk 5ft 

„ 1108 4ft 4ft 4ft _ 

J» 1.1 67205 fft 7ft ■ —ft 
X0O 2X 52 33 31k 37 Vi ■ 1 

-. 21813 1JV, 12k 

■“ * 

... 897 4ft 4k 4k 1 k 
,23765 Sk 3k 4k -I 
_ 2279 9k 8 9 • k 

_ 2653 16V, 14ft 17ft > 1 
_ WO 6ft SV. 6ft ■ v, 

.. SOT 13 101.12 ’IV, 

M IJ 2840 38 38 —I 

- 253 4ft 3ft 4 ik 

_ 7464 15 12*1 13k > I 

_ 761 IS 13 14ft • 1 

.. 5428 15k Uk 15ft ilk 

32 IX 6 21 k I9W 21 ’ V, 

A *43 10 ft 9k fft —V, 

_ 8215 14ft 10 k I Ok -2k 

1ft 

_2D700 S9V, 58k S7ft —ft 
X2 ZA TMV^ 2 lift 22 ' k 

r. 577 3 

_ 154 31 

ill 


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• Mft 


23 V, » 3ft 
I A ' 5*6 5k — W 

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X «8031k 30k3l7V a .'*to 


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-44D 2X 27518 17ft 17k -ft I 


_ 7315 17ft Mft 17 - k 


271 3V, 2k 2k —Hu W 

14k Mft 1 AtHRecv 


BO 15 i.n 

407 Sft 4ft Sft - V, l 
_ $878 6k Sft 5k — k | JSpISL. 
X 6604 33 30Vi 32k - 1 ft 
X 2411 30ft 27k 30 k -2 
_ 376 30*. 29 30k - 1 

1155 3ft I**.. 3 -V„ 

_ 1538 8k Sk Bft - k 
_ sum* 9k 11 -lk 
_ 1211 15k 13k 14* - k 
214 9 8ft 8k 


AdCarWT 
AuaOatl 
Apdlmu 
Aadinavs 
AoidrArs 
ApdNber 
, . AodSCi 
ft I Aod5Ci wt 


2907 17V. Uk Hft -ft 1 
_ llll IJW 10ft II -1 I A rOTSn 
_ 618 4ft Ik 2k —Ik Arorrwa 
.9 2866 76V, Jtft Mk - Ik ) ft »t>Ort3re 
... 2078 2V. lft 1'Vu I AtWri+l 
_ 1513 2 ft Zk 2k _ ArbrWI 

„ 1326 13k 12 ilk -k ArenCm 

... 305 6 k 6 6k —V. ArchP»S 

1.9 1008 Oft 6 6ft _ Araca 

_ 1256 Ik. 3k TV,, - | Arden 


to 


AD 


12 


Alonlec 
Alerter. 

Aloanh 
AKMe 
Aid las 
Aldus 
Ale, Bid 
Ale. Eng 
AuaCo 
AlmR 

A SCO 

Art> erm 
AIIASem 
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AflC.I, 

AkgW 
AlnOm 
AfonPti 
AlnSemi 
AIBhCao 
AIMS* S 
AHCgdC 1.53 
AlldCap 
AldCall 
AJdCao 
AlliedGA 
AtaHiPd 
An OH, 00 
AHLJb 
A idW^te 
AlhiFn 
Aiirristo 
Ataetia 
AlpMic 
AIOJAjC WI 
Alena 1 

Alena 1 jA 
AianaBio 
Atabgrl 
AIDLce 
AltoGU 
A/ta. j 
Ancon 
Alters 
AMiesc 
Alirans 
AiTfear 
AmSrStr 
Amcor 
AmeorFs 
AmrLink 
Am-, an > 

Ame-Bc 
AFFF 
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AFT.E2 
AmcrOn 
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AmBcos 

ABr+.r 

ArnBogn 
AmB*dn 
4mBuw 
AmCir, j 
ACtaim 
ACU5VDV 
ACrtUid 
AConiu 
AmEashi 
ArnEcoi 


74e I.l 3277 63’.. 67ft 62ft -lft' ArdenPd 
J* 2X 106 14k 14 14 — lft|Aretnusa 


_ 3807 15ft 13 15ft .3 ArgntB s 
1.20 6.9 4367 19 I7ft 17k —ft ArgoGO 

AO 1.6 1046 25ft 24k 2?ft ->Y,. Argosy 

_ 107 «k 7k 8ft - k ! Amusfta 

. 16763 15 Ilk 13k -k.Anodun 

16081 34 Mk 32 - 3ft AnsIGl S 

16 2544 25k 74 74k — l. ArttBesf 

_ 7786 5ft 4k 5 —ft ■ Armor 

X6 3.1 , 13811k 10k Ilk - ft 1 Arnold s 

_ 7015 Mk 14k 16 - 1 V. ; ArrrsPtl 

.IS 9 76 Mft 16k 1 6k ArcrwFn 

_ SOB 4ft 3ft 4 - k Arowfrrt 

... 6098 3 1 ',, S'/., 3?m — ArrowTm 
187 i, Vi, .'li, - ft J Aftagpwt 


825 Ik 
HO k 
«5 Jft 
1» ft 
7373 13 


AsdBnc 
AsacmA 
AsdCmB 
A?»«S 
Astw.aF 
AsrraM 
Astron 
Asrasy 
Asrrvrn 
AsvsiTcn 
. AtOTCsl 
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—ft Ampy 


is 10ft 10 loft - V, : ArtguTof 

400 8k 8 8*W —Vlt I Anw 

l.J .441 34ft 41 -I*, ArtHlG 

„IM»1? 9 10ft -k Artwtrv 

... 8385 I5W Ilk. IS .3 I Asanw 
_ 39 25k 75 25 — ftiAsctndC 

2J iOSi IS MV. 14* • ft J ASCCO 

7.5 1780 17k Mft 17ft - VS > AOTwim 

I JSe 9X 188 14ft 13ft 14 - v, AwcITI 

I.TJeSJ S30 15 13U Ilk -D Auaitt 

I 00 7.7 747J loft jtv, 13' 9, . -lft 

X0 2 1 2980 79k 27ft 28k -ft 

.74 15 500 Mft Mk '5ft -ft 

66816V. 15k ISk— I 
300 Mft 13 Mft - ft 

457 3ft Jft 3ft _ 

IJ4 6ft Sft Aft ■ ft 

244 19ft 18ft 19 

130 3k Ik 2k —ft 

lft l'+.j — k 

•u 0 >v„ — k, 

Ik lft 
v« ft 

— Bk II -3 Atkinsfl 

2088 1ft lft l«>t ■ 9,» I AltanWd 

885 Sft 3% 4k — k • AllAm 

.. 1383 Ik lft IV,. 

4? 3k 3k 3k 

_ 1914 4k 4 4k 

_ 41067 29V, »k IS* 

3001 28 231. Mft 

... 1796 14k Mk ISk 
_ 73 4ft 4'.j 4k 

784 ; iv* jft 
102 77k 77 27ft 
MS 72k 2H. 21ft -k 
337 i'u 88 
43 I*'-. 15ft M • ft 

761 2ft Jk 2ft -ft 

447 27ft II 71 ft — k 

»' 9ft 81* 9 ft 

Ht 6’ , 6k fcft 

US »'-i 8ft 8'-, —V) 

9039 75 S7ft74 |*k 

... ?76 5ft 4 k Sft ft 

SO 7 7 77 18ft 18ft 111 , . | k 

73 3J 3095 21k 71 21ft -ft 

. Milt 1 , Jft Ik ft 

6J9 Ml, 13,., Uk _!.* 

. 476 14k 1]', Uv. 

... 293 Mft IS 15ft — k 

65 2k 7i„ 2ft 

16 1 .0 >201 7 I6’ i Mk l*>. 

74 1.8 IJ67 13k 12 13 -1 

71 3ft 2k 3'-, 

l 626973ft 16ft 21ft 


- 1004 4 3ft 4 -ft I fjayoorl 

- 347 BV. 75. Sft -ft 

.. 6547 31ft M 29ft - k BfCtBorti 
_ 3004 TM,, 5K1. TV „ -U„ ferttas 

- 1223 lift »k 11 

JO Z0*l574 1Sk Mft 14k _l, BeklBlh 
_ 210 Mft ITk 17k —ft , 

•48 IXx80750 35k 33 34ft - lk 
X7 .l).B963 17k ISk 16k - y. BeJCoM 

J 5384 15ft 13*. 14), —ft ! 

- 484 9 7ft 8ft —ft , BellSu t 

- 3856 10ft Oft 10 - k g**'"* 1 » 

.. 3615 6k 6ft 6k - ft ggU*rty 

266 V* ■•b v. ... BFrnnVR 

- 3585 U 1 18 18*1 —ft 

_ 1533 7k 7 7k -klgrtirOG 
_ 1*47 18*6 Mft 1 7 —lft , 

-.84301 54ft 45k 50ft -3k 1 gg*C? 

_ 481 3k 3ft Jft _ I 

_. 398 6ft 6Vk Aft —ft I 

144 1 ft k —ft , H”!f? 

53 4k 4 4’.. —ft I 

20« lft lk Ik — to/BS’S 1 . 

514 18’. 12k lift -| | 

291 51 30k Mk _ 

1SII3I'-. 19 20 — 1 ft 

- 633S |9+i lift |9 -ft 

- 1358 18k IS Mft - lft 

- 1081 Jk 2ft 7V„ —ft 

9,2234 30 k 28ft Jf"”., — V, 

- '20 55. 43V, so -s : 

_ 709 13k 10 »?’••« -Ik 

1157 12ft II 11—1 1 

X0 3.1 6 26 34ft 78 - *4 I 

I.l* 3.9 2190 30ft 29 30 - 

_ 2911 17 14V, Mft -2 

- 446 3ft lk w -ft 
_ 13820 5k 5k Sft —ft 

93 Sk 4k 5** • I 

A4 3 4481 17*. 11k 12ft -w; 

.U 10 647 21ft 20k lift - k 

A0 2.0,1644 30 19k 30 _ 

- 572 6 1 . 5 5 — lk I gray* 

16 IS) m. 16k 17 * k Bhrevs 

X 137025ft 20ft 74ft -3ft BioTlnl 

... 64 aft 5\* 4*.i - ft I [JoTdj 

_ *87 Jk Ik Ik ; gtt-dCn 


M IX 06 314ft 23’ , 24 - i CoOOT 

1X0 2.9«37lo 67 80ft 6lk -I': 'Catawov 
_ 742 3k 3k Jft —ft . Column 

Jffl Z2 35114’. 13 13 — I • Camtd Q 

_ 10911 28 k 25 26k —2k Cwnbe* 

- S* J GcmbNt 

_ 77 7 6\ 1 5+1 6k -ft CambSnd 
JO IX 1534 11ft Mft 12k - ft ' CamoTcti 
JO« 1.7 xlW 18k 17k 13 — . tonmAsh 

_ 6SSS5 S3*. 54ft - k CameoS 
_ 19093 18k 17 10 -1 CWmee 

**- "ft - Ik CWineA 
_ 78799 26 1. 21 27 b— 9-. Candela 

5ft —ft CanrtgS 
■A. “2 ■ CdWfcru 


_ 11179 13*1 lift 17ft — k 

- 6337 25 21k 9ft -lk { 

AO X6 158 1 Ik 10k II _. > 

_ I 7ft 7k 7k -'Vi. 
-76 7.7 434 3k T'V, 3k - k 
_ 589 1*6 lk J'. — k 
_ 371 36k 35ft 36k 
_ 2537 6 4k 4*V h — IUi, 

- 3168 4*4 3k 4k - * e 

- 2239 4k 3k 4', 

- 1437 7ft 6ft 7 — k 

_ 111815k 14k 14k _ 


_ 6835 6ft 5ft 
_. 2131 Mk 13*. 1 
94 4ft 4k 
- 473 3k >- 
. 76886 7k 7 
1.2 


162211'. 

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1736 10V 

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90a 8.1 *48 lift II Uk — k 

- 2149 10 9 9*6 ’ ft 

_ 905 6k 5V. 6k * k 
_. 34912 31k 27ft 3Dk ,2k 

-390799 Mk 90k 27k » lk 
X *475 29k 36*4 2* -Ik 
_ 944 Sft 5ft 5k ♦ k 

- *705 9k 8ft fft -k 

_ 5516 IS 15 »*■ 

774 18k 17ft 17k — k 
430 30V, 78ft 30 -IV. 
_ 35 33k 33 32 — » 

IS 537 24ft 73 74". - *6 

- 69 Bft 5*4 6*. -'ft 

IX 143 33ft 31 33 » I 

- 174 Sft Sft 5V, t ft 
.- 1157 0 6k ■ -H 
_ 990 7k 6 6ft —"A* 
_ 4873 3k 2V, 2*. — k 

.16 SX 48 3 7k 2k — k 
_ 3795 12*6 12 12 

2JI 8 A 100 7 Tft 77 27k - k 

- 4006 3JH Iri/. IT^u— 'V„ 

- 235 4ft 3k Jk —ft 

- 1764 8k 4k 8ft -Ik 

_ 4HB 4k 4 4k - k 
_ 71415V, 14V. 15ft - I 

IX 44718ft 17ft 17*. —ft 
1.9 AlBI 17 l*ft 14k . k 
CifSntf 2X5 9.1 *90 24ft 24k 24k -ft 
CMHltti _ 481737ft 32ft 36 -3ft 

CoOanc* X2 IX *34 30 ft 24ft 28ft— lft 
CobraEl - 399 3ft 2k 7k _ 

Cobra _ 7BZS4S 39 44ft -4k 

CocoBJl U» 3 A 319 29*4 27*4 29ft .) 
Cocenevs _ 1588 4k 3k 4’i - k 

- - 4ft ff 


9K*> 


Soles 

Ohr YU 100s MOT Low Cbe Owr 


CooprL 
CoOOBK S 
Caere 8 

Cowrt 

CaPtevPh 

Gocytrt 

CorTher 

CarGabF 

Ctyoxn 

Cordta 

CorelCus 

CmrFn 

Calmwj 

CorctCp 

corcuvrt 

Cortech 

Corves 

Carvm 7 

CoftCo 

CTnSUln 

dourer 

Cwtavt 

CrVrBri 

Crftmde 

CrayCm 


Al 7ft 6ft TV, 9 1 

- 44 20ft 19ft T9 ft — t 
2X 2204 20k 19k 19k — k 

- 3857 14k 14 14k 9 k 

_ 7S3 29 k 27k 29k > lk 

- 12385 ■ 3k Aft, — I 

_ 58*1 15k 13 14k I lk 

- 2374 21k 70V. 21k 
_ Ml 3 TV, lft 


in 


.. 1045849ft 43 49k ■ 4k 


- 442519k 18 IWi. lk 

_ 288 5k 5 5k —9, 

.. 4303 30 14k Mk I Stab 

_ 3593 Mft 15)6 M 4 *•. 

- 367 9k 8k 9k > k 


14 Ik Ik l'V» 


-Ok YU UOxHtan Low. Cbe Owe 


-,5«,V. Ik 2k |S| 


„ HB1 19*4 1*1'. 11 
_ 14* ll’/i WU 16k— Ik I 

_ 160 17k 16 17 —V. 

.X2B538 Uk I0'4 HFVw >ftt 


Danhcny _ *71 2 *k 22k 23 — lk 

DrcbHu 41 U 4*3 1} 12k 13 - 

DoreevTr - 809 Mft 13k 14k •_ 

Doskrt - 510 9k 8k 9 -ft 

Dotntac ' - - 95 lft. 1 1*. ' „ 

Obietree ■ _ 2590 19ft 17*4 18. _ 

DohAjun A0 2-5 174 19 15k 15ft— 3ft 

Donate, . - 2472 19 18k 18ft — k 

Drtnksg .100 - 1795 1ft k Ik -ft 

OrecoE - 91 9 8ft 8k i VS 

Dress -insaiok 9k row +lft 

□revvtn t - 140 10 fft 9k 9 ft 

DrexSr _ 1413 6 «Vb 6 • lft 

OrevarG M 1.0 2421 2S*6 Z*k 25ft * ft 

DruoC _ 953 5ft 5 Mu • ft 

Drvuere _ oouiik loft 13 »lft 

DuaTOrT 935 12 '+ ITk 72 


Ok rid looxKOT Law Qv* Owe 




m 



CrBoMol 

cr toils 

CredSys 

CnlAcpi 

CreeRUi 

CresAir 

CresArwt 

Q-stFfl 

Crrltcre 

CropG 

aoPGpt 

CropGrw 

CroiCOm 

Crtnsman 

CrwnAn 

CwuBV. 

CrwrRs 

Cryenco 

CryoUto 

Crvomed 

CuBnFr 

Culps 

CumbFd 

CuoWBh 

CurTch 

CustOi 

CybrOpI 

Cvfagranic 

CygneD 

Cygnus 

CynrCp 

Cyrk 

CyKN 

CvrRdun 

CvtaCTB 

C ytogn 

Cytafhr 

CVtR* 


2.1 1551 lft 7k 7ft -ft 
1J *284 16ft IS 15 
-10047 20k Mk 19ft I 3ft 
... .1X1332 Mft 22V. Mk \ lft 

XI e 1 558 10ft 9ft 10ft >ft 

-38647 2ft, Ik lk -ft, 
.. 102* Bft 3k 3k —Ik 
-41454 20 16 II —lft 

- 17514 23V. 17ft 22*6* I Sk 

_ 1239 33k » 29k— Ik 

- 208 *k Bft Bk 

_ 83D 2*6 2k 2*6 — k 
_ 318 lft ft I .ft 

— Z22 22ft 32k 27V* • ft, 

- 697 3ft lk lft — ft, 
_ 1501 Ik Oft I -37u 

.959762 132 3ft 3W 3ft lft 
_ 2775 1 0k Sft 10ft -Zk 

_ 4098 10ft Bk ia Ilk, 

... TO 7ft 7 7ft 

- 161 Oft Sft Ik —ft 

_ 394 17ft ISk 16k -ft 
_ 51 5 5 4Y. 4k — k 

- 307 4 2k 4 ,Tk 

- 912 «k Sft 7ft ilk 


DuraPtl '• - 15811 ' IOVj TTT-j 

□uraalt — 2088 <Zk 41 41 V, + Vh 

Durfui _ Mil 17ft 10 10k ■ ft 

Dunrans .42 u 1599 18k 17 lift 9 1 

OnryatGP — 2757 5 4k s. »k 

DvnRsb 40IIIU 49 4 3ft 4 _ 

DvtdC - 59511k 20k 21ft *ft 


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FCrtttiVin 
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Farmer 2X0 IX 
FormMcti — 

Fair — 

Far ref Me J 
FaSKm — 

X4 -I 3110 


FdScrw 


Oft -6k - ft 
i 6ft * V„ 
835 5 4ft 4k , ft 

* 31 ’A 27 21 —3k 

Oh 5*6 Oft — k 
158 lft ft 1 -ft 
SOI 10ft 10 10 —V, 

JWZTk 31ft 21ft— I 
274 10ft 9k 9k — k 
778 ft. *6 'k »V« 
5131 125 1X1 -4 

48318 16k 17 — k 

92 5k 5 Sft « 1 
8 5ft Sft 5ft ik 

7 " irk, 7r“ 


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Rbmrs 

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Fkfflcpto 

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RdrtUY 

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_ 5880 3 p/,. 2ft 

IX 1457 38k 36k 38 
1J 12169 9. TV, “ 


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0k 5k o - 

10k B> 9ft —ft 

9k 7ft 9 i-lffu 

_ 9 7k 7k — k 

33 6k Sft Sft -ft 

0 32ft 31 31 —lft 

31 2416 Ok 23k 


- 191910ft 


Wft + I 


„ IX 8156ft 55k 55k —ft 
X3t 9X O 9H 9 *k +k 

- 3700 3 9 Ita* -ft, 

- 403016k 14k 16h +h 

_ 576 Aft Sft 4k -h 
_ 90 5k 4k 4k —ft 

_ 4947 26ft M 26 -lk 

- 5734 7ft Oh 4k —1 
-1431440ft 34k 40k ,5ft 

1117 29k 23k 23k— 5ft 


_ JOT 3ft 3 3ft - 
I Ilk F* llh* + lft 


— 7D33 
HM6 8V. 

_ 2194 4k 
J 9024ft 

- JS* itt 


J ib 7k —ft 


» zZ 


3002 3ft 2W 3 —ft 
! Sh _5*b 5ft —V» 


- 384 5h Sft . . _ . 

- 917 4ft 3>Yit Oft — ft 

_ 10478 4*4 3ft 4ft - 1 

- 1047 7k 5>x Oh *1 

- 3319 4k 3k 4 —ft 



CBgnexs 

Cognosg 


— 498 1 lft 8*, tl'M-T 1 ',, 
XOe 3 150 B8ft 84 87*. -lft 





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160 8 k 
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lift Uft . _ _ 

S S'A -VulBlekBus 
7+i rn —•<* | BikHwK 

JH 4ft ill 06NMA 
4538 39 k 19ft »•* -ft ! BfcHvrtB 

- 1062 7ft 7 7ft - ft I Bfimule i 

- 3&S0 10ft yj. 10ft - ft ; BUsLau 
... 9607 369) 29k 34h *1h I ESoeDu 
t.t ITff I9'A 10k 17 W -lft . BltaiD 

416 37k 36ft Mft —ft I Biyth 


- 1474 5 4*V . . 

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- 008(6 Mk 16 -’ft 

_ 646 Mh 13F.« 13k — 

.643U5 Mft lift Mft - lft , 

_ 330 3*. 7ft 3 - H . 

- 142015 II*. 14 

-111512ft lft 2-ft - 7„ 

_ 1830 9 7ft • -ft 

_ 1«0 Jft Jft Jft - ft 

- 664 9+ 0 • f ft - 1 ’-. ! enreuar 

- 234 lft ft 1 - ft 1 

- 1104 4 k 4ft 4ft — „ a-rtltxis 
_ 5591949k 40ft 47ft - *i' .. • CVM 

_ 550 4ft Jft 4 . ■ . : CoreGo 

- 683 1k lft lft . Can^rH; 

_ 894 Sft 4*. s - ; CareerSd 

- 24705 10ft 9W lOTft - ir. 1 Corefclta 

_ 1457 SYi 4ft I'., _ . Crcnw* 

_ 421 3',„ 2-v,. 2‘V* — ■■ ; CcriCm 

- 1 1122 7 4", Oft — CaroFs) 

S’.; - I CarrMIB 

5 -ftlCcrePir 
H — *. Carver 
3 i. — *» GKcCom 
Bft - ’•« i CasaJe 
3ft —ft * Casevs i 
- ft ■ Casn&a 


77 7k 
.. 753 5", 4ft 

_ m "to v* 
_ 15127 2ft 2ft 
IA 701 8'S 0k 
_ 267 2* , 3’. 

_ 1534 <u, 


CcnvRs — 80S 3»u 2'ft 7»i. — Vu 

CC8T 15a X 3*30 29 » -1 

CraASc _ 87 tan ft ft 

CroBrtc XB 11 187 22ft Ilk 52V. .1 

Cassnot 195 9X *1121 20k 20*i - 

_ 70 2‘. 2 2'. 

_ 110 14ft 13ft 14*. -ft 

XOelX 9 40!, 39*i 40ft .ft 

30 3.1 45 9V, 8 v i 9ft -ft 

33a IX 1571Bft 17k 13ft -ft 

36 1.9 3427 19+u 16k 19 -2ft 

40e tx . 31 29ft M’A 29 —ft 

.17 J 3658 38k 37k 38ft -ft 

_ 2M5 7". 6ft Vm -k 

_ 8043 3ft 3k Jk -ft 

_ BOfiir.Y 15ft 17ft 

- 3147 15*7 14 ISft ib 

- 1694 7V, 4’v 7 —ft 

- 1011 Bft 8'. Bft —ft 

91 e 33 184 Mh 27ft 27k —ft 

30b IA 207 1 5ft Mft 14ft— 1 

AO 19 x7 24k I«ft 34k - ft 

_ 7904 19V, I7h |9 -!h 

- 4)1 3k I'l M -ft 

- 13495 34' - Mft 3» 



CmcBNJ X5 
CmaHLJOTIJO 
OreSMO M 
Cmc8VA 
CmOr 
CmChB 


OmcSOR 

OrtCfiHY 

QtaCSsn 

CmcFdt 


_ 2143 9ft 8k 9k - ft 
Jig IX 5534 Mh 19V. 20k —ft 
_ 1749 l?k 17k 19)4 -Vb 

- 381 U V, TO*) lift — +* 
J2e IX 21 15k ISk 15V, 

834 8 7ft 7 Tb — 'Vg 

- 3SS 13ft 1? 13ft * h 
_ 1798 4*s 4ft JH -Jft 

JO I.l 2717 17*i 17 17ft • ft 
_ 162 2!Y lft 2 —ft 

TOO X 3423 71 18ft 20k «2h 
X0 19 275771ft 70ft 21 
_ 132 7ft 2k 3k 

X0 3.4 145 24 229; S3*. . ft 

IJ« 5.9 367 Ilk 30k 21V, -k 
XO 72 384 28ft 20* • 37ft —l ft 
_ 200 10k 10 10k _ 

_ 405 44ft 44*’, 44 *1 

IX 6IR24 27ft 25 -I 

- 444 5 4ft 4ft — k 

J 12057 17*6 Mft 97k -M’ n 
X 3597517k Mft 17k - lft 
_ Ml Mft 13 13ft — k 
_ 3824 7k 7k 7>’. - h 

_ 487 2ft. 2V(» JV. — k 

- 541727*6 19k 71k -1 
_ 1248 3k Ik Jk - 1 

12 I960 21 10k Mk - lft 

5.7 103 27 Mft 26'. i -ft 

2.1 3192 32ft MV, 33V. - |V. 
40b 1.7 2643 38 36k 30k —ft 

JO 18 718 19ft 18*1 i8V| —ft 

.70 3X 503 19k 17k 18ft —*li 

_ 431 17*. Ifr+i 97 — k 

J8b 1.9 33 M IW 95k - ft 

JO 33 IB 9ft 9 9’j - V» 

_ 3412 I4M UVi UV] -21b 
I»4 ZTft 25V) 24ft 


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DSBnc 
DSC S 
DSGOT 
DSP GP 
DSP 
DT tads 
DUSA 
DonCPS 

DotvS 

DairyA 

Doko 

Drtujtnh 

Dawren 

Oulu* 

Donbas 

Danskln 

DartGp 

WBdcst 

DlalO 

DTOMea 

DTaRsh 

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Dates rs) 

DTaTm 

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doth* 

Dojvgv 

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Dorics 

DtasBi 

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Dtawicn 

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X0 14 9OT25V. 23k 341'. -3H t OnQrtNC OX 


,98a 1 3 179 IS 14*» T5 - ft I Datum 


JH 


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- 236512k 9k llk-2 • CasnC wf 


.. 1314 Ilk 11*6 Uh-lM iCosAmv 


_ . . Ih 'V6 ltu 

_ 1305 IV, I Ih 

J 327 Oh 5k *V| 

_ II 6 5 5 


. CosinoOS 
-h • C3VJY3BC 
- » Cosnftx 
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- 404 11b lft. Ik -ICalrtStrm 
1.040 16 630 30ft 29 39ft — k ! Catotrt 


7 3783 12 10k II —1 

- «B Bk 6ft Ik —1 

- 1 'ri — k | Comaa-i 

- 271112’. 9,. iiiM-i-n.l comacwr xo 

_ 4026 77>', 23ft 24V1 -klCBNYpI 33 6J3 
-13832 7V. 5k ift -h OWVGS TJ0 IB 
4200 7ft Ih n„ —Vb CBkPo JO 14 


L* 19013k 13k 13k -hlDauphn 
- lC»lV a k :>* — »« Douco 


.92 16 


— 2870 Mk 12 14k » 21-, 


12 


130 Mk 25k 25ft —ft 
SI Mft 75*4 25ft — h 
- 857 14k lift 14 -ft 
3098 34 ft 3Jh Mft ' h 
1.4 MM 8k 8k 8h —ft 


Xlc A 410 7k Ih 2ft 


BootBns 1J& 
BOTEvn 29 
BOCaRr 
BOOyOr 
Boflinger 
BonTon 


68 Jft Jft 4*4 - l BoahMIll 


88e 3 7 
54 2 5 


60 3.0 


1.40 7 5 
1 06 II 5 
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75 8.8 
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■ ft , AiriaSIf 

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1 Autaknu 
AufOInd 
' AuTCKO! 5 
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BootgB 

BOOmTwn 

Bard 

Borind 

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BosfAc 

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.. lHUlfft 18 19ft ‘lft 
.. 3073 ISk 12ft 15ft rift 

- 1673 17ft 16’ 6 14'ft, — ’/■ 

— .. 2640 6k 5 h 6ft - ft 

■371 49 217 7ft 7V« 7ft -Vi 

„ - 518 II 10 10 ft —ft 

M IB 33417*4 W.-t 17ft 

- MS 2k 2 3 — ft _ 

~ 2819 4ft 4 Jft » ft | BdSlTc 

.. 2315 3k 3k 3ft — h BcMEnA 

_ 4054 17ft II 12V. ' ft BOXEAB 

-32 U 6421 30k I6ft 27 — lft BOVUBnK 

- .HP ,D '' a 8 *k • IH flrodPtim 

- 35705 27ft 72ft 27k -4k i BnOTwtA 
.. 4974 2?’-i 17ft Iff -ft BrdPwia 

- 16517ft 6ft 7Va -IgrtPwtD 

- „ « l4h 13ft 14k —ft | BrttfyW 
•■ l«U 17k ISft lift— lft ! Brantro 

- 3S40J B'V« 7 7h —IV,. I BrnfdSu 

— TOTS Sft Jft 4h —V. | Brauns 

- 1245 Jft 3 3 ... I Brtteig 

.. ,-S ,3t IS ' A ,J,,, 14 - 1 : »*•«> 

Z4 IM »0 9ft Bft 8V, -ft:*Wrend1 
X8 eSKBBSbft 49ft 58’., .3 ] BrsrtB 5 

- 4 iJ5 'O’* 8, *> 'Oft • ft ; BrtfcF 

- ,?ZS Sft 0ft ■ I ■ BrttgV 
~ .If” W »ft ■ ft : HrH&o 

108” « ■* 14ft 17k ■ 2k . BrpedN 

- 54 * Mh 15*. — *. . BrdbdTc 

.. ¥. Z_*ft 31 ■ 3k . BdCStlrt 

. ^ ZJ* 6ft —ft 1 BrCParl 

A 297 5k 4ft Sk . k ; BdwySey 

Brock 


_ 1581 5 4 4’i — CataBa* 

A I 17080 31k 32k 33ft— I I Cam5tT 
IX *3057 20ft 19k 20 —ft , CnfoCp 
1898 5k 4*. 4k — k I Col So 
_ 6*8 !*V’i, 2ft r*a -Vs ; Cetadon 
_ 1573 10’, ?v, 10*. - k ! CeMDInc 
... 607 9*i 8ft 9ft ■ h Ccfestidl 
0862 38 22 I*h -4k ! CdCXO 

_ 67827k 2i’.i 27k > k CetBena 
_ 6179 ISk Hft ISft _. CeDGam 
i.Ofe 14 3571k 20ft 20k -lft . CeiiPre 

_ 35715 14ft Uft Mft - Iv, 1 CcJ ta* 

_ IBM 6k 5ft A - k Crtiger 
xa 3X SIT 15ft lift 15ft - : CctCmA 
30 2.1 115136ft 33ft 36ft -3 1 

- 17395 4! JOWaJff —2 1 CetVTcS 

_ 2709712ft 9k 12 -Jft ; cclirt 

S U II 12 - 3k I center) 

- 2408 9k 8*. 8*1 —ft ! Ceretecp 

_ S77 ISft lift 17V, - - ~ 

.. 0884 3>V„ 2ft TVu 

- MJ3 3 — — 


X0 


CrrtvBn 


QrilyFSR. 

CDmFIB* AM 

CWlFBptIJS 

CumHlfH 

Cam+OSv 


2k lk r-i -ft 

_ 1140 6 4V, 5k — k 

5X 14513ft llh 12 -V, 

JOSD 10", Bk 10>i - Ih 

.16 14 13795 low 9 IQVu _ 

- 3 95 ? ft ft *'•„ — Vulcomnet 
... 836 171- is*, I5W— iv, I canwBne 

- 99 4ft 4 4k . ft QnoreL 
„ 1963 16ft 14 M <3 Orman 

- sd 15 nv, Mk -h cbmoutto 

- 1813 0k 7ft r, — h onsots 
^ 1179 Bk 7ft *’., —ft | cmplHs 

_ J57B24W 21k »*, iJklCmoMn 
^ 2381 7k Uft Jk ‘ ft | CrrpLR 

- 631I13M lift Uft -lh CpINwk 

_ 5667 Mft 50k 54 - Jk J CptOutS 

“11031 35 39k - *k | CmpPf 


31 


t * 


■W'CWIBc 
■ k ■ CentCot 


Jk Corrwuvw 
ft I Corrabr 


- 2702 13k 10k 13 

_. 1837 4k 5h ik _ 

JO IX 96120 18ft 19k • Ik f CfriORS 
36 1.4 54Mk 25*, I6V, - ft ! CorilKtl 
1X7I14JI 71 Ilk Ilk Uk . k I COTtWS 
_ 1871 14ft Mk 16 • J CaJCom 


— \2to V, "J. *Vn ■ — V c 
_ 1978 llh 17ft 1J*» - ft 
3J 201 17k M 17 »1 

22 17*4 lift lift _ 

Mi 31 ft 30'A 31ft* IV, 
3133ft 33V, 3Sk - lft 
10*15=.. 14k Iffk >ft 
7 llh low Mk *t » 
ai 1227 Mft 13V. Mk — k 
6.4 60 7T-i 24k 27k 1 Vi 

_ 231 3*.» J’. 3’i - ft 

_ SB33 2J«> 20'., 22 - V. 

_ toll*'. 10 TO 
.92 3X T 102 75*1 345', 24*..- -i« 
_ 9570I7 10ft llh -k 
_ 1045 4k 3k 3k • k 

_ 3 8k a ft Bk • k 

.10 X 571 U lift 12k * ft 

280 HW 9k WV, • ft 
_ 616 »tar lh IH 

40 4.9 *4!J 8ft 7ft 6ft • ft 

_ 5097 7U *W 6ft -ft 

... 38* Sh 4k 5*. -«b 

_ BOffS ?h r** I’.I 


Dcvel 

DovtfcnA 
Davo* 
DOW Tet) 
Dawson 

DavRun 

DcVrv 

DeWotta 

DebSbo 

DecKOut 

DeopTgtn 

Deerbka 

Dotrunc 

DencShd 

Dgk»E 

DWbGo 

DotoOta 

□etchn 

DetCotr 

DdtpFin 

Detakrt 

Detrino 


- 70200 £\ v i 37ft to 



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1401 l'k> 

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528 

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257 V„ 


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12k 



86 Ih 

lh 

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.44 

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19ft 

19V. 

.70 

2.4 

101 9*4 

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402 11*6 

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lft 1 Center wi 

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._ | CenGcron 


X 1614ft 13’.', 13W ! ConcEFS 

^ 8556 Mft 14ft 15 'Vij - 'Vi. I ConcHM 
_ 1076S IS 12*1 rj 1 7w concern 
_ 30888 M nftl3'v u -HV, I COrtdor 
- mot bk 4ft tv. • iw 1 cnncuau 
3380 19 13V. 18V, -4ft . Cgnnba 

‘ ■" IW CortfTC 


. mw IT Id-1 IO-. 

117 3J 11569 Hft 31 h 34 


.. : CJerBc 
_ CJcrFni 
- CteWw 
... 1 CPaFm 
k ■ CBsLte 


X9 1.9 
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BCBPm 
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| BrtOTCS 
! Bract 
BhtmSc 


3X 784531ft 30k 30'-, —ft ! BraoK^tn 
I6I7W Uk 1 1 U — ft BrKtre* 
.. 1531 9k TV, 81-, . u, Broktrt 


0570 20*4 17k 18'/, _ . CtStaJ 

584 4". Jft 4 h' CmvBc 

- 7017 I3h 12 Uft • I | CtrvSO 

„ 1744 14k 1I^„ 13k— lft I Ccatiln 
1.7 x46> 9ft 7ft fft • lft ; Ceram 

.. 4233 10V, 7ft 10 ■ 1 ft ! Corses 

_ 10364 54 45ft S7W • 6ft 1 Comer 

_ 3788 36k 35 31 —ft 1 Ceroto 

*39'3ft Hft 12 — klCereocer 

... 959 7k 6*, 6’1 — ••• CtKJiNaTO 

_ 3137 1 1 9ft 10*: • 1 , 1 Cholcrc 


301 Bk 7k 8ft -Vi Qxtnwd 

10077 76 36k —ft CartaWI 

4S031h 31k 31'ft -., u CanMO 

10823 22 23 -V, ConsSvi 

612 18ft 1644 17k ■ 1 QXKiirn 
7 22 Vj 23Vi 22V, - ft COO6OP0 

445 Bft 7ft 8 - ft cSriEc* 

41611k 10k 10k -W ConPd 

41 7 6W 6W —V, ConStefi 

920 8ft 7ft lk ■ ft ComFn 

._ 7512k lift 12k ■ k ConWffl 

DOT 12)4 fft lift . 7ft ! Qjn«a 

_ 73 7h 2ft 2k _ | CttCCnr* 

2 2h 3ft 2ft _ OtCCwt 

4001 19 35ft BU ■ 2ft CfUWO 
. - 14113ft lift 13 -h CtriDt 

X3e IX 77D7i 21k 23 Vi * lft Cmfiot 

_ 194 4 3h 3k ■ ft ; Conwv o 

- IX 6k 5*, 6 —ft . COOprO 


1J 

M 


. .DoBPine 
•A, DcttMG 

. -k 1 DgntaWy 

_ ... Id 9 9’A —ft DreGTV 

_ 2614 4V,, 3ft 3". 77 — life I Dsbntm 

_ 2D79 5 31, «ft | DffMHis 

_ 6AS7I1 9 9k -ft _ ' 

2320 Sft. 7*, 3 

_ 937 26”, 35ft 26h »g 
1008 7 6 6ft — 14 

B47 71ft 2 7k — V» 

- 456 3ft J", 7*5 — ft 

... 1271 AV, 3ft Aft — *>H 

J8g 2,1 908 14 Oft M • ft 

_ ID? 4h 4ft 4W 
„ 227017 14k W Vs 
IX* 6X 139 Hk 23 W 34 
^ 1506 +> 3ft 4 
.17 IX 70 13h 12 »3 

_ Mil Sk 4V. S 

_ 1326 13 13*, 13 

_ 2487 19 16*, 19 

JJf M 285 10k 10 10ft 

351 *Vi 5*. *ft —ft DaMie 

14 7 3 3 DlgPra 

233 17k ISk 16ft ■ ft DigtSd 

57219ft 18 18k .. 1 DWISv 

1186 6** s*« 6 , r : PtaftF n 

72 Ih 1 1 — V* 1 (Xante 

_ 39 Mk 14 14 ._ OrteZrw* 

„ 1952 7ft 6ft Wu — V„ DjweYr 

“ Siltau 'ft 'ft — h DfrGnl* 

_ 60 1 T+i, 17 t7V a — ; Dtrrmo 
_ 711 Jk 2ft Jk • ft . Donegal 


DtfFeor 
DcfSVi 

Octree 
Dpvcon 
DcVftrt 
Devon 
ttoffge 

□tametre 
DiOnon 
OaUUf 
. Dtarort 
) DOarV 
r l', • DwOnll 
- I DJgjta 
»3ft W 
ft I OgRLHc 


•lAo 

• ft 
•ft 


.« U 
1.16 7X 


40 4J 


.24 


_ 1395 9ft 9ft fft 

84 4 3k 346 _ 

_ 280 TOW 9 TOW *lft 

_ 651 4ft Sft 4 -ft 

S53 3ft 2h -Yu 

- 164 3*4 7k 3ft -V, 

- 238 3 W Ik JV« . ft 

2748 IS”, aft Mk ♦ ft 

_ 554 21 20 20V. —ft 

_ 3481 fft 8ft Sh —ft 
-U286 3h 2W 3ft —ft 
125 Hi 44320k 17k 20 
_ - 749 4h 3h Aft fft 

X4t AX 92513 10k 12ft +1W 

- 627 29*4 27ft 28 — IW 
-93488 SSft 22 24ft - lft 

350 .9 H8028 22 W 28 *5 

-23261 20 13k 20 -4V, 

- 341 344 Jft 3ft *ft 

X3g .1 700 17 14 17 -k 

- 73H 4ft 3W 3k * ta M 

_ 197 14h 13k M —V, 

_ 1 17ft 17ft 17ft —ft 

- 72 4*4 3ft Jh —ft 

- 59* 4 Ik 3 — lk 

- 4163 ISft 13k I4h -ft 

- 419 4ft, 3*1, 3k * ft 

- 589 8k 7k 7k —1 
_ 1910 7ft 7ft 9 fft 
_ 31733 20ft lHh 19k —ft 

- 3B7 3*i 2ft Ztau —Vu 

3 15 76 71*6 74 -2ft 

- 2257 5V, 4ft Ml — 

- 1457 3ft 3ft m +*k 

- 388 4ft 4k 5k • k 

- 40* 10 9 

- 461 lft 2ft 2k -ft 
_ 4717 1* M H) —lft 

- 11713k 12k 13 — h 

- ID 31*5 20ft 20V. -ft 

- 82 7W 7ft 7ft fft 

- 329 3 2ft 2ft — h 

- 131 8 71+ 7k —ft 

- 1785 15k 14 ISft 

- 2** 

- 922 9*« 8 
_ T0T2 1»* lft, 

- 2462 ft ’A 

- 1593 4W 3ft 
42 We aft BV, —AM 

- 2423 6ft 5W Sft -ft 

604 28 25*. 25V, 

229 17ft 17ft 17ft —n 
8*3 T? * 1W6 ‘lft 

458 IB MV, 17k • 2ft 

. a» 1 » 

- 4336 T 5V. & -ft 
-.475 ton 9k ID'., *y» 

10334 21 W 1BW JOW-Th 
.. 198527k 25ft 27 +1*6 

„ - B5S Jft 3k 3k — k 

30 Z9 358 7ft 6*6 6ft fft 
_ W7216 12*4 15h - lft 

- 21212 10 10W —ft 

40a IJ 136 36ft 34 JA —l 

... Mto 7ft 6h Ah — Vm 

._ 7132 10ft 7k 10ft -ft 

- -ft i2 '5 'a I5h — w 

xo 2X HO Bft 30’,i 37ft +1%. 

loo ix a lCk 10 low +h 
X4 1.9 11434 QV. 23ft -ft 
.-103073 36ft 98V, 34ft t5h 

.. 2964 20 16k ID -3ft 

- *2 3 Ih-lYb 

_ 9774 14 12 lift - 

.16 .9 678 19 ITk 17k - 

1.12 6J 1819k 12ft 17ft— TA 

- 10535'u 33W 35ft f h 
34 643 Mft 32ft 32ft— lft 

- *44 Jft 4ft 4k -ft 
-70068 9ft 7ft 9h fh 

- 3)4 7ft, lh |TU„ -ft 

- us BW 7k ah tv. 

- 107 13 T2h 13 f ft 

_» 8k 7k 7k 
-• £**> Ih 9h 

- 1385 22 19k 21 w - 1*6 

- 3«b Jbk— 3h 

_ 2*31 IS 1 * 10ft lift -4 

.. 333 8 7 746 f ft 

- Sh 4'A 5k — k 

„ — 1815 3ft P/„ 5h _ 

80 “ ”■'* “ v « 14ft t ft 

~ >233 fft Bft 9 +ft 
' 13W -ft 

- SSK'i «*ft *2k 

- JSk 8'n . 7h b fh 

--.gW'lk 8V, im-3ft 
-IWBiek 12k IBk -5*» 

- 1291 h Vu ft. — K, 

- »W5 1> 1 4 1« -ft 

-. 2tol 4h 2ft 4 .ft 

- SSl'Vs lift lift •» 

- nawftaftM 

78 2 J 1S8J 9ft 8k 8ft —V, 

■? »0953 24k 2QI, 33h «Jh 
*U l»*i 16V, 17ft •*■ 
105 IS'.. Mft MW —ft 


_ 830 2k 2ft 2ft. — ) 

X8 BX 3*14 lift 10V, 10ft— 1 

- 2614 4k 3ft 3k — h 

- 1 ten 2ft ift 2ft, +«g 
_ a sk jft * ft — ft 

• - 871 Uk 13ft T3ft — *6 

- 155 7 6ft 7 +V6 

- 2561 8 5k 6ft —2 
-. 150 5ft 3*6 Sh tl' 

- 125611ft 9ft 11 -1' 

- WB 4 5ft 5ft — 

_ 4885 7 6k 6k _ 

- 61815ft 13k M —lft 


FHBSjrt 

FincSBcp 

gg?0 


XOalZ- 8518ft 17ft 18 • Ik 

c.- 4823 23ft H+m 73ft • I 

— 477 Sft 4k Sft _ 

— 1134 5k 4k 5k _ 

_ 1982 Mft 1 1k 12 • ft 

11218 14ft 18 -ft 
87 Mh 11 llh -ft 
_ 329 15 14ft MH — h 

- 4503 27*6 27 77ft 1 ft 
1X4 24 *321 53 SOW 51 —lft 

_ 5)8! Sft 3k Sft *1 

- 4110 10k 9ft fft— ]ft 

_ 212 10ft fft 10ft f 1 

_ 9133 71 W 17ft 71 42ft 
_ 7518 11ft 9ft 10ft fft 

825* lift lOft 'Oft 




1-16 2X 


d MJi il - 'U— l,il — 

131 n W 16 —ft 

-26 3.1 88 |2ft MW 12V, _ 

32) 18W 17k 1BW ♦ ft 
64 42W 41 42 — W 

326 5ft 4ft 5 —ft 

_ 839 ft 1/14 V, *'#„ 

- 703 9h 8h 9ft f 'A 

_ 7658 8*6 7 W 8ft —ft 
X 465 34ft 34 Hft - 


36 


300 ZD 168 7ft 6k 6k — h 


RnSrtort 

RnsivS 
n reOTrs 

PriAIOrt _ 851 25 21 ft 24k f I 

«Ajn X4 16*3755 33k 32VS 32V w ->' _ 

RBNC A4 3A 239 22 18 19 —3 

544 p Vi 23k Hk -k 
*16 26 ft 25k 25k —ft 
4311k 11 lift — W 
242 Jft 3ft 4 —ft 
587 6ft 4ft Sk +‘A 
87 ® 19 20 +w 

1OT42W 41 41ft - Vr 
D516ft 14k 16 -1 


1X0 4X 
Fsftocs pf 125 L7 

JB * - 
FTOrtav. _ 

foaP 

397 33 


- -- 7Vu 2ft 2ft. —Vi. 
IX 6OT38k 22*6 22h— lh 
XO 3X 2D16W 15W 1S"ft +*ft 


— — . — ' 15>lft +*ft 

- \m a iv* 2 


- 7h 6 9 _ 

- OT 15k Mft MW —ft 
'3ft 10ft )3h +3 

.10 7X 1) 3k Jft 3h — 

■ „ -324139 35W37ft+lh 

xie u m sow 46k 46k— a 
_ 552 Bft Bft 8k Fft 

-4553* 1BV. Mft 18 +3*4 

_ 10W 8k |ft 8h —ft 

- 215 Bk « 7 — k 

.12 XI »4h 3k Jft —1 ft 

-12032 24ft 21 - 23k +2 

- .665 9ft 7W Bk 


.MO 3 125515k 74k ISk 
?ft fft. 


_ D8 13ft >L .. 

- dMgMh 9 14 +4W 

~ 988 4ft 4ft 4ft —ft 

ElffiEIa:!; 

- 7506 4ft, 3tau 3ta» — Wu 

- 17 19ft -2ft 

- 6JB 5ft 3ft 5 tin 

- 217 9k 8ft 8V» — k 
ITk 76k 17 —ft 


1X6 64 89 

3 *j sh s*. - 


12 


12ft 12ft 12k Z 
— JO 3ft 3k 3k _ 

-1. .73 toSit&tti 

■ : SvV-i 

_ 71B 2k lft 2k 

- 551 8 7b I -ft 

- 618 2 )Vu lta» -ft, 
-40*9 7 irf lft — vi 

- ,7^ 3W 2k Jft + W 

- 1556 3ft 3W 3ft Vi 

_ 1158 14W 13W M +k 

■ -anftavh mw +xvt 

- !23iL 7h 7h +w 

: && U 

J6e22 106017V) 11k lift — W 

- 73a -ft 3h 3ft — 
_ 5991 +H JW 4V. +k 

XO* 1.1 43558 55W OTh 56k «ft 
I - 157 7Vi 6k 6*4 
3D IX OTTO Hft 19k +1 , 

» - W« IH M I 
1.B 5.9 56 25*4 24*4 25k + 1 

- 5366 7h 5W 7h -2ft 
374113% lift 12ft +ft 

- 118 Mb 3 3 -Jft 

410 » I — IA, 

. - M9218 16W 1«b flh 

EvgrMgd - 661 17 ISft Mft 1 

Evgrlftpt 3X0 7X TS043 43 43 -a* 

ElflimRS - A, Jh 7 . -w 

E»B r . . — JM3» Wi 3ft -ft 

E*C0tb - 1035 8'* 7k 7k fft 

BStOT - 6864 5W 4k 5H +h 

EwTTwf - 887 HO 1 lk + V, 

exdTcpf 350 5J JK 6k Sk «h -ft 

EMCT1 ZX2I3ZX M6I8W 6ft 7ft —lft 

BCTbra - £» 2tau Jk, 4»„ 

- *38123 21V? 23 +1 

3 2579 21k 19 21 ft + 2ft 

- 46*7 JH Sft 7ft -1 

- 57529k 28k tok. fft 

_ 79 8W 7 7W _ 

- 242 4ft 3W Bft fft 
-.SHIS 13ft 13ft— lft 



_X0 2X 2822 23W 22k 23 +ft 


w» 1.73. 5 X 17637k 31k 32ft + ft 
' Mk f *v„ 


,X8bX6 8818k 17ft 

_ 1J70 4X 597727ft 25ft Z7W - *5 
__ _ PtlXl SX 29731 32V. 32ft _ 

POngOT — , 5 *4 2h 2ft 2h _ 

FOn CCP* 32 2X 1507 25k 23ft 25V, -lh 
■24 3J IDA 10k »V, 10k -ft 

-52b 2-B *921 lBh 16W 10ft - TW 

-80 24 3 33 33 33 -V, 

-56 2X .3901 25 23k 24k -lb 

68617ft 16k 17k -W 
233 15k 15 15W —ft 

MO 29k 28 W 20W ♦ W 
6127ft 25ft 27 -ft 
* 3J *1 

3-5*301 15 12k ^ tj 

OTfWBj* X4 IX J7 35ft 33*1 34k l ft 
FFOWMl X0 IX 917 25k 24k 2SW f ] 



US -48 1.1x1219 15W Mft 15W +1W 
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The Inte rnational Market 

— 1 ' -W-W -Ait- 



A Tough Question: 
Buck Stops Where? 


Another Health Care Gap 

Insurance Debate Switches to Big Firms 

Vafwfitc nVimsd 


By Cari Gewirte 


P aris Ii toot' almost 20 years to amass the first $1 

iriHkra of outstanding international bonds and only seven 

The daSfrontSaSd SSttest qaartedy bJSTlS 

with 14 percent and the Deut- , T . 

'sche mark with 10 percent use With constraints, tnlS 

-Japanese are the latest honow^ ,, , v 

- ers, accounting for 16 percent of soUTCe COmCl iaae. 

the outstanding volume. The ■ 

- British are second with 9 percent 

j .i an<t Americans : 


British are second wnn v percnu • • . 

and thePrench and Amwc m are nrfffh ^ 

In global terms, the international market .remains 

Sss3SSSsa=aa« 

«^ttinp the pace for the rapid expansion of the mteraaUonal 

can issuer this source of market.growth could fad?- 
Official borrowers in .CmUmte 1^ 
billioo of debt outstanding-- 24p««at * 
government and stale agencies. Swcden is a mstani se«m » 


of note programs. ■■ . « ««. Rneton in London 


SgSSsiSSpSS 


By Carl Gewirtz 

lntanotwnal Herald Tribune 
PARIS — These are tough 
days for the dollar and analysts 
warn that there is worse to 
come. . , 

Hopes For an early revival 
were dashed last week when the 
dollar faded to respond as ex- 
pected after the Federal Re- 
serve Board increased its key 
short-term rates by half a per- 
centage point. 

The short-lived recovery to 
1.5670 Deutsche marks and 
100.90 yen ran into a brick wall 
composed of continued worries 
about DA inflation, the up- 
ward revision of German 
growth forecasts, fading hopes 
of further declines in European 
interest rales and renewed fears 
that Washington and Tokyo are 
headed for a collision over bi- 
lateral trade talks. 

Union Bank of Switzerland, 
which consistently is on the out- 
look for a recovery in the dollar, 
said over the weekend that it 
needs to recover above 1.5670 
DM “to forestall further specu- 
lation.” But the dollar ended 
trading at 1 .5397 DM and 98.68 
yen. 

The oily conflict among cur- 
rency analysts now is how modi 
further it could f alL 

John Lipsky at Salomon 
Brothers in New York doubts 
the dollar will revisit earlier his- 
toric lows. “It’s not likely to 
drop below 130 DM on a sus- 
tained baas anytime soon, be 
says, while predicting a recov- 
ery toward 108 yen “in the com- 
ing quarters.” . 

At J J. Morgan, the emphasis 
is on the word sustained. Lon- 


je looks to tine international eqmties mjrk« “ “J 

-s^feessaassssss^ 

ti>* frvrmer Soviet Union. Mr. Wilmoi 


IS UU U1E WUIU w in.. . — ' — 

don-based analyst Avmash Per- 


vnal yL 

sand SMS a risk the dollar will 




bdUU JVW M- — 

faD to 1.48 DM, but concurs 
that it is unlikely to remain be- 


low the 130 level on a sustained 
basis. He sees the dollar falling 
to 95 yen before turning back 

up. . , 

The Morgan view is that the 
dollar wffl be at its weakest 
since the Fed is in the process of 
raising rales. During that time, 
international investors have no 
incentive to buy U A bonds be- 
cause there is virtually no 
chance prices can rally. And 
with short-term rates out to 
three months identical with 
German levels, there is no m- 
centive to move into dollar de- 
posits. 

Only when the U A tighten- 
ing is completed, Mr. Persaud 
argues , ran the dollar ready be- 
gin to recover. 

Tim shocking part of this as- 
sessment is that Morgan now 
forecasts that the peak in the 
overnight cost of money, which 
last week was raised to 4.75 per- 
cent, wffl not be reached until it 
touches 7 percent, probably by 
the middle of next year. 

That represents a one per- 
centage point increase by Mor- 
gan since it previously forecast 
the rate would top out at 6 per- 
cent The bank’s economists 
predict that by the end of the 
year, the overnight rate will 
stand at 53 percent 
“Hard-to-deny signs that cy- 
clical price pressures are build- 
ing suggest that growth will 
need to fan below its long-run 
pace to effectively cap infla- 
tion," the bank reports, adding 
that subpar growth is unKkdy 
lobe seen before the third quar- 
ter of 1995. To achieve such a 
slowdown, past experience 
shows that the cost of overnight 
money needs to be at least 3 
percentage points above infla- 


By Louis UchiteUe 

New York Tima Serna 

NEW YORK — Over and 
over, giant corporations that 
employ low-wage workers offer 
the reason for withhold- 
ing company-paid health insur- 
ance: Millions of qualified ap- 
plicants are willing to take the 
jobs without it. 

While much of the debate 
over uninsured wrakers has fo- 


UVGJL Mill .. — - m 

cused on small companies. 


See DOLLAR, Page U 



THE TR1B INDEX 


4 26 

frrtemationaf Herald 7ribun» 
WorWStocfc Index, composed 124 

of 2lXi internationally fndestapto 123 
stocks from 25 cosines, 

cornpUedby Bloomberg 120 

Business News. 119 


World Index 



Shanghai Notebook 


Shills Gear 


In the old days, marketing at Shanghai Phoenix Bicycle Co. 

Mr 1 is not large. but we must expend .t 

^SEs&SsgaaaSi: 

$g£ 4 Ms 

i. Hg 

rhe s^^hai Phoenix logo. 

count 

Wi 


more than 43 million of the 22 
million working Americans 
without any health insurance 
are employed at big corpora- 
tions Bte Bank of America, 
Wal-Mart, Pepsico, J.G Penney 
and General Mills. These cor- 
porations are lobbying a gains t 
any bill that would require 
them to insure all workers- 
“If there were a tighter labor 
market with fewer people look- 
ing for work, we might have to 
offer health insurance, said 
Norman Snell, a senior wee 
president at Bank erf America, 
with headquarters in Los Ange- 
les. “But no one has run mto 
that problem in California, 
which has so many college stu- 
dents who are potential part- 

time employees." 

Rank of America has 95,000 
employees, of which 20,000 are 
not offered insurance. Most are 
tdlers and clerks who work few- 
er than 20 hours a week and 
earn under S8 an hour, two 
co mm on char acteristics of the 
uninsured at big companies. 
Many work for a few weeks or 
months and then quit, another 
common characteristic. 

Mr. Snell argues that insuring 
these workers would add sub- 
stantially to the bank s costs 
and that profits would suffer, 
hurting shareholders. This ar- 
gument often masks the more 
important issue of wages. 

Studies show that most com- 
panies offering health msnr- 
a nc* finance as much as 85 per- 
cent of the company s 
contribution by limiting wages. 
Many unins ured workers at big 
companies earn less than 57 an 
hour and often only the mini- 
mum wage of $4-25. 

As a result, the companies 
would have difficulty financing 
insurance for these workers by 
cutting wages. They would have 
to raise prices or take the mon- 
ey out of profits, says James u. 
Waters, a benefits specialist at 
Towers, Perrin, a management 
consulting firm. 

“I don’t see that paying for 
health insurance will make a 


profitable company unprofit- 
able," Mr. Waters said. “But it 
is so antithetical to the Amen- 
can ethic, to penalize profit" 

Most Americans who earn 
less than S7 an hour do not have 
health insurance. Labor De- 
partment surveys show. 

“We are perpetuating the no- 
tion that the employer is giving 
something to the employee, 
when in fact there is a tradeoff 
between wages and benefits, 
said RobertD. Retschauer, di- 
rector of the Congressional 
Budget Office. “When you gel 
down to the minimum wage or 
near it, then the tradeoff basic 
come in the form of^ higher 

prices or out of profits. 

As a solution, companies like 
Pizza Hut Inc, the fast-food 
division of Pepsico, and Day- 
ton-Hudson Crap., winch ovms. 
Marshall Field and other de- 
partment stores, endorse U A 
subsidies to pay for health m- 


high cost of benefits abroad had 

forced prices up. 

In the United States, while 
Wank Of America in California 
argues that it can recruit quali- 
fied parttimers without offering 
health insurance. Chase Man- 
hattan Bank in New York says 
that it cannot. 

Chase classifies only 1 ,500 or 

. nnn a mnnlnv£££- 


Israel 
Stocks 
Plunge on 
Tax Rule 


its 20.000 


as 


T don’t see that 
paying for health 
insurance will 
make a profitable 
company 
unprofitable.’ 

James G. Waters, 
ben efits specialist 


surance fra low-income work- 

^Without subsidies, health in- 
surance largely paid by the 
companies for all employees 
would be disastrous for profits, 
says Robert Doughty, a spokes- 
man for Pizza Hut Inc. 

Pizza Hut now pays $23 mil- 
lion yearly for health insurance 
for its 1 1 ,000 full-time workers. 
Hie remaining 120,000. bang 
parttimers working 20 hours a 
Week or less for minimum wage 
or just above it, are ineligible 
for any company-paid health 
insurance until they have been 
on the job six months. Few re- 
main that long. 

Pizza Hut became embroiled 
in the debate over health insur- 
ance after supporters of a 
health bill that would require 
employers to insure all their 
workers noted that the fast- 
food chain insured its workers 
abroad. While acknowledging 
that the assertion was correct, 
Mr. Doughty argued that the 


most of them in New * — 

parttimers ineligible for compa- 
ny-paid health insurance in 
their first year on ihe job. Al- 
though Chase and Bank of 
America share the problem of 
staffing their branches with ex- 
tra people in peak hours. Chase 

employs a much smaller per- 
centage of parttimers. 

“Our whole concept is to hire 
and retain the best people, and 
in New York you have to offer 
health insurance to do that, 
said John Farrell, Chase s se- 
nior vice president for human 

resources. 

Most of the 4.5 million unin- 
sured Americans employed at 
companies with more than 
1,000 employees earn less than 
$7 an hour, according to the 
Labor Department. They repre- 
sent 21 percent of the nearly 22 
million working Americans 
without health insurance. 

By comparison, 7.6 million of 
the unins ured workers, or 35 
percent, are employed at small 
companies, which are those 
with fewer than 25 workers. An 
additional 5.7 million workers 
at big companies, while not in- 
sured by these companies, do 
have health insurance through a 
spouse or relative. 

In their lobbying efforts, 
small companies have argued 
through their trade associations 
that their profits are too mar- 
ginal to afford health insurance 
for all their employees, or that 
the companies have too few 
workers to negotiate low insur- 
ance premiums. 

Big companies do have the 
negotiating clout, but apart 
from warning about lower prof- 
its and higher prices, they have 
taken a different tack- Many 
argue that their low-wage part- 
time workers are largely healthy 
young people uninterested in 

insurance. 

“Minimum-wage workers are 
not who you think they are; 
they are largely teenagers living 
at home and glad to have a job 
while going to school, saidJet- 
frey Joseph, a vice president at 
the U.S. Chamber of Com- 
merce. 


Compiled by Our Staff From ttspaUha 

TEL AVIV — Tel Aviv 
stocks lost a tenth of their value 
Sunday as shareholders, stung 
by a new capital gains tax plan 
and reeling from months of 
losses, rushed to sell. 


The exchange had been shut 
since Tuesday, when the govern- 
ment announced plans for a id 
percent tax on stock sale profits 
as part of a wider package aimed 
at fighting inflation. The tax was 
to take effect Jan. 1. 


But 90 minutes into the ses- 
sion Sunday, the government 
backtracked on its tax plan, 
modifying it so that profits 
could be offset against losses. 
The plan must be approved by 

Parliament. 

The General Share Index feu 
nearly 10 percent, closing at 
165.18, down from 183.39. 


Losses on individual share 
prices ranged between 10 and 
20 percent- For the first time m 
its 40-year history, the stock ex- 
change lifted a 10-percent limit 
on fluctuation of share prices 
within a single day. The limit 
was expected to be reinstated 
for trading Monday. 

Because investors were asked 
to stipulate maximum or mini- 
mum prices for implementing 
buy and sell orders Sunday, 
about 80 percent of the $650 
million in sell orders were not 
carried out. On the Tel Aviv 
exchange, orders are not imple- 
mented immediately but only 
after certain time intervals. 


That could point to another 
wave of selling Monday, but 
some brokers said the amend- 
ment to the tax might stem the 
slide that wiped out about $5 
million in paper value. 

“We expect the market to ral- 
ly tomorrow because of the 
amendment to the new tax, 
said Amir Ayal, of Epsilon bro- 
kerage. 

The initial proposal took into 
account only profitable trans- 
actions, making it theoretically 
possible for investors to be 
taxed on a net loss. The amend- 
ment allows investors to choose 
an another system Laxing only 
net gains, but at a higher rate. 

(AP. Reuters. Bloomberg) 


Novell Expects 
Weak Results 


rhin.1 Wants Credit Controls 

.. . til hillinnl frn 


Industrial SectoiwA/Veekend close 
ana®* snw - * ■ 


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m _ t fin. Faa nf /WlTCA 


IM 113.49 -WH CpMGood. 1191H 117-05 *1£ 

S IS — -ST 

SI „7V7,17Js" 55 C oramwr Good»103.40 102-13 Jta 


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"■SXISSKKni™*' v- *•’ Si'S 

Last , sw r? tn the Shanghai government, the 



Aug. is 

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SZ S*Sr;«5 'S -je’HTJS « 

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FfOBWWrt 

LandMla] 


fax the Sb^igbai pair met a worse end during 
CWff an interest in sculpone 

Jd -My catalogued m the 

Museum, but not on public display. 


Bbombaz Businas News 

PROVO, Utah — Novell Inc. 
said Sunday its results for the 
third quarter would be as much 
as 20 percent below analysts’ 
expectations because of higher 
costs and less- than -expected 
revenue from recently acquired 
WordPerfect Carp, and Quat- 

troPro- .... , 

Novell, the worlds largest 
personal computer netwrak- 
software company, “has initiat- 
ed expense reductions to im- 
prove its profitability," but the 
cuts will not help third-quarter 
results, the company said. 

Novell is scheduled to report 
its third quarter results after 
UA stock markets dose on 
Wednesday. The company’s 
framings will include results 
from WordPerfect and Quattro. 

In June, the company com- 
nleted its acquisition of word- 
perfect foraboul $855 million 
in Novell shares. Novell also 
completed its purchase <rf ^ra- 
land International Inc. s Quat- 
tro Pro spreadsheet program 
business for $145 million in 
cash. 

Novell also said it expected 
to a charge of about lizu 
milli on 


Agence Frma-Prase 

BEIJING — Strict credit 
controls in the second halt oi 
the year are the only way V“? a 
can deal with runaway infla- 
tion, Vice Premier Zhu Rongji 
has been quoted as saying- 
The drouty prime min ister in 
charge of reforming Chinas 
economy said during a meeting 
of officers of the People s Bank 
of nifow last week that controls 
must be strengthened, finances 
consolidated and reforms deep- 

“Controlling inflation is the 


key to economic devdopmmi 


ymd fiscal reform, -- 
Zhu, who is also president ot 
the central bank. 

He was quoted on the front 
pages of the country’s major 
newspapers Saturday. 

The repeated call for stricter 
fiscal controls came after the 
release of July economic results 
that saw capital investment 
soaring 73 percent and a result- 
ing release of Credit- 


Retail prices in July rose 21.4 
percent, taking inflation to an 
average 20 percent over the first 
seven months of the year. The 
government had wan ted to keep 
inflation below 10 percent this 
year. 

Overheating of the economy 
in mid- 1993 forced Mr. Zhu to 
declare an austerity program by 
the end of the year. 

While calling on banks and 
local authorities to respect dir- 
ectives from the central govern- 
ment to tighten credit and slop 
financing poorly managed com- 
panies, Mr. Zhu avoided com- 
menting on the July results. 

Mr. Zhu said the country's 
money supply between Jammy 


and June 


61 bil- 


lion yuan ($7 billion! from the 
same period in 1993. 

Treasury bonds worth Situ 
billion woe issued and the 
country’s individual ravings for 
the year were estimated at 3 14.6 
billion yuan. 

Foreign exchange reserves 
have grown 70 percent from the 
beginning of the year to reach 
$14 billion at the end of June, 
Mr. Zhu said. 

China's exports, meanwhile, 
registered a 35.7 percent jump 
in July to $58.7 billion, white 
imports were measured at Wts.o 

billion. . , . 

High inflation also risked se- 
riously affecting exports, ac- 
cording to the minister of trade, 
Wu Yi, who was quoted Satur- 
day by the China Daily. 




percent in the first half, allow- 
ing China’s growth to slow 
down, with gross domestic 
product up 11-6 percent dunng 
the period, compared with 13 
percent in 1993. 


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New Shanghai Social dob Targets Foreigners 

^ty^SsstisisiSNS a 

«Dd fitness Mty, is targerog the ptoneos 

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b J»in Asia, andastme of ie firs, to esrabhslnn*lf m 

Sh K 1 S l ™S S Sfc»rai£*e local stock market by 


^bios could fly iflhe food ts any good. 


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Page 10 


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Canto t IOJB -.05 EVSBc 1X1 1 -01 RepSnlcr 
DvGlht 1664 *63 Growth p 7 JO -j® RetSr 

□ivGmt 30.77 - 02 incfiasp 7.97 — 05 S cftwrr 

Dtvinr 9-51 —ID Iresop 1184 +87 Techr 

Euro i 13.17 -JO NUmBd 974 J -J& Telecom i 

GIWI 474 -ja Sftsyp 5463 ■’■■04 Trans r 

GVCHvI 1169 -.13 SpeEqtp 7,« -JO Ufflr 

GlobLHDt 1073 - 07 TradGvr 1074 . HdeBly Spo 


STFixlnc r 9JJ -SB (Doan Witter 
SCMuni KUO -.02 1 Arrival I 21.17 -.IS 


AAL Mutual: 

Bond p 9 jj —01 I 
CaGrp 14^48 - jfll 
Mwffldp 1X54 +81 
SmCoStfc 7,« r JJ5 


GtGvAp (LI? 
GtGvBpn 116 

GIWtadAp 9J3 


Blanchard Funds: 1 

AmerCan 9.44 -.20 . 


'HS *-2! GHVteflAp 9J3 - J0i 

*$&*?*» -a a :fll 


EmgGr1nnBJ4 -.13; 

RvTFBrf n 482 ♦ J01 I DvGlht 1464 -43 
FKsrincn 4.71 _ DrvGtnt 3077 -02 

GtGrnp 1089 + 04 DWint 9JI — 53 


CooGrn 13 23 - JO 
GinieMn 14JB - SB 
Grvvlncn 34.13 -.16 


5?F$"n IIS 


gnwrgp 1283 -Jl 
FLHI to.14 -a? 


10.14 -72 
.1073 -JJ4 


Gwinin p 1067 —05 
U«I1ik:d UJ0-S 


GIMpdCnfrtJ* tJm prcwinp hat -. 1? 

GvScAp 9.94 -J13 ST Gin 175 -J1 
GvScBp 9.95 - .02 ST Bonan J.9I 
GvScCa 9.93 -j 0? BdEndow 1683 -72 
GvTg97p m3 +.02 Brinson Funds: 
GvTIAp 028 -il BflnsnS (1166 -76 
GvTIBp 128 -J)l BrinsGlBt 9JB -73 
OwTICP 038 -81 NUSEqty 9.96 -SB 
Gdncp 1272 -JM Bmdywn n 2J.71 -.18 
Grincp 1272 -84 BmdvBin 1475 -.14 
HaroAp 1483 + 85 Bruce n 9781 -73 
HarttBp 1194 -84 BrundaSI n 1072 


3074 -83 I 
7283 + 2J9 ' 


EMnCRX I486 
F1STAJ15D977 


IntEapr 1?J? -M\ 


7J2-.1H FcdnterrrlfcSS 


—88 CapApppl586 +74 IntBdns K17 •■tj 
^3n DMnep 985 —821 LfMgORS 976 *8t 


Fedtx 1174 -83 

FLT0I1P 9J0 +S! 


1987 —34 ! FLTFp tl 


J1J4 +82 
1135 +83 


LMGovp 9.14 +81 
SrnCOpS P1574 +81 


CaGrlnp 11 J2 
KwTNt 9.92 


Euro I 1117 -JO 
GW I 076 -83 
GVCHvl 1189 -.13 
GldblilOl 1023 -87 
FedSenl 879 -81 
HttriScr 9.90 -J2 
HiYW 490 —.10 
M«AZ1 1080 -82 
iSmer 1084 


NatGasr 9J7 -89 
Paperr 1989 -JS 
PrecAMtr1785 -88 
ReaSnkr 1988 -.04 
Ret5r 3482 +82 

^ P-lS 

Telecom r3il2 -.15 
Trans r 2183-84 
LMIr 35.50 —.45 
FMoBly Spartam 


ft 079 +82 
1005 +03 


as u 

IncGrn 1007 +82 1 CUdC. 


35 +75- GIGvlncPx007 — 84 Bondn 1085 *83 

87—89! GtOHUtip 10.9U +34 GovTBfln 982 -81 

— si tsunip 1274 +85 Grmimn 989 -.06 

-88 Coidp 1488 *86 hicGrn t087 *JB 

- K *-21 . ^coEg 1288 -.01 

+ 82 HYTFp 1079 _ HffisOTdGr 1095 + 14 

-84 HIMuBdPl033 -83 HemeStPA l|£ +12 
-183 Intxaerp 2J3 *81 HOrrahffla n 51?! 

+ .15 INTFP 1189 +83 HOmsldVl 1S85— 82 
—84 mstAdi 934—81 HOTDcMnn 2087 — 73 
—85 InsTFp 11.97 +82 HudsonCdPiua +.13 


VdlEam 1047 *.04 

*8 3S?T 1482 *81 


. 1288 -.01 

Hasar aGr 19.95 +.14 


cus&t 1 

8SR] ; 

QKKTt I 

as: 2 

GusS4i 

lr*fi r 


SSSffi ’5S5 ;* •’■"!: g$f* n i?S 

1067 *84 FixlncP 986 *83 1 EdlnciNf 1186 — 83 

Global 1584 -.10 ! EOMA 1186 — 84 
1482 +81 LMMUP 1084 +82! EtSnTA 1189—83 
157T — 84 I NY Mud D 9J4 +82 1 EJiKfTA 1084 -84 

482 -.84 1 NotMUP 985 +J3 RCMM 10.11 -M 

937 .) N Airier P 6J7 +83i GAITAn 1033 -82 

017 +89 Modwutelw; 1 GvTTAn 964 
2285 — 82) OtinaAt 099—86 GvttNt 984 , 

9.15 +.11 | CMnaB 9.99—84 inMuTAn 9lS +JH 


EaHKSNf 
ItSnTA ! 


87 APresnt 10^ 
_ I Balance 1(7? 


^a*J Si u 38tS5? w ^ *.1? 


*12 GusS41 7A6 *.14 IvyEsA MM *42 1 

: wir 7JS GrthAp \in\ -.Uj 

^ ffln si :fi SSift" £3 :j! 

TdxFfl 785 -l.JiplB JBJO. *g; 


IntSqln 1 1273 -J2 
lrdEaTAnl286 +J2 


BlueAp 1425 +J6.I 
CcfTAp 1087 + 83 
CfllAAp 1184 +J? 
CmTCA 9.19 +.11 
DvGtAp 1988 -.17 



IKn if 

S. ,1 

SpTrGvt? S-g _ l2 


lif! +l| sa^n .988 +4? ifb *Sl WddGWnl. 


1174 +.1S 


Trudjnvp 4W -84 AarMunn 9.73 -82 Jntt&P 1376 -.11 

TradTotlw78T~87 CAHYm 108B -82 KYTFp 10J5 -84 

=dfP£qn 1288 +.10 CTHYfT 1077 - 82 LATFp 11.06 +JS2 


NYlntmmwx +.02 HummenneMTO +82 ; tcevstane Amnr A: 

lidiap 1376 -.11 J*»mnrG 2175 -,1o AuUKPf 9J2 - 


Utillncp 1130 


HirtBp 1196 -84 Brundgjln I0J 
HiYWInvA P6.15-82 Bud 6 Bear Cf. 


LtdMum 9.58 -82 
MuCAr 10.10 -.03 


AHA Fund*: 

a tir***:' 0 ' 0 

ACBGvp 939 —81 


HiYkSp 6.16-02 
MuBA p 9.97 +83 
MunBB p 9.96 + 8? 
PaceAp 1136 -84 
PoceB p 1177 +8fl 
ReEatAp 9JB -82 
ReEstBp 9J7 +81 


Gtwnenp 88 1 -.071 MGiUt 10.17 
Gotdlnvnpl6.I9 -.11 I MuOHp 1018 
GwSecnpll.61 . ■ MultPAt 1024 
Muencp 1585 -81 1 NYT+Ft 1179 
QualGltlPl352 —87 I NIRst 1137 
SpEqp 1056 -.10 PpcGrt 2183 
USOvsnP 5.41 -.19 PrcMt 1IM 


Agrsvp 2588 +J4 
gaJAp 1583 +85 
Bast 1581 -85 
Chart D OB4 -J}* 
Canstlp 1771 - j3 
GoScp 932 _ 

GrttiBt 1036 -.14 


ReEstCP 9J7 -81 Burnham P 20.16 +89 ' 
TEhTyApIMS +.02 CaSRItyn 33.10 -87 
TEWYBplDJl -82 GGMFUKjS: ^ 

TaxExlA 01186 +81 AmerTF 978 -83 


MUFLt 1032 -.03 FLT*£ 
My UJ t 10.17 -82 FLTxE 
MuOHp 10.78 -83 NlarSc 
MultPAt 1074 -83 SmCac 
NYT+Ft 1179 -.03 USGwr, 
NIRst 1137 -08 USGav 
PpcGrt 2183 - 35 EmpBid 
PrcMt 1072 -.17 Endow 
Premier p 8.82 . Entemn 

SelMup 1186—81 CODAp 
AAanaoed 11066 -82 GvSeci 


TxElflp 11.06 -81 
TXMSAp 977 -81 


1084 +.15 I American 
977 —81 AmBd P 


977 —.01 
787 -.03 
138S -.10 

9.93 

012 -.82 
985 +.14 
1068 +82 
1063 +81 


ytdBt 1144 -.H 

value i 2184 +.i7 

VOUQ 2135 -.18 
Weina p 17.19 -71 
AMF Funds: 

wSJ5S« ?S -o'i 

inflUqn 1033 +81 


MtpSecn 1081 -81 .. - 

ARK Funds: Ta*E*p1plIJ9 -82 

CcnGrn 10.10 -.1+ TxExCApl534 +83 
Grlncon 1009 +86 TxEjcMDplOO +83 
income 985 -81 TxExVAr>15J4 

ASM Mn 987—82 WshMu1Pl784 
A VEST A: AmGwttl 985 + 8/ 

Satonced 17.16 *89 AHerilgn 187 —81 
EaGro 1885 -.1* Amer Nan Funds: 
EaliKom 1121 —.11 Growth 4J3 -.05 

income 1042 -82 income 2188 -83 

Accessor Funds: Trfflex 15J1 + os 

intFxmn 1187 +81 APIGfpnl 1287 + 72 
AocMortallTO -82 Am Perfor m. 
smimFy 11.90 -82 Bond 9J2 *81 

Acomln 16.4U +72 Eouitv 11J7 +84 

AcmFd 1379 +.17 lined 1070 

AdsnCop 2030 -88 IntmTxF 1075 +.02 

AdvCBdp 10.15 +84 AmUJIFdn 2070 +82 
AdvCRHo 986 — .02 AmwvMut 774 +JM 
Advest Advnnb AnalytShTGv973 * 81 

Gout np 8.99 . Anahnicn 12.13 +.04 

Gwthna 1686 +.11 AnctlCop 30.14 +.15 
HYBdp 089 -81 AnttimGrrvlOTO -82 
Inconp 1273 —ill Aquiln Funds 
MuBcf+at 972 - 83 A2TF 1075 -82 


Uliiep BJ7 -85 Redly n 984 —.03 1 USGvlt , 

imerican Funds Cafmasp 1190 -.14 urfin l: 

AmBdP 12.19 -84 CAOAggGr tosi! — w volAat 2 

Amcpp 1237 -.18 CATFui 10.10 -82 1 WWlnc I 

AmMutl p 21.70 -83 Culliomia Trust: WMWdl I 1 ... , 

BondFdp 13.18 — 81 Cdlncn 1287 -83 TC Strip 9.51 -.08 

COPlnBI p 3285 +.13 CalUSn 1073 _ TCCorl 1285 -.13 

capWidpfsjT -89 SiPSOOn 1189 - 84 TCincp ir - 

CapWGr 1871 -.16 S&FMM 11.92 -.12 TCLatl V. 

esgtocp 2233 -39 Catvert Group: TCNorf o 1 

Fdtrrvp 187? -89 Ariel 2833 - 78 TCSCPI I 

Gout p 13113 - ArinlAP 3181 -70 DelGrplMdt 

GwfhFdpZ7J2 +83 GlobEq 1146 +74 Decl I 1i 

HI Trap 1198 —03 Inco 16.14 *.(M Detwrf li 

Incti dp 116/ +81 MBCAI lalB -83 Died * 

IntBdp 1373 - Munlnr 10.10 -83 Dtnl < 

InvCaAp 1890 -.12 Sod trip 3987 -.15 TsvRsI 1 

LldTEBd 1483 +.02 ' ~ ' 

NwEconalS.06 +71 
NewPerp 1563 -.16 
SmCpWp7378 -74 
Ta>EjgiipII89 +82 
TX&&P15J4 +83 


978 - 83 ST BO 977 -82 Gwttinp B71 +.10 

CapDevn24J5 —.19 ST US a 986 - Grincp 1780 — 83 

Fxdlncn 1075 .. Stroll 1452 -8* HYBdp 1183 

MUlln 3A9B +87 5 Tn+Ejr 1169 -83 Infflirp 17.99 -.11 

Redly n 984 -83 1 USGvtt US -81 SmCo 579 - 85 

1190 -.14 unin 12.96 —84 TEIncp 1379 -83 

■287 —84 valAQt 20.15 +87 Everemen Funds: 

10.10 -82 1 WWlnc BJB +84 Evrumn 1476 -71 

rusk WldWdi 19.11 -75 Found n 1284 +.10 


ECBpBfil 1B82 -81 <_ _ 

Emerald Fundsi FLMum I0J1 -82 Ma 

Badnstn 1085 +83 GNMA n 9J9 -81 1 Mil 
Emlssl 1 177 —.06 Gcvlnn 9.93 « ' MN 

Eqjnam 11 J2 — 86 hfiOhlnm H/ffl -84! MC 
FLTxEAelOJ? *81 MMun 9J0 -81 , NX 
FLTxElnetOJ? + 81 InvGrBdn 980 _ NY 

MBdBOIn 985 +81 UdGv 9J7 - NY 

SmCaoin 9.64 +70 LTTJn 10J5 -82. NC 
USGtNAelOia -8V MDMura 93 -81 QW 

USGnwl nelMl —.01 Munlnr 10.(0-82 OH 
ErrroBia 17J4 +85 NJHYr 10.96 +82 (G 
Endow. 1765 . NYMYm 10J6 +84 PA 

Enterprise Gram NYlntern 9J0 _ Pro 

CaoApP 3061 *83 PAHYrn 1070 -82 f PR 
GvSecp 1187— 81 Shi Inert 970 - j 5JG 

Gwinno B71 +.10 stntGwn 983 *81 Srrr 
Grincp 1780 — 83 SitinMun 9.01 _ TA 

HYBdp 1182 . FftJuCcsJn lflJO +.19 Tx/ 

intiGrp 17.99 -.ij mvraisirvat I TX 

SmCo 579 -85 EuraEq 31J6 +81 1 US( 
TEIncp 1379 - 83 PocBsn J0J2 -88 Lflil 
njjcmrwn Funds: SmCo 1179 -,igl VA 

Evrumn 14 Jo -71 TxFSl 10.15 -81 1 Fran 
Found n 1284 +.10 FlnHorGvf 1077 _ | Cor 

GloRen 1187 -.11 BfiHorMurlOJS -83 InW 

Grolncn 15.94 +.12 HrstAraorFdsA: Rial 

LldMMn 2077 +.11 AstAtlp 1065 -84 Friuri 

MunCAn 1087 . Bdnrtp 1869+82 Ger 

MurtFn 10.19 - Eoutlyp IMS -86 GW 

MuniNol n 974 +.03 Eqldxp 1076 - 84 Ho 

Pofiren lijo +81 Fjcdlncp 10J7 -82 Hlb 

TotRln 1877 *85 IntGvBdp 9.08 +81 Frwr 

jccelfcltdns 155 _ Inline P 968 - 81 Bor 

xcehkw imat InfTicp 1063 +82 Gkri 

Bdonced 7JH! +82 Inti p 1067 +73 Gro 

EdGmvrlti 771 -85 Lid Inc 988 +82 littb 


CAHYm HUS -82 KYTFp 10J5 -84 Hyo® |86 . 

CTHYfT 1077 -82 LATFp 11.06 +JS2 HVBGD? 9.15—81 

CAinlrm n 9.83 -82 MDTFo 1086 + 83 lAATrGr |AM -.14 


ManStBY Funds; ! 
CoApr 1974 +68 


TCLOlt 1371 
TCNorf 0 975 
TCSCPI 885 


1080 -84 
1371 +85 i 
975 - 85 
885 -.19 


Stxfid IS.B2 + .02 Detown Grnn 
SocEtt 2U0 -79 Trend p 1179 -.12 


SocEtt 21.10 -79 
TxFUdn 1068 +.01 
TxFLnp 1474 +.06 
TiF VT 1588 - 84 
USGov 1481 -82 


MassTFpl 171 -82 <AI Funds: , _ _. 

MichTF p 1177 * 82 Bntenpn 1080 +05 GiOA 1686 + 72 

MNWS 1188 * 82 Bondpn 881 -.03 GvSA 9.43 +.02 

JUIOTFp 1164 +82 EmgGrpnl3J0 +J2 KrffiA 19.18 *2 3 
NJTF 1179 *82 Gowtpn 985 -S HrSrA 2171 +73 

NYlrtSP 1078 * 83 Grincp 13J2 » ImdA 881 +81 

NYTta B 1165 -84 jrtFdn 1173 -.02 Omega 15?3 +.12 

NCTFp llj +83 JiwWd 9.11 +82 PtxA lljja +82 

OttiOfT F P1189 +81 NUdcaon 1180 -!l? SfcA 775—81 

OHTFp 1170 + 83 Reocn np2074 +.18 TxFA 9J8 +JB 

Pof£rwtniS71 -86 Resrvpn 9.96 -81 WridBA 8.56 +55 

PATFP 10.18 +82 VAien 10.98-82 Keyston e Am«r B; 
PremRtP 674 +84 IDEX Group: Ajfll 965 . 

PRTFp 1174 + 82, Idex 1783 FtxBt 1®71 +82 

Si GOV 10.14 -81 2GtobAp 1687 -3/ FOABf 10.11 +79 

SmCapGr UTS +72 2GtobC» 1589 -76 GWdBt 1U4 +72 


MiChTF P 1177 +82 
MNWS 1188 *82 
MOTFp 1164 +82 
NJTF 1179 *82 
NYlrtSP 1078 * 83 

:* 

*+S 


lSB5 +81 El 
10.16 +79 Gi 
1BJ6 *•£ g 
963 +.02 M 
19.18 +£ T, 
2171 +73 Ti 
881 +81 Vi 
life +.12 (Ml 

iijja +82 a 

775 —81 SB 
9JB +82 W 


1268 * 891 
772-82! 
14.12 +84 1 
11 JB -83 1 


M TAn .985 -81 

^ m :& 

TAn 97P +82 

MMWTA 10.42 +84 
MUMAp 10.42 +84 


a&£t D HS-89 

ssfc \ffl :s 

GrthAp 19 j 3 +^I 
KblABK 774-89 


♦8* j AJtaeCA 11.18 


GrftiAp M 
hGWABK 774 


sv ■ 9js> —sn 
ip 10.15 +84 


Ap 4,03 —81 
Ct 6® —81 1 


WvGApX 9.96 - 

MHInAp 1088 +81 


GJOfcAp 1478 +70 
GiAttA 180 



Wp 1186 +89 
ITT 1184 +89 
T 985 +81 
3lnp W • - 


rwS+jfi. 

rnW73+8T 
rn982 +73 
PT19J9 +.13 


W\W* S’"# 7 :! 


1581 +72 
1575 -81 




ion -8i 

IU +72 


LldMMn 2077 +.11 
MunCAn 1087 
MurtFn 10.19 
MuniNatn 984 +.03 
Pori re n iijo + xn 
TolRln 1877 +85 


T xAdHY P 8.15 +3} 
■dTTFp 1134 -a 
USGav P 469 +81 
UTiBigiP 885—85 
+JB 

mv£roSpw S ~8i 

RiSDiVp 1474 +.11 


VAD 1783 -J 
yep 14.94 +: 


FOABf 10.11 +79 
GiOpBr 1U4 +72 
GvSBl KS +82 
imdBt 881 +81 


11 JB -83 StGvTAn 483 -81 
884 +81 STlnTAn 964 . 

11064 -87! STMuTA np984 _ 

971 +83 > STinlNt 964 
1581 +7? STJntCr 964 . 

1575 -81 i SCITAn 1071 *81 
’unfa: I SfffTAn 969 +81 

2586 +.18 TOITAn 976 +82 
3775 +65 Valuelnt 1365 +.02 
2875 +.101 Vak»<Apl368 + 82 
1774-82 VdueTA 1388+82 
1SJ»^rt VAITAll lSS +81 
1974 +86 1 VAUAD 1063 +81 


MHInAp 1088 +81 GKitA 1393 +J& VuKnCTn1]85 +A 
NTdXAfftllTO +83 GvtaAp UO . VtfWdPltjR +82 
NYTXAplOTD +84 GKtaAP 1272 >.11 Sa*»o» Funds: . 


NYTXAp 1070 +84 
ResFAp 1560 +89 
STGvtApx 2J3 - 


ipx223 - 
A 1079 +.» 
PX 887 —81 


n 1774 —82 

IfilMWn I5J9 *!l4 
51 Bond 1974 +86 
Gt>qpPtn1982 + 74 
Bondri 2074 +85 
bittern 3BJ2 +72 
Mariner Funds: 
FxtfWc 961 +81 


/aNXHAP +82 

J(*K TA 1388 + 82 
/AITAll lS« +81 
/AllAB 1063 +81 


S raxEx 11.19 —82 1 DmeroB 11179 +.12 NYTF 1077 
ncPIA px 989 —84 , PTxFBt 1073 +81 I STFxInc 9S6 


1474—86 TotRln 1877 +85 
1889 -.09 ExcelMidag 385 
24.96 +60 Exsa^skw ImSfe 
6J7 —JM Brtonced 7M +82 
975 -JB EqGravrtti 771 -85 

ns-ja&sn ssjji 


+82 GvmGvtd&IK +.31 
-86 GtobCiirpxll93 — 84 

-JB HlkicCurWj4 +82 
+81 Fremont FWlOS 
*81 Bandit 9.52 +82 
+82 Gfcbaf n 1X27 +.12 
+ 73 Growth n 1184 +.u 
+ .02 [ inflGrP 968 +.13 
+81 1 CAInt 1067 + 81 


idax3 1463 + 71 StcBr 7 

ZFlxlnApxiLn-8Q! TxFBt 9. 

[» Group: KndnMAniL 

BIuCpp 483 -84 GrQpCT 1B72 +72 
teldo AW _l KIARF 9. ‘ 
CATEP 5.18 +8! I FtxCt 10, 

DSP 768 +63 FOACt 10. 
Obcavp 1673 -.18 -GvSCI 9. 

fiSSt 18 

^Sdp tji 1 84 TxFCt 9 
GtoGrp 4.99 +J07 Kidder Group: 


/JB — 81 TREa 1268 +84 
9J5 +82 fttarkTwotoFda 
wrCi Equity 1080 +.14 
872 +72 Fxdlncm +81 


NtSand 876 
NotnFd 16.13 +.18 
NIGwtti 1186 +.17 
TxHTf 982 +82 
1 usCvlnr 989 —on 

N Sffl5SKf+74 i 


ASStBt 1051 +84 
ATLBt 1576 +J1 
BWeBt 1383 +76 

SSVt ISfs :s 

CmTtB 9.33 +.1! 
DvGrBI 1972 *.16 
EuGrBt 988 +J» 
GrthBI 19.10 +79 
GIEnSt HJfi —89 
GilnBt 1084 + 83 
GIGJBT 1087 +73 
rtin&lx IJ4 —89 
bivQSfx 9.96 - 


HfYklAp 000 -00 
MVOfAp 1281 +2B 
MuitLAp 1X97 +89 

STOMP -BJ51 — 8S 


CWTFrn 1T70 >84 
Eauffyn 14.11 +.15 
GNMAn 9.19 +81 

IncoRlfl 1789 — 84 


MiW It 6 ® 


iinvuiuv 

ssssaffija 


mm E n K ®s| i m z :s 

UtflAp -973 +84 Municn 1117 +83 -grai-n 9S +85 5.54 +84 

AUocSet 1184 +82 NWn iSv +.13 |TWn t980 +81 Go^es P *^9 

S Bt 11.14 _ Satonxm Bros: .. 5mgP^» i45J7 +&* wrtSreMPMi +86 

lia Bt 

SIS*" I* +86 KSfp 


sss? uM 


_._tifiidlX9S +77 
GBRsnt 1271 —81 
GvbjBWn If® 
GytScpii 96T +81 
GfOpBI 1182 +.11 


964 _ Muni 9.99 +81 

1072 +81 MnrfcrfWufrfi Fds 
10.12 +79 Eqtnly 1070 +88 

9-^ +82 Flexlncnl 974 +81 

081 +81 IrdFxln 960 +81 


MHlnB I 10JH +81 | GtOpBl 
NTaxBtx 1170 +84 HiYWBnt 


NYTxflt 1070 +84 
RrtyFBl 1871 +89 
STGVtBPX 273 


Guprtnn 19.11 +.13 Beu FBt 1871 +J» 
LldMatn 9.96 +81 STGVtBPX 273 > 

Monholn 11.07 *76 SmOreBtlftM +.10 
MUST 1062 +62 SMB 9JM — .CM 

NYCDCn 10.16 +87 UfflBpx BJB — ^ 
Pwtnrsn 20-99 +.18 CaTTITp 1064 +82 


Pcrtnrsn 30-59 

PTxFCT 1076 +JJ2 1 VAMuBtS 9J5 +82 SelSgJnM +.13 

®t 

MderGrouie I GthlnA 973 +83 NewOitfp 12J1 +.11 


Carmp 1064 +82 
USGvBbc 887 —81 

s iff :s 

CamTecp 9.14 +.11 


18.07 +JQ ARM GvAl I .S3 +81 


Value p 19.75 +86 FAM Vain 2066 +79 SJockp 1670 
Detaipp 2483 *60 FBLSertos: __ F%s> AmerFdsO 

Dednp 1676 —85 BlChip I IB. 70 —89 AstABn 1065 +84 


T xFxMD p 1 4.70 ‘83 QmbrtdacFdfi 
TxExVAp15J6 - CapGrA 1488 -.05 
WshMut pi 784 . GvInA 12.90—61 

mGwlh 965 +67 GwlhA 1471 -75 
Herilgn 187 —81 incGrA 1570 — Jf 
mer Nafl Funds: AAufncA 1462 +63 


FundSW 1X14 +J7 
Gvtlnc 483 + 81 
MedRs 17.90 +75 
NZtaraf HUB —.01 
NJonon B75 -82 


It* Jot 972 - 83 AZTF 1075 -82 US Trend 1193 +.12 

np 1968 + 70 COTF 1070 +.8? Cmxfiital Family: 

Inc 1X10 -87 HI TF 11.15 +81 AmGIh 968 + 74 


1481 -62 DecTRp 1286 —84 Growth 1 1X92—61 
Fd* Detow P 1X07 - 69 HKJrBdl 1065 *62 

1488 -.05 IrfflEqp 12-73 *63 HiYBdr 9.94 —62 

12.90 —.01 DetcnAp 687 —34 Monad 1 n jo — 81 

1471 -75 USGovrp 7.92 - 01 FFBLextcon 

1570 — 8i TreoSAp 9J5 — 82 CodApp 1173 -.12 

1462 + 63 TxUSAp 1X02 -.01 Ftcdln 9.93 +81 

14. B0 -JS TxlnsAp 10.98 _ IrdGv 9.93 +.02 

19.91 —.01 TWntAP 1077 - 81 Seri/aiuepII84 — 81 

1466 -74 TxPoAp 179 -81 SmCoGrnlOTB +69 

15-30— 81 DM-Pooled Trust FFBEg 1072 +JK 

1464 -83 DelEfl 12-98 —.04 FFBNJ 1063 + 82 

111. 10 -85 GtaTix 965 — 81 FFTW Funds: 

jshmore: InflEd 1X17 +89 US Short 9.93 

1077 -74 DtoienSioaaiFdS WW Fxd.n 9.41 -81 

11.70 +.13 InflValn 1064 -.12 WW ShTm 9,92 

B.B0 — 86 USLm 1194 +84 FMB Funds: 
rwa* USSml 8.42 +87 CHvECp 1181 +J» 

1^4 +77 US 6-10 n 1178 -.11 DwEI 1161 +88 

+ €' Jaoann 2885 +J7 IWGCp 9.92 

7.9U +75 UK n 2460 -70 HUG I 9.92 

'2^1 — ■£! COntn 1X98 +74 MiTFp 1071 +81 

,J“5 DFARIESIKL53 —.05 MiTFI 1071 +81 


mxiaenlO-69 +82 
qldxn 10.74 +85 


Adpres pr 1563 +.14 
Gwlhpf 14.12 +.18 
Groin pt 1681 +87 
IncopT 975 +83 
MgdTRpt 175 -84 


Fxdincn 1064 + J»2 I Fun duiniilul Funds 
IntGvBdn 988 + 81 CAMunnpBJU +63 I 


HiYdTtp 465 
WSrTEp 578 -81 
l/lflp 1085 +88 
MOdRp lljfi +^5 
Mossd 577 +82 
Micho 579 +82 


ARMInsJAIlT? +62 

ARMInstBll.99 +82 
AstAIIB 1363 +.05 
EmMKIA 1X02 +73 
EmMJclfi 11.97 +73 




MNTEP 518 +81 
MuMp 1X17 -81 


Gib&iBn 1465 +72 
GlbEqCn 1U7 +73 


9J9 + JJ5 

be* ?s+ 82| mm 

InlBOn 974 + 81 CopGrAplf4f +.19 


landFds: 

Ip 772 +81 
P 1177 +89 


IfltTxF 967 
iiNdCapn *.15 


473 +.05 CooGrBt 14 B0 -85 TxlnsAp 10.98 

2178 -83 GvInBt 19.91 —61 TrfntAP 1077 

1561 +05 GwmBt 1464 -74 TxPoAp 879 

1267 + 72 IncGrB I 15-30—81 DH-Paoled Trust: 
K Mulncfi I 14 64 - 63 DelEn 1X98 

972 *81 CapMkkr*I111.10 -85 GtoFi* 965 

1167 + 84 CappfeRo Ruslmwe: IntlEq 1X17 

1070 . EmoGrn 1077 -74 DtmeRMaaf Fds 

1075 + 82 Grwth 11.70 +.13 inflVdn 1064 

2070 +82 CODPielUtt XB0 —84 USUu 1X94 


^ P p itlg :fl 

Ohio p 579 + 82 
PneeflMp 779 -85 
Pmoresp 482 +81 
Select p B84 +81 




Intlncri 968 +JM NYMunnpl.Oa +81 procMtp 779 +85 

IrdTxFrn 1X42 +.03 US Gov n 164 +.01 Prograsp 482 + 81 

imunstn 1X48 -74 GAM Finds: select p B84 +81 

Udine n 988 -82 dobed 13469+282 SJuCXD 1968 , 

MlgSecn 981 -81 wn 19X14 + X93 SlrAggt 1X95 +77 

ResEqln 1272 +.13 PocBos 19767 + 181 Sfr&i: 960 +83 

SpecEqn 1468 — 84 GEEBuaSU: SfrliKt X99 +81 

STotStn 1669 - DivsraWnlAU +88 SlrSTl .98 

First Amer Mild A: Globcdn 1762 +.19 SDWGt 5J9 +JI4 

DivrGrp 8.97 +.10 rncomen 1180 +81 TE Bndp 384 +81 

Eolocop 983 —SB SiSLngnlO.92 +jn uffllncp 6TB —81 

Mmglncp ?J9 +82 1 S&S PM n 3479 +69 151 Funds; 

First Amer MutlC- > TaxEx 1178 +81 Mun'pn 1022 +JJ3 


GCiFxA 1287 +89 
GvtAl 1X82 
InfFIA 1161 +81 
KP£t 238? —.05 
MunlBdA 10.93 +81 
SmCooA 1044 +70 


973 +81 

,232^8 


— - Mdthersn 1464 —83 

1161 +81 Maxes FltodS: 
2X49—85 EqWaypnflXHO +.14 


Ap 1.19 +85 
Ip 272 +84 
. p 083 +82 

!p 

Ip 1477 + 78 


DvGDp 19.98 +.17 
EuGrD 9.14 +JQ4 

qcio law +J4 

NTxDpx 1170 +fe 
GrthD 1973 +79 
GJInDT 1066 +64 


HBncDpx 775-89 
InvGD x 9.94 
NYTxDp 1071 +^ 
gUgOg IJg +82 

SmCopO P> ia73 +85 
SHOP *84 —64 

12s :s 

ParnoaPk 
GulS 1560 +74 
IrriBd 987 
LATF 1064 +82 
ST Gv 9.99 
VldEfl 12.80 
VaWr 1460 +.12 


KtowOtasb Menn3th 1X94 +.14 

infTmBdn 280 - Memsirn 1286 +.14 

9iTmGavn260 - MernatFU pU68 +8* 
_ TnxExmpt n260 _ MerfSonn 25.12 +.14 

5JV +JI4 LawfcnmkFuodfc MerrtBLyqdlA 
184 +81 Btriann 1385 + 88 AmgrfnA 9.12 +.15 
6TB —81 EquitYn 1464 +6B AdIRAp 960 

Wftnc 972 +62 AZMA 1072 +81 
InflEn 1X59 +75 BalA 1169 +84 
NYTFflP 1069 *64 BtHVIA 2279—65 
USGvn 962 +81 LAIMA 969 +62 


.1 A pi 183 . 

MOSST A pi 5.93 +82 
Star A P 1X95 +.17 
TxExAp 774 
VtflUCAp 881 +87 
BatonBf 1172 *88 
CopGrBt 1465 +70 
IrrttqBt 1664 + 78 
StarBp . 1X95 +.17 
VallieB 764 +JM 
dewlBAp 1178 +.14 


960 +83 
199 +81 


SBWGt 5JV +84 
TEBndp 384 +81 
Uffllncp 6TB —81 


1161 +8B Div+Gwth n9,01 

1161 +88 EqTvlncn n9JO 

9.92 - LtdTwmn9.99 

9.92 - Mnodlnca n969 

1071 +81 FsiBosIG 9.19 
1031 +81 FstEdolnr 1577 + 72 


Sddnp 1968 +70 

Strati nc 1X10 -87 .. _ , 

Aetna Advisor: KY TF 1075 +.07 Batonced 9.91 

Atonal 1B.se +86 NramtTF 982 *87 Fund 1184 +82 

Btmdl 9.74 -.02 OR TF 1034 +.02 GaviOWv B.07 -62 

Grlhcom 110,93 +84 TxFUT 962 .02 CarllCa 13JM -JU 

InttGrl 11J4 +.11 Aquinas Fond: „ CameqOHTE967 _ 

TaxFree 973 -.83 Btflancen 964 + 83 Centura Funds: 
ictna Select: Edlncn 987 _ EqGnvCn 969 -83 

Aetna n li so - .06 Fxincn 963 *62 FedSInCn 9.94 

ASianGrn 9.15 +.14 Art* Fuads: NC TF n 9.95 +81 

Bondn 976 -81 Btri 989 -68 CentumGp B82 —63 

GOvl 963 *62 EmGrth 11.77 +74 CntrvShrn 2375 — 69 

Growth I1J62 + .13 GavCorp 9.90 . ChCapBC 1367 —84 


:fi 

5177 +.12 


CaGr 1081 
r Funds: 

iWItit 20.11 



Gap: 

so 479 + 88 
9 1X41 +.10 


GavCorp 9.90 . ChCqpBC 1367 —84 g™S“j5 

Gratae 1109 -.15 OwsGrth 1125 *72 
MoTF 1169 + 82 CHestnt 14784+173 
US Gov iojd . ChlCWUIwnl4460 -.15 K!ll Vn , 
Armsmon 896 » CJlubbGrln 14J9 —8! 

AitantaGrpli8! +67 ChubbTR 1A45 —.01 D TOS n 
AtkHFuiidc Clipper n 4989 - 64 

CAIn&A 9.96 +81 Colonial Funds.- JfISSkP, 

CoMuniA 1083 +82 CalTEA 785 -81 

GvfSecA 984 +81 Con TEA 778 +J)2 Bctacd 

GraincA 1381 +.09 FedSec 1075 +JJ7 Camtn 

NaMunIA 1083 + 82 FL TEA 774 +.01 ™' r “ n 

It 1489 + 84 BUT Fuads: FundA All +.04 £Tln|" 

P 1X97 +.18 EkriTrn 9.91 +.03 GUEqA 1261 +.13 Dreyfus 

tv 10.40 -81 GrotncTnll61 +86 GnMtttAp1X91 -.14 Edtllhd 

P 1194 +.18 InlGovTn 968 - HlYldA 660 —82 FLInt n 


Fil'd n 10169 +.11 FPA Funds: FraTFcE 1168 +.11 

GIBd 98.13 +.01 CO oil 1985 +70 FrstFtfTot 9.45 +81 

Govin 101.02 -.18 Newlnc 1067 - 61 FtHwMu 1075 + 82 

ImtGv 107.18 + 72 Pcrmnf 14,16 +.07 First bnredi irg 

WtlHBM 1X17 -.13 Perm 25.10 +>B BtOiipp 1560 + 86 

LCoPlnf 1X01 +.1B FOkmln 2472 +.12 GtaUp 679 + 86 

PacRim 1765 +.10 Fasoanon 1763 + JTI Gavtp 1060 +81 

USLgVd 10.40 —62 Fedcrdsd Finds: Gratae p 484 +84 

— USSroVe* 1164 + 88 ArmSSpn 9.63 - HiohYdp 4.96 —82 

- 03 DodaeACOic Arm In 963 - Income p 389 

„r Bman n 4467 -74 ExchFdn 7115 —85 InvGrdp 962 + 81 

-O' Income n 11.18 +83 Finn s n 10J9 - USAnp 1169 -71 

-S Stock n S5J3 +62 FSTlIsn E?l — 81 MATFp 1169 +82 

■S? DamSodal 1X39 -.11 FGROn 2162 +J7 MiTFp 1167 +83 

Dmnan Funds: FHYTn 865 — 81 NJTF p 1261 -83 

•S Comm 1478 +.10 FmSn 988 - NYTxFrplOl +63 

-S H*ftn 1667 +.16 FIT SS p 988 _ PATFp 12J7 +83 

if SmCpVal n 1 1 J2 + 72 FsluriSn 1070 * " 

■2} Dreyfus: FsioWSSplOTO 

A Bondn 1384 -83 FSTr 2177 -62 

M Aorecry 1588 -.13 FSTISSP 171 —81 

m AsseiABnlXSO -83 GnmalSn M.79 +81 


Trusts P 34.18 +77 MWuip 979 +69 

GE Funds: TTtop 964 -82 

GtobdC 1962 +72 IndOneGT 9J5 

lncomeCnll81 +61 In de p en de n ce Can 
imiEcdJn 1569 +.18 Opoortp 1X95 +83 

SiraoC 1581 +Jf3 SlntGvtP 964 +JJ1 

USEaDn 14.14 +84 TRBda 960 +82 

GE USE 1X12 +84 TRGrp 1160 +.1Z 

USEqA 16.10 -JO InvResb 464 +81 

GtTtovA iHvSerOpOtt 

EaSpcn 1989 - 84 CflPGrf 1XW *.«, 
TF?Sln 9.99 +82 QlKflSk 1419 +J» 
Gvtx 962 — JM 


Infl Eg 1X59 +75 
NYTFnp 1069 +J» 


Laurel investor; 
CWAbM +82 


12J5 

1387 +.15 
1065 + j« 
1X99 +.12 
11J2 +81 


Batncd 1359 -89 GrvnaSp 70.79 +.01 
CalTx n 1451 +JD Flotssp 1079 




incdmeApAie 
InfGrA 1065 +.15 
MATxA 768 + 81 
Ml TE A 682 *81 
MNTEA 7.00 -81 


2455 + 1.11 


Callnln 1389 +82 
CT Ini n 1258 + 82 
Dreyfus 1X41 +89 
ErJEllncl 1185 —85 
FLInt n 1384 +82 
GNMA tip 14 Tl -82 
GnCA 1X11 -83 
GMBdP 1456 - 82 
GNYP 1962 +84 
Grincn 1467 +J» 


IMTI3 10.44 +81 
MidCap 11189 +.10 
M0dAwnHU6 +85 
MgdGIn 10.12 +51 


Gratae p 464 +JH 
. HiohYdp 4* —82 
Income p 389 
85 InvGrdp 962 +81 

- USAnp 1169 -71 

81 MATFp 1169 +82 
77 MiTFp 1157 +83 
■81 NJTF p 1262 -83 

- NYTxFrplOl +83 

- PATFp 1X27 +83 

- ScecBd 1178 +81 
. SpSilP 1769 +.18 

82 TaxExptp 981 +83 
81 TotRetp 1165 +88 
81 Uffllnaip 618 —.04 
.01 VATFp 1X15 +83 

. HrsiMuf 865 
51 FtrstOmdia: 

.10 Equity n ia?9 +.n 
85 F Udine n 962 —01 
51 SIFxtnn 967 -81 


1S60 +84 EaSpcn 1969 -84 

479 + 86 TFNdTln 9.99 +82 

1X80 +81 TxFrVAnlX78 +83 
464 +JM GTGtobat 
496 —82 Ama-P 1975 +71 
389 _ AmerS 19JW 

962 +81 EmMkf 1872 +58 
1169 +71 EmMldB 1X12 -58 
1169 + 82 Euraoe P 1053 +.10 
1157 +83 EuroB 1084 -.10 
1262 + 83 GvtncA 862 —J!1 
1471 +83 GvtncB 062 —81 
1X27 +83 GrfncAP 6.17 -82 
1178 -81 GrfncB X17 +82. 

1767 +.18 HHOS 1LB7 -55 

1 951 -JO HIIncB TX49 +72 

1165 + 88 HilncA 1250 +71 


1X84 +.U Batacdn 9.97 + 85 


Wm&iu 10J4 +81 , 
S&PSOOn 1X18 + JJ« 
1X11 +.11 


Wires* J' *•" 

Drum D 1X14 +.10 L S, Qn)( 8 : J . t M 

EmurTh pnl 160 +.11 g®£Y ‘-“f 

Enawn 1070 -86 +■?! 

Envtnri 447 +.11 ]-S T-J2 

Europen 1X28 +.15 rS *-91 

’IS IS? '£2 :i? 

SfSJhM IS To* LebenNY 768 +JM 

-ft, [ 

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CAIMA 969 +82 
CcriMnA 1174 + JH 
QjpFdA 2761 —84 
Consult p 1124 +.11 
CpHiA 768 -W 
anvGdft 1054 
CplTA 1184 
DcvCcp 1455 +57 
DrooA 17.15 +75 
EuroA 16.15 +70 
FedSecAp977 +.01 
FLMA 9J7 +83 
FOFTA 1411 +71 
GIA1A 1X28 +JH 
GfBdA 9.16 +83 
G»CvA 1085 +83 


Mchdn 5178 +67 
Nchlln 2471 +73 
NkMncn 375 
NchLdn 1754 +82 


InlGfF 760 +83 lOOOr • 127S 
frdSlB-' 761 +JH SIITBdp 950 
mywartixw +85 SmoSax 9J9 

WSZV'ffil® Jfi 

MuGat 11.15 +84 Dovtopo_n2?68 
MunHYBTlO.73 +82 SnMktncll.M 
MutasA 1X70 +83 GNMAn 1402 +82 

a; raj 3».w _ 

MUHMAt.1172 +82 Goldn 1272 
MuMnt 1164 +82 Grwmcn 1773 
MunMif 1170 +83 tacomen 1X74 

ssa^Vi^:! 

MunNJf. 10J4 +83 Lot/UTTr 33.97 
MuNYt 1165 +82 LtdTrSjEfcB* 
MunOfrt 1167 *-m MAUTF nil .T? 
MuFot 1077 +jfi MATkn 1X20 
NfMtalt 1581 +83 MOdTFn 1074 
Sfrucf a 1174 +8) MMB i» 
aroelB 1175. . NYTXn 1078 


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n29JS8 +58 C»1C. 964 +.19 USGvBt 1428 +8) 

kii“+* 3 cSrfwr.5S+:i9 usGvApijjg -ill 
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1x3 *-Sa SmCopB LIB +.11 Convtn 11.18 +.J4 
nTUffl +82 strModr 9.17+84 Eqlncn 11M— 85 




1172 +82 GoWn 1272 —81 

1164 +82 Grwmcn 1773 +88 
1170 +83 tacomen 1XM +JH 

105d +® LatAmr 2357 +1.12 

1165 +82 LtdTrmTHfcW +81 

1167 +82 MTUJTFnllJJ +81 
1037 +3s MATXn 13iaS +8a 
1581 +83 ModTFn 1X74. +82 
1174+8) MMB 8W.+82 
1175. . NYTXn 1X28+82 




OH Tun 1265 

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GWCn 

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A ss et A n 1192 +85 
Convtn 11.1JJ +.J4 
Eqlncn 1X32 —85 


a Gthsncn 11W tS -if GtoRi" TO® +ja| 


TUrrind n .170—81 


Extriocer rvO.74 +67 
MoroannllJI +-15 


taSsnta 1579 +.15 
SMdxn 1177 +85 


1374 +.11 BdGttlB |X25 +.11 
768 —82 CoreGlhA 1255 +.15 
1054 _ CoreGrthB1285 +.15 
1184 _ QvcGrlnsl 1X42 +.15 
1455 +67 EmpGrA 11 JO +.13 

17.15 +75 EmpGrB 11J3 +.13 

14.15 +70 EmoGrtrein.10 +.11 
> 977 +.01 IncGrA 1364 +8? 

977 +83 tncGrf* 13J4 +87 
1411 +71 WWGrB 1564 +7B 
IX2I +JH WWpr 1567 +79 
9.16 +83 Nomura n 1X45 +74 
1X85 +83 North Am Funds 


Botonaln1i82 +.13 
Bondn 9.30 +82 
Equity n 1565 + 65 
GvfincC 977 +81 
HIYEqn 1X71 +.14 
tntlDis 1X44 +.12 

iks mxm 

MJMrtC 1X54 +82 
MnBdC 1X31 +81 
SnCopC 2188 -70 
FariatonelnvA: 

BalA 1182 +.13 
BondFd 971 +82 
Equity 1564 +65 


AstAIICpn 11.08 —83 


C4RsA 1581 . GIGrp 1456 +.19 

GtoSmA 1081 - Swlfcpm472— ,10 

GIUtA 12J3 +JH GTlncCpnlXSS +84 


977 +.01 
1X71 +.M 
961 +81 
1369 +.12 
964 +81 
1064 +83 


+.13 AUApx 1X18—82 Abbe 1 
+82 AmGvAp 870 + 81 BICh 
+ 65 AUaAp 1489 +72- Bond 
+81 AABUAP X70 +JM Secwfl 
+.14 AACnAp 077 +83 Bond 
+.12 AM311AP 073 +85 EceiU 
+81 B»GvAp 449 +81 E«1 

+81 AZTE 061 +81 Grfnc 
+82 CATxAp 870 +81 TkEk 
+ 81 Convert P 1917 +jm Ultra 

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-82 S®P P 1L» +8? S^ra! 

+65 EqtaAP MJ9— JB1 Fronl 
+81 EuGrAp 1264 +70 CdpF 
+.14 F+flnp . 764 +83 COT» 
+81 FL TJcA 0-82 +81 SnSt 
+.12 GeaAp . 1X50— 81 DnSt 
+81 GJGvAp 1375 +JQ3 CDrm 
+83 GfGrAp- 984 +.12 Comr 


S)bH» 

+89 

BICh 17J4 +.17 
Bead 1061 +82 


in 3X28 +61 ! 
1 962 +81 

n 1170 +84 
n 960 +82 


Morgan n I1J1 +-15 
Prmcpn 19.92 +.43 
Oiantn 15^ +^ 
STARn 1372 +82 
Trfrdtn 3475 +76 
TrOS ®5| +J« 
STTsrvn 1080 +.01 


ff-lfStSI W n ft 


W nn ]is:fa 




Mil un 174 +82 
PraneEqnl4J4 +.11 
Sped a 2X16 +J9 
stock n 2363 +60 
TattRetn 2562 +89 
Ynatavn 1X10 +JS 


;re>1460 +.14 
np 959 +84 


i np 959 +84 -T 


HWtScn 3X34 -.76 
HITklnp 4J3 - 

tadlnampl167 +82 
InIGovn 1X13 
InllGrn 1760 -.19 


HtthCrP 1X99 +66 Leisure ft 2152 +71 

Inrip 1175 +73 pacBasn 1459 +.16 

InttB 11.15+72 1 SellncmnpXU — 81 

japan p 1374 M I ShTrfMp 964 

JapanGrei374 -84 TxFreemHS62 +85 

~ Terfin 2X03 +65 

Tatfttn 1861 +.11 


Amerl.dp9.VS 
GWGcvtPx952 +87 
Gvflndnp 951 
HTYUpx 14.01 —.08 
IrrvGrnp 965 —.01 


272 +81 ShtDurirrv 

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2066 +8B BFMShDun 


SSSf ?J5 

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p XOO *82 
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(in 1X13 *81 
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FrSn 1064 + 81 
FTLn + 82 

)Hrtn 961 +84 
IStn 1551 +83 
I WW nil 74 +.18 
on 25.92 +83 


Oh TEA 7.10 -81 
SmStkp 1765 - 75 
SlrttncA 673 
TxExAp 1106 +.02 
TxlnsA p 7.97 + 01 
USGrA 11.94 +.11 
USGvA 461 -JH 
UfflA P 12.00 —.Of 

F«fiC|f I0j5 - ^2 

HYMuBI 9J7 *" _ 
HYSecBl X5D —82 
Incomes 4.14 

MATxBt ’/JO -81 


MBdGraniai3 -.04 FPDvAsfp 1261 *85 
Madlncrul080—84 FFMuBdp 1185 +81 
Max Cop 1183 +85 First Priority: 
MMcapnll63 +.11 EauifvTrnlOJB +.10 
ShrtTerm 1X16 +81 FwBncTr 971 
US Govt n 964 - LtdMGv 971 

STMfTSSplaifr +.01 FtfsJ Union: 

SBFAn 1474 +81 BUTn 1182 —82 


2560+281 Tech n 
82567 +280 Trffttn 
1464 + 77 1 USGovI 
1473 +77 UW n 


... .. Shrtfenn 1X16 +81 

MNTEA 7.00 -81 Grincn 1467 + 82 US Govt n 966 

NotResA 1X63 —02 GwthOo n 1X26 -JD STMTSSplXIfc +.01 

NY TEA A91 +83 lnsMtmnpl763 -82 SBFAn 1474 +81 

Oh TEA 7.10 -81 Intermn 1377 - 82 FJdeflhr Advisor: 

SmStkp 1765 -75 tawreqp 1571 +.09 EnPGR 2X53 +73 

StrttncA 673 _ InvGNn 1469 _ EqPIncA 1612 -iM 

TxExAp 1386 +.02 MA Intn 128V +83 GblResc 1773 +81 

TxlnsAp 7.97 +oi MATaxnlS.41 -.03 GovtavAp;.17 

USGrA 11.94 +.11 Mined n 1X33 +.07 GrwOppp24JI +74 

USGvA 461 rjll NJ tat n 1X10 +.02 HIMuApl167 +83 

UfflA p 1280 —Of NJMunn 1382 +.02 HnridApnlU2 —SI 

CATEBt 785 + 81 NwLdr 3*108 -74 mcGtP 1A77 +82 

CT TE B I 778 + 82 NYlTxno 11.17 +83 UdTH?Ap955 + 82 


StrtdAp 1090 +88 VrfEq 1787 +.14 

Strata W.K1 +88 InvYTOvtBI 875 —82 

Telecam 1764 +75 tstelFdnp 1459 

TeleB 1762 +75 JPMIdSffi: 

Wldwp 1768 +73 Bondn 962 


NJMA 10J7 
NYMnA 1188 
PccA 2378 
PAMA 1052 
PhnxA 1X50 
SpVlA 1575 
SirDvA 1X45 


STGIAP XI! 


EoPGR 2X53 
EqPIncA 1612 
GbRese 1773 
CavlnvAD9.17 
GrwOpppJATI 


BUT n 11J2 —82 WHwB 1773 +73 

BafCtn 1182 —02 Gotten Ftindc 

Be! 9 p 1182 — 82 ABCP 1X18 +.11 


HIMuAp 1167 +J 
HiYldApnllJ2 — J 


-82 NY Tax n 14.97 -JU 
+ 81 NYTEP 1764 + 83 
+ 84 Peootadl 1486 +84 


-.12 PeoMidmiaJM +.16 
+ .14 ShlnGvn 1085 
. ST ire pn 1189 -81 
-82 ShlnTp 1X95 
- ThdCntrn 7 82 +.05 
-.16 USTInt 1X47 
-81 USTLna 1198—84 
-.02 USTShn 1A99 


HiYldA poll, 
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LWTEJ 9, 
OvseaP 14 


2X83 +74 
1623 +85 
962 
1061 


FLMuniC 974 -82 
FxtnBpx 9.77 — JM 
FxtaT nx 978 —83 
HiGdTFB pi 0.23 + 82 
HIGdTFCIlQJB h 82 
MnBdT m 961 —84 
NCMunC) 965 + .00 
USGvt8 P 975 
USGvtCr 975 
USBvCtx 9J4 —.13 
ValueB p 1784 —09 
ValueC In 1783 —89 
valueTn 1784 —.10 
Flag Investors: 
EmGltip 1181 +77 
IntfRP 9.97 -83 
I IntTrp 1412 *32 
MMuniP 1X22 +83 


-82 Asset np 2379 +.15 
-84 CanvScpnll68 +82 
-83 Ealncp 1161 —03 
+ 82 GlMdCPn 1065 + 88 
t 82 GtCOmrit 1X57 +84 
-84 GfTelp 1021 +87 
+ .00 Growth ro>ZX53 *71 
. SmCapG 14.98 +.14 
. Value p 1X14 +.11 


PdCB<SI1l459 +.16 AAdTFp 1570 + 82 MunLtdA 98 
KTvS+i^e iS “ ■ 01 PATFp 1582 ‘83 MuInTrA 98 
, » SOlnvnp 21.19 +74 MNatlA 1X1. 
^-51 TXFrfrttp 1494 +81 NJMA 106 
tSm+E tli TolRetnplXTl +70 NYMnA 118 

V Ty^tBt'^ —SB MMBI 9in +80 SPtaA lix 
~ B2 ShDurGvA 9.94 . SirDvA 1X61 

Sgfgnp 1459 _ Lexington Gm STGIAP Xll 

- - QnvSecn 1368 -81 TechA 59« 

’A,. ; CLdr 1070 —14 TX MA 1X4! 
SJSSSmiSsP ■% GNMAn 784 +81 WtdtacA 86 
Gtobaln 1469 +.11 MerrflLvncfiB 
•" Gaidfdn 678 +.10 AdjRB 961 
^ - Gthlncn 1613 . AmerlnBI 9.1! 

SSSPninm nfi lrt,n H7I +.14 AZMBt 107! 
Ig BM <-° 4 SI Govt n 975 - BaBf 1171 

- stsa X96 +83 Basvei 2271 

K Jg:| & n gw f, B 

I8 i2 t-SE WkJEm 1X40 +74 CapFdB 1 27.01 


GrIRA 1X20 +72 USGYtAp 961 —.02 SrnCOp 2059 +70 GrfnAp 1X57 

Heart hA 154 +.13 NrtnvGrn 2478 —14 PamBaTn 1487 +82 FBttiAp 29.12+1.19 

Insflnp 971 +81 NelnvTrnx 9.90 —27 pamassus 3X16 +67 HTYdA ox i:?.B2 —.18 

IntlEaA 11.95 +.11 Northern Feeds: Pasadena Group: HYAdApx 963 — 18 

MIMUA 974 +83 Fxlrtn 980 +83 BURtnA 2 TjE +71 IncmApX 463—03 

MNMuA 1074 +84 GrEqn 1071 +S GfpwthA 15J7 +76 InvAp XQ +83 

LatAmA 1787+181 inlqit 9.91 +87 Nifty SJ 1774 +71 MnlnAp X80 

MnlrtsA 753 + 83 tafTaxE* nl080 + 82 PaxWortd n 1X54 +.14 MaTxIl 7.02 +81 

MunLtdA 786 - InBFtdnn 985 +81 PaysonBln 1168 + 84 MTTxllP X85 +82 

MuInTrA 987 +82 IldGrEq n 1087 +.13 peach TBd 963 +81 MuniAp 873 + 82 

MNatlA 1X14 +82 IntlSeiBt nlSLOT +.16 PeacliTEq 954 +.11 MnTxtlp 875 +81 

NJAAA 1X57 *83 SWEan 1X14 +.11 Pelican 11.90 +8? NfRsAp U74 — 74 

NYMnA 1188 +83 ' 

PacA 2138 +76 

PAMA 1052 +83 


1457 +S 
771 +JS 
13L32 +84 
11377 +83 
1489 +68 
D 1464 +67 


ft 

1179 +82 


In 957 +85 
1487 +73 
956 +81 


LMGavAn955 

11466 +*67 ValMomed365 —81 
764 + 83 StrUloa FuodK 
765- + 83 Dividend n2451— 82 
4174 +78 Growth n Sffi51 +.10 
11.15 +78 1 SmC^n .2683 +75 
A7A +.14 Strew Rente _ 

llw +3tt AmlJ&Sn *950 -^.14 
1171 +82 ASnPDcnlX23 +.10 
17JO +78 CmSlkn 1769 +85 
1759 +77 Dfecovn 1650 +.14 
889 +82 GavSen 9.94 +81 
777 +81 Growth n 1182 +.17 
785 +82 FfiYIMu 9J0 , 

861 +82 Moon 957. + 81 


HYAdApx 963 —18 
IncmApX 463 —03 
InvAp +83 

MnlriAo X80 
MaTxIl 7.02 +81 


SWEan 1X14 +.11 Pelican 11.9ft +82 
SmcpGr n 982 + 82 PenCapA 575+85 


MnTxtlp 875 +81 


TxExrtn 957 +82 PAMunlp 1X91 +84 1 


NfRsAp 1474— .14 MrmTxA 777 +81 
NJTxAp 878 +8T MOTxA .785 +82 


USGqvtn 985 


1X50 +.14 Narerast Fuads: 


1575 +.15 I 
1X65 —16 


Diversild nlX23 +84 


TechA 194 +89 
TX MA 1065 +84 
WtdtacA 8.42 


ArfiUST 960 -81 
aSgovA 960—01 
COTF A 963 +82 
GvtlncTr 851 —81 
GvtWCA X91 —81 
IncomeTr 961 —81 


Ptotormaeae Fds: 
EaConp 1164 +85 
Eqtnsn 1164 +85 
inFICp 981 —81 
InFl 1 n 981 —81 

■SMisa^ 

STR I n 976 


11.12 +84 
969 * 82 
10.17 +82 


'TA :fl 

1385 +.15 


. - ATOL* l M3 


Enterprn 2183 
FedTxEx 06.73 
Rxlncn 9.13 


Eqtvcri 1374 +.15 Fundn I960 +.10 

Eqrncm n 12JB —82 Grthlnc 1462 +74 
1-00 Bd 9.91 +81 IntGvt 487 

Mercury 1197 


: p 979 + 83 IntFln 884 — 81 
p 974 + 83 BaM Funds: 

0 +£J Adjlnc 9.1S - 

977 -83 BJChlpp 1972 +.13 

p 977 + 83 CripOffvp2271 +78 
p 977 +83 BT: 

988 + 81 InstAstMnVJI 
P 988 - 81 InstEqlxnlXM +.04 

1 1253 +.18 lltvtnrTFnlOJC *81 
I 1267 *.17 lnvEqAopn963 + 71 


TEtasBI I 


AflrTFm 1160 *82 


HiQ Bd 9.91 +81 
InlBd 982 
IntEqtn 1X13 • .14 
LaroeCanlAVV *86 


21Ja° 'm CW^AplIS +.14 
EqlncAp 1179 r 83 

'J® ’JO Irt^ff ' I 28 

jS*4 «Sfc 


AdjRB 9 JO —81 TF IncA 9J 
AmerlnBl 9.1! » .IS TFtacT 9J 
AZMBt 107! +81 VataiGrA 17.2 
BaBf 11J9 +84 VatuGf 
BasVSl 2276 —06 Nuveenl 
CUMnBt 1177 + 82 CAMS 
CAIMB 969 >82 CA Vat 
CapFdB t 2780 -84 FL VOl 
CpHIB t 769 —82 tnsMUT 


ineqmeA 962 — 81 1 Perm Port Funds: 


Perm PI n 1480 *88 
TBfln 6582 *84 


*88 VBondn 55 
*88 PertlCGn ll 
Ptvta Fund 6 

+84 CaTTxEp 13 


NwOnAp 2X72 +65 
NYTXAp 176 +8! 
NYOpAp 8J9 +JJ1 
OTffip 1059 +.17 
OfiTxllp 874 + 81 
PATE 98T +81 
TxExAp X67 +81. 
TFtaAp 1460 +83 
TFHYA 1X16 +82 
TFHYBt 1X16 +82 
TFTnBt 1461 +83 
USGvA p 1X49 +83 
UfflA p 9.19 —01 
VstaAp 772 +.11 
VoyAp 1164 +71 


MTTXA 861 +82 
MtanTXA 780 *83 
MOTxA 754 +82 


IncaneA. 1X75 +82 
InaxneD I37T +82 
IntlA 1770 + 78 
IntID ' 1759 +77 

LATxA 889 +82 


STTsryn 1X00 +.0] 
STFean 9.91 +81 
ST Corn n 1X51 - 

ITTsrvn 954 + 81 
GNMAn 9 m 
rrcarpn 9JS 
LTTsry n 9.42 
LTCarpn 871 
HYCorpn 776 - 

Profit n 875 +82 
idxTotBn 962 - 

taXSTBn 97* t-81 
tax 1TB n 9 JO 
IdxSd 1X41 +84 
Mx500n 4379 +.19 
tadxExtn19.il +.19 
IdxTof n 1158 +87 
tdxGron M22 +.13 
IthcVal n 1160—05 

KbdEurn 1X42 +.17 
IdxPocn 1X13 +.12 
taxtrisrn 4471 *1? 
MuHIYdnl073 + 82 
Murelnt n 1X95 +82 
MuLtdfl 10J5 
MuLongn1X52 +82 


AAuWtt 11.93 +83 
MunSfitn 1565 +81 
CAlnsiTnlOJM +81 
CAInsLTnl063 + 81 
FLInsn 1X28 +82 
NJInsn 11.13 +82 
NYinsn 1061 +82 


NcttTxA 778 +82 
NJTxA 754 +83 
NYTxA 784 +83 


MsMun 106* +84 OH ins n 1183 +82 
tatln M6B +.19 PAtasn 1X78 +81 


OhiaTxA 084 +82 
ORTkA. 7J5 +81 


PATxA 769 +' 
CAHyTkA 678 + 
CAQTXA 4J3 * 
SCTxA 771 + 
USGvtAP 471 
HiYBdAP 667 - 


778 +82 invstn 1872 +84 

754 + 83 , MuntBdn 963 +84 
784 + 83 QppWyfiaUM +.10 
•I 64 +82 STBondP 973 +81 

084 +82 CTMurtn 1085 * 82 

755 +81 ' Ttortn 2X74 +.10' 
769 + 83 SummilHY 9.95 +81 , 
478 +81 SbPAmertnFde 


:s 



988 -81 
1X93 +.18 

ti 

1 1 

871 -81 

P1X78+77 


invtntEqnlAlV +.10 1 


CAMunA 262 + 83 

AM ijj 

MAMunAILM -SB 


a « :£ 

CA TF n I1J1 +83 


Ccmadan 1683 +84 
CapAPP 1655-8* 
Coptncanr9,15 
ConarStnlSO.99 +83 
contra 3870 *74, 



■wumBa “.Bo 


g^tTSK 7 -^ sas& s 

ISSC" 241 :4S im 118 


ventrn 4876 


-M; UtaFdCI 11.16— 8t 
^3 Ubarty Fewnfltat 
|| Gthtac 1081 1 83 
•5? lnsMunlxlX37 —82 


I 1568 -81 OVB Fund* 
iB I W-OI _ CopAPPAr 


985 *83 
9.91 1 83 


isfcIN 

w Urirmnw 965 —84 


CnvSecn 1588 +.08 
Destlnyr ni783 +.18 I 


UtvLGton 977 +81 Spedn 1967 *73 MNMunAI4JQ *84 
invuffln 964 —02 Commofl Sense MOMuBi 12J0 +83 

invEqlxn 1061 +85 AbOb2Ap 1X2S .. MuBdBI 1377 

BamnAstn 2176 +74 AgOn2Bnpl273 _ MunlBdA 1176 

Bartlett Funds: Govt 1X22 -81 NCMuA 1X77 -82 

BascVIn 15J7 -87 Gratae 1569 -84 NCMuB 11174 -82 

Rxedln 9.75 - Growth 15.14 *88 NY MuflA 14.12 -84 

ShtTmedn982 - MunB 1377 - 82 NYMuflf All -84 

Vlltffl 1259 +71 Compass Cnpttak qhmuA X73 +83 
W »genBo t2XM +.20 Eqtvlnco 1X95 -84 OHMufll 174 *83 

ayrandslnsfl: Fxdln 1X14 -84 PAMuflA 485 -.04 

ST Yield 978 - Growth 11.15 *.1» PAMuBt 604 +83 

Bondn 9.43 - InllEq 1467 -.16 TXMuA 7X55 -.05 

EnurtY J 1X60 -.12 tatIFI 1079 -.02 VAMuA 681 -84 

ay Funds Invest: MunBd 10*1 -83 VAMuBt I6Q1 *84 

STi^Hdn 978 - NjMun 1X911 -.02 Dreyfus Strafeotc 

Bondn 963 - fintlnr 1072 - 82 oferp 3575 - 77 

Equity n WJ0 -.12 CamasOe Group: Growth a mM -84 

aacHU^ 2B78 -xn Br&VAp JIM -8j income p UJo -81 

SEmgbm B87 -.17 GwlhA p 1X58 -88 InvA 2017 +.14 

Mdifnwfc Funds: .. InFdAp 058 -81 InvBt 19.94 -.14 

aaunceanV.M -85 NW50Apl4J4 -.12 DutfPEnRnixoo 
BandAn 1X95 -85 TxExAp 7.43 -.01 Dupree Mutual: 
DhfGrAn 10J4 -84 _USGvAp 9.97 .. imGovn 9.72—81 

EqjfflcAnlOJ? -85 Conestoga Funds: KYTFn 770 -82 

FocGrAn 10.15 -.13 Eauttv 1480 -.11 KY5Mfn 5,19 

IntlBdAh 207-J -84 Incm 1084 -81 EB1 Funds: 

JnflGrAn jbjj ^,15 LfaMaT 1079 -81 Equity P 4181 -J5 

SmDurn 1x00 o CmnMutuafa Rexp 54.13 -75 

SIBdAn 1985 -.03 Govt 1X10 -.02 lncameP4677 -84 

SmCaLA 11.04 -.11 Grwth 1584 -83 MuttflxP 3984 -.11 

USGvA n 1962 - 83 Income 964 -81 ESCSninA 982 -.02 

U5TlctxAn19J4 -82 TotRet 14.10 -83 Eaton V dossier 

unbamGroupc OGCapMktFAi China p BJ6 -89 


Deainyll n28.77 +70 


MNMunA14J0 -84 
MDMuBIlWO +83 

MunlBdA 1X76 
NCMuA 1X77 -82 
NCMuB 11174 -82 

9mm :* 

OHMU0I 1174 *83 
PAMuBtl484 +S 



n Nfl :fi 

n 9.42 -82 


-70 


Bondn 978 -82 
EstCoGrn15.9fl -73 
Grwth n 268 -72 
fncoBdn 1082 - 81 
IrtfBanan 962 - 82 


DisEqn 1883 +89 
Divertntlnl2J7 -JO I 


14.94 -82 Eouriv 1060 -.12 tatIFI 1079 -.02 VAMuA 1681 

960 - 82 B ay F unds Invest: MunBd mm -83 VAMuBt 1681 

Hi :j 59 ! r Q : » JSS :fl 

1X18—84 ^Ecefflyn 1060 -.]2 Compuffe Group: Growth p 4064 

11 Fl* 

960 -.!0 


Growth o . 
Income P 
Inv A 


IntGovn 9.72—81 
KYTFn 770 -82 
-.11 KY5Mfn &19 
-81 EB1 Funds: 

•81 Eauiryp 6181 -J5 
_ Flexp 54.13 -75 
Income P 4637 -86 


DrvGthn 1281 +.19 
EmgGrarliVV *74 
EmrMtct 11.99 -89 
EOUhne 3X37 -82 
EQII n 19.14 — .04 

i+CnrAp nl j1?5 * 

lift 

gcWFdn 1863 +89 
Fifty 1081 *^1 
GNMn 1077 -81 
GtoBd 1078 +84 
GtoBaln 1284 - 84 
GvISran 9J2 -81 
GroCa 2873 +75 

fiRff 

InsMunn 1176 +84 
InlBd n 1087 
IntofGvtn 978 - 

intKSrln 1768 -87 
brvGBn 7.11 +81 
jBBmnr 1458 -70 
LatAmr 1474 -53 
LtdMun 9J7 -81 
LOwPrr 1758 +72 
Ml TF n 1175 -83 
MNTFn 1063 -.01 


+81 i SWRWG 14.11 *88 
*82 GriSecn 1X74 +89 
►82 GintelGraUlfe 
*83 Erisonp 2467 +89 

♦ 82 GtaltFa n 1379 +87 
*8i Gtonmederattofi 

♦ 83 Equity n 1X03 +84 
+ 83 IntGovn 1X01 +K2 
+ 83 tain 1460 +71 
+82 Munlntn 1085 + 83 
+83 _5mCapn 14.18 +.19 


Growth p 1580 
llAcore 1X81 
LT^AD B54 
MATE I1J0 


GtolSmBI W81 
CJSUSB I 1269 *84 

£S&. '371 :.■?? 

UlflEoBt 1184 i.ll 
G»WB 1X17 1 .16 
LatAma 1771 i.94 


MAMBt 1 
MIMuBt 






S 1168 -84 
869 * 81 
« 1A56 1 61 
P 1465 *60 


7.95 +.14 
7.91 -.14 


« as* 

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UtOAp 981 —85 
VATEAd 1070 +82 


1081 +.11 VATEAD 1070 + 82 
1X37 -81 FtaxFBndK 
1078 +84 Bond no 1974 
1X04 -84 GMnpn 970 +81 
982 -81 Growth npl 112 -81 
2873 +75 Mufrfflpnf 577 + 81 
2264 +89 Fantcdnen 10J5 -.18 
11.96 +83 Forth Funds: 

1174 +84 Alt AH P 1615 -71 


GBdnc 1X43 —83 
Grfnc 1641 —83 

& R9 


085 + 83 StrWCA p 4.99 —.01 gralumn 1X4* * 13 

4.18 +.19 SWHJfB 499—81 GrtUnn 11M *84 

a 3 m i i ■ 

W! *•!? GjlnA _B80 +85 amimb ioki + iu 


aap 1 » 

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NY Mr® l 1189 *84! 
NCMBI 1X11 >83 
OHMBt 1061 >83 

JBST"Sa:fl 

PAMBI 10.92 183 
PhnxBI 1370 +.13 
ST GIB I Ct2 
SPVIBt 1483 +.15 



,n9_5Q 1 89 
,n871 M3 
,n976' i 81 . 
n9J0 >82 


HiYietd X 
iflGrAp 9j 
SnGrBI 9j 

tart ■ IX 

MutFlAp IX 

S^i 

TotRetp 1511 


>p 761 +.05 
i 2X78 *87 


1L78 *87 
875 

962— 81 




: 

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1164 +71 HiYBdAP 667 -82 
1X16—82 Sentinel Grow 
1479 +71. Balanced PJ461 —81 
877 +84 Bond P 488 +81 
874 +83 ComSIK P 2974 —84 
8.30 +85 EmGrp. . 5L37- +84 

18 Is §SM8 :.8 


IPB1564. +.12 
3 p 454^01 
>0 10^0 


SPEnrar 1576 —.15 
SPGoldr 1374 +74 
SPHOhr 34.18 +84 
SPUta 1079 — .11 
USGran 1571 *73 
inOGr 1477 +73 
WeftsJvn 1B8A —84 
Wei Win mifl — JW 
.Wndsrn 1464 + 82 
Wndsll 1780 — 83 
Venture Advisers: 
IncPI 489 +.02 
Munint 9.15 +81 

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Piflp 1784 + 64. 
Fhficrn 2960 +83; 
OtoGrfhp 1415 -79 
GovTRp 7.98 -SB 
Grwth s 2578 -79 


980 

9.90 

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860 +85 
1575 - 60 
1754 -63 
1452 +82 
1449 -81 
1557 +.13 


Afflltdp 1083 + 84 
BondOebp9.15 +81 

DeveKJthp964 +ji 


W ■Sfi. 

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HSSb I?S r 11 1110 ’■- 14 Grtnf 1054 +84 

frl* *84 Mature StateSh 

SSSmi I II So^5«ft 269 - CnAnAe 975-74 

BS SSl cS^l.^- 11 XPfiTft 1X82 -81 CopAoBe 988 -J4 
iSa hw , ?(|j JFCTp 950 +82 CnoApC • 961 —74 

Artlat lie? I m TxRCdp1060 -82 EqincAo 1063 -55 

XI? Iu lE.Fkft 4J0 +81 EqlncSe 1062 . 

n. TRWJP 49? . fcqlncce 1062-55 


fflTBi +.10I 

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GvfiflP 960 + 81 5TMA 
tncEa 1370 —86 JshrfT! 
IncorrwBd 977 + 81 PBcrF 

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IrfflEqn 1410 +72 EdGr: 
LflCoGr. 1182 +87 Edtaf 


.8.11 -25: 

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Mopetion 4775 -.74 Forfreratont: 

Mwlnd nr 3455 -.15 AdBBf 956 -81 1 
MATFn 1172 + 83 Bondr 974 -82 
MkiCapn 1077 +.16 EatncFStllT* -84! 
MtneSecnlQJS +82 GStm BJ9 -83 
Muncnln 7.99 -82 Myntact OJO -84 ; 
NYHYn 1177 -83 NYMunil 084 -85. 
NYlnsn 1175 -83 OHFortP X9B -85 
NewMktnltua +J4 Utllr 1X34 
NgwMiU 11.91 +.12 M Wall Ea 4.16 -82 i 
ore 22.99 - 72 Farom Funds: 

QhTFn 11.14 +82 InvBnd 1X14—81. 


1X57 -83! 
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IntlSrtcn 1114 -8B Denham Group: „ CG Cap Mkt Fdsi China p B74 

MiTFBdn 975 -82 Ad rGo vn 9 JO -82 EmaMkfnOJ -64 FL Lid D 9.52 

StnCOGr n1X15 -.19 CaTFIn 1X80 IntrFxn 7.91 -81 Gavlp 979 


MATFn 1172 +83 
MktCflpn 1077 +.14 
Mfoe Seen 1X54 +82 
Muncpln 7.99 -82 
NYHYn 1177 -83 


TF Bd n 1088 - 83 CaTFinn 962 -82 
TFIntBdnlO.18 -82 1 CaTFSn 1X10 


AmtwuodarRetA: 
Bondi 978 -82 
EstCoGr 1589 -73 
Grwth 1X40 -72 
infflcnd 962 -82 ; 


Inrisrk 1X14 -83 Goldin n 1177 -72 
SmCoGr 1115 -.19 tacGran 1481 -84 


CarrFHn 982 - 85 LoGrwn 975 -.13 
CaQTLn 1082 + 83 LuValn 9.14 — JM 
EqGrort 1287 -8? MtaBJcdn 765 -81 
Eurfldn 1X73 -87! Munln B.02 -82, 
GNMAn 10.18 SmGrwn 11.92 -79 | 
‘ “ Smval n B7B - .04 i 


Intifxn 7.91-8H Govt p 989—81 
Inti Eon ia79 -.18) KaULldP 9.54 -.01 
InttFxn 875 -87; NWIMufip 9.18 -82 
LoGrwn 975 -.13 Eaton VManflMn: 
LuValn 9.14 —JM CAL Id 1 10JM -82 


1X75 -.12 
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CacAoBe 971 -74 T 
CotApC* 961 —74 111 
EqjncAa 1063 -55 111 
EqlncSe 1062 - on 

InineCe 1062 _— JJ a 


1X35 +81 
1X44 +82 
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vokimef 1477 
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980 *81 
985 *81 
1X37—81 
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EqlnvstA e1X49 — 73 
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!H*TWP* Bpndp 985 , RSI Tltiii: 

ApliB +.11 Brine p 1664-81 ActBd 26. 

EAd® +81 CnpGrp 1483 +83 Care 35. 

YP 1270 -an Gold 779 +.|4 etogt S 


Growth p 11^7 +.14 

|Sjj?jyp2373 +^ 

Ptanrlip 1974 +.12 
RoThree D19J9+ J3 

-85 

www© iij9 -an | 


taflEqB 10.94 +84 


InrtEqCp 1182 +87 
inttFqJnf &04— 87 
MatlAslB 061 -81 
MadAslA 864 -81 
MOdAstC B65 +81 


FLLldf 10.11 


TFlntBdt 1X18 -83 
Amcoro vi n tag e. 
Equity 1054 -89 


LTrousn L9B 


TtlRtn n 
Cod lev n 


NlTFln 1054 -81 iCoraFuads: 


1979 —881 NattLtdt 1X16 -81 


Fxlnco 9.71 -81 

imdfTF 9.93 -82 

Amer AAdvffltf Insll 


NITFL n 1173 - 831 BalanAn 10.10 -.04 1 NYLfdl 1087 -81 
STTmasn 975 -) EaW* 2161 -84; PAUot 10.13 -.02 


Baton n 1X33 —82 
Grlncon 1403 —81 


STTreasn 975 .. * 

Tarl99Sn9474 -89 
Tar2(J00n 4769 -,10 1 


Tarj£05n4647 -82 
TaiXOIOn 3X91 -86 
Tcr2015n 24,03 — 85 


Euldx 2161 -84; 
GBdAn 9.03 
GrEaAn 957 -.12 
IntfidAn 967 -Ji . 
IWtGrAn 13.98 -.11 I 
VaiEaBpnt3J3 -.09 ' 


PAUdt 1X13 -82 
ALTHFf 10.18 -83 
AZTxF I 1072 -83 
ARTxFt 1X09 -83 
CalMunit 9.0 -81 
COTxFt 9.92 -81 


InflEoty n 1279 -.12 T or2Q15 n 24.03 -^05 VqlEaBpnl3J3 -.09 • COTxFI 9.92 -81 

LtdTrmn 9.76 -821 TorTOWn 1472 — .12 CowenOpA 1260 -JA ; CTTxFl 9.97 -83 

AmerCapItofc TNfflen 1X01 - COwenlGrA11J7 — .10 Eqlnl 1077 —84 

CmslAp 15.92 -85 Uffllncan 979 —87 Crabbe Hasan*. FlaTxFf 1068 -.04 

CmriflB 15.91 -84 Berger Grown AsfAOp not -,05 GATxFt 974 - JJ2 

CpBcS.P 469 _ IWon 1573 - 7? Equity p 1464 -.10. GovtOblt 9J0 — j? 


Corp0dAp66I 
EmGrCp 2363 -64 
EGAP 2365 -64 
EmGrB P 2315 -85 
FrrfA o 1X02 -.12 
EitlBP -.12 

EtilCP . 11.97 -.13 
EqtVlncA p562 -.01 
EqineBt 561 -8T 


101 an 1174 - 88 ORMunN12JS -82. 
SmCoGr 253 - 87 ^SceDdn ]X» -.18 
BtomptaiFdfc^ CrestFunds Trust 
GvShOunl260 _ Bondn 962 

Sh^urn 1X3B - Si Bdn 9.44 

tatDurn 1X72 SoEqn 1061 -.13! 

CaMun 1119 -,01| veriuen 11.10 -81 1 

DHrAAun n 1111 - 82 1 VAMu n 0.76 - | 

NYMwim.112 -81 ICuFdAffln 9.92 _! 


1101 -.051 GATxFt 974 -JJ2 

1664 -.10. GovtOblt 9J0 — J? 

1125 - 82 1 Hi Inc t 7.07 _.(M 

1X« -.18 KYTxFI <83 -83 

Trust LATxFI 9.97 -83 

962 - MDTxFI 1X01 -83 

9.44 _ MATxFf I OJO -SB 

1X01 -.13. MITxFT 10.14 -82 

11.10 -81 1 MNTxFf 9.90 -83 

9.76 - I MSTxFI 9 JO -83 

9.92 _ j MOTxFt 10 JO -82 


Ovreean 2960 +70 
Pd gBo sn 19.94 -70 
Punran 1487 -83 
RtofiEsin 1354 —87 

Mn ^ ‘- 1 ! 

STWtan 974 
SrrtallCap 1X35 -72 

z§ 

SSK 

USBIn 10L27 
UlfUncn 1453 —80 
Value n 4341 -82 
vyrtauf . 1400 -.12 


MEBnd 1X37 -81 
TasSvr 1X31 -82' 


BfunChpnp4J4 -.10 USGavt 968 -81 

- Discvp I860 -75. HTlniEap 1187 +8B 
, Fmfrnp 2410 -ag.HTHtenpx 985— 84 
a GovSeC 9.07 —81 “HmUfricwb 9.07 

19 Grwth np 1188 -70 Kwsbw Inv Fds: 
a Passprfn 10.12 -.11 . BlChGri 1X13 -83 
14 Sped on 764 -.17- STGvt 959 
i4 WlowGrplXJ5 -J0 SmCOGrt 967 +72 

- Pauntaki Square Fds: USGvl 951 

s ?i?:5?; H ^ Fun lS45+83 

2 5® ’an. 

4 _QurtGr_ 983 -.12 Win 2X17 *64 


Yeefq pmfl 1417 -83 
Wfiterff i 1174 -89 
idwdkin Fundi ] 
AstAOoc 1X32 +831 
GBGIntl 1186 +70 i 
Bondn 1150 -81 
ParHAv 2770 +.17 
Stack n 2X11 +70 
TaxEx 9.19 -81 
USGavt 968 -81 


BSK STa iHt Trj Muni BJ2 +83 TaxExA 781 +81 
j OK** ^ 985 -.15 I TvExB 781+81 
nSSI?ta«ito -E MAS Funds: .MfMutac 1052 -82 

S v, 2 t ? Ax .H 1 . — Balanced nl1J4 -83 'Midwest 


EnvSvc 1275 +JH 
FLTxA 1084 -82 


GtotacAK.JUJ 
GrthA 1X94 -72 
HIYiddx 771 -87 
InCopA X X10 -JU 1 
IflflA 1185 +.14 


Balanced nil J4 -83 Mk»wwt: ! 

EnwGrnlSJI -70 j AcSUSGvt 989 —81 , 
Btujfvn 21.18 +89 Govfp 9 39 -81 


MunlAx 984 - in I 

+1 k S+ : l 

52S2 g’io PAFxInn 1065 +84 InEqTx 2X62 —.18 

- SSJJf JS ’-9? SetEon 1774 -JB WgBk 764 -84 

+ m ctrmii "n* §WRr:_ ?.M —81 gnlgrx Zl.io -.05 

SmCpVTnl7J4 -.15 SBdTx I960 — 87 

T. &s. ISS :s ilEK 


Fxdlndn 10J3 _ intGvp 10 

Fxdincn 1182 - LesfiUtflAlO 

GfciBafn 1x04 -85 LephTsyA a 

GtFxta 10.11 -87 OHTF tl 

HYSeanxg+.wl tffwp 
I ntEq n 1479 -.11 iMonetto 


bitlFIxln 9.92 -.11 MonertMC 1260 -89 
LMOurFI nixia + 81 Itatator Funds 


FxtaT x 2081 —88 
GrwthTx 3470 -.14 

MtgHc 764 -84 
QnTFTx 21.10 —.05 
SIBdTx I960— 87 


AmGcMr2X42 -71 PratMta Group: : IrfflGrn 1160 

AWor 2250 —.0* | AGE Fd P 264 -81 ; ShSJurn X91 
Biotech r 2459 -64' ““ ~ — - 


Brdcsfr 2178 -J 0 
Broker r 1464 -.13 
Cfiemr 3457 +84 
Corner 2767-182 
Ca+Prdr 1402 -.19 


AGEfdp 264 +81; StaOurn X91 +81 
Agyspx 975 -oa votuen ixso 

ARf 974 +.01 , Hove+iFd nr 1065 -.11 
ALTFp 1174 -^iHearttondFds: . 
AZTF p 11.15 -83 U5GVTP 975 -81 


SSSSS'il-^ 
I»pi : fl 
■ $Si&\ m 

^rapi^-88 
781 +81 HjYjdA 1363 -85 „WW W# 11 79 -82 
781 -81 HYifflr 1X38 — 85 Ptoer Jottrim 
10J2 -82 insTEAP 1462 +8? Brtancp 1 1.99 +84 
*-23 BTIOfGr 1X73 +74 
989 — 81, InvGrAp 1075 +81 Gavin 065 —81 
939 —83 LTGavA B1D69 —83 Grfnc W74 +83 

iff —86 1 7S S^Adl xS IS 

M.4i83SSSmJ KSSI w:s 

A §»? 

1260 +89 l NYTxStnlllS +82 VahMP 987 +.18 
mm “u I "’!g PtaTTWhO 9JB *jff 

^-r» nsfttf ^ ssfiSb* 11 


Care saS +!l9 

tatB? 2550 +M 
ST1F lift +81 
value 2470 +81 
RaWwwn £18 +85 
ReoGrap 1379 +85 
Regis Fond: 

SBBta 1183 1. 

C&BEq 1385— 81 
DSIDv 1087 — 88 
OSILM 967 +82 

Sfes ;a 4 

S!5&nl|5l +51 

g rowt h n 1m- +85 
SrSTRn 1084 +81 


AP 968 +81 
ritalOJi +82 

AS JB : 




Boiancp 1189 +84 
EmefGr 1X73 +74 
Gavin .165 —81 
Grfnc KL34 +83 
talfGv 877 -88 

®|| 

PacEwC 15.94 +7D 

Sectorb 1689 +.14 




.. n 185 +.11 

VAMuTn sun- +81 . 
jVaMunlf 1060 +81 


1251 +81 


- TofRnf 1X17 +85 

+* S&iFftJ +i !‘ 


+.14 NMlnt 
t-.)7 ttetm 
+89 ‘TtaMCFt 


+83 




DT 966 Tjl 
1X20 +83 
1374 +84 


CapAPP 1367 +81 

EtafflYIKlUn +84 
Gatotaco nx9J3—83 
KYMunnx97B — 8T 
SlGrMnx 9Jr— 83 


CWAponliTl *86 
SroGthh 2180 +61 
FbKnhcn 9.72 +81 
GtoblRcd nl0J2 + 82 
Grfn c n 1420 +7» 
Irffigun 2077 +70 
Man 1455 -.14 


n10J3 +81 
219.14 -75 




% 

aJa) 

mw&r 03 

BJJ +81 

liySWM A) 


StorBln 1173 +82 
T5W Eq 1181 +84 


1 W +.18 TWfflfl 1, 
?A3 _ RcfiTanonl 


TSWFta 979 +81 Sraflll 
TWInfl 1373 +.11 Caw 
XfiTtmg n 1X14 —82 JncG 


SttaGrAP 

SnTavAp 


498 -84 
.475 — 81 


_____ 3284 +.14 

Grincn 2383 — 81 
lnfidM VJD 
MKJGrLn 2L13 +31 
STBandniojis 
Sown 31.1? +68 
1X&nBdn965 +82 


Taraetp 2584 -54 
TxRat 967 +81 


Bollnvp 2X94 -.11, 
CAHYBd P968 -82' 


WScftfl + -’f 


USMfgAx 490 —82 
Iwwwf Funds B: 
DvteatX 581 — 83 
GrftSt 1191 -72 
HiYM Bt X 7.70-87 
KJPSTGIX67V -.04 


p p H z*\ IB :S XW fW 


TXFrAP .*68 -81 
Timee 16J0 +78 
ToiRtAP 11? +84 


'w^isr+8, 

BafTrn 984 +87 
GfMnTrnlO.16 +85 
GwthTrn 1X14 +87 
W8^>n1355 +.18 
SIGYPrr 957 +81 


83 mssssm 


^ St i fflKftHJS 

TEfTTJn 964 tSgAp 12l» +J0 

i&K r n B i£S:s Sap^I-^ 

yrnpiOi. 7460 +70 CMtoAp 155? +S 


Sxr m » GS 

Mi is ^ 

mi to^sr mi 

HYTFr 974 . Etanln 


2X23 +89 
10464 +266 
n 360 +81 
2171 +60 
n 964 +84 
1£M +87 
£9.\- - 

Tx9Jl . 


1064 -82 
1474—85 


1474—85 
9.15 —04 
1X91 +84 


MIDCOt n 16J6 +77 
JTGovtl 1471 -84 
BannvRplBTl —82 

gWARplXla —84 
MWC0RP1477 +77 
STCOVtR rtfij] —04 


-81 WBX 10S +ffi i 

fifa 

'SG MSP 961 +8? 


GvLIA o BM 
GwMbAp 462 *82 
GvSCAp 973 -81 


Sf 9J1 
in 1464 + 62 


+.19 1 USGvfp 
_ iVOlStAp 


trmf35J3 +84 


EqlncCp 561 -81 j WlValn 17.14 -.12 (CuFdSTn 958 —.01 j NJTxFf 1074 - 82 


ExchFd 11463 - 72 |BerwvnRiniX00 +.04 Culler Trust: 


FOMaA p 1287 
FMoBp 1X08 
GlEaAp 1X09 -.18 
OEaSpn 1187 -.17 
GlEaCnp 11.90 -.18 


-Berwyn Inc nil 73 —83 ApvEan 10JV -85 1 
BhirodMCGIOJD -81 | EqtyliKo n 9.99 


hnore Fundw . GoviSecn 983 -81 

atonced 10.15 -82 I DC Investor: 

nurfv 1X40 +82 1 Equity 10J4 ..13; 


NYTxF t 1069 -83 ! 
NotlMunt 963 +82 
NCTxFt 9.93 -84 
OHLtdt 9.76 -81 
OHTxF I 1027 -82 
ORT«Ff 1084 -83 


DfvsWre:p767 _83 

BB&rdBM 


AetABA 1171 +84 
CATFA 1X83 +83 I 


Growth n 1354 +72 GavSecpxlXM— .05 GtonAo 3X25 +73 
tortn 1288 +42 MfdQe>pS74 +82 GrfnAp 939 —S 
ST Gov n 977 _ SocAwp -2475 +81 HftncAt 1087^X1 


wm6 iSi 
JZSS, U J 


FtoSvcr 5441 


Equity p X7B -87 


WpridBdn 97! 
Herfleue Funds: 


1 WxEota 1180 


ESCORTS 4 GUIDES 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


(Continued From Page 11) 


BELGRAVIA 


ORCHIDS 

LONDON PMB$ GSCVAZUIOCH 
ESCORT I «W0f 
asm CATO wacotw 


MAYFAIR INT’l 


GENEVA ■ PARIS 


; ■ TROPICAL ■ ESCORT * AGENCY • 
London Hegdrow GomA Serece 
TEL m 637 8S5S-CBEPIT CARDS 


London Escort Service 071 7X7 4792 Fre»y w<»wxi b«ri Se+woe 321 99 61 


UK 071 589 5237 


OfiSEA SCOT SaVKt 
51 BeouSyynpPVxo. London SW3 
TeL 071 586 6513 


UAWJNS OF PARK LANE 

LONDON ESCORT SBMCE 


GBTEVA ■ GLAMOUR* PARE 
BASa «bsod Agency* VBW W 89 


ZURICH - RANKRJRT 

AMfTHY TTE Ini l Esoort/Txvei Swvct 
CAR SWITZBUArO 089610 22 59. 


•* ZURICH *• VIOLET 

5con Sw nee C'«H r.®* ««ohi 
Tel - 077 63 83 12 


INTERNATIONAL BCOKTS 

Swwce ■ Wix fc Awdr 
M 212-769-7896 New Yerit USA 
Ataev Gw*f Canh Amptd 


' ' * VANUM&I ' • • 

London ixort Sennet 0860 d9i 148 


OOB8TAL ESCORT SBVtCE 

LONDON 

PLEASE PHONE 071 225 3fl0 


" GENEVA AUlANff" 
Ewt Semce and Tra«H Muhbnqtd 
Tel 022 / 311 07 24. 


RUNHW KOIN DUSBDOtl 

ol mgs. Exori Serw 

Qj.9473294 

ZUKH • BEVBLY MS 
EsaxtSerwce 

IP7 O 51 12 

** LONDON • CARBKAN " 
Itodon Heodraw Gahnck Escort 
Setvxe 071 <3S 1DQ2 QBXT CA8DS 
( ’ZURICH" SUSAN* 

Escort Service 

T6 01 > 381 99 48 

1 WELCOME 

ESCORT X CUK AGCNCf. 

PLEASE CAR 089 91 3 14. 

FRANKFURT I AREA 

Moras Escort Agency 
; Fear CnBQiff ■ 89/66 M 

ZURKTUACOUBM 

Escort Snviu 

ZtfKH3»n5M 

■FRANKFURT* 

Pnncejs Escort and Travel Serves. 
PVwecoSMoWs: Q16l-*26 32 572 


TofRAp ixw -ja 
UfflA p 7.14 -82 
VtauAp 985 + .12 
WtoAsfAUA 15.15 - 

INoEaAplUA +89 

WoGvAp 1174 +.11 

WoGrA 1484 -73 Moro Son Inert: Baton 

WoTBTA plOJ2 -8? AaQryn 1271 -83 i COBApr 
MuGdA 1X44 +JJ2 Adarfiqn3484 -52 RvLow 
Mu+fiA 685 +82 flat 9J1 —71 J&neroA 
MuUA 764 - EmGr 15.12 -65 EnhEan 

MuALAp 1071 -82 EmMkf 19.08 -.71 Eqlncn 
MUARAD 9J7 +82 En«VUtDWna*5 +.18 Inti rf 
MuCAAp 562 +81 EdGrn 1X02 +.1B AltodBdt 

MuFLAp 957 FuCTnc 1081 -82 MioCtaJ 

MuGAAp 1079 +.03 Gjgq»Y I486 -87! SmCpG 

MUMAAP1X07 +8> GFxInn 1X17 +831 SmCpV 

MuMDApU.90 *M HiYtan 1080 * 83 UUSttn 

MuMSAp 9.19 +83 krflSCn 1477 +J2.FIMCOR 
MuNCAplUl +82 IffltEq 1577 +.1BI TM«etn 
IUM4YAP1064 +82 -tonGqfynlOJI -JM TRII1 
MuSCAp 1179 +.03 RedYHn 055-03 LowDur 
MuTNAp 1077 +.02 Votoe£qnI287 -83 ] LOU 
MRJVAAp 11J7? .81 SCVntn Itm +J»1 SfionTn 
UtflB 7.15 +8? MuMn*m0HJl +J4| Frann 
CopGBt 1199 -85 MunMIGB 1060 -.15 1 Gtobaln 
SondB I26S -83 MutlBrft X, 1E79 — 74 HiYId 
EfnGrS t 1EB7 *65 Mutual Series: _ Grwth n 

Gokfflt 4.20 -.10 Beoconn 33.19 -.06 LTUSGr 
GvMO ©f 462 - 82 DBWvry 1X70 +80 FNCFand 


Emeroeqioja 


H& 323 :s 

ST Govt SX29 — 83 Balance 


Fxtaqri 10.07 -81 PBHG Funds CapApr n 1X17 

GStedFx n 9 J4 +83 PilBoxEG 1X19 +70 DfvGran 1164 

MSmCpnlOJl +88 Growth n I486 +72 Eqlncn 1X93 

.MuriBa 1056 *81. Min 1X27 _ Enirixn 1161 


JP13J2 +J25 [PFAMCoFd*: 


Brtan 1X38 +85 
83! CasApn 13.12 +88 
-52 DivLown 11 J2 +81 


MuARAp 977 +82 
MuCAAp 562 +81 ■ 


FuOSnc 1081 -82 
Gjgqiy I486 - 87 
GPxInn 1X17 +83 


HiYtan 1X00 

klflSCn 1677 


EmeraMkt1473 +64 GATFn 963 +83 
EnhEan 1183 +89 GlbGv 951 +85 


RedYldn X3S —J3 
VWueEqnI2JJ7 -83 


71 Eqlncn 1173 +81 

-.li mil n 989 +.13 

EOGrn 1X02 -MB MadBdln 960 +it 

Fxfllnc 1081 -82 MiaDxi 1367 +.15 

87! SmepG I BJB +J0 

83 1 SmCpV 1274 +.12 

83 uasttn 889 — 81 

J2 iPUKORffldS: 

.181 Taifietn 1080 +81 

JM TRin X9S +81 

*-33 LowDurn 988 


ST Gov n 977 _ SocAwp -2675 +81 

Value n 1187 +.12 R&ncoBd 135 *81 
Tice Fond*: Ri men SIX 1X23 +88 

AdftJS 463 . raven nE 11.19 +83 

Balance 1169 +86 RtaerfKVr 972 +82 

oS5n 9^ +82 EquilYX^lSM —84 

$%Zn n \fZ «Sbx§M 

Eqlnc n 14.93 +JS3 B nbemo n9taP& w» :__: 
Eqidxn 1361 +84 Caranin 1083—87 

Biropen 1X44 +72 EmGrp 1X19 +67, 

Furajtan'aS +8i Ro^wptte 4 

GNMn 9.11+82 BdGrawp 1288 +861 

GATFn 963 +83 ROMup 1766 +87 

GtoGv _9J1 +JJ5 LIUNYp 379 +81 
Gnwthn 2063 +84 Rodney Square: 
GwRunn 1657 +.14 Divtpp 1262 +81 
HMdft 113 —83 Growth p 14& +74 
Income n 061 +81 WiEsp llS +75 
Irufidn 9.79 +.10 RetastaaRnfc 
IntiCTsn 1787 *32 GvSecn 977 +82 
misffcn 1278 +78 Grfti . lXBO t84 


HlJCAA 8.19 +JH 
mtNYA 4 ,21 tin 
LWMUP 889 +81 

yftJ’P .JS +81 

MBMuApl554 + 83 

gttrn :* 

.MfftMjfl as 

BTRA 1570 +JJ3 

BKH*' 


^^Wdiai7 

Boflwn? 1 T ; 5i60 


+.01 saurm 788 +85 

JSSEgi : * & 

weedyya TXT7 • _ BdSvc zju 

JS & '.RS :Sf 

1X11 pfWvftUMijM -r.is 


^Wthn Siffl +’S 


tattEmGrn575 +jo 


n 9M til 

.IS Quq«Y 969 + 81 


^ ;s j 

Ultra n - 2072 +76 
l«CVShT n j^ *81 
JAtato n ■ 127 —jn 
Vision 967 +71 


LMNYA 373 +81 

1 DnAtM Turn— 

■WIVF *|I|MR|| 

EXvtpp 1262 *81 

1 Ss^ p m 




ApprBt 11.00 _ USUneSUc n£17 

CaMuQf 1551+83 USAAWWipt - " 

14J2 —83 AasvGttiniXM + TC 


DvstaBt 767 —.03 


Buraet 1471 +72 

ss +* 

sSit 15-13 

978 +fl? 


SOfPIn IB m -SB] SrseTTn 989— 81 
«MR*m0»jl +74| Frann 964 — 
VjnMIGB 1060 - 15 1 Gtobaln 979 +83 
taflBnft*.IB79 -74 HiYW taTO _ 


HiYW 1(170 
Grwth n 14.11 +.14 


Wlnfll 

littmBt 


662 -82 
973 + .01 


Qualftfn 38 49 


*.0fi LTUSGn 974 +.10 
-88 FHCFandft 


Japan n 11.94 +.12 MWWGr 1163 +.11 

LgAmn 1X50 +60 tJ- 

«MTxFrn 9.94 +82 EqtaC 861 +« 

i«0»nl488 +76 OTC 654 +.00 

Newfmn2M6 +Jfl PremSwn 6Ja.+8/ 

N Asian 1081 *75 Vatuotn 960 +80 

New Cra n2i34 +84 RuthmereGroeix 
NwHranniSTC +73 AmGain 11.14 —.12 

NjTFn 1060 -83 USGLsn 981 —81 


It 980— 83 
Bt 1057-01 
ffil 1163 +.» 


MoGvBtnlJ 

MOMUBM5 


ssssaMix 

CABdn 1084 +82 

gffi" ^JS ** 

Gewmn 10jc +09 

Mcann un —8i 

Income n lljja 

I™)" +74 

NYBdn 1081 +Jn 


AflAITB 1145 *84 
OTCB XI/ -73 
MIGB 1050 +74 
RsdiB 136/ +70 
1 SeoBl 1780 +.M 
I MuWVAp!1.19 *M 
MuBdB 1063 * 83 


4.97 -02 | Sxrein 0460 -.11 
R.H - 83 ! NCCPwte 


Balances 1270 -4)1 
Bom 1X19 —81 
CoreEal 9.98 . 


!WB»L STOCKHOLM 

ESCORT SBVKf 

TEL OB 157B31 


Cbreme tnferuational 

6a»t Agency 

Amflerdam +3170WT50B6 


V084A*PAJBS*nVOA*TUBCH 

EUKXX3NTACT tel Escort + Trowt 
Semce. Col Vena +411-310 63 19 


OCFuwto:. l CoreSal 9.98 . STGtof 

Etailncit 1087 * 81 i CareEaS 9.98 *81 i SmCVI 
Equdvi d 1180 +.14: Grawthl lx 10 *.lff sueflGr 
Fxdlnd p 1070 ^ 1 GroFaS ixd8 _ specln 


SdTdin 1050 +66 
ST Bdn 480 


NJMuBt 1289 +82 
NVMuBt 1061 +84 


ft 973 +82 
.987 + 83 


1050 +741 Frfdlid p 1070 
136/ +78: OH7EIP1XS4 -.03 
1780 +.14 TotAdvlt 1X10 -82 
11.19 +82 TreoSlp 
1063 + 83 Eau5vRp1350 +.13 


idKEfl 1183 *85 TxFIreen 9.17 +82 SBCWKSn 971 — « 
E&522 5 ’I-SS 2WWFn1l6e +82 SCWWGrl6J9 +85 
IntmBdS X1B +81 TFIiKln 1070 +81 SBSFmdR 
WGvtS 977 +81. TxFttfn 5JS . COpGrn 7J0 +.11 

WTBta 9.19 +8! us Mf 589 , ConvrWnnj2 +8S 

WGovfl 97/ +81 US Long 970 +8l SBSFn 1ST? +81 

MEq 1370 +.13 VATFn 1X50 * 87 SB Futec 
irfflEas 11*8 +.11 PfsmrvTn 1087 _ Bctitaicp 1159 *^0 

Mataoetf 1080 - 82 PmcfartPresK Bondnp 1073 +81 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBl'NE, MONDAY. AUGUST 22, 1W 


ftflP I * 


ft* t New International Bond Issues 

- Q f.r — 

Compiled by Laurence Desvilette 

Price 

. . Amount Coup. • "T 


Bonds Still Trembling After Fed Whipsaw 


Boating Bate Hotea 

Compognte $150 3001 

RncnoSrede CICet 

1‘llroort EwopSenna 

first USA Credit Cord $500 T 997 

Master Trust - 

first USA Ge**t Card! / $750 2003 
Master Trust 


3/16 100 ’ — 


O.M 100 — 


$750 2003 ft.35 TOO - - — 


Halifax Bufldfing 
Soriafy 

MENA Master CretSt 
Card II 15*94-8 Trust 

Luebecker . 
Hypolhekenbank 

HMC Mortgage 
Notes 12 


$500 199? Star 99m 5 — 


$870 2002 045 TOO — 


dm200 1999 Shoe 99.W — 


£170 2037 0J0 100 — 


Cr&fit Commercial de ff 'lfiOO 1997 
France 


0.*> TOO — 


Society G6n6rale 

Acceptance 


FT 1,000- 1997 V5 99.W — 


P* er 3taonth Libor. Redeemable at per in 1999. Fees 0.25%. 
mciKsed hrxn SlOOtnifton. DenenwiaftorH 510,000 {5cnwa 
bal) 

Ow t> month Libor. Nonea&atale. Fees JW%, Abo S39.16 
Iwfcon payme 034 over Libor. (Men* Lynch Infl.) 

CW 1 -month Ubor. Average hfo 6.9 years. Feu 0.40%. Abo 
S5B.t m iGon. prry<ng OS3 over labor. (Mnmrt Lynch tatlj 

Irtwen Mil be rhe 3-monih Libor. NonoaAoblo. Feu 0.15%. 
DctvmHxavM 510/300. (Lehman Srwhm 

0«er 3-month US. T-ffiflt NoneaflaMe. Fees not dadased 
Abo $45 irtihon paymg 035 over I -month Libor. (Merrill Lynch 
Inti,} 

Interest wtB be the 3-month Ubor, NonttAatta. Feu 030% 
(Deutsche Bank.) 

Over 3-ntanth Libor. ReoHeied at 9943. Average We 5.1 
yuns. Fees nor cfedosed. Aha £20 miSon, paying M over 
ubor, and ES3 paying 120 over l&or. (Lehman 

Brerheit fot'L} 

Over 3-month Pibor. nxsaimim 8.15% NoncafcrWa. Fe« 
0.1875%. (Crfafit Commensal de France.) 

Over 3-monih Pibor. within a defined range. Noneallcbie. 
Fees 020%. Denaminatioru, 500.000 Fiona. [SaoMr G&nte- 
de.) 


Fhed-Coapww ' 

Seventh Mexican " S160 1999 

Acceptance Carpi 


Sweden 

Qesterretctwche 

KantToilbank 

Kellogg 

Denmark 

Denmark 

Finland 


DM200 2000 6K 100V* 


m. 200,000. 1997 11.35 101273 


CS 740 1997 m 101.188 


Y 25,000 1997 

Y 25, 000 , 1996 
925,000.^2014 


TO 96% — Senvonmiafly. Noncalfobfe. Few 1W% Donormncmoro 

*250,000. Aho $40 milnn priced ut 99.94, (Kidder Peabody 
HttX) 

614 10014' ’ — hderMt veil be 6ffc% in firs two years, thereafter the 6-mortti 

Libor, with a minimum of 5% and a maximum of 8%. 
■ tWnfe Fees 1.35% (CommwbanM 

1135 101.273 99.65 feaffensd at 700086. Nanadtat*. Feu HH6. (Deutsche 
■ Bank.) 

8Mf 101.788 -99.40 Reoffared at par. Nonca U able. Fees H4% (Lehman Brothers 
Irt'L) 

3 99.99 - — Noncdfabie. Fees a30V (Ddwa Europe.) 

zero 9&1? — Yield 242% NoncafeWe. Fees 0.75% (Dcrwa Europe.) 

536 100 ■ ' ' — CdbWe at par in 2004, fees not cfedwed. Denommatkxis 100 

mi Ikon yen. (Yamachi InflJ 


Coopers Employee Attacked in Turkey 


The AtsedasatPrcss 

ANKARA — An employed of the govern- 
ment-appointed administrators of the fugitive-: 
tycoon Asil Nadir's Polly Peck empire was shot ■' 
and wounded, police said. 

David Adams, an employee of the Coopers & 
Lybrand accounting firm, was shot in the leg 
Friday in a crowded street in downtown Istan- 
bul. No arrests have been made, but- Coopers. & 
Lybrand employees have been attacked and , 
threatened before for their involvement in the 
Polly Peck case. 

The accounting firm speculated chat Mr. Na- 
dir, who escaped to northern Cyprus last year, 
could have ordered the assaults. Several other 
Coopers & Lybrand employees in Turkey have 
been attacked recently. 


Polly Peck boomed in the 1980s, when its 
share prices rocketed as Mr. Nadir made a series 
of acquisitions. The British-based company also 
' had interests in Cyprus and Turkey. 

But the conglomerate collapsed late in 1990 
when investigators began probing irregularities 
in Nadir family trusts and investors sold the 
stock, which soon became worthless. 

Mr. Nadir escaped to his native northern Cy- 
prus last year, saying be could not get a fair trial 
in Britain. He bad been free on bail on charges of 
stealing $47 million. 

Mr. Nadir cannot be extradited from the 
northern part of the island, which is under the 
control of the Turkish Republic of Northern 
Cyprus, recognized only by Turkey. 


WORLD STOCKS IN REVIEW 


VnAguw F i u t rf mi t 

■■ Amsterdam 

The benchmark HOB index 
finished the week down. 1.98 
points at 412.45, hit'Friday fey a 
late fall in the dollar after fig- 
ures showed a sharp trade defi- 
cit in June. 

Volume was high all week, 
with the market coming up to 
the end of its monthly trading 
term, brokers said. 

International shares were 
generally influenced by the dol- 
lar’s performance, particularly 
against the rising yea 

Frankfurt 

The DAX index of leading 
shares posted a moderate gain 
last week, finishing Friday at 
Z 149.57 pointt, up 1.17 percent 
from the previous week. 

Traders said the market wel- 
comed the Federal Reserve 
Board's increase in ILS. interest 
rates on Tuesday, but was a bit 
disappointed that the Bundes- 
bank kept key rates unchanged 
at the Thursday meeting of its 
central council. 

The German central bank’s 
failure to lower rates fueled sen- 
timent that European rates bad 
bottomed for this economic cy- 
cle, especially since Italy and 
Sweden raised rates the prew- 
» oils week. 

Share volume totaled 30.99 
billion Deutsche marks for the 
week, little changed from 31216 
billion the previous week. 

Hong Kong 

The market continued its 
downtrend last, week, with the 
Hang Secg index finishing 
down 60.12 points for the week 
at 9,404.44. 

Average daily volume 
amounted to 4JS38 billion Hong 
Kong dollars, up from the previ- 
ous week's 4JD84 Nihon dollars. 

Pressure early in the week 
came from fears the U.S. cen- 
tral bank would raise rates 
sharply, but those fears calmed 
after the Fed's 50-basis-pomt 
rate increase on Tuesday be- 
cause investors expected it 
would be the last such move for 
some lime. , 

Brokers said they expected 
buying sentiment would return 
to the market this week. 

London 

Share prices rose tot week w 
levels not seen since March as 
dealers welcomed figures snow- 
I urn inflation in cheek- . 

The Financial Times-Stock 
Exchange 100-share index 

closed at 3J91.40 pointson Fn- 

dav for a rise of 49.1 points, or 
1.6' percent, on the week. 

Shares jumped Wedn ®?3 
after the government raGBsed 
figures showing m dcriyjng“j" 
flation had fallen to 2^ 
in the year to July. *!** lowest 

figure in years. . 

^Dealers said the figures 
would ease pressure on the gov- 
ernment to raise interest rates 
m ihe near term. 


Other figures released in the 
week showed a 11,800 drop in 
unemployment, a 0.4 percent 
rise in retail sales, a lower-than- 
ejqpected rise in the ndn-Euro-" 
pe&ri Union trade deficit and a 
fall in the budget deficit. 

The rise in u.S. interest rates 
had little impact, cm British 
stocks because the move was 
expected, brokers said. 

Among leading stocks, the 
banking and property group 
HSBC Holdings fefl 39 pence, 
to 720 pence, as investors fo- 
cused on the bank's poor half- 
year performance in capital 
markets rather than a 24-per- 
cent increase in half-year profit. 

Other companies reporting 
results did not fare much better. 
BZCC, the cables giant, 
dropped 18 pence, to 400, de- 
spite a 26 percent increase in 
first-half pretax profit. 

Sedgwick Group PLC, the in- 
surance broker, which reported 
a 13.6 percent rise in six-month 
profit dropped 1 pence; to 17Z 

Milan 

Shares staged a slight recov- 
ery last week, with the Mibtel 
index finishing at 10.610 points, 
up from 10347 the previous 
week. 

Despite the market’s stabili- 
zation, dealers said they were 
not yet convinced that Prime 
Minister Silvio Berlusconi had 
made peace with Umberto 
Bosa, bis coalition partner. 

Disputes with Mr. Bossi. head 
of the separatist Northern 
League and a junior coalition 
partner, helped puH stocks down 
7 3 percent the previous week. 

Mr. Boss has criticized Mr. 
Berlusconi consistently since he 
came to power in April, causing 
much of the political uncertain- 
ty that made the market ner- 
vous the previous week. 

Among individual stocks, 
Olivetti SpA rose 8.0 percent on 
news of strong sales in the por- 
table computer market. Fiat 
SpA rose Z47 percent. 

Paris 

Shares slipped over the week, 
with the CAC-40 bhie-chip in- 
dex dropping to 2,001.33 points 
Friday from ZD06.95 points the 
weds before. 

Dealers said the market was 
underpinned by the rise in U.S. 
interest rates out were disap- 
pointed by the failure of the 
Bundesbank to cut its rates 
Thursday. 

Bond prices continued to wor- 
ry the stock market, particularly 
after the previous week’s rise in 
Italian aim Swedish rates. 

But analysis said the medium- 
term outlook remained strong, 
with business results expected to 
pick up in the second half of the 
year, and economic indicators 
moving in the right direction. 

Manufacturing output rose 
2.6 percent in the second quar* 
ter and industrial production 
rose 2.4 percent, the INSEE 
economic institute said. 


Singapore 

Shares rose last week despite 
profit-taking as buying interest 
centered ot selective local blue 
chips and some Malaysian is- 
sues. 

The key Straits Times Indus- 
trials index gained 29 38 points 
last week to finish at 2,347.17, 
while the broader-based All- 
Singapore SES index added 
1.99 points, to 574.28 points. 

A dealer said the midweek 
interest rate increase in the 
United States had no market 
impact because it was expected. 

^ln line with the Wall Street’s 
positive reaction to the hike, 
Singapore and Malaysian 
stocks continued to find good 
buying support,” the dealer 
said. “Now that tire interest rate 
issue has been settled, the mar- 
kets here and in Malaysia 
would no longer be in an uncer- 
tain state, at least for the imme- 
diate future.” 

Total volume for the week 
stood at 1.4 billion shares val- 
ued at 3.62 billion Singapore 
dollars, up from volume of 1.16 
billion units worth Z79 billion 
dollars the previous week. 


Tokyo 


Knigiii-Ridder 

NEW YORK — Treasury bond 
prices are likely to fall this week, given 
the market’s recent shaky tone and the 
$ 28 billion of new notes due to arrive 
Tuesday and Wednesday, analysts said. 

The market rallied dramatically Tues- 
day after the Federal Reserve Board 
raised interest rates by half a percentage 

U.S. QtEDIT MARKETS^ 

point, but those gains were wiped out in 
Thursday's bid sell-off, leaving prices 
nearly fiat on Ihe week. 

The yield on the benchmark 30-year 
U.S. Treasury bond finished the week at 
7.49 percent, just up from 7.4 8 percent 
logged the previous week. 

Not only was the bond market unable 
to sustain the initial rally after the Fed's 
tightening, but the coupon yield curve 
has actually steepened from a week ear- 


lier, even though conventional wisdom 
called for a flattening on an aggressive 
Fed move. 

Ward McCarthy, a managing director 
at Stone & McCarthy Research Asso- 
ciates, said the price of long-term Trea- 
suries would not be able to improve 
until retail investors started extending 
the maturity of their holdings, some- 
thing even less likely, given the choppy 
price action ihis week. 

"Over the last couple of months, mon- 
ey managers have been happy to keep 
high cash balances and play the market 
close to their vests, maybe a little to the 
short side." Mr. McCarthy said. "If any- 
thing the events of this week will rein- 
force their conviction that they’re better 
off staying out of the market.” 

Meanwhile, be said, dealers still 
owned remnanis of the refunding issues 
sold at the start of this month and were 
not likely to have much enthusiasm for 


bidding on this week's note auctions. 
TTie Treasury will sell $17.25 billion of 
two-year notes Tuesday and $11 billion 
of five-year notes Wednesday. 

"The near-term prospect is that the 
market will go down more," be said. 

But Barbara Kenworthy, a senior 
portfolio manager at Prudential Mutual 
Funds, said she was "cautiously opti- 
mistic” about the market's performance 
□ext week. 

Ms^ Kenwonhy said the sell-off late 
last week suggests the market would 
rally Monday, then go lower heading 
before the auctions. 

The dollar's weakness was one of the 
factors that pushed Treasury prices low- 
er late last week, and investors said it 
would remain a concern this week. 

Another of the triggers for Thursday’s 
sharp sell-off was the spike in the infla- 
tion readings in the Philadelphia Feder- 


al Reserve's August economic survey. 
Gary Thayer, a senior economist at A.G. 
Edwards & Sons in St Louis, said con- 
cerns about inflation would continue to 
weigh on ibe bond market. 

"What we need is some clear signs 
that inflation is not a problem before 
our market or markets overseas can do 
belter,” he said. "We’re getting good 
news on oiL but what we need to see is 
some good news on some of the industri- 
al commodity prices, like steel and other 
industries that are near full capacity.” 

U.S. economic data due this week are 
limited to the July durable goods report, 
due Wednesday, and revisions to second- 
quarter gross domestic product, due Fri- 
day. The median forecast calls for a 03- 
percent rise in orders for durable goods, 
after the 1 .3- percent increase in June, and 
a revised gain of 3.8 percent in second- 
quarter output, little changed from the 
3.7-percent rise reported last month. 


Greenspan Cool to Rate Rise IBM Plans Pash Into China 

JL aamberg Bunnas Ncvn IBM Jaoan, a subsidi: 


Share prices slipped back af- 
ter the recent rally, depressed 
by the rise of the yen against the 
dollar on international currency 
markets. 

The Nikkei average of 225 
leading issues finished the week 
at 20.512.70 points, down 
151.13 points, or 0.7 percent, 
from a week earlier. 

Domestic players joined for- 
eign investors in a selling spree, 
discouraged by the stronger 
yen, which was feared to be 
p ushing down revenues of ex- 
port-oriented companies. 

The yen's fresh strength was 
discounted by a finance minis- 
try official as the result of spec- 
ulation, and traders said they 
expected the stock market to 
move narrowly until mid-Sep- 
tember, when think tanks re- 
lease corporate earnings esti- 
mates. 

Zurich 

The rise in U.S. interest rates 
weighed on shares here, sending 
the Swiss Performance index 
down 11.1 points, or 0.65 per- 
cent, to 1,703.93 points. 

The market also was de- 
pressed by disappointing half* 1 
year results at Swiss Bank 
Corp., which reported a 36 per- 
cent fall in its consolidated net 
profit Shares in the country’s 
third-largest banking group fell 
18 Swiss francs, to 376. 

Shares in Credit Suisse rose 4 
francs, to 535, despite a 19.3 
percent fall in its six-month 
profit- The result was better 
than expected, analysts said. 

jn the pharmaceuticals sec- 
tor, Sandoz dropped 16 francs, 
to 697, after announcing ii was 
withdrawing its Pajodel drug. 


By Keith Bradsher 

New York Tuna Service 

WASHINGTON — Alan 
Greenspan, the chairman of the 
Federal Reserve Board, appears 
to have been more reluctant 
than some or his colleagues to 
raise interest rates earlier this 
summer, judging from the notes 
of a July meeting of Fed the 
officials. 

The central bank's policy-set- 
ting panel voted at its July 
meeting to allow Mr. Green- 
span to raise interest rates at his 
discretion during the following 
weeks rather than wait Tor the 
next meeting of the group, ac- 
cording to minutes of the meet- 
ing released Friday. 

But Mr. Greenspan did not 
exercise this discretion, and the 
Fed did not raise rates until the 
its top policymakers met last 
Tuesday. Then. Mr. Greenspan 
joined Lhe other six members of 
the Federal Reserve Board in a 
unanim ous vote for an increase 
of half a percentage point in the 


DOLLAR: 

A Tough Question 

Coo turned from Page 9 
lion and Morgan forecasts that 
to be running at 4 percent next 
year. 

To complete the dimming 
outlook for the dollar, growth 
prospects are also being revised 
in Germany (as well as the rest 
of Europe) which raise doubts 
about the trajectory for interest 
rates on the Continent 

Previously, analysts were 
predicting a scissoring of the 
mark's strength as short-term 
U.S. rates were increased and 
German rates were lowered. 
Now, the most optimistic ana- 
lysts expect only a further half- 
point cut in German rales and 
that possibly not until early 
next year. 

In the meantime. Kit Juckes 
at S.G. Warburg in London 
warns of a "possible colossal 
supply" of bonds hitting the 
German market during the rest 
of this year, keeping upward 
pressure on 10-year yields 
which currently are nearly I 
equal to U.S. levels. 

While this is likely to destabi- ! 
lize German and other Europe- 1 
an bond markets, Mr. Juckes 
sees real interest rates in Europe 
— already higher than those in 
the United States — rising fast- 
er. Real yields, or what is left 
after subtracting for inflation, 
are a mere eighth of a percent- 
age point higher on 10-year 
U.S. government paper than in 
Germany. 

Mr. Juckes expects real Ger- 
man yields by mid-1995 to be 
nearly a percentage point above 
U.S. levels. “The widening gap 
in real rates,” he predicts, “will 
support the Deutsche mark,'' in 
the currency market. He fore- 
casts the dollar to then be trad- 
ing near its historic low of 1.40 
DM. 


Euromarts 
A* a Olunce 

Eurobond Yields 



Ana.17AuB.l7 

1 

i 

UJ-J,Ioob tonn 


7 AS 

7M 

621 

U A. t, nKba lesin 

7J4 

736 

73s 

545 

UJ5.s.dwfHerni 


6S> 

041 

IN 

PeMdccferfln 

AST 

ess 

Rto 

1 . 11 . 

Ffttd) Frants 

rjB 

7 36 

7.70 

SIP 

Uofianllrc 

njs 

nup 

7A7S 

7.91 

DOUsAkraM 

BM 

Ul 

&1« 

*28 

Smflsb tcrano 

11-05 

ion 

1UB 

736 

ECU, hag tern 

A44 

8J9 

tLM 

6.U 

ECU tPdm term 

7.n 

736 

T.9J 

LSI 

Con. 5 

AI9 

?M 

Mi 

6J S 

AHS.J 

»JS 

Ml 

9J9 

6 3> 

NX* - 

8.4* 

M 

8J84 

iff 

Yen 

451 

451 

452 

UP 


Source; Luxembourg Stock Etcmnge. 


Weekly Sales 

UnuMim MarKM 


CtfM Eorodtar 

S Moot t that 
SlrsMM 45J 0 75150 - 2.I14J0 

Convert. — — — *UB 

fcw mu tost sdlzo 

ECP 29W.10 3OM40 E2S7J0 tfWM 

iota) uojo ojEUe aAtnrfi mows 


COW Ewodcor 

S nobs $ noos 
simMMt amsa mj*ji ama? ha nut 

Convert. 72W SKJO 1AB.19 1,MU0 

PRttt MXM0 MITti J5JBJ0 JJ11M 

ECP 303040 IO0W.70 M5MD 2U9J0 

Total UJ7U0 &79fc» M4HJ0 St MW> 

So mo: Eurodeor. Ccrtrt. 


Ubor Elates 


us. t <unt 

tMafectenarit 4 15/11 
Powdstwflm SVH 
RmcnftiK SMi 
ECU S* 

Yes JJ/14 


WS Aug. 19 

l-flwata VraanMv tmantn 
4 uno 5 55/16 

4 IVU 5 5 1/1# 

51/1* 5ft o 

SMi 511/14 4 

SH iim 65/1* 

JJ/14 55/14 V* 


discount rate, which the central 
bank charges banks for over- 
night loans. 

Also that day, the larger poli- 
cy paneJ, the Federal Open 
Market Committee, made up of 
the Fed members and five presi- 
dents of the Fed's regional 
banks, approved a similar in- 
crease in the target for the fed- 
eral funds rate. That is the rate 
banks charge each other for 
overnight loans. 

The vote on the federal funds 
rate has not been disclosed, but 
presumably Mr. Greenspan 
would not have supported a dis- 
count rate increase while op- 
posing a rise in the federal 
funds rate. 

During late July and early 
August. Mr. Greenspan was 
perceived wi thin the Federal 
Reserve, according to some of- 
ficials, as more skeptical than 
his colleagues about whether 
higher rates were needed to 
slow the economy's strong 
growth. Consumer spending 


had slowed some and a large 
build-up in inventories devel- 
oped during the second quarter, 
signaling a possible slowdown 
that might make a rate increase 
unnecessary. 

But some evidence has 
emerged in the past few days I 
that spending remains strong, | 
notably a Commerce Depart- , 
ment report on Tuesday saying ] 
that housing starts had jumped ' 
4.7 percent in July. 1 

While Mr. Greenspan can act ! 
on his own to raise rates, and did 1 
so as recently as April IS, the 1 
committee’s vote on July 6 to 
give him that discretion seemed 
a vote of confidence amid re- 
ports suggesting he had lost 
some influence with the group. 

Earlier this year, the panel had' 
repeatedly raised interest rates at 
regularly* scheduled meetings, 
without explicitly giving Mr. 
Greenspan the discretion to do 
so on nis own in the periods 
between meetings. 


Bloomberg Business News 

TOKYO — Major computer 
makers in China. Japan and 
Taiwan will join forces with 
IBM Japan Ltd. to promote 
IBM-compatible computers 
and Oucese-language software 
in China. 


IBM Japan, a subsidiary of 
International Business Ma- 
chines Corp.. will work with 
Acer Idc„ of Taiwan, and To- 
shiba Corp. and Fujitsu Ltd., of 
Japan, according to the Nihon 
Keizai Shimbun. 


Lost Week’s Markets 


AM Poms ore as ot dose of taxiing FrkSav 

Stock Indexes 

mmefl Stott* Aus. 19 Aug, 12 Wse 

DJ Indus. &7M30 376&71 —0.11% 

DJUtiL 187.32 188.97 —087% 

DJ Trans. 1.59439 U0O.60 -039% 

5 & P 100 429 30 42*42 +0*3% 

S & P 500 46447 461.94 +053% 

S&Plnd 54354 53040 +095% 

NYSE CO 256JJ0 254.77 +04% 

BfHotai 

FT5E10O 1191.40 3.142J0 +156% 

FT 30 1496.90 Z465J30 +1.26% 

Japan 

Nikkei 225 2O512J0 20664. —0.73% 

Germany 

DAX 114957 2.13448 +1.18% 

HcupKbpp 

Hans Seng 940444 946456 —044% 

warn 

MSCIP 63840 42950 +141% 


63840 62950 +141 % 

From Morton Stontev Capital Inn. 


Money Rates 



United States Aug. 19 

Aus. 12 

Discount rate 

3to 

3Va 

Prime rale 

7V, 

7'4 

Federal funds rote 

4% 

4% 

Japan 



Discount 

Ys» 

1% 

Call money 

203 

21S 

3-nxmtti interbank 

2'A 

2>^ 

Germany 



Lombard 

LOO 

6J00 

Caff money 

4.90 

500 

3-mantb Interbank 

LOO 

5J05 

BrtttUn 



Bank base rate 

JW 

5% 

Call money 

44k 

4% 

3-monih interbank 

5"3 

511/16 

said Aus. >9 

A us. » 

aet» 

London tun. fix* 38160 

37820 

+ 0J»% 



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Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, AUGUST 22, 1994 : V \ r 


The Week Ahead: World Economic Calendar, Aug. 22 - 26 


A scftedufe of this iraefc'e economic anc 
T” c&«mmts.txinvjdeatortixln{ema- 

uOn&HcrBKJ Tnbum by 8loomt>$rn Busi- 
ness News. 

Asfa-P&dflc 


Europe 


Americas 


• *°9i 22 Hong Kong Consumer 
pnestnata date tor July. 

EarT **8B expected crtrc Pacific. Har- 
bor Ring international Hbttmgs. 

• *ug. 23 Hong Kong Retail safes, 
figures tor Juno. 

Economic Planning Agency re- 
>3asea June diffusion Index. 

Eamtaoe expected Playmates Prt>pw- 
t*® Holdings, Sea power Intemasional 
Holdings. 

• Aug. 2* Canberra New wfiicJe reg- 
istrations tor Jidy. 

Genbrara Inventories and nwnulactur- 
m sales for June quarter. 

Sydney Reserve Bank ol Australia lo re- 
lease Its annual renan. 

Earnings expe cted John Fairfax How- 
Inga, Pioneer (ntomattonal. 

• Aug. 28 Canberra Corporate in- 
vestment date tor June quarter 
Canberra Treasury holds Srs lender ol 
Ins otlorv-tinked bands. 

Tokyo Bonk of Japan releases bar* de- 
posits and loans tor toe second quarter. 
Earnlngi expected Hutchison Wham- 
poa. Mews Corp. 

a Aug. 23 Hong Kong Provisional 
July merchandise trade figures. 

Tokyo August Tokyo consumer pnce in- 
dex and July nationwide consumer pnce 
Index. 

Tokyo July crude oH imports. 


Rome 

Romo 

Rome 


■ Aug. 22 Copenhagen Jury con- 
sumer price index. 

Copenhagen Apnl current accounts. 
London Second-quarter revised gross 
domestic product 

Rone Auguai consumer pnce irwox. 

Expected tele week 

Bfussata January mdustnaf production. 
MacMd June current account. 

Geneve August consumer price index. 
Rome June producer price Index. 

June wholesale pnce index. 

July M-2, ttvee-momh average. 
July total bank lending 
July hourly wages. 

August consumer price index. 
Frankfurt June trade balance. 

Frankfurt June current account. 

Hafatnkl July trade balance. 

Zurich -Second-quarter annual 12*} 
GDP. 

Frankfurt June capital account. 
Frankfurt June long-term capital ac- 
count. 

Amsterdam Trade balance. 

Stockholm July producer pnce index. 
Zurich August consumer pnce index. 
Brusse ls August consumer price Index. 
Frankfurt July Import prices. 

Rome July official reserves. 

Rome Juty balance of payments. 

Zurich August federal consumer price 
index. 

■ Aug. 23 Paris July final consumer 
price index 

Paris July housing starts. 

Stockholm June current account 
• Aug. 24 Stockholm June retail 
sales. 


■ Aug. 22 Ottawa June wholesale 
trade report 

Ottawa Housing markets report. 
Earnings expected American Stores 
Co.. HWs Department Stores inc. 

• Aug. 23 Hard os City The Federal 
Electoral Institute is expected to an- 
nounced the final taffy of toe presidential 
election 

Mexico City The central bank an- 
nounces me country's inflation rate; tor 
the first two weeks of August. Outlook; 
Prices are expected lo rise between 02 
percent and 0.4 percent 
New York Johnson Redbook research, 
service releases its weakly survey of 
same-store sales department discount 
and chain stores in toe Unifad States. 
Earnings e xf XhJeU Bank ot Montreal. 
Caesars World Inc., Morgan Stanley 
Group Inc. 

• Arm. 24 Ott a w a July 31 crop pro- 
duction estimates. 

Washington July durable goods oftJera. 
Washington U.S. Department of Energy 
Issues Its weekly report on- U.S. petroleum - 
socks, production, imports and refinery 

utilization. 

Earnfags expected Novell Inc., QVC Inc. 

• Aug, 29 Washington The Notional 
Association of Realtors releases existing 
home sales tor Juty. 


Ottawa The Canadian government wfl 
release delate Of its quarterly auction of 
two-year bonds. 

Washington The Labor Department re- 
ports initial weekly slate unemployment 
compensation Insurance claims. 


Quite Simply, World’s ‘MospProfitable 



Big Board’s Uncovered Short Sales at a High 


.VfH- York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Uncovered short sales on the 
New York Stock Exchange reached another high 
last month, while short sales on the American 
Stock Exchange rose for the first lime in three 
months, 'he two exchanges have reported. 

The touU number of shares sold short on the 
Big Board and not yet covered rose nearly 1.3 
percent to a volume' of 1.625 billion, the tenth 
straight monthly rise. The total on the Amex rose 
by 0.05 percent to a total of 107.2 million. 

Short-selling is the opposite of buying a securi- 
ty in the hope that its price will rise. A short- 
seller borrows shares, sells them and later buys 
them back to return to the original owner. If the 
stock price drops, the trader profits. 


gering through China and 
across Asia. It has supported 
trading throughout the region 
for more than a century. It has 
helped finance the rise of some 
of the greatest fortunes in Hong 
Kong. And it has grown spec- 
tacularly in the last decade, 
benefiting from the rapid ad- 
vance of Asia’s economies and 
using its Asian profits to pay for 
moves into the 'Middle East. 
Europe and North America. ' 
Since 15190 the company's 
stock,- which trades here and in 
London, has tripled in lockstep 
with Hong Kong's stock mar- 
ket. Investors value the bank at 
S29 bOHoo, far more than the 
market value of better-known 
Companies with the largest short positions on banks like, say, Citicorp, at 517 
the New York Stock Exchange included RJR billion. It trails only eight big 
Nabisco Holdings, Ford Motor Co., AT&T 
Corp. and Chrysler Corp. Ford and AT&T were 
also among Lhe stocks on the Big Board that 
showed the greatest monthly rise in short 
positions. 

On the American Stock Exchange, the largest 
short positions included Elan Corp., Ivax Corp., 

XCL Ltd. and Turner Broadcasting System's dent with Morgan Stanley Asia, 
class B shares. But today the financial jug- 

An increase in short-selling has historically gernaut may be losing momen- 
been regarded as an indication that stock prices turn. Throughout its Asian 
will fall, but in recent years investors have used 
short positions as one element in multi-faceted 
trading strategies. 


largest competitor in Hong of the bank’sToray into British merit 

Kcmg, ihe Hang Seng Bank backing, only recently turned competition. Bu n joday as 

Ltd-,, it jointly ■ controls 365 . the comer, while Marine Mid- much 

bank branches in Hong Kong land, its biggest - American ac- banks are 

and enjoys 60 percent of the quisition, is less than two-tbirds ing fast-paced traders m « 

-the- star i i was in 1987, when £k*al money markets* 

Phased. The Hong Kong JfiL? 

« -Whafs more, the bank’s staid changing its.ways and di ersuy 

kong & 'Shanghai Banking That political question looms countries, the bank still earns culture — an old-boy network ing its corporate culture, opeur 

Corp., the most powerful finan- large for the 129-year-old bank, two thirdsof its profits inHoog dominated by English' and ing its ranks to more Asians Mq 

cial presence in this British col- The bank certainly does not Kong. A costly diversification Scots — ? is under assault, women. The question is wheth- 

ony and by far the most visible want to see ' change in Hong strategy that was aimed at re- ■ Evolved'from the bank’s colo- er the bank is making the trana- 

and influential bank in Asia Kong. It is one of the coziest during that dependence, has md heritage, it worked well in tion quickly enough- TteD?®*. 

Besides minting Hong Kong banking environments on earth, produced little in .the way of an era when banking profits de- top executives seem to be m no 

dollars, the bank has spent Because the bank's parent also, real profits. . pended on long-standing rela- hurry, and certainly in.no mmy 

much of the last century swag- owns 61.48 percent of its. next Midland Bank, the linchpin tranships with clients, govern- to leave the bank. 


By Edward A. Gargan countries and even mainland 

New York Times Service China. 

HONG KONG — If money In Hong Kong, the bank has 
tallrs, then the currency here fi ,e uncertainty of what, if any, 
says it alL changes the communist land- 

- Four out of every five bills in lords will make in the colony's market' as measured by depos^ 
Hong Kong bear the image of vibrant capitalist .’economy in its, analysts estimate. • ■ 
the headquarters o£ the Hong- 1997 when Beijing takes, over. Though it has offices in 65 


Japanese banks. 

The Hong Kong bank's Lon- 
don-based parent, known as 
HSBC Holdings PLC, is quite 
simply “the most profitable 
bank in the world,” observes 
Karen U do venya, a vice presi- 


stronghold, it faces a growing 
crop of aggressive rivals from 
the United States, other Asian 


■SlNTEBNiTIONALl if ■ 

BusinessWeek 




This week’s topics: 

o New Ideas To Curb Population Growth 
o Europe: A Recovery That’s Almost Scary 
o Beijing's Brownout On Big Electricity 
o India: Socialist Labor Laws vs. Privatization 
o California's Shaky Recovery 

Now available at your newsstand! 




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32 13 8427 30VI 289* +1fe* 

1J 3074 34 2W 29 1 * 39* 

- SOMlOfe 94* 104% -fe 

_ 2Z77 3V. 2VA. 3V* — fe- 
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_ 314613 life 1216 +5%, 

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_ 2205344% 214* 214%— 3 A* 

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- 50302 164% 15to,,16¥u 

08 IA 10718.1544 17 <1W 

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81* 76) 89* +44 
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*7* 


NPSC 



146 39% 

3fe 



HUBCO 

.60 

2.7XI3S6 23V, 20V, 224, 

*14, 




ZZ71S'* 

14 



Kodco 



2090 84* 


/fe 

-9% 


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26 

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X 15'% 

14 V, 149, 


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71 12ft 

12 

12ft 

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.181 


427 2ft 

2ft 

2'i 

t-Mi 


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CALL: LONDON 0^1 488 2001, DUBLIN (01) 67 10 457 


FullerMoney - the Global Strategy Newsletter 


cies. «k'-GornrriC-c 
^Fpii*r-+or into 




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29 Chestam Place. 


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( JSEffiji ) H 

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For further details on bote to place your listing contact : Wilt SICHOLSOS in London 
TeU (**) 71 836 4802- Fax : (44) 71 240 2254 

■7+ d* L41UMTVAU.M »4 

itcraio^^&nbunc. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, AUGUST 22, 1994 



Pa««* IS 


Sides in Strike 
Poi 



By Marie Maske 


WASHINGTON — Base- 
ball’s acting commissioner, the 
Milwaukee Brewers’ president 
and chief executive officer Bod 
SeKg, apparently is unlikely to 
be among the major league 
owners at the bargaining table 
when the game’s stalled labor 
talks resume Monday in New 
York. 

But, ownership sources said, 
Sefag’sdanghter, Wendy Sefig- 
Priw — the Brewed vice presK 
dent and general counsel —and 
one of baseball's leading power 
brokers, Chicago White Sox 
Chairman Jerry RcmsdorCare 
among the people seriously be- 
ing considered to join the nego- 
tiator, Richard Ravitch, on the 
management side at the bar- 
gaming sesaons. 

Also on the list of posable 
ownership representatives, 
sources said,, are Minnesota 
Twins General Manager Andy 
MacPbail, Toronto Blue Jays 
President Paul Beeston, Atlanta 
Braves President Stan Kasten, 
Seattle Mariners Chairman 
John Ellis, Boston Red Soot. 
General Partner John Hairing- - 
ton, Colorado Rockies Chair- 
man Jerry McMortis, Houston 
Astros Chairman Drayton 
McLane Jr. and San Diego Pa- 
dres Managing Partner Tom 
Weiner. 

The sources indicated . that 
the owners were considering ro- 
tating two sets of participants. 

Ravitch and Bod Sebg said 
the final decisions had not been 
made abont which owners 
would attend the meetings. 
“We’re working on h,” Ravitch 
said, adding mat the fist wiD be 
complete on Monday when it is 
scheduled to be submitted to 
federal mediators in a joint pten- 

ning session with rep re se n tatives 
of baseb&O’s striking players. 

Gene Orza, the Majbr 
League Baseball Players Asso- : 
ciation's associate general 
counsel, said the union may 


choose anywhere from four to 
eight players to sit at the bar- 
gaming table. He indicated that 
the players 13rely w91.be picked 
- from the' muon’s negotiating 
committee. - 

That committee indudes the 
Oakland Athletics’ Terry Stria- 
bach, the American League rep- 
. nsmtatn^ the Texas Rangers’ 
Kevin Brown, the AL alternate; 
the Kttsbuigbr Pnate^ Jay BeQ, 
tire National League represen- 
tative the Braves’ Tom Gla- 
vine, tire NLaftanate; the Bal- 
timore Orioles' Jim Poole; the 
Bre w ers' BJ- Surhoff and Bob 
Scanlan; the Los Angeles 
Dodgers’ Brest Butler and Orel 
Hezriuser;. tire Bhre- Jays’ Paul 
. Molitor, the Ctevdand Iptfians’ 
Demos Martinez; the Detroit 
Tigocs’ Tim Belcher, and the 
White Sox’s Scott Sanderson, 

The mediators have asked for 
five, or six representatives on 
each side, with a mix of small-, 
medium- and large-market 
teams. 

Monday’s meeting between 
Ravitch, union chief Donald 
Fefar and federal mediator John 
Calhoun Wells is expected to 
focus on ground rules and set 
up dates and times for further 



In Travers, Bull 
Takes the Bite Out 
Of Tabasco Cat 


By Joseph Durso 

Hew York Tunes Service 

SARATOGA SPRINGS, 
New York — Hus time, it was 
Tabasco Cat’s people who woe 
searching for excuses. 

When the Cat ran sixth in tile 
Kentucky Derby, most people 
cared more about why Holy 
Bull, tire 2-to-l favorite, fin- 
ished 12 th. 

On Saturday, while the Bull 
vindicated himself and his own- 
er and trainer, Jimmy Cron, 


Ron Kbotz/ R eturn 

Atlanta's DaraeQ Walker bobbting a ball meant for Cleveland’s Mark Carrier, No. 83. The Browns won, 28-7. 


with a gutsy performance in 
winning the Travels. Tabasco 
Cat’s trainer, D. Wayne Lukas, 
was searching for answers as to 
why his colt, who had won the 
last two legs of the Triple 
Crown, finished a poor third, 17 
leng ths behind the winner. 

“He just didn’t handle the 
track,” Lukas said. “He’s got 
big, round feet. He doesn't have 
mud feet. I don’t think he likes 
it wet.” 

The Sar ptpg p main track was 
listed as muddy when the day 


New NFL Rules: ‘A Crazy, One-Sided Season ? 


Union leaders say they do 
not anticipate any rnimmaiate 
.progress when. -talks resume. 

“They want to wait out the 
players,” Orza said, speaking erf 
the owners. “Let them wait out 
the players. The players are per- 
fectly willing to wait out their 
tittle song-and-danee routine.” 

Fefar seemed equally skepti- 
cal about whether the change in 
dy namics at the bargaining ta- 
ble wi3 produce a change in the 
substance of the talks. *7 have 
no reason to believe they’re 
ready to change their ap- 
proach,” he said. . 

Ravitch says the owners wiS 
continue to insist upon install- 
ing a xeveaone-partiapatkm sys- 
tem, with a salary floor and 
ceding for each dob. 


By Thomas George 

Nor York Timer Service 

NEW YORK — Toiling through pre- 
season games and grappling with free 
agency and the salary cap have kept 
National Football League teams on 
edge. There is more, however, on each 
team’s plate. Each has been forced to 
adjust to a new package of offensive- 
minded rules changes. 

Thus far, the nays and yeas divide 
down the middle. 

If you play offense, you love the new 
rules. If you play defense, you feel as if 
you don’t have a friend in the world. 

Somebody, sometime; said NFL fans 
wanted to see more 34-24 games and 
fewer 6-3 ones. Moreover, the NFL 
owners decided that is what fans want 
— more offensive fireworks. 

The concern was that scoring — par- 
ticularly touchdowns — had fizzled too 
greatly in recent seasons. Defenses had 
surpassed offenses in the ’90s. The own- 


ers pointed to this; Half the NFL teams 
averaged fewer than two touchdowns 
per game last season. 

So, in March in their annual meeting, 
the owners made the following chang es , 
among others: 

• Adopted the two-point conversion. 

• Moved kickoffs back from the 35- 
to the 30-yard line and limited tees to 
one inch in height. 

• insured that the chucking rule — 


bumping a receiver only within five 
yards of L 


yards of the line of scrimmage — would 
be enforced. 

• Allowed offensive linemen to line 
up deeper for better vision of tire snap 
and for better pass-protection position. 


• Changed the spot of the ban after a 
ield-RoaJ attempt fro 


missed field-goal attempt from the line 
of scrimmage to the spot of the kick. 

• Tightened roughing-lhe-passer 
rules. 

• No longer allowed defenses to in- 
duce offensive linemen to jump offsides. 


If that happens now, the penalty is on 
the defense; 

• Allowed the head coach to commu- 
nicate via helmet radio with his quarter- 
back before the snap. 

More touchdowns! That was the cry. 
Slam the defense! Make it tougher on 
them in the kicking g^me, the pass rush, 
in pass coverage and the blitz. 

“I mean, we didn’t even get a table 
scrap,” said Jumpy Gea tiers, the Atlan- 
ta Falcons’ pass-rushing tackle. “It real- 
ly makes you sad. And angry. Every- 
body that plays defense is talking about 
it” 

“It’s tike we’re trying to play football 
in year 2020 instead of 1994,” Geatirets 
lamented. “Everybody on defense hates 
it and we had no say-so. I swear, I could 
ay. This could be a crazy, one-sided 
season." 

You could see it coining. The compe- 
tition committee that encouraged the 
new package consists primarily of of- 


fe&stve-minded coaches. The NFL be- 
gan its March meeting in Orlando with 
the commissioner, Paul Tagtiabue, 
harping about change, telling the own- 
ers not to be afraid to tinker with the 
game and to be prepared to match the 
creativity of the type led by Paul Brown 
in past years. 

More touchdowns equal more enter- 
tainment, the owners were told. 

We will see. 

We will see more field goals and 
more points, if not touchdowns, be- 
cause teams offensively are gaming the 
most in the new kicking rules. Field 
position will now average closer to 
midfield. Offenses will soar with that, 
even if they continue to get bogged 
down inside the 20 . 

Defenses will be penalized more fre- 
quently. especially early in the season. 
Defensive backs and defensive linemen 
will suffer a lough time shedding old 
tricks of the trade that are now illegal. 


began. But it was upgraded to 
good before the fifth race and 
then to fast by the time the Tra- 
vers went off at just after 5 PM. 

Yet Holy Bull, who; like Ta- 
basco Cat, did aot seem to like 
the slop in Kentucky on Derby 
Day, had no problems at all 
with the surface on Saturday. 

“f didn't want it heavy,” said 
CroU, who got his wish. “The 
way it dried out was fine.” 

Apparently, not enough for 
the Cat. 

So Holy Bull proved his dom- 
inance in only the second meet- 
ing between the two best 3- 
y ear-olds in what wifi most 
likely be the last one this year. 

Despite Saturday’s loss, Lu- 
kas thinks Tabasco Cal still has 
a shot at taking Horse of the 
Year honors. 

“If the vote was today, then 
you would have to vote for Holy 
Bull,” Lukas said. “Bnt if you 
win the Preakness, the Belmont, 
the Gold Cup, and the Breed- 
ers’ Cup Classic, then you have 
to seriously consider my horse.” 

Perhaps. Bnt it will be hard to 
vote for Taoasco Cat after 
watching Holy Bull beat him so 
easily — even with the race set- 
ting up just like Lukas wanted it 
to. 

“Everything was fine,” Lukas 
said. “Commanche Trail made 
sure the pace was real." 

Commanche Trail was the 
rabbit that Lukas had entered 
as the second half of an entry 
with Tabasco Cat to insure the 
quick pace that would allow a 
stalker like the Cat to overtake 
the tiring leaders in the stretch. 

It didn't happen that way. 

While Commanche Trail and 
Holy Bull dueled on the back- 
stretch, Tabasco Cat was falling 
farther and farther off the pace. 
By the far turn, it was evident 
that he had nothing left. 

And while the long shot. 
Concern, was almost able to 
ufi off the upset at the wire, 
abasco Cat had to be content 
with moving past a tiring Unac- 
counted For in the final strides 
just to get up for show. 




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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, AUGUST 22, 1994 


O N 


A Y 


SPORTS 


In Japan , Decidedly Non- Olympic Events Put a Frost on *98 


By James Stemgold 

New York Times Semin 

HAKUBA, Japan — This village in 
the northern Japanese Alps has been 
suffering through an unusually harsh 
heal wave, but on a recent steamy 
looming, just beyond a band of dark 
green rice Fields, imaginations were 
soaring to winter. 

At a new ski jump, covered with 
synthetic turf ana slicked with water 
for summer use, one member after an- 
other of Japan’s Olympic team rum- 
bled down the slope, launched sky- 
ward, and floated high above crowds 
of awed admirers. 

The demonstration was just one sign 
of the anxious preparations here for 
the 1998 Winter Olympics, to be based 
in the nearby city of Nagano. The 
planning has left officials both proud 
and worried as they struggle to com- 
plete what may be well over $5 billion 
m projects, including a multibillion- 
doDar extension of the bullet train. By 
contrast, the Winter Games this year 
in LXUehammer, Norway, cost approx- 
imately SI billion. 

But bringing the Olympics here is 
proving somewhat less of a transcen- 
dent experience than watching 
jumpers soar. Indeed, to some critics, 
the curious string of problems dogging 




the organizers is making the prepara- 
tions a showcase for many of the ills 
that have left Japan's political estab- 
lishment in such disrepute. 

At the least, they show how much 
times have changed since the previous 
occasions when Japan was host to the 
games — the Summer Olympics were 
held in Tokyo in 1964 and the Winter 
Olympics in Sapporo in 1972. Back 
then, the Olympics rode ihe crest of a 
wave of national excitement as Japan 
was re-emerging on the world stage. 
Now, organizers acknowledge, the)’ 
are fighting indifference and cynicism. 

"The Tokyo and Sapporo games 
were national events and everyone was 
proud,” said Norimoto Komatsu, the 
spokesman for the organizing commit- 
tee. “It's true, that has changed. But we 
stQl have three and a half years to go. 
We're hoping the cool atmosphere will 
gradually disappear.” 

It will be difficult. For starters, Ken- 
ichi Takahashi. who manages the SSO- 
m iTli nn ski jump, said the winds here 
blow the wrong way, making it a poor 
location. Also, he said, this will be the 
southernmost Winter Olympics ever 
held and the site is often grim with rain 
in winter. The jump may have to be 
covered with inferior artificial snow. 

As usual, though, the worst prob- 


lems have to do with money. Just a few 
weeks ago, the mayor of Hakuba, Yu- 
taka Nishizawa, who was also a mem- 
ber of the Nagano Olympic Commit- 
tee, admitted he had accepted a 


This whole incident 
makes me ashamed to he 
a Japanese because of 
what it shows about how 
things work here/ 

Kaorn Iwata, an aggrieved city 
official. 


$200,000 bribe from Sumitomo Heavy 
Industries for a contract to build a 
sewage- treatment plant. That merely 
continued a major national bribery 
scandal involving every big construc- 
tion company in the land. 

Although the sewage plant was not 
directly related to the games, some 
critics contended that the bribe proved 
construction companies have been 
routinely paying huge sums to corrupt 
officials for Olympic business. 

The flow of money may not have 
stopped at Japan's shores either. Japan 


had edged out Italy’s Valle D’Aosta in 
the competition to hold the games. But 
earlier this year, Italian, authorities 
said they were investigating whether 
$230,000 found in the bank account of 
a member of Italy’s Olympic Commit- 
tee was a bribe for secretly allowing 
Japan to win. 

When the committee formed to 
bring the games to Japan was subse- " 
quentiy asked to account for its nearly 
$28 mifl lin n budget, it reported that, 
regrettably, it had lost the books. 

Questions were raised about the 
plans from the start, when it was dis- 
covered that some of the projects 
would bring big benefits to Yoshiaki 
Tsutsumi, one of the wealthiest men in 
the world and (he owner of holds and 
ski resorts near Nagano. Tsutsumi, 
who is also known for his substantial 
political clout, was forced to resign as 
c hairman of the organizing committee, 
but remains a deputy chairman and, 
by all accounts, an overwhelmingly 
powerful presence. 

Tsutsumi has denied any conflicts. 
But Kaoru Iwata, a member of the 
City Assembly in nearby Karuizawa, 
claims to have felt the sting of the 
political forces supporting the games. 
He has led local efforts to block con- 
struction of the new high-speed train 


line, which will dice through the Hud- 
dle of Karuizawa, a mountain resort 
Two months ago, his home was raided 
by the local prosecutor’s office, which 
carted off piles of documents. 

The prosecutor has refused to ex- 
plain the purpose of the raid, other 
than to say it was related toa claim by 
the head of the City Assembly that 
Iwata defamed him. But according to 



for the documents seized, many were 
directly related to his campaign 
a gainst the train. 

“This whole incident makes me 
ashamed to be a Japanese because of 
what it shows about how things work 
here," Iwata said. 

Bloated budgets have also been a 
burden. The city of Nagano, already 
struggling under $13 billion in debt, 
has runted it might tty to back away 
from a promise that it will pay all the 
transportation and lodging costs of the 
athletes. 

“This city is like a bankrupt compa- 
ny,” complained Juichiro Imai, a Na- 
gano city cooncflman. “We’re going to. 
be left with debts we will never be able 
to repay. What we will be paying in 
interest alone will be enough to finance 
the construction of two big schools a 
year. Is that what the Olympics are 





NASCAR Driver Injured in Crash 

YPSHANTI, Michigan (Reuters) — The NASCAR driver 
Ernie Irvan was in critical condition with a skull fracture and 
multiple injuries at SL Joseph Mercy Hospital after crashing his 
car in a practice session on Saturday morning at the Michigan 
Internationa] Speedway. 

The 35-year-old Irvan slammed his Ford Th underbird into the 
concrete Mirier in turn two of the two-mile high-banked oval at a 
speed estimated at 176 miles per hour (283 kilometers per hour) in 
the first practice session of the day for Sunday’s NASCAR 
Good wrench 500. He was cut from his car ana immediately 
airlifted by helicopter to the hospital. 

Irvin has 12 career NASCAR victories, including three this 
season and nine in the past three years. He won the Daytona 500 
in 1991. 

Montgomerie Wins En glish Open 

COVENTRY, England (Reuters) — Colin Montgomerie bird- 
ied three of the final four holes, including a 10-foot puu at the lest, 
as he overhauled Barry Lane to win the English Open on Sunday. 

Montgomerie fired a final round of 69 for a 14-under-par total 
of 274 on the Forest of Arden course to take the title by one stroke 
and move to the top of the European money list. Montgomerie, 
who led the list last year, was helped when Lane, who compiled a 
four-under-par 68, took a bogey six at the 17th hole after driving 
into trees. 

Retief Goosen of South Africa shot a closing 67 for third place, 
another shot bade on 276. 

Maradona Gets Permission to Travel 

BUENOS AIRES, Argentina (AF) — Diego Maradona, who 
faces charges that he shot a compressed air rifle at journalists, has 
received permission from the criminal court handling his case to 
travel abroad. 

The soccer star wants to travel later tins month to Zurich, where 
FIFA is expected to decide his soccer future on Aug. 26. Mara- 
dona was suspended indefinitely from soccer after two games of 
this year’s World Cup, when drag tests showed he had used 
ephearine, a prescription drug banned as a stimulant. 

For the Record 

Germany's fanner world sprint champion, Katrin Krabbe, 
barred for two years for doping, has married Michael Zimmer- 
mann, (he lawyer who helped her fight the ban, the sports news 
agency SID reported. (Reuters) 

The U-S. women's soccer team became the first to qualify for 
the FIFA Women’s World Championship in Sweden next year 
when it overwhelmed Jamaica, 10-0, in Montreal. (LA 77 

Michael Doohan of Australia became world champion Sunday, 
winning the 500cc Czech Motorcycle Grand Prix in Brno. (AFP) 



t Reuters 

LONDON -r JlKgen Khns-V 
maun lived up to his preseason 
billing as the most sensational 
recent recruit to English soccer 
with, the winning goal in Tot- 
tenham's dramatic 4-3 -victory 
on the opening day of the Pre- 
mier League season. 

- The German striker waaone- 
of three foreign players to score 
in their debuts on Saturday and 
justify English clubs’ raids into 
the ranks of World Cup stars. 

Tottenham, audacious in the 
transfer .market, was equally 
adventurous on die field as 
Manager Ossie Andes fielded a 
five-man attacking lineup 
against Sheffield Wednesday, 
that had his opposite number 
gasping. 

Klinsmann, who Scored five 
World Clip goals, had a hand in 
setting up two on Saturday, and 
then secured victory for Totten- 
ham with a diving header in the 
82d minute. : 

He caused some concern 
three minutes later when he was 
felled by a clash of beads and' 
needed eight stitches in his lip. 

Andes was full of praise for 
both Klinsmann and his other 
major si gning, fiie Dumitrescu 
of Romania, whose attacking 
thrusts caused Sheffield, 
Wednesday a host of problems. 

“Jfligen’s contribution was' 
excellent, not only: the goal but' - 


the chances he made, and that's : 
the sort of football we're going - 
to play tins season,” said At-' 
dfles, whose team starts with I 
die handicap of a six-point defi- p 
dt imposed fw financial irregu- 
larities. 

“I thinlc Hie will capture the; 
imagination of the British pub- 
lic,” added Ardikss. “He’s still - 
not TOO percent fitLbut- he 
showed today -that heV a very 
exciting player.” 

Wednesday’s boss, Trevor - 
Francis, prased Axdiles’s brav- ( 
cry in selecting five attacking!: 
players. “When I looked at the 
lineup I thought it was the most . 
adventurous I've ever come 1 
across in management," he ■ 
said. ■ 7 ' ’• 

T knew that we would have- 
problems playing against^ play- . . 
ere erf that caliber,*' he said.' 

Dumitrescu’s World Cup col- ' 
league, the defender Dan . 
JPetrcscu, scored Sheffield 
Wednesday’s opening goal, - and 
the Dutch winger Bryan Roy 
Scored the goal jn Nottingham . 
Forest’s 1-0 victory at Ipswich, j 

.Klinsmann, who said before * 
the match that Tottenham 
needed “to start the season with . 
a bang” if it wanted to be in the - 
running for the title, said: T’m - 
very happy to have started with -. 
a victory, especially playing; 
away from home. It’s a great’’ 
start” • . • 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 

















mm 





£*38 





The Associated Press 

VICTORIA, British, Colum- 
bia — It was a' first for Sri 


away Saturday, despite the up- 
set of Brown, who had set the 
world record of 2. inmutes, 


Lanka and sweeps for Australia 24.76 seconds for the women's 
and Canada. 200-meter breaststroke in 

Sri Lanka, never a medal March. • 
winner in the Commonwealth She wa* soundly beaten by 
Games, got two on Saturday, a countrywoman Sa m a ntha RH- 
gold and a silver in shooting, ey, who. shattered Brown's 
Australia swept aB. five swim- games’ record of 238.83 set in 
ming finals, three with games* Saturday’s prelims with a per- 
records even thaugfr the world sonal best of 2:Z5:53. 
record-holder, Rebecca Brown, was shocked when I saw 
was beaten, and. Canada took the time,” Riley said. Brown 
both diving golds. was a distant second at 2:30.24. 

^ Matthew 0mm, 20i won two 
gam^ m 1930, Sn golds;- first, he jaDkd from 
knovmas tohmunrilindgjen- ^ore than a 3V*rSocond deficit 

after 300 metexi and won the 
one^gdd niedal,^^ 4 f0-yard 400 individual medley with a 

games- record 4: nxi? 


and Canada. 

Sri Lanka, news- a medal 
winner in the Commonwealth 
Games, got two on Saturday, a 
gold and a silver in shooting. 
Australia swept all five swim- 
ming finals, three with games’ 
records even though the world 
record-holder, Rebecca Brown, 
was beaten, and. Canada took 
both diving golds. 

Since the inception , of the 
games in 1930, Sri Lanka — 
known as Ceylon until indepen- 
dence in 1972 — had won only 
one gold medal, by 440-yard 
hurdler Duncan White in I960 
at Auckland, New Zealand! 

Sri Lanka broke into the sold 
medal column in the women's 
pairs air rifle, as the duo of 
Pushpamalee Ramanayake and 
Make Wickremasingbe edged 
England’s Karen Menton and 
Louise Mmott. Both teams fin- 
ished with scraescJ 771 .but Sri 
Lanka was awarded the gold 
because its shooters had a 196- 
194 advantage in the fourth and 
final round. 

“We're glad that it was the 
women’s team that brought 
home the gold,” Wickrema- 











.1 


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“ -V.-pS” v 
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Canada’s Curds Myden, the 
leader after the first three legs, 
wound up second in 4:17.73, 
then collapsed after receiving 
his saver medaL After teing 

given oxygen and taken man Samantha JRiley of Australia coming up for air. She upset countrywoman Rebecca Brown to win the breaststroke gokL 

the pool on a stretcher, he recu- 

perated quickly. 

jSSgsJS! Can Kenya’s Lesser-Knmms Fill a Void? 

Australia’s other swimming 

golds in the women’s 200 Faaen ners decided en masse to miss track coach, Mike Kosgei. fully Kenyan official said. “They 

freestyle, with Susan O’Neal, a VICTORIA. British Colum- the national trials last month expects medals in every track have to earn a living." 


ners decided en masse to miss 


Sri Lanka’s silver medal 
came in the men's parts small- 
bore rifle prone competition, ** 
its team of DJL Chandrasdri 
and Lakshman Ra atinribe fin- 
ished second with a score of 
1,117, behind the 1,121 of New 
Zealanders Stephen Petterson 
and Lindsay Arthur/ 

The Aussie swimming team, 
which won four of five grids 
Friday night, didn't let any get 


freestyle, with Susan O’Neill, a VICTORIA, British Colum- aatioaal trials last month 
gold medalist in Friday’s 800 bia — The names are the same, &» favor of the lucrative grand 
freestyle relay, leading a 1-2 the talent unmistakable and prix circuit, 
sweep in 2 .CW. 86 , and in the the expectations high. Not one of the 42 male Ken- 

men’s 100 butterfly, with Scott But the Konchellah, the yans included among the brief 
Milter winning in 3439. Sang and the Tan ui in the Ke- biographies in the Intonation - 

f > pa d « swart both diving nyan men’s team for the Com- al Track and Field Annual the 
events, with Jason Napper tak- monwealth Games athletics port’s btble, will be competing 
ing the men’s one-meter spring- program starting on Monday in Victoria, 
board competition with a spec- are not the familiar figures And not one of their top 10 
tacular final dive, an inward 2Vi from the Olympic Games ot steeplechasers in this year's 
somersault, and Anne Mont- weald championships. world rankings will be r unnin g 

rainy leading a 1-2-3 sweep in Instead, the Kenyans have here. 

the women’s 10-meter platform been forced to pick a team of Vet such is the depth of tal- 
eveat, ‘ unknowns after their top run- eat in Kenya that the national 


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Cannes IX Sontoeuc IX Lyon W. SaW- 
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ENGLISH PREMIER LEAGUE 
Saturday's Results 

rt^ta^ * 0,7 ° Msredfth Mccratn. UA. ana Arantxa San- 

SviMaMMei I dm Vlaxla Spain (It. OH. Nkate Arsnat. 

4 ILX.and Krtsttas Rattord. Australia, 6 - 1 . 6-1 

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< 1 l.Gennany.dat. Mary Plsrct < 41 . Franee.a- 
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NFLPreseason 


Detroit ax Artuna W 
devatand 2 X Attaita 7 
Green Bay IX Now Orleans 10 
SaMday* Sanaa 
MtoMWA 17 , Pfttsfiurvh W 
Seattle 3 X Minnesota 17 
Tampa Bay », Miami W 
PhBadalPfala 17 . OndrmaN 7 
H.Y. Jets U N.Y. Giants » 
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UA. RaMfere 3 fc LA. Rams 33 


Zurich Classic 


SOCCER 


VfB Sfuffgvf X Hombure l Results In the atu-tun evdtee rocs on Soa- 

Boyer Louertonsn X FC KoHeratoulani 1 day: X Glonliico Bortutanii. Italy. Mope I- 
l a tsrdoys RemUi das 4 hours 14 minutes 11 ssconds: XJ omp 

Dynamo Dresden X Wsrdor Bremen 1 Momen ts, sctgtamv GB mg, same time; X 
Bayern Munich X vft_ Bochum 1 Maurtzlo Fondriest. Italy. Lwimre-Ponorio. 

Kutsnihe SC X SC Fretbure 0 LU X Claudia CMoPuod. Italy. Carrera-Tas- 

Barer Uenanun L MSV Dtdstorv 1 soul sj.; X Blame nils, DenmarK Oe wtss 

Borussla Dortmund X I 860 MuMdi 0 BaUan. uj X Felice Puttlnl. Swhzectand, 

EMracM Frenkfurt X FC Cofoane 0 Bresdafat, sJ.j 7 . Pascal fUctxmt Swttor- 

tand. GB MG, sJ. X Massimo Ghtrattab Italy. 
ZG Mnbtll-Safie. ».t 9 . Luc Leblanc. France, 
Fu« no Andorra, 3 J. IX Lanas Armstnme. 
US. Motorola, sx 

VOLVO iNTERNATtONAL WBrW Cop iluNw: I. Johan Museeuw, 

to Nsw Harm CsasecNc at USpomIs; XGtontoco Bo rtoto mt UtoX An- 

Qeortertouts drat TssJenlLMoktovo, 115 ; LGIoroloFwIan. 

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RuWa, 7-6 t>5), 6i VJ * - . J 


TENNIS 


VOLVO INTERNATtONAL 
to Nate ffavn CsasKBcat 


SmrCKET 


THIRD TEST 

■sgtond vs. Seetti Africa. Fourth Day 
Jas dtty# to Ls w dsi i 
Enotond 2nd Kurinas: 2U5-2 
tEita land wins hv 8 ndctotusiiu drawn 1-U 


FRENCH FIRST DIVISION 
Fridays Resstt 
Nantes L parts StGenwom 0 
S a t u rday’s Resent 
BOStla L Caen D 
MHz I, Auxsrr* 1 . 

Bordeaux X SL EHeniw 1 
La Havre L MontpsBNr 2 
Lens X MorDsues 1 
Sodtaax X Rennes 3 
Staubaan X Woe 3 
Monaco X Line 8 
Cannes X Lyon 1 


Semtftoats 

Connsll andGaBuolth del. Kranemannana 
MocPherwvM C7-51, *-«. Jacca Einnoh and 
Pout HoartKA Meftoricrets CD, def. Adams 
and Omo«SMV. 7-4 (7-3). W- 

RCA CHAMPIONSHIPS 
IB todtanapsKs. I s rtlopa 
Scgtiftaob 

WaynaFemMra C 7 ), South Africa, det. Alex 
Carretla. Saata 4 -L 6-2. OIMer DeMtre. 
Franca deL Bernd Karbacher. Germany. 14. 


CROSSWORD 


ACROSS 

1 Day in 
Hollywood 
6 Like a V.P. 


to Hula hoops, 
mood rings, etc. 

14 Uve 

15 Talk drunken ty 


€B€L 

i« erthUBC** 


IB Revise 
T7 like Macaulay 
CuUon, in a 
1990 movie 
IB Mr. Mosul 
SO Diner signs 
ai The Boston 

23 Sense of sail 
44— — Moines 
as One of the 
Greats 

ZB loathed 
332Bch 

34 Egyptian deity 

35 Jeanne d'Arc 

and others; 
Abbr. 

37 Asp ~ 

«i Straddler's spot 

44 Ordinary talk 

45 Roman ‘fiddler" 
4B Composer 

Thomas 

<r Western Indian 

OB Haircuiiz 
5t Cheerleader's 
prop 

54 Kind ri nut or 
brain 
ssUve 

wVeme captain 
BB Cut in a hurry 

» Poses 

W Intersection 
concent 
ea Mound 
63 TtcWed-ptnk 
feeTmg 
to Declaim 
71 Confederate 
.73 Paradise 
ra Big books 


1 N.J. neighbor 

2 Row pullets 

3 Abundant 


4 Ratio words 

5 Bleachers 
e Mary Kay of 

cosmetics 
7 Hog filler? 
a Certain wrestler 
• Boring mol 

10 Turk topper 

11 Run like * 

12 Somber tuna 

13 Remained firm 
IB Trypanosome 

carrier 

22 Divide me pie 
28 fire (ignite) 

27 Certain 
wallpaper 
design 

28 Dewy 

as Eastern V.I.P. 

30 FUSS 

31 Finishes 
3 z Postpone 

38 Not a one-panel 
cartoon 

as Yawn inducer 
aaGomto 
hysterics 
40 Soft drinks 
42 Pretend 
« Tm telling the 
truth!" 

48 Appear 
so Awkward bloke 
siBygonetrtte 
sz Bay window 
M Kind of detector 
57 Fine, 
temperature 
wise 

3B Convex/concave 
molding 
bo Dated hairdo 
5i Did laps in the 
pool 

ea Abhor 
«4 Mata Hari. e.g. 
M Hatcher 
67 Favorable vote 



Solution to Paolo of Aug. 19 


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track coach, Mike Kosgei. fully 
expects medals in every track 
event in Victoria. 

“Kenya has a very strict pol- 
icy,” Kosgei explained after 
watching his team go through 
their paces on Saturday. 

“If somebody does not go to 
the trials, be will not be select- 
ed. What I have, I am satisfied 
with.” 

The grand prix timetable has 
not been kind to Common- 
wealth athletes, with the Zu- 
rich grand prix last Wednes- 
day. the Brussels event on 
Friday and yet another meet- 
ing in Cologne on Sunday 
night. 

And the opportunities to 
earn money rather than titles 
clearly influenced top runners 
such as Moses Kipianui and 
William Sigei. 

“I can’t blame them.” one 


Kenyan official said. “They 
have to earn a living.” 

The faces may be different 
but the training routines were 
Famil iar as Kosgei put his team 
through their paces on Sunday. 

A string of warm-up laps 
conducted" at deceptive speed 
on the infield were followed 
with a series of sprints, starting 
with 400 meters and finishing 
with 150. 

“I’m checking on speed.” 
Kosgei said. “Al this point, 
speed and endurance must be 
equal.” 

A Commonwealth tide may 
mean little to European pro- 
moters when athletes and (heir 
agents negotiate appearance 
fees. 

But it may be a stepping 
Stone for the likes of Patrick 
Konchellah. Here Sang and Ju- 
lius Tanui as they strive to em- 
ulate their namesakes Billy. 
Patrick and Moses. 


\ 

Y\ 

) i 


Mitchell Wins 
But Stays Silent 
About Fistfight 

CorifiM If Our Stall From Dispatches R ussia, clocking a fast 10.95 sec- 
COLOGNH, Germany — onds. 

Dennis Mitchell still won't say “I Wt pretty good but I knew 
why he had a fight with fellow that it would be tough to run 
sprinter Olapade Adeniken of fast after r unnin g my personal 
Nigeria. best two days ago,” said Tor- 


why he had a fight with fellow that it would be tough to run 
sprinter Olapade Adeniken of fast after r unnin g my personal 
Nigeria. best two days ago,” said Tor- 

Ademken needed two stitches fence, the Olympic 200- meter 
after the two sprinters clashed champion. “I was hoping tor a 
following the grand prix meet in time of about 10.93 ^to 10.95. 


Zurich on Wednesday. 

Mitchell declined to sav Sun- 


and that’s what I did.” 

In winning at the Brussels 


day what led to the most bizarre track meet two days ago. Tor- 
incident of the track and field recce ran 10.83. 
season. Privalova was second Sunday 

*Td iit'g to say that what has in 1 2.03. while Zhanna Tamo- 
been written in "the newspapers polskaya of Ukraine was third in 
about die incident and about ray- 1 1 .14. 

self is completely false,” the On a good day for American 
American said after w innin g the athletes, Jackie Joyner- Kersee 
100-meter dash at the grand" prix beat her great rival, Heike 
meet in Cologne in 10.13 seconds. Drechsler of Germany, to win 
“We did have a confronts- the long jump with a leap of 
lion." Mitchell said about the 7.10 meters. Drechsler’s best 


fight with Adeniken. 

Mitchell said he had been ad- 


leap was 7.00. 

Mike Conley won the triple 


vised by the IAAF, the govern- jump with a leap of 17.20 tne- 
ing body of track and field, and ters and Mark Crear had anoth- 
his associates not to discuss the er American victory in the 1 10- 
fight, but added that a state- meter hurdles in 13.13. 
meet would be coming from Mark Everett completed the 
him later. good American showing by 

As reporten. pressed Mitchell winning in the 800-meters, 
for details, his manager Charles beating in the process Noured- 
Welis intervened and stud the dine Morceli of Morocco, the 
sprinter would leave the inter- top runner between 1,500 and 
view room if he faced anv more 5.000 meters. 


questions on the fight. 


Everettdocked one minute. 


About Sunday's race. Milch- 44.36 seconds to win ahead of 
ell said be was pleased with the Joseph Tengeli of Kenya, who 


time and the victory. 

He was expected to win the 


posted a time of 1 : 44.52. 

“I was sure from the begin- 


100 -meter in the absence of the rung that that 1 could win the 
Olympic and world champion, race, I am the fastest of the 800- 
Linford Christie of Britain, who meter runners,” Everett said 
is competing at the Common- Morceli was third in 1 :44.89. 
wealth Games in Victoria. Brit- “It’s a bii crazy to run 5,000 and 
ish Columbia, and the Ameri- then go over 800 just a few days 
can world silver medalist Andre later,” Morceli said. “There is a 
Cason, who pulled out of the big difference between 809 and 
race at the last minute because 5,000. The last time 1 ran two 


of a family illness. 

But Mitchell was pushed all 
the way by fellow American Jon 
Drummond, who finished sec- 


laps was in 1991 and 1 wanted 
to cry it once again.” 

Morceli said he would again 
go after the 5,000- meter world 


ond in 10.17. Osmond Ezinwa record next week in Rieti. Italy. 


of Nigeria placed third in 10.28. 
The Americans swept ihc 


Sonia O’Sullivan of Ireland 
ran the second-fastest women’s 


sprints when Gwen Torrence de- 5.000 meters this season by win- 
feated the double European rung in 15 minutes. 6.18 sec- 


champion. Irina Privalova of onds. 


(AP. Reuters) 


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Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, AUGUST 22, 1994 


LANGUAGE 


A Framework of Misunderstanding 


By Jack Rosenthal 

N EW YORK — A few weeks ago. while writ- 
ing headlines for an article about the trans- 
formation of a suburban high school near Chica- 
go. the editors of The New York Times Magazine 
learned something about applied linguistics. 

The specific lesson involves race and politics: 
underlying it is a larger principle or cultural 
context, something scholars call framing 
Listeners bring different frameworks of under- 
standing to the same words. In his study “Frame 
Analysis," the sociologist Erving Goffman relat- 
ed an incident at the nursery school of a 3-year- 
old whose grandfather owned a baseball team. 
“What's one and one?” his teacher asked. 

“A ball and a strike.” the boy replied. 
Comedians know that meaning depends more 
on the context and relationships of words than 
on dictionary definition. Many jokes are funny 
because they operate in one frame while the 
listener expects another. 

in “Animal Crackers." Groucho Marx says: 
“One morning I shot an elephant in my pajamas. 
How he got in my pajamas. Ill never know.” 

Mel Brooks offers what may be the classic 
example of framing humor in his movie “Young 
Frankenstein.” Marty Feldman is sent to bring 
Gene Wilder into the spooky castle. “Walk this 
way." he says, limping heavily. Wilder does, 
limping heavily. 

Frame misunderstandings occur often in ev- 
eryday life. A cost-conscious executive asked her 
secretary to find out the difference between first- 
class and coach for a flight to Los Angeles. The 
secretary reported: “The seats are wider and the 
drinks are free.” 

When he was informed of the Watts riot in 
1965. Edmund G. Brown Sr., then California's 
governor, supposedly said: “Why. this is the 
worst disaster since my election.” 

In “Frame Analysis.” Erving Goffman wrote: 
“I start with the fact that from an individual's 
particular point of view, while one thing may 
momentarily appear to be what is really going 
on, in fact what is actually happening is plainly a 
joke, or a dream, or an accident, or a mistake, or 
a misunderstanding or a deception, or a theatri- 
cs [performance.” 

The simultaneous existence of such different 
frames can have social and political conse- 

3 uences. which brings us back to the headline for 
te magazine on May 29. The aim was to distill 
H. G. Bissinger’s report on Proviso West High 
School, near Chicago. The article told about how 


school officials did little over 20 years to adjust 
to a tide of new students from poorer families, 
many of them blade. We wrote a cover line that 
read: “When Whites Give Up.” 

Black members of the magazine staff did a 
double lake, fearing those words would be read 
to imply racial bias. For whites to “give up*' 
could mean that long-suffering while school offi- 
cials and parents had run out of patience with 


black students. What the article documented, 
however, was not exasperation but denial. 

Other districts have worked to adjust, success- 
fully, to population change. Even in Proviso 
West some officials, teachers and students strug- 
gled to preserve the district's reputation. 

But mainly. Proviso dithered, prompting 
many families to move. To look at the headline 
through that lens was to see the danger of a frame 
misunderstanding, and we changed the words to 
“When Whiles Flee.” 

The subsidiary headline invited similar mis- 
construction. Initially, it read: “School officials 
closed their eyes.” meaning they evaded their 
responsibility to the changing population. But 
from the frame of black sensibility, the words 
suggested that the officials viewed the poor, 
mostly black students as uniformly incompetent. 
The line became “and the school board fiodled." 

We were not being picky or PC. The original 
language would have undercut the point of the 
story — and helped justify indifference or bigotry. 
Giving due credence to a different frame spared us 
from unintentionally promoting a false one. 

□ 

Falsity has many faces. One arising frequently 
in political controversies involves negative dis- 
course. in which an effusion can be read to mean 
its opposite. When an official declares something 
false, chances are it is. When he or she says it is 
absolutely false, chances are it is true. Cornered 
politicians now routinely loose adverbial arrows 
like totally mistaken, wholly uncalled for and 
completely unjustified. The overemphasis sticks 
out like Pinocchio’s nose. 

John H. Sununu gave the world a gem of a 
Republican example in 1991. Then the White 
House chief of staff, he was sharply criticized for 
breaching various travel roles. 

He responded with a profusion of protesting 
too much: “ Clearly no one regrets more than I do 
the appearance of impropriety. . . . Obviously 
some mistakes were made. Certainly I regret that 
my own mistakes contributed to this 
controversy.” 

Early Iasi year. George Stephan opoulos of- 
fered up two memorable Democratic examples. 
Was Vice President A1 Gore's stature diminish- 
ing? “ Absolutely ludicrous.” How could Presi- 
dent Clinton deny that he had said Saddam 
Hussein could find redemption — when the 
words were on tape? Because the President “in- 
advertently forgot." 

Almost always, the simpler a denial the more 
effective. Adverbial ornamentation looks anx- 
ious and diminishes credibility. Did O. J. Simp- 
son advance his cause by pleading “100 percent 
not guilty”? A jury will decide, in a few words 
that are, for all their brevity, wholly, totally, 
absolutely clear. 

Jack Rosenthal is the editor of The No* York 
Times Magazine. William Saftre is on vacation 


From Escape Artist to Magazine Magnate 


By Andrew Ranard 

B ANGKOK — In Australia, his 
country of birth, and in Thailand, 
his home. John Everingham is still a 
legend, but the rest of the world has 
forgotten his name. 

The feat that made him famous, 
however, and that became the basis 
for a B-grade movie, “Comeback” is 


Tastemakers ] 

m 

El 

An occasional series 
about people for whom 
style is a wav of life 

u 



still widely remembered: the 1978 ca- 
per, when he donned scuba gear and 
swam the Mekong River from Thai- 
land into Communist Laos to rescue 
his Laotian girlfriend, now his wife. 

Everingham was a struggling 28- 
yea r-oid free-lance photographer 
then: now with crow’s-feet around the 
eyes, he is a successful magazine own- 
er and editor in Bangkok, but the 
swagger of cinematic daring is still 
nascent in his step. He looks like a 
youthful, miscast Errol Flynn — ath- 
letic. mustached — racing up and 
down the three flights of stairs of his 
Bangkok office in tennis shoes. 

He talks nonstop, breaking into 
bursts of Thai to settle problems with 
his staff of 35. He got the date of our 
appointment wrong and apologized. 
“I started with a few pictures, and 
then postcards, and then three maga- 
zines. Now we’re thinking of four 
magazines.” he said. “Sorry, I'm very 
confused. I never wanted to be a busi- 
nessman.” 

There's a sense of crisis in the office 
and all of it is swirling around Ever- 
ingham. The deadlines, the checks and 
invoices to be signed, the editorial 
decisions are mounting. There’s a 
forthcoming assignment to shoot on 
the island of Phuket, and when Ever- 
ingham speaks of his passion, photog- 
raphy. and glances out the window 
and refers to the “light,” there’s a 
wistful look in his eyes of a sentenced ■ 
man counting his days until freedom. 

Everingham became an editor by 
default, and yet his three magazines — 
Phuket, a glossy tourist magazine: 
Heritage, a publication for a presti- 
gious Bangkok city-businessmen's 
dub: Fah Thai. Bangkok Airways in- 
flight magazine — are setting a stan- 
dard for quality in magazine layout 
and presentation in Thailand. 

Yet this is not the first time Ever- 
ingham has set a trend in Thailand. 



John Everingham and staff members atwork; ins three magazin es set a standard for quality in Thailand. 


and if there is any connection between, 
his Mekong River escapade in 1978 
and the Australian, government's deci- 
sion to build the Thai- Lao Friendship 
Bridge, opened April 8. near the spot 
where Everingham swam the river, he 
must be dted as one of the grander 
tastemakers of Southeast Asia. 

His history of taking risks tdls part 
of the story. He bounced around 
Indochina for almost IQ years as a 
photographer, on the periphery of the 
Vietnam War. before his first break 
came. That was in 1975, when the 
Paihet Lao took over Laos, and Ever- 
ingham found himself the only West- 
ern journalist in the country. He re- 
mained in Laos for two years, filing 
print and photo stories under a pseud- 
onym. which got him published in 
Newsweek but also ousted in 1977. 
when the Laotian government caught 
on to his cover. His girlfriend was 
unable to accompany hurt, which was 
why he planned her escape the next 
year. 

The years right after 1978 were 
some of the best, he says. The jour- 
nalistic connections he made in Indo- 
china during the Vietnam War paid 
off. Two foreign correspondents who 
were friends returned home and be- 
came senior editors at Smithsonian 
magazine and National Geographic. 


They began to commission Ever- 
ingham for photography stories on 
Asia with cultural angles, and Ever- 
ingham became that anomaly in the 
world of journalism — a successful 
free-lancer. He relished these stories 
with their leisurely deadlines and 
long travel assignments, but he still 
had a problem: He wasn’t as free as 
he pleased. ; 

“I was making 100,000 U. S-- a 
year." he says, “but 1 found that even 
free-lancing isn’t free. 1 had to take 
whatever jobs came along to make it. 
When I'm 35, when Tm 40, it's easy, 
but what about when I'm 60? I had 
seen some sad. sad. old free-lancers 
around at that age.” 

This inspired him to enter business. 

“Thailand is a developing country, 
economically expanding at a great 
rate,” he said. “There are gaps all over 
the place. The cracks in developed 
countries are hard to find, but here 
they're everywhere.” • 

The gap Everingham found was in . 
produang quality. With the tourist 
boom in Thailand, in 1986 he began to 
print high-resolution reproductions of 
his photos on postcards, selling them ' 
for twice the going price and igniting a 
market boom that saw the industry 
rise from one competitor to 14 within 
a year. When the postcard market 


overheated, he jumped into maga- 
zines. As an editor he hoped to have 
more control over his photography, 
his schedule and assignments. 

He saw that the island of Phuket 
had no magazine and decided to at- 
tempt a high-quality tourist publica- 
tion: It became successful almost im- 
mediately and later initiated the 
contracts to do Fah Thai and Heri- 
tage. 

The photographs In Phuket maga- 
zine are supplied almost solely from 
Everingham’s 24 drawers of file pho- 
tos. and be chooses his own jobs, but it 
is not precisely what he wants. He’d 
rather have a manager to run the mag- 
azines so he could focus on the pho- 
tography, but this hasn’t panned oul 

Meanwhile, the expectations and 
the business opportunities escalate 
He has a share with Australian part- 
ners in a Bangkok-based video, docu- 
mentary and news service and an 
En gl ish-language newsmagazine. 

When llooked for Everingham a 
week later, a partner said. “John? 
Who knows what John’s schedule is? 
John lives by the sun. When the sun is 
good, he’s out shooting somewhere.” 

Everingham, tfie escape artisr. has 
purchased a moment of freedom:- - 

-■ Andrew Ranard writes at large from 
Asia, ■ - ' 


WEATHER 


POSTCARD 


Europe 




Tomorrow 


Mto 

Lux 

97 

High 

Lo* W 


OF 

OF 


OF 

OF 

Alganw 

27/80 

19/68 

| 

28/82 

20« pc 

AmsMidNn 

22/71 

■ 7/82 

«fl 

24/75 

17*62 to 

Artaia 

30/86 

9/48 

s 

29/84 

13*5 pc 

Alhmvi 

34(83 

23/73 

■ 

34(93 

24/75 pc 

Ekucaiona 

33/91 

23/73 

0 

31/88 

23/73 1 

sr* 

33/91 

21/70 


38/97 

21/70 a 

22/71 

14157 e 

24/75 

15*59 pc 

BiusMb 

24/75 

17/62 

to 

28/79 

10*1 to 

Button* 

29/84 

19/86 

1 

32/89 

19*0 pc 


22/71 

11/52 


22/71 

14*57 pc 

tWUCWM 31/88 

24/75 


32(89 

24/75 * 

Ditto 

19(68 

14/57 

1 

19/88 

9/40 r 

Edtou^i 

17(82 

14/57 

to 

18*64 

12*3 1 

Ftormc* 

35/95 

19*88 


35*95 

22/71 1 

Fnvtoirt 

25/77 

15(58 

pc 

2WTO 

15*9 1 


30/88 

18/84 

1 

29/84 

17*2 1 


17/52 

12/33 

to 

18(84 

12/53 pc 

Matoi 

30/86 

20/86 

1 

31/88 

20*8 1 

Len Patna 

27(80 

22/71 

s 

29(82 

22/71 a 

Usto 

24/75 

18/84 

a 

26/79 

18*4 pc 

Lwto 

24/75 

18/81 


24/73 

12*3 to 

Matod 

34/93 

17/52 

• 

33/91 

17*2 1 

Uhui 

33/91 

21/70 pc 

33/91 

22/71 s 

Moocow 

17/02 

11/52 


20/88 

10*50 pc 

MtoJi 

27/80 

16/81 


27 /BO 

17/62 1 

Tto* 

31/88 

20/86 


31/88 

21/70 s 

QUO 

23/73 

12*3 


22/71 

TJ/55 C 

Patow 

31/88 

25/77 

fl 

29/84 

24/75 a 

Parti 

28/82 

18(54 


26/82 

16*1 1 


28/75 

14/57 


26/79 

18*1 C 

Hey*|a»* 

13/55 

9/48 


1509 

10*0 C 

Bonre 

33/91 

22/71 

8 

34/93 

23/73 ■ 

61 Pmntug 2owa 

9/48 


19(08 

B'40 pc 

SocHato 

17/52 

13(55 

1 

19*6*1 

13/55 to 

Swaoug 

30/88 

17/82 


30/88 

17*2 1 

Taton 

18/84 

13/55 

to 

1/W2 

13*5 pc 

Vw*=* 

32/89 

22/71 


32/89 

23/73 1 

Vienna 

27/80 

17/82 

1 

28/79 

17*52 pc 

Wanaw 

22/71 

10/50 


23/73 

13 *3 pc 

ZifxJi 

30/86 

18/84 

PC 

30<8B 

18*4 1 

Oceania 

Auetoto 

16/81 

8/40 


16/81 

10*0 pc 

Sitor 

22/7? 

12/53 

• 

20*88 

8M8 to 


Forecast for Tuesday thuxjj^i Thursday, as provided by Accu-Weather. 










\J,% 

7 






IlfttUMonaefy 


UnmonaHr 

HM 


]Rah, 


Snow 


North America 
Rna mssw mV settle horn 
Boston. New Yoifc City and 
Washington. D.C.. inland lo 
Toronto and Montreal. Days 
will have sum nights wffl be 
coal. At midweek a lew 
showers will dot toe Midwest 
like Chicago and St Louis. 
Sen Diego to Vancouver w* 
be partly doudy and moder- 
ate. 


Europe 

Several opportunities tor ram 
will arise in Northwest 
Europe including London, 
Pads. Brussels. Amsterdam. 
Franklurt and Berlin. 
Between showers there w# 
be stretches ot dry weather 
with sun. HWi heal wd spiH 
over Irom North Alrica lo 
eastern Spain, southern Italy 
and Greece. 


Asia 

Rather hot rainless weather 
is in store lor Japan aside 
horn a lew showers to Tokyo 
Tuesday. Sunshine uA heal 
Korea, ii may give way la 
showers Thursday. A tew 
thundery downpours will 
erupt In Hong Kong and 
South China. Heavy rains 
toft over from Fred writ break 
up n or to wesi of STwighat. 


Middle East 


Latin America 


Asia 


Today 


Tomorrow 



Lorn 

W 

HU* 

Low W 


OF 

OF 


OF 

Cff 


33(91 

24*75 

| 

33*1 

25/77 pc 


31/88 

22/71 

c 

30*6 

22/71 pc 

HonoKmo 

31/88 

26/79 


29*4 

24/75 1 

Utoto. 

31/88 

24/75 

to 

xnm 

24/75 pc 

New Data 

32/89 

27*0 

1 

32/89 

27*0 pc 

SaoU 

32*9 

20*8 

1 

32*9 

23(73 pc 

Shanto* 

32/99 

27*0 

* 32(89 

26(79 pc 

Swa 

32/89 

22*71 


32*9 

23'n pc 

Ta**) 

34/93 

25*77 


33*1 

28/77 pc 


27/80 

20*8 

to 

29*4 

71/70 pc 

Africa 


33/91 

24/75 


32/89 

23(73 pc 

Capetown 

22/71 

11/52 

* 

21/70 

8M6 pc 

Caubfcmca 

28*2 

19/66 


28.112 

19(66 pc 

Karar 

19*8 

11*2 

1 

22/71 

I2I5J pc 

La** 

27*0 

23/73 

1 

26*2 

23(73 pc 

Itoto 

21/70 

10*0 

pc 22/71 

12*3 pc 

Ttw 

38*7 

22/71 


34/53 

22/71 1 

North America 

Anchorage 

13*5 

7/44 

to 

17« 

6/46 to 

Atone 

30*6 

20*8 

ft 

32*9 

21/70 pc 

Boston 

23(73 

13/55 

to 23*73 

19*9 to 

Ctaip 

26/79 

15 £0 

■ 

25/77 

15*9 S 

Daw 

32*8 

16*1 

s 

31*8 

14(57 s 

DM 

25/77 

14*7 

a 

23/73 

13*6 a 


For New Yorkers, a Colorful Walk Into India — at Home 


hW 

Cn 


Fkynti 


My 
Wgh Low 
OF OF 
33/01 2*175 
□6*7 22/71 
33(91 18«4 
ai/aa 21/70 
41/100 22/71 
42/107 24/75 


Ti 

High Low W 

e if ctf 

34/93 24/75 c 
37/Bfi 22/71 s 
35/95 18*4 ■ 
32/09 19/M 1 
42/10723/73 I 
42/10725/77 s 


Buwws Aket 


To <J*T 

High Low W M*i Low W 

OF OF OF OF 

16*1 5/41 s 17*62 8 '46 s 

3209 SUJV pc 3209 26/79 sh 

1904 15/50 PC 18*04 I5»59 pc 

23/73 1203 to 24/75 1305 I 

2904 1004 a 7904 19/66 pc 

IB *4 10/SO pc IB** 9/48 pc 


Los AngWM 


Uma 
MufcoCXy 
AodaJwi 
Ssreogo 


Legend: 9-suraiy. gc-pony doudy. octoudy. sn-toowers. t-tiundersi9nna.r-rato.sL9nowSuntos. 
arvsnow. Mo*. W-Waoihar. Afl maps, fo recasts ml dm prov id ed by Accu-Wsathtr. Inc. 1 1904 


3106 23/73 pc 3106 24/75 pc 
3101 22/71 pc S05 24/75 s 
3008 2008 pc 3006 1908 pc 
3101 26/79 I 3301 25/77 pc 
2700 1804 ■ 2700 1801 pc 
22/71 1203 pc 23/73 1305 pc 
3209 24/78 pc 3209 25/77 pc 
2700 1801 to 28/79 1804 pc 
39/102 2802 s 41/1082802 * 
22 771 1305 S 23/73 1305 PC 
22/71 1203 c 23/73 1305 pc 
25T7 1305 pc 23/73 13 05 pc 
2002 1702 pc 2802 1804 pc 


By George Vecsey 

.Vin tori Timr\ Strrur 

N EW YORK — Wc arc always happy 
walking in the bustling Indian enclave 
on 74th Street in Jackson Heigh is. Queens. 
It makes me giggle with delight, the way I 
laughed the first lime my wife escorted me 
into ihe marketplace in Pune, or ihe days 
we walked ihe streets in Bombay. The 
spices, the colors, ihe characters. 

Visitors are either depressed by the pov- 
erty in India or touched by the colorful and 
artful persistence of life itself. You cannot 
be neutral. 

My wife, having been to India 1 1 limes 
as a volunteer for a child-care agency, has 
taught me to love it. We cannot afford the 
carfare to go to India every week, but we 
can drive or take the subway to one little 
corner of India. You always see something 
different. 

Recently. I watched a young Indian fam- 
ily buying gaudy greeting cards and bright- 
colored bracelets at the Indo-U. S. Books 
and Journals Butala Emporium. The pro- 
prietor. Bhadra Butala. explained that the 


family was preparing for Raksha Bandhan. 
the Hindu holiday when asters honor their 
brothers, which was celebrated Sunday. 

“It is a very sweet innocent festival.” 
said Butala. who sells newspapers, maga- 
zines and books in 14 subcontinent lan- 
guages. plus English. He also rents out 
Indian videos and sells sitar and Rakhi 
- bracelets, which Hindu girls place on their 
brothers' wrists to protect them in the 
coming year. The brothers are then sup- 
posed to give gifts to their sisters: 

Through the shifting of the lunar calen- 
dar. Raksha Bandhan coincides this year 
with the annual India Day parade in Man- 
hattan. But people do not need a holiday or 
a festival to visit 74th Street, which has 
become a beacon to Indians, real or honor- 
ary. “I want my children to know their 
roots.” said an Indian-born college profes- 
sor from New Jersey on one of his family's 
weekly shopping visits to the neighborhood. 

Although there is enough good Indian 
food elsewhere in the New York City area, 
it's hard not to walk down 74th Street 
without giving in. My personal favorite. 


the Jackson Diner. Order, an uttaparn, the 
south Indian vegetarian pancake that will 
never again allow you to take pizza seri- 
ously. The daily buffet at the Jackson Din- 
er. which costs S4.99 a person could be the 
best bargain on the block. But there are 
also the mangoes in the markets, or bas- 
mati rice. Indian teaor-snacks at Shall mar 
King of Sweets. 

Although 74th Street is generally labeled 
Indian, people from all over the subconti- 
nent mingle without tension, said Vasanlrai 
Gandhi, the proprietor of New York Gold 
Co. “People forget their personal and politi- 
cal differences here." said Gandhi, who is 
also president of the Jackson Heights Mer- 
chants Association, which has about 100 
members. 

'Gandhi is a pioneer, having opened a 
business 15 years ago because he wanted to 
work near a house he could afford. The 
residents had once been Italian. Irish. Jew- 
ish; Polish. Then the neighborhood be- 
came -predominantly Colombian, but in 
the eaiiy 1980s, Indian merchants began 
moving in. 


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AOQESSNUMBER COHJWlM ACCESS NUMB ER COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER 

ASIA It aly 172-1011 Hrrn I 


Australia 


1-800-881-011 Liechtenstein' 


China, PRO** 


10811 Lithuania* 


155-00-11 chile 


Guam 


018-872 Luxembourg 


8*196 Columbia 


000-8010 

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980-11-0010 


India* 


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114 


000-117 Mala* 


119 



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Indonesia* 

001-801-10 

Monaco- 

19*-0011 

Japan* 

0039-111 

Nethedands* 

06-022-9111 

Korea 

009-11 

Norway 

800-190-11 

Korea** 

11“ 

Poland**- 

0*0104800111 

Malays far 

8000011 

Portugal* 

05017-1-288 

New Zealand 

000-911 

Romania 

01-8004288 

Philippines’ 

105-11 

RBMfafpBosaow) 

155-5042 

Saipan* 

235-2872 

Sfcmdcfa 

00-42000101 

Singapore 

800-0111-111 

Spain* 

90099-00-11 

Sri Lanka 

43OA30 

** x — ^ • 

SWCQCu 

020-795*611 

Taiwan* 

0080-10288-0 

Switzerland* ' . 

155*00-11 

Thailand* 

0019391-1111 

us. 

0500-89*0011 

EUROPE 

Ukraine* 

84100-11 

Armenia** 

8*14111 

MIDDLE EAST 

Austria-**- 

022-903-011 

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800-001 

Bdghmr 

0800-100-10 

Cyprus’ . 

. 080-90010 

Bulgaria 

00-1800-0010 

Israel 

■ 177-100*2727 

Croatia** 

99-38-0011 

Kuwafl - - 

800-288 

Czech Rep 

00420-00101 

Lebanon (Behnt) 

426-801 

Denmark" 

8001-0010 

Qatar 

0800011-77 

Finland* 

9800-100-10" 

Saudi Arabia 

1-600-10 

France 

19 *-0011 

Turkeyr , 

00-800-12277 

Germany 

01300010 

uae* ^ 

800-131 

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00800-1311 

AMERICAS 

Illmpry* 

004-00001111 

Argentina* 

001-800-200-1111 

Iceland's 

9994X11 

BeSze* ■ 

555 

Ireland 

1-600450000 

Bolivia- 

0800-1112 


Guatemala* 

Guyana' - ' 


190 


190 


*65 


123 


95-800462.423/1 

Mcaragua (Managua) 174 


Penr 


109 


Suriname 


191 

156 


00-0410 


CARIBBEAN 


80-011-120 


British VI 


*-800-872-2881 

1-800872-2881 


1 -800-872-2881 


Grenada* 


ftetfa. Anffl 


1-800-872-2881 
>800-872-2881 
QoT-800-972-2883 
U-800-872-2881 

poi-flOO-872-2881 

1-800-872-2881 



00X11 


0800-10 



/m ^ fawn to jMMWfcajgaw *AM*MCrtrnIdb](,HW ° “'**■ 

^ " U1 1 * F** «■ ^ ^ tf * n JaI 


? ! l M-» AlifT 







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