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INTERNATIONAL 



tribune 




PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 

Paris, Wednesday, August 24, 1994 


Again Haunts 
Cambodia- 


By William Branigm 

. Wash ington Pm Serna 

PHNOM PENH — A ycax flgo, Cambo- 
dia's long-running Khmer Rouge insur- . 
gency appeared to be on the ropes. 
Wracked by defections and the failure of 
their propaganda, guerrilla leaders could 
only watch as a. new government took 
shape after elections they boycotted . 

Now the rebel group seems to have . 
bounced back. It has managed to arrest its 
deterioration, remobiHze its forces and 
score major battlefield victories against the. 
Cambodian Army. 

Can history' repeat itself? Can the radi- 
cal Communist organization, which took 
p power is 1975- and launched a four-year 
reign of terror that claimed more than 1 
million lives, possibly mako a comeback? 
A combination of factors makes that -un- 
likely, analysis say. In fact, they say, the 
Khmer Rouge is still relatively weak, but 
the corruption and incompetence, of the 
Cambodian military has made the group 
Zook good. 

The issue of Khmer Rouge strength is 
crucial for the Weston countries that are 
considering aid to the Royal Cambodian 
Armed Forces, the army of the hew gov- 
ernment . Prospective donors generally 
agree that die army must reform itself 
before it can receive major supplies of 
hardware. 

For its part, the Khmer Rouge sees its 
situation as similar to that of 1973, when a 
peace agreement temporarily ended the 
war in neighboring Vietnam and curtailed 
support for the guerrillas by Hand 

In an internal document dated May 5, 
the Khmer Rouge soeght to imbue cadres 
- with a new spirit cf sen-reliance. Despite 
recent victories, it cautioned, *hiew drffi- 
1 cui ties” lie ahead. “But if we rely firmly on 
our people," it added, “finally we will 
win. 

The guerrillas appeared to suffer a seri- 
ous setback in February, when govern- 
ment forces overran their northern base of 
Anlong Veng near the border with Thai- 
land. But forces under the command of Ta 
t Mofc. a widely feared, one-legged disciple 
of the Khmer Rouge leader, Pol Pot, coun- 
terattacked and recaptured the base two 
weeks later . >--■ - • 

The scenario repeated itsdf m, March,, 
when thie army seized the Khmer Rouge 
stronghold of Pailin, a gem- minin g and 
timber center near the Thai border in west- 
ern Cambodia. In the initial euphoria of 
victory, the overall army commander of 
the operation, Lieutenant General Pol Sar- 
oeun, declared: ‘The Khmer Rouge have . 
lost their spirit" 

Almost immediately after tak i ng the 
town, however, Cambodian -generals, 
turned their attention to dividing the 
spoils. They hauled away booty, staked out 
ruby mines, villas and other properties, 
and flew in their wives aboard a helicopter 
to participate in the plunder, virtually ig- 
noring the need to evacuate wounded and 
consolidate security, military analysts said. 

"There were no patrols, no maps, no 
operations room and no organization," . 
said a Western military attach^ who visited 
the town. “A blind man could see that 
Pailin would not be held long." 

On April 19, die Khmer Rouge retook 
the town with little opposition as bedrag- 
gled government forces fled. Subsequent 

See REBELS, Page 4 



Win MtN'amce' Return 


IN A DIFFERENT CUBA — A Caban refugee arriving at the VS. naval base at Gaantanamo Bay, Cuba, aboard a Coast Guard ship. More than 2300 
refugees have been delivered to an uncertain future there under President Bill Clinton's new policy’. Still, there is no sign the Cuban exodus is slowing. Page 3. 

For MTV Europe 9 a New Play on Nationalism 


' " ' By Erik Ipsen 

[nurnastortoi Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Five years ago when Bill Roedy came to 
London to bead MTV '. Europe he bad bis vision firmly set 
ra the impending nriracle ^of l992 and the -presumed 
oricrgenceof the unitai states of Europe. Wistfully 
recalling the boundless, almost illogical optimism of that 
earlier age Mr. Roedy says, “I fel t almost as if I would go 
to sleep one night and wake up the next morning speak- 
ing German.” 

Next month that grand vision of a stateless single 
market will take a hag step backward. On Sept. 30, MTV, 
the channel that pioneered the concept of pan-European 
broadcasting, win launch a new station aimed at Britain 
and Britain alone. 


The new channel, which is called VH-1 and already 
exists in United States, is targeted at the baby-boom 
generation with a mix of “vintage and contemporary" 
music. 

“Thg future of the business will be to develop more 
national outlets,” Mr. Roedy said, conceding in an inter- 
view that five years after he began to sell- the notion of a 
single European market to advertisers, and three years 
after that market was officially bom, it remains a tough 
slog. 

“The market was very difficult to develop early on and 
it is still very difficult,” be said. 

Advertising agency executives second that dour view. 

“The only people who really ever believed in the united 
states of Europe were the Americans,” said Brian Jacobs. 


international media director at Leo Bumett in London. 
“The problem is that it remains inherently difficult to sell 
anything across borders. It is true in Asia. It is true in 
Latin America. And it is true here.” 

la Europe the problems range from structural ones 
concerning the way advertisers themselves are organized, 
to quirky yet critical ones of national taste and even, 
nomenclature. 

Take, for instance, a good pan- European marketer like 
the American breakfast cereal maker Kellogg. Yes. said 
an advertising executive, Kellogg's products line the 
shelves from Copenhagen to Corfu, but not necessarily 
under the same brand names. He also noted that in some 

See MTV, Page 4 


Kiosk 

Argentine Case 
Lacks Evidence 

BUENOS AIRES (Reuters) ~ Ar- 
gentina's case against four Iranian of- 
ficials suspecteoin the bombing af a 
Jewish center here suffered a severe 
setback Tuesday when the attorney 
general said there was insufficient evi- 
dence to press charges against them. 

“There is not enough proof,” the 
attorney eeneral, Angel Aguero 
Iturbe, said. ' ' ' ■ 

He said thecase woold be sent back 
to the investigating judge, Juan Jos6 
Galeano. who named the four in his 
report on the July 18 bombing, which 
killed nearly 100 people. 


Trib Index 


24.61 m . 

3775.B3 Sfi 



The Deter 

New v«v 

PM 

Poorid 

Tan 

FF 


Tud-OMf. 

1.5311 
~ 1.557 

37,875 
5.2525 


Newsstand Frists 

AntJorro 9.00 FF Luxembourg M L Fr 

Antilles 11 JO FF Moroca, -i-«’!? I 5 h 

Cameroon. 1.4WCFA £2otor...^.8.00 RtaJs 

Egypt. 5000 R*union^i.»[ FF 

France 9.00 FF Soudi Arabia JM»R. 

Gabon wo CF A Senfflol—ASOCFA 

Greece 300 Dr. Spam. — 200PTAS 

Holy ...AMO Lire Tunisia --*■«« DM 

ivorv Coast .1.120 CFA Turkey JTdJjSM 

Jordan 1 JD U.A.E.-.-A5D Dirh 

Lebanon ...US5 1.50 U.S. Mil. fEUr.J ST.W 


Amid Tensions, 
Rwandans Get 
New Zaire Sites 

QmpBtd ly Our Suff From Dtspatdies 

BUKAVU, Zaire — Thousands of 
Rwandan refugees began to move out of 
Bukavu on Tuesday as tension increased in 
; the fflthy and congested town. 

- From 7 A.M. there was a steady flow of 
'Hutu out of the city center toward Hongo, 
a new camp site opening for 80,000 people 
on the windswept shores of Lake Kivu. 

“People are clearing out of town incredir 
My fast,” said Jane Pope of the Canadian 
branch of the charity Caro “They are 
vacating the sites and there’s been a steady 
stream of people." 

The start of a move from Bukavu was 
welcomed by aid agencies, who warned 
that tbs presence of 100,000 refugees in the 
aty' risked triggering epidemics and vio- 
lence. 

As the Bukavu squatters set out on foot, 
trucks supplied by aid agencies ferried 
groups of refugees waiting on the Rwan- 
dan side of the Rurizi River across the 
frontier and toward Nyamanangwe, the 
rite of another new camp. ‘ . 

After Zaire initially dosed its mam bor- 
der crossing on Saturday, on the grounds 
that h did not want a repetition of the 
Goma catastrophe in July, Zaire agreed 
under pressure from the aid agencies to 
open a less- traveled bridge further south. 

The aim was to force the refugees to 
bypass central Bukavu, which is crammed 
to the -bursting point, and settle in the 
camps. No Hutu were being allowed to 
walk across the border bridge on Tuesday. 
Tfi«tead t they were being put onto trucks 
heading directly to the camps. 

“If we let them come in on foot they will 
disperse and settle in the area near the 
bridge, which is what we want to avoid,” a 
Zairean official said. . 

UN aid workers are relieved that the 
flood of refugees from Rwanda, following 
the French handover of a safe haven to 
UN peacekeepers, has not been on the 
massive scale that swaarped Goma. 

“We’re breathing a collective, but cau- 
tious, sigh of relief,” Ron Redmond, 
spokesman for the UN High Commission- 
er for Rdugees, said at a news briefing in 
Geneva. 

' UN teams in the safety zone in sou*- 






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Ernestso Zedillo, the apparent victor in Mexico's presidential elections, greeting supporters Tuesday in the capital. 


No. 34,675 

Bonn Orders 
Close Watch 
On Far-Right 
Nationalists 

New Political Pact Cited 
As Proof of Republicans 9 
Slip Toward Extremism 

By Rick Atkinson 

Washington Post Service 

BERLIN — Germany’s interior minis- 
ter ordered federal security agents to place 
the far-right Republican Party under sur- 
veillance Tuesday after its leader an- 
nounced an alliance with the ultranation- 
alist German People’s Union. 

Interior Minister Manfred Kanther said 
the political compact, disclosed earlier 
Tuesday, proved that the Republicans 
were “sliding further on the slippery slope 
toward extremism.” 

Led by Franz SchOnhuber, an unrepen- 
tant member of Hitler's Waffen-SS during 
World War II, the Republicans had been 
considered marginally less hard-line than 
the People's Union and the party most 
likely to pull in far-right votes in October’s 
federal elections. 

Mr. Kanther said the alliance of Germa- 
ny's two largest rightist parties, each of 
which is believed to have roughly 25,000 
members, required heightened vigilance by 
the federal domestic security agency. 

The People's Union, Mr. Kanther said 
in a statement from Bonn, “has been ex- 
tremist for years and second to none in 
political repulsiveness," 

Whoever makes common cause with 
such a group, he said, “drops his mask” of 
respectability. 

Mr. Kaniher’s action came after Mr. 
SchOnhuber issued a joint statement of 
allegiance with his former rival, Gerhard 
Frey, leader of the People's Union and a 
Staunch friend of the Russian ultranation- 
alist Vla dimir V. Zhirinovsky. The two 
Gomans proclaimed an end to their bick- 
ering and the formation of a “defensive 
force” against what they described as “the 
leftist popular frant.” 

Republican activities have previously 
been monitored by law enforcement offi- 
cials in several German states, but Mr. 
Kanther’s order classifies the party as “ex- 
tremist” and brings federal egents into 
play. Similar steps had already been taken 
against the People's Union. 

The intent of the surveillance order, the 
minister indicated, is to determine whether 
the Republicans are “anti-constitutional," 
a classification already applied to the Peo- 
ple’s Union. The practical effect of such a 
move is uncertain; although Bonn has 

See GERMANY, Page 4 


Mexican Vote 
Spells the End 
Of Rule by Fiat 

By Tod Robberson 

Washington Post Service 

MEXICO CITY — The electoral re- 
forms that enabled Mexico to pull off 
clean and relatively uncontested elec- 
tions mark one erf the ironies of a politi- 
cal system that many Mexicans describe 
as having been, until now, the very an- 
tithesis of democracy. 

President Carlos Salinas de Gortari of 
the Institutional Revolutionary Party, or 
PRI, took liberal advantage of his com- 
mand over a rubber-stamp legislature to 
amend the constitution, pass far-reach- 
ing electoral reforms ana approve, for 
the first time, the presence of foreign 
election monitors at polling stations. But 
as a result of his reforms, the next Mexi- 
can president's rubber stamp is likely to 
disappear and the days of unchecked 
presidential power become a thing of the 
past. 

With 66 percent of ballots tallied at 
midday Tuesday, the federal Electoral 
Institute said the ruling party’s presiden- 
tial candidate, Ernesto Zedillo Ponce de 
Le6n, was holding a steady lead with 49 
percent of the vote, followed by 28.5 

See MEXICO, Page 3 


The Other Imbalance Plaguing Japan ; Tourist Drain 


•have left, reported that the roads were 
“amte empty” Mr. Redmond said. 

Aid officials say Zaireans are beginning 
to catch dysentery from the refugees. Once 
See RWANDA, Page 4 


By James Stemgold 
New York Times Strrin 

TOKYO —Dressed in T-shirts, shorts and sunglasses, 
Mike and Jo Ozimek of Philadelphia wane strolling 
recently along the Ginza, Tokyo's glitziest shopping 
district. 

Mr. Ozimek described Japan as the safest and most 
interesting country in East Asia, and be said he would 
love to live hero It was his fifth visit and his wife's first 

But he admitted that he would probably never have 
come to know Japan if his job with a computer company 
had not brought him here on business trips, like this one. 
And Mrs. Ozimek said that while she was enjoying the 
Dip to a country she had hardly given a thought to 
visiting before, she was intimidated by the $400 cost of a 
brief visit to Mount Fuji, a little more than an hour away. 

Tbdr experience is hardly unique. Japan is in the heart 
erf its summer vacation season, a paralyzing ritual of 
mobbed airports, train stations and roadways. There is a 
serious problem with this mass peregrination: The travel- 
ers are almost all Japanese. Few foreigners come to 
Japan, and lately the number has been dropping. 


That is a politically uncomfortable fact for a country 
that complains incessantly that it is misunderstood. Jap- 
anese officials insist that their country, though it has the 
world’s largest trade surplus, would be viewed as some- 
thing other than 2 predatory economic animal if foreign- 
ers only took the time to get to know it better. 

For reasons ranging from the astronomical costs in 
Japan and the lack of interest in the West to the difficulty 
of obtaining student visas, getting acquainted has not 
proven easy. 

More than 13 milli on Japanese will travel abroad this 
year, triple the level of a decade ago, as the Japanese have 
become more affluent. 

But Japan will receive only about 3 million foreign 
visitors in 1994, the second year in a row that the total 
will have declined, at least in part because costs have 
risen even higher with the soaring value of the yen. 

Japan, with a population of 124.3 million people, is the 
third most populous nation in East Asia and economical- 
ly the largest, yet it ranks just 25th as an international 
destination, well behind China, Thailand, and even the 
minuscule Portuguese colony of Macao, near Hong 
Kong. 


With students, the story is similar. Japan sends abroad 
roughly double the number of students it takes in every’ 
year, despite a nearly decade-long campaign to balance 
the figures because of the increasingly important politi- 
cal need to make Japan better liked abroad 

This is one of the least known but most tenacious 
imbalan ce^ in Japan's H paling s with the world, and 
officials wony that it could carry tiie most negative long- 
term implications. 

“This conveys the impression to foreign countries that 
Japan is a dosed country, even in the cultural sphere.” a 
high-level advisory body reported to the prime m i n ister 
in a study released in June. 

Theadvisoiy group recommended tax incentives to the 
private sector to encourage it to play a greater role in 
nrinpinp foram students and workers to Japan, And u 

“ . i 3 


nonprofit organizations that arrange the various types of 
exchanges. 

The report was tough in its criticism of the branches of 
See JAPAN, Page 4 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 1994 




Weak Points Exist in Nuclear Security, Russians Concede 


WORLDBRIEFS 


Agence France-Presse 

MOSCOW — Russian experts acknowledged 
Tuesday that nuclear material seized this month 
in Germany could have originated in Russia, and 
they said systems to prevent theft of nuclear 
materials needed improvements. 

Officials at the leading Russian nuclear re- 
search center, the Kurctaatovsky Institute, de- 
nied that any fissionable material was missing 
from their facility but pledged to cany out 
checks. 

“As people who work in science, we under- 
stand that ‘absolutes’ never occur,’* Nikolai Pon- 
omaryev-Stepnoi, vice president of the institute, 
said at a news conference. 

Mr. Ponomaryev-Stepnoi said the institute 
had ciemfvt mntracK with a number of 


enterprises, including U.S. laboratories at the 
Los Alamos nuclear research facility, specializ- 
ing in security systems. 

His remade was a comment on earlier asser- 
tions by Russian officials that the plutonium-239 
seized by German customs officials in Munich 
on Aug. 10 “absolutely” had not come from 
Russia, as Western governments have suggested. 

Andrei Gagarinsky, the institute’s director for 
foreign relations, said that despite improvements 
over the last decade in nuclear material control 
systems in Russia, flaws remained. 

“The systems must be modernized and 
brought up to today's standards," Mr. Gagar- 
insky said. 

Another official at the institute, Nikolai Bon- 
darvev. said security systems for nuclear facili- 


ties in Russia were in need of “completion” to 
bring them into line with international 
standards. 

The statements by the institute officials con- 
trasted with insistence by Russian officials that 
control and security systems were sufficient and 
that no nuclear materials could be smuggled out 
of Russia. 

Experts at the institute have called for the 
closure by 1995 of all first-generation nuclear 
reactors in Russia, including WR units and the 
RBMK reactors like those used at the Chernobyl 
plant in Ukraine. 


■ I ink to Iraq Reported 
A television program on Tuesday said German 
investigators had linked Iraq to a rash of nuclear 


smuggling cases, Reuters reported from Bonn. 

German commercial television RTL quoted 
unnamed sources as saying the police had seized 
documents in a raid on a suspect’s home that 
showed Iraq was trying to buy weapons-grade 
plutonium. 

The RTL news program said the raid had also . 
uncovered a letter of credit in Iraq’s name for 
$100 iwitiiftn It did not specify which of four 
major cases in the past four months it was 
referring to. 

The RTL report had parallels with the case of 
a German businessman arrested in May on sos-. 
pirion of plutonium smuggling, Adolf J&lde, who 
Bonn politicians have said was furnished with 
$100 million by an unname d country. 


Furor Over Carlos’s Lawyer Decried , „ 

: park /R euters) French officials and victims of attacks for 

wi^titeKStarios is blamed said 

at hnu , rt his lawyer was a smokescreen helping 


Carlos and a member of his orgamzanonadraeny^s before 
taking Mm on as a client last week. Mr Vergfa^ bem^Ae 
spotlight since Ms charge last weekeodthat President Franks 

bar association. 


Pakistan Has Bomb, 
Ex- Leader Declares 


ISLAMABAD, Pakistan — 
Nawaz Sharif, the former prime 
minister, said Tuesday that Pa- 
kistan possessed the atomic 
bomb. The claim was promptly 
denied by a government 
spokesman. 

Mr. Sharif, who left office in 
July 1993 and now leads the 
opposition, made the assertion 
in a speedi in the Pakistan-con- 
trolled third of disputed Kash- 
mir, according to the private 
PPI news agency. 

He warned India that an at- 
tack could trigger a nuclear war 
between the two countries, who 
have fought two wars over 
Kashmir , two- thirds of which is 
ruled bv India. 


The official restated the gov- 
ernment position that it had ac- 
quired the capability to make 
nuclear weapons but had taken 
a policy decision not to do so 
and restricted the use of nuclear 
technology to peaceful pur- 
poses like energy. 

“We have the technological 
capability, but we have taken a 
conscious decision not to ac- 
quire nuclear weapons,” be 
said. 





lipjlplp' * 


There was no immediate in- 
ternational reaction to Mr. Sha- 
rif's remark. 


India algf* denies having nu- 
clear weapons although it ex- 


PPI quoted Mr. Sharif as tell- 
ing the rally in Neelabutt: “I 
confirm Pakistan possesses the 
atomic bomb.” 


plotted a nuclear device in 1974. 
Western diplomats believe both 


Western diplomats believe both 
countries could easily assemble 
nuclear devices. 

The claim reported by PPI 
was immediately denied by a 
Foreign Ministry spokesman in 
Islamabad, the Pakistan capi- 
tal. 


Western observers and gov- 
ernments have long suspected 
that Pakistan had developed or 
was developing nuclear arms. 


The United States cut off all 
mili tary aid to P akistan in Oc- 
tober 1990 on suspicion it was 



Israeli West Bank Trfflttsfer to Start 


' RAMALLAH. Israeli-Occupied West Bank (Combined Dis- 
patches)— Israel wfll begin on Wednesday to hand over author 
ro^tetinians in parts of the West Bank that are Sou occupi 
the army said Tuesday. 

An army spokeswoman said the transfer of education, the first 
of five fields of authority to be ceded in an interim phase of the 

Isiadi-PIX) peace agreement, wfll begin h«e. . 

Palestinian sources said the handover of education would be 
completed in the West Bank by Aug. 29, in time for the opening of 
schools on Sept. I. ... (Routers, AFP) 


Burma; Arrests 5 as Critics of Junta 


BANGKOK (Reuters) — . Burmese mflitaiy authorities have 
arrested a former United. Nations worker and four others for 
criticizing the government, contacting banned opposition groups 
and fabricating anti-government reports, Burma s state media 

re ^/£ction will be taken against a former Unicef worker. Kten Zaw 
Win, 44, and the four others according to Burmese law, state 
television reported in a broadcast monitored in Thailan d. 

Khin Zaw Win, a dentist who worked with Unicef in Rangoon 
from 1991 to late 1992, was arrested at Rangoon airport on July 4 
as he was about to fly to Bangkok. He was reportedly found to be 


carrying mann 
meat material 


Ministry of! 


report 


Italy Holds 110 in Motion Probe 

SALERNO, Italy (Reuters) — Magistrates probing one of 
Italy’s worst ecological disasters have_ put HO people under 


working to make nuclear weap- 
ons. Pakistan denied this, call- 


ous. Pakistan denied this, 
ing the cut discriminatory. 


Scmd SnpbftMgaKt RBWsftBW 

THE UKRAINE CELEBRATES — A woman sweeping up around a military monument Tuesday in Kiev prior to 
celebrations on Wednesday marking the anniversary of its independence following the coflapseof the Soviet Union. 


Rabin Indicates Acceptance of Syrian Authority in Lebanon 


By Joseph Fitchett 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin was 
quoted Tuesday as saying that Syria had vetoed 
an Israeli offer of a separate peace with Lebanon, 
indicating for the first time that both he and the 
Clinton administration had accepted Syria’s de 
facto authority over the Beirut government. 

In an interview published in A1 Hayat, a Beirut 
newspaper, Mr. Rabin said that he had given the 
UJS. secretary of state, Warren M. Christopher, a 
plan for a phased withdrawal of Israeli forces 
from southern Lebanon over nine months, a 


duded its own peace accord with IsraeL Mr. 
Rabin said. 

Lebanon's president, Elias Hrawi, denied 
Tuesday that Beirut had received any Israeli 
proposals, adding that Lebanon did not plan any 
accord of its own. But Mr. Rabin's office stood 


by the published version of his remarks, which 
clearly conveyed the view that Syrian authority 


period during winch the Lebanese Army would 
have to demonstrate that it could prevent cross- 


have to demonstrate that it could prevent cross- 
border attacks. 

But Mr. Christopher, who was in the region 
earlier this month, bowed to Syrian opposition to 
any settlement on Lebanon until Syria had con- 


cleaiiy conveyed the view that Syrian authority 
over the Lebanese government had become a 
diplomatic fact of life. 

Asked if be had objected to Mr. Christopher’s 
acquiescence to the Syrian fiat, Mr. Rabin re- 
plied that be would have liked to, but kept quiet 
“I have to deal with reality,” he was quoted as 
saying. 

A State Department official said that he was 
unaware of any U.S. position on linkage between 


Syria and Lebanon in Washington’s approach to 
the peace talks. But he did not deny the report 


that Mr. Christopher had tested an Israeli pro- 
posal about Lebanon with the Syrian 
government 

President Hafez Assad's objections to a sepa- 
rate peace for Lebanon ostensibly arise from 
fears of seeing Israel gain yet another secure 
border, isolating Syria further after Israeli peace 
accords with Egypt the Palestine Liberation 
Organization and Jordan. 

His real interest diplomats say, is either pre- 
serving Lebanon as a trouble spot that can be 
pacified only by a deal that gives Damascus the 
territoiy it wants back from Israel, or garnering 
international recognition of Syria's semiperma- 
nent authority over Lebanon. 

This Syrian approach is reflected in the activi- 
ties in southern Lebanon of Hezbollah guerrillas, 
who have the backing of Iran and Syria. If the 


Lebanese Army succeeded in crushing the guer- 
rillas, it would deprive Syria of a means of 
pressuring Israel and also might fuel resistance 
in Beirut to the current situation of de facto 
Syrian control over Lebanese policy. 


investigation and shut down 48 companies, the police said Tues- 

^Tuey the rubbish-lined river Santo, winch empties into the 
Gulf of Naples just north of the Amalf i coast resort area, has for 
decades been the dumping ground of raw sewage and untreated 
industrial waste. The police said almost all the towns and compa- 
nies inspected in the area dumped their waste directly into the 
'river. “ 

Those under investigation include officials from the towns of 
Sarno and Scafati and me mayors of San Valentino Torio, Alberto 
Esposito, and of Nocera Superiore, Giuseppe Sahd. They face 
charges of environmental destruction over pollution in what 
Italian television called “Europe's dirtiest river.” 


Mr. Rabin said that the Israeli proposal would 
ive required Leba no n to stop all Hezbollah 


have required Lebanon to stop all Hezbollah 
operations by sending regular forces to dean out 
the guerrillas from the zone adjacent to the area 
controlled by Israel’s surrogate force, the South 
Lebanon Army. 

If the Lebanese forces demons trated'success 
for six months; Mr. Rabin said. Triad would 
have begun to pull bade to its international 
border provided that the armed Lebanese sup- 
porters of Israel were integrated, like other mili- 
tia groups from the civil war, into the Lebanese 
Army. 


Russia Complains to U.S. on Visas 

MOSCOW (AFP) — Russia complained Tuesday that the U.S. 
Consulate in Moscow was denying visas to Russians with diplo- 
matic passports and called the practice unacceptable. There was 
no immediate comment from the consulate. • 

A Foreign Ministry, spokesman said both sides faced a heavier 4 
workload in processing visa applications since relations had 
improved and that therefore “some errors are excusable.” 

- “Bui certain cases cannot be considered errors, a spokesman 
said. He cited visa applications by those with- “dig lothati c pass- 
ports accompanied by a letter from the Russian Foreign Minis- 
try” 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


Insider Sees a Tough Fight Ahead Over the Fate of Jerusalem a close Can for u.s. jet at Gatwick 

O O w T TYNTVYN ^Rnitrr<\ — An 1 1 S Rnamr7i < 7 srii 


By Caryle Murphy 

Washington Post Service 


JERUSALEM — Amir Che- 
shin, a barrel-chested, bespecta- 
cled man of SO, learned as much 
as any Jewish official about this 


city’s 160,000 Arab residents 
over the past 10 years. 

From his second-floor office 
on Jaffa Street, near the walls of 
Jerusalem’s Old City, the may- 
or’s adviser on Arab affairs 
fielded complaints about taxes. 


broken water mains and the of- 
ficial but undeclared, policy of 
restricting construction in the 
Arab areas of East Jerusalem. 


The right loca»n. 
The right pedfiee. 
The right priffk 
FF1380* m 


Thai, last November, a new, 
hard-line mayor swept aside 28 
years of Labor Party rule in this 
contested capital. Mr. Cheshin 
soon departed as well. Now an 
outsider and government critic. 
Mr. Cheshin speaks with a de- 
cade's accumulated frustration 
of the rifts he could not bridge 
between Arab and Jew. 




Mr. Cheshin’s pessimism 
suggests the difficulties ahead 
foHsraeli and Palestinian nego- 
tiators, who have left talks on 
the political status of Jerusalem 
for Iasi. After a decade in office, 
Mr. Cheshin claimed little suc- 
cess in giving Arab neighbor- 
hoods equal rights and equal 
service. Tne city, be said, still is 
not weD -equipped to pick up 
“Arab garbage," which is dif- 


ferent from “Jewish garbage.” 
He saw municipal workers 
abandon basic services to Arab 
neighborhoods after stone- 
throwing youths drove them 
out during the Palestinian up- 
rising, or intifada. 

“What I learned in the last 
seven years, which means dur- 
ing the intifada, is that we have 
to reach a situation where the 
Arabs in Jerusalem will first of 
all feel at home, and secondly 
do not feel themselves under 
occupation,” Mr. Cheshm said 
in an interview. “As long as 
Arabs in Jerusalem will not be 
part of the decision-making 


procedures, we won't have a 
real united dty." 

The battle for Jerusalem's fu- 
ture is now dearly under wajy 
following September's histone 
Israeti-Palestinian peace agree- 
ment, which set a deadline for 
opening negotiations on the 
city’s final status. 

Mayor Ehud Olmert, a mem- 
ber of the conservative Likud 


party who unseated Teddy Kol- 
lek m elections in November, 


said his highest priority as may- 
or was “to protect the integrity 
of the dty." He has made it his 
central mission to block any Is- 
raeli concessions when Jerusa- 


lem comes up for negotiations 
in 1996. 

In die interim, Mr. Olmert is 
doing his utmost to demon- 
strate that Jerusalem is indivis- 
ible, and he said that one way to 
show this was improving mu- 
nicipal services to the Arab resi- 
dents of Jerusalem. 

Mr. Cheshin is skeptic&L “If 
the new system, or the declared 
system, by Ehud Olmert will be 
implemented, theresultswifl.be 
veiy good,” he said. “But I 
doubt the municipal budget will 
allow Olmert to put so much 
money into changing the sys- 
tem.” 


LONDON (Reuters) — An off-qourae UJS. Boeing 747. airliner 
tb 233 people aboard flew within 500 feet of a busy passenger 


with 233 people aboard flew within 500 feet of a busy passenger 
t erminal as it attempted to land at Gatwick Airport m February 
1993, an aeddent repost said Tuesday. 


The report said a computer failure prevented the automatic 
pilot of the Continental Airlines jumbo jet from locking on to 
radio beams that would have guided it to the runway. 

The flight crew did not believe that cockpit instruments show- 
ing the plane was off course were accurate, according to the report 
by the Air Acddents Investigation Branch of Britain’s Depart- 
ment of Transport The airliner was attempting to land after a 
flight from Texas. The pilot finally landed safely on manual 
controls. 


A bomb e xp loded Tuesday at the Topkapi Palace museum is 
Istanbul causing minor damage bat no injuries. The five-century- 
old ate was dosed to visitors around noon, when the blast 
occurred.' (A?) 


Paris and Bonn Seek Bosnia Monitors 


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SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Hetzegovina — France 
and Germany urged Serbia on Tuesday to agree 
to international monitoring of the blockade Bel- 
grade imposed on Bosnian Serbs to press them to 
accept a partition plan to achieve peace. 

The French foreign minister, Alain Juppfc, and 
Foreign Minister Klaus Kinkel of Germany ap- 
pealed to President Slobodan Milosevic of Serbia 
“to meet his commitments and accept an effec- 
tive international control on the bonier of Bos- 
nia-Heizegovina." 

Mr. Milosevic has sealed the borders with the 
Bosnian Serbs over their rejection of the latest 
partition plan, but has so far refused to agree to 
placing United Nations observers on the fron- 
tier. 


Leaders of the Bosnian Serbs, defying Mr. 
Milosevic, have turned down the peace plan for 
Bosnia and plan to hold a referendum this week- 
end, which is expected to ratify their stand. 

“They urge Bosnian Sob leaders and the par- 
liament at Pate not to take the heavy step of 
rekindling the war by rejecting the pjrace plan 
that has been proposed to than,” said a joint 
statement issued in Bordeaux, where the minis- 
ters were bolding taTVs 
The Bosnian Serbian leader, Radovan Karad- 
zic, predicted overwhelming rejection of the 
plan. 


American citizens wiH need visas to enter Ttokey be ginning jn 
October, officials said Tuesday. Foreign Ministry offi cials said the 
ch ange was made because the United States recently began • 
charging Turks the equivalent of 520 for U.S. visas. After OcL 1,-d 
A m e ri ca n s wlQ have to obtain, a visa in advance an d pay $20 -the 
ministry announced. (AP) 


Air France said Tuesday there would be a delay in its planned 
joint route with Japan Amines to fly over Russia between Paris 
ami the new Kansai Airport at Osaka. The French airline said the 
dday was due to a “difference in interpretation” by Russians of 
a irline documents related to the service. (AFP) 


Malaysia wfll use a British mobile ndfitaiy radar startin g Mon- 
day, the Star newspaper reported in Kuala Lumpur. The regular 
radar system at tin; Kuala Lumpur Airport was damaged by a fire 
Aug. 13, resulting in flight delays and a reported near-miss. 

(Reuters) 


Karadzic said in an interview broadcast from 
Pale, the Serbs’ stronghold outside Sarajevo. 


. Dowiafis Cfty Council sec a Feb. 28 deadline to open its new 
airport, w ith or without its unruly automated baggage system. If a 
conventional baggage system is up and running, the S3.7 billion 
airport wtil open whether or not die high-tech system is ready, a 
spokes man said. ■ (AP) 



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Ar POLITICAL NOTES + 


Vaccine Pr o g ram Suffers a Relapse 


' WASHINGTON sudden- reversal; -The Clinton 

administration has abandoned plans: for a national ware- 
house that was to have stored ana distributed vaccine as part 
of a campaign to immunize children across the .country 
starting Oct. J. - . . . .. . 

The demise of the warehouse is the latest in’ a : series of 
setbacks to ah initiative that, when proposed m 1993, called 
for providing free,- government-subsidized vaccines to all 
children. 5 • 

Administration officials say they still want to' see all chil- 
dren immunized and hope to raise immunization levels by 
having manufacturers make bulk shipments of- vaccine to 
state health departments and public health dimes. 

Mr. Ames's cooperation in reconstructing what he.did for 
Moscow is to play a key role in determining the length of her 
sentence. Mrs. Ames' could face a maximum of 15 years in 
prison 1 . Bui as part. of a pk% bargain, prosecutors agreed to 
seek a term of between five and; six years soIongasMr. Ames 
answered questions posed by the government . - (WP) 


Pentagon's Paw Look Already Fading 


WASHINGTON — Barely a year after it was unveiled, the 
Pentagon’s highly touted “Bottom-:Up Review”" of U.S. mili- 
tary policy, intended to serve as the umtonadmkiistration's 
blueprint for the post-Cold War military, is largely- in tatters. 

As envisioned by former Defense Secretary Les Aspin, the 
review was supposed to clean out old thinking, forge a new 



protect Americans in this new time. 


when the new study was completed.. 

‘ i Review has become a liability. 


But today the Bottom-Up 
derided by military experts of all stripes and given only 'a 
lukewarm embrace by the Defense Department’s new man- 
agemept. ^ - 

Liberals' complain fhat the review’s central recommenda- 
tion — that the United States maintain a large enough force 
to fight two major regional wars “nearly simultaneously" — 
is merely a holdover from Cold War days and'isout of sync 


with the relatively low-intensity conflicts that have broken 
a, Haiti and elsewhere. Conservatives contend 


out in Rwanda,.! 
that the administration’s military budget is insufficient to 
finance the force the review says would be needed. ' (LAT) 

■■■ J.. . ,.i . . . • ’ . . ' 


Sentencing of CIA Spy’s Wife Delayed 


WASHINGTON '-~.A.ffederal judge has delayed the sen- 


tencing of the wife, of Aldrich Hazen Ames so government 

.CIA officer 


investigators can further question the- former 
about. his work as a double agent for Moscow,. 

Rosario Arnes was to have been sentenced Friday in U.S. 
District Court as a result of her pleading guBty along with her 
husband in a conspiracy to commit espionage and evade 
taxes. But Judge Claude M. Hflton delayed action until Sept. 
23 at the request of attorneys on both sides. . 

Mr. Ames's cooperation m reconstructing what he did for 
Moscow is to play a key role in determining.the length of his 
sentence. Mrs. Ames could face a maximum of 15 years in 
prison. But as part of a plea bargain prosecutors agreed to 
seek a term of between five and six years so long as Mr. Ames 
answered questions posed by the government. ( WP) 


Quote/ll nquots 


President B31 Clinton, in a statement to senators: "This 
isn't a Democratic crime bill or a Republican crime bill. It's 
an American crime bin; And it will make a difference in every 
town, every city and every state in our country.” ( WP) 


End id]RubberfSu^^ 


Caafhmti ftXMtV*QD 1 

percent for Diego Femfindezde 
Cevallos, of the conservative 
National Action Party. The in- 


1 I ; : 


tenor minister, Jorp Carpizo, 








said as much as- 75 percent of 
"the electorate participated in 
the vote. 

Most international and Mex- 
ican observer groups described 
the election as clean, though 
spotted with irregularities. A 
San Francisco-based, observer 
group. Global Exchange, on 
Tuesday reported instances in 
southern Oaxaca state inwhich 
men brandishing rifles or ma- 
chetes stood next to polling 
booths, while others, instructed 
voters where to mark. their bal- 
lots for the PRI. Medea Benja- 
min. who heads Global Ex- 
change, described such 
irregularities as very wide- 
spread* “Out in the country- 
side, it was quite the norm.” 

Other groups, including the 
International Republican Insti- 
tute, criticized the lopsided ad- 
vantages in funding and logisti- 
cal support available to the PRI 
throughout the campaign, al- 
though they said therewas little 
evideifca ■ of Hmpering in -the 
vote itself. 

Administration and PRI of- 
ficials haye bees' working the 


phonies since Sunday trying to 
of irreguiar- 


... "3^- 


• f 


play down reports 
ities and portray the election to 
foreign journalists as exactly, 
what Mr. Salinas promised: the 
cleanest in Mexican history. 

**! think it says a lot that the 
debate has changed dramatical- 
ly from talk of fraud and bal- 
lot-stuffing to what it is now: 
complaints that the playing 
field is uneven.” an admimstra- 
. lion official said: 

The official conceded that 
the electoral reforms Mr. Sali- 
nas engineered this year would 
not have been possible without 


• The PRI currently controls 
95 percent of ah seats in the 
Senate and 322 of the 500 seats 
in the lower house. The party's 
broad majority, combined with 
an internal structure that pun- 
ishes dissenters, has enabled 
Mexican presidents to virtually 
decree any legislation they 
deemed necessary. 

The Mexican Constitution 
has been amended more than 
100 times sSnceit was written in 
1917, and at least six times since 
Mr. Salinas took office in 1988. 

Although the existing ar- 
rangement served Mr. Salinas 
well when he needed quick ap- 
proval of economic and politi- 
cal reforms — or when he 
sought legislative approval last 
year of the North American 
Free; Trade Agreement — he 
has now eliminated the advan- 
tage for his successor. 

Under new Teapportionment 
rules that accompanied Mr. Sa- 
linas's electoral reforms, lead- 
ing opposition parties are guar- 
anteed additional legislative 
seats based on the proportion 
of votes they received in Sun- 
day’s election. A constitutional 
amendment Mr. Salinas pushed 
through this year prohibits any 


Republicans Do AU They Can to Kill the Crime Bill 


By Helen Dewar 

Woshingicwt Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Senate Republicans have 
mounted a last-ditch effort to forte major revi- 
sions is the $30 billion crime bill, threatening the 
measure with further delay and raising the possi- 
bility that it could have to make another peril- 
filled trip through the House. 


Hours after the House reversed itself and ap- 
proved a painstakingly negotiated bipartisan 
compromise. Senator Phil Gramro, Republican 
of Texas, and other Republican conservatives 
served notice Monday that they would raise a 
procedural challenge to the bill that would tgka 
60 votes to overcome. 

In a rare attempt to reopen a House-Senate 
conference agreement on the verge of the bill's 
final passage, Mr. Gramm said Republicans 
lenge the bill as a technical violation 


of budget rules because the trust fund created to 
finance anti-crime programs was not sanctioned 
by the 1995 budget 

[Senator Joseph Biden. Democrat of Dela- 
ware, said Tuesday that he believed there were 
enough votes to block the Republican plan to 
derail the package. The Associated Press 
reported. 

| Mr. Biden, the chairman of the Senate Judi- 
ciary Committee, said in a television interview 
that he had “at least 58 senators” of the 60 
needed to block the Republican plan.] 

Mr. Gramm, who did not raise any questions 
about the bill on budget grounds when the Sen- 
ate first acted on it in November, made it clear 
that he was using the technicality only to force 
votes to strengthen penalty provisions and scale 
back prevention programs. 

“We’d like to get the pork out,” Mr. Gramm 


said, along with what he described as social 
welfare programs disguised as crime prevention 
efforts. 

If Republicans win the procedural fight, the 
legislation — or, more particularly, an earlier 
version of it — would be open to amendment by 
majority vote. 

After the Senate completes action on the mea- 
sure, the revised bill would then have to go back 
to the House, where any major changes could 
unravel the fragile compromise that was ap- 
proved Sunday evening by a vote of 235 to 195. 

The House had sidetracked the bill Aug. 1 1 on 
a procedural vote, setting off a frantic scramble 
by President Bill Clinton and Democratic lead- 
ers to reverse the outcome. Among the most 
difficult elements of the compromise that led to 
Sunday’s success was setting the balance be- 
tween prison construction and prevention 
programs. 


“It looks like an effort to make sure the crime 
bill doesn’t reach the president's desk.” said an 
aide to the House Democratic leadership, who 
predicted that changes proposed by the Senate 
Republicans would doom the bill in the House. 

Go Monday. Mr. Gin ton sent all senators a 
two-page letter urging passage of the crime bill 
and asserting that it had been paid for by reduc- 
tions in the federal bureaucracy. 

The letter pointed out that in November, 95 
senators voted for the crime bill, whose central 
provisions were the same as those in the current 
legislation. The president called on the Senate to 
“put aside politics and finish the job.* 1 
Administration officials called the letter, 
couched in gentle, bipartisan language, the “hy- 
pocrisy report” because it essentially told the 
senators that what some of them were objecting 
to today was what they had voted for a few 
months ago. 


overwhelming PRI control of 
both the Senate.and the lower- 
house Chamber of Deputies. 
"Of course, he needed the PRI. 
but he also needed the other 
parties," the official explained. 
"The president has always said 
he would only be able to go as 
far as the political consensus 
allowed." 



Battle on Simpson Blood Tests 


His Lawyers Try to Discredit DNA Results 


Ccrrptfed by Ov Sufi From Dapatcba 

LOS ANGELES — O.J. 
l’s defense team esca- 
i its attack on critical DNA 
evidence Tuesday, jousting with 
the judge and grilling police 
technicians on now they had 
handled blood samples found 
at the murder scene. 

A police expert, Collin Ya- 
mauchi, acknowledged that he 
bad mislabeled one blood sam- 
ple, but he insisted that he had 
taken pains to protect blood- 
soakea swatches, going so far as 
to avoid touching them with a 
ruler while measuring them. 

“I didn't want to risk con- 
tamination, so I made approxi- 
mations,” said Mr. Yamauchi, 


ing, its accuracy and the quality 
of laboratory procedures, be- 
cause there is no direct evidence 
linking anyone to the June 12 

Irifling n. 

Mr. Simpson, the former 
football star and televirion per- 


sonality, has pleaded not guilty 
that he murdered 


under questioning from one of 
defense attorneys, Barry 


the 


Scheck. “I tried to avoid touch- 


ingthem as much as possible.” 

The inquiry cam 
contentious hearins 


came during a 
ring to deter- 
mine if the defense would be 
allowed to conduct its own tests 
on newly disclosed blood sam- 
ples. But the Simpson camp 
dearly tried to use the session 
to lay rite groundwork for its 
overall challenge of DNA evi- 
dence. 

The fight is critical for Mr. 
Simpson. On Monday, prosecu- 
tors said that sophisticated tests 
had found that the genetic 
makeup of his blood matched 
that of blood found near the 
slashed bodies of Nicole Brown 
Simpson and Ronald L. Gold- 
man. 

The Simpson case is tikdy to 
center on the issue of DNA test- 


to charges 
Ms. Simpson, his former wife, 
and Mr. Goldman, her friend, 
outride Ms. Simpson’s home. 
Jury selection is to begin Sept. 
19. 

“We contend that, with re- 
gard to all of this evidence, 
there’s a real question that ail of 
it has been degraded or contam- 
inated in some way,” another 
defense lawyer, Johnnie Coch- 
ran Jr., said outride the hearing. 

Prosecutors charge that Mr. 
Simpson left blood at the mur- 
der scene when he cut his finger 
during a struggle. The defense 
has provided a variety ot expla- 
nations for the cut. 

Earlier blood tests on sam- 
ples taken from the crime scene 
had determined that they 
matched Mr. Simpson's blood 
type. But DNA testing is be- 
lieved to be far more specific in 
identifying or ruling out an in- 
dividual 

There is wide disagreement 
among scientific experts about 
the accuracy and usefulness of 


Berkeley, said that the blood 
tests appear to be extremely 
strong evidence of Mr. Simp- 
son's possible involvement in 
the crime. 

“One would have to specu- 
late that he is one of a very 
small percent of the population, 
almost certainly less than 1 in 
1,000 and maybe even less than 
1 in 10,000,” he said 

According to court papers, 
two samples taken from the 
“blood trail" leading away from 
Ms. Simpson’s condominium 
were subjected to a general type 


of DNA testing known as poty- 


DNA testing, and they empha- 


s ting, 

size that only those tests per- 
formed under the best of cir- 
cumstances are valuable. 

But George Sensabaugh, a 
professor of forensic science at 
the University of California at 


menu* chain reaction, or ! 
with results suggesting that they 
matched his samples. 

One of those samples was 
subjected to a preliminary form 
of a more rigorous DNA test 
known as RFLP, or restriction 
fragment-length polymor- 
phisms. The results of this ten 
also indicated a match with Mr. 
Simpson, according to court pa- 
pers. 

Scientific experts have dif- 
fered on how to interpret DNA 
tests, so prosecutors must per- 
suade Judge Lance A I to to 
admit their results. They also 
must say what the odds are that 
the blood came from Mr. Simp- 
son and not someone else. 

California’s appeals courts 
haw been divided on the ad- 
missibility of DNA evidence, so 
the defense has room to maneu- 
ver. Mr. Simpson's lawyers are 
expected to challenge the test 
results at a hearing after jury 
selection. {AP. NYT) 


For a Byte to Eat, Try Pizza by Internet 


Realm 


O J. Simpson and the chief prosecutor, Marcia dark, at a hearing concerning evidence. 


Washington Put Service 

WASHINGTON — Computer nuts have 
lost their last reason to leave their keyboards, 
ever. In Santa Cruz, California, Pizza Hut has 
logged on as the first outlet accepting orders 
over the information highway. 

A test run has begun on HzzaNet, the 
world’s first Internet pizza delivery system. 
Pizza Hut chose Santa Cruz, about 50 miles 
(80 kilometers) south of San Francisco, for its 
90-day test because of the city’s large number 
of Internet users. 

Those who live in more ordinary exits off 
the electronic superhighway will have to wait 
for PizzaNet until after this test run and until 
the company senses a groundswell of de- 
mand. A groundswdl did not seem imminent 


by the end of lunchtime Monday; not a single 
Internet order had been logged. 

Internet orders are sent to the company’s 
headquarters in Wichita, Kansas, where the 
customer’s address is electronically verified. 
Then the company identifies the Pizza Hut 
outlet closest to the customer and electroni- 
cally dispatches the order to it. Filling an 
Internet order should take the same amount 
of time that a telephone order would take, a 
spokesman said. 

If it is expanded nationwide, PizzaNet will 
still be limited to people within eight minutes’ 
drive time — in rush hour — of a Pizza Hut. 
Bui you will not be able to send a pizza 
instead of flowers for Mother’s Day, since 
payment must still be made at the door. ; 


Refugees Back in Cuba — - the U.S. Part 


By John Kifner 

New York Timex Service 

GUANTANAMO BAY 
NAVAL STATION, Cuba — 
The first Cuban refugees in 28 
years to be refused asylum in 
the United States — more than 
2,000 of them — have arrived at 
Guantanamo Bay Naval Sta- 
tion to clusters of tents pitched 
as hastily as American policy 
hadcbangecL 

[The Clinton administration 
is close to an agreement with a 
half-dozen hemisphere nations 
to provide “havens” for thou- 


ihe countries being approached 
to set up detention centers are 
the Turks and Caicos, Suriname 


and Panama.) 

Coast 


When the Coast Guard cutter 
Courageous slid up to the dock 
at 11:45 A.M. Monday, the 267 
Cuban refugees it bad plucked 
from frail rafts squatted glumly 
under a tarp stretched across its 
aft helicopter flight deck 
against the burning sun. Earlier 
in the morning, three cutters 
had Unloaded refugees picked 
up at sea, and another, the Mo- 
hawk, arrived in the afternoon. 

Military officials said they 


sands of Cubans fleeing their 

party 'from hiving a majority at oountry despite a U.S. warning thought the five cullers would 
or exceeding two-thirds in ei- to stay at home. The Associated land roughly 1,450 refugees 
ther legislative chamber. Thus, Press reported Tuesday, quoi- picked up over the last few 
..... . ing state Department officials, days. But by midnight, the 

[Refugees in Guantanamo Coast Guard said, 2,548 refu- 
Bay will be sent to the other gees who had been picked up in 
countries when facilities are the Florida Straits had landed, 
ready, the officials said. Among It was the largest one-day total 


future constitutional amend- 
ments — which require a two- 


thirds maj 
be 

the opposition. 


vote — cannot 
it support by 


of refugees since the Mariel 
boatHft m 19S0. 

Suddenly, the refugees were 
no longer headed for the riches 
and freedom of Miami, likg 
fleeing Cubans before them. In- 
stead, following President Bill 
Clinton’s abrupt challenge to 
President Fidel Castro of Cuba 
on Friday, they faced an uncer- 
tain future on this bleak 45- 
square-mile (117-square-kilo- 
meier) base that was already 
borne, as of Monday, to 14.616 
Haitian refugees. 

Rather than decreasing with 
the American policy change, 
the tide of refugees seemed to 
be rising. 

“We have been told to pre- 
pare for 10.000," Brigadier 
General Michael J. Williams 
Said. 

“We’ll give them basic hu- 
man services, a cot, a tent. 


something to eat,” he said. 
“We'D get them three hot meals 
a day as soon as we can. Then 


we’ll try to work rm improving 
the quality of life.” 

Marines put up more tents on 
these barren hillsides whenever 
Mr. Clinton’s policies in the Ca- 
ribbean change. They have 
done it several times with shifts 
in Haitian policy, and now they 
are doing it again. 

The refugees who arrived in 
Guantanamo Bay on Monday 
said that they had left Cuba on 
the rickety, jeny-buflt boats the 
regime seemed to be encourag- 
ing before they had heard of the 
American change of policy. 

They seemed stunned and 
some were angered to have 
wound up back on the same 
island, albeit on the portion 
leased by the United Slates. 


Singapore Rejects 
The ‘U.S.-StykBoy’ 


Reuters 

SINGAPORE — An ad agency has with- 
draws a publication display advertisement 
here after it was criticized by Prime Minister 
Gob Chok Tong for promoting what he caDed 
American-style youth insolence, the ad’s cre- 
ator said Ttiesday. 

The advertisement was for a children’s nu- 
tritional supplement called Susiagen. It 
showed a toddler with raised fist and wearing 
a baseball cap sideways, saying: “Crane on. 
Dad, If you can play golf five times a week, I 
can have Sustagen once a day." 

Mr. Goh said Sunday in a speech that be 
had found the advertisement to be “most 
objectionable," reflecting American values. 


Threats Traded in Cairo Over Population Talks 


New York Tma Service cover a number of subjects that are considered 

CAIRO — Muslim militant preachers have offensive or controversial in parts of the Muslim 
rn n rfprrm»H a United Nations population confer- world, including abortion, family planning and 
eace that is to be held here next month, prompt- adolescent sexuality. 

ing a private warning from Egyptian security j ( j eas jyjve stirred indignation among 

agents to call off such sermons, a militant leader j^iamic militants, who are waging a violent cam- 
said. . paign to topple Egypt’s secular government and 

“Some brothers are preaching against this cor- : — « ~ --5- j ~\ — - 
rapt, immoral conference in the mosques,” said 
the leader, an important militant figure in Im- 


Wesl- 


dominate the Islamic world 
era immorality, the militant leader said. 

He said that Egyptian security agents had 
warned him Sunday night to call off any addi- 
tional sermons condemning the conference. 

The conference, expected to draw as many as 
20.000 participants, has already drawn criticism 
from moderate Islamic quarters. 

But it is the radical militant groups that 
the greatest threat to the government of ” 


Away From Politico 


• The maid's largest depository of tropical viruses, at Yale 
University, may be closed because a scientist unwittingly 
exposed more than two dozen people to a rare disease. 
Federal, state and local public health officials met privately 
with university leaders on Tuesday to discuss what to do in 
the aftermath of the second known escape of an exotic disease 
from the lab in 25 years. The name of the scientist was not 
released, but New’ York Newsday identified him as Dr. Jean- 
Paul Gonzalez. The scientist contracted the deadly Brazilian 
Sabia virus when a test tube broke while he was working Aug. 
8 in the New Haven laboratory. He apparently believed a 
sterile mask and rubber gloves had protected him. Instead of 
going into isolation, which rules require, he kepi quiet and 
over a 12-day period moved about in the general public. He 
developed a high fever and was put into isolation Aug. 20. 

• The Reverend Benjamin F. Chavis Jr., fired as bead of the 
National Association for the Advancement of Colored Peo- 
ple, is sung to get his job back on grounds that his dismissal 
violated the group’s bylaws. The lawsuit, filed in District of 
Columbia Superior Court, seeks an injunction prohibiting the 
NAACP from removing him from the job until the issue is 
resolved. He earned $200,000 a year as executive director. 

• After be won a $5.1 million lottery jackpot, a man who left 
his wife and three children 48 years ago agreed to pay them 
less than $100,000 in retroactive child support and alimony. 
“I knew I could win the case," John Gonsalves. 71. said of the 
lawsuit by his former wife. "But rather than go through all 
this, I decided to make the offer. After alL she's the mother of 
my kids." 


• In the Colorado mountain fire that killed 14 fire fighters last 
month, a federal investigation found that fire fighters and 
supervisors made crucial errors in judgment and violated 
safety procedures. The report said that their "can-do alti- 
tude" led to a “compromising” of standard safety procedures, 
such as a failure to plot an escape route. 

AFT. (V)T. AP. Reuters. LAT 


install a strict Islamic state. 

The country’s most active and violent militant 

baba. a poor section of Cairo that is the city's organizations, the klaimc Groupand A1 Jihad, dent Hosni Mubarak, which has only recently 
ffl^italist stronghold. ™ condemn^ the coherence or tiu^t- ^ to a “^ ve of ^ ^ 

raheramay decide todefend Islam by mod yvokace And many ofjhetr members, SSL. — *nn 

fcfiifno Siri thev would be willing to die in the including key leaders, have been captured or 
afrai Jofbfood, it should “ shoot-outs, Intenor Ministry officials 

Stay away from us.” He spoke on condition that sa 3 r - 

he not be named. , ? ul r ° r ti»c last month, militant preachers have 

The International Conference on Population delivered fiery sermons denouncing the confer- 
and Development, to be held SepL 5-13. will race as an American and Israeli attempt to 


killed over 400 people. 

■ Ban on Demonstrations 

Egypt’s interior minister, Haasan Alfi, said 
Tuesday that the government would ban any 
form of protest in Cairo while the meeting was 
taking place, Reuters reported 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 1994 


Wounded Hutu- Led Soldiers Lie Helpless, Lacking Aid 


By Keith B. Richburg 

Waibmpim Post Soviet 

CAMP PANZI, Zaire — Rwandan wounded 
here He in an open Held without tents or tarpau- 
lin cover. The majority are amputees, young men 
in, the prime of life, their bodies and futures 
ruined by war. There is no medicine to ease the 
pain and food is running out. 

But the wounded men at this Zairian military 
base — here with thousands of Rwandan women 
and children — are soldiers from Rwanda's de- 
feated Hutu-ied army, accused of massacring 
i~ns of thousands of minority Tutsi during three 
months of ethnic fighting earlier this year. 

Relief workers are thus in a bind. To provide 
aid for the camp is to help accused killers. To 
■I’-oid the camp is to risk the deaths of innocent 
women and children. 

far. aid agencies are slaying away. 


“There is nobody here helping,” said a Rwan- 
dan Army medic who asked not to be named. 
“Medicine is a big problem because we don't 
have money to buy it We have war-wounded 
here. We have infectious diseases. We have dys- 
entery. There is malaria.” 

Asked about the absence of relief assistance, 
he said, “It’s a problem that we ask about also. 
There are infants here. There are old people 
here." 


Aid groups that have Docked into Zaire’s east- 
ern border region will not assist Camp Panri’s 
refugees because, they say, the soldiers are Still 
organized and are not true refugees. 

To receive aid, relief workers say. the soldiers 
must shed their uniforms and mix in with the rest 
of the area’s refugee population, now approach- 
ing 400.000 at Bukavu. 


‘There are wounded people basically lying out 
in the open,” said Kris Janowski. a spokesman 
for the United Nations High Commissioner for 
Refugees in Bukavu. But the UN agency cannot 
get involved in a military camp, he said. 

Another relief official put it this way: “These 
are the alleged perpetrators of the massacres, and 
nobody really wants to touch them.” 

But ignoring the soldiers also affects the wom- 
en and children with them. Hie UN refugee 
agency estimates that about 4,000 soldiers live at 
Camp Panzi, along with 6,000 women and chil- 
dren. Among the refugees are 800 orphans and 
unaccompanied children whom the retreating 
soldiers picked up along the road. 

Many of the children were naked or in rags 
and now wear oversized olive green military 
shir ts as their only efotfiing,, 


The children receive one meal each day of rice : 


and beans, prepared by wives of Zairian soldiers 
who live at a Zairian camp. 


im’s Ascension 


who live at a Zairian camp. 

Captain Assani Bwansolu of the Zairian 
Army, allowed a reporter access to the camp to 
show the deteriorating conditions and appeal for 
help. 

“It’s serious here, very serious," he said, stand- 
ing in front of the hundreds of children Hned up 
and waiting patiently for their meaL “You smell 
the odor? The toilets are right there," he said, 
pointing to the trench where nearby children 
were preparing to eat. “The latrines are poorly 
made. The children will get side and die/ 


“There will be a big calamity here if the world 
doesn't come to help ” he said. Asked how long 
food could last, he said, “There is nothing. 
Nothing." 


ConyM Oir Stfff From Diapetdia 

SEOUL — Leaflets calling 
for the ouster of the des igna ted 
North Korean leader, Kim Jong 
D, have been scattered in the 
diplomatic district of Pyong- 
yang, a South Korean report 


3 Somali Gunmen 
Seized in Ambush 


'■'< * v " : **•-**' 

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4 jam Franct-Pressc 

NAIROBI — Three Somalis were killed and three captured 
in the ambush of a UN coavoy of Indian troops in which 
gunmen massacred seven soldiers and wounded nine, a UN 
spokesman said Tuesday. 

Major Rick McDonald said by telephone from Mogadishu, 
the Somali capital, that the three detainees would be interro- 
gated by personnel of the UN Operation in Somalia, but the 
motive for Monday's attack was not yet known. 

The assailants snot at the convoy, carrying some 35 Indian 
troops in the central Somali village of Burleego, with mortars 
and anti-aircraft weapons, and the soldiers returned fire. 

Major McDonald said that nine soldiers had been injured 
and not six, as first announced by the United Nations on 
Monday, and that all were in stable condition Tuesday in 
hospitals in Baidoa and Mogadishu. 

He added that it was possible that more of the Somalis had 
been killed or wounded, but that only three deaths could be 
confirmed. 

On Monday, Major McDonald described the ambush as an 
unprovoked and carefully coordinated attack. 

The incident brought to 106 the number of UN peacekeep- 
ers killed in Somalia since May 1993. 












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Such leaflets would be the 

Gist overt sign of a power strug- 
gle against the son and heir- 
apparent of the late presid&it of 
North Korea, Kim D Sung, to 
be reported from the North. 

The Sooth Korean domestic 
news agency Yonhap quoted an 
unidentifie d Western diplomat 
in Seoul as saying the leaflets, 
which read, “Down with Kim 
Jong H,” were dropped at em- 
bassies in North Korea's capital 
Friday night or Saturday morn- 
ing. 

That neighborhood is off- 
limits to ordinary North Kore- 
an citizens, so the appearance 
of such leaflets would seem to 
indicate that some faction 
among the North Korean pow- 
er was behind.them- 

There was no immediate in- 
dependent confirmation of . the 
report. 

One senior Western diplomat 
in Seoul said be had heard no th- 
ine of the reported incident. 


of the world's most secretive 

Yonhap quoted the source as. 
saving the incident might bere^ 
lamdto a North Korean radio 
conmnabay Sunday that hffl*v _ 

ed at oppostiion to the takeover ;., 
by Kim Jong IL 

The commentary, brojrfcari ' 
by North Korean domestic fa- ... 
dio and monitored in Tokyo,- 
said the country's revolutionary 
work should not end with-just -'=• 
one generation. 

“Historical experience,” it 
said, “shows that unless The 
problem of a successor of a rev^ 
olutionary leader is solved Cor- 
rectly, ambitious persons and • 
conspirators may, with a breach . 
of faith, play with the party and 
its revolution.” 

This, the radio added, “could : . 
have a very bad result, destroy- ■ 
tog the revolution and its foun- 
dation." . 

North Korea’s media has 
hailed Kim Jong D, 52, asthe 
country’s “Great Leader” since 
his father’s death last month. 

But there-bas been increasing 
confusion in the world as to • w 
why no. fonnai announcement - 
has been made of bis assuming 
his father’s . highest posts — 




g r o w i ng unc ertainty over the cral secretary arid 
situation in North Korea,” one (AP, > 


7 P, Reuten) 


Lagos Court Delays 
Curb on Oil Union 


Psiiidi dc Noirmont/Kaueis 

Disabled soldiers from Rwanda in Zaire on Tuesday approaching their camp, crowded with solders and their families. 


Murayama Trailed 
By Wartime Issues 


C-mipifaJ bt Our Staff From Dapairha 

L '.GOS — The Nigerian fed- 
eral nigh court Tuesday sus- 
pended for a week a govern- 
ment order dissolving the 
leadership of the main striking 
oil union, officials said. 

The military government an- 
nounced last week that it was 
dissolving the leadership of the 
National Union of Petroleum 
and Natural Gas Workers and 
replacing it with a military ad- 
ministrator. 


The union has been leading 
an eight-week-old strike calling 
for the military to band over 
power to a civilian government. 


Judge Mamman Kolo said he 
would hear the suit next 
Wednesday. “The association's 


executive body dissolved by 
government should have its 


government should have its 
original status quo maintained 
until then,” he said. 

General Sani Abacha, the 
military ruler, moved against 
the unions to end a six-week- 
old strike in support of Mo- 
shood K. O. Abiola, the busi- 
nessman believed to have won 
an annulled presidential elec- 
tion last year. 

He is on trial now, charged 
with treason for having pro- 
claimed Hims elf president 

The union and its sister 


union, Pengassan, are asking 
the court to declare the dismiss- 
al of their executives illegal. 

Earlier, the dismissed presi- 
dent of the white-collar oil 
workers' union. Bola Owo- 
dunni. said Tuesday that mem- 
bers of the union had not re- 
turned to work despite an order 
’ from General Abacha. 

“The claim that most of our 
workers resumed yesterday is a 
hoax," he said. 

Oil industry officials say 
some of the strikers had turned 
up after being ordered back to 
their jobs by General Abacha, 
but they maintain that it is too 
early to say the pro-democracy 
strike is over after seven weeks. 

General Abacha's govern- 
ment warns that the striking 
workers have until Thursday to 
return to work. 

Mr. Owodunni said, “Only 
those people on essential duties 
have resumed, and they are 
mostly management staff.” 

Nigeria's oil operations have 
been severely disrupted by the 
strike. 

“We do not intend to para- 
lyze the economy but govern- 
ment’s intransigence to not lis- 
ten to us during negotiations 
has brought about this im- 
passe," Mr. Owodunni said. 

(AFP, Reuters) 


RWANDA: Wounded Hutu Soldiers, Feared and Shunned, Go Untended 


Continued from Page 1 

epidemics like measles start, the aid offi- 
cials stress, there will be a far higher death 
rate among Zaireans, many of whom are 
not vaccinated, than among Rwandans 
who have benefited from a vaccination 
program. (Reuters, AFP) 

■ Rights Monitors Urged 

A United Nations investigator called 


Tuesday for the deployment of up to 200 
human righLS monitors in Rwanda, Agence 
France- Presse reported from Geneva. 

In a report punished here after a visit to 
Rwanda at the end of July, Renfe Degni- 
Scgui of the Ivory Coast said (he “funda- 
mental problem" in Rwanda was security. 

Mr. Degni-Segui. a lawyer sent to 
Rwanda by the UN Commission on Hu- 
man Rights, pinpointed the illegal seizur e 


of abandoned houses — often try returning 
refugees — banditry, summary executions 
and a collapse of state administration. 

But he said that he was satisfied widi 
unambiguous assurances he had received 
from the new government, installed hr Ki- 
gali by rebels of the Tutsi-dominated 
Rwandan Patriotic Front, that there will 
be no summary executions in reprisal for 
the massacre of Tutsi and moderate Hutu. 


CompMbf Oar Staff From Dtyatcha 
MANILA — Prime Minister 
Tomrichi Murayama of Japan 
began a visit to four Asian 
neighbors on Tuesday, dogged 
by the issue of Japan's wartime 
activities. 

- About 50 Filipino women 
who said they were forced to be 
prostitutes for Japanese sol- 


diers daring World War II pro- 
tested Mr. Murayama’s arrival 


MTV: Play on Nationalism for Europe Music Channel GERMANY: 

Continued from Page 1 By all accounts MTV has as “dominated by American Watchon Rightists 

cmr*^ ni/w awMCK than mv and British music.” 


European alphabets the letter 
“k” does not exist, which is a 


problem for a company like 
Kellogg hawking products like 
Rice Kxispies. 

Even those companies that 


Even those companies that 
do sell the same product under 
the same name across Europe 
still tend to be organized along 
national lines. Sales targets and 
crucially, advertising budgets. 


By all accounts MTV has 
scored more successes than any 
other pan-European broadcast- 
er in selling itself. Professional 
marketers point out that it is 
aided by a strong brand name, a 
discrete 16-to-34-year-old audi- 
ence and by the fact that music 
suffers fewer problems of lan- 
guage and national taste in 
crossing borders than does any 


are all pul together nationally. 
Mr. Roe - - 


other type of programming. 

Still, the pan-European mar- 
ket, far from approaching the 
sum of its national parts, re- 
mains a tiny sliver of the total. 

“It is still relatively small," 
said Paul McGhee, director of 
network and business develop- 
ment at NBC Super Channel, 
which along with MTV, Euro 
Sport and CNN lead the field. 
Mr. McGhee estimates the val- 
ue of the pan-European adver- 
tising mancet at $130 milli on. 
Although Mr. Roedy puts the 
figure at close to $500 mflhon, 
that still constitutes barely one- 
tenth of the total market. 

Next year MTV's faith in the 
single European market will 
face a new litmus test. By digi- 


lr. Roedy describes the pro- 
cess by which he has now signed 
up over 200 advertisers as very 
labor intensive. “You have to 
sell not only their corporate 
headquarters but each of the 
national units as weH," he said. 


REBELS: Khmer Rouge, Again 


Continued from Page 1 

Khmer Rouge probing found 
army resistance so weak that at 
one point a force of about 400 
guerrillas pushed to within nine 
miles of Bat tarn bang, Cambo- 
dia’s second-largest city, burn- 
ing down villages and forcing 
more than 40,000 people to flee. 
Government casualties in the 
campaign were estimated at 
more than 500 killed and 1,000 
wounded. 

For the army, “Pailin was a 
total disaster from all points of 
view," a United Nations official 
said. “A direct consequence of 
these military operations is that 
the Khmer Rouge remobilized. 
They have provoked a de facto 
return to war nationwide.” 

The current number of 
Khmer Rouge combatants re- 
mains unclear, with estimates 
ranging from 10,000 to 15,000. 
Defections that seemed to be 
sapping Khmer Rouge strength 
last year now have nearly 
stopped amid reports of gov- 
ernment corruption and mis- 


treatment at a military camp 
where hundreds ware being re- 
trained for service in the new 
Cambodian Army. Many of the 
more than 1.500 Khmer Rouge 
members who defected last year 
have run away, and some have 
rqoined the guerrillas, human 
rights investigators said. 

“The Khmer Rouge are at the 
weakest they’ve been in years, 
but the army is so inept that it 
makes the Khmer Rouge look 
strong,” said James Ross, a rep- 
resentative of the International 
Human Rights Law Group. 

Since UN-supervised elec- 
tions last year under a 1991 
peace accord, the guerrilla 
group has lost its Chinese spon- 
sorship, its unhindered access 
to sanctuaries in Thailand, its 
UN recognition and its claims 
to national legitimacy through 


Norway 9 s First 
Gay Spouses 
Seek Divorce 


professed obeisance to King 
Norodom Sihanouk. 


For nivutment iufonnotsovi 


Rood THE MONEY REPORT 
every Saturday in 6ie WT 


The Asuxiated Press 
OSLO — One year after 
Norway allowed homosex- 
uals to many, a couple has 
filed for what may be the 
country's first gay divorce. 

Two homosexuals have 
been granted a separation, 
the first step toward a di- 
vorce, said Wenche An- 
dreassen of the Oslo family 
services office. 

Mr. Andreassen refused 
to give details about the 
couple or the separation, 
citing privacy rules. 

Norway was the second 
country in the world, after 
Denmark, to allow gay 
marriages. Spouses are 
guaranteed the same rights 
as heterosexual couples, ex- 
cept for a church wedding 
or adopting children. They 
must follow regular divorce 
court procedure. 


tally compressing its signal, it 
wiU be able in January to 


as “dominated by American 
and British music.” 

Already MTV has begun to 
slip in a more coun tty-specific 
direction. Last year, it set up a 
German edition of MTV. The 
programming is the same. The 
only difference is that advertis- 
ers can now buy air time in 
Germany alone. 

Even more tellingly, MTV 
has quietly bowed to European 
nationalism by offering for the 
last two years to screen national 
advertising on its pan-Europe- 
an service. 

With a reach that now ex- 
tends to 60 million households 
across Europe and with a 
viewerehip of 300,000 in any 
given half hour of the day, 
MTV’s owners are slowly turn- 
ing from development to profit 
maximizatio n 

In an attempt to pump up its 
revenue stream, MTV plans to 
scramble its signal beginning 
next year. From that point on 
MTv viewers, only a small frac- 
tion of whom currently pay for 
the channel, will have to pony 
up a monthly subscription fee. 


will be able in January to 
squeeze six channels on to the 
satellites it uses to cover Europe 
instead of the one it now has. 
Mr. Roedy is considering 
whether to use that new capaci- 
ty for new product offerings 
like VH-1 or to tailor MTV for 
national markets. 

Meanwhile, MTV faces ever 
greater competition from a ris- 
ing number of national rivals. 
In Germany, for instance, a mu- 
sic video station called VIVA 
began broadcasting in January. 
Owned jointly by the record 
companies EMI, Sony, Poly- 
gram and Warner Music, Viva 
not only takes Germany-only 
advertising but emphasizes 
German groups. 

David Hughes, a spokesman 
for EMI Records UK, criticizes 
his pan-European competitor 


Pope’s Recovery 
Called Excellent 


New York Tana Service 

ROME — The Vatican in- 
sisted Tuesday that Pope John 
Paul n was making “excellent” 
progress during a mountain va- 


cation in northern Italy despite 
concern over his health. 


concern over his health. 

The worries about the 74- 
year-old Pope's physical well- 
being resurfaced Sunday when 
he seemed to grimace in pain 


while descending from a plat- 
form where be had said Mass. 


form where he had said Mass. 

At the time, his spokesman 
said the Pope had inadvertently 
put all his weight on his right 


Gontaned froai Page 1 
banned several small neo-Nazi 
groups in recent years, it has 
balked at outiawing the larger 
far-ri ght parties. 

Chancellor Helmut Kohl 
flatly ruled out asking the Ger- 
man high court to ban the Re- 
publicans in April “The vast 
majority of Germans know very 
wdl that every vote for the Re- 
publicans is a vote against do- 
mestic stability and against our 
country’s international stand- 
ing,” Mr. Kohl said at the time. 

Whether association with the 
People’s Union will hdp the 
Republicans’ flagging electoral 
fortunes will be seen in the OcL 
16 elections. Earlier this sum- 
mer the Republicans won only 
3.9 percent of the vote in Euro- 
pean Parliament elections, less 
than the minimu m needed for 
representation and about half 
of the party’s 1989 tally. Mr. 
SchOnhuber, 71, recently an- 
nounced that he would step 
down later this year as chair- 
man of the party he founded in 
1983. 

Opinion polls indicate that 
the Republicans will also fall 
short of the 5 percent needed 
for seats in the German Parlia- 
ment. The People's Union has 
no slate of candidates in the 
October election, so any joint 
political strategy is presumably 
intended to further Republican 
chances. 

Mr. Frey and Mr. SchOn- 
huber, both based in Munich, 
said in their statement that Ger- 
many’s mainstream parties had 
used “divide and conquer" tac- 
tics to keep the far-right out of 
Bonn. They also professed to be 


tested Mr. Murayama’s arrival 
in Manila on the first stop in a 
' four-nation Southeast Asian 
tour. The women demanded 
compensation for their ordeal. 

similar demonst rations are 
expected when Me.- Murayama 
visits Malaysia, and Singapore, 
where resentment of Japan’s 
brutal occupation of Asia is still 
strong. Japan’s position is that 
any reparations disputes were 
settled m postwar treaties. 

Mr. Murayama’s trip also in- 
cludes a stop in Vietnam, where 
talks are expected to focus on 
Japanese help for Vietnam's de- 
veloping free-roarket economy. 
Japan provided about S600 mu- 
Hon in aid to Vietnam last year. 

Mr. Murayama and. Presi- 
dent Fidel V. Ramos of the 
Philippines were expected to 
discuss the issue of compensa- 
tion Wednesday. 

A Philippines official said 
Manila would “welcome the 
manifestations of the remorse 
of the Japanese government 
and the Japanese peopled 

Media organizations in the 
region have reported that Japan 
is considering compensating the 
so-called “comfort women- by 


organization which would' aix . 
cept donations by individuals . 
and groups. . 

Reports have also said that 
Japan may -invest SI bilBou • 
over the next 10 years to buDd 
job training centers in Asia and 
help those who had been Vfh r 
rooted by the Japanese army to 
return home.. 

' Mr. Murayaroa, a' SodaHst, 
has sympathized with the com- . 
pensation demands of. Arian 
countries, but his coalition 
partners,. the conservative lib-', . 
cral Democrats,, oppose .the ^ 
idea:'’' i : ■ 

His visit began as apubfisbed 
pall showed that more than 70 
percent of Japanese believe 
their country has not pud 
enough compensation to vic- 
tims of its ag^resrion in Asia 
before and during the war. 

The survey, published Tues^ 
day by the duly Asahi Shimbun 
showed 72 percent of 2^1.6 re- 
spondents believed compensa- 
tion had been insufficient. 

Seventeen percent said full 
compensation had been pud. 
Among people aged 70 and 
over, 24 percent said the com- 
pensation had been sufficient. 

Japan’s wartime acts include 
needlessly rating thousands of 
Filipino dvQiam in battle, exe- 
cuting and conscripting Malay- 
sians as laborers, and executing 
at least 40^000 Singaporeans, 
often after torture, who were 
suspected of being anti-Japa- 
nese. - (AP, Reuters) 


iffi 


i about half . 

JAPAN: Number of Visitors Drops 

would step 


Cnatiaped from Page 1 
government that promote ex- 
changes, such as tire Japan 
Fo u nd a tion, and suggested that 
they be doubled in size over the 
next few years and that their 


budgets be increased 

The report also called for 
more housing for forei gn stu- 
dents, more language courses, 
simpler visa procedures and 
more money for scholarships. 

AJato Arima, the former 
president of Jtqj&n's leading 
university, Tokyo University, 
and bead of the advisory com- 
mittee, said: “Japan Hag to es- 
tablish itself as a cultural coun- 
try, not just an economic giant. 
Japan’s, whole raison d’fetre 
most c h a ng e. France is a coun- 
try of acts and culture. Why not 
Japan?” 

No one doubts that a big part 
of the problem rests in theUnit- 
ed States and other, .foreign 
countries. Few foreigners learn 


motivated by calls within Mr. 
Kohl’s Christian Democratic 


leg, broken last April when he 


his bathroom at the Vati- 


Party for constitutional revi- 
sions that would allow dual citi- 
zenship far fordgpm and an 
overhaul of current laws that 
base citizenship on bloodlines. 


Japanese, and courses in Japa- 
nese history or culture have 
generally not been popular at 
Western universities. 

Culturally, Americans toad j 
to fed more connected with Eu- 
rope, in spite of the fact that 
Japan is the largest UJ3. over- 
seas' trading partner and the 
critical link in American mili- 
taxy strategy in the Pacific. 

Even when costs in Japan 
were far lower, few Americans 
came here. And while the dis- 
tance is great, that does not do- - 
ter Americans from visiting 
China, for instance, m greater 
numbers. 

“For Japanese there is no 
donbt, the United States is a 
kind of dream destination," 
said Fumio Kanaya, a 'deputy 
general manager at the Japan 
Travel Bureau, the country’s, 
largest agency! “But it's not the 
same for Americans. Ameri cans 
usually come bac on business." 














When an airline has a young 

fleet ? experienced pilots, 
attentive cabin crew, and the 

pickiest ground technicians in 

the world, it’s free to concen- 
trate on what’s really 

important: 










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.. International Herald Tribune 
if Wednesday, August 24, 1994 
E 6 


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Robin Soans and Debra Gi/fet as the Pinch wifes in "Country Wife 


By Sheridan Morlev 

ImemaiionallteralJ Tribune 

L ONDON — In a summer when 
London theaters are reeling from 
the double whammy of heal wave 
and rail strike, lines around box 
offices are about as rare as accessible car 
parking and air conditioning. But nightly 
along The Cut around the Young Vic, 
several hundred people wait to get into the 
surprise hit of the season : Theatre de Coru- 
plicite’s “The Street of Crocodiles:' 

Surprise, because this show was at the 
National Theatre less than two years ago, 
and because the revival has accordingly 
not been all that widely reviewed. It must 
therefore be word of mouth, plus tremen- 
dous brand loyalty, which brings Compli- 
city's followers out in such unseasonable 
force, and given the Young Vic's current 
uncertainty of management it might be 
wise to offer them tenure. 

For the Complicate group is quite ex- 
traordinary: part actors, part acrobats 
(one of them makes his entrance here by 
walking down the length of a wall from 
ceiling to floor), part mime artists, they 
come together to perform the surrealist 
short stories of Bruno Schulz, the Polish 
writer murdered by the Nazis in 1942. 
These range From family dinners interrupt- 
ed by the birds Bruno's father keeps in the 
attic, through slapstick schooldays to the 
final, awful realization that the marching 
feet heard offstage, and the ever-increasing 
sense of menace on the stage, lead inexora- 
bly toward the ghettos and the gas cham- 
bers. 

Yet this is also where Franz Kafka meets 
the Marx Brothers. Simon McBurney's ag- 
ile production is much more audience 
friendly on second viewing, and although a 
knowledge or German or Spanish might be 
useful for the occasional bursts of dia- 
logue, there is so much else going on in this 
three-ring circus that it is best just surren- 
der to the fantasy and the nightmare. 

You have only the next two Sunday 
afternoons left in which to catch, in con- 
cert at the Barbican, the most exciting 
musical rediscovery of the year. George 
and Ira Gershwin's “Strike Up the Band" 
first opened, and indeed closed, in Phila- 
delphia 67 years ago next week. Three 
years later, by which time the original 
George Kaufman book had been ditched, 
it made it to Broadway but was then never 
heard of again until a discovery of its sheet 
music in a New Jersey warehouse led to a 
CD recording some five years ago. 

Now, and not before time, we get a 
London premiere in Ian Marshall- Fisher's 
Lost Musicals sequence, and with an im- 
mensely starry cast: Daniel Massey, Thel- 
ma Ruby, Frank Thornton. Kathryn Ev- 
ans and Sam Kelly bring Lfae original 
Kaufman script back to wisecracking life 
with a score rich not only in the title song 
and 'The Man I Love," but half a dozen 
other Gershwin classics, many of them 
unheard on stage this last half-century. 

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so fascinating is the reason for its original 
failure: when it first opened in 1927, 
World War I was less than a decade away.. 
and there must have been, many, in .that, 
opening-night audience who had lost loved., 
ones in Europe. Yet here was a show, '4 ; 
musical yet, in which Kaufman said that ' 
war is the work of charlatans, politicians 
(often the same) and milli onaire business- 
men, and can only be won by the truly 
corrupt and self-interested. 

To establish his thesis, Kaufman sets up 
a cheese war between the United States 
and Switzerland and then allows all-man-', 
ner of financial and romantic blackmail to 
resolve it. It is here, I now’ firmly believe, 
rather than in the more widely-quoted “Of 
Thee I Sing," .which Kaufman, and the 
Gershwins wrote three years later! that you 
will find the first truly contemporary satir- 
ical musical. 

Like “Of Thee- 1 Sing,”' “Strike Up the 
Band" has an often unwieldy plot that 
develops in a series of frantic lurches. But 
like the better known score, this' one also 
benefits from that curious fusion of the 
Gershwins' joyous, . lyrical romanticism 
and Kaufman's sour, brilliantly add de- 
spair at a nation that could regard politics 
as just one more commercial commodity 
on sale at bargain prices to the gullible by 
the greedy. 

Massey as the big-cheese cheese mogul. 
Thornton, as a presidential sidekick un- 
willing to comment even on the weather 
until he has written his memoirs, Ruby as a 
predatory society matron, and Kelly as a 
spy of many pans all give vintage comic 
performances at the head of a cast that 
brings this soaring score joyously back to 
life. 

Also at the Barbican, in the RSCs Fit 
stage, Max Stafford-Dark has a hugely 
inventive revival erf Wycherley's “Country 
Wife," in from Stratford, one which gets us 
well away from the usual problem of what 
can seem a one-joke play about a rake who 
feigns impotence in order to calm the hus- 
bands he them cheerfully cuckolds. 

Stafford-Dark suggests it is also about 
feminism, mal e bonding and a 1675 high 
society in terminal sexual and social con- 
flict and he has brought together a power- 
house cast led by Jeremy Northam, Abigail 
McKern and Robin Scans as a frenetically 
desperate Pinch wife. It has taken the Roy- 
al Shakespeare Company 30 years to get 
around to this classic of HI manners, but 
they have done it proud, even if the new 
songs do seem a little overeager to con- 
vince us of a topicality we always knew was 
there. 


A Poisoned Chalice ? 

Lord Gowrie and the Arts Council 


, By' John Rockwell • ' 

•• : ;.Ni w York Tunes Strict . ' , • 

L ONDON — There are those who 
believe that Alexander ■ Patrick 
Greysteil Hore-Ruthven. other-' 
. wise theEariof- Gowrie, is drink- 
ing’ deep from what the Financial Times 
says could be a poisoned chalice. The job 
he took cm, as of Aprfl 1,. is Ike chairman- 
ship pf the newly organized Arts Council 
of England, for five year! 

The chalice might seem poisoned for 
any number of reasons. The left in -Britain 
has. complained for years that the Conser- 
vatives starved the arts, first by halting 
expansion in subsidies .and then, last year, 
by actually cutting the Arts Council bud- 
get by ; $5 mfllion. 

. In addition, over the past year, the Arts 
Council found itself mired in controversy, 
notably over an ill-considered plan to 
j^inunate support for some London or- 
chestras. Cbmplaints boiled up, the coun- 
cil backed down, and morale collapsed 
Perhaps partly as a result. Lord Pa- 
lumbo resigned as chairman and was re- 
placed by Lord Gowrie. But as part of their 
. decentralization campaign, the govero- 
. mem split off the arts councils of Scotland 
and wales, (The arts in Northern Ireland 
are undo: a different jurisdiction.) . 

The Arts Council of England’s budget- 
ary allotment from the secretary of state 
for heritage is $300 milli on, which rather 
overshadows the $36 million for Scotland 
and the $20 million for Wales. Still, the 
postion Gowrie has assumed has been 
diminishe d in more ways than one. 

I N 1 985 he resigned from government 
because, he said then, his salary of 
$50,000 as minis ter for the arts was 
insufficient. Although from a vener- 
' able Irish f amil y, he does not have a per- 
sonal fortune. 

- Gowrie then became chairman of Soth- 
eby’s Europe, however, and can now pre- 
sumably afford the unpaid post of Arts 
Countil chairman. He also retained a num- 
ber of positions as a paid consultant, for 
which he has drawn opposition criticism. 

- Gowrie, 54. brings an impressive back- 
ground to iris post. A graduate of Eton and 
Oxford, be has been a published poet and 
art critic, a teacher (and Robert Lowell's 
assistant at Harvard), an art dealer, direc- 


tor of .the Serpentine Gallery in London, 
provost of the Royal Coll ege of Art, a 
director of the London Symphony .and 
chairman of Andrew Lloyd Webber's 
Really Useful Group. . , ' ' 

He lists book-reviewing as a nobby and 
■ is - married to- Adelbeid Grafin von der 
■Schuknburg, a journalist whose father was 
• executed by Hitler . 1 . ■ - 

He held several Conservative- minor or 
' shadow posts in the 1970s, iiTcluding oppo- 
sition spokesman on economic affairs. In 

the 1 980s, he was part of Maigaidt Thatch- 
er’s inner rirde, caHed.by some the *T>csi 

brain” in her government- 
• Staunchly conservative in his political 
aid economic views, he. is open- -to the 
ch arge that tie is too closeto Torypower to 
champion alternative views. 

BuVbe has defended the council’s politi- 
cal independence and denounced its bud- 
get cut as “an erratic decision,” adding, “1 
deplore it.” The cut was made by the man 
who named him Arts Council chairman, 
Peter Brooke, who was replaced as heritage 
secretary by Stephen Dotrell in. July. 

- In Britain* elected officials have ddegat- 
: ed-arts subsidies to a supposedly indepefr 

dent body, meaning in theory that politi- 
cians won’t interfere with artistic 
decisions. 

When Gowrie was arts minister, he had 

- to deal with the fallout from the public and ^ 
political outcry over a Minimalist pile of 
bricks by the American sculptor Carl An- 
dre that the Tate Gallery had acquired 
Vanguard arts polemics in London are still 
divided between, conservatives and “brick- 
ies.”- Gowrie counts himself a brickie, 
fomig h no particular fan of Andre’s. 

The new Arts Council chairman has 
publicly courted not only the two heritage 
secretaries under whom he has already 
served, but also the Labor Party's arts 
politicians. He has moved to restore confi- 
dence in the coundl by restructuring, 
which he concedes includes dismissals. 

He has also named several distinguished 
Britons to places on the council itself, 
among them the theater director Trevor 
Nunn and the architect Richard Rogers, 
who is firml y linked with Labor. 

He dismisses the view that the Tories 
have been hostile to the arts. “It’s not true 
that the arts have been especially badly 
treated,” he contended in an interview. 




W UDcCmctn? 


Ben Stein , right, with Jim Carrey. in “ The Mask”: "I was trained by the best at sounding nasal and boring. " 

Actor’s Niche: Exquisitely Boring 


By Stephanie Dolgoff 

.Vw York Tones Service 


N EW YORK — An 
actor’s ego is a fragile 
flower, and most per- 
formers would with- 
er if they heard themselves de- 
scribed, universally, as 
annoying drones. For Ben 
Stein, it is a source of pride. 

“The truth is, inside this bor- 
ing, bourgeois exterior. I’m 
really a churning mass of terror 
and exultation," deadpans 
Stein, 49, whose off-camera na- 
sal voice is as devoid of intona- 
tion as the one heard in his 
numerous film cameos, televi- 
sion appearances and radio 
voice-overs. 

Stein has cornered the market 
on dull, to hilarious effect “We 


needed a guy who was annoying, 
and it was Ben all the way,” says 
Mike Label!, the producer of 
“Honeymoon in Vegas,” who 
cast Stein as a airline passenger 
who holds up the ticketing line 
to get the best rate to his neph- 
ew's wedding, preventing Nico- 
las Cage's frantic character from 
hightailing it to Hawaii 

Michael Chinich, now the 
head of casting for the director 
Ivan Reitman, gave Stein his 
breakthrough role -as an- ineffec- 
tual teacher in the 1986 film 
“Farris Bueller's Day Off.” 

While audiences may not 
know Stein's name, they recog- 
nize his face — and,, of course, 
his whining voice. At a recent 
showing of “The Mask." in 
which Stein plays the preten- 
tious psychologist Jim Carrey 
visits after discovering a masV 


of Loki, the crowd tittered be- 
fore Stein uttered a sound. 

Stein's career is based on brief 
scenes: He played a museum cu- 
rator in the recent bomb 
“North," a fair-weather politi- 
cian in last year’s “Dave," a mar- 
ket researcher in a Wendy’s 
commercial and a boring teacher 
on ABCs “Wonder Years.” 

Stein was an economist for 
the Department of Commerce 
in the late^ 1960s, was elected 
valedictorian at Yale Law 
School in 1970, and was a law- 
yer for the Federal Trade Com- 
mission shortly thereafter. 

“Only a person who spent the 
first three .years of his profes- 
sional life as a bureaucrat in 
Washington can fully appreci- 
ate how great life is on the seL I 
was trained by the best at 
sounding nasal and boring.” 


A film fan, Stein became a 
“hip pie-sl ash- teacher” of cine- 
ma at the University of Califor- 
nia at Santa Cruz 7 — until he 
was drawn back to Washington 
by the desire to help President 
Richard Nixon fend off what 
Stein describes as persecution. 

Stein wrote speeches for the 
president, which led to a free- 
lance writing career and to a gig 
as a columnist and editorial writ- 
. er for The Wall Street JoumaL j) 

Stein lives in Los Angeles, 
writes for magazines including 
Barron’s and The American 
Spectator, teaches law at Pep- 
per dine University Law School 
in Malibu and has published 16 
books, most recently “A Li- 
cense to Steal: The Untold Sto- 
ry of Michael Milken and the 
Conspiracy to Bilk the Nation." 


Dining £jiL 2 t Out 


Off Season in Paris 


MSB 2nd 


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WMond btfra oxjfang m authentic 1900 
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Bcncd Faring Si G*iWan*'j 0 jf res 

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Hctd m fa? bed kitfcan nskwwl m France 
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iwlWwT 4326 449). 


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«w**oned Open rmdm rid£& 

ro roe Si -ftxnrapc Td {1] 4/ 05 4975 
Near fnrakbs Tereiinal 


If WESTERN 

The Rebwoa.far lews 
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By Thomas Quinn Curtiss 

International Herald Tribune 


P ARIS — Summer theater in Paris replaces the city’s 

national theaters that dose for vacation. 

In the Crypte Sainte-Agnes under Saint Eustache 
Church in Leg Halles, Jean Anouilh's “Thomas ’More" is 
playing. Here Sir Thomas More is about to be beheaded for 
judging that Henry YIIl was wrong to separate the English 
Church from Rome. 

A spading novelty, knovwi as “Rue deb Galt* Offenbach” (at 
the Theatre de la Madeleine) is just the' tiling for a Parisian 
^^jvenins- Michd Frantz has written the scripfand selected 
ttw numbers. He also plays the piano score and impersonates the 
compcser. He and his quartetrare remarkable in all they do from 
Offrabachs La Bdle Hatne” to the rarely -revived, “Le R'| 

P ]“? n 8 of 1950s, “Bobossi" is 
la . Micbod i fe re. Franqois Perier firet took 
2t J OT ye* 1 *- Gerald Rinaldi of the 

“ aiffigiff 1 “ by doub “ 

Les Palmes de M. Schutz” (at the Math mins) is based on the 

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WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 1994 

OPINION 


. V 


Heralfc 


INTERNATIONAL 



Sribunc Russians Who Used to Admire America Now Wonder 


* 


fTni.LSIiMl WITH THfc NF.W V'llKK TIMIA AMI THK W VSHINCTON POST 


M OSCOW — After a few 
years’ absence. I returned 


A New Goal for Mexico 


The party that has dominated Mexico's 
politics for two generations appears to 
have won again, electing its candidate for 
president, Ernesto Zedillo Ponce de Leda, 
and a majority of the legislature. But this 
time, unlike previous presidential elec- 
tions, there was a real campaign and a real 
choice. True, there were enough reported 
irregularities, but there was nothing — at 
least according to the early returns — on a 
scale that would invalidate the results. 
Despite some double voting, some r unnin g 
out of ballots etc. reported by the moni- 
tors, the government seems, on the evi- 
dence so far, to have largely fulfilled its 
promises to run a straight election. 

One of the losing candidates, Cuauhtfe- 
moc CSrdenas, has charged fraud. But 
before the election be bad declared that 
any election would be sell -evidently fraud- 
ulent. in his opinion, if it failed to elect 
him. In fact, the exit polls indicate that be 
ran third, with about one-sixth of the vote. 

So after many years as a rather authori- 
tarian one-party' state, Mexico now ap- 
pears to be in the process of moving cau- 
tiously but irrevocably toward democracy. 
Most Mexicans want to move toward 
greater democracy, but there are a lot of 
anxieties about the possibility that the 


transition could turn violent. Memories of 
a long and bloody revolution are still dear, 
and those fears were heightened by (he 
peasants' uprising in Chiapas last winter 
Followed by the assassination of a presi- 
dential candidate in the spring. Hie people 
who voted for Mr. Zedillo seem to have 
been voting above all for stability. 

Mr. Zedillo is known as an economist, 
but this era’s great decisions of economic 
policy, to open Mexico to world markets, 
have already been made by his two prede- 
cessors. The job confronting him is likely 
to be H ealing fairly and effectively with the 
social consequences. Free markets are effi- 
cient but are not necessarily just or gentle, 
especially in dealing with people who, like 
many Mexicans, are only beginning to 
move out of traditional peasant life. 

In the new North American economy as 
it is evolving, the people best equipped to 
prosper are those with the most education 
and advanced technical skills. Govern- 
ments have a responsibility to see that 
others don't suffer m this process and that 
economic growth does not result in wider 
and angrier social divisions. Thai may well 
be the test by which Mr. Zedillo and his 
administration are measured. 


— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


JLVJL years’ absence, 1 returned 
to Moscow recently and discov- 
ered something that surprised 
me greatly: a growing feeung of 
annoyance toward America. 

Five years ago it seemed (hat 
we Russians were knocking on 
heaven's door. The rich Ameri- 
can unde promised us the keys 
and sent advisers to guide us. 
Now, as Russians see it, the 
advisers have left us with a mess 
while taking their handsome 
consulting fees back to the 
States. Some people believe we 
have become a playground for 
the American experts and their 
world-class egos. 

True, we can always reject 
their advice. But the internation- 
al lenders are pushing it on us. 
Besides, it's always easier to 
blame someone else. 

We do have professional 
America^aaters, such as the right- 
wing Co mmunist s or the chau- 
vinist followers of Vladimir Zhir- 
inovsky, but I am not talking 
about than J am ml Mug about 
people who not long ago were 
warm toward the United States. 

One of them is a friend. Boris 
Flujccsky, who wozfcs in nuclear 
disarmament. “They said they 
came here to make the world saf- 


By Yelena Khanga 


is trying to enforce its own solu- 
tion without consulting Russia. 
How would they fed if there was 
a conflict on the Mexican border 
and Russia stepped in without 
talking to America?” 

Even the dexgy grumble. They 
suffered through the lean Com- 
munist years. Now American 
evangelists march in and step on 
their corns. The Bifly Grahams 
can afford lavish media cam- 
paigns. The/ rent whole stadi- 
ums and plaster ads on subways 
and television. The Russian cler- 
gy can’t match those marketing 
blitzes, and they are miffed. 

American foundations have 
become objects of suspicion. We 
hear that foundations are pouring 
in money. We are supposed to be 
grateful. But ordinary people 
oorft see touch of It, winch, sug- 
gests to them that it finds its way 
to somebody's pocket — Ameri- 
can or Russian, and probably 
someone dose to the trough. 


All of this creates a situation 
in which small slights become 
large blows. Our veterans, for 
example, were deeply hurt that 
they were left out of the D-Day 
celebrations. 

True, we were not directly in- 
volved in the Normandy land- 
ings. But the veterans fed that 
the United States was playing 
down their enormous sacrifices 
and thcar contribution to the Al- 
lied victory, which for many is 
their last source of dignity. They 
ask: Weren’t we Allies, too? 

Hie older people are not hap- 
py that English is coming at 
them from, all rides — advertise- 
ments, television shows, every- 
thing. They are deluged by third- 

rate terminator movies and 
soaps. And why, people ask, axe 
we now bombarded wtth adsfca 
cigarettes — something Ameri- 
cans themselves are fighting? 

There are signs that such an- 
noyances are starting to Feed an 


atmosphereof paranoia. While I 
was there, Tor example, the FBI 
director,. Louis. Freeh, was in 
Moscow to launch a joint attack 
on organized crime with the Rus- 
sian poHce.But at least one tdevi- 
rian reporter saw a more sinister 
motive. Are the Yankees using 
the Russian - underground, he 
aA fld, as an excuse to wocm their 
way into our law enforcement? 

America respects only its own 
law, he continued. America does 
whatever it wants. Look at what 
it did in Pankma. Are we becom- 
ing a banana republic? 

There is even talk that Ameri- 
ca was pulling string s in the as- 
sault on the Russian White 
House last fall by President Bo- 
ris Yeltsin’s forces. People no- 
ticed that CNN seemed to have 
canristenfiy good camera angles, 
as if it knew what was co mma , 
amid that ' president BSfi. Ginton 
never actually, denounced the 
unconstitutional attack. 

I don’t want to overstate the 
case.' Lois of contradictory' cm- 


yftfiK are running through ray 
country right now. For many of , 

Sirica* stin : 


ns, Araenca » 

toe dream- Personalty I tafc a , 
lot of the griping is off the wall. 

But reason does not flourish 

whm life goes from bad to worse. .• » 

The growing annoyance is j®®®' 
thing that Americans should not , 
write off. As they have seam 
their own country* Je » c g ativc 111 

poBtks can be mucb more powav . 

£l than the positive. _ ; 

■nBreisabigirapy^to-of , 

mail Nowit is coming from the 

grass roots. America used to be 
“ _ . if was onr • 


ourscapcKw- — : — . . . 

“enemy" Now tt is becommg 
one because it is our Tfiend. 


The writer is a former reporter 
for The Moscow News and the 
author of “Soul to Sou t The Story 
cf a Blade Russian American 
Family. "She contributed this com- 
mon to 77ie New York Times. 


By Dominique MoTsi and Diana Pinto 


to Tnafcg the leap, into pluralist modernity. 


Burundi Needs Leadership 


ex” be says cf the United States' 
efforts to cut the Russian mUi- 


ny ifOSCOW — Can Russia really be 
1VX summed up as a theater of Mafia 


Nervous outsiders have for weeks 
looked for signs that Burundi would fol- 
low its neighbor Rwanda on a bloody 
slide into genocide. The two Central Afri- 
can countries have the same ethnic mix, 
roughly 85 percent Hutu, 15 percent 
Tutsi- The massacres in Rwanda that 
claimed up to 500,000 lives followed a 
suspicious air crash in April in which the 
Rwandan president, a Hutu, was killed. 
The same crash also killed Burundi’s 
president, likewise a Hutu, resulting in 
political paralysis, sporadic killings and 
hairtrigger tension in a country rich in 
weapons. Yet no comparable massacres 
have taken place since then in Burundi. 
What keeps it teetering on the brink? 

For one thing, Burundi has already 
experienced a bloodbath, although the 
world paid too little attention. Between 
50.000 and 200.000 people were killed 
there last fall after the first Hutu to be 
elected president was assassinated. More- 
over, the people of Burundi seem trauma- 
tized, not only by that bloodbath but by 
the chaotic upheaval next door and the 
death of two presidents. 

The uncertainty has affected political 
leaders, who have been unable to agree 
on appointing a new president. A self- 


imposed July deadline passed without 
action. The interim president, Syivestre 
Ntibantunganya, a Hutu like his two pre- 
decessors, lacks authority to speak for 
Burundi, where the Tutsi dominate the 
mi titary. Responding to anxious interna- 
tional nudges, the factions in Bujumbura, 
the capital, say they will meet a new 
deadline late tins month. 

The United Nations has inconclusive- 
ly discussed deployment of peacekeep- 
ers or international monitors to proride 
a reassuring presence. But not much can 
be done until the country’s political par- 
ties agree on a new president Nor can 
monitors alone offer any guarantee that 
Burundi will not succumb to ethnic mas- 
sacres and large-scale displacement of 


peoples. The wholesale killings in 
Rwanda, in sad fact, occurred after 


Rwanda, in sad fact, occurred after 
years of peacemaking efforts by ihe 
United Nations and despite the witness- 
ing presence of UN blue helmets. 

Burundi's destiny will be determined 
by the people of Burundi. For now, the 
best news would be agreement on a new 
president and the formation of a broad- 


based government that can begin to lift 
a cloud of fear. 


tary. “Right Now we've got mas- 
sive layoffs. Whole cities have 
been wiped out economically. 

“America, meanwhile, has the 
upper hand, phis a bigger slice of 
the world aims market — maybe 
the only industry in which we 
could compete with than. Let’s 
face it. Americans act only in 
their own interest" 

That is a pattern that Rus- 
sians are seeing, rightly or not, in 
a multitude of ways. 

Some of us think, for example, 
that America is waiting off with 
our best minds. Bom Buskin, a 
highly respected academician, 
says American interests seem to 
spoon off the cream. “Their 
grants are a pittance by Ameri- 
can standards but huge by our 
own.” So our best scientists are 
waiting in line to go. 

“In Russia,” says Nikolai 
Krotov, head of a publishing 
house in Moscow, “the pride 
factor is more important even 
than money.” He points to the 
touchy area of foreign policy, 
the Ralkanc in particular. 

“Serbia was a traditional ally, 
like a brother. Yet now America 


-LVA summed up as a theater of Mafia 
crime, corruption, future Chernobyl* and 
veiled aggression in the “near abroad"? 

There is a deeper reality. Without fanfare, 
Russia's elites nave undergone a crucial 
transition from ebullient adolescence to a 
more mature and stable identity rooted in- 
creasingly in Russian tradition. 

We Save witnessed this transformation 
through the Lens of the Moscow School of 
Political Studies. Created little more than a 
y ear ago by a dynamic Russian, Lena Ne- 
mirovskaia, with the support of the Council 
of Europe, West European foundations 
and enlightened Russian capitalists, this 
school, really a series of seminars, is now 
a centerpiece of intra-Russian dialogue. 
Designed to expose new young elites to 
Western models, it has become a popular 
place for Russia’s young elites to “net- 
work” in informal surroundings. 

A year ago (IHT, Aug. 31), when describ- 
ing the school's initial impact, we empha- 
sized the creation of a democratic spirit 
among young parliamentarians, officials, 
businessmen and journalists. These people 
were still fighting an anden regime they 
were not sure they could defeat. This time 
the tension had ebbed. Pragmatism, cau- 
tious optimism and assise of political legiti- 
macy now prevail. New problems and chal- 
lenges have arisen. Vla dimir Zhirinovsky is 
generally seen less as a threat than as an 


indicator that Russia needs a new moderate 
nationalist line to contain the country’s 
“red-brown" tendencies. Alexander Solzhe- 
nitsyn is admired as a moral beacon, but goe 
with little political relevance. Russia’s new 
elites have other things in mind. 

Capitalism now seems to be the collective 
passion of the elites — and of themasses, if 
one considers how many Russians invested 
in the murky MMM financial venture. . 

The concepts of democracy and freedom - 
have not lost their attraction, Bnt there is 
still no zeal understanding of the notion of 
democratic accountability, and the crucial 
counterweight of an independent judiciary 
is not yet firmly rooted. Russians are keen 
an importing Western democratic tech- 
niques (such as taxation systems), but they 
want to place them in a “Russian contact.” 
To these Westernized elites, Russia needs & 
political model that is more centralized and 
authoritarian than Western examples, but 
far more committed to h uman rights than', 
say, the Singapore approach. The model of 
the year is post-Franco Spain, with its pact 
of national solidarity and newly democrat- 
ic officer corps. 

Latin America is mentioned; too. Chile , 
and Argentina fascinate liberal economists. 
Pe ssimis ts evoke Brazil with its corruption, 

and professionalism of Russia's dibBLand 
middle classes weaken that comparison). 
Russia has the human capital with. winch 


Foreign policy is dearly not a. priority. 
Box those present in the school, mostly 
members of the Duma, want, to join every 
possible ripnal nr mwri/ati on. from 

the Group of Seven to the European Union, 
thus expressing a refusal to be excluded. 
They resent being lumped iri with far smaller 
nations also 's tanding in fine. As someone 

said, “How can you compare us with the 
Grech Republic car even Poland?” 

- Despite » h pr feeling of intrinsic superior- 

iifn » — i 4.4 U tl.., 


like Poland, the Czech Republic and Hunga- 
ry are far. of them in economic and 
political terms. And they know that they 
share many of then^tivncharacteristicsof 
Balkan Europe: potentially explosive na- 


-StiB, these young Russians were willing to 
engage in open, pluralist dialogue in a spirit 
of tolerance and modesty. Without such 
tolerance, democracy cannot flourish. 

Russia’s problems are far from over. But 
Moscow and other cities are returning to life. 

A new Russia with new rules and institu- 
tions is slowly surfacing. It may not be a 
Westernized democracy. But it is a dynamic 
and progressive country, and it is now point- 
ed in the right direction. The West has a 
responsibility to keep it on course. 


Mr. Motet is dqnity director of the Insntut 
Francos da Relations Internationales. Ms. 

Pinto is a historian and writer. They contribut- 
ed thiscommcnt to the Herald Tribune. 


— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Sending Art Back Home Committed Citizens Could Start to Reverse the Mailing of America 


Just a few years ago it was nearly un- 
heard of for museums to return contested 
treasures to a previous owner. But as a 
second major return this week shows, the 
balance bas now shifted. The Metropoli- 
tan Museum of Art shipped back to Tur- 
key a statue of Marsyas and the so-called 
“Aphrodisias boy” just months after the 
celebrated return to the same country of 
the long-disputed Lydian Hoard. 

We are not talking here about the kind 
of contested ownership that is claimed by, 
for instance, Greece against Britain for the 
Elgin Marbles, or Iraq for the Babylonian 
“Ishtar Gale” in Berlin. These objects were 
acquired by colonial regimes from now 
nonexistent imperial governments under 
then valid title in a different world. Those 
sorts of claims remain deeply problematic, 
not just because recognizing them would 
empty half the museums of Europe but 
because it amounts to pretending that his- 
tory didn’t happen. (It also sets off a 
never-ending spiral. Would Turkey, hav- 
ing claimed its possessions from Europe 
and America, dismantle its own imperial 
collections in Istanbul?) The claims gam- 
ing legitimacy now are of a different, finite 
kind: objects stolen in recent years from 
new excavations or badly guarded monu- 
ments, exported by unscrupulous dealers 
in defiance of the host countries' current 
laws. Technology has made this abuse in- 
credibly rampant in recent decades, and 
dealers' indifference has fueled the rush. 


Those who suffered were not just the 
nations now occupying the lands on which 
ancient civilizations rose and fell in the 
Middle East; looting now threatens to 
decimate the cultural heritage of many 
East European countries as once sale 
churches and museums are targeted by the 
unscrupulous. The loss is not just to those 
countries, or to the scholars who study 
those cultures, but also to the museum 
goers and art patrons served by the results 
of that scholarship. A looted object, its 
origin obscured, loses its context and near- 
ly all hopes of decent identification. 

The case that woke up dealers who buy 
without asking if an object was legitimate- 
ly exported was the 1990 Indianapolis trial 
that found dealer Peg Goldberg liable (and 
out $20 milli on) tot rashly buying some 
Cypriot mosaics in Switzerland. The one 
that forced museums — and the mighty 
Metropolitan itself — to the same aware- 
ness was the Lydian one that met a fluky 
climax when a disputed mosaic proved to 
fit perfectly, jigsaw-fashion, wim a piece 
that looters had left behind on the site 
when they ripped it away. 

The precedent was important in law, 
but also psychologically. The Marsyas 
statue case is not so dramatic as either of 
these, but it does not have to be. It under- 
lines a point that has been made — to the 
great benefit of those who take seriously 
the perilous fortunes of precious art. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


W ASHINGTON — Last year 
the National Trust for His- 
toric Preservation put the entire 
state of Vermont on its list of 
Most Endangered Places. The 
qualities that make the state spe- 
cial — compact, walkable cities 
and towns, unspoiled countryside 
and a near absence of suburbs 
and strip development — were in 
Imm i n ent danger, it said, from 
the newest engine of sprawl; the 
huge discount superstore and the 
regional outlet mafl. 

It is happening all over the 
United States, the trust says in a 
repeat whose pictures and text 
capture the best and worst of 
American democracy. Ugly, ho- 
mogenizing development — Wal- 
Marte.Kmarts and the rest — that 
makes everyplace look fike no 
place and derives a good part of its 
profits from shifting costs to oth- 
ers (especially local governments) 
is galloping across America. 


By Jessica Mathews 


Misguided zoning and trans- 
portation policies are enabling 
these stores to do to small dries 
and towns what shopping centers 
did to the larger dries before them: 
to suck the life out of downtowns, 
destroy farm and rural land on the 
outskirts and dog the roads with 
the congestion that accompanies 
total auto dependence. 

St Albans, Vermont, is a typi- 
cal example. A 150,000 square 
foot (14,000 square meter) store 
has been proposed for this town 
of 11,000. It would be plunked 
down two miles (32 kilometers) 
out of town (much too far to walk), 
an what is now farmland. If built 
true to form, the store would be a 
cheap, windowless box set amid a 
vast, flat, treeless expanse of con- 
crete. Its 44 acres (18 hectares) 
would cover an area as large as St 
Albans's present downtown. 


If successful, the s up erstore 
would generate 9,000 automobile 
trips daily and new strip develop- 
ment Needed economic growth, 
yes, but much of its sales would 
crane at the expense of locally 
owned stores, many of which 
would dose. Most of the super- 
store’s profits would go to its cor- 
porate headquarters elsewhere. 

One-, two- and five-acre zoning 
does not preserve open land as 
originally intended. Instead it 
produces a cbopped-up country- 
side of parcels that are “too big to 
mow and too small to plow." 

Rules that forbid mixing resi- 
dential and commercial uses mean 
that no one can walk to buy a 
carton of milk, much less to work, 
and that the number and miles of 
automobile trips will dimb inexo- 
rably. In the 1980s, the number of 
vdnde miles traveled in the Unit- 


A Few Other Things Syria Might Do 


N EW YORK —The Syrian 
government bas kicked out 


Enter the Floating Waffle 


In toe broad category of presidential 
irritants, cartoons and cartoonists hold a 


special place. The late Richard Nixon had 
a thick hide when it came to written com- 


a thick hide when it came to written com- 
mentary. but the drawings of Hcrblock in 
The Washington Post seemed to launch 
him into an enenries-list frame of mind at 
warp speed. George Bush was known to 
hold an undying grudge toward Garry 
Trudeau for depicting him as an invisible 
man. Now Mr. Trudeau, in his “Doones- 
bury” strip, has concluded his announced 
plebiscite for a visual symbol or “icon," 


for Bill Clinton. Monday’s strip reported 
that by popular vote he would henceforth 
be embodied by a floating waffle. 

It represents an interesting turn for 
Mr. Trudeau. During toe campaign, he 
was disposed in a kindly way toward Mr. 
Hin ton and sometimes jabbed his pen at 
critics of toe candidate. What process of 
disenchantment led to this portrayal of 
toe leader of toe free world as a levitating 
cake? As they say in the cartoon business, 
words fail us. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 



government has kicked out 
one terrorist but still has a full 
warehouse of them left That is 
the real importance of the story 
of Carlos toe Jackal, now in a 
Parisian jail possibly recover- 
ing from the built-m hangover 
he must have from lying around 
drunk in Damascus for years. 

If the Syrians ever decide they 
want peace with Israel or hope 
to get off the U.S. list of terror- 
ist states, they will have to dean 
out that warehouse and do a few 
other things that are not getting 
much attention right now. 

The Syrians tried to buy a little 
respectability by giving Carlos a 
satchel of money and the door. 
He was too hot to keep much 
longer in his apartment in a fash- 
ionable district of Damascus. 


By A. M. Rosenthal 


The French, who never forgot 
his killing of two French inteUi- 


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gence agents in 1975, could drop 
into town someday and pick him 

off the streets. So Carlos was sent 
on his way — first Yemen, then 
Jordan (with an Iraqi passport) 
and then Sudan, where the local 
dictatorship sensibly delivered 
him to toe French. 

That is the end for this Vene- 
zudan-bora killer. But in Syria 
now are at least nine Palestinian 
terrorist groups that rgect peace 
with Israel Wito money from the 
Arab world, they spent years 
murdering Israelis and Western- 
ers, with special attention to 
Americans. Also in Syrian safe 
havens are assorted Japanese, 
German and Kurdish terrorists. 

Nowadays the terrorists’ mon- 
ey and arms come mostly from 
Iran — especially to Hezbollah, 
in Lebanon, the best organized, 
funded and aimed toror group. 


With no protest from the world, 
Syria turned Lebanon into its 
colony, where it /permits Hezbol- 
lah to operate. U.S. sources say 
Syria could end the militaiy ac- 
tion of Hezbollah in Lebanon 
wito a snap of its fingwre 

Iran has became the world 
center for anti- Jewish hatred. 
With Iran’s help, Hezbollah has 
set up armed branches around 
toe world. The United States 
and Israel believe that Hezbol- 
lah suicide bombers carried out 
the attacks on the Jewish center 
in Buenos Aires and the Pana- 
manian plane carrying promi- 
nent Jews. 

Without the disarming of 
Hezbollah in Lebanon, Israel 
would have to mam ram its own 
forces in southern Lebanon. 
That would mean no peace 
agreements between Israel and 
either Syria or Lebanon. 

But for Syria, disarming Hez- 
bollah would not be cost-free. 
Syria’s enemies would no longer 
have to fear that Damascus 
could itself use tire terrorists at 
any moment Iran would make 
sure that Hezbollah had weap- 
ons and money to kill abroad, 
but Syria wouia face at least a 
temp orary break with Iran, now 
its only important friend. 

And if the Syrians are seri- 
ous about getting off the U.S. 
terrorist to they aright have 
to end the drug-growing and 
drug-running in Lebanon that 
now errrich Syria’s army and 
officers. Who knows, the Unit- 
ed States might even demand 
that Syria stop working with 
Iran in their multibillion-doflar 


counterfeiting of UJS. currency. 

There are a couple of other 
items to straighten out. One is 
Syria’s role in the destruction of 
Pan Am 103 in 1988. The other 
is tiie Brunner matter. 

Carlos lolled about 80 people. 
Alois Brunner, deputy to Adolf 
Eichmann, knwi or dispatched 
to their death about 128,000 
Jews. That is the figure of Simon 
Wiesenthal and the Simon Wie- 
senthal Center of Los Angeles. 

For at least 30 years Herr 
Brunner lived in Syria, safe and 
gkrwingly prosperous. The Syri- 
an government says: Brunner 
who? Brunner Fndier is who. He 
lived in Damascus mostly under 
toe name of Geora Fisher. He 
worked for assrated arms dc&kis 
and Syrian inteOtottee. He was 
last qrottod at his Damascus resi- 
dence. 7 roe Haddad, in 1991. 

Is he stiD alive? If dead, how 
did he live so long, so cozy in 
Damascus? IsraeTs ambassador 
to Washington, Itamar Rabino- 
vich, a specialist on Syria, wrote 
to toe Wiesenthal Center on 
Dec. 30, 1993, the day he re- 
ceived the center’s letter asking 
about the Brunner case in the 
negotiations with Syria. Israel 
he said, was still working on 
“core" issues wito Syria. But he 
promised that the Brunner issue 
would be addressed “at the right 
time,” and added the em phasis 
of an exclamation mark. 

The center also wrote to Pres- 
ident Bin Chiton on Dec. 30. In 
the eight months since then the 
United States has been most ac- 
tive in the Syria-Israel talks. 
But, the center said, it has re- 
ceived no reply from Washing- 
ton. Exclamation mark. 

The New York Tbnej. 


ed States grew four tones faster 
than population. dkL . 

As congestion worsens, the lo- 
cal government tries to fix it But 
state transportation agencies will 
only help pay for roads built ac- 
cording to thorstandards — vezy 
wide, no sidewalks, no trees, as 
straight as posable. The stan- 
dards dictate roads that are great 
for cars but bad for people arid 
devastating for neighborhoods.' 

Few states have land-use plan- 
ning laws. Without them, residen- 
tial developers can build pre tty 
much where they like, -which - 
means rax. toe cheapest land far- 
thest from downtowns. These 
sprawhng suburbs are the most 
expensive of all types of develop- 
ment to service with water. scw- 
ers, schools and transport," which 
means higher property taxes for 
toewhcriejurisaictirai. 

Because they are auto-depen- 
dent (nothing else works at such 
low densities), congestion and air 
pollution follow. With morepco- 
ple living farther and farther from 
downtown, commercial develop- 
ment concentrates on the subur- 
ban strips, and the stores on Main 
Street begin to dose. 

No one ever planned it this 
way, but the result,, says toe 
bust, is this: “It is against the 
law in modi of America to build 
tightly knit, communities that 
people love — places they fea- 
ture on Christmas cards . . . and 
visit by the nriBions.” 

Citizens are starting to fighr 
batik, with some success. Among 
photographs that are painful to 
look at, the trust’s report also 
describes how some communities 
organized to stop mall sprawl 

A handful of determined ordi- 
nary citizens is usuaUythe key. In 
one town, such a group commis- 
sioned an independent economic 


analysis which showed that a 
Stare's claimed gain of 177 jobs 
and.$7 minion, in . taxes dwindled 
to a net of eight jobs and 534,000 
when the loss of existing busi- 
nesses was counted. 

Otfabr communities chose to ao- 
cept a superstore, but on their own 
terms. Some masted on a smaller 
store, more appropriate to toes 
town’s scale. Others forced devel- 
opers to use ah existing braiding, 
or even to put the superstore 
downtown, where walkers and 
transit ridos could use it. The 
most successful weapon is a com- 
rartment to revitalize downtown. 

One town found financing to 
restore and refurbish existing 
• buildings, put in benches, lights 
.- and plantings and even installed 
a “snowmelt” system of buried 


water pipes heated by waste heat 
from its local power plant so 
shoppers could stroll cm dry and 
dear sidewalks. 

- - Superstore-driven development 
means that smaller cities and 
towns across the country are 
quickly becoming immature ver- - 
swns of Los Angeles, where so 
much of the land area is devoted 
to toe use of cars, or cf Houston, 
winch boasts 30 parking spaces 
per resident. 

. Instead, they can .recognize 
toe iron link between zoning pol- 
icies, patterns of development 
and transportation, and choose 
to make tbe automobile serve the 
needs. of people and co mmuni ty 
rather than vice versa. 

Superstore-driven sprawl has a 
big head start, but its further 
spread, says the National Trust, is 
not a foregone conclusion. 


The writer is a senior fellow at 
the Council on Foreign Relations ■ 
Six contributed this comment to 
The Washington Post. 


IN PUB PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1894tf Bomb in Caracas 


NEW YORK. — A despatch from 
Caracas to the Herald states that 
a deliberate attempt to nmider 
General Crespo, President of 
Venezuela, was made yesterday 
[Aug. 22]. An unknown man 

threw a bomb at the President as 

he was passing along the street, 
but fortunately the fuse failed to 
act and toe infernal machine did 
not explode. Tbe would-be mur- 
derer was arrested. 


1944s Pushing to Paris 

SUPREME HEADQUARTERS 
Alhed Expeditionary Force — 
iFiom oar New York edition:] 
annor hammered cot 


g* 1 1 ” mum aim somneasi w 

ranstoday [Aug. 23], while to the 
of toe captial — now 
™Byin control of French patriots 
-“Americans and Canadians 
Qa uned a lightning stran glriinld 
on remnants of toe German army 


1919: Against Profiteers 

NEW YORK Congress look 
the first step in legislating agamst 
the high cost of living when the 
House passed the Anti-Profiteer- 
ing BflL'nttbiH b ri ngs the retail 
profiteer in food, doth mg or oth- 
er necessities withiii toe reach of 
Federal prosecution, making him 
liable to a $5,000 fine and two 

years* ww pmnnmcnt- 


oomoers nai- 
j 3 ®** toe Germans? frantic -efforts 
■to withdraw across the river; ’ 
The -latest advance south of 


* ww armored reconnaissance 
toe mae than fifteen miles 

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opinion 



orged by Crime 


W ASHINGTON — 3ffl 
Ginton won a needed vic- 
tory Sunday when tin House of 
Representatives passed' the 
crime SUL' Sijgnsfieafl^he was ' 
able to reverse the stunning set- 
back suffered 10 days earlier, 
when the bin was Wodced ona 
procedural vote, by reaching 
out to Republicans: 

For the first time, the Clinton 
administration did Us domestic 
policy-maldiig on a gemfanefy 
bipartisan basis. That -pattern 
offers its best hope of salvaging 
something, not jnst on health 
care legislation in ^September, 
butont! 

1995 and 1996 as weft 
Remember that at the outset 
of fais teem, Mr. Clinton accept- 
ed the advice of top congressio- 
nal Democrats that,despite Ids 
43 percent plurality win and the 
loss of 10 House seats, fais do- 
mestic agenda could be passed 
simply by mobffizing the Demo- 
cratic majorities in die House 
and Senate. Last year's budget' 
and economic plan were passed 
over unanimous Republican op- 
position. Small er domestic mea- 
sures alro went through on large- 
ly party-line votes. Republicans 
strongly supported Mr. Clinton 
on the North American Free 
Trade Agreement but most 
Democrats — - mdudmg two of 
the three top leaders in both the 
House and Senate — did not 
This time; it tries genuinely 
bipartisan. At (he news confer- 
ence following the 235-195 pas- 
sage of the c rime bill, the Etem- 
ocratic leadership was 
surrounded by a dozen Repub- 
licans. They had . made major 
contributions to rewriting the 
bill after the House bn Aug. 11 


By David S.- Broder 


The other key negotiator for 
the Republicans was Represen- 
tative John Kasich of Ohio, a 
budget expert who knew Mr. 
Panetta well from the days 
when Mr. Panetta headed the 
House Budget \Connmttee. 

; Both Mr. Castle and Mr. Ka- 
sich had opposed Mr. Clinton 
on the firstvote, and their will- 
ingness to eater the negotia- 
tions was criticized by many 
'Republicans. But, significantly, 
Representative Newt Gingrich 
of ^Georgia, foonunority whip, 
'encouraged the talks, even 
while withholding his own sup- 
port csf tbefinal product. 

ton realstf the frustration of 
JHouse Republicans, 40 years in 
the minority.over thrij exdu- 
. sioc from , substantive policy- 
making. Occasionally, on some 
issues in sane -committees, their 
- ideas get serious consideration, 
but rarely can they influence the 
shape of a bill cm the House 
floor. Here, they .found them- 
selves dealing directly with the 
leadens of the opposition party 
and the White House on major 


leg isla tio n. It was heady stuff. 

“In the states," Mr. Castle 
told me later, “you get past par- 
tisanship and into governing 
pretty quickly. Here in Wash- 
ington. if you’re part of the mi- 
nority, you are rarely allowed to 
contribute to governing.” 

In the same interview, Mr. 
Kasich said, “This is the first 
real gut-wrenching effort both 
sides have made to govern from 
the middle. There will be no 
going back.” After November, 
when Republicans are expected 
to make gains in both the House 
and Senate, Mr. Clinton wiD 
have no choice but to approach 
more issues on a bipartisan ba- 
sis, Mr. Kasich said. 

The Home Democratic whip, 
David Bonior of Michigan, who 
is as liberal as Mr. Kasich is 
conservative, agrees. “We’re en- 
tering a new era,” he said, “and 
after the election, we’ll seed a 
less rancorous House.” 

It is too soon to say that Mr. 
Clinton will reach out regularly 
to Republicans as he struggles 
to salvage his presidency. But 
the House crime bill vote cer- 
tainly signals that the possibili- 
ty is open to him. 

The Washington Post 


TMSOSBUES A UW& COST IN 

POOR EPuemONU Atmtv£M£NT, 
^CREASE.? PRUG ABu&E .CRIME 

Amp wEtHWE psmjDoJCv' 


UNTIL FATHERS •nWERESfWSifiiury 
FOR THEJR OFFSPRING, WE WILL 

neglextJ 



Take a Number , Please , 
And Another and 


• • 


By Ellen Goodman 


gOSTON —In the great lot- 


tery of modem life. I have 
just been handed another num- 
ber. This four-digit beauty is a 
timely addition to the extensive 
and highly esteemed collection 
of personal ID numbers that 1 
eun happy to call my own. 

By merely pressing these 
handsome new little numbers 
on an electronic pad, T can 
make the security gate lift. Then 
I can drive mv car with its des- 


MEANWHILE 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


ignaled license plate number 
onto the office parking lot that 
sits on a ZIP code number of 
its very own. 

I can even gain entrance to 
the building where I have been 
assigned an employee number. 
My employee number, I hasten 
to add, is different from my 
health care plan number, which 
I memorized in case I'm carried 
into a strange emergency room 
bleeding from the head. 

By the way, I can be reached 
at this office by a telephone 
number with an area code num- 


ber or, if you prefer, a fax num- 
you fan to 


Small Cort for Survival 


're- 


jected the procedural vote to 
bflL 225- 


•• F« 


up the btlL 225-210. 

On that vote, 58 Democrats 
— mainly opponents of the as- 
sault-weapons ban~—- opposed 
Mr. Clinton, and only 11 Re- 
publicans (mostly Northern 
suburbanites) crossed lines to 
support bringing up the bUL 

Mr. Clinton took Ms case to 
the public, but shifted few 
votes. He tried wooing recalci- 
trant Democrats in pn-e, but 
won over only three' of them. 
On the key vote Sunday, 55 
Democrats still opposed the 
'resident. What mime the dif- 
erence was that this time 42 
Republicans, almost four times 
as many as on the first round, 
voted with Mr. Clinton. " ' 

He got them by sending the 
White House chief of staff, 
Leon Panetta. into serious ne- 
gotiations with the Republicans 
and idling his congrcKaonal al- 
lies he wanted them ehgaged in 
the talks as wdL Mr. Canton ; 
refused to comprbnnse on the 
MB's assault-weapons ban,, but 
approved major concessions in 
other areas and a reduction in 
its overall spending targets. 

The president found a famil- 
iar Republican negotiating 
partner in Mike Castle, a for- 
mer Delaware governor who is 
now a freshman member of the 
House. When Mr. Clinton was 
governor of Arkansas, fee and 
Mr. Castle represented the Na- 
tional Governors Association in 
dealing with Congress on wel- 
fare issues. They started the 
crime talks with a basis of trust 


Letters bunded fir ps&ticaim 
should be addressed “letters to fie. 
Editor^ ami contain the writer's sig- 
nature, name and fiiB address. Letters 
shouU be brief and are subject to 
editing. We cannot be responsible for 
be return of u> noMdted manuscripts. 


Regarding “ 'Do We Realty 
Need to Satrt Bracing T* (\ 
ion, Aug. 6) by William Pfi 

It is extraordinary that a 
modem commentator like Mr. 
Pfaff should adopt so fatalistic 
an approach about the possibil- 
ity of finding an asteroid or 
comet aimed at Earth. 

Presumably the dinosaurs, 65 
million years , ago, lacked the 
technology to save themselves. 
We have the technology. In the 
extremely unlikely event that 
such a celestial invader is dis- 
covered in the next few decades, 
I hope and trust that few would 
share Mr. Pfaff s view that we 
should passively accept the de- 
struction of our civilization. 

Mr. Pfaff seems to believe that 
it is easy to discover threatening 
asteroids and comets. He won- 
ders why existing telescopes 
can’t housed to find than and 
points out ihat the cornet that 
recently struck Jupiter was 
found “by amateurs using their 
own equipment.” In fact, the 
comet Hi-aonairri Shoemaker- 
Levy 9 was discovered as part of 
a project funded (modestly) by 
NASA for two decades, led by 
Dr. Eugene Shoemaker. 

Dr. Shoemaker, far from be- 
ing an amateur, is a widely re- 
spected geologist who has held 
such important posts as chair- 
man of the Division of Geologi- 
cal Sciences at the California 
Institute of Technology in Pasa- 
dena. The comet discovery was 
»p«fte by Dr. Shoemaker, his 
wife, Carolyn, and their asso- 
ciate David Levy (who Is, in- 
deed, an am a tear and was 
working as an unpaid volunteer 
on the project) at the Ptdomar 
Observatory in California. 

Although the Schmidt tele- 
scope they were .using is not as 
large as Patomar’s famous 200- 
inch Hale telescope, it is hardly 
amateur equipment. 

As it happens, existing tele- 
scopes cannot be used to search 
effectively for cosmic impac- 
tors. Nearly all large telescopes 


etc. Contrary to popular per- 
ception, very few astronomers 
“scan the sues.” The few that 
do, including the Shoemakers, 
use so-called wi de-fidd tele- 
scopes of very different design- 
But existing telescopes of that 
design are rather small; they are 
incapable of finding more than 
a small fraction of the threaten- 
ing objects. If a comet or aster- 
oid is headed earthward and 
due to strike during the next 
century, we would most likely 
not know it — until the cata- 
strophic 

Largo - telescopes, of 
ized design analogous to the PaT 
omar Schmidt, could do the job 
in the next 20 years. But they 
don’t exist today at the world’s 
astronomical observatories. 
They must be built And that 
will cost money. Is it worth $50 
mflKon, plus operating costs, to 
find most of the ovilizalj on- 
threatening objects that could do 
us in? That is the question. 

CLARK R. CHAPMAN. 

Tucson, Arizoua. 

The writer is a planetary scien- 
tist at the SA1C Planetary Sci- 
ence Institute in Tucson and edi- 
tor of the Journal of Geophysical 
Research — Planets. 


Waldheim question is the mat- 
ter raised by Jim Hoagland in 
“Rome Shouldn’t Be Allied 
With Iran and Libya” (Aug 22). 

I am a Papal Knight myself. 
If someone wishes to call for a 
review of the way in which pa- 
pal honors are awarded, that is 
perfectly legitimate. 

But the objective of such pro- 
posals should be constructive, 
avoiding misunders tanding s of 
the kind the Waldheim 
award has unfortunately creat- 
ed. Nothing should detract from 
the improving Catholic- Jewish 
relations, for which so many 
have wtnked so hard for so long. 

SIGMUND STERNBERG. 

International Council 
Of Christians and Jews. 

London. 


1 did enjoy reading Mr. Fii- 
chett’s article, which gave a very 
balanced account of the libera- 
tion of Paris. 

However, may I pant out 
that AMGOT does not stand 
for American Military Govern- 
ment but for Allied Military 
Government of Occupied Terri- 
tory? The aster organization 
was OETA, the Occupied Ene- 
my Territory Administration. 

JOSEPH N. SHAMA. 

Monte Carlo. 


Prevent the Massacres 


The superpowers, at the 
height of the Cold War, were 
prepared to spend billions to 


prepare for a cataclysmic con- 
flict. Nu 


Odd Sort of Democracy 


Regarding “ Mexico's Ruling 
Party Would Do Better to Lose ” 

(Opinion, Aug 18): 

Stanley A Weiss’s suggestion 

to the PRi, Mexico’s governing Compared to Whom? 
H rig itself a loss for * _ 


Nuclear holocaust no long- 
er haunts us, yet genoddal tribal 
conflicts threaten millions of 
people. Some part of the “peace 
dividends” should be employed 
to prevent these conflicts. 

MAHMOODELAHL 

Ottawa. 


Aug. 10) by George C. Wilson: 

So Mr. Wilson rates Father 
Jean- Be nr and Aristide, the 
ousted Haitian leader, as low on 
h umanitarianis m? Hmznm. 

ROD MILLER. 

Lausanne, Switzerland. 

Curious in Luxembourg 

I have a question concerning 
men’s neckties — striped ties to 
be exact. I have noticed that on 
American ties the stripes run 
from the right shoulder toward 
the left hip and on British and 
other European ties, from the 
left shoulder toward the right 
trip. Now, why is that? 

ROBERT W. SMART. 

Luxembourg. 


A Question of Control 


party, that it rig : 


William Pfaffs comments on 
foe eagerness of Congress to 
spend $50 million on a comet- 
watching project raises a ques- 
tion: Is there intelligent life 
on Capitol HQl? 

RICK BENGE 
Vienna. 


foe recent elections was bizarre 
to say the least. If foe PRI wins 
the election with the dear sup- 
port of a majority of Mexicans, 
as now appears likely, how 
could it possibly serve the inter- 
ests of justice, democracy or in- 
deed stability to deny foe au- 
thenticity of this vote? 

SAMANTHA K. SPARKS. 

Mexico City. 


Regarding "Convert Haitian 
Refugees Into Police ” (Opinion, 


On foe s»im» day that 1 read 
about the airliner that crashed 
while the pilot and co-pilot 
were fighting over who was to 
control it, 1 read about foe be- 
ginning of foe baseball strike in 
America. Why do I fed that 
these two events are related? 

MICHAEL KALK. 

Chicago. 


ber. If you fail to reach me and 
get a recording, I can retrieve 
your message merely by activat- 
ing my voice mail number. 

I have an AT&T credit card 
number which I can use to call 

C back from any phone 
th. This number is long. 
How long? Well I can use it to 
call a foreign country or to write 
a brief libretto in memory of 
Alexander Graham BelL 
On the way home. I can get 
cash from a bank machine bv 
employing my ATM number. 1 
can then enter my house with- 
out setting off the alarm, by 
pushing foe alarm code. Once 
m, I can check foe messages on 
my home phone by dialing a 
different voice mail number. 

I also have a Social Security 
number, but you guessed that. 
This number is — bless you. 
Registry of Motor Vehicles — 
the same as my license number. 
I have not one but five frequent 
flier numbers which I use in 
conjunction with my VISA, 
MasterCard or American Ex- 
press numbers. 

If you want to know how 
many other crucial digits are 
competing for room in the lim- 
ited storage space of my brain's 


floppy H»A stand in line. Or 
should I say. take a number? 

Frankly. I am not sure how 1 
came to 'inhabit such a multi 
digital life. I am from a numeri- 
cally simple background. 1 was 
born the second child of two 
parents with nothing more than 
a birth date to call my own. 

As a grade school child. I 
shared one telephone number 
with three people. At 17, 1 got 
an SAT number which was, ! 
hasten to add, not very impres- 
sive in the math department. 

But sometime during foe last 
decade, foe entire industrial- 
ized, computerized world has 
been subject to a numerical ex- 
plosion that dwarfs foe popula- 
tion explosion. In America, foe 
average middle-class citizen has 
more numbers to call her own 
than cousins. 

Moreover, every friend on 
my Rolodex, every business 
card that passes my hands, car- 
ries a list of numbers for foe 
faxes, computers, beepers and 
phones that litter offices, 
homes, cars and pockets. 

Clearly foe identity crisis that 
once plagued America has been 
replaced by the new ID crisis. 
It’s 3 A.NC you're broke, and 
do you know what your ATM 
number is? Have you confused 
it with your cholesterol num- 
ber? Your shoe size? Your IQ? 

And by foe way, somewhere 
in this mathematical mess 
shouldn’t there be a lucky num- 
ber? May I play it? 

It seems that with the energy 
it takes to store and remember 
the codes that track our lives, 
millions of numerically chal- 
lenged Americans could figure 
out black holes and top quarks. 
This is especially true for those 
of us who have reached an age 
when we have enough trouble 
remembering names. 

The dirty little secret of mod- 
em life is that every technologi- 
cal advance and every so-called 
convenience comes with the 
curse called complication. In 
this case foe complication is 
multiplication and it’s happen- 
ing so quickly that pretty soon 
we’ll need a master number to 
access all foe numbers. 

No, no, not to worry, I have 
not become a number in an in- 
creasingly impersonal world. 
It’s worse than that. I've be- 
come dozens of numbers. 

The Boston Globe, 


in North’s Self-Defense 


Better to Ignore Ham 


are designed to peer intently at 
itches of sky, to 


very tiny patches ol sky, 
study distant quasars, galaxies, 


Regarding “Yes, the Pope Has 
Done a Bad Thing" (Opinion, 
Aug IS) by AlM. Rosenthal; 

It is, I believe, a “bad thing” 
you are doing in continuing to 
give space to the award to Kurt 
Waldheim of a papal honor. 

Of comae the award was con- 
troversial, and of course Jews — 
and not Jews alone — have a 
right to be offended, but there is 
Httle point in encouraging such 
ludicrous proposals as for I sad 
to break cn its newly established 
diplomatic ties with foe Vatican 
(Letters, Aug 19) 

Far more serious than the 


Although Oliver Nath’s re- 
jection for a gun permit cm the 
ground that he is “not of good 
character** seems in no way to 
tarnish his potential as a U.S. 
senator, perhaps his skewed be- 
lief that a concealed pistol will 
protect him from Abu Nidal 
ought to give his prospective 
constituents pause. 

LAUREL HIRSCa 
Paris. 


Allied, Not American 


Regarding “From the Libera- 
tion of Paris, Potent Myth of 
national Unity Arose” (Aug 22) 
by Joseph Filched: 


BOOKS 


THE INFORMERS 


By Bret Easton FMi 226 pages. 
$22. Knopf. 


Reviewed by Carolyn See 


I Nafltbefura over Bret Eas- 
ton Ellis’s last novel, “Amer- 
ican Psycho,” people have lost 
sight of the fact that this enfant 
terrible is actually an extremely 
traditional and very serious 
American novelist. He is a mod- 
el of literary filial piety, count- 
ing among his parents Ernest 
Hemingway (portentous prose 
with a disinclinat ion to use con- 
tractions), F. Scott Rogendd 
(foe mill of youth, where life 
i» pris around 35 and is unbear- 
able before 35), Nathanael 
West (a strong taste far the lu- 
rid and grotesque) and Joan Di~ 
diefl (the perfect set of words 
for d escr ibing female emotional 
and physical paralysis). 

He shares two other charac- 
teristics with foe above-men- 
tioned four a ravaging depres- 
sion that borders on the 
pathological, and a strong sense 
of moral outrage. AH of these 


dal class. Their parents appear 
to be incontrovertibly odious 
fools. And precisely because 
they are so low and thick, their 
children grow up to be unloved, 
angry orphans who torn their 
anger into justified vice and 
crime. 

It could be argued that the 
author thinks the whole world 
stinks. But to dismiss Ellis as an 
ungrateful child or an unattrac- 
tively a g m g brat is to miss the 
point. 

Most of us have not stabbed 
a kidnapped boy to death in a 
bathtub, but. we do live in a 
world where that happens. 
Most of us have not sent our 
sexual partners to foe hospital 
as a result of erotic frenzy, but 
we probably know someone 
who has. Most of ns have not 


destroyed our lives with 
but, again, we know some tc 
who have. HRs has picked that 
part of foe world to write about. 

This is not a real “novel” but 
foe by-now-traditiona] set of a 
bakers dozen of short stories. 
The body count is high in these 
tales: In 226 pages about 10 
people di& They die in car acci- 
dents, they overdose, their arms 
get hacked off, their blood is 
drained by enthusiastic vam- 
pires who live in the San Fer- 
nando Valley, their throats get 
slit, they’re shot in the head and 
skinned, and of course that un- 
fortunate tittle boy is nabbed in 
a shopping mall, fearsomely so- 
domized tty a vile sociopath and 
then stabbed by another guy 
who’s just hanging out at the 
■aatnr. apartment- These stories 


are set in L-A^ and who are we 
to argue that this is not the way 
it is? 


Violence, drugs and degrada- 
tion have become institutional- 
ized, popularized, sanctioned, 
validated by our popular enter- 
tainment These are not isolated 
events, Ellis insists. If they hap- 
pen to one of us, they happen to 
ati of us» This is the world of the 
nigfetly news, and that news 
must come from somewhere. 


There’s no point in telting Bret 
Easton F0Hs to cheer up. He 
knows foe country is going to 
hell in a handbasket, and he 
may have a point 


Carolyn See reviews books 
regularly for The Washington 
Post 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TIUHUTVE^VEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 1994 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 1994 


NEW 


YORK 


THE WEATHER. 


Today : Shown), ending before 
moi); Uur clearing and cooler 
Tmpemiwm Ynlcnhv: Mu. H: Bn ** 
detailed Report on Page 21 ' 




(Tribune L EDmON Y 


Vol. 01 V No. 35,711 


CiMlkl, IMI. 
H*« Iwk Trlhta lac. 


THURSDAY. AUGUST 2i 1H-H 


THRU CINT1 
In He* Varh City 


R 


ITllHIi 


ia Joins Allies, Turns Guns on Germans; 


Paris Frees Itself, U. S.- French Troops Sent In; 


,Nazi Rout Grows 


t 

Paris People 
FreeOwnCity 
In 4 ~Day Fight 


Story From Paris: ElitCF A lUCric 3 II Si^ ^ r ^ish Haul of Prisoners From the Normandy Pocket King Michael 

Nazis Asked Truce m .... ...... • ! ° 

ToWithdrawArmy Marseille in Drive OnEastif^r* y, ‘ ..... (Breaks Ties 


jRise on Call of Resistance 
! Chiefs, Drive Off Nazis 
< and Vichy's Officials] 


Patriots' Chief Rushes to 
Bradley With the News; 
He Orders Troops In 


CirclingMove For Germany j 


By CKaxtes Cotlingwood Gre ? 1 Port Is Captured Push From Sens Opposed; 
Columbia Broadcasting System With Little Resistance; by Planes Only, Border ^ 

rt . Snipers Are Mopped Up Now 150 Miles Awayj 

London).— The 2d French Armored — , , _ 

DMaon toured p»hs today after t resh Gams Made Annihilation Battle 

the Parisians rose as one man to » rr, . _ 

beat dovn the motley, terrified In loulon r iffhting Rages in Normandy 

German troops who had garrisoned ° 0 J 

it was the people of Paris who'Patch’s Army iii 100-Mile Evreux Seized in Thrust 
ZXtfSmSc ££££ DashJsOnly 230 Miles From South; 3d Army 
Tbe American Army was occu- From Forces at Sens Fiffhtinsr South of Paris 


Prefecture ofPolice 
Turned Into a Fort 


Battles in Rne de Rivoli, 
at Bastille, Concorde; 
Koenig Expected Today! 


By Eric Hawkins 


! rrgn Me Jbnu rritan Arm 

j CopyrttfK. um, JT«r rock Txtmlae. 

| LONDON, Aug. 23.— -Paris has 
| been freed by its own people after 
i four days' fighting In which sev- 
1 eral hundred thousand unarmed 
I citizens and 50,000 aimed men’ of 
i the resistance forces routed the, 
| Nasi garrison troops and occupied 
the city's principal buildings. It is 
: the first Allied continental capital 
to be wrested from the Germans. 

Announcing the liberation of 
the city after filly months of Ger- 
man occupation and tyranny, a 
special communique issued today 
by General Joseph Pierre Koenig, 
commander of the French Forces 
at the Interior and newly appoint- 
ed military governor of Parts, said 
the Germans were "defeated every- 
where" in fighting which' began 
last Saturday. 

The great mass of Paris patriots 
went Into action, the communique 
said, when a general Insurrection 
In the capital and the Paris re-1 
gloo was ordered by the resistance 
leaders in Prance, in agreement 
with a representative of General 
Charles de Gaulle's provisional 
government. . . 


pied with the drive through 

Evreux to the mouth of the Setae, By Homer Bigart »» n ' nc 

after which it was planned to in- «, mm muitoBifiuniw SUPREME HEADQUARTERS, 

vert Paris. cown^c. nu. Tort Tronmc i»c Allied Expeditionary Poire. Aug. 

Yesterday a. Frenchman buret MARSEILLE. Prance. Aug. 25.— 23.— American armor hammered 
into Lieutenant General Omar A. French troops entered Marseille in out fresh gains south and south- 
Bradlefs headquarters. He was triumph this morning, receiving east of Paris today while to the 
the chief of the Forces of the In- from France's greatest port and northwest or Ihe capital— now fully 
?*■“ second cilJ? a welcome that out- In control of French patrloals- 
gering. incredible to teU. thundered the heavy guns of the Americans and Canadians claimed 

Jk l J* d concIud “ 1 •» Gennan garrison still holding out * tlghtentar stranglehold on rem- 
armhrice with the Geroun forew in Port St. Nicolas. nxnta of the German army still 

In Paris. Hie people of Paris had Fewer than 3:000 Germans were below Lhe River Seine 
- (Cantinve& enpagei. column Si believed to be besieged in the Allied fighters and nri.trr bomb- 

~ ~~ ' ~ — w«icnt fort commanding the en- e „ hurried Urn Germans- fruntir 

NaziAdmiralYields effom to " ia ' anm wna u,c 

■ ■ , vere scattered groups of snipers In nver by any possible mcara. 

French Hospital to ^ *!* '"***■ •»* or 

. (1 . not ““Ui 7:32 0,44 French tanks saw armored reconnaissance 

American Fafaent rumblcd down “** ftmed Rue units drive more Ihan milrs 

Cannebiere. east of Sens, while others paused * 


Dash, Is Only 230 Miles From South; 3d Army 
From Forces at Sens Fighting South of Parist 



[With Hitler 


Soviet - American -British 
Armistice Accepted, He 
Announces Over Radio 


Will Fight Hungary 
For Transylvania 


i w 



m • * Mirs '•* ^ 


- v 4 ■ vt Vi 


Moscow Asserts Germans 
Are Shooting Down 
Retreating Romanians 


& :v;- 


3 $,, 



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: ' " r ■■■ . 1 < V ’ : *- - 




AmcU:c4 rtni rtrphat* l.-n Slirni Carpi iHM 

Th*** Ccrmai M lerrr ernpilmrrd in ll,f F»lui*r- Atgmlmu area by British troopa during lhe liquirfuJon of 
Ihe packet in tekirh a inrjee portion of t he Cermmn 7ih Arm y tan cut in piece* hy the Alfiei 


Si Thr lindelrt Pros 

LONDON. Aug. 24 (Thursday) -r 
Romania announced last nlgbt 
that she was switching from the 
Axis to the Allied side in the war. 
and a subsequent Soviet comm uni- 
que reported that shooting had 
. broken out between retreating 
{Romanian and Nazi soldiers on 
the eastern front. 

( Acceptance of armistice terms 
offered by the Soviet Union. Great 
: Sri Lain and the United States vu 
'announced in a proclamation 
•broadcast from Bucharest. 

The early morning broadcast 
Russian communique told of 
clashes on Romanian soil between 
i lie Romanians, ordered by King 
Michael l o cease hostilities against 
the Red Army, and the Germans. 
Romanian prisoners were quoted 
as saying dint the Germans were 


W* uim Out in Auto to Forced Security Plan Gains in Capital ; 

SSS-rr£ iOuti„Brazilby Hull Sees Dulles for 2'A Hours = 

B, Homer ^jPrO-Argen tines R„„, rvr n IVlIs Bij; TI,ree l«.,frrrrs ,,f Nreri forL^^^'’^ STSlS 

[ Ifre —77- Early Ap-irnirnt; Hull .o Mpcl Senate Croup; & £ 


By Homer Bigart 

Bi WlrcUu to nu Berate Trfti»t 


four Partisans Jeadlng forty Get- the Americas 

ADC-EN-PROVENCE. France. "«*« at rifle-point down a nar- nelr^ ^Crnirhr^™ n fu”? Army U(lirt-r>' I’rr->urr on 

w U rt utorewhisifed 6 and hooted. wet. nmistanee evrrywhere aasl I’rt-.-iilrnl Varu.i>Bljin»eH ; j 

iK ari Eyerich entered a privatejutors wh»tredand.hoote«L lW M ^ ^ J (^|( ei |SevrreB(mv lo l.S.| 


Felice Selu Prefecture 

The Paris police, who had tees 
on strike for nearly a week, took 
possession of the Prefecture of Po- 
lice on the De de la Cite, which 
was transformed into a fortress 
against which German attacks 
broke, while other patriot forces 
seized all public buildings, accord- 
ing to the communique, which 
added that representatives of the 
Vichy regime in Paris either fled 
or were arrested. 

With their bridgehead over the 
Seine near Mantes. American, 
forces were thirty miles west of 
the capital, while to the southeast 
they were broadening their sweep 
as they pressed on. it was stated.: 
It was thought probable that the 1 
toTUory overrun by General! 
George S. Patton's fast moving I 
forces extended to the outer en- 
virons of Paris at points north of j 
CorteiL 

The news of the freeing of Paris 
was first broadcast by a radio sta- 
tion hear Paris which presumably 
had been seized by the patriots. 
This was followed by a trium- 
phant broadcast from Algiers ac- 
companied by "La Marseillaise" 
ami the announcement that gun 
salvos, church bells and street pa- 
rades were to celebrate the event 
during the day. 


room of Lhe surgical pavilion at a 
German marine hospital near here 
at 3 p. m. Sunday, and gravely laid 
his sword on a. cot where a cap- 
tured radio operator-gunner of an 
American bomber crew lay recov- 
ering from a broken leg- 


Americans Reach Grenoble 


1 light, except where ihe Germans 
{slowed the Canadian advance in 


Drary Krpresrnlalivr K(*j>»rl.s ‘IVo^res.**’ 


By Rnsscll Hill 

By Wtrrlctt la t&e HeraM TrCkamt 
CepjrJch:. OH, Mew VwHTrftWt IM. 
ROME. Aug. 23.— General Jean 


the /orty-flre-by-Ihirty-mile pock- 
et by blocking further brideeheads 
j across the Toques River. 

I iA Belgian communique said 


By Joseph Newman 

Sreat tar Harris Triton* Barter 
Ct>wrt»M. 1H4. are York Tntwne ine. 


armed clashes between the re- 
Lrrailng Romanian detachment* 
and German frontier detachments 
Ry Bert Andrews m several places ' 

WaSIU SOTOS. Aug. 73. — Thr prospects of bl -partisan co- The King's Proclamation 
operation on ihr issue ol an international security organization were a proclamation by twenty- twq- 
rnhanrrrt iccay by a host of developments in which the on -the -scene: year-old King Michael, read over 
role or President Roosevelt was; 5 ihe Bucharest radio, said all hos- 


BUENOS AIRES. A up. 23.— Os- matched in importance 


de LaMre dc Tbssignys French fighting beside tteJ iraJf | (l Arar.i:a has been furred lo Proxy represenlaiio n of Governo; 


5IC Mfc *»*«*rij » AlllfkC kfeft bH\2w n • I u nBKIU AltllU.A CAA Mgvn HJimi «V - " " • 

Although the Americans had not carps, tasting at lost the sweet *" *** resign as Foreign Miniiter of Bra- Tliomas E. Dewey. Krpubhcan . isw.n jw.m amain 

yet captured Aix. Admiral Eyerich fruits of victory for which they ^ zli by a group of army ollicers who Prrsidenua; randidair. UriVC Ol) flllleS ceasc " from 

said he feared French Partisans have waited, hoped, prepared and! J? . - ’ “ StJUSS opp<wir<] h » «» one imjwrunt more in Utej jstan armies 

would break into the hospital and bled for four years, entered Mar- {^! . -ourni tha: it r.vtablisheti too wrlear che wa,- for a Polm-T . n fRomama to 

harm 300 German patients and his setae as liberators today. I055es U,t Grrman s.l c , osc rrUu.ms with the United campaign simu* bitter rlcai-tllllO A O 111 d II 1 d {Bucharest i 

staff ol seven doctors and twenty- This great news followed the . m,m *** u,e for Prance Is SValrri aRll We)rfcf ,i urazilian rrrox- see urrr tornen policy, it was Ploesti oil fli 


by ^iXwnRprlAriniPQ UUUes aRainst the M Anay ‘ 

overnor i vVUfit.q>UrKl II1*CS wen as Romania's stale of 


(Drive 60 Miles 


with Britain and America, would 

.M.. '-(mm (Ml niAmbMt 11 Riu. 


cease "from this moment." Rus- 
sian armies were stabbing into 


harm 300 German patients and his setae as liberators today, 
staff of seven doctors and twenty- This great news followed the 


right puntt. isnnouncemcai muter m uie oiy ■ ~ imu*n ■« is;*- .nRT.iwr o u- .» % — — »• m • . - 

*1 yield my command," the ad- * that a column of American ar- Associated Pres* corre- xntnl. acrordme to wrU informed Secrrtary of State, had lnviteti<hc^ a ^ 111 2 B^ssar nrnnn The text of the King's proc- 

_ v I cnATirfAfit whn vnirtiM A iwarthn n t \ — <- ■* Vi .1 — n*. I U ■' 17 .1! . f lamaf Inn a« rarftwfaH Hw f ha Del k_ 


announnemcat earlier In the dayi^ rw,y ovcr, . M Harold initlaii nf ii:r Argentine uovrrn- j leaned umiihi Utat Cordell Huit.« 


Romania to within 167 miles of 
Bucharest and threatening the 
Ploesti oti Adds as the announce- 


ment went on the air. 


miral said, "but on one condition, mored forces In a sensational 100- spontleT ' t ; * ho niched American persons who have arrived here bi-partisan group ol Foreign Ite- 
You must go out and find Aroeri- mile drive oorrh through the Alpes ‘f nks . *"*‘5* ® : rr ° m «‘ Q ** J.andro. lavions Committee Senators lo 

cans and hring them here quickly." de Prorence had reached Grenoble, Sen * to wltWn 150 m,,e » OI lhe They leporietl that on Aug. 11 confer wit i him at 10 a. m. Friday 


BnstionsFalI;KoiicY'sMeiiJ ,amatlon - « recorded by the Brltr- 


Take Drmbica in Poland « information, fol- 


The sergeant, a tall, slight youth tor two years the greatest center German border with no sign that Aranha was named virr-prendent so he can tell them of the pro- attkeaummeenm _ — “ 

from Cleveland, nodded weakly, of the French resistance move- the Germans were rallying. 0 r the Swirly of Friends of erodings i.p to date ol the “Big j/ysDON. Aug. 24 •Thursdayi.r 1 ®^ °J our country I have de- 

fOmtimicd on pages. cotumnZi TContlnucU on page 2, column 5/ TrocWoads of prisoners streamed America, an organization for Uie Tlirre“ conference at Dumbarton _ The Sortct offcnsh . c that ?*** Uie ; “J«Uon of the 

back in the wake of the American prumoiiun «if rlu%er rrlaiions be- Oaks. knocked Romania out of the war r » the ' , lAnd on immediate cessation 

1 advance, but Ihcre was noi » an- xwren Brazil and the other Ameri- This acz.cn. which was also de- roared through Us fourth day yes- i ,D5Li,1Ues *ith the United Na- 
gle smoldering enemy vehicle lo ran ruumnes. especially :h- Utiiiedj. timed to smooth she path for terdav capturing Va*lui 140 miles - ,on5, ancJ I caJ1 u P° n ^ govern- 

Mdicale U»e enemy had put up a 4-1 a let. Thr follow ing day the: event uai Senate acceptance ol the northeast of Uic'ploesii oil center; “n 1 ol the national union to 

determined fight, said his dis- hcndquarirrx of the society, of; final distillation of the views of uir two big Bessar abian bastions Uie determineii will of the 

patch, dateiined “En Route to which Jefferxm Cattery. American, riser United Stairs. Russia endj 0 ( Tighina and Cr la tea- Alba on country, to conclude peace with 
CITY AND VICINITY Berlin." j Ambassador to Brazil, is I ran oca r>- Grcai BriUin. and of Odna after thr west bank of the Dncsir.'and '-he United Nations. 

8.000 Negroes are serving as sea- Only swarms of German war- 'president, were closed by order of china is cUird in. for the China- more than 400 other towns. ‘-Romania has accepted armistice 

men on merchant dhtpaJPage 14 fContinncdoapaoca column 4t iCimfmurdtm page J6. column /* Britain-Un-.ted Slates pliast of; Disregarding developments on .erms offered by the Soviet Union. 

Mother of baby wlio died in fire throe discussions, came as Uie ihe political front, the 2d and 3d Great Britain and the United 

Tuesday gives self up. Page H Hji' ^ J IVnwizi/] climax of ;l»e following happen- Ukrainian Armies deepened to as States. 

^“sivs^ SL^pJe S Morgan and lVlUin, LiOen amed tags: much as sixty miles Uie holes they "From this moment all. hostili- 

Waunded private's phone call wr*.1 tw n •! j * m . o •. l- Presidtnt Roosevelt met with liave ripped in the Cerman-Ro- its against Soviet armies and the 

opens free service hereJPage 17 WltJl 4? I KailrOadS 111 J.FU§t oUlt'^ forty-two drlegatrs to Dum-jmanian defenses and advanced lo -;tate of war with Great Britain 

Larger stores here plan to shut “ barton Oaks and urged upon tl.rm within -167 milts of Bucharest. And the United States will cease. 

quickly on V-Day floshJPage 37 tar name Barm* ninet-r rnnn t m, x1, « importance of an early agree- 1 Romania still was garrisoned “The United Nations have guar- 

B B?S?a?T^‘ , pS’ e S w^i“aTONr^,^r.Co..:-w tauuonaap^ 0 ^, 2 , u ., c, no- 

POLITICS lustve and illegal actions, some roads drsjmc the fact that many ^ rr it * T7”*ll t* a 

P. A. C. to seek clergymen's dating since 1932. to fix rates ar.d'aspevU of ilscir business are sub- 11 Wa KlailP r a lie Aflfp K file SA Orders the Army to Fight 

support for Roosevelt. Page 28 retard improvement of service and Jeti to regulation, by lhe Interstate **.*,**^«j ' "Any one who opposes the de- 

Truman supports Job-priority equipment was charged today by Commerce Communion. 3 C vision we have taken and wbo 

plan fox war veterans. Parc 23 me Department Of Justice in an) “The Supreme Court has held *)D Ol Jl flCIIl Vt.im urcn^ UlJuXlMlaiJU takes justice in his own hands U 

Brownell says siurveys show anti-ti-ust Jaw suit against lhe that “ihe cummis^ion has nu power ^ an enemy of our nation. I order 


TContlnuca on page 2, column SI 


"Romanians! In the difficult 
hour of our country I have de- 
rided for the salvation of the 


News on Inside Pages 


Koenig’s Communique 


General Koenig’s communique 
followed early this afternoon. 

It said: 

"On Saturday Aug. 19 in the 
morning the National Council ol 
the Resistance and Paris Commit- 
tee of Liberation, in agreement 
with Lhe national delegates and 
representatives or the provisional 
government nf the French ftepub- 

(Contmucd cm page 4. column 2 ) 


Office Help 


AWT BOVKKtXPTR. >no«l Urnafwphy. 

l«0tnt inonr-or bekrrf. pllUUI *ur« 
rMMMii pttouMi Mtum. nbrr tu. 
call CO a-Ou aa 


-We bireti a wry »tee gin We 
toonk you very touch for tne good 
ecmce.' 


WAR 

Plrench battle with Nazis for hill 
farts around Toulon. Page 3 
French In New York cheer Paris 
tall at big. meeting. Paged 
Pershing acclaims free Paris as 
“step toward Berlin." Page 5 
Prance is united after four years 
' of Nazi domination. Page 6 
Americans and French push 
drive to rim Bordeaux. Page 6 
Army backs up 9th Air Force on 
transfer of reporters. Page 6 
Nazis intensify their robot at- 
tacks in dawn barrage. Page 7 
Luftwaffe fights to protect the 
fleeing Nazi armies. Page 7 
Russians drafted by Nazis now 
are captives of F. F. L Page 7 
Liberators sink two ships in at- 
tack on Pacific convoys. Page 8 
Roosevelt sees U. 3. trade aided 
if lead-lease continues. Page 8 
Senate investigators on war 
goods hear Nelson. Page 9 

Secrecy surrounding the peace 
parley stirs protests. Page IS 
Bumper crops, sunflowers cover 
signs ol war in Kuban. Page 17 
War communiques. Fax* 8 

Army, Navy casually listzPage ll 
SPORTS 

Plebiscite wins by driving finish 
at Belmont Park. Page 2b 
Nelson and McSpaticn favored to 


CITY AND VICINITY 
8.000 Negroes are serving as sea- 
men on merchant shtpsJPsge 14 
Mother of baby wlw> died In fire 
Tuesday gives self up. Page 17 
Bride-elect can't marry: birth 
record soys she’s mole. Page IT 
Wounded private's phone call 
opens free service hereJPoge 17 
Larger stores here plan to shut 
quickly on V-Day flashJPage 17 
Brockman succeeds CheaJey as 
Bronx O.P.A. head. Page 28 
POLITICS 


Brownell 


anti-tiust Jaw suit against the that 'the commission ]>qs no . 


Dewey, BrickEr will wlnPage 28 Association of American Railroads. Ilo enforce U>e Sherman art ns By The United Frets ‘reach srveiUy-fivc in Britain's 1,IC arm y lhc whole nation to 

VanrtMhrrv fem mroiu* bill tarty-seven Wcstcfn carriers and Nidi. ' saai Uir Attorney Cnierel. LONDON, auk. 23 — Fifty-four worst neduent til llic kind. M* 1 wUt ' means and at the 
will crinM eranomv P?re 10 thetr ch,er eveculfvcs - 01,d the. who had made a number of state- „ P „ 0ll!{ . (nrludilic thirty-five chit- Tin Unltetl Stales Stratc«lc Air of *ny sacrifice against iiim. 
Wilson birthpl ace foundation * l '* w Tork banking houses of J. P - romls recently tlwi this and other nren. all umler five, were kilted to- Forre announced that Uie bomber. i ' 11 Romanians must rafiy 
gets $80,000 movie gift. Pace 12 Morgan 8s Co.. Inc., and Kuhn. -suits would be filed. "Conse- ^ when a flaming American a Liberator, crashed alter it was around the throne and the govern- 

Roasevelt seizure of Pennsylvania Loeb & Co. Also named ns de- quently. it is Uie duty of Uie De- bomber plunged Into a church caught In a sudden storm. The ment: he who does not assist the 

mine sets a precedent. Page 14 rendanu were the officers and di-lparumcnt of Justice lo take action school infants’ department in the pilot was among the three crew- government and resists the wiU of 

House group eliminates aid for rectors of the American Railroad; against ihcsc practices which so qu t el Lancashire village of Freek-jmen killed. Other members of the the nation Is a traitor to the coun- 


our nation. I order 


vt. nr i nn to.» A rJ t n ^ IA «,r n i.,. mu forty-sewn Wcsteftt carriers and surii.' " sanl tlw Attorney Cnienl. LONDON. Aug. 23.— Fifty-four 
will MnDmvWte io thetr ch,ef executives, and the; who had made a number ol stale- „ P „ 0ll!{ . including thirty-five chit- 
wiLvm btrthnlacfi loundaiion New York banking houses of J. P.<njciils rccenily Uwi this and other uren. all under five, were killed to- 


btrUiplace foundation 


House group eliminates aid for (rectors of the American Railroad; against ihcsc practices which so quiet Lancashire 


War communiques. Pages _ Association, the Western Assocla- [vitally affect lhe people of lhe icton. crew were injured. IdenUficaUcn try. 

Army, Navy casualty UstsPagc ll tion of Railway Executives anti.' Wrsiern part of tii» United Stales it was feared thirty or forty or these casualties was withheld. “The United Nations have 

SPORTS swWMTvaVc » wnwrT<^r ftt! w tWrtjr-one other Individuals. f and the national economy as a outer persons may have bmij Another Liberator, accompany- recognized the InjusUce of the 

Plebiscite wins by dr J ring finish bBlTOIllALSA D WibLtLbA Attorney General Francis Bid-; whole." trapped in the ruins or a ssackjlng the plane, continued on a dictate of Vienna under which 

at Belmont Park. Page 20 ”5 e file, now on the west coast. ULs-' Wroidrll llcntr. AssuianL Altor- bar across thr street. None had local flight. Transylvania was torn from us. 

Nelson and McSpaden favorcoto “'“"SJLf ' i" “ dosed through hi* office here lhati nr - v Onrral. explained that sonu- been reached by rescue parties The plane smashed through the "At Lhe side of the Allied army 

win in Chicago golf. Page 20 '"i7 Society". .'^' ’ 19 the dvU complaint under Uic.oi U‘«' Wp ' Lrn ’ railroads Had « i,>n darkness fell. top of Die school building, where and with their help we wui cro« 

Kennedy* win fRiher-nnd-son Br jj ge ! 19 Amusem'ta 12.' 13 Sherman anti- trust act. said to be) ^ utt> ' 1 ***** nuu uisUK dalit American soldiery Acre- tony-one rtuUlren under five, the frontiers unjustly imposed 

Pa *. C ,° Webster Zt Fresh Air. .... It one of the largest anti-lnist suits ' nevr w 1 ™* bul had been dis- among those killed, includm,-; many of Hieur refugees from robot- upon us ri vienrin." 


It you are looking Tec general 
oS ■ • help U*e Herald TrlbuOa 
er: Vidyineni column* eon ba of 
real uslstmnce to you. Fbo» 
PEntuylvuiia 6^000. 


" -KISMET* l» ra* *»«lr at lr«uu." a*n\ 
IV 8-T*M TrUHne of tsfat. 

it— rv Btr i hu itCM datUttf mmaOtt 
a: :*>» aaior <iov— MPVlar pnet*— *a»L 


Jowl, Oliver and Boll gain in 
Southampton tennis. Pase2l 
View* of Sport, by A1 

Laacy. Page 2t 


a ruct ok Bis 

tda Sum Bpatteti 
Seventh Ctmi." B 


© New Vbrk HeraM Tribune, fleorfrriad wtfi penrosaon 


TEffi LIBERATION OP PARIS - 
AUGUST 22-27, 1944 
In the last days of August, as the 
Allies approached the city, the unarmed 

t , ' TYm-otc* . r«nrnrf'<3fi RV A SIT1/1 


IN THE NEW YORK HERALD TRIBUNE 


-days of street battles and general 
insurrection. Paris was liberated. To 

i 


numDer 01 aiuicu i wwumvv — — “ r 

against the occupying German forces. In four 

I l 



L. I \ S AiAUW*a.AWb*VW^ J-U1AU IT Uu MkJk/LU VVV4. 

herald tribunes commemorate these dramatic days, the 
International Herald Tribune is reproducing the 
- |j A six front pages from the New York Herald 
*- r 1 W Tribune chronicling the week of August 22 
through 27 , 1944 


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international Herald Tribune, Wednesday, August 24, 1994 


Page 11 



THE TRIB INDEX. 116 , 


International Herald Tribune World Stock Index ©. composed of 
280 internationally invested le stocks from 25 countries, compiled 
by Bloomberg Business News. Jan, j, 1992 * 100. 

120 — : — Z— i 



. . 


IBM 

AsSa/Pacilfc 

Europe 


Appro. 1*01*10: 32% E3 

®l Appro wNflWng: 37%- 

M 

Close: 13231 Prev- 133.51 g£ 

2 Ooea 117JB PraiultTOl 



MAMJ JA M A 14 J J A 



19M 

IBM 


nm 


Approx w^gWTfg: 28% '• 

■ns 

Appro «risUaer 5% - EH 

CkBK 9533 PlBVJ 9438 

um 

Oosk 14835 Pro: 14551 . 



Pm Mn tracks US. dokar va tuos at stocks to: Tokyo, Nm York, London, and 
Argentina, Australia, Austria, Mghsn, Brazil, Canada, CWtn, Danmark, Rntaad. 
Franca, Gurasny, Hong Kong, My, Mexico, NathartandB, Nwr Z e a l a n d. Noway, 
Singapore, Spain, Sweden, Swttmrtsnti and Venazueta. Far Tokyo, Now York and 
London, the index is compand at dm 20 tap Issues ft (sms at nutkfff capUahtSon, 
otherwise the ton top stocks am tracked. 


1 Industrial Sectors 1 


Ton. Pit* « 


Ttt. 

Pm. 

% 


data data dang* 


daw 

daw 

dmtge 


11325 112-99 4023 

Capital Goods 

imi 

1 18-92 

40.08 

uwtks 

131.48 13152 -053 

Raw Materials 

13351 

133.90 

-0.07 

Finance 

118.11 118.48 -032 

Consow Goods 

103,78 

10353 

40.15 

Services 

122.50 122.14 -tOa 

' MhcaBnnaus 

13255 

13358 

-0.55 

For monkilonriailon about ttta kxtex, a booklet Is svaSabte true of chame. 


Write to Trb Index, 181 Averw Charies da Gatrfa. 92521 Neu^y Codex, France. 


Car Sales 
In Europe 
Look Up 


Industry Differs 
With VW Outlook 


O International Herald Tribune 


Robot 

FRANKFURT — Investors 
rushed to sell German car man. 
ofacnam’ shares Tuesday after 
the chairman of Europe’s larg- 
est carmaker, Volkswagen AG, 
said he expected West Europe- 
an sales to stagnate this year. 

But while share analysts 
agreed with a further forecast 
by Ferdinand JPiSch that Ger- 
man car orders would slow in 
the final six months of the year, 
they were puzzled by his 
gloomy outlook fen* the Europe- 
an market as a whole. 

“Picch’s comment on West- 
ern Europe does not match our 
expectations,” said Gerd Schu- 
bert, industry analyst at Deut- 
sche Girozentrale. He said that 
analysts tended to agree more 
with the German car industry 
association’s outlook. 

The industry association, 
VDA, expects growth in West 
European car sales in the sec- 
ond half of the year, excluding 
Germany, to substantially re- 
main at the 7 percent to 8 per- 
cent rate of the first six months. 

“The VDA forecast is more in 
tine with what we're saying,” 
said an industry analyst wnb 
brokers James Capd in London. 

“James Capd expects West 
European car sales including 
Germany to rise by 53 percent 
this year and by 5.8 percent 
next year” the analyst said. 

DB Research analyst JOigen 
Melzner said car sales were ex- 
pected to rise by 4.0 percent this 
year in Western Europe. 

He said sales growth would 
flatten to around 0.4 percent in 
the last five months of this year 
after rising by 6.6 percent in the 
first seven months. 

Both be and the James Capd 
analyst said financial incentives 
offered to customers to scrap 
older cars in France and Spain 
had boosted demand in the first 
half. 


A Holy Alliance in Russia 

Orthodox Church Joins Bottling Venture 


By Ales sandra Stanley 

Afar York Times Service 


KOSTROMA, Russia — In earlier times, it 
might have been considered an unholy alli- 
ance, but the Russian Orthodox Church is 
working with a California businessman in a 
joint venture to bottle natural water from the 
Saint Springs for sale in Russia and soon the 
United States. 

“New times,” explained Archbishop Alex- 
ander as he briskly led an inspection tour of the 
bottling plant. The archbishop, who led the 
effort to turn the output of the church's spring 
into Russia's only domestically bottled still 
water, said he expected to turn a profit this falL 

“We need a lot of money to restore what 
was lost,” he said, referring to seven decades 
of Communist persecution of the church. 
“Donations just are not enough.” 

Saint Springs Water Co. is the church's first 
commercial undertaking since before the Bol- 
shevik Revolution in 1917. And it is the first 
venture that the insular, hierarchical patri- 
archate has entered with a foreign partner. 

In contrast to most joint ventures in Rus- 
sia, both sides seem content The church, 
which is trying to reclaim and restore proper- 
ty confiscated under communism, acquired a 
potentially abundant source of revenue with- 
out putting up any money of its own. 

And John V. R. King, a retired plastics 
manufacturer from Lake Arrowhead, Califor- 
nia, got a resourceful and well-connected 
Russian partner. 

Mr. King said the archbishop’s office had 
cut through red tape, wheedled concessions 
from local authorities and even won some tax 
breaks. When government officials told him 
he would have to provide bousing and a food 


store for his 30 employees, Mr. King turned to 
the archbishop. 

“Basically, he said, *We’ll take care of it,' 
and he did,” Mr. King said. 

In July, Patriarch Alexei II went to Kostro- 
ma to bless the venture and gamely pressed 
the button for the maiden journey of bottles 
down the conveyor belt. 

The church does not contend that the water 
can produce miracles, but it does try 10 appeal 
to a certain consciousness. As the archbishop 
put it, “It is an ecologically clean product.” 

Nonsparkling bottled water is still a delica- 
cy for ordinary Russians. Saint Springs, 
which is sold in the Metropol Hotel in Mos- 
cow, in the Grand Hotel Etiropa in St. Peters- 
burg and in hard-currency shops, is mainly 
sold to tourists and Western business people 
who fear Russian tap water. The price of a 
1.5-liter bottle ranges from 90 cents to 51 .80, 
depending on the outlet 

“This is a charitable endeavor for us,” 
Archbishop Alexander said. “All the profits 
we plan to make will go to noble purposes." 

Mr. King first met the archbishop while on 
a cruise down the Volga in 1992. The venture 
grew out of their discussions. 

Mr. King said the plant was bottling and 
distributing I million bottles a month, which 
is about 20 percent of its capacity. In the first 
week of September, it will be adding half-titer 
bottles for sale in hotel mini bars and on 
airline flights. 

Mr. King said he planned to begin export- 
ing Saint Springs water to the United Stales 
this autumn, marketed as an exceptionally 
pore water that bears the seal of approval of 
the highest spiritual authority in Russia. 

The company plans to start with cities that 
have large Russian populations, such as New 
York, Los Angeles and San Francisco. 


Land Auction 
Withdrawal Jolts 


HongKongMart 


Complied by Ov Staff from Dispatches 

HONG KONG — The gov- 
ernment was forced to with- 
draw a plot from its land auc- 
tion for the first time in a 
decade on Tuesday, a possible 
signal that the expensive resi- 
dential property market has 
simmered down. 

The surprising development 
undercut stock prices hoe, with 
the Hang Seng index, which 
represents about 70 percent of 
total market capitalization, 
closing down 22321 points, at 
9,234.06. 

The real estate development 
and investment company Sun 
Hung Kai Properries fell the 
most among index stocks, 2.25 
Hong Kong dollars (29 US. 
cents), to 50 AO dollars. 

Two of three sites in the auc- 
tion were sold for prices lower 
than expected, and the last one 
was withdrawn with no opening 
bid. In May, the government 
said it would review the way it 
conducted land auctions after 
powerful developers refused to 
bid against each other and one 
site went at a price much lower 


than expected, 
ml Tam. chi 


Paul Tam, chief survey offi- 
cer in the Land Department, 
said it was the first site with- 
drawal in 10 years. 

Two larger sites were bought 


for prices below expectations 
by the sole bidder, the China- 
backed company CIT1C Pacific 
LtcL, at the opening bid. 

“Locals are selling because 
the land auction at Tai Po only 
sold for 950 million dollars, be- 
low the expected price of 1 bil- 
lion dollars," said Priscilla Ng 
of Sun Hung Kai Securities. 

Regent Fund Management 
was forecasting a 50 percent to 
75 percent fall in prices over the 
next five years. 

“I expect the sale to show 
that we will get some further 
softening in prices over the rest 
of the year, maybe another 5 to 
10 percent," said Alexander 
Webber of the property consul- 
tants Vigers Hong Kong. 

Residential prices overall 
have fallen by 10 percent to 15 
percent since the government 
announced measures in June to 
increase land availability and 
make life tougher for specula- 
tors. The government owns all 
land in the colony and sells 
leasehold interests. 

John ConigaH. the auction- 
eer, also blamed last week's rise 
in U.S. interest rates, which 
prompted local banks to raise 
their prime rates half a percent- 
age point, to 7.75 percent. 

(Reuters, Bloomberg) 


Hopes of Stability Bring Mexican Stocks Off the Roller Coaster 


By Lawrence Malkin 

International Herald Tribune 

NEW YORK — Optimism 
about Mexico's political pros- 
pects steadied its stock market 
Tuesday and put at least a tem- 
porary end to the rollercoaster 
ride that kept many investors 
on the sidelines earlier this year. 

Analysts said the market 
would hold its own or keep ris- 
ing if Mexico proves it has- re- 
gained its stability and contin- 
ues growing. 


The Bolsa gained 51.13 
points or 1.9 percent Monday, 
the first day of trading after the 


weekend electoral victory by 
r Leon, 


Ernes to Zedillo Ponce dc _ 
the governing party's presiden- 
tial candidate. 

With Mexican money head- 
ing into blue-chips, the index 
climbed for most or Tuesday 
but ended down 3.44 points or 
0.12 percent at 2755.53 points. 

Wall Street's reaction on the 
second day after the Mexican 


election was not as optimistic. 
Two closed-end mutual funds 
that invest in Mexican securi- 
ties both were lower. Mexico 
Fund fell SI. 125. closing at 
S33.S75 on the New York Stock 
Exchange, after gaining 12.5 
cents on Monday, while Mexico 
Equity & Income Fund fell 75 
cents to S22.75. following a 
62.5-eem rise on Monday. 

Meanwhile. Telefonos dc 
Mexico was the mosi active is- 
sue on the New York Stock Ex- 


change on Tuesday, falling 50 
cents to S66.00. 

From its high of 2.881 on 
Feb. 8. the Bolsa index dropped 
drastically, hitting a low of 
1,957 on April 20. The market 
recovered, then traded in the 
2.200-2.400 range most of the 


summer, improving along with 
ring Mr. Zedillo. 


the polls favoring 
But in the past month, the index 
has gained more than 600 
points with the approach of the 
election. 


“We’re in a bull market 
now,'' said Bond Snodgrass, an- 
alyst in Mexico City for Abaco, 
a major Mexican brokerage 
house. 

“Most people make the mis- 
take of making too dose a cor- 
relation with Wall Street." he 
added, “but in fact what hap- 
pens in Mexico politically, and 
the valuation of individual 
stocks arc much more impor- 

See MEXICO, Page 12 


MEDIA MARKETS 


Books Go West to Change 


By Leslie Helm 

Los Angela Times Serriee 

S EATTLE — Think encyclopedias and 
you think of Oxford dons m flowing 
gowns and the tweedy wodd of New 
Yoik publishing. But what you really 
should be thinking is RedmoocV Washington 


That’s the home of Microsoft Corp., whose 
Encarta CD-ROM encyclopedia, replete with 
video and sound, has become the world's 
best-selling encyclopedia in its first year on 
the market 

The sudden success of Encara is more than 
just another indicatkm that the electronic 
informati on age has arrived. To many, it's a 
sign of a changing inteSectnal landscape, one 
in which the inf otmatkra-techndogy outposts 
of the West are quietly becoming hubs of 
thought and creativity as wefi. 

“New York used to be the center of the 
information industry,” says Tom Corddry, a 
multime dia executive at Mkrosaft “But eJeo- 
tronic publishing could be based on the West 
Coast. 5 

Nobody is saying New York is about to 
disappear as a center of ideas, or that Los 
Angeles will soon lose its grip cm movie and 
television production. But there are signs that 
chapgmfi technologies are starting to redraw 
America’s cultural map. 

“You are getting painters, artists, writers, 
designers moving here because of employ- 
ment opportunities” says Bob BeR a profes- 
sor at ban Francisco State University’s multi- 
media center. 

New media technologies are evolving rap- 
idly. Taking advantage of the latest advances 
requires dose interaction among mu s ici ans , 
artists, writers and computer experts. The 


iiriminil wizards and creative professionals 
most attuned to the new media tend to be 
concentrated in the major metropolitan cen- 
ters of the San Francisco Bay area, the Pacific 
Northwest and Southern California. 

Of the 4500 members of the International 
Interactive Communications Society, a group 
of multimedia professionals based in Beaver- 
ton, Oregon, dose to half are in San Francisco 
or Los Angeles. New York has 357, well 
under 10 percent 

Migrations of talent have occurred through- 
out history as fortunes have changed and tech- 
noLogies evolved. Driven by the desires for more 
dear days for shooting, the American movie 
business moved west from New York genera- 
tions ago. Beginning in the 1920s, waves of 
writers — mdwfing Hemingway, Faulkner and 
Fitzgerald — were drawn by the high pay and 
excitement of Hollywood. 

And although publishing and the fine axis 

s tilt tend to be centered on New York, the rise 

of universities as patrons of the arts long ago 
dispersed writers and other creative talent 
around the country. 

Multimedia companies find that cities in 
the West have the best selection of people 
with both technical and artistic talent. 

Compton’s NewMedia, a subsidiary of Tri- 
bune Ca, established itself in Carlsbad, Cali- 
fornia, rather than at its parent’s base in 
’ Chicago. 

“How many people would be willing to 
move to Chicago?” Tom McGrow, Comp- 
ton’s vice president of marketing develop- 
ment and product planning, asks. 

Southern California was ideal, he says, be- 


See MULTIMEDIA, Page 13 


Lloyd’s Due 
To Post 5th 
Yearly Loss 


Bloomberg Businas News 

LONDON — Lloyd’s of 
London is set for its fifth con- 
secutive annual loss, according 
to the British insurance analysis 
company Chatset. 

Chatset said that the 1992 
results, which will be reported 
next June, will be much worse 
than Lloyd’s underwriters’ fore- 
casts of about £135 million 
($210 motion). For 1993, they 
predict a return to profit of 
i800 million. 

But these headline figures 
don't include losses on syndi- 
cates that cannot dose their 
bodes because of difficulties 
quantifying their liabilities. 
And they do not indude the 
effect of a substantial decrease 
in investment returns on syndi- 
cate assets. 

Analyst Derek Brawn at 
Smith New Court said that if 
the underwriters’ forecasts were 
correct far 1993, they were ex- 
tremely disappointing. 


With underwriting capacity 
lion, a profit 
of £800 miltion for 1993 — - be- 


for 1993 at £8.9 billion, a ; 


fore adding in reserves for prior 
years and losses in investment 
returns — represented a yield of 
less than 10 percent, below its 
long-term average. 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


Cross Rates 

% * DM. 

JumerdMi IW 1M U2» 

Smmis subs a* nos 

FnakMft IS »B — 

L— dmr (a) USE — - X3tm 

Madrid nun mot n so 

MUoa UHJ3 1005 UBUS 

KnrYartfU UBa tSin 

toll &S5 8.1 0 3JBN 

M 1M Hi 

UDM ZKB Um 

U*S1 Mill 64® 

UM U1 us 

LKM HNS UH7 

OtottKB to A m sterdam, London, 
rahaatSpjn. 

a: To buy oat pound; D: To bur 
avaJAtate 


Tofcva 


Zorich 
1 ECU 
1SOR 


Aug. 23 

FJF. Un DA BJv UR. - Too Cl P«M»» 

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am va • U3U — - sues uni me mju* 

unr via* amt u*i* use uw* ui* iw 

US U&n 24KB «2M 29152 UCtJJ l\m WW 

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mm — mss era me nm loss us 

Uttm VMM 3171 1391 fMM ISH HMD 

, mtH auo 44997 iw* ua UBS* 

ms . 241. SUM 1TW* 2SM •— 71S VU* 

03BI B SHI- B7WI AAW* UMf . use- — IfiB* 

osei bob- o» urn* — un** am* uw 

mu iwu 24® . awe taw men uis hws 

7 JIM 23WJ van 444467 1JH9 MJU MM U4« 

New Ybrk midZurtA Wops in other centers: Toronto 


Eurocurrency Deposits 

Swiss 

bailor D-Mark Franc 

SterfUiQ 

French 

Franc 

Yen 

Aug- 23 

ECU 

I manta 

AtwAm, 

44W4 <ft 


4JW*. 

SBkSte 

2 V2ft 

SlVd9W 

3 manta* 

4te-5 

4904 


Sftrfift 

SWt-Sft 

2ft-2ft 

S'vwS'ft 

Smaalbs 

S ft 

4A44ft 

4MK 

5M 

SftSft 


VMM 

lytar 

51^5 >ft 

SftrSft 

4>Hr4 -ft 

flUA 

/ill- ffu 


6*w4'ft 


Soarcm Rum Lloyds Bonk. 

Notes tav d oobb to Mertank dometts of si motion mXUmtm {aretojtwwen//. 


Key Money Rotes 


ant debar! m : Units at Atf; HO.: net quoted: HA.: not 


dose 

406 

7% 

4* 


> Other Dollar Vafcao* 

pert comm Fort 
ami orwcdrac. 2SM0 
USB7 MOOflKOBff* T3333 

iaas KMKfcWrtio vojz 

AM lottprgtH 3US 
MW iwto.n»toh 
BX Mac 0AM 

4063 tiraaasiwk. 3103 
XB KmnHi dMr UW* 
SJXO MAW.dng. ISM 


Cww h c t 

AffMLma 

AtHfrOLI 

AsSr.iCUL 

BrafflrMl 


Currency 


Cm* koruna 
omMittsae 
Emu. pound 
Fia. markka 


HLZaedandf 

krone 

PtdLoeso 

rommiotv 

port-dGuda 

Rus.ruMc 

Saudi mol 
Stoat 


Perl 
1335 
’ 14444 
4741B 
2440 
22224. 
WOT 
KZMO 
US 
14W9 


CnnMcy 

UAfr.ndd 

£Kor.iM» 
Steed, kram 

rwanaf 

That ham 
TtarkMiBra 
UAEOrtum 
VOMS-Mfl*. 


Port 

35745 
HOLW 
75758 
2U» 
2499 
St StTT. 
16727 
19850 


UnHtd States 
D U i iuit rote 
Prime rota 
RSHTrt funds 
Mann CDs ** 

CMu*. paper lMdm J* 

xawffc Treasury MU ** 

Waar Tn xaurv MW 
H«gr Treasury mete MJ 

s*ear Treaxrrntf* *** 

Tieer Treasury oof 
W*oar Tranary not* {ff 

j*vear-T»a*aryfcMd 
inerrin Lvm**-d“Y Reaayaiie! M2 


3ft 

734 

4*4 

08 

558 

441 

&33 

422 

495 

497 

731 

755 

331 


Brunte 


BaaK ban rate 

5 ft 

5 ft 

Call nano* 

5 J» 

4 ft 

t-maatt Mterbaak 

590 

4 V. 

3 -montti Interbank 

5 ft 

5 ft 

Awiaatt tatarboak 

5 V. 

5 <ft 

14 v*arOW 

8 J 6 

174 

Prance 

teuneaUan rate 

590 

509 

Co* money 

9k 

5 ft 

Unanib toiartwiib 

9k 

Sft 

XwHtai tetertMiak 

5 ft 

5 ft 

4 nMntb bnarlNB* 

59 k 

59 W 

uwarOAT 

747 

794 


Pound stems 
OwfsdhedturK 


Cur luna r 

Canadian dollar 


jMar «Mn*»daT 
13785 13791 13798 

9747 9757 97JO 


Forward Rates 

»d or tdoor sMbt 
v-me USB l5SB 
14320 >5327 14324 

Mafranc larw 1-S9W U9ll 

30UHM.- tun AM {Amsterdam); mabtver Bank ( Brussels/: tunas Commarsede tut/a» 
tMtk*v; Agones Frau* Press* tPartsl; Bonk of Tokyo I Tokyo!; Bonn 0m* el Canada 
l Tbtomai; HOF tSOKl Odureoto tram ftttem and a* 


Dteconntrate 
can moon y 

1 -AMiliMortMi* 

3-raoothintert** 
t, n o nth Morto n* _ 
ifrraar envommeaf bead 
G v mw rr 

LpMihardnile 
CpU maaer 
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yawntli Uteftaafc 

tamm Mitotan* 

jbyeorBmd 


w 

9M 

K 

2K 

2ft 

441 


ra 

2 ft 
2ft 
2*4 
2ft 
44# 


Sources: Routers. BUomborg, Merritt 
Lynch. Bank at Tokyo, Cemmenbank. 
GreemeeB Montagu, CrtkfiT Lyonnais. 


Gold 


un 

495 

Sflfl 

4» 

595 

7.17 


498 

5-00 

ICO 

&Q5 

797 


AM. 

PJA. 

CWoe 

38135 

381 JB 

-148 

381 35 

38135 

-125 

346.18 

38A5D 

-nm 


Zones 
London 
Mow York 

tt&aoBansmr ounce. Lendwie/llciaHtit- 
InOf ; Zurich ad New r or* opening and ekn- 
ina arias; New IW* Coasut toacemoacj 
Source: Reutos 


Banking Clients Have Always Expected 
Outstanding Personal Service. 
Today They Find It With Us. 



D uring the Renaissance, 
rrusted advisors helped 
administer the finances 
and protect the interests of private 
individuals. The role demanded 
judgment, commitment and skill. 

Today, clients find that same 
personal service ar Republic 
National Bank. We believe that 
banking is more about people than 
numbers. It's about the shared val- 
ues and common goals that forge 
strong bonds between banker and 


client. It’s also about building for 
the future, keeping assets secure 
for the generations to come. 

This client focus has contrib- 
uted to our leading position in 
private banking. As a subsidiary 
of Safra Republic Holdings S.A. 
and an affiliare of Republic New 
York Corporation, we’re part of 
a global group wirh more than 
US$5 billion in capital and more 
than US$50 billion in assets. 
These assets continue to grow 


substantially, a testament to the 
group’s strong balance sheets, risk- 
averse orientation and century-old 
heritage. 

Ail banks in the group are 
locally managed, artuned to the 
language and culture of their cus- 
tomers. They share a philosophy 
that emphasises lasting relation- 
ships and mutual trust. Those 
values were once the foundation 
of banking. At Republic, they 
have been and alwavs will be. 


REPUBLIC NATIONAL BANK 
OF NEW YORK (SUISSE) SA 


A SAFRA BANK 

TIMELESS VALUES, TRADITIONAL STRENGTH. 


MEAD OTFICi: GENEVA I20« -2. «-ACE DU LAC - TEL, i022i 705 55 55'FDBEX: i022>70*> 55 50 AW GENEVA 1201-2. ROE DB. ALFBED-VINCENT ■ CORNER 
QUA! DU MONT-BLANCi BRANCHES: LUGANO 6901 * I. VIA CAN0VA ■ TEL. (Mil 23 85 32 • ZURICH 8039 - STOCKERSTRA5SE 37 - TEL »01> 288 '8 1 

GUERNSEY • RUE DU PRE ■ ST PETER PORT ■ TEL. i4«r> 7lt 761 AFFILIATE REPUBLIC NATIONAL BARK Of NEW tORK IN NEW K7HF OTHER LOCATIONS 
GIBRALTAR - GUERNSEY - LONDON - LUXEMBOURG • MILAN * MONTE CARLO • PARIS * BEVERUT HILLS • CAYMAN ISLANDS • LOS ANGELES - MEXICO CITY - MIAMI • 
MONTREAL • NASSAU - NEW YORK • BUENOS AIRES ■ CARACAS • MONTEVIDEO ■ PUNTA DEL ESTE • RIO DE JANEIRO ■ SANTIAGO ■ BEIRUT • BEIJING - HONG KONG • 

JAKARTA • SINGAPORE * TAIPEI • TOKYO 




■ 'j 

J- 




<’ HTTcPp 



I'ajjf 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 1994 


** 


MARKET DIARY 


| Cydicals’ Earnings 
Spark Share Rally 


NEW YORK — UJ5. stocks 
spgfid Tuesday as stronger- 
than -expected earnings from 
Dewe fueled gains in farm- 
equipment and cyclical stocks. 

Stocks were also supported 
by the higher dollar and bond 

U.S. Stocks 

prices, which swept away con- 
cerns about higher U.S. interest 
rates. 

The Dow Jones industrial av- 
erage jumped 24.61 points to 
close at 3,775.83 

Almost seven slocks rose for 
every four that fell on the New 
Vork Slock Exchange. Volume 
totaled 307.2 million shares. 

The benchmark 30-year U.S. 
Treasury bond closed up 7/32 
at 99 J8/32, for a yield of 7.54 
percent, down from 7.55 per- 
cent 

Deere’s performance boosted 
other farm machinery and con- 
struction equipment makers. 
Caterpillar rose 4ft. to 111 %, 
and Clark Equipment spurted 
2ft, to 68%. 

Deere and Caterp illar gave 
“a little more interest to the 


cyclical side of the economy," 
said Neil Yar house, a fund 
manager at Aetna Life Insur- 
ance & Annuity. 

Philip Moms jumped 1%, to 
56%, on speculation that the 
maker of Marlboro cigarettes 
and Miller beer may either raise 
its quarterly dividend or an- 
nounce a Stock buyback at a 
board meeting next Wednes- 
day. 

Interest-sensitive issues, such 
as those of banking and broker- 
age rums, advanced as interest 
rates fell. Fleet Financial 
Group added ft at 39%, Travel- 
ers rose 1ft, to 35ft, and Ban- 
kAmerica Corp. added %. to 
48%. 

PepsiCo rose ft, to 34, after 
Goldman Sachs recommended 
buying the stock, saying Pepsi’s 
earnings growth would be bet- 
ter than expected. 

Compaq fell 1% to 36ft after 
the computer maker said it was 
cutting prices in Europe. 

AT&T rose ft, to 53ft on 
news the company will work 
with Intel which rose ft, to 
64ft, to develop a computerized 
conferencing service. 

(Bloomberg, AP) 


Japan’s Buying Pashes 
Dollar Up Against Yen 


Bloomberg Businas News 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
eked out a gain against the yen 
Tuesday on Bank of Japan 
overnight intervention, and the 
U.S. currency also made pro- 
gress against the Deutsche 
mark. 

"The Bank of Japan bought 
pretty aggressively Monday 

Foreign Exchange 

night,'' said Joe Francomano, a 
trader at Dai-Ichi Kangyo 
Bank. The central bank’s pur- 
chases, which have often 
proved ineffective, helped drive 
the dollar higher because many 
traders were short the U.S. cur- 
rency, Mr. Francomano said. 

The dollar rose as high as 
98.54 yen before ending the day 
at 97.82 yen, up from a five- 
week Low of 97.70 yen set Mon- 
day. The U.S. currency rose to 
1.5311 DM from 1.52M DM. 

The dollar gave up much of 
its early gains against the yen 
after C. Fred Bergs ten, an inde- 
pendent Washington economist 
regarded as dose to the Clinton 
administration, was reported as 
saying that the dollar might fall 
to new lows against the yen as 


rhetoric in the U.S.-Jai 
negotiations heats up- Tne dol- 
lar’s current postwar low is 
96.60 yen, set on July 12. 

Die United States has set a 
Sept. 30 deadline for talks 
aimed at getting Japanese gov- 
ernment agencies to bny more 
American medical and telecom- 
munications equipment The 
administration is authorized 
under UJ5. trade law to put 
sanctions on Japanese exports 
if the deadline passes without 
an agreement 

“Bergsten’s comments hit a 
nerve,” said David de Rosa, di- 
rector of foreign-exchange trad- 
ing at Swiss Bank Corp. Traders 
eager to sell the dollar when it 
rose saw his comments as justi- 
fication. 

“The trend for the dollar is 
still down,” said Lynn Tierney, 
vice president at Shawmut 
Bank of Boston. 

Mr. Francomano said the 
dollar could probably fall as 
low as 95 yen within a month. 
In addition to skepticism about 
the trade negotiations, many 
traders have lost faith in the 
Clinton admini stration’s eco- 
nomic policies, Mr. Franco- 
mano said. 


V* AuauaftK.' P>m 


Aug, S3 


The Dow 


Daily closings of the ' 

Dow Jones industrial average 



3500 


F M A M 
1994' 


J J A 


Daw Jones Av erages 


Oku Hiah Low Lott 0*9. 

irwus, I75XD7 3WI jt 3750.90 377533 • J44I 
Trans 1581 SI 158733 I570.M 158*34 -782 
, urn 197.58 I8BJO 184.7? 187.71 -192 
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Standard & Poor’s Indexes 


HIT 


NYSE Most Actives 


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insurance 

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TWA vtg 

2830 !•: 


2-tt 


- »u 

-5« 

—2 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


Metals 

dot* nMon 

■U M BM Ask 
ALUMINUM I HIM) Grade) 

Dottm per metric toa 
St 145WI0 T441JM 145730.145080 

rtmsrt WWM 1149180 . 1 «OT MRS 

COPPER CATHODES <HM> Grade) 

S5** ^ »mjo 2375a 

Forward 238100 2306X0 WIOT 23723 

ff—W™ »» u. 

Forward BUB 59489 SK280 SHOO 
NICKEL 

Dalian pot rnMcM „ 

TIM 

Sp^^^SwU^SUSOT SUMO 3IBU0 
Forwtmd SMOOT &&&SB 524000 524SO0 
2IHC tSPedfll H W Grade) 

050 ototVso 
wot MMO ws wine 


Financial 

hm low cm* omse 

3-MONTH STERLING (UFFE1 
iman-pfsefNipo 


Sea 


JOD 

Ptc 


S£ 


W 9 

*380 


mm 

90.70 

ms 




94M 

rU2 

n m 

92J* 

9103 

7i.n 
n » s 

9004 

9449 

hot 

9024 

9414 



Dow Jones Bond Averages 


20 Bomia 
ro utilities 
10 Industrial* 


Clm aw 

9739 —Ml 

KL43 —IUM 

10156 +1 


NYSE Diary 


Advanced 

Detained 

Unchanged 
Toiall&iues 
NtoHKk 
N ew low* 


□m Prsv. 

1339 922 

763 1238 

76? 711 

2871 2871 

7 4 «7 

39 47 


AMEX Diary 


Advonood 
Doclirttd 
Unctumed 
Total hsues 
New Hobs 
Now LOW* 


299 


302 
254 
241 233 

797 BIZ 

16 17 

19 20 


NASDAQ Diary 


Aovcnoxi 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Tow issues 
MewHWns 
New Lpw* 


Oose Prey. 
170* 1539 

1378 1565 

1932 1906 

5009 5070 

115 85 

47 65 


Spot Commodities 


Market Sales [ 

Commodity 

ftli.railtitaw IK 

Today 

it in 

Pray. 

n Ait 

NYSE 

Atnox 

Nasdaq 

In millions. 

Today 

dose 

307.25 

1X83 

20635 

prey. 

cons. 

26X74 

1788 

254.75 

MllNTlIrVUtiV *0 

Copper electrolytic lb 
Iran fob. ten 

Lead, lb 

Silver, tray u 

Steel (scroo). tan 

Tin. lb 

Zinc, lb 

U4M1 

L13 

213JJB 

838 

SOT 

1W.17 

N.T. 

08655 

DM1 

1.14 

M2M 

038 

X23S 

11X17 

154 

08671 


Est. volume: 34,994 Open mt,- 

KB3 OS'S?# 1 *'"™ 

5(P N.T. N.T. TLB? 4-Bfll 

Dec Tuo sos mn +tW 

Mar 93M 9X94 9X95 . + OJD1 

Jim N.T. N.T. 9342 Unch. 

5M N.T. K.T. 9332 —041 

Eat volume: 12tLOpen mu 54 
3-MOMTH EUROMARKS (LI FFG) ’ 

DM1 mOBon - pti oflM per 
Sep 95JS 9541 9543 — 001 

D*c 96AS 9645 9685 + O0V 

Mm- 9*45 9650 9654 Unctv 

JOB 9617 9610 7617 + 003 

Sam 9U6 9178 nss +044 

ON 9058 9X47 9357 +0.05 

Mar 9U6 7138 9315 +003 

J>a 9X13 «06 9X13 +044 

98* 9X92 9249 9194 +003 

DOC 9X73 9249. 9271 —041 

Mr 9249 7257 9258 —041 

Ja 9X47 9264 7267 +041 

Eat volume: 7S1 11 open InX: 72X462. 
S4KMTM PIBOR (MATIFI 
ffs mmaa - no or iso act 
So* 7627 9633 9437 +045 

Dec 9181 73.74 9X80 +aflS 

MOT 9X49 9X41 9X49 +045 

JOB 9341 9113 9X21 4055 

Saw 9295 9287 9293 +845 

Dk T2JD 9261 92.78 +046 

Mar 7136 9246 9235 +047 

JM 9X39 9241 9X39 +049 

Est volume: 3X402. Open bit: 199416 
LONS GILT (LIFFEJ 
OMM - at* « M a* WO act 

no-si mas nx2s 


Doc 100-13 1004)8 TOMS Ui 

.: lain. 


+ 04 n 

_Und«. 

Eat. volume: 54S86 Dean ln£i 
GERMAN GOVrRMMENT BUND (UFFEJ 
DM 29MM - pt> H 18» Pd 
SOP 9148 9046 9143 +030 

Dec 9060 90.11 9056 +016 

Eat.vaiune: 126803. Open bit.: 169AM. 
to-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BOKQ8 UAAT1F) 
mum ■ pt* at ne pc* 

Sep 11X36 11X44 31X34 +846 

DOC 11246 11144 11X46 +046 

Mar 11148 11140 111X2 +044 

Jun N.T. H.T. 11144 +8*6 

EtL volume: 201319. Open MU 15720. 


Industrials 

HMi Loar Lost Settle cv* 
GASOIL (IPS) 

U3. doflars per metric tea M » of 188 ten 
Sep 14845 14600 1475B 14745 +175 

OO 151OT 14950 15850 150OT +200 

Nov 15X73 15200 13X80 15X00 + 225 

Dec 13X50 15X75 15550 15500 +225 

Jan 15745 15550 157JO0 WHO +275 


ifSltS 


Mob Lew- Last Settle cn*e 

inn 15600 + X5B 
>.» M +550 
JOT 15550 + 380 
lOn -15440 +250 
IfflOO 13200' + 233' 
Open bit. MMJ4 


Feb 


wS v moo ij_ 

June 15200 151. 
Ext. volume: 17488. 


BRENT CRUDE OIL (IPS) 

U A doner* P«r band-fats ef.uao barren 
OCt - .1605. 1549 1346 15JS +619 
1616 . 1590 1601 l&d +618 


DOC 

JOB 


Joe 

JIT 

AM 

Sop 


1608 15-94 +6U 

l&ffil 1344+615 
1604 1545 +61? 

IJjjg 1SJS +618 


1545 + 615 

— ... N.T. 1543 +615 
N.T. M.T. M.T. 1346 + 618 

■N.T. N.T. JLT. 1547 +618 

M.T. H.T. NT. 1S» +618 

NT. NT. NT. 13LB9 +.618 



CeL vahm: 36684. Open bit 136949. 


Stock Indexes ■ 

HM. LOW . One anon 


tsspertaa* 

S«P 31974- 1 37714 31914. +10 

Dec 32D60 31874 33044 +04 

• • NT. NT. 32264 +40 

volume; ?4*6 Oacn M.-. <1429. ■ 

CAC48 (MATIF) 

PP280 per todne petal 

Awe 201600 197240. 201540 +3740 

SeP WUm 198020 203321$ +3620 

oct mm i99xao 201240 . +37J» 

Doc . -301540 301540 205140 +3740 

Mar 205640 204740 306040 + 3640 

BA volume: . 34*78. Open bit.: 66S96 
Sources: Mallf. Associated press, 
London left FfnateM Mures Exchange, 
tntl Petroteom Excttonee. 


Dhrldmds 


10 + 

M2 


Per Amt Pay Rec 
IRREGULAR 

GaM FWWsSA Ltd C J92 

Torch Enerwr Q J66 

oapprox amaant per ADR. 

STOCK - 

Fbst-Knojc Banc . 5%' 1IM1+21 

STOCK SPLIT 
Concord EFS 3 far 2 wilt. 

UT Bancan) 2 tar i split. 


SbajTO Inc 3 for 2 sol 
WHilamvSanMnaXfi 


3 tar? split. 

UI CREA S ED 
Century Slti Bks Q 4875 

-Ganrwft Inc Q M 

Peopta* BncpOH . Q .15 

INITIAL 


CORRECTION 
d Ml 


9-15 

9-16 

9-15 


10-7 

HM 

16-1 


Radius Inc 
Wlnttmw Resource 
d-revUed split date, 
•-revised pavdtHe dote. 


JS 


Ml 

9-15 


W-14 

940 


REGULAR - 


SSM 


.Find 

Inc . . 

Bell Atlantic 
Bloant Inc A 
Blount Inc 8 
Caraustar [nduit 
Owntaton InH 
Crown Ciad, 

FstCHtmnsBncsHc 
Flair Corp 
UwaauyCorp 
La Quinta Inns 
Marine MM acdptA 
MMtadBkADRA 
NtlCainpwtar 
Pm* W VA RR 
SanOlesaG&E 
Tran pta ton GDI Gv 
Tlffonv & Co 
UnRndlHwn 
Yankee Enerav 


Ddppnax amount per AD 


- .10 
. 41 

Q jfi? 
Q .125 
Q .1125 



UmSv/AT THE CLOSE 


MEXICO: Hopes for Stability End the Market’s Roller-Coaster Ride 


Continued from Page 11 

tant. The next tests arc finauciul 
and social, not jum political.” 

Tuesday's c.irly leaders on 
the Bolsa were liidustrias Ox> 
A shares, up 5 percent, the if- 
nanciul group Baiuiniex Aceival 
shares, up 4.46 percent, and 
Modema ACP. up 5.<-o percent. 

Sectors in ihe Mexican stock 
market favored by analysts in- 
clude export firms, whose prof- 
its arc expected to benefit from 
a strong and stable peMi; fin- 


eaneial groups, which will bene- 
fit from lower interest rates, 
and infrastructure companies 
which depend on political sta- 
bility for their large projects. 

Tim Hay man of Baring Secu- 
rities in Mexico City forecast 
that the market would be m the 
3.100 range by the winter, even 
heller than its high before the 
turbulent political events of this 
year. 

Trading at I H times earnings. 


Mr. Hayman added, ‘■Mexico 
now is the cheapest market in 
Latin America. It is also liquid 
and the biggest in Latin Ameri- 
ca, and now Zedillo’s victory 
makes the difference.” 

Jorge Suarez, managing di- 
rector of AFIN Securities in 
New York, said that even after 
the Bolsa started rising earlier 
in the summer, many Mexican 
investors kept some cash in re- 
serve "waiting to sec what 
would happen, and they were 


Delta Hires AT&T to Run Systems 

' NEW YORK (AP) — DeUa Air lines Inc. said Tuesday it had 
hired AT&T Corp. to run 5 many of its computer systems, becorn^ 
ing the first major airline to min out that chore. 

Under the $2.8 b'dlion deal, which involves the creation of a 
joint venture between, (he two companies, AT&T will too Delta s 
computers used for accounting, payroll and other functions. 

- , Hie -AT&T- Delta venture, which. wiH be based in Atlanta ana 
dtiqjldy U00 current Ddta“ vwnters. wiD sen* computing and 
commmucations services to other transportation and travel com- 
panies but will not provide reservations systems. 

CBS Share Buyback Oversubscribed 

. -. NEW YORK ( AP) — CBS Inc. said Tuesday that stockholder* 
had tendered 12.6 million shares, more than three rimes as many 
as it said it would buy bade under a $1.1 billion repurchase offer. 

As a result, the broadcasting company said it would accept 
roughly 27 percent of the shares each saareholder had tendered as 
of Mondays deadline. .When the $325-a-share buyback is com- 
pleted, the company’s share s outs tanding will be reduced by about 
22 Descent, to 12£50riOQ shares. 

OSS’s biggest shareholder, Loews Corp., tendered all its 
3,030,000 shares. CBS will buy about 817,000 of those shares, 
cutting Loews’s stake to about 18 percent from 19.2 percent. 
Loews isheaded-by Laurence A Tisch, who is also chairman and 
chief executive officer of CBS. The company previously an- 
nounced it would split its stock 5 for 1. A date for the spin is 
expected to be set by the CBS board next month. 

North American Sales lift Deere Net 

MOLINE, Illinois (Bloomberg) — Deere & Co. said earnings in 
the third quarter of its financial year jumped 74 percent as 
improved economies in the United States and Canada stimulated 
sales and resulted in steady, more profitable production sched- 
ules. 

The maker of .farm, industrial' and lawn equipment earned 
$157.7 opinion in the quarter ended July 31/ up from $90.8 million, 
a year earlier. Year-ago results were restated to reflect accounting 
changes covering retirement benefits. Revenue rose 14 percent to 
$3,33 billion. Deere’s shares rose $3,625 to $69,625. 

Chairman Hans Becherer said Deere’s results also reflected ' 
improved. pricing as the company offered fewer sales incentives 
t friiTi a year ago. Faming * from its financial services subsidiary 
also were strong, be said. 

Expansion Cots Into QVC Earnings 

WEST CHESTER, Flermsylvama (AP) — QVC Inc. reported 
Tuesday a 12 percent drop in second-quarter earnings, citing costs 
of expanding television home shopping to Britain and Mexico. 

Es tablishin g the operations in the two countries, where the 
network reaches 17 million homes, resulted in a $6.1 million loss 
after taxes in the most recent quarter, QVC said. Net income in 
the period was ■$11.7 million, or 25 cents a share, down from SI 3. 3 
millio n, or 26 cents a share, a year earlier. Revenue rose 16 
percent, to $3033 milli on from $262.4 million. 

First-half timing s were $23.8 million, or 49 cents a share, 
compared with $34.9 mini on, or 70 cents a share, in the first half of 
1993, QVC said. The latest first-half figure reflected $12.6 million 
in losses after taxes on joint electronic retail ventures, while the 
1993 net income figure was inflated by $4 millio n due to a change 
in accounting for income taxes. 

Morgan Stanley Reports 46% Drop 

NEW YORK — Morgan Stanley Group Inc. said Tuesday that 
second-quarter earnings fell 46 percent 
For the three months ended July 31, the fourth-largest U.S. 
ones back in this securities firm earned 5 12 1 tmllioa, compared with $224 million a 
year earlier. Morgan Stanley also said the board had increased its 
stock-buyback program by $200 million, authorizing it to buy- 
back as much as $278 million of its stock on the open market. 


the first 
week.” 

He added that they would be 
followed by the international 
fund managers shifting money 
into Mexico, and then by indi- 
vidual investors — both domes- 
tic and international — who 
may inflate prices. 

Geoffrey Dennis, a senior 
emerging market manager for 
Bear Steams in New York said 
he advised diems to move back 
into Mexico last month. 


For the Record 

Westingfaoase Electric Corp. took another step toward shrink- ^ 
ing its enviromnental services business, agreeing to sell its Aptus 
Inc. hazardous waste incinerator unit to Rollins Environmental 
Services Inc. for $160 million. -■«' - (Bloomberg) 

Michael Moskow, a Northwestern University professor, was 
named president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago. 

( Reuters i 



WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Agetn France Fraae Aug. 23 

OomPtw. 


Amsterdam 


ABN Amro MU 
ACF Hawing 
Aeaan 

Afraid 

Akza Nobel 
AMEV 

tteleJUauHoira 

Dwntraganpi 

CSM 
DSM 
Ebevtor 
FokKar 
Ght-Bmadn 
HBG 
Hainekan 


61 6040 
38J0 ».10 
9920 9940 
4520 4540 
21720 21X30 
7X30 71.W 
4Tum 41.60 
6690 7810 
14420 Ml 20 
16720 167.40 
1620 1620 
4680 4720 
29630 297 

239.40 240 

... _ 79-80 7MB 

Kwitor Dougtos b+to 04 jo 

IHCCotand “ 

Inter Mueller 
I mi Nodertana 
KLM 


KNPBT 
KPN 
NedlloMl 
Oce Grfnten 
PoKnoml 
PNlfPS 
Potyurom 
Rooeco 

Rodamco 
Roilnco 
Rorento 
Royal Dutch 
Stark 
Unilever 
Van Ommeren 
VNU 

wi IteeVKhwier 11620 117 


41. Ml 4020 
7950 81 

7740 7740 
5X30 52 

JB 48.48 
5140 5120 
6X10 6240 
77 JO 7740 
5020 5020 
57.10 56J30 
7*20 1540 
114.90 114J0 
5*20 500 
11620 11610 
0520 8520 
W2B 18740 
47.40 47.90 
19170 19520 
50 50 

186 


Brussels 


2550 2535 
SS58 7710 
4800 4800 
2515 2515 
4335 4265 
26400 26050 
12100 119S0 
2540 2520 
2040 20TO 
201 199 

5830 

7300 7260 
1266 1254 
5670 5650 
3I0D 3100 
1432 1430 
4230 4160 
9650 9570 
5050 5100 
3040 3040 
6650 6680 
1484 1484 
10300 10275 
1W0 3106 
530 530 
5200 3140 
aac uv» 0290 8190 

f£ aetata* am Zg 

15700 15475 

10400 10350 

TrocMbet 

UCB 

UrienNUntoie 
Wagons LIU 


AG Fin 
Abnaall 
Axbed 
Barca 

BBL 

Bakaerl 
CBR 
CMB 
CMP 
Cockerlil 
CobM» 
Colnivt 
Del Win . 
Electrabd 
Etadroitoo 
GIB 

GBL _ 
Gtvao rt 
Gtoverbei 

immoOel 

Kradtoreami 


p.trollna 
Pawarlto 
Rectieet . 
RovaWBetae 
Sac Gen Bow* 


Salim 
Sohw nr . . 
Tesunderto 


SBBMWW 


10200 10025 
J54J0 23K0 
7570 257a 
KLA. 7010 
larau : 7514J4 


Frankfurt 

I73LSD 17650 
139 348 
2333 2344 
470 676 

row row 
3194031950 
36X5036230 

4W407JS 

Bov verelnst* 416504J4JO 
770 773 


AEG 

AkotalSeL 

AlHaiUHoW 

Alluno 

AlNO 

BASF 

Bmr 

Bay. Hypo Bonk 


BBC --- 

BHF Bank 379381 50 

BMW 883 817 

Commerzbank 319319.50 

CantlMnral ^ W 

Daltntar Benz W1WM 

DegusM 477 488 

DtBWWCk 2505025539 
DtuMcM Bane 6UoM50 

DOvORK stte 503 

Drasdner Bank 38650 M7 
FeMrnwehto _ —JSSSHS 
f KruPF Hondl 2325032650 
Momeaer Sl 33 ^? 

Henkel W 

Hocmnrf WS «s 

Moermi 364 146 

mumrai 855 BU 

Horten K9H 

IWKA , W. * 

Kan Sail 

Kantatft , 
kovifiof SS»«2 

KHD 12480 125JSO 

KtoeekperWerke l« U2 


Unne 
LlrittWKH 
MAN 

Momnniann 
Metaihmeir 
MueraSi Punk 
Poocne 
Preu ssa a 

PWA 

Rwe 


923 »3J 

209M *09 
*47 438 
43658*5150 
19050 IM 
27M) 2*45 
*20 855 
46947010 
349 35 JO 
44X 50 444 


OaMPrev. 



Helsinki 

Amer-YWfroo 
Emo-Gutzell 
i+gtomaW 

Kvmmene 

Metro 

Nokia 

Pohtola 
Rnaoto 
Stodcinani 

PS fOSHSOT 


110 120 
44.40 4180 
150 158 

1050 1660 
135 133 

160 IQ 
517 518 
4650 69 

W4 104 
VO 250 


Hong Kong 

BA East Asia 3980 31.40 
camav Padfle ixio tias 
Oieuna Kona 3580 3630 
Ctltaa Light Pwr 3660 39 

Dairy Farm Inti 1150 11 JO 
Hans Lung Dev 1X90 1X3S 
Hang Seng Bank 5150 5250 
Henderson Land 3950 4180 
HK Air Eng- 3680 3731 
HR China Gas 1380 1620 
HK Electric 3X55 3480 
HK Land 1665 1980 

HK I Realty Trus* 2670 2695 
HSBC HUdlnas 8785 8985 
HfCSKangHns 1185 11.90 
NKTeteanran 1645 1685 
HK Ferry 13JB 1450 

HwUiWnamaoa 33AO 3630 
Hyson Dev 22JB zuo 
JarflkwMaNv 65 64 

JarflhaeSIr HkJ 39.10 2950 
Kowloon Motor 15 1140 
Mandarin orient iojo 1055 
Mliwnar Hotel 2050 2660 
New World Dev 2640 2530 
SHK Praps 5050 5275 

Stete xis 123 

SwtraPW A 3950 6675 
Tol Cheung Pass loos 11.ro 
TVE . 60 *JH 

WTtarf Hold 3040 3150 
WUK) On Ce InH 1155 1140 
wiremr ind. >155 HE 

853WJ8 Bf*“ 


Johannesburg 

25 2*85 
l?1 118 

360 
3L» 


AECI 
Aitech 
Angta Amgr 


Mr 

Pe B ee r s 

Drlefcmtein 


GFSA 


HRenraid Steel 
Kloel 

NnBmk Grp 
RondhmMn 
Rum lot 

5& Brews 
SI Helena 
Sasai 

Western Deep 





3LM 3185 


London 


Abbey Nail 

X93 


Allied Lyons 

687 

ADI 

Arid wiaa Ins 

289 

TH 

Argyll Group 

287 

2M 

Ass Brit Foe* 

X87 

X7S 

BAA 

XU 

581 

DAP 

435 

XU 

Bonk Scotland 

281 

1.95 

Barclays 

X85 

587 

BBSS 

X87 

5« 

BAT 

430 

41* 

BET 

1.15 

l.M 

B ! Of Off 

J8S 

t?» 

BOC Group 

73$ 

73* 

Baal* 

SOT 

X52 

Banai er 

480 

482 

BP 

407 

486 

Brit Airways 

199 

2to 

Brtt Gas 

2J0 

102 

Brit Steel 

13* 


Brit TelKow 

170 

3J9 

BTR 

380 

179 

Cable wire 

439 

482 

Cadourv&eh 

4J9 

473 

Corodan 

2.93 

291 

Coots Vlveiia 

237 

ITS 

Cernm Union 

X45 

542 

Csurtauldi 

Ut 

X3I 

FCCGraw 

IM 

U2 

Enterprise Oil 

196 

197 

Eurotunnel 

28? 

2B7 

FHans 

14$ 

186 


CtaM Prev 


Parte 

GEC 

Gem Acc 

Glaao, 

Grand Mel 

GRE 

Guinness 

GUS 

Hannon 

HUlsdtnwi 

HSBC HWas 

ICI 

InchaaPB 

Klngflsner 

Lodbroke 
Land Sec 
Laparte 


Montreal 


Alcan Aluminum 
Bank Montreal 

Belt Canada 

Bombardier B 
Cambtor 
Cascades 
Dominion Text A 7*. ny 
Donohue A 
FCA inti 
MacMillan Bl 
Nan Bk Canada 
Paw Cara. 

Pravtao 
OuebaeTei 


LtoolGcnGrp 
Lloyds Bank 
Marks So 
ME PC 
Nan Power 
NalWest 
NthWst water 
P^raan 

PftkJnghm 
P awer aen 
Prudential 
Rank Ora 
Reckltl Cal 
Redianct 
Reed inti 
Raurars 
RMC Group 
Rolls Rovca 
Rottwin (iinlii 
Royal Scot 
RTZ 

SalftMnKv 
San Nnrao 
Scat Power 
sears 

Severn Trent 

Shell 

5iebe 

Smith Nephew 
SmiltiKHne B 
SmimrWH) 
Sun Alliance 
Tate 6 Lyle 
Tesco _ 

Thorn EMI 
Tomkins 
T5B Group 
Unilever 
UM Bhcrats 
Vodafone 
War Uian 9b 
UMkame 
Whitbread 
williams Hdas 
WIlluGarraen 
I-T.3 


33 32 

S4 3 * J4''» 
■UK i 43 

20 l?1k 
17*6 I 
69? 
7-u 

13*9 IT'S 
415 615 
18*0 18Ki 
9H F9 
IWl 191t 
51* 57V 

IP'S 191* 
1PV1 19ln 
19>k I? 
18 k> 18 1 * 
1I»V 11*9 


QuebacorA 
Quebecar “ 


Te H WObe 

VWeatFon 


Paris 


iMrSeuWe 


661 60S 

(Alcatel Aistham 5*8 600 

246 24430 

Bancalre (Ctc> 46*46620 
BIC 1285 1210 

BNP 23690 229 

flWOUeS 645 6J7 

Danone 032 on 

Carrefour 30*5 2873 

CCF. 209JD 2US.-J0 

Cents 11530 115 

Charocurs 1406 1387 

aments Franc 312 3ffl 

Chib Mod 423 4» 

EIFAauitOlnc 39580 399 

Euro Disney 1055 1050 

Gen. Eaux 528 525 

Havas 46645653 

I metal 579 582 

LaforoeConwe *39.10 *36 

LBOrandl 6430 6210 

Lyon. Eaux 527 512 

areal (L’l 1172 1133 

L.VJVLH 868 841 

Matro-HocheWe 11*81) 11680 

Mhftenn B W 2*671) 

Moulinex 11711650 

34880 34150 

PecMnevlntl 
Pernod- Rtcard 
PeuaM 
Plnoull Prim 
RadMtectinlaue 
Rh+taulMK A 


Madrid 


BBV 31150 DM 

Bco Central Hho. 2635 2615 
Banco Santander 5100 5060 


Raft. 51. Lewis 
Sraiofl 

Soim Gobain 
S.C.U 

5te Generate 
Suez 

Thqtnson-CSF 
Total 
UAP. 

Valeo 
CAC 4M Index : 2B00A1 
PmlDtn : 197283 


1 5660 15640 

325 3?4j50 
845 839 

974 920 

517 SIJ 
131 13080 
1580 1540 
*20 *06 
6SQ 674 
541 535 

565 IS 2 

257 JO 35580 

161.10 15880 

31080 30630 

14660 ItiJO 

77BJ0 2Bl«O 


Stockholm 


AGA 
A SCO A 
Astra A 
Atlas Copco 
Electrolux B 
Ericsson 
Essollc-A 
Handoisbanken 
Investor B 
Norsk Hydro 
Proconfla AF 
Sandulk 6 
SCA-A 
5-E Bankcn 
SkarxHa F 
Skansko 
SKF 

Stern 

Trrtleborg BF 
Volvo BF 


41-50 6X50 

3? 

*50 « 


370 

409 406 

100 101 
,95 9780 
167 171 
25325550 
120 121 
116 117 

109 [03 

44 400 
111 112 
MS 148 
135 135 

440 450 
9680 98JS0 
Ml 142 

A fl o a raoert de p ■ 1B52JB 
Previous : uknm 


Sydney 


Amcor 982 985 

ANZ 194 4JM 

0HP 1982 198T 

80 ml 387 X« 

Bousotawllll? 0.93 09' 

coros Myer +22 492 

Comctao 4.97 5JB 

CRA I?,* 1 9£/> 

CSP 486 446 

Fosters Brew 1.W ijjt 

Goodman FWd 1-49 1+8 

ICI Austraiw n 10JH 

Maart Ion l.«* 1.96 

MIM 2.95 Z96 

Hat AusU Bank llfet VMO 

tines Caro 986 

Nine Network 481 445 

N Broken HIU 389 251 

Poe Dunlap 422 430 

PWWCCT lull iB4 X05 

Nmnd y Poseidon zas zm 

OCT Resources UV 1 Jy 

Sonias X8? 192 

TNT ZSO 2J9 

Western Mining 740 743 

iMtstpac Banking 4J8 4J* 

WoodsWe 467 439 


Tokyo 


Baiesio 

CEPSA 

Drogados 


twraraia 

Reesoi 

Tobocalsra 

ToManloo 


1075 1075 
3230 3230 
2135 210$ 
5640 5600 
154 

3990 3970 
3185 3130 
ITU 1740 




Milan 

Alteonza 16000 15809 

AallaHa 14590 14450 

Autastrade nrlv 1790 1740 
Pea Asncollwni 3030 3849 
Bco Canuner Hat 1700 I70a 
Noz Lovora 12790 12890 
Pop Novara 9090 91S0 
. CO 01 Romo 1970 1910 
Bco Ambmlano *305 4 2£» 
Bco NaoaU rh* 13M 1334 
B enetton 


Singapore 

Cerabos X3S 7."0 

Cltv Dev. 7 ID 7.20 

DBS 11 II 

FroserNeave 17 10 17 JB 
Gentlw I4js 14^0 

Gaiden Hope Pi 112 3oa 
How Par 3.18 3JB 

Hume Industries 6.65 l.To 
incncDPe ltd lt 

Kcoad 
KL Kernna 
Lum Chang 
Malayan Banks 
OC8C lor eton 


oua 

OUE 
SoRMxrwang 
Shangrila 
Shme Darby 
SLA foreign 
TVare Land 
spare Press 
Stag Steam strip 


11 W 11.43 

4 

185 187 

9.95 laic- 
1480 14 

640 640 
0.10 020 
IIJD 1IW 
585 5JM 
480 AM 
1130 13.40 
7JS V3> 
•1650 1650 
4E8 4.18 


Cradllg Itatlono 
1 Aug 


24800 24200 
1 2059 ism 
2990 3030 
1127 1810 
4S95 4565 


<^nerau 


Enknem 
Perl In 

Flalsz 

FtaamAaroInd 84*0 8479 
Finmeccanica 1750 1789 
Fono Porto soa 17100 118H 

ASSlC 41500 40600 

ws ms 

, W0O1IBSO 

I to loos 5200 5200 

MeqiobandB 142601*400 

Montedison 1*25 1415 
Olivetti 2360 7390 

Pirelli saa 3640 26*0 

R*S 25500 24800 

Rtaaseente 9700 9410 
San Paolo Torino 9650 wvs 
S[P 4590 4440 

WOO 3710 
Srriobnd j 385 2765 

S tondo 36300 3000 

SKt 5340 SBO 

TOTOAHk; 27090 26700 


ypora Telecomm l*a 3m 
Strolls Troatao 144 3.44 
. UOB (croton M 14JS 

UOL 234 ?27 

^srs^ :xxiM 


Sao Paulo 

Banco do brosll rsto 22. zv 
Bwesea 
BrodnsCD 
Brahma 
cemio 
Elelrzibrov 
ItouttaRCD 
Liam 

PeronoMnniic 
Pet rotor as 
Souza Ci ur 
Tetotoroi 
Telesn 
Ustaimas 
vaieRtoCtaoe 
Varn 


10 l><5> 

* 7.U0 

airo ;.to 

1*001 U2 
>+ 

23880 314. 

24S 3M 
1640 ■ 

I43L5G ISJ 
MOO 617u 
5180 5240 
4S84S9.9? 
1.47 180 
12! Ill 
13496 125 

Boveud bides - 53339 
Fr**loirt . 524SC 


Altai Elnclr J61 470 

Awhl Chankm 790 791 

Asanl Gkr.^ 1250 1260 

Bank ot Tokyo IWD 1540 

artoontone iwo iseo 

Canon 1700 1730 

Casio 1220 1730 

Dal Nloaon Print 1890 

DomroHotne 1500 

Dolma 5e curdles 1560 1560 

Famrc 


Fun Bank 
Full Ptmo 
FUtllUl 
Hiiochl 
Hiractii cable 
Honda 
ilo Yokada 
1 roc ha 

Jopon Airlines 
Kalima 
ran vat Power 
Kownokl Stool 
Kirin Brewery 
Komatsu 
KUDO’S 

kyeccro 

Matsu Elec huh 1730 1730 
MOtMl EKc Wks 1110 1109 
Mitsubishi Bk 
MiisuUsm Kzncl 
NurauushtElK 
Mitsubishi Hev 
MlKuMstu Corp 
Mitsui and Co 
Mitsui Marine 
MIKukD5h) 

MlCuml 
NEC 

NGt; Imulowrs 

Nikka Socurllies 11041 1190 
Nlroon KaoQbu 1010 999 


2190 2100 
1010 1070 
978 979 
875 860 
I6M 1660 
5200 5200 
N.A. MA 
745 764 

968 968 

2600 268 
41B 411 

1200 1200 
930 T35 

740 740 

neo »z3o 


roie roin 

541 541 

m 677 
784 784 

1220 1240 
855 874 

795 796 

HJ» 1040 
1540 1549 
H60 1160 
1058 1050 


Nippon Oil 
Nippon Slcel 
Nupai Ymen 
Nissan 
Nomura Sec 

NTT 

Olympus Optical 1120 1150 
Pioneer 2wfl 26611 

Ploah KJ 

SertvoElec 

Sr.art 1 
jhlmuzu 
Stimersu CAern 
Vair 

Suir.i limn Bk 
Sumitomo Ctiem 
Swml Marine 
SumUomoMdol 
■ Dial Corp 
Tokeda Chem 
TDK 
Tellin 

TofeVB Marine 
Tokyo Etocpw 
Toppon Printing 1470 1480 
'ora. Ind. 740 7*7 

■’SJin.- 743 743 


74 i 7S2 

362 362 

654 653 
7® 785 

2269 2270 
8630O 8670Q 


. 946 

551 558 

1770 1790 
724 735 

7950 2JS0 
S3v9 53ffl 
1970 WOT 
M 575 
m 942 
S3 336 
673 686 
1250 1260 
4390 4410 
572 573 
1240 1230 
3C40 3CT 


Toyota 
Yamalclil Sec 
a; xin 

2B: 


date Prev. 


2160 2150 
853 


Aanloo 
Air car 


Toronto 

AtoinW Price into 1816 

' Eagle . MW 164k 

6W 44k 
2W6 209k 
309k onto 
4696 469k 
2tth 2S9k 
149k l£k 
26 3S9k 
516 Slto 
IGA 10 
7Vk TV. 
420 496 
32 319to 
239* 211k 
116k 11W 

into row 

X90 190 
916 9W 
5 5 

21M 2146 
23W a 
lOlto 11 
229k 22tk 
Ul 0J3 
15VJ 1SVS 
ABO 0*1 
+15 4.15 
7 7 

ro 17J 
5W 59k 
039 0J9 
596 SW 
13 13 


Alberta Energy 
Amor Borrlck 
BCE 

BkKomSeMto 
BC Gas 

BCTetoco iTwn 

Bramatea 

Brunswick 

CAE 

Camdev 

CISC 

Cdn padfle LM 
CanotBan Tire A 
Cantor 
Caro 

CCLIndB 

OneateH 

Cominco 

Conwest Exm 

CSAAtotA 

DotasCO 

DylexA 


Equity ! 

FCA inti 
Fed ind A 
FMcher Choil A 

C entra 
Gull Ola Res 
Hees ihi 
H ernia GW Mines I3» row 
Homager i3v. 12% 

Horsham W9k t8to 

Hudson's Bay Ca 264 27W 
masca 1M 369* 

men 

IPL Energy 
Jarmoefc 
Laban Uahn) 

LototowCee 
Mock rattle 
Magna Inti A 
Manle Leaf Fds 
Marmme 
66ark Res 
MobonA 
Noma ind A 
Naronda Inc 
Nerteida Feres} 

Narcen Energy 
Nlheni Tctocom 


3696 369k 
. 29 2914 
161k MVk 
209k 190k 
2016 SOW 
79k 79to 
53 3894 
119k II9k 
2S9k 35 
99to 9tto 
221k 211k 
400 AM 
24 Vk 2596 
12 111k 
17*k W 
4816 47H 

Ottawa Croup a row row 

XM XB5 

_ .. .. .... 279k MW 

Poea Petroleum » 9 

PWA Can* 056 057 

Rovrpek I6*k Wk 

geradwroe Env 21 27W 
Rogers Comm B 22W 2196 

n to 

Z9tto 2TK 
11 ion 
99k aw 
429k 419k 
71to 7Vi 
42 4194 
129k 119k 
69k 7 

169k 161b 

izva 131 % 
Bta aw 

299k 99W 
2294 229k 
159k 1596 
211% TSflh 
24 23* 
MJto MW 
17W 171b 

155 1JS 


RornlBw* Cdo 
jOfllrt Rm 
scotrsHott 
SeagroinCe 


SMI 


1 Canada 
Canada A 


SML Svslemhu 
Soatham 


SMco i ng A 
Talisman Env 

Thomson Com 
TorOam Bank 
T orator B _ 
Tronsolto Corp 
TransOUPIae 
Triton f ml A 
Trtmae 

Union Enerov 


Zurich 

AdtalnHB 257 256 

Alusulsw 6 new 676 (77 
SBC Bran Bov B 11S5 1176 
CAMGeMVB fl4 tn 
CS Holdings B 

ElelrtrawB 
FhcherB 
InterdlscountB 
Jelmntl B 
Londb Grr R 
MeevMMckB 
Nestle R 

Oerllh. Buehrte R 
Parana Hid 8 1510 1j 

ROChe HdO PC 562S S4_ 
Sahtt Republic NA II J 
SarataxB 693 692 

ScWndtor B 7500 7300 
Staler PC 



pc 902 ne 

SurveWance B 303b 3570 
1 tes Bat Corps 372 374 
4 m Retnsur R S9b 535 
_ tesak ft US 857 

UBSB 1071 lHo 

Wtatorttwr B 673 664 
Zurtcn AH B 1291 1749 


Preen 


U.S. FUTURES 


Seoson Seanei 
Hgh Low 


Ctorai Mgh La* Oosr Che Op.iw 


Grains 

1MJEAT IW7D inHun6*nni.«PiMrM«l 
XDJ* 102 SepM 3J1V, X51* 144 347 -04KP6 10843 

UOVi XD9 DbcW XM 148 1*3 X63U-OIMV1 42,133 

X79 If mom 37696 172 XT^-OMta 1XSTO 

HI 370 170 X6 Sh 244 -OJ04 1.M5 

JSu. 3-11 i" , Sr »4» 3A» X« X4(44-a02-A 1.671 

XSiW X55 Dec 95 XS796— 04)196 13 

Eg.utas lira® Man's, staes 1x339 
Man's open lot 69^73 up « 

MEAT IKBOT) MHMmMmun riseon cerewMI 
U4V, Xa2HS4P« 2*3 X64 3J7W 2609*— 002 >4 IIJKH 

XTOVj XIIWOKM 1671k X68K 36296 X69 —00296 20305 

XJ2 J2S MarOT 9491k 370 165 36696-0031-, UO 

Jffl! i4nS L58H-04P SW 

1»1* M*Vl I* 14596 Xa -00096 690 

X60to X60VkDec« U7Vi-9UI»9t 

EOstau na Men's. soles 4785 
Man's o pen ne 40*71 

CORN (CB°TJ UNlMmiMraitehM 
inu. J14 SepV* 22T4 X22V, lt» 121 — OD6V1 9,186 

*77 117 Doe 94 224 >4 22*9* 220 272V,— 0014 1M2S4 

27* Mar 95 273 233'4 23096 231V,— O01 VMS 

«h**DV»5 2»V6 27914 2»}4 27716-001 IBL8S4 

UViJuini 14T* 2A39* 239V. 242’*— QJJBtk 9.971 

Wtog JA5V, 2459k 241 2A4W-OJ10V, BM 

2759k Dec 95 2479k 7A79* IAS'S 247 -OOOV, 5752 

IS MH Ul 13 

QLsales 3X000 Mon*s.scSeS 20641 

MorTi open lo t M7^ 56 off 12a 
SOYBEANS tenon UHtunranm.^ 

7J8V, 5409k Sep 94 577Vk 5789k 574 

LSI MW94 5.70 57H6 546M 

540 JttlM. 571 5799k 5751k 

58796 +BJDV, .. ^ 

/MA T * a - ra .-T=-. M«**0A3ta 3427 

tJOV, 

597VS 
L50V, 


2829k 

*45 

2859k 

UQIto 

263 

261 


57696 *0019* 1X30 
5499k *0JnVk 7X253 


571V, *DA31k 11068 

1 SB 


7J71k 
746 

745 _ 

575V, Mov 95 5931k 

5TOM449S 5*9 XOMk 5«9k 5S»», *00394 «47l 

579 Aug 95 5989k 601 5181k 59>9k *06096 199 

577 lap* 599 599 5fl» 5989* +0M9* 3* 

578V, Nov 95 672 685 AJI 6JB96-084 X087 

JUl 96 473 *088 

ESLstaes 35K» Mail. pries 35573 
Men's Been tori 11940 off MU 
SOYBEAN MEAL 


SOYBOANMSAL (CBOTT MOtera-OttnPWkT, 
21000 nUOSeoM 17510 17520 17510 17540 

3040 IgUOOdM 17X80 17440 17120 17340 

IKUODeeW T7A7S 175* T7190 17440 


30940 
207 JO 
207 JO 
20740 


171.10JPI9S 17640 17640 1 7480 17540 
' 17040 17140 17690 177 JO 


1 7240 Mar 9$ .. 

174J0 May 93 179 JO t79J0 T78JJ0 17840 

njja 1 7530 Justs IBOJ0 1BU0 180.00 18048 

1*940 9363) Aunts 1WJ0 1*1 JO U140 10140 

11200 17650501 95 1B200 192.00 18140 18140 

EU.SriM 15000 Mm's, sails 20,738 
MranopsnW BIJ34 up 763 
SOYeCANOO. (Cuon Mita->Wnwll*Bt 
30J4 HMSepM 24JS 2*60 MJ7 34. 50 

79-54 22100396 3427 J445 2425 2*38 

2687 2240 Dec 94 2443 J429 3UH 3623 

79-45 2265Jcn95 3440 2U0 2440 24.U 

2630 72.93 Mor 95 2X9S 24.10 23.93 SCO 

7845 2293 May 95 2290 2440 2X90 2440 

2745 2340 Ail 95 ZUO 2X92 2X80 2X90 

37-20 22-95 A«j 9S 2X29 2X79 2X79 2179 

2XM 23. load 95 nu 

73-2) 27 JO Pec 95 73 77 

Eaurio 17JM Man's, sales 17430 
Man'iapanM MJV5 up 103 


*031 18489 
*0.1® 1IJ71 
♦OJO 3X512 
*0J0 5350 
,QJB 4485 

*an 44m 

*070 14*9 
-OJO 130 
tljo 261 


*348 ixtn 
*0.14 1SJ16 
*031 35258 
♦023 5473 
- nw 5625 
*CJ0 3481 
-OJO 1,970 

♦at? is* 
‘0.19 65 

*009 1 

•049 3 


8X00 
81 JQ 
B1J5 
8840 
8095 
8025 
74«0 
J6J0 


4tJ5 
5DJ8 
5080 
4880 
47 JO 
4100 
4 J. 4 O 
4050 


6045 

MUOI 

Ifl.W 


76J0 

75» 

74J0 

7160 


7575 

7683 

7440 

7132 


Livestock 

CATTLE tCMER) AtUOtn.- cmUwn 
7X05 66J0Aug94 67+0 6740 66H 

Tito 6xnodM nun nus 045 

7030 6740 Doc 94 48.75 «.15 4035 

7*25 47.90 Fed 95 6BJ5 66.70 6445 

7i.ro 69^0 Apr 95 7037 70.45 7O0B 

69.31 6640 Jun 95 67,1? 47 JO 44.70 

40® 665DAUB95 66.70 6670 6647 

Est. yries I MOB Man's, srira ua 17 

iw raiae nan m ra 

~C&TTVE (CME1D mnbi.urt,, 
7J.MAUQM 74.90 77 J3 7480 

7i aq sap 94 ran /mb hm 

70250 a M 7680 7X05 7682 

7X0Nev«6 7X90 
72.9530,95 76.95 
72J5 Marts 7480 
7MSAW95 70*0 
72JSMOV9S 

Estszrira I,<*5 MorTi start LSB 
Mon’s open in) 9JJ1 all 174 
HOGS (0*135) aomras- imwb 
4685 4X50AUBM 4SJE 4537 

39JBOdM 7940 
3980 Dec 94 0.9$ 

3080 Feb 95 4007 
3585 Apr 95 J3.4J 

4X70 JunK 44, TO 

4195 All 95 441Q 

42.70 AUB 95 

39 JO Oct 9) 

Est. sales Uffl Mon*5 sales 4J02 
Jton's raran M 25.14} ub 79 
PORK BELLES fOWRl 4MH«*^i 
flJO 95UAUB91 3Z80 8J1 
4l80F*b9S 4X35 
4083 Mar 95 42J0 
4280 May ?5 4X00 
5480 4X»Jul9S an 

5X25 41MAW95 

Etf. Start IJ71 Men's serin 1,5® 

Mon's open he 7JU UP 14 


4085 

0.55 

4841 

tow 

70.12 
8687 
*047 . 


-OS2 JJ97 
-OAS33M7 

-047 15.944 

-020 11X409 
—OW 6J5Z 
-008 1844 
-Old 3BB 


» JO 
4025 
4035 
31.55 
4JJ0 
4U0 


4687 

39.10 
»80 
39J95 
37 JO 
4407 

44.10 


ABM 4000 39.90 


3Ji® 
005 4X70 

4280 4X30 
4X30 4X00 
4425 4X65 


7710$ 


IJW 

7682 

-0.43 

xm 

7480 

7XW 

-035 

—AO! 


7495 

-0.1D 

$69 

Km 

—035 

UJ 

713J 


• 193 

7380 

*0.13 

73 

4527 

♦0JO 

$01 

3930 

-08! 12316 

4042 

1 0.17 

jjm 

4007 

-HOT 

XIM 

otj$ 

—0.07 

MI7 

44.1$ 


516 

6610 

— A87 

136 

42.ro 


41 

an 

-ft 10 

» 


3X27 

4X67 

4X35 

4110 

4435 

4125 


-OJk 133 
-W UK 
-057 353 

—035 68 

,an too 
14 


Food 

COFFEE C INCSE1 tt.WSbc- (ameer A 
77480 MJOSanM 18675 19280 1867$ 

J44JS 77.IDDec94 1919 H02S 19280 

34480 7* 90 MW »5 19675 W7.44 19530 

MUD BX»MoyMt«.7S 1V9J0 19675 

24510 8580 Jut 9$ MM MM 20000 

281.2$ iaSJ05ep95 
34240 0180 Dec 95 

ESL start 3AU Morrs. SOWS 9.741 
Man's eeen 'nri 3X150 oflBn 


SUGAR-WORLD It INC5E) iiuoiim 
a *4 txii 


1280 
17 IB 


1X16 

IT.l* 


11.97 

1280 


19180 

19788 

199.4$ 

199.00 

7D080 

20075 

3J1J5 


118]' 

1783 


i?85 2814 
•O10 2IJI3 
i AM 5837 
•MO 7.72$ 
■ 680 tqt 
> 600 ie 
>680 Jt# 


—888 39.416 
-48* S0JU 


Simon Season 
High Low 


Open Hlah Low One Che QpJto 


1X08 1 057 Star 95 1X01 1280 11.97 1188 

IX® J0J7JU19S- 11,95 1280 I1JB 11.95 

11-90 JXVOcm 1181 

1J80 rojSMtrOT IIS 1133 1130 11 JD 

II J4 11.18 Mov « 1134 

Est. KriH . 2X405 MeiXHU 11854. 

off 58 

fJKO* <NC5E| m iknu».iw non 

15C \mgSrp9* lsw mb bD 1401 

15® 0*1 Dec 9* 1440 1466 1431 MU 

1605 1077Mar*5 14® 1300 1419 1407 

1612 107BMay95 1309 150? 1309 1373 

»«“ «**7 1547 W 1547 

is» !SSS"!S iso 

1633 12® Dec 93 1592 

104 nsOMa-96 1615 

1642 1 225 May H 1636 


EsXttte U45 Brian's, staes SJ44 
Man's am Inr tSMf off SB 
ORANGE JUKE iScTNJ 


-406 10231 
—088 4836 
♦ 081 1875 
— OLID 430 

-aw 


♦31 
+36 4X700 
•2011,1® 
♦M 3-330 
♦« fc473 
♦a 
*a 
♦a 18 H 
♦a us 


Season Season 

Hitai UN* 


Qpbi tfigh Law aow Ora op.bs 



13450 
13400 
12280 
12425 
71425 
11980 
It XU 

11X50 
ES». stan 
Mars ax 


OMSSopof’^JS^JI 9X75 
89.10 Nov 94 9820 9880 94J0 

9lMJai95 10240 10080 IDOjO 
MJ0MW95 10X40 10580 10*80 
9780Mav«S 

101 JO Jut 95 11023 11025 11025 
11X00 New 95 
Jm« , 

moosep» 

utn Mon's sata 2200 . 
open Mr 


9X35 — 130 4259 
9780 —185 4JOO 
WOTS — IJ5 on 
10385 — L60 2896 
107.K1 —140 — 

M».10 -180 
uxra. —140 
nxio —180 

I11.1D —140 


Metals 

K! GRADE COPPER DKJMO XUdle-w 

11690 7480 Sep 94 187 JO 107.95 1D7J0 

7525 Dec 94 1040 HX10 H740 
7690 Jan 95 
7380FW95 

73® Mar 95 137X5 107 JO W7XB 
7685 May 95 
7880 Jill 95 

75J0Aag95 10880 10880 10X00 
W..!DSep95 


11520 

HUB 

111-30 

11170 

111140 

1IXS0 

11680 

11085 

11585 

ilia 

10980 


7529 Od 95 l®J0 10720 turJO 


7725 Nw 95 10720 1B7J0 1®. 
8880 Dec 95 
10880 8050 Jan 96 

6220Nhr« 

11040 91.MAPTM 
_ May 96 

107 JO 10630 Am 96 U6J0 106J0 1Q6J0 

Est. sate -80D Man'Astaes 395 
Man's open eri 461 BT 

SILVER CN04X) uenm-oMM'imi 


107 JB 
10720 

W7X0 
10*20 
10680 
1080 
10540 
107 JO 
M7J5 
MS83 
104.00 
W4J0 
1069$ 
HM85 
106J3 


5408 5Z45AuoM 

*158 MXOSttM 5208 

5178 511 JOctM 

5978 3008 DK 91 5278 5108 5250 

5648 018 Jan 95 

6048 41 65 Mar *J 5378 537J 5228 

6065 41 88 May 9$ 

410D C08 Jut 95 

5558 5315 Sep 95 

638.0 g98DecV5 56X0 5618 16X0 

*1X0 STXBJaiM 

6188 5540 Mar » 

3878 5878 MOV « 

JUM 

Em rates 26 Mt Men's, raxes 4422 
MartanenW '10800 
PL413NUU fNMERJ »n».«knpvta 
MBJBOcfW 41X9 41450 41080 
42SJ0 37488 Jan 95 41780 41780 41X9 

390 00 Apr 9$ 

42X50 419J0M9S 

43180 *2280 Od 95 

Est.raries X«6* MonH. sates 2JJJ 
Mon's aeen mi 24312 

eoui INCMX) nsbevaL-Mmrareeva. 
41580 xnjOAtlBM 30180 38280 30140 
37788 Sep 94 
41X00 344800094 78380 30300 

42650 343 00 Doc 94 M6TO MOT MOT 

41180 3*3J0F«9i as JO 309.90 389 JD 

4JXD0 364J0AW93 391H1 390.1# 09X10 
*2X9 36120 Junto 39670 39670 394JB 

52 a rota am « 

41 IS, «J80OO95 

429® OTJODocM 

*2450 41 2 JO FeO 96 

<3080 41X30 AprW 

43X00 *1100 Junto 

EB.staec 1X000 Mars. sow* 833 

Momopeniiri iujo? 


5288 317 J S20L7 

52X2 
52X1 
53X4 
5368 
5*18 
5469 
552J 
SOU 
HU 
571.1 
5774 


41220 
*1 520 
419.10 

31S 




*085 17,465 
+0751925 
+X70 STO 
*060 

+050 X9S9 

*030 09 

*XH 154 
+ 030 663 

+ooo tor 
rOM 59 
+040 851 

+040 9 

+0J0 13ri 
+043 Ul 
+040 

+045 1U 


-46 46.19 
-ft* 

-06 4229 
-O* 37 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 1994 


Pa"** 12 


EUROPE 


In Bad Day on 
NFC and Trygg L 


die Top Floor, 
ose Leaders 


Shares Fall With Sherlock Sprangare Cites Criticism 


Roam 


LONDON — Britain’s biggest freight trans- 
port group, NFC PLC, suipnscdmvestors Tues- 
day with news that its chief executive, Peter 
Sherlock, was quitting after 1 S months in the job. 

The company’s shares, tumbled 15 to 185 
pence ($2.88), and analysts speculated that the 
move had been caused by a boardroom fight over 
Mr. Sherlock’s management style. 

“It didn’t work; fuU stop. That’s the best way 
of putting it," an NFC spokeswoman said, refujr 
ing to elaborate. 

NFC also forecast a nine-month profit before 
tax, and exceptional items of £76.6 nriffibn, an 
increase of 23 percent from last year’s £623 
million, but bdow expectations. 

The former state-owned ' National Freight 
Corp. became a success story for management 
and employees who bought it in 1982 and went 
on to float it on the London Stock Exchange. It 
now ranks as one of Britain’s 100 biggest 
companies. 

Analysts said Mr. Sherlock had an abrasive 
Tstyle that alienated other directors, especially 
after a key executive director, Robbie Burns, said 
in Mav he was resigning. 


Reuters 

STOCKHOLM — Bjorn Sprangare, the 
much-criticized chief executive of the Swedish 
msurance group Trygg-Hansa AB, announced 
ms resignation Tuesday. 

The company said Mr. Sprangare would re- 
main until his successor takes office. 

' : “The media criticism of me during the spring 
and summer is evidence that I do not have the 
full confidence of the public at large, which is 


if I am to exercise my leadership re- 
~ ■- “Such 



Tuesday 
staying on. . 

‘ Mr. Sherlock had been brought in from the 
brewing and hotels concern Bass PLC to refocus 
NFC on higher-margin activities and expand the 
group. To this end, the group raised £263 million 
in a rights issue in December. 

The NFC chairman, James Watson, will take 
on more executive responsibilities, and the fi- 
nance director, Trevor Ionian, wiD be in charge 
of day-to-day operations until a successor to Mr. 
Sherlock is chosen. 

Forecasts for the company’s full-year profit 
were scaled back to about fllO million. The 
company owns Allied Van Lines in the United 
Slates and Allied Bickfords in Britain. 


sppnshittty firmly," Mr. Sprangare said. 

criticism even indirectly hurts our employees, 
’ whose task is to foster a relationship of confi- 
dence with clients." 

. Mr, Sprangare has come under heavy attack 
this year in the aftermath of a series of moves 
that have either failed or proved to be less advan- 
. tageous for the company than predicted. He was 
amazed for the purchases of the unprofitable 
U.S. insurer, Home Holdings, and Gota Bank, 
which went bankrupt. 

- His handling of the ambitious acquisition and 
refinancing of Home Holdings also spurred criti- 
cism from inside the company, including some 
from new board members. 

Since the replacement of several board mem- 


Ukraine Acts on Currency 

Exchange to Reopen as Controls Are Eased 


Jteutm 

KIEV — Ukraine announced plans Tuesday 
to reopen the Kiev currency exchange and ease 
government controls over' markets, but some 
critics called the moves half-hearted. 

A decree signed by President Leonid S. 
Kuchma calls for Kiev's interbank currency- 
exchange to reopen Oct- 1. The bourse was 
closed m November 1993 after the govern- 
ment accused it of fueling inflation. 

Ukraine is under pressure to restructure its 
economy to receive $4 billion in aid promised 
by Western economic institutions. 

*T can’t imagine that the IMF and ether 
institutions will be pleased with this,” a Wesi- 


barifei 


era diplomat said. "Hus is a recipe for further 
' " . They’ve essentially maintained the same 


drift. 


system, perhaps knocking off some of the 
rough edges.’ 


By the end of the year, Ukraine's central 
: is to bring the overvalued official foreign- 
exchange rate of the karbovanets more in ttne 
with the oue set on the exchange. 

Ukraine now has two exchange rates, an 
official rate used for the required sale of 50 
percent of companies' hard-currency earnings 
and a second rate set at weekly central bank 
auctions. The official rate is currently 20300 
karbovanets to the U.S. dollar, and the auction 
rate is 40300 to the dollar. 

Under the decree, the official rate will be 
based on a series of factors, including inflation, 
monetary creation and the trade balance. 

Enterprises will still have to surrender 50 
percent of their hard-currency earnings. But 
20 percent will be sold at the market rate and 
30 percent at the official rate. 


Stora Profit 
Rises Sharply 
On Asset Sale 


Swedish Banks Post 
Profit as Bad Debts Fall 


Investor’s Europe 


Frankfurt 

DAX ' 


London 
FTSE700 Index 



m "a iFTj a" 

1994 


V AM iJA 
1994 



'VM A M J J ft 
1994 ■ 


bers arid the chairman this summer, after Trygg- 

EratinA profit 


Hansa announced its best-ever operating pr 

far 1993, the departure of Mr. Sprangare had 
seemed inevitable. 


In departing, he said the criticism was hi 
Trygg-Hansa when its prospects were very j_ 
Trygg-Hansa on Tuesday reported a loss of 380 
mutton kronor ($50 million) for the first half of 
1994. It had a profit of 1.38 billion kronor in the 
period last year. 

The company’s operating profit for the first six 
months was 190 million kronor, compared with 
884 nuffion kronor. The latest results included a 
write-down of 1.9 button kronor in the value of 
its investment assets. 


Bloomberg Business News 

STOCKHOLM — Stora AB 
said Tuesday its first-half pre- 
tax profit jumped after it made 
a large one-time gain on the sale 
of businesses. 

The forestry group posted a 
pretax profit ofl J 1 billion kro- 


nor ($200 milli on), up sharply 
iot last 


Chart-Toppers Spur Thom Results 


Bloomberg Business News 


LONDON — Thom EMI PLC said Tues- 
day that first-quarter profit from continuing 
businesses rose 25 percent, thanks to chart- 
toppers by Pink Floyd, the Beastie Boys and 
chanting monks. 


Bolstered by a 17 percent rise in sales at 
EMI Music, the receding anti, operating 
profit from continuing businesses rose to £53 
million ($80 million) during the first three 
months of 1994 from £42.1 million a year 
earlier. The figures were in line with forecasts. 


EMI shares," said Nigel Reed, an analyst at 
Paribas Capital Markets. 

First-quarter operating profit, under- 
pinned by sales of albums such as the Bene- 
dictine monks* “Canto Gregoriano" and Pink 
Floyd’s “The Division Bell.” provided further 
evidence that Thom's decision to jettison its 
security, lighting and electronics business and 
focus on music was paying off, analysis and 
executives said. 


“These are some encouraging results and 
add support to our ‘bzzy’ stance on Thorn 


. Because sales of records, tapes and com- 
pact disks often are slack through the summer 
and pick up as Christmas approaches, Thom 
executives said it was difficult to forecast full- 
year profit from first-quarter results. 


from 30 million kronor 
year. 

Sales fell to 23. 1 1 biltton kro- 
nor from 24.95 billion. 

Stora said first-half earnings 
were boosted by a gain of 914 
million kronor from the sales of 
its flooring unit, Taricett AB, 
and of the Finnish opoations 
of its Akeriund & Rausing AB 
unit. 

Charges totaled 297 million 
kronor, including 200 mfflioc 
kronor for a possible write-down 
on a pulp plant in Canada. 

Stora shares fell 10 kronor to 
close at 440. Analysts said the 
fall reflected worries about the 
effect a lower U.S. dollar may 
have on companies with over- 
seas sales. 

Meanwhile, the company 
said it would invest 665 million 
kronor to improve five of its 
factories in Nova Scotia, Swe- 
den and Belgium. Stora said the 
work would be done by 1995. 

Stora said that since 1993, 
5,425 employees have been shed 
through the sale of businesses. 


NYSE 


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Compiled by Our Staff From Dupadm 

STOCKHOLM — Svenska Handels banken and Skandinaviska 
Enskilda Banken, two of Sweden's biggest commercial banks, 
reported higher- than -expected first-half operating profit Tuesday 
as bad-debt charges dropped. 

Svenska Handelsbanken said its operating profit after credit 
losses almost tripled in the first half as bad-debt charges fell by 
more than 50 percent. 

The bank posted an operating profit of 2.3 billion Swedish 
kronor ($304 million), up from 768 million kronor a year earlier. 
The bank's bad-debt charge fell 60 percent, to 1 .46 biltton kronor. 

But Svenska Handelsbanken's net interest income slipped in 
the first half, to 4.29 billion kronor from 5.03 billion kronor. That 
reflects a fall in the amount lent by the bank and shrinking 
margins between lending and deposi Crates. 

Skandinaviska Enskilda Banken said it returned to an operating 
profit of 233 billion kronor in the first half after posting a loss of 
298 milli on kronor a year earlier. Earnings were lifted by a lower 
bad-debt charge of 296 billion kronor, compared with 5. J 5 billion 
kronor a year earlier. (Bloomberg. Reuters) 

■ Skandia Says Its Bond Boycott Stands 

Skandia Forsaekring AB, Sweden’s insurer, will continue to 
boycott Swedish government bonds until it sees more support for 
the political decisions needed to stabilize the Swedish economy, 
AFP-Extel reported, quoting Gosta Stenberg, Skandia's commu- 
nication's director. 

Of the opposition Social Democrats' proposals to reduce the 
budget deficit, Mr. Stenberg said. “We see the proposals as a 
positive sign, but they are still not enough." 


Exchange 

Index 

Tuesday • 

ftev.w 

%■ 


Close 

Close - 

Change 

Amsterdam 

AEX 

410, & . 

409,33 

44J-37 

Brussels 

Stock Index 

7.51*34 

7,538.07. 

*0.31 

Frankfurt 

DAX 

2,107-87’ 

2,123.79 

-0.75 

Frankfurt 

FAZ 

796.34 

806.96 ’ 

-132 

Helsinki 

HEX 

1,883.48 

1,888.00 

-0-29 

London 

Financial Times 30 

2,489.80 

2,486.50 

.+0.13. 

London 

FTSE tOO ■ 

3,175.10 

3,171.30 

+0.12 

Madrid 

General index 

301.47 

304.99 

. -1.15 

Milan .. . 

MIBTEL . 

loan 

10809. 

+0.94 

Paris 

CACAO . 

2,00063 

1,97263 

+1.42 

Stockholm 

Affaersvaarirfen 

1357.02 

1 .864.64 

-0.41 

Vienna 

Slock index 

453.29 

454.88 

-0.35 

Zurich 

5BS 

007.06 

906.86 

-0.20 

Sources: Reuters. AFP 


(nictnauiiuf HetiJJ Tribune 

Very briefly: 


• SAP AG, the German computer software company, said first- 
half earnings more than doubled to 78. 1 million Deutsche marks 
($51 million) on sales of its R/3 applications system. 

• Spain increased its revenue from tourism by 18 percent in the 
first half of (he year, while revenue for June soared 25 percent 
from a year earlier, the Ministry of Commerce and Tourism said. 

• European Union consumer price inflation in July slowed to 3 
percent, the lowest annual rate since March 1987. after four 
consecutive months at 3.2 percent, the EU statistics office said. 

• France's June balance of trade surplus narrowed to 6.25 billion 
francs ($1 billion) from 7.62 billion francs in May. 

• RCnry Cointreau, a French liquor group, has signed an exclusive 
deal to have all its products marketed in Kazakhstan by the 
former Soviet republic's biggest private company, Butya, an 
imported consumer goods distributor. 

• Wegener NV, a Dutch newspaper publisher, said its first-half net 
profit rose 22 percent, to 23.4 million guilders ($14 million) 
because of cost-cutting measures. 


■ Gambro AB, the Swedish pharmaceutical group, signed a condi- 
Fii 


tional agreement with the Finnish company Instrumental! urn Oy 
to sell its intensive care and anesthesia business. No financial 
details were disclosed. 

• Sweden's June industrial orders rose 3 percent from May and 19 
percent from a year earlier, the Central Bureau of Statistics said. 

Bloomberg. Knight- Ridder. AFF, AFX 


MULTIMEDIA: Creativity and Technology Come Together Out West 

Continued from Page 11 


cause of the graphic designers, 
musicians and cartoonists at- 
tached to the movie industry. 

“We want programmers with 
an aesthetic sense." says Greg 
Roach, who recently moved his 
multimedia company. Hyper- 
bole, to Seattle from Houston. 
His hires in Seattle include a 
programmer who is also a 
sculptor and another who is a 
drummer in a rock bond. 


A former playwright. Mr. 
Roach began working in Multi- 
media after he found himself 
writing plays that involved sets 
exploding into flames and other 


fantastic scenes be could not 
afford to produce. “In the com- 
puter ! can do all those things." 
says Mr. Roach, who is widely 
recognized as a leader in ad- 
vancing multimedia as an art 
form. 

Some people still find New 
York alluring, “There's a great- 
er concentration of writers, art- 
ists and musicians; it's a richer 
soup,” said Robert Stan, devel- 
opment director at Voyager, a 
multimedia company that re- 
cently moved to New York 
from Santa Monica, California. 

In the Jong run. the staying 
power of these new multimedia 
centers depends on the future of 


OMV Offers Dividend Hope 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

VIENNA — OMV AG, the stale-controlled petrochemical 
company, gave investors reason to hope for a dividend this year 
as it reported on Tuesday a return to profit in its first half. 

OMV said it earned 240 million Austrian schillings ($22 
million), following a loss of 552 million schillings in the first 
half of 1993. The improvement largely reflected cost cutting, 
as sales were stagnant at 40.10 billion schillings, compared 
with 40.03 million schillings a year earlier. 

Last year, OMV eliminated 1,084 jobs, or 8.6 percent of its 
staff. That reduced salary expenses in the first half to 4.8 billion 
schillings from 52 billion schillings. OMV's restructuring has 
improved results in its energy businesses, even as prices re- 
mained low and the company’s chemicals and plastics business- 
es continued to lose money. It is discussing cooperation in such 
units with other companies, notably Rep sol SA of Spain. 

Richard Schenz, the chief executive, held out hope for a 
dividend payment after two years of losses. “If the results turn 
out the way we imagine, there will be a dividend, if possible 
without liquidating reserves." he said, f Reuters, Bloomberg) 


(he technology and society's 
readiness to adapt to a new wav 
of projecting ideas. 

Some are skeptical. “Books 
have been around for 400 to 500 
years for a good reason." says 
Michael Powell, owner of Pow- 
ell’s in Portland, Oregon, said 
to be America’s largest book- 
store. “They are hard to im- 
prove upon." 

But others see multimedia's 
ability to transmit ideas and in- 
formation through the use of 
interactive programs as on im- 
portant advantage over print in 
areas such us educational texts, 
reference works and documen- 
tary-style nonfiction. Viewers 
can explore ancient worlds, 
work through math problems or 
conduct virtual experiments in 
biology texts. 


Economics also favor elec- 
tronic publishing in important 
areas. The En carta encyclope- 
dia, which sells for $70, costs $2 
a copy to manufacture. A set of 
the Worid Book Encyclopedia 
costs $150 to prim and huge 
sums to market and distribute. 


That means, over time. Micro- 
soft will have more money than 
its print counterparts to spend 
on commissioning fresh work 
from artists and writers. 


For whatever reason, Ameri- 
cans are turning to the new me- 
dium in huge numbers. CD- 
ROM title sales, excluding 
games, quadrupled to $300 mil- 
lion last year, according to Da- 
taquest Inc., a market research 
firm. It expects sales to triple 
this year. 


Unidanmark Posts a Surprise Profit 

Compt/ed by Our Sta ff From Dispatches 

COPENHAGEN — Unidanmark AS. Denmark’s second-larg- 
est banking group, said Tuesday that its first-half pretax profit fell 
50 percent, but the result surprised analysts who had predicted a 
sizable loss. 

Unidanmark’s pretax profit was 207 million kroner, compared 
with 483 milli on kroner in 1993, It attributed the downturn in 
earnings to losses on securities and bond holdings. 

Analysts bad forecast an average first-half pretax loss of 633 
million kroner. 

Unidanmark posted net interest income of 4.78 billion kroner 
for the period, up 8 percent from last year, but it warned it 
expected this income to be lower in the second half of 1994. 

Loan losses and bad debt provisions fell 60 percent to 950 
million kroner from last year. 

“The gains show that our strategy of restructuring the bank and 
strengthening its market position through tighter cost and credit 
control is paying off” Lhe bank said. ( Reuters , AFX I 


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Canon Overcomes Strong Yen 


TOKYO — Canon Inc. re- 
ported an 84 percent rise in 
first-half current profit Tues- 
day as strong sales of bubble-jet 
printers and a successful re- 
structuring program overcame 
revenue losses tied to the yen’s 
appreciation. 

Canon’s current profit rose to 
28J4 billion yen ($289 million) 
in the first six months from 
15.54 billion yen last year. 

Net profit rose 41 percent, to 
16.4 billion yen from 1 1.6 billion 
yen, while revenue was up 3.8 
percent, to 512.7 billion yen. 

Ryozo Hirako, Canon’s man- 
aging director, said bubble-jet 
printer sales rose 43 percent 

While Canon’s profit is vul- 


nerable to the strength of the 
yen because of its high depen- 
dence on exports, analysts said 
sales of printers and office ma- 
chines such as copiers had off- 
set the yen's appreciation. Ex- 
ports account for 78 percent of 
Canon’s sales. 

Hitoshi Kuriyama, an ana- 
lyst at CS First Boston, said 
d eman d for computer peripher- 


al equipment such as printers 
remained strong, and he saw 


remained strong, and he saw 
“do factors that are detrimen- 
tal” to Canon’s earnings pros- 
pects, “except for the yen’s ex- 
change rate.” 

Canon officials also credited 
the turnaround to benefits from 
the second year of a five-year 
restructuring effort- The re- 
structuring plan, dubbed 


“Canon Restructuring 100,” is 
designed to make the company 
profitable at a level of 100 yen 
to the dollar. 

Mr. Hirako said the yen’s ap- 
preciation in the first half result- 
ed in a decline-in revenue of 38 
billion yen. but he said the com- 
pany was able to offset the de- 
cline with 65 billion yen in cost- 
cutting, coupled with price rises 
and increased sales' volume. 

He said the .company was 
forecasting an average ex- 
change rate of 100 yen to the 
dollar, in the second half of 
1994, after an average of 105.20 
yen in the first half. In the first 
half of 1993, the dollar averaged 
1 14.60 yen. 

( Reiners, Bloomberg, AFP) 


The Earnings Mystery 
At Tsingtao Brewery 


U.S. Makes 


Prices and Currency Batter TDK Profit 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dapotthes 

TOKYO — TDK Corp. said Tuesday that the 
strong yen and a fall in the price of video and 
audio tapes combined to send consolidated pre- 
tax profit down 23 percent to 4.95 billion yen 
(S50 million ) in the first quarter. 

TDK. the world’s largest maker of audio and 
video cassette tapes, said total sales for the peri- 
od fell 23 percent, to 1 17.8 1 billion yen. 

The company said the strength of the yen 
reduced revenue by about 1.1 billion yen. The 
dollar was worth around 103 yen in the first 
quarter of this year, down from 110 yen in the 


first quarter of 1993. TDK sells 56 3 percent of 
its products overseas. 

The company said sales in its magnetic tape 
division, which account for 27 percent of all 
sales, fell by 2.8 billion yen because of falling 
world prices. ( Bloomberg AFP) 


Fujitsu Says it Expects to Return to Profit 


Fujitsu Ltd. said it was likely to have a net 
profit in its next six-month period, reversing a 
loss of 44.1 billion yen ($447 million) a year 
earlier, Agence France- Presse reported. 


Bloomberg Busfaas News 

HONG KONG — Tsingtao Brewery, which claims to have 
pulled off the impossible combination of suiting profit in the 
face of higher costs and level sales, met with analyse here 
Tuesday. Their curiosity, however, was not satisfied. 

“It's still a little murky” said Nick Moakes, a China analyst 
with S.G. Warburg Securities. “Margins are expanding, but 
what we don't know is just how they are achieving this if costs 
are up and prices aren't. There has to be something else going 
on." 

Last week, China’s largest brewery announced a 63 percent 
jump in net profit for the first six months of 1994, to 1 12.1 
million yuan ($13 nnfiion). Adjusted to international account- 
ing standards, the figure was 102 million yuan. 

While beer production hopped 27 percent in the first half, 
sales only rose about 5 pe rc ent. With raw material costs rising 
between 15 percent and 20 percent, analysts were at a loss to 
explain the hefty earnings. 

Tsingtao executives came to Hong Kong to meet with 
investment managers and securities analysts, but several ana- 
lysts said later that they would be telephoning the company 
privately for further clarification. 

“This year's figures did not include sales tax, unlike those 
for last year,” said Yan Wenmmg, Tsingtao’s chief accoun- 
tant If this were taken into account he said, Tsingtao’s sales 
actually grew about 15 percent in the first half. 

Last year, Tsingtao received dollars or a favorably convert- 
ible currency in place of yuan for as much as 30 percent of the 
beer sold in China. This was halted on Jan. 1. 

One way Tsingtao may have improved margins is by 
changing the ingredient of the beer itself, suggested Sonja 
Jong, an analyst with Mees Pierson Securities. 

“For example, they could increase the percentage of rice 
used and thus lower the cost price of the beer and the need for 
foreign currency to buy barley,” she said. 


The Associated Pros 

TOKYO— The U.S. govern- 
ment has proposed a compro- 
mise in seeking compensation 
from Japanese firms for alleged 
bid-rigging in construction pro- 
jects at a U.S. naval base, Japa- 
nese officials said Tuesday. • 

Seventy-three Japanese com- 
panies allegedly inflated costs 
of work done on the Atsugi na- 
val base, near Tokyo, by rigging 
bids between 1984 ana 1990. . 

In March, the Justice Depart- 
ment complained to the Japa- 
nese government and sought l_.l 
MlHnn yen ($11 million) in 
damages from the companies. 

Washington now t ha t 
companies that won Atsugi 
contracts pay back 22.4 percent 
of the successful bid prices and. 
that companies, that took part 


in the bidding pay 500,000 yen 
for each bid. Construction Min- 


for each bid, Construction Min- 
is try officials said. 

Koken Nosaka, the construc- 
tion minister, said the govern- 
ment would not interfere with 
the case, which he said was a 
matter to be settled by the com- 
panies involved. 


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• China established a steel trade group to curb unchecked imports 
that in' the past two years, have 'caused high domestic surpluses. 

• Beijing’s statistics bureau said the private sector generated just £ 
over half of the city’s economic output in January through July. 

• Tokyo Electric Power Co. asked for government permission to 
build two nuclear reactors, as wen as two facilities that turn 
thermal energy into electrical power. 


• Hie World. Bank approved a $40 million loan to convert the 
framer U A Subic Naval Base into an industrial center. 


• Coles Myer Ltd. said the independent advisers KPMG Corpo- 
rate Finance concluded that the company’s plan to buy back the 
21.45 percent stake held by Kmart Corp. in the company was fair 
add reasonable. 

•Carrefoursaidil agreed to set up a joint venture with the Chinese 
retailer Tinnira to operate supermarkets in the Shanghai region. 

• China's largest offshore gas field in the South China Sea will 
begin prodnrang.natural gas in 1996. 

• Allied Industries International Ltd, formed a joint venture with 
Taiwan-based Tramp Chemical Crap. to market specialty chemi- 
cals in CTiina 



• fMwa will need to spend $200. billion to .$250 billion on 
.infrastructure by the turn of the cedtmy, 20 percent of which will 
have to come Iran, abroad, according to Hans-Ulrich Doerig, vice 
dmirman of Crfirfit Suisse. . AFF.AP, Bloomberg, AFX 


CetryBedby Our Sufff From Dapatdtes 

MANILA — AscadaSdn. of 
Malaysia s^id Tuesday it would 
acquire up to 21.7 percent of the 


Kuok conglomerate’s Philip- 
nine hotel affiliate, Shangri-La 


pine hotel affiliate , Shangri -La. 
Properties Inc. in a 125 billion 
peso ($48 million) private 
placement 

Shangri-La said in disclosure 
posers filed with the PbSipinne 
Securities and Exchange Com- 
imssk m that die private place- 
ment became necessary after it 
faded to amortize about 1 bit- 
lion pesos in bank loans in June 
and . faced foreclosure an its 
mortgage assets. 

In aD, Knok reduced its stake 
in Shangri-La to 56.0 percent 
from 615 patent, setting. 5S.8 
mfflinn shflies for 6762 m il Kon 
HaogKangdottars ($88 mfl- 
lion), Shangri-La said. 

Ascada’s acquisition of the 
Shangri-La shares would fur- 
ther cement the par tner ship of 
the Hang Kang-based Malay- 
nan tycoon Robert Kook and 
Tan Sri Khoo Kay Feng. 


Tan Sri Khoo’s Malayan 
United Industries Bhd. has a 20 * 
percent stake in the investment 
nrm_Btaiacoia Co., of Hong 
Kong, winch controls 13 per- 
cent of Shangri-La, a listed 
cambany dot owns two luxury 
holds in Manila. 


Officials of the PhilimTine Se- 
curitiaandExchangeCominis- 
sboh said Shangri-La’s disclo- 
sure papers on the deal would 
beforwarded to the Hong Kong 
Securities and Exchange Com- 
nnssirav which is looking into 
Ascada’s acquisition of the 


. -The. placement agreement, 
signed last month, is to be com- 
pleted after a two-step rights 
jssue in which Ascada will sub- 
scribe to any shares not taken 
up tnr Shangri-La's existing 
shareholders, at 1.61 pesos a 
dure. 

Tire first of two tranches of 
the rights issue is to be complet- 
ed by the end of September. 

(AFP, AFX, Reuters) 


Strong Currency Prompts 
Sony to Expand Abroad 


Compiled by Our StaffFnm DiipaKha 

■ TOKYO — Sony Corp. will concentrate its capital spend- 
ing on overseas operations as it moves toward shifting half i ts 
production outside Japan to cope with the higher yen. a 
spokesman said Tuesday . 

The company will drift some basic products — such as 
Waflonan stows and color television — to overseas produc- 
tion facflitua while makin g value-added products domestical- 
ly, thp spokesman said. Domestic production would include 
dewces with high growth potential, such as semiconductors 
and disk players. ‘ . 

. The m hon Kdzai Shimbun said Sony would shift plant 
investment to subsidiaries in China, India and Vietnam, while 

< ^ opmcnt tacm ™ “ Em °P e 

color tdev ^on plant in India 


• hviuu Iiww vuiupma 2HJ 

components in addition to TV sets, the 


pers said. 

\ Bloomberg) 


I)ata Show japan Recovery 


TOKYO — The Japanese 
economy is heading for recov- 
«y, md recent data havesbown 
imp rov em ent in ecbnbnric ac- 
tmty, accordii 2 g to the Bank of 
J xpatfs monthfy financial and 
economic review.' 

..The report, issued Tuesday, 
said recovery, was Serially no- 
ticeable in consumer spending. 
Corporate capital spending re- 
nnins stoggiMiL, but. some-lead- 
ing indicators suggest that cor- 
porate activity has stopped 
deefining, it said. 

Bmjhe groundwork fra a ie. 
coyeiy is -still weak, the report 
said. The Ministry Intcroa- 
Ttknfiil Trade and Industry said 
Tuesday that industrial output 


-jntlto ApoUune period grew l 
P^^t* the second consecutive 
qaarter of growth, but there 
were no firm juospects of con- 
““hng expanaoiL 

The Economic Planning 
Mid the leading* 

m June froin a revised 58 1 

th? 1 ?” 1 ^ it was above 

^ 50-Point line 
SKthmonth in a row. 

the Labor Mn^ 

(Kright-Ridder, AFP 
AFX, Reuters) 










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Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 1994 


NASDAQ 


Tuesday's 4 p.m. 

Tms list complied By the AP, consists of the 1 ,000 
ritles ii 


most traded securities in terms of dollar value. It is 
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Pape 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 1994 


SPORTS 


A Bad Boy Takes Charge 

NFL's Ryan Thrives in the Maelstrom 


By Leonard Shapiro 

Washington Post Service 

FLAGSTAFF, Arizona — 
For the Arizona Cardinals, it 
was almost the end of the day's 
second practice and time for 
some live hitting. Scrub offense 
ag ai n s t the first-team goal-line 
defense. All out. Full contact A 
spirited little skirmish, just the 
way boisterous bad-boy coach 
Buddy Ryan always likes it in 
tr aining cam p, 

Maybe that’s why Ryan, in a 
new trademark wide-brimmed 
black Panama hat, stood so se- 
renely in the middle of the end 
zone. His arms were folded 
across his chest just above that 
budding potbelly, and a mis- 
chievous smile was etched on 
his face as a rookie running 
bade slashed into the pile and 
immediately was thrown back 5 
yards like a rag doll pitched into 
a toy chest by a peevish child. 

But wait, over on the other 
side of the line, a small-scale 
brawl was breaking out A free- 
agent tackle literally fighting 
for a job was swinging and kick- 
ing and cursing, aiming his 
wrath at several defenders. 
Now, players were running into 
the fray from the sideline. More 
balled fists, lots of pushing and. 
shoving and shouting and star- 


ing and finger pointing. 

But not by Baddy Ryan. Still 
planted in the end zone, his 
arms stQl folded, that sly little 
grin still on his face, the irasci- 
ble head coach was taking it all 
in, a man at peace in the middle 
of a combat zone. 

Later, after calmer heads pre- 
vailed, someone asked Ryan if 
yet another typical day of fuss- 
ing and f uming in the Cardi- 
nals’ camp bothered him much. 

“Nah," he said. “There’s not 
much they can do to each other 
but break their hands. You might 
be a little late far dinner, but 
nobody ever really gas hurt in a 
football fight. I just let 'em go.” 

And he Bmiltfri a gain 

The Cardinals train in the 
National Football League's 
most spectacular preseason set- 
ting. Their practice fields are 
7,000 feet (2,100 meters) above 
sea level, surrounded by stands 


of Ponderosa pine, with the San 
Francisco peaks and Mount El- 
don in the background. Over 
the last four weeks, James Da- 
vid Ryan, 60, and his staff have 
been trying to nanow the yawn- 
ing gap between the Cardinals 
and the competition. 

He’s a curiously complex fel- 
low some said would never 
work as a head coach again af- 
ter taking a nationally televised 
poke at a fellow Houston Oilers 
assistant, Kevin Gilbride, in 
December, But even after that 
dustup, he’s got it aH Ryan is 
head coach and general manag- 
er of a team that hasn't been to 
the playoffs since the 1982 
strike season, when 16 of 28 
teams qualified. Before that it 
was 1975. 

What's more, he's the hottest 
item to hit the state since Charles 
Barkley arrived from Phxladet- 


Bnddy Ryan 
never saw a 
headline he could 
not dominate. 


phia ostensibly to lead the Phoe- 
nix Suns to a National Basket- 
ball Association championship 
two years ago. Season ticket 
sales have almost doubled, to 
60,000, since Ryan's airivaL 

Ryan said he has not been 
surprised by the exuberance of 
Cardinals fans. In fact, he’s not 
shy about pointing out that 
“that’s why I’ve got it in my 
contract to get a percentage of 
season ticket sales.” 

Already the owner of a res- 
taurant in downtown Phoenix, 
Ryan has a Tuesday night radio 
show that is absolutely must lis- 
tening. Last week, the first call- 
er of the night questioned a few 
of Ryan's recent personnel 
moves, and Buddy decked him 
with a vitriolic verbal barrage. 

*Tve seen more film and 
know more about football than 
you do,” he began. “I get paid to 
do it It’s my job to evaluate 
talent, not to listen to every 
Tom, Dick and Harry. You’re 


not going to make any decisions 
just because you bought some 
tickets. You want to nuke deci- 
sions, go get youradf a job is 
football” 

Ryan hasn't been a head 
coach since Norman Braman 
fired him in Philadelphia after 
the 1990 season, despite Ryan's 
miring the Eagles to me playoffs 
the last three years of bis five- 
year tenure. 

His punch thrown at Gil- 
bride had general managers 
leaguewide insisting Ryan 
would never get another head 
coaching job. Ryan heard that 
talk too, but said last week: M 1 
had chances to go lots of places 
the last few years. People Know 
if they want to win right away, 
I'm their guy.” 

And no, he tells anyone who 
asks, he's never apologized to 
Gilbride. He says he threw the 
punch only after he thought the 
younger man was about to 

riiBig a him. 

rarHirtals owner Bfll BidwiD 
cairi he had no qualms going 
after Ryan, even if the two seem 
like such an odd-duck couple — 
the shy, bow-tied owner and his 
new coach, who never saw a 
headline he could not ctanrinate. 

BidwiD fired the popular coach 
Joe Bugd on Jan. 24 after a 7-9 
season, despite BugeTs strong 
show of support from many Car- 
dinals players and four wins in 
die team's last five games. 

BidwiD met with Ryan three 
times m early February, then of- 
fered him die job of coach and 
general manager, with a salary 
reportedly around 5500,000 over 
the next four years. 

“You always have reserva- 
tions with anyone coming in," 
BidwiD said. “But I knew he 
had the ability and the experi- 
ence to handle the coaching and 
the general manager end of it.” 

Bidwill has acknowledged 
that he did not anticipate the 
reaction — especially the ticket- 
buying frenzy — to Ryan's hir- 
ing. His decision to fire Bugd 
had not been popular. Bidwill 
added, “I’ve had no problems 
with him, none at alL And if he 
shoots from the hip sometimes, 
so be it” 







V'-J ■ 




. The Assodaud Pros . 1 • # . 

WILLIAMSPORT, Pennsytvairia. — Taiwan, back m toe 
Little League World Series for the first date ance 1991. beat 
Glace Bay^Nova Scotia, 4-1, and E^ardo Fotct 
oneJntter and bantered as Venezuela beat Saudi Arabia, >L 
irj the opening games. ■ 

. The only hit off Ferrer was a first : innmg homer by the 
Saudfi pitcher, RonaldUaptiste. Fearer was pcrfect the rest of 
the way except for Jutting Baptiste with a pitch m the fourth. 

Esteban y&Oa scorcdln the first for the Lana American 
ri wn iiww s arid ag m" in the third. Ferrer's three-run homer /m 
tEfifth scored Eric Vfflaloras, who readied an^sacnficcand 
error, and Hidalgo, when his grounder struck Avila, who had 
walked. . ■ 

■Taiwan took a 2-0 lead on three ecroisinthe Gist andthiid 


back Lamer* m the fifth. - .... . . 

In Nova Sootia’s sixth, Jason Snow doubled home.Kyte 
n nT -if who had Ham-Fan walked Adam smmnette, 

starting pitcher Sandy Sparrow to end the game. 

Taiwan has won !5 Little League titles since 1969. It missed 

last year's tounumtent after fading to prove its players woe 


Rusty JCcmdy/Tbe Aaodned Pkb 

Wai-Gah Hoang of Taiwan, right, colliding with Nova Scotia's To mmy Sheppard. 


lathe American division, of the to u r nam ent, Brooklyn 
Center, Minnesota, beat Narthridge, Cali forn ia. 4-2, and 
Sprmgfirid, Virginia, beat Middlcbaro, Massachusetts, 2-1. 


Baseball Talks: the Next Round sidelines 


Complied by Ov Staff From Ddpaxhes 

NEW YORK — As negotia- 
tors for major league baseball 
team owners and striking play- 
ers prepare to resume collec- 
tive-bargaining talks on 
Wednesday, the chances that a 
settlement is near seem slim. 

Somehow, the outlook got 
even gloomier and the rhetoric 
even nastier after their p lanning 
session earlier this wedL 

Afterward, Donald Febr, the 
unio n c hi e f, called the manage- 
ment negotiator, Richard Ra- 
vi tch, “the hatchet man for the 
owners.” 

Fehr said Ravitch is “shed- 
ding crocodile tears” for those 
who have lost their jobs because 
of the 13-day-old strike while he 
continues to be paid his 
S750,000-a-year salary. 

Fchr said he saw no evidence 
there could be progress, and 
John Harrington, the chief ex- 
ecutive officer of the Boston 
Red Sox, said when owners get 


to the table they wfll be offering 
the same salary-cap proposal 

“We assume that at the first 
meeting well get the manage- 
ment chorus of 'Solidarity For- 
ever,’ ” Fehr said after meeting 
with Ravitch and federal media- 
tors for about 20 minutes to set 
this week’s schedule. 

Un Monday, Ravitch met 
here with 11 of the 12 manage- 
ment participants who wDl rep- 
resent the owners at the bargain- 
ing table. The participants 
include Wendy Selig-Prieb, 
Brewers’ vice president and gen- 
eral counsel and daughter of the 
acting commissioner Bud Srfig , 
and the man who may be the 
leading power broker among 
owners m this dispute, Jecry 
Rrinsdorf, the Chicago White 
Sox chairman. 

Fehr, speaking before owners 
announced their team, launched 
into repeated attacks on Ra- 
vitch’s credibility. “The owners 
want to drastically lower player 


salaries,” Fehr said. “Dick’s the 

hatchet maw fO gO and . 
get It done.” . 

Ravitch shrugged off Pda’s 
comments. “The last time I 
found name calling to be mean- 
ingful was when I was in grade 
scfaocd,” he said. “I don’t thmt it 
helps the situation.” 

Fehr masted owners are on a 
preset schedule, believing that 
players win crack and accept a 
salary cap. 

“The owners decided a Iona 
time aao they are on a dock.” 
Fehr said. “And when the dock 
gets to the day they want to 
settle — whether tf s this week, 
this month, next month, next 
yen' or 1996 — then they’ll talk 
seriously. Up until then we can’t 
expect them to. Unfortunately, 
all we can do is wait” 

Harrington denied Feta's 
charge. He said a lengthy weak 
steppage may affect consider- 
ation of adding mmin far the 
1998 season. (WP^iP) 


Colombia Looks at Dnigs-Soccerlink' 

BOGOTA (AFP) -r The Colombian government is launching 
an rri ywf ri gptinw into possible between, the country's notori- 
ous drug cartel, ana professional soccer, . Education Minister 
Arturo Arabia has announced. . I 

- Tire investigation wiD alsQ probe the murder of the World Cup 
player Andris Escobar, who was bdieved to have been gmme^i 
down by dis g run tled gamblers after he served, against his own 
tearii in a 2-1 loss to tSo United States. . 

Suns 9 Lawsuit Goes to NJ. Court 

PHOENIX (AP) — A federal judge has forwarded the Phoenix 
Sims' lawsuit agaratthe National Basketball Association over the 
voidin g of AC Green’s contract toa New Jersey court to be heard 
try Judge Dickinson Dcbevoiso before Sept. 12. The ju dge heard a 
similar case last year between the Portland Trial Blazers and Chris 
Dudley.'. 

For die Record . , . ;-j 

Hakeem Ot^uwon, who led the Houston Rockets to their first 
NBA tide arid earned MYP honors, has been named an interna- 
tional spokesman f arthehague. - (AP) 

; Juan Antonio Samaranch , president of the International Olym- 
pic Committee, hasaMUtedamaJeur taxing officials that sport 
wDl atifi be on the.pragram far.a* Inst the next two Olympic 


Games. Olympic boxing has come under threat on medical 
grounds and also became afmtiasm of its judging system. (AP) 


7 TTT 


Comtnonwoalth Games 


GYMNASTICS 


Floor Exordia: 1, Non Thomas. England 
van points. 1 Kris Bortov. Conoda, 9.437. X 
Aton Nolot, Conoda MSB. 

POBMMI Mora: 1. Brannon Dawrlck, Aus- 
tralia. 9J21 X Nattnxi Ktnaaton, Australia. 
M0X X Rkhard Ihoda Conodo. 920. 

Rings: I.L» McDermott. England 9.47S.Z 
Potor Honan. Australia, 927S. X Dowrlck and 
Ikoda 9.1SX 

Voom l. Brett Hudson. Australia 9J75. z 
Bortov, 9412. X Thomas. 9,306. 

Parallel Bars: l, Hogoa 9.40X z Burlov. 
9JSX x Oawrtck, 9230. 

Hortsoolal Bar: 1. Nalot.94IXX nwdaVJU. 
X Kingston. 9J25. 

Individual APforatl 
Wool on 

Vaott: 1, 5t«l to Umoh. Canada 9A56.X aorta 
Lowronco.tWolox»jq.X UooM m o o . Conoda 
1906. 


Uneven Bars: l, Rebecca StovaLAuetralla, 
9323. Z Umetv 9,451 X Sarah Thomason, Now 
Zeatand 9.337. 

Bata co Boom: 1, Sol 1 1 Will*. Australia, 
ion. X Zita Lunch. England. MS 7. X Ruth 
Mont*. Australia. 190X 

Floor Emrctae: 1. Anrrika Reeder, England 
9J5C. Z Jocquollm Brady. EnohxxL 9,662. X 
Sim#*, 9530. 

SHOOTING 

Mot 

Air PWoL pahs: I. M lch rtangota Ghufln- 
lano and BenatSandstrom. Australia 1,137.x 
Jean-Plerre Hurt and John Rochorv Canada 
1,131 X Jaaal Nona and Vtvek STngh. India 
1.139. 

■manors RMaXpaltion, Pairs: LWOyne 
Sorenson and Michel Dion, Canada UH. X 
Allstar Altai and William Murray. Scotland. 
2371. X Christopher H otter and Trevor Lan- 
grtdga, Ena tend. 1239. 

Slnot, Pairs: 1, Antonis Andrew <md dirts. 
las Kmirtalkn. 119. Z Brian Thcmamri and 
Gaaffrov Jufcoa Now Zooland, in. x Mldiaol 
Thom n o on and Ian Maradsn. England. 186. 

Pam Air nM:l,Aimotlo woodward aid 
Chrtstlne Trofrv, Australia 747 points. XJoco- 
tvn Lass and Gord Bartunab Now Zortand 


749. X Carol Page and MargorotTftomA Eng- 
land 741 

SWIMMING 


WO BroasMraho: l, Nk* Gflllngham, Eng- 
land3:lZ94 (Gamas record proviausracard: 
2:1456 by Jan Cl a valcwd Canada 1*90). X 
PhKM Rogora Austral la 2: 1X96.X Jon Owo- 
land Conoda 2:U91. 

4N Froatfylo: X Waron Parkin. Australia 
3:45J7 (Games record previous record: 
3:4X91 by Ian Brown, Australia 19901. X Can- 
yon Loorier. Now Zealand 3:49.65. X Daniel 
KawaWd Australia 3:9X41. 

ON R o oi luls tutor: 1. Australia (Darren 
Laua Andrew Balldan. Dwodo Shoohob 
Chrtoto u hor Fydtor), 3:2X09. X Now Zootond 
(John StooL Nkhotoo Tasua Donyon Load- 
ar.8ray).3:2L79.XEnglaid ( NkJwtas Shock- 
olL Mark Fastv, Andrew Oavtan, Mkhaol 
Flbfeons). 3^2X41. __ 

HO Breaststroko: l, Samantha Rllay. Aus- 
tralia 1:0X02 (Games record previous re- 
cord: 1:09.47 by Riley In morntog hoot). Z 
Rebecca Brown, Australia 1 :09AX X Porerio- 
ao Hems. South Africa 1H9J6. 

NO Butterfly: 1, Petrta Tho mas . A us tralia 


1:0X21 (Gamas record previous record: 
1HILM by Lisa CumHCormy. 19*0). X Susan 
OTtoUL Australia 1:0X34 X Em# Ovortan. 
Australia i:oux 

SYNCH RON I ZB D SWIMMING 
Sale 
Flarts 

LUnAmaniNr.Canada1>9^n5.XKoiTV 
Shacklecfc, Enalmd 18X9717.1 Cthfii Por- 
rorts. Australia 17X6624 

Deal 

Floats 

1, Lisa Amanda and Erin WtxxSov. Cano- 
da 1840094. Z Kerry ShacWoCk and Ldta Vo- 
UL Enotond H2JNX X Monique Downes and 
Celesta Porrarls. Australia 167.1644 
TRACK AND FIBLD 
Mon 
nasi 

Henman LSoon Canto. AuotraBa 3(1 foot 
1 1nch. X Paul Hoad Engtaid NO* X Potor 
VMon, Enotond 229. 


M0 l lur dloe I to ot I: 1, Khn Venderhook. 
CBKida 14J4 *67. Z Nclumo Ftafcher, Guv- 
ana. 14.11, »6lXJ#nn! tar Krtly. Enalandl4AX 
91*. 

NOHor dtai Haat l: l.Clova Court, England 


1X07,1,ltdXJa« Ftornmlng, Australia 1X32, 
1A77. X Dontso Lewi 4 Enotond 1X64 1.022. 

NO Hoot 1: 1, Kendall Motimoa Canada 
347X *1X X Nalwna Plotdwr, Guyana 2SJX 
079. X Carotins Ochela Konya *402. 793. 

11 100 12: 1. Flemming. KI4 975. X Court 
2414 NO. X Undsoy, K61. 92X 

HI J o i np G r o u a 1 : 1. Undsoy, 5 loot. SH 
Inchos, 901 X Un Gtobs. Wales. » 794 X 
Moth#**, H4 730. 

MOB J u mp Oraoo I: 1, Cotherlne Bond- 
MMa Canada 6-1 M, UB4 X PMMor>d 1 ,014 
X Joann# Henry, Now Zealand S-NH4 971 

M Pot; l. Flommlno, 44SM, HI. X KoRv, 
44m, 76*. X Bond-Mills. 446*. 761 
Waafflogo 
First Day 

1, Ftommtaa, UK Z BowHVUIIs, 170. X 
Lawla XS49. 4 Henry, XSll X Court, X404 4 
Vandortwrt, X46X 7, Ftatdwr, XN9. 4 Kelly, 
X965. 9, MathoMHi, X104 N, Undsoy, X177. II, 
GMh, X13X IX Ochrta X034 


Australia 
Canada 
England 
Now Zealand 


Hone Kano 0 
Sri Lotto 1 

Cyprus I 

Northern Ireland 1 
Pakistan 0 

South Attica - 0 

Malaysia 0 

Guernsey 0 
Zimbabwe 0 


BASEBALL 


WIT 
Yam tart 61 43 0 

awrtcM . 32 51 ; 0 

HonsMn 92 St 0 

Hiroshima SO B 0 . 

Yakuit 46 S4 0 

Yokohama -. 46 38 0 

T ONdayo tart 
Yomluri 4 Yakott 2. • 


I Hiroshima 4 OiunKM 6 . 

7 Yokohama 4 Hanohta 3 
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1 • -/ W L T 

3 3#no S7- 44 fl 

2 OrtX 54 44 3 

2 Ktatatsa . 39 45 * 
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2 - Lotto 41 a 1 

2 Nippon Ham 39 61 4 


1 - Kintetsu 4 Srtbu 7 
1 Data! 11 Nippon Ham f 
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— — — HFL Prwri aon • 

Pci GB . Moadorl On 

5B7 ' — Chicago 21. Kansas City 'll 
JOS 1% ■ • 

JDS ' 9 

A90 10 

JSO IS 


JM ■ * MHBALL 

jgi Th. Americas Loaoaa ; • 

jgo rn OAKLAND Acllvatod G aran h na Borraa. 
Mt 2 oalfMdonirainlMaydtartMItaLQpHaMd 
jB 'lSh mo Yoon*. euH H Odo r , to HawtaeHta. SU 
j*o m ’ ^ „B*«axTmA U. ^ . 

'■ ' •’ CHICAG O An n ounce d . the retirement of 


SOCCER 


GOLDEN STAT E A nn ounced mat Josh 
Oront forward has signed a oae-yoar ooa- 
traef urOh Vatanda of (tie Spontah League. 


Arizona— watved win purror. quaner- 
bdekj JJ. Floumar, kkSar; TSmr Voushn, 
Anthony Owens. Cort BnMra,and Jan Pinck- 
ney, wide recgNirei Hadnoy Tunrtn, tun- 
bock; John Raera, carrwrtadc; Uunl# Jsn- 
khn. Scat!' Rtnen end Dgnrl Mfflwm. 
datanNw Hnamow WIMe wridM. tut end; 
Rob WaMowr a t te ngt vg Hnomani and Tracy 

'*SM5ASaTP^H»toMtf Dan Satoaumud 
ROM tackle, to a ttve-vear am trod. 


DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 


r wot n-’tWEN'nsf 
uwt KT yCTWWM 







































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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 1994 


Pajjp 19 


With Boli, Glasgow Seeks 
Greater? Glory in Europe 


L ONDON — UK tears of Basflc Boli have 
flowed as; co^tant as a river, Lhrougi recent 

11 “?® cant tola's knees after Ins 


•-■..team, blympi- 
J ~^, que Marseille,. Hob - 
■i>; went out an ^ .Hugliea^y ^ 

? penalty shoot- r— ’ 7 " 

' J ■ BdgnHtefA?** defender, Ins gfjreehad been 
.. witfioto fanlt; as a competitor he was a loser, 
'.'-without being dtfeatei : '• 

■ ~-ti ' j«rain. HK Dowetfully headed gpal 


4 * Eurowsnxlershave messed up thar most pig*- 

- ; . 77 . v *« tiu, PT-fmt that Wednesday 


- Like all salable stars, ne was sain oy 

1 ssrs»s 

* are investments to what ■Rangers cmve most a 

- the European dory and the Ecns that- 

r^: Some OTth. ft. David Murray, the Rax^chan- 
seeks recognitkm through. success on the. 

G Ho he laid ont a sufficient amount tojrf 
0U!t Not if UE£A?s tmkerers keep moving *h®jB°®^ 


intoNikos Gomnas Stadium at the height of the 
Aihenian summer. 

■ ‘ • Dimitri Saravakos, small and lightweight but a 
CTflxung man at 33, then tormented the Scottish 
defense, scored twice and could easily have dou- 
Hed Ms night’s toll. As it stands, 2-0 to AEK 
xrith the return in front of 44,000 Glaswegians to 
comec© Wednesday, the cause is not hopeless. 

“Losing to Athens was a disaster ” insists Boli. 
^To tjHvlosng *s always a disaster. I will be 

giving my all- fighting with everythingrve got, to 

x^t^qrn it. 1 always do." 

■■; Fi ghting , Mr. BoU3 He knows what is coming 
oegL the insinuation that he is a tough nut It has 
hounded, him since the summer of 1992 when he 
avSefy drew blood by head-butting the cheek 
booueof En glan d's own hard-man, Stuart Pearce. 

• -^Jtsall over, forgotten,” he says irritably. Why 
TOBgt the Brits raise it now? O.Kl, Baz, let’s chalk 

that one down to history. 

?■ He is big enough not to argue with, and he 
inasts thal the brief reign of Franz Beckenbauer 
. : as com* to Marseille taught him a more positive 
style, a counterattacking use of his brain and 
' brawn that produced the winning header of 1993. 



Australia Leads 
Games’ Medals; 
Christie Sizzles 


\|f,C \icivn ■ Ijrnis Frj«-Ptr.,e 


;~Uat tmned this yc^n coDqjcteticm anto 

gsaStf^sstfeBS 

Aiax Amsterdam, Anderlechi and Moscow Spur 
- -ti are the eight teams wHcK by 

success, go straight mto the lucrative Champions 

- .... League. , ; . 

.“.■“T - Hie rest have to fight for it • . 

■*, • Glasgow Rangers can J^.SggftJS 
. team’s own secretary, Ounplxfl 
' draft the blueprint for ^Sraduation to l^gue 
- riches. But, uh, oh, Rangersdnw nCbe shortstrau^ 
— i. Its intended kw prdimmary hurdle^a two4cg 
contest against AEK Athens; gave the Scots an 
:\ug. 10 tnptoto an oven. The Rangers stepped 


3™TMd bAA Shdi words, all of 
four letters to let you know his intent 
' ‘ Ouch! Now, obviously the Rangers knew the 
kind of competitive gentleman, it was purchasing 
when it wrote the check for Boli. 

• Saravakos dared pass, not once but twice. But 
the presence of Boh — and a presence he is, born 
the son of an Ivory Coast diplomat who moved 
totheesribassy in Paris when Baalewras 13 ha. 
taken on far more than a physical dimension in 
his latest move. 

‘ tt 7HEN he was 16, Boli played for Anxerre on 
VV condition that the clob also sign his elder 
brother, Roger. Barite Boli had some epic skir- 
mishes with Jean-Pierre Papin, the pugnacious 
Marseille striker, so much so that m time Mar- 
seille purchased him. 

■ Better to play on Bdi’s ride than against him. 

‘ And he. sturdy in mind as well as body, saw off 
the racists who greeted his arrival in 
port. Now he is in another tough port of bigotry- 
He is black, foreign, and THE catholic on Rang 
os’ side. “Look, I know about Ranges and 
CdticThe says. “Signing me shows that Rang- 

1 era has ewdved beyond religion- 

The evolution, he reckons, is to business. That. 

he correctly asserts, is the name of the game now 

to sports. He is here for money, for ambition, for 

[ Europe. . 

[ Wednesday’s business is winning. Three gods, 
' or the Rangers kiss Europe bye-bye. Has any 
’ brave soul translated to Boh the term Glasgo 
} Kiss.” (It means head-butt) 

J Rcbfh&aamthtsKtfiffl*^* 0 ' 


Annika Reeder, displaying winning form to floor exercise at Commonwealth Games 

Scandinavia’s Day at Cycling Races 

utes, 38 seconds at an average U bappenedto- 


The Associated Press 

CAPO D’ORLANDO, 
Sidly — Alex Pedersen of 
Denmark captured the ama- 
teur road race title Tuesday 
to a triumphant day for Scan- ■ 
din avian countries at the 
World Cycling Champion- 
ships. 

Pedersen's victory added 
to Monica Valvik’s success m 
the individual wom- 

en’s race, which gave Norway 
the first-ever world title in 
road events. 

Pedersen, 27, took oppo- 
nents by surprise by sprinting 
200 meters from the fmtoh 
Hue. He piled up a lead of a 
few metere and withstood the 
strong comeback of Milan 
Dvoredk of Slovakia, who 
won the silver medal, and 
Christophe Mengin of 

France, who took the bronze. 

Pedersen, completed the 1 5 
laps race, for a total distance 
of 185.1 kilometers (114 
miles), to four hours, 24 min- 


utes, 38 seconds at an average 
speed of 44.764 kph. 

“1 really wanted to win a 
world championship before 







-CROSSWORD 


l, I I*- ’ — . TT 

.-•> -,r 
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■ across 

• •’ri' i Speleology top* 

* s Plane egresses 

‘ io Pedestal topper 

14C.1A profiler 
- '.*2 ■ PhMP . 

is Paradigm 
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1 - - '-^ T 


17 Canine 
laryngitis? 

i» Mutant heroes 
of modem 
comics 

20 Not gross 

atQalo 

22 Fanciful 


24 Doubtful story 
za Fancies up 
as Record Basts 
22 Uses a cbBHt-shoet 
ao“TDeMany-— - 
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31 Watkins . 

N.Y. 

M Gridiron period 
as Candid - 
37 First-aid 
c on triv anc e 
aa Stage curtain 
asEndrde 
40 Way with wrxds 

41 Sneak preview 

42 Posh ' 

. 44 Uke some hair 

45 Words - 


<r Kingsley etaL 
48 Warned with a 
horn 

4> South of France 
so Shocking word 
sslhelaast . . 

concern. 

84 Experimental 

canine? . 
wr Adjective tor an 
antique store 
soTVexecSpeffing 
ssHorsrfoauvie 


€B€L ’ 

,h. arebi**® 1 * •! 


ee Former empire 
•i Acknowledge 
ea Like certain _ 
trays 


i 'Three Coins In 
the Fountain* 

. lyricist 
2Chtts 

3 Third piece of 
three 

,4‘Amwiser 


s Richard 
Sheridan play, 
with The" 

e Be gaga over 

7 Chow 

a Lobbying 
acronym 
a Winter sport 

10 Canine 
underwear? 

11 Frighten to the 
core 

12 Cut flowers 
is "West Side 

Story" beau 
is Lady Gregory 
cohort 

23 Deprive (of) 

24 Stylish canine? 

as- Yoo Glad 

You're You?" 
(1946 hit) 
aa Stop (up) 

27 Snake dancers 

28 Maintain 

29 Succeed, 
informally 

31 Endocrine, e.g. 

33 Loads 

34 Juice flaw* 

35 Rations 

37 Not get hit? 

41 Dither 

43 Miniature 

44 Failing 
business’s woe 

45 Trunk items 

46 Gangsters 

47 Plains critter 

. 48 Com man dm eni 

word 
49 Vidal's 

Breckinridge 

so-Gfl * 

si Courtroom 
ritual 

52 Comply with 

58 Contemptuous 
cry 

58 Bath, tor one 


SSSS Sill mi 

S”ISs: ! "5i:K ! 

3g»:ssis"isss 

SSSS Siiihh 

i gun naiHB 

^IIIIH IlH.-na 

issryH 

jiii jiii^y! 




Monica Vahik 


m 


day, Tm happy,” Pedersen 
said. He said he gave up pro- 
fessional racing after suffer- 
ing bean problems, which 
put his career ai risk. 

“Now the problems are 
over, my heart is good- I 
planned to retire next year, 
but now that Tm the world 
champion I would continue 
for anothem season. But I 
plan to race mostly to Den- 
mark,” be said. 

Valvik defeated Patsy 
Maegerman of Belgium and 
Jeanne Golay of the United 
States with ease, cruising 
across the finish line as her 
opponents struggled behind. 

*Tm good to sprints but 1 
did not expect this victory. 
Fm so ludcv to wear this jer- 
sey today," said the 23-year- 
old Norwegian, who com- 
pleted a distance of 86.39 
kilometers in two hours, 8 
minutes and 3 seconds, at an 
average speed of 40.475 kph- 


Tht Associated Pros m 

VICTORIA, British Colum- w 
bia — World champion Linford 

Christie was billed as the star of J- 
the Commonwealth Games 
and, after a leisurely first race. B* 
he lived up to expectations. “ 

The 1992 Olympic gold med- 
alist at 100 meters had the slow- & 
est winning time of all the first- ^ 
round heats Monday, then 
came back to tie his own Com- 
monwealth Games record with c 
a sizzling 10.02-second quarter- q 
final victory. e 

The Englishman matched the ^ 
record he set four years ago in 
Auckland, New Zealand. Chns- t 
tie. 34. also lied his best ume k 
this year that was not aided by ^ 
wind and set the stage for a 
swift final two rounds Tuesday. t 
“I’ve still gpt work to do,” was , 
all he said as he left the track. j 
Frankie Fredericks of Na- 1 
mibia, the world championai 
200 metere, won his quartern- i 
nal heat to 10.04, his fastest of 
the year, as the Games track 
and field competition began in 
cool and damp weather. 

Away from the track, Austra- 
lian swimmers Kieren Perkins 
and Samantha Riley flirted 
with world records. Perkins col- 
lected his third gold medal of 
the Games to the 400-meter 
freestyle at 3:45.77. The world 
record of 3:45.00 was set by 
Evgeni Sadovyi of Russia at the 
1992 Olympics. Perkins broke 
the Commonwealth Games’ re- 
cord by more than 4 seconck. 
Riley won her second gold, to 
the 100 breaststroke, in 1:08.02, 
just off the world mark of 
1:07.91 set by Silke Hoeraer of 
East Germany to 1987. Penelo- 
pe Heyns of South Africa won 
the bronze. 

Commonwealth Games’ rec- 
ords fell to all four individual 
swimming events. Petria 
Thomas led a 1-2-3 Australia 
finish to the women’s 100-meter 
butterfly in 1:00.21. 

Sean Carito of Austra&L won 
flie hammer with a throw of 241 
J feet, 1 inch (73.4 metere). English- 




mm Paul Head and Peter Vivian 
won the silver and bronze. 

Canadian gymnast Stella 
Clinch, the all-around gold 
medalist Sunday, won a second 
gold to the vault and a silver in 
the uneven bars. Australian 
women won two gymnastics 
gold — Rebecca Stoyel m the 
uneven bars and Salli Wills in 
the balance beam. 

Neil Thomas of England, me 
all-around men’s gymnastics 
champion Sunday, won his sec- 
ond gold Monday in the floor 
exercise but settled for the 
bronze to the vault. 

With its swimming domina- 
tion. Australia widened its lead 
to the medals race. (See Score- 

board.) . 

Australia got three golds in 
men’s gymnastics when Bren- 
non Dowrick won the pommel 
horse, Peter Hogan the parallel 
bars and Brel Hudson the vaulL 
England got two other gym- 
nastics golds when Lee McDer- 
mott won the rings and Annika 
Reeder won the floor exercise. 
Canada’s Alan Nolet won the 
horizontal bars. . 

The 35.000-seat Centennial 
Stadium was mostly empty for 
the eight first-round 100-meter 
heats and other track compeu- 

World champion and record- 
holder Colin Jackson, running 
for Wales, won his 110-meter 
„ hurdle semifinal heat to an un- 
; exceptional 13.51. Englishman 
' Tony JarTett, runner-up to 
Jackson at last year’s World 
j Championships, won the other 
semifinal in 13.52. 


Benetton-Renauh linkup 

Reuters 

LONDON — Benetton has 
signed a three-year contract 
with Renault, the French en- 
gine manufacturer, whose V10 
power units helped the Wil- 
liams team claim two successive 
world championships to 1992 
and 1993. Renault will now be 
supplying both of Formula One 
racing’s top teams until die end 
of 1997. 







HeraltG«ribunc. 


pustltylWiKlHenlg 

.O New York Times Edited by Will Shorty 


Solution to Puzzle of Aug. 23 


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BQEmnciE 

CDana0HaanQ3S_ nni 
nan naan gag 
mnnfnra nQ0 tHOulLa 

00 mm oaa 

ranra 0000 C3EK3 

EBQaapnanaaaa 

nroCS00 £JQD 00QQ 

iiaasaa araaiaago 
iSaasaa SSI 


S B F ■ PAR 

Published by the International 
Herald Tribune, in coordination with the 
Paris Stock Exchange, the 1994 edition 
indudes detailed profiles of all the 
companies in the new SBF 120 ^<Jex. 

Launched in December 1993. the 
SBF 120 is made up of the CAC 40 Pj“ s ^ 
other major firms. Its stocks gained 318% 
last year, making these the companies to 

watch in the coming years. 

Each profile indudes: head office, 

CEO, investor relations manager, 

company background and major activities, 


5 BOURSE 

recent developments, sales breakdown, 
shareholders, subsidiaries andhoWmgs in 
France and internationally, 1989-1993 
financial performance, and recent stock 

trading h^tory j^pany Handbook is 

updated annually for finandal analysts, 
institutional investors, corporate, 
government and banking executives, 
documentation services - anyone who 
needs to know about the leading 
companies in the world’s fourth largest 

economy. 


eteWXfiSB2. < 
























Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 1994 


OBSERVER 


Saving the Language 


A New Breed of X-Men Rises to Save the Universe 


By Russell Baker 
TNJEW YORK — Age comm- 
* ^ ues to have her way with 


* ' uk ra nave ner way with 
me. Not hing can be done about 
it» not even by Science, winch I 
capitalize not to denote the 
name of a magazine but out of 
respect for one of the world's 
more civilized reli g i on s. 

Just as insufferably wise men 
predicted years ago, age has 
driven me from s miling resi- 
dence in a tolerant Christian 
liberalism to the sour and prick- 
ly solitude, the natural habitat 
of the reactionary mossback. 


No longer am 1 cheered by 
te expression’s brutal triumph 


free expression’s brutal triumph 
oyer Emily Post, Amy Vander- 
bilt and what used to be called 
etiquette. Some say the world 
will end in Ere and some in ice, 
but a terminal case of bad man- 
ners Seexns likelier. 

So I favor a three-strikes- 
and-you’re-out law; life impris- 
onment for all caught more 
than twice trying to conceal the 
eleventh-rate quality of their 


min ds by using the four-letter 
words that were once so d di- 


words that were once so deli- 
ciously sho cking. 

Those superb old Anglo-Sax- 
on words, once so effective in 
rare doses, have been beaten to 
death by lousy novelists, bush- 
league demagogues, hack 
screenwriters, entertainers with 
no talent and proponents of 
sundry "liberations trying to 
show off their freedom from 
convention by using words that 
once drove mothers to wash out 
chEdien’s mouths with soap. 

D 

Mothers had good reason for 


doing so. Mothers knew that 
children spouting these words 


children spouting these words 
freely would allow familiari ty 
to destroy their magic. The 
mouth washing was a civilized 
language-preservation act. 

My three-strikes'-and-you’re- 
out plan would be a start to- 
ward restoring life to these 
great words. 

Putting these language assas- 
sins away for life is no more 
absurd than the current com- 
mon practice of filling precious 
prison cells with narcotics us- 
ers. Tolerant Christian liberals 
will protest that free expression 


Of the utter emptiness of one’s 
mind is a sacred right and that, 
even if it were not, die punish- 
ment I propose would not fit 
the crime. 

This is balderdash, a word 
my reactionary mossbackery 
now licenses me to use without 
feeling ally. People are tucked 
away for years for using narcot- 
ics and ostensibly sane people 
applaud the idea, don’t they? 

If the country is to be run on 
asinine ideas made law because 
our statesmen lack the courage 
to forgo pandering to their silli- 
est colleagues, why draw the 
line against equally brutal mea- 
sures for the nobler goal of pre- 
serving our magnificent heri- 
tage, the English language? 

□ 

With equal reactionary fer- 
vor I cheer for the Florida tele- 
vision station that curtailed the 
Reverend Jerry Falwell’s 
speech rights the other day. 

The news report says a 9- 
year-old boy came to his moth- 
er asking her what “oral sex” 
was. She asked where the child 
had heard about "oral sex.” He 
said he had been listening to 
Fal well on TV. Complaint was 
made to the TV station, which 
dropped Falwell’s show. 

Fal well is of course a leader 
in the Republican Party's con- 
servative legion, and my moss- 
hackery is not so innocent that I 
am blind to the possibility of 
Democratic Party deviltry be- 
hind this deed. 

This doesn’t alarm me as it 
would have before age showed 
me the delights of mossbackery. 
Tax-free parsons have been 
abusing the cloth for political 
reasons almost forever. It's one 
of those hypocrisies that consti- 
tute the American way of life. 

However, preachers promot- 
ing their political agenda by 
discussing oral sex before vast 
unseen audiences stretch my 
tolerance for the good old-time 
hypocrisy. It typifies the deca- 
dence that results when incivil- 
ity becomes terminal. When 
preachers know no manners 
both fire and ice would be su- 
perfluous. 


By Douglas Martin 

New York Tima Service 

N EW YORK — In ihe beginning, there 
were five troubled teenagers — Cyclops, 


IN were five troubled teenagers — Cyclops, 
Angel, Beast, Iceman and Marvel Girl — all 
normal until they turned 13. Suddenly they 
could do superhuman things — fly, shoot ener- 
gy from their eyes and much, much more. 

Called the X-Men, they promptly went to 
war against Magneto, the master of magnetism 
and a real bad guy. 

It was a rebellious style, only slightly masked 
by the jackets and ties the X-Men then wore. 
An early issue has Iceman, whose frigid rays 


cool any situation, exclaiming: “Here’s a quick- 
freezing icy sweatshirt for you. Stretch! ThisTl 
cramp your style real good!” 

That was in 1963, thousands upon thousands 
of comic books ago. Today, the X-Men, whose 
powers come from genetic mutations and 


whose troupe always included formidable X- 
Women, number about 200 and are spread in 
enclaves around the world. 

They have become an ensemble cast popular 
with adolescents of all ages, a soap opera in 
which every story ends with the crying rued for 
another. 

And next month a new breed of X-Men, 
“Generation X,” younger and rougher-edged, 


will begin appearing in their own comic book, 
further seasoning the gurgling stew of plot 
permutations. 

Let it be firmly pronounced that the X-Men 
are the original mutants, decades ahead of a 
certain group of sewer turtles. They grapple 


with the pain of being misunderstood outsid- 
ers, and yet they use their superpowers to rise 



ers, and yet they use their superpowers to rise 
above this prejudice, trying to save ungrateful 
humanity before it is too late. 


“Chamber,” ooe of the new generation of X-Men, blowing away iris own chest; trading cards of “Storm” (top right) and “Magneto. 


This, arguably, is the perfect teenage fantasy. 
They are the world’s best-selling group of 
comic bodes and America's most popular ani- 


mated Saturday morning cartoon show. In 
schoolyards, X-Men trading cards are neck and 
neck with Power Rangers. X-Men action fig- 
ures were the top-selling plastic dolls last year. 
Thrir videogames are arcade hits. Plans for an 
Orlando, Florida, theme park with X-Men- 
inspired rides were announced recently. 

And yes, the X-Men are soon to be a miyor 
motion picture. Sequels are being discussed 
even as 20th Century Fox chooses a script. 

Not to put too fine a point on it, but this is an 
example of the synergy for which entertain- 


ment companies are scrambling. 

The billionaire Ronald O. Perdman, who 
now owns 80 percent of the Marvel Entertain- 
ment Group, has pushed it very aggressively. 
He bougjht Fleer, a major bubble-gum card 
company, and half a toy company, and re- 


pushed it very aggressively. 
, a major bubble-gum card 


company, and half a tew company, and re- 
trieved many of Marvel's licensing agreements. 


New York Tima Service 


tneved many of Marvel s licensing agreements, 
under which 1,500 items, from shoelaces to 
$1,000 leather jackets, are produced. 
“Perelman has made Marvel a much more 


aggressive company,” said Lauren Rich Fine, 
mSc vice president of Merrill Lynch. "Thor 
diversification is going to enable them to show 
tremendous revenue growth this year.” 

The 16 X-Man tides (“The Uncanny X- 
Men,” “X-Force," “X-Factor,” "Excalibur," 
“Wolverine,” etc.) are the big nebulae in Mar- 
vel’s universe; SO million comicbooks a year, at 
SI-50 or more apiece. 

In general. Marvel superheroes are a differ- 
ent breed from DC Comics powerhouses like 
Superman and Batman. They nave weaknesses. 
They find truth, justice and the American way a 
bit goody-two-shoes. 

And it’s mind-blowing how they dominate 
their newsstand rivals. In July, the X-family 
accounted for more than 14 percent of the 
comic market, more than the combined total of 
the next four families: Spider-Man. Batman. 
Superman and Dark Horse. Overall statistics 
are scarce, but the industry is believed to ap- 
proach $1 billion in sales. 


“The X-Men are tbe juggernaut,” said Mitch 
ltler, owner of Sl Mark's Comics, which has 


Cutler, owner of Sl Mark's Comics, which has 
stores in Manhattan and Brooklyn. “They are 


the big, immense, non-stop, cash-generating, 
unstoppable force.” 

Perhaps the most intriguing aspect of the 
phenomenon is its longevity. .The stories that 
began 30 years ago are the basis of ones still 
churned out, each one building and relating to 
the others in one of the most brilliant — or 
cynical — marketing ploys ever. (Where will 
“The Lion King” be a year from now?) 

So if they’re so omnipotent, why haven't you 
beard of then? 

To some extent, it depends on who you were 
at 13. It’s teenage angst that separates the X- 
Men from tbe Robin the Bey Wonder fans. 
Lots of revenge-craving nerds can identify with 
alienation, and with joining a dub of other 
societal rejects. 

“As a teenager, I sometimes feel sort of help- 
less. Things are sort of spinning out of control" 
said Akil Kixiew, a 15-year-old in Manhattan. 
“The X-Men never let that happen to them.” 

In some ways, it is their very ordinariness 
that is most attractive. Their powers come from 
a mutant gene, not the planet Krypton. ■ 

This easy accessibility may be part of the 


reason giris (perhaps a third of the television 
show's viewers) are drawn to the X-Men. Sa- 
mantha Kkinfieid, who is 7, loves Storm, who 
leads her own X-Man team and has telekinetic 
power over the weather. 

Of course, in their spare time, the X-Men are 
also in a death struggle with evil mutants to 
waiwt the world safe tor the ignorant mortals, 
who often despise them in return. 

“They are supethmnans who want to protect 
humans,” Mid Lauren Shuler Donner, who is 
producing the movie. “Humans don't recipro- 
cate in land and that's the sad part” 

- The trail of monthly Armageddons all began 
in tbe mind of Stan Lee, from whose brain also 
sprang Spider-Man, the Incredible Hulk, the 
Avengers and the Fantastic Four. His heroes 
have everyday human foibles. 

. “My mam interest has always been people,” 
said Lee, who e»lto himself “70-ish” and now 
lives in Los Angeles supervising Marvel's mov- 
ie and television ventures. When people look at 
Wolverine, he said, he wants them to think “If I 
had huge daws coating out of the back of my 
hands, that would be me.” 


WEATHER 


PEOPLE 


Europe 


Forecast for Thursday through Saturday, as provided by Accu-Weaiher. 


OF 

MgM *7/80 

JMmkm 18/88 

Mu am 

Mans MKO 

Bantam 27190 

Wpft 34103 

Banin 24/75 

BnmMta 22m 


CqwtiKmn 22771 
Cota Dm Sol 31/99 



Today Tomtom 

Mgti Lon W High Low W 
OF OF OF OF 


A N attorney for the woman who was 
sexually assaulted as a 13-year-old by 


Honglceng 


32 TB 2**75 I 32*9 24/75 DC 
2S*4 21/70 I 29/9* 20*96 pc 
31/60 25/77 pc 31/66 29-79 9 
Z04S* 23-73 9h 29(5* 23-73 
33*1 27-60 I 34-93 27W ■ 
31/96 72/71 pc 31-86 23-73 *h 
32/99 27/ao c 33/91 27-80 pe 
31/88 23-73 pi 31 /» 23771 pc 
33-91 23/73 pc 32*9 24-75 pc 
25/82 21/70 c 26/6? 21/7D pc 




North America 

The Mktaes) and moa of the 
East will have a spell ol 
warm and humid wealhor 
laler this week. A few tfiun- 
derstorma will occur Irom 
Dea Metres la Chicago Fri- 
day and from SI- Louis lo 
Detroit Saturday Scattered 
thunderstorms will continue 
across southern Florida. 


Europe 

London lo Hamburg will 
have a period of wet. chilly 
weather Thursday krta Satur- 
day. Paris to Geneva will 
have a lew thunderstorms 


Thursday. Friday and Satur- 
day wili be dry and chilly. 


day will be dry and chilly. 
Madrid win remain (by and 
very warm while Oslo end 
Sto ckhol m are cool with a 
few showers. 


Asia 

Tokyo will have hot. dry 
weather Thursday through 
Saturday. A lew Ihunder- 
storms wll reach Osaka and 
Nagasaki by the weekend. 
Scattered thunderstorms wil 
be Mowed by cooler weath- 
er across Korea. ManBa and 
Hong Kong will be warmer 
than usual w#h a lew after- 
noon showers. 


M7n 

G^aTowi 

CmWilni 


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17/92 7/44 * 21/79 1«»57 pc 

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/x sexually assaulted as a 13-year-old by 
Roman Potandd, tbe film director, in 1977 
said his client would like to see the crimi- 
nal case settled once and for all. including 
an arrangement under which Polanski 
could return to the United States without 
serving prison time. Late last year, the 
woman and Polanski reached an out-of- 
court settlement of a civil lawsuit she filed 
stemming from the encounter at the home 
of Jack Nicholson. Polanski fled the Unit- 
ed States just before he was to be sen- 
tenced for having unlawful sexual inter- 
course with a minor. 


II 

W 



into nuisance calls Princess Diana alleged- 
ly made to a millionaire friend, according 
to the editor of th e News of the World, the 
tabloid that brake the story. His statement 
came amid calls by both Tory and opposi- 
tion Labor members of Parliament for ar J 
inquiry into how the police investigation 


Roman Polanski: A conclusion? 


North America 


Middle East 


Latin America 


Today Tomorrow 

High Low W 16* Low It 

OF GIF OF OF 

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36-57 21/70 a 36-37 22-71 a 
39/97 14/57 a 39/97 17«2 a 


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39 /I OZ 19/66 a 40/10423/73 ■ 


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OF OF OF OF 

Bilanaa Aire* TB«4 8/48 pc 18/54 9/49 c 

Casern 27/80 21/70 pc 27/90 21/70 pc 

Lkna 18/94 16*1 , 16*4 15*1 pc 

MadcoCVy 24/75 1««7 I 23/73 1253 pc 

HiodaJairto 23/73 18*4 pc 34/75 19*6 a 

BaWage 19*6 7*4 a 17*2 3*7 pc 


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WV3KW. Mcc. W-Weamef. AI mapa, taacaaia and data provided by Accu-Waather, he. 2 1994 


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24/75 10*1 
29*4 19*6 
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29/84 19*6 
30*8 23/73 
33*1 22/71 
31*8 20*6 
33*1 26/79 
31*9 17*2 
20/79 11*2 
32*9 24/75 
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* 23-73 
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25/77 l 
18*4 pe 
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28/79 PC 
20*9 pc 
79*4 s 
13*5 s 
1355 PC 
14/ST PC 
20*8 pc 


A movie by the late Orson Welles that 
lay neglected in cellars and garages for 
many years has made its public debut four 
decades after he began work on it. “Don 
Quixote” inspired by Miguel Cervantes’ 
17th-century classic and shot at Welles's 
own expense over a period of at least 15 


concerts that never took place — tbe singer 


died six days before ins scheduled Aug. 22, 
1977, performances in UniondaJe, New 
York. Tbe lunch was attended by 150 peo- 
ple who still had their 1977 tickets and they 


years, won an enthusiastic reception at the 
Edinburgh Film Festival. 


were able to apply for a refund. The lunch 
featured one of his favorite foods: peanut- 
buiter-and-fried-banana sandwiches. 

□ 


j burgh Film Festival. 

□ 


Ehis Presley fans were treated, to a 
lunch marking the 17tb anniversary of two 


Scotland Yard did not leak information 
to the press about a police investigation 


said Diana was considering violating an- 
other royal taboo by taking legal action. 

□ 

- Hie mother and brother of Brian Wil- 
son, founder of die Beach Boys, sued Har- 
perCbilins, the publisher of a 1991 autobi- 
ography, and Wilson’s former therapist for 
more than 515 million. The book describes 
Wilson’s descent into drug use and depen- 
dency, while the libel suit says Audree 
Wilson is falsely portrayed as an aicobolic, 
unfit mother ana emotional cripple. Carl 
Wilson is described as an aicobolic and 
drug dealer. 

□ 

John Denver rammed his car into a tree 
near Aspen, cutting his bead, and was 
charged with drunken driving. 


WlC ,7 


Travel in a world without borders, time zones 

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COUNUty ACCESS NUMBER COUNTRY ACCESS NUMTnm COUNTRY ACCF^f NUMBER 


Australia 
C hina. PRO** 

G uam 

Hong Kocg 

India* 

Indonesia* 

Japan* 

Korea 

Korea** 

Malaysia* 

Ncw2ealand 


ASIA Italy- 

1-800-881-011 Liechtenstein* 

10811 I&huairfa* 

018-872 Luxembourg 


172 -1011 Brazil 
155-0 0-11 Chile 
8*196 Cofamfafe 

0-800-0111 Costa Rica** 


Saipan* 

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•in Lanka 
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001-801-10 Monaco- Iga-OOii Guatemala* “ r ““ 

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Armenia” 

Austria” - 


Bulgaria 

Croatia** 

Czech Rep 

Denmark* 

Finland - 

France 

Germany 

G reece" 

Hungary 

tagtanJa 

Ireland 


’ 105-11 Raasfa**tMoacow) 

235-2872 Slovakia 

8004)111-111 Spain* 

430-430 Sweden* ; . 

0080-102884 SwittCriJEOd* 
0019-991-1111 ILK. 

EUROPE Ukratee* „ 

8*14111 MZDDL 

022403411 Bahrain. . 
0800-100-10 Cfpni? 

00-18004010 Israel 

99-384011 Kuwait 

• 00-42040101 Lebanon (Beirut) 

8001-0010 Qatar 

9800-100-10 Saudi Arabia • 

J9*-0OT1 Turkey 


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156 

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