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international 



PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK 


TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


i a £ 




No. 34,676 


"London, Thursday, August 25, 1994 



H Russia,. 

•.:•••■••■• .■■■**• •’••• «sk- ond her husband, Mikhail, x. wu«. t ^m. it is a monument to &ov!cw 


In Russia, a ores 

.;■ Y : ‘: By iAJeSsandra Stanley 


teace farme rs. . , now donrinatt^ie 

^S^c^food^webo^ 


Moscow Set 


«nm* She and 

£S« to S' 

ssigg-^r'-*' 

tones, even dormant ou», * £ - to duplicate: sub- 

275 ka0 ““ rS 070 

ore Nuclear Mater 


£5?aiK °^ fac,OTy 
^©3*2®?® 

of the ^ fjS’^FKTTfte^sefflbly line* now 

parts and modem** 

See RUSSIA, Page 13 


PC Price War 
Stirs Industry _ 
But May Help J 
Business User * 

By Lawrence Malkin J 

Iniemauonal Herald Tnbw* r 

NEW YORK — Prices of persons" f 
Compaq are under pressur e ^JJ? 
STworid because an mtc ™J 4u ^ * 
tug-of-war that may leave some ma 

a ? 'iZZ w&S’^t couid , 

demand. and computer makers are . 

up on a bet that sales wdl 

continue during the normally busy au- 
^SSb^cause of *e econo^c 
nvoverv PC shipments rose 23 per 
S^&e second quarter in the Umt- 
al States and 17.8 percent m Europe. 

I The price war has not spreadio 
uope so far. but lively price conrpe- 
ionis under way m Japan m what is 
sentiahy a marketing phase of an 
irlier generation of computers. 

SeAW 22 percent on Deskpro, 
rolinea, and portable Gottnjj; 
hines, afl of w^ch are targeted at the 
usiness and not the home-office or 
pme markets, which have been left 

“imSS^o maintain market 
hare and bearing less 

Je as its belated restructunngsiarts to 

Sc hold, replied Wednesday with 

SifiSiSn-i.'o.^gsr 

demand for models with complex ar- 
chitecture for company wag**, 
Compaq is trying to position itseu 
toShtobefore the next 
of machines takes over in theever 
advancing computer business. TJomr 
SlRoot« 7 of Donaldson, L^km& 

J curette said that Intel Corp., 

leading chipmaker., wants 
Compaq to move up a notch from 486 
chips to a much faster 
ButOunpaq mamtains tte 
not necessary on 

Furthermore, said Jerry Mtcnaisiu, 
Tn ynapine editor of the computer mag- 

SSWease 1.0. manuf a^and 

buyers are watching the ittojubon of 
the struggle between Microsoft s new 
S^fsystem, known as Chicago, 


U.S. Readies 

Guantanamo 
For Unabated 
Cuban Tide 


‘Absolutely 1 Vo Way 9 
For Refugees to Reach 
America, Offtdal Says 

Compiled by Our Si off From DUpotcha 
WASHINGTON — Frustrated by a 

Sas^'KiW 


See COMPUTE, Page 4 ' 


Kiosk 


OHnnifn* *n */*“ 

\_rnomW Russian awlhonbes »- 

MOSC°W . seM 21 


Rad been stolen frmn aseci^^ 

offiaals said Wednesday. 

ties. • 

involving *c tbcq. iesearc h fadh- 


tS^iSSSsss 

'“Sawsissas 
■ asifSfrA'ss-sss 
^swsw-. t°- 


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to the state ooncemR^^ 

gaasssas 

told tetaf 


virtually tmythmg 
^^£^-238, the most common i*o£>po 

See BOMB, Pag® 4 , 


An Islamic Simple for Sau 

a* 4 Kr same nme, as rdigjous mBita 


Bv Nora Boustany 

■■p ■Li^affi Pott Sendee « 

^ anundectoedb^^l^, themod- 
want that drm»&» : 

an age and identity and rehr 

xould harm its cutomt ^ iis spe- . 

■&£ heritage. B^^SKgb K ^ 

Slslaimfchai^^^ d otber forapi 

^^ 0fl i!w lO s^5rSaimed reformat 
i seeking a b^rsay^ ^ spends «1 

inducts for ®^j > ^religion an undial- 
' essential^ 

'iasHisaSr powe'^p^- 


Atttessme ftJ-^g-gSSfS 

M3S3L«giKSS; 


AraKm” Prince Bandar bin Saltan, the 
•© Washington, said m 

a recent interview. . 

-This is a conservative c ““JJ , LjL Bt 



Alarmed that more auu . 

are^Sg «o reach the United Su^m 
SakShSt rafts and boats dwpite r^nt 
American efforts to dissuade themj senior 
ofQcials stressed that refugees pickedupat 
sea would stay at GuantAnamo indefinitely 

W ? av s 

anv wav of coming to the United Stat^ . 

riSrasasrssgs 

SSaasaatasB 

into the United Slates. rw>n« Sec- 
At a White House briefing. Defense : bee 
miary William J. Perry. Attorney General 

5S Reno and Undersecretary of State 

Peter Tamoff outlined a bleak P 

r?ihans who risk their lives trying to make 
the 90-mile (145-kilometer) crossing to 

F1 S's.id they were reviewing innm^a- 

rion ^roodures with ooeyetowmd™- 

couraging Cubans to apply fw U.S. 

^r,,ha hut had not taken the step m 

Immigration rules to expand" the 

number of Cubans that could be let in. 
to PmysSd the United States would 

J£l£S exp f d ^re'^^ 

SS* 11 *? 1980 Mariel boatlift, when 
'^Thousands of Haitian refugee*, also tar 

geSBS&SSSs 

ssssss-A srssrj* 

i ssusaMsffsa^ 

r end of next week, facihutt for 
, He said there was "significant capacity 

for even more and Wa^ngton 
nnnd hevond that if necessary. 

J SSsasaisaBSC 

: I ^t^’tK^efi^^^ 

tmtil such time as the people can be rep 
SS b ^now.edged that tae ad- 

ministradon had failed to «nvm“ ^U' 
so far. "We have a flood of boat 
Se en the way to GuantAnamo now. 


£ based in Saudi Arama, officials, wno B&pt 

i b«8? say m taw ’’SmentaHsm. to ™1- 


___ _____ Ear^ M»ri3nvnulU«it n 

United States in July. Page 

&DBn enKflL2hiMOTweanHD^_ 

d auat Morocco (Reuters’).-- Gun- thud SpamaidMi 



mo on the teachings oi - -- 

&tS»S?5 


of sJSi isle® 

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Pound 

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1 S 117 - 14 


wS«m accwded special consideratron. 

ja*as!KBisssa 

See SAUDIS, Page 4 


and Ballots 


RABAT. Morocco 

men shot and [, Wednesday when 
tsts in a lobby with automatic 

thcy ^ 5 !^ Won.3dng off With 
SXSomd^Mor«»n press agen- 

gunmen, who wounded a 


car “andtSk its ownCT hostage. Th 
woman was later released. 


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ItuwM.-.iMFd 5 Zirg^^— — - 


By John F - ^oras 

’ l " Y ? Tb t rSTn years of warwilh 

COLOMBO, Sri lAnto-Arg blighted tlds once 

w^SSs&ssss 

^^t”af^t1^5,000to^^confl^ 

^ — 

hie new leadtaj Chm^» «« hi 


rrtffgSSa 

sSSSSSS £ 0 ^.^ 

MSSS®?®®— t’^.fiassfSasS 

Mrs. Knmaratunga, 49,^d she «voiw ne w whcnain ®?f ° TamD rebels approached hff 
“as soon as posstble* and wouto cottcesaons to >s mosl 


SldSrtalematc. „ ^ KS ^ in Sri Lanka, as be has sugg^ “ 

jjsSStSjrSffis- ««-- 

theethnu 


See ISLAND, Pag® 4 


^eVicials said the Umted S«t«w^ 
also pressing its effort to get **““*“*! 

S wtd Canbbean nations to mkc in ^ 

^^irawg 

HoSe was considering takm &.?°®® 5?*" 

^^fcr^^sairh 

See CUBA, Page 4 

On Wall Street , 
Weak Data 
Spark a Rally 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dirjoiches 

view YORK — U.S. Stock prices 
surged Wednesday after a drop m ordere 
for durable goods in July » 

tors that the Federal 
not be forced to raise interest rates io 

sixth time this year. 

Stocks advanced in concert rrith bonds 
and the dollar after **<*££,% 
partment said orders 10 L -b- ^ oe __ nl j n 
big-ticket items declined b> -- . . 

Jrdy. the biggest drop .n two and a hall 

years. 

J Many economists had been forest tag 

Gaining i^iies ou ^ york“ Stock 

a . a^T3£.r*f*- hhw - 7 * 

as million shares changing hands. 

!is MThcre is a developing consensus that 

ratcTare not going lo go much higher and 

las that the Fed's ^^^'w^hTtev^r innation 
sufficient tojontrolwhatev^ 

m may be out thLl *v “ at Dillon 

188 deii. chief investment omcer 

Read & Co. 

s jwt 

£ lo-year 

See MARKET, Page 12 





.* V *swi; ; 


. mV.- - 4i. •■ . 




.Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 25, 1994 


Paris Ceremonies Spotlight Gallery of Aging Survivors 


WORLD BRIEFS 


By Joseph Fitchett 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — When Prime 
Minister Edouard Balladur 
and Paris Mayor Jacques 
Chirac stand side by side at 
ceremonies commemorating 
the French capital's liberation 
SO years ago, the solemnity of 
the moment will eclipse their 
rivalry as the leading conserva- 
tive contenders in the presi- 
dential election next year. 


198!? at age 80. Despite her 
prominence, the rank-and-file 
of women in the underground 
have benefited only slightly 
from the advancement in busi- 
ness and government that has 
often been the lot of men 
whose war record opened 
doors in the French establish- 
ment. 




But most French political 
leaders prominent in this 
week's events are probably 
marking their last hurrah in 
politics. Like the American 
veterans who participated in 
the Normandy landings in 
1944, the commemoration this 
year finds the politicians at re- 
tirement age or beyond. 

Among the famous living 
witnesses, Jacques Chaban- 
Delmas, 79, still using the 
name which he took in the un- 
derground, is approaching the 
end of an almost uninterrupt- 
ed postwar reign as mayor of 
Bordeaux. As a 25-year-old 
Gaullist general, Mr. Chaban- 
De lmas flew to London to 
warn the Allies of an immin ent 
Communist-led insurrection 
in Paris, then parachuted back 
into France in time to help 
seize control of the capital on 
behalf of General Charles de 
Gaulle. 


The passing of a generation 
also marks the end of a period 
in which wartime fighters have 
dominated historical discus- 
sions of this complex period, 
often seeking to block fresh 
research liable to sully the im- 
age of the Resistance as almost 
a chivalric saga of modem 
French knighthood. 

Even President Francois 
Mitterrand, 77, has never man- 
aged to quiet doubts about his 
wartime role. Successfully es- 
caping from a German prison- 
er-of-war camp after several 
attempts, Mr. Mitterrand 
joined the Vichy government 
as the official handling veter- 
ans’ affairs and was decorated 
by Marsha] P&tain for his ser- 
vices. 


But Mr. Mitterrand has ex- 
plained that he was acting on 
orders from the underground 
to infiltrate the Vichy r anks 
and use his authority to help 
the Resistance. 



Peacekeepers Pass Bosnian Blockade 

ZAGREB, Croatia (Reuters) — A convoy of French UN 
• peacekeepers, blocked for two days by Muslim refugees stranded 
m a demilitarized zone in Croatia, resumed its journey Wednes- 
day, the United Nations said. 

TIk 22-vehicle convoy, taking 280 French troops to Zagreb, 
manage d to get past the refugees , without incident early in the 
morning. “Most of the ref ugees were asleep because they were 
very tired/* Mqjor Jean-Fianqois Philippe said. 

- the convoy was Mocked on Monday by up to 3,000 refugees 
from the Bihac enclave In northwestern Bosnia, an area occupied 
by rebel Muslim forces. Major Philippe said the refugees accused 
the peacekeepers of having helped the rebel forces overrun their 
territory, a charge he denied. 


Khmer Rouge link Hostages to Aid 

DUV/ur DCWU 1Thmi°r Honor cuefriHnS h 


PHNOM PENH (Reuters) — Khmer Rouge guerrillas, have 
•’ dropped ransom demands for the release of three Westerners but. 
• want Western countries to halt military aid to the Cambo- 
dian government, the prime minis ter said Wednesday. *1 

“The Khmer Rouge said they don't demand a ransom any- 
more; but they, demand that powerful countries stop provjdmg- 
aid,” said the p rime minister, Prince Norodom Ranariddh. He 
said he was less optimistic of an early release of the hostages now 

that tin guerrillas had linked them to a poh dad agenda. . . 

The Khmer Rouge bad earlier demanded 5150,000 for. the. 
release of the three hostages, a Briton a Frenchman and an 
Australian. They were seized on July 26. . 


French TV Stations Face a Rare Suit i 


Mr. Chaban-Ddmas, now 
in failing health, will probably 
be succeeded in Bordeaux, a 
major conservative power 


base, by Alain Juppfc, 49, cur- 
rently France’s foreign minis- 


remJy France's foreign minis- 
ter and a young pillar of the 
Gaullist party founded before 
he was bom. 


Old age has claimed many 
other individuals who played 
key roles in those dramatic 
hours in Paris. Ernst von Bres- 
sensdorf, 76, who died Friday 
of cancer, was the officer in 
charge of communications at 
the Paris headquarters of the 
German occupation on Aug 
23, 1944, when be saw an in- 
coming telegram from Hitler 
ordering the destruction of the 
city. 


The most important mo- 
ment of Mr. Mitterrand's war 
was a trip to meet General de 
Gaulle, a visit that soured in- 
stantly when De Gaulle 
learned that the French politi- 
cian had traveled in a plane 
supplied by Britain. De Gaulle 
suspected the British govern- 
ment of wanting to manipulate 
France's political moderates. 

Both men came away from 
their encounter as political 
foes for the rest of iheir lives. 


Appalled, Mr. von Bressens- 
dorf stalled, holding up deliv- 
ery of the message until the 
next day when it was too late 
for the Germans to do much 
damage, a factor that helped 
General Dietrich von Choltitz 
decide to ignore the Ftihrer’s 
instructions and spare Paris. 


Some of the most tenacious 
survivors of the war are veter- 
ans of the French Resistance, 
some of them Communists, for 
whom the liberation of Paris 
was a crowning moment in 
their long underground cam- 
paign. 

Women, who were numer- 
ous in the ranks of the Resis- 
tance, especially as couriers, 
have received attention In the 
Paris ceremonies, all the more 
deserved for bong overdue in 
many cases. 

The head of France’s orga- 
nization of former Resistance 
fighters was for years until her 
death a woman, Marie-Made- 
leine Fourcade, who died in 


In the Gaullist system, an 
unspoken ally was the French 
Co mmunis t Party, whose ex- 
tremism helped drive voters to 
the right. As De Gaulle ex- 
plained to Andr6 Mairaux, his 
culture minister: “There is 
nothing between os and the 
Communists.” meaning that 
French voters were left no 
choice because centrist parties 
had emerged from the war al- 
most fatally weakened. 

For the Gaullists, now led 
by Mr. Chirac, there were 
many emotional links to the 
Communists because the two 
parties bad fought side by side 
m the Resistance. 



When the Capital 
Became War Zone 


Roam 

PARIS — Parisians looked 
bade on Wednesday with pride 
and nostalgia to a time 50 
years ago when they took to 
the streets with hunting rifles 
and gasoline bombs to liberate 
the French capital from its 
Nazi occupiers. 

For roughly 10 days begin- 
ning on about Aug. IS, 1944, 
such Parisian landmarks as 
Notre Dame Cathedral, the 


Latin Quarter and the city hall 
plaza were transformed into 


plaza were transformed into 
guerrilla war zones as police 
officers and lightly aimed ci- 
vilians took on German troops 
and tanks. 




The man who initiated the 
Paris uprising was & Commu- 
nist, Henri Tanguy, now 
known by his nom de guerre as 
Rol-Tangui. 




, 

Afrmx Frame -ftcor 

In the effort to prepare France for the surrender of 
German forces, top (Aug. 24, 1944), a young Ameri- 
can at the Office of War Information in London, John 
Peter, <frew a poster signaling the ‘Dawn of a New Day.** 


By the time General Phi- 
lippe Leclerc arrived at the city 
gates at 7:45 A.M. on Aug, 25, 
the street fighting had largely 
died down and the Germans 
had all but given up. 

For this reason, while 
France earlier this year ex- 
tended warm thanks to Allied 
veterans for the D-Day Nor- 
mandy landings, it has been 
taking all the credit for freeing 
Paris. 


Mr. Rol-Tangui, 86, has al- 
ways been a man with strong 
bonds to the left wing of the 
Gaullist party, which shared 
many of the Communist ideals 
of social change and much of 
their anti-imperialist ideology, 
including strong anti-Ameri- 
can impulses. 


For De Gaulle, this com- 
plicity tit his perceptions of 
the postwar world. With 
France safely protected by 
UJS. power, Paris was free to 


pursue policies of national in- 
terest even when they were at 
odds with its allies. The Krem- 
lin’s delight at this display of 
Gaullist independence meant 
that Moscow always ordered 
the French Communis to do 
whatever De Gaulle needed. 

Those turbulent days in 
1944, so bright after the gray 
occupation, brought out vivid- 
ly the characters and move- 
ments typifying France's his- 
tory as a tug-of-war between 


revolution and dictators, uto- 
pianism and military-style na- 
tion-building. 

Now fadmg into political 
folk memories, that era is hav- 
ing a last word with the Paris 
commemorations. As a Resis- 
tance veteran told an imperti- 
nent academic interviewer 
during a radio broadcast this 
week: “Just be patient a little 
longer, then you can tell our 
story the way you want it to be. 
But not yet" 


A three-day celebration be- 


gan on Wednesday with par- 
ties and speeches as well as 


ties and speeches as well as 
honors for those who fell in the 
fighting. The ceremonies go 
into high gear on Thursday 
with fireworks, a parade and a 
gila ball at the Place de la 
Concorde. 

They continue on Friday 
with a parade recalling de 
Gaulle's triumphant return to 
Paris from London. 

Hundreds of thousands of 
people lined the Champs- Hy- 


s6es on Aug. 26, 1944, to see 
him pass by. A key goal of bis 
march was to kill support for 
the Communists, wno had 
done much of the initial orga- 
nizing of the Resistance within 
Paris and had begun setting up 
their own postwar governmen- 
tal structures. 

De Gaulle, who opposed a 
big role for the Communists, 
grabbed the spotlight for him- 
self and then turned his back 
on the Resistance fighters. In- 
stead, he appealed to all politi- 
cal factions to unite in the new 
government. 

It was de Gaulle who had 
suggested General Leclerc’ s 
roleto the Allied commanders, 
feeling that a French liberating 
army would restore the honor 
that had been taken from 
France by the Nazis. 

Allied commanders were 
not eager to free Paris, believ- 
ing that taking the capital 
street by street would cost 
many lives and distract from 
the more pressing task of pur-, 
suing the fleeing German' 
forces. 

, In addition, rapturing the 
capital would oblige the Allies 
to take on the task of feeding 
Paris, diverting foodstuffs 
from the soldiers. 

• But de Gaulle convinced 
them that the Germans’ grow- 
ing weakness and the Resis- 
tance’s successes dictated an 
Allied move on Paris itself. 

Today, plaques can still be 
seen throughout the city mark- 
ing the sites where French sol- 
diers and citizens died. La all, 
more than 2,000 fell during the 
campaign to liberate Paris. 


Jewish Relics Given Back to Hungary 


BUCHAREST (AP) : — Romanian policemen returned more 
than $200 million worth of stolen Jewish relics and artworks to 
Hungarian Jewish officials at a ceremony Wednesday in Bucha- 
rest 

The head of Romania's police force, Major General Ion Pi- 
tulescu, said nearly all the religious objects, relics, carpets and 
paintings stolen from the Budapest Jewish Museum last Decem- 
ber had been recovered in a nearby village. Two Romanians who' 
also hold German citizenship have been detained in connection* 
with the theft ■’ ■ ■■■ ? 

“Ibis is the greatest gift we ever - received for our New Year- 
celebrations," said Gusztav Zoltai, director of the Confederation' 
of Jewish Communities in Hungary. > 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


Paris Police Warn Over Holdups 

PADTC/ACtn TL.l? L 1 ! - . _ . 


. PARIS (AFP) — The Fiencb police issued a warning Wednes- 1 
day concerning a wave of: holdups by drug addicts wielding L 
hypodermic needles allegedly infected by the AIDS virus. v 
The police said they had made eight arrests in Paris since the i 
beginning of the month after people* were -attacked as they 1 
- withdrew cash from ancomatic bank tellers. ■ ■ 

The most dangerous area was Les Hailes, in the center of the ; 
capital, ft huge shopping and entertainment complex haunted by . 
gangs of youths and drug addicts, the police said. ~ 

A widesgsredl power hdtare hit many areas of southern Italy for 
®bre than 90 minutes on Wednesday, blocking thousands of , 
people in trains and elevators and knocking out traffic signals in 1 
many towns and cities, officials said. ( Reuters ) 1 

RaOroad ticket booths for international travelers were dosed 
Wednesday at major Dutch stations as employees walked out over 
potential job cuts and company restructuring plans. (AP) 

Fires in the north off the Spanish province of Aragon have 
destroyed about 3,000 hectares of pine forest and brush and are ! 
getting dangerously close to a Romanesque monastery where the 
Hth- and 12th-century kings of Aragon are buried. (AFP) J 
Traffic wiH be tnrtaOed in Athens an Thursday because of ■ 
pollution and a heat wave, the Environment Ministry said. (AFP) 


Italy and Germany Vow 
To Battle Fascist Groups 


Rightist Denies German Alliance 


‘Palestinian School Year’ Nears 


BONN — The German and 
Italian justice ministers agreed 
Wednesday that European na- 
tions needed to work together 
more to combat rigbtisL radicals 
and block the spread of neo- 
Nazi propaganda. 

Sabine Leutheusser- Schnar- 
renberger and Alfredo Biondi 
said European governments 
had to find ways of keeping 
young people from committing 
hate crimes against foreigners, a 
statement said. 


dally by youngsters,” the state- 
ment reported the ministers as 
saying. 

“More intensive cooperation 
is also needed to halt the spread 
of neo-Nazi propaganda mate- 
rials and the international 
networking of extreme right- 
wing organizations," they add- 
ed. 

■ Berlusconi and Bossi Abet 

Prime Minister Silvio Berlus- 
coni of Italy has met with Um- 
berto Bossi, the leader of the 
Northern League and his coali- 
tion partner, to patch up their 
beleaguered coalition and head 
off a new row on pension re- 
form, Agence Fran ce-Pr esse re- 
ported from Porto Cervo, Italy. 

The two met in Sardinia late 
Tuesday night, Mr. Berlusconi's 
spokesman said. 

Since the March election that 
brought them to power, the two 
men have been engaged in an 
almost constant public quarrel. 


The two ministers met here to 
review legal issues and prepare 
for a European Union justice 
and interior ministers meeting 
scheduled for SepL 7 in Berlin. 
East European ministers have 
been invited to join the session 
the next day. 

“Preventative measures sup- 
ported by the whole of society 
are needed to combat hate 
crimes against foreigners, espe- 


BONN — The far-right leader Franz Schdnhuber denied 
Wednesday that be had formed an alliance with another 
' ultranationalist figure, and he said Germans would soon be 
fed up with paying for Nazi crimes. 

Under fire from the government, the medi a and his own 
Republican Parry, Mr. Schonhuber, a former Waffen-SS 
member, said his talks with Gerhard Frey, leader of the hard- 
line German People’s Union, were merely intended to stop 
feuding within the far-right 

The two men had jointly announced the formation oi a 
“defensive force” against what they described as the "leftist 


Israel Cedes Control Outside Self-Rule Area, 


Bare Elbows: 
Unorthodox? 


popular front.” But on Wednesday Mr. Schonhuber said, 
“There was no talk of coooeraraon nr an nlliannp. in mv 


“There was no talk of cooperation or an allian ce in my 
statement, just of efforts to avoid letting the established 
politicians play us off against each other.” 


This was their first meeting 
of attempted reconciliation 
since Aug. 13, when they met at 
Mr. Berlusconi’s residence in 
Milan. 

One of the main items they 
discussed was pension reform, 
which involves heavy spending 
cuts and has millions of pension 
holders worried. Mr. Berlus- 
coni’s spokesman said the gov- 


ernment majority coalition was 
determined to preserve pen- 
sioners’ rights. 

In October, the government 
is to present an austerity plan to 
cut up to 45 billion to 30 billion 
lire ($29 billion to 532 billion) 
from the budget. Cutting ex- 
penditures was a central plank 
in Mr. Berlusconi's election 
campaign. 


By Carylc Murphy 

Washington Past Service 

JERUSALEM — Israel 
h anded over to Palestinians 
control of education in the 
West Bank town of Ramailah 
on Wednesday, marking the 
first transfer of power to the 
Palestinian self-rule authority 
outside the newly autonomous 
areas. 

The ceremony, to be followed 
by similar ones in other West 
Bank towns over the next few 
days, will place the entire edu- 
cational system of the Israeli- 
occupied territory in Palestin- 
ian hands by the time the school 
year begins on SepL 1. 

"The new school year will be 
a Palestinian school year in the 
West Back and Gaza Strip un- 
der the responsibility of the Pal- 
estinian National Authority,” 
said Naim Abu Humes, direc- 
tor of education in the self-rule 
government 


An Israeli education official, 
Mahfouz Zaber, said, "This is 
the fruit of the peace process.” 

Although a small step, the 
move provides Palestinians 
with the first evidence that their 
self-rule government will not be 
confined to the Gaza Strip and 
Jericho, as many had feared. 

The PLO and Israel, mean- 
while, initialed an agreement 
Wednesday in Cairo allowing 
the Palestinians to ran their 
own civilian affairs in the occu- 
pied West Bank starting SepL 
12. After six weeks of tough 
bargaining, the chief negotia- 
tors, N abfl Shaath for the Pales- 
tinians and General D ann y 
Rothschild for Israel, initialed a 
document that is to be signed 
Sunday at the Erez crossing be- 
tween Israel and autonomous 
Gaza. 


thority because a meeting of. 
countries that have pledged aid 
to the Palestinians is set for 
three days earlier. 

Most donor countries have 
withheld aid, com plainin g that 
the Palestinians have failed to 
set up a proper financial system 
to receive the money. - 

“Today is the real start for 
the implementation of the 
peace agreement on the West 
Bank,” Mr. Shaath said. 


Only after this transfer takes 
place will the two sides begin 
negotiations on a full turnover 
of political authority to Pales^ 
tizuans in the West Bank. 


Those talks are likely to be 


lengthy and difficult since they 
wfli cover Israeli troop rede- 


Reutm 

JERUSALEM — A Tel 
Ayiv rabbi, in the face of a 
withering heat wave, has 
ruled that a man can di- 
vorce his wife for rolling up 
her sleeves past her elbows 
in public, an Israeli news- 
paper said Wednesday. 

Some Orthodox Jews in- 
sist women cover their arms 
for modesty. “The sleeves 
must reach the elbows, cov- 
ering the whole of the el- 
bows,*’ the daily Ma’ariv 
quoted Rabbi Moshe Bitan 
as saying. 

“Even on the hot days of 
summer ” the rabbi said, 
“if a woman bares her arms 

in the street, her husband is 

entitled to divorce her.” 


ploymeat, security for Jewish 
settlements on the West Bank. 


Mr. Shaath said earlier that 
SepL 12 had been chosen for 
transferring other areas of au- 


settlements on the West Bank, 
and Palestinian elections for a 
governing coundL 
Although Palestinians are 
pushing hard for early elec- 


tions, and have declared they 1 
want them to take place on Dec. 
lathis seems too early consid- 
ering the issues that must be 
resolved first, Israeli officials; 
have said. 



PARIS (AFP) — For the first time. France’s broadcasting * 
watdidog said Wednesday that it would seek fines against the 
three main television networks for giving the government too 
much air time. ..... 

The agency, known as the CSA, said it would file suit with the 
Council of State, France’s highest administrative comt, against* 
the privately owned TFi and the state-owned. France 2 and": 
France 3 stations. It said it would seek fines of several million 
francs against each station. A million francs is about $200,000. 

Under French law, television stations must share air time 
equally between governing and opposing parties. The nine-mem- 
her CSA said that hi the first three months of this year, it had * 
observ e d that news programs on the networks gave the lion’s share; 
of coverage to the government when it came to appearances by * 
poUtitians. . j 




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3 


osition’s Collapse Raises Fear of Radicalism 


• By Anthony DePahna 

New Yor k Time s Syria - 
MEXICO CHY-t— A fterthe 
stinging rejection Of its candi- 
date and of its radical image, 
the primary party of Mexico's 
left — once a strong challenger 
to the government partybut-a 
weak third in the presidential 
election ott Sunday ---is so 4i- 
vided that it is in danger, of 
tearing itself .apart. ' • 

The spiiQtermgof the left as a 
political force raises feats that 
the most disaffected parte of 
sodetywill feel cut off from the 
political process. The feats arc- 
made more Teal by rebels who 
staged ah armed uprising in 
Chiapas state" on jan. I, swing 
they had been exduded from 
Mexico’s political fife. ‘ 

“For aH practibaT purposes, 
the left asapohtical force could 
disappear after this," stud Lor- 
enzo Meyer, a political scientist 
at the CoLegto de Mexico, who 



supported the- leftist presiden- 
tial candidate, Cuauhtemoc 
CAntfwias Scl6rzano.“But the 
fact is tlwd Mexico needs a left 
if we want to have, a healthy 
society. If we 1 do. not, then at 
some point the most radical 
-bans of the left will turn fo the 
possbffity^Qf vkrtenceL” 

The rebels,' known as Zapa- 
tistas, stfflannedandhiding in 
the mountains of Chjapas, have 
already tried to turn their ihifi- 
tazy offensive -into a -political 
one. Earlier this month, they 
organized what they called a 
National Democratic Conven- 
tion that was basically a gather- 


RkrtpoBcmKO waitHig outside the Federal Electoral Institute in Mexico City as ballots were counted on Wednesday. 


mg of peasant groups, - indepen- 
dent labor organizations and 
other parts of what makes up 
'the Mexican left 

Th^mdirectty .endorsed Mr. 
C&rdeoas and vowed to partici- 
pate in a national mobilization 
if the decthnu- were, tainted by 
fraud. In; the following weeks. 


the Cdrdenas campaign drew 
huge crowds and appeared to 
be gaming momentum. But the 
coalition faltered Sunday, un- 
able to convert the street enthu- 
siasm into votes. 

According to official results, 
with 88 percent of the votes 


counted as of Tuesday night, 
Mr. C&rdenas got about 17 per- 
cent of the vote, far behind the 
50 percent of the projected win- 
ner, Ernesto Zedillo Ponce de 
Lo6n of the governing Institu- 
tional Revolutionary Party, and 
the 27 percent far Diego Fer- 
nandez de Cevallos of the right- 


of -center National Action Par- 
ty. 

The 17 percent is about half 
of what Mr. C&rdenas received 
in the 1988 election, which was 
generally considered to have 
been marred by fraud. 

Local candidates for Mr. 
Cardenas’s party, the Demo- 


cratic Revolutionary Party, also 
Tell short Sunday. Us candidate 
for governor of Chiapas is trail- 
ing the governing party candi- 
date in partial results. The party 
is projected to win just nine 
seats in the expanded 128-seat 
Senate and about 70 seats in the 
500-member lower bouse of the 
national legislature. 

Weakened by infighting, Mr. 
C&rdenas’s party also suffered 
from contradicting images. On 
one side, it is perceived as a 
violent movement whose high- 
way blockades get out of hand 
and whose takeovers of munici- 
pal buildings disrupt the civil 
society. Yet economic and so- 
cial planks in its platform were 
not radical at all — parts 
matched the proposals of Mr. 
Zedillo and Mr. rem&ndez. 

Adolfo Aguilar Zinsser, one 
of Mr. Cardenas's advisers, said 
the only difference between his 
parry and the rightist opposi- 
tion was “the expectation of 
risk connected to change.” 

In an interview Tuesday, Mr. 
C&rdenas said he would “con- 
tinue being a tighter to change 
the country for democracy” and 
was going ahead with a rally 
Saturday that be hoped “as im- 
portant number of people” 
would attend. He conceded, 
however, that he does “not 
know where the left stands” af- 
ter the election. 

“The banner of Cardenism is 
more or less a moral idea,” Mr. 
Meyer said. “And it seems it 
doesn’t work in a country like 
ours." 


Prognosis Not Good 
For Health Reform 
If Newest Plan Fails 


Hair Samples From Murder Scene Are Said to Match Simpson’s 


Cw yfl e rf ty Our Stiff From Jiyafcte 

LOS ANGELES— Samples of hair found in a 
blue but cap at the scene where O. J. Simpson’s 
former wife and a friend were murdered have 
been found by the FBI -to match those of Mr. 
Simpson, according to a report by a Los Angeles 
television station.' ’ " 

KNBC television said scientists at the FBI 
laboratory in Washington had found that sam- 
ples from the. cap -were consistent with hairs 
taken under court order, from Mr. -Simpson's 
scalp. 

Mr. Simpson, 47, a forma: football star turned 


sportscaster, actor and advertising pitchman, has 
pleaded not guilty to the murders of Nicole 
Brown Simpson, 35, and. Ronald L. Goldman, 
. 25, who were killed outside fits. Simpson’s Brent- 
wood townhouse on June 12. \ 

■ The hair samples were among several develop- 
ments in the Simpson case, which is moving 
quickly toward its Sept. 19 trial date. 

.. The disclosure of the FBI tests, which do not 
carry the scientific weight of the more-accurate 
DNA blood tests, nevertheless cast doubt on Mr. 
Simpson's contention that he was never at the 


POLITICAL \OTES 


The MAACP Poidars Ks Boote 

BAlTlMokE ~~ On April 9,; 1993, Benja- 
min F. Chavis Jr., the freshly elected NAACP 
executive director, struck a confrontational 
pose as lie attempted to reverse the moribund 
image of the 85-yofnxjld civil rights organiza- 
tion. 

Last weekend, Mr Chavis was dismissed 
for. in the words of - oiip board member, 
racing the engines of .the organization “too’ 
hard, too fast "The main accusations against 
him concerned the organization’s -money 
problems. 

On Wednesday, a judge denied Mr, Cha- 
vis’s request for an injunction prohibiting the; . 
NAACP from removing him. ■ 

Now. for the second time iii less than two 
years, the proud and revered civil rights orga- .. 
nization is lurching toward yet . another 
change in direction — away from Mr. Cha- 
vis’s aggressive black nationalism toward its: 
traditional, integrationist roots. 

The search for a new director will requires 
potentially divisive sift through a rosterof 
black leaders for someone with the talent, 
desire and charisma to lead the NAACFr 

-ALAT) 

Can Sroohey Bescoe EspyT ■ 

W ASH INGTON — Agriculture Secretary 
Mike Espy was the guest of an Atlanta muse- 
um at this year’s Super Bowl game — a two- 
day trip he characterized as official because 
halftime at the pro football contest included a 
salute to Sraokey Bear. . 

Smokey is the mascot of tiie.U.S. Forest ; 
Service, which is under Mr. Espy’s jurisdic- 
tion. 

The secretary received four game tickets 
worth $350 from the Ferabank Museum of 1 
Natural History, which was preparing to" 
open an exhibit to mark Smokey’s 50th birth- 
day. Mr. Espy's travel, hotel and daily ex- 
penses — $849 — were paid by the govern- 
ment, according to travel documents 
obtained by The Associated Press. 

Attorney General Janet Reno hp asked 
for an independent counsel to investigate Mr. 


'Espy,- arid that request is still pending. The 
White House also is seeking an ethics investi- 
gation. Mr. Espy denies any wrongdoing. 

• An Agriculture Department spokeswom- 
an, Ah Webb, said Mr. Espy considered the 
Jan. 30 game an official function because of 
the Smokey tribute. ( AP) 

A Hero, but Only Half a Story 

. WASHINGTON — In television commer- 
cials aired by Oliver L. North, who is a 
. Senate candidate. William Haskell says Mr. 
North saved his life. Wbat Mr. Haskell does 
not mention is that he served as a key aide to 
.Mr. North during the Iran-contra scandal. 

Mr: North is paying for television spots 
' across Virginia that describe his relationship 
with Mr. Haskell, a Maryland accountant, in 
heroic terms. According to the advertise- 
. riienl, Mr. Haskell was severely wounded 

- during the Vietnam War and Mr. North's 
platoon rescued him on the battlefield. “I 
wouldn’t be sitting here talking to you if it 

/weren’t for OHie North,” Mr. Haskell says. 

. But Mr. North and Mr. Haskell also 
shared in covert activities during the Iran- 
contra affair of the 1980s. according to the 
final report of special prosecutor Lawrence 
HL Walsh. While Mr. North served in the 
White House as a key architect of that arms- 
for- host ages scheme, Mr. Haskell acted as a 
trusted courier for Mr. North, dispensing 
more than $140,000 in cash, tapping into 
secret Swiss bank accounts and even arrang- 
ing the purchase of a ship used to smuggle 
weapons. 

Mr. North’s aides said that they had made 
no mention of the Iran-contra connection 
because they did not believe the public cared 
about it. fWP J 

Quote/Unquote 

- Francisco Aruca, who runs a charter com- 
pany authorized to operate flights io Cuba 
•arid who has been singled out by rightist 
Cuban-American interests as a sympathizer 
of Fidel Castro’s regime: “To be called a pro- 
Comrounist in America is not dangerous. But 
in Miami it is a death sentence.” 


crime scene on the night the murders were 
committed. 

In a motion filed Monday, prosecutors said a 
sample taken from a bloody trail leading away 
from the murder scene match the DNA type of 
Mir. Simpson’s blood, according to preliminary 
tests. 

Defense lawyers accused prosecutors of trying 
to “burn up” all the DNA evidence in the case by 
overtesting it so that there would not be any left 
for the defense examine. 

Gerald Uelmen, a member of the defense 
team, said prosecutors had acted in bad faith by 


Away From Politics 

• The rate of violent crime in ran*«fa dropped by 
more than 5 percent last year, the sharpest de- 
cline in more than 30 yearn, and the number of 
homicides fell to 630 from 732 in 1992. the 
Canadian Center for Justice Statistics reported 

• A judge ordered a Korean infant retamed to a 
Cheektowaga, New York, man whose adoption 
attempt fell through after his wife died of cancer 
last month. Ruling against the Quakertown Love 
the Children adoption agency, a Pennsylvania 
judge denied its claims that Keith Dossier and his 
wife, Kimberly, had deliberately misled case- 
workers about Mrs. Lussier’s illness. 


failing io disclose immediately the existence of 
some blood samples and are now trying to use up 
the evidence through overtesting. 

“Your honor needs to consider if what is at 
issue here is a sophisticated game plan to burn up 
the evidence before we can do independent 
tests,” Mr. Uelmen told Judge Lance A. I to. . 

But Deputy District Attorney Lisa Kahn 
urged the judge to deny the defense request for 
access to blood samples until prosecution tests 
were completed. 

Judge llo ended the two-day bearing saying he 
would rule Friday. 


• A man was attacked by nearly 4,000 bees while 
mowing grass near Robstowo, Texas, and was 
stung about 1,000 times. The victim, Christopher 
Graves, was hospitalized in serious but stable 
condition. Five other people were stung, includ- 
ing an emergency room nurse. So-called killer 
bees were believed to have been be responsible. 

• Sport fishermen and environmental groups can- 

not sue Exxon Coro, for losing use of natural 
resources after the devastating 1989 Exxon Val- 
dez cal spill, the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in 
San Francisco ruled. ap. Rewa % lit 


By Adam Clymer 

New York Tima Senux 

WASHINGTON — Health 
care legislation is hanging by a 
fraying thread. Eleven months 
after President Bill Clinton pro- 
claimed a bold — and complex 
— proposal to guarantee health 
insurance to all Americans, the 
last dear legislative path to- 
ward that goal seems to be clos- 
ing. 

The bipartisan proposal an- 
nounced Friday by the self- 
styled “mainstream coalition.” 
which seemed to pro-adminis- 
tration Democrats to offer a 
welcome basis for negotiation. 
looked less encouraging Tues- 
day after the group’s Republi- 
can leader. Senator John H. 
Chafee of Rhode island, con- 
tinued to present it in all but 
“take it or leave it” terms. 

The mainstream plan, far less 
sweeping than the bill now be- 
fore the Senate, aims to reduce 
the deficit by $100 billion and 
to insure 92 percent of Ameri- 
cans, up from the current 85 
percent, by 2004. 

The Senate majority leader, 
George J. Mitchell. .Democrat 
of Maine, has legislation on the 
floor that seeks 95 percent cov- 
erage by the year 2000, and says 
that employers could be re- 
quired to pay half of workers' 
insurance premiums if that goal 
were missed. 

Mr. Mitcbdl, in an interview, 
insisted that there was no occa- 
sion for gloom. He said that 
negotiations were difficult but 
that “it is within our reach to 
get agreement ” 

But another retreat on health 
care was sounded in the House 
on Tuesday as the speaker, 
Thomas S. Foley. Democrat of 
Washington, said he did not 
know if a universal-coverage 
bill could pass in the House. 

If it could not, he said, he 
would settle for a bill providing 
progress on insurance-law 
changes. The administration 
has repeatedly scorned the idea 
of insurance reform alone, ar- 
guing that if it were not accom- 
panied by universal coverage, it 
could do more harm than good. 

At a breakfast with reporters 
Tuesday morning, Mr. Foley 
said that if it could not pass a 
universal coverage bill. Con- 
gress would either pm the issue 
off until nr l year or “try and 
find legislation that can pass 
and make significant, if initial, 
steps toward the goals of cover- 
age, avoidance of cost shifting, 
maintenance of quality, all 
those things, including some 
strategies for controlling costs.” 

His comments crystalized a 


growing recognition that sup- 
porters of universal health in- 
surance may be unable to get it 
through Congress, and must 
soon decide whether to accept 
something less if they think it 
points the way to full coverage. 

No less an advocate of uni- 
versal coverage than Senator 
Edward M. Kennedy, Demo- 
crat of Massachusetts, who has 
seen past efforts founder on an 
unwillingness to compromise; 
has been urging less experi- 
enced senators to take the long 
view and not be too quick to 
reject promising moves short of 
universal coverage. 

Bui even the chance of signif- 
icant incremental change like 
that described by Mr. Foley 
may evaporate if negotiations 
between Mr. Mitchell and Mr. 
Chafee and others in bis group 
do not show progress soon. 

The Mitchell approach to the 
talks, as described by him and 
his allies, is that once they have 
seen the fine prim, they hope to 
accept many of Mr. Chafee’s 
proposals but want some others 
put to a vote in the Senate. 

They cite issues such as the 
mainstream plan’s lack of pro- 
vision for prescription drugs for 
the elderly, despite severe limits 
on future Medicare spending, 
as the sort of issue they cannot 
accept without a vote. ' 

Democrats pointed out that 
they were do! asking the main- 
stream group to give up some of 
its stands, just to agree to put 
some of them to a vote. 

“I think it’s a reasonable ap- 
proach,” said Senator John D. 
Rockefeller 4th, Democrat of 
West Virginia. 

But when Mr. Chafee was 
asked if teal approach satisfied 
him, he replied, “It doesn’t, be- 
cause we spent a lot of time 
ironing out very fun dame ntal 
differences.” His group had 
held 60 hours of discussions. 

“We haven't quite said. Take 
it or leave it,’ ” be said, “be- 
cause teal would sound very 
demanding.” 

But tears tee way he sounds 
to many disappointed Demo- 
crats. On Monday, be told a 
meeting of Democrats that 
while members of his group of 
about 20 senators had different 
levels of flexibility, “in my own 
rase, there is probably not a lot 
of room for negotiation,” one of 
J?ose Demo*^a» reported. 


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AVSC is an intematfonaj family 
planning/health organization 
whose mission is to foster world- 
wide access to quality family planning 
services while ensuring free and 
Informed choice. We seek an experienced 
international manager for our Regional 
Office in Asia. Presently located in Dhaka, 
Bangladesh, the Asia Regional Office will be 
moving to a new location within the region (to be 
announced shortly}. 


• rote In developing, managing and evaluating country- level 
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the countries of the region (Bangladesh, Indonesia, Nepal, the 
Philippfnes, Pakistan, and Vietnam). He or she win manage the 
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The candidate we seek should have a graduate degree in pubic 
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Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 25, 1994 , 


U.S. Considers Lifting China Sanctions Linked to Rights UN Says It Lacks 

but Oiinaiaban^ from n^ving theasastance. « wf o jWl /YI'llIVlT'S 

A second sanction still in force involves the MA- W dJ l.lXdJl i-TXl-fii-1 W-*- & 

Rights Watch and Inquiry 

'em as Hobbled 


By Paul F. Horvitz 

InierrumoraJ Herald Tribune 

WASHINGTON — Three months after Presi* 
dent Bill Clinton pledged to continue certain 
economic sanctions against China for past hu- 
rnan rights abuses. Commerce Department offi- 
cials say discussions have been held about lifting 
those barriers. 

Adding to confusion about the Clinton admin- 
istration’s intentions, Commerce Secretary Ron 
Brown said Wednesday that there were “no pre- 
sent plans” to lift the sanctions, which bar Wash- 
ington from providing money to Beijing to plan 
major development projects. 

A day earlier, Mr. Brown said at a briefing that 
it was “common knowledge” that the ban on. 
development funds for China was “under discus- 
sion in the administration” but that no decision 
had been made. 

“Those items are always under consideration.” 
he said. 


The comments indicate that a move to lift the 
sanctions has not been seriously considered by 
the president but could emerge in coming 
months. 


The subject is sensitive because Mr. Brown 
begins a major trade mission to China this week- 
end in hopes of boosting the fortunes of U.S. 
companies, and because Mr. Clinton had specifi- 
cally extended the sanctions when he decided in 
May to grant China unconditional most-fa- 
vored-nation trading status. 


Hie sanctions were imposed in 1989 after pro- 
democracy demonstrations were brutally put 
down by Chinese troops, and Mr. Clinton evi- 
dently wanted to retain the sanctions to show his 
resolve on human rights issues even as be broad- 
ened China's favored trading status with the 
United States. 

A senior Commerce Department official said 
Wednesday that low-level discussions had been 


held on development aid but that there were no 
plans to lift the sanctions. 

“It may happen sometime,” he said, “but tills 
is not a front-burner issue today.” 

Mr. Brown, the official said, misspoke when he 
said discussions were “common knowledge;” 

The sanctions specifically bar China from re- 
ceiving so-called trade development assistance 
and ban the payment of risk insurance for invest- 
ments in China. Restoring these programs would, 
have high symbolic value for China, whose offi- 
cials are keen to see the sanctions dropped. 

When the sanctions wore imposed, the U.S. 
Trade and Development Agency had been 


VS. Overseas Private Investment Corp., which 
provides risk insurance to American companies 
investing in prcyects abroad. 

Mr. Brown, meanwhile, has touted Ms mission 
to China as an aggressive effort to gain a foot- 
hold for American companies in the world’s 
largest market. 

He will travel to Beijing, Shanghai, Guangz- 
hou and Hong Kong with the cmef executive 
nor US. i 




By Jane Periez 

Sew York Tunes Stmce 

NAIROBI — The United. 
Nations' efforts to monitor hu- 
man-rights abuses in. Rwanda 
under the new regime and to 


op meat projects. Typically, U-S. companies con- 
ducting the studies would have the inside track 
on weaning an eventual construction contract. 
Today, the total fund has grown to $45 million 


officers of 24 major US. corporations, including 
Atlantic Richfield, Fluor, Westinghouse Electric, 

Bell Atlantic, Eastman Kodak, Chrysler and 
TRW. 

Mr. Brown is expected to agn agreements with - bring to justice those suspected 
Chinese officials to formalize ways of resolving a of participating in the massa- 
range of trade disputes between the two coun- 
tries, and company- to-company deals are also 
expected to be sealed. 


Senate Republicans Say 
They Can Stop Crime Bill 


Compiled try Our Staff From Dispatches 

WASHINGTON — Senate 
Democrats and Republicans 
maneuvered Wednesday to find 
a way out of a political impasse 
that has blocked final passage 
of President Bill Clinton’s $30 
billion crime bill. 

Democrats say Republicans 
are stalling and trying to kill the 
bill because it includes a ban, 
strongly opposed by the Na- 
tional Rifle Association, on 19 
types of semiautomatic assault 
weapons 

“It is clear that a substantial 
majority favors passage of the 
crime bill,” the Senate majority 
leader, George Mitchell of 
Maine, said. 

But Senate Republicans have 
claimed enough support to de- 
rail the measure if they do not 
get the changes they want in a 
House- approved version. 

Republicans say they only 



COMPUTE: PC Price War Starts 


want to make the bill tougher 
and less costly. “We’re pre- 

S ared to move ahead,” said the 
Republican leader. Bob Dole of 
Kansas, in a Senate speech 
Wednesday. “We think we can 
have a better crime bilL” 

A vote on the bill has not 
been scheduled. 

On Tuesday. Mr. Dole out- 
lined the Republicans’ strategy 
to remold the legislation to their 
satisfaction. He said he had 
enough Republican votes to 
block the measure indefinitely 
on a procedural vote if the Re- 
publicans’ changes were not 
adopted. 

Mr. Dole released a letter 
signed by 40 of the 44 Senate 
Republicans saying they would 
support his procedural chal- 
lenge “unless most of our con- 
cerns are resolved." With Mr. 

n T - ■ . tvnii' a ncucr- lutucn 

5? ] ' n,e miDorit y leader. Bob Dole, holding a letter from 
W4 lUSSi* w S n ** ^ Republican senators who want changes in the crime bin. 


Nfiic Thrifcr-' Reuters 


BOMB: 2 More Russians Arrested CUBA: [7.5. Readies Guantanamo 


Continued from Page 1 

and the integration of IBM and 
Apple systems through the 
PowerPC chip that the two 
computer makers and Motorola 
Inc. jointly designed. 

To most people, all this may 
seem like a battle out in cyber- 
space, but Mr. Michalski point- 
ed out that in the computer 
business, "it is dog eat dog, and 
the low-cost producer wins.” 

He said the streamlined 
Compaq company had taken 
the opportunity “to pull ahead 
like a bike rider in the Tour de 
France, which leaves the others 
the choice of trying to catch up 
with him or hanging back and 
waiting for him to exhaust him- 
self." 

The risk for Compaq is that it 
will not sell out its heavy stock 
of 486 models and be stuck with 
them. 

So far, the latest round of 
price cuts has not been extend- 
ed to Europe or Asia, but ana- 
lysts have said that Compaq is 
likely to initiate reductions next 
week, although probably less 
than its North American cuts. 

Chris Fell, director of the Eu- 
ropean PC group at Dataquest 


in London, said Europeans not 

only were buying more priwa"- . ,, „ , , 

ful machines but were fading i 4 *’ 


cres were woefully under- 
manned and underfunded, offi- 
cials said Wednesday. 

Only 3 of a planned 20 hu- 
man-rights monitors have ar- 
rived m Rwanda, and these 

people do not have cars or com- 
munications to enable them to 
move around the country. 

A minimum of 70 monitors. 


up on more software as wefl. 

If any company stands to 
gain by a price war, Mir. Fell 
said, it is Compaq, which has 
led European safes for two 

§ uarters. CBM, which ranks 
lo. 2 in Europe but is fourth in' 
the United States, is still losing 
ground. 

In Asia, price competition 
has been stimulating sales of 
486-based PC models, which 
have become standard because 
of their greater performance in 
Asian languages. Compaq and 
IBM entered Japan, the world’s 
second largest market, with the 
first low-priced PCs in late 
1992. 

The NEC Coro., the Japa- 
nese market leader, joined in 
the price war, and the market 
jumped 15.2 percent in 1993 
and 27.6 percent in 1994. IDC 
Japan Ltd-, a unit erf Interna- 
tional Dataquest, forecasts that 


the United Nations special en- 
voy to Rwanda, Shahyar Khan 
said here Wednesday. The spe- 
cial rapporteur of the United 
Nations Commission on Hu- 
man Rights, Rent Degni-Segni, 
has said 150 to 200 human- 


The evidence collected by the 

jurists sod their staff Is to be 
presented to an international 
tribunal on Rwanda called for 
by the special rapporteur but 
yet to be approved by the Unit- 
ed Nations Security CoundL 

The presence erf credible hu- 
man-rights monitors is consid- 
ered essential to help persuade 
the more than 1 million Rwan- 
dan. refugees in Zaire and Tan- 
zania that it is safe to return 
home. 

The longer the refugees stay 
in the camps, where members of 
the forma government are suc- 
cessfully waging an alarmist 
campaign against returning to 
Rwanda, the more difficult it 
wffl be to break up the camps, 
refugee specialists say. 

There haye been reports of 
increased violence in the camps 
against refugees who do try to 
retu rn home . Five refugees were 
taken hostage by extremist 
Goma refugee 



^Wearevery anxious to have Hutu at the Goma 

core visibility,” of human- ^ ?h^db!Sk% 
;»k*. Mr Vaii« coir* when they tried tqhrad back to 

Rwanda, the UN High Com- 
nrissiooer for Refugees said. 

■ Toll Pot at 1 Mfflkm Dead 


prices, which fell only 3.6 per- 
cent in 1993, are Kkdy to fall 17 


percent this year. 

Erik Ipsen In London and 
Steve Bndt in Tokyo contributed 
to this report 


more 

rights monitors, Mr. Kahn said. 
Referring to the likelihood of 
tnnrw triflings, he added, “Their 
very presence is a deterrence.” 

Three African jurists who 
have beat appointed as a com- 
mission of experts to take testi- 
mony on the massacres are 
scheduled to arrive in Rwanda 
on Saturday, but they will not 
have the necessary support staff 
to do a speedy job. 

The jurists asked Western do- 
nors on Wednesday for a team 
of 100 lawyers and 100 forensic 
specialists “as quickly as possi- 
ble,” but it was not clear Mien 
or from where the help would 
come from, according to one of 
the jurists, Amega Atsu-Koffi, 
the former president of the Su- 
preme Court of Togo. 


A United Nations official 
said Wednesday that the final 
death toll in the bloodbath in 
Rwanda could be well over 1 
million, Reuters reported from 
the Rwandan capital, Ki g ali. 

Charles Petrie, deputy coor- 
dinator of the UN Rwanda 
Emergency Office, said, “1 
don't think i milli on would be 


an exaggerated figure.* 

Mr. Petrie's estimate was 


backed by .a senior aid worker 
who said his organization had 
piit the deaths, mainly from 
massacres of minority Tutsi and 
moderate Hutu govermrent op- 
ponents, at around 1.5 million. 


:T A \ 


Continued from Page I 
of the element, can also be used 

“p™?„ u “ ? lu r ium -, but l lhe KKi ss 

SfliSLutfrfS: The announcement of 1 


nuclear weapons. There is a 
100 -kilometer security zone 
around the city, according to 


terial in many forms of nuclear 
weapons and is one of the most 
toxic substances known. 

Other officials said the most 
recent investigation began 
when 11 pounds of uranhan- 
238 were discovered missing at 
Arzamas- 16, a nuclear weapons 
design center in central Russia, 
about 400 kilometers (250 
miles) east erf Moscow. 

Arzamas-16 is one of a net- 
work of closed cities built dur- 
ing the Soviet era for the re- 
search and development of 


the ar- 
rests came a day after special- 
ists at Russia's leading nuclear 
research institute warned that 
security measures were insuffi- 
cient at the country’s nuclear 
sites and said that theft of nu- 
clear material was possible. 

Russian news organizations 
reported Wednesday that Presi- 
dent Boris N. Yeltsin and 
Chancellor Helmut Kohl were 
expected to discuss the problem 
of illicit trafficking in nuclear 
substances during the Russian 
leader's visit to Germany next 


Continued from Page I 

“There will be no Cubans com- 
ing from Guantanamo to the 
UJS., either to federal facilities 
or to any other place.” 

The Senate Republican lead- 
er. Bob Dole, said the surge of 
boat people showed Mr. Clin- 
ton's detainment policy was a 
failure. 


Cuban refugees, ordering the 
Coast Guard to intercept Cu- 


ban boat people £ it d^s Hai- Russia and Japan SAUDIS: Islamic Forces Divided on Nation’s Direction 

ti ans and take them to Guanta- t 

Plan Naval Tests 




name. 


“President Clinton’s new pol- 
icy punishes the wrong Cu- 
bans," he said, adding that Mr. 
Clinton should organize an al- 
lied coalition to push for Fidel 
Castro’s ouster. 


The United States rejected 
Cuba's assertion that the only 
way to stop the refugee exodus 
was for Washington lo hold di- 
rect talks with the Castro gov- 
ernment on lifting the economic 
embargo against Havana. 


week. 


(AP, AFP) 


Mr. Clinton last week ended 
a 28-year policy of granting 
automatic political asylum to 


“We see nothing to be 
gained” from high-level talks. 
Mr. Tarnoff said. “It should be 
dear after 35 years to Fidel 
Castro and his government that 
the way he has been managing 
the affairs of the island is a 
failure." {Reuters, APi 


A gence France -Prase 

MOSCOW — Russia and Ja- 
pan are planning a small-scale 
naval exercise on Sept. 14 in the 
Sea of Japan, the Itar-Tass news 
agency reported, quoting a Pa- 
cific Fleet spokesman. 


The Russian side of the test 
will invol ve a logistics vessel, a 
rescue ship, a helicopter and an 
Antonov-24 airplane. Japan 
will take part with a helicopter- 
carrying patrol ship. 


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Russian- Japanese relations 
have been strained by a quarrel 
over four Kuril Islands off 
northern Japan. The Soviet 
Union seized the islands at the 
end of World War Q and Japan 
demands their return. 


Vietnam Woman Gets 
Death in Fraud Case 


Reuters 

HANOI — Le Thi Thu Ha, 
36, a captain in charge of the 
Namha Province economic po- 
lice, has been sentenced to 
death for fraud in one of the 
country's first such sentences, 
the official Evening News said. 

The conn said she confessed 
to lying to 41 people and two 
state companies to misappro- 
priate gold and cash worth 
$321,000 in 1993. 


Confirmed from Pigel 

Court, sit “to the right erf the 
king,” according to one Saudi 
physicist 

The appointed members of 
these bodies act as intermediar- 
ies between the state and the 
younger Islamic generation that 
is pushing for power. That class 
of mosque preachers, judges 
and professors has spoken out 
more daringly against corrup- 
tion and financial mismanage- 
ment since the Gulf War, which 
cost the kingdom $65 bflUon, 
and has promoted an even 
stricter application of the 
Sharia, or Islamic law. 

“They have a voice,” a secu- 
lar Saudi said. “They are the 
only lobby in the country. They 
are aggressive, obnoxious and 
very intimidating, and the gov- 
ernment always succumbs to 
them. The liberals are aB cow- 
aids. I am one erf them.” 

An Islamist-oriented lawyer 
agreed: “The reason is not that 
the clerics’ were the only podi- 
luns available. The religious 
sector was the one that had 
more courage to take the risk 
and voice an opinion. Everyone 
is equally prohibited from de- 
manding 

Saudi groups in exile disavow 
militant piety or violence, bat 
memories of the 1979 armed 
takeover of the Grand Mosque 
in Mecca by a fanati c claiming 
to be the expected mahdi, or 


Although calling for more 
openness and “human rights,** 
reformers are seeking an even 
more puritanical application of 
Islamic roles. 

A weekly newspaper ■■ called 
Al Muslimun — - The Muslims 
-ronce flourished with a circu- 
lation of 170,000. That has now 
sagged to 20,000 after attacks 


Rights describe scores of arrests 
without due process and the 


reprimanding of clerics for ser- 
mons considered subversive. 

The Saudi government has 
been quietly fighting extremism 
inside and outsideats border^ 
and also attempting to Mod: 
the use of Islamic charity orga- 
nizations as channria for xnfB- 


from the pulpits on its secular . ^ ^tams. 


views. 

“This is a law within the 
law,” said a U-S.-oducated Sau- 
di businessman who puts him- 
sdf cn the secular rad of the 
social spectrum. 

While one sector of society 
describes the fastidious en- 
forcement of morality as “social 
and emotional terror,” others 
contend it is their religious right 
and duty to propagate virtue 
and fight vice, and even to in- 
terrogate, detain and punish vi- 
olators. The interior minister, 
Prince Nayif, said, however, 
that members of the mutawa, 
the religious police; who ex- 
ceeded their limits were now 
being punished or fired. 

“This country is hypochon- 
driac about its stability,” a Sau- 
di economist said. 

A Sandi analysis said: “This 
is not a repressive society. This 
is not a tyranny like Iraq or 
Syria even, but people disap- 
pear.” 

Publications distributed 
from London by the Committee 
for the Defense of Legitimate 


“Ten major charities in Ri- 
yadh were suddenly dissolved 
arid ordered.!© stop their activi- 
ties by a direct order from 
Prince Salman, the governor of 
Riyadh,” the Committee for the 
Defense of Legitimate Rights 
reported last month. 

~A lawyer in Riyadh said if 
preachers give sermons seen as 
politically provocative; they are 
dis mi ssed. “Now people are 
censuring themselves,” he said. 

Last year, Kin£ Fahd created 
the Islamic Affairs Ministry so 
the state could better control 
and regulate the activities erf Is- 
lamic preachers, charity organi- 
zations and universities, and 
str eamli ne the work of mullahs 
whose mission it is to prosely- 
tize here and abroad. 

“Societies that raise money 
from private individuals abroad 
cannot operate unless they have 
a license to do so,” a Saudi 
official said. The move followed 
reports from Algeria; Sudan 
and Egypt that wealthy 'Saudis 
were financing extremist move- 
ments on their scnL 


ISLAND: After Bullets and Ballots, the Sri Lankans Take a Shot at Peace * 

Continued from Page I 


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instantly. The motive for the attack ap- 
peared to be the demands for compromise 
with the Tamil rebels that tire Kumara tun- 
gas had made after founding a breakaway 
political party. 

After the assassination, Mrs. Kumara- 
tunga rejoined the Sri Lanka Freedom Par- 
ty that her father and mother both led to 
election victories in the past, and h was an 
alliance based on that party that won a 
narrow victory in last week’s election. 

The election was held virtually under 
martial-law conditions, with a round-the- 
clock curfew imposed by the old govern- 
ment as soon as the balloting on Aug. 16 
ended, (hen extended through last week- 
end, in an effort to quell the shooting and 
bombing that have become the hallmark of 
Sri Lankan politics. 

Many here feared that diefaards is the 
United National Party government, in 
power for 17 years, would use the excuse of 
turmoil in tire streets to try to bang on to 
power. 

But there was also fear of the Tamil 
rebels. The group that Mr. Prabhakaran 
leads, the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Ee- 
lam, has carried out scores of assassina- 
tions, within their own ranks as well as 
among mainstream Sinhalese politicians. 

Some of tire killings have been in retalia- 
tion for the government’s harsh prosecu- 
tion of the war, such as when a bicyclist 
with a bomb strapped tohis body rode into 
a May Day procession in Colombo last 
year, killing President Ranasiaghe Prema- 
dasa and 23 others. 

But those endangered by the Tigers also 
include politicians who have sought a mid- 
dle ground. Mb. Kumaratunga was said to 
have been on a Tiger death fist during the 
election, and as a result, she was virtually 
invisible as she delivered campaign speech- 
es behind a ring of government paratroops. 

But in making an end to the war a top 
priority, Mrs. Kumara tunga appears to be 
counting on a widespread war-weariness 


among the mainly Hindu Tamils as well as 
among tire predominantly Buddhist Sinha- 
lese. Exhaustion and grief have combined 
with a disbelief that Sri Lanka has fallen so 
far. 

Arab traders in medieval times knew the 
island as “Serendip,” from which the word 
serendipity was coined. Sri Lanka, former- 
ly known as Ceylon, has some of the 
world's most fabled beaches, deep jungles 
and forests that envelop the mins of an- 
cient Buddhist dties. 

And partly as a result of the efforts of 
American and British missionaries who 
came during the 19th century, the island 
boasts a literacy rate of neady 90 percent, 
the envy of most countries in the region. 

But the war has engendered a culture of 
violence that has gnawed away modi of the 
island’s pride. 

When the government agreed to an Indi- 
an plan for peace with the rebels in 1987, 


. sex k unconditional talks with the Tigers 
and abandoned past government deman ds 
mat the rebels first accept a binding cease- 
fire, surrender their weapons and agree 
that Mr. Prabhakaran will head their dele- 
ion. Those conditions, especially the 
uaud for a personal appearance by the 

K‘«S r ty^rar Snedtop - 


. o more important, Mrs. Kmnara- 
tanp pledged constitutional concessions 
that woidd seek to meet Tamil grievances 
against Smtalese domination by shifting 
"ower from the central gwernment in' Cr? 




1 to , — — * O « L tu WA/" 

tombo to regional authorities and bv re- 
drawing colonial-era boundaries so that 


Tamfls m tire JaffniLarea and along the 
aland s itortheast coast would comewtder 
a single Tamil-led province. 


a 50,000-strong Indian peace- 
wla have 


force and terms that wot 
granted the Tamils in the north wide au- 
tonomy, it sparked a wave of terrorist 
attacks by an extreme Sinhalese nationalist 
group, the People's liberation Front 
By the time ure Indian force withdrew in 
1 990, having lost U50 men in fitting the 
Tigers, Sri Lankan Array and ponce death 
squads had mounted a campaign erf terror 


Sunflar propo^ have been floated be- 

Mm endave of 42 basic ^ZLSJr 
not to do meaning- 


l 

^ Chi, 


husband was killed, Mrs 
Komaratonga traveled with hmTto v£ 

fe-™ Indian state of Tamil 


The levels of .violence have fallen' in 
zecent years, but in Colombo and other 
(tides businessmen, human-rights workers 
and politicians shelter in homes . guarded 
by high steel gates and snarling guard 


Most middle-class families have guns, 
and those who can afford them tide in 
heavily ar mo red cats. 'Emigration has 
soared. 


“o ox me rew 

edge of tic rebdlSfc ErSlhand knowl - 


sgas SS 9 S 


Those who hope that Mrs. Kumara- ' ennnent been, 1851 gov " 

tunga wffl change things note her party’s pensive war without nmsiS? L Vcry 
election manifesto, in whidi it plec^ed to tion.” y ol a sohi- 




-•Sr 


■ y .i: 


’••Ci 














1^-37; ' 


£ 


0ts A- 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 25, 1994 


Page 5 



% 


7 Pakistan Reasserts It Barred 


Nuclear Weapons Production 


V Roden - . ... 

.'o’ '; ISLAMABAD, Pakistan- 
's^ r 1 . Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto 
•: >. * on Wednesday denounced as ir- 
■;-* *‘ respcfflsfcfemeasscrtiQfthyfoff- 
. • ’ mer Prime Minister Nawaz 
-V ‘ Sharif that Pakistan has nudear 


“It is a highly inropoarible 
statement,” $he told reporters 
~ in Karachi in her firstcomment 
" on Mr. Sharif s warning on 
; Tuesday that any attack cm Pa- 
1 Mstan by India could spark nu- 
: dear war between than. Both 
• ' nations officially deny having 
f * the bomb. ~ • 

Miss Bhutto would not elab- 
orate. “I cahoot comment on 
every irresponsible statement 
: the leader of the opposition 
makes." 

A Foreign Ministry spolces- 
' man sai&rln the coarse of its 
development of a peaceful no- 
dear program, Pakistan has ao- 
' qirired the capability to acquire 
, nuclear weapons, but we nave 
made a sovereign decision not: 
V to produce them.” 

*. Mr. Sharif s statement, made 
at a raDy in the Paldstani-bdd 
part of Kashmir on Tuesday, 

• appeared to undermine Pato- 
> stan’s tang-standing denial that 

r. ^SrMSharif, prime 

; minister for 30 months rati! he 
-..resigned in July 1993, is now 
leading a campaign to topple 
. . Miss Bbatto. 

“I confirm Pakistan pos- 

• sesses the atomic bomb,” Paki- 

- stan Press International quoted 
him as saying. An Indian attack 
. on Pakistan could trigger “a nur 

- dear holocaust as both conn- 


EUROPEAN 

TOPICS 

Ntmff^Medk&ie: 
Slapstick or Surgery? 

It was like something oat 
of a Buster Keaton fihn, bat 
it really happened and it was 
not funny. In the middle of 
an opera Don in a Norwegian 
hospital, the table suddenly 
collapsed, and only the* 
quick reactions of doctors 
and nurses saved the anes- 
thetized patient from hitting 
the door. Such mishaps, re- 
ports Der Spiegel of Ham- 
burg. are increasingly com- 
mon in the Norwegian 
health-care system. . . 

Ufleval Hospital, Oslo’s 
biggest, has had to dose 
whole wards in wintertime 
because its antiquated heat- 
ing system is barely able to 
keep temperatures above 
freezing. In Trondheim, 73 
cancer patients had to wait 
up to three months for oper- 
ations. “People with good 
chances of survival,” said 
the lung specialist Einar 
Gloersen, “are being left 
waiting until it is too tele to 
do anything.” 

Part of the problem, ironi- 
cally, is the ambitious reach 
of Norway's health-care sys- 
tem. The country, with only 
4.2 million inhabitants, 
boasts 84 full-service chnics. 
Even small, remote clinics 
are equipped for rare and 
comp heated surgery. Costs 
are high. And the country 
has a serious budget deficit. 

The government says it 
will issue a report next 
month outfitting measures to 
restore trust in the m e dical 
system. But many Norwe- 
gians are not waiting: More, 
and name are traveling to 
Germany, England or Swe- 
den for operations. 

Around Europe 

Saving w3dHe from man’s 
ilf p i wfartniw can be a com- 
plicated affair. Natural hab- 


tries possess atomic bombs," he 

sa id , - ’ .v • 

Defense Minister Aftab Sha- 
banMuani told the newspaper 
Frontier Post’ that Mr. Snanfs 
claim was. “a childish acLV 

In Vienna, the International 
Atomic Energy Agency said it 
was unable to comment on 
whether Pakistan had an atom 
bomb because Islamabad docs 
not allow inspections of its nu- 
clear sites. 

Pakistan, Hke-India. and Isra- 
d, has not signed the nuclear 
NocproBferation Treaty or a 
safeguards accord, that lets the 
atomic energy agency verify an 
inventory -chi a stater* declared 
nuclear materials. 

India on Wednesday de- 
manded international action to 
halt Pakistan’s alleged nuclear 
weapons program. A Foreign 
Ministry spokesman said Mr. 
Sharif/ declaration had con- 
firmed New Delhi’s fears about 
a Pakistani threat to regional 
stabifify.. 

“The curtain at ambiguity 
about Pakistan’s nuclear pro- 
gram has faBenoff,” he said. “It 
is a matter of grave concern that 
Pakistan is actively pursuing 
this nuclear weapons program 
and is clandestinely procuring 
materials in tins -regard as is 
evident from recent reports.” 

- He. was referring to a con- 
signment of plutonium seized 
last week in Germany. Officials 
in Bedin said they believe the 
mater ial may have been bound 
for Pakistan. . 

. ' Pakistan has denied any Knlr 
to the plot to smuggle plutoni- 
um from Germany. 


itat has been steadily re- 
duced and divided by 
highways and rail lines. Ani- 
mals have trouble reaching 
feeding grounds; their ge- 
netic pools are sometimes 
reduced, leading to muta- 
tions; and sometimes, be- 
cause they are separated 
from traditional predators, 
overpopulation results. So in 
France, the highway and na- 
tional railway authorities 
have spent millions at francs 
to baud 130 passages over 
highways, and high-speed- 
train trades. . ' 

But just because you build 
it does not mean they will 
cross. As the daily libera- 
tion reports, 72 percent of 
the passageways are not 
used at all ~or if they are, it 
is by cyclists' and hikers, 
whose presence scares away 
those animals riot already 
frightened by the fights and 
nose of passing cars or 
train s. - 

Enter Pierre-Marie Thau- 
vih, a most creative Parisian. 
An imitation tree trunk he 
has devised has a movable 
covering of bark on one side, 
liberally coated with pine tar 
— and when boar come to 
rub against it, as they love to 
do, a distributor on the other 
side releases more pine tar. 
for the boar, or salt, for deer. 
By gradually moving these 
trunks nearer to the passage- 
ways, Mr. Than via hopes to 
persuade game to use them. 

Highway authorities are 
waiting for test results be- 
fore investing in the Thauvin 
trunk. 

The FtDdsh government 
wants women hi its aimed 
services to receive combat 
t rain ing . Defense Minister 
Elisabeth Rehn says that all 
female soldiers aged 17 to 19 
should be instructed in the 
use of arms; the proposal 



Reports of Tensions in North Korea 


ON TRIAL — Rob Sob Yeong, daughter of South Ko- 
rea’s former president, Roh Tae Woo, appearing in a 
Seoul court 'Wednesday to face currency smuggling 
charges, windi she and her husband denied. They were 
conncled last year of breaking U.S. currency laws. 


—Rob Sob Yeong, daughter 
president, Roh Tae Woo, a 
Wednesday to face curretv 


Ate Yot*# JeoB/n* Aneciaied Prc» 


Compiled by Qtr Stuff Front Dtspotche 

SEOUL — German diplo- 
mats have confirmed the exis- 
tence of leaflets in North Korea 
calling for the overthrow of the 
government, a sign of opposi- 
tion to the succession of Kim 
Jong 11 as president and party 
leader. 

The German Foreign Minis- 
try quoted a German diplomat 
in Seoul as saying that “quite a 
number” of the leaflets had 
been found in the gardens of 
embassies in the diplomatic 
compound in Pyongyang, the 
North Korean capital The min- 
istry said its envoy had not seen 
one himself. 

The South Korean press re- 
ported that leaflets opposing 
the succession of Mr. Kim, 52, 
the son of President Kim II 
Sung, who died July 8, had been 
scattered around the diplomatic 
compound last Friday. 

One unidentified Western 
diplomat in Seoul was quoted 
as saying that the North Kore- 
an authorities had gone on spe- 
cial alert since the inciden t 
were in a state of “utter ten- 
sion.” 

A North Korean radio com- 
mentary on Sunday hinted at 
opposition to the succession. It 
said the country’s revolutionary 
work should not end with just 
one generation. 

Mr. Kim has not been seen in 
public since his father’s funeral 


on July 20. He looked ill, and 
there were numeroas reports 
that he was too sick to take fuQ 
command of the government. 

Observers are also puzzled 
about why Mr. Kim has not yet 
formally assumed the nation's 
presidency and leadership of 
the Korean Workers’ Party, ti- 
tles that his father held. 

South Korea said Wednesday 
that it was concerned by indica- 
tions that Mr. Kim was facing 
problems consolidating his 
power. 

President Kim Young Sam 
said Tuesday night there had 
been several “significant move- 
ments” in the North. "Our peo- 
ple should be well prepared to 
cope with any eventuality,” an 
aide quoted torn as saying. 

“It appears that the power 
transfer in the North is not pro- 


gressing wett,” the aide said. 
“The government is concerned 
about prospects of instability in 
the North." 

Pyongyang's official daily 
Rodong Shinrnnn stressed uni- 
ty and Mr. Kim’s leading posi- 
tion in an article on Wednes- 
day. 

“Our integral whole has not 
been broken up or shattered to 
pieces," it said, “but has been 
further consolidated even is the 
bitterest grief at the death of (he 
Great Leader Kim D Sung." 

It repeated previous asser- 
tions that Kim Jong D was 
“firmly standing at the head of 
the party, the slate and the rev- 
olutionary armed forces.” 

“No force on earth can break 
this integral whole in which the 
Great Leader and the people 


share the destiny all the time,” 
it added. 

Japan's Kyodo news agency 
quoted Yevgeni Bazhanov, dep- 
uty head of the Russian Foreign 
Ministry’s Foreign Affairs 
Academy, as saying in Tokyo 
on Tuesday that he believed a 
power struggle was going on 
over the succession and that the 
North Korean government 
would eventually collapse. 

It said he based his predic- 
tion partly on information from' 
Korean residents in Russia. 

Mr. Bazhanov died die exis- 
tence of reformists in the gov- 
ernment, pent-up popular dis- 
satisfaction, pressure from 
foreign countries, including 
China, for reform, and a severe 
economic crisis. 

(Reuters. AP} 


Japan Offers Aid to Atone for ‘Comfort Women’ 


Washington Poo Sender 

MANILA — Japan on Wednesday proposed 
setting up women’s vocational training centers as 
an indirect way to atone for having forced thou- 
sands of Asians into prostitution as “comfort 
w ome n” during World War II, but Philippine 
victims of the sex slavery rejected the idea. 

Tbe proposal was made by the Japanese prime 
minis ter, Tomb chi Murayama, in a meeting with 
President Fidel V. Ramos. 

According to a Japanese spokesman, Mr. 


Murayama told Mr. Ramos that his new coali- 
tion government in Tokyo was “at present con- 
sidering seriously” bow best to express its “apol- 
ogy and remorse on the issue of comfort 
women." 

Mr. Murayama added that the government 
was now ready to help establish women's voca- 
tional training centers “in a framework of eco- 
nomic cooperation.” 

An estimated 200,000 women were forced to 
work as prostitutes for the Japanese Army dur- 
ing World War II. 


Brian Knowlton 


A Typhoon Devastates 
Eastern ChinaProvince 


Return 

BEUING — The prosperous 
wwtam Chinese province of 
. Zhqiang has bees devastated 
• by a typhoon, which, killed at 
i least 1,000 people in the city of 
Wenzhou alone, rmmkapal offi- 
cials said Wednesday. 

The province as a whole faces 
economic losses that prpvision- 


y iJivwn jw - 

, by telephone said 771 people 
• were c onfirm e d dead in the 


at least 490 people missing. 

“Of the missing, 1 guess we 
won’t be able to find SOQotso, 

said Chen Wetguang. “Tins ww 

our worst storm in 16 0 yea rs. 

He said the figures were i cer- 
tain to rise since three of the 
worst-hit counties in Wenzhou 
had not yet reported in. 

. A smafl island in the coastal 
municipality was completely 
’swallowed by the 

Mr. Chen said he md not 


have an estimate of the number 
of people seriously injured by 
the typhoon* designated Fred, 
whicn roared through Zhegiang 
over the weekend, causing some 
of the highest tides in 20 years. 

Provincial officials could not 
give accurate casualty figures 
on Wednesday for the province 
as a whole, saying that about a 
quarter of the province’ s 42 nm- 
lioa people had been affected 
by the storm. 

Hsgfi winds and pounding 
rains destroyed farmland, col- 
lapsed thousands at houses, cut 
electricity, ruined roads and 
forced thousands of factories to 
shut down. About 700,000 
houses were damaged. 

The Wenzhou airport wul be 
dosed for at least 15 days be- 
cause equipment was de- 





iV'»vo 


•> - 




stroyed, officials said. 

More than 2 milfion people 
are surrounded by flood waters, 
and 560,000 have been evacuat- 
ed to safer area& 


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Page 6 


THURSDAY, AUGUST 25, 1994 

OPINION 


Hcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


Stop Punishing Cubans 


Sfrtbune Risky Pressure on Cubans, Not Exposure to Freedom 


SH i - 

o. , 

H • - «•’ 


WASHINGTON — In the Cold War 
W the United States and its allies used 


President Bill Clinton's abrupt rever- 
sal of 28 years of Cuban refugee policy 
last Friday looked clumsy enough, but 
over the weekend he made it worse. 
Seeking to punish Fidel Castro for un- 
leashing the latest refugee tide, Mr. 
Clinton ended up also punishing ordi- 
nary Cubans. He cut off all cash support 
from their relatives in the United States, 
rather than the 50 percent cut originally 
announced. By raising the temperature 
on Cuba wheu it should be trying Lo cool 
it, the administration could yet convert 
a rhetorical emergency into a real one. 

The package of pressures the presi- 
dent unveiled on Saturday did include 
two legitimate spurs to greater freedom 
in Cuba — increased radio broadcasts 
and a new United Nations initiative on 
human rights. It also included a cutoff 
of charter flights from the United Slates 
— unwise, since Cuban freedom is 
served by more contacts with Ameri- 
cans, not less. 

. The administration suspended the 
payments because they not only help 
stretch family budgets but also provide 
hard currency to Havana as recipients 
exchange their dollars for goods in spe- 
cial government-run stores. The policy 
seems designed to bring Cuba to a polit- 
ical boil by closing off the refugee safety 
valve and driving down living standards. 
Presumably that will hasten a popular 
revolt, but this course entails a pointless 
risk to the Cuban people since the Cas- 
tro regime is already withering. 

Even in decline, Mr. Castro has again 
shown his uncanny power to get Wash- 
ington to tie itself in knots. Following a 
familiar pattern, the United States is 
overreacting to his provocations and let- 
ting domestic politics distort foreign 
policy priorities. 

In any rational calculus, Mexico, with 
its 92 milli on people and a North Ameri- 
can Free Trade Agreement, should be 
the administration's main Latin concern 


after a critical and tense election, in- 
stead all eyes are fixed ou Cuba and 
continuing efforts to contain the refugee 
crisis, promoted in one frantic day by 
Attorney General Janet Reno from non- 
problem to national emergency. 

The Clinton administration’s new of- 
fensive against Havana is supported by 
Cuban- Americans, who were upset, 
when Washington reclassified those 
who risk their lives to flee Mr. Castro's 
economically battered police state as 
“illegal immi grants’* rather than refu- 
gees From tyranny. They believe the time 
has finally come to get rid of the Castro 
regime, and inflicting increased short- 
term pain on Cuba’s people seems worth 
the long-term gain. 

The voice of a milli on Cuban -Ameri- 
cans should be beard, but it should not 
be allowed to drive U.S. policy against 
humane values and larger national inter- 
ests. Those values weigh against punish- 
ing innocent victims, and those interests 
do not include detonating a large explo- 
sion in the Caribbean. 

Discontented Cubans do not relish 
rising up only to be mowed down by a 
totalitarian regime. They would rather 
get out and start anew somewhere else. 
It is unconscionable for Washington to 
tell them, in effect, no, we will lock you 
in until you revolt 

Getting rid of Fidel Castro is a job for 
the Cuban people themselves, not for 
the U.S. government or Miami exiles. 
This Cold War orphan can still annoy 
the United Stales but poses no serious 
threat. Instead of gearing up for another 
round of sterile confrontation, Wash- 
ington should be spelling out what Cuba 
could gain, under this regime or a suc- 
cessor, by embracing democracy and re- 
specting human rights. That, rather than 
increased hunger and misery, might en- 
courage those Cubans who remain in 
Cuba to work for political change. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Antiquities: A Correction 


In an editorial yesterday, we wrongly 
died the Metropolitan Museum of Art 
as the owner of two antique treasures 
that were returned to Turkey on Aug. 
14, some years after that country’s gov- 
ernment protested that they had been 
illegally exported. The contested pieces 
had not been die property of the Met 
but of two different private galleries in 
New York, both of which agreed, after 
years of disputes including an investiga- 
tion launched by U.S. authorities at 
Turkey’s request, to send the antiquities 
back to their point of origin. We heard 
on Tuesday from Metropolitan Museum 
President William Luers, who also took 
exception to our description of a previ- 
ous return of a contested cache of anti- 
quities to Turkey, in a settlement of the 
long-running “Lydian Hoard” case, as 
forming a legal and psychological prece- 
dent that is making such returns of an- 
tiquities more acceptable. 

Mr. Luers points out that the purpose 
of the Met in reaching a settlement of the 
Lydian Hoard case was to avoid creating 
a specific legal precedent that would 
speed such returns of antiquities as a 
matter of general principle. The Met’s 
executive vice president and counsel to 
the trustees, Ashton Hawkins, notes that 
among the legal issues still to be settled in 
this developing area of law is whether 
Turkish laws against the export of cultur- 
al patrimony, in force since the early 
1970s, can be treated as the equivalent of, 
say, U.S. laws against simple theft 


The significance of the'retum for ob- 
servers, however, is another matter. 
Many other museums are watching 
these cases with urgent interest, since 
many American (and, for that matter, 
European) collections include objects 
whose exact provenance is murky. 

The struggle over the Lydian Hoard 
spanned decades, during which interna- 
tional treaties on the export and repatria- 
tion of treasures altered dramatically. 
The shift in perception created by the 
Lydian return, Mr. Hawkins says, was 
not so much in the eyes of museum man- 
agement — since “everybody has his own 
case, and the facts are always different” 
— as in the expectations and confidence 
of those making the claims, the Turkish 
government prominently among them. 

The more recent return was accom- 
plished similarly, without actually going 
to trial. One of the gallery owners under 
challenge agreed to donate the contested 
statue to a Turkish- American founda- 
tion, which then passed it on to Turkey, 
an innovative compromise that falls 
short, again, of legal resolution but 
could herald other such adjustments. 
Mr. Hawkins stresses that the Met, long 
enmeshed in these cases, is “looking 
forward and not backward on this'’ and 
feels it has made progress. The Lydian 
Hoard event, which he says satisfied 
both sides, was certainly a turning point. 
Its long-term effects, though, legal and 
otherwise, remain unclear. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


The Vaccine Debacle 


Shortly after President Bill Clinton 
took office, his administration an- 
nounced that it would provide free vac- 
cinations for all youngsters — rich, poor 
and in between. The goal was Laudable 
and sounded simple. But the adminis- 
tration's attempts to reach it have been 
tortured beyond belief. 

During the cramped Reagan years, 
the price of vaccine went up and federal 
funding for childhood immunization 
went down. Congress, and eventually 
President George Bush, pushed for more 
money. The 1991 Dallas measles epi- 
demic proved a cautionary tale — 95 
percent of the sick children had not been 
vaccinated because they were loo young 
for school enrollment and their health 
providers did not have enough free vac- 
cine for everyone. Nevertheless, arguing 
that vaccines should not be given away 
to more affluent families. Congress 
scaled back the Clinton proposal, pro- 
viding free vaccine only to low-income 
and uninsured children. 

Unfortunately, Congress did not 
specify how the vaccine should be dis- 
tributed, planting the seeds for trouble. 
The administration, having predicated 


part of its free-vaccin.es argument on the 
“greed” of the pharmaceutical industry, 
proceeded to demonize an established, 
largely private delivery system that was 
working just fine. The government 
would instead establish a national ware- 
house, to store and distribute vaccine. 

This week the administration 
dropped its plans for the warehouse — 
in the face of thoroughly plausible testi- 
mony from members of Congress, drug 
company executives, federal auditors 
and many state officials that the Public 
Health Service simply did not have the 
ability to distribute vaccine to tens of 
thousands of private doctors on sched- 
ule. So far, the government is out about 
5700,000, money that might more credi- 
bly have been spent on other aspects of 
disease prevention. 

Some officials recklessly advertised 
the vaccine distribution program as a 
dress rehearsal for their efforts to re- 
structure the entire health care delivery 
system. That was unfortunate. The larg- 
er goal of health care reform should not 
be made to suffer from one silly but 
correctable blunder. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 



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the free, movement of 


ideas and 


nonstralegic goods to undermine com- 
munism's closed societies. But on Cuba 
the United States has ignored that lesson. 
Washington fights tyranny there by en- 
closing the island and its people ever 
more tightly in a dictator’s grasp. 

Over the weekend President Bill Clin- 
ton decided to pursue America’s long- 
standing campaig n of isolation against 
Cuba with a new ferodty. His abrupt 
reversal on refugee policy now traps even 
thepeople who flee the island. 

The abrupt changes in U.S. policy on 
Cuba fly in the face of history, logic and 
compassion. Openness — to refugees, 
political evolution and cross-border trav- 
el — helped bring down Soviet totalitar- 
ianism. Openness is also the best course 
in combating Fidel Castro's tyranny. 

Mr. Clinton's temptation to squeeze 
Mr. Castro until the pros squeak is under- 
standable. Mr. Castro is tottering. Getting 
credit for toppling him would shut down 
the right wing’s attacks on Mr. Clin ton’s 
foreign policy for at least two days. 

The harsh new economic sanctions, cut- 
ting off hard currency and goods sent by 
Cuban- Americans and most charter travel 
to the island, provide political cove: 
a gains t criticism that Mr. Clinton's refusal 
of immediate asylum in America to Cuban 
refugees did nothing to punish Mr. Castro. 


By Jim Hoagland 

But, as he has done in Haiti, he makes 
living in Cuba more miserable and then 
refuses to take in those who flee the 
conditions that American policy exacer- 
bates. Overnight Mr. Clinton abruptly 
substituted “demagnetization” of the 
United States and its borders for con- 
tainment of communism as the guiding 
principle of policy toward Cuba. 

In a sense, the president is gambling 
that public concern about immigration 
into the United States is greater than the 
residual concern about co mmunism. More 
than most American politicians, the alleg- 
edly inconsistent Mr. Clinton is consistent 
in shaping policies which reflect that the 
Cold War has ended psychologically and 
politically as well as militarily. 

His removal of most favored immigrant 
status from Cubans is also a removal of 
Mr. Castro’s special demon status. As of 
last Friday, when Mr. Clinton announced 
the change in policy, Mr. Castro is just 
another two-bit local dictator, on a par 
with Haiti's Raoul CMras. Without a trip- 
wire reaching back to Moscow, Cuba is for 
the first time in 34 years not a national 
security threat to the United States. 

White House aides explicitly equate 
Cuba and Haiti. They tell reporters that 
prohibitions against taking boat people 
from either island are an attempt to “de- 


magnetize” the United Stains and pre- 
vent Florida, and other Sun Belt states 
from being overrun by economically des- 
perate people from the south. 

But that is where the new policy fails in 
compassion and logic. The burden of suf- 
fering falls on the already abused people 
of the two states, not on the entrenched 
and corrupt leaderships. If there is logic to 
simultaneous Harsher embargoes and the 
shutting off of refugee flows, it fies in an 
unavowable hope that the sanctions will 
provoke public uprisings that will oust 
Mr. Castro and General Cedras, with no 
costs in (American) lives. 

But Cuba is not Haiti, or just another 
version of Tutin American dictatorship. 
Cuba today should be seen as part of die 
flotsam and jetsam of the breakup of 
world mnuniiTTism. These rotten little re- 
gimes — in Cuba, Neath Korea, Syria and 

elsewhere — have been stranded by the 
Soviet collapse and live on borrowed time. 

To buy a little more time, some (Syria) 
try to ingratiate themselves. Others (North 
Korea) try to intimidate the great powas. 
In Syria and North Korea, President Gin- 
ton (rightly) attempts to seize tbe opportu- 
nity to influence transitions in the rem- 
nants of the Soviet empire. 

History argues for greater involvement 
in Cuba's immediate fate, not a shutting 
off of almost all Am mean contact with 
the island at crucial moment. 

In the summer of 1989, as large num- 


bers of East Germans bean to flee the 
pressure cooker that their Soviet-created 
Stionhad become, West German Chan- 
cellor Helmut Kohl and East German 
President Erich Honecker made conflict- 
ing decisions that set in motion the de- 
struction of world co mmun ism. 

Mr Kohl decided to reach out a help- 
ing hand to the Germans who were flee- 
ini to the West through Hungary and 
Czechoslovakia in growing numbers. Mr. 
Honecker panicked and sailed East Ger- 
many’s borders. To shut off the migra- 
tion west, he forbade East Gomans to 
take their vacations even in other War- 
saw Pact nations. Thai decision triggered 
popular demonstrations that led to the 
crumbling of the Berlin WalL 

This summer the script is reversed. Mr. 

Castro has been letting the steam off by 
letting disaffected Cubans leave the is- 
land prison that bis misrule has created. 
He now has an American president to 
blame for Cubans not being able to join 
their f amili es in America and for tbe 
worsening of the already desperate eco- 
nomic conditions on the island. 

Shutting off all the escape valves of the 
pressure cooker is high-risk, short-term 
policy. Mr. Clinton’s gamble on Cuba 
must work quickly if it is to work at all IS 
it does not, he will be obliged to return to 
the slower, steadier erosion of tyranny by 
exposure to freedom. 

The Washington Post. 


Who Will Have the Political Courage to Coil This Nonsense Off? 


P ARIS — Only a truly inno- 
cent man could say, as Bill 
Clinton said on Aug. 19, that all 
the United States wants for 
Cuba is that it be swept up in the 
hemispheric wave of “democra- 
cy and freedom.” 

President Clinton surely wish- 
es Cubans well, but history con- 
tradicts him. Tbe historical 
American relationship to the Cu- 
ban nation has been anything but 
a struggle for Cuba's liberation. 
The events of recent days are a 
Cuban revenge for that history. 

Fidel Castro has a victory. He 
has compelled Mr. Clinton to 
reverse an American policy that, 
since the Cuban Refugee Act of 
1966, gave automatic U.S. entry 
to anyone leaving Cuba. Mr. 
Clinton now is sending refugees 
picked up at sea to Guantana- 
mo, the U.S. naval base in Cuba, 
and putting those who reach the 
United States into camps. This is 
a comprehensible response to the 
anxiety of Floridians and others 
over the new and deliberately 
provoked refugee flow, but it is 
nonetheless a U.S. humiliation. 

It is the latest event in Ameri- 
ca’s 35-year obsession with Fidel 
Castro that produced the Bay of 


By William Pfaff 


Pigs debacle in 1961 and the 
collaboration of the U.S. gov- 
ernment with organized crime in 


Defenders of the Eisenhower 
and Kennedy administrations 
would claim the Cold War and 
Fidel Castro's alliance with Rus- 
sia as justification for those ac- 
tions. But that does not explain 
the emotional intensity in this 
struggle between the most pow- 
erful state in the world and one 
of the weakest. That belongs to 
the realm of political pathology. 

The practical effect of UJS. 
pohey in the 1960s was to make 
Fidel Castro a figure of world 
consequence and Cuba a power 
in Latin America and Africa. 

No administration since John 
Kennedy’s has had the political 
courage to call this nonsense off. 
When Bill Clinton was asked at 
his Aug. 19 news conference why 
tbe embargo on Cuban trade — 
which has made life miserable for 
ordinary Cubans, without other 
evident effect — should continue 
while be and his predecessors 
have traded with China and other 


regimes with h uman rights re- 
cords worse than Cuba’s, his an- 
swer was the lame *T think the 
circumstances are different" 

Indeed they are. 

Elements m both Cuba and 
the United States repeatedly 
tried during the early 19th cen- 
tury to bring Cuba into the Unit- 
ed States as a slave state. Prea- 
dents Polk and Buchanan trial 
to purchase Cuba (as Grant and 
McKinley tried later). Under the 
presidency of Franklin Fierce, 
when a reforming Spanish cap- 
tain-general called for a ban on 
slavery in Cuba, there was a plan 
to seize the island. 

The U.S. public and govern- 
ment supported lata- Cuban up- 
risings against Spain, and In 
1898 the U.S. invaded Cuba to 
free it The result was Cuba's 
attachment to anew empire, that 
of tbe United States. 

The operative change in the 
Ameri can conscience is best seen 
in William McKinley, who had 
said in his 1897 inaugural address 
that “we most avoid the tempta- 
tion of territorial aggression.” A 
year later, finding the United 


States in possession of Spain's 
Caribbean and Pacific posses- 
sions, by his own account he fell 
to his knees in search of divine 
guidance, and in the early hours 
of the morning heard the voice of 
God instructing him to annex the 
Philippines. Puerto Rica Wake 
Island and Hawaii followed. 

Cuba was not annexed, since 
the justification for the Spanish- 
Ameri can war had been Cuban 
independence. When a republic 
was at last proclaimed, in 1902, 
ending UJS. military occupation, 
Cuba's constitution incorporat- 
ed the notorious Platt Amend- 
ment gjving the United States a 
permanent right to intervene, 
and the United States was 
awarded the extraterritorial na- 
val base at Guantknamo Bay. 

The Cabans rebelled against 

this arran gement , and the Unit- 
ed States reoccupied the island 
between 1906 and 1909. Ameri- 
can troops went back again in 
1912 when blade Cubans rose up 
against rad^ discrimination. 
The Platt Amendment was final- 
ly revoked under the Roosevelt 
administration in 1934, but by 
th^t time Cuba was under the 
co rru pt control of the first of the 


two despots who ruled it from 
1928 to 1959. The second of 
these. Sergeant (subsequently 
General) Fulgeado Batista, was 
overthrown by Fidel Castro. 

If democracy is indeed sweep- 
ing the Western Hemisphere, as 
Mr. Clinton says, part of its task 
must be to transform the inherit- 
ed UJS. attitude toward Cuba. 
Economic boycott by the Clin- 
ton adminis tration, with naval 
blockade perhaps to come, is a 
direct continuation of the U.S. 
policy of Cuban intervention 
that began when the Maine was 
blown up in Havana harbor in 
February 1898. 

One would think it time for a 
chan ge. Mr. Clinton claims that 
democracy is sweeping the Ca- 
ribbean. In Haiti? In the Domin- 
ican Republic? Who will follow 
Fidel Castro? Will the future 
really bring Havana something 
better than the squalid coinci- 
dence of Cuban and U.S. com- 
mercial and criminal interests 
that prevailed before 1959? A 
Cuban song of the 1950s lament- 
ed, “The roads erf my Cuba nev- 
er lead where they should.” 

International Herald Tribune. 

© Los Angeles Times Syndicate. 


Mexico Risks Bloodshed After an Election for More of the Same 


AyTONTERREY. Mexico — 
lVA During the terms of Mexi- 
co’s last two presidents, the pur- 
chasing power of consumers has 
declined by 60 percent, unem- 
ployment has doubled, emigra- 
tion to the United States has not 
abated and nearly a quarter of 
the work force has taken to 
moonlighting, or to hawking 
cheap wares on the streets, in a 
struggle to survive. 

On Sunday, three major presi- 
dential candidates stood before 
the electorate. Cuauhtemoc CAr- 
denas of the leftist Party of the 
Democratic Revolution promised 
economic justice for the peasants. 
Diego Fernandez de Cevallos of 
the National Action Party, a 
right-of-center group, promised 
to throw out the crooks who have 


By Dick J. Reavis 


been running the country. Er- 
nesto Zedillo Ponce de Ledn of 
the ruling Institutional Revolu- 
tionary Party, which has mono- 
polized the presidency since 1929, 
promised only more of the same. 

Yet partial tallies give Mr. Ze- 
dillo 50 percent or the to tab with 
Mr. FernAndcz at 27 percent and 
Mr. C&rdenas at 17. If democracy 
means that voters seek self-inter- 
est, what happened? 

Jorge Castaneda, a political 
scientist and leading critic of the 
PRI, says he is not quite sure. 
“There was a lot of the tradition- 
al, retail vote peddling,” he told 
me. “But I think that the results 
reflect the will of the people.” 

Most watchdog organizations 


are indicating that the election 
was probably the cleanest ever in 
Mexico. But Eduardo Arguyo 
Baldenegro, a 38-year-old engi- 
neer, isn’t buying that He was the 
mayoral candidate erf the Party of 
tbe Democratic Revolution in 
Villa de Garcia, a small town of 
adobe walls and pecan orchards 
in the stale of Nuevo Ledn. 

The most striking exhibit for 
Mr. Aiguyo’s case is a pair of 
brown leather work shoes, shiny 
new, wrapped in a plastic bag 
emblazoned with the emblem of 
the PRI. The manufacturer's 
marking on the thick soles has 
been buffed away so that their 
origin can't be traced. 

“These shoes were given to 


A Lively Few Days at Castel Gandolfo 


C ASTEL GANDOLFO. Ita- By Ijll y Weymouth 
1 y — It was. in short, a J J J 


Renaissance weekend, papal 
style. For three days. Pope John 
Paul II hosted a gathering of 
Polish, American, German and 
French intellectuals, plus a few 
European politicians, at his 
summer home here. 

During the days, the Pope, 
attended seminars at which the 
scholars and politicians present- 
ed and debated papers. Al 
lunch, he talked a little about 
what was on his mind: Yugosla- 
via, for example, which he 
called an “artificial” state and 
likened to the Soviet Union. 

The subject of the symposium 
here was “identity.” During the 
discussions, the Pope sat slight- 
ly apart at a small wooden table, 
listening intently. 

Krzysztof Michalsld, director 
of the Institute for Human Sci- 
ences in Vienna, which had or- 
ganized the gathering, ex- 
plained that with the Soviet 
Union gone, “it's necessary to 
search for a new order.” What 
he did not say, except by impli- 
cation. was that the collapse of 
communism had rendered it 
crucial for the Catholic Church 
to seek a new role, especially in 
Poland and other countries pre- 
viously under Communist rule. 

Bronislaw Geremek, the for- 
mer Solidarity leader, talked 
about Poland’s request to enter 
the European Community. An 
expert on Islam, Bernard Lewis, 
presented a paper on how the 
Islamic world has addressed the 
question of identity. 

Also present was Father Josef 
Tischner, a professor of philoso- 


phy in Poland and an old friend 
of the Pope’s from Krakow. It 
was Father Tischner and Mr. 
Michalski who developed the 
idea of bringing Western intel- 
lectuals together with thinkers 
who lived behind the Iron Cur- 
tain. This was in the 1970s, and 
the first such effort took place 
when Karol Wojtyla, now Pope, 
was Krakow's archbishop. 

He sent out letters inviting 
academics to come to Krakow, 
thus giving the affair a religious 
cast that helped disguise its 
political character. 

The 1989 meeting came at a 
crucial moment for the Polish 
resistance; Solidarity leaders Had 
to decide whether to form a Soli- 
darity-led government It was 
not an easy choice. Solidarity 
was a minority in the Polish Par- 
liament General Wqjckeh Jaru- 
Trixlri remained in the post of 
president, and the interior and 
defense ministries were to re- 
main in Communist hands. 

The Polish resistance leaders 
were able to discuss their dilem- 
ma with the Pope at dial 1989 
session. He reportedly urged 
them to seize the moment 

Last week, the Polish intellec- 
tuals at Castel Gandolfo sought 
the advice erf the Pope again. As 
they see it, there is a new and 
unexpected crisis in post-Com- 
mimjst Poland over the role of 
the church. Under the Commu- 
nists, the church served as 
“home and supporter of the re- 
sistance,” said Mr. Geremek. 

Maaej Zieba, a Polish intellec- 


tual, recalled that when the Com- 
munists ruled. Solidarity mem- 
bers would telephone the 
Vatican almost daily to receive 
an analysis of their prospects. 
“The Pope had 100 percent cred- 
ibflity,” ne said. 

Now, in post-Communist Po- 
land, the question turns cm the 
role of tbe church in a pluralistic, 
democratic society. Poland is di- 
vided over a draft of a new con- 
stitution, over abortion and over 
the nature of relations between 
the Vatican and Warsaw. 

During a break in the confer- 
ence. Jerzy Turowicz, editor of 
the Catholic weekly Tygodnik 
Powscechny, 'recalled what the 
1978 election of Karol Wojtyla 
as Pope meant to Poles; It gave 
them hope. In 1979, when the 
Pope visited Poland, huge 
crowds turned out The govern- 
ment could not control them. 
It made the people fed strong, 
Mr. Turowkz said 

John Paul EL is most likely to 
be remembered for his contri- 
bution to ending communism in 
Eastern Europe. But now he 
sees himself on a new crusade; a 
fight for traditional values. 

Recently, his opposition to the 
draft agenda of the coming Cairo 
conference on population has 
brought him into conflict with 
the Charon administration. 

In this struggle, the Pope has 
few allies; he has had to enter 
into alliances with extremist 
states like Iran. ‘The question 
Dflife is a fundamental right,” 
said tiie Pope, in a terse re- 
sponse to my request that he . 
elaborate on his Cairo position. 

The Washington Post 


people in tins district so that 
they’d vote for the PRL” insisted 
Mr. Aiguijo, who narrowly lost 
the mayoral contest in 1991 to the 
PRI candidate. 

On Sunday, nearly 90 percent 
of the town's eligible voters 
showed up at the polls. Shortly 
before midnight, local election of- 
ficials told Mr. Aigudjo that he 
had lost by about 250 votes. 

On Monday, he had his follow- 
ers demonstrated outside the 
town’s Officeof Electoral Affairs. 
That night they were rewarded; 
the vote was annulled on account 
o f electoral fraud. 

Mr. Argirijo’s crusade proves 
that in Mexico, where crooked 
victories are sometimes bargained 
away, the electoral curtain may 
not fall for weeks to come. Still, 
Mr. Zedillo’s ascension to the 
presidency is assured. And the 
real loser wQl be the organized left. 
That bodes 21 for the country. 

Mr. C&rdenas called his sup- 
porters to town squares across the 
nation at noon on Monday, urg- 
ing them to contest election re- 
sults in their hometowns. Fewer 
than 50,000 supporters answered 
the call in Mexico City, a mere 
fifth of the crowd that Mr. Carde- 
nas drew there two weeks ago. 

When the meeting eadeoj Mr. 
Castafleda, who was present, told 
me. at least a thousand people 
were recruited to sessions orga- 
nized by aimed groups that pro- 
claim alliances with the guerrilla 
leader in Chiapas, Subcommander 
Marcos. These people have no 
stake in the peaceful reordering 
of things. Mr. Zedillo is not the 


only beneficiary of Mr. Carde- 
nas s faltering strength. Subcom- 
mander Marcos is smiling, too. 

Mr. C&rdenas is a unique figure 
in Mexican politics: a man with 
moral authority. Yet his poor 
showing this year may fatally un- 
dermine his standing. To stay rel- 
evant, he must become Mexico's 
Martin Luther King Jr. — he 
must start a nationwide wave of 
nonviolent civil disobedience 
against the PRI’s electoral and 
political abuses. 

If he cannot or will not lead 
his followers into the streets, the 
armed radicals on his left will 
step into the vacuum created by 
his political demise, as the Black 
Panthers did when Mr. King was 
assassinated. A wave of violence 
and repression will begin. The 
reputation of Mexico's govern- 
ment and its imposition will be 
bloodied. 

Only one person, a Mexico 
City resident named Eduardo 
Roses, was arrested for an elec- 
toral crime on Sunday. According 
to the authorities, he walked into 
a polling station, took his ballots 
and tore them up. Destruction of 
electoral materials is a crime. 

The government says Mr. Ro- 
sas was drunk. Bat, like the mil- 
lions of Mexicans who cast their 
ballots, he may have done all 
that he COuld to Stop the car nag e 
that lies ahead. 

The writer is author of“Conver- 
■ttttrona' With Moctesuma : Ancient 
Shadows Over Modem life- in 
Mexico. ” He contributed this com- 
ment to The New York Times. 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1894s Servian Reversal [A u §- 24] that the- measures out 

, , Imea in the Imperial rescript is 

PARIS — Many unexpected sued at Tokio wSd not satisfy th 

bulth S P«Pple. TtisnotthedvDadufinh 
news which Iras jim bam received turnon, nor the dvfl police that w 
from that ktfcjan&om passes are fighting.” he said, “nor are w 
all bounds. It ra stated that die fighting fo? equalrights with th 
young King Alexmidcr, actmg on Japanese. It is for die absobt 
the ad™ of his father, is about independence of Coreans, by th 
to abrogate the Constitution of Coreans and far the. thu 


1869, which was recently re-es- 
tablished, and revert to that of 
1888, which it superseded. The 
latter was discarded only a few 
months ago as not only worthless 
but the cause of all the trouble in 
"Servia. The Servians must be a 
most accommodating people. 

1919: DoobtingTokro 

PARIS — Coreans in Paris ex- 
press complete scepticism as re- 
gards the reforms which are to be 
effected by the Japanese in 
Corea. Mr. Eaii K. Whang, of the 
Corean mission, stated yesterday 


[Aug. 24] that the- measures out- 
lined in the Imperial rescript is- 
sued at Tokio would not satisfy the 
peopk “It is not tiie civil adminis- 
tration, nor the dvfl police that we 
are fighting,” he said, “nor are we 
fighting for equal rights with the 
Japanese. It is for the absolute 
independence of Coreans, by the 
Coreans and for the Coreans, that 
we have shed our blood." 

1944: London Suffers 

LONDON — The Germans have 
sent about 7,250 flying bombs, 
each carrying a ton of explosive, 
against London and nearby parts 
of Eng l and, the government dis- 
closed tonight [Aug. 24], as the 
barrage continued after a lull of 
several daylight hoars. Tbe fury 
of the robot bomb oh England 
has now reached such a pitch that 
houses are being destroyed or 
™aged at the rate of some 
17,000 every twenty-four hours. 




t 


■ ,v : V ' ••■ ' - 

. %-.#/> ..... V... ... ..... 


"N 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 25, 1994 

O PIN IOW 




*4^ 








-Z- 



By E. J. Dionne Jr. 




e W 




W ASHINGTON For the 

Gmton presidency, the past, 
week was a very big deaI, to use one 
of the presideat’sfavorae phrases. 
There woe lessons all. around. The 
problem is that the lessors are con- 
tradictory. Advocates of utterly dfe. 
content agendas wfll say . that die 
doings around the crime bill 
“prove" whatever point they axe try* 
mg to mak&But beware of an the 
dogmatic conventional wisdoms 
busy being bom. The red problem 
in Washington at the moment is that 
the American electorate has not fig* 
ured out its own ridnd. ' 

That win not sum the theorizing. 
It will, for .example, be said that 
passage of die crime- bfllwith46 
votes man mostly moderate Repub- 
licans shows the importance to Bill 
Clinton of reaching out to the other 
paityforsopport That is true; But it 
is also tree that by attaching the 
Republicans fiercely for working at 
first to Withe crime bill, the presi- 
dent scared some of those moderates 
back into negotiations. Many in 
their ranks did not want to be 
blamed for gridlock, especially on 
an issue as important as crime. A 
little partisanship helped/- breed a* 
tittte bipartisanship. 

There will be much talk of govern- 
ing from “the center" and how (he 
final crime deal proved that could 
work. Well, maybe. But the initial 
crime bin that went down was in 
many ways a classic 1 in centrism, 
Cimton-style. It tilted “right” onvd' 
ties and rhetoric (threo-strifces-and- 
you’re-out, new death penalties) and 
left” on federal spending, (for 
100,000 cops, more prisons, the pre- 
vention programs). For good mea- 
sure, irmdnded a way for Mr. Cfc* 
ton to take his stand {gainst “fecial 
interests* (by supporting an assault 
weapons ban over the objections of 
the National Rifle Association). 

This foamula is supposed to bring 
right and left together. But the first 
time around, parts of the left re- 
belled against the death penalties, 
most of the Repuhficans iribeDed 
against the spending, and conserva- 
tive Democrats preferred to stand ' 
with the NRA and their fire at 

Mr. Clinton. Instead cf broadening 
the center, Mr. Clinton and the 
House leadership shrank it 
But wait: Do not conclude that 
the Ointon approach is hopeless. 
On the contrary, when a few dials 
were adjusted during all-night nego- 
tiatingsessions last weekend, the old 
engine came back to life. The center 
reappeared, for a moment, at least. 



-■ There is a reason that dogmatic 
pronouncements about Washington 
‘ are both popular and mostly wrong 

- thesedays. Many .would like to offer 
some sweeping explanation of just 
why things here scan so strange. But 
that very strangeness is the product 
of contradictory political forces 
that neither Republicans nor Demo- 
crats have mastered. 

Tfae.heart of the problem is that 
the electorate is sending a steady 
stream of opnfnsmg signals. It con- 
tinues to be skeptical of government 
and yet wants government to do 
more. Majorities tdl pollsters that 
they Jong for bipartisan concord, yet 
wonder if bipartisan deals are not 

- just politicians’ plots. 

hi airy event, who can afford to be 
bipartisan when passionate sub- 
'■ groups (who vote in huge numbers') 
punish any sign of weakness on is- 

^ nc negotiator on the crime bill their switching; Democrats needed But if they want the politicians to 
wa ^ 1 over the weekend that to rive the Republicans their juslifi- make choices, the voters themselves 

— -UM^cabovew^^^^^ lljal0r 2 , many °* ^ * ssue ? at stake, especial- cation without seeming to cave on have to choose. Few their part, politi- 


-to rise above partisanship — and 
also touafaerand less compro mising 


ly the mon 
enough to set 


ey issues, wore easy 
trie. Republicans xnost- 


They WMtgpvernment to doit Jl ly knew that not ab of the social 
on h ealth care (^e. guarantee every- programs in the crime bill were junk 
one coverage), yet tear that their — a lot of them had enjoyed Repub- 
own health. care wiD be wrecked if Hcan support. Democrats mostly 
the government doa anything. knew that there were places where 
■ An unce rtain public creates edgy spending could be cut But the polit- 
pofatKaans who are always waxy of ical stakes had become so high that 
putting a: foot wrong, yet axe always the negotiations were almost entire- 
hoping to fi nd opportumties to fit ly about postures and appearances, 
p ublic o pimonthejr way. This puts Republicans who wanted to switch 
a premium on symbols. needed to get something to justify 


the essentials (which, mercifully, 
saved the assault weapons ban). 

Episodes such as this one feed the 
public’s sense that so much of what 
happens in Washington has more to 
do with partisan politics, narrowly 
conceived, than with the problems 
supposedly under discussion. Yet 
voters also need to bold themselves 
accountable for their role in creating 
this mess. Politics is about choices. 
Professional politicians are paid to 
make them on behalf of majorities. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Aadl^VNei^iboi^ 

Regarding. “Oppose Iranian and 
Other Extremists, Not AU Islam*' 
(Opinion, Aug. 29): 

Omar Al Hassan has weighty cre- 
dentials, but his article is short on 
facts and long on conjecture. 

Iran’s annual arms procurement 
was recently estimated by the U.S. 
National Security Council al 52 bfl- 
tioatu Sources in Europe have cited 
figures as low as S800 mDtioo. Ibis 
contrasts to Saudi Arabia, as well as 
Kuwait and other Gulf 


times as much as ban annually and 
12 times as much per capita. 

Further, good neighbor liness does 
not necessarily mean giving away 


Of the hundreds of millions of cou- 
ples in poor countries who wish to 
plan their families, most do not get 
the chance: Almost half of the SO 


the family silver. The ownership of milli on women in poor countries who 


the disputed Gulf islands is well 
documented in both Iranian and 
British archives. The last rime any 
question arose regarding their ad- 
ministration was in 1971, when the 
British, after pulling out of the area 
in a continuation of the Wilson gov- 
ernment's “East of Suez* policy, 
returned them to Iran. 

KEWMARS BOZORGMEHR. 

London. 


which are receiving or have on order 

They Do Not Feei Free 

P-15. Assuming a delivery schedule Regarding M Population Eton - 
spread over five years, these states, ormes: The Sensible View Goes 
with a combined population ©! 20 Unheard" ( Opinion, Aug. 22) by 
mflfion, are spending perhaps four Julian JL Simon: 


became pregnant in the last 12 
months fid not want another child. 
Where is Mr. Simon’s “true repro- 
ductive freedom" in this situation? 

Under the circumstances in which 
most poor people live, not giving 
women birth control amounts to 
forcing them to bear children — a 
fact that Mr. Simon and Pope John 
Paul n conveniently ignore. From a 
political standpoint, to deny women 
access to birth control is to deprive 
them of a fundamental human right; 
and from a human standpoint it is 
hugely callous. 

KATHERINE CLARK. 

Heidelberg, Germany. 


dans have only encouraged evasion 
by engaging in a symbolic politics 
of false choices. 

Ultimately, voters have to gamble 
on one of two competing proposi- 
tions — that government really can 
get some things right and is worth 
paying for, or that they really can 
live with much less government. Ei- 
ther they are wilting to pay a tittle 
more to guarantee that neither they 
nor anyone else will lose health cov- 
erage, or they will take their chances 
on the status quo. 

All of us also have to face what is 
for some an unpleasant fact: that 
many of these arguments are about 
the politics of class. The people who 
have the least to fear from the status 
quo are those who can buy their way 
out of it Voters have to decide 
whether certain benefits — such as 
health care — should be guaranteed 
in some form, as a matter of course. 
to everybody, or whether certain 
people (the poor, middle-class fam- 
ilies who cannot afford insurance, 
the very side) will be left to their own 
devices, or to chance or to charity. 

President Clinton says he wants 
to change the conduct of politics. He 
might look less partisan and less 
compromising if be challenged the 
voters and Congress by speaking a 
few impolitic truths. The idea would 
be to encourage the electorate to 
make some choices so politicians 
could get on with making some deci- 
sions. As it is, the gridlock in Wash- 
ington is only a reflection of the 
gridlock in the country. 

The H'oshingren Purr. 


At That Moment in Paris 
We Were the Finest of All 


By John C. Ausland 


O slo — as Aug. 25 , 1944 , 
dawned, the U.S. 4th Infantry 
Division found itself in a bivouac 
just south of Paris. Orville Schroe- 
der. nry communications sergeant, 
brought me out of a deep sleep by 
shaking roe and saying, “Wake up. 
Captain Ausland. we are going to 
go take Paris.** 

A few hours later I found myself 
driving in my jeep through throngs 

1944 PARIS 1994 

of civilians as we made our way to 
Choisy-le-Roi, a suburb of Paris. 
The mission of the 1st Battalion of 
the 8th Regiment, to which I was 
attached as artillery liaison officer, 
was to guard the bridge at Choisy. 

The 12th Regiment of the 4th 
Division reached (he center of the 
city around noon. It joined up 
there with the French 2d Armored 
Division, which had met heavy 
resistance when attacking from 
the west. Shortly after noon, after 
some firing to preserve his honor. 
General Dietrich von Choltitz, 
commander of the German forces, 
surrendered and was taken into 
custody by the French. 

Soon after, in a letter dated 
Aug. 29, I wrote this account erf 
that day in Paris to my parents. 

□ 

Well, this division has now been 
in on three of the most important 
phases of the French campaign: 1 1 
the landings oa D-Day, 2) the 
breakthrough on the Saint-Ld- 
Pfcriers road, and 3) now the free- 
ingof Paris. 

This has been one of the most 
exciting times we have had since 
arriving in France. 1 won't go into 
the military details, but perhaps 
you would be interested in the 
purely nonmilitary points. 

We started into the city late one 
morning. The infantry battalion 
with which I traveled was one of 
the first to enter the city from 
its particular side of entry. 

It was a grand welcome the peo- 
ple gave. They lined the streets for 
mile after mOe, thousands of 
them. All were shouting “Vive V A- 
merique” or “Vive la France,” lit- 
erally wild with joy. We were the 
first Americans they had seen, the 
first sign of freedom after four 
years of domination. 

As we rode through the streets, 
the crowd would surge about us 
until it was impossible to move 


forward. People would crowd 
about and onto our vehicles. 
Women, men and girls flung their 
arms about us, insistent on kissing 
us on both cheeks. Mothers held 
np their babies for us to kiss. We 
were literally showered with fruit 
of all kinds, wine and flowers until 
Our vehicle resembled a garden. 

At street intersections the 
crowd was so thick it was impossi- 
ble to move forward, with the 
street solid with people as far as 
the eye could reach. We moved 
only with loud use of the horn and 
insistent urging. 

There were thousands of pretty 
girls, all dressed in their Sunday 
best It seemed to me Td never 
seen so many beautiful women. 
Until they spoke, one would think 
he was in America. 

At last we stopped and set up 
our headquarters in an ex-German 
Army bunding. The people crowd- 
ed about the gates to watch these 
Americans. It was impossible to 
work because of the Josses, hand- 
shaking and shouting. Our men 
were having a wonderful time. 

That night there was singing, 
drinking and dancing until the 
wee hours of the morning. The 
hardships of occupation were for- 
gotten. though it was difficult to 
convince them that the Ameri- 
cans, unlike the Germans, would 
permit them to dance, collect in 
crowds and enjoy themselves. 

It was a big moment in the city’s 
history, and the French are the 
ones to demonstrate it For the 
moment at least, the Americans 
were the finest persons who ever 
existed. Paris was liberated 

And so it has been for days as 
we move from one part of the city 
to the other. Crowds, kisses and 
celebration. A new kind of war. 
But the fighting will come a gain 
There are many Germans between 
here and Berlin. They haven't giv- 
en up and are not defeated. 

In another letter I will tell you 
of the FFL the French Forces of 
the Interior, and their fight to help 
free Paris. Also of the “tittle war” 

I got into at the Place de la Con- 
corde in the center of the city. 

Love, John 


The writer's wartime correspon- 
dence was published last year in 
"Letters Home: A War Memoir." 
He contributed this article to the 
International Herald Tribune. 



BOOKS 


e>an> 




BRECHT & COMPANY: 
Seat, Politics, and the Mak- 
ing of Modem Drama 

By John Fuegi. 732 pages. 
532.50. Grove. 

Reviewed by Weady Smith 

I TS never been a secret that 
Bertolt Brecht (1898-1956) 
was not the world’s nicest guy. 
Yon don’t need to have read 
anything more than scattered 
memoirs to be aware that the 
man many consider the greatest 
playwright of the 20th century 
was chronically unfaithful to 
his wife, the actress Helene 
Weigd, frequently cruel to his 
many lovers, and extremely 
sharp (verging on dishonest) in 
his business dealings. 

It's also common knowledge 
that this avowed Communist 
made a cooperative appearance 
before the House Committee cm 
Un-American Activities in 
1947, that when going to East 
Germany in 1949 he hedged his 
bets with an Austrian passport 
and a Swiss bank account, that 
he said nothing about the Sta- 
linist purges of the 1930s, dur- 
ing which many of his friends in 
the Soviet Union were mur- 
dered, and commented only 
obliquely on the German Dexn- 


WHAT THEY RE READING 


• Mark Palmer, former 
American ambassador to Hun- 
gary and now president of the 
partial European Development 
Corporation m Berlin, is reading 
“ Fatherland w by Robert Harris. 

'“Hus book says so much 
about the terrible events that 
took place m this city for so long 
aud it brings h all up to the 
present. It’s a frightening story, 
and yoti can team from it” 
(Michael KaBenbach, IHT) 



ocratic Republic’s repressive 
actions in the 1950s. 

. But until now, everyone as- 
sumed be wrote Ms own plays; in 
fact, the subtext of many Brecht 
biographies was that a lot could 
be forgiven the author of 
“Threepenmr Opera," “Galileo,” 
“Mother Coinage" and “The 
Good Woman of Setzuan.” 

John- FuegPs scathing ac- 
count of Brecht’s life directly 
c h all en ge s that assumption. A 
founder of the International 
Brecht Society and author of 
two. critical studies of the Ger- 
man dramatist, Fuegi asserts 
(backed up by extensive docu- 
mentation) that three remark- 
able women — Elisabeth 
Hauptmann, Maxgarete Steffin 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscott 

T HERE were four Close 
matches hi the Spmgfid 
Knockout Teams, and all the 
favorites survived. Jeff Wolf son 

and his team won by 2 against a 

foursome headed by Richard 
Pavlicek Jr. after trailing by 50 
at the midpoint. 

Pavlicek’s slender loss after a 
big lead was particularly poi- 
gnaat because one opponent 
was his father, Richard Pavlicek 
Sr. Earlier on, the younger Pav- 
licek had finished second in the 
Junior Team Trials with Blair 
SddZer, who, in the SpmgoM 
found himseJf te 
tract of five spades redoubted 
on the diagramed deal. 

East expected to beat the 
contract because he had made a 
l ea d-directing bid of five dia- 
monds and hoped tO SCQtC two 
ruffs, in the suit. His partntf 
obliged with a diamond lead, 
but after one niff there was no 
quick re-entry to the West 
hand. East tried a duix South 
won, raffed a heart, and raffed 
a club high, removing the king. 

Since West was known to 
have begun with a doubleton 
dub aud it least 10 red cards. 


he could not have more than a 
singleton trump. So South 
raffed a heart, crossed to his 
spade ace, and ruffed his last 
heart with dummy’s last trump. 
He threw a diamond on the club 
queen and lost one more trick, 
making his contract for a score 
.of 1,000 and a gain of 15 imps. 

Notice that five hearts dou- 
bled would have succeeded bar- 
ring an inspired dub lead by 
North and an underiead of 
South’s spades to score off a 
ruff. 

■ NORTH (D) 

.* JS 
ri A KQ3 
*K4 
4KQ865 


WEST 
♦ K943 
09*2 
0 10 9 
4J972 


EAST 
1 *108 6 
7105 
OQS763 2 
*10 4 
SOUTH 
* AQ72 
OJ87 6 
.0 A J5 
#A3 

East and West, were vulnerable. 


The bidding: 



North 

East. 

South 

West 

I* 

Pass 

IP 

' Pass 

4? 

Pass 

1 NX 

Pass 

5* 

Pass 

Pass 

Pass 

79 

Pass 


and Ruth Beriau — wrote sub- 
stantial portions of the plays 
mentioned above and others. 
AD three were dedicated Com- 
munists and gifted artists in 
their own right who, because 
they had the misfortune to fall 
in love with him. found them- 
selves enmeshed in a web of 
sexual, professional and politi- 
cal manipulation through 
which the charismatic and un- 
scrupulous Brecht made them 
wholly dependent on him and 
reaped virtually aQ the rewards 
of their labors. 

Fuegi is lavish with details, 
and persuasively sketches a 
chining baste outline. The fe- 
male "collaborator” did the ba- 
sic research, identified material 
that could be used as sources, 
did the necessary translations, 
then — sometimes with Brecht, 
but often without him — 
roughed out the basic structure 
and wrote the early drafts. In 
Fnegi’s assessment, Brecht was 
at most the co-creator of many 
of his most famous plays. 

These are devastating 
charges, made all the more so 
by r uegi’s disdain for fellow 
Brecht scholars who be feds 
have ignored the evidence 
about these women’s contribu- 
tions: Indeed, it is most disturb- 
ing to reread previous biogra- 


phies or critical material with 
Fuegi’s revelations in mind. 
Many, including Klaus Volker’s 
“Brecht” and the introduction 
to "Collected Plays, Volume 7” 
by Ralph Manheun and John 
Willett, contain passing refer- 
ences to Hauptmann, Steffin 
and Beriau working with Brecht 
on the texts and to contracts 
sharing royalties with them, yet 
do not address the question of 
what these fads say about the 
plays* authorship. 

Fuegi’s footnotes point out 
such evasions and detail the nu- 
merous letters left out of the 
allegedly comprehensive Ger- 
man edition of Brecht’s oorre- 

last Berlin’s Bertolt Brecht Ar- 
chive that were placed off-limits 
to researchers. Suggesting both 
willed blindness and deliberate 
coverup, “Brecht & Company” 
is as much an indictment of 
slipshod scholarship and politi- 
cal control of intellectual mate- 
rial as it is of Brecht's reprehen- 
sible behavior. 

Fuegi’s own scholarship, for- 
midable though it is, has its 
lapses. His years of research 
have apparently made him so 
detest Brecht that he occasion- 
ally seems more vitriolic than a 
particular instance of his sub- 
ject's behavior warrants. 

These faults, however, are in- 
timately linked to the book's 
principal strength; a passion- 
ate, extremely personal indig- 
nation over the way in which 
belief in Brecht’s genius led 
both his intimates and subse- 
quent critics and historians to 
excuse the most serious moral 
failures is the domestic, finan- 
cial and political arenas. 

Wendy Smith, the author oj 
"Rea! life Drama: The Group 
Theatre and America. 1931- 
1940." wrote this for The Wash- 
ington Posl 


West ted the b tan two. 


— Ilcralb^^Sribunc — , 

LIVING EN T THE U,S.? 

NOW PRINTED IN 
NEWARK 

FDR Same Day 
delivery in key Cities 

TO SUBSCRIBE, CALL 

1-800-882 2884 

(IN NEW YORK, CALL 212-752-3890) 


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c 


MEDITERRANEAN 

Economic**, BiuineM and Politico 

ASTIR PALACE HOTEL, VOULIAGMENI, NEAR ATHENS. 10-11 OCTOBER. 1994 

T his exceptionally timely conference examines the potential for business and investment 
unleashed by the Middle East peace process. As the economic dividends of recent 
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and infrastructure opportunities in Jordan, Israel, Lebanon, Gaza and the West Bank. 

The conference will be an important working meeting for those who want to be part 
of the regions future prosperity. It offers a unique opportunity for meeting business 
leaders and key decision-makers with interests in this transforming region. 

The impressive group of speakers addressing this major forum includes: 

18 Abu Ala a. Minuter of Economy. Palestine Nathuta* Authnrih/ am) Managing Director, PF.CDAR 
S Yossi Beilin, Deputy Minister of Fturitjn Affairs, fjraet 

H David R Bock, Afana^intj Director, Ijebman Brother* hilemaluwal (Europe), Ltmckm 
§1 Roger Edde, Lebanese Politician and International Buoine.vman 
i HE Dr Ziad Fariz, Ath’iu>r to HRH Crown Prince of Jon)an 
I§ Dr Jacob Frenkel, Gocemor. Bank of lewd. Jerusalem 
® RaJkmi K09, Chairman, Koq HoMings AS. Istanbul 
§ Manuel Marin, 1 -ice President, European Commission, Bru.u*els 

i HE Sheikh Ahmed Zaki Yamani, Chairman, Centre for Global Energy Studies, London 
Conference Location 


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VOULIAGMENI. NEAR ATHENS 
TEL; (50 1 > 89602 1 l/SI I FAX: (50 1 > 8962582 

Situated on the coast and surrounded by 80 acres of 
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The calm, relaxing atmosphere of the hoiel creates 
the ideal climate for focusing on the key issue* under 
discussion. 


{ For further information, or to register for the conference. 

} p/ea«e complete the Torm below and send or fax to: 

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| 63 Long Acre, London WC2E 9JH 

| Tel: 1-W7D 836 4802 Fax: (-M 71) 836 0717 

[ The conference fee is £650.00 -IS 0 ® FPA 

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HEALTH /SCIENCE 



Toxic Shock Threat * 
Hasn’t Gone Away 


By Jane E Brody 

New York Tima Service 


Okm Woifl/Tbt Nn York Tin 


Renewed Alarm on Pesticides and Fertility 


By William K. Stevens 

New York Times Service 




EW YORK — In a new wave of 
concern about synthetic chemi- 
cals in the environment, some bi- 
ologists are warning that trace 
: amounts of pesticides and other man- 
made substances may be interfering with 
the action of reproductive hormones and 
thereby damaging the fertility of various 

animal populations, including h umans 

The evidence is far from conclusive. But 
the economic and political stakes are high; 
should die new fears prove justified, a 
large group of important industrial chemi- 
cals might have to be curbed. 

At least 45 synthetic chemicals, most of 
them pesticides, have been found to upset 
the workings of the hormonal, or endo- 
crine system, and for this reason they are 
known as endocrine disrupters. 

There is little doubt, many scientists 
agree, that when people or animals are 
exposed to large doses of these chemicals, 
as has happened in chemical spills or con- 
tamination of food, serious derangements 
of reproductive function sometimes result. 

Male alligators bom in Florida's Lake 
Apopka after a large pesticide spill in 1980 
were found to be incapable of producing 
sperm. In Taiwan, reproductive and other 
defects have been noted in the sons of 


women who in 1978 and 1979 ingested 
cooking oil contaminated with PCBs. 

The question at issue is whether trace 
amounts of these chemicals that are now 
widely distributed in the environment are 
exerting a less visible but still pernicious 
effect on the reproductive fitness of many 
species of wildlife and possibly even hu- 
mans. 

For at least some wildlife populations. 
*Td say we are on a fast trade to extinc- 
tion,” said Dr. Theodora Colbora, a zoolo- 
gist with the World Wildlife Fund, a con- 
servation organization in Washington. 

“You would expect the same thing to 
happen with human populations.” 

Other experts disagree. 

“I don't think it is a huge problem at this 
point,” said Dr. Thomas Goldsworthy, a 
toxicologist with the Chemical Industry 
Institute of Technology, a nonprofit re- 
search organization at Research Triangle 
Park, North Carolina, that is largely sup- 
ported by industry. 

Said Dr. Tom Onne. a Washington- 
based toxicologist with the American 
Council on Science and Health in New 
York, which has long held claims of barm 
from chemicals in the environment to be 
exaggerated: “We suspect there is a lot of 
baloney here. On the other hand, to devel- 
op the hard science to refute it is going to 
be a formidable task.” 

Still other experts view the issue as pos- 


sibly serious but say it is too early to call it 
one way or the other. 

“We don’t want to argue we've got a 
massive problem,” said Dr. Larry Reiter, 
the director of the Enviro n men ial Protec- 
tion Agency's Health Effects Research 
Laboratory at Research Triangle Park. But 
he also said, “I don’t think we want to 
argue there is no problem.” 

Although many biologists are convinced 
that endocrine disruptors are pervasive, 
they have not yet been able to assess the 
quantity and distribution of the chemicals 
in the environment. Nor is there any good 
survey to tell what burden of these chemi- 
cals is carried in the body Tat of the general 
population. 

But a number of studies suggest grounds 
for concern, particularly from the com- 
bined effects of several different chemicals 
acting in concert either to mimic or block 
the crucial effects of natural estrogens on 
sexual development in the fetus. 

D R. Ana M. Soto and Dr. Carlos 
Sonnenschein, biologists at Tufts 
University, have found that 
doses of estrogen-mimicking pes- 
ticides too small to have any effect individ- 
ually on test-tube cultures of cells from 
breast-cancer tissue have a powerful effect 
when combined. Estrogens spur the 
growth of such cells. 

Other laboratory studies have shown 


that the synthetic chemicals can disrupt 
the reproductive development of mammal 
fetuses. And field investigations have 
traced reproductive disorders in mammals 
and birds to the consumption of fish whose 
flesh contained the chemicals. 

Some environmentalists are caning for a 
phaseout of endocrine-disruptor chemicals, 
and there is legislation before Congress to 
replace some chlorine compounds, many of 
which have been identified as endocrine 
disruptors, with feasible alternatives. 

The EPA and the United Slates Fish and 
Wildlife Service have asked the National 
Academy of Sciences to investigate the 
problem. 

The debate is in some ways a replay of 
“Silent Spring,” Rachel Carson's land- 
mark book published in 1962, in which sbe 
argued that fat-soluble pesticides in the 
bodies of birds were interfering with repro- 
duction. Her thesis provoked a barrage of 
criticism, but biologists in time learned 
that many chlorinated hydrocarbons like 
DDT do indeed sabotage reproduction, 
for example by making the shells of birds’ 
eggs too fragile. 

DDT and similar pesticides like aldrin 
and dieldrin were banned long ago in the 
United States. But their residues persist in 
the environment, not the least because 
they remain in use in much of the world 
and are being transported to America on 
globe-girdling winds. 


N EW YORK — Toxic shock syn- 
drome may have faded from 
pro min ent public concern but 
not from the medical record 
books. This often-faia) disease may be 
nearly as common now as it was in the 
eaiiy 1980s, when it terrified menstruating 
women, especially those who used highly 
absorbent tampons. 

Cases of toxic shock fell off sharply in 
1984 after Rely, made fay Procter A Gamble 
Co„ and other soperabsorbent tampons 
were taken off the market But according to 
da ta gathered in Minne sota, toxic shock 
cases slowly began to rise again as the 
staphylococcal bacteria that could produce 
the deadly toxin spread to more people. 

Av oiding the or ganism is problematic, 
since half the U.S. population already car- 
ries staphylococcal bacteria on mucous 
membranes and one-quarter of those who 
are infected cany the kind that can pro- 
duce a deadly toxin. 

Most of these “Typhoid Marys,” among 
them health care providers like surgeons, 
are immune to the loxin but can spread the 
organism to others who are susceptible. 

Today, about half the cases of staphylo- 
coccal toxic shock syndrome have no con- 
nection with campons or menstruation. 
They affect a wide rangeof people, includ- 
ing older women,, mcm and ehfldren, under 
a wide range of circumstances: in conjunc- 
tion with surgery, a wound, influenza, si- 
nusitis, childbirth, use of a contraceptive 
sponge, cervical cap or diaphragm, intra- 
venous drug abuse, an abscess, boil, cut or 
even an insect bite. 

A very severe form of staphylococcal tox- 
ic shock can occur in connection with influ- 
enza; the influenza virus bdps the bacteria 
invade throat cells and, by lowering the 
aridity of the throat, enables the bacteria to 
produce toxin. A particularly deadly form 
can also attack AIDS patients. 

Based on the number of cases of definite 
and probable toxic shock occurring each 
year in Minnesota, Dr. Patrick Schlievert 
estimates that 5,000 to 10,000 cases of 
staphyloooccal untie shock syndrome now 
occur each year in the United States, mak- 
ing it as common as Lyme disease. 

Dr. Schlievert, a microbiologist and tox- 
ic shock specialist at the University of 
Minnesota, said that national reporting of 
untie shock cases was very incomplete, “in 
Minnesota alone there are - as many Unde 
shock cases reported annually as are re- 
ported by the entire country to the Centers 
for Disease Control and Prevention," he 
said. 

Furthermore, there has been, a sudden 
increase in cases of Untie shock associated 
with a different bacterium. Streptococcus 
A. the culprit in the recent rash of severe 


Alnesses and deaths from soiled flesh- 
eating bacteria. 

Toxin-producing streptococci can m- ; 
vade duckeopox lesions in children and 
any break in the skin in adults. It mainly 
affects healthy adults, between tire ages of 
20 and 50; women acquire it mainly aunng 
menstruation or during the second two . 
trimesters of pregnancy. Dr. Schlievert - 
said. From 10,000 to 20,000 cases ofstrep- 
tococcal toxic shock now occu r cam year,’ 
with a death rate of up Co 50 percent 

Although all forms of toxic shoot syn- 
drome are relatively rare, they are common; 
enough and serious enough to warrant a 
widespread alert to their early symptoms, 
especially since many patients do not take 
the first signs of trouble seriously and 
doctors unfamiliar vrith the syndrome of - 
tfp Tn i sdiagnYvsT; it until it is too laic to save 

tbepatient. ... 

Tnis is one situation in which patients or •• . 
their famiSBB must take control, forcing 
doctors to explore the possibility of toxic ; 
shock syndrome by asking, “Do lhavethis . . 
disease?” 

U NLIKE staphylococcal toxic 
shock, which attacks a dispro- , 
portionate number of women, 
the streptococcal form affects 
meai and women m equal numbers. Chil- 
dren who develop it are likely to become ; 
deathly ill even before the bacteria attack # 
soft tissue, and any child who suddenly 
gets sicker while recovering from chicken 
pox should be suspected of having strep to- 
coccal toxic shock. 

However, Dr. Schlievert said, many pa- . 
turn is who do not meet all the classical ■ 
criteria for toxic shock may have what he , 
and others now call probable or possible • 
untie shock syndrome. ! 

Making the correct diagnosis and • 
promptly treating lire disease is important , 
ip these cases, too, since 5 to 15 percent of ■ 
patients will otherwise die. He added that 
the removal of superabsorbeot tampons > 
from the market had eliminated one cause ; 
of the severest form, and “today a lot of the > 
menstrual cases fall into the clasafication ‘ 
of possible toxic shock syndrome.” 

Dr. Larry J. Strausbaugh of the Veterans • 
Affairs Metrical Center m Portland. Ore- ■ 
gqo, wrote in the journal Postgraduate ' 
Medicine, “The diagnosis should be con- < 
sidered in any. severely ill patient with 
fever and hypotension in whom staphylo- ■ 
coccal or streptococcal colonization or in- ] 
fection is remotely possible.” 

in addition, he wrote, “Toxic shock syn- ; 
drome should be suspected in patients < 
without rash or with rashes other than the ; 
classic” red one. 

Time is of the essenoe in treating toxic : 
shock syndrome, especially when it is . 
caused by flesh-eating streptococci. Once ; 
these bacteria begin to destroy soft tissue, , 
they can multiply rapidly ana spew toxin, r 



Australian Surface Lines Baffle Scientists 

MELBOURNE (Reuters) — Straight lines across southern 
Australia’s flat, featureless Nullarbor Plain and invisible except 
via satellites are baffling scientists. The parallel lines up to 400 
kilometers (250 miles) Jong, and only visible with infrared satellite 
equipment in daylight, were discovered three weeks ago. :. 

They said there are no known geological structures such as fault 
lines that would explain the images. The lines are up to 15 
kilometers wide and about 100 kilometers apart near the middle of 
the plain. The most likely explanation was a different type of soil 
structure, vegetation or moisture pattern compared with the 
surrounding earth, Ian Barton, a senior physicist with the Com- 
monwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, said. 

Teas Found to Inhibit Skin Tumors In Mice 

WASHINGTON (WP) — A team headed by Zhi Y. Wang at 
Rutgers University has found that green tea, black tea and 
decaffeinated versions of both inhibited the formation of skin 
tumors in mice. 


Comparing the results against those from a control group that 
received the ultraviolet irradiation, to induce tumors, but drank 
just water, the researchers found that all the teas inhibited the 
formation of tumors and reduced the average size of those that did 
form. “The results of our study indicate that Mack and green tea 
have a similar potent inhibitory effect,” the researchers stated. 

Recent studies have also shown that green tea, drunk mainly by 
Asians, can reduce the incidence of esophageal cancer. 

Biosphere II Diet Caused Energy Loss 

TORONTO (AP) — Eight people sealed inside Biosphere II for 
. two years experienced excess drops in metabolism anddedines in 
physical activity because of their low-calorie, low-fat diet, a study 
has found. 

Biosphere II, a glass-enclosed structure designed to show that 
humans can survive in a self-sustaining environment, was a not 
entnely successful experiment Food production fell short of 
mmal expectations and Biosphere’s residents were forced .to 
subsist on 1,700 calories a day for the first six months. 


Closing In on an Ultracold World 



By Malcolm W. Browne 

New York Times Service 

EW YORK — Sixty- 
nine years ago, theo- 
rists calculated that if 
a certain class of at- 
oms could be chilled to tem- 
peratures below any that exist 
in nature, the atoms would 
merge with each other to be- 
come huge “super atoms”: bi- 
zarre states of matter straddling 
the gulf between the everyday 
world and the ultrasmau do- 
main of q uantum mechanics. 

Recent advances at dozens of 
laboratories in the United 
States and Europe have encour- 
aged some scientists to believe 


that they may be nearing this 
elusive goal. 

The creation of a Bose- Ein- 
stein condensate, as this hypo- 
thetical superatomic state of 
matter is called, would be a his- 
toric landmark in physics, one 
that many physicists say would 
be worthy of a Nobel ftize. 

It would not only demon- 
strate the validity of some out- 
landish predictions of quantum 
theory, but would create a form 
of matter that may never have 
existed anywhere before — a 
substance with properties scien- 
tists can only guess at. 

No one knows what a Bose- 
Einstein condensate, or super 
atom, would look like. But sti- 


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Tribune esdusfae articles: Eke tehaad reports frora the 
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■ The auto industry’s dream of a "global car. 

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enlists are confident that what- 
ever its appearance, certain in- 
visible but easily detectable 
features would afford ample ev- 
idence of its existence. It is 
named for the late Satyendra 
Nath Bose and Albert Einstein, 
whose statistical calculations 
led to Einstein's prediction of 
1925 that this superatomic sub- 
stance could exist. 

Last week, scientists at the 
National Institute of Standards 
and Technology in Gaithers- 
burg, Maryland, reported an 
achievement that may bring the 
goal closer; They reached a new 
record low temperature in their 
laboratory. 700 nanokelvins, or 
somewhat less than one-mil- 
lionth of a degree above the 
absolute zero. 

The absolute zero, a tempera- 
ture fixed by the laws of ther- 
modynamics that can be ap- 
proached but never quite 
reached, is defined as zero de- 
grees on the Kelvin scale, mimic 
273.15 degrees on the Celsius 
scale ami. minus 459.4 degrees 
Fahrenheit. 

Thfrnew record temperature 
is far colder than t hat of' any 
matter astronomers have been 
able to measure anywhere in the 
universe, and should be cold 
enough to bring about Bose- 
Einstein condensation, theo- 
rists ^bdieve, if more atoms 
could be packed into the appa- 
ratus where the cooling Jakes 
place. So far, however, no one 
has Achieved a high enough 

concentration of atoms at alow 

enough temperature. • 

Dr. Steven Rolston, a mem- 
ber of die NIST team, saidte 
did not expect that his laboraio- 
ry-s enrrem equipment could 
produce cower temperatures or 
create a Bose-Einstein conden- 
sate, but thatbe was not unduly 

ring a Bose-Einstein 


condensate would have been 
wonderful, but it would be inci- 
dental to Our main task, which 
is to apply atomic cooling to 1 
improving the precision of 
timekeeping,” he said. 

The NIST intends to exploit 
the record temperature it has 
achieved in building the most 
accurate dock ever 

MPROVING the accurai 
of the current cha — : - 


I oi me current cbampic 
timekeeper — the NIS?T- 
wmch gains or loses lei 
one second every miHi c 
years — will require supercol 
temperatures, comparable t 
those needed to create Boa 
Emstein condensates, Dr. Ro 
ston said. The laboratory’s sw 
cessm reaching a temperate! 
of 700 nanokelvms guarantee 
that NISTs next dock, will b 
many tunes more accurate (ha 
NIST-7. 

•JAf Me was to reduce' tii 

speed of the atoms that run ih 
atomic dock to as dose to zex 
iMe. 

i^at of a substance i 


equivalent to the speeds 
molecules; tl 


of 

thus, 


and rails 

the speed of an atom could 
educed to zero, its temperat 
w °uld also be zero. 

ri 1 Dr* Rdston’s laboratr 
“SHtin atoms shot from a H 
furnace start their journey i 
1,000 meters, or ab 
jvw reet, or more per seco 
they immediatdy^couiS 

^ Prosefy tuned 
ser beam* luhioi, ™3 .u.. 



per second. 

Once the atoms in- the an 
22, dowed. or coS 
?jaay of them become trapj 

flat create Httle 

“*Rped insuch a wdk, an m 

r™. stay put its vdo 
greatly; 





TTaT 


I 





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INTERNATIONAL 


Whirlpool of Responsibility 


■ ByBamaby J. Fedcr . 

New York Tones Serric* - 

B enton harbor, Michigan — 

Thanks to Whirlpool Corp.’s trans- 
formation from a major North 
American appliance company into 
the industry’s worldwide leader. David R. 
Whitwam, the chairman and chief executive, - 
has been receiving praise and recognition 
lately that indudes being else focus of a Har- 
vard Business Review article, “The Right 
Way to Go Global'’ 

jtot back in the middle of 1990, three years 
after Mr. Whitwam committed Whiripool to 
the expansion now winning accolades, ids 
strategy was in trouble. Opoating profit was 
falling, and Whirlpool's stock was trading 
even lower than the bottom it hit /after the 
1987 stock-market plunge. 

The company was in danger of planting the 
flag all over the map without really profiting 
from it. Whirlpool, Mr. Win twam concluded, 
needed an outsider to harness the straogths of 
its growing ranks of partners, aubsidianos and 
suppliers. 

Enter Ronald L. Kerber, a former academ- 
ic, government bureaucrat and aerospace ex- 
ecutive fond of fast cars and farm life, Lured 
to Whirlpool from his job as chief technology 
officer at McDonnell Douglas Corp. in early 
1991, Mb. Kerber was given the titles of chief, 
technology officer and executive vice presi- 
dent in addition to a hefty pay package and a 
mandate to expand his empire as needed. 

Mr. Kerber, 51, now has what may wdl be 
the broadest workload of any technology ^man- 
ager in a major American company, indnding 
worldwide responsibility for purc ha sing . ; 

“Having technology and procurement to- 


gether helps decide what you make and what 
yon buy” Mr. Kerber said. “Fifty-five to 60 
percent of ourproduct cost is procurement, so 
we never take oar eye off it” 

Before Mr. Kaber’s arrival, some divisions 
at Whirlpool had been following the trend of 
using fewer suppliers and making them part- 
ners m product development. But purchasing 
was decentralized. 

Today, Whirlpool is halfway through a 
five-year crash program to cut its supplier 
base of dose to 2,500 in half. Typical of the 
new partnership approach was the recent de- 
cision to tun over design of the gas system 
and controls for a hew range the company 
will budd in its Tulsa, Oklahoma, plant to a 
single supplier, the controls divirion of Eaton 
Corp. 

In the past. Whirlpool would have done 
much of the design work itself and then re- 
quested bids from a number of suppliers for 
various components of the system. While it 
might have come up with decent results for 
components and good price quotes from sup- 
pliers, integrating the components would 
have taken much longer and cost more, ac- 
cording to a company spokesman. 

Broad control of procurement is not die 

a musual aspect of Mr. Kerber’ s portfolio, 
on, Mr. Kerber also had responsibility 
goring out what to do with the compa- 
ny’s European compressor manufacturing 
operations. 

Mr. Kerber assigned a management team 
to consolidate the operations by dosing a 
factory and making them profitable. Then be 
decided that it made sense to sell the unit even 

See WHIRLPOOL, Page 13 


g gi gp. p|j 


*3$ -a-V: '«■ SSESSSSSgiS 

International Herald Tribune, Thursday, August 25, 1994 



Page 11 


■ . ? Hoechst 

Profit Up 

mm i* 1 Half 

S countries, ■: compiled 

— Foreign Demand 

Improves Outlook 

Rearers 

FRANKFURT — Germa- 
ny’s largest chemicals group, 
Hoechst AG, on Wednesday 
said strong foreign demand 
boosted first-half profit, and 
the company forecast a dear 
rise in earnings for the foil year. 
Group pretax profit was up 
■- j A 39 percent, to 1.0&5 billion 

. . 1994 '- ■ 

Strong US. sales boosted Hoo- 

MhteM mm Reels. 

t 7 .TTPar- 1 U 0 S mm 

— — — - — Deutsche marks ($708 million) 

- from 781 million DM a year 

, __ earlier. 

Sales rose nearly 8 percent, to 
24.66 billion DM from 22.88 
billion DM. 

“Demand rose in Germany 
I M J J A too, even if this was not as 

•- : 19M marked as abroad,” Hoechst 

said in its intoim report. 

“With vohnne sales remain- 
n^SSSL^m tBi ing^od abroad and amid signs 

that domestic demand Is recov- 

f* ering, we expect overall eam- 

’’ ■ Lf tags for 1994 which will clearly 

y- ■ ’is j exceed the previous year’s weak 

Foreign business was good in 
the first half of the year, but 
pressure on profit marg in* con- 
' M J J A turned. The company said group 

1a3 * sales in Germany only improved 

• iui yid 1>_ ,iii «i _ sfi^ttly, but “we were able to 
achieve a rise in other European 

WM. Nwr ZMtanO, Norway; COUBtlieS of 10 percenL” 

' Tb * group’s European sales 
av “ s ‘ MW rose to 1338 billion DM from 
1237 billion DM, while U.S. 
sales climbed to 7.40 billion 
. S ' An DM from 7.05 billion DM. 

11128 119m 4023 Thc^rwults were at the tt^j 

end erf forecasts. The firm s 

134 J 133B1 -tO.58 shar es gained 4 after the news, 

• 104,10 103.78 +030 , rising to 348 DM. 

133.10 132^5 +0.34 The bourse had been await- 

rug interim results from Germa- 

ybtehdBo ftttarg e. q y*$ (jjg three chemical compa- 

‘J Nau^rCsOeKFiaax. jyes to see how fast the sector 
Naottt Trim , has emerged from recession. 


Cowboys and Indian TV 

Network Seeks New Image, More Viewers 


By Kevin Muipby 

IntenmkmJ Herald Tribune 

NEW DELHI — India’s newest mantra — 
competition — is yielding some miraculous 
results far the one in three among its nearly 900 
million, people who can get to a television set 

“In dian television is at last becoming wat- 
chable,” said ATyque Padamsee. a Bombay- 
based marketing yna^ media co nsult s i | 

actor and producer. “There’s nothing like loss 
of market share to focus any manager’s 
znznd.” 

Previously unchallenged on its home turf, 
India’s national broadcaster, Doordarshan, 
has been forced to restyle its format, sell 
advertising and employ the satellite technol- 
ogy that uninvited competitors such as Ru- 
pert Murdoch’s Hong Kong-based STAR-TV 
used to snare minions of its captive viewers. 

Where it once pushed a fare of natum- 
buScfing propaganda between news bulletins 
and anezenz movies, Doordarshan now laces a 
second national Hindi channel, Metro, with 
freshly commissioned dramas and some 
Western fare. 

like most sectors of a long-protected Indi- 
an economy, it had little choice but to re- 
spond to a new environment. In 1992-93, 
Doordarshan’ s revenue growth slowed to 33 
percent freon 20 percent growth the previous 
year. 

In 1993-94, revenue growth slipped to 0.7 
percent to 3.7 bQhon rupees (SI 18 million), 
considered poor for a network charged with 
paying for itself by a government whose eco- 
nomic reform is in the midst of shaking off 
nearly 50 years of Indias-styie socialism. 

Doordarshan now expects revenue to grow 
10 percent to IS percent this year. While the 
numbers lode better as India's economy be- 
ans to heat up, Mr. Padamsee is less sure: 
“They have slightly reversed the tide, but not 
quite completely.*' 

Two years ago Doordarshan was getting 
pounded by the private sector, unauthorized 
neighborhood cable television networks and 
Zee TV, a locally produced, racier Hindi- 
language service broadcast by STaR-TV on 
one of its five channels. 

Then, its early bid to commercialize 


prompted better comedy than some of its 
deliberate attempts. When the government 
announced it would hand out the right to time 
slots on the Metro Channel on a first-come, 
first-serve basis, a rowdy line formed and 
lasted for weeks. 

Racy programming, a High Court order 
against the process and ’npopti ff -sha n ’S of 
share in the profit from successful prime-time 
shows brought an end to the embarrassing 
episode. 

“It proved to be very divisive/’said Bhaskar 
Ghose, the senior bureaucrat overseeing 
Doordarshan. “We lost out on the money and 
quality and got all the complaints.” 

But now Mr. Ghose says Doordarshan 
wants to go global with a 24-hour satellite 
channel, targeting the tnriijwi di aspor a. 

“We’re looking to provide a service to people 
who are wanting something Indian, 1 * said Mr. 
Ghose, the secretary at the Ministry of Infor- 
mation and Broadcasting. “But frankly, we 
hope to get a fair amount of revenue out erf it.” 

“It will generate a tremendous demand for 
programming,” said Mr. Ghose, already find- 
ing a dearth of shows for the 1 1 local non- 
Hindi language channels Doordarshan 
launched this month. “We are definitely look- 
ing for partners.” 

Critics say Doordarshan is still dreary and 
needs help but much less so after a sometimes 
chaotic revamp, winch has breathed the first 
twitches of life into a stirring commercial 
giant 

“The Metro channel is giving Zee-TV a ran 
for its money,” said Lalit Modi, whose Bom- 
bay-based joint venture with Walt Disney 
Studios produced the first regular foreign 
program dubbed in Hindi to be shown on 
Doordarshan. “They’ve definitely changed 
their profile.” 

Currently meeting only 60 percent of its 
costs, Doordarshan is looking harder at sell- 
ing advertising than ever before. The launch 
of the 1 1 channels aimed at non-Hindi lan- 
guage speakers, which allows national rccep- 

See TV, Page 15 : 


Consumers Give 
Japan Reason 
For Optimism 


By Steven Broil 

International Herald Tribune 

TOKYO — The outlook for 
the Japanese economy bright- 
ened Wednesday with the news 
that consumers, whose spend- 
ing holds the key to recovery, 
bought more at chain stores for 
the first time in nearly two 
years. The upturn is unlikely to 
be sustained, though, suggest- 
ing that recovery will be gradu- 
al , economists said. 

After 23 months of decline, 
sales at supermarkets and gen- 
eral merchandise stores rose 2.8 
percent is July, compared with 
the year earlier, to 1.44 trillion 
yen ($14.75 billion), tbe Japan 
Chaih Store Association said. 

“After being in reverse for 
years, consumers are finally get- 
ting into first gear,” said Paul 
Heaton, a retail analyst at Bar- 
ing Securities Ltd. 

As in other advanced econo- 
mies, private consumption is 
the biggest component of tbe 
economy, making up nearly 60 
percent of it in Japan's case. 
For Japan to emerge from its 
longest postwar recession, 
moreover, consumers will have 
to lead the way, something they 
have never done before Japan's 
traditional routes to escape re- 
cession — exports and business 
investment — have been closed 
off by the strong yen and under- 
utilized factories. 

Tbe upturn in Japanese con- 
sumer spending stands in sharp 


Digital Sells Olivetti Stake to Raise Cash 


Gxapdcct by Our Staff From Dispatches 

MILAN — Digital Equip- 
ment Com., the financially 
troubled US. computer maker , 


“Under the new situation, 
our global agreement with Digi- 
tal will be revised,” an Olivetti 
spokesman said. He did not say 


shares, said the cooperation ao- strengths and a well-established 


cord would be maintained. 
“Digital continues to be a sig- 


presmee,” Digital said. 

Digital recently reported a 


said Wednesday it sold its 10 wlwn ^ would happen or 
percent stake in flic Italian *what would be changed, 
computer company Olivetti But Digital, which confirmed 

SpA as part of its restructuring, that it had sold 98.5 million 
The 100 million shares were 

sold over the past few weeks on pmmmmmmmwi 
the stock market, Olivetti said. 

Telegraph Profits Erode 

stances to include the Olivetti ° *■ * 

Shares as part <rf itS assets tO be Compiled by Our Sutff From Dtyoufies 

sold,” Olivetti said. LONDON — First-half profit at Telegraph PLC crumpled 

Ohvettf s shares finished at in the face of a price war started by its rival. News Corp. 
2355 lira ($1.50) Wednesday, Telegraph on Wednesday reported a 12 percent sHp in first- 

down from 2360. half pretax profit, to £303 million ($47 million), well below 

The shares had been bought forecasts of up to £36 mDlion. The pain is likely to be even 
to seal a technological and com- more pronounced in the current half. The company cut the 
accord signed in 1992, price of its flagship Daffy Telegraph, Britain's best-selling 
tindw which Olivetti won access broads h eet daily paper. 

to s om e Digital technology and Telegraph shares ended slightly higher at 374 pence. In 
the U.S. company increased its Sydney, News Corp. stock was at a three-month high on an 
purchases at the Italian oompa- anticipated record annual profit News Corp. ended at 9.18 
ay’s jvT*?n«t) computers. Australian dollars, up 12 cents. (Reuters, AFP, Bloomberg) 


mficant customer far Olivetti’s $1.75 billion lass for the final 
components, terminals, and quarter of its July- June finan- 
personal computers and a com- dal year, including a $1 2 bil- 
mitted partner in markets Hon charge to pay for the cost of 
where Olivetti has proven cutting its work force by about 


ivetti has proven cutting its work force by about 
25 percent, to 65,000. 

Rumors had swept the Milan 
bourse that Digital was behind 
_ _ heavy selling of Olivetti stock 

rOdS since around July 20. 

Analysts said a breakdown in 
« the agreement between tbe two 

ph PLC crumpled companies would be more dri- 
ll, News Corp. rimental to Digital than Olivetti 

sreent sUp in first- because Digital counted on the 
Sion), well below Italian company's support of its 
likely to be even Alpha AXP computer chip, 
company cut the “Digital is out on a limb with 
tain's best-selling Alpha,” said Jane Doorly, a 
computer analyst at Dataquest, 
at 374 pence. In a unit of Dim & Brads treet 
nonth high on an Corp. “Olivetti is one of only a 
rp. ended at 9.18 few backers.” 

AFP, Bloomberg) (Bloomberg, Reuters l 


Europe Survey Calls Employment Outlook Grim 


AFP~Extd News down, which in tom depresses 

BRUSSELS — The Europe- demand because of a general 
an Commission said Wednes- reduction in disposable in- 
day that its annual survey of comes.” 
industrial manufacturing and Officials involved in the 
service sectors showed that the study said EU industry com- 
outlook for the employment petes across the full range of 


try sectors face more and more paries in foreign investment in 
new competitors and must con- Asia. 


tinue to restructure by cutting 
jobs. 


Foreign direct investment 
outside the EU represents 40 


market remained grim. 


Information-sector comp a- percent of the total, and a large 
nies must deal with technologj- portion is in the United States 
cslchange, officials said. and xo a lesser extent in Japan. 


The survey concluded, on the Japan trading zones, they said 
other hand, that firms are reap- ' — but is focused more heavily 
ipg the benefits of massive re- tn low-growth sectors. 


sectors — unlike the U3. and The Eu telecommunications the commission said. 


sector must cope with liberal- 
ization of world markets. 


Tbe study concluded that la- 
bor costs are not the key factor 


structuring over the past three Japanese industry is domi- 
and be ginning to adjuyt tn nated by electronics, cars and 
heightened competition, the equipment manufacture, and is 


commission said. 

But the survey added: “The 
outlook for employment re- 
mains grim, however The need 
for firms to improve productivi- 
ty in order to maintain profit- 
ability drives employment 


not so strong in the food, drug 
and chemical sectors. 
Traditional European indus- 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


Cross Ratw Aug. 24 

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ft ft Mr. Lauren said he accepted 
■ M2 itravoAT 734 ib the investment because he 

^ rriU needed money to finance his 

w tHC4 Bank et Tokyo, CommorxOqntu , J 

234 <zmweNmonttm*cr*iafLrvtnot*. company s growth, 

s* A aj Most Ralph Laurm products 

wold are made under license. Tbe 

441 zwwi mSn • aw 'JX Goldman Sachs stake repre- 


oy meit Goldman Sachs 
raw Buys Stake in 
Ralph Lauren 

New Torie Times Service 

24 NEW YORK — An invest- 
ECU meat fund managed by Gold - 
man, Sachs & Co. has pur- 
chased a 28 percent stake in the 
mhiii intensely private Polo Ralph 
4 M % Lauren Corp. for $135 million, 
creating a partnership between 
two of New York’s tropby insti- 
tutions. 

Goldman Sachs is the first 
outsider to gain a stake in 
5% 5% Lauren. Goldman’s investment, 
which will dilute the holdings of 
5vi m Mr. Lauren and Peter Strom, 
to! IS who owns 10 percent, estab- 
lished a value of $4821 million 
sm sm for the Polo Ralph Lauren bus- 
ness. 

st ft Mr. Lauren said he accepted 
7*4 7 » the investment because he 


The drug and chemical com- in explaining the lack of global 
parties must face up to the dial- competitiveness of EU produc- 
lenge from biotechnological ers. It said a firm’s organiza- 
product advances, they said. tion, links with suppliers and 
The commission said Euro- distributors and effective re- 
pean companies are lagging far search and development efforts 
behind UJS. and Japanese com- are more important 


A true collector's item. 
The only coin watch 
for the connoisseur. 


contrast to Germany and 
France, where there is little evi- 
dence that consumers are 
spending more, despite signs of 
economic recovery. 

The story might not be so 
different here if not for spatial 
factors prodding consumption. 
“If we look out the extraordi- 
nary factors, sales growth 
would probably be fiat," Mr, 
Heaton said. 

This summer's weather, the 
hottest since World War IL was 
the biggest factor, leading to a 
boom in sales of air condition- 
ers, refrigerators, beer and ap- 
parel. The increase was particu- 
larly dramatic because Iasi 
summer was very cool and weu 

A 10 percent cut in income 
tax, a measure long resisted by 
the Finance Ministry but 
strongly pushed by Washing- 
ton, was also important Tbe 
average tax cut, paid as a rebate 
is June and December, totals 
94,000 yen. 

Since the impact of these spe- 
cial factors is short-lived, econ- 
omists expect spending (o de- 
cline after August, slowly 
rebound and then takeoff again 
in December. 

“The data confirm that lax 
cuts have a role to play, but 
even with tax cuts and the 
weather the sales increase 
wasn’t so strong," said Mineko 
Sasaki- Smith, an economist at 
Morgan Stanley & Co. “This 
suggests we’ll see a very muted 
recovery.” 


U.S. Orders 
Declined 
In July 

CcmptledbYOtB- Staff From Dispatches 

WASHINGTON— Sea- 
sonal shutdowns in the 
U.S. auto sector and con- 
tinued weakness in the air- 
craft industry were behind 
tbe surprising plunge in 
July durable goods orders, 
analysts said Wednesday. 

The often volatile data 
may be providing a distort- 
ed picture of the health of 
the U.S. manufacturing 
sector, they added. 

Hie Commerce Depart- 
ment said orders for durable 
goods — cars, home appli- 
ances and other items meant 
to last at least three years — 
declined 4.2 percent in July, 
tbe largest drop in two and a 
half years. 

The motor vehicle indus- 
try accounted for more 
than half of the decrease in 
new orders for durable 
goods, the department said. 
Excluding transportation 
equipment, orders dropped 
just 0.3 percent. 

"This report isn’t as bad 
as it looks," James Glass- 
man, senior money market 
economist at Chemical Se- 
curities Inc. said. “Much of 
the weakness is in autos 
and aircraft," he added. 

Automakers “are adding 
shif t* and b uilding new 
plants. You don't do that in 
a weakening economy," 
Robert McGee, chief econ- 
omist at Tokai Bank said. 

(Bloomberg, Reuters ) 


CORUM 

Maitres A rtisatis d Horlogerie 


Dtaawrtra** 

CaBtaMNV 

mmmHi tafMBM 

3 m ontt r ma r wn fc 

64BSHTH MWatt 
itwrOiiiiMnLitM 


Fori— rd Hit** esmw »Our IWw IW SSSBS. 

Cmtft Kt »dmt Cmwftan drtlf U m W7M Uatartrole 

rartfc » JtSi mi ii run i~ cmmu 

nmifwimn MS H2 i-rara. tuta traa 

****** U 0P l 3 ” *f r fTfr-f* ^.n^r^meniaieimKa* 

ry IW nr* *~ « <*"*» 


tzmwen montage crvaiLrofmot*. company’s growth. 

Most Ralph Laurm products 
OoW are made under license. Tbe 

mu ma < a& ?£ ^ ^ 

London .ma 3Buo 42 ss scuts an investment m some m 
rt»* asr.io am - +a.ie the royalty revenue, so the value 

of the conq>any may be some- 

touixtces; New Yet* Cemex laxxmoerj w ha* highs' than the purchase 

sower* Reuters. price inuicated. 




The Coin watch by Comm, handcrafted from a genuine gold coin. Water resistant. 
For a brochure, write to : Co nun, 2301 La Chaux-de- Fonds, Switzerland, 


hr 

he 


'i 

& / 


,!•' “ 



. ** 


Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDA Y, AU GUST25, 1994 


MARKET DIARY 


Japanese Buying 
Keeps Dollar High 


Bloomberg Businas News 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
rallied against the yen and most 
other currencies Wednesday af- 
ter the Japanese central bank 
bought the U.S. currency ag-. 
gressively for a second day. 

Rallies in the U.S. stock and 
bond markets also helped the 
dollar's advance. 

Meanwhile, in Mexico City, 
the new peso fell against the 
dollar, which rose about 1.5 

Foreign Exchange 

centavos to 3.3525 pesos. Trad- 
ers said the fall was due to a 
lack of liquidity in the market 
and some nervousness in the 
wake of general elections. 

The Bank of Japan probably 
spent SI billion a day over the 
past two days in an effort to 
keep the dollar from falling 
against the yen, said David Gil- 
more, a partner at Foreign Ex- 
change Analytics. 

“The Bank or Japan is keep- 
ing the currency market on its 
toes this week.” said Tun Ra- 
phael, assistant vice president 
at NatWest USA Bancorp in 
jersey City. New Jersey. 

The dollar closed at 98.99 
yen, up from Tuesday’s 97.83. 

Gains against the yen per- 
suaded vinced many traders to 
buy dollars for Deutsche marks. 


The dollar rose to 1.5460 DM 
from 1.5311 DM. 

“The outlook is grim for the 
fall because trade tensions wQl. 
build,” Mr. Gilmore said. 

The Bank of Japan started 
buying after the dollar fell to 
five-week lows against the yen 
in New York trading on Mon- 
day amid speculation that nego- 
tiators will not reach agreement 
on ways to open Japanese mar- 
kets to imported goods by a 
Sept. 30 deadline. 

Many traders expect the 
Clinton administration to call 
for a strong yen or at least let 
the dollar fall without com- 
ment 

The dollar, stocks and bonds 
were feeding on each other's 
strength, said David Durst, a 
trader at Bear Steams & Co. 
“People are buying dollars to 
buy U.S. stocks "and bonds,” he 
said. “The dollar looks cheap to 
investors at these levels.” 

Bonds and stocks, in turn, 
benefited from the dollar's rela- 
tive strength since that made 
foreign investors more willing 
to buy UJ3. assets. The dollar’s 
slide a gains t most major cur- 
rencies this year has cost those 
holding U.S. assets dearly. 

The British pound closed at 
$13535, from $13570. The dol- 
lar rose to 5.2950 French francs 
from 5.2525. 


MARKET: Surges on Goods Data 


CoBtnmed from Page 1 

Treasury bond rose 29/32 
point, loTOO 15 32. sending the 
yield down to 7.46 percent from 
^.54 percent Tuesday. 

Weak economic data are 
sometimes baJ news tor the 
stock market. But investors 
read the durable-goods orders 
report to mean that “the threat 
of inflation is abating, and you 

U.S. Stocks 

can extrapolate from that that 
the Fed doesn't have to raise 
interest rales any more this 
year." said Thom Brown, mar-, 
"kei strategist at Rutherford. 
Brown & Cathcrwood in Phila- 
delphia. 

The U.S. central bank raised 
imerest rates by half a percent- 
age point last week — the fifth 
rise this year — in a bid to head 
off inflation that could accom- 
pany strong economic growth. 
The move depressed stocks be- 
cause of concerns that higher 
rates could choke off economic 
growth. 

But Wednesday’s gains show 


that “investors are comfortable 
with and are betting on a 
steadily growing economy 
without inflation, " said Eugene 
Peroni. technical analyst at 
Janney Montgomery Scott in 
Philadelphia. 

Economically sensitive 
siocfcs provided leadership on 
the Big Board. .Among the 30 
components of the Dow aver- 
age. International Paper. Al- 
coa. Minnesota Mining, Beth- 
lehem Steel, General Motors 
and Exxon were all sharply 
higher. 

The average rose more than 
50 points in midaftemoon trad- 
ing. triggering the New York 
Stock Exchange's “downtick 
rule" for the first rime since 
April 25. The rule curbs some 
trades in connection with 
stock-index arbitrage in an ef- 
fort to stabilize the market. 

A round of computer-guided 
buy orders added 12 points to 
the Dow industrials near the 
closing bell, according to the 
research firm Birinyi Associates 
Inc. 

(Bloomberg, AP) 


Vta 


Aug, 26 


The Dow 


mSSSmte. 

,p 4. 


ft® 


, 


NYSE Most Actives 


BMCkE 
TOIAMX 
SoUloM 
LAC g 
RJR Nd> 
Compaq s 
WriMart 
WstaEl 
Forts 

IBM 

irrtOame 

PMMr 

GnMatr 

ABne* 

AT&T 


Wot HOT 
sons 7 r* 
56777 UAw 
50586 38 
3M33 10W 
37774 6X. 
37439 36% 
34203 24*. 
30552 13% 
27777 30* 
76538 67% 
25815 23«h 
25256 ST’A 
23741 SO* 
23385 22* 
22371 54* 


Low Last 
26 24* 

46* 44* 

54* 36* 

9A 10* 
6V> 4* 

35* 34* 

24 24* 

12* 13 

29* 30* 

66* AT* 
22* 23* 
54* 57 

48* 50* 

21 * 21 * 
53* 54* 


as. 
— 1 * 
+ % 
+ 1 * 
*<A 

— S 
+ % 
+ H 
*1 


NASDAQ Host Actives 



VoL Htob 

LOW 

Last 

NawbkAc 

52770 30% 

28* 

29*Vu 

Nouefl 

30934 15 

MM 

14% 

Orodes 

37876 41* 

40 

41% 

Cscos 

32521 23* 

23* 

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23 

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31525 SI* 

48* 

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Intel 

31316 64* 

63* 

64Vh 

Amgen 

30431 54* 

S3 1 * 

531.. 

Cord Cos 

2518* IT 1 A 

16% 

17 

Cidco 

23817 25 

22% 

24% 

IDBQns 

23374 9% 

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27002 56 

55* 

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LDDSS 

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«-* 
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AMEX Most Actives 


XCL Lid 
ViocwtE 

VrtXfi 

ChevSfts 

RoyriOa 

Vksanrt 

ARC 

EchoBav 

Hasbro 

Wrtifrd 


VOL 

Hteti 

Law 

Last 

16436 

IVu 

1 

IV* 

18103 

3% 

3% 

3*n 

15455 35% 

34% 

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1D741 

12 

11% 

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9256 

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jab 

4% 

8943 

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8732 

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7031 

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6150 31% 

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31% 

6057 

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12 

12% 


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— %+ 

** 
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Market Sales 


Today 


NYSE 

Amu 


309 JW 
2148 
29259 


36952 

2254 

33351 


Doer Jones Averages 


Open Kgb Low Last Chi. 

Indus 378748 3W4J3 377X83 386X73 +7050 
Trans 1SB9.10 1601.98 150388 1601 SO. - ISlIB 
UW 107.91 18844 187.12 18X74 +XK) 
Camp 1307.79 132253 130448 432253 * 17.85 


StsmlanJ A Poor’s kidexes 


Industrials 

Transo. 

UtUIttos 

Finance 

SPOT 

SPTO0 


High 

54954 

37952 

15452 

44.18 

mm 

43451 


Low dost 
54401 54936 
37457 379.14 
15557 15440 
4SJ8 44.17 
«4J1 40953 
4SB84 43350 


cm 

+5JS 
+457 
+ 173 
+U3 
+452 
+U4 


NYSE Indexes 


HU Low Lust an. 

Composite 25852 25444 25851 +117 

industrials 320J7 31759 32077 +118 

Trcn». 34350 241.14 243.47 +253 

Utaitv 210.15 208.97 30959 +080 

Finance 71459 21544 21654 +1.11 


NASDAQ Indexes 


Mob Low Lost On. 

Corrwoille 75185 7*883 7 SI 55 +357 

industrials 75454 73037 75454 +456 

Banks 779.17 777.15 77955 +038 

Insurance 92446 9UJ8 MU4 —0.18 

Finance 95554 951* 95554 +1.19 

Transp. 72076 72849 72742 -009 


AMEX Stock Index 


Mali Law Lent Os. 

44840 44074 447.98 +130 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


- American BarricIWias Bidior I^c 


Metals 


KT 1 "* 


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ALUMINU M twfrh QrotMJ 

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Wr 572508 573550 

Forward 591000 591550 SOS ffl 583000 
TIN 

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mss 

-082 


9033 

«M 



uneft. 



Unch. 


9017 

UBCfL 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


20 Bands 
10 Utilities 
10 industrials 


Clue 
97 31 
9348 
HIM 


evae 
+002 
+QJ85 
+ 0.10 


NYSE Diary 


Advanced 

Declined 

Unchanacd 
Total issues 
Mew Htata 
New Lows 


1374 1347 

814 766 

703 758 

7891 2871 

54 73 

42 40 


AMEX Diary 


Advonced 

Declined 

Undionood 
Total issues 
NawHIphS 
New Lows 


Prav. 
329 303 

277 25S 

550 309 

eon 797 

10 16 

9 19 


NASDAQ Diary 


Aduneed 
Declined 
Unclionwd 
Total issues 
NOW MabS 
Now Laws 


dose Pm. 

1780 1789 

1433 1378 

1857 1922 

580 500 

137 115 

» 47 


Spot Co mm o di ties 


Commodity Today Prav. 

Aluminum, lb 0475 0461 

Coaparoioctrofvticpib 1.12 1.13 

iron FOB. ion 21X08 mws 

Load, lb 058 os 

Sliver, tray az A23S 320 

Steal (scrap). Ion 110.17 310.17 

Tin. lb 38*09 154 

ZlKC lb 04716 04655 


J> E3L volume: 30531 Open lnL:~&iU& 
MMOTTH EURODOLLARS (UFFE3 
SI mtHtaa - nts oi 1M pel 
Sen 94J92 94J3 9693 +BJ84 

Dec K» K» 9627 +« 

MOT 9357 9197 93J9 +044 

Jn N.T. NT. 9345 +0t03 

sen N.T. XT. 9358 +0b06 

EeL volume: 381. Open Inhi 129. 

WHO NTH euromarks ojffe) 

DM1 URM - Pts 0 IN pa 
sen 95JB 9540 

DOC 9445 9440 

Mar *444 9649 

Jun 9617 9611 

SOP 9346 9342 

DOC 9157 9353 

Mar 9336 9332 

Jun 92.14 9349 

Sep 9242 9392 

DOG 9272 9248 

Mor I6T. XT. 

9257 9243 


9SJD1 — 042 
9442 —043 

94J0 —042 

9615 —042 

53JH 042 

tin am 

9111 —842 

9292 —042 

9271 UndL 
tost Undv 
9245 —042 




+042 
+048 
+045 
-HUB 
+043 

+&4D 

nSB +043 
9342 +003 


Est volume: 7M37. Open BA; 780SW. 
3+MJNTH PI BOR (MATIF) 

DK 9381 9381 

MOT 9356 9249 

Jon 9326 9320 

Sen 9298 9293 

Dec 9274 KM 

Mar 9259 9255 

Jun 9243 9230 

Est. volume: 42439- OPenbiL: 201486 
U7MG01LT CUPPED 
*80000 - p* « BuH t» 100 pet 
Sep 101-01 100-15 100-27 +MB 

Dec H»15 OMT 10040 +0-02 

Mar N.T. N.T. 99-22 +<MB 

EsL volume: 46221. open hit: 116359. 
81RMAN GOVERNMENT BUKO (UPPE) 
DM 29M0I - pts Of 100 Kf 
Sep 9140 9L18 9137 —046 

Dec 9371 9030 MO —041 

Mar moo 98,89 9303 + 043 

EsL volume: 126326 Open Ink: 166126 
10-YE AR FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MATIF) 
PFSNtM- p* or 100 ad 
HP 11378 11312 11342 + 848 

Dec 11280 11228 TH54 +048 

Mor 11148 111®} 11150 +OISI. 

Jon N.T. NLT. 11132 +<UM 

Est. volume: 158492. Com Ml- 156936 


Industrial 

Mob Low Lent settle 
GASOIL (IPO 

iLLdotlars per metric ten+otsedeo I 

S IM 14675 14875 M940 
15275 15825 T52B0 15175 
Nov 15535 15350 15425 15625 

DiC 15675 15540 15600 15600 


+ 375 
+ 325 
+ 325 


I hm low Last sen* ai*g» 

Jan IAS 15650 15840 15735 +350 

s nrais-Hts 

Mr 15640 15540 15600 15688 +158 

May 15540 15375 15650 15650 +125 

Jane 15175 15135 15135 15625 +135 

Est voiaine: 16477. Open laL 106783 

BREWT CRUDE OIL (IPE7 
U . Ldn U nr a Mci uaii e mm 0(1 4 — b w ra* 
Oct 1643 1 U 0 1635 K3S +048 

Nov 1648 7640 . 1648 1648 +439 
DM 16S3 1609 1646 1646 +337 

Jan 1649 1612 1640 1642 +023 

ftb 16S 16M 1639 1636 +431 

Mar 1643 1610 1635 1635 +432 

ACT Mf 1624 1630 1630 +427 

May 1613 1612 M.T2 1630 +$27 

Jn 1630 1672 1625 7631 +U7 

J)9 N.T. H.T. N.T. 1632 +427 

Ana N.T. N.T. . N.T. 1623 +836 

Sop N.T. N.T. H.T. iuf +427 

Eat. voiwne: 34416. Opwi W. 137459 


American Banick ^ SOUI ^ 

Its ^H«:h -aild-sfoafg for 

, ($2 bflUon), 

ion dollars- American Bamck 


TORONTO (Bloomberg) 

Cbfp. said Wednesday tot 
. recommend acceptance of a 
American Banick agreed to 
Lac to 2L24 billion Canadian 
previous offer valued at 102 «««»». •---—- _ 

SdRoyal Oak Minta ta folconwl 4lx~ Toronto 

Shares in Lac fdl 123 ^ts, H^LfSTofAmerican 

Stock Exchange before bang Mted for release « 

Barriers revised bid. Ameriran 
halted, rose 6.25 cents, to 31 doll 

Van Kampen Buys American Caphd 

NEW YOSCK 


Stock Indexes 

HM LOW OM 
FTSE 1M (LIFFfU 
OSoa Index mM 
SOP 32304 31864 32344 +3X0 

Dec X065 32065 +334 

n£ “ nx jSL*3 1 

EsLvotumt: 1X4T6 Open hi: 5L129. 
CAC40 CMA71F) 


in 2BU48 200340 A1640 +140 

^ S1240 2OU0 +U0 

0«5 2EHL88 2031 J: 283340 + 

Dec 2SS5J8' 204248 203248 + 058 

m£ ILT. 296UM +140 

EsLvokiim: 79507- Open mt: 67.H3. 

Sources: MaMf, Associate d- Frew 
London inn Financial wun ExOtanot, 
Inti Petroleum r “ “ 


. ITWJLWtlWAJ - 

from Travelers — - v , - 

The new finn, to be called Van 

have S38J bfflion of assets unto 
funds and about 2 million shardiau _ 
Braddoc k, a former president of Ob 
In another sign of consolidation in 

try, General American life Insurai 
would buy Xerox Financial Sfflvices 
not disdosed. 


ML 

-American Capital, vim 

nagement, more ton 50 
a^unitholders. Ridiard 
j, will be chairman, 
financial services indus- 
Co. said Wednesday it 
Co. Terms were 
(Bbombers, Knight-Ridder) 


Gates Hans to Cut Mcrcsoft Holding 


DhrldMids 


POT Amt Par Reel 

IRREGULAR 

BardavsPLC - 48 HI 9-1 1 

BartnstnReaou Coal ^4091 9-1 9-u| 

STOCK 

LSIImtat - 6* 9-12 MSI 

WcoMfs -10% 9-19 10-171 

RRVE USE STOCK SPLIT 
ATCII Incl far 40 reverse urttt. 

STOCK SPUt 
Safocanl seknw 2 lor 1 sum. 

INCREASED 
Bawne ACo Q 49 9-9 9-21 

HarteravIBe Grp Q .17 945 930 

LSI Indus! A .10 9-12 9-23 1 

INITIAL. 

MAP Ba> ‘ - 48 9-W 10-1 1 

CORRECTION 
Champion inti e 45 9-16 10-12 I 

o-revised payable data. 


REDMOND, Wi__ . 
rhaimuwi and chief executive of MI 1 
about 12 million tores of to corajwn 
documents filed with the Securities and E 
- According to Microsoft, Mr. Gales own 
soft shares as of May 5, or about 24 l 
outstanding. At current trading prices, that 
$8 biUioh. Sficrosoft dosed Wednesday at 

• ftml Allen, wi» co-foonded Microsoft 
served as an executive vice presideat until h 
200,000 tores, worth about $11.1 million. 
Microsoft’s board. 


Bin Gates, the 

C 0 rp„ intends to sdl 

stock, according to 
ange Commission. 
149.424,088 Micro- 
t of the shares 

is worth about 

,.875, up 37.5 cent* 

Sth Mr. Gates and 
also intends to sell 
-. Alien serves on 



ACM Gov Income 

ssagsjgsr- 

aCm Gov Spectrum 
ACM Mood Dollar 
ACM Mnpd Inoorw 
ACM Mnnd Multi 

SSfiffSSlSffir 

AlHancoWU II 
AmuWc tnc 

EUoBlnc 
' r Inc 
Transamer 

/ Toi 

Fit Rod Bncp QH 
FpMbpqM 
Fit Sttrritolnc 
FartDaarboni 
GonPuiioiwiilLo 
tmportol Oil a 
I ntarsta* Gonl A 
Johnstua mtus 
Manual! I Wry 

SS JSSKT 

RCMStratcan 

•IS 




France Might Keep 51% Stake in Renault, Reports Say 


Compiled tv Our Staff From Dispatcher 

PARIS — France is considering keeping 
a 51 percent in Renault if there is a privati- 
zation operation by the end of the year, the 
paper Le Monde reported Wednesday. 

Until now the government had been 
considering reducing its 80 percent stake 
to 34 percent, just enough to ensure a 
blocking minority on strategic decisions. 

Quoting sources close to Prime Minister 
Edouard Bahadur, Le Monde said the 
prime minister thought there was no ur- 
gent need to sell all of the auto maker’s 


capital because the government’s 1994 pri- 
vatization target has already been met 

The government has decided to respond 
to union and socialist opposition to the 
Renault sale by scaling back its original 
plans and keeping a majority stake, at least 
until after next May’s presidential election, 
the report said. 

Government officials were not available 
to comment or elaborate. 

Mr. Balladur said this month he had 
made no decision on the Renault sale and 
would make none until September. 


But to issue has become more political 
in recent days because the government has 
come under attack from the opposition 
socialist party for its plan to sell part of 
Renault 

The company is one of to ewe state 
holdings,^ widely viewed by voters as a part 
of France’s industrial -heritage^ But to 
government is anxious to sell at leastpart 
of it to meet its target of raising 55 biuioa 
French francs ($ 10 billion) in revenue from' 
asset sales this year. 

(Bloomberg, Reuters, AFX) 


Blockbuster Plan Sends Stqck Down 

NEW YORK (Bloomberg) —Shares of Blockbuster Entertain- 
ment Corp. and Viacom Inc. tumbled Wednesday as some disap- 
pointed shareholders reacted to the pending merger between me 

S.T& analysts and institutional holders of Blockbuster 
and Viacom stock said to merger, which once was 
dead, woddprobabfy' go through if Viacom s stock did not tali 

^Blockbuster said late Tuesday it would recommend sharehold- 
ers sell to company to Viacom in a deal valued at $8.4 billion. 
B l oc k buster shares dropped $1.75, to $26,125, while Viacom s 
shares lost $1,625, to $38^625. 

Unitrin Holds Off on Buyback Plan 

WILMINGTON, Delaware (Bloomberg) — Unitrin Inc. 
agreed Wednesdayto suspend its stock buyback, plan until a judge 
rules on whether to block to program. 

Unitrin formulated the plan to buy bade about 19 percent of its 
shares to try to block a hostile takeover attempt by American 
General Ckxp. American General requested a restraining oitoro 
try to three to Chicago-based insurer to negotiate on its S2.6 
billion bid. ‘ 

American General, an insurance company based in Houston, 
contends the buyback. is iBegal because it would increase the 
percentage stake of a group of Umtriris directors and leave them 
with virtual veto power oyer any merger proposal 

Novell Plans to EIimina te 1,750 Jobs 

NEW YORK (Combined Dispatches) — Novell Inc. said 
- Wednesday it would it would tidee a charge in its fourth quarter 

endinginOctober to account for a reduction of 1,100 jobs in the 
quarter.lt also plans to cr^andthcr 650 jobs in the first quarter of f 


:The frovo, Utah, saftware con^pany also said third-quarter 
earning *, e st Ending items related ^to^ ^acquisitions rose to $77 
-mil Bo n from $57 milli on m the 1993 quarter. With a charge of 
$120 minio n for (he acquisitions of WordPerfect and Quattro Pro, 

Novell posted a loss of S4 tmffioo. - 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Agwa France IVetw Aug. 24 
OosoPrav. 


Amsterdam 


ABN Amro Hid 
ACF Holding 
Aegon 
Ahold 

A tan Nobel 
AMEV 

Boto-wmsanen 

DSM 

Ebevlar 

Fakhw- 

Gls+Brocada 

HB6 

Hclnefcen 
Haaaavcm 
Humor Douglas 
IHCCaiuoa 
infer Mueller 
inti Norton ond 
KLM 
KNPBT 
KPN 
Nedliovd 
OcoGrimen 
Pakhoed 
Philips 
Polygram 
Robeoo 
Rodamco 
Rollnoo 
Rorenfo 
Royal Dutch 
5torfc 
Unilever 
Van Ommeren 
VNU 


41 JO 61 
3670 38.90 

nM r»so 

46 4SJB 
218JD 21740 
7340 72J30 
4140 41.40 
4940 6698 
145 14620 
16740 167.70 
16AO 1620 
4640 4680 
292 29650 
24030 239.60 
81 JO 7940 
83 84.10 
4240 4140 
8640 79J0 
79 77^0 
SJL60 SUB 
4630 48 

5148 5L60 
6170 6110 
77 JO 77 JO 
4690 SM0 
5770 57.10 
77 JO 76J0 
11610 11690 
5670 54 JO 
11670 1)820 
8540 8520 
191 1 89 JO 
4750 4740 
19670 19570 
49.60 50 

183J0 106 


HMferVKfuwer 116J8 11620 

msszuss? 


Brussels 


AG Fin 

Almami 

Arted 

2arto 

EBL 

3ehaerf 

;br 

CMS 

CNP 

Cockerlll 

Cobroa 

Colruyt 

DeUmbe 

eloctraoel 

=Iectrotlna 

GIB 

3BL 

^•voerl 

ulnverbel 

in monel 

■Lredlelbank 

/lasane 

*eiro(lna 

•awef-ffn 
teaioel 
lovale Boise 
ocGen Bamue 


2560 2550 
7900 7650 
48S0 4800 
2560 5515 
4230 4235 
26300 24400 
12125 12100 
2540 2540 
2010 2W9 
201 301 

5830 5830 
7240 7300 
T77B 1266 
5720 5670 
3100 3103 
1432 1432 
4240 4230 
9648 9650 
5060 5050 
3840 3040 
6670 4650 
1484 1484 
103S0 10300 
J05S 3100 
532 530 

5290 5200 
0310 8290 


Rtwtametail 

Settaring 

Siemens 

Thysson 

Uarta 

Veto 

VEW 

Vino 

Volkswagen 
Wei la 


Close Prav. 


330 330 

91Z50SB65Q 
48150 678 

■a 3 

ssss 53 ^ 

487 JO 486 
47750 483 
1040 1040 


__ _i?®s 

Previous : 796J4 


Helsinki 


Amar-Yhlyina 

Enso-Gutoett 

Hulttamokl 

K.OF. 

kymmene 

Metro 

Nokia 

Pohlola 

Reoolo 

Stockmann 


119 ill 
4620 4640 
157 15a 

1050 1050 
130 135 

m 168 

523 517 

6750 6850 
TO5 1iM 
256 360 




ocGen Beigloue 2265 2=w» 


oflna 

sow 

ecsendeHo 

rortntml 

CB 

nkxn Min lent 
'omnsLlts 


I42W142C0 
15000 15700 
1 0350 10400 
10250 10250 

25400 25450 

2590 2570 
I6A. 7010 


arrant stock boat : 7555.14 
rovmn : 737634 


Frankfurt 

EG 1745017350 

COW 5EL 339 339 

I loro Hold 2345 2333 
tarn 563 670 

*0 1810 1005 

‘•SF 3215031940 

W 36636350 

Y.Hrpobonk 410 402 
vveretasMt 42350 41450 

1C 759 770 

IP Bank 379 379 

rtW 804 803 

romentwnk 372 . 20 31? 

.jHnenfol J50J0 544 
| taller Ben* 79S 7B6 

•SfflJ 479 

24825050 

IM( BaU 70150 686 

!«kn 517 506 

iisdncr Bank 3905038850 
idmuOiN 305 306 

runHaesdi 2264022250 


nener 
Hkei 
. hllef 
chsl 
■onwm 
f tan 
‘-A 

’ Sab 

I J™l 

1 cknerWerks 

I 0 

, Viraa 

I I 


iltaewfl 

TCflRwrdt 

Che 


336 336 
59650 583 
944 935 

34750 344 
868 855 
214 212 
382 380 
137 138 

612 599 

53152950 
19413480 
148 148 

929 923 
21020950 
44150 442 
ffiWQU) 
19819050 
2760 2760 
841 820 
477 469 

25050 249 
450 44150 


Hong Kong 

Bfc East Asia :s).td 3080 
Colhov Paciiic lWS 12.15 
Cheung Kong 3SJ0 35 Jo 
CWno Uaht Pwr 30 33^0 
Dairy Farm infl 1140 1150 
Hang Lung Dev 1120 12.90 
Hono Seng Bank si 50 51 _sa 
Henderson Land 39.90 3950 
HK Air Ena. 36.40 36TO 
HK China Gas u llflo 
HK Electric 24.75 7455 
HK Land ifl54i ifl-fes 

HK Really Trust 2080 30.30 
HSBC Holdings 8750 H7J5 
HK Snana Hits 1IJ5 1155 
HK Telecomm 16J5 1645 
HK Ferrv 14JD U8s 

Hutch Whamnoa 35J0 35.40 
Hrsan Dev 2150 2205 

Jartlne Mil. 6550 65 

Jartlne Sir HW 2HJO 29.10 
Kowloon Mater 15 15 

Mandarin Orient lfLZS 10 Jo 
Miramar Hotel 2050 7050 
Nrv World Dev 7435 2440 
SHK PrtPS 5CL75 5050 

Stelux 318 1)8 

SwIrePOCA 40J5 5950 
Ted Cheuna Prps 1075 10*5 
TVE 608 602 

wnart Hold 3JM0 3840 
Wing On Co mil 1150 1155 
Wlnsor Ind. 1150 1155 
jtoiasepa : 923859 


Johannesburg 


S 25 

l» til 
26226250 
J1J5 3150 
44 44 

1UL50 10950 
6950 6950 
1375 1165 
I261K50 
2950 3950 
3250 3225 
6650 6550 
3450 34 

5075 5050 
106 105 

6850 89 

4550 45 

3250 3175 
195 193 


AEC1 
Alleoi 
Anglo Atncr 
Barlows 
BuHels 
t)e Beers 
Orlefonlcln 
Gencnr 
GFSA 
Harmony 
Hlgnveid Steel 
Kloof 

Nadbank Grp 
Ranatanfeln 
Ruse fey! 

SA Brews 
Si Halono 
Sasol 

Western Deep 



Close Prev 

Forte 

2A6 

284 

GEC 

3JD2 

19* 

G«n Ace 

581 

5J1 

Gloxo 

<53 

6 M 

Grand Met 

KJ 

<41 

GRE 

VI 

lJC 

Guinness 

<82 

<73 

GUS 

5J4 

581 

Htroon 

2J6 

253 

Hlllsdown 

184 

184 

HSBC Hldgs 

7J3 

72S 

1CI 

8J0 

ore 

Incheape 

<72 

<73 

Ktagfisher 

5J2 

xa 

Lod broke 

187 

ire 

Land Sec 

650 

654 

Lopaiie 

7.95 

881 


15* 

ire 


453 

<46 


589 

584 

Marks Sp 

<34 

<33 

mep5 

452 

451 


are 

<99 

NntWost 

482 

<N 

NthWst water 

589 

580 

Pearson 

turn 

hJ » J 

PXO 

685 

684 

Pllkington 

ire 

1.94 

PovrerGen 

586 

XU 

Pradenlial 

X24 

120 


<m 

are 

RecklH Col 

6J7 

681 

Redloond 

522 

522 

Read Inti 

786 

7.92 


584 

587 

RMC Group 

VJS 

0*4 


1.99 

1.99 

RotJlmn lunttf 

X» 

192 

Royal Scot 


483 

RTZ 

850 

553 

Sabisburv 

<46 

<37 

Scat Newcas 

5J3 

5JS 

Scot Power 

<22 

<20 





6 

531 

Shell 

729 

7.17 

Slebe 

5J9 

5JB 

Smith Nephew 

TO 

TO 

5mittiKllne B 

<46 

<87 

simm (WH) 

<82 

<60 

Sun AHtonco 

136 

124 

Tate & Lvte 

451 

<47 

Tesco 


284 

Thorn EMI 

10139 

1051 

Tomkins 

281 

2J6 

TSB Group 

XI3 

X10 

Unilever 

11JB 

1L22 

Utd Biscuits 

384 

139 

Vodatane 

282 

283 

War Loan 3% 


40M 

Wellcome 

721 

786 

wmiibreoa 

5.73 

X7S 

wiiHcm:Hdes 

354 

ISO 

Willis corraon 

154 

154 

F.T. 38 Index : W740 

P/TS^IBS Index : 338580 
Previous : 317X10 


Madrid 

BB’J 2995 3050 

SraCenlrOIMWo. 2645 2635 
Banco Saniander 5160 51m 


Buncsto 

CEP5A 

Draoados 

Endesa 

Ercros 

iDerdrola 

ftassof 

Tabacaiero 

Telefonica 


1060 1075 
3230 3238 
2170 2135 
5760 5640 
166 165 

883 875 

4005 

3280 3185 
1795 1785 




London 


Abbey Nan 
Allied Lyons 
Aria Wiggins 
Argyll Group 
Ass Brit Foods 
BAA 
BAe 

Bonk Sotlanc 
Barclays 
Bass 
'lAT 
JET 

Slue Circle 

BOC Group 

Boots 

Bawcrfer 

~p 

rtf Aimavs 
Brtf Gas 
Brit Sira! 
rft Telecom 
.TR 

Cable Wire 

CcxBury$cJ» 

CartxJon 

Coots tfl valla 
Contm Union 
Caudaulds 
ECC Group 
Enterprise Oil 

P uratunnet 
fewns 


197 

6.18 

274 

196 

556 

ill 

695 

139 

5 58 
5J6 
631 
1.15 
3M7 
7JI 
554 
4J1 
611 
4JF 
107 
125 
186 
186 
455 
674 
2.95 
2J1 

559 

5.18 

US 

3.91 

255 

>58 


m 

601 

259 

257 

557 

112 

695 

251 


620 

SS 

S0 

199 

298 

156 


659 

4J9 

293 

127 

&45 

SJfi 

MS 

196 

25« 

145 


Milan 

AJtoania 16260 16000 

Asslfolld 14608 14590 

Aulostrode prtv 1780 1790 
Sco Asrlcanura 9O00 JB38 
BcoCommer Hal 3690 3700 
Bca tiaz Lavora 12800 12790)'; 

Bea Pop Novoro 9090 9090 1 

Bona di Rotfla 1921 1970 
Ben Amnrasiano 4260 4205 
Bca Napoli rlsp 1383 1309 
Benetton 
Credlio Haiiano 
Enlchem Aug 
Ferfln 
Flat spa 
Flnanz Agrolnd 
FinnwcccBHeo 


OomPtov. 


Montreal 


Alcan Aluminum 34* 

Bank Montreal 25 24* 
BoD Canada 
Bombardier B 
Cambtar 
CokxkJbs 
D ominion Text A 
Donohue A 
FCA mn 
MocMIltanBI - 
Natl Bk Canada 
Power Con*. 

Provtoa 
Quebec Tel 
CkMitwnrA 


. 43 46* 
19* 

17* 17* 
6* 6* 
7* 7* 

13* 13* 
615 615 
19* 18* 
9* 9* 
19* 19* 
5* 5* 
19* 19* 
19* 19* 
19* T9* 
18* 183* 
12 11 * 


QuebecorB 
Telco lobe 
VMeotron 


Parts 


467 

38 


25870 
465 ... 

1279 1285 
236 23690 

£ 


Air UsuUe 
Alcatel Atethom 
Axa 

Banco! re (Clel 

BiC 

BNP .. . 

Bauvpues 443 645 

Danone KM 832 

Carrefour 2120 2095 

CCF. 21150 20950 

Ceruf 11630 7I5JD 

Owraewra 1406 1 404 

laments Franc 308 3U 

Club Med 418 423 

Elf-Awl to! ns 40QJ0 395J0 

Euro Disney 1IL30 KL55 

Cfn-Eawc 
Havas 
I metal 

Latorar Cappee 
Legrond 
Lyon. Eoux 
OroolIL-) 
l_VM>i 
Matra-Hachette 
AUctwflnB 
Moulinex 


536 538 

466 4M 
SB3 579 
439 439.10 
6380 6430 
532 522 

1169 1172 
877 868 

1T7]1&20 
.,20 347 

11970 117 

34970 348JD 
PecMnev int) 1S6 15650 
Psrnod-Rkart 32SL50 325 

PeusWt 844 045 

PlnauH Print 935 924 

Rnflotedmlque ._jl0 512 

Rh-Foulenc A 
Hatf. St. Louts 


Ste Generate 

5okc 

Tbamson-CSF 

Total 

UAP. 

Vatea 





ForKftertasoa 
Generali Asslc 
IFIL 

italcemenll 
1 taigas 
MeaJabanca 
MonletfiscBi 
Olivetti 
Pirelli sw 
HA5 

Binaswnle 


34500 24800 
2070 3050 
3800 2990 
IBIS 1827 
6555 6995 
8490 8*40 
1730 1730 
13038 13180 
41550 41500 
6095 9995 
12300 12000 
5250 X00 
14150 14260 
1423 1425 
mss 2360 
2635 2640 
25750 25800 
9700 7700 


San Ponlo Torino 9S90 9650 
SIP 4548 4990 

5ME 3800 3800 

Sola bed 2365 22(5 

Standa 36300 36200 

SM 5255 OB 

Toro Asslc 27300 27000 

FhsniiMH ? ISu 


Singapore 

Cerebas 

SK 0 *”' 

Fnoaur Heave 
Gcntlra 
Gdden Hope PI 
Haw Par 

Hume industries 
I mtaca pe 

KLKesang 
LumChano 
Maiavan Bcmkg 
OCSC foreign 
0UB 
OUE 

Sembawang 
Shaaarfta 
SHne Derby 
SfA ftjrefcn 
SWr Land 
’Staara Prase 

Stag Steamship 

Stem Telecomm 146 248 

Straits TraBng 3m 354 

UOB foreign 14 M 

UOL U4 2» 

Fu Jl nji^ BlS '' 2278-81 


9 BJS 
775 7.10 
11 11 
1670 17.W 
USD 1639 
U6 3.12 
118 3.18 
6J5 655 
§55 5JD 
1150 1150 
292 4 

137 1-5S 
9 JO 975 
T4J0 1650 
MO 640 
610 610. 
11 JO 11 JO 
610 60S 
656 660 
13 I3J0 
7 JO 7J5 
1658 NJL 
612 488 


SaoPauJo 


Banco do Brasil 2450 25J0 
gatwaw 1006 1009 

Brnteeca 9.13 9 

BiWma 2050328290 

Omto 10511601 

Eletiuwus 35688 356 

yow 327 345 

P a ran ao nn emg * 1640 
Fotrebras 14314650 

SwraCruz 625 6300 
T»*Snn 51 5170 

Trtesp 4jo CSS 

140 1X2 

Vote RtoCfaCe 
Vartg 


SoSS 


52877 


Close Prtv. 


Stockholm 


AGA 

64 6150 

Tteeo A 






Attos Copco 

M Qt KV 

Electrolux B 



Ericsson 

413 

409 

Ejselte-A 

96 

WO 

Handetobanlum 

N5S 

« 

investor B 

172 

167 

Norsk Hydro 

755 JO 

253 

Procortlta AE 

127 

120 



116 

SCA-A 

we 

109 

S-E Bardeen 

4480 

44 

Skandla F 


111 

Skoaska 

147 

145 

SKF 



Stern 

446 


TreUeborg BF 

90 9X50 

VMvoBF 

145 

141 


1fff2J5 

Sydney 


Amcor 

928 

922 

ANZ 

in 

194 

BHP 

1954 

1982 

Borol 

187 

147 

BosisalnwSlta 

ore 

053 

Cotes Mver 

<20 

<22 

Comalco 

s 

<97 

CRA 

19JD 

1980 

CSR 

<69 

456 

Fosters Bnm* 

189 

18B 


15* 

189 

IQ Australia 

1090 

11 

Maori km 

TO 

TO 

MIM 

X9S 

US 

Nat Aunt Bank 

HUB 

086 

News Carp 

9.18 

986 

Nine Network 

<55 

451 

N Broken HIM 

160 

ire 

Pnc Dunlap 

<22 

422 

Pioneer Inti 

114 

384 


Z12 

285 

OCT Resources 

157 

159 

Santos 

192 

389 

TNT 

286 

280 

Western Minina 



Wesnioc Banking 

<36 

<38 

WoodsMe 

<72 

<69 



Tokyo 

Akal Siectr 465 461 

Asahl Chemicnl 798 790 

AsaM Gtam 1260 12SD 

Bank of Tokyo 1S5D 1530 

BrlOBCStmte 1570 1540 

Canon T710 1700 

Caato 1230 1220 

Dal Nippon Print 1930 1890 

Datwa House 1510 1500 

Dalwa Securities 1580 1560 


Fanuc 
Full Bank 
Full Photo 
Fujitsu 
Hitachi 
Hitachi Cable 
Honda 
Ita Yofcado 
llOChu 

jooan Airlines 
Kalima 
Kama) Power 
Kowessw steel 
Kirin Brewery 
Komatsu 
Kubota 


Mofsu Elec inds 
Matsu Elec Wks 

Mitsubishi Bk 
Mitsubishi Kasai 
Mitsubishi Elec 
Mitsubishi Hev 
Mitsubishi Cora 
Mitsui and Co 
MJUui Marine 

MllsufctchJ 

Mitsumi 

NEC 

ngk insatatars 
NflamSKDrittes 
NIonaKagakw 
Nippon Oil 
Nhwoa Steel 
Niuean YaM) 
Nissan 
Nomura Sec 
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Ricoh . 

Sonya Elec 

Sharp 

Shimaeu 

ShinetsuCnem 

Sony 

Sumitomo Bk 
Sumitomo Chern 
Suml Ntertnc 
Sumliantp Metal 
TalseiCarp 
TafcedaCnem 
TDK 
Teqm 

Tokyo Marine 

TakvaEtaePw 
Tappon Printing 
Torav md. 
Toshiba 
Tovata 


4580 4488 
2290 2380 
2200 2190 
mm 1070 
978 978 
862 875 

1690 1660 
5170 5300 

782 TW 

752 745 

977 966 

MS am 
439 4J9 
1210 15H0 
949 930 

739 740 
7200 7180 
1740 1730 
1120 1110 
2630 2610 
540 541 

671 675 
785 786 

1230 TO 
849 flici 
793 795 

1030 1050 
1S43 1540 
TUO 1160 
1080 U5D 
1170 1160 
996 ion 

757 7X5 

370 343 
664 654 

783 780 
2240 2260 

8630a 8436a 
1140 1120 
2680 2440 
955 943 
553 551 

1790 1770 
725 734 
2060 70S) 
S9» 5890 
1980 WD 
565 565 

943 922 
338 m 
679 673 

1260 1258 
4270 4380 
STB 572 
1390 1240 
3070 3040 
1470 1470 
768 769 
733 740 
3150 3160 



Abilfbl 


AsnkaEaMe 
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18* IBfc 
_ .17* 16* 

Canada 6* 6* 

a Energy 20* 2I» 

Amtr Barrlck 29* 30* 

BCE 47* 46* 

Bk Nava ScaHa 27V. 26* 
BC Gas 15 14* 

BC Tetecomm 26* 26 

Braraaiea 4.95 5* 

Brunswick W W. 

CAE 7* 7* 

Comdev 4J0 <30 

CISC 32* 32 

Cdn Pacific Ltd 23* 23* 

Canadian Tire A 11* Tl* 
Cantor 19* 18* 

Care 3.90 3-90 

CCL Ind B 9* 9* 

CliMPiex <95 5 

Comlnco 22 21* 

Canwest Expl 23* 23* 
CSA W«S ft 10* 10* 

Dotasoo 23* 22* 

Dvlex A Ml 

Echo Bay Mines 16* 15* 
EauBy Silver A dm bjo 
FCA Inti <15 <15 

Fed Ind A 6* 7 

Fletcher OtoH A 18* 18 

FPI 6 5* 

Gentra 6% BJ9 

Guit Cda Res 5* 5* 
Haas mtl 13* 13 

Heroto GW Mines 13* 13W> 
HMBnger 13* 13* 

Horsham 18* 18* 

Hudson*! BOV CO 26* 26* 
Imasca 36* 36* 

loco 38 36* 

I Pi_ Energy 29 29 

Jan nock MM MM 

LOtMt (John) 20Vt 20* 
LobkwCca 20» 20V. 
Mackenzie 8* 7* 

Magna Inti A 53* 53 

Maple Leaf Fds 11* it* 
Maritime 24* 25* 

Mark Res 9* 9* 

Motion A 22V. 22* 

Noma ind A 4* <80 

Ncrodg tnc 26* 26* 
Noranda Forest 11% 12 

Norcen Enemy 17* 17% 
Nthern Telecom 48* 48* 
Nava Cara 13* 14 

OshawaSraopA 19* 18* 
Paaurtan A 3.90 ug 

Placer Dome 29 27* 
Poco Petroiewn 8* 9 

PWACaro 055 054 

Rayrocfc 17 16* 

R en ntsson ce Eny 27* 28 

Rogers Comm u 22* 22* 
Ro lh mona 77* 76 

Royal Bank Cda 29* 29* 
11* 11 
8* 8* 
42* 42* 
7* Tta 
42* 42 

12 * 12 * 
6 * 6 * 
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11% 12* 
8* 8* 
29% 2M 
22 * 22 * 
15* 15* 
23* 31* 
a r% 24 

16* 14* 
17* 17* 

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15* 15* 
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ScotrsHom 

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Sherrill 

SHL Srstemtat 

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TeckB 

ThMTBOn ^im 


TorDom L 
Torstar B 
TransaniCarp 
TtwOtaPtae 
Triton Flnl A 
Trlmac 

UnMarp Energy 


Zurich 


ACBaintlfl 255 257 

AlewbseBnnr 682 476 
BBC Brian BwB 1180 1185 


CtoaGetav B 
CS Holdings B 
EMfctrawB 
FtaherB 

InterdboountB 

Jeimoll B 
Landis Gyr R 
Motvenpldt B 


800 814 

519 92 
336 338 
1560 1455 
2180 2200 
847 875 
710 715 

410 410 
1194 1184 
OerilkLBuelvleRi41JO 141 
HW B I5U 1510 


ReawHOi _ 
Safra Republic 
SOMtazB 
ScMndtor B 
Sutter PC 
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Swiss 3nk Coro B 
Swiss Rtinsur R 
Swtssafr R 
UBS B 
WInterttiurB 
Zurich AssB 
585 index L9tiJB 
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7500 7300 
967 M2 
7UH 2070 
373 372 
515 520 

838 B45 

1097 1078 
661 673 

1319 1231 


U.S. FUTURES 


VnAmdatodPran 








Hfah 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 25, 1994 


Page 13 






LlJfl 


i\ or It 


OimpdedbyO* Slag Frm. Dispatches . 

LONDON Wellcome 
PLC launched a legal broadside 
against SnrithKlme Beedbam 
PLC on Wednesday, churning, 
its rival’s new anti-terpes drag 
Famvir infringed U.S. patents 


Charges Cut 
W. EL Smith L 
Profit by 27% 

Qm^bfOvStaffFbmDtvmifa 

LONDON — W3L 
Smith Group PLC said 
Wednesday mat one- time 
charges few jok cots and n- 
structuring helped slash pre- 
tax profit neany 27 percent 
in the year ended May 28. 

The book, newspaper, 
mnric and hardware retail- 
er said it earned. £83.4 mB- 
iitra ($130 million) in the 
year on sales of £2.44 bil- 
lion, up 5.6 percent- . 

The "company, took- a 
charge of £36.6 xnfllkm lor. 
the sale cf 40 erf its jointly 
owned: Do It AS home im- 
provement stores and of £6 
million for restructuring in 
its WJH. Smith Retail divi- 
sion. The results also includ- 
ed a profit of £L2.miIIkm 
for the sale of property. 

(Bloomberg Reuters) 


on Welcome's best-seHing Zo- 
virax medicine, 

--Wellcome said. its U.S. sub- 
s diary, Boroughs Wellcome 
Ox, lad filed a. lawsuit in North 
-Canafina' seeking an .ng unction 
againsttbesaleofFanivirin the 
United Suites and seeking un- 
specified damages- 
. - It argues Famvir is virtually 
identical to Zovirax^ and that 
-the -method used to deliver it 
. into the bloodstream is. covered 
by another WeHctsne patent. 

- «u*. 

andsaid itwonld vigorously de- 
fend its positioa- - 
■ Swwthto ine lamiriied Famvir 
' for the txeatmdtt of herpes zos- 
ter, or stances, in the . United 
States last month, breaking 
Weflcome's previously unchal- 
lenged doama&oa-cf the anti- 
heipc8Tnarket these: 

Zovirax is. the., the world’s 
fouriihlaigmt-sdhng prescrip- 
tion drug, with annual global 
sales of about $ 1.2 billion, it 
accounts for more than a third 
of Wdlcome’s reveoue. 

WeBcome’s shares rallied on 
news of the lawsuit, gaming 15 
pence to 721. Smith Kline 
dipped Ito 446. ' 

Brit the reaction was some- 
what muted, reflecting puzzle- 
ment, ■among pharmaceutical 
analysts as to why Weflcome 
had waited so Jong to launch its 
rJmfleng c. A spokesman said it 
d e cid ed to wait until Fam- 
vir was launched because “that, 
in our view, was the infringing 
activity” 

(Bloomberg Reuters) 


PTT Nederland Profit Rises 

Strong Post Division and Cost Cuts Pay Off 


ConpUedbf Our Stiff Frm Dutches 

AMSTERDAM — Royal 
PTT Nederland NV said 
Wednesday its first-half prof- 
it jumped 16 percent because 
of successful cost-control 
measures and strong results 
in the postal division. 

The Dutch postal and tele- 
communications company 
earned a net 1.Q2 billion guil- 
ders ($590 million) in the first 
half, up from 875 milli on 
guilders in die 1993 first half. 

Sales rose to 8.72 billion 
guilders from 7.94 billion 
guilders, led by a higher-than- 
expected increase in the com- 
pany’s postal diviaou. 

Sales at PTT Post rose by 
0.7 percent, to 2.83 billion 
guilders, helped partly by 
higher volume of national 
and international mail 

Operating income in the 


post division rose 26 percent, 
to 263 mill ion g nflders- 

Sales at FIT Telecom rose 
9.4 percent, to 6,164 billion 
guilders, with more than half 
of the increase coming from 
higher call volume and more 
subscriber lines. 

Rate increases introduced 
on April 1, 1993, and April 1, 
1994, also were reflected is 
the sales figures, the company 
said. 

Revenue from internation- 
al c« 11 r began to rise after 
stabilizing in 1993. despite re- 
ductions in charges to a num- 
ber of countries, it said. 

Operating profit in the te- 
lecom diviaon rose 5 percent, 
to 1.3 million guilders. 

“On the bass of tbe profit- 
development over the first 
half-year of 1994, the board 
of directors expects the net 
result as compared with 1993 


will show a significant in- 
crease,” tbe company said. 

The results exceeded ana- 
lysts’ expec tations and helped 
send PTT s share price up to 
51.80 guilders from 51.60. 

“The results simply look 
very good,” said Erik de 
Graaf, analyst with Kempen 
& Ox, who had expected 
PTT to earn 975 million guil- 
ders. 

PTT said the moderate cost 
increases seen in the first half 
reflected a limited rise in la- 
bor costs and fewer absences 
through Alness and higher ef- 
ficiency. 

It noted that depreciation- 
expenses were lower in the 
first half compared with a 
year ago. 

PTT said it would pay a 
first-half dividend of 80 
Dutch cents a share. 

( Bloomberg Reuters, AFX) 


One-Time Gain Lilts Hagemeyer Profit 


Compiled by Ov Staff From Dtipasdta 

NAARDEN, Netherlands — Hagemeyer 
NV said Wednesday its first-half net profit 
almost tripled, thanks to a large one-time gain 
from the sale erf its stake in a Singapore-based 


Tbe Dutch conglomerate, whose activities 
range from setting consumer goods in Europe 
and North America to importing cars in the 
Netherlands, also said it planned to increase 
its share capital by about 5 percent to raise 
money for expansion. 

Hagemeyer, which is 50.2 percent owned 
by the Hong Kong-based real estate and com- 
mnnicatiom company First Pacific Co., said 


first-half earnings rose to 141 million guilders 
($82 million) from 50.6 million in the first half 
a year ago. 

Tbe income included a one-time gain of 
80.9 million guilders from divesting its minor- 
ity stake in a Singapore-based import venture 
for electronic goods produced by Matsushita. 

Hagemcyers sales rose to 2 billion guilders 
in the half from 1.64 billion guilders in the 
first half of 1993. 

Also on Wednesday, Intematio-Miiller NV 
said its first-half profit rose to 323 million 
gufldeis from 19.6 million in tbe 1993 first 

(Bloomberg AFX, Reuters } 


WHIKLPOOt: Executive’s Ample Portfolio Combines Purchasing and Technology 


Continued from Page U . 
though compressors were important 
parts of refrigerators, a key Whirlpool 
product 

The sale for $106 million to Embrace 
SA, a Brazilian compressor manufactur- 
er in which Whirlpool has a minority 
interest, was announced in December. 
Mr. Kerber has since taken on responsi- 
bility for running Whirlpool's $250 mil- 
lion microwave oven operations. 

“It’s a way to keep Roan in-touch with 

reality rather than bang out in the pop- 
pies doing something theoretical,'’ said 
WflliamD. Marohn, Whirlpool's preo- 
dent and chief operating officer. 

priijnrf such joking comments is the 
assessment shared by Mr. Kerber and 
other senior Whirlpool executives that 


any dnef technology officer without 
. substantial line management tasks runs 
tbe risk of not being taken seriously. 

■ -Qne test of Mr. Kerber’s influence 
will be how thoroughly Whirlpool takes 
to the procedures bus group outlined for 
all product development, from refine- 
ments erf existing products to new appli- 
ances. The goals include making sure 
that the biggest risks are taken early on, 
when the least money has been spent 
. The new rules, which Whirlpool be- 
gan using last winter. should prevent tbe 

nod of costly mistakes that delayed roll- 
out of a new generation of washing ma- 
chines in Mexico for more than a year. 

In that case. Whirlpool concedes, 
-safes amt marketing executives were not 
forced to set priorities among the 24 


models they wanted. Manufacturing en- 
gineers wasted time and money design- 
ing a more flexible plant instead of fo- 
cusing on producing the most important 
models first in high volumes. 

“There isn’t anything in the new ap- 
proach that wasn't being done some- 
where in the company,” said Daniel 
McNicholl, who helped design the new 
procedures after following Mr. Kerber 
from McDonnell Douglas Corp. “The 
problem is that no part of the company 
was doing it alL” 

One early indication that tbe technol- 
ogy management efforts are paying off: 
Whirlpool last year won a contest spon- 
sored by a group of electric utilities to 
desig n a new energy-efficient refrigera- 


tor, opening the door to a reward of $30 
million if it can sell 300,000 of the units. 

After receiving a doctorate from Cali- 
fornia Institute of Technology, Mr. 
Kerber taught at Michigan State Uni- 
versity's College of Engineering. 

In 1983 he joined the Defense Ad- 
vanced Research Projects Agency at tbe 
Pentagon. In 1985, be was promoted to 
oversee all Defense Department tech- 
nology research, programs totaling S5J 
bflhon a year. 

Mr. Kerber started a £ McDonnell 
when that company was disrupted by 
trouble in its commercial aviation busi- 
ness and by the first stages of consolida- 
tion in the defense industry as the Cold 
War wound down. 


GEBids 
For Control 
Of Lindner 

Bloomberg Bteinas Sans 

BERLIN — General Electric 
Lighting GmbH stepped in 
Wednesday with a proposed 
takeover of Lindner Licbt 
GmbH after Germany’s anti- 
trust watchdog agency rejected 
a takeover by a unit of Philips 
Electronics NV. 

Heaner Bruhn, a spokesman 
for tbe Federal Carta Office, 
confirmed that General Electric 
Lighting was seeking the merger. 

He said he did not know 
when the cartel office would is- 
sue a decision on that proposal 
but said, “1 suspect it won’t take 
long,” 

General Electric Lighting’s 
finance manager, Inge Boehm, 
said company policy precluded 
discussing or even confirming 
any proposal. “But certainly we 
have talked to Lindner in the 
past year,” he said. “That’s 
public.” 

Mr. Bruhn said tbe planned 
Philips purchase of a majority 
of closely held Lindner would 
give a “dominant market posi- 
tion” in the German light bulb 
industry to both Philips and Os- 
ram, trie Siemens AG lighting 
subsidiary. 

Harald LQbbert, bead of the 
cartel office’s department re- 
sponsible for reviewing pro- 
posed takeovers, said General 
Electric Lighting and Lindner 
Licht each had about 6 percent 
to 7 percent of the market. 

Tbe cartel office said Philips 
and Osram together already 
had a nearly 80 percent share of 
the light bulb market. 

Lindner Licht has 
sales of about 30 million Deut- 
sche marks ($19 million). 

Os ram's market share is 
twice that of Philips, but com- 
petition between the two com- 
panies is still “considerably lim- 
ited,” tbe cartel office said. 


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SSS . •" 


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3^ps4d 

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011 iff ■ ■ 907.06, • -H3.44 

Inicnunioal Henld Tnbunr 


Very briefly: 

• Georg Fischer AG, a Swiss automotive products and machinery 
group, said economic recovery in Europe helped it post 3 first-half 
profix of 31 million Swiss francs ($24 million), following a 33 
milli on franc loss last year. 

• Store Kopparfcergs Bergslags AB, a Swedish forestry group, said 
it was raising its pulp prices as much as 13 percent to $700 a ton 
OcL 1 after posting a first-half pretax profit of 1-51 billion 
Swedish kronor ($199 million). 

• Advanced Micro Devices Inc. plans to invest 2 billion Deutsche 
marks ($1 billion) to bufld a factory in Dresden. Germany, a 
spokesman from the Saxony regional Economics Ministry said. 

• Noi tfbanfceo AB, the state-owned Swedish bank, posted a first- 
half operating profit of 25 billion Swedish kronor, up 47 percent 
from a year ago. on lower bad-debt charges. 

• Volkswagen AG said it would supply the Daimler-Benz AG unit 
Mercedes-Benz AG with an adapted six-cylinder engine with 
automatic transmission for the new Mercedes limousine, in a 
contract worth an estimated 50 million DM a year. 

• Outokumpu Oy of Finland said it sold its unit Candor Sweden 
AB to Rodnac AB, which was established for management buyout 
purposes, as tbe mining and metals concern focuses on its core 

business. Bloomberg. AFX 


European Sales lift Adas Copco Profit 


G veiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

STOCKHOLM —Atlas Copco AB. the Swed- 
ish maker of mining machinery, said Wednesday 
its first-half profit after financial items increased 
29 percent to 852 million kronor ($113 million), 
as sales and orders in Europe picked up. 

The earnings were above expectations. 

Atlas Copco said earnings in 1994 before a 
capita] gain from tbe sale of Atlas Copco Auto- 
mation were expected to be “considerably high- 


er" than for 1993, when the company earned 1.32 
bfllion kronor. 

Sales rose to 10.01 billion kronor in the first 
half from 8.93 billion a year earlier. During the 
period, orders increased by 14 percent. 

“A favorable trend in demand was noted in 
most European markets,'’ the company said 
During the second quarter, there was also an 
increase in orders in the German and Italian 
markets. Tbe company said it expected this de- 
mand to continue. (Bloomberg, AFX) 




Did Stolichnaya Taxes 
Put Vodka on Rocks? 


RUSSIA: Capitalism’s Rocky Road 


By Lee Hockstader 

Washnqum Past Service 

MOSCOW — Ask the 
makers of Russia's roost 
famous vodka, Stolichnaya, 
about their major competi- 
tion. Absolut? Nope. Smir- 
noff? Wrong. 

‘It’s tbe Russian govern- 
ment," said Sergei Nxkult- 
sev, deputy director of Kris- 
tall, the factory that 
produces Stolichnaya and 
about 70 other brands of li- 
quor. 

A strange answer, consid- 
ering that the state is the 
majroity partner in Krista 11. 
Bat since the government 
declared KristaU insolvent 
last week, citing more than 
S3 million in debts, relations 
between tbe Kremlin and 
Russia's foremost vodka 
producer have been on tbe 
rocks. 

KristaU complained that 
it was being crushed by taxes 
amounting to 92 percent of 
the factory's sales. Tbe gov- 
ernment lowered taxes a lit- 
tle, but not enough, Kristall 
managers said 

“The way they are treat- 
ing os is unjustified” said 
Mr. Nikultsev. “Our cars 
may be a lot worse than tbe 
ones made in tbe West, but 
our vodka is the best," 

But Kristall is becoming a 
test case of the government’s 
determination to force “red 
directors,” as they are 
known, to run their plants in 
a whole new way for Russia: 
profitably and efficiently. 

“We’re not acting as po- 
lice, and it's not our aim to 
sack the director.” said No- 
dar Sarkisian of the bank- 
ruptcy office. “BuUhey have 

got to restructure.” 

Mr. Sarkisian, 34, is typi- 
cal of the young reformers 
who staff tbe bankruptcy of- 
fice, a bastion of free- market 
thinking. 

A former mathematician 
and en gin eering professor, 
he is convinced that bloated 
Enterprises such as Kristall, 
whose managers for years 
have done as they pleased 
with no regard for the bot- 
tom line, must begin behav- 
ing with the discipline and 
rationality of capitalists. 

Until now there has been 
only a handful of closures 
due to bankruptcy in Russia. 
Mostly, the government is 


cajoling and threatening 
managers to restructure. 

In Kristall's case, Mr. 
Sarkisian said the govern- 
ment would be within its 
rights to install new manage- 
ment. 

Another option is to sell a 
portion of the government’s 
*>] percent share to private 
— even foreign — investors. 

“KristaU is just a drop in 
the ocean It’s a typical case 
like those you see in the oil, 
gold gas and timber indus- 
tries,” he said 

“Every enterprise director 
should think about bow to 
raise production and cut ex- 
penses within tbe confines in 
which he must work.” 

Vodka production, which 
remains a government mo- 
nopoly, has always had a 
privileged position in Rus- 
sia. It a guaranteed money- 
maker for czars and com- 
missars alike. 

So popular is vodka in 
these times of financial 
hardship that it often serves 
as an alternate currency. 
Short on cash? Pay tbe 
plumber with a couple of 
bottles of vodka. 

Dmitri Mendeleev, tbe 
19th-century Russian chem- 
ist who helped devise tbe pe- 
riodic table of elements, is 
almost equally renowned in 
Russia for his refinements in 
the production of vodka. 

KiistaR, founded in 1901, 
was known in the beginning 
as the State Wine Store un- 
der the direct control of the 
Finance Ministry. 

In February, the factory 
cut from two daily shifts to 
one and sent most of its 
1.000 workers home on un- 
paid leave to protest high 
taxes and low tariffs on im- 
ported vodka. 

Production that topped 80 
million liters (84.5 million 
quarts) last year is expected 
to fall below 35 million liters 
thisyear. 

“The government created 
conditions that left us like 
an athlete stuck in the start- 
ing blocks,” said Mr. Nikult- 
sev. 

"The state should be 
proud to have such famous 
brands of vodka as those we 
make — famous all over the 
world. “In the West, the 
state would never impose 
such taxes or try to strangle 
a business like ours.*' 


Gonteed from Page 1 

and rehabilitation spa, where 
employees’ 21-day stays include 
whirlpool massage, bee-sung 
acupuncture and oxygen cock- 
tails, which are drinks enriched 
with glucose, vitamins and bub- 
bles of pure oxygen. 

“We sent all four children to 
the factory day camp for three 
weeks,” said Mrs. Razzhivina, 
praising the camp’s computer 
games and hot lunches. “With- 
out it, I don’t know how we 
would have done.” 

She and her husband used the 
extra time to can and store po- 
tatoes, radishes and cucumbers 
from their garden plot 

They hope the factory will 
reopen in September, but say 
they would tw grateful merely 
to receive wages for June. Nei- 
ther can bear to contemplate 
what will happen if it stays 
dosed. 

“At least under communism 
there was always somebody you 
could complain to,” Mr. Razz- 
hivina said quietly. “Now no- 
body seems to be responsible.” 

He and his wife look more 
stunned than angry as they 
stare at the prospect of real pov- 
erty for the first time. Hard 


workers at what they know, af- 
ter a lifetime of dependency 
they display a helpless passivity 
at the prospect of doing any- 
thing else. They will not consid- 
er even selling their spare pota- 
toes and turnips for extra cash. 

“Engage in trade?” Mrs. 
Razzhivina said, truly shocked. 
“I could never do that" 

Her attitude is not uncom- 
mon in a country where until 
recently all private commerce 
was known as “speculation,” 
and was illegal. 

But there are exceptions. Ni- 
kolai Komarov, 32, lost bis job 
as an engineering instructor at 
the plant two years ago. But as 
the head of the construction 
unit of the local Young Com- 
munist League be had connec- 
tions and capital to start up his 
own construction company. 

He then opened a hardware 
store, and then a second. Now 
he employs 15 people , but 
makes most of his money run- 
ning a wholesale construction 
materials business. He is build- 
ing his own six-room house, and 
his only complaint is about high 
taxes. 


CORRECTION NOTICE 

BANQUE NATIONALS DE PARIS 

US$ 400,000X100,- floating rate notes 1984 due 1995 

The interest role applicable to the interest period from August 10. 
1994 to February jo, 1995 as determined by the reference agent is 
5.50% per annum (instead of 5.25ft mentionned in the notice dated 
August 12, 1994) namely USS 281.11 and not US$ 268.33 per 
Bond of Us$ 10.000.-. 


Anywhere • Anytime 
AT&T Network 


P . . . 24hrs 7 days a week! 

m wm Call Us & Well Call You Right Back. 

■ P ■ CAU-TOILFHKFHOM... 

.AM.mnn UOMR KDMC S00-£WS9 


1 Call Us & Well Call Yon Right Back. 

CAU.TOLLFHKF’ROM . . . 

10900-594-9223 HONGKONG 800*489 

177-101-2253 PHIUPPWES 

1B7B-75652 TAIWAN 0080-10-3288 

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UB. DIRECT 1-407-253*454 so o N. U.SJi • 

UB. TOLL FREE 1 -a 00 -N£ED-TTA« US. FAX 1-407-253-6130 




C lfT>p 
























Page 14 


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Wednesday's f losing 

Tables Include the natiom ids prices up to 
the dosing on Wall Street and do not reflec 
| Hate trades elsewhere. Via The Associated Press 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 25, 1994 


13Mtt*i 
HWiLd* 5todt 


SW 

Qw Yld PE 1D05 


i Lo* Lost aree 


37W1SWBU1WJ 

IBWllWBufldT 


_. Wednesday's 4 p-m. 

The list ompued fcy the AP, condsts of the i ,000 
tftoet traded securities In toms at dollar value. It is 
updated twice a year. 


lBWllWBufldT 
16*9 10 CAJ Wre 

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*<V' 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 25, 1994 


Page 15 


ASIA/PACIFIC 



ion in China 
Spurs Release of Food Stocks 


BEUING —■ The Ch foese 
government on Wednesday or- 
dered authorities in the coun- 
try's biggest cities to rdcase re- 
serves of meat; sugar and 
vegetables in a bid to halt soar- 
ing food prices. 

Simultaneously," Beijing in- 
troduced de facto price controls 
on a range of vegetables and 
threatened to investigate any- 
one charging more than 10 .per- 
cent above an official “refer- 
ence price,” official newspapers 
reported Wednesday. 

Retail inflation m 35 major 
□ties in July stood at an annua- 
Hzed 242 percent, the State Sta- 
tistical Bureau said Wednesd 
The pace of food for city 


ere rose 31S. percent over July 
lust year, with gram prices jump- 
ing 5Z8 percent and vegetables 
29.7 penxat, the report said. 

The inflation data prompted 
tbe governs tstfsiuar measures 
to try to reign in prices. 

China’s leaders,’ who five 
years ago used the army to 
crush pro-democracy demon- 
"strations that. were sparked in 
part by anger at inflation and 
corruption, are fearful erf prices 
again setting off unrest. 

Pori, oue of the items singled 
, out in the goveproacht’ s new or- 
der and one of the staples of the 
Chinese diet, was 48.6 percent 
mare expensive July than in July 
1993, the official China Infor- 
mation News said Wednesday. 


ihe government said its new 
measures should ensure that the 
retail price of pork not rise 
more than 15 percent above the 
wholesale price. 

Official papers said Beijing 
authorities would release 20 
million kilograms of meat onto 
the market from now until the 
first half of October and would 
ensure that there was at least 2 5 

VaHUaiA T -^ 1 — , « 


Obsolescent Textile WUs 
To 



The Associated Pros • 

BEUING. — China will etinsnate .10 million obsolescent 
cotton spnx&era — roughly one-fourth of its total • — in the 
near future, Wang Zhongyu, minister of the State Economic 
and Trade Commission, told a conference in" Beijing. 

He said the move was intended to combat qiiaHty problems 
in the textile industry and a glut in cotton' supply. The 
restructuring would sharply cut option output. 

Stockpiles of low-quality textile products must be reduced, 
tbeBeople’s Daily mi Wednesday quoted Mr. Wang as saying. 

tion since 1991. Nearly 1 milli on oijwfescent were 

eliminated during the 1992-93 production year, the official 
Xinhua News Agency reported. 

China’s producers of export goods, however; face serious 
problems not only in outmoded equrpmait'bui in obtaining 
needed supplies of high-grade cotton. Insect infestations have 
decimated crops in the past two years, and- hoarding by 
officials has compounded the problem. 


To protect the huge state textile industry, China immaim 
a subsidized quota system on cotton. Such pricing encourages 
state cotton barons, most of them Communist Fatty bureau- 
crats, to underreport the weight of cotton purchased from 
fanners, creating an off-the-books surplus that can be sold at 
higher prices. 


in the city’s markets each day. 

On Monday, Beijing started 
publishing vegetable prices 
based on a survey of the city’s 
five wholesale markets. The 
published prices are to serve as 
a “reference?* for retailers, and 
those charging more than 10 
percent over the reference price 
will be punished, the govern- 
ment said. 

So far, there has been no pan- 
ic buying and no sign of public 
protests. 

But the State Statistical Bu- 
reau warned that rising infla- 
tion threatened the country’s 
economic reform program. 

“Major problems exist in the 
economic performance at pre- 
sent," it said. '‘The task of con- 
trolling the price is still ardu- 
ous.” 

Complicating the fight 
against inflation is the fact that 
money has started pouring back 
into construction projects, 
threatening to push the econo- 
my mice again to the brink of 
overheating. 

In July, state enterprises in- 
vested 72,9 percent more in 
fixed investment projects than a 
year earlier, itself a major peri- 
od for construction. 

But tiie State Statistical Bu- 
reau said the economy was still 
in the “yellow light area.” 

“The overall situation is still 
in the normal area; however, 
there are some unstable factors 
which need careful regulation 
and control," it said. 

(Bloomberg, Reuters) 


Honda Earnings Improve 

Rover Sale and Strong U.S. Market Help 


By Andrew Pollack 

Hew York Tunes Savin? 

TOKYO — Buoyed by strong sales of its 
cars in the United States, Honda Motor Co. 
on Wednesday reported a 15.8 percent in- 
crease in operating income on a 5.8 percent 
gain in revenue for its first quarter. 

Consolidated net income for the quarter 

_ led from the same period a 
though much of the gain p»ne 
the sale of Honda’s stake in Rover 
Group Ltd-, the British auto company. 

Honda said consolidated revenue for the 
quarter rose 6 percent to 973.1 billion yen 
($10 bilEon). Operating profit rose 16 per- 
cent, to 25.8 bflfion yen. 

Net income was 23.1 billion yen, up 280 
percent About 12.8 billion yen came from the 
sale of Honda’s 20 percent stake in Rover. 
Rover is being acquired by BMW. 

Honda sells more cars in North America 
than in Japan, so its fortunes are closely tied 
to the U.S. market This year, Honda has 
done well as a resul t of the general strength of 
the American market 


The results show that the strong yen, while 

hurting Japanese companies, need not cripple 
them, Honda makes many of the cars it sols 
in North America at factories there, shielding 
it somewhat from currency fluctuations. 

The company sold 214,000 automobiles in 
North America in the quarter, up 20 percent 
from 178,000 last year. 

Honda raised U.S. prices in May only 
about 1 percent But Sbigdri Hayashi, a mem- 
ber of the finance department said the com- 
pany might have to raise prices again. 

But if Honda found comfort in America, it 
fared miserably in its home market with auto 
sales in Japan dropping 1 1 percent to 132,000 
in the quarter. 

Mr. Hayasfai said, however, that both 
Honda and the entire industry saw strong 
sales gains in the first two weeks of August a 
sign that the downward trend in Japanese 
domestic auto sales is ending. “1 think it’s safe 
to say car sales in this country are rebound- 
ing.” he said. 


Investor’s Asia 


Horig *Cprig : ‘ !•, k f ^toky^:: 



a«V t'.Y- 4 *; • .P y* .199?. u ; -..iv- 

gKShht*B& Ar-sjj$ 

/.vv.- v; »r v V : v.:. . 


Thai Commercial Rates Edge Down 


Bloomberg Bmittas Neva 

BANGKOK — Commercial 
banks have reduced some de- 
posit rates after a central bank 
warning that too" much “hot 
money” is flowing into, the 
country. 

The Bank of Thailand says 
it’s worried that rapid inflows, 
hired by high interest rates, 
could be followed by jusz-as- 
rapid outflows that would leave 
banks with loan portfolios too 
large for their deposit bases. 

Although analysts differ over 
how muck effect this “hot mon- 
ey" is having on Bangkok's 
stock-market boom, stock in- 
vestors also appear edgy , that 
the flow ought my up. 

Hot money describes funds 
shifted quiddy from country to 
country in search erf high raxes. 
Institutional investors from the 
United States and Aria’s finan- 


cial capitals have been attracted 
to Thailand, where nonresident 
fixed deposit accounts is baht 
have been paying more than 9 
percent in annual interest rates. 

But last week the Bank of 
Thailand said enough was 
enough, and commercial banks 
have begun reduringlhdr rates. 
Bangkok Bank this week 
droned its rate on three-month 
nonresident baht accounts 'by 1 
about 1 percentage point, to 7 
percent.- Siam Commercial 
Bank is paying 8 percent, down 
half a percentage, point. 

That compares with. 4.875 
percent offered on both three- 
month Eurodollar and Euro- 
mark deposits. Further, there’s 
little currency tide for dollar- 
based investors in Thai depos- 
its, because the baht is pegged 
to a "doUar-led basket of curren- 
cies 


“Well still gladly pay 8 per- 
cent,” said Sinchai Sombatsiri, 
senior vice president and man- 
ager of treasury operations for 
Sum Commercial Bank. “The 
system still redly needs off- 
shore money. Domestic savings 
aren’t enough far us to fund 
operations.” 

But what it doesn’t need is 
foreign money that wiH be 
yanked once the account ma- 
tures, Mr. Sinchai said. 

“We don’t leave that money 
sitting there; if s lent out,” he 
said. “If a lot of deposits are hot 
money, it creates a mismatch 
between deposits and loans.” 

The central bank is not wor- 
ried about the current inflow on 
a macroeconomic basis, said Pi- 
sat Leeahatham, chief spokes- 
man for the Bank of Thailand. 


South Korean Growth 
Put at 8,1% in Quarter 

The Associated Press 

SEOUL — The South Korean economy, propelled by brisk 
exports and capital investment, grew at an annual rate of 8.1 
percent in the second quarter of tins year, the Bank of Korea said 
Wednesday. 

That put the growth rate for the first half of the year at 85 
percent, the highest rate 0 / expansion in three years. The economy 
grew 8.8 percent in the first quarter. 

The central bank, encouraged by a strong economic rebound, is 
now predicting that the economy will grow at least 8 percent for 
all of this year, up from 7.8 percent forecast earlier this year and 
5.6 percent recorded in 1993. 

While painting a rosy picture of the economy in the remainder 
of_ the year, bank officials said they feared that sharp increases in 
private consumption might fuel inflation. 

“Inflation is the angle major concern for the economy for the 
rest of the year,” said Kim Shi Dam, the bank’s chief researcher. 

Mr. Kim and other bank analysts said they expected inflation 
would be 62 percent for all of 199 4, up from 5.3 percent in 1993. 

A continuing economic recovery in industrialized countries, 
including the United States, and Japan's strong currency has 
helped South Korea increase exports in the second quarter, during 
which the country sold 17.7 percent more goods abroad than a 
year earlier, they said. 

The United States is South Korea’s largest export market, and a 
strong yen makes Japanese goods more expensive than their South 
Korean competitors in foreign markets. 

In the Apnl-June period, Korean companies increased their 
capital investment by 1S.4 percent in anticipation of future 
demand. Overall, private capital investment for all of 1994 was 
expected to expand 15.9 percent, up sharply from 0.2 percent in 
1993, bank officials said. 


Philippine Stocks 
At 7-Month High 
After Peso Falls 

Bloomberg Business News 

MANILA — Philippine 
stocks rose to a seven-month 
high Wednesday as investors 
plowed money into shares in 
large companies whose earnings 
stand to gain from the declining 
Philippine currency. 

Since last Thursday, the peso 
has fallen 1.6 percent since 
against the dollar, which stood 
at 26.48 pesos in New York on 
Wednesday. 

Chit Abada, a salesman at 
DBS Securities said the marker 
was absorbing a “tremendous 
amount of funds.” He said he 
thought the rally would contin- 
ue for a few days. 

The Philippine Stock Ex- 
change composite index dosed 
at 3,124.11, a gain of 18.26 
points. It was the exchange’s 
sixth gain in seven trading days. 

Big companies that earn 
much of their revenue in dol- 
lars, such as Philippine Long 
Distance Telephone and Philip- 
pine National Bank, were fa- 
vorites with investors. Philip- 
pine Long Distance closed at 
1,775, up 5 pesos. 




.L-aeawa., ,.s ^ olbb, " 



■■ imW': + 0 : 4 €-; 

roRji 8 ?. >; ;Xc 

iiSSSTc 

•• - mpoSftd'+O;^- 

KtialaLumpor 

"Goni^te. v - v - • 

; •-i.iejr. 

-s 

■ SET . . 

y\jnA£& ■■■ •; \jtiu s v j-S£i a; 

/Sjeo&v; '2 

' qqmposfla Stock- . 94 W 4 . -c.ssl^St - v . : . ■ 

Ttifeel.'. ; v ; 

-.V^ghtedPueei; 

35 , 862-14 • - 6 , 7 ^ 8:19 } ,» 0.94 

- ManUa ; - . - 

PSE-s-r 


.- 4 Bfo»ta-. : 

Stoc* Index . ' 

; mst- ' . 496.43 • ^. 43 ;- 

■NeftfZSairffflMl; 

WZS&<I 0 . 

. 2 , 10 i 7 i ' ■ M 1.14 

Soinbay 

fla&^&dex 

• N .-. 2 , 104 :qg ■ 

Sources: Reuters. AFP 

(oumuDorol HcnldTiUionc 

Very briefly: 


• Hyundai Heavy Industries Co. readied a temporary agreement 
with its unions, virtually ending a 61-day strike that crippled the 
world’s largest shipyard. Both company and labor leaders were 
confident the accord would be approved in a vote Thursday. 

» Bank of Japan experts will visit Beijing for about two weeks 
starting in late September to help reform China's foreign ex- 
change market China opened a foreign exchange trading center in 
Shanghai in April as an initial step toward establishing the foreign 
exchange market 

• Ford Motor Co. and Mazda Motor Corp. have started a feasibil- 
ity study on joint manufacturing of pickup trucks in Thailand. 
Output would be sold locally as well as exported 10 nei 
countries. 


neighboring 

Knight -Bidder. AFP, Reuters. AP. Bloomberg, AFX 


Malaysian Firm Sets Forestry Deal 

Bloomberg Business News 

KUALA LUMPUR — Construction & Supplies House Bbd. 
hopes to operate a timber concession in Papua New Guinea on 
behalf of Innovision Pty, Construction & Supplies announced 
Wednesday. 

If Innovision’s board approves the arrangement, Innovision 
will obtain approvals from the Papua New Guinea government 
for the right to extract timber from the 300,000-hectare (741,000- 
acre) Makapa Timber area. Construction & Supplies will then be 
pointed the exclusive contractor, buyer and marketing agent for 
timber extracted during the expected 20 years of the conces- 
sion. 

Construction & Supplies will pay Innovision an undetermined 
percentage of net proceeds, not to exceed 5 percent, and will 
reimburse Innovision for expenses incurred before operations 
begin. 


Weaver Is China’s Largest Bankruptcy 


HONG KONG — A state 
weaving and dyeing company 
in the central Chinese city of 
Wuhan has been declared bank- 
rupt, becoming the largest vic- 
tim erf Beijing's recent policy of 
allowing unprofitable compa- 
nies to collapse. 

“Among all banlorupt enter- 
prises, this factory is largest in 
scale, greatest in work force and 
laden with the heaviest debt,” 


the semiofficial China News 
Service reported Wednesday. 

The Yangluo Weaving & 
Dyeing Factory had nearly 
4,000 employees. 

The company, which was 
founded in 1976, had debts of 
158 million yuan ($20 mfllioo) 
against assets of 89.3 mfllion 
yuan. 

Beijing began to allow bank- 
ruptcies on an experimental ba- 


sis two years ago in the north- 
east of the country, the first 
since the Communists took 
power in 1949. 

The policy has been extended 
nationwide although authori- 
ties have mainly tried to en- 
courage companies close to 
bankruptcy to merge with a 
stronger partner in an attempt 
10 avoid large-scale layoffs. 



GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT FACILITY PROJECTS: 


The U.S. Agency for International Development 
UD) solicits expressions of interest in receiving Requests fur Proposals 
P) for two USAID-funded Gohal Environment Fad toy Projects. 

BULGARIA BIODIVERSITY GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT 
FACILITY PROJECT. This project is aimed at strengthening the Bulgarian 
nature protection management system at the national and local levet 

DANUBE TRIBUTARY BASINS GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT 
FACILITY PROJECT. This project is aimed at reducing the emission of 
toxic compounds and pathogens to international waters in selected areas 
where potential pathways of human exposure cross national boimdaries. 

To recent a off of both of these IIP. please mfi/iw a written request nr 
Karen Beveridge, t/i. Agency for International Development. Office of Procurement, 
A/0P/EWEE, Rm 1440, » 14. Washington. DC «M 2052M42L 


Dewan Sahnan floats First PaJdsUmi Eurobond Issue 


Reuters 

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan — Dewan 
Salman Fiber Ltd, a polyester company, 
has successfully floated Pakistan's first 
private Eurobond issue, putting the' 
country on the international capital map. 

European fund managers may have 
barely blinked, but other Pakistani in- 
dustrial groups could now faflowDe- . 
wan’s lead after its $45 tmUkm issue, 
launched in May, was fully subscribed. 

“It. is a landmar k for a Pakistani corn- 
party,” said Shahzad Mahmood of Fu- 
ture Management, consultants to the Is- 
lamabad and Lahore stock exchanges. 
“It has put Pakistan on the map. 


- The chairman erf Pakistan’s Corporate 
Law Authority, Shamim Ahmed Khan, 
said two other companies were seeking 
the authority's pemnssian for a Europe- 
an float He did not name them. 

Established in 1990, Dewan Salman is 
the biggest polyester producer in Paki- 
stan, with a capadty of 56,500 metric 
terns a year, its chief executive, Dewan 
ZSa Rehman Farooqi, said. 

The Eurobond issue wifi finance a new 
unit that will almost double capacity, to 
-208£00 metric terns a year, he said. 

. Dewan 's plans have shaken its com- 
petitors because higher production could ■ 
force down prices. 


„ pset, a 

market analyst said. “Overproduction 
can seriously hznt the prices and maybe 
even the quality.” 

When Dewan began production in 
1992, the Hong Kong-based securities 
firm Smith New Court said a price war 
was possible, given domestic polyester 
demand of 120,000 terns a year against 
local production capacity of 85,000 tons. 

But Mr. Farooqi remained confident 
of his -company’s future. 

Dewan recorded an after-tax profit of 
300.6 million rupees (S10 million) on net 
sales of 1.7 billion rupees in 1992-93. 


TV: Competition Leads Indian Network to Seek New Image and Viewers 


Coatinaed from Page 11 

non of the regional language 
broadcasts, will help. 

While the move gives non- 
Hindi speakers a chance to keep 
up with events at home wherev- 
er they are in India — only 20 
percent of Indians consider 
Hindi their native language — 
it also gives advertisers a crack, 
at a new audience for then 
products. 

“The environment is very 
complex out there, India has 15 
official languages.” said San- 


jeeb Chaudhuri, marketing 
head erf Citibank's credit card 
operations, and before that a 
brand manager for Hindustan 
Lever Ltd. 

“You can have a national 
br and in Indi a KVe anywhere 
else, but the communications 
have to be tafiored to the differ- 
ent territories,” said Mr. 
Chaudhuri., encouraged by 
Doordarahan’s move. 

In another 1 

move, Doordarshan is pi 


Channel 3, an up-market chan- 
nel lex an intellectual viewer- 
ship, which doesn’t get all its 
kicks STAR TV’s pop music V 
Channel or Zee’s dramas. 

“It will be a sort of a BBC for 
the intdhgcatsia who fed a bit 
neglected except for a few 
newspapers,” said Mr. Padam- 
see, referring to the British 
Broadcasting Corp. Mr. Pa- 
damsee will produce a show on 
media image making for the 

new e-hamtetL, which is due to be 
launched by year’s end. 


Whatever its final shape, 
most Indians agree improve- 
ments at Doordarshan, along 
with the new airlines formed to 
challenge Indian AirHnes, a do- 
mestic monopoly with a woeful 
record for everything, are high- 
lighting the consumer benefits 
of India’s economic liberaliza- 
tion. 


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Page 16 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 25, 1994 


“SELECTED IN UNIOUE 

THE FIRST INTERNATIONAL MAGAZINE FOR PRESTIGIOUS HOUSES, CARS, YACHTS, CRUISING, AIRCRAFT, ARTS AND UNIQUE PEOPLE. 


FRANCE ww on the m 

So an ap prariniagdy I baa af bad at Sami Nam La 
fimecbc, 20 km mat if Puis, Ac bay windon of dbn 


^ nmn is die Paris so. Bril oa ftasone, « 98® 
iq. a hriuJc vas nsxpUofl naan with fireplaces, I 
™". * hwlmim. naff arrrmnibtinm and 5 


Faa> Bottom ■ FRANCE. 

TeL [33] 1 46 04 50 8? tax. [33)1 46 04 IQ 23 


PARIS 7TH DISTRICT >cu»hv(g£)qx> 

Thk I7tb-Ceanuy ununhaae b atraed is die best af 
the uriqua 6op qnancr. Appnmmdj 300 rqusur 
BWID inchnfe jpioxiid rarpatw areas, ihitc bedrooms, 

tferee |pAc wl conoviciJ oIScb. 


JOHN TAYLOR 


86, Avenue Vidor Hugo 75116 Pftril Franco. 
TeL(33} 1 45 53 25 25 tax. (33) I 47 55 63 97 


LUBERON 

A remariabic property locoed oa a bends) lino with a 
wmafJL 65 kct of woodland and fiddi Large nxcpoun 
rooms, cony lull ad lately satram. 8 bedrooms. 
7 brill. Indrica a rented nil bouse with 2 bedrooms, 
brill oocii kiufaea aad thing mom- Luge ham n be ran 
nnd. Price no rcquen. Re£2921 
HaadquaMn : Qantier Incondtt - 44220 Gardes - 
frame. TaL{33) « 77 07 55 ■ tot. (33) 90 73 08 97 


A MINI ESTATE IN U.K. 

Cotsonjldr -Tbe Slaughters.. This immaenfate Cotnold 
home has die best posable locadoa and view. About 
bOOO m2 1 1,5 actcu, nmunded by uipetb Eagpdtamn- 
tnridc. Reception bJL drawing mom, 4 bedrooms, 2 
briinoom. Coen aanoc Stable Uocfc wub a nunege. 
Inge bn Price £6ML000l5TC). 

O rta H in Lendro, 

TeL [44] 71 603 3023 - Fea. (44)71 602 6747 


PA1ACE INTANGER 

Maraflma and uniqm pabir m die bent of tbe Kasbab. 
M room appro, looted oa diflaenr levels, vrii ranees 
ari inside patio*. Rooftop swimming pool bong the 
bar. Palace lor talc nidi in rwyuw»- Oriental ari 
Chinese fanbmrc. 


Coronet in Ttmgnr, Morocco. Td 6 Fax. (212) 9 93 
68 58 - or Ibe magmine UMQUi in Pans, Friroen. 
Dd [33] I 43 308100- Fox [33} I 43 34 00 72 


FRANCE CHATEAU DE LA LOIRE 


Entirely rerenred ant 2500 m2 bterior set in 30 bea of 
parks. Lnaorioudy Jet wared wiifa period features. 
Swimimg-pool, Tends coon. J-ot (page, possMity for 
acquiring an additional 200 beet of hooting ground. 


For further information, contact owner’s office in 
TeL (33) I 47'S%40^ta. B [33M L 47 40 07 77 


CASTLE NEAR PARIS 

Si Claud, Marly. Si Germain. Venriles, Widofle are 
die 5 largess enasa ness of Park Widevffle. ten than .10 
km bom Paris, b lire «riy castle in is das* rindi is for 
sale. Ill tuEuio prime domain. inrisMe from she om- 
riJt Ehgant IGih century rtridnkx nidi orangny, 
woodwork and dtapcl 


Contact die mm SO VSderifc. ham- M. (33) 1 47 60 
71 12 or (33) 1 47 M 79 99 or pm real esMe ago*, 


COUNTRY ESTAH IN UK 

Is omring a country enare k Eu^rod or Soodari your 
pipe dream? Arc jw aware of the riKOntid laaandntbo 
ritauoe benefits of owning farmland m ibe LHC? Bidwdk 
loans, riucs nsd reymirs bryim ibe psudase of ibe 
Eum or ereae of your dnice sod supervises die Eurninf; 
opcuums r a amgrm em, subicmcr and a er i m ii i iiKy. 


Cambridge, UX. P1W Pumbortan Fries. 

L (44) 723 841 641 -fax. [44) 323 645 ISO 


LEGEND OF T1NTAGEL 

H3‘ <*3.S ml Ckcm going brainy momryadiL Boib in 
hdjr. 1982 Lloyds Obis itaoraraodarioos fix 12 m 6 
sola pins at». Sumptuous interior. Laws urigsiun 
equip Escepdonjl Quner reooed Carftbean. Med. For 
sale reafisocpncc. 


YMTOMBMimBS MIEWAllOiMi 
UtCTal [44] 0273 571722 - Fax. (44] 0273 S7I720 or 
Awm TeL 133) M 34 01 Was. 133) 93 3420 40 


C0L0MBAI0 SUN 

126' (38.9 ml 1991 Diacfa swrid crossing motor trier. 
High quality b double cabins, big exterior deck space, 
lids ne8.aR (anna of kmuyr mounyadu. Modaa sri 
|« luffing equip. Lip m dare dearonics. comrmniicaiims. 
Very j irrar iit price . 


YACMNS RUDNB5 MBMAnONAL 
UOd (44)0273571722 - Fox. (44)0273 571720 or 
franco Td. (33) 93 34 01 00-fax. [33)93 34 20 40 


38M DIASHIP. 1987 

By Heesro HoDmd 18 ko na. qt 2 i IJ>70 HP Demi 
3-000 mda cage. Midder design, Anfiw ini. Owners 
ssnre ui main deck, fid widdi 3TP nanmom » 3 guest edn 
». back enmor ns Imscr dak. Stp. i bning room, gym, 
sana. befipsd. 7 an, luge arwniav. laundry. NKK 
dzu, ABS possible Very litdc ured. Scsmsuly fix salt 


UXS5EN YACHTS Spam. 

Td [34) 71 700445 - Fax. [34) 71 700551 


1992 25M M00NEN 

Hailari. F. Mulder deign. Aluo sanidapk bdL 23 In 
rnaL 2 a 1. 100 HP MAN, 2J00 odes range jN nig bo, 
fid cqwp FeS triddi omien tanasm j dbfe gnat edi, 
top Erifitia 4 crew. JxusL heated maribb Boon ia brio, 
hilei proof £ks ulna* bridge. Uaiqu oppon u bay 
M ahuH new yadx. beloir aew costs Saiwdy fix ale. 


UISSSEN TACHT5 ! 


Td. (34) 71 700445 -fax. ( 


LISTER LE MANS 


User Le Mans. 7 fines Vllngy n-kiry d TmaxeUle 
bom 3$ mannbcronal - one Ui load, one right band 
drnt. Both in a oesr am&oafc Please call fix till roed- 
fiatwos, fill'd. • 


lister Can UD 

ToL (44) 0372 377474 / 366972 
Fen. 144) 0372 386364. 


UDY CHRISTINE 

TbilUtiBid IIL <3m dnrninrmn meaxyadn. 9 ahun, 
5 haihranmy am x nu riaiian fcr 8 ton. Launched ia 
Sqx 94. Ttafirional imtrier. cfamy mi Dtasbip 
De^a Toil superrised by fiaok Laupman. 


Diadma USA Td (1) 305 356 1699 
fax |1) 305 856 4616. Hem HoloodL 
Id pi) 4120 32510 Fox. pi) 4120 3765 


PARIS 

Sopot 240 apart metres aparrmrot, bared in a dw- 
mog ISdKoouy buUx^ Very bbx erurance kail 
Saaftncsn lectpoon room, aosdy dowing room nbti 
brepber. (Somg roan, and 3 bcdroomi 


Los b«8*s d<»ieun» da Franco. 

13% Bd Hannon* 75008 Paris - FRANCE 
Td [33) 1 4008 1038 - 40 08 1000- 
Fax. (33) 142 94 98 65 


RIVIERA 

Set oa mp of ■ bd dm riia cnyoyi a hearojfid rim 
of the ua a& brie de U N^odc. Very lonrioB feama 
la 3600 sq. fi of Bring in indadex firing ream, during 
roatD,4bo6MOH,2giKi(n«ns,(*eirier , lei%es l im- 
ar pn&. pod pool boast Ref 261. 

JOHN WYLOR-Jfaems GbafcsaMr 
55, La Crabcttc. 06400 Comtes mute. 

Td [33] 93 36 00 66. Fax. [33] 93 39 1365 


LUBERON 

L^S^MBOritidro riri . ssrim^i pStS 

pool bwcTlro^ na efdw hnae 4W nr, round mine 
oU^rbarib^.UoUfireydi^ilrimHn.^e 


Erin Mam i/M nr. Cbm 
Price an requoc Ref. MM. 


Qoarttar Loctwdse - 84220 Genka - FRANCE 
Td(33) 90 72 07 55 - Frix. (33) 90 72 08 97 


SEYCHELLES 

A iriqm Mdd of naiad beauty. TW sqwib «3bo in a xning 
of aupiri pnksB ari turquoise hsb acromBaiuc op n tnu- 
M patupend pou Euxpuood asutnc of ride asiay; AD 
■cab latered m br an Mcumr adTsTbuiRm. 


For information cboeri privnla mated, 
contad: Vmenqun Marooe of UMQUi/Cimsna 
faru FRANCE 

Tot [33] 1 42 30 81 00 - Fax [33] 1 42 24 00 72 


BASQUE COUNTRY 




Bcnh in die 1930's, tfab sparious bane resides in a 
rotiqae, prowred die, frdng die sea and tie mosmtiins. 
1,9 acres of bndstapod graamb. The most nctqxinnml 
honoe of ike Basque Ririeta. 

OUATOUNE - 19 Avenuo do I'bnpcrotrice 
64200 Biroritz - France. 

Id [33] 59 22 04 52 - Fax. (33) 59 24 63 63 


FRANCE 

lidKanwy fixrified frrmlwa«e<ridi atmo boMnp on 
5 baa of skoaded pounds riih a pood and gardens. Very 
tastefully moral rids a selection of original materials, 
equipped with modern dcrxrkaL unitary, rod kitchen 
systems. 

Seosboro EAUORS - Greece 
TeL (3<^ 1 89S2212 nr BV5 6733 - Fax. 89S 
8317. Para -From TeL (33) 1 6407 6666- 

fax. [33) 164 07 66 23. 


CASTLE NEAR PARIS 

(FnSoriag the prerious adl Modern ksaug, eknrioi 
and smriry ledxwlogy 1 . mnCTsf hiy integrated. Hefiporr 
and hangar, coorcrdMe "«■"»>»" IJ km anuunobde 
Hack, pored roads whidi spread thsongfiom ibe esude 
(6900 square mam of Wr up nnfrexs] a the three 
iqpsaic dKunccs- 

Oonkad dst Dwnaa SO WtdoriBo. hnaca. UL [ 33 ] 1 47 AO 
7112 ar ( 33 ) 1 47 M TV 99 oryov red mMe qnl. 




LOUISIANNA - FOR CHARTER 

Hie -Fills- yadn to dttner. Jarorm. marble Scored 
<£sco. hot air balloon, wars son and beficoprer deck. 
Majwnf i ibis rear mrodude new swimming pbdtnn,' 
boib area aad new sundecL Vay quiet to tssnre tod 
priraqr. AcCDounodaiion fix 10 in super staterooms. 


Camper A Kdmisans. London - UK. 

TeL [44] 71 491 2950 ■ Fax. |44) 71 629 2068. 


SENSATION 


I.- 


SC MT sloop, sen sa rinn radni 1991. Aroonnudaiions 
Ex 8 in 4 eahias. Ron Holland drspi. Andrew wiadi 
nuerior. EretBem amfirinn, ataibble i mmedbais . bring 
USA. 


Camufisfa Wlxta. 

ToL [44) 71 352 6565 - Fax. (44)71 352 6515 


BLUE SHADOW C FOR CHARTER 


A hoary I6S k (Vml nwronadn ritb marious enter- 
daing)rccreasiosaI arms and acummMUOon for 12 
eitesa serred bra pro&riona] aerr af HTbc idd ndu 
fix mmazn aW; dx French and lalbn Ririeras, »xfa 
wnnen bued b ibe Gaiibesm. USS 85JWQ per wade . 

mODg LL[UUEL 

CrnsJarYodA Ui Loudo n , 

TeL [44] 71 730 9962-Fax. (441 71 824 8691. 
USA ToB-Froe : (1) 800 222 9985. 


iIoB-Froe: [1] 


FERRARI 348 GTS 

1994 Ferrari 448 GTS Amso aero bide, Seaw 
CD, immobiliser. -L500 m. L74.VN. 


■ MABANBIO SALES UAUIH) 

Tower Garaga, The 8y Pan Eedan. 
Surrey TW200AX.UK 

TeL [4fl 0784 436431 - Fax. (44) 0784 436510 


ZULU SEA 


1 14' LHro) Code** «e»ivrly refitted under Ac saq*r- 
risioo af bidden md Jon Aomenberg. New Ji 7 J 9 Jqr 
CaterpBbn iesold in 1991. Tea pass b fire tau- 
roomipkaatw. About 4000 mdeange- ID0AI -LMC 


tesado te d Yodit Broken. 


ToL (33) 93 25 00 25 - fax. (33) 93 25 83 10 


125 FT CAMPER & NICHOLSONS 

fTwrirri dri ps ri awl bd mmre ra ri n wn-lmi armrs . 

modatiaa fix 10 g(iBB m double cahins. Owecn M- Beam 
hoe m deck. Urge profasod ark pScy. Huge, ad 
cowpletth' ncfesedile afi ddt area amqdflnems the spa- 
csoni saloon and prarxia a popdar farogfe m en a bing 
uca. Very soioosly bx sale and Inity priced. 

Globe Regal Mro befei Spain. 

TeL (34) 5 281 3162 - Frix. (34] 5 281 5194 




1956 MERCEDES BENZ 300SC 

Send JtfjUOlIK). Mfaflr 1.UB0 £otn new. Fined kigp 
gc. min spwn. ftsxn dcfW <-v?ad o»wx. Be* in 
Meadnubnalc 1986- Yror af the blands. Cudscted by 
ibe Maxis Bem of 1 Genmg Hrobqr- Eras Pbcc Junior, 
fiat Place Saaeb Valued at U5S fiOWW® S* hxe 

ussmooiun. 

CoririX iocL, 142$ Earin (sri, I torfigriac M 


RIVIERA 

Qarnjng Medbrnmn s a j d a x T . 3 nria. fioro dx 

Priadpmc ef Monco b a oaas rf aim and peoioy. 

5090 af garden tarace pimttd widt lOfryear af ofce 
nee tod bwm and omp am. Panaoni view of the 
sm md bqFofBoqDiroaa Fuat* fpts boas Rrfj07. 
iKmaad Dona «U* Bodrogiin*» 

5 ba Ax, MnaaASceMC 91000 Monaco. - 
ToL (33) 93 25 50 25 • Fa*. (33) 93 SO 95 81 


RIVIERA 

Bamdnl oosaioti rrids riew of ibe sea, recently bank on 
JOOOnr. Cimwd a lew ItButucua Bam Nice aad 
Monaco. 500 m ! Bring spree, guest bane, gwnfaw 
quartos, swimming pool + tumis ronn. Ref 4 ' S 


Breamed Dotto vLacBaiAgriaia 
5 bis A«. PiixasK ABan MC 98000 Monaro. 
TeL (331 93 25 50 25 ■ Fax. (33) 93 50 95 81 


SWITZERLAND 

Fabalous 1 9th caauty pnxdgfims property. 15 mama 
6um Gaxrx Superb riew merkwlaa g Like Genera and 
the famous Mom-Btanc bl7 be ik n nws E t ahantin g fire- 
places in erery room. Impoiiiig Hrmy. Oiidoot snuong 
peak pool borne with sauna and a ammer veambL Man 
be sen Price Sfr. 5300000. 

CraTOrve M ariceJoifl Group Swiiu bed Estalt. 
ToL (41) 21 962 8000 - fax. (41) 21 962 8019. 


SWITZERLAND 

Qannmg 19rb- century escat. faqn i i h efy renamed 
Sri» style &rmkBsre rimb emdes droaoer and tbann. 
7/8 bafinams. hemeoAm bepbas. apannem on 2nd 
Boor. Cbm-yud with strides, ham and fountain. 20 min. 
fimGeswa.Tcmm of 45^100 m- 1 . Price :Sr 6.500000. 


Crsotiw Marketing Group Swiss Red EsMs. 

. ToL (41) 21 962 8000. Fax. [41) 21 962 8019. 


BASQUE COUNTRY 




i- 


Mapnficeat W not estare, 25 notes from Baniaand 
■try close to Spun. Meal fix hotsc and mure kneo. 
From the sparious reoeptian roams, row af the splendid 
rubles rid) farms of hkfa qnafity, 10 tdb, sride 
room, burring, larihr sbteafcfd. A mujcal place 
OUATO&tt - 19 Aronse deP^Aabfce. 

64200 Haifa- From. 

TeL (33) 59 22 04 52 Fax. [33] 59 24 63 63. 


FRANa 

Near Verniks, tbu lumsr sits b the bean of a 7,1 10 sq 
m. dandy-wooded preserve in the VaBee de Qsevrense. 
Lriiog area of approx 450 sq dl 8 baboons, 5 baths, 
lasge reaptMa room and ample kiedxu. Guanfian's 
quartos. Heated svrimmiiig pool Very attractive priot 
Pinole cal Pans. Franco. 

Tel (33) 1 47 04 25 41 or (33) I 46 08 98 76 
ar (33) 1 47 63 94 52 (answwmg machine) 


f:4 

# « j 

-foM 


FRANCE ANTIBES 

Aaa» fine the Port One and due Marine ia a family 
residential complex. Bm-ttre shopping am. Ganges afu 
.asSable on die knmai ierek From 1 600 000 FF 
. |VaT oebdodi^fix' J6 m : m 4 lOOODOFFrtATddri-; 
dedlfix 168 or. 


frxt frriqm, 11 man Sofia Mi OMOO Mfru 
frown. TeL (33) 93 33 19 11 -Fn [33] 99 ri 17 74. 


JAMAICA BAY -FOR CHARTER 

Athxnughbred amon^ charter p±u. □auk iocs and 
cra Jhi oaal Englidi mdwgtny imerox Bu 8 gpeoi b 4 
cabins. Spidous dads unable fix ewes a b ing rod 
(daring. Ffi^dy operieaced prolbiiaad crew ensure a 
memoreble charter. 


Conqinr A NkhofaeRS. London - UK. 

TeL (44) 71 491 2950 - Fax. [44] 71 629 2068. 



N1CHASI 


24.4 MT wroketfi 1990. AcconmNdaom fix 8 b 4 

r*~ ^ ' 

•Jtbms. 2 a nu II 00 HP - 2212S Kuna. 
Coniprdnwdf ctprppcd. my good (owfewOs im- 

. 

fable immediately. lying S. Fcmce. 


Cowtcfish White. 

~ • .. r • >■ .•-* - ■ 

r.. 

TeL (44) H 352 6565 - Fax [44] 71 352 6515 


M00NMAIDEN II FOR CHARTER 

As fbuarad in Jama Bond’s ■ The Living DajGgjhts., dot 
aacaanc 128 ft (39m) ucess-gaiog mo w tyxht accom- 
nuxLres lOgDcres m 5 daide criua asd itaheadyboo- 
UngGeUem winter danm. Ercdkm Bariifa crew of 
II. USS 492)00 pa wed; * nmmngexpensev 
Cradar Yachts tfd, landoa. 

TdL (44) 71 730 9962. Fbx. (44) 71 824 8691. 
USA TaO-fae j (1) BOO 222 9985. 




FIFE 105 

32s3J0a4J0iiLbuib I92Q by U'dlam 1%. A Uripc 
J-Qass, ana owTxd by Priore Rriuicr of Monaco. 350 
Sq- MroS, 2 a RoBi Ro*te 185 bp. 12 knots, genoauxs, 
Aktau, Radar, GPS, AixopBoc, SSB. A^n»,.^ihpy (jr 
10 pa* t crew. 


FOB SALE A CHARTER. SEAHORSE Graeco. 
TeL [30] 1 8952 212 -Fax. (30)1 8958 317 


%J|§ 

■■■ !- w *. r: 

*.-£.5.ic3a 


AMERICA 

Umqne appenuaity. 

IW (32m) boib by Goody aad Stcreni ia 1967, Nor 

rrpiiQ nf the origmri AM£RiG 4 winner of Ac bondmi 
Guima Cap b Englaii in 1851 ^lidi was the fixunb- 
rina fix die A wvr in't fnp U vtqnr appflrnmiiy C f Mr ll 


Asnodeind YochS *rinw, 

TeL (33) 93 25 00 25 - Fax. (33) 93 25 83 10 


98 FT BROWARD ckxht iotoi taw 

Offering a tprimuneB nounaiy aoochad twb omeb 
brsr yadxs KLARA tzm fix ha greta with aceptk> 
cmnbrtaUc tanmmdbgk Vay Isgt saioou oxl 
xpumr fixed ifimag area, large Mad-flyleaft deck wilh 
easy and poctiai nea ro n ea ifi EAbg obpiL Maw 


TeL (34] 5 281 5162 ■ Fa*. (34) 5 281 5194 


1961 MERCEDES BENZ 300SL 


1H1 Mcntdes Ben 3U SL Rudaer. Sabi J8IU9fi& 
Mileage -1 1200 torn new. PlnhasedfiaajMKs Grow 
Enaua b>» bad rod ss6 up - soft up soB b Genas 
hat Valued as US I 4)040000 - Sale pda US $ 
30fLOWJML 


Carina J u ana S a dfc 105 hshwlomLWairhironv 
PA 19976 , UU, Td. [ 1 ) 315 X 910700 -fat ( 1)215 
491 09M.fau-9pmfrtfr^fih qmeirogcniypfHSa 


rjYIKAraksmbeauvauon 

Uropc ^ brofabg 

arokwiane the sea. senna awSs, beach and (XTroepofr 

ZwSig »3iat brpe frtm tuom(4l n»2).0*«J 


Ut Pom de BwwnBaa 

83120 SabteMaMBiaJWW^ 

Tit (33] 94 M « <8 * «■*- M 54 41 83 


% RIVIERA PAK3MBEAUVAI10N 

£3 (Fb8mw*thedwic»82,3«^WroiiMi,»*»OTl 

H ■ imnnriK pooh. |*a * “ ** ™ 

■ rirnwH team nhs cbc a sB br&ty 




lft*nBodBlaaiwiifca^Ba«rrf«j| , i«*^ 

83130 ScrinteMaatfine • FRANCE 

TA (33] 94 56 48 48 -Fax. (33)94 56 48 W 


THE MOST BEAUTIFUL HOUSE 
FOR SALE IN GREECE. 

Tins 10 babaam (al wh batkonon at roiee) house is 
' in m hailitT^ 1 ^ (jjwd™* wi*h t*** deatwora rod 
fitu bexmg atn. Price oa rapes. 


Holm Propertias-A Insrashemd Snnrieas lid 
Saianxro 18. LykswriifL 14123 Alhero, Groaco. 
M. [360) 1 2S450W - Fax. (30) 1 28450M 


GR KCC ■ , t 

[Ft&mngcfaedemad) Hotda, bofcfay haws, officer for 
- devdoprnsu, isbwh, umm boosts, bdurou d b“Mn^- 
Coopeoricn possddc with other agenn, FuE sffrice oute 
tgeoty prosiing ndrioei recantoattfing kswyeis ad fin- 
tfagbaroarosperifiadere 
Hriknk Proptrties A firratmad Sonricns Ltd 
Sokxnou 18. Lyfcovristi, 14123 Athens, Greece. 

' ToL [360) 1 2845060 - Fax. (30) 1 2845060. 


ARGENTINA- BAR2L0CHE 

Water dd resort - Sa turner Resort. Bendfid bray 
wmmmw nhnofUe, fitly fimxsbcd. 5 sums. Large 
roopmm met, dnsg roam, surrounded by doted terra- 
ce Whar bcc u ft kitchen. S-car pagp. 2 modi' n»m* 
- w/badr, IDO nr' party rtxxa «4nrbecm; on 14000 nr of 
gxdca. Central boring. Outside badreaie w/mndeck_ 


CeriacilfrSgi 
Aftre- Aug. 30. ar Fax. (54) 94MI381. Argeafau 


ARGENTINA- BARIL0CHE 

(Fnlnring the above adj Heated cowced pod wfsauna 
and outride stmdoL Hand gxta boure and regetable 
garde s. Greohas home and bmgdom. Accea to die 
kite, Readout of Honamy Coatd, cwdd be ased as a 
iahh £mn or country dnb. i? k*i from town. 15 km 
faun rid center. Ashing price USS L6 M. 

Coalacf MrSigi 

frarfag. 36, M fax. [S4| 94MI38I. Atgrattw 


FRANCE ANTIBES 

. Acnat ftam&fiM Caere and Port Vaubro, )5 unique 
fen i» a hsmy re s idential complo-Motdy l aad 4 room 
fkcu5.5rod fironasim anUde. Fmcst appointments 
and Enijhings. Twi room Bao. 54 m2 ad 15 tnl-ns-' 
races: ftoml 560MOFF. Fax roero flats. 115 ni and 
46m2tanm: Bum 3 900000 IT, 


•Pori ftaafga, II Aram W frriv 04400 AftSbui 
from. TkL |U| 93 n 19 II -fra. (33) 9868 8778. 


PRINCESS TANYA 

L uuuy i iMne rbthcMcdandCarib. 188.W (57^0ml 
burry nmwtydx nay btgk jqrec 1961 Ansdn and 
Rekas^l LtLEntmhrh refined admit 1992. 
2a84flbbp Sober ftd enus speed 12 knots. 
Stpetbwandpro ifcrfarrn ii xnndaitnn sfer 18b9stae- 
jtnznw pins crew. 


. Cortfcxtyixx Qwxter Breleer fur fui infortaa lk xi 
and ariour brochure. 


R0SENKAVAUER 

Snpetfa 219' riasric momyacbr fix dtanier. h these hec- 
tic days of But firing there are n few hideaways whtre one 
tan trely ndaa and ram to the qinetcr pox of Bft of a 
, bygone eoTml badrb tunc m the^anom days of the 
- etperitnee Efc aboard ROSENKAVALJER. 


Cotdori yoor OtroMi Brokro far M mf onaatian 
and colour brochors. 


f IFFANELLA - for charter 


Begun 133’ Feadriup with wry suotmafiil chaner 
history- 5 double uaaroouu fix 10 gneu, craw of 8. 
Loony, privacy, taperior csisioe, bxs of toys. 
J70dWWwaL 

Bob Saxon AssncxXxs 
Ft Laadnrdde, USA. 

TtL (1J3Q5 760 5801 - Fax. (1) 305 467 8909 


SAFE CONDUO It - for charter 


Bmemedf popular 119* chaner yacht m Nen-Eariand 
/Cmbbean/Brinmas, 4 drabk saterooos fix 8 poo, 
6 crew Syfisfi smrora&gi 'wrimSu fiat oriend « 
edkerian. $ 34JkMftreck. 


lob Saxon Acsociafts 
Et.Uroderdale, USA. 

W. (1) 305 760 5801- Fax [1] 305 467 8909. 


SUBSCRIBE TO UNIQUE BY FAX! 


I 6 issoes/1 yeYHstbymd: I 

| FFI50 J - £18 J - 0H60 <j - SF46 u - BF1150 - lit 50 M0 J - Pla4800 U | 

USA IKS 36 J-CBx rnd«fagGSnilSS44^j-o% tnratrbsOSS HLOO.j 1 

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^ Address - — ■ ■ | 

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Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 25, 19W 


SPORTS 


Christie Saves the Best for Last 




■Jg' : 

! ’ *> * 



r -**•*•« spr* * 

: ;$55 

i>.jy . .</••» v <.<• • 


7*r Associated Proa 

VICTORIA, British Colum- 
bia — Linford Christie’s quick 
visit to the Commonwealth 
Games was just about every- 
thing the event's promoters 
hoped it would be. 

The biggest name in the 
Games, the man whose picture 
was featured in much of the 
advance publicity, spent about 
40 seconds running in four 
races over two days. 

And, as all good showmen 
do, he saved bis best for last. 

The Ffiglj^man won his sec- 
ond Commonweal lb Games 
gold medal in the 100 meters on 
Tuesday in 9.91 seconds, 
matching the sixth-fastest time 

in history. 

At 34, when many sprinters 
would be past their prime, he is 
at the top of his sport, a world 
champion and Olympic gold 
medalist- SdU. he keeps run- 
ning, and winning. 

“Age is in the mind," he said. 
“Every day they keep telling me 
Tm old bat Tm stiU going out 
here and mixing it with the 
young ones and beating them 
all the rime.*' 


Commonwealth Gaines offi- 
cials said they would take no 
action against Edwards unless 
the international federation did 
so. The shot put event is sched- 


uled for Saturday, but it is not 
known whether Edwards will be 




"» y- •• ' 1 ■ 

;•».*> . , ‘.jf *• 


VOeBUce/RaiMs 

Denise Lewis, winner of the gold medal in the heptathlon. 


China Bans Swimmer for Drugs 


BEUING (AP) — A Chinese woman swimmer tested positive 
for drug use and has been banned from competition for two years 
and stripped of her three Goodwill Games gold medals, the 
Xinhua news agency reported Wednesday. 

Ren Xin was one of three Chinese swimmers tested at the 
Goodwill Games in Russia. The results showed a higher-than- 
normal ratio of testosterone and epi testosterone in her urine, the 
report said. 


Paralympics Sues USOC Over Mascot 


ATLANTA (NYT) — Organizers of an Olympic-style competi- 
tion for disabled athletes have sued the U.S. Olympic Committee 
in federal court, contending that the USOC is improperly at- 


tempting to claim royalties from the disabled athletes' mascot. 
G. Andrew Fleming, president and chief executive officer of tl 


G. Andrew Fleming, president and chief executive officer of the 
Paralympic organizing committee, said the USOC had refused to 
approve any Paralympic marketing plans until it was given 
assurances it would derive royalties from Blaze. 


Christie overshadowed a re- 
markable performance by the 
unheralded Horace Dove-Ed- 
win of Sierra Leone, who 
stunned a world-class field by 
winning the silver medal in 
10.02 seconds. Dove- Edwin, a 
student at LaGrange College in 
Atlanta, hopes to compete in 
that city’s Olympics in 1996. 

While Christie dominated the 
track, an issu e familiar to inter- 
national competitions surfaced 
— drug testing. 

The English shot putter Paul 
Edwards, in a Victoria hospital 
for treatment of an obstructed 
bowel, said he had been told 
that there was “a problem" with 
his drug test in the recent Euro- 
pean Champ ionships . 

England’s team manager. 
Alan Lindop, would say only 
that an English male athlete 
had failed a drug test at Helsin- 
ki. Edwards said, though, that 
be had “had no notification of a 
failed drug test, but I have been 
told by Mr. Lindop that there 
was a problem with my test in 
Helsinki." 


known whether Edwards will be 
healthy enough to compete. 

The world champion Colin 
Jackson, running for Wales, re- 
peated as 1 10 hurdles champion 
and matched the Games record 
of 13.08 he set four years ago in 
New Zealand. 

Angela Chalmers repeated as 
women’s 3,000-meter champion 
before her hometown crowd 
and broke her Games record by 
more than six seconds, winning 
in 8:32.17. 

Other gold medalists were 
Mary Onyali of Nigeria in the 
women’s 100, Catherine Free- 
man of Australia in the wom- 
en's 400, Daniela Costian of 
Australia in the women’s dis- 
cus, Denise Lewis in England in 
the heptathlon and the Ke- 
nyans Charles Gi tonga at 400 
meters and Johnstone Kip- 
koech in the 3,000. 

England won two swimming 
golds when Martin Harris upset 
Australia’s Steven Dewick in the 
men’s 100 backstroke and Mark 
Foster edged Aussie Darren 
Lange in the 50-meter freestyle. 

Danyon Loader, who bad 
won three silver medals in the 
earlier competition, gave New 
Zealand its first swimming gold 
by touching the waD 1 ^-hun- 
dredths of a second ahead of 
Australia’s Scott Miller in the 
men’s 200 butterfly. 

Australia’s EQi Overton, the 
winner Friday in the 400-meter 
individual medley, won the 200- 
meter individual medley for her 
second gold in a Games record 
2:15.59. Australia went 1-2 in 
the women’s 800 freestyle with 
Stacey Gartrell taking the gold 
and Hayley Lewis the silver. 
And the Aussie women easily 
won the 400 medley relay in 
4:07.89, also a Games record. 

The weight-lifter Marcus Ste- 
phen of the Pacific island of 
Nauru won all three gold med- 
als in the 5 9- kilogram class. He 
won a gold and two silvers four 
years ago. 



Jt'i 

k pi 

,;-n 1 

W- , 


Ane Dedcn/Rcmca 


Miroslav Kadlec of Kaiserslautern, left, and Jan Furtok of Fnmkfmi: (haring tibeir 1-1 draw m the German first division. 


Maradona Banned for 15 Months 


ZURICH — Diego Maradona was 
banned from soccer for 15 months by 
FIFA on Wednesday for taking perfor- 
mance-enhancing drugs at the World Cup 
finals. 


Sept. 29, 1995, and Maradona will be 34 
and 1 1 months when it expires. 

The Argentine captain, who paced ids 
country’s t**™ by leading it to World Cop 
glory in 1986, but who has since been 
caught twice using drugs, had been due to 


Cup finals, in 1998, it would draw up a 
f rame work: of sanctions for using drugs. . 


Maradona, who tested positive for five 
stimulants after a first-round match 
against Nigeria on June 25, was also fined 
20,000 Swiss francs ($15,000). 


play a record 22d game in the Worid Cup 
finals cm die day he was suspended. 


nals cm the day he was a 
He was not present at 


three-hoar 


meeting in Switzerland, and he was repre- 
sented bv Manager Maioos FranchLa mw- 


The Argentine Football Association was 
given a caution, and Danide Serruti, a 
medical consultant with the team at the 
World Cup who was held partly responsi- 
ble for Maradona’s positive test, received 
the same p unishm ent as the player. 


The suspension is the same as the one 
Maradona received for testing positive for 
cocaine in Italy in 1991, and probably 
nwans the end of the 33-year-old’s playing 
career. The ban runs from June 30, 1994, to 


seated by Manager Marcos Franchi,alaw- 
ye r and a football association official. 

FIFA's ness officer, Guido Tognom, 
said: "We do not want to destroy him for 
his actions. But it was always said that we 
should deal with this case without keeping 
in mind he was Maradona.*’ 

The decision was final, with no possibili- 
ty of appeal, FIFA’s general secretary. 


Sc pp B latter, said. 
FIFA, which wa 


FIFA, which was dearly taken by sur- 
prise by Maradona's positive test in June, 
also announced that Ixfore the next Wodd 


“At the moment we have a wide range of 
possible sanctions, but we need more cer- 
tainty in future;*’ Togncmi said. “We know 
we mould be more precise next time." 

Maradona was withdrawal from the 
World Cup by the Argentine federation 
before FIFA could decide what punish- 
ment to hand down after he tested positive 
forephedrine, a stimulant round in 

many over-the-counter medicines,, and 
four related drags. 

Maradona denied any wrongdoing at 
the time in the United States, but both 
samples taken from the player tested posi- 
tive. 

A FIFA spokesman said that no new 
evidence bad been offered to the commit- 
tee- on Wednesday and that . Maradona’s 
lawyer: daimed there had been a mix-up 
'' between two sunfiarfy named products. 


For the Record 




Rom&rio, the Brazilian World Cup star, was fined 10 million 
pesetas ($78,000) on Wednesday after delaying his return to the 
Spanish soccer champion. Barcelona. (Reuters) 


3 : v. : 7. 


The Michael Jordan Watch 


The AC Milan defender Mauro Tassotti, 34, had his appeal of 
a right-match international ban rejected bv FIFA on Wednes- 


Japanea e L ea gues 


an right-match international ban rejected by FIFA on Wednes- 
day, which almost certainly means the end of his international 
career. (Reuters) 

Mario Lemieux is expected to announce next week that he’s 
taking a one-year paid sabbatical from die Pittsburgh Penguins 
because of an anemic blood condition that was triggered by 
radiation treatments he received for Hodgkin’s disease. (AP) 
North Korea has informed countries expected to participate in 
next year’s East Asia Games that it will not be able to host the 
event because of instability on the peninsula, according to Japan’s 
Kyodo News Service. (AP) 

The NASCAR driver Ernie Irran has begun to show signs of 
consciousness although he remains in critical condition and on 
life-support systems after a crash, his doctors say. (Reuters) 
Fred LeBow. the founder of the New York City Marathon who 
has brain cancer, was inducted into the National Track and Field 
Hall of Fame in a ceremony in Manhattan; the other new 
members will be inducted in December in Sl Louis. (NYT) 


CaifrnJ League 



w 

L 

T 

Pet. 

Yomlurl 

62 

43 

0 

590 

Hanshln 

53 

52 

0 

505 

Chunirtil 

52 

52 

0 

5D0 

Hiroshima 

51 

53 

0 

595 

Yakutt 

46 

55 

0 

■455 

Yokohama 

46 

56 

0 

451 


TUESDAY’S GAME: Jordon word Vtor-J 
with on* RBI as B li i nlnoh cin i defe c ted Orlan- 
do 2-4 

SEASON TO OATE: Jordan b batting .195 
f7»4or-4BM with 48 runs. I* doubles. one triple, 
throe home runv47RBIs.4S wo Iks. 104 strike- 
outs and 27 stolen bases In 44 anenwts. He has 
199 cutouts, five assists end 10 errors as an 
outfielder. 


Australln2: 1101 Marianne Umcert, Cana- 
da, 2:1S57...X . Nfipcv Sweetnonj, .Canodo. 
2:14*7. - • - ~ 

m Freestyle: 1, Stacey Gartrell. Australia 
8:38.14. X Hayter Lewis. Australia 8:3471 X 
Nikld Drvdca Canada 8:37.70. 

TRACK AMD FIELD 


L—J emc Cro u p 1:1. Houston. 24-816.444 Heptathlon 




Yomlurf 3. Yakut! 1 
Hanshln 7. Yokohama 2 
Hiroshima A CJmntcw 3 

Pacific League 


Commonwealth Games 


tat: I.Linfcrt Christie, Eng Ksid.y5T.XHor- 
oce Dove-Edwla Sierra Leona 1442. 3, Mi- 
chael Green, Jamaica 14BL 
488: 1, Charles Gltanga. Kenya 4SJXL 2. 
Ouatne Lodeta En eland, 4411. X Sunday 
Boda Nigeria. 4544 

IN hardta: 1, Colin Jackson. Wales. 1X08.2, 
Anthony Jarrett England. 1X22.X Paul Gray. 
Wales. 1X54. 

XS88 Ttarpjrkmw Final; 1, Johnstone KJp- 
koech. Kenya. 8: 14J2X Good km OilrcNr, Ke- 
nya 8:1525. X Graeme FeX Canada 8:2324. 


Skat eat G ro w l; 1, Dean Smith, Australia 
4MI6, 788. X IhaWilfUy, England, 4MVX 
73XX Alex Krueer, Enafcmd, 461 723. 

Shot Mt-Oraep 2: 1. Smith. 5M*. M4 X 
Tennant, 45-2 W. 714. X Andraoo. 4M16, 474. 

High Ja uw Cr eep 1: i.Andreoit, 6416, 8942 
fife]. Smith and Joseph, 6-4M, 734 - 
High Junp41roup2: 1, Kruger, H0H.8N.Z 
Houston, Wh, MB. X Shirley HX 844 
488-Haatl: l, Houston, 4951, KLXQuarry. 
49.74, 826. X Refer, 5054 79X 
988 H ea t X- X Winter, 4755, 912. X PlrW, 
4759. 91X X Michael Smith. 4484 MX 
toinifiegi Altar Ptaa Events: X Wilder, 
42S9.Z Michael Smltte4,i7&X Houston, 4,174 


MX Noluma Fletcher, Geram. 2MM. 946. 

. J— Ita: L Oeatae Lewis. England. T76-L 
932,*Z Kim Vantarhaakr&adcvtila15af,78Z.X 
CaraRne Ochota. Kenya, 136-1, ML . 

H H bpI 1: 1, Joanne Henry, New Zealand. 
2:11-71 M X Jana Ftammlna Ausbufla, 
2*1X07. 920. X Band-MHta. 2:1444. ML 

MS-Heat 2: 1, Coral bw Ochota. Kenya 
2:1447. MX X Emma Ltaitaiy, Scotland, 
2 U4 BXB M XJ wwItarKafiy.EnglawtfcaiJL 
7*7. 

Ftaal staoWPas: 1, Dentoe Lawla EagtanX 
L32S points, x Jana Ftamm l na Australia 
4*17. X Catherine BmdMIll* Woodstock, 
L19X ' 



w 

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pcl 

Setbu 

57 

45 

0 


Oris 

55 

44 

2 

556 

Kintetsu 

56 

45 

2 

554 

Date! 

57 

47 

1 

548 

Lotte 

41 

62 

1 

J98 

Nippon Horn 

39 

62 

4 

586 

WedPOSdPFS Ran 
Kintetsu X Selbu 1 

Orl* 7, Lotte 3 

Date! x Nippon Ham 4 

Its 


288 B u ttafH* : 1, Danyon Loader, New Zea- 
land. 1 5954. X Seclt Miller, Austral la 1:5974 
X Jamas Hickman, England. 2:8487. 

■ Freestyle: l.Martc Foster. Engkmd.2J.lZ 
XOanran Longa Australia 2X.1X X Peter WIV 
Hoax South Africa 23.1*. 

M8 Backstroke: 1. Martin Herts. Engtand, 
SL 77 X Steven Dewtcfc. Australia 56J7*. X 
Adam RucfcwoaX Engfcstd. 5652. 


r: 1, Elite Overton. 


1M Mr — pi: LFetorWIntar.AmtroHalBJV 
seconds, 908 potato. X Douotas Ptrtnl. Now 
Zealand, 1481, ML X Jamte Quarry. Sartkmd, 
1454 892. 

188-Greup I: 1. Victor Heustaa Barbados. 
1076.975.2. Rater Joseph. EngtonaHjOL 847. 
X Brendan Tennant, Austrafia 1UX B4X 
Leegjgnp-Gnwp 1:1. Winter. 25-1 It, 972.X 
Michael smith, Canada 24-7, 932.x PfrM, 34- 

ox m 


m: 1. Mary Onyali, Nlperta 1154 X C 
Oparo-Tbomasoa Nigeria 1UX X Paula 
Thomas, Enatand. 1123- 
484: X Cathertae Freemcm, Arakralla 5434 
X Fatlmo YtauLNlgartaA5XXScndtaRlcli- 


SOCCER 


Dtoem: I.DaKelaCosncin, Australia ZJM. Traltataora X Goto X 
X Beatrice Fanuih Haw Zealand, 187-LX AIK X Renar 4 
Marta Etzebeth. South Alrtca 182-14 Cork CBv 4 Stoula Prague 4 

XM8 final: L Angela Chatmera Caaada Aberdeen X Skotoo Riga 1 
8:3X17 X Robyn M aag har . Canada 8:4559. X GKS Katfowtce 4 Intar CarMIT 8 
Alteon Wyeth. England. 8:4754 PC Mure 4 PC Aarau 1 


. Shuman 1, Anarttwsts Famagusta 2 

.,PC.Beke»cscba U Vordar 0 

“ UeVrid -Sofia 1, 5CT Otymplo 2 
ApaOo Limassol 4 Tauta Dunes 2 
Shamrock Rovers 0, GomO: Zcbaa 1 
Sfaean Brattetara X FC P u ftn d awn a 
Ararat Ycrewm 0 CSKA Sofia 0 
Uniield X FH Hatnor fl ordur 1 
CS Grawetimodier 8 Rosenborg TrawBie but 
FC Hlbcmians 4 Dtaamo Minsk 3 
Hapo« B e tc taeba l. Arte Salonlca X 
Rtad Bucharest 1. La Vat lotto 1 
Zknbrot tasbtaev 0, Ktepest Haaved 1 
Uafvarattataa Craiova 1, Dynamo Tbilisi 2 
Havnor BoOWob X FC Motherwell 4 
FC Jatz Pal X FC Copenhagen 4 
MyPa of An Waskmkl X inter Bretts lava 1 
Horn Tallinn X Odense BK 3 
Scho cl rter Donates X Ultestrem SK 0 
ENGLISH PREMIER LEAGUE 
Tterth'i Rosalia 
Blackburn x Leicester 0 
Leeds 1, Arsenal 0 
Wimbledon i. Ipswich l 

BUNOESUGA 


SC PrellMrg X Bayern Munich 1 
I860 Munich X VfB Stuttgart 2 
FC K o ta ar jtau ta in 1, EtatracM Frenfcfart 1 
VH. Bottom X Dynamo Dresden 8 
FC Cotaone X. Bonnsia Dortmund 6 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 




SOME PEOPLE THINK 
CATS ARE SMARTER 
. THAN 0065.. J 


SOME PEOPLE THINK 
BIRDS ANP D065 ARE 
.SMARTER THAN CATS.. 


/ WHY DO \ 
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V THAT? / 


CATS PON'T 
WEAR VISORS 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 25, 1994 


Page 19 



Itk 


Guilty Plea in Fraud 


ByJamesJBates 
ana Lisa. Dflfanan ■ 

Las Angda Times Service 

LOS ANGELES — JJnjceP. 
McNalL. the president of the 
Los Az^geles Kings and ^tbe 
sports entrepi^cur credited 
with turning Southern CaDIor?; 
nia on to professionance hock- 
ey, has agreed to pfead gn3ty 4o 
four criminal cooats, stemming 
from a federal bank fraud in-; 
vesligationi sourcesdoseto the 
case hawcsodnfirnaed. ; 

McNall, hailed as recently as 
a year ago as one of tbe most 
successful and innovative 
American sports executives, has 
signal a draft agreement nego- 
tiated by his lawyers and fedct^ 
al prosecutors. 

That agreement calls for 
guilty pleas to one count -of 
bank fraud, two counts of until 
fraud and one count of conspir- 
acy, the sourcessakLA federal 
grand jury has been investigat- 
ing McNaD for afiegedfyfelsaiy- 
ing loan documents. 

Sources with knowledge of 
the agreement said probation, 
was unlikely, adding that under 
federal sentencing guidelines 
and the current plea, McNall 
probably would face a maxi- 
mum prison sentence of six to 


McNaD remains" a minority 
partnerin the t ea m . 

Once a brash, free-spending 
1 executive, McNaD brought gitz 
to the Kings. '.He acquired 
Wayne Gretzky /ro*n the Ed- 
. nw* 1 !” 1 fiiieni in 1988 in what 

remains the sporf s rnost sigQifi- 
cant tradeevta. Celebrities were 
drawn to the team,, and soon 
McNafi was mfeg^ng at games 
'with acton, -actresses and for- 
mer presidents. Such stars as 
' Kevirv Costner known to 

shoW tip m thc ]Eing^ dressing 
room to UKCt tibe players. 

Hits .Canadian football team, 
the Toronto Argonauts, became 
tr endy ,- too, miter McNall 
: wgwerf (he farmer Notre Dame 
star Raghib (Rocket) Ismail. 

' the Argpnau&' won the Ca- 
nadian Footba&League’s Grey 
Cup the firstly ear McNall 
owned the team, tmd the Kings 
nearly won die 'Stanley Cup, 
losing the 1993. finals in five 
games to the Montreal Cana- 



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wncs to the Montreal Cana- Ma*st*»/Ra.iOT 

ac£'’ : ‘ V 7 - Donald Fete*, players’ ration chief, left, and Richard Ravitch, owners* representative, taping the “Larry King Live’' show. 

U.S. Soccer Star, Cut by Jets, Will Keep on Trying 


ing could be lowered. : 

McNall has been making no 
public statements on his situa- 
tion. Authorities at the U-S. At- 
torney's Office have dedined to 
co mmen t. ' r " 

McNall would most likely - 
enter a formal plea no earlier 
than mid-September,, with sen- 
tencing coming sometime next 
year, the sources said. For the 
moment, McNall has ho plans 
to leave his post as Kings* presi- 
dent, they said. 

McNaD, 44, was sole owner 
of the Kings from 1988 until 
May, when he was forced to seS 
a 72 percent interest in the team 
to the investors Jeffrey SndDcoCf 
and Joseph Cohen because of 
severe financial problems- that . 
eventually led to his filing for 
protection from creditors in 
U.S. Bankruptcy Court. 


«.-■■■ By Gerald Eskenazi 

New Turk Times Sorias 

HEMF5TEAb, New York — They 
gate Tony Meola. a dozen footballs, a 
Inciting lee ai^tcjd hiin. to go home and 
practices And maybe, the Jets told him., 
he can return soon. 

- The Jets were encouraging to Meola, 
who. tried to; .live out his fantasy of 
switching fromWorld Cup soccer goalie 
to National Football League kicker. 

Officially, Meola was cut Tuesday as 
the fels pared diar preseason roster to 
60. He had not been consistent — either 
in booting fherbafl into the end zone or 
hamming it high on kickoffs. Then again, 
he had only been doing tins for a few 
weds. 

There was never a question that 
Meola would unseat 38-year-old Nick 
Lowery, the most accurate lacker in his- 
toQfU 3here was the hope; though, that 
the 25-year-old Meola, with his power- 
ful light leg, could kick the ball so deep 
that no one could return it 


“Pm not disappointed, that's for left the practice 
sure,” said tbe pony-tailed Meola, who Ids workout T! 
was going home to Kearny, New Jersey, difficult it was ft 
with the supply of balls to practice lock- to make it as a bi 
ing. *Tm going to try to be ready for “He made gre 
next Wednesday. Pete said he’s going to ay. “But be hi 
try to make a place for me on the prao- kicking motion 1 
tice squad.” it down to 20, th 

Coach Fete CarraS suggested that af- Things like point 
ter more practice, Meola could be signed leaning over too 
to the 53-man roster, of which 46 suit up Still, Lowery 

for games - There is also the five-man “made (be fastes 
practice squad, which is where Meola is I've ever seen.” 
apparently headed with the regular sea- Yet, with aD i 
son starting on Sept. 4. probably at the 

Carroll said there was no reason to standing college 
use Meola in the final preseason chance enough for the 
against Tampa Bay on Friday night done so much f< 
“Not in a week’s time,” he said. “He was a 12-year-c 
wouldn’t make that much progress that Warner League, 
fast”. When he im 

While Meola hauled away his gear, month in a work 
Lowery went through his obsessive rent- ing, be was driHi 
tine of stretching and jogging. kicks into the ei 

Thirty minutes after the others had away. This wouli 


left the practice Geld, Lowery finished 
his workout Then he explained how 
difficult it was for Meola, a fine athlete, 
to make it as a big-league kicker so soon. 

“He made great progress,” said Low- 
ery. “But he bad 35 variables in his 
kicking motion the first week, knocked 
it down to 20, then 10 and now it’s at 4. 
Things Kke pointing his right foot, or not 
leaning over too much.” 

Still, Lowery believes that Meola 
“made the fastest progress of any kicker 
I’ve ever seat” 

Yet, with aD that progress, Meola is 
probably at the stage of being an out- 
standing college kicker — but not good 
enough for the big time. He had not 
done so much football kicking since he 
was a 12-year-old playing in the Pop 
Warner League. 

When he impressed the Jets last 
month in a workout that led to his sign- 
ing, he was drilling a high percentage of 
kicks into the end zone from 70 yards 
away. This would be the perfect comple- 


ment to Lowery, with the new kicking 
rules that lowered the tee and required a 
kickoff from tbe 30-yard line. 

But Meda’s kickoffs too often hang 
only 33 seconds instead of the league 
average of 3.9. 

And bis distance and height suffered 
as his form improved. Early in camp. 
Lowery warned Meola that he might 
lose two to five yards in distance by 
changing techniques, but that eventually 
he would be a better kicker. 

Meola. meanwhile, will continue to 
point toward the new Major Soccer 
league, which is scheduled to begin next 
spring. 

“You know. I said from the beginning 
that 1 hoped to make the practice 
squad,” Meola said. “1 also haven’t giv- 
en up on soccer.” 

Lowery himself was cut by the Jets 1 6 
years agp. He has spoken to Meola 
about overcoming these unkind cuts. 
Meola is still two years away, Lowery 
said. 


Strike Day 13: 
They’re Talking 
But Not Quietly 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — The two 
sides in the major-league base- 
ball labor dispute met Wednes- 
day for the first time since the 
save began. 

After about two hours be- 
hind dosed doors, the negotia- 
tors took a break so the players 
could talk among themselves. 

“It’s too early to tell whether 
anything happened that will be 
consequential in the process,” 
said Richard Ravi tch, manage- 
ment’s chief negotiator. 

Paul Motitor, tbe Toronto 
Blue Jays designated hitter and 
one of 21 players at the talks, 
said aD 12 of the management 
representatives spoke at tbe 
morning session. 

“They aD got up and shouted 
a chorus of, 4 We support 
Dick,’ ” Motitor said. 

After hearing tbe manage- 
ment presentation, Motitor 
added, the strike “seems to be 
about not as much substance as 
about why the proposal that 
was made was made." 

Before the talks began, the 
odds were better for raised 
voices than a settlement. 

“Maybe we need a little 
shouting,” Kansas City Royals 
pitcher David Cone said on 
Tuesday. “I know that there are 
fans all over America who 
would tike to shout right now.” 

With the strike in its 13th 
day. there was no sign that the 
owners would alter their de- 
mand for a salary cap or that 
players would accept one. 

“If they stick with a salary 
cap. players are going to play a 
lot of golf,” the Los Angeles 
Dodgers outfielder Brett Butler 
said after the union delegation 
met with federal mediators for 
about two hours. 

When they went behind 
dosed doors just before 1 1 A.M., 
owners were at tbe bargaining 
table for tbe first time in nearly 
four and a half years Jerry 
Rdnsdorf of the Chicago While 
Sox, Jerry McMorris of the Col- 
orado Rockies and Drayton 
McLane of the Houston Astros 


were to be joined by right or 
nine other management officials. 
The management team met with 
the mediators for about three 
and a half hours on Tuesday. 

“Everyone had a different 
way of articulating their con- 
cerns for tbe economics of tbe 
game,” said the Boston Red Sox 
chief executive office, John 
Harrington, the spokesman for 
the group. “But the unanimity 
of ihe final message was that we 
have to bring about some fun- 
damental change to the player 
compensation system in order 
to ensure the future viability of 
the game.” 

“There’s not that much opti- 
mism right now,” said Cone, one 
of 18 players who met the media- 
tors, on Tuesday. “There's do 
reason to expect anything sub- 
stantial tomorrow.” 

Owners, by their own choice, 
had refused to attend bargain- 
ing sessions. But they changed 
their stance after federal media- 
tors asked last week. 

“It is very much a step in the 
right direction that the stakes 
holders — as they have been 
referred to — the owners and 
the players, wiD at down with 
each other and have a dia- 
logue.” said management’s ne- 
gotiator, Richard Ravitch. 

Ravitcb said owners would 
stick to their salary-cap propos- 
al. He repeated that owners 
want to have a fixed figure or 
percentage of revenue assigned 
to player compensation. 

“No, we’re not going to 
change our view on that,” he 
said. 

Harrington left open a possi- 
bility that owners could refer to 
other plans they’ve considered. 

“We've looked at other alter- 
natives,” be said. “We’re willing 
to discuss them also.” 

Players made dear that no 
progress was possible as long as 
owners insist on a cap. 

“Once you take the salary 
cap off the table, we’re wilting 
to talk about all aspects of the 
game.” Butler said. “But that’s 
got to come first.” 


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6 New York Times Edited by Will Shorn. 


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Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 25, 1994 


ART BUCHWALD 


-4 Kg’s Christmas 


TI7ASHINGTON — The 
T Y word that crops up the 
most in discussing the belea- 

ftTirim rl - — - - 1 • 


crime bill is “pork.’ 

- ^ ss, in working on its 
cnme “stew,” kept adding pork 
for taste, and obviously that 
caused trouble. 

One illustration is Represen- 
tative Jack Brooks of Texas, an 

X g pit bulk 

earlier de- 
clared that If 
his alma ma- 
ter. Lamar 
University in 
Beaumont, did .] 
not receive a 
510 million 
grant he would 
refuse to re- 
lease the pro- 
posed legisla- 
tion from his committee. 

Other congressmen also tried 
to add pork to the crime bill, 
until it began to look like a pig's 

Chris tmas tree. 

□ 


street gangs are on the west 
bank. Unless the law enforce- 
ment people have some way of 
crossing toe river, the streets of 
Journey's End will never be 
safe.” 


□ 



BocbwaJd 


Said one, “I would lita to 
submit as an amendment to the 
crime bill a request for a new 
bridge across the Telephonic 
River, spanning the east bank 
of the town of Journey’s End to 
the west bank.” 

“Will the congressman yield? 
What has a bridge to do with 
crime?” 

“The police department is lo- 
cated in the east bank, and the 


$100,000 Poetry Prize 
Established in U.S. 


New York Times Semet 

NEW YORK — The Acade- 
my of American' Poets has an- 
nounced the establishment of 
the Tanning Prize, the largest 
U. S. award for poetry. The 
5100,000 prize will be given an- 
nually to a living American 
judged to be a master of the art. 

The painter Dorothea Tan- 
ning, widow of painter Max 
Ernst, gave $2 million to the 
academy to endow the prize. 
The first recipient will be 
named Sept. 29. 


Another representative 
jumped in. “I have read this 
report from cover to cover, and 
I see nothing in it for tobacco 
supports. In the fight against 
cnme, a study by the Tobacco 
Institute of America indicates 
that if you supply c riminals 
with cigarettes in prison they 
will be less prone to violence 
and do everything to obey the 
rules. I ask a paltry 51 billion to 
see that every prisoner in the 
United States receives one pack > 
of smokes a day.” 

“I will back the congress- 
man's proposal if he agrees that 
the most essential part of any 
crime war is new highways. If 
Congress will give Bloomsbury 
Comers a six-lane highway to 
replace the dirt road now going 
through Main Street, I will 
change my vote to yea.” 

□ 

Taking the microphone, an- 
other legislator said, “l will 
happily support the congress- 
man's bid for a six-lane high- 
way if he supports the new fac- 
tory we want to construct in 
Blood voile, which will manufac- 
ture semiautomatic weapons to 
replace the ones that are to be 
eliminated from sale in the pre- 
sent bOL The country — and 
when I say the country, I in- 
clude the NRA and Charlton 
Heston — must have automatic 
weapons if its citizens hope to 
keep illegal aliens off its shores. 
The factory will cost $309 mil- 
lion, but what the taxpayer will 
get for his money is a piece that 
can fire 20 shots per second” 

“A 11 the proposals have mer- 
it,” declared another congress- 
man, “but 1 cannot vote for any 
of them unless my district gets a 
new sewer. You can’t ask young 
people to give up lawlessness if 
therr sewers back up cm them. 
Time after time, whoa someone 
in my district is picked up for a 
crime and is asked why be did 
it, he says, This town stinks.’ " 


More Pranks and Politics in Gonzo Lai 


By David Streitfeld 

Wadangun Fast Service 

W ASHINGTON — In Room 604 
of the RitZrCartton, Hunter S. 
Thompson is perched on one knee, 
drawing a square on the caipet The 
black ink makes a pleasing contrast 


pleasing < 

against the pale threads. Now, this 


may already sound like a wantonly 
destructive act, but by Thompson’s 
standards it’s inconsequential. After 
all, tins is the man who once chopped 
up the furniture in a hotel room so he 
could make a fire. 

That, however, was long ago. The 
inventor of gonzo journalism and -ts 
sole remaining practitioner is now a 
calmer, kinder, practically jolly fellow, 
to which this suite bears witness: After 
32 hours erf occupancy, it wBl be practi- 
cally unscathed, if you ignore the dent 
in the wall and the stains caused by 
some high-vdkKity fruit 

In the center of his square, Thomp- 
son places a plastic roach. You are 
supposed to imagine this is a Caribbe- 
an beach, the roach is a scorpion, and 
that the square is a little four-sided 
trench dug with a stick. “The scorpi- 
on,” Thompson explains, “will rush 
everywhere, dying to get out, trying to 
make it over the wall. It gets so frus- 
trated at racing around that it finally 
goes nuts, and stings itself to death.” 

Bill Clinton’s only hope, Thompson 
asserts, is to learn from the scorpion. 
“This is a metaphor for the White 
House,” he says. “Roger Altman was 
stung to death. The whole Clinton 

a dminis tration is tike a scorpion in a 
box. Ronald Reagan was not. He was 
a scorpion who could jump. Nothing 
about the town bothered him at afl.” 

Two decades after the eye-opening 
work he did for Rolling Stone, 
Thompson was sucked into covering 
politics again during the 1992 cam- 
paign. In some ways, he’s sorry. Not 
only was it an ordeal, but Clinton has 
been a tremendous disappointment. 

The president, Thompson writes in 
“Better Than Sex: Confessions of a 
Political Junkie Trapped like a Rat in 
Mr. BilTs Neighborhood,” “would 
have played the Jew’s harp stark na- 
ked on “60 Minutes' if he thought it 
would help get him elected.” 

Demonstration over, point made, 
Thompson makes a halfhearted at- 
tempt to rub out the ink s tains. When 
it fails, he places a plate over the spot 
and, unfazed, heads for the couch, 
“rve never trapped a scorpion and 
witnessed it sting itself to death,” the 



Midnd WSuMC/Tta Wntnjtm ft* 

Hunter S. Thompson, now 55 or 57: “The myth has taken over.” 


writer admits, adding: “But then, nei- 
ther have I . . .” — long pause. 

“I have not” — huge pause — 
"stabbed myself through the palm to 
produce a stigmata to convince some- 
one I love them. O. K_, I know that’s 
weak.” 

Clearly, there’s not much that 
Thompson hasn’t done in his 57 years 
(or possibly 55 years; sources differ, 
and he’s vague). Run with the Hell’s 
Angels? Interviewed Richard Nixon? 
Influenced a generation of writers? 
Become a “Doonesbury” character? 
Gone shark fishing at night while 
stoked on acid? Narrowly escaped be- 
ing killed for screaming obscenities in 
a Vietnam combat zone? Indulged in 
more illegal, quasi-legal and merely 
unhealthy substances over a longer 
period than anyone ever? 

Been there, done that. 

This leaves Thompson no choice but 
to do some things all over a gain, T 


haven't learned enough to stay away 
from politics,” he says. Tm an addic- 
tive personality” He chainsmokes 
Dunhills and downs Chivas Regal with 


abandon, and those are just bis public 
itauzed. 


vices. Still, he has been revi 

Thompson does not like the idea 
that he’s kinder and gentler. “Just 
look wha l happened to the last guy 
who used those words,” he snarls. 
Clearly, he’s afraid of blowing his 
tough-guy image. 

In 1973, Tom Wolfe expedited an 
anthology called “The New Journal- 
ism.” Ifs a snapshot of a cresting 
literary movement While most of the 
contributors are still alive and work- 
ing — including Joan Didioo, Garry 
Wills, J ohn Gregory Dunne, Joe 
McGirmiss, Norman Mauler, Wolfe 
himself — no one calls what they do 
New Journalism. Most of the big shots 
have moved on, in any case. 

Only Thompson seems, for better 


or worse, frozen in time. His particu- 
lar variation- was gonzo journalism, 
straightforwardly defined by Wolfe as 
“a highly ad 1160 *! first-person 

style in which Thompson’s own emoj 
tions continually dominate the story. 

Ifs -hard for “Better Than Sex” to 
top die sort of material Thompson 
wrotMome years back. It still holds Up 
very wriD indeed. Thompson compares 
Ins new book instead to “The Diary of 
Anne Rank.” His point that tins is 
- also 'a sort of “found document” has 
some truth. It doesn’t look as thou gh it 
was intended to be a gu hlfebed book. 

Thompson’s political commentary is 
bam out of a combination of anger and 

frustration. Bob Love, his editor at 
Roflmg Stone, says: “He finds himself 
wanting tn believe in politicians. He 
takes their stuff seriously and tends to 
get attached;, only to find himself 
bruised by the experience.” 

Then, s tarting hi the mid-TOs, the 
life became an art form itself: 
drugged, crazy, impossible Thomp- 
son. “The myth has taken over,” he 
pointed out a long time ago. “Tm 
realty, in the -way as a person.” 

Plenty -of people gave up on him 
during tins extended hiatus. ' 

The problem, Thompson complains 
now, is that “I never expected to be 
here tins long. I planned from early on 
to die at the age of 27, actually planned 
it Most of the people who knew me 
were betting on 22. So everything after 
that’s been kind of a shock.” 

- Some friends show up. Thompson 
tdls some jokes, and they laugh. He 
empties out his pack of Dunhills and 
aims at the wastebasket, which is about 
six feet away. He’s not even dose. 

Maybe frint will be easier. He throws 
an apple, an orange. They miss. 
“Bow’d you Hke to play far money?” 
he asks. The betting quickly moves up 
to a thousand dollars a toss — he insists 
that his editor will cover any losses — 
bat everyone misses, especially 
Thompson. The banana does leave an 
interesting smear on the wall, however. 

’ “It just won’t go in,” he mutters, 
genuinely frustrated. “There’s a lid on 
die basket,” Tbds, even more than the 
scorpion, is open to the possibilities, of 
easy metaphor: Thompson can no 

the last shoL If I don’t > make it now, 
we’ve failed, we’re zero,” he growls. 

He throws.. The ball slams into the 
waH, leaving a sizable dent. With: a 
loud clang, it drops into the wastebas- 
ket- Victory at last 


people 


A 26 -year-old drifter was 

sentenced lo a year in jaiHor 

scsaling a fence aromw Mana- 
na’s Hollywood Hills estate on 

July 19. A trial wassmyosedto 

have begun tins week for Todd 
MBchael Lawrence of Arizona, 
but he pleaded no coolest to 
attempted entry mto a bunding 
and battery cm . a po«ce omcet, 
both misdemeanors, nc w as 
then sentenced and ordered to 

go imme diately to jafl. 

□ 

While British politicians 
buried accusations at police for 
refusing to probe the press leak 
that triggered the latest royal 
gntndni involving Princ ess Pi- 
nna, she was having her portrait 
painted. Diana, who has denied 
patting any nuisance caOs to 
millionaire an dealer Ofivcr 
Have and says dark forces are 


for 


studio, 


American artist 
at a Chelsea 
British newspapers 

Sir Paid Condon, the 

police chief, has promised that 
any evidence of poEce malprac- 
tice will be thoroughly investi- 
gated, but he ruled out any offi- 
cial probe into the leaked story. 
□ 

A thief stole the key left in the 
Dutch royal palace gale, then 
sent it to a newspaper because he 
was worried about Queen Bea- 
trix’s security, according to the 
daily newspaper De Telegraaf. 
He said he took the key “so I can 
boast that one of the women 
whose keys I have is the queen,” 
in an. anonymous letter to the 
newspaper. The officer who 
watches the gate will “undoubt- 
edly get a good dressing-down”, 
a: ‘ 


Myung-Whun Chung, has 
sued the Paris Optra for breach 
of contract Chung is seeking 
recognition from a Paris court 
that his contract as music direc- 
tor was terminated illegally. He 
is also asking for an order ban- 
ning further rehearsals of VerdTs 
“Simon Boocanegra,” the sea- 
son’s opener, on pain of a fine of 
88,000 francs ($16^00) per re- 
hearsal. 


WEATHER 


WEEKEND DESTINATIONS 


Europe 


Forecast for Friday through Sunday, as provided by Accu-Weether. 


Algana 

Amaatown 

Mn 

Alans 


Costa (M Sol 
Pubfin 

Effinougn 

Ftorvnce 

Franttsi 


IsanM 

un Palmas 


Muneti 

Nco 

Oslo 

Pum 

Pare 

piSE»* 


St. FMantug 
Swd*c*n 

Soasoowg 

Tallinn 

VOnco 

Vienna 


2uncn 


Today 
Mgh Low 
OF OF 
sun 19*6 
19M6 14157 
28182 5 <48 

38/37 Mm 
26/79 20/86 
33/91 1509 
22.71 14157 
I9«K 12/53 
29*4 16/61 
21/70 '3/55 
26/82 2373 
10/BI 10/50 
16/81 1ZA3 
Z8/B2 H/57 
22/71 15/59 
16*66 11/52 
1B*1 11/52 
31/86 22/71 
27/80 20 TO 
25/77 18/04 
17/82 12/53 
27*0 14*57 
24/75 15/59 
17*2 6/46 

20*8 10/50 
24/75 16*1 
19*6 11/52 
28/79 23/73 
19*6 13/55 

am 12*3 

13*5 12/53 
30*8 17*2 
18*4 B«« 

18*4 10*0 
19*6 9A48 
16*4 12/53 
27/80 18*4 
S/73 13*5 
23/73 14/57 
20*6 11/52 


w won 

OF 
S 29/84 
all 21/70 
t 34/93 

■ 34/93 
PC 27*0 
I 26/79 
l S/73 
J 23/73 
I 24/75 
an 22/71 
I 31*8 
Sh 16*4 
c 17*2 

■ 25/77 

I 23/73 
an 23/73 
Ml 17*2 
a 33*1 
5 28779 

1 28*2 
c 22/71 
pc 31*6 
all 25/77 
ail 19*6 

I 20*6 
pc 24*75 
C S/71 

S 29/84 

an 24/75 
i S/71 
an 15*9 
g 27/BO 
pc 18*4 
pc 16*4 
» 22/71 

PC 17*2 
tn 25/77 
I 21/70 
pc 23/73 
I 22-71 


LOW W 

or 

am pc 
14*7 c 
•6*1 pc 
22/71 I 
am s 
12*3 i 
11*2 Si 
12*3 C 
13/55 I 
12*3 III 
24/75 a 
8/46 PC 
11*2 SI 
10*1 PC 
12*3 Si 
14/57 pc 
11*2 c 
19*6 PC 
22/71 1 
20*8 PC 
11*2 C 
19*6 « 
17*2 pc 
12*0 pc 
11/52 c 
16*4 pc 
13/55 e 
23/73 a 
13*5 pc 
11*2 Si 
9/48 pc 
16*4 oc 
8«6 pc 
12*3 PC 
12*3 C 
11.52 C 
19/06 PC 
13*6 C 
11/52 I 
>3*5 PC 



Jat H O nw n 

North America 

Washmqton D.C. lo Boston 
will have very warm end 
Humid weather this 
weekend. A few 
thunderstorms will occur 
along a frontal boundary 
abwchlng from near Denver 
lo Chicago this weekend. 
The Rockies and southern 
Plains wiR remain hot and 
humid this weekend. 


Haavy 

Snow 


Europe 

London to Copenhagen wa 
have windy, cool weather 
Friday into the coming 
weekend with frequent 
showere. Madrid wfll remain 
sunny and hot while Parts 
will have seasonable 
weedier and some sunshine. 
Heavy reins wfll slide from 
the western Ukraine toward 
the Black Sea. 


Asia 

Tokyo vMB have hoi weather 
this weekend with soma 
sunshine. A taw 
thunderstorms may reach 
Osaka Bid Nagasaki later in 
the weekend. Scattered 
thunderstorms will be 
followed by more 
seasonable weather across 
Korea. Mania and Hanoi wtt 
be warm wKh a low 


Middle East 


Latin America 


Asia 




Tomorrow 




Low 

W 

Hgh 

Low 

W 


OF 

OF 


OF 

OF 


Bangtail 

32*9 

24775 

1 

32/69 

Z4/7S 1 


31 *a 

18*4 

s 


21/70 1 

HanaKmo 

31*6 

2S777 

pc 

31*6 

25/78 pc 

Mania 

29*4 

24/75 

Bfl 

29*4 


PC 

Now rata 

33*1 

27/80 1 

34.93 

25/79 

pc 

S«x4 

31 OB 

24/75 

®!1 

32J89 


PC 

Snangnw 

32*9 

26/79 

PC 


26/70 pc 


31 *B 

22771 

PC 

31*8 


t 

TacA 

33*1 

23/73 PC 32*9 

24775 

1 

Tokyo 

2904 

21770 OC 

26*2 

22/71 

PC 

Africa 


78*2 

71/70 

B 

29/84 

22/71 


C^MTawi 

21/70 

SM8 

a 

22/71 

12*3 

pc 


25/79 

18*4 

B 

28*2 


pc 


19*8 

11/52 

1 

am 

12*3 


Legos 

27/80 

23773 

*n 

28*2 

23773 

on 

NmraO 

19/69 

ID/50 


22/71 

11/32 

PC 

Turn* 

34/99 

20*9 

pc 

32*8 

am 

PC 

North America 

ArdiOngB 

19*8 

11/52 

01 

20*8 

12/53 

PC 

Mm3 

32*9 

21770 

* 

31*8 

21/70 

* 

ecscn 

27*0 

17/m 

pc 

26*2 

16*4 

PC 

Cheogo 

31*8 

21770 

c 

31*8 

18*4 

PC 


32*9 

15/50 

ec 

33*1 

14*7 

s 

Ca«oa 

31*8 

19*9 

a 

31*8 

17*2 

PC 


SATURDAY 



SUNDAY 


Europe and Mkkfle East 

Location 


Europe and Iflddto Eeet 


Al tanewa and data provided 
by Aocu-Wartw. maa i«H 


Cannae 

Daauvfte 

Rimini 

Malaga 

Coglian 

Faro 

Piraeus 

Corfu 

Brighton 

Ostand 

Schevenkigan 

Sytt 

Izmir 

Tel Aviv 


Weather 

High 

Low 

Wotar 

Wav* 

Wind 

Locrton 

Wartbar 

Hfeh 

Low 

Wrtsr 

wm 

Wind 


Tamp. 

Tamp. 

Tstqp. 

as - ■- ■ « 

mgrai 

Spas'! 



1m. 

Tamp. 

Temp. 

Heights 

Speed 


C!F 

C IF 

OF 

0*«*WO» 

(kph) 



OP 

OF 

OF 

PWras) 

(kph) 

Minny 

27/80 

18*4 

28 m 

i-a 

m 

10-20 

Ctnaat : . 

- sumy 

28*2 

10*6 

28/79 

1-2 

NW 

12-25 

party awiy 

22/71 

14/57 

1B*6 

1-3 

w 

20-40 

Daauvflta- 

psrtyautny 

23/73 

14/57 

10*6 

-• 1-8 . 

W 

20-40 

auraiy 

28/82 

18/64 

27/80 

0-1 

N 

ia-257 ;• 

‘ RWri 

«mny 

27*0" 

“10*6 

27*0- 

0-1. 

N . 

.12-25 

■winy 

30/88 

23/73 

26/79 

0-1 

SW 

12-25 _ 

Malaga : 

surmy 

31*8 

24/75 

28/78 

0-1 

SW 

12-2S 

sunny 

31/88 

23/73 

27*0 

0-1 

w 

10-20 — 

Ca?SisaJ 

sumy 

30*8 

22/71 

27/80 

0-1 

w 

1020 

party sunny 

.8/82 

22/71 

10*6 

1-2 

SW 

20-35 ■- 

Run 

ctoudsandsun 

20*4 

22/71 

10*6 

1-2 

SW 

20-35 

sumy 

34/B3 

24/75 

27/80 

0-1 

MW 

12-a 

Pkaaus - 

sumy 

34*3 

23/73 

27*0 

0-1 

NW 

12-25 

surety 

32/88 

22/71 

27/80 

0-1 

NW 

15-25 

Corfu 

sumy 

32*0 

22/71 

27*0 

0-1 

NW 

15-30 

party sunny 

18/64 

11/52 

18*4 

T-2 

SW 

20-35 

Brighton- 

sumy 

21/70 

10*0 

18*4 

1-2 

SW 

2085 

partly surety 

13*6 

14/57 

10*6 

1-8 

SW 

20-40 

Ostand 

douos and sun 

21/70 

14/57 

19/88 

1-3 

SW 

20-40 

party sunny 

19*6 

13*5 

18*4 

1-3 

SW 

20-40 


doudsandsui 

20*8 

14*7 

18*4 

1-8 

SW 

2040 

partly stamy 

18/66 

14/57 

18*4 

1-3 

SW 

20-40 

Syx 

partly surety 

20*8 

1365 

18*4 

1-3 

SW 

20-40 

party siimy 

34/33 

22/71 

28*2 

1-2 

N 

15-25 

Izmir 

sumy 

34*3 

22/71 

28*2 

1-2 

N 

15-25 

sunny 

30*6 

24/75 

28*2 

1-2 

SW 

20-35 

TalAviv 

sumy 

31*8 

24/75 

28*2 

1-2 

SW 

15-30 


Caribbean end West Atlantic 
Bo/badoc 


Kingston 
St. Thomas 


Bank 

Can 

Damascus 

Jmaaten 


Oceania 


lMoy 
regt! tow 
OF OF 
32/89 22/71 
36/97 20*6 
35/95 13/55 
26*2 1 7*2 
11/102 18*6 
42/1177 23/71 


Mgb Low * 
C* OF 
32*8 23/73 S 
36/97 21/70 • 
36*7 16451 a 
29*4 19/86 t 
407104 22/71 a 
43/10826/79 ■ 




16*1 7/44 an 16*1 8MS PC 

21/70 11*2 a 21/TO 13/55 s 


AynSi 

Lagaod: a-aumv. pc-oorify cloudy, c-doudy. 
m-nnow. Won. W-W/aaHwr AB map*, kmc 


T«W| 

Hgh Low W HKP Low W 

OF OF OF OF 

Ekane/ms 18*4 0J*3 c 16*1 8-46 pc 

Caracal 32*9 28/79 pc 32/83 26-79 PC 

uni 16*4 16*1 c 10/84 15*9 c 

UfcmsCty 22/71 11.52 pc 23/73 12*3 I 

FtodhbnalRi 23/73 16*4 a 26-79 19*6 9 

Santiago 17*2 6 <43 pc 19*8 7/44 ac 

di af un m a. HrnnWAom r-rahi. d-WKM Rentes. 

' n Lmm WaatlMi. Inc. 1 1984 


Mcrddu 

HouiKn 

LosAn^tot 

team 


29*4 23/73 PC 31*8 24775 pc 
33*1 23/73 S 34*3 23/73 pc 
32*8 22/71 pc 34*3 22m pc 
33*1 25/77 I 32*9 2*775 I 
27*0 16*4 I 29*4 16*1 PC 
24/75 12*3 1 28719 14*7 pc 


SLT 
H em tton 


parity sumy 31/86 
ttwndsretoims 33/91 
party sunny 34*3 
party eunny 31/88 


24/75 

24/75 

26/79 

22/71 


2 a/82 
28/82 
28/82 
2802 


1-3 

1-2 

1-2 

1-2 


E 20-85 

E 25-50 

BE 25-45 
SE 20-40 


Caribbean and West Atlantic 
Baibadoe.' 


sumy ‘ 

31*8 

24/75 

28/82 

1-2 

SE 

20-30 

party sumy 
party sumy 

33*1 

23/73 

28*2 

. 1-2 

E 

25-50 

34*3 

25/77 

26/82 

1-2 

E 

20-40 

showore 

30*6 

23/73 

28*2 

1-2 

% 

20-35 


AaMPadftc 


AsMPadBc 


NawYtak 

Prewar 
Son Fran. 


32*9 25 777 PC 32*9 25/77 pc 
28*2 20*8 pc 31*6 22/71 pc 


407104 26.82 pc 41710628*2 1 
22/71 13/56 a 21/70 1*.57 pc 
24/75 12.83 PC 25/77 13*5 pc 


Penang 

Ptwka 

BaS 

Cebu 


27.90 14*7 t 28*2 16*1 pc 
29.84 20*8 a 3i*B 21/70 • 


Shaehama 

Honokiu 


thunderatoms 

31*8 

26/70 

29*4 

0-1 

SW 

1020 

ctoudsandsun 

32/80 

24/75 

20*4 

0-1 

SW 

15-25 

ctouds and wn 

32 *9 

23/73 

29*4 

0-1 

SW 

12-25 

party sumy 

32*9 

25/77 

3006 

0-1 

SE 

1530 

sumy 

22/71 

12/53 

18*4 

1-2 

NE 

1530 

party sumy 

18*4 

1060 

16*1 

1-2 

W 

1530 

party sumy 

32*9 

28/77 

28*2 

1-2 

SE 

1530 

party sumy 

30*6 

24775 

27*0 

1-2 

ENE 

25-45 


Penang 
Pbukat . 


Cebu 

Pehn Beach. Aus. 
HonoMU 


party sunny 31/88 
ftunderatom* 32/89 
clouds and sun 31/88 
party swsqr 32/89 
sunny 23/73 


suwy 18/86 

ttuMsmtonmi 


pertly sunny 


31/88 
31 1*8 


25/77 

Z373 

28/73 

25/77 

13/55 

11/52 

23773 

24/75 


23VB4 

29784 

28784 

3(V88 

18/84 

17/82 

2904 

27/80 


0-1 

SW 

10-20 

(jf. , " 

0-1 

NW 

1535 


0-1 

SW 

1235 

fet- \ 

0-1 

SE 

1535 

■ •- - _ 

0-1 

NE 

10-20 

‘ ’ - - 

1-2 

WNW 1535 


13 

SE 

20-40 

tC-.'’'- ■ 

1-2 

ENE 

25-45 



ABET Access Numbers: 

How to can arraznd the worid 

L Using the chan below, find the country you are calling from 

2. Dial dw corresponding AST Access Number. 

3 . An AESTEotfidt^raM^OpOTtarix vote prompt will ask for dicphcmfimiinberyDu wish tocaEorconneayoutoa 


TomrivTyourfrec wallet CTtl of ABaTsAactssNimibei^ just dial the access number of 
the country you're In aoctisk fcrGotomerService 


Travel in a worid without borders, time zones 

or language barriers. 



Imagine a world where you can call country to country as easily as you can from home. And 
reach the US. directly from over 125 countries. Converse with someone who doesn't speak your 
language, since it’s translated instantly. Call your clients at 3 3-m. knowing they’ll get the message in 
your voice at a more polite hour. All this is now possible with AIEE 1 

To use these services, dial the ABET Access Number of the country you’re in and you’ll get all the 
help you need With these Access Numbers and your ACS0T Calling Card, international calling has never been easier. 

If you don’t have an AGS3T Calling Card or you'd like more information on ABET global services, fust call us using the 


COUNTRY 

ACCESS NUMBER 

COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER 


ASIA 

Hair 

172-101 1 

Australia 

1-800-881-011 

UecbtexMtein* . 

155-00-11 

CbfaULFBCaa* 

10811 

XidZDsudBo 

8*196 

Guam 

018-872 

Luxembourg 

O-8O0MJ121 

Hong Kong 

800-1111 

Macedonia, F.Y JL of 

99-800-4288 

India* 

000-117 

Malta* 

0800-890-110 

Indonesia* 

001-801-10 

Monaco* 

19-e-OOll 

Japan* 

0Q39-111 

Nedaeriands* 

06022-9111 

Korea 

009-11 

Norway 

800-190-11 

Korea** 

11- 

Poland** - 0*010480-0111 

Malaysia- 

8000011 

Portugal* 

05017-1-288 

New Zealand 

000-911 

Rumania 

01-8004288 

Pbtfippines’ 

105*11 

R0mia M tMoM»w} 

155-5042 

Saipan* 

235-2872 

Slovakia 

00-420-00101 

Singapcxe 

800-0111-111 

Spain* 

900-99-00-11 

Sri Lanka 

430430 

Sweden* 

020-795-611 

Taiwan* 

0080-102884) 

Swizzerixnd* 

15*00*1 

Thailand* 

0019-991-1111 

VJL 

0500-890011 

EUROPE 

TTIrralaW 

8*100-11 

Armenia** 

' ‘ 8*14111 

MTDDEEEA5T 

Austria**** 

022-903011 

Rahtn^p 

800001 

BclgbsS* 

0600-100-10 

Cyptuf 

080-9QQ10 

Bdptia 

CO-1 800-0010 

brad 

177-100-2727 

Croatia** 

9W8-0011 

Kuwait 

800-288 


0004010 


004-0312 


980-11-0030 


114 


1 19 


190 


.190 


165 


123 


95-8Q0-462-424D 


Denmark* 


l UfcteaooCBdgnp 


convenient Access Numbers on your right 


Finland" 


8001-0010 Qatar 


9800-100-10 Saudi Arabia 


l-SOO-10 


Panamaa 

Peru* 

109 

191 

ftiAmna 

156 

Uruguay 

00-0430 

Venezuela** 

80-011-120 

CUBREAN 

Waha^iaa 

3-800872-2881 

Bermuda* 

1-80043722881 

British VI 

1-800872-2881 

Cayman Islands 

_ 1-800-872-2881 

Grenada* 

l-80O572r2a8l 

Hafo* 

O01-800^72-28ffi 

Jamaica** 

0-800-872-2881 

Neth. AntiT 

001-800-872-2581 

SLKtas/Nevb 

1-800-672-2881 


France 


19A-OOU Tartar 


00400-12Z77 Egypt* (Cafarfl 


510-0200 



AT&T 



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