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& 


INTERNATIONAL 









PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 







‘^:S 
* A - 




Paris, Friday, August 26, 1994 




No. 34,677 







. ‘ amvlMbr■OwSt&T^DiQadK* , 

: RABAT* Morocco— The pilot of a Royal Air Maxoc ■ 
plane carrying 44 people deliberately crashed into the 
.Atlas Mountains this week because be warned loccsnodt 
•suicide* according to a commisti.on investigating the 
crash. All aboard were kSfcd,.. 

Sach a crash is believed unique in modcrn aviatioB 
history. . — _■■■ • - _ _ 

Examination of the pane’s: “black box” recorders 
showed that’tbe pilot, Youncs. Khayati, 32, had “discon- 
nected the automatic pilot, and directed the aircraft 
toward the ground,** said ^ statement Thareday /ronj the. 


ie. Passengers Had No Choice U.S. Crime Bill Moves 

Toward Final Passage 


Rhezcmaai. >: -- - . . - ; ; : ■ 

: The acodenl “is due to the-ddfberate will of die pfiou 
who wished to endhislife;” the statemCat.aaid; ’ 


A voice recorder captured the last words of the co- 
puot, Sofia Flgugui — “Help, help, the captain is . . — 
atxordmg to French aeronautics officials who examined 
the black boxes. 

A spokesman for the plane’s French-Italian manufac- 
turer, Avzoos Regional de Transport in Toulouse, 
France, said: “It was horrific for the poor woman co- 
pilot who tried to talk him oat of it” 

A veteran pilot said that the widely scattered debris 
could be explained by the plane coming apart in the air. 
At a critical speed in a dive, the wings would be torn off. 
the pilot said. 

The twin-engine ATR-42 was on a flight from Agadir 
to Casablanca when it crashed about 35 kilometers (20 
miles) north of Agadir about 10 minutes after its 7 P.M. 
takeoff. 


Twenty of the 44 people on board were foreigners, 
including eight Italian tourists and a member of the 
Kuwaiti royal family and his wife. 

“The behavior of the pilot is all the more inexplicable 
considering be was an experienced pilot with 4,500 hours 
erf flying time, and with confirmed professional aptitudes 
and physical condition,” the commission's statement 
said. 

Mr. Khayati had passed regular medical checkups, the 
most recent on July 7, and passed his most recent pilot 
examination on July 30. it said. 

“This looks fairly unique,” said David Leannount, 
aviation safety specialist for the London-based weekly 
it Internal" 


International. “It is certainly unique in 
airiine history.” {AFt Remers) 





But President 
Accepts Delay 
On Health Care 


By Paul F. Horvitz 

Im e rn a rio nal HeraU Tribune 

WASHINGTON — In another cliff- 
hanging victory for the White House, Sen- 
ate Democrats overcame vehement Re- 
publican objections on Thursday and won 
a test vote paving the way for final passage 
erf major anti-crime legislation. 

But President Bill Clinton’s long-sought 
goal of health-care coverage for an Ameri- 
cans sustained another severe blow. The 
Senate Democratic leadership dropped its 
insistence on non stop debate on health- 
care reform on Thursday and called for 
adjournment until Sept. 12. The White 
House approved. 

The anti-crime vote was a tentative but 
crucial victory for Mr. Clinton in the run- 
up to congressional elections this Novem- 
ber. And it appeared to spell eventual 
defeat for one of the strongest lobbies is 
Washington, the National Rifle Associa- 
tion. 

The vote came after four days erf aston- 
ishingly bitter and partisan debate. 

Republicans needed 41 votes on a proce- 
dural point to block the crime bill but fell 
two votes short, as moderate defectors 
joined Democrats. A final legislative vote 
on the crime bill was expected late Thurs- 
day as the Senate moved under its rules to 
cutoff debate. 

There was an outride chance the final 
vote would be delayed until Saturday. 

The $30 trillion measure offers a multi- 
tude of grants to states and dries to hire up 
to 100,000 more police officers, build more 
prisons and set up special drug-crime 
courts. It toughens mandatory minimum 
sentences for some federal crimes, and 
makes more money available for preven- 
tion programs. 

It also bans the sale of 19 military-style 
assault weapons, a provision vigorously 
opposed by the gun lobby. 

The anti-crime measure passed the 
House last week only after a withering 
Republican assault forced the White 
House and Democratic leaders in that 
body to cut some $3 billion in Spending 
and restructure some of the prevention 
programs. 

A similar assault was launched by Sen- 
ate Republicans, but their party unity was 
not as solid as in the House, as moderate 


Renlufd Krauac. Rtutrr, 


THANKS FOR THE MEMORY — Russian soldiers in Berlin singing a farewell song Thursday to mark their withdrawal from their last base in Germany. 

For Relief Officials in Goma, It’s a 6 Virtual State of War’ 


Canptied by Ow Sufi Ffcmbafauhu 
COMA, Zaire — International relief 
agencies said Thursday that security in 
Rwandan refugee camps around the east- 
ern Zairian town of Gama was now worse 
than anything they had previously experi- 
enced and that they could no longer guar- 
antee normal operations. • 

“We are in a virtual state of war in the 
big refugee camps,” said Ray Wilkinson, 


spokesman for the UN High Commission- 
er for Refugees. He cited more than a half- 
dozen incidents in which grenades had 
bees thrown and refugees shot and hacked 
to death in the past two days. 

"We are hearing hair-raising tales about 
brutal killings and camp violence,” Mr. 
Wilkinson said. "There is not much 
UNHCR or the aid agencies can do about 
tiris."” . - 


Aid workers have called for XJN peace- 
keepers, but no such force is bring consid- 
ered by the United Nations. 

An estimated 800,000 people are living 
in the Goma camps, the vast bulk of the 
million-plus Rwandans who fled across 
the border last month as the Hutu govern- 
ment and its army fled ahead of the Tutsi- 
dominated Rwanda Patriotic Front. 

Mr. Wiflrinson said that experienced aid 


workers found the degree of danger to 
themselves and those they were trying to 
help more serious than anything they had 
experienced in Afghanistan or Cambodia. 

“There is always a degree of danger in 
places like Cambodia or Afghanistan," he 
added, “but here we have found, and I am 
speaking of experienced aid workers, that 

Sec RWANDA, Page 4 


with the Democratic majority. 

Republicans had mounted a spirited of- 
fensive, charging that the measure was 
laden with unnecessary “pork." 

Democrats, in turn, asserted that the 
opposition party was bent only on denying 
Mr. Clinton a legislative victory. 

Senator Orrin G. Hatch, Republican of 
Utah, said the crime bill sustained “a gra- 
vy-suclring hog called the federal govern- 
ment and its liberal allies.” 

He also accused “political cronies of the 
Clinton administration” with threatening 
the jobs of junior federal prosecutors so 
that they would not publicly oppose the 
White House position. 

Senator Frank R. Lautenberg, Demo- 
crat of New Jersey, scoffed at Republican 
assertions of “pork-barrel” spending. “It’s 

See SENATE, Page 4 


Peace Back in Parts of Rwanda 

In One Region, *We Are Trying to Forget the Past* 




' r - By Raymond Bonner 

iftwjWTtowJW* . 

SHARA, Rwanda — A day in Rwanda’s 
rice- growing region is a reminder that not 
every Hutu is a kQler or a refugee. 

At the ria vmillrnjg cooperative ' here, 
men are again working right-hour days, 
s&elling, bagging ana swing the nee 

andrfutsL ^c*ceme^factqry, which em- 
ploys both Hum and Totsi, may reopen, 
soon. 

It is also rice-planting season here arid, 
unlike other parts erf southwestern Rwan- 
da, the fields are not sileht. Men and worn- ' 
en are swinging boss to prepare so3 soft- 
ened by recent rams. Hutu and "Tutsi 
farmers with pails of tomatoes and other 


produce walk along the dirt reads, on their 
waytomarkets, not to Zaire. 

It would be too optimistic to say life has 
retmued to. normal After what Rwanda 
has gone through, that may take years. But 
at least in some areas, Hutu and Tutsi are 
resuming a peaceful life together, the life 
they led before politicians bent on power 
set them against each other. 

. There is no‘ way «rf telling how typical 
. Shara is. Although most residents have 
'remained, hundreds of thousandsof other 
Rwandans fled the country and still live in 
foreign camps. 

. Btjttbe wiBingness of Tutsi and Hutu to 
coexist hope, once common throughout the 
country, hints that the horrors of the past 

st*mrru,Page4 




Kiosk 


UN Rights Unit Takes Iran to Task 


L 


GENEVA (Reuters)— A United Na- 
tions human rights body called on Ira n 
on Thursday ti> t stop using "excessive 
force in s up pressing pubBcoemonstra- 
tions and to cease involvement . in. 
“state-sponsored tarorism." 

> The resolution passed by the UN 
Subocanm^aon on Prevention of Dis- 


crimination and Protection of Minor- 
ities urged Iran to take “urgent and 
effective action to improve its Tecord in 
tha field of human rights.” 


Books 

Bridge 


Page 9. 
Page 9. 


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A Proud Paris Celebrates Its Liberation 


8SK- 



QswtBe GniMM/itCBM 


A French fire rhwrf Hanging the nati onal tricolor from the top of the Eiffel 
Tower Thursday; in 1944, Iris father scaled the structure to unfurl the flag. 


By Alan Riding 

Ww York Times Serrice 

PARIS — As a military victory, the 
liberation of Paris was not significant. By 
the time Parisians took up arms against 
their German occupiers on Aug. 22, 
1944, Allied forces were encircling the 
city. And by the time French troops 
arrived here three days later, most Ger- 
mans had fled. 

Yet, as Parisians celebrated the 50th 
anniversary of the end of four years of 
German occupation on Thursday night, 
with World war U tanks andieeps reen- 
acting the entry of General Philippe Le- 
clerc’s 2d Armored Division, the extraor- 
dinary political significance of the 
occasion again became apparent. 

Within 24 hours of returning to Paris 
from Ms long years in exile, General de 
Gaulle brushed aside challenges to his 
authority from both the Allies and 
French Communists; he won recognition 
as Fiance’s undisputed leader, and he 
began restoring pride to a France 
shamed by defeat and collaboration. 

No less significant, in a matter of 
weeks de Gaulle transformed France 
from an occupied land into a combatant 
nation and, in the process, set the stage 
for France to be recognized, along with 
the United Slates, Britain and the Soviet 
Union, as one Of the victorious Allies. 

The key to this, though, was the way 
he interpreted the liberation of Paris. 

“Paris, Paris insulted, Paris broken, 
Paris martyred,” he told a crowd at City 
Hall on the evening of Aug. 25, 1944, 
“but Paris liberated^ liberated by itself, 
liberated by its people, with the help of 
all France.” 

That virion has survived. Tea weeks 
, leaders of Allied nations were invit- 
to Normandy to celebrate the 50th 
anniversary of the D-Day landings. On 
Thursday, no foreign leaders were pre- 

See PARIS, Page 4 


U.S. Rejects 
Castro Offer 
To Negotiate 
On Refugees 

By Steven Greenhouse 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — The Clinton 
administration rejected Fidel Castro's 
call for negotiations to resolve the 
refugee crisis on Thursday, insisting 
that such talks would be fruitless be- 
cause the Cuban leader appears reso- 
lutely opposed to the political and 
economic reforms sought by Wash- 
ington. 

Even as many allies and members 
of Congress urged President Bill Clin- 
ton to agree to Sigh-level talks, admin- 
istration officials articulated a policy 
of confrontation rather than commu- 
nication with Havana. 

They said negotiations were unnec- 
essary because Mr. Castro knew what 
reforms were needed to satisfy his 
people and stop their exodus. 

Undersecretary of State Peter Tar- 
naff said at a White House briefing: 

“Our position is that we are not 
going to enter into a dialogue with 
Castro or the Cuban government over 
the pace and nature of change in 
Cuba. That is something that he is 
hearing every day, increasingly, from 
the Cuban people, and the people who 
are coining out are telling it more 
publicly than they did before. That’s 
where the dialogue should take place.” 

The administration's decision to re- 
ject talks with Havana appears to en- 
sure that the showdown with Cuba 
will continue indefinitely. 

Mr. Castro seems unwilling to stem 
the flow of refugees, Mule President 
Bin Clinton appears intent on tighten- 
ing, rather than easing, a trade embar- 
go, as Mr. Castro wants. 

Some administration officials see 
only two things defusing the crisis: 
Either Mr. Castro will have to back 
down and adopt reforms and stop the 
refugees from leaving, or there has to 
be a spell of bad weather and stormy 
seas that discourages Cubans from 
setting out in flimsy rafts and boats. 

Several officials hinted that if Mr. 
Castro continued to let refugees flow 
out in large numbers, the administra- 
tion might seek to turn up the heat 
further on Mr. Castro by asking other 
nations to halt tourism to Cuba. Tour- 
ism and sugar exports are Cuba's two 
largest sources of hard currency. 

in a two-and-a-half hour wpear- 
ance on Cuban television on Wednes- 
day sight, Mr. Castro suggested that 
he might stop the exodus of refugees if 
the Qimon administration agreed to 
talks on a range of issues, including 
Washington's 32-year-old trade em- 
bargo against Cuba. 

“Solutions that are real, realistic 
and just would benefit the United 

See CUBA, Page 4 


Business Faces 
Dilemma Over 
Rights in China 

By Steven Mufson 

Washington Tmt Service 

BEUING — In early July, Gao Feng 
returned to work in the stamping shop of 
Beijing Jeep after an absence of more than 
a month. He said the Public Security Bu- 
reau had held him for 35 days because be 
planned to hold a Christian religious com- 
memoration for people who died in 1989 
outside Tiananmen Square. 

Because it considered his attendance re- 
cord poor, Beijing Jeep, a joint venture 
with Chrysler Coip M said it would fire Mr. 
Gao unless he produced proof. The Chi- 
nese police gave him a note saying he had 
been held for three days, then released 
without charges. 

This was not your average misunder- 
standing over attendance. The New York- 
based Human Rights Watch took Mr. 
Gao's case to Chairman Robert J. Eaton of 
Chrysler, who is part of a high-level group 
of executives accompanying Commerce 
Secretary Ronald H. Brown to China on 
Friday. 

After a call from corporate headquar- 
ters, Chrysler’s management in Beijing put 
Mr. Gao back to work while they attempt- 
ed to clarify the reason for his absence. 

The incident highlights the questions 
facing companies in a politically charged 
and sometimes repressive atmosphere such 
as China’s. Do they have a special obliga- 
tion to foster human rights? 

In the aftermath of President Bill Gin- 
ton's renewal of most-favored-nation trad- 
ing status for China, a corporate code of 
conduct has become the main battle- 
ground between human rights groups and 
U5. business. Mr. Clinton endorsed a set 
of voluntary principles for U.S. firms in 
China when he renewed China's trading 

See CHINA, Page 4 



% 


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Pb^e2 


INTERNATIONAL HERAID TRIBONE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 26, 1994 


Foes Suspect a Kohl Ploy in Nuclear-Smuggling Affair 


^ORLD BRIEFS 


By Stephen Kinzer 

New Yak Tima Service 

BERLIN — With public fears over 
the smuggling of atomic material ris- 
ing dramatically in Germany, opposi- 
tion leaders asserted Thursday that 
Chancellor Helmut Kohl h ad staged 
several highly publicized seizures of 
plutonium and u ranium in order to 
improve his image in advance of the 
national election in October. 

“There is serious suspicion that 
these most poisonous of poisons were 
brought to Germany with the help of 
German authorities,” Gunter Verhcu- 
gen, a senior official of the opposition 
Social Democratic party, said m Bonn. 
“This smacks of a stunt” 

Another Social Democratic leader, 
Kars ten Voigt told a meeting of the 
parliamentary foreign affairs commit- 
tee that Mr. Kohl's “hectic activity” 
against smugglers of nuclear material 


The chancellor’s coordinator of se- 
cret services, Bernd Schmidbauer, re- 
jected the accusations as “absurd and 
bizarre." 


The exchange on Thursday made it 
dear that both major parties were 
seeking to turn the wave of public 
c o n ce r n over atomic smuggling to their 
own political benefit Mr. Kohl is en- 
gaged in a heated campaig n for re- 
election against the Social Democratic 
candidate, Rudolf Scharping. 

Social Democratic leaders have as- 
serted in recent days that German se- 
cret agents were being ordered to pose 
as buyers of atomic material, both in 
Germany and in the former Soviet 
Union, in order to produce spectacular 
arrests that would strengthen Mr. 
Kohl’s Iaw-and-order image. 

An aide to Mr. Schmidbauer con- 
ceded in an interview that agents had 


contacts only within Germany, and 
insisted that transactions between 
agents and would-be smugglers in oth- 
er countries were always initiated by 
the smugglers. 


Mr. Kohl’s office announced Thurs- 
day that the Russian counterintelli- 
gence chief, Sergei Stepashin, would 
visit Bonn in September or October for 
further talks. 


baucr replied, “It is not absurd to 
bdieve that buyers may be. acting on 
bchaK of governments.” 

He refused to identify any govern- 


U.S. Ends Red Sea Blockade of Iraq * 

- S - . . 


AMMAN, Jordan {A 
from the mouth of the 


— United States 
ulf of Aqaba on 


moved away 


“What you heard today was strictly 
campaign rhetoric,” said the aide. 


Since May, the German authorities 
have made four seizures of atomic ma- 


terial. Three were of lethal plutonhim- 
239 and the fourth was of highly en- 
riched uranium. Officials here say they 
bdieve the material came from the 
former Soviet Union, although Russia 
has denied that any of its material is 
missing. 


At Thursday’s parliamentary hear- 
ing in Boon, Mr. Schmidbaner backed 
away from earlier assertions that 

atomic material seized here was almost 

certainly of Russian origin. He said it 
might have come from me Ukraine or 
other former Soviet republics, and 
added that there were indications such 
material was being smuggled by sea as 
wdl as by air. 


enforcement of. United Nations sanctions against Iraq 


ivmgthe 
to land- 


After the seizure of 300 grams (10.5 
ounces) of plutonium at the Munich 
airport this month, Mr. S chmi dbauer 
traveled to Moscow for talks with Rus- 
sian officials. He signed an agreement 
on Monday under which German and 


In addition, Mr. Schmidbauer said 
he bu d information suggesting that 
former agents of the Stasi, the secret 
service of the former East Germany, 
were involved in the illicit trade. 


•LTikl Fwl RTf-'i ■ i 


I i kvl HI 


Asked if he believed that foreign 




iia "Wiv O — cr — “*r 

od before the federal election when might sell flfirit* atomic material But ate more closely in the effort to control smuggled atomic material in mmisters^mtenor 

media attention is esuedallv intense.” he said that thev had initiated such the smuggling of atomic material. bufldmidear weapons, Mr. Schmid- nee and nuance ministers. 


cosing on Norm jyorea a»u nnwui. 

At the same hearing, government. 
wfRriain announced that border guards 
at 50 mtiy points into Germany would 
soon be equipped with devices allow- 
ing them to detect the presence of., 
radioactive material in luggage or 
freight shipments. They said the de- 
vices were now being tested and would 
be in useby October. ' 

Finance Minister Theo Waigel 
urged Thursday that the issue of node- 
ar smnggling be placed on die agenda 
at the neat meeting of the Group of 
Seven industrialized nations. He said 
the matter would be discussed at meet-' ' 

i n o c nf Pi ii rmpan TTninn fn iw flii AttH! 


based inspectors. 

The US.~ted blockade in theRed Sea begpn four E*j*W*™* 
Iraq invaded Kuwait and continued when the GtnTWar cadet 
- — i a MirtimntMi with the United states. 


Jiaq mvaoca jroiwau aim wuwuusu o ta *:T- 

Warships from 14 nations participated, with the United 
Britain and France the leading cohtiibutors. - 
' But with a hod from Washington, the Umted Nations agreed; 
last week to halt the interceptions at sea for at least s manth, 
Winning Thursday, to see if onshore inspections would be just as^ 


Israelis Refuse to Reojjen Mosque 

umnnu Tnmj: Wm! Rank (Returns) •* 


. HEBRON. IsradtOccupied West Bank (Rauw^. : — Six 
months after a Jercidi settler shot and killed 30_Muauns at & 
mosque in Hebron. Israel rejected d eman ds on Thursday that a T 
tomb complex at the site, which is sacred to both Islam and. 
Judaism, be reopened. - ' ‘ ' % 

offidals said the Tomb of the Patnarchs 7" reyenri as ^ 

burial place of Abraham, Isaac, Jacob and their wrves^Starajv 


media attention is especially intense.” he said that they had initiated such the smuggling of atomic material. 


that even with the best 




In Sensitive Case , 


U.S. Gives Asylum 
To Saudi Diplomat 


By John Mintz 

Washington Pat Service 

WASHINGTON — The 
U.S. Immigration and Natural- 
ization Service has granted po- 
litical asylum to Mohammed 
Khilewi, a Saudi Arabian diplo- 
mat who criticized the Saudi 
royal family and then went un- 
derground because he feared 
retribution, according to his 
lawyers. 

In a letter to Mr. Khilewi, the 
agency said it was granting him 
the political asylum he request- 
ed on June 14 because he had 
established a “well-founded 
fear of persecution” upon re- 
turn to his homeland. 

The question of whether to 
grant political asylum to Mr. 
Khilewi, 31, was a diplomatic 
quandary for the U.S. govern- 
ment because Saudi Arabia is 
the United States' closest ally in 
the Gulf. Saudi government of- 
ficials may be embarrassed by 
the U.S. government action, 
which implicitly acknowledges 
that they can be heavy-handed 
with dissidents, foreign policy 
specialists said. 

Officials of the Immigration 
and Naturalization Service and 
the Stale Department declined 
to comment on the matter. 

A spokesman for the Saudi 
Embassy also Hra-Hnud to com- 
ment, except to reiterate past 
Saudi government statements 
that it does not want to harm 
Mr. Khilewi. 

Mr. Khilewi, who had been a 
first secretary at the Saudi mis- 
sion to the United Nations, said 
in an interview Wednesday that 
he still feared that he, his wife 
and two children could be 
harmed. 

Mr. Khilewi told immigra- 
tion officials that a Saudi intel- 
ligence official had threatened 
his and his family’s lives on 
May 17, the day he informed 
Saudi officials by cable of his 
opposition to the Saudi govern- 
ment’s human-rights record. 
Mr. Khilewi secretly taped the 
conversation, and included the 
tape in his application for asy- 
lum. 

On the tape, the Saudi intelli- 
gence official told Mr. Khilewi 
that he must travel to Washing- 
ton immediately to speak with 
the Saudi ambassador in the 
United States, Prince Bandar 
bin Sultan. 

“You have to go today or 
your life, your wife and your 
childrens' fives will be in dan- 


ger,” the man told Mr. Khilewi, 
according to his application. 

Daniel Pipes, a specialist in 
Arab affairs and editor of Mid- 
dle East Quarterly, said the 
U.S. government’s decision was 
likely to be “an acute embar- 
rassment for the Saudis.” 

Saudi officials may be espe- 
cially concerned, Mr. Pipes 
said, because the U.S. action 
may oonfer some legitimacy on 1 
allegations by Mr. Khilewi that; 
the Saudis have financed Pales- 
tinian and other terrorist 
groups, electronically eaves- 
dropped on Jewish groups in 
the United States and spent bil- 
lions of dollars in the 1980s to 
help Iraq develop nuclear weap- 
ons. 

Mr. Khilewi said he bad 
14,000 pages of Saudi docu- 
ments supporting these and 
other claims, and had presented 
some to news organizations. 
The Saudis deny the allegations 
and say the documents are 
forged. 



no, 

way* they gna«ntw* that a similar incident would not occur. 1 

Natal Shaat h; a senior official with the Palestine liberation. 
Organization, told Israeli Army radio the restrictions covering 
Hebron, which is homo to some 100,000 Arabs and about 400*; 
Jews, should stop. “Of course it shoiild be reopened,” he said. . 
“Why r nmish the wtwshipers of the mosque f or^he crime of a; 


Murayama, in Vietiiaiii^FledgeBAid 

HANOI (AEP) — - Prime Minister Tonmcin Murayama began 
the first visit by a Japanese leaderto Vietnam on Thursday with 
pledges of assistance, but mgcddraComniunist gove rnm e n t to 
speed up economicrefonns. - v' "• / 

Eco no m i c issues and steppedrup contacts between the two ‘ 
countries dominated 90 urinates Of talks betWren Mr. Mnray&hia <4? 
and his Vietnamese counterparty. Vfo Vaq Kwt. Hve accords an ‘ 
grant aid worth more darn $73 nnHion andan agreement to allow . 



g rant pjri worth more man a73iinmop. ana. an agreement to aiiow . 
Japanese peace corps workers to teach in VIetnam werc signed. ' ■ 
A Japanese Foreign Ministry spokesman, said Mr. Murayama • 
had tot# Mr. Kiel of “his personal remonse^ about. Japanese, 
atrocities arid colonial rule in Aria during Wbdd : WarIL” 





.'I -msata. 


Bhutto Rival Defends Nuclear Report 


'ISLAMABAD, Pakistan (AP) — The predecessor of Prime. 
Minister Benazir Bhutto said he had. announced this week that 
Pakistan had a unclear bomb in order to prevent Miss. Bhutto ! 


frefo rolling back the country’s atomic program. 

_ P/vr Trv»r femft Minister Nawaz Sharif, who now heads the main ' 
opposition party, marked the latest nuclear controversy with his • 
assertion, on Tuesday. La ah interview with Pakistani journalists - 
published Thursday, in several ncrivspapera^ Mr. Sharif saidJte 1 

TTTcaiif^TYg to India. “Prhra Mm<rterBenazirBhiitre was * 

about to compromise on the nuclear program,” he said. 

Miss Bhutto’s government, however^ said Pakistan had no plans 1 
to alter its midear program* winch is extrem^popular among the . 
country's political and military leaders- Pakistan has the ability to •' 
make. a bomb, but does not pferi- to do so, officials said m 
restatement of a long-standing pdEcy. 



Chri* Hdjreu/Raaca 

ACROSS THE WIRE — A group of Bosnian refugees wanting at a Unified Nations checkpoint Thursday where they 
ht^ied to cross into Croatia from Serb-held territory. About 23,000 have fled fbflowing heavy fighting m Dilute. 


Inability to Solve Bombing Embarrasses Argentina 


By Calvin Sims 

New Yak Tima Service 

BUENOS AIRES — Despite announcements two 
weeks ago that Argentina had evidence linking Iranian 
diplomats to the bombing of a Jewish community 
center here on July 18, the government is still far from 
knowing who carried out the attack and may never 
resolve the case, Argentine officials say. The bombing 
killed 100 people and wounded scores of others. 

The officials, who are familiar with the govern- 
ment’s investigation of the bombing, said in recent 
interviews that the case against the Iranian diplomats 
was very thin, based mainly on circumstantial evi- 
dence provided by an Iranian dissident whose credibil- 
itywas uncertain. 

There is a mowing sentiment in the administration 
of President Carlos Saiil Menem that the government 
has mishandled the case by publicly endorsing such 
flimsy evidence and threatening to sever diplomatic 
ties with Iran and expel its ambassador based solely on 
unsubstantiated information, the officials said. 

“We have looked pretty silly and naive in recent 
weeks,” a senior government official said. “It’s awful 


to raise expectations and make people believe things facts woe m. Foreign Minister Guido Di Telia said in 


that are later revealed as uhproveru That destroys an interview thathe bdieved Judge Galfeado had acted 

rrMliKililv '.!■ r^ CT innoWii’m iconno Iha i nn front frhr fVu>flnwt 


credibility. :l- 

H 1 was astonished by the way bright, learned offi- 
cials have acted throughout this whole affair,” the 
official continued. “They acted as if they didn't realize 
the world was watching us and judging us to see how 
we would handle this.” 

The government's chief investigator in the bombing. 


Judge Juan Jos6 Galeano, has dropped out of the 
spotlight and has refused requests for interviews after 


and has refused requests for interviews after meat came under pressure from Jewish 


issuing the arrest warrant for four Iranian diplomats 
whom the dissident identified as being involved in 
other terrorist activities, including the bombing of the 
Israeli Embassy here in 1992. 

Iran has said that none of the four were in Argentina 


responsibly M issuing the warrant for the arrest of 'tire 
Iranians based on the information available at the 
tune. 

“There was a tremendous ptrblicjuessure to find the 
culprits and a lot of overentbusiasm that the first 
investigations were leading somewhere,” Mr. Di Telia 
said. 

Indeed, after the bombing, the Argentine govern- 
ment came under pressure from Jewish groups here to 


ROYAL OAK, Michigan (AP) —Arnan who had been waiting 
yens for a heart transplant, fmafly got One — from his own - 
daughter, who was ItiHeq idacar wreck. 

Chester Sznber received the hear t Monday from his 22-year-old • 
daughter, Patti, officiate s!- William Beaumont Hospital said; 
Thursday. She was killed: frx a traffic accident in Knoxville, V 
Tennessee. .#£>•:• . 

Mr. Szuber, 58, had betcrou a heart transplant waiting list far ! 
neady four years, the hospital said in a statement 


IfflSigV- — \ ‘ 

ter!- — * ; 


I czzsz i- • 


For the Record 


<= zr. 


exhaust all possibilities in mvestigatrng.tbe blast and 
to prevent future acts id terrorism. 

The 1992 bombing of the Israeli Embassy here, in 


in investigating, the blast and 


which 29 people were ItiQed, was never resolved 
Meanwhile; Argentina remains on a state of alert 


A member of Algemfr National Tranritian Council died rif- 
wounds suffered in an attaidc at hu home in an Islamic fundamen- ; 
tahri stronghold east Of Algjferst security services said Thozs- . 
day. Kaci Abdallah Mbhartirned,<P, had been shot the day before 
mBenzerga. . r (AFP)'. 

JMdboats and heficoptos safely evacuated passengers and crew • 
meanbers from a ferry that caught fire Thursday in the English ! 
Channel, officials of the ferry operator said Sally Line Ltd said - 
there were 104 crew members arid 17 passengers aboard the ferry, ; 
SaHy Star, when the fire broke out in the engine room. (AP) ■ 


CS.-T-i. 




i . , 


}: 32<tsr 




at the time of the bombing, an assertion Arge n ti n a h as that began two weeks ago after the United States and 

j: a r t— — t 1 - r j T. .1 « a - » 


not disputed Furthermore, Iranian officials have ac- Israel inframed the government that they had infor- 


ensed the United States and Israel, whose intelligence mation indicating another bomb attack was likely. 


a g en c ies helped Argentina in its investigation, of While there are fewer police officers on street ora- 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


pressing the Menem government to link the bombing ners now than there were a week or so 


to Iran. 


and Jewish schools are still 


Asked if the government bad acted before all the policemen and guard dogs. 


New Lufthansa j 

PARIS (Bloomberg) — Lufthansa German Airlines un veiled a ' 


A as a**:’- .i; 


W, Lilw kMUUl liUWUl- 

Zedillo Pulls In Just Over 50% of Mexican Vote 


By Anthony DePalma 

New Yak Tima Service 

MEXICO CITY — With the 
official vote count nearly com- 
plete, Ernesto Zedillo Ponce de 


Le6n has slightly increased his Mr. Zedillo’s closest rival, many precautions and it didn’t 
sizable lead in Mexico's preri- Diego Fernandez de Cevallos of happen,” he said He added 
dential election. the rieht-of-<center National that he had “indications of 


ask the butter... 




Vhn urrei >i r*nf ;n wa.l il I • i». 


%a wty?4 JfyuHodl &vl 


Also, Mexican ejection offi- 
cials revealed that they had un- 
covered plans to sabotage the 
computers used to tabulate 
votes. 

With more than 88 percent of 
the estimated 36 million hand- 
marked ballots from Sunday’s 
election counted Mr. Zedillo 
had 50.08 percent of the vote. It 
was not clear whether the final 
percentages would push his to- 
tal over the 50.47 percent that 
Carlos Safinas de Gortari re- 
ceived in 1988 in what was the 


the right-of -“center National that he had “indications of 
Action Party, had garnered 26.8 those who possibly were re- 


Party in India 
Calls Strike in 
Aide’s Slaying 


tniwi isiuumoExgj — Juoiuiansa t ur man Airimr s unveiled a • JT? w, 
new, law-cost service on Thursday with a simplified fare structure. a v'-i ^ * ' 

The service, initially available on six routes within Germany, is to ' • - 

V. fmandrH latM tlw oirlm, unM * ' - - 


be expanded later, the airline said 
Five of the six routes are ones on which the German subsidiary 
of British Airways, Deutsche BA, competes. Deutsche BA, antici- 
pating the new Lufthansa service, announced fare cuts several- 


percent of the vote so far. 

On Wednesday morning, the 
head of the Federal Electoral 
Institute, Jorge Carpizo 
McGregor, said officials bad 
found out about plans to intro- 
duce a virus into the institute's 
main computer that would have 
thrown ine counting process 
into disarray. That would have 
been a discomforting echo of 
1988, when the computer sys- 
tem broke down. 

Mr. Carpizo, who is also sec- 


sponsihte,” but he did not re- 
the veal who they might be. He said 
>ral that the matter would be inves- 
izo tigated and that those responsi- 
jad me would be prosecuted 


New Foreign Minister 
Appointed in Ukraine 

Ream 


&>. 1911 - PARIS 

THE OLDEST COCKTAIL BAR IN EUROPE ~ 
Just tell the taxi driver, " Sank roo doe mo" 
PARIS: 5, rue Daunou 
BERLIN : Grand Hotd Esplanade 
HAMBOUR& Btefchenhof 


Carlos Safinas de Gortari re- tern broke down. KIEV — President Leonid 

caved in 1988 in what was the Mr. Carpizo, who is also sec- Kuchma of Ukraine has ap- 
Iowest-ever turnout fra the rul- retary of the Interior Minis try. pointed Hennady Udovenko as 
ing Institutional Revolutionary did not explain how the plan ms acting foreign minister, rc- 
Party, ra PRL since it gained would have worked or who was placmg Anaum Zleuko, offi- 
ihe presidency in 1929. responrible. He said only that dak in thw gtichma admrni'K tTa- 

Excceding 50 percent also Ire had received indications that tion said Thursday, 
should enable Mr. Zedillo to someone had wanted to use a A decree signed by Mr. 


the presidency in 1929. 

Exceeding 50 perc en t also 
should enable Mr. Zedillo to 
avoid the problem of being 
branded a president elected by 
I a minority of the voters. 


decree signed by Mr. 


virus “to disconnect the whole Kuchma, who was on vacation 


system. 


in Crimea, said Mr. Zlenko was 


Tor this reason we took being shifted to another job. 


Ream 

BOMBAY — India’s 
rightist Hindu opposition 
Bharatiya Janata Party 
called Thursday for a gen- 
eral strike in Bombay car 
Friday after the assassina- 
tion. ra a local party leader. 

The local party leader, 
Ramdas Nayak, was shot 
and killed in a western sub- 
urb by two men on a mo- 
torbike who riddled his car 
with an assault rifle, the po- 
lice said. Mr. Nayak’s 
bodyguard was also killed 
in the attack, and his driver 
and two passers-by were 
wounded. 

The slaying touched off 
fears of a violent baddash 
from party supporters in 
the dty of 12 rmUion peo- 
ple. 


I he Lufthansa service, called Express, is scheduled to begin oi 
Sept. L It offers rare-way feres of 299 Deutsche marks (S193) for - m 
economy class and 369 DM fra business das. The routes are' P kv* 1 

Munich-Hamburg, Mumch-Beriin, Mrmreh-Dflsseldmf, Munich- 4 

Cologne/ Bairn, Beriin-DOsscldorf, and Berim-Cologne/Bonn .' ± Slu. m 
There will also be a 99 DM economy-class fare.al off-times. I* ' WHGEJllrai 
-Sabena Belgian World Airfares -said iLwould resume flights to! 


■ oetgian w«uw AUfines sard iLwould resume to ; 

the Rwandan capital, KigaE, on Sept Z The airihre said it would 
^ially operate a weekly * a 194-seat DC-10, and would - 


service to Rwanda in April (Reuters)' 

4 partial trifle bn in Athens w31 be continued Friday to- 
raffia* ponnnon during a heat wave, the Environment Ministry; 
stud. Cara and texts whose ! license, plates end with an odd number. 
wdl be ba nned from the city center from 7 AM. to 3 PM: 
m^reratures me expected to rise to more than 40 degrees! 
centigrade (H)4 F ahrenheit) for the second day in a row. (AFP)- 
A rash of storms from northern to southern Italy knocked down 
treesand caused other damage Wednesday night and Thursdays 
was cut m parts of Ronre. Mleast two deaths! 
and injuries to 16 people were attributed to the bad weather. (AP)- 

i "■* S“ J?®* 51 J*? 1 *”*■ St x betweea tl» 

UndedStal« and otirer oountrres. Some 92-5 million passengers* 
pecoau from 1992, the TransportatiCHLDepartinenL (AP)- 




Sfvi 1 " r : . - 





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■ *tV. 


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--:. >. 

J * *..■ s 

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By(&smVNfcbnbr . :l 

. liar fork Timet Saybx 

NEW YORK^—Tp natron's? laig- 

Roman Ga&obctiurc^ J^adsjisdf Qf 
two . min^s; ; when , a it £ j06jn« Ho new 
bealtiw^legidirioi ;V ' ;. 

' It dcspCTateJy wanis universal cover- 

that many legislators 
on inducing: guaiajrte^rxj^^ 
abortion:' ’*?'• ; ; 

As a result, the chuxch finds itsdtf 
pursumg a lobbying strategy that is at 
the least exceptionally oanpEcated 
and at the' worn paradoxical.. 

■ In dioceses across .tbe^coontry. 
Catholic leaders are u&ng tefepboae 
callsi postcards _taidper$o^;visit$_to 
Congress to make the twOijwouged ar- 
gument that has been sunroaed up in a 
flier inserted in ovier 

the last month. . - . ....... 


Away: 


"We can have health-care reform 
that does pot include abortion cover- 
' age hod tfaatdoes provide coverage for 
M^ itsays. '. ; 

public pducy ‘Sim, -flte United States 
Catholic Conference, in eludes the 
Capitol HOI switchboard number. 

to & speech, in Washington in May, 
Cardinal Joseph Bemarttin of Chicago 
declared passrcaiaiGly dun “Justice and 
die common ^obd” demanded a tbor- 
f%wgh~p»stetetBring of health care, but 
he added that “insistence on abortion 
coverage wiB. turn, millions of advo- 
cates of refoeni into adversaries of 
healfb-caie k^sltlioa.’’ 

: Most of. proposals before Con- 
gress now ipdnde a requiremeaii that 
Americans^ offered a standard pack- 
age' oi beneflis’includixig “pregnancy- 
. related services," a phrase widely tak- 
en. t,o include abortion. But this 


a Complicated Health Strategy 


provision is certain to provoke latter 
debate if and when the House and 
Senate begin serious efforts to pass 
legislation. 

The church's opposition to abortion 
is, of course, weD known. But to grasp 
tiie bishops’ position, one must under- 
stand that the Catholic stake in health 
care is institutional. 

As the largest private health-care 
provider in the United States, the 
Catholic Church accounts for about 
one of every six hospital beds. 
Through various dioceses and religions 
orders, the church operates S66 hospi- 
tals. many of them founded by congre- 
gations of nuns. They have a dispro- 
portionately lazge stake in the quest 
for universal coverage, as they treat 
large numbers of tbe poor and unin- 
sured. 

The hospitals have already been 
struggling to preserve that sense of 


charitable mission in the face of (he 
market forces sow reshaping the medi- 
cal system. Further complicating mat- 
ters, many institutions are in the midst. 
of a generational handover, as a dwin- 
dling cadre of nuns toms over control 
to lay administrators. 

The bishops as a body have been on 
record supporting some form of uni- 
versal access to health care since 1919, 
when they declared that “the stale 
should make comprehensive provision 
for insurance against illness, invalid- 
ity, unemployment and old age." 

But the Democratic bills now before 
Congress, which would move tbe na- 
tion much closer to that goal, all in- 
dude abortion coverage. 

The bills, however, all indude a 
“provider conscience clause,” intend- 
ed to allow hospitals and doctors to 
refuse to perform abortions. 

The bishops have said this does not 


assuage their concerns, because Catho- 
lics would still have to pay into insur- 
ance plans that cover abortion, and 
Catholic hospitals could not ethically 
join the networks of insurers, doctors 
and hospitals. 

Market forces are already promot- 
ing the formation of these networks, 
but they might become even more 
widespread under some of the health 
proposals under consideration. 

That means being left out could 
prove a finan cia l disaster, the bishops 
argued in a recent letter sent to all 
members of Congress. 

“Because they could nor agree to 
coordinate access to abortions or solic- 
it abortion providers to join their net- 
work, Catholic facilities could be effec- 
tively barred from leading such 
provider networks," their letter said. 
“Many Catholic institutions simply 
may not survive in such a situation." 


North Within Spitting Range of Senate ? 


= v- \ti 



w -t 


— A_ • . 1 ~_ 

s -: 


i'ii 





NO PARKING^ — A car submerged fa a Chicago 
apartment-complex swinaming pool after it plowed 
through a fence: The driver, 86, was rescued. 

• Lawyers for die Nstkaud Assodatiou for the Advancement 
of Colored People and for the group’s former . executive 
director, BeqjammF. Chavis Jr* agreed to discuss an out-of- 
court settlement after a judge ; -rejected Mr. Chavis's bid for 
remstatement-. L .' r : .»• 

Disease CmcroTandPlreventi<mm Atlanta to make a 


By Richard L. Beike 

New Tort Tunes Sorter 

RICHMOND, Virginia — As a call-in 
show host in Richmond egged him on 
before a live radio audience, the candidate 
for the US. Senate swigged a cup of water, 
then squirted it between the gap in his 
front teeth high into the air, hitting a target 
nearly 10 feet away. 

“Bull’s eyei Dead on!” said Oliver L. 
North, the former Marine lieutenant colo- 
nel, who still likes to prove he has that can- 
do spirit. 

After months of dismissive »tt«rk» from 
pundits and fellow Republicans, Mr. 
North is finally having a good time run- 
ning for the Senate from Viigmia, and with 
good reason. 

Perhaps because his detractors recog- 
nize they can do only so much to stop Mr. 
North now that he lias his party's nomina- 
tion and the criticism has subsided over his 
role in the Iran-contra scandal and his 
citation for contempt of Congress. 

Mr. North is widely viewed as ooming 
on strongest among the four candidates in 
this highly unusual race. 

He has pulled even with. Senator Charles 
S. Robb m the polls, with each getting 
about 30 percent, and is well ahead of the 
two independent contenders, former Gov- 
ernor L. Douglas Wilder and former State 
Attorney General J. Marshall Coleman. 

Moreover, Mr. North had, by the end of 


+ POLITICAL NOTES * 


Clinton Decides to Be Seen, Not Heard 


WASHINGTON — Waves of Cubans were fleeing to 
Florida, his health and crime bills were barely dodging doom, 
but the only question President Bill Clinton would touch at 
his riiual morning jog earlier this week had to do with the 
injured Achilles* tendon of Vice President A! Gore. 

"He's belter." Mr. Clinton allowed grudgingly — then 
clammed up tight. 

In a month of stunning surprises from Washington, this 
one surely ranks among them: Mr. Clinton, maybe the 
chattiest man ever to occupy the Oval Office, is suddenly 
rationing his conversation like Cabin (Silent Cal) Coolidge. 

In the Iasi two weeks, he has had none of the photo 
opportunities that he has long used for run-on lectures on 
topics from the federal deficit to defense conversion. He has 
taken reporters' questions on only two occasions, and is 
threatening to hold to the new tack indefinitely. 

Urging the new policy was his new chief of staff. Leon E. 
Panetta, who. adopting a view long held by the Washington 
punditocracy. argued that Mr. Clinton has been talking too 
much. The common view at the White House is now that Mr. 
Clinton needs to save his wind. 

The new. more coy Clinton has had a very real impact on 
the network television correspondents, who like to have fresh 
footage of the president — preferably answering one of their 
questions — every’ day. Now they are resorting to shots of the 
president ignoring them. 


June, raised $8.6 million in campaign con- 
tributions, as against $2Ji million by Mr. 
Robb, a Democrat. He has been by far tbe 
most viable of the candidates, both is bis 
television advertising and in appearances 
across the state. 

And since winning the Republican 
nomination in June, Mr. North has picked 
up the support of established party mem- 
bers like former Senator Paul Laxalt of 
Nevada and former Attorney General Ed- 
win Meese 3d, who had beat among ins 
most outspoken critics earlier. 

Some even venture to say that Mr. 
North is now the man to beat. 

Marie J. Resell, a political science pro- 
fessor at Mary Washington College in Fre- 
dericksburg, Virginia, who was once skep- 
tical of Mr. North’s appeal, is one of many 
analysts who have revised their views. 

“1 can say with a great deal of confi- 
dence there is one candidate who win not 
fade by Election Day, and that is Oliver 
North,” he said. “He has the most commit- 
ted, fervent following, and the best grass- 
roots campaign. And he’s getting the most 
media coverage because he’s setting the 
agenda for tbe campaign, defining himself 
and his opponents.” 

Mr. North, SO, who has vowed to retire 
to tbe Virginia countryside if dected’to 
two terms, is trying to do some image 
building. He wants to be liked. 

As he told an audience Wednesday: “At 
the end of my two terms in the U.S. Senate, 


I want the people of Virginia to think of 
me as an old shoe, very comfortable to be 


very comfortable to be ) It Has Been an Expensive Nonvacation 


me as an 
with.” 


Mr. North is a passionate speaker, talk- 
ing of issues like the ravages of crime, and 
he lingers after events, looking for more 
hands to shake. He does not come off as a 
cocky Marine who won prominence after 
shreddin g documents about the secret sup- 
ply operation he ran for tbe Nicaraguan 
contras against the demand of Congress. 

“Oliva North is not the demon they 
created,” Mr. North told his radio audi- 
ence as he picked on one of his favorite 
targets, the press. “He’s a good father. He’s 
a h uman bong. It’s hard, sometimes, to gei 
that message across.” 

Mr. North's biggest challenge is still to 
get that message across, to wm over the 
people who do not believe that someone 
convicted of three felony counts — ob- 
struction of Congress, destroying docu- 
ments and accepting an illegal gift — 
should sit in the Senate, even though tbe 
convictions were thrown out on appeal. 

“This is a kamikaze candidacy,” said 
Stuart Stevens, a Republican media strate- 
gist “The only way this guy can win is if he 
goes on camera and explains why he was 
convicted of a felony. But he continues to 
ignore it as if it didn’t happen, as if he were 
some sort of Shenandoah populist who 
emerged from a military background to 
run against the system." 


WASHINGTON — President Bill Clinton and his family 
are still stuck in the capital, where they can only dream about 
their postponed beach vacation on Martha's Vineyard. But 
taxpayers have already begun to foot the bill. 

Since Monday, when the Clintons had planned to hole up 
on the Massachusetts island, the tab has quietly been running 
for dozens of rooms and residences rented for presidential 
aides, military technicians and Secret Service agents. 

Lodging space is so scarce at the height of the summer 
season, aides to Mr. Clinton say. that the White House had 
no choice but to make its best guess about when Congress 
might wrap up business and then agree to pay for the rooms 
whether they were used or not. But having gambled and lost, 
the costs to the White House, and thus to taxpayers, are 
mounting. 


An Early Exit From Presidential Race 


WASHINGTON — At a time when most Republican 
hopefuls are still weighing whether to run for president, one 
of them. William J. Bennett, has announced that he will not 
join the race. 

Mr. Bennett, a former education secretary and drug policy 
director, cited family and professional reasons on Wednesday 
for not seeking the' Republican nomination, leaving up for 
grabs the religious conservatives who have been his biggest 
supporters. 


Quote/Unquote 


Senator Byron L. Dorgan, Democrat of North Dakota, on 
the politicking over the crime bill: "This debate is like a 
migraine headache: It goes on and on and on.” ( li’Pl 


i-xe •. xrc s 

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entiy violated umveEaty safety lulesby failing to report a spill 
of the urns in the lab and by moving about in the general 
public until Aug. 19, potentiaUy - exposiiig as many as 80 
. people to tins virus,¥alc officials said. No secondary infec- 
tions Jfitye, been detected.,. ’ t J 

•iWemapatakes company P iA H a boV Clearing House has 
agreed with 14 states, to clarify its contest makings, after 
recipients complained about official-looking notices that 
seemed to label everyone a “finalist” dr dedared their ^eligibil- 
ity for a “final rouxvL’*-Pabtbher , 8 Clearing House agreed to 
pay the state* $490,OOQto^reirnbur8e them for their two-year 
investigation. Tbe agreement was arnirementi between the 
c om p an y and Arizona, California, Connecticut; Honda, Ida- 
ho, IHmou> Kentucky, Minnesota, Missouri, New Mexico, 
NewYork,Wi&consin. Tennessee and Texas. 

• Neariy l^MO people wore evacuated as a hurricane, desig- 
nated John, approached Johnston Island, a U.S.-heM Pacific 
island that contains a drearies! weapons incinerator. 

' - • l - - . WP. yTt, AF. Reuters 


Italian Tourists 
Shot in Florida 

The Astodaud Pna 

: l&SSXMMEE, Florida-'— -An 
Italian ample visiting the Unit- . 
ed States was shot several times 
in a robbery attempt in central 
Florida, the police say. 

The man was in critical con- 
dition Thursday at Orlando Re- 
gional Medical Center, while 
the woman was listed is stable 
condition, a nursing supervisor 
said. The couple, in their late 
30s, asked not to be identified. 

The police said tbe couple 
were walking on a sidewalk 
when two men began following 
them, A third was waiting 
in a car across the street The 
two men forced the couple to- 
ward the car and a struggle en- 
sued. Witnesses told the police 
that they heard gunshots, then 
saw the car speed away. The 
victims were found lying on the 
pavement - 


’65 Test Sent Radioactive Cloud Over Los Angeles 


By Melissa Healy 

. Leu Angela Times Serrict 

WASHINGTON —A feder- 
al -agency’s- test of a nuclear- 
powered rocket in 1965 pro- 
duced a radioactive cloud that 
drifted over Los Angeles before 
dissipating over the Pacific 
Ocean, according to a lawmak- 
er who say the area’s 6 million 
residents were used as human 
guinea pigs in the experiment 
Citing documents recently 
made public by the Energy De- 
partment, Representative Ed- 
ward J. Markey, Democrat of 
.Massachusetts, said the radio- 
active cloud of nuclear material 
was a result of an “intentional 
accident” designed to monitor 
the effects of a malfunction 
aboard the rocket 


Although radioactivity levels 
were low and unlikely to have 
caused Alnesses, Mr. Markey 
said, “an intentional reactor ac- 
cident releasing a radioactive 
cloud should not be considered 
prudent public policy.” 

A panel of scientists and ethi- 
dsts commissioned by Energy 
Secretary Hazel R. O’Leary is 
investigating a range of radia- 
tion experiments involving hu- 
mans between 1945 and the late 
1970s. Tbe panel is expected to 
recommend compensation and 
medical follow-up for victims. 

In a letter to Mrs. O’Leary, 
Mr. Markey urged the secretary 
to refer the rocket test to the 
investigating panel for consid- 
eration as anuman experiment 
If tbe panel accepts the experi- 


ment as an episode of human 
experimentation, Los Angeles 
residents who can demonstrate 
that they were affected by the 
test could be eligible for some 


compensation. 

The test was conducted by 
the Atomic Energy Commis- 
sion, a predecessor of the Ener- 
gy Department, with the assis- 
tance of tbe U.S. Public Health 
Service and a private contrac- 
tor. It took place on Jan. 12. 


1965, and was what scientists 
called a “controlled excursion.” 

The rocket took off from a 
Nevada test site and burned off 
part of its radioactive core in a 
spectacle that scientists said 
“resembled a Roman candle.” 

Winds pushed the resulting 
cloud of radioactive debris 
southwest over Death Valley, 
and then onward over “the Los 
Angeles area,” according to the 
documents. 


Russian Submarines Reappear in Atlantic 


REYKJAVIK — Russian 
submarines have reappeared on 
patrol in the North Atlantic af- 
ter an absence of two years, 
Icelandic officials said. 


The officials said the subma- 
rines bad been detected “in the 
past few months” sailing west 
out of Murmansk and in inter- 
national waters. 


Royal Plaza 

MONTREIJX 


landing stage. 

Y' Ttoontygnid ; 
fatal ri$it oft the shore 
-. of Late Geneva. ; 

1820 MONTREUX ■ SWITZERLAND 
TltL. 41-21/9635131 
FAX 41-21/963 5637 


TENDER NOTICE 

MANAGED LEASED UNE NETWORK IN HUNGARY 


TH£CeMMUNICATI(2«^riD; $flt) now invites sealed bids for the 


i*jr. i m Isa i ij - N 


The MLLN, scheduled to be executed in I995-96; wffl be a new, country-wide, digital, centrally 
managed overlay network to fulfill HTC's business customers' leased line demands for their 
corporate networks. The MLLN will operate on HTC's existing digital transmission (PDH) 
infrastructure through El and qxtkirB^ Birtaffeces. ; 

Planned service feafures of the overiay network are: ; 

- End-to-end managed digital leased Brie sendees from nib-rate to super-rate transparent data 
speeflSfirariied EO, EL and fractional EL services, analogue voice transmission with signalling. 

- The above range afservices shall be extended in the near future with frame relay, ATMaccess, 






- voice; video ai^inultiHnedHappl^^ . 

Bidders are required to offer fufiy integrated system-solutions, based on a single Network 
Management Systenyl/O DXC's, flexible multiplexers and local loop driving and terminating 
equipment The complete MLLN project will include 54 nodes country-side and 26 nodes in 
Budacetf by tfc'endbf 1996, of ^ wWeh 19 and 6 nodes, respectively, shall be established by the end 

Interested companies mid consortia, who have the capability to complete this project may msped 
the Tender Document and may ptfrdtase them from MSeptember, 1994 at the following addres: 


Interested companies mid consortia, who have the capability to complete this project may mspea 
the Tend^ Documents and may ptindwse them from 1st September, 1994 at the following address: 

INTELTRADB CO. LTD. 

Ms. M&xta Gabrieli a T6th, Sales Executive 
Budapest U; Medve utea 25-29., 1027 Hungary 
Tel j(+ 36-1) 201-0054 
Fax: (+36-1) 20fr0017oi 201-0008 

upon payment of a.non-rriiindaNe fee of USD 400 (domestic companies shall pay 
&tKes shall be made to fee account # 21748931 /2949408 kept by Intdtiade Co. Ud. with 

’Cf Tinder IT-2D4/TMG 

Hie tender d oemne nfe wffl be available upon presentation of the receipt of the effected renuKance. 
Bidder may ask for mailing the Tender Documaib to.hfe address, if he sends the above receipt to 
Intdtrade and und«fakes fo petite noifag costs- 

Bids shall be delivered toflie above addressnot later than UtiO ajn. on 1st November,199t 
All bids shall be acccanpaniedfry a bid security of not less than 300,000 DSDor its eqirivafentinany 
freriyconvertMecunmcy.^ • 

Only those bidders wffl proceed to the. evaluation of flier bids who meet the postqualification 
criteria which© sfipubteain the Tender Documents. -- 





ARGENTINE REPUBLIC 

GOVERNMENT OF THE PROVINCE OF SANTA FE 
MINISTRY OF WORKS, PUBUC SERVICES AND LODGING, PROVINCIAL DEPARTMENT OF ROAD SYSTEMS, 
PROGRAM FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE ROAD SYSTEM FOR THE PROVINCE OF SANTA FE 
KUWAIT FUND FOR ARAB ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 

PUBUC INTERNATIONAL BIDS FOR CONTRACTING THE EXECUTION OF WORKS 


** V,” v; 


Official Budget $ 9,492,690 
Term of execution: 18 months 
Price of the Bid Document $ 3,000 
Opening: October 6, 1994 
Time: 1 1 AM. 

Place for the Reception and Opening of the tenders: COMUNA San 
Martin de las Escobas (Santa Fe Province) until the day and time set 
for said act 


_ -- --m. ' v v , , »- _ .. • i 


Official Budget $ 7,923,000 
Term of execution: 12 months 
Price of the Bid Document $ 2,600 
Opening: October 11.1 994 
Time: 11 AM. 

Place for the Reception and Opening of the tenders: COMUNA Villa 
Mugueta (Santa Fe Province) until the day and time set for said act 


Official Budget $ 11,079,392 
Term of execution: 15 months 
Price of the Bid Document $ 3,600 
Opening: October 4, 1994 
Time: 11 AM. 

Place for the Reception and Opening of the tenders: COMUNA 
DE VILA (Santa Fe Province) at the place and time set for said act 



Official Budget $ 4,398.370 
Term of execution: 1 0 months 
Price of the Bid Document S 1 ,450 
Opening: October 7, 1 994 
Time: 11 AM. 

Place for the Reception and Opening of the tenders: COMUNA 
SOLDINI (Santa Fe Province) on the day and time set for said act 



Official Budget $ 3,269,000 
Term of exertion: 12 months 
Price of the Bid Document $ 1,100 
Opening: October 14. 1994 
Time: 11 AM. 

Place for the Reception and Opening of the tenders: 
COMUNA GOBERNADOR CRESPO (Santa Fe Province) 
until the day and time set for said act 




Next Bids for the Program 

• Provincial Road N°91 , section: Bustinza - Totoras 

• Sanla Fe Circunvallation Avenue, section; Highway AP-01 National 
Road N° 11 (North). 

• Provincial Road N° 39, stretch: San Javier- National Road N“ 11, 
section: San Javier - Arroyo Safedilta Amargo. 

■ Provincial Road N* 39 - stretch; San Cristobal - Crespo, section: 
San Cristobal - Km 25+000 

• Provincial Road N° 39 - stretch: San Cristobal - Crespo, section: 
Km 25+000 - Rio Salado. 


















Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 26, 1994 


U.S. Policy on Cuba: 
Castro Holds the Key 

But Neither Havana Nor the Refugees 
Seem Ready to Help Solve the Crisis 


By Daniel Williams 

Washington Past SariCc 

WASHINGTON — Clinton 
administration policy toward 
Cuba is adrift, and rescue for 
Washington is up to the unpre- 
dictable Fidel Castro and thou- 
sands of potential refugees. 

The administration's radical 
shifts on treatment of refugees, 
undertaken largely to calm do- 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

mestic immigration fears, have 
overturned policies toward 
Cuba built up over decades. 

But the refugees keep com- 
ing. and the White House has 
outlined no clear strategy for 
where to head next Its best bet, 
analysts say, is to persuade Mr. 
Castro himself to block the ref- 
ugees from leaving, but the 
United States has little leverage 
to pressure him to do so. 

In the meantime, the admin- 
istration says it will hold out, 
even if it means keeping refu- 
gees locked up indefinitely. 
“We can manage the crisis for 
as long as necessary,'' said Un- 
dersecretary of State Peter Tar- 
noff. 

Washington is unwilling to 
meet Mr. Castro’s key demand, 
for talks. In fact, ignoring the 
long-standing advice of liberals 
in his own party, President Bill 
Clinton has adopted a more 
confrontational posture toward 
Cuba than his Republican pre- 
decessor. 

Talks await democratization, 
the political equivalent of ask- 
ing Mr. Castro to commit sui- 
cide. "Talks are not useful be- 
cause this is not a problem to be 
resolved between the United 
States and Cuba,** Mr. Tamoff 
said in an interview. “Castro 
most listen to what his own peo- 
ple are saying.** 

The new policy on fleeing 
Cubans is burdened with con- 
tradictious. Proclaiming loudly 
that Mr. Castro would not be 
allowed to set American immi- 
gration policy, the administra- 
tion has let him do just that. 

The current crisis began 
when Mr. Castro had local au- 
thorities aOow Cubans to set off 
on makeshift rafts and small 
boats across the 90-mile (145- 
nrile) Florida Straits. The re- 
sulting surge in refugees led Lhe 
administration to halt admit- 
tance of Cubans. 

In one sense, that represented 
a victory for Mr. Castro. He 
had long regarded easy entry 
for Cuban exiles to the United 
States as a source of instability 
in Cuba: People were always 
trying to leave. 

By letting people flee, he ba- 
sically told Washington that if 
it wants to accept Cubans indis- 
criminately, be can send over 
more than they can handle. 
They now are being sent to a 
rapidly swelling camp at the 
U.S. naval base at GnantAnamo 
Bay in southeastern Cuba. 

Mr. Castro has also demand- 
ed that the United States accept 
higher numbers of legal mi- 
grants through its office in Ha- 
vana. Attorney General Janet 
Reno said Wednesday that she 
was looking into ways of doing 
so. 

The turnabout in immigra- 
tion policy also unleashed polit- 
ical waves in Florida that led to 
a ratcheting up of economic 
and diplomatic pressure on Mr. 
Castro's government. Stung by 
complaints from rightist Cuban 
exile leaders in Miami that it 
was unfair to punish just the 
refugees, and not the govern- 
ment they fled, the administra- 
tion eliminated exile visits to 
the island and banned gifts of 
money sent from the United 
States. Both steps were meant 
to stem the flow of hard curren- 
cy into the country’s economy. 

The measures represented a 
rejection of rec omm endations 
that have been coming from 
middle-level Slate Department 
officials and some Democrats. 
They urged that Washington 
engage Mr. Castro, to avert ei- 
ther chaos surrounding his pos- 
sible downfall or just the kind 
of crisis that is under way. 

But Mr. CUn ton, timid in the 


face of congressional hard-lin- 
ers and still harboring hopes of 
electoral gain in Florida, set 
aside such proposals. Instead, 
he in effect prolonged the poli- 
cy of his predecessor, George 
Bush, holding that Mr. Castro 
would eventually fall. 

All this puts Mr. Clinton in 
the uncomfortable position of 
depending on the kindness of 
strangers. Either Mr. Castro or 
the refugees must change their 
mind. Lacking incentives from 
Washington, neither has given 
indications of doing so. 

The question of time is press- 
ing because Washington has de- 
cided to lock up Cubans at 

Guantanamo until they can be 
repatriated to Cuba. For some, 
that could be a life sentence. 

Mr. Clinton's policy was not 
driven by a contemplation of 
what to do about Cuba, offi- 
cials said, but rather by a desire 
to avoid a repeat of the 1980 
Mariel influx of refugees. When 
making his decision to reverse 
refugee policy, Mr. Clinton 
reminisced to aides about his 
experience as governor of Ar- 
kansas, when 20,000 Cubans 
were held at Fort Chafee, Ar- 
kansas, and some escaped into 
nearby neighborhoods. The in- 
cident helped cost Mr. Clinton 
his re-election. 

The memory makes him 
averse to putting any Cubans 
on U.S. territory anywhere, of- 
ficials say. 


Anti-Kim 

Movement 

Discounted 



By Steve Vogel . that, passed, the situation was 
w&mgmPm$enke deteriorating. By the time we 
KIGALI, Rwanda — When readied the. assembly points, 
oil Kagame, commander of the country was already in cha- 


Paul Kagame, commander of 
the Rwanda Patriotic Front . 

with the rank of major genera^ General Kagame dcta ““ 
heard on .April 6 that a plane move, and the force headed 
carrying lhe presidents of .south. A IarE e government 
Rwanda and Burtmdihad been force of seven battalions was 
shot down, he summoned his near .the northern , raty of 
top co mmande rs and told them Byumba, bat General Ka g ame 
to brace for trouble.' , bjP 

The unexplained plane crash The rebcb took four days to 
was followed by a murderous cover the 40 nriles to Kigali, 
campaign hy extremists of the moving entirely on root and 
majority Hum tribe within the carrying their eqprpmqrt on 
government against Rwanda’s their- backs. A second prong 
14 percent Tutsi minority. An was directed eatfward. 
estimated half -million Tutsi • Throughout the war, all the 
and moderate Hutu were id>d movements were, on fort,, 
slaughtered. In retrospect, the and they fought with mostly 
crash also was die signal lor East European weapons — re- 
reaewal of the country s qmes- portedly obtained mUganda— 
but not foreotten civil war. - as well as with howitzers, mor- 


Xdrib«iall«incMiH»BC Fwct P t tnc 

Soon- to-be Cuban refugees tossing coins into the ocean. They are as k ing their goddess of the sea for safe passage. 

CUBA: yls Exodus Continue s, U.S. Rebuffi Castro on Refugee Negotiations 


crash also was the s 
renewal of the countr 
cent but not forgotten 


Continued bum Page 1 

States as well as us," said Mr. Castro, who 
took power in 1959. 

The Cuban leader said the main factors - 
fueling the exodus were the embargo and 
Washington's failure to allow in more Cu- 
bans who apply for visas in Havana. 

President Clinton pulled the welcome 
mat from under Cuban refugees a week 
ago, but more than 10,000 have flooded 
out of Cuba since that announcement 

The Coast Guard said 476 Cubans were 
picked up before dawn Thursday in the 
Florida Straits. 


Pentagon officials estimated Thursday 
how much it would cost American taxpay- 
ers to tens of thousands of Cubans 
and Haitian refugees at the Gua ntanam o 
Bay Naval Base in Cuba. They said it 
would cost SI 00 million to prepare the 
base to hold 45,000 refugees, and $20 mil- 


the responsibility for the crisis in Cuba at 
the foot of the United States.*' 

“We amply reject that premise,” he 
said, “andmat is the reason that wc do not 
believe it is useful to have a dialogue with 
Castro.” 

In turning down such talks, the adminis- 


lion a month to feed and shelter them. In turnmg drtvn sued tancs, me aonmis- 37 now Rwanda’s vice aims embargo put in place in 

Mr. Tamoff, who has been the State ttmon *1 Mlowmg the , Sent JSdrf^Ssteri- May, - ; , * . - 

Department’s chief voice on Cuba with by the <^ban-AiDen^a Na^ial Fotu- obscurity into The rebels scored a key early 

Secretary of State Warren M. Christopher datzon, the nati on s meet OAut- unitary history. • victory: Despite heavy assaults 


Secretary of State Warren M. Christopher dation, the nation’s most powerful Cuban- 
on vacation, had a harsh reaction to Mr. American organization, which favors a 
Castro’s speech, saying, “Once again, there worldwide economic embargo of Cuba 
was an attempt by the Cuban leader to lay rather than negotiations. 


modem militaiy history. victory: Despite heavy assaults 

In little more, than three bygavwaeat troops, the out- 
months, his Tutsi-led force do- numbered rebel battahon mKi- 


SENATE: Democrats Succeed in Winning Vote to Advance Crime Bill 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

SEOUL — A leaflet attack- 
ing North Korea’s leader-desig- 
nate, Kim Jong fl, seems to be 
the work of disgruntled individ- 
uals rather than a power group, 
officials in South Korea said 
Thursday. 

A senior presidential official 
said there were no indications 
that Mr. Kim had had any 
problem succeeding his late fa- 
ther, President Kim H Sung. 

Western diplomats con- 
firmed that leaflets against Mr. 
Kim had been scattered at sev- 
eral embassies in Pyongyang 
last weekend. 

The leaflets, whose full con- 
tents are not yet known, con- 
tained a passage asserting, "No 
hereditary succession of power 
can be permitted in a socialist 
country.’' 

Such criticism may have 
come from supporters of ortho- 
dox Marxism-leninism rather 
than the so-called self-reliance 
ideology of the late president. 

Some defectors from the 
North, kept in the custody of 
intelligence authorities before 
bring presented to the public 
hare, have said students scat- 
tered subversive leaflets. 

Mr. Kim, 52, was groomed 
for more than two decades as 
his father’s successor and con- 
tinues to be hailed as such by 
Pyongyang's official media. 

But he still has not been con- 
firmed in key positions his fa- 
ther held until his death July 8 . 
These are state president, gen- 
eral secretary of the Korea 
Workers' Party and bead of the 
party's military commission. 

Meanwhile, the Seoul Broad- 
casting System quoted an un- 
identified senior government 
official as saying that Pyong- 
yang had stepped up ideology 
education among its cadres. 

“This is an indication that 
after Kim's death, ideological 
confusion in the North is more 
serious than previously 
known," the official was quoted 
as saying. 

Meanwhile, a Japanese 
Olympic Committee official on 
Thursday said he had been told 
that North Korea was with- 
drawing as host of next year's 
East Asian Games. 

{AFP, Reuters) 


Continued from Page 1 

a barnyard, all ri gh t!" he shouted, and 
lilfwifri opposition arguments to manure. 

On health care, the news for Mr. Clinton 
was not as sweet The decision to send the 
Senate home appeared to reflect a growing 
reality: After months of public debate and 
private negotiations, no real progress has 
been made to bridge the gap between those 
who. like the president favor firm steps 
toward universal coverage and those who 
do not including many Republicans. 

The House has already adjourned until 
after the Labor Day holiday Sept 5. and 
the Democratic leader of that body. Thom- 


as S. Foley of Washington, has said he is 
willing to consider a very narrow health- 
insurance bill rather than pressing for Mr. 
din ton’s broader package. 

Senate Democratic leaders cautioned 
that the time off would be used to continue 
negotiati ons among key Democratic and 
Republican senators, and an optimistic 
White House official declared Thursday: 
“1 don't think going home is going to be 
the death knell of health care.” 

Mr. Clinton's chief of staff, Leon E. 
Panetta, seemed resigned to the delay. 

“I think, " he said, “it may be healthier 
for everyone to be able to take this break 
and to have the key parties continue to 


zaxncr man ncgutuuiuus. government army that, gali mummed to break out of its 

' ' at 30,000, outnumbered his compound near the Parnamait 

. guerrillas roughly 2 to l at the bmldiiig and linkup with rebel 

, a | / i ■ n<n start of the fighti ng. The gov- reinforcements. 

to Advance Lnme JDZlf emment army also was trained Most observers of the war 

aarf equipped by the French assumed that rebel forc es, we re 
negotiate in what I think will be a quieter military and had tens of thou- preparing an assault to. capture 
atmosphere, which is probably what we‘ san d* of armed- Hutu roiHtia- the capital. But General Ka- 


atmosphere, which is probably what we‘ 
need.*' 

But many analysts see few prospects for 

a vote on health care before the November 


rare imtfln^rf year with his key Democrat- Ro- 


ic allies in Congress. 


in reserve. - game had other ideas- 

Behind the rebel victory lay „ Much of the ^overnmoal 
yearn of careful preparation and foroewM concentrated m and 
banting, phis a campaign, so around Kigali, 
tactically well executed . and . “If I put all ray forces into : 
strategically clever that it is re- Kigali, f would be sucked into 
caving attention from militaiy pitched, battles that would go 
schools, according to military onfof a. long time,” General 
observers. Kagame said. “I would lose my 

“In my opinion, it will cer- other objectives of capturing 
tainly be a useful tool in staff territory and saving the peo- 
coUeges on low-intensity war- pie.” 
fare.” said 'Major General Ro- At the same time. General 
mco DaBaire, the Ctmmt fifri Kagime put enough force into 
who commanded UN forcesm Kigali to harass government 


men m reserve. 

- . - . , t ... , B ehin d the rebel victory lay 

a vote on health care befocethe November of careful preparation and 

congressional elections. If that is tree, the t Ta f n j n& phis a campaign so 
centerpiece of Mr. Chntons JjSfJj**® ractic&Uy well execute^and 
agenda for 1994 would bej Mb* dead. state ^i ay dcvw ^ iign . 
And some Democratic members of Con- giving attention from militaiy 
grass may be open to attacks from Repub- S( ^ 00 t according to military 
licans that they failed to deliver on their • 

promiseof health care reform. . “in toy opinion, it will cer- 

Accoiding ;to one repot, J^amton minly be a useful tool in staff 
has discussed suspending _debate on health low-intensity war- 


tainly be a useful tool in staff 
colleges on low-intensity war- 


PARIS: Significance of liberation k Again Apparent RWANDA: 


Cootaned from Page 1 

sent. Just as de Gaulle insisted 
that it was an all-French affair 
in 1944, it was an all-French 
occasion on Thursday. 

Over the last week, ceremo- 
nies have recalled key moments 
of the Communist-led insurrec- 
tion that eventually prompted 
tens of thousands of Parisians 
to build barricades across the 
dty and turn against an enemy 
that, in Paris at least, had until 
then faced minimal resistance 

On Thursday night, before a 
fireworks display along the 
Seine and a massive “popular” 
celebration in the Place de la 
Concorde, it was the moment to 
honor General Leclerc’s Free 
French forces, which landed in 
Normandy on Aug. 1. 1944, 
and, at de Gaulle's insistence, 
were ordered by the Allied com- 
mand to take Paris. 

Huge crowds were expected 
to turn out again on Friday to 
watch 7,500 children from 
across France symbolically re- 
enact de Gaulle's triumphal 
march down the Champs Ely- 
sees on Aug. 26, 1944. 

Indeed, it is a measure of de 


Bomb Defused in Britain 

The Associated Press 

LONDON — Nearly a thou- 
sand people were allowed to go 
home Thursday after being 
evacuated because of the dis- 
covery 145 miles north of Lon- 
don of an unexploded German 


Gaulle's impact on modern As late as Aug. 1 1, nine French 6 State of War’ 

French histoiy, both as the Jews were arrested by the J 

head of a provisional govern- French police in Paris. On Aug. Continued from Page 1 

ment until January 1946 and 16, collaboration newspapers w m • bey^d ^ de _ 

later as president from 1958 to were still published. And, al- e ~ CL ’« ^ 3 

1969. that French politicians though food was in short sup- & j n days ^ French 

are to this day still wrestling to ply, sidewalk rafts were crowd- Red Cross suspended all its re- 

ElihcnL hlS mantle. cd. 1**F mwatinnc fAtlnunno dmffi 


Rwanda during the past year, troops and .prevent them from 

" “Kagame is an mteflectoal reinforcing other areas of the 
figure, I would rate him as a country out of fear that the re- 
first-rate operational fighter’” bds would then take the city, 
said Colonel Jim McDonough, While leading government 4 
the commander of American forces to believe they were f of- 
ferees in Rwanda anda. former cased , on Kigali, the rebel 
director of the U.S. Army troops, whose numbers had 
School for Advanced Militaiy • grown to.araund 25,000 as the 
Studies. “He understands disci- fighting continued, instead 
pline. He understands speed, were sweeping through eastern 
He understands mobility. . . Rwanda, moving south swiftly 
By April 7, the day after, the but careful to consolidate their 
presidential plane was shot advances. - 
down. General Kagame was re- As rebel forces in the east 

oemng numerous reports that a began an enveloping move be- 
pogrom was under way against low Kigali, putting a squeeze on 


inherit his mantle. 

As a Socialist, President 
Francois Mitterrand always op- 
posed him. But the two main 
contenders to succeed Mr. Mit- 
terrand in May — Jacques 
Chirac, the mayor of Paris, and 


piy, sioewaiK cares were crown- ^ chw suspended all its re- 

lief operations following death 
But <>n Aug. 22, despite de threat to ^ staff. The agency 
Gaulle s call for patience, the postponed further aid 
msunectioo rtRms begjmun- fUghtstoto Coma. 

T^yl"Sg“^ Five looters -^ stealing 
now known by fais nom de 


futsa and that the Presidential 


tut. UlflJUl VI XiUbN uuu HVW IU1UWU UJ UU UVUI uv TV— U.. -f. " 7 « T 

Prime Minister Edouard Balia- guerre, Rol-Tangui And, as the ^ 

dur — are Gaullists, and both remaining 16.000 or so German SjiSr Minister. Agathe Uwilingiyi- 

tr^^nght refuge ma hand- *H 2 ^?SBS , £T£ 


have sought maximum political troops 
advantage from this week's an- ful of 
toversary. Gaulle 

The politics of today, though, proval 
are little compared with the po- take P 
litical maneuvers that preceded In i 
and accompanied the liberation Frenci 
of Paris. Before D-Day. de Germ 
Gaulle had to fight Washing- i2,800 
ton's desire to impose a military noon * 


lomats and mili- 
reafized a rout 


KToTSy^^oldrde 7 Ovi&nMy thought to be based in Eg^ under a 
Gaulle finally won Allied ap- ' Zairians, toey were later discov- previous truce agreement was 
proval for General Lederc to tidringfire. 

take Paris. ^ Gmeral Ka g ame said be or- 

▼ — . .v- l.mi. -c n i con UN Stan members nave naa f«, r k» 


Minister. Agathe Uwilingiyi- was on. Then it was a function 
mans. A 600-man rebel contra- of whether the rebels would 


take Paris. 

In lhe battle of Paris, 1,500 
French died, while some 3,200 
Germans were killed and 
i2,800 captured. On the after- 
noon of Aug. 25, the German 


ifi under a stop, said one. They did not 
sement was On July 4, with the govern- 
ment army collapsing, , rebel 
said be or- forces captured Kigali and, to 
four of his thesouth, seized the city of Bu- 


tonsdesre to impose a military noon of Aug. 2 X the German janow m, ano mci 

government on France as if it commander, General Dietrich spokesman for the e ommiss ion- 
were an occupied territory. By you Choltitz, signed the surren- cr, said: “The security situation 


erea to oe nuni nunnamcn taking fire. meat army crtlapsing, . rebd 

stralmg from then own peop^. General Kagame said be or- forces captured Kigali and, to 
Wl staf f members have had ^ered troops from four of his the south, seized the dty of Bu- 
roras torown at them and have tattehous to move to assembly tare. In the days that followed, 
warned that food nots could be jjj northern Rwanda, ter- hundreds of thousands of Hutu 

imminent ritory controlled by the r^ds look flight as the rebels ad- 

Kris Janowski, another since they first invaded, from vanced on several fronts. More 
spokesman for the commission- Uganda, m. 1990. : than a half-million fled the final 


mid-August 1944, as the Battle der document One hour later, has worsened con sider ably, and sembted, I would have assessed 
of Normandy was finally end- de Gaulle was furious to see we are very concerned about the situation to the point erf 

that along with General Le- the safety of our staff. ....... 


tog, he again had to insist that that along with General Le- 
Paris be freed. cl ere, Rol-Tangui had also wit- 

De Gaulle’s suspicion of the nessed the signing. 

Allies, though, was matched But de Gaulle had already 
only by his distrust of the Com- written the official lnstoiy of 
munists, who dominated the the city’s “unshakcable will to 
Resistance in Paris. And when fight and conquer,” of the way 
the National Police seized the “it was liberated by its own ef- 
police headquarters on Aug. 19, fort united with the avant-garde 
1944. de Gaulle’s greatest fear of the French Army.” 


ganda, m. 1990. : than a half-million fled the final 

“I knew by the time they as- rebel advance on Gisenyi, on 
cabled, I would have assessed the border with Zaire, where the 


the situation to the point of Rwandan government had tak- 
making the decision to move or en refuge. 


"The situation is almost out not to move,” he said. “But of The rebels declared the war 


erf controL" 


( Reuters, AP) course, with every single hour over July 18. 



Within a day. General Ka- tins and recoflless rifles rap- 
game launched an offensive tmwl from government troops, 
that would sweep the car ; -The government forces had 
trenched Hutu . government mode r n . Fre nch-s up pli ed ar- 
fmm power, put an end to one ■ moments in their arsenal, m- 
of this century’s most ferocious elu din g armored vehicles and 
slaughters and trigger a refugee helicopters, but they soon ran 
exodus of equaflyhistoriepro-’ short of ammunition and their 
portions. • stodra were not OTlemshed^- 

In the process, Gmeral Kji- . the result of a UN-mandated # 

rl— arms innhsTOTi THlI m TllflCC ' 






HUTU: bi One Regjurn, a Peacefullife Is Returning 



Continued from Page 1 The Tutsi here also feel safer, the v33age, coniLag up the dirt 

may not dictate the future. One “»? ?«* ?M. ojhawise I roadfam Bugarama. A truA> ; 

would have left, said one of filled with troops led the way, 
receu day, as tens Of thousands Uwimana's nciehhors. Mr. Rueanrntwa.fi said, fnl- 


was that the Communists 
would liberate the dty. 


But it was perhaps Albert Ca- 
mas who best explained thesig- 


of Rwandans streamed toward 


don of an unexploded German many German officers and 
bomb from World War IL The troops had already left the dty. 
bomb was defused. Paris itself had hardly stirred. 


Until that moment, while mfira^Qfevaatsbae50yrajrs /W, the residents of Share, 


Miss Uwimana’s neighbors, Mr. Ruganintwali said, fol- 
Cansilda Mukarugero. wbo was lowed by two columns (rf men 



ago. "Paris fights today so that 
France can speak tomorrow ” 
be wrote. 


CHINA: Business Faces Dilemma Over Human Rights 

Cmatinnad from Page 1 subject of political prisoners or that China's domestic social sit- 


near the Zaire and Burundi bor- __ ndd ^ 
ders, met in the local Methodist 

church * Mis. Mu 

Should they too leave, they to 
asked one another? The villag- sons wer 
ers, mostly Hutu and some three dau 
Tutsi, have suffered the same band, ’ll 
scourge as the rest of the com- daughter 


holding her 18-month-old on foot and another truckful. 


granddaughter. He said he recognized some 

The chilcFs father — one of men as members of the Intera- 
Mrs. M nkanig ero’s sons — was harnwe, once a youth wing of 
,_m_j * « * *" ’ '* " ' Revolution! 




status in late May. Human ^ uman rights. 

rights groups want American “We have the exact same ob- 


comparaesra Chirm to adopt a jective of improving the quality i/JUTIL 

77 _■ _ -i .l. n..n: ^Kt. " u, WOUlQ COSt nppnmwiines 


uaiion is America’s to mold.” 
Many business leaders fear 


On September 6th, the 1HT will publish a 
Sponsored Section on 

The Shipping 
Industry 

Among the topics to be covered are: 

■ Posstole alliance among four of the 
world’s largest shipping companies. 

■ An analysis of technological advances. 

■ Effects of GATT on the shipping industry. 

■ Focus on the luxury cruise market 


code similar to the Sullivan 


of life of people in China,” Mr. 


try far the last four months — ried to a Hutu; her husband 
Hutu mobs killin g Tut si; ram- paid troops not to kill her. 
pant looting and destruction by “We are trying to forget the 
government soldiers as they past,” Mrs. Muknnrgero said, 
fled in defeat, and anxiety The trauma for this vfflaet as 


uugu ui ngu. rave m ner s« tnc national Revolutionary 
sons were EHed, and two of her Movement for Progress, the rul- 
three daughters. So was her hus- ing political party at the time, 
band- They were Tutsi. The But with azzns and training 
daughter wbo survived is mar- from the Rwandan Army, the 
ried to a Hutu; her husband youth, wing h a ra mw a govern- 
paid troops not to kfll her. ment militia. 

EmtV- brother-m- 

p^, Mrs. Mukarugero said. ^ » said Vedaste Bukuru, 15, 

as ; 



























Page 6 


iterate 


INTERNATIONAL 



tribune. 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON TOST 


From Rwanda to Cairo 


As you look at those terrible photo- 
graphs from Rwanda — the endless lines 
cf refugees, the starving children — per- 
haps you wonder about the causes of this 
^reat tragedy. The Rwandan civil war is 
nilitaiy, political and personal in its exe- 
-ution; but these activities are playing 
.ut in a particular context: a merciless 
iruggle for land in a peasant society 
•hose birthrates have put an unsustain- 
able pressure on iL As recently as 1950, 
'.wan da's population was 2.4 million, 
i his year, before the killing began, it was 
' .4 milli on. Its birthrate is twice the 
-■‘-rldwide average and three times that 
. f the United States. 

Since 1950 the world's populau'on has 
Rubied. In many countries that increase 
■ .as been accommodated comfortably with 
cace and rising prosperity. But most of 
-sc fortunate countries are in the middle 
- upper levels of the income scale, with 
panding industries to provide jobs. 
Rwanda is typical of much of Africa, 
.-jrth and south, where the number of 
j jple has tripled since 1950. There are 
. ‘.her recent examples on the continent of 
: miJar stress that has ended in disease, 
■nine and war. And not only in Africa 
jt elsewhere in the world. The total 
^pulation of the planet, now about 5.6 
. i : lion, is rising on a path that will take it 
;r g billion in one more generation, by 


2025. Most of the newcomers will be born 
into the societies that are the least able to 
employ them. The World Bank estimates 
that about 70 percent of the increase will 
be in countries with average incomes of 
less than S700 a year — that is, at best no 
richer than Egypt, where the United Na- 
tions conference on population will be 
held early next month. 

One consequence of high birthrates in 
the poor countries and low rates in the 
rich ones is already very visible. The 
pressure of immigration on the rich is 
rising. The boat people trying to make 
their ways perilously to Florida are only 
part of a much larger pattern. At the UN 
Cairo conference, the basic quarrel will 
be whelher high birthrates constitute a 

threat requiring a worldwide response. 
The Vatican, many Muslim leaders, some 
American Protestants and some econo- 
mists, among many others, argue vigor- 
ously that it is noL 

They may be right regarding many 
parts of the world, but they are profound- 
ly wrong about the countries where high 
birthrates aggravate extreme poverty. 
The way to judge ihe Cairo conference's 
work is to ask whether it will make any 
difference in the poorest countries — a 
list of about three dozen beginning with 
Rwanda, Iraq. Haiti and Nicaragua. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Misrule Batters Nigeria 


The reckless soldiers who govern Nige- 
ia seem to have a single response to 
anything that displeases them: Lock up 
.‘.erybody who is out of step, even if that 
..:eans half the country. Since the country 
.n question happens to be the most popu- 
' : us in Africa, a major exporter of oil and 
; volatile mix of a dozen cultures, 250 
inguages and three unstable regions, this 
Martial misrule has to be of serious con- 
. :n to Africa, Washington and the world. 

It would appear that the army manual 
..tipulates these rules for dividing, demor- 
alizing and impoverishing a potentially 
.cat nation: 

• If elections are held and voters favor 
lie candidate least liked by the soldiers, 
.'ien annul the election. That happened in 

une 1993 when the presumed winner 
.vas Mosbood Abiola, whose victory 
vould have ended a decade of military 
ule and for the first time allowed a 
fcruba from the thriving southwest to 
;rve as president. 

• If the presumed winner refuses to 
-ecept defeat, then charge him with trea- 

3n, hold him incommunicado and ig- 
nore court orders to produce him for a 
udicial bearing. That happened this June 
Mr. Abiola. a wealthy entrepreneur 
uid a Muslim whose generous benefac- 
‘.ons have given him national standing 
-.id a national following. 

• If newspapers publish what is obvi- 
us to everybody, that these steps have 
‘evoked an argument within the mOitaxy, 

. , -:n silence them. This has happened to a 


score or publications in Lagos, including 
the well-respected Guardian, depriving 
Nigerians of an outspoken free press that 
has tempered military rule during 24 of the 
country’s 34 years of independence. 

• If oil workers demand Mr. Abiola's 
release and call a strike, fire the union 
leaders. This happened after 90,000 oil 
workers struck, cutting by half the petro- 
leum exports that account for fully 80 
percent of government revenues. But the 
dismissed labor leaders went into hiding 
and the protest action continues. 

How aggravating it must be to General 
Sani Abacha, Nigeria's exceptionally in- 
ept ruler, that none of this has worked. A 
defiant federal high court judge has re- 
instated the dismissed union leaders. The 
Academic Staff Union of Universities 
has closed all the country's colleges until 
the |overnment recognizes Mr. Abiola's 
election. Banks remain closed in much of 
the country despite government threats 
to revoke their licenses. 

All this has prompted fresh arrests of 
scores of prominent Nigerians, including 
former minis ters and army commanders, 
and an order dissolving the 5-million- 
m ember Nigerian Labor Congress. At 
this rate, most of the country may soon 
be in jail, and the entire economy may 
stutter to a standstill Before this hap- 
pens, Americans can only hope that Gen- 
eral Abacha, after deep thought, will fi- 
nally locate a major source of Nigeria’s 
miseries, and arrest himself. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Opportunity in Havana 


Cuba thinks it sees a tactical opportuni- 
/ in the outflow of its people toward the 
pen sea and the American ships waiting 
..ere. Its ambassador to the Urn ted Na- 
. ns hinted heavily on Wednesday that 
its stream of refugees would be permitted 
. < continue until the United States agreed 
. negotiate an end to its sanctions against 
. uba. Thai is an offer which the United 
Vstes ought to seize and exploit. 

The Cuban government argues that its 
. *op!e are Fleeing because of the increas- 
hardships on the island, and that the 
zrd ships are created by the American 
!\>ckade. Cuba cannot be the guardian 
,f the U.S. borders, its ambassador pi- 
gsty said, but it is always ready to par- 
The Clinton administration would be 
i.ve to accept immediately but insist on a 
.. ider agenda than the ambassador had in 
dnd. It makes good sense to offer Cuba 
mdual relaxation of the sanctions in 
.■urn for progress toward democracy. 
Cuba is one government with which 

■ ashinglon has been unwilling to negoti- 
le constructively over human rights. The 
.ruled States is willing to trade (on a 
uge scale; with China and to offer re- 
-. jnition even to North Korea. Why not 
\fba? Because there are a great many 

. j ban- Americans who want to see 
—lerican power used to force Fidel Cas- 
:<i out and who object furiously to any 
"plomatic relationship or overture that 
"their view might seem to legitimize his 
.rime. But the deteriorating conditions 
: Cuba are inflicting real misery on its 
..• •pie. Americans need to ask them- 
;/-es what they want to pursue in Cuba 
- democracy or mere vengeance. 

Some 70 American vessels are now at 
. rk plucking Cuban refugees off their 
::s and boats. Thousands are already 

■ American ships or at the Guantanamo 


base. More are coming. At a White House 
briefing, the administration was asked 
whether these refugees are going to be 
kept in the detention camps until Mr. 
Castro has vanished. “Our policy is that 
they are to be detained for an indefinite 
period,'' an official answered That is a 
troubling prospect. 

Refusal to negotiate with Mr. Castro 
leaves Lhe initiative wholly in his hands, 
enabling him to create spectacles like this 
exodus, risking many lives and. not inci- 
dentally. imposing an enormous diver- 
sion of attention on an administration 
that has other things to worry about. For 
the sake of the Cuban people, it is time to 
start bargaining with the Castro regime 
over civil rights and democracy. That 
might also prove to be the most effective 
way to push Mr. Castro out of power. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 

Other Comment 

Yeltsin's Caution Is Welcome 

President Boris Yeltsin's insistence 
that under no circumstances will Russia 
invade the breakaway region of Chech- 
nya in the volatile Caucasus region is a 
tribute to his political intelligence. It 
shows an admirable measure or backbone 
in the face of a possible backlash from 
Great Russian nationalists who might 
fault him for failing to respond forcefully 
to the virtual secession of one of Russia's 
89 republics and regions. “Intervening in 
Chechnya's affairs with force is out of the 
question.'* says Mr. Yeltsin. “This would 
be so messy and bloody that no one 
would forgive us.” Too rarely do politi- 
cians get due credit for the disaster; that 
they successfully forestall. 

— The Bangkok Post. 



International Herald Tribune I 

ESTABLISHED IS& j 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER ! 

Cii-Ckuirn:i-r; I 

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• WALTER WELLS. Sms fiifov • SAMUEL AST. KATHERINE KNORR ami 

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Dimnur i k hi PtMuxaton: Rickard D. Sttrmms ^ 

Dvrclcnr Mjrm tie la PlJticjlinL- Kuhirnu- P. I in mm \ 


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Tel : i h 46_T7.u3.UJ. Fax: Cue. 1 ; Adv_ 46J752 12 Internet: IHT'sanT*ofiuc 


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tZMJM 

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* ou capital dr lyn rm F. RC\ Swum B fsiKI 12*' Cmmiv*'* Artviiv No. rti/.C 
MR. bttuaHind HenjUTriamr. AS n$l$i rrxnal ESS-iCV-Wl 




FRIDAY, AUGUST 26, 1994 


OPINION 


Nuclear Black Market- Much Ado About Not Muck 




M UNICH — Past, wanna build a 
bomb? Come to Germany, it's hog 
heaven for plutonium. lithium and other 
goodies that go into the making of nucle- 
ar or even thermonuclear weapons. 

Fortunately, that is poppycock, even 
though German authorities have counted 
440 illicit nuclear deals since 1991. 

That is a startling number, but on 
closer inspection the incidents do not 
add up to Apocalypse Now. 

It is grams and micrograms, a few 
drops of caesium here and a handful of 
lithium there. And the big haul that Mu- 
nich police proudly presented this month 
— “the biggest-ever plutonium find in 
Germany, and probably in the world" — 
was not the real stuff. 

It was 300 grams of mixed-oxide fuel, 
a blend of natural (non-bomb) uranium 
and plutonium that powers civilian re- 
actors. A terrorist, even a state like Lib- 
ya, would have a very hard time separat- 
ing the bomb-grade plutonium from the 
rest of the fuel. 

Earlier in the summer, the world was 
similarly shocked with tall tales of pluto- 
nium and ur anium busts in Germany. On 
closer inspection, the catch turns out to 
be six grams of the one and less than one 
gram of the other. If you want to build a 
bomb this way. you would have to be 
very patient. Since your average terrorist 


By Josef Joffe 

is not exactly a bomb Meisier, he would 
have to acquire at least nine kilograms of 
pure plutonium metaL Even then, his 
problem would only begin. 

The base recipe he can get from a 
public library. After that, it is precision 
work of the highest caliber that only an 
advanced economy can . master — ma- 
chining a perfect plutonium sphere, 
surrounding it with a decent neutron- 
reflector, enveloping it with high ex- 
plosives all of which must. go off in the 
same millisecond to compress the core 
into a critical mass. Carlos could not do 
it and neither could Libya. 

So why the excitement that galvanizes 
European and American newsmagazines 
to lead with cover stories such as “Nukes 
for Sale" or “The Blackmailer’s New 
Weapons”? Is Russia really flooding 
market with bomb-grade material? And 
is Germany really the place where the 
likes of Iraq or Hezbollah are heading 
with their nuclear shopping hstS? 

Hardly. “The European market,” a 
Goman expert told Newsweek, “consists 
almost exclusively of undercover police- 
men.” The chief prosecutor of the -city- 
state of Bremen confirms: “There is no 
evidence of a genuine market for plutoni- 


um in Germany.” In other words, it is 
Amateur Hour rather than Armageddon 
— a story of countless sting operations 
netting desperate small-timers in search 
of instant riches. 

An investigating commission of the 
German Parliament might well ponder 
why this is so — why the police and the 
secret services are creating a cl imate of 
doom in the name of law enforcement 
Cynics have a quick answer. The govern- 
ment is pushing hard for legislation that 
would give the intelligence services ex- 
tensive new powers of domestic surveil- 
lance currently not sanctioned by the 
constitution. What bettor way to con- 
vince the skeptics than to foster visions Of 
immin ent nuclear disaster? 

But if there is a danger, il is neither 
clear nor present. Although it may well 
be true that corruption in Russia is ris- 
ing while the state's grip is loosening, 
there is no evidence that bomb-grade 
material is slipping out of the country in 
significant quantities. 

Nor would this be very plausible. As a 
nuclear power, Russia has absolutely no. 
interest m sharing its exalted place with, 
the nuclear wannabes of this world. Yes, . 
there is leakage from' Russian laborato- 
ries and power plants, and some of the 
stuff ends up in Europe. But the last 
thing Boris Yeltsin wu countenance is 


the looting of well-guarded Rusaan plu- 
tonium stores forpriyatogain and profit 

Nor is there a real demand that would 
get the well-organized ' JRussian under-' 
ground into the gameL Terrorists ran - 

wreak havrx:mudiinbie'cheM>Iy.w , db mW 

blend of fertilizer add diesd fuel which 
almost wrecked the "World, Trade Center- 
in New .York. And rogue states are not 
interested in a few kilos df plutomum. 

They don't want one or two bombs, 
which would invite deadly preemption, . 
but a whole fuel cycle, which would yield . 
nuclear independence, arid an arsenal large.- 
enough for dispersion and concealment 

Nonetheless, Russia and the West 
should take notice. Sometimes, drops do 
presageaflood, andhenceitis high time 
to put in place all those- dams, that We 
have discussed, for years — from a funo*. 
tin ning accounting system (there is none, , 
in Russia) to physical safeguards in- ; 
stalled at storage sites, borderposts and 
airports. Por nuclear disarm a m ent -is 
now releasing about. TOO tons of pur$ 
plutonium a -year. In the hands of expe- . 

* rienced bomb makers^, that Is good for' 
up to 20,000 bombs. 

The writer isforeign and e&lorialpage^ 
editor of Suddeutsche Zeituhg. He. con- 
tributed this comment to the International 
Herald Trdnme. 


Why Hafez Assad and Yasser Arafat Have to 



M ONTREAL — Yasser Ara- 
fat makes all Lhe decisions 
for the new Palestinian author- 
ity. This frustrates many Pales- 
tinians. the Israelis and virtually 
all foreigners and world econom- 
ic institutions. 

President Hafez Assad is, of 
course, the supreme authority in 
Syria. Outsiders so much empha- 
size this fact thaL they have trou- 
ble believing that he has political 
constraints other than his own 
inhibitions and rigid positions. 

Both leaders are determined to 
pursue peace by using the very 
ideas and methods that they have 
exploited to retain power in the 
long years erf the conflict. They 
are convinced that their mastery 
of internal political complexities 
and of inter-Arab rivalries, and 
their careful modulation of the 
conflict with Israel, have enabled 
them to survive to this watershed. 

Their peoples, including their 
harshest critics, share their basic 
assumption that only they can 
bring peace to their nations. 

Israeli and American officials 
are convinced that these leaders 
are essential. With Mr. Arafat, 
this acceptance is grudging; with 
Mr. Assad, it is grudging and re- 
spectful, but wary. 

However, in light of Syrian and 
Palestine Liberation Organiza- 
tion terrorism, Israeli and Ameri- 
can public opinion understand- 
ably shares the grudges more than 
the acceptance. These Israelis and 
Americans believe that peace can 
succe e d only if Mr. Arafat and 
Mr. Assad ' abandon their old 
methods and concepts. 

Thus, while they acknowledge 
that Mr. Arafat is the decision- 
maker. they prefer to deal with 
his politically weak advisers. That 
is often a mistake, because the 
advisers, angry over Mr. Arafat's 
habit of using money, jobs and 
threats to control them, can and 
do provide advice that is more 
misleading than helpful. 

Mr. As^ad is admired for his 
strength, but his critics think that 
his conceptual world is rigid and 
outdated. His emphasis on a com- 
prehensive peace is seen as empty 
rhetoric, with a touch of a dream 
of Syrian hegemony. 

At raosL it is accepted as a 
euphemism for Syrian influence 
in Lebanon. It is not seen as a 
shrewd, practical strategy for 
managing conflict, either within 
Syria or with Arab rejection! sts. 
Mr. Assad’s talk of popular sup- 
port is dismissed by the West as a 
code word for iron-fisted control 
and intimidation. 

The politics of an autocratic 
state are certainly not the politics 
of a democracy . but there are po- 
litical processes nonetheless. Not 
only does Mr. .Assad seek to 
maintain his monopolistic con- 
trol over the multiplicity of mili- 
tary and security forces, he also 
strives to balance rival ethnic 
groups and regional interests. 

Most of ah, his politics are the 
politics of maintaining the ratio- 
nale for rule. Regimes can be- 
come captives of their own dog- 
mas and claims. 

IF Syria is the “beating heart" 
of the” Arab world, as Syrians 
always say. and is preeminent in 
the struggle against Israeli domi- 
nance. then Mr. Assad must ex- 
plain his peace initiatives to cad- 
res of activists who have 
followed that dogma. 

The cynical are not as hard to 
deal with as those who believe loo 
fiercely or those who haw built 
their lives and livelihoods around 
the maintenance of the security 
state and the con/UcL 
Middle East peace is not arriv- 
ing through the excitement of 
popular upheaval and overthrow 
of regimes, as in Eastern Europe. 
On the contrary, peace is a central 
part of a calculated policy to pre- 
vent such upheaval and chaos. It 
is a strategy of change to preserve 
the leaders' rule and to reinforce 
it as the barrier to extremism mid 
internecine warfare. 

Popular upheaval would mean 
that extreme anti-Western move- 
ments that invoke Islam would 
come to power. It w’ould mean Lhe 
eruption of ethnic and political 
rivalries that could tear the soci- 


By Stephen P. Cohen 


eties apart and wreak revenge 
against former ruling groups. 

There would be no wave of 
democracy and pluralism led by 
enlightened critics of the regime 
and supported by emerging West- 
ern-oriented middle classes. These 
forces are not yet politically strong 
enough to win in a no-holds- 
barred struggle for succession. 

The West's desire is to see au- 
thoritarian rule replaced by de- 
mocracy and respect for human 
rights. We want state socialism 
and corruption superseded by 
open-market economies. But to 
condition our diplomacy in any 
way on the prospect of such 
transformations may slow the 
peace process and bring to power 
the most bitter enemies of peace 
and Western values. 

Like it or not, the two key fig- 
ures for the removal of the ideolo- 
gy of hatred toward Israel are Mr. 
Arafat and Mr. Assad, who pur- 
sued that enmity with great effec- 
tiveness and ruthlessness. 

In Washington in July, King 
Hussein of Jordan provided a 
respite from this hostility. 
His formal, agreement to_end .. 
46 years of enmity toward Israel 
produced a wave of good feeling 
in Israel and America. His be- 
nign image is due in part to 
his Western manners and style, 
which contrast sharply with 
Yasser Arafat's deliberately pro- 
vocative image. 

But the other side of King 
Hussein's image is his weakness 
as an enemy of Israel. This 
heightens the contrast with Mr. 
Assad’s insistence on military 
strength and unabashed willing- 
ness to use force. 

Still, the king has played a 
weak hand with panache, dignity 
and determination. Now that he 
has played it, the West must hur- 
ry to strengthen iL 

Mr. Arafat exploits his own 
weakness by masterly and mad- 
dening brinkmanship, his unique 
brand of guerrilla diplomacy. He 
uses his one credible threat again 


and H ffl in — that if he fails, the 
extremists on the left and right 
will rise and chaos" will ensue. 

Mr. Assad flaunts his ability 
to make war while seeking peace. 
But he can deliver peace. The 
burden is on him to show that it 
can be done .comprehensively, 
relatively quickly and with Israel 
as a full partner. 

We should listen with close 
attention to Mr. Assad’s analy- 
sis. He has led Syria and the 
forces of rejection almost 
throughout the period since the 
1967 Arab- Israeli war. No one 
knows better than he how the 
logic and emotion of that rejec- 
tion can be put to rest 


He says.be is determined to 
make peace. He is very convinc- 
ing to those who hear him, (as 1 
did oh Ang. 16’ in Damascus as 
part of a Council on Foreign Re- 
lations, delegation) and to those 
who overhear him. 

Mr. Arafat is detenhined to 
build his Gaza- Jericho rump enti- 
ty into a Palestinian state that 
lives in peace and economic coop- 
eration with Israel. He has al- 
ready staked his life on that belief 
and has maneuvered "his people 
into that gamble. 

Perhaps the West should be a. 
little more reticent in denouncing 
his strategies for controlling Ha- 
mas terrorism and building Pales- 
tinian institutions. Maybe it can 
be more creative in developing 


J-..CC 


economic strategies that fit his 
style of governing. . .. 

Israel’s leaders are dealing with 
Arab leaders as they find than. 
Mr. Assad and Mr. Arafat have 
decided to make peace. There will 
be a time for different Tenders 
with ;other values and practices- 
thai are closer: U^ihe, West’s. Btit_ 
we will never get to . that promis- 
ing next generation if we under- 
mine today’s leaders, by burden- 
ing the present with our too krfty 
hopes fear the future. ' - 

The writer. As president of the 
Center forMiddleEastPeaceand 
-Economic ■ Cooperation, a non- 
profit organization in Montreal 
He contributed this, comment i'o 
The New York Times. 


ExpectaSyri 


T HE Assad regime urgently 
needs Western aid since the 
demise of its superpower pa- 
tron, the Soviet Union, and the' 
drying up of migrant remit- 
tances and financial assistance 


Mr. Assad is conscious of the 
intricacies of Israeli domestic 
politics. Collapse of Syrian-Is- 
raeli peace talks would bring to 
power a far less accommodating 
Lflmd-led government. 


from the oil-producing Guff"**” A" number* of “developments 
stales. The promise of U.S. £1- suggest that the Syrian regime is 


nandal rewards wQl reinforce 
the perception in Syria that it 
must make peace with Israel 

With the Palestinian and Jor- 
danian breakthroughs, Syria is 
isolated; Hafez Assad can no 
longer pose as the representa- 
tive of a united Arab front He 
is fully aware of the new reali- 
ties of Middle Eastern politics 
and his dwindling options. 

He is playing hard to geL 
hoping to win further conces- 
sions horn Israel and induce the 
United States to recognize the 
strategic role of Syria in region- 
al security and stability. But he 
cannot afford a return to the 
status quo that would pit him 
against a new alliance of Israel, 
Turkey the United States and 
most of the Arab states. 


moving steadily toward dosing 
the final bloody chapter in 
Arab-Israeli hostilities. 

Mr. Assad has embraced the 
formula “full withdrawal • for 
full peace.” A Syrian official 
has confirmed that indirect 
contacts with Israel have been 
established. The Syrian govern- 
ment has undertaken a deliber- 
ate effort to prepare the public . 
for peace. And Mr. Assad has 
shown restraint by not opposing 
the Palestinian and Jordanian 
accords with Israel. 

Mr. Assad and Prime Minister 
Yitzhak Rabin both now accept 
the baas for a settlement — terri- 
tory for peace; and Mr. Rabiri 
seems to be edging toward ao- ‘ 
ceptms Mr. Assad's “full with- 
drawal for fuO peace" formula. 


lhe deadlock in peace talks- is 
more tactical than strategic, and- 
will .yield to UiS. intervention 
and tangible assistance to the so* 
doeconomic and political devel- 
opment of the area. ‘ 

courting -Mr; -Assad,' coaxing t 
. h i m to make a deal. BiS Clinton 
has gone out of his way to reas- 
sure Mr. Assad 4hat he is ‘‘per- 
sonally committed to the objec- ; 
live of a comprehensive peace” •; 
and recognizes that “Syria is the 
key to the achievement” of this 
soil Secretary of State Warren . 
Christopher has been shuttling* 
between Damascus and Jerusa- / 
lem, committing the political - 
weight and prestige of U.S. di- 
plomacy to the attainment of a 
treaty between the two sides. 

For all these reasons, a break- 
through in the Syrian-lsraeti 
peace talks is immineaL 
— Fawaz A. Gorges, a visiting 
fellow in the Near Eastern 
' : Studies . Department at 
Princeton University, writing 
in the Los Angeles Times. 


The Revisionists Err: The Bomb Was te Save lives 


W ASHINGTON —The brou- 
haha over the Enola Gay ex- 
hibit to open next year at the Na- 
tional Air and Space Museum here 
is but a foretaste of what we can 
expect on the 50th anniversary of 
the end of the war in the Pacific, 
after the United States dropped 
atomic bombs on Hiroshima; and 
Nagasaki. I think it is ixnportanL 
in part because I was involved. 

My small role had to do with 
the estimates of casualties should 
the United States have to invade 
Japan. 1 followed movements of 
Japanese kamikaze units by use 
of intercepted and decoded ene- 
my military messages. 

That led to estimating what 
Japanese planes might be avail- 
able to attack American troops 
wading ashore on Kyushu, the 
westernmost main island, on 
Nov. 1. the date set for what was 
code-named Operation Olympic. 

I have been through a tnass of 
now declassified data in the Na- 
tional Archives. And I have read 
the revisionists' arguments that 
such estimates were wildly inflated 
and, anyway, the real issue is the 
immorality of the atomic bomb 
and the racism that dropping it on 
the Japanese supposedly implies. 
(1 red certain that it would have 
been used cm Hitler and the Nazis 
had it been ready in time.) 

Context is vital in judging histo- 
ry. My generation can never forget 
the ferocity of Japanese defenders, 
from Guadalcanal through the 
Philippines to the Marianas and. 
especially, Okinawa. 

Indeed, the costly battle for 
Okinawa was on everybody’s 
mind, from Harry Truman, the 
new president, down to me, a sec- 
ond lieutenant in the Army Air 
Corps working in the Pentagon. 
Why? Because the kamikaze at- 
tacks on our ships had extracted 
a terrible toll. 

Kamikaze attacks sank some 


By Chalmers M. Roberts 


30 vessels and damaged 368. 

More than 12,000 Americans 
died in taking Okinawa. The Jap- 
anese had 110,000 military and. 
perhaps 150,000 civilian deaths, 
many of them suicides. 

The Kyushu invasion was set 
for May 25, ISMS, just after the 
German surrender in Europe. 
That casualties had long been on 
the leaders' minds is demonstrat- 
ed by a passage from the autobi- 
ography of the journalist Joseph 
C. Harsch. He teDs of walking 
into the White House office of 
Admiral William Leahy, Roose- 
velt’s chief of staff, around Feb. 
1, 1945, to be greeted with: 
“Harsch, how do you think the 
American people would react to 
half a million casualties on the 
beaches of Japan?” 

That was well before Okinawa. 
More precise casualty estimates 
were worked up for a White 
House meeting, called by Horry 
Truman, on June 1 8 as the Okina- 
wa struggle was ending. It was at 
this meeting that, according to 
the minutes. President Truman 
said be hoped “that there was 
a possibility of preventing an 
Okmawa. from one end of Japan 
to the other.” 

Admiral Leahy reported that in 
capturing Okinawa, U.S. troops 
“had lost 35 percent in casual- 
ties.” The assault force planned 
for Kyushu numbered 766,700, 
and 35 percent of that — which 
A dmira l Leahy said “would give 
a good estimate of the casualties 
to be expected” — would have 
come to more than 268,000. 

General George C. Marshall, 
the army chief, extrapolated the 
casualty figure to conclude that 
defeating Japan, after landings in 
Kyushu and the -mam island of 
Honshu, would cost 500,000 to 
1 million lives. Secretary of War 


Henry L. Stimson used those fig- 
ures. Harry Truman spoke after 
the war of a possible 250,000 
dead and 500,000 wounded, his 
justification for using the atomic 
bomb to end the war without a 
terribly costly invasion. 

From the Potsdam Conference 
in Berlin on July 18, 1945, Hany 
Truman wrote to his wife, Bess, 
that Josef Stalin had then agreed 
to enter the Pacific war on Aug. 
15. To this, the president added: 
“Til say that we*D end the war a 
year sooner now. and thinlc of the. 
kids who won’t be killed!” This 
evidence does not fit the revision- 
ist thesis that the United States 
used the bomb, in part at least, to 
intimidate the Soviet Union. It 


was used to prevent casualties. 

Estimates surely were wobbfyj 
but I think they were reasonable: 
That opinion derives, in part, from if. 
my inspection of Kyushu and its . 
mountainous terrain and_shallow 
beaches shortly after the: surren-* 
der, phis interrogation of Japanese 
military personnel by myself and 
others. We were part of the US| 
Strategic Bomb Survey. - » . 

The Enola Gay dropped its 
bomb on Aug, 6, and the Soviets) 
scenting war's quick end, came in 
two days later, ahead, of theiij 
promised date of Aug. 15. They 
wanted a piece of the Japanese 
empire and a say in Japan’s future* 

■ « 

The writer covered local nation-, 
al and international news for The. 
Washington Post for 23 years, j 


PN~ OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 5 


1894: Neglected Grave? 

PARIS — The rumors that the 
grave erf Guy de Maupassant, in 
the Montparnasse cemetery, has 
been neglected are altogether un- 
founded, and Mme. d’Haraois de 
Blangues, aunt of the late novel- 
ist, who visited it yesterday [Aug. 
26], states that it is daily covered 


litxcal object. The population ot 
Upper Silesia, by tire terms of the 
Peace Treaty, is to decide by i 
plebiscite whether it will remain, 
under the German jackboot of 
will be reunited to Poland. There 
is no room for doubt as to whax the 
reailt of the plebiscite would be $ 
it wore carried out without pres*- 


1944: Batde for Paris 


wooden cross surmounts -the 
grave, which is not to be the final 
resting place of the great writer. 
Permission has-been obtained for 
the transportation of the remains 
to P&re L ac h aise; where a monu- 
ment worthy of the reputation of 
the dead will be erected over them. 

1919: Silesians’ Future 

PARIS — The old allies of the 
Huns — artillery, incendiarism 
and torture — have again been 
called into play, this time not for 
military purposes, but with a po- 


PARIS — American and Ffehdjji 
columns fought their way into the 
center of Paris today [Aug. 25J 
and received a thunderous weir 
come from her citizens as they 
opened battle with G ermans anfl 
Vichy mili t iam en still entrenched 
in important strongholds. The A¥- 
lied troops entered the city from 
the south, and almost immedr- 
ately as they reached the beauti!- 
Fol Luxembourg Gardens, the 
Nazis and the collaborationist 
militia opened fire. 







— •, — rV* ■ 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 26, 1994 


Page 7 


O PIN I O N 



VI 


*on4‘ 


Clinton’s Strategic 'Plan’ 
Is Hot Air and Pretense 

By William Satire V 




W ASHINGTON —The CKnton 
admnustratkm*s ino&jeveal- 
ingpdicy document, layingom^toc 
national security strata ■ of the 
United States,’* no less, ..fias '’been 
kept secret by the fittuhshly devef 
device of making it public. 

Issued a month ago in the dead of 
night, the Mae-covered “National 
Security ; Strategy of ExK^emcat 
and Enlargement” was dabbed “the 
Ea-En Document” ^engaging re- 
porters and enlarged punmts. 

The struggle over naming the pol- 
icy engagement (a Gaiy Hart .tram 
favored by the. State Department) 
vs. eolaraancpt (a Tony Lake term 
favored by toe National Security. 
Council staff) was resolved in , a. 
quint essenti ally Clintonian way: 
Both are used,' conjuring a vision 
of involved tumescence. ... .. 

But whoa a president signs Off an a 
25,000-wora exposition of bis global 
strategy, attention must be 

WTO 

has provided the mnsdc tlial is hop- 
ing to bring about a. peaceful settle- 
ment in the former Yugoslavia-” 
Some leadership; some muscle. 

_ -The En-En Document deserves 
academic dissemination and re- 
spectful or infuriated 'analysis by 
think tanks. It can save as the basis 
far “great debate” hearings when 
Richard Loijjpr of -Indiana becomes 
chairman of the Senate Foreign Re-. 
larirwiR Committee in January. 

" That’s because the strategy has 
become so determinedly anti-con- 
troversial that it should , provoke 
controversy. By examining its draft- 
-ing, we can see its policy evolution. 

hi an early version of the docu- 
ment, this line led a paragraph in the. 
'president’s cover letter: “Ultimate 1 
ly, the strength of our security de- 
rives from the strength of our val- 
ues.** Gutsy hmhan-ngbts rhetoric. 

hi the final version pedutps' after 
the decision on China’s most-far- 
vored-nation trade stains, a fine from 
was brought up from 
as a substitute: “Our national 
-secunty strategy reflects both Ameri- 
ca's interests and oar values.” 

The following fix nhmnnates a 
switched emphasis: “We believe that 
our goals of promoting democracy, 
protecting our security, and enhanc- 
ing our economy are mutually sup- 
portive” was changed, at perhaps the 
highest levd, to “We believe that our 
. goals of enhancing our security, bol- 
stering our economic prosperity, and 
i promoting democracy are mutually 
supportive.” Different priorities. 


A. section oh European defense, 
irodenrHnmg:NATO with a ocmtro- 
venjy-averse Partnership for Peace, 
imdfcs debate. *Tn keeping with our 
strategy of enlargement, PfP is open 
to all fomter members of the War- 
raw Pact as well as other Fttro pe an 
states . . . with PFP the best path 
toward NATO membership.” 

That means we are preten ding to 
{dan to invite Russia to join NATO, 
an. osgamzation that exists to pro- 
tect Europe from Russia. The strate- 
gy," as stated, is an absurdity. Mr. 
Clinton's Partnership for Peace is a 
device to avert debate about admit- 
tingPoland, Ukraine and other East 
an states into NATO now. 
i- atm of NATO’s future ex- 
rn, however according to En- 
, “will not be to draw a new line 
in Europe further (sic) east, but to 
expand stability, democracy, pros- 
perity and security cooperation to 
an ever-broadcr Europe.^ 

' Tbatis strategic hot air. As Henry 
Kissinger writes, “The administra- 
tion’s Atlantic policy is creating two 
categories of frontier in Europe: 
those that are guaranteed are not 
threatened, and those that are 
threatened are not guaranteed.” 

The forum fra- talk of bringing 
“security cooperation to an ever- 
. broader Europe” already exists in 
1 the 52-nation Conference on Securi- 
ty and Cooperation in Europe. Rus- 
sia and its farmer satellites are part 
of that UN-minus- the-Third- World. 

But NATO is an Atlantic militaiy 
alliance vrith a dear purpose to sub- 
sume Germany and keep Russians 
in Russia. It works; it should now 
: tndnde the countries most at risk 
from any future Moscow yearning 
tovirit the irredentist twice a year. 

Foreign relations debaters should 
use “Engagement and Enlarge- 
ment” as their text. The near-fmal 
draft rang with resolution: “Our na- 
tional security requires the patient 
application of American will and 
resources, and, at times, lives.” 

■The printed version, formally 
by William J. Clinton, re- 
frain such boldness: “and, at 
times, lives” was stricken ouL 
. TheWen York Times. 


Letters intended for publication 
should be addressed ", Letters to the 
v Editor** and contain the miter’s sig- 
nature, name and full address. Let- 
ters should be brief and are subject to 
editing We cannot be n^tonsdtk for 
the mum of unsolicited manuscripts. 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Another Algeria Scenario 

Regarding “ Why the Stakes Are 
So High in Algeria ” (Opinion, Aug. 
13) by Daniel Pipes: 

Mr. Pipes’s scenario fra North 
African and potentially European 
apocalypse at the hands of Algeria’s 
so-caHed fundamentalists begs for a 
bit of calm and common sense. 

While he offers many reasons to 
take the crisis in Algeria seriously, 
they do not include the obvious one: 
When the Algerian government an- 
nulled the results of the 1991 elec- 
tion, naiy a peep of protest was 
heard from the West. 

By s u pporting the Algerian gov- 
ernment m a complicity of 
(and nowin France by active repres- 
sion of its foes) Western statesmen 
seriously or. They have taken sides in 
what Mr. Pipes calls the second battle 
of Algiers, when they need rally have 
supported the maintenance of the 
democratic process. 

But another scenario, far more 
prosaic, is just as plausible as Mr. 
Pipes’s desccnt-in to-apocalypsc rea- 
soning. It begins with new ejections, 
such as the Islamic Salvation Front 
had won. The “fundamentalists,” 
with an outright majority, form a 
government. Fadng internal division, 
and bowing to strong p r essure from 
the West and vigorous protests inside 
Algeria, the new gove rnm ent main- 
tains most established liberties, but 
does not manage the economy well 

Come the next election, a re- 
framed party of toe left returns to 
power, with a program designed to 
create jobs anil stimulate foreign in- 
vestment. This may be a simplistic 


gloss on a complex situation, but it 
is the sort erf managed and measured 
competition fra power that will in 
toe long run ensure human rights 
and economic opportunity. 

TREVOR DICKIE 
Oxford, England. 

Let tbe Cubans Decide 

For those of us who have lived 
and worked in Cuba, the recent 
events in Cuba are particularly trag- 
ic and could have been avoided. 

The blockade of Cuba should have 
been lifted years ago; it should not 
now be reinforced. lifting it would 
allow Cuban society to evolve, to 
change their political system without 
forcing the island's government to 
take a revolutionary stance. 


Tightening the blockade will only 
prepare Cuba for bloodshed and 
civu war. The U.S. administration 
has lost right of the fact that Cuba is 
an independent state with an edu- 
cated population able to decide its 
own future. The United States has 
no authority to impinge on Cuba’s 
sovereignty or its right to take its 
place among other island nations in 
the Caribbean basin. 

NICOLAS SAPJEHA. 

Panjim, India. 

In Qmton’s Defense 

By what bizarre logic do some of 
your columnists figure that if Presi- 
dent Bill Clinton’s crime and health 
proposals fail to pass through Con- 
gress, it should be his Democratic 
Party that will suffer in future elec- 
tions? Surely the resulting opprobri- 
um will fan on toe Republican Party. 


Slowing Down: From 100 
To Zero in the Milkweeds 


By Ellen Goodman 


C ASCO BAY, Maine — I arrive 
here coasting on toe fumes of 
hi-octane anxiety. The split-second 
timing of my daily life has adhered 
to my mood like a watch strapped 
to a wrist. 

Behind me is a deadline met by 
toe skin of my teeth. A plane was 
late. A gas tank was empty. A boat 
was missed. 

The cany-on baggage of my 
workaday life has accompanied me 
onto the 'island. An L. L. Bean bag 

MEANWHILE 


Moreover, what if every single 
sexual and Whitewater accusation 
againsL Mr. Clinton were true? What 
difference can such personal consid- 
erations make in respect to the na- 
tional issues? By putting bullying 
tactics and parochial politics before 
these issues, toe Republican Party, 
in my view, is co mmi tting suicide. 

LESLIE SCHENK. 

Chevilly- Larue, France. 

Regarding the editorial “Enter the 
Floating Waffle " (Aug 24): 

The New York Tunes asks why 
toe cartoonist Garry Trudeau has 
begun to take aim at President Bill 
dm ton. Clearly Mr. Trudeau has 
become infected with toe disease af- 
flicting the rest of toe press. The 
symptoms: lack of even-handed- 
ness, sudden paralysis when any 
Clinton effort succeeds, and a ten- 
dency to a forked tongue. 

DEBORAH BURTON. 

Vacallo, Switzerland. 


The Son in Their Eyes 

Regarding “ The Galilean New 
World Offers an Opportunity to Seize 
Quickly” (Opinion. Aug. 17): 

It was Copernicus, not Galileo, 
who moved the Earth out of toe 
center of the solar system; to both 
men, toe sun was at toe center of toe 
cosmos. Not until toe 1930s did toe 
work of toe American astronomer 
Harlow Shapley demonstrate that 
tbe sun was a great distance from 
toe center of our galaxy. 

JAY M. PASACHOFF. 

Die Hague. 


full of work, a fax machine, a lap- 
top with a modem. 

1 have all sorts of attachments to 
the great news machine that feeds 
me its fast food through the elec- 
tronic stomach tube. 

Fully equipped this way, I tell 
myself that 1 can get an extra week 
away. And so 1 spend that week 
wondering why I cannot get away. 

For days l perform toe magic 
trick unique to my species. My 
head and my body are in two differ- 
ent places. Like some computer- 
generated animation, my body is 
on an island where toe most impor- 
tant news is toe weather report. My 
head is on toe mainland of issues, 
ideas, policies. My body is dressed 
in shorts. T-shirt, baseball cap. My 
mind is in a suit, pantyhose, heels. 

I am split across toe great divide 
between this place and the other. 
Neither here nor there. 

The desk chair is full, toe ham- 
mock empty. On the road, I am 
able to see toe brown-eyed Susans 
and Queen Anne's lace only in my 
peripheral vision. My focus re- 
mains elsewhere. 

1 feel like a creature of the mod- 
em world who has learned to live 
much — loo much — of toe lime on 
fast-forward. And to pretend that it 
is a natural rhythm. 

What would Charlie Chaplin 
make of these Modern Times? Our 
impatience when toe computer or 
toe ATM machine “slows" down, 
or when toe plane is lace. The way 
many of us have learned to do two 
things at once, to ratchet up our 
productivity, that buzzword of toe 
era, as if life were an assembly line. 

In some recess of this modem- 
times mind-set, I thought I could be 
on vacation and at work. Instead, 
these two masters wrangle for cus- 
tody over me and I learn that there 
are two things you cannot do at 
once: something and nothing. 


But finally, this morning walk- 
ing down toe country road at a 
distracted, aerobic, urban speed, I 
brake for butterflies. 

I am aware suddenly of four 
monarchs in full orange and black 
robes at their regal work. They have 
claimed a weedy plot of milkweeds 
as their territory. 

As I stand absolutely still, these 
four become eight and then 12. My 
eye slowly adjusts to monarchs toe 
way it adjusts to toe dark or toe 
way you can gradually see blueber- 
ries on a green bush. 

There are 20 butterflies harvest- 
ing a plot no bigger than my desk. 
There are 30 in a space smaller 
than my office. The flock, the 
herd, has followed their summer 
taste buds onto my island, toe way 
native tribes once came here for 
the clams. They leave as suddenly 
as summer people. 

The monarchs allow me, a com- 
moner, to stand among them in toe 
milkweeds while they work. 

I feel foolishly and deliciously 
like some small-time anthropolo- 
gist, some down-home Jane Goo- 
dad, pleased to be accepted by toe 
fluttering royals. 

I am permitted to watch from 
inches away. For half a minute, one 
monarch chooses my baseball cap 
as his throne. For half an hour I am 
not an intruder but part of toe na- 
tive landscape. 

1 remember now toe lines of po- 
etry I read in toe icy dead of last 
winter. After watching two mock- 
ingbirds spinning and tossing “toe 
while ribbons of their songs into 
toe air,” Mary Oliver wrote, “I had 
nothing / better to do / than lis- 
ten. f I mean this / seriously." 

Such moments are rare in our 
world of Rapid Eye Moments. 

We have been taught to hurry, to 
scan instead of read, to surf instead 
of watch. 

We can go from zero to a hun- 
dred miles an hour in seconds — 
but only by leaving toe natural 
world in toe dust. 

We pride ourselves on speed, and 
forget that time goes by fast 
enough. The trick is to slow down 
long enough to listen, smell, touch, 
look, live. 

At long last, the faxes and 
phones and ties all disconnect And 
for a summer afternoon, surround- 
ed by monarchs, I know this; I have 
nothing better to do than watch. 

I mean this seriously. 

The Boston Globe. 



* \ ? u 








NOVEMBER 1994 


:.v. i.Vf ; .• . 



* ■ 


- i *. : 




‘V- 


■. * ‘t - V, i - 


MARK YOUR 

As prospects for economic recovery brighten in the U.S. and Europe, 
investment activity in the public and private sectors is beginning to revive. 
Die program for this timely conference will focus on three key sectors - 
telecommunications., transportation and energy. 

Our illustrious group of speakers will include: 

■ tfnrtfa Ua’ngr*»imrtn J Member of the European Commission, Commissioner 
for Industry and Itetecominzinicatfon Markets 

■ Wolffeang Both, Vice Freddent, European Investment Bank 

■ Marianne Henderson, V. R, Chief Financial Officer, Bell Atlantic 

■ Eberitard von Koerbeij President, Asea Brown Bowed Europe Ltd S^. 

■ '’ Heauring Christophersen, V. E, European Commission 
m Graham Corbett, Chief Financial Officer; Eurotunnel 

■ Clande-Dacmon, Managing Director; 'Dransport Division, GEC-Alsthom 


US. Department of Commerce 

■ Thierry Deputy Vice-President, European Bank for Reconstruction 

and Development 

■ Greg C. Simon, Domestic PdHcy Advisor to A1 Gore, Vice President of the USA. 

■ Gonter Kexrodt, Nfimster of the Economy, Germany 

■ Marion Price, Bead, Pit^FhTazM^SmnitoiiK) Bank Ltd 

■ Alain Canale, Director; Project Finance, Credit Lyonnais Groiq) 

□ Bernard Sorel, Managing Director, Bombardier Eurorail 

■ WUHam Ginsberg, President and CEO, Celhilar Communications International, Ihcl, 
New York 

■ Hagen Hultxsch, Management Board, Technology and Services, DBP INetom. Bonn 

FOB FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT: 

Brenda Erdmann Hagerty 

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Tbt (44 71) S36 4802 Fax: (44 71) S36 0717 

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International Herald Tribune 
Friday, August 26, 1994 
Page 8 


A A 7 


& A 


.AT 



+: : 

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Roberto Alagna in Gounod's “Romeo et Juliette": Ringing high notes and conscientious, boyish charm. 

French Voices, a New Generation 


Ii 

Si 
0 

Diana of 
Ephesus 

IT 




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s6»S 


Diana of Ephesus 
is in a museum 
in Naples, but she 
comes Ui a 

variety of sizes in 
airports and 
other shops 
around the 

world. 


By John Rockwell 

New York Times Senice 

P ARIS — The travails of French 
opera have become almost a cli- 
ent by now, and the abrupt dis- 
missal of Myimg-Whufl Chung as 
music director of the Pans Opera would 
only seem to confirm the cliche. 

Never mind that this seems to have 
been a pure power struggle and that the 
winner, Hugues Gall, the designated di- 
rector of the company, is a man of proven 
taste and vision. It still looks in the short 
run like yet another “proof’ that when it 
comes to opera, the French haven't a due. 

The stereotype is this: Despite some 
strong (Berlioz, Bizet Offenbach) or at 
least appealing (Gounod, Massenet) com- 
posers in the 19th century, French operas 
began to decline even before the general 
crisis of operatic composition in the 20th 
century, and French singing began to un- 
ravel after World War I. 

All of this played against a backdrop, 
the cliche concludes, of French indiffer- 
ence to music in general. A coda to the 
cliche was this: While hurling money at 
the arts in the 1980s, the Socialists under 
Jack I-ang as minister of culture revealed a 
particular incomprehension about opera. 

The supposed white dephant of the 
Op6ra Bastille became a symbol of that 
incomprehension. Yes, provincial opera 
houses were rebuilt and revitalized. Still, 
French opera performance was more 
marked, this string of assumptions con- 
cludes, by glitzy stage direction and design 
than by solid musical accomplishment 
But as two recent performances suggest, 
France at last could be developing a gen- 
eration of world-class singers. If true, the 
impact on the neglected French repertory 
should be marked! 

The performances in question were Ro- 
berto Alagna’ s Rom£o in a Toulouse pro- 
duction of Gounod’s “Romeo et Juliette,” 
seen at the Op6ra Comique in Paris in late 
spring, and Natalie Dessay s Queen of the 


Night in the William Christie- Robert Car- 
sen production of Mozart’s “Zauberfldte” 
at the Aix-en-Provence festival In July. 

These are both singers in their 20s who 
are clearly poised to make a mark on the 
world, certainly on that part of the world 
to which the Metropolitan Opera in New 
York can lay cl aim. Dessay is to make her 
Met debut as the Fiakermllli in Richard 
Strauss' “Arabella” in October. Alagna is 
in negotiation to appear as Rodolfo in “La 
Boheme" in the 1995-96 season. 

What makes them interesting is sure- 
ness of technique. Alagna, who is of Sicil- 
ian ancestry, is a French tenor more in the 
Georges Thill mode than in earlier guises. 
That is to say, he sings top notes with 
plenty of chest tone in the best Italian 
verismo style, rather than floating them 
out in a subtle blend of head and chest 
tones. He is capable of ravishing soft sing- 
ing as well as ringing high notes, and has a 
conscientious, boyish charm as an actor. 

Dessay is an even more accomplished 
technician. As Olympia in Offenbach’s 
“Contes d'Hoffmann” at the Bastille two 
seasons ago, and this summer in Aix, she 
handled fiendishly diffi cult coloratura 
sin g in g with sweet, sure-footed ease. 

This is not a raw talent about to be 
undone by premature success, but a well- 


grounded, musical singer who attests to a 
new solidity in French training. 

They may of coarse be two isolated 
stars in an otherwise dim and dowdy fir- 
mament. But three seasons of operagoing 
in France have suggested otherwise. A list 
of names could be assembled, from the 
dramatic soprano Francoise PoDet to the 
bad tone Jean-Phflippe Infant to a host of 
early-muac specialists who came of age 
under Christie. 

There is indeed a healthy horde of good 
young singers in France today, active in 
the provinces and incre asi ng ly in Paris, at 
the Optra Comique (which is a kind of 
forum for successful provincial produc- 
tions), at the Theatre du Ch&telet and at 
the Optra's two theaters. 

What effect are they likely to have on 
international r epertory? For decades, a 
few hoary staples aside, French repertory 
languished, even in France. There has 
been something of a Berlioz fad, bat that 
speaks to him, not to his country of birth. 

Now, with a proliferation of angers 
interested in their native French reper- 
tory, confident in the language and en- 
couraged — through French stage revivals 



mm* 


T 


UCKED into the cor- 


ners of suitcases of re- 


turning travelers are 
the world's treasures 


couxagcu — uixyugurrnu.il suigcrcviv^ ^ a form forever safe from duty 
and government-subsidized recordings — „ „ ^ * 


■ With a proliferation of topless 
bars, all-nude, bring-your-own-booze 
joints and a nude steakhouse, 
Longview has become known as the 
sex capital of Texas — to the 
chagrin of some residents who are 
videotaping customers frequenting 
the nightspots. Other bars, hoping to 
attract patrons who like their 
bourbon straight, without sex, 
advertise “fully clothed waiters” 
and “fully clothed dart tournaments.” 


to learn the roles, it should be easier for 
foreign houses to program French works. 

Certainly the heretofore nearly un- 
known field of French Baroque opera has 
been brought to a new level of internation- 
al recognition by Christie and all the con- 
ductors and singers he has spawned. 

French record companies have antici- 
pated what is likely to happen in theaters, 
with unusual projects often based on pio- 
neering concert performances presented 
by France Musique, the state classical 
radio station, or on specialist festivals by 
champions of exotic French repertory. 

French 19th-century operas offer a 
wealth of beauty, sensuality and subtlety, 
variants of European-wide patterns but 
also audibly indebted to the special quali- 
ties of the French Baroque: And they can 
be beard at their best only when articulat- 
ed by native-practitioners of the language. 


TEE E 0 FI E U I 9 E 


Color of Night 

Directed by Richard Rush. 
U.S. 

Bruce Willis has packed 
away his pistol for the role of 
a dispirited psychologist in 
“Color of Night,” a convo- 
luted psychosexual thriller. 
Willis plays Bill Capa, a 
Manhattan psychotherapist 
who quits his practice when 
a patient leaps to her death 
from his skyscraper office. 
As a pool of blood seeps 
from her body, Capa realizes 
he can no longer see the col- 
or red and is destined to re- 


main colorblind until he is 
atones for his mistakes. He 
travels to Los Angeles to for- 

E at the home of a col- 
gue. Bob Moore (Scott 
Bakula), who confides that 
he has been receiving death 
threats. He suspects the 
threats are coming from one 
of the members of his Mon- 
day night therapy group, 
who serve not only as sus- 
pects but also as comic re- 
lief. Shortly afterward, 
Moore is found stabbed to 
death. The investigating of- 
ficer insists that Capa take 
over the “squirrel farm” and 


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thus unmask the culpriL It 
comes as no surprise — not 
much here does, really — 
when Capa becomes the kill- 
er's new target. “Color of 

Night” marks Richard 
Rush’s return as director 
more than a decade after the 
release of “The Stunt Man.” 
He manages to give this il- 
logical, overstuffed and tra- 
ders tructured story some 
edge and flourish, but finally 
nothing can distract us from 
its sheer silliness. Certainly 
not Bruce in his birthday 
suit. (Rim Kemplcy, WP) 
Tha Advocate 
Directed by Leslie Megahey, 
U.K 

Set in 15th-century France 
and featuring a dignified 
Fjnglish cast, “The Advo- 
cate” begins with what looks 
Uke a pretty fair Monty Py- 
thon moment A man is fit- 
ted with a noose, about to be 
executed for having had 
“ca rna l knowledge of the 
she-ass here present” By his 
side, and also about to be 


hanged, is a sexually compli- 
ed! donkey, since this story is 
set at a time when animals 
and inanimate objects could 
be tried under civil law. 
When a last-minute pardon 
arrives, it’s not for the man 
but far his impassive con- 
sort Unfortunately, “The 
Advocate” proves not to be 
particularly playful about 
such events. As an earnest 
leeringly ribald foray into 
arcane legal history, with an 
emphasis on four-legged de- 
fendants, its main selling 
points turn out to be crass- 
ness and curiosity value. 
And for ah its legal exotica, 
tins film is so ordinary in 
visual style and bask story 
line that it holds few sur- 
prises. “The Advocate” gets 
a high gloss from the pres- 
ence of acton like Ian Holm, 
as a priest; Donald Plea- 
sence. as the weary prosecu- 
tor; Nicol Williamson, as an 
add-tosgued feudal lord; 
and Cohn Firth, a pleasantly 
urbane leading man. 

(Janet Maslin, NYT) 


or even dose customs inspec- 
tion: a pint-size Eiffel Tower or 

Taj _ _ 

from Osiris to Buddha to Zeus, 
bought for a dollar and rhany 
in stalls and schlock shops. 

People who would not dream 
of making a shrine to a saint 
happily display deities that 
once had million* in thrall but 
now attest chiefly to the power 
of frequent-flier programs. 

The monuments were origi- 
nally built by men, and most of 
the gods were male. But females 
once held sway, and one or two 
had such lasting authority that 
they even became models for 
souvenirs in antiquity. 

Mother goddesses reigned in 
G reece until the Dorians invad 
ed late in the second millenni 
um B.C and installed Zeos and 
Apollo. Bat feminis ts need only 
look to Turkey, where the femi- 
nine principle reached its gran- 
dest, most distinctive and most 
influential form in Ephesus, less 
than an hour south of Izmir. 
Here was the home of Diana of 
Ephesus, worshiped across 
most of Europe. 

She is still present in her city, 
at least at the museum, in the 
guise erf two strange, compel 
ling and peculiarly awesome 
statues of the fust and second 
centuries. Many museums have 
images of her, but Ephesus was 
her headquarters, arid her tern 
pie there was one of the seven 
wonders of the ancient world. 


V ; 'F >k I t 

[\ ^ *ar & V -l 


a 

: '4t* FT? 



Y OU, too, can have her 
image. In 1884, not 
long after some of the 
greatest Greek sculp- 
ture had been excavated from 
Turkish soil and shipped off to 
Berlin and London, the Turkish 
government decreed that all an 
tiquities were the property of 
the state. But in Turkey, as else- 
where, tourists are encouraged 
to load up cm the great artworks 
of the world reproduced in sizes 
suitable for an ant farm. 

Though Diana gets uglier 
with each decline in quality, 
even at key-chain size she re- 




“THE FRONT PAGE 1887-1992” 

A BOO K OF G REAT FRONT PACES FROM THE 

WTHgiftTONW. HERMX1 TKBUNE . 

REPORTWG BE MAJOR EVENTS OF THE PAST C&fftRY; 

Reproductions of 150 front pages, many v^hHecid v 
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“HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL” 

appears every Friday 


flickering r eminder 
^ fhe anginal's power. 

This is the goddess with the 
confounding attribute of rows 
of multiple breasts. Obviously, 
connected to fertility, this Di- 
ana — Artemis in Grade — was 
the ruler of everything die 
mother goddess, des^te the at- 
tribute of permanent Virginity. 

Her Ephesian incarnation 
has a tubular lower body, lions 
on hex aims, animate and bees 
on her siart— altogether unlike 
nrare familiar Dianas like Fran- 
cois Boucher's darling naked 
blond nymph with dainty feet 
Even more confounding is 

the sdxdazfy proposal that the 
“breasts” the Ephesian Diana 
wests in such profusion are ac- 
tually not breasts but bulls' tes- 
ticles. In 1979 a classicist 
named Gerard Sdtde pointed 
out that none of her appen- 


and its testes wore symbolic of 
fruitfulness, and that there was 
an altar at Ephesus large 
enough to sacrifice & steer on. 

In shod, far centuries the 
world has misunderstood -the 
goddess, whose cult figure was 
m effect a kind of ccoswlresser 
ai the most baric level 

From the Renaissance on, 
artists have depicted her com- 
plete with her beasts and her 
putative breasts. Raphael 
painted her in the Vatican. Ce3- 
finr put her on the base of his 
Perseus. Hogarth made a merry 
picture of putti drawing her 


statue, and Tiepolo turiked her 
into one of his pictures. 

More recently, Louise Bour- 
geois alluded to fertility and the 
animal kingdom in a sculpture 
called “Nature Study,” ahead- 
less beast with several very hu- 
man breasts. 

She was . worshiped in some 
form from paleolithic times on, 
and if art and souvenirs are any 
indication, in a way still is. The 
first image ever found of the 
mother goddess, in Turkey, 
dales to 6,000 B.C., give or take 
a couple of hundred years. 

Greeks who had colonized 
the western coast of Turkey by 
1,000 B.G simply appropriated 
her and incorporated many of 
her attributes into their own 
gods. First they identified her 
with Cybele, who went about 
accompanied by lions, and fi- 
nally with Artemis. 

- By the first century, travelers 
and devotees who journeyed to 
Ephesus could buy little silver 
goddesses and little sflvor mod- 
els of her temple. One ancient 
author says that at the end of 
the festival of Artemis, mall 
silver images of her were placed 
on the temple steps for people 
toltiss. 

St. Paul neariy ruined this 
trade fay preaching in Ephesus 
that there were no gods made 
by hum a n hands. A silversmith 
named Demetrius, who special- 
ized in images for pilgrims, 
called a meeting of artisans and 
craftsmen and created an up- 
roar. Paul left town. 

ha Ephesus today, only the 
barest traces of Diana' s great 
temple remain, but the wealthy 
city where she rerided has been 
pa ins t akin gly excavated and 
some of it meticulously and 
stunningly restored. 


M UCH of the glory 
that was Greece 
and the grandeur, 
that was Rome still 
lives in present-day Tmtey. 
Christian pilgrims during the 
Renaissance and afterward 
were once again keen to own 
some little reproduction of 
whatever holy icon they had 
traveled far to see. 

The closer the imugg was . to 
the original, the more of its 
power it might absorb, but ev- 
ery image that came from the 
holy place and looked some- 
thfag.lft e the holy object had a 
certain power. 


I*# 


At religious sites, such im- 
ages still do. Secular pflgrim- 
ages to Ephesus. Paris or Lon- 
aon do not hold the traveler in 
the same spiritual grip, but even 
v acati oners are seeking some 
deg ree of wonder and a way to 
reproduce some semblance of 
the experience in photographs 
or knickknacks. ^ 

The German philosopher and 
cntic Walter Benjamin thought 
that mass reproduction robbed 
art of its aura, but it is precisely 
some trace of that aura that 
persuades tourists to cough up a 

Sr>k°?? fs for *8re*t wodcof 
S £■* evidently been cop- 
ted by elves wearing mitten s 




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International Herald Tribune 
Friday, August 26, 1994 
Page 9 



% 


A 




Kfleatar AtdVOtT 


\ High Tech Meets Gracious Dining 


By Dayi.d Kaip \ 

Neve Yoric Tima Serntx ' 


N EW YORK — They may evoke 
images other than personal ser- 
vice and culmary artistry, but 
computers and electronic sys- 
tems are trana earning the workings and 
ambience of restaurants: 

• The Probost paging network; devel- 
oped by Dallas-based Rock Systems, 
equips customers, : waiters, cooks and : 
managers with wireless message devices,/ 
worn cm the wrist .Among the possibili- 
ties: diners buzz waiters, * computer tells 
the cooks lhrt~ibefitlakxa& too. long to 
prepare food, of. the manager sends a 
‘‘happy birthday” message to a customer. 

• At Zoe in Manhattan’s SoHo, a com- 
puter is used lo post the day’s specials and 
to keep trade of what sold well the previ- 
ous day. Waiters teH the kitchen to gay 
special attention to a VIP’s order by using 
the computer to mark the order “Elvis.” - 
a The Dive, Stbven^nSbdgfSnewsub- - 
marine- themercstaaraarui Los Angeles, 
gives diners boasters with red lights that 
blink to signal when their tables are ready. 

• At Jose Tq'as, a Tex-Mex restaurant 
is isetin. New Jersey, that of ten has-a two- 
hour wait on weekends,- diners are given 
pagers that- vibrate when their tables are 
ready. To keep guests from walking off 
with the devices, the restaurant holds a 
driver’s license or other identification. 

At the heart of 'these changes is the 
pcdnt-of-sale computer, which was intro- 
duced in the United States in the early 
1980s. According to *4992 survey by the 
National Restaurant Association, 64 per- 
cent of taWe-servicd restaurants with aver- 
age checks Of $25 or more used the sys- 
tems, up from 40 paean Jn 1990. 

Typically, after taking a table’s order, a 
waiter goes to a computer terminal and 
uses a keyboard or touch screen to enter 
the number of diners, table location, dish- 
es selected, and any special instructions. . 
The older is printed outin the kitchen. 


and the food is routed to the appropriate 
stations. An expediter, often the executive 
-chef' or the sous-chef, coordinates the 
preparation and assembly of the order, 
relying on the waiter to signal when it’s 
time to set up each course. 

“-'A smoothly running point-of-sale sys- 
tem improves efficiency in many ways. 
Waiters spend JH 0 TE time is tile dining 
room. Printed orders ehnrinate mix-ups 



caused by sloppy handwriting or shouted 
instructions. At rush hour in the kitchen, 
diminished traffic is a blessing; - - 


' From tlie owner’s point of view, paint- 
on give-aways 


i point 

of-sale systems cut down 
and forgotten charges. The dmer gets* a 
legible, accurate check. Sales, tax and tips 
are automatically tabulated and can be 
finked to systems for accounting, payroll 
and inventory. 

Computers axe generally less common 
in ethnic restaurants, and it usually does 
not pay to put.in a point-of-sale system, 
which costs $10,000 and up, in a restau- 
rant with less than about 75 seats. 

Some higbend restaurants for which 
the systems would make economic sense 
deliberately don't install them. “We prefer 
to keep the personal connection between 
the kitchen and the dining room staff,” 


said Karen Waltuck, who owns Chante- 
relle with her husband, David, the chef. 

Only a few UJ5. restaurants so far have 
invested in hand-held point-of-sale units, 
theoretically the most direct method of 
conveying orders. More than 150,000 of 
the hand-held units are in use in family 
restaurants in Japan, where the passion 
for speed and reverence for technology 
has overcome any reluctance to computer 
devices at the table. In the United States, 
the high cost has limited their use to set- 
tings where waiters must cover long dis- 
tances to get to the kitchen. 

Point-of-sale technologies often origi- 
nate in fast-food chains, which operate on 
slim margins and are always looking for 
ways to cut costs, and then “trickle up” 
into full-service restaurants. Consumer- 
activated touch sc r een s, which have been 
installed at more than 100 Arty's fran- 
chise restaurants, offer the equivalent of 
aiiinmatir idler machines in banks. 

“When customers get familiar with 
them they like them, because they know 
that they can get in and out fast,” said 
Paul Segert, the president of Manage- 
ment Information Support, which owns 
those Arty's franchises. Within a few 
years, he said, customers will be able to 
pay for their purchases at the same termi- 
nal with credit and dehit cards. 

M OST current point-of-sale 
systems can process credit- 
card transactions. Handling 
debit cards, which automati- 
cally deduct money from the holder's ac- 
count when used, is trickier, because it 
requires a secret personal identification 
number. 

To solve this problem, portable pay- 
ment terminals have been introduced. The 
waiter brings the unit to the dicer, who 
eaters a personal number. Portable pay- 
ment terminals are currently being used at 
only a few U. S. restaurants, but are com- 
mon in France, where a wireless unit com- 
pletes the whole transaction at the table. 


'.~i r:- T.i-: 




HENRY AND CLARA 

By Thomas Median. 358 pages. 
$22.95. Tkknor& Fields. . 

Reviewed by 
George Garrett - 


WHAT THEY RE READING 


O NE of the clear and dis- 
tinct pleasures of good his? 
torical fiction, is its shared sense 
of authenticity, the mysterious, 
collaborative process between 
writes: and readier whereby fact 
and fiction come together, hand 
in glove, in a credible, if alien 
(sometimes fantastic) reality. 

Thomas Malkm has written elo- a little 


• Sir Clonstopher Mafiaty, 
the British Ambassador to 
France; is reading “Le Premier 
homme" by Albert Camus. 

. “I read all Camus’s novels as a 
student T/iin now 58 and so 
excited and thrilled to be able to 
read this novri, unpublished nor 
til now, Much was not finished 
when he died. -The style is very 
spare, veiy intense, and tells you 
a lot; about France ” 

. - (Margaret Kemp, JUT) 



quently about this process 
(“Writing Historical Fiction,” 
American Scholar, Fall 1992); 
and his own career has bal- 
anced four diverse books -of. 
nonfiction with, including 
“Henry and Clara,” four nov- 
els. 

One of these, the highly 
praised “Aurora 7” (1991), is 
historical, set on May 24, 1962,- 
the day that the astronaut Scott 
Carpenter carded three times 
around the Earth. There .the 
past was part of the author's, 
and many readers*, Tristtiry.'ablb 
to be' summoned up, like a 
memory or a dream, by amid- 
most ritual arrangement of the 
right details. 

“Henry and Clara" ventures 
into a deeper past and includes 
a wider range' of time, from 
1845 to 1911. The stray < 
on Good Friday, April 14, 


10 is the evening, 
with John Wilkes Booth in full 
flight on horseback from Fred’s 
Theatre, haring just shot Presi- 
dent Abraham Lincoln. 

- Omniscient in point of view, 
'.the narrative then flashes back 
to May 30, 1845, and follows 
the lives of the principal charac- 
ters, the very real Major Henry 
Rathbone and Miss Clara Har- 
ris, who, in .fact, shared box 
numb er eight at Ford's with 
. President and Mrs. Lincoln. 
Booth savagely attacked Rath- 
bone with a knife, and Rath- 
bone came dose to death bim- 
sett. ' 

He stowed to many Clara 
Harris and to live into the 20th 
. century. .They had three chil- 
dren, but they did not five hap- 
pily ever after. Following them 
tram dnldfiood to middle age, 
passing a gajn through the scene 
at Ford’s Theatre, this time 


from their point of view, the 
story builds implacably toward 
its climax of madness and mur- 
der. 

Henry and Clara were, as it 
happens, stepbrother and step- 
sister, raised together within a 
large and prominent family net- 
work in upstate New Yoric 
Clara’s father, Ira Harris, was 
“a rising man” who served as a 
senator from New York during 
Lincoln’s presidency. 

These are, then, real people 
of some importance who left a 
wealth of records, files and pa- 
pers — letters, diaries and jour- 
nals. In a note the author says 
that “nearly all the book's prin- 
cipal characters, and most of its 
minor ones, were living per- 
sons.” He has used the weight 
of documentary support in an 
Interesting and imaginative 
way. 


By Alan Truscott 
N the diagramed dcaLboth 
U North-South pairs readied 
the sound contract of seven 
hearts, hi the diagramed auc- 
tion, the five-spade response to 
Blackwood showed two key 
cards plus the trump queen, so 
South knew that his dummy 
would have four hearts beaded 
by the ace-king'qufien- Both de- 
clarers received a trump lead. 

Assuming a normal trump 


AJIJl* LLlV wvuww ~ 

Jubs divided evenly or if South 
could take a winning finesse in 
spades or diamonds when the 
dubs split 4-2. One declarer 
drew tramps and tried chibs, 
raffing the fourth round. He 
then cashed the last club and 
the last tramp, leaving a two- 
card ending. He now led to the 
diamond ace, hoping that West 
had been squeezed wi th th e 
spade king and the diamond 
queen, and was d e fea t ed. 

After warning the first trick 
with the heart jade. South 

crossed to the bean queen and 


led the spade jack. There was a 
fair ch i*?** that if East held the 
irmg , he .would either cover the 
jack or think about doing so- 
When East promptly played 
low. South put up the ace, 
knowing that the king was more 
Kkriy than not to be on his left 
He then drew the missing 
trump, worked on dubs, and 
eventually took the diamond fi- 
nesse to make his grand slam. 

- NORTBOV 
r 4J5 
■ 0 A K Q 3 
6X1 

*K QB 65 

' WEST EAST 

*K843 * 1D f B 

0 911' O Iff 5 

■' frQ87S32 

+ J972- *»6 

SOUTH 
... 4AQ72 
9J876 
. 6 A JS 

• A3 

East and West were vulnerable. 
The bidding: 

North .. East’ Sooth Wes 

J* Pass 1 "P 

4 9 , -PMS 4N.T. Pa® 

54 pus 7<t Pass 

Pass' . Pass 

Wen led the heart two. 


rnmim 


The wrong diag r a m accom- 
panied the bridge column in oar 
Thursday editions. The correct 
diagram is below; 

NORTH 
419 43 
o — 

0 9053 
4Q1QS53 

WE$T(D) EAST 

A s •863 4 

9 A 10 5 3 2 9KQ874 

0KJ873 

4 K 2 439784 

SOUTH 
4AKQ107 
9 iff 
OAQ1Q4 
*A 

and West were vulnerable. 
The bidding: 

West North East Sen* 

1 0 Pass 4 9 4 4 

Pass Pass 3 V Dbl 

Sass 59 Dbt 

»* DM- *«lbL 

pass Pass Pass 

West led the diamond eight. 


Paris Chefs Fish in New Waters 


By Patricia Wells 

Intemontmol Rerokt Tribune 


P ARIS — For more than 25 years. 
Paris's best fish restaurant, and its 
dubbiesi, has bees Le Due, in 
Montparnasse, a place where one 
submitted to snobbery and abrupt service 
for the pleasures of sampling the Min- 
chelli brothers’ top-notch fisb cuisine. 

Now Paul Mmriieffi has gone off on his 
own taking over and remodeling the long- 
established Chez les Anges on Boulevard 
de La Tour Maubourg. 

Much like fashion designers with a spe- 
cial unmistakable look, (he Minchelli 
school of fish selection and cooking has its 
own stamp. Much of it begins with fish 
that has an overwhelming sensation of 
freshness and purity of flavor. Minchelli 
does little to bis fish and shellfish, but 
what be does is inevitably the right thing. 
Try a sample lobster salad — lobster, 
greens and vegetables — and you'll see. 
No fancy dancing, no combinations that 
set you in a spin. Yet you’ll swear it’s the 


most impeccably prepared lobster salad 
that will ever pass your lips. 

I'd pat myself on the back and do hand- 
stands if I ever achieved a poached lotte as 
perfect at Paul Mmcheui’s. Hyperfresh 
monkfish is poached ever so gently and 
served wjih a garlic-rich aioli lightened 
with a potato puree. 

Here, you pay the price for quality. 
Prices start at 70 francs for a small platter 
of raw bar, or sea bass, and rise to 280 
francs for varied lobster offerings. The 
wine list is extensive (Minchelli bought the 
existing cave), and includes some well 
priced finds, including Domaine Osier- 
tag’s nestings, a fine Trimbach pinol 
blanc, a few white Burgundies, ail served 
by Didier Gamier, an enthusiastic, well- 
versed sommelier. 

While the same high-powered crowd 
has followed Minchelli to his new address, 
lei’s hope a more democratic posture pre- 
vails. 

The recently popular Le Petit Plat has 
taken wing, landing in larger and more 
comfortable quarters in moving from the 
5th arrondissment to a quiet section of the 
1 5th. Here Jean and Victor Lamprda con- 


tinue to offer totally modem, dependable’ 
bistro fare, including cool platters of green 1 
beans and artichokes; warming casseroles! 
of tomates a la proven^ale, and extraordi-' 
nary roast chicken, accompanied by a gen- ' 
exous sautfr of mushrooms, bacon and- 
onions. 

I loved the beany portions of rougeu ! 
pan fried to a crispy edge, served with 
mounds of Provencal lian, a layered mix 
of aubergine, zucchini and tomato, all - 
cooked to a confit-like tenderness. 

The wine list is chosen by Henri Gault . 
(bis daughter is married to Victor Lam- 
preia) and merits attention. Try the pure 
syrah of Domaine Saint-Oaude, well 
priced at 100 francs. 

Paul Minefield, 54 Boulevard de La Tour 
Maubourg, Paris 7; tel: 47.05.89.86. Closed 
Sunday , Monday, and August. Credit card: 
Visa. A la carte, 350 to 600 francs, including 
service but not wine. 

Le Petit Plat, 49 Avenue Emile Zola. 
Paris 15; tel: 45.78.24.20. Closed Sunday 
and Monday. Credit card: Visa. A la carte, 
150 to 200 francs a person, including service 
but not wine. 


/ H E JETS 9 f I B E 



Botticelli's “Annunciation, " in an exhibition of Italian Renaissance works at the Burrell Collection in Glasgow. 


“Nearly all the extracts from 
letters and journals that appear 
iz> the text are made up, but in 
[daces quotations from actual 
material are included.'’ This as- 
sertion is a bravado gesture, 
daring the reader to try to find 
the visible stitches joining the 
fact and fiction. This reader 
here reports that the fabric of 
the story is magically seamless. 

But there is more to the mag- 
ic of “Henry and Clara. ** The 
powerful stray is superbly told, 
in a sequence of dramatic 
scenes, by a narrative voice 
which is appropriately and con- 
sistently stylish, plausibly dis- 
tant from our own vernacular. 
Dialogue, often a problem in 
histoncal fiction, is credible 
and sharp. Characters are fully 
dimensional and believable, 
and the details erf the world they 
move in add up to an entirely 
imaginable living space. * 

In addition, Mallon’s render- 
ing of the social life of Ameri- 
cans at home and abroad (for 
these privileged characters are 
great travelers) before, during 
and after the Gvil War, is at 
once subtly nuanced and pre- 
cisely accurate. 

You can’t ask for much more 
from historical fiction except, 
perhaps, the validity of the ma- 
terial as history. “Henry and 
Cara” passes that test with Dy- 
ing colors, too. 

People in “Henry and Clara” 
axe, as they truly were, readers 
of books. They read poems and 
novels and history. They read 
Shakespeare, Tennyson, 
Wordsworth, Byron, Bryant 
and Parkman. Drawing on their 
example, one can be allowed to 
hope that lots of contemporary 
readers of books will find and 
read Mallon and share his vi- 
sion of our past. 

George Garrett, whose most 
recera book is “Whistling in the 
Dark : True Stories and Other 
Fables,” wrote this for The 
Washington Post. 


AUSTRIA 


FRANCE 


Vienna 

Kunsthlstoriches Museum, tel: 52- 
177, closed Mondays. Contlnu- 
frtg/To Oct. 30: '’Albrecht Dorer.” 
Eight paintinss documenting the Ger- 
man master’s artistic development, 
from before his second Italian trip to 
his late works. Abo illustrates the 
painter's broad range ol subjects, 
small intimate devotional images, offi- 
cial county portraits and large altar 
paintings. 


BELGIUM 


Nice 

Musee Matisse, tel: 93-13-23-30, 
closed Tuesdays. To Oct. 2: “Henn 
Matisse: Le Grand Atelier. 1935- 
1948.’’ 20 paintings. 60 drawings. 1 5 
cut gouaches as well as art objects, 
photographs and illustrated books. 
Parts 

Mus6e du Louvre, tel: 40-20-51-51 , 
dosed Tuesdays. Continuing/To 
Sept. 5: "La Rdforme des Trots Car- 
rad: Le Dessin a Botogne, 1580- 
1620." 


Brussels 

La Monnaie. tel: (2) 2 18-12-1 1. 
VextJ’s “La Traviata," directed by 
Kart-Emst and Ureel Herrmann and 
conducted by Antonio Pappano, with 
Etzbi eta SzmytVa, Laurence Date and 
Victor Ledbetter. Aug. 27, 31 , Sept. 
2, 4 and 7. 


GERMANY 


BRITAIN 


The Burrelt Collection, tel: (41) 
649-7151. open daily. Continu- 
Ing/ToSepL 25: "New Perspectives: 
Aspects of the Italian Renaissance." 
Arms and books, bronzes and majol- 
ica, drawings and paintings provide 
an Insight into the artistic creation in 
Italy from 1400 to 1650. 

London 

Buckingham Palace, tel: (71 ) 799- 
2331. dosed Mondaw. To Dec. 22: 
"Gainsborough and Reynolds: Con- 
trasts in Royal Patronage." A selec- 
tion of paintings by the two 18th- 
century portraitists from the royal 
cofiecnon documenting the differ- 
ences in the artists’ techniques and 
approaches. 

CANADA 

Montreal 

Canadian Centre tor Architecture, 
fei: f 514) 939-7000. Continu- 
Ing/To Sept. 25: "The PaHedian Re- 
vival: Lord Burlington, HI8 Villa and 
Gardens at Chiswick." Features de- 
signs by Palladio and lmgo Jones, 
drawings by Burlington and garden 
studies by Kent, showing the revival 
of Pafladian influence on English ar- 
chitecture in the 18th century. 

CZECH REPUBLIC '* 
Ptragtw 

Convent of St Agnes of Bohemia, 
tel: (19) 231-42-51. To Oct- 30: 
"Chinese Ceramics." A historical 
survey of Chinese ceramics from the 
neolithic period to the art’s ultimate 
nourishment in the 19th century. 


Berlin 

Berlintsche Gaterie, tel: (2) 54-86- 
108, closed Mondays. To Oct 12: 
"Der Deutsche Splesser Argen sich: 
Retrospeklive Raoul Hausmann 
1886-1971." 250 works by the Aus- 
irian-bom artist (1886-19/1), a rep- 
resentative figure of Berlin Dadaism 
around 1918. 

Brocke-Museum, tel: (30) 831- 
8029. dosed Tuesdays. To Nov. 27: 
"Der Fruhe Kandinsky." More than 
100 paintings, drawings and prints 
dating back to the years 1900 to 
1910, before the beginning ol his 
abstract work. 

Bonn 

Oper der Start Bonn, tel: (228) 7- 
28-1 . George Whyte's dance drama 
“Dreyfus - J'Accuse.” Music by Al- 
fred Schnittke, choreography by Va- 
lery Panov, with Shuia Okatsu con- 
ducting and J. Mamrenko/A, Dubinin 


as Alfred Dreyfus. Sepr. 4 ( world pre- 
miere), 6. 8. 10. 16. 24, Oct. 3, 14, 
18. 29. Nov. 9 and 1 1 . 

ITALY " 

Florence 

istituto degti Innocent!, tel: (55) 
247-7952. open daily. To Nov. 3: 
"Picasso: Ceramiche. inasioni, Ulus- 
traboni, Arazzi.” Works from lhe vari- 
ous periods in Picasso's irfe. Fea- 
tures his iilusl rations of literary 
works, a series of female portraits 
and a selection ol ceramics. Also 
features targe tapestries inspired by 
his work. 

NETHERLANDS 

Utrecht 

Centred Museum, tel: (30) 36-23- 
62. closed Mondays. To Oct. 23: 


"The Utrecht Way. 1495-1995." 250 
works of an by Utrecht artisls. Furni- 
ture. silverware, statues and draw- 
ings are exhibited alongside paint- 
ings by Jan van Score), Abraham 
Bioemaert and Pyke Koch, among 
others. 


UNTTEP STATES 

New York 

Museum of Modem Art tel: (212) 
708-9400, closed Wednesdays. 
Continuing /To Sept. 6: "Master- 
pieces from the Davkj and Peggy 
Rockefeller Col lection: Manet to Pi- 
casso." 21 examples of Post-Impres- 
sionism, Faivism and Cubism, rang- 
ing from Cezanne’s "Still Life with 
Fruit Dish" to Picasso's "Woman 
with a Guitar." 


f l 9 S 1 f f f 


J 


)n Alto. 28: "Andre Masson: Surre- 
Jist Dra 


On , 

alist Drawings. 1925-1965." The 
Irteh Museum of Modern Art, Dub- 
lin. 

On Aug. 29: “Le Jutte de Bourges." 
Musee du Louvre, Paris. 

On Aug. 28: "Leonardo da Vinci." 
Kuiturhuset, Stockholm. 

On Aug. 30: "Arts Royaux du Camer- 
oon." MusPe Barbler-Muelier, Ge- 
neva. 

On Aug. 29: "Visiteurs de I’Empire 
Celeste." Musee National des Arts 
Asta&ques-Guimet. Paris. 


On Aug. 29: "Back to lhe Shtetl: An- 
SKy and the Jewish Ethnographic Ex- 
pedition 1 91 2-1 91 4.’ ' The Israel Mu- 
seum, Jerusalem. 

On Aug. 29; "Bonnard at Le Bos- 
quet.’’ Hayward Gallery, London. 
On Aug. 31: "Desir de Rivage.” Mu- 
see des Beaux- Am. Caen. France. 
On Aug. 31: "As Tentagoes de Bosch 
ou o Eiemo Retorno." Museu Na- 
tional de Arte Amiga, Lisbon. 

On Aug. 31: "The Smithsonian’s 
America." Nippon Convention Cen- 
ter, Chiba, Japan. 



C— i 


ta-arttV 


LIVING IN THE U.S.? 

NOW PRINTED m 

new turk 
For Same Day 
Delivery m Key cities 

TO SUBSCRIBE, CALL 

1-800-882 2884 

(IN NEW YORK, CALL 212-752-38901 


Rate the world's best restaurants 
with Patricia Wells. 


The IHT's restaurant critic has set out 


She will be rating, in month-to-month 
articles, the top restaurants from region to 
region, and comparing them to one another. 

Whether it's the best in dim sum, 
delicious but secret sushi bars or die finest of 
French tables, she will guide readers with 
articles about inexpensive restaurants as well 
as the grand ones in the world's maior cities. 

She wm also share her tips on how to select 

quality restaurants in unfamiliar territory. 

Don't miss this series. 


COMING SEPTEMBER 19 th 
GERMANY 



Patricia Wells is the author of The Pood 
Lover's Guide to Paris, now in its 
thud edition. 



037* <? »rr*p 



Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 556, 1994 


As Africa Grows , It Grows Hungrier 


By Jennifer Pannelee 

Washington Post Server 

DOLLA, Ethiopia ■ — Du be bo Madebo, 
scratching for survival from his small 
patch of com, sweet potato and bananas, 
has no trouble plotting the trajectory on 
which his family is traveling. 

The jaundiced yellow of recurring ma- 
laria that clouds his eyes cannot obscure 
his clarity of vision. 

• “The end of the road is coming for us." 
he said dispassionately, a tall, frail, figure 
|jwathed in white robes, sitting on a stool, 
surrounded by scrawny children. 

Mr. Dubebo's arithmetic is brutally sim- 
ple. When he was young and life was 
manageable, his father had more than 5 
acres of land in this poor southern Ethiopi- 
an hamlet. 

. When the plot was divided among the 
male heirs, Mr. Dubebo got 1.7 acres — 
slightly above the family average for the 
densely populated North Omo area, about 
ISO miles southwest of the capital, Addis 
Ababa. 

Today, times are painfully bard. Fam- 
ine, after two disastrous rainy seasons, has 
struck; Mr. Dubebo is too sick to work his 
crops; his merchant wife is dead, her pre- 
cious household income is lost, and the 
children are withering before his eyes. 

Many thousands of his North Omo 
neighbors have died in the last few months 
of tenible hardship, and, like Mr. Dubebo. 
one in three depends on food handouts to 
survive. But even if the big rains come this 
s umm er and turn their lives back from the 
.precipice, the future is bleak. 

Little land is left for Mr. Dubebo's two 
boys, though he hopes his six daughters 
will marry well. 

“rd like to teach them how to be a 
fanner, but on what?" he asked, spreading 
his arms to indicate the small plots they 
will be left to farm. “I would rather they be 
educated and get away." 

In some ways, Mr. Dubebo presents an 
extreme case in terms of Ethiopia and the 


rest of Africa. F amin e is not the norm, 
thoug h imag es in the press of stick-thin 
African children sometimes give that im- 
pression; even in this perennially hard- 
pressed country, outright starvation is still 
exceptional . 

Yet in many other ways, Mr. Dubebo is 
grimly typical of the continent's small 
farmers, the traditional backbone of Afri- 
can society, locked in a seemingly losing 
battle to feed their families. His land has 
been farmed, and over-fanned, for centu- 
ries. Soil and seed quality are poor, crop 
production ever smaller, neighbors crowd- 
ing in. Deforestation and the erosion that 
carries off vital topsoil are visible every- 
where. 

Blame it on unchecked population 
growth, war, economic stagnation, natural 
calamity, overreliance on rash crops at the 
expense of food, too much food aid — or 
all of the above — the result is the same: 
Millions of Africans are hungry today, and 
statistics say they are getting hungrier. 

While worldwide surveys indicate a 
slight decline in hunger in the last few 
decades, the average African today eats 10 
percent less than he did 20 years ago. 
according to the Food and Agriculture 
Organization. 

Fueling this engine of want, the United 
Nations organization says, are two salient 
facts; While African populations have in- 
creased by close to 3 percent a year since 
1970, annual production of staple cereals 
has grown by less than 2 percent, leaving a 
gap few nations can afford to fill. In the 
m eantim e, the amount of arable land per 
person has fallen by half. 

Ethiopia, long associated by the world 
with the harrowing cost of famine, is at the 
low end of the African scale. Its citizens 
consume an average of 1,500 calories a day 
— below the Food and Agriculture Orga- 
nization's minimum 1,800-a-day standard 
and on a par with the recommended intake 
for a quick weight-loss diet in the West 
Overall the organization classifies one in 
three Africans as undernourished. 


Hunger is one symptom of economic 
distress, but it also works in ruthless tan- 
dem with poverty and disease. Workers 
weakened by lack of food produce less and 
sicken easily, reducing overall productivi- 
ty- 

Overtaxed social services, especially for 
health, break down. “Structural poverty” 
sets in, a bare subsistence with no cushion, 
no food stores, no valuables to sell off 
when drought or pests hit. Season to sea- 
son, crisis hovers as living standards erode. 

“People are surviving," a Kenyan pedia- 
trician, Florence Manguyu, told Audubon 
magazine, “but you would not want to be 
one of them." 

The individual struggle for survival is 
mirrored at the nationaflevel; whole coun- 
tries get so deeply mired that it is tough to 
pull them ouL 

Ethiopia is one of the worst-off of 15 
sub-Saharan countries in which about 34 
million Africans face what the Food and 
Agriculture Organization calls “exception- 
al food emergencies.” It needs an extra 1 
million torn of food to keep 7 mini on 
citizens alive. 

That is roughly comparable to the 
amount needed during the great famine of 
1984-85, when up to 1 milli on Ethiopians 
died. If this s umm er** mam r ains f ail, Ethi- 
opians will need from 2 milli on to 3 million 
tons of emergency food, an amount so big 
it would probably be impossible to trans- 
port supplies in time to all the remote areas 
in need. Even if the T ains are bountiful, 
food import requirements will likely 
mount. 

Astronomical growth will require huge 
agricultural expansion. Ingo Loerbroks, a 
veteran Food and Agriculture Organiza- 
tion representative in Ethiopia, said, 
“Even the bold assumptions of a 5.8 per- 
cent growth of grain production in Ethio- 
pia over the next 17 years win not elimi- 
nate the country’s need to import between 
600,000 and 650,000 tons in any one year 
— excluding, of course, the occurrence of 
another natural disaster.” 




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GAS IJNE,LAGOS-STYl£^Nfeertaiis fating a foarth day Thui^y for gasoKne.OTifori^ are on strike, 

and their onion leaders have urged au nations to support their efforts to bring down Nigeria’s nrjitary government. 

3 Leaders Tell Lesotho King to Reinstate Cabinet 


fO v 


Reuters 

PRETORIA — Three south- 
ern African leaders said on 
Thursday that they had given 
Lesotho's King Letsie IQ a 
week to reverse his decision to 
dissolve his country's demo- 
cratically elected government. 

“The three presidents made it 
quite dear that they cannot 
condone the measures that he 
has taken," said President Rob- 
ert Mugabe of Zimbabwe. “It 
was decided that he had to be 


given time to relook at the mea- 
sures and take steps to reverse 
them." 

Mr. Mugabe was speaking at 
a news conference flanked by 
his South African and Botswa- 
na counterparts. Nelson Man- 
dela and Qnett Masire. 

The three met the king and 
the man he fired last week. 
Prime Minister NtsuMokhehle, 
in Pretoria to try to resolve Le- 
sotho’s political crisis. 

King Letsie, citing popular 


dissatisfaction, last week dis- 
solved Mr. Mokhehle’s admin- 
istration, which came to power 
last year after Lesotho's first 

multiparty elections in 20 years. 
Five people have died in clashes 
since. 

The king told the news con- 
ference that he wanted time to 
consult with his advisers. 

“We agreed that they should 
go back to Lesotho for consul- 
tations and come back to us 


within a week," Mr. Mugabe- 
said. 

. Mr. Mugabe, asked whether, 
the six-hour summit talks, held-; 
at Mr. Mandela’s offices, dedd- " 
ed that Mr. Mokhehle should 
be restored to power, said thai^. 
tins was tiie case. 

“Indeed, there’s no other al- 
ternative,” he said. “We are 

jjoback homeland thin^a^mt 
it. The titnation in Lesotho is-’ 
showing signs of hope." J 


Ci 


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* Trip ; ,,, 


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Fax: [33 ]) 46 37 93 70 
or your nearest. IHT office or representative 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 26, 1994 



THE WEATHER 


Todirs Ff^i mild in ihe iIlrnMii 
and cool it niitht, with awierit* 
wind* ■ ■ • 


jMnnhw TnUHUfi- Mu*. 1»:. SU4 . M . 

OtUikd Report on Page 20 



NEW 

jJX&sZ lllf 


YORK 



(Tribune 


LATE CITY 
EDITION 


You CIV No. 3K.713 ; 


Uwrlrfal. HU. 
*«» Talk TiIUm Im, 


SATURDAY, AUGUST 2G. 1944 


THIfI CtNTS 
In Nn fok CHy 


Liberation of Paris Is Hailed as Nazis Yiel 




Say Foe Flees Norman Rocket Coast; 


Reached, Brest Shelled, Cannes Falls 



** r *TT n xi i 




r: ./ 



■'X*- 

,Y 





;v r^‘ i 


X- 



Peace 
Men Here on 
Surprise Trip 


Bid to WUlkie 
Acknowledged 
By Roosevelt 


34 of 36 Delegates , to 
Dumbarton Oaks Slip 
Quietly Into the Gty 


2 Embassies Deny 
Knowing of Trip 


SteUinius’s Office Made 
Arrangements ^Dr.Koo, 
Chinese Envoy, Arrives 


Thirty- four of the thirty-six 
Russian, British and American 
representatives to the Dumbarton 
Oaks conference on post-Mr 
curity arrived in New York from 
Washington last night, alter every 
effort had been made to 'keep 
secret their visit and. more suc- 
cessfully. their mission. 

Pint reports, with ; Httte sub- 
stance upon which to base them, 
were that the trip was merely 
planned to offer Urn conferees a 
respit e from their arduous wok 
in Washington. The e xt re me care 
taken to keep it secret, however, 
led to the belief , that something 
more momentous than recreati n g! 
might be in the air. ‘ 

Dr. Koe In New York.. 

At almost the same hour, three 
other delegates arrived In New 
York. Dr. V. K. Wellington Koo. 
Chinese Ambassador- to Khgfand .^ 
debarked with two . aids at La 
Guardla Field in a Pan American 
Airways dipper, and said he would 
proceed today or tomorrow to 
Washington, where he will head 
the Chinese delegation. 

With Dr. Koo were Liang Yuen- 
U, counselor to the Chinese Em- 
bassy in London, and Cha Feng- 
yang. secretary to the ambassa- 
dor. 

Dr. 'Koo said at the airport that 
he was planning no 
while he remained in New York, 

Among those staying on the 
ninth and tenth Sootof the Wal- 
dorf-Astoria was Joseph c. Grew, 
former American Ambassador to 
Japan and State Department ex- 
pert an Japanese affaire Before 
Joining the group at the hotel. Mr. 
Grew was at La Guardis. Airport, 
where he greeted Dr. Koo cm his; 
arrival. 

Dr. Koo's party , went to the 
Hold Ambassador, where they will 
be a block away from the Wash- 
ington group at the Waldorf- As-] 
tori*. The Ambassador is at Parkl 
Avenue and Fifty-first Street, the 
Waldorf Astoria at Park Avenue 
and Fiftieth. 

Heading the group from Wash- 
ington was Edward R. Stettin! us 1 
Jr, Under Secretary of State. At] 
the Waldorf Astoria, where twen- 
ty-seven of the visitors are buying] 
for the week end. they were re- 
ferred to as "Mr. Stetlinlus and 
party* when any one dared to) 
refs to them at alL 

Embassies Deny It - 

Ihe reservations had been made 
in advance by Mr. Stettinhzs's of- 
fice in Washington, but the hotel 
and the State Department refused 
to tell who was footing the bill 
for the thirty-six visitors. 

The Russian end British Embas- 
sies Id Washington denied any 
knowledge of the trip. In both 1 
places an official said that only 
“a few” of their delegates had 
left town, statements that were; 

(Continued on page *. column 7) 


By Bert Andrews 
WASHINGTON. Aug. 25.— Presi- 
dent Roosevelt acknowledged today, 
after having denied it last Friday, 
that he had communicated pri- 
vately with Wendell L. WUlkie. 
looking toward' a conference to 
discuss foreign policy, and he said 
he may yet meet: Mr. WOUtie. but 
no date has been set: 

The question was brought up at 
Mr. Roosevelt’s regular press con- 
ference this mdtning in the light 
of publicity which had thrown un- 
desired limelight on his reported 
quiet attempt to bring the 1940 
Republican Presidential nominee 
into the Democratic camp. 

On the acknowledgment in 
Washington. Mr. Willkle issued a 
brief statement to New York, draw- 
ing an implied distinction between 
Mr. Roosevelt as an individual and 
(Continued on page 22, column 1/ 


MANY CHOICE HOMES 


!*■«, Sw4ay you cm fiad mb, «k- 
riraMt inwat m «4 Ike fcumfrwft 
■fr rt i n i m (to Cloudicd Real 
fit ate Pqn Amfen, towe-Mcte* 
4 a watte of Haw. Select Ike Hears 
a* Mold like <0 «h from tfie Sun- 
der. CleMrfifd Pages . . . rim go 
«ed inspect tW Here ere « for 
foe eil Ind tomorrow : 


acxKHMO CONN. — Colonial. *■ rooms 
fauiiu «' bni. M acres, brook ?;=."*■ 


WONTCLam N J —White CsknitL center 
ball, s brtnmou. lUJUrt 


rbowra mux L. I — VMiurmsiu iron 
brukMix, rcctnUis room. ■» acre 
IIIMll 


JACKSOH KBOffT* Qiiwn*— On* lento 
a iiee. ntmu, sixmo. 


Wants to See UimPrivalely ; 
WUlkie Hopes It Won't 
Be Till AJter Election 


Americans 
At Troyes in 
23-Mile Push 


Are 138 Miles From Gap 
at Belfort; Other Units 
Are Reported at Reims 


The Citizens of Paris Welcome the End of Four Years of German Tyranny 


Senate Passes 
8 -Man Board 
Surpluses Bill 


Measure IsWidelyDif f eren t 
From House’s, Which 
Admin isfrationApp roves 


nMttfNcriNTrAiutnm 

WASHINGTON. Aug. 25.— With- 
out a record vote, a listless Renata, 
which on two occasions failed for| 
a brief period to obtain a quorum 
of forty-nine members, passed late 
today a bin designed to set up the 
machinery an dprovtde the for- 
mula for distribution and disposal 
of the' government's surplus war 
[property: variously estimated to be 
worth. . from too. 000,000. 000 to, 
f 112.000.000,000. 

The Senate -approved measure, 
now goes to conference with the 
Rouse, which passed a widely dif- 
ferent version of surplus' property 


l egisl a tion early this week, carry- 
ing the approval of the Roosevelt 
administration as expressed by 
William 1*. Clayton, present Sur- 
plus Property Administrator under 
appointment or president R oosg - 
relL. 

Mr.- Clayton has made no secret 
of his disapproval of the Senate 
f Continual on dobs 12. co lumnJi 


Flyers Pound Foe 
Fleeing theChannel 


Nazis May Withdraw to 
Somme -Marne Lines; 
Seine Pocket Narrowed 


If TKt duatUUi Prtu 

SUPREME HEADQUARTERS. 
Allied Expeditionary For ce . Aug. 2C 
(Saturday) w— American tanks, in 
a twenty-three-mile advance, yes- 
terday rolled Into Troyes, eighty- 
five miles southeast of Paris and 
263 miles from the German border 
at the Rhine, while far behind 
them Allied armies were slam ping 
out the last sparks of German re- 
sistance south of the Seine. 

lieutenant General George S. 
Patton's armor, racing toward soil 
known to Americans who fought In 
the World War. was cutting across 
the last German conununicaUon 
'lines to southern France and rais- 
ing fresh perils to the German 
frontier. 

f At London “The News Chrun 
tele" said an unofficial report 
placed Americans at Reims, eighty- 
live allies northeast .of Paris and 
fifteen -miles 'north of the Marne. 
[The source of the report, uncon- 
firmed at Allied headquarters, was 
not given. “The London Dally 
Herald" said a German D. N. B. 
broa d cast reported the Americans 
were in Reims, but motor listening 
posts at London did not record 
such a broadcast.} 

May Flee to Somme 
There were signs that even more 
momentous fighting was Impend 
Ing cm the plains north of Paris, 
with the Germans pcssibly falling 
back to a battle line along the 
Somme River. AC least part of 
their forces were pulling out of 
the rocket coast fortifications, 
pilots reported, probably before 
the menace of the American 
bridgehead thirty miles northwest 
of Paris which the Germans have 
failed to eliminate despite bitter 
fighting. 

Allied planes by night were at- 
tacking German trucks moving 
away from the rocket coast toward 
Amiens, indicating the 15th Ger- 
r continued on payez, column 3/ 


News on Inside Pages 


WAR 


Patton's story, from England to 
beyond Paris. is told. Page 3 
Plying -bomb ton is set at half of 
the worst "blttx." Page 3 
Housekeeper says foe shot way 
into Paris. embassy. Page 3 
Flame-throwing British Chur- 
.. chili tanks rout Nazis. Page 3 
U. S. flyers hit robot launching 
sites in a wide sweep. Page 3 
Russians race for Bucharest, are 
near the Galatl Gap. Page* 
Tito says Allies plan closer ties 
" with the Partisans. Page 8 
U.S. planes hit forty-eight enemy 
planes in the Celebes. Page 5 
Japan cancels U. s. relief for 
prisoners in Philippines Page 5 
Chinese sever enemy's ichang to 
Hankow railroad. Page 5 

Merrill asserts an error sent in- 
jured back to front. Pace 5 
Army discarding supplies along 
the Alcan Highway. Page 12 
Cossacks of the Kuban grateful 
. for U. S. food and belp.Page 13 
Pope discusses "problems of the 
hour" with Churchill. Page 14 

War cammimlqaes. Page * 

Army. Navy casualty lists Pare 14 


taacimoNT x r — wwt* bH*» cvhbmj 

Paw tool. BmtffM wina lltM. 


SPORTS 

Giants swamp Dodgers in night 
game, 10 to 2. Page 15 
Yankees defeat Senators in 11- 
inntog duel, 4 to 2. Pare 15 
Byron Nelson's 138 paces Tam o' 
Shan ter golf field. Page 25 
Devil Diver favored to win Wil- 
son at Belmont today. Page 16 
McNeill gains semi-final round 
In Meadow dob tennis pace 16 
Views, of Sport, A1 Lancypagc 16 


CITY AND VICINITY 
State planning to increase the 
facilities at Jones Beach Page 7 
Schools irian to link history and 
economics courses. Page * 

Quill's supporters break up rally 
of Lewis's forces. Page 9 

Boy drives off with Idle bus. picks 
up nine passengers. Page 13 
Mrs. Cromwell wins a point in 
her divorce action. Page 13 
Bishop O'Hara will rededicate 
N. Y. Guard chapel. Page 14 
Negro church makes a Harlem 
theater its new home. Page 14 
French church to give thanks 
Tor freeing Of Paris. Page 14 
A. P. of L. Ignores Tobin's cajol- 
lngs to back RooseveltPage 22 
Service men's ballots in New 
York may total 400.000JPaie22 
NATIONAL 

Mortimer E. Cooley, engineer 
and educator, dies. Page 6 
"Pair treatment" bill is drafted 
for Federal agencies. Page 12 
Nelson's ouster as chief of the 
W. P. B. seen possible. Page 12 
Revolt is quelled at Florida Jail 
after six-hour siege. Page 13 

editorials and miscellany 

Page 

Pood 9 

,Soclety 11 

Amusements - 6 

iBeebe 11 

Church news 14 

Fresh Air 8 

[Real estate ...21 

[Radio 20 

Obituaries — 8 
[Financial - .17-28 
Business ..17-20 


Page 

Editorials .. 

.10 

Lippmutn . 

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Major El lot- 

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in Short... 

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Bridge 

.11 

Webster ... 

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"Mr.aad Mrs."21 

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Puml* 

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Boqfcs ...... 

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Fashions ... 

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Hi! picture, the firm* mWt fmllmtimg the mrriout mj Allied Imp in Peru, ihi 

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[Cannes Taken; 
F. F. I. Reported 
Reaching Lyon 


PatcVs Men 8 Miles From 
Arles in Rhone Valley; 
Toulon Fight Still Rages 


By Russell Hill 

Sy Witten to <»« Herald Tnbmi 
Capnisht, ISM. Mn> Vatic TritaM Zac. 
ROME. Aug. 25. — Cannes and 
Antibes, famous resort towns of 


Aiwdiirt ton lirtflM* frtoa K(ul Ctfn n<lQh»w 
a celebration In progress near the Porte d’Orleons 

♦ 


Paris People Go Wild With Joy 
As Allied Armor Enters the City 


Jam Streets as on Mardi Gras, Kiss Soldiers on 
Both Cheeks; Crowd al the Luxembourg Melts 
Away When Machine Guns Open Up 


By Don Whitehead 

PARIS. Aug. 25 LPi- — American and French columns fought their 
way Into the center of Paris today and received a thunderous welcome 
from hrr citizens as they opened battle with Germans and Vichy 
mlHliamen still Intrenched in im- 
portant strongholds. 


the French Riviere, were occupied; 


The Allied troops entered the 


by American troops of Lieutenant 
General Alexander M. Patch's 1th 
Army in a twelve-mile advance 
eastward on the right flank of the 
Allied front in southern France. 
Allied headquarters announced 
today. 

Meanwhile, at the opposite end 
of the front other American de- 
ments operating in the lower 
Rhone Valley were reported within 
eight miles of Arles, on the road 
from Salon. Fighting continued 
in the port area of Toulon, while 
in Marseille the French were said 
to be stin mopping up. 

(A French Purees of Interior 
communique said the Maquis en- 
tered Lyon on Thursday, thus bot- 
Uinr up those Germans in the 
Rhone Valley between Arles and 
Lyon.l 

The capture of Cannes followed 
a period of Inactivity on the east- 
ern flank since the first days of 
ine invasion. Troops in this sector 
have been content to hold their 
positions while the main drives 
developed westward against Tou- 

{ Continued an page 2, column 61 


city from Uie south, and almost 


immediately as they reached the 
beautiful Luxembourg Gardens, 
the Nazis and the collaborationist 
militia opened fire with machine 
guns, rifles and pis lots. 

A column of American infantry 
streaked for the lie de la Cite. In 
the center nl the capital, to Uie 
relief of French patriot forces and 
police who had been fighting Uie 
Germans for nearly a week. On 
reaching that island in the Seine 
the Americans drove to the Ca- 
thedral of Notre Dame, reaching 
there ac II a. m. and closing In 
with a ground attack against en- 
emy positions. 

As this dispatch is written the 
Germans are still holding out in 
the area on both sides of the Seine 
halfway along the Champs Ely- 
sees and at the Place de la Con- 
corde. Qua! d'Orsay, Tuileries 'the 
gardens of Uie Louvre-, the Ma- 
delrine. the Chamber of Deputies. 
Ute Senate and the Hotel de Cril- 
fon (adjoining the American Em- 
bassy 1. French patriots have s 
grip on the De de la Cite, the Pa- 

f Continued On page 2, column it 


Nazis Reported 
Surrendering 
At Bucharest 


De Gaulle Rule 
InFreedFrance 
Put Into Effect 


Eisenhower Acts on Accord 
for Civil Power Pending 
Election by the Citizens 


Paris Is Tom 
By Battles as 
Troops Enter 


French-ControUed Radio 
Says German General 
Surrenders to Le Gere 


De Gaulle Reported 
With Army in City 


His Speech Is Broadcast; 
Bitter Fighting Raged 
at Concorde and Eloile 


Slain Woman Found in Bushes 
In Grounds of the Planetarium 


Concealed in shrubbery ten feet 
high, the body of a blonde young 
woman was discovered at 11:35 
m. yesterday twenty feet from 
the main entrance of Hayden 
[Planetarium. In Manhattan Square 
Park, Centra) Park West and 
Eighty-first Street. 

An autopsy showed that the 
woman had been strangled during 
the night. So well was the body 
hidden that morning strollers 
failed to see it. and only by the 
circumstance that two Park De- 
partment employees took a short 
cut through the shrubbery was 
the slaying revealed. 

Although scores of detectives 
were put on the case immediately, 
the victim was still unidentified 
fast night. Police said she was a 
natural blonde, about twenty-six 
years old. weighing about 135 
pounds. She wore a tan camel's 
hair coat, a blue wool dress, flesh- 
colored hose and dark blue shoes. 

Detectives said the only clew 
they had was a key, apparently to 
an apartment, found to a beaded 
bag picked up near the body. The 


key bore on one side the stamped 
characters "7-F." and on the other 
the name, "independent Lock 
Company. Fitchburg. Mass." Also 
in Uie bag were 11 cents in cash, 
two red ration points, a package 
of agamies. a make-up kit and a 
pair of silk panties, neatly folded. 

Some distance from the body 
police round an empty envelope 
addressed to a woman, and from 
its return address it appeared that 
iL had been sent by a woman. They 
declined, however, to disclose 
either name. 

The only marks on the body 
were a discolored eye and a heavy 
scratch on the right side of the 
face. Until an autopsy was per- 
formed al Bellevue Hospital by Dr. 
Benjamin M. Vance, deputy chief 
medical examiner, police were re- 
luctant to believe that the woman 
had been slain. 

Dr. Vance's report however, said 
the cause of death was ‘‘strangula- 
tion. probably manual.*- 

The spot where the body was 
/Continued on pope 20, column 6 J 


City Raided by Germans as 
Romanians DeclareWsr; 
Bulgaria Seeking Terms 


By Lewis Gannett 

From the HtruU Tiffim Burro 
OantKki, IM4. K«w Tort Trtbaae Inc. 
LONDON. Aug. 26 (Saturday) 
— German troops in Bucharest 
have surrendered to the Ro- 
manians. German air forces have 
bombarded Uie Romanian capital, 
and the new Romanian govern- 
ment has declared war on its erst- 
while ally. Germany, according to 
radio reports reaching London 
from Bucharest and Cairo. 

The German radio admits that 
the Russians now control all of 
Romania north of Uie Danube and 
that the Russians are fighting In 
the Danube delta. Reports regard- 
ing the Black Sea port of Con- 
stanta at the mouth of the Mg 
rtrer. are conflicting. Some say 
that the Romanians are in con- 
trol: others that the Germans are 
still in sufficient force to be able to 
scuttle their Black Sea fleet. 

I Two Russian armies, credited 
ilh killing or capturing 205.400 
enemy troops in a six-day Balkan 
(Continued on page 4. column SI 


By Turn United Preys 
WASHINGTON. Aug. 25.— Gen 
eral Dwight D. Elsenhower. Allied 
supreme commander In Europe, 
placed in effect today Pronco- 
American agreements for civil ad 
ministration in liberated France 
until the people can choose a per 
manent government. 

The agree m ents, concluded with 
General Charles de Gaulle's French 
Committee of National Liberation 
became effective with an exchange 
of letters between Generals Eisen- 
hower and Joseph Pierre Koenig, 
leader of Genrral de Gaulle’s 
Preach Forces of the Interior. 

As outlined by the War and 
State Departments, the agree- 
ments deal with administration of 
civil affairs and related mailers 
and are designed to facilitate the 
"direction and co-ordination" of 
assistance rendered to Allied 
troops by French authorities and, 
the people. General Eisenhower 
will retain whatever authority he 
considers necessary for Uie “unim- 
peded conduct of military opera- 
tions." 

The State Department said the 
agreements are "essentially tem- 
porary" and will remain In effect 
so long as- General de Gaulle's 
representatives "continue to re- 
ceive the support of the majority 
of Frenchmen who are fighting for, 
Uie defeat of Germany and the 
liberation of Prance." 

The agreements result direcUy 
from Genera) de Gaulle's recent 
visit to Washington and the subse- 
quent recognition oT his commit- 
tee as the de facto authority in 
Prance. 


Army Rules Roosevelt Address 
‘Political,’ Then Reverses Itself 


Tram Ut Herald Trttune Barca ■ 

WASHINGTON. Aug. 25— Pres 
Went Roosevelt's efforts to remain 
akmf from campaigning in what 
he has termed "the usual partisan, 
political sense" encountered rough 
going today at the hands of the 
War Department, but were sal 
vaged to some extent tonight by 
an eleventh-hour reversal of an 
earlier decision today that his Aug. 
12 speech at Bremerton. Wash., on 
returning from his tour of Pacific 
bases, was a "political address." 

Tonight's action was taken by 
John J. McCloy. Acting Secretary 
of War. In the week-end absence 
of Secretary Henry L. Stlmson. Zt 
was made known when the depart- 


ment released a statement by Mr. 
McCloy stating that the War De- 
partment now "determines” that 
the President's •■report" from 
Bremerton was not political, and 
that therefore It has withdrawn 
radio lime previously promised to 
the Socialist party for an over- 
seas broadcast to American troops 
on the theory that the address was 
political and that therefore the 
Socialises were entitled to - equal 
time for a political speech of their 
own. 

In Denver. Norman Thomas, the 
perennial Socialist candidate for 
President, was quoted as saying 
the War Department’s ban proves 
(Continued on page 22, column 2 J 


By Eric Hawking 

from the Herald rrifemt JlirMi 

CmrrUM, 1*44. Km Tort Trtbaa* lac. 

LONDON. Aug. 26 (Saturday) — 
The week-long battle to liberate 
Paris Anally was won yesterday 
evening, according to reports 
which reached London late last 
night. A broadcast from a Faria 
radio station now to patriot hands 
said General Jacques Le Clerc. 
commander of the French 2d 
Armored Division to the French 
and American relieving forces, bad 
summoned the German com- 
mander at Paris to cease a useless 
resistance. A half hour later, the 
same station said tbs Germans 
had surrendered to General Le 
Clerc and General Jolnvtlle. leader 
of the Paris citizen forces. 

A spokesman at Allied supreme 
headquarters aald there was no 
official knowledge there that the 
; Germans to Paris had surrendered. 
The spokesman declined to say 
whether Paris could be regarded 
as definitely freed. 

General Charles de Gaulle, 
president at the French Commit- 
tee of National Libera lion, entered 
Paris at 7 p. m. yesterday, accord- 
ing to the Paris radio station, and 
presumably was with General 
Le Clerc when the reported Ger- 
man surrender was received. 


Severe Fighting In City 
Reports which reached London 
yesterday on the situation at Parts 
were conflicting and confusing, 
but it was clear that severe fight- 
ing raged in various parts of the 
city during most of the day. The 
fighting was particularly severe at 
the Place de la Concorde and the 
Place de fStoUe. at the two ends 
of the Avenue des Ch&mps-ElyseeB, 
In the western part of the city. 
According to German reports, 
there was a battle also in the Lux- 
embourg district, on the left bank. 

Apparently German resistance 
was steadily crushed once the 
French and American relieving 
forces, which entered Paris from 
the south and west yesterday 
morning, went into action along- 
side the French Forces of the In- 
terior and civilian fighters who 
rose against the Germans a week 
ago today. The bulk of the reliev- 
ing forces bad remained Just out- 
side the city last night, after send- 
ing a vanguard into the center of 
Paris. 

CSrilians Wildly Happy 
Vast crowds of civilians poured 
into the streets, deliriously happy, 
as the French and American troop* 
entered the city yesterday morn- 
ing. At Uie Porte dltaile. the Allied 
tanks and troops entered just be- 
fore 20 a. m. on their way to cen- 
tral Paris. The people alternately 
cheered and wept as they thronged 
the streets in the southern part of 
the city. Similar scenes' were wlv* 
ne&srd later in the day elsewhere. 

The spokesman at Allied su- 
preme headquarters said the 
Americans, after crossing the 
River Seine at the Pont de flevrea 
midway between Versailles and 
Paris, entered the city yesterday 
at the Porte d'Orieaiu. apparently 
without encountering opposition 
immediately, and moved directly 
to the Be de la Cite, which 
throughout has been a center of 
the uprising. 

Around noon a large pari of the 
relieving forces was to action in 
the Champs-Elysees district and 
the Latin Quarter, which includes 
the Luxembourg. At the same timg 
they reinforced patriot forces 
holding the He de la Cite 


the 


$ New Vtxk Herald Tribune. Reprinted with permission 


THE LIBERATION OF PARIS - 
AUGUST 22-27, 1944 
In the last days of August, as the 
Allies approached the city, the imarmed 
population of Paris - reinforced by a small 
number of armed resistance fighters - rose 
against the occupying German forces. In four 




days of street battles and general 
insurrection, Paris was liberated. To 

‘in the new york heraid tribiwe® 2 ^ co mm emorate these dramatic days, the 

International Herald Tribune is reproducing the 
six front pages from the New York Herald 
Tribune chronicling the week of August 22 
through 27, 1944. 




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The International Herald Tribune 
is owned by The New York Times and 
The Washington Post, America’s two 
most prestigious newspapers. 

In addition to having instant 
access to their coverage, we have 
assembled a staff of selected journalists 
all over the world to bring you a view 
that is distinctly multinational. 

And with the availability of every 
newswire service, it all adds up to the 
world’s most extensive news-gathering 
network. 

No other publication can match 
our resources. 


So if you’re interested in 
commerce, in finance, in industry, ini 
politics, or if you need to know what the 
world’s strongest economy thinks about 
events in the rest of the world, make sure 
you get your copy of the International 
Herald Tribune. Every day. 

To subscribe, call us at: 

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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 




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Page U 



THE TR 1 B INDEX 1 17.2711 


International Heraitf Trfcune WorB Stock Index A composed of 
280 internationally invastabte stocks from 25 countnes, compiled 
by Bloomberg Business News. Jan. 1 , 1992 = 100 , 

120 — — r— 1 — : !—r — — : — 








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B Asia/PacHic 


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Ctosalia»ft«:: 117.17 



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1994 

■ North America 


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Ckwa 95.08 Prevj 95.09 
150 

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Approx weighting: 5% f3f|§ 

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Argentina, AuotraBa, Austria, Btogkon, BnsB, Canada. ChBa.DnwIi, Rnlaml. 
France, Germany, Hong Kona, b*h. Moadnow Natharlaoda^Nns Zealand, Norway, 
Singapore, Spain, Swndao, Swtaa rt and and Vanazutta. For Tokyo, New York and 
London, the Max k axnpcoed & toe 20 top irauns h team d market cepkaUialk. 1 , 
otharmaa foe ten lop Bocks am tracked. 


| Industrial Sectors ^ 


Ttao. IVK % 

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Energy 

114.40 114.46-0.05 

Capital Goode 

12028 11928 

4084 

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132.13 13088 4086 

RawlMeriats 

13553 13458 

40.78 

Finance 

11750 117J0 -025 

Consumer Goods 

10420 104.10 

-4X19 

Services 

123.12 123.42 -024 

Huceflaoeoat 

134.15 133.10 

4079 

For mom krionmtion about tho Imtox a bocMet is available fax ot charge. 

Write to Trib Index, 181 Avgnoo Cttariesde Gadte. 92&1 NeaUfCBdoK, France. 


3DO Makes Plans for Christmas 


By John Markoff 

Nee York Times Service 

REDWOOD CITY, California — In a 
move underscoring the convergent paths 
of personal computers and video-game 
technology, 3 DO Co. says it will adopt 
the Motorcda-tBM Power PC chip for its 
nextgeneration of video players. 

3 DO, an American company with 
powerful backers like AT&T C 0 rp„ 
Time Warner Inc. and Matsushita Elec- 
tric Industrial Co. but with slower-than- 
expected sales of its video-game ma- 
chines, is seeking to develop a machine 
that would sell for less than $500 but 
surpass the speed and power of the fast- 
est personal computers. 

It intends to have that product ready 
by Christmas 1995 — in titrm to meet 
sim i lar ly ambitious new machines from 
3D0’s bigger Japanese competitors, Nin- 
tendo Co., Sega Enterprises Ltd. and 
Sony Carp. 

3 DO means to adopt the same Power 
PC microprocessor technology that In- 
ternational Business Machines Corp. 
and Apple Computer Inc. are using for 
their most powerful personal computers. 

The Power PC chip, introduced last 
year, was jointly developed by IBM, Mo- 
torola. Inc. and Apple and is manufac- 
tured by IBM ana Motorola. 

Industry analysts said 3DO’s plan to 
base its new machines on the Power PC 
was a sign of the blurring of computers 
and consumer electronics that would be 
a feature of households of the future. 


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In that exa, thedisrinction between the 
videogame player, the personal comput- 
er and — eventually — the interactive 
television set win be chiefly a matter of 
which room they are used in and what 
software they run, rather than any sgnif- 
icant hardware differences. 

The trend, if it plays out, could give 
momentum to the Power PC in its con- 


test with microprocessors from Intel 
Corp. 

Intel, despite being the world’s largest 
chip maker, has no presence yet in the 
video-game field ana trails Motorola in 
many chip markets other than desktop 
computere. 

“The momentum behind the Power 
PC makes it an attractive bandwagon to 
jump on,” said Michael Slater, editorial 
director of the industry newsletter Mi- 
croprocessor Report. “It's finding its 
way into games and laser printers, as well 
as other industrial applications.” 

3 DO, which was founded in 1991 and 
wait public in May 1993, has yet to turn 
a profit. In its first quarter, which ended 
June 30, the company had a loss of $8.7 
million on revenue of S4.9 million. But 
with $42 million in cash on hand, it has 
money to spend on research and devel- 
opment. 

Although it has sold only about 
200,000 of its $500 video-disk game play- 
ers, sales have picked up recently, and 
industry analysts estimate the level will 
reach 500,000 by die end of the year. 

3 DO’s stock price rallied on Monday 
and Tuesday, rising a total of 27 percent, 
on an announcement from 3 DO’s presi- 
dent and chief executive. Trip Hawkins, 
that the company “just had our best 
month ever” and was “buflding momen- 
tum” for the Christinas shopping season. 

rs of 3DO* 


Wednesday, on news 

See 3DO, Page 12 


DO’s tech- 


Japan’s Minebea 
To Sell a Unit 


To GE Capital 


Bloomberg Business News 

TOKYO — In a move that 
would give it a foothold in the 
world’s second-largest financial 
services market, GE Capital 
Corp. said Thursday it would 
buy the consumer finance unit 
of Japan’s Minebea Co. The 
price was not disclosed. 

GE Capital the financial aim 
of the American industrial con- 
glomerate General Electric Co., 
said it would buy Minebea 
Credit Co. and its wholly 
owned subsidiaries, NC Card 
Senai Co. and Nakaxna Shop- 
ping Service Co. 

The operations being sold 
have 180 billion yen ($2 billion) 
in total loans outstanding, ac- 
cording to both companies. But 


lion yen in 1984 to 71 trillion 


yen by last year, said Betsy 


GE Capital will not be buying 


Samsung Commits $5 Billion to Car Plan 


Rotten 

CHANGWON, South Korea 
— The Samsung group of com- 
panies has committed itself to 
invest $5 billion in an automak- 
ing project that has been ques- 
tioned by the government, a 
Samsung executive said Thurs- 
day. 

“We have made a fins deci- 
sion already to start the car- 
manufacturmg business,” said 
Kim Moo, vice president of 


Samsung Heavy Co., one of 27 
units of 


O International Handd Trtouna 


the Samsung group, 
whose product lines also in- 
clude semiconductors and sug- 
ar. 

“We will initially invest $5 
tuition over three years to start 


the for manufacturing 
passenger cars,” Mr. Kim said. 
“We will start with the nmwud 
capacity of 50,000 cars, rising 
gradually to 200,000, 500,000 
and eventually 1.5 million cars 
or more.” 

Samsung Heavy began sell- 
ing trucks in May as a first step 
but had to delay its filing with 
the government to produce cars 
because of the government’s re- 
luctance to approve. 

“The government has not 
told us outright it is opposing 
our plan to produce cars, but it 
has voiced concern about possi- 
ble negative impacts on the na- 
tional economy,” Mr. Kim said. 

Samsung Heavy signed an 


agreement with Nissan Motor 
Co. this year to buy technology 
to produce cars but announced 
in May that it was indefinitely 
postponing the project. 

Mr. Kim said it would notify 
the government of iis plan to 
buy technology from Nissan to 
compete in global car markets 
before 1997. 


negative impact on the econo- 
my. 

Some government officials 
said the country’s car industry 
was already overcrowded. 


“It wiD take three years for us 
to market cars after we start 
breaking the ground for build- 
ing a car plant,” he said. 

He said Samsung was legally 
required only to notify the gov- 
ernment of its plan to import 
foreign technology, although 
policymakers can stop the plans 
if they are viewed as having a 


South Korea is already sixth 
in the world in auto production, 
with output from Hyundai Mo- 
tor Co., Daewoo Motor Co. and 
Kia Motors Corp- Samsung's 
aspirations to join the dub have 
met strong opposition from the 
current carmakers. 


about 60 trillion yen of real es- 
tate-linked loans, of which 20 
billion yen are considered trou- 
bled. 

Neither side would say what 
GE Capital would be paying for 
the companies. But Minebea of- 
ficials said the company expect- 
ed to devote 10 billion yen to 
writing off its remaining bad 
real-estate loans. Both rides 
were sketchy about the details 
of the transaction, which is not 
due to close until November. 

Still, the acquisition would 
give GE Capital, a financial ser- 
vices company with total assets 
of $211.7 billion, access to Ja- 
pan’s cash-rich consumers. 

“Japan is No. 2 in financial 
services in the world,” said Ta- 
keto Yamakawa, managing di- 
rector of GE Capital Corp- **R 
is too big to ignore.” 

Tbe country's consumer 
credit market grew from 23 tril- 


Daniels, an analyst at Morgan 
Stanley & Co. in Tokyo. During 
that period, the market has 
posted 13 percent annual aver- 
age growth, although it has 
slowed in recent years. 

As the transaction Is current- 
ly structured, GE Capital 
would not assume tbe troubled 
real-estate portfolio of tbe cred- 
it finan cing units at Minebea, 
which is better known for its 
manufacturing of ball bearings 
and electrical components. 

Minebea Credit bad 18 bil- 
lion yen in nonperforming 
loans lied to soured real-estate 
transaction as of June, a com- 
pany executive said recently. 
The unit's total real-estate loan 
portfolio is 55 billion yen, ac- 
cording Yasuaki Miyahara, a 
Minebea spokesman. 

By raisin g some cash from 
tbe sale of its consumer finance 
business, the company eases 
some of the financial pressure 
from its real-estate woes. 
“There is a lot of merit in terms 
of reducing guarantees,” said 
Takeshichi Ogi, senior manag- 
ing director with Minebea. “We 
have cleared a big mountain.” 

But analysts say investors 
will wait for more details before 
being as upbeat. Trading was 
suspended early Thursday af- 
ternoon in Tokyo in Minebea, 
when the stock was down 30 at 
805 yen. 

“If the profit on the deal for 
Minebea exceeds the estimates 
of losses on the real-estate port- 
folio, dearly tbe market will re- 
act favorably,” said Mark Faulk- 
ner, a finanrial services analyst 
with S.G. Warburg & Co. 


South Korea could be fifth in 
the world as an automaker by 
2000, when its three main com- 
panies plan to have production 
capacity of at least 2 million 
cars each. 


WALL STREET WATCH 


Disney Changes Top Floor 


by Ow Sufi fine Dtyouha 

L OS ANGELES — Walt Disney Ca’s 
announcement of due deriartare.of 
studio chairman Jeffrey Katzenberg 
and the reshuffling of senior execu- 
tives quells weeks of speculation about Dis- 
ney’s top management and sets the course for 
a new phase, analysts said Thursday. 

Joe Roth, chairman of Caravan Pictures, 
was named chairman of Walt Disney Mtitiou 
Pictures late Wednesday. . 

Some said the reason for his departure was 
that Mr. Katzenberg had sought — and failed 
to get — the No. 2 job at Disney after the 
death of Disney’s president, Frank G.Wefls, 
in a helicopter accident in April. 

Disney said Wednesday it was reorganizing 
its film business by creating two distinct oper- 
ations, one for motion pictures and one for 


televirion. Mr. Katzenberg’ s film-malting re- 
parov 


abilities will be partly assumed by Mr. 

. Rims accounted for about 43 percent 

of Disney’s 1993 revenue. 

Richard Frank, who had served as gresir 
dent under Mr. Katzenbog at tire Disney 
studio since 1985, has beat promoted to 
chair man of the newly created Walt Disney 
Television & Telecommunications unit . 

The creation of that unit followed an an- 
nouncement this month by Disney and three 
regional phone companies that they were ex- 
ploring forming a joint venture to develop 
interactive video services. 

Both Mr. Roth and Mr. Frank will" i 
to Michael D. Eisner, chairman and 
executive of Walt Disney Co. 


point in its corporate life where redesigning 
itself is not a bad tiling.” 

David Londoner of Werthdm Schroder & 
Ca said: “One of the good things to come out 
. of this is that the policy erf releasing 60 films a 
year will probably go by the boards, and Dis- 
ney will concentrate on a more modest number 
of films. It is no secret that Disney’s live-action 
films over the last couple of years have not 
been as good as they were in the first five years, 
when this management group took over.” 

Although Mr. Katzenberg was a creative 
and energetic executive, Mr. Logsdon said, 
Mr. Roth should allay any fears Wall Street 
may have about Disney’s future film qpoa- 
tjpns- “He should bring some strength to the 
live, action film business," he said. 

But Mr. Katzenbeig’s departure may prove 
"painful for the animation ride; which has 
been extraordinarily lucrative for the compa- 
ny and is an area in which Mr. Katzenberg 


has played the dominant role. 
Now the 


Jeffrey Logsdon, a managing director of 
SeidJer Cos, said Disney 


■ was “probabfy at a 


the responsibilities fall to Roy Dis- 
ney, vice of the company and a 

nephew of its founder, Walt Disney. While 
Roy Disney has played a role in animation, it 
was Mr. Katzenberg who led the division to 
its enormous success. 

Mkhad Eisner and Frank We&s together 
took over the helm of Disney in September 
1984. Mr. Eisner brought Mr. Katzenberg 
with him from Paramount Pictures to take 
charge of Disney’s film studios. 

Mr. Wells’s death sparked talk about the 
company's need to name a successor . 

Speculation intensified in July after Mr. 

See DISNEY, Page 13 


News Corp. Profits Despite Price Cuts 


Compiled by Oar Scoff From Dispouha 

SYDNEY — News Corp- on 
Thursday reported the highest 
earnings in Australian corpo- 
rate history, with annual pretax 
profit of 136 billion Australian 
dollars ($993 million), up 17 
percent 

Generous film and television 
earnings helped offset a slump 
in the newspaper division, 
where a price-cutting war in the 
British market proved cosily 
despite a circulation leap for 
The Sun, a London tabloid. 

The media conglomerate’s re- 
sults included a one-time gain 
of 123 million dollars on the 
sale of its 343 percent stake in 
Tbe South China Morning Post, 
in Hong Kong, in September. 

News Corp-* 8 overall sales 
rose nearly 9 percent in the year 
ended in June, to 1 1.6 billion 
doQaxs. 

But the results were below 
expectations, and shareholders 
sent News Corp- stock down to 
9.00 dollars from 9.18 dollars 
on the Sydney exchange. 

“It was not exactly an out- 
standing result,” said Lachlan 
Drummond, media analyst at 
CS First Boston in Sydney. “It 
was a touch disappointing.” 

He said the newspaper price 
war in Britain had been more 
expensive for Rupert Mur- 
doch’s company than many an- 
alysts had expected 

News International PLC, the 
British unit of News Corp-. re- 
ported operating profit down 


47 percent in the year to June 30 
because of the cost cuts. That 
division’s contribution to News 
Corp- revenue dropped 26 per- 
cent, to 297 million dollars. 

“The U.K. newspaper market 
has sever been so competitive, 
and I can’t see that changing,” 
said Gus Fischer, chief executive 
of News International 

News Corp- said operating in- 
come from film productions 
jumped 16 6 percent, to 141 mfi- 
Hon dollars, reflecting the suc- 
cess of Twentieth Century Fax’s 
box-office hit “Mis. Doubtfire." 


Fox Broadcasting Co., News 
Corp.’s television division, 
raised its affiliate base by one- 
third, to 184 stations, bringing 
total U.S. household coverage 
to 98 percent. 

The company said it expect- 
ed its television division to im- 
prove further in 1995 as it start- 
ed to benefits from rights to 
broadcast National Football 
League games, which it won 
with a $1.6 billion bid in De- 
cember. 


The film is Fox’s biggest suc- 
cess since the 1990 hit “Home 


Alone.” Mrs. Doubtfire grossed 
more than $200 million in the 
first nine months of the year. 

But overall earnings from the 
film division disappointed 
some analysts because for the 
r, it feu below the 165 mil- 
dollars reported in third- 
quarter results. 

Terry Povey, media analyst 
at James Cape! Australia, said 
Fox had written down costs as- 
sociated with the production of 
the movies “Baa Girls” and 
“Baby’s Day Out” 


The combination of strong 
earnings in film and television, 
both based in the United States, 
turned North America into tbe 
most profitable region for News 
Corp- Earnings in the United 
States alone rose nearly 12 per- 
cent, to 1.1 billion dollars. 


Operating income from book 


to 208 milKon dollars. Results at 
the Harper Coffins division were 
“slightly ahead of last year,” 
with U.S, and British divisions 
showing improvement while 
Australian operations declined. 


(Bloomberg, Reuters, AFX) 


Toyota Profit Falls 


By Andrew Pollack 

New York Times Service 

TOKYO — Toyota Motor Coip-, hurt by the strong yen 
and a weak Japanese car market, reported its fourth consecu- 
tive annual decline in profit Thursday, with net income falling 
to its lowest level in at least a decade. 

But Japan's largest automobile company said the worst was 
over and predicted that sales and profit would rise in the 


coming year. In Tokyo, Toyota’s stock rose 10 y^ea, to 2.160. 


Toyota's 1993 consolidated net income fell 29 percent, to 
SI .29 billion). The figure is just over one- 
billion yen the company reported for 1990, 


its best year. 

Toyota’s revenue fell for the first time since 1 986, dropping 
83 percent, to 936 trillion yen. 

Worldwide vehicle sales fell 7.5 percent, to 4.13 million. 
Sales in Japan, the company's largest market, fell 6.9 percent, 
to 2.01 million. 

Toyota has not had much help from the United States, 
where the market has been strong. From January through July 
this year, its vehicle sales rose only 2 percent, compared with a 
rise of 9 percent for the market as a whole. 

By contrast, Honda reported a big gain in quarterly profit 
Wednesday, in part because of buoyant sales in the United 
States. Nissan is also seeing strong growth in tbe American 
market- Unlike its two Japanese rivals, Toyota has had no big 
new products to drive its U.S. sales. 

Like other Japanese companies, Toyota has been shifting 
its manufacturing abroad to cope with the strong yen. Bui 
that means that production in Japan has been dropping, 
leaving a problem of overcapacity. 

Toyota is in the midst of a cost-cutting program and said it 
had achieved 150 billion yen in savings in the last year. It 
expects to cut 100 billion yen more from its costs in the 
coming year. Most of tbe savings have cook from changes in 
the design of cars. 

Tbe company said it expected its domestic motor vehicle 
sales to rise 73 percent, in part because it had introduced 
some popular vehicles into the Japanese market. 

Total motor vehicle sales in Japan have declined for three 
years, but there are signs that the downturn might be ending. 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


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market diary 


TBIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 26, 1994 


Bonds Sap S team 
From Stock Market 


VriAwaMlAw 


OaSy dosings of Off; :v- 
DO# Jonas « irf usti$ 8 i £yefr 

4000 • .T : *"- fi: 


. Compiled ty Our St^f From Dapstcha 

NEW YORK — Stocks fin- 
ished mixed Thursday, with a 
drop in Treasury bond prices 
pulling down blue-chip issues. 

The Dow Jones industrial av- 
erage finished down 16.84 
points at 3,829.89, but advanc- 
ing, Stocta ~ 

ing issues outnumbered declin- 
ing ones by a 5-to-4 ratio on the 
New York Stock Exchange. 

Stocks were undermined by a 
drop in the benchmark 30-year 
Treasury bond, which fell 
28/32 point, to 99 19/32. That 
sent the yield up to 7 .53 percent 
from 7.46 percent Wednesday. 

Fresh data showing that eco- 
nomic growth was continuing at 
a steady pace took the steam 
out of the bond market, which 
had rallied Wednesday on a re- 
port pointing to a slowdown in 
growth. 

The government reported 
that unemployment claims fell 
last week, while a realtors’ 
group said sales of existing 
homes were little changed in 
July from June’s high level. 

“Anytime you see strong 
payroll employment numbers, 
it does raise in the bond mar- 
ket's eyes the fear that the Fed 
will move prematurely, perhaps 
in September," to raise interest 


rates, Anthony Chan, chief 
economist at BancOne Invest- 
ment Advisers said. 

Technology stocks were 
strong, with International Busi- 
ness Machines jumping 2 to 
69% on prospects for strong 

r rth in demand- IBM was 
most actively traded stock 
on the Big Board. 

Novdl rose % to 15%, after 
the software company said late 
Wednesday it would trim the 
operations of recently acquired 
WordPerfect by cutting 1,750 
jobs. 

Digital Equipment gained 1% 
to 24W, helped by confidence 
recent cost-cutting measures 
would begin to pay off. Also, 
Microsoft named Digital as an 
authorized support center in 
Microsoft's Solution Provider 
program. 

EMC jumped 1% to 17%, 
benefiting from Wednesday's 

announ cement that sales of its 
Symmetric Integrated Cached 
Disk Arrays to the financial ser- 
vices industry rose 93 percent in 
the first half" of the year. 

Webco Industries plunged 6. 
to 7%, after it said it bad over- 
stated profit in the second and 
third quarters because account- 
ing errors resulted in underpric- 
ing its products. The company 
said it expected to report a loss 
for the year. (Bloomberg, AP) 



Dow Jones Averages 


(Ml Wch Low Loo On. 

MW 384058 3356.1? 3627.95 3829X9— 16 AS 
Trans 140474 1609.34 1597.38 15949? — 2X3 
UM 18BJ7 18804 19659 194.99 —1.25 
Como 13ZUS 132644 13165* 131754 —4.9? 


St anda rd & Poor's Indexes 

High Low ansa orge 
Indtstrtota 551.28 SO* 549X9 —077 

Trtsap. 381 31 37132 37858 —024 

UtiqtlW 15*71 1S5X3 — 172 

Flnonc* 4422 4555 4ife— 021 

SPSOO 47C.T2 *OM 468X7-196 

SP US 43603 43241 43285 — L13 


Dollar Gains on the Yen 
Amid Trade Optimism 


..' ' *<• :.r::r:K' - x^- _ 


NYSE Most Actives 


IBM 
EMC S 
TeiMe* 

Compaas 

DWta 

MIcrTCA 

Gen0S 

RjRNab 

GnMOtr 

BiecKE 

WMXTc 

ABtrCk 

GTE 

JotinJn 

AT9.T 


NASDAQ Most Actives 


Nave* 

OdICPtr 
Cisco s 
MJcsfl s 
Oracles 

Cvntrys 

05CS 

MWC 

weticDlnd 

TelCmA 

Cot CP 

McCaw 

Maori lx 

Amgwi 


AMEX Most Actives 


NYSE Indexes 


HMi Low 

Composite 269.1$ 257X9 

tadusti-tas 321X1 328X4 

Trane. 244.67 243x1 

Ul«fy 210X6 208.97 

Roto 21497 21418 

Last am. 

258.18 —043 
33038 -039 
3*371 — au 
309.14 — nee 
2142? -002 

NASDAQ Indexes 



High 

UM 

Lest 

am. 


ftftli 

8916 

+2 

1714 

16V. 

17H 

• l»i 

67 Vi 

*546 

654ft 

— *6 

38ta 

3596 

3896 

+2V* 

24W 

ZP/it 

34V6 

-IV. 

4346 

4016 

43 

-3V6 

494h 

49*6 

494ft 

-46 

6H 

4 V, 

6V6 

__ 

51 ■* 

5046 

SOW 

—46 

2646 

2596 

3* 

— W 

30 Vi 

299ft 

2*Vft 

• W 

21 Vi 

21 'A 

21*6 

—10 

» 

314* 

3146 

- M 

491* 

4896 

489. 

— 46 

5416 

J4"> 

54W 

+ W 


ComaesHe 754.18 75157 7S422 -250 

WfluSlTlOtS 756.99 73501 757.04 -112 

Banks 780(3 777.13 777.12 —144 

Insurance 92B42 92144 92649 * U3H 

Finance 957.04 9S179 9SL79 —142 

Tims. 732.19 726.91 724.91 —074 


AMEX Stock Index 


448,13 44044 417.12 -QM 


Dow Jon es Pond Averages 


20 Ban d * 

M Utilities 
10 Industrials 


VaL HM 

Low 

Last 

aw. 

55868 65Vj 

63W 

65W 

*IV H 

44747 15W 

1546 

159ft 

-96 

43313 36W 

MW 

3516 

_ 

42953 2416 

2316 

M 

+ W 

34484 56*6 

S9. 

56*1. 

♦Ye 

30453 <346 

4196 

4396 

*146 

30345 22 VS 

17Ve 

18 


27311 2596 

249. 

25W 

♦ W 

26678 3696 

MW 

3SV» 

-Uh 

26084 816 

ft 

7W 

— 6 

24963 2396 

21 V* 

2146 

— ig M 

23003 11*6 

1046 

11W 

*to 

73902 54 'A 

53W 

53 W 

*46 

20775 23% 

21*6 

23 

+ 1 

20538 53*6 

996 

S2W 

— W 


NYSE Diary 


c 

Advanced 

Declined 

Unchanged 

Total femes 

New Highs 

New Lows 

tom Prev. 

056 1379 

125 814 

692 699 

1873 2892 

44 54 

a 0 

AMEX Diary 



EUROPEAN FUTURES 
Metals 


■u Ask Bid Ask 
AUJMmuMtHMi eradel 

Soot* 1 * 0, K61M 00 1487X0 1487 JO 146850 

^^^“SSSTsCOB 20PM 340M8 
Forward 341100 241600 241 7 JO 241800 
LEAP 

p v flm Mr metric too 

soot 57450 57750 57650 57750 

Forward J93J0 5WJ0 5S4J0 59455 

NICKEL 

Donors dbt merle kw 

Si muosnuo J8SOJO stasM 

Forward 59*5X0 599000 5710X0 5915X0 

TIN 

Dotas bbt metric ten 
Snot S29 8M 529000 5206X0 5215X0 

Forward 5360X0 5378X0 5285X0 5010X0 

ZINC ttpocfel Hta Grads] 

Donors Hr sHmcfoa 

Snot 973X0 974X0 957.50 958 58 

Forward 99650 997X8 982X0 98250 

Financial 

Hid Law doss Ck ou p s 
MrtOKTH STERUNO tUFFO 
IS88808 - ptl Of IS PCI 
S40 94X9 9494 9(35 —801 

Dee 93J9 9134 9134 Uoch. 

Mcr 9249 92X5 044. Uneh. 

Jpa 9114 92X9 9112 +0X4 

500 9145 91.0 9154 +0X6 

Dec 7136 91 S 9134 +0X4 

Mar 9tLM 90X0 9694 +0X4 

.ten 9077 9071 9075 +007 

Sep 7044 HJB 7842 +8X7 

Dee 9052 9045 90-49 +009 

Mar N.T. N.T. 9B0C +012 

Jn 9831 9827 70X0 +013 

Esf. volume: 42307. Open Int: 536099. 
WftOHT H EURODOLLARS tUFFE] 
SlmillfMi-ptsoMMpcI 
50 94M 9493 94X3 inch. 

OK 9427 9427 *437 Uneh. 

Mor 74X1 74X1 74X1 +0X2 

Jm H.T. N.T. 9167 +0X2 

sop N.T. N.T. *3X9 +001 

Est volume: MO Open ML: 38L 
3-MONTH EU KOMAR K5 CUFFS) 

DMT mOHea • PtS Of 188 pet ' 
sea *5X3 95X0 *501 Uneft 

Dee 94X5 94X1 94X2 UnctL 

Mar 94X4 94X0 94X3 +DX1 

Jan 94.19 94.16 9418 +003 

Sea 9183 93X4 9187 + 081 

Dec 9160 9154 *15* +004 

Me 9138 9134 9138 +005 

Jm 93.1S ' Tin «us .+ 0X4 

sea 92X5 92X4 72X6 + 0X4' 

Dec 9234 *231 *234 +0X3 

Mar 92X2 92X0 92X9 +031 

Joe 92X0 92X7 92X7 + 803 

Ext. volume: 58X54 Open Ml: 782X48. 


Htrt Low 

Me 158X0 K6J3 

<m 159X8 158X0 

£ iBfifS 

IBT 157X0 T363S 

MV 15429 15473 

»aa rna 

Eft volume: 10988 . 


Last Settle Ofm 
WM 157.25 + L23 
15835 15835 + 1X0 
159X0 13935 +135 
15876- 15859 +1X0 
15*35 15625 +076 
13475 15439 +025. 
15150 15X50 +02T 
Open IhL 10002 


UJ./AT THE WM g 

Judgp Says AT&T Can Buy McCaw 

rw^ONGTON (Combed with fts 




BRBNT CRUDE OIL(IPE)- 
UA d ou ari pi t mitS l st » cft—tarsti 


Oc* 

1806 

18.10 

18X8 

1438 

+U1 

Wrv 

IASI 

14X3 

1403 

1402 

+ 0X2 

9K 

1434 

1438 

1452: 

1452 

+ 038 

Jem 

1452 

1426 

9652 

1452 

+ 0.1# 

Feb 

1608 

16X0 

1404 

1407 

+&.11 

MOT 

1501 

ka 

1601 

1600 

+ U5 


1432 

WJ2 

1432 

1435 

+ 031 

war 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.~. 

14 AS 

+5x5 


N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1801 

+B1B 

Jit 

N-T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1802 

+ DM 

MM 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1803 

+ 8.13 

SOP 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

M04 

+555 

Est. volume: XX51 . 

Open InL 134X32 


Stock Indexes 


FTSCMIfUFra 

OSperJnaexHtat 

Sea 33640 3235X 3300 +190 

Dec 32710 3349X 32545 +T9X 

Mar N.T. N.T. 3279X +380 

btwhmt: TZ435L Open laL: 41.712. 

CAC m CMATIFJ 
FF3M per Index askrt 

AH 2045X0 201*00 2028X0 +12X0 

Sea 205100 WWiw j yw nn ti le 

oa 2058X0 20(7X0 +12X8 

Dec 307700 2067X0 20*400 +1200 

Mar N.T. N.T. 209300 +1208 

Es*. vDtame: 3S7B1. Open kdx 4UC8 

Sources: Motif, Associated Press* 
London Inti Financial Futures Exdiono+ 
tatl PUmteum BxettoouSk 




3+MJtmi PI BOR (MAT1F1 



FF5 muiloa 
SOP 

-pdefiMPd 
94X3 94X9 

942 9 

Unde 

Dec 

9353 

9X88 

9X90 

+ 8X2 

Mcr 

9X59 

9X54 

9X57 

+ 0JO 

Joa 

9331 

9X25 

9X28 

+ 0X5 

SOP 

9338 

9X00 

9X02 

+ 038 

Dec 

*203 

9177 

92X7 

+8X4 

Mo 

*207 

91*0 

9201 

+ 033 

Jom 

9208 

*207 

9307 

+0X5 


Total issues 

Newt+Bhi 

New Laws 


Bloomberg Business News 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
rose against the yen for a third 
day ’fhorsday bn reports of 
overnight intervention by the 
Bank of Japan and the possibil- 
ity that American and Japanese 
negotiators were making pro- 
gress in resolving trade dis- 
putes. 

The dollar started its rise in 
Tokyo after the Bank of Japan 

Foreign Exchange 

bought the U.S. currency for a 
third day, traders said. 

Meanwhile, the U.S. curren- 
cy feQ against the Deutsche 
marie and other major curren- 
cies after a German government 
report showed a small rise surge 
in that country's inflation rate. 
There was speculation that the 
Bundesbank would stop lower- 
ing interest rates, or even in- 
crease them, to control infla- 
tion. 

A Japanese Finance Ministry 


official who spoke on condition 
of anonymity said U.S. and 
Japanese negotiators bad en- 
gaged in “positive discussions.” 
The talks, on trade in insurance, 
are part of the so-called frame- 
work talks on ways to reduce 
Japan's $60 billion annual trade 
surplus with the United States. 

“There is a sense of optimism 
that the U.S. and Japan will 
make progress in this month's 
trade talks," said Michael 
Faust, a portfolio manager at 
Bailard, Biehl & Kaiser, a mon- 
ey-management concern in San 
Mateo, California. 

The two countries are also 
expected to resume talks on in- 
creasing Japanese government 
purchases of U.S.-made goods. 
If an agreement on that issue is 
not reached by SepL 30, Wash- 
ington can impose trade sanc- 
tions. 

The dollar closed in New 
York at 99.78 yen, up from 
98.99 yen Thursday. It fell to 
1.5425 DM from 13460 DM. 


VoL IBM 

Low 

Last 

am. 

1203* 34*0 

3396 

33*6 

—96 

7*49 12‘A 

11*6 

13*6 

♦ Vft 

8438 416 

4ft. 

4*6 

**6 

5830 «*u 

4*H 

416 

+ 96 

5447 1116 

11*6 

ll*ft 

— V6 

5444 3016 

20 

2016 


4740 39 

33 10 

32*6 

— 5*ft 

4150 7416 

M 

34*6 

—16 

3647 8*6 

lift 

8*6 

— V6 

3599 1216 

11*6 

t3'A 

— 


i NASDAQ Diary 


Unchanged 
Tax* issues 
Now Highs 
New Lows 


278 330 

289 274 

MO 224 

807 B28 

1* 18 

10 * 


1633 1780 

1500 1452 

1954 1857 

5089 5089 

1D2 137 

SS *9 


Ext votamc: 33XM. Open InL: 708X33 
LONG GILT CUFFO 
OMN - B>* A 32M» 04W* pet 
Sap 101*96 10MB 101-1* +044 

Dec 101-10 100-16 101-05 +M7 

Mor N.T. N-T. 100-17 +M? 

Eat volume: 64X30. Open hU 11 U09. 
GCRMAN GOVERNMENT BUND CUFFS) 
DM 3580*0 -Ph DM Kpd 
Sea *133 *1X5 *1X0 + 823 

Dec 90X9 90X8 90X0 + 007 

Mar 90S 90X5 90.10 +607 

Bit. volume: 93X13. Open kt: 159X83. 
10-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MATIP) 
FFSB8880 - Ms of IN act 


Caspar Per Amt Pwr 0k 

IRREGULAR 

AHkd IrtshBfcPLC C X£2* M J0-11 
London OverFrcfeXtf c X25 t-2* 1Q-Z1 
SmiftiKJto* BchEq . c 027 *4 10-17 

SmtttiKllaa PLCA C 3924 *-2 1044 
c-cmaroxanovntoer ADR. 

REVERSE 5TOCK0PUT 

Plant ForTaraotrawl tor 30 ravens sallL 

STOCK SPLIT 

HauttMym Tedi 4 tor 3 »m; pay data op- 
era*. 

auaera county 3 tar 2apRL 
Wamoco Group 3 tar 1 Mlt 


Morgtm Keegan Q 08 

CORRECTION 

FstNtlBkCoroMI d 00 

d-dorttylng noma of company. 

INITIAL 


Martel Sates 


Spot CommodHioa 


Alurntnum. 8> 

Copper etedratytto lb 
Iron FOB. ton 
Lead, lb 
Silver, tray az 
Steel (scrap). Ion 
Tin.® 

Zinc m 


Sep 

114X0 

11302 

11350 

+0X8 

Dec 

11X10 

11X58 

11X60 

+ 0X4 

Mar 

112X0 

112X0 

111J8 

+ 0X6 

Jan 

N.T. 

N-T. 

1)108 

+0X8 


Esf. volume: 15303*. Open Int: 1527VL 


ox75 1 Industrials 

nloo Hhm Low Loot sottta ctye 

038 GASOIL (IPE) 

5353 US. dotas per metric tea l ets etlW tans 

nan 501 isixo i«35 mjxo msxb +aso 

Oct 154X0 152X0 152X0 152X0 +03S 

0*714 Nov 15405 154X0 15500 15505 +1X0 


Capital Svgi Bncp - JOS 

LaiKTBterColCPn - .12 

Queens County n , X73 

Somerset Group • - .10 

REGULAR 

M 05 

2 :1s 

_ X7 
Q 05 
i Q .125 
Q .13 
a X6 

Q J673 
. 04 

’ g % 

O -XI 75 

§ 2 
Q J8 
Q .12 
M .14 

a — m lt gpgyo Me tn C Mo fl en 


*-4 *15 
** M0 
M M0 
*-2 *-14 


04S S-31 
*-1 *-15 

*-15 MO 

04* *0* 
11-1 IMS 
*15 *30 
*1 *45 
TO-14 10-31 
*-15 MO 
M3 MO 
*-l *15 
*-15 *40 
*1 *15 
** 10-1 
M *15 
f-15 1M5 
*42 104 
*-M MO 
84) *4 


3 DO: Company Is Developing a New and Faster Video-Game Machine 


Continued from Page 11 
oology plans and Mr. Haw- 
kins's announcement that 100 
software titles would be avail- 
able for the current 3 DO player 
by October, the stock rose 
a tyiiTi- On Thursday, however, it 
fell $1.50, to $20,125, in over- 
the-counter trading. 

Although 3 DO has been per- 
ceived as having good technol- 
ogy even in its current genera- 
tion of machines, until this 
week the company was strug- 


gling against perceptions that it 
lacked the marketing power to 
take on the Japanese consumer 
electronics giants. 

But Mr. Hawkins con Leaded 
that 3 DO had a belter technol- 
ogy strategy than its competi- 
tors. 

“We are well positioned be- 
cause this busin ess is moving 
away from being a toy business 
and becoming arhigh technol- 
ogy business,” be said. 

At competitors Sega and 


Nintendo, the top machine* use 
16-bit chips — a measure of the 
amount of information the ma- 
chine ran process at one time, 
which translates into the quality 
of the video graphics and the 
speed and responsiveness of the 
games. 3DO’s current player is 
a 32-bit machin e 
But by Chris tinas 1995, all 
three companies, along with 
Sony, which plans to enter the 
market, plan to have more pow- 
erful 64-bit players. 


Mr. Hawkins says he intends 
to use his new IBM-Motorola 

alliance to develop a technology 
strategy that will- break with the 

current video-game business 
modeL Now, he said, customers 

are expected to throw out old 

technology with each new ronnd 

of more powerful systems. But 
3DO will offer its first Power PC 
system as an upgrade module for 
its c u rre n t video player. 


$12.6 bfflion acquisition of McCaw of a 

■ BellSouth Coip said itwould appeal . dccrte ^ 

.would combine - the woritfs^ iargest itj centra! 

cdlute tdephoire company. AT&T shares tiosed ^ - Reuters) 

554.50, andMcCaw was vp $1,625 at $53,625. (At, *«“**/ 

GM and Union Reach Tentative Pact 

"ANDERSON, Indiana (Bloomberg)— General MjwJjJ 
and the United Auto Woriors reached a tentative 
Thursday, ending astrike at aparts plant that had forced um to 

Thursday on the agreement. The imwn wooldn t release degfls 
hutsaM-wmkess could return to their jobs by Thmwlay cvemng. 
GM confirmed the accord but did not comment further. 

Broader Disclosure on Derivatives 

^ASHINGTON (Bloomberg) — The agency that sets US. 
accounting standards has agreed to require companies to cusoose 
more about their imMmg « of derivatives, financiai instruments 
whose value is based on. ah' underlying asset or index. 

The Fm an rial Accounting Standards Board's statement, to be 

. issued in early October, anil require companies 
: ptt^6ses other than trading, such as risk mamtgeoKnL 

Dell Posts Profit on Higher Sales 

AUSTIN, Texas (Combined Etispatdbes) — Dell Computer 
Cg*p. said Thursday that second-quarter earni n gs rebounded 
fiom-aloss ayeara^o as revenue jumped 13 percent. The peraonal 
. computer m«Ver m id second-quarter net income was 528.6 mu- 
fion, con^ared with a $75^ million loss last year. _ 

’ The chairman and chief executive, Michael DeC, said Dell s 
move to a more direct sales approach based on aggressive product 
pricing remained on track. (Reuters, Bloomberg) 

Software Etc, and Babbage’s to Join • 

DALLAS (Bloomberg) — Software Etc. Stores Inc. and Bab- 
bag£s fine, said Thursday they would merge to become one of 
America's largest software retailers, with nearly 700 stores and 
more than $500 million in revenne. - 
' The companies will merge into a new holding company, with 
Babbages holders receivuig 1.3 shares of the new company's 
. stock. Software Eta holders will get ode share in the holding 
ccanpany for each share they own. 

Sayujr to Buy ^Television Stations 

NEW YORK (Reuters) — Savoy Pictures Entertainment Inc. 
said Thursday its SF^ Broadcasting LLC joint venture agreed to 
buy. the assets of three tdeidaoa stations from Burnham Broad-] 
ca^jmgfCo. for$229miIlkm.. • * 

The stations will be 74 pexosit owned by Savoy Pictures and 25 
pocent owned by its Fox Television Stations me. joint venture 
partner. it said, wkh 1 percent owned by two Savoy Pictures senior 
executives, Victor Kaufman and ^Lewis Korman. ] 

For die Record ' 

Srieulffic-Atlaota Idil, a te k com n nmications equipment makers 
announced a 2pfor--1 Nock qdit, shortly after its stoat hit a record of 
S44.625. lt dosed at $44^5, iqi 37 5 cents. ■ ( Bloomberg J 

Nynex Cotjl, citing conqietition in its local telephone market; 
said it -had asked ue Justice Dqjartment for permission to] 
compete against AT&T Corp^ MCI and Sfnint in the $60-billjon- 
a-year long-distance market. - (Bloomberg) 

The Federal Ikade Cmwmo requested more inhumation 
about American Home PrxxhKaa.Cijqa’avpendmg; $9.7 billion 
acqutrition rtf' American CyanamidCbBoth companies said they 
planned to comply with the request promptly. (Bloomberg) 


v , “ > ' 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Agora Franca Prone Aug. 25 


Amsterdam 

ABN Amro HW 
ACF Holding 


Ahold 

A Ico Nobel 

AMEV 

Bois-Wesaonen 

CSM 

□SM 

Etsavlor 

FokXer 

Glst-Bracodu 

HBG 

ll « Inc K en 

Hoooovhh 

Huntar Douglas 

iHCCaKmd 

Infer Mueller 

inn Nederland 

KLM 

KNPBT 

KPN 

Nedlknrd 

OceGrtnfen 

Pakhocd 

Philips 

Polygra m 

Robcco 

Radamcs 

Rodnco 

Roranta 

Royal Dutch 

Stark 

Unilever 

Van Ouune ran 

VNU 

waUera/Khmcr 


U.S. FUTURES 

Via Assooatcd Prats 


ffSE 




deep Prav. 


330 330 

*25912X0 
409X0681X0 
31230900 
318X0 310 
54853800 
30839OXD 
494J0 487 JB 
400477X0 
1050 1040 




Brussels 


Rhetacne tall 

Scftcrlng 

S lemons 

Thynen 

varia 

V*bo 

VEW 

VtoB 

VBIkowB— n 
Wei la 


Helsinki 

Amcr-Yhtyma 117 11* 

Erao-Gutieit 4X50 4400 

Huhtomakl 155 157 

K.OJ-. 10X0 10X0 

Kvmmene 137 130 

Metro 168 168 

Nokia 528 523 

Fob lota 68 6700 

Repoto 1D9 105 

Stoc kma nn 257 25* 

liSE" . 


Hong Kong 

30J0 
12J0 
36 
3*00 
11X0 
1110 
S2J5 


ColruTl 

Ddhaize 

Eledrobet 

Ele ct raih i u 

GIB 

GBL 

Gevaen 

Glaverbei 

fmmobel 

KradMDank 

Mesa ne 

Petraflna 

Powerful 

Red leaf 

Novate Batac 

Sec Gen Banaue 

Sac Gen Belgique 

Safina 

Soiuar 

TnseixJerio 

Trocteoel 

UCB 

UnbnMIdore 
Wagons LJH 


Current Start Men : 7602X4 
PravlnH : 7SSU4 


Frankfurt 

AEG 

Alcatel SEL 
AiHoraHokf 
Altana 
Asha 
BASF 
Bover 

Bay. Hypo bank 
BavVeraimM 
BBC 

BHF Bank 
BMW 

Commerzbank 
Continental 
Daimler Benz 



Johannesburg 

AECI 
A Betti 
Anglo Amor 
Barlows 
Blyvoor 
Buffets 
De Beers 
Drietantetn 
Gencar 
GFSA 
Marmcny 
motive hi steel 
Kloof 

MGiWlimfi ft - ~ 

iinwuiM snp 

Randiontein 
RuspJat 
SA Ekews 
SI Helena 
Saul 

Western Deep 

8835?! SSBf 9 "*" 


OEC 

com ACC 

Glaxo 

Grand Met 

GRE 

Guinness 

GUS 

Hanson 

Hllbdown 

HSBC Hldgs 

ia 

Inchcape 
Kingfisher 
Lodbnofce 
Land Sec 
La porle 
Lasmo 

Legal Gen Grp 
Lloyds Bank 
Marks Sp 
MEPC 
Natl Power 
Namest 
NthWst Water 
Pearson 
P&O 
Pllkington 
PawerGen 
Prudential 
Rank Ora 
Heck itt Col 
Redkmd 
Reed Inti 
Reuters 
RA4C Group 
Rolls Raya 
Rottarm (until 
Royal Scut 
RTZ 

Salisbury 
Scm Newcas 
Scot P ow er 
seme 

Sqvuub i roof 

Shell 

Slebe 

Smith Nephew 
SmKhKBne B 
Smith IWHJ 
SunAIBatK* 
Tate * Lyle 
Tesca 
Thorn EMI 
Tomkins 
TSB Group 
Unilover 
Uld Biscuits 
Vodafone 
war Loan 3VS 
Wiflaxw 
Whitbread 
' WU H an ts tta gs 
WTIUs Corraan 


Madrid 

BBV 3015 2995 

Bco Central HIsp. a*» 2*45 
Banco Sa n tander 5190 smo 
B onesto 1070 KUO 


Montreal 

Ataon Aluminum 34H 34H 
Book Montreal 24* 25 

Bofl Ccsnda 43 43 

BombonHer B l«4 m» 

Corablar 17 17% 

Cascades Ab 8W 

Dominion Text A 8VV 7» 

Donohue A 13* 13* 

FCA Inn AU 4.13 

MocMIllon Bl 20 19V1 

Natl Bk Qmada W, 
Power Corn. IWfc 

Pravlga 59k 5* 

SSS^A 

^ IK 

VMeotran 12»3 12 

IttSSfUte-'’*-" 


Stockholm 

AGA 
ASOOA 
Astra A 
Alias Ccoco 

tanETB 
Ericsson 
C— B*A 
Handel sbanken 
investor B 
Norsk Hyt+a 
PraoofxSa AF 
SandvOt B 
rri.4 
SE Banksn 
Skandta F 
Skanska 
SKF 
Store 

TrHIeborgBF 
Votva BE 

^SSS^S&‘ m 



Toyota 

YamokMSoc 

a: nun 

Nikkei 225 : 20*43 


3140 3150 
840 8S5 


Air Liquids 
Aleatai Aisthom 
TlXO 

Bkmcalre (del 

BIC 

BNP 

nauvmm 

Danone 

Carretaur 

CC.F. 

Coras 
Chorgeura 
aments Frame 
auBMed 
Elf-Aaoftnlns 
Euro Disney 
Gen. Eaux 


tsss 0 * 

Lean. Eaux 
Oral il '1 
LVJIUi 


CEPSA 

Drogodos 

Endesa 

Ercros 

IDerdrata 

ROPSOl 

Tatmoatero 

Tele f onlco 


3255 3230 
2195 2170 
5790 5760 
170 164 

BOO BOO 
SCS0 4005 
3350 2280 
1805 17*5 


London 


Dl Babcock 

Deutsche Bonk 

Douglas 

Dresdnrr Bank 

Fetdmwctile 

FKrapoHoescti 

Haroener 

Henkel 

HoeMHf 

Hoechsf 

Hotomann 

Horten 

IWKA 

Kali sail 

Korsladf 

Koutaot 

KHO 

KtoecknerWerke 

Linde 

Lutthania 

MAN 

Mamevnam 

Meiailgesell 

Muengfi RvKk 

Porsoie 

Preussog 

PWA 

RWE 


Abbey Nan 196 1*7 

Aiilea Lyons 607 4.18 

AriOWggtaS L78 2.74 

Argyll Group 303 TM 

Au Bril Foods 545 544 

BAA 117 5.12 

BA* 453 4.95 

Bank Scoitana 1.9* 1.99 

Bcrshnrs SM SM 

Baa 503 504 

BAT 4X2 4J1 

BET 1.13 1.15 

Blue Circle 307 307 

BOC Group 7X7 731 

Boots 171 164 

Bowater 401 401 

BP 4.12 4.11 

Brit Airways 4.17 409 

Brit Gas 308 302 

Brit Steel 159 156 


ULGeoeraflndex : 3*54 
Prev ioat : 30502 


Aflcarua 
Assitalia 
Auttstraoenrlv 
Ben Agrlcatturo 
BcaCommer Ihd 
Boo nci Lavora 
1 Bca Pop Novara 
Bmw iH Roma 
BcaAmbrosiano 
Bco Napoli riso 

n rub II ■ 11 

Cradifa Hailana 
EnknemAug 


MkheanB 

Moulinex 

Paribas 

PscfUnev Inti 

Porpod-mcard 

Peugeo t 

Plnautf Print 

Radtotectinlque 

RB-PauWficA 

Raff. St. Louis 

Sanofl 

Saint Gobaln 
s F ..B 

Ste Generate 
Suez 

Thomson-CSF 

Total 

UAJ*. 

Valeo 

asansis 8 ' 


Sso Paulo 

[BaKsdoBrosn 
Bcmesco 
Bradesco 
Brahma 
C ondo 
Efetrobnn 
Itaubanco 
Ugnt 


Sydney 

Amcor 936 931 

ANZ 302 193 

B HP 19X0 19X6 

Bora! 3X6 3X7 

Sousa taviDe 0X1 OX1 
Coles My tr 417 4X0 

Comctan 5X2 5 

CRA 19.94 19 JO 

OR 42ft 409 

Papers Brew 1.1 1 1X9 
Gooanxzi Flew ixo 1X4 
JClAustroSa 11X8 10X0 
Masettan 1.95 10* 

MIM 207 205 

NatAusIBanfc 11142 10x8 
News Corn « 9.1a 

Nine Network 4X5 *£S 
N Broken ma lxs 1x0 
PpcDuntaO 432 432 

Pioneer inn 337 1U 
Nmn dy Pm sldon 201 2.12 
OCTRomraes 1XB 1X7 
Santas 109 2X2 

TNT 24* 244 

Western Mintao 7J2 7x7 
Westaac Banking 4X4 434 
Wsodskie 4J5 432 

%S2S?5&r-- mm 


Tokyo 

Altai Eledr 
AsaM Chemical 
AscM Glass 
Bank of Tokyo 


Casta 

Dal Nippon Prim 
Datiw House 
Pc iw o Securities 
Fanuc 
Full Bank 
Fuji Photo 
Fujitsu 
ratocM 
Hitachi Como 


Toronto 


AgnJcn Eagle 
Air Canada 
Alberta Energy 
Amor BarrK* 
BCE 

Bk Nava Scotia 
BCOas 
BC TelecDmm 
Brunswlc* 

C AE . 

Comdev 

aac 

Cdn PocHJc Ltd 
Canadian Tire A 
Cantor 
Corn 

ccl tndB 
dnealcx 
Comtoca 
Camvest Expl 

, Dotasco 
DYJt* A 

EctKs Bay Mines 

ritlltll CILfM • 

Ewnif w*»f*i n 

fca inti 

FedlndA 

Fletcher ChaB A 

FPI 

Centra 

Gull Can Res 

Hees Inti 

Hemlo Gtd Mines 

Homnoer 

Horshoe* 

1 Hudson's Bay Co 


Labatt (John) 
Loblaw Cos 
Mackenzie 
Magna lidl A 
Made Leaf Fds 
Maritime 
Mark Res 
JMalson A 
Noma IndA 
Norando lr>c 
Nor on do Farasf 
Moreen Energy 
Nttwm Telecom 
Nava Cora 
OdwwaGraopA 

Paourian A 

Placer Dame 
Poca Pe t r o lew n 
PWA Cora 
Rovrarii 
Renafsioncr Erry 
Rogers Comm B 





Roraf BankCdo 


Sousa Cruz 
ToltaBS 
Toloso 
Usiminas 
vole Rio Dora 
Varlg 

mss^* 5 * 



Singapore 

m 70S 


am Telecom xsg 146 

BTR 307 30* 

Coble Wire 430 44ft 

Codbury Sell 471 434 

Cerodon 304 295 

Cools Vlyelta 234 231 

Comm Union SX8 U2 


Courtoukts 
ECC Group 


530 5.18 

3.91 105 


Enterprise (XI 195 3.9) 


Fiorspo 
Flncnz Agroind 
Finmeccanica 
FandtaftaSH 
General Ante 
IFil 

ualcemenil 

l taigas 

MeSlobaico 

Mgntedlson 

OMvoni 

Ptraiilsaa 

HAS 

Rtnasceme 

San Paolo Torino 

SIP 

SME 

Salabpd 

Stando 

Stet 

Toro AsJJc 

ssisim 


Cwebas 70S * 

cm- Dev. 700 70S 

DBS 11.10 II 

FrasorNesve 1720 M08 
Genttag 14.10 1300 

Golden HooeR 207 304 
Haw Pur 120 im 

Home Industrie 445 455 
InchCBP* 545 545 

Kraael 1130 11X0 

KL Kwang 3M 192 
LumCnang 155 157 

MBtav nn Banka 9jg 930 
OC&C foreign 1440 T4JD 


1130 11X0 

3M 112 
155 157 


OUB 

0UE 

Sem&owcng 
Shoogruo 
Shoe Darinr 
SIA foreign 
Sbore Land 
Staoro Press 
51 no Steamship 


HO 8.10 
12 11.70 
5X5 510 
444 4X4 
1358 IS 
735 730 
1440 1450 
430 4.12 


slPoreTetaconm 3X4 146 

Straits Trading 3X0 1X4 

UOB torsion 1430 14 

UOL 232 224 


ItaYokodo 

Itochu 

Jtapon Airlines 
Koltma 
Kansal Power 
Kawasmcl Steel 
Kirin Brewery 
Komatsu 
Kubota 
Kynraro 

MatSD Elec Ms 
Matsu ElocWks 
Mitsubishi Bk 
MDRAtatU KBSOl 
MitsubUd Elec 
MDsubWIMn 
MltSUMMCora 
Mitsui and Co 
Mftsui Marine 
MBtakosM 
Mttsoml 
NEC 

NGK I Mutators 
Nlkko Secur Dies 
Nippon Kogtfcu 
N apod CHI 
N mean Steel 
Nipoan Yussn 
Nhsad 
mmaraSK 
NTT 

Otrimtas Optical 
Ptanew 
Rladi 
Sanya Elec 
Sharp 
SWrnazu 
SWnetsv Oran 
Sony 

StitniMmoBk 
SgmHomoChem 
Sum! Maine 
Sum Itonia Metal 
ToUef Cam 
TokettaChem 
TDK 
Teiiin 

Tokyo Marine 
Tokyo Etac Pw 
Teaoan Printing 
Toravlnd. 
T05MD0 


Stales toe A 
Talisman Enr 
T*ck B 

Thomson Cora 
TorOom Bank 
T uiilui B 
Truusulta Cora 
TransOtaPta* 
Triton Ftal A 
Trfcnac 

Unlcore Energy 

TSE208ta«9:< 
Prev tone : 06331 



Zurich 


AdtalnHB 254 2SS 

Atndsse B 1 new £09 683 
BBC Bran Bov B n*d 1180 

CSiaGafBVB B12 M 

CSHOfdliaB 52D 519 

EletarawB 341 33ft 

Fischer B 1570 ism 

Interdtxoieif B 2200 2180 

J Mmol lB 870 B67 

Lends Grr R 710 710 

Mca w np lc k B 415 4)8 

Mesh* R 1202 n*« 

Oerilk. Buersne R M5H1J8 
Paramo hw b isio isia 

Roctie Hdg PC 5750 37(0 

S ctra R equeue |R 113 
SondOXB 491 68ft 

fmWrB 7495 7300 

SuDm-PC 925 907 

SirueUknceB 255 2IS0 

SwtBBnkCoraB 377 U2 

Swiss Reinsur R 519 515 

ta rlta ol r R M 838 

UBS a 1109 W97 

Winterthur B 640 441 

Zorich Au B la* 1215 

■BttftiSW 1 


Season Season 

HWi Low Open 

Hfeh 

LOW 

Oose 

aw 

ObM 


Grains 




WHEAT (OftOT) UMeumfetawm-. 

r r 



X5FA 

3X2 Sep 94 307 

385 

106ft 

356 

*0X9 

80S 

170% 

3X9 Dec 94 381 

372 

10 

171ft *OOBft 43X49 

3J9 

127 Mar 95 171 

380 

170ft 

379ft *006 

1611* 

171 

XI6ftMov 95X65 

373ft 

306 

373 ft 

•axsft 

1XU 

150 

XU 8495 145 

353 

105 

USft *087 

1784 

X59'6 

IB Dec 95 



143ft 

• 004 ft 

13 

Esi. safes 17X00 Wed’s, m 

3 15X07 




Wetf»! 

oenirt 69,182 off 15 





WHEAT CKBOT7 V«Da&u it«i*tvt>-c 

osnarbuta 



304 VS 

3X7ftSep*4 302ft 

372 

302 

170ft ♦0X816 

9X79 

1709, 

117ftO«cM 305ft 

373 

305ft 

174ft +009 

19X9S 

172 

3X5 Mta-95 304ft 

375 

304ft 

374ft +0X1 

7034 

303 ft 

3X1 ft May 75 303 

385 

301ft 

105 

•0X4 ft 

619 

ISO 

116ft Jul *5 149ft 

150 

107ft 

ISO 

•0X5 

£72 

350 

3J9 Sep 95 150 

151 

150 

351 

♦0X4*4 

9 

EO. safes NA wed's. sta« 






WeCsopeninf 






CORN 

lC»OT) 30OOoumHmn.<u 

art mt Bum 



X92ft 

2.14 Sep 94 2X3 

2X3 

2J1V!i 

221*6— CJHfe 24852 

177 

7.17 Dec 94 2X5 

225 

232*6 

233*6-000*6126X00 

202ft 

226 Mor» 2X3ft 

234 

281ft 

2X7ft-Om 

27003 

185 

232ft MOT 95 U916 

239ft 

238 


IIJ2* 

28Sft 

236ft Jul »S 203ft 

204 

202ft 

243 

-8X1 

RUM 

770ft 

239 Scots 



241 

-an 

154 

203 

23SViDec9S 247V, 

287ft 

204ft 

247ft— OXI 

5030 

101 

257 Jul 9* 



200 

-0X7 

13 

Est stars J4J00 Wed’s Staes 50,140 




WrcTj open Ini 207,13* Off 

121 





5CYMAJO COSOTI sotabD 


cfr-dodcn 



7.00ft 

S40ftSep94 580 

581ft 

5J7ft 

57Fft-0Xr/i 11080 

787ft 

251 Nov 94 i7SYj 

575ft 

577V. 

575 

-am ft 74X77 

1.04 

580 Jen 95 SJW 

SM 

581 

583*6 -8X1ft 13.130 

7X5 

L0 Marts 19116 

193 

580ft 

19Zft-OXIft 

50M 

JXSft 

575 ft May 95 198ft 

606 

587 

6X0 

-aooft 

3745 

7X6ft 

ITSVjJuin 6X3ft 

604ft 

601 ft 

6X4*6 -OXOft 

4757 

60S 

SJ9 Auots 6X3 

6X1 

6JD 

6X3 

-0X7 


6X3 

577 Septs 



604V, 

-QXIft 

35 

eJftft 

5XBftNM9S 6X7 

609 

6X6 

609 

♦amft 



Jul 94 



629 

*ao 


Esf. safes NA Wed's Stan 

32.9S 




Wcd-iGPOTtot UI065 off 

S 





SOYBEANMEAL ICSOTJ UBkxn-c 




710X0 

1 7080 Sen 94 17580 

17580 

17640 

17620 

—070 17X19 

701 SB 

16*000094 174X0 

174X0 

17290 

17130 

-OJO 12X99 

209X0 

IJB.I0Dec94 17480 

17470 





317 JO 

171.10 Jan 75 175X0 

17500 

17400 

175.10 

—1X0 

5073 

207 JO 

17280 Mar 95 177X9 

17770 

17680 

17700 



317X0 

174X0 May 75 17880 

non 

17081 

178X0 

-aso 

4X10 

70400 

175JQJta*5 18080 

ui jo 

THUD 

180.90 

—070 

1378 

18200 

1 76J0 AuoTS 181 JO 

18180 

mxo 

181X0 

^1 00 

in 

11270 

176JDS0P9S >1180 

in jo 

inxo 

inxo 

—1X0 

290 

Est. safes 27X00 wed’s stags luu 




WtdiomW BTJ75 up 364 





SOYBEAN OR. (CBOT3 tua 

>IA.fM 

art pr 




30X4 

7200 SfP 94 1(83 

2580 

3470 

2614 


J9J4 

22tOOtat4 K79 

7689 

MAS 

3479 


2187 

2200 DecM 3185 

74* 

7*08 

3404 

.8X3 31544 

7855 

226SJK95 TUB 

3470 

M0J 

2603 

•0X7 

5770 

78X0 

2293 Mar 9S XSO 

2483 

3638 

2654 

+a» 

5777 

28X5 

2291 MOy 95 M« 

3650 

2630 

3647 

*0X5 

3.956 

2785 

23X0849$ 200 

26* 

34X7 

2640 

*008 

loco 

27X0 


3632 

3620 

MJJ 



24.7S 

2295 Seats 




•0X7 


mo 

2280 Dec 95 






Esf. stars 12X00 Wed’s stars 2 1844 




Wed’s open Inf 6+000 off 1623 






Livestock 




CATTLE (aum> OXK6I.. 

rnmemumrn 





72X5 

6650 Aug 74 4670 

6*75 

4600 




7A10 

65JOOC»*I 7170 

7080 

7007 

7087 

—073 3*439 

74X0 

67 X Dec 94 080 

085 

<0X6 

0X0 

-ae iLaa 

7*25 

67.90 FePtS 6880 

4890 

68X5 



7LW 

4700 Apr 95 7073 

1075 

7030 

70S 



#9 JO 

6640Jta>n 67X0 

67.10 

67X3 

87X0 



EV. stars 10843 Wed's, safes 21X87 




wed's ooen Inf 71X73 off 1056 





l-LLUi 

1 CATTLE |CMtt) 

■Wfes . ranr. 




9170 

71X8 Aug M 75X5 

76X5 

7135 

7635 

-Otf 

1189 

9US 

70950d 94 7LM 

KM 

7500 

750? 



9W0 

7240Nou9« 7680 

77.10 

7600 

7602 

-as 

2J0I 

90.95 

77.95 Xn 95 7575 

/us 

7M? 

7587 

-IS 

SBS 

90X5 

7255 Mor 95 




— n m 


7690 

720£Aer« 7635 

74X5 

73X5 

73X5 



74J0 

7125 May 95 735# 

7140 

7150 

73X0 


73 

Esf stars 1X24 weffs. Staffs 

1X90 





«wu 

secM 9879 Off 1U 





NOGS (CWJn toeoOfeL-cstasnrto 





49 75 

3t«Oc»M 3? JO 

3)80 

39M 

3982 

-038 ruin 

50JD 

3900 Dec 94 4035 

4040 

3975 

2982 

—0X3 

IM 

SUP 

3880 Fed 95 «J0 

«uo 

»80 

JSM 

-06 

as# 

4880 

3885 Aar 95 3987 

3887 

3935 

3935 

—027 

1072 

17 JO 

4375 An 95 M45 

4485 

4U0 

44X5 

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533 

4SX0 

43558495 4617 

4617 

41*0 

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-au 

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4170AUB9S 4305 

43.10 

ojo 

CJ5 

—0.15 

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39700a 95 4Q1» 

40X5 

3985 


10 m 


Ed stars 1865 Wed'ksofcs 

1619 










PORXB&JJES (CMBD uofe-nfeerk 



bttOS 

41X0Feb9S 4480 

4480 

4185 

am Tn 

-080 

£.93* 

020 

4067 Mar 95 46M 

4185 

4370 

0.90 

-a 45 

4H 

11.15 

4200 May 95 4 SM 

6100 

4430 

0628 

-0.90 

71 

5U0 

43X0JW95 46X5 


6J0 

<5X5 

-497 

IN 

=9 safes 1.901 WWi-SOM 

2J49 





wed's ooeo inf 7774 up 56 







Season Season 






Op-tor 

toman 

tan, ■ 


’ - 






Mon 

Lam 

Ooen 

HMl. 

LOW 

dost 

Cho 

Hk* 

Low 

Open 

♦Ml 

Law 

Case 

Cho OpJnt 

f > "-t- * 


12 x 2 

10X7X4 9S 

1188 

12X1 

1148 

1149 

.♦0X7 

4 MS 

96730 

90710 Jun 95 

93700 

93700 

EMCJP 

93040 

-50258006 

*7V 1 


1IJ0 

18X70(295 

1172 

1149 

1172 

11X7 

• 089 

1041 

96550 

71 710 S*C 95 

93400 

92470 

92330 

*230 

—5020900 

. 


1180 

1088 Mta 96 

116 

nx 

1108 

1105 

+015 

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96300 

91.180 DOC95 

*1110 

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93X3# 

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ll.llMayt* 




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♦015 

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96220 

9D750MOTM 91X40 

710*0 

92970 

92380 

—501X1053 




Jul 94 




12X8 



91380 

.92X20 Junto 

«uio 

*2910 

*2X50 

92840 

—5010795 




lopg ilnt 1 25JP (FT 370 
IA OTCSEJ emiMeln-IMrlpi 

1020 Sep *4 1345 ISM 1339 1JSB —9 519. 

1841 Doc 94 140 1417 1397 T«! —SB 4L990 

1077 Mor 95 MS 1455 1434 1447 —IB 11,149 

I07EMOV95 1467 1410 1467 1477 —14 3X0B 

1225X495 1487 1495 1417 1501 — 14 2X81 

150S top 95 ISIS ISIS ISIS 1521 —14 1X05 

12WDK95 1332 1532 1SB - 1564. -46 4X41 

13X1 Mcr 96 157* —13 1X14 

T 225 May 94 1391 . —13 IS 

des 7X15 Watfi. safes 4084 
I open tnt 6 4J4I up 913 
WEJWCE CNCTNJ luata,«knrA . 

BSXSSraW 9125 *335 *1X0 *135 +108 4034 


13600 

B9.IDNOtf9* 

9640 

9680 

9505 *675 

♦L10 

7X79 

122X0 

*140 Jon 95 

9*70 

MOJO 

9900’ 100X0 

+ 1 x 0 


12625 

9650 Mta 95 10240 

I83J0 

M 20 O ran 

+075 

7070 

11425 

97J0MOV95 10600 

106X0 

185X0 .10745 

+1X5 


119X0 

10100 Jul 95 

W7J0 

M7J0 

187X0 10*45 

♦1X5 


11300 

112X0 Mr 95 



TOJH 

♦ IXS 



JtaiW 



. raxs 

+1X5 


T12XD 

112X0 Sep 94 



mxs 

♦LOS 



BR. SOfeS 38IV98I WETt-stUS 276.139 
WMTsopenlr* UB4XM up 2796 
■nnafPOawi (CmBD sewpoune-lmkir 
1X744 1X440 5 * P * 4 1X534 1.B7B . 1X474 

1X760 1X500 Dec 96 1X09 U548 1X660 

Est sates 11,144 lHWs.«ofeS 6X44 
Whdt O PPlW 40X78 up 326 
CANAWANnOII AR <0600 iwk'IM 
07740 -OTDMSMiM OJ264 0X291 0720 

0J67I 03038 DOC 91 07358 03279 07254 

07605 CJB20Mor9S 07239 07X4 03255 

03322 0X5*0 Jun 95 ' . 

03219 8 X 96 5 top 95 

07133 ■ 070® Dec 95 
EsCkSb 8029 IHtflMB 11067 
VWkrsapmU «X79 is> 2570 
BERMAN MARK DCMVO S iwrmvfe. l peM< 
UB OX6O0S«S»*« 0X*67 0X491 0X453 

84606 ASBOQecM 0X611 0X492 04456 

0X595 098000195 8X671 0X00 0X471 

08650 <UK73ep95 

04595 aOIOMorM 0X00 8X490 0X61* 

BLsefes 323S5 Wtars.staes H665 
MM’S open ftt 11X443 IIP 168 


• 28 3B0M 
*26 ZOSt 


Metals 

HiGRAOCCOPPER (NCMX) 2XMfe*.-0Mi 
114X0 76X0 Sep 94 109.10 110X0 109X0 

11X20 7573 Dec M 109X0 W975 M8JD 

111X0 7LOOFBOW 

11330 71X0 Mor 95 101X0 HU 10825 

111X0 74A5MOV9S 
11250 71X0 JultS 

11880 75X0 Aug 95 W935 1IB35 M9J5 

11005 7».lDtop*5 

115X5 7120 Oft 95 MtxS 10930 10900 

112X0 7735NOW9S 109X0 10900 W0O 

W9X0 WX0Dec95 
108X0 88X0 Jon 96 

1 VU« 91.10 Apr 96 

May 96 

10700 KbJOJunM . . 

EM. sales 9X00 WuTvs tan 12083 

ytersoPDiw 4*038 ts> m 

5B.VHR CNCMX) UOMra-wMerMye 


-OJO St 

-025 MS 


BOX 

S34JAOB94 5220 

vu 

mo 

win 

—14 

61 SX 

OlXSanM 5765 

5260 

ftnjb 

3867 

-03 33013 

5170 

snxodM 



SB 3 

-03 

597 X 

3R1XDK94 532X 

ms 

329X 

33 27 

-05 55X36 

566X 

«!XJon95 



5X3 

—05 

4X60 

4165M0T95 5424 

5420 

537X 

340.) 

— 03 7014 

6065 

418X6*0995 SOB 

5628 

5*24 

5*65 

-44 

a ox 

4200 Jul 95 



SU 

-40 

5365 

5325S«P9S 6584 

5584 

53BX 

B7X 

—04 1X86 

828X 

539.0 Dec 95 5670 

5400 

SBS- 

stss 

—08 

6164 

5S*XMOrt* 5780 

3700 

5708 

5765 

-03 ■ 

5874 

587.0 May W 



3817 

-03 


C CNCSE) KWH-wnn 
MSOSepM was W2J0 
77 10 Dec M HU0 197X5 
7890 MET 95 1*875 20095 
C0OMOV7S IIUS JflOXO 
85080895 25500 2040 
81BDK95 20100 20400 
4099 Wed V taka 5089 
SIM 32.123 1 8* II* 
WORLD II CNCSE) IIXSWIM 

43V OB *4 11.96 1116 
9l7MorfS 1201 K.15 

I0S766BV95 11.95 120* 


•200 704 

•305 SUN 
•3X0 5X00 

• 100 2321 
•108 » 

• 100 371 


• QJ1 S6.fl* 

• BOB 52.122 

•an nun 


A4*4 ma —80 

Estsafes 19X00 Wed’s. soles 39 JU . 
wnrsaowiM it040i on no 
PLATINUM INKER) pniBL.MntrMr«. 

42L40 3640003*4 40X0 417X0 413X0 4157B *1X0 17313 

43500 374J0 JanVS 414X0 411X0 41400; WJO *100 4X30 

439X0 390X0 Apr 95 421X0 421X0 421X0 «2JD +1X0 1J9D 

431X0 422.00 Od 95 ■ ’ ‘ - 4X700 4100 

Est.sctn NA WkTl r*S 6 1791 
WtafsaMnlnt 14387 U> 284 
GOLD OKMX) WnMUMnnrnm 
<15X0 341J0AOO94 383X0 383X0 371X0 3BLS0 -000 388 

417X0 3*40000*4 305X0 3M0O 3*400 30V40 —001 9021 

42*00 343X0 Dec *4 381X0 3K7D WXS JO. TO -060 914*9 

41100 363X0F**S.39»a 39100 39OJ0 39L40 -0X0 TX026 

4I7XQ 34LSAor9S 39SXO 39SXQ 395X9 30U0 -812# 8070 

428J9 361 30 Jm 95 3M3D —OJO 9355 

4060 3*0X0 Aun 95 . «0B —0X0 A9S1 

41130 401X00(2 95 • 40LJO OJO U3I 

0900 <3003 DOC 95 409JO -0X8 5029 

out 4IUBAITM 4181# -401 

Esr.safef 14X00 WM’S.MdeS 45X63 
Wfe kwrt e 147066 up 460 ■ 

Hnancial 

US T. BILLS (CklER) 1tiWWm-N.rfWM ' 

NX *402 Sen *4 9SJS 9505 VSX4 *535 14052 

96. W *425 Dec *4 *403 *404 Mil *40 '—80318029 

♦LBS ttttucrtt MS IUJ NS N9 '. 4X9 

EU. start 1917 Wnfimta* 4X27 
MdtweiW MB alt 70S 
5 Y1L TREASURY KBOT) UBugoeito.efcA3MurmKt 
I1M9SH2.R 5*0*4104-10 HH-W 106X8 18MO- US UM57 
106-11 101-28 Dec94H3-345 VO-23 M3.T351SW2S— 11 32714 

103-25 Mar 95 WH3S— 11 

EsLeofeS 45X00 WSOXtMM *4X91 
warsaonlnr tomt off aa« 

18 YR. TREASURY (CBOTl sH0MM*.Mi»8M«(niMl 
115x1 nun s*p«< HH-29 196-30 H*« m-»— n m. <m 

114- 31 100-25 Dec 94 103-37 183-27 W-N K3H- 1ft 62054 

111- 07 100-05 Mar 95102-24 02-29 102-U BHJ— M 879 

ms-22 99-20 JunfS W-» — 18 208 

101-0* n»-17 top 95 1MI- U 

EP SON* #808# W*dX*8fe* 85X0* ' 

Weert apORU 2S20I8 UP Cl 

US TREASURY BONDS KBOT) UMJ WH I MM atoW WRMCO 
118-26 90-12 tepMm-n T83-M KS-ri IM— 38 30500 

lift-88 91-W Dec 94 181-16 102-22 Wl-U NS -It— » UUO 

it*xo 98 - jo itarosiei-as 101-21 km im- s ftxn 

115- 19 98-12 Jon 95101 40 lffi-41 Mkta T80-86— S 410 

112- 15 9M0 Sects 99-U- 30 K* 

lO-U 97-14 OK 95 9Mft 99-30 99-® T9-00 — 30 44 

114-04 90*71 MOW • *►«— » « 

MO-20 96-13 AtaH . *M0— 3# 20 

Est. soles 405X10 WM^ssta* 

MRSWU 449 X66 Off 2557 

66UNK3PAL BONOS CCBOT) H W «Nl e » le ft — dWM 
95-17 08-13 Sen 94 91 -06 «-» 98-ID 90-W — T7 n.979 

91-17 0-H D*0 9690-06 SC-09 MSS SUP — 30. 1903 

EsL safes SJB0 Wtfs.RU 3X89 
Wenraenb* 71X81 Off 238 
Bjeo n flLUUB ICM B1U st I m tt mu moo. 
tun 9UBSB9I 9(3«0 *050 MB WM . 3*4X01 

nno 9C. 710 Dec 9* 943N M» H390 0U0 -®4»X4# 

95X00 90340MflT I5 .WB0 94X30 «U« C9R -8130.46 1 


oxio4gekm942S(p*4 BxiouHxroumxiiiojsaxiaMi 

QXTO4908 JOM35 DeC*4 LOmMLOWnOiROlinLOlOltf 
flUIOfiTflUWT /SJUtiVS 

OX1«77a)0HnOO5e»»9S . 80KQ68 

ajia56Bn 0 D9on u wui etaswn 112 0*00101850010203 
Bd-JOfes KA. VNsn.sotos 22X03 
WtaTt opwitat 73X10 'Off 1207 
Swig F R AN C (CMNIU Spertre u c-lpow— latafftOBOt 
O70n 406® Sep *4 87678 07*91 07*47 07685 
07*40 *0885 Dec *4 017676 07702 07860 47697 

4700 47668 Jim 96 07741 

07138 47*kU80r96 OTTO 07715 OT686 07718 

BO. safes 14538 WWT6.sata4 15,923 
MBgMBNlkd *6X79 off » 

industrials 

OTTTONl (NCTtO MBR-amw* 

746D BJlOctM 6900 70X0 «8J0 6970 

77 J5 59X1 Dec *4 68X8 6436 67X0 67X1 

7415 62X0 Mar 95 69X0 69X0 68X7 6174 

71X5 64X0 Marts 70J0 70X0 < 6U5 076 

7475 0X00495 71X0' 71X3 71X8 7D0S 

7470 66000095 WJB 0X0 0X0 0X0 

72X0 66X3DeC*S 6425 6UJ2S 6435 C4« 

EKWes 4X80 W*rfi.H0e» A448 
WetfsopenH 527C off 57 . 

WA-nMOL OMBO «•»**- ampere* 

67J7 <300 Sep *4 44X9 «J0 4410 

57X0 *40000*4 0X5 000 4475 0X# 

5430 - 4680NPVM 50.10 64*0 *900 SOM 

.59X0 .4600 Dicta 51.1! 5100 5008 51X0 - 

CX5 <3X5-kr>95 SU0 5279 51X0 5I0D . 

5475 4705 Feb 95 5U0 5265 5300 Sl3 

ss-^ssBra ss-ss 

ss£rt!i H »- 

(JGffT 5WRBT OKIDN 0O6BRJ 
3473 14X5 Oct M 1707 1707 

3S MJ2N0V**- 17X5 1770 17X8 1700 

2000 140ODSCM 1701 1777 1707 ffjCti 

1*05 U.16J01H 1706 1775 17S 17^ 

Will 153BFNI9S 1706 1776 17X1 T7+1 

3066 U0ZAlcr95 1705 1707 17X5 WJl 

1908 lUSAOTfS 170* 1706 1706 TJJ2 

SxS 3S3S7 5S US Sfl 

HW UT6 Au^s «" . ,7J> » H 

1412 • 177M0P9S Ks 

19.17 1602 oa 95 Jj-s 

IM* 17.15NM95 

3480 16X0 Dee *J 17 JO 17 Jo 1790 ¥,£ 

w ■ ssss ,7j2 n * w « as 

1480 17.1 5 Mor 06 

** "“fig ,W7 » W »■» wS? 

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EVTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 26, 1994 


Page 13 


EUROPE 



LEVERKUSEN, Germany 

— Bayer AG said Tfioisday 


that second-quarter pretax 
.30 percent as eco- 


' profit soared 
nomic recovery- abroad com=‘ 

- pensated for weak domestic de- 

'mand. 

The chemical company said 
pretax profit rose to 999 ariffioin 
Deutsche marks ($649 miffion) 

• from 770 million DM in the 
■ year-earlier quarter.- In the first 
quarter of this year, pretax 
profit was 755 miffion DM, 
’compared with 640 million . 
■DM.- ■ 

Thai means fust-half earri- 
ings climbed 24 percent, to 1.75 
billion DM. 

Sales in the second quarter 
were up 5 percent, at 11.19 bil- 
lion DM from.. 10.67 bAKon 
DM. -For the first half, sales’ 
'rose to 22.18 bSlion DM from -- 
21.01 biffion DM. ■ 


.. .Bayer stud economic recov- 
ery abroad was the main influ- 
okk cm the period* whereas do- 
mestic demand was restrained, 
and prices remaned unsatisfac- 
tory. But tight cost controls, in. 
chiding a lower wage bill and 
lower pay settlements, helped 
boost earnings. 

The company also cited clear 
of recovery in the chexni- 
sector; which has been 
since, the start of. the 
by dwindling demand. 

. “We therdforc remain confi- 
dent that we wifi -achieve our 
aim of a substantial rise in earn- 
ings for the full year," Bayer 
sard in a report to shareholders. 

Bayer shares: dosed at 367 
DM, up from 366 Wednesday. 


Shaw Bridges, an equities an- 
mdb. Pierce, 


alystai Merrill Lync 
Benner. & Smith Ltd, said the 
profit exceeded expectations 


and said Merrill Lynch was 
raising its earnings estimates on 
Bayer. 

Peter Schouten, a chemicals 
analyst with Credit Lyonnais 
Securities in the Netherlands, 
said the chemical industry 
would continue to show signifi- 
cant improvement in the second 
half, in large part because of 
cost-cutting ana reorganization 
in the second half of 1993. 

Prices in the first half “were, 
on the average, lower than a 
year ago,” Mr. Schouten said. 
Higher, sales reflected increased 
volume' rather than price in- 
creases, he saidl 

Bayer also said it planned to 
invest a total of 33 billion DM 
this year. The funds will be di- 
vided ^more or less equally” 
between the company's domes- 
tic and overseas activities, Bay- 
er said. (Reuters, Bloomberg) 


Krupp Narrows Loss 
On Reslruc^iimig 


Bloomberg Busmos Newer , 

ESSEN, Germany — Fried. Krupp AG 
Hoesdi-Kjrugp, a steelmaker, narrowed its 
loss in the first half because of coist-c»ttiiy» 
measures, and it forecast Thursday that it 
would break even for the fuD year. 

Krupp cut its net loss to 47 noaffidn Deut- 


sche marks ($30 mflKon) in.- the first six 


($30 

months from 32A nuDkm DM k year earlier. 


Sales in the first half rose 6 percent, to 10 
billion DM, while new orders rose 12 percent, 
to 1 1.19 billion DM. The company. attributed, 
higher sales and orders to a “considerable” 
increase in foreign bootless miri a stabiliza- 
tion in German demand 

The “speedy realization” of its reorganiza- 
tion plans also helped earning^ the company' 
said 

“Thanks to the cost-cntting measures in the , 
Krupp group, its financial situation has im J - 
proved noticeably,” the company said in an 
micrim report. ' 

Analysts said they expected Krupp to ex- 
ceed its own break-even forecast for the cur- 
rent year. 

The company's performance mirrors devel- 
opments in many other German engineering 1 
companies that are benefiting from a pickup 
in capital investment as the global economy 
improves. 

Krupp said its profit turnaround came at " 
midyear. In June; Krupp posted its first, 
monthly profit since the December: 1992 
of Fried. Krupp AG and Hoesch AG 
qnn Germany’s tourth-iargest steel and 
engineering concern. 


merger i 
to form 


West German Prices 
Pick Up Pace, to 3% 


. Caviled by Our Stqff From Dispatches 

• -FRANKFURT — Western German consum- 
er prices rose a provisional 3 percent on an 
annual basis in August, the government an- 
, pounced .Thursday, after a 29 percent annual 
increase in July, but economists said there was 
little danger of an inflationary surge. 

They said the rise was due to statistical tech- 
niques and exceptional increases in prices of 
■ gasoline and cofree. 

Inflation had been declining steadily from 43 
' percent in July 1993 to a three-year low of 29 
percent last month. 

Analysts said the latest inflation data could 
see the Bundesbank re think the timing of further 
interest rate cuts, but they said that overall, the 
policy of gradual reductions should remain in- 
tact as inflation appears still on a downward 
course, analysts said. The Bundesbank’s infla- 
tion goal is 2 percent. 

- German bonds were unaffected by the pickup 
.in the cost of living, even though inflation cuts 
the returns and underlying value of bonds, which 
generally pay fixed rates of interest 

In other signs of growth. East German indus- 
trial production rase a preliminary 53 percent in 
June from May and was up 15 percent from a 
year earlier, the Economics Ministry said. 

_ Meanwhile, the German automobile associa- 
tion, VDA, said Germany's automobile produc- 
tion would rise about 8 percent this year as 
buoyant exports outweighed stagnant domestic 
demand. The chairman of Volkswagen AG, Fer- 
dinand Piech, this week predicted a slowdown in 
European car sales for this year. 

But VDA said the German automobile indus- 
try still faced excessive production costs at home. 

(AFP, Bloomberg, JOiight -Bidder) 


Neofascists Continue 
Bank of Italy Attacks 


Reuters 


ROME — Outspoken attacks an the Bank of Italy by' the 
neofascist-led National Alliance have focused attention on 
the relationship between a key government party and the 
country's central bank. 

Senior members of the coalition party have accused the 


central bank of working against the government. This has 
; on fir 


created some unease on financial markets, but most analysts 
do not sec the bank's independence at risk. 

The National Alliance fired its latest salvo when Environ- 
ment Minister Altero Matteoli was quoted in several newspa- 
pers Thursday as accusing the bank of working to undermine 
the government of Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi. 

The bank is exercising its enormous power against the 
executive, Mr. Matteoli was quoted as saying. “Other govern- 
ments have paid the price of its decision's," he said, “but this 
one does not want to end up in the same position.” 

fEs comments echoed those made by the Treasury under- 
secretary, Antonio Rastrelli, this week that the bank's recent 
half-point increase in the discount rate to 73 percent went 
against government policy. 

The rate rise, announced on Aug. 11 to protect the lira, 
sparked an outcry by most of the National Alliance's five 
cabinet ministers. None hold key financial posts. 

“It is a worrying general background problem and will 
weigh cm the market, but no one expects the bank’s autonomy 
to come under discussion,” said one economist who has 
followed the dispute. 

On Monday, President Oscar Luigi Scalfaro defended the 
bank’s freedom to fix interest rates and called for an end to 
the sniping ‘The bank has a right to autonomy,” he said. 
“Everyone, beginning with the men in government, must 
respect that autonomy.” 

On Thursday the National Alliance's budget undersecre- 
tary, Antonio Pariato, asked the Bank of Italy's governor. 
Antonio Fazio, for names of economists and journalists 
whom he alleged the bank had retained to boost its image. 

He emerged unrepentant from a meeting with Treasury 
Minister Lamberto Dini, a former director-general at the 
bank; who had tried to convince him that the bank's balance 
sheet was clean. 

Mr. Pariato, who supports the central bank's indepen- 
dence, alleged it was holding undisclosed funds and said he 
had written to Mr. Fazio asking for names of economists who 
did consulting work for the bank. Tt could be the same 
economists who are firing on the government,'’ he said. 

Umberto Bossi, the leader of the federalist Northern 
League, backed the central bank, saying it should remain 
autonomous. The Northern League member who is interior 
minister, Roberto Maroni, accused the National Alliance of 
trying to grab power. Officials at Mr. Berlusconi's Forza Italia 
party have also distanced themselves from the neofascists. 


Saab Profit 
Gives lift 
To Investor 


Compiled fy Our Staff From Dupmdia 

STOCKHOLM — Strong 
sales of Saab cars and Scania 
trucks and buses helped more 
than double Investor AB’s first- 
half profit, the Swedish con- 
glomerate said Thursday, 

Net income for the flagship 
company of the Wallenberg 
family's financial empire, 
jumped to 808 million kronor 
(5106 million) from 351 million 
kronor a year earlier. 

The increase was due mainly 
to improved earnings at Saab- 
Scania AB, which owns half of 
the carmaker Saab Automobile; 
General Motors Corp. owns the 
rest Saab- Scania, which report- 
ed results Friday, posted net 
profit of 819 million kronor, re- 
versing a 271 million kronor loss 
a year earlier. Saab Automobile 
died a restructuring program 
thru cut its work force in half. 

Investor controls many of the 
Wallenberg family's share in- 
vestments, and its holdings in- 
clude stakes in Astra AB, the 
pharmaceuticals company; 
Stora AB, a forestry concern, 
and LM Ericsson AB, the tele- 
communications gian t 
On Au{». 5, Investor acquired 
the shares it did not already own 
in Export-Invest AB, a Wallen- 
berg investment company with 
holdings in export -rdaied’Swed- 
ish businesses. The deal valued 
the company at 3.47 billion kro- 
nor, but Investor said its market 
value had fallen “slightly” below 
that because of recent weakness 
in Swedish stocks. 

The value of Investor’s port- 
folio of strategic holdings as of 
Wednesday was 29 billion kro- 
nor, down 1 percent since the 
beginning of the year. 

[Reuters, Bloomberg) 


1 Investor’s Europe | 

Frankfurt 

DAX 


London Paris 

FTSE 100 Index CAC40 


22ft 

vmf- — £ 

Jt 

3406 --- 
330Q t 

-- - • 

2308 

• - 

32D0 \ mm - • 




2DG0- — • 

1300 M A"M 
1994 

Exchange 

Amsterdam 

it 

J J A 

Index 

AEX 

3100 

3ooo - y 
2800 

\£. 

2000 

1300 

4 ; 

2HB M A to 
1994 

Tj a 

Thursday 

Close 

417.73 

™°M r A M 
1984 

Prw. 

Close 

414.04 

j J A 

% 

Change 

+0.83 

Brussels 

Stock Index 

7JSQZJK 

7,565.10 

+0.63 

Frankfurt 

DAX 


2,15221 

2,125.37 

+1.22. 

Frankfurt 

•FAZ- 


81333 

804.52 

+1.17 

Helsinki 

HEX 


1,915.98 

1,888.99 

+1.43 

London 

Financial Times 30 

2£29£0 

2,507.00 

+6.88 

London 

FTSE 100 

3,23420 

3,205.20 

40.90 

Madrid 

General Index 

38854 

305.92 

+0.86 

UHan 

MI8TH- 

10897 

10945 

■4J.44 

Paris 

CAC40 

2.Q2&52 

2,00629 

+1.01 

Stockholm 

Affaersvaeriden 

1.88&SS 

1,89235 

+0.06 

Vienna 

Stock index 

459.02 

455.39 

+0.80 

Zurich 

SBS 


914.78 

911.07 

+0.41 


Sources: Reuters, AFP 


iMcnauaml Hcrjlil Tribune 


Very briefly! 


• Sophus Berendsen AS said its 52 percent share of Rentokfl 
PLCs first-half pretax profit amounted to 796 million kroner 
($130 million), up 26 percent from a year earlier. 

• Poland has unveiled plans to create a holding group embracing 
the country’s state chemical and petrochemical companies. 

• Sudzucker AG has acquired the frozen-foods operations of 
Scboefler Lebensmrttel GmbH. 


• Naf Naf SA confirmed it would buy the Charles Chevignon 
brand of fashion goods; the price was not disclosed. 

• France’s current-account surplus narrowed to 1.1 billion francs 
($2 1 0 million ) in May from 2.8 billion francs in April, the Finance 
Ministry said 

• Scottish & Newcastle Breweries PLC said beer sales strength- 
ened in May and June but take-home margins remained under 
strong competitive pressure. 

• Swedish industrial output rose 2.1 percent in June from May, 
when production fell 0.7 percent from April. 

AFP. Reuters. AP. Bloomberg, AFX 


Trading Profit Boosts ING’s 2nd-Quarter Net 


Bloomberg Business News 

AMSTERDAM — Internationale Nc- 
derianden Groep NV said Thursday its net 
earnings rose 125 percent in the second 
quarter as costs were cm, efficiency im- 
proved and trading operations turned a 
modest profit. 

The company, the second-largest finan- 
cial services group in the Netherlands and 
one of the world’s most active financial 
organizations in emerging markets, earned 
565 million guilders ($326 million) in the 


second quarter, up from 502 million guil- 
ders a year earlier. 

First-half earnings rose 19 percent to 
1.07 billion guilders, ING said. 

Income from both its banking and insur- 


Heinie Hakker, analyst with Barclays de 
Zoete WedcL 


ance operations rose, and its trading o per- 
is became i 


alions became profitable again in the quar- 
ter after a loss in the first three months. 

ING’s shares rose 1.80 guilders to 80.80 
Thursday. 

“Their results simply are good," said 


Analysts were pleased that ING man- 
aged trading profit of 9t million guilders in 
the quarter after it lost 99 million in the 
first three-month period. 


ING's banking division had a trading 
loss of 8 million guilders in the half be- 
cause of difficult market conditions. Last 
ear it posted a trading profit of 566 mil- 
ion guilders. 


I 


Thursday’s dosing 

Tables inducts tha nationwide prices up to 
the doing on Waft Street and do not reflect 
late trades etoewhar*. Via The Associated Pmsa 



U.S. Division Dents Willis Profit 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dapaicha 

LONDON — Willis Coiroon Group PLC. one 
of the world’s largest insurance brokers, said 
Thursday its first-half pretax profit fell 14 per- 
cent because of problems in its U.S. retail 
operations. 

The British insurer earned £54.1 million ($84 
million) before taxes in the half, down from £63.1 
million last year. The first quarter proved the most 
detrimental to the bottom line, with profit at 
Willis Corroon Americas falling 7 percent in the 
period. That division rebounded to a 3 percent 
gain in the second quarter, the company said. 

But with expenses growing faster than reve- 
nue. the company — which matches people who 
want insurance with the underwriters who write 
policies — said it had initialed a strategic review 




ses on continuing operations grew 6 percenu 
ota] brokerage and fees for the first hair of 1993 
dropped to 062 million from £3712 million. 

The company’s shares slipped l pence on the 
results, to 154 pence. ( Bloomberg, Reuters ) 


of the group to improve profit. 


Brokerage and fees rose 2 percent in the half. 


excluding exchange-rate difl 


2 percent i 
iffcrences. 


while ex- 


■ Higher Premiums Help Guardian Royal 

Guardian Royal Exchange PLCs profit dou- 
bled in the first half, helped by a 14 percent 
increase in premium income. Reuters reported. 

The British insurer earned £131 million in the 
six months, up from £65 miffion in the first half 
of 1993, helped by strong results from its Com- 
mercial Union, General Accident and Royal In- 
surance divisions. 

Large increases in premiums combined with a 
fail in claims to produce a rare underwriting 
profit- Insurers normally rely on investment in- 
come to offset underwriting losses and produce a 
profit. 


KNP Reports 
Better Results 
AndaMerger 


Bloomberg Business News 

AMSTERDAM — KNP 
BT NV on Thursday an- 
nounced better second- 
quarter earnings and a 
planned merger of its U.S. 
office products unit with 
closely held Ivan Allen Co.. 
an Atlanta-based distribu- 
tion concern. 

KNP said it earned 74 
million guilders ($43 mil- 
lion) in the quarter, revers- 
ing a loss of 3 million guil- 
ders a year earlier. Sales 
rose 14 percent, to 32 bil- 
lion guilders. 

In tiie first half, KNP 
earned 124 million guilders, 
reversing a loss of 16 mil- 
lion guilders. 

KNP stock rose 0.80 
guilders to 49.10. The com- 
pany said it was “modestly 
optimistic” about full-year 
earnings. 

KNP said it bad signed 
an agreement with Ivan Al- 
len to merge the U.S. com- 
pany with BT Office Prod- 
ucts USA, its U.S. uniL 
Dutch law requires compa- 
nies to disclose plans for a 
merger once negotiations 
reach a stage where an 
agreement is Hkely. 


DISNEY: More Changes Likely After Executive Quits 


Continued from Page 11 
Eisner underwent emergency 
quadruple coronary bypass sur- 
gery. Hollywood bunted with 
rumors tins summer that Mr. 
Kaizen berg would resign if he 
were not named president of 
the company. 

Mr. Welis was brought in 
with Mr. Eisner in 1984 because 
he had a background in finance 
that Mr. Eisner lacked. 

In its announcement 
Wednesday, Disney did not 
name a new president, but it did 
name Sanford Litvack, execu- 
tive vice president of law and 
human resources, as chief of 
corporate operations. 

“There’s not a Frank Wells 
done out there.” Mr. Logsdon 
of Seidler said. But he said that 
between Mr. Litvack and Rich- 
ard NanuJa. the company's 
chief financial officer, “you're 
going to have many of the bases 
covered." 

When asked how he felt 
about Mr. Kaizen berg’s depar- 
ture, Mr. Eisner told The New 
York Times, “I’ve had less 
stressful days in my life.” He 
added that Mr. Kaizenberg bad 
yearned to run his own compa- 


ny and that his decision to leave 
was not based on Lhe availabil- 
ity of the president's job. 

When asked about his depar- 
ture from Disney, Mr. Katzen- 
berg told The New York Tunes; 
“It never got to an offer. It was 
noL about a job opening. It was 
about an opportunity and a 
type of partnership that really 
wasn’t in the cards.” 

The 43-year-old executive 
said he had informed Mr. 
Eisner and Mr. Wells a year ago 
that be might leave after ms 
contract expired in September. 

“I’ve not made any plans at 
all,” he added. “I don't know 
what the opportunities are that 
are out there. 1 need to finisb 
out ihe last 30 days of my con- 
tract-" 

Almost immediately, specu- 
lation centered on Mr. Katzen- 
berg leaving for a top job with 
Matsushita Electric Industrial, 
which owns MCA/ Universal; 
Sony Corp., which owns Co- 
lumbia and TriStar Studios; or 
the ABC or NBC television net- 
works. 

Sony Corp. of America said 
Zaun: (hat Mr. Kafzenberg was 
not joining Sony. 


When Mr. Katzenberg does 
land, Disney may face a second 
round of change. 

“Wherever he ends up, I’m 
sure there may be people he 
may want to bring with him.” 
one source said. 

The source said many people 
expected David Hoberman, 
president of motion pictures for 
Wall Disney Studios and a pro- 
tfrgfe of Mr. Katzenberg, to fol- 
low him to a new home. 

f jV IT, Reuters) 


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Page 14 


NYSE 

v _ Thursday** Closing 

Tabfes include the nationwide prices up to 
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late trades elsewhere. Wa The Associated Press 


(Continued) 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 26, 1994 


Page 15 



ASIA/PACIFIC 


ewers 


E 

^u$lv> 


TOKYO — Maisusluta Elec- 
tric Industrial Cd: said Thurs- 
day that recovering economies 
and increased ; pending Ja- 
pan and' the '.United. States 
helped lift consolidated pretax 
earnings 1 1 percent in its first 
quarter, which ended June 30. 

The maker of the Pahasosnc 
and National brands of elec- 
tronic goods said consolidated 
pretax profit for the period rose 
to 37.6 billion yea ($385 mil- 
lion) from 33.7 tiflfion yen a 
year earlier, while sales rose 3 
percent, to 1 .642 trillion yen. 

Matsushita Js one of the few 
Japanese companies that report 
quarterly earning. The figures 
are taken as an indication of 
whether the company is cm tar- 
get for its profit forecasts; for 
the year ending March 31, 1995. 

The electronics company said 
it was on track to achieve' its 
forecast of earnings of 190. bil- 
lion yen in the full year, op from 
128.12 billion yen last year. . 

The company said consumer 
spending in Japan picked. up 
slightly, while there was a “oan~' 
rideraUe improvement” in tbe 
economies of the United Slates, 


the rest of Asia and some Euro* 
' pean countries. Tbatbdped off- 
,set the effects of the strong yen 
qo. earnings, Matsushita said. 

; v Matsushita exports 38 per- 
cent of its products. Revenue 
from those products sold over- 
seas in dollars must be convert- 
ed back into yen; so a faDin the 
■ dnTlay cuts into profit 

The company said improved 
sales in its. audio, communica- 
tions equipment, battery and 
components division helped 
push up earnings, 

'..(Blqcniberg, AFP) 


Kbe mOkiProfit Seen 


■. Old Electric Industry Co. is 
Bkdy to post earnings of 16 
billion yen for the first half of 
its financial year; ending in Sep- 
tember, Agence France-Prcsse 
reported, quoting Japanese 
press' reports. - 


. Profit- that high would be 
double Okfs earlier estimate. 
The company said its forecast 
remained near 8 billion yen, 
vriridh would be. a ^turnaround 
fronts 6.8 bvOiaayen Joss a year 
earlier. ' 


In Asm , Satellite Warfare 

Singapore and Hong Kong Want Stations 


Bloomberg Businas .Van 

HONG KONG — _ Singapore is threaten- 
ing Hong Kong’s dominance in Asia's rapidly 
growing broadcast industry, according to a 
Hong Kong government official. 

“As things stand at present, it may seem 
more attractive for foreign satellite TV broad- 
casters to fyase their services in Singapore 
than in Hong Kong,” especially considering 
Hong Kong's scheduled reversion to Chinese 
control in 1997, the colony’s secretary for 
recreation and culture, Jazses So. said in Van- 
couver, British Columbia, on Wednesday. 

Mr. So outlined a number of proposed 
policy changes that be said could help Hong 
Kong, remain more attractive to broadcasters. 

One of his key suggestions, a change in 
restrictions on foreign ownership, would take 
time to achieve; he said, because China would 
have to be consulted and laws amended. 

Beijing is concerned about the infusion of 
Western news and culture as carried by satel- 
lites. It is illegal for individuals and unli - 
censed organizations in China to install or use 
satellite dishes, but the rule is widely disre- 
garded. 

China could therefore be reluctant to en- 
courage a territory that will soon be under its 
control to become a center for broadcasting 
in Asia. 

In April, the Hong Kong-based Asian re- 
gional satellite broadcaster STAR-TV 
dropped the BBC World Service from its 


programming in northern Asia, including 


China, in response to pressure from Beijing. 

referred to China's sensitivities in 


Mr. So 

his speech. If a foreign satellite broadcaster 
“hopes to succeed in penetrating the Asia- 
Pacific market, he must be highly sensitive to 
the Social, cultural, religious and political 
diversity of the region and be ready to respect 
that diversity and differences,” he said. 

Mr. So said a partial ban on Cantonese- 
language programming by Hong Kong-based 
satellite broadcasters was likely to be lifted 
early next year. That ban has prevented 
STTAR-TV, owned by Rupert Murdoch's 
News Coqx. from showing Camonese-lan- 
guage films and entertainment programs on 
two of its channels. 

STAR’S satellite links are through Hutch vi- 
sioQ Hong Kong, which is controlled by 
STAR’S former owner, Hutchison Whampoa 
Ltd This arrangement has enabled STAR to 
avoid breaking the rules on foreign owner- 
ship. 

Mr. So said Hong Kong’s close coordina- 
tion with Beijing could work to the advantage 
of broadcasters seeking to enter the China 
market, as Hong Kong's licensing conditions 
were “more likely to be acceptable." 

Mr. So said Singapore offered such attrac- 
tions as tax breaks, financing plans and sites 
for satellite facilities. He said Japan did not 
encourage foreign broadcasters to base ser- 
vices there. 


NEC Shifts 
Stance on 
Standard 


, *. 
c » ? 


Give Philippine 
Airlines a Loss 


Bloomberg. Businas- flew - 

MANILA — Philippine 
Airlines said Thursday h 
had a loss of 451 rnfflion 
pesos ($17 million). in the 
year ended March 31 be^ 
cause of escalating operat- 
ing costs and increasmg 
competition. 


The company said ex- 
penses jumped 17 percent 
last year-, to 27 bilbon pe- 
sos, outstripping a‘9 per- 
cent gain in revenue, to 26.7 
billioh pesos. it was the air- 
line's fust loss since a gov- 
ernment bailout in October 
1991. The carrier earned 
1.03 billion pesos in the 
year ended in March 1993. 


Company executives said 
they also expected the air- 
line to have a loss tins year. 


Hutchison Whampoa Results Help Cheung Kong 


! £onptkd Ip Our Snffffa Dapauba 

Hong kong Cheung 

Kong (Holdings)- Ltd. said 
Thursday its- first-half profit 
.dipped about 1 percent, with a 
48 percent surge in profit by 
Hutchison Whampoa Lid. pre- 
venting a sharper drop in earn- 
ings. 

■Both companies are con- 
trolled tar the investor U Ka- 
Shing. Cheung. Kong, Mr. Li’s 
flagship investment company, 
owns 46 perccntof Hutchison. 

Cheung Kong earned 4.47 
b ill in n Hong Kong dollars 
($579 million) in the half, down 
from 4.53 bmtm. dollars in die 
: 1993 first half, .because of de- 
clining profit from real-estate 
development. Many projects 
thin the investment company is 
involved . in are not scheduled 
for completion until' the second 
half, Mr. Ii said. 

Hutchison Whampoa’s profit 
leaped to 3.73 bflfion dollars 
from 252 billion dollars amid 
strong contributions from aQ 
sectors, including real estate, 


container ports, telecommuni- 
cations, retailing and energy 
operations. 

Hutchison was the second- 
biggest contributor to Cheung 
Kong’s profit 

Sales at Hutchison rose to 
14.06 billion dollars from 1152 
bQlion dollars. 

Hutchison’s A.S. Watson re- 
tail company performed strong- 
ly, with overall profit signiii- 
cantly ahead of the year-earlier 
period, Mr. li said. He did not 
offer specific figures. 

The amount of container 
traffic handled by Hongkong 
International Terminals, the 
company’s Hong Kong con- 
tainer port operator, climbed 27 
percent in the first half of the 
year, he said. 

Hutchison's share of profit 
from associated companies rose 
71: percent, to 1.78 billion dol- 
lars. One of its affiliates, Hong- 
kong Electric Holdings, said 
Aug. 11 that its first-half net 
profit rose 33 percent. 

Hutchison raised its first-half 


dividend to 26 cents a share, up 
from 19 cents a share a year 
earlier. The results helped send 
the company’s shares up to 
3550 dollars from 35 JO. 

(Bloomberg, Knigki-Ridder) 


■ Price Review Planned 
Hong Kong's government 
plans to announce a review of 


the commercial-property mar- 
ket by the end of September. 
Knight-Ridder reported. 

Tony Eason, the secretary for 
planning, environment and 
lands, said that compared with 
residential property prices, 
commercial prices are not 
something “people are as anx- 
ious about." 


Compiled by Oar Siajf from Dispatches 

TOKYO — NEC Corp. is 
considering selling a computer 
in Japan that can work with 
those made by IBM — a major 
change from a long-standing 
policy of protecting its own 
computer standard. 

The company is planning to 
sell a server, which is used to 
control networks, that can be 
linked to NEC's own computers 
and to those built by Interna- 
tional Business Machines 
Corp., said Akira Kobayashi, 
NEC's senior executive vice 
president. 

The introduction of the serv- 
er would mean that for the first 
time, NEC users in Japan could 
use NEC hardware to link their 
IBM -compatible computers 
with NEC machines. 

NEC already makes and sells 
IBM -compatible servers in the 
United States. 

NEC is the only Japanese 
computer maker that still sells 
only computers and servers it 
has developed itself. The others 
have been shifting to machines 
compatible with IBM’s, which 
virtually constitute the global 
standard. 

“The move was not motivat- 
ed by foreign competition," Mr. 
Kobayashi said. 

NEXT has carefully guarded 
its position as the leading sup- 
plier of personal computers in 
Japan. The company's ma- 
chines, which have a 52 percent 
share of Japan's personal-com- 
puter market, cannot use the 
software that is written for 
IBM-type computers. 

(AP. Bloomberg) 


Investor’s Asia 


Hongkrtfe ; Singapore. Tokyo ' • 
Hang Seng . Straits Times . Nikk^225 



— “ 23»lr-Hfc 
-Tfik 


m snru~ 

1994 

Exchange ■ 

Hong Kong 



SA - ^M AW 
' 1994 

..ihdfibt ' - 

..Hang Seng. 

.J JA' j'j"A " 

" ISM 

.Thursday ..ppev. % . 

..Ctoso Closa Change 

9,336.11 9^3fiL89 +1.05 

Singapore 

. Straits Tftpes . 

2jSSr& 2^78.82 ‘+0 37 

Sytfmty 

Aff Ordinaries 

2577JW £061.10 +0.81 

Tokyo 

NMcet225 - 

20,443129 20.511.80 -0.33 

|- Kuala Lompoc Cotrtpo&te . 

Umi4 . 1.MJ-S7 -0.48 

Qartgtok .■ 

SET 

; 1,4745ft -Z.02 

Seoul ' 

-ContposS&Stec^; 

94541 943.64 +0.19 

TaSpel : 

Price ■ 

6,858.01 . 6^62.14 -0.06 

Atenfia 

■*$£ ■ 

3.127.W ' 3.124.11- +0.09 

Jakarta 

Stock index 

502.86 .498,54 .+0.89 

Hew Zealand 

NZSE-40' 

2,11899. 2,102.71 +0.77 

Bon^wy.-. 

Natontrf Index .5 

2jmM 2,10252 ,-0S8 

Sources; Reuters. AFP 

tiiKmaiioajI HcnIJ Tnhunc 

Very briefly: 


■ Standard Chartered PLC is negotiating with Indonesia to pro- 
vide assistance to the management of state-run Bank Pembao- 
gunan Indonesia, or Bapindo, which lost about $450 million in a 
credit fraud, the Antara news agency said. 


• Japan’s industrial robot manufacturers are planning a major 
export drive because of the slumping domestic market. 


• China’s government has renewed its commitment to pay rebates 
to foreign-funded firms whose tax bills have soared because of 
reforms introduced this year, a senior tax official said. 


• Pasmuco Ltd. of Australia, the world’s biggest zbc producer, 
narrowed its net loss for the year to June to 14.4 million Austra- 
lian dollars ($11 million) from 86.9 million dollars last year. 


• Taiwan’s Council for Economic Planning and Development 
cleared a 2305 billion dollar ($9 billion) project to build a rapid- 
transit system in the southern port city of Kaohsiung by 2007. 


Malaysia Air’s Cutbacks to Focus on Domestic Service 


Compiled by Our Staff from Dirptndtes 

KUALA LUMPUR — Malaysia Air- 
lines will soon be restructured to become 
more competitive and efficient, the chief 
executive of the national carrier said 
Thursday. 

Tajudin Ramli, chairman of the Ma- 
laysia Airlines, said every aspect of the 
company would be reviewed 

He said the major pruning would be 
done on the government-subsidized do- 
mestic services, which hurt profit. 

Mr. Tajudin. who took over early this 


month, said a subsidiary could be 
formed to operate domestic services. 

Some analysts are concerned that the 
government will demand that the airline 
continue to fly unprofitable routes. Mr. 
Tajudin said he was in continual contact 
with government officials. 

“The government is very receptive to 
suggestions," he said. 

If adjustments are not made to the 
airline’s management and operations, 
“Malaysia Airlines could end up like Pan 
Am," Mr. Tajudin said. 


Once the biggest airline company in 
the United States, Pan American World 


Airways stepped flying in December 
1991. 

Mr. Tajudin said there would be no 
staff layoffs in the company, which has 
about 20,000 employees. 

In its last financial year, Malaysia Air- 
lines had pretax group profit of 4.3 mil- 
lion ringgit ($2 million), recovering from 
a loss of 179.2 
ous year. 


million ringgit the previ- 
(AP, Bloomberg) 


Philippine High Court 
Racks Ramos on VAT 


Bloomberg Business Nan 

MANILA — The Philippine 
Supreme Court gave President 
Fidel V. Ramos a victory in his 
campaign to raise additional 
revenue when it upheld an ex- 
panded value-added tax. 

Emilio Neri Jr_, an economist 
at the Center for Research and 
Communications, said the ac- 
tion sent an important signal to 
the investment community that 
Mr. Ramos could push for 
needed reforms. 





S O U T H A F R I CAN RESERVE BANK 


i- Li’* 


& 


The txYWfn; i« non- an a new cutirw «»l expjnwnn, prime .sector 
fixed invc-lmenl 'is increasing and there if- a nsing diinand for hinds, as 
evidenced bv the recent, admittedly unit- moderate, increase in the amuunt 
fit bank credit extended to the private «ecitir. In this situation, excessive 
borrowing bv government can easily !ead to an upward pressure on interest 
rates and a "anwdine-oul" of the private sector and *c*r to the temptation 
of financing part of the denen with bant credit. Both these courses will 
sooner or bier dampen the economic upswing and re Jure the country's 
ability to maintain the current welcome expansionary ph-i&e tor any length 
of time, not unlike the xtid >top-gp experience- ul the sexx-ntn-s. 


transition, jnd force the re-introduction of the Did controls, or even the 
application of other new direct controls over markets, all of which may be 
more damaging, to the economy. South Africa must for obvious reasons 
avoid this mute. 


' • - ’ * . . . 

Economic reconstruction and development 
with financial stability 


Inflation declines bat inflationary pressures persist 


One of' the most gratifying development- m ifu. past tear hj-t been the 
decline In the rale of inflation Both the producer and cw 


Extracts from address by Dr C. L. Stals, Governor of the South 
African Reserve Bank, at the seventy-fourth ordinary general 
meeting of shareholders of the Bank on 23 August 1994 


oreornier price indices 
over the post year increased at their lowest rates for ninro than two decades. 
The overall producer price index in 199? increased by only 6.* per cent and 
the consumer price index by w.T per cent Measured over twelve- month 
period?, the rate ol change in the producer price index reached its lowest 
level of the past eighteen months equal to s.4 per cent in October inn?, 
before rising again to 7.9 per cent in hint* l 1 **! On the si me ha«i>, cun-sumer 
price inflation turned around tmm a low o( 7.1 fit cent in April l**l, 
before increasing to 7.3 per cent in June 

The nvtny disadvantage-!- nf inflation have been spelled mil in previous 
Owni.yr s .4ji/r«*-sis at these meetings, m almo>l all the Annual Eceiinniir 
Ri^iarls issued bv the Bank in recent times, and in many public speeches 
and publications by Reserve Bank officials. These disadvantages can be 
summarised in terms at the follow inf quote from the Iom page* of the 
Rcccnst ruction and Dnvi.'/'n.-nl Programme itself: "Excessive inflation or 


The riming of the abolition of exchange controls, particularly if it were 
If* be done without the support of 0 comprehensive package of other macro- 
economic measures, is ol vital importance, it will be advisable, tor example, 
to take the plunge only alter South Africa has finalised arrangements tor 
re-entering the international capital markets. The Reserve Bank has also 
warned before that the adjustment process could be rather painful if the 
abolition of exchange controls were to take place in a situation where the 
discount between the two exchange rates is shJi substantia), large amounts 
ot readily available financial rand balances are still held on deposit with 
hanking institutions in South Africa, and the Reserve Bank has but a small 
amount of foreign reserves at its disposal to support the foreign exchange- 
market in the initial transition period 

It is naive to believe that huge amounts of capital will flow into S>uth 
Africa on a net basis once the restrictions on the outflow of capital Jroro the 
country are removed. Exchange control is but one utatode for the foreign 
investor who is looking around the world fur countries where he can invest 
his savings. Other considerations, such as soda) and political stabiiitv, 
economic viability, sound fi«cal and monetary policies and improvements 
in multi-factor productivity are of exen greater importance for ni-wt potential 
foreign investors. 


The financial structure 


Introduction. 


The lung awaited recovery in the South African economy 
hnnllv materialised during the past twdve months. The 
onmtrv entered its longest post-war recession as far bade . 
ns March 1W. while the protracted dowroeatd.phase only 
levelled nut during the first haU of last yeat Since the third V 
quarter of 1995. total economic activity has dearty been on 
a recovery path This new upward, phase wavered in the' 
first quarter of IW. but then regained some momentum hi 
Lhe second quarter of this year. 

The current recovery was also fostered by favourable ' 
weather conditions which led to. a sharp increase. in 
agricultural output, and by higher' growth In some 
industrial countries which' further .promoted export 
lOlUtIKN. 


Most important of all was, of course, the good progress 
made in South Africa over the past year in the pol itical and 
social reforms which culminated In the widely supported 
liemLirjhc idecuon at 27 April 1W, and in the subsequent 
inauguration otMr NH ion Mandela as the new President. 

In the period leading up to. the election. Initiatives were - 
launched fur the withdrawal or intenufionaf sanctions and other punitive 
economic acthms applied against South Africa in terms of United Nations 
resolutions. With the progressive termination of these actions. South Africa s 
international economic relations were gradually noanafised, and the fac^ifies 
nflcrod by such Institutions as the International Monetary Fund and the 
World Bank became accessible once again. . 

South Africa has arrived at a momentous stage in its- history of 
development and must now display national responsibility for good 
iv mature gmcmance and sell -confidence m us faftire „ The most important 
ctmtribuflon that the central bank cat make is to contain lhe inflation 



Persistent capital outflows 

As could have been expected against the background 
of rising domestic expenditure, increases in imports, 
particularly in the first half of J994, led to a smaller 
surplus on the current account of the balance of 
payments. Following upon a surplus ol' R5. 4 billion in 
1993, ihc actual current account surplus declined in 
only about R0.5 billion in the first half of 1994. 

This rapid deterioration in the current account 
during the eariy phase of an economic recovery' makes 
the need for an improvement in the capital account of 
the balance or payments all the more important. Thus 
far. the net capital outflow has receded from no less 
than R9.8 billion in the last six months of 1993 to 
R3.7 billion in the first six months of 1994. 


serious balance >il payments problem^ .. would worsen the position of lhe 
twin .mi" 


poor, curtail growth and cause the RDT f*« tail" 


The weighted average value of the rand against a 
basket of the currencies nf Si 


South Africa's major trading 
twiners depreciated by no loss than lh.7 per cent from 
Hie end uf December 1W2 te the end of luly I^W. This 
depreciation in the nominal value oi the rand exceeded 
the inflation differential between South Africa and the 
relevant countries, with the result that the real effective exchange rate ol the 
rand depreciated by about 10 per cent oivr the same period. 


Multi-factor productivity must improve 

Now that South .Vinca is being reintegrated into the world economy and 
our producers are increasingly being vxpened to intematinnjl competition, 
it is at the utmost importance that we shaft as a nation become much mure 
root peti five. 

A combination ot relatively low wage incroises on the one hand, and 
increased output per wurker. on the other, resulted in a decri-asc of no less 
than 3,0 per cent in the real lafaur cost per unit or physical output in IPW 
This Jeveliipment it ni.tinfain»«d. augurs well for the eounfiy's pmspeeb- 
lor economic development 

There is an undeniable potential to increase productivity further in 
South Africa, tor example through hetter education and training, 
improvement ol wmet* sucii as hinixing. health care, transfv-riation and 
electrification, the innoductiun ot more advanced technology and the 
promotion ot elfectivo rnmpetiiion. In other wordi, the achicx’emont uf 
many of the obit-xtii'es of the Re* on si ruction and PwuJi.»pineni Pnigramme 
is of great impx«rtance. m*t only tor suru»- political mitviv. bui al«o ior 
future' economw dcvelopmeiU. 


A number ol South African banking institutions are now involved in 
programmes lor the establishment of a presence in major international 
financial centres and arc afcu> opening branches or subsidiaries in other 
Alrican coumnes. This 'internationalisation" nf South African banks 
increases lhe responsibility of our regulatory and supervisory authorities to 
promote sound and well-managed banking institution* in the country 

Fur these reas>.ins. the South African regulatory authuritin. have octivclv 
encouraged lhe development of appropriate clearing, settlement, ownership- 
transfer and market intorniation systems and are now insisting on proper 
intra-market and cross-market risk management systems, including capital 
adequacy requirements for market participants. Extended risk management 
arrangements have become necessary because of the rapid growth of the 
South Alrican financial market-- during recent years- in terms ol the numtx-r 
of instruments and participants as well as turnovers - and the omcomitnni 
higher potential for systemic risks, including cross-market contagion .. The 
Reserve Bank is now leading an initiative to create a strategic tr.tmeuori 
for the further development of the national payment system, aimed at 
achieving greater cificieney and risk reduction. 


The constraint of exchange controls 


pressure-' that will unavoidably be encountered on the lone road nf economic 
development ahead. Witiwot HnandaJ sfabilify Sooth Africa's ) 


i Journey along 

Ore path *id «uwmic dVi-ekipment and human betterment will not. be 
sustainable. - - 


The beginning of a new economic upswing 

After more than fmir v»rs uf low and. for most of the time, eve® 

cniwth, the South African econoim' staitwf townw agam during m? 

Siirvui ?“9-‘ fn:he wd.-e*wH»lhsiamiJuJy 

domestic product was indeed 3V per cent 

preceding twelve fimnltn. Growth was parttcufaijy 

Q. r-( 7993. but then fpJteiwJ in the- early months of ^ 

result uf rcneu%-d unevrtainte* leading np to the election of 27 ApnL In the 

second quarto.- of 1W, the ex^wnsion. regained ^ 

gn*s doiocsoc product inawsed at a seasonaUy adjusted annual rate ol 

about 2 per ixirt. . 

The rrewnt xi P >wm S wus «pported by fi m iwre wes In the main 
companJk of di wra»W expendihtre, such as carsmytioh J 

huuv-h.xld?, cross domestic fixed investment and the ac cumubtm^ ^ 
invu.iot.^ iMihr with a relatively sharp n« «n eorreni consoitipticm 
txuimdmuv in-^fnvnJf ^ermnent the increases in the various components 
■n’jcm.md wi-bfti fuM nsi» S™* damesne expenditure for the twdve 
ri-nths mdiig m June 1«W4 to a lewl 4'.: per cent above the level for the 
imnV-dutclv pnMn-diTxj* tui-lvc months .•'* 

Dosritv the revival in total eLonwhic activity, total tarmaf-ncaor 

cmpK-nt continued to cfecUnein S^^SSSS 

empl, .vmcnl acceicrAKd trom Dd> t** «nt n 19M and 2.1 par «nt bot ’ 1 
iwi and lonitoX*’ per cent in W&. 


Current financial developments 

In 1?N3. the Reserve Bank not only provided the foreign exchange market 
with substantial amounts pf foreign exchange in order to lean against the 
wind in respect of a declining exchange rale, but also support^ the money 
market to avoid an excessive tightening in liquidity ana a fx»«ible rise in 
interest rates at a very early stage of the economic upswing. 

The situation, however, changed during the course nf The rate nl 

growth in the M3 monej’ supplv measured over twelve-month periods 
increased tmm 1.9 per oil in July 1993 to 7 A per cent in December 
and to if B pur cent in June 590J. 

7Tw rate of expansion In the amount of bank credit extended to th e 
privatr sector, also measured over twelve- month periods, contracted from 
8" per cent in Pecember 1992 to 57 p« rent in May 1993, before rising 
again to 4,7 per amt in December 7993 and to 137 per cent in Jure 7*9j. 

Against the background of the perefefent outflow#! of capita) and lhe 
depredation in ffte exchange rate ol the rand, the Pcwrve Bank nvilchea to 
a more neutral policy stance during the early part of W and refrained 
from any further special assistance to the money market 

Interest rates in general reached a lower turning point in February 
199 * From then onwards the vu*f curve over ite full maturity sptvtnun 
shifted to a higher lew). With long-term rales increasing wen faster than 
short-term rales, the yield curve adopted a rather sleep upward slope as 
lhe gap between long and shnrt-lenn mlerest rates widaied. 

These developments ruled out the possibility for any further reduction 
in the Bank rate after six consecutive reduettons had been made from IS pi r 
rent in March ?»? to per cent »> CVtobiv 1993, 


The exchange contfuls may have h.id some success in achiex ing the original 
objectives, but like all direct controls of market act#! ilu-s applied over an 
extended period ol time. the\- have also created many distortions in the 
South African economy, aliening the exchange rale the- general level of 
mteivft rates, che prices of real o*K He and financial assets, and even wages 
and salaries Adjurtmvnb- ln lh«w important ecomimic xanables which 
should normally have taken place over the years wen? either jx'slponed ur 
depressed under the system of exchange confrols. and backlogs which 
accumulated will haw tn he accommodated i<nre the contrxxls are ultimaivly 
remo'ed. 

in the long run. and in the interest of future economic growth. South 
Africa must fifvrafi.se its foreign exchange marhei and revert to a system o! 
unitary floating exchange rates, influenced only by nxxcssnry Rsvivc Bank 
intervention aimed at snvxjlhing out rx-xersibio sh«'ri-lerm fluctuations. 


Many demands are now being made on South Africa n banking 
institutions to extend their activities in South Africa to accomni- stale afsu 
the banking needs ot Lhe less privileged parts of the population, and to 
provide mure funds for purposes such as housing, export financing, 
agriculture and small business development. The bant-S surely haw 
respi insibi lines in this regiird and can in the normal course ol their buriniw 
make an important contribution to the implementation of the Reconstruction 
and Ctevclopmcoi Programma However, it must be taken into consideration 
at ail times that a bank's credibility and survival in the longer run will bx- 
determined bv the quality of ibs assets book. Banks must not be lorcud into 
excessive risk exposures, tor then they may also one day become dependent 
on subsidies fwjn goveroment. 


An Imporktnt step in thL* direction was taken when agreement was 
reached tn September 1^.? with Snulh Afnc.i ? foreign creditor fatidy fur a 
fin.il rescheduling or the remaining amount of LS billixut of the original 
amount of SI3.*i billion blocked in South Africa since August 19h5 in terms 
oi a «ries ol interim debt arrangements. This balance will tv fufiv rcpitid to 
creditors in regular six-moitlWv iresljlments up l«iW. 


As far as the remaining exchange conltiJf are concerned there are. 
however, irttnv Jifierent viftvs on how and when South Africa -heuld 
move front the presenl system to the desired system, and wh.it 
supplementarv and supporting actioib may be nWSHrv to laabutc this 
transition. In manv other cnunlnc-.. exchange controls were <uccess/ttHy 
aholishi'd dull as part of a comprehensive and well-planned macro-eCtinuinK 


restructuring programme, Often with the co-f.pvratlon and support m lhe 
Inlemational Monctarv Fund and the World Bank. Such programme* 


La^e borrowing requiremcnb of government 


Oi-cr the post threi.- fi-eal ««rs that ended on 31 March 1W2, W3 and 
! delict 


vrver rue pBi inra; — - — — -- , - _ 

J994 lhe d elicit before bxwwntg on the budget ot the central government 
amounted to 4,3, 8A and tv9 per cent of gross diimWtiC prodiKt. respvcto-riy 
For the fiscal year t994/'9fl iftfa deficit has been projected at a Jovri of 
R2V ? billiiMJ. or bjh pc* «mi id ibe estimated grow domestic produrt- 


nurmafly provided for appropriate inlx-rcst rare and t-»changf rale ptvfino. 
and also committed the central bank and th»- government to clearly defined 
restrictive monetary and fiscal dwcipltnex. Tin- prtxgrammex ,k prescribixl 
fur some counuw^ ato* included cuns+ratitts un tutuie wage incroxMS., and 
*«hiWKhtxJ etternal financing ianlitii-i l*>i-uppnn lhe tvilancv of paymx-nt> 
in the transition period, if necessary 


Concluding remarks 

South A Inca earned the admiration of the world with the way in which it 
introduced a new- and hilly democratic political dispensation. The people 
ill lhe country tackled almost inaurniountable problems of socit*-pciUlKai 
retorra with determination, nnd with the will to succeed. 

South Africans must now face the next task, that is ol economic 
reconstruction and development, in the same spirit - we must pUv ifre 
game with the mil to win. On the one hand, the enunfry h> faced with 
massive but not unreasonable expectations of its people for txitier In mu 
conditions and a better standard of life. On the other, nv have limited 
resources to meet the needs of our people, for example, limfred s.n rngi> 
from which the necessary funding for the many urgent development 
programmes and expansion ot the physical production capacity must be 
provided ... This challenge gives no reason for despair - u is a normal 
situation for any country in a similar stage nf tvunomic drveJoptncnj. 

There is, no Instant solution to this nucro-ecrmomic challenge. Swtb 
Africans must rid themselves of the illusion that a solution con he mund 
simply through artificial changes to prices: we cannot make 5x«uth Airica 
rich just by depreciating the exchange rate, by lowering interest rates, bv 
increasing wages, or by creating mure inflation. Rea) n «Mith comes ihrough 
hard work, greater efficiency, unproved productivity and by being more 
competitive than other tuitions. Real wealth can only be created over dexvdxs. 
rather than years, and any durable process of economic deeeiupmoni can 
only be maintained in an eiu-Tfonmenf of uvemll social, pililicaJ. financial 
and economic stabiiitv. 


The abolition ol exchange controls m isolation without iffiv suppsirtive 
aiixiliarv measures mav cause serious disniptiotis in the initial phase ol Uie 


Against this background, the Reserve bank has no other upturn but 
tn continue h> pursue its objectives Ot maintaining a stable uvi-rall 
financial environment, backed by sound and veeH-managed financial 
institutions, operating in efficient and reliable financial markets This 
must remain the cornerstone of monetary policy in South Africa in the 
year> ahead - 


m 












































































The conference, 


Europe's leading energy 


forum. 


will be addressed by oil industry 


experts from the world over. 



OIL & MONEY 

London • October 11 & IS 


The Oil Daily Group 


































































Page 18 


SPORTS 






t Stages 

NpPl 


fr*;**. . ■ . x # 

*g£iY*V 

Ete S"" V* . 


Chiu WiBiioj- Axcnx ‘^lacrPrcJc 

Kieren Perkins after breaking his worid record. 


Boardman Gains 
A 2d Cycling Title 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

CATANIA. Sicily — Chris 
Boardman of Britain took his 
second title at the world cycling 
championships on Thursday, 
winning the 42-kilometer time 
trial. 

Karen Kurreck of the United 
States captured the world tide 
in the women's individual time 
trial — a new event at the cy- 


Boardman clocked 49 min- 
utes 34.5 seconds to beat An- 
drea Chaiurato of Italy by 50 
seconds in heat of more than 40 


degrees centigrade (104 degrees 
Fahrenheit). Jan Ulrich of Ger- 
many was third in 51 minutes 
25.4 seconds. 

“Hie beat was incredible," 
Boardman said. “I rode the first 
half carefully, and after that it 


was just a question of counting 
off the kilometres to the finish." 


gymnast at the University of 
Illinois, took the rainbow iersey 


off the kilometres to the finish." 

He was the fastest at each 
time check and before the finish 
overtook the Tour of Italy win- 
ner, Yevgeny Berzin of Russia, 
who had started three minutes 
before him. 

Last week in Palermo, Board- 
man added the world 4,000- me- 


ter pursuit title to his Olympic 
gold at that discipline, and on 


Thursday he brought down the 
cumin on an outstanding first 
full season as a professional 
with French team GAN. 

He spent three days in the 
yellow jersey of the Tour de 


Illinois, took the rainbow jersey 
completing the distance in 38 
minutes 22.8 seconds. Sam- 
plonius finished in 39:07.7, and 
Longo finished in 39:44.1. 

Clara Hughes of Canada, 
who finished fourth in 39:50.7, 
led Kurreck by 8.6 seconds at 
the split. She slowed down in 
the final kilometers as Kurreck 
took command. 

“I told myself I'd be happy in 
the top five," Kurreck said “I 
just went as hard as I could go. 
It's just you and the dock." 

Rebecca Twigg, the No. 1 
American woman in time trials, 
placed sixth. (AP, Reuters) 


DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 


ic -- 

^ E-? 

• 1*1 5— T * ai 




HI. CHOCK.. I 
COULPN'T SLEEP 
A5A1N 50 I 
THOUGHT I'D 
CALL YOU.. ^ 


1 O'L 




GARFIELD 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 26, 1994, 


•k' 


Australian Sets 
2 Swim Records 
In Same Race 


yegggB 


The Associated Press 

VICTORIA, British Colum- 
bia — Kieren Perkins of Aus- 
tralia broke two world records 
in the same race, winning his 
fourth gold medal on the final 
night of swimming ai the Com- 
monwealth Games. 

His time of 14 minutes 41.66 
seconds in the 1,500-meter free- 
style was more than a second 
faster than the record of 
14:43.48 that he set at the 1992 
Olympics. Perkins, 21. also 
broke his world 800 mark dur- 
ing the race at 7:46.00, bettering 
the record be set in Sydney in 
February 1992 by .6 seconds. 

“Once I got the 800 I was 
feeling good" Perkins said “I 
was feelmg pain, but I was still 
buoyed by the reaction of the 
crowd There was one hell of a 
dull roar coming through the 
water." 

In swimming, the 800 is con- 
sidered pan of the 1,500 for 
record purposes. The two re- 
cords have been broken in the 
sam e race eight times since 
1958. The last to do it was Ste- 
phen Holland of Australia in 
1976. 


Australia won aD six swim- 
ming events Wednesday and 
finished with 24 of a possible 32 
gold medals in the six days of 
competition. 

Pe rkins was sw imming alone, 
far ahead of his competition, 
almost the entire race, cheered 
on by the fans, his teammates 
and other swimmers who lined 
the pool at Saanich Common- 
wealth Place. 

Perkins also won the 200 and 
400 freestyles and was part of 
the winning 800 freestyle relay, 
setting Games records in all 
three. He was .77 seconds off 
the world mark in the 400. 

Two of his teammates. Susan 
O'Neill and Nicole Stevenson, 
each won a third gold. 

O'Neill led an 1-2-3 Austra- 
lian sweep in the women’s 200- 
meter butterfly, winning in 
2:09.96, a Games record. Hay- 
lev Lewis, the defender, won the 
silver and Julie Majer the 
bronze. 

Stevenson won the women’s 
200-meter backstroke in 
2:12.73. Matthew Dunn won 
his first individual gold in the 
200-meter individual medley in 
2 : 02 ^ 8 . 



ilf- 

#> ,n 


()• 


lack SWe/Tbe Aswciilcii 


Simon Shirley of England , left, g nd teammaf y Alex Kruger ft wH n g hurdles in the 110-meter event in the deca t hlon. 


The Australians also got a 
second gold medal from Karen 
Van Wirdam, who won the 50 
freestyle in 25.90, and from the 
men’s 400 medley relay team in 
a Games record m 3:40.41. 

In track and field, it was a 
day of disappointment for 
South Africa as Yvonne Mur- 
ray of Scotland sprinted away 
from Elana Meyer over the final 
500 meters for an upset victory 
in the women's 10,000-meter 
race. R unning the event for the 
first time in nine years and sec- 


ond time of her career, Murray 
stayed just behind Meyer’s right 
shoulder through most of the 
race before making her move 
with just over a lap to go- 
Meyer, who hoped to give 
South Africa its first Common- 
wealth Games gold medal In 36 
years, had nothing left to re- 
spond tothe challenge. 

Murray’s winning time was 
31 minutes 56.97 seconds. 

There was a lot of success, for 
England on the track, where 
Rob Denmark of England 


charged from third place; with 
about 200 meters to pull away 
to win the 5,000 meters in 
13:23.00. • 

England got a gold and a sti- 
ver in the women's' shot put: 
Judy Oakes won at 59 feet 7 
inches, and Myrtle Augee was 
second. 

- The’ boxer' Masibulele 
(Hawk) Makepula was defeated 
in a bout in which a victory 
would have made him the first 
black South African ever to win 
a Games medaL His 106-pound 


quarterfinal bout with BiijuSah 
of India ended in a 13-13 tie, 
and Sah was given the victory 
amid a chorus of boos and den? 
rive whistles, From the crowd. ' 
Officials of several African 
nations have complained abbut 
what they perceive to be bias in 3 
the ’kxuihg in boxing in favbr of* 
white athletes. They have) 
threatened to withdraw fromi 
the competition and plan to; 
meet later this.year to consider-, 
mg setting up' their own sepia- 1 
rate boxing evenL 




IARD 






Japanese Leagues 


Central League 


France leader after w innin g the 
opening time trial in Lille in 
early July. Now he bas pledged 
himself to a road racing career 
centered on the tour. 

Berzin, who has twice beaten 
Miguel Indurain at his special- 
ty, time trials, in the Tour of 
Italy, was nowhere near that 
form on Thursday. He was 
struggling in the heat a^ Board- 
man caught him. 

Kurreck, 32, beat Anne Sam- 
plonius of Canada by 44.9 sec- 
onds in an unexpected showing 
by North American athletes in 
the 29.6-kilometer race through 
the streets of Catania. The 
French veteran Jeannie Longo 
finished third. 

Kurreck, who began cycling 
two years ago after a career as 



W L T 

pa. 

GB 

Yemlurl 

63 44 0 

J*5 

— 

Hmsbln 

54 52 0 

-509 

8 

Hirntiilma 

52 52 0 

300 

9 

Chunldll 

52 51 a 

493 

9*4 

Yakidf 

47 55 0 

481 

13 

Yekataama 44 57 0 

Ttaandav*! Results 
Yakut! 6 Yemlurl a 

HansbUi A Yokohama 6 

Aft 

14V; 

Hiroshima 9. ChunlcM 7. 15 Innings 
Pacific League 



W L T 

pa. 

GB 

Stlbu 

SB 45 0 

J83 

_ 

Orix 

55 44 2 

.554 

1 

Kintetsu 

54 48 2 

set 

ito 

Dolel 

57 47 1 


1W 

Lotto 

41 82 1 

398 

17 

Nippon Ham 39 82 4 

ThurMaYk Result 
Seibu 6 Kintetsu 2 

388 

18 


Cupwkmncw 

FC Sctaon B. FC Ptrtn L FC Plrtn advances an 
44) ougreg ut e 

HJ K Helsinki 2. Scndorar IrenerMog 0, HJK 
Hateinfci advances 7-0 opote v otp 
US fa Cob 

FC A* rones Z Bangor City 0, FC Akranas 
advances out 4-1 omfcooiv 

German first division 


Hie Michael Jordan Watch 


WEDNESDAY'S CAME: Jordan **en» 3- 
<or-4 iritti two tins In. one double, two rum, 
two stolen bawn. or HBI ortda strikeout InaS- 
0 victory aver Orlando. He had three mtmits 
in left flew. 

SEASON TO DATE: Jordan is batting JOB 
t82-for-41(» with 42 tuns, 17 doubles. 1 lrlMe.3 
home runs, 48 RBls. 45 walks. 105 strikeouts 
and 29 stolen bases In 4* attempts. He has 202 
Mauls, five assists and 10 errant In the out- 
field. 


MSV Duisburg 2. Schalke Z lie 
Hamburg SV 01 Barer Uenflngen a tie 
Borussla Moenchen. 2. Karlsruhe SC 2. tie 
Warde r Bremen 1 Bayer Leverkusen 2 
standings: Borussla Dortmund4 paints. VT8 
Stuttgart 4, Karlsruhe SC 1 wader Bremen i 
FC Kaiserslautern 1 5C Freiburg 2. VtL Bo- 
cfeim 2. MSV Duisburg 2. Borussla Moenctieng- 
ladbacb 2. Schalke Z E Inf rode Frankfurt Z 
Bayer Uenflngen Z Bovem Monk* Z Ham- 
burg SV I, Dynamo Dresden L FC Cologne V 
Bavor Leverkusen 0, IBM) Mundan 0. 

ENGLISH PREMIER LEAGUE 
Wednesday's Remits 
Aston Villa 1 Southampton t 
M anchester CHv 3 West Ham 0 
Newcastle 4 Coventry 0 
Norwich 0 Crystal Palace 0 
Queens Park Rangers 3 Sheffield Wed. 2 
Tottenham 3 Everton I 
Stonffiags: Newcastle 6 points. T ot t e nh am 
6 Blackburn 4. Manchester united 4. Natttng- 
nam Forest 4. Leeds 4, Uvergaol 1 Arsenal X 
Chelsea x Mandre s tor City & Queens Park 
Bangers 1 Aslan villa 2. Sout ham pt o n a Wlm- 
biedon z Everton Llmwtch I, Norwich I.West 
Horn 1, Coventry L Crystal Polace !■ Sheffield 
Wednesday ft Leicester a (Tottenham will be 
deducted sis points at conctuslan ot season.) 






EUROPEAN CUPS SCORES 
Wednesday's Results 
Chaaimaas Cue 
Prsflmbimv Round, second log 
Casino Sab burs 1 Mocccbi Holla L Casino 
Salzburg advances on 5-2 aggregate 
Dynamo Kiev 1 Slikebara 1. Dynamo od- 
nnen on 3-1 augregofo 
Cakstasaray 6 Avenir D oggen 0. CaMtasarnv 
advances on 9-1 aggregate 
Claseaw Rangers 0. AEK Atttens 1.AEK Am- 
am advonces on WJ oggragatt 
Hoi auk Sent 4. Legla Warsaw o, nadiuk Soili 
oavances on so a ggr eg a te 
IKK Cooteborg Z Soarta Prague 0, IFK ad- 
vances on 2-1 aggregate 
Servette 1. Steau Bucharest I.Stecu advances 
on S3 aggregate 

VAC Samsung 1, Paris St. Germain Z Parts 
Saint -German advances on SI ag gr e ga te 


ONE -DAY INTERNATIONAL 
England es. South Africa 
Tewsdoy, of Ed sbotien 
At Too 

South Africa: 21 FT (55 oversl 
England: 90-1 after 27 overs 


UMS-1. Station 5blrley, England, 432J6 
72». 2. Jamie Quarry. Scotland. 4 :3U6 722. 1 
Douglas PlrtnL Now Zealand, 4:36.14. 70S. 

Polo VOoH— Section 1—1, Michael Smith, 

Qinoda, 1SB4L 94L 2, Peter Wlrder, Australia, 

15ML8S0.3 (He), Dean Smith. Australia and 
Douglas PlrtnL New Zealand. 15-S. 819. 

Section 1—1, Brendan Tennant, Australia 
I44U. 73L 2 (He), Jamie Quarry, Scotland, 
and Georgias Andreau. Cyprus. 14-1VL 702. 

Pisces Section 1 — L Michael Smith, To- 
ranta l» teeL 6 inches, 842. 2. Rater Joseph, 
England, 15B-&835. 3, Dean s<nl ft, Australia 
150-9, 787. 

Sections— l,GeMUlooAMbEou,Cygn& 138- 
11.711 1 Jomle Quarry. Scotland. 1369. 487.1 
Brendan Tennant. Australia 13B-1L 4*0. - 

Javelin— Section 1—1, Simon Shiriav, Eng- 
land. 209 feet.4 Mies. 795.2, Dean Smith, Aus- 
tralia. 201-8. 740 X Alex Kroger, England. 190- 
7. 799. 

Section 2—1. Michael Smith, Canada 2234. 
<59.XBrend>i7lsmanLAustntilaaof-9.7iG.lL 
Peter Winter, Australia 1902. 744. 

Final Stanflees 

I, Michael Smith, Canada 8316 points. Z 
Peter Winter, Australia 83176 X Station Shir- 
ley. England, 7,980 

Woman 

HUM9— 1, Yvonne Murray, Scotland, si min- 
ute65697seama&.2. Ekma Mayer, south AhT- 
ca 32:04312. & Jane Oman, Kenya 32:1301. 

Shot pm— 1. Judy Oakn England, 59 teat, 7 
inches. 1 Myrtle Augaa England. 57 -IOKl 3, 
Use Vfcantort, Australia 544. 

CYCLING 

1A08 m ot or Hme trim— l. Shone KoHy.Auo- 
iraila. one minute, 5J84 seconds (Games re- 
cord, prevtous record, 1:05572. set by Martin 
Vtamteambe. Australia 1990). 2, Darryn HIIL 
Australia 1:05432. 3. Tlmoitiv O’Sharmessev. 
Australia 1.-06789. 

DIVING 


8473k 3, Benat Sandtiram. Australia SSWLS- 
4425. 

SWIMMING 


Thr ee m s tsrsgrhtgta—td- I.MichatiMur- 
ohv. Australia 471740 paliTf. 4 Bean SfsworL 
Zimbabwe, 425540 3. Jason Nswr. Canada 
421300 




Commonwaafth Games 


O u o- met er springboard— 1, Annie Pei kit er. 
Canada 279440. Z Jodie Rogers, Australia 
2S2J30 X More DePtora Canada 245540 
SNOOTING 


280 tadlvtduai medley — 1. M oi diew Duna 
Australia 2 minutes. UB seconds. Z Curtis 
Myderv Canada 2:810. X Fraser Wadw. 
SooNand. 2:0420 

UN Freostyfe— 1, Kieren PortdnaAatira- 
11a 14:4146 (world record, previous, record 
14:4L« set by PerUns, 1992 Barcelona Otvm- 
aics). Z Daniel Kowalski, AutiraOa 14535L 
1 Glen Housmm. Australia 15:0259. 

4xiai momer rotor — T. Australia (Steven 
Dewksc, Philip Jtaaarx Scoff Miller, CWtsto 
sber Pvdtar). 3:4041 (Games record, previ- 
ous record 3^4245 sat by Canada 1PM, Z 
Canada 3:4135. 3. Ena land. 3-jtSTL 
Wanna 

SS Freestyle— 1, Karen Van Wtrdura. Am- 
fnrila 25501 Andrea Nugent. Canada 243L3. 
Shannon Shokosneare, Canada 2837. 

288 Bodtsfrate— I. Nk»4» Sfevemaa Aus- 
tralia 2: 1271 2. Anna standa Now ZsaknxL 
2:1354. & Elite Overton, Australia HI <96. 

. m Bsltsrfly— ). Susan otiefH. Australia 
2:8954 (Gone record, previous record 
2:11.15 set by Hayhnr LewfaAustraDa19RiL2, 
Kavlev Lewis. Australia 2:1231. 3, Julie 
Malsr, Australia 3: 1243. 

WEIOHTUFTIHO 
M kg 

Saatcb— L NaHIa Ognoda Ntanrta. 27* 
pounds. 2. SevdallnMirbiav, Australia 276 3,' 
onver Toby. Maarta. 288. 

dean and J er h 1 . oHver Toby, N i geria 
3362.Sovdolln Marlnov, AutfraJlaJM. 
life Ogboda Nigeria 331. 

T o tal 1 . Sevdolln Marlnov, Auetralla.in. 
Z Nailte Ouboda Nigeria *061 Oliver Toby, 
Nigeria 401. 

98kg 

Snatdt— L Lowal RHIwaa Nigeria 290 2, 
Stewart Crulliabank, Enakond, 290 X Molt 
Oluwa iftewla 287. 

CNawaadJWN Z AMIOIawa,Mtorta,3U. 
2, SatUh RaL India 344. 3. Steward Cruik- 
fhank, Engtaiam 

ToW—' 1. Moll Otanwa Nlgerta 850 2, Sattsh 
RaL India 848. 3, Stewart CrwUNhardi. Eng- 
land. *48. 

MEDALS 

(threagb W gvomsl 

«*w Stiver BigiHs rural 


Hang Kang 



3 - 

3 

Sri Lanka - 



. r- 

2 

Cyprus . 

1 


.1 

2 

N. i rewd 

1 


i 


Malavtia 

0 

2 

0. 

2 

Jamaica 

0 


2 . 

2 

Pakistan 

0 


2 

- 2 

Siam Leona 

8 

\ - 

0 

1 

GoaruMV . 

a 

. 0 . 

. IT 



Drug Tests 
Are Positive 
For 2 Britons 


NOTE: NDsBuerorbrassemdaNe 


- . BASEBALL 
Amertcae League 

'CLEVELAND INDIANS— Rotaased Malt 
TuraeiE. PHther. . . 

BASKETBALL ' 


CA. LAKERS— Signed Nick Van EseL 
auonL and Anianlo HoinMibforwardrto mut- 

HVfor .ccNvr rticUy 

• MIAMI— Named Ed Badger. amMaat 
coa<3> and stoned Mm totnutftynar con t ract 
Stoned Alvla Gentry, assistant coach, to mul- 
tiyear cordracL 

SACRAMENTO— Resigned Uaaei 51m- 


• FOOTBALL . ■ . . 

Naflsaal FaenaH Lseaee 
. ARIZONA— signed Shawn Maura ouarter- 
bdek. Waived Brett Vrailsrstedt. Hneb oc ker ; 
B ern ar d BatiwnW ds te ns ive endi GrkM Bbl-- 


nneer. guard; (ml Gang McGahc, center. 
redded Seai’Waboce. mfetv, on inlurad re- 
serve. ■ ; 

ATLAN TA- Waived Jason PMlllpa and 
caw Dtatoa Mde receivers; John HtWaa- 
relctv tackle; and Mltdi Davis, Unahackor. 

BUFFALO— Waived Anthony Ftokflnas, 
TodcL-Herget, Scott Stophsn, and Anthony 
Abianisi.liiMbadiani;Mattltodgorakauartir- 
badU John Bock, guard; Darrldi Branchcmi 
OrhmdoMcKay.wfderecstver s iMIkeCDWnB 
end Grog Evans, safeties; 'Sonny Fsetica 
punier; Dan Sitvostii, kicker; and Tim Tim 
dole. fulbodL 

CHICAGO— Rokiasod Greg FrlntuW Wide 


Room 

LONDON — Two English; . 
athletes were flown home from! 
the Commonwealth Gaines be- 
cause they failed dope tests, of-) 
fidals^ confirmed on Thursday, t 

Peter Radford, the British!. 
Athletic Federation's executive! 
chairman, said the shot-pqttcr! 
Paul Edwards and the. 800-me-* 
ter runrier Diane. Modahl hadj 
both tested positive in the first! 
of two Samples takes from ath-) 
letes after, racmg :or ..during! 
training. A test . on thc steccmd,' 
or'B, sample is yet' to he ci)n-| . 
ducted arid thus no action could,4 
be taken, Radford said. ■ - ■ 

■ .Edwards* who was hospitals a 
ized In Canada with a stomach 
complaint before be could com- 
pete, and 'Modahl, ~who flew - 
home because of what officials 
called a “family bereavement,” 
had been linked with reports in 
Victoria that two English ath- J 
letes had failed dope tests taken, 
at earlier meets. ' 


MBG-1. Robert Denmark. Engkmd,13mJn- 
utts.2msoconaL2. PhiMmon Hannack, Zim- 
babwe. 13:2120. 3, John Nuttatl, England. 
13:2156 


118 Hprdl o* — I Nat 1—1. Jamie Quarry. 
Scotland, U36 seconds. 929 pohds. X Peter 
whiter. Australia. 1 Michael Smith, Toronto. 
UAL 171. 


individual Rwtsfoe Targe*-!, Bryan WIF 
son, Australia 541 ond 969, 4575 tola 1.2. Mark 
BedUngtoa, Ontario; 548483k 8561 Paul Car- 
mine. New Zealand. 5S5W. 8503. 

individual smaflbare rifle prana— 1, Ste- 
phen PeWtrscw. New Zealand. JW and IOTA. 
4M4 (Games record). 2, Jamee Cornish. Eng- 
land. 598-181.94883. 1 MKkal Men, Canada 
591-1S3A0866 

idMdaal Free PhTof— 1, MWiaol Oautt, 
End land, 558 and 98.1,4961 total IGarnoe re- 
cord). X PtUIllo Adaraa Australia 5S8973F 


Australia 

48 

34 

34 

1(8 

Canada: 

38 

» 

28 

78 

Enstaod 

- 18 

23 

V 

81 

Now Zealand 

S 

10 


21 

India 

5 

■ 

8 

19 

Nigeria 


7 

5 

n 

Scetignd 


2 

8 

it 

Woles 

1 

3 

1 

9 

South Africa 

0 

1 

4 

5 

Kenya 

2 


1 

4 

Nauru 

3 

0 

0 

3 

Zimbabwe 

0 

2 




CLEVELAND P Incod M8kt MMCkauard. 
ondGreg 7TwnMaaafafy^nla(«redreoorva 
R e leased Floyd Fields, safety, Announced 
that Robert Cobb, a u artorto cK , has left the 


DENVER— W ai ved Kevin Farkas. Mat 
HamaeL- Crala Ritter and Mario Cristobal, 
offensive Unomon; Tim MosieY, wide receiv- 
er; Chuck Snowden running bock) Brian 
Dveb defentive end: Reggie Jahnooa, tight 
end; and Btllv Lofton, now tackle. Put Bob 
Mee ks , oWowlvo Unomnaand Metvtai Ban- 
ner, wfd»racetosr,an biiured reserve. Signed 
WIU Funrer, quarterbaefc. 


Earlier this month, the*’ 
sprinter Solomon Wariso was" ; 
suspended by the British team * 
after testing positive for the---, 
stimulant ephedrine before the, ^ 
European championships. ; « 

Radford declined to say what! 
drags were involved in the cases’ 
of Edwards and Modahl who.’ 
pulled out of the Games just 30* 
minutes before she was due to! 
run. • 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 


I GUESS I LIE 
AUAKE ANP WORRw' 
ABOUT TOO MAN* 

^ THINGS, HUH 7 . 


MAV3E ALL I NEEP 
15 A KIND WORD... 

£70 W HAVE A K1NP 
UJORP FOR .V\E, CHUCK? 


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Bunker KIL June 17, 177S: An unlartanM* twfit of Mb 
for one Young Rfcdco«, Charts* "Bufl«y8d“ Bmah-n, 
was not knowing that th* opposing American ganant 

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until you SBB th« wWiBB of thalr sjiw.- 











' -.M fy yS— -.___ . ,____ 


3*. 


INTERNATIONAL HERAU) TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 26 , 1994 


Page 19 



Wifi f Lucky r Circuit 


■ ' 7 Xoagrr ; ■■ 

SPA-FRANCORCHAMPS, 
Belgium — Michael Schu- 
macher, tbeleadcr in the JPor- 
mala One drivers’ cfaaxnpioQ-. 
slop, wffibe hoping for more 
good fortune fan hb ^hkaty’ 
and f avorite carcuit this week- 
end to hdp add to his lead in _ 
the title race at the Belgian 
Grand Prix. 

The 25-year-old German,, 
who has wen 7 of 10 races tins 
year for i Benetton, -hafeilfe 
Briton Damon Hill of iWQSams 
by 31 points: " ' ; •*- - ’ 

But he knows’ he may have 

his two-raccban, forj gnoring a. 
blade flag during theBriush 
Grand Pnx, confirmed when he 
a ppeals that p unishment ih Par- 
is on Tuesday. . 

For Schnmacfacr, however; 
the Spa^runcorc£tamps dntirit 
is a special attraction. It.fe the 
track on which he made his For-; 


, 2U£Bg 


Skater Jansen 
CaUs It Quite 

The Associated Pros ' 

MILWAUKEE — Gold 
medalist Dan Jansen, whose, 
frustration and triumph 
held America's attention 
through four Ofyamics,, is 
retiring from" speedskating 
and wifi become a television 
comme n tate: . 

Jansen, 29, won a gold 
medal in the 1,000 meters . 
at USchammer, Norway, 
in February, ending years 
of Olympic frustration. - 
At the 1988 Games in 
Calgary, he fell twice after 
his sister died of- leukemia., 
hours before Ins first race. 1 
Despite snccess iu interna- 
tional competition, he failed . 
to win a medal in Albert- 
ville, France, in 1992. - 

He slipped, during in? 
500-meter race atlihdiain- 
mer and finished out of 
medal contention. Five 
days later, he won the 1,000 
in world-record time. 


molar One debut in 1991 and 
where he won fab first race in 
1992. ; ; : 

“I always haw yoy special 

is ih/drant is 
nearest to my iamfly home in 
Germany, and I alvrayshave a 
Iot of.support. ' r ‘ r - 
■ “It is almost Eke my ‘home’ 
Grand. Prix, if you -fibs. So, I 
-shall be doing my-tttmiost to try 
and be soccessftn there again.’’ 
.^rniwrfw has 76 pomts to 
FfflFs 45,T»t ifiteimsses two 
races — Hkdy tobethe Italian 
and Portuguese — and Hill 
wins them both, Schumacher's 
31-point lcadcookibe trimmed 
io 11 by the time cf the Europe- 
an. GrandPrix at Jerez, Spain, 
onOcLlti. .: 

-••• Since last yem th^track, the 
longest and one of the fastest on 
the calendar, has been modified 
to increase safety. This has 
meant the eUmination of the 
Eau Rouge corner, a dipping 
left-right sweep of trade mat is 
followed .immediately by a 
steep hill swerving away to the 



Baseball Owners Dispute 
Study of Game’s Finances 


By Mark Maske 

Washington Pest Service 

NEW YORK — Major 
league owners and their labor 
negotiator, Richard Ravitch, 
have dismiss ed a study by a 
Stanford University economist 
— which concludes that base- 
ball is financially healthy as an 
industry and will continue to be 
that way in the foreseeable fu- 
ture — as Players Association 


It has long been regarded by 
' the drivers as the most demand- 
ing and potentially dangerous 
corite in the wodd - •• 

trafizedwi^Tthe introduction of 
a chicane on a temporary bask 
Next year, the track— -current- 
ly wmdg upofa nrixtnre of par- 

wtt become a 
permanent dremt/ ' 

“I don’t know .any. drivers 
who don't like Spa,** said H3L 
“I think ills amajestic dreuit in 
a fantastic location.lt is a vast 
circmt, so wbatyou complete a 
lap it is a long cmc. 

. “And unlike Hungary where 
you fed you are going around in 

circles, you do fed you are go- 
ing sonKWbcxeL’’ •• 

While the battle for the title 
beMea Schumacher and Hill 
and Benetton and WflHams will 
donanatc attention, the chal- 
lenge from Ferrari, should not 
be ignored. Die Italian team 
lias a powerful V]2 engine and 
stonra be highly competitive on 
this track. 


Knit Lajfcm/Thr Asodsicd Pn. 

MahYti Washington smashing his way to an upset of Stefan Edberg in the Hamlet Cop. 


Union officials, meanwhile, 
cited the finding s as further 
proof that the owners’ attempt 
to install a salary rap is a pipy 
designed to maximize profits in 
an already booming business. 

Donald Fehr, the union 
chief, said the study was not 
addressed by Ravitch and the 
ownership representatives dur- 
ing the meeting Wednesday 
with ihe players — the first such 
get-together since the players 
went on strike on Aug. 12. 

But management officials 
spent plenty of time attacking 
the economist, Roger NoU, ana 
his report, which was mailed to 
each cf the 28 major league 
teams this week. 

Ravitch and the owners were 


quick to point out that NoU had 
worked for the union since 
1985, when be prepared a study 
of baseball’s finances during, 
the collective-bargaining pro- 
cess. And they added that NoU 
works frequently for unions in 
Other sports and was disallowed 
as an expert witness in court 
recently during the National 
Basketball Association labor 
dispute. 

Baltimore Orioles officials 
said some of the information 
regarding the club’s finances 
contained in Noll’s report was 
incorrect. 

“I knew of Mr. NoU,” Ra- 
vitch said at a news conference. 
“He’s an economist who has 
worked with sport s unions. The 
players and the union are enti- 
tled to have any advocacy state- 
ment prepared they wish.” 

John Harrington, the Boston 
Red Sox general partner, said: 
“He was paid to reach those 
conclusions. It’s a very biased 
report.” 

Sources said that Ravitch 
and his staff were working on a 
response to Noll’s report for 
when the meeting resumes on 
Thursday. Tbe response. 


Navratilova Wants to Be No. 1 — at the WTA 


By Robin Finn 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Martina Navratilova 
won't be the first retired athlete to segue 
into politics, but she's probably the first 
to run against her own longtime doubles 
partner, Pam Shriver. 

The post at stake in this curious com- 
petition is the presidency of the WTA 
Tour Players Association, a position 
held by Shriver for the last three years. 

At an election to be held in New York 
on Sunday night, the fourth-ranked 
Navratilova, an outspoken advocate of 
challenging the tennis establishment, 
will attempt to block Shriver s re-elec- 
tion bid. But the 37-year-old Navrati- 
lovs, who is dapping tbe U.S. Opes and 
retiring at tbe dose of 1994, could find 
herself running unchallenged if the in- 
cumbent Shriver is not first re-elected to 
the WTA Tour board by the players. 

While Shriver s dedication to tour is- 
sues is unquestioned, her popularity 


among her constituency has suffered be- 
cause of her past policy affilia tions with 
the departed WTA executive director, 
Gerard Smith. 

There are some players, Navratilova 
among them, who believe that Smith 
and Shriver alienated the tour's former 
title sponsor, Kraft, and also encour- 
aged the impending departure of Virgin- 
ia Slims, the tours founding sponsor, 
without having an adequate backup in 
place. The WTA Tour has no sponsor 
this year and efforts to recruit a title 
sponsor willing to provide $5 million to 
S7 milli on is 1995 have so far met with 
no takers. 

■ Reform Platform 

Navratilova is running on a platform 
of reform: Revamp the tour, revise the 
rules and restore sanity to the sport. The 
Associated Press reported. 

Navratilova endorsed tbe idea of a 
“tennis summit meeting” to bring togeth- 


er all the key factions — tbe men's and 
women’s tours, the USTA, the Interna- 
tional Tennis Federation, manufacturers, 
advertisers, promoters, media and fans — 
to examine the problems of the game: 

“Absolutely,” she said in an interview 
Wednesday from her home in Aspen. 
Colorado. “Get all of us together because 
we’re all working for the same goal. Right 
now tennis is very splintered. A summit 
conference would be good for the game.” 

John McEnroe, elder statesman of tbe 
men’s tour, agreed. T think it would be 
an excellent idea,” he said. “I don’t 
know if the answer is mixing the men’s 
and women's tour. That's two different 
things. But at the same time, tennis is 
unique in the sense that at major events 
men and women play at the same tune.” 

Asked whether the antagonisms 
among some of tbe groups are too deep 
for the sport to become unified, McEn- 
roe said, “I don’t think so. The Berlin 
Wall came down. Anything’s possible.” 


Navratilova wants fewer tournaments 
so top players will meet each other more 
often and develop rivalries. 

*Tve gone for a year without playing 
against Steffi Graf,” she said, im 
ranked No. 4, she’s ranked No. 1 and we 
never play each other.” 

Navratilova also would like to see tbe 
men’s and women's game speeded up, 
playing lets, reducing the number of 
times players sit on changeovers, and 
serving more quickly. 

And, after seeing Jennifer Capriati's 
decline, she's urging tougher rules re- 
stricting the eligibility of young players 
to “let these kids have a life” before they 
go on the tour. 

“I wfll be running for WTA presi- 
dent." she said. “Whether I get elected, 
that’s another story. But I’ll be ttying. 
I’ve done it before, but I fell I didnt 
have enough time to really do a proper 
job. Now Iobviously have the time and 
the desire.” 


sources said, would focus on 
three main points: Noll’s asser- 
tion that tee players’ salaries 
have risen at a rate comparable 
to baseball's revenues, Noll's al- 
leged misrepresentation of tbe 
owners’ revenue-sharing plan 
and his claims that the owners 
are hiding their profits. 

Ravitch addressed tbe first of 
those points on Wednesday 
night, saying that player com- 
pensation consumed 42 percent 
of baseball’s gross revenues in 
198 9 and 58 percent this year. 
He said it was “absurd to sug- 
gest” that the game’s revenues 
had risen at the same rate as the 
players’ salaries. 

Both Ravitch and Bud Selig, 
the Milwaukee Brewers’ owner 
and baseball’s acting commis- 
sioner, said they had not had 
time to go over Noll’s report 
thoroughly. Bui Selig said by 
telephone that the owners stood 
by the bleak picture they have 
painted of baseball’s finances. 

In the report, NoU asserts 
that the owners underreported 
their 2 993 profits by at least 5 50 
million and underestimated 
their '94 revenues by S50 mil- 
lion to 5140 million. According 
to the owners' financial state- 
ments, the 28 major league 
clubs turned a $50 million prof- 
it last year but were projecting 
to lose 547 million this year 
(with industrywide revenues of 
SI .803 billion and operating ex- 
penses of $1.85 billion) in an 
uninterrupted season. 

Noll says tbe owners are hid- 
ing revenues (and profits) in 
complex local television con- 
tracts and in inflated general 
and administrative expenses — 
including management fees 
paid to owners. Tne economist 
wriies in the report that the 
dubs exceeded by S124 million 
from 1992 to *94 the reasonable 
costs needed to run their from 
offices (which he places at $5.5 
million per team per year). 

Noll says the owners* new na- 
tional broadcasting deals dis- 
play “poor business judgment” 

He says teams are not des- 
tined to fail in any of the current 
markets, although he does assert 
that the revenue-sharing among 
(he clubs is inadequate. 


CROSSWORD 


ACROSS 

i Macintosh . 

predecessor 
a Fish feature 
io Crumples 
14 Joie de vfvra 
is Less racy 
is Unbalanced 


J- 


it Start of an 
excerpt from an 
EdneSt 
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pdeot ' 
is Elvis, forone 
2D“Readm«* . 
n Chaser,- 
perhaps 


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tfc a arekiutli of **»< 


22 Noon's wHe, bn 
■Cheers'.... 

*□ Physicist \ . 

• JoBof-Curie 

2S Excerpt, part 2 
sa A, to Mozart . 
ao Not sanguine 
si Bal perch 
32 Having a ;. 
ranking 

»* Chateau-dotted 
' valley 
M Wind up ..; 

37 Excerpt, pan 3 • 

.*0 pendant- * 

43 Zigzags 

44 Gsctiales 
48 Antecedent 

period., 

41 Year of Trajan's 
victory over Oada 
so Ruined 1 
.51 Excerpt, part 4 
» Comical Anne 
'.WProwince 
S7 Young man’s " 
dub- 

90 Moore's"- 

the Last Rose of 
Summer* 

•e Kind of slew 
si Excerpt, part 5 

C4 leaseholder 
r .aa.What a summer 
•• skims 

-'mBom - . 

«7 Half-note • 
feature 
sa lt's a crying 
need 

6> Baseball 
HaB-d-Famer 
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DOWN. 

1 More verdant ' 

2 Twelfth tfigfn* .. 


3 Conspicuous 

4 What's more 
- 5 Eye problem 

c Old Testament 
• scout 
T Dean Martin 
subject 
SDetghtonor 
Dawson 

• Dyne- 

.. centimeter 

10 Chre up 

11 Not too soft 
1* Opener* 

13 Like a 

newborn's legs 
ie Tad’s dad 
24 1970 Nobel 
physicist Louis 

23 Most bears. 

• biologically 

27 One of TVs 
Cleavers 
38 Them, with 
■the" 

33 Quit flying 

34 Massenet opera 

35 Black or red 
tree 

38 bean 

38 Pave the way 

40 Is mannerly 

41 Pig out 

4a Leave desolate 
as This and that 
48 Onetime 
dictator 

. <*T Eisenhower . 

• confidant 

. sa 1692 trial site 

53 Commonly ' 

54 Inflict 
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sa Land force 
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dleh* 

82 Powerful D.C. 
lobby 

83 Superways 


i mmmm mhhhuss 



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iiuiiHri mmuuu 
him mumu hi 

Sill iillllill! 





OAfao York Tm*a/ Edited by WiUShortz. 

Solution to Puzzle of A up. 25 


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TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 26, 1994 



OBSERVER 


-4 Most Cryptic Scrawl 


Herbie Hancock’s Take on Lessons of life 


people 

BostonWomanGicea 


By Russell Baker 


N EW YORK — “Rob the 
rich" was the advice 


l~rich" was the advice 
scrawled on a flat surface just 
outside the Boston Public Gar- 
den, Although it has been three 
weeks since I saw it it still tor- 
.nents me. 

Like so much writing that 
looks simple — “The truth will 
set you free,” “To thine own 
self be true,” and so forth — 
“Rob the rich” has power to 
'ead the mind down labyrin- 
thine corridors until it winds up 
• apped at uncertainty. 


Since my mind is profession- 
ly trained to leap recklessly at 


□supportable conclusions, I first 
decided that “Rob the rich'’ was 
the work of some bush-league 
Robespierre hoping to incite the 
Boston poor to violence. 

If so be was obviously bound 
to fail. When the poor rob, it is 
almost always their fellow pau- 


pers they choose to victimize, 
seldom the rich. The author of 
“Rob the rich*' obviously knew 
too tittle about American society 
o be a dangerous revolutionary. 

He was probably from one of 
Boston's many college campus- 
es, which meant he was of rela- 
tively high pedigree. This would 
explain his ignorance about 
-ho robs whom in America. 


“He's not worth worrying 
about,” I decided. Not that I 
am rich, mind you. Although I 
might seem so to desperado de- 
facers of public property, in 
fact I am resigned to seeing ev- 
ery last coin in my piggy bank 
devoured by the medical indus- 
try when its force assembles to 


merit for treating all the 
who get sick in spite of being 
uninsured, it covers the costs by 
jacking up the bills of the ric£ 
In this case "rich” means not 
only the rich, but also every- 
body lucky enough to have in- 
surance. 

□ 

A student would know this. 
He might not know how the 
robbing branch of society 
works, but he would know that 
the medical industry is already 
robbing the rich. It's been on 
television. 

So I started over again. How 
complex it was, that ample sen- 
tence: “Rob the rich.” why pick 
the rich to rob? WdL as Willie 
Sutton is famous for saying 
when asked why he robbed 
banks, that’s where the money is. 

Or is it? A banker told me 
recently that there isn't any 
money in banks anymore. Just 
paper and electronic blips. The 
same is probably pretty much 
true of the rich: all their rich- 
ness exists in pieces of paper, 
computer blips, lines of credit 
and most of it accessible only 
by phones and codes. 

In short, the riches to be had 
from robbing the rich are about 
the same riches to be had from 
robbing the poor: TV sets, cars, 
whisky, guns. 

“Rob the rich” — I wake in 
the night to ponder it. Last 
night I e xamin ed the possibility 
that it is simply the work of an 
irrational young sorehead who 
foolishly hopes it will scare the 
daylights out of the rich people 
of Boston. 

□ 

I believe the textual evidence 


By Mike Zwerin 

/nitrnazional Herald Tribune 


P ARIS — On a safari in Kenya. 
Herbie Hancock saw a plaque on a 


I Herbie Hancock saw a plaque on a 
tree trunk near a lodge saying that on 
this spot on Feb. 6, 1952, Elizabeth 
learned of the death of her father and 


became queen of England. He zoomed 
in his video camera for a take. Because 


in his video camera for a take. Because 
on that very same day, at the age of 11, 
he performed Mozart’s D Major piano 
concerto with the Chicago Symphony 
Orchestra. Talk about kanna. 

He was 20 in 1961 when he was 
hired as a substitute by Donald Byrd 
for one night and found a steady job. 
Since then Hancock has crossed over 
this way and that from jazz to blues to 
rock, rhythm and blues and funk so 
often that it is difficult to pin down his 
starting point. IBs songs “Watermel- 
on Man,” ‘'Headhunters,” “Maiden 
Voyage," and “Dolphin Dance" 
among so many others, became hits. 
While straddling categories, these 
songs have their deceptive simplicity 
in common — uncluttered melodic 
linns , modal minimalism, space, built- 
in organic rhythmic accompaniment. 
Written three decades ago, they con- 
tinue to be basic vocabulary today. He 
has won Grammies, his records sell 
gold and platinum. 

For five years in the ’60s he played 
the piano with the Miles Davis quin- 
tet, a hot band that set standards still 
bong followed. Kano players have 
been trying to catch up to him ever 
since. The longer Miles has been dead, 
the harder it seems to be to escape 
him. This summer, I interviewed three 
al umni — John Scofield, Marcus 
Miller and Hancock. All three came 



• remember whether your team woa by 
20 points or if there are 20 million 
‘ people drfngsonKwhere. Our sense of 
- . values, .is fakmg more and. more of a 
frgrfram to all kinds of other things; 
most of which have to do with, toe 
. malting, of money.” \ 

His. view is t hat the extension of 
knowledge, even though often distort- 
. ed,- is .per se positive. One posonal 
noumusical benefit from bringingjazz 
muse to people around the wond is 
gaining a wider perspective bn hu- 
manity. Which didn’t make sense to 

m^ cr myfdffrihg all the TOUTS FvC been 

on where most of the musicians hardly 
. left their hotel rooms, and I told Mat 
so. He said it doesn’t matter. Jazz 
fa »ipht him that all you have to do IS 
look "around your room, the lobby, the 
airport, whafs on; television. It may be 
subliminal but “it is our good fortune 
to be involved with an art fonn that so 


Tradition weighs a ton at thtr 
Salzburg Festival, bu t it was 
chair w> .Thursday when Anne 
Mahsoo. a Boston-bom con- 
ductor, was assigned to conduct 

the final performance of Mus- 
sorgsky’s “Boris Godunov,” 
making her the first woman to 
conduct a. major event m the 
festival's seven decades. Man- 
son, 32, is an assistant to Oao- 
(SoAbbado, who has conducted 
the earlier festival perfor- 
mances of "Boris,” and has 
been musical director at Meek-' 
lenburg Opera in Germany 
since 1^8. Samuel Ramey sings 


frui 1 ' 




v *■ 


auiwv */w. ■■ — v , — -y- 

the title role, and in therat for 
nm-fm-mance is the Vienna 




completely reflects the present tense 
that we automatically absorb our nn- 


Music expresses “the stuff of life. My hopes. Your dreams.-' 


out of stints with Davis musically 
strane and commercially successful I 


and commercially successful. 
Hancock how that worked. 


oversee my departure. 
Aha! Here was anoi 


Aha! Here was another way 
to look at “Rob the rich.” May- 
be it was not aimed at the poor, 
but at the medical industry. 
With so much talk in the air 
about medical care, perhaps 
some morally outraged student 
— a divinity student surely! — 
was aiming his words at the 
hildren of Hippocrates. 

But wait a minute: The medi- 


proves him young and foolish. 
Only the young and foolish be- 


"You don’t come out of Miles, you 
come through him,” he replied. “Be- 
cause you couldn’t get to him in the 
first place unless you had something 


plies to life, not only music. Improvisa- 
tion is not only technique, there’s a 
whole lifestyle involved. I watched how 
he reacted and interpreted things that 
happened to him. Jazz is more tied to 
daily life than any music I know. It 
takes courage to be spontaneous — to 
■say, *Oh, I think m go to Barcelona 
today,’ and then not feel fri ghtene d 


being all alone in Barcelona, 
“rve noticed that when I'm 


cal industry is already robbing 
the rich, isn’t it? Since the medi- 


Only the young and foolish be- 
lieve the rich’s daylights can be 
scared out of them by threats of 
robbery. Since they are insured 
against it anyhow, robbery is 
far likelier to comfort them by 
reinforcing their belief that tire 
rich are denied the services of 
spendthrift governments that 
prey on their wealth. 

To scare the daylights out of 
them, the sentence would have 
to read: “Tax the rich.” 


“rve noticed that when I'm in Ja- 
pan the people responsible for me 
don’t want me to take a train to Osaka 


.al industry can’t receive pay- 


taught me. He would never tel J any- 
body to do anything. He just sort of 
hung things out there and it was up to 
you pick up on them.” 

“I pay you to practice on the band- 
stand,” Miles said to Hancock. And 
he once advised a long-winded young 
homblower to ^join Notes Anony- 
mous.” 

What Hancock learned was not only 
musical: “He inspired courage, he in- 
spired mrnidflna to take risks. It ap- 


by myself if I have a few days off. 
‘You can't read Japanese.’ they say. 


You can t read Japanese, they say. 
You’ll get lost* They get worried. 
And it occurred to me that one of the 


reasons the Japanese gravitate to jazz 
may be because it contains the free- 


may be because it contains the free- 
dom and individualism that their cus- 
toms don’t encourage.” 

Hancock is a member of the Afri- 
can American creative elite in Los 
Angeles. He knows how to make a 
bundle of money playing exactly what 
he wants to play anyway. (Did he 
learn that from Miles?) Although it 


might be a matter of deciding up-front 
to do something he knows wal make a 
bundle and doing it so well that every- 
body buys it. In either case, arid he 
does this often, heU follow up with a 
work so aesthetically deep and intro- 
verted that there is no way it will pay 
— and people eat it up anyway. 

He has an Internet address on Ms 
business card and has been in the 
forefront of advanced sound record- 
ing and modulating technology for 30 
years. I asked him whether he still 
thought technology was positive. 

“Alans with the good news comes 
the bad news. We have more input, but 
that gives us more responsibility. There 
are negative repercussions to every- 
thing. We have to grow up and realize 
the importance of responsibility. In the 
media, technology s umm arizes every- 
thing into bits and bytes. A war here, 
starvation there, man’s inhumanity to 
man everywhere. Then right after a few 
’messages’ came the sports scores- It's 
all delivered in the same tone of voice 
and it gets to the point where you don’t 


that we automatically absorb our im- 
mediate surroundings.” 

Most young musicians, he said, 
miss the pout: “They would be sitting 
here now asking me tons of questions 
about this chord and that mode and 
any answer I give them 'wouldn't be 
any help at all They might learn, 
something about what I did, but I 
already did it, so how's that going to 
help them in. the future? Music doesn’t 
provide answers to te chnic a l ques- 
tions, it expresses the stuff of life, the 
staff we’ve been talking about. Expe- 
rience. My hopes- Your dreams. 

“Getting back to Miles, which is 
where we started, he understood that I 
never saw him practice, but in spire of 
not practicing every time he picked up 
his hom, even if he flubbed some notes 
and stuff, 1 would notice two things. 
One, he'd always be reaching for some- 
thing. Sure, sometimes he’d play his old 
ticks, he was only human, but by and 
large he would always be challenging 
himself. And two, he’d invest tha maxi- 
mum emotional content possible. Soci- 
ety places more emphasis on thirigs like 

scandal, power, money and sex but I 
still believe human beings respond 
more deeply to things like sincerity, 
strength of character and courage. 

"I practice Buddhism because I get 
a dearer picture of the things that are 
happening in my environment I get a 
greater sense of the connection be- 
tween things. I want my life .to be 
more than the stringing together of 
separate events. I want to get to the 
pomt where I can see the connection 
between mus' c and the people I love.” 


New York Tunes Service 


the performance is the Vienna 
Philhar monic, which famously: 
has never had a woman mem- 
ber. 

' □ 

.• The surviving members of 
Nirvana, the seminal gnm^j trio 
silenced by the suicide of vocal- 
ist Kart Cobam four months 
pgo, plan to issue a posthumous 
double album of the band’s live 
recordings in early November. 

□ 

A promotions com- 

pany is suing pop star Mtefaad 
JacteKm for $5 million for can- 
celing two concerts last year. 
An attorney far Prodin Produc- 
tions said the lawsuit filed in 
Los Angeles accuses Jackson of 
fraud and violating Ms contract ■ 
when he canceled a concert hi 
femriagft and one -in Peru last 
October, claiming he had pulled 
a back muscle. 

D 

Prince Charles is scheduled 
to visit Southern California this 
fall for the first time in 1 7 years. 
During the princes visit, from 
Oct 31 to Nov. 4, he will attend 
events at UJL-LA. 1994, a 
two-month celebration of Brit- 
ish arts. 

A $10 tthIH oti copyright in- 
fringement lawsuit against the 
singer Billy Joel has been 
dropped. Joel's lawyer said that 
songwriter Gary 
who had charged that Joel had 
stolen parts of an unpublished 

1986 far two Mt soags jSSre- 
caved no money. • 




WEATHER 


WEEKEND DESTINATIONS 


Europe 


Forecast for Saturday through Monday, as provided by Accu-Weather. 


wvrlimn 

CroteCWSd 

E' . t'tv ii i 

Frankfurt 

Orw 

-‘•'tfnVJ 

tiUrbuJ 


Un&d 

‘-CV 

rnt-T, 

'•-1 

l-srn 

r — 

s* FWit>nr 

S T>W-1 

F'roilw.-g 

1 a r ~n 

'J+ r *CM 

/-rn, 

Ig-.S 


Today 
Htyi Urn 
CJF OF 
20 m* 2i no 
21.70 14*7 
SMI 14*7 
34*3 21/70 
27*0 21/70 
Z4/7S 17*2 
21/70 12*3 
2271 12*3 
MTS 1S*1 
2170 12/53 
31*5 2479 
*7*2 SMS 
16*1 11/92 
27*0 13/30 
2271 13*5 
2271 14*7 
17*2 11*2 
33*1 2271 
2970 2170 
29*2 10*9 
2271 11*2 
3MB 17*2 
2675 17*2 
16*4 0/4« 

2170 12*3 
2577 16*4 
19*8 12*3 
2679 2170 
2373 13*9 
2170 12*3 
13*5 11*2 
27*0 17*2 
19*1 9/46 

19*6 12*3 
2271 12*3 
16*1 12*3 
2579 11*0 
2170 14*7 
2373 12*3 
2271 13*5 



■Mjrtrmm 


1 lAi a a— au My 
Hot 


North America 
Vary worm and humid 
woalher b In stoie lor this 
weekend from Washington. 
D C., to Boston. Thunder- 
storms will arrive later Sun- 


day. lallowed by cooler 
weather Monday. Thunder- 
atorma will occur along a 
frontal boundary « retching 
tram near Denver to Chicago 
thta weekend. 


Europe 

London to Olso will have 
windy, cool weather this 
weekend with frequent 
showers. Madrid wUI remain 
sunny and hoi. While Pari* 
will be breezy and cooler 
with some wn. Heavy rains 
wNI aook Scotland, northern 
Ireland and western Norway. 
Southeastern Europe will 
have pioeoant weather. 


Asia 

Tokyo wffl have hat weedier 
this weekend with some sun- 
ahine. Korea win remain very 
warm, bul a tew stray thun- 
derstorms are possible. 
Heavy thunderstorms will 
remain west of Beijing this 
weekend. Belling through 
Shanghai vrtt be vary worm 
and humid wilh some sun- 
shine 


Asia 




Tomorrow 


HMl 

Lora 

W 

Hlg/s 

LOW W 


C/F 

C/F 


OF 

OF 


32/09 

24 /re 

■h 32/89 

25/77 pc 


32/89 

19/M 

■ 

31/88 

2170 pc 

Hong Kona 

31/86 

2577 


30/06 

2870 pc 

ManW 

30166 

2373 

Hi 30M 

2475 pc 

NowCWv 

31 «B 

27/80 

1 

37/89 

2679 pc 

Snd 

31 <88 

2170 

pc Tim 

2271 pc 

SwnghW 

32<W 

2879 


3? <B9 

2879 pc 

Slntwora 

31/68 

22/71 


JIM 

2373 pc 

T«P« 

33/61 

2577 


33 <91 

2679 pc 

Tokyo 

29/84 

7371 

I* 

31/66 

2173 pc 

Africa 


26 m 

2170 


29/84 

2373 1 

CapaTnm 

2170 

11/57 


21'TO 

I1<57 pc 

CmUm* 

28/82 

19/E6 


70/82 

2O«0 £ 

Knre 

19CB 

11/52 


2170 

12*53 pc 

Ugi» 

77/80 

2373 


28/82 

2475 £h 


20*6 

10<50 


2271 

11/52 pc 

Timb 

30/M 

IBM 


S/B9 

2271 pc 



SUNDAY 


Al toracon and due praiiiito 
bytoaj-Wesihar.IncCiBM 


Europe and Mtddta East 


North America 

Ai ch mgr 19*9 1 


Middle East 


Latin America 


Today 

High Low W 
OF C/F 
31 *0 23/73 a 
30*7 21/70 ■ 
30*5 19*9 1 


High Low W 
OP OF 
32*9 2373 a 
30*7 2170 a 
32*9 19*1 a 


25/02 18*4 a 29*4 16*0 t 


Oceania 


39/102 19*6 
42/107 2271 


41/1062371 pc 
42/1072077 a 


Today Tomor r ow 

Wgh IM W HW Low W 
OF OF C/F OF 

BuanoaAkao 10*1 5«1 pc 16*8 10<90 pc 

Can 27*0 20*6 pc 20*1 2170 pc 

Lima 10*4 19*1 e 18*4 19*9 e 

Maoeocay 2475 73*8 t 2373 12*3 ( 

nodajanwo 2679 19*6 a 2373 11*6 a.1 

Santiago 1BA4 7M4 pc 19*8 5'4! pc 


Daw* 

tancMu 

Hounon 

IflaAngrias 


« » 1 1B4S1 0/46 pc 17*2 10*0 pc 
"v. it 2170 12*3 1 2170 13*9 • 


Legend; s-wsmy, pc -partly doudy, odoudy. rf n hona m . HBundgmom*. iwMvtfsnaw Hurries, 
sn-snow, Hoe. W-Weaow. AH mapa. forac oH and die provided by toon W ee d ier, Inc. £ 1994 


19*6 12*53 
32*9 2170 
27*0 19 KS 
31*0 19*6 
34*3 1B*1 
30*0 19*0 
31*6 2679 
34-03 2271 
33*1 2373 
32*9 2577 
2879 18*1 
2679 14*7 
31*8 2475 
30*5 2271 
411100 26*2 
2170 13*9 
2373 12*3 
29*4 18*1 
31*8 2170 


r 19*6 11*2 «h 
» 32*9 2170 pc 
pc 29*2 18*4 pc 
I 28*2 19*6 I 
I 35*5 14*7 * 

1 29*4 17.62 ps 

pc 3769 Jq/79 pc 

■ 2373 ■ 
pc 33*1 2373 pc 
I 32*9 24 79 I 

pc 28*2 18*1 I 

DC 2676 13*5 ah 
pc 32*9 2577 pc 
PC 32*6 2373 pc 

■ 42M0736/M i 
a 2170 15*9 PC 
pc 2577 13» pc 
I 26*2 14*7 pc 
a 32*9 227? pc 


Location 

Waathar 

High 

Low 

Water 

Wave 

Wind 



Tamp. 

Tamp. 

Tamp. 

Heights 

Spaad 



C/F 

C/F 

C/F 

(Uatraa) 

(Mi) 

Cannes 

sunny 

24/75 

18/64 

26/79 

1-2 

NW 

. 10-20 

Oesuvite 

doudy 

zara 

12/S3 

ISO* 

2-3 

W 

30-50 

Rmini 

sunny 

2879 

10496 

2VW 

0-f 

N 

IMS 

Malaga 

sunny 

33/91 

24/75 

27/80 

0-1 

8W 

12-25 

Cagkan 

sunny 

32/89 

23/73 

27/80 

0-1 

W 

10-2Q 

Faro 

sunny 

31/88 

23/73 

20188 

0-1 . 

NW 

10-20 

Piraeus 

suiny 

34/93 

23/73 

27/80 

0-1 

NW 

12-25 

Corfu 

sunny 

30/86 

20/88 

27/80 

0-1 . 

NW 

15-2S 

Brighton 

doudy 

20/68 

0/48 

17/82 

1-2 

SW 

30-50 

Oswnd 

showers 

IB/04 

10/50 

18/84 

1-3 

SW 

30-80 

Schovmngen 

showers 

17/62 

3/40 

17/82 

1-3 

w 

3040 

Syit 

rain 

16/81 

10/50 

16/01 

1-2 

W 

3040 

lanr 

partly sumy 

3S/9S 

23 173 

26/82 

0-1 

NW 

15-25 

TalAvw 

sunny 

29/84 

23.73 

28/82 

1-2 

sw 

20-35 

Caribbean and Weet AUentic 







Barbados 

partly sunny 

32/89 

23/73 

28/82 

1-2 

E 

2045 

Kingston 

mundersnnns 

32*89 

23/73 

28/82 

1-2 

E 

25-50 

SL mamas 

partly sunny 

32/89 

23/73 

28/82 

1-2 

SE 

25-45 

Hamilton 

portly sunny 

32189 

24/75 

28/82 

1-2 

SW 

20-40 

AaWPwMo 








Ponong 

toundwalumis 

33/91 

25/77 

29/84 

0-1 

sw 

10-20 

Photo 

doudsand sui 

32/89 

24/75 

29/84 

0-1 

sw 

15-25 

Bali 

clouds and sun 

31/88 

22/71 

29/84 

0-1 

sw 

12-23 

Cebu 

touideraunns 

31/68 

24/75 

30M 

0-1 

SE 

15-30 

Palm Beach. Ana 

sunny 

21/70 

12*53 

18/84 

1-2 

NE 

1540 

Bay of Islands. NZ 

partly suiny 

18/61 

BM8 

18181 

1-2 

W 

15-30 

Slwahama 

partly sunny 

31/88 

23/73 

28/82 

1-2 

SE 

20-40 

Honolulu 

parity sunny 

29/84 

23-73 

27/80 

1-2 

ENE 

25-45 


Europe end Middle East 
Location W eedier 


High Low 
Tamp. Temp. 
OF 'OF 


Water Wow 
Temp. I h i l g ti U 


Cennaa* 

DeeiivWe 

ftaitfti. 

Malaga 

CagNani 

Fare ■ 

Piraeus 

Corfu • 

Brighton 

QsentJ 

Schovenfrigan 

sy«. 

ton* . 
TbZAWv 


sunny 

partly sunny 
tuny 
sunny 
euiriy 

doudsandaun 
sunny 
auiaiy 
partly sunny 
cloudy ' 
doudy 
cloudy 
■unny _ 
suiny 


Wind 
Speed 
’ (kph) 

NW 10-25 


W 8Md~ 

N . . la-zs . 


NW 1245 
W 10-20 


tun 


W 12-22 
NW 12-25 


NW 15*0 
W 3540 


SW 30-50 
W 40-70 


Caribbean end West Atlantic 


Bodudos 

am ny 

33791 

24/75 

28/82 

1-2 

SE 

2030 

Kbnmn 

St. Thomas 

partly »wry 
partly, sunny 

33ffll 

32/89 

'23/73 

28/79 

28/82 

28/82 

1-2 

1-2 

E ' 
E 

25-50 

2040 

htendton 

sbowara 

31/88 

23/73 

28/82 

1-2 

SSE 

1845 

AaWPadflc 

Parang 

partly auviy 

32/89 

24/78 

2804 

0-1 

SW 

1040 

Riukst 

ihunttontonna 

32/89 

25/77 

28/84 

0-1 

NW 

1545 

EM 

doodiaridwn 

31/88 

23/73 

28/84 

' 0-1 

SW 

12-25 

Cebu 

partly sunny 

31/88 

24/75 

3008 

0-1 

SW 

15-25 

Palm Bench. Aua. 

sunny . 

23/73 

13/66 

18/84 

0-1 

NE 

1040" 

Bov cdstenda, NZ 
Shtoiama 

sunny. 

ttwraarstomia 

law 

30/88 

10/80 

23/73 

17/82 

28/82 

1-2 

1-2 

WNW 1545 
SE 2040 

Honolulu 

party sury 

30/88 

24/75 

27/80 

1-2 

ENE 

2345 


J ( _ 


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8*14111 MIDDLE EAST 

023-903-011 Bahrain ~ 800-001 

0800-100-10 cypwr r T" — • oetwooio 
00-18J(M010 brad • . : ’ ' I77-10O-Z7Z7 

99-389011 Kuwait . aOQ^ 

00420-00101 Lebanon (Bcfrnfl 426-SOl 

8001-0010 Qatar • . •• 080Q-QU-77 

9800-100-10 Sourfi Arabia - - - 1-800- ib 

19*-0011 Turkey* ~ 0(h600-1^77 

01300010 UAE*- 800-121 

00«0-13n AMERICAS 

Oa- 800-01111 Aracmku* „ 001-800-200-1111 


00-800-1311 

QQa- 80001111 Argpxfa 
999-001 Bribe* 
1-800950400 Bolivia- 


1-800-872-2881 
1-800-872-2881 
1-800^72-2881' 
1-800-872-2881 
001-800972-2883 
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001-800-872-2881 
1-800-872-2381 











0-800-D12 - Somfaai^a 


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510-0200 
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00111 

0800-10 . 
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0-800-99-0123 


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