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4 k INTERNATIONAL + 4 

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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


** 


Paris, Tuesday, August 50, 1994 


No. 34,680 



as Insult to Islam U.S. Drops Public Push 


By Michael Georgy 

New York Times Service 

CAIRO — Saudi Arabia, widely considered to be the 
Muslim world’s most influential country, will boycott 
next month’s United Nations population conference in 
Cairo, raising fears that other Islamic nations will follow 
suit, UN officials said Monday. 

The last-minute move, which comes amid a healed 
controversy in the Muslim world, hands political ammu- 
nition to both moderate and violent Islamic groups that 
have condemned the conference as another plot to domi- 
nate the Muslim world by . spreading Western “immoral- 
ity-” ' • ; V = ' 

Saudi Arabia sent the International Conference on 
Population and Development’s secretariat in New York a 


letter saying h would not attend the Sept. 5-13 confer- 
Snferraa: 0tl Shankar Sin Sh, executive director of the 

'They gave no reason,” he wd 

Five other countries — Eritrea, Nauru, T i«*htpnstwn 
and Monaco — will also not attend, he said. The five were 
not part of a boycott, but it was not clear why they would 
not attend. 

The International Conference on Population and De- 
velopment, expected to attract 150 countries, will debate 
several issues that are seen as offensive in many parts of 
the Idamic world, including premarital sex, abortion, 
homosexuality and family planning. 

■Urn conservative Saudi government apparently made 
the decision not to attend after giving in to pressure from 


the religious establishment. A debate over the conference 
has been raging for weeks in Saudi Arabia, with colum- 
nists condemning the event as an assault on Isl am. 

‘This is an attempt to tear the values and beliefs of 
Islam from their roots,” said Mohammed Salahideen. a 
leading columnist. ‘‘It is a ferocious attack on Islam and 
Muslims and their most holy beliefs.” 

Other people, such as Mohammed Abdou Yam an, the 
framer Saudi information minister, argued against boy- 
cotting the event, saying Saudi Arabia’s attendance 
would help influence the debate. 

But on Monday in the Saudi resort of Taif, Sheikh 
Abdulazizibn Baz, the kingdom's highest religious figure, 
urged Saudi Arabia and the rest of the Muslim world to 

See BOYCOTT, Page 4 


For Rights in China 

In Beijing , Commerce Secretary r 
Stresses r Commercial Diplomacy' 



Inn Hollander- Reuter- 


SIGNING ON NEW AUTONOMY — The Palestine Liberation Organization negotiator NabiJ Shaath, right and Major General Danny Rothschild of 
Israel pocketing their pens Monday after signing an expansion of self-rule for Palestinians in the West Bank, but not ending Israeli military’ rule there. Page 2. 




Caught in Traffic, Europe Coughs in a Smoggy Quandary 


By Brandon Mitchener 

laumatiarjal Herald Tribune _ 

FRANKFURT — The smog alerts that have made 
this the roost pollute# summer in a decade are giving 
Western Europe a pungent taste of what the Continent 
faces as its urban air quality problems continue to 
-^■nrvqn. • 

The problem, experts agree, is that rising numbers of 
automobiles are overwhelming attempts to reduce their 
emissions. 

A drastic reduction in the use of fossil fuel is the rally 
way to resolve the problem over the long term, the 
experts say, but in the short term, local, state and 
national environmental and public health officials have 
begun issuing warnings and imposing curbs on traffic. 


“It will happen next year, you can be sure of that," 
Peter Wiederkehr, the program manager for the Organi- 
zation for Econqnrfc Cooperation and Development’s 
poiiulioc prevention and control division in Paris, said of 
this summer's widespread environmental alerts. “The 
problem has been budding up over 30, 40 years and will 
take years to reduce.” 

In Germany, an unprecedented speed limit of 100 
kilometers (60 miles) per hour was imposed this summer 
on autobahn traffic in an attempt to limit dangerous 
emissions. Rome, Paris and other major European cities 
advised older people and children to stay indoors. Milan 
issued its first summertime ozone alerts ever, and Athens 
is still imposing restrictions on traffic. 

The pollution alerts have been accompanied every- 


where by nsing reports of respiratory problems thought 
to be related to ozone, an irritating gas formed when 
sunlight cooks nitrogen oxide and volatile organic com- 
pounds in automobile exhausL 
“As long as we have to fear that high ozone levels will 
recur in coming years, children and young people in 
general face the risk of experiencing respiratory difficul- 
ties at a relatively young age,” said Claudia Weisbart, a 
spokeswoman for the Health Ministry in the German 
state of Hesse. 

While catalytic converters and electronic fuel ignition, 
among other technical improvements, have substantially 
reduced the impact from an individual automobile's 

Sec POLLUTE, Page 4 


By Patrick E. Tyler 

New York Times Service 

BEIJING — Commerce Secretary Ron- 
ald H. Brown, leading a high-level business 
development delegation to China, has 
agreed to take h uman rights off the public 
agenda so that be and the American corpo- 
rate executives traveling with him can 
open a new era of “commercial diploma- 
cy’ in the world’s fastest growing emerging 
market, American officials said Monday. 

As tiie first cabinet member to visit 
China since the president separated hu- 
man rights concerns from trade policy, Mr. 
Brown has publicly avoided any statement 
about the deterioration of human rights 
conditions over the last three months or 
about the security clampdown that has 
coincided with his arrival. 

A senior official traveling with the com- 
merce secretary said Monday night that 
Mr. Brown would undertake only “private 
representations” to China’s top leaders 
about continuing rights abuses. 

“Commercial engagement” is one aspect 
of the adminis tration’? new human rights 
policy, the official said. “One strand of 
human rights policy is private representa- 
tions,” he added. 

Mr. Brown’s first full business day in 
Beijing included a friendly session with 
Prune Minister Li Peng, who greeted his 
American guest by saying: “We have wait- 
ed a long time for you to come to China. I 
hope that your current visit will provide 
impetus for friendship and cooperation of 
our two coon tries.” 

In remarks carried on national televi- 
sion, Mr. Li also told his American visitor 
that China was willin g to hold a dialogue 
on human rights, but only on the basis of 
“mutal respect.” Western diplomats say. 
however, that the high-level dialogue be- 
tween Washington and Beijing on the fate 
of thousands of religious and political de- 
tainees in China remains suspended. 

Mr. Brown told Mr. Li, “We are very 
anxious, Mr. Premier, to enhance the com- 
mercial relationship between our two 
countries, and I believe we have made 
great progress in that direction.” 

A senior official traveling with Mr. 
Brown said later that the Chinese were not 
so friendly when the talks got down to the 
dispute between Washington and Beijing 
over the terms and conditions for China’s 
entry into the General Agreement on Tar- 
iffs and Trade. 

Chinese officials look a tough line 
against Washington’s insistence that Chi- 
na rationalize some of its protectionist 
tariff and currency rules as a condition for 
entry to the World Trade Organization. 


18 Long Months on the Health- Care Trail 


By Adam CHymer, 

Robert Pear and Robin Toner 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON —In March 1993, two 
months after his inauguration. President 
Bill Clinton appealed to Robert C Byrd, 
the presiding officer of the Senate, to let 
national health insurance legislation be 
considered as part of that summer's budget 
bill. 

1 1 was, at first glance, a move of remark- 
able hubris, a president elected with 43 
percent of the vote expecting Congress to 
let him rearrange one-seventh of the Amer- 
ican economy under the streamlined, fast- 
track procedures of a budget bill. 

% Bui it reflected the concern of the pres- 
cient and his allies that his power would 
never be greater than it was in his first 
months in office, that what was hard then 
would be supremely difficult a year latex, 
and that a window was open, perhaps only 
fleetingly, to pass a major health-care bilL 

Mr. Byrd, ever the parliamentarian, de- 


murred;, the rules could not be bent, he 
said, that way and that far. And Mr. Clin- 
ton, before long, was distracted by eco- 
nomic struggles, the North American Free 
Trade Agreement, Whitewater and foreign 
crises, and the window began to close. 

The Clinton health-care plan became 
the captive of events, and politics, and an 
enormously complicated process beaded 
by two figures making their debuts in na- 
tional pobcy-makiiig — Hillary Rodham 
nintrtrv the first lady, and Ira Magazines', 
a policy guru and friend of Bin Clinton's. 

As the administration and its congres- 
sional allies take a brief vacation and try to 
gather strength for one last push on health 
care, some reflect on that moment in the 
spring of 1993 and see it as emblematic of 
losttune, lost opportunities, lost confi- 
dence.' ‘ 

There were many mistakes and misjudg- 
ments surrounded the campaign for 
universal coverage: The administration as- 
sumed that a 43 percent electoral plurality 


was a mandate for a tremendously compli- 
cated overhaul of a system as sensitive as 
healthcare. 

It showed a continuing uncertainty 
about how to deal with Republicans, and 
an overly combative political approach. It 
even assumed that when the public said it 
favored fundamental change in health care 
that it meant the kind of change the policy 
analysts wanted. 

But on all sides, from Clinton allies like 
John Rolher of the American Association 
erf Retired Persons to foes like John Motley 
of the National Federation of Independent 
Business, to sometime allies and sometime 
foes like Senator John H. Chafee, Republi- 
can of Rhode Island, there is agreement on 
one thing: delay was a basic error, the 
caudal stumbling block to passing legisla- 
tion. 

Consensus stops there. Even now there 
See HEALTH, Page 5 


Rights Abuses Abound on Idyllic U.S. Isle 


By William Branigm 

Washington Post Service 

ROTA, Northern Marianas — Fra: most 
visitors, this tiny island is an idyllic place ' 
of flowering flame trees, turquoise waters 
and homey cordiality where motorists rou- 
unelv wave to each other. Natives like to 
coil ft “the Friendly Island.” . 

But for many foreign workers over the 
last several years, a tittle dice of paradise 
in the Pacific has become a a outpost of 
tropical bcB under the American flag — a 
place where labor and huma n rights are 
routinely violated by islanders who are 
U.S. citizen*. 

According to American officials, hu- 
man-rights advocates, church sources and " 
victims of alleged abuses, the exploitation 
of guest workers, most of them from the 
rSimppines, has become practically a way 
of life for mdigetK ii g enqphfferacn Rota, 


which belongs to the U.S.-affiliated Com- 
monwealth of the Northern M a rian a Is- 
lands. The commonwealth is a chain of 
islands formerly ruled by Japan and cap- 
tured by the United States in World War 
IL 

- . Waitresses have been forced into prosti- 
tution ***** locked up during their free 
tintf the sources say. Housemaids have 
bee n beaten and raped. Farm laborers 
have been treated virtually as slaves. Con- 
struction workers have been abandoned 


without pay. And foreign employees of all 
categories have been routinely cheated of 
their wages. Those who complain often 
have been threatened or deported. In many 
cases, employers have been allowed to re- 
peat tire abuses by simply bringing is re- 
placement workers. 

Filipinos, who m»Va up the bulk of the 
commonwealth's 27,000-strong alien labor 
fence, make up most of the victims, but 
other exploited contract workers have 

See ISLE, Page 4 



Kiosk 


Foes Sue Kohl 
For Defamation 

DRESDEN (AP) — The party of the 
former East German Communists sued 
Chancellor Helmut Kohl for defama- 
tion on Monday because of his refer- 
ence to the party members as “fascists 
with a red varnish." 

Christine Ostrowski, leader of the 
Dresden chapter of die Party of Demo- 
cratic Socialists, the former Commu- 
nists, said the charges were filed in 
Frankfurt, where Mr. Kohl first made 
the remark at a rally on Wednesday. 

One of Mr. Kohl’s primary themes in 
his campaign for re-election Ocl 16 is 
an assertion that the Social Democrats, 
the main opposition party, betrayed de- 
mocracy by forming a government in 
Saxony- Anhalt State that is tacitly sup- 
ported by the former Communists. 


Stun TkmduD/AP 

A WINNER! — Tiger Woods, en 
route to victory in roe U.S. Ama- 
teur Gdf Championship. Page 17. 



The Dollar 

New Yen*. 


DM 


1.5773 


previous dan 


1.5745 


Pound 


1.537 


1.531 


Yen 


100.00 


FF 


5,3965 


100.45 

5.392 Books 


Ivanisevic Upset 
In U.S. Open 

NEW YORK (Reuters.) — Markus 
Zoecke of Germany registered the first 
major shock of the 1994 U.S. Open 
tennis tournament Monday when he 
upset Goran Ivanisevic of Croatia, the 
second seed, 6-2, 7-5, 3-6, 7-5. 

Zoecke, ranked 68th, got his biggest 
victory ever by staying in the back conn 
and waiting- as Ivanisevic made 60 un- 
forced errors. 

Earlier article. Page 16 

Page 7. 


New Generation Lets AIDS Resurge in San Francisco 


Newsstand Prices 


Andorra... ..9.00 FF LuxembourB«L.Fr 

Antilles 11.20 FF Morocco 12 Dh 

Cameroon.-l^OOCPA Qatar 8.00 Rials 

Egypt E.P.50Q0 R6unlon....V*JDFF 

France .9.00 FF Saudi Ambkt^XQR. 

Gabon..-.~.9SG CF A Senegal. -..ttOCFA 
Greece....... JOB Dr. Satin — 2DDPTA5 

naiv Lire Tunisia —.1.000 Qth 

ivory Coast .I.UDCFA Toriray ..TL.XO0 

Jordan 1 JD UAE 

Lebanon ...USS T.50 U.S. Mil. (Eur.J S1.18 


By William Hamilton 

Wa&argun PoU Service 

SAN FRANCISCO — No city has been 
more associated with AIDS than San 

Francisco, where 13,000 people have died 
from tire disease since 1981, most of them 
gay men But just as the epidemic seemed 
to have finally eased, a specter haunts the 
Castro and the city’s other gay neighbor- 
hoods; the specter of history repeating 
itidf. 

After one of the most successful publio- 

Bwareness camp aigns ever undertaken, 
AIDS and the human immunodeficiency 


virus that causes it are again on the in- 
crease, infecting a new generation of gay 
men for whom the terrible toll of the epi- 
demic’s early days and the lessons learned 
from it are for the most part distant memo- 
ries. 

Recent studies estimate that as many as 
18 percent of gay men under the age of 26 
in San Francisco are HIV-positive and that 
one in three homosexual and bisexual men 
will be HIV-positive by the lime they are 
30. That is well below the 45 percent infec- 
tion rate for gay men over age 26 in San 
Francisco. But three out of every 100 


young gay men contract HIV every year — 
a rate three times greater than that of older 
men. If current projections hold, more 
than half will eventually become infected. 

Underlying the statistics is one inescap- 
able fact. 

“While older gay men have changed 
their behavior, a high proportion of young 
gay men are practicing unsafe sex,” said 
Dennis H. Osmond, an epidemiologist at 
the University of California San Francisco 
who conducted the most ext ensi ve study of 
gay men between the ages of 18 and 29. 
“We prematurely declared victory in the 
gay population.” 


Mr. Brown was able to claim the first 
modest success of his business mission on 
Monday night. The power generation giant 
Westinghouse signed a SI40 milli on agree- 
ment to proride the steam turbines for a 
700-megawatt electrical power plant in 
Jiangsu Province. 

Westinghouse’s chief executive. Michael 
H Jordan, is a member of Mr. Brown’s 
delegation. 

Pitney Bowes and IBM each sealed con- 
tracts Monday worth about S20 million, 
delegation spokesmen said. 

Mr. Brown began the day by addressing 
a breakfast of the American Chamber of 
Commerce in Beijing, telling dozens of 
business managers based here. ‘'Commer- 
cial diplomacy allows the United States to 
pursue our economic agenda of creating 
jobs by increasing export s and bringing 
down Darners." 

“And commercial diplomacy provides 
the basis for long term sustainable growth 
in the United States-China relationship,'’ 
he added, “advancing not only economic 
bui strategic and human rights objectives. " 

By the end of the day, Mr. Brown had 
signed a set of agreements to expand the 
U.S.-Chinese Joint Committee on Com- 
merce and Trade, a forum to help the 
Chinese develop various industries, pre- 
sumably with American technology and 
equipment sales. 

In his speech to the American chamber, 
Mr. Brown at times seemed carried away 
by his enthusiasm for his mission. He said 
he was not after a “level playing field” for 
American business in China. 

“1 want a tilted playing field,” he said, 
one that gives American firms an advan- 
tage because of close cooperation with 
govemmenL 


Asian Money 
Is Pouring Into 
N.Y. Real Estate 


By Ashley Dunn 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — They seemed to come 
out of nowhere — a powerful group of 
Hong Kong billionaires who appeared in 
June to revive Donald J. Tramp’s troubled 
Riverside South project with millions in 
cash and a promise to finance the multi- 
billion-dollar development 

Bui while the names of the new investors 
were largely unknown here, the size and 
power of their move into New York cam e 
as no surprise to brokers familiar with the 
recent influx of overseas investment 

Over the last two years, a surge of money 
from Hong Kong and Southeast Asia has 
swept into the city’s battered real-estate 
market in a variety of high-profile deals. 
Drawn by bargain prices and a market that 
offers a haven from the turmoil of specula- 
tion in tire Far East those investors, large- 
ly ethnic Chinese from Hong Kong and 
Singapore, have bought some of the city’s 
choice properties. 

And while the deals have been modest in 
number, their size and scope has brokers 
predicting that the new Asian investors 
could become the deal makers of the 
1 990s. driving the real-estate market as the 
Japanese did in the 19S0s, and the Canadi- 
ans and the Europeans did in the 1970s. 

The Riverside South project is the most 
notable of the new .Asian investments in 
New York, but there have been others, 
including the sale of the 1. 000-room New 
York Palace Hotel to interests from Brunei 
for S202 million in November, the 561- 
room Hotel Millenium to Singaporean in- 
vestors for $75 million in February, and an 
older office building at 40 Wall Street to a 
Hong Kong group for 58 million in May. 

“Chinese firms have just begun to look 
internationally,” said Edmund Yu. presi- 
dent of Kinson Properties, which pur- 
chased the Wan Street building for the 
company’s Hong Kong owners. “They fig- 
ure it is time to come out and now- they 
have the capital to play with the big boys." 

European, Canadian and Japanese com- 
panies still have the largest holdings of all 
foreign investors in New York, but- the new 
investors have begun to alter tiie nature of 
the market. 

For the last decade, the regional econo- 
my of China. Hong Kong and Southeast 
Asia has been the most dynamic in the 
world. And while Japan still languishes in 
a recession, economic growth elsewhere in 
Asia is expected to increase by more than 7 
percent next year, nearly triple the pace 
projected for the United States, according 
to estimates from the International Mone- 


tary Fund. 
Like; 


The increasing rate of infection ob- 
served in San Francisco has broad impli- 
cations for national AIDS policy. It illus- 
trates the difficulty of maintaining an 
effective prevention campaign and, by 
focusing attention on the need for more 
nationwide efforts targeted at the gay 
community, is likely to lead to new con- 
frontations with such conservatives as 
Senator Jesse Helms. Earlier this month, 
the North Carolina Republican success- 
fully sponsored an amendment to the Ele- 
mentary and Secondary Education Act 

See AIDS, Page 5 


i many Asian investors, Mr. Yu said, 
the owners of Kinson Properties began 
their forays into real-estate by buying in 
areas they were most familiar with — in 
their case, Hong Kong and China. 

The comp any s New York purchase was 
small in comparison, but was done in part 
to establish an overseas base, an important 
consideration for many Hong Kong com- 
panies in preparation for the transfer of 
the British colony to Chinese control in 
1997, he said. 

Another reason, he added, was that for 
many Hong Kong investors, buying into 
New York has become cheap. In the 1980s, 
top-quality office space in New York went 

See NEW YORK, Page 4 


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TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 



Abortion Is Latest Fissure in Italy’s Shaky Coalition 


Haiti Priest WORLD BRIEFS 


ROME — Sixteen years after abortion was legal- 
ized in Roman Catholic Italy, the emotional issue 
returned Monday to divide the country and its 
government after a top politician called for repeal of 
a law allowing the practice. 

The dispute over the 1978 law sanctioning abor- 
tion has split the government of Prime Minister 
Silvio Berlusconi and embarrassed his largest coali- 
tion partner, the federalist Northern League. 

One member of the League, Irene Pivettl the 
devoutly Catholic speaker of the Chamber of Depu- 
ties, sparked the controversy over the weekend by 
indicating that the law should be repealed. 

Her comments to a Catholic youth conference, a 
week before the opening of a United Nations confer- 
ence on population in Cairo, drew widespread criti- 
cism. 


they say represents only a conservative Catholic 
section of Italian society. 

The Northern League distanced itself from Irene 
Pivetti’s opposition to the abortion law and from 
simultaneous calls on Italy's Catholics to reassert 
themselves in politics following the collapse of the 
long-dominant Christian Democrats. 

“God preserve us from a Catholic party.” its 
leader, Umberto Bossi, said in comments published 
by the Corricre Della Sera newspaper. “God save us 
from fundamentalist parties.” 


Luigi Rossi, parliamentary spokesman for the 
Northern League; slammed his fellow party mem- 


ber's religious zeaL 

“Every form of religious fundamentalism is bias- 

t- a- J aiaaa PrtiiAnbtmtir rtf f*nrl *• 


phemous and goes against the sovereignly of God," 
he told reporters. 


The opposition has criticized Mr. Berlusconi for 
sending a delegation to the Cairo conference that 


he told reporters. 

Members of Mr. Berlusconi’s Forza Italia party, 
too, criticized the parliamentary speaker. But minis- 
ters with the neofascist National Alliance — the 
third mam coalition partner — backed her call for 


an end to abortion, underscoring divisions within 
the government. 

Abortion on demand during the first three 
months of pregnancy in Italy has been legal since 
1978, a policy strongly endorsed in a 1981 referen- 
dum. 

Mr. Berlusconi’s government said earlier this 
mouth that it would not review the law despite 
pressure from the National Alliance and cafls by 
senior Vatican officials. 

Environment Minister Altero Matteoli of the Na- 
tional Allian ce provoked a storm when he said 
abortion was “murder," an opinion be has repeated 
in recent days. 

Irene Pivetti’s comments were all the more contro- 
versial because, as the lower house speaker, die is 
expected to keep out of the political fray. 

The latest bickering has become a further embar- 
rassment to Mr. Berlusconi’s coalition, which was 
shaken throughout the summer by a series of debili- 
tating disputes among partners. 


Who Aided 
Aristide 
Is Slain 


By Douglas Farah 

Waking ton Pda Soviet 

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti 
—A prominent Roman Catho- 
lic priest, known for bis support 
for the ousted president ofHai- 
ti, the Reverend Jean-Bertrand 
Aristide, and his organization 
of grass roots groups, has been 
gunned down by suspected. 


army gunmen. 

The Reverend Jean-Marie 
Vincent, 49, was shot repeated- 
ly Sunday by gunmen waiting 
outside his house in the capital, 
witnesses said. 

[In Washington, the State 
Department spokesman, Mike 
MoCurry, said the UJS. message 
to those behind this and other 
assassinations was: “Your 
crimes only increase our out- 
rage and strengthen our resolve 
to rid Haiti of your abuses.” 

[Mr. McCuxiy said at a 
Washington news briefing that 
it was “entirely incorrect” to 
suggest, as some news reports 
did Monday, that Haiti inva- 
sion plans had been put on hold 
because of the crisis over Cuban 
refugees trying to reach the 
United States.] 

Father Vincent was one of 
the first people to begin orga- 
nizing grass roots literacy cam- 
paigns and peasant movements, 
even before the downfall of the 
dictatorship of Jean-Claude 
(Baby Doc) Duvalier in 1986. 

He had maintained a low 
profile since Father Aristide 
was overthrown by the military 
onSepL 30, 1991, seven months 
after taking office. 

A U.S. , Embassy spokesman, 
Stan Schrader, condemned die 
assassination and railed it “a 
tragic and sad reflection of die 
state of repression and violence 
that unfortunately character- 
izes life in Haiti today. It is the 
latest example of the brutality 
of the de facto regime, die mili- 
tary and their supporters." 

Since Father Aristide was 
overthrown, the army and its 
civilian supporters had targeted 
his supporters. But there was no 
immediate explanation as to 
why the priest was killed now. 

“it has been awhile since 
someone prominent was 
killed” a veteran diplomat said. 
“This was a reminder by those 
people; an object lesson, that 
the military can get who they 
want when they want.” 

Father Vincent organized 
peasant farmers in the norths 
west region of the country, an- 
gering holders of large estates 


Israel and PLO Sign 
Self-Rule Extension 


But Atmosphere Remains Sour 


By Caiyle Murphy 

WaskmgtPT Past Service 

JERUSALEM — Israel and 
the Palestine Liberation Orga- 
nization signed an agreement 
on Monday extending Palestin- 
ian self-rule authority to the 
West Bank in several areas, al- 
though leaving the territory un- 
der Israeli military control. 

The document, which was 
initialed by both sides last week 
in Cairo and unanimously ap- 


proved Sunday by the Israeli 
cabinet, transfers to the Pales- 


cabinet, transfers to the Pales- 
tinians responsibility for educa- 
tion, culture, health, social wel- 
fare, tourism and taxation. 

It remains in force until the 
two sides conclude the so-called 
Interim Agreement, which win 
cover the sensitive issues of Is- 
raeli troop withdrawal from the 
West Bank, security for Jewish 
settlers there and Palestinian 
elections. 

“This proves that the peace 
process does not end with Gaza 
and Jericho but will include all 
Palestinians in all parts of the 
West Bank,” Nabfl Shaath, the 
chief Palestinian negotiator, 
said at the signing or the 48- 
page document. 

The signing at the Erez cross- 
ing point from Gaza into Israel 
took place against a sour atmo- 
sphere created by the recent 
stabbing of two Israeli con- 
struction workers and by Isra- 
el’s barring a Pakistani diplo- 
mat from entering the newly 
autonomous Gaza Strip. 


turn to us to ask for permission 
for the ambassador to go to 
Gaza.” 

Pakistan's ambassador to 
Egypt, Mansour Alam, told 
Rollers that Miss Bhutto “is 
desirous of going to Gaza, but 
we do not recognize Israel” 

“It is up to the Palestinians to 
arrange it with the Israelis.” 

The expansion of Palestinian 
authority also takes place 
against a background of isolat- 
ed dashes between Israeli sol- 
diers and Palestinians in a few 
areas of the West Bank, notably 
Hebron and Ram all ah. He- 
bron, where an extremist Jewish 
settler massacred scores of 
praying Muslims in February, 
is said to be extremely tense. 

In a sign of the continuing 
concerns of both Palestinians 
and Israelis over the lade of 
financial resources besetting 
the self-rule authority, the 
agreement on Monday states 
that the two sides will "jointly 
approach" countries pledging 
aid to the Palestinian govern- 
ment “with a request to finance 
the shortfall” between the pro- 
jected budget of the areas being 
transferred and taxes collected 
by the Palestinians. 

That request will be made 
when the donors meet Sept 8 in 
Paris. Within three days after 
that meeting, the two sides will 
dedde on a date to transfer 



CSr£*HcJra-^NS“* cc Franco-Prow? 


General Atif Dudakovic of the Bosnian Army in a warehouse captured from a rebel 
Muslim leader, Fflcret Abdte, in an area known as the Bihac pocket. The United States is 
trying to negotiate a safe return for 25,000 refugees who fled the fighting Into Croatia. 


Bosnian Serbs Reject Accord 

lifting of Embargo on Muslims May Be Next 


power in the stipulated areas 
“based, among other things, on 


The ceremony was ddayed 
when Mr. Shaath arrived late to 


the response of the donor coun- 
tries to the joint request.” 

The donors, asserting that 


* ■ ’-w m»Tn »»!«)» iVm ■ y- n 


By Roger Cohen 

New York Times Servlet 

BELGRADE — Bosnian Serbs said Monday 
that they had overwhelmingly rejected an inter- 
national peace plan in a referendum, setting the 
stage for a new phase in the Bosnian war in 
which President Bill Clinton has said he will 
press for a lifting of the arms embargo against 
the Bosnian Muslims. 

With about half the votes counted, Petko Can- ' 
car, a senior electoral official said 90 percent of 
Bosnian Serbs had voted against a plan drafted 
by the so-called contact group of the United 
Stales, Russia, Britain, France and Germany. He 
did not say how may people had voted. 

The proposal calls on the Serbs to accept 49 


cepted by the Muslim-led Bosnian government 
The Bosnian Serbian rejection seemed to make 


The Bosnian Serbian rejection seemed to mak e 
it inevitable that President Gin ton wffl follow 
through on his pledge to press the United Na- 
tions for a lifting of the arms embargo if the 
Serbs did not accepted the peace plan by Oct 15. 


In putting pressure on the Bosnian Serbs to 
imnromise, the contact group has a new ally in 


compromise, the contact group has a new ally in 
President Slobodan Milosevic of Serbia, the man 
who armed and backed the Bosnian Serbs before 
recently deriding that thrir leaders were “war 
profiteers” who had gone far enough. The Serbi- 
an border with that part of Bosnia held by the 
Bosnian Serbs is now dosed. 

But just how strongly to support President 
Milosevic and give hun credence has already 


Algeria Mobilizes Its Transportation 
To Return Citizens From Morocco 

dLe^Morocco, as a diplomatic nf t deepened between the 

two North African nations. „ _____ 

The Transport Mimstnr ordered' aB-stttMTO- nanmmtwtipa- 

nies to help stranded atfaeav most of them 
called on its nationals to report either to Casablanca airport m 
Morocco or to border posts where buses are 
Morocco imposed a visa requirement on [Algerians last week 
after Moroccan police said they had arrested wo French 
ale of Algerian origin m connection with the daywg , of two 
Spimirii mrnsts. Algeria dosed its land border in retaliation and 
said Moroccans would need visas. _ , , 

The first of several flights by Air Algtoe from Casabbnca 
arrived in Algiers cm Sunday evening, while other scheduled 
fKcrtm were asked to detour there, to pick up more navriers. 
Sorters observed some 500 Algerians tvaiting under a pounding 
sun Monday at a main bonder crossangin northwestern Algeria. 


Basque Tigress’ Charged in France 

PARIS (AP) — A reputed member of tire Basque separatist 
group ETA known as “The Tigress,” wanted in Spam m connec- 
tion with 23 kHHngfl, was charged Monday by a French anti- 

terrorism magistral*. • • . 

Irene Idoia L6pez Riano, 30,. and her French co mpan ion, 
Olivier Lamotte, 28, were charged by Judge Laurence Le vert with 
possessing illegal weapons ana forged and stolen doc uments, am t 
taking part in criminal and terrorist enterprises. They were anest- 
ed Thursday in Alx-eorProvenos. . _ 

Ms. L6pez Riano is wanted in Spain in connection with at least 
23 kmfrr g Sj mostly of members of die paramilitary Civil Guard. 


Danish Coalition Calls Snap Election 


COPENHAGEN (AP) —Denmark’s Social Democratic prime 
minis ter called new elections mi Monday for Sept- 21, hoping to 
capitalize on a recent surge in public support 
The vote will be the first for tire four-party coalition led by 
Primp. Minister Paul Nvrrm Rasmussen, who was rcooired to call 


Prime Minister Pool Nyrup Rasmussen, who was required to call 
elections by December. ; 

Mr. Rasmussen became minister in 1993 without elec- 
tions, after a decade of Ccmservativc-led governments. He said the 
four-party government coalition intended to stay together. 


Nigerian Strike On, Abiola’s Trial Off 

LAGOS (Reuters)— A political strike by Nigerian oil workers 
entered its ninth week Monday, and a scheduled court appearance 
by the presidential claimant, Moshood K. O. Abiola, was can- 
celed. . ■ # • 

03' industry executives and union leaders said most of the 
strikers, who began their pro-Aiaola stoppage on July 4, were still 
defying the military government's order to resume work. 

Chief Abiola, who is widely believed to have won the presiden- 
tial election annulled last year, was charged with treason after 
proclaiming himself president in June. His trial was to resume in 
the inland capital Amga, but the hearing did not take place. 


French Question Tourists in Tragedy 


AVRANCHES, France (AP) — The police opened inquiries on 
Monday that could lead to charges against tourists who watched 
and videotaped a woman drown in waters below the ancient Mont 
Saint-Michel abbey. The inquiries, judicial sources said, were 
aimed at discerning the altitude of the tourists and what efforts 
were made to alert rescuers. . . 

Dozens of tourists on the ramparts of die abbey are said by 
residents to have watched Marie-Noefie Guallcrnce, 42, drown 
Aug. 2z as she tried to save her child, Yictorine, 6. The child was 
rescued by firemen who said they arrived 10 minutes too late to 
save her mother. ^ 

It the tourists fafledto takenonlife-dueatening steps to save her r. 
^ as sedcmghdp —they could be prosecuted for nonassis- 
tance 15 a person hrojmgdr, punishable by two years in prison. 


Olympic Centennial Marked in Paris ; 

PARIS (AI>) — Sky (fivers brought the Olympic flame by 


think when people decide to de- 
lay others,” he said, “it is only 
fair to retaliate a little bit.” 

Israel was irked by the at- 
tempt of Pakistan’s ambassador 
to Tunis to otter Gaza on Sun- 
day, apparently to discuss a 
possible visit there by Prime 
Minister Benazir Bhutto, with- 
out first informing it. 

Pakistan does not have diplo- 
matic relations with Israel. But 
under agreements reached with 
the Palestinians on self-rule, Is- 
rael retains authority over for- 
eign relations for the autono- 
mous areas. 

“The lady from Pakistan 
must learn some manners in in- 
ternational relations,” Prime 
Minister Yitzhak Rabin of Isra- 
el told Israeli television on 
Monday night 

He added, “Pakistan has to 


failed to set op proper financial 
institutions, have transferred 
only a minuscule amount of the 
$700 million pledged for the 
first year of the self-rule govern- 
ment 

For the first six months, the 
areas to be transferred will re- 
quire $54.6 million, with educa- 
tion taking $26.2 minio n 

Undo- the agreement, the 
Palestinian Authority promises 
to “do its utmost” to set up a 
working tax collection system, 
and the Iaaelis agree to transfer 
75 percent of taxes collected 
from Palestinians working in Is- 
rael Jewish settlements and 
nriiilary locations. 

The agreement also calls on 


would have to give up about a third of the among the contact-group countries. 


crrmiGTirnr 


territory they hold after 28 months of war in Russia, a tradil 

Bosnia. reward President 

“We will ask for another map,” said the Bosni- tionai trade emb; 
an Serbian leader, Radovan Karadzic, wbo had over two years. 


Russia, a traditional ally of the Serbs, wants to 
reward President Milosevic by easing an mterna- 


3 that has been in place for 
"’lomats said the United P r °B rams 


with Father Aristide. 

His Heads Together move- 
ment also emphasized literacy 


r.vj i i ■ i 3) i (J \ 


described the plan to his people as a recipe for States. Britain, France and Germany were ready _ 

mili tary defeat and economic disaster. “We ex- to consider a mild easing of the sanctions — were strong advocates of liberar 
r ct - — — -• * . i%..« ;<* uieotoffV. an mtometatum 


Both he and Father Aristide 


tiozz theology, an interpretation 


pect a new conference, new peace efforts.” perhaps an opening of the airport — but only if uonweoiogy, an mterpretatum 
The contact group countries, however, dis- international monitors are placed on the Serbian ot toe oospeitnat teacnestnat 
minte d the referendum as a sham and ruled out border with Bosnia to ensure that Mr. Milosevic God has a ^preferential option 
redrawing a map that was only reluctantly ac- maintains a blockade against the Bosnian Serbs. ™ e Poor. 


for the poor. 


_ runners cameo tnetorcn through the streets 

of Paris on Monday to kick off the International Olympic Com- 
mittee's centennial congress. 

. Five French sky divers jumped out of two hehcoptexs and 
landed, in front of the Eiffel Tower. One carried the Olympic 
flame. At the same tune, Francois Legrand, a four-time world 
dimbing champion, desoended 400 feet (12) meters) from the 
second kvd of the tower and unfurled the Olympia flag 
The Olympic torch was handed to Edwin Moses of the United 
States, a two-time Olympic hurdles champion. A brief ceremony 
was hdd at the Sorbonnc, where the modem Olympic movement 
was founded 100 years ago by Baton Pierre de Coubertin. * 


Scharping Rivals Head Shadow German Cabinet 


By Ferdinand Protzman 

New York Times Service 

BONN — Moving to bolster 


the Palestinian Authority to his faltering campaign to be- 
p revent “activities with a mill - come Germany’s next chanced- 


Social Democratic Party’s his cabinet would have the laxg- by the Free Democratic Party, 
shadow cabinet, a diverse group est number of women ministers junior partners in Mr. Kohl’s 
that included his two mafn n- in German history. There are ccnter-nght coalition govern- 
vals for the party leadership four in Mr. Kohl's cabinet meat Herta Dkubler-Gxnehn 
and a record number of women. Mr. Scharping first intro- would be justice minister. 


tary orientation” in each area lor, Rudolf Scharping on Mon- 
for which it assumes control, day presented the opposition 


Mr. Scharping, 46, the pre- duced Oskar Lafontaine, the 


ccnter-nght coalition govern- 
ment Herta Daublex-Gmehn 
would be justice minister. 

Some of Mr. Scharping’s de~ 


600 Kurds Killed in Iraq, Iran Says ; 

NICOSIA (Reuters) — Iran's state-run radio said Monday that 
about 600 people had been kffled in recent fighting between rival 
Kurdish factions in northern Iraq. ' . • 

Tehran radio said that in the last 10 days about 600 people had 
died in clashes between groups opposed to President Saddam 


govern- ■ , — — wj l iguucui aaaaain 

-Gmetin Hussein s govanment, and that damage amounting to mflHpns cj 
lor. doDais had been mflicted on Iraq's impoverished Kurdish rrgik™ 

The radio did not give a. source for its figures. 

< _“The area is faohg chaos and social disorder,” the radio said. 
“Tjiis human tragedy may become even more painful and affect 


mier of the Rhindand-Palati- Saarland premier and unsuo- ^ be attributed to the 


cessful candidate against Mr. 


Helmut Kohl by five points in a Kohl in 1990, who would be 
poll by the Forsa Institute, a finance minister if the Social 



inion concern. Democrats win. 


the Social Democrat- Next was Mr. Scharping 1 s 


beat aided by the German 
economy's rebound. But the 
diancelfor has also taken every 


HOTEL DU RHONE 


ic challenger held a 15-point arch-rival Gerhard Schroder, 
lead. The elections will be held premier of Lower Saxony, who 


opportunity to portray the So- 
cuu Democrats as an inesponsi- 


on OcL 16. 


would be given a new 


ty, wno 
“super 


E N E V A 


The Social Democratic Party ministry” for economics, ener- 
has suffered serious setbacks gy and transport. 


renovation is c 


oniptete. 


since the spring in local dec- 'Mr.Schaipmgsaidhedidnot 
lions and in voting for the Eu- believe that Mr. Lafontaine and 


renoy^ haVC 

ASa ,i"n!-^’facilUies 

excellent 


ropean Parliament As a result, Mr. Schroder, who have criti- 
Mr. Scharping has come under dzed him in the past, were wait- 


fire from his own ranks for his ing for him to lose in the hope 
lack of charisma and failure to of gaining control of the party. 


•* l \Mress m Hit must location 

■TZI, Unci ness address ui 


Geneva's first business 


ooeof 

‘Tlitfjgadiiig-Holds of thtfWjrldm 


TEL. (41 22) 731 98 31 


The Swiss Leading Holds 


(T hit > 


FAX (41 22) 732 45 58 


defend his large lead. “I don’t have to listen to 

Such sniping from within these rumors,” he said “It’s a 
helped derail the party’s previ- plus point to have Oskar and 
ous attempts to beat Mr. Kohl Gerhard in the team.” 

64, who has been chancellor Hans- Ulrich Klosc, leader of 
since 1982. the party’s parliamentary fac- 


But the party appeared to tion. would become defense 
dose ranks on Monday behind minister, and Gunter Vcrficu- 


Mr. Sci 
shadow 


ig as he named a gen would take over the Foreign 
et of seven women Ministry, which has been head- 


and right men. Should he win, ed for more than two decades 


earn Democrats as an irresponsi- 
ble tax-and-spend party that 
would share power with Party 
of Democratic Socialism, the 
successor to the former East 
German Comm unis t Party. 

The Social Democrats 
framed a minority government 
with the environmentalist 
Green Party in Saxony- Anhalt 
earlier this summer that de- 
pends on the tacit cooperation 
of the Party of Democratic So- 
cialism. . 

The Social Democrats have 
since said they will have noth- 
ing to do with the framer Com- 
munists anywhere else, but 
some party officials concede 
that the coalition in Saxony- 
Anhalt was a tactical blunder. 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


Strike Curtails Portugal Rail Service 

V TOOAXT / A fTTPv ■ T* 1* n . 1 _ ... 


’ LISBON (AFP) — ■ Portugal's commiiteis and tourists faced 
chaos on Monday as rail engineers dog in for a weeklong strike. 
AH international and main intercity services have beri i ” 

rail company official said. The strflte, the second since the begin- 
ning of August, is expected to last until Friday. 


ing of August, is expected to last until Friday. 

A spokesman for the striking engineers said almost 100 percent 
f their memberc had observed the strike. The strikers are refusing 


o f then meuiben. had observed the strike. The strikers are refuring 
overtime and are seeking a reduction in wade-hours to a 40-hour 
week. 


The pace of the cholera epidemic in southern Russia is slowing 
and health authorities have it under control the Itar-Tass news 
agency reported. Neariy 300 people remain hospi talized forcbd- ■ 
era in the Dagestan region. The epidemic already ha« at 

least 18 deaths. ' • 

A total of 54 fsojieww-kffledM hgjhway arriAmfo in Spain 
cwra: the weekend as tens of thousands of Spaniards returned from 
thar summer vacations, the national traffic department said. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 30, 1994 


Page 3 


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Afraid Castro Will Shut the Door, More Cubans Put to Sea 


: 1 By Maria Newman 

Nat toif[ Timer Smice \ 

• HAVANA As the son rose bright over calm 
blue waicrS here, Cubaus oncc again put their 
rickety crafts to sea on Monday to make their 
way intoiateniatiqaal waters in hopes of being 
rescued by the UJS. Coast Guard. 

' In Cqjinaar, the main la mthhing point for those 
in therHavana area,dozens of froats lined the 
beach with people posed to go. 

Also, as another sign that the flow could in- 

• crease, ncm with improved weather, bucks were 
'arriving with otter boats that people had. been 
assemming at thar homes miles from the beach. 
r Two brothers, Fdipe and Jesus, said they had 
' come from Pinalrio, about 200 kilometers west of 
- here, to leave from Cuba in a boat they had bmlt 
'themsdyes by soldttmgto^etber pdeces.of aluxni- 

aum and- then painting rt over .with tar and 
padding the inside with styrofoam. 

“We're afraid Mr. Castro Isgaing to say, *No 


. aKkC,’ so we have to leave now,” Jesus said. “We 

fS£j^? ecau ^- it is ^ dosest point to the 
Umted States, and it is a good place to launch a 

^ that on their stretch of 
tbe_c*nsi, the government’s coast guard still 
sccxncd to be patrolling the waters. 

_ No one has' been able to predict the pace of the 

ilfS Ce !2S? Dg J heir *** 111(0 the-FIori- 
^ t S^^K Mtber i? ias h*® one Prognosticator. 

“ian exhortations bv the Cuban lead- 
“ r F Si C ?? tr0, OT Resident Bill Clinton. 
Indeed, there has been less science and method 

*XES- “ hc "? people have gone than 
; there are emotions, such as anger at Cuba's 
economic situation or impatience to get on with 
.what everyone knows is a perilous journey, 
inflow* C ° Uld marit die beginning of another 

m m. , « . 


.‘ T& U.S. Coast Guard said its search ships had 


picked up 101 Cubans aboard rafts or s mall 
boats by early afternoon Mondav, Reuters 
reported. 

“The weather is pretty good out there today,” 
said a Coast Guard spokesman, Luis Diaz. “We 
hope the message about the dangers of the trip, 
and that Cuban rafters will not be taken to the 
. United States, is getting through.” 

The number of Cuban rafters rescued at sea 
had steadily dwindled since last week, apparent- 
ly because of stormy weather and a change in 
U.S. immigration policy. 

A total of 84 rafters were picked up by the 
Coast Guard on Sunday after 130 were rescued 
Saturday. That compares with the more than 
3,000 Cuban refugees found on a single day last 
week. 

Since the Clinton administration announced a 
change in policy on Aug. 18, all Cubans found at 
sea are taken to the U.S. naval base at Guantana- 
mo Bay, Cuba, for an indefinite stay. 


Previously, Cuban rafters were virtually guar- 
anteed political asylum under a special U.S. law 
adopted soon after Castro and his Communist 
government seized power in Cuba more than 30 
years ago. 

For the first time since thousands of Cubans 
began to flee the country by boat more than two 
weeks ago, Cuban armed security forces were 
patro lling some beaches on Sunday, warning 
escaping Cubans not to take children aboard 
their rickety boats. 

Tbe order to keep children from risk came in a 
message from Mr. Castro published in Juventud 
Rebelde, Cuba's only Sunday newspaper. He 
said he would send border guards and internal 
policemen to patrol tbe beaches because “despite 
repeated warnings to people not to leave the 
country with children and adolescents aboard 
insecure boats, some people have continued to 
do so.” 


3d-Party Candidate 



Political Landscape Shifts 


By Dim Balz 

fVasMrtgtcn Post Service 

WASHINGTON ~ Four 
years ago, Wes W. Watkins nar- 
rowly lost the Democratic 
'nomination for governor of 
Oklahoma and, like many de- 
feated poKtitians, he istrying 
again. Bat this year, tbe seven- 
term former House member is 
'going it alone: Havingshed his 
party label, be is running as ah 
independent. . 

- “Oklahoma has had several 
years of chaos and turmaH,” 
Mr! Watkins said. “I tinny as an 
-independent that I can send a 
'message that 1 will not be 
owned or controlled by apoliti- 
cal party, political bosses or 
.speaal interest groups.” . 

*■ “If I win,” he added, “we 
change the destroy of Oklaho- 
ma.” . . - 

Mr. Watkins may faB short of 
that goaLBut even If lie doesn’t 
-win, he may be changing the 
‘political landscape by encour- 
aging voters to turn away from 
toe Democratic and' Republi- 
can parties, and in ti»»r endeav- 
or he has lots of company. ' 

" Disenchantment with the 
■ parties, the public’s distaste for 
'the partisanship of Washington 
and the success of Ross Peaot’s 
i 1992 presidential campaign 
'have spawned independent or 

ernor or 

with congressional .and. state 
legislative activity in othexs. 

. Same of these independent 


. ■ V r*. 

..... ^ +. / 

candidates- have a chance of 
wiiming, tat most- do not Yet 
their existence —and apparent- 
ly voters’ willingness to pay at- 
tention to tbenr^- is another 
sign of tte destabilization and 

ff & ^ X ^itihnris^£ trend'has 
enormous impKriiftions for the 
major parties, for the way cam- 
paigns may be xim and for the 
way the country*eouId be gov- 
erned in the future. 

. While. Washington-based 
politicians ailit&ate what the 
November elections might do 
to the partisan balance in Con- 
gress and to the health of Bill 
Qmtan’spreside&cy, some ana- 
lysts argue that the simmering 
independent movement is an 
equally important phenomenon 
an the horizon. .»'• 

“I think -what we’re seeing 
now is quite significant in- 
deed,” said David Gillespie, au- 
thor of “Politics at the Periph- 
ery: Third Parties in Two-Party 
America.” • 

“This is the mp$t fertile peri- 
od since, the Great Depresaon 
for third parties an<f indepen- 
dent movements^he said. 

Today’s activity; may be dif- 
ferent, however, m that it is as 
much at the ceutek of the politi- 
cal spectrum as 4 tte fringes. 
Everyone has a theory about 
why thigt js happening and what 
it may itiean, bat there is agree- 
ment that dt bottom it repre- 
sents a voce of no-confidence in 
the political status quo. 


■ V...- . -u-J.x 

;.v*V' ♦'■>* • • . -fcv «inlV 

* u4 

/ •••••• ■■■ . 

■ 



. , . 


FOLLOW THROUGH — President Clinton watching his drive at his vacation retreat on Martha’s Vineyard. 


“I don’t think it’s complicat- 
ed,” said a White House poll- 
ster, Stan Greenberg. “It’s a 
breakdown of the major parties. 
It’s a breakdown in public con- 
sciousness and loyalty, rein- 
forced by tbe Perot experience 
and by the institutional weak- 
ness of the parties.” 

Mr. Perot is not the first inde- 
pendent, nor will he be the last, 
to seek the presidency. The 
Reverend Jesse L. Jackson, who 
unsuccessfully sought the Dem- 
ocratic presidential nomination 
in 1984 and 1988, said last week 


Away From Politics 

• The son of the US. someon geno-al, Joyce- 
lyn Elders, was sentenced to' 10 years in pris- 
on for selling cocaine. Kerin EWers,-28, was 
convicted in July of setting one-eighth of an 
ounce (3.75 EEams)dfoecame to onundercovk 
er agent in December 1993 m a park tniinJe 
Rock, Arkansas. - 

• Two men sought In a ma W state robboy 
spree were captmed in devdand after thmr 
shot and IriBed a security ^guard at an adult 
bookstore and led j>ctice. on a car chase, 
authorities said. Besides the bookstore heist, 
the men were wanted for a slaying in Michi- 
gan and assorted car thefts, bank robberies 
and . other holdups in Indiana, Michigan, 
Minnesota and Wisconsin since Aug. 12. 


• A carnival worker in Sacramento, Califor- 
nia, who was operating a Ferris wheel when a 
'^year-old boy fell 20 feet (six meters) to the 
-pavement, has been charged with being under 

the influence of an illegal substance. The boy 
'/was listed in fair condition. 

• Nearly 1,000 homosexuals and human rights 
supporters rallied in Marietta, Georgia, to 

• protest a year-old Cobb County Co mmis sion 
resolution condemning homosexuality as in- 
compatible with community standards. 

•Evacuated homeowners in Sams Valley, Or- 
■egou, breathed easier as tire fighters began 
m opp in g up a forest fire that had burned six 
bom** and killed one fire fighter. Reuun, ap 


that he might run for president 
as an independent in 1996. 

Nowhere is the phenomenon 
of independent candidacies 
more obvioas than in Virginia, 
where dissatisfaction with both 
the Democratic senator, 
Charles S. Robb, and his Re- 
publican challenger, Oliver JL 
North, has resulted in two inde- 
pendent candidates: a former 
Democratic governor, L. Doug- 
las Wider, .and.a former Re-, 
publican attorney general, J. 
Marshall Coleman. Neither ap- 
pears lflcely to win, but then- 
presence has reshaped the race. 

In Maine, Angus King is a 
serious independent candidate 
for governor. In Pennsylvania, 
Peg Lukrik, who lost the Re- 
publican nomination four years 
ago, is running as an indepen- 
dent with support among oppo- 
nents of abortion. Her candida- 
cy is a threat to Representative 
Thomas J. Ridge, the Republi- 
can nominee. 

In New Mexico, a former 
Democratic lieutenant gover- 
nor, Roberto Mondrogan, is 
running for governor on the 
Green Party ticket Nervous 
Democrats there tried and 
faded to keep the Greens off the 
ballot In Hawaii, Frank F. 
Fasi, a former Democratic may- 
or of Honolulu, is running a 


close third in polls in his inde- 
pendent bid for governor. 

In Pennsylvania, New York 
and Oregon, third parties hope 
to field candidates to gain bal- 
lot status in the future. 

Although most independent 
candidates still seem doomed to 
fail, many voters do not appear 
concerned about traditional ar- 
guments that they are wasting a 


vote by supporting them. In- 
stead, voters use these candida- 
cies to send a message to the 
two parties. 

“Voters are treating these 
candidates a lot more serious- 
ly,” said Celinda Lake, a Demo- 
cratic pollster. In the polls, she 
said, “They used to get I or 2 
percent. Now they gel 10 per- 
cent” 


'dr POLITICAL XOTES* 


Congress Hits the E-Mail Trail at Last 

WASHINGTON — When the House of Representatives 
was weighing an amendment to a bill on education earlier this 
year, constituents swamped Representative Eliza beth Furse’s 
office with questions and concerns. 

And so the Oregon Democrat took to the information 
highway: Along with conventional interviews, she posted 
soothing explanations on various computer bulletin boards. 
The uproar died down, and the bill passed. 

She was one of the first representatives to plunge into the 
sea of electronic bulletin boards, e-mail and the Internet — 
the network of interconnected computer networks with some 
32 million users worldwide. And the crowd is growing. From 
Congress to the Defense Department, politicians and bureau- 
crats are venturing, office by office, into electronic communi- 
cations. 

The White House continues to lead tbe way. Both President 
Bill Clinton and Vice President A1 Gore got Internet address- 
es very early in their tenure. 

The House of Representatives and Senate are following, a 
few paces behind. Since the early 1980s, most offices have 
been able to swap electronic messages internally, but not with 
the outside world. In the last year, about 40 representatives 
and 30 senators have acquired Internet addresses; about that 
many more members and committees in both houses have 
requested access. 

Yet Congress still must confront a host of questions about 
why and how it is going on-line. Voluminous reports on 
congressional tugs-of-war do not necessarily give constituents 
a better understanding of work on the Hill, cautioned Repre- 
sentative George E. Brown Jr. Democrat of California. 

(WP) 


HufflngtoiTs Races Too Far, Too Fart? 

SAN FRANCISCO — A wealthy Republican political 
novice. Representative Michael Huffington, now in his first 
term, has spent $8 milli on of his own money, with millions 
more to come, in an advertising assault meant to unseat 
Senator Dianne Feinstein. And in just six months, Mr. Huff- 
ington’s cannonade of commercials has narrowed Ms. Fern- 
stein’s huge lead to single digits. 

Effective? Yes. Risk-free? No, say political experts of all 
persuasions, who are asking if Mr. Huffington has come too 
far, too fast for his own good. 

Just two years ago Mr. Huffington, a newcomer to Califor- 
nia with no record, spent $5.2 milli on to win a congressional 
seat in Santa Barbara. Now, he has set his sights on one of the 
rising Democratic stars of the Senate, going from long shot to 
contender bet ore Ms. Feinstein knew what happened to her. 
and before be should have, many experts say. 

“I think he’s paid for a mistimed surge,” said Larry J. 
Sabato, a professor of government at the University of Virgin- 
ia. “It’s like the old Chinese proverb, ’Be careful what you 
wish for.’ In this case, it’s be careful what you pay for.” 

Tbe last round of polling here was in July, when the Field 
Poll, for one, showed that Mr. Huffington had narrowed the 
Democrat's lead to a margin of 45 to 39, a statistical dead 
heat, from 53-25 in January. The next big polls are imminent, 
but analysts around the state are predicting that Mr. Huffing- 
ton has already peaked. (NYT) 

Quote/Unquote 

Stan Arachikavitz, president of the Kentucky Association 
of Tobacco Supporters, as an effigy of Hillary Rodham 
Clinton was doused with gasoline and burned at a tobacco 
rally against the health-care reform plan.- “Hillary didn't last 
as long as my Marlboro.” (AP) 



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Peru’s Presidential Race Jumps the Gun 


■?* 


By Calvin Sms 

Tiew York Thna Service 

TACNA, Pern — What 
promises to be a long and bitter 
battle for the presidency of 
Peru has begun in earnest here 
;with rival campaign visits by 
President Alberto K. Fujimori 
and Javier P6rcz de Cuaiar, die 
.former secretary-general of the 
United Nations. 

While both men have yet to 
■declare their candidacy for tte 
election in April, Mr. Pfrez de 
CuHlar, who ret urn ed to Ran 


tins monm irom rans, uas oeen 
Tbarnstonning the country’s 
poor andrnral areas. 

He was to be the main attrac- 
tion Sunday at a commemora- 
tion of this city’s separation 
from Chile in 1929. Bat at tte 
last minute, Mr. Fitinnori an- 
nounced that he and his cabinet 
-would attend. Tte ceremony 
was delayed two hours as enga- . 
inizers scrambled to find more 
'platform chairs before Mr. Fu- 
jimori arrived in a motorcade. 

■ Mr. Fujimori needs to build 
[political strength in Tacna, a 
•city of 215,000 people where 
^voters bucked the nat i onal 
.trend last year and overwbdm- 
■ingly rejected his new constitn- 
'lion, proposed by the preadoit . 

•r^ter he seized ne arly dictatorial 
feowersin April 1992, (fissohang 
! Congress and the courts. 

) When Mr. Figimori arrived 
•Sunday, he reviewed troops and 
*, shook hands with Mr. Pftrez de 
.Cuellar. The two later marched 
'separately in a parade where 
ithey were both showered with, 
•praise, flowers and kisses. 

For now, however. Mr. Fqp- 
•mori, whose policies have. 

rilla movement and revived Pe- 
ru’s economy, has a morepress- 


ma problem than outshining 
Mr." r faez de Goiflar: his dis- 
pute with Ins wife, Snsana Hi- 
guchi. 

Last week, Mr. Fujimori 
went an national television to 
a n n o unce that he was relieving 
Ins wife 1 of hor duties- as first 
lady. In m angry address, be 
said that his wrie was “unsta- 
ble^ and that ter behavior was 
motivated by “unscrupulous” 
advisers, whom he aid not 
name 

In zwceatinterriews cm rdevi- 


■ ****** *** A A*- 

gochi has criticized her hus- 
band’s authoritarian policies, 
accused his faanty.and adminis- 
tration of corruption, and hint- 
ed at running for president her- 1 
sett. . r- 

Two weeks ago, Ms. Higuchi, 
who had said that Mr. Fujimori 
had ter undo surveillance, be- 
came so incensed that she 
moved out of the Presidential 
Palace for 10 days. 

_ Tte rift is seen here as a ma- 
jor UahiHty for the president. 
To some Penmans, Mr. Fuji- 
mori appears weak and unable 
to control iris - household. To 
others, he is a victim of a bad 
marr iage that is damaging the 
country’s reputation abroad. 

Mr. Fujimori’s critics say 
that by essentially dismissing 
Ins wife, the president has once 
again demonstrated that he 
governs only by an iron band 
and not by ccmsensus. They 


IS OPEN 

. 17, Are. frunUinfieoserelt 
U: 4X59^3.43 & 4339.67.45 


ai<a~> say that the first lady's ac- 
cusations of corruption have 
damaged Mr. Fujimori. 

Mr. Fujimori's supporters ac- 
knowledge that his marital dis- 
cord has hurt him politically, 
but say that the damage is only 
short-term. They point to his 
successes in improving the 
economy, which grew by 7 per- 
cent last year, and subduing ter- 
rorism. Inflation, 7,000 percent 
in 1990, was less than 40 per- 
cent last year. 

Opinion polls here show that 
•ha nncidnlt has 3 60 DUCSlt 


approval rating but that only 48 
percent of the people would 


vote for him if he ran for re- 
election, which he is allowed to 
do under the new constitution. 

Mr. Pfercz de Cu&Iar has said 
that he will wait until next 
month to announce whether is a 
candidate, but his advisers say 
he is already hard at work on a 
platform that win focus on the 
poor and a return to what they 
call “full democratic rule in 
Pent.” 

While Mr. Perez de Cuellar, 
72, is seen as a viable challenger 
to Mr. Fujimori, 56, critics say 
that his ase and the fact that he 


has lived most of his life abroad 
are negatives. 


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Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 30, 1994 


Waking for the ‘ Difference ’ in Gambia’s Military Coup 


POLLUTE: A Taste efthe Tatars 


By Howard W. French 

New York runes Service 

BANJUL, Gambia — When Lieutenant Ya- 
hya Jammeh seized power in this West African 
country in a coup last month, breaking one of the 
continent’s longest traditions of electoral democ- 
racy, he joined the increasingly crowded ranks of 
soldiers who have risen to power in Africa. 

From the start. Lieutenant Jammeh, 29, fresh 
from a military-police training course in the 
United Stales, has promised that his would be a 
“coup with a difference." 

He has vowed that he and his fellow soldiers 
are “not here to perpetuate ourselves,” and will 
return to the barracks “as soon as we have set 
things right.” 

That such repeated pledges are necessary says 
much about tins region’s recent history. Young 
militar y officers have time and again overthrown 
larcenous or ineffectual civilian leaders in the 


nam e of national redemption, only to cling to 

inflicting even 


power through violence while 
greater disaster on their countries' economies. 

So if ordinary people in a mostly illiterate 
population, mainly of peanut farmers and poor 


city dwellers, have applauded the coup and its 
leader, many educated Gambians are bracing for 
the worst. 

Their skepticism is shared by Gambia’s major 
donors, the European Union and the United 
States, which have suspended most of their aid 
and have pressed for a quick return to civilian 
rule in the tiny former British colony along the 
Gambia River. 

"This is exactly the same phenomenon we 
have seen elsewhere, with the only difference 
bong that so far there has been no violence," a 
Western diplomat said of the coup. “Nothing 
good can come out of this. The best we can hope 
for is that nothing too bad comes out of it 
cither." 

For his part, the young lieutenant now in 
charge here bristles at the comparisons with 
nearby countries like Liberia, where a sergeant 
named Samuel K_ Doe seized power in 1980, 
promising equality and an end to conuption. 
InsteacLtbe country plunged into a civil war that 
still continues. 

But even as he pledges to announce a timeta- 
ble for a transition to democracy by the end of 


Sqjtember, Lieutenant Jammeh. a child of the 
rural upcountxy whose formal education ended 
in the 10th grade, complains that suspensions of 
vital donor aid in the meantime amount to 
“neocolonialism.” 


“It is wrong, in the first place to use other 
military governments as a yardstick to measure 
our credibility here,” he said in an interview in a 
crimson-carpeted salon of State House. “We are 
here for reasons that are peculiar only to the 
Gambia, and what has happened in other parts 
of the continent, that does not concern us.” 


Other Gambians, and several longtime politi- 
cal analysts here say that despite these protesta- 
tions, the similarities linking the Gambia's new 
rulers to other military regimes in the region axe 
disturbingly dear. 


Governing by decree with four other junior 
offices and several civilians at his side, Lieuten- 
ant Jammeh has barred all political activity, 
arrested two socialist journalists who defied him 
and detained many of his superiors in the 800- 
man armed forces, while co nfining mini sters of 
the former government to house arrest 


“Our fears and apprehensions are pretty much 
the same, because mili tary governments axe gen- 
erally the same," said Kenneth Y. Best the 
managing director of The Daily Observer. He is a 
Liberian citizen who fled the Doe regime's tenor 
in 1990 after his paper’s office was twice burned 

down and he and his staff were repeatedly jailed. 

“They crane in making a whole lot of grandi- 
ose promises and end up worse than the regimes 
they replace,” he said. 

Much like the early President Doe, Lieutenant 
J ammeh has said that his goal is only to wipeout 
corruption and help improve living standards in 
a country where the illiteracy rate is 70 percent 
and per capita income is $300 a year. 

The exang>le the new leader uses most often to 
illustrate his country’s backwardness is what he 
calls the failure of predecessor — Sir Dawda K. 
Jawaza — to build a single hospital in 30 years. 

A more telling case, some Gambians say, and 
one that may negatively affect die country’s 
course for generations, is the deposed president’s 
failure to mold a university, or even, as some here 
ted it, a single new high school 


Ballad ur Envisions 


A 3-Tiered Europe 


France and Germany Seen 
As Center of the ‘ Hard Core 9 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

PARIS — Prime Minister 
Edouard Balladur has called for 
a three-tiered Europe in which 
the strongest European Union 
states would form the bard 
core, with the rest of the Conti- 
nent’s states in two other 
groups. 

In an interview released 
Monday, Mr. Balladur de- 
scribed his plan as three con- 
centric curies, the inner one 
grouping some EU countries 
around France and Germany. 

“A small er number of EU 
member states must build an 
organization better structured, 
monetarily as well as militari- 
ly," he said of the inner circle. 

The middle circle would hold 
the weaker EU states. The outer 
one would group the rest of the 
Continent, with security and 
economic links to EU states. 

Mr. Balladur, the current fa- 
vorite in France's presidential 
race, said all EU states should 
be invited to the elite circle but 
were unlikely to be able to join 
at the same time. 


serving an effective central 
core. 

France takes over the rotat- 


ing six-month presidency of the 
EU Council of Ministers in Jan- 


uary. Germany currently bolds 
the post 

“Later, wcTJ need to work to 
turn these three circles into two, 
perhaps, much later, into a sin- 
gle one,” he said in the inter- 


view. to be published Tuesday 


Mr. Balladur said France's 
amb ition over the next 10 years 
was to recognize the diversity of 
the Union's states while pre- 


in the conservative daily Le 
garo. 

Mr. Balladur said the EU 
must tighten links among Euro- 
pean currencies to make it in- 
creasingly difficult for states to 
move in conflicting directions. 
The Maastricht treaty calls for a 
single currency between 1997 
and 1999. 

He said the European Union 
should also prepare for expan- 
sion into Eastern Europe and 
turn the Western European 
Union into a fully-fledged de- 
fense alliance despite the prob- 
lems this could cause with the 
North Atlantic Treaty Organi- 
zation. 

If they really wanted to en- 
sure their own defense, he said, 
they must bolster the Western 
European Union. 

(AFP, Reuters) 



tote Mocre/Tb* Anodatsd 

Young Rwandan refugees peering through the side of a transport track on Monday near Goma, Zaire. 


Hutu f Executed’ lor Urging Return to Rwanda 


The Associated Press 

GOMA, Zaire — Hutu zealots lolled a 
member of their own ethnic group when 
he advocated returning to Rwanda, a 
United Nations spokesman said Mon- 
day. Three other Rwandans were killed 
in fresh violence in Zaire’s teeming refu- 


gee camps. The killing of the Hutu mod- 
erate was part of a growing campaign of 
intimidation by extremists aimed at foil- 
ing United Nations repatriation of 
840,000 refugees from the Goma area. 
The man, whose name was not immedi- 
ately available, was beaten and stoned to 


death Saturday in a “political execu- 
tion," said the UN spokesman, Ray Wil- 
kinson. 


Despite the intimidation, te ns of thou- 
sands of the more than 1 minim i Rwan- 
dan Hums who fled to Goma have re- 
turned to Rwanda. 


r imite n ed from Page 1 
exhaust pipe, the rising number 
of. motor vehicles on Europe’s 
ever-more-numerous streets is 
rendering those successes al- 
most insignificant. 

• “The ozone pollution is a di- 
rect result of too many cars put- 
ting out too much exhaust, ex- 
acerbated perhaps by wanner, 
anniiw weather, said Charlie 
Kronick, a lobbyist for Green- 
peace. 

“The rally answer is a long- 
term commitment to consider- 
able mritffim reductions on the 
whole," said Mr.' Wicderkehr, 
of the OECD, adding, "The 
long tram starts now.” 

Europe |s trailing the United 
States on several fronts in .the 
battle agains t air pollution. Cal- 
ifornia, which has the worid’s 
strictest air pollution laws, has 
manrimeri that at least 2 percent 
of manuf acturers vehicles 
sold in the state as of 1998 be 
“zero-emissions” vehicles. Cur- 
rently, only electric cars fit that 
definition. 

Europe so far has avoided a 
direct discussion of such mea- 
sures, bat it is begi nnin g to toy 
with wnnfhw successful U-Sl 
regulatory inn ovation: refor- 
mulated gasoline that has less 
benzene. 

Ultimately, however, pollu- 
tion expats agree that attempts 
to legislate lower fossil fuel 
emissions need to be accompa- 
nied by fiscal incentives to con- 
sider nonpoDuting alternative 
sources of energy such as hy- 
drogen and electricity supplied 
by solar, thermal, hydroelectric 
and wind power. 

Certainly, Western Europe’s 
problems pale in comparison 
with those of Mexico City and 
some o ther major cities around 
the world, where ozone levels 
are routinely three or four times 
as high as the worst recorded in 
Athens. 

A joint project of the World 
Health Organization and the 
United Nations Environment 
Program found that about-one- 
qiiarter erf the wrokTs people 
regularly experience excessive 
lewis of sulfur dioxide, nitro- 
gen oxides and soot. Half of the 
20 dtje; considered in the pro- 
gram-experienced excessive iev 1 - 
ds of carbon monoxide. 

Ozone concentrations were 
in Los Angeles, Mexico 
f, SSo Paolo and Tokyo. 
Experts agree the si tuation is 
steadily getting worse. 

“The successes erf catalytic 
converters on cars and scrub- 
bees rat heavy industry have 
been swallowed by the overall 
grow t h in number of automo- 
biles,” said Franz August 
Einrit, a spokesman for the En- 
vironment Minis try rn B nrm 
' While some air quality indi- 
cators have improved over 'the 


last decade; emissions of mtro- 
gen oxide, a major conmbutor 
to ozone formation, and ben- 
zene, a powerful carcinogen, 

have risen. t 

Governments arc also con- 
cerned abootgrowing emissions 

of soot from diesel engines- A 
recent report by the OECD 
condndea that optimizing die- 
sel engines with current tech- 
nology could significantly re- 
duce emissions of certain 
pollutants from heavy-duty 

^The World Health Oxganiza- 
tion established 120 micro- 
grams of ozone per 100 cubi c 
meters as an acceptable limit. 
The European Union requires 
governments to alert the popu- 
lation when the concentration 
reaches 180 micrograms and is- 
sue outright warnings when it 
cries 360 


reaches 360 micrograms. 

S op ^e local governments, in- 
cluding the one in Hesse, have 
taken action sooner. The Ger- 
man state inxposed autobahn 
speed limits several days in a 

row. 

Attempts to reduce the ozone 
problem over the short term by 
restricting traffic are seldom 
successful because the gas 
forms slowty, moves across bor- 
ders and paradoxically reaches 
its highest, most dangerous con- 
centrations where the air is oth- 
erwise dean. 

“WeVe always said, regional 
•auto bahn speed limi ts don't 
work,” said Dietrich Plass, a 
sp okesman for the Environ- 
ment Ministry in Germany’s 
North Rbine-Westpfaalia state. 
“In order to work they would 
have to be permanent, not tem- 
porary, ana ideally internation- 
al — all across Europe.” 

Uesd Hartenstein. the depu- 
ty chairman of a Bundestag 
co m mission on protecting the 
atmosphere, thinks otherwise. 
“Speed Emi ts on the autobahn 
are stopgap measures,” he said, 
“but if you cut the fuel con- 
sumption. in half, you cut the 
emissions in half, too.” 

Ferdinand Pifech, the chair- 
man erf Volkswagen AG. an- 
nounced this week that the 
company, Europe’s biggest 
automobile manufacturer, 
. would introduce a car in 1996 
that uses only 3 liters of gaso- 
line per 100 kilometers, an effi- 
ciency equal to 78 miles per 

gallon 




World War II Wreckage 


The Associated Press 

SYDNEY — The wreckage 
of a World War II American 
bomber has been found in 
rough terrain in central Queens- 
land State almost half a cent 
after it disappeared, of 
said Monday. 


Ex- UN Official Blames Butros Ghalifor Failure in Somalia ME W YORK; Hong Kong Money 


By Thomas W. Lippman 

Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — The failure of the United 
Nations effort to restore order in Somalia is 
attributable partly to inherent weaknesses in the 


If Mr. Sahnoun’s assessment is accurate, Mr. 
Butros Ghab bears personal responsibility for 


much of what went wrong in Somalia and, by 

i’s dial- 


organization but in large measure to mcompe- 

• of the UN 


tence and arrogance on the part 
secretary-general Butros Butros Ghali, accord- 
ing to a memoir by the former head of the UN 
operation in Somalia. 

In “Somalia: The Missed Opportunities," to 
be published in October by the Washington- 
based US. Institute of Peace, Mohammed Sab- 
noun, an Algerian diplomat, accuses Mr. Butros 
Ghali of mkrng actions that undermined Somali 
confidence in the United Nations, undercut Mr. 
Sahnoun's authority and tolerated corruption. 


extension, for the Clinton administration’: 
lurionmenlwith the United Nations as an instru- 
ment of multilateral pe ac e k eeping. 

The Somalia experience led the Clinton ad- 
ministration to develop guidelines restricting 
US. participation in future UN peacekeeping. 

Mr. Sahnoun is not an impartial analyst. He 
strongly criticized the UN performance in Soma- 
lia even while he was head of its operations there 
in 1992, and attributed his resignation to “bitter 
experiences with the UN bureaucracy.” 

He quit after being reprimanded by Mr. Bu- 
tros Ghali for criticizing UN agencies, and Ms 
account puts himself in the most favorable light 


But Mr. Sahnoun is widely respected, and 
drew praise from relief agencies for his work in 
Somalia. His account is consistent with previous 
studies indicating that the United Nations 
moved too slowly to head off the Somalia catas- 
trophe and took sides in the dan conflict after 
assuming responsibility for the international mil- 
itary operation in May 1993. 

A spokesman for Mr. Butros Ghali said UN 
officials had found inaccuracies in Mr. Sah- 
noun’s essay but did not want to enter into a 
detailed argument with him. “In general Sah- 
noun kind of misrepresents his role in an effort 
to make himself look good and others look bad.” 

The pst of Mr. Sahnoun’s indictment is that 
the United Nations and its chief first waited too 
long to respond to the Somalia crisis, and then 


acted in ways that increased Somali suspicion of 
UN activities and made violent conflict inevita- 


ble between the armed dans and UN troops. 


The overall problem with the United Nations, 
, is that it is il 


in his view, is that it is ill -equipped organization- 
ally and politically to be the eagm6 of peacekeep- 
ing efforts. The current system “routinely reacts 
to crisis through improvisation,” he said. “This 
explains why there are so many delays and con- 
tradictions m the UN’s response to crisis.” 

In Somalia, many people harbored hostility 
toward Mr. Butros Ghali that predated his selec- 
tion to the top UN post. As a senior official of 
the Egyptian Faredgn Ministry, he supported 
Mohammed Siad Bane, the Somali presdeat 
whom the clan leaders f ought successfully to 
overthrow in the late 1980s. 


CouAned frara Age J 
fra as much as $300 a square 
foot (more than SS.OOO a square 
meter). Today, sale prices in the 
volatile Hong Kong market 
have risen to about $1,200 a 
square foot, while New York 
prices have fallen to about $150 
to $200 a square foot for prime 
office buddings, a level that he 


ISLE; Rights Abuses Abound for Foreigners on Idyllic U.S. Pacific Territory 


Continued from Page 1 


come from China and elsewhere in Asia. 
American officials say the abuses reflect a 
pattern of discrimination by native island- 
ers, who belong mostly to the Chamorro 
ethnic group. More than 63 percent of 
employed Chamorros hold government 
jobs, and Asians have been brought in to 
do the dirty work and heavy lifting. 

Among the recent victims are two Phil- 
ippine women who came here to work in a 
restaurant but were forced to become cade 
dancers and prostitutes. In another case, a 
Philippine maid said she was kidnapped. 


to leave the island to get j 
and file a complaint 
Their stories are among dozens of cases 
of physical mistreatment, sexual abuse and 
labor violations described in interviews. 


human-rights reports and workers’ affida- 
vits submitted to American and Philippine 
authorities. 

Many other workers have been afraid to 
complain, residents say. 

“It’s a small island where everyone 
knows everyone else," said the common- 
wealth governor, Froilan Tenorio, a re- 
formist who took office in January. “They 
seem to cover up allegations against one of 
their own." 

In a review of labor complaints on Rota, 
a commonwealth panel “has found that in 
case after case, labor law and regulations 
were violated to the benefit of employers 
of alien workers,” the governor’s office 
said Aug. 16. 

It noted that “there were also more seri- 
ous complaints,” citing “physical and 
mental abuse as well as sexual harassment 
and assault” 


Rota’s lop local official, Mayor Joseph 
Inos, called the criticism “overblown.” 
Rapes are “hound to happen in any soci- 
ety.” he said, and forced prostitution “is 
not rampant on Rota; it happens every- 
where." 

Although most UJ5. laws apply in the 
commonwealth. Rota seems to have 
slipped largely through the cracks of the 
federal justice Systran, whose laws often 
are not enforced here. 

In trying to pursue some abuse com- 
' its on the islands, federal authorities 
regularly encountered challenges to 
their jurisdiction, hostility from tight-knit 
local communities and witnesses too in- 
timidated to testify. 

“If s like trying to do a civil-rights action 
in the old Deep South.” said Mikd 
Schwab, an assistant U.S. attorney on 
neighboring Guam. 


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U.S. Navy Decides 
To Tank 30 Dolphins 


By Jeff Leeds 

las Angdes Tunes Service 


WASHINGTON — Work your taS off every day, risk life 

id what thanks do 


and limb to protect your country and what thanks do you get? 
Early retirement and a one-way trip to Sea World. 

It is no secret that the Pentagon’s scaling down has been 
tough on American troops across the board. But now the 
cutbacks have gone beyond troops to the nav^s dolphins. The 
elite squad of 100 reserved for the riskiest underwater 
search and demolition zmsaons — has saved as watchdogs 
fra anchored ships and as minesweepers in conflicts from 
Vietnam to the 


But in today’s str eamlin ed military, there is less room fra 
the uni t, winch is cared fra by civilian marine scientists. The 
Pentagon says 30 of the dolphins have got to go. 

Two years ago. Congress asked the navy to study the 
possibility of releasing the animals into the open sea. Re- 
searchers determined that freeing the tamed dolphins, which 
are regularly fed and treated fra medical problems, could 
expose than to diseases and leave them without the necessary 
survival skills. 


So now, about 70 dolphins will stay on post in San Diego, 
and the rest will find homes at amusement centers, aquariums 
or parks. 

Animal-rights advocates demand release of the dol phins 
from any type of captivity. Scone have questumed the navy’s 
devotion to the dolp hins and have accused civilian caretakers 
of mistreating the animats. 

The discussion, of how to handle the d ol p hin s’ future has 
turned into a bitter personal feud. Mditaty officials denounce 
the animal-rights advocates fra basing their argument solely 
on emotion and failing to look at the research on rc-introduo 
tion. The navy says it cares fra the animals responsibly and 
exercises them daily. 


believes is as low as it will ever 
go- 

Kinson Properties bought the 
older building at 40 Wall Street 
for $7 a square foot, although it 
has required extensive renova- 
tion that will very likely push 
the final cost to around $50 a 
square foot 

Theprices in New York in 
the 1990s dropped substantially 
from the preceding decade. 


push tire market to high lcvds. 

From 1984 to 1990, the total 
value of Japanese-owned real- 
estate in New York State, most 
of which was invested in the 
caty, jumped from $800 nriDfa m 
to over $10 Mlion, according to 


: Economic Analysis. 


Bat the actual Japanese share 
of the city’s real-estate market 
is smalL At best, Japanese com- 
panies — die single largest 
group of foreign real-estate in- 
vestors — own only about 3 
percent of the commercial real- 
estate in New York City, ac- 
cording to figures from the real- 
estate firm of Cushman Sc 
Wakefield. 

While thrar share was small, 
they represented a significant 
portion of new investment and 
were able to drive the prices of 
the market 

In a smrii»r fashi on, brokers 
in New York say that the new 
Asian investors have the poten- 
tial to assume a powerful posi- 
tion in the market. 

The vahic of property owned 
by Asia n companies, with the 
exception of those from Japan, 
is below even 1 percent of all 
c omm ercial property, accord- 
ing to figures from the Bureau 
of Economic Analysis. 

But at least for the moment,.* 
they are striking some erf the 
and most pr omin ent 


BOYCOTT: Saudis Snub Talks 


CoBtiuaed from Page 1 

stay away from the confer- 
ence. “We call on Saadi Arabia 
and the zest of die Muslim 
worid to boycott the confer- 
ence,” he told Agence France- 
Presse. “It is incompatible with 


the Muslim religion. 1 

sfimwoii 


The Musfimworid League, 
an international, nongovern- 
mental organization funded 
mostly by Saudi Arabia, is due 
to meet Tuesday to discuss the 
conference’s draft document. 
The organization’s senior cler- 
ics arc expected to condemn the 
conference. 

In a previous statement, tire 
League said the reader of tire 
UN docum ent “will notice that 
the terminology used was pnr- 

OASdvhrrttH - 


sim tnat it was setting the 
for freedom and equality, but 
was disguised in fiery slogans 
- hcentious&ess and 


Contrary to Saudi Arabia’s 
the 


that the action by Saudi Arabia 
might encourage other Muslim 
ana Arab countries to chawgp 
thrar minds, saying IS other 
Arab countries had confirmed 
that they would attend thecou- 
ference. 

The Saudi development will 
embarrass the government of 
President Hosni Mubarak, 
which has ccme under fire from 
moderate and radical Islamic 
groups that accuse it of caving 
in to Western pressure to pro- 
mote the controversial ideas to 
be discussed at the conference. 

The Muslim Brotherhood, 
Egyp t’s largest opposition 
poop, A1 Azhar University, the 
Islamic World’s most presti- 
gious institution of learning , 
and hard-line militant groups 
have all denounced the confer- 
ence. 

On Saturday, the Islamic 
Group, the country's most vio- 


Gore Curtails Travels Because of Injury to His Leg 


Reuters 

WASHINGTON — A tom 
Achilles’ tendon has forced 
Vice Preadeat Al Gore to can- 
ed scheduled visits to Israel, 
Jordan and Germany, and he 
will now attend only tire United 
Nations population conference 
in Egypt next month, adminis- 


tration officials said Monday. 

Mr. Gore was released last 
week from Bethesda Naval 
Hospital, where he had surgery 
to repair the tendon cm his left 
leg. He tore it playing basket- 
ball with former congressional 
colleagues. 


Cl 1 ^*“9 viw im bu Ujr Utc 

rest as a dangerous p ariah 
state that advocates extremist 
«61aice, wn participate with 
the declared aim of influencing 

the event’s outcome. 


“ o VUtWUUICi 

“Iran will do hs best to adapt 
the final document to the rek- 


i*s health minister, told the 
official Iranian press agency, 
IRNA. . 


took responsibility for a im** 
attack on foreign tourists in the 
smith a day earlier and warned 
all foreigners to avoid the con- 
ference or ride their lives. The 
a ttack killed a 13-year-old 
Spanish boy and imored four 
®*k cr pcopfe including his fa- 
ther. 

The threat raised fears about 

» ll WAAA * - 


the safety of the 20,000 partia- 
nts, which will mefede 


Mr. Amir played down fears 


guts, ***«««««« 

of state and government offi- 
cials. 










INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 30, 1994 


Page 5 


HEALTH: A Lesson in the Difficulty of Legislating Major Change in an Era of Intense Partisanship 


_ 1 

are disputes over whether some slight 
chance for a broad bill remains, or whether 
the realistic choice ahead is between sfim 
chang e and none. 

Though unfinished, the history of 
health-care legislation is a striking measure 
of the complexity of legislating major 
change in an era of intense partisanship, 
with a public that distrusts Washington as 
never before, a campaign technology ap- 
plied to whipping around voters' opinions, 
and news reports that emphasize conflict, 
not explanation. 

Bob Blendon. a public-opinion scholar 
at the Harvard School of Public Health, 
said of the adzoiinstracion: “They misread 
the mandate, read it much too broadly. 
Since people are very cynical about gov- 
ernment and the president only had 43 
percent of the vote, the/ wanted reform, 
out they wanted something easy to under- 
stand, something that did not look as 
threatening as the Clinton plan. The Clin- 
ton White House read it as much too broad 

in terms of trust in President and Mrs. 
Clinton.” 

Whatever trust there was came under 
tremendous assault Lobbyists for every 
conceivable interest that could be affected 
by any version of legislation swarmed over 
the Capitol. And to influence the public, 
more than $50 milli on was thrown into 
advertising, most by opponents and much 
of it simply falsa . 

And newspapers and television failed to 
cut through the din and educate people, 
said Kathleen Hall Jamieson, dean of the 
Annenbcrg School at the University of 
yhrania. Instead, they merely elevat- 
ed public skepticism. ' 

Everything the press did appeared to 
n p gf-nder cynicism,” she said, citing a 


study that she and a colleague, Joseph 
CappeDa, plan to present to an American 
Political Science Association convention. 

When the news emphasized controversy, 
she said, “That under min ed the public 
sense that there was any agreement on 
what the problem is." 

"But only two or three years ago, it 
seemed there was a huge, historic consen- 
sus bubbling up from the grass roots, a 
hunger for sweeping change in the nation’s 
health-care system. 

But BQl Mclnturff, a Republican poll- 
ster who also works for the Health Insur- 
ance Association of America, said last 
week: “Pecmle overread the data in 1992. 
Almost half of Americans said they want- 
ed a radical change in the health-care sys- 
tem, but in Washington that was interpret- 
ed to mean something these people did not 
mean.” 

Mr. Mclnturff said that when he fol- 
lowed up in focus groups, asking people 
exactly what they meant by radical change, 
they said: “If I lose my job, 1 don’t want to 
lose my coverage. 1 don’t want it to cost so 
much.” 

The pollster added: “What they were 
really talking about was portability. So 
what in Washington was considered incre- 
mental change, was to people out in the 
country radical.” 

In hin d si ght, people who worked for the 
administration task force that designed the 
Clinton bill say its organization and secre- 
cy planted the seeds of trouble for the 
president 

The policy experts developing proposals 
for universal coverage, a comprehensive 
: of health benefits and federal sub- 


sidies for poor people, rarely spoke to the 
fiscal experts who were supposed to figure 
out how to pay for it all. 


On Sept 22, 1993, Mr. Clinton went 
before a joint session of Congress. Over- 
coming a malfunctioning TelePrompTer. 
he gave a compelling speech. 

“Tonight we come together to write a 
new chapter in the American story." he 
declared. “This health-care system is badly 
broken, and we need to fix it 
“At long last after decades of false 
starts, we must make this our most urgent 
priority: giving every American health se- 
curity, health care that can never be taken 
away, health care that is always there." 

At first the signs seemed favorable. Sen- 
ates’ Bob Dole of Kansas, the Republican 
leader, offered hope for bipartisanship and 
played host to Mrs. Clinton. Mr. Chafee, 
with 23 Republican co-sponsors for a dif- 
ferent approach to universal coverage, re- 
quiring individuals to insure themselves, 
basked in her tributes. 

But, like a new battleship that slides 
down the ways, the health-care program 
was still not ready for action. The bill itself 
was not ready to be introduced until Oct. 
27. 

The most immediate problem was not in 
Washington, however, or even in the Unit- 
ed States. On Oct. 3, 12 American soldiers 
on a peacekeeping mission in Somalia were 
killed and scores were wounded in an ex- 
change with a Somali faction. Americans 
were horrified to see pictures of a dead 
soldier being dragged through the streets 
of Mogadishu. 

The president turned back from a 
health-care trip to California and turned 
his foens abroad. Other foreign-policy 
problems erupted in Haiti and Bosnia, the 
North American Free Trade Agreement 
was in trouble, and it was December be- 
fore Mr. Clinton was again heavily focused 
on health care. 


Bill Mclnturff, who was polling for the 
already hostile Health Insurance Associa- 
tion. of America, said last weekend: “We 
were doing daily tracking from Sept. 22 on, 
and awareness of his plan was going up. 
Support for the plan was going up.'’ Bui on 
Oct. 3. Mr. Mclnturff said, it stopped. 

In the beginning, almost nobody wanted 
to be cast as an opponent of health-care 
restructuring. But by the end of 1993, 
when the vague promise of a health-care 
overhaul had been turned into the 1.342 
pages of the Clinton plan, it was difficult 
to find out-and-out supporters of the pro- 
posal. 

In February 1 ' the Business Roundtable, 
representing about 200 of the nation's larg- 
est companies, rebuffed the Clintons and 
threw its support to a more modest rival 
plan. 

This was devastating to the administra- 
tion, which had counted on such compa- 
nies to offset the opposition of the small- 
business lobby. 

Many advocates of health-care restruc- 
turing were perplexed. After all. they had 
reasoned, big corporations generally paid 
for their workers’ insurance — and what 
they paid also subsidized care for millions 
of uninsured people. 

For years, business executives had com- 
plained about the soaring cost of health 
care. But many corporate executives had a 
visceral reaction against the complexity of 
the Clinton plan and the expansion of 
federal authority that Mr. Clinton was 
proposing. They said they could control 
costs much better than the government 
could, and they feared that under the Clin- 
ton plan they would lose the right to tailor 
their health benefits. 

The supporters of Clin ton-style health- 
care legislation proved no match for the 


groups opposing Mr. Clinton. Citizen Ac- 
tion, a consumer group, says that political 
action committees formed by insurance 
companies, doctors, hospitals', drug com- 
panies and others in the health-care indus- 
try contributed more $26 million to mem- 
bers of Congress from January 1993 to 
May 1994. 

In his State of the Union Message on 
Jan. 25. 1994. Mr. Clinton waved a pen 
before Congress and threatened to veto 
any health legislation that did not guaran- 
tee' insurance coverage for all Americans. 

By then, health-care reform had made 
its way from a vague buzzword on the 
campaign trail to a scholarly treatise to a 
sprawling piece of legislation scattered 
over five major congressional committees. 

It was in those committees that the most 
Byzantine stage of the health-care struggle 
began: The struggle for universal coverage 
began to collapse. Again and again, mem- 
bers tried to reach consensus on how to 
cover everybody without antagonizing the 
small-business lobby. But they always ran 
up against the same problem: Without an 
employer mandate or a broad-based tax 
increase, how could they pay for it? 

A particular blow was the loss of the 
House Ways and Means Committee's 
chairman, D an Rosienkowski, Democrat 
of Illinois, who gave up the chair when he 
was indicted in May on corruption 
charges. 

Ways and Means soldiered on under the 
acting chairman, Sam M. Gibbons. Demo- 
crat of Florida, producing a bill that at- 
tained the necessary 20 Democratic votes 
on the committee to keep the process go- 
ing. 

But by that point, the Republicans were 
essentially opting out of the process and 
Democrats were beginning to wonder 
where it was headed. 

Health care was the kind of issue the 
co mmi ttee system was intended for. de- 


manding great expertise, hard decision- 
making, months of close-in work. But in 
the end. the issue seemed to overwhelm the 
lawmakers. 

The Senate began debating a plan pro- 
posed by the majority leader. George J. 
Mitchell, Democrat of Maine, in early Au- 
gust, but Republican s tallin g tactics pre- 
vented any important votes. That was not 
the only distraction for Mr. Clinton’s al- 
lies: Representative Chafee of Rhode Is- 
land was now leading a bipartisan group 
proposing another plan. 

Finally, hoping that a cooling-off period 
might help, Mitchell sent the Senate home 
Thursday night, promising that it would go 
back to the heaJth-care debate on Sept. 12. 

Mr. Chafee expressed optimism Sunday 
morning, but he conceded that if anything 
passed it would not provide universal cov- 
erage — “not if by “universal’ you mean 
100 percent or 95 percent.” 

Mr. Mitchell took a longer view. “I real- 
ly believe that we will get this done, if not 
all this year, in time, if for no other reason 
than it' is so necessary.'’ he said in an 
interview last week. “Democracies tend to 
respond to crises afterwards more so than 
before them." 

To Mr. Chafee, the hope for insuring an 
additional 15 milli on or so Americans and 
making other changes in health insurance 
practices that were once scorned as “incre- 
mental” rests on the willingness of the 
president and his allies “to abandon “mam- 
moth steps’ and recognize that “we had 
better be cautious." 

There is general agreement that Mr. 
Clinton would have got closer to his goal if 
he had acted faster, before the opposition 
had mobilized and his own standing had 
weakened. But beyond that, even perfect 
hind si phi produces no consensus on what 
could have been done to bring the nation 
closer to the universal health care it 
seemed to have wanted 1 i months ago. 


AIDS: A Resurgence Among Young 


Contmaed from Page 1 
schools that, among other 
things, teach about safe sexual 
practices to gay students. 

For San Fran casco’s public 
health officials, the prospect of 
renewing the fight in behalf of a 
new generation has been partic- 
ularly discouraging. 

In the early ^BOs the disease 
swept through San Francisco 
with devastating speed, tearing 
at the fabric of what had be- 
come fiie nation’s gay capital 
In 1982, 8,000 men in the city 
were infected; by 1992, the epi- 
demic’s peak year, 8,851 had 
AIDS. Bui a community mobi- 
lization, documented in the 
1987 book “And The Band 
Played On” by Randy Sh3ts, 
resulted in the virtual transfor- 
mation of gay sexual practices. 

In the name of safe sex, the 
city’s gay bathhouses were shut 
down, homosexuals cut down 
on the number of partners, and 
the use of condoms became rou- 
tine. Only now is the number of 
AIDS cases beginning to reflect 
this change because ot the long 
incubation period betweartn- 
fection and the development of 
AIDS. One recent study pro- 


jected that the number of all 
new AIDS cases, which peaked 
at 3,326 in 1992, would decline 
to 1,204 in 1997. 

But last year, Mr. Osmond’s 
study and another by the city 
health department documented 
the increasing threat to young 
homo sexuals, underscoring the 
tenuous nature of the city’s suc- 
cess. 

“We really had myopia,” said 
Th omas J. Coates, director of 
the Center for AIDS Prevention 
Studies at file University of Cal- 
ifornia San Francisco. Now, he 
added, there is a realization 
“that we’re in this for the long 
haul in terms of changing sexu- 
al practices.” 

Bat Mr. Coates warned that 
because of the general reluc- 
tance to deal with gay issues 
and, in some instances, because 
of homophobia, it is difficult to 
obtain much in the way of pub- 
lic funds or even sympathy for 
campaigns in the gay communi- 
ty. 

A common attitude, he said, 
is, “Gee, they have the informa- 
tion, they’re doing it to them- 
selves axw gay sex is an unnatu- 
ral act anyway.” 


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TUESDAY, AUGUST 30, 1994 




Heralh 


INTERNATIONAL 



Sribunc. 


PUBLISHED WITH 


TOE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WaSHWCTON POST 


Discuss Rights in China 


its terms for talking to Washington 
about proliferation issues. 

This tough-minded behavior should 
come as no surprise. While Beijing always 


Commerce Secretary Ron Brown, in 
China with an entourage of U.S. execu- 
tives, is being spared the personal hu- 
miliations showered on his cabinet col- - - . _ - rwver 

teSTSSfaSra; 

goal of convincing the Clinton ad minis- B ?? penal^r for _ .. ® Jh 
traiion to drop all human rights condi- 
tions for China's tariff privileges. Al- 
though Mr. Brown on Sunday promised 
to raise H uman rights concerns with his 
hosts, he has made it clear that com- 
merce is his priority. Beijing is showing 

its appreciation by upgradmgtheoom- ^^^ < 2JpSSng with 

suppliers that use prison labor. 


How can the United States now recov- 
er its human rights credibility? One way 
would be for Mr. Brown to persuade 
American b usinessme n to adopt a volun- 
tary code erf conduct, which would assure 

minimal labor standards, restrict bua- 


status to 


merce secretary’s protocol 
“presidential envoy.” 

But on matters of substance, China has 
given the Clinton adminis tration little to 
show for its human rights retreat. 

Mr. Brown arrived amid reports that 
Qin Yongmin, who protested against 
China hosting the 2000 Olympic Games, 
has been beaten and mutilated in a pris- 
on labor camp. Wang Dan. a student 
leader in the Tiananmen Square move- 
ment, was detained briefly on Saturday 
after weeks of surveillance. Wei Jing- 
sheng, China’s leading democracy activ- 
ist, who was harassed during Mr. Chris- 
topher’s visit, soon after disappeared 
into the labyrinth of China’s penal sys- 
tem and has not been heard from since. 
As for Bill Clinton’s original human 


Another would be to begin loosely 
linking progress on particular U.S. griev- 
ances to relevant aspects of the official 
U.S.-Chmese relationship. For example, 
progress on Yoioe of America broadcasts 
could be linked to the frequency of cere- 
monial visits by high U.S. officials, pro- 
gress on proliferation to mil i tar y cooper- 
ation, and progress on prison labor 
exports to Chinese membership in the 
World Trade Organization. Perhaps oth- 
er links could be found that w ould make 
Beijing more eager to permit Red Cross 
visits and release prominent dissidents. 

These loose linkag es need not insist on 

[tats measurable by results. Mea nwhile , 
none of the new finks should be interpret- 
ed to preclude actions that directly serve 


Transition and Interdependence mthe MideOeJ^ 


W ASHINGTON — America’s con- 
fusion about the role _ and nature 
of government shows up in the long 
battles in Congress over anti-crime and 
health care legislation. Magnify that 
confusion a thousandfold and you get a 
glimpse of the crisis of confidence and 

, V.f At tha nnuurnmMK 


By Jim Hoagland 

The problem is to manage a transition 
in which the peace dividend seems to 
have gone astray and political opposition 
has been long suppressed The Islamic 
fundamentalists rash into the legitimacy 


legitimacy that tears at the governments 
ofSdle East today, . , 


annealed to Fame Minister Yitzhak^ 
Mr. Arafat has not ctamgd; the ester- *pp«d. tfffhgical and ji^ P had 
nal circumstances have. The Isradifc governing the 

weary of mflitanzanon. want to tom JSthu&A over to the self g 3 ' 
gage from the problems of. the Arete- Mr. Rabm said^no- 

They have challenged Mr. n E ft is easy to understand ^ ety , 

from wamor to governor and run the .j. intent on remaking thetf- 

sdf-govemmg Palestinian authority of to shed the problems 

Jericho and the Gaza Strip. 


is harder than bang shjp rv^oauon and 

a revolutionary huckster, running a war 




For four decades, Arab rulers used ne^jfl^agamsc^aa^^^ a rcvdutionaiy hudestw, rumni^ a ™ J^gtudanupri^ make the 

the threat of war with Israel as jusnfica- political system “ of words, terrorism and B uttf Mr. Arafat fails to t "W 

tha onnrmmir Hard slims. notice- exmimn as the 20th century enas. «n- Wr Arafat shows sums of not un- —u the Israelis. James t*** 


isted to confront Israel. 

That justification disappears as peace, 
or at least its promise, spreads. A central 
premise of American diplomacy in the 
region, that Arab governments would 


Amo worm, urn — 7 7 

shown, the Mure of the present Arab 
political system is all too apparent with- 
out a war footing to obscure it 


lUC CAUilUIuiuuij, 7 — ; — „ 

that the Middle East is expenenang is well 




turmoil at home anyway. 

The piecemeal dismantling of the Aiab- 
Isradi conflict exposes the milit arizatio n 
of Arab society that followed the creation 
of Israel and the withdrawal of the colo- 
nial powers. The military-based regimes 
of Egypt, Syria, Algeria, Iraq and other 
Arab states must find a new rationale tor 
holding power, or face revolution. 


The otffaOTdmaiy, ^ease him. Ttesc" efforts' to buiW a 

Palestinian future on ihe outmoded Ako 
system are not taking root . 

Mr. Arafat is not functioning as a 
dictator, Fateh Azzam, director of tte at 
Haa human rights institute m me west 
Bade town of Ramatiah, told the Pans 
daily newspaper Le Monde recently, it 

is worse than that. You can’t see any land 

of regime taking shape. We are gentry 

sliding toward chaos. 

When they met cm Aug. 10, Mr. Arafat 


rh airman is today accused of being un- 
trustworthy and. di c tato ri al by Edward 
Said and other Palestinian nationalists 
who without reservation once supported 
him against exactly those accusations. Is- 
rael's leadership, which once wo uld ha ve 
eageriy executed Mr. Arafat as a terrorist, 
now pleads that he means well but needs 
more *n™». to deliver on his promises. 


ian sodetY -'CHIC that encourages socuu 
stal^^cmocratic 

nomic growth —can deEver the tong t™ 
Scraftytbal Israelis rightly . 

Another words, thefat« erf Arabs** 
Iarariis areas bound in the transition 

peace as they we in war. 

Washington Post Writers Group. 


The Monroe Doctrine, Whatever That May Be, Shouldn’t Be Sawed 


N ew 
C linton 


rights conditions, progress went into re- 

^oi'X^^ hnerests. such as hold- 
policy- As P^ck^ler ofTheN wYork ■ high-level talks on North Korea, 
limes reports, China has coutmuea to Clinton is at all serious 


round up democracy, labor and religious 
activists, including some it had previous- 
ly released, like Mr. WeL 
China has broken off talks with the 
Voice of America over jamming of its 
broadcasts and dropped discussions 
with the Red Cross about humanitarian 
visits to prisons. It has also toughened 


about defending human rights in C h i n a, 
cabinet officers like Mr. Brown need to use 
their private meetings to convince Chinese 
leaders that the quality of their rela ti o ns 
with the United Mates will in part depend 
cm how they treat their own people. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Population Policy 


With human population rising faster 
than ever before, there is a real risk that 
the United Nations’ conference in Cano 
could do more harm than good. The furi- 
ous quarrels over abortion and contra- 
ception threaten damage to governments’ 
attempts, often fragile and hesitant at 
best, to bring down their birthrates. 

The Vatican has launched a formidable 
attack on the U.S. position in particular. 
The purpose of Vice President A1 Gore’s 
speech last week was to respond by 
broadening the debate and suggesting 
that the Clinton administration’s pur- 
poses and its adversaries’, including the 
Catholic Church’s, may have more in 
common than they tha nk . 

First of all, he said, contrary to its 
opponents’ charges, the United States is 
not trying to establish an international 
right to abortion or contraception. He 
wants the United States to use the Cairo 
conference to link together population 
control and development with great em- 
p basis on improving the status of women. 

The differences over abortion are un- 
likely to be resolved, he acknowledged. 
But he went on to quote the Pope on the 
importance of seeing population policy as 
only part of a country's strategy for devel- 
opment, and of defining development not 
merely as accumulating national wealth 
but as benefiting each person in more than 
economic teems. Mr. Gore is en ga ged in a 
belated attempt at bridge-buMing. 

The politics of population has shifted 
greatly over the years. Several decades 
ago, when concern over the accelerating 
increases began to be audible in the rich 


countries, the poor ones suspiciously 
wondered whether it wasn’t all a plot to 
kefp tHwm wwaTl and weak. Since then 
they have discovered, to their sorrow, 
that sky-high population growth can de- 
stroy any hope of escaping poverty. For a 
time, governments looked to rising in- 
comes to curb birthrates, but they learned 
♦hat usually the birthrates have to come 
down to get the incomes up. 

Then the development agencies began 
paying closer attention to the status of 
women. Some years ago the World Bank 
pointed out that the cheapest way to 
reduce a developing country’s infant 
mortality rate is to teach the girls to read. 
Lowering infant deaths is an important 
step in the process of persuading people 
to nave fewer babies. Throughout a wide 

range of cdtures there is a reliable corre- 
lation between more education for wom- 
en and lower birthrates. 

The Cairo conference begins next Mon- 
day, and if it goes as Mr. Gore hopes it will 

encourage national policies that tie all of 
those dements together — devekmment, 

fanrily planning services, better health care 

especially for mothers and children, more 
education especially for giris. 

A stable country can usually accom- 
modate a moderate rise in population. 
But high rates are the enemy of stability 
and invite all the traditional means of 
population control That means disease, 
hunger and war. As Mr. Gore observed, 
the fastest growing population in the 
world is Afghanistan’s, and the fastest 
growing in Africa is Somalia’s. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


YORK — When the 

_ administration 

sought United Nations approval 
to intervene militarily in Haiti, it 
was instantly accused of under- 
mining that holy of holies, the 
Monroe Doctrine. This is a tried 
and true way of gaining shocked 
attention, since most A meric ans 
have no idea what the doctrine is 
but nevertheless are certain that 
upholding it is a good th in g. 

In fad, there is no single defini- 
tion of the doctrine, which has 
meant different things over the 
years and most assuredly was not 
originally a license for invasions. 

The doctrine that bears James 
Monroe’s name grew out of a cab- 
inet discussion in 1823 when the 
president sought approval for a 
bold warning against European 
meriting m the Americas. But he 

also wanted to intervene in behalf 
of Greeks, who were then rebel- 
ling a gonist Ottoman rule, by 
ending a diplomatic mission to 
Athens. Secretary of State John 
Quincy Adams was vehemently 
opposed, and made his case pri- 
vately the next day: 

‘The ground that I wish to take 
is earnest remonstrance against 


By Karl £. Meyer 

the interference of the European velt attached a famous corollary. 


powers by force with South 
America, but to disclaim all inter- 
ference on our part with Europe; 
to make an Americ an cause, and 
adhere inflexibly to that.” 

Adams’s counsel prevailed. 
The doctrine as set form in Mon- 
roe’s wrwuial message to Congress 
on Dec. 2, 1823, warned Europe- 
an powers that any attempt to 
extend their system in the West- 
ern H emis phere would be viewed 
as “dangerous to our peace and 
safety.” Aooroflaiywas that “our 
policy in regard to Europe” re- 
mained “not to interfere. 

Monroe's unilateral decl ar a t i o n 
did not prescribe any specific en- 
forcement measures. Thus when 
Britain ignored it in 1833 and 
grabbed toe F alkland Islands, the 
united States pragmatically acqui- 
esced. president James Knox Polk 
in the 1840s then added that the 
doctrine was confined to North 
America, conceding Britain new 
colonies in Central America. 

The conveniently elastic doc- 
trine was stretched another way 
in 1905, when Theodore Roosc- 


assexting that the seizure of cus- 
tom houses to settle money claims 
was the hemispheric prerogative 
of the United States. 

There followed the era of the 
Big Stick: and “dollar diploma- 
cy” when U.S. marines were 
routinely sent to collect debts 
and to teach Latin Americans (in 
Woodrow Wilson's words) to 
“elect good men.” 

Hence the sigh of relics else- 
where in the Americas when 
Franklin D. Roosevelt called 
back the marines and proclaimed 
the Good Neighbor Policy, whose 
principles were enshrined in the 
1947 Rio Pact. It provides for the 
collective action erf all contracting 


n ations agains t an armed attack 
on any American nation, from 
any quarter, and thus multilatera- 
lized the Monroe Doctrine. 

In CTtreme circyirnrt q nr**, toe 
United States may still fed com- 
pelled to protect vital interests 
unDatara fly. But to derate , this 
necessity into a sacred right be- 
stowed by James Monroe is to 
accept the very sphere-of-inuu- 
ence principle that led the Soviet 
Union to invade Hungary in 
1956, Czechoslovakia in 1968 and 
. Afghanistan in 1979. 

•That, too, found its nebulous 
rationalization in- the form of a 
doctrine — toe Brezhnev Doc- 
trine, which pronounced the 
imnriw rf ftnmn mnism irreversible. 

“If you want a war,” the con- 
servative social scientist William 


Graham Sumner wrote m 1903, 
“nourish a doctrine. Doctrines 
are the most frightful tyrants to 
which men are ever subject, be- 
cause doctrines get inside a man s 
own reason ... ... 

“Somebody asks you with as- 
tonishment and horror whether 
vou do not believe in the Monroe 
Doctrine ... You do not know 

what it is, bat you do not dare to 

say you do not, because you un- 
dirtand it is one of those things 
which every good American is 
bound to believe m. Now when 
any doctrine arrives at that de- 
cree of authority, the name otitis 
adub which any demagogue may 
swing over you at any tune and 
apropos of anything." . 

Wise and timeless advice. 

The New York Times. 


Policy Toward Taiwan 
Needs a Clinton Redo 


By William Clark Jr- 


Other Comment 


Democracy Does Work Best 

In China [last week], a despot celebrated 
his 90 th birthday, and many capitalists 
applauded. Although he heads a dictatori- 
al regime that has spilled the blood of 

miffioiis during his lifetime Deng Kao- become gndlock«L If 

ping is now famous ^ ecanonrasuocess is about governments 

achievement: presiding over the worid s ^ fl™ done ^ then would it not 

f.rtart- nmillL no mmnmv _ & I 0 !. . , 1 


were about economics: about economic 
freedom and unleashing econranic growth. 

Not only is that pomt forgotten; it is 
now frequently turned on its hea d . De- 
mocracy, it is thought, is weD worth hay- 
ing, but there is a price to be paid for it 
Interest groups squabble, people demon- 


W ASHTNGTON — Current 
U.S. policy toward Taiwan 
was developed in the late 1970s 
and early 1980s when fear of 
pushing China toward toe Soviet 
Union was stfll rife. Now that the 
“Evil Empire” has disintegrated 
and China has a new capitalist- 
style economic orientation, the 
only thing adherence to the policy 
ensures is that the United States 
will be out of step with the rest of 
Asia, if not toe worid. 

This is not to suggest recogni- 
tion of Taiwan as a separate state; 
even Taiwan does not want that at 
present But it should be posable 
to move toward recognizing toe 
island as past of a divided state, as 
the United States did with the two 
Gennanys and the United Nations 
with the two Koreas. 


Taiwan's politics have been lib- 
eralized in recent years while its 
export-oriented economy has ex- 
panded, providing major new op- 
portunities for American exports. 
Relations between China and 
Taiwan have also improved more 
rapidly than expected. It is past 
time for America to adjust its 
dealings with the 14th largest 
trading entity in the world. 

In the dosing days of toe Bush 
a dminis tration, Cana Hills, the 
U.S. trade representative, visited 
Taipei She was the highest-rank- 
ing American official to go there 
since the United States recog- 
nized Ghma and severed diplo- 
matic ties with. Taiwan. Hie visit 
was balanced by one to Beijing by 
Barbara Franklin, the secretary 
of commerce. The sky did not fall, 


Don’t Oppose Fundamentalist Islam 


By Sally Ann Baynard 

W ashington — Damd Pipes, in “Why 

_ m mm « ■ _ * 1 It /Tl f*l 1 

I 


“Principled opposition” to all forms of Islamic 
fundamentalism would give the United States toe 
same problem that tannsbed its Cold War foreign 
poBcy. it would be forced to support all sorts of 
unsavory dictators as long as they famed a 
bulwark against the common enemy. 

The “common enemy” would be an ideology 


. . toe Stakes Are So Higfc in Algeria” (TJST 
Opinion, Aug. 13 % is wrong about the proper 
American response to Islamic fundamentajum. 

SLn^n^for^UniudStau, 

to power of precisely toe extremist dements it 
should most tear. 

A more sensible approach would be to seek out 

jnut encourage toe moderate dements of Isla m ic 
fundamentalism- The Clinton administration, in 
a farsighted move, is already talking with such 
groups in Algeria. It should push client govern- 
ments such as those of Egypt, T unis ia and even 
Saudi Arabia to do so. The alternative, ignoring 
tiw growing populist Islamic opposition, could 
prove as shortsighted as it did in Iran. 


^mental mistake fa the 

Islamic fundamentaHsm is sot a sin gle moye- 
ment but myriad groups with raned approaches 
to Tdamic government and how to achieve it. 
They have significant public support. Not all 
Tdnmic- fundamentalists support terrorist vio- 
lence or are implacably hostile to AmCTica. . 

TV Misprint for Islamic government need not 

follow the example erf Iran. It is quite possible for 

Islamic government to be accountable to its citi- 
zens, to give them what the West calls civil 
liberties but winch, in Islam, is toe perronal 
freedom to choose to submit one’s will to God, 
and to live up to a state’s obligations under 
international law. Future funda mentalis t re g i mes 
are unhkdy to be more abusive of human rights 
than such UJS. allies as Egypt or Saudi Arabia. 


The writer, who teaches at the Georgetown Uni- 
versity School of Foreign. Service, contributed this 
comment to The Washington Post. 


because Beijing understood the 
need to accomodate the United 
States, wbich had become its larg- 
est export market . 

The aim of a study begun in 
the fall of 1992 under George 
Bush and now being considered 
by the Clinton administration is 
to see if it is possible to put U.S.- 


fastest-growing economy. . 

Meanwhile, across the Pacific, Mexico 
elected a new president, Ernesto Zedillo, 
in a vote that left markets sighing grate- 
fully: because the election seemed fair, 
and because Mr. Zedillo, candidate of the 
party that Has ruled Mexico un democrat- 
ically for 65 years, was toe clear winner. 
A surprise winner or an “unstable” result 
it was thought might threaten the coun- 
try’s economic progress. 

Mr. Deng’s Western fans have misun- 
derstood. or probably never thought 
about the economic case for democracy. 
Ask an American, a Briton or a French- 
man why he favors democracy, and the 
rhnnras are his answer will be moral and 
political. Those countries’ revolutions of 
1776, 1688 and 1789 are remembered as 
taming points for rights and equality and 
liberty. And so they were. But they also 


be better fra them to be strong and au- 
thoritarian rather than weak and elected? 

Thai view is now widely hdd about new 
democracies in the developing and post- 
Comxxmnist world, and in those countries 
themselves. Mr. Deng’s China symbolizes 
an apparent trade-off: the idea that toe 

crack of toe whip, toe spilling of blood are 
acceptable — perhaps even n e cess ar y 
sacrifices an the altar of growth. Slower 
growth for freedom of choice; rising living 
standards for the loss of a few rights. The 
trade-offs seem reasonable. 

But they are false. Rise beyond the 
anecdote and the exception, and the evi- 
dence is dear: across scores of countries 
and ewntnries of history, democracy has 
promoted growth far more effectively and 
mnastfntly than any other political system. 

— The Economist (London). 



International Herald Tribune 

ESTABLISHED 1887 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 
Co-Chairmen 

RICHARD McCLEAN, Publisher & Chief Executive 
JOHN VINOCUR, Exeat* Etier & VhxPre&da* 

• WALTER WELLS, Afewfi&ar • SAMUEL ABT, KATHE RINE K NORR “d 
CHARLES MntHE1^10R£/>j^fi*ws* CARLGEWKIZ.AaociiSeBi**' 

• ROBERT J IXXMRJE,Ed^tfiheEd^riaiPa^*JC^TIWtGAGEBusnessodFnaKxEi^ 

•JUANITA I CASPARL intermtiond Devdo^rwaDmctor* ROBERTFARRE. OrcuLrUtn Drrftsar, Ewvpe 
Pircdeurde la PubGaaion: RkhordD. Smmom 
Pi~*4^Aj^delaPublkxakxvKahcnwP.I>zr^ 


Tribune, 181 Aval* Ctariu^feGaufe, 92321 

MUM cm KwaSliSSte m 210 - 2254 . 

si 6/357 



Tough With Haiti , Nice With Cuba? 


WASHINGTON —Will toe 
W principle that guides Clin- 
ton administration domestic 
policy also be applied to foreign 
affairs? The bedrock principle, 
as it has evolved from Bunker 
HID to the White House bunker, 
is this: Don’t run until you see 
the whites of their eyes. 

Using this key, readers of my 
prognosticaiory harangues were 
able to discern beforoiand the 
passage of the Rep ub lican-de- 
porked crime bill, as well as the 
president’s sudden willingness 
to let Congress go home to mull 
over ever less tone health legis- 
lation. Now let ns apply it to 
the mini-crisis precipitated by 
Fidel Castro. 

Mr. Castro used toe tech- 
nique of immigration aggres- 
sion and dissident-dumping on 
Jimmy Carter successfully 14 
years ago. In 1994, however, toe 
OS. presi dent properly chose to 
defend the U.S. border. 

The determined Clinton reac- 
tion set hard-liner hearts to rac- 
ing. He interdicted the pitiable 
raft armada at sea; be reversed a 
policy that automatically mol- 
ed Cuban economic refugees 
ihe asylum of the politically per- 
secuted; he turned Guantlna- 
mo into a Cuban colony under 
American, protection; be tight- 
ened the embargo of three de- 
cades by cutting off the flow of 
hard currency sent in by rela- 
tives in the United States. 

That is a vigorous response to 
aggression, at once hush and 
humane and expensive, toe for- 
eign policy equivalent of a 1,400- 
page comprehensive health 
plan. Now cranes the reaction to 
his swift reaction. 


By William Satire 

Democratic accommodation- 
ists, led by Chris Dodd in the 
Senate and Lee Hamilton in the 
House, argue that President 
Qin ton is playing to Mr. Cas- 
tro’s hand by martyring him. 
They would go along with the 
dictator's demands for normal- 
ization of relations. 

Republican hawks Hke Sena- 
tor Richard Lugar, forgetting 


mats will call “a wider range of 
bilateral concerns.” 

Before allowing Mr. Castro 
to extort an end to the embargo 
in return for taking back his 
refugees, however, Mr. Clinton 
needs to show some musde 
elsewhere (toe equivalent erf his 


ins of the Soviet system bdped 
bring down communism in Rus- 
sia, also want to do business with 
Mr. Castro. They see Cuban 
comnuimscfs demise in a wave 
of trade and tourism and cultural 
e xchange, altonng ft that approach 
hasn’t quite worked in C hina . _ 

Everybody worries about ri- 
ots in the holding pens, led by 
Mr. Castro’s implanted provo- 
cateurs, which would cast Ameri- 
cans in toe role of Israelis abus- 
ing Palestinians in camps. 

Mr. Clinton, observing toe 
charge erf the d&aitc nik s begin, 
does not yet see toe whites of 
their eyes. Instead he feds the 
heat from the Cubait American 
community, led by stalwart anti- 
Castroists, and worries about 
lrwrng Florida to a Republican 
tide if he caves in too quiddy. 

That is why we see “midleyel” 
talks beginning, Hunted “strict- 
ly” to the topic of immigration. 
In time these will escalate to 
upper-level ex change s at the 
United Nations or Gnantfaia- 
mo, or semi-private interces- 
sions under a cigar smoke 
screen ( Emmy Cartels bags arc 
packed}, on what U.S. <npk> 


rms in the m™ bill). 

This suggests the October 
Non-Surprise, the multination- 
al, multicultural, multimedia in- 
vasion of Haiti, with air cover 
by CNN, with the Congressio- 
nal Black Caucus in the second 
wave to take the surrender, and 
with a nice boost in the polls for 
Mr. Qin ton before election day. 

Then, _ with the eyes of Ins 
congressional and editorial crit- 
ics getting dose enough to show 
thar whites, Mr. Chston will 
declare Mr. Castro to be a new 
democrat, whose promises of 
“market socialism” mean the 
end of communism in the West- 
ern Hemisphere. 

End of embargo, end erf refu- 
gee probkan,.and a revived dic- 
tatorship in Cuba for Ml Cas- 
tro, who logically expects to 
outlast Mr. Clinton in office. 

As an unreconstructed inter- 
ventionist and human rigfats- 
nik, I root for an Amencan 
military ouster of the Haitian 
junta and a continued squeeze 
on Mr. Castro until Cuban pa- 
triots do their duty. 

But if the Clinton foreign 
policy is bottomed on the same 
prin c i p l e that undergirds Ms 
domestic politics, then we can 
soon expect to be singing 
“Sand in my shoes, sand of 
Havana ...” 

The New York Times. 


Taiwan relations an a more nor- 
mal footing, at least in the eco- 
nomic arena. First and foremost 
would be the lifting of the prohi- 
bition <m officials from theUnii- 
ed States and Taiwan visiting 
one another. 

Recently, President Lee Teng- 
hui was refused permission to 
mend the night in Hawaii when 
Ms aircraft stopped there to refu- 
el It was the first time a presi- 
dent of Taiwan had even, been 
allowed to stop for gas since 
Washington withdrew recogni- 
tion from Taipei 

Considering the size of U.S. 
trade with Taiwan, the amount of 
Taiwan investment' going over- 
seas and toe S90b3Hon in foreign 
currency reserves that toe island 
now holds, it makes no sense to 
refuse common courtesy to the 
democratically elected head of 
the government on Taiwan. 

It is time the United States 
opened the doors of the State De- 
partment in Washington to Tai- 
wan officials and fitted the ban 
on the unofficial American repre- 
sentative in Taipei from entering 
the Foreign Ministry there. 

President BSDL Canton should 
move ahead with all possible 
speed on the Taiwan relations is- 


sue. He has already missed toe 
best opportunity to adjust policy 
without too muai fuss. 

Japan got around the ban on its 
represent a tives visiting the Tai- 
wan Foreign Ministry by sending 
an emissary to apologize for toe 
Japanese Army's forcible use erf 
Chinese “comfort women” as 
prostitutes during the Pacific war. 
How could Beijing object to such 
a gesture? It did not 

When. Mr. Clinton made toe 
correct decision and delinked 
trade tmA h uman rights in Amer- 
ica’s China policy, who could 
have faulted him if at the same 
time he had delinked trade and 
direct dealings with Taiwan 
from the problem of a divided 
China? Not Beijing. 

As he did with policy toward 
China, Mr. Clinton should quick- 
ly make the necessary adjust- 
ments in policy toward Taiwan 
and cany them out straight away. 

The writer, a forma- U.S. assis- 
tant secretary of state for East 
Asian and Pacific affairs, is the 
Japan chair holder at the Center 
for Strategic and International 
Studies in Washington. He con- 
tributed this comment to the Inter- 
national Herald Tribune. 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 
1894: CoreanYs-Corean 1944: German Gloom 


PARIS — That the Conrans do 
not resemble other nations the 
King nf that country tmexpected- 
ly proved by signing a treaty with 
Tap an, notwithstanding the fact 
that in Ms treaties with other 
Powers he had admitted himself 
to be a tributary of China. His 
people are now fighting by turns 
m tire ranks of toe two araries 
which have invaded their country. 

1919s : Standing Army 

WASHINGTON — Representa- 
tive Mondcfl, the House m^ority 
leader, today {Aug. 29] charged 
that tire President, through the 
War Department, was inspiring 
a deliberate pro-intexventiori-m- 
Mexioo propaganda, in an effort 

tojustify the Adntinistratioii’s de^- 
'maud for a pe rman en t standing 
army of half a mflhon men. 


LONDON — The German peo- 
ple heard tonight [Aug. 29] per- 
haps the gloomiest radio speech 
broadcast to them by an official 
spokesman since the war began. 
Lieutenant General Kurt Kitt- 
mar, who is billed as the spokes- 
man for the Nazi high command, 
admitted that “the outward de-rt 
vdopment of. events actually 
seqns largely to justify this ene- 
my appraisal of the situation" — 
that tire overthrow of Germany’s 
military power is by no means so 
far removed as it appeared rally 
a short three mo nths ago. “The 
greater part of France has 
slipped from our hands," he 
said. “We are engaged in most 
difficult fi ghting to hold on to 
important remnants, both on toe 
coast and in northeastern 
France. A war of movement has 
been unleashed." 






•40 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 30, 1994 


Page 7 


OPINION 


st Hot Air in the Capital, 
Wallowing in the Land 




- lC ; 


Wl 




^yDavid S. Broder 


•J 


W ASHINGTON This 

has been a bummer of 
a summer. It is not in the same 
lea guess- the Sommer of 4 968, 
when assassin auons and - riots 
were running rampant. It is not 
as bad. as the summer of. 1974, 
when the last sad chapter of 
Richard Nixon's Watergate 
charade was playing oqtf But it 
has been a bummer. 

The -heat and himndityhit 
Washington early in June, even 
before the. season .had started 
officially, and did not let up 
until last weelL : But yon expect 
hot summers in Washington, .so 
there’s ho point in whining. 

Usually, however, Congmss 
leaves -Bx part of July and most 
of August, and that. feds like 
relief. This’ year, if staye- 
d ....and stayed. To- accom- 
plish what? Wdl, it’s hard to say. 

The big story, in television 
terms, was the .Whitewater 

The l 00 , 000 new police 
officers are a fcaitasy. 

hearings held in both the 
House and the Senate. And 
1 defy you to find anyone, 
barely a month after the hear- 
ings ended, who can teQ you 
mat they were about 
There was sometiHog -about 1 
a suicide which was. sadly, 
a suicide. There was something 
about a 28-year-old prodigy’s 
diary, which may or may not 
have set down exactly what oo- 
curred There were meetings be- 
tween Treasury officials and 
White House officials, which 
sounded every bit as dull and 
inconclusive as the meetings 
yon and 1 go to. And every so 
often, that fellow Lloyd Cutler 
popped up from the White 
House intoning the mantra: 
“No laws were broken. No ethi- 
cal standards were violated.” 

Compared to past summer 
scandals, this was thin grueL 
Unless, of course^ you like the 
spectacle of Senators Alfonse 
D’ Amato and Donald Riegk 
delivering lectures on public 
morality. My sense of humor is 
not that weird. 

Of course, everything in 
Washington was ovashadowed 
by the big summer drama of the 
O.J. Simpson case. What a 
downer that has been. Here is 
a mythic figure we all admired 
acct&ed'of a terrible crime and 
transformed into die central 
player in a trashy soap opera. 

If you want a case .study of 
the tabkadizalKm of public life, 
you need go no further than the 
Simpson case. What does it 
have to teach us? Almost noth- 
ing, as far as I can make out 
But it has spawned a huge vol- 
ume of rationalization, theoriz- 
ing and pontifi cation about 


Letters attended far pt&tica- 
tion should be addressed " Lexters 
to the Editor^ and contain the 
writer’s rigpatwe, name and full 
address. Letters should be brief 
aid are stdrject to aStihg. We 
cannot be responsible for the re- 
turn of unsoikited manuscripts. 


-male- female relationships, 
black-white relationships and 
even the relationships between 
blood samples, on a doorstep 
and in a laboratory. 

Celebrity has replaced repu- 
tation in -this society, and a ce- 
lebrity murder caseisjust about 
irresistible. So we are having 
a good' wallow m iL . 

.. Meantime, the armed Forces 
' of the United States are being 
dispatched almost weekly to 
_ places where death is common - 
~ place and suffering all too evi- 
dent. What is hard to discern is 
any common thread of policy 
in their use. 

..In Rwanda they are feeding 
the refugees, and urging them 
. to go home. In Haiti and in 
Cuba our military embargoes 
are making the fives of people 
living, under military dictators 
. even more miserable, but we 
are telling them they may not 
flee — at least hot to the Unil- 

- ed States. 

For much of the summer we 
seemed to be^threatening an 
invasion of Kahii as if we had 
learned nothing from a century 
of trying to install govern- 
ments at gunpoint in Latin 
America. Now we are building 
a huge camp for Haitian and 
Cuban refugees in Guantana- 
mo. It is hard to explain why 

- the refugees ire being pun- 
ished for the acts of the dicta- 
tors in their lands. 

All this might be tolerable if 
there were any evidence that 
something useful was being ac- 
complished here in Washing- 
ton. But the health care debate 
is further from being resolved 
than it was when the summer 
began. And die crime bill, 
which had been the center of so 
mnch partisan tugging and 
hauling, is laden down not 
with the “pork” its critics 
claim but with pretense. 

In an the debate, almost no 
one pointed out that every dol- 
lar the federal government will 
actually spend on crime-fight- 
ing in the next IS months al- 
ready has been appropriated 
— and that sum will not 
change under the crime bill. 

The 100,000 police it prom- 
ises are a fantasy. Representa- 
tive Neal Smith, the Iowa 
Democrat who heads the panel 
that actually appropriates 
anti-crime money, says it will 
finance at most 28,600 more 
police, but the actual number 
will be smaller because the 
money can also be used to pay 
overtime or buy fancy equip- 
ment fen- police departments. 

The truth of the matter is 
that crime-fighting is the busi- 
ness of local and state govern- 
ment, not Washington, and 
both the proponents and the 
critics of this crime bill were 
mostly posturing, or, as Repre- 
sentative David Obey, Demo- 
crat of Wisconsin, likes to say. 
“posing, for holy pictures.” 

All this in a. summer with no 
big league baseball. What a 
bummer. Fm going to the cab- 
in in Michigan for a week. See 
you, in a better mood, after 
Labor Day. . 

The Washington Post. 



Of CoUftg... 

IF WE HAD ONLY 
KHO m IT WOULD T \JRrt 

OUT THIS WAY... Wt 
COULD HAVe.HAD 
CLEAN ELECTIONS 

YEARS A®>! 


Crt^- 

The Chroma Some Mow 
Lm Augcta Taro Syndkar. 


Plenty of Time Going Unused 


By Robert N. Stan gar one 


REAT FALLS. Virginia — 
VJli is 3:18 A.M. The soft 
blue glow of the computer 
screen, the tapping on the key-- 
board and the hum of the hard- 
ware will be my world for the 
next several hours — a quiet 
world of self-imposed isolation. 

Phones will not ring, nor 
doorbells chime. Kids will not 

MEANWHILE 

interrupt There is no chatter 
from a television or pounding 
beat from a stereo. The first in- 
trusion 1 can expea will be the 
sound of a van pulling away 
from the mailbox after deliver- 
ing my newspaper at S: 10 AM. 

By then I will have taken ad- 
vantage erf one of the more valu- 
able untapped resources we 
have: time. Specifically, nigbt- 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Islam and the West 

In response to “ Of the House 
of Islam and a Structure for 
Lasting Peace” ( Opinion, Aug. 
1) by Stephen S. Rosenfeld: 

Islamic countries embody a 
variety of political and econom- 
ic structures. Morocco is a capi- 
talist monarchy, Egypt a non- 
democratic republic with an 
important state-run economy, 
Turkey a capitalist Western de- 
mocracy, and Pakistan a capi- 
talist Islamic republic. Despite 
the pretensions of Saudi Arabia 
and Iran, no one nation domi- 
nates the “House of Islam.” 

More important, man y Is- 
lamic countries find themselves 
in political and economic flux, 
searching for an authentic mod- 
el. The United Stales cannot 
afford to define one policy to- 
ward a religion, toward these 
various political and economic 
systems. In fact, it does noL 

The No. 1 problem for U.S. 
foreign policy is choosing be- 
tween democracy and stability. 
Many “secular” Arab leaders 
are in faa dictators who have 
mismanaged their countries' 
economies through socialist 
principles and excessive mili- 
tary spending. Similarly, U.S. 
allies in the Arab world tend to 
be religiously backed monar- 
chies that serve a minority of 
the population. 

How long will these popula- 
tions continue to be excluded 
from the .political process? And 
when the change comes (and it 
will), who will lead the process 
of democratization? Who will 
be blamed for propping up 
these regimes? 

Take Algeria, for example. 
After being trounced in a demo- 
cratic election, the military gov- 
ernment decided to annul the 
results and jail the victors. The 
result has been, not unexpect- 
edly, violently worrisome. 

Should the United States, 
like France, back the military 
regime against the Islamic re- 
bels, in the name of stability? 
Or could U.S. influence pro- 
mote a negotiated peace ana an 
eventual continuation of the 
democratic process? 

The latter course envisions 
the probable coming to power 


of the Is lami c Salvation FronL 
The choice is dear: long-term 
democratic development with 
an Islamic flavor or short-run 
international stability. 

Current unrest in the 
“House of Islam” presents an 
enormous opportunity for the 
West. Popular sentiment fa- 
vors opening the economy and 
the political process. Opposi- 
tion to tbe West stems not from 
an ideological divide but from 
the frustration of not being able 
to construct a just world. 

FARHAD GHAUSSY. 

Paris. 

Land Risbts in Rwanda 

Before the current crisis, 
about 7.5 milli on people lived 
in Rwanda, and from 1 to 3 
million people who live in 
neighboring stales claimed to 
be Rwandan by birth or de- 
scent. Of the latter, several hun- 
dred thousand were those or the 
children of those who had fled 
when the masses deposed the 
long-standing monarchy, kill- 
ing thousands of Tutsi civilians 
in the process. They form the 
core of the Rwanda Patriotic 
Front, which now governs. 

Of the 7 J milli on people liv- 
ing in Rwanda, more than 
500,000 died in the recent geno- 
cide perpetrated against the 
Tutsi population and Hutu op- 
position. Perhaps several hun- 
dred thousand more have died 
of hunger and diseases. Of the 
surviving 6.5jrsUion, about -4 
million are displaced within 
and outside Rwanda. They re- 
main as refugees not only in 
fear for their lives but also for 
their livelihoods — fear of los- 
ing the fields on which they 
have depended. 

Assuring those displaced of 
their continuing rights to their 
land is one necessary condition 
to encourage their return home. 
Yet with the Patriotic Front in 
power, more than a million 
“ethnic Rwandans” who had 
been living long-term in neigh- 
baring countries could find the 
necessary confidence to go back 
to Rwanda. They will assert old 
and new land claims. Rwanda 
therefore faces an explosive is- 
sue of land rights. 

Approximately 60 percent of 


the arable land in Rwanda was 
owned by individuals before the 
crisis. The re maining 40 percent 
was property of tbe state. In due 
time, the new government will 
surely be formulating policies 
to deal with the inheritance of 
the land of perished families, 
and to allocate land now under 
state control. 

Tide to land owned by peo- 
ple who became refugees or 
who died in the past four 
months may be hard to estab- 
lish. Cases of refugees who 
might find displaced persons or 
newcomers on their land are 
likely to emerge. Questions of 
who should be in charge of solv- 
ing land disputes will arise. 

No peaceful or durable solu- 
tion to the Rwandan crisis is 
foreseeable without confront- 
ing such issues of land rights. 
Tbe question of guaranteed res- 
toration of land to the people 
displaced in the last four 
months needs a quick response. 

Tbe international community 
should cooperate with the new 
government in contributing to 
land security by enabling the 
formation of a multilateral in- 
stitution charged with identify- 
ing and restoring properties of 
displaced people. 

Apart from the Rwanda Pa- 
triotic Front, the institution 
should incorporate representa- 
tives of refugees not implicated 
in the genocide, and United Na- 
tions monitors. Technical assis- 
tance in land rights could be 
provided. This would help cre- 
ate tfi2 necessary confidence 
among the 4.million displaced 
people to go back to their lands 
and livelihoods. 

JAMES FAIRHEAD, 
JAMA MHLANGA. 

PAOLO VERME, 
NEIL BOYER. 

University of Sussex. 
Brighton, England. 

Tlie Population Debate 

Regarding '‘Population Eco- 
nomics: The Sensible View Goes 
Unheard ” (Opinion, Aug. 22) by 
Julian L Simon: 

Professor Simon’s spirited la- 
ment on the tactical blunders of 
the Vatican in its stand on pop- 


BOOKS 


THE PRIMARY COLORS: 
Three Essays 

By Alexander Theroux. 268 
pages. SI7SS. Henry Holt <5 Co. 

Reviewed by 
Michiko Kakutani 

A LEXANDER Theroux’s 
last book, “An Adultery” 
( 1987),' was less & conventional 
novel than one man’s grandilo- 
quent monologue about an un- 
happy love affair, a monologue 
that frequently threatened to 
become a veritable anatomy erf 
adultery in afl its shapes, moods 
and forms. 

This time out, Theroux 
makes no bones about emulat- 
ing Robert Burton’s 17th-cen- 
tury classic, “The Anatomy of 
Melancholy.” 

Although his subject, the 
three primary colors, may ini- 
tially seem like a pectrfiaiiy lim- 
ited topic, he has brought to 

bear on it all his imaginative 
gifts as a novelist, and like Birr- 
ton, he has produced a charm- 


ingly allusive bode that en- 
chants and provokes and often 
AptIbs. 

Each of 'the three essays in 
this volume — the first on the 
color blue, tbe second on yel- 
low, the third cm red — reads 
like a streaxn-of-consdousness 


The effect is similar to that of 
listening to a' gifted jazz musi- 
cian improvise on a theme, 
weaving variations into an intri- 
cate tapestry, while showing off 
his own skins as an artist 

Hue, for Theroux, is the col- 
or of heaven and the abyss, the 
sky and the sea, the color of 
sobriety and temperance, but 
also the color of tbe imagina- 
tion. He mentions blue movies, 
Hue notes, doe moons. Blue- 
beard, the bine hour, Blue Wil- 
low china, bfaegrass, the Blue 
Fairy and Hue lagoons. He dis- 
cusses Windex Woe, Tiffany 
blue, Disney due. even die 
baseball player Vida Blue. 

Yellow, for Theroux, is 
finked, affi rmati vely, with the 
sun. with gold ana fight and 


transcendence. It is the color of 
butter, sponges, tennis balls, 
candlelight, pencils, rain slick- 
ers and McDonald's golden 
arches. Its negative connota- 
tions seem equally potent: Al- 
ness and cowardice and evil. 

“It is the color of early 
bruises,” he writes, “unpopular 
cats, potato wart, old paper, 
chloroflavedo in plants, forbid- 
ding skies, dead leaves, xantho- 
derma, purulent conjunctivitis, 
dental plaque, gimp lace, foul 
curtains, infection and pus, 
speed bumps. caDused feet, and 
ugly deposits of nicotine on fin- 
gers and teeth.” 

Red, for Theroux, is the color 
of war, passion, sin. martyrdom 
and atonement. 

“Satan has almost always 
been depicted as red as boded 
crabs,” Theroux writes. “Adul- 
tery wears a scarlet letter. Cap- 
tain America’s foe is the menac- 
ing Red Skull. It is the color of 
anger, debt, diamonds and 
hearts, prostitution, attack, 
gout victims, the second home 
of the Apocalypse, a mandnirs 


buttocks, and the red necks of 
country churls in the American 
South.” 

'Certainly Theroux’s’ discus- 
sion of color isn’t terribly com- 
prehensive, nor is it meant to 
be. 

Yet one of the very things 
that makes “The Primary Col- 
ors” so much fan is its complete 
subjectivity: the arbitrariness 
with which Theroux makes his 
assertions, the eccentric ferocity 
with which he connects one ob- 
servation with another. 

Indeed, some of the very 
qualities that can make Ther- 
oux’s novels cumbersome and 
self-indulgent — a highly am- 
plified prose style, a pedantic 
turn of mind, a love of digres- 
sion, allusion and exaggeration 
— work in this volume to pro- 
duce a wonderfully rambunc- 
tious cultural history. 

Freely mixing references 
from art, music, television, his- 
tory, psychology, film, science 
fiction, biology and architec- 
ture, together with gossip, anec- 


WHAT THEY'RE READING 


- • Karen Mofler, a Canadian 
consultant on fabric trends for 
Trend Union, a fashion con- 
sulting firm, is reading Camille 
Paglia’s bode. Sexual Perso- 
nae i” 

“It’s a feminist anti-feminist 
book, a breath of fresh air that 
we badly need, which forces us 
to reassess established thinking 
and question our assumptions.” 

" (John Brunion, IHT ) 



dotes, superstitions and person- 
al reminiscences, Theroux uses 
his subject of primary colors as 
a springboard for free associa- 
tion. 

Some of his riffs sound like 
the acid-induced r amblings of a 
mad poet 

Theroux cavalierly declares 
that tbe '70s, most poetry by 
women, lewd suggestions, the 
Yale faculty, political compro- 
mise, tbe name as well as the 
country of Brazil, physicians 


and the state of Nebraska all 
remind hiin of the color yellow. 
And he similarly asserts that 
Homer. Shakespeare and Dos- 
toyevsky are all writers who re- 
mind him of tbe color red. 

The reader needn’t agree wi th 
Theroux's odd, funny, erudite 
and often demented observa- 
tions. One need only sit back 
and enjoy them. 

Michiko Kakutani is on the 
staff of The New York Times. 


ulation control misses the 
point. Whatever the reason, no 
one seems able to cope with the 
rapidity of population growth 
in poorer countries. 

Mr. Simon says there are 
more than enough resources to 
go around; not all economists 
would agree. Regardless, wheth- 
er because of incompetence, cu- 
pidity or selfishness, neither the 
richer nor tbe poorer have orga- 
nized adequately to support 
rapidly growing populations in 
poorer countries, nor is there an 
immediate likelihood of such a 
development 

While accurately pointing to 
tbe draconian steps taken in 
some countries. Mr. Simon is 
charitable in his description of 
the Roman Catholic Church’s 
policies. Perhaps tbe church re- 
cognizes the limitation of indi- 
vidual families in principle. Bui 
in practice its rigid opposition 
to reasonable methods of con- 
traception. even putting the is- 
sue of abortion aside, negates 
its principled stand. 

WALTER McCANN. 

London. 

A Useful Eponym 

Regarding “ Bluespeak : The 
Lingo of the UN” (Aug. 8): 

Colin Campbell’s observa- 
tions on eponyms were interest- 
ing. I find it significant for our 
times, though, that his article 
included mainly words remind- 
ing us of rather unpleasanr 
events. John AJgeo was quoted 
as saying that those words 
whose extended meanings are 
very useful are the ones that 
tend to survive. 

Let me add to that list an 
eponym with a very useful 
meaning and which has been 
around for almost 50 years: 
fulbright, noun, a gram award- 
ed to finance lectures or re- 
search abroad by American 
students and professors ( Web- 
ster’s Third New International 
Dictionary). 

I wish more people like Sena- 
tor J. W LOi am Fufb right would 
inspire eponyms. 

GUNTER FRUHWIRTH. 

Vienna. 


time: To those who know my 
early morning ways, I am ab- 
normal. They are right. To them 
1 appear to have a sleeping dis- 
order, because my day begins 
between 3 A.M. and 4 A.M. and 
ends around 9 P.M. 

It may seem eccentric, but 
there is great value in the pro 
dawn hours: to tbe individual to 
businesses and to society. 

Expensive resources sit idle 
or near idle in the dark. Office 
buildings, computers, medical 
facilities, power plants, librar- 
ies, research centers, telecom- 
munications networks, air- 
planes, trucks, educational 
facilities, golf courses, retail 
shops — almost everything — 
go from assets to liabilities as 
we, ironically, search for ways 
to do more with less and be- 
come more competitive. 

Until this century, nighttime 
activities — work, travel, recrea- 
tion — were largely impractical. 
The technology and the will were 
not yet developed. 

Even today darkness dulls our 
senses and diminishes our de- 
sires to do anything but the saf- 
est and most comforting activi- 
ties — eating, drinking, reading, 
watching television, makin g love 
and, alas, sleeping. 

The habit has rarely been 
challenged. When it has been, it 
has been done accidentally and 
out of practical necessity. Night 
package carriers, for instance, fly 
their airplanes through un con- 
gested sues to uncongested air- 
ports with fuel and time efficien- 
cies that yield profits 
unapproachable in daytime op- 
erations. But the airplane move- 
ments just happen to take place 
at night because of the way 
packages are gathered and 
moved during the day. 

Shifting operations to night- 
time or using resources around 
the dock would not now be 
practical for most companies. 
But many could find immediate 
advantage by easing into tbe 
fringes erf the traditional work- 
day and then gradually expand- 
ing deeper into the night as 
benefits, confidence and practi- 
cality take hold. 

At first only a few companies 
will have the flexibility to make 
a major shifL Bui in time, oth- 
ers will follow. Once the mo- 
mentum begins, it will be self- 
sustaining. A new culture will 
begin to emerge. It will seem 
odd for a while, even cultist. 
But, like any societal movement, 
people will adapt, companies 


will prosper and the night will 
become more familiar. 

There will be obstacles, of 
course. Few people want to 
work at night, so it will be nec- 
essary to create incentives such 
as a shorter workweek with full 
pay and benefits, or longer va- 
cations. The suppliers, contrac- 
tors or administrators they 
must deal with may not be 
available at night. In time they 
will be. Meanwhile, voice mad 
and other products of modern 
technology can help. 

There is extraordinary po- 
tential in capital equipment 
such as airliners. Idle airplanes 
do not add to profits. Entice- 
ments could encourage busi- 
ness and leisure travelers to 
travel at night: free hotel 
rooms, sleeper seats, free 
transportation to and from the 
airport, or night bonus points 
for frequent-flyer programs. 

Colleges and universities sit 
empty for most of the night. 
Financial incentives could 
make it attractive for students 
to take advantage of those facil- 
ities during untraditional hours. 

And is there any reason why 
road construction must be 
done during the day, especially 
during rush hours? Traffic 
jams mean higher fuel con- 
sumption, ma gnif ying the dis- 
advantages of cramming life 
into a 12-hour window. 

Some gains from shifting to 
nighttime operations are obvi- 
ous. One would be the leveling of 
energy demand, lopping off the 
peaks and putting them in tbe 
valleys, saving enormous 
amounts of energy. Bui there are 
likely to be unanticipated advan- 
tages for the company, such as 
reduced time off for workers to 
see to medical needs and other 
personal requirements. 

In addition, there are poten- 
tial quality-of-life benefits. On 
most summer afternoons, 
much of the continental Unit- 
ed States is baking in high tem- 
peratures. A workday shift to 
the very early hours could pro- 
vide a welcome respite for 
those who work outdoors. 

Technology can help us break 
the old constraints on how we 
use time, but hardware alone 
cannot do the job. We also must 
have workers, managers and 
leaders who are able to break 
tradition and see the world in 
terms of both space and time. 


77ie writer, a corporate exec- 
utive and former journalist, con- 
tributed this essay to The Wash- 
ington Post. 


CHESS 


By Robert Byrne 

J UDIT POLGAR beat Vasili 
Smyslov in Round 7 in the 
Palladienne Tournament in 
Monaco. 

The old Berlin Defense to the 
Ruy Lopez, 3...Nf6. omits 3...a6 
in favor of keeping a compact 
position. 

After 5 d4, the point of 
5._Nd6 6 Bc6 dc 7 de Nf5 8 Qd8 
Kd8 is to bring about a complex 
endgame: White has a mobile 
kingside pawn majority which 
he hopes trill let him obtain a 
decisive passed pawn later on: 
be also controls more space: 
Blade has the bishop pair and 
hopes to prove that the e5 pawn 
is overextended and can eventu- 
ally be attacked; be considers 
his inability to castle to be an 
impediment that can be over- 
come with patient, precise, 
careful maneuvering. 

Sravslov chose 9...Be6 10Ng5 
Ke8 11 Rdl Be7 12 Ne6 fe 13 
Ne4, allowing White to break 
up Black’s bishop pair, but the 
half -open f line that resulted 
gave Black a chance to create 
some rook pressure that could 
make it difficult for White to 
advance his kingside pawns en 
masse. Then White won a deci- 
sive pawn after 13...KJ7 14 g4l 
Nh4 15 Rd7Nf3 16Kg2NeS 17 
Rc7 Rad8 18 Rb7 Ng4 19 Ra7. 
Smyslov avoided this with 

13...Rd8. 

Smyslov tried for a draw by 
repetition of position with 

19...Nf3 20 Bf4 Nb4. but after 
21 Be3 Nf3, Polgar found a way 
to escape with 22 Bc5! 

Thus, after 22...Bc5 23 Nc5 
Ne5 24 Ne6, she had forestalled 
the enemy complications and 
headed the game closer to a 
thematic ending. 

Smyslov made an attempt to 
develop counterplay with 

3I...Ra5 32 a4 b5. If tie could 
eliminate all the queenside 


SMYSLOV/BLACK 



d e ( g « 
POLOAft/WHfTE 

Position after 53 . . . Kc4 

pawns, the resulting rook-and- 
pawn ending would be a routine 
draw. But after 33 Re5 Ra6 34 
ab Ra3 35 Rc5! cb 36 Rb5 a5 37 
Kd3, Polgar bad nicely thwart- 
ed him. 

Since 47...Re7? walks into 48 
c4 mate, Smyslov had to play 

47.. .c5 48 be Re7. But quite 
soon, after 53 Ke4! Kc4 54 f6!. 
all resistance became futile. On 

54.. .gf 55 Rh6. defense by either 

55.. .RT7 or 55...Rg7 would be 
broken by 56 Kf5. Smyslov 
gave up. 


RUY LOPEZ 


While 

Polgar 

1 M 

2 Nf3 

3 Bb5 

4 0-0 

5 d4 

6 BcS 

7 de 
S Qd8 
9 Nc3 

ID Ng5 
M Rdl 

12 Ne6 

13 Ke4 

14 RdS 

15 c3 

16 h 3 

17 Kfl 

18 Ke2 

19 r3 

20 Bf4 

21 Bc3 

22 BcS 

23 NcS 

24 Nefi 

25 Bel 

26 M 

27 b3 


Black 

White 

Black 

Smyslov 

Polgar 

Smyslov 

e5 

28 Kfc 

RdS 

NCS 

29 ReS 

K(6 

N16 

30 Ke2 

RdS 

Ne4 

31 Re8 

RaS 

Ndfi 

32 84 

tfl 

dc 

33 ReS 

Rafi 

NI5 

34 ab 

Ri3 

KdS 

35 Rc5 

cb 

Be6 

36 RbS 

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■■ 


International Herald Tribune 
Tuesdty, August 30, 1994 




The Power of the Chair: Form and Function m African Design 

JL UK; J- V-r ▼▼ vyj- wj- ^ ^ ^ movement. such as Ah* 


By Michael Lawton 


W E1L-AM-RHEIN, Germany 
— When Picasso visited the 
Trocadero Ethnographic Mu- 
seum in Paris in 1907 and saw 
the African art gathered there, it changed 
the direction of his artistic development. 
“In this moment,” he said later, “it was 
clear to me that this was what painting was 
really all abouL" His masterpiece “Les 
Demoiselles d’ Avignon” was completed 
soon after, and showed what he had 
learned about form and expression from 
his visit to the museum. 

What he saw there were African mastcs 
and statues of gods, but the same aesthetic 
qualities are visible in the collection of 
chairs currently on display at the Vitra 
Design Museum in Weil-am-Rhein, just 
over the German border near Basel. 

The museum, which is run by an indepen- 
dent foundation funded by the Vitra furni- 
ture factory on whose grounds it stands, 
usually exhibits modern furniture. For this, 
their first excursion into non-European cul- 
ture. they have cooperated with the Africa 
Museum in Tervuren, Belgium. Upstairs. 


.sjassssaas 

spiritual life of the people. But th*mysten Q f an the Ashanti kings, was believed to 


. » — th . fnmilv - Chair. The functional object was thus swal- 
“^^Stipeop^G^a African 

stools share a basic form, in wnch Africa- The most charming of those on 

ffiSSslaas SSSSS?wb 5 
LfeffiKas £S5B S * 0M “ 


descriptive detail to formal values, the use 
of ornament for structural purposes, the 
presentation of the figure in universal ty- 
pological terms. It is hard for a Western 
observer to “read” these figures, to tell 
whether a face is supposed to be beautiful 
or frightening, or whether a reaction is 
being invoked that we can't even imagine. 

Nevertheless, character often comes 
across despite the fo r m alis m erf the stocky 
totemic figures — patience, anger, gentlo- 


ness, humor, sullenness — the artists have 
achieved an extraordinary degree of vaneiy 
within the strict limits of their conventions. 

Many of the most impressive chairs in 
the exhibition arc small, designed to be 
carried by the owner, perhaps as he travels 
with his nerds or visits friends. 

The simple geometrical design of there 
stools, carved out erf one piece of wood, 
represents a perfect unity of function and 
form such as was sought by the designers 


of the modem movement, *£*5 
Aalto or Ludwig Mies vender Rohe. But, 
as the exhibition’s curator, Sandro Bocoli 
writes in the catalogue, the African artuts 
show an undamaged sensual relationship 
to their natural and thar social world that 

^aeodSition doses in Wefl-am-Rhein 
on Sept. 25 and travels over tire next two 
years to Paris, Munich. Holding. Den- 
Vienna, and Tervuren, Belgium. 


Dazzling Jewelry of Ancient Peru 


with silver, gold or brass — in one case the 
four legs belong to an elephant that su 


Museum in Tervuren, Belgium. Upstairs, 
yellow light from the specially colored sky- 
lights shines an unforgiving hard light on 


tights shines an unforgiving hard light on 
the chairs from desert areas, while down- 
stairs the exhibits are displayed in the sub- 
dued light of the jungle. 


ports the seat on its back, in another, the 
four legs have become a complicated knot, 

and on each end sits a human figure cover- 
ing its mouth. 

Some of the stools on display are those 
of prominent people. One King’s Stool is 
covered in brass and comes with a foot- 
stool in the shape of a lizard since the 
king's feet were not to touch the ground. 

The king’s stool was enormously impor- 
tant The soul of the king, embodied in his 


up nose and sunhat 

Other, African figures feature in the so- 
called caryatid stools of West and Central 
Africa, in which a human figure, mostly 
female, arms upraised, supports a circular 
seat Once it was thought that the female 
figures represented slaves, but tire rich dec- 
oration of the women’s bodies implies that 
they were intended to portray members of 
the highest families. 

These sculptures show those characteris- 
tics that so overwhelmed Picasso: the lack 
of interest in realism, the subordination of 


By Rita Reif 

New York Torres Service 


N 


EW YORK — The 
lord of Sip&n, a fierce 
warrior in third-cen- 


‘When he walked, they re- ered in the 
sounded like rattles,” says 1890s . at 
Craig Morris, curator for South Moche, a vu- 
Ameocan archaeology at the m nortb- 
American Museum of Natural em Peru.. But 
History. “And all those round the Moche 


things Ire wore on his chest and name was not 

. . • j v " annlipn tn 


ior in uinu-cca- ~ , 

Pqu wore cold- bis head were fitted with bells. 

* . ^ . “ . nrL.n- .I— «nrl (.Ian 


A. ^ tnry Peru, wore gild- 
ed armor, feathered head- 
dresses and dazzling jewelry. As 
part of his glittering garb he had 
back flaps, metal decorations 
shaped like ax heads, h an gi n g 


While the ringing and clap- 
imr noises are left to a viewer's 


applied to 
these people 
until the 1960s, 
after their arti- 


snapea uite ax neaua, nonplus “ r — 

fromMs belt to impress observ- Tombs of Srp&n, an exhibition 

ers and protect his rear. at tiro 

F The Lord of Srp&n, who was 



ping noises are left to a viewer's untutteiseus, 
imagination, the warrior- after their arn- 
pnesfs possessions are richly facts were ex- 
documentedin “The Royal tensrvdy stud- 
Tombs of Sip&n,” an exhibition ted. . 
at the ransaaim through Jan. 1. A necklace 
The Lord of Sipfin, who was of peanut- 
about 40 at his death, just be- shaped 
fore the year 300, was discov- (10 in gold on 

_ . J v m _ _ .a n. AftA n/iff r vr ni 



tmfc, MM efcvaml Htfrny • 

Plaque from a Moche parade banner. 


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ered in a^pyramid’ near the Pe- one ride perhaps representing ry, are tinged with honor for 
mvian viHaSTSrfo&n in 1987. the sun and 10m silver on the some people encountering _un- 
He was amembertrf the Moche other for the moon) reflects the agesof thedecapitator— -afop- 
people, who flourished in duality innamre. Duality is 

northern Peru from the first to again expressed in a necklace of onetand,akmfemtheother. 
the etehth centuries. • beads the srae of hockey pucks, “The Moche practiced hu- 

etgir cadi harped by the gold body, of man sacrifice but <mly after 

Looters were tne mst to un- a spiderin the form of a human one-to-one combat,” Morris 
cover his ceremonial je we l r y sitting on an exquisitely said- “There was never the sort 

and pottery, objccte depicti ng crafted web. of mass militarism we know 

spiders, moan monsters, scorpi- “TOc spider is a metaphor for from Western history.” 

The mysteriousness of the 

tuns. When these artnams ap- m ^ web” Moms said. Moche is what gets to people, 

peared on the market, ^ gjonous metalwork, -jj- ‘*xhey’re suronsed by 
archaedogistswere alerted and ^ hammered paper- ^ depicting spiders, dccapi- 

thin sheets of gold. sB*r and 5S525S SpjSd 
ed three tombs at Srpin. copp*, whkji Sey Jurihj a* Se^Tdicse piec^is so 

The rite is now described as hanced by planing the snriaces nmch ianser than thcjewdiy in 

with other metals and adding olher cafams.” 
inlays of turquoise or men. 

H .* *. * t « _i • "ViAQffvra annAtir «a avat. 


cd three tombs al SipiiL^ ^ SSKKS 3 

The rite is now described as hanced by planing tiro surfaces amdi largBr than the jev 

the richest ever found in the with other metals and adding 0 ^ cdtutts.” 

Americas and one of the most inlays of turquoise or shell. «... M 

significant (rf the century. “Our While the technology is *1- so , o e f' 

knovriSge erf the Moche people ways impressive, the glowing 

doublea or tripled with these images are what prove rnemora- of this stuff that the intellectual 
discoveries,” Morris said. ble. A haunting plaque from a b sb J®J 

Tlic Moche, EtUelmawniniffl ^ 

their dedme. Tbeir potteiy and Mrth, wi* a small man at the Fuumced pranarily 
^taortr howeveTSraeded basemthe samepOM. National^ Endowment 


metalwork, however, exceeded 
in sophistication the works by 

_ * n: 


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National E 


y by the 
it for the 


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lived 800 rears later. ow” Morris said. Angeles last September; it 

The first items of the earlier Curiosity and wonder, the moves next year to Detroit and 
pre-Columbians were uncov- usual responses to Moche jewel- Washington. 





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A New Life as a Gay Bar 


N gan, Joe Lechle was Id early July, he figured it by a straight man. 

r^ardingmost of his out He would make Joe L’s a “But 1 liked Joe. He’s one at 
customers with serious con- gay bar. those basically honest people, 

tempt. There were problems. For He was straightforward, and he 


once add 

EW YORK — By audlater 


z a Chinese kitchen the wrong liquor. I wondered if 
fering Italian dishes, people would come up to In- 

L. J J « -.-nJ _ n AA „ 


the time summer be- What now, he wondered? _ wood or come to a gay bar run 


g in, Joe Lechle was 


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IN INTERNATIONAL HOTEL 

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& 


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P.O. Box 171 
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Phone: 41-61-31 2 3094 
Fax 41 -81 -31 2 6035 


The Blue Mountains 
International Hotel 

Management School 

P.O. Box 851, Pymble 
Sydney, NSW 2073 

Australia 

Phone: 61 -2-388 4188 
Fax: 61-2-988 3476 


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P.O. Box 17082. Kdonaki 
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used to wrap drugs.” Lechle did not fa 

Lechle considered dosing the about gay life: “0 
place but, he says, “You don’t j bad known a fe 
gpt a pension from running a but that was it S 


For mi International Management Career in 
Hotel and Tourism Industry. 


So instead of retiring; he kept 
thinking how he might attract a 


answer. 


-He said the 






SKAT! OP 


la U. 


I HTTT Taranaki ., nas run iot Jo years in inwouu, was rar rrom ijreenwicn viuage orx weexs ago, joe i. s openea 

School of Hotel : ' v ' 1= in northan Manhattan. “Evwy or Chelsea, miles in distance in its new incantation. 

Maoauewsm morning, Fd- go into the bath- and light-years in atmorohere Lechle said some people who - 

Private Bag 2030 f- : 100131 811(1 l ^ 5cradc franNew York’s gay social life, were there that night seemed " 

New Plymouth 4620 /'* needles and ahnnmran foil they A greater difficulty was that leery of him. “One guy asked - 

.. - 7 . ticmH innmn drnes." T m-hlp. did not Imnw flnvthnur me whv T was druno it nnd t • 


was that leery of him. “One guy asked - 


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rife agreed." TFirst I was scared we wouldn’t 
: thing he did. get customers, mid then I was 


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Tel.-. 45 55 13 27 -F3JC 45 51 25 12 


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52 rue St Lazare - 75009 PARIS - FRANCE 


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Tel.: J 6 51 65 87 • Fax: 4551 25 12 


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Tel: (33) 93 21 04 00 
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The IHT 

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dassroom 1 ' materials are 
now available. 

R^rnvxGirfofTnalpnoteaseconact 
Mary Louse Stott 
Baicatxjiml Swwcra Dfifwmeir 

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NEW FALL 
COLLECTION 

ESCAIK 

In Paris 

Also, Sales: 

on Summer Coltection 

Marie-Maitiiie 


s - * ' 7 


8, rue de Sevres, 

Parts 6th 


m. ise viuage voice saymg joe uwa wouia react, he sard. ^ 
L’s “was going over • to .'a gay ' As it turned oat, the custom - 7 
format” Then he dtised down Pen came from all over, more (rf ■ 
for two weeks, hoping his old them with every passing week. * 
customers would find someplace As for the neighborhood, ex- l 
rise to hangouL “I painted the dept for two instances when ? 
•gratters in our window lavender ; teenagers shouted slurs at cus- ; 
and I- interviewed bartenders 'tamers leaving the bar, there » 
who knew the gay scene. I must has been no great commotion. * 
have talked to about 15 befare-I “It’s worked out better than I , 

. found Randolph.” ever imagmed,” Lechle said- “I 

Randolph is Randolph Scott got quality customers with 1 
Colon, a. 23-year-dd. paimo- money to spend, interesting > 
and student people who appreciate what * 

?To,tdlthe trutlL vriicn I first you do for them. I should have . 
met Joe, I thought the whole done this earlier.” ' 


Vy 


' - 

v 

A V T % V* ■ 

8 -. i 

vV- 

V 




1 ■'*- . 




International Herald Tribune, Tuesday, August 30, 1994 



h 


*>10? 




i \ 





THE TRIB INDEX 117 . 

International Herald Tribune World Stock Index <D, composed of 
280 trrtwnafionafly: investabfe stocks from 25 countries, complied 
by Sfoomterg Business News. Jan. T, .1992 = 100. v 
.120 - >■- ■ — . : — — 



1 AsiarPacific 


Europe 


typoa weighing: 32% 

Ckne: 13130 Piwj 13&84 

0 


Appioi weighing: 37% - 

Close: 1 1826 Pro: 1t8S1 

13 



150 


130 


0 M A M J 

J A _ 

1904 . 

M A. M .-J J A 
1964 

1 North America 


Latin America | 

Appro&wlgMlng;28% 

ggmfl 

Appro. wntytins 5% EEBK1 

Closa: 97.13 Prev^ 97.19 

Qdsr 14438 Pmft: 14&34 Eygfl 


• • . - •- 

, . 



‘ J A M A M J J A 

IBM IBM 

Waridlndw 

The Max trades US date- vakm d stocks be Tokyo, Nnv VMc, London, and 
Ammribm, AuiMb, Awtrta, BaMura. Bnafl, Cow*. CM*. Unmade, Finland. 
Franc*, Gmmny. Hong Kong. My, Mndeo, NMborfmto. Mir ZMbnd, Manw ay , 
Sinppam, Spain, Swdaiy Swttnriond aid vmamaia. For Tokyo, New York and 
Loodan.ua Max le composed ol Mm 20 top tons In tanm-d madM captaBzation, 
othsmtaa Baton top docks am fmcfeod 


1 Industrial Sectors 


HI 


Ban. Pm. .% 

state dose ckaagi .. 

Ho*. Rbk 

dsn . dBM 

% 

ilwyt 

Energy 

115JM 11356 +QJ2 . CapMGooda 

120.79 120.43 

4050 

UtHaa 

130f8 13015 aMS toWBi* 

.137.12.-13457 

4159 

firanoB 

11755 ff&JSI AffSO Contatm Goods 

. 104.70 104.42 

*027 

Senrtcw 

123.43 12287 rt,46 

134,70 .13353 

40.88 

Ftr worn takxmalion about thn hdoiLBbaaUBli&aaaaUBtmolchaigB. 

Write to Trlb Index, W AmueOariu de Ga0a,925Z1HeuHy CmfB*, Fiance. 


O Manmftinal Herald Tribune 

. . ' i • • ;■ ••• 


Calling 
For More 
Rate Cuts 

OECD Sees Room 
For Bundesbank 
To Help Economy 

CavjtUed by Our Staff From Dupadia 

BONN — The Organization 
for Economic Cooperation and 
Development said Monday that 
it saw room for further cuts in 
German interest rates to sup- 
port economic recovery. 

The Bundesbank is makin g 
progress on inflation, although 
M-3 money supply growth, its 
key indicator, is overshooting 
its 4 percent to 6 percent target 
range. But taking these devel- 
opments into consideration, 
“there may be some further 
scope for reductions to give 
support to recovery,” the 
OECD said in its annual eco- 
nomic report. 

The organization also 
warned that rising interest rates 
worldwide could curb the 
growth of the large portion of 
Germany’s economy that de- 
pends (m exports. 

“The worldwide rise in inter- 
est rates could lead to a slow- 
down in export growth, while a 
higher value of the German 
mark could again harm Germa- 
ny’s competitiveness,” the 
OECD said. 

The German central bank 
last cut the discount rate to 4.5 
percent from 5.0 percent and 
the Lombard rate to 6.0 percent 
from 6 5 percent in May. The 
Centra] Bank Council is sched- 
uled to hold its next regular 
meeting Thursday. 

The OECD said that despite 
excessive money supply growth, 
the Bundesbank had continued 
a “flexible policy" that took 
monetary as well as nonmone- 
tary indicators into account. 

But the organization also 
warned that the inflationary 
danger was not over yet. 

(Knight-Ridder, Reuters) 


INTERNATIONAL STOCKS 



elps Stocks 


By Kevin Murphy 

Ime mado md Benrid Tribune 

BOMBAY — The last time Indian, stocks 
readied current levels, a river of speculative 
money diverted illegally fir om bank deposits 
was pushing the market to unrealistic heights. 

Two years, a crash and a slow recovery" 
later, the S13 b£Ukm scandal re main s unre- 
solved in India's courts and Parliament, but a 
chastened stock market has recovered to 
1997s wild fevds. 

time around, analysts say, the in- 
creases are more firmly rooted in strong cor- 
porate earnings growth and increased liquid- 
ity in a reviving economy. 

The bullishness combined to drive the 
Bombay Sensitivity Index of 30 leading 
stocks to 4,53433 on Aug, 18, breaking the 
record of 4,46732 set on April 22, 1992, 
before the scandal broke. Bombay dosed at 
4323.48 Monday, up 2 percent. The National 
index, which tracks 100 stocks in five of 
India’s top exchanges, rose 13 percent to 
2,13233. 

“On fundamentals there is nothing I can 
see that is not optimistic for lndia right now, 
and I am one of the more cautious people 
around,” Vidula Warawdefcar, an economist 
with Jardine Fleming India Broking Ltd. said. 

Indian companies have benefited greatly 
from wide-ranging direct and in dir ect tax' 
cuts, greater operatise efficiencies, stronger 
demands for their products and lower finance 
costs. 

In the year hi March, . 1,600 Indian 
companies surveyed by brokerage WI Carr 
averaged a 77 percent increase in profits. 

Production statistics for manufacturers of 
consumer goods in many categories are sub- 


stantially ahead of last year. Some companies 
are even having trouble meeting increased 
demand for their products. 

The best of several good wet seasons in a 
row has prompted optimism in the rural sec- 
tor, which employs the majority of Indians 
and supplies the bulk of exports. 

- Many of the country’s largest industrial 
groups have announced massive expansion 
plans certain to stimulate demand m steel, 
cement and other heavy industries that had 
straggled through two years of painful reces- 
sion and restructuring. 

And the government, which appears to 
have its budget deficit under better control, is 
ronfidently sticking to its predictions of 5 
percent annual growth, and lower inflation 
and interest rates by year-end. 

. Given such a scenario, most analysts be- 
Ecve corporate results for the six months to 
Sept. 30 will average 35 percent to 40 percent 
growth over the same period last year. 

But with the Indian market ahead 32 per- 
cent since the start of the year, many traders 
and analy sts wonder whether investors can 
maw the temptation to cash out when blue- 
chip stocks are looking expensive. 

At the same time, new issues worth roughly 
S5 billion — nearly half from partial privati- 
zation of state-owned entities are expected 
* to come to the market in the next four 

mow the 

While Jardine Fleming and other brokers 
expect the market to reach 5,000 by year-end 
after a period of consolidation and digestion 
of new issues, some fund managers wonder if 
the party might be over. 

See INDIA, Page 13 


Has the Bull Returned? 

Wall Street Suddenly Trusts Greenspan 


By Floyd Norris 

New York Times Serncc 

NEW YORK — Alan Greenspan is not 
going to be mean to investors anymore. Or so 
many on Wall Street now believe. 

If that belief persists, and if confidence 
grows that the economy and corporate profits 
will not suffer greatly at the current interest 
rate levels, the stock rally that surprised Wall 
Street last week could have a considerable 
way to go. 

“I think the next move the Federal Reserve 
will make will be to reduce interest rates, not 
to raise them,” said Byron Wien, the chief 
American equity strategist for Morgan Stan- 
ley & Co n discussing one reason that he 


expected the next big move in stock prices to 
be up. 

The belief that the Fed, headed by Mr. 
Greenspan, would not need to raise rates 
again after the large increase on Aug. 16 has 
been reinforced by a series of economic fig- 
ures during the past two weeks that pointed to 
less robust growth. 

The new mood helped push the Dow Jones 
industrial average up more than 125 points, or 
3.4 percent, to 3,881.05 last week, and that 
rally continued Monday, with the Dow push- 
ing to a six-month high. 

The happiness with the Fed is in sharp 
contrast to the mood that generally prevailed 

See RALLY, Page 10 


Investment Guru Buries the Bear 


By Leslie Eaton 

New York Timer Service 

NEW YORK — For a living. Barton M. 
Biggs predicts market booms and busts 
around the globe. Sometimes he even causes 

thran 

Mr. Biggs, the chairman of Morgan Stanley 
Asset Management, is one of the most venera- 
ble seers on Wall Street. If he says, as he has 
in recent years, “Put money in emerg ing mar- 
kets,” plenty of institutional investors do so 
— and a boom is born. 

Late last year, he predicted that short-term 
interest rates would rise and cause trouble for 
securities markets around the world. That 
seems obvious today, but at the time stocks 
were soaring in the United States and man y 
market gurus were forecasting the best of all 
possible years in 1994. 

All of which explains why investors may be 
heartened to hear that Mr. Biggs is a good 


deal more optimistic now than he was then. 
He said that he expected stock markets to 
rally — perhaps very soon. 

He likes American stocks, particularly 
small-capitalization companies in the emerg- 
ing growth category. 

His favorites are the smaller Asian stock 
markets, which he says “will be the best place 
in the world to be far the next five years.” In 
particular, he recommends Thailand, Indone- 
sia and Hong Kong, citing dramatic growth 
prospects and relatively low prices. An three 
markets have fallen this year. 

Many markets got pounded in the first half 
of the year, and investors have suffered enor- 
mous losses in derivatives, bonds and emerg- 
ing markets. In addition, many professional 
investors remain gloomy, which in the topsy- 
turvy world of Wall Street is considered a 
positive sign. 


Kodak to Sell 
Sterling Unit 
To SmithKline 


NEC Disputes Samsung Chip Claim 


CwigM led by Our Sufi From Dispatcher 

SEOUL — Samsung Elec- 
tronics Co. said Monday it had 
become the first company to 
develop a new generation of 
computer memory chip, a claim 
immediately contested by its 
leading Japanese competitor 
and sometimes co-developer. 

Samsung said it had made a 
working model of a 256- megabit 
dynamic-random access memo- 
ry chip, a semiconductor thaL 
can hold about 2,000 newspaper 
pages of data. Japanese compa- 
nies announced such a device 
several mouths ago, but Sam- 
sung claims to be further along. 

“We take issue with their 
claim to be first in the world,” 
stud Mark Pearce, an NEC 
Corp. spokesman. NEC an- 
nounced a prototype of the 256- 
megabit chip in February. Other 
Japanese companies, such as Fu- 


jitsu Ltd. and Hitachi Ltd., have 
developed their own prototypes. 

Currently, 16- mega bit 
DRAMs are commercially avail- 
able, with 64-megabit chips in 
the final stages of preparation 
for mass production. Samsung is 
now the world's largest supplier 
of I- and 4-megabit DRAM 
(hips, the most widely used 
chips for data storage in com- 
puters and borne appliances. 

Samsung and NEC an- 
nounced in March that they had 
agreed to share information on 
the development of a 256-mega- 
bit chip. NEC at the time hailed 
the deal as the first step towards 
joint development. But Samsung 
said Monday that the new chip 
was developed with Samsung’s 
own patented technology. 

The dispute between Samsung 
and NEC is largely one of se- 
mantics. The companies agree 


S amsung developed a “function- 
al sample” of the chip. In semi- 
conductor parlance, a functional 
sample is a working model above 
the prototype stage but not as 
advanced as an engineering sam- 
ple, the version sent to cheats for 
testing and final adjustments be- 
fore mass production. 

A Samsung spokesman said 
his company had developed a 
prototype of die 256-megabit 
chip at the “working die” stage, 
one step short of commercial ap- 
plication. 

The Japanese makers say their 
engineering samples of 256- meg- 
abit chips will be available at the 
beginning of 1996 at the earliest, 
while mass production will begin 
at the turn of the century. Sam- 
sung said its chips would not be 
commercially available before 
1997. 

(Bloomberg, AP) 


Bloomberg Business News 

PHILADELPHIA — 
SmithKline Beecham PLC, in a 
move that would create the 
world's largest over-the-counter 
drug business, agreed to buy 
Eastman Kodak Co.’s Sterling 
Winthrop Inc. for $2.93 billion. 

SmithKline’s agreement 
comes as drug companies turn 
to the growing 530 billion year- 
ly over-the-counter business as 
a haven from stagnating pre- 
scription drug prices. 

Sterling Winthrop’s products 
include Panadol, a p ainkill er 
that ranks as the company’s 
largest-selling drug, as well as 
Bayer aspirin, Phillips' Milk of 
Magnesia and MidoL The prod- 
ucts helped generate sales last 
year of more than Si billion. 

“In one big swoop, we now 
have what we consider the es- 
sential dements of a world- 
class health company,” said Jan 
Lescbly, SmithKline’s chief ex- 
ecutive. 

SmithKline said it planned to 
sell debt to pay for the pur- 
chase. Die company said the 
acquisition would have no ef- 
fect on 1994 earning s per-sharc 
and boost earnings afterward. 

In May, British-based 
SmithKline raised the prescrip- 
tion side of its business with the 
purchase of Diversified Phar- 
maceutical Services Inc., a man- 
ager of prescription drug bene- 
fits. from United Healthcare 
Corp. for S23 billion. 

For Kodak, the sale would 
complete the divestment of 
Sterling Winthrop and take Ko- 
dak three-quarters of the way 
through a restructuring intend- 
ed to refocus the company on 
its 110-year-old photography 
business. 

Kodak stands to lose money 
on Sterling Winthrop, for which 
it paid S5.1 billion in 1988. In 
June, Kodak announced an 
agreement to sell Sterling Win- 
throp’s prescription drug busi- 
ness to Sanofi SA of France for 
$1.68 billion. If both sales go 
through, Kodak would get back 
about $4.61 billion of its origi- 
nal investment 

“This price was a big, big 
price," said Nicholas Heymann, 
an analyst at NatWest Securi- 
ties Corp. in New York. “We 
were thinking $2.2 billion or 
$23 billion.” 

Kodak shares closed at 
$50,875, their highest price 


Ivax to Buy 
Zenith Unit 
For Stock 

Bloomberg Business News 

MIAMI — Ivax Corp. 
said Monday it would buy 
rival Zenith Laboratories 
Inc. for about $6123 mil- 
lion in stock, creating the 
world’s largest maker of ge- 
neric drags. 

The price of $26.63 a 
share was a 16 percent pre- 
mium to Zenith’s closing 
price of $22,875 Monday, 
up 623 cents on the day. 
But Ivax shares dosed 623 
cents lower, at $19.75. 

Zenith, based in North- 
vale. New Jersey, makes ge- 
neric versions of popular 
anti-inflammatory, cardio- 
vascular and diabetes 
drugs. The company 
emerged from bankruptcy 
in 1989 and bad net income 
of $18.4 million on revenue 
of $96 million in 1993. 

Under the agreement, 
each outs tanding common 
share of Zenith will be con- 
verted into rights for 1307 
Ivax shares. 

The acquisition will give 
Ivax more drugs to sell to 
large managed-care buyers, 
which purchase more than 
half of the pharmaceuticals 
sold in the United States. 

“Combining our product 
lines will enhance our posi- 
tion with drug wholesalers, 
distributors, chain and in- 
dependent drugstores, 
managed-care providers 
and hospital purchasing 
groups,” said Phillip Frost, 
c hairman and chief execu- 
tive officer of Ivax. 


since December and a $135 
gain. 

In New York. Moody’s In- 
vestor’s Service Inc. said it may 
upgrade Eastman Kodak Co.’s 
A-3 senior debt rating and 
Prime-2 short-term debt rating. 
About $5.6 billion of long-term 
debt is affected. Moody’s also 
said it may downgrade SmithK- 
line’s Aa3 long-term debt. 


MCI Pulls Out of Deal 
With Nextel on Wireless 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dupastba 

NEW YORK — MCI Com- 
munications Corp. and Nex^ 
Communications Inc. said 
Monday they were disbanding 
an alliance struck in February 
that would have seen MO in- 
vest $13 billion in Nextel 

The two companies, along 
with Comcast Corp., had 
planned to market digital wire- 
less telephone, data and paging 
services through a network de- 
veloped by NexteL 

Nextel shares plunged on the 
news, losing $535 at $2535. 
MCI shares closed up 18.75 
cents at $243625, while Com- 
cast finished down 373 cents at 
$16.50. 

The companies said they 
were lo oking at other ways to 
work together, but gave no as- 
surance that a new agreement 
would be reached. 

“Because we’re continuing 
negotiations with MCI and 


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Comcast, we cannot comment 
on the reason for the termina- 
tion nor any of the terms of a 
new agreement,” said Walt Pie- 
cyk, a spokesman for Nextel 

An MCI spokesman also de- 
clined to elaborate. 

A Comcast spokesman said 
the company would not com- 
ment while discussions were 
pending. 

Nextel based in Rutherford, 
New Jersey, had counted on the 
investment to help it roll out its 
wireless service, which is like 
cellular phoning but operates 
on a different part of the radio 
spectrum. 

Some said a separate Nextel 
deal with Motorola Inc. damp- 
ened MCFs enthusiasm. 

Analysts speculated that 
MCI had been unhappy that 
NexteTs recent acquisition of 
radio licenses from Motorola, 
which had given Motorola a 
bigger stake in the company 
See MCI, Page 10 


ITT Shares Fall 
As Stale Looks 
Into Garden Sale 

Bloomberg Business News 

N EW YORK — Shares in 
ITT Corp. tumbled on the New 
York Stock Exchange on Mon- 
day as New York opened an 
investigation to see whether 
Viacom Inc.’s sale of Madison 
Square Garden had violated 
st ate a ntitrust laws. 

ITT, which teamed with Cab- 
levision Systems Corp. in the 
purchase, reD $4,125 to $82. 

Attorney General G. Oliver 
Koppell of New York said the 
takeover would give Cablcvi- 
sion, which owns the New York 
regional cable channel Sports- 

channel control of the MSG 
network, its main competitor. 

He said Cablevision and ITT 
could control the New York 
sports marketplace with two of 
the state’s major franchises, the 
arena in which they play and 
the cable channel on which 
most of their games are shown. 


GABO NESE REPU BLIC 

MINISTRY OF EQUIPMENT AND BUILDING 


REHABILITATION WORKS OF THREE ROAD STUMPS 
NOTICE TO THE APPEAL FOR TENDERS 


Date: 

Tlie Gabonese Republic Government has got a poan from Islamic Development Bank (l.D.B.) and 
from Anih Economic Development Dank in Africa CA-EJD.B.A.) for the financing of rehabilitation 
works of three road-stumps divided Into two geographical lots: 

- Lot N»1 : - ASSOK NGOUM-RIEVIERE SO: 25 km 

- Lot N°2 : - MINVOUL-NKOLMENGOA: 92 km 

- Lot 1^3 : - KOULAMOUTOU-LASTOURVILLE: 45 km 

2 - The Ministry of Equipment and Building invites, through this notice to appeal for tenders the 

companies to present under enclose covers their tenders for the carrying out of the following works: 

- Lot N°1 : - 117 km of ground-road 
Those works include the following tasks: 

- overhauling of plat form 

- earth -works 

- embanking 

- laterite wearing course 

- drainage and small works 

- overhead sign 

- Lot N»2 : - 45 km of tarred-road 

Those works include the following tasks: 

- overhauling of plat form 

- earth-works 

- embanking 

- laterite subhase 

- heavy-crushed granular base 

- asphalt concrete wearing course 

- ground sign 

- overhead sign 

- drainage arm small hydraulic works 

- building of eight ferro -concrete bridges 

Works will he subdued to an Insurance Quality Programme with internal and external checkings to 
the producer. 

5 - AH the companies are allowed to tender for except those subdued to the boycott of the Arab 
League, of the Organisation of African Unity (O.A.U.) and of the United Nations Organisation 
tU.N.OJ. 

4 - The eligible tenders interested can get some further information and go through appeal for 
tenders records In the offices ofi 

Ministfrre de 1'Equipement et de la Construction 
Direction G£ncrale des Etudes et de la Programmalion 
BoJie Postaie 49 Libreville - GABON 
Telephone: 76 38 56 et 72 15 22 - Fax: 74 80 92 
Tflex: D.G.T.P. 5408 GO 

5 ■ Any eligible company interested In the present notice can huy a complete tender documents set 
on writing form from above service and at charge of payment of non refundable amont of: 325 OQO 
CFA Francs a lot, to the order of the company responsible of records reprography: 

SNGE 

B.P. 3908 Libreville GABON - Telephone: 76.28.16 

In case of postal sending or another mode of mail, the Ministry of Equipment and Building can not 
be responsible of the non receipt of the record by the company. 

6 - The established tenders in French language and in four specimen (an original and three copies 
labelled as such) will have to reach to the above address, Including a tender warranty of two 
hundred million (200,000,000) CFA Francs later on September 19th, 1994 at 12 o’docfa. 

7 - The tenderers are abided by their tenders for 120 days from the deadline fixed for the tenders 
receipt. 

8 - The opening of lender* will take place In the presence of tenderers representatives who desire to 
attain It on September 12th, 1994 at 3h30 p.ra. at: 

Ministers de 1'Equipement et de la Construction 
Secretarial General - B.P. Libreville GABON 

L e Mhristrc d*Etat Mlnbtre de 1 ’Equipement 
et de la Construction 

Zacharic MYBOTO 











• .n 

*i 






Page 10 


ESTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 30, 1994 


MARKET DIARY 



Dollar Ends Mixed, 
Falling Against Yen 


Vkj Associated Press 


fcjfl. 29 


Compiled by Our Staff Frm Dapaldm 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
finished Fixed Monday after a 
strange session in which il 
surged a pfennig and a half 
iigajnst the Deutsche mark in 
the morning, but then quickly 
gave up the gain. 

At the end. the dollar stood 
at 1-5773 DM. up from 1.5745 
DM on Friday, and at exactly 
100.00 yen, down from 100.45. 

Dealers said the volatile mar- 
ket reflected the absence of a 


Foreign Exchange 


unified view on the dollar. The 
prevailing sentiment seems to be 
to attempt to take the dollar 
above 1.60 DM and, if it does 
not appear to be well supported, 
to take it back toward 130 DM. 

Some outright dollar buying 
was seen, not only by funds but 
also by corporations. 

“It got pretty violent, but it 
didn't break anything,” said Di- 
mitri os Gazis. a dealer with 
Daiwa Bank. “Everybody is 
waiting for it to get into the 
1.60s," said Mr. Gazis, who 
added that the dollar's expected 
move to the downside once it 


topped out in the near term 
could be pretty violent. 

Japan's exporters, mean- 
while, attempted to take advan- 
tage of Friday’s rally to sell dol- 
lars. They have a supply of 
dollars that they must sell for 
yen when they return profits to 
Japan. 

The dollar followed stocks 
and bonds higher Friday after 
the government revised its esti- 
mate of second-quarter gross 
domestic product growth to an 
annual rate of 3.8 percent. 

The smaller-than-expected 
revision in GDP convinced 
some bond investors that the 
U.S. economy was not growing 
quickly enough to spur an in- 
crease in inflation. 

“The dollar is dearly bottom- 
ing," said Marc Chandler, direc- 
tor of research at Ezra Zask As- 
sociates, a hedge fund with $180 
million under managemenL 

Against other currencies, the 
dollar rose to 5.3985 French 
francs from 5.3920 on Friday. It 
also rose against the Swiss 
franc, to 1.3327 from 1.3300. 
The British pound rose to 
$1.5373 from $1.5310. 

(Bloomberg. Knight-Ridder) 


RALLY: Stock Prices Head Higher 


Continued from Page 9 

after the previous rounds of 
credit tightening, be ginnin g in 
February, which sent bond 
prices down sharply. 

This time, the bond market 
has reacted reasonably well. 
Bond prices are generally a bit 
higher than before the latest 


seem to be showing more will- 
ingness to invest in slocks. 


That is improving the supply- 
and -demand outlook. 


U.S. Stocks 


Fed move, and short-term in- 
terest rates, which are set by the 
market, have fallen. 

“We really have the best-of- 
all-worlds scenario here, for the 
economy and the stock mar- 
ket,” Edward Yaideni, of CJ. 
Lawrence, said. The evidence 
indicates the economy is grow- 
ing in a way that win increase 
corporate profits without push- 
ing up inflation rates, he said. 

In the stock market slump 
that followed the earlier Fed 
tightenings, it was professional 
money managers who showed 
the most concern. “Individual 
investors have kept the faith,” 
said Abby Joseph Cohen, the 
co-chairman of the investment 
policy committee at Goldman. 
Sachs & Co. 

While stock mutual funds 
have seen the rates of inflow 
slow from the heady days early 
this year, investors are still put- 
ting money in them, even while 
money has slowly drained out 
of bond mutual funds. 

Corporate insiders also have 
been buying their own stocks in 
larger volumes than normal. 
What has been new in recent 
days is that professionals now 


■ Bhie-Qiips Forge Ahead 

More signs that the economy 
was growing at a moderate pace 
that was not likely to be accom- 
panied by inflation sent stocks 
higher Monday, news agencies 
reported. 

The government said person- 
al income and spending in- 
creased within analysts' expec- 
tations in July. 

The Dow Jones industrial av- 
erage finished up 17.80 points 
at 3,898.85. Advancing issues 
outnumbered declining ones by 
a 12-to-9 ratio on the New York 
Stock Exchange. 

But the Treasury bond market 
was not as encouraged by the 
data. The price of the bench- 


The Dow 



•••*:, M A M J A 

:.1394 


urr 


NYSE Most Actives 



Va8 

High 

LOW 

Last 

aw. 

AirTchn 

47010 

78* 

27Vi 

38lv 

♦ 1 



28’.'* 

27*6 

279. 

•li 

PnilAAr 

31725 

59 

58 U. 

5B*4 

—'A 


30905 

B3V, 

81 

82 


ATAT 

3005 

55H 

5«te 

SSta 

♦ ta 

RJRNob 

Ml 21 

4W 

1% 

6 Vi 

-'A 



20<4i 

20 

201a 




70 

69'A 

69V. 

— V, 


21774 

2146 

21 ta 

21ta 

-ta 


71252 

6» 

64H 

64H 



30963 

20 V. 

19'A 

19H 

♦ 14* 

Compels 

20874 

39 'A 

38 Vi 

3BV. 



20322 

34 





19687 

94 Vi 

23*. 

24 V, 

♦ 19te 

Fords 

19406 

31 Mi 

30 Vl 


— 


NASDAQ Most Actives 



VoL High 

LOW 

Last 

an. 

NevrelCm 

93870 2646 

23'A 

25 'A 

-5V6 

Chess 

70734 2A4v 

2546 

36'A 

♦ 46 

BMC sir 

47547 4446 

41 

41 

— 546 

MJcsfTS 

35335 581% 

57 

srv. 

♦»« 

MCI 

35223 23 

24 

24 

—46 

InM 

32967 6644 

65W h 

66W 

♦16 

EfcArt 

30370 IV 

1446 

17V. 

—146 

DeHCptr 

79011 3346 

31*14 

32*A 

-Wi* 

SunMic 

26681 2044 

27 Vt 

27T. 

—46 

Meihanx 

25137 17V* 

1644 

1416 

*V H 

ZenLabs 

21408 23 Vs 

22 Vi 

23V* 

♦ >Vw 

Moved 

21075 1544 

1546 

154fc 

—46 

D5C& 

30243 28 

77V6 

27 V6 

♦ Vb 

TotCmA 

18966 2Wo 

22*u 

23 

-46 

McCaw 

IS242 5446 

54 

5446 

*46 

AMEX Most Actives 


VaL Mgti 

LOW 

Last 

Chg. 


GovtCn 

IvopCd 

EchoBoy 

CheyShs 

VtocB 

Vtacm rt 

RoydOa 

PeoGW 

SPDR 

GrevLne 


TB3I1 frfe 6 M6 *Vi 

12209 20V. 19'.. 1934 — Vfc 

11 «M 12 * uyti 13* 

9646 13* 17* 13* >* 

7850 £F* 32* 33* — * 

6746 5V. 4>V» S + 96 

6391 4* 4* 4Vi* +V» 

4785 15* IS* IS* -* 

3498 4W h 474/m 47'Vs — Vr 


3473 5* 5* 5* 


Market Sales 


NYSE 
Amex 
Nasdaq 
In millions. 


Today 

Clow 

26688 

19.31 

262X2 


Prev. 

coos. 


36577 

21.70 

31681 


Dow Jones Averages 


Omni hUi Law Last Cm. 


Indus 3892-38 371 1.15 301.05 389085 - 1780 
Trans 1430 60 1631.18 1613.94 163683 - 1M 
Util 189.10 189.96 108X4 18877 -073 
Comp 1236-92 134138 1332X7 1339-54 -695 


Standard A Poor’s Indexes 


Industrials 
Trans*. 
Uttillics 
FI none* 

SP 500 

spin 


High Low date Orta 
559.N 55631 556.98 +077 
mw 3BU5 38688 +123 
15028 15691 157.52 +061 
mm 4648 4650 +602 
477.16 473J0 47659 +679 
441X1 «UM 43837 +025 


NYSE Indexes 


Law Lard OH- 


OomPWMto 

indoSfriab 

Transo. 

UHlity 

Finance 


High 

26244 240 fo 26139 -047 
325.91 32395 32640 -045 
24847 24605 247.59 -164 
212.17 21039 211.42 -0X3 
71933 218.11 21838 -037 


NASDAQ Indexes 


High Low Lest On- 


Composite 

Industrials 

Banks 

Insurcnce 

Finance 

Tramp. 


765.97 763.11 7A346 -072 

768.98 76675 76776 
778.91 77661 77779 -034 
93231 929.16 919.?* -1.93 
957.15 95536 957,15 -149 
740.02 735-82 73849 *333 


AMEX Stock Index 


High Law Last CM- 
451.74 449.56 45146 *1.90 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


20 Bands 
10 (JflHflm 
10 industrials 


9736 

9189 

10334 


arte 

+ M 0 


NYSE Diary 


dose Prev. 


Advoncad 
Dectineo 
Uncharged 
Total Issues 
New Highs 
New LOWS 


1233 1508 

901 699 

729 670 

2863 2877 

B8 BO 

29 ZS 


AMEX Diary 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total issues 
New Highs 
New Lows 


300 345 

259 230 

250 231 

009 006 

17 M 

13 8 


NASDAQ Diary 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Told Issues 
New Highs 
New Laws 


1579 1829 

1553 1330 

1953 1929 

5005 5088 

120 126 

47 47 


Spot Commodities 


Com mod Or 
Aluminum, n> 

Copper elect r olyt ic . B> 
Iron FOB. ton 
Load, lb 
Silver, troy az 


auvci i hut ax 

Steel (scrap). Ian 

mib 

Zinc lb 


Today 

0474 

1.14 

2I3D0 

038 

5755 

nan 

34106 

04877 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


Financial 


HOD LOW One Change 
3440KTH PIBOR CMAT1F) 
PFSmHIIoo-rtsontOpd 
5ap kas W 94J2 • +uz 

Dec 9194 9371 9374 +OD1 

MV 9343 9340 9343 . +042 

JWl 93J4 9332 9334 +041 

Sep 9308 9305 9X08 +0JBJ 

DOC 9244 9283 9184 +004 

Mar 9247 9245 9245 +001. 

Jan 9151 9250 9350 +0JD1 

Eat. volume: 13624. Open toil.: 197681. 


1PYBAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MAT1F) 


FWBM8B- 

Sep 

rtf or 180 
11X86 

Rwa 

11X06 

+X22 

Dee 

113.10 

11492 

113.16 

+ X22 

MOT 

11266 

11268 

112152 

4*022 

Joo 

N.T. 

N.T. 

11156 

+EL22 

EsL volume: »J». Open Int.: 13X40. 


Stock Indexes 


Ctosn Chongs 


High Low 
CAC48 (MATIFI 
PP700 per Index Point 

Amb 208800 305140 207440 +940 

Sep 20965® mma 208440 +940 

Od - 210340 208000 ZRMJH +958 

Dec 21MSS 210040 Z1K00 +1048 

Mar 213248 Z12B40 314340 +1140 

SSL volume: 27515- OPtti Inf.: 64.1 19. 


SouraarMom. The LanOo nMetol Exchange. 

Wilnoidif Futures Exchange 


ttic London tntl Ft 

amt the Inn Petrofeum Exch a nge wen 
dosed Mender. 


Conmeny Per And Pay Rcc 

STOCK SPLIT 

Caribbean Util A 2 far 1 spilt sublets to ap- 
proval. 

INCREASED 


Cortbtwan Util A 

Q 

275 11-18 

12-2 

Tosco Corp 

a 

.18 

9*20 

M0 

SPECIAL 






0233 

92 

9-28 

Amwoy Japan 

c 

25 

9-1 


amount oer ADR. 




INITIAL 




Amwoy Jcoxsi n 

c 

.15 

9-1 




26 

MV 

10-1 

c-appruK amount per ADR 




REGULAR 



Adta Services 

0 

84 

9-5 

M9 


M 

m 

92 

9-21 

fCfn t ' ! jl* M I • illV x 

M 

JS3 

92 

9-28 

M JI375 

92 

928 

AmAifiRf Torm to 

M 

24 

92 

Ml 


M 

2C5 

92 

928 


M 

264 

92 

MB 


M 

28 

92 

9-311 


M 

265 

92 

928 



92 

9-291 

gf “ t W > ' m 1 ' - QQHk'3^1 


92 

+28 



92 

Ml 

Am Mum Term 111 

M 

Cal 

92 

+28 


M JB33 

92 

928 

Am sm Port 

M 

2037 

92 

9-28 


M 

.1125 

92 

9-28 


M 

.1135 

92 

9-28 

AmStrat Inca ill 

M 

.1062 

92 

928 


M 

1067 

92 

9-28 

FFWCdro 

a 

.11 

9-15 

NO 


a 

60 10-21 

11-7 


8 

25 

TO-7 

11-18 


225 10-11 

18-25 

I ■ I 1 l! .V is A . . ■ 1 1 

M 

.116 

92 

928 

Home FcdBncP IN 

8 

275 

9*20 

102 

IBP Inc 

25 

92 

10-M 

Minerals Tetfi 

a 

225 

9-7 

920 

■7M ii'TT 1 1 1 1 ■! ■ errr -:r. M 

M 


92 

928 



l 

92 

928 

Minn Muni Term II 

>1 

92 

908 

Natl Gm& Oil 

s 

JW 

9-13 

926 

Peoples Bnk NC 

.12 

92 

M6 

Polaris Ind LP 

0 

83 

MS 

11-15 

Rival CO 

a 

JM 

9-1 

915 


0 

am 

9-7 

921 

USBcncarp Inc PA 

Q 

235 

9-710-5 


Vista Bnco 
WM bra coro 


Q 477 9-19-9 

Q .10 9-00 10-31 


PMHrthty/q-qBorterty; mbhI+muiI 


Countries 
Face Job 
Dilemma 


AT&T Seeks a 2% Price Increase 

Maher rales would add $95 million in annual reven 


[he 



uwgh-uuucu calls, service charges •» ~ — - .. 

tfic use of an operator and domestic calling-^™ r orraer iy 

MCKSON H0la wyc 

mmg — Industrial nations estimated market-value for the semiconductor business. 

around the world face a harsh 


By John M* Berry 

Was hingt on Past Service 


< UVUUU UMr TTV4AU a. __ ^ ^ A 

“ Coca-Cola and Nestle Redo Venture 


f mtHtntls „nd 

their less skilled workers and ATLANTA (Combined Dispatches) — paid 


leaving those workers with no 
job at aQ. 

That was the conclusion of a 
large group of government offi- 
cials, economists and other ex- 
perts from most of the countries 
at a conference hoe last week. 
The group agreed that the atua- 


. iwwiviuvm , v.ae cQi/i 

Nristlh SA, .the world’s biggest beverage and food a 

Monday they would revamp their ready-io-drink teed 
iced-coffee business, Coca<^a NesU 6 Refreshments Co- under 
the labels of “Nestea" and “Nescafe." ■ mvc , r 

Under the new agreement, Coca-Cola will haw a r 

license to use the Nestea trademark globally, except J&P 

___ xi 14 nnTl ilMMinn the rvescaic 




_ to-drink activities, and the 

tioh was'earised bv dumpa s in fid through the global Coca-Cola bottling systmn. . 
the global economy over the La Zurich, Nestle said the joint venture based 111 P« 
past two decadesthat reduced Florida, and founded in 1991. had annual sales of more tjjj” 
the valire ofUwIabor oftow- miHionlSwiss francs ($75 milion). (Bloomberg. Reuterd) 

^ gicximy P&G Sees Red Over Revlon Move ; 

consensus that for ■ bom eco- CINCINNATI (AFX) — Procter * Gamble Co. said Monday 
nomic and political reasons j t had filed a lawsuit to stop Revlon from introducing a produce 
there is no set of government named “Red" into the U-S- fragrance market. 

policies that can significantly Tbe suit, filed by the P&G unit Giorgio Beverly Hills, charged 

alter this stark choice between Revfon with infringing on Giorgio’s “Red" and “Red for Men 
jote mid better pay for the less trademarks. . 

skilled. P&G recently acquired Giorgio Beverly HrEs and the Red. 

The United States has opted fragrances — among the five best-selling prestige fragrances in thy 
for jobs by maintaining flexible Urntcd States — -from Avon Products Inc. • » 


& 


\ 


■I 


i ■ 




r. 


labor markets and relatively 
low minimijm wages, the ana- For the ReCOTu 


fezOs^miliSns FSnandal Management Corp. said it expocted to submit a 

workers have found fobs if thev bid to buy Western Union Financial Senrices Inc. as pan of 4 


w^erstove jbjmd j^bs l^ikruptcy court-supervised auction of the New 


» that have not kept pace umt - 
inflation. ' 


smA Texas i t wi no nm^ Idc. said they 


The U.S- pnvemment has w»ld devdqp a series of netwcxking chips dubbed “Thunderi 
mruuwl wnan^nill i-w nAtKna Lan" for ddivery next year. The chips will .be designed to transmil 


proposed expanding or adding ^ for delivery next year. The chips wiu .t»e designed to transom 
tomanwwSatimimd “ J «ast 10 m«®abits of data per second^ora colter nerivorkff, 
tramingprcgrairis in this coun- lO tunes the med of cont^porary chigL The first 
trythatare supposed to up- chips are scheduled for sampling m 1995. • (Bloombergf 

grade the skills of low-paid or America Hokimgs Corp. said’its Express Amoaca Mortgage 
unempl oyed American work- Corp. subsidiary agreed to sdl its mortgage loan servicing unit to 
ers-and thus attempt to reduce NahorisBanc Mortgage Corp., a subsidiary of NationsBank Coq^ 


the income inequality that has NationsBanc Mortgage will pay approximately $85 million for the 

mortgage-servicingportfolio and tbe servicing operation, pi 


MCI: Long-Distance Company Scraps Deal with Nextel 


developed here.' m mtgage-servidng portfolio and the servicing operation, plus net 

In contrast, most European ho6k for <*&*** additional serwdng-rdated assets. , 
nations made efforts to keep ( Knight -Riddeiy 

wages erf low- skilled workers Westinghouse Electric Corp, Pitney Bowes Inc. and In tern > 
from falling. Meanwhile, gener- thmal Business Machines Corp. signed contracts totaling. $18® 
ous, long-lasting unemploy- million in. Chma, the first to berigned by American companies 
ment benefits meant that many since Commerce Secretary Ronald H_ Brown began a seven-day 
unemployed workers were just trip to Bqjmg- Mr. Brown has said be believes that America? 
about as well off collecting on- co mp anies wig sign at least $3 bfllioc of contracts. ( Bloomberg i 
taxed benefits as they would { 


+■' .•? *• 


"li 4' 


Gmtmued from Page 9 

mark 30-year Treasmy bond than MCTs $13 billion invest- 
slipped 4/32 point, to 100 3/32, ment would, 
taking the yield to 7.49 percent “They found themselves with 
from 7.48 percent Friday. 12 rather than 1 8 percent of the 
Among actively traded is- company,” said Mark Lowen- 
sues, AirTouch Cellular rose 1 stein, an analyst at the Yankee 
to 28V4. The company is ex- Group in Boston. “Motorola's 
panding its Atlania-area net- share went up and MCI wanted 
work. to have some say in the show.” 

In the over-the-counter mar- MCI, the second-largest long 
ket, BMC Software plunged 4 to distance company in the coun- 
to 4214 amid concern that the try, had touted the Nextel rela- 
compan/s practice of booking tionship as a key element in its 
revenue from multiyear license “networkMCI” portfolio for 
agreements up front put future advanced communications ser- 
sales growth at risk. rices. 

Goldman Sachs and UBS Se- The company is under some 
curities lowered their invest- pressure to get into the wireless for MCI and Nextel. Nextel is 
mem opinions of the Sugar- business. Its largest competitor, losing MCTs name recognition 
land, Texas, software AT&T Corp., will probably and the marketing expertise 
company’s slock. close its $12 billion puxchaseof needed to expand its fledgling 

(Reuters, AP, Bloomberg) McCaw Cellular Communica- wireless phone system nation al- 


tions Inc., the country’s largest ly. MCI, meanwhile, lost pre- 
ceUular phone company, next cious time in its effort to corn- 
month. Sprint Corp-. the No. 3 pete with its long-distance 
long-distance company, already rivals in the fast-growing wire- 
owns cellular properties. less arena. 


have been on the job. 

Those factors, plus a series of 
recessions, pushed unemploy- 
ment rates in many European 
nations to double digit levels, 
where they remain today. 


W — k— id Box Offtai 


TheAaodaud Pm 


LOS ANGELES — - “Natural Born KaHeri" dominated ihfc 
U.S. box office with a gross of $10JS mfilioa over the weekend. 
Following are the Top 10 moneymakers, based on Friday ticket 


Comcast owns one of the “MCI was concerned about 
country's largest cable teleri- NexteTs technology,” said Scott 
sion systems, with nearly 3 m3- Wright, an analyst with Argus 
lion subscribers] and has cdlu- Research. “MCI had to be ab- 
lar operations in the Northeast solutely sure before it entered 
with more than 7 milli on cus- an agreement like this." 
tomers- The Philadelphia-based 


In United 


company owned 17 percent of 
Nextel, but that stake also was 
diluted by NexteTs purchase of 
Motorola’s spectrum assets. 


(AP, Bloomberg ) 


more modest array 
support programs than those in 
Europe, the market forces have 
produced -“a dramatic increase 
m wage inequality," said Paul 
Kiugman, an economist at the 
Massachusetts Institute of. 
Technology. 


L "Natural Bara Klllarr 
3 “Forrest Gamp - 
1 -dear an d P rai o nl Dtaw r" 


.^.■mwMaair 

5. rcarrlaa, Gorrtno* 
: 6~Q*JTDf NtoM- 
- 7. “Trua U«- -. 

- LXampNavrtwnr 
* 9-”Ttw Lion K7nO~ 

. ULTUcCBent- 


imtrmrBrotnen) 
(Par am o u nt! 
t Pamnw onO 


tNdaUmChmnat .. . . 

INowUneOnemo) 
tHodywoodneham . . - 
t T wm M mCanmrrFaxi 
■ (Hollywood Pfdurao) 
(Watt Money* 

CWtamer Oradtera} 


9106 mluien • 
W7 ml iflon ■ 
S32 minion 
SfmUUan 7 
$4 mil Hon 
114 million 
Oil ml Itton 
■ 824 million 
327 million 
*27 million 




her 


* « : 


The breakdown is a setback 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


AgsMO Franco to* Aug. 29 


CIom Pray. 


Amsterdam 


ABN Amro Hid 
ACF Holding 
Aegon 
Ahold 
Akzo NoM 
AMEV 

Bolx-Wnsonon 

C5M 

DSM 

Elsevier 

Fokker 

Gtet-Brocmtea 

HBG . 

Hebieken 

HOOtWVWM 


63 6180 
3840 an 
105 10448 
47 4660 
27160 220J0 
7620 7570 
42.10 42.10 
7050 69.1 0 1 
145.40 145 

172 I69i5 
1690 1670 
4640 4680 
299 294 

34373 24220 
8370 8240 


Hunter Douglas 8150 84 

JHC Coland 


_ 4390 43J0 

Inter Mueller 90 9020 
Inti NcdcrKmd 8370 79.90 
KLM 
KNP BT 
KPN 

NedHord 

Oce Gtlnten 
Pole hood 
pto nps 
Polygram 
Rateca 
Rad am CO 
Rollnco 
Rural to 
Royal Dutch 
Stark 
Unil ever 
Van Ommeren 
VNU 


53 5350 
4970 « JO 
5450 5630 
64«0 63.98 
7750 7720 
48 4770 
5390 5370 ■ 
7390 7310 
120 11750 
5450 5460 

12320 120.10 

B5J0 8540 

19950 19550" 

49.10 4310 
20450 20310 
49 JO 4950 
18650 181 JO 


WoltetVKIuwer 11920 1I7J0 


RSUr*8 


Brussels 


Close Prev. 


21721150 
39450 388 

149 146 

633 621 


IWKA 

Kali sou 
Kprstodt 

Koufhof _ 

KHD 12380121.50 

Kioeckner Werfce 15114350 
Unde 953 9S7 

Lufthansa 712L5021380 

MAN 

Mannesmatm 
Metal laesaii 
Muencti Ruecfc 



Markets Closed 
Stock markets in 
London and Hong 
Kong were closed 
Monday for a holi- 
day. 


AG Fin 

AlmanH 

Artwd 

Barca 

BBL 

Brtawrt 

CBR 

CMB 

CNP 

Cockerlll 

Cotapa 

CoJruyt 

Delhabe 

EtactraM 

Elect rotlna 

GIB 

GBL 

Oeyaert 

Gktvetiief 

immotef 

Kredlatfaank 

Mobom 

Patroflna 

P ow er fki 

Retried 

RovateBeHM 


2575 2545 
7870 7890 
4B80 NA 
2600 2585 
4260 4235 
26400 2625 
12475 12375 
2575 2570 
7IK|» HKQ 
210 208 
5050 5000 
7390 7280 
1280 1272 
5830 5790 

3150 3150 

1494 1470 
*S1® 4345 

•was 7730 
5120 5080 
3025 3025 
6810 6780 

1484 I486 
10500 MKt® 
3060 3050 
332 532 
5370 5240 


SocGen Banaue 8340 8220 
SacGenBctotaue 2300 txs 


Safina 
SOfWW 
TcsMtiderlo 
Tractebd 
UCB 

Untan Mlnlera 
Wagons LI ts 
Current 
Previous : 


14400 14200 
16125 15975 
10500 10475 

10400 naoo 

2S450 25175 

3640 2625 
NA 6950 
: 7632 


Frankfurt 


AEG 

Alcatel 5EL 
Allianz Hold 
Altana 
A»k* 

BA5F 

Bayer 

Bar. Hvno bank 


100 177 
34$ 34] 

2418 2379 
60690 Ml 
wo m 
m 70 325 
3753)367.50 
424 419 


Bay venrtra&k 451 JO 441 


BBC 

BHFBanfc 
BMW 

Commerzbank 
Continental 
Daimler Benz 
Deaussa , 

Dt Babcock 
DeutscneBank 
Dauahn _ 

DresdnerBon* 

RHamuehte 
F KruoD Hoescfl ZMUn 228 
Hareener 335 336 


755 765 
395 395 
833 829 
33X50328.90 
258 260 
821 810 
504JB 466 

J57J0 353 
729 710 
536J8 533 
41240650 
30X10 303 


Hanwi 

HachHef 

UA|4|uf 

Halzmam 


6165061X50 
976 973 
3613543)0 


Helsinki 


Amer-YMvmo 

Ensa+Sutzall 

Kutitomafcl 

K.Q.P. 

Kymmene 

Metro 

Nokia 

PohWa 

RemHa 

siodunann 




114 114 

46J20 4X20 
160 156 

KUO 1020 

142 13o 

168 169 

538 530 

67-50 47 

112 106 
250 259 


Johannesburg 

AECI 
Altwti 
Anglo Amer 


Bartow 
Biyvoor 
Buffets 
De Beers 
Drtofentefn 
Gencor 
GFSA 


2 U 0 
121 111 
256 m 
3Z25 32 

NLA. 1073 

4650 4575 

10410825 
6650 M 
U40 1370 
129 IX 
29 29 JO 
32J0 3Z50 

66 67 

34 39 

.52 52 

113 114 

a n 

48 47 

3275 3125 
19219650 


Htemmid steel 

Kloof 

NedbankGni 

Randtanteln 


Rusplat 
SA Brews 
St Helena 
Sasol 

Western Deea 


Madrid 


8BV 3080 3045 

Bco central Hm. 2670 2650 
Banco Santander 5310 5260 


Banesto 
CEPSA 
Dronadas 
Endesa 
Ercros 
Iberdrola 
Rensoi 
TaMcalera 
T eta tonlcn 


1040 1040 
3295 3270 
2240 9nn 
5950 5810 
170 170 
894 893 
4185 4105 
3360 3380 
1855 1130 




Milan 


Alleonza 

Assltona 


906 893 [Autostrada an v 


16725 1*4M 
14650 vsm 
1840 1800 


Close Prev 


Bca Agricoirura 2780 2910 
Bco Cgmmtr Ital 3835 37M 
Boa Naz Lavoro 13440 13400 
Bca Pop Novara 9000 9025 
Banco dl Roma i960 i960 
Bco Ambrasiano 4300 4305 
Bco Napoli rfsp 1331 1314 
Benetton 
Cradlta Itoltona 
Enlctem Auo 
Ferfln 
Fiat spa 
Flnanz Aorotnd 
Finmeccanica 
Fandtarfaspa 
Generali Asslc 
IFIL 


Uai c emenH 

llatoas 

Mediobanca 

Montedison 

Olivetti 
Pirelli spa 
RA5 

Rlnascente 


34050 24550 

2270 2210 1 

3000 2780 

1834 1814 

6615 6560 

§608 8550 

1700 1715 

12080 12100 
42350 41900 
6120 <<3851 

12340 12325 

5290 5275 
14800 148401 
1426 1404 

2300 2320 1 

2630 2600 

26200 257501 
B989S 9795 


San Paolo Tortna 9660 9695 

SIP 4SS5 4560 

SME 3800 3760 

Snlabpd 2295 2240 

Standa 36950 36750 

Stel 5170 51 TO 

Tara Asslc 28S5D 28100 


MIBTEL : IlffS 

PlYSVlOD® m I” 


: 71084 


Montreal 


Alcan Ahimtoum 3528 3543 
Bank Montreal 25J0 25J8 
Bell Canada 4X25 4X25 
Bombardier B 19.88 19J5 
Cambtar 17J8 17 

Cascades r, 

Dominion Text A BJS &50 
Danohue A 14.13 14.13 
PCA mn 4 425 

MacMillan Bl 20.13 2075 
Natl Bk Canada 
Power Cora. 


Proviso 
Quebec Tel 
A 


9.88 925 
20J8 19.88 
5.75 5J8 

19 JO 19 JO 
I 9 JO 19JS 
19J5 1983 
1875 1875 
1163 1125 

n^ssfm :iKus 


■oMotooe 

Vldeotran 


Paris 


Aeogr 
Air Ltaulda 

Ak»trl Aisthom 


689 

839 

610 


599 


A» 

Bancolre (do) 

BNP 

Bouysues 
Danone 
CofT+tour 
C.CF. 

Cerus 

Chargeura — 
Cfments Franc 31250 313 

Club Med 42542680 


26X50 259 JO 
520 509 
1300 1275 
249.40 244.90 
671 676 
814 846 
2174 2170 
224.10 224S9 
1IA511&SD 

1488 1470 


EtMadlolne 418JD 417 
Euro plsney 840 9 JO 


Gen-Eau* 564 558 

Havas 472JO 471 

I metal 5046 564 

LatargeCapne 452J0 445 

Legrmta 6650 6630 

Lyon. Eaux sn 544 

OTOOI (L") 1237 1233 

LVAM. 895 891 

Matra+lacfKtte 11911940 


MIcheUnB 
Moulinex 
Paribas 

Pedilney Inti 

Pernotf-Rtaard 335J0 
Peugeot st» 


Ptaoull Print 956 
RodJotechnlau# ftl 
Rft- Poulenc A 13&JD 
RWLSf. Louis 
Sanafl 
Saint Cabo In 
S.EJL 

5te Generate 
Suez 

Thamsan-CSF 
Total 


235 237 JO 
121 121 JO 
373 366J0 
15W199J0 

■■03 

8711 


953 


UAP. 

Valeo 


135 

1607 1590 
968 961 

696 683 

550 550 
SB4 50 
277 JO 277 
166 163 

31X60 314 


157 JO 156 
2UJ02B5J0 


Close Prev 


I Singapore 


Crrefcaj 

765 

N.T. 

ary Dgv. 

7.10 

765 

DBS 

11.10 

11.10 

Fraser and Nacv 

I/Jo 

1780 

Genring 

IJ.VU 

1360 

Golden Hope PI 

283 

263 

Haw Par 

•128 

124 

Hume Industries 

6JU 

688 


566 

5A5 

Keppei 

1160 

II 

KLKepana 

NJL 

4 

LumChona 

163 

163 

Mrtayon Banks 

9J5 

V6S 

OCBC foreign 

1480 

1X90 

OUB 

666 

660 

DUE 

B 

8 

Sembowang 

1X10 

12 

9iongrlta 

NJL 

5.10 


X68 

468 

5IAiorefgn 

NA 

1380 

Stoora Lmd 

7JU 

780 

S'nora Press 

1630 

1661) 

Sing Steamship 

NJL 

X2B 

Staore Telecomm 

364 

364 

Stratts Trading 

368 

364 

UOB foreign 

1460 

1380 

UOL 

224 

283 


I Sao Paulo 


Boica do Brasil 

2X15 2X80 

11 . Mi;,."'' 

1150 11.15 




Bnuirra 



Cam lg 


Etetrobras 



Itaubanco 

mn 

280 

Ug« 

340 

332 

Poroi'iciuanemo 


Prtrabras 

15114381 

Souza Cruz 


6050 

Teiebnn 


Teton 



| IT 1 

166 

164 


4LS1I4QJ1 

1 vans 

121 

123 

BSHSS'fffiii 5 " 43 


Stockholm 


AGA 

AS 

6460 

Aiwa 



Astra A 




91 

90 

EteetraiuxB 

300 

387 

Ericsson 

474 

417 

Essdte-A 

to 

97 

Hondelsbanken 

97 


Investor B 

184 

1B3 

monk Hydro 

8160 

259 

Fmxnfla AF 

128 


Sofldvlk B 

SCUM 

m 

111 

12! 

113 

5^ Bsaiken 

46 

4580 

SkandtoF 

117 

118 

Skensko 

154 

150 

SKF 

139 

138 

Stora 

439 

444 

Trollebora BF 

9960 

99 

Volvo BF 

UD 

149 

PnnSwaMrS/ 

192764 


Close Prev 


«aarwr ! ™ 


Tokyo 

AkoJ Electr 465 465 

Asobl Chemical 781 778 

ASahl Glass 1250 1240 

Baik at Tokyo 1560 ISO 

Bridgestone 1500 1MQ 

Canon 1740 1720 

Casta 1260 12* 

Dal Nippon Prim 1900 1900 

Daiwa House 1520 1530 

Dalwe Securities 1550 uw 


Fanuc 


Fall Bar* 

- ill r 


4570 4540 
mo t mui 
2250 2210 
1070 1060 
975 960 
851 850 

16* U60 
5240 5300 
HA 706 
751 755 

V93 970 
2590 2590 
421 418 

1280 1190 
DOB 920 
733 729 

7360 7280 


FUN Pbolg 
Fulltsu 
Hitachi 
Hitachi Cotote 
Honda 
llo Yakodo 
Itochu 

Japan Airlines 
Kanma 
Kan sal Power 
Kawasaki Steel 

Kirin Brewery 

Komatsu 
Kubota 

Kvocera 

Matsu Elec Inds 1730 1730 

SSSW 1120 !T?? 

MtteubbW Kasei 

MdsuMsM Elec 

Mitsubishi Hev 
AMtsubishl Carp 
Mitsui and Co 
Mitsui Marine 
Mitsukasni 

Mitsumi 
NEC 

NGK Insulators 

Nlkko Securities 1180 1160 
Ntapon Kagakw 1010 977 

Nippon Oil 750 753 

Ntopan steel 372 37D 

N ippon Yusen 656 657 

Ntason 779 787 

Nomura 5ec 221a Twin 

NTT SSSOoSaaOo 

Olympus Optical 1170 11* 


26* 2620 
550 5* 

676 675 

783 788 

1210 1210 
859 89 

790 788 

hod 1020 

1570 1570 

1190 1190 

1080 TON 


Pioneer 
Ricoh 

Sanya Elec 
Sharp 
SMmaxu 
Shlnefsu CJiem 
Sony 

Sumitomo Bk 

SunUtofneawm 

Sum! Marine 
Sumitomo wetai 
Tatsel Corp 
TakedaChem 
TDK 

Tallin 

Tokyo Marine 

Tokyo Elec Pw 

Tnppan Printino 1460 1480 
Toray ind. 7/S m 


2740 3700 
962 966 
557 551 

MOO 1790 
744 739 

2050 20* 

S900 5830 

1990 2000 
566 559 

944 912 

345 339 

685 680 
1270 1240 
4350 <350 
sm 569 
1220 120 
3030 3038 


Sydney 

9j*8 9 JO 
198 195 

20X4 19.90 
150 149 
0.93 089 
413 424 
SJ0 505 
2044 19Jf 
472 468 
1.12 1,12 
148 147 
1182 10.90 
185 1.9S 
105 196 
1090 1066 
9.19 9JD2 
460 463 
184 166 
446 434 
145 132 


Amcor 
ANZ 
BHP. 

Boral 

BWOOlnwllle 
Coles Mnr 
Camalco 
CRA 
CSR 

Fosters Brew 
Goodman Field 
id Australia 

Mood km 
MIM 

Nat Aust Bank 
NemCorp 
Nine Network 
N Broken HIN 
Poc Duntap 

Pioneer Infl 

Nmnchr Pasekian 2J1 123 
OCT Resources 160 . W 
Santas 402 195 

TNT 266 162 

western Mining LIS 762 
Wcstpac Banking 450 443 


Toshiba 
Toyota 
Yomoichf Sec 
a: x 100 . 


746 752 

2150 2150 
B0 BS5 


esses 5 . 

i*"i eiiwn .v 

Topbrloeej 

Previous : 1 


Toronto 


Abmu Price 
AotHcoEOfllB 
Air Canada 
Alberto Energy 
AjwrBorrtck 

BCE 

8k Nova Scotia 

BC Gas 

SC Telecomm 

Brunswtck 

CAE 

Camdev 

CISC 

CdH Pacific LM 


29J5 29* 
£88 47* 
»J0 27* 
1488 14* 
2475 26* 
1025 10 

7JS 7* 
i?0 490 
3X50 ]3* 
24* 


Canadian Tire A 11,75 11* 


Cantor 
Corn 
CCL Ind b 
aneotax 
COminca 
CanwastEMd 
CSAMsi A 

Dotasca 
OvtexA 


HM 21 

in 195 

9J8 9* 

si 

ZU8 23 
090 OB6 


Echo Bay Mines 1475 14M 
Eaultv Silver A 082 iSS 


Close Prev 


FCAlim 400 415 

red Ind A 475 fi* 

Fletcher Chair a lftao T9 
FPI 488 6 

Centra 0^4 0X5 

GtiHCda Res iso s* 
Hees infl 1163 m. 

Hernia Gld Mines 1X63 13% 
Hoi Ung er 1150 i» 

Horsham 19,13 19 

Hudson’s Bay Co 2488 27* 


Imasco 
Into 

IPL Energy 
Jamocfc 
Labatt (John] 

Lototaw Cos 
Mockende 
Manna Inti A 
Maple Leaf Fds 
Maritime 
Mark Res 
Molson A 
Noma Ind A 

NcranOa Inc _ 

Noranda Forest U0a 12* 
Norcen Energy VMS 17* 
Nlhern Tetecom 4&8S 48* 
Nava Cora 1x75 D* 


3L63 38* 

39 JM 39* 

2 L 8 B am 

T42S 16* 

ai^5 20* 

214*1 21 * 
413 8* 
5438 54* 
11,75 11* 
2450 2Pk 
9JS 91* 




465 
2463 27 


Oshowa Group A 1 9J5 19* 


4^4^ 


nigurlonA 438 410 

Placer Dame 30 J 3 29* 

Poco Petroleum 475 m 
PWACorp 0J7 0J7 

Rm+ock I7JO 17* 

Renal jjooceEny Z7J3 22* 

Rogers Comm B 7ZS3 221* 

Rothmans 79JM 82 

Rayed Bank Cda 29 43 291* 

Sceptre Res 1173 11* 
saorrsHosn ajn m 

SeagrmnCo *175 43* 

Sears Canada — — 

Sten Canada A 
Sherri tt 
SHLSystemtae 
Southern 
Spar Aerospace 
ShHco Inc A 
Talisman Env 
TecfcB 

Thomson Corn 
TarDom Baik 

TorstarB 
Transalta Core 
TnmsCda Ptoe 
Triton FlnlA 
Trirnac 

Ltnlcora Energy 

TSE toOInd^K :4D1* 


TZ38 12% 
488 6* 

17 JO 17* 
11,75 11* 
413 8* 
29 J5 29* 
2150 23* 
MJB 15* 
21 JS Zl* 
2413 3* 

1475 14* 
1425 18* 
405 A 
1450 16 

160 1J5 


Zurich 


Adta Inti B 257 251 

AkBUbsc B new 6V2 684 
BBC Brvm BavB 1718 1193 


OWGUwB 
C5 Holdings B 
ElektrowB 
Fbcher B 
interdbxount B 
JefcnollB 
LesiSJsGyrR 
Maevemricfc B 
Nestle R 

Oerllk. Buehrle R 
Parwsn hub 

RocneHdgPC 

5otra RcfiutMIc 
Sandaz B 
Schindler B 
Sober PC 


820 805 
541 506 

351 344 

1615 1400 
2250 2200 
880 670 
710 70S 
410 418 
1245 1229 
145 148 

1590 1500 

5975 5840 

113 III 
715 <93 
7400 7400 
950 94g 

gffWjllWteo B 2100 2130 
Swiss Bl* Corp B 374 372 

Mss Refnsur R 5*5 523 

S*UsoJr R S3 688 

UB5B. TIM 1126 

Wmterthur B 663 665 
Zurich AS* B 1270 1252 


U.S. FUTURES 


VfaAMtMBdhn 


Aug . » 


Season Season 
ftgh Law 


Open High um Oose Che Oaint 


Grains 


WHEAT jCBOll MHjMmMimiirK 


161* 

176* 

185* 

178 

15514 

Iff* 


S«P94 157 13B* 155V, ISTW-OHIH 4722 

Ml Dec 94 173* 174* 171* ITMi-OJE* 45^79 

127 Mar 95 161* 16» 360 181*— <L02 14589 

lM*May95177 177 174 174*-0 lD2H 1^461 

in JUI9S 151* 153* 151* I51to-002 1065 

155 Dec 15 163 164 163 164 — OJTI'A 1| 


Est sates liooa Fri's. sales 21473 


Fri'5 open int 71L484 ■*> 371 
_ BAT CKBOT) 


WHUA' _ 

179 102* Sep 54 174* 176 173* 17S*-O0lto 7,931 

181 112* DK W 177* 179* 175* 179* *0.00* 21^*02 

183* 125 Mar 95 178* 160 176 360 4144 

1« 121*Mav95 169* 170 169* 170 -OAK* 440 

155 116M-M95 152 151* ISO 350 —003* 795 

151 129 Seats , 3J1W-JMB 11 

360* 160* Dec 95 160 -04M* 1 

E*. sites NA Frf-s. totes 11,138 
Fri'sanenM 38.9Z4 up 499 
CORN (CBOTJ Aa»6m n i nlimn . ta n ipei I m i i rni 
2MA 114 Sep 94 2.19* 2.19* 118* 119 -0J1I* 22J79 

277 117 Dec M 221* 221* 22DW 171 -001*127216 

262* 226 Marts 230* 2J0* 229* 2JOWi-OJn* 28,133 

MS 222*Mav95 2J6* 226* 226 22616-001* 11295 

265* 226* 3695 141 241 240* 2to*-0iin* 10643 

270* 239 Sep 95 243* 244* 243* 243*— 0211 . 89 

20 225* Dec 95 246* 246* 246 246*— 0.01 5471 

161 257 All 96 29 19 257 258 -001 13 

Est.9BteS 21AM R+s.«kB 220*1 
Fri’s even be 206.158 up 705 
SOYBEANS ((SOT) igmgumtenurvdtenivbuM 
728* S60*S»W 571 571* 548 570*-0JH* HU29 

iSI NovM 541 568 544 547*-0JH* 74J7* 

560 Jan 95 574* 574* 573 5J4* -023* 13236 

169 Mar 95 545* 546 522* 5J5W-023* 5748 

575* May 95 572 54J 590 572* -023* 1*BJ 

578*41195 5.97 577* 54* 5.97* -HUB* 7,2« 

579 Aug 95 577 577 5.96* 577 — 004 205 

577 SOP 95 &99 —02* V 

578* Nov 9S 603 623 640 602*— IUM 1181 

JUI9S 617 — OLIO 

ESLwteS NA FrTLSOteS 2U29 
FrTjDpen irtf 119453 up 2S3 
SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOT) la Mm- Man per a, 

21020 1 7020 Sea 94 1 71 JO 171 JO 17060 17040 —140 15448 

207J0 1 69.60 Oct M 16>J0 17a 10 169 JO 14970 —120 111 88 

70. 10 Dec 94 17050 17120 16978 17040 — 1 JO 34478 

171.10 Jem 95 17120 17220 17120 171 JO —120 6175 

17320 Mar 95 17X30 17440 173J0 17430 -060 6467 

17400 MOV 95 17520 17620 17500 17520 —120 4108 

1753044 95 17440 17720 17620 T7740 — OJO 2515 

17650 Aug 95 17750 17650 17750 177 JO -040 157 

304 


757* 

724 

725 
725* 
726* 
628 
Ut 
650* 


20920 
<9750 
207 JO 
2020 
20600 
18260 


187JD 

17660 5en 95 





Est. sates NJL FfTtesdes 

17.752 



Fif&i«sefimt CL449 

•JS> 1570 



SOYBEAN Ot (CBOTJ ngmua-wi 


308A 

2240 5ep94 

auo 

2X91- 

2X73 

2X92 


22. KKJd M 

2485 

2X85 




2U»OecM 

2X40 


Jnfj 


2155 

2X65 Jon 95 

2X5! 

2X9 

1 

pn 

2860 

2XQ Mar 95 

2X9 

2X52 

2440 

2450 


2X9] MOV 95 2X33 

2X41 

2X30 


2785 

2380 JIN 95 

2X30 

2433 

2X20 


2760 

2285 Aug V5 

2X20 

2X20 

2485 

2480 




2X05 



23.10 

21100495 





2360 

2X80 Dec 95 




2360 


Estates HA. FfYs. sates 30508 
Fri's Open Inf 84498 up sm 


Livestock 


CATTLE (OMBR) «un0U- ante wt. 


7410 

7430 

7425 

7110 

6950 

6610 


65400094 60.95 7025 4025 6940 -025 35485 

67 JO Dec 96 6865 6875 6827 6847 -0.18 16589 

67.90 R* 95 68,15 6820 6720 0.97 -0.18 11.113 

6940 Apr 95 055 0.95 041 057 -U8 7,141 

6668JWI95 6720 029 MX BSB -0.10 1,795 

4645 Aug 9S 4670 6621 6660 6670 ’U3 437 

EsLnms 11256 FfTtesOkS 11,147 
FrFsopenM 72856 up 1112 

CATTLE ICMER) sknM-aMMk 
7 SM 7430SW94 7425 75JB 74J0 76.52 210 

81.35 MSI DOW 74L5D 7452 73JO 74JD -060 3286 

6320 7240 NovM 7525 7525 7S35 7547 —035 2227 

729SJOI9S 75.10 75J5 7497 7522 -418 — 

7255 Mar 9S 7400 7430 7400 


1 Semen Season 






Utah 

Low Open 

Hten 

LfM 

Ooe# 

dig 

Ooint 

1166 

U.ISMavW 



116* 

♦ 085 

5 





1285 

+ XK 


Estates NJL Fi+s. softs 

156M 





FrT* open ten 12X879 off 1173 

-• - . 








1543 

1020 Sep +4 1370 

un 

047 

1353 

-as 

397 

1580 

10(1 Dec 94 1423 

1430 

1395 

M09. 

— 25 41804 

1605 

1077 tutor 95 1450 

1440 

1435 


— 23T1JD2 1 

1ST! 

107B6V:,y95 1«S 

iae 

1+60 

1478 

-35 

3694 

1400 

1225 Jut 95 1500 

uoo 

1500 

isn 

-25 

24M 

1540 

1505 Sep 95 



150 

-as 

I6M 

U33 

1290 Dec 95. 15* 

15* 

1540 

15* 

—27 

460 

1476 

1350 Mo-94 



1547 

— 27 

2*850 

164} 

1225 May 96 . 



150 

-37 

1B5 

Ed. softs 5832 FrfS. soles 

XB4 





Fri’S Open tell 4X211 IB 901 
ORANGE JUCS {NCTffll IXtoftCr 

•BP 

rft*. 



13X50 

8605 Sep 94 9160 

9160 

91.10 

+065 

3643 

13480 

n.lONavU 9580 

9560 

9140 

9X15 

♦ 165 

X925 

13X00 

9380 Jon 95 9980 

9980 

97X 

9BJ0 

♦ 060 

4476 

12X25 

*660 Mor 93 1035 

10X25 

10X70 

110.10 

+<LB 

2410 

114J5 

11980 

9780MOV95 10560 
101608495 KP-20 

10580 
187 JS 

HEX 

10X25 

10540 

10X10 

+0u3S 
^■1 IMS 

474 

11140 

11280 Nov 95 11160 

UIX 

11160 

m.10 

♦us 






11110 



11260 

11180 SepW. 



11Q.10 

♦ 085 


1 Esc mes njl Pm. softs 

1 Fri’s open tor 







Metals 




HI GRADE COPPER fNCMXl 

DM 

M-W 

■s per ft. 



11480 

7530 Aug 94 11230 

UUO 

11230 

nxso 

♦ 160 

- 128 

11460 

7X90 Sep 94 -11160 

11480 

11160 

11100 

♦ 160 11485 

11520 

7L7SD0CM 11160 

1U95 

rtuo 

11XH 

♦ 16526893 

111 JO 

7460 Jon 95 11380 

H3J0 

11X30 

11260 

♦160 


11180 

7380 Feb 95 



11285 

+165 

272 

11X70 

7380M0T9S 11060 

11120 

nta 

nun 

♦ 16S 

3.174 

11160 

7XB5May9S 11180 
7X00 Jui 95 10980 

ni8o 

THOU 

11080 

+1.1S 


11260 

nix 

10980 

W960 

+185 


11085 

79.nStP95 



10980 

♦ 0.95 


11585 

7530 Od 95 I1X* 

11X90 

11240 

TTifS' 



11x00 

77 JS Nov 95 11380 

11380 

T1380 

11265 

+160 

04 

10988 

8080 DOC 95 



10840 



10880 

8860JBI96 



10X05 



10580 

4X70 Mar 96 



10760 

+085 


TW60 

97.18 Apr 96 



111.25 

+ 160 

207 


May 94 



1065 

+085 


10780 

10X30 Junto 



11035 

+1.10 

112 

Est tofts 15800 Fri's. SJtel 

21.93* 



Fri’s open w oa 46 up iao 

SO.VER (HCMW S-OMIrtrca.-ort.perhwVas. 



4158 

4938 Sep M mo 

5456. 

5188 

54X7 


5128 

51160© 94 


5410 

+228 


5978 

3niUtac04 5278 


3256 

5508 


5648 

4018 Jan 95 5408 

5*8 

5*8 

5524 

+211. 


4048 

41 46 Mw 95 53X0 

598 


55X1 

+226 


6066 

4188 May 95 5396 

3408 

5996 

5436 

+ 224 


4108 

4208 Jut 95 5458 

5498 

5458 

54X4 



55X5 

5326 Sep 95 5508 

5728 

5508 

3736 


160 

6288 

5398 Dec 95 5(36 

5828 

5436 

50X5 


6118 

5758 JanH 



978 

♦229 



5548 moth 



SM4 

+2X1 


5078 

5578 MOV 94 



40X9. 

+214 






4078 

+217 


Ed. soles 45800 Fri’s. stea 
Fri’s open Irt 11X464 - gp 38 

27,130 









©MB 

36880 OOM 41068 
37X60 Jan 95 41380 

41780 

40X10 

41578 




41200 

41X90 



43980 

39080 Apr 95 ©860 

42X9 

4UL5B 

42260 

♦ 170 

1.931 


419606893 



42560 

+271 


422800© 95 


4 1 9 

4060 

+270 


Ed. sales njl Fri's. soees 
Fri's men teit 2X9(1 up 4Z1 

269 










41580 

34160 to « 381-30 

3*7 JO 

J*L30 

3*7.10 



3080 

37780 SWU 



3060 



41780 

34X00 OdW 38X70 

39100 

38170 

38X90 



42460 

X180Dec94 38680 

39480 


391 JD 


©180 

36160 Feb 95 3060 

06JU 

39580 

♦IS 11719 i 

41788 

34460 Apr 95 


— ’ 

39840 

+190 

4471 

42860 

3(160 JunTS 39880 

39784 

31760 

401 JO 



41260 

3060 Am 95 
«I8QOd9S 



4520 ' 


4.900 

41380 



*■80 


42980 

40060 Dec 95 



411611 

♦480 

1775 

42X30 

41 260 Feb W 


g . 

nuo 

+480 

1681 '■* 

mm 

©XX Apr 9b 



4200 

♦AS) 

4J089 

41300 Junto 



4940 

♦ 480 


Estates 4Q800 Fri-s-wtes 
Fri’s opon to? M0.9TQ off .391 

17,517 






30.95 

80251 

7690 

76J0 


7405 




Education Drectory 


B«y Tuesday 
Contact Fmd Renan 
Tel: (33 1)46 3793 91 
Fas (33 1)46 37 9370 
or your nearest HT office 
ariEpresentatm 


5050 

SOJO 

an 

87 JO 
4520 
4360 
4050 


•O.I7 12,107 


— . — . _ 4025 

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** 


INTERNATIONAL HERAT!) TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 30, 1994 


Page 11 


: <ist 


S» 

L 


«Ted 


f'inm 


EUROPE 


MAN’s Profit and Payout Fall 

But Firm Says Net Is Belter Than Expected 


Compdedly Oar Staff From Dispatcher 

MUNICH — MAN AG, a 
diversified machinery maker, 
'said Monday that net profit 
dropped 30 percent in its latest 
-business year, prompting the 
- company, to slash its dividend 
for the second straight year. 

Although the company said 
the financial year turned out 
“markedly better than initially 
anticipated,” it said its dividend 
-would be 7.00 Deutsche marks 
a share; down from 8.50 DM 
the previous year. 

Net profit in the year ended 
June 30 dumped to 160 million 
DM ($102 million) from 230 
million DM in the previous 
year. 

A recovery in orders and 
sales in the second half, coni' 
bined with the effects of cost- 
cutting and a halt in price de- 
clines, lifted earnings for the 
full year above the unsatisfac- 
tory level of the first half, MAN 
said. 

Sales fell 4 percent on the 
-year, to 18.14 billion DM. Do- 
mestic sales fell 13 percent, to 


6.93 billion DM, but foreign 
sales rose 2 percent, to 11.22 
bQlion DM. 

"Higher demand in South- 
east Asia and the United States 
spread to Western Europe in 
the second half of 1993-94." the 
company said. “Thai means our 
most important foreign markets 
arepicking up.” 

• Foreign i 


Analysis said the results were 
m line with or slightly better 
than expectations. But MAN 
Jares closed at 444 DM on 
Monday, down from 442.80 
DM on Friday. 

(Bloomberg, AFP) 
■ Bearings Maker Posts Net 
The bearings maker FAG 
Kugelfischer Georg Schafer 


• * oreign orders rose 20 per- A/ -.- - T -e» 

cent, to 11.97 billion DM. while "sh^ctunng measures 


domestic orders fell 3 percent, 
to 6.49 taQion DM. 

But the company said domes- 
tic orders had begun to show a 
“noticeable rise” in the past two 
months. 

“The uptrend marking the 
second half of financial 
1993/94 is continuing in the 
current financial year. That is 
why one may expea a rise in 
profit in 1994/95” the compa- 
ny said. 

A strong recovery in orders 
will enable MAN to continue to 
rebound in the current fiscal 
year and raise earnings, the 
company said. 


enabled it to swing to a net 
profit of 17.2 million DM in the 
first half of 1994, after a net loss 
of 103.5 million DM in the 
year-eadier period, news agen- 
cies reported from SchweinFun. 
Germany. 

_ Improved economic condi- 
tions should enable the compa- 
ny to record a profit for thefull 
year after a net loss of 29.8 
million DM for all of 1993. 

Pretax profit from operations 
was 49 million DM in the peri- 
od, compared with a pretax loss 
of 1053 million Dm last year. 

Sales in the first half were up 
1 percent to 1.32 billion DM, 
the company said. 


Cardo Reports 
Profit Tripled 
In First Half 

Bloomberg Business Near 

STOCKHOLM — Cardo 
Investment AB said Mon- 
day that its pretax profit 
more than tripled in the first 
half on improved earnmg c 

at its pump, railway and 
health-care easinesses. 

Cardo posted a pretax 
profit of 417 milli on Swed- 
ish kronor ($55 nriffion), up 
from 137 milliac kronor a 
year earner. Saks rose 9 per- 
cent, to 8.72 billion kronor. 

Incentive AB, one erf the 
companies in the Wallen- 
berg f amil y financial Cm- 



gam 

Gambro AB. a medical- 
equipment subsidiary, and 
plans to refloat the rest erf 
Cardo's operations once 
the unit is absorbed. 

Despite weak Swedish fi- 
nancial markets; Cardo re- 
ported a 4 2 percent rise in 
its equity portfolio, which 
Incentive plans to sell. 


Plunging Bond Prices 
Drive Skandia to Loss 


CeupUed by Ota Suff From Dispatches 

STOCKHOLM" — Skandia 
AB said Monday that losses in 
its investment portfolio caused 
it to post a loss in the first half 
erf the year, reversing a profit- 
able 1993 first half. 

Sweden’s largest insurer post- 
ed a loss of 550 naOion kronor 
($72 million) in the half, com- 
pared with aprofit of 1.16 billion 
kroner in the 1993 first half. 

Earnings were hit by an unre- 
alized loss erf I.86 billion kronor 
on Skandia’s bond portfolio, 
which caused tbe company to 
post a loss of 2.40 bQlion kronor 
on its overall investment portfo- 
lio. 

Last year, the insurer made a 
profit of 1.67 billioD kronor on 
its investments. 

But the company said premi- 
um income increased 35 per- 
cent, to 273 trillion kronor. 

S kandi a’s operating income 
was S29 milli on kronor, down 8 
percent 

Despite the results, Skandia’s 
share price slipped only I kro- 
na, to 117. 


Skandia’s loss on invest- 
ments was caused by a sharp 
fall in the value of Swedish 
bonds over the first six months 
of 1994. 

Under Swedish accounting 
practices, the value of a compa- 
ny’s bond and stock portfolio is 
adjusted according to the price 
on the last day of the account- 
ing period if that value is lower 
than the value it was previously 
booked at 

As a result of this policy, al- 
most all Swedish financial insti- 
tutions have had losses from the 
f alling value of bonds. 

Skandia said the losses were 
continuing into the second half 
of the year. Ironically, this was 
largely caused by Skandia itself. 

On July 1, Bjoere Wolralh, 
chief executive of Skandia, said 
he would boycott Swedish 
bonds until politicians brought 
state debt under control. 

The boycott caused a plunge 


Given a Blanc Check , 
Air France to Revamp 

Bloomberg Business News 

PARIS — Nearly a year after he was sent in by the 
government to rescue financially crippled Air France, the 
chairman, Christian Blanc, will carry out his decentralization 
plans. 

On Thursday the airline will put into place the final pieces 
of a vast restructuring intended to turn Air France from a 
bureaucratic, centralized company into 1 1 separate profit 
centers established mainly along geographic lines. 

Although Mr. Blanc has described the change as a radical 
restructuring, however, there are no assurances that a mere 
shift in organization will make Air France — which lost 83 
billion francs (S2 billion) last year — lean and mean in the 
difficult European skies. 

The Spanish carrier Iberia, for example, decentralized op- 
erations in 1990. After lousy financial performance over the 
past three years, it is now scrapping the decentralization. 

Although Air France will lose 5,000 jobs through attrition 
over the next three years, the French government has essen- 
tially promised employees that no ODe will be laid off. 

“How do you change the company if you can't change the 
people? It’s difficult,” Gilles Bordes-Pages, an Air France 
pilot, asked in April when Mr. Blanc first won approval for 
his company restructuring in an employee referendum. 

Mr. Blanc’s supporters point to the success of his restruc- 
turing of the Pans rafi system, which he decentralized in the 
late 1980s. He ended a series of strikes and cut the hierarchy 
from seven to three organizations. 

But unlike tbe Paris transport system. Air France has com- 
petitors. British Airways, for example, is about to begin offering 
a Paris-Rome service. Nor is Air France free to set fares in a 
vacuum. The industry is suffering from fare competition. 

Yield — a figure that relates to the average revenue per 
kilometer flown — has been falling for all European earners 
over the past three years, making it impossible lor airlines to 
improve profits unless they can cut unit costs by greater 
amounts than yields have fallen. 

The fact that the French government has just given Air 
France the first tranche of a three-part financial rescue 
package of 20 billion francs may help. 

Rather than being organized along logistical lines such as 
marketing, routes and pricing, with all regions reporting to 
Paris, the aidine’s operations will be divided into geographic 
regions. Managers will set their own profit goals. 

Commercial air travel will be broken down into North 
America, Africa-Middle East, French territories, Asia-Pacif- 
ic, France and Europe, with a seventh person supervising 
global freight. The carrier has set up logistical profit centers 
for fleet maintenance, da la-processing, industry and Paris 
airport personnel. 


Compaq 
Cuts Price 
In Europe 

Compiled ty Our Staff From Dispatches 

MUNICH — Compaq Com- 
puter Corp.’s European divi- 
sions have cut prices for person- 
al computers by as much as 29 
percent, following similar cuts in 
the United States and Canada. 

Analysts said they expected 
International Business Machine 
Corp.'s European divisions to 
follow Compaq’s lead, but an 
IBM spokeswoman said, “We’re 
still looking at the market.” 

In the United States, IBM cut 
prices Thursday, nine days after 
Houston-based Compaq began 
a round of price cuts. 

In Europe, Compaq said its 
flagship Deskpro XL model 
would sell for 20 percent less. 
Other DeskPro computers and 
ProLmea prices were reduced as 
much as 29 percent. 

“Commercial customers have 
been telling us that their first 
choice is Compaq, and these 
new prices will make our prod- 
ucts even more appealing to a 
wider audience,” said Andreas 
Barth, senior vice president and 
general manager for Europe, 
Middle East and Africa. 

The leader of a group of 14 
major computer makers said 
Monday that he expected com- 
petition to force prices even 
lower, eroding profit margins 
for producers. 

“We expea prices of the av- 
erage personal computer 
equipped with 486 DX proces- 
sors to drop below the 2,000 
guilder level ($1,140) in the be- 
ginning of 1995,” Rob Spijkers, 
chairman of World Micro Com- 
puters Statistics Group (Euro- 
bit), said from his Netherlands 
office. (Bloomberg, Reuters) 


Euro Disney Shares Plunge Again 


CoayHtd by Our Staff Front Dispatches 

PARIS — Shares in Euro Dis- 
ney SCA, the operator erf the 
Euro Disneyland theme park 
□ear Paris, plunged for the sec- 
ond trading day in a row Mon- 
day to hit new lows as the low 
number of visitors at the park 
continued to worry investors. 
And analysts said tbe rough 


An analyst at a French bro- 
kerage concern said Euro Dis- 
ney was counting on 1 1 million 
visitors a year, of which 45 per- 
cent, or almost 5 million, would 
be French. “This means it’s ex- 

Iztiioa^to vmt the park iTre- 
mains to be seen,” he added. 
“The investment is dispro- 


NYSE 

Hominy* ■ Clotltig 

Tables include the nationwide pnews up to 
. me dosing on watt Street and do not reflect 
late trades eteewnere. Vm The Associated Press 


rig re lOOs Higti Law Lotesi Orm 



Mr YM PE 100s HM< LowUtieriCH'Be 


m the value of government ri(Je m nol over M ^ i ong . portionately large compared 
bonds and the krona. term 0 f tbe project re- wi tb the size of the market,' 

(Bloomberg, AFP ) mained in question. Antoine Nodeti an analyst at 

N.R. Bourse said. 

The shares closed down 1 1.6 
percent Monday, at 8.40 francs 
($139), compared with 9.50 on 
Friday, after hitting an intraday 
low of 7.75. 

It fell no further because the 
French Bourses Association put 
a 7.75 franc floor under shares 
in Euro Disney and would not 
execute orders below that price. 

“If it falls below 7.75 we just 
stop trade until somebody is 
willing to deal at 7.75 or high- 
er." a spokesman said. Bui the 
spokesman said the floor price 
would be in effect only for 
Monday’s trading. 

Trading in the shares was 
suspended for 15 minutes Mon- 
day morning when they hit 835 


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Continued on Page 12 


francs and again briefly when 
they dropped to 8.15 francs. 

The Paris bourse slops trad- 
ing in a share if its price falls by 
more than 10 percent from its 
previous closing level and again 
if it falls a further 5 percent 

Euro Disney said Monday 
evening it would ask the Market 
Operations Commission of the 
Paris bourse to “analyze the 
trend in the price of the Euro 
Disney shares over the last few 
days.” The stock has lost 18 
percent since Thursday. 

The heavy selling got tinder 
way Friday after a Paribas Cap- 
ital Markets analyst said he val- 
ued Euro Disney shares at 1.60 
francs. 

Plagued since it opened in 
April 1992 by a disappointing 
level of business, Euro Disney 
has been struggling to improve 
attendance by cutting prices 
and making new marketing ef- 
forts. 

It recently completed a Finan- 
cial restructuring that enabled 
it to cut its debt from 21 billion 
francs to 16 billion francs and 
reduce its operating costs. 

(Reuters, AFP ) 


GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT FACILITY PROJECTS: 

The U.S. Agency for International Development! 
(USAID) nicks expressions of interest m receiving tapiest* lor Proposals 
j (RfP) for two USAID-funded Global Environment Facility Projects. 

BULGARIA BIODIVERSITY GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT 
FACILITY PROJECT. This project is aimed at strengthening the Bulgarian 
nature protection management system at the national and local levels. 

DANUBE TRIBUTARY BASINS GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT 
FACILITY PROJECT. Pus project is aimed at reducing the emission of 
toxic compounds and pathogens to international waters id selected an 
' where potential pathways of human exposure cross national boundaries, 
ft rewire a copy of both of that HP. phase submit a written request to: 

Karen Serf ridge, Ui. Agency for Iniermtional Development, Office of Procurement, 
A/OP/ENI/EE. Km WO. SA-H, Washington, DC USA 20523-1426. 


Investor’s Europe 


Frankfurt 
DAX 
2300' 


London 
FTSE 100 Index 

m 



-0 


2180 -HPt-U 

/V 

2000 * 




y 


V 





A' M 
1994 ■■■ 

Exchange 

Amsterdam 

■jta' 2800 mrsi 

• W 94 

index 

AEX ’ 

J J A 1 

Monday 

Close 

424.60 

’““'M’TSf 

' 1984 

Prav. . 
Close 
420.83 

j J A.' 

% 

Change 

+ 0.90 

Brussels ;• 

•Siocfclnctex ■ 

7 , 832.00 

• 7 , 580.05 

+ 0.69 

FraajWurt ■' 

PAX ' . . 

2 , 193.19 

2 , 161.54 

+ 1 , 48 - 

Frankfurt 

■-FAZ-. 

82&08 

814.32 

+ 1.60 

Hstetok* . 

J 4 EX, 

1 *WW 6 

. 1.91423 

+ 1.70 

London- ; 

■.Financial Times 30 

Closed 

2 , 552.20 

- 

London 

FtSE’iOO .• 

Closed 

3 . 285.10 

- 

Madrid. 

■ General Index 

312.80 

307.06 

• + 1.87 

Milan j. . 

M&tel 

110 % . 

11004 

+ 0.83 ‘ 

Paris • : 

CAC 40 ' 

ZfiTSJZT 

2 , 062.74 

+ 0.61 

Stockholm 

Affeerevaerfdeh . 

1,92744 

1 , 912.67 

* 0.77 

Vtebeav- 

-Slock tode* ■ 

463.11 

: 45950 - 

+ 0.79 

■Zurich. ■ 


938.10 

922.78 • 

. + 1.66 

Sources: Reuters. AFP 


International Herald Tribune 

Very briefly! 


-• BellSouth Corp. has sold its 17 percent stake in Comdev SA, a 
French co mmuni cations company now 90 percent owned by 
Grisse de D£pMs & Consignations. 

■ Rabobank Nederland BA's first-half net profit rose 1 1 percent, to 
654 million guilders ($373 million), as increases in income from 
interest and commissions offset a drop in trading income. 

■ Stad Rotterdam NV, a medium-sized Dutch insurer, said its net 
profit rose 2 percent in the first half of this year, to 42.8 million 
guilders, helped by a 13 percent increase in revenue. 

• Saab Automobile AB, a joint venture between General Motors 
CorpL and Saab-Scania AB, said it expected to sell 92.000 cars this 
year, up from 87.400 sold in 1993. 

• East Asiatic Co. reversed to a 22 million Danish kroner ($4 
million) profit in the first half of the year from a 97 milli on kroner 
loss, helped by higher sales and operating profiL 

• Promodts SA, the French retailer, signed a partnership deal with 
O mnium Nord Africain, the largest private company in Morocco. 

• Swissair AG’s Beteffigung AG unit said its air freight subsidiary, 
Jacky Maeder AG, was merging its U.S. unit with Caledon Group 
Inc-’s subsidiary. Randy International U.S. Ltd. 

■ Union Bank of Switzerland said it held 88.81 percent of the share 
capita] of EKN Bank in NidwaMem Union Bank's takeover offer 
for the smaller bank expired Friday. 

• IsraeTs central bank raised interest rates by 13 percentage 
points, to 14 percent, in a strike against doublenligit inflation. 

• France plans to launch a bond issue aimed at individual 
investors rather than institutions, the Economy Ministry said. 

AFX. Reuters, Knight- Ridder, Bloomberg 


Real Estate Marketplace 

Every Friday 
Contact Fred Ronan 
Tel.: (33 1)445 37 93 91 
Fax: (33 1 ) 46 37 93 70 
or your nearest IHT office or representative 


In tbe matter of 

Confederation Treasury 
Services (U.K.) pic. 

and 

in tbe matter of 

the Insolvency Act 1986 


Notice is herebv given, pursuant ro Section 98 of the 
Insolvency Act 1986, that a meeting of the creditors of the 
above-named company will be held at The Merchants Centre, 
New Street Square, London EC4A 3JB on 2 September 1994 at 
10:30 a.m. for the purposes mentioned in Section 99, 100 and 
101 of the said Act. 

Statements of claim, and proxy forms if applicable, must be 
lodged at P.O. Box 730, 20'Farringdon Street, London 
EC4A 4PP not later than 12 noon on the 1 September 1994. 

A list of the names and addresses of die company’s creditors 
may be inspected, free of charre, at the offices of KPMG Peat 
Marwick, P.O. Box 730, 20 Farringdon Street, London 
EC4A 4PP on 31 August and 1 September 1994. 

Dated 23 August 1994 

By order of tbe Board 
AJ McMahon - Joint Liquidator. 


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Hcralb^Sribunc. 


. _• -iv _ ~i — : .v. .- 





















































































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 30, 1994 


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Page 13 

ASIA/PACIFIC 


Daewoo Pins Its Future on Autos 


Farmland 

CcmpiUfy Oar StagFron Obf onket ' 

BELONG — China; alarmed 
at the amount of arable land 
taken' over far development, 
said Monday, it would intro- 
duce regulations to curb faxm- 
land development . 

‘It is a fact that. our country : 
has a largspopulalkHi but iittk 
arable land,” said ZouYuchuaa, 
director general - of the cabinefs 
State f amt A rlmfmgtrfltinm . 

“Rapid eoooon M c develop- 
ment, urbanization and n onag- 
ri cultural development has re^ 
suited in arable land decreatong 
by the year,” be said. “The otu- 
atkm is very serious.” _ t. . 

He said the government want- 
ed to slash by about 75 percent 
the amount of fannland convert- 
ed to nonfaim. usage each year 
until the end of the centmy. 

In all, (Tima has 97 3 million 
hectares (240 ririffion acres) of 
farmland, a «™>n amount for 
its burgeoning population of 
1.2 biffion people. 

In J992, a total of 413,400 
hectares of farmland ‘was devel- 
oped into sites for apartments, 
office buildings or factories. . 

“The contraction between 
population and land farther 
sharpened, whichdirectly fet- 
ters the impr ove m ent of peo- 
ple’s firing standards and na- 
tional development,” 

a government statement said. 

New rules to conserve farm-' 
land have been approved bythe . 
cabinet and wiU go into effect in 
October, Mr. Zou 'said. : 

Under the regulations, pro- 
vincial government approval is 
necessary for development of 
agricultural plots smaller than 
333 hectares, and national. ap- 
proval is required if the devel- 
opment will involve more than 
33 3 hectares. - 

Authorities can caned land 
development projects approved 
by subordinate governments if 
inegularities are 'discovered, 
such as developers obtaining 
use of a {dot of land through 
backdoor negotiations instead 
of an auction, Mr. Zou said. 

After farmland is converted, 
its new tmants must pay the 
local gov ernmen t a fee that will 
be used to reclaim land far cul- 
tivation and improve farmland 
with low production, according 
to the regulations. ' 

China’s property market has 
boomed m recent years, con- 
tributing to the growththat has 
pushed China’s economy to the 
brink of overheating. • 

The new regulations will try 
to restore some order to the 
sector and let the authorities 
take control back from specula- 
tors, officials said. 


SEOUL — ; Kim Woo Gboong, chair- 
man of Daewoo Corp., is betting the 
future of that conglomerate on its un- 
profitable automalring subsidiary. 

To this end, Mr. Kim has install e d 
himself at" the group’s auto unit in Pu- 
py ong, west of Seoul, and is dedicating 
his time to rebuilding profitability. 

Mr. Kim, 57, hopes to repeat his suc- 
cess in turning the group’s financially 
troubled shipyard into a profitable enter- 
prise. This year, Daewoo Shipbuildin g; & 
Heavy Machinery Ltd. said it had 
cleared losses accumulated since the 
group took over a debt-ridden state ship- 
yard hr 1978. 

Mr. Kim removed himself from Seoul 
to the shipyard on the southeastern is- 
land of Koje and based himself there for 
Two years. : 

“It is critical at this time to foster the 
vehicle industry — for Daewoo and for 
the country, "Mr. Kim said. He sees full- 
fledged car production capability as the 
prerequisite for South Korea to join the 
ranks of industrialized countries. 

Mr. Kim started a textile company in 
1967 and built an empire now in control 
of more than 20 domestic and 120 over- 
seas units producing virtually everything 


from television sets to heavy industrial 
equipment. 

Securities analysts said Mr. Kim ap- 
peared to be trying to beef up related 
core industrial sectors of the Daewoo 
group of c ompa nies, such as machinery 
and electronics manufacturing, by sup- 
porting the car industry. 

Mr. Kim predicted that Daewoo Mo- 
tor Co. would be producing 2 million 
vehicles by 1997, when the plant is ex- 
pected _ to become competitive in the 
tough international car market. It pro- 
duced 388,000 vehides in 1993. 

Daewoo Motor, which ended its part- 
nership with General Motors Corp. in 
1992 amid fierce competition in the do- 
mestic market, had a loss of 84.7 billion 
won ($105 miQion) last year on sales of 
2.16 trillion won. 

During their 15-year partnership, 
Daewoo and the American car gian t 
were frequently at odds over sales strate- 
gy, investment derisions and Daewoo's 
plans to market its cars separately in 
some overseas locations. 

In 1992, the company lost 95.6 billion 
won, after a loss of 146.7 billion won in 
1991. 

The chairman’s presence on the scene 
at Daewoo Motor has already brought 


some changes. Mr. Kim said the number 
of defects in export cars had dwindled to 
a tenth of what it was before be took the 
helm at the car planL 

The new passenger car models Cielo 
and Arcadia — a variation of Honda 
Motor Co.'s Legend — made a success- 
ful debut this year. 

Daewoo group's vehicle sales, includ- 
ing a small number of light cars pro- 
duced in its shipbuilding unit, were ex- 
pected to rise 32 percent this year, to 
514,000. In value, sales are estimated at 
3 2 trillion won. 

“General Motors will regret the split 
with us,” Mr. Kim said, adding he was 
tired of his American partner's conserva- 
tive management. “GM, accustomed 
with very low growth, never understands 
that sales can grow 30 percent or 50 
percent.” 

Mr. Kim said he was frustrated before, 
when Daewoo was restricted from mar- 
keting its cars in Europe and other im- 
portant regions under its original busi- 
ness agreement with GM. 

The shipyard had a net profit of 200.6 
bflfion won in 1993, its third consecutive 
annual profit after more than a decade of 
losses. The company’s net accumulated 
loss peaked in 1990 at 798.1 billion won. 


South Korean Petrochemicals Find Success 


BhombergBmtness News 

SEOUL — Last year, South 
Korea's loss-ridden petro- 
. chemical companies asked the 
government to approve a “re- 
cession carter under which 
supplies would be limited and 
rmr imi wn prices established. 

The request was rqected. 

Today the petrochemical 
companies are still without a 
cartel, but their main problem 
now is that they do not have 
enough capacity to meet de- 
mand. 

Economic recovery in 
South Korea and elsewhere 
has boosted not only demand 
but also international prices 
for petrochemicals. 

- With their earnings up 
more than 40 percent m the 


first half of this year, share 
prices have soared for weeks 
m a bearish stock market. The 
petrochemical industry index, 
which includes related compa- 
nies, rose 5 percent this 
month, compared with a rise 
of less than 1 percent for the 
Seoul bourse as a whole. 

“The Korean petrochemi- 
cal industry has finally es- 
caped from the long tunnel of 
recession,” said Park Hoorn, 
planning director at the Korea 
Petrochemical Industry Asso- 
ciation. 

In addition, while many 
foreign petrochemical plants 
dosed down during the reces- 
sion and then have lost pro- 
duction to accidents since re- 
opening, the South Korean 


culture minister, said China was 
confident the deefine in arable 
land would not lead to food 
shortages; as land was being re- 
claimed for cultivation and 
there was a steady increase in 
prod ucti on, capacity. 

Also on Monday, the govern- 
ment said stockpiles of unsold 
goods continued to mount at 
state-owned factories. 

The state statistics bureau 
said inventories at 380 large in- 
dustrial enterprises had risen by 
50 b8Honyuan($6 b3hon) since 
early tins year. 

(Reuters, Bloomberg) 


Chun King Sale Aside, 
YHS Still Attracts Bears 


- SINGAPORE — The worst may be over for the food and 
drinks group Yeo Efiap Seng Ltd. once it discards its unprofitable 
Chun King group in North America, but analysts on Monday 
remained bearish an the stock. 

.- Yeo Hlap Seng, announcing its interim results, said it planned 
to sdl the North American operation. It said it would incur an 
extraordinary loss of 30.6 million Singapore dollars ($20 million) 
on the disposal. " 

“As far as Chun King is concerned, fix worst is over, but the 
dare is fully valued,” said Lim Jit Soon, investment analyst at 
Baring Securities Singapore. The canned-food maker Chun King, 
acquired from Nabiscolnc. in 1989, was to spearhead the group’s 
expansion into North America. 

Chun King had a lack of shelf presence and advertising muscle, 
analysts said. Analysts said Chun King's 1994 first-half loss of 6.9 
milli on dollanv widened from 2.9 imllion dollars in 1993, was its 
biggest ever. 

' Yeo Hum Seng also plans to sell investments in Nanguo Winko 
Beverage & Food Corp. and Xin Fa Beverage Sc, Food Co. and 
posted 3.6 milBriin i dollars in extraordinary losses from those 
transactions. 

Group net profit for the half year fell to 973,000 dollars from 
13 million dollars in 1993 because of the loss at Chun King, the 
company said. Its group attributable loss was 3321 million 
dollars, against a gain of 1.48 million dollars a year earlier. 

- The Singapore property tycoon Ng Teng Fong has built up a 21 
percent stake in Yeo Hlap Seng, and one analyst said the company s 
“saving grace hing as cm what Ng can do in toms of helping the 
company develop China contacts for its existing food business. 


Malaysia Wary of Ringgit Speculation 


KUCHING, Malaysia Malaysia’s cen- 
■ rial bank remains wary of heavy offshore 
trade in the ringgit and would consider taking 

action against speculation in the cur rency, a 
senior Bank Negara official has said. 

In recent weeks. Bank Negara has relaxed a 
series of strict capital controls imposed at the 
start of the year to punish speculators betting 
the ringgit would appreciate. 

Khong Kim Nyoon, the new deputy gover- 
nor of Bank Negara, said over the weekend 
that the central bank could kill the offshore 
market in ringgit with a stroke of the pen but 


was unlikel y to do so unless things got out of 
hand. 

“We know that the ringgit is being traded 
actively in the offshore markets, and on our 
-part we are not too comfortable with the fact 
that there is such a large offshore market m 
the ringgit,” Mr. Khong said. 

“We want to be in control of our interest 

rates and exchange rates, and we would hate to 

be dictated by offshore parties," he said at a 
gathering of central and commercial bankers. 

Regional currency dealers estimated mat 
trade in the ringgit in Singapore, the key 
offshore center during 
could total 4 billion to 7 billion ringgit ($2 
billion to $3 billion) on an active day. 


INDIA: Reviving Economy Gives Stock Prices a lift 


Gratemed from Page 9 

“We’re very optimistic on In- 
dia, and it looks Hke a lot more 
money is about to come in,” (me 
Singapore-based fund manager 
said. 

“But we 'don’t know bow 
much further prices for the 
blue-chips can go, so we’re sell- 
ing than and looking for value 
among the cheaper, smaller 
stocks," be added “Maybe.the 
i&ry is over for a while." 

Foreign investors in particu- 
lar have begun to shift focus to 
the B group companies, which 
are also known as cash shar es 
because they have a. cash settle- 
meal system. The shares also 
tend to be in companies, with • 
smaller capitalization. 

The A shares settle every two 
weeks unless investors decide to 
pay a financing margin. -The fi- 
nancing margin allows, inves- 
tors to roll the stocks over in a 
system that has encouraged 
speculation. 


uuwmuuu 11UU1. U1E uiwftWJ 0 — - . - irf,* 

who use it. Brokers went on other countnes th 

strike for nine days in Decern- ly to come at a slower pace than 
ber m protest against regela- earlier in the year. 
t<ws* efforts to himt the use of Then Indian companies 


feared that blue chip shares, 
with price/camings ratios in 
the 40s, are overheated 

“Of course, more focus on 
them will work to increase sup- 
ply, but it will take time.” Mr- 
Shah said of the B shares. India 
has 22 different exchanges in 
.the national market Bombay 
accounts for two-thirds of total 
turnover. 

The supply of new global de- 


plants continued operating 

Hanyang Chemical Co., 
(me of the top eight petro- 
chemical manufacturers, 
showed profit of 33 billion 
won ($4.4 mOlion) in the first 
half after a loss of almost 10 
times that much for all of the 
previous year. 

Honam Petrochemical Co„ 
also an industry leader, saw its 
loss shrink to 1 1.1 billion won 
in the first half From 68.8 bil- 
lion won for all of last year. 
Cbo Hyun Kwang, an analyst 
with Coryo Securities Co., 
predicts H onam will post a 
profit this year for the first 
time in three years. 

Collectively, the petro- 
chemical companies are ex- 
pected to break even this year 


after posting a combined loss 
of about $1.25 bOIion last 
year. 

The South Korean econo- 
my’s 8 percent growth this 
year has been reflected in the 
automobile, electronics, ship- 
building and other industries, 
most of which need large 
amounts of petrochemicals. 

“Surging petrochemical 
sales is one of the first signs of 
an economic recovery,” said 
George Goundry, a petro- 
chemical analyst for Jardine 
Fleming Securities in SeouL 

With a 4 percent share of 
the global market, the South 
Korean petrochemical indus- 
try ranks sixth in the world 
About 40 percent of its output 
is exported, mostly to South- 
east Asia and China. 


Retail Sales 
In Japan 
Show Gains 


ConpiM fa 1 Our Skiff From Dispatches 

TOKYO — Japanese retail 
sales in July rose 13 percent 
from a year earlier, the first an- 
nual increase in 26 months, the 
Ministry of Internationa] Trade 
and Industry said Monday. 

A ministry official attributed 
the rise to a heat wave, an in- 
come-tax rebate promised by 
the government to boost the 
slow economy and increased 
store working days in the 
month. Those factors are ex- 
pected to have an impact on the 
sales performance for August as 
well 

Sales at major retail stores in 
July totaled 219 trillion yen 
(S22 billion), the ministry said 
in a preliminary report. 

Sales at 430 department 
stores fell 1.4 percent, to 1.17 
trillion yen. 

Sales at 2328 supermarkets 
rose 4.6 percent from a year 
earlier, to 1.02 trillion yen. A 
surge in spending on seasonal 
clothing and home appliances 
supported the rise, the first such 
gain for this store category in 24 
months, the ministry said. 

Meanwhile, more than three- 
fourths of Japanese manufactur- 
ers responding to a poll said they 
expected to shift production 
abroad because of the yen’s rise. 

The survey, conducted by the 
Nihon Keizai Shimbun, Japan’s 
leading financial newspaper, 
said the yen’s rise had eroded 
profits of exports. 

Based on 158 responses to a 
questionnaire mailed to 507 
major manufacturers, the news- 
paper poll also predicted that 
overseas manufacturing by Jap- 
anese firms would increase by 
an average of about 20 percent 
through the rest of the decade. 

Respondents said they would 
increase the work force at their 
overseas units by 5.5 percent in 
the year ending in March 1995. 

(AP, AFP. AFX. Knight- Ridder) 


investor’s Asia 


Hong Kong Singapore 

Hang Seng Straits Times 

noon — — 2400 — — — 


Tokyo 

Nikkei 225 



2100 -W— 


MAM 

1994 



Exchange 


Monday 

Close 


% 

Change! 


Hong Kong Hang Seng 

Singapore Straits Times 

Sydney AH Ordinaries 

Tokyo Nikkei 225 

Kuala Lumpur” Composite 


Bang kok 

Seoul 

Taipei 

Manila 


SET 

Composite Stock 

Weighted Price 
___ 


Jakarta Stock Index 

New Zealand NZSE-4G 
Bombay National Index 

Sources: Reuters, AFP 


tta 1 - ^isnrsr m: 

1994 

Monday Prev % 
Close Close Chang 

Closed 9,399-08 

2.305.80 2.293.51 +0.54 

2.111.80 2,07720 +1.67 

20,600.42 20,471.49 +0.63 

1.12037 1.111.78 +0.77 

1.48CL24 1.450.75 +OK 

936.01 941.18 -0.55 

7,040.52 6,953.04 +1.26 

3,09227 3,098.89 -0.21 

507.76 505.33 +0.48 


1,48024 

936.01 

7,040.52 

3,09227 

507.78 

"2,14128 


2,105.86 +1.68 


2,13253 2,10158 +1.47 


InicmabonaJ Herald Tribune 


Very briefly: 

■ Malaysian manufacturing sales rose 21.7 percent in the first six 
months from a year earlier, with rubber, energy and electronics 
heading the list. 

• RFM Corp* invested 90 milli on pesos (S3 million) in a Philippine 
semiconductor maker. Pacific Semiconductor Inc., effectively 
acquiring 55.2 percent of the company. 

• Shanghai's stock exchange will display Lhe top three bid and ask 
prices, plus volume, on B -share trading through its computer 
system starting Thursday. 

■ The Saigon Floating Hotel in Ho Chi Mirth City has won a new 
lease on life, but the Japanese-Australian hotel may have to 
change its mooring on the Saigon River. 

• Mazda Motor Corp. hopes its new C-apella and Familia models 
will support a domestic sales recovery. Mazda President Yoshi- 
hiro Wada said. 

• Evergreen Group will invest 42.1 million ringgit (S!6 million) in 
a container factory in Malaysia, the Commercial Tunes said. 

• Pakistan plans to export locally assembled Suzuki automobiles 
to the former Soviet republics in Central Asia. 

• Sega Enterprises said Chinese authorities had penalized the 
Shenchu Electronic Equipment Factory that had been illegally 
makin g and selling copies of Sega video games and software. 

AFP, Reuters. AP. Bloomberg. AFX 


Japan Tobacco Verdict: Also Too High 


Bloomberg Business Nem 

TOKYO — Just days after shares of 
Japan Telecom Co, toe nation's third- 
largest long-distance telephone carrier, 
were priced at hefty 4.7 million yen 
($47,000), the average bid for Japan To- 
bacco shares came in Monday at 1.438.000 
yen — a price analysts said was too high. 

The auction price for Japan Telecom “is 
a bit too expensive,” said Kouici Kuraia. 
manager of the securities and investment 
department at Asahi Mutual Life. 

In the first part of Japan Tobacco’s two- 
phase stock issue, more than 1 million inves- 
tors bid on shares of the world's foinrih- 
largest tobacco company. The highest bid in 
the auction was 2.1 ] million yen, and the 
lowest accepted bid was 1 36 million yen. 

While Masaru Mizuno, the company’s 
president, attributed the number and 
strength of the bids to strong fundamen- 
tals, traders and analysts said that at these 
levels toe shares were far too expensive. 

The Ministry of Finance announced the 
average price and other results of Japan 
Tobacco's auction of 230,000 shares after 


the market dosed Monday. The remaining 
436,666 shares being sold wiU be allotted 
to individual and institutional investors 
through brokerages from Friday until 
Sent. 8. 

The price of the initial offering will be 
set Wednesday, based on the results of the 
auction. It is standard practice in Japan to 
auction a portion of an initial public offer- 
ing before the actual listing of the stock. 
This allows the underwriters to set a price 
for the stock based on what investors are 
wiling to pay. 

One-third of the government's holding 
in Japan Tobacco will begin trading on 
Japan's eight stock exchanges Ocl 27. 

The government will retain about a 67 
percent stake in the company, which cur- 
rently commands an 82 percent share of 
Japan’s dgarette market, according to the 
company’s most recent prospectus. Its Oc- 
tober debut will make Japan Tobacco the 
first tobacco company to be listed on Japa- 
nese exchanges. 

Analysts said that Japan Tobacco's pri- 
ce/earnings ratio would be far higher than 


that of U.S.-based Philip Morris Cos. or 
BAT Industries PLC of Britain. 

According to a recent Jardine Fleming 
report, a Japan Tobacco price of 1.2 mil- 
lion yen would have put its P/E ratio at 
37.7, compared with 13.5 for Philip Morris 
and 1 1 .4 for BAT. 

Bui traders say investors are interested 
all the same. 

John Doyle, a trader at Chemical Securi- 
ties, said institutions and “some foreigners 
fed tike they have to buy it as well, because 
it’s the only tobacco stock, and they have 
to include it if they want to diversify their 
portfolio.” 


Intemationd Recniftment 

Every Thursday 
Contact Philip Oma 
Tel.: (33 1146 37 93 36 
Free (33 1)46 37 93 70 
or your nearest IHT office 
or representative 


Stake Offered 
In Manila Hotel 


MANILA — The vener- 
able Manila Hotd — which 
has sheltered U.S. presi- 
dents. a Japanese emperor 
and General Douglas Mac- 
Arthur — will become the 
latest Philippine govern- 
ment enterprise to be sold 
into private hands. 

A civil service pension 
fund that owns the hotel 
said Monday it was looking 
for a foreign partner to run 
the hotel and would even- 
tually sdl off 55 percent of 
its stake. 

Built in 1912 and once 
regarded as among the 
great Asian hotels, the ho- 
tel overlooking Manila Bay 
now is an hour's drive from 
the city’s business centers. 



ARGENTINE REPUBLIC 

GOVERNMENT OF THE PROVINCE OF SANTA FE 

MINISTRY OF WORKS, PUBUC SERVICES AND LODGING, PROVINCIAL DEPARTMENT OF ROAD SYSTEMS, 
PROGRAM FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE ROAD SYSTEM FOR THE PROVINCE OF SANTA FE 

KUWAIT FUND FOR ARAB ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 

PUBUC INTERNATIONAL BIDS FOR CONTRACTING THE EXECUTION OF WORKS 


pwpnmi 




Official Budget: $ 1 1 ,079.392 
Term of execution: 15 months 
Price of the Bid Document: S 3,600 
Opening: October 4. 1994 
Time: 11 A.M. 

Place for the Reception and Opening of the tenders: COMUNA 
DE VILA (Santa Fe Province) at the place and time set for said act 


Official Budget S 9,492,690 
Term of execution: 18 months 
Price of the Bid Document: $ 3,000 
Opening: October 6. 1994 
Time: 11 A.M. 

Place for the Reception and Opening of the tenders: COMUNA San 
Martin de (as Escobas (Santa Fe Province) until the day and time set 
for said act. 


Attempts to change the mar- positary receipts .“**“2 
gin system have met with firm Indian equity deno “““$“J - 
duration from the brokers foreign cnmsncy and traded m 




uaa biwu oj uiuu uig u* Then Indian companies 
margin trading. The issue has Capital at lower interest 

not yet been resolved. rates ffooded the international 

“Hoe are some first class provoking investors’ ire 

companies among the B-group wten share prices coi- 
ctmipanies.batthereisalackof j^sed soon after issue, 
liquidity in their shares," said ... 

Prariip Shah, managing director The embarrassing decision in 

of Credit Rating Information May to delay a $1 billion issue 
Services of India. He said he for Videsh Sanchar Nigam Lto-- 


lhe government-owned long- 
distance telephone monopoly, 
marked the worst of the turmoil 
for India’s attempts to list 
shares abroad. 

The situation brought closer 
scrutiny from bureaucrats m 
New Delhi who damped down 
on new issues and moved to 
tighten the requirements lor 
subsequent deals. 


Official Budget $ 4,398.370 
Term of execution: 10 months 
Pries of the Bid Document: $ 1 ,450 
Opening: October 7, 1994 
Time: 11A.M. 

Place for the Reception and Opening of the tenders: COMUNA 
SOLDINI (Santa Fe Province) on the day and time set for said act. 




Official Budget $ 3,269,000 
Term of execution: 12 months 
price of the Bid Document: $ 1.100 
Opening: October 14, 1994 
Time: 11 A.M. 

Place for the Reception and Opening of the tenders: 
COMUNA GOBERNADOR CRESPO (Santa Fe Province) 
until the day and time set for said act 


Official Budget $ 7,923,000 
Term of execution: 12 months 
Price of tiie Bid Document: $ 2,600 
Opening: October 1 1 , 1994 
Time: 1 1 A.M. 

Place for the Reception and Opening of the tenders: COMUNA Villa 
Mugueta (Santa Fe Province) until the day and time set for said ad 




Next Bids tor the Program 

• Provincial Road N*91 , section: Bustinza - TotoraB 

■ Santa Fe Circunvallation Avenue, section: Highway AP-01 National 
Road N* 11 (North). 

• Provincial Road N° 39, stretch: San Javier * National Road N" 1 1 , 
section: San Javier - Arroyo Saladilto Amargo. 

• Provincial Road N° 39 - stretch: San Cristobal - Crespo, section: 
San Cristobal - Km 25+000 

• Provincial Road N" 39 ■ stretch: San Cristobal - Crespo, section: 

Km 25+000 - Rio Salado. 









- — J LUUJ.uuiwiw 


*K 


Page 14- 


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Monday’s Closing 

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the dosing on Wall Street and do not reflec 
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1 Page 16 


ENTERNATIOPiAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 30, 1994 


/!\l 


SPORTS 




On Perfect Day, 
Yankee Stadium 


Is Perfectly Still 


By Ira Berkow 

Hew York Times Service 

N EW YORK — Yankee Stadium was like a morgue. The sun 
was shining brightly, the Held was gorgeous with the mani- 
cured grass as green as a pool table, the tan infield din was smartly 
raked. It was a perfect day for a ball game. The first-place 
Yankees, according to the schedule, were supposed to be playing 
the Texas Rangers, in the heat of a pennant race. But Yankee 
Stadium was as silent as a cadaver. 

Except for the whir of a sprinkler system that is run by comput 
- ers in the stadium basement and 


Vantage 

Point 



which pop up for a time first in 
right field, and then behind third 
base, and somewhere else after 
that, the playing field, the broad. 


wondrous sweeping diamond, was empty. No runners, no bitters, 
no one to err. 

Like the stands. like all of the 57,545 stark blue seats in the ball 
park. From the box seats to the grandstands to the bleachers that 
curve down From the f amiliar Gothic facade of the roof. Empty. 
No cheering. No booing. Nothing. 

If someone had been held captive in a cave for the last few 
weeks and was released to see a ball game here and didn't know 
anything about the strike — the dispute between the major league 
owners and the players that is now in its 1 9th day — he migb t have 
wondered: Had he arrived too late and the game was ova? After 
all. cigarette butts remain in the aisles, and peanut shells, and 
discarded soda cups. Or maybe there had been a bomb scare, and 
everyone evacuated. Surely something word had occurred. 

It was reminiscent of a recurring dream that Mickey Mantle 
had shortly after his retirement. He dreamed of going to a game 
and not being allowed in. That there were locks on the gates. But 
then he heard his name announced on the public address system. 
It was a sad d ream. A kind of nightmare. For baseball fans now, 
this, too. is a bad dream come true: 

It was Sunday and the skeleton crew in the Yankee office was 
off. The space in the parking lot reserved for George Steinbren- 
ner’s limousine, and those for the cars of his pinstriped employees, 
was vacant. 

Across the street from the ball park and under the elevated train 
tracks on River Road, Stan’s Sports Bar and Grill is shuttered. 
Discount Dugput is closed. As is Baseball Land. Only Stadium 
Souvenir is open, but the proprietor, Abdul Al Sacahi. says 
business is dead. 

‘‘Very slow, they wreck my business,” he said. He held up a slip 
of paper. “Here, this is my bill for the rent. $4.500. 1 can't pay it. 
Maybe have to dose up next week.” 

On the other side of Yankee Stadium is Macombs Dam Park, 
with a sign above a handball court that reads, “We Do Care. New 
York Yankees Neighborhood Project 2.” There is also a basket- 
ball court and a ball Held. 

At the ball field, there was, unlike the big white structure across 
the road, a game in progress. It was a Little League game between 
the green-and-white uniformed Rosado Design team and the red- 
and-white NatWest nine. 

The players were playing on a Held with grass up to their ankles. 
‘It’s a shame,” said Dennis Centeno, the NatWest coach. “One 



After Wimbledon, What? 

iOpen 


Martinez 



Conch ita Martinez begins Open test against Veronika Martinek of Germany. 


In First Round , Star Quality Counts 


New York Tunes Service 

While top-seeded Steffi Graf and Pete 
Sampras have been given a little extra time to 
heal injuries, the lineup for the first round of 
the U.S. Open was more stellar than last 
year's — even though the opening match was 
delayed by rain. 

After being criticized for fielding a weak 
opening-day lineup in 1993, U.S. Open offi- 
cials slated 12 seeded players for action Mon- 


day in addition to two other players whose 
foil 


owings exceed their r anking s- Andre 
i and Ivan Lendl. 


nan Earley, the Open’s referee, said this 
in the A 


iven 


year’s participants in the Arthur Ashe AIDS 
Challenge on Sunday were no 
special consideration for playing in the i 
ty event. 

“It's not that much tennis on a Sunday.” 
Earley said of the exhibition. “They would be 
practicing, anyway. We felt we needed the 
players.” 


The 20tb-ianked Agassi, will face a qualifi- 
er, Robert Eriksson of Sweden, in the second 
match on the Stadium Court. Scheduled first 
on the court was second-seeded Arantxa S4n- 
chez. Vicario against TinHa Ferrando, an Ital- 
ian who upset Monica Seles in the Open’s 
third round in 1990, but rain began falling 
about an hour before the two were to take the 
court and delayed the match. 

The first match on the Grandstand Court is 
second-seeded Goran Ivanisevic against an- 
other big server, Markus Zoecke of Germany. 

Six seeded players in each draw are sched- 
uled Monday. No. 3 Conchita Martinez goes 
against Veronika Martinek of Germany. 

What hasn't changed from last year is the 
Open’s decision to schedule first-round 
matches over three days. 

Sampras, who hasn’t played a match since 
July because of tendinitis in his left ankl e, will 
play Tuesday or Wednesday. Graf, who has a 
bad back, will play Tuesday. 


. By Robin Fran 

New York Tims Service 

NEW YORK — Unknown, underestimat- 
ed and tooshy to speak up about it, Gcmdhita 
Martinez, something of a national after- 
thought to the ubiquitous Arantxa Sanchez 
Vicario, didn't exactly plot to overthrow her, . 
lack, of reputation by winning Wimbledon 
this year. ■ 

The mere thought of having to curtsey to 
royalty was enough' to make the Spaniard 
forget what a backhand was. Phis, there was 
the problem of the serve-and-voQcy activists 
who tend to paralyze baseliners like her. 

“Everyone who plays serve-and-volley 
makes you suffer there,” said Martinez, 22, 
who had to outwit the virtuoso of all vofley- 
ers, nine-time champion Martina Navrati- 
lova, in the final. 

But one Wimbledon title does not guaran- 
tee an aura of Grand Shin invincibility. 

Even after a coveted Saturday practice ses- 
sion on the Stadium Court at the National 
Tennis Center, that ominous concrete con- 
coction where U.S. Open champions are 
made. Martinez didn’t strut away convinced 
of her ability to seize a second career Grand 
Slam there. , . 

Martinez doesn't think the noise, the food 
and the endless metropolitan traffic tie-ups 
are conducive to the quiet brand oi tennis she 
prefers. 

“If s quite difficult to put your ttmA into 
this to urn ament,” she said after a co nf using 
array of practice sessions divided -between 
Central Park, where each bounce is$n adven- 
ture. and Flushing Meadows, where just get- 
ting there is a crusade. 

And when tire subject is stealing ihe No.l 
spot from Steffi Graf, a maneuver that would 
involve circumventing Sfinchcz Vicario, the 
reticent Martinez, not a chatterbox to start 


a nd makeups titan Liz and Dick in their 

same quality van Harpen initially liked 
jm Martinez, her humility in a sport jammed 
with braggarts, that bas now become cause 
for occasional irritation. 

“Sic could do it if she wanted; she should be 

Nal,” van Harpen said. “She already has the 
shots, but shtfsstffl not a real tough player, and 
that's whafs missing. I mean, what would be 
easier, fra Graf to get that topspin backhand - 
she needs, or for Sfinchez Vicario to get a 
fondkmdfikeGmcinta’s, orfdrCant±dta to get 
the fitness of both -of than? 

: “It’s starting to come, but with Conchita 
nothing comes overnight. Tve been telling her 
for seven years to lose weight, and finally now 
she’s done it.” 

Van Harpen admits he's the perfect candi- 
date to give Martinez, 48-9 this year with a 1 6- 

4 hard-court record, the final push she nee d s. 

**Tm the kind of person who. would give up 
two fingers to be No.1, and Fd give one finger 
for her to he No.1,” he said. “My wife thinks 
that’s not normal • and probably Conchita 
feds the same, but that’s just the way I am.” 

WbDc Martinez isn’t about to go to extrc- 
mesto get ahead in her sport, she was vehement 
in her dedrion to- train with van Harpen. 

She ignited a family feud when she decided, 
at 15, to leave home and train in Zurich with 
van Harpen, an instructor who gained renown 
for bis work with the early blooming S&ochez 
Vicario. Her mother didn’t want her to go, but 
her Mvr understood her detaminauoa to 
work with thebest tennis teacher available. 

Player and coach have been together for 
sevenyeaxs now, a span that has 'seen Marti- 
nez dimb from nowhere to No3 in the worid. 



she said of her goals, which don’t seem press- 
ing enough to qualify as obsessions. 

But there is a ready antidote (he Iow- 
dedbel Martinez approach to iifeiS&e simply 
leaves the Machiavellian strategy toiler 
coach, Eric van Harpen, a man who possesses 
sufficient chutzpah for both and the longtime 
mentor with whom she has had mote break- 


It was van Harpen who told Martinez she 
not only could bat should win Wimbledon. 

According to Navratilova, who ended her 
22-year Grand Slam singles career with the 
loss to Martinez at Wimbledon, the Spaniard 


to the low- certainly didn't perform like a player with just 

s&e simply two years of Wimbledon experience. 


“She passed me as well as anybody ever 
has, even Monica . Sdefc because she passed 
well from both sides,” Navratilova said. 
“She's playing great teams, period." 


• ¥ 


t 


* ; i-v-i 


Lots of Surprises as NFL Revs Up for 75th Season 



of my kids could get hurt because you can’t see the holes in the 
field.” 


Some around Yankee Stadium thought the owners right, some 
the players. Some thought neither was right. 

But it was a perfect day for a ball game. Yet all was still. Like a 
morgue. 


All Quiet on Strike Front 


The Associated Press 


NEW YORK — Players and 
owners were expected to speak 
to federal mediators Monday, 
the 18th day erf the baseball 
strike, as nine more games were 
canceled, raising the total to 
232 — more than 10 percent of 
the season. 


“There’s nothing going on," 
said Bud Selig, the executive 


council chairman, by telephone 
from Milwaukee. 


Negotiations broke off Thurs- 


day and no further talks are 
scheduled to end the walkout. 

“Tve had no contact with 
anyone.” said Donald Fehr, the 
union head. 

But John Calhoun Wells, di- 
rector of the Federal Mediation 
and Conciliation Service, said 
he will try to call another bar- 
gaining session for the middle 
of the week 

No progress is foreseen in the 
talks until at least after the 
owners' quarterly meetings, 
scheduled for Detroit from 
Sept. 7-9. 


The Associated Press 

For those out of touch with Ameri- 
can football since January when the 
Dallas Cowboys won their second 
straight Super Bowl by beating Buffa- 
lo. 30-13. the first National Football 
League game next Sunday will be 
something of a shock. 

Jimmy Johnson is gone after coach- 
ing Dallas to two straight Super Bowl 
victories. He found that be and his old 
pal, Jerry Jones, the Cowboys' owner, 
could not fit both their egos mto Texas 
Stadium. 


Barry Switzer is the new guy, leaving 
; ana allowing 


things pretty much alone 
Emmitt Smith. Troy Aikman and Mi- 
chael Irvin do their stuff. 


CBS is no longer broadcasting the 
games because Fox paid the NFL 
$1.58 billion, or about $400 million 
more than CBS offered. 

Then there’s this two-point conver- 
sion stuff, part of an attempt to get 
more offense in the game after a sea- 
son of 12r9 and 9-6 yawners. 

So far it has been used a lot in 


exhibitions, but will be used a lot less 
in regular season. 

Bui more scoring is likely to come 
from more subtle changes involving 
the kicking game and pass defense. 

There are five new coaches, includ- 
ing Switzer and -Buddy Ryan, resur- 
rected with the Cardinals, now finally 
identified by the state of Arizona, in- 
stead of the city of Phoenix. The oth- 
ers: June Jones in Atlanta, Norv 
Turner in Washington and Pete Car- 
roll with the New York Jets. 

Don Shula, the winningest coach in 
NFL history, will mark another mile- 
stone on Oct. 2 when the Dolphins 
play Dave Shula’s Cincinnati Bengals 
— the first time father-and-son head 
coaches have faced each other. 

The biggest impact on the NFL this 
year comes from the new salary cap, 
which limits each team to spending 
$34.6 million oh salaries. 

A lot of other name players have 
moved or no longer have jobs. Phil 
Simms, Karl Mecklenburg; Dennis 
Smith and Charles Mann, to name just 
four, are no longer playing. 


To the NFL, the emphasis is on 
offense — particularly touchdowns — 
after a season in which games averaged 
only 37.4 points. 

So tiie NFL moved kickoffs back 
five yards to the 30-yard- line, and low- 
ered tees; a move that in preseason has 
improved offensive field position by 
10 to IS yards. 

But perhaps the biggest change is 
one that places the ballon failed field- 
goal attempts at the spot from which it 
is lacked, instead of the line of scrim- 
mage — 7 or 8 yards farther up the 
field. 

The favorites for this year remain 
the teams that won last year, with a few 
additions — like Arizona. For while 
Dallas is favored to walk off with the 
NFC East, the Cardinals seem to have 
a good shot 

The Giants are building and the. 
Eagles have to replace a host of free 
agents who defected in the last two 
years. And the Redskins, 4-12 last 
are starting from scratch under 


changing quarterbacks: only Green 
tt Favrfc is where he was last 


Bay’s Brett ... 

year. The Packets are one of the favor- 
ites in tiie division. The co-favorite; 
Minnesota. Detroit, tiie champion a 


year ago, figures to be in the picture. 
In .the West, jhe 


year, ar 
Turner. 

The NFC Central is the divirion of 


, 49ers are ow»* 

whelming, with Atlanta and New Or- 
leans fighting for second and a wild- 
card. 

The Falcons me more stable with 
Jones replacing the dismissed Jerry 
Glanville as head coach while tiie 
Saints hope to rebuild their offense, 
with Jim Everett. 

- The Rams have running back Je- 
rome Bettis, the offensive rookie of the 
year last season. 

The Raiders are the favorites in the 
AFC West, the league's most exciting 
division. 

Denver has finally given John Eiway 
recovers— Anthony Miller and Mike 
Pritchard to go with Shannon Sharpe: 
But it has not given Wade Phillips much 
of a defense. Kansas CSty has that de- 
fense phis Joe Montana, but needs help 
at running badq.San Diego needs more 


pooch and Seattle needs more players . 
to go with quarterback Rick Mirer, de- 
fensive Kraman Cortez Kennedy ami 
safety Engene Robinson, 

_ Pittsburgh, 9-7 a year ago, is proba- i . 
Wy the fawsite in the Central if nut- 
rang bade Bany Foster stays healthy, ~ 
Houston, with a . league-best playoff 
string of seven straight seasons, should - 
challenge if Carlson stays healthy. 

; . Cleveland thinks it is ready for.the 

playoffs, but it needs a consistent sea- 
son from Vmny Testaverde, or Mark 


:* r.. 


1 i 


S-c. - 
t'/ k. . - 
t* . 


* v 




3-13 last year, brings up the rear al- 
though iJ has a top rookie in the No. 1 
overall pick, defensive tackle Dan (Big 




and Miami look like the 
dass of the Easy although New Eng- 
land dosed last season with four 
straight victories under Bill ParceUs. 

The Jets have veterans like Boomer 
Eriasan, Ronnie Lott and Art Monk 
and a decent defense, but look like a 
■500 team. Indianapolis has an excitii 
rookie in running bade Marshall Fs ' 
but a history of bad hick. 




l v , 

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DENNIS THE MENACE 


PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 30, 1994 


Page 17 


SPORTS 


18 - Year- Old Makes Golf History 


By Larry Dorman 

New York Timex Kenri ee 

PONTE' VEDRA BEACH, Florida 
— Playing with the steadfast persis- 
tence of a many years his senior, 
18-yeaiH>ld Tiger Woods fought his 
way into the record books, defe at i n g 
Trip Kuehne, 22, in the UJ5. Amateur 
Gou Championship to become the 
youngest winner in the 99-year history 
of the event. 

Woods, the first black man to win 
the wodd’s most prestigious amateur 
tournament, battled back from the 
abyss. His charge from six holes down 
to a 1-up victory is, according to the 
U.S. Golf Association, the greatest 
comeback in U.S. Amateur history. It 
was also the most dramatic. Woods 
played the last 12 boles of the 36-hole 
match Sunday in four-under par, mak- 
ing prus from the trees with the virtu- 
osity of a young Seve Ballesteros. 

“I have never been 6 down and 
won,” said Woods, of Cypress, Cali- 
fornia. “It's an amazing feeling to 
come bade from 6 down against a great 
player. Indescribable. I have been that 
far down and lost. Coming back from 


that far back* hanging in there, is the 
best thing about winning.” 

Unprecedented achievements are 
becoming derigueur for Woods, whose 
fust name is Eldrick and who will be a 
freshman at Stanford University in the 
falL He was also, at the age of IS, the 
youngest winner of the U.S. Junior 
Amateur Championship, which he 
won three times. He also is the only 
player to have won both the Junior 
Amateur and the Amateur. 

His accomplishments in the world 
of junior golf attracted much atten- 
tion. This victory is sure to raise expec- 
tations even further. By reaching the 
finals he earned a spot in the Masters, 
and the victory gave Mm entree into 
the U.S. Open and the British Open. 
Winners of the U.S. Amateur do not 
necessarily go on to become great golf- 
ers — the roil call of amateur champi- 
ons who had marginal careers is a 
lengthy one — but Woods’s name will 
now tie inscribed on the Havemayer 
Trophy alongside some of the game’s 
finest players. 

These can be little question that it 
belongs there. Kuehne, a junior psy- 
chology major at Oklahoma Slate Uni- 


versity who was a third-team all-Ameri- 
can this season, was a formidable 
opponent. In the morning round, 
Kuehne birdied 7 of the first 13 holes 
and shot the equivalent of a round of 
66. In match play, the low scorer on 
each hole wins that bole, and the player 
wins the match when be is more boles 
ahead of Ms opponent than there are 
holes remaining. Kuehne was 4 up go- 
ing into the final 18 boles Sunday and 
was 3 up going into the final nin e holes. 

Then Woods came roaring back, 
with a birdie at the 1 1 th hole, par saves 
from the woods at the 14th and 15th 
holes, a birdie to tie al the 16th hole 
and then a spectacular 14-foot birdie 

S itt on the infamous 17th, the Island 
ole, from the water’s edge to the 
heart of the cup. That pun followed a 
pitching wedgje shot to the most 
treacherous pin placement on the 
green, a shot that bounced once and 
stopped right of the pin, only two feet 
from the water. 

]Thal shot was a great gamble that 
id off,” said Kuehne, of McKinney, 
exas. “You don’t see too man y of the 
pros hitting to the right of that pin. My 
hat’s off to him. It was great, great 
playing 



Smart T. nm e K i H .Tbc Arjoaucd Press 

2-year-old golf fan shares sweet moment with U.S. Amateur champ. 


Noisy End for Commonwealth Games 


The Associated Press 

VICTORIA, British Columbia — The 
Commonwealth Games, not known for con- 
troversy, ended amid protests, disqualifica- 
tions, acrimony and another drug scandal. 

Horace Dove-Edwin of Sierra Leone was 
stripped of the silver n»dal he won in the 100 
meters after testing positive for steroids. 
After boxer Godson Sawah of Ghana had 
been stripped of his bronze medal and the 
Jamaican hurdler Robert Foster had been 
sent heme, it was the third drug scandal. 

Dove-Edwin reportedly was refusing to 
give bade his medaL 

Other athletes would like to forget the final 
day Sunday, too. Cathy Freeman of Australia 
thought she had had wem her third gold medal 
when she overtook Sally Gunnell in the 
stretch and gained the 1,600 meters title in 
games’ record time. Minutes later, her team 


was disqualified because she had impeded 
Fatima Yusuf of Nigeria on the final bend. 
Nigeria was disqualified, too, for an illegal 
changeover. 

From that point, it was protest and coun- 
terprotesL The English quartet, wMch fin- 
ished second, also was initially disqualified. 
After they complained, too, officials gathered 
again to debate the race. Eventually, the Eng- 
fish were given the gold medal and their time, 
3:27.06, replaced the Australians* 3:26.84 as 
the games’ record. There was a long delay 
until the result of the final event, the men’s 
1,600 relay, was announced after more pro- 
tests. The outcome was Kenya’s disqualifica- 
tion. 

Steve Monegbetti of Australia look home 
the gold in the marathon, and despite En- 
gland’s late rush, Australia dominated the 10- 
day sports event. 


A Show of Support for Cyclist 


Agenee France-Pease 

PARIS — The International 
Olympic Comittee and the In- 
ternational Cycling Union have 
joined forces to help Miguel In- 
durain, the four-time Tour de 
France winner, clear his name 
of drug-taking charges. 

A drug lest conducted in 
France more than three months 
ago showed traces of Salbuta- 
moL, a substance that is not 
banned by the cycling union, 
but is banned by the French 
Cycling Federation. 

The test was adminis tered on 
May 15 when the 30-year-old 
Spaniard won the Tour de 
l’Oise cycling race. 

The substance is found in 
medication taken to relieve 


breathing problems. Because of 
pollen allergies, indurain had 
such problems this past spring. 

In nearly a dozen years of 
competition as a professional, 
he has never before failed a 
drug test, including those ad- 
ministered to him every day of 
the dozens that he has led the 
Tour de France. 

During the Tour de l'Oise. 
indurain made no attempt to 
hide Ms use of Venloline, which 
contains Salbutamol. 

The French federation's dis- 
ciplinary co mmis sion will meet 
On SepL 6 to consider the case. 
Indurain could be suspended 
and stripped of his victory in 
the Tour de l'Oise. 

French cyclist Laurent Ma- 


Woes May Stall 
Schumacher’ s 
Drive for Tide 


dous was banned For a month in 
April after testing positive for 
the same substance during a 
race in France. 

The root of the problem lies 
in lack of uniformity over which 
drugs are banned. The ICU 
bases its list of banned drugs on 
the IOCs own list, but the 
French go further, outlawing a 
range of products permitted at 
the Olympics. 

“Nobody is happy with the 
present situation, said Jean- 
Marie Leblanc, director of the 
Tour de France. “This confu- 
sion is damaging to the image of 
the sport.” 

Indurain’s Spanish team 
Banesto. based m Madrid, is 
upset at a “smear campaign” 
against its premier rider. 


Reuters 

SPA-FRANCORCHA MPS. 
Belgium — Michael Schu- 
macher and the Benetton Ford 
team may have contributed to 
their own problems, leading to 
the world championship lead- 
er’s disqualification from the 
Belgian Grand Prix. 

This became clear early Mon- 
day — more than nin e hours 
after the race ended and four 
hours after the 25-year-old Ger- 
man driver was disqualified — 
when it was revealed that a rival 
team’s designer had warned be- 
fore the race of an impending 

disqualification. 

Alan Jenkins, technical direc- 
tor for the Arrows t^m said he 
feared that at least one car 
might run into problems be- 
cause of the difficulties of 
choosing the correct dry weath- 
er set-up at the Spa-Francor- 
champs circuit after two days of 
heavy rain. 

Jenkins explained that all the 
cars and teams, in trying to 
maximize the downforce for 
their cars, might choose as low a 
riding height as possible. But, 
he warned, this could lead to 
problems with too much wear 
of the wooden skidblock under 
the car. 

Schumacher, who finished 
the race first, comfortably 
ahead of his British title rival 
Damon Hill was disqualified 
more than five hours later be- 
cause the skidblock on his car 
was undersized. 

The block, a plank of wood 
installed under the car to make 
it slower as a safety measure, 
was 1.6 millimeters thinner 
than the permitted minim um of 
9 millimeters in some places. 


said a report by the Formula 
One technical delegate. 

The team claimed Schu- 
macher had had “technical 
problems" with Ms car after his 
first pit slop and said that this 
might have resulted in his spin, 
on lap 19, when the plank may 
have been scraped. 

The plank was introduced to 
reduce the aerodynamic effi- 
ciency of the cars at the Ger- 
man Grand Prix in July. The 
plank has made the cars slower, 
and in most cases more stable. 
Teams attempt to gain maxi- 
mum performance by running 
with the lowest ride- height pos- 
sible. 

The Benetton Ford team ap- 
pealed the disqualification, but 
it is now feared this third dis- 
pute with the International 
Automobile Federation will 
shrink Schumacher's runaway 
lead and stall his chances of 
becoming the youngest Formu- 
la One champion ever. 

Having won the first four 
races of the season and six of 
the first eight. Schumacher and 
his team have been hit since the 
British Grand Prix at Silver- 
stone by a series of self-inflicted 
mishaps and allegations of 
cheating that have wounded 
team morale. 

Schumacher is due to face a 
FLA board of appeal in Paris on 
Tuesday to appeal his two-race 
ban and six-point deduction for 
ignoring a black flag at Silver- 
stone in July. 

The team also has to face the 
FIA’s world motor sport coun- 
cil on SepL 7 to answer charges 
of illegally tampering with a re- 
fueling rig before the German 
Grand Prix. 


SCOREBOARD 


Commonwealth Games • 

SURMTS RESULTS 
a TRACK AND P1EL0 

P MW 

LSW— 1, RmiMn dmoaob KMmSOUO; Z 
Kevin Sufflvnn, Comte 3£A79; X John 
Movock, EraAmt 907. 32. 

m ratal— 1, Canada (Donovan Datin'. 
Canton OadMn, O ta war Gflbort, Booty 
Sarin) JUtiXAnctroHo (Shone Naytoe. Pout 
Hondvreoa, Ttmottiy Jackson. Damloa 
Marenl.mn; X Enaiand IJohn Jason, PMUp 
( toedlucLTobiaa Bax, Torre MROkma >.39.39. 

Jovtita— 1. Stove Dodder. England. 27J-J; 
X Michael HID, EtwtaML 7t*+i X Covin Low 

Brave, New Zaatona. DU-IB. 

Mot not— t. Mofttum Simeon. Eftotand, «■ 
11V*; XCowrlnmr IretamL Now Znotand, 43-7; 
1 Chinn Urn Moerte 6MW. 

Triple l i i w w t Juttan Galley, England, » 
toaHPtatadiMlGaiiMi recant arevtotara- 
corn. SSTte set tor Marine Hotfltondreoa. Cv 
pm rent; 7 We), Jonat h an EAranh. Erw- 
kind and Brian Wellman, Bermuda. 55-VY*. 

1M0 rotor—' I. Enatand (David McKamte 
Peter Crompton, Hodrtan Patrick Duoine 
Lcxtoio), 3:02.14 IGamo* recant previous re- 
conk 3:<ttAX set Ov Kenya. WDi: 2, Jamaica 
(Orville Taylor. Dennis Bloks, Unval Laird, 
Gantt RaUnsen), 3:8X32; ITrindadand To- 
bona (Patrick Delict. Men De SMj. Hayden 
S Wadena. Ion Morris). 3:0X78. 

Mo untain l , Sfatoon Mo nwPwffl. Austra- 
lia,] hours. 11 minutes. 4J second*; 2. Sean 
Qumv, Australia, 2: 14:57; X Mark Hadmtte 
Enaiand. 2:15:11. 

Mttoeicft olr Mn r otoe n 1. Paul Wloalra. 
Auatraltel (37:33; X Ivon Newman, Enaiand. 
l:«(J5; X Butowdn Lucas. New- Zealand. 
1:42:19. 


van Campbell. Dean H omat lwH. Inca Turner, 
SamaeRldiarriU,3:2US;xCanado tAianra 
Yafclwchuk. Stacy Boworv Donakta Duprev. 
Ow n a o l n e Cranks). 3:32 a 

urnai ^ 

(through 217 areals) 

OoM SBvarBrnoze Total 


Atslrnlta 

87 

62 

43 

1B2 

Canada 

40 

« 

46 

128 

Enatand 

31 

« 

49 

125 

Now- Zealand 

■s ■ 

Iff 

20 

41 

Ntoorto 

11 

13 

»3 

37 

India 

6 

11 

7 

24 

Scottond 

6 


11 

20 

wales 

S 

6 

6 

19 

Konya 

7 

4 

8 

19 

South Africa 

2 

4 

5 

11 

H. Ireland 

S 

2 

3 

10 

Jamaica 

2 

4 

2 

8 

Malaysia 

2 

3 

2 

7 

Zimbabwe 

9 

3 

3 

6 

Cyprus 

2 

1 

2 

5 

Zamtda 

1 

1 

2 

4 

Homo Kona 

0 

0 

4 

4 

Nauru 

3 

8 

0 

3 

Sri Lanka 

1 


a 

3 

Pakistan 

0 

0 

3 

3 

Usanaa 

0 

■ 

2 

2 

TrhvToDoao 

• 

B 

2 

2 

Namibia 

1 

0 

1 

2 

P. New Guinea 

0 

1 

0 

1 

w. Samoa 

0 

1 

0 

1 

liolewma 

0 

6 

i 

1 

Ghcna 

> 

0 

1 

1 

Guernsey 

0 

0 

1 

l 

Norfolk island 

0 

0 

i 

1 

SmrdtoUos 

0 


1 

1 

Toazanto 

0 

0 

1 

1 

Tonga 

8 

0 

1 

1 


(Wfl 

m 

ton-str - 



-1. Kcftv Holmes, England, 4:0884; X 
Paula Schnarr, Canada. 4:045; X Gwen Orif- 
Htax South Africa, 4: tat 6. 

«M retoy— 1, Nigeria (FaKti Meton, Mary 
TombtrL CJOpam- Thompson. Mary OnyoU), 
42.99; X Australia (Montauw Mien. Catherine 
FreonwaMoflnrtB Go Instant Kathleen Sam- 
twin. 4X43; X England (Stephanie Douglas, 
Geraldine McLeod, Shnmone Jacobs. Paula 
mamas). 43 .46, 

MOO relay— 1, England (pftytis Smith. Troev 

Goddard. Linda Kaouah, Sally Otnaehl. 
3:27.06 (Gomes record, prevtoos record, 
3 :27.19, se) bv Enatand. T9B0 ; X Jontolco I fte- 


WORLD SERIES 

Scores from Sunday's aw mad of me dirs 
2 mUton d tonWM bte Play i d an the Wiff- 
yard CM2Hne*r), par-79 Fhcdoae Country 
Ctab worth Coma to Akron. OWo: 

Jose Maria Wanted, Santa 4+67-49-07— a* 
scan Hoctx United Stales 714HB-7D-Z7D 
Brad Faxon, Uni led States *WMW*-27i 
Stove Lowery, united Slates *7-4*44-72— 271 
John Htnton. United States 73-64-64-71—272 
Mark McMwUy. Zimbabwe «-6»-*5-70— 272 
Mike Hetoeaii United States 71-67-45-70—273 
Fred Couples. United States 69-7045-70-274 
Greg Norman, Australia 047-48-72—274 
Kate Irwte Unfted Stales 7045-71 -70— 276 
Nlefc. Price. Zimbab w e 604*49-73—276 


BASEBALL 
American League 

CHICAGO— Stoned 2-vear player develop- 
ment agreement with Prince William Can- 
nons, CL. 

BASKETBALL 

National Basketball Association 
BOSTON— Signed Erie Man) rasx cm tor. id 
multiyear contract 

FOOTBALL 

Nat i on al Football League 

ARIZONA— Waived Perry Carter and Most 
Richardson, comer H utto .- Orta Swartz, auar- 
lerbodc Darryl Hardy. UnenocKer; and David 
Wtudno. de t ensi ve end. Stoned Kart Dunbar, 
defensive end. Pvt Garrison Hears, running 
hack, on phvslcolhn'taabto-to-parlarai list. 

ATLANTA— WWved Milch Dovta. lineback- 
er; BrvrmAddban. safety; Keith Alev and AJal 
KalanJuvahj, guards; Tvofcg Jackson raid 
Thomas WtflMms, defensive ends. Put Corev 
Dixon. wide recoiver, on Inlured reserve. 

BUFFALO — Waived Eddie Fuller, running 
bock; Gton Youna linebacker; John PnreJte 
de f e ns ive lineman; Sean Crocker and FDmol 
Johnson; defensive hacks; ana Crato Hendrick- 
son and Jerry Ostraskl, offensive linemen. 

CHICAGO— Traded Jim Schwann, line- 
backer. to Dallas for undlsdosed 1996 draft 
pick. Waived Keilh Jennings. Hunt end. 

CINCINNATI — Reggie Johnson, (torn end. 
has failed ream physical. 

CLEVELAND— Waived Brad Goebel, <war- 

terbadc; Mario Johnson, defensive lackto; 
Marcus Lee. running back; Andy McCollum, 
tackle; Rod Mitsfead. ouard: Patrick Rowe, 
wide receiver; and Percy Snow, llnebachor. 

DALLAS— Waived Dewane Dotson and 
Roosevelt Cnlllm. linebackers; Matt Joyce, 
offensive lineman; Lindsay Chapman and 
Tony Richardson, running backs; Darren 
StudstllL safety ; Coleman Bell mid John Do- 
vis. tight ends; and Shelby Hill, wide receiver. 

DENVER— Trooed Tommy Moddov, nunr- 
terbock. to LA. Roms for 1995 4itwound rkoff 
pick, waived Frank Robinson and Sebastian 
Savage, defensive backs; Dwavne Carswell ond 
Kcflh McKeHer. ttohf ends; Rod Smith, wide 
receiver; ond Kenny Hull offensive tackle. 

DETROIT— Put Kevin Scott, comertwck. 
an Inlured reserve, waived vauohn Bryant. 
comertMck; Eric Green and Richard Wood- 
lev. wide receivers; Kyle Moore aid James 
Wilson, defensive ends; John Oglesby, run- 
ning back; and Marry Thompson, light end. 

GREEN BAY— Pul Sammy walker, corner. 


bock, on Inlured reserve, waived Dexter 
McNabb, M Ibock; Ed Kina Lance Zeno aid 
Charles Hope, offenrive linemen; Bernard 
Carter, linebacker; and BUI Scnroeder and 
winie Harris, wide receivers. Acquired 
Charles Jordon, wide receiver, hum LA. Raid- 
ers tor ureBsclosed T99S drafl pick. Pul Aaron 
Taylor. auarcL an phvslcally-unablo-to-per- 
form ItsL Stoned Mike Holmgren, coach, to 3- 
vear contract extonslan (fwough 1999 season. 

HOUSTON— Re-stoned Lorenm White, run- 
ning back, to I-yenr contract. Waived Lee 
GiBsendancr, wide receiver; JoH Neal, 
guard; Shawn Harper. offensive Tackle; Le- 
mamki HolL Unebacker; ond Emanuel Mer- 
lin and Tony Brown, coruorbacks. Pm Tom- 
my Stowers, tight end. ond Sean Jackson, 
running bock, an Inlured reserve. 


■ru,r^, r 




' -J ' ' 

CROATIAN OPEN 
la Umog 
Final 

Alberta Berasalegul (I). Spain, def. Kami 
Kuaeni IS), Slovakia. 6-2. 64. 

HAMLET CUP 
In Com mack, N.Y. 

Final 

Yevgeny Kafewkav 151, Russia del Cedric 
Ptoitne (t), France, s-7. 61, 6Z 

OTB INTERNATIONAL OPEN 
In Schenec ta dy, N.Y. 

Metre Final 

Jacco Eitlnnn. Nefhertonds. def. Chuck Ad- 
ams. United States; 61 64. 

Women's Ftato 

Judith Wtesner (B). Austria def. Larisa Wel- 
land. Latvia WL 36, 64. 


DUTCH FIRST DIVISION 
Rada JC Kerkrode 1. FC Twenty Enschede 1 
Willem It THburg X NAC Breda o 
NEC Nllmogen X FC UtrecM 3 
Dordrecht ■90 1, Ferenoord Rotterdam i 
a lax Amsterdam 3, RKC Waotwllk I 
Vitesse Anthem X PSV Eindhoven 4 
votondo m X GA Eagles Deventor 0 
StnmUags: FC Volendam, PSV Eindhoven, 
Ajax Amsterdom, Heerenveen. Willem il Til- 
burg, and FC Utrecht, 3 points; Dordrecht ‘to. 
Fevenoard Rotterdam, Rada JC Kerkrode, 
and FC Twenty En schede, I; MW, Saarte 
NEC Nllmegen, Vitesse Arnhem. RKC Waal- 
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gles Deventer. X 


CROSSWORD 


ACROSS 

i Son of Abraham 
6 RR slops 
to ill-considered 
14 Han destination 
is Justice Black 


ts\ .. and to 

goodnight” 

17 Whittles down 
ib The sun, to the 
skin 

19 Here's husband 



20 Noted baseball 
announcer 

22 Give the boot to 

23 Actor Ray 

24 Lustily robust 
2 « Cervantes’s 

Panxa 

30 Improvise 

32 Mountain oj 
central Russia 

33 Defense 
acronym 

as Actress 
Christine 
39 Fixed shoes 
41 Emancipates 

43 Borgnine’s 
■From Here to 
Eternity” role 

44 Pronounced 

48 Abstract artist 
Paul 

47 dear, as a tape 

49 Loco 

*1 Quarterback. 

often 

s« Misplace 
s« Compassion 
57 Afl worked up 
«2 Concept 

E3 Tastes 

•4 * of Athens* 

46 First name In 
casino 
ownership 
67 Option word 
6* Gentry 
ae Educator 
Sullivan 
to Noticed 
7i Acted 

grandmotherly 

DOWN 

1 Mischief-maker 

2 Cook quickly 
a Caldwell's 

‘God's Unte 


4 Scored on a 
serve 

5 Algiers quarter 
5 Archeologist's 

frag mem 
7 Harbor helper 
a Author James 
9 Horse color 
lO Clinton's home 
team 

11 Certain Alaskan 

12 Kind ot fund 

13 Cursory 
zi By onese« 

25 Is sickly 

24 Malibu sight 

27 Neighborhood 

28 Cartoon LSI 
Thomas 

29 Nea» miss 
31 Celebrated 

Freud case 
34 Hubbubs 
at Dance 

performed m a 
grass skirt 

37 Hign schooler 

38 Smkirig-in 
phrase 

40 Knowledge 
42 “Aeneid' queen 
45 Setback 
48 Gets up 
so Cleated 

si Jar? rrumpew 
Louis 

52 ‘The Age of 
Anxiety' poet 

53 Shock jock 
Howard 

85 Novel'S 1 Til |ie 

58 Cairo's nver 
s* Hawaiian 

seaport 
so Spew forth 
6t Dull routine 
as Pulp penman 
BuntJine 


itaJLby JowlM" sSSZzaecn' 


4? New York Tones/ Edited by' Will Shorts. 


Solution to FunJe of Aug. 29 


naans anas aaa 
bqqiiej nnma natziH 
000Bn onaa nasa 
HciaHnniosainsaaaci 
□on Ejaaaaa 
EDC3130Q □□aaa 
DH00 naan asn 
onoDBaaasaBSHBS 
rasa □□□□ niaoQ 
Bsaas 0 aaaaa 
Haanaa □□□ „ 

C3QQSSQC3ianD0lMa3 
SBHQ oaQQ □annul 
qbdb ulidu aaaaa 



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Page 18 


** 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 30, 1994 


ART BUCHWALD 


Island FundrRaisers 



A/f ARTHA’S VINEYARD, 
1 Vi. Massachuseti$ — One of 
the downsides of Martha’s 
Vineyard getting so much pub- 
licity is that everyone is under 
the impression this island is 
loaded and ripe for political 
fund-raisers. 

The politicians now call it 
“Martha’s Eldorado.” 

I realized how bad it had got- 
ten when I received a call from 
Bladings 
Landing. *Tm 
giving a code- 
tail party for 
Mngsy Krewp- 
shaw who’s 
running for 
governor of 
Hawaii We’ll 
have hot hors 
d’oeuvres and 
a free clam 
bar. Since you DncMW8W 
live on the island it will only 
cost you 51,000, unless you 
want to shake Mugs/s hand. 
That will cost another 5500.” 

”1 know this is a ally ques- 
tion, but why would someone 
who lives on Martha's Vineyard 
care who gets elected in Ha- 
waii." 

“Because you live on an is- 
land, and everyone must pay 
attention to the politics of other 
islands around the world.” 


“When is itr 
“Wednesday night” 

“I can't come, I m going to a 
clambake for Katherine Ban- 
net ti who is running for senator 
from Oregon.’’ 


AD Hail the Corvette, 
Now a Museum Piece 

The Associated Press 

BOWLING GREEN. Ken- 
tucky — More than 100,000 
Corvette fans are expected to 
appear at the opening sched- 
uled this weekend of the Na- 
tional Corvette Museum. 

The museum, run by a non- 
profit foundation, will display 
more than 50 models and proto- 
types of the Corvette, which 
first appeared in 1953. 


“Why are you doing that?” 

“Because the Luodenfellers 
are giving it, and I am hoping to 
get in the Felix Neck golf dub. 
LundenfeDer, who is on the 
board of Felix Neck, indicated I 
had a much better chance of 
getting m if I gave 51,500 to 
Katherine.” 

“Go to both.” 

“It’s not just the Lunden- 
feller’s blast The Renwicks 
want me to come to a square 
dance for Edsel Cowbdt who is 
running for district attorney in 
Denver. They’re charging 
51,000 to get in and 51,500 ex- 
tra if you want to dance with 
Cowbell’ s wife. Frankly Fm 
getting a little tired of all these 
political fish fries. Why can’t we 
enjoy our vacations on this is- 
land like everyone else?” 

“No one says you have to 
come to the party. Just send us a 
check for $1,000 and well mark 
you present Martha's Vineyard 
has now become the fatted calf 
of fund-raising, replacing 
Southampton and Malibu 
Beach.” 

□ 

“How do you know we have 
so much money?” 

“Princess Duma isn’t going 
to vacation with poor people, 
m make a deal with you. If you 
give me a check for 5750 we’ll 
take your picture with the can- 
didate, which is suitable for 
framing and can be hung in 
your boat house or your guest 
room on the Vineyard.” 

“I would probably agree to 
the proposal, but just this 
morning I heard from Senator 
Dogwood’s people and they 
want me to attend a midnight 
sail to raise money for his de- 
fense fund. He’s accused of 
stealing tip money from the 
Senate cloakroom, so it’s a good 
cause.” 

I passed on the Hawaii bash 
— but it didn’t matter because, 
as soon I hung up, the phone 
tang. It was Iris Caplan, who 
wanted to make sure 1 was com- 
ing to a fund-raiser for Con- 
gressman Doggerel of Florida. 
She promised ne would give a 
private briefing on his plan to 
clean up the water in the Ever- 
glades. 


Gone With the Sequel: Moscow’s False Scarletts 


By Alessandra Stanley 

New York Tima Service 

M OSCOW — American fans of Margaret 
Mitchell’s classic novel, “Gone With the 
Wind,” had to content themselves with one 
authorized sequel, Alexandra Ripley’s 1991 
best sella, “Scarlett.” 

But at almost any Moscow bookstand, Rus- 
sian readers can buy SUCh tantalising offering s 
as “We Call Her Scarlett,” “The Secret of 
Scarlett O’Hara,” “Rhett Butler" “The Secret 
of Rhett Butler” and “The Last Love of Scar- 
lett.” 

Most of these sequels are attributed to a 
writer named Yuliya HHpatrik, but there is 
something singularly gloomy and Slavic about 
many of the plot lines. In “The Last Love of 
Scarlett,” for example, almost everybody dies, 
including Scarlett and Rhett. 

That may be because Yuliya Hilpatrik is a 
pseudonym with an Irish flavor of about 30 
Russian and Belarussian writers in Minsk who 
jointly crank out story after story based on the 
setting and characters in “Gone With the 
Wind," as well as dozens of other unauthorized 
sequels and noveHzali ons. Most of the writers 
are men, and they are unsentimental about the 
enduring romance of Scarlett O'Hara and 
Rhett Butler. 

“We are just doing it to make extra money ” 
said Vladimir Adamchik, a Belarussian writer 
who with his brother Miroslav created the se- 
quel cottage industry in Minsk. *T don’t have a 
favorite. I like them all as long as they are 
making money.” 

And” they are. In the first two weeks of 
August, “We Call Her Scarlett,” by Yuliya 
Hilpatrik, was No. 2 on the best-seller list 
compiled by Book Business, a Russian weekly 
magazine on publishing. All over Moscow, li- 
kenesses of Vivien Leigh and dark Gable, in 
varying states of rapture, gaze up from vendors’ 
tables. Wholesale copies sell for about 52 to S3 
— almost twice the pike of a copy of Ripley’s 
“Scarlett” — and for that matter, Dos- 
toyevsky's “Brothers Karamazov.” 

“I've never heard of anything like this,” said 
Marde Posner, a vice president and director of 
international rights at the William Morris 
Agency, which represents the Margaret Mitch- 
ell estate. “It's unbelievable.” She added that 
the sequels are illegal because under American 
law characters are copyrighted. 

American readers might not immediately 
recognize Mitchell's devilishly debonair hero in 
the tormented incarnation wrought by Adam- 
chik’s team of writers. On page 182 of “The 
Last Love of Scarlett,” Rhett Butler sounds 
more like Raskolnikov in “Crime and Punish- 
ment” as he is overtaken by self-loathing after 
yet another fight with Scarlett: 

“Rhett, not even glancing at his wife, silently 
pulled a revolver from his writing desk and 
forced it into Scarlett’s hand. 

“ ‘Do what I tell you.’ 



Bat his MoseOT di ff°“^ ^Pf^™ ^d 
of the practice. “We had cm ^usp**™* ^ 

.KSSta venture” 
us it was a conpMy, poorly 


“ ‘But Rhett, I . . 

“ ‘Just do it, shoot, Scarlett! 1 don’t want to 
live any longer, Pm fed up with it all!’ he said in 
a horribly despondent voice.” 

He lives, bat Scarlett dies on paw 202. 

Adamchik, a poet whose works nave ap- 
peared in Russian literary ma garines, declined 
to explain exactly how his team of writers 
collaborates on the books or devises plots, 
saying it was a “commercial secret” Bat easi- 
ness has been good enough to permit Adam- 
chik to go to Barcelona for 20 days to relax and 
write poetry. He chose Spain, he said, because 
“I am continuing the tradition of Hemingway.” 

Adamchik’s group also publishes novdiza- 
tions, including lurid renditions of the popular 
soap opera “Santa Barbara” and of countless 
Chnt Eastwood movies. 

Making sequels of literature and film is of 
course nothing new. Partly inspired by the vast 
success of “Scarlett,” agents have signed up 
authors to write continuations of everything 
from “Star Tide” to the novels of Jane Austen. 

But most authors and publishers zealously 
guard their copyrights to such sequels. When 
pastiches of “Gone With the wind" began 
appearing in France and Italy, Posner said, the 


' Ntahc Anu/IHT 

estate’s lawyers took their authors to court and 
won. 

The Russian i nte r preta tions are the most 
blatant to date. The Russian government 
passed legislation in 1993 that seeks to protect 
intellectual property and authors’ rights and 
stem the tidal wave of pirated books, cassettes 
and movies began flooding the Rthumhh 
market after Communism collapsed. But the 
laws are rarely enforced. 

Taking Adamchik and his CoUeagUjW *n onnit 
would be difficult, Russian experts said, be- 
cause the unauthorized sequels are not outright 
piracy since they can in some way:be consid- 
ered original creations, however derivative. 

“We decided not to go after them because we 
realized it would go nowhere,” said Gennadi 
Kusnunov, a spokesman for Authors and Pub- 
lishers Against Piracy, a society thar represents 
20 Russian publishers. ' 

And Adamchik did not appear wanied. 1 
don’t thrak. I am d ning anything criminal,” he 
said. “There has been alot of tafifafidnt it,* he 
added, referring to the Blegafityqfiiswark, 
“but nobody has complained to me personal- 


■■&*^SSss& 

not entirely within the letter of 

-figtSsessKsa 

working with those people. 

° . , Lu.fcinB house that 

, An afitor at a 

also distributes^ “Gone With the WifldseqMte 

was even more < ** sa PP rt j v “?°? ?£. thrown in 
• era. “I think these peopte woddj £ 25J2 L? 
jafl," said Natalya, anetotor of children shter- 
atme at the Erifc publistong house^o^re 

^-JSSSSSS; 

-of Tara, cotillions and Southern gentlemen 
- cannot' be slaked. - 

•• Olga, a saleswoman at the Olympic Stadium 
bootmaricet here, a vast emporium where 
street vendors and bookstore owners buy bodes 
wholesale, said Russians worship Margaret 
Mfrch c fl. She sells the work of umtaiors, dui 
with dismay. “In my view, there isonly one 
‘Gone With the Wind,’ ” she said. “The rest a 
just about money.” 

Under communism, ordinary Russians rare- 
fy h fn* an o ppor t un ity to read “Gone With the 
Wind,” because only books by state-approved 
Soviet writers were widely drailftted. The 1939 
riansHT film version was not shown m Russia 
until 1991 and became an instant sensation. It 
was shown at one Moscow movie theater for an 
entire year. So many pirated translations of 
Ripley's “Scarlett" appeared on the Russian 
when the official translation finally 
made.it into bookstores, it sold poorly. 

: Russian intellectuals complain bitterly about 
the incessant infusion of lowbrow Weston cul- 
tme such adap tations and novetizations 
repre sent . Bat there axe signs that highbrow 
Russian publishers axe also getting into the 
sequel marke t. Vagrius, one of Russia's most 
respectable publishing houses, recently signed 
an author to write a sequel to Tolstoy’s war 
and. Peace.” 

Senior editors at Vagrius refused to divulge 
the identity of the author selected to prolong 
* War and 



Tolstoy : is a gpcL Peo^e would bom theau- 
tfioFs house down.” 




WEATHER 


PEOPLE 


Europe 


Forecast for Wednesday through Friday, as provided by Aocii-Waather. Asia 


Mpm 

taatvdm 

Anton 


ftpwtown 
Cento DM Sol 
Dub*i 
Ednta(?i 


FrvUud 

Onw 

HataMd 

btorftU 

LanPl* 

Unban 

London 


Pngui 23/73 

Rnykta* IBM 

Ron* 

St-Pwto mg 


Vw*» 

Vtonm 


Hlgti Law 
OF C/F 
28/70 IM* 
tom 15SB 
24/79 12/53 
32/36 23/73 
30/88 22/71 
29/84 17*2 
22 {Tt 9/48 
21/70 12/53 
28/79 13/55 
21/70 8/48 

2904 22/T1 
18/81 12/53 
17/02 1203 
32/88 17*2 
23/73 8/48 
24/75 18/55 
18*1 9*48 

28*2 20*8 
27/80 21/70 
24/75 17*2 
20*8 12*3 
35*5 17*2 
28*4 17*2 
21/70 10/50 
22/71 10*0 
28*2 18*4 
17*2 9/48 

29/84 23/73 
23173 13/55 
23/73 9MB 
11" 

32*9 21/70 
18*4 7/44 

17*2 8/48 

23/73 10*0 
17*2 10*0 
28*2 18*5 
22/71 12*3 
23/73 7/44 

25/77 12/53 


W NgU 

OF 

• 27/80 
c 20*8 
pc 31*8 
» 33*1 

■ 30*8 
pc 29*4 
pc 21/70 
pc 23/73 
I 25/77 
Mi 19*5 
> 30*5 
*1 18*4 
C 17*2 

• 32*8 
pc 21/70 
pc 27*0 
Hi 18*1 
pc 32*8 
po 28/78 
pc 25/77 
pc 21/70 

■ 32*9 
8 29*4 
pc 20*8 
I 23/73 

• 28*2 
Ml 18*4 

• 29*4 
po 2«m 
pc 21/70 
po 18*8 

■ am 

t 17*2 
Mi 16*1 
pc 25/77 
Ml 17*2 

• 29/84 

1 22/71 

pc 19*8 
pa 28 m 


Low W 
C/F 

18*4 per 
18*1 «h 
17*2 pc 
23/73 ■ 
22/71 pc 
18*4 ■ 

12*3 pc 
13*5 Ml 
17*2 s 
10*0 c 
23/72 pc 
8/48 c 
12/53 po 
17*2 ■ 
12/53 Ml 
15/50 pc 

1000 ill 
21/70 a 
22/71 ■ 
17*2 po 
12*3 Ml 
18*1 pa 
18*4 a 

10*0 pc 

13*5 pc 
18*4 pc 
9/46 Ml 
23/73 pa 
13*5 Ml 
13*5 PC 
8/48 c 
19*8 pc 
8/48 c 
9/48 c 
13*5 pc 
II® Ml 
21/70 a 
15*9 a 
10*0 PC 
14*7 pc 



Today 

Wgh Low W 

OF OF 


31/65 

31*8 

32*8 

30*8 

31*8 

31*8 

33*1 

31*8 

32*9 

33*1 


25/77 

22 m 

28/79 

24/75 

27*0 

23/73 

24/75 

24/75 

22/71 

aura 


C/F 
Mt 32*9 
C 31*8 
pc 32*9 
Ml 30*8 
Ml 33*1 
1 32*8 
pc 33/81 
pc 32*0 
pc 32*9 
pc 32*8 


Law W 

OF 

24/75 t 
23/73 I 
27*0 pc 
24/75 pc 
27*0 I 
3/77 pc 
30/79 pc 
24/76 I 
am pc 
25/77 l 


North America 

An autumn chill will settle 
southward through the Qroet 
Lakes states and Northeast 
later this week. A tropical 
system will bring locally 
heavy rains to South Taxes 
end nonhoastam Mexico at 
midweek. The Rockias will 
remain hot end mainly dry 
Her th* week. 


Europe 

France through northern 
Spain will have wet. cool 
weether Wednesday Into 
Thursday. Dry. pleasant 
weedier «ffl return to London 
and Paris by Friday. Cooflrtg 
thunderstorms will reach 
Rome by Thursday. South- 
eastern Europe wW how dry. 
hot weather later this week. 


Asia 

Japan win hove seasonable 
weather aid 0 taw scattered 
thunderstorms Wednesday. 
Mostly sunny, hoi weather 
w» return by Friday. Seoul to 
Shanghai will hove sunny, 
hot weather late this week. A 
tropical storm could bring 
locally heavy rains to Taiwan 
Wednesday or Thursday. 


Africa 

M Bta» 

31*8 

23173 C 

31*8 

23/73 pc 

Cap* Tam 

23/73 

11*2 a 

19*6 


Cto abtoimi 

28/70 

18*4 a 

28^9 

18*4 pc 

Hnm 

19*6 

1162 1 

22/71 

11*2 'pe 

L*9“. 

27*0 

23/73 1 

28*2 

23/73 pe 


19*8 

10*0 t 

22/71 

12*3 po 

IM 

33*1 

19*8 a 

33*1 

am a 

North America 

Anchnaga 

18*4 

10*0 1 

18*4 

9/48 pa 

Atofia 

32*0 

22 m i 

31*8 


Raton 

28*2 

17*2 a 

27103 

14*7 «h 



CHCBpO 


Middle East 


Latin America 


f Lagan* pc -parr* dqudj, c<ioutfy. MvMwnar*. t-nmderSonna. wain, M-wxm Hurries. 

10*4 8/48 pe 21/70 12/53 * sn-BW. Hce. W-Wettwf. M imps, forecast* md data provided by Accu-Wnathar, toe. C 


JoraMtam 

Lunor 

m«r 


Today 

Mgti Low W 
OF OF 
29*4 23/73 • 
33101 19*8 * 
28*2 14*7 9 
27/80 18*4 1 
37/38 18*4 5 

41/100 28/79 * 


Mah Law W 
OF C* 
32*9 24/75 ■ 
34/83 22/71 s 
31*9 18*4 ■ 
29*4 20*8 ■ 
38/10221/70 • 
40/10424/75 * 


Low W 


Today 

MOD Lew W Htah 
OF GIF CF OF 

BuarmAfew ram 9/48 Mi 18*4 8*8 ah 

Ctoaca* 28*2 20*8 pc 29*4 20*8 pc 

Lhna 17*2 10*1 pc 18*4 T5*B pc 

McdccCty 23/73 14*7 pe 34/75 13*5 I 

RtadaJantoo 20778 1BA4 a 27*0 18*8 a 

Swdogo 16*1 *ew pe 14*7 0*2 Mi 


Date* 
HonoUu 
Houakm 
LPa Angatoa 


88*2 17*2 
28/78 13*5 


21/70 8/48 pc 

20/78 1000 po 


NmYwk 
Rwank 
Swifian. 

Sccnto 

Ttrorto 

Inc. 01994 *»**1*» 


22/71 17*2 Ml 19*6 8/40 po 
32*9 2*/75 pc 32*8 24/75 pc 
34*3 34/75 I 33*1 32/71 pc 
31*8 18*8 pc 27*0 18*4 pe 
32*8 25/77 I 33*1 24/75 1 
22/71 13*5 Ml 10*8 6/43 pc 

21/70 10*0 pc 19168 11*2 ah 
SMI 23/73 pc 32*0 28/77 po 
20*2 19*8 a 28*4 10*1 Ml 
41/108 27*0 a 40/104 27*0 a 
22/71 13*9 a 31/70 13*5 pc 
22/71 12*3 pc 34/75 12*3 pc 
22/71 13*3 pc 30*8 11*2 Mi 
20*4 20*8 a 31*8 10*8 Ml 


A PARIS court reinstated Mytmg-Whun 
jcVOmag as musical director of the Paris 
Optra on Monday and prohibited the 
management from hiring substitute con- 
ductors to launch the season, pending a 1 
final ruling on the dispute. Hie Optra’s 
management immediately said it would 
the decision. The Optra dismissed 
on Aug. 12, saying he had spumed 
; to roO back the termination date of 
his contract from the year 2000 to 1997 
and to hold his salary and fees to their 
current levels. Chung contended that the 
dispute centered primarily on his freedom 
to select works and artists. The season 
begins on Sept 19 with Giuseppe Venffs 
“Simon Boccanegra.” 


A former friend of Princess Diana was 
quoted as saying that he too had received 
nuisance calls that he believed could have 
been from hen The princess denied in a 
newspaper interview last week that she had 
made anonymous calls to another friend, 
the art dealer Oliver Hoare, after the weekly 
News of the World alleged that they had 
come from hex private number. The latest 
edition of the mass-circulatkni tabloid 



..V. . VMaanwfaa 

Myung-Whmi Omni?. A legal victocy. 

quoted Janies Hewitt; a former riding in- 
structor to the princess, ns saying that a year 
ago, after he stopped seeing her, he received 
about 10 mysterious caDs over three weeks. 

n' • 

The romance, relationship or call-it- 
what-you-will between Greta Garbo and 
Cedi Beaton has been toe subject of a few 
books over toe years, hot toe latest has hit 
a snag. “Greta and CecBT by Diana Son- 
hand, scheduled to be published in Eng- 
land next week, has been .withdrawn. A ■ 


; Jonathan 

said that someone noticed “at toe 
last moment" that permission had appar- 
■ cutiy aot been obtained from Garbo's ex-M 
center to reproduce some of the letters.. J* 

. . ■ r% 

.. The broadcasting executive Ted Tamer ' 
was rep orted in excdknt condition afiet 
aggpEj^ to -re move : a minor skin cancer 

□ • 

■ P w ‘y 

Jotai F. Kennedy Jr. was the best man?' 
and Caroline Keanedy Schtossberg tht 
maid of honor at the wedding of their 
cousin, Tony Radzfwfll, to a fefiew ABC 
newsmagazine producer, Carole Am Dt 
Faton, in East Hampton, New Yoik. 


Robot J. KorengoM, former xmmstet-, . 
counselor far culture and information at - r 
the U. S. Embassy in Paris and a f ormer? 
journalist, has been appointed admuristrife^r.. 
tor of the Museum of American -Art si---: 
Giverny, west of Paris. Korehgold 
oeeds Mayatene Oossfcy who has ran tfceV 
museum smee it opened in 1992. . ; 




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COUNTRY 

ACCESS NUMBER 

COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER 


ASIA 

Italy* 

172-1011 

Australia 

1 - 800 - 881-011 


155 - 00-11 

China, PRO** 

10811 

Lithuania* ■ 

8*196 

Guam 

018-872 

luxembouR 

0-8004111 

Hong Kong 

800-1111 

Macedonia, F.TJK. of 994004288 

India* 

000-117 

Maha‘ * 

0800890-110 

Indonesia* 

001 - 801-10 

Monaco* ■ 

19*4011 

Japan* 

0039-111 

Nethedands* 

0 ^ 022-9111 

Korea 

009 -U 

Norway 

800 - 190-11 

Korea** 

11 * 

Potend**** 

0 * 010480-0111 

Matayuts* 

8000011 

Portugal* 

05017 - 1-288 

New Zeeland 

000-911 

Bnm.nlfl 

~ 014004288 

Philippines* 

105-11 

Rn 8 s 2 a* i t>Ioeoow) 

1553042 

SaipanT 

235-2872 

Slovakia 

0042040101 

Singapore - 

800 - 0111-111 

Spalna 

900 - 9940-11 

Sri lank* 

430-430 

Sweden* 

020 - 795-611 

Taiwan* 

0060-102884 

a — *- „ j- „ 

. 15540-11 

Thailand* 

• 0019 - 991-1111 

UJL 

0500494 OU 

EUROPE 

Dlaafne* 

8 * 100-11 

Armenia** - 

8 * 14 . 1 11 

MIDDLE EAST 

Austria"** 

. 022 - 903-011 

Bahrain 

. . 800401 ' 

Vk -1 ^7 * 

nriyiiii 

0800 - 100-10 

Cyprus* 

09090010 

Bulgaria 

00-18004010 

find ■ 

177 - 100-2727 

Crouds** 

99-384011 

Kuwait 

800-288 

Czech Sep 

0042040101 

Lebanon (BriniQ 

426401 

Demnsttk* 

80014010 

Qatar 

0800411-77 

Finland* 

9600 - 100-10 

Saudi Arabist 

1 - 800-10 

France 

19*4011 

Turkey* 

00400-12277 

Germany 

01304010 

ILAJL* - 

800-121 

Greece* 

00600-1311 

.. . AMERICAS 

Hungary* 

00*40041111 

Argendm* 

001400 * 200-1111 

Iceland** 

999401 

Beflze* ■ 

555 

Ireland 

1-806350400 

Boihia* . 

0400-1112 


COUNIRY 

ACCESS NUMBER 

Brazil 

0004010 . 

Chile 

00*4312 

Colombia 

980-114010 

Costa Rica*a - 

ri 4 ' : 

Ecuador*: 

= •• U 9 uS? 

21 Salvador* 

• • ‘ 198 ’-v 

Guatemala* 

190 -1 

Guyana*" 

165 ::v 

Honduras** 

■ 722 ■■ 

Mexico***, . . 

95 - 800462 - 1240 :-^ 

Nicaragua (Managua) . 174 . _ £ 

Panama ■ . 

109 . 

P«U* 

191 

Suriname 


Uruguay 

004410 . 

Venezuela** 

80411*120 

CARIBBEAN w fl 

Bahamas 

l- 80 O 4724 fc«L _ J i 

Bermuda* 

1 - 800 - 872-2881 • > = 

BridiftiVX 

l- 800 - 872 r 2881 ■* ^ 

Cayman islands 

140047 * 2881 - H 

. Grenada* 

. 1 - 8004724881 * . . . i 

Haiti* 

001 - 000 - 972-2883 ■ 

Jamaica** 

0400472-2881 . 

Neth.AmSl 

001 - 800872-2881 ■ . 

SuKins/Ncvia 

1400472-2881 i 

AFRICA 

*&P«*CCaho> 

3 M 4200 -£:l: 

Gabon* 

40 * 401 - K 

Gambia" - 

00111 ; I- 

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0800-10 
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0-000494223 


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