Skip to main content

Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1994, France, English"

See other formats


V 






s - . . 


l&o 


\ ^ . . 


1 


*7 + 4 W INTERNATIONAL # f 

itcralo^&iJEnbune 


■;>'v 



PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 




** 


Paris, Friday, December 2, 1994 



Obese? Renegade Gene 
Seems to Tip the Sixties 

because of Mutation, Scientists Say, 
Body Doesn’t Cry ‘Enough!’ at Meals 


No. 34,761 


, ■ By Natalie Angier 

i Nf " York Times Service 

, NEW YORK — Leading mighty sup- 
,port to the theory that fat people are not 
.piade but, rather, born that way, scientists 
have discovered a genetic mutation that is 
4hought to be responsible for at least some 
types of obesity. 

■ mutation is believed' to disrupt the 
body s energy metabolism and appetite 
control center, the mechanism that teii.s the 
& pram one has eaten enough and has suffi- 
«it fat stores to meet the demands of the 
.day. Without a woridng hormonal signal 
for fullness, or satiety, a person might 
continue to overeat even when extreme 
corpulence threatens health and self-es- 
teem. 

, "D*® discovery could accelerate scien- 
tists’ understanding of the molecular hps is 
of obesity, a condition that afflicts one in 
_ three Americans, although a practical ap- 
plication is probably a decade away. 

People are considered obese when they 
are more than 20 percent above their ideal 
weight, at which point their risk for disor- 
ders like diabetes, high blood pressure and 
heart disease rises. 

Eventually, the finding might lead to 
novel and more effective therapies for 
weight problems, notably a drug that 
would mimic the protein produced by the 
newly discovered gene. 

In theaiy, supplying people with the 
satiety signal they lack could help them 
feel satisfied with smaller amounts of food 
and thus lose weight without the sense of 
deprivation and hunger that often under- 


mine conventional efforts to shed fat. An- 
other possibility is testing for a genetic 
predisposition early in life, when modify- 
ing the diet would' mitigate the effects of 
the gene. 

But researchers caution that it will take 
5 to 10 years to translate the preliminary 
results into a medication. Much work re- 
mains to be done to prove thaL the gene, 
called obese, or ob for short, is indeed the 
body’s satiety signal and that the use of it 
in experimental animals leads to weight 
loss. 

Dr. Jeffrey M_ Friedman of the Howard 
Hughes Medical Institute at Rockefeller 
University in New York and five col- 
leagues reported the isolation of the ob 
gene Friday in the journal Nature. 

“I think it's a landmark paper," said Dr. 
Timothy J. Rink, president and head of 
research at Amylin Pharmaceuticals in San 
Diego, California. “It isn't all demonstrat- 
ed out yet, but this looks to be the central 
hormonal control of body weight and body 
fat." Dr. Rink wrote an editorial accompa- 
nying the latest report. 

Dr. Phillip Gordon, director of the Na- 
tional Institute of Diabetes and Digestive 
and Kidney Diseases in Bethesda, 
land, said: “This is a major break throi 
but it is very important that people 
stand it will not nave any immediate appli- 
cation. The treatment and prevention of 
obesity still rest with diet and exercise.” 

The scientists found the gene by study- 
ing a strain of mouse that can balloon up 

See OBESITY, Page 7 


Biliac Crisis Plunges Croats 
Into Fight With Rebel Serbs 


3 

By Roger Cohen 

New York Timex Service . 

TOPUSKO, Croatia — Intense mortar 
and artillery fire brake out between rebel 
Serbs and Croatian government forces 
Thursday as the crisis m the Bosman en- 
clave of Bihac threatened to provoke a 
wider War: 

Paul Risley, a spokesman for United 
Nations peacekeepers, said Thursday that 
there was a fierce exchange of artillery and 
mortar fire between the Croatian Army 
and the Serbs who have occupied dose to 
one-third of Croatia since 1991. 

The large number of Croatian Serbs in - 
the Serbian assault on the Muslim enclave 
of Bihac in northwestern Bosnia has 
brought tensions between Zagreb and the 
Serbs who rebelled against Croatian inde- 
pendence in 1991 to a breaking point. 

The shelling and mortar fire, one of 129 
violations of a cease-fire between Croats 
and Serbs in two days, took place in the 
T imar and Vranovaca areas south of the 
self-styled capital of the Croatian Serbs in 
Knin. 

At the {Mme tune, a heavily armed Bos- 
nian Serbian commando unit crossed into 
the Serbian-held part of Croatia. 

Michael Wflfiams, a UN spokesman, 
said the Bosnian Serbs entered Croatia 


near Bosanski Novi raided the UN mili- 
tary observation post and took seven 
Ukrainian soldiers prisoner. The prisoners 
were taken back into Serb-held territory in 
Bosnia, and no contact with them has been 
permitted. . 

The Ukrainians joined the approximate- 
ly other 500 UN peacekeepers seized by 
tne Serbs since NATO carried out an air 
raid on the Udbina airfield in Serb-held 
Croatia last week. In effect, these captive 
soldiers have proved reliable insurance 
against further NATO action 

The Bihac crisis has again focused atten- 
tion on the smoldering problem of the 
Sqrbum.occupation of large areas of Cro- 
atia known as Kxajina. Serbs from the 
region have attacked Bihac out of an ille- 
gally occupied area, crossing an interna- 
tional border to come to the assistance of 
their fellow Serbs in Bosnia. 

“Up to now the Croatian government 
has shown considerable restraint and pa- 
tience," Mr. Williams said. “But they have 
been obliged to witness an attack by Serbs 
out of Croatia into another member state 
of the United Nations. Obviously, they are 
extremely concerned.” 

Defense Minister Gerojko Susak of Cro- 

See BOSNIA, Page 7 



f _ _ r __ m Cnrnig Dolta/ Roncn 

LOATH TO SINK — — The AchiBe Lauro ablaze off Somalia on Thursday. The finer, listin g and empty, remained 
afloat as about 1,000 passengers who had taken refuge on a tanker were rescued. Two people were killed. Page 7. 

In Trade Debate, a Shift to Protectionism 

By Tom Buerkle 

International Herald Tribute 

BRUSSELS — The world trade agree- 
ment appeared headed for approval in the 
U.S. Senate on Thursday, but the intense 
debate over the accord revealed a rapid 
fraying of the free-trade consensus that has 
prevailed in the United States and other 
industrialized countries since World War 
II, o fficials and analysts said. 


The shift, which is likely to slow further 
trade liberalization efforts, reflects acute 
fears that the jobs of min i nns of middle- 
class workers are threatened by the mass of 
cheap labor in rapidly developing econo- 
mies in Asia and Latin America. 

The protectionist sentiment is rein- 
forced in the United States by a budding 
isolationism that has led even establish- 
ment figures like Senator Bob Dole of 


Kansas, the incoming Senate majority 
leader, to question the future of NATO. 

“There is a feeling that the world is a 
troubled place, and we’re better off not 
opening up any farther," said Gary Huf- 
bauer of the Institute for International 
Economics in W ashington. 

Intense last-minute lobbying by Presi- 
dent Bill Clinton, senior Republicans led 
by Mr. Dole and business leaders got the 
General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade 
accord through the House of Representa- 
tives comfortably on Tuesday, and was 
expected to win approval in the Senate late 
Thursday. 

“By the time the vole is actually taken 
tonight, we expect GATT will pass,” the 
White House press secretary, Dee Dee My- 
ers, said Thursday. 

Passage would represent a major victory 
for Mr. Clinton, and could help him eslab- 


Russia Balks 
Over NATO 
Expansion 
To the East 

Moscow Refuses to Sign 
Accord on Special Ties; 
U.S. Plays Down Move 

By Daniel Williams 

Washington Poll Service 

BRUSSELS — NATO's foreign minis- 
ters tried to turn attention away from the 
Balkans and paint a rosy picture of future 
European security on Thursday, but their 
efforts were undercut by the Russian for- 
eign minister, Andrei V. Kozyrev, who 
objected to NATO's long-range plans to 
extend membership to former Soviet satel- 
lites. 

Mr. Kozyrev was in Brussels to sign a 
program of military cooperation and con- 
sultation with the North Atlantic Treaty 
Organization, but in an extraordinarily 
awkward moment for the alliance he told 
the 16 NATO ministers that he would 
rtf use to go ahead with it 

“Very frankly I must tell you, there are 
certain issues that must be clarified," he 
said, fingering the day’s NATO communi- 
que that set out the next steps for possible 

S iansion. “If the strategy of NATO is to 
arge, that requires consultation." 

The NATO secretary-general, Willy 
Claes, responded quickly: “It’s not toe 
difficult to explain. Til ask the press tc 
leave now." The ' 


shut off. 


television cameras were 


lish cooperation on other issues with the 
Republicans who swept control of both 
houses of Congress last month. 

It also would virtually assure the 
planned Jan. 1 start-up of the trade accord, 
which cleared a key hurdle in Japan's Par- 
liament on Thursday and is expected to be 
ratified in Europe in coining weeks. 

Still, the vote was a far cry from the 
previous GATT deal, the 1978 Tokyo 
Round agreement. That was approved, 395 
votes to 7, in toe House and 90 to 4 in toe 
Senate. 

For a country that single-handedly de- 
signed GATT in 1948 and made open 
trade a cornerstone of postwar security 
and prosperity, today’s opposition repre- 
sents a drastic change. 

Peter Sutherland, director-general of 

See GATT, Page 7 


American officials dismissed Mr. Ko- 
zyrev’s comments, saying they still expect- 
ed Russia to sign. 

*T would be tempted to say it was a 
theatrical performance meant for domestic 
political consumption," said toe U.S. State 
Department spokesman, Mike McCuny. 
The government of President Boris N. 
Yeltsin has been criticized by Russian con- 
servatives for easing closer to the West 

In all. It was an uphill straggle for 
NATO to exhibit confidence and purpose. 

An admission of impotence over Bosnia 
on Thursday departed sharply from a 
meeting less than a year ago of NATO 
leaders, including President Bill Clinton, 
who derided that NATO warplanes should 
be used to protect Bosnian Muslim civil- 
ians from attacks by rebel Serbs. The Clin- 
ton administration regarded toe air strikes 
as a means of pressuring toe Serbs to sign a 
peace agreement. 

The threat dribbled away last week as 
toe Serbs assaulted toe town of Bihac, 
controlled by toe Muslim-led government 
of Bosnia. Britain and France rebuffed an 
American request for air strikes, prompt- 
ing toe Clinton administration to abandon 
the tactic of linking force to diplomacy. 
NATO was left trying to shore up its own 
image. 

“The solution for this appalling conflict 
can not come from this organization 
alone,” said Mr. Claes. 

“I have heard no head of state or prime 
minister ready to take toe risks,' he said, 
referring to full-scale intervention. 

What was important, Mr. Claes said at a 
news conference, was NATO “solidarity." 
He excused NATO’s performance by say- 

See NATO, Page 7 




Berlusconi Strikes a Deal With Unions 


By Alan Cowell 

New York Tana Service 

ROME — Prime Minister Silvio Berlus- 
coni on Thursday struck a last-minute 
co m pr om ise with Italy’s labor unions on 
budget cots, averting a planned eight-hour 
general strike Friday that would have 
deepened Ins government's aura of embat- 
tlement. , , 

The breakthrough after 22 hours of ne- 
gotiations was depicted by toe Italian lead- 
er as yet more good news after two other 
developments that eased toe crisis.over toe 
decision last week by magistrates in Milan 
to investigate him for corruption. 

On Tuesday, in a highly unusual show of 

common purpose, his three-party coalition 
offered support for a six-month policy 


program, giving toe Italian leader breath- 
ing space at least until toe new year. 

And, on toe same day, toe Court of 
Cassation, toe country’s highest court of 
appeal, ruled that the corruption case in 
which toe Italian leader is purportedly 
entwined could not be tried in court by toe 
same graft-busting magistrates who are 
investigating him. 

Under toe Italian legal system, toe mag- 
istrates who oversee investigations also ap- 
pear in court as prosecutors. But toe court 
r uling ordered magistrates in Brescia to 
tpW over from the Milan investigators as 
toe case — involving bribes purportedly 
paid to the tax police by companies includ- 
ing Mr. Berlusconi's Fininvest — ap- 
proaches trial. 


Apple’s Chief Shoots Down Vision 
Of a Computer Junkie’s Paradise 


By John Markoff 

New York Tima Service 

YORK —Whoa, there, wide-eyed 
ir industry executives. Michael H. 
■ chairman of Apple Computer, 
s words of caution: You have too 
non. , , , 

s remarkable turnabout 
company conceived less than 


Newsstand Prices 


Andorra ...«9.ofl FF 

Antilles 11.20 FF 

Cameroon.. 1 .400 CFA 

EBVPt ejyg 

France 9-00 

Gabon .960 CFA 

Greece 300 Dr. 

Italy .MOO Lire 

ivory Coast .1.120 CFA 

Jordon ■"VJ' 

Lebanon ...USS1.50 


Luxembourg M L Fr 
Morocco — .--12 On 
Qatar 8.00 Rials 

Reunion.... 11-20FF 
Saudi Arabia ..9.00 R. 

senega 1 .— «o CFA 
Spain ......200 PTAS 

Tunisia ....1.000 Dm 

Turkey -T.L 3MXJ0 
U.A.E. Dirn 
U.S- Mil. (Eur.) SL10 


years ago and dedicated to toe proposition 
that personal computers would change the 
world. 

But Mr. Spindler, in New York on 
Wednesday to discuss some technology so 
pragmatic and fundamental that it almost 
sounded boring, says he is fed up with toe 
industry’s lofty promises. 

He is tired of windy talk about omnipo- 
tent widgets that wiB change our lives by 
grihfd^ing our meetings, answering our 
phone calk and otherwise organizing us. 

Flirting with heresy, Mr. Spindler says 
he sees no need for the so-called informa- 
tion superhighway. And 500 channels? Six- 
ty are plenty. _ 

“This is not going to be an all -electronic 
world where we all at on the couch and are 
force-fed a constant stream of informa- 
tion, 1 * he said. . 

Mr. Spindler, a pragmatic German engi- 

See APPLE, Page 16 


Mr. Berlusconi repeated on Thursday, 
however, that he would not use the ruling 
to sidestep interrogation by the Milan 
magistrates whose inquiries into massive 
corruption brought down Italy's one-time 
political elite, 

“It will definitely take place at toe Milan 
prosecutor’s office and there will definitely 
be a press conference afterward," said Mr. 
Berlusconi, who seemed far more relaxed 
during a press conference Thursday than 
he did last week as he resisted pressures to 
resign. 

“I’m not resigning,” Mr. Berlusconi said 
Thursday. “Don’t even think about it." 

“I do not believe there is a court in toe 
world that could condemn me just because 

See ITALY, Page 7 


Kiosk 


Clinton to Seek 
Defense Increase 

WASHINGTON (Reuters) — Pres- 
ident BiB Clinton said Thursday he 
would ask Congress to increase de- 
fense spending by $25 billion over the 
next six years to ensure that U.S. mili- 
tary readiness remains at desired 
peaks. 


Book Review 


Dow Jones 


Down 
H 38.36 
3700.87 

&7:: 

The Dollar _ ^ 

NwVoA 


Page 7. 


Tnb index 



DM 
Poun d 

Ywi 
FF 


1,5735 

1.5665 

99.345 

5.393 


pwviomctosB 
1.57 
1.5645 
98.975 
5.3835 



WORLD AIDS DAY — Delegates of 42 nations met Thursday in Paris to mge gove rnments to make fighting AIDS 
a top priority as activists like Wn Chmwheng. left offered brochures on the disease to passers-ty hi R ejpng. Pag? 7, 


Cracking a Cursed Case of Saudi Jewels 


By William Branigm 

Washington Post Service 

BANGKOK — After nearly five years 
of frustration, Saudi Arabia’s royal family 
has reason to hope that it may finally get 
some justice in the case of more than $20 
million worth of stolen jewelry — thanks 
in part to a pistol-packing diplomat's rath- 
er undiplomatic behavior, toe power of 
superstition and what might be called “toe 
curse of the Saudi gems. 

By all accounts, toe case of toe missing 
jewelry has become Thailand's worst scan- 
dal, leaving a trail of dead bodies, ruined 
careers and expensive ill will between the 
Saudi and Thai kingdoms. Cer tainl y, su- 
perstitious Thais cannot be blamed for 


believing rumors, encouraged by toe Sau- 
dis, that an ancient Bedouin corse hangs 
over toe jewelry. 

Pilfered in Saudi Arabia by a Thai ser- 
vant in 1989, recovered by the Thai police 
in Bangkok and then stolen again, toe 
treasure includes irreplaceable family heir- 
looms hundreds of years old. 

At least 17 Thai police officers stand 
implicated in various aspects of toe case, 
ana private investigators hired by the Sau- 
dis have painted to even higher-ranking 
government and other officials. Moreover, 
Thailand has lost billions of dollars in 
revenue from a Saudi ban on hiring Thai 
guest workers and a decline in Saudi tour- 
ism here. 


Now, says Mohammed Said Khoja, toe 
armed and outspoken charge d'affaires at 
toe Saudi Arabian Embassy here, there is 
new hope of resolving the case and recov- 
ering some of toe missing jewelry. Feeding 
this hope, he says, are toe recent formation 
of a Thai police investigative team he can 
trust, a new amnesty program and toe 
power of the “curse.” 

In recent weeks, more than 100 pieces of 
toe missing jewelry have been turned in 
anonymously to the police under a no- 
questions- asked policy. Accompanying 
some watches was a note saying they had 

See GEMS, Page 10 


’age 5 



□d the 
waiting 
re that 
et with 
id Jap- 
: later a 
hat his 
Naka- 
?□ de- 
nsible! 
lerican 
■ere no 
tienses 
Bom le- 
verage 
:d that 
ded to 
•mbing 

iL 

I zs had 
ty had 
tut toe 
Tokyo 


>8 

r- 

a- 

rf 


lowing 
fell, it 
x. Be- 

5, from 
tofind- 
or the 
at low 
laries. 
it the 
e city, 

> that 
>ff es- 
o flee, 
traps. 
n into 
from 
f oxy- 
>wned 

d sev- 
re do- 
Degin- 
April, 
ed an 
made 
With 
struck 
ie in- 

mded 
e toe 
lions 
se re- 
mean 
eland 
paign 
ffleri- 
t, Pel- 
aday- 
ck of 
n Hi- 
3roke 
th. 


r cor- 
n the 
jour- 
iid or, 
i mem 
nine. 



• J 

r-j 






7 


■4 




P: 


( 


J 


es 

ol 

CD 

w 

n 

ci 

ai 

si 


»•- a- 


page 2 


/ Moscow’s Deadline 


To Republic Passes 

Yeltsin Appears to Back Off 
Threat of Imminent Action 


By Fred Hiatt 

Washington Pea Service 

MOSCOW — President Bo- 
ris N. Yeltsin's 48-bour ultima- 
tum to the breakaway Chechen 
Republic expired Thursday 
without attack from the Rus- 
sian troops massing on the bor- 
der or without other decisive 
action. 

Mr. Yeltsin threatened Tues- 
day to use “all forces and re- 
sources at the disposal of the 
state" unless the rebel govern- 
ment in Chechnya disbanded 
its army and freed its Russian 
prisoners by Thursday morn- 
ing. He said he would otherwise 
impose a state of emergency on 
the southern Muslim republic, 
which unilaterally declared its 
independence from Russia in 
1991. 

But on Thursday evening, the 
presidential administration ap- 
peared to step back from a po- 
tentially violent conflict. The 
official Itar-Tass press service 
reported that Mr. Y eltsin would 
not declare a state of emergency 
in Chechnya “in the nearest fu- 
ture," although Chechnya had 
not complied with his demands. 
Accusing the media of misin- 


terpreting Mr. Yeltsin's threat, 
the president' 


the presidential press service re- 
issued the ultimatum, but with- 
out the key words, “a state of 
emergency will be imposed” 
Also missing in Thursday’s ver- 
sion was the contention, con- 
tained in the ori ginal, that all 
hope had been exhausted that 
Chechnya itself could settle its 
“internal conflict.” 

In a tense and confused day. 


not all signs pointed away from 
conflict. Two warplanes 
dropped bombs on the capital 
Grozny, killing a woman and 
badly injuring two children, ac- 
cording to journalists on the 
scene. Chechnya asserted that 
the planes belonged to Russia. 
Russian television also reported 
that troops and tanks were stiB 
moving into position on Chech- 
nya’s borders. 

Kremlin leaders view Chech- 
nya's claim of independence as 
a threat to the integrity of Rus- 
sia and a dangerous example to 
other restive regions. In addi- 
tion, law-enforcement officials 
say the republic, rich in oil and 
with fewer than a million peo- 
ple, has become a source of law- 
lessness and arms trafficking. 

But many Chechen people, 
who resisted Russian conquest 
for decades in the 19th century 
and suffered heavily under the 
Soviet regime, believe they have 
a legitimate right to self-rule. 
Thousands of Chechen men in 
tall fur hats gathered Thursday 
with their nfles in Grozny’s 
central square; some vowed to 
resist to the death any Russian 
attack. 

Some Russian analysts have 
predicted that an attempt to 
break Chechnya's indepen- 
dence by force could set off a 


long guerrilla war there and 
provoke terroii 


f/.S. Would Assist 


UN Peacekeepers 
In Bosnia Pullout 


Washington Pott Service 

WASHINGTON — Presi- 
dent Bin Clinton has made a 
“decision in principle” for 
American ground forces to aid 
in the withdrawal of UN peace- 
keepers in Bosnia if the united 
Nations were to make such a 
request, officials said. 

Pentagon planners have been 
working on contingency plans 
for such an operation, including 
scenarios that could involve 
“many thousands" of U.S. 
troops for “months,” a senior 
official said. 

A withdrawal of the peace- 
keepers is not at all imminent, 
the official said. But the issue 
has taken on more urgency as a 
Serbian advance in Bosnia has 
underlined the ineffectiveness 
of the 24,000 UN peacekeepers 
and triggered new calls for their 
withdrawal 

A senior U.S. official said 
that Washington expected that 
the British and French would 
resist removing their peace- 
keepers. 


provoke terrorist acts elsewhere 
la Russia. The police in Russia 
stepped up their guard on 
Thursday around nuclear pow- 
er stations, Moscow subway 
stations and other potentially 
vulnerable points. 

Russia has been arming and 
financing pro-Russian opposi- 
tion groups in Chechnya for 
several months, but they have 
met with little success. Chech- 
nya's leaders have asserted that 
Russian troops and planes have 
taken part in the fighting; Rus- 
sian officials have denied the 
accusations. 

But the crisis this week was 
set off by Chechnya’s capture of 
about 70 Russian soldiers, in- 
cluding a number of army offi- 
cers. 

The chairman of the Russian 
Parliament’s defense committee 
flew with other legislators to 
Grozny for talks on Thursday 
with Chechen officials on the 


prisoners. 

Thursday morning, shortly 
after the deadline passed, a 
spokesman for Mr. Yeltsin an- 
nounced that “a package of 
measures is being carried out 
aimed at decisively improving 
the situation in the Chechen re- 
public and reinstating constitu- 
tional order, law and the de- 
fense of human rights.” The 
statement did not specify the 
measures. 

The spokesman also said that 
Mr. Yeltsin was taking “all nec- 
essary measures to save the 
Russian soldiers” taken prison- 
er in Chechnya. 



l6<BW'd MvlMi &CUI 

bs 1911 -PAH5 

THE OLDEST COCKTAIL BAR IN EUROPE i k 
Just tell the taxi driver, “Sank too doe noo” m. 
PARIS: 5, rue Daunou 
GENEVA : Confederation Center 
MSEUROPA: At Sea MONTREUX: Mortreux Palace 



Sparkling New Year’s Eve 


Near THe Champs Elysees 


The Royal Monccau effinyau tfyt luxury cf teeing in the 
. Nett’ Year in ihctntdidbn t^rke greet Parisian hotels. 


Rokal New Year’s Eve 

Accommodation for 2 sights, branch on January 1st, continental 
‘ breakfast-on January 2nd, access to the.hcalrh and beaury cencre, 
, -.'laze check-out, champagne, fruit and chocolate on arrival 
- Single Room: FF 3350 - Double Room: FF 3760* 


: Hotel Royal Monceau 

■: 37, avenue Hoche -75008 Paris -Fiance. 
-TeL 03) 1 45 61 06 98 / Fax (33) t 42 99 89 




- Groups Royal Monoemi 
'“Luxury with z he Frank Touch “ 
2 night* from 51.12.94 to 0241.95 




Meted ftobi/Tbc Auodaied Free 

Irmgard Mofler being greeted by friends Thursday upon her release from prison. 


Germany Sets Terrorist Free 


Car-Bomber Leaves Prison Unrepentant 


By Rick Atkinson 

Washington Peer Service 

BERLIN — Irmgard 
MdDer, an unrepentant leftist 
terrorist convicted of kifimg 
three U.S. soldiers with a car 
bomb in 1972, walked out of 
prison on Thursday after her 
life term was commuted to a 
suspended sentence. 

Miss M&Uer’s release on 
grounds of poor health came 
despite protests from family 
members of her victims ana 


the U.S. State Department, 
h publicly de- 


which last month pi 
plored her lack of remorse in 


22 years of confinement 

A crowd of 250 supporters, 
flanked by dozens of report- 
ers and photographers, await- 
ed Miss Molier as she 
emerged from the gates of the 
federal prison in Lflbeck, 
near Hamburg. She waved 
and smiled at the crowd while 
collecting champagne bottles, 
Christmas presents and bou- 
quets of roses and gladiolas. 

“It still feels a bit unreal" 
said Miss M&Uer, 47, dressed 
in a red sweatshirt leather 
jacket and jeans. “I would 
never have gotten out if there 
hadn’t been an international 
mobilization.” 

Miss Molier deflected all 
questions about her plans but 
indicated that she was not 
ready to condemn the politi- 
cal ambitions of the notori- 
ous Baader-Meinhof gang — 


later known as the Red Army 
Faction — of which she was 
an early member. 

“A lot of people are going 
to ask how I survived all this 
time,” added Miss Mdller, 
who spent part of her impris- 
onment in solitary confine- 
ment. “I kept alive the aims 
for which I fought and I felt 
the support of my sympathiz- 
ers.” 

Miss Molier drove an ex- 
plosive-packed car onto the 
U.S. base in Heidelberg on 
May 24, 1972, as put of 
bloody campaign against 
American “imperialism” and 
the U.S. military’s “genorid- 
al” war in Vietnam. The sub- 
sequent explosion killed three 
U.S. soldiers. Miss M5ller 
was captured six weeks later 
and had been in prison since. 

Among those who objected 
to her release was Sergeant 
Charles Bonner of the U.S. 
Air Force, whose father. Cap- 
tain Clyde R. Bonner, died in 
the blast. 

“I was only 7 when my fa- 
ther was killed,” Sergeant 
Bonner said recently. “Our 
housing was just across from 
that parking lot. That’s some- 
thing HI never forget” He 
added, “I think releasing here 
is ridiculous.” 

Although Miss M&Uer re- 
fused to cooperate with a 


ity, the Lubeck court con- 
cluded this fall that she no 
longer posed a threat to soci- 
ety and “had changed ha at- 
titude toward violence in a 
positive way.” 

The Heidelberg stale pros- 
ecutor declined to appeal the 
court's decision. 

Miss M&Uer reportedly 
suffers from skin, eye and 
other diseases. She appeared 
drawn and pale Thursday, a 
graying shadow of the strik- 
ing 25-year-old terrorist As 
the longest-serving female in- 
mate m Germany, Miss 
Molier had become a martyr 
of the far left and a cause 
ofclfcbre for clergy, writers and 
politicians. 

Her notoriety derives in 
part from being the only sur- 
vivor of the so-called “death 
night” in October 15177, when 
three other top Red Army 
Faction leaders died in Stutt- 
gart's maximum security 
Stammheim prison. German 
authorities and foreign ex- 
perts determined that the 
three had committed suicide 
but Miss MOller, who was dis- 
covered with four deep knif e 
wounds in her chest, insists 
she was the victim of a gov- 
ernment plot. 

German legal experts have 
predicted that Miss Mailer’s 
arole will be followed quick- 
by the release of other Red 
Army Faction prisoners. 


Sinn Fein 
And British 
Will Meet 
Next Week 


WORLD BRIEFS 


West Bank Taxes Pass to Palestinians 

. u Thi* Palestinian. Au 


By John Damton 

Mr w York Tima Service 

LONDON — The British 
government and Sinn Fein, the 
political face of the IRA, will 
begin negotiations in Belfast on 
Wednesday, almost one year af- 
ter Britain and Ireland 
launched an initiative to try to 
resolve the conflict in Northern 
Ireland. 

The announcement was not a 
surprise, but still it set off an 
exciting ripple that history was 
in the making Though British 
officials have in the past con- 
ducted secret talks with Sinn 
Fein leaders, never before have 
they sat openly at the same ta- 
ble with people they used to 
disparage as “terrorists.” 

In both a letter to the Sinn 
Fein leader. Gory Adams, and 
a three-paragraph statement. 
Prime Minister John Major’s 
office pointedly referred to the 
meeting as “exploratory dia- 
logue.” This is in keeping with 
London’s position that it is sim- 
ply jo ining in “talks about 
talks,” not a full-fledged negoti- 
ating session, which must "in- 
volve all parties to the conflict. 

For 25 years now, the Irish 
Republican Army has been 
iting the British Arnrjr in the 


ram ALLAH West Bank (Reuters) — The Palestinian Au- 
thOTitYEoti^bi^St lift toWard financial independence on 
Thursday when Israel handed over control of 
Rank that exoerts say could earn hundreds of millions of dollars. 
^ri^J^S^Gadi Zobar, head of ^^CivdAdmims- 
tratiomand the Palestinian finance chief, Mohammed Zukh 
Nashashibi, signed the transfer agreement at a ceremony here. 

1 i.-:.! Wwvsufcince and the kev ft 




fll nr tnp KaiKs nnian ruimiw. - — — 

word to the taxpayer. The avoidance of taxes under occupation 
was a national struggle worthy of praise, but now itis l8G degrees 
different. Now delay in paying means a delay in building the 
Palestinian state.” 


2 More Journalists Killed in Algeria 


ALGIERS (AP) — Two morejoumatists have been assassinat- 
ed in Algeria, security forces said Thursday, bringing the death 
toll among journalists to about two dozen since they became n 
target of Islamic militants IS months ago. 

The latest victims were Ahmed Issaad, a reporter for state 
television, and Nasseredine Lekhal a journalist with the state-run 
daily A1 Massa. They were stabbed to death Wednesday m 
Boufarik. south of Algiers, security forces said. 


UN Report Blames Hutu in Massacres 


PARIS (Reuters) —The head of the United Nations commis- 
sion has concluded that the genocide in Rwanda this year cost 
500,000 lives and chat hard-line supporters of former President 
Juvfenal Habyarimana and his government were behind it, 
Atsu-Koffi Amega. whose report was made public Thursday; 
said his team had been unable to find out whether the Rwanda 
Patriotic Front, now in power, had also committed atrocities as it 
fought General Habyanmana’s forces. .... 

H uman -ri g hts groups estimate that hard-liners in the Hutu-led 
gover nmen t organized the killing of up to a million people 
between April, when the president’s plane was shot down, killing 
him, and July. 


Millions Attend Rites of Shiite Leader 


name of the Catholic minority 
to join UI- 


of 650,000. It wants to join 
ster to the Irish Republic to 


NICOSIA (Reuters) — Millions of people attended the funeral 
of Iran's Shiite grand ayatollah in Qom, Iran, Qom on Thursday, 


(he 


£ 


south, something that is an 
anathema to the province’s 
950,000 Protestant majority. 
They insist upon their right to 
remain British. 

The announcement of talks 
evoked a familiar pattern of re- 
sponses across Ulster’s varied 
political spectrum. Mr. Adams, 
who took a considerable risk in 
persuading the IRA to go along 
with a unilateral truce that was 
declared Sept 1, welcomed it. 

“The opportunity to realize a 
lasting peace, which will benefit 
all of the people of Ireland, has 
never been greater,” he said. A 
clever antagonist, Mr. Adams 
had lately been making political 
hay by charging London with 
font-dr ag gin g on the peace pro- 
cess. Now be said it was time to 
move on to “the next phase of 
dialogue: multilateral talks led 
by both governments.” 

The Ulster Unionist Party, 
the mainlin e Protestant politi- 
cal group, was skeptically ac- 
cepting. At least the talks would 
establish one thing, said an Ul- 
ster Union Party member of 
Parliament, John Taylor, and 
that was “if Sinn Fein really is 
to become a normal political 
party.” 

The Reverend Ian Paisley, 
the preacher and parliamentary 
member who has turned his 
Democratic Unionist Party into 
a rejeoionist front, continued a 
line opposing talks or any other 
move smacking of compromise. 
He proclaimed before the 
House of Commons on Thurs- 
day that “a vast majority of 
people” resented the decision to 
talk to “the men of blood.” 


amid signs that members of the religious hierarchy were preparing 
to Tiannp the spiritual leader Ali Khamenei as his successor. 

Grand Ayatollah Mohammed Ali Araki died at the age of 100 
Tuesday with no obvious candidate to succeed him. But Iran 


radio’s English-language service referred to Ayatollah Khamenei 
several times on Thursday as “Grand Ayatollah.” 


For the Record 

Paula Corbin Jones, who has accused President Bill Clinton of 
sexually harassing her when he was governor of A rk a n sas, lost a 
court fight on Thursday when a federal judge ruled that Penthouse 
magazine can distribute partly nude photographs of her. (Reuters) 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


Amsterdam Extends Bars’ Hours 


AMSTERDAM (AP) — Amsterdam will allow its 2850 ban 
and caffe to stay open until 4 AM on the weekends and 3 AJML 
during the week, as of Jan 1. 

“We have to compete with cities like Beilin where caffe can stay 
open until whenever. They are big competition,” Joop Brouwer, cl 
the city’s restaurant and cafe owners' interest group, said Hun?' 
day. “We want to have more offerings for our tourists.” 

Ukraine has officially opened its first modern international 
airport at Boiyspfl, near Kiev, after nearly two years of recon- 
struction. Lug gag e conveyers, English-language signs and gleam- 
ing toilets are features of the new airport The $15.1 million 
project was financed by the European Bank for Reconstruction 
and Development and two Ukrainian banks. (Reuters) 

European Union interior minsters have agreed to aDow children 
not holding EU passports to travel visa-free within the EU if they 
are part of a school group, Germany’s interior minister, Manfred 
JCanther, announced. (Reuters) 

Spanish train engineers hove called for a 24-hour strike Friday 
to back demands for a 20.9 percent pay increase, unions said 
Thursday. The Transport Ministry said it would ensure a mini- 
mum service, which should guarantee that 50 to 70 percent of 
commuter trains operate at rush hours along with 50 percent of 
long-distance trains. (A FP) 

Germany plans to open two new consulates general in Russia, 
one in Novosibirsk and another in Saratov on the Volga River, to 

E romote economic and cultural ties and serve German citizens 
ring there. (Routers) 


DEATH NOTICE 


Cleary, Gottlieb, 
Steen Sc Hamilton 


is sad to note 
the passing of 


Jean L. Blondeel 


our colleague 
for forty-five years. 


ORLY- LONDON 

from FF. 790 RT* 

4 flights daily 
I st flight from Orly 7; 1 5 am 


J^U rtK 


Scheduled Airline 
See your Travel Agent 
or call (Paris): 44 56 18 08 

vplus tax 


In Newly Democratic Albania, Voters Rebuff Leader 


By Henry Kamm 

New York Tunes Service 

TIRANA, Albania — The 
voters in what was once tbe 
most rigidly communist coun- 
try of Europe have dealt a sharp 
rebuff to their president, to 
whom they handed a landslide 
victory in their first democratic 
elections in 1992 

As a result, Albanians and 
foreign diplomats fear that the 
infant democratic system has 
lapsed into a deadlock that puts 
at risk the political and eco- 
nomic gains achieved since 
Communist power began to 
crumble in 1991 in Europe’s 
poorest, most underdeveloped 
and dependent country. 

Albania’s voters last month 


rejected, 54 percent to 42 per- 
cent, a draft constitution that 
President Sali Berisha bad 
placed before the electorate. 
Mr. Berisha circumvented the 
Parliament, where approval by 
two-thirds would have been re- 
quired, and chose a referendum 
in the belief that he was sure to 
win a majority. 

The defeat is seen here as the 
low point in a steady decline in 
affection for the once hugely 
popular leader of the Demo- 
cratic Party, not for what he has 
done or not done but for the 
way in which he does it. 

Albania was repressively and 
reclusively ruled by Enver 
Hoxha and his chosen succes- 
sor, Ramiz Alia, from 1944 un- 


til the 1992 landslide by the 
party of Mr. Berisha, a cardiol- 
ogist. 

Mr. Berisha has conveyed to 
too many Albanians an impres- 
sion of resembling his dictatori- 
al predecessors in style, al- 
though not in content. 

Even leaders of the largest 
opposition party, the Socialist 
successors to the Communists, 
grant that the president has ef- 
fectively led Albania's transi- 
tion toward democracy and a 
market economy. 

“The Democratic Party and 
Berisha have played a positive 
role after the fall of commu- 
nism,” Luan Hajdaraga, a rice 
president of the Socialists, said 
in an interview. 


Mr. Hajdaraga and Arta Da- 
bulla, a member of the party 
presidency, said the referendum 
result showed that early parlia- 
mentary elections were called 
for to reflect the present mood 


of the country. Parliament 
ride 


m ask the butter... 




j- — . 

Ttrrr itrvut n ewytHag yta weal it It *». 


S-l-n-C-A-P-O-R-E 


•Mi. 


Education Dredwy 

Every Tuesday 
Contact Fred Ronan 
Tel.: (33 1)46 3793 91 
Fax: (33 FJ AS 3793 70 

or your nearest IHT office 
or representative 


elects tbe president. 

Mr. Berisha’s disregard for 
Parliament, where defections 
from his own party have de- 
prived him of the two-thirds 
majority he had obtained in the 
1992 elections, and the one- 
man character of his referen- 
dum campaign proved counter- 
productive. 

“Albanians were not against 
the constitution but against the 
style of the propaganda,” said 
Ismail Kadare, a writer. “The 
television propaganda was fre- 
netic. It annoyed everybody 
and recalled the days of com- 
munism.” 

position politicians cri ti- 
the draft as giving too 


many powers to the president, 
rid tb 


but even they said the voters 
bad rejected the president’s 
style rather than the charter. 


In an interview, Mr. Berisha. 
vigorously rqected all criticism. 

“If yon examine my constitu- 
tion,” he said, “you wiE find it’ 
definitely diminishes and not 
increases presidential power.” ; 

He said there was no ques-. 
lion of calling early elections or 
submitting a new draft to Par-, 
liament before submitting it to 
the electorate. In a round table' 
with party leaders, he proposed- 
that Parliament name a new j 
drafting committee. . : t 

“Berisha has a clear desire for 
a democratic sodety and a mar-' 
ket economy,” an ambassador- 
said. “But does he know what' 
these things mean?” He an-! 
swered his question by recalling 
that, like all Albanians, the' 
president was a product of a 
system that denied its people 
any knowledge or experience of. 
more open societies. 

Mr. Kadare said he saw a 
silver lining in the referendum 
result. “It showed this people 
have truly progressed,” he said.! 
“Despite tne frenetic television 
propag anda , the people calmly 
said no." 


To call from country to country, or to the U.S., dial the WoridPhone® number of the country you're calling from. 


Antigua 

(Available from public cent phonos only.l 


« 


Universal 

T RANSLATOR 


Argentina* 
Austriaico* 
Bahamas 
Bahrain 
EWglmnico* 
Bermuda -5- 
Boflvia* 

Brad 
Canada tcO 

Cayman Islands 
CWhhCQ 
CokrnibiaiCCH 
Costa Rica* 
Cyprus* 

Czech Rapub&nCCi 


001-800-333-1111 
022-903-01 J 
1-800-62 *-1000 
800-40? 
0800-10012 
1-800-823-0*84 
0-800-2222 
000-601? 
1-800-888-8000 
1-800-624-1000 
OOr-0318 
980-16-0001 
162 
080-90000 
00-42-000112 


DanmartaCO* 

Dominican Republic 
Ecuador 4- 
EbyptCci* 

rOuuida of Cairo, dial 
H Salvador* 

Finland! CCJ* 
Francatcci* 

Gambia* 

GenhanyiCCi 
(Limited availability In 
GroeetfCO* 

Granada* 

Guatemala* 

Haiti ICC H- 
Honduras-* 

Hungary CD* 


8001-0022 

1-800-751-6624 

170 


02 first.) 


355-5770 

195 

9800-102-80 
19V-00-19 
00-1-99 
0130-0012 
eastern Germany.) 

00400-1211 

1-800-824-8721 

189 

001-800-444-1234 
001-800-67 4-7000 
00t -800-01411 


Iceland* 
kant 
Ireland ICO 
IsroahCC) 

Italy* Co* 

Jamaica 
Kenya 

(Available from most major dlieil 


999-002 
(Special Phones Only} 
1-800-S5-1Q01 
177-150-2727 
172-1022 
800-074-7000 


080011 


Kuwait 

LabanwflCCI 

(Outside Of Beirut, dial 01 first.) 
Uacht a n a t o lmCCi* 

Luxembourg 

Mexico* 

Monaco! CO, 

Natheriandstco* 

NefhMoitds AntfletiCO* 


B0Q-MCI (800-624) 
600-624 
426-038+ 
155 0222 
0800-0112 
96-800-674-7000 
I9v 00-19 
06-022-91-22 
001-800-950-1022 


Nicaragua! CQ 

(Outside of Managua, dial 02 firsL) 
NorwayKO* 

Panama 
Military Bases; 

Paraguay* 

Porn (Outside of Lima, dial 190 first) 
Poland! CG 
PortugaHCQ 
Puerto RtaXCO 
Qatar! CD* 
rtomanlrKCCH 
RusslMCCH- 
San Marino 1 co* 

Saudi Arabia 
Slovak RepubBeicci 
South Ahteaicq 


168 

900-19912 
108 

2810-108 
008-11-800 
001-190 
Ov-01 -04-800-222 
05-917-1234 
1-800-888-8000 
0800012-77 
01-800-1800 
8 t 10-800 ■ 437-7222 
172-1022 
1-800-11 
00-42-000112 
0800-99 -0011 


SpalniCC) 

Sweden i CO* 

Switzerland iCO* 

SyriatCCI 

Trinidad & Tobago 
Turkey* 

Ukraine + 

United Arab Emirates 
United Kingdom* ca 
To call the U.S. using BT 
Us call the US. using MERCURY 
To call anywhere other 
than iha U.S. 

Uruguay (Collect not available.) 
U.S. Virgin Mandated 
Vatican City ICO 
Venezuela** 


90099-0014 

020-796-922 

155-0222 

0800 

(Special Phones Onlyl 
008001-1177 
Br 10-013 
800-111 


0800494222* 

05008942221 


0500-800-800 
CW0-H2 
1-800-888-8000 
f 72- 1022 
900.111 4-0 


" *'-"■ ’ ^ U*® V° ur MO Card, 3 '- total telephone card or eall collect .^11 at the same low rates, 







ICO Coumry-to-cotimrY calling available. May not be available M/from all international locations. 
* ,7.;?!".” Certain restrictions apply. ■}- limited availabilftv. V Wait hr second rftsl tons. A Available from 
•; i j.—r '• LADATEL public phones only. Rate depends on call origin In Mexico, t Inrameucnol communi- 
cations carrier. * Not available ftenn public pay phones. * Public phone* mav require deposit of 
;. J, coin or phono card for d>af tone. 


YYOmlWNE" Let It Take You Around the World. 

y From MO 


Imprimc par Ofjpnni, 73 rve de I 'Evangil*. tSOISPtris. 








t- 


& 


i*;-” 




a- 

jf'.r- 

- 


'£■- 


■ 


c '■ 

ill; 

-l 


O.V 

A; 



- r,‘:‘ -j 






■r-tse-'i-.p- - 










'IZtZi'S.lr. 

fci C-!_- 










% 


fesS.* 




ip 




* 


i uat IS 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 1994. 


*2$ 


;$>■ 

:5s4 


l ;Via : 


'°S'! 


£.r*^W 

^ : '&W 

v ‘ ^ IS 


WileLeaj, 

- - ^-Oai'VjL^ 

: '■■• 3; ^t:S 


■ 


»’ Hours 


TU- 

l 


K&?/ 


to Benefit 


;Sj 

fv;:-T-^rn 


vviiL^r -am 




House Panel Leaders 


55 1 r %,Guy Crugliotta 


" I UN 

^WASHINGTON — Re- 
forms contemplated by the 
Mto-to-be, Newt Gingrich, 
and the incoming Republican 
leadership win substantially 
.weaken' House committees and 
make it unlikely that the Re- 
ffl b S c a n s could create a new 
generation of “bosses” in the 
tradition of Democrats such as 
Dm RpstaJcowsld of moms 
and John D. Dingdl of Michi- 


^Instead, almost- by default, 
power will flow back to the 
speaker’s office, where Mr. 
Gingrich, Republican of Geor- 
and his advisers have 


*ptit the young Republican 
members who have the most to 
grin in. the new . regime. Mr. 
. G in g ri ch has said he hopes to 
at least one Republican 
freshman on every co mm ittee. 

* The Republican team is aim- 
ing forVa historic makeover in 
the- way the House conducts 
Business and will accomplish it 
simply by exercising its prerog- 
ative as the majority party and 
changing the rales, 
u "firings will be substantially, 
it not radically, different,” said 
Representative Robert S. Walk- 
er of Pennsylvania, one of the 
party’s leading theorists. Over- 
all, the. party aims to create a 
leaner, more efficient House 
that will pass fewer but better 
bills, he said. 

The new rules will eliminate 
{hree committees, dash com- 
mittee staff by one- third, im- 
pose term limits on committee 
and subcommittee chairmen, 
end proKy vdting in committee, 
rewrite the rules of floor debate 
and stipulate a three-fifths ma- 
jority to pass tax increases. 

Power, grown diffuse and un- 
wieldy during the Democrats’ 
40-year domination, will shift 
away from the committees and 
toward the speaker’s office, 
where the rules are written. 
Chairmen win be challenged on 
the floor, their bills amended 
and their wishes thwarted. 

^*T can say this,” said the in- 
coming chairman of the Natu- 
ral Resources Committee Don- 
ald E. Young, Republican of 




A l a s ka, “I believe the House 
can t run as a total democracy.” 

But for Mr. Young and other 
new committee chairmen, many 
of whom have wailed for de- 
cades to run the show, the pros- 
pect of having their authority 
diluted by committee term lim- 
its, staff reductions and chal- 
lenges to their jurisdiction ma y 
be less than attractive. 

The incoming chairman of 
the Energy and Commerce 
Committee, Thomas J. Bliley 
Jr., Republican of Virginia, al- 
ready has withstood the leader- 
ship’s efforts to dismember his 
co mmi t t ee. Republican sources 
said. But publicly, most, if not 


seem willing, at least for now, to 
uy out the changes. 

Henry J. Hyde, Republican 
of Illinois, who is set to take 
over the Judiciaiy Committee, 
said he had “mixed feelings” 
about the rules but would “see 
how it works” with the proviso 
that the changes could be un- 
done if they proved unsuccess- 
ful 




Daud J. PbnSp/Tbc AMcutfd Pim 


THE BUSHES DIG IN — George Bush, his wife, Barbara, and family at a gro undb r eaking for the George Rnd« 
Presidential Library in College Station, Texas. Gazing at several former members of Ins cabinet, be deadpaimed, 
4 "ben I look-out here at the dedicated leaders from my administration, I see — well, I see half the field for 1996.*" 


Away From Politics 

• An International drug mooey-Lmndering operation, which 
prosecutors said used lawyers, rabbis, a diplomat and a New 
York policeman who reportedly stored dose to SI million in 
his precinct locker, was broken up after raids in New York, 
Florida, Colombia, Europe and Los Angeles. 

• Several anonymous phone calls rt wflftmlwg President Bin 
Qfatton led to the arrest of a 15-year-old in Detroit who said 
he made them from school to relieve his boredom and to 
impress his friends, the Secret Service said. 

• A jury recommended a zookeeper be awarded more than S 3 
million for the arm she lost to a polar bear she was feeding at 
the Cin cinnati zoo. 

• The fanner TV evangelist Jhn Bakker became a free man 
Thursday, after four and a half years in prison, a month at a 
halfway house and four months of bouse arrest Mr. Bakker, 
54, was convicted in 1989 of defrauding his followers. 

• The last of three Marines to be tried in the May 1 stabbing 
death of a fellow Marine near Hiroshima, Japan, has been 
sentenced to life in prison, the U.S. military said. Corporal 
Kenneth E. Ruiz, 23, was convicted of premeditated minder. 
•In a ruling that has stirred deep and emotional divisions 
among Catholics in northern Virginia, Bishop John R. Keat- 
ing said the Arlington Diocese would not allow girls to serve 
at the altar in most services. Pope John Paul H has ruled that 
girls can be altar servers, although he left the decision to each 

di0CeS& .. LAT.AFP. Reuters. AP. WP 


Mexico’s New Leader Pledges 
An Era of Pair Treatment? 


Ethics Debate Swirls Around Gingrich 


WASHINGTON —Die House spcaker-to-be._Newt Ging- 
rich, who has buQt a political reputation as an ethics crusader, 
now finds himself at the center of a congressional debate over 
alleged improprieties while also in the powerful position to 
pick new members of the House ethics committee. 

Mr. Gingrich, Republican of Georgia, says he will not 
recuse himself from making appointments to the 14-member 
ethics panel despite a complaint lodged with the panel that 
said he improperly used his political organization to finance a 
college course he taught. He bas dismissed the allegations as 
nothing but political vindictiveness by a former Democratic 
representative, Ben Jones, whom he defeated Nov. 8. 

Mr. Gingrich has sent a letter to the panel in which he 
contended that it did not have the authority to investigate the 
matter because it is a tax issue. The panel put off a decision 
this week on whether to pursue the allegations, raising the 
possibility the matter will not be resolved until early next 
year, when Republicans assume control of Congress. 

Mr. Jones asserted that Mr. Gingrich had violated House 
rules by improperly using GOPAC, a Republican political 
organization that Mr. Gingrich heads, to develop and raise 
money for the course he taught last year at Kennesaw State 
College in Marietta, Georgia. Contributors who funded the 
course got tax deductions because they sent checks, to the 
college’s foundation. (WP) 

Retiring Leader Gets Part-Time U.S. Port 

WASHINGTON — President Bill Clinton will name the 
retiring Senate Democratic Leader, George J. Mitchell, to be 
a special adviser for economic initiatives in Ireland, White 
House officials said Thursday. 

The appointment will be part-time, and not tied directly to 
peace talks between Britain and Ireland, officials said (AP) 

Quayle’s Blood Clots Laid to Long Flights 

NEW YORK — The blood dots that lodged in former Vice 
President Dan Quayie’s right lung probably resulted from 
immobility during long airplane flights, his doctors said 

The condition of Mr. Quayle, 47, who is in an intensive care 
unit in Indiana University Medical Center in Indianapolis, 
has unproved and his vital dens have returned to normal. He 


By Tod Robberson 

Washington Pm Service 

MEXICO CITY — Ernesto 
Zedillo Ponce de Ledn, a 43- 
year-old, Yale-educated econo- 
mist, donned the presidential 
sash Thursday and delivered a 
scorching inauguration speech 
calling for greater attention to 
the nation's poor and for whole- 
sale reform of Mexico’s corrup- 
tion-tainted judicial system. 

With Vice President A1 Gore 
of the United States, Fidel Cas- 
tro of Cuba and most other Lat- 
in American heads of state in 
attendance at Mexico’s Legisla- 
tive Palace, Mr. Zedillo hugged 
the outgoing president, Carlos 
Salinas de Gortari. and praised 
the advances Mr. Salinas’s six- 
year administration had made 
m transforming Mexico’s econ- 
omy and implementing the 


North American Free Trade 
Agreement 

Although Mr. Zedillo repeat- 
edly praised Mr. Salinas, the 
new president heavily criticized 
the outgoing administration’s 
toleration of corruption, per- 
sonal enrichment by public of- 
ficials, lax law enforcement 
practices and inattention to the 
nation’s poorest people. 

In a clear reference to last 
month's passage in California 
of the ami-immigration Propo- 
sition 187, Mr. Zedillo frowned 
as he pledged to be an “active 
and open nationalist” who 
would “defend lawfully and de- 
cisively the dignity and human 
rights of those Mexicans living 
beyond our borders.” 

Mr. Zedillo urged redoubled 
efforts to investigate two major 
political assassinations, peace- 


fully negotiate an end to a peas- 
ant uprising in southern Mexi- 
co, and curtail international 
drug trafficking and wide- 
spread political corruption. 

The overriding theme of Mr. 
Zedillo’s speech was that aver- 
age Mexicans do not feel they 
are receiving fair treatment un- 
der a political and economic 
system heavily weighted to fa- 
vor Mexico’s business elite. 

“Fair treatment means fight- 
ing monopolistic practices, 
abuses and privileges. It means 
precise, simple regulations to 
prevent corruption and pro- 
mote economic activity,” Mr. 
Zedillo said. “Fair treatment 
means a simple, transparent 
and equitable tax system, and 
the capacity to defend oneself 
against possible abuses on the 
part of authorities.” 


has improved and his vi 
will begin on an anti-c< 
take for several months 


;ns have returned to normal. He 
int drug that he is expected to 
leaving the hospital. (NYT) 


Illegal Allens Cost California $2.3 Billion 

WASHINGTON — The General Accounting Office has 
released a report estimating that California will shoulder $2.3 
billion in costs during the coming fiscal year to provide 
education, emergency Medicaid and adult incarceration for 
its large population of illegal immigrants. 

The study, released by Senator Barbara Boxer, Democrat 
of California, also estimated that the state's undocumented 
population generates $1 3 billion in UJS. tax revenues. (LA T) 

Quote/Unquote 

From a draft of “1945,” a forthcoming novel about World 
War II co-written by Mr. Gingrich: “Suddenly the pouting 
sex kitten gave way to Diana the Huntress. She rolled onto 
him and somehow was sitting athwart bis chest, her knees 
pinning his shoulders. ‘Tell me or I will make you do terrible 
things,' she hissed.” Moments later, the hapless White House 
chief of staff succumbs to the Gennan spy’s spell, telling hen 
“We’re making this new kind of bomb.” (AP) 



Ciient/Server computing is good for your 
people because it gives them easier access to 
more information. It’s good for your business 
because it removes barriers giving you new 
flexibility to improvise, to reorganise, to reen- 
gineer. 


Ciient/Server from IBM. 
Because there is a difference 
between a choice of solutions 
and a solution for \ our choices. 





There i * 

<{ i fie re w e »' 


So the question is not whether to explore 
Ciient/Server, it’s what to look for in the people 
who help you. Here’s a suggestion : look for 
someone who has the experience to custom tailor 
a solution for you. If they don’t have a long hist of 
references in building Ciient/Server applications, 
call someone who has; someone like IBM. 

We have more experience with more kinds of 
platforms, networks, and industry applications than 
anyone. So when we custom tailor your solution 
we can be more objective about your options than 
single platform vendors. 

And we keep careful track of everything we 
learn. Each Ciient/Server solution is unique, but 
we’ll compare your situation with ones we’ve 
faced before to give you the direct benefit of real- 
world experience. 

So if you want your solution tailor made, call us 
first. Simply contact your local IBM representative. 


INTERNET: *A Guide lo Open ClientServen. « available via 

1) E-Mail: climiJunvr@iMi.ibm.com 

2) http;! Iiowul.eiirope.ibrn.cond client-server 

3) fipzt 1fip.europe.ibm.com)clieBtj8ermrfdocs 


nd the 
waiting 
ire that 
.etwilh 
edJap- 
I later a 
hat his 
Naka- 
ren de- 
niable! 
lerican 
, ere no 
sf eases 
Bomb- 
iverage 
sd that 
ded to 
<mbing 
)L 

ks had 
sy had 
tut the 
Tokyo 

lowing 
felf ft 
*. Be- 

Ssfnom 
Ihfind- 
: or the 
at low 
lanes, 
ht the 
e city, 

5 that 
yff es- 
o flee, 
traps. 
j t into 
from 
f oxy- 
ywned 


n p ?*p Q,~? &f-8 ^ jap y 













Page 4 


P a 


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 1994 

opinion 



f ReralbS^Srlbunc 



PUBLISHED 


WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


J 


] 


A Moment of Shame 


es, 

ofi 

m 

wl 

ru 

cu 

ag 

sti 


be 

it 

S3 

le 

tc 

pl 

y< 


- Bums Butros Gbali went to Sarajevo 
' on Wednesday not so much to save what 
is left of Bosnia as to save what is left of 
the United Nations, whose mission, rep- 
' utation, self-respect and forces alike are 
in peril. He said that if there were not a 
cease-fire in Bihac and across Bosnia 
' plus respect for UN peacekeepers, he 

believed that the UN expedition should 
1 end. Both Bosnian Serbs and the Muslim- 
led Bosnian government disdain a cease- 
fire, and the Serbs continue harassing 
! UN forces. With Mr. Butros Ghali’s rea- 
sonable conditions unmet, the United 
' Nations should accept the fact of its dis- 

- grace and misfortune and withdraw. 

But, you say. what about Bosnia? It is 
only prudent to expect that removal of 
the UN peacekeeping cushion, thin and 

- lumpy as it is, will undo the UN arms 
embargo and precipitate a new round of 

' aiming and fighting — and possibly 
again draw in Croatia. (It will also leave 
untended the 1.4 million Bosnians whose 
feeling is in the Uni Led Nations' care.) 
Within Bosnia, the well-armed Serbs 
start this new phase ahead, but the lightly 
armed Muslims figure to catch up. The 
latter's prospects seem dismal to many 
outsiders, but Muslims are the principal 


victims of the war, victims of Serbian 
aggression and Western abandonment, 
and they have an undeniable moral claim 
to choose to tight on. 

The United States has its own decisions 
to taka For NATO reasons, it will want to 
help in the evacuation of endangered UN 
forces — with serious bombing if their exit 
is impeded. But as for joining the Muslims' 
battle against the Serbs in the air, Ameri- 
can interest and opinion still dictate cap- 
tion. NATO has been hiding behind Unit- 
ed Nations neutralism; with the United 
Nations gone, NATO is unlikely to heal 
its divisions and commission a big bomb- 
ing campaign. But the NATO countries 
and Russia can at least offer their mediat- 
ing services to the combatants, and they 
must use their diplomatic reach to try to 
inhibit the war’s spread. To support their 
policy, the outside countries should be 
prepared to extend the political and eco- 
nomic isolation of the Bosnian Serbs for a 
protracted period of time. 

This is a moment of breathtaking inter- 
national shame. On top of tragedy, fur- 
ther tragedy will be piled. But Americans 
do accept at least a minimal obligation to 
Bosnia — don’t they? 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Norway Out in the Cold 


While most Central and East Europe- 
an countries clamor for the swiftest possi- 
__ ble admission to the European Union, 
' Norwegians have for the second time 
rejected an invitation to join. This week's 
" referendum was only an advisory vote, 
but the Storting, which has the official 
~ say, will not defy the electorate's advice. 

Norway’s voters are not crazy. Their 
country is indeed a special case — al- 
' ready a NATO member, rich, well run 
and with an economic structure that 
might have made it a net loser from 
membership in strictly economic terms. 
' Its main export, oil, does not depend on 
' privileged access to European markets. 

Its wen-managed fisheries will now not 
'Ji have to admit Spanish, Portuguese or 
other EU trawlers or accept the suspect 
7. custodianship of Brussels Fishocrats. So 
"■ long as these resources remain plentiful, 
. going it alone makes some economic sense, 
I especially for the rural people who cast 
most of the “no" votes. Once those re- 
. sources start running down, Norway can 
count on yet another invitation to join. 

On the other hand, those working in 
_ manufacturing and service businesses 
could suffer from reduced access lo Euro 
_ J _ pean consumers and investment. That 
’ helps explain the strong “yes" vote in 
[. Oslo and Bergen, Norway's main cities. 


Moreover, all Norwegians may soon 
come to regret their country's isolation 
from European political councils at a 
time when important new security and 
financial institutions are being shaped. 

The European Union’s expansion, 
meanwhile, goes ahead. Three new mem- 
bers, Austria, Finland and Sweden, join 
next year. The leaders of the Czech Re- 
public, Hungary, Poland, Slovakia, Bul- 
garia and Ro mania have been invited to 
next week’s EU summit meeting in Essen. 
Some of these countries may be ready for 
membership by the end of the decade. 


End the Carnage in Bosnia , Even on Unfair Terms 


S TEYNING, England — I never imag- 
ined I would find myself defending 
Serbian conquests. Yet the choices that 
the United States and NATO have made 
throughout the Bosnian conflict have been 
so bad that there are no good choices irft. 
It is better to end the carnage, even on 
unfair terms, than have it continue for 
what could be a decade or more. 

The Europeans are right The West 
should make the 'Bosnian government 
settle against its wishes. 

After the humiliation surrounding the 
Muslim defeat in the struggle for Bihac, 
the United Nations is deadly serious 
about withdrawing its peacekeeping 
troops, perhaps even this winter, unless 
the waning parties agree to a cease-fire 
across Bosnia and a new round of talks 
aimed at ending the war. 

The risks of withdrawal would be 
great, since NATO forces — presumably 
including American ground troops — 
would have to provide escort to retreat- 
ing United Nations personnel. 

Until his policy shift this week, Presi- 
dent Bill Clinton bad been halfheartedly 
pursuing a strategy that did nothing to 
end the war while raising tensions with 
Britain and France: arguing for lifting 
the arms embargo against Bosnia, unilat- 
erally ending 0.5. enforcement of the 
embargo, and pressing for more NATO 
air strikes against Serbian positions. 

Finally, President Clinton has backed 
away from these efforts now that West- 
ern forces have failed to stop the Serbs in 
Bihac. Now the strategy should be for- 
mally dropped. 

Despite the Muslims’ recent losses, 
there are worrying signs that they are 
preparing another large offensive — this 
time in central Bosnia. Such a move 
would be another fiasco. 

In the past, faint American encourage- 
ment has led to gross M uslim overconfi- 
dence. But has the White House learned 
not to underestimate the Muslims' irra- 
tional and dangerous belief that the West 
will eventually come to their rescue? 

The last two winters in Bosnia, fighting 
abated. This winter it may escalate as 


By George Kenney 


Muslims, Serbs and Croats anticipate the 
UN withdrawal and the possibility of 


five-nation “contact 
this past summer. 
Alt! 


group" proposed 


What was once a clear-cut war of a SS F ^“ 
sion — some call it genocide— gradu^y 
turned into the civil war that many incor- 
rectly thought it always was. 

What was once a genuinely multieth- 


cap mnng equipment left behind. 
In the last week. 


week, peacekeepers have 
been de facto hostages of both Muslims 
and Serbs, while European governments 
insist that they will pull then: troops out 
of Bosnia if the fighting escalates. 

And what happens if the United Na- 
tions leaves Bosnia? Humanitarian aid 
noil end. The Serbs will shut down Sara- 
jevo. There will be no passage by road in 
or out; no electricity, no gas, no water. 
There will be violent sh elling . 

The Serbs wQl no doubt grab all of 
eastern Bosnia and what is left of the 


. Jthough senior Clinton administra- 
tion o fficials dismissed this possibility. 

conversations I have had in the last two filed Bosnian gov- 

months with diplomats close to the nego- me and legi y hard-line, anti- 
datians have convinced me of the Serbs’ eminent turned .rate a am « 

gqn pjnc desire to end the fighting- The 
Serbs’ recent successes have shifted the 
terms in their favor, but their interests in 
a settlement remain the same. 

They don’t want all of Bosnia. They 
know they couldn’t control it. And they 


want to support the efforts of the Serbian 
nt, Slobodan Milosevic, to get in- 


Uncritical condemnation of 
the Serbs (mdimcritical 
support for the Bosnian 
Muslims must be re-examined. 


Bihac pocket. The Muslims can maintain 
a stronghold in central Bosnia, but if they 
ever seriously threaten Serb-held areas, 
Bosnian Serbs can rely on allies in Serbia 
and Croatia to back them up. 

If the United Nations pulls out, my 
guess is that the Muslims will surrender 
within six months, with less land than 
they have now. Bosnia would disappear, 
carved up between Serbia and Croatia. 

This scenario might improve some- 
what if the Muslims got outside help, but 
the Bosnian Serbs would find benefac- 
tors, too. Jingoistic Russian legislators, 
for example, have said that Russia win 
arm the Serbs if the arms embargo on 
Bosnia is lifted. The Muslims, in short, 
have no winning strategy. Like it or not, 
they are looking at the war's endgame. 

Before the Muslims' recent devastating 
setbacks, there was reason to believe that 
the Bosnian Serbs were ready to sign a 
deal — one quite close to the plan the 


president, _ . . _ . 

temational economic sanctions lifted 
from Serbia and Montenegro. 

The Bosnian Serbs flatly refused the 
contact group plan for several reasons. 
They want to keep their northern corri- 
dor connecting Sob-held territory in 
eastern and western Bosnia at its current 
foar-lokancter width, rather than narrow 
it to 2.4 kilometers as the plan provides. 

As a military calculation, that logic is 
reasonable. They would trade Muslim- 
held land in eastern Bosnia, which the 
plan leaves with the Muslims, for Serb- 
held land around Sarajevo. The exchange 
carries both advantages and drawbacks 
for the Muslims, but seems negotiable. 

The Serbs want most of the Bihac 
pocket. Thanks to Sarajevo’s intemper- 
ate, failed offensive, they are taking it. 

Finally, they want the same rights of 
confederation with Serbia that the Bos- 
nian Muslim-Croat federation enjoys 
with Croatia, a proposal that now seems 
lo be on the table. 

Outsiders should note that the U.S.- 
brokered constitution of the Muslim- 
Croat federation gives no explicit rights 
to Serbs living in federation territory, 
whereas it does explicitly protect Mus- 
lims and Croats. American officials pri- 
vately admit that the arrangement was 
too hastily pm together, and they are 
working to fix the problem. 

Uncritical condemnation of the Serbs 
and uncritical support for the Bosnian 
Muslims must be re-examined. Much has 
changed in Yugoslavia since July 1991. 


democratic Muslim entity. 

Now we find ethnic cleansing by Mus- 
lims alongside that of the Serbs^ana the 
senseless determination of President 
Alija Izeibegovic of Bosnia to wage war 
against his longtime rival, Fikret Abdic, 
the dissident Muslim leader of north- 
western Bosnia, thus shattering the one 
region spared from earlier fighting. 

It is all understandable, but it isn t 
right. In August 1992, when I resigned 
from the State Department, I said the 
West had a brief window of opportunity 
to intervene. Well it shut a long time ago. 

The clique of nationalist politicians 
around Mr. Izetbegovic — particularly 
hard-liners like Ejup Game, the vice 
president — don’t want to admit that 
they will never govern all of the former 
Bosnia, because doing so raises questions 
about their legitimacy. Nor can they 
clearly explain what is to be gained by 
further fighting. These men — inexperi- 
enced, corrupt, unable to fathom interna- 
tional politics — hardly warrant U.S. 
support in a civil war that would destroy 
Lheir country in order to save it. 

I do not believe that morality has an 
existential reality independent from the 
world. Arguing that we must lift the arms 
embargo so that the Muslims can defend 
themselves ignores the brutal conse- 
quences of aiming them. 

In Bosnia, we have to recognize that 
the good is the enemy of the least bad,' 
however tragic that may be. If there is 
anything to be salvaged from this deba- 
cle, Mr. Clinton must work more closely 
with the Europeans, not against them. 


The writer resigned from the State De- 
partment in A ugust J 992 in protest against 
Bush administration policy in the former 
Yugoslavia. He contributed this comment 
to The Hew York Times. 


The momentum lost in (he early 1990s 

burea: 


u- 


over public unhappiness with the 
era tic and centralist Maastricht 
seems to have been regained as B 
and national leaders grew more respon- 
sive to public alienation and scaled down 
overly ambitious plans. Neither a single 
currency nor a common foreign and de- 
fense policy is likely before the end of 
this decade, as originally planned. But 
the European idea is again a positive 
vision, from the Atlantic to the borders 
of the former Soviet Union. Norway has 
chosen for now to stand outside, along 
with Iceland, Liechtenstein and Switzer- 
land. A decade from now, that may no 
longer be a tenable choice. 

— THE HEW YORK TIMES. 


Sobering Up After Casablanca: Work Remains Before the Bonanza 


W ASHINGTON — The re- 
cent Middle East/North 
Africa economic summit in Casa- 
blanca was hailed by many as a 
significant step on the road to a 
comprehensive, just, durable and 
prosperous peace. By bringing lo- 


Bv Paul Chabrier 


The writer is director of the Middle Eastern Department 
at the International Monetary Fund. 


gether in a public forum high- 
level government and business 


Back Down on the Farm 


A major task of the Clinton adminis- 
tration and the Republican Congress 
next year will be to write a new farm bill. 
It is a huge undertaking; here will come a 
five-year bill involving billions of dollars 
in likely subsidies and other forms of 
support to an entire sector of the Ameri- 
can economy at the start of a new era in 
world trade. But this time the problem is 
compounded. The administration has no 
discernible farm policy, has never devel- 
oped one and seems most unlikely to do 
so now, when it has been politically 
weakened and will shortly lack even an 


agriculture secretary. The Republicans, 
ie House, 


perhaps particularly in the House, are 
likewise untested. It is clear enough that 


they want to cut federal spending and 
■ that they 1 


regulation, but not so clear that they want 
to cut farm spending and regulation — 
not the elaborate regulatory structures 


thiri prop up prices, at any rate. 


The major farm support programs are 
trade-offs of price and income supports 
for production restraints. The strongest 
believers in free markets among the Re- 
publicans would do away with them. Some 
urban Democrats have also tried to kill or 
cut back some of the lesser programs, 
although for different reasons. There is 
likely to be a revival of such talk this time 
around, particularly if Republicans, who 
tend to be strong in farm states, also pass 
a balanced budget amendment and begin 
to make heavy cuts in other spending. If 
only for political reasons, members not 
from farm states will try to force them to 
cut farm spending, too. 

Farm state members of both parties can 
be expected to resist They have already 
indicated that they will again try to do no 
more than make modest further reduc- 
tions in support levels. But that, too, can 
eventually lead to a dissolution of the 
system, because as support levels drift be- 
low break-even points, fanners will be 
inclined to withdraw from the programs 
rather than submit to production limi ts 

That win be the broadest battleground 
— how much and how to cut the princi- 
pal programs. There will also be some 


lesser battles. Dairy price supports have 
become dysfunctional; what helps one 
region hurts another. The Systran has 
bran so patched over the years that the 
price of milk is now almost entirely a 
federal artifact A truly deregulatory 
Congress would strike the system down. 
It would do away with such anti -competi- 
tive constructs as the sugar program as 
well, in which import ana now even do- 
mestic marketing limitations are used to 
keep U.S. prices artificially high. 

The farm bill also presents environ- 
mental issues. What happens next to the 
conservation reserve program, in which 
farmers are paid to idle supposedly frag- 
ile land? To what extent will either the 
administration or Congress seek to use 
the farm bill to make pesticide and/or 
clean water or wetlands policy? 

The administration may not propose a 
bill Instead it is said to be considering a 
statement of principles, mostly of the 
steady- as-you-go variety, the effect of 
which would be to leave the writing of the 


level government and 
leaders from most of the coun- 
tries in the region, it provided a 
signal — not only to people in the 
region but also to those outside it 
— of changing political and eco- 
nomic relations among the re- 
gion’s countries. 

In the midst of optimistic state- 
ments at the summit, some partic- 
ipants, including the respected di- 
rector-general of the Arab Fund 
for Economic and Social Develop- 
ment, Abdulla tif al-Hamed, cau- 
tioned against unduly high expec- 
tations. Their sobering remarks 


reminded the audience that a fa- 
vorable political environment is a 
necessary but not sufficient condi- 
tion for the region to exploit its 
considerable economic potential. 

This reminder of the challenges 
ahead is confirmed by the experi- 
ence of the International Mone- 
tary Fund with countries in this 
region and others that have called 
on the IMF for macroeconomic 


policy advice, as well as technical 
and fu 


financial assistance in sup- 
port of their economic adjust- 
ment and reform programs. 

Certainly, peace and economic 
progress are linked: peace im- 
proves the prospects for high eco- 
nomic growth and poverty reduc- 


tion; better economic conditions 
help to cement the peace process. 

Specifically, at the country level 
in the Middle East, reductions in 
defense spending would free re- 
sources to finance needed invest- 
ments, especially in social sectors 
like health and education. Peace 
would lessen private market per- 
ceptions of country risk, thereby 
boosting the expected return to 
investment activities, a key to high 
sustained economic growth. 

At the regional level, reduced 
tensions would open opportuni- 
ties for wetfareHenhancmg trade, 
production and investment. 

Tourism, power generation, wa- 
ter and transport could ail bene- 


fit- In addition, there is scope for 
joint production activities, espe- 
cially in agriculture, agro-indus- 
tries and manufacturing. 

Both the private and the public 
sectors from several countries in 
the region put specific projects on 
the table at Casablanca. In some 
cases they relied on a strength- 
ened institutional base. Sugges- 
tions included: establishing a de- 
velopment bank to facilitate the 
financing of regional infrastruc- 
ture projects and to serve as a 
forum for policy deliberation: 
creating a tourist board; and set- 
ting up a regional chamber of 
commerce to promote trade be- 
tween countries and facilitate pri- 
vate sector contacts. 

The range of possible benefits 
of peace ties behind some ob- 
servers’ enthusiastic expecta- 
tions, including visions of a free 
trade zone from (be Atlantic to 


kS For Commerce as for Stability, Involve Arab People 

atinnv aro iicmt In •/ 


bill to Congress, which has the power 

olitical 


anyway. That would be a bow to po! 


reality as well as a way of preserving the 


eality 

president’s options arid avoiding blame. 


all of which might be shrewd. But it still 
wouldn’t constitute a farm policy. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


/^JENEVA — The Casablanca 
VJ conference demonstrated 
once more King Hassan’s ability 
to get conflicting parties together, 
ana was another example of Mo- 
rocco’s gracious hospitality. 

For the organizers it was no 
mean success to attract more than 
a thousand leaders and executives 
from all over the world These 
included leading Western and 
Asian politicians, and seven Is- 
raeli cabinet ministers. Some 
Arab governments, especially 
those that have peace treaties 
with Israel were represented 

But apart from a natural con- 
centration of Moroccan entrepre- 
neurs, the Arab business commu- 
nity was virtually absent. 


By Mohammad Tarbush 


In a large measure this was due 
to an old habit of Western and 
Israeli policy toward the Arab 
worid, namely, reaching out to 
Arab governments but rarely to 
Arab people. The Israelis are still 
far from winning popular accept- 
ability in the region. 

Fifteen years of Egyptian-Israe- 
li coexistence has brought a vol- 
ume of trade of around $40 million 
per annum between the 60 million 
Egyptians and the 5 million Israe- 
lis. This represents an annual ex- 
change of goods and services of 
less than one dollar per person. 

The situation can change when 
Israel and its Western allies extend 


Other Comment 


The Multilateral Challenge 


The president and his top officials 
must be prepared to put deeds — and if 
need be, military power — b ehin d their 
words. That could require acting unilat- 
erally when national interests warrant 
doing so. More often, it will likely mean 


After the War, the Hard Part 

By Walter Russell Mead 


|^EW YORK — The Middle 


participating as part of a larger collective 
~ “Mult" 


effort. “Midtilaleralism, for good or ill 
almost always requiring American lead- 
ership, has descended on the worid," 
notes Leslie Gelb. The key words in that 
sentence are American leadership. 

— Los Angeles Times. 



International Herald Tnbune 

ESTABLISHED ]S8? 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 

RICHARD McCLEAN, Publisher A Chief Execuiive 
JOHN VINOCUR, ExradveEiStw & VkePteadau 
. • WALTER WELLS. Abu Efa.* • SAMUEL ABT. KATHERINE KNORR and 
CHARLES MilCHELMORE.Df'/wn fi/rftvs* CARL GEWIRTZ, Associate Editor 
• ROBERT J. DONAHUE. Efitonfti* EeBtory Pages * JONATHAN GAGE, Business end Finance Editor 
• RENE BONDY. Depun PuNhkr 1 • JAMES McLEOD. Advertising Director 
•JUANITA L CASPAR!, buemmonjl Deirkjmm Dn-mrv • ROBERT FARR£, Ciratksian Director. Europe 
Duntturdc la PuNkatuau Rk'hird D. Simniaru 
DinictarAJjamideLiPiibliarion: Kaduuinc P. Darrm 


international HetaJdTrflwne, ISI Avenu: Charfo-de-GuuIk. 9252 1 Neuilly-sur-Seine, France. 
Td. : 0 ) 4GJ7.93XXJL Fax:Cirr. 46J7J365I: Adv.,4<jj7^2.12. Internet Wr^teurokcrrue 

Editor tor Aar Midud ftidvnt mu 5 Gmertvn RrL Singapore (. TeL irtj) ei2-77(& Fax: (651 274-2334 
Mrn. Or. Asia. RMD KnmnxAL 50 Glawster RtL Hang fconjj, TeL XS2JI222-I IS& Fax 852-9222-1 m 
Col Mer. German: T. SdEber. Fntdrichnr. 15. 60323 Fnmhfim/M. TeL fftW) 72G75X Fas (069) 727310 
preslOL MkhadCovm. 850 MdAx. New York. N.Y. 10322 Td (212) 752dm Fax (2/2) 7558785 
U K. Advertising Office: 63 Long Acre. London W'C2. Td (071 1 836-4802. Fax (071 ) 240-2254. 
e s aa capital de 1. 200.000 F. RCS Nmtemr B 732021126. Commission Paritaire No. 61337 
O /Wt, b&mximr! Hm3d Trtfwe- AEriffSS reserved ESN: U29t-8052 



il 


East peace process is at a 
crossroads. Yasser Arafat has 
agreed to make peace with 
Israel but the terms of the 
agreement are destroying his 
political authority. 

On the West Bank and in Gaza, 
one can see the decline in Mr. 
Arafat's influence. More and 
more Palestinians talk openly 
about their disappointment with 
the agreement and their disillu- 
sionment with Mr. Arafat. 

Israelis aren't much happier. 
Agreement wish the Palestinians 
furthered peace with Jordan, but 
it hasn’t brought peace to the Is- 
raeli people. Soldiers are still be- 
ing attacked, terrorists are still 
hitting civilian targets. 

Israelis and Palestinians are 
both weary of war, but neither 
sidc Is quite ready for peace. It is 
the same problem that has haunt- 
ed the Middle East since the 1967 
war The Israelis do not know 
how to deal with victory, and the 
Palestinians do not know bow to 
deal with defeat 

Mr. Arafat needs to be both the 
George Washington and the Kon- 
rad Adenauer of Palestinian histo- 
ry. As Washington, he must secure 
national independence and pre- 
side over the birth of a nation and 
a new political system. As Ade- 
nauer, Mr. Arafat must help his 
people come to terms with defeat. 
Neither role will be easy. 

Mr. Arafat mil need help from 
the Israelis and the West The 
West’s job is the easy one: to pay. 


Western governments and donor 
organizations must belp the Pal- 
estinians set- up a government, 
compensate refugees and provide 
social services so that Palestinian 
public opinion will be convinced 
that the benefits of cooperation 
outweigh the psychological satis- 
faction of continued hostility. 
The money is needed now. 

The Israelis have a tougher job. 
If Mr. Arafat and the peace pro- 
cess are to survive, the Israelis 
must let him win political vic- 
tories that will bolster his support 
among Palestinians. 

If Mr. Arafat must walk a 
tightrope, so must Yitzhak Ra- 
bin. The Israeli prime minister 
cannot make concessions that un- 
dercut Israeli security or alienate 
a sensitive and divided Israeli 
public. But he must avoid forcing 
Mr. Arafat to comply with de- 
mands that discredit both Mr. 
Arafat and the peace process 
among the Palestinians. 

Taking risks for peace goes 
against the grain for many Israe- 
lis; to make concessions to a de- 
feated enemy seems foolish to 
people who have spent their lives 
in a straggle for survival. 

Israel must learn the lesson to- 
day that the United States began 
to absorb after 194S: It isn’t 
enough to defeat your enemies — 
you have to make friends with 
them. These lessons came relative- 
ly easy for the United States; they 
will be much harder for a smau 
country like Israel surrounded by 
former enemies whose goodwill is 
far from assured. 

Los Angeles Tunes. 


their official dealings with Arab 
governments to the Arab people. 

The Clinton administration 
has already began such contacts 
with the Palestinian private sec- 
tor through its Overseas Private 
Investment Corporation. How- 
ever, with an annual budget of 
only $75 million allocated to 
projects in the occupied territo- 
ries, the scope of the corpora- 
tion’s achievements is limited. 

Truly democratic institutions 
in the Western sense are still rare 
and at best at a formative stage in 
the Arab world: no effective trade 
unions or representative national 
assembles, widely controlled me- 
dia, and in most places an omni- 
present thought police. 

Nevertheless, a widespread and 
effective souk democracy exists, 
in which Arab consumers rule su- 
preme and selectivity of purchase 
is observed. Consumers’ wDl car- 
ries more weight in the calcula- 
tions of Arab entrepreneurs than 


official policy. This silent constit- 
rillvot 


uency will vote “yes” to meaning- 
ful economic relations with Israel 
when Israeli withdrawal from the 
occupied territories is complete 
and an equitable settlement is 
made for the Palestinian refugees 
of 1948 and 1967. 

The learned crowd at Casa- 
blanca were naturally aware of 
the constraints facing foreign in- 
vestment and mobility of capital 
within the region. They insisted 
on the need for appropriate legis- 
lation and political stability as 
prerequisites for economic devel- 
opment and prosperity. 

There was talk about a S10 bil- 
lion regional development bank 
and other grandiose projects that 
would help the Middle East and 
North Africa leap into a more 
prosperous future. The right envi- 
ronment should also draw part of 
the $600 billion in Arab funds 
invested abroad, with all the mul- 
tiplier effects such a movement of 
capital would have. 

Israeli participants at the con- 
ference who were looking Tor out- 
lets for their products and know- 
how may have been surprised by 
the sophistication of their counter- 
parts and lheir ability to tap ad- 
vanced sources of production and 
technology worldwide. 

No doubt for this reason, but 
also because, demonstrably, offi- 
cial peace treaties are not suffi- 
cient for growth of multinational 


trade, no substantial transactions 
were signed, and Israeti-Arab 
contacts were often confined to a 
mere exchange of business cards. 
(According to Ha'aretz. this led 
Shimon Peres to comment that 
Israeli delegates were busy meet- 
ing each other.) 

Beyond the celebrations and 
rhetoric, Israelis were reminded 
that acceptability in the Arab 
world is to be earned through the 
occupied territories. 

When that happens, a major ob- 
stacle to the flow of capital and 
ideas within this resourceful region 
of 300 million inhabitants will be 
removed. If this is coupled with 
the spread of legitimate regimes, 
and a radical correction of unem- 
ployment (now affecting mainly 
the young and reaching as high as 
50 percent in some Arab coun- 
tries), prosperity can finally dawn. 

Bear in mind ancient Mesopo- 
tamia. which Forms a fraction of 
the total area of the contempo- 
rary Middle East and North Afri- 
can, once supported a population 
of 50 million. The potential for a 
prosperous region is hardly an 
ivory tower hallucination. 


The writer, a Palestinian, is an 
investment banker and writer on 
current affairs based in Geneva. He 
contributed this comment to the 
International Herald Tribune. 


the Gulf. Four cautionary points 
must be emphasized, however, in 
evaluating the likelihood that 
economic benefits will material- 
ize on a significant scale: 

• The peace process needs to 

be broadened further to bring in 
all relevant parties and address 
remaining, albeit difficult, issues. 
This is key to a comprehensive, 
just and durable peace. 0 

• Timely follow-up is needed 
to ensure that appropriate pro- 
posals aimed at strengthening the 
region's institutional base are car- 
ried out effectively. 

• Macroeconomic and struc- 
tural policies of countries in the 
region must be strengthened to 
create a firm enabling environ- 
ment for private sector growth 
and investment The economic 
peace dividend will not material- 
ize on its own. It needs to be 
secured through governments' 
determined implementation of 
economic adjustment and struc- 
tural reform policies — policies 
that restrain inflation, foster 
growth and spur employment 

• The general public in the re- 
gion needs to be made aware that 
realization of the economic peace 
dividend will take time. While fi- 
nancial assistance from industrial 
coun tries — especially to the Pal- 
estinian authorities — will be es- 
sential in the interim period, it 
cannot substitute for self-gener- 
ated amelioration in living stan- 
dards through policies that pro- 
mote saving, inves tmen t amt eco- 
nomic efficiency. - 

Moreover, given the legacy of 
years of hostility and mistrust, 
new regional economic and finan- 
cial linkages are likely to evolve 
only gradually, taking root and 
flowering as the people of differ- 
ent countries get to know and 
trust each other more. This is an 
essential reason not to allow the 
momentum created to be lost, but 
on the contrary to build on it. 

The Middle East/North Africa 
economic summit was a signifi- 
cant event in the economic, histo- 
ry of the region. Now the remain- 
ing challenges must be addressed, 
and appropriate policy responses 
formulated. As it has done or is 
doing in so many parts of (he 
world, the IMF stands ready to 
assist countries in the design and 
implementation of economic pol- 
icies, and in the provision of tech- 
nical and financial assistance. 

Internationa l Herald Tribune. 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 
1894; Don’t Mention It 


LONDON — Any man daring to 
mention the state of the weather 


in an after-dinner chat last night 
would have been summarily cject- 


ed from the smoking-room of any 
a. The fog was a 


newspapers, reappears to-day 
[Dec. 2J m its customary form. It is 
unnecessary to state that we ac- 
cepted the suspension of publica- 
tion with extreme reluctance. Bui 
we had no acceptable alternative. 


dub in London. The fog 

kind which could not be cut with 
the proverbial butter knife, but 
which would take a keen-edged 
razor. Every man one met — or 
collided with — was muffled up 
to the ears and gasping and 
coughing like the asthmatic wal- 
rus of Lewis Carroll's creation. 


1919: Herald Reappears 

PARIS — Another strike has 
ended; after the booksellers' em- 
ployes, the grocery and dry goods 
store workers and others, the Par- 
is printers have resumed wcnk on 
the former conditions. The strike 
having been called off, the Herald, 
in common with the other Paris 


1944: Banzai Attacks 

GENERAL MacARTHUR’S 
HEADQUARTERS, Philippines 
— [From our New York edition:} 
Units of the American 7th divi- 
sion advancing northward toward 
Ormoc along Leyte’s west coast 
smashed a series of suicidal Japa- 
nese banzai attacks on Tuesday 
[Nov. 28] and Wednesday pights 
near Palanas, General Douglas 1 
MacArthur announced. Bran- 
dishing Samurai swords and bay- 
onets, screaming and shouting, 
and fortified with sake, the enemy 
charged the 7th*s positions in - 
considerable strength. When the 
foe was within range, our men cut 
loose and mowed them down. 



I v YPJHu* 


— ”i 





How dp you bulld a car tiiat tias to live up to some amaz ing automotive, 
reputations? The best way ive know is to borrow a little from each. And that's 
just what w^ve done with the new Neom From Chiysler’s Vision weTve taken 
eab^forward d'esigni which gives the car a wide track for precise handling while 
i ujaaginatiye; : 


iMi, 

- rC^ 
v: 
r 

-- ; 

./ r k 


MMiai 12 


The Bear Will Rise Again, 
So Build the Alliance Now 


By William Safi re 


"NJ~ W ,r OR ^ — The first rule of 
to present a dear 
point of view. My formula: Here’s 
what s wrong; here 5 who’s messing 
JP’ here . s wh L ai we should do. 

No on-the-other-handwringing. 

Let others take an attitude: I 
offer certitude. 

That comes naturally because 
I have worked out a mindset. 
The fervent furtherance of free- 
dom, international and personal, is 
its bedrock Thai’s why I want the 
United States to be interventionist 
[or human nghts abroad and anti- 
buttmsky at home. 

But today I have a conflict of 
mindsets. One says: Within the next 
decade the Russian bear will be- 
come strong and hungry and will 
grow] again, so we must strengthen 
and extend the Western alliance 
to avert a lest by war. 

Deep geothinkers like Henry Kis- 
singer and Zbigniew fiizezinski sup- 
port this mindset with historical 
sweeps: Russia is authoritarian at 
heart and expansionist by habit; 
with its educated population and 
- v a$t resources — now unencum- 
bered by Communist baggage — 
Russia will rise again 10 su- 
perpowerhood, and is manifestly 
destined to look west and south to 
fill its irredental caries. 

If dial is true — and a lifetime’s 
hawkish instinct says it is — then we 
Americans should set aside petty 
irritations with newly complacent 
allies in Europe. 

We should not only main min our 
troop strength of 100,000 Americans 
there, which puts our men and wom- 
en where our mouth is, but extend 
membership of the North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization eastward to 
countries most likely to be threat- 
ened by a revivified Moscow. 

That means soon taking in Po- 
land; Hungary, the Czech Republic 
and the Baltic states — the most 
Westernized nations of Eastern Eu- 
rope — and ultimately Ukraine as 
it privatizes. The rime to push the 
protective line eastward is now, 
while Russia is weak and preoccu- 
pied with its own revival, and 
not later, when such a move would 
be an insufferable provocation to 
a superpower. 

That inclusion is the direction 
taken by Clintonites, to the con- 
sternation of doves and other isola- 
tionists. After flirting for a year 
with a silly halfway house called a 
| Partnership for Peace to fool or 
pacify the Russians, Deputy Secre- 
tary of State Strobe Talbott is get- 
ting serious, about making certain 


Over Tokyo the Tail Gun Fell Silent 


the nations most at risk will be 
brought into NATO and no longer 
be up for grabs. 

That is why President Bill Clin- 
ton is off to Budapest on Sunday on 
a frenetic five-hour photo opportu- 
nity at a gathering of the Confer- 
ence on Security and Cooperation 
in Europe, the alliance bigger than 
NATO but smaller than the United 
Nations. It is a way of telling the 
Russians they can belong to a con- 
vivial European club too, without 
letting them into NATO, which 
would defeat the purpose of the 
Atlantic alliance. 

On the other hand (a phrase I 
swore never to write), there is this 
contrary mindset: If allies are not 
prepared to pull their weight in an 
alliance, let them go it alone. 

Bosnia is to the UN what Ethio- 
pia was to the League of Nations: 
the moment of truth at which the 
world body flinched, inviting great- 
er aggression elsewhere later. 

The “pro” in “Unprofor” means 
protection. Some protection. Not 
that two of the key players in NATO 
wanted to protect Bosnia from dis- 
memberment. The United States 
wanted to supply the victims with 
arms and offer them NATO — 
mainly U.S. — air support. France 
and Britain put troops in only to 
facilitate surrender. But if nobody is 
willing to supply Sarajevo, who will 
be willing to die for Danzig? 

Or Pam, for that matter? France's 
record includes a preemptive surren- 
der in World War 11 and a free ride 
on NATO’s back in the Cold War. 
Britain’s reliability has been compro- 
mised by a studied spinelessness in- 
tended to curry favor with Euro- 
philcs. And insular Germany, the real 
power in Europe, quietly favors help- 
ing us defend Germany. 

If America's NATO partners 
laugh at its leadership in the Bal- 
kans, why maintain a major force 
over there at all? Why promise to 
participate in a European nuclear 
war? America's front line is no 
longer Europe; it is the skies over 
the United States. 

To employ a Franklin Roosevelt 
metaphor, NATO's failure of nerve 
in . Bosnia shows we have bred mili- 
tary-welfare dependents, who — as 
soon as the Communist disease 
seems cured — throw their crutches 
at the doctor. 

These conflicting weltanscbau- 
ungen cannot long co-exist in the 
same head. Not to worry; 1 will 
noodle it out and pass along which 
mindset won. Watch this space: 

- The New York Times. 


By HAGEN is Ventas Gag (Oik* CAW SynScHt 


M ELBOURNE — Many Japa- 
nese believed that they would 
lose the war after the decisive U.S. 
naval victory in the battle of Mid- 
way Island, in June 1942, ended Jap- 
anese expansion into the central Pa- 
cific. The capture of Saipan Island 
by American forces probably sealed 
the country's fate. 

However, when air raid alarms 
signaled the first U.S. Superfortress 

1944 TOKYO 1994 

raid on Tokyo, just over 50 years 
ago. the Japanese were gripped by 
even deeper despair — of the sort 
that had overtaken ihetr forebears in 
the previous century, when an 
American naval squadron dropped 
anchor in Tokyo Bay, to mar k the 
start of a painful process of modern- 
ization. 

On Nov. 24, 1944, 1 10 B-29 Su- 
perfortresses took off from Saipan 
for a high-level daylight bombing 
raid on Tokyo's Nakajima aircraft 
factory. The B-29 was a large and 
sophisticated plane. It had new fuel 
injection engines specifically de- 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


To Understand Bosnia 

Regarding comments by William 
Pfaff. Flora Lewis and Jeane Kirk- 
patrick ( Opinion , Nov. 25): 

These three articles on the former 
Yugoslavia were remarkable in sev- 
eral points: All displayed a strong 
anti-Europeanism, a will/ui misun- 
derstanding of the European role in 
ex-Yugoslavia, and a mocking of 
European concerns. 

Don't Americans realize that we 
Europeans do not want our own Viet- 
nam? Americans should wear their 
self-righteousness less easily. We Eu- 
ropeans remember that the United 
States was founded on the “ethnic 
deansing” of its previous inhabitants 
and military land grabs from Mexico. 

On this ride of the pond we de- 
spair when Americans think they 
know best and try to force their 
solutions down our throats, insult- 
ing us for not taking the medicine. 
For the sake of trans-Atlantic re- 
lations, Americans should try to 
understand: not mock, threaten 
and then retreat. 

T.G.L THIRKELL. 

London. 

With the UN Security Council 
and NATO being held at gunpoint 
by the Serbs, like grocery clerks who 
will soon hand over the cash, 1 find 
profoundly disturbing the present 
European strategy aimed at obtain- 
ing any kind of peace in Bosnia. It 
appears likely that the European 


members of the Security Council 
will close their eyes to anything, if 
the Serbs make this problem go 
away. Unfortunately, some ques- 
tions of basic humanity are about to 
be brushed under the carpet. 

Will the effectiveness of the 
peacekeeping effort in Bosnia be se- 
riously assessed? How much did it 
cost? Was it worth it? 

Wfll aggression now be recog- 
nized as a legitimate means of ob- 
taining land? What about the Bosni- 
ans' right to self-defense, included 
in the UN Charter? Will future gen- 
erations of Bosnians accept an un- 
just peace, or will they choose to 
Tight again in 10 or 15 years? 

Can we afford to forget the atroc- 
ities, the mass rapes, the systematic 
destruction of a culture? Didn’t the 
world say “Never again” to atrocities 
committed in the name of ethnic su- 
periority just 50 years ago? Can we 
afford a peace at all costs in Bosnia? 

P. M. ULRICH. 

Strasbourg. France. 

In the Yippies’ Shadow 

Regarding “Jerry Rubin, Fire- 
brand ’60s Radical and Co-Leader of 
Yippies. Dies at 56“ (Nov. 30): 

Your obituary of Jerry Rubin re- 
peats the canard that the Yippies 
were “the quintessential 1960s pro- 
test group.” The Yippies were the 
brainchild of a stoned get-together 
on New Year's Eve, 1967, at which 


fewer than a dozen people, includ- 
ing Jerry Rubin, decided to invent 
something the media would pay at- 
tention to. and in the process of 
paying attention to iL create a self- 
fulfilling prophecy — which eventu- 
ally drew demonstrators to Chicago 
for the Democratic convention the 
following August. 

The media endlessly declared the 
Yippies and their stunts “quintes- 
sential.” In collaboration with re- 
porters who found them endlessly 
fascinating, the never numerous 
Yippies did capture (indeed “in- 
haled”) one of the spirits in the air 
of those days. But most of that 
decade's activists belonged to less 
photogenic civil rights, anti-war, 
women’s and other radical groups. 

TODD GITLIN. 

Paris. 

The writer is author of “ The Six- 
ties: Years of Hope, Days of Rage. ” 

Clinton Was the Target 

The White House's analysis of the 
results of the recent congressional 
elections — that the electorate was 
fed up with incumbents and not so 
much with Democrats — is inaccu- 
rate. For if it were true, why did not 
(me single Republican incumbent 
lose? Perhaps the election outcome is 
more of a referendum on President 
Bill Clinton than was believed. 

FORD ROBERTSON. 

Vienna. 


By Denis Warner 


signed to operate at high altitudes 
and long range. In training, howev- 
er, the crews had been dogged by 
engine trouble. Tokyo was more 
than 1,500 miles (2,400 kilometers) 
from Saipan. A round trip would 
take 16 horns. 

The island was not an ideal opera- 
tional base. Only one B-29 could 
take off or land at a lime. Since there 
would be an interval of one minute 
between each take off, the bombers 
could not operate in mass forma- 
tions as the allies did in Europe. The 
crews were not to have the comfort 
of safety in numbers. 

The preraid briefing was not Tor 
the faint of heart. We were told that 
for safety's sake, the planes would 
have to detour around all Japanese- 
Leld islands on the way to the home- 
land. We were warned of the dan- 
gers we might encounter over Japan, 
of the treatment we might expect if 
we crashed or landed by parachute 
in Japan, and of the difficulties of 
making the long return over water if 
the aircraft was badly damaged. 
Submarines had been positioned to 
rescue crews who came down at sea. 
We were given their locations. 

As we approached the target over 
Tokyo, the first anti-aircraft fire 
burst well below us. But soon the 
shells started coming uncomfortably 
close. Japanese fighters followed 
Our tail gunner and a Japanese gun 
opened fire at the same time. We 
saw the Japanese plane pull out. But 
our own gun also stopped suddenly. 

Our B-29 dropped its bombs and 
swung bade toward the sea over To- 
kyo Bay. We could see other Japa- 
nese fighters coming up. Fortunate- 
ly, they were loo late. When the 
captain checked his crew, there was 
no response from the tail gunner. 
The co-pilot went back to investi- 
gate and found him bleeding badly 
from a head wound But in rushing 
to his aid, the co-pilot had forgotten 
that we had depressurized. While he 
was in the tail gunner's bay. his 
oxygen supply ran out He ceased to 
respond over the intercom. 

We dropped from 29.000 feet to 
12,000 feet, a level at which oxygen 
would not be needed A third crew 
member went back to the lad gun- 
ner's compartment and reported 
that both men were dead or dying. 
Low on fuel, and having lost valu- 
able gliding altitude that might have 
helped us in an emergency, ws 
limped back to Saipan. We landed 
with two dead men and the fuel 
tanks showing empty. 

Of all the B-29s that had taken off 
from Saipan, only 24 reached To- 
kyo. Sixty-four turned back. One 
was destroyed in a Japanese kami- 


kaze attack. One ditched and [he 
crew was picked up by a waiting 
submarine. 1 am not even sure that 
the plane I was in hit the target with 
its bombs. Torao Saito, a noted Jap- 
anese war correspondent, and later a 
close friend, used to claim that his 
home, a long way from the Naka- 
j ima aircraft factory, had been de- 
stroyed and that I was responsible! 

Successive high-level American 
bombing raids over Japan were no 
more successfuL Japanese defenses 
improved. Soon the U.S. 2 1st Bomb- 
er Command was losing an average 
of five planes of every hundred that 
went on a raid. It was decided to 
change from high-altitude bombing 
to low-level fire raids by night- 

While the high-level attacks had 
not caused great damage, they had 
frightened many Japanese. But the 
moment of real horror for Tokyo 
came on March 9, 1945. 

A gusty wind had been blowing 
during the day. As darkness fell, it 
reached almost typhoon force- Be- 
hind it came hundreds of B-29S, from 
Sai pan, Tinian and G uam. Pathfind- 
er planes marked the target for the 
main forces, which roared in at low 
level, dumping ions of incendiaries. 

It was impossible to fight the 
fires. They raced through the city, 
often preceded by fireballs that 
started new blazes and cut off es- 
cape routes for those trying to flee. 
Bomb shelters became death traps. 
People living near canals leapt into 
the filthy water, only to die from 
smoke inhalation and lack of oxy- 
gen. Thousands of others drowned 
in the Stimida River. 

About 100,000 residents and sev- 
en square miles erf Tokyo were de- 
stroyed. But this was just the begin- 
ning. From March to mid-April, 
American fire bombers burned an 
estimated 770,000 houses and made 
3 million people homeless. With 
Tokyo in ruins, the B-29s struck 
at other areas, wrecking the in- 
dustrial heart of Japan. 

Could the fire bombs have ended 
the war? I doubt iL Despite the 
incendiary horror, preparations 
continued for suicidal Japanese re- 
sistance to the planned American 
invasion of Kyushu, the homeland 
island. That resistance campaign 
would have made the bloody Ameri- 
can landing s at Saipan, Tarawa, Pel- 
eliu and I wo Tima seem like Sunday- 
school outings. Only the shock of 
the U.S. atomic bomb attack on Hi- 
roshima and N agasaki finally broke 
Japan's mil to fight to the death. 

The writer, an Australian war cor- 
respondent with U.S. forces in the 
Pacific, was one of five civilicin jour- 
nalists to fly on the first B-29 raid on 
Tokyo. He contributed this comment 
to the International Herald Tribune. 


- , >£.*>•■ 


Imp is ,t n-gisfiircd trademark of Chryslor Corporation. 










INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 1994 



DELTA FLY TO AMERICA FROM 


MORE EUROPEAN CITIES THAN ANYONE ELSE. 




m. 






/.'V 



CIMCINNAT* 
MEW YOTUt 

n. t l a. m r a. 
s a. m r Ft a. m — i r 
LOS A. M « E • L E « 
O R. L A M O O 
NEW YORK. 
WASH I NGT ON 
MIAMI 
NEW YORK 
DALLAS 

S AN FRANC t 
LOS A N GEL E 
NEW YORK. 
ATLANTA 
BOSTON 

YORK. 


UMt&m otwjM 




B y*DWa k £ r & £ ~ = 
M A NCH £ST:ER 

.C Q g E N H A G 1 N 
B U C H ARE S J- 
SARCELO NA 
S T U T T GAR T 
B DM B AY . 


WARSAW 


NEW 
WASH 1 NGTON 
SAN FRANCISCO 

NEW YORK. 

DALLAS 
BOSTON 
NEW YORK 
HOUSTON 
ATLANTA 
LOS ANGELES 
MIAMI 
NEW YORK. 
WASH I NGTON 
ATLANTA 
DETROIT 
NEW YORK. 
ATLANTA 


O L 4 I 
■0 L 6 S 1 

O V. I l 9 

D L 1 7 
t> 1_ & O & 3 
D L l 4 7 
D L 1 *3 7 7 
SCO T> L l 7. 

S D L I 8 T 

D L 4 7 
'O L l \ 

O A_ 4 9 8 

t> L t l O 
OL l 2 9 

D L 120 
O L 9 5 


O H 2 S 
OU 2^ 

D L 7 T 
D L 9 7 
OL 47 
O L I S 
OU'.S. 
U7 \ 
DIM 
D \_ \ O 9 
D L UO 
Dl \ 9 1 
DUS 


MILAN 
MOSCOW 
HAMBURG 
NICE 


C A G O 


SAN 
C H I 
NEW YORK 
ATLANTA 


DU5 
D1T \ 

D L 8 \ 
DL 115 


LONDON 

C 1 N 

C 1 N N AT 1 

DU 7 m 

W ATHENS' 

NEW 

YORK 

D L l ’ 2 M 

W FRANKFURT 

L 0 S 

ANGELES 

0 15 7 1 

1 PRAGUE 

C 1 N C ! N N. A T 1 

rs \ An ’ 

U U “1 7 

■ i 

' Y J JENNA 

11 / A C 
n n j 

KINGTON 

uL 4 \ 

B E RL 1 N 

M C Ui 
if .c n 

YORK 

rv i ft o 

U L 7 -J 

TEL AY LV 

p y ! 

i a r\ r * quia 

U M w t l r n i K 

DLVVf 

y A DR 1 D 

ME X 

1 r A r 1 T V 

1 W W ^ 1 1 1 

n i £ iv n 

U L M \l 1 

u u i r u 

4 / / f i L n 

r\ a « 
u n l 

LAS 

ru 

u W d i 

Cl U 1 
- u n f 

uy a c 
nr h a 

U 1 u r T f\ KI 
n i n u i v if 

rv i l cv 

U U 1 VI 

u n a ki 
/? u y n 

1 A c 
i- w 

A M r C 1 C c 

M 11 VJ L Ltd 

rv i v n 

U L d I 


r a 

vj v 


X/ 1 / 
/? A 


II o 
u n 


i n 

L I 


r c i 
j t L 


o n a 

n i/ m 



A tall story? 

No, Delta 

fly from 30 European cities, in 20 
different countries with over 220 
direct flights to the US every 


week. 


From our seven major hubs 
in the States the Delta system 
can connect you to 247 other US 


destinations. 


So we’re big, but are 


we beautiful? 


Well, we get our fair 
share of fan mail, but it’s the letters 
we don’t get that might interest 


you. 


According to the United States 
Department of Transportation, Delta 
received fewer complaints* than any 
other American international carrier. 
(And this from a nation that really 

j likes to complain.) 

> 

s 

f 

j It’s a poll we've 

j 

| been glad to come bottom of every 

! 

j year since 1974. 

• 

And since we fly 
87 million passengers every year 

j that adds up to a whole lot of 

0 

1 satisfaction. 

Next time you’re flying 
to the States, look us up. 

ADEHAAIRUNES 

You’ll love the way we fly. 


















INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 1994 


Page 7 



ver o% 


j Air a. 

' ^ver\ 


u ‘ su5$ 


system 


42 Nations Heed the Call to Make AIDS Fight a Top Priority 


By Barry James 

PAXtlT ntaiMal * ,trU,d Tnt ™' 

gg.'-ss's-.ir-s 

SffijBBSKME 

mg the disease a top poS prifJl 

_J2“ AIDS ?®. tivisB the decla- 
ration recognizing the disease as “a 
threat to humanity" fell short on%e- 

The declaration, by which the gov- 
represented promised to 
SS, a « a ^ the “poverty, stigmati- 

SS5SS, d £ c T il “ lion '’ thatoften 
^dtsease, was the main 

^fe^ lofaWorldAiDSDa y 

Although the French government 


and the World Healih Organization, 
the sponsors of the meeting, invited 
42 heads of state, none came. In- 
stead, 13 nations sent prime minis- 
ters and 23 others sent cabinet mem- 
bers. 

WHO estimates that 17 milli on 
people in the world are seropositive, 
meaning that they carry the human 
immunodeficiency virus, or HIV, 
which causes AIDS. 

1 Half of new infections occur in 
people under 25, and WHO believes 
that by the year 2000, 30 million to 40 
million will carry Lhe virus. About 4 
million people, the UN agency says, 
suffer from acquired immune-defi- 
ciency syndrome, a 60 percent in- 
crease in one year. 

Butros Butros Ghali, the UN sec- 
retary-general, assailed the “serious 
shortcomings” of the global fight 


against AIDS and called for greatly 
increased coordination on the politi- 
cal level. 

“We are not meeting here in Paris 
simply to issue a further warning, but 
to declare a planetaiy emergency.” 
he said. 

Scientists said that a vaccine, even 
one with limited efficacy, is still 
many years away and that the best 
that can be hoped for in the near 
future are improved therapies that 
may longer delay the onset of AIDS. 

The call to political action was 
designed to galvanize governments 
into adopting preventive strategies 
and to avoid discrimination against 
AIDS sufferers. 

“The policies of the last 10 years 
have driven most people living with 
HIV and AIDS underground," said a 
Jamaican woman using the pseud- 


onym of Yolanda who was represent- 
ing a group of AIDS activists. “What 
are you going to do in reality when 
the ink of your signatures under the 
declaration has dried up?” 

The governments said they would 
foster education about the 'disease, 
which is spread primarily by sexual 
contact, and promote the use of con- 
doms. 

They pledged to adopt “specific 
risk-reduction activities” to prevent 
AIDS among highly jeopardized 
groups such as drug users and homo- 
sexuals. And they promised to 
strengthen international cooperation 
to ensure the safety of blood prod- 
ucts, which are an important factor 
in the spread of the disease in devel- 
oping countries. 

The governments also promised to 
“ensure equal protection under the 


law for persons living with HI- 
V/AIDS with regard to access to 
health care, employment, education, 
travel, housing and social welfare.” 
Some of the countries that signed the 
declaration, including the United 
States and Japan, restrict the entry of 
people with AIDS. 

Officials said they hoped the Paris 
conference, and a series of follow-up 
meetings, would help raise con- 
sciousness. This is vital, they said, 
because many governments had not 
realized the global pandemic nature 
of Lhe disease. 

In China, for example, according 
to Agence France-Presse in Beijing, 
“official hesitation to tackle issues 
like sex, homosexuality and drugs 
has left the vast majority of citizens 
in the dark about the nature of the 
disease and its tr ansmissi on." 


Achille Lauro Drifts in Flames as Ships Collect Its Passengers 


Hew > ori. Times Servin' 

ROME — Listing and 
scorched after a mysterious fire 
that turned it into a blackened 
a 11 ":, the Italian cruise liner 
Achille Lauro drifted in placid 
seas in the Indian Ocean on 
Thursday as United Slates 
Navy and other vessels rescued 
almo st 1,000 passengers and 
crew who had first taken refuge 
on the flat deck of an oil tanker. 

But, omeiy to the last, the ill- 
starred vessel that had been re- 
ported Wednesday night on the 
brink of sinking was still afloat 
Thursday evenin g , apparently 
because its internal superstruc- 
ture had collapsed into the h ull 
providing a kind of ballast to 
stabilize its 20-degree lisL 


Commander T. McCreary, a 
spokesman for the U.S. Navy, 
which sent two warships io as- 
sist in the rescue operation, 
said: “The ship is on fire inside. 
There is smoke from the back 
end of the ship. It is still well 
above the water but the super- 
structure is completely 
charred.” 

Under a fierce Indian Ocean 
sun, 150 miles (250 kilometers) 
off the coast of Somalia, hun- 
dreds of passengers — many in 
nightgowns or evening dress 
and some of them weeping — 
were ferried to safety Thursday 
from the deck of the oil tanker 
Hawaiian King to the American 
and other rescue ships. 

They made the brief crossing 


in calm waters known for their 
sharks aboard U.S. Navy rafts 
and on the same lifeboats that 
had taken them there from the 
Achille Lauro early Wednes- 
day. 

The ship had been on a cruise 
from Italy to South Africa, but 
most of its passengers and crew 
will now end up on freighters or 
U.S. warships taking them to 
dry land in Mombasa, Kenya, 
Djibouti on the Horn of Africa 
or the Seychelles Islands to be 
flown home. 

Of the 979 people on board, 
two — a Briton and a German 
— died in the disaster. 

“The water is calm. It’s just 
the hot sun beating down mer- 
cilessly on folks,” said Com- 


mander McCreary in Dubai as 
more and more passengers were 
transferred off the Hawaiian 
King, where they had spent the 
night 

At sunset Thursday, the Ital- 
ian coast guard said most rescue 
vessels had left the area around 
the Achille Lauro, leaving the 
liner still smoldering. 

The drama came as an undig- 
nified end for the 47-year-old 
ship, whose fortunes had often 
drawn the wrong kind of celeb- 
rity, particularly in 1985 when 
Palestinian terrorists hijacked 
it, shot and killed a 69-year-old 
Jewish hostage, Leon KJingh- 
offer of New York, and 
dumped him over the side. 

And, even in its throes on 


Thursday, the ship became the 
object of an equally undignified 
dispute over salvage rights. Two 
private salvage tugs were re- 
ported heading for the Achille 
Lauro, and Captain Ferdin- 
ando Lolli of the Italian coast 
guard said they might make a 
bid for salvage of the 23,479- 
ton liner. 

But the ship’s Neapolitan 
owners. Star lauro, said tugs 
from their own company were 
in the area and might salvage 
the vesseL 

The Italian Ministry of 
Transportation said the vessel 
was not technically abandoned 
because its owners had made 
clear they wanted to reboard it. 

United States Navy film 


jjg 

Clinton Will Bypass % 
Congress on Payout _ 
To North Koreans 


made public on Thursday 
showed the Achille Lauro 
belching smoke and flame from 
its midships to its stern 
Wednesday. 12 hours after the 
Tire broke out at 1.30 A.M. 

Passengers waited on deck 
for seven hours before aban- 
doning ship. But even then, the 
worst was not over because 
their only place of refuge was 
the Panamanian -registered Ha- 
waiian King with its long, flat 
deck that offered no protection 
on Thursday from the sun. 

Italy's Transport minister. 
Publio Fiori, said the fire may 
have been started by a discard- 
ed cigarette, but there has been 
no formal investigatioa 

— BY ALAN COWELL 


By R. Jeffrey Smith 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — The 
Clinton administration has de- 
cided to finance the initial stage 
of its nuclear deal with North 
Korea with about $5 million in 
discretionary Defense Depart- 
ment funds already approved 
by Congress, ducking a possible 
clash with Republican lawmak- 
ers who claim the accord gave 
too much away. 

The strategy effectively gives 
the administration until next 
spring to sell skeptical lawmak- 
ers on its merits before Con- 
gress might be called on to ap- 
prove further expenditures. 

Senior Clinton administra- 
tion officials said their strategy 
reflects their apprehension 
about the poor reception the 
deal is getting from influential 
Republicans. 

Neither administration offi- 
cials nor Republican lawmakers 
said they expected a concerted 
effort to undo the accord on 
Capitol Hill. As Ambassador- 
.at-Large Robert L. GalJucri. 
the chief U.S. negotiator, said 
of the congressional critics: 
“They may not find it as win- 
ning a deal as we do. But they 
will find it preferable to any 
alternative.” 

The administration's plan is 
aimed partly at keeping some of 
the most controversial aspects 
of the nuclear deal off the con- 
gressional agenda in coming 
months, including a promised 
initial lifting of barriers to 


American trade and investment 
with North Korea. That action 
will be performed by presiden- 
tial order, and will not be sub- 
ject to congressional review, ac- 
cording to U.S. officials, who 
asked not to be named. 

“We will not do anything 
that requires passage of a stat- 
ute because we cannot assume 
passage of a statute," a senior 
administration official said. 

The 55 million Defense De- 
partment expenditure is for the 
shipment to North Korea of an 
estimated 50.000 ions of heavy 
oil. which North Korea had de- 
manded as compensation for 
keeping a nuclear reactor shut 
and halting the construction of 
two new reactors that Washing- 
ton complained were developed 
to produce plutonium for nu- 
clear arms. 

A separate Department of 
Energy plan to assist North Ko- 
rea in improving conditions at a 
storage pond for the plutoni- 
um-laden fuel rods, as the deal 
requires, will be funded from 
discretionary Energy Depart- 
ment accounts, and also will not 
be subject to congressional re- 
view, officials said. 

Another S5 million to 510 
million expenditure by the En- 
ergy Department for long-term 
storage of the rods in North 
Korea will be reprogrammed 
next year from funds Congress 
has already approved, officials 
said. Thai' would make it sub- 
ject to routine approval by just 
a few key lawmakers. 


-- V .. - 



GATT: 

Shift on Trade 

Continued from Page 1 

GATT, which is based in Gene- 
va, said the U.S. debate was 
“both necessary and desirable" 
given the unprecedented scope 
of the pact. 

The agreement win cut tariffs 
by a more than a third, extend 
global trade rales to services 
and such intellectual property 
as movies and software, and es- 
tablish a World Trade Organi- 
zation with power to enforce 
hose rales for the first time. 

UJS. opposition prevented the 
establishment of such a power- 
ful trade arbitrator 46 years ago 
and limited the GATT to a con~ 
sensnal role, whereby every 
country has a veto. 

More importantly, Mr. Suth- 
erland said, 124 countries have 
now joined GATT, reflecting 
Lhe new-found popularity of 
free-market economics in once- 
closed places like Chile, Mexico 
and India. Even China and 
Russia are knocking on 

^ “Thereh^been a sea change A Bosnian Serbian soldier guarding hundreds of troops from the mostly Muslim Bosnian Army captured near Bihac. 
in many parts of the developing 

SoeS. 11 BOSNIA: Bihac Crisis Set Off Battle Between Croatia and Its Rebel Serbs 

The triumph of free-market M 

forces has rebounded with a Continued from Page 1 meters north of the Bihac pock- dovan Karadzic, refused to 

vengeance, however. The free _ ■ . et and well within the Serb-hdd meet with Mr. Butros Ghali. 

movement of capital and tech- “ area of Croatia, there were no The United Nations is striv- 

nological progress, allowing signs of large-scale troop move- ing to obtain a cease-fire for the 

business to produce almost any- ments or unusual tension. Bihac pocket and Bosnia as a 

thing anywhere, has made free a f£v “J" Yasushi Akashi, the top UN whole that would last at least 

trade seem like a threat to many restrain ea y neavy .a. pres- gjgcjal ^ ^ former Yugosla- three months. The Serbs want a 

people in the West. “Jfv. „ , . , . — via, is to visit Sarajevo on Fri- longer cease-fire that might 

“Competitive pressures are . JMF; -Tjfr? day in an attempt to revive talks serve to consolidate thdr hold 
so great that trade has simply “*y on a Bosnian cease-fire after the on 70 percent of Bosnia; the 

become a focal pant for ex- jKT_ fiasco of Secretary-General Bu- Muslim-led government forces 

pressing anger about the struo- intervene, Keu- lTQS jj uU08 Ghali’s visit want a limited cease-fire that 

tural changes” that have forced tore reponeo. i . Wednesday to the capilaL The would offer them a respite from 

ZdXSrUH^ds of lay- leader of the Bosnia ^bs.Ra- the blip assault. ^ 

StK nwmcnT thannowforthe 

®5r35£K SIMMS. - Political Quandary for Kohl: 

j^UtuonandalMy fiffJrein the J Bihac frontj ^ inter- X J 

JSZXS&cSSSZSt NATO Requests German Pilots 

already led the Omtonammn . Offensive after the Serbs’ 1 

istration to effectively snerve recem cross-border assault on The Associated Press liberal opposition said it op 

talk of expanding tne ivorin ^ wes tem outskirts of Bihac. BONN — NATO asked Ger- posed any combat role in tni 
American Free trad® /v return of the war between many on Thursday to send Ba lk a n s. 

the entire Western riemispner& £ roat j a and its rebel Sorbs fighter planes to patrol the skies Germany has shied from di 

The deal Mr. t "f nlon r \~V7r would escalate the current bor- over Bosnia in a mission that rect involvement in Bosnia 
with Mr. Dole for his support oi ^ conflict and shatter already would place the German mili- Herzegovina because of the his 
the GATT agreement aiso strained attempts to bring tary in a combat rote for the tory of Nazi atrocities in the 
poses a threat to w °!*“ peace to the region. first tune since World War n. former Yugoslavia and anti 

Trade Organization, stw Bul un military observers Defense Minister Volker German sentiment amon{ 

cent Cable of the Royal insu- diere had been no particu- Rflhe said Germany must take many Serbs. 
pi „ oHn^ano f , aI ABa , Bm ^ movement or massing of on the mission, but the foreign But Germany’s credibility ix 
London. The deal will set up a xsx>ops in the last day minister, Klaus Kinkel, raised the North Atlantic Treaty Or 

panel of retired U-S. judges to rumors that govern- doubts about it. ganization could be threatened 

review World Trade Urgatuza- ment f OIC es had moved over the If Chancellor Helmut Kohl if it refuses the mission, giver 

cio rulings, and will allow ton- line south of decides to accept, it could mean Mr. Kohl’s repeated assertion* 

gress to pull out of the oigaiuza- ^ n - n embarked on an of- a bruising battle in the new Par- that his nation must bear iu 
tion if the panel ™ .“P?: fensrve. liament, where Mr. Kohl holds share of peacekeeping respcmsi- 

rulings in a five-year penoa to jjere hi Topusko, a few kilo- the narrowest of majorities. The bilities. 
be unfair. _ — — 


ITALY: Berlusconi and Unions Settle , Averting Strike 


Continued from Page 1 meters north of the Bihac pock- 

SIS 

signs of laig^scale troop move- 
.VuIj T™. ments or unusual tension. 


dovan Karadzic, refused to 
meet with Mr. Butros GhalL 
The United Nations is striv- 
ing to obtain a cease-fire for the 


In the Bihac pocket, UN offi- 
cials said the town of Bihac it- 
self was comparatively quiet 
Thursday, with intermittent 


SlS Yasushi Akashi, the top UN whole that would last at least gun fire, 
restrained by heavy U.S. pres- official ^ fonner Yugosla- three months. The Serbs want a In Veil 


ic pocket and Bosnia as a. small -arms and heavy machine- 


c , ., • rj. via, is to visit Sarajevo on Fri- longer cease-fire that might 

m 40 attempt to revive talks serve to consolidate their hold 
ona Bosnian cease-fire after the on 70 percent of Bosnia; the 
fiasco of Secretary-General Bu- Muslim-led government forces 
f0rc ^^2T mtervcne ’ Keu ‘ iros Butros Ghali’s visit want a limited cease-fire that 
tere reportetL j Wednesday to the capilaL The would offer them a respite from 

. CcrtanUy tberecond scarre- leaderof the Bosnian &rbs,Ra- lhe blip assault, 
ly be a better political or mill- - 

tary moment than now for the 
Croats to make a move: The 


three months. The herbs want a in Velika Kladusa, in the 
longer cease-fire that might north of the pocket, there was 


Political Quandary for Kohl: 


greb offensive after the Serbs’ 
recent cross-border assault on 
the western outskirts of Bihac. 

A return of the war between 
Croatia and its rebel Sorbs 
would escalate the current bor- 
der conflict and shatter already 
strained attempts to bring 
peace to the region. 

But UN military observers 
said there had been no particu- 
lar- movement or massing of 
Croatian troops in the last day 
and denied rumors that govern- 
ment forces had moved over the 
confrontation line south of 
Knin and embarked on an of- 
fensive. 

Here in Topusko, a few kilo- 


The Associated Press 

BONN — NATO asked Ger- 
many on Thursday to send 
fighter planes to patrol the skies 
over Bosnia in a mission that 
would place the German mili- 
tary in a combat rote for the 
first time since World War n. 

Defense Minister Volker 
Rflhe said Germany must take 
on the mission, but the foreign 
minister, Klaus Kinkel, raised 
doubts about it. 

If Chancellor Helmut Kohl 
decides to accept, it could mean 
a bruising battle in the new Par- 
liament, where Mr. Kohl holds 
the narrowest of majorities. The 


intense fighting as Croatian 
Serbs supported by Muslims 
who oppose the Sarajevo gov- 
ernment of President AJija lzei- 
begovic tightened their noose 
on the town- 


THE GOOD SHIP VENUS: 
The Erotic Voyage of the 


NATO: Russia Refuses to Approve Special Ties but U.S. Plays Down Move 


, p__ , Serbs to release UN personnel they are 

CBfintdmBnff holding as virtual hostages, 

ipe it was limited by United Nations die- unwillingness to put NATO's full force 

tales. xi .into Bosnia is not new, blit the eagerness to 

Secretary of State Warren M. Uinstfr- ^ issue aside undercut the da/s offi- 
cer. at a separate news conferenow^ £ja] message that even after the Cold War, 
Suggested that future NATO is still important- and the key to 

would belter handle conflicts like FAnaoeQIi security. 


^ts would belter nancue cornua — 

the one in Bosnia. 

“Bosnia was certainly on our minds to- 
really addressed (be future of 

wh^treops NATW 

? S2c t 0 f a luncheon* discussion, and bare- 
fv fed during the formal morning and 


European security. 

The main business of the day,. NATO 
and U.S. officials said, was an agreement 
on steps toward NATO expansion. The 
group said it would define the minimum 
nicmbership requirements for countries in 
East Europe who want to be covered by the 
allian ce's security blanket. 


James Campbell’s look at 
Paris in the 1950s focuses partly 
on black American exiles and 


r 

; V 


subiect of a luncheon discussion, anu derision was heavily weighted with Mr. Kozyrev was supposed to formally on black American exiles and 

lv raised during the formal morning an j t topped short of guaranteeing enter Moscow in activities of the Parmer- bow they connected with the 

afternoon meetings. . . membership once the conditions were fnl- ship for Peace, a program designed to French, notably Boris Vian and 

Out of 20 items on a final commimiq afld effectively delays for at least a prepare potential members of NATO and Jean-Paul Sartre. The two 

n-cnia was No. 18, just ahead to probably much the controversial to stay in contact with other countries, bodes intersect on the history of 

Irnooltaijce to developments around me w jj 0 will get in and when, which like Russia, will probably never be the Olympia Press, on the writ- 

jSSterranean-NATOcaU^fora^cea^ t b e next three or four months, invited to join. ers loosely known as the Merlin 

fire, supported diplomacy 


Continued from Page 1 

my name is Silvio Berlusconi. If 
it did, it would be a political 
sentence, a subversive act,” Mr. 
Berlusconi said, once again 
casting the Milan inquiries as a 
vendetta against his conserva- 
tive government 

“I have sworn my innocence 
in a sacred way because I’m 
convinced of it,” he said. “If it 
was shown I was guilty, I would 
no longer be able to be prime 
minister, 1 would no longer be 
able to stay in my own country 
because of the shame.” 

The Milan magistrates, 
whose inquiries into Mr. Ber- 
lusconi’s dealings as head of 
Fininvest do not imply guilt, 
want to find out if he knew of 
bribes allegedly paid to the tax 
police in 1991 and 1992 in re- 
turn for favorable audits. Mr. 
Berlusconi has accused the tax 
police of extortion. 

The ruling to shift the case to 
Brescia brought bowls of pro- 
test from Mr. Berlusconi's ad- 
versaries, who said tbe decision 
resembled notorious episodes 
in Italian legal history when po- 
litically-sensitive cases were 
transferred to backwaters. 

“Since then the makeup of 
the orchestra has changed com- 
pletely,” said Alessandro Ga- 
lanle GarronL a historian and 
jurist “But, it seems, the music 
is the same,” 

Antonio Chiappani, one of 
the Brescia magistrates, said. “1 
think this is designed to put us 
in a position where we cannot 
continue with the inquiry.” 

The case was transferred af- 
ter lawyers for a defendant 
from the tax police said hear- 
ings in Milan would not be fair 
because other members of the 
same tax police unit are helping 


the magistrates investigate their 
colleagues. 

Mr. Berlusconi was speaking 
Thursday after weeks of con- 
frontation with labor unions, 
who brought hundreds of thou- 
sands of Italians onto the 
streets and staged a four-hour 
general strike Oct. 14 to protest 
proposals for cuts in Italy's gen- 
erous and indebted state pen- 
sions system. 

The unions bad threatened 
an eight-hour stoppage on Fri- 
day that would have brought 
the country to a halt. Mr. Ber- 
lusconi had been holding out 
for budgetary proposals de- 


signed to rebuild Italy's inter- 
national economic credibility 
by reducing its 1 995 budget def- 
icit to some $86 billion. 

Mr. Berlusconi has sought to 
trim the deficit by some $30 
billion in part through spending 
cuts relating to state pensions. 

In negotiations with union 
leaders, the government agreed 
to soften a proposed freeze on 
early retirement pensions and 
to ease proposed penalties for 
nonpayment of social security 
contributions. The government 
also agreed to union demands 
to treat the whole pension re- 
form in legislation separate 
from the 1995 budgetary law. 


OBESITY: Mutant Gene Found 


Continued from Page 1 
to five times the ginh of normal 
mice and that is also subject to 
diabetes and other disorders. 
The researchers then used the 
mouse gene to scan through hu- 
man DNA, the genetic material, 
which led them to the human ob 
gene. 

The mouse and human genes 
are nearly identical, which 
means that the molecular mech- 
anism for regulating fat storage 
and appetite has been con- 
served through tens of millions 
of years of evolution. 

Whether in rodent, human or 
other mammal, tbe gene ap- 
pears to be switched on solely 
or largely in fat tissue, where it 
generates a hormone-like pro- 
tein that is secreted by the fat 
cells into the bloodstream. 

Once in the blood, the pro- 
tein is thought to travel up to a 
region of the brain, called the 
ventromedial nucleus of the hy- 
pothalamus, which is consid- 


ered the major controller of ap- 
petite. In that way, the fat stores 
of the body tell the brain how- 
big or small they are. and the 
brain can regulate food intake 
accordingly. 

“The idea is that there is a 
physiological pathway that con- 
trols body weight,” Dr. Fried- 
man said. “Each of us has a 
certain body weight that usually 
is stably maintained, and this 
requires signals to the brain 
about what you weigh.” 

By this model, a mutant ver- 
sion of the gene would either 
fail to make the hormone alto- 
gether or would produce too 
Bttle of it. Thus, the brain 
would not get the proper mes- 
sage on its adipose status. 

Psychologists who study the 
lives and struggles of fat people 
in America greeted the new 
work with enthusiasm, declar- 
ing that it could help those of 
normal weight be more sympa- 
thetic toward the obese. ' 


BOOKS 


liberal opposition said it op- ™ fcrot,c of 

posed any combat role in the Olympia Press 
Balkans- 

Germany has shied from di- By John de SL Jorre. 332 pages. 
rect involvement in Bosnia- £20. Hutchinson. 

Herzegovina because of tbe his- 
tory of Nazi atrocities in the PARIS INTERZONE: 
former Yugoslavia and anti- Biehard Wright, Lolita, Bo- 
German sentiment among . ir . ^ . 

many Serbs. ns Yian and Others on the 

But Germany’s credibility in Left Bank 1946-1960 
the North Atlantic Treaty Or- „ r „ , „ 

ganization could be threatened ^ Jmes Onnpbeil 305 pages. 
if it refuses the mission, given £20. Seeker & Warburg. 

Mr. Krill’s repeated assertions 
that his nation must bear its Reviewed by 
share of peacekeeping responsi- Katherine Knorr 
bilities. rp HERE seems to be an un- 

X quenchable thirst in the 
publishing world for stories 

Plays Down Move shout Pans When it was cheap 
•2 and literary expatriates could 

NATO will study the costs and obligations *5 * 

for membership and present them to pro- de ?*■£?** °* 

spectrve members, nriably Poland, Hun- ** 0\ympm Press and its leg- 
m and the Czech Republic. end-m-hi^own-time founder. 

", j , . Mannce Girodias, is less ro- 

The alli a n ce appeared to be wary of man tie, than man y of these 
offending Russia, which opposes inclusion ^ though it serves up its 
of any former Soviet satellite. Mr. Kozyrev s h ar e 0 jp nostalgia for cold gar- 
was unimpressed. Arriving after the smelly staircases. He 

NATO meeting, be expressed surprise at concent^ interestingly, on 
the deriaon to study expjmson. the good books that Girodias 

Mr. Chnswyher and otharN ATOran- published) ^ on ^ ^ 
isters assured Mr. Kozyrev ihat no recruit- M ^ ^ wefe ^ 

ment of new members would take place in bad ^ heard ^ him 
1995. and that even afterward, movement James Campbell's look at 
to expansion would take tune. Paris in the 1950s focuses partly 

Mr. Kozyrev was supposed to formally on black American exiles and 
enter Moscow in activities of the Partner- bow they connected with the 
ship for Peace, a program designed to French, notably Boris Vian and 
prepare potential members of NATO and Jean-Paul Sartre. The two 


group, named after the review- 
edited by the Scot Alexander 
Trocchi, and on the better- 
heeled Paris Review crowd. 

John de St. Jorre's is the better 
book, more thoroughly re- 
searched and more focused. 
Campbell's approach at times 
seems scattershot and dichfed, 
but he offers interesting insights 
into the experience of black 
Americans, who came to Paris 
for vastly different reasons than 
white writers, and were received 
differently — not only Wright 
but also' Chester Himes and 
James Baldwin. These are two 
books by Britons that rely heavi- 
ly on the testimony of American 
writers and their friends, and 
now and then something seems 
lost in translation. 

Maurice Girodias was the 
son of Jack Kahane, tbe Paris- 
based English publisher whose 
Obelisk Press published Henry 
Miller, Anais Nin and Law- 
rence Durreil. Girodias 
launched Les Editions du 
Ctaane and then the Olympia 
Press just before the war. Ac- 
cording to de SL Jone, he pub- 
lished some P6tainist pam- 
phlets and seems to have found 
a modus vivendi with the Ger- 
mans despite the fact that his 
father was Jewish (Girodias 
took his mother’s name). 

He went on to publish what 
he famously called DBs, for 
dirty books, quickies written 
mostly by various expats. One 
of those DBs, “Candy ” by Ter- 
ry Southern and Mason Hof- 
fenberg, became a big success, 
and the subject of one of Giro- 
dias’s many long legal battles. 


WHAT THEY'RE READING 


• Frank Wossner, a member 
of the board of directors of Ber- 
telsmann AG, is reading John 
Grisham’s ” The Chamber." 

“Tbe story is interesting and 
I want to improve my English. 
Grisham is thrillin g without 
necessarily being easy reading.” 

(Brandon Mitchencr, JHT ) 




Because Girodias took on 
censorship laws and had a 
vague reputation as an avant- 
gardisL, he also found himself 
on the receiving end of a few 
good books that couldn't find 
publishers, notably J. P. Don- 
leavy’s “The Ginger Man” and 
Vladimir Nabokov's “Lolita.” 
He was often in trouble with the 
Paris vice squad, and amusingly 
fearless about fighting back. 
His fortunes went up and down. 
After making a considerable 
amount of money from “Lo- 
lita,” he opened night spots in 
Paris where he held court until, 
predictably, he went bankrupt. 

Later, he moved to the United 
Stales, where he kept in touch 
with tbe outrageous by publish- 
ing Valerie Solanas, who would 
get her 15 minutes by shooting 
Andy WarhoL But Girodias's 
time had passed with censorship. 
He died in 1990, at the age of 71. 

Girodias, like a lot of publish- 
ers, (aided to see words as cheap 
and authors as nuisances, until 


the words gained some indepen- 
dent success. Both the Donleavy 
and tbe Nabokov cases were 
classic Girodias legal tangles, 
which de Sl Jorre retells exten- 
sively — sometimes too exten- 
sively — and Campbell more 
quickly. 

De Sl Jorre’s book received 
advance publicity after The 
New Yorker published the 
chapter dealing with “Story of 
O,” the sadomasochism “clas- 
sic” pseudonym ously printed 
by the French publisher Jean- 
Jacques Pauvert and subse- 
quently, in a bad English trans- 
lation, by Girodias. 

The New Yorker played up 
the “unmasking” of Dominique 
Amy, the French journalist who 
wrote “Story of 0 ” even though 
deSL Jorre himself admits in the 
book that her authorship was an 
open secret in French publis hing 
circles. John de Sl Jorre's coup 
is to have interviewed her. and 
told the story so well 

ImemaiionaJ Herald Tribune 


i 



International Herald Tribune 
Friday, December 2 , 1994 
Page 8 


A AT' 




Two Outposts of Old China in Hong Kong Suburbs 


CHINA 


By Bruce Edward Hall 


H ONG KONG — History can be 
elusive in Hong Kong. Vestiges 
of the old city are fast disappear- 
ing under layers of concrete and 
high- rises Ironically, it is in the New Terri- 
tories, the modem suburbs of Hong Kong, 
that the visitor will find a portion of the 
past intact, within the two walled villages of 
swrn Tung Ok and Kat fifing Wai. 

Built by Hakka fanners during the peri- 
od of lawlessness that marked the end of 
the Ming Dynasty, these fortresslike com- 
pounds functioned as a cross between cas- 
tles and medieval European towns. Such 
fortified villages, once common through- 
out the region, actually resembled large, 
sprawling houses, with streets as narrow 
as corridors. Covering an area roughly the 
size of a city block, the complex of several 
dozen tiny homes — each little more than 
one big room — provided shelter for the 
extended generations of a family clan, 
often numbering in the hundreds. Each 
village was surrounded by a thick masonry 
defensive wall and sometimes a moat, be- 
yond which were fields and fish ponds. 

Sam Tung Uk has been restored and is 
now a museum in the suburb of Tsuen 
Wan. My parents and I took the Mass 
Transit Railway, Hong Kong's dean, effi- 
cient subway, from Kowloon, although we 
could also nave taken a Hovercraft from 
the central ter minal downtown. After the 
20-minute ride to Tsuen Wan, the last stop 
on the line, our hearts sank a Utile when we 
got off the train, for it is a rather ugly 
suburb — all poured ocmcrete and highway 
overpasses. Following the signs to the mu- 
seum, however, we walked just one block 
before coming to the ornately carved wood- 


en gate of Sam Tung Uk, an amazing 
sumvor of the region’s rural past. 

Sam Tung Uk was constructed in 1786 
by the Chan family, farmers who had 
originally emigrated from Fujian province 
on China's southeastern coast. It is a 
single-story structure, low and square, its 
white- washed walls surmounted by a sim- 
ple tiled roof. Off to the right is a small 
fish pond and a sliver of farm field, pre- 
served to give a taste of what life was like 
before urbanization. 

We just wandered in, and found our- 
selves at the head of the central axis of three 
community balls once used by the villagers. 
(Sam Tung Uk means three-row or three- 
beam dwelling, which describes the config- 
uration of the three hall*, one behind the 
other.) The first, now empty, bad been used 
for the storage of carts and sedan chairs. A 
tiny courtyard separates it from the central 
banquet room, still decorated with a huge 
red silk lan tan whose tassels hang more 
than halfway to the floor. Beyond that is 
another tiny courtyard and then the heart 


■ Buyers at a London auction bid 
£130,000 for 1,000 old Underground 
signs, including good old 
Piccadilly Circus but also, Reuters 
tells us. Ladies and Gents. What 
will the collectibles market of the 
future be Eke? How much for 
hand-lettered signs “Out-of -Order” 
and “No Change”? 


of the complex, the ancestors' hall, used for 
ancestral worship. Its bright red and green 
altar is surmounted by a fantastically paint- 
ed arch on which a brilliant sun is flanked 
by golden phoenixes lounging among azure 
douds, and glittering birds Gutter around 
blue and pink flowers. Placards with po- 
ems extdfing ancestors’ virtues adorn the 
walls. 

Off the central axis, down five-foot-wide 
(1.5-jneier) “streets,” are the f annex homes 
of the residents — each one of simple 
stucco, devoid of ornamentation, with a tile 
roof and tiny courtyard. Furnished and 
decorated in several different styles accord- 
ing to rite owner's social status (the size of 
the house varied with one’s status as wdl), 
some have teakwood chairs, chests and 
elaborately carved wedding beds. Others 
are full of bamboo mats and farm imple- 
ments. Every house has its restored kitchen, 
with a large wooden steamer sitting on top 
of a brick stove. Each little entrance court 
contains a small decorative pooL 

In one row of houses is a changing his- 
torical exhibit; the one we saw was devoted 
to the rote of women in traditi onal Chinese 
society. A book and rift shop has an Eng- 
lish-speaking staff on hand to answer ques- 
tions; all the more attentive as we were the 
only tourists there. There is also a perma- 
nent display documenting the restoration 
of the village. A startling aerial photograph 
shows Sam Tung Uk in the early 1970s, 
while the Chans woe still In residence and 
farming the fields that stretched in every 
direction. Now, barely 20 years later, tire 
village is surrounded by high-rise buildings. 
After setting off the fields that afforded 
their traditional way of life, the Chan fam- 
ily moved out, and their home was opened 
to the public in 1981. Now, all is pristine 


and silent, and, as anyone who has ever 
visited a crowded Chinese neighborhood 
can attest, unnaturally orderly. 

Our second destination, the town of 
Karri Tin, was a simple trip once we man- 
aged to find the No. 51 bus, which stops 
on the roof of the Tsuen Wan train sta- 
tion. Firmly ensconced on the upper level 
of this double-decker, we spent 45 minutes 
careering up and over the mountains of 
the New Territories and some of the pret- 
tiest countryside to be seen around Hong 
Kong. Even Tsuen Wan looked pictur- 
esque, bristling out of its valley, contained 
by slopes too steep to build on. 

Kam Tin is the last stop, a small garri- 
son town full of Nepalese Gurkha troops, 
pokey tittle shops and Indian restaurants. 
After a couple of quick plates of curry, we 
wandered down the road and, opposite 
the Park ’n’ Shop, found the walled village 
of Kat ffing Wai 

Though it shares its baric form with Sam 
Tung Uk, Kat Hmg Wai is crowded and 
worn. Ivy and moss sprom from the brood- 
ing dark gray 20-foot stone walls. A moat, 
filled with water lilies, is bright green with 
algae. The compound is still home to sever- 
al hundred members of the Tang clan, who 
migrated to the area from central and 
southern China 1,000 years ago, building 
this village in the early 1 7th century. 

A small iron-grill gate in the ancient wall 
opens into a common room, originally in- 
tended for fanners’ carts but now contain- 
ing a couple of motor scooters, which leads 
to the long main passageway to the ances- 
tral hall. Noise from cutthroat mab-jongg 
games drifts over from the houses. Some 
have no windows, just wooden accordion 
doots across the front, closed at night and 
wide open during the day. Cooking smells 


territories [msBa 




hang in the air. The tiny three- or four-foot- 
wide streets are crammed with lines of 
laundry and tables covered with souvenirs 
to buy. Somehow, small children find room 
to ride their bicycles, single file. 

Some houses double as stores as well as 
dwellings, but none has beat restored. 
Indeed, in some places the simple brick 
bouses with tile roofs have been replaced 
with new three-story concrete homes — 
one room per floor — -a testament to Hong 
Kong's aggressive prosperity. 

The old ancestral ball has incense smol- 
dering in its shrine, the ashes of paper 
money burned to support forebears is 
heaven lying in little heaps mi the pavement 
in front of its weathered, but exquisitely 
carved attar. Unlike the restored shrine at 
Sam Tung Uk, tins one is striking because 
of its patina of age — with faded hues of 
red, gold and green, banners embroidered 
with flowers and, the day we were there, a 
tall tree fa<liinnad from paper flowers and 
streamers, left over from a recent festival. 

Lived in h is, but Kam Tin is also a 
recognized, albeit infrequently visited tour- 
ist destination, and the arrival of a group of 
Americans with a camera created a consid- 
erable commotion. Old Hakka women 
rushed to sell us trinkets and pose for 
pictures, demanding money for each pose. 

lAff Sam Tung Uk, the village is a 
shadow of its former self, but still an 
interesting contrast with the bustling so- 
phistication of Hong Kong. 

Bruce Edward Hall, who has traveled 
extensively in China, wrote this for The New 
York Tones. 

Silk lantern in the museum village of 
Sam Tung Uk. 


Kam Tin 



Tsuen Wan 


Lantau 
i. 


ilpS®! 



f 





NYT map: Ray CnmboonK^Utacfc So* tar Tbe New Yotk Httct 



TEE M 9 F / E SEISE 


Directed by Andrez Wajda. 
Japan. 

Nearly a decade ago Andrez 
Wajda went to Japan and dir 
reeled a play staring Japan’s 
leading omagata, Tamasa- 
buro Ban do. Based on Dos- 
tqyevslty’s “The Idiot,” it had 
its leading actor playing both 
Myshikin and Nastassia, 
availing itself of only those 
scenes with the both of them 
and Rogozhin. The result was 
curious, a slim entertainment 
enlivened by very fast cos- 
tume changes. It is now a 
fuD-length movie; made in 
Japanese in Krakow, Poland, 
and the Warsawa studios, 
and the results are even more 
curious. Always an actor's ve- 


hicle, the play has on die 
screen become ever more ao- 
torly — particularly so in that 
Wajda, not knowing the lan- 

masaburo and^Oshtyuki Na* 
gflghima shape their own 
performances. On the stage 
the resulting overacting was 
part of a grand Russian-Jap- 
anese tradition. On film, 
however, it is something dif- 
ferent Nagasbima, a screen 
and Shmgdti actor, chews up 
all the scenery in sight, yet 
fh« Kahiiki- gfar Tflmflsah nm 
now manages to achieve a 
certain intensity by under- 
playing the prince and letting 
the costume speak for the 
harlot Aficionados of angu- 
lar cinema may wdl flock to 
tins — its like has never be- 


fore been seen and probably 
w£Q sever again. 

(Donald Rickie; IHT) 

Otoanna 

Directed by David Mama. 
U.S. 

In “Oieanna,” David. Ma- 
met's incendiary play about 
sexual harassment, a college 
student and her professor 
pace around his office hurl- 
ing words at each other, ac- 
tions that inspired fcnock- 
down-drag-out verbal fights 
in theater lobbies when the 
play was first produced. Now 
this faithful, flat-footed 
screen version offers a re- 
minder that “Oieanna” was . 
more effective as a debater 
topic than a work of drama. 
(Caryn James, NYT) 



HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


iiMHulU 


yQHOTH. 

saiktQ/onore 

141, rue Sami Honor#, 75001 PARIS 
Tel.: OOJ1/1/42.96J3-23 
Fas: 003 3/1/41-96-2 1.M 

Ideally located m the heart <4 Pars, * 
none'* throw away from the Grand 
LOUVRE and On.iy Museums, 
withm walking distance ct Fcauhnug 
and the shopping districts >.>f the 
Capital, the HOTEL LOUVRE 
SAINT HONORIS will provide, 
behind it's discreet facade, the 
comfort and the intemanon.il 
sutkknds the travellet <4 the "Vs is 
seeking. All in ail 40 modem tnJ 
well furnished n*m« featuring mini- 
hw*. ciMe T V. . direct dul phnwe. 

St a> m the hem nf Fare and 


HOTEL*** 

Saint-Romain 

5.7. me Swim Rcch, 75001 PARIS 
Tel-: 0033/1/42^0.31.70 
Fax: 0033/1/42-60. 10.69 
A short stroll away from the Rue de 
Ris-nli. the Grand Louvre Museum, the 
Jurdin da Tutlcrics anJ the burns Place 
de Li Concorde, tn the heart of Parts so 
historical and immortal - die city of 
lights, art and fashion - the ideally 
located HOTEL SAINT-ROMAJN «ill 
offer you a quiet, restful and enjoyable 
stay m refined, and comfortable sur- 
roundings. 

34 Imely aprumted and elegant guestnwno. 
all *nh mirole harfmjooo aw shown, cofur 
c-iWe TV. radtu. mmi-har, direct dial tele- 
phone, mdn i dual or-roun uk 

save on your hotel hills with 


_ . ^^ < lBS c BEAUXLOQtS 

c H<3tELS “ DB 




• 3 nights for only: 1725,- FFrs 

• 4 nights for only: 2100,- FFrs 

l Rjres include rcCi<min.«Liruifi in Double i,<om. Breakfast for two, all government 
faxes and Service Qmrpe. City tax: 6 FFpw person per Jay extra Offer subicct to 
Him availability, valid fntnYwivembw 18th. 1994 thru. March 31st. 1945). 


Stepping out of jour haul, on the left there’s the Theatre de I'Qdeon, the 
Luxembourv gardens and. just behind Montparnasse and it’s cafes. 

On the right, there’s Samt-Cermam-des-Pres, the river Seme, the new 
Orsa/ Museum, the Loam and a few sups further, Beaubourg... 

The Odeon Hotel. 34 charming rooms m the heart of Paris. 

Odhu Ufttel 

TeL: (1)432590 67. Teles Odeotel 202 943 F. 

Fttril) 43 25 55 98. 


HOTEL MADISON kkk 

Nestled in a charming square just off the 
boulevard, the Madison will ensure your 
complete well being with Its 55 spacious, 
quiet, air-conditioned rooms and its efficient, 
friendly staff catering to vnur every need. 

143 bd. St Germain, 75006 Paris 
Tel.: UM0 51 60 00 Fax: (1) 40 51 60 01 


SPEOALOFFER* 

fmn Dec. I la ftb. 28 
BwkJsuccessw 
nights and receive a 
500 FF gift certificate 
froniGA LERlF S 
LAFAYETTE 
* Qtfcfbg %rfuis"jxnof 
a*ifm2SDaLlollBL 


hi Ike bran id Paris 

war $Mf -t .1 ■rmin-iks-i’ivfi 

HOTKIi DM Ii’UNIVKRSITM 

JJ. nn-'h 1 1 'niwr-lM*. WWf I'AWK 
Tfl III um in I‘I fax (l» 11! Ml 1U HI 

\ short walk (rum llic prrMfefcnis Mitsrr 
fj'i ir.'Uis and Hit- lamvrr. The rrilnnl rnmfnri of 
a I Till n-nlnn. puWfnrr 
\ir-t niulil ionril rooms. 



7J[ 




HOTEL DES MATHURINS**** 

in the heart of the theatre district, 
near the 'grands magasins" and Madeleine. 
36 rooms, underground parking. 

43, rue des Mathurins, Paris 8th 
T61.: (1) 44 94 20 94. Fax: (1) 44 94 00 44 

HOTEL RESIDENCE BASSANO*** * 

2 minutes Champs- Bysdes, 

31 rooms. 

15, rue Bassano, Paris16th 
Tel.: (1) 47 23 78 23. Fax: (1 147 20 41 22 



HOTEL 

DU 

DANUBE 

A truly charming hotel in 
the heart of St. Germain 
des Prts for your leisure or 
business visits 
40 comfortable and 
personalized rooms. 

Near the Louvre. Notre- 
Dame and the Mus£e 
d’Orsay. 

Covered parking nearby. 


58, roe Jacob, 75006 Paris 
Tel.: (1)42 60 34 70 
Of 42 60 94 07 
Fax: (1)42 60 81)8 
Telex: 21 1 062 F 



L’HOTEL 

PERG0LESE 

Pons 

Light, coIot, harmony... 

The warmth erf parquet- 
wood, armchair-feather, 

& rug-wool enhanced 
by the purity of modem 
design in a setting of a 
4-star hotel, just a few 
blocks from the 
Arc de Triomphe. 

Experience the 
refinement in details 
and a unique decor 
by Rena Dumas 

Special "Herald Tribune 1 * rate 
Dec ember 15 to January 10 
FF750 for double room & breakfast 

L’HOTFL PERGGLESE 
***« 

3, rue Pergofcse. 75 J J6 Paris. 
Tetephone.fJJ 40.67.9677. 
Fax;/)/ 45.00.12. JJ 



Hotel atala 


10, nic Chateaubriand, 75008 Paris. 
TeL: (I) *15 62 01 62 - fir 640576 
Fix: (1)42 25 66 38 


AST OFF THE CHAMP5EIT5EES 


• 50 stylishly dec ora led & 
perfectly eqttlpp&l moms 

• Gourmet restaurant gfres onto 
pleasant IHTFMKiR GARDEN. 
Rooms hum 700 FF to 1 300 FF. 


RESIDENCE 
LORD BYRON 

5 rue Chateaubriand. Paris 8th. 

TeL. (I} 43 59 89 38 
Ttx: 649 «2 - Fax: (1) 42 B9 46 M 
HER Etoila. Metre George V 

HOTEL 

MAYFLOWER 

3 rue Chafeaubnead, Pans 8th 
Tel. (1)45 62 57 46 -Tlx: 640 727 
Fax. (1)42 56 32 38 

Two charming' * * ho’eis on a calm 
street |us: alt the Champs Dysees 
near Etoile Refined and ccmlon- 
able rcctic. with garden 


Hotel ^Brighton 

tariff 


Z18, rue de Rivoli 
75001 PARIS 
TeL: (l) 42.6000.03 
Fax: (l) 4260.41.78 


Directly on the Tuilcries 
garden near the Louvre and 
Place Vendflme. 

Traditional French refinement 
coupled with all modern 
comforts and excellent service. 
Private tea room offers an 
intimate cosy spot for guests 
and business associates. 


Herald 


Special 

Tribune 


readers. 


HOTEL FERRANDI 

*** 

19th Cent, townhousc in the 
peaceful part of St Germain-dcs- 
Pris Refined, comfortable rooms. 
A helpful and friendly welcome 
Prices from FT 5S0 
92 roc till OKTthc-Mkfi. 75006 PARIS 
Tfl- fl) 42 22 97 40 - Fax: (1) 45 44 89 97 


Present ibis ad when reserving for 
nr complimentary breakfast 


LeRELAIS 

DuLOUVRE 


19 me dss Prtoes St Germain rAunrrois 
75001 PARS 

r«L (1)4041 96 42 - FsC (1)4041 9644j 

The efurtn ff i-furjcur ii/ an 
ISA Cent, budding hunted wruvtm 
NutTL Oumtr and dw bwac- 
Period furniture , modem comfort 
and a warm uvlcimuv 
1 0 % disiaiaa for Herald Tribune nadm. 


HOLIDAYS 

& TRAVEL 


LOW COST FLIGHTS 


ACCESS VOYAGES 

IKE BEST FARES TO 
THE UNITS) STATES 

and Mar 5Q0 ih>b dest MoA on i werltj- 
wada an 40 dffafax idwdM uxnwv 

TeL PAKtS 143 13 0? 02 or 42 21 *694 
fee 14? 21 44 20 
A4NTEL 3615 ACCE5SVCW AGS 
Tat LYON 78«3ff 77 v 77 56 15 » 

BOOK NOW by phm wnh aatM axd 
Gotenime* iMnEK >751 M 


On a Ski Company koliday 
tke moun tains may ke 

lligll L-ut our prices 


HOTELS 


• jfp " 

Treat yoi^Self 
to Pa^, 


From only £849 in high oeaaon yoti ran eqwrinMe our superb 
personal servier fairludinft rbiunpagnr amt ranapH 
I’larj aigbt snrl frra we of the reticle in the retort. 



t. RU6 SCRIBE - 75009 STOle 
i at the Opera) wj. 

* '§4 

FF1380 m 


•EBittivt Dannber 1«K • Jnaay 
At (Mpie. per nxat per niglt. 6lr^W?**<*>*« , 
(3 mghs amiiMi^p 
CfflitsdromtriTdtjn^t&nosifcm 
TtL 33 UH471 242>:*te‘3J ill 4265 »97 


Til ECIVf USED WAY TO SKI. 

Abrrrrnmliir & Kent Travel on 071-730 9600 


HOTELS 




Paris Or Nice Our 
New Year’s Eve Is The Best 

Royal New Year's Eve at the Hotel Vernet-Paris’* 

2 n igftra from December 31st, 1994 to Jammy 2nd, J995 
Single Room: FF 2910 - Dot&le Room EF 3320 
25. n» Venn*.- 75008 Paris - France. 

TeL 133) 1 44 31 98 70 / Fax (33) \ 44 31 85 69 

New T&ar’s JEve in Nice xttbe Hotel JEqsEe Palace* 

3 nights mumnisi fom Deccsohcx 29, 1954 to JanuwyJnl, 1995 
Single Roane FF 1230 pcs mgbt - DaoWe Rgoac FF 1870 par night - 
59. Promenade de Aa^ais ■ BP 291 - 06005 Na Cede* I - France. 

TeL (33) 93 96 53 19 / Fax (33) 93 44 50 40 


CHATEAU 


Groups Royal Monceau ' 

* Luxury with the French Touch " 


'Packag: rata subject to sptxxd cotubaoat. 




holiday rentals 


CARIBBEAN 


wjMHaawr, f.wx_ ova 200 


From November 28 till April 15 

Exceptional Weekend In Corsica 

for Herald Tribune readers 
Friday (o Sunday, half board: FF 2,500 for two 
HOTEL ***** LE MAQUIS, 20166 Porticcio 
Tel (33) 95.25.05.55 - Fax ( 33) 95.25.1 1 .70 




Bed & Breakfast 

APARTMENTS IN 

JERUSALEM 

Over too Apis, throughout Ihe dty. 
from $45 per couple per night 
Tel. 972-2-511270 
Fax:972-2-511272 


BOATS/YACHTS 


lewtera or 


WBCTP VAUMIAtMmn&i Mm 
_ AagMei, a weonSl 
beodv moped seueb, kmaeg a 
nwmig pool <bmg wrier Ae 
Van - dl m the pmacy of yarn «m*i 
'ail Woowjy. Tow choica of t0 
Mm horn 6<w 2 to 10 bedroom; 
« omeni l iea mdudne ndf. For 
penond attention & enter brodwe 
at heto CASA tffiGA VILLAS: 
703-333C22 FAX 203-579-7133 USA 


PARIS & SUBURBS 



























S Z 7 A* A 7 


International Herald Tribune Y1 
Friday , December 2, 1994 
Page 9 



III lit! ( l / I l 


Dining Out (at Home) in Elegance 


AUSTRIA 

Vienna 

"Hubert Q^Jr 0 *?^ 5 - To J an. 8: 
ist & 3^^“' T he Austrian an- 
p ai , ® fspresentative of the New 

fi r 2B£*n» 1970s Si -SS 
'«■ 



sr&satiai's 

Twe^Protesjan^ and Catholics. 

is-awii 

Ancien, tel: (2) 508- 
?xj c, °S6d Mondays. To Feb. T2- 
a E *jy w " ™- and 18th- 
Sn.^ rench Paintings, usually 
KjTjte reserves of the mueeuni 
includes paintings by Simon Vouet 
P^Jippede Champalgne, Greuze and 
David, among others. 

BRIT AIM 


London 

British Museum, tel: (71 ) 323-8525 
mP® 1 daily. Continuing/To Jan. 8: 
Pre-Raphaelite Drawings." 120 
drawings by Dante Gabriel Rossetti. 
John Millais and William Holman 
Hunt, among others. 

Hayward Gallery, tel: (71} 928- 
. 144 i, c $£ n *My- Continuing /To 
Jan. 8: The Romantic Spirit In Ger- 
man Am 790-1 990.” 

CANADA " 

Montreal 

Muste des Beaux- Arts, tel: (514) 
285-1 6-00. dosed Mondays. To Jan. 
15: "Alex Colville: Peinturea, Es- 
lampes et Processus CreatHs. 1983- 
1994." More than 20 paintings, 10 
engravings and 340 drawings. 
Quebec 

Muste du Quebec, tel: (418) 643- 
2150, closed Mondays. To Jan. 8: 
"Alexander Calder: L'lmaginalre et 
I'Equilibre." 55 works by Calder from 
i he Whitney Museum of American Art 
in New York. 

Toronto 

Art Gallery of Ontario, tet (416) 
977-0414, closed Tuesdays. Con- 
tin ulng/To Dec. 31 : “From Cezx»me 
lo Matisse: Great French Paintings 
from the Barnes Foundation. 

CZECH REPUBLIC 

Prague 
Convent of St 





A brooch designed by William Harper in 1 977, in a show 
at the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam. 


dosed Tuesdays. Continuing/To 
Jan. 9: "Gustave Cafllebolte, 1848- 
1894." Also, to Jan. 2: "Nicolas 
Poussin." 

Hotel de la Monnaie, tel: 40-46-56- 
66, closed Mondays. Continu- 
ing/To Jan. 8: “Voltaire et I'Europe." 


Jutfs du Danemark." Judy Ellis Glick- 
man's photographs document Ger- 
man operations In Denmark dunng 
World War li and the ffighl of 7,000 
Danish Jews to Sweden with the help 
of Danish resistants. 

Muste d’Art Modem®, tel: (1 ) 47- 
23-61-27, dosed Mondays. Contin- 
ung/To March 19: "Andre Derain. 
1880-1954: Le Peintre du Trouble 
Modeme.” A retrospective of the 
works of the Fairve pointer. 

Muste Rodin, tel: ( 1 ) 44-1 8-61 -10. 
dosed Mondays. Continuing/To 
Jan. 8: "Dessins de Zadkine." 


tel: (2) 24-81-06-28, dosed Mon- 
days. To Jan. 29: ‘Tender Rops." A 
j collection of 80 works by the 19th- 
century Belgian artist, who settled in 
Parts in the mid-1870s and main- 
tained dose contacts with the French 
Symbolists and Decadents. 


of Bohemia, QEMIAIIY 


HumtobMk- 

Louisiana Museum for Modeme 
Kunst, tel: 42-19-07-19, open daily. 
Continuing/To Feb. 5: "Toulouse- 
Lautrec and Parts." Approximately 
70 paintings, 30 drawings and 100 
graphic works from the time the artist 
spent in Paris from 1890 until hb 
death imaoi. 


Bonn 

Kunst- und Ausstellungsba/le der 
Bundesrepubtic Deutschland, tel: 
(228) 9171-200, closed Mondays. 
To Feb. 26: "Wunderkammer des 
Abendlands." A journey through the 
history of -European museums and 
collections. Features 2000 objects, . 
from the Renaissance to the Surreal- 
ist exhibitions of the 1930s, collected 
by Europeans and new belonging to 
-Scandinavian museums and private 
collectors. 

DGaaaMorf 

Stadtische Kunsthafle, tel: (211) 


FRANCE 


Lyon 

Muste des Beaux-Arts, tel: 78-28- 
07-66, closed Mondays and Tues- 
days. Contlnufng/To Dec. 18: 
"Maurice Dante, 1870-1943." 

Parte 

Centre Georges Pompidou, teti (1 ) 
44-78-40-86, dosed Tuesdays. To 
Feb. 1995: "Kurt Schwitters." 300 
paintings, coBages, sculptures, typo- 
graphical works and poems created 
between 1910 and 1947 by the Ger- 
man artist (1887-1948). Bom In 
Hanover, exited to Great Britain, 
Schwitters's work reflects the varkxo 
avant-garde movements until the late 
1940s. 

Grand Palais, tel: (1) 44-13-17-17, 


889-6240, dosed Mondays. To Jan. 
29: "Johann Gottfried Schadow und 
de Kunst seiner Zed.” More than 50 
sculptures, 15 portraits and 60 works 
on paper by the Neo-dasslc German 
artist, whose well-known Quadriga 
tops the Brandenburg gate in Berlin. 
Stuttgwt 

Staatstheater, tel: (71 1 ) 2-03-20. In 
the Kammertheater, Kurt Weill's 1 'Der 
Jasager" and Reiner Bredameyer's 
"DerNeinsager." Directed by Maxim 
Dessau, conducted by Cornells 
WMhoeffL Dec. 2 (premiere), 3, 6. 7 
and 9. 


IRELAND 


Dublin 

Hugh Lane Municipal Gallery of 
Modem Art, tel: (1) 872-2182, 
dosed . To Jan. 22: "Henri Hayden, 
1883-1970." An exhibition of the 
works of the French painter, who 


Met Sets Up Shop in Louvre 

International Herald T ribune 

PARIS — We an know that museums are really only there to 
provide another opportunity to shop. The world t/ jtisuc trinket 
buying has become aUttle more international jwth the opening “ 
theLouvre’s Carrousel shopping area of a Metropolitan Museum 

^Cooteof art and objects from museums around the world 
- - JSJrt rhinese and oie-Columbian statues as well as the 

Sf*"* L™?£ ^m^s^^^Wth-dynasty earrings in 
Die8B J!yS£S£f f 3 ttframa»ahd the inevitable Matisse silk 


Alan Truscott 
diagramed deal oc- 
ed m the Regional 
ams. North and South 
e Pineles, and Alexan- 
a. who previously won 
strict North American 
,e. 

North’s two no-trump 
nee diamonds was an 

check-back, askingfor 

rd heart support. When 

s forthcoming. South 
jis singleton spade with 

T jump to four spades, 
s music to North’s ears, 
hatged on with Roman 
:d Blackwood, locating, 
b five-spade response, 
of diamonds and the 
sen of hearts in his part- 

ad- 

no-trump was a grand 

legestion, and South 

his club king- He^was 
3 seven clubs, and the 
contract was reached, 
spade lead he took the 
fed a spade and drew 
Then the even heart 
-e him 13 tricks, and he 
diamond guess in re- 

nenL it is always ^ 
escape from an agreed 


suit into another. Seven dubs 
was virtually a laydown if the 
trumps were no worse than 4-2, 
for if the hearts had broken 
badly, South would have had a 
good clue to the winning play in 
diamonds. Another time, per- 
haps, South’s distribution will 
be 1-5-5-2, and the right con- 
tract will still be seven dubs, 
even though the fit is only 4-2, 
although the percentages are 
now close. 

NORTH (D) 

♦ A6 
9 A 104 
6 K J 86 
*AQJ5 


WEST EAST 

* K 10 5 4 3 2 * Q J 9 7 

0752 OJ9 

4 53 0 Q94 

*4 2 *109 7 3 

SOUTH 

♦ 8 

7 K Q 8 6 3 
0 A 10 7 2 
♦ K 8 6 

Neither side was vulnerable. The 

N«S 8 East South West 

1 $ . Pass l V Pass 

2 n.T. ' Pass 3 0 Pass 

3 o Pass 4 * P® 55 

4 N.T- Pas® 5 * Pass 

5 N.T. Pass 6* Pass 

7 * Pass. Pass Pass 

West led the spade five. 


staled as a Cubist after meeting with 
Gris and Delaunay, then turned lo 
painting from nature in the 1920s. 
After World war II, Hayden's style 
evolved toward a combination of 
Cubist and Realist principles. 

ISRAEL 

Jerusalem 

Israel Museum, tel: (2 ) 708-811, 
open daily. Continuing/To Jan. 9: 
"Camiille Pissarro: Impressionist Inno- 
vator. " A retrospective oil 25 oil paint- 
ings by the French Impressionist. 

ITALY 

Padua 

Palazzo della Ragkxie, tel: (49) 
828-5006, open daily. To Dec. 26: 
"Luca Carlevans e la Veduta Vene- 
ziana del Settecento." Nearly 100 
works by the Venetian painter and 
etcher who painted scenes of Venice. 
Also features paintings by Canaletto 
and Guardi. 

Rome 

Palazzo Ruspoll, tel: (6) 683-21- 
77, open daily. Continuing/To Feb. 
19: "Nerfertari: Light of Egypt." A 
commemoration of the discovery of 
Nerfertari 's tomb in 1904, and a trib- 
ute to Ramses It's favorite wile. Fea- 
tures 130 objects, including amulets 
funerary statuettes, jewels and the 
Queen's sandals. 

Venice 

Museo Correr, tel: (41) 940-200. 
open daily. Continuing/To Dec. 11: 
"Impressiorusmo & Neotmpressiorv- 
Isrrt: Donne e Paasaggi dal Petit Pa- 
lais di Ginevra" 70 works represent- 
ing women and landscapes, includes 
works by Fantin-Latour, Caillebotte, 
Degas, Kisting and Foujita, as well as 
a bronze by Gauguin. 


JAPAN 


Kasama, Ibarakl Prefecture 
Kasama Nichido Museum of Art 
M: (296) 72-21 60. closed Mondays. 
To Dec. 25: "Raoul Dufy." 120 works 
by the French artist. 

Tokyo 

Bunkamura Museum, tel: (3) 3477- 
9252, open daily. To Dec. 25: "Euro- 
pean Modem Paintings." 80 works 
by European painters. 

Ueno Royal Museum, tel: (3 ) 3833- 
4191. To Dec. 24: "The Unknown 
Modigliani." Drawings by Italian artist 
Amedeo Modigliani from 1906 to 
1924, until now the most obscure 
period in his life. 


THE NETHERLANDS 

Amsterdam 

Stedetijk Museum, tel: (20) 5732- 
SI 1 . open daily. To Jan. 8: "Jewelry, 
1 964- 1 994: A Selection from the Col- 
lection of Helen Drutt." Modem jew- 
elry dating from the 1 960s when art- 
ists departed from the traditional 
materials and designs. 
Rijksmuseum, tel: (20) 6-79-81-46, 
closed Mondays. To Feb. 26: "The 
Art of Devotion, 1300-1500." Fea- 
tures 50 medieval objects of private 
devotion, such as paimmgs, minia- 
tures. prints, wood carvings. Among 
the artists represented, are Mantegna 
and Memling. 

SPAIN 

Barcelona 

FundadO La Caixa, tel: (3) 404- 
6073, closed Mondays. To Jan. 22: 
"Kandinsky/Mondrian: Dos Ca- 
minos hacia la Abstraction." Docu- 
ments the parallels and differences 
between the two painters in their ear- 
ly phases. Both staned as figurative 
painters although Kandinsky later de- 
veloped an abstract style while Mon- 
drian adopted a geometric idiom. 
Fundackl Antoni TApies, tel: (3) 
487-0315, . To Jan. 29: "In the Spirit 
of Fluxus." An overview of the 1962 
movement that united avant-garde 
artists, wriiers, composers and film- 
makers in Europe and later In the 
United Stales. Documents the devel- 
opment of Performance art, minimal- 
ism and Conceptual art. 

Madrid 

Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, tel: 
(91 ) 3694)1 51 . closed Mondays. To 
Feb. 12: "H Siglo de Oro del Paisaje 
holandes." More than 70 Dutch 
paintings trom the 1 6th and 1 7th cen- 
turies, including works by Rem- 
brandt, Ruysdael, Meindert Hobbema 
and Jan van Goyen. 

SWEDEN 

Eriksbergshalten, tel: (31) 779-11- 
11, open daily. To Feb. 19: "Leonar- 
do da Vinci: Universal Genius.” 
Drawings, manuscripts and paintings 
document the life and work of Leo- 
nardo da Vinci , including models of a 
bridge, a parachute, a tank and a 
stamping machine made exactly to 
the specifications of the Renaissance 
man. 

SWITZERLAND 

Lugano 

Museo Cantonate d'Arte, tel: (91) 
22-93-56, dosed Mondays. To Feb. 
28: "Domenico Trazzini and the 
Building of St. Petersburg." More 
than 200 paintings, drawings, mod- 
els, and art objects document the 
work of the Italian architect who laid 
plans for Peter the Great's city earfy 
in the 18th century. 

UNITED STATES 
Chicago 

Art Institute, tel: (312) 443-3600, 
open daily. To Jan. 15: "Glad Tidings 
of Great Joy." 15 medieval, Renais- 
sance. and Baroque works of art from 
the institute's permanent collection to 
Tell the Christmas story. 

Houston 

The Menll Collection, tel: (713) 
525-9400, closed Mondays and 
Tuesdays. Continuing/To Jan. 9: 
"Colonial Masterpieces from Boliv- 
ia." 

Los Angeles 

County Museum of Art, tel: (213) 
857-6522, closed Mondays and 
Tuesdays. To Jan. 22: "The Peaceful 
Liberators: Jan Art from India.” 150 
sculptures, textiles, monumental 
paintings on doth, illuminated manu- 
scripts and symbolic objects docu- 
ment the relationship between Jain- 
ism and the Hindu and Buddhist 
traditions. 

New York 

Cooper-Hewttt Museum, tel: (212) 
860-6894, dosed Mondays. To Feb. 
26: "Good Offices and Beyond: The 
Evolution of the workplace. Explores 
the major themes in the office environ- 
ment - the management of time, 
numbers, paper arte Information. 
Metropolitan Museum of Art tel: 
(212) 5703791, dosed Mondays. 
To Feb. 26: "Thomas Eak/rts and the 
Metropolitan Museum of Art." Paint- 
ings, watercolors and drawings 
snowing the museum's continuing in- 
terest in the American painter's work. 


By Patricia Wells 

International Herald Tribune 


P ARIS — It's a Parisian fashion 
that has grown slowly but surely 
over the past few years and a 
trend that will certainly mark the 
1990s: Casual restaurants designed and 
decorated to make you feel as though 
you’re enjoying the meal in your own 
dining room. 


Gone are the nostalgic red-and-white 
checkered tablecloths, heavy carafes of 
wine, thick institutional china. Instead, we 
see crisp and seamless white linen, spar- 
kling silver plate and thick carpets on the 
floor. Inevitably, the room has a distinct 
“designer" look, but one in which we 
might easily see ourselves loun g in g . 

The latest in the crop of "restaurants at 
home" is the newly redecorated Les AUo- 
broges, a truly charming elegantly com- 
fortable spot in Paris's 20th arrondisse- 
ment, not far from Nation. Here. 38-year- 
old chef Olivier Pateyron and bis wife, 
Annette, entertain a mixed group of Pari- 
sian diners, offering a homey, straightfor- 
ward, satisfying sort of bistro cuisine. 
Chef Pateyron is a talent, and though 
elements of his cooking are still rough 
around the edges, I think it's safe to say 
that his is a name that will be heard quietly 
around Paris for years to come. 

The Pateyrons seem to have done their 
homework. giving the dinin g public what 


they seem to want today: a luxury look at 
casual dining prices. So rather than going 
for a faux-bistro look, they opted for a 
modern, pastel-toned ambience, with 
tweedy green carpets, lovely milky-white 
light fixtures that shed a soft and flatter- 
ing glow, nicely framed prints of fish, 
vegetables and fruit on the walls. The two 
small dining rooms hold just 30 diners. 

The honorable menu offers veritable 
bargains, with an 81-franc (515) menu 
thai includes starters such as soup or a 
meat terrine, then the plat du jour, which 
might include a salt-cod brandade, tele de 
veau, or beef with carrots. 

I'm a pushover for an immense mixed 
salad, perfectly dressed, and Pateyron 
won my heart with his gigantic tumble of 
greens that included radicchio, lamb's let- 
tuce, curly endive, chervil, tarragon and 
diU all masterfully tossed with a Banyuls 
vinegar dressing 

it's been years since I've seen a menu 
offering souris d’agneau, that tiny, meaty 
muscle attached to the tip of the bone of 
the leg of lamb. Pateyron has made it his 
specialty, and well he should. He braises 
the dense, chewy meat for four hours, 
until it’s pleasantly lender and the thin 
layer of fat surrounding the muscle turns a 
deep, rich mahogany. (I only wish be 
would be less timid with his seasoning: a 
dusting of sea salt, a turn of the pepper 
mill just before serving would elevate the 
dish to even greater heights.) The lamb is 
well accompanied by a mound of sweeL 
soft doves of garlic roasted in their skin. 


Equally good — and equally under- sea- 
soned — is exemplary roast Bresse chicken, 
which arrives steaming, golden and. moist, 
accompanied by a good potato gratrn. 

Less app ealing was his first course of- 
fering of ratatouUle and langous tines 
cooked and served in their shells, a combi- 
nation that’s neither obvious nor worth 
repeating. The two have nothing in com- 
mon gustatorially or historically, and I 
have a hard time imagining that the chef 
ever ate this dish himself with satisfaction. 
The langous tines — neither best quality 
nor at the peak of freshness — were sim- 
ply plopped atop a bed of ralatouQle. 
making for an obviously awkward eating 
experience. His desserts also under- 
whelmed: an overly sweet pineapple gra- 
tin and a banal, unmemorable rendition of 
the ubiquitous nougat glaoL 

One could make a meal of the extraordi- 
narily crisp and chewy rolls, and while the 
wine list is tiny, it includes some well- 
priced selections, including a vigorous 
1988 Saint Joseph full of flavor and char- 
acter, from the vineyards of Pascal Perrier. 

The Pateyrons seem to have a real talent 
for caring about what they do. They make 
an effort, it shows, and they're sure to be 
rewarded for lhaL 

Les AUobroges, 71 Rue des Grands- 
Champs, Paris 20; tel: 43.73.40.00. Closed 
Sunday and Monday. Credit card: Visa. 
Menus at 81 and 150 francs; a la cane, 200 
francs, including service but not nine. 


It’s That Time: The Gift of Music 


By Mike Zwerin 

International Herald Tribune 


T 


1MB again to spend lots of mon- 
ey to prove how much you love 
^our friends and family. Ho-ho- 

• BOOTSY COLLINS. “Back in the 
Day . . . Best Of" (Warner Archives): 
Groove is bassist William (Bootsie) Col- 
lins’s specialty. He played key roles in the 
building of funky foundations for the 
bands of James Brown (the JBs) and 
George Clinton (P-Funk). Here he 
stretches out with his own, Bootsy’s Rub- 
ber Band. 

• JOHN HIATT, “Comes Alive at Bu- 
dokan” (Polydor): From these Japanese 
concert performances of his finest songs 
we are reminded of how much Hiatt bad 
to do with the blurring of the line between 
rock and country. Duke Ellington said 
there are only two lands of music, good 
and bad. It bears repetition. 

• GINGER BAKER, “Going Back 
Home" (Atlantic): The ex-Cream drum- 
mer pays homage to Baby Dodds, Big Sid 
Catlett, Art Blakey and other of his early 
jazz heroes. Harmony, melody and 
rhythm are equal partners in this trio’s 
delicate dance, this is not exactly a “drum- 
mer’s record" (Bill FriseU, guitar, Charlie 
Haden, bass). 

• PRINCE, “The Black Album** (WB): 
The Prince album for people who suspect 
that there is something wrong with them 
because they don’t lute Prince. This is 
what it should be all the lime. You hear 
the Prince Miles Davis liked. Called too 
dark and complex to be commercial, the 

nect was aborted by the Purple One in 
S7 after a “dark night of the souL" 
including intimations of his own mortal- 
ity. Pirated right and left since, it’s never 
brfore been legally released. A sticker pro- 
claims “legendary" and a “limited edi- 
tion.” 

• HELEN MERRILL, “Brownie” (Gi- 
tanes Jazz): A jazz singer with a great 
track record and a good shot at winning 
today’s race too salutes trumpeter Clifford 
Brown, who became a legend when he 
died in a car crash at the age of 26. 
Superior performances of classics (“1 Re- 
member Clifford”) by Merrill's bevy of 



Chiwian Rroerli 


Cannonball Adderley ( left Ginger Baker (top right ) and Bootsy Collins. 


Brown disciples — Roy Hargrove. Wal- 
lace Roney, Lew Soloff and. a cut above 
them all, Tom Harrell (“Joy Spring”). 

• STING, "Fields of Gold . . . The 
Best OF (A&M): You often hear good- 
old-days pop crooners bewail the lack of 
quality contemporary songwriters. Steer 
them to Sting. “Fragile” ana “Moon Over 
Bourbon Street" are standards by any 
standard. 

• CANNONBALL ADDERLEY. 
“Jazzmasters 31” (Verve): Altoman A el- 
derly has been called “a happy man in an 
angry time." Hats off to Joe Goldberg, 
whose cultured selection and sequencing 
of a variety of 1950s takes adds up to 
illustrate what Nat Adderley meant when 
he said that his brother was “the epitome 
of what could have been.” 

• CHET BAKER, “Jazzmasters 32” 
(Verve): Singing and playing with all-stars 
and unknowns in ensembles small and 
large spanning three decades, the master 
of understatement never raises his voice. 


And another hat off to another great selec- 
tor and sequencer. Harold Danko. The 
programmers of this Verve series take disk 
jockeying up a notch. 

• THE STAMP COLLECTION. 
(Sony/ France): A new popularly priced 
collection (94 francs, or about S17, per 
package) of 2-CD box sets converted from 
mythic rock LPs by people like Sly and the 
Family Stone (“Stand" and “There’s a 
Riot Going On"), Janis Joplin (with Big 
Brother and the Holding Company), Ste- 
vie Ray Vaughan, Muddy Waters and 
Santana. The covers look like cartoon 
postage stamps. 

• MILES DAVIS, “En Concert, Olym- 
pia" (Europe I): Fust time on the market, 
two CDs each of two 1960 Parisian con- 
certs — in March with John Coltrane, 
October with Sonny Stitt Miles is unusu- 
ally strong with the weaker of the two, but 
Coltrane intimidates him. A steaming 
rhythm section, first-class sound, an in- 
sight into Miles, a jazz benchmark. 



WITH 

FRIENDS. 




$ 195 ’ 




DECEMBER 19TH r 'jA^WSkY I0rr 


DELUXE ACCOMMODATIONS'*' FJTN£S§^NTER • !$E ALLOCATION * 


-V 



HOW YORK 


MAI >IM)N AVI-'NUI' AT fiVTl I SI Klil'T 
NI-AV >ORK. Ni:W M.7KK IIM2I 
212 • - 


■*i ■ 

kyi* y% 


U.S.A. & t AN APA KUU ■ 225 • WJT 
' U.K.44 -4+1 • 41*1(1 • -Ml 
I UANCI (IK) 4ll.22.lt 
«..| KMANY (Hl> .Hl.JJ 44 
n.\i.Yii>t»rn2 tui.su 

•SIIHII I JH.W.MI .Mfll.ll ri KNIv ail. ITKHi O’M 
Nl»l INI Il'IMNl.AITI It AHII I.WI.N. 

I K.S IV M 


. «■« 
FORTE 



Our affordable prices coupled with a genuine care for your comfort 
and satisfaction will convince you that your derision to fly Biman 
was right Fly Biman, one of the international airlines of 
South Asia that offers real personalized service. 
Connections to 2 6 cities from Tokyo to New York. 




Biman 

BANGLADESH AIRLINES 

Your home m the air 


For booking and further information, please contact your travel agent or the Biman office nearest you. 







With First-Time Posts to Pick, Taiwan Goes Into Electoral and Media 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 1994 



By Kevin Murphy 

International Herald Tribune 

TAIPEI — The old, passiooaie 
ways die hard in Taiwan elections 
despite their lively history. 

Where a few colorful campaign 
banners would do the job, millions 
flap in the gritty breeze, covering 
every inch of Taipei as partisan 
street marches, huge rallies and 
truck-mounted loudspeakers blaring 
candidates’ slogans bring traffic to a 
standstill 

Long snakes of firecrackers ex- 
plode throughout the evening for 
good luck. Drums beat and cymbals 
H pch Rival legislators who ordinari- 
ly joust in Taiwan's rambunctious 
Parliament still draw muscular sup- 
porters into the streets, along with 
riot police, lest interparty rumbling 
flare. 

And, when it comes to vote-buy- 
ing, which every party naturally says 
it condemns, the only things to have 
truly changed are the harsher penal- 


ties for gettiui 
— up to 5000 ' 
for a vote in Ti 


caught and the price 
aiwan dollars ($190) 
pea’s hotly contested 


for island- 


three-way race for mayor. 

But as Taiwan prepares far island- 
wide elections Saturday, arguably its 
most important since the long-ruling 


most important since the long-ruling 
Kuomintang began to dismantle its 
authoritarian regime in 1987, new, 
high-technology channels for debate 
have burst upon the scene. 

The Nationalist Party has bravely 
allowed one of Asia's most outspo- 
ken political arenas to thrive where it 
once prosecuted dissent and the use 
of local dialects over Mandarin Chi- 
nese. 

But the Kuomintang still domi- 
nates the mainstream media and, its 
critics argue, skews political cover- 
age through direct ownership and 
old loyalties to its electoral advan- 
tage. 

“Most people who have good edu- 
cations know they can’t trust the 
television stations or the big newspa- 


pers,” said Gloria Yang, who spent 
her lunch break Thursday waving a 
political banner alongside a bury 
city street “If you don't try hard to 
find the facts, you might believe 
what they say.** 

But in another first for Taiwan, 
political dissent and analysis flour- 
ish on illegal radio and television 
stations, barely legal cable-TV net- 
works and computer bulletin 
boards, some of which government 
authorities have tried to stop but 
failed 

“It’s not that the three main net- 
works have suddenly become more 
fair/' a Western diplomat said. 
“They simply have been subverted.” 

No one yet knows exactly how the 
rise of alternative media will affect 
the final results of tight, first-ever 
races for Taiwan’s governor, big-city 
mayors and local assemblies, but 
most campaign officials and ana- 
lysts agree that Taiwan's political 


system has changed forever — even 
if not quickly enough for some. 

The Kuomintang “always tries to 
create the image that we intentional- 


The debate now gripping Taiwan 


claimed to rule all the provinces of is complex and emotional 

mainland China — ■ could establish t}* 6 country of fa- To support their r< 


mainland China — could establish of the socialists, fa- To support their 

himself as a credible aspirant for the The Democrat! T jjjg opposition parties haw 


create ujc image uui wcmicuuuuai- __ „t, J r mn j £ m a formal (MCiarauuu encotu^B^ 33 u aw » themselves 

ly create violence / 11 said Chen Fang- due m 1996, analysts say. S^hV^SSv's de facto indepen- radio stanons_ and havette^w 

mine, information director of the He will also control a large prov- ™ ttoiiigg ;f , national refer- formed television stamps 


W f"** ° D f to He will also control a large prov- if a national icier- formed tdwjWB , 

China Democratic Socialist Party, ince-owned business empire that m- suimons such a move. programming to ^ i ^^. Be]alediv 

the largest opposition group. ctudo some of Taiwm’s hugest °» fe SHff Lgigj New Party, a afe to£- 

“But violence in politics here is a banks and Taiwan TOevuon, one of group from the National- the of ^0 and teteri- 

structural problem because the me- the country’s three large commercial ^ President Lee Teng- pand the number o ......... 

dia are controlled," said Mr. Chen, stations. hu i Taiwan-born, secretly sion licenses. - • 

whose party’s high jinks in Parlia- At the same time, a loss byincom- p i an g t 0 break away from China to produce a n**® 

meat regularly trigger fistfights — bent Nationalist mayore in Taipei or S^tain power. An independence mail agod by a party member woqjs 
and coverage of issues otherwise Kaosiung, the second city, could referendum is anathema to people a j ourna ijst/’ said ^Newt'any 
overlooked- “Once the media is truly give opposition parties a valuable w bose families left China 45 years spokesman, Fu Kud-coctl "bfte nas 
open, the violence will fade away.” platform for proving their adxmnis- ago with the hope of returning vie- ruiming them objectively, and 

While the elections Saturday are trative mettle in preparation for fu- tonOTsly after regrouping m Tai- trust them." 

largely local, contests for the top tore elections. wan. Increasingly, though, Taipei 

mots have national significance. The Candidates start out tatting about The Nationalists seek to maintain . ^<3 other urban viewers 

three mam parties involved hold corruption, raising pension benefits the status quo, a fuzzy definition « tmtring to TVBS, a cable net- 
pasaonatdy different views on Tai- or SioWameto not getting nationhood that suits many citizens by Hong Kong-based 

wan s future. Taipei’s cursed new train system to because such a P°h^y is Television Broadcasts Ltd., which 

Taiwan's first elected provincial run at all, let alone on time. Soon, provoke Bemng, Cbma has n features in-depth, prime-time cover- 
governor — the post is a hangover though, fiery debate turns to Tai- renounced the use of force agams ^eepon developments, 

from the days when Taipei still wan's 'China policy — in effect, a the losing side in the crvU war. .. 


T- ' \ 

\T- ;V 


Vietnam Denies 


A Visato Colby, 
Ex-Chief of CIA 


A getter Fnatce-Presse 

HANOI — Vietnam b as re- 
fused a visa to a former U.S. 
director of central intelligence, 
William E. Colby, now a busi- 
nessman cm the board of a fund 
investing in Vietnam, a Foreign 
Ministry spokesman said 
Thursday. 

“At tins time it is not appro- 
priate for William Colby to visit 
Vietnam,” the spokesman said 
in response to a question about 
the former CIA chief, a major 
figure in the U.S. war effort in 
Vietnam who is now with the 
U.S. -based Vietnam Frontier 
Fund. 

Mr. Colby went to Vietnam 


in 1959 as deputy CIA station 
chief in Saigon. In 12 years in 


chief in Saigon. In 12 years in 
Vietnam, he led counterinsur- 
gency programs in the former 
Sonin Vietnam and orchestrat- 
ed a program to infiltrate armed 
bands into the North, in a failed 
hid to start an uprising against 
Hand 

He also led a so-called pacifi- 
cation program that resulted in 



GEM&AManu^aCunea^aSeaMmThwlliiid 


fils 


GoHtmaed from frge 1 
brought bad luck. According to 
Mr. Khoja, hundreds of items 
are still missing, including a 
“priceless” 50-carat blue dia- 
mond, a necklace of “very rare” 
green diamonds, more gem-en- 
crusted watches and necklaces, 
“rubies the size of chicken eggs” 
and a S2 million bracelet con- 
taining, among other gems, a 
large blue sapphire. The sap- 
phire was reset with stolen 
pearls to make a necklace that. 


srfe-jBarA 


head and chest arter ms 

The chain of events began suspicious turn, 
when Kriaagkrai Techamouft a 


Thai servant managed to dis- 
able an alarm system and steal 
nearly 200 pounds (90 kilo- 
grains) of jewelry from the pal- 
ace of Prince Faisal ibn Fahd in 
Riyadh, the Saudi capital The 
prince, a son of King FahdTs 
and a noted collector of antique 
jewelry, was away on a three- 
month vacation with his wife. 


Mr. Khoja said in an interview, 

was seen adorning the wife of a JSnHv 

senior police tcnSal at a party robbery., Thru pohee .qmcfciy 


senior police general 
two years ago. 


caught Mr. Kriangkrai in Janu- 


nlained, the jewelry was tdeen 
to a Bangkok hold for two days 
before being transferred to a 
police station. 

By the time the jewelry was 
returned to Saudi Arabia two 
months later, 80 percent of the 
items were missing, and most of 
the rest were fake, Mr. Khoja 
said. Valuable pieces were sto- 
len before and after the display 
at the police station and wound 
up in the hands of high-ranking 


VJSXU aogw. Toon ntl fh<» up m UUJ uauus ui ui£U-AauAiu£ 

A dapper 60-year-old With a iSSa^id- The police, gweniment and other 

ay mustache, Mr. Kboia came Mr. Khqa said, ine said. 


death or imprisonment of tens 
of thousands of Vietnamese 


Communists. 


ELECTION DAY — Women of Arsheguda waiting to vote Thursday In the first round of state assembly elections in 
Andhra Pradesh, home state of India's prime minister, P.V. Narasftnha Rao. Clashes among rival political groups 
left at least three dead. In neighboring Karnataka state, a political activist was killed as a mob threw rocks at lrim. 


gray mustache, Mr. Khoja came 
to Bangkok as a career diplo- 
mat in March 1990 to follow up 
the case of the stolen jewelry. 
But as his frustration mounted, 
he publicly accused senior Thai 
ponce officials of lying to him 
about the affair, exposed a cov- 
er-up in the murder of a jewel- " 
er’s wife and son and blamed a 
Thai police “mafia” for numer- 
ous threats against his life. 

For that reason, he carries a 
Smith & Wesson 38-caliber re- 
volver. In an interview in his 
heavily guarded office, Mr. 
Khoja proudly shows off the 
results of his frequent target 


servant was convicted and 


Singapore Grants a Delay in Case 
Against Herald Tribune and Writer 


The Associated Pros 

SINGAPORE — A con- 


which he criticized unnamed 
Asian governments and their 


tempt of court case against an court systems. The case was 
American scholar and the Inter- scheduled to be held Friday in 


national Herald Tribune was the High Court but was post- 
postponed Thursday for five poned to Jan. 9 to accommo- 


weeks, state television reported. 

The case involves an article 
by Christopher tingle pub- 
lished in the IHT on Ocl 7 in 


date the Herald Tribune, whose 
Lawyer requested more time to 
prepare the case, the televirion 
reported. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


PARIS & SUBURBS 


BELGIUM 



GERMANY 


UUSSB5 - EKJHEX PBHH0USE. 200 | 
sqm. 4 bedrooms, 3 butiwopat L meet 
area $4B0jCKXL Tri= 3Z.ZA48.g2?- i 


SUPERB RIVER VIEWS 

AMI MORE DAME 

Artist 's Aider. 

110 sqjn. To renovate. 
Tel: COT (1) 43 33 3Q00 


16* - YKTOt HUGO - POMCARE CHAMIUY. 30 Mta horn Peek, 
ooe^iond ‘psed 6 tore' 75 sqm, BeaMi 166 sqm. duple* in sin# 


MVAlflXS-rZSOJM. 


Eving + bedroom n freestone build- 
ing, nnqr, 6* floor. Hi Perfect con- 
dam. amm/ ped men TO adoi 
Owner Hi 35 S3 02 B1 or 45 00 % 95 


rradmi until tomes & pool 6 rooms. 
21 bathroom, fireplace. R,TOJX». 
Tdb emmer J3S 44 SB 56 00 (office) I 
or (331 <4 57 12 17 [home). | 


Top floor, dm, 2 rooms + tenoo*. 
parfanq Tel: (1)44 71 87 12. 


EXCEPTIONAL SALE 

B€ IA8GST PROPERTY AVAILABlf 
so aosr to pmbs- 

W iiunf drive to Place dp fEtode. 


ON LAKE DBJGt&N 

AteiqueS bedroom house with 2-darey 
bof wind o*i Guest house weh wo 


ARE YOU MISSING THE BIGGEST 


BULL MARKET 


1,500 SQJVL CASTLE 

Saioled in o 20 ha Park 
Needs rono w tm g exienean possible. 
550 sqm. stables + cw crate s house. 

Price: flEF. 80 netton. 

CnB Mr Pttndc Bertronou m the UJA 
Tefc (8081 737 3370 
Proa (80S) 737 3224 


! Gaden & ftogoda. 15 mra RH » Porte 
Ma®« FJB tekortTnl 1-39643787 


MMDON-8EUEVUE rtedenbol South 
War suburb, renovated 1930 home 
witii triple recepoon, fi bedrooms. 3 
bdhroorto. ArWi ateter, 30 sqm. 
terraoe with mew on port Near bter- 
notional School of Sevres, easy access 
Peru by horn or cor. rF 5,600,000. 
MOtwm-1146 2635 18 


OWN® SHIS BEAUTIFUL VB1A 
ON Tft HBGHI5 OF CANNES 

with panoramic rew of the crol 
+ /- 360 sqm. fiwng area & 2700 sqm. 
of land 6 bedrooms, 5 bathrooms + 
tepme 2-bedroom guest home. Soufh- 
facmg, cofm, security system. 

Phone Frmroe 133)93 69 34 90 
Car pbaaOE (33J 07 06 65 94 


GATMAB ESTATE 

Very dmmg otd formhoute 
.ronowteA Nra Courtenay Booefl, 

1 10 Im P»k 10 nen IBbafag^ 
cane. 300 sqjn biqareq 
3 recepBow. 2 Iwpo e as, 3 bedrooms, 
2 bcehttnms. 80 sqm garage and wine 
cel or, f hajprtfea FfzJKQJXO. 

Toi tail (M-l| 43 29 «Tfi7 


TOR SAl&HUWHHBT AREA 


SreCTACUlAR VtW, foteg Cap Par- 
rel, in mstane confamMn, bsrwmn 
Nice ond VSIefrtudie, chatting, ln- 
wiously modem fumebed 70 sqm. 


Modem 115 sqm rgtortmni) holm 
50 tqm. “open plat (ving/cteog aoa 
likhen - My ecumsd 

(Ueie^. Breplaca. 2 bedro o ^ T botfas. 

Bad $u3iu$sb&o!Sa!t 
ft omeno d e. 50 nden in ctfy part. 
tmae. QA Spm W2r6m3L 
fac *72640435. 


MONACO 


Dirodty or, BOB 

Owner rapiTO B on ti tauter*, needs to 
ml KCBPTK5NAL TOV««6 uSE4K 


IN THE USA? 



"--v- 

r-r-t . • . . . __•* 


404 Washington - scheduled completion date January 1995 


*i 09 

^ :n* 6 - **- 

O- -i 

- - V vV 


TAP INTO THE 


WORLD'S STRONGEST 


GROWING TOURIST 


& BUSINESS MARKET: 


SOUTH BEACH 



APARTMENT will hugs awn private 
garden. 2*3 bedrooms. 2ty bcOhs 
[ The finest In dec o ration J co uife rt 
nchteig a sfctie of the orl tehen 
S ?<xr gaage + mod’s quartos, 
“Aar. ZZhour seewity. Thai Me 
l nKn ate m haau y and eemmahae o . 

Conaxr owners represenromro 
T«fc 133-11 46 40 7144 


PAJU5 6fiL AV MONTAIGNE 

high dan buifcfcng, rory good asnefam. 
jturto 45 sent. - Apartment 101 xun. 
+ paHur^ WNTAftTW f-47 20 ffi7 < 


BUY IN FRANCE 
WITHOUT COMMISSION ! 

Free! few regdarly. at jw home, 
a sefeaion of rod stale 
corrapondng to your dtrnand. 
Pro 7331 67 43 63 19 or write foe 
IE PAKTB1AJRE BJROPBN 
34297 Montpeier cedn 051, Frmce 


fu( gardens ond saniepoo! Avalablc 
nwtSalrir. TT25 naan. Dima art - 1 
vttie sete. Tel Rome (39-6} 3SS03W1 


PRWOPAUTY OF MONACO 

Foang ttse part of Marti Carla 
Grondmi m living room wlh 


MBM: BETWEEN MONfPBUBI 


Tefc 133-1) 46 40 71 44 
foe (33-1] <7 45 IT 21 


88t - DIIPIEX PSfTHOUSE + 35 
sqjiv TBSACE Fabulous loamt, or 

p cuj j uwo, iwici* rvTicf icon u^noi 

mOM. Tet Owner pi 42 56 47 83 


20km CAMC5 - PANORAMIC VIEW 

ftestigow vilo m secluded ceeo otw- , 


greenery aid ie* 200 sqm. 
+ 100 sqm. ten ace an 2,500 sqm. 
wed grands. Spacious pananmc 
hmg oao orerflaw pool. 2 hr effaces, 
BBQ, maito bedroom wM chesting 



CcAor md jafag induded. 

PARKrTAGENCE 


Leftrt PUoce 
25 Awetwe de la Costa 

MC $0000 MortoCorip 

Hober A PartMr 

Tet 93 25 15 00. Fan 93 25 35 33 


NEAR AVENUE FOCH 

PAMS 16ft - Rue de la Meamteio 


8ft) - VEW ON SACXE CORff 
Tavahoine la met; 
fo Owner (fj 45 03 48 00 


bath + 3 bedroom, 2 botfn study, 
low lees. F42M. Teli (33) 9366 4444 


to mu* toemhowe. 
xl floor character oparwert. 


159 sqjtL: entry, 60 sq.m. Iwrg, 

3 bert ooms. 2 baftreonB, bichen. WC 
Pnvate garden + independm stofio 
m gaden, obart 20 sqm. vwtb shower- 
room & WC Gatnr. 
PmFF 5Jm&on 
Teb (1] 43 26 68 42 


PARIS 8TH- MONTAIGNE 

Very Kgfc dan Attrtew* 

in recent btdeinq. 

2 STUDIOS <5 sqm. each, 
on 5th & 6th Hoary 



ANTBES- COTE D'AZUR 
, SpiwxSd Provencal Mai 


PROVOKE: NEAR UZES: Superb con- 
fatetoray “mos", perfectly restored 
end decorated usmg aurbrrtic mate- 
riot lara lerrorm aid charmna 
gadat ft75W»a NEAR PONT DO 
GAUD: 'Mom de vAob*" 100 sqm. 


MONTE CARLO 


US ROPAUBJCarre d’OrJ. 
fhomt Uucto 42 sqjn. enteefy 


ioutbuidn®. 

Tdh (33) 93 3343 45 foe (33) 


tastefully restored, roof-terrace: 
F495.0D0. P0MO Tefc P3) 66 57 61 44 
Fa* (33)66 57 52 61 


refurixJrrd. storage roan aid doable 
paring space, fg.1% Mime Agent 

AAGEDI 


CANNES - SB m. nasi of Pten ftwch • 
on the seo - es c el ea canton 


SWITZERLAND 


Wdes Mocfo. MC 98000 Monaco 
Td 33-92 T6 59 39 ha 33-93 50 T9 42 


ground flow 100 sqm apalment + 
150 sqm. btey, prorate garden - 2 
bedroom* - 2 bcShroons - forge fin 
roan - fuSy ftmshod by desgw 




~ if/ii 


B orqge. Price FFL5 miKon. Tel: +33 1 
93 4318 m Fax +202 '34023)3 


□ UKESOEVftl 
HOUNTABI RESORTS 


USA RESIDENTIAL 


NYC/ 56th 9. West 


FRBVCH RIVIERA 


Ppssh&y conversion #Ko Duplex. 
NOTAtir Tefc (1) 40 06 «21 


PAJ85 15TH NEAR 7TH Owner wfis 
7B sqm. ap ar tment, 1st floor on sheet 
& courtyard, recently en tirely t e done 1 
daMe teng + 2 bedroom, htrea 


bitten, marota bathroom, cela. very 
beautiful renovOed freestone bicldng. 


M0. Td pi 4274)327 offer a 
61393 home. Fa» HI 4274775a 


SAINT G8UHAM Bi 1ATT onvOe 
Mwtooum "Ncpoleon B” 450 sqm. 
+ 3700 sqm. land + caenAers 
house. Exceptional condition. 
19,000.000- let SA (1)39 21 17 21 


VOICE - HETKNG EXECUllVB 
EXCHANCE / SA1E 
Archlecr owned 17lh century 
renowted Mas n Hauls de Venen 
300 sqm., 2750 sqm. fand, 
swewing pool & towy old trees. 
Unxfie ponororoc view of the mo- 
iron □ neon from Cannes St. ietsi 
Cap Fwra & the mountams. Estanaled 
F6 KKon. Sel a exdxngt fa at 
□portmenJ in Pan I6lh a Newly sir 
Some a a {reeshntng <da m Garehes. 
Vaucresson or la Cew Sb Ooud Cal 
owner todfy. Paris 1-47 41 64 65 
or fax 1-47 D1 20 89 (offer hood. 


GRASSE - COIE D'AZUR 
Sopsrb 300 sqm. Estate with pawramic 
seaview, tenras&pooL 9j00Q sqm. fand. 

<5mms Nee Mrpart. F7m0.000. 
Tel<33l13424142fm(33il34259J9 


authorized 
ice 1975 
ICHAUTS 
US, GSTAAI 


SENSATIONAL CONDO 


Spedtoa space trade & out. 1000 iq 
ti. wrap terrace endeemg 3000 sq ft 
«ena space. IncreiUe views from al 
rooms induinq 4 Bedrooms. 45 baths. 


I CAMS Owner sets knanaa 2«xm 


CRANS-MONTANA, etc 1 fa 5 bod- 

seems. 5 Fr. 200,000 to 3J mio. 


lumey condom 1st dost faitog 
MASS BIANCO 3128917® 


apartment fl teng + 1 baioanl 60 
sqm. + 4(J sqm. Terrace/ baa + 
EptoH + cela. ScM fmqted. 


REVAC 5-A- 


52. MaMhrma d. CH-121 1 Gonna 2 
Tel 4122-734 15 40. Fax 734 12 20 


DOUGLAS HUMAN 


softoo. Tel: faro |1)45 79S< SB- 
FRENCH PROVINCES 


ltt CSffURT CHATEAU/ HOTS, 
pettown. Tows ond Cfxnon, on Jhe . 
bonks of the lore River. Passfaie for 
pwwe reodence. Sekig due to health 
tnani. Contact owner droct for. 
(33)47965736. T«h 47 9*70 47. 


WAf G5TAAD rSwnZBBAN 

Superb rnxrunent with exception 
ttoMOsq*. 5 bedrooms, 

4 bathroom + menonmn. 
MAGf&XINT VSW 


5earty gate atari 
honw. 130 ft. waterfront. Mnures to 


& downwwn. 5295JJ00. Ante 
Monfaomery Beatty 305392-W6 US* 


, L f«: (33-1)20 36 27 61 

»2 k rtei 3 i!L <7 AS 73 23 or 
TNt OrteOMTOn (41) 29 46932 


Page 23 
FOR MORE 
REAL ESTATE 


FRANCE 


GREAT BRITAIN 


It has been 35 years since Miami Beach 
offered such an exciting opportunity. 

5outh Beach has become the world's most 
dynamic location, giving rise to a new level 
or luxury in living, office and retail space. 
Take advantage of this new level of luxury 
currently under construction. 


Real Estate Auction Sale at the Palais de Justice of Paris 
Thursday. December 15 at 2J0 p-m_„ in one lot. 


IN BUILDING LOCATED IN PARIS 7 


Porto fino Tower— a 44 story landmark in the 
South Beach skyline, features spectacular, 
multilevel mansions in the skv. Priced from 
£250,000 to $3/500,000. 


■?r ■ ■'Sd 


! bis rue de Buenos Ayres 

A 6-ROOM APARTMENT 


Rortofmo Tower, scheduled completion date. June, 1996. 


with 2 maids' rooms and a cellar 

Starting price: FF 6,000,000 

Contact; Mautf-e Bernard de SARIAC. Attorney In Parts, 

SCP Bernard de SARIAC - Alain JAUMEAU, 42, Av. George-V, Paris 8 
(only from 10 qm. to noon. tel. (I) 4720.B2J8) 

HWtd 3616 AV0CAT. Vaitf on site the 12th of December from 2 pjn. to 3 pjn. 


404 Washington- 55,000 sq. ft., of office 
and retail space, combining vintage Art Deco 
and modern Southwestern design, establishes 
a completely new standard for the market. 


The (WON Group, a real estate broker since 1975, in exclusive 
collaboration with the U.K. subsidiary of one of the major Swiss 
banks, can offer you income properties, located in prime U.K. titles, 
whidh whofty correspond to ihe following criteria: 

1} Commercial and office buttfngs fully rented. 

2) National or international credit tenants. 

3) Long term leases (15-25 years), with 5 yearly upward only rent reviews. 

4) Absolute net rent (F.R.I.). as Ihe tenant pays for an oosts (real estate 
taxes, insurance, maintenance, repairs, etc.). 


The ideal oceanfront lifestyle is only minutes 
away from die city's business and finance 
centers, airport and sea port. 


SPAM 

NARBELLA 


.SumswneXra&i 


i Southern I 
California 


BE A PART OF IT ALL. 


Portofino Tower 


Fully equipped luxury apartment 
in private tropical gardens and 
beach next to Puerto Sanus. | 
14 nights $1,000 Golf available.! 


6) Sale and increasing income over the years. 

7) Attractive fiscafrty tor foreign investor. 

8) Real estate investments starting from El ,000,000.-. 

Fiscal and legal counsels by our specialists. 
Local property management. 

For further information, please contact 


For* leasing, buying or investment 
opportunities call (305) 5.12-25 19. 


SOJTH BE+CM HOM3A 


I Tel. 34 52 a I 40 60 Fa* 34 5? 81 0992 ! 


Purchase $1 5 M or loose 
Accwn Jim Itauano 
TEL.^3 1 0/TO5-1 «SO 
| Pax: 910/795-1844 usa ( 


TO WNW FOB BA Of HUftF.; 
PORTOFINO f.AOf IP 
44fc f nLLINS AVENIT. 
MMMI KAMI, FI. 11M9 I'M 


pop TOFINO TOWF.R 


404 U'ASUfNf.TON 


SI XT> PROV INI F 


PttsUI 7IP( IMW 


RUSSIA 


NYC/SA Aw & 78 Si. 


REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 
USA RESIDENTIAL 


NTC/Port Aue & 72 S>. 7 Boon 


Real Estate 
in Moscow 
For Sale 


5th Ave’s fined Pre Wo- 6 

Magmaem tafr ™« rrnox uOu ro m a 
'toK.'ratonol fl»le Fnbdouj pak 
w«rt from the Lrong Room. Full Oim 
bom ft 2 Bnfcoana. Master Bedu xen 


oqnionMO iowois*cmrtipnoji^MWj^KVRWJW ud orai 
wrasF*u™sdGU»»f k 'giyp yro *§raK4icTi t swnK 
TWtmflOPtR FWajnRECrRFPMSPITMBHS •*Mi£fHWX®101« > IW‘WE, r , 
M3SEUFN1 AND IQ THE DQCUIMT5 BftUKD SfCTIOti .18 503 FI ON PA SlATuTFS TO 
Bf B/JwewDBynFwtflPfJtio Rjvfbob ussa 


« lllufs :unl Iwiililinu^ m i(*nlr.it 
Moscow I»i*> . i" rvnl. »•* 
liiUiir*' mun.U-W 


hmte/het batin Supub bmi tehm. 
rafs room ft bofc brety ame™^ 
wfrwrdmarr oppominf* la ihe 

212-WI 7D»/Bbi 21742BW57 


SOLBY 

Fax: (UK) -irt'71 <99 5559 


IFJfINSrON MASSACHUSETTS 
Eotuiw home wdh 44- bedoan 
and man} eitiaHhort cansnute to 
Batfdn. Fir xfe J5fftTOor long farm 
fame. A miable nmedn^v fwr»hed 
a unfunjied — FAX 617^625399 


DOUGLAS HUMAN 


AMZGNA excg(Mml 14^XK) aere ednfa 
ranch 93 oaes pnvafa. njudas 2 
gh«J town, odd mow. ngiud 

ipBV- SStnOflO nnonabfa Sam 
Scdmnek. HO Ban IWNogto, A2 
85671 USA. Fan 1 607 2877051 


Bjtfftmlhowe In New YoA 

Gten orow p erthowe m pnee loeaMn 
<<*n crams wrap pfanfad terrace 
roWouj Mater Bertoaai cute wah 
ha/tot baiht 2 odtond Bsdrooas 
ar I & Kjrcry. Ooubfa fang roora with 
’"Opdbumng ftoloce, ful dmmg room 
to skriee. Qehae eom witea 
trodto/dnjer, csnOal or oondfaannq 
[rtnt ronton Fcragn ft arpnofa 
buytm weto me Cocidiame . 

®£CCA STOOKKH 
212-B91-70W/Rel. 212628807 


DOUGLAS HUMAN 




> I/: 


V 


\ \ 


\ \. \ 











I'” - ' - : — 


INTERNATIONAL 


TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 1994 


Page 11* 


SPONSORED SECTION 


Analysts predict that 
Russia’s gross domestic 
product will continue to rise, 
now that inflation is being 
brought under control and 
private enterprise is stimulat- 
ing the economy - and 
purchasing power. 


7^ A Turning Point 
,n T ^ For the Economy 

' . ' ' - . industrial output is up again, as is the GDP. 


S II: * 

Hi- 1 Vi-~ P 


5? USSia s ^ anered economy is at a turning point After hit- 
g economic rock bottom earlier this year, the country is 
set to embark on a tough economic program for 1995 that 
e government hopes will crcare a springboard fora period 
of sustained economic growth. 

DrF Ve ” t . h ? u S^ ** lR presiding over a shrinking economy, 
rnrne Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin’s cabinet has managed 
to turn most businesses over to private ownership, creating a 
^ r ^ ec * n ' n § securities market in the process. It has also 
chalked up a number of successes in controlling the budget 
..n 1 ^ , f , " a h° n and the exchange rate of the ruble. 

Russia has reached the end of a long fall in production,” 
says Richard Layard, who heads a Moscow-based research 
group under the London School of Economics. “It is now 
ready to begin a long period of growth.” 

Political progress 

The men: fact that talk has now turned to economics is in- 
dicative of just how much progress has been made in the po- 
litical sphere. Only a year ago. President Boris Yeltsin used 
tanks to drive his political opponents out of the old parlia- 
ment building. These days, Duma Chairman Igor Rybkin, 
himself a veteran of the White House siege, works closely 
with the president, and there are encouraging signs that a se- 
ries of long-overdue commercial and tax reforms will at last 
become pan of the statute books. 

A recent government reshuffle bodes well for reforms in 
1995, analysts say. Radical reformer Anatoly Chubais was 
promoted to first deputy prime minister with overall respon- 
sibility for the economy to work with the new economics 
minister, Yevgeny Yasin, a seasoned marketeer. 

The government's program for 1 995, which this new team 
must ensure is implemented, envisages slashing monthly in- 
flation to less than 2 percent by the end of the year. This will 
be no mean achievement While inflation was brought down 
to a monthly low of 4 percent in August, the “Black Tues- 
day” crash of the ruble forced the October rate up to a 10- 
month high of 15 percent. 

Shrinking the deficit 

The main weapon in the government's anti-inflation armory 
will be its statai refusal to resort to using inflationary Cen- 


Marching to a different. drum: 
now that some political issues have been 
cleared up, the Russian government 
is ready to address 
continuing economic reforms. 




.i- 




I' * 


i*?.*v .. ■ ' • ?i 




tral Bank credits to finance a forecast 7.8 percent budget 
deficit. On current evidence, it looks as if it means business 
- even in the last quarter of this year, the government has 
turned away from simply printing more money to solve its 
problems, and this year’s deficit looks set to come in at just 
under 10 percent. 

Russia is now looking to fund the gap between revenue 


and expenditure through an ambitious program of state 
bonds, coupled with some $1 1 million to $ 1 3 billion in long- 
term loans from international financial institutions. The 
World Bank says it is likely to hand over some $3 billion in 
loans, while a $4 billion standby loan from the International 
Monetary Fund is under discussion. 

Moscow is also asking for a $6 billion stabilization fund 


from the IMF, which would prevent exchange-raie glitches 
like Black Tuesday's on Oct. 1 1 , when the ruble lost 20 per- 
cent of its value in a day, sliding to nearly 4.000 to the dollar. 
It has since recovered to a position of around 3,100 to the 
dollar, and acting Central Bank chief Tatyana Paramonova 

Continued on page 12 


There Is Only One Newspaper 
in Russia which Is 

Filed by Companies 


Everything in Russia changes quickly. Emerging markets. Rich potential. 

But sometimes things change too quickly. New governmental decrees take the 
places of ones adopted only a month before. Instructions of Central Bank and 
new taxes. Decisions of local authorities and practically anything one needs 
to know about doing business in Russia and the CIS. 

The only newspaper which offers all this and much more 
is ^Economics and. Life* weekly. Nearly 85% of our readers and sub- 
scribers are companies rather than private persons. Thus it’s 
jjHfe the only newspaper for filing at banks, financial institutions, 

jB *5 insurance companies, industrial enterprises. 

IIU^ jjPfe Editorials of Economics and Life» cover situation 

ilflp ajjTJk in Russia’s macro- and micro-economics, busi- 

. ness events, opinions of academicians, 

t0 P businessmen and governmental 
officials at all levels. 




m 


v J 








'SjSSP ' " / 







And advertising. Coca-Cola and 
Opel, Baskin Robbins and Procter 
and Gamble. Dozens of foreign and 
domestic advertisers are our 
clients. 

^Economics and Life» is in files 
of Russian businessmen. 

For annual references. 

CaU International 
department of RAGUI 
advertising agency: 

+7.095.257.3552 


pan-? © 1994, RAGUI All rights reserved. 



The largest public-sector holding company in Russia 
STATE INVESTMENT CORPORATION (GOSINCOR) 
provides investors with the following services: 

The locating of suitable partners 

through the use of Gosincor's proprietary, integrated database, which contains the details of more than 
2,000 planned investments and wore than 4,000 projects. These are to be found in ail major industrial 
sectors and in all regions in Russia. 

The arranging of project finance 

using standard, certified procedures. Packages compiled take into account current conditions prevailing in 
Russia's economy as well as the client's particular needs and incorporate the expertise of international 
consulting firms. 

The conducting of business audits 

ranging in depth from initial overviews of companies and their operations to comprehensive surveys carried 
out using our own methods or following the client's stipulations. 

The acquiring of equity stakes and shareholdings 

and the formulating of proposals of participation in consortia and investment projects as well as the com- 
piling of bids for companies up lor privatization. To that end, Gosincor supplies clients with ail requisite 
information and prepares an necessary documents. 

The supplying of investment insurance 

covering all kinds of risks, including those arising from such non-commercial causes as poBtical events. 
This coverage takes the form of guarantees made on capital accounts held in Russia, and the securing of 
policies with well-known insurance companies. 

The providing of banking services 

providing finance for all stages of the investment process. Not covered provided are payment guarantees, 
the factoring of non-performing accounts or of inconvertible earnings. 

The monitoring of markets and of risk factors 

by expert staff members, including evaluations carried out by groups of highly qualified managers 
equipped with state of the art information provision and assessment technologies. 

The offering of legal counsel and information 

on current and pending legislation. Gosincor also assists in the preparation of agreements, contracts and 
other legal documents. 

The conducting of import-export operations 

including activities in procurement, starting with the acquisition of the necessary equipment, and the orga- 
nizing of its shipping and its passage through customs, and in production, with this comprising the distrib- 
ution of finished goods, their shipping and passage through customs. 

The supplying of all necessary business to business services 

including the setting up of offices, the providing of communication, transport and security services and the 
arranging for tamper-proof data links. 


Slate Investment Corporation 
was founded in February. 1993, 
on the basis of a presidential decree. 

The company's share capital amounts 
to S 125 billion. 

Its chairman is Yuri V. Petrov. 

For further information, please contact 

gosincor 

35, Mynsnitskaya Str. J01959 Moscow Russia 
IfcL* (+7-95} 2089944 Fax: (+7-95) 207 69 37 



The Corporation includes Interbank. 

Russian Investment Insurance 
Company (the Bahamas). Incor-Sirakh, 
Gosincor - Trust. Trading House. 
Incor-Finance. Incor- Invest. 

Gosincor maintains regional offices jn Tyumen, 
Yekaterinburg. Saint Petersburg, 
Nizhniy Novgorod, Sochi and Yalta, 
representation in New York 


ABRAITYTE/8IPA PRESS 









* * 



Privatization Enters Second, Irreversible Stage 


After a slow start, the post-voucher stage of Russia's ambitious and far-reaching privatization program has taken off. 


Fash auctions and invest- 
ment tenders across the 
country are offering im- 


gram’s potential to bring in 
fresh capital. 


cash auctions with most of 
the rest going to local and 
budgets - 


mense opportunity for Russ- 
foreif 


ian and foreign investors 
alike. In contrast to the first 
stage of privatization - in 
which the state sold off 
shares in enterprises for 
vouchers issued to every 
Russian man, woman and 
child - the second stage fo- 
cuses on sefting stakes to 
strategic investors who have 
the capital and expertise 
needed to cum Russian in- 
dustry around. 

“Now the ideology is dif- 


Everything must go 
While official statistics are 
unavailable, lists compiled 


regional budgets - have giv- 
en a significant boost to pri- 
vatization in Russia’s far- 
flung regions, many of 


Russia's privatization program has 
reaped praise from Western experts 
..as an unprecedented success 


ferent,” says Arkady Yef- 
for 


stafyev, spokesman for First 
Deputy Prime Minister Ana- 
toly Chubais, the driving 
force behind Russian priva- 
tization. “Now it is the at- 
traction of capital." 

President Boris Yeltsin 
launched the second-stage 
program with a decree in 
July, but die move was fol- 
lowed by a summer lull be- 
fore local administrators and 
the companies themselves 
began to realize the pro- 


by private consultants show 
hundreds of cash auctions 
and investment tenders tak- 
ing place throughout Rus- 
sia's 89 regions. The sell- 
offs range from tiny stakes 
in huge enterprises such as 
LUKoil, Russia's largest in- 
dependent oil company, to 
controlling stakes in lesser- 
known companies such as 
the Crystal sanatorium in the 
Black Sea resort town of 
Sochi. 

Mr. Yefstafyev says that 
the rules of post-voucber 
privatization - which allow 
enterprises to keep 51 per- 
cent of the proceeds from 


uty 


which had previously op- 
posed the program. 

Vadim Shingorov, 
head of the Urals Stock 
ter in Yekaterinburg, agrees. 
"The market started thriving 
as soon as sales of enterpris- 
es for cash began,” he says. 


The share market 
The development of a mar- 
ket for shares in Russian 
companies also means that 
many Russian assets are no 
longer as cheap as they once 
were. A 0.076-percent stake 
recently auctioned by 
LUKoil Holding, for exam- 
ple f went for more than $2 


million. Nonetheless, shares 
in Russian enterprises are 
still a bargain compared 
with their foreign counter- 
parts. Based on share prices 
in over-the-counter trading, 
the average Russian oil 
company, to give one exam- 
ple, is currently valued at be- 
tween 10 cents and 40 cents 
per barrel of proven re- 
serves. 

Although Russia’s privati- 
zation has reaped praise 
from Western experts as an 
unprecedented success, it 
still faces obstacles at home. 
Some observers worry that 
Vladimir Polevanov. a for- 
mer regional governor re- 
cently appointed to head 
Russia's State Property 
Committee, might slow the 
program down. 

But Charles Blitzer, chief 
economist at the World 
Bank mission in Moscow, 
believes such worries should 
be taken with a grain of salt 
"We’ve learned from past 
experiences that when there 
are changes in the govern- 
ment, policy generally 


changes more slowly than 
we would believe from read- 
ing initial quotes in the 
press,” he says. 


Pending legislation 
The main source of opposi- 
tion to privatization remains 
Russia's contentious parlia- 
ment, which has yet to pass 
definitive legislation on land 
ownership as well as on reg- 
ulation of the country's se- 
curities market, all of which 
experts say is essential to at- 
tracting foreign investment 

Some reactionary mem- 
bers of parliament have even 
threatened to put a stop to 
privatization and annul the 
results of all cash auctions, 
but Mr. Yefstafyev isn't 
worried. 

“Try to imagine what 
would happen if parliament 
moved to stop privatiza- 
tion.’' he says, pointing out 
that the program has created 
millions of shareholders 
across the country. “It's po- 
litically impossible. It’s al- 
ready irreversible.” 

Mark Whitehouse 



A Turning Point for the Economy 


Continued from page 1 1 


recently pledged to use all available resources to 
defendits exchange rate. 


Industrial output up 

The government, however, still foresees shrink- 
age in the economy next year of between 6 per- 
cent and 8 percent, compared with a 22 percent 
decline in GDP over the past 12 months. 

Figures for October have caused many analysts 
to be more optimistic about the prospects for 
1 995: GDP rose 4 percent over September, spear- 
headed by an astounding monthly rise in previ- 
ously waning industrial output of 9.5 percent. 

‘There is a chance the budget will turn out bet- 
ter than it looks at the moment, because the fore- 
cast of a 6 percent foil in GDP is now no longer 
likely,” says Mr. LayartL “Industry figures may 


cent to 50 percent of economic activity is thought 
to take place in this “gray" sector of the economy, 
helping to explain why real incomes have in- 
creased by some 13 percent so far this year, while 
official wage levels have stagnated. 


start falling again, but there is enough strength in 


the rest of the economy to make sure GDP will 
grow from now on." 

Analysts give much of the credit for economic 
revival to the new, small private businesses that 
have mushroomed in the trade, services and small 
manufacturing sectors over the past few years. In- 
deed, the extent of Russia’s revival may be under- 
estimated, analysts say, because much new entre- 
preneurial activity is unrecorded. Some 25 per- 


Demand for consumer goods 
The extra rubles in Russians’ pockets have fil- 
tered through into a boom in demand for imported 
consumer goods over the past two years. Imports 
account for some 70 percent of all food bought in 
the bustling streets of Moscow and Sl Petersburg, 
and foreign brands have captured around 50 per- 
cent of the alcohol and cigarette markets, inde- 
pendent research shows. 

While exporters have been quick to move in on 
the Russian market. Western companies have 
been more hesitant about committing themselves 
to direct investment International investors like 
CS First Boston, Morgan Grenfell and Salomon 
Brothers have been pumping money into Russia's 
untamed securities markets at a rate of S500 mil- 
lion to $700 million per month, Mr. Chubais says, 
but direct investment has been less forthcoming. 

Nevertheless, the Central Bank reckons direct 
foreign investment will come to $2 billion this 
year, compared with a total of just $2.7 billion in 
the previous six years. 

A bullish Mr. Chubais recently predicted $8 bil- 


lion to $9 billion in new investment in 1 995, if die 
government can address some of the basic con- 
cerns expressed by Western businesses in the ar- 
eas of taxation, customs duties and guarantees. 

A consultative council on foreign investment, 
including representatives of 17 leading Western 
companies, is working with the government to 
thrash out the specifics of some of these questions 
and come up with answers. 


Tax reforms 

Reform of the tax system is also under way in par- 
liament Its goal is to shift the fiscal burden away 
from business toward the individual and to scrap 
anomalies like the excess-wages tax. which pe- 
nalizes companies for paying their employees 
higher salaries. 

In addition, a new Civil Code now awaits the 
president’s signature and should come into effect 
on Jan.l. providing Russia with an economic ver- 
sion of the constitution that will revolutionize 
commercial law by clarifying previously murky 
concepts such as what constitutes a contract 

"The code will replace Soviet law, wipe away 
the legal patchwork and replace it with a complete 
framework of civil law." says Lane Blumenfeld. a 
U.S. lawyer who advised on the drafting of the 
code. 

EuanCraik 







international 
' ; fetxrin; Carp., 

' ‘'Hydra-, wmcfrfontted 
. chora Go. to .explore tmd i t v 
fields in Arctit^RuS^ 
of a moductioii-sharing 
' . Russian authorities^ 
basin, the 

• than SI 00 million oo a 
praisal of the Roman TrabsafiekE . _ 

\! The Urals. The Und Moun&ttfa; fMPr 
merly a top-secret zone beca^^f te >ifoi 
large number ofmiljtajy enterprises^, las f 
recently become accessible to. foteigaajL'rv ' . 
“The region has the best oppcartujitty for '.' 
Western business.” says Jack D. SegaL ! 
the American consul general in Ydutter- -s 
inburg, the Urals region capital Tts only >' the 
disadvantage is that few people; know “'say* 
about it.” The main sef ling, points of the ‘ c “ “ *** 


region are its high-tech rmlrtory scctor ^ j 


**••*>< .•» **y> : 



tfcfqpa MGtimialmaya m T5, 123362 Moscow' 
fcoc©9»490-5«rlO - Phonw:to95) 490-68-08 


Our Cfxrq>aay bcis boon apetaGng sfoco I992ajnd hasa 


cjffesstM companies concerned: 
S fafefia d B qwravfcefr •'* ./ •..• 

partners focmjiucSfbwi^dcS 


onieqjrisQs umfertfie partners’ fasMcSansi 


■ / 


tt» reduce n&iislt 


For further information on advertisers in 
this section, please contact: 

Wolfgang Lauterbach, 

International Herald Tribune, Friedrichstrasse 15, 
D-60323 Frankfurt, Germany. 

TeL: (49-69) 72 67 55 - Fax: 149-69) 72 73 10 


or 


¥ 


PUBUOTAS 


os 


nyerincuTACcHr 


5, Pushkin square, K-6, 103798, Moscow, Russia 
Tel.: (095) 20947-27 - Fax: (095) 209-77-39 



26, Myasnitskaya 
Moscow, 101000 
TeL: (095} 923-08-09 
Fax: (095) 923-65-39 
Telex: 412366 R0C0M SU 
Teletype: 114996 VLT 
Sprint mail - RNCB / customer 
S.W.I.F.T. CODE - RNCO RUMM 
REUTER DEALING CODE: RNCB 


RNCB 


e NEW BflNK IN THE NEW RCISSIfl 


Four years have passed since Russian National Commercial Bank was founded. Four years is a 
short term for a bank in general but it is quite a long term for a new baric in the new Russia. 


Back in 1990 a team of just a few young people could offer a limited range of services on a very 
limited scale. 


Today the Russian National Commercial Bank with its branches employs more than seven hundred 
highly qualified professionals and ranks among the top performing commensal banks in Russia. 

Russian National Commercial Bank strives to achieve a high degree of stability aid refabifrty. The 
Bank develops relations with Russian and international banks, enterprises and private customers and 
provides various services in lending and money transfer, induing international bank transfers. 

7?ie Bank's development was backed up by a rapid buildup of its clientele. At present RNCB has 
more than 6000 institutional clients. Its performance, growth of turnover aid the volume of accumula- 
ted financial assets have placed Russian National Commercial Bank within the top banks in Russia. 

Therefore during this period the Bank has been expanding rapidly. This is particularly true of capital 
growth, accumulation of financial resources and of the amount of loans extended. RNCB's performance 
far exeeds the inflation index and consolidates the positive change in aS spheres of banking activities. 

The Bank has always sought to minimize ban and investment risks and to protect its clients' and 
shareholders’ funds and the effectiveness of this policy is confirmed by ratio analysis. More than 49% of 
assets are placed with minimal risk or risk-free. . . 

RNCB has a wide network of branch offices m different cities of Russia: St Petersburg, Kirov, 
Izhevsk, PetropaviovsWCanrchafcsky, Novosibirsk, Tula. Perm and KaSrwgrad. To serve the needs of 
clients 6 branch offices have been opened in Moscow. 

The Bank broadens the scope of its activity and now has corresponding relationships with 23 lea- 
ding international banks and with 5? banks in the Commonwealth of Independent States. 

The Bank is actively developing close partnership ties with leading Western financial institutions ai 
the field of international portfolio management. This service, entirely new for the Russian market, is offe- 
red to institutional clients interested in global asset management Extensive contacts have been develo- 
ped with Western banks and investment funds interested in entering emerging financial markets in 
Russia. 

The Bank is a member of S.W.I.F.T. and of the Association of Russian Banks. Mr. Peter Korotkov, 
the Bank’s president, is a member of the Association of Russian Banks Council. 

The Bank's auditors are Coopers & Lybrand. 


Joint Ventures Are Key to Investment 


For foreigners, entering the Russian market is often most easily done through a joint-stock arrangement 




heiher they are in the 
business of drilling oil wells, 
building office buildings, 
opening" fancy boutiques or 
selling Big Macs, many 
Western investors say that 
founding a joint venture 
with a Russian partner is still 
one of the most reliable 
ways of investing in Russia. 

“You can hardly find a 
single serious Western man- 
ufacturing project here that 


MEDIATOR LTD. 


Ten-year production and sales of ultra-violet IrrocSatof of Wood, 
an extroofdnory medical device. Own patents and research. 
Other engineering and equipment. 

Seeking new business partners. Investors. 

A Knipovfch Sir- Saint Petersburg, 193019 RUSSIA 
TeL/ Fax: (0951 812 / 567 4128 


does not involve a Russian 
partner.” says Pyotr 
Medvedev, a lax and legal 
advisor with Arthur Ander- 
sen in Moscow. 

“If you are going to be do- 
ing business here, you need 
a Russian partner,*’ says Jef- 
frey Zeiger. a Trenton. New 
Jersey native who opened 
Tren-Mos. Moscow's first 
American restaurant, as a 
joint venture with the Russ- 
ian carmaker Lada. ‘There 
are things that we will never 
understand.” 


Local expectations 
Once the only form of for- 
eign investment permitted in 
die Soviet Union, joint ven- 
tures have often been 
fraught with difficulties. 
Several have fallen apart 
over tussles for property and 
profit. Others ran aground 


when Russian and foreign 
work ethics collided. 

Faced with an obstacle 
course of restrictions on oth- 
er forms of investment, such 
as a prohibition on land 
ownership by foreign com- 
panies, would-be investors 
are still opting for Russian 
partners. 

A partnership between the 
chocolate makers Kraft Ja- 
cobs Suchard and a candy 
factory in Yekaterinburg in 
the Ural Mountains fell 
through when workers be- 
came alarmed that Western 
investment would mean job 
cuts. The company, a Philip 
Morris division, is persist- 
ing. 

“We do not believe the 
discussion is over.’* says 
Bernhard Huber, executive 
vice president for Kraft Ja- 
cobs Suchard. “You cannot 


succeed on the Russian mar- 
ket if you do not have a local 
production.” 


The new 
East Side 


The countries of Eastern 
Europe are among the 
promising investment 
opportunities of the future. 


Story. 


We. the Landesbank of 
Saxony, possess a special 
insight into the opportunities 
and risks in these up and- 
coming markets, since wo are 
the only new Landes! tank In 
have been established in 
the newlv formed states ot 
Eastern Germany. That’s why 
ivo ivish to support you as 


a fair and competent partner 
for your business activities 
in the East. After all. invest- 
ments in the future should be 
well prepared and carefully 
carried out. 


Make use of our special 
know-how in this area. 

Call us. We're there for yon. 
Tel.: +49 341/979 0 


fen; 


Sachsen LB 

Lmdesbank Sateen Glronnnle 



Useful partnerships 
Valery Belov of Ernst & 
Young says that many for- 
eign companies turn to 
Russian partners in order to 
obtain land and work space 
to set up local production. 
“The main obstacle to set- 
ting up a serious 1 00-percent 
foreign company aimed at 
production here is the im- 
possibility of buying land,” 
he says. 

Although any foreign 
company can buy a Russian 
factory at a cash auction or 
at an investment tender. 
Western companies are of- 
ten put off by restrictions, he 
says. According to Russian 
legislation, a company buy- 
ing a factory at a cash auc- 
tion or an investment tender 
may reduce its work force 
by only 3 percent and cannot 
change the type of produc- 
tion within the first three 
years. Mr. Belov says. 


Joint-stock companies 
All joint ventures were to be 
transformed into joint-stock 
companies under a 1993 
government regulation, and 
all new legal entities with 
foreign investment are now 
registered as joint-stock 
companies, but the term 
“joint venture” is still-widely 
used to refer to any foreign 
investment in a Russian 
company. 

Many foreign companies 
have set up successful joint 
ventures with Russian com- 
panies in the last two years. 

Julie Tolkacbeva 


*i 


For information a hour 
subscription in Russia. 
please contact: 

SOVAMEVCO 


1 1/4 Gertsen Sir. Build. 2 
Moscow 205009 USSR 


191065 
St PclCftbuis 

Milliomya Ufitsa 
DOM 27 KAB 45 


i . uft til . .. liKZil 



L.. _____ 




V 


V. 


LI 



- < 





*> 





rj r 

7\ *" 


' • * « ’. \ “ 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 1994 


Page 13 


SPONSORED SECTION 


U 


I 


Banking Sector in Search of Stability 

hakeout may be coming in the banking sector, but in the meantime innovations ant being made. 


M 




dte ( h3E^^ssj; 

mg by leaps and bounds - or both. 
i top Panics are beginning to 

loolc fairly sophisticated, opening for- 
eign branches, introducing Russians to 
services like automatic cash withdraw- 
jtf, attracting foreign investment and 
building slick images through Western- 
style advertising campaigns. 

P 8 ? 1 !* has distinguished it- 
seif with television ads set in the court 
of Catherine the Great. A huge neon 
advertisement in central Moscow touts 
l okobank, one of the country’s largest 
commercial banks, as a bastion of “re- 
spectability” and “stability.” 

Turning the image around 
Still, banks are widely viewed with 
suspicion as more and more go under, 
taking with them the savings of ordi- 
nary Russians. Economists and govern- 
ment officials have warned that the- 
banking system is heading for a crisis. 


Bright spots remain, however. 
Stolichny Bank, one of the country’s 
largest, recently announced plans to 
buy 2,000 automatic teller machines 
from IBM to create the country’s first 
major network of computerized cash 
dispensers. It also recently received 
permission to open the first Russian 
bank branch in the European Union, in 
Amsterdam. 

Tokobank. with assets reportedly 
worth about $1 billion, won the first 
major investment in a Russian bank 
when the European Bank for Recon- 
struction and Development bought 14 
percent of its common voting stock for 
$35 million in September. 

The Russian National Commercial 
Bank, founded in 1990, is developing 
contacts with Western banks and in- 
vestment funds interested in entering 
the country’s financial markets. 

Russian and foreign bankers are 
skeptical about the stability of the 
banking system. "Some banks are cer- 
tainly attacking the market with a 
vengeance - they're spending a lot on 


ads because they’re so profitable,” says 
Miljenko Horvat, who heads 
Citibank’s operations in Russia. “But 
I'm afraid that the aggressiveness and 
growth have very little to do with the 
inherent stability or lack thereof of 
Russia's banks.” 

Capital cushions 

Mr. Horvat says the apparent solidity 
of top banks like Stolichny and 
Tokobank may be illusory because ac- 
counting methods mandated by Lhe 
Russian Central Bank do not conform 
to international standards. “Most banks 
have been spending every dollar they 
get, when it would be better to build re- 
serves and get that capital cushion that 
would reflect that they are working in a 
very risky environment,” he says. 

The State Investment Corporation 
(Gosincor) has presented a plan to 
President Boris Yeltsin to compensate 
depositors in Sberbank, the former So- 
viet savings bank, which were frozen in 
April 1992. 

Anne Barnard 



The tentral Bank has pledged to defend the exchange rate Mkn v- 
tng the rubles troubling one-day 20 percent slide in October. 


Stock Market at That Awkward Age, but Growing Up Fast 

Russia s young stock market has been developing at breakneck speed this year. Once regulation catches up. foreign capital should continue to pour in. 


oreign hedge funds have 
been pouring billions of dol- 
lars into Russia, but big in- 
stitutional investors have yet 
to enter the still wild market, 
where buying a stock does 
not necessarily mean be- 
coming a legitimate share- 
holder. 

Government officials have 
estimated that foreign port- 
folio investment in Russia - 
the major factor influencing 
growth of the stock market - 
has risen to $700 million a 
month from a mere $150 
million at the start of the 
year. 

Attracting foreign funds 
First Deputy Prime Minister 
Anatoly Chubais, who has 
overall responsibility for 
Russian economic policy, 
^ recently predicted foreign 
portfolio investment will 
continue to grow next year 


and could reach $1 billion a 
month. 

Foreign investors have 
flocked to buy shares in 
Russia’s oil, aluminum, 
electric power and commu- 
nications industries, some 
reaping huge gains mi stocks 
whose value grew more than 
100 times in several months. 
The Moscow Times Stock 
Index, an indicator based on 
brokers' quotations of 30 
leading stocks, has grown 
more than 50 points, to 
15039 from 100 on Sept. ], 
when it was launched. 

“In my opinion, the aver- 
age share price of good com- 
panies in Russia will 
quadruple in two years,” 
says Benoit Mounter, a 
Moscow-based manager for 
Eastern Capital Fund Ltd., 
an offshore fund that plans 
to put some $50 million dol- 
lars into Russian equities. 


Lately, however, the mar- 
ket has been in the dol- 
drums, waiting for a boost 
from big institutional in- 
vestors such as emerging 
market funds and pension 
funds. Officials and market 
dealers have warned that the 
government must secure 
property rights and develop 
better regulation of the mar- 
ket to maintain an inflow of 
foreign capital. 

The need for discipline 
Foreign and Russian in- 
vestors have long suffered 
from the lack of regulation 
in Russia's securities mar- 
kets. Russian industry man- 
agers, reluctant to share 
property rights in their com- 
panies. have been known to 
delay or even refuse regis- 
tration of new shareholders. 
Company directors also 
commonly hide financial ac- 


tivities from shareholders 
and bar principal outside in- 
vestors from shareholders* 
meetings. 

“These people got used to 
being czars in their enter- 
prises. so they treat investors 
as unwanted guests, not fel- 
low owners of the compa- 
ny,” says Sergei Pavlenko, 
director of the'govem mental 
Center for Economic Re- 
form. 

Some Russian companies, 
however, have already 
changed their attitudes. In 
October, seven of Russia’s 
leading industrial compa- 
nies and investment funds 
stepped in to fill the legal 
vacuum left by the govern- 
ment. creating a bill of 
rights to proteci their share- 
holders. The Declaration of 
Shareholders' Rights, 
signed by such giants as 
electricity producer United 


Energy Systems and oil 
company LUKoil, guaran- 
tees the property rights of 
the companies' 8 million in- 
vestors and requires the 
companies to provide share- 
holders with detailed finan- 
cial disclosure. 

Custodial services 
Most big foreign investors, 
however, are still waiting for 
more guarantees on their 
money, and are unlikely to 
enter the market until custo- 
dial services, in which banks 
or other financial institutions 
guarantee ownership of 
shares, are set up. 

CS First Boston. Chase 
Manhattan and Citibank are 
all working to establish such 
services, and investors hope 
they will be in place in the 
near future. 

“In the next few months, I 
think that adequate custodial 


services will be available on 
the market,” said Mr. 
Mounier of Eastern Capital 
Fund. “When that happens, 
big foreign investors will 
come into the market, which 
will cause it to explode.” 

Besides ownership guar- 
antees for investors, the 
Russian equities market 
lacks two other essential ele- 
ments: It has neither a uni- 
fied stock quotation system 
nor a clearing center where 
share purchases can be reg- 
istered. Dealers often have 
to fly to outlying Siberian 
cities to register share trades 
at a company's headquar- 
ters. 

Such costly and time- 
wasting procedures leave no 
room on the market for 
smaller investors, as most 
brokers refuse to go to the 
trouble to strike deals worth 
less than $100,000. 



The situation could soon 
improve, however, as more 
companies seek to attract the 
means of individual in- 
vestors. 

Red October. Russia’s 
largest candy factory, which 


is offering 55 percent of its 
stock at cash auction in De- 
cember, has already said it 
plans to sell most of the 
shares to individuals through 
special stock stores. 

Mikhail Dubik 


“Russia" 

mizt produced in its entirety by the Advertising Department 
of ihe International Herald Tribune. 

Writers: Anne Barnard. Euan Craik. Mikhail Dubik. Julie Tolkacheva 
and Mark Whitehouse are on the staff of The Moscow Times 
Program director: Bill Mahder. 


t 


LARGEST VOUCHER INVESTMENT FUND IN RUSSIA 

Recently, the stories about JSC MMM received wide coverage in western media. Analysis of the publications revealed that they do not distinguish between JSC MMM and MMM- 
Invest. In most newspaper articles JSC MMM is referred to as “investment fund”, whereas MMM-Invest is classed as a voucher investment fund. The present report is aimed to put 


the record straight. 

The Voucher Investment Fund MMM-Invest 
was established in December 1992 to partici- 
pate in the privatization process and is the 
largest in Russia. The Voucher Investment 
Fund obtained the license from the State 
Property Committee of the Russian 
Federation, numbered 58 and dated January 
29, 1993. Fund authorized stock was regis- 
tered by the State Property Committee on 
February 1 and September 1, 1993. Paid up 


Date 


01.08.94 

07.08.94 

15.08.94 

21.08.94 

30.08.94 

07.09.94 

15.09.94 

21.09.94 

30.09.94 

07.10.94 

14.10.94 
2L10.94 

31.10.94 

08.11.94 


Liquid assets value 
(*000 VSD) 

43 453 
45 696 
54 501 
61 359 
74 086 
100268 
117 479 
121 694 
126 476 
103 853 
92 364 

80 663 

81 208 
85 931 


share capital amounts to Rbl. 42167 bn. or 
USD 13393 m at the rate available on 
November 8. 1994. The number of sharehol- 
ders is estimated at appr. 2.4 min. 

An efficient investment strategy provided to 
Fund assets has been sourced from the shares 
of privatized enterprises and, qualified as 
highly liquid assets. The figures below illus- 
trate the growth of market value of highly li- 
quid Fund assets during recent months. 

Asset value per single placed 
share (S/share 1000 rbl. par value) 

1.03 
1.08 
136 
1.45 
1.75 
237 
2.78 
2.88 
2.99 

. 2.46 

2.19 
1,91 
1,93 

2.04 


No , t M J * market value in the first half of October was resulted from a recent sharp 
A fall ofFund ^ Quotations of oil production complex enterprises in the Russian market, 
decrease of shar : q “ qws m upward trend of Fund assets values in the past two weeks that 
Nevertheless, die growth of market price for other investment portfolio constituents, 

connected first of .11 "jKSdL* comp | e x shares. For example, cost of AvtoVAZ Stock 
particularly costs h ]nv£st has a ]argest block of shares, rose by over 40% for 

company shares, in wmui mm 
the last October in terms of US dollar. 


enterprises. 

ssisrsi^-'itjas 

taken at the genera meenn=. y ^ ^ . lIlo . 


a market value of Fund liquid assets is 6.3 
as larger as the Fund authorized capital. 

The Fund is represented by a team of high- 
ly skilled professionals. Some of the top 
managers are doctors of economics and 
many have gained qualifications in securi- 
ties dealing from the Finance Ministry of 
Russia. 

The Voucher Investment Fund MMM-Invest 
is Financially and legally fully independent 
from the companies incorporated in the 
MMM Association,. and. from JSC MMM, 
which has been the subject of great discus- 
sion in recent months, in both Russian and 
Western media. 


LIST OF INVESTMENTS 

Voucher Investment Fund “MMM-Invest” 
In excess of 3% ownership capital: 


% from 


Name in alphabetical order 

ownership 

capital 

Description of activity 

Location 

AVTOVAZ 

8,18 

Car production 

Samara dist. 

ANGARSKNEFTEORGSYNTHEZ 

1130 

Oil refinery 

Irkutsk dist. 

BERIOZKA IN LUZHNIKI 

19,43 

Trade 

Moscow 

VARIOGANNEFTEGAZ 

3,04 

Oil and gas extraction 

Tyumen dist. 

MIL’ HELICOPTER PLANT 

7,55 

Design and production of 
helicopters 

Moscow 

HOUSING CONSTRUCTION CENTER N.9 
LENINGRAD OPTICS AND MECHANICAL 

3,06 

Construction 

Moscow 

PLANT (LOMO) 

4,80 

Precision Manufacturing 

St. Petersburg 

MOSCOW JEWELLERY PLANT 

24,48 

Jewellery making 

Moscow 

RYAZAN OIL PROCESSING PLANT 

6,86 

Oil refinery 

Ryazan 

TOMSK OIL AND CHEMICAL PLANT 

1 8^8 

Oil refinery 

Tomsk 

TOURCENTER SUZDAL 

1L65 

Tourist industry 

Vladimir dist. 

UAZ 

17,02 

Car production 

Ulianovsk 

TSUM 

5,50 

Trade 

Moscow 

JAVA TOBACCO 

4,02 

Cigarette making 

Moscow 


Up to 3% ownership capital: 

“On Tverskaya” (hotel “Minsk". Moscow); Ostankino meat processing plant (Moscow); Hotel complex 
“Kosmos” (Moscow); “Red October" (confectionary, Moscow); “MIKROMASHINA" (MIKMA, consumer 
appliances, Moscow); PURNEFTEGAZ (oil and gas extraction, Tyumen dist.); NOYABRSKNEFTEGAS 
(oil and gas extraction, Tyumen dist.); KONDPETROLEUM (oil and gas extraction, Tyumen dist); 
SAKHALINMORNEFTEGAS (oil and gas extraction, Sakhalin); NORILSKY NICKEL (ferrous metallur- 
gy, Krasnojarsk region); MEGIONNEFTEGAS (oil and gas extraction, Tyumen dist.); KIRISHINEFTE- 
ORGSYNTHEZ (oil refinery. Leningrad dist.); NIZHNEVARTOVSKNEFTEGAS (oil and gas extraction, 
Tyumen dist.). 

MMM - Invest is currently seeking foreign companies wishing to participate in the privatization 
process in Russia. MMM - Invest offers business consulting services and joint^operations in securities 
in the Russian market. 

Tel: (7095) 201 3908 Fax: (7095) 201 3746 





















































































150 


Apprdx. weighting: 26% 
Close: 93.41 Piwj 94.32 


Approx, weighting: 5% 
Close: 13218 Piwj 13122 


130 






O N D 
1394 


The Index Hacks U.S. doBar values of stocks in: Tokyo, Now York, London, and 
Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Canada. ChHe, Danmark. Finland, 
France, Germany, Hong Kong, Maly, Mexico, Nethertanda, Hew Zmdand, Norway, 
Singapore, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and Venauele. For Tokyo. New Tork and 
London, the index Is composed of the 20 top Issues in terms Of market cep/tobation, 
otherwise die tan top stocks an tracked. 


f iodustriai Sector^.”* | 


ihi. 

Pnt. 

% 


Thu. 

Am. 

% 


dOM 

dow 

chmgg 


daw 

dm 

•ham 

Energy 

111S7 

11326 

-1.14 

Capital Goods 

111.47 

11157 

-0.45 

UtiMas 

12424 

124.84 

-056 

RawIMsfWs 

12357 

129.47 

-0.70 

Finance 

112JJ1 

112J0 

+0.28 

Consumer Goods 

102.52 

10329 

-0.75 

Services 

112JS 

11384 

-105 

Itaetaneous 

115.14 

115.19 

-0.04 


$jttr rnore information about the Index, a booklet Is available /red o( charge. 

Write to Tn b Index, 181 Avenue Charles de GauBe. 92521 Neufty Cedax, Fiance. 


6 IrttomalJonal Herald Triano 


Indonesia ’s Redr Hot Profit Center 

Sales Soar at Maker of Unique Gove-Laced Cigarette 


By Paul Blustein 

Washington Peal Service 

SURABAYA, Indonesia — Tropical 
dampness hangs heavily in the morning 
air. The spicy-sweet aroma of doves per- 
meates the factory floor. Fingers fly m a 
blur as women produce 300 to 400 ciga- 
rettes filled with cloves and strong tobac- 
co an hour. 

Even in Asia, few companies are at 
once as exotic and as dynamic as H. M. 
Sampoerna, the most profitable maker of 
kretek , Indonesia's unique cigarettes. 

It’s a huge business, as evidenced by 
the smoky fragrance that pervades the 
streets of the world’s fourth most popu- 
lous country. 

Sampoerna ranks as one of the most 
sophisticated and fastest-growing com- 
panies in this booming region, an exam- 
ple of the tough local competition that 
Western and Japanese multinational 
firms are finding as they invade Asia’s 
lucrative markets. 

It’s a flourishing company that must 
occasionally s umm on priests to its fac- 
tories because cigarette rollers some- 
times become seized by a fear of ghosts 
— a burst light bulb once sent thousands 
erf workers fleeing. And workers are or- 
ganized into villages and subvillages 
beaded by "village chiefs.” 

Yet the company raises mooey on the 
Eurobond market and employs Madison 
Avenue-style advertising and market re- 
search. And its stock is red-hot: Based on 
the recent price on the Jakarta stock 


exchange, the company is worth about 
S22 billion. 

Sampocma’s sales have risen at a com- 
pound rate of SO percent a year since 
1990, propelled by clever marketing and 
fast-rising consumer incomes. It is only 
slightly slowed by a government-backed 
dove monopoly organized by T omm y 
Suharto, President Suharto’s youngest 
son, that charges about four times the 
world price for doves. 

“Let’s put it this way,” Putera Sam- 
poema, the 47-year-old company presi- 
dent, said with a shrug, referring to the 
dove monopoly. “My five-year plan be- 
came a seven-year plan.” 



Mr. Putera’s grandfather, Liem Seeng 
Tee, established the country's first 
brand-name product, a kretek called 2-3- 
4, or Dji Sam Soe (pronounced “jee-sum- 
soo”), which is Hoklrien Chinese for the 
three numbers. 

The founder gave 2-3-4 a prestige im- 
age that has proven a gold mine. With its 
high-quality ingredients, the brand is 
widely viewed as a smoke to be savored 
like a fine dgar. It commands twice the 
price of an avenge kretek, about $1.05 a 
pack, a hefty sum in a country whore per- 
capita annual income is around $700. 

The product is extraordinarily un- 
healthy. An unfiltfered stick of 2-3-4, 
which is still made today with the same 
tobacco and clove blend that liem Seeng 
Tee used eight decades ago, contains 
about 60 milli grams of tar, compared 
with 26 milligrams for a regular unfil- 
tered Lucky Strike and 1 6 millig rams for 
a king-size Altered Marlboro. 

But, as the brokerage firm Jardine 
Fleming observed in a recent report, 
“there is no goal to deter smoking” in 
Indonesia. That is partly because the 
government has more urgent health 
problems, such as malaria and typhoid, 
and partly because “the kretek industry 
is simply too important for the overall 
Indonesian economy.” 

Kretek makers employ more Indone- 
sians than anyone else except the govern- 
ment and pay more taxes than any other 
See KRE 7 TEK, Page 17 


Fund Losses Squeeze California County 


Bloomberg Business News 

SANTA ANA, California — 


A wealthy Southern California 
county known as a bastion, of 
conservatism said Thursday 
that the value of its investment 
fund had tumbled about $1.5 
billion this year, partly because 
of holdings of risky securities 
called derivatives. 

Orange County's setback was 
the biggest disclosed by any mu- 
nicipality in the United States 
this year. Since 1992, more than 
24 cities, counties and school 
districts have lost hundreds of 
millio ns of dollars from invest- 
ments in derivatives, whose val- 


ue is derived from an underlying 
index or asset, such as bonds, 
currencies or commodities. 

If Orange County is forced to 
sell its securities at big losses, 
financial shock waves would 
shake communities throughout 
California. Orange County in- 
cluded in its investment fund 
money from as many as 187 
other California municipalities. 

The fund’s market value has 
dropped an estimated 7 per- 
cent, to $18.5 billion from $20 
billion, since January, the coun- 
ty said. 

The Orange County treasur- 
er, Robert Citron, who 


launched the fund in the late 
1980s, promised investors re- 
turns of 8 percent or 9 percent, 
said Ronald Struck, an institu- 
tional trader of mortgage- 
backed securities at Country- 
wide Securities, a unit of 
Countrywide Industries Inc„ in 
Pasadena. California. 

The state's fund for munici- 
palities was offering returns of 
about 4 percent at the time, Mr. 
Struck said. Now those investors 
cannot withdraw their money, 
because Mr. Citron has exer- 
cised his right to freeze the funds 
for 30 days, Mr. Struck said. 

Mr. Citron was not immedi- 


ately available for comment The 
county treasurer is known for his 
aggressive investments, includ- 
ing purchases of derivatives. 

lire county said it had assem- 
bled a team of executives and 
business and securities consul- 
tants to “develop a strategy for 
repositioning the fund's invest- 
ment s." 

Merrill Lynch & Co. shares 
fell $1.50 to $36.50 on concern 
about the brokerage concern’s 
exposure to potential Orange 
County losses. Merrill Lynch’s 
San Francisco office sold Or- 
ange County many of its invest- 
ments, traders said. 


Chrysler Bows 
To Kerkorian, 
Lifting Dividend 


The Assoaaietl Press 

DETROIT — Chrysler Corp. 
on Thursday increased its divi- 
dend 60 percent, announced it 
would buy back $1 billion in 
stock and relaxed its anti-take- 
over defenses, three of four 
steps proposed by the compa- 
ny's largest shareholder. 

Kirk Kerkorian, the billion- 
aire who owns 9 percent of 
Chrysler and has been pressing 
for action to increase the value 
of his investment, bad also asked 
the company to split its stock, 
but no split was announced. 

Chrysler raised its quarterly 
dividend to 40 cents a share 
from 25 cents. The company 
also had made two 5-ceni in- 
creases in the past year. The 
latest increase will cost Chrysler 
$212.4 million a year, based on 
its 354 milli on shares of com- 
mon stock outstanding. 

The stock repurchase pro- 
gram will start after the first of 
the year. 

“We remain committed to en- 
hancing shareholder value, and 
this is a very effective method for 
doing so," Robert J. Eaton, the 
chairman of Chrysler, said 

Despite the company’s 
moves, Chrysler’s stock fell 62.5 
cents to close at $47,875 in New 
York Stock Ex chang e trading 
of 3J5 million shares. 

Nevertheless, Mr. Kerkor- 
ian’s company, Tradnda Corp., 
applauded the moves. 

**We’re very pleased with the 
program that the Chrysler board 
of directors announced," Alex 
Yemeni djian, an executive at 
Tradnda, said “We hope that 
board will reconsider a stock 
split sometime in the future.” 

Chrysler also modified its so- 
called poison piD anti- takeover 
provision so that it was not trig- 
gered until a stockholder ac- 
quired 15 percent erf the shares 
outstanding. The previous trig- 
ger was 10 percent Mr. Kerkor- 
ian has asked federal regulators’ 
permission to increase his stake 


in the company to as much as 
15 percent. 

Mr. Kerkorian wrote to the 
Chrysler board Nov. 14, calling 
for a dividend increase, stock 
buyback, stock split and relax- 
ation of the anu-takeover de- 
fense. He said be would pursue 
the proposals, in court or other- 
wise, if the board did not act on 
them by Dec. IS. 

Booming auto sales and 
Chrysler’s cost-cutting have 
combined to push the compa- 
ny’s profit to record levels this 
year. But Chrysler’s stock has 
not mirrored this performance. 
The shares peaked at about $63 
early in the year and have 
trended downwa rd since. 

Activity Nears 
11-YearHigh 
At U.S. Factories 

Compiled by Our Staff Fran Dispatches 

NEW YORK — U.S. manu- 
facturing activity rose for the 
15th straight month in Novem- 
ber and mi its fastest pace in 
nearly 11 years, the National 
Association of Purchasing 
Management said Thursday. 

The association said its man- 
ufacturing index, a gauge of 
output from factories, increased 
to 61.2 in November from 55.9 
in October. That is the highest 
rate since February 1984, when 
the reading hit 613. 

The group’s price index, con- 
sidered by some to be a gauge of 
inflation, fefl to 77.9 from a six- 
year high of 79.9 in October. 

A purchasing management 
index reading of 50 or more 
indicates that the manufactur- 
ing economy is expanding. 

The indexes measure how 
many manufacturers reported 
increased output or paid more 
for raw materials. 

(Bloomberg, Reuters) 


Thinking Ahead /Commentary 


Can India Match China? Not Likely 

By Reginald Dale 

International Herald Tribute 

W ashington — wm India 
be the next China? Is India, 
in other words, heading for a 
growth explosion that will 
bring it global economic superpower sta- 
tus alongside in the zlst century? 

Throe years after their country began 
struggling free from a system of sta te 
controls unmatched in the non-Commu- 
nist world, many Indians say the answer 
is yes. The parallels between India and 
rhma are dose enough that many for- 
eign investors are beginning to agree. 

Although China started 12 years earli- 
er, both countries are in the throes of 
tumu ltuous change as they mov e fro m 
command economies to free enterprise 
and from agriculture to industry. 

Both are opening up to thcoutsde 
world after years of isolation. While Chi- 
na’s population, at 13 bflbon,_is bigger, 

India’s, at 920 million, is growing faster. 

Foreign money is pouring into India, 
although not nearly so quickly as into 
China Already, by some measures, India 

is the fifth- or sixth-ranking world econ- 
omy, level with France. 

Last year, China’s economy grew more 
than three times as fast as India s. But 
India is poised for takeoff, and aomeijaytt 
mniH overtake China in the years ahead. 

Among India’s advantages area don- 
ocratic government,, a wdl-tned legAj 
system, a tag professional class, wjck use 
tf English and familiarity with 
way&lndia has a more sophisticated 


financial system and a better-developed 
private sector than China. 

India’s nrach-cntidzed infrastructure 
is still probably better than China’ s, par- 
ticularly now that communications, 
power, electricity and airlines are being 
privatized. And, despite its agitated his- 
tory of assassinations and internal strife, 
India may prove more politically stable. 

China faces the uncertainty of Deng 
Xiaoping’s succession, tension between 
Beijing and the provinces, and hnge re- 

Both economies are 
growing dramatically, but 
India lacks the resoorees to 
overtake China. 

gional wealth disparities. Nobody knows 
whether or how far an authoritarian re- 
gime can survive as the country becomes 
richer and more open. 

“India, by contrast, looks ast onishing ly 
predictable,” writes Jean-Louis Martin in 
a comparative study of the two countries 
for the Banquc Indosuez in Pans. But Mr. 
Martin argues that there are inescapable 
economic reasons for India's growth to be 
less dramatic than that in China. 

India has far worse financial problems, 
both in terms of foreign debt and internal 
deficits, and it gets much less help from its 
residents overseas than China does from 
its expatriates. India has no Hong Kangs 
or Taiwans on its borders. 


But the main reason China’s growth is 
likely to remain stronger is that, unlike 
India, it started from scratch. China got 
a massive boost from privatizing agricul- • 
ture and creating industries and services 
that had simply not existed before. It still 
has vast amounts of virgin territory in its 
coastal areas to convert into export pow- 
erhouses. 

India, however, already has private 
agriculture and a more diverse economy. 
The pace of its reform is slow and erratic. 

If it is to catch up with China, or with 
Indonesia for thai matter. India win 
need to speed the reform process. The 
army of bureaucrats who for so long 
paralyzed the economy are still too pow- 
erful, and there is still too much corrup- 
tion. Bloated state-controlled industries 
need to be made more efficient, labor 
laws modernized, and banks released 
from stale control. 

India enthusiasts should keep a sense 
of proportion. “Whereas China’s ambi- 
tion is to become the world’s largest 
econonty,” Mr. Martin writes, “India is 
fi ghting , as Finance Minister Manmo- 
han Singh has put it, against ‘the certain 
prospect of entering the 21st century as 
just about the poorest country in Asia.* ” 

Mr. Martin thinks Phi ns will settle 
down to growth of between 8 percent and 
10 percent, against 6 percent to 7 percent 
in India. In the second half of the 1990s, 
India is likely to provide the main new 
m Asia for foreign investors 


i exporters, just as China did 10 years 
ago. But another China? Not likely. 



Dec. 1 


t OM. 
va IBM 
s UK sues 

Hi 

1460 

ptia DM 
HUD UZUS 

jHSa LOTS 

uff um 

Utfl P* 

am 

7 mm 0M9 
um tn? 
a ym un 

jnt London, 


at Liro CLFi BJ=. SX. 

& i»- — 

SSSS'S 

s s 

IS qE ** *g. 

MM MS* WD M* 0 1JC * 

25 um* 4110 — 

._ ,m»« ius» mu w* 

£ 33 » 'w> 

^ York and Zurich, nrinpa 


In Cl 
IJ715* U» 
nna 2MS 
UM- 1J *> 
USB UW 
BUB- vsm 
wan U4W 
wse u v 

LOBS* mn 

7U» 

IBS- 

ibp* o*ss 
mm ib 
wm u® 

other centers; 


Peseta 
UflS* 
MiJ* 
liw 
as A 

U3W 

ma 

auk- 

L»l 
1J MB* 

unr 

158552 

man 

Toronto 


0: To tar one 


joHor: *; units 


not quoted; MA: not 


urreocr 

nckdroc 

I ww-ww in4i 
km ranee 31,37 

STn*** 

Ml 

I MM** “5 

Wtf.iW zat * 


Curreeev 
Mex-Pm* 
ti. Zealand S 
mew. loom 
p MLsesa 
MW dot* 
Port 

SOMiirfvM 

SM> 


per* 

1439 

1-5911 

*«T» 

24.10 

24019. 

16039 

1228X0 

17504 

1X635 


Conner Per* 
LAftMund 1556 
S. Kor. wen 79100 
5 W«L Krona 7J15B 
TflhNMS 

TtaUbaM 2SM 
TBrttahUra S64SL 
IIABiMun M72 

vena. Mb. M9S0 


MOOT 6MW9MW 

UNO U»0 

HJ5 9MJ 9S.1Z 


tutor caermcT 

MW 

w® „ r „ „ rrrrrI . Boned CommorckOe lloiieno 
um-WiI (BtvsseBI, Bono.’- Caxxkr 

T0kfO t Ta * roi{ ^ 


Eurocurrency Deposits Dec. i 

Swiss Freni* 

Dollar D-Mark Franc Sterling Fnmc Yen ECU 

1 manta 5Mh 5Kr5h 3%-3?fc 5 'wBi SML 2V.-B4 

3 raortte 5SV5* 3*r«h 6»*6VS. 5fe-5* Ztt-ZM S«r6 

6 monte «M» 55&-5M 41*4% 5^ *. VM-TVi IMS' 

1 Tear 7 VWV6 JM% 4>V4* 7*7*. 2-^2^ 6V6*. 

Sources; PsumUords Bonk. 

Odes opnHcable to kdert xa* ttBpaUtso/SJ mhSon mSthnum {oraquMUmtl. 


K«y Homy Katas 


unued state 

Close Prnr. 

DtaGMBtrafe 

414 

4% 

Pimento 

BYz 

8V4 

Federal (em 

5* 

51V 

mwakCto 

542 

536 

Conn, paeer 188 dan 

U2 

UO 

i ewatti Treasury MB 

548 

545 

lfearTnanrrMl 

650 

6X6 

MtarTreaswrneiB 

M4 

7J9 

5-year Treownr note 

750 

7J9 

HwTnaHrak 

7J1 

729 

is-vw Treasury note 

752 

7X 

awTtmnbed 

U2 

3X0 

Merrttf LrachSkdamadr asset 445 

444 

Dkaralrate 

re 

re 

Casnwv 

222 

222 

1 iiHinTfi Pituimei 

2 IV 

230 

3-eunlta MtorMeK. 

2*. 

2V 

4 uiBPia letoihaMc 

2 N 

242 

lere^OorarameBibiMd 

Germ* 

445 

442 

Lombard rote 

650 

6X0 

Call money 

5.15 

6.10 

lmanrti Ueiburfi 

SJO 

530 

Muni* latorMflt.' 

550 

520 

naatt intorMnfc 

525 

525 

1 wear BMW 

751 

733 


Brttqta 


tak bate rate 

S* 

9k 

CdlHMT 

M 

9b 

towOMatyet 

5V, 

ik 

MBOBtoiatBtHSX 

6*v 

re 

t pmoWi Mrrtmelr 

6k. 

6tv 

WvearSUI 

L45 

546 

France 

latonnBsH rale 

5X0 

5X0 

Caflewner 

5 VV 

5h 

FbmbHi intertiiMfc 

sv, 

SK 

3 aiontti toterkenfc 

5 tv 

9b 

i MMiito InlirtneiK 

» 

59v 

18-rear OA 7 

2X8 

2X4 


Sources: Reuters, Bloomberg, Merrill 
Lmh, Bonk of Tokyo, Commerzbank, Cridh 
Lyonnais. 


GOM 

am. PM C»*e 

Znrtek BUS 3810 b —350 

London 38150 mie — loo 

(tew York 38450 3B2JB -22D 

US deHart net ounce.' London otfkM fcr- 
Iubl Zurich and New York apen ta e a nd Oas- 
Mn prices.- New York Cemex fFehruarrJ 
Source: Re ut ers. 


Pilots Scuttle Iberia’s Rescue Proposal 


Compiled fry Om- Staff From Dispatches 

MADRID — A bid to salvage the near- 
bankrupt airline Iberia appeared doomed 
Thursday after overnight talks between 
management and pilots ended in disagree- 
ment over pay cuts. 

Management and representatives of the 
carrier’s two main unions reached a tenta- 
tive agreement Tuesday on a plan that 
entailed a wage freeze, salary cuts averag- 
ing 8.5 percent and a reduction of about 
3,500 jobs through measures including ear- 
ly retirements. 

“We are left without an agreement,” 
said Javier Salas, the chairman of Iberia. 
He said that without the cooperation of the 
pflots’ union it would be “difficult if not 
impossible” to cany out the viability plan. 

Agreement with aQ unions is vital to 


secure European Commission approval of 
a capita] injection of about 130 billion 
pesetas ($1 bOhoo) to revive the airline, 
which had losses totaling nearly 200 billion 
pesetas over the past five years. 

“The pilots are only 5 percent of the 
work force, but the best-paid 5 percent and 
that on which production depends,” a 
company spokesman said. “They have the 
last word, and they know il" 

Iberia has said that without an emergency 
restructuring, the airline would face bank- 
ruptcy by March. The deal called for pay 
cuts ranging from 3 percent to 15 percent 
and 3.500 job losses between 1994 and 1997. 

Other Iberia unions have already agreed 
to the plan, and some were critical of the 
pflots’ decision. 

“It doesn’t surprise us they failed to 


agree,” said a spokesman for one of the 
two major unions that together represent 
70 percent of Iberia’s work force. 

A spokesman from the General Workers’ 
Union suggested forcing cooperation by 
cutting the number of pilots. He said there 
were at least 250 pilots too many at Iberia. 

But the pilots union will not shoulder 
the blame for sinking the management 
bailout plan, a spokesman said. 

“They are unfairly putting the blame on 
us if the viability plan does not go ahead,” 
the spokesman said. 

Also on Thursday, Iberia’s nonpilot 
unions canceled a wildcat strike that had 
been planned for Friday. The strike had 
been called before management’s rescue 
plan was proposed. 

(Reiners* AP) 



To Return 


Lira to Grid 

Renters 

FRANKFURT — Italy 
hopes to take the lira back into 
the European Union's exchange- 
rate mechanism, the system of 
currency management, next 
year. Budget Minis ter Giancario 
Pagliarini said Thursday. 

“We want to do that for sure, 
but there is some opposition,” 
Mr. Pagliarini told bankers af- 
ter a speech to the Frankfurt 
Chamber of Commerce. 

Italy, along with Britain, 
abandoned the mech anism in 
September 1992. when markets 
{Hit currencies under specula- 
tive pressure in the s emifixed 
exchange-rate grid. 

By ta king the Kra back into 
the system in 1995, Italy would 
potentially qualify for member- 
ship in the projected European 
monetary union in 1997, the 
first date possible under the 
Maastricht Treaty. 

EU countries must be part of 
the exchange-rate mechanism 
for two years, and tbeir curren- 
cies must trade wi thin normal 
fluctuation bands as a prerequi- 
site to qualify for the monetary 
union. They must also fulfill 
stiff economic conditions relat- 
ing to interest rates, inflation 
and budget deficits. 

Mr. Pagliarini said Italy, as a 
founder member of the Europe- 
an Community, was eroedally 
determined to meet all the crite- 
ria for membership of the mon- 
etary union. 

“It’s very important for us, 
since we were there al the Trea- 
ty of Rome, that we be a part of 
this," he said. 



Blanc paiN 



Tourbilkfi 


Since 1735 there has 

NEVER BEEN A QUARTZ BlANCPAIN WATCH. 
AND THERE NEVER WILL BE. 


Arfan 

*-rT- — 't 

X. hwki arJ dr. intv. Pm. TA III 41ft I J* U 
7a buhnu; St44.nw. 'SUP Pan*. TeL I II « M HI ,V> 

HAri InX I4SH Dram iBr . Td. I Ifcl 



p» 


Th 

me 




Page 16 

MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 1994 


Computer Issues 
Drag Down Stocks 


Compiled by Oar Stiff From Dlspotdux 

NEW YORK — Stocks 
slumped Thursday on a combi- 
nation of continued weakness 
in Treasury bonds and a selloff 
in computer and retail stocks. 

The Dow Jones industrial av- 
erage closed 3836 points lower, 
at 3,700.87. 

Declining issues led advanc- 
ers by a 5-to-2 ratio on the New 
York Stock Exchange, where 


U.S. Stocks 


volume totaled 289 million 
shares. 

Stocks responded to a drop in 
bond prices, which was due to 
(he release of stronger- than-cx- 
pected economic data. The 
price of the benchmark 30-year 
Treasury bond fell 5/32, to 94 
5/32, and the yield rose to yield 
8.02 percent from 8.00 percent 
Wednesday. 

Economic reports signaling a 
robust economy stirred concern 
that rising interest rates would 
hurt profits and lure more mon- 
ey into higher-yielding, less 
risky Treasury securities. 

The most" actively traded 
stock, at 11 milli on shares, was 
InteL, which trades on the Nas- 
daq system. It was followed by 
the retailer Best Buy. which 


trades on the New York Stock 
Exchange. 

Computer stocks were broad- 
ly lower as concern mounted 
about Intel's Pentium chips. In- 
tel fell 27/46, to 62 45/64, 
pulling down other computer 
stocks. 

Dell Computer closed down 
35/16, at 39%, and Gateway 
2000 feUl 13/16, to 20 1/16. CS 
First Boston downgraded the 
issues, citing potential expenses 
lied to the problem Pentium 
chips. 

Digital Equipment fell 2%, to 
31%, Compaq fell %, to 38%, 
and IBM fell 1%, to 69%. 

Best Buy sank 11%, to 32%, 
after the consumer electronics 
retailer said it expected third- 
quarter earnings to fall below 
Wall Street estimates. 

News that Hewlett-Packard 
would cut prices on some per- 
sonal computers pressured its 
shares 2%, to 95. 

Retailing stocks dropped on 
weak November sales data. Wal- 
Mart Stores fell %, to 22%, Gap 
Stores dropped 3, to 32%, ana 
Penney edged down 3 Vi, to 42%. 

Lotus fell %, to 44%. after 
Goldman Sachs cut its fourth- 
quarter and 1995 profit esti- 
mates. 

(AP, Bloomberg, Reuters) 


Dollar Rises as Chance 
Of Rate Increase Grows 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
rose against other major curren- 
cies Thursday after strong eco- 
nomic data seemed to enhance 
the likelihood of further rate 
increases by the Federal Re- 
serve Board. 

The dollar finished here 
Thursday at 1.5735 Deutsche 
marks, up from 13700 DM 
Wednesday, and at 99.345 yen. 


Foreign Exchange 


up from 98.975 yea It rose to 
1.3295 Swiss francs from 1 .3272 
francs and to 53930 French 
francs from 53835 francs. But 
the pound rose to S 1 3665 from 
SI 3645. 

Support came from a sharp 
increase in the National Associa- 
tion of Purchasing Manage- 
ment's index of manufacturing 
activity for November. The asso- 
ciation's prices-paid index fell, 
indicating economic expansion 
with little threat of inflation. 


Nonetheless, currency trad- 
ers said they expected the re- 


port would prompt the Fed to 
raise rates again to rein in 
growth before inflation gets a 
chance to take hold. 

“We’ve seen evidence that 
there is a more aggressive Fed 
out there," said Guiflenno Este- 
ban ez. an economist at Bank of 
America. “It’s sinking in that 
the central bank won't let infla- 
tion get out of hand." 

The ability of the U.S. cur- 
rency to hold its ground despite 
lower Treasury bond prices also 
encouraged investors. 

“The Fed has more credibility 
in the foreign exchange market 
than in the bond market, and 
this is leading to a decoupling of 
the dollar from the bond,” said 
Earl Johnson, an analyst with 
Harris Trust & Savings . 

Comments by Edward Kel- 
ley, a Federal Reserve Board 
governor, also underpinned the 
dollar. Mr. Kelley said he want- 
ed to see the dollar stronger and 
said the U.S. economy contin- 
ued to perform more strongly 
than expected. 

(AFX. 

Knighi-Ridder . Bloomberg ) 


The Dow 


OaKyckwInBs-dffce • 

Dow Jorttts industrial average 



J J A SO N 

1994 


D 

Imt 


NYSE Most Actives 



VOL MBft 

LOW 

Last 

am. 

BestBuy 

99008 38% 

22 V* 

32 V, 

—11% 

RJR Nab 

56634 *h 

*W 

*V> 

— V* 

WaWftart 

4901* 23% 

22% 

223b 

—9b 

NntnsBk 

*4238 45 

44V, 

44% 

— % 

DMtal 

42324 33% 

31 Vi 

31% 

—2% 

Ovyslr 

34878 49% 

47H 

47Jb 

— % 

Campaqs 

30902 39 V, 

38 

38% 

—9b 

Nterck 

29408 37V. 

37 

374b 

-Vb 

Pwmey 

27571 *534 

419b 

42% 

— 3% 

AT8.T 

268*9 493b 

4BW 

48% 

—3b 

Moore 

26136 17V. 

I45h 

17% 


PtMAAr 

25042 59% 

58% 

sa* 

— % 

Motortas 

24905 S73* 

56 

56% 

— % 

FordMS 

23390 27Vb 

2AH 

27 

— % 

ChmBnk 

21193 37 

36% 

36% 

*% 


NASDAQ Most Actives 


into) 

DritCpfr 

MQ 

ApfclMotf 

LOtln 

Nevou 

AppkC 

MicsRs 

Ciscos 

TetCmA 

SuxiMJc 

Intel wt 

Oracle 

GoteMOO 

DSC » 


Vot. WBti 

Law 

Last 

aw- 

12*839 63% 

61V* 

62% 

— % 

47559 41% 

39 

39% 

— 3V|, 

353SS 19% 

19% 

19% 


344*5 48 

44% 

45% 

—2% 

33069 44% 

41% 

44% 

— % 

30569 30 

1* 

19% 

— V, 

27413 37% 

36 

36V 4 

— I'/u 

26907 63 Wp 

62% 

&7Vit 

— Vu 

23362 32* 

31% 

32'* 


19707 23% 

33% 

23% 

% 

18302 33% 

30% 

31 

—7Vr 

17620 14% 

13% 

13% 

— % 

16907 41% 

40% 

40% 

— % 

16412 30% 

20 

20% 

— 1% 

15451 31% 

28% 

29 

—2% 


AMEX Most Actives 



VOL 

High 

Law 

Las* 

Chg. 

HanwtB 

9690 

% 

"to 

% 

_ 

EciloBav 

6734 

10% 

10% 

10% 

_ 

VtocB 

6283 38% 

38% 

30% 

+ % 

Presd A 

59B1 


% 

V, 

+ % 

XCLUd 

5192 

9h 

% 

1b 

-% 

RovcXOO 

5101 

3% 

3% 

3v.. 


QfeySRS 

4494 

12% 

1319 

m- 

—ill 

Nctaors 

4453 

7% 

«• 

67* 

— % 

SPDR 

4390 45"/- 

4SV- 

4S*- 


Vlocvrt 

4157 

I'/* 

1% 

»«% 

— 


Marks* Solos 


NYSE 

Arrtex 


360*5 

2182 

32571 


tn mg! tons. 


Dow Jones Averages 


Own HMi Uo« Last ttg. 


Indus 373051 37*124 J490X4 370087— 3034 
Tran* 1*403* 1*4571 1426X3 1431.04— 1035 
Uhl 178X2 179.21 176J1 177.04 -240 
Comp 124840 105029 I23SJ6 1238.93 —1241 


Standard 4 Poor's Indexes 


Industrials 

Tronsp. 

(fflltitaa 

Finonee 

SPffi 


High LM CtoM CftVt 
54073 53241 53172—59* 
349 JO 34M7 34504 -Z94 
1S0J79 14507 14849-140 
41.09 4047 4075 -029 
40.91 *4757 44092 —4.77 
42175 414.19 414X3-444 


NYSE Indexes 


Low Lost Qig. 


Composite 
inAr&rtals 
TrniKo. 
in si iv 
Hnonca 


High 

348.55 34S44 24644 —237 
31193 X0.n 310.31 —128 
224 J5 27178 TO AT —1.79 
199.63 197.40 198.00 -148 
19439 193.12 19142 —1.05 


NASDAQ Indexes 


Man LOW LOST Qig. 


Com cos fw 

industrials 

Banks 

Insurvce 

Finance 

TransP. 


•MS 


748X5 741.04 747.04 
753.99 744 JO 74420 
49728 689-02 489.02 -567 
89432 889 46 89(160 *082 
863X3 057. 0B 057,06 .8.19 
65243 64445 645.96 >5.99 


AMEX Stock Index 


Hite Low Lost Qig. 
434.14 43047 431,19 —2.67 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


Metals 


OCBC 

BM 6ik 
ALUMINUM (High Grade) 

Dalian per metric tea 
Spar I92QJO 1921 JO 191049 

Forward 1M5J0 194U0 1936.00 

COPPER CATHODES (High Grade) 
Dollcirspcr metric too 
Spat 2M0M ZWXO 295520 

Forward 291 U0 29163)0 291100 

LEAO 

Dollars per mottle tod 
5 pet 637JJ0 «3UO 636JO 

Forward 652J0 653JS 65400 

NICKEL 

MlarSMr metric ton 

Spot 806000 B07MC 6025X0 

town 819000 81B&00 815540 

tin 

Dalian per metric ton 
SPOl 604000 6050JN 6U5XQ 

Forward 613000 6135JI0 6I5SXO 

ZINC (SPedal High Grade) 

Donors per metric ton 
Spot 1121IO 1 1223D 1129 JO 

11*9X0 11 SLOO 1157 JO 


BM A8k 


191 L88 
1937 JO 


29S8JH 

291400 


637 JO 
455X0 


9035.00 

8160X0 


6075X0 

6160X0 


1130X0 

1158X0 


Financial 


High LOW Close Change 
34*0 NTH STERLING (L1FFE) 
tsoexoo-Ptsef teopet 
Dec 9X65 93X7 

Mar 92.92 92X1 

Es S 31 

S« 9744 91J9 

D«C 7142 9146 

Mtr 91.27 91J3 

jST 91.13 91.10 

cm 91X2 90.98 

EW: 9092 90£ 

Mnr 9045 90X1 

jJSf 9081 90J4 


9X59 -0X6 

92X2 —art 

922* —0X8 

9i jc -aw 

9148 —ag 
9125 —0X1 

9L11 — O® 

9ixo —am 
90X9 —0x3 

90X1 —0X3 

9025 — 004 


High 

FTSE-itaruFFB 
125 per index pota 

Dec 30B40 30340 3041X — 510 

Mar 30905 305SJ 3Q56X — 53X 

30860 teAftn 30710 —540 

Etf. volume: 10307. Open bit: 63.121. 


Dow Jonas Bond Averages, 


20 Bonds 
io Utilities 
10 Industrials 


Close cftVel 
93X3 —029 

89.14 —0X2 

9053 —025 


NYSE Diary 



dose 

Prev. 


684 

12*3 


IS 63 



689 

685 

fatal issues 






New Laws 




AMEX Diary 


AOVonCM 

OWmed 

Unctionced 

Total issues 

WwNPU 
New Lows 


Ooh Prev. 
193 346 


397 259 

716 237 

006 B4T 

6 5 

38 37 


NASDAQ Diary 


dose Prev. 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
TokH Issues 
New Hiatts 
Now Lows 


1080 1919 

2199 1405 

1445 ISOS 
5127 SIS* 
38 60 

133 120 


Spot Commodities 


Commodity Today 

Aluminum, lb 0X71 

Capper electrolytic, lb 1J6 

iron FOB. twl 213X0 

Lead, lb CM 

Silver, trov az .4*9 

Steel (scrap), ton 127X0 

Tin. to 40664 

Zinc, lb 0X555 


0X67 

1J6 

213X0 

04* 

4X15 

127X0 

4053 

05555 


Sot 9076 902.^9^ 

Est. volume: 78,968. Open hit.: 509X29. 
J-MONTM EURODOLLARS (LIFFE1 

ffiflMlofl-PtSMIOOpCt 

Dec N.T. N.T. 93X0 —OX* 

S?r N.T. NT. 9X01 —007 

jm N.T. N-T. 9241 — 0X7 

N.T N.T. 92.11 —0X4 

EsI. volume: a Open W.! 4650 
34*0 NTH eUROMARKSJLJFFE) 

DMi mflBon - ph oM08 pa 
Dec 9478 9473 

SS- 9468 946* 

jET 9436 9430 

sS 9403 93X6 

DK «61 

Mar 9140 93X* 

Jan rat) 

SeP ? 2 A 6 

Dec 9 158 925* 

Mar 9245 92X2 

Jon 92X5 92X3 


9475 -f-aat 
9466 +O01 

9433 +0X1 

9400 +0X1 

9X65 +0X2 

93X9 + OW 

9X10 +CJM 
92X5 +006 

9259 + 0X4 

9245 + 003 

92X5 +0X3 


« 92X1 92X8 92X1 +0X3 

Est. volume: 76521. Open hit.: 7*3X26. 
3-MONTH PI BOR (MATIF1 

£3 msSSSn* 

Star M-n 

iS 

se ££ gg 

job 925* 9248 

S» 92X4 9227 


(436 +0X3 

9411 +004 

9X69 +0X* 

93X7 + 005 

9X06 +007 

9277 +0X7 

925* +0X8 

92X4 +009 


Est. volume: 25,1 OX Open tat.: 19X835. 




(30800- pts & 

Dec 103-09 102-30 1(0-30 -IMS 

Mar 102-17 102-06 102-07 — 04M 

jjs N.T. N.T. 101-07 -M* 

Est. volume: 67X30 Open Ini.: 1*1550. 
GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND (UFFE) 
DM 258X80 • Pts Df 100 pet 
Dec 9142 91.11 91.15 —007 

Mar 9XJ5 90X8 9049 Unch- 

Sm N.T. N.T. 897* UnctL 

Est. volume: 151X70. Open Ini.: 204*48. 

1 8- TEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS IMATIFJ 


FF5O0O9O- 

Dec 

ptsefiaopd 
111X8 11274 

112X2 

— 0.T2 

Mar 

112X6 

1)1X2 

112X0 

—012 

Jun 

111X6 

lllJJfl 

111.10 

— 0T2 

sap 

11050 

110X0 

11036 

— 012 


Est. volume: T8657). Ooentnt: 150203 


Industrials 


High Low Last Settle CNge 
GASOIL (IPE) 

UJ. donors Per metric fun-tot* of r» fans 
Dec 1*850 14775 14775 14775 Undv 

Jtm 151 JO 14973 14975 14975 — 025 

Feb 15X25 15100 152X0 152X0 —075 

Mar 15475 15150 15375 1537S —025 


Apr 

mr 

June 

July 

Ana 


High Law 
154X0 153X0 
25X50 25150 
15100 152X0 


N.T, 

N.T. 

N-T. 

N-T. 

N-T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N-T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 


NOV 

Est. volume: 177*2. 


Lost Settle CJiHe 
mm 15X00 —0-50 
15X55 15125 Undu 
152X5 153X0 +050 
NT. 155X0 +050 
N.T. 15675 + 0® 
N.T. i5t» +aa 
NT. 160-50 +J2 
N-T. 1«50 +050 
Open hit- 99,178 


Feb 


« S 3 } S 5 ! IS 

is Its Its !ts-i 

1474 1071 ion “jh 

w w ^ ^=g 

^ Its 

NT NT N-T. 16X1 —014 
1676 1676 

1478 1676 1677 WJS-076 


Mat 

Job 

Jty 


Dec 


EsL volume: 34Z1 8- Qpenlnt. 170776 


Stock Indexes 

Low data Change 


CAC4t<MATlp 

dS* 8 "**^ 20DX00%7X00 1972X0 -15X0 

201500 195000 >97950 


Feb 

Mar 

Jaa 


■ 15X0 


N.T. N.T. N.T. UnctL 

2012X0 1998X0 1 99750 -1550 

N.T. N.T. 197950 -15L00 

H.T. N-T. 380300 


■ 15X0 


Est volume: 36324 Open lot: 47X06. 


Sources: Motif, Associated Press. 
London tnrt Ftmmck U Futons Exchange. 
Inn Petroleum Excnango. 


U.S./MTHLy^ 


Cjpn Trust Chair man Is Sent to PHsob^, 

l^en into chairman of the failed CeriTrvsl 

MIAMI (AP) “\ D i iUfcdawo 1 1 years in prison for his part in 
Bank, was sentenced ^ ^ 

the $1-7 biihon corpse of the of rackeieenng and 

Mr- Paul 55, was jqqq failure of CenTnisu tbe fourth- 

fraud in connecuon with the iiwiau 

bi^st banking ^UfJ^^nended Sat Mr. Paul serve between 

a ***"*** 

Chemical Bank to Cut 3,700 Jobs ' 

irti Tinnlanff Corn, said Th 


JieilUUU — / _ . JTL , 

vrew vnR It (API — Chonical Banking Coip. said Tb,irsd al 

« g£SS£2SZ IS 

"5SSKJ«S gg^SBSaSSE 

uK- 1 * bmIMSS »-• — “ — 

$230 million recorded next year. ' 

Incomes Rise, but Sales Don’t Shine" 

nicnairhes) — Retailers- oosii 


UWUtM - ,j 

MEW YORK (Combined Dispalches) — Relailem posted 
mmdv onknorisive sales for November, as shoppers : saved aw 
SSng SsSonably warm weather and came out only lmer m^e 
Sh Sit got raider and Christmas got closer, analysts sajd 

^sSSftely, the Commerce Department said Americans 
i a in October, the biggest lump m i 


it 

± 0 - 


Divlctonds 


CompaoY 


ASR Invt 
Drwrfs CAMiml 
DrayfsMA intrMun 
DrrytsNVMunl 
M*tra»ftn Rftv 
SupecTr CooMkt 


Pgr And R«C Par 
IRREGULAR 

» .W 12-15 12-28 
_ X952 12-13 12-28 
» X155 11-29 11-30 
_ X571 12-13 12-28 
_ 7* 12+ 1220 

_ M 17 -6 720* 


STOCK 

CFSB Boj - 10 % 12-12 12-22 

REVERSE STOCK SPLIT 
Ontbalmlc ImagSvs 1 tor J reverse saw. 
INCREASED 

X6 12-12 13-28 


BaUard iNed Prtf 
can ImprtBk Comm 
ChryslWCorp 
Fripanrcn Indus 
Security Bo> 

SauttaMgBcsra 


Conn Energy 


MFSBcd 


Bombadter A 
Breed Tech 
Cardinal Bcshs 
CommonSense Mun 
Eldorado Ba> 
FFWCcrv 
Gen Parametria 
Ggnl Putri Utils 
Horton Otrttgls 
i tiler ir ons Cora 
Invucare Carp 
MTS Srs 
Muni AdvFd 
Nttm IN PSadiPlA 
Patriot PfDhr 
PermCorp Flnl 
PepBari 
Pitrortum HeatA 
Siorra PacKRes 
Skyline Coro 
UW IHundnetino 
Wynns Inti 

ZwoIb SiGvSecA 


g 57 12-28 1-27 
O A0 12-15 1-13 
Q X6 1-20 2-24 
Q .1375 12-15 12-30 
Q AS 12-8 12-15 
REDUCED 

Q 3ZB 129 12-30 
SPECIAL 

_ so 12-14 1-3 

REGULAR 

g an 1-13 1-31 
. X5 12-23 1-23 
Q 20 12-15 MS 
M X® 12-30 12-30 
_ X8 12-12 1-2 

O .11 12-15 12-31 
Q X6 12-16 M 
Q A5 1-27 2-22 
Q M 12-16 1271 
Q X5 12-15 W3 
Q -D125 12-30 1-15 
Q .1* 12-16 V-2 

M X65 12-15 12-30 
_ 75 12-16 M3 

M 0963 12-14 12-29 
Q XI 12-12 12-30 
Q £425 1-9 1-23 

S .1375 12-15 
28 1-18 
G .12 12-16 
Q *9 12-12 
Q .11 12-21 
M -0425 11-30 


Separately, the Commerce uqMiuu»«» 

comes rose 1.4 percent in October, the biggest jump m e.g .1 
months. The department said consumer spending rorcMpere,ot 
in October, while income after taxes also climbed 1.4 percent. 

The Commerce Department also said construcaon spending 
rose 0.9 percent in October, but the advance was limited.to 
nonresidential and government spending. Residential spending 
fell as mortgage rates continued to nse. (AP, Bioombejg) 

SEC Offers New Registration Plan 

WASHINGTON (Knight-Ridder) — The Securities and Ex- 
change Commission on Thuisday asked for pubhc comment off a 
p lan that would give investors a new way to hold thor secunus. 

The plan would set up a direct-registration system that would 
let investors register their securities on an issuer’s books abd 
receive an account statement instead of a stock certificate. The 
system would give investors the same mobility they would brfye 
with a certificate. " 

The proposal is based on a growing consensus that the current 
direct-registration system should be expanded to accommodate a 
shorter securities settlement time that goes into effect next June. 


For the Record 


1- 3 

2 - 1 
1-2 
1-1 
1-4 

126 


(Mutual; 9-partzbia la ondta tomb; m- 
moathly; aA pju jtwtr; 1 wml nimnn i 


Intel Coq>. said Thursday it had found and fixed a second 
problem in some of its top-of-the-line Pentium computer chips 
but said new processors without flaws would not be widely 
available to computer makers for several weeks. ( Bloomberp 

Browning-Ferns Industries Inc. has negotiated an agreement 
with the Justice Department and state authorities to avoid aiyi- 
trust problems in case it succeeds in its takeover bid for Attwopas 
PLC, a British waste-management company. (Bloomberg) 
PepsiCo Inc. and Buenos Aires EmboteDadora SA. the Argen- 
tine bottler of PepsiCola, said Thursday they would invest more 
than S400 milli on by tiie end of 1995 to expand the manufacturing 
and distribution of Pepsi products in Brazil. (Bloomberg) 


APPLE: Practical CEO Says Products Should Be More Down-to-Earth 


Continued Iron Page 11 


neer. has been running Apple 
since the ultimate dreamer, 
John Scull ey, fell from grace 
and left the company last year. 

He took pains to contrast 
himself with two of his industry 
rivals — Bill Gates, chairman of 
Microsoft, and Andrew S. 
Grove, Intel’s chairman. 

“They believe that just be- 
cause of the technospeak, its 
going to happen, but it's not,” 


said Mr. Spindler, who fears a 
backlash from customers if the 
reality of future technology- 
fails to live up to the promises. 

If that sounded a bit like 
bashing the competition, it was. 
Mr. Spindler was in New York 
to help kick off an venture to set 
technical standards that would 
make it easier for various kinds 
of computers, telephones, com- 
munications switches, wireless 
devices and facsimile machines 
to talk to one another. Apple's 


partners in the effort are 
AT&T, IBM and Siemens. 

Mr. Spindler said the stan- 
dards project was much more 
pragmatic than a similar effort 
announced last year by Micro- 
soft and a group of more than 
50 other companies, including 
Xerox, Hewlett-Packard and 
Compaq. 

He predicted that the Micro- 
soft alliance would end up 7 cre- 
ating standards that would 
leave the other companies and 


their customers beholden to 
Microsoft’s software. 


Mr. Spin tiler's presence at 
the Versit news conference 
Wednesday morning was a rare 


public appearance for him. 
That may heh 


By contrast. Mr. Spindler 
said, the standards effort an- 
nounced Wednesday, called 
Versit, would permit industry 
diversity. 

Even while criticizing Micro- 
soft, however, Mr. Spindler said 
the Versit allies were holding 
talks with Microsoft to try to 
find common ground on the 
standards issue. 


Lp to explain the 
reason he apparently finds it so 
galling that his rivals, Mr. Gates 
and Mr. Grove, are both such 
celebrities. 

The two men gave speeches 
spelling out their views on the 
future of the computer industry 
at a recent trade show in Las 
Vegas. Since then; Microsoft 
has been selling videocassette 
recordings of Mr. Gates’s 
speech. 


Mr. Spindler said h wa^a 
mistake to assume that comput- 
er users would blindly follow 
the path down which computer 
executives wanted to lead thepi. 

u If you just drive down the 
technology curve and say f'.$ 
— J for mankind, you’ll sW a 
sh,” he said. 


Ultimately, Mr. Spindler 
said, the way that computers 
will be used in the future will 
not be determined by industry 
executives but by the people 
who buy the machines — .or 
choose not to. -■ 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


U.S. FUTURES 


Agmea Franca Prctia Doc 1 


Amsterdam 


ABN Amro HM 

ACF Holding 

Aegon 

Allow 

AkzoNoM 

AMEV 

Bob-Wosaonen 

C&M 

DSM 

EImvIot 

Foklcar 

Glst-BracocXm 

HBG 

H nineteen 

HunCrDouolas 
IHC Cahmd 
IntorMuaMr 
Inti Nodertand 
KLM 
KNPBT 
KPN 


NKtllavd 
Oc* Grlnton 


Paklwed 

PhniM 

Polygram 

Roteco 

RodamCO 

Roltnco 


Royal Dutch 
Start 
UnHovcr 
Van Ommeran 
VNU 


61X0 60X0 
3350 33X0 
10850 10050 
5250 51-60 
195 1« 

7120 7370 
15-40 3SA0 
65A0 6570 
132 131 

1770 1750 
1450 14X0 
4540 44.10 
271 26750 
252X0 254.10 
74 73 

7450 7470 

32 &S 

82X0 8240 

5*70 54-90 
S47C S3 
76 76X0 
44J0 45.10 
5250 5370 
7470 7470 
M2 11270 
49X0 4970 
J14.10 11470 
8340 B340 

18850 19070 

4220 4X40 
19570 19730 
4450 45 

17250 172X0 


WMten/KUHnr 12170 124 




Brussels 


Almgnll 

Arbed 

Barca 

BBL 

Bakaari 

CBR 

CMB 

CNP 

Cockcrlll 

Catwpa 

Calrwt 

Demauc 

Elgctrobai 

ElectraNna 

Fart.s AG 

fed! 

ItnmoDal 

KndtamanK 

toos a ne 

PMraflna 

Pmmrfln 

Rectioci , 

Rovata Betae 
Sac G«n Banoue 


7320 7510 
5090 5150 
2410 2470 
4400 4415 
22875 23100 
12175 121 25 
2570 2630 

1980 1980 

194 197 

1072 1080 
7150 7200 
1290 1300 
5870 5600 
2850 2 
2600 2... 

1306 1304 

3300 3865 
9260 9200 
4190 4220 


6660 

MOD 1428 

9410 9410 
2925 2900 

5010 

8230 


S Bs 

90 


Sac Gen Belgique 2145 2145 


Safina 
Satvav 
Tessentlerlo 
Tractebel 
UCB 

linlm MlnleiM 
iUls 


13050 iwm 

15025 15150 
10175 101501 

9650 9710 

24575 24725 
2510 2525 
6100 6050 


Frankfurt 


AEG 748.1014840 

AtootHSEL 268 274 

Allianz HaW 2420 2394 

Altana 616620-50 

***« 7” 720 

BASF 30340304-20 

Baver 344X0343J0 

Bay. Hype bank *10 409 

Bov veref IBM 459X04S7XD 
BBC 649 6*9 

BHF Bank 381 381 

BMW 74&SD 755 

Csmmentnnk 2AJ0 323X0 
Ctatlnertfsi 
Daimler Beru 


22Q21&30 
736X074250 
433 439 
□IBabcock 2D420S50 

DeulWhe Bank 743JD 741 
Douglas 410 410 

Drasdner Bank *050 409 

FeWmueBig Xi 302 
F Krupo Haesdi W8J0 1W 
29830058 


Henkel 

Hoctrttel 

Haecftst 

Ho to twnn 


IWKA 
Kali Salz 
Karsladl 
Kuuftwf 
KHD 


540 5*4 

915 925 
310314X0 
855 B4S 
285X0306X0 
336X0 3*1 
16216250 
553 555 

43* 438 
112X0115.10 


Klaeckner Werke 128X0 13250 


Unae 

Luflliansa 

MAN 

Maanesmom 

MefalWcaeif 

Muencti Rueck 

Porsche 

Preuwao 

PWA 

Owe 

Rtmlnmetetl 


902 896 

110.90198X0 
mm 422 
411X0 410 
TWO 12S 
2815 2B10 
673 668 
430 433 
236 239 

448 452 

277 U» 


Close Prey. 



Helsinki 


Anwr-yirtYinB 96SI 95 

Enso-Gutzelt 38.10 37X0 

HUMamaU 138 138 

POXP. 6.10 6 

Kvmmgne 126 128 

Metra 1*5 1*5 

Nokia 487 465 

Poll lota 71 71 

Reoota 88J0 89 

Stockmann 244 245 


Hong Kong 

Bk East Asia 31.70 31X0 
Camay Pacific lljo 11X5 
Cheung Kens 31X0 3220 
China Until Pwr 33 33X0 
Dalrv Farm Inti BJ0 810 
Hang Lung Dev mo 11X0 
Hmto Seng Bank 5825 57 J0 
Henderson Land 42X0 42 

HK Air Ena. 2630 1UO 

HK China Gas 12.75 r2rafl 

HK Electric 19X5 1920 

HK Land 15.95 16J05 

HK Realty Trust 15X5 ?5J0 


H5BC HokXrtos 8575 85X0 
ang Hits 


HKShangHtb 8X0 855 
HK Telecomm 1510 1525 
HK Ferrv 7X5 8JK 

Hutch Whampoa 30.70 30X0 
Hysan Dew 16X5 16X0 

Jardlne Math- 54 5275 
-tartflne Stl HM 2590 24.90 
Kowloon Motor 13x0 13X0 
Mandarin Orient 8X0 8 

Miramar Hotel 17.45 17 

New World Dev 71X0 21X0 
3HK Praps 49X0 49X0 

Slelux 270 2X5 

Swire Pac A 51X5 51X0 
Tat CtiewiB PTP9 7J0 770 
TVE 120 3X0 

Wharf HeM 26X5 26.90 
When lock Co 1165 I3X0 
Wing On Co inn BX0 8X0 
Wlnsor Ind. 9X0 9.95 




Johannesburg 

3375 3375 
96 97 

229 228 

33.75 33.75 
NJL 36 
89X0 90 

59X0 6075 
14X5 MTS 
123 124 

33X0 35 

37X5 37 

5675 56X0 
42X0 4175 
X 38 
107 109 

96X0 94 

32 32 

ltt 171 


AEC1 
Altech 
Angta Amor 
Barlows 
Buffets 
De Beers 
Driefonteln 
Geneor 
GFSA 
Harmony 
HlgtiugM Steel 
Kloof 

NedbankGrn 
RondfanfeJn 
Rusptat 
SA Brews 
Sasol 

Western Dow 


Claw Prev. 


GEC 
Gent Acc 
Glaxo 
Grand Met 
GRE 
Guinness 
GUS 
Hanson 
Hllbdown 
HSBCHKto* 
ICI 


2X4 

273 

526 

6.12 

374 

173 

4X2 

553 


nchcape 

Kingfisher 


1X3 

6X6 

7X0 


Klngfls 
Ladhroke 
Land Sec 
Loparig 

Lasmo 

Legal Gen Grp 
UovdsBank 
Marks Sp 
ME PC 
Nan r 
NafWest 
Nthwsl Water 


MS 

1XS 

578 

7X5 

1X7 

*79 

540 


277 

5X3 

517 

3X4 

1X2 

4X5 

541 

2X5 

1X5 

7.15 

7X5 

4X1 


1X1 

5X9 

4X7 


5 75 


P&O 
PI Ik motor 
PowerGen 

Prudential 




Reckttti 

Red land 
Reed Inti 
Reuters 
RMC Group 
Rolls Rovce 
Rotamn (unit) 
Royal Scat 
RTZ 

Sa Irabu ry 
Scot Newcas 
Scot Power 
Sears 

Severn Trent 

Shell 

Siebe 

Smith Nephew 
SlMthKIIneB 


3X6 

4X1 

51S 

5*2 

601 

605 

1 X 4 

537 

3.13 

4.73 

548 

4X6 

7X7 


SrnmtfWHl 


9X1 

176 

643 

4 

842 

602 

5» 

as 

1X4 

530 

7X3 

555 

1X9 

4 J 4 


602 

4.95 

520 

543 

614 

63* 

1X7 

545 

321 

4.10 

559 

471 

7.99 

690 

970 

178 

4X3 

470 

8X3 

611 

516 

3X4 

TAB 

532 

7.14 

557 

1X3 

473 


Sun A! 

Tate 8 Lvle 


512 

616 

7X2 


978 1DJO 
2.16 222 


225 230 

17.12 7725 


Thom EMI 
Tomkins 
TSB Group 
Unilever 
Utd Biscuits 
Vodafone 
War Loan 3W 
Wellcome 
WMtbreM 
WllltamsHdss 
WHIb Corroan 

SeSigryss" 


321 

421 

2X5 


515 

204 

41X8 

6X2 

5X0 


117 
I ZB3 
4125 


1X0 


Madrid 


BBV 3420 3410 

Bco Centred HTsp. 3020 300 
Banco Santander Bio 5M0 


Banesto 

CEPSA 


Ercros 
Iberdrola 
Repsal 
Totxxalera 

TcKfanlGQ 


947 950 

XS0 3060 
1950 1955 
5890 9930 
ISO 151 
873 879 

3775 3775 
1670 1480 




SSSS^ 


iron 


London 



m 








|r L | 






p.1 * 


V p -1 



m J ’ 1 

B l'L 











■ V ] ■ 

■1 • 

: | ,1r^ 

frr / J 









W L>l 






B h,'| 



Bt *■ 





•* 1 IrJ f - !?« <i v 1V22 









* 1 ?, \ vTyi**- - ■ ' kt 







B/'l 



B 








Jifi** ! * 1 * 1 1 1 




■*7 ■ 






Milan 


Alteonza 15*35 15310 

AaaltaJta 10550 10250 

Auknlrodeprtv 1950 1912 
BcoAsricollura 27M 2740 
Bco Convner I to I 342 0 3405 
BcaNoz Lavoro 12550 17600 
Bca Pop Novara 9*50 93M 
Banco dl Rama \sn 1595 
Ben Am Pt t otal 10 4410 4470 
Bco Napoli riso .mo um 
Benetton 19900 19750 

CjwWo UoHana 1628 1592 
Enktwm Aug 
Ferfln 
Flat spa 
Fjnanz Agroind 
Fkwneceonion 
Fondloriaspo 


3010 3000 
1310 1302 
4070 6025 


m 9180 


■M1630 
118301172) 


Generali Aosta 37500 37250 


IFIL 
Italcementl 
1 taigas 
Mertabonca 
Montedbon 
Olivetti 
Pirelli spa 
RAS 

Rtnascente 


5805 5765 

10550 10350 
4320 47B0 
12950 12S75 
1140 1161 
1945 1926 
2140 2145 
14900 14700 
8770 8750 


San Paolo Torino 9505 9430 

51 P 419S 4190 

SME 39«0 3960 

Sn la toed 1891 1886 

Stonda 36850 37150 

stet 4755 4715 

TaroAssIc 2389023360 




Montreal 


Atca LM 1 
Bonk Montreal 


14 141m 
2 SK 2 SH 


Oaee Prev. 


BCE Mobile Com 
Con Tire A 
Cdn Util A 


CTFin’l Svc 
Extendlcare 
Goj Metro 
Gt-West LHecn 
Hera inn Bee 
Hudson's Bay Ca 
■ masco Ltd 

investors Grp Inc 

lohatt {Jatvil 
LototawCas 
Molsan A 
Natl Bk Canada 
Oshawo A 
taicdn Petrotai 
Power Corn 
Powgr Fln'l 
Outbecor B 
Roeers Comm B 
Royal Bk Cdo 
Seors conode Inc 
Shell CdaA 
Swrttxim Inc 
Shrtco A 
Trllon Flnl A 


43W 4414 
1116 1116 
239k 23tfe 
7JJ 7Yi 
18 18 
19 19 

1216 1216 
21 21tfe 
12W 12Vi 
24Vr 24V, 


wa»ass 


1516 15W 

2016 3016 
2214 22% 
rtth 1816 
9VJ 9kg 
1714 1714 
41F4 4tWS 
ins 18M 
28Vl 28V, 
lew i 6 ta 

OH *314 
15V. 
716 8 

3X5 3X0 
180677 


Paris 


Accor 570 587 

Air Ltaukle 731 7*3 

Atoofel Alsfhom 45120 455 

Axo 9A4X0 26690 

Bcncnire (Cle> 563 579 

BIC 665 469 

BNP 269X0 267 

Bouypues 562 570 

Danone 781 7S1 

Carretour 2270 2238 

C.C.F. 23* 236X0 

Cerus 99 jo 100X0 

OtanreuTs 1250 1283 

Clments From; 250 252 

C tab Wed 448 450 

EH+Wultotae 37336850 
Euro Disney 8X0 &.90 

Gen. Eaux 510 515 

Havas <37 *3? JO 

I metal 528 Si* 

Lafarge Conrec 398X041X10 
Leo rand 
L von. Eaux 
Oreql JL'J 
LVAU1 
MOtro+toehette 
Mlctwfln B 

McuHne* 10620 

Paribas 38SJ0 ssi 

Inti 165 163X0 

322 329X0 

782 7n 

Plnoult Print 952 940 

Radtotechnlaue <98 510 

Renault laavo lauo 

Rtl-PW«toncA \32AOmaO 
Raft. St. Louis 1456 1479 

Sanofl _ , 3*1 24690 

Saint Gctoaln 643 6*8 

SFH 532 532 

Ste Qenerale 621 616 

Suez 263X0 265 

Thomaon-CSF 167 169 

Total 333 337 

UJLP. 150X0 152 

Valeo 280 287 


47048450 
1133 1167 


866 861 
1118J0 


118’ 


^l 111X0 


Sao Paulo 


Banco do Brasil 
Bcnespa 
BriJdesco 
Brahma 

SlS^n. 

Itaubanco 

Light 

P or qiicpanemo 

P g trotoras 

Sauza Cruz 

TMetotw 

THe» 

Usiminas 

VofoRioDec# 

Varig 


17J5 17 

I0JO 9X6 

Jr 

297 297 

87.90 87 JO 
301 298 

238 2*0 

3*0 250 
15 15.10 
12051 123 

7.95 8.10 
*050 <050 
380 375 
U5 134 
159 JO 162 
3300 3490 


Bavespa lades : 46523 
Prev tons : *656* 


Singapore 

Ado Poe Brew 15J0 15X0 
Cmtes 7,95 8.10 

CJtv Devetatemt 7S5 7J5 
Ode 4 Cartage 1330 1250 
DB5 1050 1050 

DBS Land _ 4^ 

FE LevJnsston 6» 7X5 
Fraser & Heave 16^ 1630 
Gt Eastn Lite 27 JO 27 
Hang Leons Pm 
inchcape 5JH 920 

Jurons SMsjyord 113D 11X0 
KavHtatiJ Canal IJ* 1» 
Keppel . UXO 1U0 

N ats t e el 3 3X4 

Nepfuw eOrita rf 1X5 J.96 
OCBC fareisn 15 15 

» a 

tmffiore 

Stno Aerosooce 2.10 il 9 


Close Prev 


Sins Airlines ton 
Stas Bus Svc 
Sing Land 
StaoPettm 
Sine Press lam 
Sing SWpWdg 
S ing Te l ecom m 
Straits 5 team 
straits Trading 


13J0 K20 
9 095 
8.15 825 
2X2 1*1 
27 JO 2720 
2X0 2X7 
2.93 2.92 


Tat Lee Bank 
1 Industrial 


Utd 

uracseaBklan) 
Utd (Tseas Land 




3X2 3X0 
426 438 
.122 123 
15X0 1S.40 
2X7 160 
nr 




AGA 

6050 

69 

AseoAF 

533 

53* 

Astra AF 


203 


97 



381 

385 


41550 

415 

EssHto-A 

« 

96 

11: 

98 

9050 

lr . J 'JW 

190 


!■ ' - 1!“'. 

2S7JQ 

259 

Hi ; . - 

119 

130 

SanrfvIkB 

I265U 

127 

3CA-A 

11912050 


45X0 45.70 


1375013750 

Skansha BF 

1*850 

172 

SKF BF 

1335013350 

StoraAF 

46* 


TrrilBters BF 
Volvo BF 

10950 

no 

145 

145 


Sydney 



068 

060 

ANZ 

19* 

it* 

BHP 

19.10 

1068 


3X9 

135 

Bougainville 

086 

052 

Cole* ftftyer 

01 * 



095 


CRA 

1016 

17X0 

CSR 

4X9 

045 

Fosters Brew 

1.12 

J.JO 

Goodman Field 

1.13 

1 .1* 

ICI Australia 

11 X0 

11 X0 

Magellan 

1.92 

1.95 




Not Aust Bank 

1050 

105* 

5X2 

N Broken Hill 

3X3 

3X9 


351 

358 

pioneer inti 

3X3 

016 

Nrtmdv Pcseklon 

1X8 

2X2 

PubllShg Brdcsts 

357 

050 

OCT Resources 

1 X0 

062 

1X9 

059 

TNT 

2X2 

2X2 


770 

7X0 


420 

03J 

Woodslde 

07* 

066 



Tokyo 


Akol Eiectr 

Asalriawmlcat 
AsoM Glass 
Batk of Tokyo 
Bridgestone 
Canon 

C"«le _ 

□al Nippon Print 1690 1730 
Dalwa House 1360 1360 
Dai vwj securities ijto 12so 
4600 46ia 


373 377 

730 740 

1!H> 1220 

1490 1480 

1530 1540 
1720 iro 
1240 1250 


2040 20*0 
2210 2200 
1010 1030 
975 977 

775 77V 

1660 1660 
5220 5250 
707 724 

720 730 
810 859 
2300 200 
415 424 
1050 1050 
919 9T9 

715 723 

7310 73*0 


Fonuc 
Full Bank 
Full Ptwfo 
Fujitsu 
Hitachi 
Hitachi CotXe 
Honda 
ItoYakado 
Itochu 

jasan Airlines 
Kalima 
Konsai Power 
Kawasaki Steel 
Kirin Brewery 
Komatsu 

Kuteto 

Ma+S^Elec Md9 1540 1530 
Matsu ElecWks 998 1018 
MlfSUtoWlI Bk 2260 2210 
Mitsuto Chemical 5*6 sa 
Minublshl Elec 697 697 
Mitsubishi Hev ™ n* 
Mitsubishi Coro 13M 1320 
Mitsui and CO 899 857 

Mitsui Marine 
Mltsukoshl 

Mitsumi 
NEC 

NGK insulators 
Nlkko Securities 10H 1050 
NtaPtm Kooaku 941 721 

Nippon 011 478 679 

Nippon Steel 374 384 

Nippon Yuscn 650 458 

NiSSdn 827 535 

Nomura Sec 1980 1940 
NTT 8350a84Wo 

Olympus Optica! 1080 JM 


707 7TB 
951 946 

134D 1330 

IlSO 1150 

990 1010 


Planer 
Ricoh 
Sanvo Elec 


2230 2200 
939 9*0 

57* jao 


Shorn 

SWmraii 

ShJnetsu Cheat 
Sony 

Sumitomo Bk 
Sumitomo Cheat 

Sum I Marine 
Sumitomo Metal 
Tolsel Corn 
Takedo Cheat 
TDK 
Tallin 

Tokyo Marine 
Tokyo Elec Pw 
Toppan Printing 
Torny ind. 

Tosh too 
TovOfO 
YamaichlSec 
a: x too. 

NHUtri 22 S : ltei* 
Preytow: 19076 
Tapiz Mr visit 
Previous : 1520 


O 0 M 

1680 

<87 

1920 

53*0 

1830 

569 

B 2 S 

320 

600 

1230 

4750 

5*7 

1140 

2790 

1420 

7T1 

7tn 

2700 

734 


Prev. 

1720 

681 

1940 

5250 

1770 

573 


323 

too 

1230 

*700 

554 

1140 

2800 

1*30 

737 

694 

2110 

726 


Toronto 


17V% 176* 
794 7to 
18* 18*0 
* 34 33* 
29 28*4 
25 25 

Z7V* 2714 
45*4 45*6 
2394 23* 
22ta Z2to 
2 2X2 
19*4 19V’J 
29 




16 
32 

21 U, 21ta 
514 Sit 
2446 2* 

1644 17 

17V: 1740 

11 lire 

1 7V; T7Vi 
14V. UU> 

ir-0 T3W 
23V. 22V. 


AMtltol Price 
Air Canada 
Alberta Energy 
Alcan Aluminum 
Amer Barrlck 
Avenor 

Bk Nova Scotia 
BCE 

BC Telecomm 
Sorrttordier B 
Bramdea 
Brascan A 
Comeco 
CISC 

can Natural Res 15H 
COn OcOd Pel 33V, 

Cdn Podllc 
Cascades Paper 
Cominco 
Consumers Gas 
Datosco 
Demon ind B 

DuPont Cdo A 
Echo Bov Minas 
Empire Ca A 

FaiconWtaoe 

Fletcher Choir A 17s* |7*e 
Franco Nevada 75Vs 76 
Guordlon coo A 
Hernia Gold 

Horsham 
imperial Oil 
inco 

IPL Energy 

Laldlaw A 

Laialaw S 
Loewen Group 
London JnsurGp 23V4 29 

Mocmlll Bloodel 17S* 17*4 
Maona Inti A 
Maple Leaf Fds 

Moore 

Newbridge Netw *5Vj *6W 
Noronda Inc 24*o 2*94 
Noronda Forest 
Norcen Energy 

Nlhem Telecom 

Nova 
Ones 

Petra Canada 

Placer Dome 
Potash Carp Sask 
Provloo 
PWA 

Ouebecor Prtol 


8 V. BM 
129b 121b 
18V. 164b 
46^4 65* 
MV. 37*4 
27Vi 27>t 
low lOVi 

10 tow 
34 34H 


4544 46K. 
1144 12 

233* JJ4 


10*4 1IP4 
le4b 1644 
*3fb 44Vb 
13<4 1314 
124u 121* 
11V, 11V. 
2S*b 25M 
49 

5* S 
0X3 0X6 
1344 1394 


Renaissance Env 29V, 29 w. 


Rle Algoni 
Seagram Ca 
Stone Coraaid 
Talisman Env 
Trieatobe 
relus 
Thomsen 
TorDcm Bank 
Tronwlta 
TnmsCdaPIpe 
Utd Dominion 

UiUWestburne 

West coas t Env 

weston 

Xerox Canada B 
TSB 300 Index 1 <882X8 
Previous : waxo 


24*4 2444 
40V4 391b 
144o U* 
264b 26M 
174k 1794 
16 16 
16*4 1644 
20V: 2044 
13*4 13*4 
17V. T7ft 
26V, 26V4 
10* Wto 

39 V. ^0 
<34, 46*4 


Zurich 


Adta Inll B 2a 220 

Alwsuhse B new 647 651 
BBC Brwn Bov B 1107 1113 


ft 

340 

1^5 

.*<0 


m 

562 

3X 

1520 

1770 

740 

730 

*40 


12J6 1232 


cite GetorB 

CS Holdings B 
Elektrow B 
Fischer B 
interdlasuni B 
Jefmoll B 
Landis ovr R 
Mo e venotekB 
Nestle R _ 

Oeriik. Buehrle R 128X0 130 

Porgeso Hid B ljto 1460 

RocheHdgPC 
Sofra Republic 
Sondoi B 

Schindler B 
Suiter PC 

Surveillance B 
Swiss Bnk Carp B 
Swiss Rrinsur ft 
Swlswir R 
USSB 

Winterthur B 
Zurich As* B 
SBC Index: 91337 
Previous ; 919J1 


.5775 5855 
I3150 in 
701 710 

74U 7550 
ESC 193 
1790 1825 
3*3 365 

7*9 779 
90S 815 


1135 1144 
670 670 


1237 1240 


Via Auooatyd ftew 


Dmc.1 


Season Season 
Woh Low 


Open Hite Low CbM Chs OPJm 


Grains 


WHEAT (CBOT7 SMBurr*tmum-aiHona*'Oum 
4.1 SL 3.09 Dec 94 172 17SVi 170 ' i 17444 *0X245 4,917 

4264a 333 MOT 95 1B5 3JB 3X3 

19BVj J.16V, MOV 95 3X9 170 1S6V: 

16344 111 JUI95 3X0 1X1 3J64* 

165 139 Sep *5 1*5 1X5 3X3W 

173 3X9 Drc 95 155 3X5V, 154 

3X4 Vl 125 Jut 96 

Est. soles 24.000 W«fs-srt«S 33X03 
Wetfs open ht 65431 up 10*7 
WVEAT CKBOT) iOOObunWVnwOOlfcwowbudwt 


Season Season 




Hite 

La* 

Open 

Hah 

LOW 

15.18 

1057 May 95 

1458 

1071 

14X5 

7075 

1057 Jul 9S 

1451 

14X5 

MX1 

1096 

10570095 

1047 

1061 

10W 

1028 

1088 Mar 96 

1092 

1007 

1290 

1000 

11.18 May 96 

1080 

1095 

1080 

1172 

11X0 Jul 9* 

1050 

1057 

1041 

1050 

10050096 

12X1 

10X2 

1015 


LOW Ooee Chs Oplnt 


187V* -0X3 41X93 
iMW-aam sj«3 

13BV.-0X0M 12X85 
axjVi 55a 

3X5V*_ft00W 211 

131 W -cma'A 11 




156 


192 ,0X5% 1301 

1884* *0X344 XWN0 
172 ,0.10* 
1X544-0.01 
3XM4 *0X1 
15* *0X044 


103 

1 * 


185 
785V, 
2.70 V, 
2X3 
3X0 '4 
2X7 


L13 1 * 2.1* *001 2140 

— 12344 . 0X04.112X79 


+23% 112“, Dec 9* 185V, 19V* 

*27% 125 Mcr9S 3X3 Vj 189 

*03 2214* May 95 170 172H 

158% 116V|Jul«5 3X*Vy 3X6 

177. 12* Sep 9 b 

ax*’.-] 3X2 Dec 95 156 3X6 

ESI. ides NA. Wed'S- sabs 8.73* 

Wed-sa oenint 32X95 up 236 

CORN tCBOT) S-SOaOuiwntmum- 
177 LIO^Decto 113% 116V6 

2X2% 2J31WMar 95 12244 226% 

228 May 95 1294* L3Z46 1294k 130 V, -0X1 3AM8 

2J2'.yJul9S 2X344 237 2JJ4. 23444 *0X1 46.27B 

136 Sep 95 1*0% 2X1 139V: 2J9V: -OX0V, *X60 

235 Vk Dec 95 1X5 2X6 3X4 V, 2X*V,_aw% 22,902 

2X9'..Mor9i 2X1 Vi 2X3 2X114 2X1% 1X5* 

ZXSViJuf 96 2X8 h 2X8 'A 2X816 2X893 1X7* 

Est. sales swoo wetfs. sales *2X07 

Wed's open Irrt 2*9,72? Qfl 51** 

SOYBEANS (CBOT) 5J0IBgminlnwn.««arsewDumt 
7.04 137 ', Jan 95 5X4 SX5>3 SXS 5X4^-1064* SOXW 

7JK SX7’.,Mcr95 573h S7S 16* 5A5W-aa7Vi 32X25 

7.0F, 5X6 MOYfS i» 582 tri L72*-<L0m 14.767 

5Xjv,Jul95 5X551 5X6% SJt 177% —007% 25X00 

SX6VjAus 95 587% 5H 179 579 — QJB 2X07 

171 Sep 95 5X1% 5X9 5X0 V, 5X0 V, -0X7 122* 

5 n 1 ., Nov 95 595 59* W JX64, S88%-O07V, 11J62 

599% Jan 96 50244 50244 595 ITS 1 * -037V, 10* 

510 Marts 509% 5094k 502V, 502%-a07V, 20 

SJ9V5JUI96 511 511 *10 51D —0X7 SB 

501 Nov 96 595 597 59* 597 -007 115 

EsI. sobs 50X00 Wed'S, sobs 5CX92 
Wed’s opm Int 139.72* up 31 fi 

SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOT) tgoNre-McnperWn 

339 JO 15580 Dec 9* 156X0 157X0 15520 155X0 —130 10.191 

IJ7X0Jtef5 131.60 15900 19.00 13720 -1X0 32.199 

1*1 JO Mar 95 161.70 163.70 140.90 161X0 -090 ».1«; 

1A5J0N1OV 95 14520 16590 1*500 1*500 —130 13X79 

17T1X0JUI95 170X0 171.70 1*9X0 1*9X0 -1X0 11X44 

177X0 Aug 95 17X30 17170 171 JO 171 JO -1X0 2X43 

173J0S6P95 175X0 17550 17170 17170 — 1J0 137* 

175x0 Oct 95 17730 177 80 17SJ0 17180 —1X0 5670 

174X0 Dec 95 110*0 180*0 I7K80 178X0 —U4 1092 

Jan 9* 18000 —2X0 ■ 

Eg. safes NA Wetr^sdn 28X97 
Wad's Open Ir* 104X72 UP 389 
SOYBEAN Qfl_ (CBOT) *OXBiR*-aoUnnBVl09bA 
7926 22.00 Dec M 3070 29X7 MJS 255* -Cl? 14,18 

38X5 22X5 JpnU 27 JO 77.93 27.1* 2733 —035 34,1a 

2030 22.91 After 95 2&J2 ZA9S 2*30 2635 -039 Z7X01 

2505 22X5 May 95 2170 2595 2520 2537 — 033 17.96* 

27X5 23.76JU195 74.93 2517 243 74X8 -119 11X86 

7720 22.73AUQ 95 2455 24X5 2430 2*30 -022 2318 

2475 22.75 Seo g 5 X 50 2*X0 3400 3400 — 0.15 l.Jl 

7440 22,750cl 95 2410 2430 23X0 23X3 -115 3393 

2485 23.»Dec95 ZL90 7423 21*0 23X1 -X.IO 5X83 

2415 23%Q Jon 9* 23X0 23X0 2335 2335 —030 78 

Est sales NA Wad's sales 23.231 
Wee’s open W 171X80 up 27* 


_ „ 21X47 Wed's, sales 30X40 
wjdjopte bn 189.178 up 688 
COCOA OiCSEJ Wnwlrtc* 


|*JD 

1*31 

an 

12.90 

12X3 

UX5 

1230 


-031 35317 
-033 23,175 
-033 22X42 
-art 5917 
-am ixi* 
-aio 853 
-ao* a 


is 

1*05 

1612 

HOC 

1560 

1433 

1676 

1*42 

1505 

1531 


1 0*1 Dec t* 1218 1718 1204 

1077 After 95 1239 12*5 1221 

1078 May 95 126* 1266 1254 

1225X895 1282 121* 127* 

1305 1305 1305 

J335 1325 1330 


1195 Sep 95 
1290 Dec 95 
13SDMCF9# 


1225 May 9* 
D July* 


1610 1410 14K) 


1490 Jill 
1S20S4P9* 

EB. safes 6X7* Wad's, safes 22X16 
WiffJijwiH nx« UP 1831 
ORANGE JUfCE (NCTNJ lUNOvamer 
132X0 BS.OOJct, 95 ujlJJ 10JJ0 101 J5 
7100 MIX 95 10410 1WX0 106.10 
97J0A«oy»5 lia9S 11315 lia9S 
lOOXOJuUS 116X5 115X0 114X5 
IQ735Sep95 118X0 JT9X0 11100 
10PJXNDV95 12000 732X0 179 JO 
msxo Jon 9* 

12*35 After 96 

Esr. safes 6X40 Wetrs. sales 
Wed's open Inl 26X01 aft 665 


1213 

1231 

125* 

1277 

1303 

1334 

1352 

1378 

1297 

1419 


*13 667 

*3 43X58 
*2 10,151 

+ 2 4OT9 

*1 1 XB 
-6 3366 
— 6 7X15 
—4 3J13 
-6 2X17 
-6 70 




Season Seam 
Utah low 


Open Hite Law Ckae 


On Co-Tnl 


91580 

94733 

94550 


-80345,^6* 


13425 

73465 

127X0 

130X5 

129X0 

179.00 

130X0 


105X0 

109X5 

113.15 

11150 

119X0 

119J0 

1 J 0 JD 

122J0 


*420 12,141 
7X79 


♦ 395 
♦3XS 1XM 
•2X0 1X2* 
*2X0 1,959 
- 2 X 0 7J13 
*2X0 538 

*2X0 10 


7 06V: 

6.13 

6-15 

4X0V, 

6.16 

477 

421 

4X7 


2S7JB 
W JO 
207.00 
20*00 
182X0 
1J3JU 
101X0 
185X0 


Livestock 


CATTLE (CMERI ant*- cams ewe 
7431 *675 Dec W *J.J0 *7X7 67X5 

44*7 Feb 95 6»X0 67.90 67X5 

67X7 Apr 95 4075 49.27 *475 

«.OOJun95 4450 *100 *447 

*230 AM 95 ta.90 *125 *190 

aiOOdtS 63X5 6195 6165 

*4mDec95 4*J0 *450 6*30 

Est Idas 14X20 Wad’s, soles 28X22 
wwiooenirt 71.561 uo 1897 
FEEDER CATTLE (CMS2J sah-iMi 


7425 
75.10 
*9 JO 
4110 
67X5 
6455 


67.77 

67X7 

*9X0 

6495 

*122 

6285 


*0X5 15X93 
*042 20441 
*038 17,955 
*030 4227 
•030 2X59 
+035 Mir 
*040 160 


8095 

71X0 Jan 95 

pjj 

7040 

n.90 



■. i ■ 

71X2 

7080 

7090 

K i 

Eli 

7070 

70X5 






■J-LLU 


7015 

69X9 

49X5 

6075OO9S 




71^1 

69X0 S*P 9* 





1,742 


Est sates 1X3? Wed's sates 
Wsd’sapenli* 43a up 39 
HOGS (CMER5 *«o#B»-ewa.refJ* 


71 32 
71,17 
7057 
69X0 
70.15 
69X0 
69 


+ 0 J 0 4.W 

*0X2 2X74 
♦ 0X7 998 

-0X5 50 

*0X5 199 

*12 33 

+020 a 


JOABDecto 50 JO 

}4 07 Feb 95 3*30 

3105 Apr 95 BJS 

4035 Jun 95 60X7 

6U5JUI9S «J0 
6030AU095 *aw 

3BJOOct« »X5 

79 W Dec 9 5 41 JO 

4lOOFeb« 

EM. sacs 1X91 Wed's. safes mxi7 
WMT«n«il 25X77 off 397 
FORKBOJJES IOJER1 «X*Jbs’Oi*i* 


5050 

son 

60X0 

47 JO 
4100 
43-rt 
«lH 
41X0 
4060 


31X5 30X5 
3*73 34X5 
35X7 3035 
41X0 40X7 
6IJB 48J0 
41X5 4.90 
39,40 39X1 

41X5 41.10 


30X5 
349 
3177 
41.17 
41 JO 
41X0 
39X7 
41X5 
42X2 


+a« 7X08 
*012 13.735 
*0X0 4X49 
*030 4XS5 
+0 A0 779 

♦ MO 9BS 

• 040 029 

+ 0X0 172 

+ 0X2 37 


309 Feb 95 2MQ 

3SJDMOT 9S 36.70 

36.90 Mav 95 31X0 

37J0 XH 95 309S 
26.70 Atra *5 37.90 
39 JO Feb 9* 

39J0AAOT96 

Estsotes 1X91 Wed's, vies 3X93 
wed's open Kit 10397 pH 168 


6005 
<02 
61.19 
54 00 
MOD 
66X0 
5950 


37X0 1*25 

37X0 3060 
3095 3000 
3975 3870 
18X5 37-70 


37.15 

3725 

3037 

39X0 

47X0 

4050 


♦ 0.90 8X59 

*OBS 1X0* 
♦075 479 

+070 405 

+0x0 ia 

♦ 0.90 9 

1 


Food 


C0FPEEC (NCSEl sr.»m.- afeNrP 
+7+5 77, 10 Doe 0 * 1 57 00 1SLM 19X0 

7490 Mar 1*073 141X0 1970 
82.8 May 95 1*1X1 16485 16100 
it to JUTS 16150 166X0 1*4X5 
16330 Sap 9$ '6730 16020 16630 
81X0 Dec 95 

^R*S li 092 , ' , 5w , 0« 1M 0615 
15.25 » 1456 


24400 

244X1 

7*010 

23000 

KL0OI 

W330 


15000 

1*1.70 

1640D 

1*540 

167X5 

147.95 

16045 


-BAS 33* 
17.743 


>090 
+9A5 *473 
♦045 199 
♦ I JO U» 
♦070 1,110 
+a70 233 


W*T 1*39 14*4 -057 *9,990 


EURODOLLARS (CMER3 si mHkn-raaf leora. 

90180 90710 Dac 94 91740 93J40 93X60 91680 . 

90240 Mtr 95 93X60 91090 92.920 92350 -1I0J77+TM 
90Jt0Jte9S 91*60 WOO 92J20 913B -110344^78 
91 XI D Sap 95 92.130 92.190 92X30 92X80 -702*7^ 

71.1 B0 Doc 95 91X20 91.9*0 91X50 91.910 

90750 Afttr 96 91XW 91X60 91X7D 91.930 
91370 Am 9* 91X40 91X20 91X10 91.900 

91X205*PH 91X00 91X00 91770 91X60 

EK SttfeS 944.730 WKTAftXaf 936MB 
Wed's open inf 2785X86 up 29645 
B«mSM POUND (CMERI soar MunO-lMHeMkiaoni 
1343* 1X500 Dec 94 1365* 13730 1XM) 13666 +10 49,726 

13440 IX640MO-95 13710 13720 13660 13664 *10 7X3* 

13380 133*8 Jun95 13*80 13700 13660 13*60 -10 1*5 

GstmJes 12X89 Wed's.sofes 11X65 
Wed's otfenlnt 57X07 off 53 


*4220 

93,180 

91570 


— mw . i -. 

—M 194777 
•40185X78 
•70144791 
-7014A272 


CANADIA N DO LLAR (CMBO war- 1 ooMeuusiwi 
' ” " " " 07269 07281 07259 (L7261 


44,532 
—4 7.728 

=i ^ 

—1 OU 
—a 10 


06765 

0X747 

0X7*0 


-12 12526 
—10 1J514 

— 10 -ns 



Metals 




HI GRADE COPPER (NCAMO BJBOfcs.- cents peh 


l 

137X0 

75X5 Dec 94 115JK 




*1X0 11X03 

135X0 

7090 Jon 95 13080 

13090 

13000 

13085 

*1X5 

1X68 

13070 

73X0 Feb 9S 


+ 1.70 

734 


72.00 Aftar 95 131X0 

13023 



*1X0 2AX63 

13030 

91.10 Aw 95 



+ IJ0 

671 

12850 

76X5 May 95 10* K 

128X0 



+ 1X5 

2X93 

1ZU0 

10010 Jun 93 



*050 

125.70 

78X0 Jul 95 12100 

12000 

12000 

12X45 

—0X5 

4X79 

ItoXO 

111X0 Aug 95 



12150 

-0X0 

121X0 

79. 10 Sep 95 117.75 

11*50 

117XS 

11020 

—0X0 

1,508 

11550 

11000 OU 95 



11650 

-0X5 


ILOOOec 9S 112X5 

1I07S 

11075 

11070 

-055 








1 

11030 

UXO After 96 




-0X5 


109J0 

107X0 Aftay 9* 



10050 

-0X5 

124 


lesjojum 



102*5 

-OX5 


105X5 

105X5 Sep 96 



105-10 

-0X5 


11355 

1)095 NW 96 11195 

11095 

11195 

110X0 



Ect.sfites 0000 Wed's sates 

11.265 




1 Wed's open Inl 5U0* oft 811 




1 

SILVBi 

(NOlUD sxoemww 

-canrtc 











5745 

401XJte9j 4900 

4900 

491.0 




6D4M 

F«b 95 

aSJMortS 4972 

499 X 

•N3J 

4955 

+ IX 


6065 

41 LO Aftay 95 SD10 
420XA4W 509 X 

5050 

5000 

5044 

+1J 

7X44 


5105 

505X 




6005 

51 6X Sep 95 51 iX 

515.0 

51 SX 

5T7J 

+ 1X 

8X55 


522XD1C95 525J 

S27X 


527X 









*200 

543XMar9* 536.0 

S6X 

5340 

5386 

♦ IX 

6271 



541X 

MIX 


-IX 


fiODX 

5500 Jul 96 



5509 

-IX 

1570 


Sea 96 



5605 

♦ 1.0 

Es.SOfes 25X00 Wed's «*« 66X72 



1 

wed's oaenw 136552 off 359* 





PLATINUM (NAftER) jdttw 




43350 

37080 Jan 9j 603.00 

43 JO 
MBS) 

399X0 



429X0 

39000 APT 9S *07X0 

40150 

405X0 

— UD 

95*0 



<1250 






422X000 95 










*1750 

-025 


Est. safes NA Wed'S- soa 

6X91 





Wed's 01 
GOLD 

901 M 27X9* UP 879 
NCMXJ 100 eor co.- Mm >■> 





42*50 

36000 DK 06 37950 
Junto 380X0 

380X0 

moo 

37070 

30000 


-2.10 

—5*1 

6.5*6 



380X 

30060 

3njo 





3B45D 



42850 

3*l.a Junto 39ZXO 

391A1 

3B850 





X9tca 

39000 







39»X0 

-uo 


CIXO 

400.50 Dec 9 5 «SX0 

40150 

401X0 



<2050 

4T250 Fe* 9* 




—7.7Q 



418X0 Apr 9* 



41050 

-020 


431 JO 

*13X0 Junto 



417X0 

-020 

5X12 


AusW 



42020 

-axe 

314 


00 96 





EB. soles 40000 Wed'S safes 9X13 




wed's ooen int 1701*9 off 521 






Financial 


US T. BILLS UMBO iMW»M«r fetd. 

96.10 9425 Dec *4 943* >437 4433 9435 —001 0X95 

95X5 TltlMtrVS 93X4 9367 9333 9335 -010 14X00 

942* 93X2 Jun 9S 93X7 93X7 92.93 92.95 -a 10 2X30 

92.7B 9234 9239 -004 43 


9337 9272 Sap 95 92X1 92.78 
Est. safes 9X65 Wed’s, solos 7XS 
Wfed’SOPteH 24968 OH 170 

5 TIL TREASURY <OOT) SiaunBra-ahOlMiariHpct 


j ini » nwft n«n 1 ibiiviy tiwiwiHnn-PiaavianBHKi 

104-20100-0*5 Oecw 100-18 100-215 100-14 1(0.17— 04 82X10 

103-09 99-20 NUT 9599-305 100-025 99-27 99-30— 035 82X40 
100-08 99-19 Jun 95 99-17 — 03 19 

99- 07 99-07 Seo«S 99-08 — 03 2 

Est. safes wa w«rs, ic*es 02357 

wetTseaenM 164771 up iom 

HYR.TkbASURT (CBOT) IWM)ni.Hi81MalOpa 

”5 2" ,S »-•> *9-07- a 152,90* 

U>~?, e un 2J W-M *- n "- 17 *- a - w 3 = 

JOI-OA 97-n Septs S*j77 _ 07 9 

no-31 06-30 Dec 95 9 Tk- 07 

Ejjotes na Wed's, mm wxie 
Wed'S open M 297 238 OH 5632 

iggEASURTBOWIMKro Uael-sn0X6riPhAB>idifelNpe) 
116-08 91-19 Dec 96 to-JQ 98-M 98-03 98-17 — 10 181X26 

{{*■" W-ll 97-12 96-31 97417 - 10 12,159 

ml 4 !tl? 96 - 21 rt-W- 0* 356 

7-1* W-2T Dee9S 46-10 9*-l* 96-10 46-15 — 08 207 

IH-06 93-13 MOTH 4*-n* — 08 49 

100- 20 93-06 Tunis __ n X 

93-25 n-05 Sep 96 oCiP - 5 2 

E»7.jP fe» NA ttlM's.sfeei 493X27 

War s Ope n W 440XM OH 2144 

MitnentL BONDS (CBOT) HOOOxMn-im A3MHW190BCI 
71-17 80-31 Dec 9*84-00 84-06 53-73 83-31 — 0) 14,188 

SPLaT' « .“^L”? 3 ' 29 6M5 81-19 - 04 22X3* 

Eshsow NA Wetfs safes 10.938 
HWsspenlnf J14M up 1295 


07470 arm Dec 94 

07*05 07020 Mar 95 07269 07281 07260 07262 

07J22 06990 Jun 9S 07369 07290 07258 07259 

07438 0*965 Sep 95 07245 07265 07260 07256 

07400 O70«OBC9S 07246 

07335 0.7240 Mar 96 0723* 

Esl cafes 9.1*8 Wed’s, safes 6 X*6 
WetrsooenW S4732 UP 270 
GERMAN MARK (CMER) lev mark- looHn Mud* t0XK< 

0X721 05590 Dec 91 06373 0X381 06342 0*355 -13 99X17 

05810 After 95 0X389 04392 0X3J5 0637B 

0.5980 ton « 06418 06416 06390 06399 

<3.6347 Sso 95 06428 

eb. sans 27.95* Wed's, safes 31X13 
Wed's open W 113,965 off 1775 
JAPANE SE YEN (CMERI sefeMn-iDCWeaufestai- 

aOKM9O0IIO9SZSDeC M 0O1O1330OID1 360X100660010082 

Ml«*toO«M^Kfl^ma0Dl 022800101580X10174 

OX106700X09776Jun95 0X1 0314001 03700X1 0270001 0297 

0X1 07731X1 OlOOSec 95 0X104000010*250 01 04000010419 

0X1 07*05X 1 0*41 Dec 95 0X10530001055000105300010542 

oxio93mxio*asMCT-w aaio*65 

Eajefas 25X17 Wad's, safes 27X89 
WKtT! normal 71329 up 2099 
SWISnUMC (CMERI tprftvic-lpw««quatifllff01 1 

O^SSCtecM 07548 07554 07504 07575 -14 5«60 

“ “ 07594 07990 075*3 07563 -13 5rt*7 

0.7615 -12 J35 

08155 0X091 Sep 95 »-««« x 

Ejt.sMes 19.158 Wed’s. safes 21,016 
Wed’s open In} *axiS off 743 


74,953 
-41 14X46 
— 37 1X68 
—15 » 

—33 1 99 
-31 • 25 


07669 —11 


Industrials 


COTTON 2 (NCTNJ AtOOfe.aeiprb 


4X9 Dac 94 77JS 

42-50 Mar 95 JOXO 

MXOMoy 95 81 JO 
6930 Jut 95 8160 

*6X000 95 73X5 
Dec 95 71 JJ 
68X0 Mar 9* 72.30 
Aftay 9* 74X0 


E*». soles NA wed's, safes 7X39 


6020 77.75 
81X6 80X0 

82X5 81X0 

82.96 B1 0 
74.45 73.40 

72-50 71JS 
73X0 72X0 

74X0 74X0 


79X0 
87 X* 
8245 
82.97 
74.10 
7210 
7290 
73.80 


•250 ,9S> 


P 


ZXOrtjTg’' 


* 2.00 . 
*1.99 5(580 
-095 83* 

*0X0 4X7B 
+ 0.75 45 

*030 • 


rl 


i' ; *■; ‘ . 

i*.% ■ 


i 



l !£-’ . 


~C. 

p;: 

k~- 

V-.: 

4,.. 


S»* • 





rii. 


‘ 1 - 


4125 Jon 95 49.50 
47.95 Ffe: 95 5020 
47X0AAer93 50X) 
*3X5 Apr 95 4RXD 
47X0 Aftay 95 «40 
4429 Jun 95 49.15 
47X5Ju|9S 4? JO 

4220 Aug 95 49.90 


UllJonK 1005 

1528 Feb 95 UXO 

15X20*0-95 17.97 
15J5«pr9S 17X8 
15X9 Aftay 95 17.96 

1523 Jun« 17X0 

l*XSJd95 17X3 

1016 Aug to 17.95 

17X0 Sep 95 17.96 

16X2 oa« 

17.1 5 Nov 95 17.97 
16J0Decto 37X6 
17.05 Ml 96 IBM 
17X8 Fob 96 18X3 
17.1SMO-96 
17J1ABT96 
1032 Aftay 96 
1722 Jun 96 1012 
18X8 Sep 96 

17X0 OeC 96 18X6 1826 

r^o-^- 

5*Jo 
55X0 


MXD SOJOjffito 55X5 

58X5 51.10 Fob to SLID 55X0 

Mto SLKMartS 5565 Sn 


*030 5*-5S Apr 95 fe.90 MXS 


»J0 55-50 Aftay 75 57-50 J7JD Sm 

52 SMS S2 ffJD 

37.9* MXOJulto 57X0 BM Mia 

EsLatos na Wed'S. safes 3U» 
WWlopanW 70X14 affiriii 


S4PC0AftP. IN0ex (CMERI 
4 453. to 


—'.to xnxoDecto'^a^ Slb^mbivi 40m 

fi**? iJH? 457X0 451.10 «47 m 

460X0 45^ gS 

H S3 S3 S53 

SsaSfSa* “ " 


Moody's 
Reuiers 
DJ. Futures 
Com. fiescprch 





Stock Indexes 


Commodity Indexes 

Cktse 


unut 

Z1S2D0 
151 31 
2?M» 


















j>J 


» ** 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 1994 


Page 17 


mm 



4 TrL? 


Hi 


Central Europe Seduces the West 


In Workweek 


■.By Brandon Mitchener 


'■ FRANKFURT — A year af- 
-ier it first circulated plans for a 
four-day workweek, Volks- 
wagen AG has served notice on 
: its German employees that they 
should start thinking in terms 
of a 24-hcmr week. 

In. its newest five-year plan, 
other details of which caused 
YW’s stock price to drop about 
^ percent over the past week, 
the company predicted it would 
need 50,000 fewer employees 
than its current total of 194,000 
Worldwide by 1999 because it 
■■expected a 54 percent increase 
"in productivity. 

The five-year phut confirmed 
'* the company’s intentions of ex- 
tending beyond 1995 the ex- 
-perimental four-day workweek 
in its German manufacturing 
fadHties, a move that is said to 
jhave saved 30,000 jobs. 

But a top VW labor represen- 
tative said he thought an even 
'shorter workweek was more like- 
ly than a return to full-time em- 
ployment, a concept that the 
company did not immediately 
. discard. “We’ll talk about the 
24jKnir week if it becomes a 
subject in 1995," Peter Schldein, 
a Volkswagen spokesman, said. 

In an interview with the Ger- 
man ma gazine Auto, Motor & 
Sport, which hits the news- 
stands Friday, Klaus VoJkert, 
.head of the VW workers coun- 
cil, said productivity in the 
company’s German plants was 


already rising so fast there 
could be no return to a 35-hour 
wedt without imposing layoffs. 

Currently, 

Volkswagen em- 
ployees wont an average of 28.8 
hours a week. 

‘The 24 hours are closer than 
the 35,” Mr. Volken was quoted 
as saying, while questioning 
whether workers could afford 
the corresponding wage loss. 

The VW plan, which was de- 
bated at a supervisory board 
meeting last week and only now 
became public in detail, its 
goal of a 54 percent increase in 
productivity worldwide “a con- 
servative assessment.’* 

The plan calls for every VW 
worker to produce 22 cars a year 
in 1999, compared with 14 now. 
Productivity at plants that pro- 
duce VoOcswagens would have 
to increase II percent a year. 

At Sociedad Espano la de Au- 
tomdviles de Turismo SA. 
Volkswagen’s Spanish unit, 
productivity is expected to rise 
15 percent and at Skoda, its 
venture in the Czech Republic, 
a 30 percent rise is predicted. 


Volkswagen and Ford Motor 
Co. plan to end their joint ven- 
ture in Brazil and Argentina, 
known as Autolatina, next year, 
news agencies reported from 
Wolfsburg, Germany. 

Autolatina, which is 51 per- 
cent owned by VW and 49 per- 
cent owned by Ford, was set up 
in 1987. (AFP, Reuters) 


Bloomberg Businas News 

LONDON — Central Eu- 
rope’s competitive edge over 
its Western neighbors is prov- 
ing irresistible to big compa- 
nies in Western Europe facing 
Ugh costs at home. 

From a 300 mini on Deut- 
sche mark (SI 91 million) 
plant in Gyor, a Hungarian 
Industrial city on the Buda- 
pest-Vienna highway, Audi 
AG has just started shipping 
four-cylinder engines for its 
new midsized A4 cars to 
sou lb era Germany. 

In Sl GothardC nearer the 
Austro-Hungarian border. 
General Motors Carp- builds 
Astra cars to ship to Germa- 
ny; Italy and Turkey. 

“If we did not have this op- 
portunity, God knows what we 
would have done," said Eber- 
haid von Koerber, president of 
ABB Asea Brown Boveri Ltd. 
“This is a gift of history.* 1 

Under mounting competi- 
tive pressures in world mar- 
kets, these and other Western 
companies are taking a fresh 
look at Central Europe. More 
companies today regard the 
region — Poland, Hungary 
and the Czech Republic — as 
a potential exporting base. 

The region’s low wages, 
highly educated work force 
and competitive exchange 
rates look inviting. The poten- 
tial opportunity for Western 
manufacturers based in the re- 
gion or contemplating invest- 
ment looks enticing enough, 
especially since tax incentives 
often supplement the coun- 
tries’ otter advantages. 

Vladimir Dlooby, the 
Czech minister of industry 
and trade, chides Western Eu- 
rope for the high cost employ- 


Delors Warns of Job Crisis 


BRUSSELS — The European Union summit meeting in 
Essen, Germany, next week must take solid steps to tackle the 
region’s high unemployment or risk seeing society disinte- 
grate, Jacques Delors, president of the European Commis- 
sion, said Thursday. 

“We must make a breakthrough at Essen,” Mr. Delors told 
the European Parliament. “1 will not be content with vague 
phrases.” 

More than 17 million people are out of work in the EU. a 
number that is not expected to shrink by much soon, despite a 
return to economic growth, unless extra steps are taken. 

Mr. Delors called on leaders at the two-day meeting set to 
begin Friday to create jobs by approving 14 major road and 
rail projects and ways of funding them. 


ers bear to finance generous 
unemployment, pension and 
sickness benefits. 

“It’s clear that Western Eu- 
rope’s problems are not from 
Southeast Asia or Central Eu- 
rope,” he said recently. “It is 
the continued expectations of 
the welfare state.” 

Some companies that invest- 
ed in the region after the Berlin 
Wall fell five years ago did so 
specifically to exploit the local 
market Now they realize they 
also can exploit the area’s com- 
petitive advantages. 

“In certain sectors, where 
labor costs are rising, compa- 
nies are looking at the region 
to reduce their total manufac- 
turing costs," said Ralph 
Land, who chairs the Central 
and East European working 
group of UNICE, the Europe- 
an employers’ organization. 

ABB, for instance, said it 
expected its exports from 
Central and Eastern Europe 
to rise to about one-third of its 


orders by 1997, up from a 
quarter of its orders now. 

Procter & Gamble Co. 
bought a Czech detergent com- 
pany, Rakona, in 1990, export- 
ing none of its output. Now it 
exports to 14 countries. 

JPiat SpA, which is investing 
$840 million in Poland be- 
tween 1992 and 1996, is in- 
creasing its exports of s mall 
Fiazs from its Polish plants. 

An added incentive for 
Western companies is the fact 
that Poland, Hungary and the 
Czech Republic all have asso- 
ciation agreements with the 
European Union. This gives 
them almost unlimited access 
to the Ell’s market for most 
manufactured goods. 

Cheap imports from the 
East represent a “veay big 
threat” to West European 
manufacturers, said Daniel 
Janssen, chair man of Solvay 
SA, Belgium’s biggest chemi- 
cal company. “East European 
labor costs are one-tenth of 
West Europe’s.” 


Companies are impressed by 
the availability of ed u cated 
workers at low cost In the 
Czech Republic, manufactur- 
ing wages average $220 a 
month, or about $1.25 an hour. 
In Hungary, monthly wages 
average about $250, and in Po- 
land, between $400 and $500. 

In Germany, where Eu- 
rope’s wage costs are highest, 
total labor costs per hour av- 
erage about $27. 

There are caveats: Al- 
though labor is cheap, strikes 
are common in Poland. 
Throughout the region, pres- 
sure for higher wages is grow- 
ing by the day. 

Wage increases are large 
enough for the Hungarian 
government to warn that they 
could deter foreign invest- 
ment. In the Czech Republic, 
Volkswagen AG made it dear 
that wage restraint was of vi- 
tal importance to swvfa, the 
Czech carmaker in which VW 
has an equity stake set to rise 
to 50.5 percent this month. 

Even so, “the enormous 
productivity increases in Cen- 
tral Europe will for years off- 
set the increase in wages,” Mr. 
Koerber of ABB said. 

The region’s exchange 
rates, too, are likely to remain 
advantageous for Western 
currencies for some time. 

Still, it will take some time 
for exports from the region to 
emerge as a force significant 
enough to shake op western 
Europe. 

Yet there is little doubt the 
exporting trend win broaden. 

“It could have a big im- 
pact,” Mr. Land said. “Cer- 
tain manufacturers wiQ be 
looking less at Southeast Aria 
and more at Central Europe.” 



Sources: Reuters, AFP 


lucnKUcnil Herald Tribune 


KRETEK: Indonesia Cigarette Maker Is Red-Hot Glcllicl Md Profit Jobs Off 

- GnBfimied fmm Fra 15 a -nifitifw af I - - »- l_ 


- Gmfnmed from Page 15 
industry except cal and gas. 
(Sampoema has made one bow 
in the direction of public health 
by introducing the first low-tar, 
low-nicotine fcrelek, called A- 
Mfld.) 

Mr. Putera took over from 
Sis late father in 1980. Highly 
^Westernized — he spent much 
of his youth in Australia and 
the United States — he inherit- 
ed a company steeped in tradi- 
,!jnal Indonesian ways of doing 

business. 

For example, many of the 
workers, especially those who 
grew tq> in rural villages, believe 


Mr. Putera recalled, the time a 
tight bulb burst, in a factory. 
’Suddenly, yon bad 2,000 peo- 
ple runnmg out of the factory. 
Women were crying. I was in 
.the middle, trying to comfort 
them." 

Eventually, Mr. Putera sum- 
moned a priest to bless the fac- 
tory to gk everybody back to 
work. 

• Mr. Putera left largely un- 


touched a number of traditions 
established by his grandfather, 
notably the company^ pater- 
nalistic, almost feudahstic per- 
sonnel policy. 

' Workers are organized into 
Indoncsian-style villages and 
subvillages beaded by layers of 
maruiurs, or supervisors, and 
village chiefs. 

The mandurs, chosen by con- 
sensus from among their peers, 
play big-aster roles in the per- 
sonal lives of the women they 
supervise, and anyone who is 
not ft member of a “village” is 
expected to ask the chiefs per- 
mission to enter its area — and 

thal includes Mr. Putera him- 
self. 

The oompany is convinced 
that these sorts of policies are 
responsible for its relatively tow 
employee turnover, which, is im- 
portant for a company that 
spends throe to six months 
training each worker to make 
cigarettes according to its ex- 
acting specifications; 

But Mr. Putera did radically 


alter Sampoema’s business 
strategy from its historical role 
as a pure manufacturer that left 
marketing up to independent 
distributors. As Indonesia's 
economy began to take flight in 
the late 1980s, he recognized the 
need to make the company 
mine market-driven. 

The company, which had 
never advertised until 1990, de- 
veloped a campaign three years 
ago aimed at capitalizing on 2- 
3-4*s premium image by asking 
the question: “Do you remem- 
ber the first 2-34 you ever 
smoked?” 

-Sampoema’s share of Indo- 
nesian cigarette sales shot up 
from around 4 percent in early 
1992 to just under 10 percent at 
the start of 1993 and even fur- 
ther this year, to nearly 15 per- 
cent in June, according to Sur- 
vey Research Indonesia. Profits 
from sales of the high-margin 2- 
34 have grown so quickly that 
Sampoema’s earnings this year 
are projected to reach $100 mo- 
tion. 


Coaqjilcd by Our Staff Fran Dixpaicha 

LONDON — Grand Metropolitan PLC said 
Thursday that annual earnings rose 5 percent, 
but the British food and drinks company said it 
would have to cut 2,600 jobs worldwide as part of 
its restructuring charge made along with its full- 
year results. 

Grand Met posted pretax profit, including 
provirions for job cuts and plant closures, at 
£654 nriHion for the year to September. Sales 
slipped to £7.78 billion from £8.12 billion in the 
previous year. 

Strong earnings growth at Pillsbury Co„ driv- 
en by increased sales and higher margins, over- 
shadowed a slump in profit at Grand Met's 
branded spirits business. International Distillers 
& Vintners LtdL, the company said. 

But Grand Met told investors that plant clo- 
sures, job cuts and increased marketing expendi- 
ture at IDV, the world’s largest spirits company, 
would strengthen profit next year. 

The branded foods business, which has opera- 
tions in Europe and North America, made an 
operating profit of £267 million, up 18 percent 
from last year. But while U-S. earnings increased, 
profit from Grand Met’s European foods busi- 
ness fell below last year’s figure as prices were 
cut. 

But cost-cutting program is expected to reduce 


the food businesses’ costs by about £46 million a 
year, the company said. 

Georee BuQ, the chief executive, said operat- 
ing profit from continuing businesses was up 5.4 
percent, reflecting strong performances by Pills- 
bury and Burger King but “difficult market 
conditions on minks.” 

The aarniny were lower than expected, and 
Grand Met riiares ended 8 pence lowin' at 376. 

(Bloomberg Reuters, AFP) 

■ Hanson's Earnings Exceed Forecasts 

Shares of Hanson PLC rose after the British 
industrial company reported higher-tban-ex- 
pected earnings for the year ended Sept 30 and 
predicted improved performance this year, Reu- 
ters reported. 

Hanson shares rose 3 to 238 after the company 
said pretax profit rose 33 percent from a year 
earlier, to £1-35 billion, while sales rose 14 per- 
cent, helped by the jraitihase of the U.S. compa- 
ny Quantum Chemical Coip. at the beginning of 
the year. 

Hanson has interests in chemicals, tobacco, 
housewares and mining. 

The chief executive. Derek Bonham, said an 
improving economic donate and the continued 
strong performance of Hanson’s companies 
would provide “ another excellent result for the 
current year.” 


Very briefly 


• Tdd6nka de Es p arto SA said it would restructure its several 
lines of business to better prepare the company for competition 
and make it more attractive to potential foreign investors. 

• VERA AG said it would restructure its insurance activities and 
dis m iss one management board member and one director at Veba 
units because of a report on fraud at its insurance agency. 
Hambuger Hof GmbH, which will cease operations. 

• Luf thans a AG said it was in talks with Scandinavian Airlines 
Spates® on a cooperation agreement The German airline and Thai 
Airways International are also considering a joint subsidiary 
airline to operate cargo services in the Asia-Pacific region from 
late next year. 

• West German manufacturing output rose a provisional and 
adjusted 1.6 percent in October, compared with September, the 
Economics Ministry said. 

• ABB Asea Brown Boveri lid., the Swiss- Swedish electrical 
engineering conglomerate, said it had won a $900 million order for 
high-speea locomotives and urban trains from Germany's nation- 
al railway, Deutsche Balm AG. 

• Matsushita Electronic Coa^oaeats GmbH said it would buy 
Nokia Display Technics GmbH, a Goman picture- tube maker, 
owned by Nokia Consumer Electronics of Finland. 

• Royal Bank of Scotland PLC reported a 106 percent increase 
from a year earlier in annual pretax profit, to £532 million ($830 
mtitimj, as bad-debt provirions dropped. 

• 3i Group PLC, a major European venture capital company, said 
the value of its investments in small and medium-sized companies 
rose nearly 7 percent in the first half of its financial year. 

Bloomberg, AFX, AFP, AP 


BASF Quits 7 Exchanges 


Bloomberg Businas News 

LUDWIGSHAFEN, Ger- 
many — - The chemicals giant 
BASF AG has become the first 
big German company to with- 
draw its shares from the seven 
regional German stock ex- 
changes. 

The company’s shares will 
now be traded rally on the 
Frankfurt Stock Exchange, 
Germany’s biggest. 

The move, which the compa- 
ny said was to save money and 
provide investors with a more 
active market in Frankfurt, 
prompted speculation that oth- 
er companies would follow. 


“Investors increasingly want 
to trade on exchanges with 
higher liquidity Max Dietrich 
Klcy, chief BASF financial offi- 
cer, said at a news conference. 
He said this was an internation- 
al trend evident in other centers 
such as Paris and London. 

BASF is one of the 30 blue- 
cbips that make up the leading 
stock index, the DAX Index. 
That wiU not change. But for 
the smaller exchanges in Berlin, 
Bremen, DOsseldorf, Hamburg, 
Hannover, Munich and Stutt- 
gart, BASFs withdrawal wiT 
add pressure to find ways to 
maintain revenue. 


NYSE 

Thursday's Closing 

Tables Include tho naflonwJcte prices up to 
the closing on Wall Street and do not reflect 
late trates enewhera. Vie The Associated Press 


Of VldPE WBI Htfl LcwUdSslOfoC 


12 Marti 
Low Stock 


I n Marti 9s I II Marti 

Wi Low Latest 01*80 HMlLawSodt Dtv VM PE 1BB1 ttoh LnaLOiaaOrBO HWlUWiStq»_ 


DN VMPEiS H» LoaUtetOrt* I Htth LowWtc a* YM PE IQflS W LOKrLgfofCn'oe HMlLowSIW* Div YM PE MOs Mall LawLataBPi*B» 




. * 3* - 

"'*.•« I- i it- 


1 1 |-| I 

I jj a n i 

8? wo. io3 " 5# m 
a* a-* * « j f?l 

£ -B ■* fj | € 




111 : 


^ A 

AT. - ■■ - ID 




* i 

. - , ‘ a 


e* -■ 

*- - V i. 




I 




*’5 a 

■j» ifl “ 

■* fl * 


riS iH = 


■si 


MB « 1 

rt SB 


4 4 8 




a 3 a 

a 8 j 


fIk §T~cTT 

f* 4 Jli 

£111 

S: & & i 


aSS H n 
v*. » ij is 

Ul Si li ( 

5 a 0 s 


nr m iL. ifl 


■aa 

r & ai 

"as 


« a 


H a 9s 




|£ i.jj » a f 

^ Hi; 

! : i 

I “ S 


184 


*3 

js a " 

a i 


COatinued on Page 18 


GOUNIWE5 


acassWUMBaS COUNTRIES 


ACCESS Nuwaas COUNTMES 


ACCESS WUMBBtS COUNTRIES 


ACCESS NUMBERS COUNTMES 


Mgw IdodkoMd pha»*i) 
Aotgua (pay phonii] ' 

ArflSrttlO 

AnnWta 

AutraEo (Optus] + 
AMhaflaCbfalnd* 
AosMol 
Bahamas . 

MnlnA 
Bdglani + 

BalzaPKMb) 

MmO 
BaPwriaS ' 
ttaOrfa . 
hod .. 

RiMsfc Vfcyht U. X 

BataolaA- . 

Cw-fa- 

ewu 

Chino (EngMi) +/ 

China (Mandarin) W 
ColamUa (Englnh) 
Cohnahia tSpWfh) 

Com Biob + ' 

Cmada+ 


633-1000 

Ml 

1 -800-366-4663 
0M-MW77-III1 
S-] 0-153 
OOt-U 11-10 
140MB1-B77 

lOMmOIA 

1^B0M8W21tl 

I^OOJ77JOOO 

0800-10014 

556 

*4 

1H0O623-0877 
0600-3333 
000-MI 6 
l^Kh87?-B0a0 
00-800-1010 
1800JD78000 
00+M17 
101-13 
108-16 
980-130010 
980-1 90-110 
163 

99-3-800-13 


Cyprus ■ 

Czadt lapahfic 
P i nm arii* 

DomUom BapabSa A 
JEcuodar/ 

Egypt (Gain) + 

Egypt (a! olhai) + 
aSo(ttKfar + 

nptfcnh 
Hnlaml ♦ 

C ar n m ay » 

Smear + 

Guam 

G urmnwl n * 

Honduras A 
Haag Kong 
Hoag Kona A 

kMiond+rt 

kdlu* 

Indonaila 
Ireland 4- 
bn*l + 

My-f 
lomdco- ‘ 


080-9004)1 

0042-087-187 

800-1-0877 
1 ^00^31-7877 
171 

356-4777 

02456-477 

191 

004-890-100-3 

9800-1-0384 

1940017 

01300013 

0084)01-411 

950-1366 

195 

001-800-1313000 

800-1877 

Oil 

»♦ BOW 1-877 
9994)03 

000- 137 

001- 801-15 
1-800-55-2001 
177-103-2727 
172-1877 
1-800- 877 -8000 


Japan (DC] [EnfllMi] 4 
Japan POX^ (bghh) 4- 
Jppai (Jopamna| * 

Kaijo/ 

Korea (Dosaa) + 

Korea (KT) 44 
brwair 

UteMew ri e h 4 

LMmaBla/ 

l u x nahaurg 

Macao o 

MtdayiZo + 

Mexico t 
Monaco 4 
MtiKAnOn 

(Cutwao & Sonaire) 4 
Hrt ta ln u d i * 

Nan ZaaJaadA 
(1» coairty caBs) 
K*w2aok>rt 

Nfawagua Ohmn a w &8&AI a 
Nwbiubb W imp m Si— 

iierway 4 
Pananu 

Paraguay A 


0066-55-877 

0039-131 

0066^5-888 

0800-13 

0039-13 

009-16 

800-777 

155-9777 

84197 

08004)115 

0800-121 

HD-0016 

95-800*877-8000 

1940087 

*001-800-745-1111 

06*4224119 

0134)-— Bt» d« pOaiin 

000-999 

171 

161 

024 Enroll a Spnmhn 

MO-19877 

115 

008-13-800 


Rau</ 

T MU pp hn s (E1W rtafaw 
MBppinas (TUCoaO 4 
F hmp p lna i (wan 

Poland 4 
Portugal 4 
Paata Rko~- 
Romania +■ 
bHb(8n— )4 
tuuia (all sAar) +rt 
So%ND 

Tfariaa and Redo- 4H 
San Maria* 4 

5—dAratda 
Snuapora + 

5auNi Africa 4 
SM 
SLludaO 
SLladoA 


Syfio4 
Taiwan a 
Thahmd J 
Trinidad A Xeboga 
(pom at entry only] 


196 

.only) 01064)1 
, 101411 

105-16 

0010*400-115 

09017-1-877 

1-800477-8000 

01-8004877 

155-6123 

8095-1554133 

2354833 

1-233-0333 

172-1877 

1800-15 

6000- 177-177 

0400-994)001 

900444013 

1 400-277-74*8 

187 

0209VM11 

155-9777 

0688 

0080-144877 

001-999-13-W7 


Turtuy 4 

U5. Vhgb, bbuMts - 


(MndArabEartata>4 

Udrtd Kingdom (ST) 
UnBod tOngdon (Mwcary) 
Uruguay** 

VatfeaiCBy + 

Vtmnuala (GngOdi) 
VmmbmIo (Spmddi) 


ACCESS NUMBBtS 

00-800-1-4477 
1400477-4000 
1400-877-8000 
8-10015 
800-131 
0800494877 
0500494877 
000417 
172-1 B77 
800-1111-0 
Boo-nu-i 


Sprint. 


TtiJL put iet in taJrjihi jikf Jut rtr dm-o mniJn fn 
iht ivumiy wurnuitii^. In in rant# Jf. mil ht ,*ni,-,i;,l v 
m Ijrgteh-sptdanJ Sprmt l hi An tutr 








































































































Page 19 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


Motion and Aid 
To the Jobless Lead 
’95 Agenda 



Delt 


a i 


’ iri 20 
3r 220 
every 


r hubs 
system 


ner US 


Uui cfS 


/“• ; r •» 
w u ■ ■ ~ 


;\5i 


- . ■* rt ‘ 
■%* ,i(» J 


* A? 


i.aj 

-r> r 


■ n- 

'’P ’V 

. V 


Tc* 



“■■■■' " /fm/eri 

rBEUING Controlling in- 
flation and oompensaiing work- 
. as laid off from unprofitable 
slate-owned companies will 
^ma’s agenda for eco- 
n$mjc reform next year, offi- 
cials said Thursday. 
fThe announcement was 
made on national television af- 
ter an economic conference that 

opened Monday. 

Currently. China's most 
outstanding problem is exces-' 
sivdy rapid price rises," the an- 
nouncement said. 

^Deputy Prime Minister Zhu 
Rongji, responsible for guiding 
the economy, said the next most 
important problems were the 
management of state-owned en- 
terprises and main t.i ii^jng social 
order, especially in the prov- 
inces. 

-The free-market reforms of 
the paramount leader, Deng 
OCiaoping, were reaffirmed, but 
Tngh inflation is threatening to 
undermine some of the achieve- 
ments they have brought. 
’Outlining tasks for 1995. Chi- 


na s Communist leadership said 
the first job would be to “strict- 
ly and consistently codlto! and 
stop inflation." 

■ ri n P ct °b er ' consumer price 
inflation in 35 major cities 
reached an annual rate of 27 
percent. 

In addition, more than one- 
third of China's thousands of 
state-owned companies are los- 
ing money and draining the na- 
tional treasury as they struggle 
to adjust to a new system that 
requires them to compete with 
vibrant private enterprises. 

■ High-Tech Trade Soars 

Chinese imports and exports 
of high-technology products 
reached a record $20.59 billion 
in 1993. up 40 percent from 
1992. The Associated Press re- 
ported, citing official figures. 

Imports jumped 48 percent, 
to $15.91 billion, in 1993, while 
exports rose 17 percent, to 
$4-68 billion. That left a trade 
deficit in the sector of $11.23 
billion, widened from $10.71 
billion a year earlier. 


Ch ina Gets a New TV Station 

■ " • Agena Franar-Presse 

‘HONG KONG — A new television station began beaming 
family-oriented programs throughout China Thursday. 

. Robert Chua, who is known for an ability to select hit program- 
ming, attracted $50 mini on in investment capital to start China 
Ehter tainme nt Television Broadcast Ltd. Mr. Chua has ordered 
that the programs have “no sex, no violence, no news.'’ 

1 Chi na Ent ertainment Television/Family Entertainment Chan- 
nel, or CETV, started with a one-hour test program. It plans to air 
sa hours of Mandarin-language programming starting March 12. 


Chipmakers Raise Stakes 


Bloomberg Business News 

SEOUL — South Korea’s semiconductor 
makers are stepping up their assault on the 
competition with billions of dollars in new 
investments, a move that is pulling their Japa- 
nese rivals into an ever more expensive cycle 
of factory and plant construction. 

Korea’s top three makers of semiconduc- 
tors, Samsung Electronics Co., Hyundai 
Corp. and Gold Star Co., will spend more 
than $6 billion on new semiconductor manu- 
facturing facilities in 1995. 

If successful. South Korea's share of the 
world market for 16-megabit memory chips 
may hit 48 percent by 1996, while japan’s 
may fall to 46 percent, according to Choo Dae 
Yung, an electronics analyst with the state- 
run Korea Institute for Economics and Tech- 
nology. South Korean chipmakers have 
around 30 percent or the market now. 

“We can't tell Samsung and the others to 
stop investing," said Hajime Sasaki, executive 
vice president of NEC Corp. But he said 
Japan’s biggest chipmaker was “prepared to 
make the investment necessary to keep up." 

Japanese chipmakers, which have dominat- 
ed the dynamic random-access memory (D- 
RAM) chip industry since the early 198ds, are 
finding themselves in a squeeze. To keep up 
with South Korea, they need to spend as 
much as $1 billion for each new plant. At the 
same time, they need to keep memory chip 
prices down. 

Holding on to their leadership in memory 


chips is all the more important because Japa- 
nese concerns have failed to make a significant 
impact in the more profitable market for logic 
chips and microprocessors, which are semicon- 
ductors used to control functions of electronic 
devices rather than simply for storing data. The 
market is dominated by U.S. companies, espe- 
cially Intel Corp. and Motorola Inc. 

The expansion plana of the big three Kore- 
an chipmakers will raise their combined pro- 
duction capacity of 16-megabit chips to 25 
million units a month from 4.5 milli on. 

Samsung invested $1.6 billion this year in 
memory chip plants and plans to spend $225 
billion to build production lines for 16- and 
64-megabit D-RAM semiconductors. Hyun- 
dai wifi increase spending on semiconductors 
next year by 20 percent, to $2.4 billion. Gold- 
star plans to spend $1.88 billion this year on 
expansion, up from $875 million last year. 

But Japanese mak ers are matching their 
Korean counterparts with some expensive in- 
vestments of their own. 

In the past three months, NEC has an- 
nounced an $800 million investment in a new 
plant in Scotland, a $50 milli on update of a 
memory plant in California, a $1 billion new 
production line at a site in southern Japan 
and $10 milli on in refurbishmenis to chip 
plants in Singapore and Malaysia. 

Toshiba Corp., Japan's second- largest 
chipmaker, said in September it would spend 
about $1 billion to expand one of its Japanese 
chip plants. 


NEC Unveils Music by Credit Card 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

TOKYO — NEC Corp. has developed a 
palm-sized audio system with no moving 
parts that can play music- with the same quali- 
ty as a compact case or digital audio tape, the 
company said Thursday. 

The so-called Silicon Audio system stores 
music on fat cards roughly the size of credit 
cards, and the cards can be played on a 
Walkman-like pocket stereo system. The 
cards contain rows of computer memory 
chips. Each card can hold 24 minutes of 
music, the company said. 


Mark Pearce, a spokesman for NEC, said 
the company hoped to market the system “as 
soon as possible” but said it was not likely to 
be mass-produced before 2000. 

Unlike compact disc or cassette players, 
Silicon Audio has no moving parts, m eanin g 
there would be no vibrations distorting sound 
quality. 

Also on Thursday. NECs high-tech rival 
Hitachi Ltd. said its first-half profit rose 23 
percent, to 13029 billion yen ($1.3 billion), as 
its overseas units returned to profitability. 

(AFP. AP, Reurers) 


Car Sales 
Improve 
In Japan 

Reuters 

TOKYO — The Japan Auto- 
mobile Dealers Association re- 
ported Thursday that Japan’s 
domestic vehicle sales rose 6.1 
percent in November from a 
year earlier, their sixth straight 
month of gains. 

Analysis predicted that sales 
would go on to show a full-year 
increase this year, for the first 
time in four years. 

“Japan sales will rise by 2 
percent to 3 percent from a year 
earlier, to around 5 million in 
calendar 1994,” said Hiroshi 
Suemasa, an analyst at Kan- 
kaku Research Institute Inc. 

Vehicle sales fell 8.4 percent 
in 1993. 

Noriyuld Matsushima, an an- 
alyst at Nikko Research Center 
LtcL, said, “Domestic sales are 
now in a recovery phase but will 
slowly track the domestic eco- 
nomic recovery.” 

At Toyota Motor Corp.. No- 
vember sales rose 3.0 percent 
from a year earlier. Nissan Mo- 
tor Co. posted a 2.8 percent 
gain, while sales surged 172per- 
cent at Mitsubishi Motors 
Corp. Mazda Motor Corp.’s 
sales rose 32 percent. 

Honda Motor Co.’s sales fell 
10.5 percent in November be- 
cause of high demand last year 
for its Ascot and Rafaga mod- 
els, a company spokesman said. 

Separately, Agence France- 
Presse reported that Toyota was 
the most profitable Japanese 
company for the seventh year in 
a row, according to a survey 
conducted by Nihon Keizai 
S him btin, a business daily. 


Investor’s Asia 


Hong Kong 
Hang Seng 


Singapore * Ttokyo 
' Straits Times' . : Nikkei 225 


locec -4 



1 J A S O W'D 
1994 



S'K .8 o” ti.'o A' sRT nTd 


1964 


Exchange Index 
Hong Kong Hang Seng 


1994. 

Thursday] ]:.PreV. “ ; ■ 

Close. 

&43QA0 &4B&26 : ,"' r £42- 


Singapore 

Straits Times ■. 

2£2&35 .2242-08 ..-OST.: 

Sydney 

Ail Ordinaries 

1,90040 1.880 JO ..A&5V- 

Tokyo 

Nikkei 225 

19,013.60 19,121.72 --QJ5F 

Kuate Lumpur Compos&e 

986.13 ' 1 ,013.13 . -Z8T 

Bangkok 

BET 

1,371.60 . . 1,862.44 *-*0457 

Seoul 

Compostie Slock 

14)6921 1 4)74.41 •. -0.7)6' ; 

Taipei 

Weighted Price 

6,444:05 .8,363.72 ' *1.26. 

Manila 

PSE 

2;64526 2,691.19 MITD- 

Jakarta . 

Stock Index 

462.13. •• 482^3. • 

New Zealand 

NZSE-40 

1^76.06 i 1 8ee.97- ,: ; l .^. , 7^ , : 

Bombay 

National Index 

1,953.42 1,959.56- 

Sources: Reuters. AFP 

International Herald Tribune 

Very briefly; 


• Acer Inc^ a Taiwan-based manufacturer of personal computers,, 
plans to enter the telecomm uni cations business next year and start 
producing mobile phones, pagers and digital cordless phones. 

■ British Telecommunications PLC plans to invest 440 million 
Australian dollars ($334 million) in Australia over the next seven 
years and to move its Asia-Pacific headquarters to Sydney. 

• The China Daily, the country’s only national English-language 
newspaper, said it planned to add four pages to the current 12 next 
year and expand coverage of economic news. 

• Total SA of France and Sinochem, a Chinese state trading firm, 
have agreed to cross sales of crude ofl and chemical products 
worth $3 billion over the next three years. Total Beijing said. 

• International Petroleum Corp. of Canada said it had made a 
potentially large oil find off the east coast of Malaysia. 

• South Korea’s trade deficit swelled 54 percent from a year 

earlier, to $626 billion, in the first 1 1 months of 1994 as imports 
hit an all-time high. AFP. Bloomberg Reuters 



Foreigners Buy in Seoul as Koreans Sell 




trHveOasVdemands tenvec Ctrikl’5 play. 

■ & business iravr&» r yoa'd warp easy access to the 
fottOBcrcial efisain. an djki^busaressaattrc anitfiify-eqaipped 

“ ' maefeigioainGfixastaT. 

. ~On die after- tend, % a feisare traveller, yoa‘4 be askfa® about the 
■ swimming pool, the fitness centre] stopping ahdrarfsi hauus ... 

. Come lo Hoff! New Otaru and We'D meet afi ihese demands and ntore 
’ Jnsi so Mroi'ttie thrown ofF-haianre. 



Compiled ty Our Staff From Dispatches 

SEOUL — Foreign investors 
snapped up blue-chip shares 
that became available to them 
Thursday after the government 
increased the ceiling on foreign 
stock ownership to 12 percent 
from 10 percent. 

But brokers said domestic in- 
stitutional investors were sell- 
ing as furiously as foreigners 
bought, leaving the benchmark 
composite index down 8.2 
points at 1,06621. 

. .“This mirrors strong foreign 
interest in our market,” Koo Ja 
Sam of Daewoo Securities Co. 
said. But some analysts said the 


fact that domestic investors 
were selling might indicate a 
trend. 

“This gave institutions an op- 
portunity to materialize profits. 
The market is expected to con- 
solidate further,” said Choi 
Bum, general manger of W.L 
Carr (Far East) Ltd. in Seoul. 

Analysts said South Korean 
institutions, concerned about a 
liquidity squeeze by the central 
bank and uncertain about mar- 
ket direction, were trying to se- 
cure more cash- 

institutional investors low- 
ered their off ere on large manu- 
facturing shares to make sure 


they were sold to foreigners,” 
said Cho Hyun Kwang, a trader 
at Coryo Securities Co. 

Despite the decline in the in- 
dex, stocks that gained outnum- 
bered those that declined by 
467 to 404, because most of the 
stocks that fell were those of 
large manufacturing compa- 
nies, which are heavily weighted 
in the index. 

Immediately after trading 
started, foreign investors placed 
orders for about 40 top manu- 


facturing shares that had al- 
ready been at the old 10 percent 
foreign-investment limit. 

Korean institutions compet- 
ed to sell their holdings to the 
eager foreign firms. 

While foreign investors as a 
group can now hold 12 percent 
of any one South Korean com- 
pany's stock, the limit for indi- 
vidual ownership of any stock 
remains at 3 percent 

(Reuters, Bloomberg) 


Manila’s Growth Rate Rises 


Reuters 


MANILA — Philippine economic growth gathered pace in 
the thud quarter, helped by a record rise in farm output and 
strong industrial production, Cielito Habito, the country’s 
chief economic planner, said Thursday. 

He said gross national product grew at an annual rate of 5.9 
percent in the quarter, und he predicted growth of about 5.5 
percent for the year. GNP grew at an annual rate of 5.5 
percent during the first nine months of the year, compared 
with 22 percem a year earlier. 

Mr. Habito said growth was being driven by investment 
and higher demand and therefore should be sustainable. 


International 

Classified 

Marketplace 

I Monday 

International Conferences and Semina'S 
I Tuesday 

Education Directory 
I Wednesday 

Business Message Center 
I Thursday 

In tern a tional Recruitment 
I Friday 

Real Estate Marketplace, Holidays aid Travel 
I Saturday 
Arts and Antiques 

Plus over 300 headings in International Classified 
Monday through Saturday 

For further information, contact Phifip Oma fn Paris: 
Tel: (33-1) 463794 74 - Fax: (33- 1)463752 12 

INTERNATIONAL* 


i *kw vm ipa o* ret runmgua aki 


CURRENCY AND CAPITAL MARKET SERVICES 


r a nrV: — ^ SFA a IPE 

^ 3 jrxTZXKTETZX member 

FUTURES LIMITED 

->4 Hour margin based foreign exchange paling 
Catering only ’to speculative & hedging needs 

information and Kdgol -ft* 

Full futures brokerage in all major ™rk«s 

33 Cavendish Square London 

rv ,• ■ CAH\ Reiners Moniior SABY/Z 1+ Daily fw> 

4,2 0M3 

Please col! for ft**" lrt f ormation l. 


Catch The Big Moves 

DID YOU SELL DEC DAX AT 2142? 

- DID YOU SELL DEC S+P 500 AT d72. 557 

DID YOU BUY COFFEE IN MARCH? OUR CLIENTS DID 
Comrrtrac, he computerised trading sysfflm is now available tw bx and corere over 75 
commotitiSG/nnanriai tuturetfndkaes with specific “Buy, "Self or neutral" recommendations 
Request your S<tay tree ftfia/ by eentBng a fax 

to Can* on 0624 662272 Hit + 44 S 24 662272 



ECU Futures PLC 
29 Chesham Place 


FUTURES & OPTIONS BROKERS 


London SW1X8HL 
TeL +71 245 0088 
Fax: +71 235 6599. 
- Member SFA. 


$32 


i < y ROUND 

TURN 

EXECUTION ONLY 


G Signal Realtime! USAG 

: O S.CCK * F« r 

- ^rv^f^S^nVunrn, Softo Cicte & pn« M ° 
P Call NOV. + W 17, ^35561 ~ J 


iMMMCrtttlOrapir 


Keystone 800-967-4879 
312-207-0117 


!20&khiiridD Tfaa 
Ctika&tBuHfUM 



Currency Management Corporation Plc 
11 Old Jewry - London ECZR 8DU 
TeLs 071-86? 0800 Faad 071-972 0970 


MARGIN FOREIGN EXCHANGE 


24 Hour London Dealing Desk . 
Competitive Rates & Daily Fax Sheet 
: ■ Call for further information & brochure 



TeL (44) 71 836 4802 
five: (44) 71 240 2254 


NtasdiJUaMMii 


Ww* P) 


1 39X3284 
>3!U8777. 


$32*817.04 
MET kealdzd pawns 

I^FJIXUWOUNEffiR MANAGEMENT 

June 27, 1994 thbough Octdbex 31, 1994 



TILL 


Can you imagine 



. . .fulfilling your dream! 


T his yacht, the 'White Gull" went around the 
world departing from Cannes in 1986, across the 
Atlantic to the Caribbean, through the Panama 
Canal, across the Pacific and Indian Oceans and up 
through the Suez Canal back to Cannes. 

During the four years voyage, the owner had the frfe 
'time experience of calling at exotic and beautiful 
places, such as the West Indies, Galapagos, Tahiti, 
numerous pacific atols. New Zealand, Australia 
(the'Great Barrier Reef), Bali, Java, Sumatra, 

Sri Lanka, Seychelles, Madagaskar, Comor Islands 
and Kenya. 

All this in the luxury of “White Gulls' accommoda- 
tions. And, most important, he was aboard a sailing 
ship which was truly built for such a voyage, never- 
theless maintaining the amenities of a large power 
yacht, cruising four years across all these waters 
without a problem. 

Who has got the money and dreams of such 
a global exploration on the world's best, most 
comfortable stay sail schooner, now waiting for 
her new owner? 


T his person has the possibility to acquire “White 
Gull”, which has been maintained to the highest 
stand a rs and just brought up to top condition under 
the supervision of Veritas with a certificate valid for 
the next 4 years. 

A very extensive inventory of spares is kept aboard. 
Sails can be set and easily handled by one crew 
member only. Always reachable via the most modem 
communication, two independant satellite systems, 
faxes and everything necessary for 'White Gull' to 
be used as home or office for private or corporate 
ventures. 

The yacht has never been chartered and has always 
been cherished by the owner. 

All water sports equipment are carried aboard: 
complete diving facilities, a sailing dinghy and 
a catamaran, three tenders and sophisticated big 
game fishing equipment. 


LQA : 49 metres Surveyor's appraisal (1993) USS 12500.000,- 

Beam: 9 metres Asking price USS 10.000.000,- 

Draft: 4 metres Hnandng possibilities are available on request 


If you are interested, please contact Captain Larry Ciprich on board: 
Tel + 33.92.987196 or Fax + 32.89.721913 





Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER SL1994 


. I'y; 




THE RUHR A 


Schleswig- J ✓— < M 

Holstein Mecklenburg- 

Axr Vorpommem 

Hamfiur?rv r ~' r ^' — ' 


THE ‘ \ BremerC 


>13 X 


Lower Saxony 


^Brandenburg 

\ o 

/ Berlin 


Saxony - 1 

Anhalt 


r s,^ 

r J 

/ Thuringia ^ 


'North Rhine- r J _ , 

1 Westphalia' ( Thurlnj 

T r''' Hesse “J-. 

t C— v 

I V Rhineland- l W 
LyX.paiatinatfi > £> v 


aarl^nd 


«=*"«*/ Baden- r ' 
/ Wurttemberg \ 


" CZECH. 

# Rep. 

VfC 


Some 4,500 European Union 
ministers, staff members and 
journalists will be arriving in the 
Ruhr district on the afternoon of 
Dec. 8. Their meeting place: the 
Messehaus Sud (South House) 
on Essen’s trade-fairgrounds, 
where, over the following two 
days, the 35th summit 
conference of the Council of the 
European Union will be held. 


Emblem of Europe’s Constant '^^ wal 

The Ruhr urea exemplifies hov.- Europe s key industrial areas hare adapted to tec Imo ogt 


Bavaria 


WES EL 


^SWnZERLAMD 


“The Ruhr Area" 

was produced in its entirety by the Advertising 
Department of the International Herald Tribune. 
WRITER: Terry Swanjferg is a business writer 
based in Munich. 

Procram director: Bill Mahder. 


S\ Dortmund 

sburg^- ^ Es3BI1 : Bochumj^^^ 

^d* 0 ^***^ ( RUHR ^ 4 


COUNTY | j 

City ! 1 


Al\ the European Union summit in Essen starting Deu- 8, 
the last major event of Germany's EL 1 presidency, the Coun- 
cil will strive to formulate Union-wide policies on measures 
protecting the atmosphere from a further rise in me levels ot 
carbon dioxide, harmonizing individual countries rates ot in- 
terest-income taxation and how to proceed with the EU s pu- 
tative expansion eastward. 

The routes the delegates will take to get to the conference 
are short and well-trodden. Essen is about three hours by train 
from Brussels and an hour and 20 minutes flight from 
Copenhagen. London and Milan. Traversing these stretches 
over the past decade and a half has been a large number oi 
peripatetic professionals: urban and regional planners, envi- 
ronmental protection experts, businesspeople and architectur- 
al conservationists. 

European business hub 

The region attracting their interest is notable first for its size 
and output. Home -to 5.4 million people and extending over 
4.434 square kilometers ( 1 .773 square miles j, the Ruhr dis- 
trict has a 200 billion Deutsche mark (SI 33 billion) econo- 
my that makes it Europe's second-largest contiguous busi- 
ness area, with the Ruhr ranking first in output of industrial 
producLx and technical services. • . 

Apart from this, the Ruhr boasts a diversified business 
community, with a noticeable tilt toward heavy engineering, 
international trading, energy and environmental tecryiolo- 
ojes. and telecommunications networks, plus some primary 
coods processing - a typical spread tor a progressive region 

Tn Europe. _ . 

Like the rest of Germany and most of \\ estem Europe, the 
Ruhr shows an encouraging growth rate - 2.2 percent at lat- 
est report - which is helping to bring down a still-ioo-high 

rate of unemployment. , 

The Ruhr has a goodly collection ot medieval castles and 



ISTANBUL 


EUROPE’S NEW CENTRE - MOVED TO THE RUHR. 


With the eastward expansion of the European Europe. Not just geographically. It ,s also the hub ^ 

horizon the Ruhr - an ideal area for life and of exciting, new developments m bus, ness. pot,, 

business - has become the central focus for tics, culture and science. When w.tl you ,om us. 


RUHRGEBJET. 


For further information: KVR - The Ruhr. D-45032 Essen. Fax .49-20.-2069-555, Telephone .49-20.-2069-574 


trial High. S 0 J f Tdisftct-s surface ata ‘ 

nature accounts lor o_ pereem , • 

andpleasantly heterogeneous inner une . . ; 

The legacy of coal and steel affairs and future; 

A gencrat.on age- the Ruhr's «a^ some jn Lj|a . - ,, 

prospects ^..^? ns FranL ^- s Nortli and Lorraine- regions ; ;! 
England n Midlands. F _ . j Luxembourg. the Ruhr '. ? 
and the "rust belts ! n in . ei ^ v ined industries to affluence and: vj 
had ndden two major. jmt counterparts, when com- . ? j 

national economic pnmaty JL Le ns made coal . • 

petition from abroad and from new teennu s economic • ?’ 
Snd steel nonviable commodities, the Ruhr s y 

; 

Kommunaiverband Ruhrgebiet (KVRl. the ■ 

SSHS environmental protection auUion.y. ' *a L fte ; , 
Ruhr, tike its counterparts, had irreversibly and mevtt^h _ : 
reached the cycle's final stage, that it was condemnoJ to be a, g 
“bumed-out g^ant’ lingering on in a twilight ol subsidies and . < 

underemployment” ■ I 

■■•■■'a 

A dramatic turnaround . ' 

Instead, in a dramatic turnaround, a new cycle was begun in; p 
the earlv 1980s. accompanied by the creation ol _ 10.000 jobs.; . 
during the decade. Nearly all were in the region s mushroom- > \ 
Sb services sector, and most of them were at the sector s high . 
end. in such areas as project engineeni^. pnnung and U-.- , 
nance. Todav, services account for about 60 percent of the re- ? 
° ion's economic output - a bit more than the German aver-; f 

s - I 

a5 fo accomplish this turnaround, a broad-based, ad hoc;, j 
-i coalition was formed. It included the governments of the slate-, j 
of North Rhine- Westphalia and the Ruhr s 15 major cornmu- • f 
nities and administrative districts, plus the KVR and other re- - ■ 
oional bodies, the local business community and such spe-_ , 
cialized project development authorities as LEG (Landes- ; . 

entwicklungsgesellschaft Nordrhein-Westfalen 1. . 

In inducing this tmnsfomiation. the members of this couli- . 
tion called on a number of potent assets: their own consider-.- 
able financial resources, their ability to work together and the - 
legacy of a highly successful past 

Corporate strength 

Durina a 160-year period, dating from Fnednch Kcupp s 
founding of his' machine-building comply in Essen in 181 1,.- 
larae-scale corporate empires were built up in the region.-. 
Bearine such names as Thyssen. Mannesmann and Guteliofi- • 
nunashulte. these empires diversified over time, entering into 
everything from automotive and aerospace engineering to. 
construction and energy supply. * 

Not surprisingly, this accumulation ot corporate wealth ana.- 
consumer purchasing power triggered the growth ot a reiar! jr 
in*: and trading sector that still occupies a position ot prtmap 
cv in Germany today. The names Aldi, Tengelmann and; 
Karstadt are to be found in inner-citv business disincts ana. 
shopping centers all over Europe. The companies behind , 
them have their headquarters in the Ruhr. - • i 

Efficient transport links ! 

To sene this concentration of industrial and commercial 
power, a lightly woven grid of rail lines, roads and waterways 
was built up. including Duisburg's Ruhrort harbor, located at 
the junction of the Rhine and Ruhr rivers and the largest in- 
' land harbor in the world. Later came the airports, including . 
Diisseldorfs. located just to the south of the Ruhr and the ; 
second-largest in Germany. - 

•“This density and state of development ot infrastructure 
has proven to be one of the region's major advantages as it : 
has none about redeveloping its industrial base.” says, 
Thomas KJante. head of information at RWE AG. Germany V. 
largest energy and environmental technologies supplier, with, 
headquarters "in Essen. "In contrast to many other areas of Eu- 
rope. each redevelopment site already had the necessary in*, 
frastnicrure in place. No site was more than 10 kilometers- 
away from a highway.” 

It is the scale and scope of redevelopment and its highly in-; 
arresting architectural and social products that are now prov- 
ing a magnet to many segments of the world's intellectual^ 
and professional community. 

Coal mines redesigned 

There is no more coal mining, at least in such cities as Essen, 
where the last of 22 mines. Zoilverein. ceased production in ; 
19S6. But the coal mines, or at least their aboveground strue-; 
cures, live on. Drawing on generous grants from the EU and': 
employing architect Norman Foster's design. Zoilverein is! 
being restored and expanded. At latest report, four of its 2bi 
magnificently austere Bauhaus structures had been refur- ! 
bished. 1 

Today. Zoilverein houses galleries, stages, studios and vo- . 
calionai retraining facilities. Fittingly enough. Design Zen- - 
trum Nordrhein-Westfalen, a premier venue for retrospec- - 
lives on and presentations of contemporary design in Europe, 
will move there at the beginning of next year. 

Zoilverein and many of its 139 counterparts are now', 
venues for some of Europe's liveliest entertainment and cul- . 
tural events. Equally interesting but more sedate are the offer- 
ings of the region's* 135 museums, led by Essen's Folk wans.- 

Make way for technology - 

Renewal through restoraiion is one half of the Ruhr's dev el-', 
opment story. An indication of this renewal is pro\ ided by the ; 
work of the 1BA (Internationale Bauaustellung) Emschcr 
Park. Named after the Emscher river, the regional develop- f 
ment program now includes 83 individual projects, ranging^ 
trom the renaturation of 350 kilometers of waterways to the. 
sprucing up of residential neighborhoods and inner ciliev 
Renewal through innovation is the story's other half. Ger- 
many's first technology park was founded in Dortmund in*. 
1974. Today, the region lias 28 of them, including ETEC tEs-.' 
sencrTechnologie- und Entwicklungs-Ceiitrum). plus 15 uni-; 
versifies and polytechnics (with ! 70.000 students). 38 lech-; 
nology-transfer institutes and 30 independent research cen-‘- 
tors. 

These institutes have yielded u large crop of new compu- j 
nies - 500 over a recent five-year period - and new feu lilies, 
manv of them in the field of environ menial technoloaies. 


Dynamic new projects ; if 

One of the most visible signs of the region's ever-increasing; -j 
dynamism is the spate of recently launched inner-city Ucvcl-! e 
opment projects, anx one of which would he enough to quails j: 
fy as blockbusting. Their ranks include Ohertiauscn's 2 oil-' i| 
lion DM shopping, sports and leisure-time center, being de-' V 
veloped by the British P&O group: Bottrop's Warner Bros.’, j 
Movie World. Europe's first film theme park: and the multi '. I 
hillion-Deutsche-mark "Dienslleistungs/cnirum Stern. 
which w ill completely trunsfomi the face of downtown Bn sen-. ? 
upon completion in !«%. ■ j 

"In a wav, all that was done over the past generation won 1 
remedial, a highly successful fonn of catching up." says Mr r \ 
Leverniann. "Over the last couple of years? we've finally --i! 
started pulling ahead." }| 




































































































Page 22 


INTERNATIONAL HE RALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, D ECEMBER 2, 1994 


SPORTS 

Baseball Mediator Buys 
Time From Both Sides 


By Murray Ghass 

New York Tuna Sender 

LEESBURG, Virginia — 
The mediator whom the Din- 
ton administration sent to save 
major league baseball from it- 
self is viewed by labor negotia- 
tors as a master of good timing , 
and Bill Usery Jr. has put that 
talent to use. 

At his urging, the owners* ne- 
gotiating team has agreed to 
postpone a meeting scheduled 
for Monday in Chicago, where 
the owners had been expected 
to declare an impasse in negoti- 
ations and implement their sal- 
ary-cap proposal. 

“I’ve asked the owners to put 
off the meeting, and they’ve 
agreed to do that,” Usery said a 
little more than six hours after 
the two sides began meeting 
here, outside Washington. 

*Tve asked the owners to 
withdraw the threat of imple- 
mentation and they've agreed 
to do that," he said. “I?s in 
everybody’s interest to change 
those deadlines and continue 
negotiating." 

At the same tune Usery was 
persuading the owners to post- 
pone implementation, he was 


pushing the players' negotiators 
to develop a counterproposal at 
the union's executive board 
meeting in Atlanta next week. 

“It's our intention to come 
out with one," Donald Fehr, the 
players’ labor leader, said. “I 
can’t say more than that" 

The two sides agreed to meet 
Dec. 9 in Rye Brook, New 


York. John Harrington of the 
Boston Red Sox, who is the 
owners’ chief labor spokesman, 
said they would also meet Dec. 
IS or 16 at a site to be deter- 
mined. 

A key dement of Usery's suc- 
cess was inducing the owners to 
agree to postponement without 
a guarantee of a new proposal 
from the players. 

The agreement also involves 
postponing the Dec 7 deadline 
for dubs to offer salary arbitra- 
tion to their free agents. 

The two tides agreed to put 
off that deadline until Dec 17. 
After that date, unsigned play- 
ers would be able to consider 
changing teams. TIm deadline 
for response from players who 
receive offers was postponed 
from Dec 19 to Dec 23. 

The postponements could 
not be taken as signs of prog- 
ress, but as an effort to keep the 
talks going without disruptive 
actions. 

“If there is a window, both 
tides found a way to keep it 
open a few days more, and 
that’s very important," Lauren 
Rich, a union lawyer, said. 

A 10-day delay in the owners’ 
meeting would be enough time 
for the players to formulate and 
present a counterproposal and 
lor the owners to decide if the 
approach is worth pursuing. 

If they saw no promise in the 
proposal, the owners would 
presumably implement a salary 
cap at their rescheduled meet- 
ing. 


A Dec. 20 deadline was not 
discussed That’s the date by 
which dubs must tender con- 
tracts to the approximately 900 
players who are not signed for 
1995. Neither side apparently 
wants to change that d e a dline 
• As the National Hockey 
League lockout entered its third 
month, a crucial collective bai- 


rn Chicago, with the players to 
present a counterproposal on 
three of the most critical issues 
in that labor dispute. The 
Washington Post reported. 

As one neutral source said, 
“If owners walk away from this, 
there will be no season." 

The parties last met in Bos- 
ton on Saturday, at which time 
the NHL Players’ Association 
broke off the bargaining session 
after a half-hour, saying it need- 
ed more time. Some on both 
sides were irked at the time, but 
after five days, the union had 
formulated a package that ad- 
dresses a rookie salary cap, sal- 
ary arbitration and free agency. 

The negotiators had reserved 
room space in a Chicago hotel 
for three days. Both sides 
seemed agreed that these meet- 
ings are pivotal. 

The owners’ lockout has 
forced a work stowage that 
was now in its 62a day. The 
schedule is already down to 60 
games, following the cancella- 
tion of 24 for each of the 26 
teams. Owners have said they 
will accept no less than a 50- 
game sdralnle. 



Points to Title Shot 


7&xawrtite/Aiw Seven Cl eve 

The Orlando Marie arc look- in double fi 
mg evay bit like the title con- les was ram 
tenders they were projected to lopsided del 
be at the start of the National T he Jos s 
Basketball Association season, five-game y 


Sewn Cleveland players scored!! 
in double figures as Los Angel- 
ica was handed one of its most; 
lopsided defeats ever. . > 
The loss ended the Lakers’; 
five-game winning streak and, 


JMOEUMU naauwnuwu wbvu. “ — (r , . . 

A 114-107 victory over the sent them home with &>ii^ 
Sacramento Kings on Wednes- cord for thear four-game road, 
day night gave Orlando its trip. > 

eighth consecutive victory, a re- Bulls 118, Suns 105: Scottie; 
card for (he fifth-year fran* Pippen did it all for Chicago? 
chise, and the best record in the getting 35 points, 9 rebounds, & 
league at 10-2. assists and 5 steals while hdp- 

“How you start is important, . - ■ ■ ■ . 

but how you finish means NBA HIGHLIGHTS 

mare,” Magic’s coach, Brian 

H3Q, said. ing keep Charles Barkley in 

ShaquiUe O’Neal led the way check in the second half, 
itk 41 points, while Anferaee pippen’s 13-for-17 shooting 
Lardaway added 23 and Nick die Bulls withstand a 


with. 41 points, while Anfernee pippen’s 13-for-17 shooting 
Hardaway added 23 and Nick helped the Bulls withstand a 
An de rson 22. late surge to end the Sons’ four- 

The Magic haven’t lost since gum** winning streak. 

Nov. 10, when the New York Barkley, making just his 
Knicks beat them, 101-99, in second start of the season, led 
Madison Square Garden on a the visiting Sons with 22 points, 
late jumper by Patrick Ewing. c*™, inn- 


“look at them as a team come Darid Robinson’s 42 . 


that was in the finals last yc 
and who woo our division," K 


points for San Antonia _ ; 

In reaching a season high,' 


to be a real good team, we are 


ShaqmDe O’Neal, maid 
with a dunk, scored the 


plmcDoCtannc/lUutcn 

the Kings’ Mitch Richmond (left) and OMen Pofyufce dock 
igte’s first 13 points, finishing with 41 in the 114-107 victory. 


to dc a real goou team, wc me ; 0 

going to haveto go through throws and had 9 rebounds. 
New York." Celtics 118, Pistons 115: A 

O’Neal scored the Magic’s season-high 37 points by De- 
first 13 points and finished the trait's Teny Mills and a flurry 
first period with 17 on 7-for-8 of 3-pointers down the stretch 
shooting. Then Anderson weren’t enough to beat Boston.' 
scored 16, with four 3-pomlexs, Dino Radja had 26 points 
in the second quarter to give and 12 rebounds at Boston Gar- 
Oriando a 66-52 halftime lead. den. Rick Fox added a season-, 
Cavaliers 117, Lakers 79: high 21 pants. 



2 Would-Be Spoilers Give Big Guys 
Their Best Shots, but Narrowly Miss 


The Associated Press 

Ohio University and Wiscon- 
sin-Green Bay were good 
enough last season to mike a 
little noise in the NCAA tour- 
nament. 

They were almost good 
enough Wednesday night to 
knock off two of this season’s 
best college basketball teams. 

Ohio, concluding a two-week 
road trip that included a cham- 
pionship in the Preseason NTT, 
used a furious late second-half 
run to pressure No, 3 Kentucky 
before losing, 79-74. 

“Ohio U. is a great basketball 
team," Kentucky’s coach, Ride 
Ktino, said. “They have Final 
Four potential." 

The Wildcats held Ohio’s 
best player, Gary Trent, weD 
below his season averages, yet 
still couldn't shake the Bobcats 
(4-1), who lost a dose game to 
Indiana in last season’s NCAA 
tournament. 


Wisconsin-Green Bay (0-3), 
which knocked off Jason Kidd 
and California in the NCAA 
tourney before barely losing to 
Syracuse, dropped a 61-57 deci- 
sion to Na 13 Wisconsin. 

The near-misses by Kentucky 
(2-0) and Wisconsin (2-0) were 

(X)LL 3 EGE ffiGEOUGHTS 

the only dose games in the top 
25. 

In Lexington, Kentucky, the 
Bobcats went on a 14-2 ran to 
dose to 66-64 with 3:20 left to 
play, but Rodrick Rhodes sank 
a me throw and short jumper 
in the final three minutes to 
keep Ohio from tying it. 

Tony Delk and Walter 
McCarty led Kentucky with 17 
points apiece, while Mark Pope 
got 11 points and 11 rebounds. 

Treat, averaging 25.8 points 


To our roodors in BorUn 

You con now receive the IHT 
hand delivered to your home or office 
every morning on the day af publication. 
Just call us toll free at 0130 84 85 85 


and 145 rebounds, had 21 
pouits and 10 rebounds, but 
made only six of 17 shots. 

“We’re really fatigued,” 
Ohio's coach. Larry Hunter, 
said. “The last two weeks we’ve 
been on the road. I think our 
guys really socked it up." 

In Madison, Wisconsin, cen- 
ter Rashard Griffith scored 21 
points in 9-for-13 shooting as 
the smaller Phoenix had trouble 
guarding him. 

Griffith’s basket with 4:12 
left put Wisconsin on top. 58- 
45, before the Phoenix used a 
10-0 run to dose to 58-55 with a 
minute left. But Sean Daugher- 
ty's two free throws with 24 
seconds left were the last pouits 
for Green Bay. 

No. 9 Arizona 78, Na 17 
Michigan 57: In Auburn Hills, 
Michigan, the inaugural Great 
Eight tourney ended with a 
great letdown for Michigan. 

Arizona (3-1) had a 20-3 run 
before the Wolverines (2-2) 
made their first field goal of the 
second half, more than 716 min- 
utes in. By that time, it was 52- 
34, and Michigan never got 
doser than 13 the rest of the 
| way. 




NBA Standings 


EASTERN CONFKRENCK 
Affcmttc Ofvfilo* 



W L 

Pet 

OB 

Orlando 

18 2 

£33 

— 

New York 

7 4 

A34 

2to 

Boston 

7 4 

J38 

M 

New Jenny 

4 f 

ADD 

5¥i 

HleelMnsA, ■ 

wovnnmon 

4 7 

J44 

sta 

PhHodeftmkj 

4 8 

A3 

4 

Mtoni 

3 9 

Central DhmiM 

20 

7 

CJ evetatff 

8 5 

M3 

— 

Indiana 

7 S 

Jn 

ta 

OmrioHe 

7 4 

.sn 

1 

Chicago 

7 4 

-538 

1 

Detroit 


-938 

1 

MHwoiAm 

S 7 

A17 

2ta 

Atlanta 

4 * 

J88 

4 


WESTRRH CONFERENCE 
WM— IPWIIi 



W L 

-Pet 

SB 

Houston 

10 3 


' — 

Utah 

9 9 

JM 

• ita 

Dallas 

1 4 

A 34 

2 

Denver 

4 4 

-300 

3ft 

San Anton la 

4 7 

M2 

4 

Minnesota 

1 13 

m 

Ota 


ItacHIcDMsIoa 



Phoenix 

ID 4 

JM 

— 

Seattle 

9 S 

M3 

1 

Golden State 

8 S 

419- 

Ita 

LA. Lakers 

■ 4 

J71 

2 

Portland 

4 4 - 

3» 

3 

Sacramento 

4 4 

J00 

3 

LA. Clippers 

a is 

-000 

Ota 

HIE ON BS DAY’S RESULTS 


Detroit 

28 24 

22 

35-113 

Boston 

M 27 

30 

25—118 


D: Mills 14-21 54 37, HU) 8-17 3-4 If. B: Radio 
11.174-4 2ft. Fox 8-105721. ReboeW H Ptfrult 
42 (Milter 15), Boston S8 (Radio 12). Assists— 
Outran 31 (Dumors 9), Boston 30 (Wesley 12). 
So crom trto 23 29 ZJ '33— W 

OfMg 35 41 32 U— 114 

S: B. Grant 514 5519, Richmond 514 M2H. 
O: -Anderson 511 50 72. O’Mnrf 1525 5U 41, 
H o rdow u y 4-13 il-l4 23. ruwo m s Sacra - 
manta S3 (B. Grant >), Orlando 51 (H. Graft 
11). Assists— Sacrum wife 23 (Hurley 4). Or- 
lando 22 (Hardaway 11). 


Miami 38 19 27 21—17 

CharMta 84 It 27 14— IB 

M: wmii WWH Miner 51a M 14. C: 
Jocnsen 1514 3-3 23. Mourning 747 58 20ilts- 
Do ca d J Mfc w d 52 OMIRs 4), Ourterte 47 
(Johnson 18). Assis ts Mia m i 34 (Cotas V). 
Charlotte 72 (Hogues 11). 

LA. Lattars 29 98 18 14- 79 

OsMasd 38 29 21 89—117 

LA.: Dtvoc S-ft) 4-5 W. Van Ext) 4-124-413. 
C: Price 512 1-1 U. Brandon 74MU.T. 
OnMHM M. IMfERdta-LM AaeriM 
37IMvac8).asvsta«sdg(Cn— UI-AtaMS— 
LOS Angeles 13 (Van Exit 4), Cleveland 34 
(Price, Brandon. T. Campbell 9). 

PbOtnlX 39 31 38 29— Its 

Ottaao V 39 21 28-118 

P: Bvfctay 514 51422. Person 511 54 18. C: 
Pippen 1517 H S Kukoc 512 54 If. Re- 
lwnadi Ptiusnta 92 (Green 8). CMcaae 98 
(Ptopsnf). Assist s P hoenix 12 (Matartet), 
adcona 38 (Ptaaen, Myers i). 

Saa Antonia 22 24 27 29— Ml 

Seattle 38 U 29 23— IW 

S: Rebkaan 1528 1514 42,Dei Negro5T753 
if. S: Panrtan 51752 21, Peddni 5H H m 
Rebo u nds— Son Antonin 52 (RiridlJI. Seattle 
42 (Schrempt 71. Assist! HonAntantalf IA. 
Jdnei 9). Seotite 23 (Portal th 


Top 25 College Results 

How the top 2S teams In The Altoclatad 

Proas' mao* cofltoe tadoM Ml find 
Wednesday; 

3. Kentucky (24» beat No. 14 Ohio Untvenl- 
tv 7574 Next: vs. Na. 9 UCLA at Anaheim. 
CaHL Saturday 1 v Arkansas (51) beat Jack- 
son state 1087. Next: vs. Centenary, Tues- 
day; 9, Artana (51) heat No. 17 Michigan 75 
57. Next; «. Florida Stats Tutadcy. 

13, wisemnm (50) beat WToconstn-Grwjn 
Bay 41-57. Next : vs. Texas Tadv Saturday; H 
OWo uohmrslty (51) taftta NoJ Kentucky 75 
74. Next: us. UC Irvfne at i«wa CKy, lowa 
FHdav; 17,MN9daau (24) tafttuNa.9 Arizona 
7597. Next: at T en nessee C n u ltawogo. Sat- 
urday. 

U,m)cM u oh S ta te (1-0) beat imnotaOilaa- 
ae 9578. Next: «. Loubvflta, Saturday; 15 
Be welu e ii (i-i) beat Morgan State 9543. 
NexR vs. DePauL Saturday slLVlratatq (511 
beat North CoroflnaAl.T 94-40. Next: vs. Tow- 
sac State. Saturday; 51. VffimwM (51) beat 
Murisf DW9. Next: vs. Setai Han. Monday. 


Cmra Major College Scores 
EAST 

Dorimoulb 97, Mlddtabnrv S3 
Pam SL 75 Duqoem 0 
Princeton 75 Lafayette 92 
Rhode Wand 71, tia rthe uWi rn 44 
SL French. Pa. A BucknoK 49 
8L John's 71, Cental SL 73 
SOUTH 

Alcorn St. US. Jarvis Christian IS 
Appalachian St. n. Ccdawfaa 89 
Auburn <0. AkL-BIrmtaghorn 94 
edward Waters 85. Bonwne-QMlanan 80 
Orambllne SL 71, ArtuMe Matt 40 
Howard U. «. Amertcm U. » 

Jacksonville 89. Stetson 77 
Mtam 44, Robert Morris 51 
Mta. Vat lev A 99. TaHadsga SI 
Murray SL 131, CamMwUsvtn* M 
N. Carolina A 19. RodlOfd <2 
Va Commanweam A Uberiy 49 
Vaxtafbllt 9G Tenwnea Tech 54 - 
MIDWEST 

Fdrtaoh Dkklnson 44. Wright A <2 
Iowa A 97, Florida Tech 25 
Mannette A Ohio SL 70 
Marshall sr. Cool MHMgwi 88 ' 

Missouri A Purdue 44 - 
W. IKlnata 77, DOVten 78 
W. Michigan 44. E. imnab 58 
Xavier, Ohio 99, Mtaml, OMo TV 
Yatmgrtuwn SL 99. WHninotan. Ohio 31 
SOUTHWUT 
Oklahoma 99. UC Irvine 77 
Okfahoma SL 73. Southern Math. SI 
Tens Cbrtsttai H9.MMwntarn stjTgxae78 
Texas Southern 104, Touoatoo 81 
Texu5aanAntento97.TmBAA45Kfii»vffle7S 
PAR WEST 

Long Beach SL 71, Detroit 44 
Oregon SL 7a New Orleans 81 
San Otago 87. CM PMy-SUO 71 


SOCCER 


ENGLISH UEA9I7V CUP 
Fourth Round 

Arsenal z SheflMd Wednesday 8 
Btockbum 1. Uverpoal 3 
Crvsinl Palace A Altai Vttta 1 
Men uwita r City 1, Hun cast lei 
Norwich 1, Notts County 0 
Nottingham Forest ft MflfmiU 2 


Swindon l Derby 1 
west Ham 1. fieftan 3 

DUTCH CUP 
ban Hoag 8. Breda 2 
rnimsgen 0. Ahn Amsterdam 3 
WHtamll Tlttura 1, F ewwotd Rotterd am 1 
(Fevenoard H B Her U omwen57onpenaWe « l 
Nsractas Almtta 5 Sparta Ra tter Ow n t 
PC UtracJrt X PC Twwtta Enschede 1 
Alax Am sl et d osn 5 Dordrecht 0 
PSV Elndhwsn a SC Hsersmeen l 
PC Vtashdom 5 ABonaor 8 
ITALIAN CUP 


Parma 2, Ftomftlna 0 
Inter L paaetaO 

INTERCONTINENTAL CUP 
Velez SarsfleM (Argentina) 5 AC Milan 8 
INTER NATIONAL FRIENDLY 
Spain 5 Finland 0 


CRICKET 


ONE-DAY MATCH 
Natal vs. Sri Loans 

W idn e dmn ta Ft ei w m initihui g. %. Atrios 
Sri Lonka mntaas: 28M (SB outre) 

Hatat Inntnge: 3BMM (47J avers) 

Natal wan By she wldtan. 

SECOND TEST 

India el. Want imSes. P*rE Day 
Thundey, ta Nagpar. India 
India lit findnee: 2SW (753 even) 


BOSTON— Signed CBlwdnCeR»ra8n.Cta1* 
Hill. Dam Jabnean and GraoLanMtatavpH^ 

•n. to ralnorJeaaue contracts. • 
CALIFORNIA— Agreed to terme wffh 
Mitch WUItamv pitcher, an vreqr axftract. 
National Ljeagxa 

ATLANTA— Suit Jerry KaUer, Mott Mur- 
rey and Briai Bark, pitchers and Tray 
Hughes outf i e lder , ta RWmwnd. 1U 
CHICAGO Ma m ed Jimmy Ptarwdi ravine 
nrinor-taague outftatd Instructor; MntTy De- 
MexTtt ptrchlne coatft o( Orianda. SL; Dave 
Tronddeymanagor and Gtay Lucas pltddng 
agaeft al Daytona F3L; Ato MB Mtttng aodi 


at WlllamtPorL NY-PL; and Sandy Atamar. 
manager aid Oscar Acosta pitching coach d» 
the Cubs GO- 

COLORADO— Brad MUb. manager 1 Frank. 
Funk, pitching coaetu <md Amos Otts hlMtng 
tnstrudor, ot Catarado Springs AA; wHl ro- 
tunr. Put Dreg Harrta, Pitcher, an walwers far 
purpaie at owing Ms uncondfttonal reteasC. 

LOS ANGELES— Gent Mike Busch. M 
baaeman. autrtWft ta AlhuegarquskPCL: Pur 
Jerry Brooks eqWwrwtfloWer. on wahmrt 
to give Mm hta wicondntonal rataase. Agreed 
to forms wdh Oetlne DesMeWs 3d bamnian. 

NEW YORK— Acquired Carl evarctL out- 
Itatdor. tram Florida lor QutMa Veras, 2d 
beenwi aidOaua Hsanr. uMmr.tramtUi- 
waukae tar two player* ta be namod. 

St. UXH8 A cquired Romm C ur n tai ta K. 
ItoMN.iramAflantaivptaratobenwnetfaia 
otrignsd Mm to UxilsvUta. AA. Named G«j 
Ktatah senior (told eoardbntaT Mosk DeJiCi 
raring eoostfnBtor; Rick Mu H taahttdng can 
dfcwfcyj and Oeorgo Hendrick niWtnocoortitri^ 

lor tar teams mlnor-taogue svstara,. 

SAN DIEGO— Put Wally Whitehurst pllcfw 
er, red ArM Ctattaco InfliWw, on weftyea 
togtv* them their unawStlonol retaases A5. 
stand Hltly Hathaway mid Erik PkeWonbera, 
pitchers to Las Vogas PCil 

BASKETBALL »' 

Hattoatd Basketball AseadaMoa 
CHARLOTTE— Ginned James BladtweS, 
guattL 

ORLANDO— Put Rodney Dent.torward.on 
Intamd HtL Activated Demta ScoH, forwora 

FOOTBALL 

Naftonal FaetnaB League 
NFL— Suspended Frank WVdwck. Wash- 
lagtas Mtaklnt ArfRwdc, fw ramatnirw *o»f 
games at seaMMWtlhouT pay tor using amem- 
lle steroids The Redskins put wycheck an 
reserve, non-footoall titans M. 

BUFFALO— Put Meaty Brown, linebacker, 
an iRturad reservs Activated Jerry OBtrowtf, 
guard, from practice sauad. ■ 

Cincinnati — P ut Louis Oflver.gristY. aa 
la lured reserve. Released Ml ten Bergsr.kh*: 
it, from nracVIce oauocL 
DALLAS— Released Joe FMbacfc, serfetju 
Stoned Blair Thomas running bock, and Dow 
ran StudNUL detenstv* back. ' 

GREEN BAY— Signed Joe Kearney, wide 
receiver, to practice sound. 

KANSAS CITY — Pat Victor Jones, tut I bock, 
on In hired reserve. Started Jan VMgm. ran* 
afiw back. 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 


r WINDER VOW A CRP-SBS 
SUX UKE m GOT TO BE 

SWTCSUKTCNDEHT 

























SPORTS 


Page 23 



Italian Soccer’s Ultra Right: A Great Wrong 


By Ken Shulman 

Special 10 1 he Herald Tribune 

FLORENCE — I am a journalist Call 
me a Jew. 

Ignore the non sequitor. The Drughi 
certainly did “Crosetti, you are the head of 
the Jews," the ultra-right fan dub of Tu- 
rin's Juventus soccer team chanted during 
the recent UEFA Cup match against Ad- 
mire Wacker in Vienna. Never mind that 
the Drughi don't even know what a Jew is. 
except that be is the enemy. “Crosetti, you 
axe the head of the Jews." 

Who is Crosetti, and what had he done 
to draw the Drughfsire? Maurizio Crosetti 
is a journalist for the Italian daily La 
Repubblica, who happens not to be Jewish, 
but who wrote an artide in which he dem- 
onstrated that the Juventus club had in the 
past, helped to pay the travel expenses of 
the Drughi during an away match in Euro- 
pean dub competition. A treasonous act, 
at least in Lhe eyes of Lhe Drughi, who take 
their name from the violent gang in Antho- 
ny Burgess' novel “A Clockwork Orange." 
And who, unfortunately, are not Italy’s 
only extremist soccer fan dub. 

It has nothing to do with soccer. 

Every Sunday, for years, there have been 
scuffles, attacks, arrests, injuries, and 
sometimes deaths in the country’s stadi- 
ums. Automobiles, storefronts and other 
properly are systematically destroyed 
Hatchets, dubs, knives and guns are regu- 
larly confiscated by police at Lhe stadium 
gates. Some of the weapons get through, 
into the stands. 

Two weeks ago, in an well-armed and 


AC Milan defender Alessandro 
Costacmta folded forward Omar 
Andres Asad in die box, which led 
to Roberto Luis Trotta’s penalty kick 
and a 1-0 lead in the 50th minute 
as Argentina’s Velez Sarsfieid won 
tihe Intercontinental Cup, 2-0, in 
Tokyo. Asad scored himself seven 
minutes later, intercepting a luck 
pass by Milan’s Franco Baresia. 


John Prylr/Rnttcrs 


China on Drug Use: 
Individual Acts ’ 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

BEIJING — China sought Thursday to 
distance itself from its II athletes who 
tested positive for dreg use at Octobers 
/toian Games in Hiroshima. 

-rThis is an act by individuals," the For- 
eign Ministry spokesman, Chen Jian, said 
at a weekly briefing. 

Adding that Chinese authorities prac- 
tice “strut prohibition, strict testing and 
strict punishment" of drug use, Choi reit- 
erated China's position that the outstand- 
ing performances of its athletes was the 
result of hard, scientific training. “Their 
performance cannot be denied," he said, 

China's Olympic Committee has 
launched an official inquiry after b ‘ 
formally notified that the 11 had fs 


Edberg-Volkov Match to Open 
Davis Cup’s Final in Moscow 


Compikd by Our Staff From Dispatches 

MOSCOW — Stefan Edberg will lead 
off Sweden’s campaign to win its fifth 
Davis Cup title when he faces Alexander 
Volkov of Russia in Friday’s opening 
match of the final, 

Edberg, ranked No. 7 in the world, will 
be appearing in his seventh final in 1 1 
years, but it win be the first for Volkov and 
teammate Yevgeni Kafelnikov. 

Kafelnikov was drawn against Magnus 



ay idem 



athletes, seven of them swimmers, as in- 
cluding Yang Aih.ua, who won the wom- 
en’s 400-meter freestyle at the Wodd 
Championships in Rome in September, 
and Lu Bin, who won four gold medals at 
the Asian Games and set a world record in 
the women’s 200-meter individual medley. 

The other swimmers were 400-meter 
freestyle champion Zhou Guanbin; Xiong 
Guonring, who won four golds; 50 free- 
style titfik Hu Bin; 200 butterfly winner 
Xue Wei; and Fu Yong, a bronze medalist. 

Germany’s swimming federation said 
Wednesday that it would boycott the 
World Cup meet in Beijing and other 
events in China. But Chinese sports offi- 
fiali; sai d Thursday were are no plans for a 
World Cup competition in Beijing because 
the Chinese Swimming Association has 
been unable to raise funds for the event. 

• “We never even sent out any invita- 
tions,” said an official who answered the 
phone at the association's offices. 


Pettengill Leads in BOC 

CAPE TOWN (AP) — The American 
yachtsman Steve PeuengQl had taken a 
narrow lead Thursday in the second leg of 
the BOC Challenge around- the-world 
yacht race, organizers reported. 

Pettengill, who finished second in the 
first leg of the race, from Charleston, 
South Carolina, to Cape Town, had gained 
a two-mile (3^-kilometer) lead on Chris- 
tophe Augtrin of France. Jean Luc van den 
Heede of France was dose behind in third 
place, while the winner of the first leg, 
France’s Isabelle Autissier, was fourth. 

For the Record 

Pud Merson, the England international 
who has admitted using cocaine, will be 
suspended from the Premier League while 
he undergoes a drug rehabilitation pro- 
gram, soccer officials said. (Reuters) 

Rooakfo Blackman, who was released by 
the NBA’s New Yctfk Knicks, has signed a 
one-year, $400,000 contract with AEK 
Athens. ( AP) 


Larsson for Friday’s second angles match 
at Moscow's Olympic Stadium and will the 
key to Russia’s bid. 

Ranked No. 11, Kafelnikov has won 
seven straight Davis Cup matches since 
losing in his debut to Germany’s Michael 
Stich in March 1993. He is favored in his 
match, although Larsson was hero of the 
semifinal victory over the United States. 

The 27-year-old Volkov, who won last 
month's Kremlin Cup tournament in Mos- 
cow, has played the 2&-year-old Edberg 
five times, with Edberg wanning three of 
the matches. 

“Frankly, we would have preferred for 
Kafelnikov to play Larsson in the first 
match, " the Russian team captain, Vadim 
Borisov, said after Thursday's draw. 

Volkov was more sanguine, saying, “I’ve 
played Edberg many tunes and I’m very 
excited, but it does not add to the pres- 
sure.” 

Sweden, with Jonas Bjorkman and Jan 
Apell, should have the edge in Saturday’s 
doubles match. They are the world's No. 1 
ranked doubles team and last week won 
the ATP world title in Jakarta. They will 
face Kafelnikov and Andrei Olhovskiy. 

On Sunday, Kafehrikov plays Edberg in 
their third meeting; so far they’re tied at 1- 
1. Volkov plays Larsson, whom he has 
defeated in their only previous match. 

Sweden beat Denmark and France be- 
fore knocking out the United States; Rus- 
sia defeated last year’s finalist Australia, 
then the Czech Republic and Germany. 

Sweden leads Russia, 2-0, in Davis Cup 
competition, but the two have not faced 
each other since 1982. Russia hopes to 
become the first unseeded team to win the 
title; it is only the seventh to reach the 
final (AP, Reuters) 


CROSSWORD 


ACROSS 14 Turning poim 

« ■_ i is Bundle 

1 Surety he Jests _ , . 

•Comma. “5Z£? 

commega baseball 

9 Produce 17 Piquancy 


$ 

CORUM 

Maitre Artisans eTHoriogerie 


In Paris, 

1. rue tie La Paix 


18 Homeowner's 
hangover? 

19 Circus 
Maximus, eg. 

20 Startling 
revelation 

22 Eland land 

23 Keystone Kops 
creator 

24 Kind of rock 

26 ‘Clinton's 
Ditch" 

27 Freight weight 
31 Midlothian 

misses 

34 Attracts and 
holds 

35 Right from the 
beginning? 

36 Multimedia 
format 

37 Vitamin 
prescription 

40 Boutonniere's 
counterpart 

42 Not quite 
major-league 

43 It's often thrust 
upon someone 

44 Throwaway part 

45 Most trim 
45 Nomadic 

Mongol tribe 
82 Fifty-fifty 

54 Kind qf 
committee 

85 Deprivation 

se Burg 
57 'Camelot' 
composer 
se March 15 
question 
89 Parmenides'S 
birthplace 
so Dutch artist Hals 
si Lop the crop 


62 Senator in 
space. 19B5 

DOWN 

1 Rattles 

2 Small round ' 
window 

3 Novelist Till ie 

4 Relax, literally 

5 SnoOkums 

6 '75 U.S. Open 
winner Manuel 

7 Computer 
command 

a Do business 

9 Hair-raiser? 

10 Become angry, 
literally 

11 Mr. Magwrtch of 
“Great 

Expectations" 

12 Crank (up) 

13 Spruce 
ii They’re 

historically 
evocative 
25 Homswoggle . 

28 Mogul capital 
until 1658 

29 Rand McNally 
subj, 

30 Salinger's “For 

-With 

Love and 
Squator" 

si "The Talmadge 
Girls' author 

32 “Tom Thumb" 
composer 

33 Stanch 

m Son otVal anti 
Ateta 

39 Peak 

performer? 





• 

isr 




7T 




W~ 




w 






49 

50 

SI 



si - 





sT' 





So” 






Purdetoy BoJjKJxtm 


© War York Times /Edited by WiU Shorts, 


40 Relative ol the 
organ 

41 Begins firing 

46 First name in 
aviation 

47 ‘Las Miz" 
setting 

48 Theater critic 
Kenneth 

49 Moiety 

so Effluvium 

si Poseidon's 
mother 

S3 Have one's say. 
in a way 


Solution to Puzzle el Dec. 1 


E3I30Q 

□doomsis nansHas 
HHEDnaa manaana 
hshqd ana 00000 
0000 0000 s 01100 
nm Bmanaan nos 
3000000 0000300 

000 ana 

0000030 00H0000 
OHS anaaaaa 00 a 
00Q0 00300 3000 
001300 D00 030 
□300000 3033003 
0300003 Q000330 
000330 □□aaaa 


organized attack, a group of AS Roma 
ultras charged off a team bus in Brescia 
and tried to break through a police cordon 
to get at the Brescia fans. Giovanni Selmin, 
the city’s 50-year-old vice-chief of police, 
was stabbed, and nearly killed, by a group 
of some 15 fans wearing scarves over their 
faces. “1 have directed swat teams for years 
in Milan and Catania," said Selmin after 
the emergency surgery that saved his life. 
“And in all my experience I have never 
seen such a quantity of gratuitous vio- 
lence." 

A swastika here and there is harmless. 

The ultra fans are neither gentle, tame 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

nor meek. They arrive in their special 
trains, march through the stations, squares, 
and city streets in military formation. I 
have seen their shaved heads and skin tight 
jeans, have seen them raise their arms in 
the Nazi salute, Celtic crosses and swasti- 
kas on bands aronnd their biceps. I have 
seen them and I have been afraid. 

Today, the coon try expresses shock that 
two of the five Roman men arrested for the 
attack at Brescia have documented ties to 
outlawed neo-fascist, racist groups. And 
that there is an undeniable right-wing ex- 
tremist matrix in the ultras' stadium as- 
saults. The country is startled that its stadi- 
ums are full of fascists. How, I ask, can this 
possibly be considered a surprise? 

The clubs cannot be held responsible. 

To be fair, many of the clubs have taken 
at least cursory steps to divorce themselves 


from thcar most ardent, violent followers. 
In the 1980s. the former president of Ju- 
ventus, Giampiero Boniperti, unilaterally 
dissolved all that team’s ultra fan dubs 
whose names connoted violence. AS Ro- 
ma’s president. Franco Sena, has discon- 
tinued that club's practice of issuin g free 
tickets to the Opposta Fazione ultra group, 
and of subsidizing its transportation for 
away matches. Lazio's president, Dino 
Zoff, has done the same with his club in 
Rome. 

But years of tolerance, by the dubs, the 
Italian Soccer Federation, and the Profes- 
sional League, which regulates club teams, 
have allowed the ultra groups to establish 
deep roots. The assault in Brescia appears 
to be the first in a series of actions planned 
by the ultras to force Juventus into restor- 
ing their privileges. Either you help us out, 
or we will sow terror, their gesture seems to 
say. “I have the sensation that we are 
listing towards death,” the Italian Olympic 
Committee president, Mario Pescante, said 
this week. He added, speaking of lus city’s 
teams, “The Roman dubs are blackmailed 
by their extremist fans. We are not talking 
about hooligans here, but a massive pres- 
ence of violence in the stadiums." 

Taking drastic measures would be playing 
into the extremists’ hands. 

A Sunday in Italy without soccer is not 
imaginable, but is one of the solutions 
proposed by legislators, a break of a week 
or so to, supposedly, allow passions to 
cooL Another proposal is to play matches 
deemed “at risk” behind closed stadium 
gates. Has it come to this? In a country 


fortunate enough to have seen the 
glory of Giancarlo Antognoni, the light- 

footed ballet of Mkhd Platini and the feral 

fury of Diego Armando Maradona? Must 
it turn its back on such sunlit beauty? 

Yet what else can be done. Fernando 
Masone, chief of the national police, sug- 
gests that a more efficient system is needed 
to keep undesirable elements away from 
the stadiums. Wonderful. Now all we need 
to do is tefl the cat. 

77ie stadiums merely reflects society. 

If this is tree, as the apologists say, that 
the percentage of right-wing ultras at the 
stadiums is the same as the perc e ntag e of 
right-wing extremists in the Italian popula- 
tion. What is more relevant, and far more 
worrisome, is that this percentage is mow- 
ing, and rapidly, both inside the stadiums 
and out. And that those who dare speak up 
or write about it are insulted with impuni- 
ty. The Juventus club still has not issued an 
apology to Crosetti. Furthermore, on 
Monday, during a televised sports talk 
show, the team's vice president, Roberto 
Betlega, admonished an overly aggressive 
interlocutor with lhe warning mat the dub 
“kept a dossier of what was being written 
about it.” 

In Italy, today, to be a journalist, even a 
sports journalist, is to be the enemy. I am a 
journalist. Call me a Jew. 


Ken Shulman is freelance journalist who 
has lived in Italy for 12 years and has reported 
on a wide range of subjects, including soccer. 


REAL ESTATE MARKETPLACE 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


USA RESIDENTIAL 


NEWYOKCTTY CONDOMINIUM 

100 United Nations Plaza 

Ona of New York's finest condominium 
amn ?4-hoar doorman & conrierge, 
pmae physical fitness center, 
garoge^ & 900011 s rexx li n e nh well 

HJRMSHED 7 BEDROOM 

Mogrufiten! ? bedroom/ 2 to both 
ttmnwit with lovely views. Beoufcfuly 
renovated & ftmwied ro meet the 
highesi sSandank 

_ PBimousE parecnoN 

2293 rq. ft. home plus 5V sq. it. wrap 
terrace with nredUe views. A otvkJ- 
O-bnd exquisite home! 


Exdi 
Tefc 712- 


Bayne Gelber. V.P. 
Fax: 212488*434 


GREENTHAL RESIDENTIAL 


New Jersey 15 Min. to NYC 

Come Dndty to The GALAXY 
7000 Bvd. E Gu*te!toera/lower Mol 
Tern. b> & Outdoor rook, Oub 
1-2 & 3 Be dr oom & Penthouses 
HNTA15 J1200J4000 

SALES $90000-5565,000 

CORPORATE RELOCATION 



201-861-6777 

OPEN 7 DAYS FAX: 201 « 1-0677 


THE ADDISON OF BOCA RATON 

Florida Luxury Ocecnfronl Condo. 
2800 sf Irving mace, 3 bedroom /3 1/2 
bah. Richard So J305J57W950 USA 


REAL ESTATE 
INVESTMENTS 


EXCELLENT tfVESTMENT Buy a lot «i 
limy Brad. Fat egqprexfing tourist 
area near beach, 55 tae goad road 
from Inti Deport US$4 per tarn. 750 
sgjn. lot for USSSJJOQ. fiat 3725, IJtT 
92521 Neu*y Cate*. France or Fax 
Luoono Cflvdmnte (55) 85 261 3100 


REAL ESTATE 
SERVICES 


SCENES D'INTERIEUR: Baroque. 

naodased & colored decoration. 
Man. to Sat. hi 7pm. 40 rue de 

Farads, 75010 Bans, fat 1-4770 2706 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


TOWMfOUSE NEAR GENEVA, on on 
IRhcrte gotf course, new of me lake 
and Geneva 218 sqm, 4 bedroom. 
3 bahrooms, targe ltvrng room. My 
eq uipp e d fatehen, snxfl privtfe g or- 
s. free French Zone. 
+ charges. Tel & Fa* 
115224 


den, 2 , 
far*. flFl 

j± &a 


GREAT BRITAIN 


CENTRAL LONDON 
WHom Sononn A Compaiy 
Short and Lung TernrRrerhrtt. 
American Express Welcomed 
Tefc I44m 634 6899 
Fate 144) 71 636 6855 


MOVING TO CENTRAL LONDON? 1 
Bedroom Ha lo lei in Si. Johns Wood. 
Nicety furnished Great location. Only 
£750/ month. Cd owner in NY 212- 
7894157 wort, 2127557421 hone 


LONDON - GB0VB4OR SQUARE, In 
floor Wry flat £340.00 per week. 
Tel: +44 81 692 4501 


HOLLAND 


S looking for fuSy/ party 
I quofity acammodanon ? 
C<4 ROB-VAST 


Are you 
fintafied r 

Cd 

Amsterdam +31 20 6391149 

The Hague +31 10 346 4840 

Rotterdam +31 10476 2323 

Su offices « 4 m Nether lords 


HOTHOUSE RflBMATIONAL 
No 1. ei Haloid 
lor (semi) funahed housas/flats. 
Tefc 31-206448751 Fa 31 204465909 
Nhown 19-21, 1083 AM Amsterdam 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


Embassy Service 
YOUR REAL STATE 
AGENT IN PARIS 
Tefc (1) 47.20.30.05 


IDEAL ACCOMMODATION 

READY TO MOVE-M 

Over 4^100 apartments 
■ TOP QUALITY - amSS cock accepted 

De Grcourt Associates 
Trt 1-47 53 80 1 3 Fax 45 51 75 77 


PARIS 5th - LATIN QUARTBR 

740001 o po rt mf m Townhouse: 
Entry, kitchen, bahroom, sunny. v*_-wv 

frib Owner (1) 43 54 65 69 


OW5TMAS-NEW YEAR HOLIDAYS 
m Pure? Nmxly-LevdfciB. charming 
flat, fitly finished, 70 sqm, sleeps £ 
Avertable aametiately from 1 week to 
8 weeks ct fSOO per day. 2 metro, 3 
\ n) l- 

a 1-44 


buses. T* Wan - I pm) 1-47 57 59 86 
26 0264. Furl-4060 00 45. 


CAPITATE ■ PARTNERS 
Hondpidted quality apartn a rts, 
al no. Park aid suburbs. 
Tell-4614 8211. Ftm 1-47723096 


PARC MONCEAU. Totally renovated 

80 sq.rn. triplex, bertoorn, maztme. 
2 baths, on nxet courtyad, Furty 
eq uipped F15JI00 + utrtihes. Direct 
owner. Teh fit 40 55 91 98 


BJLMTL WHCOMB YOU TO PAHS 

if you need at opatmeirt a a horse 

ei rais/lle de France, rust lei us know! 

Tek HI 408*9251 Fox D1 40840488 


CASTILE AREA, llfa. Lvmg + 1 
berkoam, kitchen, shower room. frr«- 
pfaoe, quiet, sum, cham. F4fi00/mo. 
retTefc Owner fi 1 43 73 26 42 


6ft, ODEQK studo. ped a tore. 

character, calm. 1 mom & more FI 50 

per dev with chonm. Tel 1-4634 1899 


LATIN QUARTER, cloart 2-room flat, 
newly redone. FBJOO/mo. 3 
nwumun. Owner Tel: 1-43 25 15 34 


BOULOGNE, METRO Moral Smnbttf 

2 roams, v comforts. 50 sqm F6.000 
net. TcL HI 45 32 32 00. 


5ft, TOO wpn., Tb bedrooms with 

terrace on Seme. Availatrte now. weekly 

or tong term. Tet/Fcof 1-43 25 B5 92 


MARAIS. ravBhng I bedroom, hr* 
place, beams. F5J9675 net (with cen- 
trd hraini Tet owner 1-3076 36 90 


PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 


16A - MASON DE LA RADIO, 

2 rooms. 70 sqjn, dm burtdvn, 
modem, FfijoD neL Tel 1-45 32 32 Off 


5fa - NOT® DAME, wpetb brAfetg, 

exceptional 150 sqm. charocter flot 


SPAIN 


PLAZA BASILICA APARTMENR 27, 

Gomandante Zorito Madid bated in 

lhe fnxiaol & bunnea area. A warm 

& refiwdutrt style. Daly - WeMfy - 
Mortbly rotes, teervafcore - Tet 04- 
11 53536 42. Fax, 04-1) 5 351497. 


LOS JERONIMOS APARTMENTS 

Maeto, 9 Madrid. Between Prado 

Museum & fateo Pork. Finest e 

of trakbonal fixixhtre. Daily - 1 
- Monthly roles, faservtrtm - Tet I 
1)420021 1 Fax 04-114294458 


7 PLAZA DE BP ANA APARTMENTS 

In die heat of Madrid High 

Oudas to let. Daly weekly, aontty 

rates. FuBy equpped Deed resano- 
> tarn Teh 3L1J42 85 85. Fine 
341.548.4380 


USA 


Greenwidt VHane. 
2 bams. 


NEW YORK CITY .. 

MOO sqit toff, 3 bedrooms. 2 I 
large eat-m kitchen, great nver 
mews, very sunny, working fireptace. 
$5 ,500 per month. 1 or 2 year lease. 
DEBRA XMOOi COMPANY Tet (11 
212-219-360Q. Foe ffl 212-727-0996 


FLORIDA, SAM8BL EDAM) 1^& 3 

bedrooms on & off beach. Summer 

S545 to S1300 per week Winter S945 

to S2500 per week. UR 0800964-055: 
GE OnOfiTsaaS: Sw «. 1-55«42. 


Page TO 
FOR MORE 
REAL ESTATE 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


PERSONALS 


HAPPY BRTHDAY 

TO THE AUSBE H AMSTB8MM 
Rert wMie> (rana year 
Eriends al the Tnb. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


MBA 5CH0NL The mod reftwd of cd 

lito m ZURICH esfuavcrty at - 
WBMIERGi - ieafina men I dore - 
13, Brtxrtwte. 01-211^9 50 


FRIENDSHIP 


BEAUTDUL • BEBANT LADY, 25. 

pekte. brwiaflta eduarted soffasb- 
oMeo seeks howacme. l e rrt niy, m i e o lihy 
gentiemai 10 warm me up fas wn- 
tar-and farevtrt Do aal it you na- 
medy woddi 1 39-M056547 Mian 

MOVING 


0 


INTERDEAN 


FOR A FfH BT1MATE CALL 

PAHS (1} 39201400 


CAPITAL AVAILABLE 


FUNDS AVAHABU 

FOR 

All BUSINESS PROJECTS 
OR FOR 

LETTERS Of CRSXT 
BANK GUARANTEES 
OTHER ACCEPTABLE COLLATERAL 

Broker ’i common guaranteed 

Mention MLLP.U. 6 Oe 

RNAN0MI MSTnUTXM 

Breneb - BSJSSJSNI 

In tormation by fin 32-2-534 02 77 
or 32-2-S38 47 91 
THflt 20277 


FINANCIAL SERVICES 


FUNDMG PROBLEMS ? 

Venture Capihrt - Equity Loon 
Red Estate ■ Busmen 
Fwanam ■ Lang Term 
OJanrol Supported Grxxanlees 
Badable auxorases to secure funding 
far viable project arranged by; 

Bancor of Aria 

CommilHn earned only upon Fining. 
Broker 1 Common Amured 

Fax (63-2) 810^284 
Tot (63-2) 894-5358 
or 810-2570 


RANK PURCHASE ORDERS, KTTs or 

CbntWond SWFTs avtxUM. Contact 

by far only Lmdan 71 8394696. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


HUSH N0N-HE9DENT 
COMPANES £195 

Ideal tar-avadance vehides: 
tow proNe, tax free & European. Suit- 
oble For Irodmg, conwlftncy & ofaer 
admixes. For enmetfiato service contact 


EKdi Morphy, DR* 

Cooetsiy Servkew 56 
Sqocew, Dtibfin 2, irekeid 

Teh +3S3 T 6618490 Foa 66T8493 


CLASS A BANK m to free venue with 
otkniristrcM services end etiabfahed 
banking and securilia ocogwA. US 
550/Uu. bnmnticm tramfar. Gal 
Gnada (604) WMT® or Fax JfiM) 
942-3179 or London 071 394 5157 nr 
FAX 071 231 992a 


OH5HORE COMWIMS- For free 
brochure or odwee Tefc London 
44 81 741 1221 Fox: 4481 748 6558 


OFFSHORE COMPANES 

■ 730 READY MADE COMPANIES 

■ BANC WmCOUCTIONS 

• ACCOUNTING, LEGAL & ADMIN 

• LO AND TRADE DOCUMENTATION 

• THJSWONE & MAR. FORWARDING 

Telephone or fax for n nmeckcte service 
ond 100 page colour brochure 

OCHA ASIA IIMIIB) 

26-02 Bank of America Tower 
Horcowt food, Hong Kang 
Tet +852 5220172 
Fob +B52 5211190 


OH3HORE GOMPANU5 

* Free professond confufUx>ns 

■ Woriawide incoporahons 

* ta u netfate avartobrtiy 

■ Pul CDirtidenlxJ tavrees 
’ Lon don repre sentative 

1 Fid adaxradrcrtion serrices 

ASTON CORPORATE TRUSTS LTD 
19, Peel Road, Dowtos. krie of Mm 
Tefc 0624 ^591 Fax 0624 625126 


TEXTHE MAOMERY 
Tampon IVoduckon Machinery 
Coton Swob Forming Madxne 
Cotton Pad Modxne 
X. FaabirxMudwig & Co. AG 

Tefc ra 28 31 41 Tlx 875349 FALUCH 
Telefax: 55 28 42 60 


BUSINESS TRAVEL 


Id/ Badness Oats Frequent Travelers 

to Orierrt/AiBtrota/Alnca/Na & So 
America. Save up to 509L No core 
pons, na redriefian. Imperial Canada 
Tefc 514-341-7227 Fax 51+34? -799a 


LEGAL SERVICES 


DIVORCE M T DAY. No fraud. Wnte 

Bax 377, Sudtury, MA 01776 USA. 
Tet 50B/443fl387.fau 508/4430181 


DIVORCE 

CertiT 
17141 


FAST - $495. 


Certified by US. e mb eay. Coll/Fax. 
C7141 968WS" " 


i USA 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


Save on 
International 
Phone Calls 

Save 50% ml mare compmad 
to load phone compared. 

Coi from home, affioe, cor 
even hotels {red mold 
surcharges}. (Stock our rates 
far any courtnes and see hrer 
you can Mart saving today. 

Cafl is now and we'B 
ca8 you righf badd 

Td 1-206-284-8600 
Fax 1-206-282-6666 

lines open 24 ham. 

Agents inquires wdaxid 

KkallbacK 


419 Second Avenue West 
SerttteLWA 9B1J9 USA 


COLLE GES & 
UNIVERSmES 


FRE5TON INVBBITY, USA 
BflA. BS. MBA, MS, PhD. etc pro- 
home Study or OitCmpm. 


by .the Deportmert of Educo- 
tan 2727 (XNbI Am, Cheyerme, 

WY 82001 Fax; 1 3076322750 


SERVICED OFFICES 


hstont Office in Hong Kong 

■ Fhntrta diorf 6 tang lann leramg 

■ Fully funmhed & equaled with strict 

• Ccavereeiitly locoted m lhe most 
presbreota desgn-wming Peregrine 
Twer Lppo Centre 

• WdHhrough to Arinirdly subway 
floeon, ton & bus skrtion 

• Comeded by covered walkways to 
major office bJdngs, Srtor hotels, 
stepping centre & service opretmert 

• Futfexecuny e s e cretonol support by 
p-of emend staff 

• tnavporated and corpanX* setvrco 
u v uftft te 

AsxxJfacSc Bovrvm Centre 
For further detafa 

Man, Mu & Assoaalcs Consailing Lid 
Fa*i (8521 530-5937 

Tefc (8521 S22r0198 
29M Poregnne Tower 
“ rtie, Admnnlly 
.Hang Kang 


L-flnwaj, nan 


YOUR CffiFKEM LONDON 
Bond Street - Mafc Ptrcne, Fbdl Telex 
Tefc 44 71 499 91W Free 7*1 499 7517 


EDUCATIONAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


INGUSH SCHOOL snela novice mother 

tongue English teachers. Wort penmt 

oh^itoiy, fut-Unv bask. Please ad 
Pat fl 144 09 99 22. 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


PSEOOUS STONES 


ROERE5IG0 COMMMB PURQfAS- 
JNG A VAJBFTY OF PREOOUS 
STONB. TH7FAX 0049-221-441 883 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


BELGRAVIA 

ORCHIDS 

LONDON FWBS GH4EVA ZUIBCH 
Ewart Rgmcy Cwdfa Creih W Mto n 

UK 071 589 5237 


MADSOHS 

LQMX3N PASS Escort Agoogr 

UX 071 266 0586 


MBOmONALESCOaS 

Seni# - Wbridmth 
M tow York, USA 

Major QwD&HkAnupied 


LONDON'S N0.1 ESCORT 

3 S h eofifcam Si lutfag WT 
AG8CY Q7T 258 0090 


LONDON BRAZILIAN Escort 

Service 071 724 5697791 - cedi cads 


CHB5EA ESCORT SSVKX. 

SI BM3uchanntxe,IendonSW3, 
Tet&l. 584 6513 


■•ZURICH** VIOLET •• 
Escort Service. Crecft avds aexaptad. 
Tefc 077 7 63 83 32. 


UJCY -EMMA *** 
LOMX3N BCORT SKVK2 
THffHONE (PI - 363 - 0033 


•GENEVA A ZURICH* 

••••GLAMOUR**## 

BASEL Escort openey 022/346 00 89 
ALL CREDIT'' 


AMSTERDAM BUTTBAY Escort 
Servo. Tefc (0)206471 570 
OedrtGredsr 


ORBNTAL ESCORT 5BN1CE 
LONDON 

PLEASE PHOC 071 225 3314 


‘PARIS I LONDON* 

•ELEGANCE* 

EsonT Service London (71] 394 5145 


CARBREAN ANGBS OF LONDON 

BCORT SERVICE ALL AREAS 
07T-828-3P03 ermft «xds occected 


TOKYO EXECUTIVE 
Escort 5enm. Cretfit amk 
Trii 01-34797170 


AMSTERDAM * DREAMS'ESCORT 

Dmner dotes 4 persond gutde sernce. 

Tefc +31 BOhM 02 111 / 64 02 666 


ZURICH * HERN * lUZBtN 
NATHAUE Escort Service 
TM 01 / 463 23 34 


TO OUR READERS 
IN GREAT BRITAIN 

It's never been easier 
to subscribe 
and save. 

Just call toll-free 

0 800 89 5965 


F RAN KFUET 

ESCORT SERVICE 
Ta, 069 -597 4338- 


“TOPTBT 


MUNICH* WELCOME 

ESCORT & GUOE AGENCY. 
PLEASE CALL 089 -91 23 14. 


KHSMGTON ESCORT AG84CY 
10 Kmnatan Chech St, London WB 
Tet 071 W7 9136/9133 crafl cads 


VENNA** *ZURK»* **PAK 

HCH SOCIETY International Escort 
Cdf Vieneq + 43-1-535 41 04. 


AMSTERDAM BBMADETTE 

Escort Service. 

Jefcj 631 63 36 or 631 06 41 


RAMnKTBXNDUSSEUXW 

m neos. Escort Service. 
059-0^4 


IMDOD HARMONY Esatrt & Guide 

Semen. Dutch & En do 
Cardt Tefc 90&flI3964 re 1 


■GBVVA • G9VSSL * PARS* 
Escort Snrvire 
Tefc 0227731 90 81 


EXECUTIVE* • 

LONDCXrt ESCORT SBMCE 
JEL071 722 5008 Crertt Cards 


IQNDON 1 BtOUSIVE * MRS 

rttnen & ndan peer? win & 
TrgveL Teb London ^44101831533883 


'“VIENNA* 'PRAGUE* 'ZUBOf* 

TOWN'S JBT. SUBEMEBCORT 
J cords. {++43 1)532 II 32. 


DIAMOND ESCORT SERVICE 

AD ewer SwtBeriand 
Tefc 07 7 77 4? 87. 

^m.VB«A. MONACO AM- 
WT&ojrt/Trtivel Service 

-CAii swnzaiAND qbmio 22 » 


*Z U * ,c . h, SUSAN* 
Esasrt Service 
Tefc 01 x 391 99 48 














































Page 24 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 1994 


OBSERVER 


History? What’s That? 


By Russell Baker 

N EW YORX —Political in- 
tellectuals are having a 
nasty argument about what his- 
tory should be taught 10 Ameri- 
can schoolchildren. Tales you 
hear indicate that, whatever his- 
tory may be taught in the fu- 
ture, at present kids learn prac- 
tically none of any kind. 

My favorite anecdote stars an 
apparently normal high school 
student Amazed to hear a gray- 
beard refer to World War I, he 
cried, M I never knew there was a 
first world war!” 

Evidence of equally prepos- 
terous ignorance turns up in the 
papers with comic regularity. 
Yet we have this serious quarrel 
among ostensibly serious peo- 
ple about what history should 
be taught to the kids of some 
improbable future. 

I say improbable because of 
my own experience with school- 
book history. Though a major 
drudge, I was unable to digest 
more than a few lumps of 
schoolbook history until college 
was weD b ehin d me. 

My history learning was a 
boneyard of unrelated facts 
useful for passing tests, but ut- 
terly useless to a person who 
should have been trying to ori- 
ent himself in a complicated, 
long-running show. What a 
shabby store of facts: 

1492, 1776, Columbus. 
Something about the “Fertile 
Crescent” Tigris and Euphra- 
tes. Hammurabi, Pilgrims, 
Plymouth Rock, a New Eng- 
land Indian named Squanto 
(can that possibly be right?), 
assorted wars, George Wash- 
ington, Lincoln, Woodrow Wil- 
son, world safe for democra- 
cy .. . 

□ 

The one time I awakened in 
high-school history was at men- 
tion of some medieval thug or 
king whose sister was seduced 
by I’ve forgotten who, or whom 
as I would have written at the 
time, being a tiresomely nig- 
gling g rammar bore. 


The names of the stars of that 
1 Oth-grade moment escaped me 
almost at once. What woke me 
was the teacher’s saying “se- 
duced." 

Tenth-graders weren't sup- 
posed. to hear words like that, 
and the outlaw thrill of hearing 
such stuff from a teacher was 
exquisite. Students and teacher 
were all males in that class- 
room. Here was a gamy whiff of 
barracks freedom. Could it be 
that history was more interest- 
ing than school had hitherto let 
on? 

No. On and on I careered 
into college, fighting sleep as 
professors talked of the Sher- 
man Antitrust Act, Luther's 95 
theses nailed to the church 
door, the reign of Commodus, 
Wellington’s horse, Henry 
George and the single tax, the 
Whiskey Rebellion, the inven- 
tion of the incandescent light 
bulb . . . 


I doubt that many school- 
children can be brought to val- 
ue histoiy or enjoy the delights 
of its tantalizin g subjectivity. 
Much of its pleasure lies in 
discovering its ironies, and iro- 
ny is uncommon in the typical 
harassed, scared, browbeaten 
American schoolchild looking 
forward in dread to SATs that 
may wieck his life while simul- 
taneously wondering if the stu- 
dent in the desk behind him is 
packing a semiautomatic pis- 
toL 

Irony is for people who 
don’t have to decide at age 18 
what they are going to be when 
they grow up. My memory of 
that experience is that it was 
like being asked to choose 
among a variety of prison sen- 
tences. Of course, I may have 
invented this memory much 
later, thought it sounded clev- 
er, and repeated it so often that 
I now believe it’s true. That's 
history for you. 

New York Tima Serna 


Sao Paulo Megashow: Hints of a Global Art V iilage 


By Roberta Smith 

New York Tima Scrrlce 

S AO PAULO, Brazil — The 22d 
S3o Paulo Bienal is a mcg&show 


O SSo Paulo Bienal is a mcg&show 
that needs to make up its mind. Does 
this hodgepodge of weak art and 
mixed messages want to be, like its 
European counterparts, a survey of 
the artistic mainstream, accessorized 
with an amorphous, loosely applied 
theme? 

Does it want to redefine the mega- 
show concept into something more 
e galitarian and gen- 
uinely interna tron- — - 

al? Or does it want m i. 

to remain the ama- inC CXill 

teurish exercise in hnm>shn 

nationalism and re- na » c “ u 

gLonalism that it has art and E 

tended to be in re- 
cent years? messages 

To varying de- 

gives, the answer to 
all of the above Is: yes. This incarna- 
tion of the biggest international sur- 
vey of contemporary art in the West- 
ern Hemisphere, on view through 
Dec. 11, presents 2.000 objects and 
installations by more than 220 artists 
from 71 countries. It is nearly twice 
the size of its predecessor and for the 
first time in the event’s histoiy in- 
cludes artists from Russia, Eastern 
Europe, Africa and China. 

The Bienal is clearly trying to re- 
gain some of the status it possessed in 
the 1950s and '60s, when it was al- 
most on a par with star-studded in- 
ternational surveys like Documenta 
and the Venice Biennale. But it seems 
to have conflicting ideas about how, 
exactly, to raise Its profile. 

On the face of thing s, this is a no- 
frills, e galitarian biennial, the leading 
candidate for becoming what might 
be called “the biennial of the Other.” 

It is situated far from Europe, in 
an enormous country whose mix of 
racial and ethnic groups gives the 
term “melting pot”a reality that it 
may have no place else. 

The show has no national pavil- 
ions to separate rich, powerful na- 
tions from poorer, weaker ones, as at 
the Venice Biennale. Also lacking is 
the moncy’s-no-object grandeur of 
Documents, held in Kassel, Germa- 
ny, every five years. (The 55 million 


The exhibition is a 
huge show of weak 
art and mixed 
messages. 


budget of the SSo Paulo show is less 
♦hfln half that of the most recent 
Documenta, although the artist 
count is nearly the same.) 

Set in a plain cast-concrete building 
in a park, the Bienal starts abruptly 
and without fanfare. One minute the 
viator is buying a tidrnt, and the next, 
w aiving through hundreds of strands 
of clear plastic, which form a kind of 
frozen downpour that is a sculpture 
by the Venezuelan artist Jfcus Soto. 

A right turn leads immediately to 
the rough-hewn, 

“ folk-art-inspired in- 
, . . stallations and 

lbon IS a sculptures of Betye 

it n f wnalt Saar and John Ou- 

* 0I , icrbridge, two black 

ixed artists from Los An- 

geles who are repre- 
senting the United 

States. In adjacent 

spaces are works by 
artists from Aruba, Chile, Barbados, 
Puerto Rico, Costa Rica, Martinique, 
the Dominican Republic, Egypt, Ice- 
land and the Bahamas. The message is 
hard to miss: Artists from countries 
major and minor are equals here. 

This is a striking departure from tbe 
Vance Biennale, whore artists from 
small or emerging countries have long 
been crowded together in tiny galler- 
ies at the back of the Italian pavilion. 
Here, as at many other pants of the 
exhibition, it also seems that the art 
capitals of Europe and the United 
States are about to be rendered obso- 
lete by the rising tide of artists world- 
wide. 

Yet it is equally apparent that news 
travels fast: The exhibition makes 
ctear that installation art has become 
the lingua franca of art, practiced 
credibly, if not innovatxvdy, virtually 
evaywnlere. 

As one moves up the ramps con- 
necting the building's four levels, a 
sense of business as usual creeps in. 
The stow becomes better behaved 
and more hierarchical, making the 
ground-floor free-for-all seem like a 
bargain basement 

At the top of the first ramp, one 
encounters handsome installa tions by 
Giovanni Anselmo and Richard 
Long, regulars of the international an 



“Forced March,” by the Dominican artist Tony CapeUfin, at the Sao Paulo BienaL 


Anton io Prado 


circuit which seem to anno u n c e. 
“This is the real Bienal-” 

This finding is confirmed by tbe fact 
that the artists in the “special roans” 
— invited by the show's or g a nizer s, 
not the national commissioners — in- 
clude arch big names as Robert 
Rauschenberg, Julian Schnabel, John 
Chamberlain, Marcel Brood tiiaers 
and Per Kirkeby. 

Other special rooms review the his- 
tory of modernism with impressive 
displays of works by Joaquin Torres- 
Garda, Diego Rivera. Lurio Fontana 
and even Piet Mondrian and Kasrmir 
Malevich. 

Amid so much derivative art, these 
achievements cast long shadows. 
Nonetheless, the money spent to se- 
cure such loans might nave been bet- 
ter used for contemporary efforts: for 
example, increasing the number of Af- 


rican countries. (Only Namibia and 
South Africa are represented.) 

A related problem is that the show 
shamelessly and ineffectively pro- 
motes Brazilian art, devoting 10 per- 
cent of its space to often mediocre 
local talent, a practice that also dilutes 
the Venice Biennale. Included are 
small retrospectives of relatively es- 
tablished B razili an artists like Lygia 
dark and Hdio Oitidsa, both of 
whom have died within the last 15 
years. 

While these shows are in principle a 
good idea, in reality they are poorly 
executed and fail to make convin cing 
cases for their subjects. It is especially 
unfortunate that the Oitidca retro- 
spective that was recently on interna- 
tional tour could not simply have 
stopped off at the Bienal. 

Ultimately, this show is best taken 
as a sign of thing s to come, both in 


f«m« of individual artists and the 
megashow formal itself. 

The Bienal introduces a number cf 
promising artists, mostly doing in-' : 

Stallation week, including F ernanda 

Gomes and Adruuma Varqaoof 
Brazil, ftandia Parker of England, 
In ghfl d Karisen of Norway, Kcho 
(Alexis Leyva Machado) .and Tons! 
(Antonio EHgio Femdndez) of Cuba,- 
Tony CappeMa of the Dominican 
Republic and German Venegas of 
Mexico. 

More important, the best parts of 
the exhibition give glimpses of the 
megashow redefined, transformed 
into a genuinely multicultural enter- 
prise oriented beyond the main- 
stream, toward the global an wodd 
already in progress. Perhaps die next 
Sfto Paulo Bienal can turn tins glimpse 
into a genome vision. - 


WEATHER 


PEOPLE 


Europe 


Today 


Tomorrow 



High 

Low 

W 

High 


W 


OF 

OF 


OF 

OP 


A1SWW 

16*1 

11.52 

ST 

17/62 

12/53 

PC 

A.-rawoarn 

12-53 

4/33 

1 

0/48 

4.-39 pc 

Anker* 

1*4 

■5-ZJ 

HIT 

1/34 

-5.74 

art 


IS SO 

3/37 

K 

U-S2 

7 -44 

ac 

Bocntcna 

20 ta 

9«8 

SC 

1407 

9«8 

an 

BefjmSe 

4.30 

•3-27 


7 44 

104 

a 

3ert*i 

7-44 

1/34 


6/43 

2/35 

sn 

Basnets 

17*2 

5 Ml 

B 

B'48 

6.-43 

X 

Buncos! 

fi<A3 

1/34 

» 

7/44 

3-37 

a 

Cepenrspor. 

fl.'43 

1-34 

C 

6-43 

3/37 

s 

Cera Da< Scl 

17*2 

1!<52 


17/62 

12/53 Vi 


10/50 

541 

C n 

11/52 

3/37 

• 

EnirSuQP 

e-« 

fc-43 


3-48 

E-43 

* 

Rranci 

14/57 

2.3S 

0 

12/53 

5-41 

• 

F-ant-Jun 

14/57 

2.3S 

5 

7/44 

3-37 

pc 

Garo*a 

10-50 

2/36 

ts 

8*46 

2-35 Cc 

Hetariu 

7/44 

•2 *29 

pc 

9*48 

0/32 

s 

tetareu) 

7«4 

2/35 

c 

7/44 

4-38 

* 

Las Poin-js 

24/75 

17*62 


26.79 

19-66 

a 


14/57 

17/62 

1152 

sh 

15/59 

1203 

PC 


6/43 


11.62 

6« 

er 

MaOrC 

17*2 

6/43 

sc 

75-59 

6-43 

sc 

MWi 

3-42 

2/35 


7-44 

3.37 

a 

Ues«* 

■A <25 

■7 IX 

■J 

■127 

-7.-20 5 

Mtran 

e-46 

0/32 

9 

7/44 

1/34 

PC 

Nee 

17K> 

5/41 


13<SS 

7-44 

a 

Osu 

2/3S 

•3*27 

5 

307 

-1/31 

s 

PBkna 

19/56 

11/52 


13/55 

10-50 

on 

Pens 

IB-64 

4/39 

3 

10*50 

403 

DC 

Pra-i» 

8/46 

-1 51 

5 

307 

0.02 

ST 

Boykin, 

5 41 

205 

i 

3*37 

•1-31 

r 

Rotrm 

1752 

3*37 

3 

19-66 

5/41 

0 

a PweraDun 

-1/31 

-4*25 

PC 

-t *31 

-4/25 5n 

Socuiotm 

4/33 

-2/20 

3 

4.39 

002 

t 

arosuour^ 

8-48 

2/35 

PC 

6/43 

2/35 

tn 

Tasinn 

7/44 

■2/29 


9M6 

104 

s 

Vera* 

12/53 

3/37 


9«8 

4.O0 

s 

Vioma 

5-41 

•lOI 

s 

5*41 

104 

s 

Warse* 

3-37 

■2/29 

e 

4/30 

•131 

3 

Zuncn 

307 

15t 

c 

4/39 

1.34 

xn 

Oceania 







Aocwerd 

21/70 

1355 

l 

21/70 

13/65 

DC 

Syiwy 

26/73 

18/64 

& 

27*80 

19*66 

PC 


Forecast for Saturday through Monday, as provided by Accu -Weather. 



jots&osn 


I -Jnc-jasorraBt, 
CoM 


UflMOsoniHy 

Hot 


North America Europe 

Dry weather wilt continue England wit 
through the weekend in New rainy over 
Ycrtt and Washington, then Some shov 
rain is possibio Monday, aver into Fi 
Toronto aiS have dry weam- many, as w< 
er Saturday, then rain Sun- will contfmn 
day into Monday, perhaps from most c 
ending as snow. Chicago wffl Italy. Westi 
have a bit of rain over the ramaki cold, 
weekend. and Los Angeles 
will be wet Saturday. 

Middle East 

Today Tomorrow 

High Low W High Low W 

Of OF Of OF 

Bemn 18*1 12 53 e r«/ST 9/48 W 

Cano 1559 a '40 C 11 152 8/43 r 

Banosa* 12,53 3*37 pc 7*44 -1/31 ah 

Jefuuttm 12/53 8*46 pc 9.-48 SMi sh 

Uusr 22-71 2/3S a 13*5 104 pc 

FBVMi 25/77 13-95 9 24/75 11*2 ■ 


Europe 

England will be windy and 
rainy over ihe weekend. 
Some showers may spill 
over into Fiance and Ger- 
many. as well. Dry weather 
will continue farther south 
front most of Spain across 
Italy. Western Russia will 
ramakicold. 


Asia 

Cokl winds will blow across 
Korea and northeast China 
ovbt the weekend. The cold 
will bring some snow to 
northern Japan, but Tokyo 
will be dry. Hang Kang will 
have mild and dry weather 
over ihe weekend end into 
early next week. There will 
be same thundershowers in 
Singapore. 


Latin America 

Today Tomorrow 

Htgft Low W Mgh Low Mr 
OF Of OF OF 

Ehanaa AMH 34/B3 23/73 ■ 28 HE 15*56 pc 

Cwww 28 *2 21/70 ah 29/B4 20*8 PC 

Una 23/73 18*4 pc 23/73 iS*a pc 

Unco cay 20/H 7*4 pc 22m sms pc 

FBodeJanaM 29*4 21/70 PC 31*6 22/71 pc 

SaflBigo 24/75 3*7 PC 24/75 BM8 pc 


Asia 

Today 

— 

Tomorrow 

— 


Mgh 

Low 

W 

High 

La* 

W 


OF 

C/F 


OF 

OF 


Bangkok 

31 m 

23/73 

e 

2904 

22/71 

t 

Be$ng 

3/37 

-7*20 

a 

C/43 

-4.25 pc 

Mens Kona 

25/77 

SI/70 

PC 

23/73 

19*6 C 

JtanJa 

31/86 

23/73 

PC 

30/88 

24/75 


NawDekv 

32 /BO 

15*59 

t 

26/34 

13/55 s 

Seoul 

7/44 

M/25 

pc 

8/43 

•* OS 

1 

5-irru/iai 

11 <52 

400 

Hi 

11JS2 

337 

«n 

Snow* 

30/88 

24/75 

c 

29/84 

24/75 

c 

Talgat 

22*71 

IS/B4 

1 

21/70 

17/82 

1 

Tokyo 

18*61 

a/43 DC 

17/62 

4.-30 pc 

Africa 

«BWi 

17*82 

11/52 

a 

15/59 

12*53 

an 

Cape Town 

23/73 

13/55 

s 

28/79 

15*9 

H 

CasaWontai 

17.62 

11/52 


18*4 

11/52 

DC 

Harare 

17*62 

9/46 

c 

20*6 

9/48 

t 

Lugos 

31 OB 

24 in, 

DC 

30*6 

25/7/ 

#n 

0UCO& 

21-70 

11/52 

DC 

23.73 

13*55 

1 

Tin* 

1B/B1 

6/43 

PC 

14/57 

7-44 

ah 

North America 


Logond: a-Bunny, p&oarsv cieudy. c-doudy. ah-stiowwa, Mhunderenrns, laah. ■*«»* fwitas, 
an-snow. mco. W-Weathar All traps, forecasts «! data provided by Acsu-WwOw. Inc. 0 1994 


Mdww 

Adana 

Bcasai 

Chicago 

Darner 

Doom 

Honolulu 

Houston 

Loo Angelas 

Mans 


Toronto 

WOsttigton 


A SPOKESMAN for Michael Jackson 
denies reports that Jackson plans to 
end his marriage to lisa Marie Presley 
after five months, calling the stories “an 
outrageous, 100 percent, total lie.” In Lon- 
don, the Daily Mirror reported that Jackson 
wanted more independence and did not 
want Prcslev to stay at his apartment in 
New York, feut the New York Daily News 
said that Presley refused to leave California 
to live with him. “People just don’t want to 
give these kids a chance," said Bob Jones, 
Jackson’s manager. “You have my word 
that this is simply somebody’s sick fantasy.” 
□ 

Prince Rainier of Monaco, who last 
week underwent double-bypass heart sur- 
gery, is recovering well and is expected to 
leave the hospital early next week, the 
principality's press office said. 

□ 

Wynton Marsafis made news in his first 
set at the Village Vanguard in New York. 
Before he began to play, tbe trumpeter and 
band leader announced that tins week’s 
engagement would be the last for his septet, 
one of the most influential and active bands 
in jazz. The septet indudes, besides Marsa- 
lis, Eric Reed on piano, Wess Andeisoo and 



Zone Jkxaxric/AP 

Presley-Jackson split is denied. 

Victor Goines on saxophone, Wydfffe Gor- 
don on trombone, Ben Wolfe on bass and 
Herlin RBey on drums. 


The feminist writer TasGma Nasm, who 
faces an arrest warrant and death decree by 
Muslim f undam en talis ts in Bangladesh, was 
presented a French prize for human rights 
by Foreign Minister Alain Jupp& Juppe 


praised Nasrin “for all of her work, in 
Ban gladesh and abroad, in defense of free- 
dom of expression and against all forms of 
religious intolerance.” She delayed a visit to 
France last month after the authorities first 
said they would grant only a one-day visa 
because of security concerns. . ' tf% 

□ 

Beatfemania again: Fans from around 
the wold are flocking to London to buythe 
first Beatles album in almost 25 years. The 
album, with the group's hits and cover ver- 
sions of rock classics, does not go on sale iu 
the United States until next week and Brit- 
ish stores r^rt large numbers cf American 
buyers. Tom Thomas, a systems analyst 
from New Jersey, said she would be taking 
hex copy home 4 sewn into my bra.” 

□ •; 

Several officials of Japan's Imperial 
Household have been reprimanded for 
misplacing a decoration given to Emperor 
Akfliito by King Joan Carlos of Spain in 
1985. The decoration, Spain’s highest or- 
der , was sent by air from Tokyo to Madrid 
but was lost on arrival, and the emperor 
had to wear a borrowed decoration at a 
banquet in his honor. 





.. : >s 

■ 

, * • •: v- 


BS***^- '• .-r* 

, Jlre Concorde does it in three. 

' . • • ^ 

With an operator, you can do it in seconds. 



l > \£p