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INTERNATIONAL 


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(tribune 


** 


PUBLISHED WITH THE ISIRW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 

Paris, Monday, December 12, 1994 


No. 34.769 


6 No’ From Delors Stuns French Left 

Deep Political Rifts Keep Him Out of Presidential Rate 


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By Joseph Fitchett 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — In an extraordinary aci oF 
pouucal renunciation. Jacques Delors told 
the nation on Sunday night that he had 
decided against running for the presidency 
because he could not see effective, broad 
enough support to carry out the reforms 
that France needs. 

Speaking in a choked voice and reading 

■ from a bnef prepared statement, Mr. De- 
iors, 69. said: “I could not put into effect 
the solutions l believe are necessary" for 
France to meet its domestic problems of 
high unemployment and social tensions, as 
•well as international challenges related to 

■ European unity. 

• Mr. Delors's decision, after weeks of 
suspense, seemed to guarantee that conser- 
vatives will win the presidency, giving 
them control of almost all the political 
y levers of power in France when President 
Francois Mitterrand, a Socialist, steps 
down after 14 years in office. 

In the end, Mr. Delors’s prime motive 
came down to a conviction that France, in 
a period of uncertain transition, could not 
afford political gridlock of the son that 
now hampers initiative and change in so 
many capitals from Washington to Tokyo. 

By pulling out, Mr. Delors "must have 


felt the need to spare the country what he 
saw as a losing battle among ourselves that 
would have hurt France's chances in the 
long term." according to one of his asso- 
ciates. 

Mr. Delors put an end to weeks of sus- 
pense during an hourlong television inter- 
view. In recent weeks, questions about his 
possible candidacy had spawned a mini- 
industry in Delors- watching, with little re- 
sult. 

Acknowledging the disappointment for 
the French left and also among pro-Euro- 
pean center-right factions. Mr. Delors said 
that “disappointment today is not as bad 
as regrets tomorrow." 

The disappointment will be sharp. The 
Socialist Party, which saw an opportunity 
for an almost miraculous political come- 
back behind Mr. Delors, has little hope of 
performing credibly with any other candi- 
date. like former Prime Ministers Michel 
Rocard and Pierre Mauroy or former Cul- 
ture Minister Jack Lang. 

Now the race is likely to be dominated 
by Prime Minister Edouard Balladur, 
characterized by Mr. Delors as a “do- 
nothing," and Jacques Chirac, the Gaullist 
candidate, who, Mr. Delors says, “lies to 
the French people" by promising tax cuts 
and better welfare programs. Their compe- 


tition seems likely to be a muted struggle 
aimed mainly at winning over sections of 
the conservative political parties’ appara- 
tus. 

In Europe as a whole, particularly Ger- 
many, many leaders had pinned their 
hopes on seeing Mr. Delors run, win and 
become a French president determined to 
push for closer integration within the Eu- 
ropean Union. 

His views, including his crusade for clos- 
er European unity, also forced sympathies 
between the Clinton administration and 
Mr. Delors, in contrast to his clashes with 
the Bush and Reagan administrations. 

Chancellor Helmut Kohl, a Christian 
Democrat, and Mr. Delors, who describes 
himself as a Christian Socialist, became 
close political allies during Mr. Delors's 10 
years as head of the European Commission 
in Brussels, a job he will leave in late 
January. 

While Britain’s Conservative govern- 
ments have often tended to single out Mr. 
Ddors as the incarnation of big bureaucra- 
cy and tax-and-spend tendencies in Brus- 
sels, Mr. Delors often supported moves 
toward deregulation and free competition 
in the European Union that often dis- 

See DELORS, Page 6 


EU Backs Away From ‘Closer’ Union 


By Tom Buerkle 

International Herald Tribune 

ESSEN, Germany — The European 
Union has taken a major step away from 
an “ever-closer union," the bloc’s' stated 
goal, to a looser form of political coopera- 
tion favored by Britain and, increasingly, 
France. 

The shift was underscored by a provoca- 
tive analysis presented to EU leaders by 
Jacques Delors, the outgoing president of 
the executive commission, as well as more 
mundane disputes at the Union’s s ummi t' 
meeting here at which it embarked on the 
road to Eastern expansion. 

The meeting offered the clearest glimpse 
yet of the Europe of the next century, 
bringing together the heads of government 
•nf the 12 existing members and of Austria, 
tfmland and Sweden, which will join in 
January, with leaders of Poland, Hungary, 


the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Romania 
and Bulgaria. 

Even Vaclav Klaus, the Czech prime 
minister who has made the most insistent 
calls for early membership, expressed sat- 
isfaction with the strategy adopted by EU 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

leaders. It gives no timetable for entry but 
sets up a work program to prepare the' East 
for the EU single market, steps up finan- 
cial aid and admits Eastern states to regu- 
lar EU meetings. 

“I would not underestimate the symbol- 
ic importance of what happened today,” 
Mr. Klaus said as the summit meeting 
ended on Saturday. 

Mr. Ddors did not underestimate the 
importance, either, daring a lively brain- 
storming session with the IS leaders over 


dinner on Friday, according to accounts of 
those present. 

He began by talking of a Union of 27, 
embracing all the countries represented on 
Saturday; the three Baltic republics and 
Slovenia, which will win the same member- 
ship prospect shortly, plus Cyprus and 
Malta. 

Mr. Delors said the applicants bring 
“enormous demands for resources.” With- 
out major reforms of EU policies. they 
would require a rough doubling of farm 
and development spending that accounts 
for two-thirds of the EU budget of 70 
billion European currency units. 

What’s more, an extension of existing 
voting procedures would make it impossi- 
ble for Germany, France, Britain and Italy 

See EUROPE, Page 6 



Ludwig HucM/Rsuien 

CHRISTMAS BONUS — Magnus Larsson of Sweden, ranked 19th in 
the world in men’s tennis, upset the top-ranked Pete Sampras on Sunday 
to win the Grand Sam Cup in Munich — and $13 million. Page 19. 


With Old Arkansas Friends Like Clinton’s, Who Needs Enemies? 


By Rath Marcus 

Washington Pan Service 

WASHINGTON — President Bill Clinton took 
care of one troublesome problem from Arkansas last 
week. Another returned to haunt him. 

The president's week started in a meeting in Buda- 
pest on European security, continued at home where 
he signed the new world trade treaty and ended in 
Miami with a hemispheric summit meeting. 

But all of that was overshadowed tty two difficult 
events that resurrected Mr. Clinton's Arkansas past — 


the di.snri.ssal on Friday of his outspoken surgeon 
general, Joycdyn Elders, for suggesting that mastur- 
bation “is part of something that perhaps should be 
taught” in schools, and the guflty plea on Tuesday of 
one of the president's closest friends, former Associate 
Attorney General Webster L. Hubbdl. 

As the networks replayed footage of the president 
and his confidant on the golf course, Mr. HubbcU’s 
guilty plea evoked memories of the fate of other 
Arkansans that the Clintons brought to Washington 
with them, chief among them the suicide in July 1993 

sat Fc 


of another Rose Law Firm partner, Vincent Foster, 


who was then a deputy White House counsel And 
new problems from old friends loomed for the presi- 
dent. There were reports that his former partner in the 
Whitewater zeal-estate venture, James B. McDougal 
is about to be indicted by the Whitewater independent 
counsel, Kenneth W. Starr, and that a second indepen- 
dent counsel investigating Agriculture Secretary Mike 
Espy has broadened his inquiry to include an exami- 
nation of Tyson Foods Inc., the Arkansas ipouluy 
conglomerate with longstanding ties to Mr. Clinton. 

“The thing with Webb is just one more a long line of 
tragedies that related to Arkansas friends and is in 


Kiosk 


Kinkel May Go 
As Party Leader 

GERA, Germany (Reuters) — 
Klaus Kinkel the German foreign 
minister, is considering resigning as 
leader of the Free Democrats, junior 
partners in Chancellor Helmut Kohl’s 
jverament, party sources said Sun- 


corlier, Mr. Kinkel was booed and 

jeered at a party congress, called in the 
wake of nine devastating regional 
election losses in a row and the party’s 
plunge w 6.9 percent of the wte in 
October from 11 percent m 1990. 

“It is largely due to our poor image 
that so many people have turned away 
from us," Mr. Kinkel said. "These was 
a lack of fidelity to our principles, an 
inability to convince and a lack of 
authority.” 

Ambush Kills Israeli 

MARJAYOUN, Lebanon (AP) — 
Guerrillas ambushed an Israeli mili- 
tary patrol in southern Lebanon on 
Sunday, killing an Israeli soldier and 
wounding seven. Security sources said 
four guerrillas were killed and three 
Lebanese civilians wounded. 

The Shiite Muslim group Hezbol- 
lah, or Party of God, claimed respon- 
sibility for the roadside bomb attack. 

Gwnwral News 

The Frencb-Itafian maker of ATR 
planes called the U.S. ban on its com- 
muter aircraft unjustified. Page 2. 


Book Review 


PageS. 



RaM Mta|hnbi/AgMce Pmce-PitNC 


A BLACK FLAG— A Muslim fundamentalist woman in Amm a n taking 
part in a protest Sunday against the opening of an Israefi embassy. Page i. 


Signal of Philippine Terror 
As Blast Kills Air Passenger 


By T. R. Rend 

Washington Post Senior 

TOKYO — The pilot of a Philippine 
Airlines plane with a hole blasted m its 
floor by an explosion made a one-hour 
detour to the nearest airport and brought 
his Boeing 747 jumbo jet in safely Sunday 
morning. 

One passenger was killed and 10 suf- 
fered mild injuries, but the re mai ning 296 
aboard emerged unscathed after 
it 434 from Manila and Cebu to To- 
made an emergency l an ding at Naha, 

ilosion blew a hole in the floor of 


he explosion blew a hole in the floor of 
fuselage. Passengers told Japan's 
K-TV that they watched debris flying 


The< 
the 

NHK- , _ 

through the plane and feared another ex- 
plosion during the rash to Naha. 

Several hours after the blast, a man 
claiming to represent a radical Philippine 
Muslim guerrilla group catted The Associ- 
ated Press in Manila to claim responsibil- 
ity for the bombing. 

“We are Abu Sayyaf Group," the caller 
said in broken En glish, “We explode one 
plane from Cebu." 

He warned that the group planned to 
target other Philippine aircraft 

The Abu Sayyaf Group, winch opposes 
peace talks between the Philippine govern- 
ment and the country’s main Muslim rebel 


faction, the Moro National Liberation 
Front, has been blamed for numerous 
bombings in the southern Philippines and 
for the kidnapping of businessmen, priests, 
doctors and other people for ransom. 

In June, Philippine marines launched ft 
major offensive against the Abu Sayyaf 
Group’s strongholds on Basiian after the 
rebels massacred IS Christians and kid- 
napped a local Roman Catholic priest for 
ransom. 

The military later overran the rebels’ 
main base ana said it killed at least 36 
aimed members of the group. 

Fighting resumed last month when the 
military launched a new effort to capture 
the group's leader, Abdurajak Abubakar 
Janjalam, an Islamic radical who formerly 
studied in Libya. 

His fighters arc believed to number only 
in the hundreds, but they have shown a 
capacity to cause havoc. 

Bombings of churches, shopping centers 
and other targets attributed to the group 
have killed or injured scores of people. 

If the group is responsible for the bomb- 
ing, however, it would mark the first time 
that it has targeted a Philippine airliner 
and courted a major international catas- 
ie. 

dead passenger was identified as 

See TERROR, Page 6 


many respects unprecedented in terms of bringing 
friends from home to Washington with you," said a 
former White House deputy chief of staff, Roy Neel. 
“This is all just very sad when you think about a bunch 
who came to town with such high hopes and good 
spirits. There was great pride in that adventure, and 
now you just get a sense of survival over there.” 

In dismissing Dr. Elders, Mr. Clinton took action 
that many — including some of his own advisers — 
believed was long overdue for his political survival- 

See CLINTON, Page 6 


Yeltsin Sends 
Troops Into 
Breakaway 
Rebel Region 

3 Armored Columns 
Pour Into Chechnya but 
Stop Short of Capital 

By Lee Hockstader 

Washington Post Service 

MOSCOW — In its largest offensive 
military action in 16 years. Russia on Sun- 
day sent troops and armor pouring into the 
rebel southern region of Chechnya, which 
has resisted Moscow's rule since it de- 
clared independence in 1991. 

Thousands of troops and hundreds of 
armored vehicles and tanks swept into the 
breakaway republic in three columns from 
the east, west and northwest, encountering 
light resistance and inflicting some casual- 
ties. The troops had stopped short of 
storming the Chechen capital of Grozny. 
1,600 kilometers (1,000 miles) south of 
Moscow, where several-thousand lightly 
armed volunteers have vowed to fight the 
Russians. 

In a statement reported Sunday night by 
Russia’s Itar-Tass press agency. President 
Boris N. Yeltsin said the troops had moved 

Russia’s invasion of Chechnya has a 

touch of the old Soviet style. Page 6- 

in “to help find a political solution and to 
defend the people’’ of Chechnya. He said 
he remained hopeful that peace talks 
planned for Monday could resolve the cri- 
sis without further bloodshed. 

Speaking at a news conference in Mi- 
ami, President Bill Clinton expressed little 
alarm over the situation, saying that he had 
counseled the Russian leadership to use 
the minimum force necessary. 

“It is an internal Russian affair,” Mr. 
Clinton said. “We hope that order can be 
restored with a minimum of violence and 
bloodshed” 

Reports bom Grozny said the city of 
400,000 people was quiet. It was not imme- 
diately dear whether the Russians bad 
merely paused pending the talks and to 
gjve civilians a chance to flee the city ahead 
of a major assault, or planned a long siege 
to wear down the Crvschen troops and 
force them to negotiate. 

The Chechen president, Dzhokar Du- 
dayev, who has defied the Kremlin at every 
turn, declared that war had begun. But the 
Chechen economics minister, Taimaz 
Abubakarov, said he would attend talks 
with Russia on Monday as head of the 
Chechen government delegation. 

“We will defend ourselves," declared 
Mr. Dudayev, 50, a former Soviet Air 
Force general who has staked his career on 
confrontation with Moscow. 

The Russian thrust Sunday was the most 
extensive hostile act by Moscow's troops 
since the invasion of Afghanistan in De- 
cember 1979. It marked a decisive step by 
Mr. Yeltsin, whose patience has worn thin 
through months of escalating tensions be- 
tween Moscow and Grozny. 

Unlike most of the ethnic and national 
conflicts that have erupted along Russia’s 
southern flank since communism's col- 
lapse, the Chechen crisis is unfolding on 
what Russia — and the world — recog- 
nizes as Russian territory. 

That has raised the stakes of using force 
against Grozny, a move that could lead to 
an open split between Mr. Yeltsin and 
most of his liberal allies, who strongly 
oppose military intervention. 

Grigori Yavlinsky, head of a major lib- 
eral bloc in the Russian Parliament, said: 
“We're against our children being killed. 
We’re against democracy being established 
using these methods." 

Chechnya, mostly Muslim, is a vital re- 
gional transport hub and important oil 
refining center. It has been a thorn in Mr. 
Yeltsin’s side since it declared indepen- 
dence from Moscow three years ago. 
Alarmed by the precedent, Mr. Yeltsin 
sent troops to Grozny then but withdrew 
them in the face of opposition from the 
Chechens and the Russian Parliament. 

Since then, efforts to reach an accom- 
modation between Moscow and Grozny 
have been fruitless. Russian officials have 
meanwhile stepped up allegations that 
Chechnya, an enclave of 1 million people, 
is providing a safe haven for terrorists, 
drag traffickers and arms dealers. 

Earlier this year, Moscow began a thinly 
veiled policy erf helping the armed Che- 
chen opposition seeking to topple Mr. Du- 
dayev. That opposition, together with Rus- 
sian troops recruited by the KGB's 
successor agency, launched a poorly 

See RUSSIA, Page 6 


Intrigued by New South Africa, American Blacks Pack Their Bags 


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By Paul Taylor 

Washington Past Service 

JOHANNESBURG — As Zambia McLeod, a 
Georgetown University prc-med student, was packing 
to viat her family here for the Christmas holidays, 
several of her black friends in the United States 
stuffed her suitcase full of rfcsumte, 

“They kept saying: “We can't believe it Your 
parents actually live in South Africa. How fantastic,* " 
she said. “Some want to move here.” 

Once the symbol to American blacks of all things 
evil South Africa has become atoyst amecca for them 
now ***** it has transformed itself from a white racist 
state to a black-led democracy. 

“A lot erf African Americans seem to have the idea 
that they can come here now and find that 40 acres 


and a mole they never did get at home," said Miss 
McLeod’s father, Madtie McLeod, who directs the 
Lotus Trust, the American computer company’s social 
responsibility program in South Africa. 

The McLeods are in the vanguard of a small but 
growing number erf African Americans who have 
settledhere since the political transition that culmi- 
nated in April with Nelson Mandela’s election as 
president 

They are corporate executives, development offi- 
cials, educators, entrepreneurs and consultants. They 
number in the low hundreds, according to Mr. 
McLeod's best guess. 

Some have come to do good in Mr. Mandela's South 
Africa, some to do well, some to fill a personal void 
and some to win battles here that they nave given up 
for lost in the United States. 


Almost aD have found the journey to be bracing. 
But some also have found it disorienting, as they 
discover how similar histories of oppression mask 
differences of outlook among the Macks of the two 
countries. 

“When a black American comes to South Africa, 
there’s this realization that here is this marvelously 
sophisticated country, with its impressive infrastruc- 
ture, that is coming under black control” said Francis 
Kornegay Jr., director of the African-American Insti- 
tute's South Africa program. “That’s powerful coming 
from a society where blades — no matter how success- 
ful — fed that control is tenuous, if it exists at all” 

“The idea of flying in the business-class section of 
an airplane back to the continent where your ances- 
tors had been dragged away in the hull of a ship — 
that’s pretty amazing stuff," Mr. McLeod said. 


But as he and others acknowledge, this is also a 
journey easy to romanticize and fraught with potential 
disappointment 

“If a the old cliche — African American comes to 
Africa and realizes just how American he is,” said Mr. 
Kornegay, a scholar who has visited South Africa on 
and off for two decades. 

“Many of the American blacks who come are gong 
to be in for a rude awakening,” said Ron Carter, dean 
of students at the University of Witwatcrsrand, who 
until 1989 was a dean at Boston University. “You can 
very easily be seen as a carpetbagger, and your black 
skin won't help you " 

“If you think you can come here, enjoy the comfort 
of living in Sandton," he said, referring to an exclu- 

See SETTLERS, Page 6 


N 1 


Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 1994 


** 


The UN, Staying in Bosnia as a ‘Witness,’ Leaves Its ‘Fig Leaf Mission Intact 

' J o -v /virnnritment to staying in Bosnia,.at 1 


By John Pomfret 

Washington Pari Service 

VELEKA KLADUSA Bosnia — The 
road to this besieged Muslim farm town in 
northwestern Bosnia is lined, with Serbian 
artillery batteries and the best intentions 
of the international community. 

Trembling with the wallop of tanks, 
mortars and 155mm howitzers, the road 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

twists by a base of the United Nations 
Protection Force, where Polish soldiers 
peer out from under thin blue helmets at 
passing Serbian weaponry. Few worry 
about safety. No shells fall on this side of 
the line because the Muslims lack big guns. 

"We’re just listening to people die,” said 
an officer as a barrage of Serbian tank and 
artillery shells shattered a few moments of 
ralwij boring into the Muslim-held town on 


the far side of the hills. “But if we left, 
wbo’d be here to witness?” 

The biggest peacekeeping mission in his- 
tory hobbled to the brink of collapse last 
week, peered ova* the edge and stopped 

Talk of pulling out the 23,000 UN 
peacekeepers from Bosnia faded quickly 
amid fears that the effort to cage the war 
within rite boundaries of former Yugosla- 
via would become the first casualty of the 
withdrawal Added to that were European 
fears that a widening war would spare the 
first East-West nuKtaiy confrontation in 
the post-Cdd War era. 

In the end, the Serbs, the United Na- 
tions, Britain, Fiance, the United States, 
Russia and the Muslims seemed petrified 
by the unknown and resigned themselves 
to the imperfections of the UN peacekeep- 
ing operation. 

Few called for a robust reconfiguration 
of the UN operation into a force capable 
of ixnpoGu j a solution, as allied armies did 


in 1991 to save the Kurds in northern Iraq. 

Some American politicians called for 
muscular NATO bombing raids on the 
Serbs and a unilateral lifting of die arms 
embargo on Bosnia’s Muslims. But even 
U.S. military officers scoffed at those 
ideas, arguing that they would only swell 
Bosnia’s rivers of blood and leave the Mus- 
lims more battered than before. 

France and Britain also lambasted that 
j the widest breach ever in the 
of U.S. security since 1949, the 
North Atlantic Treaty Organization. 

The United Nations’ rote as a “fig leaf,” 
in the words of Kofi Annan, UN underset- 

won. 



A traveler at Chicago’s O’Hare Airport making a rental car reservation after his flight was canceled by potentially 
icy weather. Hie Federal Aviation A dminis tration has ordered ATR tur b oprop planes grounded in such conditions. 

ATR Maker Protests U.S. Flying Ban 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

TOULOUSE, France — The Frencb- 
Italian maker of ATR planes called the 
UJ3. government ban on its turboprop 
commuter aircraft unjustified and said it 
would conduct tests in California to 
prove iL 

Avion de Transport Regional said Sat- 
urday that it “shares the FAA’s worries” 
but suggested that the Federal Aviation 
Administration overreacted by ground- 
ing ATR-72 and ATR-42 planes in icy 
weather. 

The FAA announced the ban on flying 
the ATR-42 and ATR-72 planes in icing 
conditions immediately after getting new 
test results from the manufacturer. 

In Calgary, Alberta, Can a di a n Re- 
gional Amines and Inter Canadian said 
in a statement that the ATR-42 planes 
not only were barred from flying in icy 
conditions but also were being grounded 
“in the interest of passenger safety and 
convenience." 

The order will be in effect until further 
notice. 


The FAA suspects icing caused the 
Oct 3) crash in Raselawn, Indiana, of an 
American Eagle ATR-72. A total of 68 
people were killed. 

The National Transportation Safety 
Board, which investigates accidents, has 
not ruled on a cause of that accident but 
it urged that the ATR-72 and ATR-42 
not be flown in icing conditions. 

ATR said the planes met FAA and 
French standards. The wind tunnel tests 
conducted by the company “furnish no 
basis that can justify the measures taken 
by the FAA.” it said. 

“We’re going to do everything we can 
to get the Federal Aviation Administra- 
tion to reverse its verdict,” the ATR 
chairman, Henry-Paul Pud, said at a 
news conference. “We’re not going to 
roll over that easily” 

Mr. Pud said “high risk” tests would 
be carried out at Edwards Air Force Base 
in California in the next few days, simu- 
lating atmospheric conditions that pre- 
ceded the Indiana crash. 

The tests will involve a tanker drop- 
ping water on an ATR-42, Mr. Puel said. 


More than 290 flights were canceled in 
Chicago alone within hours of the FAA 
order on Friday, which could affect as 
many as 15 percent of the seats available 
on regional air carriers. Some airlines 
plan to drift the affected planes to warm- 
er parts of the United States. 

Nine UJ>. airlines fly 1 1 1 of the 40- 
seat ATR-42s and 42 of the 66-seat 
ATR-72s. A total of 62 companies 
worldwide fly 269 ATR*42s ana 129 
ATR-72S. 

American Eagle grounded all 41 ATR 
commuter airplanes at Chicago’s airport. 
American Eagle decided it was better to 
ground all flights than to inconvenience 
customers daily with last-minute deci- 
sions about cancellations, a company 
spokeswoman said. 

American Eagle has the nation’s larg- 
est ATR fleet, and O'Hare is its Midwest 
hub, where only ATRs are used by the 
company. American Eagle said it would 
try to get some of the passengers on 
flights, bus some commuters to nearby 
destinations or refund their money. 

(AP, AFP) 


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But for Europe’s deadliest conflagration 
since World War II, the impheations of the 
fig leaf are grim: continued low-level con- 
flict, widespread suffering for several ntil- 
licm people already exhausted by war and 
mare futile attempts to patch together an 
imperfect peace plan that roughly divides 


Bosnia between Serbs and a Muslim-Cio- 
atian federation. , . . * 

And even without a UN withdrawal, the 
prospects for a wider war remain mgn. 
Already the fighting around VeKka Kla- 
dusa and Bihac town 24 kilometers (15 

mfles) to the south has become a proxy war 

between Croatia and rebel Croatian Serbs, 

who occupy 27 percent of that country. 

There are also broader ramifications ot 
this arrangement By refusing bolder ac- 
tion and clutching to its tenets of impar- 
tiality, the UN mission could be condemn- 
ing the viability of a molti-ethnic state and 
the potential for nurturing moderate 
strains of Islam in the heart of Europe- 
Rup Game, the vice president of Bos- 
nia’s mostly Muslim government, bp 
warned of “a Gaza Strip m Europe’s back- 
yaid” with all its accoutrements: funda- 
mentalism, terrorism and poverty. Some 
Western officials worry he could be right 
The basic strategy of the UN mission 


appears to be to to stay long enough to 
rack up the pieces after the war is over. 
And by their presence as a witness, nketne 
Polish soldier on the road to Vdika Kla- 
ifriw, they hope to “attenuate and blunt 
the sharpness of the conflict," said Yasushi 
Akasbi, the Japanese diplomat who leads 
the UN operation in former Yugoslavia. 

On, w,. HvifwQpino f hr. fio leaf notion. th< 


key member statesln thelJmtfid Nations 
have ceded control of the pace of conflict 
to the Serbs. , . . _ 

As time passes, Serbs m Croatia, Bosnia 
and Yugoslavia are approaching their 
dream of “Greater Serbia,” further com- 
plicating the search for peace. Such a de- 
velopment defies the insistence of the car- 
tent negotiators, the United States, Russia, 
Britain, Germany and France; that inter- 
national borders cannot be violated to end 
the Balkan wars. 

By week’s end, the United Nations, and 
Britain and France; had voiced a renewed 


commitment to staying in Bosnia,.at least 
through the winter, even though there had 
been nb change to the political or military 

relaxed flieir pressure on 
the United Nations. They released 187 
peacekeepers held for two weeks and took 

‘ . * 1 l ii fi.r A fam knmanita^.- 


% 


repiauauaw - . , , : — 

aid convoys were allowed through to iso-, 
lated Muslim enclaves — Bihac, Gorazde, 
Srebrenica— but Serbs continued to hlai.' 
the resumption of the Sarajevo air .bridge 
and deliveries of fud to the UN mission. J 
Perha ps concerned about the 


UN withdrawal, tne Bosnian aennaa wad- 
er, Radov an Karadzic, declared that a UN‘ 
pullout would be a humanitarian ifeaster. 
for both Serbs and Muslims. 

“fit we are approaching a peace «ttb.' 
meet,” he said, fc then we would need the 
UN around, and they should not leave.” 


Serbs Hijack UN Fuel 
And Halt Aid Convoys 


The Associated Press 

SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Heize- 
govina — Bosnian Serbs hi- 
jacked a United Nations fuel 
convoy and on Sunday banned 
all heavy UN vehicles from 
their territory, halting many hu- 
manitarian aid convoys, offi- 
cials said. 

“This is an outrageously un- 
acceptable behavior.” said 
Lieutenant Colonel Jan-Dixk 
von Mervddt, a UN spokesman 
in Sarajevo. 

But there appeared little the 
United Nations could do in the 
face of continued Bosnian Ser- 
bian obstructions. 

The Bosnian Serbs refused to 
grant clearance Sunday to a 
plane carrying the UN com- 
mander in Bosnia, Lieutenant 
General Michael Rose, to land 
at Sarajevo airport General 
Rose, returning from a failed 
mission to visit his trapped sol- 
diers in northwestern Bihac — a 
trip blocked by Serbs in neigh- 
boring Croatia — landed with- 


out the clearance, a UN spokes- 
man said. 

The Sarajevo airport has 
been dosed for weeks since 
Bosnian Serbs positioned sur- 
face-to-air missiles in the air 
corridor approaching the city. 
That has forced a shutdown in 
the humanitarian airlift, wtdeb 
supplies 80 percent of the needs 
of toe Bosnian capital’s 300,000 
residents. 

A three- truck Danish fuel 
convoy was hijacked in Bosnian 
Serbian territory near the air- 
port Saturday mght after gun- 
men blocked the front and rear 
of the convoy. Coland von. 
Mervddt said. 

With one armed Serb in each 
vehicle, the convoy was forced 
to go to a Serb-held part of 
Sarajevo, where the peacekeep- 
ers were questioned. Serbs then 
agreed to release the troops, but 
two Danish officers refused to 
leave. They were believed to be 
somewhere in the Serb-held 
part of the city. Colonel von 
Mervddt said. 



WORLD BRIEFS 

Journalist a Spy, Ex-KGB Officer Says 

LONDON (Reuters) — A former KGB officer considered a 
British journalist who resigned last week ova: Sot allegations a 
ytar informant and paid mm more than £10,000, The Sunday, 
Times reported- > 

The newspaper quoted Oleg Gordicvsky, who once headed the' 
Sonet Union’s spy network in Britain, as saying that he consid- - 
ered the journalist, Richard Gott, to be a genuine agent. r 

Mr. Gott, a former I^tin America correspondent and literary ' * 
editor with The Guardian newspaper, has denied allegations that 
be accepted cash payments from a Soviet agent. He admitted the , 
Soviet Union paid for him to travel to Vienna, Athens and Nicosia * 
to “meet their man” in the 1960s. He resigned from The Guardian 
last week, saying he had acted foolishly but had not been a spy. ' 

Full P nnifthme nt Set for China Fire . 

BEUING (Reuters) — Three days after at least 311 children' 
died in China’s worst fire in IS years, Wang Leqnan, acting 
Comm unist Party secretary of the Xinjiang region, vowed to' 
punish those responsible with “the full fury of the Law,” the China 
News Agnocy said Sunday. 

The fire raged through a haU Thursday when it was packed with 
more than 800 people, including 500 schoolchildren. When fright- - 
ened children tried to escape, they were ordered to remain sitting' 
and maintain discipline, an official said. 

Most of the victims were sitting in front rows. They were' 
engulfed in flames when a ball of foe erupted from the curtains 
and exploded into the auditorium, witnesses said. All the doors' 
except one were padlocked, and iron bars blocked the windows. 
Preliminary investigations showed the inferno was sparked by an - 
electrical short circuit in the roof. 

Italian Neofascists Denounce Fini 

BOLOGNA, Italy (AP) — Neofascist leaders denounced Gian-, 
franco Fini as a traitor to the movement Sunday, as the steering 
committee erf the Italian Social Movement, or MSI, in effect 


4 

u „ 
} 

Y 


| ■ • I m TT _ * * FWT 11 TTTVT completed the break Mr. Fini sought from, the group. But it could 

Kignts Unit lells UIN 


By Barbara Crossette 

New York Tunes Service 

NEW YORK — A leading 
human-rights organization is 
calling on the United Nations 
to reconsider its policy of neu- 
trality and to act more forceful- 
ly against those who carry out 
atrocities in the new rash of 
small conflicts around the 
world. 

“Faced with genocide and 
mass slaughter, neutrality 
should not be the ultimate val- 
ue,” the gjronp. Human Rights 
Watch, said in a report It calls 
the United Nations “unique in 
its capacity to legitimize farce 
in the most extreme circum- 
stance to uphold human 
rights.” 

The international survey, 
“Human Rights Watch World 
Report 1995,” also accuses ma- 
jor industrial nations of follow- 
ing policies that subjugate, and 
sometimes obliterate, human- 
rights c on ce rn s in the name of 
trade. It takes issue with the 
argument that economic growth 
leads to improvements in dvfl 
and human rights and the 
spread of democracy. 

“Indeed, even if economic 
development could be correlat- 
ed in the long term with im- 


tion, specifically Commerce 
Secretary Ronald H. Brown. 

Under Mr. Brown, the report 
said, U.S. delegations have bees 
“hawking trade and investment 
deals while rele gating human 
rights to the in effectual realm of 
private diplomacy.” 

“The administration’s 


_ away U 

The movement’s leaders said they would seek court permissiaa- 
to retain the group's name and its flame- shaped symbol after Mr/ 
Fini severs it from the National Alliance. Mr. Fini, seeking to 
distance his rightist party from its hard-line roots, plans to hofd£ 
meeting next month to banish the MSI and strike its flame symtrcr 
from the National Alliance emblem. 

The movement’s leaders approved a statement “marking the 
demise of Fini from the membership and as national secretary of ; 
the MSI for resounding and chronic violations of the rules of the; 
party,” the ANSA press agency reported, 
tion on India exemplified the , _ _ . • ■ ■ - - 

sMft,” Human Rights Watch Bangladesh Judges Home Bombed : 

said. “Its refreshing but short- _ , . . 7*3 . ... _ . • 

lived public criticism of Indian . DHAKA, Ban^adesh (AP)p- Three bombs e>q>loded Sunday 
abuses in Kashmir was replaced m ^ borne of a judge who ordered opposition lawmakers to end 
by the eager promotion of an ***** nilK> ' monlh boycott of FarfiameaL The explosions damaged. 

- - - a car and wounded its driver, the police said. 

Tbebomb6 — tin pots of explosives and glass fragments — were, 
tossed inside the judge’s home even before be left the courtroom. 
No one took responsibility for the attack, but the judge, Kari; 
Monwaruddin, said the ruling was “the apparent reason.” 

He and another High Court judge ruled Sunday that the 
boycott, aimed at forcing out Prime Minister Khalida Zia, was. 
illegaL The court did not say how it would enforce its ruling. 
Opposition lawmakers accuse Bcguzn Zia's government of vote. 
fraud, corruption and inefficiency. They want her to step down 
and call general elections, which are not scheduled until 1996. 


‘emerging market’ where public 
discussion of human rights was 
taboo.” 

In Indonesia last month to 
attend a meeting of the Aria- 
Pacific Economic Cooperation 
forum, Mr. Brown played down 
questions of Indonesian hu- 
man-rights abuses and what 
American labor leaders have 
called unfair practices in the 
workplace. 

The Clinton administration 
has also backed away from ear- 
ly promises to be tough on Chi- 
na. even publicly undercutting 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


those who are imprisoned or 
tortured today,” said the report 
Human Rights Watch, which 
this year expanded its organiza- 
tion to new bases in Europe and 
Central Aria and also opened 
an office to scrutinize the Unit- 
ed Nations, is sharp in its criti- 
cism of the Clinton administra- 


A Rocky Road for Travelers in Spain 

!taK£?i££S£3: 

fuffwatch said in ? u ^ way striies scheduled. A nalionmde strike wUUorSTa raiS 
“ f? r c w “ B r wua . r - ““““*5** ^.**5 *** m latIon of an international and long-distance train service^S 
proved respectfor human nghts its report that Wasfongtoa was maintenance and service unions 

~ » proposition — not alone m adopting “com- stoppage against Iberia airlines. simultaneous ~4-hour; 

that would offer little solace to roeraal diplomacy” as a policy. . . 

“Germany, France, Canada rba ^ p2o 'f^ bo down the management plan to keep; 
and Australia all vied for Chi- airborne, approved their own- 

nesc commercial contracts, with aLr ^ ce s aud called on service and' 

waning interest in Chinese re- crews to ngem management proposals, 

pressi on,” the report says. Transport Ministry officials said Sunday they would conceit-’ 

“France, driven by geopobti- tr ?f e m ai n t a i ning commuter service on RENFE, the stale.’ 
cal designs and commercial mo- ra ti roa “ system, through an agreement with striking anions.' , 
fives, led the charge to embrace Bt^s^ internalional airport opened a new 21-billion-franc ^ 

Iraq s genocidal regime, it (S6S6 million) terminal Sunday that should increase the number* 
says. “The European Union, o* passengers it can handle from 6 million to more than 20 million 
having concluded a cooperation a year. 

agreement with India in 1993 _ . _ ( 1 

conditioned on respect for ho- This Week’s Holidays 

man riphts lancMl infs, « 1 sn/« D , . - 

government offices will be closed or services 


UMVERSFTY DEGREE 

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man rights, lapsed into silence 
on the atrocities in Kashmir in 
1994.” 

The report also surveys the 
situations in individual coun- 
tries, grouped regionally. In ad- 
dition, it looks at special pro- 
jects ranging from aims control 
or prison conditions to wom- 
en’s and children's rights. 


wrtafled in the following countries and their dependencies this! 
week because of national and religious holidays: 

MONDAY: Kenya, Mauritania, Mexico. Thailand, Venezuela. 
TUESDAY: Malta. «=»«a. 

FRIDAY: Bahrain, Ban gl iwfra h, Kazakhstan. South Africa. 

SATURDAY: Bhutan, sri 

Sources: JJP. Morgan, Reuters, 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 1994 


THE AMERICAS / 

Ex-Intelligence Chief Urg es a Sharply Trimmed Agency 


By Walter Pincus 

Washington Past Strict 

WASHINGTON - Robert 
M. Gales, a former director of 
OnuaUntemgeHee, has drawn 

create a dramatically smaller! 
more focused spy agency by 
transferring some of its func- 
tions to the Pentagon and other 
agencies, and the plan has at- 
tracted the attention of senior 
administration officials, 

“pie idea,'’ Mr. Gates said in 
an interview, “is to have a 
leaner, more focused and 


tougher CIA and force the Pen- 
tagon, which gets five-sixths of 
the intelligence community 
b *“«?. *0 get rid of its ap- 
proach, which was left over 
from the Cold War " 

At the White House, where 
the National Security Council is 


vice on the security council staff 
under three presidents — Ger- 
ald R. Ford, Jimmy Carter and 
George Bush — developed his 
proposals in the course of mak- 
ing speeches to audiences con- 
cerned about the future of the 
Central Intelligence Agency, 


p — ~ wuiK-U iiMwugwubv n^uv;i 

preparing its own plans for in- He recently described them to a 
tdhgimce in the coming year, 5111811 Washington audience, in- 
Mr. Gates's ideas were de- eluding legislators and adminis- 
scribed by one senior official as Nation experts, 
interesting” and “reflective of Among the more controver- 
sorne of our thinking.” sial elements in his proposal is 

Mr. Gates, whose 20-year the creation of a director of mil- 
agency career also included ser- itary intelligence and transfer- 


ring to that four-star officer and 
the Pentagon all of the CIA’s 
responsibility for analysis of 
foreign weapons and military 
force levels. "This would end 
the competitive military analy- 
sis between the services and 
CIA," Mr. Gates said. 

The only exception would be 
to have the CIA continue col- 
lection and analysis involving 
nuclear, chemical and biologi- 
cal weapons of mass destruc- 
tion, so that there would contin- 
ue to be competing analyses to 
make certain nothing is missed. 


Under the Gates plan, the 
individual military services 
would also be given responsibil- 
ity for paramilitary operations 
around the world, most of 
uliich in the past have been 
carried out as coven activities 
Of the CIA. 

In return for these new re- 
sponsibilities. Mr. Gates said, 
the Defense Depan mem would 
have to cut back the “ three - 
tiered duplication" of analysis 
and research of threats, weap- 
ons and force numbers that 
now ore done by the Defense 


Intelligence Agency, the intelli- 
gence components of the sepa- 
rate military services and their 
MnifieH commands. 

Mr. Gates would also take 
the CIA’s science and technol- 
ogy directorate out of managing 
imagery satellites, the ones that 
take photos, radar or infrared 
images from space. 

That responsibility would be 
given either to the National Re- 
connaissance Organization or 
to a new National Imagery 
Agency, based in the Pentagon. 


Americas Summit 
Splits Over Cuba 


m 

.riTEK 


By William Booth 

Washing nut past Serrtce 

MIAMI — Although Presi- 
dent Bill Chnton warned to 
keep Cuba off the agenda at the 
Summit of the Americas, more 
f than 50,000 flag-waving, coffin- 
7 carrying Cuban exiles and their 
supporters who marched into 
the Orange Bowl stadium h*d 
other ideas. 

The issue of Cuba is among 
the most divisive for Latin 
American leaders, who are split 
on bashing President Fidel Cas- 
tro or trying to bring his coun- 
try into the hemispheric famil y 
with freer trade and fuller rela- 
tions as an enticement. 

For years, many Latin Amer- 
icans have applauded Mr. Cas- 
tro for needling the Yankee im- 
perialists. But with the end of 
the Cold War and the collapse 
of Cuba's protector, the Soviet 
Union, Cuba increasingly is 
seen in the region as an anach- 
ronistic failure. 

In one of the largest demon- 
strations in years, tens of thou- 
sands of Cuban immigrants and 
their children poured into the 
Orange Bowl on Saturday, 
where they sang the island’s na- 
tional anthem and chanted for 
its liberation from C ommunis t 
rule. 

Tile Clinton administration 
wanted to keep the talks at the 
summit focused on free trade, 
but the Cuban exiles and their 
political allies have kepi push- 
mg the administration and the 
Z^trn American dignitaries to 
demand that Mr. Castro, the 


only leader in the hemisphere 
not invited to Miami, bold free 
elections. The other 34 leaders 
in the region have been elected 
by popular civilian vote. 

President Carlos Safil 
Menem of Argentine could 
probably be elected mayor here 
now, after breaking ranks with 
other Latin American leaders 
by pledging to push for democ- 
ratization on the island. 

On Saturday, in private meet- 
ings with the 34 leaders of the 
hemisphere, Mr. Menem again 
raised the issue of Cuba and, 
according to Argentine sources, 
now has the support of at least 
several Central American lead- 
ers. 

Several Caribbean leaders 
say they want to transform 
Cuba not by attacking Mr. Cas- 
tro but by e ngaging him and 
pressing the Clinton adminis- 
tration to resume relations with 
the island. 

“If the United States can es- 
tablish diplomatic ties with 
North Korea and Vietnam, we 
can see no basis why diplomatic 
relations cannot exist with 
Cuba,” Prime Minister P.J. 
Patterson of Jamaica said re- 
cently. 

Yet even Mr. Menem advo- 
cates so mething die Miami Cu- 
bans are dead set against: dia- 
logue with Mr. Castro. The 
Cuban exiles believe that by 
continuing to isolate and de- 
nounce the Cuban leader they 
wfll eventually topple his 35- 
year-old regime. 



_ Jaime R-min Agcntx Fra*rP>r%tt 

Cuban women in symbolic chains and wearing “F for “prisoner" shirts demonstrating against Fidel Castro in Miami. 


Away From Politics 

• A convict was put to death by lethal 
injection in Huntsville, Texas, for a 1984 
barroom killing of which he professed 
innocence. Raymond Kinnamon, 53, 
made a 35-minute final statement in 
which he condemned the death penalty. 

f Hauers j 

• A 19-year-old shot and wounded his 
former girlfriend and another teenager in 
Pelham, Georgia, just before a Christmas 
parade, then filled himself with a bullet 
in his head. Charles Earnest Swilley fired 


a hunting rifle with a scope from behind 
a hedge about 25 yards from the parade 
staging area where about 200 people had 
gathered, a police investigator said. 

(AP) 

• A jury awarded more than $1.8 nriffion 
to a woman who claimed the funk singer 
Rick James and his companion beat her 
and held her hostage in a hotel room in 
Hollywood, California. The jury is to 
meet Monday to consider whether Mr. 
James should pay punitive damages to 
Mary Sanger, her lawyer said. Mr. 
James, 45, was convicted of assaulting 
Miss Sauger and was sentenced in Janu- 


ary to five years and four months in 
prison. His companion, Tanya Anne Hi- 
jazi, 23, was sentenced to four years in 
prison. f A Pi 

• Two survivors of a Ukrainian cargo 
ship that sank Friday in a North Atlantic 
storm were found and rescued by a heli- 
copter and a merchant vessel oa Satur- 
day as a wide sea-and-air search contin- 
ued 1,200 miles off the New Jersey coast 
for 29 other members of the ship's com- 
pany. The Coast Guard reported late 
Saturday that merchant ships in the 
search area had recovered the bodies of 
seven of the missing men. (NYT) 


A 


Page 3 


APOLITICAL NOTES A 


Polishing an Image, and Stepping on Toes 

WASHINGTON — House Republicans have hurried io 
show that they are different not only from the dethroned 
Democrats, but also from the popular conception of Republi- 
cans as a homogenous party of uncaring, nch white men. 

The party has elevated more women to important positions 
than have the Democrats, has tried io reach out to black 
liberal Democrats, and moved to open up debate on the 
House floor, which had been tightly controlled by the Demo- 
cratic leadership in earlier Congresses. 

The House speak er-io-be. Newt Gingrich of Georgia, has 
sought to soften his confrontational image, changing his 
rhetoric on welfare reform, pushing some family-oriented 
policies for legislators and backing off an austerity measure 
to deny dismissed House employees accrued vacation pay. 

Some of the changes have caused problems, both for the 
party and for Mr. Gingrich personally. For example, after 
Mr. Uingrich opened discussions with Democrats in the 
Congressional Black Caucus — in hopes of reaching compro- 
mises with them on the conservative goal of a capital gains 
tax cut — he infuriated them by supporting a move to take 
away the offices and budgets of 28 caucuses, including those 
for black. Hispanic and female lawmakers. t WP) 

Clinton Foreign Policys Some Optimism 

WASHINGTON — While Republican legislators map 
plans to attack President Bill Clinton's foreign policy, he can 
take heart that his worst nightmare is not bring realized: Jesse 
Helms of North Carolina, the new chairman of the Senate 
Foreign Relations Committee, will not single-handedly deter- 
mine his party's agenda. 

Instead, the mix will include several moderate voices, 
including Senator Bob Dole of Kansas, the incoming major- 
ity leader. Senator John S. McCain 3d of Arizona, a leading 
Republican strategist on national security mailers, and Ben- 
iamin A. Gilman of New York, the new chairman of the 
House Foreign Affairs Committee. 

These and other Republicans are already bickering among 
themselves, a development that could enable Mr. Clinton to 
gain their backing in foreign policy disputes. He may even be 
able to pick off enough Republicans to prevent Congress 
from blocking some of his diplomatic initiatives. ( A' IT i 

Clintion Shoots Down Gingrich Proposal 

WASHINGTON — President Bill Clinton has opened fire 
at Representative Gingrich, saying in his weekly radio ad- 
dress that those who advocated putting children' in orphan- 
ages as an alternative to welfare were “dead wrong.” 

The president has announced plans to meet with Republi- 
cans and Democrats from around the country next month to 
share ideas about overhauling the welfare system. But aides 
said that although Mr. Clinton remained open to compro- 
mising with the Republicans, he believed it was important to 
draw the line against a proposal that has proved controver- 
sial even among Republicans. 

Mr. Gingrich has proposed that money saved by denying 
welfare benefits to young mothers be used to provide services 
to children, including promoting adoptions and establishing 
orphanages or group homes. (N YT) 

Ouote/Unquote 

Harvey Fineberg. dean of the Harvard School of Public 
Health, after the Surgeon-General Joycelyn Elders was 
forced to resign for saying that masturbation should perhaps 
be taught in public schools: “Dr. Elders’s great virtue was her 
willingness to speak out as she saw the needs and the 
problems. I think it was also her undoing.” ( WP ) 


15 

I 


■ ■ 


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15 




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i 




Page 4 


CST ERWATIOWAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDA Y, DECEMBER ^ 

Fuitv Victims Wolf Is Poised for a Return to 

J The rale in Minnesota wq« out tinyr^Ungw™ 


By Timothy Egan 

New York Tmva Sent cf Rut even as Yellowstone park 

YELLOWSTONE NA- * ^ put the final touches on 
TONAL PARK, Wyoming -- ^^(half-hectare) pens m- 
After more than a century ot t<tn<1e d to acclimate the wolves 

policy ffip-flops^^w to 



I*' 


mg ai uic iiwLuiiv iM 
luo wiwiuw — — j . - ■ altitudes and policy, 

haps the most extensive am- ^ ranc hcrs, the biggest 
ronmental impact statement beneficiaries of the campaign 
ever done, the mythic preoato to eliminate the 

is a single court heanng away fronj ^ West, have 

from a formal return to tne a lawsuit that threatens to 

American West- hold up the project. 

That it has taken .two de- ^ ^ 2 1 , a federal judge m 
cades, 120 public Wyoming will decide whether 

^vesfrems.xp^d^dczj to^sue a preliminary injuno 

committees and $12 million those most passionate 

worth of studies to get to ^ bringing the wolf back, 

point where wolws^dswm ^ rc ^^ e wed as a grand 

run thr^gh Yenowstone, Na deed, balancmg a 

tional Paik zealous act of one era wiS a 

hca^dof^i^fa 1 QQH^ctiyg act of another. 
n^f^bbU&c It is absurd, tbcy_aigue,_tot 

. - I-. Tnrtvianr fG n1»TP. & 


UUUilg aiiu uvtvwv 

the animal to this area. 

Under the plan, 30 wolves in 
Canada, tagged with radio col- 
lars so biologists can track 
them, are to be brought into 
Yellowstone and the wilderness 


them, are 10 dc oruu&ui. u»c «»» * u “ w '? 1 land.” mesuu w*— — — — — — — 

Yellowstone and the wild erness thor hveiihood from to lan^ - “ ^ TK^tyfo 

House Republicans Give Newcomers Choke Conwmttee^ ^ 

-f iOlls&ts XV-Of/M'”*'*' orancs — sour or otherwise, means Democratic mcu “*® d j^g seven must lose thar scats 

. rhr a dozen sitting mem- During the transits skilled, able people will, lose committee s^sj^ nd * ^ 

Rv Ouv Gucliotta lose nearly a dozen stung men*- u bave taken great 


VY Lull IWV1W — , 

to do in early January is place s 
predator with a lust for fresh 
meat bads into a part of the 
country that is overrun with 


wolves still roam free not far 
from the urban masses of 
Rome, but yet cannot be al- 
lowed inside North America s 


WASHINGTON — House or, Kicnaru 
handed laiwe 

numbers of Republican frest to™wC=^s™™'« 
men coveted committee assign- 2 n,c ?P J? of the 

Smts in the incoming Con- ^^ c t ^TSie in 40 
gress, but they bave outraged House for the urst un«= 

Democrats, who are slated to years. 


lose nearly a dozen sitting mem- tken great care severity they have grown, so 

bers from key pands. . ^^S^Sit^tsof wlth aocLstom^ to. Tte is parocn- 

Theinconfingmejontytod- 'f^^eSSf^hman con- 8™“^; 8°° d P™ Iessl0nal Sf ^ of Appropnaoons 

Sot, and Mr., Armey _gave “““Lne* enthusiasm en- and Ways and bo* of 


elected, so under Republican 
rules seven must lose tbarscats. 
At Ways and Means, Demo- 
crats must lose four room* 
bents. 


INTERNATIONAL RECRUITMENT 


IIWIU I ml 

ungen t, and Mr. Armey gave 
[hem their reward: seven seats 
on the Appropriations Com- 
mittee and three on Ways and 
Means, the powerful panels 
charged with spending money 
and raising it. 

“If you’re able enough to get 
the job, you’re probably able 
enough to do the job,” said an 
ebullient Mr. Armey. And 
when you say ‘a bunch of fresh- 
men,’ this is not like a bunch of 


iffi 8000 P E*™ * Appropriations 

Mr. Armey’s enthosiaOTOT- a™* ^ays “delusive” commit- to be gracious. 

gendered no pleasure in Demo- winch are exclusive . others were not so diplomal- 

° 1,0 TlMV 


‘exclusive” cwnmit 

genoK^^K*™- J^Tdeened to be so important 

damned by the Republicans for l 11 ? 1 sc^ged^rS ^“We have never made a at- 

tyrannizing the minority during joined or dis«3urag«i Republican come off a 

STb^running House dy- said the Dem* 

nasty. Democrats are scram- Republicans ^navc ^ erariewhio 


t:: 


motor of comnnttee slots. mmtn ^nd Denials ^ 


bl 

number ui wiuuuikwx n>v— 
With the Republicans' deter- 
mination to shrink the overall 
of committees, conformity 


UlUillA'lO, ■ — 

go to 24 minority scats from of 
majority seals; 31 of the com- 
mittee’s Democrats were re- 


^d^^^nior of Michigan. 
“We’ve always accommodated 
them. This represents a hypo- 
critical position on their part.” 


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TOPICS 

New Jersey Makes Its Lawyers 

Face the Music in the Open 

This fall New Jersey became the 31st 
of the 50 states to open its disciplinary 
proceedings against lawyers. Like many 
states. New Jersey changed its rale after 
a 1992 American Bar Association report 
urged openness, not only to deter other 
lawyers from becoming wayward but 
also to let consumers know whether a 
lawyer has been disciplined or faces 

charges. % , 

Many lawyers disagree. Most gnev 
ances, they say, are filed by vengeful 
clients dissatisfied with the outcome of 
their cases. Eventually, the overwhelm- 
ing majority of those grievances will be 
dismissed, they say, but by then thepub- 
licity will have irreparably damaged the 
lawyer’s reputation. 

Historically, a complaint against a 
lawyer was kept secret until a punish- 
ment was decreed, and that could take 

years Like almost all the states that have 

hade the switch. New Jersey now opens 
hearings once an investigation has found 


probable cause that the lawyer has vio- 
lated an ethics rule. 

Although the trend is toward opening 
the hearings, proceeding aga^ law- 
yers remain Tigh tly shuttered m 19 states. 
Even the medical profession is more 
open to scrutiny than lawyers in those 
jurisdictions. 

Short Takes 

A commercial direr harvesting sea ur- 
drinsinthe Pacific Ocean about 40 miles 
(65 kilometers) off Santa Barbara, Cali- 
fornia, was lolled by what apparently 
was a great white shark. If confirmed, it 
would oe the first fatal shark attack in 
California waters since 1989. James 
Robinson, 42, died at a hospital about 
two hours after the attack, which oc- 
curred after dark. The area is known as 
“Shark Alley” because great white 
sharks congregate there to hunt me plen- 
tiful seals and sea lions. 

When Crime Doesn’t Pay: David Lee 
McCumsey Jr. 18, went to a hardware 
store looking for work and allegaily 
stole two handguns and a watch. Police- 
men in Homosassa Springs, Florida, say 
he was not hard to find: he left his job 
application behind. He was charged with 
larceny and released on $4,250 bail. . . • 


Two suspected drug traffickers landed 
their planeat a U.S. Air Fuce > base hit 
M erck, California, instead of a_nearby 
civilian airport, officials said. Edward 
Vdez and JosA Gonzalez were taken into 
custody, officials said, when a search of 
the aircraft revealed two pounds of 
methamphetammes with an estimated 
street value of $16,000. 

G sheet of paper bearing an 

u copy of the dassic poem that 
begins “Twas the night bdore Christ- 
mas” was auctioned Friday for $255,000 
at Christie’s in New York. The buyer was 
Ralph GadieL, an Illinois gift retailer. 
The author, Clement Clarke Moore of 
New York, left just three copies of the 
Doem in his own hand. Moore wrote the 
poem — formally titled “A Visit From 
Sl Nicholas” — in 1823. 

Americans spend $Sj 6 MBon a year on 
perfume. The Washington Post reports, 
and 75 percent is spent by men for 
Christmas presents. 

A New York Times reader, Ann Root, 
reports in the Metropolitan Diary col- 
umn that her son, asked in an elementary 
school quiz to name _ one of George 
Gershwin’s compositions, put down 
“Rap City in Blue." 


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- ** ’ * 'Vi’/llj IlkillAUU Jl IU 

The Nigerian Junta Is Tightening Its Grip 

We ve Never Seen Anything Like This,’ Lagos Laivyer Says 


Page 5 


By toS*'/ 1 ® 11 iMn-righi!, advocate. “Or all 
LAGOS^^iTtr ., ^dictatorships we have suf- 
irtiii»«nri j When Nigeria s fared, we have never seen anv- 
fflJhtarylwderseroshed a strike thing like this before.” 
m^Augtm aimed at forcing Opposition to military rule is 

ssMaaraa* 


many people ©raced for another 
long chapter of stem rule by an 
army that has controlled power 
f or m ost of the country’s 34 
years of independence. 

In its latest attempt to Lighten 
control, the mil itary suspended 
habeas corpus, a protection 
against illegal imprisonment, a 
week ago. 

. The move, which denies ar- 
rested people the right to ap- 
pear before a judge, comes as 
ihe government pursues its 
Roundup of opponents and ig- 
nores court rulings providing 
for the release on bail or for 
medical treatment of the man 
believed to have won the presi- 
dential election in lune 1993. 

“The military has been going 
around giving speeches saying 
they respect the independence 
of the judiciary said Itse $a- 
gay, a Lagos lawyer and hu- 


of a return to democracy. 

In a surprising show of the 
spreading disaffection, dele- 
gates to a conference set up to 
rewrite the constitution ignored 
mpngs by army leaders that 
they be granted as much as 
three more years in power. 

Instead, the conference last 
week demanded new elections 
and a transition to civilian rule 
by Jan. 1, 1996. 

The constitutional gathering, 
in the capital. Abuja, had been 
widely considered an exercise to 
buy tune for the military leader. 
General Sani Abac ha, and to 
provide legal cover for Jus gov- 
ernment’s imprisonment in 
June on treason charges of Mo- 
shood K. O. Abiola, presumed 
winner of the 1993 election. 

But with the popular mood 
turning strongly against the 
army after a sharp decline in 
living standards in the last year 


BRIDGE 


5 • 

■ r-es iia 1 

rtCkfr ; 

’ z.: :rjij- 

--■trMwsj 
~ u ■■ « ife 

: v.'v-'t® 


irtiS5 

.. : •: - rrei 

• “ zs.r, 


j By Alan Truscott 
T 1 HE captain of one contead- 
j A ing team in The Fall Na- 
tionals of the American Con- 
tract Bridge League, was 
Michael Becker, who held the 
West cards on the rli«jrr»nwt 
deal in the Spingold Knockout 
T eam s. He opened the bidding 
with one diamond, then found 
himself defending four hearts 
after a take-out double by 
North. 

The opening lead was the 
club king, and when Hast 
played a discouraging dub, the 
chance for successful defense 
seemed poor. There was little 
point inshiftmg to the singleton 
spade, since East could not 
have an entry. Ihe obvious play 
was to cash the did? ace and 
hope for something good to 


apparently innocuous diamond 
to dummy’s diamond ace. This 
gave South another possibility 
and be snatched it, unwisely as 
it proved. He crossed to the 
spade jack and played his dia- 
mond winners, throwing the re- 
maining dubs from the dummy. 
Hast ruffed, and gave his part- 
ner a spade ruff to beat the 
contract 

Should South have seen 
through the trap? Maybe - but 
give Becker credit for setting it 

NORTH 
♦ AKQ4 
9KQ865 
0 A 

+ Q J ft 


WEST(D) 

♦ 3 

9AJ 

0 J87542 

♦ A K 10 3 


_ [»-• g 

. Im 
..... 

A 


it was what West did in 
f, and nothing good 
When a third dub 
was played. South won in dum- 
my, crossdido the spade jade 
and led a trump. When the jack 
was played and won with the 
"*jng, be led another trump, 
hoping for an even split, and 
was rewarded. 

Becker made a subtler play. 
At the second trick, he led an 


EAST 

« 10 9 8 6 5 2 
9 10 3 
❖ 96 
*976 


SOUTH 

♦ J 7 
9B742 

❖ X Q 10 3 
*5 4 2 

Both sides were vulnerable. The 
bidding: 

West ; North East South 

1 ❖ DbL Pass 1 9 

2* 49 Pasa Pass 

Pass 

‘ West ted the chib king. 


and Mr. Abioia’s continued de- 
tention, many politicians at the 
conference seem to have decid- 
ed that the only way to save 
their careers is by turning on 
their military patrons. 

Delegates reported that the 
government had sought to sway 
their decision on the transition 
by threatening withdrawal of 
official vehicles and other per- 
quisites, but those who urged a 
slower handover to civilian rule 
had nonetheless been shouted 
down by ihemajority. 

Diplomats say that if the gov- 
ernment can count any success- 
es since it took power one year 
ago, it has been in generating 
resignation among Nigerians, 
including many or Mr. Abioia’s 
supporters, about his ever tak- 
ing office. 

“This is really the bottom line 
for these people, that Abiola 
never be allowed to become 
president,” said one diplomat, 
referring to the government. 

Government officials who 
publicly maintain that Mr. 
Abiola is receiving fair treat- 


ment concede in private that no 
amount of Segal arguments wiC 
secure hi*, freedom. 

The official said the govern- 
ment feared that if he was re- 
leased, Mr. Abiola, a wealthy 
publisher, would “use his for- 
tune” to revive his claim on the 
presidency. 

Diplomats who have seen 
him in jail say Mr. Abiola, who 
has long suffered from high 
blood pressure and circulatory 
problems, has recently had uro- 
logical and “severe digestive 
problems." 

Along with many Nigerian 
political analysts, these diplo- 
mats say that now that the con- 
stitutional conference has es- 
tablished a date for civilian 
rule, there are two primary 
threats to the military. 

One is the likelihood of un- 
rest if Mr. Abiola dies in prison. 
The other is a new wave of op- 
position, coupled with strong 
international pressure, that 
would be sparked if General 
Abacha refuses to abide by the 
handover date. 


Iran Is Backing 
Education , Not 
Punishment 

Mt* York Tima Serna 

TEHRAN — Iran has 
declared that education 
and rehabilitation have re- 
placed punishment for con- 
victs and invited interna- 
tional organizations to 
inspect the country’s pris- 
ons. 

As part of the new poli- 
cy, journalists were granted 
a tour of a penitentiary 
where tens of thousands of 
political dissidents have 
been detained, tortured 
and executed since 1964. 

Nonetheless, the authori- 
ties denied journalists’ re- 
quests to visit the solitary 
wing of Evin Penitentiary. 

The tour of Evin, the sec- 
ond this year, was seen as 
an attempt to address re- 
cent reports of human 
rights abases, including a 
report by the UN human 
rights commissioner accus- 
ing Iran of violating the 
rights of women and reli- 
gious minorities, among 
other things. 


Lord Joseph, 76, Ex-Cabinet Minister 
And Senior Thatcher Adviser, Dies 


By Richard W. Stevenson 

Ne# York Times Semct 

LONDON — Lord Joseph, 
76, a former cabinet minister 
and one of the main ideological 
architects of the Conservative 
Party’s free- market philosophy 
under Prime Minister Margaret 
Thatcher, died Saturday. 

A spokesman said the cause 
of death was chest complica- 
tions from a stroke he suffered 
last year. 

Keith Joseph was a Conser- 
vative member of Parliament 
from 1956 until 1987. During 
that period, he served in a suc- 
cession of cabinet posts, start- 
ing with die post of minister for 
housing ana local government 
from 1959 to 1961 and ending 
as education and science secre- 
tary for five years until 1986. 

Mrs. Thatcher considered 
him one of her chief mentors 
and most important aides. She 
entrusted to him a central goal 
of her administration when she 
became prime minister in 1979 
— that of transforming British 
industry by privatizing state- 


owned companies and dimin- 
ishing the power of unions. 

He served as secretary of 
state for industry for two years, 
until 1981, and played a central 
role in breaking a suike at Brit- 
ishSteeL He also helped begin a 
process that led over the next 
decade to the sale of British 
Airways, British Telecommuni- 
cations and many other large 
state-owned companies. 

As education secretary, he 
clashed bitterly with the teach- 
ers* unions in an effort to hold 
down pay increases. 

In a statement. Lady Thatch- 
er said: “Today 1 have lost one 
of my dearest friends, England 
one of her greatest men.” 

William Luce, News Editor 
Of Tire New York Times, 70 

NEW YORK (NYT) — Wil- 
liam P. Luce, 70, a former news 
editor of The New York Times, 
died Friday in Jacksonville, 
Florida, where he was vacation- 
ing. He lived in Englewood, 
New Jersey. The cause of death 
was an aneurysm, his family 
said. 

A shirt-sleeve editor with a 


zest for life; Mr. Luce was an 
old-fashioned newspaperman 
who turned bis skills to shaping 
local, national and cultural cov- 
ers ge at The limes, rising to the 
position of news editor, in 
which he supervised the editing 
of the newspaper. 

Mildred Hilson, 96, who 
raised millions of dollars for 
charities, museums and the Re- 
publican Party, died Saturday 
m New York. 

Antal Apro, 81, an old-guard 
Communist leader and former 
deputy prime minister who op- 
posed the 1956 uprising against 
Soviet rule, died in Budapest 
Friday. 

Phoun Spraseoth, 74, the 
deputy prime minister of Laos, 
died of a heart attack in Vien- 
tiane, the official Vietnam 
News reported in Hanoi on Fri- 
day. 

Israel Aaron Maisels, 89, an. 
attorney who successfully de- 
fended Nelson Mandela and 
other senior anti-apartheid ac- 
tivists in several trials, died 
Thursday. 


BOOKS 


GOING ABROAD: Europe- 
an Travel in Nineteenth- 
Century American Culture 

By William W. Stowe. 251 
pages. $24.95. Princeton Univer- 
sity Press. 

Reviewed by 
Jonathan Yardley 

E ARLY in the 19th century. 

Americans started ventur- 
ing across the Atlantic to Eu- 
rope in ever-growing numbers. 
As William W. Stowe puts it in 
“Going Abroad,” “With the 
large-scale introduction of fast, 
comfortable and fairly reliable 
North Atlantic steamships and 
the roughly simultaneous ex- 
pansion of European railway 
networks, the tide of the early 
19th century became a torrent, 
and the American tourist in Eu- 
rope became a commonplace." 
Or, in the words of one of those 
tourists, Mark Twain: 

“During that, memorable 
month I basked in the happi- 
ness of being for once in my fife 
drifting with the tide of a great 
popular movement. Every body 
was going to Europe — L too, 
was going to Europe. Every 


body was going to the famous 
Paris Exposition — 1, too, was 
going to the Paris Exposition. 
The steamship lines were carry- 
ing Americans out of the vari- 
ous ports of the country at the 
rate of four or five thousand a 
week, in the aggregate. If I met 
a dozen individuals, during that 
month, who were not going to 
Europe shortly, I have no dis- 
tinct remembrance of it now” 
They went to Europe, but 
why? The explanation might 
seem close at hand — to see the 
famous sights, to soak up cul- 
ture, to have a good time — but 
it is not in the nature of contem- 
porary American scholarship to 
settle for the obvious; inctAad 
beneath the surface of ordinary 
human events one must be ever- 
alert for Meaning. Thus it is 
that Stowe, who teaches English 
at Wedeyan University in Con- 
necticut, has plumbed the travel 
writing done by many of these 
innocents abroad and has 
found in it not merely Meaning 
but also Correct Meaning. 

Yes, the subject of correct- 
ness is tiresome, but when its 
ugly bead is reared there’s little 
to do save recognize it for what 
it is. Thus we have Stowe assert- 
ing in his preface that “one way 


WHAT THEY'RE READING 


• Lotas Begley, president of 
PEN American Center and the 
author of “The Man Who Was 
Late: A Novel,” has just fin- 
ished reading “Le Mauvais 
Genre ” by Francois Nourissier. 

“The most marvelous book 
about writing in general, the 
uses of memory and other nove- 
hstic concerns.” 

(Mavis Gurnard, JHT) 



19th-century Americans used 
European travel was to help 
construct and claim identities 
variously defined by gender, 
class, race and nationality”; 
that “the whole enterprise . . . 
was intimately associated, fur- 
thermore, with the construction 
of a privileged bourgeoisie in 
the context of an ostensibly 
classless society”; that “much 
of the best work on the intersec- 
tions of questions of race, class, 
gender and nationality with the 
experience and writing of travel 
has been done by feminist 
scholars, who have seen travel 
as a site both of female empow- 
erment and contestatory dis- 


course and of the definition and 
assertion of power by dominant 
races, classes and national- 
ities.” 

These feminist scholars may 
have seen it that way, but is that 
how it really was? Was 19th- 
century American travel in Eu- 
rope not mere travel per se but 
an elaborate ritual fraught with 
Meaning as defined by the Holy 
Trinity Plus One: race, doss, sex 
and nationality? Persons living 
in the real world may protest 
that this is reading rattier more 
into such travel than the facts 
can substantiate, but those living 
in the hothouse of radical schol- 
arship are geniuses at reshaping 


the past to suit the ideological 
convenience of the present 
Thus we have Stowe, who 
clearly is determined not merely 
to placate his feminist col- 
leagues but to be more feminist 
than the queen. “Going 
Abroad” is riddled with the 
stale rhetoric of chic scholar- 
ships: Not merely are “empow- 
erment” and “privilege” and 
“domination” pervasively pre- 
sent, but the reader is treated to 
such twists of the knife as “ca- 
nonical sights” instead of what 
normal people would call “tour- 
ist attractions.” So reading 
“Going Abroad” is a vexing if 

nnt jnfn riatrnfc tnsV marfe all tht* 

more so by the recognition that 
beneath all the obligatory rhet- 
oric is an intelligent mind. 


Studying the chronicles of 
the famous as well as the un- 
known, Stowe shows how 
Americans sought, consciously 
or not, to improve and redefine 
themselves in the Old World. 
But just about every time he 
writes something sensible, he 
follows it with indigestible prat- 
tle such as “the historically 
problematic class and gender 
identity of certain 19th-century 
men.” The final result is a book 
that will appeal only to true 
believers ana will seem, to all 
else, a missive from another 
planet 


Jonathan Yardley is on the 
staff of the Washington Post. 


TO OUR REAPERS IN BERLIN 

You can now receive the JHT hand delivered to your 
home or office every morning on the day of publication. 
Just call us toll free at 01 30 84 85 85 


The engines are quietly humming at 37,000 ft. 
above the Indian Ocean. And you wish you 
could sleep. Then you remember who you’re 
flying with. 


it > 






Lufthansa 


m 




Lllfl J'” 


** 


Page 6 


• Af n TRIBUNE MONDAY, DECE MBER 12, Xggjy 
INTERNATIONAL HERALD TloBt , . 


In Chechnya, « Touch of Old Style 


By Steven Erlanger 

Sew York Tima Senna 

MOSCOW — Russia’s invasion 01 
Chechnya, the small, fierce Caucasian 
state that declared indepeDdence toee 
years ago, will mdfetta wall i “ “^d 
this week by Vice Pnsidem A1 Gore and 

Defense Secretaiy wahMn J. Peny “> a 

much more difficult and delicate. 

Mr. Gore and Mr. Perry will mejntabty 
trv to restore a sense of conuiy and ®o- 
mentum to a relationship that 
ton, at least, suddenly seems to hat e lost its 

^Marly. Secret of State Wnail U. 
Christooher plans a meeting with Foreign 
Vb£2 Andrei V. Kozyrev » “dear *e 
Hf. sbarp^Russ^opposmon M 


Chechen leadership, ^Si^^orce" 

meal and funding of a It is not just that Mr. 

to the center, seeldna an 


den military intervention, has all the nt« 
of the old Soviet style m Afnca and the 

"nurd World. . , . (wwn 

It seemed to be taken straight from 
Soviet textbooks on dentation, sm* 
Oleg Kalugin, a former KGB general, and 


is back. He complied, but it is unlikely 

notjust feat Mr. Yeltsio has “9^ 

center, seeldngsupportftomnaM^ 

aHsts and not just from democrats, wno 

have been divided andnot^^l.^ 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


twice in Chechnya 
destroy Mr. Yeltsin’s authority, and it 
would also underline the weakness of the 

Ce iSebatlle^^t Chechnya can be por- 
trayed as a fight for Russian unity and 
against chaos and crime^ given tteprom*- 
nSee of Chechens in the “g 

that bedevils .and ***** 


it is an indication of how much Mr- bedevils and corrupts all of Ru^ a - 
seems, these days, to be depeodingwwi Xnd if Mr. Yeltsm is lucky, a CMen 
“power ministries" he controls — the mdi 0 f three years of poverty 

tary and the intelligence sconces — an* PJJg confusion under its current eadeis 
MiniMci — . . ------ . ri , . paying less attention to other pub ^ nQt strongly resist a Russian 

air^’ after sharp Russian opposition last ^j^j^tary opinion, ■- * u “ ~' 1 - mrtr * reasonable 

^kTo U.S. policy on NATO, Bosnia and P™ done^m 1 the old style, and it 
Iraq. , disaster, which the democrats and tn 


:’s a 


But the invasion of Chechnya, and the 
miner in which it was cone, wiU I tajd > 
help the Clinton administration s effjns U 
preserve its aid-Russia policy with the m 
coming Republican Congress. . 

Chechnya, a mountainous and obstrep- 
ero£ aae of only 1-3 million peopl* rand 
seemingly as many feuding clans, is part of 
- _ „ _ j iiincrnai Has never accepted its 


Its acme in uk- -v—v . . - 

disaster, which the democrats and the m 

telligentsia cannot 

5fc h "h^He poin^lo the 

plto^nimswfwho has been 
Ukwith.Mr.Yellzmonanyofef^ 


tion on the side of more 
^But the Russian invasion is more likely 

fssxssssHEB 

ff 4 s«!ass®sfffl 

chens have the capacity to bring the war to 
Moscow with terrorist incidents. 

More concretely, Russia is now faced 


erous state of only 1.3 million peop«“* ^ ^ Yeltsin on anyotner ^ Mofe concretely, Russia is now faced 
seemingly as many feuding clans, is part of » u * s a dear sign of the ^ith the traditional military problenvweU- 

rESmkI Moscow has never accepted its ovenvbelmiQ&> influence of the»«J u> Americans in Vietnajn or &ma- 

independence. _ tW people on Mr; lia: It’s easy to get m and hard to get out 


Washington has taken the posincm 
unlike the cases of Azerbaijan or Ukraine, 
what happens in Chechnya is an internal 

Russian affair.” __ 

But it can hardly ignore what mods to 
be a new aggressiveness on the part ol a 
Ru^ia wi^Shom it was talking of close 
partnership only a year ago. p . , , 
The way the government of President 
Boris N Yeltsin has moved to subvert the 


Tis also a sign of a leaderwto ^f^f Mr. Yeltsin is in fee hospital. recovermg 

jEesskj sKsaSffisra ir*— isrsfi 

Um?S, Sfr^SnSSSoito his former 
Union, mi. 1 . . v RnLskoi. and 


S°&rsS=V.Ru^,and 
sian Parliament ordered him to pull the 


from a convemeuwj- ---- _ 

nose, apparently damaged m a childhood 
and it is probable that he will be 

Sffie to see Mr. Gore. It will also be 


imauic ikj » — 

interesting to see whom Mr. Perry gets to 
meet, given the open opposition of some 
high-ranking military officers. 


Farmers’ Protection May End 

hU/a’m flAt c^kine to keep the swii 


Reuters 

BRUSSELS — One of the EuroPJ^ 
Union’s most expensive policies, whii.hp.o- 
tects farmers’ incomes from currency fluctua- 
tions, is likely to be abolished by farm minis- 
ters this week. . . 

The so-called switchover mechanism, intro- 
duced in 1984 to cushion German farmers 
from a cut in prices after a revaluation of the 
SS, has sent farm prices nearly 21 1 percent 
above market levels and cost more than 5 j 3 
billion in the last 10 years. . . 

“We should at least have a political deci- 
sion," said the EU farm commissioner, Rene 

Steichen. , „ 

Reform of the EU's complex green mon- 
ey” system to convert subsidies from Europe- 
an currency units into national cummaes is 
one of a long list of items that EU .arm 
ministers will start to tackle on Monday m a 
meeting expected to last several days.^ 

“The switchover is dead and gone, said a 
Union diplomat, who added that member 
states disagreed over what should replace iL 

. . ^ fnr fgrmefl! 


“We’re not swking io Jceep ^ swit- 
chover" said a German official. But we 
want to avoid German farmers suffering a 
loss in income after a revaluation. 


As the European Union’s chief paymaster 
and current president of the council ofrmius- 
ters, Germany will play a key role m reaching 
a compromise agreement. 

The farm commissioner warned against a 
German-led effort to resurrect a mmi-swit- 
chover system automatically converting a 
price cut For farmers whose currencies revalue 
into higher compensatory payments for all 
other fanners with weaker currencies. 


DELORSs 

Not a Candidate 

Coatmued from Page 1 


“They're trying to bring it in again through 
door," added a Steichen aide, noting 

. > i * 4-J rhirman 


the back door, uuuw » : — 

that only Britain has resisted the German 

move. 


5iaieS OlStfglcwJ v»»y. -T 

notably compensation measures for fanners. 

A final decision can only be made aiter tne 
European Parliament has given its opinion, 
expected early in 1995. 


Each 1 percent revaluation of the marie 
would cost an estimated $255 million in high- 
er area aid and livestock premiums agreed 
under the 3992 reform of the Common Agri- 
cultural Policy compared with $365 million 
under the old switchover. 


pleased governments in Pans, 
including conservative ones. 

This rare mix of ideologically 
contradictory views has always 
made Mr. Delors a disconcert- 
ing figure in French politics. 

A former Socialist finance 
minister who ended up impos- 
ing budget austerity as the path 
for national competitiveness, 
Mr. Delors became in Brussels 
the architect of a stronger Eu- 
rope in which member govern- 
ments pooled their powers in 
order to operate on a par «"•*» 
the United States and Jap 



russiA;;"; 

Chechnya Action * 




, mi, Scan fUm«y/R«3Men 

A member of the Chechen Women's Defense Brignde at a solidarity rail, in Gt^r. 


Continned from Page ! 
planned and executed assault 
on Grozny on Nov. 26. When 
the smoke, cleared*- -Mt- Du- 
dayev’s forces had taken more 
than' 20 Russian troops. prison- 
er.. • 

After that, Mr. Yeltsin, who 
i&under pressure from national- 
ists to stand.up for Rushan in- 
terests, ran out of patience ana 
ordered a build-up of Rnssian 
forces on Chechnya’s borders. 

Although the Russian prison- 
ed yrere freed last week, Mr. 
YeLtsinon Friday signed^ de- 
cree ordering that “aU avaflable 
measures" be used to disarm 
the Chechen farces, and. restore 
“constitutional order” m the re- 
gion. 

On Saturday, the 63-year-old 
president underwent a minor 
operation on his nose that was 
expected to ckeep him away 
Eronvthe office for a trade. 

prime Minister Vtictor S. 
CheriidmyTdin met Sunday 
with the Iwdere of Russia's two 
' houses of Parliament. The 
meeting seemed, an effort to 
stem rnirig cmpositiOTi among 
moderate and Iflxaal polmaans 
to foro ? agnP 51 the break- 
away republic. . t*~ 

Tounderline thatoppoatxon,f 
several hundred demonstrators 
gathere d in freezing weather in 
downtown Moscow on Sunday 
to denounce Mr. Yeltsin s.deci- 
sion to use force against Oiech- 

nya. • . • 

u We received information 
that Grozny will be stormed to- 
mdiL” said former Prime Mm- 
SferY^ort: Gaidar, fle^ng 
liberal “The attack wBl end m a 
sea of blood. Grozny should not 

be stormed. It is a Russian town 

on Russian soil.” •• 

, Mr. Gaidar warned Saturday 
that hard-liners in the Russian 
government and security ser- 
vices had conceived the attack 
on Grozny as . a way to derail 
Russian democratic reforms. 
He said the hard-liners were 
counting on the Chechens to 
respond to the invasion with a 
campaign of terror ngainst 
Moscow. 



X>leu U1GU 

A..JSSSS SETTLERS: Intrigued by New Soutii Africa, U.S. Blacks Pack Their Bags 

K2^8Mi£ fee townfeiM. I. - lead u, hd p fee. bis wife is Soufe Afn- Soufe/fnmn 

rive.^helmin^Mufemb- -e dlecomfon. 

J .1 A «. n f«nn crimp snverdmlv to urb. “and iust see the townships 


can. 


“It’s crazy to compensate fanners for price 
cuts they've never experienced,” the aide said. 


«^>n community ai uic — -b-j I'"",,;' “Peonle here look at me and 

&ting some^ sovereignly to urb, “and just the townships People nereioox^ 

s^imUned European Com- through bulletproof 

vif-W dose tO dOWS. YOU IC KOlDg tO 


rts 5 - 5iuc«^ 

ST.W So^ou’rTgofeg to create re- 

Bonn’s thinking but opposed semmoiL -»- n f black directs a union training pro- 

publicly by all French conser- Wife fee ontari^ ^ bWk ^ AFDOO and has 

______ wllvesf . uaemg^entptuhi ^W^ . ^ here woyeMs .- Im u S t 5 ay 

. _ "SyiPtSSE: Sn^vrotSuery^takes lgeta little uncom/orlabky,^ 

EUROPE: EU Moves Away From ‘Ever- Closer Union polls showed hin 

..... . . a. anathmna favorite, ps 


South African exiles made the 
United States their temporary 
home during the worst years of 
The blood and cultural con- repression under the white mi- 
nections between South African polity’s now-dismantled &F^t: 
and American blacks are actu- had. 
ally not all that old or thick. The 
Afripanc tvhn were taken to 



As > e0 


'Sen#* 


it 


■S.S 


li 




-jT 






•_ \,i.' :( 


t-j 


C“ : “ 


.’5 

<C, 


VL& - 


c:'- 

Q-‘ 


c*. 




— — 


-■ M 

. : T 

--•V* 




Continued from Page 1 
to form a blocking minority 
against small-state demands. 

. “Is this the Europe we 
want?" he asked. 

The analysis struck a chord 
with Prime Minister John Ma- 
jor of Britain, who defended 
once again Britain's opt-out 
from the Union's single-curren- 
ts plan, and Prime Minister 
Edouard Balladur of France, 
who cited the same voting wor- 
ry in his recent proposal to al- 


low different subgroups within trade zone remains anathema 
i he Union to cooperate on areas outside Britain. Mr. Bahadur 
Sch^deferS^omicsand said France would prepare jgo- 

posals for a common foreign- 
^SncSor' Helmut Kohl of policy apparatus dimog its EU 
Germany, the stoutest .backer pr^den^ ^begins next 


that I tbjnk we are. somehow 
providing some false hope." 

Mr. Kornegay, by contrast, 
has been here just a Tew months 
and senses an instant comfort, 
especially with middle-class 
black South Africans who have 


Vjciwouj, . , , , 

of deeper integration, said lead- 
era needed to make their Union 
“irreversible," but he avoided 
mention of his party s recent 
call for a hard core of commit- 
ted stales to force the pace. ■ 
To be sure, the idea of a Eu- 
rope as little more than a free- 


In this Tuesday’s 


Oldham’s 

Time 



preaiucuwj, "***“* " — 

month. And Mr. Kohl said after 
the meeting that in the Europe- 
an train, "you can’t have the 
slowest car dictating the pace 
for afl.” 

But there was agreement 
among all the Leaders to avoid 
an ideological debate over a 
federal Europe, which carries 
different meanings in each 
country, and instead take a 
“pragmatic” look at what is 
needed, according to President 
Francois Mitterrand of France. 

The gathering made clear 
that the cost of absorbing the 
poor Eastern countries and the 
difficulty of finding consensus 


polls showed him as me na- ££ r 
tjo£s favorite, paitiy toau. jhaL ^ South African 

of his image as a man oi roex- one 

like personal inteaity at a time aa everything 

W hea France has ten wracked fe« 

with corruption scandals. tn mw. disappoint- oiaw jvuui ruuv— 

But French opinion also re- ^ misunderstanding. grown took 

mained widely opposed to the South African whites they have climbed the economic 

Soc^ -ho offered a, and- have ***** 

blacks here have always been 
fascinated by America. African 
American superstars of movies, 
television, sports and music are 
the dominant cultural- icons of 


Africans who were taken to 
America as slaves were drawn 
from farther north.- The dom- 
ing that many WackAmericans 
associate with this continent 
comes from West Africa- and 
the language, Swahili, from 
East Africa. “On the cultural 
level, about the only thing we 
share is jazz,” Mr. Komegay 
said. 


But even, a common history 
.of oppression has spawned 
Soane differences in the psyches 
of the two peoples. 


“Blacks here have always 
known that, come rain or shine, 
they are the majority here," said 
Mamphela Ramphele, a South 
African sociologist who spent 
lastyear at Harvard. “There is a 
onH n rnntfidneSS which 


kwbt 1 . 


tzr r .?■- - ■ 




slide defeat in Parliament last 
year, so Mr. Delore faced an 
uphill battle in trying to trans- 
late his personal popularity into 
a working political majority; 

If he had run, Mr. Delors was 
expected to announce that, if 
elected, he would immediately 
hold a national referendum to 


“I was at a party taat 
end — about half South African 
black and half African Ameri- 
can — and it was amazing the 
way we all just sort -of melted 
into each other,” he said. It may 


It is on the political front that 
the bond is so potent American 
blacks were in the forefront 
the worldwide anti-apartheid 
movement; South Africa blacks 
drew inspiration and guidance 
from the American civil rights 
struggle. Thousands of black 


, i&l IKU rtuu. 7 — 

security and a rootedness which 
from that. On the olh®t 


flows - . 

hand, I sense a great deal ot 

helplessness aDd hopelessness 
among African Americans. Y ou 
almost gel the sense they want 
to come here to win the battles 
they felt they never fully won in 
the civil rights era.” 


hold a national referendum to 

reduce the presidential term, in- Ry .Hftaltn Aide 
crease the powers of Parliament 
and make other institutional ffac NJo RefiTetS 
changes to improve the balance na » 1 w 

~ f in ,he French About Comments 


CLINTON: With Pals Like This, Who Needs Enemies? 

w. u„KK«ii miiM hold the the nolitical caoital to witfa- 

Continued from Page 1 


Ei-r- 




■* 

•■-.'idti 


L-:-_ 




?n. ir. ,r- 






uumew «v - - — 

of authority in the French sys- 
tem. . . . 

With that reform to give him 

I. M ik.fi hivii 


KSSMSrS W aSMO^GTON*— S urgeon 

Si er! a force bi, ffiisjte SSK** 

.....a rk# haH nn 


amoLe, - a ^ 

members would force big 
changes in the way the Union is 
run, officials said. 

In its details, the su mm it 
meeting indicated that pragma- 
tism involved a more limited 
vision. 


tions in hopes that Socialists 
would recapture enough seats 
for Mr. Delors to tempi the cen- 
ter-right parties to break ranks 
with the conservatives and form 
a new centrist voting block. 


TERROR: Fatal Blast on a 747 

Continued from Page 1 


House pressure, said she had no 
regrets about comments that 
led to her downfall. 

In a telephone interview with 
NBC television broadcast Sun- 
day. Dr. Elder* said she did not 
know whether President Bill 
Clinton was goaded by conser- 
vative Republicans to pressTor 
her to leave, saying only, “He 
did what he had to do.” 

Dr. Elders had been outspo- 
ken on sexual education • and 
drugs. This got her into hot wa- 
ter wiih conservatives in her 


e president, particularly in his rate federal inquiries. But jrffi- Although they had weathered 

Trent wounded condition and dais and Democratic strategists n r Eldcrs’s calls for legaliza- 
the 1996 presidential election said last week that they behev^ tio D ofdmL^nd bbsl^atSe 
aws nearer ft ' fcffiK Rom^Cafeolic a.urch for 


omy section of the plane. The 
victims were apparently sitting 
Haruki Ikegami. 24. Mr. Ike- in ^ near row when the 
garni and the 10 injured passen- explosion occurred. 

and After the explosion, the pilot, ter wun conservauvcs m .«■ 

1 rmediate stop on Eduardo Reyes, dropped to own Democratic Party and with 

made an mterm«Jia ^ op — ] JO qqq feet from 30,000 and Republicans m Congress. 

changed course for Naha. “I don't really have any re- 

„ - , 1 Hrets.” she said. “I try to speak 

But it took an hour to get ^ tlsecasl ^ truth.” 

there — an hour when passen- ^ grace was her 

gqrs feared that another explo- comicen t on masturbation. 

sion might be imminent. _ _ . 


Cebu Island, site of several 
beach resorts. The passengers 
were mainly Japanese tourists, 
NHK reported. 


Passengers and crew .mem- 
bers told reporters in Naha that 
the blast happened at .10:45 
A.M., three hours out of To- 
kyo’s Narita Airport. 


Japanese media reports said 
the explosion appeared to have 
occurred at Row 26 in the econ- 


When the plane landed safe- 
ly, the passengers burtt into a 
round of applause for the pilot. 
Passengers praised the pilot and 
crew for handling the crisis 
calmly. 


i,uiuiuwm> - — ---- — 

Asked during an AIDS confer- 
ence about bringing masturba- 
tion into sexual Mucation in the 
schools as a means of control- 
ling AIDS, Dr. Elders said she 
beSeved that such education 
should be considered. 


With victorious Republicans in 
Congress pushing a conserva- 
tive agenda, Mr. Clinton jetti- 
soned an official whose outspo- 
kenness on incendiary issues 
was an increasing liability for 
the president, particularly in his 
current wounded condition and 

as the !J “ 

draws 

But even as he divested his 
administration of one political 
difficulty, Mr. Clinton found 
himself confronted with anoth- 
er: the Hubbell guilty plea and 
its potential legal and political 
fallout A former law partner of 
Hillary Rodham Clinton, Mr. 
Hubbell admitted bilking his 
law firm and clients of nearly 
$400,000. 

Mr. Hubbell's criminal con- 
duct took place before Mr. 
Clinton’s election, but the 
closeness of their relationship, 
and the fact that the president 
brought him into the highest 
councils of the Justice Depart- 
ment, poses a new political dif- 
ficulty for the president at a 
moment when that is the Iasi 
thing he needs. 

Mr. Hubbell promised to co- 
operate with Mr. Starr, and 
some Republicans suggested 


that Mr. Hubbell could hold the 
key to uncovering possible ad- 
ministration tampering with the 
Whitewater investigation. 

Mr. Starr is also conducting a 
broader inquiry into the billing 
practices at Rose, and the firm 
is under scrutiny in five sepa- 
rate federal inquiries. But of li- 


the political capital to with- 
stand conservative demands for 
her ouster. 


62- . 



“Her detractors were largely 
viewed as little more than 
gnats,” Mr. Neel said, adding 
that now, “The detractors have 
now become lions and tigers.” 


\ 'i 
‘ i: 


ui E bigger peril for the presi 
dent posed by Mr. Hubbell’s 
guilty plea was political rather 
than legal because they believe 
Mr. Hubbell has nothing dam- 
aging to say about the presi- 
dent. 

The accident of timing that 
brought the two events together 
in the same week served as a 
p ainf ul reminder of what has 
happened to the Clinton ad- 
ministration in the last two 
years. 

It was two years ago. on 
Christmas Eve, that then Presi- 
dent-elect Clinton pointed 
proudly to the very trait that 
ultimately led him to dismiss 
Dr. Elders — her outspoken- 
ness — as he announced her 
selection. ’ "" ” 

ders 


UV/U VI VI U^J HU\* — -7- 

Roman Catholic Church fra: its 
“love affair with the fetus,” of- 
ficials insist that her comments 
on ipaieHing masturbation went 
so far beyond the pale that sfc^ 
would have been dropped no 
matter what the political cli- 
mate. 


-■ 


tHatT.2 


&-NSU 


A Middle-Gass Tax Cut? 


With Republicans clamoring 
for tax cuts, Mr. Clinton said 


i 

!? 



Sunday he thought the federal 
nt could a 


.... afford a tax 

for middle-class A meri- 
cans, Reuters reported from 
Miami. 


H. 

V 


Mr. Clinton, who promised a 
middle-class tax cut during the 

1992 


«,■<. r !?■ 


. * *. - 




UUUIa UVI vvnifv«wi — — — — - kr 

; — as he announced her 1992. campaign, told reporters 
Ertion In office, as Dr. El- after the Summit of the Amen- 
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ments demonstrated the accu- mitment of our campaign and 
raev of the president's niy commitment to tax fak- 
Oinion had 


racy 
assessment. 


Mr. 


my commitment 
ness,” he said. 


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Israel and Jordan Exchange Embassies 

^T^wf Step Toward P eace Protested by Muslims in Amman 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 1994 


Page 7 


Ne " ?«* TimJseric^ not *** ^gn- and the West Bank district of "shortcuts might lead to catas- 

ment for several more weeks. Jericho. trophe." 

Although relations between 


r 

• ■- J: S 5 


. _ " 

t: ”T 


*V- 


Serric r 

r - JERUSALEM -i waP i at , H 

'■Jordan fleshed out thdr raa “ ons 6et, *“ After collecting their shared 

■■'-'treaty some more on Sunday proS^f^T ??“ l ? ** 1994 Nobel Peace Prize on Sal- 

■ -‘-opening temporary embassies agreement SJSP? f l 5 Cir Y 1 *?*' Isradi 3X1(1 Palestinian 
in each other’s country and sav larutsumu* Jr* •?. facades- loaders turned from ceremonies 
',jng they would exdKe 2£- Ptwftion -5 faccs °P~ “ Oslo to the sober realities of 

bassadors next month. Jordan rha mud i n50 i re ®? m how t0 move w this next stage. 

- For the first ti Z. Bn m J”*h whffe At its heart are Palestinian dl£ 

^r“dS“ a,J05 ' S >“• “ d ■ »*■ 

■‘sepmtefcmimmy^wj 1 ^ iJtS Tt llIln< V* d Idamic P™- 

-atoost d foreign ,&?£ fiS, £ 

tion in A mman to Hgnffl 'iKfi 
what they called “a black day” 
t* 1 ® 1 represented “a departure 
from the nation's principles.” 

As the Israelis strengthened 
their ties with Jordan, they 
struggled unsuccessfully for 
progress in their trouble-ridden 
negotiations with the Palestine 
Liberation Organization on ex- 

degatioif 


t,' ■» , O— LU 

2 '“d ^ located. Both embas- 
sies are m holds for now, until 
5 permanent locations are found. 
Israei has yet to name its am- 


bassador to Jordan, which on 
-OcL 26 became the second 
- Arab country, after Egypt, to 
M . iK 3?** peace treaty with the Jew- 

v£ ^ appoint- 

j ? r ‘ r u:1 J r ed Marwan Muasher, a former 
“gxycesman for the Jordanian 
to peace talks in 


' Washington, as its ambassador, 


lions and a companion rede- 
ployment of Israeli forces in the 
West Bank. But while saying 
they still favor such elections, 
the Israelis are looking for a 
way to limit their troop move- 
ments to minimize security 
risks to the roughly 125,000 
Jews settled in the West Bank. 

The three Nobel winners — 
Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin 
and Foreign Minister Shimon 
Peres of Israel and Yasser Ara- 
fat, the PLO chairman — dis- 
cussed the matter in Oslo but 
reached no agreement. A senior 

.. „ - — — Palestinian official, Ahmed 

ponding Palestinian self-rule Khoury, complained that Israel 
throughout the West Bank, tak- was “not serious” on the issue, 
mg it beyond the Gaza Strip but Mr. Rabin cautioned that 


_ - ■ 


I-:: 

- . " -s ' 




" ■- - 




" P?* Thiti 




Q & A: Neo-Nazi Reconsiders 

‘Hell of Senseless Violence’ Is Left Behind 


. 5 

■ 


Hingo Hasselback spent five years as a lead - 
er of the neo-Nazi youth movement in Berlin. 
Mr. Hasselback emerged from what he called 
the heU of senseless violence and hate in 1992 to 
write a confessional autobiography about his 
years as a neo-Nazi He recently spoke with 
Ken Shubnan for the International Herald Tri- 
bune in Rome. 

Q. Why does a young German decide to 
become a Nam? 

A. In the East, we were brought up in a very 
repressive regime. My youth was lived in a 
series at radical choices, first as a hippy, then 
as a punk, and then, following a spiral of 
violence and hatred, as a neo-Nazi We per- 
ceived the state as a sort of antagonist. And 
being Nazis was our way oS showing that we 
were cantraxy to the state. 

Q. Do you mean that your rebellion took 
you to embrace the symbols and ideology of a 
movement that was both illegal and taboo? 

A. The fad that Nazism and its symbols 
were forbidden in East Germany had a very 
strong appeal for rightist youth. Dressing as 
Nazis, accepting then - ideology, this was all a 
part of our declaration of independence. For 
East German youth, the Nazi paraphernalia 
and philosophy were extremely seductive. 


of the Holocaust so 
[ azi creed? 

Auschwitz that we 
our Nazi history, and propa- 
gate a vision of a Nazi Utopia. Exposing the 
so-called ‘Tie of Ansdrwitr* is fundamental 
to the revival of the Nazi party. 

Q. Did you hate the foreigners living in 
East Geanion? 

A. We really had very little contact with 
them, as they hved mare or less in ghettos. In 
a sense, we envied them, because they had 
passports and could leave the country, while 
we who were German citizens could not. 



Q. Did you ever take part in a homicide, or 
in an attack on foreigners in Berlin? 

A. Most of my activity was political, and 
consisted in propagating our views in the 
newspapers, and on television. In Berlin, our 
conflicts were with the leftist groups, and I 
was involved in some of these. It is fortunate 
that I did not participate in one of the actions 
that caused death. It would have been impos- 
sible for me to emerge from the movement 
after that 

Q. You had contacts with neo-Nazi move- 
ments in West Germany, in Canada, and in 
the United States. How do these movements 
differ? 

A. For the Western Nazis, Adolf Hitler is 
still the charismatic party figure. And thi^ 
determines their ideology. We were more in- 
terested in the social question, and in politics. 
In America, this idolization of Hitler is partic- 
ularly strong. And I encountered a form of 
racism and hatred there that was even more 
profound than the one that 1 had known in 
Germany. 

Q. How did you decide to leave the neo- 
Nazi movement? 

A. In 1990, a German filmmaker named 
Winfried Bonengel asked me to be his protag- 
onist in a documentary about the neo-Nazi 
movement We spent a lot of time together, 
and he made me reflect on my actions and on 
my choices. The chang e omw after the po- 
groms in Mdlln and Rostock. I saw that the 
philosophy which I had been disseminating 
was responsible far the deaths of these peo- 
Pkv** . .... 

Q. Leaving the movement cannot have 
been too easy. It wasn’t as if you were resign- 
ing from a country dub. 4B 

A. It was very difficult I had to devise an 
exit that would allow me no chance of turning 
back. Hus is why I chose to write my book. 
There is a very strong sense of loyalty within 
the movement, and I knew that to emerge, I 
had to betray that loyalty in a dramatic, 
public gesture. 


Vr-Kt** 




" Police in Berlin 
“ Detain 19 Youths 
At Rightist Rally 

V' Reuters 

BERLIN — German pa&ce- 
men broke up a neo-Nazi rally 
v . jn B erlin, detaining 19 youths 
ami finding extremist propa- 
.. Uganda and a weapon in snbse- 

qnent raids, a police spokesman 
~'said Sunday. 

ering, which took place Satur- 
day and involved a total of 
'"• -about 35 rightists, apparently 
'■■'marked the second anniversary 
--of a ban on the neo-Nazi Ger- 
‘man Alternative group. 

• • The police in the Berlin sub- 

• ‘urb of Marzahn, meanwhile, 

said they arrested around 30 
# -people after a crowd erf mili ta n t, 
'-^leftists attacked and chased 
■“some extremist youths Saturday 
afternoon. 

o Germany saw a surge in neo- 
•Nazi violence after unification 
?‘in 1990. 

r.-« The Beam government has 

'banned several groups ov er the 

r -past two years. Official figures 

• "’show that the number of attacks 
«=-Ths dropped slightly but, espe- 
cially in the eastern part of the 

f country, neo-Nazi violence per- 
. sists. 



AFonnerTop Minster 
In Germany in Hospital 

. Rotten 

HAMBURG — Germany's 
former “super minister.” Kan 
Schiller, was in intensive care m 


a Ham „ 
His family 


& 


rftal onSmkbty. 

™ — that .his contfr 
tion was “serious but stable, 
and that he had been admitted 
to the hospital mi Dec. 1. _ 

The 83-year-old former So- 
da! Democrat was known as 
the super minister because ne 
once held both the finance and 
economics , portfolios ^at the 
same time, m the eariy 197US. 




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Despite the familiar bicker- 
ing, both sides seemed eager to 
settle the matter quickly and 
keep relations from deteriorat- 
ing, and so they scheduled sev- 
eral meetings for later this 
week, both between Mr. Arafat 
and Mr. Peres and among low- 
er-level officials. 

In Israel and the predomi- 
nantly Palestinian territories, 
the Oslo events received mixed 
reviews on Sunday. As before, 
many Israelis deplored the idea 
of their leaders* sharing an 
award with someone who has a 
terrorist past, and many Pales- 
tinians saw no reason to give 
peace prizes to Israd when they 
remain under military occupa- 
tion. On both sides, commenta- 
tors said that the absence of real 
peace made the Nobel ceremo- 
ny premature. 

But there was also praise, 
even from Israelis for Mr. Ara- 
fat, which is rare. 



_ _ Mali Kvxuk/Thc AnoriamJ Pio» 

The Jordanian flag bang raised Sunday next to Israel's at Jordan’s embassy in Tel Aviv. 


New Delhi Rejects Demondsfor National Vote 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

NEW DELHI — The gov- 
erning Congress (I) Party on 
Sunday rejected opposition de- 
mands that India's prime minis- 
ter resign and call a national 
election. 

The demand came after the 
party lost three of four state 
elections last week, including 
one in Prime Minister P. V. Nar- 
asimba Rao's home state of An- 
dhra Pradesh. 

With ballot counting nearly 
complete Sunday, Mr. Rao’s 
party was routed in Andhra 


Pradesh and adjoining Karna- 
taka state. It also lost the tiny 
Himalayan state of Siltirim, but 
won the southern state of Goa. 

‘There is no question of snap 
pofls,” said a Congress Party 
spokesman, V. N. Gadgii. 
“ Where is the question of snap 
polls? The verdict is not against 
the federal government” 

The state elections have no 
direct impact on the party’s 
parliamentary majority in New 
Delhi. Pre-poll surveys showed 
that voters were swayed mostly 
by local issues and generally 
were not taking aim at Mr. Rao. 


National elections are not 
due until 1996. 

The centrist Janata Dal Party 
renewed its dominant position 
in Karnataka after a gap of five 
years. The new chief minister, 
H.D. Deve Gowda, said that he 
was not opposed to foreign in- 
vestment in energy, tourism, 
telecommunications and urban 
development sectors. 

Mr. Gowda’s assurance came 
amid fears that the Congress 
Party’s defeat could slow down 
India’s three-year-old economic 
reform program. 

Congress Party leaders meet- 


ing in New Delhi backed Mr. 
Rao. But news reports said the 
session was acrimonious. 

Many Congress Party leaders 
attributed the drubbing in the 
elections to anger caused by the 
withdrawal of farm subsidies. 


Swiss Avalanche Kills 4 

Reuters 

APPENZELL, Switzerland 
— Four hikers died and two 
were injured in an avalanche on 
the 2302-meter Sfintis peak 
near here, police said Sunday. 


2 Senators 
Arrive in 
I / North Korea 


R&aen 

SEOUL — Two U.S. sena- 
tors arrived in North Korea on 
Sunday to discuss the nuclear 
accord reached between Wash- 
ington and the North in Octo- 
ber. 

Paul Simon, a Democrat 
from Illinois, and Frank H. 
Minkowski, a Republican from 
Alaska who has criticized the 
accord, left by air from Beijing 
aboard a U.S. Air Force plane, 
the first American military air- 
craft to land in North Korea 
since the aid of the 1950-53 
Korean War, South Korea’s 
Korean Broadcasting System 
reported. 

North Korea's official Kore- 
an Central News Agency re- 
ported their arrival and said 
they were greeted by Song Ho 
Gyong. adviser to the foreign 
affairs committee of the Su- 
preme People’s Assembly, and 

Other officials. 

They are due to travel to. 
Seoul on Monday for talks with 
South Korean officials. 

The senators said before 
leaving Beijing their visit was 
aimed at improving relations 
between Washington and 
Pyongyang and fmflmg ways to 
ensure the nuclear accord is 

faithfully implemented. 

£17^ Million Lottery Won 

Agence France-Prase 

LONDON — Britain’s new 
national lottery, inaugurated 
less than a month ago, has its 
first big winner of ajackpot 
worth £17.8 milli on. The win- 
ner, who had not come forward 
Sunday since the draw on Sat- 
urday night, had all six winning 
numbers as well as the comple- 
mentary number. 


COMR 




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Page 8 


MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 1994 

PINION 




Reralh 


INTERNATIONAL 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW WHUC TIMES Aft® THE WASHINGTON TOST 


Rescue Mission in Bosnia 


StibuitP. U.S. Cover in Bosnia 

> ntf wfASH.wgroH fpsT WiB Have to Be War 


By Jim Hoa gland 


President Bill Clinton was right to 
resist earlier pressures to commit U.S. 
forces either to repel the Serbian aggres- 
sors or to serve as neutral peacekeepers. 
But he is now right to agree in principle 
to send substantial numbers of Ameri- 
can troops should NATO be called upon 
to cover the withdrawal of United Na- 
tions forces. First, however, Mr. Clinton 
must get congressional approval; and 
Congress has an obligation to define 
strict time limits for any U.S. involve- 
ment and to insist on force levels that 1 
provide rn arjm11TT1 protection to Ameri- 
can and allied troops. 

The United Nations has not yet decid- 
ed to withdraw its soldiers, nor is any 
nation about to withdraw unilaterally. 
The pinion adminis tration hoped that 
its troop offer would encourage those 
countries that have been publicly con- 
templating withdrawal, chiefly France, 
to stick it out a little longer. The initial 
French reaction suggests that Washing- 
ton has succeeded on that score. 

But in truth, the United Nations pres- 
ence has been a mixed blessing, hemmed 
in by its mandate of scrupulous neutral- 
ity. Recently the lightly armed UN 
forces have not even been able to protect 
themselves, in past weeks Serbian units 
have taken 300 of the blue helmets hos- 
tage. to use as pawns. 

Under these circumstances, the Unit- 
ed Nations and several countries with 
troops on the ground have asked NATO 
to draw up plans to provide military 
cover for their withdrawal. NATO, 
which acts only by consensus, could de- 
cline. But the majority of the 23,000 UN 
troops at risk come from France, Britain 
and seven other NATO countries. 


For the United States to veto or stand 
aside from a NATO relief operation 
could inflict a mortal blow to the trou- 
bled alliance, still a key element of U.S. 
global security strategy. At the heart of 
NATO is a U.S. commitment to defend 
its European allies. Moreover, abandon- 
ing ibe surrounded troops would cripple 
the United Nations* ability to deploy 


die United Nations* ability to deploy 
troops in situations where America 
might otherwise have to be involved. 

Bosnia's waning armies say they 
would not harass withdrawing UN 
troops. But the Bosnian Serbs' promise 
is unreliable. Serbian troops surround 
UN forces in many areas. The with- 
drawal could be a difficult operation. 
Before Mr, Clinton commits U.S. troops 
to such a risky mission, the U.S. Consti- 
tution and political sense oblige him to 
secure congressional support 

Republicans will reasonably insist 
that a withdrawal operation be under 
direct NATO command, unlike recent 
bombing operations that were under 
joint UN-NATO control. They would 
also do well to hold the administration 
to its word that any NATO intervention 
will employ overwhelming military 
force to deter potential problems from 
any Bosnian faction. 

Since the United States is prepared to 
supply as many as 25,000 troops ont of a 
NATO total of 50,000, Washington will 
have a chance to influence strategic 
planning. Bosnia’s tragedy has brought 
no glory to anyone. But it need not end 
in the further disaster of United Nations 
military catastrophe and the breakdown 
of NATO, if President Clinton and Con- 
gress plan together. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


The Miami Summit 


At the center of the s ummi t of 34 
Western Hemisphere leaders that Presi- 
dent Bill Clinton opened in Miami on 
Friday lies the purpose of advancing the 
economic integration and convergence of 
the Americas. It is the right purpose, and 
the right time to reach for iL The Odd 
War is over, and a new shared focus of 
hemispheric striving is due. The United 
States does not inspire the old fears of 
imperial overreach; Latin and Caribbean 
nations have more confidence in their 
capacity to bargain with their biggest 
neighbor. Successful consummation of a 
North American free trade area and U.S. 
congressional approval of the new world 
trade agreement have set the stage for 
extending free trade soon to Chile and by 
2005 to the rest of the hemisphere. 

The hemisphere is already on the way 
to forming assorted subregional trading 
blocs. The Clinton administration pro- 
pelled the summit to expedite movement 
to a single universal bloc. Plenty of rele- 
vant experience has shown that there are 
measurable advantages in jobs, exports 
and wealth for countries that take the 
new path. Not that the path is cost- or 
friction-free. In the United States and 
elsewhere, labor, environmental and hu- 
man rights groups and their political rep- 
resentatives insist that their claims be 


heard by spokesmen of expanding invest- 
ment and trade. Throughout the hemi- 
sphere, however, the forces of trade are 
ascendant. They can best consolidate 
their advantage by showing respect for 
interests on the other side. 

Trade got the attention at Miami Be- 
hind the economic agenda, however, rests 
a serious political purpose. It goes be- 
yond the (irregular) boost that economic 
modernization can give to political mod- 
ernization. The proposed Free Trade 
Area of the Americas is open only to 
democracies. That rule lets in some argu- 
able cases (Peru) bat emphatically ex- 
cludes Co mmunis t Cuba, which finds it- 
self fenced out of a historic post-CoId 
War project of hemispheric integration. 

But the rule could yet be applied to 
countries that, in their unsteadiness, re- 
vert to an openly undemocratic style. In 
this way are the more or less freely elected 
governments of the Americas building in 
a ratchet against backsliding. The Euro- 
pean common market had a similar de- 
vice, which was applied to supply demo- 
cratic incentives to then-military-mn 
Spain, Portugal and Greece. Now the 
Western Hemisphere has its own quiet 
but potentially invaluable economic lever 
to ensure the deepening of democracy. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Mischief Beyond the Pale 


Surgeon General Joycelyn Elders, was 
fired by President Bill Clinton on Friday 
more or less for doing what Mr. Clinton 
had advertised she would when he 
brought her into his administration. The 
early word from Arkansas on Dr. El- 
ders, after all, was that she was outspo- 
ken and a real shaker-up of establish- 
ments and a shocker of the meek and 
conventional, and wait until she took on 
the stuffed shirts of Washington. We re- 
call all this merely by way of reminding 
you that the Clinton administration can 
hardly claim to have been astonished by 
the role she has intermittently played 
since she joined the administration. 

We have expressed the opinion in the 
past that Dr. Elders was doing neither 
her causes nor her administration nor 
herself any good by what increasingly 
seemed to be careless provocation of 
various segments of the population and 
statements that simply could not be jus- 
tified. She was gratuitously dismissive of 
educators and parents who questioned 
the distribution of condoms in the 
scbooL Her views on the legalization of 
drugs was the direct opposite of the 
administration's policy. Her remarks on 
religion — in particular directed at 
Catholics and what she called “the un- 
christian religious right” — were intol- 
erant. Her latest remark, agreeing with a 
questioner on the possible merit in the 
age of AIDS of teaching schoolchildren 
about masturbation, was, in the words 
of White House Chief of Staff Leon 
Panetta, “just one too many.” 

Dr. Elders came on the national scene 


with a reputation for more than bong 
controversial, confrontational and 
something of a crusader. As head of the 
Arkansas Health Department, she may 
have stepped on plenty of toes and made 
plenty of enemies. But she was also a 
doctor whose aim, she said, was to make 
“every child bom in America a planned 
and wanted child.” She confronted the 
important problem of teenage pregnan- 
cy, expressed determination to stop the 
spread of AIDS among young people, 
and seemed, at first, to be os the right 
track. But die just wouldn't stop pop- 
ping off in heedless fashion, almost as if 
she were looking for trouble. 

We think the president was justified 
in asking her to leave. The surgeon gen- 
eral has to deal with extremely sensitive 
issues. What the president needs in that 
job is a doctor who is wise in handling 
these matters, inspires cooperation in 
this work and has the judgment to know 
when to speak out and when to play a 
supportive role. Dr. Elders evidently 
didn’t see her mandate that way, but it is 
not clear that until last Friday the presi- 
dent she worked for did, either. 

What remains unanswered and trou- 
bling in the way Joycelyn Elders's term 
as surgeon general has ended is why a 
president of the United States could 
not have made clearer earlier, at any of 
the many inflammatory opportunities 
she gave him along the way, what it was 
that he wanted in that office, what he 
didn't want, and what the limits be 
would accept were. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


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W ASHINGTON— The Unit- 
ed States has little choice; It 
must say “yes” if its NATO allies 
ask American troops to cover 
their withdrawal from Bosnia. 
Bat the Clinton administration 
has great choice over how those 
troops vdR go in and how they 
will come out 

The president and his advisers 
must be dear with themselves, 
Congress, the American public 
and the waning parties on the 

Thetirategicbombmg 
campaign that hawks 
have tong wanted 
becomes areal threat in 
these draamtances. 


rules of engagement, before any 
UJS. troops are committed. 

That means no more pretense 
and wishful thinking on Bosnia. 
The “peace strategy” that Secre- 
tary of State Warren Christopher 
says America pursues must be ex- 
plicitly abandoned as allied with- 
drawal begins. Sending U.S. sol- 
diers into the Balkans for this 
limited purpose must be treated 
as an act of war — with the Serbs 
as the identified enemy. 

U.S. troops helping with a 
withdrawal must not go in as 
peacekeeping troops bound by 
the restrictions that apply to the 
United Nations force m Bosnia. 
They must not be used by the 
State Department as agents of 
diplomacy in the now vain hope 
of shaping a negotiated settle- 
ment GIs will be in Bosnia to 

ammplidi a limi ted miss ion and 


to kill anyone who opposes than 
in that effort 

President BOl Clinton bowed 
to the inevitable in announcing 
last Thursday that he had dead ed 
to send up to 25,000 US. troops 
to assist in the pullout of French, 
British and other NATO-country 
forces from the UN c o m mand in 
Bosnia if their withdrawal is or- 
dered by their governments. To 
keep American troops out of the 
Bosnian retreat would have cod- 
ed NATO and American miutaiy 
l( -» dership globally. 

Retreat is the most difficult 
strategic military maneuver to 
perform in the best of dream- 
stances. It could be a hellish task 
for the fragmented United Na- 
tions force of 23,000 peacekeepers 
from 15 nations. American muscle 
must be deployed and unmistak- 
ably flexed to keep the Serbs — 
and the Muslims who benefit most 
from the UN presence — in line 
during a withdrawaL 

The UN force has been a useful 
idiot for the Serbs, helping the 
British and French fend off 
American hawks who back strate- 



mgof the UN arms embargo. The 
Serbs will not want to see that 
protective screen dismantled. 

The interest of the Bosnian 
M uslim population in obstruct- 
ing a UN withdrawal is even 
dearer. For all its weaknesses, the 
UN force 1ms been feeding and 
protecting the populations of Sa- 
rajevo and other Muslim-con- 
trolled towns. The withdrawal 
will mean death tar a large num- 
ber of Muslims. 

America must use a withdrawal 
strategy that will minimize the 
Muslim deaths and military 
losses that a UN pullout would 


bring. That goal is morally and 
strategically m American nation- 
al interests and justifies a war- 
fighting posture by the American 
troops who would be used these. 
Bri tain and France may not Hke 
this approach. But they would 
have to agree to these steps if they 
are thepneefor American, protec- 
tion for their troops: 

To expedite the withdrawal 
and provide the Muslims with 
more protection, the departing 
European troops should leave 
their tanVs and other equipment 
in Bosnian-held territory. This is 
the carrot for the Muslims to let 
the United Nations leave peace- 
fully. If the pullout is obstructed 
by them, the international force 
will fight its way out with, and 
take or destroy, that equipment 

The U.S. strategic bombing 
campaign that hawks have long 
wanted becomes a real threat in 


these circumstances. Belgrade 
and its Bosnian Serb allies have 
to be put on explicit notice that 
interference with an American- 
assisted withdrawal will trigger 
the obliteration of all Serbian 
military assets by the U.S. Air 
Force; with infrastructure tar- 
gets held in reserve if the Serbs 
continue attacks on the retreat- 
ing international force. 

To be more succinct: If flatten- 
ing Belgrade is what it takes to get 
Serbian acquiescence to a with- 
drawal that increases the Muslim 
war-fighting ability, flattening 
Belgrade would be justified in 
this context Slobodan Milosevic 
needs to be told that, credibly. 

The endgame of TJN involve- 
ment in Bosnia also imposes a 
reality check on the administra- 
tion’s critics, led by Republican 
Senators Bob Dcue and John 
McCain. lifting the arms embar- 


be achieved and observed. 
The Washington Post 


To Combat Hate Broadcasts, , Let’s Try Propaganda for Peace 


/"|TTAWA — Hate campaigns on Ser- 
KJ bian and Croatian television helped 
brew Bosnia’s horrors. Hutu on their 
Radio Mille Co times ordered half a mo- 
tion murders and a death march of 2 
milli on Rwandans. 

The United Nations staggers under an 
unpaid peacekeeping bill of nearly a bil- 
lion dollars. Yet the instruments that 
keep running up the bill — military inter- 
position, humanitarian aid, economic 
embargoes, diplomacy — all fail to end 
root conflicts. 

Could the United Natioas head off or 
stop ethnic wars by mobilizing airwaves 
that are too often used to set them off? 
Used against (and by) dictators and dem- 
agogues, broadcasts are subversive. 

That is why Serbian aggressors put 
such a high priority on destroying or 
capturing Bosnian radio and television 
stations. And that is why the Hutu set 
up a mobile radio transmitter 24 hours 
after the United Nations stopped Radio 
Mille Collines. Unlike print media, both 
radio and television reach all social and 
cultural groups — especially the illiter- 
ate or poorly educated, whom dictators 
so easily manipulate. 

Broadcasts can convey anti-racist facts 
and perspectives in the same powerful 
way that nate is peddled. They are fairly 


By Keith Spicer 


inexpensive; they require only a modest 
amount of equipment and supplies, and 
cxily a few staff members. They arc hard to 
silence. And they risk no lives, or very few. 

How could the United Nations, and 
perhaps NATO and other regional secu- 
rity organizations, make electronic 
peacekeeping work? 

Broadcasting can help stifle ethnic 
conflict before and during aimed com- 
bat Networks erf “early warning” volun- 
teers could advise the United Nations’ 
24-boor situation center of hate cam- 
paigns that preach violence. Such net- 
works are already run informally by in- 
dependent media groups. 

The Security Council could order a 
new, well-equipped media section in its 
Department of Peacekeeping Operations 
to broadcast corrective news and views to 
places inundated with aggressive propa- 
ganda. At the heart of such an effort — 
call it propaganda for peace — should be 
a handful of experts in the use of the 
media for war and peace. They should be 
trained in politics, mass psychology and 
traditional and unconventional warfare. 

If war broke out despite their efforts, 
the department would nave standing au- 


thority to ship transmitters and media 
experts to the region to fight back with 
facts and balanced comment. 

In some situations, saving lives might 
temporarily demand j amming or inca- 
pacitating mass killers’ tr ansmi tters. 
But the emphasis should always be on 
freedom: on countering evil voices, not 
silencing them. 

At both stages, volunteers from the 
West's private media aid organizations 
— for example. Article 19 in Britain and 
Reporters Sans Frontifcres in France — 
could be enlisted to bring their beliefs, 
resources and specialties to help the 
United Nations. 

Why hasn’t the United Nations taken 
up information diplomacy as an obvious 
and routine peacekeeping instrument? 

First, because some governments may 
still not believe that transmitters can save 
as many lives as soldiers or relief sup- 
plies. They ask: Isn’t broadcasting some 
kind of public relations frill — luce the 
UN Department of Public Information? 
The analogy is wrong. Public relations 
has nothing to do with peacekeeping. 

Second, cynics argue that a few chum- 
my broadcasts won’t sway people with 
blood in their eyes. If so, why the dicta- 
tors ’ frenzy to prevent any syllable of 
peaceful talk? 


Third, some governments fear that in- 
vasion of so-called sovereign airwaves 
migh t one day be turned against them. 
That is why the West backed Serbia 
«p»in «i free Bosnian journalists who 
tned to use unauthorized frequencies to 
broadcast factual peace propaganda on 
the “pirate” radio ship Droit de Parole. 
But Wouldn’t die frequency of death in 
wartime override such niceties? 

Fourth, the United Nations’ Legal Di- 
rectorate, conservative as are all legal 
departments, sees no mandate far such 
un traditional roles. The Security Council 
should instruct UN lawyers to devise 
new theories, as they always can, to fit 
the needs of their political masters. 

A few journalists may be skittish about 
anything that seems to involve the news 
media in public purposes. But we are not 
talking about corrupting the media. We 
are talking about using technology, a few 
volunteers and some vision. — all at a 
pittance — to stop ethnic bloodbaths. 

We are talking about using our heads 
to stop warn that always start, and end, in 
somebody's head. 

The writer is chairman of the Canada’s 
official Radio-Television and Telecom- 
munications Commission. He contributed 
this comment to The New York Times. 


In Japan, a Swing Toward Fellow Asians and Away From the West 


T OKYO — A new phrase is 
cropping up in Japan these 
days: “Datsu-Oh, Nyuu-Ah,” 
meaning, “Leave the West, Turn 
to Aria.” The phrase comes up 
with unsettling frequency on tele- 
virion talk shows and in magazine 
articles and speeches. It reflects a 
growing belief among Japanese 
that their nation, a faithful disci- 
ple of the United States for the 
past five decades, should tilt more 
toward its Asian neighbors. 

The words reverse a slogan 
popularized during Japan’s mid- 
19th century modernization — 
“Datsu-Ab, Nyuu-Oh,” or 
“Leave Asia, Turn to the West.” 

Manifestations of the trend are 
everywhere, from the rising popu- 
larity of Korean-Ianguage songs 
to the new wave of investment by 
Japanese companies in fast-grow- 
ing China and Southeast Asia. 

“Japan Swings,” declared a re- 
cent cover of Nikkei Business 
magazine, which showed a pen- 
dulum swaying away from the 
Stars and Stripes toward a Chi- 
nese flag symbolizing Aria. 

Most striking of all is the surge 
of attention the Japanese are ac- 
cording to Malaysian Prime Min- 
ister Mahathir bin Mohamad, a 
nationalist who ridicules Western 
decadence and exhorts fellow 
Asians to confront the United 
States and Europe on issues such 
as human rights and trade. 

Mr. Mahathir’s face recently 
adorned the cover of the highbrow 
Tokyo weekly Aera, and Japanese 
have snapped up copies of “The 
Aria That Can Say No.” a book 
published in October that Mr. Ma- 
hathir co-autbored with Shin taro 
Tshthar a, the right-wing legislator 
famous fra his 1989 book “The 
Japan That Can Say No.” 

The new book aigues that Japan 
should return to its Asian roots 
and join the East Asian Economic 
Caucus, an Arians-oaly dub erf 
countries proposed by Mr. Ma- 
hathir sevoal years ago. 

Americans have heard little 
about Mr. Mahathir, and it is 
high time they started paying at- 
tention. The Malaysian prime 


By Paul Blustein 


minister, who loves jousting in 
public with Western leaders, rep- 
resents a strain of resentment 
throughout the region against 
what many view as Washington’s 
high-handed criticism of Asian 
economic and political practices, 
a resentment that has intensified 
as America’s social and economic 
problems grow more evident. 

So far, Mr. Mahathir's EAEC 
hasn’t gone anywhere for lack of 
support from Tokyo. But last 
week the Keidanren, Japan’s 
most influential big-business or- 
ganization, disclosed that it is 
strongly considering an endorse- 
ment of Japanese participation. 

Japan’s growing economic pre- 
sence in Asia need not threaten 
U.S. interests. Tokyo’s Asian eco- 
nomic links may actually benefit 
U-SL industry by spurring new 
markets fra US. goods. 

Nor is it bad for America that 
Japan is trying to play a bigger role 
in Asian political matters such as 
the Cambodian conflict. Indeed, 
Washington is actively encourag- 
ing Tokyo to help resolve such 
problems, and Japan's view usual- 
ly turns out toresemble the U.S. 
position on regional issues. 

But if Japan were to join a 
group like the EAEC, that would 
mark a serious escalation of its 
shift toward Aria. 

Defenders insist that the group 
would be a mere forum for dis- 
cussion, not a trade bloc. But it 
would substantially raise the risk 
of polarizing pubhc opinion on 
both rides of the Pacific by creat- 
ing the impression that Asian na- 
tions are colluding along racial 
lines and ganging up on America. 

Several factors he behind Ja- 
pan’s new emphasis on Asia. Eco- 
nomic and social problems in the 
United States, plus the end of the 
Cold War. have raised questions 
in Japanese minds about UJS. 
willingness to continue its Aria- 
Pacific military presence, which 
allows Japan to remain pacifist 
and thus keeps the region stable. 
The rise of U.S. protectionism. 


although episodic, has likewise 
stirred fears among the ever sensi- 
tive Japanese that the United 
Stales is becoming a less reliable 
trading partner. 

At the same time, nearby Aria 
has become an attractive place 
for Japan to hedge its bets — and 
Japanese companies are doing so 
without any need for prompting 
from their government 

Japanese investment in plant 
and equipment continues to in- 
crease in Asia while falling in the 
United States and elsewhere. 

The government maintains 
that Japan can promote its Asian 
ties without damaging its links to 
the United States. “The zero-sum 
arguments urging Japan to deter- 
mine which is more important to 
its interests, the United States or 
Asia, have no meaning,” said 
Foreign Minister Yohei Kono is 
a recent speech. 

Japan plainly has no interest in 
building a trade fortress in ine 
Asian market, which for all its 
Spectacular growth remains rela- 
tively modest in size. Nor is Japan 
doing so, despite all the idle talk 
of a self-sufficient “yen bloc” in 
the making. While Japan’s invest- 
ment in Aria may be rising, the 
United States remained by far the 
largest destination for Japanese 
spending on plant and equipment 
last year, with two-fifths of the 
total, compared with less than 
one-fifth for Asia. 

Japan’s export machine, mean- 
while, remains heavily dependent 
on the United States, The share of 
Japan’s exports going to the Unit- 
ed States is still well above the 
1980 level, when it stood at 24 
percent. Most other East Asian 
countries likewise remain highly 
dependent on the U.S. market. 

Asians love to boast about how 
they trade with each other more 
t han ever, but much of this com- 
merce consists of goods like fiber 
and chemicals being shipped from 
one Asian country lo another fra 
ultimate manufacturing into, say, 
a sweater sold at Macy's. 


Although Japan indisputably 
overtook America as Aria’s lead- 
ing economic power during the 
late 1 980s, when Japanese foreign 
aid and private investment 
poured into the region, Taiwan 
and South Korean investments 
provide an important counter- 
weight to the Japanese presence. 

According to the U.S. Interna- 
tional Trade Commission, Ameri- 
can exports to East Asia doubled, 
after several years of stagnation, 
during the same 1986-1991 period 
when Japanese companies were 
investing so heavily in Asia. That 
suggests that the Japanese money 
indirectly helped stoke demand 
for U.S. products in tire region. 

Still, all this plus-sum arithme- 
tic might add up to something 
quite different if a Mahathir-style 
pan-Asian group were regularly 
thumbing its nose at the West. 

Mr. Mahathir sugarcoats his 
EAEC (which would combine Ja- 
pan, China, South Korea,, Taiwan 
and Southeast Aria) as a “loose. 


consultative” group that would 
observe ah global trade rales. But 
the formation of such a group 
would surely boost the decibel 
level in txans- Pacific debates, and 
risk arousing protectionist and 
isolationist sentiment in America. 

Because of Washington's ob- 
jections to the EAEC, Tokyo has 
politely rejected Mr. Mahathir’s 
entreaties by pretending that it 
doesn’t understand what his 
group would do. But support for 
the idea is clearly growing in the 
Japanese establishment 

In the end, Japan’s leadership 
will probably conclude that join- 
ing toe EAEC makes fittie sense. 
Tokyo, after all, does not have to 
choose between Asia and Ameri- 
ca; APEC allows it to choose 
deeper ties with both. But the 
wellspring of support for Mr. Ma- 
hathir is a sobering sign 

The writer is Asian economics 
correspondent for The Washington 
Post, in which this appeared. 


* ^ 




go, as they have advocated far 
months, does not end UJS. moral 
responsibility to Bosnia but en- 
gages that responribHity more 
deeply. The embargo hawks may 
shortly face the consequences of 
answered prayers. 

It is possible to construct an 
American-led withdrawal strate- 
gy that holds NATO together, 
minimizes the Muslim suffering 
that would result from this action 
and causes all Serbs to think more 
seriously about the costs of con- 
tinuing this war. 

President Clinton should seek 
the help of Mr. Dole, Mr. McCain 
and other Republicans in design- 
ing and explaining such a strate- 
gy. And they should give that 
help- American policy on Bosnia 
has readied “the water's edge,” 


IN OUR PAGES; 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 
1894: Autocratic Czar foreign languages. The predilec- 

PAotc n-. tj. i j for words ending in “inn,” a 

of hi s Empire. He will remain an ine exercise- ** « 

™ hi*, predecessors, 

and does not sedin the least in ^ m 

the world inclined to introduce 1944; German 
into Russia even a mitigated ^ CTman 3norte 

constitutional organism. LONDON — [From our Ne* 

ima. r n- n . German subma- 

lviy: Gallic Borrowings 0088 equipped with periscope 

PARIS — Strange differences of 

Xr K? PnliuL* S Sl u 01 Gentians, they are being teamed 
edbv u haVC h®? not_ “snorts*’ by the British. The air 

ed by the French since the war shaft is said to be divided intr 


— — J uu •uuuguig, a 

Tuxedo; “un skating,” a rinir 

1944s German 'Snorts’ 

LONDON — [From our New 
York edition;] German subma- 
rines equipped with perisoope* 
like airshafts that allow them to 
“breathe” have been reported. 
Called “schnorkel spiralT by the 
Germans, they are being termed 
snorts*’ by the British. The air-* 
shaft is said to be divided in Ur 
two sections, one for air intake, 
t he ot her for exhaust They 
permit recharging of batteries 
beneath the water, and the Ger- 
mans assert they enable a sub- 
marine to remain muf er water 
from twenty to thirty days. 


S*«.y 


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Page 10 


EVTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 1 994 

CAPITAL MARKETS ON MONPAY 



Most Active International Bonds 


The 250 mast active international Bonds traded 
through the Eurod Mr system lor the week ending 
Dec. 9. Prices supplied by Telefcurs. 


Raft nbw 


cm Momttv Price ywd 


ft* Mean 


Cm tatartta nice TW 


Aust ra l ian Dollar 


199 NSWTsy 

10ft 

12/07/04 

986750 104200 

Austrian Sending 

220 Austria 

7ft 

10/18/04 

IOOjMOO 

MW0 

BoIoImi Franc 

221 Belgium 

238 Belgium 

340 Belgium 

7ft 

7 

6ft 

10/1 SAM 
04/20/99 
05/25/97 

96JD000 

976500 

99.0000 

isrm 

7.1000 

46200 

British Pound 

148 EIB 

212 Natwcst FRN 

219 ir Perm FRN 

243 All a Lde FRN 

8ft 

6ft 

461 

450 

if 

994250 

926000 

wan 

90J0OO 

88000 

76700 

66200 

7(4200 


Canadian Dollar 


192 Bell Canada 

9ft 

12/01/99 

9935250 

9(4100 

Danish Krona 


7 

12/15/04 

89 MOO 

7M0Q 


9 

11/15/98 

102.1500 

86100 


8 

05/15/M 

96J5Q0 



9 

11/15/00 

1023300 

.88000 


9V, 

00/10/95 

101(4900 

9.1300 


6 

12/10/99 

903500 

66000 


9ft 

02/10/95 

100(4309 

97100 


9 

11/15/96 

102JO0Q 

B6000 

102 Denmark 

5V. 

08/10/96 

960500 

SA20O 


9 

11/15/95 

1010800 

86500 

144 Denmark 

a 

03/15/06 

970358 

82400 

164 Denmark 

zero 

04/03/95 

970425 

96500 

181 Denmark 

6 V, 

02/10/97 

970800 

84200 

198 Denmark 

6 

02/10/96 

980000 

6(0900 

Deutsche Mark 


6ft 

07/15/04 

95A000 

7JWQ0 

2 Treuhand 

7ft 

09/09/04 

1000300 

7A800 

3 Germany 

7Vs 

11/11/04 

100A688 

7(4700 

4 Germany 

8 

01/21/02 

1020214 

77800 

S Treuhand 

6ft 

07/01/99 

970600 

66500 

4 Treuhand 

6ft 

05/13/04 

950667 

76000 

7 Germany 

Bft 

12/20/95 

102.7800 

86100 

8 Treuhand 

7 

11/25/99 

99.6650 

76200 

9 Treuhand 

6ft 

07/29/99 

967920 

6(4600 

10 Treuhand 

5ft 

04/29/99 

95.0000 

6JQ500 

12 Treuhand 

6ft 

03/04/04 

927300 

6.7800 

13 Germany 

aft 

09/20/01 

10A2125 

7.9200 

14 Germany 

8ft 

03/20/96 

1027833 

82700 

15 Germany 

6 

09/15/03 

900057 

6(6100 

18 Treuhand 

6 

17/12/03 

908700 

iJtiW 

70 Germany 

9 

10/20/00 

1077900 

83500 

21 German v 

6ft 

01/04/24 

42.1374 

7AI00 

24 Bundespost 

7ft 

10/01/04 

10Q.3775 

77200 

25 Germ cm v 

6ft 

12/02/98 

99.3837 

67200 

27 Germany 

7ft 

10/30/97 

JO1.KU0 

7.1700 

29 Germany 

5ft 

08/20/98 

96.1120 

5.9000 

31 Germany 

Bft 

09/20/96 

103L3E3) 

82200 

33 Germany 

6ft 

07/15/03 

9X8200 

6.9300 

34 Germany 

7ft 

10/20/97 

101.7200 

7(3700 

36 Germany 

6% 

01/20/98 

99M®a 

86700 

37 Germany 

are 

02/20/96 

1QZ8TB8 

83900 

38 Germany 

a 

09/22/97 

102.9560 

7.7700 

39 Treutiand 

5ft 

06/11/03 

96.1500 

7.1500 

40 Treuhand 

6ft 

07/09/03 

94-4817 

70100 

42 Germany 

B 

07/22/02 

102.7500 

77900 

44 Germany 

8ft 

12/20/00 

107.4)75 

82600 

45 Germany 

8ft 

04/22/96 

1028586 

62600 

47 Germany 

fl’A 

07/21/97 

103.4400 

7.9BO0 

48 Gemtaiy 

6ft 

05/20/99 

96M00 

62600 

51 Treuhand 

6ft 

04/23/03 

93-9S25 

89200 

54 Treuhand 

7V, 

10/01/02 

101.3500 

7-6500 

56 Treuhand 

7ft 

01/29/03 

97.7867 

72900 

57 Germany 

6ft 

08/14/98 

975000 

6-51:3 

58 Germany 

6ft 

04/22/03 

95-5140 

731700 

60 Germany 

8ft 

06/20/0) 

1067000 

82000 

62 Germany 

8ft 

02/20/01 

1057820 

80700 

(3 Germany 

0ft 

07/20/95 

101.9000 

87100 

64 Germany 

a 

(0/20/97 

1027680 

77800 

65 Germany 

9 

01/22/01 

1074617 

83400 

66 Germany 

8ft 

08/20/96 

1037367 

82300 

67 Germany 

7 

12/22/97 

1004400 

89700 

68 Germany 

9 

10/20/95 

1026800 

87700 

70 Treuhand 

5 

12/17/98 

934620 

83600 

72 Germany 

5ft 

10/20/98 

947300 

515700 

73 Germany 

Oft 

07/20/00 

1064350 

82100 

74 Treuhand 

7ft 

12/02/02 

99-3740 

7.4200 


75 Germany 
77 Germany 

79 Germany 

80 Germany 

82 Treuhand 

83 Germany 

84 Germany 

85 Germany 
U Germany 

B9 Germany FRN 
93 Germany 
96 Treuhand 
101 Germany 

109 Treuhand 

110 Germany 
HI T reuhoM 
115 Germany 
122 Germany 
125 Germany 

128 Deata 

129 Germany 

130 Germany 

141 Germany 

142 Germany 
150 KFWlnriFln 
156 Germany 
ire Germany 

177 Exlm Bfc Japan 
180 world Bank 
184 BundesbkUcu 
207 Germany 
210 Bundesbk Lta. 
213 Sweden 

215 Germany 

216 1AOB 
242 Germany 
246 Germany 
250 world Bonk 


m 

6% 

5% 

8Mj 

5% 

7Vb 

8* 

6 

m 

AM 

fftt 

5 

6 

M 

7Vs 

6V5» 

716 

7Mj 

8ft 

m 

m 


6ft 

5ft 

7V, 

6 

zero 

5ft 

m 

zero 

B 

zero 

zero 

7ft 

7ft 

6ft 

7 

5ft 


01/22/96 
05/20/98 
02/72/99 
01/22/96 
09/34/98 
12/20/02 
01/20/97 
04/20/1 6 
08/21 /Q0 
09/30/04 
05/21/01 
01/14/99 
65/02/03 
06/25/98 
01/35/95 
IB/26/98 
10/21/02 
71/2I/W 
05/22/95 
12/07/99 
05/02/00 
05/22/00 
ffl /O2/00 
05/20/97 
10/06/04 
02/20/98 
08/11/95 
12/17/03 
10/13/99 
03/15/95 
02/20/95 
12/21/94 
03/06/95 
01/20/00 
12/06/04 
07/20/95 
10/20/99 
11/10/03 


102.9575 

983500 

MOW 

102.1843 

956060 

97.9433 

103(4788 

81.1533 

1056371 

986000 

1046500 

93.1367 

1026000 

976500 

100.1900 

976500 

987600 

1016300 

1016700 

1007323 

9*5525 

1064700 

986150 

994500 

1014363 

77.5509 

956008 

884500 

1006800 

986602 

1004200 

99.2X40 

907071 

1007457 

100.1650 

100.7100 

1006000 

89J000 


86200 

84900 

5.7200 

7.9500 

56800 

74700 

86900 

74900 

86500 

46000 

7.9900 

54700 

74200 

64900 

76900 

64700 

74400 

76400 

84300 

74200 

7.1400 

84000 

64209 

6-4200 

76500 

6-1500 

64900 

44400 

74000 

46500 

74700 

189000 

84000 

74000 

74400 

87000 

76000 

86000 


Rut Name 

CM 

Maturity 

Plica 

YMd 

179 France Oat 

Bft 

04/25/03 

1037800 

81900 

196 France BTAN 

7 

11/12/99 

97.6700 

7.1700 

229 France BTAN 

4¥i 

04/12/9 9 

9OJ800 

57800 

236 France OAT 

6 

10/25/25 

74(6300 

80400 

Japanese Van 

98 World Bonk 

4ft 

12/20/04 

10G2SOO 

47400 

118 World Bank 

4ft 

03/20/03 

99.0000 

44500 

121 World Bank 

5ft 

03/20/02 

1088750 

57500 

1Z7 EdF 

4ft 

12/05/01 

997000 

47600 

133 World Bonk 

4ft 

06/30/00 

1088750 

4A600 

134 World Bank 

4ft 

12 / 22 m 

1013750 

4(4000 

159 Sharp Flrt Netfl 

7 

09/14/95 

1020635 

88600 

162 Exim Bk Japan 

4ft 

10/01/03 

97J0O0 

4(4900 

IBS Japan Dev. Bk 

S 

10/01/99 

103-5000 

88300 

193 Credit Fonder 

4ft 

00/09/02 

997500 

47600 

194 Sweden 

zero 

09/20/99 

088707 

44300 

201 Nippon Oil Fin 

7 

W/14/9S 

1020635 

64600 

202 Korea Dev. Bk 

3ft 

02/06/97 

988150 

37900 

203 state Bk NSW 

s 

04/20/98 

815000 

57900 

314 Japan Dev. Bk 

6ft 

09/20/01 

1108750 

54600 

218 Italy 

3ft 

06/20/01 

928250 

37800 

237 Sweden 

3ft 

01/12/04 

90-3750 

34700 

244 LB Rheinland 

zero 

12/02/97 

094800 

16800 

Spanish Peseta 

138 SPOIn 

8 

05/30/04 

81.3750 

94300 

197 Spain 

10ft 

11/30/98 

975000 105100 

22 s spam 

» 

02/28/97 

97.1250 

97700 

Swedish Krona 

226 Sweden T-Wlls 

zero 

11/15/95 

91(4865 

94700 


Dutch GuHder 


U.S. Dollar 


30 

Netherlands 

7ft 

10/01/04 

98.1500 

72900 

52 

Netherlands 

5ft 

01/15/04 

08(8000 

64000 

69 

Netherlands 

6ft 

07/15/98 

97J700 

64200 

01 

Netherlands 

7 

02/15/03 

97.2300 

72000 

91 

Netherlands 

7ft 

01/15/23 

9S.9300 

7X200 

99 

Netherlands 

Bft 

02/15/07 

1014000 

7.9000 

116 

Netherlands 

9 

05/15/00 

1075500 

82700 

120 

Netherlands 

6ft 

04/1 5/96 

1004500 

64790 

123 

Netherlands 

6ft 

02/15/99 

985000 

6X500 

126 

Netherlands 

8ft 

06/01/0 6 

1065800 

7X800 

131 

Netherlands 

6ft 

04/15/03 

94.1500 

6X000 

146 

Netherlands 

7ft 

06/15/99 

101.1500 

74100 

173 

Netherlands 

8ft 

09/15/07 

104A500 

7.9000 

187 

Netherlands 

7ft 

11/15/99 

1015000 

74000 

189 

Netherlands 

6 

04/15/95 

100.0600 

6X000 

19S 

Netherlands 

7 

05/15/99 

995500 

7X500 

209 

Netherlands 

0ft 

01/15/07 

1002000 

0X900 

222 

Netherlands 

6ft 

05/01/95 

1002100 

62400 

223 

Netherlands 

6ft 

09/15/01 

107.1500 

8.1700 

231 

Netherlands 

8ft 

06/15/03 

1044000 

7X900 

23d 

Netherlands 

9 

01/15/01 

1075000 

82400 

ECU 

19 

UK T-note 

5ft 

01/21/97 

952750 

55000 

32 

France BTAN 

5 

03/16/99 

892400 

54000 

50 

France OAT 

6 

04/25/04 

85X000 

7X600 

61 

eiB 

10 

01/24/01 

1072750 

92100 

71 

France BTAN 

7ft 

03/16/98 

98.1700 

72900 

76 

UK T-note 

B 

01/23/96 

101X000 

7.9200 

80 

France OAT 

6ft 

04/25/02 

91(4000 

72900 

94 

Holy 

6ft 

02/21/99 

925000 

67600 

UM 

Britain 

9ft 

02/21/01 

1004250 

8X100 

106 

Finland 

Bft 

02/13/07 

96X750 

8J700 

140 

France OAT 

9ft 

04/25/00 

1052000 

9X000 

163 

Italy 

9ft 

03/07/11 

987500 

92700 

172 

France Oat 

8ft 

03/15/02 

1007000 

84200 

211 

Italy 

11 

07/16/96 

1052366 10/1500 

228 

France OAT 

Bft 

04/25/22 

952000 

86700 

233 

France OAT 

to 

02/26/0) 

108X000 

92600 

247 

Calsse Fse Dev. 

5ft 

02709/01 

86.1250 

62900 

249 

FEK 

9ft 

06/09/95 

101X000 

9.1600 

Finnish Markka 

113 

Finland 

11 

01/1 5/99 

105X760 102900 

161 

Finland 

6ft 

09/15/96 

982120 

64200 

in 

Finland 

9ft 

03/15/04 

952775 

9X600 

French Franc 

41 

France OAT 

6ft 

10/25/04 

922000 

72100 

114 

France OAT 

7ft 

04/25/05 

97.1700 

77200 

119 

France OAT 

Oft 

04/25/23 

101.9000 

82400 

132 

France OAT 

10 

05/27/00 

110X600 

9X400 

140 

France BTAN 

8 

05/12796 

1017200 

7X600 

149 

France BTAN 

6ft 

10/1 7m 

992000 

65500 

152 France BTAN 

8ft 

lt/12/07 

1011700 

82400 

157 

France OAT 

5ft 

04/25704 

845000 

65100 

171 

France BTAN 

5ft 

11/12/98 

942000 

6X900 


II Argentina FRN 
16 Brazil 9806 FRN 

22 Argentina par L 

23 Venezuela FRN 
26 Brazil FL I RB L 
44 Brazil El LFRN 
78 Mexico par B 
87 Brazil ZL FRN 
90 Argentina FRN 
92 Venezuela par A 
95 Mexico pot A 
97 Brazil par YL4 
100 Bulgaria A FRN 
103 Ontario Hydra 

107 Brazil LFRN 

108 Finland 
112 KFW 

117 Brazil par YU 
124 Poland FRN 

135 Mexico D FRN 

136 Toyota Motor 

137 world Bank 
139 Hewlett Pack. 
143 World Bank 
145 Nigeria main 

147 Canada 

148 Poland past due 
151 Stand Crdt Card 

153 SocGenAcc 

154 Argentina 

155 FHLB 

158 Brazil LFRN 
145 Citicorp FRN 

166 Finland 

167 OKB 

169 Bulgaria FRN 

170 Britain 
174 BNG 
176 Ontario 
178 Sweden 

182 Sweden FRN 
IBS Argentina 
186 Mexico B FRN 

190 Mexico A FRN 

191 LKBFRN 

200 Morgan Guartv 

204 Venezuela A 

205 Ford Credit 

206 Japan Dev. Bk 
208 Mexico C FRN 
217 Bco Com Ext. 

224 Ontario FRN 
227 Reed Elsevier 
230 World Bank 
232 Philippines B 
235 GMACFRN 
239 NTT 

241 Italy FRN 
245 World Bank 
248 Freddie Moc 


6ft 
6 ft 
4ft 
5ft 
4 

4 -ft 
6ft 

6<ft 

7ft 

6ft 

6ft 

4 

6 ft 
7ft 
4ft 
7ft 
SK 
4 

6ft 

7ft 

7ft 

7ft 

7ft 

0ft 

5ft 

4ft 

3ft 

7ft 


lire 

Oft 

4ft 

542 

6ft 

7ft 

6 ft 
7ft 

7 

7ft 

5ft 

5ft 

Oft 

676 

6ft 

5ft 

6J3 

7 

6ft 

7ft 

6ft 

7ft 

5ft 

7ft 

7ft 

5ft 

864 

7ft 

5ft 

8ft 

7ft 


03/29/05 
01/20/01 
03/31/23 
12/18/07 
04/15/14 
04/15/06 
12/31/19 
04/15/24 
03/31/23 
03/31/20 
12/31/10 
04/15/34 
07/28/24 
12/05/97 
W/15/12 
07/28/04 
11/30/04 
04/15/24 
10/27/24 
12/28/19 
10/24/97 
00/27/90 
12/05/97 
10/0 7/90 
11/15/20 
(77/97/07 
10/27/14 
12/07/97 
12/01/97 
11/01/99 
11/18/96 
04/15/09 
11/03/00 
11/24/97 
11/15/99 
07/28/11 
12/00/02 
08/23/00 
06/22/04 
12/01/95 
02/08/01 
12/20/03 
12/31/19 
12/31/1? 
11/04/98 
03/00/95 
03/31/07 
02/26/08 
10/25/90 
12/31/19 
02/02/04 
08/17/99 
10/04/99 
01/19/23 
12/01/17 
12/06/96 

ii/i ere? 
07/26/99 
03/01/97 
07/21/99 


716664 
802636 
460767 
482207 
505103 
47.70O8 
638687 
64 .4976 
67.0372 
472619 
657993 
42.0495 
486567 
998000 
59(4809 
955000 
90(6250 
42.1064 
75.6303 
863222 
988000 
968750 
983750 
10)7500 
418000 
M6259 

<78757 

99.1250 
79(*563 
78-5000 
988750 
63.1497 
908300 
968750 
076250 
44.1961 
948750 
968500 
948750 

98.1250 
98J40Q 
828000 
85.9106 
85.9185 
998800 

1000021 

50.1319 

945000 

97.5000 

85.9196 

818750 

998100 

968500 

928000 

638443 

79.9893 

985000 

99(4400 

1028500 

96.7500 


98700 

76500 

98200 

11-7200 

78600 

98600 

97900 

108700 

10(4900 

147800 

98000 

98100 

126600 

78300 

118500 

8.1600 

88800 

96000 

98100 

86000 

78700 

78500 

76200 

88300 

138500 

67300 

67900 

77400 

80100 

11.1200 

89900 

106900 

£8300 

89700 

76800 

1X7200 

76400 

78500 

88400 

56100 

57600 

1X1500 

78800 

77800 

5.9100 

83300 

137600 

86100 

78900 

80700 

88500 

58400 

77900 

88400 

9.1200 

66500 

78700 

£7195 

85600 

78600 



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A New Test for the Federal Reserve 

. * /K** mflrkw 




By Carl Gewirtz 

[memoxionai Herald Tri fane 

PARIS — The bankruptcy of Orange 
County m California after huge losses is 
the derivatives market is damaging many 
bystanders. The most prominent of these 
could be the Federal Reserve Board — 
whose credibility as a vigilante against 
inflation may be sorely tested 

The main problem for the Fed is timing. 
The bankruptcy comes at an awkward pe- 
riod: The preparation of end-year ac- 
counts always leads to a rundown m activi- 
ty, draining liquidity from markets and 
therefore creating conditions for highly 
volatile price movements. 

US. bond and stock prices ended a 
jittery week on a calm note, but fears are 
high that this could be the false calm 
before a storm. 

The immediate threat is this week’s re- 
on November inflation, with the pro- 
price index to be announced Tues~ 


anticipates that the price for intermediate 
goods, which has been rising at an annual 
rate of 625 percent over the past six 
months, will register another sharp gam. in 
addition, the expected 0.4 percent nse in 

core consumer prices w oou 2 o well raise eye- 
brows.” ... , 

The view at Moigan is that while the 
]cvd of inflation may not be troubling, the 
direction is alarming. “With economic 
growth likely to remain rapid and operat- 
ing rates headed higher, pressures on 
prices should bnfld.” 

Assuming the estimates are correct, the 
question then is whether the Fed raises 
interest rates again in December after the 
unexpectedly large ^-percentage- point 
rise last month or whether it d«tides to 
postpone the move until the end of Janu- 
ary. 

A December rise, in thin markets, might 
lead to a sdl-off in the bond market, add- 
ing to the distress of others like Orange 


day and the consumer price index the County who speculated on interest rate 
following day. movements in the den 


'The numbers are likely to be on the 
high side,” says Walter M Cadette at J. P. 
Morgan. The expected 0.6 percent rise in 
the coze producer price index, which ex- 
cludes the volatile food and energy sectors, 
will not be much of a shock following a 0.S 
percent drop a month ago, he says. But he 


derivatives market. But 

a delay until next year, if an increase is 
warranted, could undermine confidence in 
the Fed. 

The betting at Morgan is that the Fed 
will probably refrain from acting Dec. 20, 
when the policy-making Open Market 
Committee next meets, “partly in recogni- 


tion of the thinness of the markets at the 

end of the year.” 

But European analysts fear that a delay 
in the Fed’s response to nnfaraabfc infla- 
tion data could damage its credibly and 
create a tumult in financial markets that it 
was trying to awn. 

Both the currency and the U.S. bond 
markets are at risk from any sign that the 
Fed is becoming more circumspect in re- 
straining inflation, warn bankCTS at SLQ. 
Warburg in London and BHF-Baak in 
Frankfurt 

The official view, as expressed m are- 

port prepared by central 

Group of Ten and released last week by 
the Bank for International Settlements, * 

that: - - 

“At times there may be a short-term 
conflict between the policy requiremeats 
of maintaining low inflation and die policy 
stance that might seean appropriate in the 
light of asset price considerations. Howev- 
er, there is nothing to be gained and much ■ 
to be lost by allowing monetary policy to 
deviate from a course consistent with price 
stability.” 

Another focus of international interest 
is what the Japanese are up to. pie dollar 
remains above 100 yen, confirming its re- 

See FED, Page 13 


f“ nii 

Wfa 10 * 


i 


9&P'. -~ 


.48*’*, -A 

■?-1 ■ 
e t ! 

>' ~ ' . 


M 


v:: 




Inflation Data Point to Volatile Week 


t • -■ 

;«■(/. V: 


ti-- 


Coo q>Ued by Our Stiff From Dispatches 

NEW YORK — Economic data due this 
week are likely to send inflation tremors 
through the Treasury bond market, adding 
to an already nervous tone created by 
Orange County’s financial debacle that 
came to light last week. 

“The economic data’s going to have 
some muscle and the inflation numbers are 


not going to be encouraging,” said Ward 
McCarthy, a managing director at Stone & 


“Greenspan told us in his testimony that 
he’s concerned about economic activity 
and inflationary tendencies,” said Barbara 
Ken worthy, a portfolio manager at Pru- 
dential Mutual Funds. “I think, he was 
quasi telling us to be careful” about the 
upcoming numbers. 

Analysts said the data could send the 
yield on the benchmark 30-year Treasury 


McCarthy Research 


UJSi CREDIT MARKETS 


The government is set to release itepro- 

Tues- 


ducer price index for November on 
day and its consumer price index for the 
month on Wednesday. Both indexes are 
expected to show a sizable uptick in prices, 
which could spur the Federal Reserve 
Board to raise interest rates after the next 
meeting of the Federal Open Market Com- 
mittee on Dec. 20. 

The data will hit a market already shak- 
en by testimony to Congress last week 
from Alan Greenspan, chairman of the 
Federal Reserve Board. 


8.0 percent. The 
at 7.86 percent. 


bond market back above 8.0 
yield finished last week 
down from 7.9 1 percent the previous week. 

Ms. Kenwortby said the inflation data 
would provide “a flavor of how well the 
market can take bad news in an area where 
we haven’t had bad news for a while.” 

Bad news on inflation also should add to 
the weakness in shorter-term securities, ana- 
lysts said, further flattening the yield curve. 

The news of Orange County’s bankrupt- 
cy filing caused a short-lived but dramatic 


steepening in the curve at midweek, but 
eventually dealers’ sales of Orange County 
collateral proved the dominant factor and 
the coupon yield curve finished flatter on 
the week. 

The spread between the yields on 30- 
year bonds and 2-year notes stood at 36 
basis points Friday, narrowed from 49 
basis points the previous week. 

Traders say still more flattening seems 
to be in the cards, in part because the bond 
market has decided the Orange County 
situation will have tittle impact, if any, on 
the Fed’s policy moves. 

But some analysts said the Orange 
County situation and the benign inflation 
data seen so far this year could stall the 
Fed’s next rate rise until at least January. 

Raising rates again would put the 
squeeze on investors like Orange County 
that made the wrong bet. The Orange 
County bankruptcy “complicates the 
Fed’s job," said Margaret Patel, with Bos- 
ton Security Counsellors. 

(Knigfti-Ridder, Bloomberg, Reuters) 


. t 




IT™ 

■ 

ns - " 



new imemcmonai Dona issues 

Compiled by Laurence Desvilettes 

!■■■■«■ Amount n_i 

(mOkms) 

^ Price 

Price 

end 

week 

» 

Terms 

Floating Rato Notes 

Australia & New 
Zealand Banking 

S25Q 

199B 

O .10 

99X9 

— 

Over 3- month Libor, Non callable. Fees 0.15%. Danominafions $10500. Payable In Jan. 
(Union Bank of Switzerland.) 

Caymadrid tnfl 

$200 

1997 

Hbor 

99J* 

— 

Interest will be the 3-month Libor. Noncallabte. Fees 0.125%. Denominations $10500. (Leh- 
man Brothers InH.J . . 

Cornpagnle 
Financlere de CIC 
etdel'Unlon 
Europeenne 

$100 

2001 

3/16 

100X5' 


Over 3-month Libor. Redeemable at par In 1999. Fungible wffft outstanding issue, raising 
total amount to $350 million. Fees 035%. Denominations $10X00. (Sanwc lnt'l.1 

BBDO Canada 

DM200 

2000 

Olas 

99.48 

— 

Over 3-month Libor. Callable at par in 1997. Fees 0X5%. Payable In Jan. (Morgan Stanley 

Inn.) 

Maple Mortgage 
Securities 

tl75 

2030 


100 


issue spirt into 3 tranches: 00 million paving 0-15 over 3-month Libor until 2005, thereafter 
040 aver, reoffered at 99.955, average life 1.49 years; «93 mutton paying 0.18 over 3-month 
Libor until 2005, thereafter 050 over, reoftared at 99X5, average lire 6X3 years; £12 million 
notes whose terms were not disclosed. Fees 0.125%. Denominations 000500. (NafWesf 
Capital Markets.) 

Midland Bank 

£100 

2000 

llbor 

100 

— 

1 merest will be the 3month Libor. Reoffered at 99J3. Nanool table. Fees (L42%. Denomina- 
tions £100500. Payable In Jan. (H5BC Markets.) 

Sonar 1 

EM 

2021 

QJ 0 

100 

— 

interest will be 0 J 0 over 3-month Libor until 2002. when Issue Is callable at par, thereafter 
0 X 0 over. Fees 035%. Denominations £10500. Also £16 million privately placed notes. 
(Citibank InTU 

European 
Investment Bank 

I TL 350500 

1999 

'M 

700 JO 

— 

Below 3-month Libor. Non callable. Fees 050%. Increased from 240 billion lire. <C5 First 
Boston.) 

Fixed-Coupons 

BNG 

$200 

1999 

8 

101 x> 

99x5 

Reoffered at 100.18. Noncullable. Fees )%%. Payable in Jan. (Dalwa Europe.) 

Centragas 

$172 

2010 

10 -*s 

99xi 

— 

Quarterly. Average life 10 years. Fees 1%. (Lehman Brothers tnt'l.) 

Euraflma 

$100 

1998 

7% 

101X12 

— 

Reoffered at 99.95. Noncallabte. Fees lft%. (Dalwa Europe.) 

General Electric 
Capital Cdrp. 

$200 

1997 

7% 

101X77 

99.78 

Reoffered at 99X9. Nancallable. Fees lftrtb. (Union Bank of Switzerland.) 

Heinz { HJ .) 

$300 

1998 

8 

101.154 

99X0 

Reottered at 99.981. Non callable. Fees T%%, Payable fn Jon. (Goldman Sachs Inti.) 

Invergas 

1100 

199 9 

12 W 

99V, 

— 

Semiannually. Noncallabte. Fees 1 1/16%. DenomhKrfionsSSOXOa (Chemical Bank.) 

Kyushu Electric 
Power 

$300 

1999 

8 Mi 

IOJjss 

99JS3 

Reoffered at 99X92. Nancallable. Fees 1 %%. (IBJ lnf’ 1 .) 

Nordic investment 
Bank 

$250 

1997 

74k 

100.797 

99X5 

Reoftared at 99 J97. Nonco liable. Fees lft%. Denominations $10500. Payable in Jan. (Nantu- 

TO lilt f.I 

South Africa 

*750 

199 9 

9% 

99XW 

99M 

Semiannually. Nancallable. Fees 0X0%. (Goldman Sachs inn.) 

Austria 

DM500 

1999 

zero 

72 


mernmnk!) 6- Nonea,,obte - Pr «»eds 356 million marks. Fees 2%. Payable In Jan. (Com- 

Spain 

DM2,500 

2000 

7 

lOO.vs 

— 

Reoffered at "20. Noncallable. Fees 2 %. Payable In Jan. (Baverlsche Landesbank.) 

Depfa 

£100 

1996 

8 % 

100X4 

— 

Reoffered at 99X65. Noncallabte. Feeslft%. (HSBC Markets.) 

General Electric 
Capital Carp. 

£100 

1996 

8 ft 

100X74 


Reoffered at "X74. Noncailable. Fees lft%. (Barclays de Zoete Wedd.) 

Argentarla Global 
Finance 

FF700 

1996 

TVs 

101 

— 

Reoffered at 100. NoncoUoble. Fees not disclosed. (Credit Commercial de France.) 

Austria 

ITL 100500 

1997 

11 

102 % 

100X5 

out!rtond,nfl ,S3ue ' ralsJ "S “al amount to 300 billion lire. Fees 

Istituto Bancario 
San Paolo dl Torino 

ITL 150500 

1998 

zero 

100 



European 
Investment Bank 

OF 200 

2001 

rv 2 

101.78S 

100 .00 


General Electric 

Capital Carp. 

Aims 100 

1997 

10 

101 

99.00 

Nancallable. Fees )W*%. Payable In Jon. (Hombras Bank.} 

New South Wales 
Treasury Corp. 

AusSlOO 

1997 

4ft 

87jm 

■—* 

Semtarmual'y. Nancallable private placement. Fees 1%%. Denominations Aus$l050Q. (No- 

Argentarla Global 
Finance 

Y 40500 

2001 

4ft 

100 


Nancallable. Fees 1X275%. Payable In Jan. Denominations 10 million yen. (Nlkko Europe.) 

Argentina 

Y 15500 

1999 

7.10 

99ft 


ISS3 <md0 " ,t 10 mlllte, l,nM from ,22 billion 

Dalwa Europe 

Bank 

Y 25500 



100 


1 l, ’ a, ' <: bes, with maturities ranging from 1997 to 2005. numM frnm w. «« 
5%, and Including a zero coupon tranche and a floating rat* 3 % to 

Denominations 50 mllllofj yen. tDolwEwsre.) ™ rQle hot disclosed. 

Equity-Linked 

Apache Carp. 

$150 

2002 

6 

100 


Semiannually. Nancallable. Convertible at S30X8 per sham nn hkv. = — — - 

dlsctoaed. Payable In Jan. (NatWest Securities.) snore* an 18% premium. Fees not 


Last Week’s Markets 


Euromarts 








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- 

pc'-' 


TH1TRIB 






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— * 


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— - 




AH npures are as of ctenr of troatna Frusay 


Eurobond Yields 


Stock Indexes 


OJ Indus. 
OJ Util. 
DJ Trans. 
5&P100 
S&P500 
S&P ind 
NYSE Cp 
BHtata 
FT5E1W 
FT 30 
Japan 
NlkkaHSS 
Germany 


OAX 

Hong Kona 


Hang Seng 

World 

MSClP 



Money Rates 



Dec. 2 Ch’ge 

United States 

Dec 9 

DK.2 

37*fi -JJ4% 

Discount rate 

4ft 

4ft 

1795 -004% 

Prime note 

Bft 

8 Vi 

1X3840 -186% 

Federal hinds rate 

SVj 

57/16 

m « -i.»% 

45130 -140% 
53883 —159% 
2481)) — )55% 

Jgoon 

Discount 

Call money 

1ft 

2 3/16 

Ift 

23/16 

3>month interbank 
Germany 

25/16 

25/16 

101 7 JO — 1J3 % 

332530 -1J0% 

Lombard 

600 

600 

Call money 

635 

S .10 

1859830 —0.11% 

3-month Interbank 
Britain 

£50 

xJO 

2X3831 -050% 

Bonk base rate 

6W 

5ft 

Cali money 

6 ft 

5ft 

822157 -126% 

3 -month Interbank 

A 15/16 

65/16 

Gold Dec.9 

DCC 2 

Cfctn 

MAW -1X8% 

London 37650 

pjuflxX 

379X0 

- 066 % 


US. S, (oag lenti 
U5.5*ln6mlGnB 
US, t, start term 
PMAds sterling 
FrwcJi francs 
ffadan tire 
DantsAknan 
Swedish krtt» 
ECU. long term 
ECU, mdffl term 
Con. I 

6 US.$ 

N8.S 

Yen 


Due. 9 D*c.2YrbWjYrlm* 
861 868 848 681 ' 
M9 870 545 
7 M 767 488 
9,14 9/1 624 

M7 


Weekly Seles 

Plenary Marluu 


Ok. 8 / 


8.10 

767 

0.14 

784 


O 567 
771 


4.18 
860 561 


11.04 line 1180 

822 626 874 U) 
1057 1064 1123 7* 
152 156 

823 881 

WY 9.12 964 MB 
1060 1Q64 1064 659 
983 0.17 961 5.99 

467 457 4i4 2J7 
Sowro; Lurembaurs Stock Exchange. 


StaWMs 
Convert. 
FRUt 
ECP 
Total 
Sean 


Eorodear 
Noas 


Cedel 

* Naas s ..... 

264J0 7560 1,18880 1,91080 

“ — - 1960 

— 760 15560 MOJO 

Z56a» &W780 563160 
ilNJO 2645601M3Q5O 751280 
'Market 



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V. f - 


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EBrtdenr 

$ Mont 


Ubor Rates 


CtMW 

.mm*. , NoaI * ton* 

cKF 16635602969160 3464)60 

fEIT' mSS 

T 2, 1101160 98126) 2167130 

Taw iWWO 31533504960460 5267360 
Shone: E procure, CeOoL 




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Powte sterling tu J 7 H 4 7 


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french tranc 59/14 
ECU 41/16 

Ym a 


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frmotb 

4 

47/16 
2% 2ft 
Saorctst Uardt Barth. ReuM« 


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Kgr; ;=, ^'T=|llP^ 


International Herald Tribune, Monday, December 12, 1994 


Page 11 


f ^-?uv 


,;:hi- 

- V- . *-•«-, f. *1 
— « 

-r ,. % 


WAU. STREET WATCH 

Flagship Fund Finds Itself 
Sailing in Riskier Skiers 


Asians Reach Again for High-Tech’s Cutting Edge 

Goldstar Tries to Muscle Into LCD Market A Chipmaker’s Gamble Pays Off in Taiwan 




■:■: .- ■" 1 ‘ : - r, <!i 




eek 


■*.- 

- 

: i .-1“— 1 : ®3«; 


By Floyd Norris 

^ ew York Tunes Service 

“Sell,” he tdls his broker. 

pSliSf -15®“ broker - “To wfaom?" 

companies. So far, that hasn’t — 

hurt; it probably has helped as nr n » 

the stocks he buys go up and up M age ll an has moved 

JS^MRSfc to concentrate 

Mr. Vmik says he is carefuL ^ n, 8 s * 

“When I buy a stock, I buy it 


.- '- 'C 






■ S 01 Systems Corp., a software company, 

is “representative of how I do it,” Mr. Vina: said. 

Over a six-month period ending in September, he bought 12.6 
mflUtm shares, or about 100,000 shares for every day the market was 
open^md the stock rose 33 percent Fidelity now owns 10 percent 

*3 large fund has to take some big positions, of course, but 
Magellan under Mr. Vinik has made a specially of it. Magellan had 
„ “FL 4 P® 10 ® 111 °* assets in such concentrated positions when 
Mr. Vmik took over in the summer of 1992. Now the figure is 45 
percent. 

That means that when Mr. Vmik decides to seD a stock, he will 
often be selling into a market in which he is an important player — 
and in which even a rumor that he hac turned negative could 
depress the price. 

“It doesn't bother me at all,” he says of the concentration. Not is 
he worried that the boom in personal computers, on which Magel- 
lan has bet big, might slow down. 

Mr. Vinik’s strategy this year appears to have been to sell his 
losers while holding onto and adding to his winners. That is one 
reason the fund will pay no capital gams distribution this month, a 
disclosure that embarrassed Fidelity because it had previously 
es timate d the fund had $2.4 billion of such, gains 

Magellan had a great 1993, but is down 6.8 percent so far this 
year, mcJuding a 3.1 percent fall last week. 

If Mr. Vinik is right about the stocks he is concentrated in, the 
fund could recover. But if he is not, he may find that selling the 
losers makes the kisses even greater. Because of the concentration, 
owning Magellan is a lot riskier than it used to be. 


By Steven Bruit 

International Herald Tribune 

ANYANG, South Korea — Technicians at 
Goldstar’s research facility here on the outskirts 
of Seoul ought to be stressed out. Swathed in the 
light-blue bunny suits that attempt to soften Lhe 
sterility of the deanroom, they are rushing to 
work out the kinks in the manufacturing of color 
liquid crystal displays that ore fast becoming 
ubiquitous in high-end notebook computers. 

The clock is ticking. Their bosses have already 
ordered hundreds or millions of dollars of pro- 
duction equipment and are determined to grab 7 
percent of the world market in a few years. 

Yet, as the technicians step out of the dean- 
room and shed their masks, there is banter. 
Despite being a step behind their domestic rival 
Samsung Electronics Co., and two steps behind 
the Japanese, there is overwhelming confidence 
that South Korea w£D manage to muscle its way 
into the Japan-dominated market for active-ma- 
trix LCDs, just as it has for semiconductors, 
consumer electronics, ships and automobiles. 

“In terms of technology, there’s no doubt that 
we’ll catch up with Japan," said Cho Kwang Ho, 
the senior managing director of Goldstar Co. 
Ltd’s LCD division. “The Japanese are afraid.” 


In a manufacturing jirocess so expensive and 
exacting that the VS. Defense Department plans 
to spend about $380 million by 1999 to strength- 
en American manufacturing of LCDs, the South 
Koreans emoy two strategic strengths: A de- 
cade's worth of experience in making memory 
chips, a dose technological cousin of the LCD; 
and piles of cash, which the companies, both 
among South Korea's biggest chaebol, or con- 
glomerates, can cull from highly protected do- 
mestic business interests ranging from insurance 
to holds. 

The combination, analysts say, gives the South 
Koreans a strong chance of elbowing their way 
into LCDs just as they did memory chips, even 
though the Japanese, having seen their profits 
and market share in semiconductors slide as a 
consequence, have refused to transfer any LCD 
technology. Using aggressive pricing, the South 
Koreans, who entered the memory chip market a 
decade ago, now enjoy a market share greater 
than 25 percent Samsung has become the 
world’s biggest memory chip supplier. 

“As a new entrant well have to absorb some 
portion of the penetration price, but we won’t be 

See LCD, Page 13 


By Kevin Murphy 

haemanonol Herald Tribune 

TAIPEI — Like the rest of Taiwan’s computer 
industry, Morris Chang can't sit still Several 
years of explosive growth should only be a pre- 
lude to more of the same. 

In computer keyboards and mouses, mother 
boards and monitors, Taiwanese manufacturers 
have grabbed major shares of world markets in 
their respective fields, cumulatively expanding 
from about $23 billion in sales in 1986 to S10.8 
billion last year. 

And that’s what Mr. Chang, a Shanghai-born, 
American-educated engineer who rose to the top 
ranks of the U.S. computer industry before mov- 
ing to Taiwan, envisions for the nation’s integrat- 
ed rincuit maker s, the business where the real 
money — and real risk — is these days. 

Mr. Chang, who beaded Texas Instruments 
Inc.’s semiconductor business before becoming 
General Instrument Corp.'s chief executive offi- 
cer, now finds himself a leader of Taiwan’s 
assault on the world’s computer chip markets. 

As chairman of Taiwan Semiconductor Manu- 
facturing Corporation, Wyse Technology Inc., a 
maker of personal computers, and Vanguard 
International Semiconductor Corp., Mr. Chang, 


63, embodies the brain gain and restlessness that 
has put Taiwan in contention in so many markets 


Disenchanted with the mergers and acquisi- 
tions frenzy in the U.S. industry in the 1980s and 
eager to work in Chinese society after 36 years in 
the United States, Mr. Chang agreed in 1985 to 
head Taiwan’s Industrial Technology Research 
Institute, a government-funded laboratory. 

The Taiwanese government has extended sub- 
stantial assistance in the form of tax holidays, 
R&D grants and cheap loans to the information 
industry in a bid to create the high-tech exports 
needed to replace the low-skill manufacturing 
work being lost to other Asian countries. 

“Taiwan has to choose what kind of industries 
it wants to specialize in. Right now it is a big 
personal computer maker and a big monitor 
maker, both of which are under pressure because 
their value-added is lower,” said Mr. Chang. 

“The industry should probably go upstream, 
building the key components. It’s making good 
progress in integrated circuits and there are op- 
portunities in display components, flat panels 
and CRTs. They’ll be around for a long time,” 

See CHIP, Page 13 


Orange County Is Not Alone 5 Arrested Western Leaders 

Lta Angeles Times Service was placed under review for pos- $326 million out of the state of' Tyi r*llU iDCA Tttl 1 

LOS ANGELES — Wal- sible downgrading on Friday by Texas’s investment pool on Fri- -E-U VdllllvoU -B-j’-w I. 

worth County, a southeastern Moody’s Investors Service. day after a published story drew A lClliiC |U *_4l Irt/ 

Wisconsin region of dairy The pattern disturbs bond unflattering analogies between 1? . 1 

farms, lakes and subdivisions, analysts, who see a growing it and Orange County’s fund. I 1 ±3110. LftSC xv m -- r -_ 

has as much to do with upscale number of municipalities reap- At the end of the day, the fund M Z f I J A 

Orange County, California, as ing the whirlwind after sowing was down to about $33 billion. Agmce Fnmu-Presse 1 jM T 1 1 I V^-ll 1 §-* MM f |li-* 


Las Angela Times Service 

LOS ANGELES — Wal- 
worth County, a southeastern 
Wisconsin region of dairy 
farms, lakes and subdivisions, 
has as much to do with upscale 
Orange County, California, as 
cheddar cheese has to do with 
Ferraris. 

But the two share one thing. 
They both have seen the value 
of their investment funds drop 
dramatically as a result of risky 
bets on mortgage-backed deriv- 
ative securities. 

And like Orange County, 
whose bond ratings have 
plunged as a result of its finan- 
cial straits and resultant bank- 
ruptcy filing. Walworth Coun- 
ty’s own double-A bond rating 


was placed under review for pos- 
sible downgrading on Friday by 
Moody’s Investors Service. 

The pattern disturbs bond 
analysts, who see a growing 
□umber of municipalities reap- 
ing the whirlwind after sowing 
the seeds of risk by borrowing 
too heavily, investing in dicey 
securities, or both. 

Reports of investment losses 
have appeared around the 
country since Orange County’s 
debacle became known, affect- 
ing c ommuni ties in Texas, Flor- 
ida, Kentucky, Maine, Mary- 
land, IlKnais, Wyoming. West 
Virginia and elsewhere. 

Government agencies also 
appear to be edgy about then- 
money. Municipalities pulled 


$326 million out of the state of 
Texas’s investment pool on Fri- 
day after a published story drew 
unflattering analogies between 
it and Orange County’s fund. 
At the end of the day, the fund 
was down to about $33 billion. 

Meanwhile, credit rating ser- 
vices, which have come under 
critical fire for underestimating 
the exposure of Orange Comity 
and other communities, have 
quietly begun to re-evahiale the 
credit worthiness of various 
municipalities. 

“Out of the 50,000 issuers 
across the country, we think it is 
a fairly isolated event," said Mi- 
chael Dorfsman. spokesman for 
Standard & Poor's. “But we are 
in the process of doing a scan.” 


Turning Pretzels to Prof it 

THE TRIB INDEX Health Fad Buoys Family-Run Bakery 


__ World Index m 

- International Herald Tribune 114 MEr 

World Stock flxfex, composed 

of 280 Internationally Investabto na ^ ,7 j* 1 ", 

stocks from 25 countries, ’ "•* ’ *** A 

compiled by Bloomberg uz 
Business News. 

ill 

Weekending December 9, 
daily dosings. 

Jan. 1992 = 100. 110 f m t w t 

« B UI ns Bure » M> 


124 

123 #ff » 


mmmrn 

r Up M 



mm 


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97 Worth America 



94 — 

93 F M T W T 


111 F M T W T 

Latin America IRE 

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132 : r \ V 


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Industrial Sectors/Weekend ctose 

dST aSr cMr do- dot* cumge 

Energy 11120 112.04 -0.75 Capital Goods 111-54112.19 -056 

Utmttes 124.24 12257 +V3B Raw Materials 127.55128-11 -0.44 

finance 110.93 111 M -0-si Consumer Goo ds 101 .44 102.71 -1.24 

Services 110.0 5 11131 -1.13 HlsceHaneous 112JS113J8 -1.43 

17» Mw trucks US. ao ^J^ bjeS B ^^ S 

c irtt mo tfonri Herald Tribune 




By MitcheU Martin . 

International Herald Tribune 

LTITTZ, Pennsylvania — With its neat 
two-story houses, East Main Street in Lititz 
resembles a Norman Rockwell painting of 
small town America. The only thing that 
seems out of place is the f our-f oot-taH pretzel 
in front of 219, the home of the Sturgis Pretzel 
House, the first U.S. pret- 
zel bakery. 

Hie famfly-nm Sturgis 
company has grown more 
than eight-fold in the last 
two decades as it com- 
bined tourism with the 
phenomenal popularity of 
pretzels in a health-con- 
scious, fat-averse America. According to the 
Snack Food Association, pretzel salesjumped 
25 percent in 1993, to $1.1 billion, far outpac- 
ing the rises of other kinds of snack foods. 
Because they are baked, not fried like potato 
chms, pretzels contain little or no fat. 

Julius Sturgis was a baker in this town, cm 
the northern fringe of Pennsylvania Dutch 
country, in 1860. The company legend is that 
a bobo passing through town in that year 
traded a German pretzel recipe for a meal one 
day, and that by 1861 the bakery’s four ovens 
were all producing pretzels, having forsaken 
other baked goods. 

“Bums road the rails, even when X was 
little,” said Barbara Tschudy, whose hus- 
band, Clyde, bought the company in 1970. 
“Bums would come to the door ana ask for a 
sandwich-" 

The Tschudy family is related to the Stur- 
gises, who sold the company in 1948, she said, 
although Lewis Sturgis, a son of the founder, 
worked at the company until 1975. Clyde runs 


the baking operation, while his son Michael 
and daughter-in-law Holly keep an eye on the 
business end with Barbara. Overall the com- 
pany usually employs 13 people. 

For more than a century, the four coal 
ovens were used to bake pretzels, which are 
popular with the German people who settled 
this part of eastern Pennsylvania. (The Dutch 
in Pennsylvania Dutch is a corruption of 
deutsch, the German word for German.) In 
the mid-1960s, a gas-powered oven was in- 
stalled to bake most of the pretzels, although 
hand-made soft pretzds are still done in the 
original ovens. 

Mrs. Tschudy said that around that time, 
the previous owners started giving tours of 
the factory, taking advantage of visitors to the 
region's Amish and Mennomie attractions. 
Tourists now account for about 50 percent of 
the company’s sales, Michael Tschudy said. 
The traditional commercial baking is now just 
20 percent of the business, with mail order 
sales comprising the rest. Mr. Tschudy said 
annual revenue was about $100,000 in 1970, 
when his father purchased the company, and 
it peaked at $1 million in 1992. But the 
company has suffered slightly from its own 
success, and sales last year fell to $800,000, 
which is the likely level this year as well 

Mr. Tschudy said Sturgis had been doing 
private-label baking for a larger snack food 
company. That customer wanted Sturgis to 
devote all its time to the private-label work, 
and when the Tschudy family refused, it of- 
fered to buy the company: Barbara Tschudy 
said the oner was rejected- 

Tourists coming to the store can buy a six- 
pound bag of plain pretzels for $3.98, and 
Mis. Tschudy said 60,000 such bags are sold 
each year. 




In Chinese 
Fraud Case 

Agenee Fnmce-Pnesse 

BEIJING — The police in 
the northeastern city of Dalian 
have arrested five people for 
embezzling about 360 million 
yuan ($42 million), a report said 
Sunday. 

Sun Hongxiang, 57, was 
among those arrested last Mon- 
day for allegedly raising the 
money from local investors by 
offering interest rates well above 
levels for bank deposits, the Chi- 
na Business Times reported. 

About 170 million yuan 
earned “by the sweat and blood 
of numerous investors” was al- 
legedly squandered on luxury 
cars and other extravagances, 
the paper said. 

Mr. Sun went into business in 
1980 with a 600,000 yuan bank 
loan as the director and presi- 
dent of the Dalian Hongxiang 
Co mme rcial Development Co., 
which boasted numerous brick 
factories all over China — all of 
which were losing money. 

Between 1985 and 1994 he 
raised increasingly large sums 
of money by offering investors 
interests rates of up to 193 per- 
cent, 80 percent higher than the 
prevailing bank deposit rate, 
the newspaper said. 

The Dalian government, 
complying with an order from 
Bering, launched a campaign in 
March to stamp out illegal 
money raising and sent repeat- 
ed warnings to Mr. Sun to end 
his activities and pay back in- 
vestors, it said. 

He informed investors in 
May of a six-month delay in 
interests payments and alleged- 
ly moved more than 6.6 minion 
yuan and $200,000 abroad be- 
fore buying plane tickets, the 
paper daimed. 


Compiled by Otr Sutff From Dnpanha 

MIAMI — A pledge to nego- 
tiate a gigantic open-trading 
zone by the year 2005 and to 
expand the North American 
Free Trade Agreement to in- 
clude Chile capped a three-day 
meeting erf leaders from across 
Lhe Western hemisphere. 

U.S. President Bill CUnton on 
Sunday called the Summit of the 
Americas an extraordinary mo- 
ment of opportunity that “mare 
than fulfilled ouf expectations." 

“Future generations will look 
back on the Miami summit as a 
moment when the course of his- 
tory in the Americas changed 
for the better” be said. 

Mr. Clinton and the leaders 
of Mexico and Canada said ne- 
gotiations to indude Chile in 
NAFTA were set to begin by 
May 1995. Leaders from all 34 
countries represented at the 
meeting agreed to create a Free 
Trade Area of the Americas, 
which would liberalize trade 
from Alaska to Argentina with- 
in the next decade. 

In a series of speeches, the 
leaders applauded themselves 
and the spirit of the summit 
meeting. Ernesto Zedillo Ponce 
de Le6o, the president of Mexi- 
co, said the summit opened “a 
new era in our history.” Presi- 
dent Itaznar Franco of Brazil 
declared that it would “usher in 
a lasting era of peace and un- 
derstanding.” 

In addition to the trade 
plans, the leaders adopted a 
program listing more than 100 
action issues, including envi- 
ronmental cooperation, mea- 
sures against corruption, nar- 


cotics trafficking and money 
laundering, and steps to pro- 
mote democracy, education and 
health care. 

Warren M. Christopher, the 
U.S. secretary of state, said 
there had bemi an “extraordi- 
nary degree erf economic and 
political cooperation” among 
the governments with a variety 
of traditional differences. 

Eduardo Frei, the president 
of Chile, said the fact nis coun- 
try would join NAFTA proved 
the Summit of the Americas 
produced tangible results. 

He said the benefits his coun- 
try would reap by joining 
NAFTA outweighed changes 
Chile would have to make in its 
“management style” to be in- 
cluded m the North American 
zone. 

“I believe this agreement will 
not only unleash historical 
profits for Chile but also for the 
world,” Mr. Fred said. 

Mr. Clinton echoed that sen- 
timent. 

“From the leaders of our 
hemisphere’s largest economies 
to the smallest, we believe the 
rewards wfll be great and very 
much worth the effort,” that lies 
ahead on the free-trade deal 
Mr. Qin ton said. 

After the summit meeting 
dosed, the president of Bolivia, 
Gonzalo Sanchez de Lozada, 
announced that his country 
would host a November 1996 
hemispheric meeting on “sus- 
tainable development,” or the 
pursuit of economic develop- 
ment in harmony with the envi- 
ronment. (AP, Knight-Ridder ) 





THE LINK BETWEEN THE PAST 
AND THE FUTURE 


Omega Constellation. 
kl8 kgold. 

'mk Swiss made since 1848. 


mat 


CURRENCY RATES 


Dec. 9 

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a: TobuyonePoaM b: Totxiv oner**** 
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Other DoUar 

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Brazil real US 
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fraec 1 J 3 » 13345 Bank (Brussels); Banco ‘^1 

^.NGBonb pmmiBced or Canada 

Aotaea France 

mil IMF tsom. omr data rram rm/mu 


Statement of ►SSSStJS 

Income miaioroolYan 

Net sales 2,213,884 

Cost of sales 1,556,842 

Income before taxes and minority 

Interests 41,761 

Income taxes 25,483 

Net income 6.793 

Net Income per share 2.1 1 (in Yen) 


Balance Sheet 

Assets 


~ 7 , . . _ , . ConsoOdatad Nat Sales 

{torftBpBrioBAprtl.WJ (emonhserKlng MsrdiSl 
to September 30, 1994) and Sept. 30} 

toftflllmolYen ^ 


J 190*S«pL 

.ISMMweh 


Le<- — HBSSapt. 

.1983 March 


(SeptemborSO, 1894) in Mbonsof Yen 


Liabilities and Shareholders' Equity 


Cash and cash equivalents 632,746 Bank loans and current portion of 


Notes and accounts receivable, 


long-term debt 941 ,328 


trade 1 ,036.236 Notes and accounts payable, trade .... 845.963 

Inventories 1 ,201 ,506 Other current liabilities 1 .082,658 


Other current assets 

Property, plant and equipment . 


... 393,933 Long-term liabilities 1,401,140 

.1,364,295 Minority interests 79,425 


Other assets 826,120 Shareholders* equity 1 ,104,322 


Total assets. 


.5,454,636 Total liabilities and 

shareholders’ equity 5^454,836 


In Tbuch with Tomorrow 

TOSHIBA 


Q 

OMEGA 

The sign of excellence 





Page 12 

NASDAQ NATIONAL MARKET 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, DECEMBER 12* 1994 L 


Consolidated trading for week I *"* 
ended Friday, Dec. 9. 


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Page 13 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 1994 


China Moves Secret Cold War Industries 


i;\- 


: th: 

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'■=arth - 

-SO baitS 

iiiSr- • ^ 


1 „ wasMsf 

States or the i?? United 

^-196fc -ZkSSSf' 
ndccatonSti 
^tEJ? 10 *® 01 Its strategic factories. 

War m 20 after World 

war tu railed to occur as Mao Zednni* 

bad predicted, some of the country’s too 
saentists and engineers are^JSckUng 

down from production lines in remote 
and caves to sleamin^d« 
Kkethis one in south-central Chinn 
iney are designing television sets fax 
{“dunes, satellite feedvers an“ pe“ 
Igs, the battery system for the next 
electnc car. They are also setting im 
S£J™* sending delegation w 

SThZ 01 ?* 1? ek i2 8 mvesl ®ent capital 
forthesehigh-todiziQlogy ventures. 

You know, there axe many thinas in 

SS“ manufacture* 5 

bo ^° s m the manufacture of auto- 
mobiles, said ZhuSenyuan, 48. a com- 
puter automation specialist at a military 
msmutenow heiping600 factories 
110055 Otinn convert armaments >»w»s to 
commercial production. 

But many of the factories are outdat- 
ed or redundant, and despite their relo- 
^oon to cities on the plains, they are far 
from potential markets as China tries to 
restructure its economy. 

Under Mao’s polity, hundreds of key 


were relocated in the 1960s 
ana 19 70s to remote canyons and caves 
m “orthwestera and southwestern Chi- 
na. The cost of the top-secret program 
was staggering. Barry Naughion, an 
economist at me University of Califor- 
nia at San Diego, has estimated that 
aunng the peak years China was spead- 

Many of the factories 
are outdated and despite 
tbeir relocation to cities 
on the plains they are far 
from potential markets. 


rag 40 percent to 50 percent of its na- 
tional investment resources under the 
so-called Third Line policy, and that it 
had sent hundreds of ihn m«nH«s of 
workers to the mountains, where they 
chiseled out caverns and t unn el s for rail- 
roads, transported machinery »nH erect- 
ed assembly lines. 

“It very substantially slowed down 
China’s economic growth and on some 
levels contributed to the collapse of cen- 
tral p l an n i n g," said Mr. Naughton, a 
specialist on China's economy who has 
conducted one of toe few studies on the 
Third Line and its impact. 

Beijing’s central planners “got so tan- 


gled up in directing resources to these 
remote sites that they never could com- 
plete these projects or make them eco- 
nomically viable,” he said during a re- 
cent visit to China. 

By the tone toe Third Line was com- 
pleted, Mao had died. 

"The decision by Mao to build the 
Third Line was a big mistake," said Hua 
Di, a rocket scientist who spent months 
living in Third line bases testing Chi- 
na’s first strategic nuclear missiles. He 
now lives in California. “We have wast- 
ed a lot of money by building this Third 
line,” which, he added, gave China little 
additional security. 

“If you have a rocket program, and a 
bomb or missile fails on just one of the 
many component factories, then you 
have no program,” Mr. Hua said. 

In its heyday, planners of the Third 
Line ordered steel mills, nudear weap- 
ons plants and huge truck assembly 
lines, first built in coastal provinces or 
near borders with toe Soviet Union, dis- 
assembled and transported over treach- 
erous mountain roads or paths to what 
Mao tooaght would be an impregnable 
“rear base,” or “third line of defense" to 
sustain a Chinese war effort. The “first” 
line was China’s coastal defenses; toe 
“second” line was a fallback position on 
toe central China plain. 

The consequences of toe program are 
still radiating into toe present because 
toe construction was so large in scale 


and took so k>n& 15 years in some cases, 
that it left China with an uneconomical 
and inefficient industrial architecture. 
Today, toe plants are still being disman- 
tled, abandoned or turned to other uses. 

“There is a major investment in this 
region,” said Cheu 23totiang, deputy di- 
rector of the Mianyang economic and 
planning commission, “but toe problem 
a that toe investment is spread out 
through canyons some distance from toe 
city. Our production and research bases 
are located in the mountains and acces- 
sible only over very difficult roads.” 

Even Mianyang is difficult to reach. 
The 100 LQomcters (60 miles) of win ding 
two-lane road from Chengdu, toe pro- 
vincial capital, can take four hours. 

Today, much of toe burden of finding 
employment for the Third Line work 
force has fallen on toe governments of 
inland provinces, whose economies are 
not as strong as those in toe coastal belt. 

Governor Xiao Yang of Sichuan 
Province said that while the prospects 
for toe best of toe Third Line factories 
were good, nothing seemed certain 
about the bulk of the rest. 

“The state of the Third Line indus- 
tries is that one-third of them are doing 
very well,” he said, “but another third 
are just breaking even and toe last third 
are in very bad shape.” 

With two- thirds of these industries at 
break-even levels or worse, their future 
very much depends on sustained high 
growth in China’s economy. 


The Week Ahead: World Economic Calendar, Dec. 12-16 


A seftactoto at (Ms Meat's teonortke art 
totodalemta, convert hr too mtama- 
fortiHonU Ttibuna by Stocaturp Stat- 
flWMns. 

Agte-Pwctffc 

• Dm. 11 Sjrdoty Aus&atai ratal 
tatm figtmc lor October. FtoracMC 24 
pareert gain. BuMing stars lor the juy. 

Saptembor Quarter. 

Eapactad mriM «te m* 

Syria* Money wpply tgraw lor Octo- 
ber. 

• Bn. 13 Tokyo MachMy orders 
for October. Steel production during No- 
vember. Bank «* Japan to release wftora- 
nte price index tor November. 
WsMnpMn Reserve Bank of Naur Zw- 
land to rate— bimuri report on mono- 
tray POfiey. Food prices tor H ovmbsr. 
•DM.14 Hoag Kong Government to 
suction two pieces of land In the N am 
Tenflortes eras. 

Tokyo Bankruptcies dunng November 
Massed by Tokyo Shako n aes er ch and 
Teftofcu Otoe Dank. 

Wslfcgton Labor com tntex tar Ju*r- 
Septambar quarter. 

• Dm. IB Sydney Wesipae- Mel- 
bourne Institute tos rttnfl economic index 


Prices: up 04 percent in month, up 74 
percent In year. Forecast tor output 
cnees: up 04 percent to month, up 24 
percent >fl yttr. 

Me November consumer prtce index: 
Forecast up 02 pram to month, up 1 4 
percent in year. 

Oeto November consumer price Man. 
Fbrecrat up 0.1 percent. 

WtorMwIm November unemployment. 
Forecast ui changed. 

Expected aomarieie Ms weak 

Parte October M3. Forecast up 03 per- 
cent. 




Ntwentoer emtaner price 
index. Forecast: up 24 percent in year. 
October producer price Index. October 
ratsfl sates volume: 

ftafctort October ratae sates. Forecast: 
down 04 percent West German October 
mt»R sales. F o recas t up 05 percent in 


e Dae. IS WHitogtow Department 
0 1 Agriculture expected to reteeae Wor- 
mstton on world coflee protection. 

0®0 

• Dm. IS WsaWnglnn N o vember 
producer price Max. November rataB 


Hoag Kong Gove rn ment to inue fob- 
tera figures tar the three months horn 
September through November. 

Tokyo Benkof Japan to retease Novem- 
ber money supply. 

•Dm. IS Tokyo Bank o( Japan Gov- 
ernor Vasufiht Mend's toe y e ar term 
ends. He w* be replaced by vssuo Mat- 
sushita. executive adviser of Sakura 
Bank. 


October industrial production. 

Forecast up 5.0 percant 

• Dm. 14 Boon Finance Minister 

'nwoWMgei » present updated 1895 led- 
enri budget 

Laedea November reran price Index. 
Forecast down 0.1 percent, up 24 per- 
cent in year. November unamptaymera. 
f orec ast down by 30,000. November sv- 
erege emngs. Forecast up 3.75 per- 
cent 

Paris Current account Forecast up 24 

M ie n Irenes. 


New York 

service re leases its wesMy smvsy of 
sanrasura Mae at US. department dis- 
count and chain stores, 
a Das. 14 WaaMegtan November 
consumer price Index. The Federal Re- 
serve reports November Industrie? pro- 
duction and capacity utilization. Thfrd- 
ouartar current account hntonm The 
Labor Department ceporra Nove mb er real 


• Dae. 18 Pmsfrif Three m on th 
unemployment. F or nrast down to 74 


Europte 


• Dam 11 

ducer price 


London Nov em ber pro- 
Fnracrat tor input 


November consumer price In- 
dex. F ore ca s t up 0.1 percant In month, 
up 21 percent in year. 

Leaden November reran sales. Fore- 
east: up 02 percent In month, up 3.1 
in year. 


O tta w a Department More sates report 
tor October. Winter 1994 perspectives on 
labor end Income report. 

• Dm. 1I PWtorts»hto ThePhitedeF 
pUa Federal Reserve rateematBroorShty 
survey ot economic activity lor December. 
W a s hin gton The Commerce Depart- 
ment reporta October business inven- 
tories and atees. November money eup- 
piy. The Labor Department reports InftH 
weekly state unem p toymant com p en sa - 
tton Insurance claims. 

• Dm. IB Wastringtoa November 
housing strata and buBtOng penotot 
Ottawa Cons um er pries tnttecc report tor 
November. Tram report tor October . 

Aao Alter, McMgan The IMvarsHy of 
Michigan releasee Its taato n h my con- 
sumer sentiment Index tor December. 


' f. r^'Eae 

• * JC t.;- 
-lit. 


>r Peace 


^ r_ 


. » 


•. : *■ 


- - 'i- 





z* m 

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>- V-- 







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- 


For Brave Investor, 
Former Soviet 
Bank Debt Beckons 


By Richard W. Stevenson 

New York Tbnes Service 

NEW YORK — It is hardly 
for the faint of heart But same 
traders say that the former So- 
viet Union’s S26 billion worth 
of commercial bank debt, 
which is trading on secondary 
markets for around 32 cents on 
the dollar, could prove a good 
bet for investors with the stom- 
ach to hold it for the long term. 

The loans, one of several 
classes of Russian debt that axe 
traded in Europe and the Unit- 
ed States, have been a volatile 
investment for several years 
and the coming months could 
bring more of toe same. 

But if Russia, which has tak- 
en responsibility for the Soviet 
Umazrs debts, can ftialm an 
agreement with its 600 commer- 
$ial bank Hflen to stretch out 
repi 


ue of the debt, which is mainly 
bought and sold by institutional 
investors, could surge. . 

The value of the bank debt 
has swung in the past 12 
months from, a high of around 
50 cents on the dollar down to 
half that and then back up 
above 40 cents in eariy October. 

That was just before the Rus- 
sian government announced an 
outline agreement with the 
bank consortium, led hy Deut- 
sche Bask AG, for areschednt- 
ing package that included a 
$500 million payment by Rus- 
sia for past-due interest to be 
made hy the end of this year. 

But^ when the ruble crashed in 
October and the Russian gov- 
ernment’s economic policy 
threatened to nm off course, the 
price of the debt began smiting 
again, a process that was accel- 
erated when President Boris N. 
Yeltsin named Oleg D. Davy- 
dov as ins new chief debt nego- 
tiator. 

In his previous job as trade 
minis ter, Mr. Davydov horrified 
the debt holders by suggesting 
that Russia should seek to have 


FED: Inflation Data Pose Threat 


Cortmoed from Page 19 
cent recovery, and data for Oo- 
Zr tober showed a SI 0-billion in- 
> crease in foreign bond jmr- 
chases, suggesting that capital 
has a g ain started to flow out of 
v Japan. „ . 

But Jim O'Neill at Swiss 
•Rank Coip. in London, warns 
. ' that the report is “highly mis- 

leading” because it includes 
Japanese purchases of Euroyen 
v bonds. “Japanese investors re- 
main remarkably loath to take 
" any foreign exchange risk,” he 
insists. „ . . 

Even Japanese bankers, who 
were lead managers in $850 mil- 

Bon of the $2J ttOHon worth of 


fixed-coupon Eurodollar bonds 
issued last week, acknowledge 
that it is premature to suggest 
Japanese investors are looking 
at foreign currency bonds. 

Argentina, which just raised 
IS bonon yen, is scheduled tins 
week to make its maiden entry 
into the Enrofranc market with 
the sale of 1 billion French 
francs of three-year notes. 

South Africa, which last week 
reentered the dollar market 
with a global offering of $750 
million of five-year notes, is ex- 
pected early next year to issue 
securities in Japan to raise 50 
UDion yen. 


BusinessWeek 




v 


** r ■ « 
■■■ . :•* zi" 


This week’s topics: 




o Cities Of The Future 

o Why Sweet Deal Are Going Sour In China 
o Economics: Clinton's New Team 

iinu, available at your newsstand! 


BuslnesswM* wwu»«e*« a&i 

14 n 4’Ouefcr, CH-1B06 iMsarnw W- 41-21-817-4411 gg| 

For sol^ipttons call UK 44-628-23431 Hong m S52-523-2TO p> 


SHORT COVER 


LCD: Goldstar Moves Into Market 


some or all of its loans forgiven. 

Mr. Davydov has since bark- 
tracked on his idea of canceling 
some of the debts, but in the 
markets the damage was al- 
ready done: The bank loans 
sank to around 28 cents on the 
dollar last month before re- 
bounding slightly. 

The price is now about 32 
cents and traders said it had 
remained firm at those levels on 
reports that there has been buy- 
ing from Russia. Traders inter- 
preted the Russian buying to 
mean that government insiders 
think finalizat io n of the deal is 
wi thin reach and are talcing po- 
sitions on expectations for the 
price to rise. 

“At these levels we have tend- 
ed to find that there are some 
players who will step in and buy 
as a long-term play,” said Bob 
McCarthy, the head of Eastern 
Europe trading at Morgan Gfexi- 
fefl in London. “They fed that 
eventually there will be a deaL” 

Few investors are taking any- 
thing for granted. The $500 mfl- 
Kon interest payment agreed to 
in October now is unHkeiy to be 
made by the end of the year. 
Mr. Davydov, although appar- 
ently eager to ease the fears of 
the worid’s bankers, has not yet 
revealed mnch about his negoti- 
ating position or how it might 
differ from that of his pnderes- 
sor, Alexander N. Sh okhin 

Traders said they expected 
Mr. Davydov to move relatively 
quickly to complete a repay- 
ment agreement. 

, “I hoove the Russians recog- 
nize that they need to get this 
behind them because they are 
starving for capital,” said Nich- 
olas Jordan, a trader at Chemi- 
cal Bank in London. “They rec- 
ognize that there’s a Hunt to 
how much capital will come 
into their country until they get 
some of tiie foreign debt prob- 
lems out of the way. 1 think it 
will be sooner rather than later, 
but there are still some substan- 
tial issues to be dealt with.” 


Investors Shun Oriental Offering 

HONG KONG (Bloomberg) — Oriental Metals (Holdings) 
said Sunday that its initial offering of shares was only 59.24 
percent subscribed, leaving the rest in the hands of underwriters. 

The company is a subsidiary of ONFEM Holdings Ltd., an 
investment company controlled by the state-owned Oiina Na- 
tional Nonferrous Metals Industry Crap. 

Concerns about the impact that hi gh inflaiinn and austerity 
measures introduced to control it will have on corporate ^arninpc 
have caused international investors to lose their interest in Chi- 
nese companies. 

Kmart Readying Flan to Col Jobs 

DETROIT (Bloomberg) — Kmart Corp. may announce as 
early as Monday the layoff of hundreds of workers at the compa- 
ny’s headquarters in Troy, Michigan, the Detroit News reported. 

The company confirmed that executives held malting * Satur- 
day and Sunday to try to deride how to cut as much as $600 
million next year from Kmart’s $8.5 billion budget. Joseph An ton- 
ini, the chairman of Kmart, said last month that some jobs would 
be cut as the company elimina ted redundant processes. 

China Vows to Expand Trade Plan 

BELTING (AFP) — China, in a bid to increase its chances of 
rejoining the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade this year, 
sad Sunday it would expand bidding for export quotas to enhance 
trade transparency and fairness. 

Tang Wei, an official with the Mhristiy of Foreign Trade and 
Economic Cooperation, said the bidding system, first introduced 
in February, “has reaped initial success in curbing freewheeling 
‘ wars that often involve China in international dumping 
ites,” the China Daily’s Business Weekly repeated. 


Coetinoed from Page 11 

a cheap player,” said one Gold- 
star manager 

Indeed, with the South Kore- 
an companies imprating the 
vast majority of their produc- 
tion equipment and materials 
from Japan, there is virtually no 
chance of beating the Japanese 
on production cost But they 
hope that strong demand for 
LCDs will minimrrr! the dis- 
counts they must offer to win 
business from Apple Computer 
In<t, Compaq Computer Corp. 
and other major assemblers, 
mostly American, that they are 
courting. 

The aggressive move into the 
market by the South Koreans 
could help to lower prices for 
notebook computers. The 
wholesale price for 10-inch (2.6- 
centimeter) color active-matrix 
screens will fall from about 
$1,200 at the be ginning of 1995 
to $900 by the end of the year, 
according to Shi Seung Wood, 
Samsung’s senior sales manager 
for LCDs. 

But it remains unknown how 
quickly the South Koreans will 
be able to increase their yields 
— the percentage of screens 
that crane off the production 
Hne without any defects. In pi- 
lot production, executives say 
their yields are already compa-- 
table to the Japanese, but ana- 


lysts say they may encounter 
unforeseen problems in mass 
production. 

More da unting , there is the 
possibility that other types of 
color displays that are ampler 
and cheaper to produce will be- 
come dominant, male 
ing LCDs attractive only for the 
most expensive notebook com- 
puters. 

Both Goldstar and Samsung 
are investing about 500 billion 
won ($625 mQtion) over several 
years to equip new LCD fabri- 
cation plants outside Seoul. 
Goldstar win make screens for 
notebook computers as well as 
smaller panels for car naviga- 
tion, audio-visual and other 
equipment. 

Samsung aims to concentrate 
on the top end of the market It 
plans to mass-produce 10-incb 
screens next February and 
boost output to as many as 
60,000 units a month by the end 
of the year. Inter it will diversi- 
fy into othra types of screens, 
a imi ng to grab 10 percent of a 
global active-matrix LCD mar- 
ket it values at $16 bfltion in the 
year 2000. 

“We intend to be among the 
world’s top 5 suppliers by the 
year 2000,” Mr. Shj said. “Our 
minimum target for market 
share is 10 percent” 


CALL FOR TENDERS 

On behalf of the Municipality of Budapest/H/ The Budapest Metropolitan 
Property Management Center Co. Ltd. 
hereby invites tenders to purchase 
the exclusive property of the Municipality of Budapest 
in the fifth district of Budapest, at 12 Kaxolyi Mihaly Street 


The four storey /plus basement/palace was built in 1866 and designed 
by Mikl6s Ybl, the most significant Hungarian architect of the period. 

The aim of the tender is to choose the new owner of this historical building 
in the heart of downtown Budapest, 

who will renovate it while preserving its original architectural character. 


January] 

at the non-refundable price of 30,000 HUF + 25% VAT, 

Budapest Metropolitan Property Management Center Co. Ltd., 

23-27 Vdci dt, XII floor, Budapest XIII, H-1134 Hungary 
Phone/Fax: / 36-1 / 120-227 8, 120-1278 

Tenders must be received before 14:00 p.m. January 20, 1995 

The opening of tenders: January 24. 1995, 10:00 a.m. 

A co mmi ttee designated by the present owner will preliminarily evaluate tenders. 
The fiTial decision ought to be made by February 28, 1995, 
by the General Assembly of the Municipality or Budapest. 

Hungarian law requires that we notify bidders that the inviter of bids bos foreign trade rights. 


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CHIP: Taiwan Gamble Pays Off 

Contipoed from Page 11 


Mr. Chang said. CRTs are cath- 
ode ray tubes. 

Originallybisjob was to help 
steer a government-backed re- 
search and development effort 
toward commercial success. But 
seeing an eoarmoos opportuni- 
ty. Mr. Chang convinced the 
Taiwan government and Dutch 
electronics giant Philips Elec- 
tronics NV to set up the world’s 
first independent chip foundry. 

“I knew what it took to do a 
fab wdl,” said Mr. Chang, in 
the industry parlance for a chip- 
making factory. “And I thought 
Taiwan possessed many of 
those requirements.” 

In seven'years, that business, 
TSMC, has grown and is fore- 
cast to make a 82 bfltion Taiwan 
dollar ($311 mQtion) profit 
year and 13.3 bilHon Taiwan 
dollars in 1995, according to HG 
Asia Securities Taiwan Ltd. 
TSMC restricts its business to 
making mo$tfy logic drips under 
contract to other companies. 


World-class engineering, low 
salaries fra highly trained tech- 
nicians and economies of scale 
have combined to make TSMC 
the largest “pure foundry” busi- 
ness in the world with an esti- 
mated 12.6 percent global mar- 
ket share. 

“Taiwan Semiconductor rep- 
resents an unparalleled corpo- 
rate success stray,” said Jona- 
than Ross, bead of HG Aria 
Taiwan, of a business started 
with a $46 million initial invest- 
ment that has allowed Taiwan- 
ese chip design booses to lessen 
their dependence on foreign 
manufacturer 

To remain ahead of the pack, 
TSMC win spend between $300 
and $500 mution a year over the 
next three years in a bid to dou- 
ble capacity. 

With still more expansion in 
mind, TSMC has taken a 25 
percent stake in another ITRI 
spin-off, Taiwan Sub-Micron 
Laboratories, the country’s 
most advanced semiconductor 
facility. 


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'Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, DECEMBEHJV99* 


SPO NSO U I D S K(..*T f o \ 



S PON SO R El) SECTION 


Saudi 


Coming to Terms 
With Economic Reality 


PRIVATIZATION 

INDUSTRY 

EXPORTS 



A 



Despite criticism, Saudi Arabia maintains its economic strength. 


Significant changes are taking place 
in both the public and private sectors as 
the government, strapped for cash over 
the past two years, tries to come to 
terms with its present economic posi- 
tion. 

The situation is a result of several 
factors: the Gulf War's exceptional 
costs, an estimated $77 billion, of 
which more than half was paid by Sau- 
di Arabia; a slump in world oil prices; 
and an expected overall aggregate cur- 
rent-account deficit in 1991-1996 of 
$96 billion, according to International 
Monetary Fund estimates 

The situation is exacerbated by the 
substantial defense spending in the past 
four years, amounting to well over $30 
billion, much of it linked to offset pro- 
grams with Lhe United States, Britain 
and France. Over the past four years, 
the kingdom has gone to the interna- 
tional banking system to borrow a total 
of $7 billion. Banking sources suggest 
farther borrowings may be needed in 
the short term. 


Saudi Arabia holds more than 25 per- 
cent of all global oil reserves. 

Attempts to diversify the economy, 
increase the added value of down- 
stream petrochemical products and im- 
prove the manufacturing and agricul- 
tural export base are now bearing re- 
sults. Non-oil exports have risen from 
$6 billion in 1987 to $8.4 billion in 
1992, according to an analysis by the 
Abu Dhabi-based Arab Monetary 
Fund. 


Responding to criticism 
International criticism of Saudi Ara- 
bia's overall economic position follow- 
ing visits by International Monetary 
Fund teams and U.S. Treasury Secre- 
tary Lloyd Bensen have been pushed 
aside by King Fahd, Ibn Abudl-Aziz, 
the Custodian of the Two Holy 
Mosques and ruler of Saudi Arabia. 

In a recent broadcast, he insisted that 
the economy was still strong and that 
he would keep his pledge to privatize 
important state-owned sectors. 'There 
have been a lot of harmful campaigns 
against our economy,” he said. “But 
thank God, our economy is stilt strong, 
and we do not have major problems. 
We have and are still spending billions 
of dollars in subsidies to housing and 
farming and in loans and grants to Arab 
and other countries ” 


Moves to attract capital 
Earlier this year, King Fahd told a 
Riyad University graduation audience 
that the private sector now contributed 
35 percent of the kingdom’s gross do- 
mestic product. “The government in- 
tends to attract national capital into its 
productive institutions,” King Fahd 
added. 

He envisaged a move that would en- 
able private investors to buy into cer- 
tain state entities, in which the govern-, 
ment would retain only a minority in- 
terest. 

A package of new incentives for pri- 
vate investors has been announced in 
the forthcoming Five-Year Plan in or- 
der to attract a greater return of capital 
invested overseas. The plan is also 
seeking more foreign investment, in the 
forms of both cash and transfer of tech- 
nology. It has always been an objective 
of the offset programs to encourage de- 
fense contractors to provide the basis 
for new high-tech industries. 


Role for private sector 
For the past decade, the government 
has been urging the private sector to 
play a greater role in the development 


of die kingdom, particularly in the pub- 
lic sector. Saudi Arabia is now the 


world’s largest oil producer. With pro- 
duction of more than 8 million barrels a 
day, it has overtaken the former Soviet 
Union oil producers. Oil revenues are 
expected to fall to about $38 billion this 
year. While bankers may be expressing 
doubts about the kingdom’s current fi- 
nancial position, most analysts point 
out that it has to be remembered that 


‘Massive excess liquidity' 

While public finances may be in disar- 
ray, there is no shortage of private 
funds in the banking system. Henry 
Azzarru chief economist of the Nation- 
al Commercial Bank, said at the IHT 
Oil and Money Conference in London 
last October “There is massive excess 
liquidity in the Saudi financial system. 
Most of it ends up in interbank deposits 
overseas. These funds can be absorbed 
in the kingdom and used by the private 
sector - and the government, to finance 
its deficit." Other bankers in the king- 
dom suggest that excess liquidity 
amounts to around $30 billion to $40 
billion. According to the Saudi Arabian 
Monetary Agency (SAMA), total bank 




deposits at the end of 1 993 stood at 1 83 
million riyals ($49 million), compared 


million riyals ($49 million), compared 
with 143 million riyals at the end of 
1990. 

Lack of suitable financial instru- 


Contuiued on page 15 



The Ongoing Debate 
Over Privatization 


Will Saudia, Sabic and other state entities soon open to private investment? * 


(Continued diversification of the 
kingdom’s economy and greater in- 
volvement by the private sector are pri- 
orities in the sixth Five-Year Plan 
(1995-2000), which takes effect next 


January. Although weaker oil prices 
have accelerated moves to sell off 


some state entities, some confusion still 
exists over which companies or indus- 
tries will be available for private in- 
vestment 

“We will sell some successful gov- 
ernment projects to nationals,” said 
King Fahd in a Middle Hast Broadcast- 
ing Center television interview this 
summer. Tt is time for the citizens to 
participate in some projects like 
telecommunications, water, electricity 
and other sectors." 


ty as well as chairman of Sabic, said 
that tbs government would not neces- 
sarily maintain a stake in The petro- 
chemical sector, but final decisions 
were still awaited- 

The new plan, which caHs for more 
private investment, does not exclilde ' 
foreign sources. Thai; ' will, however, - 
probably be restrictions' on- fid3 foreign 
ownership, especially in 1 what art re- 
garded as strategic industries - avia- 
tion, oil and petrochemicals, 7 power 


generation' and the media. The' pre- 
ferred option would be for mdre' joint 
ventures between the foreign and local 
investor or investors. : - - J - ; 


Giant state entities 
The government has also stated that 
public bodies for privatization might 
include Saudia, the national carrier, 
and some of the electricity-generating 
companies. 

There is uncertainty about whether 
the giant state entity, Saudi Basic In- 
dustries Corporation, wiD be open to 
private investment; Sabic has 18 
world-class plants, mainly in the petro- 
chemical sector. 

Any investment in Saudia, which has 
one of the world’s biggest jet fleets and 
is about to undergo a major fleet re- 
newal would most likely be limited to 
nationals of Saudi Arabia and possibly 
Gulf Cooperation Council country na- 
tionals. 

Some analysts believe it might be 
possible that some utility services, like 
water and power, may be let on a build- 
operaie-and- transfer system if any im- 
provements or extensions are made un- 
der the new Five-Year Plan. An ideal 
candidate for BOT would be AT&T’s 
$4 billion nationwide telecommunica- 
tions project 


Tftrgpfm g flight ra qiital 

The current debate within government 
circles, is exactly how fee kingdom can 
attract the billions of dollars of flight 
capital back into Saudi Arabia by 8 intro* 
during the new incentives. 

“There is no doubt that all these mea- 
sures by the government will open up a 
vast scope for foreign investors to enter 
joint projects within the private sector,” 
comments a recent study . by the Arab 
Corporation for Investment Guarantee, 
which is based in Kuwait. Accordingto 
AC1G, total foreign investment ip .the 
kingdom at the end of last year was 
$6.3 billion in 360 joint ventures, 
which had a total capitalization of 
$14.74 billion. The joint- venture com- 
panies also included banks. 


Mixed messages 

There have been many mixed signals 
this year about the extent and imple- 
mentation of privatization and exactly 
how it will be carried out 
Abdel-Aziz Al-Zamil, Saudi Ara- 
bia’s minister of industry and electrici- 


Private-sector Investment 
T expect privatization to be successful, - 
given the high liquidity in the local , 
market and the huge resources of the ; 
private sector internally and. abroad;” 
says Yusuf Khalifa, an economics pro- , 
fessor at Emirates University in foe ' 
United Arab Emirates. 

“This will open the door for the es- . 
tablishmem of new companies, which . 
will attract national and foreign invest- 
ment,” he adds. 

One caveat highlighted by ACIG, - . 
however, is the ruling that Saadis must 
maintain a 5 1 percent holding, which it [ 
says has dissuaded potential major in- ‘ 
vestors from the United States, Japan . 
and other industrial powers. 

L.V. 


From the National Commercial Bank cer^lnd<mntomJeekbh(top)tos 
tuckprodueUon tine and a nmrpodostrian district in Riy^ (bottom), the 
kingdom offers evidence of a \rtgorousarKl diversified economy. 


“Saudi Arabia" 

was produced in Us entirety by the Advertising Department of the international Herald Tribune. 
Writers: John Roberts Is based in Scotland. Lee Voysey Is based in London. 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBI NE, MONDAY. DECEMBER 12, 1994 


Page 15 


Sponsored section 


S A 


u 


a q 

i -t A 


I A 


Offset Programs 
Gain Ground 

Progress is made on the three main offset programs. 


in addition to advances in 
the main offset programs - 
involving the United States, 
Britain and France - there 
are further possible develop- 
ments in counter-trade as 
Saudi Arabia, with ii s fi- 
nances under pressure, ex- 
plores various options to 
meet projected aircraft and 
defense deals. Offset and 
counter-trade agreements 
nave resulted in facilities 
and equipment such as giant 
underground oil-storage 
tanks blasted out of solid 
rock, new jetliners, a phar- 
maceutical factory, a sugar 
refinery, the manufacture of 
avionics components and 
telecommunications equip- 
ment. Approximately $5 
million a day, raised from 
part of the British offset pro- 
gram, is going toward re- 
building and developing the 
Two Holy Mosques at Mak- 
ka and Medina, 

Ofl swaps 

Swapping oil for goods and 
services is not new to the 
kingdom. In 1984, an agree- 
ment was made for a swap 
of oil for 10 Boeing 747s, 
and this idea was later ex- 
tended to defense contracts. 
Industry sources suggest that 
the same principle may be 
extended to current negotia- 


tions oyer the purchase of up 
to 80 jetliners from Boeing 
and McDonnell Douglas to 
re-equip Saudia's fleet. 

An important change is 
that civil contractors with 
major orders (such as 
AT&T s 54 billion telecom- 
munications project) are 
now encouraged to provide 
offset programs. So far, this 
is not mandatory for the civil 
sector, as it has in the United 
Arab Emirates for contracts 
worth over $10 million. 

Surveying the Held 
Under the original $4 billion 
U.S. Peaceshseld defense 
program, contractors had to 
reinvest 35 percent of the 
contract value in the king- 
dom in the form of new joint 
ventures and transfer of 
technology. Since 1990, 
U.S. defense sales have 
climbed to 530 billion, about 
the same as the United 
Stales' own defense budget. 

The terms of Britain's Al- 
Yamamah program were 
different, as Lhe agreement 
was signed on a “best-ef- 
forts" basis to reinvest 25 
percent of an ongoing pro- 
gram worth many billions of 
dollars. The French Sawari 
1 1 program, which calls for 
a 35 percent reinvestment, 
has lagged behind the U.S. 



Diversifying 
The Economy 

The kingdom focuses on non-oil exports . 


A Sauttta 737 undergoing maintenance at Al Satem Aircraft Company's facility at Riyadh. ASAC is part of the U.S. Peaceshiekt program. 


and British programs. After 
lapsing, it has just been re- 
vised following the Novenv- 
ber agreement for a $3.6 bil- 
lion deal to supply two air- 
defense frigates, shore bases 
and training programs. 
Thomson-CSF and the Sau- 
di group Shairco are in- 
volved in a $48 million 
gold-refining project of old 
mine tailings. 

Hundreds of proposals 
have been examined by the 
British Offset Office. Less 


than two dozen have formal 
approval, and only four have 
started. The most outstand- 
ing one is a joint venture by 
Glaxo, one of the world’s 
largest pharmaceutical com- 
panies. whose new factoiy at 
Jeddah is about to go into 
production. Booker Tate and 
Savola. a Jeddah-based edi- 
blc-oi 1-processing company, 
arc building a sugar refinery; 
British Aerospace and 
Kanoo have set up the Saudi 
Development and Training 


Center. BAe has a share- 
holding in the Aircraft Ac- 
cessories and Components 
Company. Rolls-Royce. 
General Electric and Pratt & 
Witney have joined with 
Saudia to set up the Middle 
East Propulsion Company, 
which is now going ahead 
after several years' delay. 

In 1991, Hughes Aircraft 
Systems took over from 
Boeing to finish the 
Peace&hield 1 1 project. Its 
offset proposals include 


manufacturing satellite- 
communications systems, 
auto parts and advanced 
software development. 

The first civil offset pro- 
gram is being proposed by 
AT&T, which is interested 
in high-tech joint ventures 
and training programs with 
at least three leading Saudi 
companies - Advanced 
Electronics Co.. Internation- 
al Systems Engineering and 
the Saudi Cable Company. 


Coming to Terms With Reality 


Continued from page 14 

ments has led to consider- 
able interest in Saudi Ara- 
bia’s stock market, which 
has seen some frenetic activ- 
ity in the past two years fol- 
lowing a number of flota- 
tions said new issues. These 
have been oversubscribed 
many times. In the case of 
Saudi British Bank, the offer 
was oversubscribed 26 
times. 

Saudi Arabia has a popu- 
lation of some 12.6 million 


(exact figures vary as details 
of the official 1992 census 
have not been published). 
About 60 percent of the in- 
habitants are under the age 
of 17. Combined with a very 
high population growth rate 
of 3.7 percent, job creation 
has become a major factor in 
determining economic and 
social policies. About 
100,000 Saudis enter the job 
market annually. 

In addition, many highly 
skilled and educated young 
Saudis are being tempted 


away from “safe" jobs in 
government service (by far 
the biggest employer) into 
the expanding private sector, 
which offers better career 
prospects and higher 
salaries. 

This year has seen some 
$10 billion worth of new 
contracts between the king- 
dom and three U.S. compa- 
nies - Boeing and McDon- 
nell Douglas ($6 billion) 
and AT&T ($4 billion) - for 
new jetliners and internal 
telecommunications- These 


orders reaffirm the King- 
dom's commitment to its 
biggest trading partner, even 
if the question of payments 
has yet to be finalized. In 
the final analysis, however, 
big oil does mean big mon- 
ey. 

“Every country has its ups 
and downs, and we are no 
different." says a leading 
Saudi oil man. “We just 
have to come to terms with 
reality and forget the boom 
days of the late 1970s." 

Lee Voysey 


& tnston} : ■ • • .7: 7>/\ -7 

exports .; < ! 

imports . ■ . 7 "7^^ 

•.Met Sendees. ■ '■ ■■ 7 % v- '^^,924 y 

.Trcrisfers ; ■ ■ ” 

Cu«ent Abbairtf /. < 


“A 

TX country with a diver- 
sified economy is a stronger 
economy. Our industrial ob- 
jective is to expand and di- 
versify the production base, 
develop non-oil income 
sources and give the king- 
dom a greater degree of self- 
sufficiency." Abdul-Aziz 
AJ-Zamil, minister of indus- 
try and electricity, declared 
to a group of investors in 
London. 

During a visit to Japan last 
month, he carried proposals 
for more than 30 joint ven- 
tures and urged the Japanese 
private sector to provide 
more investment and techni- 
cal assistance. 

Diverse range of exports 
While self-sufficiency was 
the primary objective, the 
emphasis today is on devel- 
oping more non-oil exports. 
There is now a wide range of 
products, including down- 
stream petrochemicals, de- 
rivatives and semi-manufac- 
tures. building iron, tiles and 
other ceramics, electric ca- 
bles. pharmaceuticals and 
medical supplies, cans and 
bottles, air-conditioners, ma- 
chinery and electrical appli- 
ances. processed foods and 
edible oils, flowers, ftuit and 
vegetables, chickens, eggs 
and dairy products. 

Wheat harvest down 
Until this year, wheat, which 
is heavily subsidized, had 
been an important export. 
The harvest this past season, 
however, is estimated to be 
1 .8 million metric tons, only 
sufficient to meet domestic 
demand. 

A company formed re- 
cently under tire U.S. offset 
program. Advanced Elec- 
tronics Co. of Riyadh, is 
even manufacturing and ex- 

for the Lockheed Fort Worth 
Co.’s F-16 Fighting Falcon 
jets. 

According to Mr. Zamii, 


at the end of 1992 there were 
445 companies in the king- 
dom. whose annual exports 
totaled more than 52 billion. 
Total industrial-production 
sales amounted to 5 10 bil- 
lion. 

Manufacturing op by 10% 
Henry Azzam. chief econo- 
mist of the National Com- 
mercial Bank, says that 
manufacturing, which ac- 
counts for 7 percent of Saudi 
Arabia's gross domestic 
product, grew by IQ percent 
in 1993. 

This growth in manufac- 
turing was a consequence of 
a sharp rise in the Saudi Ba- 
sic Industries Corporation's 
production, (o 14 million 
metric tons. 

Sabic is the latest single 
non-oil exporter in Saudi 
Arabia. For the first nine 
months of this year, sales 
revenues rose to 52.6 billion, 
from $1.9 billion last year. It 
exports mainly petrochemi- 
cals to more than 76 coun- 
tries. 

Positive outlook for 1994 
Mr. Azzam believes there 
is a positive outlook for 
manufacturing. He is confi- 
dent that export-oriented 
companies will have done 
quite well by the end of the 
year. 

“Petrochemicals, plastics, 
cables and metal products 
will have benefited from 
better growth prospects in 
the major export markets of 
the world,” he says. 

On the domestic side, Mr. 
Azzam adds, several indus- 
tries were benefiting from a 
surge in consumer demand 
These industrial sectors in- 
clude food and beverages, 
which account for 17 per- 
cent of the total number of 
Saudi factories (2,036). Fur- 
niture and light consumer 
products were also doing 
well. 

L.V. 


We’re proud to be a part of 
Saudi Arabia’s digital vision 
of the 21st century. 


The Saudi Arabian government and the Ministry of Post, 
Telegraph and Telephone recently commissioned AT&T and Bell 
Laboratories to implement a world-class digital communications 
networic 

As it is phased in over the next seven years, this network will 
add new communications capabilities geared for success in the 21st 
century, vastly enhancing Saudi Arabia’s existing, highly advanced 
system with 1.5 million next-generation digital lines and 200,000 GSM 
(cellular) lines. 

In fact, new switching, transmission, outside plant, 
operational support systems and mobile telephones will virtually 
double the capacity of the Kingdom's current communications 

network. 

Which means that twice as many people in Saudi Arabia 
will be able to do all those things that only advanced data 
communications can empower them to do. So they can woik faster, 
smarter and more cost-effidently than ever before. 

This is the largest single telecommunications project ever 
undertaken outside the United States. We’re proud to be a part of it. 





Today, Our Flag Flies More 
Proudly Than Ever Before. 


Since its establishment back in 1%8, the Petromin 
Lubricating Oil Company (Petrolube) has been the 
flagship of the Saudi lubricating oils industry. From the 
very beginning we set ourselves many goals... to strive for 
perfection in everything we do. The challenges were 
many, the achievements even more. • The first Saudi 
Arabian company to be established in the Kingdom to 
produce and market lubricating oils and greases. •The 
first and only Saudi company to 
produce and market, both locally « 
and intemationaly, lubricating oils __ 

and greases under a proud and 
distinctly Saudi brand name - i 


second to none in the Middle East • The Jirsf lubricants 
company to be awarded the SASO “Quality Mark". •The 
first ana only company in Saudi Arabia to produce the 
most highly advanced motor oil in the world— ULTRA 
7-API/SH.»The first Saudi company to blend and produce 
lubes and grease products for major and independent oil 
companies. • The first Saudi lube company to market its 
products in over 35 countries around the world. 


to produce practically all the 
advanced range of lubes and greases 
used in Saudi Arabia, with a capacity 



Now Petrolube has become the first 
Saudi Arabian company to be 
awarded the ‘ISO 9002* certificate 
for its three plants and its sales 
offices in the Kingdom, all at the 

DAfrn It ih& “® e Kme * 1116 k* lest achievement in 
• V flv/u vt reaching our goals that we have set 


1 -$■ P.O.B 0 X 1432, Jeddah 21431, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, Tel. 681-3333, Tlx. 601675 PFTLUB SJ. Fax. 661-3322 





Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, DECEMBER 12,. 1994 



SAUDI 


ARABIA 


Saudi Aramco Targets Capacity and Quality 

The world's largest oil company produces 8.1 million barrels a day, and 75 percent of the kingdom has yet to be explored. 

Industry sources report that million barrels a day. To however, theaveragodai^ Aonnhiqtab-M- 


Industry sources report that million barrels a day. To however, the average daily 
Saudi Aramco' s maximum keep within the guidelines of crude-oil output : for ^the fa 
sustainable crude-oil output the Organization of Petroie- nine mon ths >f year was 
capacity is now just over 10 um Exporting Countries, 8.1 million barrels aday. 



Belt tightening 
Saudi Aramco, now the 
world’s largest oil company, 
is the result of a merger in 
June 1993 with Samarec, the 
marketing and refining orga- 
nization. Developments are 
ahead of schedule, but some 
projects - notably the up- 
grading of the major export 
refinery at Ras Tanura - 
have been scaled back or 
postponed due to the belt- 
tightening of the overall 
economy. 


Sabic’s Sadat ethylene plant, one of the latest ethylene projects In 
the world. 


$15 billion slated 
The original capital-expen- 
diture program before last 
year’s merger was about $40 
billion. This has been 
slashed to $15 billion pend- 
ing a complete revaluation 
of the program. 

Nevertheless, prospecting 
and development work on 
new fields in the central re- 
gion and southeast are con- 
tinuing as more than 75 per- 
cent of the kingdom has not 
yet been explored. 

In the export field, Saudi 


Aramco is trying to capital- 
ize on the growing demand 
from the Far East Asia and 
Australia how account for 
52 percent of crude exports; 
North America accounts for 
24 percent and Europe, 20 
percent The remainder goes 
to South America and 
Africa. 

In recent years, Saudi 
Aramco has been trying to 
develop a more integrated 
system for crude oil and gas 
supplies and refining by es- 
tablishing or buying iato 
overseas downstream opera- 
tions. These include a pres- 
ence in the United States, 
Western Europe and East 
Asia. 

Its objective is to increase 
refining capacity and quality 
of wellhead production to 
within its own capability ei- 
ther at home or abroad. Cur- 
rent domestic refining ca- 
pacity is 1.7 million barrels a 
day, including 30,000 bar- 
rels a day from the Arabian 
Oil Company’s refinery in 
die neutral zone shared with 
Kuwait. 


few years has been the 
growth of the private sector 
in oil exploration and down- 
stream activities - a David 
and Goliath situation. The 
most active company is 
Nimr Petroleum Corpora- 
tion; its principal sharehold- 
er is the Bin Mahfouz fami- 
ly, which has the controlling 
interest in National Com- 
mercial Bank. Last year, 
Nimr was successfully 
pumping small quantities of 
crude from a Yemen conces- 
sion, which it won in the 
face of stiff international 
competition from 12 other 
groups in 1991. Nimr is also 
active in Romania, Malta 
and tbe Russian North P&cif- 



!piO> 


■t-'l'K- 

ii‘‘ 


David and Goliath 
One of die most interesting 
developments in the past 


Another Jeddah-based 
company. Meridian Interna- 
tional (Khalid Alireza and a 
U.S. group) has attempted to 
begin operations in some of 
the Central Asian Republics, 
formerly part of tbe Soviet 
Union. 

In the summer of 1992, 
Meridian proposed a $20 
million investment to devel- 
op oil resources with 
Uzbekneft in a counter-trade 
venture. 

L,V. 


Petrolube Awarded 
ISO 9002 Certificate 


" Many challenges , but even more achievements, " says Petrolube 's chief. 


Industrial Jewel: Saudi Basic Industries Corp. 


Thanks to increased production and marketing. Sabic’s profits rose by 76 percent in the first nine months of this year. 


TT he jewel in the crown of 
the kingdom's industrial de- 
velopment is the Saudi Basic 
Industries Corporation, 
which may be open to in- 
creased private investment 
from home - and abroad. 

Last September, Abdul- 
Aziz A1 Zamil, minister of 
industry and electricity and 
Sabic chairman, made it 
clear that the government 
would not insist on being in- 
volved in any future petro- 
chemical-plant investments, 
provided the new company 
bought its raw materials lo- 
cally. But he also said that 


Sabic would continue to in- 
vest in new petrochemical 
projects or in the expansion 
of existing ones. By the end 
of next year, it is expected to 
raise $4 billion to finance 
new expansion plans. 

At the end of the first nine 
months of this year. Sabic's 
profits jumped 76 percent, to 
$622 million, compared 
with the same period in 
1993. Last year, annual prof- 
its amounted to $564.4 mil- 
lion. Total production in- 
creased by 9 percent, to 17 
million metric tons. Produc- 
tion for the first nine months 


of this year was 14 million 
metric tons. 


Supplies at short notice 
Commenting on the dramat- 
ic improvement in Sabic's 


f terformance this year, 
brahim A. Ibn Salamah, 


Ibrahim A. Ibn Salamah, 
vice chairman and managing 
director, says: ‘The trend of 
declining profits in recent 
years is now being re- 
versed." He attributed this to 
the rise in production and 
marketing, with a gradual 
but steady recovery of prices 
in the global petrochemicals 
market. Sabic sells its prod- 


ucts to more than 70 coun- 
tries; it has 15 marketing of- 
fices and storage facilities 
worldwide. This enables it to 
supply basic chemical raw 
materials to its customers at 
very short notice. 

Sabic's manufacturing 
hub is the industrial city of 
Jubail, where 12 of its IS 
plants are based, including a 
steelworks. A 1 3th plant is 
nearing completion. The 
corporation is one of the 
only petrochemical groups 
in the world to manufacture 
all five basic thermoplastics. 
It also has investments in 


two petrochemical plants in 
Bahrain, whose products it 
now markets, and the Alu- 
minium Bahrain smelter. 

Last year, it paid its share- 
holders I billion riyals ($267 
million) in dividends. At 
present, Saudi nationals and 
GCC citizens own 30 per- 
cent of the shareholding; the 
rest is held by the govern- 
ment. Following various 
(and at times conflicting) an- 
nouncements, there has been 
speculation that 75 percent 
of the share capital will be 
open to private investment. 

L.V. 


V^ommenting on some of tbe changes 
and developments taking place in Saudi 
industries, HE Ahmed M. Alkhereiji - 
chairman, president and chief executive 
officer of Petrolube - says that more and 
more companies in the kingdom are now 
pursuing the need for quality rather than 
quantity as consumers become more de- 
manding and the market more competi- 
tive. 

Established 26 years ago, Petrolube 
has now become the first Saudi Arabian 
company to be awarded the International 
Standards Organization’s ISO 9002 cer- 
tificate on its first attempt. The award 
was for its three lube oil plants and the 
company’s sales offices throughout the 
kingdom. 


now provide the kingdom with two- 
thirds of its lubricating and grease re- 
quirements. which are marketed under 
flie Petromin Oils brand name. Petrolube 
also produces products for other multina- 
tional oD brands, which are marketed in 
Saudi Arabia in healthy competition with 
Petromin Oils. 


#* 


v '- 


Aiming for perfection 
“From the very beginning, we set our- 
selves many gtxtis, and we strive for per- 
fection in everything we do.” says Mr. 
Alkhereiji. Being awarded the ISO cer- 
tificate, he adds/was “the latest achieve- 
ment in reaching the goals we had set” 
Petrolube is a joint-venture company 
between Petromin (71 percent) and Mo- 
bil (29 percent). It has a designed blend- 
ing capacity at its three plants of more 
than 6 million barrels a year. Petrolube’ s 
blending plants were one of the king- 
dom’s first downstream sectors. They 


More than 30 countries 
Over the years, Petrolube has built a rep- 
utation for providing quality products. 
Faced with saturation of the domestic 
market, it began looking outside the 
kingdom for export opportunities in the 
late 1980s. Today, Petrolube exports to 
more than 30 countries and has overseas 
blending operations in Egypt, Rotterdam, 
Pakistan and Malaysia. 

Last year, a Petrolube sister company, 
the Petromin Lubricating Oil Refining 
Company (Luberef), produced 1.9 mil- 
lion barrels of base oils. Another 300,000 
barrels of oils were imported, making a 
total of 23 million barrels for domestic 
consumption. Total production was di- 
vided between Petrolube (1.2 million 
barrels), a Shell joint-venture blending 
plant (700,000 barrels a year) and die lo- 
cal and privately owned Gulf Oil Trading 
Company's Yanbu refinery (400,000 
barrels). 

L.V. 


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-11 


For nearly half a century, E.A. Juffali & 
Brothers Co. has been a major partner in 
the construction and development of the 
Kingdom of Saudi Arabia by introducing 
new products, innovative services and 
advanced technologies. 

Now in the 1990's r E.A. Juffali & Brothers 
continues its mission by broadening 
markets, training Saudi youth, and 
providing quality goods and services. 
Established in 1946, Juffali Jed the private 
sector in participating in the building of 


Saudi Arabia's infrastructure. Beginning 
with electric power utilities, Juffali's 
activities extended into telecommuni- 
cations, transportation, air-conditioning, 
and other products and services. 

These undertakings enhanced Saudi 
Arabia's economic base and substantially 


improved the economic life and prosperity 
of its people. Today, activities of the Juffali 
Group, include manufacturing, engineering, 
electronics, construction, distribution, and 
services. 



E.A. Juffali & Brothers 


•, 

1 ^ , 


Corporate Office Bustttng 


Corporate Office: P.0 Box 1049. Jeddah 21431, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Tel: 657-2222. 71* 601130 SJ.. Fa* 6694010 





'•*« ■iSeSSsS 


7 j*jji ^ ufiol 


LJ* 


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A# 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 1994 


SPONSORED SECTION 


— - SAUDI 

Pioneers in Private Sector 


ARABIA 


: E^m * Brothers, founded in #** /, 

di ' Arabia, condom ° il,duslriai world. He I 

remote part of the Empty world ' n lhc Aryb ,or farsi fih 

Quarter, you are bound to the rower ndu^ ?! l ° idc ? t * l ‘>' in ^ 
. come across a Mercedes V r nduslr > • telecom- tunnies an 

truck. The name is cvn ftn „. £ . ' ons : «wni, manu- them relcn 


truck. The name is synony- facturin °° S: CCmc ™\ hu- 
mous with E.A. Juffali x, *® Uu { ln e' * 1,r- condi!ioning. 
Brothers, one ofthf^ H nd u 'V d *r ran ? c 


Brothers, one of the largest 
■importers of Mercedes 
trucks in the world. 

7*?e company was found- 

iK the ^te 

Ahmed Juffali. whose brain- 
child was a joint venture 
: W \, Mercedes-Benz AG 
. called the National Automo- 
'■ bile Industry. 

This company has been 
assembling Mercedes com- 
mercial vehicles since 1977 
■ Ir was one of the earliest 
manufacturing joint ventures 
tn the kingdom. Juffali be- 
came a pioneer in develop- 
ing the private sector, and 
the company has become 


— " lull CL 

OI engineering and distribu- 
tion services. 

One of the latest Juffali 
projects is a joint venture 
with Dow Chemical for the 
production of latex for Saudi 
Arabia and other Middle 
EasL markets. 

Most of the group’s activi- 
ties are carried out through 
wholly owned subsidiaries 
and joint ventures with 
names such as Siemens. 
Carrier, Electrolux. Fluor. 
Du Pont. L.M. Ericsson and 
many others. 

Ahmed Juffali was a leg- 
end among business execu- 
tives all over the Arab 


world. He had a natural gift 
for farsightedness and Tor 
identifying business oppor- 
tunities and then pursuing 
them relentlessly. He pos- 
sessed those special leader- 
ship qualities that attracted 
total commitment and loyal- 
ly among h'is staff. People 
mattered to him more than 
anything else. 

E.A. Juffali & Brothers 
was one of the first private 
companies to establish an 
’’in-house" technical training 
center for the long-term de- 
velopment of human re- 
sources. 

Today, the Juffali Train- 
ing Center in Jeddah lums 
out hundreds of technically 
skilled young Saudis each 
year, an appropriate re- 
minder of Ahmed Juffali's 
perception oF the needs of 
lhc kingdom. L.V. 



Tanker FLeet Will 
Be Among Largest 


- - in* *R.D inc Kingdom. L.V. Students under instruction at theJuftMTn ^(^toj£S 

Banking Sector Records Healthy Increase in Profits 


The kingdom’s 30 very large crude-oil carriers will be capa- 
ble of carrying 50 percent of its daily oil production of more 
than 8 million barrels, and they will be part of one of the 
world’s biggest tanker fleets. Twenty-five of the VLCCs 
will be owned by Saudi Aramco through its wholly owned 
subsidiary Vela Marine International, and five have been on 
order from the National Shipping Company of Saudi Ara- 
bia. The combined fleers of VML NSCSA and National 
Chemical Carriers (80 percent owned by NSCSA) now total 
about 70 vessels, including more than a dozen special petro- 
chemical vessels. 

Last year. NSCSA ordered five VLCCs of 300,000 dead- 
weight each for a total of $400 million. 

is due to take delivery today of the first of three 
37,000-deadweight special chemical carriers costing $225 
million. The vessel, built by Kvaemer Govan Ltd. of Glas- 
gow, is named NCC Riyad. 

Japan s Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, which has the order 
E VLCCs, is building an innovative design for the 

g 300.000-deadweight crude-oil carriers. The vessels will 
i have a double hull, which extends around the fuel tank 
I structure; this should lessen anv spillage if there is a ground- 
ing accident or collision. Each VLCC will be able to carry 
j 2.1 million barrels of oil or petroleum products. 

NSCSA, whose top management is all Saudi, is currently 
evaluating a number of new transportation concepts for the 
future. This includes a new design for Ro-Ro vessels. These 
will be used to replace the existing fleet of eight vessels by 
the end of the decade. 


Saudi banking boomed in 'be wa kc of 'he Golf War. and nu.s, bank' are ,,,// placed 'o cope wi 'h 'he more difficuh conditions 'his year. 


Oaudi banks’ profits 
soared after the Gulf War, 
and many banks took advan- 
tage of strong conditions to 
increase their .capital. Most 
notably, the National Com- 
mercial Bank in late 1 993 


‘ and early 1 994 published re- 
sults for most of its “missing 
: years,”, showing that it was 
returning to profitability and 
that it possessed a capital ra- 
tio of around 14 percent (us- 
ing the risk- weighted sys- 
. tern), compared with the 8 
percent standard recom- 


mended by the Bank of In- 
ternational Settlements. - 


Lastof problem banks . three-qua 
: In September, the last of the five other 
kingdom’s potentially prob- settle for 
Jem banks. Bank Al-Jazira. In most . 
^declared an operating loss of turns are 
^$6 million amid anticipation modest ar 
• that it would be able to se- -seen as a 
cure an- operating profit on downturn i 
its 1 994 activities. Bank AJ- omy during 
Jaiira, however, typified year, 
current caution in Saudi 

by= se titug;: lotednnk 
1 Onesignil 

‘ provisions against loans and year has be 


investments. Loan-loss pro- 
visions in previous years 
were minimal, and provi- 
sions for investments were 
modest, with the bank's last 
significant total provisions 
figure amounting to just $5.5 
million in 1989/ 

Two major players in the 
Saudi, market, Saudi Ameri- 
can and Arab National, in- 
creased their provisions dur- 
ing the first nine months of 
.1994. While Saudi Ameri- 
can, along with the United 
Saudi Commercial Bank and 
the Saudi Investment Bank, 
was. still able to report in- 
creased profits in the first 
three-quarters of the year, 
five other banks have had to 
settle for reduced earnings. 

In most cases, these down- 
turns are comparatively 
modest and can simply be 
■seen as a reflection of the 
downturn in the Saudi econ- 
omy during the course of the 
year. 


pro- bank placements, a conse- 
?ars qaence of increased local 
»vi- lending, not least lo the gov- 
i'ere emment. As of the end of 
last September, four banks - 
ions LJSCB, Saudi Hollandi, Sau- 
B5.5 di Fransi and SIB — were in 
breach of the Saudi Mone- 
the tary Authority’s guideline 
leri- that the ratio of loans to cus- 
in- tomer deposits should not 
lur- exceed 60 percent. Although 
i of SIB had the highest ratio 
-ri- (84.3 percent). This was at 
ted least down from the 89.8 
wd percent ratio it recorded in 
nk. the same period last year, 
in- The peculiar circum- 
irst stances concerning NCB 
ar, and Bank Al-Jazira make it 
I to sensible to exclude them 
gs. when considering overall 
m- bank performance in 1993. 
ly The country’s other 10 com- 
be mercial banks saw their 
he profits rise a healthy 25.8 
in- percent, from $979.1 million 
he in 1992 to $1.23 billion in 
1993. AH 10 banks recorded 
a steady increase in their as- 
-sets, Joap&^aad-advaflces -inr. ^ 

..w-l li/j p. nv • : 


With net profits also rising 
steadily from 1991 to 1993, 
the banks found themselves 
well-placed to cope with 
more difficult conditions in 
1 994. The first quarter of the 
year saw most banks secur- 
ing a continued increase in 
profits, but the second quar- 
ter witnessed the first signs 
of retrenchment. Several 
reasons have been cited, in- 
cluding a fall in public-sec- 
tor activity as a result of the 
government’s declared in- 
tention to cut 1994 spending 
by 20 percent. 


Oafe significant, trend this i the three-yearperioti Follow- 
year has been reduced inter- !ng the Gulf War. ' 


Spending cuts 
Perhaps the most pressing 
question in late 1994 is 
whether the spending cuts 
will prompt a significant in- 
crease in bad debts and a 
consequent requirement for 
provisioning. 

The banks’ position re- 
flects the dominance of the 
public sector in the Saudi 
economy. 

Azzam, the chief 
economist of the National 
Commercial Bank, noted in 


July that lending to the pri- 
vate sector remained firm, 
however. Indeed, in the first 
six months of the year, Saudi 
American’s private-sector 
lending was 25 percent high- 
er than in the first half of 
1993. 

With the private sector 
continuing to grow, there 
will thus continue to be 
scope for considerable bank 
lending. It should also be 
noted, however, that some 
private companies will be 
requiring funds not for pro- 
ductive investment, but as 
bridging loans pending pay- 
ment for public-sector con- 
tracts. 

As for NCB itsdf, the re- 
organization was epitomized 
by the appointment in April 
1993 of former Citibank 
Chief Michael Calien as se- 
nior advisor to the chairman. 
.His charge was to reform the 
bank, and concrete results, 
are beginning to show. Fi- 


nancial statements for 1991. 
1992 and 1993 show the 
bank’s assets falling in 1992 
and then recovering modest- 
ly in 1993. 

The extent of the losses 
sustained from 1989 to 1991 
has not yet been disclosed. 
Despite substantial provi- 
sioning. which totaled 
$375.4 million between 
1991 and 1993. the bank 
was still able to declare prof- 
its totaling $248.3 million 
for 1992 and 1993. This 
year, provisioning will again 
be high, reflecting the recent 
settlement of the BCCI de- 
bacle. 

By far the largest of the 
Saudi banks, NCB is clearly 
back in profit on its current 
business. In other words, 
NCB is once again not only 
the most important player in 
the Saudi market but also a 
player whose problems are 
largely behind it 

John Roberts 


New Instruments 
For Investors 


Islamic banking and finance have undergone a major ex- 
pansion, with new instruments offered to investors. The 
basic principle is that under Islamic law. interest is for- 
bidden. The Jeddah-based Dali ah Al-Baraka Group has 
set up two investment groups - AJ Tawfeek Co. for In- 
vestment Funds (ATCTF), registered in the Cayman Is- 
lands in 1992, and Al-Amin Co. for Securities and In- 
vestment Funds (ACSIF), registered in Bahrain in 1992. 

The two companies work together as TWA, which has 
been pioneering research and development of new finan- 
cial products for investment on a global scale. ‘‘Our long- 
term aim is not only to match, but also to create alterna- 
tive model financial packages, which offer superior alter- 
natives to conventional interest-bearing systems." says a 
TWA director in Jeddah. TWA very quickly raised more 
than $1.8 billion; this has been placed in 10 wide-ranging 
specialized funds and issues, which TWA manages on 
behalf of its investors around the world. 

Its major investments by country include the United 
States (19 percent). Turkey (14 percent), Saudi Arabia 
and Algeria (12 percent), and Morocco (9 percent). Dal- 
lah Al-Baraka Group has a balance sheet of well over $6 
billion and shareholders’ equity of more than $1 billion. 

L.V. 


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doesn’t just 



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It's reinforced by our associtiiloti with tlte global 

in Suudl Arabia. ' 

i ■ , 

Citibank network. through which we baiv instant. 

Confinuous programmes of training and canvr 

i ' electronic links with over J0.000 emplo) res uoridwidu. 

deivloppiertt ' extend the skills of ctvry one of our . . 

And we have our own offices, in. the must important . 

carefully-cbvstm, bi^ply-motiwted stajf. 

financial centres for our customers: New York. London, 

. .4s ^cusitmtr, you'll find Samba offers mnitl class 

Paris. Geneva and Istanbul. 

service, \ within anil beyond the Kingdom. 

The scale and sophistication of our operations 

So ]fyau want ip deal with a hank that delivers on 

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. its pmrifisas, talk lo'tbe one that speaks yt'ur language- 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 1994 


SPONSORED SECTION 


v : 

«■>*■ ■&"<?*•<** • • : • - — 


cpAN SORED SECTION 


SAUDI 


A R A 


Major New Developments Are Up in the Air 


Saudia , the kingdom ’s national carrier, seems set for major fleet renewal and it is a likely candidate for privatization. 


Saudia's new Director- 
General Khaled Abdallah 
bin-Bakr entered office in 
1994 facing dramatic 
changes in the airline’s cir- 
cumstances. In February, a 
draft agreement was reached 
with the United States for 
the purchase of some $6.2 
billion worth of Boeing and 
McDonnell Douglas airlin- 
ers. In June, King Fahd him- 
self declared that the airline 
was a candidate for privati- 
zation. 

As of late November, the 
Boeing-McDonnel! Douglas 
order had yet to be ratified, 
although both U.S. plane 


house the kingdom's long- 
haul fleet at Riyadh, Jeddah, 
Dhahran and Damman. 

Financially, the most im- 
portant component in the 
deal was the willingness of 
the U.S. Eximbank to pro- 
vide massive export credits; 
these could cover as much as 
85 percent of the contract 
value for a deal that is likely 
to prove crucial to the coro- 


by 6.6 percent, to $2.2 bil- 
lion. 


mercial prospects of Mc- 
Donnell Douglas. 


makers were already assign 
ins production lines to fi) 


ing production lines to fill 
the giant order. With the ar- 
rival of the new aircraft - a 
mix of long-haul 747s (for 
direct service between 
Riyadh and the Americas) 
and a variety of medium- 
and long-haul aircraft (to 
serve closer markets) - as 
many as 70 of the king- 
dom's current fleet could be 
replaced or reassigned to 
new duties. 

The deal is expected to in- 
clude 29 Boeing 747s, five 
Boeing 737 s and 12 of the 
new Boeing 777 s. In addi- 
tion. Saudia is purchasing 15 
McDonnell Douglas MD- 
1 Is, many of which are ex- 
pected to be used as part of 
the Royal Flight. The order 
was won against intense 
competition from Europe's 
Airbus Industrie and re- 
quired considerable sales- 
manship from U.S. corpo- 
rate and government offi- 
cials, including President 
Bill Clinton himself. 


Donnell Douglas. 

In Riyadh, the govern- 
ment has sought to insulate 
Saudia from the wave of 
spending curbs triggered by 
the 1994 budget by increas- 
ing the airline’s own budget 


Pros and cons 
On June 3, King Fahd gave 
the royal imprimatur to a 
policy of privatization dur- 
ing a major television inter- 
view. There was a need, he 
said, for a larger private sec- 
tor in several areas of the 
economy, including oil, air- 
lines, gold mining and other 
key industries. Saudia was 
specified as a target for at 
least partial privatization. 

Privatization, however, is 
not expected to take place in 
the next year or two. The 
kingdom is still feeling its 


way m this complex field. 
Moreover, Saudia plays a vi- 
tal social role, wiih its low- 
cost internal flights substi- 
tuting for services that in 
other countries would be 
provided by ground trans- 
port. Careful financial 
arrangements are therefore 
required to ensure that po- 
tentially profitable interna- 
tional services effectively 
subsidize domestic routes. 

Privatization should help 
speed up the process of 
“Saudization.” The airline 
has had considerable success 
in training local flight crews, 
which now account for 
around three-quarters of to- 









mmmsm 


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Mi. States;. -Europe &*■;} 




Bulk to United States 
Although the bulk of the or- 
der will go to the United 
States, Britain's Rolls- 
Royce is to supply many of 
the engines. Saudi joint ven- 
tures with European compa- 
nies. as well as those with 
American companies, are 
expected to compete vigor- 

S for key contracts to 
giant new hangars to 


swctpfifeii '4&m domestic, 

*:■ come alsd fifth .to nm] Mfev; 

•• Tubail j : ■adf , ; oct^.t6other'.&&^fe,Bas(,;: 

' plants. r j •; V :i « =•' V 1 wetLas':icorrtigared «at-- } ' countries.” •. . ■ '-V ' • r r * :• 

, " / AS'.the battle' for- • Al-Baya has bces&iog;./ 

biggest: "" J : 1 : ■ i • - *• : /%rceareats witb.'iaaky : s 

•' branded. sdft-dririks' soar- . # «" **&■ foreign compktu^nf-j * 

'}&_became$'efeii,niQt&: bwned-oSarinace'utiea} eluding Jasssen /Deit- 


.. ' competitive 
which owns 


D “P hat WelftwSaBjfg. 

• of Saodt Arabia, fans gone.. ' gay^WaBdAmm Jiayyaii; . . ..-.jLlL*. 

..v. . • { v.T /' 


'DREAMING 


“Ten years from now, this will be 
achy." 


^You’re dreaming. 1 
“Exactly.” 


We haw made our dreams realities 
We have looked at sand and seen cities. 
We have looked at deserts and seen 
gardens. 




We have created, out of the grain of 
an idea, a world-class petrochemical 
company. A company that uses Saudi 
Arabia’s own hydrocarbon-based 
natural resources. A company that 
produces and markets more than 16 
million metric tons of different quality 
petrochemicals and plastic resins 
around the world. 


W; are one of the world's leading 
producers of MTBE, one of the 
few petrochemical companies to 
manufacture all five of the most 
widely used thermoplastic resins and, 
thanks to work at our Research and 
Development Complex, an exporter 
of technology. 


We have dreamed. We have achieved. 
And we continue to plan for the future 




For the long-term 



SAB1C 
RO. Box 5101 
Riyadh 1 1422 
Saudi Arabia 

Telephone (966-1 ; 401-2033 
Tdcx 401 177.SABIC SJ 
Fax (966-1 ) 401-2045/401 -3831 



Saudi Basic Industries Corporation 





taJ flight staff. Cabin crew, 
however, continue to be 
largely hired in Europe; iu 
1994, some 35 stewardesses 
from Scotland were hired. 

In the kingdom, the new 
aircraft will be serving some 
of the world’s most ad- 
vanced airports, including 
the new King Fahd interna- 
tional airport at Dhahran. 
which is capable of handling 
4 million passengers a year, 
and a new 52 billion airport 
at Dammam. At present, 
several of the kingdom’s 
North American services re- 
quire refueling stops at 
Shannon in Ireland. 

J.R. 



AT&T Wins $4 Billion Telecom Deal 


Telecommunications has long been accorded an extremely fugh priority in Saudi Arabia. 


in May 1994, the U.S. 
AT&T won the giant $4.08 
billion Sixth Telecommuni- 
cations Expansion Project 
(TEP-6) to supply 1 .5 mil- 
lion new lines, taking capac- 
ity to around 4 million lines, 
and to provide and install an 
integrated digitally based 
telephone network for the 
kingdom. 

At present, the Saudi PTT 
is in tbe last stages of a pre- 
vious expansion, designed to 
raise total capacity from I_5 
million lines in 1990 to 2.5 
million lines by the end of 
1995. 


International standards 
The new AT&T contract is 
intended to ensure that the 
kingdom's telecommunica- 
tions are brought into line 
with global Integrated Ser- 
vices Digital Network stan- 
dards. The deal is likely to 
yield considerable spin-offs 
for ancillary services as 
Saudis and Saudi-based ex- 
patriates boost demand for 
mobile phones, pagers, fax 
machines and modems as 
well as regular phone ser- 
vices. 

The contract, for which 


senior Clinton administra- 
tion officials lobbied long 
and hard, was won against 
stiff opposition from such 
companies as Canada's 
Northern Telecom and Swe- 
den's LM Ericsson. Two 
factors in particular helped 
AT&T secure the job. One 
was its stress on technology 
transfer and the training of 
Saudi managers and tele- 
coms professionals: the oth- 
er was its willingness to de- 
velop an economic offset 
program. With the White 
House known to be seeking 
to secure the deal for U.S. 
companies, these factors 
proved sufficiently enticing 
for the kingdom to’pass up at 
least one proposal that, one 
of AT&T's rivals asserted, 
was considerably lower in 
price. 


lion, allowing uniform ac- 
cess and architectural free- 
dom,” says Mart van der 
Gucnte. vice president in 
charge of the project 
As part of the giant deal. 
AT&T will also install 
200,000 mobile lines. 
AT&T is expected to intro- 
duce a system based on digi- 
tal technology, although tins 
will entail complex frequen- 
ev reallocations. 


Leading role in telecoms 
“AT&T believes that the im- 
plementation of the TEP-6 
project w ill guarantee that 
the Kingdom of Saudi Ara- 
bia will continue to preserve 
its leading role in telecom- 
munications in the world, 
with an advanced network 
designed for graceful evolu- 


Waated: mobile phones 
Factors feeling the demand 
for increased lines include 
not only the fact that the 
kingdom has one of the 
fastest-rising population 
rates in the world, but also 
the recent expansion of the 
oil industry, which has 
boosted demand for mobile- 
phone systems. 

One of tbe greatest areas 
for growth is likely to be in 
pagin g services. The Saudi 
PTT introduced a public ra- 
dio-paging service in 
Riyadh in 1991; subsequent- 
ly "expanding it to serve 
120.000 customers through- 
out the country. The system 
comprises three GL 3000 
paging-terminal control cen- 


ters located in Riyadh, 
Dammam and Jeddah - and 
41 Data cast high -power ra- 
dio transmitters throughout 
the kingdom. But demand is 
so great that, as with mobile 
phones, constant expansion 
. of pager services will be re- 

Aithough Saudi policy has 
long been to promote the 
PTT paging service and to 
prevent the setting up of pri- 
vate systems, some major 
companies such as Saudi' 
Aramco do possess their 
own private paging systems; 
The expectation was that 
these would be phased out in 
favor of the new PTT ser- 
vice, but the government's 
recent emphasis on privatiz- 
ing aspects of Saudi, 
telecommunications would 
seem to indicate there is a 
future for private paging 
systems in the kingdom. As 
a direct result of the 1994 
budget, one area that will be 
handed over to the private 
sector is pay telephones. The 
PTT believes the kingdom 
needs some 43,000 pay! 
phones, but at the start of 
1994 it had only 8,000. 

JJL 


If Money takes a piece of your mind 
Let it be with peace of mind 



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O N D 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, DECEMBER 12. 1994 


Page 19 


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Ordieb Edges 
Moe in Delayed 
Super-G Race 

The Associated Prat 

SS5?*wriB£ 

J"'?“ P“‘P°»«i from Saturday. Ort- 
beb was tuned 1 minute, 2235 seconds on 
a course that was 2,623 meters (8.603 feet) 
long and dropped 625 meters * 

“ 1-22-5S. and Luc 
Alphand of France was third in 1:22.65. 

- ^surprise downhUJ winner 

S anc f- ln 1992 but fagged 

fourth behind Moe this year in Lilleharn- 

™S Norway. The race Sunday was Ort- 
B^s third World Cup victory. 

to Val d’ls&re for two 
downhills on Fnday and Saturday. 

“TJe atmosphere is different every 
race, Ortlieb said. “Of course, Val d’lsere 
is speaal, but the course is not the same 
course as the Olympics." 

Moe also took the silver medal in the 
^ Olym pic sup er-G. 

“As Patrick would know after winning 
the Olympics, it changes your life,” Moe 
said. Everyone knows who you are.” 

Fog and high winds following a heavy 
snowstorm forced the cancellation of the 
race Saturday. It was run Sunday in place 
of a giant slalom that was rescheduled for 
Val d’lsfcre on Dec. 18. 

As part erf a massive juggling because of 
a lack of snow in most of Europe, another 
super-giant slalom originally scheduled in 
Austria for Dec. 20 was switched to Val 
dlsbre. But that event has been changed to 
a giant slalom to allow top t«irbn ieal skiers 
like Alberto Toxnba of Italy to come back 
to France. 

Tomba, who did not race in the super-G 
on Sunday, retains the lead in the overall 
World Cop standings with 1 50 points. Mi- 
chael Von Grflnigcn of Switzerland is sec- 
ond overall with 125 points. 

Kjetil Andre AamodL. last year’s overall 
World Cup champion, moved into third 
with 104 points after a 23d place. He has 
scored in all three races this season. 

Tomba gets a chance to extend his lead 
in a slalom under the lights Monday night 
in Sestriere, Italy. He won the season s first 
slalom last Sunday in Hgnes. 

The super-G scheduled for Saturday 
and run on Sunday had originally been set 
for Val d’Isfcre the previous weekend 

A tie Skaardal of Norway was fourth 
with 1 : 22.70, followed by Luigi Col tun of 
Judy in 1:22.81. Sixth was Daniel Mahrer 
% Switzerland, 1:2183. 





. . I* Tv ■ 


Kabul Plato/ Ream 


Patrick Ortlieb of Austria, 1992 Olympic gold medalist, on his way to victory in the World Qq> snper-gjant slalom race. 

Seizinger Turns Weekend Into Success 


Compiled by Our Staff Fran Dispatches 

LAKE LOUISE, Alberta — Katja Sei- 
zinger of Germany made the most of her 
last chance at success over the weekend by 
winning the World Cup super-giant slalom 
on Sunday. 

The German skier was timed in one 
minute, 1138 seconds for a comfortable 
victory over Heidi Zeller-Baehler of Swit- 
zerland, who was docked at 1:11.90 for 
second place. Picabo Street of the United 
States, the winner of Friday's downhill, 
and Martina Ertl of Germany tied for third 
in 1:12.47. 

Seizinger, the defending World Cup sn- 
pcr-G and downhill champion, finished 
third in the downhill on Friday and was a 
disappointing 10th in Saturday’s downhill 
race. She said she had been frustrated 
earlier but felt vindicated by her triumph 
on Sunday. 

“Fm satisfied now,” said Seizinger, who 
also won the last super-G contested at 


Lake Louise, in 1992. “I made two little 
m is t akes but it seemed to work out all 
right." 

Seizinger said she would be happy if 
every ski season opened in North America. 
*Td be extremely happy if the racing was 
held in Lake Louise." 

Fifth place went to Bibiana Perez of 
Italy in 1:12.60, and Katharina Guten- 
sohn of Germany finished sixth in 
1 : 12 . 66 . 

Hilary Lindh of the United States won 
the downhill race on Saturday. Lindh, the 
winner of the season’s opening race in Vail, 
Colorado, and second in Friday’s downhill 
at Lake Louise, won in 1 minute. 39.90 
seconds. 

Florence Masnada of France finished 
second in 1:40.08, and Zeller-Baehler was 
third in 1:40.40. 

Americans finished one-two in Friday's 
downhill. Street won her first World Cup 
downhill, followed by lindh. 


Unlike Street, who finished ninth Satur- 
day, Lindh didn’t regale the media with 
humorous stories about herself or drawing 
pictures in the snow on the podium. 

“I try to stay away from that," said 
Lindh, 25. “If I find myself thinking about 
how the results are gang to gp, I have to 
try to correct myself and think about 
something else." 

After winning the downhill silver medal 
at the 1992 Olympics, Lindh missed half 
the next season with a knee injury. She 
returned to win a race at Sierra Nevada, 
Spain, last season. 

I-inrih only shrugged when asked what 
she was going to do with the Canadian 
funds she woo over the weekend: “Get it 
changed, I guess." 

The race was held on the men's Olympic 
downhill course. A total of 41 gates were 
scattered over the course which has a verti- 
cal drop of 707 meters (2300 feet). 

( Reuters, AP) 


Much-Richer Larsson 
Aces Sampras in Final 


emptied by Or Staff From Dispatches 

MUNICH — One week after helping 
Sweden win the Davis Cup title. Magnus 
Larsson upset top-ranked Pete Sampras on 
Sunday to pocket the richest prize in ten- 
nis: $13 million. 

Larsson, 24, won by the score of 7-6 (8- 
6), 4-6, 7-6 (7-5), 6-4 in the final of the 
Compaq Grand Slam Cup and said, “This 
is the best Christinas present I could get." 

Larsson nearly equaled his entire ca- 
reer’s prize money, $1.690317, and more 
than doubled his 1994 earnings, which had 
stood at $639,105 before the final. 

Sampras, who won the inaugural Grand 
Shun Cup in 1990, got $750,000 as tire 
losing finalist, plus a bonus of $500,000 for 
the two Grand Sam tides he won in 1994. 
the Australian Open and Wimbledon. 

The tournament invites the 16 players 
with the best records in the four Grand 
Slam events, which also include the French 
and the U.S. opens. 

Larsson, woo is ranked 19lh in the 
world, had never beaten Sampras in five 
previous matches. He got into this tourna- 
ment by virtue of reaching the semifinals 
at the French Open. It was his best finish 
at a Grand Slam event. 

Sampras won 10 titles this year, the last 
at the ATP Tour World Championship in 
Frankfurt in November. But be could not 
match the raw power of Larsson, who 
served 31 aces. 

With serve-and-vo!ley predictability 
that at times became tedious on the super- 
fast carpet of Munich’s Olympic Hall, 
both the first and third sets went with 
service throughout and were won by Lars- 
son in the tiebreaker. In between, Sampras 
took the second sec on a single break of 
serve. 

Larsson, the winner of two titles this 
year, then broke Sampras twice in the final 
set to take a 5-1 lead. He wasted a match 
pant and was broken in the eighth game, 
as Sampras cut the Swede’s lead to 5-4. 

But Larsson went up, 40-0, on his save 
and a service winner gave him the match 
after 2 hours, 37 minutes. 

“At the start erf the fourth set I had a few 
good games, but at the end I felt a bit tired, 
the pressure was one me,” he said "But I 
saw that Pete was also tired and I thought 
that the longer the match lasts, the better 
my chances. 

“To win the Davis Cup is something 
very big, I felt 1 could go here and play 
with no pressure.” Larsson said 

In reaching the final, Larsson upset 
three higher-ranked players: Davis Cup 
teammate Stefan Edberg, then No. 2- 
ranked Andre Agassi and then Todd Mar- 
tin in the s emifinals Saturday. 







SirA s-‘ - 




Lutag HnrM'Rcwen 

Pete Sampras: “T felt a bet tired" 

Sampras had to battle through five 
tough sets, and survive 41 aces, on Satur- 
day to beat Goran Ivanisevic, 5-7. 6-3, 6-4, 
6-7 (5-7), 10-8. That match took 3 hours. 
22 minutes, and Sampras appeared far less 
fresh than Larsson in the final 

“I felt a bit tired but you've got to give 
Magnus credit." Sampras said. “He played 
too good be served too big, and he's com- 
ing off the Davis Cup victoiy." 

In his semifinal, Sampras wasted two set 
poults in the first set before allowing Ivani- 
sevic to come back and win it. 

Then Sampras needed seven set points 
to finish off the second set. And he wasted 
four match pants before Ivanisevic hit a 
volley long that ended the match. 

But, by adding $135 million to his 1994 
earnings, Sampras reached the record sum 
of $4,857,812 for the year. The money here 
also boosted the two-time Wimbledon 
champion’s career earnings to more than 
$I6mfllion. 

As for Larsson, he was asked after his 
semifinal whether he was starting to tire 
after a pressure-packed week. And. be did 
not have to search long for an answer. 

“It’s not hard to keep motivated for the 
Grand Slam Cup," he said “It’s too much 
money.” (AP, Reuters) 


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Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 1994 



O N D A Y 

SPORTS 


With O’Neal Front and Center, Magic Defeat Hawks 



SIDELINES 


The Astodaed Pros 

For Shaqiullc O’Neal, it was not 
mission impossible. 

“He played very hard. He was on a 
little bit of a mission," said the Orlan- 
do Magic coach, Brian Hill, after the 
NBA’skading scorer got 33 points, 13 
rebounds, 4 assists and 3 steals in a 
109-98 victory Saturday night. 

“Atlanta is a team that poses prob- 
lems at the center position because 
they have two 7-foot guys that are big 
and strong and have 12 fouls to use,” 
Hill said. 

The triumph was the 13th in the last 
14 games for Orlando, which improved 
the league’s best record to 15-3. The 
team's only loss in the past month was 
a two-point setback Dec. 3 in Atlanta. 


Anfernee Hardaway had 22 points 
and Nick Anderson 19 for the Magic, 
which broke the game open by out- 
scoring Atlanta by 27-11 in the last 
nine minutes of the third quarter. 

“We knew that [John} Koneak and 
{Andrew} Tang couldn’t hold Shaquifle, 
so we just threw the ball inside and let 

him do his thing ,** Hardaway said 
“When he threwitback outside we tried 
to get our shots going. But mainly our 
focus was to get the ball inside. 1 ' 

Mookie Blaylock led the Hawks 
with 15 points, but he had just two 
Stew Smith, Craig Ehlo 
aad 14 for 


and Ken Norman each bad 


Atlanta, which had won four of its 
previous five games. 

Pacers 217, Heat 103: Hot-shooting 
Reggie Miller tied his season high with 
33 points as Indiana won its fifth 
straight Miller made 9 of 11 shots 
from the Odd and 10-of-l Ifree throws 
in 27 minutes. 

Suns 103, Timberwolves 89: Rookie 
Wesley Person scored seven of his 25 
points duringa 17-1 run in the fourth 
quarter as Phoenix ran its record 
against Minnesota to 22-0. 

Lakers 120, Jazz 113: Sedale 
Thread in his first start of the year 
because Nick Van Exel had a sprained 
left ankle, scored a season-high 38 
points as Los Angeles handed Utah. its 
third straight home loss. 


Mavericks 99, Hornets 8& Jamal 
Maahbum scored 31 points and Jim 
Jackson 20 as Dallas won its ninth 
game — a total the Mavericks didn’t 
reach until April 5 last season. 

Coach Dick Motta moved into third 
place on the NBA’s aE-thne victory list 
with 865; he was tied with Jade Ram- 
say. 

Bucks 106, Bids 109: Gienn Robin- 
son’s three-point play with 53 seconds 
left ended Milwaukee’s pine-game los- 
ing streak. 

Chicago, which never led and trailed 
by 16 pome at halftime, rallied to tie 
at 103 on Scottic Kppea’s free throw 
with 14 seconds left. Robinson, who 
finish ed with 18 points, then got a pass 
from a driving Lee Mayberry and was 
fouled by Pete Myers as his shot f dL 


PSppec and Toni Kukoc missed 3- 
pointers in the final five seconds. 

Spun 108, Rockets 96: Avery John- 
son led a balanced San Antonio attack 
with 24 points, and Chuck Person sank 
ax of nine 3-pointers and finished with 
22 in Houston. 

San Antonio, played without Dennis 
Rodman, who was removed tom the 
team’s suspended list Saturday but did 
not suit up. Rodman accompanied the 
team to Houston but remained in his 
hotel room during the same. 

Nuggets 111, Bullets 89: Mahmoud 
Abdut-Rauf, a day after bring fined 
for missing practice, came off the 
bench to score 31 points as Denver 
won its fourth straight Abdul-Rauf 
made five 3-pointers and was 13-01-19 
shooting. 


Foreman to Defend Tides in Aprfl 

(>onte Foreman will defend hisXBF and 

NEW YORK (APJ-Geot^^ ^ at ^ Lcw^ 

i Arum. 



Saturday that an when he knocked out 

Sd ttW’.t 20 yea* ^cr losing his. title to 




NBA Standings 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Ationrtc Dtvtstan 



W L 

Pci 

GB 

Orianda 

15 3 

AD 

— 

New York 

11 6 

M7 

3fe 

Boston 

8 11 

ja\ 

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Washington 

6 9 

ADD 

Tft 

Philadelphia 

7 11 

J89 

■ 

New Jersey 

B 13 

J81 

SYl 

Miami 

4 12 

GMfrafDhrMM 

JS0 

10 

Indiana 

12 5 

JhA 

— 

Cleveland 

11 8 

sn 

2 

Charlotte 

9 9 

500 

3Vi 

Chlcoaa 

9 9 

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m 

OgfnVt 

8 10 

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Atlanta 

8 11 

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5 

Milwaukee 

A 12 

J33 

AW 

WESTE RN CONFERRNCS 
Mkhmst (Mvlslee 



W L 

PCS 

GB 

Houston 

12 A 

Mr 


Denver 

18 A 

535 

1 

Utah 

11 8 

sn 

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Dallas 

9 7 

563 

2 

San An tank) 

• 9 

jin 

3ta 

Minnesota 

3 15 

PBdflc DtvteMP 

.167 

9 

Phoenix 

13 S 

722 

— 

Seattle 

12 A 

Mr 

1 

LA Lakers 

1) 7 

Ml 

2 

Sacramento 

10 7 

588 

2W 

Portland 

a 7 

533 

3W 

Goktan Slate 

8 18 

AM 

5 

LA. Clippers 

2 17 

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FRIDAY’S RESULTS 

Ctevetand *1 a 26 26-91 

■him 17 M n 30— M 

C: WllHamWIMX; PhfllsB-JSW) )4; B: 
Wilkins 9-U 7 a 77. Wesley HMllRs 
flawi k Ci ow ft xta a (Cbm III, Boston 37 
(Strong 18). Assists— Oevabmd 35 < Price 13), 
B«IM 30 IWwtsy B). 


IB 27 37 26-94 
PtWnMpmp 27 21 15 2MI 

) : MCKn 5-135-7 15, 0. DovlsA-10 3-2 Ui P; 
WsottwrspocM 7*11 « 19, Burton 5-11 4-6 IR 
Re b oonds lnatanaA3(ixDavtal8),PMkKtat- 
girl it 34 IS. williams ID. Assists— Indiana 2 i 
IMJadaaa 8). PimadelpWa U (Bams 7). 
OrtaMto W 27 M 17— 111 

Maori to h if at— m 

O: O'Neal 11-15 3-4 25, Hardaway 7-145-9 24; 
M; Willis 5-21 U 14, Owens 8-12 S-* 21. Rt- 
boands— Ortando S3 (Grant 11), Miami 51 
IW1Ute.Oweas9). Asslsts-Or lands 30 (HWd- 
way 139, Miami SB (Rmws 71. 

NwYork 27 30 n 25 — *5 

Atlanta 29 27 U 10-09 

N.Y.: C5mHfl*?9»92a Enina $-20 44 !0; 
A: Biavtack Mi 2-4 )7. S. smltti Ml *5 15 
Rebounds Now York 57 lOokley 15), Attn nta 
55 (Blaylock U). AuM>-Nm York 3) 
(Maria A). Atlanta It (Blaylock 9). 

Ottawa 27 II 30 39-117 

Dima 33 23 25 38— N 

C: Pitman 1-14 1-3 19, Anmtrano M2 M23; 
O; Hunter 6-M (M 18, Miller 6-M A-7 U. Re- 
bounds— Chicago St (Wennlnglon 9), DatroH 
52 (NUIlar 10). AnMs-atieaBo33 ( Kufcac A), 
Damn U iDowWne A). 

O otaoa Wl 33 M 27 29-107 

PorttaBd Kin 29-iK 

G; Hardaway 9-161-321, Wood 3-AM14; p; 
C Rabtraan 10-17 5-1030. Drular 11-19 3-3 36. 
Momk-SMtn 3kri»48( Rasin' m.Port- 
kmd A0 (Williams 13). AmMo— QoMon Stott 
24 (Hardaway fl, Portland 26 (Strickland ill, 
LA. Clippers N 33 21 15-101 

LA. Latum 14 17 K 14- M 

LA. cappers: Richardson 0-71 ft-ft 25, Saafv 
11-35 W 25; la. Lahore: Cebatlae 9-19 3-4 23, 
Otuoc 9-14 3-3 21. RaMONda— CRppars 51 
(vaupht 13), Laker* A1 IDtvoc 171. Assists— 
cilppet* 24 (Richardson ioi. Laker* 17 (Van 
EM A). 


SATURDAY’S RESULTS 
Philadelphia DBM 25-101 

New York 35 21 34 33-^07 

p: Weatherwear; M41M929, Burton 7-187- 
824; N.Y.: Ewing T2-71 4436. Harper 7-16*4 
22. EeBoua ds — PltfioBeWThi 45 (Weather 
naan 10). New York 55 (Oakley 16)- AulctS- 
PhDodetohla 12 t Barms 9). New York 27 
(Horner V). 

Baden 22 23 19 39- 9A 

New Jersey 35 33 XA 94-198 

■: Mantras 9-lt 1-1 19, Wesley 7-1A A-7 21; 
ALL; CWtiman 7-142-3 14 Anderson 8-12 W 23. 
Reb o und* B oston 55 < Foe 14), Now Jersey 54 
-(Coleman 15). Asdsts-Boskm 18 (Wesley A). 
New Jersey 33 (Anderson 151. 

Atlanta 21 27 17 33- 91 

OrtoMdo 3* 38 35 22-H9 

A: Smllti M W14, Blaylock A-1S0-0 IS, Elm 
S-ift 2-214, Norman 6-12 tHl 14; O: O'Neal M-» 
M3 33, Hardaway 8-14 54 32. RebeoMs— At- 
kutfa SS (Long 101. Orlando 5V (O'Neal 13). 
Assists— Atlanta 25 (Smith, Blaylock A). Or- 
lando 28 |5haw 101. 

Detroit If U St 29 -W 

Cleveland 18 31 19 21-87 

D : T. Mills 4-124-4 11 Houston 12-1804) 25; C: 
C. Mills 7-14 (HI 17, Brandon 5-9 3-4 14. Re- 
boendt— Detroit 43 (TJiAUto V). Oavekmd 51 
ITJtin 10). Assists— Detroit 77 (Dawkins A), 
Cleveland 71 iPrlcsA). 

Miami 21 30 M 35—183 

Indiana 37 31 >1 31—117 

M: Rice 7-14 Ad 21, Owens S-U 3+ 19; I: 
Miller Ml W-11 XL Scott MD 7-7 19. Re- 
hornets Miami 40 rowans 10). Indiana 43 
(DXJavtx Smnx Thamnon A). Alltits Ml- 
ami 27 (Coles, Gamble, Reeyes 5], Indiana 31 
(Jackson 11). 

Phoenix 34 31 21 30-101 

N Ue s MO ta 24 35 23 17— 09 

P: Person M0 +7 55, Malone 6-303-9 W m: 
West 9-30 1-1 20. Garland 7-13 4-7 20. Re- 
boun ds - P hoenix 58 (Green Iff), Minnesota 68 
(KlaglO).Aulsto-Phoeiilx 23 (Perry 5),Mta- 
nesota 18 1 Rooks, Garland 4). 

CMcoao 34 23 51 M— M3 

M il wa uke e nun is— 104 

C: Pitmen B22 fr4 30, Armstrong M7 04121; 
M; Newman 74 *4 21, Baker 7-19 A-10 30. 
RebaoMs— ChlcaDO 57 (Ptopen It), Mllvrau- 
kse 49 IRfter 11). Assbts-Cbtaaoo 39 [PJp- 
pen 9). Milwaukee 19 (Murdock 8|. 
Chartatts 19 33 14 19-84 

Dallas 30 M 34 21-99 

C: Jatwison 9-17 1-4 19,MaumlnaM42-230; 
D: Mashbum 1 1-288-10 31, Jadaon 10-21 ODJft. 
Rthe en ds — Ororlotte 37 (Mournlna 11), Dal- 
las AO (Taraley 121. Assists— Charlatte 20 (Bo- 
oues 8), Dallas 27 (Kidd 13). 
sae Antonia 31 38 » W— MS 

Hoestan 39 21 25 21- *4 

S; Elliott 8-17 (HI 20. Johnson 1M7 4-5 24, 
Penan 8-14 04) 23; H: Thorpe M2 U W, 
Otolimon HW4 0-2 20. Rebowds-Aan Antonio 
54 (ReMnaon 11), Houston 52 miorpe 141. As- 
sisi*— 5on Antonio 24 (Johnson 11), Houston 
30 (Maxwell 7), 

MtaWmfM M n W 38— If 

Denver 29 23 22 38-111 

W: Webber 6-12 3-4 IS, Cheamrv 7-16 3-2 17; 
D: a WlWams Ad M 11, Rogers 54 14 1), 
Abdul-Rouf 13-1904) 31. Rebou nd s— W as hing- 
Ion 41 (Webber 18), Denver 47 (Mrfwnba 151. 
Assists— Washington 13 (Webber A). Denver 
20 (Pads 12). 

LA. Lakers * si— nt 

utab 24 27 24 3A— 111 

LA; Cebolws Alt M 27, Thnoatf 13-199-18 
38; <J ; Malone 15-21 3-4 34, Hornacek M 84 30. 
Rebounds— Las Anaekn 40 (Dfvac 13), Uldi 
m (Malone 10), Assists— Los Angeles 21 
(Thrsatt ■), Utah 32 (Stockton 14). 
ieaftle " 29 38 21 M 9 H-.HI 

LA O H uen 29 X 23 38 9 4—127 

S: Kemp 1 1-1 A 30-22 42. Pavtan 11-28 11-13 33; 
LA: Vaught 9-202-320, Richardson 14-24 04) 
a Sooty M7 10-13 3, PkrtKowsW 0-13 44 23. 
(MbeuiHie— Seattle 59 { Kemp UI.Loi Angelas 
SA I Vaught 14). Asdsts— Seattle 31 (Payton 
14), Los Anguln 32 iRIchordsan 15). 

■ aaWon Slate 23 35 23 as— 94 

Sacramento 21 31 32 si— 10* 

O: Hardnwoy7-)4A4)2X3pnrmtHB-79342D; 


s; WHltanst-M A-waOL Rktimond Ml MM 
Grant M2 5-10 23. Rebounds -Golden State 46 
(Rosier 11). 5ao - om en lo 43 (Gronl 12). As- 
state— Golden Stole 17 (Jennings, Sprowell 4), 
Sa cr amento 23 ( Williams. Webb A). 

Top 25 College Rewrite 

How M top 25 teams in The AssocJated 

Press* men's coBege basketball pod farad (Ms 

w eeken d; XUCLA (88) beat CaHtotP#WHir- 
ton 99^1 Next: at L5U, Saturday; 3. Arkansas 
(A-l) beat Murray State 9AA9. Next: Flort- 
do A6M, Wednesday, Dot 21; 4. Kansas (HI) 
bout Norm Carolina State 9A4T. Next: at Indi- 
ana, Saturday; 5. Massachusetts (3-1) beat 
No. 11 Maryland 85-74. Next: vs. Princeton, 
Wednesday; A Ffsrtrio (4-1) beat Texas 91-73. 
Next : vs. FlortdD State at Qrlanda. FKl, Batur- 
dor; 7. Kentucky (4-Utmat Boston Unhmrritv 
90-49. Nest: vlToros Tech al Cincinnati, Sat- 
urday; 9. poke (5-1) beat No. 33 Mtahtacm 69- 
59. Next; vs. North Carotlna A8.T, Monday. 
Dec. 19. 

II. MarykWO 164) lost to Na 5 Massachu- 
setts 85-74 Next; vs. Towson State. Monday; 
laCtadanafl (A-2) km to Canbtai 7249; boat 
Tstmeisee-Mcirttn 110-56. Next: at Na, 12 Min- 
nesota Tuesday; 14 Wisconsin M-i) lost 10 
Eastern Michigan 92-74 Next; vs. wtscoraln- 
Mlhmukee. Wednesday; 15. MKhlgan State 
0-1) last la Nebraska 96-91, 07. Next: vs. 
Oeveland Slate, Monday; 17, Georgia Tech 
(541 beat Lafayette 112-84. Next: vs. Georgia 
at the OmnL Wednesday; u. Georgetown (4- 

1) beat Memphis 83-BO, OT. Next: vs. Ntary- 
tand ■astoiwlhena8gtunkn'?24 virvhrio (A 

2) beat Rice A7-5a Next; vs. VMI, Monday. 
Dec. 19; 22. Hew Mexico state (6-7) beat Now 
Mexico 7441 Next: at New Mexlca, Saturday, 
Dec. 17; 23-M l c hl gm (4-3) bat to No. 9 Duke 
A9A9. Next; vk Pennsytvanla, Tuosekry. 

Other Major College Sc otm 

EAST 

Brawn B7, Maine 78 
Dree el 44 Rider 64 
Hefy Crass SU Dartmouth 71, OT 
Iona 70k Portfwm CO 
Lehigh 83, Harvard 74 
Loyola, Md. 67, Md- Baltimore County 64 OT 
Manhattan aa. Monmouth, NJ. 59 
Marts! wi, StsnaSt 
Now to. Air Force 50 
No r thea ste rn 74 Hotsfra 54 
Perm ML Fdriefoh Dkkbnati 71 
Perm St. Cent. Connecticut st. 62 
Providence 94 Niagara 74 
Robert Morris 82. American U. 80, OT 
Setan Hail 97. Wggw 83 
St. Bonaventur* 88. Buckneil 75 
SL Fronds, Pa. 65, SL Peter's 63 
Wed Virginia 34 Pittsburgh 30 
Xavier, Ohio 85. Hartford 68 
MIDWEST 
Bail St. BS. -Butler 77 
Bowline Green 79. Layato, III. 59 
DtPouf Al, Notre Damn 48 
Detroit 7a wolsh 68 
Drake IDS, Texos-San Antonia 99 
Eva ravin* 74 Illinois SI. 51 
Iowa St- 76. Iowa A3 
Kansas SI. 64 Coopln st. 56 
Kurd 54 FdrtMd 49 
Mercer 81, Indiana St. 74 
Northwestern 71 Cent. Michigan AS 
SE Missouri 75, Wbw-Mllwauke* 71 
3W Missouri st. *9, Alcorn 51. 57 
St Loull 83, CrrtgMon 56 
W. Mich toon 75, IILChlcaga 72 
Wright SI. 74 Dayton 53 
Youngstown St. 69, Akron 53 
SOUTH 

Akb-Blrmlnahom 76, UC Santo Barhara 59 

Chanson SI, Aopatodiian St. AA 

Colt, of Cha r leston 7fc Cha r l est on Sosrthom 64 

Davtasan 7a KOWtlmtantan 68 

E. TwmessN SL lia Wortora 80 

Eat Carolina 7a w. Carolina 69 

Ptarida SL 81, Tutane 74 

George Mason ML Troy St 133 

Georgia 74 Jacksonville 68 

Georata Samtm 54 Savannah st. 76 


Jackson SL 84 Tougaloo 84 OT 
Long Island U. SS. Margcm St 82 
Laabiana Tech 7a Georgia SI. 57 
Louisville 84 e. Kentucky IS 
MdrE. Shore 101, Long I stand U. 71 
Miami 67. Florida A&M 53 
Middle Tenn. 84 Voktasta st (2 
Miss. Valley st 74 Arit-PInt Staff a 
Mtastodool St. 7a NE Louisiana 56 
N.C Cheviot fe 74 4 I 111 note 70 
OW Dominion 43..Wyamfeig 81 
Radtard 99. VMI 93 
S. CaroB no SI. 64 Ctoflln 55 
SE Louisiana 102, uvota, NO 74 
South Florida 89, Cent Florida 44 
Southern Mbs. 84 Florida Tech 73 
Sletoon 74 EmbTY-ftktte 69 
Tmneaee SI. 63, N, Carolina A&T 60 
Tennessee Tech 94 Bethel. Tern. 72 
Va commanweatth 74, Fla. Inrt 47 OT 
Virginia Tech 94 Texas Christian 84 
W. Kentucky 111 Belmont 79 
Wichita St 71. Mleshntaol n 
PAR WEST 
Babe SL 74 Peooenflne 53 
CS Northrtdge 73. Son Diego st. 68 
FrawM SL 71, San Jaee SI. 61 
Ganzaoa 91 Cent. WbaMnetan S3 
Marquette 79, Son Francisco 72 
Montana St 77, Sacramento st. 60 
N. Arizona 97, Notre Dame, Coin. 49 
Nevada 71 Montana 63 
Oregon S3. Idaho 55 
Oregon SI. S3, Santa Clara 75 
Portland 95, E. Washington 77 
Stanford 94 Cal Potv-SLQ 52 
Toledo 79, Cotorodo St. 64 
UC Irvine A San Dtego 70 
Utah 71, WMer Bt. S4 

SOUTHWEST 

ArfcrUttie Rock 101. Centenary 69 
North Texas 77, Torietan St. 35 
Oklahoma 89, Niche tb St. 80 
Oklahoma st ft, NW Missouri St 53 
Southern CM 95, Houston 89 
Sam Houston st, 97, Mary Hardln-Bavtor 10 
Stamen P Austin 89, Hardtag M 
Texas Southern 67, TnaH’ui American 61 
Texas red; 107, pralrta view « 
Texos-ArUngtan 91. GrarrMlna St. 75 
Tafsa 99. Oral Roberta 54 

TOURNAMENTS 
BoHermakcr Invitational 
Cftomotaastap 
Purdue 79, Rutgers 67 

Third Place 

Vatporaisa 71 Austin Pecv 69 
Cougar C lanlc 
Ora m ptarsWo 

Brigham Young 84 NW Louisiana 53 
Third Place 

4 Utah 144 South Alabama 73 
Delta Airlines Classic 
amwioMlNg 
Monhall 1B2. Cantatas 93 
Third Place 

Cincinnati IKL Tamt-Martln 56 
Dr. Peooer lavttatleaol 
CbonwtaMWP 
La salle 74 Bavtar 64 

Third Plato 

Somtard 74 Howord U. 49 
Hlhnl Classic 
Ctemphtublfi 
ill irate 91, Princeton 37 

Third Ptace 
E. lUtadS 64 NE Illinois 53 


Indiana 91 MtamL Ohio 77 
TUrt Ptace 
Morahead St. 89. Coastal Co 

tmwam 

Worid Cup Rewrite 

WOMEN’S DOWNHILL 
wesuffs FrW u ytrom Labe Lootae, Alberta; 

1, Plcebo Street, Sun VOfley, Idaho, 1 minute, 
404B seconds; 1 Hilary Undh, Juneau, Alas- 
ka, 1:4L16; 1 Katto SeMnger, Germany, 
1:41.33; 4 Barbara Merlin Italy. 1:41 S); % 


Btatana Perot Italy, 1 :4ij7; 4 Ftaranc*Mas- 
nada. France, 1:414a; 7, Warworn zetans- 
kata. Russia, 1M7JT; trie) Krwa Schmf- 
dtaaor. Lee, Musa. 1:4L73; 9, Mel onto 
TUrgeen, Canada. 1:«1A4; n, Statanle Schus- 
ter, Austria, 1:41 32. 

Results sueroar tram Lake Louise; 1, Hi- 
lary LMdta Juneau. Alaska. ! mfetofis, 3930 
seconds; z Florence Masnoda Prance, 
1:4418; a Hekfl Zefler-Boehler, Swl ta orte n d. 
1:4440; 4 BtatoM Perot Italy. 1:4053; 4 
Nathalie Bouvter, France, 1^455; A, War- 
wars ZvtanskPtaf Russia t:40J9j 7, perallki 
Wlbera, Sweden 1:4Q£5;48vef Iona Gtadtah- 
vta, Russia l;40M; 9, Pfcato Street, sun Vat- 
in. Idaho, 1:4LM; 14 Katto Setztager, Ger- 
many, 1:4133 

Downhill stondta ss (after tame roots): L 
HUary Undh. Untied States, 380 oototsi 4 
Kalla SeCdnaer, Germany, 146; 4 Plate 
Street, United status, 729; 4 Florence Mas- 
nada, France, 130; 5, BlMana perwx. Italr.lUj 
4 Hekfl Zeller-Bachtor, avftaortand. 105; 7/ 
warworn T a inH e i a. Russia 183; 4 PernUlo 
Wtoera, Staodoa, 109; 9, Noftetfe Bouvter. 
Franco, 98; 14 Stetonto Schuster. Austria, 83. 

Overall World cap standtags: T, Hekfl 
Zmier-BaotOnr, Smtznrtand. M3 points! Z Hi- 
lary undh. United States. 384; 4 Vrenl 
Schneider, SwttxertaniL 257; 4 tcotfa 9et- 
teneer. Oerr m my. 229; 4 PstnHla Wlbarg, 
Sweden. 188; 4 PtaaM Stroot. United Stales, 
US; 7. M arianne Ktaerstad, Norway, 141; 
(he). Barbara Merlin, Italy, 141; 4 Nathalie 
Bouvter, France, 135; ta Mdrilna Erd, Ger- 
many, 132. 

ME7TS SUPER G 

Raaifs Sunday dram none*, Primes of toe 
Hrst Saaer-G race of the season: 1, Patrick 
Orilieta Austria, 1 minute, 2435 seconds; l 
Tommy Mon. ULS. 1:2251/ 4 Luc AlphaaA 
Prance, 1AL66; 4 A tie SkoontaL Norway, 
l:2ZJU; S, Uital Coduri, Italy. I:2Z8I; 4 Omr 
kri Mahrar. Swttiariand, 1:2233; 7, Peter 
Rungaahflar, Italy, 1: 2284; 4 Werner peram- 


ener, Italy, irzuti % Kyle Rasmuaen, 
UJL12L89; 14 Loco Ccrttaneo, Italy, 1.2254 
orarak Wbrkf te standtags Coder ttne 
raced): t. Alberto Tomba, Holy. U0 potato; z 
Mlchool Vbn Graentoerv Swtoartaid. 125; 4 
KIotU-Andre Aomodt. Norway. 1M; 4, AcMm 
Vogt. LlecMcnstcbv Ml; S, Patrick QrHteh, 
Austria M0; 4 Tommy Moe-Glnhwaod, Aka- 
La, BD; (He) MlchaslTritschcr, Austria,*]; 4 
Mario Reftar, Austria 62; 9, Luc AMnmt 
France, 60; [tie) Thom mas Feadoe, Sweden, 
64 


FOOTBALL 


NFL Standings 


(Through Sedvnknri 


mm) 


AMERICAN CONFERENCE 
■wr 


m 


Arabella 

Grand Hotel 

Frankfurt am Main 

The 
Grand Hotel 
of our Time 

Downtown location, 
complete health dub 
with indoor pool. 

Speciality restaurants: 
Japanese & Chinese cuisine. 
Sushi-bar. 

Bar with live music. 

] 3 banquet & meeting rooms 

Konrad-Adenauer-Str. 7 
D-603I3 Frankfurt 
[ Telephone.: ++69 - 29 81 0 
Fax: ++69 - 29 81 810 



W L 

T 

PIS PP PA 

Miami 

8 5 

8 

.415 311 369 

Buffalo 

7 A 

D 

-531 297 284 

New England 

7 A 

0 

JOB 369 279 

indtanapefle 

A 7 

D 

M 2 274 277 

KY.Jets 

A 8 
Central 

8 

jO> 248 273 


W L 

T 

PIS PF PA 

y-PIIUburah 

IQ 3 

8 

Ml 231 187 

Cleveland 

18 4 

0 

714 298178 

Cincinnati 

3 11 

0 

,154 216 321 

Houston 

1 12 
West 

0 

JD7 179295 


W L 

T 

PtS PFPA 

Son Diego 

9 4 

a 

m. 308228 

Kanos a ty 

7 A 

0 

J38 241 235 

LA Raiders 

7 6 

D 

538 254 279 

Denver 

7 6 

0 

5» 287 381 

Seattle 

5 8 

0 

385 3442S7 

NATIONAL CONFERENCE 

East 


W L 

T 

Pts PFPA 

x-Oaltoe 

11 3 

O 

786 388217 

PMksdeMila 

7 A 

a 

538 262 MS 

N.Y. Giants 

A 7 

0 

MA 221 262 

Arizona 

A 7 

0 

M2 184 235 

Washington 

2 11 
Central 

0 

.154 267 357 


W L 

T 

Pts PFPA 

Minnesota 

8 5 

ft 

Jtt5 295242 

Chicago 

1 5 

0 

415 238 341 

Detroit 

8 A 

ft 

571 296 296 

Green Bay 

A 7 

0 

442 337248 

Tampa Bov 

4 9 

West 

0 

JOB 191389 


W L 

T 

PIS PFPA 

e-San Francisco 

11 2 

0 

446 411241 

Atlanta 

A 7 

0 

462 278329 

New Orleans 

5 8 

0 

J85 273 335 

LA Rams 

4 9 

0 

JOB 238 29ft 


XcllU- 

Lop« of the Umted Stjtes 
bleeding ovct ^ and bloodied, hrtdmd 

weirfittitkby knockiiig oul Jo^ Gaina«^c of the United Stales m 

thc .S d E^]UHo^Sid his WBO tighweight titlekM* 
AugdSwbcn his fight against fdlow American Johnny AvQ& was 
stepped in the ninth round. 

Tapie Replaced at Marseille Club 

MARSEILLE (Reuters) — The forma television anchorman 
Pierre Cangioni took ova Sunday from Bernard Tapie m presi- 
dent ofthe Olympique Marseflie soccer team and 
cutbacks whoa he said, “You’ve had Santa Claus as a president for 

^^Taphawho was banned by French authorities from runningihe 
club foflowing the aUeged rigging of a league mstii ^^mst 
Valenciennes last year, said he would be giving up all his shares m 
the team by “next week at the latest.” 

For die Record 

Yusif Omar, 22, a Nigerian soccer player with Olympic of 
Alexandria, was deported from Egypt after proving to be HTV- 
poativc in the mandatory AIDS test for foreigners. (Reuters) 
Jose the home-run-hitting outfidder of the Texas 

Rangers, was traded to the Boston Red Sox for center fielder Otis 
Nixon and minor league third baseman Luis Ortiz. (NYT) 


x-d (netted alvtalon 
y -clinched Moratf root 

s atard mf s oamnn 
Detroit 14 Now York Jen 7 
Own land 19, Dallas 14 


ENGLISH PREMIER LEAGUE 
Liverpool 4 Crystal Potass D 
Aston VDJo 4 Ewrton 0 
Blackburn 4 Southampton 2 
Leads Z West Ham 2 
Newcastle X Leicester 1 
Harwich 1 Chelsea D 
NdHnpnm Forest 4 Jpswfch I 
Queens Park Rangers 2. Manchester united 3 
Tottenham 3. Sheffield Wednesday 1 
Wimbledon 2, Coventry 0 
Staad ta e s ; Blockbura 43 petals. Manches- 
ter United 4), Newcastle 37, Liverpool 32, Not- 
Hnabam Forest 33. Manchester city 28. Leeds 
M Chelsea 27, Noov/cft 27. Toftanhom a Cov- 
■ntrv 24 Arsenal 21. Crystal Palace 21, Sauttv 
amptan 21, Shetflold Wednesday 21. Wlmbla- 
denn. Queens Park Rangers 19, Everton 14 
West Ham 14 Aston villa 14 Leicester 14 
Ipswich It, 

OBRMAH FIRST DIVISION 
Dynamo Dresden t, Bayer Lsverfcusen l 
MM Munich Z Etotraail Frankfurt 1 
Hamburg sv 4 Barussta Dortmund 4 
MSV Oulsbura Z VfB Stuttgart 0 


warder Bremen 4 Bayern Munich 8 
SC Freiburg 4 Scholl* 0 
Standtags; Beraasto Dortmund 28 potato. 
Werder Bremen 24 Mooncheng lodtx>ch23,SC 
Freiburg 24 Bayern Munich 22, FC Kotaerv 
tautern 22. Karisruhe SC 71, Bow Leverkv- 
■en24H0RtauroSV14vrashiHgart lAEhv- 
traait Frankfurt l*. setette tt FC Cologne 
13, Bayer Uerdfciuen 14 tott Munich 1ft Dy- 
namo Drasilsn 14 VfL Bochum 4 MSV Dute- 
burg 7. 

SPANISH first Dtvrsicm 
Denarttvo de La canma s. SevHto 1 
Ceitn- Barcelona (Late Game) 

Bette L VaBododd 2 

Rea) Madrid Z OvUdo o 

Logrann 4 Real Saciedad 4 

Atoocnte 4 Tenerife i 

snorting de Gilan 4 Attehoo de Madrid 2 

Racing de Santander 4 Zaragoza i 

Esponof Z Compasfeto 0 

Athletic de Bilbao Z Valencia 1 

S tan d in gs: Real Madrid 21 paints, Danor- 
tfvo La Coruna 21. Z u rm ox a 71, AtMetIc de 
BBbaa 14 Barcetona 17. Betts 14 EsPanal 14 
Sevilla 14 Celta K Comnostelu 14 Valencia 
14 Attatlcn de Madrid 14 Tenerife 14 Real 
Sodadad iLOvtodo 11, Albaceto )1. Spartina 
deGthxi II, VUftodotU 14 Racing deSaitam 
der 9. Loorones 5. 

DUTCH FIRST DIVISION 
Saarta Rotterdam 4 FC l/frecht 0 •• 

FC Ttearrte Enschede. 3 MW Maaet rttet a 
Vitesse Arnhem 4 Willem It'Hlbarg 1 
SC HseronvMn 4 NAC Brada 3 - - ‘ “ ■- 
siomBiws: Rada JC 24 minis, Alax 34 FC 
TteenteZL PSV21, Vftesw 14 Heerenveen 14 
Fevenoord 17. WBttm II 16. MW 14 FC 
Utrecht XX Sparta 14 MAC 14 FC Groningen 
14 FC Votondom 14 NEC )4 RKC 14 GA 
Eagles 7, Dordrecht *98 4 

ITALIAN FIRST DIVISION 
Broeda 4 Samodorta nt Genoa 0 
Flaranflna I, AS Roma 0 
Foogta I. AC MHon 3 
Genoa 4 AC Parma 0 
Internationale of Milan 4 Nmall 2 
Padova 2 Coot tori I 
Regglana 4 Cromanese 0 
Torino 4 Barf 8 

Standless: Parma 28 notate, jweatw 24 
Florentine 24 Roma 24 Lazio 32. Bari 24 
SamPdarta 14 Feaala 17. inter 17, Cagliari 17. 
Milan M, Torino 14 Naeoil 14 Genoa 14 Cre- 
manese 14 Padewo 11, Regglana 4 Brssda A 


RUGBY UNION 
England 64 Canada >9 


THIRD TEST 
ladki vs. West ladles, second dor * 
sandav. ta Chandigarh, ladto 
West Indies Iftrd tanlngs): M3 
India (first fanlnm): 95-1 

MANDELA TROPHY 
New Xte fcm d vs. South Africa - 
Sunday, at Oaeterioa Fork 
South Africa tontags: 31+7 
N«w Zoo land 333 (alt out) — 443 overs. 
Resutt: south Africa won by tl rum 

BASEBALL 
M,nmrltrmt LtOtOt 

BALTIMORE— Agreed to terms with Mott 
Hokes, catcher, on l-vear contract. Destomt- 
ed John O'Vanoahue. Pilcher, tar asstomnent. 

CALIFORNIA— Named Steve Rente idtch- 
tna coach of Cedar Rapids, Midwest League, 
aad Gary Petite mkxr-ieogue ban running 
tastractae. 

CHICAGO— Claimed Terry Bran Pffdter, 
off watvers from CtactamdL Stoned Junior 
Ortte,caftdicr.tamtaor l eague cordroct Sent 
Luis Andutar. pitcher, to Nashville, AA.' 

CLEVELAND—Aoreed ta terra with £3P 
Smith, autllnUsr, an mlnar-tomue eorrtnscf; . 

DETROIT— Named Bill Phmuner maw , 
er at Jacksonville, SL. . 

OAKLAND— Ckdmed Heath Haynes, POOH . 
er, off wTMven ham Boston. - 
TEXAS— Traded Jose Conseco, outflektor, 
to Boehm tor OtteNbcwCcxilfietderiand Lute . 
Orttz. third basenson. , 

Hehenal Laoaae 

ATLANTA— Acquired AMo PecarillL first 
Dapemav from St. Louto to comptete on sortt- 
er trade; assigned Pecarilll to Green vflle,SL. 

FLORiDA— sent Brian Barmfc aifcher, 
outrtgrd to Edmonton, PCL 
PiTTSBUR O H- Agreed to term* with 
Mocker Sasser, catcher, and Milt HIM, Fitch- . 
nr. on minor-ieogue u mlr ucte . 

ST. LOUlS-Nomed Lou Brack soectai tn- 
structor.NanedChitsMalonevniQnager; Rich 
FOI tiers pttriitaB coach; John Lewtocoach; and 
Brad Bluestone trainer at st Petarsburte F5L. 
andRoyWvermmo e er; RovSeoraoo pitching . 
aaach; KvMi5mt8iaoaeh;and Bert Boyd train- 
er at Peoria Midwest League, 

BASKETBALL 

Nofloufl Basketball Associate* 
DETROIT— Pul Uncfeey Hunter, guard, 
and Oliver Miller, center, on the Murad HsL 
Activated Ivana NewMlL forward, tram In- 
lured Hit. 

PORTLAND— Activated Rod Sfrfckkmd, '■ 
guard, from Mured Us). Pul James Edwards, 
canter, on (hlurvd (fat. 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


PEANUTS 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 199-i 


Page 21 


A Y 


Packers Trounce the Bears, 40-3, to Keep Their Playoff Hopes Alive 

Thw ifMniif.J **- - 


• The Associated Press 
A return to Frigid Lam beau 
Fldd in Green Bay, a white-hot 
offense and an ice-cold Steve 
Walsh were just what the Green 
Bay Packers needed to salvage 
their playoff hopes. 

The Packers routed the Chi- 
cago Bears, 40-3, on Sunday as 
Brett Favre threw for three 
touchdowns, two of them to 
Sterling Sharp, and Green Bay s 
defense returned to form after a 
five-game skid. 


dchjuiging coverages, scored Three Rivers Stadium for the within a half-game of the AFC the NFL has done for years. Bengals (2-12) for the first time 
lce “ less than two miniilM ACrr«<nl >:<U Fuel ImHm Miimi Tli«/ Ivaf »hf rinn'nmli R»n. » 


r ? 655 t * lan lw ° minutes 
of the fourth quarter to beat the 
fading Eagles m Pittsburgh. 

Aadre Hastings scored his 
wst NFL touchdown, and John 

NFL ROUNDUP 


WM, two of them to L. Williams, taking over as the 
aarp^and Green Bay's Steelers* feature back with Bar- 
retmned to form after a ry Foster and Bam Moms in- 
* “ J „ jwwi, scored 1:48 apart to pre- 

i ®J* ded /?4£ fieJd veat «n upset that would have 

goals as the Packers (7-7) won revived the Eagles’ playoff 

thdr ninth straight game at hopes. ^ ^ 

Lambrau. where they romplet- The Steelers ( 1 1-3) won their 


™f f “ ted season sixth in a row and now will play 
ana 1962 when Vince Lom- aeveland (10-4) on Sunday in 
bardi won his second of five y 


AFC Central title. 

Pittsburgh's start is its best 
since the 1979 Steelers — the 
last of their four Super Bowl 
champions teams — had the 
same record. 

With Randall Cunningham 
throwing a critical fourth-quar- 
ter interception, die Eagles (7- 
7) never did find an offense 
while losing their fifth in a row. 

Patriots 28, Cohs 13: The 
New England Patriots, a fran- 
chise starved for success, con- 
tinued their playoff drive with 
their fifth straight win 

The Patriots, playing at 
home, overcame a 10-0 deficit 
and four interceptions to move 


East leader, Miami. 

The Patriots ( 8 - 0 ), who have 
not had a winning season 1988, 
survived Ray Buchanan's third 
interception return for a toueb- 


Tbey beat the Cincinnati Ben- 
gals for the first time and kept 
alive their faint playoff hopes. 

The Giants did it the hard 
way in winning their fourth 


down in five games, covering 90 straight game after losing seven 
yards. in a row. Rodney Hampton 

The Colts ( 6 - 8 ) suffered a se- scored on a three-yard run with 
rious blow to their playoff 40 seconds to play as the Giants 


Bengals (2-12) for the first time Errici Rhett ran for 1 19 yards passes, sacked him twee; recov- 
in five meetings. and a touchdown. Wilson's 71- ered a critical fumble and 

Buccaneers 24, Rams 14: It yard reception came in the sec- watched a last-minute Dallas 
was too little, too late lor the ond quarter, while his 44-yarder rally end at the three-inch line 
Tampa Bay Buccaneers. The occurred after Charles McRae for a victory that virtually as- 
Bucs, with Craig Erickson blocked what would have been sured the Browns of a wild-card 
throwing touchdown passes of a game-tying 48-yard field goal bath in the playoffs. 

7 1 and 44 yards to Charles Wil- by Tony Zendejas with 1:51 to Lions 18, Jets 7: In East 
son. won their third straight go. Rutherford, New Jersey, De- 


hopes because they could not 
capitalize on the other intercep- 
tions, including another by Bu- 
chanan. who has six steals in 
five games since moving from 
free safely to comer back. 

Giants 27, Bengals 20: In 
East Rutherford. New Jersey, 
the New York Giants finally 
did something everyone else in 


blew a 10 -point fourth-quarter 
lead, then moved 66 yards in 
four plays to beat the Bengals. 

Hampton also scored on a 
one-yard run, Dave Brown 
threw a touchdown pass and 
Brad Daluiso kicked two field 
goals as New York (7-7) 
snapped a four-game home los- 
ing streak. The Giants beat the 


son, won their third straight 
game for the first time in 12 
years. 

Entering play this weekend, 
the Bucs (5-9) were one of 25 
teams with a shot at the NFL 
playoffs. But the victory was 
not enough as results from oth- 
er games eliminated the Bucs 
from contention. 

Erickson threw for 231 yards. 


Tampa Bay last won three in uoil enhanced its playoff 
a row in the strike-shortened chances, and Art Monk set an 


1982 season when the Bucs h ?d 
their last winning record and 
qualified for the playoffs. The 
Rams are at 4-10. 

In games played Saturday: 

Browns 19, Cowboys 14: In 
Irving. Texas. Cleveland inier- 


176 of them to Wilson, while cepted two Troy Aikman 


NFL record of 178 consecutive 
games with a reception on New 
York's first play. The Lions 
clinched the victory with Jason 
Hanson’s fourth field gpal a 
23 -yard er with 3:02 remaining. 
Barry Sanders was thrown for a 
loss nine times, but also had 
runs of 29, 27 and 22 yards. 






«n;t dusM 


NFL titles. The temperature at 
Lam beau Field was 15 degrees 
at kickoff, with a wind chflf of 6 
degrees. 

The stunned Bears lost their 
14th straight December road 
game, a streak that dates to 
Dec. 7, 1987, when they edged 
the Raiders, 6-3. 

^ The Bears ( 8 - 6 ) also fell from 
first place in the NFC Central, 
a game behind Minnesota. 

The Bears managed just a 25- 
yard field goal by Kevin Butler 
for an early 3-0 lead before the 
Packers overwhelmed them. 

The Packers rushed for a sea- 
son-high 257 yards, including 
106 by Edgar Bennett. Favre 
completed 19 of 31 passes for 
250 yards with one intercep- 
tion. 

Vikings 21, BiBs 17: Warren 
Moon never won in Buffalo in 
10 years with the Houston Oil- 
era. Maybe he should have 
brought Cris Carter and Jack 
Del Rio with him 

Carter caught nine passes for 
111 yards to lead Minnesota 
and give the Vikings’ new quar- 
terback his first victory at Rich 
Stadium in six tries. Carter is 
one catch shy of Sterling 
Sharpe’s single-season NFL re- 
cord of 112 . 

Del Rio had an interception 
to kill one Buffalo drive and 
sacked Jim KeDy to stop anoth- 
er as the Vikings (9-5) scored 
the last 12 points to solidify 
their hold on first place in the 
NFC Central 

With 1 :29 left and Minnesota 
needing only a first down to run 
put the clock, Phil Hansen 
gripped the ball from Tory Al- 
len. But Kelly was injured and 
carted off after the second play, 
and Thurman Thomas was tak- 
en to the sideline on the fourth 



Colorado’s Salaam Wins 
Heisman by Wide Margin 




tip 




- :-V'l ' 





Psj SulEvan/The Acocialnl Pros 

The Browns* Derrick Alexander couldn’t grab the pass, but Larry Brown of the Cowboys was called for interference. 

UMass Hangs On to Beat Maryland 


By Ken Denlinger of Nebraska (1983) — also won 

Washington Past Semce the Hei sm a n . 

NEW YORK — The Colon- “I think that’s what pul me 
do tail back Rachaan Salaam has over the top, S a l aam said at a 
a flair for the extraordinary that news conference at the Down- 
began when be learned to walk lown Athletic Club, after the 
at 6 months. Now be has won award was announced on Satur- 
coliege football’s most coveted "™* * f °r the offense. I’m 
prizeT the Heisman Trophy. J 0 ^ here representing the of- 

The voting for the 60th Hds- '“g” aboul whelhcr 

points to 901 for another junior 

mnmog tack. Ki-Jeoa Carter r£»TgLe 

of Peon State. agamsi Notre Dame. 

Senior quarterbacks Steve Even though his competition 
McNair of Alcorn State (655 was formidable, the 6 -foot-I 
points) and Kerry Collins of 218-pound ( 1 .85-meter, 99-kilo^ 
Penn State (639) were third and g^n,) Salaam had more first- 
fourth. place votes (400) than all the 

Salaam was only the fourth other candidates combined, 
runner in the history of major Carter's average of 7.8 yards 
college football to gain more per cany was higher than Sa- 
than 2,000 yards in a single sea- faam’s — and also higher than 
son. Each of the others — Barry all but one of the 35 other mn- 
Sanders of Oklahoma State ning backs who have won the 
(1988), Marcus Allen of South- Heisman. Rozier had the same 
era Cal (1981) and Mike Razier average. 


McNair set the all-division 
record for career total offense 
(16,823 yards) and for career 
offensive average per game 
(400 .5 yards). His was the high- 
est finish ever for a Division I- 
AA player. Doug Williams of 
Grumbling was fourth in 1977. 

Collins was the nati onal lead- 
er in pass efficiency with a 
172.86 raring in leading an of- 
fense that averaged 48 points 
per game. He seemed the most 
disappointed. 

“After winning the Maxwell, 
maybe my hopes were a little 
too hi gh " he said. “But I’m not 
flashy and 1 had no phenome- 
nal stats. I can say Fm a Heis- 
man finalist. Not too many peo- 
ple can say that” 

Salaam was noticed by run- 
ning for 4,965 yards and 105 
touchdowns in two-and-a-half 
years of varsity balL He was 
ready to quit Colorado during 
his freshman year, until Coacn 
BiH McCartney and others put 
him straight 


The Associated Press 

Nine months after they took 
a drubbing at the hands of 


^SSSSSaSSSSi Ae MassadiuscUs 

of a 32-pobToSme^ that 
knocked Moon and the Oflers 

out of the playoffs in 1992, fejj” SSLSf^k 


out of the playoffs in 1992, 
could not pull it out this time. 
Buffalo (7-7). which has not 


Minutemen survived. 

Mike Williams scored 12 of 


won consecutive games smoe his 18 points after halftime Sat- 
September, lost after an emo- ^ Baltimore as UMass, 
tional victory last week over ^ ^ Associated Press 
. _ . . college basketball rankings. 

Although still m the wild- beat toe 1 ltb-ranked Terrapins, 
card race, a Miami victory over 55 . 74 . The Mmutemen over- 
Kansas City on Monday night came a 30-paint effort by Joe 
would dest roy Buffalos Smith and gained a measure of 
chances of a sixth AFC East revenge for a bitter loss in last 


and Johnny Rhodes had 16 
points for the Terrapins. 

UMass had a 61-54 lead be- 
fore Maryland’s Exree Hipp got 
three straight points and Mario 
Lucas scored m the lane to get 
the Terrapins within 61-59. 

Dana Dingle followed with a 
layup and a three-point play to 
put the Minutemen up by sev- 
en. After a Maryland miss, Din- 

COLLEGE HIGflLIGgrS 

gle scored on a breakaway to 
make it 68-59 with 7:44 left. 


No. 3 Arkansas 94, Mnrny 
St 69: Forced to shoot from the 
outside, Clint McDaniel and 
Corey Bed: made 6 of 8 3- 
pointers in the fast half and 
Dwight Stewart hit a trio of 3- 
pointers in the second half in 
Fayetteville, Arkansas. 
McDaniel scored 17 points and 
Beck 11 as the Razorbacks boill 
a 21-point first-half lead. The 
Racers trailed 68-55 with 10:45 
to play, but were ou (scored 15-2 
during the next four minutes. 

No. 4 Kansas 96, N. Caroima 
St 91: In Raleigh, North Caro- 
lina, Sean Pearson hit five 3- 


Smith then scored eight “ a 


title in seven years. 

In his first year with the Vi- 
kings, Moon has already begun 
to rewrite their record books. 

He was 21-for-34 for 261 
yards against Buffalo to give 
him 4,078 yards for the year and 
top Tommy Kramer's team re- 
cord of 3,912. 

Steelers 14, Eagles 3: Not 


season’s NCAA tournament. 

In March, the Minutemen *« Bui Maryland got 
blew a 10 -point aximd-haff «£ *ree pomtsm the last four t£ sd^f record for 


points in a 12-2 ran that 
the Terrapins their first 


record-setting long-range 
shooting night as the Jayhawks 
remained unbeaten. Pearson 


lead in a 95-87 setback, that put mmutes. 


Maryland in the final 16. The 
Minot emen lost a nine-point 
lead Saturday but rallied back 
to win, closing with a 15-3 run. 

Marcus Camby scored 15 


No. 2 UCLA 99, Cal St- FaL 
lertoo 65: Sophomore Charles 


3- pointers in a game, hitting 15. 
No. 9 Duke 69, No. 23 Mkhi- 


even the inventor of the Steel points for UMass, playing its 
Curtain defense could devise a third game against a Top 25 


way to beat the best Pittsburgh 
Steeles since the 1970s. 
The Steelers, shut out for 


team. Lou Roe, saddled by foul 
tremble throughout, was held to 
six points — his fewest in 39 


CTBaanon equaled bis career 

high with 23 points and - Dukeendur^a 24-0Midn- 
grabbed 10 rebounds in gan ran m the fest half to earn 
UCLA’s victory in Los Angles, its 92d consecutive vnetory over 
The Brains led 42-36 at half- a nan conference opponent at 
time and 44-40 early in the sec- ^ a * 01 straight over 

and half before using their su- Mich ig a n . 


three quarters by Philade lph i a games. 

defensive coordinator Bud Car- t 

son's inge nious mix of blitzes Smith made 10 of 18 shots 


perior talent to blow the game 
open. The Brains outscored the 


Michigan led, 51-46, with 
12:41 to play on a breakaway 


Titans, 57-29, in the second dank by Maceo Baston. The 
half. Bine Devils then ran off 15 


CROSSWORD 


ACROSS 

1 Sobbed 
5 Dangerous 
Marcfi date 
9 First-class, In 
slang 


i« Lotion 
ingredient 

is Kind ot tide 
«S Boisterous 
festivity 
17 Bottle tops 


GJ\ 


CAFtAN JACHE 

SENEVE 


is Rivera. 

CaW. 

is Warner 

(Charlie Chan of 
film) 

20 1943 musical 
compos e d by 
37-Across 
23 Poker opener 
24 'High* time 
25 Parts of table 
settings 

29 Source of some 
PBS programs 
29 Six-foot two, for 
example 
39 Prying tool 
34 Mother of 
Hermes 
afGetoutta 
here!" 

34 Numero 

37 Composer Kurt 
SB Popular oft 
additive 
39 Gabby bird 

41 at fame 

42 Grudge 

44 Bridge option 
4» Light switch 
positions 

4* Loews's partner 

on Broadway 
47 Trudge 
«9 Othello's 
ancient 
501928 work 
c o mp os ed by 
37- Across with 
The' 

97 Ache (tor) 
sa Moses' attire 
59 One corner In 
Monopoly 
90 Cote rival 
•1 Hardy- — 
(rarely) 

Sicilian spewer 


ea Vaudeville's Ola 
•4 June honorees 
as Sounds of 
reproof 


1 Texas city 

2 Dash 

3 John PauLe.g. 

4 Having a valid 
wffl 

5 Feeds the 
computer 

e CJear the winter 
windshield 

7 Apiece 

8 One may ba 
roseate 

9 Utah city 
loesvesin 

11 - — fee Terrible 
12 Diner's card 
isEarfyauto 
maker 

2 1 It’s unique ■ 

22 Kind of point 
25 Well-padded 

28 See 31 -Down 
Z7 Three English 

rivers 

29 Fights to save a 
sinking boat 

ao Brat Marta 
character 

31 Wife 26-Down, 
wife of 
37-Across 

32 Gentle runner 
34 Rambled 

37 Rodeo yd! 

40 Slander 

42 Utah My 

43 Light plane 
48 Cake features 
48 Red Square 

figure 



straight points to take a lead 
they never relinquished. 

No. 13 Cincinnati 110, Teo- 
nessee-Martin 56: Stunned by 
an upset by Canisius, Cincin- 
nati took out its frustrations on 
an overmatched Tennessee- 
Martin by scoring 64 points in 
the opening half, then coasting 
to the consolation title in the 
Delta Air lines Classic in Cin- 
cinnati. It was the first time that 
Cincinnati failed to win its own 
5-ycar-old tournament. 

E. Michigan 92, No. 14 Wis- 
consin 76: In YpsxLmti, Michi- 
gan, Brian Tolbert scored 26 
points and Eastern Michigan 
grabbed a 37-point lead en 
route to an upset. Kareem Car- 
penter added 21 points and 
pulled down 18 rebounds as the 
Eagles successfully exploited 
the absence of center Rashard 
Griffith, who missed the game 
with an ankle injury. 

Nebraska 96, No. 15 Michi- 
gan SL 91 : Nebraska, playing at 
home, scored the fust seven 
points of overtime and made 
five of six free throws in the 
final 27 seconds. Nebraska’s 
Tom Wald sent the game into 
overtime when he hit three free 
throws after he was fouled on a 
3-point attempt with 0.5 sec- 
onds left. 

No. 18 Georgetown 83, Mem- 
phis 80: George Butler’s 3- 
pointer at the buzzer sent the 
game into overtime in Toronto, 
where No. 18 Georgetown fi- 
nally prevailed. 



Ted Mittn/HcAMoWd Prea 

Maryland 9 s Joe Sxzdtfa scored 30 points when be wasn't being overran by UMass players. 


Baseball Owners Cool to Players 9 Plan 




49 Nat yet risen 
» Printer's goof 

51 Dog command 

52 Hip songs 

53 Exploding star 

54 Gobbles 

ss Where to do 
figure eights 
56 "Ob. woel" 


QNao York Times/ Edited by fTiUShortz. 

Solution to Puzzle of Dec. 9 


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By Marie Maske 

Washington Pea Service 

RYE BROOK, New York —Die Major 
League Baseball Players Association pre- 
sented its new labor proposal to the team 
owners, as the two sides resumed negotia- 
tions in what probably is a last-gasp effort 
to reach & settlement before the owners put 
a salary-cap system in place. 

Die owners offered no immediate judg- 
ment on the nnion’s proposal on Saturday, 
at least not publicly. Donald Fehr, chief of 
the players union, said he expected to 
receive the. owners' official response Sun- 
day or Monday. But it was dear that the 
owners believed the union's proposed pay- 
roll tax —which would be approximately 5 
percent initially — does not adequately 
address their goal of curbing player sala- 
ries. Said one owner: “It’s not enough.” 

John Harrington, the Boston Red Sox 
general partner and chairman of the owners’ 
neg o t i at ing committee, said the owners 
were “encouraged” by “concerns about our 
mutual self-interest,” But he reiterated that 
the owners would evaluate the proposal on 
whether it addresses “cost certainty,** and 
said that “deadlines are upon us.” 

But a management source said the own- 
ers were working on a counterproposal If 
William J. Usety, the special mediator, 
can’t get the two sides to reach an agree- 
ment here, this could be the final break- 


down in talks. Die owners are scheduled to 
meet Thursday in Chicago, and if there’s 
no settlement, they plan to declare an 
impasse in ne gnriflfipm and unilaterally 
imposes salary cap. That likely would lead 
to the players extending thdr strike of 
nearly four months into the 1995 season. 

The proposal as expected, was an at- 
tempt to create a “partnership” with the 
owners, something the owners have talked 
about doing often during this dispute. 

“The purpose of this proposal is not 
only to attempt to break this logjam in a 
way everyone can live with,” Fehr said, 
“but also to do so in a way that will force 
the two sides to do something they haven’t 
done — work together day by day.” 

The union released details of its propos- 
al after it was given to the owners. Dial 
drew an admonishment from Usery, who 
also continued to urge the owners publicly 
not to implement a salary cap. 
cw -1 The players’ proposal calls for a 
three-year plan of increased revenue-shar- 
ing among the 28 The proposal 

would generate a pproxim ately $58 milli on 
in subsidies per year for small-market 
dubs. Of that, about $23 milli on would 
result from a change in the portion of gate 
receipts; visiting dubs would receive 25 
percent of the receipts from each game. 
Currently, visiting teams receive about 20 
percent in the American League and 
roughly 5 percent in the NationaL 


The rest, about $35 million, would come 
from a tax on teams’ player payrolls. Using 
last season as a model the tax would be 
about 5 percent initially. Under the owners' 
taxation proposal three weeks ago, the tax 
rate would have topped out at 77 percent for 
(he dub with the highest payroll last season. 
The tax system is the area in which the 
owners probably win call the union's pro- 
posal unresponsive to (hear concerns. But 
Feb* said the union’s proposal would create 
a “drag” on player salaries, since the teams 
with the highest payrolls would be paying 
the most in taxes — and thus would have 
less money available to pay players. 

Union officials said (he players' proposal 
could create $100 million in salary savings 
for the owners for the duration of the agree- 
ment Die players’ proposal also would ae- 
ate a separate “industry growth fund” of at 
least Soft million. The players and owners 
would contribute at least $30 million each, 
with the players’ portion probably coming 
from thdr licensing fund, and the owners’ 
portion from expansion fees. 

The growth fund would be administered 
by a joint players-owners committee and 
would be used for marketing, community 
service and international development 

S ects, including the improv e ment and 
, acement of ballparks, an idea that 
originated with the Baltimore Orioles' ren- 
egade majority owner, Peter Angelos. 


Page 22 


LANGUAGE 


Getting to the Core ofCyberlingo 


By William S afire 

W ashington — wm- 

stoa Churchill is turning 
over in his grave. Peering into 
the mists of the future, the 
keepers of all the books and 
papers of the past and present 
at the library of Congress came 
up with a dreary name [or its 
plans to reproduce a core of its 
holdings as on-line digital bits; 
the National Information In-, 
frastructure. 

When Sr Winston in 1950 
heard an opposition politician 
use infrastructure, the lover of 
forthright English prose rose in 
the House of Commons to heap 
ridicule on the uppity member; 
‘It may well be that these words 
‘infra’ and ‘supra’ have been in- 
troduced into our current polit- 
ical parlance by the band of 
intellectual highbrows who are 
naturally anxious to impress 
British labor with the fact that 
they learned Larin at Winches- 
ter.” 

Vampire-like, infrastructure 
has returned in the dead of night 
to suck the blood out of the 
colorful language of the infor- 
mation age. A Washington Post 
editorialist had a livelier idea, 
infradigging up the scene of the 
linguistic crime as **1116 ‘Cyber- 
brary’ of Congress.” Let’s inter- 
face it: cyber- is the hot combin- 
ing form of our time, 
when a Los Angeles think 

tanlr started the experimental 
Democracy Network to let poli- 
ticians interact on line, the 
move was headlined as “Cam- 


ed with the Internet (aJ^a. the 
information highway, info- 
balm, autostrada, etc.).” Gib- 
son’s novel was the forerunner 
of what has come to be called 
cyberpunk fiction. 

In what it hailed as “the first 
interactive election event of its 
kind,” U. S. News & World Re- 
port labeled its election night 


or bdongs not to the brawny 
soldier but to the astrophysics 
major who invented smart 
bombs,” somebody who's 

called a cyberwmL 

Newsweek, which calls its 
page covering the virtual virtues 
Cyberscope, informs us that 
“steamy computer bulletin- 
board exchanges” form what is 
called cybersex. Naturally, the 


climax induced by computer- 
transmitted stimuli is a cyber- 


transmilled stimuli is a cyber- 
gasm, as safe as sex gets. 

A New York advertising 
agency, Biederman, -Kelly & 
Shaffer, issued a glossary of 
“the new cybertingo" titled u Cy- 
bertalk"; its definition of cyber - , 
die combining form, is ^just a 
slang hand-me-down from Cy- 
bernetics.” 

Which brings us to Norbert 
Wiener, the early automatical ge- 
nius, who settled os kybeman, 
the Greek word for “to steer,” 
hence “govern,” and declared in 
1948: “We have decided to call 


Core is in. To get right to the 
heart of the matter, as we used 
to say, such terms as center, hub, 
nucleus, crux and even quintes- 
sence have been rendered hope- 
lessly old-fashioned. 

Those who remember core 
mainly for “rotten to the core” 
had better get down to the ker- 
nel of the nut: the vogue word’s 
power is shown by its use not 
merely as a noun but also as a 
modifier. 

Newtonians speak of core be- 
liefs; virtuous William Bennett 
holds forth on core values; liber- 
al altiterators worry about core 
concerns in the core city (inner is 
out). Thus has core established 
itself as the year’s hottest attrib- 
utive noun. 

When did we start using core 
as a modifier? In the 19th cen- 
tury, core bar and core box were 
used in metal-casting. In 1925, a 
guide to Stone Age implements 
in the British Museum observed 
“tile change from a core-indus- 
try to a flake-industry." (Flake* 
industries today range from 
head shops to political com- 
mentary.) 

To get to the nub, 1 turned to 
the Barnhart Dictionary of Ety- 
mology. The noun is suggested 
there to be derived from the 
French coeur, literally “heart,” 
from the Latin cor for the same 
word, which does not lead to a 
coronary (from the Latin coro- 
na, “crown”). The etymologists 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TKEBUT’VE. MOHPAY, DECEMBE R 12, 1994 

— A French Importer 

SSL Of ‘Frontier Culture’ 


By Ginger Danto 

D AMM A RI E-EN-PU ISAY E, 
France — “It's not Texas, says 
Scree Lecacheur, standing boot-deep 
in tire swampy turf of la Puisaye, a 
region of southeast France encom- 
passing picturesque parts of Burgun- 
dy, but otherwise notorious for in- 
chmeal weather. “Bui it might as well 
be,” he adds quickly — ever the opti- 
mist — a key ingredient, along with 
capital, for the vicissitudes of the 
horse trade, 

For Lecacheur, whose fluent Eng- 
lish is spiced with a Texan twang. 


? aarter-mlle races staged by tobacco 
anners in town streets and plants- 


Tastemakersl 


An occasional series 
about people for whom 
style is a way of life 



the entire field of control and report that the first use erf core 
communication theory, whether to mean “the part of a nuclear 
in the machine or in the animal, reactor containing fissionable 


paigning in Cyberspace "■ that 
word was coined by William 
Gibson in “Neuromancer,” his 
1984 sci-fi novel. BH1 Howard, 
executive editor of PC Maga- 
zine. modems me that “origi- 
nally cyberspace was the future 
network created when people 
melded their brains with com- 
puters. It then came to mean the 
romanticized nonplace where 


communication theory, whether 
in the machine or in the animal, 
by the name Cybernetics/' 
(That’s how to coin a ward au- 
thoritatively. Wiener was appar- 


ope rates a 120-hectare (300-acre) 
spread on the outskirts of D arom a n e- 
en-Puisaye, where he raises all- Ameri- 
cas quarter horses. 

Comments like “sound and 
“steady” — high praise from a horse- 
man — pepper bis assessment of tire 
latest crop of colts and fillies. AH are 
re gis tered with the Amarillo, Texas- 
based American Quarter Horse Asso- 
ciation, an organization founded in 
1940 to protect and promote the 
breed, currently numbering 32 mo- 
tion animals worldwide. As the first 
large-scale importer and breeder of 
quarter horses in France, Lecacheur 
has possibly done enough business in 


reactor containing fissionable 
material” was recorded in 1949, 
and note that the verb form — 
“to takeout tire core of frail” — 


Amari llo to justify his accent. 

A 56-year-old former advertising 
executive, Lecacheur saw in the over- 
irrigated and ni gge d pasture land of 
La Puisaye a terrain suited to a breed 
so linked with the American frontier 
and the cowboys who claimed it. 

“This place is truly a marriage of 
France and America,” Lecacheur 
said. "The typical French provincial 
farmhouse together with the quarter 
horse.” 

The first breed developed in the 
United States, the quarter horse origi- 
nated in the Carolmas and Virginia, 
where it got its name for excelling at 


ently unaware of the 1834 use of dates to the mid- 15th century. 


cybernetique by the French 
physicist A. M. Ampfere to mean 
“the art of governing.”) 


But this excellent reference 
work about linguistic roots has 
no coverage of the attributive 
noon that today’s deep think ers 
have taken to their innermost 


“On those things that are at 
the core of our contract,” said 


lexicon. For that, you have to 
go to the cover of the dictio- 


go to the com of the dictio- 
nary, which advertises itself as 


come to be more broadly equat- there will be no compromise. 


New York Tima Service 


farmers in town streets and planta- 
tions. A capacity for swift starts, stam- 
ina, calm and agility when it came to 
sliding stops appealed to cowboys, 
who adopted the compact-musdcd 
species for cattle work. Thereafter, the 
quarter horse became an integral part 
of frontier history. 

Enamored of the myth of the Amer- 
ican West, the French are conspicuous 
consumers of frontier culture, from 
film to fashion. “Why not import the 
very symbol of that life, which is alive 
and well today?” Lecacheur asked 
himself in the late 70s, before delving 
overnight into a project for which be 
had far less experience than insight 
But there was, within his mind’s mix 
of challenge and calculation, a deeper 
reason. Sentiment. If any animal in- 
spires such emotion in man, it is the 
horse. 

Hones have been part of Leca- 
cheur’s life as far back as he can re- 
member, from about age 5, when his 
family left France for Morocco to wait 
out the war. His early memories are of 
fragrant orange groves, and of the 
handsome "Barbes” horses that 
roamed his adopted home. He went to 
work at 17 on a U. S. Army base 
outride Casablanca, and subsequently 
found his profession in advertising, 
notably commercial radio broadcasts. 

With his earnings he indulged his 
hobby of big-game hunting, and 
turned a profit as one of Africa’s last 
white hunters, leading expeditions on 
the continent for 15 years. 

He created a radio program for Af- 
rican villages, with news and how-to 
information "like digging a well” 

But childhood memories exerted a 
profound influence; and Lecacheur- 
longed once again to the company of 
horses. 



p*°(, 

pis « h 
tin- Dr? 


Ginger Draw 

Serge Lecacheur with his Palo m i n o stallion “Make No Mistake, . 


“I went looking for tire horse of my 
youth — the Bar&e,” he said of visit- 
ing the Salon du Cheval, a horse fair 


it was love at first right The owner 
was Michel Blanc- Dumont, a devotee 
of cowboy culture who in 1981 found- 
ed the now 400-member French Quar- 
ter Horse Association. Lecacheur 
(who served a term as president) was 
seventh to sign up. At the time, there 
were 13 registered quarter horses in 
France. 

Emotion notwithstanding, the en- 
trepreneurial Lecacheur invariably 
saw an opportunity to exploit the 
quarter horse’s association with the 
American West and tire traditional 
French liking for horses, from farm to 
military front, racetrack to Olympic 
arena. 

Inspired by the kind of projections 


that had nurtured his prior ventures, 
Lecacheur set off to comb the United 


held annually in Paris. 

“The horse most resembling the 
Barbe turned out to be an American 
quarter horse,” he said, recalling that 


Lecacheur set off to comb the United 
States. Hie sought specimens that 


commercial stables, stud farms and 
backyard sellers. 

His reputation preceded him. “1 be- 
came known as the SL00,000 man,” 
Lecacheur said, referring to What he 
paid for a stallion. Briefly. Europe’s 
leading quarter horse breeder, Leca- 
cheurhad 80 horses and 25 brood 
mares roaming his oasis in the heart of 
La Puisaye. 

His success spawned several quarter 
Irene farms around France, which 
* ranks sixth worldwide in the number 
of registered quarto: horses (1,200), 
after the Unitea States, Canada, Ger- 
many, Italy and Mexico. Terms like le 
roping and le cutting have entered tire 
French horseman’s vernacular, and 
names like “Silver Dude Frosty” and 
“Smoky Bandit” adorn French breed- . 
ing books. 




At-'. 

psz 


duce the quarter horse abroad, from Ginger Danto is a free-lance journal* 

Texas to Oklahoma, California to Ne- ist based in Paris who specializes in the 
braska. Ire visited private breeders and arts. 


WEATHER 


POSTCARD 


Europe 


Forecast for Tuesday through Thursday, as provided by Accu-Weather. 


Today 

High Low W 
OF CJF 

Algarve IBB* '0/SO s 

Amsterdam 11*2 ■»/» IX 

Ar*an 9/41 1.34 sn 

Anns 15/59 8/48 pc 

Biucalm 22.71 10.-50 s 

Mpocto Bm 2/35 DC 

Bertn 6*43 2/35 c 

Brussels 12/53 SMI pc 

Bueapaa 7*4 4/39 pc 

Cow-tome* 5/41 2/35 on 


Tomorrow 
KOgh Law W 
e/F c/p 
17/02 11/52 pc 
e <46 «ra pc 
5/41 -2/20 r 
17/62 11/52 8 
ie«e 11/62 s 
7/44 30! (ft 

6/ 48 2/35 sn 
10/50 fl/43 pc 

7/44 4/32 aft 
6/41 2/35 tfl 


Today 
Hlfld Low 
OP OF 


Tomorrow 
I* high Low W 
OP OF 


In Sea of CDs, Vinyl Records Staging a Small Comeback 




Com CM Sol 

10«4 

10*0 fl 

17/62 

11*2 pc 

Dutt'f 

12/53 

fi/43 K 

9 m 

3/37 1 

Edmtwgn 

8i«C 

7/44 1ft 

7/44 

5M1 r 

fionreo 

19*6 

BK3 S 

17/62 

9/46 * 

FmrWun 

B/46 

3/37 m 

6/43 

3/37 sh 

Cenna 

9/40 

3/37 DC 

10*0 

4/39 a 

He&rOu 

3.37 

.5*4 pc 

4/39 

-405 a 


11152 

B/J8 * 

11*2 

7/44 r 

LMPaunas 

24/73 

15*9 a 

26/77 

17*2 » 


10*1 

10*0 a 

15*9 

10 *0 ( 

Loncc/i 

15.53 

8W3 pc 

12*3 

6 M3 pc 

Moiatd 

ia«4 

5/41 ■ 

14*7 

0/43 a 

imn 

11*2 

3137 S 

11*2 

□Ml ■ 

Wacom 

-S/24 

•7/20 sn 

-4/26 

-700 an 

MUMCft 

BKB 

2/35 PC 

a/46 

307 po 

MtO 

23/73 

B/46 D 

21/70 

11/52 a 

OSD 

1/34 

■3/27 in 

0/32 

■307 in 

PM TO 

21/70 

11/52 S 

18/W 

13/55 » 

Pwi» 

13*5 

4/39 • 

11*2 

6/41 ■ 

Pm(M 

5/41 

104 C 

4/39 

1/3* f 

HoumwlK 

S/35 

■307 w 

307 

■lOt pc 


21/70 

7/44 a 

19*8 

10/50 ■ 


-6/22 a 

-307 

-0/22 »n 

Swdtfmfrn 

2/33 

-2/29 pc 

206 

-2(29 «1 

embcuig 

11/52 

205 pc 

B«B 

3/37 I 

Taam 

3/37 

-4/26 ns 

4/30 

-4/25 ■ 

'tvka 

i3/sa 

5/43 a 

13*5 

7/44 a 

VMM 

7/44 

3/37 pc 

B/43 

3*7 Ml 


3/37 

1/34 1 

3/37 

0/32 r 

Zutcn 

BM3 

1/34 DC 

7/44 

2*8 a 

Oceania 





22/71 

13*5 a 

21/70 

14*7 pc 

Scanty 

26/82 

21/70 » 

28*2 

’9/88 pc 


Banghdi 

Bd*ng 

Hong Nang 

Man/a 

New MS 

Seoul 

snangnel 

Stogvxm 

Twpw 

Tokyo 


32/BB 24/75 
1/34 -12711 
22 fn 16/64 
31/88 20/88 
28/82 7/44 

9 MS -2/29 
fl/48 4/39 
28/82 23/73 
23173 18/64 
fl/46 8/43 


By Neil Strauss 

New York Tones Service 


N EW YORK — Vinyl is back. For the 
first time in 13 years, sales of old- 


■'TTw—S' 

Moment 


I Urautenanty 
com 


UwMKffflUy 

Ha 


North America 
WMhlngTon. D.C., through 
Boston will be chilly; dry 
weamar is favored, yoi soma 
rain and snow cannot bo 
ruled out. Ontario and ths 
Great Lakes status wiB have 
Hurries: maybe snow by 
Thursday. Texas wd have a 
low showers as will San 
Francisco through Vancou- 
ver. 


Europe 

Strang wlnde wtt herald mod- 
est coring and a Oey or two 
ot showers Tuesday from 
U.K. to Germany, Belgium 
and Netherlands. Showery 
weather wW reach the Alps 
early Wednesday; epouy 
rains and gusty winds are 
possible hi Italy midweek. 
MW, sotted weather will fiOW 
In Spain and Portugal. 


Asia 

Near-normal cold will settle 
from north China to Korea; 
Befng end Seoul wfflbe dry. 
Chilly Shanghai may hove a 
ftfto nth; a law shoiwre may 
dampen Taipei, Hong Kong 
end Guangzhou. In Japan, 
showers may wet Tokyo 
Tuesday; oold ram and wet 
enow will chill weef-coeat 
stas. 


Mgkns 17/82 

dm Town 30/B8 

QuaUsnea 1808 

Him 1906 

LS0 W 31/88 

Nurats 81/70 

Tins 1804 


12/53 pc 17*82 13/55 PC 
17/8 3 » 2802 1709 « 
fl/46 « 17<S2 9/48 I 


7/44 pc 82 771 8/48 I 

24/75 * 3108 24/73 » 
11/52 pc 23/73 12/53 pc 
B/46 t 2008 12/53 ■ 


North America 


Middle East 


Latin America 


Today Tomorrow 

High Low W Nltfi Low W 

OP Of OF OF 

Beirut 16/81 1308 Ift 1702 1306 *i 
Cairo 1801 1102 C 1702 11 IK tfi 

Qunoacua TT/B2 8/43 pc 1102 601 aft 

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Uwcr 1908 2/36 pc 14/37 307 ah 

Kpsrr <702 1203 pc 21/70 7/44 s 


Tot taf Tomorrow 

M«i taw W High Low \ 


CO OF OP OP 
Boom Aina 9706 23/73 t 3006 1702 pc 

Caracas 2804 2006 pc 2804 2006 pc 

Una 22/73 1804 a 23/73 1908 pc 

MwdeoCay 2006 1000 pc 21/70 6/46 pc 

reodajmtal 3008 22/71 PC 32/88 23/71 1 pc 

acreage 28/79 8/43 a 28/79 8/48 pe 


wwaraga 

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Beaton 

CHcago 

Danvar 

OMH 

BonoMu 

Hourton 

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mUSnow. We* Wthotwr AM imp* ferocaota and Mtm proviM by Accm-WmBmt, inc. 0 19B4 


Torarao 

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1-130 pc 
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I -6/22 PC 
I -10/16 pc 
i -6/22 C 
I 21/70 pc 
I 7/44 C 
1 6*41 PC 
! iB/64 an 
’ -10/18 PC 
I -180 pc 
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I 4/39 DC 

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IN first time in 13 years, sales of old- 
fashioned vinyl LP recordings are on the 
rise. Sales In the United States have in- 
creased by 80 percent for the first half of 
this year compared with the same period 
last year, according to the Recording In- 
dustry Association of America. 

Stores like Tower Records are stocking 
vinyl again, record companies like Mobile 
Fidelity Sound Lab and Blue Note are mak- 
ing it again, and musicians are championing 
it as a better-looking and sounding medium. 

Recent albums by Nirvana, Neal Young, 
Johnny Cash and Sonic Youth were all 
released on vinyl at least a week before the 
CD version was available. In hip-hop, the 
group Arrested Development has started 
its own advocacy organization called Pow- 
er to the VinyL 

The same shift in senribiliiy is registering 
among classical music lovers, particularly 
opera fanatics. lake their pop counterparts, 
many maintain that the voice comes 


through more truly on warm-sounding vinyl 
than on cleaner, colder CDs. Many also 
believe that cover art lodes better on 12- 
inch albums than it does on 5-inch CDs and 
that jacket information is more legible and 
complete. Still, for the moment no major 
classical labels are idearing vinyl commer- 
cially, and the phenomenon remains, far 
more striking in the world of pop. 

Pearl Jam's new album, "VitalQgy,” 
went to No. 55 an Billboard's pojj charts, 
with sales of more than 35,000 copies. This 
feat would be unremarkable except for one 
fact: The album was available only on 
vinyl. Two weeks after the LP version was 
made available, it was released on CD and 


sales are hardly on the decline. LPs cur* 
rentiy account for only two-tenths of one 
percent erf aQ recordings sold. 

“I think the return of vinyl is a nostalgic 
thing,” said Jay Berman, the chairman oL 
the Recording Industry Association a 
America. ‘Tfs interesting that if s happen- 
ing at a time when the technological world 
15-swirimg around os with multimedia and 
interactive CDs. Is the midst of all this, 
vinyris re-emerging as a. blip on the screen 
and maybe as a reaction to technology.” 

Ray Farrell of Geffen Records, which 


puts out most of its high-profile alterna- 
tive-rock releases on LP in advance of the 


cassette. According to Billboard, ^Vlta- 
lew” is the first album to appear on its top 
200 pop album chart because of vinyl sales 
x the proliferation of the CD. 


since the proliferation of the CD. 

But don't sell your CD player yet Vinyl 
has returned not necessarily as a rival to 
the CD, but as a fetish object or relic. Most 
vinyl versions erf rock records, including 
Pearl Jam’s, are released only in limited 
editions of fewer than 100,000, and CD 


tive-rock releases on LP in advance of the 
CD, agreed. “We don’t make a whole lot of . 
money off of vinyl," he said. “We're doing 
it because if s fun, fans like it, and if s a . 
good marketing tool for a band. Record 
stores often display vinyl more prominent- 
ly than a CD” 

“Vinyl is still particularly important for " 
the punk rock community,” said Brian- 
Long of Caroline Records, an independent 
New York-based record label, “ana it is at - 
the heart of club culture and dance music.”. 



^ ' i 

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AT&T USADirect* and World Connect 9 Service. • - ] j M - 




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you’re out of touch. Simply dial the AT&T Access : 


Kiosk 


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Number below of the country you're calling from. • ! '-flllpl 1) 

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In a matter of seconds, you’ll be connected with an . *... j _ ^ 

English-speaking Operator or voice prompt for clean ; ; 


reliable connections to the U.S. or over 300 other ■ 


- 


. Some of it might even be go^d. 

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countries. Charging it to pur AT&T Calling Caid can !'C ; ' 
minimize hotel surcharges and assure you econom- ' 


■ ‘i -'<< *■ ” . 

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ical AT&T rates, too. So go to the nearest phone and i^, 
check in with those who said,“Don’t worry about ■, 


a thing. After all, that's reason enough to worry. 


ASIA /PACIFIC 
AUSTRALIA .1800-881-011 


CHINA. PRC**» 
HONGKONG 
INDIA* . . 
INDONESIA* 
JAPAN*. 

KOREA 

MAM) 

MALAYStt- 


10811 
. 808*1111 
OfflMtT 
001-881*10 
0039-111 
099-11 
0600- >11 
. 800*0 011 


NEW ZEALAND 

PHIUPPmES* 

RUSSIA‘*|H0SC0W) 
SAIPANt 


000-311 
. 105-11 
.155*6042 
23S-Z872 


AUSTRIA*". 

BEUMflr. . 

BULGARIA 

CBOATOt*.... 


.022-003-011 

WOO-llM-Tfl 

D0-1B03-C010 

.9WB-BH1 


SINGAPORE awOUI-111 

SRI LANKA 430-430 

TAIWAN* 0080-10288-0 

THAILAND* KHMSWlll 

EUROPE 

ARMENIA** 8014111 


CZECH REPUBLIC 08-420*00101 
DENMARK" . . 8801-0010 


FINLAND’.., 

FRANCE. 

BERMANY 

GREECE- 


0800*100-10 
.100-0011 
. siao-nno 
oo-MV-tm 


HUHSART 

icajuro*. . . . 

IRELAND .. 

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USNTENSIBN* 
UTHUANIA* . . 

luhmmorg. 

MALTA- 

MONACO* . .. 

NEfflfflUWDS- 


MO-MKHrmi 

109-851 

1-S08-S60-0W 
.. ..172-1011 
.1SB-00-11 

80106 

. .j-m-Giu 
. 0800-810-110 

190*0011 

. .96-822-0111 


NORWAY BOO-1 90 -11 

POLAND**' .(MI10-400-011T 
PORTUGAL^ 09817*1*288 


PORTUGAL^ 
ROMANIA. 
SLOVAK REP. 
SPAIN* . . 

swam*... 

SWITZERLAND* 

UKRAINE* 

U.JL 


■ 01*800*4288 

BB*42B*MnOl 

980*00*00*11 

020-705*611 

155-88/11 

B&10O-11 

0580*89*0011 


MIDDLE EAST 

bm9vsn man 

CYPRUS*.. .080-90010 

EBYPT* (CAIRO) 1 . . 510*0280 

ISRAEL 177-10MHI 

KUWAIT m 0-208 

LEBANON dGMUTl 1 

SAUDI ARABIA 1-800-10 

TURKEY' . . 00-880-12277 

U WAB EMIRATES' - - M0-«* 


AMERICAS 

Aflssmw* ...ooi-fioo-Mo-nn 

BOLIVIA* 0-800-1112 

BRMIL 000-8010 

CANAOA 1-800-575-2222 

CWLE OOO-OJIZ 

COLORWA 980-11-0018 

R SALVADOR*. 190 

HONDURAS*. . . . 123 

MEXICOMA - 95-W0.1ffi.4Mfl 


PANAMA... 

PERU* 

VENEZUELA*. 


109 

191 

.80-811-120 


TrueWorld m Connections 


AFRICA 

GABON* 

gaiwia* 

IVORY COAST* ... . 
K0IYA* . . ........ 


. 000-081 

88111 

. 00-111-11 
.OSW-IO 


MBERIA 797-797 

SOOTH AFRICA 0-888-09-0123 


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