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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


% *v / 


London, Tuesday, December 13, 1994 


No. 34,770 , . 


ExitbyDelors 
Deals a Blow 
To Europe’s 
Unity Dream 

By Joseph Fitchett 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — The withdrawal by Jacques 
Deters from the French presidential elec- 
tion sends a bad signal about the future of 
Europe. 

Turning away from the political prize 
that seemed within his grasp, Mr. Delors 
said that he refused to become a president 
l , who could not deliver. He thereby wors- 
* ened the widening credibility gap in 
France, especially on the divisive question 
of greater European unity. 

His gesture differs from the routine pro- 
cess of electoral elimination in the sense 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

that he left the Socialists without a promis- 
ing candidate, effectively conceding the 
French presidency to conservatives, whom 
he has criticized for foot-dragging on the 
issue of European unity. 

The Delors move amounts to a dire 
indication of France's readiness to pursue 
closer cooperation with Germany on the 
path toward deeper European integration. 

The decision is a blow to Ger mans, 
starting with Chancellor Helmut Kohl, 
who had counted on France to support 
their ideas of a strong Europe thai could 
absorb Germany's ambitions. Mr. Kohl 
has pledged to make European unity the 
centerpiece of his last term as chancellor. 

“It means that Kohl has no partner in 
trying to put in place a modem Europe 
strong enough to define comfortable new 
relations with the United States and Rus- 
sia," according to a US. official 
After 10 years as head of the European 
Commission in Brussels, a job he will leave 
in January, Mr. Deters had the perfect 

P rofile in the eyes of Germany. But in 
ranee, his partially reconstructed social- 
ism was an electoral handicap in a decid- 
edly conservative political climate. Seen as 
"acorruptable and internationally experi- 
enced. however, his presidential stature 
was unquestionable. 

What pushed him to withdraw, asso- 
ciates said, was bis realization of how 
deeply divided France "had become over 
European unity. Although Mr. Deters said 
that an electoral campaign was the wrong ‘ 
time to debate Europe’s future, the issue 
was likely to be forced on him by other 
candidates. 

With Europe enlarging to 15 member 
states next month, it is a crucial moment. 
Mr. Delors apparently believed that 
France was not ready for an agonizing 
debate on the issue. 

By standing aside, he hoped to preserve 
the chances for European unity. A united 
Europe figures prominently m Western 
hopes of making Germany fed secure, 
without fears of isolation like those that 
fueled German nationalism in the past 
Now the campaign for the May election 
will be dominated by conservative leaders 
who have been backing away from doser 
European integration, partly under pres- 
sure from voters frightened of growing 
German power. 

Mr. Delors has argued that this conser- 
vative French nationalism will backfire. As 
the American official said, “A GanJhst 
France will engender a Ganilist- style Ger- 
many.” 

In other words, Germans may start to 
rhinlf in terms of European unity as a 

See FRANCE, Page 8 


Kiosk 

High Court dears 
Ex-Brazil Leader 

BRASILIA (AF) — The Supreme 
Court on Monday acquitted former Pres- 
ident Fernando Collor de Mello of cor- 
ruption charges because of lack of evi- 
dence. , , ,, . 

The panel voted, 5 to 3, to absolve Mr. 
Collor of charges that he funneled mil- 
lions of dollars in kickbacks for public 
works projects into bank accounts for ms 

personal use. . . .. 

A congressional investigation of tte 
allegations against Mr. Collor set off 
nationwide protests and led to ms im- 
peachment by the Iowct house of Con- 

resigned in 1992 to avoid a tnal 

by the Senate. 

UN Command Change 

UNITED NATIONS, New York 
(Reuters) — The United Nations an- 
nounced on Monday that Mqor General 
Rupert Smith of Britain, who distm- 
gffi himself in the Gulf War, would 
lake over command of the UN forces in 
Bosnia from Lieutenant General Mi- 
chael Rose on Jan. 24. 



Yeltsin Faces Fears 
Of Long Ethnic War 

He Appeals to Parliament for Unity ; 
Troops Halt Outside Rebel Capital 


•• • 


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A Chechen man confronting a Russian soldier Monday, as troops moved to wi thin 25 kilometers of Chechnya’s capital 

A Key Critic Swallows U.S. -Korea Pact 


By Andrew Pollack 

New York Tones Service 

SEOUL — In what could portend a 
significant victory for President Bill 
Clinton, a leading Senate critic of the 
nuclear agreement between the United 
States and North Korea softened bis 
position Monday and predicted that the 
incoming Republican-controlled Con- 
gress would not follow through on recent 
threats to overturn the accord. 

“As far as any efforts to scuttle that 
agreement, I don’t anticipate any,” Sena- 
tor Frank H. Murkowski, Republican of 
Alaska, said at a news conference here 
after he and Senator Paul Simon, Demo- 
crat of ffimms, made a rare visit by high' 
level American officials to North Korea. 

The comments by Mr. Murkowski 
seem to remove one of the first chal- 


lenges to his foreign policy that Mr. 
Clinton was expected to face next year 
from the Republicans, who swept to con- 
trol of both houses of Congress in last 
month’s elections. 

Mr. Murkowski is in line to become 
c hairman of the Senate's subcommittee 
on East Asia in the new Congress, so his 
opinion on the nuclear accord will carry 
great weight. 

Mr. Murkowski vociferously criticized 
the nuclear agreement Tate- Iasi month, 
saying that the United States had “given 
away the store” by making too many 
concessions. 

The senator said at that time that he 
would seek to overturn the agreement by 
blocking the United States from buying 
the dl it is committed to supply to North 
Korea under the pact. A few days later, 
at a Senate hearing, Mr. Murkowski 


pulled back from that threat, but some 
other Republican lawmakers still said 
they would try to block the funding 
needed to implement the accord. 

The agreement, signed in Geneva in 
October, requires North Korea to give 
up activities that are suspected of being 
aimed at bomb development. In ex- 
change it will receive two modem nucle- 
ar reactors, at an estimated cost of 54 
btiJion that will be borne mainly by 
South Korea and Japan. 

In addition, the United States will' 
provide North Korea with fuel oil until 
the new nuclear plants are ready and will 
relax its restrictions on economic and 
diplomatic relations with the communist 
nation. 

Mr. Murkowski said his trip the last 
See KOREA, Page 8 


By Steven Erlanger 

New York Tunes Service 

MOSCOW — President Boris N. Yell- 
sin appealed Monday for political unity 
and parliamentary support for his invasion 
of the breakaway Russian region of Chech- 
nya as Russian troops, after minor clashes, 
stopped 25 kilometers outside the capital, 
Grozny. 

The R ussian Army does not intend to 
enter Grozny, Russian spokesmen said, 
but the massive military presence is in- 
tended to speed along talks to settle Lhe 
crisis that began. Monday between Russian 
and Chechen negotiators in the nearby 
Russian town of Vladikavkaz. 

But with nearly 60 Russian soldiers al- 
ready taken prisoner, at least eight more 
wounded Monday in Chechen rocket at- 
tacks, and the beginnings of disturbances 
in the neighboring north Caucasus states 
of Ingushetia and Dagestan, Moscow rang 
Monday with sharp political criticism of 
Mr. Yeltsin. 

A group of parliamentary factions rang- 
ing from the liberal democratic Russia's 
Cptiice to the Communist Party held a 
joint press conference to condemn Mr. 
Yeltsin’s actions and to call for a peaceful 
resolution to the conflict There were also 
three rallies in a cold, snowy Moscow that 
drew some 5,000 demonstrators. 

The deputies, who are preparing for an 
emergency debate Tuesday in the State 
Duma, or lower house, were uniformly 
critical of Mr. Yeltsin’s resort to force now, 
after federating the self-declared indepen- 
dence of Chechnya for the last three years. 
Some talked of trying to impeach Mr. 
Ydtsin, but most considered that highly 
unlikely. 

Grigori A. Yavlinsky, a prominent liber- 
al economist, said he feared that Mr. Ydt- 
sin would precipitate “a long Caucasian 
war” and produce nothing positive. Like 
Mr. Yavlinsky, Yegor T. Gaidar, the for- 
mer prime minister and leader of Russia’s 
Choice, the largest party in Parliament, 
called for restraint 

“We are foir a maximal peace initiative," 
he said, calling on Parliament to “devise an 
approach for avoiding bloodshed.” Mr. 
Gaidar has been loyal to Mr. Ydtsin but 
has broken with the president on this issue. 

Anatoli S. Sidorov, a member of Vladi- 
mir V. Zhirinovsky’s party, said the move- 
ment into Chechnya could not be called an 
“invasion,” since no international border 


Seeds of Hope for Rwanda: A Plan to Avert Famine 


By Curt Suplee 

Washington Yost Service 

WASHINGTON — Millions of Rwandans who sur- 
vived the horrors of civil war and genocide are threat- 
ened by the prospect of famine unless a novel interna- 
tional rescue effort can bring in enough seed to plant 
next year’s crops. 

Virtually all of Rwanda’s seed supply has been eaten 
by famished citizens or destroyed during the fighting 
between rival Hutu and Tutsi factions that left as many 
as 1 million dead and forced hundreds of thousands into 
refugee camps in neighboring Zaire. 

“Without seeds,” said Ismail Serageldin, chairman of 
the Consultative Group on Interna Lions] Agricultural 


Research, “Rwanda will not be able to plant next year 
and will have no harvest. Farmers will become beggars 
and millions of people would again depend on outside 
food aid." 

To avert that outcome, the consultative group — an 
international network of agricultural research centers 
sponsored by the World Bank, the United Nations De- 
velopment Program and the Food and Agriculture Orga- 
nization — has begun an operation called “Seeds of 
Hope” to identify and reproduce 30 tons of seed from 
various plant species best adapted to the Rwandan 
environment. 


‘It’s not 


3t good enough to provide fanners with just any 
id William Scow croft, deputy director-general 


of the Internationa] Center for Tropical Agriculture, in 
Colombia. “Rwandan farmers need the seed they had 
before, that are suited to their soil, their dimate, which 
resist local pests and plant diseases, that taste like the 
beans, maize, sweet potatoes and plantain they are accus- 
tomed to eating.” 

The network, said Mr. Serageldin, who is also a World 
Bank vice president, “is the only international organiza- 
tion that could quickly replace Rwanda’s seed base 
before the next planting season begins.” 

After 25 years of collecting plant genetic material 
around the world, the network’s 17 centers have 500,000 
samples of major food crops that provide an estimated 75 
See RWANDA, Page 8 


was crossed. But he, too, called fora cease- 
fire and “all attempts at negotiation.” 

The Communist leader, Gennadi A. . 
Zyuganov, was harshest, accusing Mr. 
Yeltsin of being power-hungry and isolat- 
ed. 

“Democracy in Russia has turned into, ; 
‘all power to the president,' ” Mr. Zyu- . 
ganov said, twisting an old Bolshevik do- 
gan. “A weak power has decided to place 
its bets with forceful methods and has 
ignored the will of the people.” 

But few deputies were willing to support 
an independent Chechnya, arguing that 
the Russian Federation must remain unit- : 
ed, but through peaceful methods. 

In Chechnya itself, there were scattered 
incidents, including a prolonged artillery ‘ 
attack on two columns of Russian troops ’ 
north of Grozny. The Russians responded * 
to the rocket and tank fire with helicopter 
gun ships and two fighter-bombers. The 
Interfax news agency said eight Russian ■ 
soldiers were wounded, and there was an 
unconfirmed repost that two had died, ■ 
while Chechen officials said at least four. 
Russian tanks had beat destroyed. 

Interfax also reported that the road into" 
Grozny was obstructed with large cement 
blocks and lined with armed civilians gath- 
ered at villages and bridges. 

The Chechen president, Dzhokar Du- 
dayev, who is a former Soviet Air Force 
general, told colleagues in Grozny that “we 
are right in the eyes of the world because 
we’re defending our lives and our free- 
dom,” according to an aide. 

“We wanted talks but instead Russia 
started a war,” Mr. Dudayev said. 

Russia has been trying to overthrow Mr. 
Dudayev since August through an opposi- 
tion “Provisional Council” funded and 
backed by Moscow. Despite scarcely hid- 
den R ussian military support, including 
the use of army volunteers and air power, 
the councO has been unsuccessful, prompt- 
ing the full-fledged Russian invasion now. 

In signs of unrest in the rest of the 
northern Caucasus, troops from neighbor; 
ing Ingushetia, which used to be formally 
joined to Chechnya, attacked Russian 
troops late on Sunday, setting 30 armored 
vehicles on fire. Russia's defense minister. 
General Pavd S. Grachev, accused Ingu- 
shetia’s leaders of “virtually dedaring war 
against the Russian president,” but Ingush 
leaders denied the charge, saying (hat they 

See RUSSIA, Page 8 


IBM Halts 
Shipments of 
Pentium Chip 

By Lawrence Malkin 

International Herald Tribune 

NEW YORK —IBM suspended on 
Monday its shipments of computers 
that use Intel’s top-of-the-hne Pen- 
tium microprocessor, saying it had de- 
tected more flaws in the chip than the 
manufacturer had previously ac- 
knowledged. 

Intel, the world’s leading maker of 


Avoiding the ‘Economy- Class Syndrome’ 

Frequent Stretching May Help to Ward Off Blood Clots 



BOSNIAN OUTLOOK — Mus- 
lim refugees peering from a tent 
near BBuc. Washington and Paris 
agreed Monday that UN forces 
Should be strengthened. Page 2. 

General News 

FBI investigators said a mafl bomb that 
killed a U.S. advertising executive was 
sent by a serial bomber. Page 8. 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — Frequent fliers, take note: Dan Quayle, 
the former U.S. vice president, may have gotten blood clots in his 
lungs from too much jetting around. 

Although such clotting is a rare occurrence that most passen- 
gers can ward off with a little fidgeting, doctors do not know why 
some people get emboli, or clots, and others do not. 

“All of us nde on airplanes and buses and trains and we get by 
with it almost all the time.” said Joseph Bates, president of the 
American Lung Association. “But we really don’t know why it 
causes a clot in a few cases." 

Most at risk are people who are over 40, overweight, have 
congestive heart failure and, for some reason, have cancer. 

But some blood is predisposed to clot, and a few people get 
dots from simply being too stfll — lying in bed after surgery or 
sitting in a cramped airplane seat for hours, a phenomenon 
sometimes called “economy-class syndrome.” 

The condition that hospitalized the 47 -year-old former U.S. 
vice president for a week, called a pulmonary embolism, is not 
that rare. Every year, about 600,000 Americans develop a blood 
dot in a leg that them travels up to the lungs. 


“No one knows if this really is a major problem or an 
occasional problem,” said Dr. Russell B. Rayman, the Aerospace 
Medical Association’s executive director. 

Clots in the coronary arteries or neck arteries, usually formed 
when those arteries narrow with plaque, are commonly associat- 
ed with heart attacks and strokes. 

Bui leg clots are different — they occur in large, deep veins in 
the calf and thigh. Blood courses through those veins back up to 
the lungs to pick up oxygen and then down through the heart t.o 
be pumped into the body. The only way blood can make that 
long uphill stretch is by leg muscles pushing on the veins. 

So when people don’t move their legs for a long time, particu- 
larly if they’re sitting in a cramped position or with their legs 
crossed, the blood pods. That sets the stage for a dot 

Often, leg clots never break off and the blood just reroutes 
through neighboring veins. Clots that break off and get stuck in 
the lung, however, can be life-threatening. 

One little dot probably won’t stop enough blood flow to hurt, 
but several together can cause shortness of breath, chest pain and 
even death, said Dr. Elliot Chaikof, a vascular surgeon at Emory 
University in Atlanta. 


microprocessors, conceded last month' 
that its new chip might make an error 
in division once in every 9 bfllion 
random calculations, or once every 
27,000 years. 

But International Business Ma- 
chines ran its own tests and reported 
that in common spreadsheet programs 
that are recalculated every quarter of 
an hour, PCs with Pentium chips 
could produce errors once every 24 
days. For a customer with 500 PCs, 
such as a nationwide department store 
chain keeping trade at inventories or a 
brokerage firm with a changing stock 
portfolio, the result could be as many 
as 20 mistakes a day. 

After the IBM armouncement, Intel 
stock fell 5450 to $55.25 a share in the 
heaviest trading among over-the- 
counter stocks, and IBM fell 51.75 to 
$69.75. Intel recovered, however, in 
late trading to close only 52.375 down 
while IBM dosed 75 cents lower. 

Wall Street analysts noted that al- 

ffitionafiy baseef on Intel 

See PENTIUM, Page 8 


Sudanese Feud, but Can’t Say ‘Nay’ to Sport of Kings 


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1-5733 

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99.985 

5.408 


1.577 

1.58 

100.075 

5.416S 


By Chris Hedges 

New York Times Semee 

KHARTOUM, Sudan — There isn’t much incentive 
to race a horse in Sudan, Betting is illegal Jockeys earn 
$] a race. And the prizes barely cover the cost of a bag of 
oats. 

Nonetheless, horse racing, introduced by the British in 
1929, has endured, if not always prospered. And the 
newest season, which began in October and win end in 
June, is now drawing an eclectic collection of spectators 
who set aside bitter political enmities for the love of the 
sport, at least for a few hours. 

Officials from the Islamic government, including Es- 
sam Turabt, whose father is considered the most power- 
ful figure in Sudan, mingle with former officers and 
p oliticians who were ousted in the 1989 military coup, 


including the deposed Prime Minister Sadik Mahdi. The 
former prime minister, as many in the crowd will remind 
you, is also Mr. Essam’s unde. 

Sprinkled in the gathering are enthusiasts, trainers, 
stable hands, owners, and undercover policemen on the 
lookout for anyone making a bet Those suspected of 
gambling are marched out of the grandstands. The ar- 
rests hare become a routine part of a day at the races. 

The races are one of the last diversions left in a country 
raked by dvil war, repression, and tremendous poverty. 
And many see the prohibition on gambling as addingjust 
another thrill to an afternoon. 

“The Sudanese have venerated horses for centuries,” 
said Mamoun A. Mekkt the secretary-general of the 
Sudanese Equestrian Federation, “Horses were intro- 
duced here 4,000 years ago by the Nubian civilization. 


one of the first of the great five ancient civilizations. The 
love we have for horses tames the hatreds that exist 
between us outside the clubhouse.” 

The Equestrian Federation remains one of the handful 
of independent associations that has not been shut down 
by the government 

“The concept of European chivalry, built around the 
horse, was a notion that came from Islam,” said Mr, 
Mahdi, the former prime minister, who owns one of the 
largest stables. “It remains an important part of our 


When the English colonialists built Sudan’s first rac& 
track, they had no intention of spreading the sport to the 
Sudanese. 

But gradually, wealthy Sudanese began to breed and 
See SUDAN, Page 8 






k 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 13, 1994 


U.S. and France Close Ranks on Reinforcing UN in Bosnia 


WORLD BRIEFS 


WASHINGTON — The United States and 
France agreed Monday that UN peacekeeping 
troops should remain in Bosnia and should be 
strengthened to be effective. 

“We refuse to grant the Serbs the reward that 

^ r get^S is/the vritSdrawal of UN forces 
from Bosnia,” the French defense minister, 
Francois Ltotani, said after talks with Defense 
Secretary William J. Perry. 

Both the United States and France believe that 
the United Nations Protection Force “performs 
a very valuable function,” Mr. Perry added at a 
joint news conference. 

The United States has been at odds with 
France and other governments with troops in 
Bosnia-Herz^ovina over proper allied military 
policy there. 

Washington has pressed for the lifting of the 
international arms embargo to enable Bosnian 


Muslims to better arm themselves and for NATO 
to carry out air strikes against Serbian forces. 
The allies have opposed both moves on the. 
-grounds they would only fan warfare and endan- 
ger die peacekeeping forces. 


troops and weapons, by using better rules of 


it and" even setting up a heavily pro- 
ride 


At a separate news briefing on Monday, Mr. 

hat Pans had not softened 


L&otard made it dear that Paris had not 
its stand on the embargo and would pull its 
troops out quickly if the embargo were lifted 
unilaterally. 

“We're not going to wait around for the fallout 
from that decision to fall on our heads with our 
troops sdU in the Geld," be said. 

Mr. Perry and Mr. Lbotard spoke after dis- 
cussing con dnued harassment of UN peacekeep- 
ers by Bosnian Serbian forces and the possibility 
of NATO military protection, including U.S. 
troops, to cover any eventual UN withdrawal 

They said that, instead of a pullout, the 23,000 
UN peacekeepers in Bosnia could be made more 
effective, perhaps by increasing numbers of 


humanit arian aid corridor to Sarajevo 
from the Adriatic. 

But Mr. Perry emphasized that the United 
States would not send troops to join French, 
British and other peacekeepers now on the 
ground in Urania Washington has said U-S- 
troop use there would be limited to monitoring a 
peace accord or covering a UN withdrawal 

In BosniarHerzegovina, a UN fuel convoy 
rolled into Sarajevo on Monday for the first time 
in three weeks, bringing some relief to a United 
Nations mission at the mercy of a Bosnian Sertn- 
■an blockade cm regular fuel deliveries. 

. Six French tankers, blocked for three days ata 
Serbian checkpoint near thedty’s airport, ferried 
30 tons of fuel into the capital, but the United 
Nations still Faced a critical shortage that threat- 
ened to paralyze operations. 

In northwestern Bosnia, Croatian Serbs 


wounded Four Bangladeshi c 

them critically, in TnoSSS 

deLriinut Myint-U. a UN spate™ m 
rocket ® 

nplrL mer afire, wounding three soldiers. Other 

[he three and came 

’aSe™fcdon aSl i>Wte|fi i “ 

bJ?5f£ Bangladesh W-fgy-gft* 

Vdika Kladusa, a town near Bihac, wrnui ■»» 

down key United Nations functions by blocking 

biMk-atuation, a UN apolreanan. PahR idy. 
said eariier Monday. (Roam, AT) 


Sri Lanka Says Tamils Accept Trope ; > 

COLOMBO (AP) — Tamil rebels have aco^rted' the jdveo^ } ; 
meat’s proposal for a cease-fire in the 1 1-year ethnic Preri- L 
dent Cban drike Banderanaike Kmnaratunfa said Monday. ■ 

**We are hoping for a-ccssatfop. of hostilities within two weeks,* ■ 
said Mrs. Kumaratunga, who was elected last month on a pledge ! j 
to end the conflict The president did not say when the cease-fire 1 
would take effect A team of negotiators wifi be sent to tfie rebel {. 
stron^bold of Jaffna to discuss the tom* she said. *. 

Despite thepeace overtures, fighting continued in the ecnbat-{ ■ 
tied norih,and on Sunday the navy sank a highspeed rebel a&aqft/ '• 
boat that had been hidden on the beach. Many rebcteimdtwoy. 
menibeis of the navy were injured in the attack in Mannar district,^ 
a military statement said. - ' . - : 


Official Is Held in China Xlieater Fire 


Bonn Weighs a Request 
To Aid NATO in Bosnia 


Reuters 

BONN — Germany is con- 
sidering how to respond to a 
request from NATO for mili- 
tary support should the United 
Nations decide to withdraw its 
peacekeeping troops from Bos- 
nia, officials said Monday. 

A Defense Ministry spokes- 
man confirmed that Bonn had 
received a request from the 
Western alliance to indicate 
.jvhat contribution Germany 
could make should the UN pufi 
(put its troops. 

'i Government sources said 
Chancellor Helmut Kohl's cab- 
inet was expected to address the 
issue before NATO defense- 
ministers meet in Brussels this 
Week, but it was unclear wheth- 
er Bonn would have an answer 
jeady by then. 

' Mr. Kohl is ready to boost 
'Germany’s military role, but 


has consistently ruled out send- 
ing ground troops to Bosnia for 
fear of reviving memories of 
German forces that fought in 
Yugoslavia during World War 

n. 


ay w 
Hane 


consider sending warplanes to 
Bosnia should the allies face se- 
vere difficulties covering the 
withdrawal of 23,000 peace- 
keepers stationed there. 

NATO has accelerated con- 
tingency plans to pull peace- 
keepers out of Bosnia while say- 
ing an evacuation under fire 
would be a last and dangerous 
resort. 

Germany last week side- 
stepped a NATO bid to enlist 
Goman warplanes for Bosnia 
by saying the Atlantic alliance 
had made no formal request for 
its jets. 


Berlusconi a ‘Despot, 9 
Coalition Member Says 


; Agentx France-Prase 

ROME — Italy moved closer 
lb a political crisis Monday 
When the leader of one of the 
ties in the governing coaii- 
i accused Prune Minister Sil- 
vio Berlusconi of “autocratic 
despotism.” 

• Umberto Bossi, leader of the 
Northern League, made the 
charge in a party newsletter. 
< r .l‘The League rejects with the 
greatest energy any ‘pronnneia- 
tfqcnto* inspired by autocratic 
jiespotisni: either me or an. early 
general election,” Mr. Bossi 
isrrote. 

He reaffirmed his intention 
.lo go ahead with a full review of 
,the agreement between the co- 
alition parties once a 1995 bud- 
get has been approved. Budget 
legislation has passed the lower 
house of the Parliament and is 
"being considered by the Senate. 
, Mr. Bossi’s criticism fol- 


lowed a charge by Interior Min- 
ister Roberto Maroni that apo- 
litical crisis “was gathering 
speed.” 

. Leftist and centrist opposi- 
tion parties support the forma- 
tion of a provisional govern- 
ment charged with introducing 
a number of reforms, some re- 
lating to the electoral system, 
before calling a general elec- 
tion. 

The idea has the support of 
the Northern League in the 
event that it is not satisfied with 
a review of the coalition agree- 
ment 

The plan to review the agree- 
ment has been turned aside by 
Mr. Berlusconi, who rejects the 
idea of any type of provisional 
government and believes that if 
he is defeated on a vote of con- 
fidence it would be a betrayal of 
the voters not to hold an imme- 
diate general election. 



BEDING (AP) — A government official hasbeen arrested and; 
two others are under investigation in connection. with a theater, 
fire in northwestern China that killed 325 people, most of th*an{ 
students, an official said Monday. -r V ; 

Abuleati R after, deputy director of the Friendship Hotefth©.; 
a tor, was arrested Sunday, according to axunfocinatioii official is* ' 
Karamay, about 2,600 kilometers (1,600 nates) nortiraest of; : 
Benina. The official, .who asked not to be identified, said two otheg^ 
officials from the city's cultural center were being questioned. . } 
All exits but one were blocked when fire- spread through 
thre fte y on Thursday, lading. mostly primary and middle school 
students who bad been selected to attend a special petf ornnmee^. 
the goveanznent-run Legal Daily reported. The papersaidl 30 
people were injured, 72 of than seriously. - 


$24 Million Tax Bill Is Seen fpr Tapiei 


PARIS (AFP) - Tax authorities are about to order Bernard! 
Tapie, the indebted businessman and former cabinet minister; to'- jf 
pay 150 million francs, about $24 milKon, in bade taxes, soim*s 
said Monday. 

The sources said that in the next few weeks, French authorities 
would money owed fay Tapie companies for the yearsl99l, 
1992 and 1993, adding to Ins already znrdthmllion doUardetoi 
Mr. Tapie said that he had not been informed of the action, and 
he protested that the disclosure of such information to news 
organization was an attack on his democratic rights. Mr. Tapie, \ 
who was dected to the European Parliament this year, is fighting 
legal actions on several fronts to avoid being declared- bankiuptr 


Ancient Manuscripts Stolen in Russia 

MOSCOW (Reuters) —Thieves stole ancient Chinese, Mongo- 
lian and Tibetan manuscripts worth millions of dollars from a 
library in St Petersburg after an alarm to protea the artworks' 
failed to go off, the Itar-Tass press agency reported Monday. 

The manuscripts were taken from the state public library on 
Sunday night. .. _ 


Scpo HroS Rouen 

ROYAL HANDSHAKE — King Juan Carlos I visiting a working-class neighborhood south of Madrid on Monday. 


German Party- Chairman Survives Vote 


Nigeria Renews Ran on Newspapers . 

LAGOS (AFP) — The Nigerian junta on Monday renewed the 
ban on the publication of three major independent newspaper - 
groups, the Concord, Punch and the Guardian, officials said. 

One of the papers, Punch, reappeared on Lagos streets on 
Monday following the expiration a six-month-ban imposed in 
June. The military regime of General Sani Abacha had' aroused 
the newspapers of breaching state security. ; 

In September, the junta introduced several anti-media decrees 
and banned the Concord group, owned by Chief Moshood K.O. 
Abiola, the presidential candidate who is being detained on 
charges of treason; the Punch group; and the Guardian group, 
owned by Alex Ibru, General Abacha's internal affairs minister. 


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By Rick Atkinson 

iVtahinpan Pott Service 

BERLIN — Foreign Minis- 
ter Klaus Kinkel survived a 
vote of confidence Monday as 
chief of Germany’s liberal Free 
Democrats, a day after he was 
bitterly heckled by party mem- 
bers disgruntled with his leader- 
ship. 

Mr. Kinkel demanded the 
referendum at a special party 
congress in Gera following a 
stinging chorus of boos and 
jeers from rank-and-file liberals 
who hold him responsible for 
the party’s sinking fortunes in 
state and federal elections. 

The lawyer, 57. won 390 
votes in the secret ballot, com- 
pared with 185 no-confidence 
votes and 24 abstentions. He 
called the result “honorable and 
acceptable" and vowed to “do 
everything in my power to get 
better election results” and to 
ensure that the Free Democrats 
have a better future. 

German media reported that 
Mr. Kinkel had briefly contem- 
plated resigning both as party 
chairman and foreign nftnister 
but was talked out of it by other 
liberal leaders. 

The turmoil within the Free 
Democrats, who serve as junior 
coalition partners with Chan- 
cellor Helmut Kohl's Christian 
Democrats, potentially destabi- 
lizes a government that holds 
only a 10-seat majority in the 
Parliament. 

Even his supporters in Boon 
wonder whether Mr. 
:1 is overmatched in run- 


ning the foreign polity appara- 
tus while simultaneously seek- 
ing to revive a political party 
that has been crushed in nine 
consecutive state elections. 

The Free Democrats gar- 
nered only 6.9 percent of the 
vote in the October federal elec- 
tions, down from 1 1 percent in 
1990 and barely enough for Mr. 
Kohl’s coalition to hang onto 
power. Two crucial regional 
elections next year, in the states 
of Hesse and North Rhine- 
Westphalia, could seal Mr. Kin- 
kd’s political demise if liberal 
losses continue. 

A close confederate of Mr. 
Kinkel’s in the Foreign Minis- 
try said the minister was stag- 
gering beneath political foreign 
policy and cabinet responsibil- 
ities, which prevent him from 
“ever really mastering a topic.” 
Senior ofGdals describe waiting 
to ambush him outside a cabi- 
net meeting, snatching a few 
minutes of time in the car en 
route to his next appointment. 

“You can’t expect him to 
concentrate or make a decision 
under those circumstances," the 
associate said. 

“He has no sense of priori- 


ties,” a chancellery official add- 
ed. “For him, everything is 
equally important The guy's 
totally overwhelmed. _He's a 
really decent guy and very lik- 
able. On the other hand, he’s 
too open, not very shrewd. Yon 
can always tell what he’s feel- 


ing. 

Mr. 


Kinkel made no secret of 
his dismay Sunday when his 
keynote address to party faith- 
ful was greeted at times with 
stony silence and at other times 
with shrill jibes. 

“I expected criticism,” he 
told Bild newspaper, “but the 
style and tone of some of it hurt 
me.” 

A political independent until 
1991 and former head of Ger- 
many’s intelligence agency, Mr. 
Kinkel succeeded the long-time 
Foreign Minister Hans- Die- 
trich Genscher in 1992 and also 
tried to fill Mr. Genscher’s sub- 
stantial shoes by taking over the 
party chairmanship in June 
1993. 

Mr. Kinkel conceded his own 
shortcomings in Gera, acknowl- 
edging “a lack of fidelity to our 
principles, an inability to con- 
vince and a lack of authority.” 

Many liberals believe that the 


demoralized party has skidded 
badly in the polls because vot- 
ers believe that the Free Demo- 
crats — the traditional king- 
makers in German politics — 
have strayed from their tradi- 
tional free-market and civil 
rights ideals. 

Since Mr. Kinkel has headed 
the Free Democrats, the daily 
Berliner Zeitung observed 
Monday morning, “the party 
has gone into the abyss.” 

It may be unfair to attribute 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


Strike Halts Spanish Train Traffic 


the devastating failures to the 
Vfr. Kinkel alone, it 


“hapless” Mr. 
said, but added, “As party lead- 
er he has lo place his bead on 
the block.” 

Although Mr. Kinkel snared 
nearly two- thirds of the votes in 
the no-confidence poll — he got 
more than 90 percent in win- 
ning the party chairmanship 18 
months ago — some party 
members predicted that the hu- 
miliating confrontation with his 
own clan has further wounded 

him. 

“The mere fact that he called 
a vote of confidence means he 
will go back to Bonn weak- 
ened,” one delegate, Peter Har- 
nischmacher, said. 


MADRID' (AP) ; — Striking railroad workers forced the cancel- 
lation of neany ail intemationaland long-distance trains, across 
Spain on Monday, but Iberia Air Lines operated normally despite 
a strike by maintenance and service unions. 

The rail stoppage was part of fire days of strikes scheduled this 
month by the muon representing the majority of mechanical and 
service employees of the Spanish state railroads.. The. union 
contends management has failed to keep its ride of agreements. ' 

Labor conflict at Iberia also appeared likely to increase, as a 
union representing the airline's pilots maintained its opposition tp 
a restructuring plan that would cut salaries by as up to 15 percent.' 

France won’t grand ATR airliners, despite a ban in Canada and! 
a U.S. ban on their take-off in icy conditions, civil aviation 
authorities said in Paris. They said they wanted to consider! 
alternatives to U.S. findings that ice on wings of ATR s caused a 
fatal October crash. The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration 
has ordered that ATR-42s and ATR- 72s, built by a French-Itafian 
consortium, be grounded in icy conditions. (APPj. 

Searches were under way in Scotland on Monday for three 
people missing in the worst flooding in more than a century.* 
About 116 millimeters (4.5 indies) of rain fdl over the weekend at; 
the Glasgow airport (AP) 

A final decision on a new highway near the pyramids wffl be 
made by the end of the week, officials in Cairo said. The highway - 
would pass within 2JS kilometers of the Sphinx and the three 
pyramids at Giza. Critics say the project violates both Egyptian 
and international law on the protection of heritage. (AFP) 


French Wiretap Suspect Found Dead 


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The Associated Press 

PARIS — A retired police 
captain was found banged at his 
home Monday, the police said. 
His apparent suicide came three 
days after he and other former 
members of the presidential 
anti- terrorism team were 
charged with illegal wiretap- 
ping. 

Police in the Paris suburb of 
Noisy-le-Grand were investi- 
gating the death of Pierre- Yves 
Gu&zou. They said no suicide 
note had been found but quoted 
acqu ai ntances or Mr. Gu clou's 
as saying that he had been upset 
at bang charged. 

Mr. Gu&ou, three other law- 


enforcement officials and a for- 
mer high-ranking aide to Presi- 
dent Francois Mitterrand were 
charged Friday with violating 
the privaty of journalists, law- 
yers, opposition politicians and 
an actress by tapping their 
phones between 1983 and 1986. 

The former Mitterrand aide, 
Gilles Menage, is chairman of 
the state power company. Elec- 
tricity dc France. He headed the 
anti-terrorism team before serv- 
ing as Mr. Mitterrand's staff 
director from 1988 to 1991 

The team, which functioned 
independently of French securi- 
ty agencies, became preoccu- 
pied with ferreting out per- 


il was 


ceived enemies, 
dismantled in 1988. 

Mr. Guezou was depicted in 
a separate court case as carrying 
out instructions from superiors 
to arrange and transcribe the 


wiretaps. 
In the 


past two years, two 
close colleagues of Mr. Mitter- 
rand's have committed suicide, 
reportedly because they were 
distraught over political devel- 
opments and corruption scan- 
dals. Former Prime Minister 
Pierre Berfegovoy shot himself 
in May 15*93, and Francois de 
Grossouvre, a presidential ad- 
viser, killed himself at the Ely- 
ates Palace in April 


To Help (tohers. Paw Oiose Death 

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Richard and Helen Brown could 
have paid for all the health care they needed in their frail 
years. Instead, they chose suicide so they could leave their 
money to charity. 

In recent months, Richard Brown, 79, was forced, because 
of arthritis and asthma, to use a wheelchair. Helen Brown, 76, 
was suffering from Alzheimer’s disease. They had been mar- 
ried 53 years. Letters began arriving in the mailboxes of their 
f nends Dec. 6, the day the Browns’ bodies were found in their 
S“ ; “ 2? paras' of ^eir Fort Lauderdale, Florida, home. 
Botn died of carbon monoxide poisoning. They left a fortune 
of more than $10 million, which they had made from radio 
stations and a radio school in Minneapolis. 

“We have die means to afford thebest doctors, hospitals 
and around-the-clock home care to the end our lives, but 
neither of us wants that kind of life,” the Browns wrote. “It 
would also consume a substantial part of our money, which 
through our will and through the mission work of our church 
is destined to bdp many young people throughout the world 

fUJn- Y ““y more. We have no 

immediate family or heirs. In a sense, this legacy represents 
the final puipose of our lives.” 




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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 13, 1994 


7h pv .i® v;. v* / > > ‘ i 

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Page 3‘ 


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Talk-S how Advice for Hew Raauhn~»~ 

hosble press corps lurks in Washington. A 

f .. Y ° u ncvcr ever be their friends.” the conservative 
tollMhov. host warncd the Republican freshmen at a dX 
m Baltimore. “They don’t want to be your friends W 
femak reporter .will come up to one of you and slarT'baS 

rm^“f 1 50 ‘° lunch - Anii > ' ou '" lhi " k ’^' ow! 

f i“. fo . r Whe added. “This is not the lime to get 
^tk^f** “i? 01 the ume to slart trying to be liked *' 

N^SSS included not a single "femi- 

IJ5.JI5 Mr. Lunbaugh s favorite epithets for support- 
JSSETr ,M, i S u^u' wh °°.pcd and applauded, proving itself 
htp 6 fWr fh? o ub M man ** ^licvcs was primarily responsi- 

ble for the Repubhcan avalanche in November. 

as ill' *? honorar y member of the class 

^ Ihrce-day orientation Saturday 
S^^^I the ^ Cn ^ ge J OUI,dalion Md Empower Amcri- 
Ca ’n W K^° n ^ r L^ rvc Was ^ n g lon research organ ba tions. 

* ij w 31 ?- . m ’ an mcoming freshman from Wyoming, 
toJd Mr Lunbaugh that because 74 percent of U.S. newsp£ 
pers had endorsed Democrats, “talk radio, with you in the 
lead, is what turned the tide." 

Rush is as responsible for what happened here as much as 
anyone, said Via Weber, a former representative from 
Minnesota, now of Empower America. Citing a poll taken 
after the election by Frank Luntz, a Republican pollster, he 
i people who listened to 10 hours or more a week of 

talk radio voted Republican by a threc-to-one margin. 

But Mr. Lunbaugh sloughed off any suggestion that he was 
responsible for the way things turned out on Nov. S. 

Tne dimate was there," he said before his speech. “This 
country has been conservative in its heart for the longest 
Ume. It didn’t always vote that way, but it has now." He said 
the liberals helped by “illustrating their bankruptcy, both 
moral and fiscal.” j /V YT) 

2 Contenders for Top Democratic Past 

WASHINGTON — The departing governor of Tennessee, 
Ned McWherter, and Senator Christopher J. Dodd of Con- 
necticut have emerged as leading contenders for the post of 
Democratic National Committee chairman, as President Bill 
Clinton begins to piece together what is expected to be a 
difficult re-election campaign in 1996. 

Mr. McWherter, a longtime friend of Mr. Clinton and Vice 
President AJ Gore, is a fixture in Tennessee politics and is 
retiring after two terms as governor. His selection would 
signal the administration's determination to rebuild support 
in a state and region decimated in the November elections. 

Mr. Dodd caught the eye of administration officials in his 
spirited, though unsuccessful campaign for Senate Demo- 
cratic leader, which he lost by a single vote to Senator 
Thomas A. Daschle of South Dakota. 

The Democratic National Committee chairmanship is the 
first of several major personnel decisions Mr. Clinton must 
make as he looks ahead to a re-election campaign. The others 
include the chairman of his re-election committee, bis cam- 
paign manager and the White House political director. 

White House officials are not anxious to plunge into re- 
election politics, but given the Republican resurgence, die 
president's unpopularity and talk abciut a primary challenge 
to Mr. Clinton among nervous Democrats, they are aware 
that they will have to move more rapidly than former Presi- 
> dent George Bush did before the 1992 election. ( WP ) 

fluote/Uwnwte , 

Leon E.. Banetta. the White House chief of staff*,- on 
discussions of a tax cut for middle-class families: “They're the 
ones that are struggling every day trying to meet their 
expenses, raise their kids, pay their hills, and they're the oncS " 
who need to share a little bit of the economic recovery. So 
they would be the target . of it” (AP) 


Away From Politics 

• The judge hi the OJf. Simpson murder trial refused to 

remove a member of die prosecution t eam , rejecting defense 
arguments that Deputy District Attorney Chris Darden, who 
h eaded the grand jury inquiry of Mr. Simpson's Mend Al 
Cowlings, had unfair access to grand jury information. In a 
written ruling. Judge Lance A I to said there “appears to be 
no conflict of interest.” (AP) 

A grand jury in Union, South Carolina, spent less than three 
hours before indicting Susan Smith on murder charges in the 
drowmngs of her two young sons in a case in which she 
claimed that they had been kidnapped. (AP) 

A jury rejected a lawsut bbnang the anti-depressant Prozac 
fora L989 shooting rampage at a printing plant that left nine 
people dead in Louisville, Kentucky. Die verdict in favor of 
Ed my Co, maker of the widely used drug, came af ter 47 
days of testimony in tire case in winch survivors and victims of 
the rampage claimed that Prozac caused a former plant 
employee to turn bomitidaL (AP) 

• One in four schoolchildren has used Illegal drugs before 

reaching high school according to University of Michigan 
researchers who said drug use among young America ns wa s 
“iretting worse at a fairly rapid pace” In the study, 25 percent 
of the 13- to 14 -year-olds acknowledged use of Meat drugs at 
some point in their lifetimes, a figure that rose to 35 percent 
when inhalants were included. (AP) 


UUl cab a I»w — ■ m KJ- - — m 

according to the American Council of Education. 


Suit Seeks Rights 
For Child Spawn 

Alter Father Died 

The Asaodtaed Pres 

NEW ORLEANS —A wom- 
an who used her husbands 
stored sperm to become preg- 
nant after be died of cancer 
asked a court Monday to have 
their 3-year-old daughter de- 
clared his child and heir. 

The aim is to win Social Secu- 
rity survivor’s benefits far Jj* 
dith Christine Hart of Sbdefl, 


7iTiv7/-£Lii2* 


after her father's death. 

“Even when I was reluctant 


1 TTTTTI 


he would not survive, Ed said, 
‘There could always be a child 
for you,’ ” said the girl's moth- 
er Nancy Hart. “Judith was 
Ed’s last rift to me. I want her 
to know who her father was and 
to be recognized as his child. 

No state recognizes as le&ti- 
mate a child concaved after tire 
• father’s death, said Kathryn 
Kolbert, vice prea de nt °f ^ 
Center for Reproductive Law 
and Policy, which filed the suit 

Edwarf William Hart Jr. was 
rfiaenosed with cancer m 
Mai* 1990 and diedthat Jjm& 

became pmgoaut in 

September 1990. 


For Most Americans, Roots Are Shallower Than Ever 


By Sam Roberts 

New York Tuna Stmee 

NEW YORK — Nearly three times as many 
Americans are transients with shallow roots only 
months old as are homebodies who have lived in 
the same house for more than three decades, a 
new study shows. 

Overall according to a Census Bureau analy- 
sis made public Monday, more than 2 in 10 of all 
the nation's households moved in the IS months 
before the 1990 census, evidence of a mobility 
that, among developed countries, is unique to the 
United States. 

The analysis also found that fewer than 1 in 10 
households had been in the same house since 
Dwight D. Eisenhower was president and the 
newly transplanted Los Angeles Dodgers, her- 
alding the West’s ascendancy, won the World 
Series. 

Pittsburgh and two New York City suburbs — 


Long Island and northern New Jersey — were 
the only major metropolitan areas in the nation 
where people who moved in the 15 months be- 
fore the census were outnumbered by people who 
had lived in the same bouse since 1959. 

According to the analysis, the proportion of 
renters who were recent movers rose slightly in 
the last three decades. Among owners, though, 
the share who had moved recently declined to 9.4 
percent from I2J2 percent, which census officials 
described as perhaps a historic low. 

“As far as we know, it’s the lowest,” said 
Robert Bonnette, the Census Bureau demogra- 
pher who conducted the analysis. 

Striking differences separated the restless 
Americans who had moved in the 15 months 
before April 1, 1990, from the rooted stayers who 
had stayed put since before 1960. 

The more foot-loose householders were likely 
to be unmar ried men who were striking out after 


living with their parents or with roommates in 
rented houses or apartments, were younger and 
earned more than stayers, and tended to live in 
college towns or near military bases in the Smith 
and West, 

People with the shallowest roots lived in Dal- 
las, Orlando, Florida, and San Diego and in 
Bryan -College Station, Texas, home of Texas 
A&M University, where more than 4 in 10 house- 
holders were recent newcomers. 

Die stayers were often homeowners and emp- 
ty-nest ers and other older married couples and 
elderly women living alone in the Northeast and 
Midwest 

In western Pennsylvania, Johnstown and the 
Beaver Valley areas led the nation's 335 metro- 
politan areas in stayers, with 24 percent for 
Johnstown and 22 percent for Beaver. 

As would be expected, the nation's renters are 
more mobile than homeowners, with the typical 


renter living in his home for only two years and 
the typical owner at home for 10 years. 

Renters in metropolitan New York defied the 
patters. More than l in 20 were living in the* 
same apartment or house for three decades or 
more — a stability demographers largely attrib- 
uted to government regulations in New York 
City ana Westchester County that limit rent 
increases. 

Demographers noted that the Sooth and the 
West had more than their share of movers. As 
evidence, all four metropolitan areas where, 
about one in six or more of the owners had just 
bought homes were in the South and the West: in 1 
Las Vegas, Riverside-San Bernardino, Calif or-, 
nja; Yuma, Arizona, and Naples, Florida. 

In contrast, Pennsylvania was home to all but 
3 of the 15 metropolitan areas where about one 
in 6 households stayed puL 


wm, 

X IN’ 



Africa Aid on Block 
In Panel Chiefs Cuts 

Assistance Should Further 
U.S. Interests , Senator Says ; 


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AdaSbcno Rn|K>A|(m Pmcc-Pion 

A FIRST FOR CASTRO’S CURA — Monsignor Jaime Lucas Ortega y Alamini greeting followers outside a Catholic 
cathedral in Havana. Cardinal Ortega, who was recently elevated by Pope Paul D along with 29 other candidates from 
around the world, is the only Catbofic cardinal in the Communist country and the first trader the regime of Fidel Castro. 

U.S. Fears More Cuban Riots in Panama 


New York Tima Soviet 

PANAMA CITY — Ameri- 
can officials have warned that 
renewed rioting in camps hous- 
ing 8,500 Cubans in Panama 
City may be inevitable unless 
the United States is able to re- 
solve their refugee status. 

With only three months left 
on the six months that Panama 
has approved for the Cubans to 
stay on United States bases 
here, American officials con- 
cede they are hardly any closer 
to solving that problem than 
they were when the first of the 
Cubans arrived in early Sep- 
tember from camps at the U.S. 
Navy base at Guantanamo Bay. 
Cuba. 

“This issue is so thorny that 


we haven’t wanted to look at it 
as closely as we needed to,” an 
American official said. “With 
the deadline coating -op as fast 
as it is, someone is gating to have 
to get to work on it.” 

More than 250 people, most 
of them American troops, were 
injured last week in rioting at 
the camps as many of the Cu- 
bans tried to flee. 

The army commander in 
charge of the Panama program, 
Genoal James Wilson, said he 
would impose extra security 
measures to prevent further ri- 
ots. 

The refugees in Panama are 
among more than 30,000 who 
left Cuba cm rafts and in boats 
last summer trying to reach the 


United States. An agreement 
between Cuba and the United 
States in mid-September 
stopped the flow. 

*Tm confident the world, in- 
cluding the United States, will 
find a real solution to this,” 
General Wilson said. “Most of 
these people are well-educated 
and decent. They just want to 
get out of limbo and get on with 
their lives.” 

Early Sunday, troops entered 
one of the camps ana after vio- 
lent scuffling confined some 
300 Cubans believed to have 
taken part in the riots. Four 
Cubans were hospitalized, and 
there were minor injuries 
among the American troops. 

The action brings to 575 the 


Anti-Abortion Groups Lose an Appeal 


The Anodmed Pros 
WASHINGTON —The Su- 
preme Court on Monday 
turned down appeals from anti- 
abortion activists who say they 
wrongly are being sued as rack- 
eteers for blocking access to 
clinics and other efforts to stop 
women from having abortions. 

The justices, without com- 
ment, let stand a ruling that 
kept alive a nationwide, class- 
action lawsuit by the National 
Organization for Women and 
others against several anti- 
abortion groups and some of 
their members. 

The high court ruled unani- 
mously in January that anti- 


abortion activists could be sued 
under a federal anti-racketeer- 
ing law. Thai decision, threat- 
ened three groups — Pro-life 
Action League, Project life and 
Operation Rescue — with fi- 
nancial ruin. 

After that ruling, the 1986 
lawsuit returned to the 7th U.S. 
Circuit Court of Appeals in 
Chicago. That court rejected 
the anti-abortion groups’ re- 
newed effort to have the case 
dismissed. 

The appeals court in May or- 
dered U.S. District Judge Janies 
Holderman to decide whether 
the lawsuit alleges the necessary 
“predicate acts” to support a 


finding that the anti-abortion 
activists violated the Racketeer 
Influenced and Corrupt Orga- 
nizations Act, also known as the 
Hobbs Act. 

The appeals court said Judge 
Holderman must decide wheth- 
er the lawsuit properly alleges 
that the anti-abortion groups 
and their members violated the 
Hobbs Act by conspiring to 
commit extortion. 

The federal law defines ex- 
tortion as the obtaining of 
property from another “by 
wrongful use of actual or 
threatened force, violence, fear 
or under color of official right.” 


number erf Cubans under dose 
custody because of the riots. 

American officials said that 
as the deadline for the Cabans 
to leave Panama approached, 
the likelihood of more violence 
would increase unless the Cu- 
bans’ future was resolved. 

“They risked their lives at sea 
when they fled Cuba, the only 
way theyTl go back, is with 
force, even if it’sjust to Guanta- 
namo Bay ” an American offi- 
cial said. “That won’t look very 
pretty." 

“If we let them go to tire 
United States We'D have serious 
political problems al home," 
the offidal said, “and well also 
encourage more people to leave 
Cuba." 

Another official said that 
sending this group to the Unit- 
ed States when the time elapsed 
would not be an acceptable so- 
lution because it would encour- 
age the more than 22,000 Cu- 
bans in camps at Guantanamo 
Bay to riot to try to achieve the 
same results. 


By Stevezt Greenhouse 

New York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON —The Re- 

E ublican who is expected to 
ave the greatest say on foreign 
aid, Mitch McConnefl, the new 
chairman of the Senate Appro- 
priations subcommittee on for- 
eign operations, called Monday 
for slashing aid for Africa ana 
population programs as well as 
cutting assistance to every- 
where but the Middle East and 
Europe by about 20 percent. 

In introducing his foreign aid 
Inn, Mr. McConnell a conser- 
vative from Kentucky, pro- 
posed sweeping changes that 
would award assistance to 
countries based on whether 
such aid would advance Ameri- 
ca’s security and economic in- 
terests. 

On that basis, he took a harsh 
view of aid to Africa and pro- 
posed abolishing the Develop- 
ment Fund for Africa, which 
will provide $800 million in aid 
to that continent this year. 

He said he was not suggesting 
that African aid be cut to zero, 
but rather that Africa could no 
longer expect an automatic an- 
num entitlement of $800 mB- 
Hon. 

From now on, he said, Africa 
would have to compete with 
other needy countries for its 
share of the smaller pool of for- 
eign aid. 

“We send money to countries 
where government pohdes ac- 
tually defeat the prospects for 
real economic growth,” he said. 

■ “It’s in our interest to facili- 
tate the transition to free mar- 
kets, not to subsidize failures.” 

While Qmgrcss has allocated 
$450 milfion to hold down pop- 
ulation growth overseas, his bill 
allocates nothing for that activi- 
ty. 

Mr. McConnell said, howev- 
er, that he expected other law- 
makers to add money for popu- 
lation programs daring 
congressional debate. 

The Republican acknowl- 
edged that others in Congress 
would tinker with his bQL 
But lawmakers said that (he 
bfl] might win widespread sup- 
port because Mr. McConnefl is 


a moderate whose bill appears 
to steer a middle course be- 
tween those Republicans who 
want to gut foreign aid ang 
those Republicans and Demo- 
crats who want to leave it laxgfr 
ly intact ; 

Mr. McConnell takes a 
kinder view to foreign aid than 
does Jesse Hehns of North Car- 
olina, a Republican who is the 
new chairman of the Senate 
Foreign Relations Committee. 

Mr. Helms has likened for- 
eign aid to throwing money 
down a “ra thole.” 

Mr. McConnell's bill pro- 
poses eliminating the Agency 
for International Development 
and having die State Depart- 
ment administer aid itself. IBs 
Ml also proposes moving the 
Peace Corps mto the State De- 
partment. 

“U.S. foreign aid must better 
serve UB. foreign policy inter: 
ests,” he said. “Somehow along 
the way over the last 33 years <?f 
this program, the connection 
between uB. aid and U.S. in? 
terests seems to have been lost.” 

Criticizing the Clinton ad- 
ministration for having adopted 
a pohey that favored Russia 
over other former Soviet repnbr 
tics, Mr. McConnefl proposed 
ending that tilt by earmarking 
aid to three non-Russian repub- 
lics — Georgia, Ukraine and 
Armenia. 

His bill would cut aid to Rus- 
sia, which is slated to he abofrl 
$700 motion next year, if its 
military intervenes in neighbor- 
ing countries. ,j 

While aid to most of the 
world would be cut, Mh 
McConnefl proposed a slight 
increase in aid to the Middle 
East, a move that would protect 
the $3 billion in aid Israel re- 
ceived last year as well as the 
$2.1 billion received by Egypt ) 

The administration hail 
sought to fight foreign aid cuts 
by arguing that overseas assis- 
tance has already been cut more 
than most p r ogr a ms over the 
last three years and that such 
cuts would reduce Washing- 
ton’s influence and moral au- 
thority overseas. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY , DECEMBER 13, 1994 


Airlines Act 
On Security 
After Blast 
Aboard Jet 


TOKYO — Philippine and 
Japanese aviation authorities 
acted Monday to tighten securi- 
ty after an explosion aboard a 
Philippine Airlines 747 jet 
killed a Japanese passenger and 
injured six others. 

Japanese police were study- 
ing me possibility of sabotage 
in Sunday’s explosion aboard 
Flight 434 to Tokyo from Ma- 
nila and Cebu, said an Okinawa 
Prefectural Police official, 
ha Cebu, Antonio Oppus, the 
airport general manager, said in 
a radio interview that authori- 
ties were investigating airport 
personnel on duty Sunday and 
reviewing the passenger list. 

Several hours after the explo- 
sion, a caller claiming to belong 
to the Aim Sayyaf Group, a 
Muslim fu ndam entalist group 
responsible for numerous 
bombings and kidnappings in 
the southern Philippines, tele- 
led The Associated Press in 
and claimed responsi- 
bility. 

But the Philippine television 
station ABS-CBN reported 
Monday that a group leader de- 
nied that Abu Sayyaf was re- 
sponsible. The chief of police at 
Manila’s airport, Peter Mutuc, 
also questioned the claim. 

A spokesman for the Moro 
National Liberation Front also 
cast doubts on reports that the 
blast had been caused by mem- 
bers of Abu Sayyaf, a break- 


WwhSf kJTtn ifHat Pro* 

Security was stepped up Monday at the Manila international airport foBovring the in-flight explosion on Sunday. 


away group from his own orga- 
nization. He doubted that 
members had the technical ex- 
pertise to plant a bomb on an 


assengers said the explosion 
blew a hole in the floor of the jet 
and set the ceding afire. Passen- 
gers extinguished the fire with 
blankets. 

The jet, with 273 passengers, 
and 20 crew members aboard, 
made a safe emergency landing 
about an hour later at Naha 
airport on Okinawa. 

**We fed that the security 
measures already in place are 


adequate, but just to allay the. 
'fears of the riding public, we are 
boosting our security in all 
these places that we have,” said 
Manolo Aquino, Philippine 
Airlines' executive vice presi- 
dent for administration and ser- 
vices. 

Guillermo Cunanan, Manila 
International Airport’s general 
manager, also said security 
would be tightened. 

“Our security system is tight 
and wefl in place,” Mr. Cun- 
anan said. “However, we have 
to remind our security person- 
nel that any security system can 


only be as good as the people 
implementing it." 

The man lolled was identified 
as Haiuki ficeganzi, 24, an em- 
ployee of Juki Corp., a major 
industrial sewing machine mak- 
er. Mr. rkcgamj was returning 
from a business trip to Cebu. 

PAL officials in Tokyo said 
the explosion occurred beneath 
seat No. 26K on the right-hand! 
side of the fuselage where Mr. 
Ikegaini sat after joining the 
flight in Cebu. All of the injured 
were sitting in front of his seat. 

The officials said 46 passen- 
gers got off in Cebu, and it was 


Yao Yilin, China Communist Hard-Liner, Dies at 77 


New York Timer Service 

BEUING — Yao Yilin, 77, a 
conservative central planner 
who served as a member of the 
Politburo of China’s Commu- 
nist Party from 1985 to 1992, 
died Sunday. 

A member of the hard-line 
faction often opposed to the 
scale and pace of reform in the 
1980s, Mr. Yao was among the 
five members of the Standing 


Committee of the Politburo 
that sanctioned the military 
crackdown on the Tiananmen 
Square uprising of 1989. 

Never a favorite of Deng 
Xiaoping, China’s paramount 
leader, Mr. Yao s presence in 
the inner circle of power 
stemmed from his association 
with Chen Yun. Mr. Chen, 89, 
is the most senior of the conser- 
vative party eiders who have 


orthodox Marxist values during 
Mr. Deng’s era of reform. 

Stanislaw Maczek, 192, 
Polish General in War 

LONDON (AP) — Major 
General Stanislaw Maczek, be- 
lieved to be the last surviving 
senior allied commander from 
World War II, died Sunday at 
102 . 

General Maczek’ s death was 
announced by the Polish con- 


sulate-general in Scotland, 
where he settled after com- 
manding the First Armored Di- 
vision of the Polish Anny-in- 
oole during the war. 

Max BID, 85, Swiss Sculptor 
And Artist in ’Concrete’ Style 

ZURICH (Reuters) — Max 
Bill, 85. a Swiss artist and sculp- 
tor. died of a heart attack, a 
spokeswoman at his Zurich of- 
fice said Monday. Mr. Bill, who 


was also an architect and writer, 
collapsed at the Berlin airport 
on Friday while waiting for a 
flight to Zurich. 

A leader of the so-called 
Concrete Art school, he applied 
what he called a “mathemati- 
cal" approach to an. IBs paint- 
ings and sculptures showed 
bold geometric designs in what 
he said was an attempt to “rep- 
resent abstract thoughts in a 
sensuous and tangible form." 


Graft Rumors Sully an Obituary 

Governor’s Reported Riches Outrage Indians 


By John Ward Anderson 

Washington 

NEW DELHI —It is one of 
those stories that keeps getting 
bigger every time it is told. 

Last July, when the governor 
of the north Indian state of 
Punjab, Sureadia Nath, died 

v kio fomihf Ifl 


unknown who was in seat 26K 
on the flight from Manila. The 
officials said it was possible 
that someone who left the plane 
had placed explosive material 
under the seat 
Since the explosion occurred 
over international waters, the 
government of the country in 
which the flight originated — 
the Philippines — mil run the 
investigation, Japanese Trans- 
port Ministry officials said. 

Three Japanese officials were 
to join the investigation. 

(AP, AFP, Reuters) 


a crash of a private plane, tu- 
mors of his 21-gotten w ealth be- 
gan circulating almost immedir 
ately. . 

At first, the sums mentioned 
were relatively modest — say,: 
in the range of $1.5 million. But 
by this month, based on reports 
that newspapers and magazines 
variously attributed to “high 
government sources,** “senior 
politicians" and “rumors in po- 
litical circles,” his personal for- 
tune had topped S265 million. 

Tike the size of his purported 
stash, the stories about its dis- 
covery were approaching unbe- 
lievable proportions. 

“The government,” one 
newspaper in New Delhi 
rhrimeA, “had made inquiries to 
ascertain the truth behind re- 
ports that currency notes had 
rained from two boxes after the 


ns family crashed? 

Exaggerated or not, the pre- 
sumed scandal has refocused 
attention on one of the most 
Harrmmg aspects of life in In- 
dia: pervasive corruption that 
exists at every level of society. 
Official graft is one of the big- 
gest complaints of fonaga in- 
vestors considering India as a 
destination, and it continues to 
siphon valuable finds from so- 
cial development programs. 

Like most scandals in India 
that involve high-level officials, 
no one saems to want to investi- 
gate the circumstances sur- 
rounding Mr. Nath’s alleged 
treasure trove. After police and 
various stare and federal agen- 
cies begged off, the Punjab 
High Court finally ordered 
complete disclosure by Feb. 12 


complet 
of what 


was found. 


In the meantime, the press 
devised a speculative inventory 
of what could have been stock- 
piled in the governor's private 
quarters: up to $230 million in 
cash, 15 pounds (7 kilograms) 
of gold, bricks of silver, sacks of 
gems worth S13 million, title to 


$84 minion in real estate and 
$160,000 in stocks. 

As the story snowballed, so 
did demand < for investigations 
and, bdatedly, official denials. 
But even assuming gross exag- 
geration* reasonable people be- 
gan askin g: All this on a gover- 
nor’s salary of $355 per month? 

*T1k 5 evidence is overwhelm- 
ing, but you can rest assured 
nothing will happen," said Nani 
A PaBdbivala, India’s most 
pr omin ent constitutional law- 
yer. “In India, no laws axe en- 
forced, and no one gpts pun- 
ished. II the man were alive' 
today, he’d be elevated to a cab- 
inet position.*’ 

Mr. Nath was appointed gov- 
ernor of Pmijab in 1991. Nine 

members of his immediate fam- 
ily were killed is the July 9 
crash. His only surviving son, 
Ranjit Malhotra, has denied 
that a fortune was found in the 
governor's mansion and criti- 
cized reports of his father's 
wealth as “vicious gossip." 

The allegations unleashed a 
torrent of criticism about the 
state of governmental corrup- 
tion and the country's ethics. 

“Not only do people expect 
our rulers to be corrupt, they 
are not shocked by the corrup- 
tion when it is divulged," said 
Sunday magazine, one of In- 
dia’s most widely circulated 
newsweeklies. 

“No matter how absurd the 
sums being bandied about," it : 
added, “people were only too 
willing to believe the worst." 

The stories also have focused 
attention on an unaudited sc- 
cret-services fund available to 
the governor for covert anti-ter- 
rorist operations. Until recent- 
ly, there was a violent separatist 
group in Punjab, and numerous 
police and government officials 
are alleged to have converted 
millions of dollars in “black" 
defense finds to personal use. 

Perhaps most ominous, the 
growing public outrage about 
official corruption is threaten- 
ing to spread beyond tire Nath 
case to the national political 
arena. Questions about how 
such extensive corruption goes 
undetected by investigative' 
agencies have rekindled interest 


and highest-ranking govern- 
mental officials. 

That case involves a diary 


with 9,750 pounds of gold, du£ 
ine a 1991 raid entire kane and 
office of a wealthy Delhi busi- 
nessman allegedly involved is 
exchanging dollars and rupees 
oil the black market and trass-, 
faring the funds between ac- 
counts hens and abroad. - . 

The man kept a ledger with 
numbers and initials that, when 
deciphered, appeared to be a 
list of payoffs made to top bu- 
reaucrats and politicians. ■ 

But what stunned 'people 
even more were notations mtK- 
catingjpayments to senior po- 
liceonfeaals. . : . . „ \ . 

.Mast of the people fisted in 
the diary have denied iccepting 
any money from the man. ~ 

LeeKnanlew Sues lift 
Over an Opinion Article 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Lee Kuan Yew, 
Singapore’s senior minister, has • 
filed a cavil sirit in Singapore f or 
damages agains t an American 
academic and executives of the 
International Herald Tribune. . 

The suit is in addition to a 
contempt of court action. by the 
Singapore government over an 
opinion article that, appeared 
OcL 7 in the EHT. The article 
was written by Christopher lin- 
gje, who was then a teacher at 
the National University of Sin- 
gapore. 


offs allegedly made to some of 
the most powerful politicians 


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Page 6 


TUESDAY, DECEMBER 13, 1994 


OPINION 


Uteralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



(tribune 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


Useful Counterculture 


Generational beading experiences have 
always been important in American life. 
Gvil War veterans kept meeting until time 
scythed down the last of them. The De- 
pression shaped the economic dreams, and 
feats, of mfflioas of young couples and 
their children. People who fought in World 
War II have moved through history with 
a fortifying set of common memories. So 
have the children bom to them during 
and shortly after that war. 

This last group profoundly altered the 
way Americans think about their inner 
lives, fellow citizens, the earth upon which 
we live and the process by which older 
'citizens in Washington decide when and 
where young Americans die in combat. 

Now, in an excess of Republican 
triumphalism, the party’s new leaders 
have decided to make “counterculture” 
•into a pejorative. What flapdoodle. No 
period in American history has seen a 
richer fulfillment of the informing ideals 
of freedom of personal and political ex- 
pression that tie at the heart of the Ameri- 
can intellectual tradition. 

. like many of his elders. Representa- 
tive Newt Gmgnch may prefer a stricter 
regimen of social conformity and reli- 
gious observance: But the millions of 
‘Americans who incorporated the cultural 
Ideals of the 19<6Qs and the decade's 
healthy spirit of political activism are 
foolish to abandon the high ground be- 
cause of his postelection slanging. Cer- 
’tainly the excesses of the decade are easy 
to parody, and its summery, hedonistic 
tthos then and now reduced modem puri- 
ians to tits of twisting discomfort America 
is still dose enough to the frontier experi- 
ence of relentless work and danger to 
view any kind of fun with suspicion. 

- No true historian, however, can believe 
'that it is posable to repudiate so large & 
'cultural event in a nation’s history, or to 
'dismiss its seminal political events as a 
“McGovern-nik” aberration. 

The '60s spawned a new morality- 
based politics that emphasized the indi- 
vidual’s responsibility to speak out against 
injustice and corruption. It was this re- 
newed sense of responsibility that led 
enough people to raise their voices to end 
America's most disastrous foreign military 
adventure, the Vietnam War. On this level, 
the ’60s saw an exercise in mass sanity in 
which a nation’s previously voiceless citi- 


zens — its young — overturned a war 
policy that was. in fact, deranged. 

The spirit of the age, like the tactics of 
the anti-war movement, was shaped by 
the civil rights movement. Its lessons of 
citizen empowerment, to use the ’90s 
term, led to the progress of the environ- 
mental, women’s and gay rights move- 
ments. The counterculture, in sum, pro- 
duced a renewal of the Tboreauvian 
ideal of the clear, defiant voice of the 
dissenting citizen. 

There was another empowering as- 
pect of the counterculture’s confronta- 
tion with the Washington monolith. 
Those days produced the sad wisdom, 
now indispensable in American politics, 
that the government will lie to protect its 
interests and that constant vigilance is 
necessary to keep it honest 

The influence of ’60s individualism 
was not limited to politics. It fostered a 
psychological movement which, while it 
burdened our shelves with tomes of psy- 
chobabble, also enabled people in emo- 
tional torment to ask for help without 
being stigmatized. It gave people in 
dead or abusive relationships permis- 
sion to break out. 

Would many Americans truly like to 
imagine a society returned to the dicta- 
torship of the majority culture? Would 
they tike to go back to the days of 
blatant, sanctioned discrimination 
against African- Americans and women, 
to a world deprived of all the ’60s ingre- 
dients that still simmer in the cultural 
stew, including an American music that 
has become a global language? 

We think not. For one thing , there are 
too many Republicans who are also 
Grateful Dead fans or, for that matter, 
divorced, ex-potheads and opponents of 
state-regulated prayer and abortion. 

At its essence, the counterculture was 
about one of conservatives’ favorite 
words: values. It was a repudiation of the 
blind obedience and reflexive cynicism of 
politics as usual. It was about exposing 
hypocrisy, whether personal or political, 
and standing up to irrational authority. 
As in any large movement, it accommo- 
dated its share of charlatans and socio- 
paths. But it is part of us, a legacy around 
which Americans can now unite, rather 
than allow themselves to be divided. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Lesson of the Lower Back 


‘ For pain of the lower back, a malady 
' from which a lot of people occasionally 
-suffer, it now turns out that drugs siron- 
' ger (and more expensive) than aspirin 
are generally not desirable. And by the 
way, it’s exercise, not bed rest, that will 
make things better. 

These admonitions are brought to you 
by a process that is beginning to have an 
impact on the practice erf medicine in 
America. As costs of health care soared, 
doctors began to notice wide differences 
from one region of the country to another 
and from one doctor to another in treat- 
ments for many conditions including 
some, like lower bade pain, that are very 
common. Five years ago Congress set up 
the Agency for Health Care Policy and 
Research to examine these discrepancies 
and offer advice. This guideline on sore 
backs is the agency’s 14th. 

In each case, it sets up a panel com- 
largdy of recognized specialists, 
it always including at least one consum- 
er, to conduct a broad sweep of all the 
available research. It is odd, in view of the 
enormous amounts of money spent os 
medical research, but much actual practice 
is based on tradition rather than on scien- 
tific evidence — and that is one major 
reason for the disparities in treatments. 

The agency’s job is to look into the 


questions that come up frequently in 
practice but on which there is no consea- 
susl The agency has panels working on 
guidelines for, among other things, the 
rehabilitation of the victims of heart at- 
tacks and strokes, screening for Alz- 
heimer’s disease and colorectal cancer, 
and the treatment and management of 
anxiety and panic disorders. The purpose 
is to improve the effectiveness of treat- 
ment But in many cases, including bade 
pain, the guidelines also have the effect of 
discouraging elaborate diagnostic proce- 
dures and expensive surgery that is 
shown to be of little value: 

It is useful work, and recently Con- 
gress asked its own Office of Techno- 
logy Assessment to see how the agency 
was progressing. The OTA concluded 
that the agency is making valuable con- 
tributions but often is limited by an 
absence of relevant research. It hasn’t 
got the money to fill that need. 

Although it runs severely against the 
budget-cutting fashion to say so, some 
of the money that the federal govern- 
ment spends does indeed help Ameri- 
cans in ways that the private market, 
however admirable, cannot The case of 
the guidelines on lower back pain is an 
example to keep in mind. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Comment 


.Hie Horns of Chinese Inflation 

- At an annual rate of over 20 percent 
China’s inflation is the nightmare of any 
'economic planner. Add to it the memory 
-of the Tiananmen bloodshed, which was 
•sparked partly by the rampant price in- 
“creases, and one can understand why the 
Chinese Communist Party is jittery. It 
warned that unless drastic measures were 
taken to moderate inflation pressure, the 
country would soon be swamped by eco- 
nomic chaos, and social and political un- 
rest Inflation is but one of many prob- 
lems confronting China in its transition 
to a free market system. All are inter- 
twined; none can be resolved without 
extracting a price on other fronts. A more 
stringent and selective allocation of 
funds, for example, will add to the debt 
payment erf many loss-making state- 
owned enterprises and the unemploy- 
ment rate. Yet, unpleasant policies are 
unavoidable in such a mammoth endeav- 
or. The sooner the Chinese government 
takes the bull by the horns, the more 


gradual and less painful the adjustment 
process will be. 

— The Straits Times (Singapore}. 

Next, the Delore Imitators 

Jacques Delors demonstrated, through 
his popularity and the substantial number 
of people — not just of the left — who 
intended to vote for him, that the idea of 
reform is one that cas be defended. Will 
the torch be picked tip? After the lesson in 
high ethical standards offered by Mr. De- 
Ions, the courtiers of yesterday and the 
opportunists of always will study try to 
practice Dekjristn without Deters. But it 
was precisely this comedy of appearances 
and personal ambitions that Jacques De- 
lots. through his attitude, denounced. And 
that is his real message: Reform cannot 
stand opportunistic arrangements. It ap- 

In^the current state of the nation, that 
would be a serious mistake. 

— J.-M. C. in Le Monde (Pans). 



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The 6 Peace Strategy 9 
Rewards Aggression 

By Lou Cannon 


L OS ANGELES — As chair- 
4 man of the bbe-ribbon com- 
mission investigating the Los An- 
geles Police Department in 1991, 
Warren Christopher was out- 
raged by testimony of police of- 
ficials that Chief Daryl Gates 
had dealt leniently with officers 
who used excessive force. 

Mr. Christopher has reverence 
for the rule of law. He was so 
offended by evidence that some 


Diplomacy, even at the 
high levd practiced by 
Warren Christopher, 
has its limits . They 
long ago were exceeded 
with the Serbs. 


officers repeatedly used force 
and racist language that he per- 
suaded the commission to take 
the unexpected step of seeking 
the resignation of Mr. Gates. 

Mr. Christopher was a hero in 
Los Angdes after the Rodney 
King incident because he sought 

a police 'force he believed was 
rait of control. Those who ad- 
mired Wm then are sad to see 
him bob and weave as he ratio- 
nalizes the paralysis of the Clin- 
ton administration toward the 
murderous, racist Bosnian Serbs 
who mock the heritage and reli- 
gion of their victims! 

None of the excessive-force 
allegations investigated by the 
Christopher Commission in- 
volved loss of life. But an esti- 
mated 200,000 people in the 


former Yugoslavia, mostly ci- 
vilians, have perished since the 
Clinton administration took of- 
fice after promising to reverse 
the do-nothing Bosnian policies 
of George Bush. 

Mr. Christopher is an excel- 
lent lawyer and a competent pol- 
itician. Surely, some reasonable 
political statute of limitations 
applies to the responsibility of 
the last administration for the 
conduct of the present one. 

Yes, as Mr. Christopher ali- 
bi es, it was President Bush’s in- 
action in 1991 when the Serbs 
invaded Croatia and leveled Vu- 
kovar that led the aggressors to 
believe they could get away with 
anything But some of us be- 
lieved BUI dinton when he 
promised to act differently. 

In his Oct. 12, 1992, debate 
with then President Bush, Mr. 
Clinton said: “I think we should 
stiffen the embargo on the Bel- 
grade government, and I think 
we have to consider whether or 
not we should lift the arms em- 
bargo now on the Bosnians since 
they are in so way in a fair fight 
with a heavily armed opponent 
bent on ethnic cleansing" 

While always opposing inter- 
vention with ground troops, Mr. 
Clinton called for air strikes 
against the Serbs. 

Last Jan. 24, Mr. Christopher 
said in Paris that the Bosnians 
were fully justified in trying to 
recover territories that the Serbs 
had taken from them by aggres- 
sion. Nevertheless, the Clinton 
administration has not deterred 
the Serbs from their advance. 

The man who in private life 
was shocked at police mistreat- 
ment of motorists opposed, as 
secretary of state, the arming 



a, rsnmson fa v* com 


of Bosnian M uslims to defend 
themselves from genocide. 

When Congress voted to lift 
the arms embargo, it acted 
against the objections of the 
State Department. Now Mr. 
Christopher again has his bead 
in the sand. After Senator Bob 
Dole called on the United Na- 
tions to withdraw its misnamed 
“peacekeepers” and allow use of 
air power against Serbian mili- 
tary targets, he called this mini- 
malist plan a “war strategy.” 

Mr. Christopher said he pre- 
fers the “peace strategy” of ne- 
gotiating with the Serbs. A 
more accurate term would be 
“surrender strategy,” since the 
Serbs are totally uninterested in 
any settlement that denies them 
their Bosnian conquests. 

We will never know what 
would have happened if Mr. 
Clinton had armed the Bosni- 
ans, who were left to fight with 
■email arms against the fourth 


largest army in Europe. We do 
know that the only significant 
pause in the Serbian campaign 
of tenor occurred after NATO 
planes bombed Serbian artillery 
positions in retaliation for the 
shelling of civilians in Sarajevo. 

Mr. Christopher is a master- 
ful negotiator. In 1981 he won 
national acclaim and the Medal 
of Freedom for negotiating the 
release of Americans held hos- 
tage in Iran. A decade later he 
persuaded conservatives on the 
Christopher Commission to re- 
commend the ouster of Chief 
Gates on grounds that the move 
would promote public healing 
in Los Angeles. 

But this well-intentioned man 
is deluding himself if he believes 
that the Bosnian Serbs respond 
to the language of diplomacy. 
Instead, the Serbs are holding 
UN troops hostage because they 
are convinced that no one has 
sufficient will to oppose them. 


President Clinton’s belated 
decision to ‘commit American; 
troops if it is necessary lo freip 
UN troops withdraw was; 
first sign that hc admitiistrar 
tion is Degmnmg to understand , 
fixe Bosnian . reality. 

His next step, once the troops 
are out, should be to bomb mu*/ 
taxy targets Until the aggressors 
realize mat their conquests come -; 
at a price. It may be too late io 
save Bosnia, bat such firmness 
may avert a future showdown 
with the Serbs and greater casu- 
alties in Albania or J Macedonia.' 

The Bosnian Serbs are murder-^ 
ous, not stupid. They stepped 
shelling Sarajevo when their artfl- 

3 was bombed, and maze vital 
tazy targets are within easy' 
range of NATO warplanes. Di- 
plomacy, even at the high level 
practiced by Wanea Christo- 
pher, has its Hunts. They long ago 
were exceeded with the Serbs. -. . 
The Washington Past . - - 


Seize the Moment and Prepare a Victory for Collective Security 


W ASHINGTON — President Bill 
Clinton wants Americans to be- 
lieve that the United States has long been 
committed to using U.S. ground troops 
to extract United Nations peacekeepers 
from Bosnia. That is false. 

“We agreed for planning purposes," he 
told Uni vision last week, “that in the event 
tiie United Nations mission in Bosnia 
would be terminated and the soldiers had 
to get out, and tbey were in trouble so that 
they needed protection in getting out, that 
we would participate in doing that. 

That is a commitment that the United 
States has had for some time now ” Mr. 
Clinton added. “We said that back be- 
fore I became president and when Presi- 
dent Bush was in office, and the Europe- 
ans said that they wanted to take the lead 
in Bosnia; and we encouraged them to do 
that but, if they got in trouble and had to 
get out, we would help them get out.” 

That was his explanation for announc- 
ing has decision to send up to 26,000 U.S. 
troops to Bosnia if asked to cover the 
withdrawal of the 23,000 lightly armed 
peacekeeper-hostages. 

Initial congressional and editorial reac- 
tion to Mr. Clinton’s carrying out George 
Bush’s commitment was predictable: We 


By William Safire 

have to keep our promise, but our involve- 
ment had better be limited to the with- 
drawal, and under an American com- 
mander, with everybody home quick, etc. 

Nobody stopped to ask: Exactly who 
promised what to whom, and why is this 
the first we’ve heard of it? 

Over the weekend, I called Lawrence 
Eagleburger, secretary of state at the end 
of the Bush administration, to ask if he 
had made a secret co mmitm ent to send 
U.S. troops to rescue allied troops. “I 
don’t want to call the president a liar,” he 
replied, “but I don’t remember any such 
commitment. Ask Brent” 

I called Brent Scowcroft, President 
Bush’s national security adviser. “When 
they put their forces in,” he recalled, “we 
said — I think to John Major — that if it 
became necessary, we would protect them 
with our air power. We never talked about 
sending in American ground forces.” 

No high-level, publicly accountable 
Clinton administration official wanted to 
refute ibe president's misleading implica- 
tion that in sending ground troops he was 
carrying out his predecessor's promise. 


The administration person assigned 
to respond on background did some 
checking and replied: “Our commit- 
ment was confined to air power. There 
were discussions during the Bush ad- 
ministration about the use of ground 
troops but no commitments. We have 
now extended this to include ground 
forces. It is not a continuation but an 
extension of the earlier commitment.” 

That’s a whole new kettle of fish. With 
no debate, without congressional exami- 
nation, and without even a straight ex- 
planation, President Clinton has com- 
mitted to America’s allies — who have 
treated all its Bosnia suggestions with 
contempt — up to 25,000 U.S. combat 
troops to cover their retreat. How’s that 
for un trammeled presidential power? 

Has anyone stopped to define the 
world's mission in the Balkans? It is not to 
feed refugees: not to pressure the victims 
to surrender; not primarily to protect the 
protectors. It is to stop Serbian aggression 
and force an equitable end to the war. 

To that end, the United States should 
contribute what no other nation can to 
coerce the aggressor: the massive appli- 
cation of air power. But the British and 
French won’t bear of that; tbey want to 


get their troops extricated and American 
ground troops intricate*! 

Before Congress approves the Clinton 
“extension” to help cover the withdrawal 
of UN hostages, Washington should get 
return commitments: 

1. A commitment of 25.00Q British, 
25,000 French, and 25,000 German 
troops, among others, to match the mag- 
nanimous Clinton ground-troop offer, 
with each command assigned a sector to 
bring out 0e UN hos tages. v . _ /- 

2. A commitment by NATO nations to 
lift die embargo now preventing Bosnia’s . 
Muslims from defending their land; and 
by the UN forces to turn over military 
equipment in Bosnia to Muslims if Serbs 
threaten departing UN peacekeepers. 

3. NATCrs commitment to bomb Ser- 
bian military and strategic targets after 
the withdrawal, actively taking the Mus- 
lim side until Serbs withdraw to the 50-50 
partition agreed to by Bosnia. 

A superpower does not pul its sol- - 
diers and {mots at risk solely to cover an 
ignominious retreat. The United States 
should seize tins moment to brush aside 
the United Nations and organize a 
NATO victory for collective security. 

The New York Timex 


Islamic Challenge; Come to Terms at Last With the Modem World 


P ARIS — The case of Taslima 
Nasrin, the Bangladesh novel- 
ist condemned by Islamic funda- 
mentalists, demonstrates the 
plight of Islamic intellectuals who 
struggle in their own countries 
not only to write what they want 
to write but to establish the larger 
freedom to debate ideas. 

The Salman Rushdie case in 
Britain has tended to obscure 
rather than illuminate the pro- 
blems of those Islamic writers 
and intellectuals who are remote 
from the West’s promotional 
and publicity machine and its 
fashionable causes. Tbey are in- 
stead in the midst of their own 
societies, where no strong tradi- 
tion of secular thought exists. 

Taslima Nasrin did not write to 
shock. She first became contro- 
versial with a novel addressing 
the issues of Hindu-Muslim rela- 
tions in Bangladesh, after Hindu 


By William Pfaff 


fanatics in India destroyed a 
mosque in 1992 and provoked a 
communal crisis in that country. 

She subsequently spoke frank- 
ly about the condition of women 
in fundamentalist Islamic society. 
The fatwa condemning her was 
issued last year by a rural reli- 
gious group and has no standing 
in law, but the Bangladesh gov- 
ernment has since accused her of 
offending religious feelings. Un- 
der these pressures, she fell com- 
pelled to take refuge in Europe. 
She now lives in Sweden. 

Naguib Mahfouz, the Egyptian 
Nobel laureate, was stabbed and 
seriously injured in October by a 
militant Egypt’s information min- 
ister has called him the conscience 
of the Arab world, bul one of his 
novels was banned for many years 
after being attacked as heretical 


On Algeria^ Some Are Talking Sense 


By John K. Cooley 


N ICOSIA — Algeria’s military 
rulers scornfully denounced 
it The Western news media barely 
noticed it But an imaginative ef- 
fort by an obscure Roman Catho- 
lic body in Rome last month just 
may have been an important step 
toward halting the domino effect 
of Algerian violence. 

The Roman Catholic Sant Egi- 
dio community assembled repre- 
sentatives of 12 Algerian opposi- 
tion groups. Putting aside then- 
guns, they talked quietly. 

Algeria's first president, Ah- 
med ben Bella, bad ruled from 
1962 until his overthrow in 1964 
with a mixture of mild lslamism 
mtd tepid Marxism. In Rome, he 
sounded a moderate keynote, 
calling for free elections. 

If the banned Islamic Salvation 
Front should win, he said, “let 
them try to rule. We must face up 
to the consequences of democrat- 
ic elections.” 

It was the unwillingness of the 
army and the government in Janu- 
ary 1992 to permit such elections 
that led to the army takeover and 
sparked the current bout of kill- 


ings — perhaps 15,000 to date. 

The Algerian parties emerged 
from their talks in Rome with ad- 
monitions to the Zeroual regime in 
Algiers to free political prisoners 
(whose numbers may equal the ca- 
sualty figures) and to allow peace- 
ful political discourse. Anwar 
Haddam, an 6migr6 FIS spokes- 
man, insisted that his group was 
committed to political pluralism 
and nonviolent constitutionalism. 

Perhaps, but the Zeroual gov- 
ernments fear and distaste after 
the Rome meeting was palpable. A 
spokesman denounced “interfer- 
ence in our internal affairs.” 

The Economist's new annual. 
The World in 1995, says the FIS 
or an even more radical group has 
“a betting chance” of coming to 
power in Algeria next year. The 
governments of Tunisia' and Mo- 
rocco, as well as other North Afri- 
cans, are watching events closely. 

Surely, following the example 
the Rome group was hoping to 
set. it is time for all interested 
governments and politicians in 
North Africa to lay down their 
guns and get on with the business 
of responsible dialogue. 

International Herald Tribune 


in 1959 by religious authorities at 
A i Azbar University. 

He accepted that ban with 
equanimity, but recently came 
under new verbal assault from 
fundamentalists, and has refused 
police protection. The October 
assault followed, in front of his 
apartment in a modest district of 
Cairo. This all occurred in the 
political context of the Egyptian 
government’s attempt to repress 
the fundamentalist movement. 

The most serious struggle is in 
Algeria, where something close to 
a civil war is going on between the 
fundamentalists, who won the last 
national election bul were prevent- 
ed from taking power, and the 
corrupt and incompetent “revolu- 
tionary” government, which has 
ruled the country since Algeria 
gained independence in 1962. 

N onfundamentaiist intellectu- 
als, teachers, writers and journal- 
ists, as well as foreign residents in 
Algeria, have become the particu- 
lar targets of mtegrist gunmen. 
All stand for what the fundamen- 
talists consider contamination by 
Western ideas and the challenge 
of impious thought One funda- 
mentalist group has been attack- 
ing students and schools. They 
hold that to be taught mathemat- 
ics, literature and science is a dis- 
traction from God. 

f consider Lhe fundamentalist 
movement less important for the 
outside world than it often is 
made out to be. It must eventual- 
ly fail because its goal is impossi- 
ble. One cannot re-establish so- 
ciety on a romanticized and 
unhistorical notion about how 
Muslims believed and lived in 
the 8th century. 

However, there is a historical 
explanation for why the funda- 
mentalist movement exists and 
for why it makes the claims it 
does. In Western language, it is 
Islam’s lack of the God-and-Cae- 
sar distinction. Western Chris- 
tianity from the beginning distin- 
guished the claims of the state 
from the claims of religion. “Cae- 
sar” was rendered what was his: 
his taxes, obedience to his dvii 
laws, service in his armv. Reli- 


gion’s claims were in the spiritual 
order. Religion demanded faith, 
virtue, chanty, penitence. 

After Rome’s fall, when Char- 
lemagne was made the new 
“holy” emperor of the West, he 
was crowned in the year 800 by 
the Pope, which signified not his 
submission to the Pope but his 
consecration by the Pope. Char- 
lemagne was acknowledged sov- 
ereign in his realm, the political 
realm. He was the state. The 
Pope was the church. 

Later in the Middle Ages, when 
Greek thought was rediscovered 
in the West (thanks to its having 
been preserved by Arab schol- 
ars’), Aquinas and other church 
thinkers made a similar distinc- 
tion between philosophy and the- 
ology. The theologian might d«d 
with higher matters, but the secu- 
lar thinker — the philosopher — 
was sovereign in his own field. 

This is the tradition lacking in 
Islam. Islamic thinkers never suc- 
ceeded in separating religious 
thought from secular thought, re- 
ligion from politics. The purpose 
of government was never under- 


stood as being simply to gove 
— to sort out the practical issu 
of Hfe and rule the community, 
had to be to save souls. 

Bernard Lewis, the emine 
American specialist on Islai 
writes that for Muslims a gover 
ment’s principal purpose is “ 
enable the individual Muslim 
lead a good Muslim life; this is, 
the last analysis, the purpose 
the state, for which alone it 
established by God, and for whi 
alone statesmen are given an the 
ity over others.” Islamic fund 
mentahsts follow this belief. 

Here is the dilemma of the i 
tellectual in Islamic society. He . 
she can simply rqect Islam ai 
leave. But if the writer or inteUe 
tual stays, he or she assumes 
rde that the Islamic religion h 
never recognized as entirely 1 
gmxnaie. The role is essentu 
Muslim societies sooner or lat 
must come to terms with tl 
modem world outside Islam. Bi 
the role is tragically difficult - 
and these days very dangerous. 

International Herald Tributte. 

® h® dngeles Times Syndicate. 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1894c Against Diphtheria 

NEW YORK — The leading phy- 
sicians of New York met yester- 
day [Dec. 1 1] to discuss plans to 
aid the Herald’s subscription for 
the purchase of Dr. Roux’s anti- 
toxine for diphtheria. The Acade- 
my of Medicine has called a meet- 
ing for tomorrow to aid the 
Herald’s subscription. The Her- 
ald hopes that the generous heart 
of New York wiS respond as 
quickly as did that of Paris. 

1919: National Motto 

NEW YORK — Sentiments ex- 
pressed by the late Colonel [Theo- 
dore] Roosevelt with regard to the 
use of the national motto “In God 
we Trust,” on the United States’ 
coins will arouse attention. Colo- 
nel Roosevelt considered that the 
use of the motto on the American 
coinage tended to cheapen -Oirfi a 
beautiful and solemn sentence. 


use the motto on coins or 
use it in any kindred numng 
wrote Colonel Roosevelt in 19( 
*s irreverent and ootrws 
ously dose to sacrilege:” 

1944: Germany’s Fm 

LONDON — [From our 
York edition:] American 1 
for “complete and ruthless” 

iition of Ge rman war inrlr 
and strict control of the eras 
future economy were reporl 
be under discussion a$ part 
Allied plan to suppress Gera 
aggressive powers forever, 
mission of the American proi 
nuuked the first time that a 
the big powers had -laraiaD 
forward any plans for the 1 
German economy. There -r 
growing belief that Russia’; 
posals, when presented , - 1 
suggest that several miiTim 
mans be sent to Russia to h 
reconstruction of the counir 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 13, 1994 

OPINION 


PageTj 


All This Racist Blather — 
Some Kind of Joke, Right? 


By Bob Herbert 

y° u ' d to Raviich, . 
AN thuik of it as a skit Play-acting. ** a sophisi 
^eaterof the absurd. The profe£ Th? sp 

w Afn « m costume, stands legal con 
Wore ha student followers and fSvS 


Plays the buffoon. 
Energized bv it 


Energized by the spotlight, the 
professor loudly proclaims that 

chaUenzod 5e ‘Sce 1 monk” 


egotistical and exploitive. Black 
poopte* on the other hand, are warm 
and friendly, unfailingly humanistic 
and spiritual, the “sun people." 
And Jews? Well, they stink. 

i 'i™ 1 ** a j° ke « "gat? A put-on. 
Ladies and gentlemen, let's bear it 


'$s 

- “is 5; 
= ;• “5C3& 




- ■ L. . * 
■/ 


A federal judge called 
Jeffries r thuggi&h' and 
^ e8Cri bedkU comments as 
'hateful’ and 'poisonous,’ 
but Jeffries stm heads his 
^purUnent at Gty College 
inNetc York. 


Raviich, whom he characterized as 
**a sophisticated Texas Jew.** 

The speech led to an extended 
legal confrontation as the college 
finally tried to remove Mr. Jeffries 
as department chairman. That issue 
has not been resolved. 

But a federal judge found that Mr. 
Jeffries's behavior had been “thug- 
gish" and that he had made "hateful, 
poisonous and reprehensible state- 
ments” that were “incompatible with 
the civilized discourse and conduct 
expected of tenured professors." 

However the court case plays out, 
the bigger question is why Mr. Jef- 
fries's clownish act was allowed to 
run so long at City College — from 
the early 1970s until now. Top offi- 



On Kyushu’s Shores 9 a Death Trap 


M elbourne — Before the 

atomic bombs cm Hiroshima 


i-VA atomic bombs on Hiroshima 
and Nagasaki brought the Pacific 

War to an immediate and largely gence revealed that the Japanese, 


unexpected end. Operation Olym- 
pic. the U.S. invasion of the south- 


By Denis Warner “5£5S»££ 

Torpedoes had been removed from 
gence revealed that the Japanese, more than 100 midget s u b marines , 
with uncanny anticipation of where which were then bow-fitted with 


ern Japanese home island of Kyu- 

shu, was scheduled for Nov. 1, 1945. skms, witE two others in reserve, forced by more than 1,000 high-speed 
Early intelligence indicated that Worse, the initial estimates of Japa- suicide motor boats, then under mass 
the Japanese would have only three nese air power were dangerously production. Loaded with explosive 
divisions deployed to the south of astray. When the war ended an Aug. charges that detonated mi impact, 
the mountains that divide southern 15, Japan still had 12,725 planes of all they had been used on a smaller scale 


the would come, M raised high-explosive warheads to mount 

their strength to no less than 1 1 divi- suxade attacks. These were lobe rein- 


pwrwok 

NOW. SUL... 


the mountains that divide southern 
Kyushu, where the landings were to 


that detonated mi impact, 
been used on a smaller scale 


MEANWHILE straction. No fewer than 1,131 planes midget submarines were to have 

" | : had been produced in July alone. joined in the Japanese attacks against 

take place, from the northern part of I had been scheduled to land in the the U.S. transport ships off Kyushu, 
the island, where there were report- southwestern comer of Kyushu with The beaches where the marines 
edly three additional divisions and the 5th U.S. Amphibious Corns, con- were to have landed made those at 
one or two tank units. In all of sasting of the 2d, 3d and 5 th marine Saipan and Pddiu look like seaside 
Japan, there were thought to be no divisions. So I thought it would be resorts. In front of the beaches, which 
more than a 500 aircraft, of which interesting after ihc wax to look at the a Japanese infantry division was tp 
300, mostly fighters, would be used beaches and to inquire into what sort defend, were several long rock forma- 
for suicide attacks. of resistance we might have faced. th»s extending out into the sea. On 


types. One hundred underground air- against the UJx landing in Lhe Linga- 
craft production plants were in con- yen Gulf in the Philippines. AH the 


dais of City College and City Uni- 
versity are certainly to blame for 


* ft 


S S 4 


the island, w bat there were report- southwestern comer of Kyushu with 
edly three additional divisions and the 5th U.SL Amphibious Corns, con- 
one or two tank units. In all of asting of the 24 3d and 5th marir* 


- . 1 lit) if* 




- - r ££ 






- - r - ' -:j r ■ 


Securitx 


for that champion of melanin — the 
chairman and chief anti-Semite of 
the black studies department at City 
College in New York — PROFES- 
SOR LEONARD JEFFRIES. 

You keep waiting for the laughter 
because you don’t want any of this to 
be real. But the lau ghter doesn’t 
come, or h comes in the wrong places. 

Mr. Jeffries is notorious for his 
bigotry and for teaching nonsense. 
He should have been chased from 
the campus Jong ago. But more than 
two decades erf cowardice and irre- 
sponsibility by blacks and whites 
alike have allowed him to remain, 
a tenured professor and chairman 
of his department 
The situation is grotesque. Mr. 
Jeffries spends muen of his time 
babbling about the evil influence erf 
Jews and the wonders of melanin. 
City College officials knew for a 
very long time that his classes were 
exercises in the ridiculous, but it 
wasn’t until the professor gave a 
blatantly anti-Semitic speech in Al- 
bany, New York, in 1991 that he 
gained wide public attention. 

In that speech he charged that 
“rich Jews" had financed the slave 
/a trade and that Jews had conspired 
*7 with the Mafia to make movies de- 
signed to bring about “the destruc- 
tion of black people.” He talked 
; about the “head Jew” - at City Col- 
‘ lege and complained about Diane," 


verst ty are certainly to blame for 
trying to buy racial peace by short- 
changing Mr. Jeffries’s students. 

But what about black people, 
both on and off campus? Where was 
the outcry against bigotry and in- 
competence? Where was the ac- 
knowledgment that the toxic winds 
of racism blow in more than one 
direction? Where was the outrage 
over the fact that a department 
geared toward black students was 
allowed for more than two decades 
to wallow in ignorance rather than 
strive for excellence? 

Mr. Jeffries, with his colorful garb 
and his entourage and his arrogant 
attitude, is a perpetual reminder of 
the utter failure of blacks and whites 
of goodwill to deal honestly with 
racial matters, and to look out for 
the well-being of black youngsters. 

What does it mean to be taught by 
a professor who says that each white 
ethnic grouping can be represented 
by an animal, and that the animal 
that represents Jews is the skunk? 
What kind of parents would want 
such & professor teaching their child? 

Mr. Jeffries has much of City Col- 
lege intimidated Black students 
who know that be is a charlatan 
are afraid to protest, afraid even to 
criticize him if there is a chance they 
wiQ be identified. 

Such an atmosphere turns the 
whole idea of the student-teacher 
relationship upside down. It makes 
a mockery of the archetype of the 
wise old man (or woman) who as- 
sists the youngster in the difficult 
transition to a successful adulthood. 

Life is tough. For youngsters 
who come from a disadvantaged 
background it’s tougher stilL For 
those who are guided in their devel- 
opment by preposterous and hate- 
filled incompetents, it must be 
toughest of alL 

The New York Times. 




more than 2,500 aircraft, of which 
300, mostly fighters, would be used 
for suicide attacks. 

Against this resistance, the Amer- 
ican invasion force of four corps, 
each of three divisions, supplement- 
ed by the best part of another two 
divisions, with a third in reserve. 


f resistance we migh t have faced tions extending out into the sea. On 
My war assignment had been to either side of the beaches were small, 
get ashore with the earliest possible heavily wooded peninsulas. » 


wave of troops to collect material for The road to the town of Sendai was 


seemed likely to be adequate. 

Then, on July 19, 1945, new intelii- 


a full broadsheet page for my news- paved with stone revetments leading 
papers in Australia and Britain, and to a river with fortified banks. Somc* 


then get out and dispatch the story as how, it would have had to be crossed 
quickly as possible. It is an assign- After this, for the lucky survivor? 


ment I am glad to have missed 


would come a narrow passage 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


AD Japanese military units — land flanked by high mountains and steep 
a and air — in and around Kyushu cliffs with caves used by the much- 


Confusion Over Bosnia 


had been turned into a gigantic kami- bombed civilians of Sendai as air raid 
kaze force. Air cadets with only 70 shelters. The caves were made to or- 


objectives in the war of Yugoslav of your reporting as well as the atten- hours’ training, sometimes less, were der for suicidal defense. 


A shiver of fear ran down my 
spine as 1 read your weekend edition 
and realized bow quickly relations 
between Europe and the United 
States have declined and just how 
seriously British, French and other 
European officials are »akfng the 
views of the new Republican leader- 
ship on NATO and Bosnia. Senator 
Bob Dole’s visits to 10 Downing 
Street and Brussels, along with 
Newt Gingrich’s recent public com- 
ments, demonstrate that the major- 
ity position in Washington is one of 
free-wheeling threats and unin- 
formed criticism. 

As an expatriate I am embar- 
rassed at the obvious disarray in 
American foreign policy, and 
alarmed at the siege mentality in 
Washington. I fear potential escala- 
tion in Bosnia, even to the point of 
confrontation with Russia. 


succession: 


• N ATO has been severely weak- 'and- However, saying the Swiss were 
ened if not destroyed France voting on a bill that would allow 


tion you give to my country, Switzer- bang moss produced for suicide mis- The path to Kagoshima would 


always wanted U.S. troops out of authorities to “jail unwanted aliens" 
Europe (except when it is in the was misleading. The bill provided for 


sons, whether as human bombs or to have posed equally formidable diffi- 
crash their planes into U.S. fighters, culties to any invasion force. Be^ 


Mast of the new pilots woe taught yond the beachhead, a marshy plaip 


process of losing a war, of course), the jailing only or illegal aliens, such 

• France has established itself as as those who have destroyed their 


rally basic diving skills, no more. led to a defile in the mountains. This 


the effective leader of the Western identity papers before asking for asy- 
alliance in European ma tters, hav- lum, in order to prevent Swiss au- 


Kanrikaze attacks had been tern- extended aD the way across the pen- 
porarily abandoned by mid- 1945 insula to Kagoshima itself. , 


ing bla ckmail ed and bullied Germa- 
ny into backing down from its prin- 
cipled stand on ex-Yugoslavia. 


tborities from sending them back to 
their country of origin: those who 
refuse to leave the countiy, living 


while work proceeded on 20 new sui- 
cide air strips with underground han- 


When my wife, Pej 
working on a history 


’. and I were 
thekamika- 


gars in southern Kyushu. These were ze campaign, we passed the material 
intended to help preserve the element I had gathered about the defense of 


• France’s traditional ally. Ser- clandestinely after their request has 
bi » t hag been ps «n m peri- been turned down: and those who 


of surprise, as well as the planes, Kyushu to the Aust ralian Army 
pilots and fueL There were also plans Command and Staff College for its 


al power, while nations that France come as tourists and then take a job 


views as within the German orbit, and stay on. If the measure found in the mountains erf Kyushu. 


to launch a new model of the baka, assessment of what would havehaj*- 
the flying human bomb, from caves pened if the Japanese had not sur- 


especiaUy Croatia, have been dis- support among the Swiss, it is be- 


rendered immediately after the 


membered pillaged and debilitated. 
More generally, the democratic de- 
velopment of Central Europe has 


cause they believe that if someone 
requests asylum or wants to live in 
Switzerland he or she should respect 


The Japanese operational plan shock of the atomic bombing and 
was to annihila te most of the invad- the American invasion had gone 


ipg force on the sea and on or near ahead as planned 
the landing beaches. When it be- The college concluded that it was 


been retarded through the encour- its laws. But the Swiss, unlike Calif or- came obvious that landings were im- “likely that the war would have been 


agemenl of aggressive nationalist man voters, will not vote to deny minent, 300 specially trained naval 


Who is speaking fra the United 
ales? Is there an administration 


movements and the clear m essage schooling or medical treatment to the 
that the West will not protect de- children of illegal aliens. 


minen t, 300 Specially trained naval prolonged fra many months, if not 
combat pilots were to attack the years, had atomic bombs not been 

TIC I- f A .J ■ JmnuJO I. f A (L.i U.l 


Stales? Is there an administration 
stiD loyal to the chief executive? 

The United States has clearly stal- 
ed its desire to stay out of Bosnia. 
So be it! 


R.W. WHITE. 
London. 


mocracy or national borders in this 
region. Thus, the movement of the 
European center of gravity from 
France to Germany has been par- 
tially thwarted. 

ERIC HALG REN. 

Rennes, France. 


ANDRE MAILLARD. 
Cologny, Switzerland. 


US. task force. A second Japanese dropped.” It found that “there is 
phalanx, made up of 2,000 army and also a good chance that a substantial 


A Weighty UN Presence 


navy planes, was to fight to the port of the Japanese borne islands 
death to gain control of the air. would have been occupied by Soviet 
While these two forces engaged forces, which subsequently would 


On French Diplomacy 


Through vigorous diplomacy the 
French have achieved three major 


The Swiss and Immigrants 

Regarding the report “Swiss Bal- 
lot: Jail Unwanted Aliens T (Dec. 3): 
I generally appreciate the accuracy 


The brilliant MacNelly cartoon 
of the Serbian tank driving over the 
UN car (1HT, Dec. 9) omits one 
important detail: Where’s the Bos- 
nian? Answer: Lying under the car, 
where the UN told her she would 
be protected. 

ARTHUR LINDLEY. 

Singapore. 


the Americans, 825 suicide aircraft have given rise to all the problems 
were to hit U.S. transport ships in experienced in Germany." 


the open sea. As the convoy ap- 
proached an additional 2,000 sui- 


1 he writer, who covered the war in 


ride planes were to attack in waves the Pacific for Australian and British 


of 300 to 400 every hour. 


newspapers, is co-author with Peggy 


The air action off Kyushu was to Warner of “The Sacred Warriors, 
be complemented at sea. When the Japan’s Suicide Legions He con- 


war ended the Japanese still had 19 tributed this comment to the Intemq- 
seryiceable destroyers. These were to tional Herald Tribune. 


BOOKS 


THE ABORTIONIST: 

A Woman Against die Law 

By Rickie Solinger. 253 pages. 
$22.95. The Free Press 


WHAT THEY'RE READING 


wotnar 

it*rn W Si 


; Reviewed by Carolyn See 

J TUST as every drug has its 
• *1 ride effects, every book has 
I its subtext. “The Abortionist is 
; the biography erf Ruth Barnett, 
! who performed illegal abor- 
’ tions from the time she was a 
teenager until she was an rid 
woman. She was jailed repeat- 
edly in her later years, but the 
author is at pains to point out 
that from the 1920s to the early 
' 1950s, Baraeu pursued her pro- 
fession with no interference 
’ from die Jaw. She worked in 
Portland Oregon, had a hand- 


• Ronald F. Maxwell, director 
of the film “Gettysburg,” is 
reading “The Red Queen : Sex 
and the Evolution of Human Na- 
ture,” by Matt Ridley. 

“It’s a terrific book. He col- 
lects a lot of breakthroughs in 
genetics and biology over the 
last 20 yeas. It gives you insight 
into Ihiumii nature, especially as 
it manifests itself in the role- 
playing between mra and wom- 
en. 1 ’ (Al Goodman, 1HT) 



money 


century's 


had a comparatively happy life, pioneers, a city still very much 
The subtext here is the story m the making when Barnett 


of rough-and-ready, happy-go- started her trade. Barnett, by 

her choice of profession, hung 


CHESS 


>:; s : ^ 


Bv Robert Byrne After Browne bad unpinned 

X> ORIS GULKO beat. Wal- .Hr*** 7 " G f ko , thwarted 
B terBrowne in Round 1 of ^>le counfrglaywith 
the United States Champion- 

sfu P- ... . i Bd4, the white nneen hishon 


bishop 


English Opening as he aoes 
here with 3.JC5 and he has been 
successful with this strategy for 
many years. But these ambi- 
tious e and f pawns present 


BftOWN&MACX 




M 1 ^ 



id 

[!' • 

■ 


□ 

i 

0 

i: •'!! ' ! 

n 


i 



■ 

il 

m 

■ 

A 

w 

r\ 


black king. 

A cute combination enabled 
Gulko to thrust the powerful 23 
©4! Thus, 23_fe24N©4! Ne425 
Be4 Re4 26 Ng6! bg 27 Qh6 
Rh7 sets up 28 RfSmale. 

On 24 Bg2, 24_fe? would 


have been smashed by 25 Bh3 
Od8 26 Ne6! he 27 Rf6 Bf6 28 


Qd8 26 Ng6! hg 27 Rf6 Bf6 28 
Bf6 Kh7 29 Ne4 Nb6 30 Ng5 
Kh6 3 1 NT7 Kh7 32 Qh6 mate. 
After 24 — Ng4 25 Bh3, 


out with the demimonde of 
Portland and the digressions 
here about city life in the hard- 
drinking ’20s, the heartbreaking 
*3Qs and the war-crazy ’40s are 
absolutely marvelous. 

This is life as DashieD Ham- 
mett imagined it, or Raymond 
Chandler: The lights are low, 
the rugs are thick and Oriental, 
the sun is hidden by banks of 
low clouds and sometimes on 
their lunch hour, office girls, 
college coeds, desperate wives 
and women who fit no eaty de- 
scription burry to Barnetts of- 
fices where that tough lady 
(who was “helped out” once 
herself in her teens) pours soapy 
water and turns on her suction 
device and in an hour or two, 
the women walk out, their fu- 
tures back in thrir own hands. 

It would seem that “The 


Browne might have accepted a Abortionist” began as a f rani- 


weak. isolated f pawn by nist polemic, bat the stray tran- 
25_JBe5 26 efsf. even though 27 scends any point of view. Bar- 


. -■» aT‘ 


- ■ "-il 


flUU*WW»™ 

Position after 24. >.887 

themselves as a target that can 
be attacked. . 

Gulko threw himself into pe 
task with 5 d4 ©4 6 Nb4 g£ 7 


30 Rf6 wins material: he had 
nothing better to do. 

But Browne, surely in time 
pressure, blundered with 


scends any print of view. Bar- 
nett may nave been seen, 
perhaps, as a savior of down- 
trodden women — and in her 
own eyes she was but she 
made hundreds and hundreds 


pressure, oiunoerea wnn ubmuws ana nunareus 

25_Bd4? and after 26 Qd4 Rg7 of thousands of dollars. She 
27 ef gf 28 Nh5, he had to lose should have been, then, a roedi- 


butchera around but then she 
trots out names and dates and 
places where competent, clean, 
ordinary abortionists worked. 
Many of these were women, 
and many of them pursued their 
careers without event while po- 
lice looked the other way, be- 
cause while abortions were ille- 
gal, in the days before adequate 
birth control, many, many 
women sought them. 

All this changed, the author 
prints out, just after World War 
II and into the 1950s. The same 
social pressures that sent Rosie 
the Riveter bade into the home 
dictated that she should have i 
children. Thus, the same kinds 
of people who saw Communists | 
everywhere saw “unwomanly" 
women everywhere. Psychia- 1 
trists opined that women who I 
didn’t want children were 
“pathologkad” or “castrating’* 
females. Richard Reeves has re- 
marked that the recent elections 
are emblematic of a devastating 
nostalgia for the domestic safe- 
ty of the ’50s. Solinger suggests 
that even back that. Americans 
were nostalgic for the ’50s, and 
in this general thrust toward a 
mythological normalcy, abor- 
tions became more than illegal; 
they became a crime against 
God and the State. 

Old-timers like Ruth Barnett 
never got it straight. To them it 
seemed they simply treated 
women in trouble. Dumbly, 
they were arrested again and 
afflun. Stolidly, they sat through 
tnal after trial where lubricious 
attorneys tried to portray both 
abortionist and patient as lewd 
women. 

Abortion has been legal in 
the U.S. for only 21 years. In 
the mainstream it may be seen 
as merriy an unfortunate occur- 
rence. No matter what ride 
you’re on in this question, “The 
Abortionist” provides a key to 
how we have behaved down 
through the years, just below 
the surface of the law. 



'A. 








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GLOBAL SATELLITE NETWORK 


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Why News 


Iravesfast 


rook for knight. 

Gulko clarified the position 
with several exchanges and af- 
ter Browne had played 
without 


Be 5 creating a pin that could 34_Nc6 he gave up 

S^hThroken by 7^h6? be- waiting for Gulko sue 


‘ . '■* . v* .; 


< '.S'. 1 


- m A ■ 


not be broken to ,7^67 be- 
cause 8 Ng6! hg 9 Nb8 Bg7 10 
1 ) 4 ! g4 11 Ng6 was rook and 
pawn for a bishop. 

Before Browne could ad- 
vance with !0...d5, Gulko 

opened the centra- wth 10 CM 

j][JBf3. After 11-** 12 W 1 * 

Browne had no oppornimQ; to 

France with I2-.d5 bccan^l3 

cd cd 14 Nf4 would have won 


s next move. 


BNGLUBOKffirtG 


wtii» 

Made 

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cal femme fatale but she was a 
heavy-set woman who wore a 
size 20. She should have been 
either a good mother or a bad 
one, but rite turned out to be as 
bamboozled as any striving par- 
ent: Her daughter, Maggie, 
wore a size 20, too, had a flock 
of kids and a total of nine hus- 
bands, and absolutely loved her 

Rickie SofingeYs thesis is 
that there’s no print in enar-Rog 
laws against abortion, since 
abortions wiO prarist as long as 
there is heterosexual sex. Ha- 
second thesis is a mild slap on 
the wrists to pro-choice advo- 
cates and their rhetoric about 
the unspeakabie horrors of ille- 
gal back-alley abortions. Sure, 
she writes, there were some 


Carolyn See reviews books 
regularly for The Washington 


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Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. TUESDAY. DECEMBER 13, 1994 


FBI Links Serial Bomber to Murder of U.S. Executive 


- By Clifford J. Levy 

New York Time* Service 

NORTH CALDWELL, New 
Jersey — Federal officials say 
that a mail bomb that killed a 


_ -vine to track Hm involved with organized crane 

California trying to trac* OT had been a witness m a cram- 


last year, maiming a professor ^ 

in Connecticut and another in pears to be me 


firms, ap- 
t victim in 


down. „ .... 

With the death on Saturday, 
the bomber, dubbed “unabom 
because in the past he had 


were there any tnreais nmae 
against him or his family. 

He said that from a brief 


in Connecticut and another in pan*™ u* - — - 

California. [Die FBI mid Mon- ^ investigators 

Am tk«t mrvrf rermt bomb Ml- M3WB _ -r 


day that the most recent bomb “"BSSSSK 

hi a return address and port- 


mar k from San Francisco, The 


sacs gs.« E2&&& 


live during the 


sMaasSsSS «££=»=£ Rfflgss ssassa: 


^ent by the same man wno ^ ^"^thathavegrown bc®b ^ tner-^ ^mSST'TC' engraved 
I n °k? 1 t ^M S l978 °striking tar- more violent, officials swd. uXtifieSi^ a recluse, a on his bombs. Officials said 

SSsffJMS 

" i 3 faimliar with university -g-"-*?' *-> - 

crane sprees in recen ■ ^ rgJaled l0 the earlier ones ^eve that he The earliest victims of the at- 

°^e. death Samtda^of^e JJ g ?gK 

-SKjsssasst. s^SSSws aMsrjs^s 

tosjfromNewYorkOtydeep- J“‘SS { 0 mectedM r. even though they an be bought 


Young & Rubicam has some 


U.S. Postal Service, Philip Mor- 
ris, RFC Kraft General Foods 


“—.-nwi kdbymsmt 

CmStSoqpcaItogom> lj Ungoja INAl" W* 3 

2S£«S.%S.V By Craig R-VW 

^Sstion taken by investiga- m Yo * TUm serf* • 

Sfw mean that the suspect goNN - Two jg wjg; Bray wn Up g^ .- g^t: j. 
intended to ns* a*ff- AndidV.Ktgiiw.ttetoBaan Chnncelloi ■ Hg™V£S“ 

The only known sighting of foragn minister, bonmeaa Germany, thera^eg 
thebomte was in 1987 in Salt $&of53E*^«®; supporter of e^ W^. 
Lake City, Utah, when a wt- Stockholm by 0 f security and statefriy-tass. [• 


QOUUtisw»*"T 


ened the mystery of the 
bomber. .... 

The suspect, described as an 
anarchist with a masteiy of ex- 


not certain what connected Mr. 
Mosser to the other victims. 

“The components of tne 
bomb, its construction, make us 


^bard^store.Indoh^so, ^^^ enccs > ******* ^ ^ N York 12 bombing «■ ^'STrO^^king overtures 

the suspect make it harder to e®® ^ _ jeast three of the other victims, 1 97 R to 1987, be- frorncrW Cammuiust coun- 

traoe the origm of the parts- to^Sn^vice presi- including the two ^iming^Evansto^ Illinois, ^ previwiriy alHed with Rus- 

3Sf«fcSr year an* re- fading in Salt Lake Gty. Western military m- 

bomber, who app n ^ rt h ern cently was named general Times to^diara ^ -ji^^ras then a six-year hiatus in Bosnia. 

his paekag^ f r ® , . - manag er as well at Young & as leaders m th vf oaser * s for unknown reasons. He demanded the lifting of 

California, had stalled m tne article describing Mr. Mossefs ior ^ 


and some other conglomerates. 

Investigators said one reason 
Mr. Mosser might also be 
linked to the other victims was 
that he was mentioned recently 
in The New York Tunes. At 


The only known aguuus foreign minister, 
the bomber was in 1987 m Salt gathering <rf 53 &iropemM^_ 
Lake City, Utah, when a wri- Stockholm by a^mc- 

ness saw a man place a bomb he called a . cor ?*^_ n 

behind a computer store, said course of Russian foreign 


be warned, 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


which is Speaiheading the m- ^ ^ ^ insistence 

.. ^ — . TTmnn’cfflllltl 


wuiwi *» *r — liuw» r arm 

vestigation- _ EuropcrnUmOT 


SSSS «»-««■ 


ward, fdt the dflemma paifei- 
laiiy acutdy. G 5 nn fS’ c 2 ? 
St forever ; 


an edge of “the West,” he.WW 


ice me uu&ui wi y 

The investigation into the ®°ied 


feU^ B iwders, bar etfendmg; 
Western security and economic 


oong o 
world’: 


for unknown reasons. 


economic sanctions a S a m a 55®[ t w the allies thought they had , 
Wa, wfaidihesaid this drde with^or : 
on the support of gr»t «ns- ^ invitation from ^ras- 

sia-V Moscow, he waxned. u Mr Ko^iev ; 


FRANCE: Bad Sign for EU Unity Bosnians 

c— Seek Aid 


Continued from Page 1 

vehicle for their own national 
ends, taking a page from the 
book of French conservatives 
who think of “Europe” as a 
means for French self-aggran- 
dizement, mainly to compete 
with German interests. 

Both of the conservative 
Crom-runners — Prime Minis- 


to be bold enough to agree to 
mutual con cessions of sover- 
eignty, forging a European su- 
perpower eventually capable of 
dealing on a more equal footing 
with the United States, Japan 
and Russia. 

In trying to dear up any mis- 
understanding about bis views 
in a television interview Sunday 
during which he announced ms 


Of Islamic 
Conference 


& Baliad-and la. StraBonnot wnift MrDetois 
ques Chirac, leader^ of the A become a 


ques Chirac, leaner 01 iu 6 *hat Eurooe had become a 

Gaullist Rally for the Republic many senses. It 


liauuisi Kauy iui ^-deration” in many senses, 

party -have wanned to ,d«« amo 


cooperation with Britain as a 
counterbalance to Germany. 

But the liming could hardly 
be worse. Only Bonn seems to 


have the capacity for leader- 
ship, while London and other 
European capitals seem weak. 
The Clinton administration is 
pushing Britain to work with 
Germany to avoid fragmenta- 
tion in posi-Cold War Europe. 

Paris has often oscillated be- 
tween embracing the Germans 
— as de Gaulle did with Chan- 
cellor Konrad Adenaurer in the 
1960s — and striking up an en- 
tente cordiale with Britain — as 
President Georges Pompidou 
did with Edward Heath in the 
-1970s. „ „ 

0 . s Mr. Delors prefers a Gaull- 
%t-sounding approach, arguing 
•ifiat France has enough assets 
to defend its interests in a part- 
jiership with Germany. 
i - With his knowledge of Ger- 


is this “package deal" among 
governments, he said, that pro- 
tects European Union pro- 
grams such as farmers’ subsi- 
dies that are popular in France. 

The bitter attacks on his Eu- 
ropean views in recent weeks 
apparently contributed to the 
decision by Mr. Delors, who at 
69 has never fought a brutal 
campaign, not to run. 

Certainly, the Socialist Par- 
ty’s weakness was a factor. As- 
sociates said that he was re- 
pulsed by the prospect of 
having to clean up corruption 
that has mushroomed during 
President Francois Mitter- 
rand's 14 years in office. 

If the Socialists manage to 
come forward with new faces in 
a few years, a leading contender 
is likelv to be the popular for- 
mer labor minister, Marline 
Aubry, 44, Mr. Delors's daugh- 
ter. His candidacy may well 
have hurt her career. 


Reuters 

CASABLANCA, Morocco 
_ Disputes between Arab 
states dogged preparations on 
Monday for an Islamic summit 
meeting in Morocco, but a Bos- 
nian representative said he ex- 
pected the meeting to take a 
strong line on Bosnia, possibly 
endorsing military aid 

As heads of state and govern- 
ment left home for the start of 
the meeting on Tuesday, for- 
eign minis ters had yet to take a 
stand on the Iraq-Kuwait con- 
flict or decide on a request by 
Jordan that they recognize its 
role in Jerusalem. 

The ministers erf members of 
the Organization of the Islamic 
Conference had planned to fin- 
ish their work on Sunday night. 

A,t a committee meeting 
Monday morning, the bitter 



would exercise its right to use 
economic and military mter- 

startled listeners that he did not 

really mean it — he was just 
trying to shock them into read- 
ing what could happen if .the 
West pushed Russia too hard 
and encouraged the resurgence 
of expansionism by people irae 
Vladimir V. Zhinnovsfcy, the 
extremist nationalist leader. 

But in the past week. Presi- 
dent Boris N. Yeltsin has ful- 
filled much of Mr. Kozyrev’s 


when he arrived to sign a 


Russian military coopcBtott 
with NATO. He said that m 
view of the expansion^anjust 
announced, he would not sgiL- 

The Russian surpris e -Pg 8 c t~ 
tled an alliance already strained': 
by the failure of Ameriqaii[led 
efforts to use NATO *&.*&** 
to stop the fighting in IheUnilr ; 
ed Nations “safe area” ofKhac 
in Bosnia. 

The European allies were 
also amcemed abgi&thpals to 


dire prophesy, first warning 
President Bill Clinton in Buda- 
pest that NATO’s attempts to 
bring East European nations 
into the affiance were creating a 
“cold peace" and then sending 
Russian troops to quell a Mus- 
lim rebellion in the Chechnya 
region of the Russian Republic. 

Russia’s hew saber-rattling 


mg in the UN Prolog force 

that could coroe from annflai- 
eral decision by Waslrfngton to 
Kft the arms embaigb vx 
Muslim-led Bosnian govern- 
men t , as advocated fry Senator 
Bob Dole of Kansas the Re- 
publican leader, and. oto R® - 

publicans in Congress. 

The Clinton administration 


tdfo 8 

differenoeswith Washington that, because of 
and each other on what to do Congress, the United btates 
aboutthe war in Bosnia and vrouS no longer take active mfl- 
hSrJBlr to invite East Eu- itteyi steps to choree Jbe 
gStriesintotheWest- L 

French, and. 


meats already shaken by then 
differences with Washington 
and each other on what to do 
about the war in Bosnia and 


mat France has enou^n osscls War Id 1991 came to the surface 

10 defend its Lnierestsin a part- a^ddegata aid. 

■^Whh hifknowSe’ of Ger- ter. His candidacy may weU Iraq is lobbying the Muslim 

h ave hurt her career. -flSSf 5SSSS? SSS 

■■■■ ■ "" ■ -and its Gulf allies, usually the 

, » mr , n . dominant bloc in the Islamic 

KOREA: Backing on Nuclear Pact 


i Me fad Cqpc/Aanoe Fran«>p^ it has also increased doubt meBosmans. , 

rsfiar rr 1 ^^^. 

e ton administration. _ Koz^m^uss^ .. 


In Tokyo, Rabin Sets Ties With Japan 

^ » < ■» «■ • ’I'mnneb 


The Europeans have re- 
tfae new assertive- 


*K Coodaued from Page 1 

r xwo days had “changed to some 
.extent” bis opinion of North 


.extent bis opinion oi noun 
-Korea. 

- “I think they are desperately 
fri need of foreign exchange, 
’'desperately in need of energy 
and in a transition of leader- 
ship, and as a consequence, 
they need assistance," he said. 

\ The Republican legislator 
said he still was critical of the 
^Geneva accord but that his crit- 
icism was “quite specific." di- 
rected at the clause that allows 
North Korea to put off inspec- 
tions of two suspected nuclear 
waste sites until construction of 
the modern light-water nuclear 
^reactors is well under way. That 
-will be years from now and af- 
ter the expenditure of about $2 
-billion, he said. 


5 has not met all of its obligations 

agreement to North Korean of- under UN resolutions, 
ficials. . The delay has held up ap- 

“Both Senator Murkowski pro val of a final text on Bosnia, 
and I indicated that while we but the Bosnian ambassador to 
would have preferred some dif- the Maghreb states said he was 
ferent provisions in terms, of confident the ministers would 
earlier inspections, the United adopt a favorable resolution. 


earlier inspections, me umin* adopt a iavoraiw 

Slates wifi comply with the jg a strong document. 


agreement that we have the ambassador, Nerkuz 

armed,” Mr. Simon said at the /yrifhodzic, referring to the 


signed,” Mr. Simon said at tne 
news conference. 

The two senators flew to 


draft resolution. “It foresees 


The Associated Press 

TOKYO — Japan and Israel 
signed agreements Monday on 
expanding cultural and scientif- 
ic exchanges as Prime Minister 
Yitzhak Rabin began the first 
visit to Japan by an Israeli 
prime minister. 

Israel is hoping that Mr. Ra- 
bin’s three-day visit will im- 
prove economic ties with Japan 
now that the Palestinians and 
Jordanians have Further eased 
their economic boycotts on Is- 
rael as part of moves toward 


rin Sets lies wim japau S in Moscow witb eaution, 

, _ . • {riving East European leaders m 

Mr. Rabin, who will meet with Prune Minister Tonmctn Germany, last weekend 

with Japanese business leaders Murayama- _ no timetable for joining the 

during his visit, has brought At the same ceremony, For- Union. . . 

onomic advisers and busi- eign Minister Yoha Kono of A year ago, American foreign 
sssmen with him. Japan and the Israeli ambassa- policy seemed to Europeans to 

dor, Amos Ganor, signed an he bending over backwards to 


during his visit, has brought 
economic advisers and busi- 
nessmen with him. 


7. . , 

no timetable for joining tne 
Union. 

A year ago, American foreign 


Japan, heavily dependent on 
Arab oiL long observed the 
Arab boycott on Israel, but re- 
cently has been slowly wanning 
to investment and trade. Tokyo 
sent its first economic mission 
to Israel in August 1993. 


policy seemed to Europeans to 
be b ending over backwards to 


accord to increase exchange allay Russian opposition to 
among academics, students and NATO’s expansion fry tempo- 
artists. Wring on membership for _r o- 

Mr. Rabin will also meet with ^ 


Kozyrev in Brussds an D«v 2 
to uige a peaceful negotiated 
settlement of the war and reaf- 
firm .support for.tte UN mih- 
taiy force m Bosnia until a set- 
tlement was achieved.; . 

But withm a few days, France 
and Britain had asked NATO 
to draw up military plans for 
helping them get their troops 
out ofBosnia, and Washington 
pledged up to 25,000 American 
ground troops if the UN was 
forced to fight its way out 


Mr. Raoin wm ai*o UKCl " , “ P 7rv and other countries that 
Japan’s trade, foreign and 5- gWJ“Jf 
noliti- wanted to join. 


RUSSIA: 


taking several actions in all di- peace in the Middle East 

.■ . _ JL.1uu.tSn nnlitiml 


Mr. Rabin signed the agree- 
ment on scientific exchanges 


Pyongyang, the North Korean j^ons — diplomatic, political 


TIM IS "tffi Ut. January, KUMlAt 

SSSS™* 1 ^ Fear of Long War 

— c— h-raii . 


on Wednesday. 


capital, from Beijing on Sunday 
aboard the first American mili- 
tary plane to fly into North Ko- 
rea since the end of the Korean 
War in 1953. They drove into 
South Korea on Monday 
through the border village of 
Panmunjom. 


rwT^^“ tood SUDAN: Odds on Peace at Track RWANDA: 

response at the summit and „ 

hdg define a Copland rf- . . .. p,., iagby therideR.haaboledto Seeds O} Hope 


fective program of action. 

The Islamic Conference and 
its members have consistently 


But the American lawmakers supported the 
were not granted an audience ment diplomati^lly, 
with the £vt Kim JongU cnh<^g 4 e Western t»wer5 


• But despite the misgivings, 
Mr. Murkowski apparently ex- 
pressed his support For the 


who is bdfewd to bedie leader whichdominatetheUNopera- 

55“-!KS3»hn,*hh e lia« tion in the Balkans, but they 


of North Korea although he has tion in the Balkans, out tn^y 
not officially been named the 


head of state. 


Continued from Page 1 

race horses. When Sudan 
gained independence from Brit- 
ain in 1956, horse racing was 
booming. There were two races 
a week. Expensive thorough- 
breds were brought to Sudan 
from Europe and the United 
States to strengthen local 
bloodlines. 


numerous accidents and the 
death of three champion jock- 
eys in the last decade. 

But this failed to dampen the 
excitement one recent after- 
noon at the track. 

“It is El Maestro in the lead!" 
boomed the announcer’s voice 


Continued from Page 1 

percent of the food energy and 


East European countries, rcus- 
aa and other parts of the for- 
mer Communist empire equal 
terms and put off the question 
of membership into the more 
distant future. 

Bui over the last few months, 
Mr. Clinton’s policy changed. 
NATO, he proposed, should at 
least tell the East Europeans 


protein in developing countries, least tell the East Europeans 
Collection specimens — which what they rwed to do to qualify 
are I«pi cimied or frozen in f« "m^m^bashre- 


hfortfHines over lhe loudspeakers, “with 

in 1956 , most of them xjfn<»cirn oaininc p.iinine. and 


repositories to preserve them 
for as long as 100 years — con- 
tain hundreds of species that fit 
the Rwandan ecology and diet 


.Jr »hmed Maestro gaining , gaining, and 

iPENTIUM: IBM Stops Computers With Flawed Chip g“*“ 

*! Continued from Page 1 pre "‘S v tl ^^ 5 .“ d made on^by wIlTstreet dSS' sw^t'pLftileSi 

mi»nts w arimtists at the Jet much as before. The problems hisjockey. m bnghlyeUpw 


Seeds have been shipped nMd ^ to dob y mid-1995. 
from network centers to parties- w * ohinomn was ridi 


According to NATO diplo- 
mats, the Americans seemed to 
be acting precipitately, urging 
the Europeans to give the East 
Europeans an idea of what they 


Cootmued from Page 1 

did not support the activities of 
civilians. 

Si milad y, in Dagestan, 59 
Russian officers and men were 
captured near the Chechen bor- 
der on Sunday in a firefight 
after a militar y convoy had 
been blocked and surrounded. 
Dagestan officials said the cap- 
ture was also the work of local 
residents, and negotiated with 
them for the release of the sol- 
diers, who had been distributed 
two or three to a family. At least 


Continued from Page 1 


?£hips, IBM has joined with Ap- 
ple Computer and Motorola to 
■ro-eate the PowerPC, a rival to 
"the Pentium. Apple already has 
line of well-received Macin- 
'iosh computers based on the 
^PowerPC, and IBM is planning 
’to introduce its own models 
"next year. Asked if this was a 
Jictor in its review of the Pen- 
' fliim an IBM spokesman re- 
' plied, “Nonsense." 


- -The accusation was con- 
tained in an EBM press release 
duoung G. Richard Thoman. 
yninr vice president in charge 
of IBM’s PC business, as saying 
that his customers had ex- 
pressed concern and that IBM’s 
tests had shown “the risk of 
ejrror is significantly higher than 


previously thought and war- 
rants today’s actions." 

Andrew Grove, president of 
Intel, conceded that computers 
could be set up to force the 
error in the same way that “if 
you know where a meteor will 
land, you can go there and get 
hit.” 

An Intel spokesman added 
that the only user who had actu- 
ally reported an error lo the 
company was a mathematician 
at Lynchburg College i n Virgi n- 
ia wtm was numinghis comput- 


made millions, “which are 
made only by Wall Street 
quants or scientists at the Jet 
Propulsion Laboratory," said 
David Wu of S.G. Warburg. 


nor OI JvnoriOUiu <u ici luuvjivu- u. J. h«« 

which are dence, who kept a stable of two As the glistening black 
(_ii c.-aat A^wan Viakpc “We continued swept past the finish line, with 


r rom netware cenum> to pju uu- Was hi n gton was riding 
pating nurseries in Rwanda and ^ its allies, nego- 

surroundmg countnes, where ^ with the East Eu- 


they will be cultivated to pro- 
duce more seed. 


OlUl/U as luis. ■ . — - . ■ i 

came with this Islamic govern- mg wrfors, arched owjus back. 


“IBM is a conservative com-, 
pany and they want their equip- 
ment to be 100 percent accu- 
rate,” added Mr. Wu, a former 
IBM employee. “But if you be- 
lieve that is the only reason for 
their announcement. I’ve got a 
bridge to sell you.” 


UillJJu W1LU turn wiouuv P . . T • 

ment. You can't run a racetrack pandemonium erupted in the 
without gambling, or without a stands. 


wealthy patron, as in the Gulf The result set off even more 


states, to maintain and fund the feverish activity among a small 
sport This Islamic law is what knot erf men, clutching dirty 


The final yield will be 
trucked into rural areas and dis- 
tributed to fanners in 500-gram 
packets by relief agencies, in- 
cluding the Red Cross, CARE, 


Hating terms with the East Eu- 
ropeans and presenting NATO 
with accomplished facts instead 
of consulting with them, Bonn's 
ambassador to NATO, Her- 
mann von Richthofen, com- 
plained in a telegram to his For- 


has led to the decline in the sacks, in a grove of trees near 


quality of racing in Sudan.” the grandstands. The men, who 


eluding the Red Cross, cake* ripn Minis try in November. 
Catholic Relief Service and American officials said that 
World Vision International. Fi- new proposal was explained 

nancing is provided by the detail. to Russian officials be- 


Sudanese jockeys and stable work as illegal bookies, and face 
hands are often recruited by prison terms if caught, began 


A Jet Propulsion Laboratory 


scientist woilid most likely be 

primenun.tes.amtiynun.ber- 


wealthy stables in the uuu 
states because of their agility 
and knowledge. The only pro- 


unfolding pieces of paper inside 


!iSed b wth «£d e mum stability will return to new members by 


World Vision International. Fi- 
nancing is provided by the 
United States, Australia, Brit- 
ain, Canada and Switzerland. 

The effort is predicated on 

the assumption that some mini- 


fore Secretary of State Warren 
M. Christopher went to Brus- 
sels and agreed with the allies to 
decide on terms for prospective 


^ pinching task. 

The real question, Intel re- 
minded analysts on Wall Street, 
is how many calculations a user 
expects to make. Intel’s tests 
made thousands, while IBM’s 


said Jeff Rubin of Laszlo Bir- 
inyi Associates. He added that 
the only people on Wall Street 
likely to use numbers extending 
much beyond two decimal 
points were program traders. 


fessional blacksmith in ’Khar- name for one of the men in the 
loum died last year, and this stands, the predictions for each 


end of 


season has seen a series of inci- 
dents in which horseshoes have 


of the five races, and a small 
wad of bills. Those who had 


flown off during races. The picked El Maestro in the fifth 
poor condition of the track, and and final race of the day had 


aggressive jostling and bump- done welL 


Rwandan society before the 
spring planting season. If so, 
and if the program succeeds, 
planners said, it will eliminate 
the need for international agen- 
cies to supply hundreds of thou- 
sands of tons of food next year. 


next year. 

The allies did not decide 
which countries would qualify 
first or when to let any of them 
in, reflecting European concern 
that eastward expansion of 
NATO could only go ahead 


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_ Chriacpher Momc 

;V : The Oldham touch, clockwise from top left: Slip dress with Chinese flower embroidery ; boot with rhinestone- 
fa studded heel; Oldham in his SoHo boutique; Oldham's snakeskin print in a halter dress and a suit. 


Oldham’s Munich Connection 


N EW YORK — There will be no 
drag queens on the runway — 
but a confetti shower of color — 
when Todd Oldham consum- 
mates his fashion marriage with Escada in 
Munich on Saturday. 

When this unlikely alliance was an- 
nounced in October, the general reaction 
was astonishment. Oldham, the New Age 
American designer as artistic director of 
the industrial giant Escada? From a dose- 
knit family business in Texas to a high- 
tech fashion house in Munich? A vegetari- 
an, animal-friendly designer in the 
German mink-and-glitz belt? Was it a joke 
— like the witty prints and transvestite 
takes on Oldham’s runways? Or for real? 

*T still laugh when I think about it — it is 
a very unusual patting,” admits Ol dham. “I 
design with a penal — I don't have a 
computer. But what interest me is the tech- 
nology — I can’t imagine that anyone has 
more than Escada. And in three days in 
design meetings 1 never heard the word ‘no.’ 
1 want to find out what it all is and then say 
let’s make it like human hands’ — when 
mis t ak es are the gateway to invention.” 

The first seeds of Oldham’s collabora- 
tion have been planted in the fall/ win ter 
1995 show — two hours long — for Escada 
executives Saturday. The collection will be 
publidy unveiled in Dflssddozf on Feb. 5. 

Color is the link between the 32-year-old 
designer and the $ 1 -biDi on- a-year Escada, 
whose co-founder Margaretha Ley died in 
1992. Inspired by a peripatetic childhood 
between Tehran and bis native Texas, Old- 
ham serves up a feast of color, with rich 
patterns and ornamentation on sharp, sexy 
modem clothes. 

“I am very much not afraid of color,” 
says Oldham whose paintings have bran 
exhibited at a New York gallery since he 
moved to the city from Dallas five years 
ago. 


By Suzy Menkes 

International Herald Tribune 



mm&m 






Fashion’s Retro Take on Movies 


Imermuional Herald Tribune 

P ARIS — A hundred 
years of movies have 
projected indelible 
fashion images: Jean 
Harlow’s shiny screen goddess 
silhouette; Veronica Lake's wa- 
terfall of a hairdo; the curva- 
ceous sheath dress of Marilyn 
Monroe; the bionic bosom of 
Jane Fonda's Barbarella. 


And, most potent of all, Mar- 
lene Dietrich’s dark slash of a 


mouth, her penciled, arched 
brows and louche stance in a 
man’s tuxedo. 

There she is again in graphic 
black and white on the cover of 
French Vogue, lips looming in 
the lens. Except that it is not a 
still from an old movie, but an 
homage to the centenary of cin- 
ema — model Karen Mulder in 
yet another take on retro fash- 
ion. 

The entire issue is devoted to 
re-creating or recalling film sce- 
narios of the past with clothes 
of die present, in takes on Die- 
trich, Rita Hayworth and Ava 
Gardner, to Jean Renoir’s “La 
Rfcgle du Jeu” by photographer 
Mario Testino (clothes by Mar- 
tin Margiela, Ralph Lauren and 
Prada.) Cut to “Blade Runner” 
— - fast-forward in a 1990s cy- 
berspace scenario, as photogra- 
pher David Lachapefle shoots 
the shiny dothes of Gianni Ver- 
sace and Karl Lagerfeld. 

The most telling thing about 
the issue — which also has a 
charming article by Jeanne Mo- 
reau and portraits of male movie 
stars — is the captions _ to the 
pictures — those lists to tiny 

print of where the dothes come 

from. There is a fleeting mennon 
of an antique store for a belt ora 
prop. But just about every single 
item of clothing is modem. 


What’s modem? Not this 
Chand bdted tweed coat recre- 
ating the 1940s; not even the 
shiny vinyls going back to 1960s 
futurism. It is easy to do a 
streamlined pantsuit by J3 Sand- 
er or Yohji Yamamoto & la Die- 
trich with sleek hair and solid 
makeup. It is simpler still to por- 
tray Claudia Sdnffer as Brigitte 
Bardot But the fact is that so- 
called current fashion, like the 
cinema, seems to be reviewing 
the 20th century. It has at least 
one mascaraed eye on the past 

Joan Juliet Buck, editor-in- 
chief of Vogue and a former 
movie critic, believes she has 
found a link between fashion 
and film — and one that ex- 
plains the retrospective focus of 
current design. 

“Movies nave stopped time 
and made everything simulta- 
neous, because we have access 
to movies of the entire centu- 
ry ” she says. 

“We can access every female 
dream and every nrise-en-sc&ae. 


as the twin “compensations” of 
the 20th century. It is true that 1 
the fashion images from the 
1930s of mermaid dresses with 
fishtails of fabric, or 1950s 


sheaths too tight to sit down in, 
were part of the escapism of the 


were part of the escapism or the 
movies of their eras. Yet some 
approximation to celluloid style 
came through as genuine fash- 
ion worn by women, if not on 
the street, at least in grand ho- 
tels or night clubs. 


N OW films tend to 
promote a gritty real- 
ism (not least in 
dress), while design- 
er fashion has taken on the cine- 
ma’s former rede as the focus of 
dreams. It was brilliant of Buck 
to cast the supermodels as mov- 
ie stars, for that is what they 
have become: visions of glam- 
our and sexual potency as far 
removed from ordinary life as 
virions on the Silver Screen. 
Now that the models prance out 
cm near every ebano, it is not 
fanciful to imagine that these 
minifilms of runway shows 
could become classics in an im- 
age bank, to be accessed in the 
future. 

So while the streets are filled I 


It is not just that everyone looks 
at old fashion magazines, but 


at old fashion magazines, but 
they are looking at old movies 
and their images of femininity 
as our dream images.” 

Buck sees fashion and movies 


with a practical uniform of trade 
pants and trouser suits, produc- 
ing a sartorial merging of the 
sexes, on designer runways, fash- 
ion has never been more over- 
the-top glamorous. The stiletto 
heel — the symbol of the screen 
star purring out in a stretch lim- 
ousine — — is an icon of glamour 
that maga zines have now put on 
a pedestal, while the masses 
tramp about in sneakers. 

The dash of reality and fan- 
tasy was expressed at the party 
thrown by Vogue in a Path6 
cin ema complex to launch the 
fashion-and-cinema issue. 
While screenings of minibites 
offered Marlon Brando or 
Monroe, the fashion crowd 
milled about in ordinary (read 
black) evening outfits un- 
touched by the current vogue 
for glamour. Cut! Here comes 
Karen Mulder, in a slinky 
Hayworth dress cropped to a 
1990s mini, Veronica Lake hair , 
Dietrich eyebrows and Monroe 
high heels. Sampling the cinema 
images of the century is the 
height of fashion now. 


presentations, which indude the transves- 
tite Billy Erb and Amazonian models 
whom Oldham describes as “amplified vi- 
sions of iconic women.” 

There is, he says, a great deal of the 
Southern in his designs, adding that “drag 
queens and Southern women have a lot in 
common--— a deep appreciation of makeup 
and a desire to push things over the top.” 

But for aJD the razzmatazz of Ol dham’ s 
work, his spring/ summer collection also 
had simple clothes: shapely slip dresses on 


Karl Lagerfeld, he believes, has the geniu s 
to conduct a fashion orchestra. 


Oldham seems uncomfortable with the 
idea of a life devoted to fashion, describing 
his career as “a fun indulgence, a fantasy, no 
one needs it” It seems symbolic of his 
attitude that he wears for preference a thrif t 
shop sweater and recycled 1940s jeans. 


From a close-knit family 
business in Texas to 
high-tech Escada 


His many other interests include sup- 
port of a n imal rights activists at PETA 
(People for Ethical Treatment of Animals) 
and raising money for AIDS and to help 
the pets of rick people. One of his current 

nrnirtnfr Za 4— 'Pit AM 


projects is to direct a pro-veggie TV film 
featuring “mititant carrots.” 


a Chinese theme; East-meets-Wes tern- 
cowgirl separates, slithers of snakeskin 
print, or fantasy reduced to just a printed 
lining to a jacket. (“Leopard for me is like 
cream satin,” he says). Oldham sees his 
quest for perfection in finish and detail as 
another Irak with the German company. 
The difference between them might best be 
defined by Escada’s last summer’s inva- 
sion of elephants (as prints, as sweater 


appliqufcs, on belts, on sandals, for pen- 
dant jewelry). While, in his latest summer 


dan t jewelry). While, in his latest summ it 
collection, Oldham had eclectic mixes that 
included cfainoiserie gift-wrap patterns 


“When I started painting 1 began to 
think about the vibrations of color, now it 
speaks to you, the way antifreeze sits on 
the street at five o'clock when the sun is 
setting,” he says. “I am partially color- 
blind, so pinks, oranges and browns go 
wild in my eyes. In Dallas, there is an 
a m a zing blue sky and something different 
about the light. A friend and I were on the 
beach, with that sky and clouds like cotton 
balls, and we stood up clapping.” 

The applause and cheers that make ev- 
ery Oldham show a downtown happening 
recognize his joie de vivre. That cranes 
both in the vivid prints and in the runway 


Suzy Menkes 


l crane not as a replacement, but as a 
den mother,” says Ol dham of htis role as 
head of a studio winch he will direct on 12 
visits to Munich a year. He will continue to 
be based in New York’s SoHo, creating for 
his family-run company, and to present 
Todd Time, on Cindy Crawford's House 
of Style MTV show. 

Wolfgang Ley, Escada's president, says 
that no one can replace his wife, with 
whom he shared a lifedme and working 
partnership for 26 years, but that Oldham 
will put an injection of youth and energy 
primarily into the Escada/ Margaretha Ley 
signature line, as well as sportswear and 
couture — evening clothes “for Chinese 
New Year, Bar Mitzvahs or other family 
occasions that women can’t find the prop- 
er dothes for.” 


• featuring “mititant carrots.” 

The new Todd Oldham boutique on 
Wooster Street in SoHo is expressive of his 
Personality — and his handy s kill* The 
decor has a varnished floor papered with 
leaves from old bodes and scattered with 
rag rags; c h a n gi ng rooms swagged with 
velvet drapes and pasted with pages from 
encyclopedias of birds and flora, a mosaic 
counter of ceramic bits and pieces, and a 
chandelier ma d e out of junk, including an 
empty toilet-freshener holder. 

Oldham’s play school ability to make 
things out of scraps was learned in the 
childhood when the siblings gathered 
round a craft table and “friends were our 
family.” His handicraft ideas have made 
him a minor celebrity on MTV, and Ley is 
attracted by Oldham’s ability to communi- 
cate — especially with a young generation. 

The business is self-financed and the 
dothes with their 12-color silk-screen 
prints and hand-embellishments inevita- 
bly sell so expensively that Oldham says he 
“cringes at every price tag.” Yet he insists 
that he t h i n ks primarily about the “reality 
of clothes.” 


H E starts designing by sketching 
— but never people. His inspi- 
ration may come from shape, 
but is “most often an idea about 
fabric” that then grows into a “giant ball of 
eva^riung.” His fashion hero, he says,, is 
’Christian Lacroix — 1 worship at his 
shrine because you see that what he does 
comes from the heart.” 


season’s trend” designers but away from 
the sturdy, career-oriented dothes that 
made its fame in the 1980s. Oldham wilJ 
head a design team 25 strong because “it 
makes the collection less volatile.” Only 


For all the brash sophistication of the 
Oldham look, family roots go deep — back 
to Texas, where he first worked as a fitter 
in a Ralph Lauren store, and to the natural 
elegance of his mother, who works in the 
company. Above all, there was the exam- 
ple of his ebullient grandmother. 

“She taught me the joy of paradox,” he 
says. “She would say ‘What do you mean, 
it doesn’t go together. I'm wearing it!* 


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THE TRIES INDEX ■ 1 1 mi SR 

S^e™t' ra na^„™sS"oSs S ft™ K” " 3 ’i “ n " posfid °< 

l^Bloomben, Business NewV^l 1M COmp,le<1 


WMtthdex 


Tha Max tracks U.S. doSer vaitas ot stocks m: Tokyo, New York. London, and 
Argentina, Australia, Austria. Belgium, Brad, Canada, Chile. Denmark. Finland. 
France Germany. Hong Kong. Maly, Mexico, Nenurfamfe. New Zealand, Nonray. 
Smgapore. Spain, Sweden. Switzerland and Venezuela. For Tokyo. New Yori> and 
London, the Max la composed ot tfia 20 top issues at terms of market capsa&zation. 
othonaise the ton top stocks are tracked 


| Industrial Sectors 



, ■ 

• - ;l 


Uhl Prrr. _ 

dim don change 


Hob. 

dose 

PlB*. 

dote 

% 

danot 

Energy 

11157 11120 4053 

Capital Goods 

111.47 

11154 

-0.06 

utases 

12454 12424 +0.48 

RawHaferiats 

12720 

12755 

-0.20 

Haance 

11059 11053 -d31 

Consumer Goods 

10128 

101.44 

-0.16 

Services 

11021 110.05 +0.15 

kUscoflaneoua 

11052 

11^ 

-127 

For mare information about tf» Index, a booklet fc available free ot chsqje. 

Write to Ttib Index, 181 Avenue Charles de G suite. 82521 Neu&y Cedes. France. 



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International Herald Tribune, Tuesday, December 13, 1994 


Page ll 



O International Herald Triune 


U.S. Gets 
Glass Pact 
In Japan 

2 Countries Agree 
On Market Access 

By David E. Sanger 

.Vw York Tima 5Wnrf 

WASHINGTON — U.S. offi- 
cials said Monday that an agree- 
ment had finally been reached 
on assuring American compa- 
nies access u> Japan's fiat-glass 
market, one of the most closed 
and cartel-dominated industries 
in the country and a constant 
source of friction over several 
years of negotiations. 

Even Japan’s Fair Trade 
Commission has denounced the 
Japanese glass industry in recent 
years as an example of a dosed 
distribution system that locks 
out foreign competition and 
keeps prices artificially high. 
Three Japanese makers account 
for 95 percent of the market — 
and one firm. Asahi Glass, con- 
trols about half of all sales. 

But under an agreement 
reached Friday, three months 
after the two countries agreed 
in principle to resolve the prob- 
lem, Japan will issue detailed 
annual reports on the extent to 
which Japanese glass distribu- 
tors sell imported flat glass 
made by companies other than 
their own American subsidiar- 
ies. 

The government has also 
agreed to promote the use of 
insulated and safety glass, a ma- 
jor concession because almost 
no double-paned glass is used 
in Japan, despite the country’s 
insistence on other forms of en- 
ergy conservation. 

Aides to Mickey Kan tor, the 
U.S. trade representative; said 
the agreement set an important 
precedent: For the first time, 
the Japanese government has 
agreed to monitor a keiretsu, or 
a grouping of Japanese firms 
that hold each other s stock and 
chiefly buy each other’s prod- 
ucts. to assure that outside 
firms are not discriminated 
against. 


Merrill Hits a Big Snag 

A Banner Year — Until Orange County 


By Laurence Zuckerman 

New York Tima Service 

NEW YORK — In a year when most of its 
Wall Street rivals have been reeling from 
tumbling earnings, Merrill Lynch & Co. is on 
track to log its second most profitable year 
ever. 

Having escaped the large trading losses 
suffered by rivals such as Salomon Inc. Gold- 
man, Sachs & Co. and Morgan Stanley & Co. 
when interest rates began nsing in February, 
Merrill; the largest American brokerage and 
investment bank, continued to rack up profits 
and became the darling of securities industry 
stock analysts. 

Then came Orange County. 

Since news of Merrill’s heavy involvement 
underwriting and bankrolling a large pan of 
the highly leveraged portfolio that forced the 
California county into bankruptcy protection 
last week, the company’s stock lias plunged. 
Lawsuits are piling up, and Merrill is under 
investigation by federal and state regulators. 

Though it remains to be seen what the 
company’s liability will be, at the least Merrill 
faces, years of litigation that could end up 
costing it millions of dollars. 

Even so, with what is known so far, few 
securities analysts and industry executives 
said they believed that the potential payouts 
threaten the future of Merrill, which had 
$16.5 billion in revenue last year. 

[The Securities and Exchange Commission 
said Monday that about a dozen fund compa- 
nies had received permission to protect about 
20 money-market funds from in vestment 
losses related to the Orange County bank- 
ruptcy, Bloomberg Business News reported 
from Washington. 

[The fund companies requested approval 
from the SEC to take one of three steps. One 


is to remove from the funds any securities 
whose declining value threatens to cause 
shareholder losses. The second is to establish 
a letter of credit that the funds could draw 

S sl The third is to set up an agreement by 
i a fund can sell its bonds to its parent 
company at face value if it needs to.] 

In an interview, Merrill's top managers said 
the company had acted properly in all its 
dealings with Orange County, and they ex- 
pressed confidence that this would become 
clear once all the facts were in. 

“People can write what they want and they 
can also file lawsuits,” said Daniel Tully, 
Merrill’s chairman and chief executive. “That 
doesn't mean that everything that someone 
writes is accurate, or that all lawsuits are 
meritorious” 

The SEC subpoenaed Merrill about its rela- 
tionship with Orange County. Separately, the 
SEC is already investigating charges of fraud 
relating to Merrill’s activities in Massachu- 
setts and New Jersey. 

As Orange County's troubles have unfold- 
ed. Merrill has been accused of a variety of 
misdeeds, including irresponsibly selling, 
highly risky derivative investments to the 
county treasurer. Robert Giron, who con- 
trolled a portfolio containing the assets of 1 87 
county agencies, school districts and cities. 
Mr. Citron has since resigned. 

[Governor Pete Wilson of California has 
sent a team of state auditors to Orange Coun- 
ty to assess the damage done to its devastated 
investment portfolio, Reuters reported from 
Los Angeles. The auditors are to review all 
activities in the county’s funds since June 30 
and all audit reports of the last three years.] 
[Officials from at least three school districts 

See MERRILL, Page 16 


Doubtful Debts 
Of State Firms 
Hit China Banks 


Bloomberg Business News 

HONG KONG — China’s 
state-owned enterprises may be 
unable to repay debts totaling 1 
trillion yuan (SI 17 billion), 
equivalent to 40 percent of the 
country’s bank loans, the offi- 
cial Economic Information 
Daily reported Monday. 

The paper cited Zhao Hai- 
kuan, secretary general of the 
China Monetary Society, which 
is not part of the government. 

Mr. Zhao said state-owned 
enterprises now rely on bank 
credit for 80 percent of their 
working capital Working capi- 
tal is the money companies use 
for day-to-day operations. 

He said the companies' debt 
burden was hindering the abili- 
ty of government banks to act 
as real commercial banks. 

If the banks continue to bold 
such a large amount of doubtful 
debt, the chances of their being 
privatized successfully are slim. 
Spinning the debt off into sepa- 
rate units would make the 
banks much smaller and less 
attractive to potential investors. 

China’s largest b anks often 
operate as a second finance 
ministry, lending out money ac- 


cording to the directions of 
Beijing. 

About 44 percent of slate 
companies posted losses in the 
first nine months of the year, 
despite receiving low-interest 
loans. 

Mr. Zhao said the loan prob- 
lem could be eased if companies 
transferred shar es to banks ..in 
exchange for writing off un- 
payable debts. 

Separately. The Economist 
Intelligence UniL an economic 
research group, cut China’s 
credit rating to “C" from “B." 
The company said a protracted 
power struggle about who 
would succeed Deng Xiaoping. 
China’s 90-year-old leader, is 
paralyzing economic policy. 

■ China ’s Infla tion Cools ’ 

The State Statistics Bureau 
reported that inflation in 35 
major Chinese cities slowed. in 
November to an annual rate of 
24.9 percent, compared with 
27.0 percent in October. 

“These are encouragmg num- 
bers,” said Elizabeth Cheng, 
head of China research at James 
Capel Asia. “We were expecting 
some signs of a slow down, and 
it’s happening on schedule.” 


AT&T Targets Business Sector With Unisource Deal 


By Tom Buerkle 

International Herald Tribune 

BRUSSELS — AT&T Corp. 
will announce Tuesday a joint 
venture with Unisource NV, the 
European consortium, in a deal 
that will turn up the competi- 
tion in the $10 billion global 
market for corporate telecom- 
munications services, sources at 
the companies said Monday. 

The deal will add significant 
muscle to the partners’ existing 
marketing alliance and lock in 


their cooperation amid a global 
scramble for partners. 

British Telecommunications 
PLC paid $4.3 billion for 20 
percent of MCI Communica- 
tions Corp. earlier this year, 
while France Telecom and 
Deutsche Telekom have mar- 
ried their international business 
under the name Atlas and bid 
$4.2 bQlion for 20 percent of 
Sprint Corp. 

“We want to send a dear 
message to business customers 


that we will be proriding seam- 
less global services to wherever 
the customer is,” a source at 
AT&T said. 

The venture will be owned 40 
percent by AT&T and 60 per- 
cent by Unisource, which is 
owned by the Dutch phone 
company KPN, Telia of Swe- 
den and Swiss Telecom PTT 
and groups their international 
business. Unisource wiD shortly 
take in Spain’s Tdefdnica. 

The partners' investment in 


the venture will be substantial 
but less than the $1 billion that 
British Telecom and MCI have 
committed to Concert, their ve- 
hicle for serving the global cor- 
porate market, the source said. 
AT&T has said it would spend 
as much as $350 million on a 
European venture. 

The venture, tike Concert and 
Atlas, targets the fast-growing 
business of providing virtual pri- 
vate networks to multinationals. 


a kind of one-stop shopping that 
allows companies to make 
phone calls or send data be- 
tween, say, Frankfurt and Chi- 
cago as easily as they now do 
within their head offices. 

Unisource has been cooper- 
ating since early this year with 
AT&T's World Partners, a 
global marketing and traffic- 
sharing alliance that also in- 
cludes KDD of Japan and Sin- 
gapore Telecom. 


Thinking Ahead /Commentary 


President Clinton’s Shameful Sellout 


By Reginald Dale 

International Herald Tribune 

W ASHINGTON — With 
friends like Bill Clinton, you 
don't need enemies. That is 
the bitter experience of offi- 
dals at the Organization for Economic 
Cooperation and Development in Paris, 
which the Clinton administration 
pledged to revitalize under dynamic new 

^IrSeaX Washington has given it a 
contemptuous kick in the teeth. Thanks 
to a shameful sellout by Mr. Clinton, the 
OECD has been told that for the foresee- 
able future it will be effectively margina- 
lized. 

That is the result of a shabby back- 
room deal between France and Canada 
to share the organization’s leadership be- 
tween two flawed candidates for whom 
few fed any enthusiasm — a deal the 
United States first adamantly opposed 
then meekly accepted. 

Apparently to humor Jean Chretien, 
the Canadian prime minister, Mr. Clin- 
ton agreed that outgoing Secretary Gen- 
eral Jean-Claude Paye of France would 
stay on for 18 months, to be followed by 
Donald Johnston, an obscure Canadian 
politician, for the next five years. A? a 
senior OECD official ruefully put it last 
week, “we will have a lame duck Fol- 
lowed by a dead duck.” 

This is a disaster for the OECD, which 
needs inspiring leadership^ to pioneer a 
new policy-shaping role in the global 
economy, but is now totally demoralized. 
It. is also a terrible omen for the out- 


come of a similar tug-of-war between Eu- 
rope and the United States over who wffl 
brad the new World Trade Organization 
due to start work in Geneva next month. 

It’s not all Washington’s faulL By in- 
sisting on keeping Mr. Paye, France pre- 
vented the emergence of a more widely 
acceptable European candidate. Canada 
should have fielded a stronger choice. 

But it is particularly galling for the 
OECD that no other government cared 
enough to come to its rescue by vetoing 

It is irresponsible for 
. the United States and 
Europe to mark the , 
birth of the new trade 
order with feuding. 

the Franco-Canadian pact and demand- 
ing a better solution. Nor has a single 
voice been raised in the United States to 
protest a deal which achieves the opposite 
of Washington’s professed objectives. 

For months Washington swore that 
there was no way it would extend Mr. 
Paye’s mandate beyond the end of Sep- 
tember, not even for fifteen seconds. 

Now Mr. Clinton’s flip-flop has cut the 
ground from under the feet of U.5. offi- 
cials who will have to deal with Mr. Faye 
for the next 18 months, and deeply embar- 
rassed the Japanese, whom Washington 
had persuaded to gang up against him. 
Mr. Clinton also has lessened his 


chances of securing the World Trade 
Organization job for his preferred candi- 
date, former President Carlos Salinas de 
Gortari of Mexico. In balloting so far, 
Mr. Salmas is running well behind Eu- 
rope’s Renato Ruggiero, the popular for- 
mer Italian trade minister, with Kim 
GiuJ Su, the South Korean Trade Minis- 
ter, in third place. 

The best solution — to send Mr. Sati- 
nas to the WTO and Mr. Ruggiero to the 
OECD — is no longer available. And 
with Washmgton.boasting that the Fran- 
co-Canadian deal has finally loosened 
Europe’s grip on the OECD, the Europe- 
ans will be even less inclined to give way 
on the WTO. Hitherto, both the OECD 
and the General Agreement on Tariffs 
and Trade, the WTO’s predecessor, have 
been exclusive European preserves. 

Now that Congress has approved the 
WTO, Mr. Clin ton is campaigning hard- 
er for Mr. Salinas. But it is time for this 
nonsense to stop, ll is the height of 
irresponsibility for the United States and 
Europe to mark the birth or the new 
trade order with such short-sighted fold- 
ing.. 

There are excellent arguments for Mr. 
Satinas. But Mr. Ruggiero is well-quali- 
fied — and 
countries. 

Meanwhile, 
left to its fate. If the member govern- 
ments are too inept or inert to come up 
with ways of strengthening their own 
organization, they should appoint a 
group of wise men and women to do it 
for them. 


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get more out 


tjv' As regular readers* you tell us dial you spend 30 minutes engrossed in your 
r paper. It appears you Jook at. every single page and most importantly of all, 
- gain a great deal pf enjoyment from doing so.t 
. .. You also teB us dtat you have an average household income of a substantia! 
■Aim 147,600* 7; 

! ^ Convincing both you and the companies who advertise within 
our pages get more Csit of the International Herald. Tribune. 

^ which these facts are taken, please call, 

93 81; in Asia, Andrew Thomas on 
* *1^223;^ on {21.2)752 3890. 


gfl • • - :V rX .A...-. 


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** 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TUESDAY, DECEMBER 13, 1994 




MARKET DIARY 


Gains for Retailers 
Spur the Big Board 


Cmwkd by OoSuff From sjg^of inflation. The pnoe of 

NEW YORK — US. stocks ^ s bcnctimar j c 30 -year Trea- 
posted their biggest gams,® bond feU 22/32 point, to 
more than a week on Monday ^ lifting the yield to 7.92 


as 


of vigorous holiday ' J ^ x ’ bow 7.86 percent 


sales helped offset conr^n r "“AU the economic figures 

a flaw in Intel Corp. s sassfiai we should have a good 

chip could hurt computer com Q^ stmas ^ said Daniel Barry, 

pi Stp«» ss 

window shoppers mto stores ^ stocks could 


OW HW> 

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Standwd A Poor’s Index— 


i ndwtim n 

Transit. 




U.S. Stocks 


bounce. 

Among retailers, Searsroseft 


and showrooms over the week- t o*44^1iortorom surged 314 . 
end, bolstering retailers, while to ^ Dayton Hudson clnnbttl 
oil shares rose amid especta- 2 to 7814 and Wal-Mart rose * - 
Uons for stronger demand for w 22%. 
heating oil, traders said. oil stocks, meantime, rained, 

The Dow Jones industrial av- M map in the North* * 

erage rose 27.26 points to raised expectations for' 

3,71837, its biggest gam since more demand for heating oQ, 
Dec. 2. . . said Jim Benning, a trader at 

Advancing shares roughly Brokerage Inc. “If people 
balanced decliners on the New thinlc it » s going to be colder, 
York Stock Exchange and vol- tb - 1 pash those stocks up. 
ume was active, with 4 ajau fbe market’s gains were tem- 

million shares traded, up sligni- . a m computer 

ly from 420.66 million on Fn- ffiM ^ it stopped 

day. , shipment of computers using 

The bond market lent utue microprocessor, 

support amid concerns that (Bloomberg, Reuters) 

wholesale and retail pnee m- 




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Dollar Slips as Market 

Awaits a More by Fed 


Coimpilvl by Ovr Staff Front Dispaicha 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
slipped Monday against most 
major currencies amid signs 
that the Federal Reserve is fin- 
ished raising interest rates until 
late January. 

•The dollar fell after Alan 
Blinder, vice chairman of the 
Federal Reserve Board, was 


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quoted in The New Y ork Times 
as saying that Fed policymakers 
would have to see economic re- 
ports that won’t be available 
until January before they raise 
interest rates again. 

■ Some traders had expected 
the Fed to raise rates at its next 
polity meeting, on Dec. *-0. 
Higher rates often bolster the 
dollar by making U.S. deposits 
more attractive. 

Kevin Lawrie. foreign-ex- 
change manager at Mellon Bank 


It fell to 1.3335 Swiss francs 
from 1.3360 and to 5.4080 
French francs from S.4165. 

The British pound rose to 
S1.5648 from $13600. 

Though lower on Monday, 
many traders said they expect- 
ed the dollar to continue the 
rally that has pushed it up 5 
percent since the begjnnimg of 
November. Higher rates fueled 
the dollar's gains. The Fed has 
raised rates six times this year 
to combat inflation. 

“Xhere are still more dollar 
bulls than bears out there,” said 
Laurence Hayward, vice presi- 
dent and trader at NationsBank 
of Texas in Houston. 


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CFX Cnp 

STOCK 5PLIT 


Ext. volume: W4.I63. OPOT W- 1*3661 

fegssesvKKSioopc. 

Dec 


102-30 

182-18 

N.T. 


102-22 

101-28 

N.T. 


■HQ-23 

Ha® 

lOVOO 


-0-13 
— 0-15 
-0-15 


— % 
+ Vi* 
+% 


7* 


+s 
— % 
+%l 
— % 
— % 


Market Sates 


NASDAQ Diary 


Advanced 
Docfirwd 
Unchwwed 
Total Issuer 
NawHWu 
New Laws 


1439 

1753 

1899 

5121 

25 

735 


1419 

1902 

1805 

5126 

30 

287 


s. volumeTwUw. dim InL;120287. 
ORRMAN OOVCRNMEKT BUND CUFF El 




first nine 

derivatives. 




rivatives, authomy oroV ides dectric power to47 

The stato-creatwlauthonty, gj^Slo^ or 12 percentofits 

ueorgia dties,stffl basa^} S ^°5^ c ^Svative mstremmts, 

•siSsaKS sas5w-»,“- 

Knart «. Cm Stall alH « dqo « w » 


V?- 


: 

it:-... 




' TROY, 

1 would cut 900 jc 


(Bloomberg) —Kmart Corp. sairiMmday% 


« about Wpcrcoiibf 

at the North Bergm operanon. 


Tennant Co 


INCREASED 

q 34 12-20 t2-30 


OMITTED 


DM 258688 - Ft* at M8 PCt 
Mar M24 8930 


89S 8965 


8969 

8977 


— 037 
—067 


Jh Est. vatumcT 74515. &en InU 168619. 
10-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MAT I FI 


Spot Commodities 


Today 


NYSE 
Amta 
Nasdaq 
In millions. 


28574 

1270 

22962 


<00-17 

20.97 

33417 


Coamiodttv 
Alwntnum , tb , „ 
Copper electrotytlc, m 
Iran FOB. Ian 
Lead, lb 
Silver, trey m 
S teel (scrap), ton 
Tin. lb 
Zinc, lb 


Today 
am 
161 
21330 
064 
474 
137 DO 
4821 4 
05703 


0839 

139 

moo 

064 
457 
127.00 
HA. , 
05414 ! 


am 11164 11164 111^ —072 

jS 11180 11180 110J2 -gfO 

Sep mis lian 11084 —084 

Est. volume: 171 77 A Open mt: 199740. 


Wash Vnutun Homes 

INITIAL 

M 1-17 1-31 

WO* Co tgn* 2 -j£ 1-12 1-24 

BO tearz-ehd 

_ 835 12-19 1W9 


Hyper Tot f«t 


Blkrtt NY ISU2008 
CFX Can* 


Capital Guarmry 

Entofflci ~ 


Forthe Record : , 

1 iwtdd Trump and President Rivwboat 

“i r.T X- the Indiana Gaming ConnnisaCHito operate 
approval from the (Bloomberg 

riwrboat casinos m the aty of urny- i. ^ 


\ General Dynamics C«rp- and McDonndl E 
laSytoSoid^^to pay the 


Cotp- are 
afteraU.S. 


Report L rr - 


Industrials 

Last Settle Cbfee 


HMi Low 


S^1 L ^ nwtrtc t^«. - «« __ 

13985 13775 m35 ■=-" — 


Job 

Feb 

Mar 

Apr 


Si ffiSrlg 


!«B MME HHS =2oo 


REGULAR 

M 8712 1£15 1M8 
q 83 1240 1-® 
q j|5 12-16 TWO 
O in 12-1? 12-23 
M 875 12-23 W3 
Q .015 12-16 J-5 

a 83 12-26 1-9 

§ s ££ U1 

o 8B vn V31 
O M 1230 1-16 
0 82 M2 1-26 

M 873 12-19 12-» 

« - 1 ! VlS 

® 87 12-19 1-3 

Q 82 1M0 V* 


ee FIM SVC 

HOT»wSete inti 

Hudson Foods A 

KSr^mTr 

Inti Recovery C» 
LookDn Inc 

Atarowwa inti 

sssufisesbe 

Sth Alabama Ben 
VlntasePete 
o-aanqa*; •**!£** 


Cant of 
lawsuit 
cried in 1991. 

Thomas . 
was acquitted 


K»55«£=SSBrSfi;. 


the A-12 attack plane program. 


(Bloomberg) 


the former head of Ccdumbia Savings &L«m, 

of the last toe charges m a case j“jjj 


lSS S3 14780 14780 - 2M f Hatnwd ; DWgjew. 
lS3 146^ 1478 M7J0 — 075 | mantbly; o^noirtertv. WMwnBwn 



ssssasSfiSSHT z&szw (bum. 

hillion of the company's debt. ' . Z. 

SS, induding the assumption of $209 mfflion <* 


IS-.’ 


M- i. 


Bloomberg Businas News 

NEW YORK — Capping a 


Overall trading volume was 
Mi before the release of die 
wjS. producer price index for 

November on Tuesday and the , , ^ trrnt £c 

consumer price index and ca- year maAed by ttmmal m tte 
parity utilization reports on top ranks, Walworth Co^. 

-. — 0 w „ Wednesday Many players were said Monday that it had picked 

in Pittsburgh, ^d, “There new positions the dqiartment-store etecutive 

immediate need to buy dollars” ^ ^ please 0 f the data. Roger Farah as its chairman 

if the Fed is going to wail until before tne release u and chief executive. 

January to raise rates. “We are just Mr. Farah, 41, wfll fiU poor 

The dollar ended at 1.5733 what kind of numbers we get, previously held by Wil- 

Deutsche marks, down from said Debra Larsen, vice presi- | inm j^vin. Mr. Lavin tempo- 

L.5770 DM at the close on Fn- dent at Commerzbank. nuUy gave up the top jobs at the 

day, and at 99.985 yen, down (Bloomberg, Reuters) retailer in April, when Wool- 

from 100.075. 


Woohvorth Names Ex-Macy Chief Farah as Ominnaii 


Weekend Bax Offlc* 


worth announced it was looking Woolworth has posted losses 
into accounting irregularities, in five of the past seven quar 

He was reinstated as chief exeo- ters. 

utive in May only to resign for company shares were up 

good in September. j 2 jj cents at $13,875 in midaf- 

Tbe accounting controversy tcrnoon trading on the New 
is over, but Mr. Farah faces a york gtock Exchange. The 
challenge in trying to revive a slock ^ about 45 percent 
company that has posted strong . ^ ^ start 0 f the year. 
r«sult5 at some of its specialty 


made a name for hixzxsdf at Fed- ti**™***"** ■ 

ease d Department Stores too lqs aNGELES — -TTiatoure dpn mated tbe 
From 1991 to 1»3, to headed o£ ^ ^ a gross of $10.1 

Federated’s merchandising unit, m ^ Top iq moneymakers, based on Fnday ticket sales 
where he revamped the compa- estiinated sales for Saturday and Sunday. 

“*■ (Wormr Brothers! ■ 


\ - • - 


v_; 


chains but has not found a way 
to revive to stodgy varrety j>™^ M ^2OTha 


ny*s buying strategies. He insti- 
tuted a "team buying” system 
n%Her which centtal teams of 
buyers bot^ht merchandise for 
all of Federated’s chains. 

“It’s certainly a formidable 
job,” said Peter Schaeffer, an 
analyst at DiHon, Read & Co. 


L"Ot9do»™“ 
i -TTw Santo Clausa- 
1 "Drab Zona' - ~ - 

*-junlar __ 

5. "Sh» Trek Gmtaraiions* 

6. -inlwviawWmhtl»Vamp1ra" 

7. "A Law Dawn Wrtv stiwnf 

l-ThaUanKln8- 

9. "Mirada on 34th Siraar 

10. "TTaFPod In Parwllw" 


(watt Disney) 

tPormpounf} ........ . 

(Onhmval) 

(Paramount) 

(Warner Brothers) ‘ 
(Buena Vista Pictures) 

(vmaouneri 
(Twentieth Century Fox! 
( Tnentkrtti Century Fox) 


STOlI minion 
S88 million 
, *46mlinon_ 
128 ml I lion 
52JI minion 
538 mil Hon 
SSJ million 
S28 million 
*15 million 

- sumnitoa 


i. 



stores. 


H.-ss; sir?,. 



Agonto Fima IVosio 


Doe. 12 


U.S. FUTURES 


Opal HW Low Ckae a* OpJnl 


Via AsweW«l Pn» 


Doc. 12 


138B 

1M0 

1172 


OosaPfov. 


Clan Prav. 


Amsterdam 


* ABN ArtirpHW 
A CF H oWInfl 
Aeoon 
AhoW 
AkzoNobd 
Bots-Wessonon 
CSM 

. D5« . 

Emvter 
Fohlcw 
ForttsAMEV 
Olst-Brooodes 
HBG 
Holnrken 
Ho oaov ap» . 
Hunwr OouBtet 

IHC Cntand 

inter MuelNr 
inti Nedorlono 
KLM _ 
KNPBT 
KPN 
Nedllovd 
Oce Grhrton 
PoklwMl 
PHllh» 
PdYonjm 
.Robeco 
Rodomco 
RoJlncD 
Rorento 
Rovol DulCfi 
Stork 
Unilever 
•Van Ommaren 
VNU 


4050 61 JD 
33.10 3260 
11080 11060 
S 3 - 10 .. 52 

191 19160 
34J30 3*60 
6560 6570 

1306012680 

1780 1760 
14J0 1450 
J3.S3S TSM 
4580 4560 
267 27250 
253 25060 
72.00 7460 
77 7420 
nn 42M 
9280 9260 
8150 



™ GEC 

601 688 gSmb*** 

2758027570 G W” L 

30530M0 GraidMct 

GuInnBS* 

4644SS GUS 

mSSSrrn 

HSBC HUBS 
ICI 


285 

261 


Hetslnld 


42 4160 
4880 4860 
5«59 54* 
5260 5380 
74 76 

46.10 4*70 
5050 5180 
76 7670 
11060 11060 
4850 48-90 
111.90 11260 
B370 
1B6J0 10580 
4250 42.10 
194 19480 
4*70 45.10 
171 17150 
122 


Amer-Yhtvma 

Enao-Gutzelt 

HohtamoW 

KAP. 

Kymmene 

Metro 

Nokia 

Poll tola 


LandSac 

Loporte 
uumo 

Legal. Ggn Gra 
9* UmrdsBonk 
Marks SO 
ME PC 


Stockmann 


Esssrssr- 


Wolters/KItimr 122* 


Almanll 

Arben 

Barco 

HBL 

Bakaen 

SlB 

SSarlM 

Cabana 

Coirovt 

DfHhOlzo 

ElKlrabal 

E tod roll no 

Port to AG 

GIB 

GBL _ 

Gewaert 

Gknwrbel 

jmmobel 

Krudletwn* 

Mwan* 

petronno 


Brussels 

77* 7SM 
4960 4960 
"2 s %£ 
4400 4370 
22300 22450 
11950 12100 


„_.olo Bekw 
’3oc Gm EW 


2500 2550 

1990 1990 
200 199 

105* 1060 
7190 7170 
1252 1273 
5710 5770 
2830 2910 
2670 2630 

T2P 1»S 

3700 3725 
1464 1464 
4120 4160 
2900 2750 
6649 UH 
1356 

mo 9260 
3030 3015 

£42 on* 

B27D 8J370 


94 

3780 3780 

148 1* 

S8S 580 Manpower 
119 120 Hatwim 
136 140 bstwater 

^ « p£3°" 

24i w a&ss 

:inww ESSE 1 

RecklttCd 
Rfdkmd 
.Read Inti 

Hong Kong 


Hang Lung Drv 

Hang 5eng Barti 

H en d eri o n Land 


BhEas, ^2&, S-S m3 , 

Cattiav PadflC 10* «.« Rofrvrm (unit) 

Owing _Kong 30.10 30* Rovol Scot 

OilnaUgMPwr 3B7S g RTZ 

DairvFgnnjnn “ saimburv 

ia S la 5 ScotNewcas 

S36* 

*«0 3*40 SSSnTrent 
io^ i»ffi 

r,„w»~ _ . 1JH 35-2 5m lift Nephew 

HK RealtvTrust JJK smlttiKllne B 

HSBCHoWnw 80* m* Smith jWHl 

& ^«R5sr 

Hutch VVhanwiaa M 29.TO TJ^ EMI 
Hvsan BW 


HK Chino L- 
HKEtcdrlC 
HK Land 


done P«v. 
2* 
271 
582 
683 686 

388 M4 
169 1* 

484 *32 

105 

289 233 

174 171 

664 675 

733 7jG 
434 437 

439 MS 
L5Z 162 
567 53S 

675 695 

160 164 

484 *27 

561 564 

370 170 

337 1W 
469 467 

*92 5 

486 477 

575 586 

577 5.95 

^ 1* 
477 5 m 
105 3.13 

*14 *21 

56fl 586 
460 *67 

762 776 

*55 466 

987 989 

1JB 175 
437 488 

4 *09 

Ml 0* 

370 3.90 

4JH 475 
1* 332 

1X3 MS 

481 583 


CdnTIre A 
CdnUtllA 


CTRnISvc 
Extendi care 
Gaz Metro 
GFWestUteco 

HvrolntlBcP 
Hadron's Boy Co 

ImascoLtd 


OOMPrav. 

n* n% 

23% 23% 
7% 7 

19 IS 
17% 17% 
12 % 12 % 
21 21% 
12% 12% 
23 23% 
38% 38% 
irnmtaraGrvlnc l» 15JJ 

Labatt IJahn) 20% »% 
LoWaw Cos 
AMAsonA 
Natl BkCanoda 
OahawnA . 

PtrnaJn Potrulm 
Power Corn 
Power FM1 
OoeboeorB 

RooeraCanmB 
Royal BkCda 
Scare Canada inc 
Shell Cda A 

soumomlnc 

5 tel co A 
Trllon Flnl A 


n;Ul 

18% in* 

9% 9% 

17% 17% 
40 40% 
17% T7W 
27% 27 

16% 16% 
16 1% 
am 28 

7% 7% 

41% 41% 
15% 15 

7% 7% 

380 3* 


IgoAWIigwtorn 13* 1J| |Kchem 

S *3 fSmitomoBk 
fkn PrSra tom 2SJ0 * SumitomoOiem 
SlngPrtromra ^ suml Mortne 

232 2J7 Sumitomo Metal 
4J0 *48 TtdStlCcrrp 
3*4 362 Takeda Cham 
*20 472 TDK 
187 185 Tellia 

- - Tokyo Marine 
Tokyo ENcPw 

S3 MTi&Br-"" ,?0W,G,?Pr "" 


Inde^lrtatejjgtw: 
PlWM : 179585 


: 111064 


Paris 


Accor 381 

Banoolre (del 544 560 

BIC 02 

BMP 25970 


Jartjne Math, 
jarcflne Str Hkl 

Kowloon Motor 
Wnodartn Orlwn 
Miramar HoM 

Mew World Dev 
SHK Props 
Stelux 
5wira Poc A 
Tal Cheung Pn» 
TVE 

Wharf Hold 
Who* l ock Co 

wing On Co Inti 
Wlntor ind. 


JJS tomklns N 

S4J5 >375 I tsB Broun 

lunlleverH 


i||S“ 

il«s“ 

*530 wuna nwHdw 
^2 wnmearraon 


pGjnBMgkwea.g^g 

^Qtvay 

.XMwndajio 




JCB 
onion Mlniere 
pagans uts 

“ ‘i Ex * l “ 


14723 14750 

’?2SS 

6100 6310 


Frankfurt 

148146* 

280 m 
2« 2« 
6Z3 620 

70567580 
304* 30180 
34180 CT 
405 405 

448447* 
636 650 

383 35 

734 738 

32432460 
214 211 
727*739* 
42742250 
1938019280 
720 723 

427 426 


(Martel SEL 
MitanzHoW 
Attana 
«lta 
BASF 

lw*H yppbQh k 
Bov VerrtnsOk 
BBC __ 

BHF Bank 
BMW 

Commtrw»n* 

Continentsl 
□aknler Benz 
Desu^n 
DtBatxBCt 

Deirt*3ie Br .in 

gm^rBank «570«5* 

IM&SC |« 

s& sr 301 * 


660 685 
380 320 
2285 2270 
11* 12-15 
880 820 
0* 9 

978789 


S67 

1J0 

*23 

*33 

280 

3.98 

2J8 

9.92 

206 

287 

1083 

111 

183 

41* 

*53 

S87 

3.1? 

185 


SSI 

1* 

*27 

*28 

3j04 


285 

1069 

2* 

22B 

1086 

117 

1* 

41.94 

683 

588 

323 

187 


Bauwmes 

Donone 

Canetour 

CX.F. 

Cerus 
cnargeure 
aments Franc 
Club Med 
EiMaullotne 
Euro Wsnev 
Gen. Eaux 
Havas 
I metal 


555 

■as rat 

^^3 


CkB« Prev. 


SlngShtpDUg 
Slna Teteoomm 
Straits Ste orn 
Strain Tradtog 

TatLeeBmik 

Utd Industrial . 

U*d Ofeoa Bk tarn 1190 J* 
UW Drain Land 257 255 
- :: 207169 


'Ind. 


Stockholm 

AGA 6050 69* 

aSS>w= m W 

Electrotux B SB-h*?! 

Ericsson 3W399^e 

FnMte-A 93 94 

toSSnbaokBP 

Investor BF 

Norsk Hydro 25S25850 

pSS^ocSaf i^»ii*a 

Sandvlk B 122*12150 

ira-A 119 119 

?EB®iW' AF 4*20 

SkoudlO F ,.JS 131 ,-2 

Shonskn BF 1*550 1“ 

SKF BF l^iayO 

SJoroAF 

vSmoSSp” 137*13750 

SSSSStlBSi ,B “ 



1910 1910 
sms ^ . 

1780 1780 
557 561 

823 820 

307 M“ 
990 5Wj 
1190 12* 
4700 4740 
5120 527 • 

1130 1140 
2750 2778 
1400 W10 

% 

707 703 

2060 2078 
700 700 


Open rt*t 


Low Ckpr Obi OaJnt 


1068 Mar 96 074 
ll.lSMayW J255 
II JO All ?6 12K 

I2000c*96 015 


1277 

1261 

1235 

015 


1274 

1255 

1232 

1115 


M°sZ49i 969^“ FtTl. 

FrTsoPBiint 190853 off 2211 

S^*^j o -r^r-ia ,sn i240 


077 

1253 

1283 

1215 


HUB LID 

+6JH i.«n 

+QH2 w 

*004 79 


925m 9Lpgs«*w 5*0 ria nJn 


Grams 


WHEAT lJT *387’?' 179% +0*% 1.J10 

4.1 JW JnSyi T?5 3.91 3.94^8 tWfl’A 43.T91 

42M XW. imL 177 — OOOVio 

198% J.li'kMOyM 377 imk 375% 4" _0J1 M^e4 

363Vi 3.11 JdH 366 ^ _ WXWl Tffl 

365 13J S«P95 251% 363^-O.mw 251 


J75 369 Dec95 in 


otv* IIJM WlWB 1U24 

SS2 1$ 


1*0 140 360 -OO'A 


197 

1« 

4*.. U1*M0V95U8 iS5 J* 


1M% 11 6% 64 « 152 

iS% i| _d£m. 361% 3UU% 363% 363% 


*01 -082% 18® 
193%-OAl 2imi 
179% +M0% 

134 1M 

22 


Toronto 

AM W7I Pric e IMS I«J 

Air Canada 7% 7% 

Alberto Energy l»k 1«S 

Alcan Aluminum 33% 

Arner Borrlck 
Avenor _ 

Bk Nova Scotia 
BCE 

BCTeiecomm 
Bnmbarcner B 
Brnmalea 
Broacan A 
Comrco 
CISC 


^ s «5i inf J VS( 

sr warttpa 

162% 170%M»HL31 123 


29% 29% 
26% 26% 
26% 26% 
45% 45% 
22H- 

23% 23% 
185 185 
20% 20 

ss n 


233 232.10 |aKZ 


BHP 

BoSalnvlUe 

CotaMver 

Comaico 


Madrid 

U9Q 3435 

HSrcentn»HM>. ano MB 

lISco Santander 030 5350 


Johannesburg 

2850 20 

m 90 

222 227 

3450 34JB5 


AECI 

AIlBCfl 

AnstoAmer 

Barlows 

Buffets 

DeBews 

prlefenMn 

Gencor 

GFSA 

SSsm- 

K3U*Cjro 

Randfentoin 
Rusotol 
SA Brews 
Sasol 

western Deep 


tes£ 


Hotunarm 
Horten 
1WKA 
Ka il SOU 
Karriadl 
MOuJro* 

KHD 


Xtaec*owrwerltel2lW 

pBjjl 
liuftnorau 

“AN 

Aimnnesmmn 

MetaHoMil 
Muendi Rueck 
Porsche 
Preussas 
p WA 

j^WE 


540 538 
915 ra 
30L«30^ 
03$ CCS 
20640 206 
31331250 
14550 144 

54954450 
43650 432 
11480 U4 

125 

877 

18618580 
390 3M 
39430 W7 

134 124 

2830 2820 
630 637 

4305042650 
224 224 

433431 J80 


35 N -& 

9085 92 

row 50 
1335 13W 
120 122 
32 3275 

5S 5ijra 

10550 103 

9535 96 

32 S 
163 162 
SOiX 


Banesto 
ICEPSA 
Dresadw 

Endesa 

Ercras, 

Iberdrola 

FtoMOl 

Tabaoalero 

ITetetonlca 

goct 

Pt ttw w : 


London 


AUMVNatl 
Allied Lyons 


Art o Wiggins 
11 Gniim 


Argyll I . 
Ass Brit Poods 
BAA 
BA« . 

Bank Scotland 
Barclays 


BAT 

BET 

Blue arete 
BOC Group 
Boots 
Bonnier 
BP 

Bril Airways 
Bril Gas 
Brit Steel 
Brit Telecom 
0TR „ 

Cable wire 
Cadbury Sch 
Coredon 
Caqts VI vol la 
Comm union 
Courtoulda 
ECCGrow 
Enterpri s e OU 
Eurotu nn el 
F Isons 


950 94$ 
3130 3130 
2010 »« 
5910 SMO 
147 148 

Ob 

S15 SSS 

3755 3770 
1600 1695 
30169 


440 

375.10 37980 

8J5 UO 
520 524 

425.10 *M 

S3I 537 CRA 

UAHpeCCPPee 3905039*80 C5R 

Learand 6*60 6SS0 Fosters Brew 

LvSteoux 4B7 30 *98.10 Goodman Field 

gJSfLT 1112 1JJ> iCIAujrolla 

LV6AK. , „ ^ BA0 Magellan 

wam>+tochette im 12M mim 
/VU chellnB NatAwdBanfc 

Mouibw* loaMigs® Hew* pora 
Porlbra 37930 3DTO N Broken Hill 

PecWne y inti . 159 1SUD pqc Dunlno 

Pernod- Rlcart 315 316 pioneer hifl 

Peugeot 760 W wau»sy Pusg jdw* 

Plaautt Print wa 938 pgniwig Brdcstg 

Rarflateehnloue 504 qcT Resources 

Renault 
RthPaulencA 
RaH. St. Louis 

iabdGobahi 
S-EB. 

Ste Generate 

Thomscn-CSF 

Total 
UAP. 

Valeo 


Sydney 

866 889 
199 197 
1U8 1856 
388 139 


am natural Res 1*!J Wg 
Cdn Ocdd Pet 3l?k 
Om Pacific 


TTY 17tL5B yyitot 
I245HWP TNT 
1*47 'rij Western AUnlm 


OH) 088 
*19 *W 
*75 480 
17J06 17.18 
4.12 4.17 
1417 1JI8 
139 1.11 
10.90 1080 
180 1JB0 
221 224 
1066 1066 
*99 4.98 

8-18 IS 

1*5 350 
3.10 389 
16S 121 
133 Iffi 
126 127 
147 345 
227 226 
7.16 731 


Com toco 
Consumers Gas 
Dafosco 
Daman IndB 
Du Pont Cda A 
Echo Bay Mines 

Empire Co- A 

Faiconbridoe 
Fletcher Ctrotj a 
F ranco Nevada 

Guardian Coo A 

Hernia Gold 

Horsham 

Imperial Oil 
Inca 

I PL Energy 
LdWKiwA 

LoMlowB 
Laewen Group 


19% 19% 
5% 5% 

25 2*% 
16* J6% 
17% 17% 
11 10 % 
17 17 

14% 14% 
13% 13% 
23% 23% 
17% 17 

69% 70 

8% 0 
12% IPS 
17% 17% 
44% 4£fc 
39% 39% 
27% 27% 
10% 10% 
IDVz TO% 

32% 32% 


"lT“Tl« +081 4JM 

2J0% 131% +081 111746 

m h[|»(M 

*56« Lata 7J9 V| l54 ^ +080% 1^9 

issssisr ,is% ^ Mr* ^ 

1st soles . 39800 Fn's.K^sJB-* 74 


winSSSsjCBQ^ sStol nyrnmnv. OlJM 


7.04 

78S 

785% 

78*ki 

612 

615 
(uSthl 

616 
617 
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687 


viribjahys 56* 565 561*4 564% +080% 45647 


i 87% 691 +081% 2+ 

589 5.90% +087 1269 

sSs% L9M4 > 083% 1109* 


|g%i£f% S 585% n6%+PM%^Jlj 

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1«’' , j 5^*6 AO* Vi 685V; 686% -LIB 1W 

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fc02% 605 683% *85 +082% 125 

EsJ. sales ZLflpo Ws. sate 19890 

m^ANMEAL (CBOT) wwviUmww 
iSoOlSAIDDeeW 1 59 JO 1 5? JO ISl^ 


2*7^0 25080 wSrotKBanWng 4» *» 

617 *2J | waodsWe 4M *63 

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330 


5^ 
604 
251102020 
161 166 
31680 321 

14*3014*18 


: uon 


Tokyo 


266 26750 Akal Eleetr 

Asotu Chemlcnl 
Asahl Glass 
Bank of Tokyo 
Bridgestww 
Canon 
Casks 


45 *5% 
11% 11% 
24% 23% 
43 42% 
24% 24% 
10% 10% 
16% 16% 
44% 44% 

131* !» 
12V. 1» 
11 11V* 
27% 27% 
47 *7 


374 W5 
710 711 
1200 1190 
1490 MW 
1530 1560 

JM 17M 

1260 1250 


Milan 


Sao Paulo IB^NKroonPrmr i»o |«o 

ia.10 1870 1 Doiwo House iaap ™ 


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| Banco da Brwfl ^ iE5|53SSaS?W« Wt 


mm 


gasa'ig^' ^giBIlg 


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| hL ' J 

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Bca Pop Novara 

Banco d I Romo 

Bca Ambrogano 

Bco Napoli rtsp 
Benetton „ 
CretBto Hottano 
EnidumAup 

Fortin 
Flat spa_ 

nnaruAgrotod 

Finmeccanica 

Pondtartava 

Getwall Asslc 

IFIL —1 

llaKemcnll 


nea 
Montedison 
OUeettl 
Pirelli spa 
RAS 

Rhxaccnle 


1*30 TOT 
4330 <280 

17350 17900 
1550 1544 
2830 Z7H 

ict nra 

5405 3990 
W20 9003 

loSsigS 

9890 10150 

iralSg 

1081 TI07 
1800 TB17 
1940 2010 
14800 15310 
8375 8600 


Paranepanema 
Petrotoras 
Souza Cruz 
TeMbros 
Tejesp 
Uslmlnos 
Vole Rio Doee 
vorio 


BvvaealndroLl 

Prevwus :*ria 


755 8 Fanuc ^ 

29260 289 Pull Bank 

9250 8850 PutlPhOtO 
330 316 Fujitsu 

250 254 Httorid _ 

365 3M Hitachi Coble 
IOO 1*50 Honda ^ 

118 1» IteYDkadO 

8.15 810 ItocTro 
42 40.90 J boot Airlines 

425 416 KolbtW 

134 13* Konscfl Power. 
157 157 Kawasaki Steel 

190 190 Kirbi Brewery 
Komatsu 
Kubota 

Me clnds 


«I31 




Singapore 




Cvge«.w»m ■ 1B {^20 Suisui Marine 

Bit Land *11 * J2 JWNukOShi 


SIP 
SME 
SntoDPd 
StandO 
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ToroAsslc 


MlBTeMowncn: 
Prevtoos : 9564 


38S0 3945 
1666 1752 
J«»D37«g' 
4225 <430 
2165022300 j 
9389 


<90 *88 NhPPonKnOku 


jurong»Hrj^ ^1 Sippon Steel 


Montreal 


AKOLtdl 

BankMortrem 
BCE Mobil* Gem 


KayHlan. 

Keopct 

Natstert 

NontwwOrient 

OCBChxeign 
OTcasUntaiBk 
Q'seas Urtan Ent 
sembgwane 


bm *490 

m ms 

2290 2OT 
981 «M 

m 21 

795 

1710 1710 
5170 SOT . 
691 W6- 
699 70S 

OB Wg 

397 398 

1050 m 

55 SS 

70* OT 
7330 TOT 
1580 1570 

2330 2OT 
547 5« 

m «3 
712 

1290 1280 
828 OT 
72* W 
986 991 
1380 1380 
1«0 1 W 
99S 988 
1030 1M 
934 

665 6g 
349 3SJ 
643 ^ 

S22 ,&e 

1900 1990 
8300a 83D0" 


London insur Go 23% 0% 
Macmlll Btoedcl 18 T7V 
MagnalnilA 
Maple Leaf Fds 
Moore. 

Ntwbrldgc Netw 
Noranda Inc 
Noranda Forest 
Moreen Energy 
Nthern Telecom 
Nava 
Onex 

Petra Canada 
Placer Dome . 

Potash Cora Saak 
Provkro 5% SJ* 

PWA □% Ml 

Ouebecor Prirl 1M* 13H 

Renaissance Env 27% 36% 

Rtu AJgom 24% 25% 

SeaDraroCo Wb « 

Stone Consaid 1H1 155 

TaHsman Erty 
Tefwfabe 
Telus 
Thomson 
TorDotn Bank 
Transotta _ 

TransCda Pipe 
Utd Dominion 
UWWestburne 
Westaaasl Env 
Weston 

xerox Canada B 


207 JD 

VXJn 
907 JO 
anAM 
189 JO 
182-70 
isiJO 
iasjo 
biaijoa 


lSJDJanK 160JB 161. IB 17*50 \O}J0 

^ 

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I TUB SCO 96 19SJ0 176J0 175A0 176.H 
174J0CX3 9S 17*70 17*20 17*20 I78JJJ 
174J0Dk« 1B0J0 18100 1BDA0 'm.90 

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2255 MOv95 M 
22.76 *6 96 2S» 

2273 AuB 95 MJ7 
TLnSaabS J*JJ 
I27SOCI95 2A4I 
SJODSCtS 2*90 

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M’s open W HSJfl off 17«3 


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+ 0.20 »W12 
+0X8 2*427 
+0.10 14.153 

• 0JD12J35 
+0JB 1146 
-0-30 1J« 
+ 060 0499 

• 0JO 3^09 
+ OJO 


2055 
3030 
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27 JO 
37-20 

7*76 

2*60 

2*56 

7*15 


27 JS 
2642 
2*75 
7*28 
2100 
2*00 
2*40 
2*56 


‘itn 
2*17 
26 JS 
2640 
2600 
7*77 
7*53 
2*0 
2*20 


204* 
27.20 
26*0 
2672 
it yr 
7*9B 
2* JO 
2*60 
2*91 
2*00 


—0.11 9.723 
—0.11 31318 
-0.07 36393 
16*50 

+ 003 11JB9 
*005 2J31 


IW1 Dec 94 12* 

1077 Mar 95 in; 


1612 

1600 

15* 

1633 


lB78May9S. 1251 
1235 JU 95 


1225 AH 96 13 

1297 S«P 95 12H 

130 Dec 95 1IW 
1350 Mir « 


12*5 

1257 

1272 

1285 

una 


1225 

12* 

1257 

1279 

1310 


ISM 4 


1233 

1231 

1244 

1259 

12B5 

13T1 

13*1 

1367 

1306 


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1J4* 

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117*46 H 
127 JO 
13025 
12900 
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IJOlOO 


10650 -A39 1MM 

HgiKS m iii 48 

I22J10 — 9J0 

187^5 Sup w 19925 n.y 

1D9JONOV95 ISS dus 

'ZSJ5 — OJ5 


10150*1,94 
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MayM 


12675 — 0J5 


EsLinus ka Ftrs. sales. 1 
^S«5lW 26536 011 m 


1737 


Metals 


W GRADE iOKSS*' °tSS J 1 ^“«4 lS” 13«5 “ftS M2 

i-uw IUM 13*20 13AM f0J0 1,739 


139^BI 
136.90 
13500 
134J0 
131 JO 
12880 
12*00 
12570 
120.00 
12180 
11550 
11575 
11170 
1I2J0 
109 JD 
107 JO 
10525 
11375 


ill l l l l 


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10*IOJun9S 1EL7D 12170 12170 1HJ0 
7600*495 1 22J0 112J0 12110 IZWO 

’tJjSSS?” 116* II6J0 H6J0 117-55 

111050095 "5» 

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«UOMcr94 !^-59 

1 07 JO MOV M 106J0 

1D6J0JUI96 

10575 SeP 96 

11195 NovW 


Est.wkn 7,500 FH-S-Wte 9J8S 


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MSJ0 

11170 


+ UD 1309 
+ 1.18 

+ 175 IJ22 
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+ 1J0 2,929 

+ 1J0 

+ 1J0 559 

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+1J0 
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4760 4720 


4770 


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4970 

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7510 
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6110 
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6977 

49.90 

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6575 

6375 

6190 


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6437 

62.97 

6160 


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18% 18% 

16 Wh 
16% 15% 
20% 20% 
13% 13% 

17 16% 
2SU 25 

It 11 

22 % 255 

39% 39% 
41% 43% 




<045,18 


Zurich 


Adin mil B 2W 216 

Atuuisse B new 637 640 
BBC Brwn BovB 1116 11M 


genr 91 

6400 *M 95 M.« 

-50 Aug 95 62.97 
63.100095 61* 

gJ’salH l W C nr b samnM 

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6973 APT K 70.96 
69JOMOVU 7080 
69 J5 Aug 95 
4*750095 

- p?A 69.90 49.90 

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6947 
69 JJ 
70.12 
6587 
6110 
6175 
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— 073 78*3 
-0.10 98,ni 
+0.17 19J42 
+0.15 6^9 
+0.13 wn 
+0.10 1,376 
♦ 025 189 


3B08Dec94 47*0 
401.0 Jan 95 _ 

4718Feb95 C78 
416JMar95 £55 
41 ELD MOV 95 «I-S 
4?OJOJul9S 4W.0 
477jSep« 49*5 
4050 Dec 95 SOSO 

51*0Je»96 

49L0MII-M 5115 

4998MOV96 

520JI-M94 532.0 5338 5338 

___ 04850996 

Ext. safes 30800 FrTs.«K 128U 
Frl'sopenW 13SJ85 aft 2061 
PLAT1MUM IW4»I SWOl- “ 


476* 

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4797 

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1* 


5208 5115 


49*9 
501 J 

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51*1 

521.7 

5217 

5357 

5428 


♦78 

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+ 78 202 

+78 78^9 
+7J 1233 
+73 7888 
+7* 9,704 
+ 73 17815 
+7J 

♦ 7J 

♦ 7J 
+7J W06 
+7J 


8125 

7190 

7130 

7385 

«*jn 

71*0 


7*17 

71.77 

71.15 

7087 


7382 

71*0 

TU2 

69.90 


«986S£>W 69.90 

ESLS».™ Fri 


4986 


7*00 
7182 
7190 
49.95 
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6986 


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1115 2,777 
+183 1.126 
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229 


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43980 39100 APT 95 41180 41*00 411« fl*10 

43980 *0*808*95 419J0 42000 4198) 41140 

*41.30 ajiooocm S-S 

43980 *2080Jai9< CS90 

Sfrote *544 Frt’V SOte 3841 
FifsoncnM 9899 

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mllSli 379*6 3HL* OTA 3J0J0 

S3S9I9 ” 

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41 130 AST 96 Jl-2 

41380 Jun 96 41** 

AUB96 «n*q 

OdM 42*30 

Est. sate 1*W0 y * sate 30857 
FfTsapenM 180.912 ell 2377 


+1*0 u m 

+350 11878 
+1* 1,967 
+3J0 618 

♦ ISO T4 


Seasvi Soanei 

Hkh Low 


— 60119+Q6 


+33 1* 


m narHHHigsi 

Sd. soles N^vn 

W 70835 JM 3676 


—22 31,966 
-28 1J4 
-30 977 

— 35 796 
-37 24 


“ HKS»uhbIb 


+ 11 18* 
+11 121 


aaxHM 

0810619 


oS^^WS25Dec94 nj»wgBLnioo™8B9y730JinM 

08109mtnos®f*w 96 ... 

EsLsate .HA RTisote a.%1 

sSfesmMC (CMStl twimciNWHainwi 
08100 0*883 Dec** 1 0J479 0.7SB9 17*65 J-JSS 

D8I36 172S7Mar95 OJ310 0-7M6 0-7W7 175H 

08145 0J193JunB5 0J7SM 0-7596 0.7 W0 8.7W 

*4155 OJtlS5«>9S 07633 17633 17632 0J6O 

S.iotes HA gl'umes27*2i 

Fri's Open tot 6588B UP 3059 


+8 51*2 
+8 52870 
+18 1141 
+13 . 265 

+15 m 

+17 31 




+ 13 40810 
+13 34OT 
+14 413 

+is m 


Industrials 




6285 
5085 
5750 
55.15 
5130 
5350 
5*30 
56*0 
53.10 
5195 
64*0 
57*0 
5150 
59 JO 
5*90 
54JD 


4085 

4190 

4980 


COTTONS (NCPO SWMB*-gBe«BerJ* 

0584 4*J0May9S 13.10 080 »80 

8*97 69J0JIP95 83.10 B3JB S2-© 

«JI0 M80Oa« 7*tS 7**0 7A65 

7280 6*25 Dec 95 728S 72J2 7186 

7380 4180 Mar 16 

M°5ute ;NA*Kj% sate 1557 
Fd'sapailnr 5*267 w> 30 

"^^gkSJTSPV*!?? 

W £& i ££ 

4383 Apr 95 4170 

<7381 May 95 «J0 
**J9JunV5 4115 

47J0JUI95 48*5 

42.70 Aue 95 4880 
48*5 Sep 95 #80 

49 .50 Oct 95 5080 

50.90 Nov 95 
51 Dec 93 53-30 
9JDJon96 

5380 Fen 96 
52*0 Mar 96 

4680 A pr 96 

Est.saies 31904 ftps, sate 5184* 
FTfigpen kit 151-545 oH 1471 


B 1A 9 

82JB 

7*80 

72.18 

7280 

73*0 


—080 10870 
—082 6,120 
♦0.10 1.104 
—082 58M 
+084 79 

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5085 

SDJO 

#80 

«.1S 

4880 


#83 

4883 


48*5 

4190 

#80 

9L7B 


48.15 

478S 

«*S 

4170 

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5070 


52.30 SSJO 


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<773 -0*5 7,901 

as 

a =ss m 
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52.13 -0*5 

5183 -0*5 3» 

JOJO —0*5 200 


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mnwmmbo ,j!sr^ j-flfe-asr Si 


41180 
41780 
42150 
41*50 
41980 
42980 
42*50 
430L2O 
431 JO 


♦ ISO 
+050 
+0*0 


07 


19*S 

19*0 

2166 

19*0 

19J*I 

2030 


1987 

1987 


+ DJD2USI 
+ 0*0 

+040 lot 
+0*0 9,902 
+ 0*0 

+eua U60 
+080 
+080 
+080 


1986 

2000 


21.15 

1814 


-112 


PrVsopenUt 9839 up 8 3 . 

s 5 ,c s 1 ^' srrs as as - 41 « 


SOJO 

awol 

4880 

47J0 

45.00 


3*02 Fab 95 36*0 
3585 Apr » 3785 

*DJSJonM an 

40*581 W *J» 
auMffi #J0 
36-30 Od 95 4085 
3980 DK 95 4285 


4DJS 

42.05 


3190 
3780 
37 AS 
4286 
4285 
41*0 
4180 
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<0.95 


3380 
3*30 1 
3085 
42-30 
42*0 
42J0 
4055 


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s»51 

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4073 


*285 *24# 
<372 <172 


-1* 2,796 
♦081 1L- 
+ 0*3 7,960 
+0*0 4,W 
+085 079 

+ 0JS 1,171 
+085 1835 
tQJS 347 
+020 57 


ClbO GrtgyB 
CS Holdings B 
EkrtctrowB 

FIscftWB 
interdlGCOunt B 
jehnolIB „ 
Landis Gyr B 
Moevonptck B 
Nestle R ^ „ 

Oeritk. Buehrle B 
Pargesa Hid B 
Roctn Hdg PC 
Satra Republic 
SandazB _ 
Schindler B 
Sutler PC 
SurvglltenB 
Swiss Bflk Carp B 
Swiss Reirtsur R 
Swissair R 
UBSB 


767 


Sime Singapore 

olsingAwwoace 


11*0 n*o Nbroon Yusen 
280 283 Nissan _ 

179 1J6 Nomura See 

1U0 1380 NTT Hrnl UNO 1090 I WBS B 
UO 655 Olympus Optical JW ™ | Winterthur B 
7*5 7*5 Pioneer 
9 JO 9*o Ricoh 
181 181 Sanyo Elec 
273 286 Sharp 


2350 2310 
926 «7 

557 59» 

1690 1400 


•27 1 Zurich A5S B 

l&E^VfSS' 


773 
522 
340 3« 
ISOS 1500 
1490 1440 
730 7B 
729 730 
<51 <55 

1341 1246 
175124J0 
1450 1445 
5830 5835 

113 in 

TOO 49B 

T 4 " ’SE 

B70 BM 
Itu 10*0 
155 B5 
786 764 

791 790 

1004 1110 
670 672 
1271 1272 


(085 
6080 
61.15 
5680 
m an 
4785 
5980 


3S.iSFebW 1*50 
3SJDMar95 3*92 
3*90Mav95 ».IS 
378D8J195 M 
3*70 Auo 95 3U0 

3980 ft* 96 4*50 

3980 MW 9a 


PJ0 

37*5 

30JO 

3980 

3880 

4885 


3*06 

38.15 

3980 

3830 

«JD 


3/80 
3827 
39 JS 
38*7 

<815 

4085 


+0,17 7*17 

♦an 1*57 
+035 510 

+013 432 

+0*5 210 

+0* 9 

+080 1 


gftet 1*36 fWisrin 2*n 
SfiSSiW WM w W 


Financial 


97JSJIP195 9276 «J7 92*7 92# -4-1? 4Mt 


9387 92*4 Sap 95 92*5 92*5 

ES4.HIK NA Frr*sote 3*70 
FrfsaaenM 24*63 UP 1476 


92J9 nx —0.11 917 


SYR TREASURY KBOT| UD0JMir'n-BB*nnmc4 WJW 


Food 

coffee 


^ ISSfiHBMjS 

SSlitoll WO) 163*0 g-« 

!SS X3 ^ Sg 

F*DCte« 17280 17180 17280 170J5 
imuSSnvM 17lio 

1J1UI1 lnLBMBfW 

H«{B SJ8I Fd-s-sms GU7 

uSSSyW 14*2 

IOJ7JUI95 J4.10 
1057 Od 95 13J* 


24480 

244*0 

i&IS 

23880 

74280 

20350 

17080 


+3*5 110 

1385 17,126 
+385 *6*5 
+ 2J0 7*91 
+ 2.70 1.9S2 
+ 2*5 1*95 
+3*0 273 

4 3.60 I 


1585 

15.18 

14.75 

096 


UJO 

I4J2 

1137 


14*1 

IA14 

13J4 


14*0 

1420 

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+080 96.113 
+ 080 37*53 
1085 23.211 
+084 24855 


mm 99-15 MtrWOO-04 1«L04 W^aB 99-30— OH 16*m 

100- 01 99-06 JUlW 99-22 99-22 99-19 99-19 — JO 7*J 

9T-07 99-07 SeP 95 99-10 - 10 2 

Est sate 2*500 FfTa sttes 146J74 

RTs open hi 2128# on 1N0 

1DYR TREASURY (CBOTJ ^ “St** tSJMJ 

114- 21 99-02 OocW 100-14 100-14 1»46 « 4L» 

111- 07 90-11 Mar 951 00-00 10M0 99-16 W-30 — 15 217^0 

105-22 97-77 JuH9S 99-05 99-05 99-02 9M* - M 

101- 06 97-11 SapH ii +n 

110-31 96-30 DoctS „ 90-14 — 74 20 

Ett.snte 50805 Fri 'v. sate 19806 

PrrsonenH 266,952 ott *#5 „ 

US TREASURY BONDS <CBOT] taBcJ.iW8aMI.IMM IMboO 
11B-U 91-19 Dec 94 99-27 9*77 99-00 »-13 — 23 11^ 

116-70 95-13 Mor 95 99-14 99-14 98-H »-28- 21 321*OT 

115- 19 96-27 JonW 90-23 98-23 98-10 90-16 - 30 1280 

112- 15 94-10 SOPH 9085 95*» 98^ »-» — 10 750 

113- 14 93-27 Dec 75 77-20 90-05 97-30 W-JS — 17 260 

114- 46 93-13 MlF 94 97-26 90-00 97-25 H-00 — 16 

100-20 93-06 Jin 96 97-34 - J5 

90- M 93-0S Sep 94 97-20 — U 

ESLSOte 245800 FrfvteeS 360,790 • 

WuphiM 416*43 oH 9205 

MUNICIPAL BONDS (CBOTl groteniMa 'S'®, 

91- 17 80-31 Dec 9484-06 64-17 04-03 04-13 — 06 7, 

8889 79-20 Mar 9*83-20 83-29 03-12 83-27 — Of 

Est. ides 4800 Fri-asdcs 1891 
Fits oewn tot 35*44 alt 119 

EURODOLLARS (CMBR1 liMMMM««lld 

7*180 7QJ10Dec.94 93*30 93*40 93*00 9MJ0 

90240 Mar 9S 91750 91740 92*40 92650 — J**®-™ 
90.710 Jun 95 92.130 92.MB 92830 928# -IJ0mM| 
9IJ10SCP95 91830 91JD0 91 JW 91J90 — 1J036LW 
91. ISO Dec 9S 91630 91 OT 91J« WJffl -110194W 
90.750 Mo* 94 91J00 91700 91830 9U® 

91 *70 Jun 96 91J60 91J60 91J10 91J2D —70137,977 


7875 


95*80 

94.730 

94*50 

94200 

94J20 

91110 


17 J2 
17JJ 
17*7 
17*4 
17 JO 
1784 
1789 
17*2 
17*4 


16M 

1684 

17.10 

1780 

1785 

1787 

17J7 

17*2. 

17*3 


1880 

110.1) 

1882 

snan 

■8*7 

8080 


1785 

17X1 


1785 

17X3 


15. IS Jun 95 

!5JBF(b95 1786 

15*2Mn-M 17J1 
15tS5Apr95 1783 
1549 MOV 95 1787 
1583 Jun 95 17J5 
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17.14 Sap 95 1782 
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487*0 451 80 Jun 9S 4SJ0 45880 45380 457*5 93X5 6^ 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 13, 1994 






^ . ■? I>- .. ^ 

. r «*. 

:.:^l 

•-So* 

=s»& 

*- . ";• Wifcj'S. 


Lira Tumbles to New Low 

Bertmconi’s Growing Woes Chill Markets 


SS-S 

■: r -'.Vv *W.\U 

-• - 


Cw ^^' «*■ atffa ft^arta “ 

Nffl-AN — The Italian lira 
tumbled to a record low against 
the Deutsche mark on Monday 
amid concern about the stabil- 
ity of Prime Minister Silvio Ber- 
ItKconi’s coalition government. 

The m fell as low as 1 ,040 48 
per mark, compared with a pre- 
vious historic low or 1,038.9 set 
on Nov. 25. The German cur- 
rency fetched 1,038.3 lire at the 
™8 “ Frankfurt, up from 
,0305 lire m early trading and 
1,034.6 on Friday. 

Concern that Mr. Berlus- 
coni’s government will soon fall 
has grown as members or his 
three-party coalition have be- 
come more equivocal about 
their support. 

Such speculation has de- 
terred investors from buying 
Italian assets and the Milan 
Mibtel index of shares tumbled 
2-88 percent, to 9,289 points. 
Government bonds prices also 
fell sharply. 

“The lira seems to be sliding 
inexorably towards an abyss,” 
v said Ian Amstad, analyst at 


Bankers Trust. “The fear is that 
no one knows what will happen 
to fiscal policy if the govern- 
ment collapses. ” 

A 1995 deficit-cutting bud- 
get, which was initially presen t- 
™ ****« of the government’s 
credibility with financial mar- 
kets, must be passed by Parlia- 
ment by Dec. 31. 

. “People are scared that there 
is nobody in command. They 
just do not see a dear end to the 
Story,” said Alberto Roll a. with 
the Milan brokerage of Mil la & 
Co. 

Roberto Maroni. the minister 
of the interior and a Northern 
League member, said he could 
foresee a “different govern- 
ment, a different parliamentary 
majority with different leader- 
ship” in the near future, accord- 
ing to reports in Italian newspa- 
pers. Mr. Moroni's remarks 
fueled talk that rifts are devel- 
oping in the coalition govern- 
ment that could lead to its 
downfall. 

Umberto Bossi, leader of the 
Northern League, has repeated- 


ly threatened to leave the gov- 
ernment and form a new one. 

(Bloomberg, Reuters, AFP) 

■ Paris Markets Slump 

French markets were un- 
nerved on Monday by the week- 
end announcement from Jac- 
ques Delons, a Socialist and 
president of the European 
Commission, that he would not 
run for the French presidency 
next year, according to a Reu- 
ters dispatch from Paris. 

The franc weakened to about 
3.4390 per Deutsche mark from 
3.4319 DM on Friday, bonds 
tumbled and shares dosed at 
their lowest level for three 
weeks. 

Financial analysts said inves- 
tors were nervous about the 
sudden switch Mr. Delors 1 deci- 
sion means in the tone of the 
election campaign. Since Mr. 
Delors was the only credible 
Socialist candidate, a battle for 
the presidency is now likely to 
take place within the heart of 
the ruling center-right coalition. 


2 British Utilities 
Report Large Rise 
In First-Half Profit 

Reuters 

LONDON — Two of Britain's privatized 
regional electricity companies. Eastern 
Group PLC and Northern Electric PIC, re- 
ported Monday first-half results that out- 
shone even the most optimistic forecasts. 

Eastern Group, Britain’s largest regional 
utility which serves more than 3 milli on cus- 
tomers, said pretax profit in the six months to 
Sept. 30 had risen 27 percent, to £98.1 million 
($153 million). The dividend was raised 25 
percent to 8.25 pence. 

The smaller Northern Electric, whose shares 
have been sur ging recently amid market talk 
that there may be a bid for it in the offing, said 
half-year pretax profit had risen 20.5 percent, 
to £63.4 million, and the dividend was raised 
almost 30 percent, to 9.6 pence. 

Eastern, which promised to give domestic 
and small-business customers a rebate of up 
to £12 each, said operating costs in its main 
electricity-distribution business bad fallen 7 
percent in real terms. 

Northern Electric said ea rning s would rise 
further in the second half, after the company 
bought back 10 percent of its shares for cancel- 
lation, reducing the number of shares in issue. 


Producer Prices 
Up inlLK., Raising 
Fears of Inflation 

Bloomberg Busmen News 

LONDON — Nonadjusted producer output 
prices in Britain, a key inflation indicator that 
measures the cost of goods leaving factories, rose 
0.1 percent in November. 

Input prices paid by manufacturers for raw 
materials and fuel rose 2.4 percent in November 
after adjusting for seasonal variations, the Cen- 
tral Statistical Office said Monday. 

“The monthly increase parity reflects a seasonal 
rise in the price of electricity paid by manufactur- 
ing companies,” a government official said. “In 
the past year there nave been rises in the prices of 
most categories of imported materials.” 

Recent increases in raw milk prices added 0.4 
percentage point to the overall input index. 

Stock and government bond prices fell as the 
report raised concern that the increase in interest 
rates in Britain this month may not have been 
enough to dampen inflation. The Financial 
Times- Stock Exchange 100 Index of leading Brit- 
ish shares dosed 33.9 points lower at 2,943.4, its 
sixth fall in past eight sessions. 

“People are saying there are more interest-rate 
rises to come here and in the U-S.,” said Christo- 
pher Clark, strategist at Credit Lyonnais f at in g 
Securities Ltd. “So we can't seem to get out of 
this bearish phase.” . _ 


Mallinckrodt Retires 
As Head of Schroders 

Bloomberg Busmen VrwJ 

LONDON — George Mallinckrodt, who transformed 
Schroders PLC from a boutique securities Firm into one of 
Britain’s largest companies, said he would retire as chairman 
in May. 

Win Bischoff, who has been chief executive of the London- 
based securities house since 1984. will succeed him. 

Sticking to its policy of cultivating in-house talent, the 176- 
year-old firm also is promoting eight executives. The develop- 
ments mark the passing of Schroders’ old guard and continue 
the shift toward a new generation of executives in the City of 
London. 

“This new structure enables us to benefit from the consid- 
erable senior management experience and expertise built up 
over the years, while giving the next generation of managers 
full opportunities to develop their own specific areas of 
responsibility,” Mr. Mallinckrodt said. 

The chairman, who joined Schroders in New York in 1954, 
said the changes recognized “the evolution that has taken 
place within the Schroder group over recent years.” 

Mr. Mallinckrodt will remain on Schroders’ board in the 
largely honorary post of president. 

Since 1984, when Mr. Bischoff and Mr. Mallinckrodt took 
the helm of a firm worth less than £100 million ($156 million). 
Schroders has become a diversified securities house with three 
key profit centers: investment banking, asset management 
and its treasury division. Corporate lending, which once used 
80 percent of Schroders' capital, now uses just 20 percent. 

After more than four years of negotiations. Scnroders in 
July bought the remaining 50 percent of its U.S. investment- 
banking affiliate, Wenheim Schroder & Co., in a drive to 
expand its worldwide business. 

For Schroders, which entered the U.S. market in 1840. sold 
bonds for Southern states before the Civil War and then 
financed the railroads' westward expansion, the full acquisi- 
tion of Werlheim was designed to put Schroders on a more 
equal footing with U.S. rivals such as Merrill Lynch & Co. 
and Goldman, Sachs & Co. 

By concentrating on fund management, corporate finance, 
and trading in government securities, while other firms opted 
to become full-service investment houses after Britain deregu- 
lated markets in 1986, Mr. Mallinckrodt and Mr. Bischoff 
have kept Schroders focused and profitable. 

While many of the company's rivals increased their profit 
Iasi year with quick, and sometimes fleeting, income from 
trading securities and currencies. Schroders powered ahead 
because of investment banking and asset managemen t. Last 
year, Schroder Investment Management, the firm's fund 
management arm, saw its funds under management swell 47 
percent, to £52.9 billion. 


Mortgage Loans Buoy Vereinsbank 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 
MUNICH — Bayerische 
Vereinsbank AG said Monday 
its operating profit declined 2.2 
percent in the first 10 months of 
the year, to 900.8 million Deut- 
sche marks ($570 million), and 
that a surge in mortgage lending 
had helped offset a sharp drop 
in trading income. 

Germany’s three largest com- 
mercial banks — Deutsche 
Bank AG. Drcsdner Bank AG, 
and . Commerzbank AG — re- 
cently reported larger drops in 


10-montb operating profit, 
varying from 15 percent to 27 
percent. 

Vereinsbank voiced confi- 
dence about results for the full 
year. “Despite continuing un- 
certainty mi financial markets, 
we expect to have a satisfactory 
result overall for 1994 ” it said. 

The bank eked out 5.8 mil- 
lion DM in net income from 
trading, down dramatically 
from 241.1 million DM in the 
year-earlier period, but up from 


the loss of 7.9 million DM re- 
ported for the first half. 

Albrecht Schmidt, the bank's 
chai rman^ said that foreign ex- 
change transactions and deriva- 
tive instruments also helped 
compensate for writeoffs and 
losses in bond trading. “We 
drastically reduced our market 
risk,” he said. 

Risk provisions were down 
11.6 percent, to 682.6 million 
DM. Net interest income rose 
13.8 percent, to 3.5 billion DM, 
(Bloomberg, AFP) 


Page 13.' 


Chairman 
Of Roussel 
Resigns 
Abruptly 

Bloomberg Businas Sews 

PARIS — After just a year as 
chairman of the executive com- 
mittee at Roussel Uclaf SA. 
Ernst-Ganter Afting an- 
nounced that he would quit at 
the mid of January for personal 
reasons, company executives 
said Monday. 

Mr. Afting. 52, will be re- 
placed by 57-year-old Jean- 
nerre Godard. Mr. Godard mil 
retain his current post as head 
of the pharmaceutical division 
of Hoechst AG, Roussel Udafs 
German parent company. 

Felicitas Frick, a spokes- 
woman for Hoechsu said Mr. 
Afting resigned for “personal 
reasons.” 

“We didn’t ask him to re- 
sign,” Ms, Frick said. “It was 
his decision.” 

As executive committee 
chairman, Mr. Afting was effec- 
tively chief executive officer, 
but be reported to Edouard Sa- 
kiz, Roussel’s supervisory 
board chairman who wields 
considerable power after 2S 
years with the company. 

One of Mr. Godard’s new du- 
ties will be to head a new- man- 
agement committee covering 
both Hoecbst and Roussel, 
company executives said. 

Roussel and Hoechst are try- 
ing to forge closer cooperation 
between their pharmaceutical 
operations. 

Although Hoechst has owned 
a majority stake in Roussel 
since the mid-1970s, the two 
companies have mostly operat- 
ed separately. 


Investor’s Europe 


Frankfurt 

DAX 

2350 

«/ A 

SK-- — 

1953 . -■ 



J A S 0 N C' 
1994 


London 

Paris 

FTSE 100 Index 

CAC 40 

3305 — 

m — 

3203 -A 

2BJ3 -hj 

3135 

2350 pft 

saw*! *• -’V" } 


29SJ-- 

1900/—’ 

cKS j S O W D* 



Exchange Inc 

A msterdam AE> 

Brussels Stcx 

Frankfurt DA) 

Frankfurt F A2 

Helsinki HE> 

London Pi na 

London FTS 

Madrid Gen 

Milan Mia 

Paris CAC 

St ockholm Affa 

Vienna ATX 

Zurich SBS 

Sources ■ Reuters. AFP 


Index Monday 

Close 

AEX 40A49 

Stock Index 7,188.68 

DAX 2,024.82 

FAZ 764.71 

HEX 1,813 JM 

Financial Times 30 2^65.90 

FTSE100 2,943. 40 

General Index 300.69 

MI3TEL 8,28850 

C AC 40 1,9 19.32 

Affaersvaetlden 1 .826.25 

ATX I ndex" ~1.Oa6.9tt 
SBS 908.91 


1994 

PlBV. 

Close 

406.32 

7.226.62 

2.028.33 

763.78 

1.838.72 
2^93.50 
2,97730 
301.85 
9,564.00 
1,936-99 
1.834.95 

1 . 033.73 
912.24 


V a 

Change 

-0.45 

-0.52 

-0.17 

+ 0.12 

-1.35 

- 1.20 

-1.14 

-0.38 

- 2.88 

•0.91 

-0.47 

-0.28 

-0.37 


Herald Tribune 


Very briefly; 

• Spain's unemployment rate rose despite a budding economic 
recovery to 16.79 percent in November from 16.72 percent in 
October, the National Employment Institute said. 

• Sweden’s jobless rate fell to 7.2 percent in November from 7.4 
percent in October, prompting speculation that the central bank 
might raise interest rates at its meeting Thursday. 

• French consumer prices were unchanged in November from. 
October despite an increase in the price of tobacco, according to' 
provisional figures. 

• Volkswagen AG said results at its troubled Spanish unit SEAT 
SA would improve further in 1995 as a result of better earnings, 
and cost-cutting measures. 

• Lonrho PLCs joint chief executive. Dieter Bock, said he would., 

consider cutting his holding in the company to 10 percent “if the, 
price is right’' He currently holds 18.8 percent. - » 

• SGS-Tbomson Microelectronics NV said it was planning a share 
issue that may take place “in the next 18 to 24 months.” 1 - 

• Kenya, seeking to dean up its image for investors, said it would 
allow foreign investment on its stock exchange. 

• The European Investment Bank said it was lending 35 billion 
pesetas (S264 million) so that Ford Espaha SA can equip a new 
engine production line at its plant near Valencia. 

• Empresa National de Electriddad SA of Spain confirmed that it 

planned to pay a 1994 gross interim dividend of 73 pesetas, up 
from 66 pesetas a year earlier. * 

o LVMH Moet Hennessy Louis Vidtton SA. the French maker of 
luxury goods, said it would achieve its objective of a 20 percent 
increase in net profit in 1994. It posted profit of 3.75 billion franc* 
($691 million) last year. ,:-j 

• Great Britain's Tourist Board said that visitors to England for 
this year’s 50th anniversary celebrations of the D-Day invasion 
spent £40 million ($62.4 million). 

• Oslo's stock exchange said that its (Erector, Erik Jarve, has beep 
dismissed after the discovery of alleged irregularities involving “a; 
mixture of private economy and the economy of the bourse.” 

Reuters. AP. Knight- RidJer. AFP, 



Monday’s dosing 

Tables include the nationwide pnees up to 
the closing on Wafl Street and do not reflect 
late trades elsewhere. Via The Associated Press 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 13, 1994 


. Page 15^' 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


Tokyo Eases Rules 
In Effort to Help 
Investment Funds 


Shanghai Gets Tough on Stock Fraud 


Investor’s Asia 


Hong Kong 
Hang Song 


Singapore Tokyo 

Strate Times - •. «fldcei225 


Bloomberg Business Nem 

TOKYO — in a move aimed 
at hiring individuals back into 
japans declining, stock market, 
the Ministry of Finance un- 
yefled a senes of measures on 
Monday that relax restrictions 
on secundes-investxnent trusts. 

The new rules, most of which 
wOJ take effect Jan. I , will allow 
investment trusts, which are 
similar to mutual funds, to in- 
vest in derivatives. Investing in 


Share Prices 
In India Drop 
After Election 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

BOMBAY — Share 
prices tumbled on the Bom- 
bay Stock Exchange on 
Monday in response to the 
defeat of India’s governing 
Congress (I) Party in state 
elections. 

The BSE index, which 
tracks 30 blue-chip compa- 
nies, lost 8339 points to 
dose at 3,884.48. Selling 
was heavy as the country's 

trading after weekend bal- 
lot counting. The results 
showed that Congress (I) 
had lost power in two 
southern states. 

The index at Delhi 
dropped 21.83 points, to 

“There is a general 
downtrend," said Ajit Am- 
bani, a broker in Bombay. 
“There are only seD orders. 
The dealers are panicky be- 
cause nobody is buying. 
Foreign institutional inves- 
tors are all selling heavily.” 

Premal Madhavji, an an- 
alyst with D.S. Purbhoodas 
and Co., predicted the in- 
dex in Bombay would fall 
to 3,700 points this week. 

“It has the potential to 
fall another 150 points." be 
said- “Right now people 
just want to get out of the 
market" 

(AFP, Bloomberg) 


derivatives had previously been 
urmted to .hedging risk. 

Derivatives allow investors to 
oet on the direction ot amount 
of change in securities or inter- 
est rales without actually buy- 
ing the underlying instrument 

Individual investors also will 
be able to compare the perfor- 
mances of various trusts and to 
know what kind of securities 
they invest in. 

The new rules lake steps to- 
ward clearing away one area 
that has long been a source of 
friction between the United 
States and Japan: access by for- 
eign securities firms to Japan's 
fund -management industry. 

The ministry also will abolish 
limits on which foreign markets 
investment trusts are allowed to 
trade on. The law currently lim- 
its them to 37 markets in 28 
countries. 

In addition, companies will 
' be banned from making up for 
losses their clients suffer. 

Because of the recent slump 
in the Japanese stock market, 
investment trusts have been hit 
by a decline in new contracts 
and growing numbers of re- 
demptions. The total amount of 
cash invested in the (rusts has 
fallen to 18.14 trillion yen (S18Q 
billion) in October from 45.55 
trillion yen as of Dec. 31, 1989. 

Since June 13, the Nikkei 
Stock Average has dropped 12 
percent. It closed Monday at 
18,975.10, down 0.02 percent. 

To help investors judge tbe 
performance of investment 
trusts, the ministry will ask the 
trusts to disclose tbe perfor- 
mance of one or two of their 
funds. Based on the informa- 
tion, the association of invest- 
ment-trust companies will com- 
pile a list of each company’s 
performance. 

The request will apply only to 
those funds started after Jan. 1, 
a ministry official said. But the 
minisLiy is considering adding 
existing funds to its list, proba- 
bly after April. 

To make each fund’s objec- 
tives more transparent, the min- 
istry will ask them to explain 
details of their funds. The com- 
panies will have to report what 
securities they buy and inform 
investors of changes. 


Rnuers 

SHANGHAI — Police have arrested a 
leading company executive in the biggest 
corruption case in the history of the 
Shanghai Stock Exchange, according to 
company executives ana news reports. 

Zhu Jianping, 48, the deputy general 
manager of Shanghai Rubber Belt Co., 
allegedly earned 800,000 yuan ($94,000) 
by selling shares in his company that had 
been earmarked for institutional inves- 
tors. 

The announcement of his arrest adds 
to the woes of a market tarnished by 
speculation and battered by a wave of 
selling in the past several months. 

Rubber Belt has issued B shares to 
foreign investors, who have started to 
turn sour on Chinese equities, partly be- 
cause of fears of rising inflation. 

Shanghai television broadcast on 
Monday a program about Mr. Zhu’s ar- 
rest that showed him handcuffed and 
being interrogated by state prosecutors. 

The case dates from late 1992 and 
early 1992, when the conveyor-belt mak- 
er turned into a listed company. Mi. Zhu 
was the senior executive in charge of 
issuing and listing shares and used his 
position to acquire a block of 25,000 
shares reserved for institutional inves- 
tors, according to Du Gongtiang, the 
secretary of Rubber Belt’s Discipline In- 
spection Commission. 

He sold the shares to the manager of a 
local rubber company at 35 yuan per 
share and later arranged the sale of the 
same shares to another enterprise for 100 
yuan. Mr. Zhu and the rubber company 


manager split the profit of 1.6 million 
yuan, Mr. Du said. 

“This case has gready damaged the 
image and the reputation of our compa- 
ny," Mr. Du said on the television pro- 
gram. "Shareholders will suspecL this is 
corporate conduct, but actually it was 
the act of an individual.” 

Mr. Zhu was arrested on Nov. 7 and 
confessed two days later. Mr. Du said. 
The company announced that he had 

The Rubber Belt 
scandal is the biggest 
corruption case in the 
history of the Shanghai 
Stock Exchange. 

been dismissed for corruption after the 
market dosed Friday. 

Shanghai's A-share index has lost 
around 40 percent of its value since mid- 
September, while the B-share index has 
dropped 25 percent in the same period. 

Overseas investors are worried about 
rising bank interest rates and the impact 
on corporate earnings of Beijing's tight 
credit policy. Shanghai's B-share market 
also has been dragged down by losses on 
Hong Kong's market. 

Rubber Belt is viewed by foreign fund 
managers as one of the weaker Shanghai 
B- shares with uncertain prospects in a 
saturated market for conveyor belts. 

Shanghai shares ended sharply lower 
in slow trading Monday, mainly because 


the People's Bank of China delayed an 
announcement of a monthly interest 
subsidy, brokers said. 

The A-share index, for domestic inves- 
tors, ended down 21.17 points at 638328 
points, and the B-share index, for for- 
eigners, shed 1 29 points to end at 6234. 

Shanghai authorities have launched a 
war against speculators who have virtu- 
ally hijacked the mar ket and scared away 
many small investors. Bui, despite wide- 
spread rumors about kickbacks and ille- 
gal share dealing among brokerages and 
company directors, only a few cases of 
corruption have been publicized. 

Last month another Shanghai B-share 
company, Shanghai Forever Bicycle, an- 
nounced that it had dismissed its deputy 
managing director for accepting S2300 
in return for helping a friend buy compa- 
ny shares. In May. city prosecutors con- 
firmed that the former head of tbe listing 
department of the Shanghai brokerage 
Haitong Securities was under c riminal 
investigation. 

Paul Viben, head of research at Baring 
Securities in Shanghai, said the Rubber 
Belt case highlighted the problems of 
conflict of interest in Lhe Chinese securi- 
ties industry. 

He said overseas investors worried 
about the pervasive presence of the state 
at all levels of industry and the lack of 
clear division between the investment 
banking and trading arms of Chinese 
brokerages. 

The Rubber Belt case "will not help 
sentiment," he said, “but then sentiment 
is negative anyway.” 




HMters: 


oW :®®T7r^.>rD 

• . . «94 . 

Monday Prav. % 

Close Close Change 

7,797.78 7,789.07. -1.04 

2,10 Z2B -030 

1,842.00 1350.90 -0.48 

18375.10 1837830 -0.02 

895.77 81126 -1.70 - 

Closed 137830 

1342.77 1,03327 +032 ' 

fi.7Z2.40 6,72231 Ditch. '' 

231933 2307.66 +037 ^ 

447.76 45438 -138 , 

1 3TO4B 1389.95 -0.63* 

133533 1,881.17 -2.431 

buenuiK*ul Herald Tritaw. 


China Petrochemical 
Purchases Acer Shares 

Compiled by Our Staff Fran Dupatcka 

TAIPEI — China Petro- 
chemical Development Corp. 
has bought shares in the com- 
puter maker Acer Inc., a China 
Petrochemical spokesman said 
Monday. 

“It’s a strong company and 
their earnings potential is 
good,” the spokesman said. 

Taiwan’s CNA news agency 
said China Petrochemical had 
bought 1.61 million Acer shares 
for 152 milli on Taiwan dollars 
($5.75 million), or about 94.5 
dollars a share, up to tbe end of 
November. Acer has 477 mil- 
lion shares listed. The China 
Petrochemical spokesman de- 
clined to confirm the specifics. 

In October, Acer said profit 
for its first nine months more 
than tripled, to 2.1 billion dol- 
lars as sales rose 67 percent to 
22.1 billion dollars. 

(Reuters, Bloomberg) 


Australian TV Venture in Doubt 


Compiled by Oar Staff From Dispatches 

SYDNEY — Seven Network 
LuL, one of three major TV 
broadcasters in Australia, said 
Monday it was withdrawing 
from a pay-television consor- 
tium led by Optus Communica- 
tions Pty„ a privately owned 
phone company. 

The existence of Optus Vi- 
sion. which was to have been 
built with more than 3 billion 
Australian dollars ($2.3 bil- 
lion), was cast into doubt after 
the announcement. 

“The remaining three consor- 
tium members are talking about 
the future of Optus Vision,” a 
spokesman for Optus Commu- 
nications said. 

Optus Vision now comprises 
Optus Communications, Pub- 
lishing & Broadcasting Ltd. and 
Continental Cablevision Inc. of 
the United States. 

“1 would think by the end of 


the week we would be able to 
make a statement on where we 
are headed with this,” the 
spokesman said 
Seven Network said it would 
not give up plans to become 
involved in subscription televi- 
sion in some other forma L 
Analysts said they expected 
the company to join the pay- 
television venture formed re- 
cently by its two largest share- 
holders: News Corp. and 
Telecom Australia, which is 
government-owned 
Analysts said it was odd from 
the start that Seven Network 
had planned to invest in a rival 
to its two largest shareholders. 

The company blamed the fed- 
eral government’s “new regula- 
tory framework” for its decision. 

The government recently re- 
jected an Optus proposal to 
split the country into two mo- 
nopoly regions — one for Op- 


tus, one for the News-Telecom 
group. 

At the end of November, Mi- 
chael Lee, the communications 
minister, announced that com- 
panies could exclude rivals 
from their cables for as long as 
five years but would then have 
to give access to other providers 
at government-controlled times 
ana prices. 

After that announcement, 
Optus said it might drop plans 
to lay its 3-bflIion-dollar cable 
network. Optus warned the 
government at the time that its 
withdrawal would hand a mo- 
nopoly to the venture between 
News Corp. and Telecom. 

The Optus venture was dealt 
a blow fast week when Kerry 
Packer said he would withdraw 
his planned 318 million dollar 
investment in Optus Vision. He 
also cited the government rul- 
ing. (Bloomberg, AFP) 


7600- j 1 g' Q’ jjf q’ ’ ' 2008 j a ' 

19S4 . _ ... .. IBM .. 

Exchange ' tndax ' 

Hong Kong Hang.Spng ... 
Singapore' Straits Times 
Sydney AH Ordinaries 

Tokyo Nikkei 225 . 

Kuala Lumpur Composite 
Bangkok SET 

■ Seoul Composite Stock 

Taipei WaightedPrieo 

Manila PSE ” 

Jakarta Stock Index ~ 

New Zaaland MZS&4Q 
Bombay National index 
Sources: Reuters. AFP 

Very briefly: 


e Governor Chris Patten of Hong Kong discussed economic 
cooperation with President Kim Young Stun of South Korea op 
Monday in Seoul. 

• Digital Equipment Corp. said it had signed a joint-venture 

agreement with Hunan Computer Factory of China to develop and 
manufacture text terminals for the Chinese market. •? 

e Australian telecommunications exports are expected to grow 43 
percent in the year to June 1995, to 880 million Australian dollars 

($680 million), the teleco mmuni cations authority said. 

• Daewoo Electronics Co. will take over and expand a consumer 
electronics plant in Poland; it plans to spend $132 milli on on the 
complex in Pruszkow, west of Warsaw. 

• Matsushita Electric Industrial Co. said it has selected a new 
version of the PowerPC microprocessor being developed by Apple 
Computer Inc* lntenationd Business Machines Cwp. and Motor- 
ola Inc. for its 64-bit game machine. 

A*. Bloomberg, AFX. AFP 


Golf States to Expand Oil Capacity 

Agence France - Presse 

ABU DHABI — Gulf Arab states will invest more than $20 
billion in the next five years to expand oil production capacity to 
meet growing world demand, an industry official said Monday!. 1 

The funds are part of about $30 billion to be spent by tbe six 
Gulf Cooperation Council states in an attempt to diversify their 
oil-reliant economies, said Hisham Khawajkeya, information off£ 
dal at the Gulf Organisation for Industrial Consultancy. 

Tike six countries — Saudi Arabia, Bahrein Kuwait, Oman, 
Qatar and the United Arab Emirates — have already pumped 
billions of dollars into increasing output capacity. They control 45 
percent of the global oil reserves of nearly 1 trillion barrels. 

Saudi Arabia has increased its capacity to around 10 million 
barrels per day from 9.6 million barrels in 1992, and is planning to 
raise it to 12 milHon barrels per day by the year 2000. 


NASDAQ 


Div W PE Wk wth LowLaretfOTM 


i2Monm 
Kflah Low Stock 


n» YMPE 10Qs Hfefh Low Ltaat Of o*-‘' 










































Page 16 


mTOim^nONAl.HBltAU> raPHJWRUJBSDAYtP^ 1 -^^^ ^ 199^ 


TVA Pulls the Plug on Nuke* 

r T m O TT Q Atrkmi/* Plants Are Mothballed 


Oil How 


By Daniel Southerland 
Wadangiofi Senice 
The Tennessee Valley Au- 
thority, one of the largest 

American power 
■said Monday it would haltwork 
on the last three nuclear power 
plants under construction m tne 
United States. 

The decision marks the end 

of an era for the once-mighty 

UJS. nuclear power industry, 
which had held the promise of 
freeing the country from depen- 
dence on foreign oil 
1 Across America, 109 nuclear 

•plants produce about 20 percent 

of the country’s electricity, sec- 
^ond only to the output of coal- 
’ fired power pla nts. But most 
’utilities long ago dropped plans 
•to build nuclear plants because 
■of high costs. No .new p^ts 
’have been ordered smce 1978. 

■ “I think this is bringing to a 


Crowdl the TVA chairman. 

But while the nuclear powr 
industry is languishing m the 
United States, this is far from 
the case in other countnes. 
France is committed to nudear 
power for 75 percent of its enff- 

CT needs. In Asia, leaders of rap- 

kAy growing economies consider 
nudear power a necessary part 
of the energy mix. Cbma, for 
one, is vigorously pursumg nu- 
clear plant construction with the 
help of technology provided by 
Western energy companies. 

The TVA's decision to pull 
the plug on its construction of 
nuclear-driven electrical plants 

is intended to reduce its debt, 
Mr. Crowell said. 

Mr. Crowell, a 50-year-old ap- 
pointee of President Bill Clin ion, 
said the TVA would consider 
completing the plants if it could 


mi Huu momi wuwcnrarT ukomefwb 

Foods Common de Placement luxembourgeois 
a Compartments MulhproS 
B, Avenue de la liberte 
L- 1930 Luxembourg 

I’Atas 

ORIENT 

ANGLOSAXON i jwrtir da 5 ducembre 191*4. 

de de gertion. ,* 7 d^ccmbre 1994 

La Sodete de GeaBon 
SOCIETE DE GESTION DU 

FOIYDS COM 1 *™!!®® 1 
PLACEMENT CVTERIVAnOWAE 

management income fund &a. 

et la Banqne DeposKalre 
IMI BANK (LUX) 


find partners to bdp with toe 
financing. “But to be honest, he 
said, “therete a very sfiinpossi- 
bflity of finding partners. 

Long after other utilities had 
dropped construction plans, the 
TVA, which is owned by the 
federal government and pro- 
tected from some competitive 
pressures, had pressed ahead. 
Its decision to halt construction 
is a major shift far the agency, 
Mr. Crowdl said. But he said 
the TVA which was created 
more than 50 years ago under 
Franklin D. Roosevelt's New 

Deal, had to recognize that pol- 
icies concaved decades ago are 

no longer viable. 

Cost estimates for building 
the three half-finished TVA 
plants have climbed stea *“v 
over the years and have reached 
$8.5 billion, Mr. Crowell said- 
The TVA already has invested 
about $6.3 billion in the three 
/plants — $4.6 billion in 1 two 
unfinishe d units at the Bejle- 
fonte Nuclear Plant near Holly- 
wood, Alabama, and about $1.7 
billion in the Watts Bar Unit 2 
near Spring City, Tennessee. 


By Agis Salpukas 

Nnr York Tones Servtce 

NEW YORK -The flow of fonag 
oU into the United S«at« co* l be d£ 


^JDiBbna, the president pi me 

— American Petroleum Institute, the indus- 
h‘. a — American rcu eoiA the mdus- 

try’s leading trade group^dtte 

_ ni could not rely on inventories U sup* 

~~ ««iA emlK Ifl 1QC i A m,r tit “J ■ in A Ifltt WAY- 

taken to cover 


into the unnea a«u» — 


10 tuneTthe liability insurance tbejr have 

r accidents and spills in the 




m 


pUcs were interrupted in a big way. 

w'aassSESSS 

sSassasssJs# 

Tbhdp ease the uncertainty, the. 

iomesMpsthat have certificates. 

fimtedSts*. 
^^^ftnllswhae unloading, 

ssubs.e5»s. 

«led in the Middle East J**»use t“* 10 times* more U- 

otanonsuaiw — . wssds lack the insurance needed to do« resources to _ — a^ctnncie. 

dreds of anions ,rf dtJlais of kabD^r 


-.ser* 

» •■d {,- 


NYT 

t to the 
East, 


advebtisement 
INGERSOIX-RAND COMPANY 

(CPR») 

The undersigned announces lb*l » 
from 22 Dw»nbcr 1994 at K Mr 

with Dfk 1,29 WL <fe P® 

1 7.08.9 -k erosa $ 04® ft. «W 
deduction of 15% 0SM« = 
$ 0,1M = Dlls. 0£4 per CDR Div. 
ens. belonging to nonrendspi* 01 

NHiSEb -«! b, aid ^ 
deduction of an addjOonal 15* 
tn (= $0,138 = Dlls. (W4 with Dfls. 
IjOR ncL 

AMSTERDAM DEPOSITARY 
COMPANY XV. 
Amsterdam. 9 December 1994, 


^No one expects the change to <n use 

lines at the gasoUne^pomps, but wme 

specialists predict that **8^ 

See the price of 
heating oil by at least a lew cans * 
g^o^The Northeast is 
rarable because of its heavy depaidence 
on oil for heating m the winter- 

oRWassr~2 
SSfflSKSSKSk 

&5r costs. When that od 

American marketplace, oil companies 

may try to raise prices to recover some of 

* law en^ct^aiter^e 1(>adcd ^ erode oato. 

Exxon Valdez oil spiflm Aiaska m 19W, United Sutes from the ^d 
„ tnnkpr will be able to dock in tne _i.s— - fc*we already 1 
SfuuiA Dec. 28 «nl® rt to 

demonstrated to the Coast <3uardtlra mx* tne insu»««- 

has the financial atrih^ 1 ^ dnLbm Sto United States after Dea 2S. some 

SKeBSSS SSSi?# 

SSSsSS'W i^SS SSasssaiS» 
rtiar-stssjsg jBtsutsijsais 

-A-iaarisss ssrtswjMSE 

c^ntrth needed for the Coast Guard to provide th 5^Tf«i»vrni nnnrovals g pp is and thus open themselves to huge 

unkn own risks. 

The reaulations arc aimed at carrymg 
ontTp^riSi of the Oil MMl ** 

of 19W, an attempt by Congress to make 

® ' uTu w livrfv that taxpayers would 


Citeo retroieum 

insurance they need for their ships. 
Because it takes about 30 days for a 



The IHT Pocket Diary 

Puts 1995 

Right Into Your Pocket 


MEKKItL: 

Hitting a ^8 '* 

' f {mtin ned from ! 

K?SS»sSi 

Act can withdraw cash (ram. 

ST nw-froren emmlr™*-: 

pool, the U» An gab* 

T Tte 1 Pep gH t i°!: 

Education also has wanrd to-, 
S^erintendents tot-4ey; 

Stve Mg toan te e ttod»u-. 

< j an ds of teadiers wd pfter? 
employees 

the w^ek.alteri 

and bis 

that Merrill acted as f ^ksnatf, 
to Orange County, n ot ^ ^ 
fr^ndal adviser, and bears.DO. 

SSSSKMCSS 

Si invested the fimffs many 

What went wron& they 

more to do with Mr. Gtrai s. 
deciaon to borrow heawfy -than; 
the derivatives that Merrill sold 
to him. 

Stin, future btigatkm may- 

hinge on whether Marill had 
responribility to stop sefling se- 
cuntics to such a heavily leyer-; 

aged fund. - ‘ . 

“l think a brokerage has a; 
duty not to permit a custo mer- 
to invest in an inapjnopnattf 
fashion especially when taxpay-- ■ 
ers’ money is at stake, said 
Mdvyri Weiss, a partner at the 
law fum otMHbergWeissBer^ . 
diad Hynes & Lerach in_New. 
Yoric. 

Mr. Weiss represented the. 
dtv of- San Jose, California;, 
when it sued .13. brokerage 
firms, including Mienffl, *«er 
losing $60 mfllion in the eariy 
1980s. • " 

The National Assoaatioii c£ 
Securities Dealers, which along 
with the SEC regdat»Ii^fi»» 
said it was investigating ^wneth-: 
er Merrill violated the “pay to 
play” rules that prevent saun-; 

- to firms from makingpofitical 
contributions in order to 
underwriting business from 
municipalities. 


TRANSPACIFIC FUND 

Sod6t6 Anonyme 

cjss ttBSsfiaamw ■ 

STnD purpose, 

■ $ 

Pursusnt to Artida B oi 

FUND SA, renawalfor aWt to proceed to theirv 

ns jjaflif JS*w usara- » i-^- 

'ffftd* fw" » " 

item of tfte a ^ ttkan a m«ontv of 2/3 o* 


$&s. 


resources 10 a 9sw*»* « 
ghTii tv without outside assstanee-^ 
Tte traditional insurers for 
tot camera, 


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Decisions on wis Item 


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Price includes initials, packing and postage in Europe: 

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10-19 diaries UK £18 (U.S.S27) each I I I I 


nmm rfl SU’Jb Ol 

_ the agenda will be taken at a nw^ority 

tne snare* general meeting of 22 Dewijw. ! 

in order to take pan ^at ™ must be mastered v\ Tbe corrv 

Sbs sssgSSi' fSjsu *• " o "" s ; 

-^BANQUE DE NEUFUZE SOfLUMBERGER, MALLET 
3 Avenue Hoche, Pans Seme 

-ABN AMRO BANK 

. iSoU^^RALE DU UJXEMBOUHG SA. 

. SOafrEB*lWu^|AEB ISU'SSa SA 

^. BMrdrtDIWM 


CURRENCY AND CAPIXM MARKET SERVICES 


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• Measures 8x13 cm (.51/4 x 3 in.). 

• Black leather cover 
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Page 18 


DfTEBNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. TUESDAY, DECEMBER 13, 1994 


SPORTS 


That Binds 


Threat of 


w«-^Sa-3s ss?®' Sap-— * 

dalora Monday night under floodligh ^ ^ short-term answcx *PP“£ North 
Sestriere. Italy. they hit the holding nwre eariy competed suc- 


10 HOST me scaaon-ypcuiufims" — ■ 

part of a 50th anniversary celebration. 

Such plans sound fine to American skiers 
and coaches, who would have more races 
closer to home. Bui they remain skeptical, 
“ttiw won’t send both the men and worn - 


thinking about the ocean or uk* — 
to 


to the FIS to decade. • coapUaitrfO^ 5 ^ 

Wh^theFIStededdftthe^® LAUSANNE, 

iboattheWoridC^’sh^roisMtai^w _Jn*int«ii»«> 

rrinvamiim is pushing for a w-rieration said 


Switzed^ngi 


seess&u? 

mfes mmm 


2-srss *- 

SSKSk wss ££■*>-“ “® h - 

considerable 

SK^SfSSffiSS 

ESSSSmsk 


send eatber to me® __ _ _ the fu ture , 
America to atarttta seaso “ . season 


downnill anu 5Uper-*J lom i a . 1UV 

is iust too big over here, and the Europeans 

really don't like coming to North Amenca. 

The industry is indeed sizeable in central 
Europe, where sponsors, manufacturers and 
resorts aD rely on the publicity generated by 
the World Cup to sell equipment, doming 
and ski vacations before Christmas- 

“As soon as people see our Wood cup 
events on their TV screens, the telephones 
start ringing immediately and people want to 

makereservations,” said Jean-Claude 

Fritsch, who nmsjhc 

events in early December m Val d Isfere. we 

. - afkli iriMar anrf VP nnVv mWC D&Q tO 


high, networks neea ^ tdevi- &st time, in soum i swimmers wouiu — r — .••• 

S 5 s£str* 5 «r Sl^ssSS^' 

s^sssss s§§§§- 

buying in the last d^ide. iLvwnmOOO sion,” he said. ^ ^ Mu-tarthi* * fjnmffl in ffi- 


buying 

exampl 


out befote^nd . 


In recent yean, u - — — ~ tn North events in eany wwauiw m . ~ 

send other the men or women to N ■ ^ 39^ year, and we only have had to 

Sierica to startth= cancel twice: in 1974 and this y«m That snot 

& , KHftKo5S£B. .SSsS- -SU md otter European race 


“oS^y r£± and oarer European race 
K3d?tal»M» is to >>«£“ or a£ not about to surrender Adi 

rithmen's and women’s giant ^ p5^ouspre<3iristmas dates without a strug- 

then sendboth^^om^to ^ fctreested inpujmg the 

the United Stales for tore weete “ ™ gart of ^ season back a month and extend- 
November, starting perhaps m Pars w >. 


areTr^to be flexible. 

“We need to have a race in Val d lsere by 


to 10 minion i»uv» - • - ^. ti not - m the soutnem ^ hua ana -—-t—- • tTl > 

fere. But this winter's slew of ranceuaauu^^ on jdadem in October and November. ^ two-yew ban on me. 

only meant ibw rreprtswm^^^™ traSS^ rites in Deoanbre«n d Janu- five others tested^by ^c ^ 

tourism and television rights, found, ary and 16 more events m March. Games organizers. . “j® 

premiums will soar. If msurers ary, w do need to swimmers Xiong GuoEmg.Hfr 

&sis«a!sast- 

m nreoared to be flexible. 


al sport' 


to'ia.'BsaK — 

Under Floodlights, Tomba Wins 2 dCupSMom 


Grobbelaar Lawyers Accuse 
FA of Foul Play in Inquiry 


*?£*£*** ^5»i 

and the women’s 400-mfito 
freestyle winner at the Asm 

Games, Zhcm Guanbm. v y ^ : . . . 

Yang and Lu tested 
in federation tests w -; 

tests of the Asian Gaines orga- 

The international federation, '/- 

known as HNA, 
statement that China Rodent- 
tion had been asked 


^ The Associated Press 

■ ! SESTR1ERE. Italy — The 

three- time Olympic champion U £ i*% V-.T m 

Albeno Tomba, in to best sea- |T 

son start since his golden I va/- ’ ’ 1 

88 campaign, scored bis second ■* gm ' - * * ~p » 

consecutive slalomi rnurnph i ~S 

Monday in the first World Cup |^y||g, K * j.sJ'A '', , JE 
oce skied under floodhghts. u , 

- The Italian superstar clocked 
to fastest time in both runs, 
down the icy Kandahar course, 

for a winning combined time of ■_ 

I minute 53.61 seconds. 

Tomba, who will celebrate *'•: •’ ' A 

his 28th birthday next week and jT 

who said this may be his last BBikU. / 

season of competitive skiing ^ 

edaedbysbc-hundrethsofasecr K«: 

sted The mas Fogdoe of Swe- 
den. whose ume was 1:53.67. & . 

Michael Tritscher. the Aik- r- 
trian veteran, was third, nearly . 
two seconds behind the winner. 

' The Slovene slalom specialist 

Jure Kosir edged Thomas Stan- 
gassinger. the Olympic champi- . 
on. for fourth place, in 1 :55£5. ^ 

Tomba scored his 35th career 
victory eight days after capto- 
ing the first World Cup slalom 
of the season at Tignes, France. 

The victory Monday, his 

sixth out of nine races contested 

in this Italian alpine resort, ex- 
tended Tomba's lead m the 
overall Cup standings. 

‘ The Italian skier, interna- 
tionally known as La Bomba 

Sh?S?JiUT».SK Alberto Tomba careering do™ 

through two *Wom’ wetones throwing til 






tf " tion mw .7“ ■ •. 

th* duct an investigation to deter- 
T.ONDON — Bruce Grobbelaar’s lawyere^dMontoy a m p«soaa, tototog* 

_ Association’s inquiry into bribery allegations trainer or doctor, is 

3T^old SomSton goaltof? 1x5 ■?^toba«bdpedorudvi S ^ 

“^bM^&tarily talked to police SSlor such a pa- 

■ss-’£2ssa? p -’ B 


.;Jil : -M:' 


.■ ■» -> 
• -5 




i^g^Tit'^bSunTn 

^fdSLSIf ^ investigation mto. determining 

referred to. Ttietod«ailslmvei»^tb«np«wi ^^^ tile souree of tile 

Hewitt alao said that “misleading imprmsiorB” had jn Bqjng, the deputy graetal 

ovS the time Grobbelaar was given toTMiondtotei^^^. ^ QuneseOlym- 

Giobbdaar has never requested nor bem pML Committee, He Human, 


14-aav penoa 10 aua«» 77 ° " ‘ „ icics wuu w«*. ; 

itbin 24 hours of them beans rnade lmov^ ^ ^ ^ dehydrotesUKtemM wm 

The FA said Monday night that if 81,16 t0 8®* hold ^ **“* 

— that its oroceedings be suspaiaea penaing wv themselves. 








■•'-I'.*,,... 






^ do U ^ ** Ttot vre haveto have proof 
Jhedid, th^^“would give it very careful consideration. we can make charges 

^ about any accomplices, sue . 

CinELINES She also criticized the month' 

ailBMro* — ■ it took to Japanese organizers 

Vi rginia Wins Historic Soccer Title ^SuiSSac pos- 

DAVIDSON, Nor^C^gm^e fl Hmv^ of b^^Uudb^ta 

f ^?^?SStiSStcrawd to witness small number m anyone sbo^. 


SIDELINES 




• • * Agcnce Franee-Prnde 

an icy, floodlit course Monday m^it in Sestriere, Italy, to edge Thomas Fogdoe. 


The Cavaliers’ goal came onaii^m -***-*--£ 
Division I —in any sport. 


heJ£l« bus ssssa 


OAer top ruusners m _ . tw«,tm,e „ 

■cause he does not want to take shot off niwona. ^ of race included Sebas- Kiminobu Kimura of Japan pion Deborah Compagnom of 

risks in speed races. £35^00^ com- tira Amiez of France, 6th, and had his best slalom finish ever recovered from tolad- 

-I did not feel very well, 57.26 md 56^ saxma^ Austrians, Mano Rater. placin a 12th. 3.17 seconds be- infection that sidelined her 

Tomba said. “I did not believe I pared with Fogdotrs 3 / ji m and ^nias Sykora, 8th. fcnd the winner. fof eight consecutive World 

could win here tonight" ^ started with two Amiez, only lfth gg *e Worid Cup pro- Cup rares, «u d Monday die 


titics at Qtigary. Alberta. He 

added a third Olympic gold m 9^2.35 sec Friday and Saturday. 

^OtheMnp^fitosbeis in Mon- onds slower Aan Tomba. . T^dme Olympic cham- 

day mght’s race included Sebas- 

» _T: s,r rmnr» fith. and 


For the Record 


cause the organizeis had previ- 
ously expressed satisfaction 

tha t only a single Thai football- 
er had tested positive,” she said- 
“A wait , of this kind is un- 
precedented in the world of 
Sport,” she added. “But even 
though we have not had a satis- 
factory explanation from the 


Germany, signed a tv 

the Japanese dub re™*^ r {AF i 

23S3& SkSS 

its six professional teams to sign a maximum oirwo iorawi 
nlavers each next season, Kyodo News Service reported. (AP) 
2. ikm AJi ..v. A*opntTnn to its first World Cup tide m 


Japanese about this delay, we 
have respected the facts.” 

( Reuters, AFP) 


Tomba said. “I did not believe I pared witn b 7t h, and Thomas Sykora, 8th- bind the winner. for eight consecutive world W.J, next season, Kyodo News Service report^. \at) 

could win here tonight.” 5636. starte d with two Amiez, only 15th «te the >s World Cup pro _ Cup races, said Monday she p rpsa _ MeDOt tL who led Argentina to its first World Cup tijem 

He^dtothesuftoedfr^ al Sestriere in to first ^^. d ^ ked ^ n , J 1 i d J aS ?' gram, disrupted by lack of snow planned to im^es^o^ls coach of the strug^ing first division Boca 

rib pains .after 198?88 campaign, Tomba end- est tote m the ^ t0 SatforcedcanceUaUon of some but in a ^a^^alom next eek, most popular team. ^ 

with a suck during the warm- w r ™^3h nine Worid improve by nme phjfj- ZL* s* r,»iy Fnmce. Switzer- weather permittmg. JUIUora - 

U ^“No doubt this is my favorite Cup trophies and two Olympic The defending World p 


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SPORTS 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 13, 1994 


Page 19 




49ers, Playing With All Kings, Treat the Chargers Lik e Pawns, 38-15 


3Tb ^rfi 






By Thomas George 

.Yew York Tunes Service 


Hoa- 

- 

* **5? 




: 








mm 


m .. 

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>een forTa,i 














■. - '■."■': : ^ n 

■; *4**15 

••• 





^'itruinRui^ 


Lanny Igorin/Tbc Anooafcd Fuss 

Jeny Rke, dwfing the Chargers* Dwayne Harper, made 12 catches for 144 yards in the game, pushing his total to 
13,141 yards. He joined James Lofton (14,004) and Steve Largent (13,089) as the only receivers with more than 13,000. 


- Z '~ i*a. 


' *; :c. 


Baseball Owners: New Plan , and Old Threat 


Nrv%papep 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

RYE BROOK, New York — It was 
the players' torn Monday to respond as 
the major league baseball strike went 
into its fifth month. 

The owners made a new proposal Sun- 
day, replacing their escalating payroll 
tax with a flat tax. Union officials, how- 
ever, said it would act like a salary cap. 
leaving the sides almost as far apart as 
they were when the strike began Aug. 12. 

Management’s chief negotiator. John 
Harrington of the Boston Red Sox, said 
the new plan was a "substantial move" 
by the owners, who had received the 
union's latest proposal 27 hours earlier. 


The owners* new plan also has provi- 
sions for a secondary tax that, would 
ensure that salaries don’t escalate, they 
said, and embraced some of the union's 
ideas on future joint ventures. 

Donald Fehr. the union leader, said 
his side needed time to analyze the plan, 
but his initial reaction wasn't positive. 

“At first blush, it appears their new 
proposal contains virtually all the ele- 
ments of the salary cap," he said. 

Even as they offered the new plan, the 
owners said their salary cap proposal 
remained on the table, asked the union to 
formally respond by Monday night and 
reminded the union that there is a meet- 


ing of all owners scheduled for Thursday 
in Chicago. Harrington has said the own- 
ers will declare an impasse and impose a 
salary cap unless an agreement is 
readied by then. 

“If they need to rush off to their meet- 
ing, then they'll do whatever they do," 
Fehr said. 

In a related devdopement. Gene Orza, 
the union's associate general counsel, 
said that the Department of Labor certi- 
fied the strike last Thursday, meaning 
that the Immigration and Naturalization 
Service will not gram visas to players 
who could replace the striking major 
leaguers. (AP, NYT) 


i • • 1 i -T 


SCOREBOARD 


[ r.-j: / wS* 


,s a 5 


NFL Stentings 


AMERICAN CONFERENCE 
Eat 


■ . — 


w 

L 


m» pf pa 


Mtatta 

B 

5 


3ii aw 

' Zb 

New England 

B 

B 


J71 297 292 


Buffalo 

7 

7 


M0 314 30S 

: -*■ 

SLY.Jeb 

6 

1 


429 24B27S 

. ‘JZl 

Irtknaeatto 

6 

B 


429 ZX7 SOS 



Central 





W 

L 


PtS PF PA 

' ~ 

v-Ptmtxvgh 

11 

3 


JB6 26S190 

% ~ I--.** 

v-Ofruetand 

» 

4 


JV4 29B TIB 

■ • ■ * 1 

Ctatinnatl 

2 

12 


.143 234 341 


Houston 

1 

13 


J71 193 311 



t 

Weti 





W 

L 


Pt» PF PA 

i ■ ■ ■■ ■ ” * 

SaiDtcao 

9 

5 


643 323 26* 

- 

LA Ratters 

> 

6 


371 277 292 


KtawsCttv 

7 

t 


S3B 241 23S 


Darner 

7 

7 


J0Q 300324 


Seattle 

6 

B 


AS 262 271 


Tampa Bay 24. Las Angelas Rams 14 
Mkmwota 21. Buffalo 17 
Plrntjun* m. PhUadsfoMa 3 
Lac Angeles Ratter? 23,-Oenvcr 13 
San Francisco 38, San Diego 15 
Seattle 14. Houston 14 
Arizona 17, Wta eM BB ta i 15 
Now Or team », Atlanta 2B 


P: StrtcMand 10-16 3-4 24. Drextor 5-14 1-9 17. 
ttanwtte Sacramento 53 (W. Williams 7), 
Portland 55 fDitttey M. Asstats— Sacramento 
19 (W. Wllikxm. Hurley 4A, Portland 30 
(Onsdcr 9). 


NBA Standings 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
AHooftc DlTtstoa 


NATIONAL CONFERENCE 
East 

W L T Pts I 

x -Dal las It 3 0 JU : 

N.Y. Giants 7 7 0 300 I 

Arizona 7 7 0 JOB : 

PNUMMa 7 7 0 5B0 : 

Washington 2 13 0 .143 ; 

CootnB 

W L T Ptl I 
Minnesota 9 5 D Mi : 

Detroit 8 6 0 571 ! 

aucaao 8 6 a J7i ; 

Green Bay 7 7 0 500 : 

Tampa Bay 5 9 a 357 i 


v 


W L T Pts PF PA 
»5anFranefsco 12 7 0 A5J 447 351 

Hew Orleans * 8 8 429 303 355 

Atlanta 5 8 0 429 290 338 

LA Rams 4 10 0 286 2S23W 

x-cHndicd division 
yucHnched ptavofl spot 

Sundays Games 
Gram Say 48. CMawo 3 
New York Giants 87, Cincinnati 38 
New England 28. Indianapolis 13 



W L 

pa 

GB 

Orlonao 

IS 3 

JQ3 

— 

New York 

11 6 

447 

3te 

Banian 

B 11 

421 

TVs 

washing tan 

6 9 

400 

TVs 

PNtodatpoio 

7 11 

-389 

B 

Haw Jaraov 

B 13 

J 01 

tVi 

Miami 

4 12 

JS0 

10 


CeatratDMetaa 



laclkna 

12 5 

■7W 


Clevetand 

11 ■ 

-579 

7 

Otartatie 

9 9 

500 

3V> 

Chicago 

9 9 

JN 

3V> 

Detroit 

B 10 

444 

4% 

Atlanta 

B 11 

421 

5 

Milwaukee 

6 13 

333 

6 Ki 

WESTS Ml COHFEREMCE 


MWieet DhtUlaw 




W L 

PCt 

SB 

Hoiaton 

12 4 

M7 



Denver 

to 6 

JOS 


Utah 

11 B 

379 

m 

DaNoa 

* 7 

343 

2 

San Antonio 

B 9 

471 

3» 

Wnmaota 

3 15 

.147 

9 


Pod fie Dtvtxtoa 



PtXMfllx 

13 5 

372 



Seattle 

12 6 

Ut 

1 

LA. Lakers 

11 7 

All 

2 

Porttand 

9 7 

343 

3 

Sacramento 

U ( 

358 

3 

Golden State 

8 10 

444 

5 

LA. Clippers 

2 17 

■IK 

Ufa 

5uu uwieutu 

17 9 

25 

Zt— «s 

Porttand 

21 II 

33 

19-93 


AP TOP IS RESULT 
Uta-nmkad Minnesota 1461 treat Rhode its- 
MM 

OTHER MAJOR COLLEGE SCORES 
EAST 

Boston CoUeac 77, Buffalo 40 
Comall 99. Hobart 83 
Fairmont SL 9L U*e Erie 71 
LeMovne 44, cw. past 40 
NYU 4& Rochester 44 
New HampMre Coll. 79, Sacred Heart 78 
Seten Hen 99. UNLV 79 
W H ta u u k m. Lyndon St. 75 
Wheaton 99. Framingham SL 55 
SOUTH 

■JodBMvftle St. TJO. Lindsay Wilson 88 
Maryville. Ten. 116. Ferrum 77 
Rtdanond 7ft C eeree Washington M 
Vanderbilt 83, MjC-AstievtUe 44 
Wtathrap 73, Queans, HC. 70 
MIDWEST 

N. tamo 63, WOrtburg S3 
NW Missouri St. 82, Benedict Sie.Korv 43 
SOUTHWEST 
Lamar 88, Southern Cat 78 
FAR WEST 

CM Poly-Pomona 81. UC DovU 48 
Regis 73, M. Colorado t/t 

TOURNAMENTS 




X CMmecHaif 84. Bryant <8 
Tbtrd Place 
Tufts H, Endlcott 44 


Morey. N.Y. 78 Dominican, ay. 73 


BJoomflett 75. Purchase SL 41 


WOMEN’S SUPER-© 

EOinHi (ms Swrt nvY S u per G race at 
Lola Louism Alberta: LKatta Sebtager, Ger- 
many, l mtauto» 1 158 seconds; ft Heidi Zefier- 
Baehier. Switzerland, 1:11-90; 1 Plata 
Street. Sun Valley, Idaho. 1:1341 } (tie I Mor- 

Mno ErtL Germany. 1:1147; 8 Btokma Perez, 

Italy. 1:1350; 8 Knttuitno Gutensohn, Ger- 
many, 1:1246; 7. Regtoe Gaumrntt. Fnx«; 

1 :U49: 8 PemWa WBierg, Sweden, 1 :1220; 9. 

Michael Gera-LeHner, Germany, l:T2J7: 18 
Regina Haeusl. Germany. 1:1229. 

wwtd Cep s we r O staudines: L HeKfl 
Zener-floHrier, 5wttzerloo8 144; i Kot|a 5el- 

ztnger. Germany. 126 j X Sylvia Eder.Avnhfa. 

118; 4. veronfko Stotlmaler, Austria W4; & 

Ptcuba Street. Sun Valtev. tdohe. 94: 6. Mar- 
tina em Germany. 82; 7. Barbara Merita 
Italy, 43; 8 Nathalie Bouvter. France. S; 9. 
Ale x andra Ahi U wnft zer . Austria, S3: ML Per- 
OHIO Wftwrg. Sweden, 58 




THIRD TRST 


S: Rkhmand *239-12 17. aGrani 6-954 17; 


M— d ay, le Chaedbmrlt, India 
Wert Buses first tnabws: 443 lull out) 
IfrtBa first kmkias: 3799 


Zeller-BaeMer. Switzertand, 445 puMs; 1 
Kntla Setdaaer. Germany, 329J 1 Hilary 
Lbtth. Juneau. Alaska, 384; A VrerU 
Sdneider. Swttzertand. 257; & Plortio Street. 
Sun Valley, Matin. 225; 8 PentHio VHbera. 
lemiiei iw it nnmHiiiinn miunmiT nil 
BBriana Perez. Italy. 140; 9. Barbara Merita 
Italy. 154; 18 Nathalie Bouvter. France, 145. 


CROSSWORD 


ACROSS 


1 Hairlines 
8 Neeson Ot 
“Darkman" 
to Toe woe 
44 Influence 


is Chills and fever 
te Marganne 
tr Renowned 


cabaret crooner 


GA 


CABAN JACHE 

CENEVt 


2 0 Addison's 
literary partner 

21 Marsh bird 
23 Geese 

tormailon 
34 Onetime 
Mideast into. 

28 Vacil tales 
28 Staircase 
adjunct 
sawaier — - 
rwmdinihe 
Willows" 
character) 

34 Sandler of 
'Saturday Night 
Live' 

as Designer von 
Furstenbeig 
37 Gay cny 

41 Hany Kb mol man 
Sleuth 

44 Flock of geese 

45 Singer Home 
4« Blackhearted 

47 Murphy, for one 

48 Portray as 
saanic 

si Electrical units 
55123*45-6789. 

e.fl.: Abfi7- 
5S*L'6tatc'est 
*: LOuiS XiV 

st a line night 
music 

89 More spooky 

84 Bide (stay 

a bit): Scot. 

«6 Vegas 
impressionist 
68 Epsilon (oHower 

88 1994 film " 

Lies’ 

to Magicians' 
props 

7iPanolO-E-D- 
72 Actress Lamarr. 
7j-_i_inthe. 
Dark' 


i Cancer-causing 
compounds 
2 'Thanks 1" 

3 After-shower 
wear 

4 Toothpaste 
holder 

s Phonograph 
needle 

• di-dah 

7 Lab assistant 
b Astral glows 

• Reid of 

achievement 
to Folding 

47-Acrass 

11 BasebaUerTony 

12 Extends 
subsc rip tion 

13 Poet Alfred 
16 Like 

passengers 
during takeoff 
22 Bounds 
25 Fit for a king 

27 Male flower part 

28 Captain’s 
Insignia 

28 Aleutian island 
so Local theater, to 
Variety 

31 Drink 

32 Wandered 

a* Dressed to the 



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©New York Timei/ Edited by WM Short. 


Solution to Pmsde of Doc. 12 


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Abbr. 

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51 Stun 
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SAN DIEGO, California — 
The San Francisco 49ers are 
feeling pretty good about them- 
selves right now. Having 
watched the Dallas Cowboys 
lose the day before, they then 
strolled into Jack Murphy Sta- 
dium and dispatched the San 
Diego Chargers as if this were 
an easy game of checkers. 

You’ve got black, they’ve got 
red — ana they're all kings. 

That must have been how the 
Chargers felt. They fell behind 
by 2 1-0 and then by 31-9 before 
losing by 3S-15. It was ugly and 
it was convincing, it was the 
49ers on offense for most of the 
afternoon, humming to perfec- 
tion, and the defense stout and 
penetrating. 

• Steve Young was 15 -for- 32 
for 304 yards and iwo touch- 
downs, completing all 1 1 passes 
he threw in the second half. He 
equaled another of Joe Mon- 
tana's team records with his 31 
TD passes this season, the same 
as Montana had in suike-tom 
1987. 

• Jerry Rice, who has more 
records than most people can 
count, caught 12 passes for 144 
yards. 

t8 And for good measure. 
Deion Sanders threw in an 90- 
yard interception return with 32 
seconds left, characteristically 
dancing into the end zone for 
the score. 

“We are," said Young, “at 
the top of our game." 

The 49ers had already won 
their division, the National 
Football Conference West. 
Now, with Dallas having lost to 
Cleveland, the 49ers stand 
alone atop the NFC and are a 


step closer to clinching home- 
field advantage throughout the 
conference playoffs. In fact, the 
49ers have the league's best re- 
cord. 

Thai once belonged to the 
Chargers. They lost for the sec- 
ond time in six days and, again, 
failed to clinch die American 
Conference West division 
crown. Having started the sea- 
son 6-0, they are 3-5 since and 
with this loss, and with the bru- 
tality of it, have plenty of mind 
games left to play. 

“We had an opportunity to 
close it out and clinch it. You 


NFL ROUNDUP 


start to wonder if we can do it." 
safety Stanley Richard said of 
the Chargers, who play the 6-8 
Jets in New York next week, 
then return home to face Pitts- 
burgh (1 1-3) in the season fina- 
le. “You don't want to wait un- 
til the very last game." 

■ In other games, The Associ- 
ated Press reported: 

Raiders 23, Broneos 13: In 
Los Angeles, the Raiders con- 
tinued their resurgence and en- 
hanced their playoff hopes as 
they beat Denver! which played 
without the injured John El way. 
for the fifth straight time. 

Jeff Jaeger kicked a team-re- 
cord five field goals and the 
defense did the rest: Twice the 
Broncos got a first down at. the 
Los Angeles 1, and twice had ro 
settle for a field goal. 

The Broncos were also miss- 
ing starting safety Steve 
Atwater because of a strained 
hamstring, and they lost leading 
rusher Leonard Russell in the 
second quarter because of a 
pinched nerve in the left side of 
his neck. 


Qurdinsds 17, Redskins 15: 
Arizona handed Washington its 
sixth consecutive defeat as Greg 
Davis kicked a 27-yard field 
goal on the last play of the 
game. The Redskins had taken 
a 15-14 lead with 2:54 left on 
Chip Lohmiller’s third field 
goal, a 21 -yard er. 

Henry Ellard had eight 
catches for 191 yards for the 
visiting Redskins. 

Saints 29, Falcons 20: New 
Orleans, with Jim Everett pass- 
ing for two touchdowns and 
Morten Andersen kicking five 
field goals, beat host Atlanta 
for the 13th time in their last 17 
meetings. 

Seahawks 16, Oilers 14: Vis- 
iting Seattle built a 16-0 lead as 
Chns Warren nearly ou [gained 
Houston's offense with 185 
yards on 30 carries, one a 33- 
yard TD run. The Oilers, who 
had 208 total yards, scored 
twice in the final 4:23. A second 
two-point conversion, which 
would have tied the score, failed 
when Todd McNair caught a 
pass but was tackled at the Sea- 
hawks’ I -yard line. 

■ In earlier games, reported 
in some Monday editions: 

Packers 40, Bears 3: Brett 
Favre threw three TD passes 
and Chris Jacke lacked four 
field goals in frigid conditions. 
Sterling Sharpe had two of the 
TD catches as the Packers 
snapped a three-game losing 
string. 

Steders 14, Eagles 3: Host 
Pitisbui]gh struck for all their 
points in 1:48 of the fourth 
quarter to win their sixth in a 
row while handing Philadelphia 
its fifth consecutive defeat. 

Andre Hastings scored his 
first NFL touchdown and John 


L. Williams, taking over as the 
main back with Barry Foster 
and Rain Morris injured, scored 
from the 3. Williams’ TD was 
set up by Darren Foster's inter-, 
ceptiou. 

Randall Cunningham fin- 
ished 9-for-27 for a career-low-- 


59 yards as the Eagles gained 
105 yards in all 


105 yards in all. 

Vikings 21, Bffls 17: BuffaloV 
AFC reign came to the edge qlV 
extinction as Cris Carter caughr 
nine passes for 111 yards to ^ 
move within a catch of Sterling^ 
Sharpe's single-season NFL re; .; 
cord of 112, and Fuad Revriz^ 
kicked five field goals. ’ ~ 

The Bills* Jim Kelly had liga^ 
meats sprained in his left knee, 
late in the gam e when hit b$- 
Henry Thomas. _ 

Buccaneers 24, Rams 14ti 
Tampa got its first three-gameL> 
winning streak since 19S2 as? 
Craig Erickson threw for 231 
yards, 176 to Charles Wilson On? 
just four catches. Enicl Rheft 
ran for 1 19 yards and a TD. 

Both the host Bucs and the: 
Rams <4-10) were eliminated' 
from playoff consideration. 


Patriots 28, Colts 13: Tw ti 
weeks after limiting Marshall 
Faulk to 48 yards, host New 
England held the AFCs No. 3 
rusher to 50 yards on 17 carries 
as an improving defense al- 
lowed fewer than 300 yards fpr. 
the fourth straight wedt. ■ !_' 

Giants 27, Bengals 20: New 
York won its fourth straight as' 
Rodney Hampton scored on a 


3-yard run with 40 seconds left.’ 
The Giants went 66 yards to. 


The Giants went 66 yards to. 
score, aided greatly by a ques- 
tionable pass interference call' 
on Corey Sawyer. 


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Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 13, 1994 


Es 


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me 


W ASHINGTON — When 
Newt Gingrich an- 
nounced that his solution to 
welfare was to put children of 
teenage mothers in orphanages, 
my phone started ringing off 
the hook- It seems that every 
editor and television producer 
shouted at the same time, “Get 
me an orphan.” 

I recently wrote my memoirs 
describing my days at the He- 
brew Orphan 
Asylum in 
New York, so 
people as- 
sumed that I 
was a house or- 
phanage ex- 
pert. 

i was placed 
in the borne 
because my 
mother was ill 
and my father Budiwa,d 
could not take care of me and 
my three sisters. Technically, 
we weren't oiphans and we 
didn't spend a Jot of our child- 
hood at the institution- We were 
sent to a series of foster homes, 
which was a different can of 
worms from doing time in that 
ugly red brick building on the 

m. 

But I wasn’t going to miss my 
chance to brag about what it 
was like to be an orphan — as 
long as The New York Tunes, 
Newsweek, “Nightline” and 
"Entertainment Tonight” t 
me to bear witness. 


The first reporter asked, 
“Was it terribleT 



I replied, “Go to Blockbuster 
and rent “Boys Town' with 
Mickey Rooney and Spencer 
Tracy. 

“Is that what it was like for 
you?” 

“No, it wasn't but Newt 
Gingrich thinks it was, and it’s 
his welfare bin.” 

"What did you do in the or- 
phanage?” a second reporter 
asked. 

“I was 5 and a half, so I 
stared out the window a lot” 

“What for?” 

“1 was hoping that my father 
would come back and take me 
home." 

“Did you blame your father 
for putting you there in the first 
place?" 

“No. When you’re a kid and 
something bad happens in your 
family, you blame yourself. I 
was sure that I had done some- 
thing wrong or 1 wouldn't be 
there. I think that Gingrich can 
expect kids to cany a lot of guilt 
once he locks them up in the 
dram” 

□ 


asked 


China Finds Stolen Artifacts 

Raaen 


BEIJING — Five and a half 
months after they were stolen, 
42 artifacts from northeast Chi- 
na's Shenyang museum were re- 
covered by the police and re- 
turned to their home, the 
overseas edition of the People’s 
Daily said Monday. The relics, 
stolen June 26, were recovered 
Thursday as the police investi- 
gated a counterfeiting case, the 
newspaper said. 


A third reporter said, “Do 
you think that children are re- 
sponsible for the fact that their 
mothers can't get off welfare?” 

“If the Republicans say they 
are, who am I to argue the 
point? After all, the GOP won 
the ejection, so now the welfare 
kids are their responsibility and 
they can stick them wherever 
they want to.” 

“Do you remember anything 
good about your orphanage 
days?” 

“Well, we didn’t have to bang 
around with a lot of snotty kids 
like Mickey Rooney. And we 
didn't have to take any gaff 
from Father Flanagan, either.” 

“What would be wrong with 
that?" 

“We were in a Jewish or- 
phanage, and we lost all our 
dessert privileges if we took or- 
ders from a Catholic priest” 


A Second Excavation for the Schliemann Treasure 

lava- and dug right through it 
■3? said While at the end of htf hfe - : 


By Steven Erlanger 

Yew York Tblta Serna 

M OSCOW — Ever since the end of Worid 
War U, a single curator at the Pushkin 
Museum of Fine Arts had a special and entirely 
secret task: to monitor and maintain the artistic 
and archaeological bounty known as Priam’s 
Treasure, which had been looted from Nazi 


Germany by the Red Army. 

“ mcc. The Soviet govem- 


Offidally, all was silence. 1 
meat denied any knowledge of the 4400-year- 
old treasure, which had been unearthed on the 
rite of ancient Troy between 1873 and 1890 by 
the German amateur archaeologist, merchant 
and showman Heinrich Schliemann, whose 
finds astonished the world. 

The treasures are actually a thousand years 
older than Homer’s King Priam of Troy, who 
died about 1200 B. G They are a stunning 
collection of gold and silver diadems, bracelets, 
earrings, pendants, rings, plates, goblets, but- 
tons, cups and perfume jars, which display the 
extraordinary artistry, technology and trading 
relationships of an ancient world. 

There are 260 individually catalogued items 
at the Pushkin, but some pieces, like necklaces, 
have up to 200 beads of varying types. Count- 
ing every bead, there are believed to be some 
12,000 individual pieces from the 17 separate 
dig ?; SnhUemann made at ancient Troy. Thir- 
teen of those caches are at the Pushkin, with the 
rest scattered among some 45 other museums 
around the worid. 

But until little more than a year ago, even the 
new Russia would not admit that the vast bulk 
of the Schliemann treasure was here. At the 
Pushkin Museum itself, according to Vladimir 
P. Tolstikov, director of the department of art 
and archaeology of the ancient world, only he, 
the museum director and the old curator knew 
that the treasure was in Moscow. He and the 
old nwn never spoke aboat it, even to each 
other, Tolstikov says, and he still refuses to 
reveal the curator’s name. 

“We needn't speak it now,” he said. “But he 
should be thanked by our government and the 
world for preserving it so we£L” 

And when Irina A. Antonova, the director of 
the Pushkin since 1961, would inquire of the 
higher-ops in the Communist Party’s Culture 
Ministry about the possibility of revealing the 
treasure, the answer would always come down, 
bluntly: “It’s none of your business. Your task 
is to keep them and that’s all.” 

Antonova has been criticized for her silence, 
especially since 1991, when an article in Art 
News suggested that the treasure was in the 
Soviet Union. 

“But no one could say a word against those 
orders,” Tolstikov said “Her career would 



never admit 


ted it in his writing- 

Coonter to the popular 
erythjrig in the coBecthn is gold or silver, there 
SvSSe bronze dish and even an artifact oF: 
^US*TWster<a»d w “ more rateable at 

'vay tacky to be able to see these : 

mar? exciting and valuable than a gold <S* -i 

df ‘T'reasure A,” known as Priam’s, cansistacf:. 
101 objects, and all of than are here, ; 

Sophia Schlietnaxm’s famous diadem. But most 
impressive to Twister are four axes : of wefc^. 
polished stone. One, made 
damaged in antiquity; the other three are p , 
perfcctcondition and are believed to be tiifcCy' 
used, as if kept in storage. . 

“What amazed me were the axes, he said.-A.-J 
“The condition of the stone, the way they were 
tnacJft It was a great pleasure to hold than, tom 
them and understand them. When you com- 
bine that with the place they were found —yes, 
it’s sometimes possible to hear the Greek trmni 


pets. 


Ono Poiif farTbc Ncr Yort Tfcna 

VladSmir Tobtflcov, left, and MikhaO Treister, will prepare 1996 exhibition in Moscow. 


The collection includes other sem imannf ac- - 
tured items, among them lenses of rock crystal 
polished well enough to be used as magnif ying . 


have been at an end, and we would have had a 
worse director. Before people accuse her, they 
should remember what kind of country this was 
in the 1950s, ’60s and ’70s.” 

Now the order has come down from a differ- 
ent culture minister, Yevgeni Sidorov, to show 
at least some of the treasures. He has approved 
a public exhibition of the Schliemann trove for 
early 1996, with a new catalogue that takes 
advantage of contemporary testing methods. 

Even Tolstikov, who bad known since 1977 
of the collection's safekeeping in the Pushkin, 
saw the objects for the first time only in April 
The German Embassy here estimates thax 
between 30,000 and 100,000 stolen works of art 
are still in Russian bands; the Russians say the 
Germans, in turn, stole many thousands of 
artifacts during their 5 * *•— =— 

Union. 

Among these treasures are 12th- to 14th 


negotiations. Bui even the conversations repre- 
sent enormous progress. 

It was only three years ago that the Soviet 
Culture Minis try admitted to having any secret 
depositories of stolen art. And only in August 
1993 did Russia admit to having Schliemann’ s 
treasure. 

Tolstikov and Mikhail Y. Treister, the cura- 
tor in his department, discussed the collection 
the other day in a cluttered office at the Push- 
kin, surrounded by bits of pottery and other 
findings from another dig going on in Crimea, 
in Ukraine. But the Schliemann treasures are 
still locked away until the exhibition, to be 
shown only to experts. 

Despite Schliemann's my thmakin g, the trea- 



century icons, many of which have been dis- 
persed into private collections, some of which 
are in the United States, and for that reason are 
hard to trace 

Bonn wants a mass exchange of works; the 
Russian Culture Ministry talks of case-by-case 


which was 1400 to 1200 B. C. 


Schli emann said he found Troy by using the 
Iliad, and for one famous photograph he 
dressed his wife. Sophia, in a diadem that he 
claimed had been worn by Helen of Troy. 
“Schliemann actually missed the Homeric 


to produce some of the aston ishing ly fine, dd- - 
tailing and granulations cm the earrings and • 
other jewelry. _ • • S* 

In addition to the lapis lazuli, which would j_ 
have come from Afghanistan, be said, there are 
two amber beads, almost surely from the Baltic 
Sea. “Imagine the reale of international. trading 
relations m the . third millennium B. CL,” the?-] 
said. “From Af ghanistan to the Baltic -—iVsm- 
e xamp le of the kind of hypothesis we ean- 
already draw from our preliminary woik.” 

Here Tolstikov broke in. “It shows you why- 
Troy was worth the battle later,” he said. L ; 

If s still worth the battle. While the value of : • 
the treasures is indisputable, there’s ccmsderaL 
bly more dispute about their ownership: 

“Many journalists call it theft,” said Totsti-’{ 
kov, “but it's reparation for damag e inflicted : 
on our country m World War IL In any case, - 
we can speak only of the exchange of valuables, . . 
not their restitution.” - 

It was Schliemann who gave the find to. . 
Germany, and it was boused in the Ethno- 
graphical Museum in Berlin, later called the 
Museum of Early and Pre-History. During the 
war, the treasures were crated and stored near— 
the Berlin Zoo in a bunker, which was liberat- 
ed, along with its contents, by the Red Army, .i 


WEATHER 


PEOPLE 


Europe 


Forecast for Wednesday through Friday, as provided by Accu-Weather. Asia 



Today 


Tomorrow 


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North America 

Seasonably cold wsethorinl 
occur Wednesday through 
Friday from Boston to Wash- 
ington. D.C.. with tranquil 
weather at liret. then a 
chance oi snow or rain Fri- 
day. Chicago and Detroit wffl 
also have seasonable 
weather, though than could 
be snow and ice Thursday 
Into Friday. 


Europe 

London and Paris will bo 
cool Wednesday despite 
sunshine, then will lum 
mflder Thursday and Friday. 
Gusty winds and showers 
nil lash Glasgow tale in the 
week. Tranquil, sunny 
weather (s expected 
Wednesday through Friday 
in Madrid and Usbon. 


Asia 

The oddest weather so tor 
this season will move Into 
Seoul Wednesday into 
Thursday, accompanied by 
gusty winds. The cold wN be 
accompanied by heavy snow 
squab In Sapporo. Rather 
arid weathar wffl also move 
Into Tokyo Thureday and Fri- 
day. Hong Kong am be sea- 
sonable. 


Asia 


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Middle East 


Latin America 


Today 
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CJWTO 17*2 liras a 

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TOKYO SUCCESS — TThTrin^ 
Diana Ross acknowledging her Japa- 
nese fans after a Tokyo concert 


T HE Los Angeles Him Critics Associa- 
tion chose Quentin Tarantino's darkly 
funny crime saga “Pulp Fiction" as 1994’s 
best picture. Tarantino also was honored 
for his direction and screenplay and John 
Travolta was named best actor for his role 
as the drug-addicted thug. Jessica Lange 
was named best actress for her perfor- 
mance as an emotionally troubled woman 
in “Blue Sky." Disney’s box-office hit 
“The Lion King” was crowned best ani- 
mated film. : . : Joan Chen won the best 
actress award at the Golden Horse Film 
Festival in Taipei for her performance in 
“Red Rose, White Rose." the Taiwanese 
director Tsai Ming-Bang's “Vive L’amour" 
won best film and best director awards 
while Tony Leung was named best actor in 
“Chungking Express.” The Golden Horse 
awards are the equivalent of the Academy 
Awards for C3unese-lasguage films out- 
side mainland China. 

□ 

Demi Moore, 32, says it's not her fault 
that men think she’s sexy, according to 
Entertainment Weekly. Then she laughed, 
hiked up her skirt and parted her knees, 
saying, “If I sit here like this I have to take 
a tittle bit of responsibility'.” 


A 1956 Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud that 
mice belonged to Bkte Darvis was sold at 
auction to an unidentified bidder for 
5500,000. The car also was owned by M&e 
Todd during his marriage in the late 1950$ .. 
to EBzabeth Taylor, and then by the actress | 
Diana Rtgg. 

' d - • ' 

The movie “Junior,” in which. AraeJd 
Schwarzenegger, improbably, . playy . a , 
pregnant man, has spawned iawwatS-The - 
German author Bend Spaeth says some ' 
scenes could have come from his 1981 • 
novel “Seitenstechen," and he wants the 
movie banned in Germany unless Uniyer- • 
sal, the distributor, acknowledges his in tel- : 
lectual property. 




Katharine Hepburn, 87, told Swoooe 


Kurtz, who plays Hepburn’s niece in the 
“One Christmas;’' 


TV movie “One Christmas,” that she has 
done her last day of acting, according to an 1 
article in TV Guide magazine. Hepburn 
also offered this advice: “If you’re given a 
choice between money and sex appeal -— 
take the money. As you get older, the 
money will become your sex appeal.” 







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123 

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8014111 

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00-022-0111 

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0500-69-0011 

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800-121 

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8-800-99- 0123 


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