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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


Paris, Wednesday, December 14, 1994 


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Chechnya Rebels Face 
‘War Without Limits’ 

Fighting Intensifies as Russian Forces 
Near the Breakaway Enclave’s Capital- 


By Lee Hockstader 

Washington Past Serucv 

SLIPTSOVSKAYA CROSSROADS. 
Russia — In the three years since commu- 
nism s collapse, Russia has stepped into a 
number of wars on its periphery — some 

r ck and brutal, as in Moldova, others 
wn-out and tangled, as in Tajikistan. 
All have been small conflicts of relatively 
low intensity, until this week. 

_ Russia’s thrust into the breakaway re- 
gion of Chechnya is a wholly different kind 
of war. Here, the full fury of one of the 
world’s mightiest armies is bearing down 
from three sides on a tiny, land-locked 
enclave. 

It is a frightening spectacle. A visit Tues- 
day to areas near the fighting on Chech- 
nya’s western front made it clear that Mos- 
cow was pulling no punches in ending the 
rebel region's three-year -oid claim to inde- 
pendence. 

As assault helicopters raced low over- 
head to avoid ground fire, long columns of 
light tanks, artillery pieces and armored 
personnel carriers rumbled toward the 
Chechen bonier, about 10 kilometers (six 
miles) away. Many of the Russian troops 
wore ski masks over their faces against the 
cold. 

“It's a disaster,” said Musa Aushov, 30, 
a factory worker who fled the Chechen 
capital, Grozny. “This is war without lim- 
its.” 


For now, the Russian strategy is appar- 
ently to lock Grozny in a stranglehold and 
force the Chechens to negotiate under the 
barrel of a gun. The Chechens, for all their 
bravado and defiance, are unlikely (0 be 
able to hold out for long against a full- 
scale Russian assault on the city of 
400.000. 

While the Russians are capable of 
storming Grozny, they may not be able to 
do so without inflicting huge casualties, 
including civilian deaths and injuries. That 
would have a perhaps unbearably high cost 
at home, where it would enrage Russians 
across the political spectrum and inflame 
the already hostile, unsettled Caucasus re- 
gion. 

Abroad, a bloodbath in Chechnya 
would likely do severe damage to Mos- 
cow's image, despite public statements 
from Western leaders that Chechnya is 
Russia’s internal affair- 

On Tuesday, war planes streaked high in 
the air on their way to Grozny against a 
backdrop of jagged mountains. Fires were 
seen burning on hillsides that had been hit 
by artillery or rocket rounds. 

From the front came the sound of enor- 
mous explosions and the crackle of small 
arms fire, as well as reports that the Rus- 
sians were steadily pushing their way 
through Chechen defenses in heavy fight- 
ing. Helicopters bearing wounded Russian 

See RUSSIA, Page 8 



Scan Rj 

Chechen fighters hiding under a bridge Tuesday near Grozny to avoid sbeRmg by advancing Russian troops. 


Castro, ‘Last Rebel,’ Warms to New Rapport With Washington 


By Tim Golden and Larry Rohter 

New York Times Service 

HAVANA —The Summit of the Americas bad just 
ended in Miami, and President Bill Clinton and his 
counterparts from 33 other countries were heading 
triumphantly home. At a long table in the Palace of 
the Revolution in Havana, the man not invited, Fidel 
Castro, argued that Cuba's exclusion had been their 
‘.joss, not ms. 

“If the summit of Miami was a great show, it would 
have been a better show if I had been there,” he said, 
grinning through the beard. 

“We are the iast rebels.” he said of his Communist 
government “That was no meeting for rebels." 


Three weeks before the Cuban revolution is to 
celebrate its 36th anniversary, Mr. Castro, 68, was 
looking a little older and perhaps feeling a little more 
isolated than he was willing to lei on. But if that 
worried him, he was making an accomplished effort 
not to let it show. 

Yes, he acknowledged during a four-hour dinner 
conversation in Spanish with representatives of The 
New York Times, he has real reservations about the 
market-oriented reforms his government has under- 
taken to save an economy devastated by the collapse 
of the Soviet bloc. It pained him to sign some of those 
contracts for joint ventures with foreign companies. 

But if he is not willing to turn Cuba into a Western- 


style democracy, he said, he recognizes that the world 
economy has changed. “I am not a great fan of 
capitalism,” he said. “But I am a realist. 

To bear him tell it, Mr. Castro was more worried 
about BQl Clinton. 

How is it that American voters have shown so little 
mercy toward their president last month, he wanted to 
know early in the conversation; the young Democrat 
had seemed to have such an attractive social agenda as 
a candidate. Now, so quickly, the Republicans and 
their traditional antagonism toward Cuba seem to be 
back, and strong. 

Mr. Castro skipped past the /act that even* as 'a 
candidate, Mr. Clinton ardently supported a tighten- 


ing of the longstanding embargo against Cuba. Nor 
did he say much about the further sanctions that Mr. 
Clinton imposed in angry reprisal for the flood of 
more than 30.000 refugees whom Mr. Castro let go 
after political tension rose here this summer. 

“The Chinese wanted Bush to win,” he recalled. 
“The Russians wanted Bush to win. The Mexicans 
wanted Bush to win.” Cuba's political isolation, Mr. 
Castro suggested, goes so far as to include rooting for 
Mr. Clinton. 

“We hope that he will be successful,” he said. 

What counsel Mr. Castro might have taken on this 
subject was. probably present in the cavernous dining 

See CASTRO, Page 8 



Exports and Jobs Keep America on a Roll 




By Peter Passell 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — The U.S. economic 
recovery just keeps on going and going. In 
spite of tax increases, sharp rises in interest 
rates and widespread skepticism that 
Washington will be able to put its Fiscal 
house in order, rapid growth continues 
unabated. Unemployment has dropped to 
its lowest level in four years. 

Indeed, as the Federal Reserve chair- 
man told Congress, “there is very little 
evidence throughout this economy of any 
degree of slowdown.” 

The chairman, Alan Greenspan, who 
only a little more than a year ago was 
complaining of powerful forces holding 
back the economy, added last week that 
“the 5 O-mil e-an -hour headwinds have dis- 
appeared’’ and that the real worry now is 
inflation. 


What is powering this juggernaut? Why 
were most forecasters, who as recently as 
this summer werepredicting a much leaner 
expansion and higher unemployment, so 
far off target? Most important, can tbe 
good times last? 

Two explanations for the unexpected 
boom stand out. 

For one, many consumers — who as 
recently as last year were mostly worried 
about keeping their jobs — are spending 
with abandon. Now, with about three mil- 
lion jobs added to the economy this year, 
some of the anxiety about employment 
prospects has eased. 

And disposable income, after falling for 

ing to turn up. T^e result? “Big-ticket 
buying has blown through every bench- 
mark,” said Stephen S. Roach, an econo- 
mist at Morgan Stanley. 


Even more important, America's trad- 
ing partners are coming out of their own 
recessions, and the surprisingly weak U.S. 
dollar has made American goods an irre- 
sistible bargain on world markets. 

“Exports explain the difference between 
an O JC recovery and a blockbuster ” said 
Robert Melknan, an economist at Morgan 
Guaranty Trust 

As recently as this summer, most fore- 
casters were predicting that unemploy- 
ment would bottom out at 6 percent in the 
fall and economic growth would slip below 
2 percent in the last quarter of 1994. In- 
stead, unemployment is down to 5.6 per- 
cent and fourth-quarter growth is now ex- 
pected to exceed 4 percent. 

But can the good times keep rolling on? 
Tbe forecasters’ coin has been debased in 
the last year. Nonetheless, predictions of a 

See RECOVERY, Page 8 


U.S. Warns Europe: Ease Computer Tariffs 


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DEATH IN NORWAY — Erik Jarve, who was rfismissed Monday as 
director of the Oslo Stock Exchange after allegations of fmarKirf nnpro- 
pneties, was found drowned Tuesday, in an apparent suicide. Page 13. 


By Tom Buerkle 

International Herald Tribune 

BRUSSELS — In a sign that trade ten- 
sions are going high-tech, tbe United 
States threatened to slap duties on $3 bfl- 
Hon worth of European exports on Tues- 
day unless Europe eased tariffs on Ameri- 
can semiconductors, computer parts and 
other items. 

The threat, made in a letter from Trade 
Representative Mickey Kamor to the Eu- 
ropean Union’s trade commissioner. Sir 
Leon Brittao, met with a chilly response in 
Brussels. One EU official criticized Mr. 
Kan tor as “a bit heavy-handed” and said 
that although the Union was willing to 
offer tariff relief, it would not necessarily 
come in areas demanded by Washington. 

“A little quiet diplomacy would serve 
U.S. interests better,” tbe official said. 


The dispute stems from the need of 
Sweden. Finland and Austria, all relatively 
free traders, to adopt EU tariff levels when 
they enter the bloc on Jan. 1. That wOl 
mean a big jump an semiconductors and 
computer parts. Austria and Finland let 
those goods in duty-free, and Sweden im- 
poses tariffs of 23 percent and 3.4 percent, 
respectively. But the Union imposes tariffs 
of up to 14 percent on dtip imports and 4.4 
percent on computer parts. 

Such a shift would threaten big business 
on both sides. Companies like Intel, Texas 
Instruments and Motorola export more 
than SI billion worth of chips, parts and 
other electro n ic goods to Sweden, Finland 
and Austria. The adoption of EU rules 
would impose new tariffs of more than 
$100 million. 

Those items, in turn, are vital compo- 
nents in somc of the three countries’ most 


modem and competitive exports, includ- 
ing cellular telephones and personal com- 
puters made by Finland’s Nokia and Swe- 
den’s Ericsson. 

Per Akerberg, head of EU affairs for 
Ericsson in Brussels, said higher tariffs 
would raise costs or delay the introduction 
of new products using the latest chip tech- 
nology, both bad for Ericsson's competi- 
tiveness. 

“If they raise tariffs on Jan. 1 without 
negotiating with us, they will be doing so 
completely outside of the GATT," the 
world trade regulatory body, a U.S. trade 
official said. Rules under the General 
Agreement on Tariffs and Trade would 
allow Washington to raise “substantially 
equivalent” tariffs, he said, a threat that 

See CHIPS, Page 8 


Philippines All Abuzz as Aquino Daughter Trumpets Her Love Child 


BY William Branigin 

Washington PatiSavKf 

MANILA — Young actress meets older 

actor on movie ^ Spate fly ttajnglo*® 
scenes. Hormones rage. Romance btooms. 

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NewsstondPricfeS ___ 

Andorra.....9.oo FF Luxembourg 60L.Fr 

► VntniPB 11 20 FF Morocco 12 pn 

' SiaSa Qatar 8.D0 Rials 

Wunion 11J0FF 

el™** 9 DOFF Saudi Arabia ..9.00 R. 

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shelL announces pregnancy on national 
television. 

Complication: He not only is more than 
20 years her senior but is still married with 
three children by estranged wife. What's 
more, he is known as a serial philanderer 
and has at least one other child by a long- 
time Eve-in partner. 

This scenario would hardly raise an eye- 
brow in Hollywood. But this is the Philip- 
pines, the only Roman Catholic count™ m 
Asia, and the actress in question is Kris 
Aquino, the youngest of former President 
Corazon G Aquino’s five children. 

Thus, the revelation by Miss Aquino, 23, 
that she is three months pregnant by Phil- 
lip Salvador, 45, scandalized Filipinos and 
presented the forma - president, a devout 
Catholic, with a moral dilemma. Thanks in 


Urge pan to the power of the church, 
divorce is banned here, and legal annul- 
ments of marriages can be time-consum- 
ing. 

For the Philippines, the prospect of an 
unwed mother in the former first family is 
especially awkward at a time when tbe na- 
tion is preparing for a visit next month by 
Pope John Paul n. 

It is also ironic. During her turbulent 
presidency, from 1986 to 1992, Mrs. 
Aquino followed the church’s dictates 
against birth control and gutted tbe coun- 
ties family-planning program. 

Since leaving office, she has sided with 
Cardinal Jaime Sin, the Philippines' Ro- 
man CathoEc primate, in his dispute over 
birth control with the government of her 
chosen successor. President Fidel V. Ra- 


mos. In August. Mrs. Aquino appeared 
with Cardinal Sin at a large rally to pro test 
a United Nations population conference in 
Cairo and denounce the Ramos govern- 
ment’s famflwplanning method* as “in- 
trinsically evxL A ' . 

She even joined the cardinal in publicly 
burning a repKca of the Cairo conference’s 
draft program of action. 

Her daughter announced on a television 
talk show Monday night that she and Mr. 
Salvador were living together — over her 
mother’s strenuous objections — and that 
she was due to give birth in June. She said 
she would fly to the United States with the 
actor next week and return to ManOa in 
January. 

The disclosure prompted a spokeswom- 
an for the former president to confirm a 


rift between the two Aquinos. Miss 
Aquino moved out of the family home 
more than a month ago and has not been 
on speaking terms with her mother since 
then, said the spokeswoman, Deedee Siy- 


Mrs. Aquino, she said, “believes in the 
sanctity of marriage.” Miss Siytangco ac- 
knowledged "a falling out” between moth- 
er and daughter and said that the two had 
had “no communication” since Miss 
Aquino moved out 

T- e couple’s travel plans sparked specu- 
lation that Mr. Salvador planned to di- 
vorce his wife in the United States and tie 
the knot with Miss Aquino. But such a 
divorce and remarriage would not be legal- 
ly recognized in the Philippines, since an- 

See MANILA, Page 8 


<? 


No. 34.771 


Italy’s Crisis 
Deepens as 
Berlusconi 
Faces Judges 

He's Questioned 7 Hours 
On Bribery Allegations ; 
Coalition Is Weakening 

By Alan Cowell 

New York Time* Service 

ROME — With their land awash in 
crisis, Italians confronted their latest dra- 
ma Tuesday as Prime Minister Silvio Ber- 
lusconi spent more than seven hours under 
interrogation by magistrates who suspect 
him of corruption. 

Mr. Berlusconi was questioned in Milan 
about whether he knew of money paid to 
tite tax police by executives of his huge and 
indebted Fininvesi empire on three occa- 
sions between 1989 and 1991, before he 
entered politics. The length of the interro- 
gation suggested that magistrates were 
pressing the prime minister to confront 
and explain what they say is evidence of 
sufficient gravity to warrant their suspi- 
cions. 

In a statement issued by his office to 
news agencies after the interview, Mr. Ber- 
lusconi said the investigation “is based, 
incredibly, on a theory devoid of any firm 
evidence." 

“There are no witnesses,” the statement 
said, “nor any other valid items of docu- 
mentary proof.” It called the allegations 
“totally arbitrary deductions." 

Mr. Berlusconi added that he “firmly 
intended not to give up the task" of gov- 
erning Italy. 

He earlier protested his innocence in a 
front-page letter published in II Sole-24 
Ore that took a swipe at the growing ranks 
of his enemies, including the big-business 
elite that he left for politics last January. 

“I am going to be questioned with my 
head held high and certain to the core that 
I’m right," the letter declared in what 
seemed a further sortie in the prime minis- 
ter’s unfolding battle for political survival 
“I have never corrupted anybody, never 
and not in any way,” the letter said, echo- 
ing previous statements in which Mr. Ber- 
lusconi has sworn his innocence on the 
heads of his children. But- the very specta- 
cle of a prime minister under interrogation 
seemed certain to fuel calls from both the 
opposition and members of his own coali- 
tion for fat's exit from office. 

Since Italy’s best-known anti-graft in- 
vestigator, Antonio Pi Pietro, resigned last 
week, Mr. Berlusconi's woes have expand- 
ed. 

His two principal coalition partners — 
the Northern League and the once-loyaJ 
National Alliance — are predicting a gov- 
ernment crisis within weeks. Economic re- 
form programs have slipped badly, and Lbe 
country’s currency and bond markets are 
under fierce attack by traders sensing a 
government collapse. 

Deepening a sense of crisis within the 
judiciary, one of the country’s most senior 
appeals court judges, Antaldo Valente, 
quit Monday to protest accusations by 
newspapers and politicians that he favored 
Mr. Berlusconi m his handling of a key 
corruption case. 

Magistrates in Milan and Palermo, 
moreover, are in open revolt against what 
they call political interference by the jus- 
tice minister, Alfredo Biondl who has sent 
inspectors to scour their offices for evi- 
dence of improprieties in their crusades 
against corruption and the Mafia. 

Even the Pope has urged a return to the 
Roman Catho tic-dominated politics of the 
postwar era, when the Christian Demo- 
crats ruled supreme. 

And Mr. Berlusconi's exchanges with 
his adversaries are becoming ever more 
acerbic. When he called Italy’s political 
theater a farce, the Northern League lead- 
er, Umberto Bossi, shot back that if it was 

See ITALY, Page 8 

Kiosk 

Franc Stumbles 
Over Politics 

The French franc fell Tuesday to its 
lowest point against the Deutsche 
mark since Dec. 2, 1993, after Jacques 
Delors, president of the European 
Commission, said Sunday that he 
would not run for president of France. 

Mr. Delors is a champion of closer 
European union. 

“Delors was seen as the /raw fort’s 
best ally,” said Tim Fix, a currency 
analyst with Credit Suisse in London. 
The strong franc policy involved peg- 
ging the franc to the mark and shad- 
owing Germany’s interest rates. 

Traders in Paris said there was no 
sign of intervention on Tuesday by the 
Bank of France. (Page 1 1) 


Book Review 


1 SB 1 Pi 

Si feSsJ 1 

pie Dollar 

MftnrYoHt. Tub*, does 

DM 1.5729 

Pound 1 J6~ 

Yw ~ 1QQ-285 

PF " 5418 


Page 10. 


Up 

0 . 02 % 

110.33 


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ENTER IVAnuiNAJL nun***' 

- A Milium Refugee* Later, Zairian City Gets Its Breath lia^k 

i . ... hrv Zairian soldiers, tbe police^ cor- »$*"**■ 


By Donatella Lorch 

New York Tima Sente* 
GOMA, Zaire — A decade ago. 


lariv looted by Zairian soldiers, tbe poU 
S 3 £d the atmosphere tense bemuse 

! U “ .t.. ikMffMm nn ,tfi AUtSitirtS. 


s not do any 1 1 ne — t „ increase in 

V^fSi Zairian soldiers at 


WORLD BRIEFS 1 H 

TOKYO (AF) — Tbepdbwfo^^ ^ explosion aboarda 

odv 5 a Japanese ^^^icatine a plastic. grenade_^d 


wmmm ^ssgg& ess*® 

^gg&si iSSgpii 

exportation of veg^bl^ **“■ wSTzairians, other Africans and European company. Houses have deeme^ more jmgtfy and enme now, 

geld and stolen cars. , j Ahnut 200 000 Brians now live in the More than 100 money changers pair chairs. tk*» influx of refugees, huge amounts of dol- 

But life changed radically in July as ®ot® than tivatin? beans rutted street, the women sitting, on tom™ 1 * ^ it 

a !ffi£lS£.« 5 «-i «?X 3 f,E SaS 2 SSf**!! *9^^ t SSSS^jSS l S. toe been hurt as 


nave causw ~ — ■ — . . ... , . 

jacket under the «ctims»a^^| di officials in charged . 

also bore gunpowtotrac^^^ ava fobletocommraton 


the investigation were noi u * u *^ 
the «P OT H*fiffcXv the airli] 


« -tswss ■ 

that mechanical trouble was no^, „ oassengfiars were_mjurcd 


ISSSSfiSSS fess SSSSSSE s 3 ss 3 s 


1 loot And the governor 
refugee agency for some 
ing it hands out to refu- 
s/He needed it for his 


EsgSgSagfea-^ 

Israel Pushes Hard 
To Secure Jerusalem 

Neighborhoods Are Expanded 
In Advance of Talks With PLO 

1 J mb Ku nrivilte devd- 


By Caryle Murphy 

WasAiagton Post Serricc 

JERUSALEM — Driving 
hard to secure its hold on all of 
Jerusalem, Israel is expanding 
Jewish neighborhoods and 
blocking Arab construction 
within the city itself and m a 


are being done by private (tevel- 
opers, not the state, and are 
being carried out in areas ex- 
empt from the 1992 agreement 
But Pales tinians have noted 
that Jewish settlements else- 
where in the West Bank are 
cited as one reason the Israeli 
government is having second 



within the city itself and m a governmen t is having second 
swath of surrounding West ° h h tit about withdrawing its 
Bank territory that Israeli offi- <vo m West Bank towns 


— o IDOUKQU awui a - 

Bank territory that Israeli offi- tro ^ from West Bank towns 
rials refer to as “Greater Jem- schedule it agreed to m 

salem.” - the accord with the PLO^ 

The effort, part of Israeli pol- -j ^ a dark future, said 
icy since the eastern portion of j^alil Tuf akji, a Palestinian ge- 
the city was captured from Jor- oeraober “We have no land to 
Hun in 1967 and united with the build. We have no land to do 
western sector, has taken on nT , yth ', n g The Israelis are creat- 
added urgency for Israel since it .-j f ^ on the ground so that 
signed a peace agreement win ^ orr0W< wh cn it comes to tie- 

.« 1 — T Slwratinn I ifPB- _ .+ r —211 m«m1 r 



aiguiAi » — o — * 

the Palestine Liberation Orga- 
nization in September 1993. 

That histone accord, which 
gave Yasser Arafat’s PLO limit- 
ed autonomy in the Gaza Strip 
and the West Bank town of Jeri- 
cho, also mandated Israeli-PLO 
negotiations on the final status 
of Jerusalem in 1996. 

Prime Minister Yitzhak Ra- 
bin, since taking over in Jmy 
1992, has pulled back from his 
predecessor's huge program of 
building state-funded Jewish 
settlements in the West Bank- 
But he is continuing a 1993 
master plan that envisions 
17,000 new units of Jewish 
housing in and around Jerusa- 
lem by 1997, according to a 
government official who asked 
not to be named. 


111 K UU#W V** D" 

tomorrow, when it comes to ne- 
gotiations, these facts will speak 
for themselves." . . 

Fawzi Kiswani, a Palestinian, 
watched the process at work 
one sunny morning in August, 
when bulldozers and Israeli po- 
lice arrived at his home in 
southeast Jerusalem. Two horns 
later, the house where two of his 
nine children were born lay in 
smithereens. 

Mr. Kiswani, a hotel kitchen 
steward, had built his home 
without a license — something 
that is rarely granted to Pales- 
tinians despite their urgent 
need for housing. Yet, across 
the valley and in view of the 
rubble of Mr. Kiswani’s home. 


Islamic Stales Codify Battle on Militants 

“This is a remarkable step," a M^itonSOO mrira ^^t^dfor^mnmg. 

c .^ b _ l “ -sa slfitit ss.ss,cs 


SSSnSfc™ boatd, V 

Filin? nos Denounce Terror Group 

SLa. 

g“-S3S5£»«»'- 

kidnappings. w„ e iim and Roman Catholic church. . 

"* Ab0 ** V:' 

tag 20.000 to 50,000 ^dtaiplflmpiotmLirid 

watch around the town square. 

China Jails 6 in Fatal Factory Fire 

HONG ,«» 

A Sort in and . - 

years, and la Tianztoo, forlOyea^ kaied 87 workers 

5tor^SK5si’S5"B-a. p<»t ^ hop*. 

W Koog owner ■ 

given a two-year sen,cnce /^J^^i wo v also anong Kong 
former factory manager, 

resident, recei^ a years. , 

Rabin Fears Korean Nudear 

TnifYO rReutcrsl — Prime Minister Yitzhak 

“Si 

StejgsKJsgsassS-' 

don that it harbors a secret nudear arms program. 

J French Seize 42 in Cult Death Probe 

rti- 


^W’SfSTJK ^SSStsonS 

KffJfSSfSSS Sf f mdMenta ]ut_ yjoleiioe -^7™^ 

sssMS^Sf ssaarKSE 

KcH^dRejecte Run for Presidency 

KZSSSsa SsSSSSS SSHsSSfc SSSssS 

aSS»h3-A-. S&'SjySSSS-? sntong poss&le Socialist 


aiatm^c in Brittany and in the Pam region, 

the police said. 


rHKva awswbs; 

al who asked S^ den j^usafent,” a now ?Ss<rfpoUticai™l m «m/J- phones of Tmorist pouK 

. Jewish development for a multi- Sudan and Afghani- geria smee the authorities .can Liatijii! or the duality of iheir message and 

construction, . . d 300 apartments. ^ Q , hCvt}^ Sed elections that an Islamic way m nnancmg , msti^ong their role to the 


uv IU « 

he added, is to ensure that there 

will be “no vacuum between Is- 
raeli Jerusalem and Palestinian 
autonomy” and to establish a 
clear-cut fact that Jerusalem is 
the capital of Israel.” 

Tins is a sensitive issue, since 
Mr. Arafat long has asserted 
that the Arab part of Jerusalem 
would be the capital of a future 
Palestinian state. Recently he 
gave a speech describing Pales- 
tinian flags flying over the 
Dome of the Rode mosque and 
other Muslim shrines in the 
city, which is sacred to Jews, 
Christians and Muslims. 

The United States, along 
with most of its allies, has hdd 
to a longstanding policy that 
Jerusalem's final status remains 
to be negotiated. 


niwtinn has risen from 25 per- 
cent in 1967 to about 28 percent 

now and is projected to reach 3 1 

percent by 2010. Nonetheless, 
Mr. Tufakii estimates that 
50,000 to 60,000 Palestinians 
have “left for the West Bank 
and other places because of the 
difficulty in building a home. 

Other critics say that Israeli 
hou sing practices, which have 
dramatically altered the demog- 
raphy of East Jerusalem over 
the past three decades and are 
now changing housing patterns 
beyond the dty Hants, have 
sowed seeds of future conflict 
and violated the declared values 
on which the Jewish state was 
founded. 


Rolls Out Carpet to Tapie’s Mansion 


The Associated Pros 


OTSKB&W* rbSkSddng .0 recoup 
^IgSSntury residence, valued at about 70 nullion tacs 
KwLUr Z ,5 


(he bank during the summer. Mr. Tapie has moved out. though 
his son and daughter-in-law still live in one wing. 

Were he declared bankrupt, Mr. Tapie would be forced to 
cti*n Hawn from his seats in the National Assembly and Europe- 
SSSSSS* te~«ld not run for mayor of Marseille or 

for president next year. 

Asked if he planned to seek the presidency, he answered. . i 
wiflSbe a candidate. It’s already a ba “f r ;J 
the left’s leaders consult each other until Jan. 15 on strategy, 

then rally behind a single candidate. 

About the tour of his home, he said: “It’s disgracefiti an 
added that “their principal objective is to humiliate me. 


y, which is sacred 1 to Jews, ^ futureconflict of curiosity-seekers, many of them dderiy and fw of ^ tour of his home, he said: “It s disgn 

instians and Muslims. ^ the declared values seemingly serious about bidding, were escort^by pohre- thartheir principal objective is to humiliate 

The United States along Qn the Jewish state was Paris mansion, stripped of its furnishings by added mat men pnn ^ j 

th most of its allies, has hdd foun dcd. ^ — 

a longstanding pohey that — T ^ 

SS^.- Without AIR Planes, U.S. Airlines Scramble to Fill In Gaps 

“ American Eat.e fUght. “My Th. Fed^Avurimn M- »S£ paSTSp^ 

pledge to the Bush admimstra- 

■- . _ c^t figment- 


construction in and around Je- . . . • including Miami, Dal- Continental Connections, 

sas.-ssraaK us . &A3&&A SI Ad “ aistwAs 

tsAtsssrsz « SSasane sbssswe =K£S'ars sa«— ,0 * 

1 eremd even bookhig passen- small problems. oeoole. tional Airport in North CaroU- Some made do with whai 

“L 1 Tl as thev Amencan Eagle, the com- people. those olanes to f u m ha A 


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for tort, Ue and Academe Experience 

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Fw or said detaled team tor 
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LPS^gete, CA 90041 


ripsaw re -see* * + -■ ^ 

gers o . arm of American Air- Tran 


— V — a tD TmnraaL CCieU SCiviWG w 

SSi“eM.3 f l“RS T XtTihut dcwn servioe at d-jJJ-Jf — fcp-QW 
Swn, Indiana, that killed 68 the Raleigh-Durham Interna- South Dakota. 

OCO pl t tional Airport in North^ CaroU- Some made do with what 

t - — they had. 


forTe mST^oTISmtau Air- 

Th<* natchwork arrangement Fnday, when ihe reaerai Avia- 
«*-medtowork Monday. Pas- tion Admimstration barred use 

of the turbemropsw icy weath- 

^ta^ss^neri -TjySSa-aci: 

nomyor problems. ner ” ln,nS 


MffiA UViMU 4 w „ 

jj c na, transferring those planes to 

Trans World Express already Qthcr operations, 
has found planes to replace The commuter airline Conti- 

JT iL. A TD e «# iicac ^llAW- * . " . r I >1. 4 


booked ^dc the »me move. 

m said The planes are made by the 
George McGellan, a Peoria res- Frrach-Italian company Avion 
idmt^lanning to travel on an de Transport RfegionaL 


‘ y> r — w - OUKH ouuuw — 

resume m 11 cities. 0 f Beechcraft planes to 

American Eagle is transfer- other areas to fill gaps left by 
ring its 70 ATR s to warmer lo- the ban. 


airline Conti- In _ Evansville, Indiana, 
ns furloughed Amencan Eagle flights to Chi- 
«s in Gillette, cago were canceled because 
the weekend they use ATRs. But a different 
passengers to plane is used for flights lo 
iTmoved its Nashville, so passengers were 
aft planes to being encouraged to fly there, 
II gaps left by then to their original destina- 
tions. 


sccondhan 

action dal 


action rfaim involving ou,uou amine employees alter ajuoge 
Miami on Monday approved the case for class-action status. (AT) 


To call from country 


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tu uuuim yf W ,rri SaalnlCCI 900-9 


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. , . -,-uwvyvi-^: .<•««■ 

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an 

f”, . .*!,% ■. >m*wu- j— — 1 — 1 


~ Sprint par Offprint. 73 nut de rEvaagile. 7501 8 Paris. 


Let It Take You Around The World 


<|BlbK' 5c»' r ~> 


prune miiuaw — * 

candidates after the withdrawal Sunday 

dent of the European Commission, shattered the lefts hopes of 

ML I am waiting for » «*«--£ 
Mr PnrartH «a»iH at the European ParKament. Mr. Rocard, 64, was 
^riSSd Sond SfSoitum Miniaer Jade Langas^; 
voters’ chrace for a Socialist candidate in an opinion poll Monday.. 

TRAVEL UPDATE 

- 1 

Runway Radar Set for Los Angeles 

LOS ANGELES (AF) — An $8 million runway radar system 
designed to avert collisions like one in 1991 that killed 34 PfgPj®“ 
soon to be switched on at Los Angeles International Airport 
Until now, controllers have had to rely on what they could see 
from atop their 13-story tower and hear over two-w^ radios _ 

On Feb. 1, 1991, a controller erred and allowed a USAir jetliner 
to land on a SkyWest commuter plane that was preparing to taw 
off. The Airport Surface Detection Equipment, tested last wees 
and expected to be in operation by the end erf January, allows 
controuers to see areas of tbe airport that previously had been 

hidden from their view. . ' 

The 43,000-member Air Line Pilots Association said that tne 
safety improvements were overdue and that the third-busiest U ^a. 
airport was still dangerous. The association has recommended 
that pilots worldwide be warned about the airport’s safety dcTh 
denotes. 

Heathrow Opens Transfer Center 

LONDON (Reuters) — BAA has opened a flight connections 
center at London’s Heathrow Airport to make things easier foe 
international transfer passengers. ’ 

’ The crater will allow transferring passengers to avoid going 
; through security and check-in for a second time, BAA, which 
[ operates the airport, said in a statement on Tuesday. BAA said the 
j center would indude showers, lounges and shops. 

71.U« IfUkt nMonlMh whn MV tkrio- HaoM, hm ihmaoed bv 





I 

i 





;,C^ 

3§& 


THEAMERICASL 

On Gingrich Agenda: 'Pretty Big' Spending Cuts and a Delay on Clean Air 


W&S&! 


^ £^ PCr He 15 similarly calling for loosening fed- “Great Society" programs of the 1960s. “I 

WASHINGTON ». . era! conlroJ over Medicaid thestate-feder- don't believe social engineering works. I 

House SDeaker-rn-h* :• u ■ n £ nc “- lhc al health program for the poorest Ameri- don’t believe building large centralized 

ing maoSSnSS;? S5^“ 8 a spjf ?- wI ' axa - government structures works." 

ited fwleralEovemS.fnf 11 ^ 5 ^ Three weeks from becoming the first Within the firsitwo months of 1995. Mr. 
“pretty bia” Dackaef. «r. JP. ron,lsj nS a Republican speaker in 40 years, Mr. Ging- Gingrich said that -‘probably the most fis- 

iy next year floatine SJE5 !? CUli car ‘ ric " has also endorsed a term limit of eight caliy conservative Congress since the ’20s" 

moratorium on clean air ™»u.-° nc ' yea i years on s P eaker5l > similar to the restriction would consider a package of spending cuts 

“ d «fcM.lfce U.S. Constitution imposes on in the 1995 budget that trill be -pretl? big. 


“Great Society" programs of the 1960s. “I 
don't believe social engineering works. I 
don’t believe building large centralized 
government structures works.” 

Within the first two months of 1 995. Mr. 


v ■-*** h, ^ i. , +_ _ . uic juca oi a one-vear 

: l f3Sft£? Um i; 0n c,caa ' air regulations ‘and 

* identifying Energy and Housing and Ur- 

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oan toevetopment as cabinet agencies most 
vulnerable to elimination. 

. Mj- Gingrich, a Repubiican from Geor- 

<S pai i ded ■*“ P fo P°^ d aliema- 
uves to federal anu-povenv programs by 

suggesting tax credits to encourage chari- 
table donations to help the poor and sav- 
rng he preferred the welfare revisions gov- 
ernors proposed over those in the GLn- 
gnch-mspired “Contract With America ” 


presidents. 

Besides his proposals on specific federal 
policies, Mr. Gingrich sketched out his 
views on broader issues of government, 
economics and race during a two-hour 
luncheon with Washington Post editors 
and reporters. The former histoiy profes- 
sor studded his responses with verbal foot- 
notes to the books of historians. 

“I’m not anti-government," Mr. Ging- 
rich said in explaining his opposition to the 


in the 1995 budget that will be “prettv big, 
I think.” 

He said House Republican leaders had 
asked the new House appropriations chair- 
man, Robert L. Livingston. Republican of 
Louisiana, to make the spending cuts “as 
big as you're comfortable” making. 

A Livingston aide said the package 
would range “somew here in the billions" 
and would he developed during Appropri- 
ations Committee hearings the first two 
weeks of January. “They’re going to specif- 


Gephardt Preempts Clinton on Tax Credit 


By Kevin Merida 

and Kenneth J. Cooper 

Washington Past Sen-ice 

WASHINGTON — - The incoming 
House minority leader. Richard A. Gtqv 
hardt of Missouri, offered his own pre- 
9 senption Tuesday to revive the Democrat- 
ic Party. It includes a tax cut for families 
earning less than $75,000 a year, incentives 
for companies to share their profits with 
workers and a “no-holds-barred" cam- 
paign to make Republicans accountable 
“for every assault on working America.” 

“The fur’s going to flv,” he said. 

Mr. Gephardt's speech to the Center for 
National Policy, a Democraiic-oriented re- 
search organization, was met with only 
polite applause. 

And the Democrat’s announcement that 
House Democrats will propose a tax cut 
for working families preempted a planned 
Oval Office address Thursday by President 
Bill Clinton in which he will lay out his 
own vision for the next two years, includ- 
ing a possible tax credit for middle-income 
families earning less than S 100,000 a year. 

A Gephardt spokeswoman, Laura Nich- 
ols, said the speech had been planned long 
in advance and that Mr. Gephardt had 
consulted with the White House about his 
remarks. Mr. Gephardt said later that he 


was not trying to “upstage" the president. 

Ms. Nichols said it was unclear whether 
Mt. Gephardt’s tax proposal would ulti- 
mately be in conflict with the president's. 

The minority leader’s proposal would 
exempt a portion of the wages earned by 
employees paid up to $75,000 annually 
ana would be available to workers regard- 
less of whether they have children. He 
promised to find spending cuts to pay for 
his plan, and Ms. Nichols said the size of 
the tax cut and how long it would be in 
effect was contingent upon the budget 
cuts. 

A Republican proposal would provide a 
S500-per-child lax credit for families earn- 
ing up to $200,000 a year, a proposal Mr. 
Gephardt labeled “a lax break for every 
child of the rich." The White House has ye’t 
to specify bow its relief plan would work. 

Mr. Gephardt's speech, which drew 
sharp class distinctions between the two 
major parties’ messages, was billed as a 
blueprint for how the Democrats planned 
to operate on Capitol Hill in the next two 
years. 

It was what one aide described as an 
effort to show that in the next Congress the 
Democrats will “begin to work more as an 
equal partner in the formulation of policy, 
rather than us acting as receptor of legisla- 


tion" generated by the White House. 

In response to a question following his 
speech, Mr. Gephardt noted that while be 
will work in cooperation with the presi- 
dent, the House was “an independent or- 
ganization." In recent weeks, other high- 
profile Democrats, including the incoming 
Senate minority leader. Thomas A. 
Daschle or South Dakota, have noted thev 
may at times operate independently of the 
administration. 

Portraying the Democrats as the advo- 
cates for working families and the middle 
class. Mr. Gephardt accused the Republi- 
cans of holding up “a punching bag for 
people's frustrations” with “the tried and 
tested GOP formula: division, exclusion 
and fear." 

Democrats, he said, must “rededicate 
ourselves to the kitchen-table issues that 
made us the majority party for most of this 
century, and will make us the majority 
again in 1996." 

“We don’t need to find the left or the 
right or the center,” Mr. Gephardt said. 
“We only need to look inside ourselves, to 
find the truth that's already there. We only 
need to rediscover the beaii and the soul of 
the Democratic Party, which is to fight for 
the working families and the middle-class 
that make this country great ” 


POLITICAL NOTES 


‘Hill Rats’ Scurry for Help Treasury Due $4.1 Million? 


WASHINGTON — Bathed in light 
from the chandelier of the spacious Ways 
and Means Committee hearing room. Eu- 
>pne Pugjiese tried to keep a sense of hu- 
mor as he filled out applications for col- 
lecting unemployment in the temporary 
office of the District of Columbia's em- 
ployment. service. y 

/“They ask you. the namcot* your depen- 
dents and I put down iny daughters, who 
are 7 and 9,” said Mr. Pugliese, who has 
been a lawyer on the House Judiciary 
Committee for 15 years. “And then they 
ask you if they’re physically able to work. 
Work what? A paper route?” 

Mr. Pugliese is among rhe thousands of 
staff members on Capitol Hill who lost 
their jobs in the Republican landslide last 
month. In response, the District of Colum- 
bia has opened the office on Capitol Hill 
to help staff members apply for unemploy- 
ment benefits. (NYT) 


WASHINGTON — Federal auditors 
recommend that President Bill Clinton’s 
1992 campaign repay the Treasury a re- 
cord $4.1 million because they said the 
campaign was not entitled to all the feder- 
al matching funds it received. 

The Federal Election Commission is 
scheduled on Wednesday to discuss the 
audit findings, which question the cam- 
paign’s decision to give bonuses to certain 
employees and disallows payments for two 
missing rental cars. 

The Clinton campaign committee dis- 
agrees with the audit findings, said Lyn 
Utrecht, the attorney for the committee, 
which has a right to a hearing after the 
commission votes. f \VP) 

House Security Under Study 

WASHINGTON — Protection ar- 
rangements for the incoming House 


speaker. Newt Gingrich, need to be quick- 
ly assessed, the incoming chief of House 
security said. Wilson Livingood . the scr- 
geant-at-arms nominee, said at a news 
conference that he did not know of any 
threats against the outspoken Mr. Ging- 
rich, but said he planned to assess the 
Georgia Republican's “threat level” as 
part of an overall review of House securi- 
ty. ( Reuters I 


Quote/Unquote 

Mr. Gingrich on crime problems in the 
District of Columbia: “There is something 
disgraceful about the richest country in 
the world inviting its citizens to come and 
go by neighborhood tragedies and neigh- 
borhood failures and neighborhood mas- 
sacre sites on their way to the Smithsonian 
and the Capitol. There is just something 
profoundly wrong about our whole ap- 
proach to this city right now.” < W r P 1 


ically be hearings on what to cut. and 
why,” the aide said. “Most appropriations 
hearings are on whai we need to spend, 
and why.” 

On environmental regulation, Mr. Ging- 
rich cited warnings from governors that a 
1995 deadline for states to reduce certain 
air pollutants would create “an economic 
catastrophe of the first order." 

The deadline was set in the Clean Air 
Act of 1990, which Mr. Gingrich support- 
ed on an overwhelming vote for House 
passage. 

“Every governor I talk to says this is 
going to be a crisis in 1995 ” Mr. Gingrich 
said, specifically mentioning Massachu- 
setts. New York, New Jersey, Pennsylva- 
nia, Ohio and California. Virginia has’ also 
experienced trouble coming up with a plan 
to meet the clean-air standards. 


Simpson 
Defense 
Moves to 
Speed Trial 

Compited by Ov Staff Fmn Dispatches 

LOS ANGELES — De- 
fense attorneys for O J. Simp- 
son told a judge Tuesday they 
wanted to forgo hearings oh 
the prosecution's crucial 
DNA evidence and take the 
case straight to trial in early 
January. 

In a move that could put the 
double-murder case on a fast 
track, Mr. Simpson's lawyers 
asked Judge Lance A. Ito to 
begin opening statements by 
Jan. 4. They said they pre- 
ferred to challenge the admis- 
sibility of tests on blood and 
hair samples later, before the 
jury. 

Both sides had been prepar- 
ing for DNA hearings that 
were expected to last four to 
six weeks. But if the judge 
grams the defense motion, the 
trial of tbe former profession- 
al football star could begin in 
earnest much sooner. 

In announcing their change 
of strategy, the defense team 
said Mr. Simpson had been 
advised of the potential risks 
and benefits. Mr. Simpson is 
charged in the June 12 stab- 
bing deaths of his former wife 
Nicole Brown Simpson and 


The speaker-to-be said many governors 
favored a one-year moratorium on the 
dean-air regulations. He did not endorse 
their proposal and instead called for hear- 
ings on the issue. 

In a letter to President Bill Clinton on 
Monday, Mr. Gingrich joined other Re- 
publican leaders of the House and the 
Senate in proposing a 100-day moratorium 
on new federal regulations. They asked the 
administration to use the time' to review 
the regulatory burden and recommend 
cuts in red tape. 

Mr. Gingnch indicated that the weak 
political constituencies for the Depart- 
ments of Housing and Urban Develop- 
ment. known as HUD. and Energy would 
make them prime candidates for cuts in the 
bureaucracy. He cited “a very limited con- 
stituency” for Energy. 


“I would argue that you could abolish 
HUD tomorrow morning and improve life 
in most of America," he said, adding: “I 
rhinlr HUD’s reputation is now' so bad. 
and the whole public housing policy has 
been such a failure, that it’s very hard to 
sustain HUD.” 

But Mr. Gingrich said the federal gov- 
ernment could still increase tbe stock of 
low-income housing, for example, by giv- 
ing HUD-owned land to Habitat for Hu- 
manity. a volunteer group that builds 
homes for the poor. 

He wore a lapel pin of the nonprofit 
group more identified with another Geor- 
gian, former President Jimmy Carter. “We 
are looking at creating a tax credit for 
people to give money to private sector 
institutions that care for the poor.” Mr. 
Gingrich said. 



Ken Lutm/R«Mm 


THUMBS-UP — O J. Simpson with one of Us lawyers, Robert Shapiro, awaiting tbe 
jury’s entry. Jurors in the murder trial were told they may be sequestered in January. 


her friend Ronald L. Gold- 
man 

Defense attorneys argued 
that failure to grant their mo- 
tion would violate Mr. Simp- 
son's constitutional rights to a 
fair trial and due process. 

The tactic has some bene- 
fits for Mr. Simpson. For one, 
it meets his desire for a fast 
trial by eliminating a time- 
consuming and, for him, ex- 
pensive admissibility hearing 
before a judge who has rarely 
sided with the defense. 

Also, it eliminates the po- 


tential for damaging publicity 
that could taint the jury and 
alternate pane] if they were 
not sequestered. 

But prosecutors may put up 
some resistance. Deputy Dis- 
trict Attorney Marcia Clark 
said that if defease lawyers 
wanted to forgo the pretrial 
hearings, they had to concede 
to the admissibOty and “sta- 
tistical significance" of test re- 
sults on evidence found at tbe 
crime scene and at Mr. Simp- 
son’s Brentwood estate. 

In the motion, however, the 


defense made it clear that it 
intended to challenge the ad- 
missibility of the prosecu- 
tion’s scientific evidence but 
wanted to do it during the 
trial. Judge Ito is expected to 
rule by the end of the week. 

The DNA tests remain cru- 
cial to the prosecution’s case. 
Authorities have no witnesses 
to the murders and no murder 
weapon, so blood and hair 
samples may be the only hard 
evidence they have. 

(Reuters, AP) 


Nature sparkles. 

Water, air, earth, fire... by Cartier. 


Away From Politics 


• Barneys dodung store ran ads in New 
Yoric-mOTspapers apologizing for a satiri- 
cal Nativity scene in which the Three 
Wise Men were represented by Bart 
Simpson dolls and Mary was a saucy- 
looking cat 

The Madison Avenue display was re- 
moved. (AP) 

m A Repubiican Party official has been 
sfi edwt as clerk of the House, the first 
tjma in the chamber’s 205-year history 
that a woman was chosen. fNYTJ 


• Tbe family of the serial fcfller Jeffrey 
Dahmer has no intention of suing over 
his death in a prison. 

“What would be the point?” the fam- 
ily's attorney said. 

Even if a suit proved the prison liable, 
he told a Cleveland daily, “No jury is 
going to award money for the death of 
Jeffrey Dahmer.” (AP) 

• A first-class letter wffl cost 32 cents to 


said as of Jan. 1, the Postal Service 
Board of Governors said, (WP) 

• A mountain Son shot last weekend was 
the one that mauled a hiker to death in a 
state park 50 miles east or San Diego, 
California officials confirmed. (Reuters) 

• An explosion at a fertilizer plant south 

of Sioux City, Iowa, killed at least four 
people and released a cloud of toxic 
ammonia gas that forced hundreds to 
evacuate. (AP) 


Dining Out 



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Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1994 


Japan’s Teen Suicides 

After 2d Death, Schools Get 
An Order to Curb Bullying 


Ratters 

TOKYO — A second 13- 
year-old schoolboy banged 
himself Tuesday in an area of 
central Japan already em- 
broiled in controversy about a 
aricide brought on by schoo- 
lyard bullying, the police said 

The suicide coincided with a 
special cabinet meeting called 
by Prune Minister 'fomiichi 
Murayama to discuss the first 
death, and the Education Min- 
istry urged teachers to crack 
down on schoolyard bullies. 

The police said the body of 
the second boy, who was not 
named, was found ax a work- 
shop belonging to his father. He 
had hanged himself from a ceil- 
ing beam and left no note. 

Shqji Sola, vice principal of 
the boy's school, said the boy’s 
schoolmates had van dalise d his 
book bag and hit him in the 
bead with a chair in October, 
the Kyodo news agency report- 
ed. 

Kyodo said some classmates 
said they had seen the word 
“die" scribbled on the boy’s 
bag. They also said the youth 
was depressed about recent 
poor examination results. 

The boy lived in the town of 


Okazaki, next to the town of 
Nishio, where another 13-year- 
old, Kiyotem OfcocM, hanged 
himself last month and left a 
note saying several classmates 
had bullied him into stealing 
money from his family. 

The note said the bullies had 
extorted $10,000 from him over 
the course of a year, holding his 
head in a river if he refused to 
pay. 

The boy’s suicide note said: 
“I just can't find any money to 
take to them today.” 

A newspaper reported last 
week that at least 10 schoolboys 
had taken their lives because of 
harassment by classmates this 
year. 

In other recent signs of 
strains in Japan's schools, a 
teacher mis suspended for hit- 
ting a pupil in the head every 
day for six months because he 
was inattentive, and a young 
truant died in a car accident 
while being pursued by a teach- 
er in another car. 

A govemmen t spokesman re- 
ported Mr. Murayama said at 
the cabinet meeting Tuesday 
that parents, teachers and stu- 
dents all had a responsibility to 
stop schoolyard bullying. 


Space Trip Due 
For Japanese 

Reuters 

TOKYO — A Japanese 
astronaut will join a mis- 
sion by the American space 
shuttle Endeavour next 
y esa as the first Japanese 
mission specialist. Japan’s 
space agency announced 
Tuesday. 

The astronaut, Koichi 
Wakata, 31, will be the 
third Japanese to ride a 
U.S. space shuttle. The pre- 
vious two Japanese astro- 
nauts conducted scientific 
experiments, but as a mis- 
sion specialist Mr. Wakata 


is qualified for space walks 
and other operational ac- 
tivities. 

Japan’s National Space 
Development Agency 
asked NASA to pat Mr. 
Wakata on a shuttle so he 
could experience space 
flight before Japan's partic- 
ipation in- an international 
space station project due to 
start in 1997. NASA plans 
to launch the Endeavour 
with a crew of six astro- 
nauts on Nov. 30, 1995, for 
a nine-day mission. 


Richard Critchfield, Writer on Third World, Dies 


In a report issued Tuesday, . 
the Education Ministry an- 
nounced an urgent survey of 
teachers and a dminis trators to 
S the extent of schoolyard 
lying. 


By Wolfgang Saxon 

Sen York Tina Senior 

Richard Patrick Critchfield, 
€3, an author and journalist 
from Berkeley, California, who 
lived and wonted among villag- 
ers of the Third World to tell 
their story to Western readers, 
died Saturday in Washington. 

He had suffered a stroke the 
week before in Washington, 
where he had gone to attend a 

K ration party for his latest 
“vaiagere." 

Mr. Critchfield spent long 
periods working and living with 
the peasants of Asia, Africa, 
and Latin Ameri ca about whom 
he wrote. 

For many years he reported 
on rural development for The 
Economist, and he also contrib- 
uted Op-Ed articles and bode 
reviews to The New York 
Times, The Washington Post, 
and the International Herald 
Tribune, among others. 

Over the years, Mr. Critch- 
field reported for various publi- 
cations on Asia, Washington, 
the . White House, the Gbina- 
India conflict of 1962, the Viet- 
nam War, and the India-Pakd- 
stan war of 1965. In 1981, he 
received a MacArtbor Founda- 
tion Prize Fellowship, totaling 
£244,000, which he used to con- 
tinue studying cultural change 
in the rural Third World. 

His books included "The 


Long; Charade:. Political Sub- 
version in the Vietnam War" 
(Hanoourt, 1 968); “The Golden 
Bowl Be Broken: Feasant life 
in Four Cultures" (Indiana 
University Press, 1974); “Shah- 
hat An Egyptian” (Syracuse 
University Press, 1978); and 
"Villages* (Doubleday, 1980). 
“Villagers: Changed Values, 
Altered Lives: The Closing of 
the Urban-Rural Gap" was 
published by Doubleday last 
month. . 

Madame Alix Grte, a Leader 
In French World of Couture 
PARIS (AP) — Madame 
Alix Gris, a major figure in the 
French fashion worid for a half 
century, died 13 months ago at 


the age of 90. Her daughter suc- 
ceeded in keeping the death se- 
cret until Tuesday. 

The newspaper Le Monde re- 
ported the death, quoting the 
daughter, Anne Gris, as saying 
she acted “out erf love." Munici- 
pal authorities in Paris subse- 
quently confirmed the death, 
which occurred Noy. 24, 1993, 
at a nursing home in southern 
France. 

Bom Germaine Krebs in Par- 
is in 1903. she was known to the 
fashion world only as Madame 
Gris. In 1937, she started a 
shop with a partner on the fash- 
ionable Rue du Faubourg Ste_ 
Honors calling both it and her- 
self Alix, and quickly became 

widely known. 


An ardent champion of haute 
couture, she was president for 
many years of the Federation 
Framjaise de la Couture, the 
powerful fashion syndicate. 

Keooeth Rash, Ambassador 
Who Played fey Berlin Role 
WASHINGTON (NYT) — 
Kenneth Rush, 84, who, as a 
UJSL ambassador helped negoti- 
ate the ground-breaking four- 
power agreement in 1971 that 
ended the postwar crises over 
Berlin, died Sunday in Delray 
Beach, Florida. A former presi- 
dent of Union Carbide, he held 
several high government posts 
and served as ambassador to 
France from 1974 to 1977. A 
son said he had been under 


treatment for heart and blood 
ailments. 

The Quadripartite Berlin 
Agreement, among the United 
States, Britain, the Soviet 
Union, and France,ended mare 
than two decades of East-West 
tensions over the divided for- 
mer capital of Germany. 

Stuart A. Roosa, 61, an astro- 
naut who flew on the third lu- 
nar landing mission in' 1971, 
died Monday in Falls Church, 
Virginia, of comphcations from 
pancreatitis. 

George Van Renesse, 85, a 
pianist who was an interpreter 
of Schubert, died Saturday in 
Bussom, near Amsterdam. 


Antoine Pinay, French Economic Reformer, Dies 


Agcacc Frana-Prastt 

SAINT-ETIENNE France 
— Antonie Pinay, a former 
French finance minister, mone- 
tary reformer and father of the 
“new franc,” died at his home 
near here Tuesday. He was 102. 

Mr. Pinay served as prime 
minister in 1952 and. then as 
finance minister under de 
Gaulle starting in 1958. 

He was credited with halting 
galloping inflation and restor- 
ing the strength of the French 
franc. His success was symbol- 


ized by the introduction of the 
“new franc,” valued at 100 old 
francs. 

Mr. Pinay, who has served as 
a ref eren ce point for successive 
French finance ministers, won 
the confidence of small savers 
with the “Pinay bond,” 
launched in 1952 and indexed 
to gold. 

In 1965 and again in 1969. he 
resisted pressure to became a 
candidate for the French presi- 
dency. 


He was named France's first 
ombudsman in 1973. 

In 1974 he campaigned for 
the successful presidential can- 
didate, Valfcry Giscard d’Es- 
taing, before retiring to Saint- 
Chamond. 

Mr. Pinay was a strong sup- 
porter of European union and 
in 1992 declared bis enthusias- 
tic support for the Maastricht 
treaty. 

He saw active service in 
World War I and afterwards. 


He ran a small tannery between 
1919 and 1948 in the Saint-Cha- 
moud region, was involved in 
local politics and became may- 
or of the town. 

He initial^ supported the 
collaborationist regime of Mar- 
shal Philippe P&ain in World 
War U before joining the Resis- 
tance. 

Mr. Pinay attributed his lon- 
gevity to the fact that he never 
drank alcohol and tried to get 
eight hours’ sleep every night 

He gave op smoking in 1989. 


Tokyo Moves Against Gun Imports 


Reuters 

TOKYO — Responding to 
increased gun smuggling and 
gun-related violence this year, 
Japan will tighten its ban on 
imports of firearms and ammu- 
nition, a customs office spokes- 
man said Tuesday. 

Under a revised customs law, 
which takes effect Jan. 1. im- 
ports of handguns* rifles, ma- 
chine guns and other firearms 
will be banned, the spokesman 
said. Ammunition and parts 
will also be barred. 


Violations will be punished 
with prison terms of up to five 
years or a fine of up to 5 million 
yen ($50,000). 

Gun imports axe now banned 
under criminal law but not un- 
der customs law; thus, customs 
officers do not have the right to 
investigate gun smuggling. If 
they discover illicit guns, they 
must report them to the police, 
who in urn take action. 

“We plan to increase our 
staff and introduce more effi- 
cient X-ray devices to detect 


gun-smuggling attempts at cus- 
toms,” the customs spokesman 
said. 

The number of guns confis- 
cated by customs officials to- 
taled 88 from January to Octo- 
ber this year, up from 69 for all 
of 1993. Many of them were 
from China, the Philippines or 
Russia. 

Japanese police seized 1,671 
guns between January and Sep- 
tember, compared with 1,019 
lastyear. 


AMERICAN 

TOPICS 

Elderly Car Drivers: 

To Test or Not to Test? 

Despite studies that show 
the effects of aging on vision, 
reflexes and cognitive skills, 
only three states — Illinois, 
Indiana and New Hampshire 
— require road-skfil exams for 
drivers 80 and older. In Kan- 
sas, all drivers are vision-test- 


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ed and given written exams 
every four years. 

Most other states have no 
restrictions on elderly drivers. 
It is a touchy problem. Many 
people resent being told they 
are too old to drive, and their 
childr en are reluctant to take 
away the car keys. Indeed, 
many of the elderly are fully 
competent to drive. But others 
experience senile dementia, 
cataracts and reduction in re- 
flexes. Many take medication 
that makes them nervous, 
weak or dizzy. 

The main advocacy group 
for older people, the American 
Association of Retired Per- 
sons, acknowledges a poten- 
tial problem with aging driv- 
ers. It even offers an 
instructional program for 
drivers 55 and older. 

The former Missouri state 
coordinator for that program, 
Earl Rosen, 80, said of fatal 
accidents caused by inco 
tent drivers: “I call it 
Personally, I would love to see 
some type of testing as age 
progresses.” 


Short Takes 

When ft oomes to how food 
tastes, people can be divided 
into three categories: nontas- 
ters, regular tasters and super- 
tasters, scientists say. Super- 
tasters have more taste buds 
than other people and so they 
taste more. Linda Bartoshnk, 
a professor at the Yale medi- 
cal school and an expert in 
sensory science, said the num- 
ber of taste buds was a matter 
of heredity. About a quarter of 
the population are supertas- 
ters, a quarter are nontasters 
and half are regular tasters. 
The differences among them, 
however, are diminished be- 
cause taste is only oae aspect 
of flavor and is often over- 
shadowed by aroma, texture 
and temperature. 

Frink Maarim, 45, an un- 
employed New York office- 
cleaning worker, has been 
charged with reporting 20 
false alarms since March 1992. 
He is suspected of phoning in 
thousands of others, a fire de- 


partment spokeswoman said. 
A law enforcement source said 
Mr. Maacim bad an irnsped- 

ncdghbOTs ted to ha- 

rass than with clanging fire 
engines at odd hours. 

II they pause to think about 
it, people can identify phrases 
that are in common use but 
derived from objects that are 
nearly forgotten. Matthew L. 
Wald notes in The New York 
Times. Muskets are gone bat 
“flash in the pan” and “going 
off half-cocked” are still with 
ns. Few people sail, but some 
get “three sheets to the wind.” 
And change goes inexorably 
onward. Many once-comnxra 
objects are. obsolescent or even 
obsolete and becoming ever- 
more rare. Examples: rotary 
telephone dials, typewriters, 
carbon papa* and record al- 
bums. 

Eyeglasses on the other 
hand, are more popular than 
ever. Decades ago. they lost 
their prim image. Thai con- 


tact lenses seemed likely to 
make spectacles obsolete. But 
today, about 60 percent of 
Americans wear glasses, and 
only 15 percent wear contacts, 
according to a spokesman for 
the Optical Laboratories As- 
sociation, a trade group. 
"Twenty years ago, the feeling 
was contact lenses were ; 
to take over,” he said, 
never happened.” 


A high school Christmas 
concert in Paris, Tennessee, 
was canceled after a brawl in 
which the choir director alleg- 
edly hit the band conductor m 
the face with a chair. Henry 
County High School's Ken- 
neth Humphrey, a county 
commissioner and minister, 
was (reed on $1,000 bail after 
Martin Pascfaall filed aggra- 
vated assault charges. The two 
men allegedly got into a fight 
over who would make an- 
nouncements at a future con- 
ceit. They also argued about 
locking up their joint office 
space, the police said. 

International Herald Tribane. 


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INTERNATIONAL 



PUBLISHES WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


Chechnya Predicament 


The tiny Russian breakaway region of 
Chechnya confronts President Boris 
Yeltsin and his fellow reformers with a 
serious internal crisis. The three-year 
insurrection cannot be allowed to stand. 
Although a negotiated political settle- 
ment would be the best outcome, Mr. 
Ydtsin is justified in using military 
force to suppress the rebellion. 

Failure to deal decisively with Chech- 
nya’s defiance could have two calamitous 
consequences. First, it could encourage 
similar rebellions elsewhere and bring 
about the collapse of the Russian Federa- 
tion. Second, in strictly political terms it 
would study arouse a ferocious backlash 
among right-wing nationalists, in tom 
destroying the Yeltsin government. 

Washington does not want these out- 
comes and neither, obviously, does Mr. 
Ydtsin. The beleaguered president is 
acutely awaxe that suppressing the rebel- 
lion by force is fraught with peril. It could 
spark fiance resistance and terrorism 
from Chechnya’s independent-minded 
people and, conceivably, bog Russia 
down in another Afghanistan. And even 
if Mr. Yeltsin satisfies the nationalists, 
as well as an embittered Russian army 
eager to prosecute a regional war, he 
could later find himself under fire from 
war-weary Russians who want out. 

That is why Washington should quietly 
counsel him to apply force carefully — 
not to crush the Chechens but to open the 
way to a negotiated settlement. Such a 
settlement would dye a measure of politi- 
cal autonomy to Chechnya. 

Shortly after the abortive 1991 putsch 
in Moscow, the Chechen strongman, 
Dzhokar Dudayev, once one of the youn- 
gest generals in the Soviet dr force, seized 
power in this oil-rich, land of 13 million 
people and declared independence. A 
year later, when Mr. Ydtsin first at- 


tempted to restore Russian rule by force, 
the Parliament balked and got him to 
seek a political solution instead. Mr. 
Yeltsin now seems determined to topple 
Mr. Dudayev — by force if necessary. 
Last week he massed Russian forces on 
Chechnya’s border and backed a failed 
coup attempt Over the weekend, he or- 
dered armored columns to advance on 
the capital, Grozny. 

Mr. Yeltsin’s move brought sharp 
protests from Moscow liberals, but it is 
Ukely to prove popular, at least for the 
moment, among those who favor a more 
assertive Russian foreign policy. Among 
Russians, the Chechens nave an unsa- 
vory reputation — some of it the result 
of Russian racism, some of it deserved. 
Chechen racketeers control many of 
Moscow’s markets with strongarm tac- 
tics, and the Dudayev regime is a tin- 
horn kleptocracy that wrested leader- 


Tbe republic, located ia an ethnic 
cauldron m the Caucasus Mountains be- 
tween the Black and Caspian Seas, could 
be difficult to subdue. Colonized by 
Russians over three centuries and 
brought under Russia’s control in the 
1860s, the Chechens have periodically 
rebelled a gains t Moscow’s rule. They 
rebelled after the 1917 Revolution and 
again in World War II. In 1944, Stalin 
deported a half-million Chechens to the 
steppes of Central Asia, for purportedly 
siding with Germany during die war; 
after his death, many drifted home. 

Washington cannot bdp but sympa- 
thize with Mr. Yeltsin's predicament. His 
task is to move decisively to depose Mr. 
Dudayev, then end the bloodletting as 
quickly as he can lest he become hostage 
to Russia’s nationalists and military. 

— THE NEW’ YORK TIMER 


Another Bosnia Charade? 


Last week the talk of NATO was about 
withdrawing United Nations peacekeep- 
ers to clear the decks for aiming the 
Bosnians and perhaps launching robust 
air strikes. But over the weekend the 
French and British, principal contribu- 
tors to the UN force, and the Americans 
looked hard at the greater suffering and 
wider war that would be the likely imme- 
diate result of a pullout, and flinched. 
They decided instead (1) to make another 
diplomatic go, (2) to continue planning 
an American-assisted UN withdrawal and 
(3) to beef up NATO militaiy action. The 
third Hem was worked up by the American 
and French defense ministers and involves 
extra fortifying, consolidating of units, 
protecting convoys and the Hke. 

Is this anything more than another 
charade? There is a dire need for a tough- 
er NATO military response. The response 
now contemplated, however, keeps NATO 
in the role of servant erf the United Na- 
tions, and does not ask the United Nations 
to alter the neutralist lite-force mandate 
which has defined its peacekeeping from 
the start. Under this mandate, the United 
Nations treats each party as a potential 
violator, single act by angle act, and 
avoids what ought to be the essential 
broad judgment that the Serbs are the 
principal transgressors. This is what it 
has taken so far to get resolutions past the 
Serbs’ UN protector, Russia. 


The two defense ministers, trying to 
restore a modicum of American- Europe- 
an consensus, promised to use “over- 
whelming force’’ to protect a UN pullout, 
if there is one. That is, the United Na^ 
tions will not be allowed to veto NATO 
pullout strategy. It is a Httle shameful 
that the Clinton a dminis tration would 
make departing peacekeepers an offer, 
including an American ground role, that 
it could never find it in its heart to make 
to suffering Bosnians. Nonetheless, the 
pledge shows good faith to those who, 
unlike Americans, accepted the more 
onerous peacekeeping risks. 

If NATO does finally undertake to 
secure a safe UN withdrawal, it will be 
bade at the further question — should it 
lift the arms embargo on Bosnia and 
conduct strikes to bdp it regain lost 
ground? — that has long split ready 
Americans from reluctant Europeans. 
Except that this time the resurgent Re- 
publicans are pressing the administra- 
tion to go it alone. 

Enabling Bosnia to arm or at least 
giving it the option is the minimal de- 
cent thing, especially if Bosnia is not to 
have even a fig leaf of international 
protection. Air strikes look a lot better if 
NATO is together than if the United 
States is alone. But let us see how the 
next few weeks go. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Europe Looks East 


Europe’s rich democracies last week- 
end sharply strengthened their offers of 
economic alliance to the uneasy countries 
that used to be Soviet satellites. The Eu- 
ropean Union’s 12 members, meeting at 
Essen, still have not provided their east- 
ern neighbors with a firm timetable for 
admission. But at the urging particularly 
of the Germans, the 12 have now made 
the steps leading to admission, and the 
offers of the bdp needed to ascend them, 
much more specific. Although the Union 
itself originated as a common market, its 
purposes here go far beyond trade. 

Tne Union hopes to use the promise of 
membership to bring greater stability to 
Eastern Europe. Bosnia is providing Eu- 
rope with a horrifying example of the costs 
of what is euphemistically called instabil- 
ity. Just as the common market not only 
helped Western Europe to prospa: but 
damped down its nationalist vendettas, 
the Union is now moving to apply the 
same magic to the Eastern countries on 
unstated but well understood terms: that 
they are to remain democracies pledged to 
live at peace with their neighbors. 

The Union at Essen gave the Eastern 
countries a bigger welcome than, as re- 
cently as a few weeks ago. seemed to be 
on the schedule. Perhaps one reason was 
Russia’s hostile reaction to the other idea 
for greater stability in Eastern Europe 
— bringing these same countries into 


NATO. When one avenue is temporarily 
blocked, it is useful to pursue another. 

But this expansion eastward raises 
concerns within the Union itself that 
there will be less attention to its Mediter- 
ranean members and the pressures on 
them from the south. The Union's meet- 
ing at Essen had a lot in common with the 
Western Hemisphere’s summit confer- 
ence bong held at the same time in Mi- 
ami. Both the European Union and the 
United States were dealing with much 
less wealthy countries anxious to proceed 
rapidly — much too rapidly for the com- 
fort of the rich — toward very close 
econonncpartnersliips. But, comfortable 
or not. Chancellor Helmut Kohl, like 
President Bill Clinton, went to some 
lengths to encourage those seeking to 
enter his trading system. 

Immigration is as urgent an issue in 
Europe as it is in America, and in both 
cases the governments of the rich coun- 
tries have a dear sense that it could 
become dangerous quickly if conditions 
among their poorer neighbors were to 
deteriorate. A lot erf people in Eastern 
Europe and Latin America (although not 
so far in North Africa) have come to 
believe that rising prosperity supports 
democracy and vice versa. It is very much 
in the interest of the rich to keep their 
neighbors thinking that way. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 



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WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1994 


PINION 


ribunc 


aning Up Isn 


WASHINGTON — The ghosts of 
y Y weapons programs past are rat- 
tling their charm: louder and louder. 
Tons of uranium and plutonium scat- 
tered at sites around the United States 
and the former Soviet Union are rust- 
ing, corroding, leaking, migrating, con- 
centrating into critical masses, threaten- 
ing to explode, and spreading under- 
ground into rivers and: water supplies. 
Most immediately dangerous, enough 
material to make thousands of bombs is 
vulnerable to theft in Russia. 

It will take decades, and tens or hun- 
dreds of billions of dollars, before the 
radioactive wastes and fissile materials 
around today are permanently con- 
tained or disposed of. As material dis- 
perses and storage facilities age and de- 
grade. the task gets harder. 

And as wore weapons are dismantled, 
and plutonium production in Russia con- 
tinues, the amount of matwHft i to 
with continues to grow. So does the frus- 
tration with having to spend today’s tight 
money on yesterday’s problems. 

Overeager budget cutters in the United 
States, eyeing the large cleanup pro gram s 
at the Pentagon and die Department of 
Energy, would like to see them as dis- 
pensable, environmental frills. They 
could not be more wrong. These pro- 
grams are addressing real threats that 
will only become more dangerous and 
more expensive as time passes. 

Ironically, cuts are bring proposed just 
as an explosive new Energy Department 
report concludes that previous budget 


By Jessica Mathews motion detectors,.*) dootrte mean having ok nudear state to . 

” J no radiation monitors at S^thrathor ^ four. Weapons are 

are facilities where workers r=gnla4y go deal information «■;- 

cuts are partly to blame for the present unpaid for f nOT .* s f .£,4^ ety ^ cta|ed on where and how each adewffl ■ 

hazards mhaff a dozen US. sites, partio- oi^nized crime is flomamg ^ the resulting plutonium.Botb com- r 

uSyRoclnr Flats, just outside Dsnver. ( Sw agreed » ban further prodw- , r 

Big as the American nuclear dial- fact that the ugg«» ^ pUUonium for weapons use. ■ 

lengeis.it is dwarfed by environmental plmommn sored .^yrtnrtmoogb is betas done torafc- ;£ 

mid security risks in Russia. . appffiendy caM fr^ a a^tan, amd. not , wc _ oas . tt5aM e material, and the- . 


cuts arc p 
hazards at 
ularty Roc 
Big as 


tW to blame for the present 
tif a dozen U.S. rites, partic- 
r Flats, just outside Denver, 
e American nuclear chal- 


with Kazakhstan, Belarus and UJ™* 6 
should mean having one nudear statetq 
deal with rather than four. Wearons are 
heine dismantled and 
S^onvritereandhoweaAatfe^ 
store the resulting plutoruum-Bo*»m- 7 ; 


and security risks ia Russia. 

The latest horror to be added to a 
steadily growing list is the recent revela- 
tion that for decade radioactive waste 
was secretly disposed of in Husria by 
pumping it directly into the ground, con- 
travening international practice and So- 
viet chums. The contamination has 
spread far beyond the injection rites, and 
experts are now debating whether it will 
remain a local threat or become a nation- 
al or even an international one. 

But the largest and most Immediate 
nudear threat comes from theft. Dozens 
of facilities in Russia, intending many 
outside the mftttary establishment, hold 
large quantities of highly enriched urani- 
um and plutonium. There is no national 
inventory of these weapons mate ri als. 
Even an individual facility may have no 
idea how many bombs’ worth are pre- 
sent, and therefore no way of knowing if 
material disappears. 

Americans who have visited some of the 
major civilian sites describe single, easily 
surmountable fences, absent easily dis- 
abled alarms, and padlodcs that any self- 
respecting bicycle thief could cut 

The absolute basics erf physical securi- 
ty are missing. There are no cameras or 


for doing so. Russian civilian faculties tunas 1 Naon-Lugar - 

cantirinmore than enough weapons-us- r 

able uranium and plutomum tosupply 

all the world’s poteu^bujms though pro ^Sr!r in., 

the theft of even a minute fraction. seointy i^p wi ^ ■> its core - 

IffiSr^ fadlitres hold more 5M- 

ra, but avffiau Mitres probably mSrff the criticism that ~ 

White BESTS' it tot its arrest the *> 

educed global he^Sh^lWw^ ifaSS ffiUect its tons 

SnKtTSef kilograms dear from to jnp-: 
highly enriched uranium, which he that it can make a big difference. .. ., 
pthtms refrigerator while making fun- If these P*®***™^ 

er plans. The facility reportedly discov- few tens of imSionsof dollars, the cost to 
ed the theft by noticing the missing uA security is likely to be mo omparab ly 
nit or . not the Tyiv«xfng material. How largcar. It is easier, cheaper anu quieter to. 
any other thefts, one has to wonder, steal the m at eri a l for a nuclear arsenal 
Lve not been caught? than to make it. And North Korea wffl 

The Clinton administration, with not be the last to tty. ; 


muiMu; ■ u 

tf-rfoij but civilian facilities probably 
pose the greater threat. 

While Bonn saw to it that its arrest 


Washington appear to have tacitly coop- 
erated to keep news of several much 
larger seizures in. Russia quiet 

In one of these, a janitor reportedly 
walked out erf a plant wearing an indus- 
trial mitten stuffed with three kilograms 
of h ighly enriched uranium, which he 
kept m his refrigerator whfie making fur- 
ther plans. The facility reportedly discov- 
ered the theft by noticing the missing 
janitor, not the material- How 

many other thefts, one has to wonder, 
have not been caught? 

The Clinton administration, with 
funding through the bipartisan Nunn- 
Lugar initiative, has achieved some nota- 
ble successes in reducing nudear threats 
in the former Soviet Union. Agreements 


The writer, a senior fellow at the Council 
on Foreifft Relations, contributed 'tit& - T 
comment to The Washington Past. 


If Smaller Works Better, APEC Could Turn Out Irrelevant at Best 


H ONG KONG — Bogor, Mi- 
ami, Davao. Which, if any, 
of these dries will go down in the 
annals of trade history? 

Bogor, stage for the set-piece 
bash of the year where leaders of 
the 18-strong APEC group — in- 
cluding the United States, Japan 
and China — committed them- 
selves to free trade among them- 
selves by 2020? 

Or Miami, host last week to the 
S ummi t of the Americas, a gath- 
ering of 34 nations which set a 
goal of free trade in the Western 
Hemisphere by 2003? 

Or the southern Philippine dty 
of Davao, where, just after the 
APEC meeting. President Fidel 
Ramos appealed for free trade 
within what he called the East 
ASEAN Growth Area (EAGA) 
encompassing the southern Phil- 
ippines, most of eastern Indone- 
sia, eastern Malaysia and Brunei? 

The surge of free trade talk is 
commendable, but is it any more 
than pious hope? There is more 
likely to be free trade within hum- 
ble EAGA by 2020 than in the 
much ballyhooed APEC zone. 

As for the Miami summit, it 
further exposed the nakedness of 


By Philip Bo wring 


APEC, which, despite the pub- 
licity surrounding its last two 
summits, always was a political 
stunt rather than a group with a 
realistic trade agenda. The drive 
to free trade within the Americas 
is so much stronger than any- 
thing in APEC that APEC itself 
is, despite the Bogor hype, al- 
ready rooking irrelevant. 

For the United States, APEC 
and its opportunity for summi- 
teering are temporarily useful, a 
cheap way of proving U.S. “'com- 
mitment” to the region while put- 
ting a little pressure for market 
opening on the Asian members — 
with almost all of which it runs 
large trade deficits. 

APEC provides China with an 
opportunity to show a benign 
face to the world and to smooth 
relations with the United Stales 
and promote its GATT member- 
ship bid. For President Suharto it 
was a useful Of flawed by Timor) 
way of raising his own and Indo- 
nesia’s profiles. 

Yet for any grouping of states to 
have meaning there must be either 
economic logic or political will In 


the APEC case, neither exists be- 
yond the most superficial level 

It is theoretically possible to 
reconcile APEC members’ com- 
mitments to free trade by 2020 
with members* existing commit- 
ments in other directions — for 
example, the North American 
Free ‘Trade Agreement and the 
ASEAN Free Trade Area — but 
in practice this is amply not pos- 
sible without political commit- 
ments that do not exist. 

The world should give thanks 
to Malaysia’s Prime Minister Ma- 
hathir tun Mohamad for his open 
skepticism. Mr. Mahathir has his 
own reasons for bring a grand- 
standing outrider, but he has 
been saying aloud what the Japa- 
nese were saying to themselves. 

Japan wants global, not region- 
al, focus. If it is to accept second 
best, that most Hkdy would be 
because it faced serious discrimi- 
nation in North American and 
European markets. In that case it 
would seek some sort of Asia- 
Australasia regional grouping. 

At one point, before NAFTA 
and while Western Europe threat- 


Norwegians Choose to Stay Different 


O SLO — Norway is differ- 
ent While the European 
Union is expanding to include 
15 nations, and most countries 
in Eastern Europe are eager to 
join, Norway has snubbed the 
Union for the second time. 

Last month’s referendum was 
arranged so that we would vote 
after the other Scandinavians. 
Compared with 1972, this led to 
a mere 1 percent increase in 
support for the “yes” side. 

Norwegians’ opposition to 
the European Union is not 
hard to explain- Geographical- 
ly. the concept of integration 
has spread from Central Eu- 
rope toward the periphery. Ex- 
cept for Iceland, a land of dis- 
tillation of the “no” faction in 
Norway, Norway has been ori- 
ented more toward the Atlantic 
and less toward the Continent 
than its Nordic neighbors. 

Our history is an even more 
important factor. Norway is a 
young nation. “Union” is a 
dirty word, conjuring up 500 
years of unequal union with 
Denmark and Sweden. On the 
Continent, on the other hand, it 
is an honorable word used in 
connection with efforts for inte- 
gration, large and small. 

It is important that Norway 
did not become independent 
until 1905 and that nationalism 
was strengthened rather than 
weakened during Worid War n. 

Finland and most of the East 
European countries are even 
younger than Norway, but in 
thrir cases nationalism and en- 
thusiasm for the Union go hand 
in hand. With the demise of the 
Soviet Union and the weaken- 
ing of Russia, they can finally 
make their own choices. EU 
membership is a matter of de- 
fending themselves against a 
possible new Russian threat 
Norway chose to join NATO 
in 1949. Our security problem 
was thus solved, and this impor- 
tant dimension is largely elimi- 
nated from the debate. 

With our oil and gas re- 
sources, the Norwegian econo- 
my is one of Europe's strongest 
In Sweden, Finland and the 
East European countries, EU 
membership is expected to solve 
major economic problems. 

The nature of the Norwegian 
economy is also unusuaL It con- 
sists partly of extremely inter- 
national sectors (ofl, gas and 
dripping) which also do well 
outride the European Union. Its 
industrial sector, which proba- 
bly would reap the greatest 


By Geir Lundestad 


benefits from membership, is 
relativel y weak . Due to solid op- 
position from fanners and fish- 
ermen who, for obvious reasons, 
fear external competition, the 
economic factor was a far less 
dear reason for voting “yes” 
than elsewhere in Europe. 

Norwegians also differ on the 
political-cultural level The con- 
cept of equality is probably 
stronger here than in any other 
country. The so-called counter- 
cultures are weaker than they 
used to be, but they continue to 
represent an important force in 
Norwegian politics. 


Tensions between the center 
and the periphery are greater 
here than elsewhere in Europe. 
When the political establishment 
in Helsinki speaks, the Finnish 
nation follows, particularly in 
connection with foreign policy 
issues. In Sweden, the Stockholm 
elite has proved its strength for 
decades, if not centuries. In Nor- 
way, initiatives front the center 
are seldom more than a basis for 
further discussion. 

The writer is director of the 
Norwegian Nobel Institute and 
professor of international history 
at the University of Oslo. He con- 
tributed this comment to the In- 
ternational Herald Tribune. 











ened to be more protectionist 
than has been the case, APEC 
might have been a realistic op- 
tion. But no longer. It may still 
serve as a warning to tire Europe- 
ans, but they now seem to recog- 
nize it for the hot air that it is. 

As host to next year's summit, 
Japan vnff be paymg further Up 
service to the APEC idea, while 
doing as Httle as posable to devel- 
op it So much for the biggest 
Asian trader. 

How about APECs newest and 
smallest American one, dole? 
The Chileans have more rifawn* 
than most to believe in free trade. 
But whether or not they eventual- 
ly get into NAFTA, they are also 
looking toward their immediate 
neighbors in Mercosur; a group- 
ing of 190 milKnn people (Argen- 
tina, Brazil, Paraguay and Uru- 
guay) with a combined GNP 
twice that of ASEAN and a de- 
cade further down the free trade 
road than ASEAN. . . 

Mercosur countries have the 
Western Hemisphere's greatest 
growth potential and do little of 
their trade with Asia. Their prior- . 
ity is arrangements with NAFTA 
and with Andean neighbours. 
The three NAFTA members are 
likely to fed the same way. 

Meanwhile, the Asia-Pacific 
talk ignores realities in the other 
direction — the other half (rf Aria 
west of the Andaman Sea. Like 
South America, its trade is quite 
small. However, things are chang- 
ing rapidly there as in Latin 
America and, more tentatively, in 
former Soviet bloc countries. 

The interests of all parties con- 
cerned with freer trade must be to 
ensure global commitments to 
more open markets and not ones 
which, if only by implication, 
leave out the newcomers. 

As for the United States itself, 
political realities at home and in 
Aria are gradually impinging on 
its rosy notions of a trans-P&dfic 
community. For one, the enormi- 
ty (rf its trade deficit with China 
will dawn soon. 

The problem is not so much the 
size of the gap ($30 billion this 
year) as the ratio of imports to 
exports — almost four to one. 
Why the United States should 
buy so much from a still largely 
clewed economy when it exports 
so little to China is a source of 
wonderment to non-Americans 
— and perhaps also to Messrs. 
Gingrich, Helms & Co. 

Despite all the fuss over Chi- 
na, it is a far less important mar- 
ket for the United States than is 
Mexico, and no more so than 
Brazil Given the sensitivity of 
employment and migration rela- 
tions with Mexico, why not buy 
Latin shirts and toys, not (Com- 
munist) Chinese ones? 

The Aria-Pacific has been the 
fastest growing area of trade in 
the past two decades, but one 
should not automatically assume 
that it inevitably will be in the 


By M 3 TRENDT m Df Ttk&rarf (Aancnfaal QtW Sradkwe 


next two. Part'of the boom ii 
overstated by double and triple 
counting as components are made 
m one or several countries and 
assembled in yet another before 
being shipped to America. . 

Another part is attnbotable to 
access to the UJSe market Al- 
though trade barriers in Asia are . 
declining, markets for finished 
goods are mostly heavily protect- 
ed mono way or another. : 
Meanwhile, the United States 

is no longer as we/comc in Asia as 

it once was. Its imHtary presence 
is comforting, but rehtctance to 
get too close is growing, as evi- 
denced by Thai unwillingness to 
act as a storehouse for supplies. 

Fierce attacks, on American 
values by countries highly depen- 
dent on its markets and manufac- 

Paciffc relatio ns — as^B^tbe 
sometimes knee-jerk U.S. a p- , 
preach to human rights issues. 0. 

There is of course a parallel 
gradual disengagement of the 
United States from posl-Co/d 
War Europe. But America is not 
seeking to take a leading part in 
any new trans-Atlantic group. 

The logic of the U.S. trade po- 
sition should be to keep a balance 
between Aria, Europe and the 
Americas in the general context 
of open trade. This is best done at 
(he global level 
If a dunce has to be made, the 
Americas will come first, partly 
because of domestic political 
considerations and partly be- 
cause Aria is a complex set of 
individual relationships with 
major countries — China, Japan, 
South Korea, Indonesia etc. — 
that cannot be dealt with under 
an APEC umbrella. 

As for tile smaller countries of 
the rqghm, they wIU naturally pre- 
fer smal l er groupings with more 
comparable economies, whether 
in ASEAN or even in President 
Ramos's Httle EAGA. 

In the long run, APEC could 
prove worse than irrelevant It is 
already highlighting differences 
of perception between East Asia 
ana North America. At a time 
when the U.S. public appears to 
be turning inward, it is di s t ra cting . 
attention from real trade issues 
toward photo oppor tun ities. 

Ironically, if the United States 
does get its act together, starts 
saving more, cutting its deficits, ■ 
taking a big stick to those who 
pay lip seprice to open, markets 
but practice merc antilism, the ■ j 
main sufferers will be those who ’ 
have benefited so much from • 
North American worship of the * 
consumer: the Asian exporters 
who jeer at American values. 

Those who met in Miami — . 
democratic, market-oriented and - 
with the ghost of Yankee imperi- ; 
afism exorcised — found a greater • 
sense of common identity, seif- * 
interest and possibly values than ! 
the Bogor group will ever muster. • 

International Herald Tribune. 




5:. 

»!<■ ?r-.: 

St!.-' 


A Lesson in Saving the Countryside — PAGIES: 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


N orwegians were more 

afraid of losing their farms 
than thdr dty jobs. There was a 
recognition that 45,000 small 
farmers are the roots that nour- 
ish rural Norway. Take away 
the fanners scratching a living 
from smallholdings in the bleak 
floors of the fjord lands and an 
essential part of Norway dies. 

The fanners were the loco- 
motive of the “no” campaign. 
They underwrote much of the 
advertising and took time out 
to march on Oslo. 

High costs, poor land and a 
harsh climate would have made 
Norwegian produce hopelessly 
inefficient in the European mar- 
ket As the Highlands are to 
Scotland, so the fjord districts 
are to Norway. The Center 
(Fanners) Party leader, Anne 
Eager Lahnstein, struck a chord 
among many Norwegians when 


she spoke of the unconscious 
way the European Union is hus- 
tling countries down a blind al- 
ley where the cost of everything 
is made dear but the real value 
of society is obscured. 

The fanners say they have 
sounded a warning for EU small- 
holders: sooner or later the Com- 
mon Agricultural Policy win col- 
lapse and take them down with 
it. Norway, in choosing to pro- 
tect its farmers, has stood up for 
cultural values above and be- 
yond profit-and-ioss economics. 

This may not be the wealthier 
way; it may cost a great deal But 
Norway wSi stand there Hke a 
billboard flashing this message: 
“And now for something eom- 
plezdy different.” 

— Jonathan Magnus Ledgard. 
commenting from Stavanger. 
Norway, for the International 
Herald Tribune. 


1894: Scandals in Rome 

F ARIS — (The Herald says in an 
editorial:] Scandals are every- 
where. The affair of the Banca 
Romans has been revived by the 
communication to a Pariaamen- 
tary Committee of documents 
which had been kept back at the 
time of the investigation. The 
question which excites the Ital- 
ian political world is: who are 
the personages compromised by 
these documents? The moral of 
this history is that disgraceful 
business is going on almost ev- 
erywhere in the worid which 
touches both on politics and 
business. None but ambitious 
people pretend to believe that 
the evil is peculiar to our times. 

1919: A Joyless Havana? 

NEW YORK — — Not content 
with making the United States 
dry, the Prohibitionists are now 


a campaign against Ha- 
vana. with no racing and no’ 
drink in America, there is a move ‘ 
to make Havana the wettest spot 

2“* «“* Monte Carlo of 
the Western Hemisphere. It is to ! 

take the joy out of tins Cuban 
city, which is only four hours by * 
boat from Key West and two ■ 
from New York, that the 
wommtionists are now working. \ 

1944: Mysteiy Defense : 

rzi Fro “ our New York i 
®~bon:j Toe Germans were dis- 
J*ed today [Dec. 13] to have 
torown a new “device” into the 
*rar mysterious silvery balls $ 
which float in the air. Riots report . 

seang these olgects, both indrrid- 
ually and in clustere, in forays over 
the-Roch. [It is possible that (he 
floatortpresent a new anti-air- ; 

crartdefense instrument m we^- 

oo. This dispatch was heavily cen- * 
sored at Supreme Headquarters.] 




I 


t 





mat 


m 


h 


— -1 i 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1994 


Page 7 


OPINION 


A Scorching Battle of Ideas, 
And Democrats Just Watch 


By David S. Broder 
W A „ S n HlNGT0 ? Michael 

a former Reagan 
budget official now with the Hud- 
son Institute, Offers the provocative 

“U Sf" 1 ™ "? of fice. the Republi- 
can Party has become the dominant 
party in America, because, he savs 
it is the place where the battle W 
ideas is taking place. 

Recaliing the work or the late Sara- 
ud LubeU, a shrewd observer or mid- 
20th century politics. Mr. Horowitz 
says he agrees with Mr. Lubell’s con- 
tention that the two parties are rarelv 
at parity. One sets the tone, the other 
reacts. The meaningful policv de- 
bates almost always take place Orithin 
toe prevailing party. 

If that is a good criterion, then 
“ere is « a P° werfuJ case to be made 
for the Republican Parry as the “sun" 
in the current political solar system, 
to use Mr. Lu bell's metaphor. 

The president is preparing his 1 995 
agenda and the policy-making wheels 
are spinning inside the White House 
and the Office of Management and 
Budget. The Democratic Leadership 
Council, which Mr. Clinton headed 
, before his 1992 campaign, has of- 
fered up a serious 10-point domestic 
and international program, which the 
president last week praised as a base 
for his own forthcoming proposals. 

But all this is reactive to the Re- 
publican “Contract With America." 
the manifesto for the most success- 
ful Republican congressional cam- 
paign in a generation. The contract 
was a strong policy document, out- 
lining positions on issues that Re- 
publicans have been arguin g vigor- 
ously for years. 

The debates began even before 
Ronald Reagan became president, 
when the supply-side insurgents 
challenged the views of convention- 
al conservatives and converted the 
Republican Party to a doctrine of 
continually cutting marginal tax 
rates. The argument was broadened 
to include everything from “star 
wars" to New Federalism during the 
years of the Reagan presidency. 

But when George Bush succeeded 
Mr. Reagan, the lire seemed to van- 
ish from Republican policy debates. 

The Bush team provided manag erial 
efficiency in foreign affairs, but it 
left a large vacuum in domestic poli- 
cy, which Mr. Clinton and his col- 
leagues in the Democratic Leader- 
ship Council sought to HL 

Their struggle to define what a 
New Democrat is produced interest- 
ing ideas, some of them — a nation- 
'll service program, direct loans to 
college students — included in Mr. 

Clinton’s first-year program. 


But budgetary and political con- 
straints forced shrinkage or post- 
ponement of many of the bolder 
ideas. A restructuring of welfare and 
job training programs was pushed off 
the agenda by a health policy initia- 
tive that proved to be an indigestible 
stew of ideas, not a breakthrough. 

The Republicans have been re- 
markably swift in seizing the oppor- 
tunity Mr. Clinton and the Demo- 
crats left open. While deftly 
sabotaging several of Mr. Clinton's 
initiatives and stigmatizing others, 
they have been honing their own 
ideas, helped by conservative think 
tanks with financing from corporate 
America and wealthy givers. 

Many of the ideas are controver- 
sial. even within Republican ranks. 
The balanced-budget constitutional 
amendment commands broad sup- 
port, but there is division over 
whether it should guarantee, in its 
own text, that federal costs will not 
be pushed off onto the states. 

The term-limits constitutional 
amendment is even more divisive. 
Among proponents, there is an emo- 
tional dispute whether House mem- 
bers should be limited to six years 
service or 12, as senators would be. 
Eveo more interesting is the emer- 
gence or a challenge from creden- 
tial ed conservatives who question 
the whole concept as an infringe- 
ment on voters' freedom of choice. 

A third constitutional amend- 
ment proposing prayer in public 
schools is being pressed by Repre- 
sentative Newt Gingrich, House 
speaker-designate, but is staunchly 
opposed by key Senate Republicans. 

Some Republicans want Congress 
to rewrite the rules on welfare. Oth- 
ers want to take the federal govern- 
ment out of the picture and let each 
state handle welfare as it deems best. 

On budget and tax issues, some 
Republicans see opportunities for 
significant savings in the Pentagon 
budget. Others insist that defense 
is undernourished. 

On immigration policy, the real 
debate has been taking place among 
Republicans, with Governor Pete 
Wilson of California favoring a cut- 
off of health and education benefits 
to illegal immigrants, while Jade 
Kemp and Bill Bennett are opposed. 

The Republicans are not similarly 
engaged on health care or on mea- 
sures to rebuild workers’ confidence 
in their economic future. But Demo- 
crats can lake tittle comfort. On 
many of the issues that voters care 
most about, the Republicans are 
hogging the debate — giving them a 
grip on the political future. 

The Washington Past. 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Peace, War, Appeasement 

Retarding "On Bosnia. Washing- 
ton Should Stop Deferring to London 
and Paris ” (Opinion, Nov. 2V) by 
Adrian Hastings. Norman Stone, 
Mark Almond, Noel Malcolm and 
Brtinka Magas: 

There ore serious moral, political 
and strategic arguments for lifting 
the arms embargo on Bosnia — es- 
pecially now that the authorizations 
to the United Nations and NATO to 
use force in response to attacks on 
the safe areas have been followed by 
such patently inadequate practice. 
However, the five writers arguing 
for an end to the embargo simplify 
the argument when they speak of the 
arms embargo's “flimsy legal basis." 

In fact, the UN Security Council's 
led reaffirmations of its origi- 
1991 arms embargo Resolution 
713 show that the Security Council, 
rightly or wrongly, made a con- 
scious decision to continue to apply 
the arms embargo in new circum- 
stances where, as it was obviously 
aware, the old unified Yugoslavia no 
longer existed. That decision, even 
though it is in tension with the right 
of states to self-defense, does have a 
legal basis in the UN Charter. 

On a separate point, the same five 
writers attribute to three colleagues 
and myself, writing in your columns, 
the view that “establishing Bosnia as 
an independent state was wrong." 
(" Prevent a Return toAII-Oul War in 
Ex-Yugoslavia, ” Nov. 16, by Adam 
Roberts, John Chipman, Philip H. 
Gordon and Mats Berdal). That is 
not what we said. We wrote that 
Bosnia was “prematurely born” and 
we cast doubt on whether it can 
function in its formal but uncon- 


trolled borders. It is obvious and 
impressive that many of its inhabit- 
ants — Serbs and Croats as well as 
Muslims — have supported the state 
of Bosnia- Herzegovina, and have 
done so in extraordinarily difficult 
circumstances. Bosnia has many 
achievements to its credit, political 
and military. We did feel it right, 
however, to draw attention to the 
ground Tor doubt as to whether the 
whole of Bosnia, in its old frontiers, 
can be put together again. 

ADAM ROBERTS. 

Oxford, England. 

Regarding "To Understand Bos- 
nia" (Letters, Dec. 2): 

T. G. L. Thirkell writes that the 
United States, in light of its own 
“ethnic cleansing" and land grab- 
bing in the 19th century, should un- 
derstand Europe’s role in Bosnia 
and should not force solutions on 
Europeans. However, more recent 
history — World War I and World 
War H. for instance — suggests dial, 
left on its own. Europe is not capa- 
ble of resolving its own problems. It 
is belter for the United States to 
push Europe now to stop appeasing 
the Serbs than to risk greater prob- 
lems in the future. 

ED PENTZ. 

London. 

The Serbs, far from wanting to 
reunite a nation, merely want to 
protect their own people from once 
more being subjected to the hostile 
ethnic groups that kept them in a 
state of serfdom for centuries. 

The Sobs observed a cease-fire for 
months, but as victors cm the battle- 
field they obviously did not feel they 
should accept a peace plan that had 


been dictated to them by outsiders 
unable or unwilling to enforce it. 

In their view the war was precipi- 
tated by the Bosnian Muslims when 
they declared Bosnia independent 
without the consent of the Serbs. 

President Bill Clinton’s talk of 
lifting the arms embargo was a clear 
signal that the United States had 
officially taken sides. As a result, the 
Bosnian Muslims reopened hostil- 
ities with a thrust from Bihac. The 
Serbs counterattacked, and military 
logic would no doubt demand that 
they take the staging area of the 
Muslims’ assault. 

RAINER ESSLEN. 

Avignon, France. 

Norway: Who Wanted What 

Francis M. S. Peele (Letters, Dec. 
2) writes that the message of the 
Norwegian popular rejection of Eu- 
ropean Union membership is similar 
to that which he claims should be 
taken from the U.S. midterm elec- 
tions: “Shrink government, and leave 
us alone to get on with our lives.” 

This flies in the face of the reality 
of the Norwegian debate. It was not 
the conservative political forces that 
said no to the EU; it was the social- 
ist left and centrist-agrarian factions 
which persuaded Norwegians that 
the EU’s dedication to unrestricted 
capitalism and big business would 
threaten Norwegian democracy, 
welfare, environmental regulations 
and food quality. As for the political 
philosophy represented by Ameri- 
can conservative Republicans, I 
happily report that such can hardly 
be said to exist here. 

ROBERT MARSALIS. 

Oslo. 


No Sentiment , Please ? We’re 
In the Process of Inter action 


By Kay S. Hymowitz 


N EW YORK — Teaching teen- 
agers about masturbation, the 
issue that led to the dismissal of 
Joycelyn Elders as U.S. surgeon gen- 
eral, is a howling example of bring- 
ing coals to Newcastle. 

But as the smoke clears from this 
latest skirmish in the culture wars, 
we would do well lo re think the 
terms of the debate. 

Condom distribution and “safe 
sex" curriculums that include ex- 
plicit instruction in subjects like 

MEANWHILE 

masturbation are only symptoms of 
a deeper problem: the prevalent di- 
vorce of sex from deep feeling 
Critics have long assailed the 
news media's fascination with im- 
ages of cool, routine sex and fleeting 
infatuations in a consumer's para- 
dise of abundance and variety. But 
what is perhaps less well understood 
is the way sex educators implicitly 
endorse this state of affairs. 

It is true that while Hollywood 
turns up the heat to a boil, educators 
scramble for ways to keep the lid on. 
But though they may call into ques- 
tion the brutal posturing of gangster 
rappers and warn of the dangers of 
serial encounters, their medical, bu- 
reaucratic and legalistic assump- 
tions add oxygen to the general at- 
mosphere in which trivialized, de- 
roman ticized sex can thrive. 

In the ’50s, David Riesman wrote 
of young people who “take sex along 
with their vitamins." But today's 
chilly discourse makes the sex-edu- 
cation manuals of those days look 
tike “Romeo and Juliet." 

Sex nowadays is defined as a 
healthy release of energy. It is good 
for you, like jogging. 

As Dr. Elders implies, sometimes 
it might be healthier to do it alone. 

“Sec is too important to glop up 
with sentiment,” shrugged a Planned 
Parenthood pamphlet for teens. “If 
you fed sexy, for heaven’s sake admit 
it to yourself. If the feeling and ten- 
sion bother you, you can masturbate." 

“Sex for Yourself’ is the title of a 
chapter of “Girls and Sex," a self- 
help manual by Wardell Pomeroy, a 
.co-author of the Kinsey Report. 

At its most sentimental sex is 
only a method in an arid list of ways 
of “sharing” or “showing feelings," 
which is healthy as long as you are 
“comfortable” or “related” about it. 
And passionless, one might add. 
In today's sex-education manuals, 
profound emotions such as love, 
jealousy and longing are conspicu- 
ous only In their absence. 
Curriculums are replete with the 


“skills” required by today's healthy 
teenager: refusal skills, communica- 
tion skills, decision-making sk ill s, 
condom skills and, evidently, mas- 
turbation skills. 

“We taught them what to do in 
the from seat of a car,” Dr. Elders 
once said. “Now it’s time to teach 
them what to do in the back seaL" 

Codes dealing with sexual harass- 
ment and with speech and sex on 
campus support a similar idea. 

Reducing the most in tima te of 
human relations to the terms of an 
apartment lease, the infamous Anti- 
och College sexual offense policy 
epitomizes the new bureaucratic, 
technical sexuality: “Obtaining 
consent is an ongoing process in any 
sexual interaction,” tire code asserts 
without irony. “Verbal consent 
should be obtained with each new 
level of physical and/or sexual con- 
duct in any given interaction.” 

Deprived of any ideal by which to 
imagine sex except as a negotiated 
contract for mutual self-expression, 
kids today would seem to have only 
one reason to say no: health. 

In a 1993 poll for Good House- 
keeping and CBS, teenagers were 
asked to give reasons not to have 
sex. Eighty-five percent mentioned 
fear of AIDS or pregnancy; 4 per- 
cent said “not being in love.” 

“Doing it,” the popular term for 
intercourse, is a perfect emblem for 
the ethos of deroman ticized sex. The 
lover — a word that seems a senile, 
mumbling old lady in this brave new 
world — is reduced to a throwaway 
object for relief of an annoying itch. 

The better students have learned 
to ape their elders' lessons, with 
even more precision. According to 
Marian Jensen, dean of students at 
Amiocb, wine and candlelight have 
been replaced by this seductive 
oome-on: “Would you like to acti- 
vate the policy?” 

All societies have artificial moral 
codes to tame and describe Eros. 
But surely this is the first generation 
in history to learn the lessons of love 
from lawyers, health professionals 
and bureaucrats. 

Those lessons evoke a joy] ess and 
narcissistic sexuality — without ro- 
mance, without imagination, with- 
out idealism and without passion. 

“We in America have tried igno- 
rance,” said Dr. Elders. “Now it’s 
time to try education.” 

If this is education. I’ll take 
ignorance. 

The writer is a contributing editor 
of the Manhattan Institute's City 
Journal She contributed this com- 
ment to The New York Times. 








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Page V 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 14 , 1994 


China Bars 

U.S. Aide 
Who Went 
To Taiwan 


The Associated Press 

BEIJING — China has can- 
celed a planned visit by Trans- 
portation Secretary Federico F . 
Pefia to protest his trip last 
week to Taiwan. He had been 
scheduled to visit China Jan. 7- 
20 . 

A Foreign Ministry spokes- 
man said Tuesday that Mr. 
Pefia violated the agreements 
that established U.S.-Grina re- 
lations in 1979 by visiting Tai- 
wan and “aroused strong dis- 
pleasure within China.” 

“Under such circumstances, 
it is hard for us to receive Mr. 
Pena in January,” die spokes- 
man said. “Visits and ex- 
changes of other senior officials 
at China and the United States 
will continue.'' 

Beijing insists that the Unit- 
ed States have only unofficial 
contacts with Taiwan. 

Despite the Pena flap. China 
continues to maintain that 
high-level exchanges with the 
United Slates should be 
strengthened, the spokesman 
said. 

China voiced “firm opposi- 
tion and strong displeasure” 
when Mr. Pena paid a three-day 
visit to Taiwan and promised 
closer ties with Washington. 

Mr. Pefia was only the second 
cabinet-level official to visit 
Taiwan since Washington 
switched diplomatic recogni- 
tion to Beying in 1979. His visit 
followed a U.S. decision to 
modestly upgrade relations in 
recognition of Taiwan’s eco- 
nomic and democratic develop- 
ment. 

Beijing regards Taiwan as a 
renegade province and objects 
to governments sending high- 
level visitors there. 



Russians Move to Isolate Re 



By Steven Erianger 

fie w Yo/k Tuna Sender 

MOSCOW — Fighting in- 
tensified Tuesday in the seces- 
sionist Chechnya republic as 
Russian troops moved to sur- 
round and seal off the capital, 
Grozny. 

President Boris N. YeUsm or- 
dered the invasion of Chechnya 
early Sunday, in the name of 
defending the unity of the Rus- 
sian state. Russian troops have 
moved toward Grozny in three 
mlnmns while Interior Ministry 
troops have tried to seal Chech- 
nya's borders, hoping to pre- 
vent any new influx of arms. 

Russian officials maintain 
that their troops will not move 
to seize Grozny, a city of 
400,000 people, but only to be- 
siege ana isolate it as talks to try 
to settle the conflict continue 
slowly in the nearby North Os- 
setian town of VI 


n. M. “SS 

rwaarass te-s-sats 
assi~ss£ asMsssss 

- -- rae ££&&£ 

fmforated state. He said 


analyst of regional issu«forthe*| 
Analytical Ceraef^ ■ •: 


boring states m 
Caucasus. 



was 

sin, but the vote 
victory for him. Three years 
ago, when Chechnya fust de- 
clared its independence, Mr. 
Yeltsin issued a state of emer- 
gency and sent a much smaller 
contingent of troops there. The 
former Russian Parliament de- 
manded that the troops be 
p ull ed bade, and Mr. Yeltsin 
complied. 

But the resolution Tuesday 
night was more careful and did 
not confront Mr. Yeltsin with a 
demand he could not now meet. 

ies 


tion the government's compe- 
tence. , 

Russian officials said the size 
of the invasion force was a state 
secret, but some estimated that 
Russia had committed nearly 
40,000 troops, Jfjf * 
from the army and half of them 
from the Interior Ministry. It is 
Moscow’s biggest mlliiary Oper- 
ation since the end of the Ar- 
ghan war. 


The Chechen forces lo^to 


The fighting wasconcentral- 


ed within 16 to 25 kilometers 
(10 to 15 miles) of Grozny, 
around a military airfield and a 
village that holds high ground 
overlooking the capilaL The 
Chechens attacked Russian sol- 
diers with a few tanks and 


on Chechnya, and the Commu- 
nist Party attacked him for 
abuse of power, he found sup- 
port Tuesday from the ultrana- 
tionalist party of Vladimir V. 


their flamboyant leader, Dzho- 
kar Dudayev, a former Soviet 
Air Force general, number 
about 12,000 men, of whom 
“some 3,000 can fight intensive- 
ly,” said Leonid V. Smimyagffl, 
a member of Mr. Yeltsin's Pres- 
idential Council and the chief 


president s 

Mr Surirnyagia.^ who£ad -V 

long telephone convcrtf^a 
Tuesday with Mr. Dudayev, 
said in an interview that tfe 
Russian aim is *to push ML 
Dudayev to accept somete&fl ; 
of treaty” recognizing CM*- 
aya as an integral parr ot:^, . 

sia. „ - : J.., ?*/..- 

Despite Rusaanr-eDgmrafcd 
and funded efforts staMfe. 
suxnmer to overthrow 
davev his downfall K ifejt.a 
Russian requirement, 
uyagin said. 

■ Aid Promised by 
Russia will allocate too 
lion rubles, or $300 
aid to Chechnya once \ 
flict there is over, rim 
prime Munster Oleg " 
said Tuesday. ■ 

The Russian press agency 

Itar-Tass, quoted himastsBog: 

an emergency sesson <£4#$** 

eminent commission set up&r 

the crisis in the region thafcfhc 
aid was intended to heJprestose 
Chechnya’s economy. I 


launchers, *wbile the Russians RUSSIA: Moscow’s Forces Nearing Enclave’s 

struck back with artillery, tank 

Couthned from Page 1 


and 


Thr AMOCtami Pita* 


The Chechen separatist leader, Dzhokar Dudayev, wbose forces are battling Russian troops. 


fire, assault helicopters 
fighter-bombers. 

With reports of 10 Russian 
soldiers dead and at least 14 
wounded since the invasion, the 
Russian Parliament over- 
whelmingly passed a resolution 
Tuesday night criticizing Presi- 
dent Boris N. Yeltsin’s use of 
the army to handle the Chech- 
nya problem. 

But the resolution, passed by 
289 to 4 with one abstention, 
declared that Chechnya is an 
“an inalienable part of the terri- 
tory of the Russian Federation, 
where the constitution and laws 
of the Russian Federation must 
be effective,” and did not try to 
order Mr. Yeltsin to withdraw 
Russian troops. 


ITALY: Fissures in Ruling Coalition Widen as Magistrates Interrogate Berhisconifor 7 Hours 


uoops landed at the airport in 
the city of Vladikavkaz, about 
80 kilometers southwest of 
Grozny. 

Despite their overwhelming 
military superiority, some of 
the Russian troops appeared jit- 
tery as they approached the 
fighting. Soldiers in a Russian 
armored fighting vehicle fired 
without wanting on a group erf 
Russian and American journal- 
ists. The journalists fled in their 
cars, but the Russian troop car- 
rier followed, again firing on 
vehicles bearing crews from 
U.S. television networks. 

Official casualty reports list- 
ed nine Russians and 14 
wounded, but the toll seems 
likely to rise as the fighting in- 
tensifies. There were uncon- 
firmed reports that the Russian 


forces intended to impose a 
blockade on Grozny by Tues- 
day night. 

There were further reports of 
heavy fighting and bombard- 
ments northwest and east of the 
'Chechen capital, from which 
many residents had fled before 
Russia’s thrust into the region 
at dawn Sunday. Estimates of 
the number of Russian troops 
involved in the attack range 
from 20,0 00 to 40,000. Chech- 
nya is believed to have more 
than a few thousand lightly 
armed volunteers. 


Chechnya, enraging the Inga-^ 
shis. 1:. ,i-- 

The Russians maintain that' 
the Tn gushis blocked Jhar con- 
voys and set fire to more titan ■ 
30 military vehicles. Reporters 
saw the burned-out frames of 
more than a dozen Russtativb- - 
hides along a road in the riSage 

of Barsuki. . . 


The Ingushis make little. Se- 
cret of their disdain and intense 
dislike of the Russians. / 


Approaching the Western 
front, one passes through Ingu- 
shetia, a neighboring enclave 
whose people share dose ethnic 
ties and fefam with tire Che- 
chens. Russian armored col- 
umns passed through the en- 
clave cm Sunday on their way to 


“These Russian -'forces' art 
not prepared ' for. war” said ■■ 
Lieutenant Magamycd Kfcamk- 
heyev, 40, an ethnic Ingushiand 
a member of a special forces 
unit of the Russian Ministry of 
Internal Affairs. “All they’re 
good .for is gathering potatoes 
and cabbages in the Odd. Only 
their equipment is frightening.* 


co- 


Continued from Page 1 
a farce, the prime minister was the 
median in chief ” 

Mr. Berlusconi was interviewed Tues- 
day by a trio of investigators led by 
Francesco Saverio Borreffl, the magis- 
trate whose team has, in almost three 
years, interrogated thousands of busi- 
nessmen and politicians embroiled in 
the scandals that finally brought down 
the country’s postwar political giants. 

Against the political backdrop of ten- 
sion and uncertainty, though, the out- 


come of the interrogation by the magis- 
trates seemed to hold little importance 
for his coalition allies. 

“A government crisis is certain,” Mr. 
Bossi said in Milan late Monday. “And 
in less than a month you'll feel the first 
stirrings of the Second Republic. It will 
be the end of Berlusconi." 

Mr. Bossi, a firebrand northern feder- 
alist, has assailed Mr. Berlusconi virtual- 
ly from the moment the tycoon took 
power after elections in March that 
many Italians hoped would produce a 


new era but which now seem to have led 
only to a tangle of confusion. “The prin- 
cipal source of our trouble is that we 
buried a republic without building an- 
other,” the Corriere della Sera newspa- 
per said. 

And remarks Tuesday by Giuseppe 
Tatarella, a deputy prime minister and 
senior figure in the neofascist National 
Alliance, only deepened the sense of 
foreboding. 

The Alliance has been consistently 
loyal to the prime minister, but even as 


Mr. Berlusconi was being interrogated, 
Mr. Tatarella was asked by reporters 
when the government parties would 
meet, in Italian political parlance, to 
“verify” the viability of their coalition. 

Additionally, the formerly Commu- 
nist Democratic Parry of the Left and 
other opposition groups withdrew on 
Tuesday most of thdr objections in the 
upper house of Parliament to next year’s 
budget legislation — a move that Mr. 
Berlusconi would once have welcomed 


NATO Chief Lashes Out at UN 

No Air Strike on Rebels Requested, Claes Says 


MANILA: An Aquino’s Love Child RECOVERY: Good Times Roll CHIPS 


Continued from Page 1 
nulment is the only option lor 
dissolving a matrimony. 

Mr. Salvador fed the rumor 
nulls last month by petitioning 
a Manila court to annul his 
1975 marriage to Maria Asun- 
cion Dabao. wbo now lives in 
the United States with their 
three children, the oldest of 
whom is a 19-year-old universi- 
ty student Mr. Salvador told 
the court he had been estranged 
from his wife for 10 years and 
was no longer “capable of com- 
plying with the essential obliga- 
tions of the marriage .*’ 

Mr. Salvador and Miss 


Aquino met earlier this year on 
the set of the Tagalog-language 
movie “Nandi to Ako” (“I'm 
Here”) and began dating secret- 
ly. Bui the secret was soon plas- 
tered all over Manila's newspa- 
pers when the actor confessed 
at an emotional news confer- 
ence that he was in love with 
Miss Aquino and had ditched 
his mistress, the former starlet 
Vivialyn Dungca, 24, with 
whom he has a 2-year-old girl. 

Like Mr. Salvador, Kris 
Aquino has been no stranger to 
controversy. After her mother 
triumphed over the dictatorship 
of President Ferdinand Marcos 
the 1986 revolution. Miss 


- in 


TTie Next Primate of Ireland 


The Associated Press 

DUBLIN — A parish priest 
who served more than a decade 
in Rome has been chosen to be 
the next Roman Catholic pri- 
mate of Ireland. Church offi- 
cials announced Tuesday that 


Aquino bad no trouble landing 



ivan, nad oeen appointed 
adjutor archbishop of Armagh, 
a position that holds an auto- 
matic right of succession to 
archbishop. 


much to her mother’s 
consternation. Her movies were 
hits with young fans but drew 
what can only charitably be 
called mixed reviews from crit- 
ics. One of them once described 
her as “spectacularly untalent- 
ed.” 

Friends of the Aquino family 
say the headstrong Miss 
Aquino takes after her father, 
the opposition politician Ben- 
igno S. Aquino Jr., wbo was 
assassin ated by soldiers loyal to 
Mr. Marcos in 1983. 


CoBtmaed from Rage 1 
slowdown in 1995 and perhaps 
even a recession in 1996 should 
be taken very seriously. 

The rapid growth this year 
proved even more surprising 
because ibe same forecasters 
who expected only modest 
gains also assumed that interest 
rates would be one and a half 
percentage points lower than 
today’s figures. 

With six interest-rate in- 
creases by the Federal Reserve 
this year, why has the gain in 
jobs and output picked up rath- 
er than stowed? 

There are a variety of rea- 
sons, from more aggressive 
bonk lending to the long lags 
between tighter money and re- 
duced investment. But econo- 
mists generally agree, that ihe 
surge in output and employ- 
ment was largely fueled by 
strong buying at home and 
abroad of America’s increasing- 
ly competitive goods and ser- 
vices. 

Consumers did more than 
their share, in large part be- 
cause millions of homeowners 
fattened their wallets in recent 
years by refinancing mortgages 
to cut their monthly payments. 


Another key factor, said 
Richard F. Hokenson, an econ- 
omist at Donaldson. Lufkin & 
Jenrette, is that exceptionally 
large numbers of Americans are 
in their mid-20s, a stage of life 
in which households are formed 
at a rapid pace and credit-card 
bills are run up to the top. 

The less widely heralded kick 
to economic growth is exports. 
Merchandise exports constitute 
about 10 percent of output. 
With merchandise exports now 
growing at a remarkable 15 per- 
cent annual pace, Mr. Mellmaa 
of Morgan Guaranty pointed 
out, the export boom is contrib- 
uting one and a half percentage 
points to the overall economic 
growth rate of about 4 percent 

Some growth for American 


U,S. Warns EU 


pean 

was expected as the big § 7 gQ\ 
industrial economies climbed ft l 
out of recession. But the early 
exit from the downturn and the 
rapid pace of economic growth 
in Europe and Canada, averag- 
ing more than 3 percent has far 
exceeded consensus forecasts. 

While exports should keep 
rising, it would take exceptional 
circumstances to match the cur- 
rent pace of export growth. 


Continued from Page 1 

was made dear in Mr. Kantor’s 
letter. 

Overall, the adoption of EU 
tariff levels would impose more 
than $200 million in added du- 
ties on roughly $3 billion of 
U.S. exports to the three coun- 
tries, according to U.S. esti- 
mates. European officials con- 
test those estimates as being 
high* 

Other sectors that would be 
hit hard include chemicals, on 
which Washington estimates 
duties would rise by $80 mil- 
lion, and many farm goods like 
rice, on which tariffs would soar 
from a mere $3 JO a ton to the 
Union's prohibitive 650 Euro- 
Currency Units (about 


The Associated Prat 

BRUSSELS — NATO’s sec- 
retary-general, Willy Claes, 
lashed out Tuesday at the UN 
operation in Bosnia for failing 
to request air strikes against 
forces tjhat kSJed a Bangladeshi 
peacekeeper. 

Mr. Claes, after an hourlong 
session at NATO headquarters 
here with the U.S. defense sec- 
retary, William J. Perry, angrily 
denied reports that the North 
Atlantic Treaty Organization 
had failed to respond with air 
attacks, saying the alliance 
could do nothing unless the 
United Nations commanders 
asked for help. 

“I'm waiting for some re- 
quests.” Mr. Claes said at a 
news conference. 

“Sorry, there has never been 
one request” for air strikes, he 
said. “We are ready, as always." 

Mr. Perry said the incident 
“should raise no doubts about 
the effectiveness” of NATO, 
and added, “NATO replies to 


peacekeepers, some of whom 
have been taken hostage. 

But alliance officials, includ- 
ing Mr. Feny, contend the 
United Nations should do more 
to defend itself is the face of 
Bosnian Serb harassment , 
which has paralyzed the UN 
humanitarian operation. 

However, bom men acknowl- 
edged that there is nothing 
NATO can do unless the UN 
decides to change its approach. 

“We have no authorization to 
unilaterally conduct air 
strikes,” Mr. Perry said. 

The U.S. defense secretary 
came to Brussels to meet with 


allied driense ministers and dis- 
cuss steps to strengthen the p<* 
sition of the UN force, or ffi 
plan tor a potential withdrawal. 
NATO and U.S. officials have 
estimated that such a withdraw- 
al would require the alliance to 
send in 30,000 to45, 000 combat 
troops, and the United States 
has offered to deploy as many 
as 25,000. 

Mr. Perry said U.&, British 
and French defense officials 
were trying to salvage the UN 
peacekeeping force in Bosnia 
because removing it would raise 
the specter of spreading war- 
fare. 


A Parisian Gambit 
Unveiled on Bosnia 


requests from the UN forces.” 
rive 


EU officials said Tuesday 
that they were seeking to reach 


an interim agreement on con- 
cessions to compensate the 
United States for the higher tar- 
iffs from Jan. I. But they said 
compensation for higher chip 
tariffs would not necessarily 
come on other electronic goods, 
as the United States and its in- 
dustry is demanding. 


peacekeepers were 
wounded after missiles were 
fired at a UN armored person- 
nel carrier in the northwest Bi- 
hac region Monday. One of the 
soldiers from the UN Protec- 
tion Force died of his wounds 
Tuesday. He was the 68th UN 
fatality in Bosnia. 

Mr. Claes's comments reflect 
the frustration inside the alli- 
ance at the UN’s unwillingness 
to call for retaliatory air strikes. 
UN officials are worried about 
the safety of their international 


By AJan Riding 

Sew York Tima Service 
PARIS — France’s recent 
threat to withdraw its troops 
from the United Nations peace- 
keeping force in Bosnia-Herze- 
govina was widely viewed here 
as a maneuver aimed at focus- 
ing attention on the new crisis 
there and mobilizing support 
for a fresh peace effort 
Political experts said that, by 
seeking in meetings in Wash- 


4,400 troops in the field, France 
has also been outspoken in re- 
j: . i \ iner ic an criticism 



NEWS ANALYSIS 


_ UN performance 
! French force has suf- 
fered 22 soldiers dead and al- 
most 400 wounded since the 
conflict begem. 

Last Wednesday, in what was 
seen as a calculated move to 
raise the diplomatic stakes. For- 
eign Minister Alain Juppg told 
Parliament that “the obstinacy 
of some and the demagogy of 


others risk setting the Balkans 


CASTRO: No Fan of Capitalism, Cuba’s Isolated President Still Warms to Better Economic Relations With U.S. 


Continued fit® Page 1 

room. To his right sat a good friend, the Colom- 
bian novelist Gabriel Garcia M&rquez, who one 
night at the height of the refugee crisis spent an 
evening in Martha’s Vineyard, off Massachu- 
setts, talking politics, Faulkner and Cuba with 
Mr. Clinton. 

Across the table at one end was Ricardo Alar- 
eda, Cuba’s lead negotiator in the talks that 
produced an agreement with the Clinton admin- 
istration to stop the exodus. At the other, was 
Jose Antonio Arbesu, the Communist Pony's 
chief expert on UJ5. affairs and Mr. Alarcon’s 
senior deputy in his talks. 

Covering their bets, Mr. Castro and his aides 
also asked after the new speaker of the House. 
Where was it that Newt Gingrich had gone to 
college? And what about the political future of 
the former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, 
General Colin L. Powell? 

Mr. Castro made no effort to disguise his real 
concern. He seemed troubled by the Republi- 
cans' sweeping victory in the Nov. 8 election, less 
out of any affinity for Mr. Clinton than from a 
fear that the end of the U.S. embargo might have 
been pushed further into the future. 

The refugees who fled Cuba in homemade 
rafts over the summer did not leave for political 
reasons, he insisted once again: they were driven 
out by the embargo and the economic turmoil it 
had wrought And whatever pain the embargo 


ditions to China. It does not diciate political 
conditions to Vietnam. Why does it have to 
diciate political conditions to us?” 


Sipping a dry martini before the meal — he 
usually 


glided from place to place with trays of simply 

id p< 

producing able 


the 


[y prefers rum and red vermouth, he said — 
Mr. Castro warmly recalled an earlv stay in the 
United States in 1948, telling of the basement 
apartment he had rented in a brownstone on 
West 82d Street in New York. Later on, as a 
young conspirator against the Cuban dictator 
Fulgencto Batista, he said, he sneaked across the 
Rio Grande into Texas to meet with a prospec- 
tive financier. 

“I probably still have a debt with American 
justice,” he said, smiling. 

Mr. Castro did not wail to be reminded of the 
great political mileage he has got out of the 
embargo over the years. 

“Some people ask why they do not lift the 
embargo, because it serves us as a pretext,” be 
said. “The day that American businessmen want 
to come and do business here, it would be a great 
headache for us. But we are ready to face that 


they corrupt us? Will we fall sick with a 
terrible infection of capitalism? We are willing to 


see. 


‘It is absolutely false that the blockade serves 
us as a political instrument to keep the people 
united." 

The Cuban leader is said not to subscribe to 


bad inflicted on Cubans and their government, the belief of Mr. Garcia Marquez, the author of 
lever force the sort of “Autumn of the Patriarch” and “The General in 


prepared chicken and potatoes, he spoke of 
revolution’s being regenerated, producing i 
new cadres who deserve the responsibilities he 
has increasingly given them. They could be trust- 
ed. be added, not to “overthrow us or put us 
before the firing squad." 

What could be glimpsed at dinner suggested 
that Mr. Castro's authority remains paramount, 
even forbidding. 

When asked, senior officials almost invariably 
dismiss the notion of ideological divisions within 
the government over the changes made. Yet, Mr. 
Castro was candid in acknowledging qualms 
about such steps as the wide opening to foreign 
investment, the advent of a flourishing parallel 
economy for Cubans with access to dollars, and 
the establishment this fall of free markets for 
some farm and factory goods. 

“I sympathize more with some and less with 
others.” he said of the changes. “But I have 
supported all of them because I think (hey are 
part of a coherent, necessary strategy and they 
have been taken by consensus. With every one of 
those joint ventures, they come to me for signa- 
tures -—and 1 sign." 

Eight years after be abolished a first experi- 
ment in free markets for peasant farmers, Mr. 
Castro was particularly open about his reserva- 
tions in allowing all Cubans who grow vegeta- 
bles, raise livestock or make handicrafts to sell 
their surpluses at prices set by supply and 
demand. 

“I was never a supporter of the peasant mar- 
kets we had," be said. Noting mat the new 
markets are wider in scope and more carefully 


creating a greater appreciation among Cubans 
for the subsidized goods they buy from the state. 

“I say that the agricultural markets teach more 
about capitalism and socialism than a thousand 
schools of political instruction,” he said. 

The challenge of rescuing Cuba's economy, 
Mr. Castro suggested, is psychological as well as 
ideological. 

If he was not sanctioning the enrichment of his 
people, as China’s paramount leader, Deng 
Xiaoping, has done, Mr. Castro said that his 
government was allowing at least some Cubans 
to accumulate some wealth. It was permitting, 
fanners to hire laborers, he said, and he hinted 
that it might eventually ease restrictions and 
allow other Cubans to hire help. 

Reflecting on the summit talks in Miami that 
be had missed, Mr. Castro maimamad that his 
fellow Latin American leaders were selling off 
their assets too cheaply to private investors in a 
headlong rush to restructure their once heavily 
protected economies and gam freer trade with 
the United States. 

Had he been given time on the floor in Miami, 
he said, he would have warned of social needs left 
unmet, of economic development gone out of 
control, of a poor country being swallowed up in 
the big arms of die United States. 

But as he bid his guests farewell, Mr. Castro 
seemed to yearn for a bit of that embrace. 


ington on Monday to dispel any 
notion that France wants to 
pull out of Bosnia, the French 
defense minister, Francois Leo- 
tard, was therefore reaffi rmin g 
tins country’s long-term com- 
mitment to maintaining a 
peacekeeping mission there. 

The experts noted that, while 
France’s recent diplomatic tac- 
tics seemed aimed at embar- 
rassing both the United States 
and the UN into urging that it 
not withdraw its troops, there 
has been no groundswcll of po- 
litical or public opinion here 
calling for such a withdrawal. 

Foreign diplomats also be- 
lieve that; with Prime Minister 
Edouard Balladur widely ex- 
pected to be ^candidate in next 
Spring's presidential elections 
here, he is eagei not to find 
him self camp aigning in (be 
midst of a new Bosnian crisis 
provoked in part by a French 
troop withdrawal 

But French threats cannot be 
separated from France’s undis- 
guised irritation at American 
policy toward Bosnia, provoked 
most recently by Washington's 
decision to stop enforcing the 
arms embargo a gains t the Mus- 
lim-dominated Bosnian govern- 
ment 

In 
have 


he promised, it would never 

political opening that has been its stated goal His Labyrinth,” about the solitude of power. Mr. 

“We are not going to negotiate the normaJiza- Castro takes pride in telling of his travels around 
tion of our relations on the basis of concessions,” the island his meetings with the workers, the - - 

he said “The United States did not blockade “people’s assemblies” at which he says they de- regulated, he described them as more promising 
South Africa. It does not blockade Saudi Arabia, ride the country’s course. than m the first experiment. Bui he was quick to 

where a few rich families own all of the wealth. Looking around a table of eight people much add that he saw negative aspects as well, and 
The United States does not dictate political con- younger than himself, as waiters in white coats that part of the value of the markets was in 


Standing atop the front steps of the vast pal- 
ace, he finally asked his American visitors to 


convey his best wishes to Mr. Gingrich and the 
ublit 4 ~~ 


Republican leader of the Senate. Then he paused 
for a moment and remembered that a conserva- 
tive Republican will soon bead the Senate For- 
eign Relations Committee. 

“And also to Jesse Helms,” he added. “Why 

notr 


tie, French officials 
made no secret of the 

fact that they blame American 
policy for encouraging the Bos- 
nian Muslim offensive in- the 
northwestern enclave of Bihac 
that ended in near-disaster 
when Bosnian Serbs and dissi- 
dent Muslima counterattacked. 

As the largest single contrib- 
utor to the UN force in the 
former Yugoslavia, with some 


ablaze tomorrow. 

Britain and Spain have also 
warned that they might have to 
pug their troops out of Bosnia. 

While he did not name the 
United Stales, Mr. Jupph dear- 
ly had Washington in mind 
when he criticized “govern- 
ments that want to give os les- 
sons when they have not lifted a 
little finger to put even erne man 
on the ground." 

To underline France’s view 
that it lacked international sup- 
port for its military presence in 
Bosnia, Mr. Jupp£ then an- 
nounced that France had asked 
the United Nations and NATO 
to plan the' withdrawal erf UN 
forces. The United States said it 
would be willing to contribute 
some 25,000 troops to protect a 
withdrawal 

But now, political experts 
and, France appeared to be- 
lieve that it had achieved, its 
i mm ed iat e objective of uniting 
Western policy on Bosnia and 
was ready to soften its tone with 
a view to a new peace drive. 

While Mr. Leotard talked, in 
Washington on .Monday of 
ways of beefing up the UN mai-' 
tary presence in Bosnia, Mr. 
Juppfc has always stressed, that 
there can be no mititaiy solu- 
tion to the conflict and that 
there is no alternative to the 
peace negotiations. 




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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1994 


Page 9 


> U.S. Plays Down Chechnya to Play Up Need for Improved Ties to Moscow 


B y Daniel Williams 

washin „ 

iration offidak Climon adminis- 
sia’s assauk on ^ Jl° rkin r s 10 kee P. Rui ' 

thewavnf a* Chechnya from gel tins in 

l ? .M™* u.s 

“nieTji 1 ! 05 ?' "*** have be- 

natoSbSLS sa£rMmer,t5 «« 

Bi " 

asjaaswssssK 
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Chechnya by Russian tanks and aircraft 
comes on the eve of visits io Moscow by 
Vice President Al Gore and cabinet mem- 
bers to discuss economic, nonproliferation 
and other issues. 

Mr. Gore’s visit this week is largely 
designed to shore up aspects of relations 
with Moscow that administration officials 
say are going well, including trade, science, 
talks on conversion of outdated Russian 
nuclear plants and energy conservation. 
These issues, a White House official said, 
are signs of a “strong relationship" with 
Russia. 


The official sad he did not expect Rus- 
sian officials, including Prime Minister 
Viktor S. Chernomyrdin, to be distracted 
by the warfare. 

Despite the use of force against the Che- 
chens, he said, "Russia is a more stable 
country than it was a year ago." 

With its position on Chechnya, Wash- 
ington is saying that it considers that the 
Ru ss ia n federation's borders are inviolate 
even when they encompass regions 
Chechnya where the local ethnic group 
considers itself non-Russian. Any other 


stand would throw relations with Russia 
into a deep freeze. 

Moscow worries about the potential for 
ethnic strife within its borders, and that 
concern is one of its rationales for keeping 
watch on former republics of the Soviet 
Union. 

Russia insists that it must keep troops in 
the so-called near abroad to keep ethnic 
strife, and in some cases the seeds of na- 
tionalism, from spilling into the country 
from neighboring states that share ethnic 
kinship with Russian minorities. 

In particular, Russia worries about the 


infiltration of nationalist Islamic influ- 
ences from its south. It is far from clear 
that such influences are ax work in Muslim 
Chechnya, although Turkey, a secularly- 
oriented Muslim state, has expressed con- 
cern over the fighting there. 

In any event, the Clinton administration 
is refusing to endorse a special Russian 
sphere of influence in the former domains 
of the Soviet Union, and this is one of the 
sources of recent tension with Moscow. 

On his trip, Mr. Gore will discuss recent 
bilateral problems with Russia, which the 
White House official played down as prob- 


lems that were typical or a "mature" rela- 
tionship. 

There is at least one indication that Mr. 
Gore’s visit is not expected to erase differ- 
ences: Secretary of State Warren M. Chris- 
topher is planning to meet with Foreign 
Minister Andrei V. Kozyrev next month, 
probably in Europe, a State Department 
official said. 

He will focus especially on Russia's re- 
luctance to take part in the Partnership for 
Peace program of military cooperation 

with the North Atlantic Treaty Organiza- 
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- . 


International Herald Tribune 
Wednesday , December 14, 1994 
Page 10 


STAGE/ENTERTAINMENT 



The Man Who Buries the Noise 



By MzkeZwerw 

Internationa! Herald Tribune 


A scene from the Kirov’s staging of Tchaikovsky’s “ Queen of Spades, : 


Cokite Maaoo/ En g umn d 

with Irina Bogacheva as the Countess . 


By David Stevens 

International Herald Tribune 


P ARIS — The opening of the wall 
between East and West has sent 
out shock waves in the musical 
world, not the least being the reve- 
lation (in the West) of the opera company 
of the Kirov/Maryinsky Theater of St. 
Petersburg as being one of Europe's most, 
enterprising and musically solid troupes. 

Perhaps this should not be a surprise, 
but while the Kirov Ballet has been spread- 
ing the theater's name around the world 
since 1961, Russian opera was represented 
to the world mainly by Moscow's Bolshoi. 

That this troupe currently seems to be 
the strongest in Russia is due largely to its 
vigorous 41-year-old music director, Vale- 
ry Gergiev. After several years conducting 
in the house, Gergiev took over the top 
post in 1988, and when the rules of the 
game changed he hit the ground running. 
With extensive touring and an ambitious 
audio-video recording contract with a ma- 
jor company (Philips), the company seems 
to be traversing the heavy economic waters 
more successfully than the ailing Bolshoi. 

The dual nomenclature of Kirov and 
Maryinsky is transitional, for maximum 
brand-name recognition. The Maryinsky, 
built in 1860, was named for Maria Alex- 
androvna, wife of Alexander IL St Peters- 
burg was the musical and political capital, 
and the Maryinsky was the house of Tchai- 
kovsky, Rimsky-Korsakov, and Petipa and 
his dancers. 

In 1935, it was renamed for Sergei Ki- 
rov, Communist Party secretary of Lemu- 
el, assassinated the previous year. But 
has become St Petersburg 


The company's opera and ballet troupes 
are midway through a two-month tour, the 
key part being the first installment of a 
long-range “residency" arrangement with 
the Theatre des Champs- EtysSes. 

Two aspects of its season here are strik- 
ing One is that this is a real company. 
sharing language and style and composed 
of artists used to performing together, a 
phenomenon largely mongrdized out of 
existence in the West The other is die 
heavy presence of Nikolai Rimsky-Korsa- 
kov, with “Sadko” and “Kitezh.” This is 
the 150th anniversary of the composer's 
birth; no anniversary is needed in Russia. 


Nezhny are a historic reconstitution of the 
1907 premiere of this religious-pantheist- 
fanlastic epic 

Mussorgsky's vast historical mural of 
political intrigue; “Khovanshchina.” is in a 


P ARIS — Scheduled to 
open next month, the 
CiVb de la Musique is 
on a comer near the 
Porte de Pantin, one of the nois- 
iest intersections in Paris — 
traffic jams, fire engines, con- 
struction crews, heavy com- 
merce, kids playing, Parisians 
yelling at eadh other. 

The Gte includes a concert 
hall, a library, an information 
center, offices, a museum, a res- 
taurant, practice rooms and stu- 
dent studios joined together by 
an interior “Rue Muscale,” for 
which Louis Dandrel is design- 
ing sound to bury the noise. 

JDandreTs work is dose to 
that of an acoustic engineer and 
an architect, though he is nei- 
ther. Although be was program 
manager of the state radio sta- 
tion France Musique and 
founding manager of the 
monthly magazine Le Monde 
de la Musique, he is not a media 
moguL For the past 10 years he 
has been the director of Espaces 
Nouveanx, a think tank funded 
by the French government, but 
he is no foundation maven. He 
an urban srumri anthro- 
pology course at the University 
of Paris but be is not an aca- 
demic. A trained musicuui (Par- 
is Conservatory), he refers to 
himself as a public composer 
and a sound designer. 

He treats noise in the Cagian 
sense — John Cage said that all 
noise is muscaT if perceived 
musically. This includes cough- 
ing in concert halls and motor- 
cycles revving up outside. 

Doesn’t new sound, designed 
or not, just add to the noise? 



Omens Rok 


Louis Dandrel: Designing an " audio identity. *' 


l made a dead of sound with and more people andwe’re nm- 
eight little beDs fastened to the fiing oat of room. The decibel 
dassceflina. So it becomes like a count keeps rising. It is posable 

urban sound more 


glass ceffing. So it becomes like 
fugue. The street noise is my 
contrebass section, the bottom 
of the orchestra, die gongs axe 
iiVt» brass and woodwinds and 
on top of that is delicate pianissi- 
mo veal, tike strings.” 


intelligently, but unhappily 
there are not enough of us 
working in this domain." 


He compared the 
to going into an air conditii 
bunding. “ ‘Oh,’ you say. 'It’s 
nice and cool in here. 1 feel 
fresh.’” So he is not adding 
noise; he is refreshing the place; 
reorganizing existing noise. The 
medium and low sounds, the 
urban noise, are grey. With 
them alone every day is a grey 
day. He doesn’t erase them. The 
waves and the clouds will make 
the day sunnier. 


D 


ANDREL loves ur- 
ban energy. City 
noise has a positive 
connotation. People 
creating things and relating to 
one another. He just wants a 
choice, the choice to take that 
crucial step “anywhere, any- 
time.” 


oute nearby, have you noticed 
that autoroutes always run 
through poor neighborhoods? 
No wonder people turn violent 
so often.” 

The design of a building is 
fgxely considered in relation lo 
its sonorous environment, 
Dandrel says- In this sense ar- 
chitecture is still in the stone 
age Sound pollution is nothe- 
Im" dealt with adequately for 
the reason that most of the 
people responsible for robing 
the problem live in weJWc- 
signed buildings on quiet 
streets. People live n«t to air- 
ports because they cannot af- 
ford to move. “In fact,” Dan- 
drel concludes. **Theie is ho 
noise problem. There is 0% a 
money problem. What if we 
decided to leave tfie spaces 
around autoroutes and air- 
ports empty, for example:” ' 

For five years, heVbeen 
working on that evil car-invad- 
er, the telephone. It zings and 
you jump; you fed Eke i duck- 
ing, like hurling it at,th&waIL 
Dandrel would prefcx a/hjce . 
little ring, like yoormQtfer ca- 
resses you and whispeevm 
your ear, *wake up* darfe 
We’re not slaves ofteiqwioj 
Shouldn’t it be mo re g e nti e 






with ns? It can say, Sweetly, 
‘Monsieur, you are wanted’ ” 


-‘with 


Why build an environment 
dedicated to making music in 
such a location in the first place? 


“They asked me to design an 
idio identity for this public in- 


troduction virtually identical to one done 


Opera from St Petersburg 
brings Russian tradition 
with a capital T. 


where most of his 15 operas are repertory 
items, but they are real rarities in the West. 


All four operas given here are described 
as “new productions,'' but this term has to 
be understood in a particular way. In each 
case the accent was not on novelty, but on 
tradition with a capital T. .All four are 
staples of the Russian repertory, three of 
them had their world premieres at the 
Maryinsky, and what was on offer here 
was operatic history, not some eccentric 
updating of it 

Thus, the delicious fairy-tale sets and 
costumes for “Sadko” are based on the 
1920 designs of Konstantin Korovin. “The 
Legend of the Invisible City of Kitezh and 
the Maiden Fevronia,” to use the full 
name, is staged by the dancer-choreogra- 
pher Andris Uepa, and the sets by Anatoli 



>y the same team for the Bolshoi about 40 
years ago, and seen in Paris on the Bol- 
shoi’s 1969-70 visit Tchaikovsky’s “Queen 
of Spades" is in a staging by Yuri Temir- 
kanov, Gergiev’s predecessor as the Kirov 
music director, and designed by Igor 
Ivanov. Both were effective and atmo- 
spheric, if not in the least innovative. 

Among the singers, Galina Gorchakova 
in the major soprano roles and the mezzo- 
soprano Olga Borodina are stars, already 
in demand in the West Larissa Diadkova 
sang strongly and gave character to the 
aged Countess in “Spades.” A formidable 
bass lineup is headed by Bulat Mmzhil- 
Itiev. a powerful Ivan Khovansky. and 
Mikhail Kit, imposing as the fanatic Old 
Believer, DosifeL Among the tenors, Ge- 
gam Grigorian hardly cuts a romantic fig- 
ure on stage, but has an impressively con- 
trolled voice; Yuri Marusin was a 
convincing Hermann, no mean feat and 
Vladimir Galusin went the route without 
flagging in Sadko’s marathon duties. The 
list could be extended. 

Future seasons here will give a better 
idea of the Maryinsky's range. At home the 
company performs an international reper- 
tory and, in the music of this century, 
reports of David Freeman’s new staging of 
Prokofiev’s “Fiery Angel” make it sound 
daring, while Gergiev argues the artistic 
merits of Shostakovich's “Katerina Ismai- 
lova;” often considered a political revision 
of “Lady Macbeth of Mtseusk.” 

The trick now win be for Gergiev to 
maintain the company’s unity of style 
while opening it up to new influences. 


audio . 

door street joining the' different 
portions of the building. I made 
five gongs, each one with a dif- 
ferent harmonic series. They will 
ring at different times and the 
sounds roll along the curved 
walls like bubbles. On top of that 


“Would you prefer apart- 
ment houses? Sound pollution 
is getting out of control. Jet 
planes break the sound barrier 
over the Eskimos and the Bra- 
zilian rain forest There are ever 
increasing numbers of automo- 
biles in the cities. There are the 
ghetto blasters. There’s more 


“Let’s face it,” he shrugs. 
“That’s a bourgeois pleasure. 
Rich people can and do have 
that choice. Not poor people. 
There are something tike 90 
decibels in blue-collar working 
environments. Getting home, 
the level is not much lower. 
When they arrive; there arefour 
kids screaming. They do not 
have die money for a nursery 
and a nanny. They hear the 
neighbors argue at night 
through thin walls, they hear 
floor scraping on. Sunday morn- 
ing. There is always a hi-fi or a 
TV blasting away. They have no 
escape. There may be an autor- 


He is also wwMqg _ 
SNCF, the French, railroad 
system, redesigning tbeSr 
sound siguals- He calls than 
“audio exclamation popitj.” 
They attract your atteutkaiW 
fore the announcement; oft a 
stop or doors dosing. ‘These, 
warnings sound y«y. ofted’ s*& 
they have to be iteubtihexoa-: 
xnation points: or Vi 
will soon get sick ' 
is proposing a sort of 
mid-range arpeggio.Hei 
it on Ins piano, ti LVa 
minor !3th/d*QZ&. V; 

cxampletf howsonn^^Hadd 
to not subtract from torquaBty 
Oflife” 



LONDON THEATER 


‘Oliver!’ A Celebration of a Show 


By Sheridan Morley 

International Herald Tribune 


L 


ONDON — With $12 
million already in the 
box-office at the Lon- 
don Palladium, you'd 
be wise to start booking “Oli- 
ver!” tickets for next Christmas 
rather than this one: that the- 
ater may indeed not need an- 
other show before the turn of 
the century. But in upgrading 
his own favorite musical from 
its original 1960 surroundings 
to the broad stage, Cameron 

Mackintosh has paid a jprice be- 
yond that of the massive pro- 
duction. 

This was always a chirrupv, 
sentimental selection of high- 
lights from the novel, Dickens 
for the theme park rather than 
the intellect: yet Sean Kenny’s 
revolutionary sets gave it a 


grainy small-stage claustropho- 
bia which, allied to Georgia 
Brown's heartbreaking Nancy, 
did at least cut arid into some of 
the sugar. “Oliver!” was never 
exactly Brechtian, but what we 
get now is, in the wide- stage 
version, all too often a celebra- 
tion of the show rather than the 
show itself. 

Yet song after song still soars 
out of this classic Lionel Bart 
score, the best written in Britain 
in the quarter-century separat- 
ing “Bless the Bride” from 
“Blood Brothers.” Every num- 
ber is both a hit and an old 
friend, and in this huge specta- 
cle as coordinated by Sam 
Men des the only other problem 
is that the show is stopped so 
often it never really bias the 
chance to get fully started. 

Jonathan Prycehasyetto take 
full measure of Fagm, taking ref- 


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14 NICOLE BROWN SIMP- 


Station in America” brings 
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WOMEN ARE FROM VE- 
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2 IN THE KITCHEN WITH 
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4 THE BUBBA GUMP 


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SHRIMP CO. COOKBOOK. 4 2 


sism so egrqgjous as to leave i 
reader gasping for air. 

Let’s dispose of the first book 
first. John Jakie, a professor of 
geography at the University of 
ufinois in Urbana-Ghampaign. 
and Kehb Scull e. head of re- 
search and education at the Illi- 
nois Historic Preservation 
Agency, have convinced them- 
selves that the gasoline station 
is “an important icon of our 


time not only for the student 
and scholar, but also for the 
general reader,” which may 
sound fairly ludicrous unless 
one bears in mind that “icon” is 
a vogue word in the pop culture 
crowd these days. 

Jakie and Sculle have re- 
searched the history of gas sta- 
tions with a thoroughness that 
borders on obsession and nar- 
rate it in prose that serves as 
positive proof that too many 
authors spoil the book. They 
ask, “How does human agency 
play out through social struc- 
tures to configure the built envi- 
ronment as meaningful place?” 

This book is their answer to 
that question, or at least their 
attempt at an answer. To be 
sure, they are halfway through 
the book before they really get 
down to the business at hand. 
When we do get to gas stations 
— “roadside facilities specially 
designed to sell gasoline and oth- 
er closely related products, such 
as lubricants, tires and batteries, 
for the automobile” — the au- 
thors offer a bricks and mortar 


analysis of nine “prevailing 
structural types.” 

“Gasoline station design,” 
the authors inform us with a 
solemnity appropriate to their 
subject, “was not merely an ac- 
commodating of mechanical 
systems useful in dispensing pe- 
troleum products. Rather, com- 
panies staked their reputation 
on the images created” They 
did this “through what we call 
place-product-packaging,” 
which is a clumsy way of saying 
that the gas station’s design is a 
form of advertising 

A0 of which may seem trans- 
parently and transoendentiy ob- 
vious, but one must never under- 
estimate the academic's capacity 
to squeeze the ethereal out of the 
mundane. “Gasoline stations, 
like everything else in the Ameri- 
can scene, invite interpretation,” 
the authors say. 44 As part of the 
American landscape they beg to 
be read for cultural and social 
meaning.” The authors do not 
manage to extract a thimbleful 
of su& meaning from the gas 
static ms they celebrate, but in 


today’s climate the proclamation 
of meaning counts for more than 
the identification of it. 

In this the authors are faith- 
ful to the dictates of the age. 
They are even more so in the 
opening chapter, where they 
ask another question: “To what 
extent did personal history — 
even personality rooted in 
childhood — help dictate re- 
search and writing interests?” 
And then proceed to answer it 
with extensive biographies of 
themselves. "This is the latest ac- 
ademic rage, self-infatuation 
masquerading as scholarship, 
and in “The Gas Station in 
America” it achieves what is for 
the moment its apotheosis. 


uge from the shadows of Guin- 
ness and Moody in a rather gen- 
tle old soul who appears from 
the look of the set to be the 
avuncular manager of a timber 
factory run by rmhiant midgets. 
MOes Anderson is an equally 
unthreatening BOX Sykes, and 
most of the rest are amiable 
Dickensian caricatures. - 

Instead we get those dazzling 
numbers, Anthony Ward’s Pal- 
ladium-pantomime scenery, 
and performances to match. Jt 
is a joyous evening for family 
parties of all ages, but stih not 
quite what it was. 

In a highly Dickensian 
Christinas season for the Lon- 
don theater, brave is the team 
that goes back to him for the 
RSG It was its Trevor Nunn/ 
John Caird “Nicholas Nick- 
leby” of 1980 which not only 
brought bade the possibility erf 
books on stage, but also opened 
up the reality of the broad-scale 
British musical for the first 
time. 

AH credit therefore to Ian 
Judge, always the most show- 
biz-oriented of Ihe current RSC 
team of directors, and the adap- 
tation skills of John Mortimer, 
for giving us this winter at the 
Barbican a new “Christmas 


For faia debut as a London £ 
director, the actor Nigel Haw-P 
theme has chosmtorevive and’’ 
star in ^Tbe. Clandestine Mar- 
nevetihe easiest of com-*. 
edies siaoe rfwM demed&oma^ 
set of rdativelyundcamatic He- 
arth, caricatures and writtenby • 
a querulous "couple (toe actor i 
David Garrick and the barrister 4 
George. Cobnan) neither of ;* 
whom ever quite seems io have ? 
had the same play in mind. J 
Moreover it depends, if it is to V 
rise above its own broken- * 
backed {doc, on a performance \ 
of tremendous and eccentric # 
cha ri sma from the actor playing “ 
Lord Ogteby. ; ; 

But Hawthoroeis an infinite- l 
ly subtle player and has trouble £ 
with the sheer lunacy of the * 
role, though his own production 
draws memorable ugly-sister 
sketches from Susan Engel and . 
Deborah Findlay. It does not, 
however, make the case for a 
classic in need of revival. 


A: 


Card” which, tike “Nickleby” 
but unlike “Oliver!” does in 


Jonathan Yardley is on the 
staff of The Washington Post. 


To oar mo J bb in France 

Its never been easier to subscribe 
and save with our new toll free 
service. 

Just aril us today of 05-437437 


fact manage to tackle the entire- 
ty of the book and all its social 
and historical implications. 

With this epic “Carol,” the 
RSC has ai last found its very 
own “Wind in the Willows,” a 
seasonal treat which can come 
back into the repertoire Christ- 
mas after Christmas. 

Clive Francis leads a huge 
cast unable as was Dickens 
himself to explain where 
Scrooge comes from or what 
makes him so horrible at toe 
outset and so schmalzy by the 
close. Outside of Shakespeare, 
toe RSC has always had trouble 
taking the measure of the main 
Barbican stage and the festive 
calendar: here at last, with a 
costume parade and the oldest 
of seasonal chestnuts in the fire, 
they have managed a lavish au- 
dience gi/L 


T the Orange Tree in 
Richmond, a long 
overdue London pre- ” 
mierc fox “Flora the t 
Red Menace,” the off-Broad- 
way musical that m ade a star of x 
Liza Minnelli back in 1965 and \ 
established, pre-“Cabaret,” the ’ * 
songwriting team of Kander * 
Ebb. The book here is just tern- 
ble, and most of toe songs seem J 
to be in the wrong places: but 
they are a fascinating curtain- 
raiser for toe later work, and 
Sam Walters has discovered a 
feisty leading lady in Lucy Tre- 
gear. 




The problem here is that Da- - 
rid Thompson’s much-revised 
book seems terminally unable 
to decide whether it is parody- 
mg or celebrating the Mercury _ 
Theatre/ WPA workshop the- 
aters of toe 1930s, and as a V* 
result no mood is ever set for 
long enough to make any real , 
sense within the plot or the peri- ' 

2? toe they wrote 

Cabaret” only a year later, toe ! 
Jtoposers had learned enough ( ~ 
for a lifetime. 



-a 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1994 


NIXDORF 



WORLD NEWS 


Vienna: 

Austria's biggest ever computer 
contract goes to Siemens Nixdorf. 




it 




ii> 





Siemens Nixdorf has been awarded the 
contract for the Austrian Labour Mar- 
ket Service (AMS) as the single source 
partner and prime contractor for an 
extensive outsourcing project By 1997, 
according to the project, 114 provin- * 
cial and regional offices and 31 employ- 
ment information centers nationwide 
will have changed over to a new 
client-server system and will be integra- 
ted in an online Ethernet network. 

At 2.1 billion schillings (around US$200 
million), this is the largest IT contract 
ever awarded by the Austrian Republic, 
and represents a major order for 
Siemens Nixdorfs UNIX computers - 
a total of 220 RM400 and RM600 high- 
power computers are to be installed 
as local servers for 5,200 PCs, 3,400 
printers and fully integrated self service 


terminals. With just a few keystrokes, 
the job seeker can access all the data in 
the computer system, not only details 
of job vacancies and training and re- 
training opportunities nationwide, but 
also background information on the 
economic state of the local job market or 
the state of the local housing market 
This facility will soon cover the whole 
of Europe. The Siemens Nixdorf solu- 
tion is open forconnection to the"Eures" 
work placement system. Just how 
effectively Siemens Nixdorf solutions 
are working for employment author- 
ities is demonstrated by similar 
facilities already operating in seven 
European countries, where the national 
average period of unemployment 
has decreased by two days, with com- 
mensurate savings on state unemploy- 
ment benefits. 





s'* 









A Madrid: The nationwide flight 
‘ ® information network from Siemens 
: S Nixdorf is cleared for take-off. 




‘ in the central AENA service points con- 

Siemens Nixdorf has landed a contract nected with ail airports. .Efficient fast 
with AENA (Aeropuertos Nacionales y and easy to operate with Windows - 

Navegacion Aerea), implementing the these were the features that convinced 
largest flight-safety communications AENA. It is planned to extend the 


system in Spain based on X.400 standards solution by additional commercial and 
-at nine airports so far. administrative appli- 

Major expansion of w cations and to intearate 


Brussels: X-Fire-CS on permanent 
emergency assignment for the 
Belgian Ministry of Internal Affairs. 




Major expansion of 
the network is en- 
visaged for next 
year. Airports are . 
able to communicate 
with each other within 
seconds via E-mail. £ 

Data on flight cancelia- £|| 

Jons, delays, earlier 
arrival times or modified 
light routes are exchanged 
rom computer to computer 
o allow rapid response ^ 

in the ground. High- 
peed computers pro- 

ide supersonic speed *** | 

Dr the commmunica- 
on channels: nine Pentium PCs as ser- 
4 |rs for the local networks at the air- 
orts and two RM computers installed 
s network and back-up computers 



cations and to integrate 
it into other airport 
networks such 
as SfTA and AFTN. 
To achieve this, 
Siemens Nixdorf 
will install new 
Pentium computers 
as well as 17 RM400 
systems in the second 
and third phases 
iHl of the venture. 


Fast, reliable and compatible - Siemens 
NixdorPs new open systems policy has 
the Belgian Ministry of internal Affaire 
convinced.To enhance the exchange of 
information via the "National Infor- 
mation Network for Fire and Rescue 
Services" (RINSIS), the Ministry placed 
an order for RM computer technology 
on an open UNIX system basis. In 
future the system will link the Govern- 
ment's coordination center with 450 
workstations at regional and local emer- 
gency call reception points, fire services, 
and civil defence and rescue organiza- 
tions throughout Belgium - nationally 
via Bemilcom,the Belgian military net- 
work, via X.25, and locally via Ethernet. 
With the combined power from RM 
computers and workstations and the 
X-Fire-CS solution intervention man- 
agement and control system, when an 


emergency occurs, RINSIS can be used 
to immediately activate the required 
countermeasures, and for total coor- 
dination of emergency measures on 
the spot What sort of emergency is 
involved? Fire, flood, road accident or 
chemical spillage? Are there casual- 
ties? What is the best strategy to deal 
with the disaster and rescue and shel- 
ter the victims? All these questions can 
be quickly clarified with X-Fire-CS, en- 
suring that the right emergency re- 
sources arrive at the scene of the event, 
folly informed and with the right equip- 
ment RM computers form the corner- 
stone of the network. They provide all 
the networked workstations with all 
the required data - quickly, and ex- 
tremely reliably, thanks to special fail- 
safe facilities. They ensure that, with 
RINSIS, the data processing operation 
runs flawlessly and without panic. 


,* a *■* • .*• ■ ■■■V'* •r -■ 







SIEMENS 

NIXDORF 


Munich: Siemens Nixdorf makes service 

for BMW customers just a matter ofaquickprt^p. 


After Europe and the USA, it's Asia's 
turn to get the benefits of Siemens 
Nixdorf IT and Siemens automation 
technology for BMW service without 
delays. In Japan and Chi na PIS- 
the Siemens Auto- 
mation diagnosis and 
information system 
to identify possible 
problem areas, in 
conjunction with 
onboard diagno- 
sis in each BMW - 
is also being tested. 

This system combines 
with TIS, the technical in- 
formation system from * 

Siemens Nixdorf, to provide a solution 
forefficient service support TIS acts as 
an electronic maintenance manual with 
a CD-ROM data medium that not only 
reduces the volume of paper gener- 
ated to a minimum, but also gives BMW 
service technicians, within seconds, 
all the information they require- from 
details of the correct specialized tool 
to be used rightthrough to complete in- 
structions on repair and installation. 
The two systems can be integrated 
into a single comprehensive retailer in- 
formation system — with other Siemens 
Nixdorf components such as the Elec- 
tronic Parts Catalog (EPC) with data 
stored and ready for queries on every 



Basel: 

No more speed 



transactions at 


imaginable component, 
just by inputting the 
chassis number. In fu- 
ture, there will also be 
business management 
software pack- 
ages to provide 
support for 
order proces- 
sing and dispo- 

SEES, * . >" 

by tine end of 1994, there will be around S,emens 

2,500 D1S ,TIS and EPC systems in and Siemens Nixdorf. 

operation worldwide. So that in more 
than 100 countries the magic formula 



London: British Ministry of Agriculture 
opts for RM computers -* 

and no longer stands alone. 

led by the RM systems 
The British Ministry of Ag riculture, satisfies MAFF's current 
Fisheries and Food (MAFF) has adop- date requirements, in rela- 
ted RM co m puters as the center and tion to ag ncultu ral support 


cornerstone of an all-new client-ser- 
ver architecture, doing away with its for- 
mer island solution. Under its multi-mil- 
lion major contract with MAFF, Siemens 
Nixdorf has linked previously isolated 
hardware and software systems from 
different manufacturers and networked 
these with 4,000 Siemens Nixdorf PCs 
and 40 RM600 UNIX servers, to create 

a state-of-the-art multivendor environ- 
ment with a client-server architecture 
incorporating the best systems from 
Siemens Nixdorf and other suppliers. 
From today's 4,000 workstations at 
Head Office and in the regions, the 
solution is to be progressively expan- 
ded connecting MAFF with all its dis- 
trict offices. Communications 
run via a wide area network 
(WAN), accessible to all com- 
puters via open X.400 and X500 
interfaces. The network can be 
used, for example, to send E-mail 
messages from Head Office to remote 
locations, thanks to a user interface, 
which provides a standard presenta- 
tion for ail the different programs, from 
word processing through to document 
production and management. The 
combined power of these computers. 


in line with EC policies. 




Payment transactions were grinding 
to a halt because of the millions of 
documents iri yolved - transfer orders, 
cheques, direct debit orders - in spite 
of home banking, self service termin- 
als and other alternative routes. The 
Swiss Banking Corporation (SBC), the 
third largest financial institution in 
Switzerland, decided ‘it was time to 
tackle the problem - with a state-of- 9 
the-art solution from Siemens Nixdorf 
as prime contractor and system inte- 
grator. Siemens Nixdorf worked 
with Bernard Schifer GmbH 
to give SBC a document- 
based automatic pay- 
ment transaction 
system, interbank 
and in dealings 
with the Post 
OfRce.Siemens 
Nixdorf instal- 
led, integrated 
and network- 
ed RM600 
computers, 
PCs, scanners 
and form read- 
ers for the state- 
of-the-art Open 
Imaging Processing 
System (OIPS)- digital 
document processing. 

And now there's no speed 
limit for payment transactions- the 
documents are scanned and digital- 
ized using the OCR system, and the da- 
ta is forwarded to the UNIX compu- 
ters for processing and archiving. The 
information can be called up from each 
workstation in the client-server archi- 
tecture, and further processed by spe- 
cial programs, with total reliability ac- 
cording to the "zero error" principle. 
The result? Efficiency gains of 50% 
and investment protection into the 
future, thanks to the flexible and open- 
ended nature of the solution. Less 
paper, less input in processing and ar- 
chiving documents -that's how the 
Open Imaging Processing System 
from Siemens Nixdorf helps the Swiss 
Bank Corporation to enhance its 
payment transaction processing oper- 
ations. 







V 




m 


Bonn:Telekom now communicating with Siemens Nixdorf "OfficeWorld" 



Now that Telekom has been reorgan- 
ized as a private company, its office 
organization is also being completely 
restructured. Paper mountains and 
cumbersome card indexes will soon 
be a thing of the past The trend is to- 
wards the electronic desk. Soon every- 
thing will be handled from the PC: 
preparing texts, processing forms, fil- 
ing documents, sending faxes, using 
electronic mail. All this is made possible 
because of the multi-functional office 
communications software OCIS- 
PC, which Siemens Nixdorf has 
tailored to suit the individual 
needs of the postal corpora- . . . 
tionaspartoftheTIBIS / , 

project (Telekom Integrat- 
ing Office Information 
System). In a number 
of pilot phases, 

OCIS-PC has prov- 
en itself super- 


client PCs at the 176 
Telekom sites to access the 
central services of currently 



just under 180 RM600 servers. 
As database and applications 
servers using such applications 


as centralized filing, electronic mail 
and address management, the 
RM systems are continuously on call 
for every PC.To enhance inter-depart- 
mental communication from PC to PC 
and from PC to RM server, Telekom 
is also considering introducing Work- 
Party, the workgroup solution for 
comprehensive workflow management 


right across the organization. Like 
OCIS-PC and other Telekom programs, 
WorkParty runs under ComfoDesk, 
the standard user interface. By the year 
2000, more than 100,000 workstations 
at 176 sites are to be equipped with 
OCIS-PC and networked. When it has 
been extended with innovative appli- 
cations such as computer-assisted tele- 
phone calls, and management infor- 
mation and workflow monitoring sys- 
tems, Siemens Nixdorfs OfficeWorld 
solution will be not only one of the 
biggest but also one of the most ad- 
vanced in the world. 


iorto any rival 
product on 
the market 
OCIS-PC 
allows 
all 






- - 3* 

\ \i: 


**—./*■ ... 

,■ ; b • , 


Furth: Quelle has ordered 


_ . _r * * *' 

V<::' - 


the European UNIX bestseller. 


--rfS: 


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*■ 


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The biggest European mail-order com- 
pany has discovered the ideal source 
for global communication: Quelle is 
now doing business with the largest 
European computer company, with 
the aim of implementing MAC, the inter- 
national "Merchandising and Com- 
munication" network. What's the reason 
behind this decision? Quelle imports 
approx. 45% of its 55,000-item product 
range from foreign countries.There are 
27 purchasing agencies from Portugal 
to Japan, from China to Indonesia, and 
all of them have to be in touch with the 
headquarters in Furth, communicating, 
consulting on decision-making 
receiving instructions. The aim of MAC 
is to reduce communication costs 
through modem data transfer and to 
harmonize all merchandising proced- 
ures worldwide. The intention is also 
to create a standard management tool 
by integrating all purchasing agencies 

into a global procurement sv^tem. 

To achieve this goal, the MAC network 
has been undergoing constant.m- 
provement and expansion since 1992 
-from document 

tronic mail transfer. All '"fonnation, 
ranging from offers to order conffona 

tions, can be sent to each 

agency. There, it is reconciler* and I har 

monized with the main p® 1 

atfoepushofabutton^athemter 

national infonet Using^MAC^ 
work. Quelle can also distnbute faxes 



directly from the UNIX system - with- 
out the need for special hardware such 
as fax cards. An example shows how 
this can reduce costs: a fax query from 
the FGrth headquarters to a client in 
Hongkong isfirstsentto the local pur- 
chasing agency- saving costs by using 
the XJ25 computer network - and 
from there via the telephone system 
directly to the client at the local calling 
rate. For Quelle, the use of Siemens 
Nixdorfs global marketing and service 
network marks a major step ahead 
in the implementation of its world- 
wide communication 
network. 



Memmingen: 

Metzeler Schaum gears up for lean 
management with R/3 LIVE. 


Extreme pressure on costs and prices, 
customer orders for smaller and 
smaller quantities, with increasingly 
rigorous quality requirements in ever 
shorter delivery times - these are the 
challenges faced by Metzeler Schaum, 
along with many other companies. 
Metzeler is restructuring its operation 
according to the lean management 
principle, to make the company faster 
and more flexible, and to increase 
profitability. This inevitably demanded 
new EDP systems with greater flexibil- 
ity as the backbone of a more efficient 
organizational structure. And it was 
Siemens Nixdorf that got the contract, 
to implement the R/3 LIVE concept 
This was because the R/3 LIVE concept 
enables Metzelerto meet another of its 
requirements - long-term cooperation 
with a reliable partner. The goal at 
the company's plant in Memmingen, 
which manufactures moulded and 
block foam-rubber, for vehicles and 


furniture, for example, was to progres- 
sively replace the old system with a 
flexible client-server architecture and a 
fast network. Standard software specifi- 
cally designed for medium-sized busi- 
nesses was installed, meeting at least 
80% of all requirements and providing 
easy and convenient data query facili- 
ties. EDP and specialized staff from 
Metzeler worked in close cooperation 
with Siemens Nixdorf spedalists.The 
central priority was to redesign the 
company's business processes, focus- 
ing mainly on core business. The 
result is a powerful, flexible systems 
architecture consisting of a host hold- 
ing all Metzeler's customer data, an 
RM600 computer acting as the server 
forthe R/3 modules - accounting, stock 
management, sales and distribution, 
PPC and human resources - and 
Siemens Nixdorf PCs, taking office com- 
munications right into the workplace. 
The old system is scheduled to finally 
shut down at the end of 1995. 


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SIEMENS 

NIXDORF 





Rotterdam: Thyssen De Reus brings 
COMET into the open environment 


Thyssen De Reus B.V. (Netherlands), 
an international company which also 
has factories in Germany, England and 
Belgium develops, produces, installs 
and services elevators. 

Besides the manufacture 
of elevators for personnel 
and special elevators, it 
specializes in the manu- 
facture of elevators and 
stairlifts for disabled and 
elderly people. Thyssen 
De Reus has committed 
itself to the latest distrib- 
uted information proces- 
sing via client-server tech- 
nology for development 
Siemens Nixdorf was 
commissioned to make 
the progressive transition 
from the old system to 
the new, by porting the 
COMET software library 
to an RM600 UNIX system, 
complete with all mod- 
ules. This was the ideal 
transition solution - the 
investment in COMET 
software is protected , un- 
til the final transition to 
the latest client-server soft- 
ware is completed, (n the meantime, 
Thyssen De Reus staff can continue to 


work on the tried and tested COMET 
system they know so well. But it was 
never this efficient The addition of RM 
power and the processing speed of 
the UNIX operation system means that 
the entire order 
processing oper- 
ation is now con- 
siderably more 
efficient The 
RM600 plays a 
very important 
role in the future 
automation net- 
work of Thyssen 
De Reus.To en- 
sure the network 
can grow and 
expand, Thyssen 
De Reus Nether- 
lands has com- 
plemented it with 
the service power 
and training of 
Siemens Nixdorf. 



Bocholt BEW exploits new sources 
of energy- from R/3 LIVE to SICAD. 


■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ MBBi in terms of hardware and software. 
Siemens Nixdorf is putting energy into The solution consists of a range of 
a completely new IT organization for software packages, such as R/3 LIVE, 
BEW; the Bocholt power and water the complete business management 
supply company- a project which must solution custom-made by Siemens 
be completed by 1998. With 70,000 Nixdorf for the power industry's spe- 

subsc fibers, BEW is the largest energy cific requirements - from order entry 
supplier in West Munsterland to accounting. In addition, SiCAD and 



(Germany). A BS2000-client for many SINCAL, Siemens Nixdorfs software 
years, BEW now plans to install state- applications for the power industry, 
of-the-art standard applications and support BEW with sewer documenta- 
move over to an open client-server tion, calculations, analysis and plan- 
architecture. This is a very ambitious ning functions for networks.1997 will 
project requiring all the expertise of mark the arrival of the OCIS office so- 

Siemens Nixdorf as a system integra- lution, turning workstations into elec- 
tor and developer of sector-specific tronic desks, and the ARCIS archive 
applications for the power industry, system, which can reduce mountains 
The challenge is to combine RISC of files to CD format Once the project 


multiuser systems, workstations and is completed in 1998, BEW will have 
PCs into a sophisticated client-server in place its IT organization for the 21st 

environment for distributed processing, century. 



Johannesburg: Allianz uses RM 
power to enter the world of UNIX. 




For Allianz South Africa, an alliance 
with Europe's No. 1 in UNIX multiuser 
systems was its best insurance policy 
for entry into the open systems environ- 
ment The insurance giant was plan- 
ning to invest in new UNIX-based appli- 
cations software, and was looking for 
the best hardware platform. It compar- 
ed products from a range of manu- 
facturers before arriving at the right so- 
lution: a multiprocessor RM600 was to 
replace the previous system based 
on proprietary computer architecture. 
The Siemens Nixdorf UNIX system is 
on the network with all the PCs. The 
result? A fast client-server link, connec- 
ting all Allianz departments, with all 
the advantages of an open and totally 
expandable system. From today's 250 
concurrent workstations, with com- 
prehensive file, print application and 
communications services provided 
by the RM60Q, the system capacity can 


be increased to several thousand - 
workstations. To do this, Allianz merely 
has to add memory or processor to 
arrive at the next RM computer cate- 
gory. The operating system is the base 
for new UNIX applications UniVerse 
and InsSure from software produced 
BCS,for all its core business. Allianz 
is also insured against the need for fur- 
ther staff training in the future, since 
Siemens Nixdorf has already turned 
Allianz employees into experts in 
working with open systems. And just 
in case a problem does arise, the 
Siemens Nixdorf service package also 
includes ongoing support, with ^ Tele- 
service, for example, providing prob- 
lem solutions between one computer 
and another. Allianz Manager Richard 
Roos is very happy with the way things 
have gone. "With RM600 and Siemens 
Nixdorf as our partner, our transition to 
the world of open systems has been 
extremely successful". 













istss® 








Vienna: Magna, component supplier 

for the car industry, gives 

the green light for RM investments. 


The Canadian car parts supplier Magna 
gives priority to new RM computers: 
five RM600 UNIX systems are to replace 
Quattro computers for COMET data 
processing. One computer has been 
installed at each of the European Magna 
branches in Weiz in Austria, Heiligen- 
stadt, Prague, and two at the Safegrtter 
branch. Together with 120 PCs and 
40 terminals, they act as a boost to the 
COMET client-server-operation, from 
financial accounting and wages and 
salaries, to time management Also in- 
tegrated in the solution is special 
trade software with the FORS supplier 
package for all tasks from order entry 
to statistics - with data communi- 
cation links to the automotive industry 
available for order processing. Thanks 
to CROSS BASIC, Magna can continue 
to rely on COMET CROSS BASIC is the 


migration tool that facilitates the seam- 
less transfer of trie business software 
library from legacy to open systems - 
without interruptions, restrictions or • k. ’- 
waiting-time for the user. At the same * ^ 

time, productivity is increased by as ^ 

much as 20%, thanks to the latest UNIX ^ \ i 

computer technology. Today, for * J s - ^ 
the largest independent supplier to the 

car industry, it's business as usual ■■ •• J I*. • : r ’ 

with COMET. And without a hitch. But ? ? *• : 

thanks to RM, the operation is foster \ V ~ V, • 

and more efficient, with unlimited > C ^ ^ 

power and connectivity. 4 - * ^ 

For further information, please : 

contact : 

Siemens Nixdorf ■ ^ T‘. 

InformationssystemeAG Kv 5^ i 

UK 41, Otto-Hahn-Ring 6 sV ' " 

D-81739 Munchen 
Telefax: +49/89/63648749 




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International Herald Tribune, Wednesday, December 14, 1994 


7' Vi ' :'•. ,:■ 


11 


THE TRIB INDEX lin QQidi 

aSSSSf inTSb?e^Ss S ftS; £?“ ®- ^ 01 

byBtoomberg Business News Jan l. waft' i3o ,nes - compiled 



100 


World Index 

12/' 3/94 close: 1 10.33 
Previous: 110.31 



approx, wegtnmg; 32^ 
Close: 121.39 Prev.: 121 41 


150 

130^ 
110 
90 


Appox. wegtmng- 37% 
Close 11093 Prw.lio fit 


N D 
1994 


/America 


N D 
1994 



The index backs U S doSar values ot statics Ik Tokyo, New York. London, and 
Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brad, Canada, Chita, Don marie, Bnbwtd, 
France, Germany, Kong Kong, Italy. Mexico. Nethertancta, New Zeatand, Norway. 
Singapore, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and Venezuela. For Tokyo, New York and 
London, die Max la composed ot the SO tap issues in terms ti marital capitalization, 
otherwise the ten top statics are Backed. 




| Industrial Sectors | 


Tin. Pick, % 

dam dose change 


Too. 

dm 

Piw. 

dm 

% 

dung* 

Energy 

111.44 11157 -0.12 

Capital Goods 

11124 

111.47 

-031 

unities 

124.66 124.84 -0.14 

RawHatariab 

127.20 

12730 

-0.06 

Rnsne 

110.35 110.59 -0.22 

Consumer Goods 

101.56 

101.28 

+028 

Services 

110.48 11021 +054 

Hscetanous 

111.62 

11052 

+150 

For maw information about 9>e Index, a booklet Is amBabb free ot charge. 

Write loTrib Men. 181 Avenue Chart* do Gadb, 9S521 NeuSyCedex, France. 


O bitematianal Herald Tribune 


Ford Helps Jaguar 
Get Batik Old Sheen 


Improving 


Jaguar is now beginning to 
recover from years of tosses and 
quality problems, but has tar to 
go to repay Ford’s total 
investment of $4 biSion. . 


By Richard Stevenson 

Hear York funrs Senior 


COVENTRY, England — They were 
madly p aiming and polishing at Jaguar 
Cars Inc.’s plant here one recent day, 
making the place sparkle for a visit from 
a loyal customer, Queen Elizabeth 11. 

But the changes at Jaguar of late have 
been more than cosmetic After nearly 
five years in which it has posted nothing 
but operating losses — and made its 
parent company. Ford Motor Co., look 
foolish for having paid $2.5 billion to 
acquire it in 1989 — Jaguar appears on 
track to reap something more than a visit 
from the queen: a profit 


work force of 12,700 during the past four 
years, Jaguar will have a struggle con- 
vincing Ford that Britain is the most 
efficient place in which to build the next 
generation Jaguar, a less expensive sedan 
expected to go into production by the 
end of the decade 


Operating income or lose. 
+$TOQmfflfon 


Nina ) 
months j 

’91 *92 *93 *94 < 


The turnaround has not come easily. 
The inefficiency and sloppiness of Jag- 
uar’s manufacturing were far worse than 
Ford had expected, and the amount of 
money and time needed to set things 
right far greater. 


Ford has sunk more than $4 billion 
into Jaguar, including the purchase 
price, accumulated losses of more than 
51 J2. billion, capital injections and a 5320 
million investment in a newly introduced 
update of its XJ sedan, the backbone of 
Jaguar's product line. 

The survival plan required wholesale 
changes in manufacturing and labor re- 
lations to cut costs and improve quality 
that had sunk to abysmal levels. (The 
favorite bumper sucker of disgruntled 
Jaguar owners: “The parts falling from 
this car are of the finest British crafts- 
manship.") 

Despite slashing 6,000 jobs from its 


But the progress so far has provided a 
clear shot aL long-term survival for Jag- 
uar, which company executives say is 
Britain's largest exporter. 

Barring some unexpected foul-up. Jag- 
uar should post a profit in the three 
months ending on Dec. 31, its first posi- 
tive quarterly result in more than four 
years, following the economic recoveries 
in Britain and the United States and the 
introduction this fall of the restyled XJ 
sedan. 

Sales next year are projected to exceed 
38,000, up from about 31,000 this year 
and 28,000 last year, but well below the 
peak of 49,500 in 1988. Analysis are 
expecting a modest profit next year, al- 
though it remains unclear bow Ford will 
recoup its investment. 

Ford's strategy has been to retain as 
much of the Jaguar heritage and mys- 
tique as possible, but to impose Ford’s 
expertise in manufacturing efficiency, 
quality control and information manage- 
ment on a company that had come to 
represent all that went wrong with Brit- 
ish industry. 

“We drove in systems and procedures 
that had been proven throughout the 
world by the Ford Motor Co.," said 
David Hudson, a plant director. “Since 



Sources: Ford Motor Company 


The Ne» Ycrt Tuan 


the acquisition, in terms of manufactur- 
ing, we’ve been through a revolution." 

The revolution was built on the same 
tactics used by automotive companies 
worldwide: investing in more efficient 
machinery, and pushing more responsi- 
bility down to the workers on the pro- 
duction line. 

Before the acquisition by Ford, Jaguar 
had been a bastion or hard-core muons 
whose members worked to strict rules on 
what they would and would not do, and 
when. .Work stoppages cost Lhe plant a 
half day of working time a week. 


“The relationship between manage- 
ment and the trade unions has not his- 
torically been, shall we say, best in 
class," Mr. Hudson said 


New r Swatch Car 9 to Create 8,900 Jobs 


Reuters 

STUTTGART — Produc- 
tion of the so-called Swatch car 
by Mercedes-Benz AG will 
create around 8,900 new jobs, 
Karl Feuerstem, the president 
of the Daimler-Benz AG works 
council said Tuesday. 

Nearly 4,000 of the jobs ore 
planned for German factories, 
he said but added that the 
work force was up in arms 
over the company’s decision 
to assemble the car in France. 


Mercedes, together with So- 
dfctfc Suisse de Micro&ectron- 
ique & d’Horiogerie SA of 
Switzerland the maker of the 
Swatch wristwatch, want to 
build a youth-oriented econo- 
my car for less than 20,000 
Deutsche marks (512.700). 

The French plant will have 
a work force of around 1,000 
employees and win assemble 
up to 200,000 cars a year, be- 
ginning in 1997. Once this ca- 
pacity has been reached Mer- 


cedes will build another planL 
“The management board is 
planning to propose a produc- 
tion site in Germany for the 
second plant," Mr. Feuerstein 
said 


more than double the 926 mil- 
lion DM reported for the first 
half, its chief executive, Ed- 
zard Reuter, said Tuesday. 

The 1994 profit, estimated 
at 1.85 billion DM. would fol- 


He criticized management 
and warned of conflicts with 
the staff over jobs. 


low an _operating loss of 33 


■ Daimler Predicts Gains 
Daimler-Benz AG expects 
its 1994 operating profit to be 


billion DM in 1993, Bloom- 
berg Business news reported 
from Stuttgart Mr. Reuter 
said sales for the year would 
exceed 100 billion DM for the 
first time, and were likely to 
reach 103 billion DM. 


Political Woe 
Takes Toll on 
French Franc 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

PARIS — The French franc 
fell to a one-year low against the 
Deutsche mark on Tuesday, as 
Jacques Ddors’s refusal to enter 
the French presidential race con- 
tinued to unnerve investors. 


The mark strengthened to 
3.4454 francs in Pans on Tues- 
day. The franc is at its lowest 
level since December 1993. On 
Friday, before Mr. Delors an- 
nounced bis decision not to run, 
the mark fetched 3.4319 francs. 


Mr. Delors, the bead of the 
European Commission, was en- 
joying a lead in opinion polls 
until ne made his decision. 

“Delors was seen as the franc 
fort’s best ally,” said Tim Fix, a 
currency analyst with Credit 


Suisse in London, The strong- 
franc policy involved pegging 
the franc to the mark and shad- 
owing Germany's interest rates. 

Mr. Fox added ihaL with five 
months to go until the election, 
the franc could fall further, per- 
haps to 350 francs per mark. 

The Italian lira, at record 
lows against the mark on con- 
cerns that Silvio Berlusconi’s 
government will fall also af- 
fected the franc, traders said. 

Traders said there was no sign 
of central bank intervention. 

In 1993, France kept interest- 
rates high to defend its strong- 
franc policy amid deep reces- 
sion, even as a currency crisis 


See FRANC, Page 12 


Orange County Gears 
Sale of All Fund Assets 


Bloomberg Business News 

SANTA ANA, California — 
Orange County, California, au- 
thorized its financial advisers on 
Tuesday to liquidate its invest- 
ment pool as losses mounted. 

The county, which filed for 
bankruptcy last week, said 
losses in the investment pool 
had grown about 33 percent 
since last week, to $2.02 billion. 
The county authorized Salo- 
mon Brothers Inc. to sell the 
fund's assets at its discretion 
over the next 90 days. 

The fund has about $8 billion 
in assets remaining, including 


S2J5 billion pledged against 
from se 


borrowings from securities 
firms. It has about 5230 million 
in cash and cash equivalents, 
the county said. 

About 60 percent of the fund’s 
assets consists of structured 
notes, primarily volatile securi- 


ties known as inverse floaters, 
whose value drops as interest 
rates rise. The remaining 40 per- 
cent consists of regular govern- 
ment and government-agency 
debt, the county said. 

The county’s financial advis- 
er, Thomas Hayes, a former 
California treasurer, said the 
county fund would lose about 
$300 million with each one- 
point rise in interest rates. 

Orange County requested a 
hearing in U.S. Bankruptcy 
Court to seek permission to be- 
gin the sales on Wednesday. 

Under Robert Citron, the 
county treasurer who resigned 
after the losses were disclosed. 
Orange County bet beavfly that 
interest rates would fall this year. 
Mr. Citron borrowed more than 
S12 billion from Wall Street 
firms to increase the county’s 
investment, which backfired 
when interest rates soared. 




Apple’s Strategy Spawns a New Toy 


By Steven Brail 

huenumanal Herald Tribune 

TOKYO — Mighty Mor- 
phia Power Ranger action 
characters are all the rage this 
Christmas season, and ifJapa- 
nese toymaker Bandai Co. 
gets its wish, its new multi- 
media game machine — 
dubbed the Power Player and 
made with Apple Computer 
Inc. — will be next year's 
smash. 

The machine, a prototype of 
which was shown here Tues- 


shm to license its operating 
systems to competitors. 

Due out in Japan and the 
United States in the second 
half of next year, the Power 
Flayer straddles the video- 
game field and the fast-gzow- 
ing market for personal com- 
puters equipped with compact 
disk read-only memory, or 
CD-ROM, players. 


day, marks Bandai ’s entry into 


the multi-media game field and 
is the first fruit of Apple’s ded- 


But at 5500, it will be rela- 
tively expensive compared to 
game machines expected from 
Nintendo Co„ Sega Enter- 
prises Ltd., 3DO Co, Sony 
Corp. and others. 


At the same timet the play- 
er, which plugs into a televi- 
sion set, is too stripped-down 
a system to offer a serious 
challenge to multi-media per- 
sonal computers. Next year, 
Asian-made computers con- 
figured for multi-media appli- 
cations will drop below the 
$800 level according to Taka- 
hflm Umeyama, of Interna- 
tional Data Corp, a market- 
research company. 

Apple and Bandai which 
foresee annual sales of 
500,000 to 1.0 million ma- 
chines, are counting on the 


Power Player’s ability to play 
a broader range of software 
titles than its competitors. 

“The game industry is 
crashing because everybody’s 
bored,” said Makoto Yama- 
shina, president of Bandai the 
world’s fifth- biggest toy mak- 
er. “Our rede is to create a 
killer application,” he said, 
adding that Bandars group of 
affiliated software developers 
were the biggest providers of 
Nintendo software and would 
help develop a library totaling 


See POWER, Page 13 


3DO: Christmas Could Be Make-or-Break 


By John Markoff 

New York Times Service 

REDWOOD CITY, California — As 
the Brazilian soccer team cm the televi- 
sion screen goes cm the attack, thousands 
of cheering fans chant to a throbbing 
samba beat, captured on a lush Dolby 

■ . 4. a I-.I -_1- Zs Zw Anli/ 9 inflwl 


MUUVU WIM, i wy WWW a - - - 

sound track. Although it is only a video 
- ,I ’": that when 


game, the image is so life-like •*“— 
players scramble, their colliding shadows 
appear darker, as they would in real Me, 
Released last month in time for Christ- 
mas by 3DO Co., FIFA International 
Soccer, as the long-awaited game is 
known, has already achieved cult status 


among video game fans for its realism. 

Whether other consumers agree that 
the game and a slew of successors were 
worth the wait will determine whether 
William “Trip” Hawkins, the Silicon 
Valley entrepreneur who started 3 DO 
five years ago, will still be in the video 
game business next Christmas. Or even 
in business for that matter. 


cause of a lack of software, and with 
software developers, who Mr. Hawkins 
expects not only to create the dazzling 
games that run on 3DO*s systems but 
also to pay for the privilege. 


Certainly, Mr. Hawkins has to demon- 
strate soon that his supposedly superior 
technology can catch on with consumers, 
who during its first year on the market 
have taken a wait-and-see attitude be- 


Otherwise, by next Christmas, more 
firmly established players — Nintendo 
and Sega, to name two — will have vastly 
improved systems of their own, at the 
same time that Sony Corp., the consum- 
er-electronics giant, and Apple Comput- 
er Inc., will have waded into the market 
Wall Street analysts, once red-hot on 


See 3DO, Page 13 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


“.A 


Cross Rates 

S S D* 

l»l Uffi UW 
MU sues 20505 
MSB — 


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rates at 3 pm. 

a: To buy ant pound, b. Toaur 
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In otaer centers; Taranto 


Eurocurrency Deposits 




Dec. 13 




Swiss 


F ranch 




Dollar 

D-Aterlc 

Franc 

Storlhiv 

Frmc 

Yen 

ECU 

1 nonfb 

6 hr+ ♦, 

SVwSIN 

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7-7IL 


Sources: Reuters, Uavds Bank. 

ttakntnmikrbletab*rbaikdta>dsllSBfPmnilanm/nlmum(orequNaletil. 


K«y Money Rates 


UaHid State 
mount ram 
Him rota 


CkttC Pr*v. BHtata 


Pars 

MUD 

7J» 

111JS 

31.035 

J109J5 

045U 

mo 

Q3019 

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tans, ruble 3304M 

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5. Kor.wu" 7915B 
maim 7 am 
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1 month CPs 
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t-narTimsary btU 


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458 


Sources: Reuters, Btaamben, Merrill 
Lynch Bank ot Tticm Commenbank, CrtdU 
Lyoanots. 


Gold 


Urabnrd roH 

Colt montr 
1 mo ^n ta tortmnfc 


leworSmt 


400 

5.15 

545 

545 

540 

741 


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535 

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744 


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Zurich 
London 
Hew Yurfc 

US. dotlacs per ounce. London otfldal fix- 
ing*; Zurich and New York openlaa and ties* 
tap prices,’ New York Cemex ( February d 

Source: Reuters. 


Banks Were Established to Protect 
Depositors' Funds. It's Still 
Our Most Important Mission. 



T hroughout history, man 
has sought to safeguard 
the things he values. 

It was true in the Middle Ages, 
when banking institutions 
emerged to shelter the wealth 
created by an expanding market 
economy. It’s equally true now. 

Today, however, safety isn't 
a matter of having the biggest 
strongbox or the heaviest 
padlock. In today’s fluid world, 
safety is tied to prudent poli- 
cies, a strong balance sheet and 


a conservative banking 
philosophy. 

Those are the very qualities 
that have made Republic 
National Bank one of the 'safest 
institutions in the world. Our 
asset quality and capital ratios 
are among the strongest in the 
industry. And our dedication to 
protecting depositors’ funds is 
unmatched anywhere. 

As a subsidiary of Safra 
Republic Holdings S.A. and an 
affiliate of Republic New York 


Corporation, we’re part of a 
global group with more than. 
US$5 billion in capital and 
more than US$50 billion in 
assets. These assets continue to 
grow substantially, a testament 
to the group’s risk-averse orien- 
tation and century-old heritage. 

So, while much has changed 
since the Middle Ages, safety 
is still a depositor’s most 
important concern. And it’s 
still our most important 


mission. 


REPUBLIC NATIONAL BANK 
OFNEWYORK (SUISSE) SA 


A SAFRA BANK 


TIMELESS VALUES. TRADITIONAL STRENGTH. 


head office Geneva 1204 - 2. puce du lac ■ tel 1022 1 toe 55 55 ■ forex: 10221 70 s se so and geneva 1201 ■ 2. rue dr. alfrep-vincent (corner 

OUAJ DU MONT-BUNC) BRANCHES: LUGANO 6901 ' I, VIA CANOVA - TEL. (091) 23 05 32 ■ ZURICH 8039 * STOCKERSTRAS5E 37 - TEL. 101) 208 IB IB • 
GUERNSEY • RUE DU PRE • 5T. PETER PORT • TEL. i40I> 711 7B1 AFFILIATE: REPUBLIC NATIONAL BANK OF NEW YORK IN NEW YORK OTHER LOCATIONS: 
GIBRALTAR ■ GUERNSEY • LONDON ‘ LUXEMBOURG ' MILAN • MONTE CARLO ■ PARIS - BEVERUT HILLS - CAYMAN ISLANDS - LOS ANGELES ■ MEXICO CITY - MIAMI • 
MONTREAL • NASSAU * NEW YORK * BUENOS AIRES ■ CARACAS • MONTEVIDEO • PUNTA DEL ESTE ■ RIO DE JANEIRO • SANTIAGO • BEIRUT ■ BEIJING • HONG X0NG ■ 

JAKARTA ■ SINGAPORE ■ TAIPEI * TOKYO 


■l 


1 






I 


T 

n 


** 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1994 



Blue Chips Steady 
But Data Lift Bonds 


NEW YORK — U.S. stocks 
ended Tuesday little cha n g e d as 
rallies in bank issues, Walt Dis- 
ney and Philip Morris out- 
weighed lower prices for o2, 
drug and technology shares. 

The Dow Jones industrial av- 
erage, after hovering in a nar- 


U.S. Stocks 


row range through the session, 
oedS.O 


slipped 3.03 points to 3,71534. 

The market was underpinned 
by the biggest gains in a week in 
the Treasury bond market after 
new economic data suggested 
brisk economic growth had not 
caused infla tion to accelerate. 

Advancing stocks outpaced 
dechners by 6 to 5 on the New 
York Stock Exchange, where 
volume climbed to 307.1 mil- 
lion shares from 285.74 million 
on Monday. 

The benchmark 30-year 
Treasury bond rose 23/32 
point, to 95 29/32, causing the 
yield to slip to 7.85 percent 
from 7.92 percent Monday, af- 
ter a producer price report 
eased concern that inflation 
would accelerate and further 
force up rates. 

Wholesale prices paid to fac- 
tories, farmers and other pro- 
ducers rose 03 percent in No- 
vember, matching expectations. 


while the rate excluding food 
and energy rose 0.1 percent, 
lower than economists' fore- 
casts of 03 percent. 

Disney climbed W* to 43% 
after thefihn studio and ibeme- 
park operator reported surging 
Christmas video sales, while 
Philip Morris rose 1% to 57% 
amid investors' doubts that the 
latest class-action lawsuit 
against cigarette companies 
would succeed. 

Ran if stocks, which peaked in 
mid-June and then fell as much 
as 20 percent amid concern that 
«»amhijift will slow, may contin- 
ue to rebound, analysts said. 

Bankers Trust rose 1% to 
58%, First Chicago climbed 1% 
to 46%, NationsBank rose l to 
46% and First Fidelity Bank- 
corn climbed 1% to 45%. 

U.S. Biosdence collapsed 4% 
to 2 after authorities voted not 
to recommend its chemothera- 
py treatment. 

Electric utilities, also sensi- 
tive to moves in rates, extended 
a three-week-long advance. 
Duke Power climbed Vi to 41% 
and Northern States was % 
higher at 46%. 

General Electric added to re- 
cent gains, climbing % to 47%, 
after the company voiced confi- 
dence about its earnings. 

( Bloomberg, AP) 


FRANC: Pulled Dawn by Politics 


Continued from Page 11 
destroyed the European ex- 
change-rate mechanism. 

Political uncertainty leading 
up to the elections has weak- 
ened French assets since the 
tv- ginnin g of November, ana- 
lysts said, and politics will con- 
tinue to effect trading until the 
election. 

Mr. Detors’s decision has 


Foreign Exchange 


hours by officials investigating 
him on corruption charges. 

“People really wanted marks 
today because of political prob- 
lems in Italy and France," said 
Jim Raphael, a trader at 
NatWest USA Bancorp. 

The dollar often suffers when 
investors sell lire or francs for 
marks because traders often 
buy dollars for lire and francs 
and then sell those dollars for 
marks. 


wn open the -field for new 
list candidates now that a 
ed front against the Social- 
deprived of a credible can- 
ite, is no longer seen as Dec- 
ry. (Bloomberg, JUT) 


The doBar slipped to 1.5729 
133 DM at the 


■ Dollar Ends Mixed 

The dollar dosed mixed in 
trading in New York on Tues- 
day. It slipped against the 
Deutsche mark as investors 
bought marks as a haven from 
political turmoil in Italy and 
France, news agencies reported. 

The Italian lire tumbled to an 
all-time low against the mark as 
Prime Minister Silvio Berlus- 
coni was questioned for seven 


DM from 1.573: 

dose on Monday. It rose to 
5.4180 French francs from 
5.4080 francs. 

Economic reports from the 
Commerce and Labor depart- 
ments that pointed to higher 
retail sales and producer prices 
helped support the dollar. 

The dollar rose to 100.285 
yen from 99.985 yen. It eased to 
13303 Swiss francs from 13335 
francs. 

"The numbers were strong 
enough to get the Fed to raise 
rates again," said Paul Farrell, 
manager of strategic currency 
trading at Chase Manhattan 

® an ^* (Bloomberg, Reuters) 



V::v:v J : Y^- Jl? 


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NYSE Most Actives 


JURNtta 

Vodfnes 

TWMex 

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770O0 6 
54498 30% 
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16085 391% 
15807 401% 
14789 131% 
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18218 9% 
15394 83V: 
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14930 40% 
14228 13*k 
13974 71% 
12757 42% 
13154 42% 
12048 13% 


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19 19% 

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32% 33% 

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AMEX Most Actives 



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Market Sales 


NYSE 
Ante* 
NOSdCH 
In m ft/ fans. 


307.10 

19.82 

23539 


Indus 371547 3727 AS 371029 J72L40 *<03 
Irons 138151 138177 137174 1375.15 —182 
Ufl 181 AS 18214 18099 181.91 +036 

Comp 123130 123534 1ZKU? 1232-55 —054 


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53X48 52X71 53145 535,16 
338.16 33129 33040 B&S9 
151.42 15054 15142 15X41 
4074 4038 4074 41X8 

449.48 44X62 449.47 450.1S 
41950 <1064 41955 419JB 


NYSE Indexes 


Hi 00 Low 3pm Ore. 


Commit* 

mduafr M* 

TWW- 

Utiifly 

Ftaonca 


34035 245X0 34637 MX1 
71020 309.12 310.13 +M2 
21X97 21X07 21352 + 0X3 
20152 20045 201X3 *089 
19X49 191X7 193X8 + lJ4 


NASDAQ Indexes 


Low awn Ore. 


Composite 

indu&rtote 

Bonks 


Fmcnce 

TrtrfUP. 


72038 718X2 719J1 4-019 
721.98 719.74 77071 —0.19 
60093 678.10 66093 -115 
885X7 88X11 88X67 +2X1 
838.13 83136 827.7! *131 
CZX8S 62090 62171 *0X0 


AMEX Stock Index 



Mgh Law 3PM era. 

421X9 419X4 420.17 —0X3 

Dow Ja 

ores Bond Avorogoo 


No# available at press time 


NYSE Diary 


are. 

— Vk 
'A, 

Advanced 

Noop 

liter 

Prev. 

Ill 2 

—Mi 

Decfinea 

90S 

1123 

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797 

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Total lauas 
NewKutts 

2*42 

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2934 

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97 

210 


AMEX Diary 


Advanced 

Declined 


Tom issues 
NeivHtortJ 
New Lows 


209 247 

247 341 

234 221 

650 609 

3 3 

21 80 


NASDAQ Diary 


Not available at 


Spot Commodit ie s 


Aluminum. U> 


iron FOB. 


Me, lb 


Lead, to 
Silver. 


uRver, troyac 
Steel (scrap), tan 
Tin. rb 
One. lb 


Thdoy 

Prev. 

0X17 

0X26 

1X0 

1X1 

moo 

213X0 

0-64 

0X4 

*75 

4.74 

177X0 

137J0 

3X956 

442216 

05671 

05703 


date Previous 

Bid AM Bid Ask 

ALUMINUM (HM Grate) 

DoBan pw metric ton 
soot lBBOtt 18(71X0 183000 1821X0 

ftWd 7*29.® I m00 7849.CC 785006 

COPP8R CATHODES (HM Grain) 

pm tan per metric ton 
Spat 3943X0 294X00 297X00 2974X0 

Forward 2S9100 2B950Q 292X00 292500 

LEAD 

Mian Mr metric tan 

Spot 60900 SlBJB 63000 63100 

Fonwrcf 6250 0 OUK 6*00 64900 

Denars per metric tea 

SOW 799000 000600 547X00 848500 

Forward 0130X0 814000 862000 863000 

Dalian per metric ton 

Spot 574500 575500 595000 59)000 

PflriMTdi 584000 585000 605000 607000 

ONCUmcU HM Grade) 

enters Per metric fen 

Spat . 104950 1B70J0 111000 llllBO 

Forward 1097 JD 109X50 lianoo 113900 


Financial 


HMfi Law dose Charge 


XMONTH STERJJNQ (LIFFE) 


CTM80-pt»pf 

9X49 


Jon 

See 


Mtr 

JM 


Dec 


9234 

9101 

91X6 

9126 

91.1S 

91.10 

7307 

9103 

W^l 

wW- 


WX7 

nta 

RS 

91.11 

7106 

9103 

9008 

90*4 


9084 


93X8 -002 

%% 

91X3 —007 

91X3 —105 

71.14 —804 
7108 -004 
FIOS — 004 

7102 -ooa 
7XM —am 
9089 —004 

9086 — 004 


SdN* 

Est volume? 66145. Open M.iSOSZSL 
3-MONTH EURODOLLARS (LIFFE) 
nmlOlaa-PtsafiMptf 
Dec 9X59 9359 93JB —004 

Mm* N.T. N.T. 7202 — flj}4 

Jew N.T. N.T. 9L9B —008 

Sep N.T. N.T. 91XB —008 

ESI. vatame: IX Open Int.: 4J5X 


3-MONTH EUROMAR KSj UFFE) 


DM inriMoa-PteoMM 

Dtcm 


Jun 


Dec 

5fsr 


9437 

908 

94X7 

— 038 

909 

94X2 

9427 

—no* 

91X7 

93X9 

93X3 

— 0X6 

9162 

9256 

9151 

— <L06 

93J0 

9224 

93X7 

— 0X4 

9100 

91X8 

9298 

— 0X4 

9274 

92X8 

9272 

— QJ4 

9255 

9251 

9254 

gm 

9239 

9234 

9236 

— 005 

909 

9228 

92JQ 

— 0X2 

9227 

9219 

9222 

Uneh. 

9218 

9217 

9277 

—034 


Est. volume: 18X30. Open ml: 7 sura. 
3MONTH PI BOR (MATIF) 

FF5 mnUea-PtseflMpct 
Dec 94.10 9X90 9X91 —023 

Mar 9X50 9X25 9X26 —031 

jun 9X17 run nst — coo 

Sep 7292 9291 9272 - 025 

Doc 9Z6S run nji —020 

MOT 9X42 9X32 9X3(1 —a.17 

JOB 9X15 9X04 9X07 —0.16 

Sep 9198 7190 7191 —0.14 

Est volume: 149,106. Open tat.: 204,168. 

E&WMESm* 

Dec W2-13 10V31 102-07 —0-16 

Mar 1 01-29 101-09 101-17 — 0-15 

Jen N_T. K.T. 100-17 0-15 

Est. volume: SLOW. Open ML: 1303DX 
GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND (LIFFE) 
DM 2SMM - Pts of 101 pet 


Mar 

89X9 

89X0 

89X9 

—020 

Joo 

N.T. 

N.T. 

B9J7 

— 020 

Ett. volume: 70S. 3*7. Open InL: 16A731. 

18-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS CMAT1F1 

FF9MM0- 

piS of 100 PCt 



Oec 

11206 

111X4 

111X8 

— (170 

Mar 

111X8 

11CL74 

11288 

— 034 

Jim 

110J6 

J 10.46 

110JJ8 

— 0X4 

sea 

109X8 

10950 

109X0 

—0X4 


18475 14690 14450 1«L» —190 
U7M 1440 1473)0 —790 

in 1=1 

jw 15X75 15850 15X73 1035 r** 3 
D B. valine: 17X18 • Often W. »X»2 


Est. volume; 


Jan 

Feb 

Mcr 

Apr 

MCT 

Jan 

Jhr 

Aofl 

s§ 

MOV 

One 


7X08 

1692 

16X1 

1X75 

1598 

Ji» 

16X5 

N.T. 

N.T. 

HI- 

NT. 

16.11 


IX® 

1X00 

1575 

15& 

15X4 

15X5 

V5.W 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

16.11 


U96 

15X8 

1SJ9 

1592 

1590 

1X98 

1595 

N.T. 

NT, 

N.T. 

N.T 

16.11 


1596 + 0X5 
1S9* +W77 
15X9 +0X1 
1X90 +a» 
1590 + 0X2 
1X78 UntfL 
1595 -4-0X5 
16X6 +A14 
14 1 J +0-15 
16.18 +0.1* 
1423 +0.17 
1698 +aw 


Esl. volume: 47X38. Open mt. 201305 


Stock Indexes 

Cbne CMB9» 


Law 


OK 

Mar 


J0D 


29240 2940X +*X 

2W7X 5956^ +5X 

SetO 2967X +55 


Est votun^a554WW InL: 7M7a 

CAC40 IMATIR 

ma l- 

ES ^ & IgS 
S ® 

Est. volume: 24,185. Ooan bit.: 46763. 

Sources: MatlCAsgcla^d 

iww 1 inTt Financial Futures Exchange. 

loti Patrotaum Exctmrme. 


Unm- 

+A50 

+ 0JO 
+ 090 
+2X0 
4-X50 


Dtvfdends 


Per Amt Rcc P°r 


IRREGULAR 


Clemente GiGrtb c .96 12-21 1-12 

FsJ Phlllpplr* Fd C X10 12-21 1-W 

Pufrnn Ml TxExJI d B l» 12-12 12-20 
atncludes XS oop aalns. 
d-cap sains dtsL 


INCREASED 


Amer PremUndra 
inn Flavors 
ltc Pniys 
simmons Fsmati 
Wstrn Star Trucks 


35 I2-W 
91 12-28 

3s ir 


,an-i ? 


a .10 12-31 


7-13 

1-10 

1-27 

1-8 

VIC 


General Dynamics to Keep 
Its Last 2 Defense Divisions 


Contpwanyw»"u _ - - 

WASHINGTON —-General Dynamics Corp. wm not sell 
itstettwo defense divisions, which make nmks and subma- 

“'Sm'dS^S’SB Sidspeculated that the company 
would sell one or both of the 

begun by Mr. MeUors predecessor. WUham A. AndenL Mr. 
/ShnioU most of General Dynamics' defense operations, 
reaping profits that helped its stock pnee quadruple, before 

Shares fell 50 cons, dosing at $4V«5 

iMh«p ^^* 5*. SfSst »w 3 Si 

General Dynamics shares closed at S4l3^p af to a 

ruled in to favor m a smt st«nmmg from the 
ii s Naw's 1991 cancelation of the A-12jel.. 

In another devdopment affecting *e U.& defease mdusr 
try an unidentified member of the British Parbamenfs all- 
party select defense committee said m London thai^e 

could amount to about £1 billion ($1-6 billion). . 

A Ministry of Defense spokesman declined to craamcnt on ■ 
the report. (WP. Bloomberg)- 


CORRECTION 

Rvkott Sexton n * 3375 22 2-16 

iJiStoesfor dividend declared Dec. 7. 


SPECIAL 


vansuord RE il 

Zonbt Inc FU 


- 1XS 1227 12-29 

- 3566 12-22 1230 


Aoree RltvCp 
Amresco me 
Artantb PtasHcs 
BMC Indus 
Cdn Pacific Ltd 
QwsBBedte Core 
FWelltv Noti Fin 
Hyoer 1997 Tm 
Hyper 1999 Tm 
I Hyper 2005 inv 


ExL voluate: 2SC72S. Open Hit.: 157,900. 


Industrials 


Lew Lost sente Oi-m 


MM 
GASOIL (IRE) 

uSrSePare per metric ton lets etiee tans 
Jon 14X50 140X0 142X0 14225 UOCh. 

Mb 14475 14395 1442S U4J25 -0^ 

MOT 14698 14590 14690 14690 — 090 


InaleaMktsA 
Ubem TmTri99 
Masco Core 
AtounaLoa Maati 
MontawnerySl IcSc 
NYMAGIC Inc 
Nova Carp 
PLM EauteGr W 
PIM Epohsoril 
Put EquiuGrilt 
Pto wr HIBrea 

RocXeteder Ctr 
Salem Core 
Laurel 

WeiisJord Resid 
2inbc jncFd 


REGULAR 

§ 45 13-30 
JK 12-1 
O 325 1-2 

Q JX2 12-21 

O XB 12-23 

O .W I-U 

Q 33 1-16 

AA 35 13-19 

M X5 13-19 

M 3625 12-19 

S .765 13-30 
X48 12-21 

q .18 1-6 

q 35 12-30 

Q 34 12-19 

Q .10 12-31 

XP 1-27 


1-13 

1-15 

I-I6 

1-4 

1- 30 

2- 15 
2-3 

12-39 

12-29 

12-29 

J-9 

12-30 

2-6 

MS 


-575 12-30 
-40 1300 
.40 12-00 
.17 1227 
.15 12-37 
.15 12-22 
.10 1200 
.125 12-31 
.45 12-22 
X69 12-22 


MO 

215 

2-15 

>15 

>15 

1-10 

1- 13 
12-30 

1-16 

2- 15 
M2 

12-3D 


eeneali awayeMi In Canodtaa tontfs; 
monthly; awuarterly; s-eemMumaal 


Novell Quarter Profit Tumbles 31% 

PROVO, Utah (Bloomberg) — Novell Inc. said Tuesday its 
profit for the fourth quarter of its financial year feu 31 potent, a 
margin far greater than expected, due to delays in shipping new f>\ 

software products. , . . . 

The company said profit excluding charges relatol to the 
acquisition of WordPerfect Corp. in June fell to $61 million in the 
quarter to Oct. 29 from $88 million in the year-earher period. . 


Tenneco to list ILK. Unit in London 

HOUSTON (Bloomberg) — Tenneco Inc. said Tuesday it 

. u ..ii in. -_L. a_ Dnfirh rkAmifHit kiicinm in on 


would sell Albright & Wilson, its British chemical business, in an 
offering valued at up to $1 billion. 


initial public 

The compan y »isr> anno unced that it would repurchase op to 
$500 million, or about 7 percent of its own common shares. 

Tenneco said the Albright offering would bring in proceeds of 
about $750 milli on. The company expects the shares to be listed 
on the London Stock Exchange in the first quarter of 1995. 


Borden’s Board Opts for KKR Offer 


WASHINGTON (Bloomberg) — Borden Inc.’s board of direc- 
tors has rejected a revised bid by Paul Kazarian to purchase a 25 
percent stake in the company for about $660 milli on. 


Japonica Partners, Kazarian’s investment company, sweetened 
sofferoi 


its offer on Dec. 6, casting it as a better value for shareholders than 
a merger agreement that Borden had already negotiated with 
Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co. 

However, Borden’s directors at a Dec. 9 meeting effectively 
chose the roughly $2 billion KKR offer, according to papers filed 
Monday with the Securities and Exchange Commission. 



a Stake in France’s Bull Disney Is Looking to South America 


Bloomberg Business Ne*s 

PARIS — AT&T Coip. may 
not, after all. buy a stake in 
Groupe Bull, France’s state- 
controlled computer company. 
Last month, in a surprise an- 
nouncement, it said it was con- 
sidering doing so. 

“We had considered an inter- 
est that was centered on tele- 
com." said an AT&T spokes- 
woman in Brussels. But^ “the 
market-access conditions” for 


AT&T “seem unlikely to be re- 
alized in the context of an in- 
vestment in Groupe Bull at the 
present time.” 

But on Tuesday. AT&T said 


it was forming adjoint venture 


with Unisource NV, a Nether- 
lands-based telecommunica- 
tions company, to tap the Euro- 
pean market. 

For Bull AT&T’s withdraw- 
al would add another twist to 
the drawn-out, difficult process 


of talcing the company private. 
Bull has piled up losses of 20 
billion French francs (S3.7 bil- 
lion) in just the past five years. 
Subsidies from the French gov- 
ernment began as long ago as 
1963. 

AT&T will have to find other 
ways of getting a foothold in the 
closely guarded French tele- 
communications market. But 
on the bright side; it won’t be 
weighed down by a costly com- 


puter company it did not want 
and probably could not fix. 

Daniel Lebowhis, an analyst 
with Meta Group, in Paris, said 
the bid had to be seen as “a 
Trojan Horse that had no 
chance of succeeding anyway.” 

Last month. AT&T filed an 
application expressing an inter- 
est in acquiring, jointly with 
Quadral, a French maker of 
computer-based signaling 
equipment, a stake in Bull. 


SANTIAGO (Reuters) — Walt Disney Co. has signed an 
option to purchase a 10 percent stake in Argos SA, a Chilean 
toymaker, a Disney executive said Tuesday. ; 

The deal also indudes a five-year contract granting Argos 
distribution rights for all the Disney products licensed to it in 17 
countries in Latin America, said Stephen de Kanter, Disney 
consumer products chid for Latin America. 


For the Record 


Hewfett-PackanJ Co. will invest heavily m development of 
multi-media and mobile-telecommunications equipment. The 
company aims to be the world leader in computer platforms for 
telecommunications by 1996, Andre Meyer, the company’s direc- 
tor of telecommunications, said. (AFP) 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Afim Fnmt Tm) Dac. 13 


dOMPrav. 


Amsterdam 


ABM Amro Hid 
ACF Holding 
A *oon 
Ahold 
Afczo Nobel 
Bob-Wessonon 
CSM 


60.90 6090 
33 33.10 
11020 110X0 
53 5110 
191X0 191 

£§ 

DSM 13250 130.40 

Elsevier 17 Jo I7j» 

1490 14Jt 
73X0 7190 
45.50 45X0 
26690 267 

256 253 

Hoooovem 72X0 72.90 

Hunter DfluoRra 7690 77 

me Co land 
litter Mueller 
Inn Nederland 
KLM 


Fahker 
Forth AMEV 
Gist -Brocades 
HBG 

I i— I - ..I,.- 

I ICinCKLJI 


4230 4220 


KNPBT 
KPN 
NriOovd 
Oce Grlnlen 
Pafchoed 
Philips 
Polygram 
■Robeeo 
fladmncQ 

Rollnco 

Rarento 

Royal Dutch 

Stark 

Unilever 

vanOmmeren 

VNU 

WdKn/XItnw 


91J® „ 

B2 8190 
42X0 42 

48.10 4820 
54X0 5490 
52X0 5260 
7270 76 


46.10 46.10 


90 5050 

10260 11040 
49 4890 
111X0 111X0 
03 0330 
18730 18630 
4270 4250 
19S30 194 

45 4*30 
172X0 171 

122 12230 




Brussels 


Almanll 

Arbed 

Barca 

8BL 

Bekaert 

CBR 

CMB 

CNP 

Cocker I ll 

Cawaa 

Cotnjyi 

DHhatte 

Elcctrobei 

Efecfraflna 

Forth AG 

GIB 

GBL 

Gevoen 

Glove rbel 
I m motel 
K real ot bank 

Masone 

PetroflnD 

Pawerlbi 

Recrtatl 

RayateBehe 


2410 90S 


Sac Gen Bonque 8230 8270 

SacGwBoWaw nis.gg 


Safina 
SoJvoy 

Tsnenderio 

Yractebel 

UCB 

Union Mlnlere 
Wagons UN 


13050 15100 
14800 14725 


loom loooo 

W» 9600 
24OWZ4000 
2480 2495 
6820 6100 


Frankfurt 


AEG . 148X0 148 

Alcatel SEL 2K 280 
AllhmcHDH 2395 24ZS 
Altona 620 623 

Askq. 710 70S 

BASF 30420304X0 

Bavw 341X0341J0 

Bar. Hypo bank am as 
Bay veretmXk 44390 446 
BBC 649 636 

a s 

CofWTWifionk 
Continental 
Daimler Ben* 

Oeaosso 
Dl Babcock 


JI9 214 
717.10 727 JO 
43090 427 
19790195X0 


Deutsche Bank 70690 720 



Helsinki 


Amer-Yhtyma 
Ema-Gutzelt 
Mutitwnaki 
K-O.P. 


Metro 

Nokta 


9290 « 

37 3790 
148 148 
5X2 5X5 
117 11* 


Pohlalo 

Rebate 

Stockmann 


135 23 


665 

68 


65 

U» 84 
243 241 


S!S»rffi3!r : 


HongKong 

Bk Eau Asia 


. _ . „ . . 27 JS 27 JS 

Cathay Pacific iojs loxo 


Chetma Kona 


anno Light p*rr 3090 
Farm 


Dairy Form Infl 8X5 8.1. 


Mono Luno Dev 10X5 mg 


Hera Sera Bank 
Henderson Land 3SL30 35 

HR Air Ena. 34X5 2440 

HK Oil no Gas 11X3 11 

HK Electric 19.10 1SJ* 

HK Land _ 1540 15.15 


HK Realty Treat 12X0 1299 
81 JS B0J5 


HSBC Holdings 

HKSharaHtls B 790 
HK Telecomm 1430 1405 


hk Ferry 7 Jo 7,io 

■■ Ghwnamnoa 29 A5 2695 


Hutch^H 

Hyson Devra 
Jardlne Math. 


V4JS 

5425 


JanSne Sir Hid 2S25 _ 

U 128$ 


Xowtoan Motor 


Mandarin Orient 8.15 125 
Hotel 1690 17 


Miramar I 


New World Dev 19130 18X0 
Props 


4640 4670 


SHK. 

Stekix 2X5 2X0 

Swire Poc A 43J0 4290 
Tai Cheura Pips 6x0 690 
TVE 330 120 

Wharf HoW 2290 22J5 
WlwetodcCo 12 1190 

Wins On Co Inti Bxo Bjs 
WUwarllKL 870 8X0 


jjragsera 8-^17849X5 


Johannesburg 



Gencor 
OF5A 
Harmony 
Htohvetd Steal 
lOoot 

Ned&cnkGfP 
PonOfccIHn 
Rusmat 
SA Brans 

Sasol 

Western Deep 


2850 2890 
90 90 

323 223 
35 3450 
35 _ 35 
90 9835 
5790 5850 
UA5 1175 
120 120 
33 32 

3790 31 

5425 55 

40JQ 40 

04M105JO 
9425 *435 
32 32 

159 163 


SSRffi £Mlf 


SOUS 


London 


Abbey Nan 4 4 

AfMd Lyons 430 42 1 

ArfOWtaglns ZS2 290 

I Grew 440 233 


AroyilG 

ASS Brif Foods 457 458 


Doustas 
Drasdner Bank 
Fektmuehfe 
F KreppHaeseh 
Haraener 
Henkel 
Hochllel 
Noecftsi 
Halimann 
Horten 
IWKA 
Kail Salz 
Kanhxtt 
Kaofhot 
KHD 


<23 427 
40340470 
»S 295 
200 200 
M 

537 540 
920 915 
30990308X0 
_832 835 

2069020690 
311 313 
16816590 
54420 549 


437JO43690 

1161 


1611420 


Kfoecfcner Werfca 120 12390 


Linde 
Lufthunw 
MAN 

Mannesman 
Mefaitenefl 
Mueneh Ruecfc 
Porsche 


873 882 
j«« J«6 
39290 390 
3939039870 
132 134 

2850 2830 
647 630 


BAA 

BAe _ 

Bank$cattand 4X3 
Bardavs 


BAT 

BET 

Blue Circle 
BOC Group 
Boots 
Banoier 
BP 

Brtt Airways 
Brit Gas 
Bril Steal 
Brit Telecom 
BTR 

Coble Wire 
Cadbury Sdi 
Carodon 




Comm 1 _ 
Courtat/Ws 
ECC Group 
Enterprise Oil 



Close Prey. 


Eurotunnel 

F Isons 

Forte 

GEC 

Gem Acc 

Glaxo 

Grand Met 

GRE 

Gutaness 

GUS 

Hanson 

Hlllsdown 

HSBC HMDS 

10 

IndKOM 

Kingfisher 

Ladbroke 

UtedSec 

Laparte 

Losjdo 

Legal Gen Grp 
Lloyds Bank 
Marks SP 
MEPC 
Natir 

ffiwofcf 


PiO 
PlUdnat on 
PwETCen 
Prudenttat 
Rank Ore 
ReekMCo) 
Red land 
Rnedlntl 
Reuters 
. Group 
Is Ravce 
, (umri 
l Scot 


RMCI 
Roils l 


Sdnsbury 
Sent Newcas 
Scot Power 
Sears 

Trent 


us 


... itlti N ec he w 
SmtHiKHne B 
Smith (WH) 
Sin Alliance 
Tate 8 Lyle 
Tesco 
Thorn EMI 
Tomkins 
TSBGreuo 
Unilever 
Utd Biscuits 
Vodafone 
WBr Loan 3ft 

Wellcome 

WMttjreaa 
WttRgntsHdBS 
Willis Corrocn 
ft 3B Index; ta 


Madrid 

BBV 3415 3420 

B co Centre! HI so. aw) 30io 
Banco Santander 5360 5350 


9S0 950 

3140 3130 

am solo 

5910 5910 
145 147 
B6G 866 
8715 3715 
2590 XTB 
1680 1680 
299-30 


Banes ta 
CEPSA 
Oraeados 
Endesa 
Ercros 
Ijwrdre ta 
Reosol 

Toteoot era 

Telefonica 


Milan 


Alleanzo 14250 14100 

AMIfalta 9050 9530 

Airtastrade ortv 1960 1930 
Ben Agriculture 2580 MOO 
Bcacotnnwifai 300 3200 
BcoNuLnvara 11700 nTO 
BCO POP Novont 5500 6420 
Banco dl Roma M12 14 30 
BcoAmtraiana 4470 4 330 
Baa Nopal! rfsp 1080 1095 
Benetton 17200 17350 

CredJto Itallano 1569 1550 

Enldtem aw 2810 M30 

Ferttn 1140 1131 

Flat Spa 5495 54QS 

Flnaiz Agramd 8600 8620 
Ftamecamlca 1435 1470 
Ftmdiarloipa 


1 WOO 10355 


Generali Ask El 50 34500 


IF1L 

ltaicementi 
Itatocs 
Mediobanca 
Mcniedlscn 
OlJverttl 
Pirelli spa 
RAS 

Rtnasanfe 

San Poom Torino . 

SIP 3630 3535 

SME 3865 3890 

Sr la bod ing leu 

standa UWMW 

Stet C8S 4225 

Toro Asdic 21750 21650 



SR!» :,3fl 


Montreal 


11% 1190 
23% 239. 
7% 7% 
18 18 
1BW 17% 
12 12% 
21% 21 


12Vh 12% 

33% _ 23 


Alco Ltd I 14VS 14V8 

Book Montreal 25% 25V7 
BCE MaMta Com 43 U. 43 
Cdn 7 lr» A 
CW^UttlA 

CTFM15VC 
E x tendtc n re 
Gaz Metre 
Gl-West Llteco 
Hees Inti Boo 

Hudson's Boy Co _ ___. 
ImasQO LM 3|% 38 Vj 
investors G tp Inc lgs 1516 
Lobatt IJottn) 1M6 20% 
LoMawCos 2114 7114 

Motion A 18% 18% 

Natl Bk Osnadd Wfc .«* 
OshawaA 17% 17% 

Pancdn Pefrokn 4QU< 40 
Power Core IB 17% 

Power Flirt 2 tu 37% 
Quetwcor B 16% 16% 
Rogers Comm B IBVi IB 
Royal BfcCdo 2TH 38% 
Seen Canada ln< f 714 
Shell Cda A 42% 4114 

Sautham Inc 15% 15% 
Sleloa A 7% 7%. 

Trllon Flnl A 3x0 3X0 

#$2S'?i'S8i'" os * 


Paris 


Accor S79 581 

Air Limride 707 7TJ 

Alcatel Aisthom 461 jo 46i.io 
Axo 25120 2S620 

Banco! re (Clel 543 5M 
B1C 670 672 

BNP 262 259 JD 

BauvaiMS 545 555 

Danone 75* 751 

Correfour 32C 2229 

CCF. 22U0 22SJ0 

Ceres 93X0 95.90 

Charseore 12*0 122* 
ciments Franc 233 233 
Club Med 441X0 444 

EK-Aauflalne 37B 375.10 
Euro DBnev 935 BJS 
Gen. Eaux SIS 520 

Havos 42790 <25.10 

I metal 529 534 

Latere* Copaee 38XX 39050 
Leorand tXOO 6460 

Lvon. Eaux 487 487J0 

Oreo/ IL'} JJ05 7712 

L.VJVLH. 860 855 

Molra-Hochotte 11850 120 

Mictmiin e twj a 19QJX 

Moulinex 70090 10020 

Paribas 375X0 37920 

Pecwney infl 164 199 

Pernod- R (card 31890 315 

Peugeot 757 740 

Pincuit Prim 944 943 

Radtotrctmtaue 5D1 504 

Renault 1 7990 179 


RihPoalenc A 124X0 12LK 


1442 . 
2(820 24770 
617 617 

533 530 

595 598 

254X0 258.10 
ThemsNFCSP J57.J0 W 
Total 319 314X0 


RnH. St. Louis 
SCTWfi 

Saint Gobdin 
S-tB. 

Ste General 0 
Suez 


UA.P. 

Valeo 


14390 14490 
257X0 266 

sss mar 1 


To Oar Readers 
Sao Paulo slock 
prices were not 
available for this 
edition because of 
technical problems 
at the source. 


Singapore 

Asia POC Brew 1680 1|» 

il 

C^eSCarnarai^lWO 

DBS Land 4-14 

FELevftigsfon && 
Frasw S Heave 1A30 MXO 
GJ EOStn Life 2^0 2410 
.HoraixateW" 4 

xsisr^* ig 

iSRjs 


gnuftB. 


s unloo EDI 7X3 


CfaaoProv. 


Scmbawteng 

SI me Slnoapore 

Slog Aerospace 
Sira Alrllnet torn 
Sira Bus Svc 


Sing Lco*d 

ana Farm 


rim 

Sira Pl ___ 
siraShlpWdo 
Sing Telecomm 
Straits Steam 
Strolls Tramra 
Tat Lee Bgn 8. 
Utd industrial 
U MO-sea Bit tarn 
Utd (Tseas Land 


straits Ttws.lnde»: 
previous : amxf 


9X0 vjo 
1 (XI 
220 2X3 
1390 1390 
870 8X0 
735 8.10 
231 230 

26 2530 
2X6 2X6 
2X9 Z72 
498 490 
3X6 3X4 
<14 4J0 
1X8 197 
1070 13.90 
2X0 297 
1.14 


Stockholm 


AGA 7090 6890 

Area AF 530 532 

Astro AF 195 193 

Atlas Copco 94 9390 

Electrolux B 373 369 

Ericsson 40790 395 

Esrette-A 9490 93 

HandeHtwnK BF 96 9690 

Investor BF 1885018650 

NorsJt Hydro 2S5J0 235 

Pftormoete AF 1159011390 
SandvBt B 123 12250 

SCAW8 71890 119 

S-E Banken AF 44X0 442D 

Skandia F 
SfcanskoBF 
SKFBF 
store AF 
Tretieoore BF 
Volvo BF 


130 130 

168 16590 
126 125 

442 443 

109 108 

13813790 


Sydney 


8X2 8X4 
4 3.9* 
1192 18JB 
X45 131 

0 x 1 axo 

425 4.19 
ATS *J5 
1720 17 
*32 

1X6 .... 

1.10 1X9 
10.92 1090 
1X0 1X0 
220 221 


”3 


Amcor 
ANZ 
BMP 
Banal 

Bougainville 
Cotes Mver 
Comalca 
CRA 
C5R 

Fosters Brew 
Goodman Field 
ICI Australia 
Moaei ten 
MIM 

Nat Aust Bank 
News Cora 
N Broken Hill 
Pac O untop 

Pioneer InCT m _ 

Nmndy Pasetden 1X7 1X5 
PuMhhg Brocsta 3x3 3x3 
OCT Resources 127 1X6 
Santas X*9 347 

TNT 732 737 

Western Minins -7X2 7.16 
HtetpacBanMra 4X0 430 
Woodslde 4.78 4X8 

Kaaw - " 1 


*58 •» 


219 21B 
3XS 3XS 
3X6 210 


Atnhl Cnenficn 

~6km 


AMtll 1 

Bonk Of Tokyo 

Bridgestone 

Owen 

Ccota 


**rt 


Tokyo 

AtoiElecfr . 365 V* 

- • 710 710 

1190 1200 
1490 J4W 
1540 1530 
1690 1700 
1250 1260 
Dot Ntopon Print 1690 1490 
Dahra House 1390 13» 
Dobra SecurttM ira 1XD 
Fonuc 
Full Bonk 
Full Photo 
Fuilisu 
HMocW 
Hitachi CoUe 
Honda 
Ita Yofcodo 
itoetw 

Japan Abilms 

Kajima 

Kansai Power, 

Kawosokl Steel 
WrbiBrewv 
Komatsu 
Kubota 
Kyocera 



Matsu Eiecinds 1570 wo 
- ' ElecWks _?n lnzo 


Mhsubmf 
Mltsu aCtWTdad 
Mitsubishi £Mc ■ 


MltsubMHev 

Core 



Mitsubishi 
Mitsui aid Co 
Mitsui Morin* 

MllsikosbJ 

Mitsumi 

NEC 

NGK Msutatap ^ 

Nfkko Securttfo* 1WQ irao 

NtaPOn KWCKU 9M 9M 

NtoBonCJl SS SS 

Nippon Steel 349 3J9 

HIppoo Yusen 641 643 

wwSoSec 

oiympusoptteoi 


Planter 
Rtcnh 
SiBivoEtee 


2340 2150 
934 926 

564 557 


Close Prev. 


Shorn 
SWmaru 
Shlnetsu Chem 
Sony 

Sumitomo Bk 
Sumitomo Chem 
Sum! Marine 
Sumitomo Metal 
Toteet Corp 
TakednChem 
TDK 
TelJJn 

Tokyo Marine 
Tokyo Elec Pw 
Toppor Printing 
Tormina. 
Toshiba 
Tavata 

Yamakhl Sec 
a: x ion 

Nl 


1710 1690 
877 879 
1900 1910 
5400 52® 
1790 1700 
07 557 

823 S 
307 22 
581 590 

1190 1190 
4700 4700 
517 520 

1140 1130 
7740 2730 
1390 1400 
690 686 

693 707 

2070 2060 
893 703 


Toronto 


AM1M Price 11% ISV 2 

Air Canada 71* 

Alberta Enerev 1£6 IMS 

Alcan Aluminum 37te 33»» 

Amer Barrie* 3tP* 2 9te 

Avenor 27W am 

8k Nova Scotia 36 26U 

44 Vk 45V. 

Telecomm 23 Z2te 




Bombardier B 2395 23Vi 
Bremotea l.U 1X5 


30 3Ws 


Broscnn A 

Comeco _ 

CIBC 3218 » 

Can Natural Res 14te M48 
can OccM Pet Jlte Site 
Cdn PacHtC 20 I9te 

Cascades Paper m 5Ui 
Comlnco 34te 0 

Consumers Gas 16V. 16te 
Datasoo I7H I7te 

Daman ind B Ute 11 
Du Pant Cda A 17te 17 
Edta Bov Mines 15 Mte 
Empire Co. A 13te 13 V. 
Ftrtconbrldpe 23te 23te 
Fletcher Chair A 1716 17te 
Franco tieyoda 6996 69Vi 
Guardian Can A Ste XM> 
Hernia Goto 12te 12te 

lSte 17te 
406 4*Yl 


^ 353 


27V, 

32V. 32W. 


Imperial OH 

Incn 

IPL Energy 
LoldJaw A 

La Id tow B 

Laewen Grara. — 

London insarGe 23 zjte 
Mocmni BtoedW 17V. 18 

Magna Inti A * Ste *5 
Monte Leal Fds lite llte 
Moore 2P6 2*ss 

Newbridge Neter 43te 43 

Noronda [be . 24te 2410 

Nortteda Forest 
Norcer Energy 
N thorn Telecom ^ 

Nova 13V. 15te 

Onw I2te 12ta 

Petro Canada 11 11 

PtoarDonw 0 27% 
Potash Carp Sask 46*. 47 

Prevtvo 5te 5V6 

PWA IU9 m 

OusbeeBf Print 13*. 1 


U.S. FUTURES 


Vio Aitodatod Prra 


Dec 13 


Utah Low 


Ooen Hon Low Close Cho OpJnt 


Grains 


mEAT ICBOT7 uennmnjn-eteiMrMM 
4.14V. 109 Dec 94 178M 17BV 172 17315-0X7 

cm* 337 marts irate ante ixs xm -mev, 

l«te ll4teMay*S 174’5 177 W 170te-OX4'6 

16B4 111 Jul9S 3X7 147 1CVJ 14JV.-0JV1V. 

3X5 337 Sep *5 151 151 1 «te 14Bte- tUDVs 

175 1X9 Dec 95 141 te 341 te 160 160 -OX3W 

1 MV> 125 JUI96 3X0 1« 140 3X0 

Gd. sates 16X07 Monts sates 1040 

Mon-sooenlrt 64X64 up 141 

WHEAT (KBCT) LOW Ou Wwn- Mei w Wtewi 

*33* Il2te0ec94 4JJ0 4X0 196 te 196 te— 0.04te 

K3T* 315 Marts 193 1939, 116 3X6 — OXTte I 

4X3 121teMflV9S 178te 179 173te 17W-0X5te 

168% 116te JUI95 152 ISJte 1X9 3X9H-0X3te 

177 319 Sep 95 352 -0X4 

3X9te 3L5S 6eC*5 10te-ft04 

Est Sales NA. Mat's, saws 3J14 

Mon'sapenlnt 33.M up 304 

cotter (01077 IMlvnMiwn-wm MrlulW 

177 110V6 Dec 94 1199. 230 219 ll»U-4UBte 


187V. 

2X5 

2X5te 

2 JW, 

1X3 

260te 

2X7 


230teMtf 9S 21016 13!te 2Xte 
2JS May 75 23816 230*6 t37M 
212 V. IX 95 2X3 V. 243 2X2 Vi 
231 Seats 246 ’v 2X6% 2XSV. 
23SteOec9S 2X9% 2X9% 23*’* 
2X»teMcr« 254 256 254% 

2559)449* 282 2X3 te 242 


E st. sates 36X00 Mon'S, soles 4L57I 
MOT'S Open W 246,125 UO 1903 
SOYBEANS (CBOT) U0l(iimiTUTi.gihni 


2J0*4 — 0X0161 

218 -0.00*4 43351 
2X2te-OXO% 45,931 
245te — 0X1 5X31 
ZX89i-4Xr% 28,168 
255 -0X1 te 1X36 
2X2te-(Ull% 1,518 


7X4 
7X5 
7.05* 
7X6 V. 
412 

415 
6X0te 

416 

417 
6X8 
6JJ7 


n in 
14 itte 


44% 44 V) 


Renaissance Eny 20% |7H 


RtaAlaom 
Seaaromco 
Stone Conreld 
Talisman Eny 
Tttaatobe 
Telus 
Thomson 
TerDomSank 

Transolta 
TtansCda Pipe 
UtdOomlnlan 
UMWesihurae 
w estcaast Eny 
Weston 

Xerox Cana* B 


24W _ 

40 Stte 
15% 15*4 
25% 24*6 
18** IBte 
T5*i 16 
UVt 14te 
20 % 202 * 
13f* 1364 
1714 17 

25% 25% 
111* 11 
ffl* 22H 
39% 39% 
83 41% 




Zurich 


Adia Inh B 
Aluulsre B new 
BBC BrwnBovfl 
Cibo Gelav B 
CS Holdings B 
ElekfrowB 
FltawB 
Interdiscaunt 8 
JelmollB 
LdreUsGvr R 
Moeve na a-B 
Nestle R 
Oeflik. BuewieR 
Pargesa Mid B 
Roche Hda PC 
Safroneraeue 
ScndazB 
ScftindJerB 
suberPC 
Surveillance B 
SwtsaBnkCcroB 
Swiss RHrrsur R 
Swtsontr R 
UBS B 

Winterthur B 
Zurich AsiB 


J19 

219 

831 

837 

HOB 

1118 

761 

773 

525 

SB. 

340 

340 

1485 

1505 

1490 

1490 

725 

730 

739 

729 

455 

451 

1244 

1241 

125 

12S 

1430 

1650 

588$ 

5830 

171 

<94 

ft 

7350 

7400 

860 

on 

mo 

1530 

360 

3S5 

781 

7B6 

790 

791 

1071 

1084 

887 

1272 

iff 




23T4iJon9S SXS 5.6*% 5X2% 
5X79, MOT 95 5J4te V76te SH*. 
IS* Marts 5X4 5X5 5X1 

SX3te Jul 95 5X7 V, 589 J- 5B6 

SX6teAuot5 291 592 SX9te 

5.71 Seats 1 »»te St} 5.91 

578V, Nov 95 59»« 6X1 596*. 

5.95 Jon?* 6X5 6X6 6X5 

6X7VVMa-W 

5.9VVi Julf* 411 411 A.1B 

5.94 NcvN 6X7 4X5 6X2 

Est. sates 71X00 Men's, sofas 27,(J2 
Man's open W 137 X07 on 09? 

SOYBEAN MEJU. (CBOT) Wm-Mnn 
209X0 1S4.10DK94 199.10 159.10 157 JO 

15550Jc»i9S 16460 160X0 15470 
1 59 JO Mar 95 16450 16450 16210 
16150 Mav 95 167.W 1*7.10 166X0 
16S.40JUI95 171 JO 171.90 170X0 

17260 Aug W 17130 tnxo 17290 
172 60 Sep 95 17530 I75J0 17490 
17450 OtS 95 177 JO 177 JO 176X0 
174J0DPC9J 1 79 JO 179 JO 7 79 JO 
1*1 00 Jen 9* 

ED vats. 30X00 Man's, sates 19X00 

MaCiaotntnr 

SOYBEANOO. 

2TJS 220QDOC94 


5X3 te -0.01 43.9*6 

573te-0X0M 32504 
S83 -aolte 17,978 
5XW.-0.Olte 2S.904 
5B7te— 0X1 te 2384 
S. PI rROOte 1365 
597V.— 0X2 12158 

6X5 -0.01V, 11* 

411-te-OXIte 27 
41* *0X0'A 60 

404 -0X1 125 


307 JO 
307 JO 


150.10 

158X0 

162X0 


206X0 


18270 
181 JO 
7*830 

181 J 


170J0 
17290 
174.90 
174X0 
779 JO 
MUD 


—130 2746 
—1.70 30.180 
-1X0 2*. 702 
-1J0 14488 
-1X0 12414 
-I JO 2180 
—1.30 1X03 
— 1 JO 5J04 
-1.70 3X09 
—1.00 10 




39.15 


28X5 

2245 Jar 95 

7730 

77M 

173D 

77A6 

*036 3X063 

2230 


7*9 

26.95 

26J0 

2*34 

• 0.1*28X30 


22X5 mov 95 25X3 

Z&JB 

2271 

25J0 

27 AS 

227*Ji49S 

2532 

25X0 

« 

25.27 

•OJIS 11X64 

27 JO 


2200 


34.95 


7A|n 

2275S*P»5 

24X0 

2&05 

24*5 

*4X7 

•0X7 2.183 

24A0 

2275 Od»5 

34X5 

2X85 

24X5 

3670 

• mo 4X51 

24JS 

74.15 

2280 Dec 95 
2125 JanN 

34J0 

24X5 

74J0 

74J0 

3610 

5XS 
• 0.10 M 


EstsalR 35.000 Man's. reles 14 IS* 
Mon's corn kit 114J6I an 968 


Livestock 


CATTLE 

(CMSI7 A 




7*30 

*475 Dec « 

0X5 

7022 

69.77 

74X5 

84.47 Fed 95 

0X5 

7035 

69-62 

7&I0 

4737 Apr 95 

TWO 

TOW 

703S 

69 JO 

6600 Jut 95 

&S.1S 

4LJ0 

65.10 

65. W 

*2X0 Auo9S 

*122 

6335 

6110 

67X5 

61100095 

6177 

64X0 

UJ7 

66B 

6385 Dec 95 

66/0 

6690 

*66$ 


741s 

*9.77 

70J7 


6110 

61X7 


Ett Kies 11527 Man's. JOtel 12446 
Atarrs ope n Ini tyjl oH ,484 
F^ED^R CATTLE (CMEH) BlXCOtes^ cents car 8J. 
80.95 7fX7XVT« 7430 74X0 7*22 74SS 


«0i* 5436 
♦0JE 29,0*6 
*0J5 19.730 
tO.19 453* 
2907 

♦ 0.12 1496 

♦ 0.10 190 


7Q.i5Mor95 71X2 

7490 4955 AorlS 71.70 

749 69 JB May 95 W 00 

nos 69X5 Aug 95 7050 

69J0 6R 75 DO 95 

80J0 77J0NW9S 89 JO 

71 X 69X058096 

Ess. sate 1425 AWs. sales tn 
Mar's open tei 9X73 up 34 


7220 71 Jt 7130 
71X0 71.13 71.15 
70.27 70X0 

705} TOjB 


69X0 


THIS 
70X5 
69X7 
« JO 6M0 



Season Season 

Wgh Law Open 

Mi 

LOW 

Close 

b»o 

Opjnt 

1X16 

1057 May 9S 1649 

1680 

164* 

1*71 

♦ 02 37X62 

1675 


164* 

142! 

1639 

+0.19XL364. 

33 

1057 Od 95 13X8 

I3JC 

1X3 

1155 

♦0.19 26544 

an 

1271 



6350 

1280 

11.18 May 96 12.92 

I2J2 

1295 

I2J6 

♦OX! 

1X23 




121 

1236 



1ZS0 

IZOSOcfP* 1200 

izoo 

122* 

12J6 

♦ OX! 

49 

Est sales 24X26 TAtte'S-HPei 8.75* 





aoenlnt 191X02 up 

1239 





I COCOA (NOB igirwtnewnupw 

n 




1580 

1041 DecM 



1195 

-a 

37 

1685 

1D77M»9S 1224 

1244 

1214 

1*17 

-14 39X97 


1078 Mov 95 1241 

1263 

1233 

1235 

-9 11,958 


1225X495 1250 

1267 

1246 

IJ49 

—10 

6954 

1560 

127? Sec 5*5 1275 

12S8 

1267 

7273 

—1C 

1,9*4 


1290 Dec 95 1306 

1316 

1200 

1300 

—11 

V& 


1350 Mar 9* 



ISO 

—11 

1447 

1725 Mar 96 



72» 

—77 

3.96* 

1505 

1410X4 96 



1375 

—11 

27716 

1531 

1520 Sep 96 



1397 

—11 

70 

Est. sales 6X70 MorYLstPes 3X71 





ORANGE JUICE rnCTN) 1SA00 c«VSDtr»L 



132X0 

89X0 Joi 95 I0BX0 

110X0 

10600 

109-85 

♦ 135 KL537 

12425 

91X0MW95 11U0 

11600 

117X0 

111J0 

11195 

116*5 

+ 170 

6W8 

134X5 

97XOMOV 95 116X0 
10030 X495 119X0 

11530 

MAS 

ixn 

127X0 

119X0 

mxa 

119X5 

♦ 1.10 


13025 

I07jssee95 moo 

122X0 

12130 

12275 

♦ 075 


179-00 

189X0 Nw P5 



1H3S 

+0JD 


>29X0 

IQSJDJanM 



11600 

+0X5 


130X0 

12625 Mor 96 



I2SX0 

-025 



May 90 



724X0 

-035 


Ed.sotes TLA. MonX sofas 

1X28 





| Man's open nt 25J» aH 147 






Metals 




| Hi GRADE COPPER (NCMX} 

IMP 




139 JO 

7175 Dec 94 134X0 

13640 

13130 

13640 

—040 


13690 


13195 

132JO 

131X5 



135X0 

71X0 Feb 95 133X0 

13120 

13120 

T33J5 



134X0 

73X0 Mar 95 131X0 

122.90 

>30X0 

■3215 


131X0 

91.10 Apr 95 



129*0 

—035 

697 

17*80 

76*5 May 95 127.40 

1HX0 

UiKl 

127 JS 

-0J0 

%6M 

12600 

104.10 Jun 95 



125 JO 


17530 

79oo juts mao 

12230 

IJIJS 

122 JS 

♦ 0X5 



111X1 Auo 95 



121.10 




79. 10 Sea *5 



118.15 




•60OOJC95 



11115 


2.916 


6670 M&96 I060Q 



112X0 



108X0 





10930 

107X0 May 96 107.00 

107X0 

107X0 

107X5 




10550X4 9* 




‘US 


10535 

10125 Sep 96 



10620 




11195 Nov 9* 



>14X0 

♦1.10 


ESI. sews 8X00 Man’s. SteK 

7.119 





SJLVtSt (NCMX) sjwnTwse. 





3800 Dec 94 4*08 

481 X 




124 



47&0 

*160 

473J 



4718 Feb 95 



476X 



6060 

4 14-5 Mar 95 484X 

4860 

mo 

479X 


6063 

JISXAVrv 95 4910 

4920 

4040 

48SX 





*910 

491.0 



7X02 



saix 





«10Dec95 5140 

sux 












498 OMar 96 SEJ 


5ZLS 



7495 






400.0 

S20XJUI96 



532.7 


1X86 





539J 

— 3X 

Ed. sato 21X00 Mon's, sates 14351 


1 Mon's anenmt 136997 oft 388 

PLATMUM (NMER) pn,x-mani>.lw u 




1M80 JOn 95 411X0 

112X0 






116X0 

113X0 

41180 




O9X0 

117X0 



J.te 8 







4J*30 

420X0 Jinn 94 



*2660 

*070 


ESf.stfrs 3JX Man's. saks 




Man's open ira .28X83 otf 97* 





GOLD 

4S6SB 

WCM30 MOttavoA-aoUartPC'iravca. 
mnoeeM 379 jo iv jn mum 



SOS 






*aro 


363J0FcB95 381X0 
3(430 Apr 95 38SX0 

382X0 

380.20 




285.90 

3*420 



030 

3*1 JO Jun 95 309.40 

190.10 

3HA0 

368X0 


<1430 

*030 Aug « 39130 

J9120 

39120 

393,20 


429X0 

3993DOK 95 40150 


40230 

397 Jb 
02.40 



47430 

JMJOKobW 



407. W 


1,97? 


*18X0 Apr 96 






413X0 jun » 



tibjo 

♦0.10 

5^10 


AUO « 



0130 


ES setes 15X00 Mon’s, sates 


asm 

•Olio 


Man's open W I7BJ96 off 2111 






<9 JO 


MGS (CMSI.WXOOto^arasperte. 


30X0 DeC 94 33X5 34J0 

34X2F«h9S 3495 3JJ0 

31D5 Acr 95 J7XP 37.75 37JB 3735 
40J5 Jlin 95 42*5 43X0 

40X5X4 95 427TJ 4297 


40X5 AusK 42X5 4MB 
00095 40.75 41X0 


3430' 


39X0 Dec 95 <225 4LS0 *235 CJD 


41X0Feb« 

.sates 9J02 Man’s. sews 11.110 


4X47 


♦ 228 2X41 
-410 14X47 

♦ 0X5 1.164 

♦ 418 4JBS 

♦0J0 891 

♦0J7 7.195 

♦ 020 1JM 
*0X0 M3 
-405 SB 


*WnTapwW l^j44_qd 9*6 


POJUC BELLJES (CMCR) toxxeeit-annpw B 
6405 35.1 5 Fee 95 3470 J7AS 346* 3735 

4420 3SJ0M»95 3720 3735 »X0 373* 

61.15 36.90 MW 95 149 39X0 MX5 3477 

94X0 17X0 Jut 95 79X0 40.10 JJ5 39-tf 

44X0 3470 Aug 95 3475 3475 34£2 3IXZ 

44*5 39 JO Feb W 

59,90 39J0Mor« 

Ed.smes 1,9*5 Man's, sofas U56 
Men's open iri 14541 ua 62 


4495 

48X5 


♦ 0J» 7.914 

♦470 1^*1 
♦CL50 514 

♦ 025 434 

90.15 JU 
♦410 10 

1 


Food 


c meso pjaetev - wr U 

77,10 Dec 94 160X0 16400 149J5 

fitBO 7WMar95 1 0.10 1U25 

244X0 BUOM0V95 166.15 1**£ U-JO 

asxojfara tsaxo U4S0 axo 
16150 Sen 95 169X5 Je*-H ftfjg 
81 JO Dec 95 16475 M9X0 1*4» 
165JB6AV9* 

, IWXOMOV 96 
Esr.saws XL 570 Man's.utaS SJI4 
Man open I rl X.SPimTT* 

SUGAR -WORLD U P9CSE) 111***-** 
IsS” iSmIfH 1441 I4J0 14X1 


24S.10 
230X01 
242X0 
20250 
1 70X0 


15473 

153.60 

161.90 

16350 

144X0 

I64JS 

165.50 

165.10 


-IJJ0 17.OT 


—4 JO (.717 
-400 3,709 
—4X0 l.w 
-6 00 1.515 
-400 273 

—6X0 I 


U.71 


Financial 


WT.BIUJ (CMER) slnvMn-Di>HID6Ba. 

91M f22»6kr9j 9133 9176 9370 

JAM 92£Jen9S 9263 9264 9ZS7 

93X7 9238 5CP 95 9231 9234 9225 

Ed- sates 4X66 Man's, sates 1J7« 

Mart's open W J4X71 up 100 

I'RMra-tetongstfllBM 

IM-ta lg-07 Dec tel 00- 11 100-13 100-065 100-13- 015 40X74 


9323 -0X6 19X62 
9257 -410 4,143 

9234 -0X5 966 


!“-?? fi-ts Mar ts 99-» 99-305 ‘99-23 99-WS^ 005 1«LS3 
W*18 — - — — 


10MB 99-06 Jun 95 99-18 99-19 99-175 99-19 

9*-07 99 JU Sea9J M.IB 2 

EP.ydrt 65X00 Mon'Lsatel 31X56 
Mon's now ed 209X77 ait 2577 

VlCS.Mpw-w,LBn«7lWw 

J££ SSSSlSS, “P-' 7 m * 2 IW * M + a »*» 

liLii S-U 9599-30 9S-J8 w-u jj.jj ♦ 06 34X46 

%:?, ££% »:« ; « »» 

11M1 96-30 Dec 95 9B-IQ ♦ 06 ffl 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1994 


Page 13 


EUROPE 


, % 
"*2 




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^Overseas 
Business 
Lifts Profit 

At Degussa 

. Ctapifa# by Our Staff From Dupaidies 

.metals company, said Tuesday 

^J t »/S urlhKpiarter P rofil 

- surged 843 percent, coniribut* 
; ^ 10 a pretax profit gain of 63 
■ ^ or ’•s full financial year, 

?y« before tax in the 'year 
: ended Sept. 30 rose to 280 mil- 
■hon Doitsche marks ($17S mil- 
■Iron). The company did not re- 
lease results Tor tbe fourth 
. quarter but only gave the com- 
parison with the vear-earlier 
i quarter. 

The company said it would 
i propose to the supervisory a 
-.board a dividend increase to 10 
' DM a share from 7 DM for the 
previous year. 

“The positive impulses for 
our business originated mainly 
in North America, Asia and a 
number of European coun- 
jt "tries,” Degussa said. “Only re- 
w cently have we noticed a slight 
recovery in domestic demand." 

. Sales declined 7 percent in 
the 1994 financial year, to 13.8 
billion DM, as a result of dives* 
ti lures. Sales from continuing 
operations rose 4 percent. 

» Separately, MAN AG, the di- 
versified German machinery 
and truck manufacturer, said 
new orders rose 16 percent, to 
8.44 billion DM, in tne first five 
months of its financial year, 
■which began on July 1. Growth 
in domestic orders outpaced de- 
mand from abroad. 

( Bloomberg, AFP ) 


Dismissed Oslo Bourse Chief Drowns 


C«r f Jed * {*, Suff r , lafl DjpJKha 

u L “ Tbe direc *or of the Oslo 
JiocK Exchange was found dron.7u.-d cuxlv 
l uesday in an apparent suicide, the dav 
after he was dismissed from his job be- 
we ctf alleged financial irregularities. 
arve * was the public face 

oi the bourse for almost two decades until 
ms sudden dismissal, drowned in a fiord 
pear his summer house in Telemark prov- 
ince, a police statement said. The police 
naa been sent to the isolated house bv 
fanuly memhers, who feared something 
might have happened to him. 

„ e X? * s Q€> suspicion of any criminal 
? c *?. 3 Telemark police spokesman said, 
indicating that the police suspected sui- 
cide. “Nobody else was involved." 

"Uie Oslo bourse board, in a terse 
statement, praised the work of Mr. Jane, 
whom it had dismissed on Monday for 
allegedly mixing his “private economy 
and the economy of the bourse.” 


Die board said Monday that the al- 
leged irregularities had primarily taken 
place this year and were uncovered last 
week. On Tuesday, Elisabeth WiUe, the 
head of tbe stock exchange, said (hat Mr. 
Jarvc had pocketed 275.000 kroner 
(S40.000) on a contract for a new trading 
system and that, in addition, illegal with- 
drawals from bourse profits totaling 
50,000 kroner had been discovered. 

“It was not the sum that was decisive,” 
she said, but a lack of trust that had 
caused his dismissal. 

Traders held a ceremony of remem- 
brance for Mr. Jarvc, who administered 
the electronic modernization of the Oslo 
exchange to international standards. 

The case was the latest of a series of 
scandals to shake Norway's closely knit 
financial community and it involved the 
man bent on cracking down on insider- 
trading and other irregularities. 

“Restoring confidence will probably be 


the most important task for the bourse in 
the days ahead, " Mr. Jarvc wrote in a 
newspaper article in April 1993. 

In the bourse’s annual report last year, 
be said complying with ethical rules was 
vital in tbe securities market. “Ethics is 
the teaching of the good, the moral. Eth- 
ics must be taught,” he wrote. 

Tbe daily Finansavisen, commenting 
cm Mr. Jarve’s dismissal in an editorial 
headlined “Oslo Bourse Banana Repub- 
lic,” said this case, coming after recent 
financial scandals, threatened to ruin the 
image or the bourse. 

“It remains to be seen if foreign inves- 
tors in Norway opt to sell and instead 
invest in markets in which they have 
greater confidence,” it wrote. 

Mr. Jarvc, who is survived by a wife 
and two children, was appointed to head 
the exchange in 1977 at 33 years of age, 
the youngest ever to hold that job. 

(Reuters, AFP I 


Deutsche Aerospace Wins Rare U.S. Plane Order 


C-Mnptied fy Our Shift Fruni Dupatrha 

MUNICH — Deutsche 
Aerospace AG, a subsidiary of 
Daimler-Benz AG. said Tues- 
day that a U.S. airline had or- 
dered 40 of its turboprop com- 
muter planes. 

Jetstream International Air- 
lines, a regional subsidiary of 
USAir Inc. based in Dayton. 
Ohio, ordered the twin-en gin e 
Domier-328 planes. 

The order comes at a crucial 
time for the Deutsche Aero- 
space, which is in the process of 
slashing 16,000 jobs because of 
poor sales. 

“This is an excellent suc- 
cess,” said Juergen Schrempp, 
chairman of Deutsche Aero- 
space. “We’ve finally succeeded 


in a breakthrough in the fiercely 
competitive aircraft market in 
the U.S." 

The German aerospace in- 
dustry as a whole has seen an- 
nual revenue drop by 40 per- 
cent since 1991, Hans Eberhard 
Birkc, the chairman of the 
country's aerospace trade asso- 
ciation, said Tuesday. 

The companies did not dis- 
close the terms or the purchase, 
but at the airplane’s list price of 
14.1 million Deutsche marks 
($9 million), the order would be 
worth 564 million DM. 

Jetstream is the second big 
U.S. purchaser of the plane. 
Horizon Air of Seattle recently 
placed 20 firm orders and 40 
options. 


The aircraft seats 33 passeo- tium that includes Aerospatiale 


gers and Deutsche Aerospace 
calls it the fastest turboprop 
plane in its class. 

Total orders for the Domier- 
328, which DASA only began 
producing in the past few years, 
now stand at 72 firm orders and 
71 options from a total of 16 
customers, DASA said. 

Separately, Airbus Industrie 
announced the creation of Air- 
bus Finance Co., a partnership 
that the company said would 
finance $3.5 billion to $5 billion 
in sales over the next five years. 

The company is backed by a 
$13 billion letter of credit 
signed by 49 international 
banks led by J.P. Morgan & Co. 

Airbus Industrie is a consor- 


POWERs Apple and Bandai Form Alliance for Multi-Media Machine 



d . Urn'S 




, Continued from Page 11 

more than 100 titles over the 
next year. 

While Bandai's popular Pow- 
er Ranger action characters will 
help, tbe machine’s success or 
failure may hinge on its ability 
to play, with only slight modifi- 
cations, tbe pool of CD-ROM 
titles developed for Apple’s 
Macintosh computers. 

^ This will provide access to a 
selection of educational, 
iusical and reference titles. But 
users will have to buy key- 
boards, mice and other peri- 


pherals to use some of these 
titles, which would make the 
Power Player as expensive as 
low-end multimedia computers. 

The machine will use Apple's 
new multi-media platform 
called Pippin. It comprises a 
simplified version of Apple’s 
System 7.12 operating system 
and runs on the PowerPC 603 
microprocessor developed by 
Apple, Motorola Inc. and Inter- 
national Business Machines 
Corp. 

All titles written for Pippin 
also will run on Apple’s Macin- 


tosh computers, giving software 
developers a bigger market, and 
thus more incentive, to write for 
(heir product. 

Expanding the number of 
programs may be the biggest 
benefit for Apple. Apple an- 
nounced in September a formal 
campaign to license its core op- 
erating system and elements of 
its PowerPC architecture to 
competitors. 

The company hopes this 
strategy will broaden the supply 
of software for its computers, 
which are losing market share 


to machines that use Intel 
and ran Microsoft Corp.'s 
dows operating system. 

By licensing Pippin, it will 
stimulate development of game 
software, the fastest-growing 
segment of tbe industry. 

Apple executives refused to 
estimate how quickly they 
could license Pippin to other 
companies, nor bow big a busi- 
ness it would eventually be- 
come. They said only that they 
were in talks with other poten- 
tial Japanese licensees- 


NYSE 

Tuesday's Closing 

Tables Include the nattonwkle prices up to 
the closing on Wall Street and do not reflect 
late trades elsewhere. l/Ia The Associated Press 


of France, British Aerospace 
PLC, Construed ones Aeronau- 
ticas SA of Spain, as well as 
Deutsche Aerospace. 

(AP, Bloomberg) 

■ Fokker Forecasts Loss 

Fokker NV, the Dutch air- 
craft maker that is majority- 
owned by Deutsche Aerospace, 
said it expected its 1994 net loss 
to approach 460 million guil- 
ders ($261 million), the same 
figure it posted last year, 
Bloomberg Business News re- 
ported from Amsterdam. 

Fokker said it did not expect 
to be profitable before 1996 be- 
cause aircraft makers world- 
wide have been hit hard by the 
recession in the airline industry. 


Santander 
Sells 3% 
Of Banesto 


Compiled by Ov Staff From Dispotho 

MADRID — Banco Santan- 
der SA said Tuesday it had sold 
a 3 percent stake in Banco Es- 
pa&ol de Cnbdho SA to a group 
of Mexican investors for about 
15.6 billion pesetas ($118 mil- 
lion.). Tbe bank added that it 
was looking to sell more Ban- 
esto assets. 

A spokesman for Banco San- 
tander said the group, led by 
Antonino Fernandez, the chair- 
man of the Mexican beer com- 
pany Grupo Modelo, acquired 
about 18.3 million shares at 850 
pesetas a share in an operation 
carried out off the main market. 
Banesto shares closed at 950 
pesetas on the Madrid bourse. 

Tbe sale brings Santander's 
stake in Banesto down to 53 
percent. Santander acquired 
72.45 percent of Banesto at 762 
pesetas per share in an auction 
m April 

Meanwhile, a parliamentary 
committee found Banesto’s for- 
mer managers solely responsible 
for the financial crisis that al- 
most led to the bank’s collapse. 

Tbe committee, made up of 
members or Spain's principal 
political parties, issued its final 
report Tuesday on the nine- 
month investigation. 

In the report, the committee 
accuses Mario Conde, the 
bank’s former president, of put- 
ting his personal interests be- 
fore those of the bank. Mr. 
Conde was formally charged 
with fraud last month in con- 
nection with the bank’s crisis. 

( Reuters, AFX, Bloomberg) 


3DO: High Hopes for Christmas 

Cbotmned from Page 11 



Mr. Hawkins's company, have 
cooled. 

Stock in 3 DO was trading at 
$1 1.00, up 25 cents Tuesday af- 
ternoon, far from the $47.00 
peak it hit in October 1993. 

On Monday, Mr. Hawkins 
warned a group of financial an- 
alysts that the company would 
nm through its modest $21 mil- 
lion cash cushion in about sev- 
en months unless a runaway 
consumer hit or two replenishes 
its coffers. 

“We’re nervous,” said Keith 
Benjamin, a consumer electron- 
ics analyst at Robertson Ste- 
phens & Co. in San Francisco. 
“The stock is a binary event. 
Either it will be worth a lot, or it 
will be worth nothing.” 

At least 200 video-game mak- 
ers before 3DO have vanished 
without a trace, and tbe skepti- 
cism would probably be worse 
were it not for Mr. Hawkins’s 
dder-statesman status in high- 
tech circles. 

Mr. Hawkins realized that he 
had to line up the many soft- 
ware developers who resented 
having to pay Japanese game 
companies as mud) as $9 to $12 
in licensing fees for every game 
they sold. 

He signed developers by 
charging a far more reasonable 
$3 a game. 

The pitch was so attractive, 
software developers signed on 
in droves, and giant American 
and Japanese conglomerates 
from AT&T Coip. and Time 
Warner Inc. to Matsushita 
Electric Industrial Co. invested 
millions in Ins company. Those 


endorsements were noticed on 
Wall Street, and for a while last 
fall, mere months after the com- 
pany went public, Mr. Haw kins 
seemed unstoppable. 

Since then, he has stumbled. 
First, he angered software de- 
velopers by setting up a com- 
peting game-development unit 
within 3 DO, then he decided in 
October to double what the 
company charged software de- 
velopers per game sold. 

Doubling the licensing fee 
not only upset the software 
companies, but it sent the stock 
price tumbling more than 6 per- 
cent the day of the announce- 
ment. Mr. Hawkins has quietly 
rolled back tbe surcharge to $1 
for the rest of 1994, and de- 
ferred the full $3 fee to a later 
date. 

Though be has made some 
progress in recent months get- 
ting back on track, his struggle 
is a vivid reminder that a hot 
new technology start-up can 
quickly lose its edge if it mar- 
kets products poorly or disap- 
points suppliers. 

The business Trip Hawkins 
set out to conquer is potentially 
a vast one. Last year, for exam- 
ple, $5 billion in software reve- 
nues from the video game busi- 
ness almost matched the $5.2 
billion that Americans spent at 
the movies. And Jefferies & 
Company, a Los Angeles based 
investment firm, predicted that 
hardware revalue would jump 
from S1.9 billion this year to 
$2.9 billion next year. 

Mr. Hawkins has invested a 
total of $15 million in the com- 
pany. 


BEAUJflVAGE RAIACE 

ENJOY CHRISTMAS AND NEW YEAR’S EVE IN LAUSANNE 

Christma s Package Sir. 485.- per person 
2 nights inducing breakfast, dim on Christmas Eve 
and lurch on Christmas day 
New Year's Package Sfr. 610.- per person 
2 nights inducing breakfast 
New YearS Eve dinner bal "The imperii Vienna' 
and lunch on New Year’s day 

Caff and ask tor further information at teL 41-21-613 33 33 or fox 41-21-613 33 34 


Investor’s Europe 


Frankfurt 

DAX 

2300 


London Paris 

FTSE 100 Index CAC40 
... 2200 


m 

2100 

2000 

1900 


'V 


J A SONO 
1904 



J A SOND 
1904 


J A S O N D 
1984 


Exchange 

Amsterdam 

Index 

AEX 

Tuesday 

Close 

406411 

Prev. 

Close 

404.49 

% 

Change 

+0,57 

Brussels 

Slock Index 

7.1S&66 

7.16&88 

-0.46 

Frankfurt 

DAX 

2,011.25 

2.024,82 

-0,67 

Frankfurt 

FAZ 

757-35 

764.71 

-0,96 

Helsinki 

HEX 

1*80&3& 

1,813^4 

-0.41 

London 

Finanoal Times 30 

Z2B7JBQ 

2,265.90 

+0.08 

London 

FTSE100 

2346.40 

2,943.40 

+0.10 

Madrid 

General Index 

29930 

300.69 

-0.46 

MBan 

MlBTEL 

9,368 .(X) 

9,289.00 

+0.85 

Parte 

CAC40 

1,917.11 

1,91932 

■0.12 

Stockholm 

Affaersvaedderi 

1,84343 

1,82625 

+0.97 

Vienna 

ATX index 

1.030.10 

1.030.90 

-008 

Zurich 

SSS 

908.20 

908.91 

-0.08 

Sources r Reuters. AFP 


InmiuuKui HnuU Tnhtnv 


Very briefly: 


• Russia and its creditor banks held further talks in Frankfurt on 
rescheduling $25 billion of former Soviet debt. 

• Tbe European Commission may delay proposals to change the 
value-added tax system until as late as the end of March, the EU 
fiscal commissioner. Christiane Scrivener, said. 

• Iberia, Spain's financially troubled national airline, will present 
a legal request to lay off more than 5,000 workers, despite an 
agreement on less drastic cuts with its main unions. 

• Accor SA, Europe’s largest hotel group, said revenue in the third 
quarter rose 1.6 percent, to 8.46 billion French francs ($1.56 
billion). 

• La Gnqui&iie, a new French state-controlled television channel, 
went on the air Tuesday to promote education and employment 
among a wide public. 

• Ustnor SacDor of France confirmed press reports that it plans to 
join a consortium bidding for the acquisition of IRl’s Ilva SpA 
flat-steel unit. Ova Laminati Piani, for about 4.8 billion francs. 

• Weston Germany's retail sales fell 2.9 percent in October from 
September and 2 percent from a year earlier, the Bundesbank 
reported. 

• British Airways PLC will sell its Caledonian Airways Ltd. and 
Caled oni an Airways (Services) Ltd. units to the vacation group 
Inspirations PLC for £4.9 million ($7.6 million) cash and the 
assumption of an £1 1.7 million loan repayable over 5 years. 

• Sooth Africa, Tanzania and Uganda have launched a new 
regional airline;, Alliance, which officials hope will lead to eco- 
nomic cooperation between eastern and southern Africa. 

Bloomberg, A FX, Reuters 


U.K. Utility Plans Job Cuts 

Agence Francc-Presxe 

LONDON — The regional electricity company Southern 
Electric PLC will cut its work force by one quarter, eliminat- 
ing 1,100 jobs over the next five years, the company said 
Tuesday as it reported a profit increase. 

The company, which had already cut 1,069 jobs since 
March 1993, will be left with a work force of about 3.000. 

Continuing a trend for British utilities, it said pretax profits 
in the six months ending SepL 30 had risen nearly 20 percent, 
to £106.8 mOHon ($167 million), from £89.2 million a year 
earlier. Sales slipped nearly 3 percent, to £744.8 million from 
£764.9 million, while the dividend was increased to 8.3 pence 
from 6.7 pence. 

“With continuing economic recovery in our region, our 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1994 


China’s Surplus 
Nearly Doubles 
As Exports Surge 


Page 15 

ASIA/PACIFIC 


China Starts Its Great Dam 

Project Launched Despite Years of Protest 


HONG KONG — China’s 
bade surplus soared in Novem- 
ber to $4.78 billion for the year, 
and economists say the United 
States is picking up the tab. 

Exports rose 41.6 percent for 
the year, to $12.67 billion, while 

$10.3 billiOEU China's Slate 
Statistics Bureau reported 
Tuesday. The strong November 
performance almost doubled 
the coun tty’s trade surplus of 

Chengdu Cable 
Falls on Debut 
In Hong Kong 

Bloomberg Businas News 

HONG KONG — 
Chengdu Telecommunica- 
tions Cable Co. of China 
fell 13.4 percent Tuesday 
on its Hong Kong trading 
debut, hit by concerns 
about capacity constraints 
and weak demand for Chi- 
nese equities. 

“It was priced expensive- 
ly, so it was an easy target," 
said LQy Wu, vice president 
for Asia research at Bank- 
ers Trust Co. 

Shares of the state- 
owned cable manufacturer 
fell 37_5 cents from the is- 
sue price to 2.425 Hong 
Kong dollars (31 cents), re- 
bounding from the day's 
low of 2325 dollars. Four- 
teen million shares changed 
hands. 

At 2.80 dollars, the 
shares had been priced at 
13.1 times 1994 earnings, 
compared with an average 
of 9 for Chinese companies 
that trade in Hong Kong. 


$2.41 billion for the first 10 

months of the year. 

China's trade suiplus with 
the United States is accelerating 
at a record pace, r aidin g the 
specter of renewed trade fric- 
tion between the two countries. 

U.S. trade deficit with 
China will become the issue 
next year,” said Joan Zheng an 
economist at Baring Securities 
(Hong Kong) Ltd 

China already has the sec- 
ond-largest trade surplus with 
the United States, after Japan. 
In the first nine months of Lbe 
year, the gap reached a record 
$21.09 billion, up 26.8 percent 
from the year-aeo period, ac- 
cording to the LT.S. Commerce 
Department. In September 
alone, the most recent month 
for which statistics are avail- 
able, the deficit was a record 
$3.49 billion. 

“The momentum is there" for 
the deficit to widen further, said 
C. Y. Ho. deputy managing di- 
rector for China at Credit Lyon- 
nais Securities (Asia) Ltd. 

By contrast, the U.S. trade 
deficit with Japan narrowed by 
7.4 percent ' in September to 
$537 billion, its lowest level 
since May. 

The United Stales has set two 
deadlines for China to comply 
with bilateral agreements on 
trade issues or face sanctions. 
On Dec. 30, Washington must 
decide whether China has done 
enough to curb violations of 
U.S. copyrights and patents. 
The next day, the United States 
will determine whether China 
has adhered to a 1992 market- 
access agreement. 

China's trade turnaround, 
from a $122 billion deficit in 
1993, owes much to highly effec- 
tive import controls and indirect 
export subsidies. It also helped 
that China devalued its the yuan 
by about 33 percent on Jan. 1. 


Reuters 

BEIJING — Prime Minister Li Peng, an 
electrical engineer, mil break ground this 
week for the huge Three Gorges dam on the 
Yangtze River, which will cost nearly 2 per- 
cent of gross national product and which has 
been contested for more than 75 years. 

With costs estimated at 512 billion by com- 
pletion in 2009, some local residents opposing 
the dam and foreign investors still to be 
convinced, Mr. Li has a tough task on his 
hands to see through China's biggest engi- 
neering feat since the Great Wall, analysis 
said. 

The prime minis ter, a former head of the 
Ministry of Power Industty, wfl] mark the 
official start of construction Wednesday at 
the site of the 175-meter (570-foot) dam. 

“After 70 years of debate and the effort of 
several generations, this is a day we have 
awaited for a long lime," said Liu Hungtoi. 
director of project organization in Yichang, 
on the Yangtze in central Hubei Province. 

Total investment will amount to 429 per- 
cent of total investment in state infrastructure 


during the construction, the official Xinhua 
press agency said 

Luo Changraao. chief of planning and 
funding for the Three Gorges Construction 
Committee of the Stale Council, estimated 
the cost at 90 billion yuan (S10.5 billion), 
exclusive of interest and price increases. He 
said the final cost would exceed 100 billion 
yuan. 

Most of the 7 billion yuan iS S23 million) 
needed for preparatory work in 1993 and 
1994 has been raised he said. It came from 
national electrical rate increases, profits from 
the nearby Gezhouba hydropower station 
and loans from the Slate Development Bank. 

China will have spent 5176 million by the 
end of 1994 to resettle thousands of people. 
More than 1.3 million people musi be moved, 
but some have been unwilling to go. 

The dam will cut Yangtze's flow in 1997 
and is scheduled to begin generating electric- 
ity in 2003. When all 26 power generating 
units are operating in 2009 it will have total 
capacity of 182 million kilowatts. Mr. Liu 
said. 


Hanoi Looks to Global Bond Market 


Reuters 

HANOI — Vietnam, seeking 
more investment capital, is 
counting oo selling more do- 
mestic Treasury bonds and 
inching toward its first interna- 
tional bond issue, bankers and 
officials said. 

Le Thi Bang Tam, general 
director of the Stale Treasury, 
said an international bond issue 
of $100 million to $200 million 
could be made by mid-1995. 

“We anticipate that this 
might happen by the middle of 
next year, she said. “But we 
still have to go through various 
steps like getting approval from 
the prime minister." 

Stressing that nothing was fi- 
nal, she said Lhe Treasury fa- 
vored issuing a bond with a 
fixed interest rate and a term of 
up to five years. 

After the government ap- 
proves an issue. Vietnam will 


seek its first credit rating from 
firms such us Standard & Poor's 
Corp. and Moody's Investors 
Service Inc., she said. 

Deutsche Bunk AG. Nomura 
Securities Co. and Merrill 
Lynch & Co. are advising the 
government and bidding to 
lead-man age the international 
issue, foreign bankers said. 

Vietnam aims to double per 
capita gross domestic product 
by the year 2000, compared 
with 1991. h also seeks invest- 
ment of up to $50 billion by 
2000, $20 billion of it from do- 
mestic sources. 

But domestic savings now are 
only about 52 billion a year. 

“Bonds are one of the gov- 
ernment’s preferred instru- 
ments to get the money out 
from under the bed." a foreign 
banker said. 

The Treasury director said 
that domestic bonds and bills. 


offered in Vietnamese dong or 
U.S. dollars with terms of up to 
three years, had been a success- 
ful savings vehicle. 

Since they were launched in 
1991, savers have purchased 
bonds worth 8.500 billion dong 
(5773 million), she said. The 
1995 target is 4,000 billion dong 

About 95 percent of Viet- 
namese Treasury bonds are de- 
nominated in dong. They earn a 
much higher rate of interest 
than dollar bonds. 

Investors in bonds can now 
earn an annual 26.5 percent on 
average, according to a survey 
by Dragon Capital Co. pub- 
lished in the Vietnam Invest- 
ment Review. 

Treasury' bonds are expected 
to be the main instruments 
traded in the first phase of Viet- 
nam's stock market. Miss Tam 
said this might be launched in 
late 1995 or early 1996. 


Minister 
In Japan 
Criticizes 
Bailouts 


TOKYO — Japan's trade 
minister on Tuesday attacked 
the Bank of Japan's use of pub- 
lic funds to bail out two trou- 
bled credit unions- 

“If I had been told about the 
recent rescue package before the 
announcement. I would not have 
agreed to that," said Ryu taro 
Hashimoto, the head of the Min- 
istry of International Trade and 
Industry. “Is it right for the 
Bank of Japan to play such an 
oven rescue role, and will they 
do the same when similar prob- 
lems emerge in the future?” 

The Bank of Japan, in its first 
such emergency bailout of pri- 
vate lending institutions, an- 
nounced on Friday that it 
would join private banks to set 
up a special bank to rescue the 
two ailing credit unions. The 
bulk of their bad debt had been 
inherited from the bursting of 
the country’s so-called bubble 
economy in the late 1980s. 

The Bank of Japan said the 
Tokyo-based institutions, An- 
zen Credit Bank and Tokyo 
Kyowa Credit Association, had 
bad assets totaling 100 billion 
yen (S100 million). 

Central bank and finance 
ministry officials said the move 
was an emergency step needed 
to protect depositors and en- 
sure the stability of the overall 
financial system. 

But some Japanese media 
and economists questioned the 
step as one that might encour- 
age a lax attitude among bank- 
ers, who might feel that an offi- 
cial bailout would always be 
forthcoming to save them from 
their own mistakes. 

“Excessive reliance on public 
funds raises the fear that finan- 
cial institutions* management 
will become lax," an editorial in 
the financial daily Nihon Kei- 
zai Shimbun said. 


Investor’s Asia 


Hong Kong 
Hang Seng 

11GC3 


Singapore 

Straits Times 


Tokyo 

Nikkei 225 




2,55 W 

30030 y** 

mi V 


700 J ASOND 330 J A S 
1984 1994 


Exchange 

Hong Kong 
Singapore 
Sydney 
Tokyo 

Kuala Lumpur 

Bangkok 

Seoul 

Taipei 

Manila 

Jakarta 

New Zealand 

Bombay 


Hang Seng 
Straits Times 
All Ordinaries 
Nikkei 225 
Composite 
SET 

Composite Stock 
Weighted Price 
>SE 

Stock Index 
NZSE-40 
National Index 


% 

Change 


0 N D 10000 J ASOND 
1994 

Tuesday Prev. % 
Close Close Chang 

7,849.75 7,707.78 +1.84 

2,089.14 2,031.69 -0.12 

1,852.70 1,342.00 +0.58 

18iS75.48 18,975.10 ’0.53 

900-41 895.77 +0.52 

1,30558 1,278.50 +2.12 

1JJ25.89 1.042.77 -1.62 

BfiSTSr 6,722.40 -0.37 

2,62059 2.619.83 +0.03 

447.04 447.76 4l1fl 

1,902.32 1,878.09 +129 

1,818.88 1,835.53 -0.91 


900-41 

1,305-58 

1,025.89 

6.697J57 

2,620-59 

447.04 

1,902.32 

1,818.88 


Sources : Reuters. AFP 


!mc<'uli>-iLil Hrr-iU Tnhinr 


Very briefly: 

• Kawasaki Heavy Industries Ltd. will lead a consortium of 
Japanese companies to bid for China's high-speed train link 
between Beijing and Shanghai. Japanese officials said. 

■ Standard & Poor’s Corp. affirmed its A rating for Sony Corp.'s 
debt and removed the issue from CreditWatch. 

• Japan's wholesale price index for November was unchanged 
from October and down 1.3 percent from a year earlier. 

• NEC Onp. said it expected shipments of personal computers to 
rise to 3 million units in the year to March 1999 from the 1.7 
million units it expects to ship in the year ending in March 1995. 

• Mandarin Oriental International Ltd. has agreed with Kahala 
Royal Inc. to take a one-third equity stake in and manage The 
Kahala Hotel in Honolulu. Mandarin Oriental said total acquisi- 
tion and renovation costs would be about 5125 million. 

• The Seasides and Futures Cbumussion of Hong Kong has 
applied to the High Court to have MKI Corp. liquidated. 

• Japan’s machinery makers saw the value of orders from the 
private sector fall an adjusted 1.8 percent in October from 
September, the Economic Planning Agency said. 

• India has cleared foreign investment of 404.37 billion rupees (S13 
billion) in 12 power projects. 

• The Asian Development Bank approved an interest-free 560 

million loan to Vietnam to rebuild drainage and irrigation systems 
in the Red River Delta. afx, afp. Knighr-rndder 




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Tables indude the nationwide prices up to 
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0 Category A— — AS 1738 

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Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY* DECEMBER 14, 1994 


SPORTS 




Prince Albert Calls 
For Lifetime Bans 


By Je re Longman 

Sf*' Turk Times Service 

ATLANTA — Monaco’s 
Prince Albert, the only athlete 
on the 101-member Interna- 
tional Olympic Committee, has 
called for a lifetime ban for ath- 
letes who test positive for 
banned substances. 

The prince also admonished 
the IOC over its efforts at dop- 
ing control, saying, “We don’t 
need so many parties; we 
should have more drug tests. 

His remarks, made Monday, 
came on the same day that 
FIN A. swimming’s governing 
body, announced the two-year 
suspensions of five more swim- 
mers who tested positive for de- 
hydro testosterone, a perfor- 
mance-enhancing steroid, at the 
Asian Games this October in 
Hiroshima, Japan. 

Eleven Chinese athletes, in- 
cluding seven swimmers, have 
now been suspended for two 
years for testing positive before 
or during the Asian Games. 
Three of those swimmers — Lu 
Bin, Yang Aihua and Zhou 
Guanbin — won gold medals at 
the world championships in 
Rome in September. None of 
those athletes will be able to 
participate in the 1996 Summer 
Olympics in Atlanta. 

The suspensions contradict 
what IOC President Juan Anto- 
nio Samaranch said last month: 
“I'm sure Chinese sport is very 
dean." 

Also last month, Samaranch 
said of drug use is Olympic- 
related sports, “We think it is 
redly declining." 

Prince Albert, a bobsledder 
who competed in the 1988. 1992 
and 1994 Winter Games and 
who is vice chairman of the 


IOCs athletes commission, ap- 
peared at odds with Samar- 
anch’s remarks in an interview 
during a gathering of some 200 
Olympic committees from 
around the world. 

“I think it’s so very much a 
problem," the prince said of 
drug use among athletes. “Peo- 
ple try to minimize it all the 
time. More drugs are coming 
into play. We’re struggling to 
keep up with new drugs and to 
find ways to detect them and 
counter them." 

He said that the IOC must 
lead the way by increasing out- 
of-competition testing — the 
type that caught Lu and Yang, 
the Chinese stare. 

“If we really dedicate our 
funds and h uman resources to 
that, well see more progress," 
the prince said. 

The IOC is looking to insti- 
tute a uniform suspension poli- 

S r of two years for athletes in 
lympic- related sports who fail 
drug tests. The prince, however, 
said a lifetime ban “is the only 
real answer." 

“Sanctions have to mean 
something," he said. 

But he added: “No one wants 
to take that step. No one wants 
to be accused of not giving an 
athlete a second chance." ■ 
Chinese officials have said 
that drug use was a matter of 
individual, not systematic, use. 

“I have a hard time believing 
that,’’ the prince said. “We keep 
hearing stories that they have 
been heavily influenced by East 
German coaches. This is a clear 
result of their influence." 

“Unfortunately, I'm sure 
we'll see more," Prince Albert 
said of Chinese athletes who 
test positive for banned sub- 
stances. 



It’s Time for a FIFA Revolt 

J ...rncraCT," says VelappaB-^AngM 


International Herald Tnbttite 

L ONDON — A letter to FIFA’s extended 
family, the 8 vice presidents, 12 sitting mem- 
bers of the executive, 5 heads of continental 
confederations, 19 1 national associations and i 
billion folks the world over who care for soccer. 

Greetings: And what do you have on your 
plate over Christmas? Might I suggest you make 
room for insurrection. 

It may not be seasonable,, but I seriously 
suggest that 


the cr ? lib ^° f BravS d S £ a world o£ ye*.- 
"wety that heh^BttKfo^ 




- 3f 

x\ your gift to soccer would be to . _ rt . reiarVi Sepp Blatter in cfeanifl&il 

while time permits, the rule of the World Cup; w<t 


challenge, while time permits, the rule of the 8® fhis summer's World Cup T wasCariray* 

FIFA president. JoSo Havelange, the Brazilian S*®® . olhe « from FIFA’s comnntteeaw^ 
now in bis 2.1st year in that position, represents a along withotbers, . ^ 

seeing reterccs. of Anicaik) Matar-" 

iSSntfflittee (which sotted Jps tg 


Cjcrard Jubcn/Agencr Ftm^Picm 

Marcel Dessailly, left, battling an Azerbaijan defender as France posted a 2-0 victory. 

France Defeats Azerbaijan in Soccer 


:2.1st year in that position, represents 
threat to the game through his abuse of power. 

In New York; two month ago, Havelange took 
it upon himself to rearrange the governing com- 
mittees of FIFA, sacking members at Ins whim, 
appointing others, brooking no discussion. Some 
of you, the v,v - > - 

presidents and the Rob Jif" • • 

executive mem- Hunhac 

bers, sat feebly by. _ ™ ^ .. 

No one, it seemed, 

had the courage to lay a hand on the autocrat’s 
arm and remind him of article 20 of the FIFA 
statutes: “The president shall have an ordinary 
vote and, when votes are equal, the casting vote." 

There never was a vote. At the very end of the 
executive committee meeting, Havelange pre- 
sented his typed list of nesw app< 
removals, then declared the meeting 

Almost at once, but almost alone. Jack iohansson" swears : “If FIFA does- not* 

Warner, the Trinidadian who heads CONCA- jt^our complaint next time it makes appoint- ’ 

merits" — a year and a half hence -—“then it will 


rese, _ . . 

to see flaws in Johansson s own leadsrstap.Foraj 

start, the European 
down in Las Vegas last 
lange single-handedly barred Pete 


SS just penned a feawip* 


Havelan^that was a declaration of war" -butv- 
eSESr didn’t pS it because his UEFA executive fdt it^ , 

eting over. unwiseT But, to show that Europe s wrath-*s-£ 


CAF — FIFA’s North and Central American 


confederation — spoke of deals done behind . be impossible for UEFA to stay within the FIFA 


Return 

TRABZON, Turkey — France rediscovered 
the way to score Tuesday night as it beat Azer- 
baijan, 2-0, in a Group 1 qualifier for the Europe- 
an Championship. 

Jean-Piene Papin’s shot in the 24th minute 
ended a goalless spell that had lasted almost 300 
minutes. Patrice Loko scored in the 55th minute. 

The victory, in a match played on neutral 
ground because of security problems in Azerbai- 
jan, boosted French hopes of reaching the 1996 
finals after a poor start of three 0-0 draws. 

The match was played in a downpour on a 
pitch more suited to mud-wrestling than to soc- 
cer. And Papin’s 30th goal for France owed as 


much to the pitch as to his noted scoring knack. 

His half-hearted volley, off a cross from Reyn- 
old Pedros, went straight at Alexander Jrvkov. 
but the goalkeeper let the ball slither under his 
body, through the mud and into the net. 

Early in the second half, captain Eric Cantona 
headed down Paul Le Oven's Free kick at the far 
post, a shot that the substitute *keeper, Elkhan 
Gassanov, managed to stop. But Loko slid in to 
net die rebound. 

The victory left France in third place in the 
group with six points, one behind Romania and 
Israel and two ahead of Poland. But France has 
played one more match than the other three, with 
Israel hosting Romania on Wednesday night. 


people's backs. He was swatted aside. The com 
mitteemen trooped out without complaint or 
explanation. Even those who were fired were 
reduced to whispering that their “crime" bad 
been to suggest early in the year that it might be 
time to replace their 78-year-old overlord. 

Until the last few days, Havelange could say 
humbug to everyone Then, in Rome, Lennart 
Johansson, UEFA’s president, threatened that 
unless Havelange consults Europe’s 49 soccer- 
playing nations in the future, UEFA could boy- 
cott the next World Cup, in France in 1998. 

In Kuala Lumpur, 41 Asian countries win vote 
Wednesday on a resolution by Peter Vdappan, 


organization. . - 

TX70WI I CAN SEE Havdange, w Rio de 
VV Janeiro, quaking about , threats 18 months 
away, threats Johansson could never keep.. To 
withdraw European countries from the profits'* 
and glory of a World Cup would n«si then- 
sanction — unless Johansson, too, thinks he has 
dictatorial powers. ~ 

Indeed, Havdange can waft Johansson aside 
like a ving dealing the air of cigar smokejtimply 
by asking if Johansson sought UEFA authonza- 
tion for his threats in Rome.. ■ ' 

So until someone c o o rdinates the five conti- ; 
neats, until senior FIFA members, inform the - 


their general secretary, calling on Havdange to president that adherence to electoral processes is ; 
account for his unconstitutional behavior. de rigueur, he will go imperiously oil -And he. 

“We need more enlightened leadership from will, as many of you surely know, end up install- - 

’ i Teixeara, his son-in-law and recently' 

elected” vice - president of 


FI FA if we are to prevent world football slipping ing Ricardo 1 


SCOREBOARD 


NBA Standings 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
AJtanttc Division 



W L 

PCf 

GB 

Orianda 

15 4 

389 

_ 

New York 

11 7 

411 

3VS 

Boston 

9 1) 

A50 

6*3 

New Jersey 

9 13 

M9 

7*i 

PhHadeiohta 

7 11 

389 

7V, 

Washington 

6 10 

375 

7*0 

Miami 

S It 

Central Division 

394 

9 

Indiana 

12 5 

306 

— 

Cleveland 

11 8 

579 

2 

Charlotte 

9 9 

sea 

3V, 

Chicago 

9 9 

SCO 

3V7 

Detroit 

8 10 

444 

4V, 

Atlanta 

8 11 

421 

5 

Milwaukee 

6 12 

333 

6*0 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Midwest Division 



W L 

Pet 

GB 

Houston 

12 6 

467 

— 

Utah 

12 8 

400 

1 

Denver 

10 7 

-588 

ito 

Dallas 

9 7 

463 

2 

San Antonio 

9 9 

4D0 

3 

Minnesota 

3 15 

Pacific Dhristoa 

.167 

9 

Phoenix 

14 5 

737 

— 

Seattle 

12 6 

467 

lfe 

l-A. Lakers 

11 7 

411 

2V, 

Sacramento 

10 8 

-556 

3W 

Portland 

9 8 

429 

4 

GaMon Slate 

8 11 

421 

6 

LA. Clippers 

2 17 

.105 

12 


123-319. Ellison 8-133-3 19. Rebounds— Denver 
4! (Mutamtxj 91. Boston 43 (EUfson 101. AS- 
tins— Denver 24 (Pock 191. Boston 25 (Wesiev 
10 ). 

Miami 22 31 32 32—122 

New York 31 25 26 25—111 

M: Rice 14-21 $-438. Willis 9-20 10-1328. Coles 
6-109-921: N.Y.: Smith 6-11 13-13 24. Ewing Il- 
ls M0 30. Haroer 10-lV 4-S 2 & Rebounds— 
Miami 4< (will Is 171. New York 44 (Oakley 12). 
Assists— Miami 34 (Coles 15). New York 26 
(Stories 7}. 

Orlando 20 XI 3fl 31—101 

New Jersey 32 33 32 Ji— 12S 

O : CTNeal 8-152-11 IB. Hardaway B-ToM 17; 
N J-: Brown 4-6 8-B 16. Coleman 7-11 7-10 22. 
Beniamin B-13 M 16. Rebounds— Orlando 52 
•Grant 17), New Jersey 62 (Beniamin 101. 
AssMs— Orlando 23 (Shaw VI, New Jersey 35 
HCAndorson i4>. 

Washington 24 22 23 32—101 

San Antonio 32 25 42 23—122 

W: Webber 9-17 34 21. Butler 8-fl a-t, 24; S: 
EUlon 6-15 4-5 18. Robinson 5-9 11-11 21. Re- 
bounds— Washington 45 (Webber 9). San An- 
tonio 54 (Robinson 121. Assists— Washington 
25 (Tucker 7), Son Antonia 2V (Johnson 8). 
Portia Dd 10 27 23 29— 89 

Utah 34 21 20 26-181 

P;Sirfcklond 5-155-617. Grant 8-130-0 16; U: 
Malone 11-21 5-6 27. Spencer 5-7 7-10 17. Re- 
bounds — Roman} 5* (Bryan!, Dudley 9), 
Utah S2 (Spencer 9). Assists -Portland 20 
(Strickland 11). Utah 29 (Stockton 15). 
Golden State 11 25 30 27-84 

Pbaetde 19 24 37 30-90 

G : Roller B-12 0-3 16. Seikaly 6-15 4-5 16; P : 
Barkley B-14 2-2 IB. Malefic 7-lo 1-2 15. Re- 
bounds— GoMenStata 42 ( Roller 12). Phoenix 
49 ( Barkley 9). Assists— Golden state 19 CGug- 
I lotto 7), Phoenix 30 (Barkley 7). 


cord through Dec. II, total points based on 35 
points tar a fbst-pface rata fftnoagh one point 
lOroastb piec e vote,ood preseosen ranking: 



Record 

Paints 

Prw. 

!,N. Carolina 152} 

54 

1431 

1 

Z UCLA (5) 

34 

1508 

2 

1 Kansas (61 

5-0 

1403 

4 

A Arkansas (3) 

6-1 

1478 

3 

S. Massachusetts 

3-1 

1401 

5 

6. Kentucky 

4-1 

131 

7 

7. Arizona 

S-l 

1,169 

8 

8. Florida 

4-1 

1.147 

6 

9. Duke 

5-1 

1.147 

9 

10k Connecticut 

4-0 

1.110 

10 

11, Minnesota 

641 

1440 

12 

13. Maryland 

6-2 

852 

11 

13, Arizona St. 

4-1 

749 

10 

14, Georgia Tech 

M 

739 

17 

15, Georgetown 

4-1 

653 

IB 

16, Syracuse 

4-1 

605 

19 

17. Cincinnati 

4.2 

411 

13 

l& Michigan 51. 

2-1 

347 

15 

19, Ohio U. 

6.2 

339 

21 

20, Wisconsin 

4-1 

32s 

14 

31, Wake Forest 

4-1 

293 

25 

22, Vlllanova 

4-2 

224 

24 

23k Virginia 

5-2 

182 

20 

24, New Mexico St 

6-2 

168 

22 

25, Michigan 

*3 

158 

23 


MIDWEST 
Mercer 74. Butler 59 
Michigan SI. 111. Cleveland SL 68 
SOUTHWEST 

A la- Birmingham 77, Texas-Artington 62 
FAR WEST 
Arizona 92. La Salle 76 
Oregon St. 72. Fresno SI. 67 
Washington St. 104. Cent. Washington 59 


Central 


World Cup stakmtstaMfiflgs (after! races): 


NFL Standings 



w 

L 

T 

Pts 

PP 

PA 

1. Alberta Tomba. Italy, 300 points; ZMichce) 

Minnesota 

9 

5 

0 

443 

316 

731 

TrUscher, Austria. MO; (He) Thomas Pogtioe, 

Detroit 

B 

6 

0 

sn 

296 

296 

Sweden. 140; 4. Ole Christian Punnetta Nor- 

Chicago 

8 

6 

0 

sn 

241 

281 

way. 76; 2k Michael Von Gruenigen, Switzer- 

Green Bay 

7 

7 

0 

330 

327 

251 

land, 69; 6. Kiein Andre Aamodt, Norsmy.65; 

Tampa Bay 

5 9 

West 

0 

257 215 

303 

7, Mario Reiter, Austria. 62; 8, Thomas Stan- 
gassineer, Austria 58; 9, Thomas Syfcara, 


W 

L 

T 

Pts 

PP 

PA 

Austria. 56; Nt Jura Kcsir, StovetiftL SO. 

x-San Francisco 12 

2 

0 

457 

449 

256 


New Orleans 

6 

• 

0 

429 

302 

355 

~ •_ - y irr-:. : 

All onto 

6 

B 

0 

429 290 358 

.;e. ’ ’ v . J- .7 ? 

LA Rams 4 10 

x-dtached cflvtskxi 
v -clinched olayoff spot 

0 

.2B6 

252 

314 

ENGLISH PREMIER LEAGUE 
Manchester a tv L Arsenal 2 


c-r. i- saw: . 


■ftx,«emw 
-,•*:» i ' -r 


AMERICAN CONFERENCE 
East 


MONDAY’S RESULTS 
Denver 25 37 27 34—183 

Boston 31 37 23 33—113 

D: Pack 5-9 3-2 14, Stlttl 7-11 7-7 21. Abdwl- 
RWrf 7-1204 (4; B: WTfklns 5-177-7 l& Brawn 6- 


The APTop 25 


The Associated Press’ college basketball 
pan, witb ( l r s Fpio c e votes le pare n the ses , re- 


AP TOP 25 COLLEGE RESULTS 
7, Arizona (6-1) beat La Salle 92-76, Next; at 
Texas-EI Paso, Saturday; 12, Maryland (7-2) 
beat Towson State 128-73. Next: vs. La Salle. 
Tuesday. Dec 27; 18, Michigan Stole IJ-i) 
beat Clevetand State 1 11-68. Next; at Detroll. 
Saturday. 

OTHER MAJOR COLLEGE SCORES 
EAST 

Boston U. 65. Fardham 52 
Hartford BX Siena 60 
SL Banaveniure 76 Niagara 61 
SOUTH 

Auburn 96. West Florida 59 
Maryland 120. Towson St. 73 
Southern u. 132. Falm Boatl st 44 



W 

L 

T 

Pis 

PF 

PA 

v-Mlaml 

9 

5 

0 

-643 

356 

297 

N«w England 

8 

6 

0 

571 

297 

292 

Buffalo 

7 

7 

0 

500 314 

305 

N.Y. Jets 

6 

8 

0 

429 

248 

275 

Indianapolis 

6 

8 

0 

429 2B7 

305 


Central 






W 

L 

T 

Pts 

PF 

PA 

y-PHtsburgti 

11 

3 

0 

■786 

265 

110 

r-Clevekmd 

19 

4 

0 

JU 

29» 

178 

Cincinnati 

2 

12 

0 

.143 236 

348 

Houston 

1 

13 

0 

571 

193 

311 


West 






w 

L 

T 

Pts 

PF 

PA 

San Diego 

9 

5 

0 

■643 

323 

266 

LA Raiders 

8 

6 

0 

571 

277 

292 

Denver 

7 

7 

0 

590 

300 3Z4 

Kansas City 

7 

7 

0 

-500 269 280 

Seattle 

6 

8 

a 

.429 

262 

271 

NATIONAL CONFERENCE 



East 






W 

L 

T 

Pts 

PF 

PA 

x- Dallas 

11 

3 

0 

J86 

380 

217 

N.Y. Giants 

7 

7 

0 

500 

248 

282 

Arizona 

7 

7 

0 

500 

201 

250 

Philadelphia 

7 

7 

0 

500 

245 

259 

Washington 

2 

12 

0 

.143 

282 374 


Monday 1 ! Game 
Miami 45. Kansas City 28 


World Cup Results 

MENS SLALOM 

Results ham Monday's race In Sestrtore, 
Italy: 1. Alberto Tom be. Italy 157.26-5635), 
1:5X61; 2. Thomas Fogdoe, Sweden (5731- 
5636), 1:5167.- 3, Michael Trltscher, Austria 
(5B34-57.10), (:5S44; -L Jure Koslr. Stovento 
(58.13-5742), 1:5555; & Thomas Stangas- 
singer, Austria (57A7-58JO>, 1 :5530: 6. Sebas- 
Meo Amlet France (5936-5640). 1:5576; 7, 
Mario Rettw, Austria (99.19-56451,1:5534; B. 
Thomas Svkara, Austria (5849-57351.1:55.94,- 
9, Kletti Andre Aamodt. Norway (5837-5749), 
1 :55.96; 10, Ole Christian Forvseth. Norway 
(58.98-5743), 1:5641. 

Overall World Cap standings (after 4 
races): l. Alberto Tomb a Ifolv. 250 minis; 2, 
Michael Von Groentgen. Switzerland. 140; 3, 
Thomas Fogdoe. Sweden. 140; (tie) Michael 
Trltscher. Austria. 140; 5. Klein Andre Ao- 
madt, Norway. 133; 6. AcMm Vogt. Liechten- 
stein, 101; 7. Patrick Or) I led. Austria, lOO; & 
Marla Reiter, Austria. 98: 9, jure Koslr, Slove- 
nia. 90; Tft CHe Chrtattan Furusefh. Norwnv. S4. 


Standings: Biocfchurn 42 polnls. Manches- 
ter United 41, Newcastle 37, Liverpool 32, Not- 
tingham Forest 32, Manchester City 2a Leeds 
2& Chefaea 27, Norwich 27. Tottenham 25, Ar- 
senal 24. Coventry 23, Crystal Palace 21. 
Sout ham pton 2L Sheffield Wednesday 21. 
Wimbledon 27, Queens Park Rangers 79. 
Evertoa 18. West Ham 18. Aston Villa M. 
Leicester IX Ipsntch 11. 

_ — -r.-jr — .TA-.ji h-, 

: ••• ' {.:■}; */.- 

THIRD TEST 

India vs. West ladles, third day 
Tuesday, in MobaU liufla 
west indies first Innings 443 off out 
India first timings: 387 
West indies: 2nd Innings: 3013 declared 
India; 2nd Innings: 37-1 

MANDELA TROPHY 
New Zealand vs. Pakistan 
Tuesday, hi Part Elizabeth 
New Zealand: 301 

■ v.‘-y- : • Vft.W. 

INTERNATIONAL FRIENDLY 
Siwdm 4. Fbt land 0 


FIFA, ashs successor. 

The bcads of the five confed^ 
erations apparently fed finpo- 1 
teat because, on April S izi Zu- : 
ridti, they signed an agreement 
endorsing Havdange as the sole 
candidate for a sixth consecu-* 
tive term -as FIFA’s presidenL 
But is that a mandate for ar-. 
ranging Ms own dynasty at the* 
expense erf meritocracy? 
Havdange admittedly builv- 

IWIHHBI LCnn •••• yw. , .. , J i 

L05 ANGELES — Tim VValloct^ Up rir A $ IIOUSC 10 UlipreC 

third baseman, to i-year contract- dented prosperity. But he is an.' 

dd man, riot a god. Hisrulrias 
always been riddled with self-, 
interest. Now, if he threatens to- 
puli down that house, then you, 
the members, must not let grata-. 


BASEBALL 

American Lbusbb 

KANSAS CITY— Signed Mark Gubtcza. 
pitcfier, to 1-vear contract. Announced that 
FvHx Jose. autfleMgr, refused a w lgt im ent 
and eiected to became a tree agent. 

MINNESOTA— Stoned Mark Guthrie, 
pitcher, to 1-year contract. 

National League 


RtWite, 


PITTSBURGH— Signed Wally 
pitcher, fa mino r Ha gu e contract. . 

ST. LOUIS— Stoned Danny Joduoo and 
Tom Henke, pttdiers. 

: BASKETBALL 
National Basketbafl AM e ctotlon. 

NBA— Fined Utah's Jay Humphries sxsoo 
tar Mttlng Vlnny Del Negraaf tfieSan Antonia 
with a flagrant ettww In a game played toot 
Thursday, 

BOSTON— Activated Sherman Dabgtas. 
guard, and Pen ds Ellison, toward , Bam In- 
lured INI. Placed Olno Radio, forward, and 
Tony Harris, guard, an frdured list. 

CHICAGO— Waived Greg Pastor, center. 

DETROIT— Signed Walter Band, guard. 


code stand in the way of duty. _ 
I commend to you “90 Years' 
of Fifa,” published last June, in 
which it was written: “Dr. Ha-' 
velange aims at oorisensos and 
riot polemics in debate, iisten- 


phoe n ix— ach voted Kevin Johnson, ing and reasoning carcfuDy. 


guard, from injured list Put Aaran Swtnsan, 
forward, on In lured list. 

FOOTBALL 

National Football League 

ATLANTA— Stoned Thomas Williams, de- 
fensive tackle, oft their praettas swad. 7*ut 
Alton Montgomery, defensive back, an in- 
lured reserve. 

NEW ENGLAND— Stoned Paul Frandscn, 
light end. oft their practice squad. 

COLLEGE 

AKRON — Named Lee Owens foofbaff 
COOC3L 

FRAMINGHAM STATE— Named Michael 
Sfroehan football coach. 


Either make him listen, or teU 
him Jus time is up. 

MBytes ban the of The Tones. ■ • 


Tc our renders in Fremce 

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Dolphins Down the Chiefs, 45-28, 
To Clinch a Berth in the Playoffs 


^SBm 




- 0 mmm n 

'“>Y‘W; ■ ■"""" "■ 


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'. „ V'lV' 

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: V-'» -V -.7 



By Charlie Nobles 

New Yak Tones Service 

MIAMI — Don aula is 1-0 
coaching from a golf cart, and 
the Miami Dolphins arc 9-5 and 
heading into the National Foot- 
ball League's playoffs. 

The Dolphins, who had won 
just two of their last Eve games, 
scored three touchdowns dur- 
ing a six-minute span in the 
second half on Monday night to 
defeat the Kansas Qty Chiefs, 
45-28, at loe Robbie Stadium. 

The victory clinched at least a 
wild-card berth for die Dol- 
phins. who need to win only one 
of their final two games — at 
Indianapolis and at home to 
Detriot — to clinch the Ameri- 
can Football Conference East 
Division. 


The Chiefs (7-7), whose play- 
off hopes are fleeting, fell into a 
third-place tie with the Denver 
Broncos m the AFC West. They 
have lost four of their last five 
games and could miss the play- 
offs for the first time since 1989. 

Simla, who sat in a golf cart 
and coached from the sideline 
after undergoing Achilles' ten- 
don surgery last week, said. 
“There was some discomfort, 
but this may be the way to go 
after this game.” 

The Dolphins appeared to 
break open the game midway 
through the third quarter when 
they scored two touchdowns to 
end a 14-14 tie. The Gist score 
came when Dan Marino, of ail 
people, rumbled Into the end 


g pne from 4 yards out He 
idled to his right, faked a pass, 
then beat two Kansas City de- 
fenders into the right comer. 

It was his d^ith rushing 
touchdown in the NFL, bnt the 
first since be returned this sea- 
son from AdnUcs 1 tendon sur- 
gery. 

Then came the most bizarre 
play of the game. With Kansas 
Qty at the 50-yard Hne, Steve 
Bono, playing for die injured 
Joe Montana, threw a pass that 
was intercepted by Miami safe- 
ty Gene Atkins at the Miami 24. 
Atkins tiptoed up the sideline, 
then zigzagged his way to the 
middle of the field and the Mi- 
ami 42-yard line. There, as he 
was being tackled, be latended 
the ball to a teammate, Troy 


Vincent. Vincent aided wide 
left and sprinted into the end 
zone to complete a 58-yard 
jaunt to make the score 28-14. 

The Chiefs retaliated quickly, 
when Jon Vaughn took the en- 
suing kickoff and raced 91 
yards to mate the score 28-22. 
It was the first kickoff return 
for a touchdown against Miami 
since 1975 and the first for the 
Chiefs since 1987. 

But Miami struck back in this 
explosive offensive show when 
it moved 75 yards in only 5 
plays. Beane Parmake sprinted 
47 yards for the touchdown 
with 36 seconds left in the third 
quarter, and it was 35-21. 

In losing four of its last six 
games, Kansas Qty had aver- 
aged only 13.7 points. 


Hopefuls Abound in Muddy NFL Playoff Picture 




GoSa Snky/RoiD] 

Cornertack Troy Vincent knocked over an official as he was scoring on an interception; ft fl a tt en e d the Chiefs, too. 


Nets Defeat 
Magic , by 27 

The Associated Press 

EAST RUTHERFORD, 
New Jersey — After playing 
like the National Basketball As- 
sociation’s best team for the 
first 18 games this season, the 
Orlando Magic were turned 
into mice try some unlikely wiz- 
ards: the New Jersey Nets. 

The Nets ended an eight- 
game losing streak against the 
Magic by shooting 61 percent in 
the first three quarters en route 
to a 128-101 rout Monday night 

Orlando came to the game 
with a league-best 15-3 record, 
a four-game winning streak and 
a run in which they had won 13 
of 14. And all three losses were 
by two-point matins. 

But the Nets succeeded 
where everyone else had failed 
U Derrick Coleman scored 22 
points and almost everyone 
contributed toward New Jer- 
sey's first triumph over Orlando 
since March 4, 1993. 

It was particularly horrible 
from the foul line. The Magic 
made 6 of 23 free throws, or 
26.1 percent, the fourth lowest 
ever in an NB A game. Shaquille 
O'Neal was 2 erf 11. 

He also had just five re- 
bounds in 33 minutes. Anfemee 
Hardaway had one assist. 

“It was just one of those 
nights,” said O’Neal, using the 
expression many times. 


After a Long Night, Baseball 
Continues Toward High Noon 


RYE BROOK, New York — 
The major league baseball play- 
ers “fundamentally” rejected 
the owners’ latest contract offer 
Tuesday and didn’t come bade 
with a counterproposal, the 
Colorado Rockies’ owner. Jerry 
McMorris. said. 

Negotiators resumed talks at 
11 AjML, about 10 hours after 
the sides recessed. They then 
met for two hours before the 
owners left the room and went 
back to their own caucus. 

“They’re meeting with the 
mediator now. deciding where 
we go next,” McMorris said. 

That followed an attempt to 
reach a negotiated settlement in 
the four-month-old labor dis- 
pute that turned out to be long 
and contentious. 

In what a management offi- 
cial said was an often venomous 
meeting that went past mid- 
night, the owners ultimately 
gave the players union an exten- 
sion until mid- morning Tues- 
day to accept or reject their 
Sunday night tax proposal that 
the union continued to charac- 
terize in terms of a salary cap. 

The owners, on Monday 
night, had given no hint that 
they would extend their imple- 
mentation deadline. They are 
still scheduled to meet in Chica- 


go on Thursday to declare a 
bargaining impasse and umlat- 
erafly impose the salary cap 
proposal made on June 14. 

The union had yet to official- 
ly iqect the latest management 
proposal — made within the 
framework of the recent play- 
ers’ tax proposal, the owners 
insisted — but a union lawyer 
compared it to a Rube Gold- 
berg contraption and said it 
contains the same speeding de- 
terrents the owners’ high rate 
tax plan of Nov. 17 did and the 
same deterrents as die salary 
cap proposal the owners have 
kept on die table while juggling 
the tax plans. 

“I wouldn’t read anything 
into the fact that we’re going 
late tonight,” the Los Angeles 
Dodgers* pitcher, Orel Her- 

shiser. Said during a dinner 
break after the sides had met 
jointly for about four hours 
Monday night and before they 
reconvened just before mid- 
night. “If the mediator wants to 
have a meeting and the owners 
are willing, well be there, but 
we’re still talking about issues 
that have been there since June.” 

Only the tenacious effort of 
special mediator William J. 
Usery to keep the sides at the 
table and the owners out of Chi- 
cago probably prevented the 
talks from dissolving during 


Monday's emotional pre-dinner 
phase, when, the players, one 
union official said, “railed 
against the owners phony dead- 
lines” and virtually pleaded 
with the owners not to wipeout 
25 years of negotiations by im- 
plementing their “regressive 
salary cap proposal.” 

“At least no one got hurt in 
there,” The Atlanta Braves’ 
pitcher, Tom Glavine. said of 
the intense atmosphere as the 
tides broke for dinner. 

Said union leader Donald 
Fehr. “There’s nothing much I 
can say expect that I'm very 
tired.” 

The union’s associate coun- 
sel, Eugene Orza, said that after 
crunching numbers over night 
and throughout the day mat 
their initial impression of the 
owners’ latest proposal as an- 
other cap in disguise hadn't 
changed. (AP, LAT) 


Evwy Tuesday 
Contod Fred Ronan 
TeL (33 1)46379391 
Foe (331)46379370 
or yoornaanestHT office 
or representative 


New York Tima Service 

Never in the history of the National 
Football League h as the playoff picture 
been so muddy so late. 

A week ago, 25 of the 28 teams remained 
in die playoff picture. Only the Washing- 
tan Redskins, the Cincinnati Beogals and 
the Houston Oilers had been eliminated. 

Now, with just two weeks left in the 
regular season, 22 teams are still in conten- 
tion. The only casualties last weekend were 
the Los Angeles Rams, the Tampa Bay 
Buccaneers and the Seattle Seahawks-The 
picture is so complicated that the Bucs and 
the Seahawks were knocked out even 
though they won. 

Only two teams, the San Francisco 49ers 
and the Dallas Cowboys, have clinched 
division titles and the playoff berths that 
accompany them. Only two others, the 
Pittsburgh Steders and the Cleveland 
Browns, have clinched at least a wild-card 
berth. 

That leaves 18 teams fighting for right 
berths. Every undecided division title can 


be settled this weekend. Here is a quick 
look, division by division: 

NFC EAST: The Cowboys can clinch a 
first-round bye by beating or tying the 
New Orleans Saints on Monday night, or 
by the Minnesota Vikings' losing to or 
tying the Detroit lions cm Saturday. 

NFC CENTRAL: The Vikings win the 
division by beating the Lions. Even if the 
Vikings lose, they can get a wild card with 
two of the following four results occuring: 
a Green Bay loss or tie to Atlanta; a 
Chicago loss to the Los Angeles Rams; an 
Arizona loss or tie to Cincinnati; a Phila- 
delphia loss or tie to the New York Giants. 
Chicago can ctinch a playoff berth with a 
victory over Los Angeles and two of the 
following four results: a Philadelphia loss 
or tie to New' York; a Detroit loss to 
Minnesota,- a Great Bay loss or tie to 
Atlanta; an Arizona loss or tie to Qndn- 
nati. Detroit gets a berth if it beats Minne- 
sota and two of the following four results 
occur: a Chicago loss in Los Angeles; a 
(been Bay loss or tie to Atlanta; an Arizo- 


na loss or tie to Cincinnati; a Philadelphia 
loss or tie to Ne w York. 

NFC WEST: The 49era have earned a 
first-round bye and can clinch home-field 
advantage throughout the playoffs by 
beating the Denver Broncos on Saturday 
or by the Cowboys’ losing to the Saints. 

AFC EAST: Miana, having clinched a 
playoff berth, can win the division title by 
beating Indianapolis, or if it ties the Colts 
and New England loses at Buffalo. New 
England can clinch a playoff berth if it 
beats Buffalo and Kansas City loses to 
Houston, or beats Buffalo ana the Los 
Angeles Raiders lose in Seattle. 

AFC CENTRAL: The Steders can win 
the division Sunday by beating or tying the 
Browns, their only challenger. 

AFC WEST: San Diego can win the 
division by beating the New York Jets on 
Sunday. Even if the Chargers lose, they can 
win the title if the Raidas lose in Seattle 
and Denver loses or is tied in San Francis- 
co. The Raiders can get a playoff berth 
with a victory coupled with a Kansas Qty 
loss to Houston. 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


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TODAY’S Attention visitors 
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NHL’s Owners Draw a Line — Probably , Maybe - h ^p™ g 

•S * BKfTSH COU1C, rwhage, mk 


By Joe Lapointe 

New York Timer Service 

NEW YORK — On Day 73 of thdr 
labor lockout, the owners of the National 
Hockey League teams drew a line in the 
smoke. 

Instead of setting a so-called drop-dead 
date for canceling thdr season if they don’t 
get a new collective bargaining agreement 
with the Players Association, the league 
was vague — sort of suggesting a point of 
no return, probably sometime this month. 

After a board of governors meeting in 
New York on Monday, Commissioner 
Gary Betlman announced that the al- 


ready-damaged season would be scrapped 
if the teams can’t play a 50-game schedule 
followed by four full rounds of playoffs 
that end by July 1. 

The playoffs generally take about two 
months. That would mean May and June. 
Teams gnerally play 12 to \5 gamesper 
month during the regular season. That 
would mean they could probably play a 
50-game schedule if they begin by Jan. IS. 

Most people around hockey say a two- 
week training camp Is necessary, so it is 
likely chat a deal would be needed by Jan. 


But that’s a best-case scenario. Other 
things could complicate this timetable. 
Budding dates might not be available. The 
union might insist on an off-day formula 
to avoid overwork and too much travel in 
too little time. Several of the participants 
in Monday's meeting suggested that Dec. 
25 is the more Kkriy deadline. 

No negotiations have been held since 
last Tuesday, when they broke off in Chi- 
cago after Bettman reintroduced his de- 
mand for a taxation on high payrolls. No 
new date has been set for talks, but it is 
expected that both sides will return to the 
bargaining table this week. 


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Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL yranAim TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1994 


OBSERVER 


Newt’s Pal Whrbueks 


Robert Altman’s Surreal Glimpse 


By Russell Baker 


N EW YORK — It’s hard to 
see little Orphan Annie. 


IN see little Orphan Annie. 
Oliver Warbucks has seen to 
that. First you have to End her 
agent Then the agent says you 
have to see the lawyers. They’re 
the best lawyers the Warbucks 
hiflinn s can afford. Absolute 
masters of inaction. 

Luckily 1 had connections. 
Newt Gingrich, eager to bring 
bade the orphanage way of life, 
went straight to Warbucks after 
1 pointed out that publicity 
about Annie's fabulous career 
would be a shot in the arm for 
pro-orphanage legislation. 

Lifting a powerful telephone, 
he said, “Get me Oflie War- 
buds.” It was done in an in- 
stant “Daddy, baby!" cried the 
youthful but silver-haired speak- 
er. Cap ping a hand over the 


Emboldened, 1 asked about 
several matters that have long 

troubled me: . . 

• Yes, his wardrobe does xar 
{ few ? consist entirely of tuxedos. 
He owns several thousand. All 
are made in Asia by child labor 
in accord with his belief that 
people can never be too young to 
enjoy the fruits of the work ethic. 

• The glittering jewel always 

worn in hS shirt front is no long- 
er a real diamond, but a $25 
zircon. Too many diamonds 
popped out and were gobbled 
off the floor with a loud “ArfT 
by Sandy. When he accused 
Sandy of being in cahoots with a 
diamo nd thief, Annie became so 
angry that she smashed her 
Ovaitine shaker. To reduce ten- 
sions he switched to zircons. . 
□ 


By Suzy Menkes 

l/uenxaioaal Herald Tribune 

N EW YORK —With a wriggle, a 
wiggle and a gjggte Sophia 
Loren removes one sflkcn stocking. 
Then the other. Right down to me 
still-luscious legs and voluptuous bo- 
som, encased in a lacy corset. The 
aud ie nce at the premiere of Robert 
Altman's new movie naturally kept 
their eyes only on la Loren’s lingerie. 

For UiU was a fashion moment. 
Being there in thcZiegfeld Theatre on 
Monday meant unlocking the ro- 
man & clef of “Ready to Wear (Pr6t-&- 
Posier)” — the movie Altman shot at 
the Paris shows. There in the audience 
was Sonia Rykiel flame-haired with 
an enigmatic sunk and the outline of a 
bra in sequins bn her sweater. And up 
on the screen, Anouk Aimfe, smolder- 
ing with sex appeal playing a Famous 
Female Fashion Designer mourning 
ihe death of her lover. 


The Warbucks geniality fad- 
ed, however, when I asked about 
the immigration status erf Punjab 


the capital gams tax reduced.*’ 
Warbucks said send me over, 
and if his dogs didn’t sniff any 
liberalism on me he’d speak to 
Annie on my behalf. 

He was more genial than 
you’d ccpect. The election re- 
sults had sweetened his mood. 
And not just because he antici- 
pated big gravy from a forth- 
coming capital gains tax cut. 

Last summer Punjab and the 
Asp had started annoying him 
with hints that they would like to 
retire if he could see his way 
dear to providing them with 
quail pensions. 

Since the California voting 
disclosed the depth of Ameri- 
cans’ malice toward aliens, 
however, Warbucks has been 
tickled at how Punjab and the 


and the Asp. Had they become 
naturalized citizens? Or had 


Asp have changed their tune. 
Since the elections, both seei 


Since the elections, both seem 
so eager to stay on his payroll 
that the great tycoon is thinking 
of cutting their salaries. Unless 
they take it with a smile, he may 
even downsize by firing one of 
them so Warbucks Industries 
can compete more efficiently in 
the international marketplace. 


naturalized citizens? Or had 
Waxbucks’s obvious hatred for 
government regulation and bu- 
reaucracy made the process too 
distasteful for him to endure? 

Did they at least have green 
cards? If, in fact, Punjab and the 
Asp were still illegally in this 
country, how did he deal with 
the Social Security problems 
that bad tripped so many of 
President Clinton's nominees. 

I had pushed him too far. 
“Little Orphan Annie is too busy 
lo see you for the next 10 years/' 
he said. “This interview will be 
concluded after the following 
coded message is issued.” 

He read on a series of num- 
bers, which I ran through my 
Orphan Annie secret-message 
decoder back at the office: 
“Newt is right. Orphanages are 
the best places in the world for 
kids to be if they want a crack at 
being taken in by the world’s 
Daddy Warbuckses and raised 


Above all there was a chance for 
this fashion editor to spot herself: 
just the briefest flash, a fashion mi- 
cro-second. The editors in fashion’s 
real world don't get much of a show- 
ing, in spite of all that effort jockey- 
ing for position in front of the cam- 
eras ana nosing up to Kim Basinger, 
playing a roving TV reporter. Alt- 
man sure got her right as your typical 
fashion journalist: all lissome limbs, 
blond hair and bee-stung lips from 
which pours honeyed drivel 
And oh for the life of the Julia 


Roberts character! She plays a whim- 
sical journalist, who rolls around in 


like princesses and princes. 
Don’t forget to drink youi 


Don’t forget 
Ovaitine," 


New York Times Service 


sical journalist who rolls around in 
bed, quaffs champagne, never both- 
ers with the shows and is never asked 
by her editor to turn in a story. Lap- 
top computers, notebooks and pens 
do not feature in the film any more 
than scissors and pins. 

The fashion world had expected a 
coruscating, sardonic take cm fash- 
ion. What we got was pure farce. 
Enter the cross-dressing retailer with 
a penchant for sugar pink Chanel 
Exit (into a closet) the fashion editor 
who offers a star photographer her 
body in return for an exclusive con- 
tract Death by ham sandwich (was 
that a Jewish joke?) for the fashion 
executive with terrible taste in ties. 
The plot is as obscure as the ending is 
transparent — a parade of models in 


the ultimate fashion show in which 
nobody wears anything at all 

“In the beginning we arc nude, in 
the end we need nothing, fashion is 
what happens to you in between,” 
was the message handed out as guests 
at the Rose) and ballroom partied to 
disco music with a scarlet-dad (for- 
merly known as) Prince. 

“Ready to Wear” is totally surreal 
with genuine fashion shows, events 
and people interspersed with carica- 
tures. Altman seems to have missed 
the point: that fashion itself is surreal 
without all that cinematic effort 
People dipping in dog’s mess? Well, 
thais not half as devastating, as 
someone dropping a felt pen on your 
new Prada shoes. Why mode up a 
fashion show in a Mfctro (been there, 
done that years ago) but fail to re- 
cord on camera the moment at Jean- 
Paul Gaultier’s show when the audi- 
ence started choking on the fumes 
from the fake snow? 

“I don’t know what to say — it’s a 
comedy, very droU It’s not a critique 
of fashion, it is a total fiction,” said 
Gaultier, who made his entrance in a 
tiger-print jacket with Lauren Bacall 

“I was cut!" claimed BacalL “A lot 
of the scenes that made my character 
add up to more were gone.” She plays 
a fashion editor ousted for a younger 
model (while Sally Kellermau and 
Tracey UUman are competing for the 
favors of the photographer). 

For fashion folks, the film just 
didn’t come off — either as an ex- 
tended skit, or as a bitchy or brutal 
dissection of the industry. Although 
Altman started the evening by idling 
the audience to “giggle and give in 
and enjoy it,” the laughter came in 
trickles rather than torrents. Ironi- 
cally, the most riveting bits of the 
movie were the polished excerpts 
from the real fashion shows. 

Vivienne Westwood pronounced 
herself bemused. Nino Cerruti (who 
had costumed many of the charac- 
ters) described it as “an amusing 
Him,” but wondered what a nonfa- 
shion audience would make of it 
Most people did not think that Alt- 
man had done for fashion with 
“Ready to Wear” what he did to the 
U. S. Army in “M*A*S*H" or for 
Hollywood in “The Player.” 






AP i Loren and Alumni; AFP 

At tile premiere, clockwise from top left: Bacall arid Gaultier, Altman, Basinger anti Loren. :■ 

** *TL« maww* ha/l tmsvna etnrv nwunlo CfliH that tHf»U ffumri mriM- OUfieHS Dosed for the D3P8T3ZZi 3Ild 


“ The Flayer’ had more story — 
this is a celebration — it’s only be- 
cause of the paranoia of fashion peo- 
ple that they thought it would be 
so mething else,” claimed Altman. 

“As a film, he has been able to 
catch aspects of fashion in a naive 
way — re-editing the shows as surre- 
al but not getting inside the heads,” 
said Gianfranco Ferr6, who sat next 
to Sophia Loren, her bosom heaving 
in a black lace Dior dress he had 
designed for her. 

Loren said that the joy erf the film 
for her was working again with Mar- 
cello Mastraanni (who falls asleep 
while she does her striptease). Many 


people said that they found her carica- 
ture of haute Couture elegance one of 
the gems of the movie. Kellernian, 
chic in a white Donna Karan pantsuit, 
said her best fuc was being looted in a 
closet with Mastroianni. Karan 
praised the naked fashion show as the 
“ultimate fashion statement,” while 
hex daughter Gaby said that her moth- 
er was mad because she had for years 
harbored the same nude-show idea. 

life imitating art, the party 
aped the movie, with Spanish actress 
Rossy de Palma (a couture assistant 
in the film) gyrating round the dance 
floor in a dress made out of a Spanish 
shawl worn with a garter belt. Drag 


queens posed for the paparazzi 
models posed for each other. 


At the end, Rupert Everett, Anouk 
Aimfee’s son in the movie, wrapped 


himself into a Russian greatcoat to - 
face the frosty Manhattan night. “I 
don’t think the movie is realty an in- 
depth microscopic view of the fash- 
ion industry,” he said. Tt*s about 
ii$ing fashion motifs for a Feydeau- 
type farce about characters in a com- 
edy of errors.” - 
But in all the fun and frolics, the 
real emotion of fashion, the drama of 
creation, the orgasms of excitement, 
even the visual energy, seem to have 
hit the cutting room floor. 


WEATHER 


PEOPLE 


Europe 


Forecast for Thursday through Saturday, as provided by Accu-Weather. 



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Africa 


G OOD and bad vibrations: The lead 
singer of the Beach Boys, Mike Love, 


North America 

Cold woattar wfil persist In 
Hie Northeast through the 
end of this week. Snow or 
rain te pouBfUe Friday end 
Saturday hi New York and 
Washington. Toronto end 


Chicago may have aotne 
arrow Thursday into Friday. 
Showers am paoaMe Thurs- 
day h Loa Angeles. 


Europe 

A Mediterranean norm will 
spread rain from southern 

Italy to Turkey later this 
week. Snow will (all on Ha 
northern fringe, especially 
from northam Greece to 
southern Bulgaria and 
Yugoslavia. A few showers 
Drill dampen England, north- 
ern France and Germany. 
Spain wO by diy and mBd. 


Asia 

Very cold, generally dry 
weather will prevan across 
eastern China. Korea and 
Japan Thursday through 
Saturday. The exception wffl 
be northern Japan, where 
some snow wfll M. Farther 
south. Hong Hong will be 


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Norm America 


VJ singer of the Beach Boys, Mike Love, 
will be some milli ons of dollars richer after 
a jury in Los Angeles found that be de- 
served to be credited on 35 songs and was 
owed past and future royalties. The jury 
also said that Brian Wilson, the band's co- 
founder, bad failed to give Love 30 percent 
of a S10 million settlement for the sale of 
the seminal ’60s group’s songs. After the 
trial Love accused Wilson’s advisers of 
taking advantage of the musician, who has 
long undergone treatment for psychiatric 
disorders. 

□ 

The Duchess of York, who is visiting 


goneraBy iky and mVd whHa 
Singapore has 00/110 thun- 
denhowara. 


Anenaraga 

Ajtmnta 

Bowen 

CNeaflO 


Portugal to support a local AIDS charity, 
says she's undergone three separate tests 


Middle East 


Latin America 


Brin* 

Cake 

Damuoiw 


Today Tomorrow 

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says she s undergone three separate tests 
for the disease. The duchess, 35, who is 
separated from Prince Andrew, the second 
son of Queen Elizabeth H, told a Lisbon 
newspaper that she underwent AIDS tests 
before her marriage and before conceiving 
each of her two children. “People must be 
more open about the disease,” Fergie said. 



tied Rajkumari Priyadhusln Raje, daugh- 
ter of the former Mahara^i of Baroda, in 
what has been called India's society wed- 
ding of the decade. Among those attending 
wen FMrne Minister P.V. Narssimha Ran, 
King Jfgme Singye Wangchuk of Bhutan 
and Sonia Gandhi, the widow of forme* 
Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi- %r - 


TVAraodiiid Pre»i 


The dissident Vietnamese writer Duong 
Tim Huong was awarded the French Order 
of Arts and Letters for her work in fighting 
for human rights in ha- country. Culture 
Minister Jacques Tonbon, who bestowed 
the honor, received a “lively" letter from'’ 
Hanoi protesting the award, sources said. 

□ .* : 


Fergie with an AIDS patient Tuesday. 


fcwuwy, pc-porty doudy, c-ckwdy, ah-ehoww*. t-fandaratomw, mWo, at-amivlhxrtaa, 
v. Men. W-WaaFior. All imps, (oraentaand data provMad by Accu-Waattor, he. C 1M4 


tooth 

Wunrowi 


more open about the disease,” Fergie sai 

□ 

The movie director Steven Spielbe 
will be the guest of honor at the 20 1 


edition of the annual Cesar awards, the 
French equivalent of the Oscars, on Feb. 
25. Alain Delon will preside over the cere- 
mony. 

D 

Jyotirmfiya Rao Schxfia, scion of the 
former royal family of Gwalior, has mar- 


Woody ABen flew into the Sicilian resort 
of Taormina on aprivatejet to film a scene 
in his latest film, but declined to talk about 
the project. The 59-year-old Allen was ac- 
companied by his girlfiend Sooo-Yi Pre- 
vin, 23, the adopted daughter of his es- 
tranged wife, Mia Farrow. Olympia 
Dukakis and Helena Bonham Carter are 
acting in the scene. Jt was the first time 
that Allen has shot in Italy. 





Your sfomachs growling. 


Mother Nature s calling. 


Your flight’s boarding. 





WitbAWVSADirecPand 
World Connect* Service, you can make 
multiple, calls without redialing 
your card or access number. 


You’re in a hum- So well be brief. AT&T USADirad and : 


■ .j^n 

in i‘ • : 

fli* 1 ‘ 

i £f 

tif 


World Conned Service gets you fast, clear connections 41 


back to the United Stales or to any of over 190 other 


countries. Also, an easier way to make multiple calls. 


Up to 10 in a row. Just dial the AT&T .Access Number 


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1 time. Spend less time dialing. And more time talking. 


ASIA /PACIFIC 

AUSTRALIA 1808-881-911 

CMMA.PM*** 11811 

HONGKONG 880-1111 

INDIA* 009-117 

INDONESIA* 001-881-10 

JAPAN*. 8038-111 

NORM OB-11 

MACAO 0800-111 

MALAYSIA' a 08-0011 


NEW ZEALAND 000-911 

PHILIPPINES' IB -11 

RUSSIA '/(MOSCOW}. IK-5842 


SAIPAN*. . . . 
SINGAPORE... 
SRI LANKA 
TAIWAN' 
nwuMJ* 


23 MS 7 Z 

...800-0111-111 

430-430 

0088 - 10208 -fl 

.0019491-1111 


AUSTMA'm .822403411 
MUSIUM' . . . 0-800-1 0S-1D 

HACAflW W-lMD-EOlO 

CHIWTW* 9940-0*11 

CZECH RETOBUC ..00-420-08101 


HUNSAHT 
K&ANDV 
IRELAND.. 
IXAUf* 


000- SOS- 01111 

999-001 

.1-809-550-099 
.... 172-1011 


DENMARK* 

FWLAW3- 

FRANCE. . 
GERMANY .. 
GREECE* . 


. . 80014*10 
.9809-100-10 
. 19C-0&11 
. .0130-0010 
00-800*1311 


UEOmEKSTHN* 1SM9-11 

LITHUANIA* . - 8MM 

LUXEMBOURG 0-0004111 

MALTA 9800-890-110 

MONACO*. W-0011 

NETHERLANDS' .06-022-9111 


NORWAY 800-1SD-11 

POLAND** 1 . 04910-480-0111 

PORTUGAL 1 85917-1-288 

ROMANIA . 01-800-4288 

SUIVWIBEP. 80-420-00101 

WMN* 99M9-00-11 

5WEDBI* 029-795-811 

SWITZERLAND* 755-08-11 

UKRAINE’ 84100-11 

ux. . . oMO-m-mni 


MIDDLE EAST 

BAHRAIN 800-001 

CYPRUS* OBMttHO 

EGYPT* (CAIRO) 1 ....B1WE00 

ISRAEL 177-1MM72T 

XUWW BOO-286 

LEBANON (BEIRUT)' . . . 426-801 

SAWHAAAfltt l-»-10 

TURKEY* . .. 00-809-12277 
U ARAB EM MATES’ 600-121 


AMERICAS 

ARGENTINA* . 0Q1-W0-200.ini 


S0UVUV. .. 

BRAZIL 

CANADA 

CHILE* . . 
COLOMBIA, 
a SALVADOR*, 

HONDURAS*!* 
Meow . 


0-800-1 112 

000-8010 

1-600-575-2223 

08^0312 

980-11-IM1B 

190 

123 

95-MQ-16Z-4240 


PANAMA-* 
PERU/,.. . 
VENEZUELA* 


700 

191 

. 80-011-120 


TnieVPbrU u Cormections ' 


AFRICA 

GABON* 

GAMBIA* . .. . 
IVORY COAST .. . 
KENYW 


.00(401 

.o*m 

U-11V11 

00 ) 0-10 


LIBERIA . . . 
SOUTH AFRICA 


797-797 

0-898-99-0123 





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