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INTERNATIONAL 


p 




PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 



No. 34,775 


Russia Force 
Renews Move 


On Capital 
In Chechnya 


Moscow Rejects Offer 
By Rebel Leader to Hold 
Peace Talks in Grozny 


A 


By Steven Erlanger 

New York Times Service 

MOSCOW — Russian troops were re- 
ported to be moving toward the outskirts 
of the capital of the breakaway Chechen 
republic against strong resistance late Sun- 
» ™y ^gbl, according to the Itar-Tass news 
agency. But there was no indication that an 
assault on the capital, Grozny, had begun. 

[Russian warplanes bombed the rebel 
Chechen capita] early Monday near the 
city’s main television tower, Reuters re- 
ported from Grozny. A Reuters reporter 
sad the bombs appeared to fall closer to 
the city center than in any previous air 
raids in the Chechnya crisis, blowing doors 
open and rattling windows.] 

The troop movements came after an 
aide to President Boris N. Yeltsin of Rus- 
sia rejected an evening offer From the Che- 
chen president, Dzhokar M. Dudayev, to 
talk to a Russian envoy in Grozny. 

“There will be no more answers to 
Dzhokar Dudayev’s telegrams," the offi- 
cial of the presidential press service told 
Itar-Tass. He said the Dudayev telegram 
was not an answer to Mr. Yeltsin's mes- 
sage earlier Sunday urging the Chechen 
leader to agree, “without delay,” to talks 
with two senior Russian officials in the 
nearby North Ossetian town of Mozdok. 

But Sunday night in Grozny, at a news 
conference, Mr. Dudayev said he would 
discuss the status of Chechnya, which de- 
clared independence three years ago, only 
with Mr. Yeltsin or his prime minister, 
Viktor S. Chernomyrdin. 

Mr. Yeltsin’s spokesman, Vyacheslav 
Kostikov, described the offer as “yet an- 
other gesture of goodwill with a view to 
ensuring a political settlement of the situa- 
tion in the Chechen republic.” 

The Yeltsin telegram was a response to 
v fr. Dudayev’s successful effort late Satur- 
day night to forestall a Russian operation 
against Grozny by offering to negotiate in 
person, and without conditions, 

But the stress is Mr. Yeltsin’s telegram 
was on “today" and Mr. Kostikov repeat- 
ed that Russia's requirements remained 

See CHECHNYA, Page 4 


B Debbi Mondlfl. Apace Francr-P re®* 

A father and daughter escaping grenade fire Sunday in Sarajevo, hours before Jimmy Carter arrived. Sources said the shots probably came from Bosnian Serbs. 


Carter , in Bosnia, Stresses His 4 Limited Role 9 


By John Pomfret 

Washington Pott Service 

SARAJEVO, Bosnia- Herzego vina — Former Presi- 
dent Jimmy Carter arrived here Sunday night and imme- 
diately downplayed hopes that his dramatic mission to 
Bosnia could result in a tide to end Europe’s worst 
conflict since World War II. 

Amid reports from United Nations and Bosnian 
Army sources that rebel Serbs have broken a pledge 
made to the American by taking a key Muslim-held town 
in; northwestern Sosaia, ;; Mr. ' Carter waded into ' ibe 
B alkans morass, tefling reporters he had a “limited role 
to play here.” 

The contrast of the start of another peace mission with 


word that the town of Vehka Kladusa had fallen could 
not have summed up better the pitfalls faced by a former 
president with limited experience in this part of the 
world. 

“What Fd like to do obviously is to understand the 
situation and contribute to some alleviation of tension,” 
Mr. Carter said in a cautious statement upon arrival in a 
UN plane at Sarajevo airport. 

Other goals included a re-opened airport, free passage 
for UN aid convoys, the release of UN personnel whose 
freedom erf movement is still restricted by *he 
cease-fire and “some attention given to protecting hu- 
man rights” — all points that the leader of the Bosnian' 
Serbs, Radovan Karadzic, the man who instigated the 
visit, had promised to fulfill before Mr. Carter’s arrival. 


Asked if thus he hadn't been too hasty in coming to 
Sarajevo, Mr. Carter replied, “I don’t want to comment 
on the specifics.” He added, “I think I’ve received 
enough assurances.” 

Mr. Carter win meet Mr. Karadzic on Monday. 

The former president’s minimalist goals belied the 
international attention focused cm his mission and his 
past record as an arbiter of skill, stubbornness and 
independence in Angola, Haiti and Noth Korea. They 
- . also did not answer. the mM 3 uon. - 5 k. 2 d by official* of the 

whether the CHa- 

ton administration was not using the mission as a way to 
renege on its commitments to Sarajevo and force it to 

See CARTER, Page 4 



6 We Can Still Lose War’ 

Remembering Battle of the Bulge 


A U.S. sohfier handing out nnts to Belgian youngsters in Bastoene in remembrance of the word a UA general 
ffrjmCTwer German demands flat he surrender to an ommshing Nazi force during the Battle of the Btrige 50 years 


years ago. 


By Rick Atkinson 

Washington Post Service 

BASTOGNE, Belgium — They are 
old men now, all of them, and their 
memories after half a century are dis- 
tilled to essences, to something pure and 
remote and terrible. ~ 

They remember the s^ow, the cold, the 
rush of artillery in tife early morning 
darkness. They remember fear, hunger, 
confusion. They remenjber the dead, and 
they want you to remember the dead, 
too: how those who feu assumed a deep 
darct color because blood in the capillar- 
ies beneath the skin froze so quickly. 

Fifty years ago this week the U.S. 
Army stumbled badly, for the only time 
in its crusade to liberate Europe from 
Nazi Germany. Among the relentless 
prooesston of 50th anawersaries recall- 
ing World Warn events in Europe, the 
Battle erf the Bulge ^commemoration is 

the bitterest 

By underestimating the German car 


parity to counterpunch, in what an offi- 
cial account calls “one of the worst intel- 
ligence failures in the history of the U.S. 
Army,” the Americans would pay a hor- 
rific price: 81,000 casualties, including 
more than 19,000 dead. Hie German 
attack was so disheartening that lieuten- 
ant General George S. Patton Jr., not 
known fox bis faint-heartedness, confid- 
ed to his diary, “We can still lose this 
war.” 

The artsy bent but did not break; the 
German onslaught bowed back the Al- 
lied line along an 85-mile front Fighting 
swept across 2,000 square miles of Bel- 
gium and Luxembourg. Some villages 
changed hands four times. In scope, in- 
tensity and duration, it was the tingle 
greatest battle the U.S. Army fought in 
the war. 

And in the end, the Bulge broke the 
back of German resistance, opening an 
unremitting assault on Fortress Deutsch- 

See BATTLE, Page 4 


Ruling Family and the Economy Fuel a Simmering Saudi Discontent 


to 


By John Lancaster 

Washington Pott Service 

RIYADH — A journalist gripes about having t< 
send Ms children to private schools because public 
classrooms are so crowded, A government doctor 
frets about shortages of painkillers and preferential 
treatment for patients with ties to the Saudi royal 
family. A successful engineer wondeas why he still 
lacks a private phone four years after he applied for 


one. 


As the ofl bonanza fades and the economy con- 
tracts, sue* middle-class grievances are piling up in 


Saudi Arabia, strengthening the hand erf Islamic 
fundamentalists opposed to the ruling Saud family. 

The signs of middle-class 'unrest have evoked 
memories of prerevohition Iran: Saudi diplomats 
defect, in tonal protests lead to arrests and a well- 
financed group erf fundamentalist exiles launches 
anti-government broadsides that strike a chord even 
with Westernized liberals inside the kingdom. 

But divining the true extent of the unrest — and 
the threat it poses to the Saudi regime — has been 
next to impossible in a closed society whose leader- 
ship rarely grants visas to Western journalists. In 


recent weeks, the Saudi government has opened the 
country’s doors to a trickle of Western reporters, 
hoping to counteract forecasts of economic and 
social chaos emanating from dissidents living 
abroad. 

Conversations over 12 days in the kingdom this 
month with Saudi businessmen, academics and pro- 
fessionals — including some with ties to the London- 
based exiles — suggested that the comparison with 
Iran is premature. Even sharp critics of the r uling 
family say their wish is reform, not revolution, in- 
voking the Koranic injunction against disorder. 


At the same time, the dissidents’ message has 
resonated with ordinary Saudis, many of whom are 
fed up with what they perceive as the royal family’s 
corruption and lavish, stale-subsidized lifestyle — 
and get iMcit pleasure from seeing it publicly at- 
tacked. Anger at the United States, a staunch all} 
the monarchy, also is common. 


ly of 


During a crackdown in September, the govern- 
ment jailed 


two prominent Muslim clerics linked to 
the dissident movement, but illegal tapes of their 


See SAUDIS, Page 4 


Airlme Safety: It 9 s Getting Complicated Very Fast 

_ -S— on the table: What is beine has cut back its network in recent years, year, completed uneveatfi 


By Adam Bryant 

New York Tima Service 

NEW YORK — When Transportation 

sS toast ‘ 

month with hundreds of anhne employees go the growing unease about flying, 

and other aviation experts, a basic ques- an American Eagle plane 

. n.U-L u«4li romlint last 


tion will be on the table: What is being 
done to improve airline safety? 

The question is rarely raised in so public 
a forum. But it has been some time since 


has cut back its network in recent years. 

What is more, the public’s confidence in 
commercial aviation may erode if current 
trends continue: With airline traffic ex- 
pected to grow about 5 percent a year for 
the foreseeable future, Boeing Co. has pro- 



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brightened after an American cagie pwne 

crashed near Raleigh, North Carolina, last Airime inspections have been stepped np, 

Tuesday — the nation’s fifth fatal crash of a senior U.S- official said. Page 2. 

an airliner this year —public pressure nay 

have prompted the can for broad answers 
on reducing accidents. 

The meeting will be of interest to a — 

Browing number of travelers in part be- over the last several years— measured 

®* v . aw dirinlrins ~ “ 


jected that the number of jet crashes 
worldwide might more than double, to one 
a week by 2015, If the average accident rate 
over the last several years — measun ** 

wyimonanDn b»v a*** fatalities per million miles flown — Luma 

Amtrak has said it wfll eliminate some rail steady. 

routes altogether, and the financially be- U.S. airlines are the world’s safest form 
leaguered Greyhound, the only remaining of mass transportation, with the huge ma- 
bus company offering nationwide service, jority of the more than 12 million flights a 


— perfectly — 

transportation, a standard that is impossi- 
ble to achieve or even approach with quick 
fixes every tmv» a plane crashes. 

Dm solutions are getting more compli- 
cated as the industry moves beyond wnat 
some people call the “flashing tight in the 
cockpit" era — those decades in which 
most problems were solved by building 
backup and warning systems. 

For example, although wind shear is 
suspected as a cause erf a USAir crash 
earlier this year in Charlotte, North Caroti- 
ns, that was the first time it had been a 
factor in a jet crash anywhere in the world 
since 1987, when shear warning systems 
See PLANES, Page 4 


Kiosk 


2d Blast Rocks 
Danish Capital 


COPENHAGEN (AFP) — Copen- 
hagen was rocked Sunday by its sec- 
ond bomb blast in 24 hours but the 
device caused only slight damag e and 
there were no casn ^ti fS, police 
The device went off at 9:48 P.M. in an 
almost deserted garden behind the 
Parliament b uilding . 

On Saturday, another bomb went 
off in the city’s center, shattering hun- 
dreds of windows and damaging cars 
but without causing injuries! u had 
been placed opposite a residential 
block 


[ 


U.S. Pilot Dies 
In Downing 
Of Aircraft in 
North Korea 


Pentagon Denies Spying 
And Seeks Release of 
Second, Uninjured Flier 


By Steven Greenhouse 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — The White House 
announced Sunday that the pilot of a Unit- 
ed States Army helicopter that was shot 
down or forced down in North Korea was 
killed in the incident, while the second 
pilot was alive and unharmed. 

“This tragic loss of life was unneces- 
sary,” President Bill Clinton said in a 
statement, which took a tougher tone to- 
ward North Korea than when American 
officials first learned of the incident late 
Friday. 

Mr. Clinton said his primary concern 
was the return of the body of Qiief War- 
rant Officer David Hilemon and the re- 
lease of the other pilot, Chief Warrant 
Officer Bobby Hall. 

North Korea has insisted that the un- 
armed two-seat OH-58 Kiowa helicopter 
was on a spying mission 5 to 8 kilometers 
(3 to 5 miles) into its territory, but Penta- 
gon officials maintain that the two pilots 
strayed during a routine t rainin g mission. 

Pentagon officials said Sunday that they 
remained unsure whether the helicopter 
was shot down, forced down or perhaps' 
had mechanical difficulties. 

Defense Secretary W illiam J. Perry said 
he wanted to know how the army scout 
helicopter bad gotten so far north of the 
Demilitarized Zone. 

“The Defense Department has launched 
a full investigation, of the circumstances 
that led to this tragic loss on a routine 
training flight,” Mr. Perry said in a state- 
ment. “Results will be reported as this 
investigation reaches its conclusion.” 

Some American officials voiced frustra- 
tion with how North Korea has handled 
the incident, saying it has been slow to 
make information available. They wonder 
why Pyongyang at first said the two pilots 
were being held for questioning. 

— ■ dM^ltann HO- 

ministration waieagerloresolyc.the inci- 
dent and get the pilots released so the two 
countries could concentrate on the sensi- 
tive task of carrying out their month-old 
nuclear agreement. 

But with the news of Warrant Officer 
Hilemon’s death, administration officials 
acknowledged that they had a considera- 
bly more serious incident an their hands. 

Mr. Clinton said be had asked Repre- 
sentative William B. Richardson, Demo- 
crat erf New Mexico, to extend his stay in 
North Korea to help resolve the crisis. Mr. 
Richardson arrived in North Korea early 


See KOREA, Page 4 


Republicans 
Say Spending 
Cuts Come First 


By Day Chandler 

Washington Pan Service 

WASHINGTON — Congressional Re- 
publicans vowed on Sunday to push for 
cuts in government spending before enact- 
ing their ambitious proposals for lowering 
taxes, and they signaled that some of the 
tax reduction measures in the Republican 
“Contract With America” might have to 
be scaled back. 

Appearing together on the NBC News 
program “Meet the Press," prospective 
leaders of the four congressional panels 
responsible for tax and spending legisla- 
tion — Bob Packwood of Oregon, of the 
Senate Finance Committee; Pete V. Do- 
meniri of New Mexico, of the Senate Bud- 
get Committee; Bill Archer of Texas, of the 
House Ways and Means Committee, and 
John R. Kasich of Ohio, of the House 
Budget Committee — promised not to 
approve any tax cuts until Congress had 
agreed on compensating spending reduc- 
tions. 

“We’re not going to say, ‘We’re going to 
give you the goodies today, and we'll pay 
for them tomorrow,’” said Mr. Kasich, 
one erf the most ardent champions of the 
compact, which pledges a host of tax 
breaks for groups ranging from families to 
investors, married couples to big corpora- 
tions. 

“I’m not even going to consider what tax 
cuts we’re going to do until I see spending 
cuts that will match them,” echoed Mr. 
Packwood. 

Recalling how Congress ran up prodi- 
gious deficits in the early 1980s by adopt- 
ing the tax cuts proposed by Ronald Rea- 
gan, then disregarding his 
recommendations to scale back govern- 
ment programs, Mr. Packwood said, “I 
just don’t want to see us once again send 

out tax cuts with a lick and a promise and a 

hope that spending cuts are costing later.'* 

Republicans have yet to outline their 
legislative strategy for tackling spending 
cuts first, but Mr. Kasich and the House 
Republican leader, Richard K. Armey sug- 
gested that House Republicans plan to do 
so through the creation of a “tax relief 
savings account.” 

“We will bank the money in January 

See TAXES, Page 4 





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Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1994 


Berlusconi an Aggrieved Star? 

Media- Adept Leader Personalizes Politics 


By Alan Cowell 

New Ye* Times Service 

ROME — Silvio Berlusconi. 
Italy’s billionaire prime minis- 
ter, made much of ms money by 
offering soap operas and game 
shows and bigfe-kick dancers on 
commercial television stations 
that drew almost half the coun- 
try’s viewers. 

For a man who won power m 

part by deploying Ids 
porate resources in advertising 
and television, the unraveling of 
his political fortunes has 
seemed an extraordinarily un- 
scripted spectacle. 

Last week he was sommoneo 
before investigating magistrates 
in Milan to face seven hours m 
interrogation about suspected 
corruption at Fininvest, his vast 
business empire, an allegation 
he denies. , . . 

Sworn into office m May; he 

now faces a confidence debate 
in Parliament on Wednesday 
with a crucial coalition ally 
openly threatening to desert 
him. A vote on the motion is 
expected on Thursday. 

Perhaps most striking of ah is 
the sense that Mr. Berlusconi, a 
58 -year-old media tycoon who 
entered politics only last Janu- 
ary, has personalized the politi- 
cal fray to the extent that he 
stands virtually alone at center 
stage, equating his own survival 
with the national interest. 
Sometimes he sounds like an 
a ggr ieved movie star — under- 
mined by the studio, beloved by 
the fans. 

Calling the charges against 
him a conspiracy, Mr. Berlus- 
coni said die other day that it 
was “so vast that it can be com- 
pared to a coup d'fetat,” and was 
not just against himself but “the 
credibility of a new political 
process, which has won the ap- 
proval of the popular vole.” 

As he faces the confidence 
vote in Parliament, Mr. Berlus- 
coni's future is so much in 
doubt that both Chancellor 
Helmut Kohl of Germany and 
Prime Minister John Major of 
Britain have declined to set firm 
dates in early 1995 for planned 
one-on-one meetings with him. 

And at home, as government 


officials and politicians become 

ever more enmeshed in the poli- 
tics of survival rather than na- 

NEWS ANALYSIS 


nonal management, the Italian 
leader faces a long list of woes: 

• The 1995 cost-saving bud- 
get, watered down under union 
pressure, is under fire from Ital- one of its members, the North- 
fan business and the Interna- cm League, whose leader, U ra- 


ft Justice Minister Alfredo 
Biondi is locked in a dispute 
with the Milan magistrates over 
their investigations into Italy's 
bribery scandals and the Mafia. 

ft Mr. Berlusconi’s various 
companies face a battery of cor- 
ruption inquiries that may yet 
land him in court 
ft The coalition he heads in 
Parliament is under threat from 


tjonal Monetary Fund. 


Italianjudge 
Deals Directly 
With Journalist 

A genet France-Preset 

BERGAMO, Italy — 
Antonio Di Pietro, the cru- 
sading magistrate who 
abruptly resigned two 
weeks ago, lost bis cool and 
hit a journalist at his wed- 
ding reception in Cumo, 
near here, Italian papers re- 
ported Sunday. 

Around 40 people had 
been invited to the private 
reception Saturday night, a 
day after Mr. Di Retro was 
married to his longtime 
companion, Susanna Maz- 
zoleni. During the evening, 
he sped away in his car. A 
short distance away he 
pulled up next u> another 
car where a reporter for the 
Italian news agency ANSA 
was writing his report 

The judge grabbed the 
journalist, pushed him 
against the car, head-butt- 
ed, punched and slapped 
him, then seized the man's 
camera and tore out the 
film, while haran g uin g oth- 
er journalists in the full 
view of the policemen who 
had been put on duty for 
his protection, reports said. 

A woman, believed to be 
one of the guests, inter- 
vened and persuaded him 
to go home. 


berto Bossi, has made the chal- 
lenge to Mr. Berlusconi as 
personal as the prime minister 
has taken it to bk 

But, in many ways, it is 
symptomatic of Mr. Berlus- 
coni's style of leadership that 
there are few in his entourage 
whom he can blame for his 
troubles. 

From the start, his Fozza Ita- 
lia movement was established 
as a loosely organized market- 
ing vehicle for the election of ■ 
Mr. Berlusconi rather than the 
land of structured political par- 
ty Italians are used to. 

His closest advisers are the 
same people who fanned his 
inner circle in business. His per- 
sonal lawyer, Cesare Previn, is 
now defense minister, a long- 
time business associate Gianni 
Letta, is the top-ranking official 
in the cabinet office; the gov- 
ernment spokesman, Giuhano 
Ferrara, made his name as a 
talk-show host on one of Mr. 
Berlusconi's commercial televi- 
sion channels. 

As he watches the crisis un- 
folding around him, Mr. Berlus- 
coni seems to feel that if any- 
thing will pull him through, it 
will be the force of his personal- 
ity. 

He personally would not 
have problems resigning, he 
seemed to say in a recent inter- 
view with Panorama magazine, 
which he also owns. But he bad 
to think of aQ the voters who 
wanted him to stay on. 

“You must not forget that 
this coalition was formed 
around the initiative of a leader 
who has a first name and a 
surname and who has won the 
confidence of the electors,” he 
saicL 


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WORLD BRIEFS 


S 1 NDELFINGEN, Gerrnany( uncertain future on 

election as chairman at a weeken elected Rolf Schherer, 

figure, and reverse a sharp dedine m popularity ana votes. 

Iran Mission Denies Funding Hamas 

. __ - . amkaccv In Jordan denis 


t 

IT. ... * 

P to rc Beuard/Agota FraawPnsac 

A SNOW DROUGHT — Snow cannons working at the French resort of Courchevel 
to allow skiers to get to the bottom of the mountain, where there is no snow. 



Transportation Head Rebuffs Critics, Cubans Stni Believe in Revolution 
But He Steps Up Air Safety Inspection 


The Associated Pros 

WASHINGTON — Trans- 
portation Secretary Federico F. 
Pena said Sunday that the Fed- 
eral Aviation Administration 


had stepped up its inspection of 
all U.S. airlines, both commuter 
and larger airlines, because of 
concerns about safety. 

Both Mr. Pena and the head 



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INSTRUMENTS FOR PROFESSIONALS 


of the Federal Aviation Admin- 
istration. David Hinson, em- 
phasized that they considered it 
safe to fly despite recent crashes 
that have disrupted travel 

Mr. Pena rejected criticism 
that his department, which in- 
dudes the FAA, 1 ms been slug- 
gish in regulating air safety. The 
FAA has been accused of slow- 
ness in implementing proposed 
regulations from the National 
Transportation Safety Board, 
winch investigates air crashes. 

The board, for example, 
urged shortly after the Oct. 31 
American Eagle crash near Ro- 
se lawn, Indiana, that ATR air- 
craft be grounded in icy weath- 
er conditions. Although the 
FAA imposed some new re- 
quirements, it did not ground 
the. aircraft in icy conditions 
until more than a month later. 

But Mr. Pena said the agency 
was aggressively monitoring the 
airlines. He cited the suspen- 
sion of 42 daily flights last 
Thursday by Kiwi Internation- 
al Airlines after the FAA raised 
questions about the carrier's pi- 
lot training. 

Mr. Hinson said Sunday that 
he considered the recent com- 
muter accidents, as well as the 
crash SepL 8 near Pittsburgh of 
a USAir jetliner that killed 132 
people, as “random" events. 

"We find no connection be- 
tween them whatsoever,” he 
said. He also said “there is 
hardly any statistical differ- 
ence’’ in the accident rates of 
the commuters (0.4 per 100,000 
departures) and the larger air- 
lines (0.3 per 100,000). 

The FAA earlier this month 
announced that it would re- 
quire commuter airlines to com- 
ply with stricter pilot training 
and operating requirements 
more in line with those already 
imposed on larger air carriers. 

Mr. Pena said that the tough- 
er safety standards for commut- 
er airlines are expected to be 
issued by the FAA within 100 
days, but some of the final rules 
may not go into effect until the 
end of 1995. 

“The American people ex- 
pect and deserve the highest 
lewd of safety in our airline sys- 
tem,” Mr. Pe&a said in a televi- 
sion interview. He added that 
he frequently uses commercial 
air transportation. 


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Un your MCI Card.* load telephone card or call coDecL.all at the same low rates. 
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Let It Take You Around The World 



AMMAN Jordan (Reuters) —Iran's 

staywKVWfs'asssss 

denies these lies and «B qme?* . . 

T^rSniSS said m a statement that its mam priority was to 
expand “brotherly ties with the Hashemite Kingdom of Jcariaa” 

Japan Figure Wary of North Korea 

TOKYO (AF) — Ichiro Ozawa, leader of a new opposition 
party said Sunday that Japan should not join a U-S.-South 
Korean plan to give North Korea new nuclear plants until it 
removes all doubts that it is developing midear aims. 

Japan and South Korea had been expected to be the mam 
donoreof the S4 billion needed to give North Kona, two modem 
power plants that would produce less potential bomb-making 
material than the North's current equipment. . 

Mr Ozawa, secretary-general of the New Frontier Party, the 
second biggest in Parliament, said on Japanese tdewson. that 
Japan should not spend a huge amount of taxpayers money 
imW suspicions of North Korea are completely re moved . He 
cairi the current agreement contains some ambiguous parts. 

Separate Strikes Paralyze Karachi 

KARACHI, Pakistan (Reuters) —Strikes called separately by a 
militant Sunni Muslim group and a transport union paralyzed 
Karachi on Sunday, and eight people were kffled in continuing 

violence. . 

All major business centers and markets in the country's com- 
mercial capital of 10 to 12 million peopleremained shut and many 
people stayed indoors fearing violence during the strike called by 
the Sipah-e-Sahaba Pakistan Sunni group. It is locked in a violent 
feud with Tehrik-o-Jafria Pakistan, a militant Shiite Muslim 
group. 

The Sunni 

aSunnimosq 

Transport Unity union, angered by a spate _ 

public transport Ethnic, sectarian and political violence has 
rJflim«»d at least 135 lives in Karachi this month. 


a ■’ • 

'*X‘‘ ■ 
:.*■> 

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A,- 

;/■ V 




MIAMI (Reuters) — A mtg’ority of Cubans believe the 1959 
revolution that brought Fidd. Castro to power wielded more 
successes than failures, according to a poll issued Sunday. 

The poll also said that many Cubans were deeply concerned 
about the country’s economic problems and blamed them on a 
U.S. embargo rather than their Communist country’s political 
system. Thirty-one percent of respondents listed the U.S. embargo 
as the most serious problem facing Cuba, with 25 percent citing a 
lack of food and 17 percent the economy in generaL Three percent 
died die political situation. . - 

The poll designed by The Miami Herald newspaper in Florida- 
and CID/Gallup, the Costa Rican affiliate of the Gallup pollihf 
organization, was conducted in November by 14 Central Ameri- 
cans. They canvassed 1,002 Cubans in 75 percent of the country, 
the Herald said. While it warned that some respondents might 
have censored themselves, the newspaper 


r:’~ ’ 


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i5‘ 

uC- ' 
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permission for the poll if there were no questic 
ities,” like Mr. Castro. 


TRAVEL UPDATE 
No Cruise for Some QE2 Passengers 

LONDON (Reuters) — Angry passengers turned away at the 
last moment from a Christmas cruise aboard the luxury British 
liner QE2 formed an action group on Sunday to sue the owners, 
Cunard. 

They were enraged after turning to to be told that plumbing 
had not been completed in time in 100 cabins after a £30 million 
($47 million) refit. The ship sailed Saturday from Southhampton 
to New York 

A British lawyer, David Steene, said: “Cunard must have 
known die boat would not be ready and they should have told us 
last week instead of just a few hours before she left My wife and 
children are absolutely devastated. We have been looking forward 
to this holiday all year ” he said. He added he was forming an 
action group and dozens of passengers had joined. 

An Egyptian highway project near the Pyramids will continue to 
be monitored closely by the United Nations’ World Heritage 
Committee to ensure that Cairo keeps the road away from the 
fyamids, a Unesco official said Sunday in Bangkok. The official 
said Egypt had assured the committee that the Pyramids would 
not be threatened. (AFP) 

Belgian roads may be Mocked from midnight Thursday by truck 
drivers and road freight operators who have threatened to act if 
their demands for lax rebates are not met, the Bclga news agency 
said ou Sunday. (Reuters) 

In Kenya, thousands of travelers were stranded this weekend 
when the long-neglected road linking the Indian Ocean resort of 
Mombasa with the capital, Nairobi, became impassable after 
heavy rains. Newspapers said thousands of passengers traveling to 
or from Mombasa were unable to complete their journeys on 
Saturday after trucks overturned and blocked the narrow road 
while trying to avoid potholes. (AFP) 

TTiis Week’s Holidays 

Banking and government offices will be closed or services 
curtailed in the following countries and their dependencies this 
week because of national and religious holidays: 

WEDNESDAY : Malawi 

FRIDAY: Guatemala, Japan, New Zealand. 

SATURDAY: Austria, Brazil, Bulgaria, CjmaAu rwh Republic, Deamadc. 
Rntind, France, Germany, Guatemala, Iceland. Italy, Lieducnsian, Macao, Med- 
co, Monaco. Norway. Panama. Portugal. Slovakia, Sweden, Switzerland, Vatican 
uty, Zaire. 

Sources: J.P. Morgan, Reuters. 





Imprime par Offprint, 73 rue de I’Evangtle, 750JS Paris. 












. . ' --fli -Z 




,rtJ i Kt 


/r Karachi 







M*t Thdkr/Raitm 

U-S. Park Pobce searching the area of the Effipse, behind (he White House, after shots 
were fired at the president’s official residence. One bullet penetrated the Anmg room. 


/UE AMEZUCAS / 

Bullets Hit 
The White 
House for 
A 2d Time 

, _ By Toni Locy 
and Rajiv Chandrasekarau 

... . '^3^' S,on Fo3t Service 

WASHINGTON — For the 
second time in two months, 
been fired toward 
J® White House, according to 
the Secret Service. 8 

Four 9mm bullets were found 
on the grounds Saturday in- 
duding, sources said, one on a 
nrst-fioor balcony below the 
president s family Quarters a nrf 
another that penetrated a win- 
dow of the Slate Dining Room 
on the first floor. 

No one was injured, and au- 
thorities had neither suspects 
nor an explanation. 

“We just don’t know if it was 
an unrelated incident or if it „ _ 

was directed at the White 
Howe, said Eric Haraisch- 
feger, a Secret Service spokes- Of- ‘sA&K 
man. ^ 

President Bill Clinton, his 
wife and daughter were home 
but were not disturbed or en- 
dangered by the shooting, the 
Secret Service said. 

At 2:05 A.M., members of 
the service’s uniformed division 
reported hearing four to six 

shots fired near the White TTO - 

House from the direction of the U-S- Park Pohce searching the area of 1 
Ellipse, just south of the White were fired at the president's official res 
House grounds. Investigators 
later found the bullets. The oth- p— 
er two were found on a roadway — 

near the South Portico and near A Way FrOIlt PolltlCS 

a tree on the lawn. 

It was the third recent breach A Miami prostitute has been found dead in 
of White House security. On an area where four others have been killed 

Oct 29, Francisco M. Duran, since September. The police said did not 

26, of Colorado, was arrested know whether the woman was the fifth victim 

after authorities said he fired at of an unknown killer linked to the other 

the White House with a semiau- deaths. (AP) 

tomatic rifle from Pennsylvania Nancy Kissinger, wife of former Secretary 

Avenue. He was charged with of State Henry A. Kissinger, was treated at a 

attempted a s sassi n ation after hospital for an in testinal ailmen t She was in 

co-workers told the FBI he had stable condition, a spokeswoman for New 

said he wanted to “take out” the York Hospital said (AP) 

president Dog search teams found the bodies of two 

& J 2 piX an iw' P eo P ,e > both shot in the head, who are sus- 
Uwder, 38, of Pray Pom£ pected of killing a sheriff, the police in Lake 
Maryland, crashed a smaU ColortZfsaid The two, believed to be 

S0U * L t^ Mark Vredenburg and Ruth Slater, were 
the Mate House and skidded found under a tree about a mfle from where 

into the west ade of the man- sheriff Roger Coursey was killed in this town 

son. He was killed is the crash. 

2 White House officials Satur- 
day played down the latest inri- 

Market Forces 

TVc are. Jetting the Secret ... .. .. . 

Service “handle it and frimBy, _ r ', 

we’re trying to diminish its im- By Erik Eckholm Run for < 

pact," a senior o fficial said JWnr York Times Service collection O 

“The more we react to isolated WASHINGTON — In the than a sys 
incidents like this, the more we two years that Congress wran- counts for 
might have." gled over health care before economy, i 

Mr. Harnischfegpr said in- failing to pass fundamental creasingly l 
vestigators had not found any change, private market forces business, ol 
s h el l casings, normally ejected were acting on their own to playing fiek 
fmm most automatic and semi- transform the country’s medical Mergers i 

automatic weapons as bullets system dramatically. hospitals, d 

are fired Ballistics tests were Cost cutting, intensive com- with their p 
being conducted on the recov- petition, and the growing role laboratories 
ered bullets to determine what of large, profit-seeking corpora- rare service 
kind of weapon was used tions in health care escalated bilhonthisy 

Ammuni tion this size can be some of the very treads that billion in 19 
fired from handg un s, shoulder- many members of Congress Combine* 
strap weapons such as an Uzi said they most opposed, like Son m phi 
and from some rifles, ballistics limitations on the choice of health-care 
experts said The kind of weap- doctors. Among the milestones m value the 
on determines how far a bullet American health care reached dustiy for 
will travel — and some can without fanfare during 1993 the Secuniu 
travel miles. and 1994 were these: search Ena 

Once investigators identify • A majority of privately in- But this 
the type of weapon, they will sored Americans were enrolled done nothin 
.have a better chance of figuring in managed-care plans that lim- of the unini 
out where the shots came from, it the choice of doctors and bets keep c 
Mr. Hantischfeger said Shortly treatments; 65 percent of work- also raising j 
■after the shooting, Secret Ser- ers at medium and large compa- tions about 
•vice agents, U.S. Park Police nies were in such plans by 1994. and ethics a 
officcrsand District of Colum- • For-profit health main to- “There’s r 
bia policemen questioned sever- nance organizations, or HMOs, the history » 
a ] homeless people who fre- grew so fast that they overtook one when 
auent the Ellipse. nonprofit organizations as die mid autonor 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1994 


Page 3 


■ V/~a ■' ,v .* j.-i*’ 


" . ^ iS; :V vVi' 


Gingrich Dry Rum Terra Incognita 


of about 500 in southwest Colorado. “It was 
either a suicide-suicide or a suicide-homi- 
cide," a police official said. (AP) 

Near Slcykoaush, Wash in gton, rising tem- 
peratures and rain sent tons of snow tumbling 
across a highway pass, burying four cars and 
injuring at least nine people. (AP) 

In Gpriimati, a Ku Sir Han cross was 
toppled briefly by protesters 1 1 hours after it 
was erected at a downtown square. Six people 
were arrested and the cross was put back up. 
police said No injuries were reported Mem- 
bers of the Knight Riders of the KKK have a 
permit that allows the 10-foot wooden cross 
to stay up through Dec. 27. The U.S. Supreme 
Court has rejected a request to ban the dis- 
play* (AP) 


By Michael Wines 

Nr* K.W Timer Seme? 

WASHINGTON — Repre- 
sentative Newt Gingrich, the 
next House speaker and newly 
crowned master tactician, held 
the 229 other Republican repre- 
sentatives captive in the Capi- 
tol’s House chamber for two 
relentless days last week, drill- 
ing them on parliamentary mi- 
nutiae, whipping them through 
a number or mock debates, ex- 
horting them with inspirational 
speeches. 

Ever the strategist, Mr. Ging- 
rich said the object was to prod 
Congress's perpetual minority 
into acting, at long last, tike a 
majority party. 

Representative-eject Sonny 
Bono, Republican of Califor- 
nia, put it another way. 

“This is sort of tike taking the 
show out of town for a while 
and seeing bow it's r unnin g," 
Mr. Bono said as he stood in 
one of the ornate hallways out- 
side the House during a break 
in the action. 

“It’s always more familiar 
when you walk out on the stage 
and you’ve already practiced 
it.” 

Mr. Bono’s analogy is apL 
Mr. Gingrich opens on Broad- 
way in three weeks with a show 
that he is touting as a runaway 
bit. The Georgia Republican 
has a cast whose sole experience 
is a 40-year run on the dinner- 
theater circuit of legislative 
politics. 

He has held only one dress 
rehearsal, and last week was it. 

“We have an enormous 
amount of work to do." Mr. 
Gingrich said after just one ses- 
sion. 

“We in the majority have a 
responsibility now that is much 
bigger than anything we’ve 
faced. It’s much more challeng- 
ing than taking control was." 

It is not difficult to see why. 
No Republican now in. the 
House has ever run a national 
legislature. When the most griz- 
zled among them first showed 
up, in 1963, House Democrats 
had already been in power for 
eight years. 

As if that were not complicat- 
ed enough for him. a full one- 
third of Mr. Gingrich's new ma- 
jority have not served in the 
House, or often in the govern- 
ment, at all 


Thus, Mr. Gingrich faced chair, for the first time in their 
two problems when his orienta- careers, to try to straighten 


lion began: Experienced Re- 
publicans, who spent four de- 


things oul 

Representative Deborah 


cades throwing gravel in the Pryce of Ohio, who is starting 
cogs of Democratic legislation, her second term in the House, 
knew how to slow a political struggled to stop two quasi- 
juggernaut but not how to keep Democrats. David Dreder of 
one moving. And freshmen California and Martin R. Hoke 


knew neither. 

For example: “O.K., say 
you’ve got a bunch of voice 
votes coming up, but you’re out 


of Ohio, from monopolizing the 
floor. 

"My question," she said lai- 


And the answer? “Tm still 
not sure of the answer," she 
said, adding: “We have to pre- 
pare for this, but Tm not sure 
we know how to prepare for it.” 

A grinning Mr. Gingrich lat- 
er pronounced it “fun to 
watch,” but he did not stray far 
from its purpose. 

“We won’t be perfect on 
opening day, and the American 
people will see us make a few 


er, “was. Do I have to recognize mistakes,” he said. “But we’ll be 


with constituents, and they each member in the course of a much better because of this 


want to take some photos," 
Steve Stockman of Texas, out- 
fitted in a proper dark suit and 
name tag, grilled a newly hired 
aide outside the House chamber 
during a break in one session. 

“You telling me that mean* 
we’ve got to sit in there all day 
for votes?" 

(The answer: No. Voice votes 
are not recorded, so no one will 
ever know whether a lawmaker 
sits for them or not.) 

“We have to set the agenda 
now — we have to bring bills to 
the floor and get them passed," 
said Representative John A. 
Bodmer of Ohio, who helped 
run the proceedings. “We never 
had to do this stuff as a minor- 
ity. We just had to anticipate, 
react — and lose.” 

Perhaps above all else, Mr. 
Gingrich does not like to lose. 
So be summoned them to the 
House chamber at 8 A.M. 
Thursday and all but locked 
them In for the day’s proceed- 
ings. 

Every Republican received a 
newly minted paperback copy 
of the “Contract With Ameri- 
ca." 

Committee chairmen lec- 
tured them on the schedule for 
enacting the contract’s tenets 
into law. Conservative luminar- 
ies — Governor John Engjer of 
Michigan was one — spoke 
about the need to be bold and 
maintain momentum. 

To drive the point home, Mr. 
Gingrich and another organiz- 
er, Representative Robert S. 
Walker of Pennsylvania, orga- 
nized a mock session of the 
House, designated several vet- 
eran Republicans to be honor- 
ary Democrats and instructed 
them to make a mess of the 
proceedings as best they could. 
Then Mr. Walker brought some 
of the less experienced House 
Republicans up to the speaker’s 


soliloquy, or what?" 


than we would have.’ 


Market Forces Bypass Idle Congress on Health Care ^ 


By Erik Eckholm Run for decades more like a Abramowitz, a market analyst HMDs seek to cut costs by 

New York Times Service collection of cottage industries with Sanford C. Bernstein & curbing tests, surgery, referrals 

WASHINGTON — In the than a system that now ac- Co. in New York, who advises to specialists, and hospital stays 
two years that Congress wran- counts for one-seventh of the health investors. “And what’s they consider unnecessary, as 
gled over health care before economy, medical care is in- wrong with that?" well as by paying lower fees, 

failing to pass fundamental creasingly the domain of big “Corporations produce hotel pushing prevention, and seek- 
change, private market forces business, offering a rich new rooms and toothpaste and auto- ing out efficiencies wherever 
were acting on their own to playing field for Wall Street. mobiles, and the country does they can. In regions where 

tr anef rynn the cou ntry's mpHirai Mergers and acquisitions of — mmm miimm mmmmm _ HMOs have begun to compete 
system dramatically. hospitals, clinics, doctor groups with each other for business. 

Cost cutting, intensive com- with their patient lists, medical Health care is there is evidence that they can 

petition, and the growing role laboratories and other patient- . . . . , hold down overall medical 

of large, profit-seeking corpora- rare services, have totaled $20 increasingly a ncll spending, 
tkms in health care escalated billion timyrar, up Eromjust $6 Qew playing field in California, a bellwether in 

some of the very treads that billion m 1992. wi_ g wr ll c2L * the transition to managed care, 

many members of Congress Combined with the $22 op- tor Wail street. three-fourths erf all privately in- 

said they most opposed, like Jon in pharmaceutical deal* sure d patients are now in 

limitations on the choice of healtn-care mergers surpassed HMOs, and even one in four 

doctors. Among the milestones m value those of any other m- fine. You still have to produce a elderly Medicare patients have 
American health care reached dustry for 1994, according to service and monitor and im- joined them said Albert 


Run for decades more like a 
collection of cottage industries 
than a system that now ac- 


Abraxnowitz, a market analyst 
with Sanford C. Bernstein & 
Co. in New York, who advises 


two years that Congress wran- counts for one-seventh of the health investors. “And what’s 


gled over health care before economy, medical care is in- wrong with that?" 
failing to pass fundamental creasingly the domain of big “Corporations produce hotel 
rhaitgp private market forces business, offering a rich new rooms and toothpaste and auto- 
were acting on their own to playing field for wall Street. mobiles, and the country does 


business, offering a rich new rooms and toothpaste and auto- 


transform the country’s medical 
system dramatically. 


Mergers and acquisitions of 
hospitals, dimes, doctor groups 


Cost cutting, intensi ve com- with their patient lists, medical 
petition, and the growing role laboratories and other patienl- 
of large, profit-seeking corpora- rare services, have totaled $20 
tions in health care escalated billion this year, up from just $6 
some of the very trends that billion in 1992. 
many members of Congress Combined with the $22 bO- 
said they most opposed, like Hon in pharmaceutical deals, 
limitations on the choice of health-care mergers surpassed 


Combined with the $22 bil- 
lion in pharmaceutical deals, 
health-care mergers surpassed 


Health care is 
increasingly a rich 
new playing field 
ior Wall Street. 


faster than the economy as a 
whole because of new technol- 
ogies and the aging of the popu- 
lation. 

Whatever it may do to cut 
spending, market competition 
has not halted the rise in the 
number of uninsured, which is 
linked to broader economic 
treads. According to federal 
surveys, the number of Ameri- 
cans living without health in- 
surance climbed to 39 million in 
1993, from 37 million in 1992, 
and further increases are ex- 
pected this year. 


APOLITICAL NOTES A 


Errant Congressmen Still Feel the Lash 

WASHINGTON — It used to be that strong congressional 
leaders maintained party discipline by punishing errant mem- 
bers, a practice that has been abandoned in this era of 
independent-minded lawmakers. Or has it? Circumstances 
surrounding two committee assignments in the House and I 
Senate suggest otherwise. 

In the Senate, the Republican leader. Bob Dole of Kansas, 
who would like to be president, appears to have blocked | 
Senator Phil Gramm of Texas from securing a coveted seat 
on the Finance Committee. Mr. Gramm, too, would like to j 
be the party's presidential nominee in 1996. j 

Id the House, the Democratic leader. Richard A. Gephardt 
of Missouri, last week deposed Representative Charlie Rose 
of North Carolina, as the top Democrat ou the House j 
Administration Committee. Mr. Rose, current chairman of 
what will be renamed the House Oversight Committee when 
the 104th Congress convenes next month, challenged Mr. 
Gephardt in the leadership race. 

Aides to Mr. Dole and Mr. Gephardt denied they had 
exacted what looks like political punishment, old-style. 

Clinton Aides Seek to Boost Legal Fund 

WASHINGTON — President Bill Clinton's legal defense 
fund has collected more than $500,000 in its first six months, 
but his supporters, concerned that the fund will not raise 
enough money because it is barred from active solicitation, 
are considering setting up a separate organization that would 
operate under fewer fund-raising restrictions. 

The new organization would have no official connection 
with the president or Hillary Rodham Clinton and would be 
free to engage in fund-raising activities, such as direct mail 
solicitations, that arc forbidden to the existing Presidential 
Legal Expense Trust according to a source familiar with the 
planning. 

“Who knows, especially with Republican control, how 
many investigations there are going to be. how many lawsuits 
there are going to be." the source said. “It's a matter of tiying 
to raise enough money in some appropriate fashion.” 

As the legal bills for the president and Mrs. Clinton mount 
the existing fund, the only such mechanism set up by a sitting 
president, is to make its first public disclosure next month, 
when it will reveal how much it has collected, amounts paid 
oul and donor names. Because of controversy surrounding 
the effort fund-raising has been sporadic and low-key. 

Clinton supporters say the fund is caught in a bind. Fund- 
raising restrictions imposed by the Office of Government 
Ethics and a pending lawsuit filed by a conservative legal 
group have forced it to operate under difficult practical __ 

constraints, they. say. Abner Wiltc HOUJC 

ScL said the fund-raising, restrictions '"‘really- tneant-rficrer.' 
couldn't be any formal solicitation of any kind. You couldn't 
do anything to raise funds. It ail had to be word-of-mouth.” 

Critics charge that the legal defense fund is an unsavory 
and perhaps illegal effort by the Clintons to have their legal 
bills footed by others. The president's supporters defend the 
fund as an unfortunate but necessary and appropriate re- 
sponse to the circumstances in which the Clintons find 
themselves. ( WP) 

Quote/ Unquote: 

Donald Berlin, an Alcoholics Anonymous member at the 
funeral of Teresa Jane McGovern, daughter of former Sena- 
tor George McGovern who died last week in an accident 
caused by her alcoholism: “Not all the senators and congress- 
men before you and after you can legislate a person to 
sobriety. That power is given only to God." 


without fanfare during 1993 
and 1994 were these: 

• A majority of privately in- 
sured Americans were enrolled 
in managed-care plans that lim- 
it the choice of doctors and 
treatments; 65 percent of work- 
ers at medium and large compa- 
nies were in such plans by 1994. 

• For-profit health mainte- 
nance organizations, or HMOs, 
grew so fast that they overtook 


the Securities Data Co., a re- prove it, for a finite price." Lowey-BaU, a consultant in 
search firm. The changes have been driv- Sacramento. In the most recent 

But this restructuring has en, above all, by the desire of gjgn of savings, larger employ- 
done nothing to ease the plight those who pay most health bills ers in the state, in negotiations 
of the uninsured, whose nam- — employers and the govern- with fiercely competing HMOs, 
bets keep climbing, and it is meat — to curb costs. In re- h ave obtained rollbacks in 
also raising profound new ques- spouse, insurers and HMOs are health premiums for next vear 


Lowey-Ball, a consultant in 
Sacramento. In the most recent 
sign of savings, larger employ- 


bets keep climbing, and it is 
also raising profound new ques- 


tions about how quality care offering to supply care at re- 


and ethics can be guarded. 

“There’s never been a time in 
the history of American medi- 
cine when the independence 


nonprofit organizations as the and autonomy of medical prac- 
dominanl force in managed titioners was as uncertain as it is 


duced, all-inclusive prices, con- 
fident that they can offer good 
care and still make a profit. 

The national debate over 
bow to revamp health care only 


Fourth Patient 
Of U.S. Dentist 
IsDeadofAIDS 

Reuters 

STUART, Florida — A 
fourth patient believed to have 
been infected with AIDS by a 
Florida dentist has died of the 
disease, a spokeswoman said 
Sunday. 

The patient, Barbara Webb, 
68, a retired schoolteacher, died 
Saturday at the Hospice of 
Martin here. She had been a 
patient of Dr. David Acer, who 
died of AIDS complications m 
1990. 

In 1991, Kimberly Bereabs, 
23 became the first of L/r. 
Acer’s patients to succumb to 
the disease. Before her death. 
Miss Bergalis bewmean out- 
spoken advocate of AIDS test 
jig for medical personnel. 

0r. Acer is the only health 
professional in the Unuc d 
States known to have transmit 
fed the human immunodefi- 
ciency virus, which causes 
aids, to patients. 

Two other former pauentsof 


care. Today the majority of all 
people enrolled in HMOs, the 
most common and stringent 
form of managed care, are in 


titioners was as uncertain as it is speeded up the changes in the 
now,” said Dr. Arnold S. Ret- marketplace, many experts 


man, editor emeritus of the 
New England Journal of Medi- 
cine. “1 think that in this pro- 


plans operated by for-profit cess businessmen and 
companies. agents will begin to exercise un- 

• At least three-fourths of all precedented control over die al- 
doctors signed contracts, cover- location of medical resources.” 
ing at least some of their pa- But proponents of HMOs say 

dents, to cut their fees and ac- that their brand of medical 
cept oversight of their medical care, prevention-oriented and 


think, as doctors, hospitals, and 
investors realized that one way 
or another, managed care was 
likely to reign supreme. 


have obtained rollbacks in 
health premiums for next year 
of up to 10 percent. 

Nationwide, health spending 
slowed considerably • over the 
last two years, though it was 
still double the general inflation 
rate. 

Whether recent reductions in 
FJMO premiums can be main- 
tained for long is disputed. And 
over time, many experts believe, 
health spending will still grow 



In this Tuesday 


decisions. Among doctors who centered on a family doctor, is 
work in group practices, the generally better as well as more 


share of such managed-care economical They say consum- 
contracts was 89 percent by ers have little to fear. 


1993, up from 56 percent the 
vear before. 


ask the butler... 


“It’s the corporatization of 
health care," said Kenneth S. 



The 1996 King Faisal International Prize 
For Medicine 
Management of the Premature Infant 

And the 1996 King Faisal International Prize 
For Science 
Biology 

Invitation To Nominate 




Christmas 

Stockings! 


tients of 
ive been 


r>r Acer known to naye oeoi 
fisted with H IV are 5 ull alive- 

pope Is Time's 'Man ol Vear" 


NEW YORK— ^ Time maw- j Pii ris is. 

i : 


Auction sale at die Palais de justice of Paris 
Monday, January 9, 1995 at 2 p.m. - in one lot 

APARTMENT 


5 main rooms on the 2nd floor . 
plus parking space and cellar 

PARIS 8 

Starting price: FF 2,500,000 

For information, contact Maitre Jacques S. BOEDELS. 
Cabinet ARMAND. BOEDELS G Associaies, 38 avenue Hoche, 
Paris 8. Tel. . II | 42 25 87 87 - Maine Joseph WEJSZ. Lawyer in 
Paris IS. HO Avenue de Suflren - or the bailiff at the TCI of Paris. 

On site visits December 21 from 1 p.m. to 5 p m 


new take 
i on legs. 


The General Secretariat of The King Faisal 
International Prtze is pleased to invite universh 
tics, scientific societies, research centres, and 
other learned circles throughout the world to 
nominate qualified candidates for the above 
Pnze.Nominaiions will not be accepted from 
individuals or political parties. 

Nominated work muse 
a) he published and original; 
hi represent a contribution of the highest 
distinction in the Prize category; 
c \ benefit mankind and advance scientific 
knowledge; 

d) not have been awarded another international 
prize. 

Nominations should include: 
a) an official letter of nomination detailing the 
scienlilic lustificauon (or the nomination: 
h) a typed CV detailing the nominee s academic 
background and experience, and listing all 
published works: 


c) Six 16) copies ol each nominated work (no 
nomination works will be returned): 
dl three (3) recent colour photos: 
e) lull contact details, 

The above inlormation must be received by The 
King Faisal International Prize no later than 
September 1. 199?. 

The decision of the Prize's Selection Committee 
is finaL Winners will be announced in February' 

J 99o and will receive the Prize at an official 
ceremony later in the year. 

Each winner receives: 

• An abstract ol his /her winning work, written 
in Diw.tm calligraphy and presented in a 
leather folder; 

■ A commemorative 22-carai. 300-gram gold 
medallion: 

• SRJ5IUKHJ (approximately USS93.000). Joint 
winners at any category share the cash prize. 

Nominations should he sent by registered 
airmail to: 


INTERNATIONAL 


nauoii* mm fie t<u mu mm uu auminH k,i 


The General Secretarial 
The King Faisal International Prize 
P.O.Box 22476 Riyadh 1 U95 Saudi Arabia 

Telephone (966)1 1 J 465-2355 Fax (966)(1) 465-8685 Telex 404667 PRIZE SJ Cable JAEZ\H 


J : 

, * 

il 




f-. Wf 











Page 4 


AMERICAN 

TOPICS 


g ipniiar vapors are now added to natu- 
ral gas so its presence can be easily de- 
tected. Congress, however, would proba- 
bly have to pass legislation requiring 
manufacturers to add such an odorant to 
gims and bullets. 


ESI™ NATIONAL HKBALD TRIBUNE. MONDAY, DECEMBER 19, 199* 

— | CARTER: 

l- zine under the tree instantly gives itself . f D 

> away. Put it in a shoe box or some other ATTWOI 171 ijOSHUI 

camouflage-” 


High-Tech Tools for Police 

Will 'See Through’ Clothes 

Policemen could soon be canying 
electromagnetic wave imagers that de- 
tect guns concealed under clothing and 
cheS tracers Hurt sniff through walls 
to find hidden bullets. Researchers say 
such technology has already been devd- 

° P Etevid Boyd* director of science and 
technology for the National Institute of 
Justice, says it is high time the police 
wOTt&gh-tech. He says s^cand 
local policemen, who handle ^percent 
of criminal cases, “are still equipped like 
Wyatt Eaip in the late I9th cerinny- 

Civil libertarians, however, warn that 
high-tech cops could trample on consti- 
tutional rights if care is not taken in 

weapons detection. 

Among the new tools that could soon 
be available to the police are passive 
millim eter wave imagers. They can reveal 
both metallic and nonmetalhc weapons, 
plastic explosives, drugs and other con- 
traband concealed under clothing at a 
distance of 50 feet (about 15 meters). 

To find weapons and ammunition hid- 
den inside buildings, high-tech cops 
could use a chemical analyzer to sniff out 
an “odorant vapor." 


Short Takes 

What is it fike to teach a classroom full 
of 8-year-old children? “Imagine giving a 


child’s birthday party five days a week,* 
says-Tbe Washington Post, and the pic- 
ture b egins to take shape. 

For the typical young teacher, manag- 
ing two dozen thud-graders “often feds 
like glorified baby-sitting." She “often 
finds herself wiping noses and breaking 
up fights. By day’s end, die often feds 
fortunate not to dissolve into a primal 
scream.” 

For “though there are no hard statis- 
tics to bade this up,” The Post says, 
“many educators believe the never-end- 
ing struggle for classroom order has been 
the single most important cause of teach- 
er dropouts." 


Cigars, long in decline, are making a 
comeback. At its current pace, this year's 
cigar sales should top 1993 sales by 6 
percent, the first annual increase since 
1970, a spokesman for the Cigar Associa- 
tion of America in Washington said. 
Americans spent $720 million on cigars 
in 1993. The spokesman said the turn- 
around has been hdped by Cigar Aficio- 
nado, a glossy quarteriy devoted to pre- 
mium cigars. The fad 'may be fueled by 
its popularity among celebrities. In addi- 
tion to long-time smokers like George 
Bums and Bill Cosby, a younger crop of 
cigar enthusiasts includes Sylvester Stal- 
lone, Patrick Swayze, Johnny Depp and 
Matt DifloTL Anti-smoking activists are 
not amused. “Smoking is harmful*” said 
a spokesman for the American Heart 
Association. 


Continued from Page 1 
accept painful revisions to an 
internationally brokered peace 
plan that Washington has said 
was the final deal for Bosnia. 
Bosnia’s Muslims have accept- 
ed the plan, while the Serbs 
have rejected it 
Mr. Carter’s visit, expected to 
end Tuesday, unfolds against a 


nado, a glossyquarteriy devoted to pre- backdrop of an international 
aaa P*f ~ mium cigars. The fad may be fueled by community increasingly ex- 
en teds jj. oonulaiitY amona celebrities. In addi- hausted bv the 32-montn war 


“Avoid 


Giving a magazine subscription for 
Christmas? The Washington Post ad- 
vises: “Avoid gift ’subscriptions. They 
may save you a few bucks* but next year, 
you’ll receive the renewal notice, and 
find yourself in an awkward spot” In- 
stead, *^ust buy the latest issue and, 
before wrapping it* send in one of the 


normal subscription cards in the recipi- 
ent’s name, enclosing your own check." 
Keep in mind that “a wrapped maga- 


The California Way of life: The State 
Farm Insurance agent in Newhall, Cali- 
fornia, is appropriately named Jim 
Posthumus, the Los Angeles Times re- 
ports. . . . The Times likewise notes that 
Hankook Elementary School, a Korean 
e duc a tional institution in Los Angeles, is 
appropriately situated in the Hancock 
Park area. . . . Wolcott’s stationery store 

rising^*^ Percent Off on AB. 1994 Calen- 
dars.” 

International Herald Tribune. 


BATTLE* SO Years Later , Remembering the Bitter fighting at Bastogne 


hausted by the 32-montn war 
and its inability to stop it. Some 
250,000 people have died; more 
than l million have been 
hounded from their homes. In 
addition, the war has strained 
the North Atlantic Treaty Or- 
ganization alliance and threat- 
ened relations- between the 
United States and Russia. 

The UN went in to settle the 
conflict but now stumbles from 
crisis to crisis and is routinely 
brought to its knees by the bd- 
Kgensnce of the Bosnian Serbs 
and its unwillingness to get 
tough with them. 

US. officials said Sunday 
that within the space of several 
hours Saturday their instruc- 
tions on how to handle Mr. Car- 
ter’s visit changed from passive 
cooperation to active support 
— a sign that same agreement 
was readied with Mr. Cuter 
during meetings in the United 
States. 

“Somebody is throwing dice 



RUSSIA: 

Troops Advance 


(^oiitj^edEroBi.F^e 1 

the same: “The reoognitkm tbat 
the Chechen republic is an mte- 


Bon and that aU unlawful 
anned forces should be tfa*. 
armed.” Mr. Dudayev’s latest 
telegram evidently promised 

nothing more thm talks. • . 

By only spccity®8 Mr. Jjn- 
dayey’s participation* m the 
document, ratha - than his sig- 
nature, Mr. Ydtsin appeared to 
be offering the Ghechax leader 
afonno ffigleaf-l^.Piidw, 
as Chechan president, nfight 
object to signing^th towtr- 
ranking Russian offioa b. 
kdai Yegorov, ML Yrdten fs 
representative for .Ch origty a, 


and Sergei Stepashin, director 
of the Federal CCTintcrimdk. 


Continued from Page 1 

land. Germany in six weeks of 
fighting lost 120,000 soldiers, 
some 1,600 aircraft and virtual- 
ly all remaining armored re- 
serves. Four months after the 
Bulge, Hitler was dead and the 
Third Reich had surrendered. 

Over the weekend, it was a 
time for contemplation and 
commemoration where 50 years 
ago there was only death and 
misery. Several hundred Ameri- 
can veterans returned to Bas- 
togne on Friday for a memorial 
service and a parade. On Satur- 
day, they honored the fallen at 
the U.S. military cemetery in 
Hamm, Luxembourg. 

“We will be worthy of your 
sacrifice,” General George A 


Joulwan, NATO’s supreme 
commander, told them during a 
sleet-spattered ceremony on a 
hill overlooking Bastogne. “We 
will not forget you. You have 
given Europe 50 Christmases in 
peace." 

And for 50 Christmases the 
men who came back here far 
the weekend have been thinking 
about what happened. 

A German attack through the 
Ardennes was Hitler’s brain- 
storm, bora of desperation and 
opposed by his senior military 
commanders, who correctly 
recognized that the loss of 3.8 
million soldiers in five years of 
fighting had rendered Germany 
too feeble to sustain a major 
offensive. 


But as the Allies on the west- 
on front paused to regroup af- 
ter their sweeping breakout 
from Normandy in July 1944, 
Hitler hoped to slice between 
the British in the north and the 
Americans in the south. If Ger- 
man forces could seize the key 
port at Antwerp* pinning; the 
British against the North Sea in 
a second Dunkirk, the western 
Allies might consider a separate 
peace. 

The offensive opened at 5:30 
AAL on Dec. 16, 1944, with an 
artillery barrage. Approximate- 
ly a quarter milli on attackers 
flung themselves against 80,000 
defenders. German comman- 
dos infiltrated behind the lines 


Belle Croix to disrupt commu- in the Write House, and we’re 
nications «p- 


tured. But 33 English-speaking said. “We can’t see what good — 

saboteurs, driving captured can come of this- . 

PLANES: Safety k Complicated 

and srrwmff name. victor of the mis sion would be 


HecK* Mua/Aiewx Tiance-Prew 

A Chechen voftmteer standing guard on Sunday in Grozny. 


and sowing panic. 


Atrocities became common- 
place. On Dec. 17, a German SS 
uni t machine-gunned 72 cap- 
tured American soldiers in Mal- 


Mr. Karadzic, whom the U.S. 
government has sought to iso- 
late since Ids forces rejected the 
latest peace plan, in August By 


medy. A dozen who escaped, hid luring a former president, Mr. 
in a cafe; the SS then set fire to Karadzic would gamer great 


the budding and shot those who diplomatic mileage as wdl as an 
emerRcdTrive days later, lust- unparalleled level of mterna- 


with checkered results. Most of tin Gilbert 


emerged, rive days later, lust- 
ing for revenge, U.S. troops 
shot and killed 21 Germans 
fi wring a burning bouse under a 
Red Cross flag at Chenogne, 
according to the historian Mar- 


the paratroops dropped near 


Within 30 hours, troops from 
the 6th Panzer Army were at Sl 
V ith. The 5 th Panzer Army, at- 


unparaHded level of interna- 
tional recognition, they said. 

“Is this the way we make for- 
eign pdlicy?” one official asked. 
“By letting a man all of ns call a 
war c riminal call up a former 
president and try to cot some 
type of deal? It’s both crazy and 
dangerous.” The State Depart- 
ment has alleged that Mr. Kar- 


SAUDIS: Discontent Over Royal Family and Economy 

.. , diers from the 106th Infantry day by Hans SIlajdnc, Bosnia s 


Continued from Page 1 

speeches remain in wide circu- 
lation — part of a clandestine 
media camp aign that the gov- 
ernment is powerless to stop. 

“They’re oblivious,” a well- 
known Saudi intellectual said of 
the ruling family he still claims 
to support. “King Fahd is like 

IN CTO naming -while- Rome 

burns. Even some of the princes 
are upset. It’s bad. The situa- 
tion is very critical.” 

Saudi leaders acknowledge 
the sour public mood but assert 
that once the country adjusts to 
living within its means, the 
grumbling will fade. 

“We have been spoiled for 20 
years," said a member of the 
royal family who spoke on con- 
dition of anonymity. 

Officials assert that doom- 
sayers fixated on the country’s 
current cash crisis have ignored 
the economy’s underlying 
strengths, which include a quar- 
ter or more of the world's 


at a reported 20 percent a year. 

By the standards of most de- 
veloped countries, the govern- 
ment stm spends lavishly on so- 
cial programs, providing its 
population with free health care 
and education, including sti- 
pends for university students of 
$226 to $266 a month: engi- 


splashed a royal family member Division, a mass surrender sec- pnme mmisier, wno met mt. 
during a rare rainstorm last ond only to Bataan in American Carter m Zagreb, Croatia, 
year, he was forced under threat history Sixteen new German “We hope that his visit is ex- 
of police involvement to make a fo e first jet aircraft actly to underline the fact that 

formal apology. The prince was attach mission ever, hit railroad they cannot hope to once again 
10 years okL targets in the Ardennes and a undermine the peace plan," he 

Middle-class disenchantment baU-bearing factory in Liege on said. , 


prime minis ter, who met Mr. 
Carter in Zagreb, Croatia. 

“We hope that his visit is ex- 


of the Federal Gwnttriniidli. 
gp nee Service, are in Mozdqli; 
waiting. 

But Mr. Dudayev’s problem 
may be that in theproud culture 
of Chechnya, his agreement 
would be perceived as capitula- 
tion on the issue of indepen- 
dence, winch he has vowed to 
die defending. . ■_ . 

Still, Mr. Yeltsin- would be 
very relieved not to have id sead 
troops into Grozny, a city cf 
400,000 people, where Chechen 
fighters have had lime to pre- 
pare bunkers, booby trapsaad 
. redoubts. Nor does he want to 
have up to 40,000 troops staad- 

: ing around* targets for anyone 

withari^tiiroughootaRiis- 
d on Sunday in Grozny, sian winter. There have ktady 

been scaiie spectacular cases cf 
"" dissent ana insubordination 
among army officers who are 

flnmnlicated not trained for pofice actions . 
KjOTMpw****** ^ who do ^ mt te ; 

resource management 

Opinion polls show that most 
now, in annual training Russians do not f awr the seral- 
yns at Northwest Airlines, m| i of troops mto Chechnya, hi 
raunple, pilots and co-pi- Parliament, Mr. Yeltsin s ao- 
wviSeStkpedastheyhan- turns have been sharply cofa- 
imulatedoises, and later o zed by liberal democrats and 
discuss with a trainer how Communists, t ho u gh he ha s 
they worked together to found support from the extreme 
ve the problem. nationalist V ladimir V. Zhmn- 

dr rmkng ia pmt of a from 

der areaof studyin avia- economist Sons Q. F*odon». 

safetv that focuses on hu- Former Prime Minister Ye- 


pit resource management 

were installed and pilots were gg noWj fo annual training 
trained to handle the problem. sessions at Northwest Airlines, 
Before 1987* wind shear was example, pilots and co-pi- 
considered a cause m about two ^ are videotaped as theyhan- 
aeddents a year. dl c simulated crises, and later 

“We’ve taken care of the easy fogy discuss with a trainer how 
ones,” said Clinton V. Osier, an we j] fogy worked together to 
Indiana University professor reso i vc th c problem. 

tnfotfog is part of a 
broader areaof studyin avia- 
the causes of tion that focuses on hu- 

a JS’V-SLfSSLS man factors — not only what 
cra sh es have become mcreas- ,,r 4 , \ ' . 

ingly less obvious, leading safe- wrong and 

ty experts to analyze accidents trammgjtechno^OT 

mtOT^chains of events. If the pro^ures^onld be mo<^ 
likelihood that each link in such 
a chain can be reduced, they denfs occurring again, 
say the chance of - an acrident Of course, each improvement 
will drop significantly. carries a price* and airlines have 

To reduce one such risk, air- long been under financial prra- 
lines are trying to improve the sure; UB. airlines lost $12.8 bil- 


resolve the problem. 

Such training is part of a 
broader area of study in avia- 
tion safety that focuses cm hu- 


man factors — not only what goerT. Gaidar seal a tdegram to 
went wrong and why, but also Mr. Yeltsin on Sunday urging 


whether training, technology or him not to escalate military ac- 
procedures should be modified tivity. 


to reduce the risk of an acci- 
dent's occurring again. 

Of course, each improvement 
carries a price* and airlines have 


10 years old. 

Middle-class disenchantment 


way pilots communicate in the lion in the last four ycars. 


has played into the hands of the- Dec. 24. The spearhead of the 


government’s fundamentalist 


neaang students get the higher ^ critics, who accuse Saudi lead- 
figure. Gasoline, heavily subsi- era of . betraying the Mamie 
aired, costs 21 cents a gallon. 


era of betraying the Mamie 
principles on which the country 


But the economic pain is reaL was founded. Uncharacteristi- 
With the decline in oil prices, » paionahsuc regime 


per capita income has plunged 
from $17,000 in 1981 to $6,975 


Tales of royal 

high-handedness 

abound. 


fighting. Hitler refused. Mean- 
while. General Eisenhower had t-i a 

SSu^at^rdS JvUKJtiA: U.S. Pilot Killed in Dooming of Helicopter 


in 1993 in constant dollars, ac- 
cording to Western economists. 

Public services are deteriorat- 
ing, and taxes, once unthink- 


known oil reserves and a highly t able here, are in the wind. 


developed infrastructure. 

That view is shared by West- 
ern governments, which take a 
hard-eyed view of Saudi Ara- 
bia’s importance as an ofl sup- 
plier and consumer of cars, 
planes and advanced weaponry 
— as well as a supporter at the 
Middle East peace process. 

“The present system is good 
for us," a Western diplomat 
said. “What we want is a stable 
country and a good market. 
And it's a pro-Western country. 
I would imagine that any 
change would be bad” 

Saudi Arabia hardly looks 
like a country in economic dis- 
tress. 

In the coastal city of Jiddah* 
families crowd the Train Lake 
amusement park, where men sit 


Up to 25 percent of recent 
college graduates are unem- 
ployed. “I was looking for four 
years," said Mahadi Amro, 24, 
now enrolled in a job-training 
prog ram at the Jiddah Chamber 


that traditionally has preferred ^ reding that 

® erSUaa0I> . re * ,re SS I h forces were overstretched, 
gmcmmait has cracked ctom wanted collect his wins 

m sMfgt'JSiTS 

*?«» -2*jP 

Rights Watch/Middle East. _ met with Generals Patton 
The campaign intensified in Bradley at Verdun on Dec 
September, when police arrest- lay opportunity, 

ed two prominent religious fo e supreme commander 
lead era, Safar HawaH and Sal- dered General Patton to nu 
man Audeb, both of whran al- sbsap Ieft ^ ^fo his 
ready had been stripped of their y ^ hit Marshal 
academic posts and ordered to Rundstedt in the flanks f 
stop speaking in public. Fol- fog ^fo. 
lowing Mr. Andeh’s arrest, dis- M General Patton whe 
adents claimed that more than his divisions around, U.S. 
1,000 of his followers had also - m fo e Ardennes stiff- 

been rounded up, forcing the enci The 99th Division, having 
government into a rare public been in the line only a me 
admission of internal unrest, foueht with savaee tens 


targets in the Ardennes and a undermine the peace plan," he cockpit; flight crews have been 
ball-bearing factory in Lieae cm found to be the primary cause 

Dec 24 r The soemhead the Mr- Sflajdzic and President in almost 75 percent of jel 
^ piS^TSi fom Alija Izetbegovic of Bosnia, crashes smce l959 says Boeing 
miles rtf the Meuse River 60 who met Mr. Carter ux Saraje- Historically, the decisions 
miles dre^intoSSt Md been vo, also voiced concerns Sat and the actions of a captain 
Allied temtorv the Bosnian Serbs were using piloting a jet were not ques- 

, the viot as a ploy to distract tioned by a co-phoL But as 
The German commander, a ft en t| on from tire the north- more accidents occurred that 
Held Marshal Gera von Rund- ^watero Bihac pocket, where could have been prevented if 
stedt, recognizing that his Serbian troops were reported to crew members had checked 
forces were overstretched, advancing on the Muslim- each other’s work and commu- 


cockpit; flight crews have been While aviation officials gen- 


In Grozny, Sergei Kovalev, 
head of the Rnssian^ govern- 
ment’s human-rights commis- 
sion, also sent a telegram to Mr. 
Yeltsin urging him ^*to go ah the 
way to find a negotiated settle- 
ment" and “avoid further casu- 
alties.” 


found to be the primarv cause erally do not oppose any mea- 
in almost 75 percent - of jet sures that will improve safety, 


crashes since 1959, savs Boeing, they also note that safety is a 
Historically, the decisions .matter of relative nsks and 


and the actions of a captai n tr ade-offs in a system that is 
piloting a jet were not ques^ already very safe. 


wanted to colleta his winnings Bosnian Army’s 5th Corps, 
and withdraw after a week of 


each other’s work and commu- 
nicated more, the study of cock- 


“If the public absolutely de- 
mands that flying be totally 
safe,” said Stuart Matthews, 
p rerid ent of the Flight Safety 
Foundation, “you are going to 
have to ban flying.” 


Continued from Page 1 


make a SatoKfcty for a two-day visit to 


Amw md hit Ntajhal von Amoghts and praytn 

Rundstodc in tbc flanks from m SSflies of bolhS 

“■^eral Patton wheeled aviators " ^ 


The UJS. position has been to 
admit that the army pilots en- 
tered North Korean airspace, 
presumably because of a navi- 
gational error. 

“This U.S. helicopter is on 
the ground in North Korea, so 
there’s no question these guys 
went where they were not sup- 
posed to go," a UJS. official 
said. “We don’t know why they 
did, or why the plane went 


in lacquered wooden booths prises — including the importa- 
puffing on water pipes while tion of satellite dishes, which 

■ ■ V .1 _ __ _ — — — .1 _ a — - t Till — ■ n r>Tl 1 1 n rll alTfwwhT Imhvi 


children maneuver electric technicall y are illegal here. 


boats in an artificial lagoon. 
Gaudy new villas sprout from 


Gaudy new v illas sprout from texiy or royaiprivueges, such as 
the desert north of town, while the separate ‘royal te rminal '’ at 
at A1 Basateen Mail, teenage the Jiddah airport and the na- 


girls in head scarves and shape- tional airline’s “royal services 
less black robes ogle the latest division. 


fashions from Benetton. Tales of royal high-handed- 

ln the capital, Riyadh, the ness abound. A Saudi banker 


new showroom, where a manag- erf their first-class seats on the 
cr reports sales of 37 cars in the national airline to make room 


last month alone. Electricity for a prince. An expatriate re- 
consumption has been growing called that when his vehicle 


ogram at the Jiddah Chamber Official statements pot the ar- 
Commercc. rest figure at arotmd 150. 

Public services are starting to Although government 
fray. Delays in securing power spokesmen have dismissed the 
hookups have stalled construe- clerics and their followers as 
tion projects. Health care is suf- fringe figures, their ranks in- 
fecting, exemplified by a physi- dude a number of prominent 
dan’s complaint that there were jurists and aca dem ics, many 
no painkillers in the rural hospi- educated in the West. Some 
tal where he worked last year, have continued their anti-gov- 
As competition intensifies eminent activities in London, 
for a shrinking economic pie, under the banner of the Coin- 
businessmen gripe that some mittee for thc Defense of Legiti- 
princes use their influence to mate Rights, 
grab government contracts and While the group has been 
muscle in on successful enter- linked to extremist views on Is- 
ises — including the importa- rad, women and religious mi- 
ni of satellite dishes, which non ties, interviews with sympa- 
xhnically are illegal here. thizers inride Saudi Arabia 
Many Saudis complain bit- suggest that it is not as far out- 
rly of royal privileges, such as side the mainstream as the gerv- 
e separate ‘royal terminal" at eminent would like to think, 
e Jiddah airport and the na- “Everybody here is an Islam- 
mal airline’s “royal services" ist,” said one of them, an Amer- 
virion. ican-educated engineer. “It's 

Tales of royal high-handed- just * question of who wants to 
ss abound. A Saudi banker do something about it.” 
id an American businessman Mr. Auden, a skillful orator. 
Id how they were kicked out is often identified as the dissi- 
their first-class seats on the dents’ spiritual l e ader. Tapes of 
i tional airlin e to make roam his speeches are Still popular 
r a prince. An expatriate re- and readily available, according 
Bed tha t when his vehicle to the physician. 


.na ucuwdi rauuu "uwiw QintOU said. mere s no quesuwi incse guys 

his divisions around, U.S. __ c ™ . . c - r went where they were not sup- 

troops in the Ardennes stiff- ■ UJS. UnHaals Seek Lange posed to go,” a UJS. official 
enedL The 99th Division, having T. R. Reid of The Washington said. “We don’t know why they 
been in the line only a month. Post reported from Seoul : did, or why the plane went 

fought with savage tenacity U.S. military offidals said down." 
along ELsenbora Ridge. The they still did not know what An American military offi- 
101si Airborne, rushed to Bas- happened to the OH-58 hdi- rial in Seoul said: “It looks 
togne when the offensive began copter that went down north of most like these guys got con- 
and wearing white Belgian bed- the D emili tarized Zone around 
sheets for camouflage; was sur- 11 AJvL Saturday. North Ko- 

rounded in a pocket barely five rea’s state-run radio origin afly rp a yDC a i 
miles in diametw. Asked to sur- said the helicopter had been I f \ \ OpBHUi 

render on Dec. 22, the besieged shot down “with a single shot,” ■* 

U.S. commander. Brigadier but has not repeated the asser- Continued from Page I 
General Anthony T. McAuliffe, tion. with the spending cuts, then as 

famously replied, “Nuts!" The officials said talks on the we pass the tax proposal, all ol 


fused. Maybe there was too 
much snow up there to see the 
usual landmarks. 

“Anyway, the basic rule for 
chopper pilots is. If you’re lost, 
land That way, you can check 
out your landmarks, figure out 
where you are. And if these 
guys followed that procedure, 
foey aU of a sudden found 
themselves in a North Korean 
town.” 

The helicopter was on a stan- 
dard reconnaissance flight 


along the border, American of- Terek River, but Chechen offi- 


firiris said. 


cials denied any such attacks. 


TAXES: Spending Cuts Come First, Republicans Vow 


Asked to elaborate, the Ameri- issue were hampered because 

mTn Ia 1.aI1 >’ 1 1 I 1 I J. . 1 


cans added* “Go to bed 


nobody knows who holds the 


Still 70 miles from Antwerp, ultimate authority in North Ko- 
the German tanks began to nm rea right now. 


Continued from Page 1 ” America’s costliest provisions: 

with the spending cuts, then as a proposal to put into effect a 
we pass the tax proposal, all of “neutral cost recovery system,” 
which we intend to pass before that would change corporate 
April 15, we will spend out of tax rules to allow businesses to 
that savings account," Mr. Ar- write off a bigger share Of their 
mey said on the ABC News pro- investment m factories and 


Asked about the proposal, 
Mr. Archer said, “We may have 
to trim that in such a way that 
when we get the official scor- 
ing” from the Joint Committee 
on Taxation — the bipartisan 
panel that es tima tes the revenue 


out of fueL On Dec. 23, thick More than five months have gram “This Week With David equipment in the later years of effects oflegislation — “that we 

rlniirle and Inw-lvino fnv that nacml einw ihv natinm'c o>lf. RrinlrWi ” tkiu* i:r_ i;.» •» n 


clouds and low-lying fog that passed since the nation’s self- 
had draped the Ardennes for a styled “Great Leader,” Kim n 

^V.c; TCI - J J f n 1* 1 n , . _ 


Many Saudis complain bit- 
terly of royal privileges, such as 


week finally lifted. Hundreds of 
American fighters and bombers 


died. But no successor as 
of state has been named. 


Brinkley.” 

Democratic lawmakers dis- 


those investments' life. 

But Clinton adminis tration 


missed Republican assurances officials have attacked the pro- 
that they would match cuts in vision as a giant revenue loser 


swarmed over the German for- The dictator’s son, Kim Jong D, taxes and in spending. 


matrons. 


had seemed to be heir-apparent. 


over the longer term. According 


The fighting would drag on but Pyongyang-watchers be- 
for weeks before the original lieve he may not be healthy 


“The Republicans have yet to to an estimate issued by the 
come forward with cuts they’re Treasury Department last 


’s largest Mercedes and an American businessman 
ip has just opened a told how they were kicked out 


battle lines were finally re- enough to take power, 
stored. Sl Vith was not recap- The last similar incident 


going to need to make this con- week, the neutral cost recovery 
tract work," said the House system would result in a net loss 


tured until Jan. 23. But the Got- curred in 1977, when the North 
mam bad shot their bolt A shot down a U.S. Army Chi- 


new American offensive was nook helicopter, killing three of 
launched Jan. 29, one that four cr ewmen. In that case, the 


Democratic leader, Richard A. 
Gephardt of Missouri, on ABC. 
Mr. Archer, acknowled ging 


in government revenues of 
$169.5 billion. 

Republicans claim the mea- 


would carry the liberators bodies of the dead and the sur- 
across Germany and into vivor were released through 


that bringing the budget mto sure will stimulate investment, 
balance would not be easy, said boost the growth rate of the 


Czechoslovakia. 


Panmuujon two days later. 


that Republicans might have to economy by one percentage 
accept some limits cm one of the point or more and generate 2 7 

wwtllul aF ika FI . . IIIUL. Jli: . .1 ■ i 


est of the Contract With million additional jobs. 


can live with it” 

Republicans insist that thc 
current government accounting 
conventions understate the ex- 
tent to which tax cuts spur eco- 
nomic growth and should be 
replaced with more “dynamic” 
forms of measurement 
The Republicans promised to 
work with President Bill Clin- 
ton, who proposed tax cuts of 
his own Friday, in rolling back 
the size of government — al- 
though they stopped short of 
endorsing the specifics of the 
“middle-class bill of rights” Mr. 
Clin ton unveiled. 


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Rflriier on Sunday, there wav 
scattered fighting around Groz- 
ny and near the border with 
Ingushetia. Just after midnight 
Sunday, morning* Russian 
planes dropped bcBmbs on Shah 

airport and used heavy artillery 

and rockets to Mt Chechen ar- 
mored columns and ammuni- 
tion depots on the southeastern 
edge of Grozny, Russian offi- 
cials said." 

During the day, die offidals 
said, dose to the village of As- 
sinskaya, near the Ingush bor- 
der to the west, “a large detach- 
ment” of Chechen fighters 
equipped with tanks, artillery 
and multiple-rocket launchers, 
attacked a regiment of Russian 
troops. “In a retaliatory strike,” 
the government press office 
claimed, “the grouping was de- 
stroyed." 

Mr. Yegorov’s spokesman 
also reported air strikes and ar- 
tillery barrages against Che- 
chen command posts in the 
eastern suburbs of Grozny and 
against five bridges over the 


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Bulgarians Backing 
Former Communists 

Po/fe Give Them 42% of Vote, 
But Coalition May Be Needed 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1994 


Page 5 


\ 1. 
v : ."- 


- r "r.^-v 
■ ^ 


Aeittn 

P-s-sis 

a 3 Ss,-ss 

Estimates from five pollsters 
gave the Socialists between 42 

percent and 44 Percent of the 

vote and the Union of Demo- 
cratic Forces between 23 Der- 
cent and 26 percent. 

Three or four smaller parties 
were expected to exceed the 4 
percent hmit needed for seats 
leaving the future shape of Par- 
liament unclear. 

According to some forecasts, 
the Socialists would be able to 
form a government on their 
own while others indicated that 
they would only be able to rule 
m a coalition. 

Osman Oktai from the main- 
ly ethnic Turkish Movement for 
Rights and Freedoms that held 
the balance of power in the pre- 
vious Parliament but now fa- 
vors the Democrats, cast doubt 
on the results but said a Social- 
ist lead had been expected. 

He said that he hoped that 
the Socialists would not be able 
to form a majority in Parlia- 
ment. “I think that the demo- 
cratic forces together will have 
fflore." said Mr. Oktai, deputy 
president of the party. 

The Turkish Movement was 
one of the three parties with an 
estimated showing at or above 
the 4 percent mark. The others 
are the anti-Communist Peo- 

S le’s Union and the Bulgarian 
usiness Block. 

“Our preliminary results 
show that the Bulgarian Social- 


ist Party has about 44 percent 
ofthe vote, while the Union of 
Democratic Forces has more 
rcan 24 percent,” said Miroslav 
Sevlievski, secretary of the Bui- t 

M nan Association for Fair ‘ !&* ' 
ec cions and Civil Rights. ‘ '' 

Four other pollsters. Citi- £/!■??' 
zens Initiative for Free and 
P®nocratic Elections, Gallup Cf 
international. Sova 5 and 
MBMD gave s imilar fo recast s w 
The two main blocs, which *. 
have had turns at the helm over f ’■ 
the past five years, accuse each . £ 
other of blocking market re- 
form and allowing street-corner -M 

racketeers and big-time Mafia 
gangs to flourish. 

A few hours after polling • 
booths opened, the central elec- 
Loral commission issued a 
warning to voters not to use 
fake or old ballot papers after it 
was discovered that party activ- 
ists had been handing them out. *'#?**■ 
The radio said that irregular ‘ 

ballot papers had emerged “in 
many places" but the commis- 
sion said there were no major Ctxj;/ ' 
infringements of the law. 

Voting was brisk and there ij&pr. 
was Some op timism. 

“This time 1 dropped my bal- JpT * 
lot in the box full of hope, much $*,-"■ 
more than in 1991 because this jjgjf ■ 
rime things have readied the |J\ • 
edge when we will either disap- 
pear or survive,” said Elena Do- . 
dova, 35, in Sofia. • 

But interim prime minister 
Reneta Indzhova was cynical. ■£’: 

“I see a tremendous gap be- % 

tween the interests of the people 

and that which politicians are '■'■■■ ' ■ 

doing for them,” she said as she 

voted in a suburb of the capital. Preside! 


■Sjft 


2 m- 


m. 



Q&A: Estonia and the EU 

Looking for Stability and the Middle Ground 




President Zhdyn Zhelev leaving a voting booth in Sofia on Sunday. 


Zhffco Angelov/ Rcoten 


German Police Break Up Rightist Bonfire Before It Is Lighted 


Foreign Minister Juri Luik 
of Estonia began negotiations 
last week to give his country 
and the two other Baltic states 
the same prospect of European 
Union membership as such 
countries as Poland and Hun- 
gary. He spoke with Tom 
Buerkle of the International 
Herald Tribune. 

Q. What is the response of 
Russia about your prospec- 
tive EU membership, and in 
particular, have you given 
any commitments not to seek 
membership in the Western 
European Union, the EU’s 
security arm? 

A. We haven’t given any 
commitments whatsoever, 
and I do not see any reasons 
why EU membership should 
be contrary to die desires of 
Russia. 

As the Russian foreign 
minister [Andrei V. Kozyrev] 
has pointed out on many oc- 
casions, EU membership of 
the neighboring states of Rus- 
sia would create stability and 
increase trade and economic 
activities in general in the re- 
gion, so Russia is certainly 
one of the countries that 
should benefit very actively 
from that kind of coopera- 
tion. 

Q. Do you think WEU and 
North Atlantic Treaty mem- 
bership will come sometime 
after the economic member- 
ship in the European Union? 

A. It's one of the possibili- 
ties. We don’t use the term 
NATO expansion because we 
think the word expansion it- 
self is completely wrong. 

We’re not talking about ex- 
pansion. NATO as such is not 
vay interested in expanding 
to the East. 

We are talking about the 
decisions of sovereign gov- 
ernments to seek their securi- 


nership for Peace and the 
hard line President Boris N. 
Y els tin has taken toward 
NATO enlargement? 

A. Our relationship with 
Russia has always been rather 
volatile, from better to worse 
and worse to better. So we are 


f Onr 

relationship with 
Russia has 
always been rather 
volatile, from 
better to worse 
and worse to 
better. So we are 
not very 
surprised at 
sndden changes. 
They are probably 
connected to the 
internal political 
situation in 
Russia. 9 


The Associated Press 

BERLIN — Rightist extremists from 
across Germany converged cm a small 
Bavarian town for a winter solstice bon- 
fire, but the police broke up the holiday 
gathering before the fire was set, au- 
thorities said Sunday. 

The police action in Maizling, north 
. of Munich, on Saturday evening came as 
>a newsmagazine reported that the Interi- 
or Ministry plans to ban four more neo- 
Nazi groups. 

Last-minute information led police to 


a tavern in Marzling where the roughly 
160 rightists had gathered under the 
guise of a record company Christmas 
party, authorities said. 


federal authorities plan to add to their Reuters reported from Bonn on Sunday, 

list of banned neo-Nazi organizations quoting the police. 

the German Nationalists; Assistance a woman and two children suffered 


guise of a record company Christmas the German Nationalists; Assistance A woman and two children suffered 
party, authorities said. Oiganization for National Political Pris- slight injuries from inhaling smoke, but 

The police were thus able to prevent oners and their Relatives; Direct Ao- the other nine residents were unharmed, 
the extremists from moving to a clearing tion-Central Germany, and the Nation- The fire was in the town of Rosenthal, 
in the woods where logs had been al Democratic Party’s Youth between the Dutch border and the city 
stacked 3 meters high for a bonfire. No Organization. Q f Monster. 

arrests were made, and the police did The Interior Ministry refused to com- .. . , . , , 

not make public any names. moil on the report. Thcpo tomd they hwi no suspects. 

^ m a •. cV-n, . n * Refugees seeking political asylum in 

Gatherings by members of banned ■ Arsonists save at Hostel mm hnm « nn >«4« of ar - 

neo-Nazi groups are illegal in Germany. Arsonists set fire to a German hostel 
Der Spiegel reported, meanwhile, that for refugees from former Yugoslavia, 


rgamzauon. of Monster. 

The Interior Ministry refused to com- .. ... . . 

cm on the report. _ pobamd dx» had no suspects. 

a : . oL_-l . o _ i Refugees seeking political asylum m 

Arsonists Strike at Hostel Germany have often been targets of ar- 

Arsonists set fire to a German hostel son attacks other violence by neo- 
r refugees from former Yugoslavia, Nazis. . . 


ty arrangements. 

1 think it’s clear that coun- 
tries who have more common 
values, more common ideas 
and economic links seek clos- 
er relations than others. 

Europe is too big to have it 
all connected to one organi- 
zation, as the CSCE has prov- 
en. 


Q. Is there a greater degree 
of concern in Estonia today 
about developments in Rus- 
sia after the rejection of Part- 


not very surprised at these 
sudden changes. 

They are probably con- 
nected to the internal politi- 
cal situation in Russia. 

I think Mr. Kozyrev will 
eventually sign the Partner- 
ship for Peace program. The 
simple reason is that Russia 
wants to be part of the orga- 
nization where something is 
decided, and where Europe’s 
future is designed. 

I think Mr. Kozyrev can- 
not afford to leave himself 
out of the Partnership pro- 
gram. 

Q. What’s the state of the 
economy now in your coun- 
try? How prepared is Estonia 
to accept the rigors of Eu- 
rope’s single market? 

A. Well, 1 think Estonia is a 
rather unique country be- 
cause we have picked a radi- 
cal way to economic growth 
and to economic success, in 
terms of maintaining a stable 
currency and a balanced bud- 
get, which is very difficult in 
these times when the state is 
growing and is having its re- 


birth and everything from the 
, } army to the pensioners needs 
! money. 

The predicted growth of 
the Estonian economy this 
year is 4 percent Inflation is 
down. Unemployment is low. 
We are proceeding in a good 
manner. 

■ And of course it’s Impor- 
tant to say also that Estonia is 
one of the few countries in 
Europe, perhaps one of the 
few countries in the world, 
that does not exercise trade 
barriers. 

• 

Q. What's the vision of the 
European Union you would 
like to join? 

A. I think all Central Euro- 
pean countries are interested 
tn some kind of middle 
ground. 

From one side it's clear 
that the larger organization 
we are talking of where Cen- 
tral European countries are 
members cannot be a federal- 
ist state. 

At the same time, we value 
very greatly a common for- 
eign and security policy and 
are determined to find a con- 
sensus on the most difficult 
issues here, and also the com- 
mon financial and economic 
policy. 

Q. What kind of role 
should Estonia and the other 
Eastern countries have in the 
EU’s 1996 review conference 
to prepare itself for vour 
membership? 

A. It’s very important that 
the association countries be 
actively involved in the prep- 
aration of the intergovern- 
mental conference docu- 
ments. 

The document which the 
Essen summit has asked the 
commission to work out — 
the financial and practical 
implications of the enlarge- 
ment — we should be very 
careful with this document 
because it’s easy to prove fi- 
nancially that the enlarge- 
ment is not profitable, that 
the enlargement is too com- 
plicated. 

We should keep in mind 
the wider goal. The advan- 
tages of stability, avoiding 
cold wars and hot conflicts, 
increasing the wealthy mar- 
kets in the East — perhaps it’s 
very hard even to count them 
in tiie methods we use at the 
moment. 


Agents Credit Fake Bank’s Role in Sting 


By Michael Janofsky 

Nev York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — Federal authorities 
say that a fake bank they created in the 
Caribbean crippled major money-launder- 
ing schemes used by the Cali drug cartel of 
Colombia and organized crime groups in 
Italy. 

As the first financial institution ever 
created and operated by federal agencies 
in a c riminal investigation, the bank pro- 
duced what the American and Italian au- 
thorities said was the strongest evidence 
yet of direct financial links between the 
cartel and Italian groups that distributed 
its drugs. 

The ploy allowed the authorities to seize 
almost $40 milli on in cash as well as paint- 
ings by Picasso and Rubens. 

So far. more than 90 people have been 
arrested. 

The two-year investigation was begun 
by the Drug Enforcement Administration 
and ul timat ely involved the Internal Reve- 
nue Service, the FBI and law-enforcement 
agencies in four states and four other 
countries. The bank operated for six 
months as the final stage of the investiga- 
tion and was closed down this month, to 
avert suspicion. ... 

Thomas Constantine, the admin i s trator 

of the agency, said Friday that the suspects 

arrested included 60 Americans and Pas- 
quale Locatdli, an Italian who was de- 
scribed as the head of a major c rim i n al 


organization operating across Europe and 
Canada 

Mr. Locatelli, who escaped from a 
French jail by helicopter in a wild shoot- 
out five years ago, was captured three 
months ago in Spain. 

More arrests are expected. Mr. Constan- 
tine said. 

For the last several years, law enforce- 
ment agencies have been piecing together 
the relationship between the cartel and 
organized crime in Italy. 

Officials involved in (he latest investiga- 
tion, Operation Dinero, said they had do- 
cumented the cartel’s transactions with 
two Italian crime groups after they created 
a private bank licensed on Anguilla, a 
British territory in the Caribbean, in an 
effort to attract drug traffickers to convert 
their assets. 

The bank, which was actually run out of 
the drug agency’s Atlanta office, enabled 
authorities in the United States. France, 
Italy, Canada and Spain, to identify not 
only traffickers in Colombia but people 
the traffickers used around the world to 
broker their deals, collect their money and 
deliver their products. 

In addition to the arrests, Mr. Constan- 
tine said, the authorities seized nine tons of 
cocaine and $52 million in assets, includ- 
ing $39 milli on in cash and three paintings 
that a trafficker had instructed bank “offi- 
cials” to sell for a minimum of $10 milium. 

The paintings, which were confiscated 


Wednesday night at Miami International 
Airport after a courier brought them from 
Colombia, included a 1904 watercoior, 
“Head of the Beggar,” by Picasso from his 
blue period; a painting of St. Paul by 
Rubens, and a portrait by the English 
artist Sir Joshua Reynolds. 

“We are most proud of the fact we could 
probe the underground economy of drug 
traffickers,” said William Malamey, a 
drug agent who worked on the operation. 
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rooms and see what was happening with 
their financial transactions. They have 
spent years establishing corporations and 
boilerplates to protect their wealth from its 
true source, narcotics trafficking.” 

The idea to create a bank to attract 
profits from drag dealers came from a 
casual conversation with an informer sev- 
eral years ago, Mr. Malarney said. By that 
time, American undercover agents had be- 


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MONDAY. DECEMBER 19, 1994 

OPINION 


£«** 


Herat!) 


INTERNATIONAL 



eriblUtC Humanitarian Dilemma: 


Are Leaving the Ca 




PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YOU TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


Turkish Predicament 


It is the right of the elected government 
of Turkey to spend the country’s re- 
sources and put at risk its cohesion, de- 
mocracy and reputation in battle against 
a «nfl» armed minority Kurdish separat- 
ist movement But to the American gov- 
ernment and other friends of Turkey, it 
becomes a matter of great political and 
strategic worry to see a friendly, demo- 
cratic and allied country, already strained 
by other cares, further exhausting itself in 
struggle with the Kurds. 

The latest episode is sobering. For 
what most Western democracies regard 
as political offenses, a government, which 


has <% > d cd authority on this broad issue to 
a nationalistic unli t 


„ litaiy, arrested eight 

members of Parliament on charges of 

S nd abetting the illegal terrorist 
force known as the PKK. Al- 
reasoD charges carrying a death 
penalty were dropped, the eight were 
convicted and sentenced to prison for up 
to 15 years. The authorities proceeded 
despite public protests from Turkey’s 
closest foreign friends, despite the coun- 
try’s internal uneasiness and internation- 
al isolation and despite possible delay in 
its access to the European customs union. 

Of course, it is easy for Turkey’s friends, 
from the comfort of their distance from its 
agony, to issue advice about the appeal of 


a political solution — regional autonomy 
for the Kurds, cultural privileges in lan- 
guage and education mid so on. The Turk- 
ish authorities, often feeling misunder- 
stood gnd pat upon, set that advice 
against the imperatives of sovereignty 
and against the revulsion generated by a 
guerrilla force that, competent observers 
suggest, is even more brutal (although not 
nearly so numerous and powerful) as the 
army that opposes it 

Yet unwelcome as the message must 
be, it is the right message. Prime Minis- 
ter Tansu Colei's struggling government 
in Ankara* badly needs to work its way 
back to the search for conciliation that 
was being conducted by President Tur- 
gut Ozal at the time of his death only 
two years ago. 

No one should underestimate the polit- 
ical and operational traps of a strategy 
meant to pry the more moderate civilian 
Kurds, like those just convicted, from 
guerrillas wedded to extremism in means 
and end. But neither should anyone un- 
derestimate the damage that an unre- 
lieved hard line will do to Turkey — and 
to the great interest that anxious Ameri- 
cans and others have in the stability and 
good sense of a major regional partner 
and friend in trouble. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Republicans and Korea 


Senator Frank Murkowskd has come 
back from North Korea a convert Before 
his trip to Pyongyang, he seemed ready to 
block the necessary funding for the pain- 
fully constructed deal under which North 
Korea agreed to freeze and then disman- 
tle its nuclear program. Now the Alaska 
Republican, who will head the Senate 
subcommittee on East Asia, says that 
meeting the North's needs could lead to a 
nuclear-free Korea. 

That is a welcome change. Mr. Mur- 
kowski and his fellow Republicans have 
made a sport of questioning the adminis- 
tration’s nuclear diplomacy with North 
Korea. He and friends apparently be- 
lieved that by showing skepticism now, 
they would wind up on the high ground if 
Pyongyang ever reneged on the deaL 

Shortsightedly, even dangerously, some 
Republicans still want to deny the money 
necessary to underwrite the arrangement. 
That would make the Republican Party 
responsible not only for sabotaging the 
agreement but also for antagonizing two 
allies, Japan and South Korea, who favor 
a deal. It could even mean that, come 
1997, a Republican president would con- 
front a risk of war in Korea. Mr. Mur- 
kowskj is prudently walking the party 
back off that treacherous perch. 

Under the agreement, Japan and Sooth 
Korea will bear almost all the costs. The 
United States, however, is obliged to sup- 
ply the North with heavy oil for its electri- 
cal generators, securely store the North’s 
spent nuclear fuel, which contains five 
bombs’ worth of plutonium, and ready it 
for eventual removal. The Clinton admin- 
istration intends to take S5.5 million from 
Pentagon funds to pay for the oft, but it 
will have to ask Congress for up to S10 
million for storing and eventually remov- 
ing the fuel rods. That is a pittance to pay 
far an agreement that would remove a 
major threat to the world's safety. 


Why have the Republicans been so 
resistant, partisanship aside? The United 
States, they claim, is conceding a lot be- 
fore getting anything in return. Not so. 
The Nozthnad to freeze its program first 
— refrain from refueling its reactor, stop 
reprocessing spent fuel and halt construc- 
tion of two new reactors — all of which it 
has done, according to international in- 
spectors. The United States agreed to 
supply fuel oil and move toward diplo- 
matic recognition only after Pyongyang 
had taken those steps. 

The Republicans also complain that 
the deal sets a bad precedent for Iran and 
other states that want nuclear arms. 


Again, not so. If Iran were willing to go 

: Nuclear 


beyond its obligations under the 
Nonproliferation Treaty, by accepting 
comparably intrusive inspections and a 
verifiable ban on reprocessing, a deal 
with it might be worthwhile, too. 

The Republicans raise tougher ques- 
tions, to which even they have no ready 
answers. Could North Korea expel the 
international inspectors and resume its nu- 
clear program? Yes. Does that mean the 
United States is still relying on good faith 
as it did in the past? In a sense, yes, but 
with one big difference: The North now 
knows it has a lot to lose by reneging. 
Shouldn’t special inspections of the nucle- 
ar waste sites take place now rather than 
later? Yes, but the North refused. 

The Republican Party says it would 
have held out for a better deal — without 
quite saying how it would have gotten 
one. In private, some Republicans con- 
cede that insisting on special inspections 
sooner might have led to confrontation 
instead of an immediate nuclear freeze. 
That freeze represents c triumph for Bill 
Clinton- At this point, congressional Re- 
publicans should stop sowing doubts in 
the larger interest of global safety 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Too Much Plutonium 


As part of its effort to halt the spread 
of nuclear arms, the United States has 
stopped producing plutonium for mili- 
tary purposes and is seeking a world- 
wide cutoff of the military production of 
nuclear material. Yet vastly more pluto- 
nium is generated as spent nuclear fuel 
in civilian power plants. Some of it is 
being reprocessed for use as fuel for 
commercial reactors, when in fact low- 
enriched uranium will do. Plutonium 
can be used in bombs; its reprocessing 
needs to be curtailed. 

Washington can begin that effort now. 
It is renegotiating a 1958 agreement with 
Euratom, the European Union’s atomic 
energy agency, which is due to expire at 
the end of next year. Under that arrange- 
ment, U.S. companies have supplied Die. 
Europeans with low-enriched ur anium 
for use in their power plants. Yet Wash- 
ington has repeatedly waived its own re- 
quirements that prohibit the spent fuel 
generated from that u ranium from being 
reprocessed into plutonium and shipped 
to others without U.S. approval. 

In renegotiating the agreement, the 
United States is legally bound to insist on 
its right to consent to any reprocessing or 
retransfer. Washington is, in fact, pre- 
pared to grant that consent in advance for 
the life of the agreement It should do so, 
however, only on the understanding that 
power plants truly need the plutonium and 
will not stockpile iL Otherwise, plutonium 


should remain in the form of spent fuel, 
which is not readily usable far bombs. 

Britain and France are resisting a UJS. 
right of consent. They are reprocessing 
the spent fuel for sale to Japanese and 
German plants. The contracts were nego- 
tiated long ago in anticipation of a 
shortage of nuclear fuel. But the world is 
now awash in low-enriched uranium, 
which cannot be used in bombs. The 
United States, by reserving its right of' 
consent, can try to keep hazardous plu- 
tonium from piling up. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Comment 


Force Isn’t the Answer 


Boris Yeltsin cannot be blamed for 
wanting to avoid a showdown with the 
army. But he can be blamed for not being 
prepared to risk one, if the army is wrong. 
And wrong it is, if indeed it is trying to 
hold the federation together against the 
wishes of the people of its constituent 
parts. That is not to say that the Che- 
chens have behaved well or wisely in their 
bid to break free, [f they wish to divorce 
in haste, they can repent at leisure. For 
Mr. Yeltsin the important lesson is to 
understand that democracies cannot be 
glued together by force. 

— The Economist {London). 



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_>ARIS — Doctors Without Borders, the 
I French^ ounded organization that has 
helped relieve misery in war-wrecked 
places for well ova a generation, has de- 
cided to leave Rwandan refugee camps. It 
was an agonizing decision, a ay of anguish 
to call attention to the cynical abuse of 
charitable aid that has made “hostages of 
tbe refugees and impotent accomplices of 
the humanitarian organizations,” grid the 
group’s monthly journal. 

Its president, Philippe Bibcraon, urges 
public reflection on “the sense of humani- 
tarian aid." It is an insistent question in 


By Flora Lewis 


on a fuU stomach tomorrow.’ 


many places, not least in Bosnia, where 
generous intentions have beed made to 
hdp prolong and magnify the hyrnan dis- 
tress that they woe meant to ease. lives 
are saved, but is it only to advance evQ 
purposes, to sustain fear and hatred and 


raiise the powers made it work, but it has 
not solved anything further. 

Large forces were sent into Somalia, a 
state whose decomposition brought famine, 
disease and massacre. Parts of the country 
are said to be feeding their people again, as 
the result of intervention. But anew report 
from the capital, Mogadishu, quotes one 

resident as saying: “It is as if nobody came. 

It cost hfllions, and we see nothing for it” 
When word began pouring oat of “ethr 
nic cleansing” used as a weapon and a goal 
in Bosnia's war, the lucid UN high oom- 
missioner for refugees, Sadako Ogata, 
asked in honor. “What are we to do? If we 

ethnic dcaxLsmg. If we don’t, we are ac- 
complice to murder.” 


the "wars that they are used to 
lea of 


Dte new idea of the “right of humanitar- 
ian interference” was launched by France 
at the United Nations after the Gulf Wax, 
to protect the Kurds of northern Iraq with- 

tllA t-rastifinnanv lunMm/M 


out the traditi 
of tbe state invoiv 


It worked there, be- 


eften at grave risk to their personnel, 
they couldn't protect themselves and their 
supplies from extortion and attack. 

The United Nations sent in forces, now 
23,000 in Bosnia, to protect the delivery of 
humnnimrinn goods and services and then 
to protect declared “safe havens.” It is a 
manomer to can them ‘peac eke epers*’: 
«hwt is not their mission- Although they 
have suffered nearly 70 killed and hun- 


dreds wounded, they succeed only in get- 
ting convoys and airlifts through, and 
shdhng of cities interrupted, when the at- 
tackers acquiesce for their own economic, 

oMh* 

“humiliation’’ when they are not allowed 
to break barricades or return fire, even to 
reast being held hostage. Aid has been 
distributed, Sarqevo survives. But the war 
goes on. “We are kept alive to me on a fuu 
stomach tomorrow” is the disillusioned 
complaint about what “protection means. 

Billions of dollars have been spent in the 
past few years on alleviating humanitarian 
emergencies so that better-off parts o f the 
woriacaufed they are showing a modrcam 
of compassion. It is eating into the capaci- 
ty to provide promised aid for longer-torn, 
more fundamental programs to alleviate 
such needs. The UN Development Pro- 
gram’s administrator reports that emergen- 
cies, which consumed 25 percent of UN 
resources in 1988, took 45 percent in. 1992. 

The president of Doctors Without Bor- 
ders focuses only on the camps for Rwan- 
dans in ins appeal for a dearer, more hon- 
est, more willful international assessment of 
how to prevent tbe perversion of humanit ar- 
ian actum. He says the aid to camps on the 
Zaire side of the border contributes to 
“delivering the refugees tied hand and tool 
to Iredgnt who are determined to continue 


their fight to tbe end against cmUans by 

minder 


fects and admwwe. 

aad onposition. Hutu m Rwanda .«Hkr 

natedfflpplie, l “W 

amounts, using violence and titratypa- 
PU farces for an offenaye m Rwmda. 
'ivTKbHSon knows that Ins group’s dc- 
mmdaiion and withdrawal wiB not remedy 
mrattre “But contributing to thmearcBing 
fof dvffians by force] with silence copies 

humamtarian weak of its sense. . Tfced&an-. 
W he says, “was not to go « to kave,_ bm 

to leave usefully in hopes of being heard.” 

He should be heard, and not only about 
Rwanda. It is hard to refuse be^> . to victims 
who sorely need it because perceentoisand 
aggressors turn it to tfadr own ends. Bui h 
istoo easv to say that responsibility ends 
with generosity and good intentions. - . 

This is a dilemma that is likdy paly to 
increase as turbulence spreads in - the 
world, and as instant communications 
rn flirp it impossible to pretend to ignore 
great human disasters in distant places. It 
is a reminder that we have not done very 

well in giving peace and human decengr a 

and that turning away m indiffer- 
ence still won’t give us a chanc e to forget 
toFlomLwis. 


/:■ 


. ■ y 

.1 




■>v •• 

*■ v 


?■ 


.j*V ■ 


• V 
i 


H umanit arian Agencies Attempt Too Much and Achieve Too Little 


I ONDON — Since the end of 
/ the Cold War the roles of 
international relief organizations 
have undergone far-reaching 
changes. Their mandates are far 
wider. Africa has been the main 
te sting ground, but die humani- 
tarian international is worldwide. 

Nongovernmental organiza- 
tions (NGOs) are struggling to 
find new roles in Bosnia, Cambo- 
dia, Haiti and Iraq. 

The most dramatic manifesta- 
tion of these new roles is the call 
for international mititaiy inter- 
vention. Five years ago it would 
have been unthinkable for a hu- 
manitarian agency to for in- 
ternational troops to intervene. 
Now it is almost commonplace. 

NGO personnel argue that 
they are faced with a new phe- 
nomenon: long-lasting “complex 
emergencies” caused by war. 
They applaud the new 1 
of the United Nations to 
gard national sovereignty in pur- 
suit Of h iimartiuirian 

Western donors’ strategic and 
commercial interest in poor coun- 
tries is declining. Their chief con- 
cern is increasingly to avoid bad 
publicity at home from humani- 
tarian crises once these reach tbe 
television screen. Channeling re- 
lief funds through NGOs rather 
than through host governments is 
attractive — h is high-profile, 
flexible and short-term, with Httie 
provision for accountability. 

Western disengagement and 
the recent big increase in NGO 
relief operations funded by 
Western governments are two 
sides of the same coin. 

Meanwhile, many governments 
— particularly in Africa — no 
longer exercise the same central- 
ized authority as before; some 
states have even ceased to have 
a recognized government They 
cannot resist the invasion of the 
humanitarians. 

International relief agencies 
are not only far larger and more 
influential than before, they have 
expanded their mandate. 

In countries like Mozambique 
and Cambodia, they may be the 
chief providers of public welfare, 
and among the main sources cf 
salaried employment and com- 
mercial contracting. Even more 


significantly, they act as news 
agencies and diplomats. They 
speak boldly on political issues, 
setting the international a genda 

In short, relief agencies are ex- 
panding into a veld left by the 
shrinking power of host govern- 
ments and the declining political 
interest of Western powers. 

Somalia was a testing ground 
for NGOs* readiness to accom- 
modate violence. It was the first 
Hhh» that many agencies hired 
armed guards. NGOs tolerated 
diversion and extortion and end- 
ed up paying hundreds of thou- 
sands of dollars to factional lead- 
ers such as General Mohammed 
Farrah Aidid. This played a criti- 
cal role in enabling them to mam- 
tain their miKtrag 

The ftnlnre tyF h imumifarianicm 

to fill a political vacuum was dear 


By Alex de Waal and Rakiya Oxnaar 

m Somalia. It has also been evi- agencies or tbe search for justice? 
dent in Bosnia — a turning point Up to now the question has b een 
in the worldwide development of 


hinnanirariftniwi. Failings famil- 
iar to Africans cann ot be hidden 

in a country so dose to the heart 
erf Europe and with an articulate 
educated that ha* access to 
international media. 

African voices critical of the 
hnrnHnitarifln interna tional have 


rarely been heard. Bosnian voices 
are ha 


larder to silence. The sheer 
incompetence and waste in tbe 
international relief effort have 
been exposed to alL 
One set of humanitarian agen- 
cies negotiates with war criminals 
to allow food convoys to roll 
while another set threatens to 
bring these same people to court. 

Which should prevail: the “op- 
erational neutrality” of relief 


fudged. This is not just a failure 
of the United Nations Security 
Councal The humanitarians have 
not made up their minds, either. 

Hie dilemmas in Rwanda are 
stark. The refugee Dows out of the 
country were not the familiar un- 
planned flight of ci vilians caught 
up in a war. To a large extent they 
were a planned exodus under the 
political direction of those re- 
sponsible for the massacre of per- 
haps a million people, to seek 
sanctuary from where they could 
regroup and attack Rwanda again. 
Among die refugees were die prin- 
cipal killer s, wefi armed and well 
organized. This has been one of 
the most flagrant abuses of inter- 
national relief in modem times. 

The extremists who had 


How Somalia Became a Media-NGO Circus 


mounted the genocide knew Chat 
they could rdy on the interna- 
tional relief community to re- 
spond with material assistance, 
and that there would be fewif any 
efforts to isolate them from the 
mass of the population. They ere- - 
axed a humanitarian disaster that 
killed thousands of people, and 
then extorted assistance man re- 
lief agencies which they used to 
constmdaie their power. . 

The debade of humanitarian- 
ism abused in the refugee camps 
for Rwandans is a striking exam- 
ple of the dangers of humauitar- 
iwnism unbound. Relief a ffinrif* 
walked straight into the trap, and 
have ended up feeding a kflfing 
nMfhiiw Again, hunumitarian- 
ism cannot ml a political void. 

There is a pressing need for an 
honest debate on whether inter- 
national homanitariaman has 
reached its limits. It is no longer 
’enough for the relief agencies to 
take the moral high ground and 


maintain that they did all they 
tough 


JN POLITICAL emergencies in 


the 1990s, the enlarged man- 
date of operational NGOs in- 
cludes primary or even exclusive 
responsibility for the delivery of 
services such as relief or health 
care; human rights; conflict reso- 
lution; publicity, lobbying and 
advocacy. Increasingly, NGOs’ 
operations can be characterized 
as “multi-mandate," comb inin g 
elements of all the above. 

The components of the en- 
larged mandate may sometimes 
be in serious coofiicL 
□ 

During 1991 and early 1992, 
Somalia was abandoned by the 
international community, save a 
handful of NGOs. These came to 
exercise an extraordinarily pow- 
erful role in lobbying and advoca- 
cy. They were able to monopolize 
almost the entire media coverage 
of Somalia, and to dictate tbe 
terms erf the international debate 
on the country. 

Every journalist who visited So- 
malia stayed with an NGO and 


This occurred partly because of 
the collapse of the Somali govern- 
ment and partly because of inter- 
national disengagement from So- 
malia — tbe diplomats and UN 
personnel simply ran away. The 
international NGOs whiedi re- 
mained played a vital role as the 
sole expression of international 
solidarity with the Somali people. 

This position gave them enor- 
mous responsibilities, which for 
the most pan they exercised wdL 
But that was fortuitous. With 
slightly different people, in slight- 
ly different circumstances late in 
1 992, NGOs in Somalia were often 
wildly irresponsible: At tbe end of 
the year, ft was the NGOs — spe- 
cifically senior officials of CARE 
— that played the key role in call- 
ing for Operation Restore Hope. 

By August 1992, much of So- 
malia had become a mcdia-NGO 


circus, with reporters competing 
other to u 


quoted largely from NGO staff. 
They 


used relief aircraft to fly in 
and out, and NGO satellite com- 
munications to file their stories. 


with one another to uncover the 
most horrific stories of starva- 
tion, while NGOs felt compelled 
to compete in their responses. 

The failure of humanitarianism 
to fill a political vacuum is more 
evident ux Somalia than possibly 
anywhere else. 


Old Rascals Out — New Rascals In 


N EW YORK —Out go the 
old rascals, in come the 
new. Out with the earnest liber- 
al rascals who talked you to 
death about tbe complexities of 
everything, and now we have 
Professor Newt Gingrich and 
his Congress of car salesmen. 
This is going to be good. 

For weeks the victors have 
treated themselves to a satisfy- 
ing public gloat. They repeated 
their favorite applause lines from 
the c am paign — Mr. Gingrich is 
practically a ddicted to his line 
about 15-year-olds killing each 
other and l&-year-olds getting 
diplomas they can’t read — and 
they cranked up the Republican 


By Garrison Keillor 


Every satirist there ever 
was kaswcOched this 
parade go tooting past. 


fog machine and presented their 
tiny majority as a tidal change 
in the history of ideas. 

But then, out of the mists. 


dim figures emerged, and lo and 
behold, it is 


the same old gang 
of fraternity boys, geezers in 
golf pants, cheese merchants, 
cat stranglers, corporate shills, 
Bible beaters, swamp develop- 
ers, amateur cops ami old gas- 
bags that we have known since 
time immemorial 

It is about as revolutionary as 
if the American colonists had 
overthrown the British and in- 
vited in the Spaniards. 

Down from the attic now 
comes the Republicans’ collec- 
tion of dotty uncles, led by Sen- 
ator Jesse Helms, the new chair- 
man of Foreign Relations, an 
old woofer whose view of the 
world is dim indeed, and Sena- 


tor Strom Thurmond, the oldest 
man in political captivity. 

Mr. Thurmond does about as 
wefl as most 92-years-olds, I sup- 
pose, but he is an eerie right 
around the capitol definitely not 
the sort of active inquiring mind 
you’d hope to find chairing the 
Armed Services Committee. 

When you look at the Senate 
leadership, you see one man af- 
ter another whom any sensible 
Republican would want to keep 
off television. 

Their best spokesman, Sena- 
tor Alan Simpson, they un- 
horsed, leaving them with Bob 
Dole, a sour man representing 
the very sort of permanent in- 
cumbency that the voters are 
to have rejected, 
tor Dole gave an inter- 
view on election night, in which 
he said something lhal startled 
me — he said, “Government 
does some things welL” 

You haven’t heard a Republi- 
can say that in a long time, just 
as you’ve never heard a Repub- 
lican speak compassionately 
about the hardship of having 
very tittle money, but if the Re- 
publicans intend to run the 
Congress, they have to train 
themselves to say these things. 

It is (me thing to run for office 
on the idea that poverty is 
caused by public assistance and 
that the poor would thrive if we 
just stopped helping them, but 
when you take power, you have 
to face reality. 

Congressman Gingrich has a 
hard time with reality. On the 
eve of becoming speaker, he is 
still trying to sound tike a Tom 
Clancy novel — announcing that 
Cotin Powell ought to be dis- 


patched to tell tbe Bosnian 
Serbs: “If you launch a general 
offensive — we would reserve tbe 
right to lake you apart, and we 
would doit in three to five days." 

This is supposed to be a new 
era in politics? This is a reincar- 
nation of William McKinley’s 
America. Suddenly a museum 
stirs and the statues start talk- 
ing, and we are back in the Gild- 
ed Age, among portly men who 
regard great wealth as tbe surest 
sign of Divine Grace and who 
amuse themselves by railing 
against the poor and calling for 
more prisons. 

Thomas Nast, Mark Twain, 
H.L. Mencken, Sinclair Lewis 
— every satirist there ever was 
has watched this same parade 
go tooting past 

How they all would have 
loved Newt Gingrich’s solemn 
announcement after election 
day: “We have to simply, calm- 
ly, methodically reassert Amer- 
ican civilization.” 

This is a remarkable tine. Cer- 
tainly Newt Gingrich did not 
rise to his position through per- 
sonal modesty, but it is afflatus 
of a high order to claim to repre- 
sent American civilization. 

But once again, the rabid 
ideologues are loose, and they 
want to tell us, from Washing- 
ton, who is and who is not a real 
American — what is and what is 
not genuine in our culture. 

It isn’t the prerogative of 
Congress to decide what Ameri- 
can civilization is. Congress has 
all it can do just to pass laws 
and apportion money. The vot- 
ers didn’t buy a civi lizati on 
from Newt Gingrich, they only 
bought a car, and even before 
we put the key in the ignition, it 
is emitting rancid gases. 

The New York Tunes. 


At the end of the day, relief 
organizations will always make 
charitable works their priority, 
which means tha t human rights 
concerns will be fudged or jetti- 
soned. In the short term, some 
people may be fed or treated as a 
result — an outcome not to be 
despised. But fins is at tbe cost of 
addressing more fundamental po- 
litical and h uman rights concerns. 
D 

In the long term, more people 
will remain alive under more tol- 
erable conditions if humanitarian 
relief is provided in a way consis- 
tent with basic human rights. 

Relief organizations must find 
their new role: The first step is to 
open up the debate. Rwanda is a 
good place to start. It is essential 
to learn the lessons of the debacle 
of the response to Rwanda. 

□ 

Tbe relief failures in Bosnia 
show how the problem is world- 
wide: The United Nations and 
most of the established NGOs 
operating in Bosnia have recreat- 
ed donor-recipient relationships 
familiar to those who have wit- 
nessed their operations in Africa. 

Rather than seeing the Bosnian 
people as the essential resource to 
be mobilized in pursuit of solu- 
tions to political and humanitar- 
ian problems, the organizations 
have presented themselves as 
controlling authorities, for whom 
the Bosnians are either passive 
recipients of largesse or trouble- 
some obstacles to the smooth op- 
eration of the international effort. 

The skilled human resources of 
Bosnia have been neglected. As 
with Africans over many years, 
the Bosnians have found tins sur- 
prising and humiliating. 

□ 

Fortunately, humanitarian 
work attracts many people who 
are courageous and compassion- 
ate. Enough of them can recognize 
what is happening and act to pre- 
vent the destruction of humanitar- 
ianism from wi thin and without 


could. One tough question is: 
Should relief organizations con- 
tinue to operate in political emer- 
gencies such as chtil war? And if 
so, under what preconditions? 

Another question: Should f£, 
lief agencies aim at operational 
neutrality? True neutrality is dif- 
ficult and costly to achieve — as 
the International Committee of 
the Red Cross knows all too welL 
Its reputation has taken more 
than a centmy to achieve, and 


relief jjg giaeg do not have this 
degree of patience or discretion. 

There wflTaftvays be room for 
opportunism, and ad hoc NGOs 

— such as arc present in Bosnia 

— can certainly achieve tangible 
results: But tins approach cannot 


be adopted as a principle. 
NGOs mi 


must consider the possi- 
bility of undertaking relief work 
on the baas of solidarity with 
victims. This also has its costs and 
dangers. Solidarity with the vic- 
tims of injustice, based upon tbe 
principle of justice, is a hard road. 
Relief would come to be seen as 
subversive, as true community 
development often is, and there- 
fore unattractive to donors. Re- 
lief programs would become ex- 
plicitly political on the side of the 
poor and vulnerable. 

Will many of the established 
NGOs be prepared to take this 
path? K is unlikely, given their 
depe ndence on donor funds, tol- 
erance by host governments and 
factional leaders, and favorable 


But there are dangers in follow- 
ing the present road of humani- 
tananism unbound The humani- 
tarians will not resolve disasters 
such as Somalia, Bosnia and 
Rwanda — and may make them 
worse. And Western governments 
are having second thoughts, af- 
ter picking up the bill in Somalia 
and contemplating the impasse 
in Bosnia. There are no easy so- 
lutions. But the first step in 
searching for a solution is to ac- 
knowledge the problem. 


These edited excerpts are from 
“ Humanitarianism Unbound , " a 
discussion paper distributed by 
African Rights. 


The writers are co-directors of 
the London-based organization 
African Rights. They contributed 
this comment to the International 
Herald Tribune 


RS OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1894: Stevenson Dead 


AUCKLAND — The following 
details have been brought from 
Samoa regarding the death of Mr. 
R. L. Stevenson on Dec. 3. Two 
hours before the end came Mr. 
Stevenson said to his wife: “I 
have a strange pain in my head" 
He had scarcely uttered these 
words when he fell back insensi- 
ble. He never recovered con- 
sciousness. The cause of death 
was sudden paralysis of the 
brain, accompanied by collapse 
of tbe lungs. Mr. Stevenson, who 
leaves three unfinis hed works, 


fti ig ft. The Esthonians are stand- 
-ri? a? their frontier cl aims . 
Tne Premier has made an appeal 

ij Government not to 
T*™* the British Fleet from 
the Gulf of Finland, as the ships 
provide r safeguard against a bd- 
shevist invasion. 


1944: Russian Ameri ka 


— [From our New 
York edition:} “Amerika," a new 
magazine in the Russian lan - 
£uage, designed to acquaint the 
Sowet people with the United 
° n , sale today [Dec. 


had suffered for some time past JjK Produced by the American, 
from brain exhaustion. He was Office of War Information, th# 


haunted by the fear that his pop- 
ularity was waning. 


1919: Estonian Flea 


PARIS — According to des- 
patches, the Estonian conference 
with the bolsbevisis is in a critical 


first issue is a sixty-four page 
publication with a color cover 
showing the United States flag 
and the silhouette of an Ameri- 
ran soldier peering through field 
glasses. The inside cover shows 
color picture of the 
White House. 







WHI 

MAI 

join llw 









INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1994 


% . Mandela’s Honeymoon Continues 

*»:=,- . 1 By Bill Keller *L _ 


Page 7 


BOOKS 




- ■■■ ■* 1 1, 
. r _ ' " '* i. 


" -CT. 


-V "=l* ft. * 
■ —■ i" - . 


: ; ^ 


'>0 Little 


«y Bill Keller 

Africal^S^ TEIN - So-* 

S& JSffiUSS-uS 

MandeJa^s 




£?* hi, 

minority is alienating the black 
that the nUdy have 
to show for hi eight 
nwntns m power. 

The alarms come from work- 







ah4&*jfll 


fr r ■ » —vuwui wore- 

ere rnhu own party, from union 


union 

Mrf ^ f 2? m journalists 

foLdE** 1 ?' They are rein- 
£»? b y a few small but sensa- 
tional protests — squatters oc- 
cupying a Johannesburg 
JEff 1 ™ 1 ?°mplex, jobless 
blMks stonnmg a Pepsi plant. 
As Mr. Mandela’s party, the 
National Congress, 
gathered here over the the 
weekend f or its first national 
conference since assuming 
gower, the president decried 
opportunists of ail hues” who 
are pressing the government to 
gam popularity on the basis of 




' R*' 

•V .. ' 

. • 


radical-sounding but unpracti- 
cal DFODOsitinna ” 



cat propositions.” y- , 

But all this grave talk about , i. 

me frustration boiling up in u •’ 

South Afnca seems to bear no 'jBHB&V'* \ { - ' 

raation to what most black |M§E« r • • ’ t »’ ' 

South Africans actually think. iPwfc' ' , ; ?v ' 

An array of recent, nonpartisan * * ■ ••jft’ *7^3 

opuuon polls, focus groups and tVf - ~ 

interviews indicates emphati- .. .'■!•• ■':« 

cally that on the streets of South ' 

Africa, the honeymoon is no- ..• ■ 

where near over. ^ ■ ■ * 

Ordinary voters are, for the MatHwAw* 

most part, intensely loyal to Mr. Nelsoa Mandela at the ANC conference on Sunday 
Mandela and his party. Over- 
whelmingly, they say the coun- - 

try is headed in the right direc- ,, , , „ . . , , 

Uon. Their expectations are H Mandela does fail to satisfy peoples 

“y” yearamgs for a better life, 'there won’t be 

years for results. Uthey resent rebellion. They’ll jnst opt out of politics, 

Mr. Mandela's emphasis on i • j r , r . . 

reconciliation among the races, 88 man y people in the new democracies of 


ance the interests of the haves 
and have-nots, embarking on a 
huge but gradual program of 
social upliftinent without sharp 
tax increases that might alarm 
investors. But the polls suggest 
that if he does not have some 
visible success, black resent- 
ment could grow. 

Despite Mr. Mandela’s man- 
tra of nonradalism, race mat- 
ters. 

A survey sponsored by the 
Institute Cot Democracy in 
South Africa found that al- 
though race was not the main 
factor in how people cast their 
votes, most voters had a strong 
sense of their own ethnic histo- 
ry, language and culture. 

In the battle for the soul of 
the African National Congress, 
a small but vocal minority of 
intellectuals argues that the 
governing party should take a 
more Africanist line, promoting 
blacks aggressively to positions 
of power and worrying less 
about the anxieties of affluent 
whites. 

In an opening speech to dele- 
gates here, in the city where the 
ANC was founded in 1912, Mr. 
Mandela said that reassuring 
whites — and »)<r> the Indian 
and mixed-race minorities, who 
fear being victims of black ad- 
vancement — was a prerequi- 
site for the stability that would 
make prosperity possible. 

But the prevalence of whites 
in the cml service does not 


THE GUTENBERG ELE- 
GIES: The Fate of Reading 
In an Electronic Age 

By Sven Birkerts. 222 pages. 
$22.95. Faber & Faber. 


WHAT THEY'RE READING 


Reviewed by 
Jonathan Yardley 


I T is no doubt an injustice to 
the author of this thoughtful 


Nelson Mandela at the ANC conference on Sunday. 


If Mandela does fail to satisfy peoples 9 
yearnings for a better life, f there won’t be a 
rebellion. They 9 ll just opt ont of politics, 


they are showing no sign of it — 
at least, not yet. 

Indeed, some researchers say 
the devotion of the black major- 
ity to the African National 
Congress is so strong that they 
worry less about popular up- 
heaval than the opposite — that 
South Africa will become a de 
facto one-party state like many 
neighboring countries, where 
opposition parties exist but can 
be ignored. 

Steven Friedman, director of 
the Center for Policy Studies, 
which has just completed a se- 
ries of group discussions with 
black voters, said that if Mr. 
Mandela did fail to satisfy 
yearnings for a better life within 
fa few years, disappointment 
was less likely to turn into op- 
position than apathy and cyni- 
cism. 


Eastern Europe have done . 9 

Steven Friedman, 

Director of the Center for Policy Studies. 


‘There won’t be a rebellion,” 
he said. “They’ll just opt out or 
politics, as many people in the 
new democracies of Eastern Eu- 
rope have done.” 

The loudest discontent tends 
to come from the people who 
are best organized to do some- 
thing — especially union mem- 
bers, who are a minority but 
one with the power to bring this 
industrial country to a halt. 

Also, there are fundamental 
differences between whites and 
Macks on what the government 
should do. Not surprisingly, 
blacks place a much higher pri- 


ority cm creating jobs, housing 


v.: m me cmi service aoes not 

• \ seem to have become an issue 

MikeHotrfeup'Rciiim with the black electorate yet, 
i Sunday. although no researchers have 
gone out specifically looking 
forit. 

, , In the group sessions spon- 

ies sored by the Center for Policy 

rtn’t a Studies, many blacks remarked 
w u i that whites (including white po- 
litics, lice) had become more courte- 

. . ous. and had tried to learn Afri- 

icies ol can lanpuys But they also 

complained of a rigid racism 
among employers. 

The polls suggest that any 
rival party or breakaway fac- 
tion would face a formidable 

task in trying to challenge the 

African National Congress, 
•jobs, housing The polls indicate that al- 


better schools and health care though blacks are satisfied with 
for the neglected majority, and their new leaders, and 


are far more willing to have the by an increased sense of free- 
govemment raise taxes on more dom and dignity, they are far 


affluent citizens to pay for these from satisfied with their lives. 


benefits. 

More blacks than whites are 


As they have put their faith in 
the new government, many 


wilting to let education stan- South Africans have lost faith 
dards fall in order to provide in the confrontational tactics of 


equal schools now. Proporti* 
ally, twice as many whites 


ion- the struggle — violence, civil 
i as disobedience, protests. They 


blacks say that those who do call for more discipline in 
not pay for public services like schools and for an end to boy- 


water, electricity and garbage colts of utility payments, and 


removal should lose them. 


many would even support a 


Mr. Mandela has tried to bal- moratorium on strikes. 


WHICH WAY ARE THE 
MARKETS MOVING? 


Join the experts as they debate the trends 


MARCH 6-7 ■ 1995 ■ THE REGENT HOTEL ■ SINGAPORE 


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X the author of this thoughtful 
and heartfelt book to say that 
Sven Birkens would have us see 
him as a good man in a bad 
time, but there is more than a 
smidgen of truth to it. Birkerts’s 
subject is the passage of our 
culture through a “total meta- 
morphosis” in which “the stable 
hierarchies of the primed pa- 
ge ... are bong superseded 
by the rush of impulses through 
freshly minted circuits.” Tech- 
nology is in, books and reading 
are out Birkens is a book man 
to the core and thus a paradigm 
of the beleaguered ola virtues; 
as such he means to command 
our sympathies. 

Birkerts believes us to be at a 
“breaking point” at which “an 
entire system of beliefs, values 
and cultural aspirations” is 


• Robert Read, fine-arts un- 
derwriter at Hiscox Underwrit- 
ing Ltd. in London, is reading 
“ Green River Rising” by Tim 
WiBocks. 

“It is about prisons in Ameri- 
ca and it is fascinating although 
not very cheery reading.” 


(Erik Ipsen, IHT) 


II 


ii 


tradition of the book” is “des- era tore — have on their side 
tined for imminent historical massive technological powers 


oblivion,” swept away by “the unimaginab le so recently as a 
technologies that will render it generation ago. The demanding 
antiquated.” Though Birkerts world of reading is being 


manages to find a flicker or two shoved aside in favor of the easy 
of hope for the printed word one of audio and video, and “ft 


and those who love it, in essence is in our nature” t ha t this 


what he has written here is a should happen, for we prefer 
literary cri dc coear — a lament ease to difficulty — and who, 
for literature and everything pray tell, is to blame us for that? 


implicit in it. 


about to be supplanted by 
something new and in the full 


been proclaimed repeatedly in “ impugn au waoem- 

^pSra^cXlSbe^ 1C -K* 1 * 1 * u 5cUo ? h T df : 

med^dther^by argument or by SSSSi 


something new and, in the full 
sweep of its implications, un- 
known. The “whole f amili ar 


evidence. Now, however, the l T** 

forces arrayed agamrt literature 


“My guess would be that ev- 
ery lateral attainment is pur- 
chased with a sacrifice of depth. 
The student may, through a 
[multimedia] program on 
Shakespeare, learn an immense 
• amount about Elizab e than poli- 
tics, the construction of the 
Globe Theatre, the origins of 
certain plays in the writings of 
Plutarch, the etymology of key 
terms, and so on, but will this 
dazzled student find the con- 
centration, the will, to live with 
the often blurred and prickly 
language of the plays them- 
selves? The play’s the thing — 
erature — have on their side km will it be? . . . The gurus 
massive technological powers of interaction love to say that 
unimaginab le so recently as a P*® student learns best by do- 
generation ago. The demanding but let’s not forget that 
world of reading is being reading a work is also a kind of 
shoved aside in favor of the easy doing.” 
one of audio and video, and “ft « anything Birkerts does not 
is in our nature” that this put it strongly enough. Reading 
should happen, for we prefer a far more demanding and 
ease to difficulty — and who, exacting undertaking than any- 
pray tell, is to blame us for that? new technology has to 

: . D . . offer. Reading demands that 

It is to Birkerts s credit that the imagination be pul to work; 
for the mostpan he declines to interaction and its various spin- 
cast blame. Though an academ- 0 fj s substitute visual and aural 
ic and hterary feUcyw himsdf j mages for imagined ones, 
susceptible to the cultural and Reading requires an engage- 
ideolMtcal proclivities those mem betweSi reader andtext; 


This is scarcely the first such It is to Birkerts’s credit that 
dirge; the death of literature has for *5? “WsfP" 1 ^ declines to 
rwnrfabnJt £rv*tSi J in Though an academ- 


c __u interaction, however alluring, is 

— or, to put it less negatively. Sa“e-playmg. Reading at its 

arrayed for a future without lit- ^ most demanding is, purely and 

imp acable advance of the inev- ampjy, £ pre dsely 

imnbhhmbmwmbhbm itable. why we are so eager to be done 

.pr, He is no less right to view with it. 

'bli with dismay “the kinds of de- What Birkerts properly fears 

vdopments we might watch for is “a flattened new world in 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Tmscott 


why we are so eager to be done 
with it. 

What Birkerts properly fears 
is “a flattened new world in 


A neck problem indirectly 
decided the result of the 


/A. decided the result of the 
Blue Ribbon Pair Champion- 
ship at the American League's 
Fall Nationals. The discomfort 
was Ed Cart’s, who was due to 
play with Mark Lair, but did 
not feel weD enough. His house 
guest, Alexander Weil and re- 
placed him and the new part- 
nership won the three-day event 
by more then two boards. 

Weiland won his first nation- 
al title, while Lair, an experi- 
enced professional won his 
16th. 

The winners began their 
surge in the final session, when 
Wetland gambled successfully 
on the magramed deaL He 
opened the North hand with 
one diamond and took a shot a 
six no-trump when his partner 
bid three no-trump over a weak 
jump to three clubs. He could 
reasonably expect that his part- 
ner stopped spades, and if he 
did not, there was a fair chance 
that West would lead clubs, a 
suit that he had supported. 

If West had led a made, the 
contract would have tailed by 
four tricks. But West thought 


that South was likely to have 
the spade king and led an obvi- 
ous club. Lair claimed 13 tricks 
for a top score on the deal, sug- 
gesting that a slam might have 
been easier to make than a 
game; West would probably 
have led a spade effectively 
a gains t three nn-lmwp 
At other tables, North-South 
usually bid to five diamonds, 
and East-West scored well if 
they could find a save in five 
spades, failing by at most two 
tricks. 1 

NORTH 

*97 

<7K6 

C-AKJ9B732 

*A 


as our ‘proto-electronic' era which only a small coterie traf- 
yields to an all electronic fu- lies in the' matters that used to 


ture.” He lists these as the ero- be deemed culturally central,” a 
sum of language, the I oss of world “become sanitized and 


historical memoiy and the dis- superficial.” The language may 
appearance of the private self be a trifle overwrought, but the 


into “the transparency of a life apprehension is not. The future, 
lived within a set of systems, as Mori Sahi used to say, lies 


electronic or otherwise.” He bo ahead, to which must be added, 
beves that whatever we may it doesn't look very good. 


in this new world is more 
offset by what we lose, to 


Jonathan Yardley is on the 
staff of The Washington Past 


iu«Miin>s.wri«.>dii,uw.ih 


WEST (D) 
* AQ JS4 
9 M 7 5 4 » 1 
0 — 

*65 


EAST 

* K 5 3 2 
7B 

O 10 6 

* K 10 9 « 7 4 


SOUTH *10 6 

t? A Q J 9 
OQ54 
*Q J32 

Neither side was vulnerable. The 
bidding: 

West North East South 

Pass 10 3 * 3 N.T. 

5 * 6 N.T. Pass Pass 

Pass 

West led the club six. 


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* Corporate personalisation ami <ILts-oun1- available. For iletails. Tax 

Paul Baker at (44-81) 82W • Blue nolepaper slieH- fit nil the bark 

of the diary — a simple pull removes lop slieei. U10 refill slietds inriuiW. 


Pleas 1 xemt me . 


1*1*15 IHT llarkrl Hiarir>*. 


Price iiK'luiies initisL'. |R>riinf; amt iMwlap* in Kumpr; 


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INTERNATIONAL 


19-12-94 




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Page 8 


CVTERIVATIONAL maiAlJD TRIBUNE, M ONDAY, DECEMBE R 19, 1994 

CAPITAL MARKETS ON MONDAY 


Mas* Active International Bonds 


The 250 most active International bonds traded 
through the Eurodear system for the wee* ending 
Dec. 16. Prices supplied by Telekure. 


Australian DoBar 


250 Australia 


04/15/00 802990 7.9300 


Austrian Schilling 


218 Austria FRN 


Belgian Franc 


24 5 BfftolunJ 


12/24/12 92*000 a*M0 


British Pound 


203 LBSChlCSwH 


240 Otubv EJee Pwr 


12/09/76 99.5000 8*400 
0B/10/77 91*250 7*700 


Danish Krone 


12 Danmark 7 

2d Dmtnoi* 8 

27 Danmark 6 

34 Denmark 9 

45 Danmark 9 1 * 

47 Danmark 8 

49 Denmark 9 

51 Denmark 9 

54 Denmark ?% 

63 Denmark 9 

66 Denmark 514 

106 Danmark 6U» 

149 Denmark T-bills zero 
183 Denmark 6 

229 Denmark zero 

232 Denmark zero 


12/15/04 89*500 7.9100 
85/15/03 95*800 8*600 

12/10/99 90*800 6.6600 
11/15/00 101*300 B*eOO 
08/10/95 101.4500 9.1200 
03/15/06 94*500 8*600 

11/15/96 101*500 8*400 
11/15/98 101*500 8*400 
02/10/75 100*000 9*900 
11/15/95 101*000 8*700 
0e/10/96 96*000 £4400 
02/10/97 96.9300 6*500 

07/03/95 96*965 5.W00 

02/10/96 98*000 4*900 
04/03/95 98*533 6.0200 
01/02/95 99.7907 4*400 


91 Treuhand 

93 Treutwwt 
97 Trquhond 
99 Germany 
109 Germany 
I Id Germany 
120 Germany 
122 Germany 
126 TreulWtf 
128 Treuhand 
131 Germany 
138 Germany 
155 Germany 
163 Germany 
166 Treuhand 
173 Germany 
184 Germany 
190 Germany 

194 Germany 

195 Exlm Bk Japan 
202 Germany 

206 Bundesxst 
208 Germany 

216 Britain 

217 Germany 
223 Sweden 

230 WOrld Bar* 

231 Ausaieieh. FRN 
233 World Bank 
237 Germany 


01/29/03 97-3400 7J2O0 

M/23/03 93*300 6.9500 
09/24/98 95*350 5.9000 

02/20/98 97*125 6.1600 
10/20/75 102*000 87800 
05/21/01 104*800 8*2110 
12/20/02 97*500 7*000 
08/21/00 105*100 8*600 
12/17/98 93*350 £3700 

06 /S/98 97.1900 6*000 

02 Z22/99 93*100 £7300 
10/21/02 983150 7J700 
07/20/00 106.1 B20 8*400 
05/02/03 94*000 7.1800 
01/14/99 92.9340 £3800 
02/21/00 102.1400 7*900 
05/20/97 99.7320 643M 
05/22/00 106.1733 8*400 
Q5/22/75 101*300 £6400 
12/17/03 88*000 6*800 
07/20/95 100*900 6.7100 
04/01/04 93*900 7*400 
Q2/20/97 99*600 6*200 
10/28/77 100*500 7.0900 
02/25/98 95*750 £5000 
03/08/95 98.1965 8*300 
11/10/03 887500 6-6200 
12/09/02 100*000 £375 0 
10/13/99 100*500 7*200 
01/20/00 100*271 7*300 


Spirit of 1993 Still Haunts Bonds 

1 • ~ chnrt-term debt. Issuers — o 


Japausss Yen 


98 World Bonk 
108 World Bonk 
110 World Bank 
130 World Bank 
151 Radi* Fin. Mat. 

169 Italy 

170 World Bonk 
191 ExImBk Japan 
199 INI Finance 
201 Japan Dev- Bk 
215 stab FRN 

226 OKB 

227 Italy 

228 Austria 


03/20/02 104.1250 £0400 
12/22/97 1025000 4*900 
12/20/04 100*250 47200 
83/20/03 99*500 4*300 
05/15/02 72J673 1*700 
06/20/01 93.1250 37600 
06/20/W 101.1250 4*500 
10/01/03 977500 4*800 
12/09/99 101*706 4*523 
10/01/99 103*250 4*300 
12/03/98 99*391 3.1300 
09/19/98 1085000 £9900 
07/29/03 102*250 4*900 
09/36/05 97*750 44209 


ML . ehnrt term debt. Issuets — including some 

of next year. By that time, official raies in sho^ ™ U.S. corporate —were wiffing 

By Carl Gewirtz Germany are Jkety »**J3j2* 8 three* to 

European bond they oouW save aboutM^th^^ 

PARIS — like a party gone wrong, the Surprisingly, tbe .start of oeatagp pokt comp** with the:Coa|^ 

nearly decade-long nSym bond prices has market for bonds has ;had ody borrowing domestically. .- 

ended in aa expensive mess. What is more, impact on ^ Salo- The yen accounted for a 


the mood is unKkdy to improve soon. national mareer. jw ^Tr/tbe maricet due to me wuuuuatg 

The setback, which began -when the Fed- mon Brothers Inc. dhowedLj^Maooe ^ uctanos Japanese investor to incur the 

era! RS^Board started to raise U.S. this year totaSng $427 
mterert raxes lart February, has affected all 

of the world’s 13 major domestic markets year Mr UoskY noted that the. stated total. 




Spanish P n a ta 


— cventnose,iIACkjcai«auj, mwi#wuu« r — ; — financial : ^,~, Trt vm uD pcauau, tv. usf 

interest rates have not been increased. As marked by economic slowdown, , issuana q Sj on — understated 

ZSSSLrtt rates rise, bond prices fall. market fragility. rising oflpnces and _taqs equivalent of £**“» 


132 Spain 
134 Spain 
148 Sealn 
157 Spain 
159 Spain 
174 Spain 
176 Spain 
197 Spain 
223 Spain 
238 Spain 


12/15/98 90*700 9.1300 
01/15/97 1017700 11*000 
06/15/02 94.1200 10*400 
01/15/02 96*628 114500 
08/30/98 1005000 11*900 
01/15/95 100.1250 117852 
05/30/04 807500 9.9100 
02/28/97 96*200 9*100 
08/30/03 97*296 11*300 
11/30/98 96*700 105800 


market interest rates rise, bond prica fall, market fragility, nsmgofl 
Jan G. Loeys at J. P. Morgan & Cam invasion of Kuwait- Onlv lwvwas worse. 


Jan G. Loeys at J. P. Morgan 

London calculated the capital losses, ex- warn activity otoff^ ^ ~ ■■ ^ T« heaw sales oT-atiHn. 

ciudiag interest income, inthese 13 mar- wateofthcnear-mduiowiimwoildenan. jnffltt 

ketsthat comprise the bank’s global gov- dal markets. ■ ™-*cr«irts tcnn n °J fiS . market ' 

eminent bo^Sdex as ranging from a low Sustaining this year’s W® The 

so far this year of 7,8 percent in Japan to a in floating**© .notes, winch «*&*«■* S«vmP8b' 

high of 15.9 percent ^Australia. The de- haven in a .period of rising ““J* down from 13 „ 

dmes in the United States and Germany issuance of yen-denominated paper. French franc suffered a worse 

were identical, 9 percent each. rag-rate notes have mterest rate ■** to 5 patent from » J*«“* : 

Hw average decline was 9.9 percent. In periodically reset to reflect Neither currency provided scope jor 

dollar terms, this translates into a loss of Floarin&raie notes daioimnatedmdol- arbitrage. Sterling was virlaally jtn.-. 


invasion of Kuwait. Onty 1987 was worae 
when activity dropped 20 pMBDjgJ™ 
wake rf the near-meltdown m world finan 


dal markets. 

Sustamine this year’s activity woe spurts 
ri/»riniunitp nnfes. wind! 8IK the SSffiSt 


Dutch Guilder 


Deutsche Mark 


1 Treuhand 

2 Germany 

3 Treuhand 

4 Germany 

5 Germany 
A Treuhand 
7 Treuhand 
B Germany 
9 Treuhand 

10 Germany 

11 Germany 
13 Treuhand 
U Germany 

15 Germany 

16 Treuhand 
19 Germany 
2) Treuhand 

22 Germany 

23 Trsutiand 
25 Germany 

29 Germany 

30 Germany 

31 Germany 

32 Germany 

33 Germ an y 
15 Germany 
39 Bundespost 

42 Germany 

43 Germany 

44 Germany 
50 Germany 
S3 Treuhand 

55 Treuhand 

56 Germany 

58 Germany 

59 Germany 

60 Germany 

61 Germany 

62 Germany 

64 Germany 

65 Germany 

67 Treuhand 

68 Germany 
7Q Germany 
71 Treunana 

73 Germany 

74 Germany 

75 Germany 

76 Germany 

78 Germany FRN 

79 Germany 

80 Germany 
82 Germany 
88 Germany 


09/09/04 99*800 75100 

11/11/04 100*813 7.4900 
07/01/99 96.9600 65700 
07715/04 94.9833 7.1100 

01/21/02 102*940 7*100 
OS/ 13/04 94.9200 7.1100 

11/25/99 99*033 7*500 

12/20/95 102*600 85700 
07/29/99 96*767 6.4800 
03/20/96 107.7133 82800 
09/20/01 103JB75 7.9500 
03/04/04 91*840 6*100 

10/20/00 107*267 8*900 
07/22/02 102*075 7*200 
04/29/99 94*200 6*600 
07/21/97 103*317 7.9800 
07/09/03 94.1050 7.0400 

10/20/97 1015233 7*900 
11/12/03 90L5925 6*200 

09/15/03 90*850 6*300 
07/15/03 93*300 6.9600 
02/20/96 102*900 8*000 
10/20/97 100*900 7.1900 
01/20/98 99.1388 6*800 

05/20/99 96.1300 6*700 

01/04/24 81.7680 7*400 

10/01/04 99.9700 7.7500 
09/20/96 103*400 8*300 
0T /Z2/96 102.1200 7.9600 
08/20/01 106*700 8*300 
09/22/97 102*940 7-7B00 
10/01/02 100.9075 7*800 
06/11/03 95*800 7.1900 

12/20/00 1069200 83000 
02/20/01 T04.9880 8.1000 
10/20/98 93.9214 55900 

04/22/03 95.1967 7*900 

01/20/97 103*783 8.1100 
12/22/97 100*550 £9800 
03/20/97 102*217 7*000 
08/14/98 97.7680 65200 
03/26/98 975750 6*800 
12/02/98 99.1417 £9300 
05/20/98 98*667 65000 
12/02/02 98*700 7.4600 

08/20/96 103.1950 0*400 
07/20/95 101.7700 87200 
08/20/98 95*700 60000 
01/22/96 102*500 86300 
09/30/04 98.7725 4.9000 
01/22/01 107.4700 85700 
05/02/02 1015825 7*400 
04/22/96 102*000 6*700 
06/20/16 80.8300 7.4200 


36 Netherlands 

37 Netherlands 
40 Netherlands 

-86 Netherlands 
90 Netherlands 
94 Netherlands 
107 Netherlands 
129 Netherlands 
136 Netherlands 
156 Netherlands 
162 Netherlands 
178 Netherlands 
181 Netherlands 
186 Netherlands 
236 Netherlands 
241 Netherlands 
244 Netherlands 
248 Netherlands 


10/01/04 97*600 7*500 
01/15/04 88.1000 £5300 
07/15/98 969000 6*500 

02/15/03 965000 7*500 

01/15/23 94J000 7.9200 
QS/15/00 1067000 8*300 
09/15/01 1063200 8*300 
11/15/99 100J700 7*400 
06/15/99 100*500 7*500 
04/15/96 100*000 6*900 
02/15/99 98.1500 6*800 
02/15/07 103*500 7.9700 
06/01/06 105*500 8*500 
04/15/03 93*800 6*500 
03/15/01 104*500 8.1100 
09/15/07 103*500 7.9700 
05/15/99 98*000 7*900 

02/15/00 103*500 7.9700 


SvradWt Krona 


18 UKT-note 
38 ElB 

41 France OAT 
46 France BTAN 
81 France OAT 
84 Britain 
87 UKT-note 
96 Italy 

113 Italy 

114 France BTAN 
143 France OAT 
MJ France OAT 
1S3 France OAT 
175 France OAT 
196 Finland 

198 Calsse Fse Dev. 
221 France OAT 


01/2I/V7 95.1250 5*200 
01/24/01 106*250 9*800 
04/25/04 84.1500 7.1300 

03/16/9? 88*100 £6300 
04/25/02 90*000 7*700 
02/21/01 102*750 8*700 
01/23/96 100*500 7.9400 
02/21/99 91.9000 6*000 

03/07/11 97*500 9*100 
03/16/98 977500 7*200 
04/25/00 104*500 9*600 
04/35/32 937833 8*000 
04/25/03 97*600 8.1900 
05/12/97 100*900 8*500 
02/13/07 96*000 8*500 

02/09/01 85*750 6*400 
03/15/02 99*400 8*600 


Finnish Markka 


01/15/99 104*170 10*900 


Flrencfi Ftanc 


48 France OAT SP zero 
S3 FrcnceOATSP zero 


89 France blan 
92 France DAT 
too France BTAN 
111 France OAT 
124 France BTAN 
137 France OAT 

139 France OAT 

140 France OAT 
152 France OAT 
154 France BTAN 
168 France BTAN 
200 France OAT 
204 France OAT 
210 France OAT 

219 France OAT 

220 France BTAN 
249 France OAT 


04/25/23 9*000 8*900 

10/25/19 12.4000 87500 
11/12/99 96*200 7*400 
04/25/23 100.1500 8*900 
05/12/98 100.9100 7*300 
10/25/04 91*800 7*900 
04/12/99 89.1900 £3300 
04/25/04 83*500 6*900 
T0/2S/2S 7X0000 8*200 

10/25/83 92*200 7*400 
04/25/03 102*800 8*600 
11/12/98 93*500 61500 
10/12/96 98.7000 65900 
12/26/12 101*500 8*500 
10/2S/19 100*500 8*700 
04/25/05 960300 7*100 
06/25/98 105*200 9*100 
11/12/96 102.1100 BJ200 
03/28/00 1027500 8*700 


Italian Lira 


08/01/97 93*500 9.1300 


127 Sweden 

1W4 

oi mm 

101*600 10*000 

147 

Sweden 

6 

02/07/05 

71*000 

8*000 

177 

Sweden 

11 

01/21/99 

1(00985 107700 

U.S. DoBar 

17 

Argentina FRN 

6to 

03/29/05 

711452 

9.0100 

20 

Venezuela FRN 

5% 

12/18/07 

480070 

117800 

24 

Argentina oar L 

4>A 

03/31/23 

460520 

90500 

28 

Brazil FURB 

4 

04/15/14 

530055 

7*000 

52 

Brazil 9800 FRN 

6 K. 

01/20/01 

815087 

7*000 

57 

Venezuela 

Mi 

03/31/20 

517500 

12*600 

69 

GMAC 

zero 

02/14/95 

98*800 

80000 

72 

Brazil L FRN 

6% 

04/15/12 

64*778 

10*700 

77 

Brazil El LFRN 

6 

04/15/06 

710342 

9*100 

85 

Elect Pwr Dev 

BVb 

12/07/99 

1862500 

£1000 

95 

Argentina FRN 

7W 

03/31/23 

<85080 

103400 

101 

Mexico 

6 Vi 

12/31/19 

630146 

9.7900 

102 

Poland 

3V. 

10/27/14 

470656 

67900 

103 

Venezuela 

6% 

03/31/20 

500816 

133400 

104 

Mexico 

6 ‘A 

12/31/19 

630493 

97900 

105 

Britain 

7V. 

12/09/02 

95.1250 

7*200 

112 

Poland FRN 

6 tw 

W/27/24 

75*472 

90300 

115 

Nigeria main 

5Vi 

11/15/M 

41J500 

133700 

117 

/Mexico FRN 

TU 

12/28/19 

85-5449 

8*800 

118 

Brazil par YL4 

4 

04/15/24 

<30598 

93900 

119 

Ontario Hydro 

rv. 

12/05/07 

99.0000 

70300 

121 

Brazil par YL3 

4 

04/15/24 

410109 

9*800 

123 

GMAC 

zero 

02/13/95 

97.9467 12.7700 

125 

Mexico FRN 

6 % 

12/31/19 

850197 

77900 

133 Bulgaria FRN 

6 <6 

07/28/24 

49*343 

122100 

136 

Brazil FRN 

6 ■* 

04/15/24 

6SABT2 10.1300 

141 

GMAC FRN 

6*5 

12/06/96 

99.9248 

66500 

142 

Venezuela 

7 

03/31/07 

505853 130400 

144 

Britain FRN 

5 

09/24/96 

990100 

50100 

146 

Finland 

7% 

07/28/04 

97*250 

80700 

147 Toyota Fin. 

7Vb 

10/24/97 

98.0000 

73700 

150 Sweden FRN 

6 VW 

06/01/98 

990700 

60700 

158 

SBC Fin. 

7W 

12/09/96 

99.1250 

7.1900 

160 

LKBFRN 

5% 

11/04/98 

99.3400 

£9100 

161 

World Bank 

TVf 

09/27/99 

970000 

73500 

164 

Mexico FRN 

6<W 

12/31/19 

85*014 

8.1000 

165 

Yokohama 

7% 

09/22/04 

95*000 

7.9600 

171 

Ontario 

6Vb 

06/28/00 

90*250 

67600 

179 

Mexico FRN 

677 

12/31/19 

850449 

70100 

18Q 

INI Finance 

5V. 

12/09/98 

900000 

£8300 

182 

Brazil FRN 

Mi 

04M5/09 

665419 

10.1400 

185 

Venezuela 

7 

03/31/07 

50*990 

130616 

187 

GMAC 

zero 

01/10/95 

98*312 20*700 

188 

GMAC 

zero 

01/09/95 

98*479 210100 

189 

Finland 

6% 

11/24/97 

968750 

69700 

192 

Bulgaria FRN 

6 16 

07/28/11 

450402 

133700 

193 ChoUenae FRN 

667 

12/09/97 

997300 

6*800 

205 

Ontario FRN 

59* 

06/17/99 

99*000 

50400 

207 Italy FRN 

5Vz 

06/29/98 

1000800 

5*000 

209 

Ontario 

7% 

06/22/04 

95.1250 

80200 

211 

Argentina 

1055 

11/01/99 

980500 

11.1500 

212 

BNG 

7 

03/23/99 

96*000 

73500 

213 Sweden 

zero 

03/07/95 

98*272 

50300 

214 

GMAC 

zero 

01/1 8/95 

963930 

173700 

224 

Argentina 

8 

12/20/03 

77*000 100100 

225 

Tokyo Mel. 

7ft 

10/13/04 

97.1250 

8.1100 

234 

Sweden 

zero 

(12/07/95 

98.1277 

13.1100 

23S 

World Bonk 

Si* 

03/01/01 

1000750 

B05OQ 

239 

Poland par bond 

2*4 

10/27/24 

34.9722 

70600 

242 

Unilever 

8 

12/08/99 

100*813 

7.9500 

243 

Freddie Mac 

7ft 

07/21/99 

968750 

73500 

247 

KFW 

8V4 

11/30/04 

100.1250 

83400 


dollar terms, uiu uoiuuura uiiu a iws vs & akuui^cuw '"Vauh; Ci^mo 
$500 billkm just in the government, bond lars rose 34 percent, to S 60 biflK«Q-bwnmg 


with a 7 percent market-. 


mark ets- That does not count the declines in floating-rate notes increased -3 Although its market sfcare is tiny* .the 

corporate issues or the losses in value sus- die equivalent of $11.9 billion. Australian dollar stood out for the. 114 

tamed in the interuarional capital market, mark notes, fueled by the opening ray®* Dercent increase in issues, rising ^tfce 
Mr. Loeys attributes the severity of the many of money-market funds* ““5S 7* equivalent of $7 J Whoa this year3jn>c 
setback not only to tbe start of a sustained percent, to the ramvalent otb I i.*mmon- ctfrr » nf .. v h««? h***n one of die best pejfonp- 


setback not only to tbe start of a sustained 
bear market for bonds following this year’s 
spurt in economic growth but also as a 
correction to “speculative fever of 1993” 
wheai investors drove yields to unreaHsd- 


otheMravalentof SU.3 bdhtm- ^ been one of tbe best perium- 

than S3 billion, : of ggg on the foreign exchange market— .up 
tpasses the f 13 percent agams* the dollar and M 9 

r set in the early 1980s. neraait against the marie. In additksJvMr. 

sSSSiS 

I S B S2 , sie 1 S fixfeupan is- Reflecting heavy retag Idanmd m :B&- 

ime in that sector was down only ium, the tax-free Uixembourg fraMTiwdat 
rat despite the dollar’s weak per- scored a 104 percent adv^icerW^OTis- 
v«pn to buv sues totaling the equivalent of $11.7 bffion. 


At more than $83 bfllioa, the volume or 
FRNs surpasses the previous records for 
this sector set in the early 1980s. 

In all, the dollar accounted for 39 per- 
Af tntai nr^witv. John Lfostcv? Salo- 


cally low levels in the bdkf that global cent of total activity. John 
disinflation was under way. mem's chief economist, noted that aotiar- 

With a global recovery in economic denominated transactions, down overall 
growth now ratnly in place, Mr. Loeys ruled by only 4pcrcent, at $ 165 billion, were also 


growth now firmly in place, Mr. Loeys ruled 
out any hope of a sustained rally m bond 
prices until it becomes clear that the Fed has 
finished pushing 19 rates. He said be did 
expect that to happen until the second half 


mem’s chief economist, noted that douar- 
denommated transactions, down overall 
by only 4 percent, at $165 billion, were also 
sustained by the sale of fixed-coupon is- 
sues. Volume in that sector was down only 
1 1.6 percent despite the dollar's weak per- 
formance since investors were keen to buy 


Fed Banks on a Slowdown Next Year 


Compiled by Otr Staff From Dispatches 

WASHINGTON — The 
Federal Reserve Board is sched- 
uled to meet on Tuesday to con- 
sider raising interest rates for 
the seventh time this ^ear, but 
most analysts are betting it will 
hold off from acting so soon. 

After boosting short-term 
rates sharply just last month, 
the central bank is at a cross- 
roads. It knows the economy is 
ending 1994 on a strong note, 
but it ex p ects growth to slow 
next year as the tighter credit 
begins to bite. 

As a result, the probable de- 


raising interest rates next embedded in higher inflation starts to ind ustria l production, 
month. Mr. Jones said he was expectations.'’ showed the ecaaotny coarino- 

looking for a half-percentage- Even some insiders in Presi- ing to steam a head. 
point increase in January, while drat BiB Clinton's rirdc admit- But there were also faint 
some other analysts predicted ted that higher short-term inter- signs of a posable slowdown qq 
an increase of up to a point est rates are likely next year, the horizon. In a national spr- 
‘Tbe longer the Fed holds “It’s not unreasonable to think vey, builders reported growing 


‘Tbe longer the Fed holds “It’s not unreasonable to think yey, buflders reported growing 
out. the more likely that offi- there might be further rate in- increasingly gloomy about 

• 1 *rt -V- A «Ua V* avia Viama pttlor Q 0 ernroKnA vVlAriL 


^aic win choose to hike the creases,” said one official. 
— But the official, who asked 


U.S. CREDIT MARKETS 


funds rate by more than SO ba- 
sis points,” wrote economists at 
Salomon Brothers Inc. in their 
weekly commentary. 

Alan Greenspan, the Fed 


rision at tbe Tuesday meeting chai rman, was about as clear as 
will be to delay a rate increase he ever gets in signaling that 

.■1 . 1 . . * _ r lAnr « - • T - 


not to be named, expected the 
Fed to hold off from acting this 
week as it tries to gauge the 
economic impact of the actions 
that it has already taken. 

The Fed has raised rates by a 
total of 2 5 percentage points 
since February. "This is a time 


increasingly gloomy about 
home sales as spiraling mort- 
gage interest rates continue to 
discourage prospective buyers. 

The yidd on the benchmark 
30-year Treasury bond dosed 
the week little changed, shromg 
to 7.85 percent on Friday from 
7.86 percent a week earlier. 

The return mi 10-year notes 
edged up to 7.81 percent from 


when yon want to have a deli- 7.79. Short-term mterest rates 


until after the start of 1995, higher rates are on the way in 
when the Fed will have a better Congressional testimony early 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


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FOR SALE 


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idea of how the economy per- 
formed during the crucial 
Christmas retail season. 

“They will wait a bit longer, 
wanting to take a look at 
Christmas spending and infla- 
tion as they go into the new 
year,” said David Jones, a vet- 
eran Fed watcher and chief 
economist at Wall Street firm 
Aubrey G. Lanston. 

But the delay is likely be 
short-lived. Most analysis ex- 
pect the central bank to resume 


this month. 

While insisting he did not 
know whether rates would be 
raised this week, he painted a 
picture of an economy growing 
too fast for the Fed’s liking and 
fueling inflationary pressures in 
tbe process. 


cate hand.” the official said. 

That argument is not lost on 
policymakers at die Fed, even 
the so-called anti-inflation 
hawks. They want to cod off 
tbe economy and thus extend 
the economic expansion, not 
kflliL 

“If you try to do too much 
too fast, there’s a' chance of an 


We must remain alert to overkill,” said Sung Won Sohn, 


signs of inflationary pressures,” 
he said to the Joint Economic 


chief economist at NorwesL 
So far there seems little risk 


C ommi ttee of Congress. “If of that happening. A string of 
price increases are accomnso- economic indicators released 
dated, they can become readily last week, ranging from housing 


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Tel: Eoro 66^ la 100 ** p* P ^I8S 1-40 13 02 02 or 42 21 4694 


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09. Ft* +41-1*03 54 4< 


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Interest will be Ik over 3-month Libor until 1999, when Issue Is callable at par, thereafter Vi 
over. Fees not disclosed. (Sakura Inti.) 


Sands Notes 


AT HOME IN PAWS 


nr.YjvT^avv'iVy. i: 


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59 65, Some in 


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Over 3-month Libor. Noncolloble. Fees not disclosed. Denominations 510*00. (HSBC Mar- 
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Hcralb^twSribunr 


CLIPS I 


Over 3-month Libor. Reofferad at 99.90. Average life 3* years. Also Cl 6* million paving 1.10 
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Tek (1) 45 63 25 60 


MONTAJGM; 320 SQJH. 

7 RENOVATH) ROOMS - TF3SJ300 
EMBASSY Td: 1^7 20 30 OS 


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PLANNING TO RUN A CLASSIFIED AD? Ftaad-Coupons 



IDEAL ACCOMODATION 

EGADY IO MOVE-IN 

From stuta id 5 bedrooms 
. TOP QUALITY ■ ow* cads accepted 


De Grcowt Associates 

W 1-47 53 80 13 Fax 45 51 75 77 



Mace your Ad quickly and easily, con lad your 
nearest (HT office or representative with your ted. 
You will be informed or tfte asst im medrol e fy, end 
once payment is mode your ad wffl rcpear within 
48 hours. AJ3 major Credit Girds Accepted. 


Companhla 
Brasilelrade 
Proietos e Obras 


— Semiannually. Noncolloble. Fees 1W%. (Lehman Brothers lnt’1.) 


Guadalajara Teplc 


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(C5 First Boston.) 


McDonald's 


EMPLOYMENT 


BIROPE 


NORTH AMBKA 


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INTSURBIS 

Luxury tertab & tales 
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GENERAL POSITIONS 
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^ INTERDEAN 


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EXECUTIVE SECRETARY, 5(7*, trifav 
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Fear (0W) 72 73 10 


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for 1212) 75S87B5 


Minnesota Mining 
& Manufacturing 


Reoffered ot par. Noncolloble. Fees We%. Payable in Jon. f J J*. Atargon Securities.) 


-4 ?£»4 TI 


K* ti-'" 


rose even more, with two-year- 
note yields rising to 7.56 per- 
cent from 731 percent and six- 
month Treasury bill yields 
increasing to 6 .51 percent from C. 
6.46 percent 

The sharp gains on tbe short 
end showed market concern 

with a Fed rate increase, which 

has an immediate effect on this 
sector. Long-term rates are 
more reflective of inflationary 
expectations, nod the slowing 
effects of a Fed rale rise on the 
economy axe thus beneficial. 

( Reuters, Kmgfti-Ridder) 


M TRIB 




Pakistan 

Dresdner Finance 
Argentina 


AStA/PAQFlC 


Factofl Hahi CONCORDE tAFAYETTE 


FOR A Hffi ESTIMATE CAU 

PAHS (1) 39201400 


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EDUCATIONAL 
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TeL (852) 9222-1 IBB. 
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fo: 163 224 15 66 
Telex. 28749. HT Sftt 


Deutsche Bonk 
Finance 


SI 50 
PM 300 
FF 1,000 
11X200*00 


— Semiannually. Noncaliabie. Fees 070%. (Bear Steams inn.) 

— Noncolloble Fees 2%. Payable in Jan. (Dresdner Bankj “ 

yy^~ Reoffered at 9955. Norteallable. Fees m% . FayoWe In Jan. (Societe G6nerale_l 
100*35 Noncolloble Fees l%%. Poyable In Jon. (Deutsche BankJ~ 


New South Wales 
Treasury Corp. 


New South Wales 
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Treasury Corp. of 
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BUSINESS SERVICES 


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AmsIQO 
Y20JXK) 
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TOW 101*25 
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Semiannually. Noncolloble. Fees l%%. Denominations Aussio*00. (Nomura lnt*l.) 
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United states Dec 16 Dec 9 Chpe 
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OJ UHL 1B321 179J4 +U1% 

DJ Trans. 141614 1J0CL97 +US% 

S&P10O 429 J3 4T7J9 +251% 

S & P 500 45350 44656 -1-265% 

S8.Plnd 54124 S3EL2Q +226% 

NYSE CP 25054 24417 +261% 


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DJ UHL 
DJ Trans. 
S&P100 
S&P500 
S8>P ind 
NYSE CP 
Britain 
FTSE100 
FT 30 
Japan 
Nikkei 225 
Germany 
DAX 

Hong Kong 
Hang Seng 
Work! 
MSCIP 


301360 2977.30 +12% 
2JI&10 229150 +294% 


19,16143 18,97230 +058% 


257005 ipm-n +206% 


116639 758907 +404% 


60610 60230 +063% 


Money Rates 



United States 

Dec 16 

Dec? 

Discount rate 

4% 

Ai 

Prime rate 

Bft 

BYz 

Federal funds rate 
Japan 

57/16 

5ft 

Discounl 

Hi. 

W 

Call money * 

122 

23/16 

3-montti Interbank 
Germany 

2'i 

25/16 

Lombard 

600 

600 

Cell money 

MB 

505 

3- month interbank 
Britain 

5*5 

550 

Bank base rate 

6(i. 

6'A 

Coll money 

5 '/i 

6ft 

3-tnonlh Interbank 


615/16 

Geld Dec 16 

Dec? 

dig* 

London Mu as 

P.m. tlx.S 

37450 

+ 1.10 % 


Dec U Dec? Yr MobYr toe 


WwUySalto 

Primary Marte) 


US. & tom term &39 5*1 848 621 

Ui i, mdra term 839 £10 820 5*5 

1/^.3 start farm 7.7 ? ia 779 £sg 

Pooeds sterling 9.12 9.14 9A1 626 

French fracs 754 7J4 824 £87 

Italian lire lljQ9 iijm lug 751 

Mshknna 130 822 874 0 

Swedish faooa l(L5i 1057 1123 7JW 

ECU, taw farm 804 852 804 £18 

ECU, mite term 826 823 850 SJi 

COT-S 909 9.19 9*4 638 

A0S.S 10*3 10*0 10*7 659 

N-2-S 9 22 923 9*1 559 

Yen 4*7 4*7 4* 207 

Source: Lvxmbovra Stock Exchange. 


StroKfch 

Coavert. 

FRNs 

ECP 

Total 


Swsndnry Mortal 


CB,W Eurode&r 

* S Nous 

MLBO 210*0 103130 £43370 
— 030 — 11550 

1U0 4300 801.10 1,12500 

842800 309800 909800 706878 
MW-<0 4,15300 12030*0 1354110 


Cedel Eoreticor- 
s nms s nom 

270461033*8130 2&770.T0 
FmSf 1, <KX W»-» 

12, 1MO450 13*5810 2403310 . 

iotaj 28,17130 3604300 7706400 6007040 V 
*ww.- Eurodear. CedoL 




i • >r v ‘- -r 


V' -r • r. > 


Ubor Rates 




wertd tnOes From Morgan Stantar CorOat imt 


Ui* 6tt 

Deutscbemort 5 9/16 
Pooed sfarHag 6 


faroanm 

6 13/16 French franc 
59/16 ECU 
6% Yen 


Dec 16 

1-toCBrti J enoe n t 4-mont* 

; 4 Mb 61/16 6% 

*1/16 63 nt 646 

2% 2% 5Vi 

Sources: UoyOs Bank. Revfen. 


.1 ‘L r 


» y 


'"'i ;" 1'--. , 


us 






In ternational stocks 

Taiwan Eases Toward Pact 
On Opening to Foreigners 

T * roc* Bloomberg Businas New 

to'SSS?"* 1 5“* *“ -nowd differ- 
how far in ^d Exchange Commission over 

Central BaEfChL l f k S*?? investors. The 

the maifcetas wi<ST« J ?? *“*. h ^ eD reluctant to open 
like, said it would contirW a« ^ ^ ,e r Coi ? m,ss,cm and others would 
the value ofshaiwuSd foreigners to hold 10 percent of 
agreed to a brwd 7*™ Stock Exchange if the SEC 

Before T fi ““ of .foreign stock investment. 

approving such a change, however, the bank said it 

wanted to talk about opening — — — 

the market in a way that would tu , . , . 

bnng “overall and long-term ad- 1 116 Central bank IS 
vantages" for Taiwan. i i . - 

In addition, the bank, which look ™g «>r agreement 
many analysts have identified as with reffoklors 
the biggest opponent of market «^uiaiors. 
liberalization, said Saturday it “ 

°* her . Prehlems in the securities market addressed 
before limns on foreign stock investment were lifted. aaaressea 

a ^or economist in the bank's department of foreign 
“Change, suggested several changes Friday in the liberalization 

^ CoI “ 1 Taiw “' 5 

.' b 1 c 9 aaal bank have long sought to define stock 
m u hlde n L ot shares bought directly by foreigners 
on the local exchange but also claims for shares, known as global 
depositary receipts, that are sold abroad. 

The bank also has wanted to include bonds sold abroad that 
be converted into GDRs or stock, as well as shares in Taiwan 
mutual funds sold overseas by local fund managers. 

By Lhe central bank’s broad definition, including all these mea- 
sures, Taiwan as of midyear already had as much as 7.56 percent of 
its stock market open to foreign investment. 

In contrast to the central bank’s approach, SEC and securities 
industry executives have asked for limits applying solely to shares 
bought directly by foreigners on the Taiwan Stock Exchange. By 
that measure, only about 3.8 percent of the market had been opened 
as of midyear. 

In addition to seeking an agreement with the SEC on definitions, 
the central bank said it wanted to discuss with the commission how 
to go about opening those investment channels that would be in 
Taiwan's best interests. 

According to the Commercial Times, the bank wants to lift the S3 
billion limit chi overseas sales of stock and convertible bonds first, 
followed by the $2^ billion limit on sales of mutual funds abroad 
by local fund managers. 

The S7.5 billion limit on direct investment by foreign financial 
institutions would be the last to be lifted, the newspaper said. 

Foreign financial institutions have been allowed to buy shares in 
Taiwan companies since 1991. Direct investment by foreign indi- 
viduals, however, is banned. 



THE TRIB INDEX 


international Herald Tribune 114 
World Stock Index, composed 
of 280 internationally investabte 113 
stocks from 25 countries, 
compkedby Bloomberg 112 
Business News. 


Weekending December 16, 
daily dosings. 
Jan. 1992= 100. 

Asia/Pacific 


World Index 



125 


124 



110 


114 


113 


112 


v.< .‘■.'I i*i>> 

F M T W T F 

Europe 



ill 

no -atretefc 



134 


133 


132 


131 


130 


F M T W T 

Latin America 



F M T W T 


Industrial Seetors/Weekend dose 
12HGM 12004 * 


12M04 12SM 


Energy 112.83 112.04 -tb.71 

Utilities 1256712257 +2.69 
Finance 112.41 111 M +0-51 
Services 11226 111.31 *0S5 


Capital Goods 113^2112.19 +U9 

Raw Materials 130J0128.il +1.71 

Consumer Goods 102.75 102.71 ■ 40-04 

Miscellaneous 11431 11338 +055 


rracta OS. OoBtu vakws of stock, m Tokyo, Hw Vo*, London. and 

.a. . *r*?m?*i — *■ »™ 

of market captaUauian. athandae tfw «« «*» «odts am iraeftsa 


O WamaHwial Herald Trfcune 


CURRENCY RATES 


5ms Ratos 

• < OM 

- - — 13S? IM» 1 . 11 a 

££2’" aS sw 
SSrt w «** — 

JKXtoO Cb) U® MO 

STvorkTO U«* 

SL HUS WO* 

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Saatchi Plans to Oust Its Name Too 


Comptitd by Our Staff From Dispatches 

LONDON — Maurice Saatchi's oust- 
er as chairman of his namesake advertis- 
ing company capped nine months of pri- 
vate battles about the direction of 
Saatchi & Saatchi Co. and has the world- 
wide advertising conglomerate off on a 
search for a new name. 

Mr. Saatchi, who was removed as chair- 
man at a board meeting late Friday, was 
given until early next month to decide 
whether he will stay at the company that 
be founded in 1970 after it sheds his name. 

Mr. Saatchi, along with his brother, 
Charles, built a small London agency 
into a powerhouse through a series of 
acquisitions on Madison Avenue in the 
1980s that earned them the nickname 
“Snatchit & Snatcbit." 

He stepped down after the board sided 
with large shareholders unhappy about 
his pay package and his rede in persistent 
internal squabbles. 

After a nine-hour meeting, the board 
also announced that it would propose 


changing the parent company's name, 
though no new name was announced. Its 
main subsidiaries are Saatchi & Saatchi 
Advertising Worldwide, which would re- 
tain its name, and Bates Worldwide Inc. 

Robert Louis- Dreyfus, a French busi- 
nessman who had slashed staff and costs 
at the company before becoming a non- 
executive director, also resigned 

A revolt by institutional shareholders, 
led by the Chicago- based fund manager 
Hams Associates, pressured Saatchi & 
Saatchi directors to get rid of the co- 
founder. “This is a watershed in the way' 
the cony any is run from now on,” said 
Carl Spiel vogei, a former chairman of 
Bales worldwide. 

Mr. Saatchi's resignation brought to a 
close several years of wrangling about his 
leadership, during which an advertising 
hero of the 197(h> and 1980s had become 
a magnet for criticism in the ]990s. 

Mr. Saatchi, 48, has been given until 
"early in the new year" to decide whether 
to accept a greatly diminished role at the 


company, according to a Saatchi & Saat- 
chi representative who requested ano- 
nymity: He has been offered a ceremonial 
title of co-president along with his broth- 
er, Charles, and chairmanship of Saatchi 
& Saatchi Advertising Worldwide. 

Mr. Spielvogd said he believed Mr. 
Saatchi would accept the new role. “If he 
were to leave; he would lose a lot of 
money," Mr. Spielvogel said 

As British newspapers speculated Sun- 
day that Mr. Saatchi might set up a rival 
ad agency, Saatchi & s»aichi said it 
planned meetings with clients — includ- 
ing Mars Inc., British Airways and Mirror 
Group Newspapers, which had expressed 
distress over the possible loss of Mr. Saat- 
chi — in an effort to retain their business. 

Mr, Saatchi this year agreed to take a 
cut in pay from £625,000 (5977,000) a year 
to £200,000. But he also backed a propos- 
al for executive incentives that would have 
awarded him options based on his former 
salary, and this upset dissident sharehold- 
ers. (Bloomberg, NYT, Reuters) 


China Arrests 4 
Over Losses in 
Metal Trading 


Pentium Flaw: Bigger Than a Breadbox 


Reuters 

MEDFORD, Massachusetts 
— Errors caused by a flaw in 
Intel Corp.'s Pentium processor 
are far more likely to occur than 
Intel Corp. admits but not as 
frequent as IBM claims, two 
computer magazines have 
found after conducting their 
own, independent tests. 

PC Week, the leading com- 
puter news magazine and its as- 
ter publication, PC Magazine, 
said tests conducted by labora- 
tories at both magazines found 
that errors can occur on the 
order of every two months 10 10 
years when certain kinds of di- 
vision calculations are invoked. 

Intel claimed that an error will 
occur only every 27,000 years. 


while International Business 
Machines Corp. claimed that the 
typical spreadsheet user could 
incur an error every 24 days. 

Intel is the world’s leading 
maker of processing chips for 
personal computers, and the 
Pentium is its top-of- the- line 
model. Intel chips are used in 
IBM computers, but the com- 
puter maker in alliance with 
Apple Computer Inc. and Mo- 
torola Inc. has developed a new 
chip, the PowerPC, that com- 
petes with the Pentium. 

The magazines said their test- 
ing found that neither Intel nor 
IBM portrayed typical user be- 
havior in their claims. 

The magazines concluded 


that engineers and scientists 
would probably find the level of 
possible errors unacceptable, 
along with most people using a 
spreadsheet for complex finan- 
cial calculations. “Most good 
financial software products will 
not use the floating-point func- 
tion, and calculations won't be 
affected, but users are going to 
have to talk to their software 
providers to know them for 
sure," said Peter Coffee, a PC 
Week technology analyst. 

Intel is facing a rash of law- 
suits and mounting complaints 
stemming from its failure to 
quickly disdose a flaw in its 
fastest computer drip. The suits 
charge Intel with everything 
from securities fraud to false 


advertising to violation of un- 
fair trade practices. 

“Intel has such a huge legal 
budget that its lawyers can 
probably take care of these in 
their free time;” said Holey 
Gwennap, editor of Micro- 
processor Report. “But the fact 
is, ethically they should have 
come out with it when they 
found the bug." 

Howard High, an Intel 
spokesman, said Thomas Nice- 
ly, the mathematician who dis- 
covered the flaw, is the only 
person to have confirmed that 
ne encountered the problem in 
a real-world setting. The chip 
giant discovered the flaw in the 
microprocessor last July but 
kept it secret until November. 


Saber-RattUng Helps Russia Ring Up Arms Sales 


By Craig Mellow 

Special to die Herald Tribune 

MOSCOW — Russian arms 
are on the march again, not 
only in the breakaway region of 
Chechnya, but through cash 
sales to prospective war zones 
around the world. 

Many of Moscow’s potential 
export markets worry the West- 
ern powers far more than the 
fate of the rebel regime in Groz- 
ny. By the most conservative 
estimates, Russian arms pro- 
ducers doubled their foreign 
sales during 1994, to 54 billion 
from $2 billion. 

This is a far cry from the peak 
of S22 billion recorded by the 
Soviet Union in 1987, but most 
Soviet arms “sales" were in fact 


donations to client states such 
as Cuba, Vietnam or Angola. 

“Yugoslavia, Iraq and Libya 
were among the few countries 
which actually paid us for 
arms,” said Alexander Pikayev, 
a scholar at Moscow’s Institute 
of the World Economy. “And 
they were all . cut off by U.N. 
sanctions.” 

As Russia receded on the 
world arms market, America 
moved forward. U.S. weapons 
producers racked up 73 percent 
of all Thud World rales in 1993, 
with orders totaling about 515 
billion. 

But this year Russian pro- 
ducers, led by the new export 
cartel Rosvooruzhenie, made 


several counterstrikes deep 
within American territory. 

The most celebrated was a 
sale of 18 MIG-29 fighter 

S lanes, worth an estimated 
550 million, to pro-Western 
Malaysia. They also reported^ 
booked a purchase of S-300 
antirftrissile missiles,by: Kuwait- 
The S-300 is Russia's answer to 
the American Patriot, which 
was used during the 1991 Gulf 
War. 

But Russia's most promising 
growth markets are in countries 
the West considers Jess trust- 
worthy holders of advanced 
weaponry. Moscow is awaiting 
Iraq's return to the market as a 
buyer with unconcealed eager- 
ness. 


Seoul Notebook 


Developed? That Depends 


Can the world's 15th-biggesi economy, 
with a per-capita income approaching 
510,000, be considered a developing nation? 

Yes, according to South Korea's president, 
Kim Young Sam, who lobbied for such a 
status at last month's Asia-Pacific Economic 
Cooperation conference in Indonesia. In line 
with the group's nonbinding agreements, the 
classification will give the country until 2020 
to drop its trade barriers, 10 years later than 
the deadline for developed nations. 

But is South Korea really a developing 
nation? It is only a year or two away from 
achieving per-capita income of 510,000, its 
gross national product ranks 15th in the 
world, and in volume of trade it ranks 12th. 

In a recent survey of competitiveness by the 
Daewoo Economic Research Institute, South 
Korea had a score of 56, compared with an 
average of 100 for the 25 members of the 
Organization for Economic Cooperation and 
Development — a group that Seoul hopes to 
join in 19%. That score put it just behind 
Spain, which now ranks Uth. 

But South Korea ranked last in that survey 
in industrial and labor productivity, as well as 
in transparency of business regulations. 

“Korea is a developing nation,” said Han 
Sang Chun, a senior economist at the institute 
who prepared the report. “The scale of the 
economy is very wide, but the quality of the 
eoonomy is very low.” 

A closer look reveals a sharp dichotomy: 
Electronics, automobile, shipbuilding, steel 
and other major export industries targeted by 
the government as strategic have achieved 
high levels of competitiveness. But highly 
protected retail, financial and agriculture sec- 
tors are far behind. 

“By the year 2010 we’ll definitely be a 
developed nation,” said Kim Kyeong Won, a 
senior economist at the Samsung Economic 
Research Institute. “But now we're in the 
middle because of unbalanced development, 
a legacy of centrally planned development 
schemes.” 


Few Get Red-Carpet Treatment 

The Hermit Kingdom, as foreigners 
dubbed Korea during the Ghosun Dynasty of 
the 19th century, is losing some of its xeno- 
phobic fervor. 

With exports mushrooming, more compa- 
nies are hiring foreigners to help with a vari- 
ety of jobs, from personnel to marketing to 
engineering. Them also are an estimated 
80,000 foreign laborers, many of them illegal, 
.helping to relieve a shortage of workers. They 
come mostly from Pakistan, Bangladesh, the 
Philippines and China. 


Samsung Electronics, which this year will 
surpass the 510 billion mark in exports, hired 
six foreigners this year, the first ones It had 
taken on as permanent employees. 

“We’re trying to become more internation- 
al,” a company spokesman, Lee Meong Woo, 
said. “We’re hoping to learn from them how 
they think and work.” 

Employees of SsangYong Securities, how- 
ever, were unprepared when they read in 
August that a 38-year-old U.S. citizen had 
been offered an unheard-of 51 million to 
become a director and head of research 

“The amount I make is beyond the pale by 
Korean standards,” said tie employee. Ste- 
E. Marvin, adding that the reported 
% not grossly inaccurate.” 

Mr. Marvin said he had a good working 
relationship with his colleagues and that he 
showed up at board meetings every few 
months to make a report (in English). But he 
acknowledged that bound his back, xenopho- 
bia lurked. “Everybody’s watching and look- 
ing for a way to trip me up," be said. “I’m 
totally isolated.” 

Bankers Hear Stocks 9 Siren Song 

South Korea’s banks, slowly emer ging 
from the yoke of government, are finding 
playing Seoul’s soaring stock market more 
lucrative than bread-and-butter lending. 

Seeing opportunity in a stock market that 
has jumped nearly 20 percent this year, the 
nation’s five biggest commercial banks in- 
creased their stock holdings by an estimated 
72 percent in the first nine months of 1994, to 
about 3.1 trillion won ($4 billion) from 1.8 
trillion in September 1993. 

In contrast, growth in lending to compa- 
nies in won came to just 8 percent in the first 
six months of the year. 

The government, worried about the shift 
away from core banking activities to specula- 
tive stock investments, and about a credit 
squeeze an small and medium-sized business- 
es, has been telling the banks to back off. But 
the banks, trying to book profits to offset bad 
loans equal to an estimated 18 percent of total 
lending, are paying little attention. 

While their investments have been profit- 
able so far, there is the inescapable risk that 
the stock market could tumble; If so, South 
Korean investors — many of whom assume 
that banks never lose money on tbdj invest- 
ments — could be in for a shock. 

"The stock market can’t go up forever," said 
Kim Kyeong Won, a senior economist at the 
Samsung Economic Research Institute. “When' 
it goes down, there win be huge problems." 

Steven Brail 


Meanwhile, Russia is . 
rearm Iran. President Boris 
Yeltsin promised President Bill 
Clinton earlier this year to cur- 
tail the sale of advanced subma- 
rines toTehran. But this accord 
did not hinder a recent deal for 
100 tanks and 80 arraorec^pcr- 
sonnel carriers. 

Western analysts are also 
waiy of Russian intentions in 
Syria and Libya. "If we have 
medium-range missiles in Da- 
mascus or Tripoli capable of 
hitting Paris or London, that’s 
going to be a real problem,” 
said Andrew Pierre of Ameri- 
ca’s Carnegie Foundation. 

Russia’s biggest arms client 
at the moment is almost cer- 
tainly China, particularly its 
navy, which Beijing is eager to 
modernize. Washington's big- 
gest concern here, Mr. Pierre 

See ARMS, Page 11 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

BEIJING — China said Sun- 
day it had arrested four em- 
ployees of a subsidiary of its 
flagship investment house on 
corruption charges in connec- 
tion with illegal trading that led 
to heavy losses on the London 
Metal Exchange. 

An official of the investment 
company, however, said foreign 
partners had done much to 
cause the losses, estimated at 
540 million, by extending credit 
to the traders without inform- 
ing the parent company. 

Two managers and two deal- 
ers of CITIC Shanghai Co., a 
subsidiary of China Interna- 
tional Trust & Investment 
Corp., were charged with cor- 
ruption and detained, the China 
Daily Business Weekly said. 
The report said one of the man- 
agers was a former president of 
cmc Shanghai. 

The newspaper said no do- 
mestic subsidiary of CITIC ex- 
cept for CITIC Industrial Bank 
was allowed to have overseas 
borrowing and credit facilities. 

It also quoted Xu S hiwei, se- 
nior adviser to CITIC Shang- 
hai, as saying blame for the 
losses lay in part with foreign 
partners who extended credit 
lines without notifying CITIC. 

Brokers said CITIC was 
seeking a compromise settle- 
ment for the losses, which came 
in copper trading, arguing that 
it was not wholly responsible. 

Mr. Xu said the amount of 
repayment would depend on 
talks in London between staff 
of CITIC Shanghai and foreign 
counterparts. 

The case raises questions 
about the legal and moral obli- 
gation of state-owned Chinese 
enterprises when trading debts 
are run op by subsidiarie . 

Lehman Brothers Inc. decided 
recently to take a different route 
in a similar dispute. In Novem- 
ber. Lehman sued two Chinese 
companies for almost $100 mil- 
lion over losses incurred in .trad- 
ing foreign currencies 'aria relaF- - 

ed financial products. 

The Lehman case also hinges 
on the legal obligation of the 
parent Chinese state-owned 
company to make good losses 
run up by a subsidiary. 

In a separate article; China 
Daily said some foreign compa- 
nies assumed that doing busi- 
ness with state-owned compa- 
nies meant forging a link with 
the Chinese government that 
could be invoked if the invest- 
ment partner suffered losses. 

Liu Zhiben, an official a( the 
Ministry of Foreign Trade and 
Economic Cooperation, was 


quoted in the article as calling 
this a misconception. 

(Reuters, Bloomberg ) 


The Shanghai stock exchange 
will bid against Hongkong & 
Shanghai Banking Corp. to buy 
that company's neoclassical 
former headquarters on Shang- 
hai’s waterfront Bund, Reuters 
reported from Shanghai, quot- 
ing the Xinhua news agency. 

The report quoted Wei Wen- 
yuan, general manager of the 
Shanghai exchange, as saying 
the bourse's facilities were inad- 
equate for the rapidly growing 
securities market. The Bund, 
once known as the Wall Street 
of China, now houses Shang- 
hai’s municipal government. 

The government is to move to 
a new building before May 
1995, and at least 18 buildings 
on the Bund are due to be sold- 


Beijing Plans 
Further Easing 
On Currencies 

Compiled by Our Staff From Duptueha 

BEIJING — As part of 
its plan to loosen controls 
on foreign exchange, China 
mil make the yuan freely 
convertible in current ac- 
counts by 2000, an official 
report said Sunday. 

China liberalized its cur- 
rency system at the start of 
this year to allow institu- 
tions with import contracts 
to buy foreign exchange for 
trade purposes directly 
from banks. 

Under the planned 
change, those institutions 
will be able to buy foreign 
exchange from banks for 
nontrade purposes as well, 
and individuals will be able 
to purchase limited 
amounts of foreign ex- 
change fof stutiyrtrave] and ' 
visits to relatives abroad. 

Controls over foreign ex- 
change in capital accounts 
will be gradually eased, the 
report said, but no timeta- 
ble has been set. 

Current accounts cover 
trade, labor, transporta- 
tion, tourism and interna- 
tional donations. 

Capital accounts cover 
direct investment, securi- 
ties investment, loans from 
international organizations 
and governments, bank 
credits and leasing. 

(AP. Reuters) 


Santa Fe Refuses to Auction Itself 


Bloomberg Business News 

SCHAUMBURG, Illinois — 

Santa Fe Pacific Coip. rejected 
over the weekend Union Pacif- 
ic Corp.’s request to hold an 
auction for the railroad and 
suggested the hostile suitor sub- 
mit a sweetened bid. 

Santa Fe’s response on Satur- 
day quashed Union Pacific's 
overture on Friday to increase 
its $3.2 billion bid if Santa Fe 
established a fair bidding pro- 
cess. 

Santa Fe's board “has not put 
the company up for sale and it is 
not considering an auction,” The 
Santa Fe chairman, Robert 
Krebs, wrote to Drew Lewis, the 
Union Pacific chairman. 

Mr. Krebs said furthermore 
that Union Pacific should sub- 


mit without delay its sweetened 
offer if it was “willing and able 
to improve" its proposaL 

Union Pacific and Burling- 
ton Northern Inc. have compet- 
ing offers for the Atchison, To- 
peka & Santa Fe Railway Co., 
m what has become a battle for 
dominance in moving freight in 
the western United Stales. 

Union Pacific said Friday 
'that it was willing to discuss' 
revisions to its proposal “pro- 
vided that Santa Fe establishes 
a fair process” to consider com- 
peting offers, 

Mr. Krebs shot back Satur- 
day that “I am not sure that 
continuing to trade letters on 
‘process’ issues serves any use- 
ful function.” 

Santa Fe has consistently re- 


buffed Union Pacific's ad- 
vances, preferring to bargain 
with Burlington, leading Union 
Pacific to cry foul. 

Santa Fe believes it has given 
Union Pacific enough informa- 
tion for a new bid. It also has 
long insisted the company was 
never put up for sale. As a re- 
sult, Santa Fe can choose be- 
tween the competing offers, le- 
gal specialists said. 

If a company is placed on the 
block, courts have ruled, in 
most cases it would have to go 
to the highest bidder. 

Santa Fe shares dosed up 
12.5 cents on Friday, at 
$16,875. Union Pacific stock 
also rose 12 J cents, to $47.50, 
and Burlington Northern's 
shares rose 50 cents, to $51 JO. 




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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1994 


lUJUAlil/ 1 IIUJ^U TUn ViiUUlTUVUIl A^^TC 

4 *^! lt } x>ns ^£ ree to Spur East- Bloc Energy Investment 


Page 1 1 


signed a Eumne ^° r t -^" s * x na Uons 

iSssss^SMSfc 

net- 

32 Tlf or ™? 1116 aS 

of our products,” Oleg Dawdov 

^s^szsssz 


SHORT COVER 


toritwf^tri l0, p^ p 0f npeliing the signs* sure that the treaty would not force it material are excluded from the Energy 
invew' ° ■ 6 'P^S 0 e^gy companies to adopt quotas on the sale of its nude- Charter," Mr. Orqa said, 
finan ■ f m tfieir countx ' es die same ar materials such os uranium. The United States and Canada have 

domp-Tr u ’ eatnaem 35 diey give their “Today in Russia we don’t have any not signed the treaty. The chairman of 
rt ai ^^fSy companies. quantitative restrictions on the import the conference, Charles Rutten, said 

and»?K > se ? r * to encourage free trade of goods,” Mr. Davydov said. “We they still had questions about its iropli- 
durfK r B k U 2F SU 10 561 VP proce- would be against the European Union cations for them, 

ures tor ban dung complaints of dis- applying any quantitative restrictions Germany’s economy minister. Gun- 
“minauon against foreign investors. on Russia.” ter Rexrodt, said, “We in the European 

erf ®, vydov sa ^ d Russia had decid- The European Union's energy com- Union are keen that the United States 
Salt m- y lo . **■* 1163 V after missioner, Marcelino Orcja. said trade should sign the treaty, and during the 
asr-minute consultations about trade in nuclear materials between Russia negotiations we tried everything to fa- 
in nuclear materials and repatriation and the EU was covered by cooperation cilitate the signing by the U.S." 
investments from Russia. agreements signed in 1989 and 1994. Separately, American and Pakistani 

ne 531(3 Russia had waijted to be ‘The problems related to nuclear companies signed 18 investment agree- 


ments Saturday in Islamabad totaling 
more than 52.5 billion for oil, gas and 
power-generation projects. 

The two governments also signed 
five agreements on research and coop- 
eration in the areas of renewable ener- 
gy resources and energy conservation. 

“These agreements reflect the inter- 
est of private industry in America and 
the interest of the government of the 
United States in expanding business 
ties with Pakistan,” the deputy U.S. 
energy secretary, William White, said. 

(Reuters, AFP) 


Spanish Retailer 
Galls In Receiver 


— Valerias Pre- 
aados. Spams second-largest 
department-store chain £T d 
? had filed for receiver- 
ship with debts totaling 64 bil- 
bo?, pesetas ($485 million). 

Galenas, hit by a dwin dling 
market share as well as finan- 
cial and organizational prob- 
lems. said it had made the filing 
Saturday to try to protect jobs. 
, ^Jeverthdess, more than 
3,000 people joined a demon- 
stration by its employees in Ma- 
drid on Sunday to protest what 
the workers called bad business 
policies and to demand new 
management. Similar protests 
were held at many of Galerias’s 
29 stores around Spain. 

Galenas, which h«<; nearly 
7,500 employees and has gone 
through several changes of 
ownership in the past IS years, 
has steadily lost market share to 
the CortC Ingles chain 
In September, a spokesman 
said Galedas would not survive 
unless it could refinance its dkrt 
and find a new partner or inves- 
tor to bring in fresh capital 
The company’s three main 
creditors — Citibank, Lloyds 
Bank PLC and Barclays Bank 


I’lC — agreed in April to allow 
it to delay debt payments until 
mie 1995, but this did little to 
improve its finances. 

Spain's minister of commerce 
and tourism. Javier G6mez Na- 
varro, confirmed last week that 
the government was negotiating 
with foreign groups interested 
in taking a stake in Galerlas. He 
said the government would not 
bail out the retailer. 

Marks & Spencer PLC of 
Britain said last month it was 
discussing buying some of the 
stores. The British department- 
store chain Harvey Nichols also 
is believed to be interested. 

Galenas is now owned by 
Abartak, a group of Spanish 
investors headed by Jus to Lo- 
pez Tello, Fernando Sada and 
Santiago Mollinedo. 

The company said it would 
continue to operate normally 
while the courts studied its fi- 
nancial condition. 

The news was a blow to a 
country saddled with an unem- 
ployment rate of 24 percent, the 
highest in the European Union. 
The state-owned airline Iberia 
recently announced plans to lay 
off 5,200 of its 24,000 employ- 
ees. (Reuters, AP) 


The Week Ahead: World Economic Calendar, December 19-24 


A schedule at eras week* economic and 
Bnanaat events, oompSed tor tntema- 
uonal Herald Tribune by Bloomberg Boar 
IMlNM 

tola-Pacfflc 

* D*e. IB Sydney Merchandise Im- 
ports ter November. 

Haag Kong Independent Comntfastan 
Against Corruption Commissioner Ber- 
trand ds SpevfJJe lo speak to the Foreign 
Correspondents' Club. 

Kong Kong Joseph Metsey. Interna- 
tional Strategic AOvteore managing direc- 
tor. speaks to the American Chamber or 
Commerce in Hong Kong on the subject 
ol -U-S.-CNna Trade Rtdauons: On the 
Right Track." 

Jakarta Fajar Suiya Wbeoa, a paper- 
maker, to Dot 47 million shares, priced at 
3J2QQ apiece, on Jakarta Stock Exchange. 
Jakarta Heavy equipment company 
Hemnao Adtpwfcasa tentatively to seB 10 
mlUmn shares of 3.000 rupiah apiece In a 
bW to Hsten the Jakarta Stock Exchange. 
Tokyo Inaugural press conference of 
Yasuo Matsushita, governor of the Bank 
ot Japan. 

Mating Jaya. M a laysia Gamuda Bhd., 
a construction company, to hold ntodt- 
hoJdere' meeting to dhscuss proposed bo- 
nus, rights and bond issues and various 
acautaldona 

• Dae. 20 Jakarta Shares of the 
clothings retailer Karwoli Indonesia 
scheduled to Hat and trade in Jakarta from 
today. The company sold 20 million 
shares In an Initial pubfcc ottering. 

Jakarta jeowon Jaya Indonesia, an 
etoctromco company, to list 6.1 mUGon 
shares of 4,500 rupiah apiece an the Ja- 
karta bourn. 

W eMngto n New Zeeland government 
forecasts for economy Hna budget 
Taipei Taiwan's Minister of Economic 
Affairs to masse reports on industrial 
production, manufacturing output and 
export orders for November, 
a Dee. 21 Sydney Motor vehicfee 
regfst rai lorM for November. 

New Defill Prime Minister Viktor Cher- 
nomyrdin of Russia to pay four-day vtatt to 


India wnh business delegation to obcu&s 
trade and investment, 

■ Dee. 22 Hong Kong Go ve r nm e nt to 
Issue November consumer price Index 
figures 

Jakarta Shares of the agricultural com- 
pany Oavomos Aback to Hat and trade on 
the Jakarta Slock Exchange from today. 
Bangkok Thai Airway* Internationa! 
stockholders' meeting to elect new boad 
of directors. 

• Dm. 23 Hong Kong October retail 
sales figures. 

Taipei Taiwan's Cabinet lo release un- 
employment data for November. 

• Dee. 24 Bangalore, India Ten-day 
National Consumer Goods For. orga- 
nized by India Trade Promotion Organiza- 
tion. 

Euro pa 

• BpDDW aon H we Orta wreak 
Amtardare October producer price In- 
dex. 

Biuuob December consumer pnoe in- 
dex Forecast: Up 02 percent m month, 
up 2.0 percent m year. 

Frankfurt November wholesale price in- 
dex Forecast: Up D.t percent 
Frankfurt November M-3- Forecast: Up 
&4 percent. 

Frankfurt October current account. 
Forecast A deficit ot 4.0 bltkon DM. 
Frankfurt November producer price in- 
dex. Forecast, up 0.1 percent In month, 
up i.i percent in year. 

Frankfurt December preliminary cost ot 
Bving. Forecast Up 0.1 percent In month, 
up 2.6 percent tn year. 

Madrid October producer price Index. 
Forecast Up 0.3 percent m month, up 42 
percent In year. 

Madrid 3rd-quorter gross domestic 
product. Forecast Up 2.1 percent In year. 
Madrid Third-quarter wage rises. Fore- 
cast. up 4.5 percent. 

Rome October producer price index. 
Rome October trade balance. 
Stockholm November trace balance. 
Forecast 7.5 billion kronor surplus. 
Stockhoka November producer price 
index. Forecast Up 5.7 percent In year. 


• Dm. 10 Frankfort Bundesbank De- 
cember monthly report. 

London East Midlands Electricity re- 
ports SraWvai results 
EMntaos expected Danisco. 
a Own. 20 Copenhagen November 
consumer pnea Index. Forecast: Up 05 
percent In month, up 2.1 percent in year. 
London November M-4 Forecast: Up 
0A percent m month, up 3.B percent In 
yottr. 

Parte October Industrial production. 
Forecast Up 02 percent. 

• Dm. 21 London November trade 
balance, excluding trade within the EU 
Forecast 375 imuon-pound deficit. 
London Minutes from the nov. 2 mone- 
tary meeting between Chanranar Ken- 
neth Clerks and Eddie George, the Bonk 
of England governor, released. 

Madrid Nwember ratal sates. 

Paris November final consumer price 
Index. 

Parte October trade balance Forecast: 
7-0 button- franc surplus. 

Rome Docomoar consumer pnoe index, 
cWea. Forecast Up 02 percent m month, 
up 3.9 percent in yav. 

■ Dee. 22 Copenhagen October 
trade balance and currant account. 
Frankfurt Bundesbank central council 
meeting, teduefes setting the M-3 money 
supply target for 1995. 

London ThkWqusnw gross domestic 
product and balance of payments. 

WwAmwIcfifi 

a Dm. IS Buanoe Alms IRSA Inver- 
slones & Reprasentadones SA, on Argen- 
tine real estate company in wNch hedge 
fund manager George Son* » the major 
sharehoiefer. sets the price of its 54 mBUon 
share rights Issue An Indicative prtee has 
bean given ol 25 pesos per share. 
Sa n tiago Government sale of 07 per- 
cent of state-owned shipping company 
Empresa Usrtttma SA. or Empremar. The 
government tun fixed a minimum price of 
*25 mason on the shipping company. 
Mtedco Cfty October unemployment 
rate- The Lxiernpioymant rate m Septem- 
ber stood percent. 


Earrings axpacted Cabletron Systems. 
Nike. Rue Aid. 

■ Dm. 20 W a d tog t un Federal Open 
Market Committee mating. 

Washington The Commerce Depart- 
mara reports October iin r cha ndure trade 
and trade defied. 

Santiago United Nation releases sum- 
mary of Latin American and Caribbean 
economies in 1994 and forecasts tar 
1995- 

Sao Paulo institute tor Economic Re- 
search, or F1PE, to release 3Dctey infla- 
tion rare. Outlook: Intumon OuOy to Mow 
from 257 percent 

Earrings a vp s rt e ri Coring ra, Oracle 
Systems. 

• Dm. 21 Washington TheU.a De- 
partment ol Agriculture to release report 
on world coffee supply and demand. 
Washington Third-quarter capital 
spending. 

Dafiaa Greyhound Lines Inc. hobte a 
shareholders meeting to vote on a pro- 
posed restructuring. The transaction 
would eliminate $98.9 iriUlon In debt, giv- 
ing creditors a 45 percent stake m the 
company. 

New York City Council votes on added 
restrict Iona to public smoking In New 
York City. 

• Dae. 22 Washington Final gross 
domestic product growth tor the third 
quarter. 

Washington Third-quarter after-tax 
profits. 

Earrings expected Shone/eLne. 

■ Dm. 23 WathtegKMi The Com- 
merce Deparenam reports personal In- 
come and spending tor November. 
Wnritogten Durable goods orders tor 
November. 

Ottawa Employment, earnings and 
hours report for October. 

SanHagn Central Bank release monthly 
indicator of economic activity, tor Octo- 
ber, a crude measure ot the growth In 
gross domestic product Outlook: Expect- 
ed to rise between 4 percent and 5 per- 
cent on an annua) basis. 

Mexico City Gross domestic product re- 
port for October 


Malaysian Economy Steams Ahead 

KUALA LUMPUR (Combined Dispatches) — Malaysia's 
economy extended its strong expansion during the third quarter of 
1994, recording growth of 8.9 percent. Malaysia's deputy prime 
minister said Saturday. 

The increase in gross domestic product followed growth of 8 3 
percent during the previous quarter, said Anwar Ibrahim, who is 
ai y> finance minister. He said the inflation rate moderated to 3.2 
percent, compared with a 3.5 percent rate in the previous quarter. 

Malayan Banking Bhd., Malaysia's largest bank, said Sunday it 
was raising its base lending rate to 6.55 percent from 6.5 percent, 
effective on Monday. This is the bank’s first rate increase m more 
than two years after nine cuts this year. (Reuters, AP) 

South Korean Firm to Work in North 

SEOUL — South Korea's Ssangyong group has agreed to 
produce and export cement with North Korea, the South's domes- 
tic Yonhap news agency said on Saturday. 

It quoted the group’s vice chairman, Lee Chou-bom, as tuning 
reporters upon arrival in Beijing after a five-day visit to Pyong- 
yang that his concern would also agree to lake pan in projects to 
build free-trade zones in Raj in ana Sonbong in North Korea. 

_ Mr. Lee had led a 12-man team to discuss economic coopera- 
tion with North Korea, the first South Korean businessmen to 
visit North Korea since Seoul banned practically all economic 
contact in late 1992. The government last week allowed Ssan- 
gyong and five other South Korean companies to visit North 
Korea after lifting a ban in November on business trips to North 
Korea and allowing local companies to set up offices there. 

4 Latin States Launch Trade Zone 

RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — The presidents of Brazil, Argenti- 
na, Paraguay and Uruguay signed an agreement on Saturday that 
joined their countries m the region’s first free-trade bloc and the 
world's fourth-largest trade union. 

The new Mercosur group, which represents about 200 milli on 
people with a domestic product of $750 billion, will come into 
effect on Jan. 1 and has been negotiated over the last four years. It 
follows a decision a week ago by 34 countries to form a hemi- 
sphere-wide free-trade union early in the next century. 

US. Shoe Discusses Sale to Nine West 

CINCINNATI (Combined Dispatches) — U.S. Shoe Corp said 
that it lias conducted confidential discus sions regarding the po- 
tential sale of its footwear operations in a taxable transaction to 
Nine West Group Inc. 

U.S. Shoe said late Friday that the companies had mnAe. 
“substantial progress” toward resolving many complex issues but 
that agreement had not yet been reached. Nine West had made an 
offer m July of $425 minion but it was rejected. (Reuters, NYT) 




Vox Reports 
EC Approval 

Reuters 

BONN — Vox FOm- & 
Feraseh GmbH, the Ger- 
man television channel, said 
Sunday that the European 
Commission had approved 
its new ownership structure, 
under which a subsidiary of 
News Carp, will become its 
largest shareholder. 

The News Corp. unii 
News International PLC 
has 49.9 percent of Vox. 

Vox said the owners had 
taken it out of liquidation 
and approved a budget for 
1995. Vox nearly went off 
the air but was given a new 
lease of life when News 
Corp. got involved. 


ARMS: Revived Russian Exporters Double Their Sales 


Gorinaed from Plage 9 
said, involves the transfer of 
missfl e production technology. 

Russians increasingly see 
criticism in the West as an ex- 
cuse to keep them out of mar- 
kets Moscow desperately needs. 
“I don't really see how Iran 
having submarines threatens 
the United States,” said Mik- 
hail Gerasev, a scholar at Mos- 
cow’s Institute of the U.SA. 
and Canada. r 

The London-based Interna- 
tional Institute for Strategic 
Studies has estimated that Rus- 
sia’s annual arms sales could 
reach S15 billion if Iraq, Syria 
and libya ail go on shopping 
sprees. Mr. Gerasev put the 
maximum at $10 billion, which 
he called “not enough to save 
our military complex, but 


enough to solve some problems 
with Russia's own procurement 
budget.” 

Such a figure would also be 
more than twice what Russia 
received in Western aid this 
year, weakening the most con- 
crete incentive for what Ameri- 
ca and its allies consider good 
behavior. 

The ongoing shift in Russia's 
priorities was obvious when the 
World Bank president, Lewis 


Preston, visited recently to an- 
nounce new aid co mmitmen ts 
Foreign Minister Andrei V. Ko- 
zyrev had little time to spare for 
Mr. Preston since he had com- 
mitments with his Iraqi coun- 
terpart, Tariq Aziz. 

Mr. Yeltsin had a more im- 
portant engagement as well. He 
flew to the city of Izhevsk to 1 
celebrate the 75th birthday of 
Mikhail Kalashnikov, the in- 
ventor of the world’s all-time 
best-selling rifle. 


For investment information 

Read the MONEY REPORT 
every Saturday in the IHT 


WORLD STOCKS IN REVIEW 


Vta Agera* frante-Pvaae 

Amsterdam 

Prices edged higher in mod- 
erate trading, with the EOE in- 
dicator up 0-69 point, to 408 J8. 

Fokker slid to 1 1 JZ0 guilders 
from 14.50 following a down- 
ward revision of e arnin gs fore- 
casts for 1994. 

DSM, the chemicals compa- 
ny, was up 0.8 percent after 
reports that year profits ware 
set to top 400 million guilders. 

Frankfurt 

An optimistic earnings pro- 
jection by Siemens gave the 
market a boost late in the week. 
The DAX index gained 2.06 
percent, ending at 2,070.06 
points. 

Thursday accounted for 
much of the rise after Siemens 
spirf it saw profit moving ahead 
20 percent m its current finan- 
cial year, to 2 billion DM- Sie- 
mens stock was up 37 -50 • 
for the week, ending at 637 JO. 

Meanwhile, Daimler was up 
730 at 747, Volkswagen pro- 
gressed 930 to 423 and BMW 
lose 10 to 748. Allianz gained 
61 to end at 2,499. 

But bond prices weakened, 
■with the average yield on gov- 
ernment issues ending Fnday at 
7.39 percent, up from 7.31 per- 
cent the previous week. 

Despite lagging consume de- 
mand m the run up to Christ- 
mas, retailers Kaufljof and Kmj- 
stadt gained 25 to 457 and 14 JO 
to 559Trespectively. 

Hong Kong 

Prices jumped during the 
week on strong selective 
from overseas institutions look- 
ing for cheaper shares after ear- 

Iie The C barOTaeter Hang Sens 
Index gained 377.32 

8 166.39 on Friday. _ 7(1 

Swire Pacific A gamed 1.70 
dollars at 46.80 dollars, Cathay 


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Pacific Airways added 50 cents 
ai 10.90 dollars and Hongkong 
Land rose 35 cents to 15.50. 

London 

The Financial Times-Stock 
Exchange 100-share index 363 
points during the week, or 13 
percent, to dose at 3,013.6 on 
Friday, as investors overcame 
inflation fears. 

Although the market took tlx; 
surprise 03 point hike in inter- 
est rates on Dec. 7 in stride, 
traders appeared to fear anoth- 
er rate rise at the begi nn i n g of 
next year as inflationary pres- 
sures increase. 

The market was taken by sur- 
prise. on Thursday when S-G. 
Warburg announced that dis- 
cussions cm a possible merger 
with Morgan Stanley had been 
i te rmin ated. Warburg promptly 
slumped 70 pence to 713. 

Milan 

The Mibtel index rose 97 per- 
cent, to 9,704 points, leaving the 
political crisis threatening the 
position of Premier SSWio Ber- 
lusconi behind. 

Investors were enco u raged 
by Mr. Berlusconi's ebullient 
resistance to moves within the 
opposition and in his own coali- 
tion to replace him as well as by 
strong foreign demand. 

Fiat rose 240 lira to 5,720, 
while Olivetti ended up 8 at 
1,940 and Telecom Italia moved 
ahead 169 to 3,875. 

Paris 

A falling franc pulled down 
stocks, and the CAC-40 index 
lost 0.6 percent, ending at 
1,924.16. Dealers forecast the 
year would end with the index 
15 percent below the 236832 at 
which it began 1994. 

. The franc fell after European 
Commissioner Jacques Dams 
announced he would not stand 
for die French presidency. 


Brokers feared the overall 
French climate would be ad- 
versely affected with no serious 
challenge from the left for pres- 
ident, leaving investors unsure 
of future ptilicy on Europe and 
financial affairs. 

With poor second-half re- 
sults forecast, Peugeot was 
down 22 francs at 725. 


Singapore 


Prices rose as blue-chip stocks 
recovered some of the recent 
losses that were spurred by fears 
of rising UJ5. interest rates. 

The Stock Exchange of Sin- 
gapore's Straits Times Indus- 
trials index moved ahead 67.44 
pants, ending at 2,169.72. 

Dealers said trading was 
dominated by local fund man- 
agers picking up blue-chips bar- 
gains after heavy selling by 
their foreign counterparts. “The 
market is expected to remain 
volatile until the return of for- 
eign fund managers, most of 
whom have wound up for the 
year," said Vasu Menon, re- 
search manager of Keppel Se- 
curities, a local brokerage. 

Tokyo 

Prices rose in fine with an ad- 
vance on Wall Street and a sta- 
ble doUar-yen exchange rate. 
The 225-issue Nikkei Stock Av- 
erage dosed at 19,163.43 points, 
up 185.13 points, or 0.97 per- 


cent, higher than a week earlier. 

Volume weakened, with the 
average value of daily transac- 
tions falling to 230.9 billion yen 
from 268.7 billion yen. 

The index was expected to 
move in a narrow range below 
19,500 for some time with pub- 
lic funds bolstering the markers 
downside and foreign investors 
remaining net buyers by small 
margins, traders said. 

“Individual investors are ap- 
parently shying away from the 
stock market. But quite a few of 
them are willing to resume in- 
vestment in slocks if there is 
incentive," said Yasukuni War 
tanabe, president of Marukuni 
Securities. 

Nippon Sled lost 8 to 355 
and Kawasaki slipped 5 to 400. 

Zurich 

Zurich finished upbeat with 
the Swiss Performance Index 
adding 11.46 points to end at 
1,706.68, a rise of 0.6 percent. 

Dealers said the market had 
been boosted by the recent 
strength of the dollar, but many 
investors were sitting on the 
sidelines to await the post-holi- 
day period, analysts said. 

Among banking issues, UBS 
dipped 25 francs to 1,085, but 
SBS rose 8 to 363 and CS Hold- 
ing was also tip, rising 22 to 546. 

In the insurance sector, Zu- 
rich ended down 3 at 1,272 and 
Winterthur lost 5 to 66 7. 


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PROFESSOR ~~~~~~ 

INTERNATIONAL 

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EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 


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(French'Eagiish) 


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75008 Paris - France. 








Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERAIJO TRIBUNE, MONDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1994 


NASDAQ NATIONAL MARKET 



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_. 694 5ft 5ft 5% * ft 

_. 10089 4 3ft 3ft . ft, 

_. 1518 4ft 4ft 4ft -ft 

— M5B 5 4ft 4ft — Vi, 

1 455 4ft 4 4'.% — W 

- 8099W 15ft 17 —1ft 

.. 72 5 7* 5ft 5ft 

.. 9835 9ft 7% 8ft ♦$* 

1J 5070 27ft 24ft 27 -lft 

1 J 4484 24ft 23ft 24ft -2ft 

... 315 28ft 27ft 37ft —ft 

_. 397 4 3ft 3«fe .'7% 

._ 1482 7ft 4V, 7 « % 

... 71312'.* 10ft lift »ft 

_. 947 21ft 19V* 21ft -lft 

- 118817 15ft I Aft -ft 

_ 47 7ft 4*6 7ft . % 

_. 1115 12% 10* j lift— 1H 

„ 307 lft lft 1% _ 

A 7*71 27ft 34 77 ft *3_ 

_ 2981 2ft 1ft lft 'ft 
_ 1601 1% IV, , IV, , - 

_ 1710 Vft 9ft 91. -I, 

- 940 5ft 3ft 3ft —1 

1 J 1431 7ft 4ft «lv —ft 

_ 377 3ft 3 3 —ft 

\JKe 3-3 1187 55ft 54 54ft -ft 

- I960 10' 4 «'V„ 9ft —J4 


HW> LOW Oi ■ O* 



5® 



-20919 
_ 3045 4ft 
I 976 2% 

i5 mm 

- 1768 4 
_ 8188 18ft 
_ 0155 12 
_ 1283 34V* 
_ 466 3ft 

- 251 ft 

- 5347 42ft 

- 4911 7ft 
,02e J 135 4ft 


7% Jft - 

»»♦« 

13ft 12ft 
14ft 15ft - 
3ft 4ft .ft 
6ft 6ft -ft 

2%. 2ft *Vi 
lift lift— I 

O'* 3ft 

11 llVi* 

40ft 41ft .ft 

6ft 7*% *4* 

3ft 3M6* — *4 


B 


16 


.12 


IDalJ 443 8% 7 7ft -ft 

J6 2J 23 15% IS 15% »% 

..10185 24ft 19% 2Sft -4ft 
1JO 7.1 59 18 17 17 —ft 

A0 1.8 1*09 27 V. 21ft 22 .% 

- 84 7 % 7ft 7ft 

- 8751 10ft 10 10ft —ft 

00 4.1 5093 22% 21% 21% — 1 

- 6858 6ft 5ft 6 Vi • ft 

36 3J 177 11 10ft 11 -ft 

- 11998 71ft 18% 21 -7 ft 

15a .9 522 17ft 16 14% 

I 3S P%1 ?V„ KVe —’ft 

- ,l3 s ; v ’* 9 s ? - w vf 

- 71 10V* 10% 10ft —ft 

I 0 0 8 * J 

... 4312 2% lft 2 .V. 

J2b 1.5 41 15ft 35 35ft -V. 

- 5238 7 5ft 4'. — ft 

... 4891 30 36V. 29ft 

.. 43213ft 13 13ft 

J2 3.2 30910*, 9V, 10 

-CoPC 1.40 &94IM0 14ft J5*» JSft 

AMUCar 1.40O11J *770 13V, 17% 17% —ft 


116 4J 6455 3714 25 
DCS Bn J 

BE AOT3 ^ 3347 ? J J* 

Sffl " “ ,S S5» 3. 

ipSw _ 10 34 24 34 — 1% 

•ffattawBfci-* 

BHCFnd i» * ^ ffi SS *« 

„ 67^21% 19% 19% —2% 

r S 3% 2% j-* -* 

-44981 SOft 41 50 *8, 

- 443014 13V4 13% +'A 

I 794 10% »ft 9ft - 

_ HSS 1 *%, 'V. —»n 

_ ran uu 4ft 4ft — Vi» 

MS i! lWfflft 2MV «ft 

,,2b4 f ,Ǥs?ft ?E ^ rft 

_ 3385 BW 8 8 — 

Z T«5 *ft 3% 4ft ‘ft 

470 7ft 7 7 — % 

40 2J 3707 17% 17 17** ♦** 

_ 1040 14ft 12% 13%— lft 

- 1144 44 43 43 — 

-11849 3% 2 2ft —% 
_ 340 8ft 8% 0ft - ^ 

_. 185 9V» BVS |% —ft 

4401 lft 7 8% ^1% 

“ l ^ =% 

_24 a 1 4 117 17 17 ♦3, 

Z tan J0ft«w%»y» 

-. 17 6ft 6ft 4ft —J* 

BanPanc 100 3.1x4856 27% 7? 2% -ft 

iSSSciM *i W2'. Mft lift -ft 

RrpSou 1J0 3J 1310 33 32 33ft -ft 

BcdNJ JM 2 J „«2 30ft M% 30 —ft 

pTirv-tpr _ 31 Vj 20 Mi 71 “Jft 

M3 >SS|i :% 

BXScxm! -g 1J.T257 17ft 1«- 

J0 24 1024 21 18ft 21 .2% 

XS 1.7 245 15ft 13% 14ft - * 

10 2JJ 485 5 4ft S .ft 

_ *366 7ft 7ft 7ft -% 

— X29 0 7ft TV* — 

AS 12 342512% 13ft 13%. * k » 

jfi 3J 187 18ft 17% 18V* 

M 16 270 24-/4 23ft nft -ft 

Mi 2.0 589839ft 37„ 27*6—’ 1% 
_ 1725 1%» 1% 1% 

AO 1J 385 4ft 4ft 4Va ... 

- 3^ 18ft 17% 18% -ft 
.9 1431 13ft 12ft » 

_ 90 7ft 7 7 —ft 

_ 1075 14 12% 1J -1 

1887 7ft 6ft 6ft —ft 
_. 276 11ft 10% lift - A 

_. 1814 9ft 9ft 9ft — % 
18 2949 29ft 28ft 28ft - 


BB&T 


BJ Inc 
BISYS 

ss 

BMC WT 3 

BMJ 

BMW 

BSBBC5 

BTRn 

BTSW 

BTGInc 

ECTU Int 

BUM In* 

BWIP 

Babooe 

BaOvSs!-' 

Bocnim 

BadcSay 

BadsrP 

Bouev 

BkHgwt 

BoParJ 

Boldl m s 

Bok3*«Lv 

BolvGm 

BalirsOr 

BcrteV. 


SMo Ofv YM lflBiWdi LOW Cm dm 


A3e 

JO 


05 e 10 

n a3 

Id 1.99 9^ 


Ctnaistr 

Con®«: 

CV1SHH 


■15* 

10 20 


i 

ipw* 7 - 
P ft -S 

ift iry*. +% 


_ 2425 4ft 
mi 1341 2ft 

" ^45^, 

“ *tn 
39934 

llv&m :8 

««®U“ 

— “1% +VB 





*% 

*% 

— % 
-V„ 


05 20x40830% 20 

: wim far. 

11625% 24ft 
11827ft 24% _ 

501116 11 11% -% 

246 14 irA 13% .V„ 
10 36% 

_ 449 Jft 2ft 3 ‘ft 

- 1040 6% 6ft 6ft —ft 

-13321 56 47% 55ft .4% 

20 209 24 22ft 73ft — % 
M 8442 14ft 13ft 13ft 
_ 2161 8% 7ft 8% 
fl 1% lft lft 

- 4132 8ft 7 7ft 

- 2673 IS 16 17 
-10994 5ft* 4ft S 

- 280 - - 

- 237* 

_ 474 , 

_ m . 

_ 1854 3 2 2 

« 9*14 12% 1 

- 4002 8% Oft Bft ‘1% 

■14 2.1x20332 7ft 6% 7ft +lft 

- 9580 7 6% 6% 

— 15931 lft* "ZB *V* +t» u 

Z 1311 14% & 1 Y&k IvS 

- 878 4ft 3% 4% ‘ft 

-218217 14% 14ft +1% 

- 315 19 17% 17% — lVi 

- 3178 *ft Sft 4% 

- 1207 9 6ft 7ft —1ft 

- 858714% 12 13ft— lft 

- 452 4ft 3ft 4ft —ft 

- 476019% 16ft Hft ♦% 
_ 5747 50ft 48 49ft —ft 

- 1569 43% 40ft *TA _ 

- 1D91 35% 34ft 34ft — % 

- 4485 14% 14ft 1,” 

- 3198 3ft 2% 

20 800 15ft 14% ... . 

10 793 21ft M 20% — 1 

GehtiBC 107I15J Wioft 9% 10 +% 

CantCd — 219616% 15ft 16 ‘ft 


lft Vn A'u ‘Vp 
■ 2% lft .% 
113% 12% lift +% 

i"fS 



15ft ‘ft 

}2k +s 


CrmrrDkl 

centonn 


10ft ‘ft 


Canter wt 

CtrCOD 

CEurAUO 


CMiGarttn 
aril N Be 

cJerSc 

CJerFln 

arMlae 

CRsLte 

C nSom 

CniTroc 

atSou 

CntvBc 

Cspnin 

Ceram 

Cerbco 
Comer 


l.lt 


16% 

lift 10 10%—% 

_ 947 10% 9ft 9% .ft 

_ 607614 12ft 13% ‘ft 
' ” 25ft 23ft 24% +ft 



- f a » wyr-i 
ft H X 2 g^ sS S’ A z 

AOb20 X11217ft 16% 17ft —ft 
At 73 334ia%1PVa18 +1 

A4 5* 212 8ft 7ft 7ft - 

_ 73111 9ft 11 ‘lft 

_ I960 15% 14ft 14ft — % 

03c 0 4 4 6 4 — 

- ,0 ’f 7 2 

Z 113 5& 4ft lft *vZ 
_ 3797 40ft 38ft 38ft ‘ft 

- 3238 10ft 9% 10ft ‘1% 
Csrvecer 064 2. 2 1457 24% 2Sft 96 —ft 

» s - 20 i S¥%3*^ +IV ! 
z 135 % & a -5 

Clinnsn 09 M 18291 6% 5ft 6ft »«W 
ChrlFd » .06e 0 483 9ft 7ft 9 ‘lft 

“ 00 10 4571 20% 1 Bft 19ft +1% 

- 1240 5% 4ft 4% — % 

104* 5% 4ft 4ft - 

-23717 7ft 2ft 2i%, 

- 1170 7ft 6ft 6ft —1 

_ 1436 16 TS 15% _ 

- 3468 3% 7ft 3ft ‘ft 

- 19713% 12ft 1*% .ft 

.84 13 6939% 38% 38ft —ft 

- 56 4ft 3% 3% — 

_ 136913% 12% 12% —1 

_ 10713 12ft 

_ 4109 31 26ft 

J2B V 1 ?9ft t9ft .. 

04 A 162911% 10ft 10% 

- 4173 5 4ft 5 


CWOrwF 

Chattm 

ChkTcti 

Cbedcere 

Cbedcmia 

CbescKs 

CnmTrfc 

Chmfob 

OvnFin 

Chmpwr 

CherrvA 

Oirrves 

cneiEno 

OtestVs 

Chdock 

Ovcnss 


3% —ft 
12% —1 
12ft —ft 
30% ‘4ft 
19ft —ft 


OikJCmp 

OUMtHs 

Chinotek 


- 819 1ft lft 1% 

- 3442 11% 9% 10ft 


BolFute 

IS* 

j- I BollBCDS 

Zl% 1 BcnCaW 
' % . BeOMiC 
BenSot 


I J4e 9.7x1039 14*1 13ft 13% — ‘ •ISihia. 

1 08 BJ *439 13ft 1?V* 13'. .. I rSuSA, 

2. 5 2830 74", 22 23T. - ft 

18 7E5I6'7 15% 1 5*.?— 1 SZ5U; 

402 11' , 10 11 — ft , iSSSnF 


.28 
.tA I.i 


Aflitl 
AlllriitO 
Aloelte 
AlpMiC 
AlcMic wt 
AIBbol 
Alone' 
ilobcB'a 
Alsbcr! 

AlBLce 
AlteGM 
AIIO, i 
ABren 

Altera 

ASPOSC 
APron 
SnSriit 
Amcor 
AmesrPa 
av£p: o 

A^V - _ .n* 

Am r Kir. •, 

Amera: . 

APPP 1*0 0.1 

Amp Of 13* 14.1 

AFT.P 54 i* 

AFT.er 75 9 a 

AtwOni 
AmS.'C 




014 14'. 13ft 14 
1 12B 4ft 3ft 3ft —ft 

2A5lV*. .8% &L 

l ~ BestPd 

Brvtco 
BeUVBc 
- n rt 

0. 

l ; : -'ft ! g^« ic 

is, 

rfimeng 



60 


00 


_ 470 17ft 1 4ft 

- 533SI0’. 9ft 
JO *|97 15ft 14’., __ 
*74 7.. = 7=. r . V'~ 
il*19ft «9 19ft 
359 7V, 7 7' i 

aiO 0ft 6’» 4’ . 
WS «'» 7ft 7>. 
.45157 49 47'., 48 

393 V : 4V, S'. , 
36 16 15- * 14 14 

’.0 4409 74ft 77'., 74', 
-. 1C77 2ft 2 2'/. 

62 16', 


5ft 


1ft 


14'. 


10ft -2ft 
54 17’/ Mft 17ft 
141 4 9 364 17 15ft 17 - 1 
.. 364 2 lft 7 • 'ft 

16 U 46ie 13ft 13 12V, . ft 

.24 16 IB44 15'.i 14ft 14% — 

... 4779 16ft 14ft 16 —1 

.16* IJ 437 7ft 7i. 7% .ft 
71* 7ft 2 2 —ft 


.28 7. 
1.00 16 


74 Bft 8 Bft BlocCn, _ 3985 IV* I'/u IV» . % 

, 7 1417 1 1' io*k 10ft _ f" . adD 1 .080 30 566 33 ft 31V, 31 %— 1% 

LA MM 74% Tfi -.7036 4% 4 4% -ft 

I (.--DM'. 17 il tSv. ,> , BotUBnc 1J4 5015322 27% 24 ft 27ft .% 

.•■• I'r* 1“^ — •* ! BobEvn X9 10 7977 71ft 19% 70ft ‘lft 


BodeBs 
-j; ! Boomlwn 


56 7 1 4806679 76% 76% 

-. 2775 5% 5V« 5% —ft | 

»! 1% ’’ft 155 *:< MTfn*. 
.. 299 72% 21V. 22 - V. I 

_. 1241 Bft 8% 8'/, - ft I Sg V g 1 - 

70 83 ioft 10% 10% — % i 25E2?r 

_ 4651 7n "ft 'V„ 

-17136 I'Ve lift lft 

’ ‘ 151 70ft 70 70ft — % 

22 5% 5 5 

z«W»Y* 

_. 852013 II Vi 12ft —ft 
_ 1667 7V. Sft 6V. —lft 
4.9 576 48ft 46ft 48 - ft 

_. 345 6ft 4% 6ft —ft 

2305 8 7ft 


"*625" 



00 


JP5CJ 
AS.-O'r 
AmE,90n 
ArrBIiM 

AlTTEji"! 

Am — ft v 
AC.avn 

ACn'rtr 
ACclloifl 
AmEonie 
AmECDl 
AmEevc 

APiltm 
AmFrghi 
AGraet 

AMIITK3, 

AmHoic: 

AHomPai 
AHemrjr 
AlnaF .24 
AminPt wt 
AmlntPt 

AmLh? of 2.16 las 
AmLcR 
A/AS 5 
AMcdK 
AmMDSat 
AMotWe 
Aritlns 70* 

AmOflfDv 
AmPoc 
APnvG 

APwrCnv -.48425 16% 15 

ARubWi .050 J 1890 lift 10 

a Peer J4 «i,m S'.* 4% 

Am Peer 581 644 6 

Am&ofRz ... 6JS 14 13 

ASavFL - 165519% 1V% 

ASomon _ 1897 31 % 74%78'Vr, - 3'V U 

ASoH J4i _. 7178 3% Jft 3 

AStudio .08 2.7 1979 3ft 3 3 —ft 

.. 1756 25% 22% 25V, -2 
_ 158311% 10ft lift * 

- 4117 15ft 13ft 15ft -1 

_ 1038 4 Jft yi„ — »6, 

411 1% % ft _ 

... 60 7ft 6% 7% .ft 

.. 423 3 2ft 7ft — % 

... 341 Sft 4% 4"/„— 

04e I.I 1084 3'V„ 3V„ 3V„ 

00 10 1288 44% 44Y„ 44% 

- 1726 4 3V, 3% 

... 447 5ft 44* 4ft — % 

940 9 8 8ft — ft 

J« 1.2 762 21% 70% 70ft — % 

- 34445 5 Sft S3ft 54% — % 

_ 91 2ft 2 2 

.I0e J 13 18% 17ft 18% -V* 

JO 3.1 7S37 7 V. 5% 6ft — % 

.. 1554 7 4'i 4 ft .4* 

- 386 1% 1% lft —ft 

.8 9734 94* Bft 9% -1 

_. 446 8% 7% 8 + % 

1.4 101915% 13ft 14V. — % 

- 7791 5ft 4ft 5% ‘’V„ 

1*0 19V. 18ft Hft * ft 

79 15V, 14ft 14ft _ 

405 19V, 18 19 

606 15ft 14ft 15 * % 

- 219 3 2% 3 - 

.. 4393 14 13 13ft - % 

1.1 333 29 78<* 28% —ft 

- 7331 I* 14ft 15ft —ft 

.. 188 4 jft Jft _]% 

2J 170615ft 13% TS .1% 

- 671'Vi» lft lft — W 

-10020 49 44 48%. 2ft 

- 372 15ft ISft I5'A — % 

- 2132 aft Sft 6ft .ft 

- 618 3 2ft 3 .ft 

- 148 6ft 5% 5% —’A 

- 33455 W 16 Mft— 7 

- 9752IOV* 7ft 9ft *ft 

... 924 12% 10% 10%— lft 

2.1 461915% Mft 15 — V„ 

1684 15ft 13% 15%,*lVi( 

- 315011ft 11 II —ft 
I J 94829 38ft 35% 37V. -1 

3 3840 1 tv. raft ir —ft 
Jx7191 15ft 13ft 15 *1% 

... 590 5 3ft 4V4 — '/. 

- 173911V, 10ft 11% -ft 

- 1751 Sft 4% 5 

Z 3778 24% 20?V Z2?» ‘ft 

- 896 Sft 5 5% - ft 

- 1685 25% » 24% H 

... 48597 44ft 40ft 40ft— 2ft 

- 500 3ft 3 3 — % 

- 993 6% Sft 6 — W 

108 ft %, 

- 281 4% 3ft 3% —ft 

... 888714 13% 13W -ft 

- 6640 10ft 10 10ft ‘ft 

- 9*1 6ft 6ft 6% - V* 

- EDA 2V„ lft lft —ft 

- 145 lft 1% lft 

- 5101 4 3ft Sft 

- 63 9% 9 9 _ 

1.5 6600 70% Hft 19ft — % 
-. 239 19% 18ft »% * % 
._ 1079 Mft Mft Mft * % 

- 254819 18% 18% -ft 

- 1366 7/h 2 2 

.9 3748 70 19 70 - % 

- 2246% 44 45%-2 

- 9943 7ft Aft 7 ■ % 

._ 1760 5 4% 4% —ft 

- 851 1 'Vi. ft —Vi, 

3496 11% 10V, lift 'ft 

626 25 Vi 25ft ft 

7703014 37ft 27ft „ 

1783 10ft 10 10% ' ft 

95 2Vi 9% 2V, - ft 

5053 lft !%, IV, —ft 
|71 4ft 4% 4ft — % 
57 Bft 7 8% ■ ft 

3457 11% 10% lift • % 
. . __ Ml 20% 19% 20 -ft 
.44 9.4 1325 »'/. 18 lB’u —V, 
99 6% 5ft 5V» —V, 
,48b 3.0 4061* Mft 16% ■ % 


_ 7368 9ft 2 2ft * * J S&Hv.* 
-69167 27 24ft 26% *1V.. [ Q "P? j c 

_ 3938 12% 10ft 12 -H1SS2!! 

w 00 3J 1642 18ft 17ft IBft ‘% 

Ska 100 30 2398 52ft SI 53% -lft 

- 1960 3% 2% 3% *% 

02 11 983 13ft 13% 13ft » % 

-270*0 31% 27ft 31V. ‘3ft . ■ . 

- 03 11% 10ft 11% ‘I I SSEF* 
_ 291 4% 3ft 3% _i CjjJER 

- 720 8 7 7ft . % 1 Cdm 

- 784 14V. 13ft 13% * Vb 

J0e 10 437 16% 16ft 16% .% 

JO 1J 8823 MV, 73 23V*— lft 

_ 1467 TO 3 , 19% 20ft ♦ % 

_ 1530 17ft 17 17ft .ft 

.. 6922 15ft 14% l5Vi _ 

_ 137 Sft 5 5 

- 1591 12% lift lift - 

- 5*7 AW., 4 4'.* -ft 

_ 150 6ft 6% 6V, _ 

_ 167 10% io io% 

_ 7758 6ft 7ft Sft -ft 

04 1 J XVttJ 34ft 33". 34ft 
1.10 7J 80 15ft 14% 15% 


_ 2077 'ti ¥ tfu 
— 22079 " 


‘ft 

'43% 36" 42% ‘ 3S 

- 8476 7 4ft Aft — '/it 

-3218574 74 75 ‘ft 

J2 2J 391 20 % 20 20V, ♦ % 

_ 4552 4ft Sft 4ft * % 

- ^7 lft IW, 1ft ‘ft 

- 2379 2 1% 1% —ft 

-. 371 21 19ft 20% —ft 

071 20 9970 18V. 14% 16ft ‘ft 

._ 1410 8ft 8ft 8% 


1262 12 lift 11% — % 

- 1 904 MV. 12% 13 —ft 

- 3451 4% 5% 6% - ft i 


101 10% 9V, 9ft — 

10 1 ?1 21 21 

. 2429 3% 2ft 3 

1 2 1714 13'.- 12ft 13% -ft 

- 714 16ft 15V. ISft — % 

526 11% 9ft lift -1ft 

0 4197 13V, 17ft 13% - 

_ 744 2ft 2V« 2ft • V, 

- 1091 15% MV* 14V. - 1 

... 859 3ft 3% 3ft • % 

wn 1ft lft, m -ft. 

V„ — ‘T 


% 

„ . 2% 

_ 10% 10% —ft 
S 4% 4% —V* 

41ft. 4ft 4'ft. - W 

49% 46 4Sft * 2% 

V £ L tZ 

4ft 4% ‘ % 

lft 22% 22% — 1% 
ft 9ft fft 

Sf 5K* W :ii 

7 *'. 

10ft -% 

35 U , 4IW 16% 16% _ _ 

r - 1396 22 20ft 21 % - lft I Dura 

1.00 4.1 014 26V, 25% jo 1 '* —ft I Our* 

h J0a .9 *35 36 34ft 35 — % | Dora 

” ?! 


M 


xcel 


r ® k 


_iomatr 
Biomet 
Eiomira 
oSctrtv 
Biovepro 

Bknpti 

B*oTcC 
BrfdCo 

Brftcbr 

S£hE3b 

Blimoie & ,02i 

Blist-ou 


ft. 

{ 

772 ^ft" 1 “ ‘ft j Q'nfr'OlS 
006 4% 3"» 4ft —V. 1 anm 
*OJ Mft 11% 14 -7V, I gubCar 

791 tv!, 2 % 2 % 



20ft 24% 27% 


285611ft 10V, 


aoBa 


Series 

Ow Yid loos H^n Low Cbc Otae 



CupjNBk 

QtrTdt 

custcn 

cybrOpr 

S55S* 

m 

StRctun 

Slss? 

Cvtottr 

CytRx 


Z^^ 

- 410 7tt 

- 4B79 3% 
08 20 139431ft 
.10 1.1 1111 9% 
.10 r l.l 


3% 

Sft 

7 


346 —ft 
3% -ft 

5* r 
% 

9ft 9ft —ft 


Is r -i 


Z 1457 3ft 3ft 3ft ‘ft 

- 


- % VL ’S? 

Z 26398 3^4 S$m M%— 3% 
Z Sft 1% 5% —ft 

-40533 3ft 2ft 3Vu ‘ft 
_ 3331 5% 4ft 5 — 

- 9128 TV* Vht 1% —Vi* 


- 1289 7ft 4% 7ft .ft 
_ 1904 6ft 5ft 6 

_ W 7ft Aft 7 ft _ 
_ 627 2ft 2ft 2ft — ft 
_ 616 3 2ft Jft -% 
_ 2371 17ft 1<% 15% — lft 
_ 38724ft 21% 23% ‘1% 
_ 15 Jft 4ft «4 —ft 

- 8190 3% 


255 722 "385 19 
„ 607 I 
Wt 7J 248S1 





I 

4ft ... _ 

Oft 10% - 

23% 24 -% 



_ 940 19% 16% 18% *2 
_ 123 4 3% 4 ‘ft 

_ 142 4 3ft 3% — Vu 
- 4559 13 12% 14ft ‘lft 


_ 237 

_ 301 


ad* 

5 ‘ft 

1% -5 


Stocks 


Sole* 

Dfv Yld lOQsMh Low Cbe Otoe 




R7TWBC 

PanapCA 
FanGd f 

fS^XOO 


- ,s SS Srdfc 

.14 J 364 44% 41ft 43 *iK 
- 3923 5 4% 4% ‘ft 

06 0 1649 lift 10ft ]K —% 

JO 19 OT17ft 16ft 17% *% 

35 W 1273 Jft — - 






71 IS 14 14Wi*— *ft» 
9 lift 10% 11% - 

noil io% io% - 

384 2Pft. 28ft 26ft +% 


_ 3172 6% 5 
- BAS 6% 4 

zSS^^s 



FBCPQH 


_ 3 

5% 5% —ft 

jjamora _ 578610% 7% 8 —9% 

Pan fan -idACmu IBft 20% *2% 

DcraWn - 1949 Sft 3ft 3ft ~ 

Parjlnq - 70 12ft 12% 12% ‘ft 

PorKJc .IS J »8l 79 75 

gtfidcst _ 5229 4% 3% 

^ . z ^ lft a 

w; z s?ip w 

Potter - 406 3ft 2ft 3% — Vu 

Downer - 493 12ft 10% lift— 1 

DotKP - 8763 17ft 15ft 17 —V, 

Dataware -319712 9% 12 +2 

DtorWi - J2W lft 11* lft +% 

Otawtcwt — 686 Hfe ft, ft* ‘Vu 

DataRce — 1653 4% Jft 4 ‘ft 

Dotron - 379 1 2 1 0V, lift ‘1% 

Datum - 339610% 8% 9% .IV. 

Ooueftn 10Q 4J 5074 24 z3 23% ‘% 

Dowd - 75613% 12% 12% —ft 

Oovet _ 325 13ft lift 12ft .ft 

□avdsnA - 37*4 31ft 29% 30 ‘ft 

Davox _ 1134 8 4ft 4ft ‘ft 

Daw Tcb - *87 Sft 5V, 5ft ♦% 

Dawson _ 31710ft 10% 10% —ft 

DayRun — 2*62 lift 15% 16 *% 

Devry - 117429% 28 28% ‘ft 

De Watte _ 334 4ft 4ft 4ft 

* « , S M 7 gl% iff* 1^^ 

DeepTedi _ no 10% 9ft 9ft — % 

Deertocr* 00a 1.9 4SSH% 39 31% .% 

□efnlnc — S15 «ft 6ft 6% — 

DeflcSno - 101s 1 8ft Bft ‘ft 

_ 28514% 15ft 15% —ft 
00 3 X 680 26 24% 25% - 

.10b 10 7610% 10% 10% 

A* 2.9 80316% M% 11% ‘ft 

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-Vu 


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AUtdGib 
AUIdG wt 
AVana 
AmWtiite 
AWowj 
AmAII 

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Ammost 
A/rarCas 
Ameriwd 
Amtea 
Amoen 
Ami star 
Amokn 
Amrasca 
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AmtnH .20 
Amyiin 
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AiKriws 02 17 
Ananui 100 c 6.7 
Anoran — 

AncnBcp 
AncBWIs 


10 


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Andrew s 
Andros 
Andvne 
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Aneda 

Amec 

Anertus 

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AnfSous 

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ApbEs.tr 

ABlasct 

AplCorbn 

ApaDpti 

Apdimu 

Apainovs 

ApWMatl 

ApbMlcr 

ApdSel 

ApdSa wt 

ApItOia 

A pd Voice 

ApplU 

Aauagru 

Aaonx wt 

Areb5h 

Arokls 

AwmcA 

ArbarOnj 

ArborHl 

ArtrNII 

ArOiCm 

AraiPli 

A retca s 

Arden 

ArdenPd 

AroCom 

ArelC wt 

ArettluSd 

ArgeniH 

A/ObCP 

Argwv 

ArwAPb 

AriodP 

Aristors 

ArkRy 

Ari.Bwl 

Armor 

Arnolds 

AfissPn 

ArawFn 

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ArtsM 

ArtritG 

Arl Way 

Annie 

AicendC 

Ascco 

Asbwrtn 

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AsaBnc 

Asiec 

AsroriaF 

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00 


02 


08 

07 

05 


JO 


.19 


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1.16 « 


04 
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Borrar 

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BraclPhm 

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BrilBk, 

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Braktrt 

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BudiAms 

Buckle 

Buffets 

BuaCrak 

BuilrfT 

BullRun 

BurrBr 

BusnObl 

BusnRc 

Butter 

BuflrJVLf 

Surrey 


00 


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10 292721% 19% 20% ‘1% 
972 8 7V« 7% — % 

_ 17600 9% 9 9 _ 

- 112511% IOH IT —ft 

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$367 1 7% 15 17% *2% 

520 25% 24% 25 
-12017 13% 12% 13 
1 J9t» 5.9 3822% 21% 21% ‘1% 

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_ 438 4ft 3ft 4V4 

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-13404 18% 17% 17ft —ft 
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_ 76 10V, 9% 10 ♦% 

- 1463 3Wu 3Vu TVu - 

_ 248 2ft 2% 2ft — Vu 

194 1%, W u Wo *V B 

« 1%. 1% We — v£ 
58 48% 47 47ft ‘ft 

_ 137 lift lift 12ft +ft 

_ 9S2 Z Ift lft —w 
_ 123 3% 3 3ft —ft 

34 2.1x2716 12ft 11% 11% —ft 

04 20 796 1% mV 17ft —ft 
,. 1936 9% Bft fft —ft 
JOaXO 5910V, 9ft 10 —ft 
_ 3756 18 IMt lift *ft 
J9e 2J 11 19 17% 17ft —ft 

08a I J X8S6V« 6% 6Vi. — Vi, 
-25398 31ft 27 31ft +4% 
_. 4085 5ft 4ft 5ft ‘ft 
_. 92515ft 14% 15 ‘ft 
_. 1414 71% Hft 20ft ‘ft, 
_ 1414 7ft 6 ift —ft 
-2447* 37% 32% 36ft ‘2ft 
... 14528 27% 26% 27ft +1% 
>.32694 12% 6% 6% —5% 
_ 2289 7ft 7ft 7ft —ft 

- 153511% 9ft 11% ‘1 

_. 1028 12 1 0ft 11 —ft 

... 5054 12ft 9% lift *1H 
36 XI 10268 Bft Bft 8ft —ft 
00 20 47 32% 31ft 31ft —ft 

- 3468 3ft 3M 3% ‘ % 

351 17ft lift lift— 1 
— 15847 9% 7ft 8% ‘ft 
_ 1039 10% 9ft 10% 

_ 4B2 lift 10ft 10% — % 

- 551 IRte 1% 1% 

_ 717 13ft 13 13% —ft 

- 988 33 % 30% 33% *3ft 

- 451633ft 31ft 33% —ft 
2536 6% 6 ift ‘ft 

■ I0e J 789 33ft 32ft 33% — % 
_ 117 7% 7ft 7ft _ 



CB/awer 382 9ft 9ft 9% —ft 

C-CUBC - 5475 18% lift 17ft *lft 

CAI Wru ... 1301 Sft 7*A 7V, —1 

CB Bnc 100 40 tl 30 30 30 - 

CBTCPS 04 XI 382 22ft 20ft 21% — % 

CCA - 1797 4 3% 3ft ‘ft 

CCBFn 1J6 30 151936ft 33 36ft ‘lft 

- 3167 26% 24ft 27ft ‘1% 

_ 71910 9% 9ft »ft 

- 2266 31ft 39% 30 — % 

_ 1367 2ft 2% ?% *H 

- 41811ft lift 11% 

- 2 4ft 4% ift ‘ft 

Ml Mft 13ft Mft ‘ ft 

62 17 16 17 

219 20ft 20ft 20ft _ 

®11 2ft 2ft 2ft - 

_ 414 Sft M* 5 — ft 

... 469 17% Mft 17 ‘ % 

00b 20 1338 31ft 29ft 30% —ft 

08OXB 2821 19 21 -I 

_ 1664 Bft 7ft 7ft —ft 

J6i .. 82 14 13V* Mft ~ 

08 17 17124 22% 24 ‘lft 

665 7ft 6ft 7 —ft 

85 ift 4% 4% —ft 

4 27 J6ft 26ft — ft 

258 14ft 13ft Mft ‘ft 

775 24ft 22 34% +3 

260 7V« 7ft 7ft —ft 

.. 825 20% !93fc 20% ‘% 

- 883 8ft 8 1 —ft 


12 A 4401 37% 27ft 31 2% 


4ft 


7% 

3% 


1.08 


.12 


... 578 5 

13794 8 
. 551 3% 

.. 1117% 

... BSD i'a * 

. 19188 38% 31 ti 
... 2531 8% 7', 

.. 4463 9% 8% . 

. *95* 3? ?*ft 31 ■ 3% 

1.8 *7*9 12% 11% lift— lft 
.. 1776 IB lift (7% ■ 1 
33 371 33ft 31 •■, 32ft % 
.. 1209 17% lift 12V* —ft 
.. JflW 27% 76". 26% -ft 
12 314 10% ID 1 , 10% — v. 


CDPTch 
CD VMS 
CESan 
CEM 
CF1 Ind 
CFl Pra 

CFsa 
CFWCm 
CISTdi 
CMC Inn 

CMC lnt 

CNB 

Fi 

CMS 
CP AC 
CF8 

CPI Aero 

CPI wt 

CRH 

CSBFn 

CSFHht 

CSP 

CTEC 

CTLCr 

cu Bne 

CbtOson 

CMrimax 

CoootM 

CacHe 

CACI 

CodbvS 

Cadein 

Cadiz 

Cadmus 

Caere 

Coim 

Cataene 

Cal Amp 

CaSnc 

CoMCul 

CotFna 

CalMD 

Cau/uc 

CalSBh 

CallNet 

CallortP 

Calowpy 

Calumet s 


04b 20 
37 10 


1060X9 
JO XI 




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3ft — % Cambe* 

7 —ft 1 CambNe 

4 —ft 1 CombSnd 

38ft 6% I CamnTcb 
gft — '.* I CammAih 
9 • ft . CompoEl 

< cwmeS 
CWineA 
CandeXj 
Candfts 
CannEvp 
ConnExB 
Conondle 


122 7% 7 7 

719 18VS 17^6 17ft 

- 3167 4% 3 4% 

1011303 2746 5% 4% 

... 791 fft 4ft 4ft — W 

<89 9ft fft 9» 'ft 
1.178 47 462 26ft 25 25ft— 1% 

- 663 W* *’{U '/* -Ha 

- 1435 Sft 4ft 5 *ft 
.20 1J 85216ft 15ft 16 *1 

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-2161 5 7ft 7ft ‘ft 
-.12212 7ft 6ft 6ft 

- 2284 ift . 

.56 30 71 Mft 1 

-. 164 6% 6 

04 30 27513 12 

_ 8197 6ft 4ft S —n 
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.40 40 137 10 9ft 10 1 ft 

Z iu tV" 10% iw« -Z 
z’?SJo v ilA 5 

zwr fis 

-. 570 4 3V„ 3ft •% 

.. 1858 7ft 4ft 6 -lft 
3550 19% 18% 19 1 ft 

1510 16 15ft 15% 

510 II IQft 10% —ft 
IB 37 33% 37 ■ ft 

6767 34ft 35ft »% • ft 

M2 1% J} 4 “ft 

2062 1‘Vu lft Jft 
274 13 11% M 1 1 

162 13ft 12ft lift 


09 

09 


J4 
JO 
.15 
- 40 

cam ns 

CBCOP A 00 
CDlnJGOS 1J6 
QKaGP 00 
OXBnk 
COIFST 

Comarr 37 

Gomrco 
Comcsf s 
Cmcsos 
CmcsnjK 
Comcoo 
Comdulu 
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9.1 7625%, 25% 25ft —ft 

3746 10 8ftu *ft • % 
114 4V, 4% 4ft 
277 9% 9ft 9ft — 

_ 7442 4 3ft 3ft • ft 
91515 13% 14% 

502 14 lift 13% —ft 
371 14 V, 13ft 14 

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60 310 19% 18ft 19% —ft 
?.? *331% 30% 31 * ft 

_ 17410% *% 9ft —% 

05490516% 14% 15ft ‘lft 
-11137 16ft 15ft 16, —ft 

- 16617 16 14% - 

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FramTe 

3 ; FramSu 
Fram5 wt 


- 67*7 27% 25% 27ft ‘ft 

- 123 2% 7ft Tl u — Vu 
05b XX 1324 20 T7%19ft‘lft 

' "" 57727% Z7 27 

180 34 % 32% 33% *1 
44616% 15% 16% *}* 

403 16 1PA 14 *% 

548 15% 14% 14% —ft 

51 14% M% 14% — % 

487 8% 8 8Vu — Vu 

- 3812% H% 12% ‘ft 

- 5309 21ft 19% 21% rl% 

J8eU 31612% lift 12 —ft 


CmCWMC .931 8J 112812% 9% 10% —VS 

ComEnt _ 2318 °h, Wn «*% — Vu 

ComOrl _ BIO 17% 16% 16% 

ComSvs JO l3 140412% 10% 11% ‘% 

Cm/vBS I JO 40 4827% »% 26ft ‘% 

CBkPos 07 X* X29 24% 23 23%— 1 

Cmtyfln 02 40 59 12ft 12ft 12ft _ 

OrtW'HPU.lOMOJ 5 10% 10% 10% — % 
CamFtBfc 04 XI 2043 14% 13 14 ‘1 

ComFBptl.7S 63 ,72V 26% 26% — % 

UfllHIMV 

Comnet 


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- M73 Hft JO II *4* 

- 10511% 9% 11 -% 

ComoBne 02 4J 1507 22% 21% 21% ‘ft 
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Cmpcjn 
Computlg 
CmaDara 

CtoH S 
CfTUXdn 
CmnLR 
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CptOutS 
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Compuwr 
Comshr 
CmstRs 
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Comvers 


- 3453 7% 6% 

_ 1549 3% 3 3 _ 

_ 1 5% 5% 5% ‘Oft 

.10 10 341 10% S% 10 ♦% 

- 1527 35 13% 14% ‘ft 

_ 470 1'Vu 1% 1"A, 

00 40 160 9% 8% 9 ‘% 

_ 2737 *ft 6% 6Vu —Vi, 

- 198 4% 4 4 — % 

-,IH 4 i' 4 3 * ’Vu 

-19594 37% 33 36% ‘2% 

_ 858 12 10% 11% ‘ft 

190 Sft 316, 3Vu +V» 


1 2ft 2% i‘/u — vu 
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2%* 2%. 2Vu ‘V H 
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- 1597 5% Sft 5% 

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- 506813% 12% 12ft ‘4ft 
_ 1548 10% 10, 10 

- 7004 lft, IVu Ift 

_ 148 3% 2V. 2% 

- 341 S% f% Sft ‘ft 

- 27*0 10% 9ft 10% ‘ft 

- 1060 4ft 4% 4V. —ft 

_ 84127 lift Mft ‘Ift 

108 70 193 24 22ft 72 *% 

- 821 3 2% 2ft —ft 

.12 1J 8211 10% 10% _ 

_ 1375 6% 6% ift * Vu 

- 355 Mft ll'Vi, 12 — % 

_ 1065 17% 15% 17ft ♦% 

03f 03 2S110H 9Mr 9% —ft 

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7628 0% 8 8% —ft 

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1229 Zft 2 W « 2ft 

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_ 712 lft ft 'Vu — Vu 

_ 287 13% 12% Mft —ft 

-10 4 _ 

_ 274818% 16% 17% »ft 

- 1068 16ft Mft 15% ‘1% 

_ 3366 5% 3% 3ft —ft 

_ 1213 lft lft lft 

_ 277 7ft 6% 7% 

_ 325 6% 5ft 

-11212 11ft fft 


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_ 216*14% Mft 14% -V, , Crda 
-45118 8:. 8 Bft -Vu I _ 

_ 1673 2 % 2ft 2ft — ftlLidakwIC 
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Cdrtadi 

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CrdAOPS 

CreeRsh 

Or«Air 

CresArwt 

Crfflcre 

CWG 

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CrepG rw 

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Cranman 

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4134 11% 9*^ lift — Vu : CwnBH 


1.18 7J S77 17<A 16 Mft 

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.72 2880 1221 ft ft ft — % 
.. TS34 9*5, 9 9V„ -Vu 

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_ 20 2% 2% 7% _ 

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- 27017% 16% 16% -% 
_ 2632 15 13ft 14ft -t 

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.16 X0 X2D 8% Bft Bft •% 

00 20 516ft lift Mft —ft 

_ 3510% 10% 10% _ 

_ 2062 17% 16% Mft ‘ft 

_ 2810? 22% 20 20%-lft 

02 .1 X30199 19ft 17% 19 ‘ft 

04 0 529 9% 9 9% ‘ft 

_ 27918 l»u J%J 1%I -%» 

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1157 ft % % —% 

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080 0 368 15 M Mft 

- 39* 9 BV, 8ft 
_ 464 90% 18 V. 20ft -IV. 

- 2014 6% 5% ‘ft 

-503 Ift 1 lft ‘ft 

_ 10119 13ft lift 12ft * 'Vu 
_ 1M S% Sft Sft —ft 

- 170* Jft 2ft Jft —ft 

_ 698 Mft 13% 13ft - 
-1039011ft 10 11% 

_ 6007 15ft 13% 13ft— lft 

- 7303 3’/. 3V« 3ft - 

- 2407 16% 14% 15ft ‘ft 

- 3961 7ft ift 6% —ft 

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1.17 73 253 16ft 15% 15% —1 

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.16 2J 636 7% 7 7% 

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_ 328 12ft 11% 12% + '- 

_ 817 1ft lft IV,, —Xu 

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08 o 90 2754 9% 9 9% t % 

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106*30.7 J? 5 4% 4ft -ft 

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061 40 110 9% 9ft 9% —ft 

>£1 25% 94ft 24ft _ 
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624 13 12% 12% — % 

43 2% 2% 3% - 

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7.1 12 42 42 42 —ft 

- 288 6 3V, Sft *% 

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... - 465 1 Vi I 

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0 1389 90 19'A 19ft -ft 

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_ 91035 28% *“■ “ 

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1.9 731 26ft 95 25% —ft 

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07t 4J 609 Mft 12ft 

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08 13 39315 14 14ft ‘ft 

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.. 6451 fVt 8% lft *% 

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— 6m 56 51ft 54 ‘2% 

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- 154 6% 6% 6% —ft 

36b 40 <1206 13ft 13% 13 —ft 
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_ 17418% 17% 17% — % 

_ 3177 9 7ft 9 ' 1ft 

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32 3.0 


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GcodGy 

GooPnv 

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GcranC 

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- 509 6% 6ft ift * ft 

50 66 34% 34% 34% — 2% 

10 798 Mft 19ft 19% _ 

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_ 5133 2% 2ft 2Vu 

- 27312% 12ft T2ft —ft 

7 x415 10% 9% *% —ft 

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_ 438 lft 1 1 -V H 

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330 21% 30% 21% ‘% 
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7313 12% 12ft —ft 

W74 (ffft 16% 17% - ft 
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4422 34 29»A 33% »3% 

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743 1% 1% 1% ‘Vu 

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*6 22V, 21 22% ‘lft 

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* 102 Bft 7% 7% *% 

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274 24 23 24 ‘ft 

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4065 31% 79 30% ‘1% 

203 7 6% 7 ‘Vu 

„ 5447 8 6% 7% —ft 

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MRS Cm 
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JOB 10 
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„ 2*9 5 5% 

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50 248 33% 31% 32’A * ft 

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16517ft 16% 16ft — % 
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30 6717% 16 14 —jft 

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McGm 04 20 85217’A 1W 16ft IS 


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_ 721 47k < ift -uft 

u. 5817 26% 24% 26% - £ 

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_ 126 6 5ft Sft 1. 

- 150 1V» 1% lft -j,u 

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06 20 151623% 23' - DVi Z 

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06s 2 3552 


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Coirimu^j on Page 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1994 


SPONSORED SECTION 


BERLIN AND BRANDENBURG 



A step at a tone: Bertot and Brandenburg are moving ahead as Gernianfs capital region. Above: Frederick the Greats SmssouctcasOe in Potsdam. 


After the Turnaround, 
Brandenburg Takes Off 

The cwnulative figures speak of rapid growth in this four-year-old state. 


The state of Brandenburg, powered 
by an 8 percent growth rate , is quickly 
maturing into one of Europe's most advanced 
economies. Berlin , once regarded as an aging 
city with an aging population, today has an 
unexcelled number of young companies , 
recently launched development parks and 
newly arrived talent Their growing business, 
institutional and personal ties are integrating 
the two states, forming one of Europe's 
most vital regions - now 
becoming the home of 
Germany's federal government 


The City-Slate 
of Berlin 

Area: 883 square kilometers 
Population: 3i million 
Mayor: Eberhard Diepgen 
The State 
of Brandenburg 
Area: 29,059 square 
kilometers 

Population: 2.6 million 
Capital: Potsdam { 139.000) 
Other major cities: Cottbus 
(129.000) 

Brandenburg (90,000) 
Frankfurt an der Oder (85.000) 


A^randenburg's economy is heading to- 
ward an 8 percent increase in 1994, an all- 
time record for the state. At latest report the 
state's industrial sector was leading the way. 
Its output was up 10.7 percent, with orders 
showing an overwhelming 26 percent rise. A 
corresponding growth in the state's industri- 
al work force has caused the number of un- 
employed in the state to drop 16 percent 
over the past year. 

Also very encouraging for the state’s eco- 
nomic policymakers is the 14 percent rise in 
exports in 1994, including a jump of 49 per- 
cent in those to industrialized Western coun- 


Also new in Frankfurt an der Oder is an 
international business park and a world trade 
center. This city’s metamorphosis illustrates 
a statewide pattern, according to Manfred 
Stolpe. Brandenburg's prime minister (gov- 
ernor), that shows “a willingness by both the 
government and the people of this state to 
take on adverse situations and turn them 
around.” 

Not are the state’s ICT activities confined 
to Frankfurt an der Oder. Mobile telephone 
networks, devices and related services are 
booming in Germany. Many of the country's 
23 million mobile telephones (a number set 


tries. Record totals of orders on hand » just • to double oyer the ‘next two years) are now 


one reason why 93 percent of all industrial 
companies in Brandenburg - a record for 
Germany - expect to register increased sales 
in 1995, according to a survey just released 
by Cologne’s Institut der Deutschen 
Wirtschaft 

Cumulative effects 

These broad-scale, substantial increases, 
points out Burkhard Dreher, the state's min- 
ister of economic affairs and technology, 
“represent the sum total of hundreds of radi- 
cal transformations of individual industries 
and individual communities.'' 

Nearly all of these transformations have 
been far more difficult and complex than the 
simple overall figures and relatively short 
time spans would suggest 
Originally, the verdict from outside ob- 
servers was clean in the postunification peri- 
od. Frankfurt an der Oder would be a “sub- 
sistence case,” surviving on the transit traffic 
passing through the city on its way to and 
from Poland, and on its engineering and con- 
struction activities, long a specialty of the 
city. Frankfurt an der Oder was not expected 
to flourish, and certainly not to become one 
of Europe’s budding centers of innovation in 
ICT (information and communications tech- 
nologies). 

In fact, Brandenburg was not expected to 
have an ICT sector at all. The conventional 
wisdom of the early 1990s foresaw a few 
satellite operations surviving on subsidies in 
Dresden and Erfurt — and nowhere else in 
Germany’s new states. 

What reaDy happened 
Today, in a firet for all of Europe, new, ultra- 
efficient ASSET (all spacer separation ele- 
ment transistor) bipolar transistors for sili- 
con-based chips are coming from SMI Sys- 
tem Microelectronic Innovation GmbH a 

company successfully refloated in 1993. 

Some 49 percent of SMTs equity is heldlty 
Synergy Semiconductor ^Corporadon (Sarrtf 
Clara, California). Frankfort an der _ Oder s 
Institut fur Halbleiterphysik Unstitote for 
semiconductor physics) be come up with 
revolutionary new ways Gf parterning and 
desieninc silicon for use in chips. A locally 

based* company, Softwarehaus Dr. Maye 

de“loSed a highly promising “image 
use by the police force and m- 

”ta!KK£ » d- Oder is a flomfch- 

SS5S«ffi*- 

5r '£ yssXSfS: 

cvurentiy the newest^rnrv Qf higher 

burg over the past five years. 


getting better reception, thanks to a SAW 
(surface acoustic wave) intermediate Filler 
developed by Teltow’s Tele Filler GmbH 
Other examples of Brandenburg’s IT indus- 
try include a hard disk testing center in 
Schwante. 

The sum total of these innovations, new 
companies and rebuilding communities is a 
bald statistic - the ICT and electronics sec- 
tor’s turnover is now up 49 percent over the 
previous year’s. 

One more simple statistic - a 20 percent 
growth in the turnover achieved by the 
state’s chemical sector - reflects another 
complex turnaround, this one centered on 
such communities as Schwarzheide. located 
at Brandenburg’s southern tip. 

The investment miracle 
In 1990, Schwarzheide was facing a situa- 
tion common to a dozen communities in 
Brandenburg. It had an aging industrial 
stock and a sprinkling of newly founded 
companies, an uncertain economic future 
and a definite problem with industry-caused 
damage to its environment. 

Then came BASF, one of the world’s four 
largest chemical companies, which decided 
to invest 13 billion Deutsche marks ($826 
million) in the building of 10 production fa- 
cilities in the city. Overnight - or so it 
seemed - Schwarzheide had an economic 
future and tax revenues to devote to its envi- 
ronment, and Brandenburg had a large piece 
of a new chemical industry. 

That is the way it looked from the outside. 
In fact, remembers Mr. Dreher, who was in- 
volved in the process from the state govern- 
ment side, the negotiations setting up the in- 
vestment involved assembling thousands of 
facts and figures into proposals for BASF to 
consider. After the company decided to in- 
vest in Schwarzheide, the state's business 
developers bad a new responsibility: fast- 
tracking various approval processes through 
ministries and authorities that bad not exist- 
ed a few months before. 

Getting it done 

This speed and efficiency of business devel- 
opment in Brandenburg is mentioned ap- 
provingly in a recent issue of impulse maga- 
zine. which lauds the state's “get it done" at- 
titude. This attitude caused some 17.8 billion 
DM (according to a conservative estimate) 
in private-sector investment to flow to Bran- 
denburg in ihe period 1991-93. 

To find out why this figure is expected to 
amount to 53 billion DM in 1994, up 8 per- 
cent over 1993's figure, it is necessary to fol- 
low what has been going on after the first 
wave of investment in Brandenburg came to 
an end, and return to Schwarzheide. 

The first of BASF’s 10 facilities at 
Schwarzheide was completed in November 
1993, with three more following. While 

Continued on page 14 


.war 





Many Accomplishments, 
And Much More to Be Done 



“Berlin and Brandenburg” 

. a I /I f +1 


was produced in ,£S enttn 

It was spam 

Writer: Terry Swaraberg 


Program director: Bill Mahder , 


The Beriin Senate, in the Rotes Rathaus, the u redtom haO. ” . 

Progress Toward 
1999 Unification 

Eberhard Diepgen is 
Berlin's governing mayor. 
Born in 1941, Mr. Diepgen 
has a degree in jurispru- 
dence. In 1971, he was 
elected to West Berlin’s 
city-state parliament, and 
in 1984, be was elected gov- 
erning mayor of West 
Berlin, a position he held 
untH earty 1989. In 1991, he 
was returned to the govern- 
ing mayorship of the now 
unified dty. 

Serin’s governing mayor, fiber- . of the unifica- 
hard Diepgen. non of Berlin and Branden- 

burg and that of the reloca- 
tion af Germany 's federal government to Berlin: 

“Everybody has had the feeling, at one rime or other, that 
both processes could be - should be - unfolding much more 
quickly. At those times, it’s a good idea to step bade and 
consider the import and impact of these processes. What’s 
involved is the relocating of the government of ewe of the 
world’s leading countries and the joining of two federal 
states - a first for modem Germany. In view of what is at 
stake in both these processes, the taking of time for a bit of 
careful consideration and detailed discussion is inevitable, 
and perhaps not inadvisable. 

“However, discussion and deliberation does not at all im- 
ply delay. Neither process is behind schedule. The joining of 
Berlin and Brandenburg will take place, as foreseen, in 
1999. Before then, the parliaments and the residents of both 
states will have voted on the draft treaty of union. 

“To perform its many operations and handle its many re- 
sponsibilities, the federal government will require a large 
stock of buildings, extensive transport infrastructure and a 
wide variety of services. All of these are currently being con- 
structed, revamped or procured. Everything will be in pla c e 
in Berlin by 1998, when the two-year process of relocation is 
set to start.” 

On where Berlin stands now: 

“Anybody who has walked through Berlin and seen the 
construction sites, the newly completed buildings and the 
new stores and companies knows that Berlin is the focal 
point of the uniting of Germany - and I mean this both phys- 
ically and psychologically. Anybody who was in Berlin in 
the old days, the days in which a wall divided us from each 
other, knows how very far we in Berlin have already come. 
Anybody intending to completely rejuvenate this city, to 
give it a new flexibility and modernity - and that is very 
much the objective of tins government - knows how very 
much there still is to be done.” 


Born in 1936, Manfred 
Stolpe has served as Bran- 
denburg’s prime minister 
since the state's inception 
in October 1990. In 1994, 
be was re-elected with a 54 
percent of the total vote. 
After having studied law, 
he spent 30 years serving 
East Germany's activist 
Protestant church, rising 
to head the church’s coun- 
cil for the Berlin-Brandeo- 
borg region. 

At what stage is the unifi- 
cation process between 
Berlin and Brandenburg? 

With one exception, the 
only problems remaining are 
psychological ones. The ne- 
gotiating teams firm Berlin 
and Brandenburg have made 
great progress toward re- 
solving a whole range of 
complicated, practical is- 
sues, ranging from the 
staffing of the new state 
government to various 
local/state divisions of pow- 
er. The exception is the ex- 
act apportionment of federal 
revenue-sharing funds on 
the municipal level, and 
even in this area, there are 
no insurmountable obstacles 
to be overcome. The psy- 
chological ones include con- 
cerns known all over the 
world. Communities outside 
a large metropolitan area - 
and greater Berlin has some 
43 million residents - are 
afraid of coming under its 
sway, of its numerical 
might This is very much a 
concern in rural Branden- 
burg. 

Other problems are specif- 
ic to Berlin and Branden- 
burg. and are products of our 
unique histoiy. After being 
an integrated region, Berlin 
and Brandenburg were parti- 
tioned into separate areas by 
the Cold War. Each of these 
areas gradually formed its 
own local culture and identi- 
ty. We are noticing the re- 
sults of tins rift today, in the 
lack of perception of a com- 
mon fate and of common 
ground. Both state govern- 
ments have been working to 


allay these fears and forge 
links between Berlin and 
Brandenburg. 

What does this entail ? 

The process of the unifica- 
tion of Berlin and Branden- 
burg has generated a 
healthy, cathartic amount of 
debate and controversy. 
Many of the questions 
brought up during these dis- 
cussions have been ad- 
dressed and laid to rest 
through the reaching of bi- 
state agreements, creating a 
further impetus toward uni- 
fication. The two states' 
politicians have eradicated 
many prejudices and allevi- 
ated a number of worries by 
simply visiting the other 
state, and engaging its citi- 
zens in dialogue. The 
process of unification has 
been given repeated boosts 
by its two strongest allies: 
the rapidly transforming 
economies of Berlin and 
Brandenburg. 


Manfred Sfoipe: “Branden- 
biug's rapid growth has 


practical form of unification. 

Perhaps the greatest force 
for unity is a simple fact: We 
in Berlin and Brandenburg 
are now very well-acquaint- 
ed with each other and with 
each others' state. Students 
commuting from Cottbus to 
Berlin, teachers relocating 
from Berlin to Cottbus, 
tourists from both states go- 
ing everywhere in both 
states - there is now a 
tremendous amount of mo- 
bility of occupation and 
recreation within Branden- 
burg and Berlin, and that 
mobility is breeding famil- 
iarity - and trust. 

What time frame are you 
now projecting for the com- 
pletion of the process of 
transformation? 

Its sheer scope and com- 
plexity mandates that it 
won’t be before the end of 
the decade that the main 
phase of this transformation 
will be complete. 


being sackBed with a needy 
“poor reiation,' and in 
Brandenburg of being depen- 
dent upon Bettife bagesse.” 


Brandenburg's rapid 
growth has dispelled fears in 
Berlin of being saddled with 
a needy “poor relation,” and 
in Brandenburg of being de- 
pendent upon Berlin’s 
largesse. More important, 
the transformation has 
spawned thousands of new 
companies in both states. 
These companies have been 
actively seeking partners, 
suppliers and distributors, 
often finding them in the 
other state. The number of 
these bi-state business rela- 
tionships is mushrooming. 
Every day. these bi-state 
partners engage in a very 



This process will never be 
entirely concluded. In this 
regard, Brandenburg is no 
different than anywhere else 
in today’s world. While 
Brandenburg has been ac- 
complishing four decades of 
catching up within four 
years, the outside world has 
kept on developing, and will 
continue to do so. 

The most encouraging as- 
pect of Brandenburg's situa- 
tion is that its centers of 
transformation feature mixes 
of products and services and 
employ technologies already 
on a par with those found in 
the world's advanced areas. 










Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, DECEMBER 19 , 1994 


^^soui r> >i:< 1 1<>\ 


GERMANY: 


BERLIN 


AND 



R R A N D E N BJL!Lg 

Nor a Subject of Debate: 
Berlin’s Growing Dynamism 

To whas extent will The Move transform Berlin i economy and cityscape 


Takeoff 

OfStaie 

Continued from page IS 

work on the others is rapidly 
being completed, a follow- 
up fjcility has issued from 
the drawing board. 

This 100 million DM fa- 
cility. also located in 
Schwarzheide. is owned by 
B ASF and the U.S. General 
Electric. It w ill start produc- 
ing plastics for (he automo- 
me and capital goods indus- 
tries in !W, 

Anther example of follow- 
up and second-stage inve.st- 
ment iv BMW Rolls-Royce, 
which i> now building a sec- 
ond. Zt'H.i million DM facility 
l or the production of jet en- 
gines in Dahlcwitz. 

Sleek new facilities 
Almost all the newly com- 
pleted industrial facilities are 
inconspicuous low-rises, 
generally clustered in neat, 
new business parks, mostly 
out of sight of the casual 
traveler. 

What catches the travel- 
er's eye are the splashy 
spreads of shopping malls 
and hotels, blocks of perfect- 
ly restored apartment build- 
ings and ribbons of freshly 
paved roads found through- 
out the state. 

This ongoing transforma- 
tion of the state’s “capital 
stock” has found due expres- 
sion in official statistics, 
which are reporting a 29 per- 
cent rise in the construction 
industry’s turnover in 1994. 
A 26 percent increase in or- 
ders means that 1995’s fig- 
ure should remain at this 
high level. 

This transformation has 
reworked the business bases 
of such small, enterprising 
cities as Cottbus, Branden- 
burg, Eisenhiittenstadt and 
Wittstock, which have be- 
come centers providing 
nearly every imaginable 
kind of engineering, con- 
struction and other technical 


Business development 
Brandenburg features an ex- 
ceptional depth and breadth 
of business development ac- 
tivities. Wirtschaftsfdr- 
derung Brandenburg GmbH 
serves as the link between 
the state’s economy and the 
international business com- 
munity. 

An additional 22 develop- 
ment corporations work on 
securing investment for their 
particular communities and 
regions - by far the largest 
number of such organiza- 
tions in any of Germany's 
new states. For prominent 
members of the .stale’s busi- 
ness. scientific and cultural 
communities wishing to par- 
ticipate directly in furthering 
Brandenburg’s develop- 
ment, there is" Pro Branden- 
burg. a vehicle for consen- 
sus-building. 



The ever-growing spate 
ol state-to-state agree- 
ments and flows of com- 
muter traffic have gotten 
the lion’s share of atten- 
tion, but it is actually on 
the company-to-company 
level that the unification of 
Berlin and Brandenburg 
is finding its fullest and 
most significant expres- 
sion. 

At least, that is what re- 
cent studies are report- 
ing. According to their 
findings. 70 percent of 
Brandenburg’s compa- 
nies now have close 
working relationships with 
companies in Berlin, and 
50 percent of Berlin's 


companies have similar 
arrangements in Bran- 
denburg, Fully one-sev- 
enth of both states' indus- 
trial sectors have made 
major investments in the 
other state, according to a 
report issued by local 
chambers of commerce. 

To further these ties, 
.the stales hold joint "sup- 
pliers' exchanges," in 
which producers get to- 
gether with potential sup- 
pliers in the region and 
award bi-state innovation 
prizes. 

They have also set up 
bi-state redevelopment 
authorities and various 
development funds. 







The look of Berlin in the 1990s: ever since the Wall came down, new 
buildings have been going up. An estimated 100.000 to 200.000 new 
jobs mil be created m the city next year. 


Jjjvery detail seems to be the subject of de- 
bate: Will the relocation of Germany s fed- 
eral government Involve a net transfer ot 

7.000 or 16,000 officials, a cost of 24.9 bil- 
lion Deutsche marks ($15 billion) or 3b bil- 
lion DM, a total of 350,000 or 450,000 
square meters in office space - and will it be 
completed by 2002 or 2005? 

Another subject of speculation is the size 
of the relocation - ’ s multiplier. 

According to a study undertaken by 
BankgeseUschaft Berlin AG, the move will 
probably generate somewhere between 151 
billion DM and 318 billion DM in additional 
investment in greater Berlin’s economy. It 
should produce between 251,000 and 

408.000 permanent jobs. All of these fore- 
casts are, in turn, based on a variety of sce- 
narios and assumptions. 

Getting down to business 
While the forecasts fly and preparations for 
the event itself continue, the reconstruction 
of the city-state’s business base is proceed- 
ing systematically and rapidly, as is the eco- 
nomic unification of the city’s rwo halves. 

Says Eberhard Diepgen, Berlin’s govern- 
ing may on “The progress achieved during 
the last four years has arisen from a success- 
ful division'of responsibility between the 
public and private sectors, both of which 
have spent the last five years planning, in- 
vesting and learning. The public sector's ac- 
tivities have yielded modem transport and 
telecommunication systems and infrastruc- 
ture and dozens of innovation centers and 
technology parks. Using and filling them 
have been our city's resurgent private sector 
and its newly founded or newly re-engi- 
neered companies with their newly built or 
re-equipped factories and office buildings.” 

Investment in infrastructure has been mas- 
sive. Four years ago, a 60 billion DM pro- 
gram to upgrade Berlin's mass transit, roads, 
railroads, telecommunications and power 
and water supply networks was launched. 
.Along with this investment came a great im- 
provement in the quality- of the city's envi- 
ronment. Today. Berlin’s levels of air pollu- 
tants are one-third to 85 percent below those 
of 19S9; notable exceptions are ozone and 
benzol. 

Breakthrough technologies 
This has spurred a huge renewal of the pri- 
vate sector. “Some of the newest and most 
exciting products issuing from the city are 
being manufactured b\ the medical tech- 
nologies. materials handling and electronics 
sectors - ail longtime corporate mainstays in 
Berlin.” says Mr. Diepgen. "It's getting dif- 
ficult to find a production facility in Berlin 
that hasn't been either recently built or re- 
vamped. That's the biggest change over five 
years ago. and it applies equally to East and 
West. Today . both the city and its economy 
have an entirely new look." 

Part of this new look is a surge in rhe .ser- 
vice sector. In 1993. Berlin's business ser- 
vice.- sector had revenues of 40.3 billion 
DM. up 23 percent over two years earlier - 
and that in a time of international recession. 
Aside from items strictly related to the move 
i such as the dramatic increase in turnovers 


from international wine sen*** “ w ^ 
to BeSmost of this increase has ensued 
from^Wlel trends in both halves of the: 

city,” as Mr. Diepgen puts it -J, 

“The service sector was underrepresented 

in each part of the city,” Mr. pepfn 
out “Metropolises generaUy 
vice centers for their hinterlands, s 

something West Berlin didn’t ^ for four 
decades, last Beilin’s was shacWrflby^ 
German roles and regulations. Today, both 
Sons have completely changed. Tata- 
Jd people from all over Germany areflock.- 
ine to all parts of our city, indisputably the 
most lively and enlivening one in the coun- 
try They’ve been founding or joining adver- 
tising agencies, finance houses and archi- 
tects’ offices. Many of their paitnere, bosses- 
or employees are our city s lewd ralem. 
They, too, have been making full use of the - 
new opportunities. 

Growth sectors 

The fastest-growing area of the service sec- 
tor has been in such relatively unglamqrous 
but highly productive areas as the skilled 
crafts, construction and environmental tech- 
nologies sectors. 

Berlin’s skilled crafts operations now em- 
ploy a quarter of a million people* 45,000 
more than three years ago. 

The newest breed within the service sector 
is the project contractor. These multiservice 
providers coordinate and carry out the build-, 
ing of entire integrated infiastrocture sys- 
tems and production facilities. Behind the 
proliferation of contractors is their ability to 
draw on Berlin’ s clusters of expertise, which 
range from civil engineering to jurispru- 
dence to production technologies. 

“Many observers have called Berlin - and 
specifically its Western half - the great job 
creator for much of Germany's new states,” 
reports Mr. Diepgen, “because of the 

170.000 people commuting into Wes Berlin 
every day from outside the city. But I call 
the new stales Berlin’s job creator, because 
an increasing amount of our technical ser- 
\ ices companies are living from work, in the 
East” 

A turbulent five years 
“Conversion. Privatization on a massive 
scale of state-run enterprises and the creating 
of a new business base in the East The re- 
newal of a mature business base in the West 
The end of wholesale federal financial sup- 
port for the city,” says Mr. Diepgen, check- 
ing off the list. “Berlin has experienced, con- 
fronted and mastered each of the individual 
problems arising from Germany’s unifica- 
tion and from Europe’s ongoing integration, 
plus a few ail our own. As the latest figures 
in Berlin's GDP, industrial production and 
export figures detail, the turnaround has 
started, and a period of long-term growth is 
presumably at hand.” 

He adds: “Whether our growth in 1995 is 
2 percent or 4 percent, whether we create 

100.000 or 200.000 jobs next year, there is 
one thing we've already achieved. We've 
proven that a city can stay livable while 
putting itself through a top-to-bottom re- 
vamping.” 


More Research Centers, fm 
Higher Technologies |§|; 

Former industrial sites are being transformed into high-tech centers. 


An the early 1980s, Germany’s 
business community began reading 
about a new idea in business devel- 
opment: a former industrial sire’s be- 
ing turned into a technology center. 
The first of this species was the 
Berliner Innovations- und Griln- 
derzentrum (BIG), located in the 
city’s Wedding district. Shortly 
thereafter, the world also began to 
hear tales of highly interesting prod- 
ucts from absolutely unknown com- 
panies, a large number of them 
based in Berlin. 

Since then, and especially since 
the reunification of the city, the 
number of technology centers and 
technology companies has multi- 
plied. At latest, informal count, there 
were four major technology parks, 
250 research and technology devel- 
opment centers and 2 1 industrial ar- 
eas undergoing various forms of 
technological redevelopment in the 
city. All told, 50.000 people are em- 
ployed in the city's R&D sector. 

More where that came from 
Additional centers are in the 
pipeline. Under construction in East- 
ern Berlin's Marzahn and Pankow 
districts are two centers that will 
each have 30.000 square meters of 
space and house more than 70 high- 
tech companies. Both are set for 
completion within two years. 

Each of these centers represents an 
abundance of business struggles and 
innovative successes. Take Eastern 
Berlin’s WF. Television tubes are 
still being made at Werk fur Femsc- 
helektronik, to give WF its proper 
name. In fact, the facility's new 
owner. Samsung Elektronische 
Bauelemenie GmbH, is now produc- 
ing just under a million of them a 
year. When the South Korean com- 
pany's 195 million Deutsche mark 
($124 millioni investment program 
has hecn completed, the output will 
rise six-fold. 

Samsung could not employ most 
of WF's R&D staff, or use more 


than a fraction of its site. As a result, 
also now located on the former WF 
site are a slew of young, creative 
companies, all of whose activities 
have something to do with television 
technologies. 

Technological spin-offs 
One of them is Vicor GmbH, which 
uses an ingenious mix of brute force 
and fine chemistry ro recycle televi- 
sion and computer monitors, LCD 
displays and other highly polluting 
electronic devices. 

Showing an uncommon sense for 
the bottom line, Vicor earns a good 
living carrying out its recyeling'on a 
per-fee basis for end users. The com- 
pany also provides recycling ser- 
vices for some of Germany’s major 
computer producers, which are now 
required to take back used devices 
and dispose of them in an environ- 
mentally friendly way. Vicor has 
also successfully franchised its tech- 
nology to a number of electronic re- 
cycling parks in the new states. 

OSA Elektronik GmbH is one of 
Vicor s neighbors at WF. Like Vi- 
cor, OSA is a successful manage- 
ment buyout, and also like Vicor, 
OSA's main startup capital was the 
stock of ideas in its founder-owners' 
heads. 

OSA's Wolfgang Eibnerand Wolf 
Albrecht had an interesting idea: us- 
ing ultra-efficient, low-power-con- 
suming optoelectronic diodes to illu- 
minate building numbers, doctors’ 
office signs and other hard-to-see 
items. Today, this idea has become a 
staple of Berlin's residential neigh- 
borhoods. much to the delight of 
eyesore pizza deliverers, doctors 
making emergency calls and 
strangers trying to find iheir way 
around. The’ success of its product 
has allowed OSA in quadruple its 
work force and to win a major Ger- 
man prize for innovation. 

IRMA (infrared motion analyzer) 
counts people - people entering bus- 
es or bank buildings nr moving 



Conversion Sues 
Attract Business 

Multinationals thrive in ex-military locations. 




New technologies Include recycling TV tubes and computer monitors. 


around train stations or even discos. 
Thanks to its use of advanced in- 
frared-based cameras, IRMA does 
this more accurately than any other 
device on the market. Using models 
formulated on the basis of IRMA's 
data, mass-transit system operators 
know how many buses to employ at 
\arious times of the day, and banks 
can see how to deploy their tellers to 
best advantage. 

The end of the crowd as we know 
if* “Perhaps, if enough IRMAs arc 
sold/' says Renate Karl, head of 
marketing at iris-GmbH. the systems 
producer. The company, which is re- 
porting “strong market interest.’' is 
also located on the former WF site, 
as is a technology transfer marketing 
group and an institute for research 
into plasma technologies. 

Big, and getting bigger 
While its offspring have been grow- 
ing more and more numerous. BIG 
itself has been getting bigger. BIG 
and its twin. Technologic- und Inno- 
vationspark Berlin (TIP), now have 
60.000 square meters of space hous- 
ing more than 60 young high-tech 
companies, with ’another 3o,000 
square meters being used by various 
research institutes. The institutes' 
funding conics from the more than 


2.4 billion DM spent annually by 
Berlin's public and private sectors 
on research. All told, 2.000 people 
work at TIP and BIG. whose collec- 
tive output of goods and services 
came to 250 million DM in 1993. 

The biggest of all centers is the 
sprawling Science and Technology 
Park in Adlershof. whose 76 
hectares (390 acres), located in East- 
ern Berlin's Treptow district, once 
belonged to East Germany's Acade- 
my of Science. At latest report. 
Adlershof is set to house 140 com- 
panies and 15 national centers of re- 
search. and has been budgeted to re- 
ceive more than 10.7 billion DM in 
capital investment over the next 
decade. 

Some 4,000 scientists and techni- 
cians work at Adlershof today, with 
that number forecast to more than 
triple once all the facilities currently 
under construction have been com- 
pleted. The largest of these is 
BESS Y I Berliner Elektronenspe- 
icherring fur Synchrorronstrahlung > 
II. the IV5 million DM synchrotron. 
Also under construct ion’is a center 
tor innovation into optics, optoelec- 
tronics and laser technologies. Re- 
cently completed at Adlershof was a 
major ( 12 . 1 XHJ .square meters) tech- 
nology development center. 


he Wunsdorf site, 25 
kilometers south of Berlin, is 
one of the largest conversion 
projects in the new states. It 
occupies 6,600 hectares and 
features five communities 
capable of housing 5,000 
people and 1.000 office and 
production buildings with 
space for 5,000 workers. It 
also has enough casinos to 
make central Brandenburg 
the next Las Vegas or At- 
lantic City, plus hospitals, 
airfields, telecommunication 
systems and other standard 
facilities. 

One hundred and fifty in- 
ternational companies re- 
cently attended an introduc- 
tory meeting on Wunsdorf, 
with eight already advanc- 
ing plans for portions of the 
site. Furthering those plans 
is the job of a steering com- 
mittee composed of repre- 
sentatives from a wide vari- 
ety of local and state bodies. 

Wide-ranging interest 
A large portion of these in- 
vestors arc from abroad, 
with Scandinavian and 
American firms predominat- 
ing. One foreign-owned 
company already active in 
conversion in Brandenburg 


is R&D Tec. This subsidiary 
of Maryland’s EAI Corpora- 
tion has signed a preliminary 
contract to decontaminate, 
renature, redevelop and mar- 
ket conversion sites. 

The sites are under the 
control of Brandenbuigiscbe 
Bodengesellschaft, the state- 
owned corporation charged 
with the transformation of 
320 areas (covering 96,000 
hectares) formerly belong- 
ing to the Soviet West Army 
Group, about four-fifths of 
the total “conversion area” 
in the state. 

As this example shows, 
the internationalization of 
Brandenburg’s economy is 
attaining new dimensions. 
According to a recent unof- 
ficial count, non-German 
companies have made more 
tiian 120 major investments 
in the states, with several 
hundred more setting up 
everything from gourmet 
restaurants to law offices 
andtran^ating services. 

There is virtually no area 
in which foreign companies 
are not to be found in the 
state, says Burkhard 
Dreher. the state's minister 
of economic affairs and 
technology. 












s 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1994 


Page 15 


SPONSORED SECTION 



2^y ELOPMENTS IN the Berlin Ring 

'Z ^ uw '^'fi'-one, Slnall communi , ies _ 


■R lie Berlin Rins has 

X"Vrii and 

Hr 1 k nu ee n»ers, some of 
them among ihe largest in 
Europe. The Ring 

f° zens . ot newly completed 
industrial facilities, manv 
with investment amounts de > 
nominated in hundreds of 
millions of marks 

De S pi Ie this. ,he Berlin 
Ring is not a monoculture of 

Hrf e ~c IZe 5 . com P3nies and 
large-sized investments. In 

, ,l . ■* not a monoculture 

i*? 1 - h ' s . h . onic to hundreds 
ot smalj. highly innovative 
companies and dozens of en- 
te T nsm £ communities. 

Taking its name from the 
C P$ encircling belt-line, 
the Berlin Ring is also inter- 
spersed with dozens of self- 
starting villages, which are 
capitalizing on urbanites* 
wish to live in rural settings 

Most of all. the Ring,’ 
which encompasses every- 
thing from Berlin’s citv lim- 
its to the last patches of de- 
velopment 30 to 5U kilome- 
ters outside, is the venue for 
newly created nature pre- 
serves, golf courses, amuse- 
ment parks and other accou- 
trements of the well-rounded 
life. 

Booming industry 
The Dahiewitz area and its 
large-scale, high-profile fa- 
cilities are what people have 
in mind when speaking 
about the “boom along the 
Berlin Ring.” 

Jn Dahiewitz itself is 
BMW Rolls-Royce's 200 
million DM jet engine pro- 
duction facility (in operation 
since May), with another, 
equally large facility and a 
new family of “whisper jets” 

- reportedly the quietest in 
the world in their class - in 
the works. 

To Dahlewitz’s immediate 
wesL is Genshagen and the 
Brandenburg Business Park, 
being developed by Cana- 


new innovations and time-honored nature presents. 


da s Horsham Corporation 
“nd reportedly the largest in 

» slatej >- Ax latest 

word. 27 companies have 
committed themselves to 
Uenshagen; 1 1 have begun 
building. A few kilometers 
to the west is Ludwigsfelde 
and Mercedes Benz's major 
h^tek production facility, 

Sommerfeld is at the dia- 
metrically opposite end of 
the Berlin Ring, in an area 
whose companies and com- 
munities are small and fairly 
unknown. But that does not 
mean they are not making a 
large-sized contribution to 
Brandenburg's growth. 

Village revival 
In late 1990. even the state's 
well-versed economic geog- 
raphers would have bad 
trouble finding Sommerfeld 
on the map, and for very 
good reasons. Located some 
35 kilometers north of 
Berlin, Sommerfeld was 
very ^mall - l .000 residents 
- and completely undevel- 
oped, withour telephone 
lines, a sewage treatment 
system or even an adequate 
supply of potable water. 

Four years later, Sommer- 
feld now has 350 more resi- 
dents. it also has telephones 
and advanced systems sup- 
plying water, natural gas and 
electricity. And the nicest 
thing about this story is that 
Sommerfeld has only itself - 
plus a generous amount of 
public-sector support - to 
thank for the change. 

Four years ago, Sommer- 
feld's city parents looked at 
the map and decided to build 
houses. As they had envi- 
sioned, their Wohnpark 
Sommerfeld residential area 
soon filled with migrants 
from Berlin or even Ham- 
burg and Munich, many of 
them working in nearby 
Oranienburg’ s blossoming 
pharmaceuticals and envi- 
ronmental technology sec- 


tors. A few head every 
morning to Leegebruch, sev- 
eral kilometers down the 
road and also not exactly a 
household name in Ger- 
many. 

The Malaysian connection 
It is, however, known in 
Malaysia, thanks to the mar- 
ket successes achieved there 
by Arc tec GmbH’s cogener- 
ation facilities, which turn 
waste oils into heat and elec- 
tricity - on site and with vir- 
tually no emissions. With 
headquarters in Leegebruch, 
Areiec is one of a dozen 
thriving high-tech compa- 
nies located in the Oranien- 
burg area. 

To attract Malaysians and 
other foreign tourists to the 
region, Sommerfeld' s devel- 
opment corporation plans to 
build a three-star hotel on 
the shores of a local lake. Jn 
making this investment, the 
corporation is banking on 
some impressive fundamen- 
tals: Brandenburg’s tourist 
trade is currently expanding 
at a rate of around 15 per- 
cent a year. “We want to 
carve out our share of the 
pie,” says a local official. 

An even more striking sto- 
ry of local initiative is taking 
place at the other end of the 
Berlin Ring, near Dahiew itz, 
where a local community - 
Gosen - has mustered 267 
million DM in public- and 
private-sector money to con- 
vert a rather duteous asset (a 
barracks previously occu- 
pied by the Stasi. the East 
German secret police) into 
an integrated commercial, 
retailing and residential de- 
velopment. Tenants include 
73 small companies, most of 
them recently founded by lo- 
cal residents. 

Canals, lakes and rivers 
Today, hundreds of thou- 
sands of Berliners know 
Sommerfeld. Leegebruch, 


Gosen and the Berlin Ring’s 
other small communities, 
and know them well. The 
Berlin Ring is threaded with 
canals leading to lakes and 
rivers, and “canal ing” has 
become a big sport in Berlin. 
A favorite route takes 
boaters from western 
Berlin's Tegeler See via the 
Ruppin canal, which passes 
through Oranienburg, to the 
Ruppiner See and its nearby 
town of Neuruppin. a mas- 
terpiece of 18th-century 
neoclassic city planning. 
The town is similar to Bath 
in its sweep of greenery and 
mansions. 

Cycling and hiking are fa- 
vorite things to do in the 
Berlin Ring’s 12 nature pre- 
serves. One of them starts 
immediately to the east of 
Oranienburg and includes 
the town of Wandlitz. Until 
four years ago, no one with a 
status lower than East Ger- 
man Politburo members or 
their servants and security 
people set foot in Wandlitz’ s 
compound of unassuming 
cottages, which was where 
Honecker. Mielke and other 
East German potentates, 
lived. 

Going to Wandlitz for a 
day of remembering or sim- 
ple gloating has recently be- 
come a lot easier. As part of 
the upgrading of greater 
Berlin’s mass-transif system 
(already the most used in 
Germany), the S-Bahn re- 
gional railroad was extended 
to Oranienburg. Also being 
improved is E 251, the main 
road leading from Berlin to 
Oranienburg. 

After Oranienburg, E 251 
turns into a tourist attraction 
in its own right. A double 
row of magnificent trees 
flunks the road well into 
Mecklenburg- Western 
Pomerania, earning E 25 1 a 
place on a list of Germany's 
most beautiful tree-lined by- 
ways. 


I 





Development tsnt Bmlted to Berlin’s bustling center, but has now spread outmtartl to more rural areas. 

Heading Downtown on Route One 


The road from Potsdam and the Prussian past to modernity. Mine and madcap cabaret. 




<.^1 VSfy !■ ■ 

* r : i ’• 

too* \ ■ »rv_ .« . 


from BerBrtit) Hamburg in on hour, 



.'tKstfsonprsS 
v*Bcem300$-.' V 
TO* company , 
fion Deutsche raarfc<$5 
ject tvasfoundet! M 
mating in 'thfe v et ... 
Deutsche .Bairn ■ AOi'ifcfc _ 
owned raH qginfiretyfraw . 
industrial and' 

.weightej. - • 

hours of work 
vironmental meoSkoft 

piling tif 700 
. evtiiuadriri 
based, 
has beep 
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berg- and : 


kTome times it is easiest to 
get a sense of changes taking 
place by being in motion, in 
this case by traveling from 
Potsdam to Berlin. 

This was the Main Street 
of the Prussian Empire, and 
it still bears the number of its 
former status - Route One. 
It was given its present path 
in the early 19th century, 
linking Prussia’s recently 
acquired holdings in the 
very western part of Ger- 
many with the Mark Bran- 
denburg and Berlin. Prus- 
, sia’s engineers built the road 
straight'- and methodically. 

Route One still starts in 
Aachen, heading east 
through 650 kilometers (400 
miles) of the north German 
plain before reaching Pots- 
dam, from which it heads 
northeast toward Berlin. 

A well-trodden path 
Jn the early 19th century, a 
cavalcade of hastening mes- 
sengers. trysting aristocrats 
and sweating craftsmen tra- 
versed Route One’s 15 kilo- 
merers between Potsdam's 
Sanssouci and the royal 
palaces and administration 
buildings clustered around 
Berlin’s Spreeinsel. For 
much of its history. Route 
One was a private road, with 
access restricted to the own- 
ers and servants of the 
palaces dotting its path, in- 
cluding Babelsberg and 
Glienicke (two palaces and a 
prefabricated ruin), all de- 
signed by Karl Friedrich 
Schinkel. that seminal figure 


of 19th-century German ar- 
chitecture. 

Today, a daily influx of 
often-frustrated commuters 
makes its way from Potsdam 
and its suburbs down Route 
One. which bears no fewer 
than seven different names 
before arriving at Berlin’s 
Potsdamer Platz. Along the 
way, the 1 50-year-old trees 
of Berlin's Botanical Gar- 
dens and of such comfort- 
able neighborhoods as 
Lichterfelde, Steglitz and 
Schoeneberg give way to 
skyscrapers, then building 
cranes. 

The heart of Berlin 

Many of them are clustered 
in Potsdamer Platz and the 
surrounding area, currently 
“Europe’s largest construc- 
tion site.” according to Der 
Spiegel. The massive 8 bil- 
lion Deutsche marks ($5 bil- 
lion) worth of work being 
carried out there, however, 
is less than a seventh of the 
current volume of construc- 
tion activity in Berlin, and it 
is only one of 250 such pro- 
jects. 

After Potsdamer Platz, 
Route One - now the 
Leipziger Strasse - traverses 
the city's Mitte district, its 
historic downtown. If the 
span of Route One epito- 
mizes the continuum of 
Berlin and Brandenburg's 
past, Mitte symbolizes the 
rapid changes taking place 
in its present 

On the Leipziger Strasse’s 
south side are the main of- 


fice buildings of the 
Treuhandanstait For the last 
four and a half years, the 
Treuhand has presided over 
a radical often painful trans- 
formation of the economy of 
Germany’s new states. Now, 
the economy's privatization 
is largely completed, and the 
Treuhand is handing its 
work over to successor 
agencies. 

The investment flow 

The Leipziger Strasse has 
received its fair share of the 
12 billion DM in outside pri- 
vate-sector investment flow- 
ing into Eastern Berlin over 
the last four and a half years. 
The street is lined with sym- 
bols of a prospering private 
sector newly built or refur- 
bished hotels, casinos and 
restaurants. Many of their 
patrons come from eastern 
Berlin, where incomes have 
risen 120 percent over the 
past four years - to only 6 
percent less than the West- 
ern average. 

Today's Route One leaves 
Mitte and heads east. Along 
the way, it picks up a fair 
share of hikers and picnick- 
ers heading towards the 
Markische Schweiz (Swit- 
zerland) nature preserve, an 
enchanting region of lakes 
and craggy bluffs (hence its 
name). As it approaches the 
Polish border, some 60 kilo- 
meters from downtown 
Berlin, Ladas. Poiski Flats 
and heavily laden trucks pre- 
dominate. 

The original Route One 


took a different course at the 
Leipziger Strasse. heading 
northeast to the heart of 
Prussian power and posses- 
sions. For a century the sta- 
ples of guidebooks on Euro- 
pean cultural and intellectual 
life. Prussia’s high points are 
virtually all still there: the 
Humboldt University, State 
Opera. Spree island and its 
world-class museums. Miss- 
ing for the last five decades 
has been the Stadtschloss 
(downtown palace), blown 
up by the Soviet Army in the 
postwar period. Contempo- 
rary visitors did get a chance 
to see the palace, or at least a 
very lifelike mock-up of it. 
last summer. 

More than a cabaret 
The elements of contempo- 
rary cultural life in Mitte are 
only listed in very up-to-date 
guidebooks and weekly 
magazines covering culture 
and nightlife in Berlin. Eight 
of Europe's most freewheel- 
ing cabarets, a variety house, 
four classic and four “Off” 
theaters, three cinema re- 
vival houses, three music 
and program clubs and 45 
art galleries are located with- 
in the district's. 10.7 square 
kilometers. 

In turn. Mine is just one of 
greater Berlin’s centers of 
culture. Others are Kreuz- 
berg, Charlottenburg and 
Schoeneberg (.in the west) 
and Prenzlauer Berg and 
Pankow (in the east), plus 
Potsdam and Cottbus a bit 
farther afield. 


For Businesses, Berlin Has New Magnetism 


Besides big international corporations , Berlin is attracting thousands of brand-new companies. 

Re 



a. recent arrivals in Berlin 
have included ihe entire 
headquarters of IBM Ger- 
many and that of Italian 

pharmaceuticals producer 

Menarini. Siemens has relo- 
cated its transport technolo- 
gy's directorate to the city. 
The Frankfurt-based JCredi- 
tanstait fiir Wiederaufbau, 
Germany's powerful eco- 
nomic development bank, 
has set up an office in 
Berlin. _ 

Daimler-Benz. Sony, 
ABB and Samsung lead I me 
city’s “100 Million Club - 
international companies m- 
vesting 100 million 
Deutsche marks (563 mil- 
lion) or more in Berlin over 
the last four years. The 
DIHT (Deutsche Industrie 
und Handels Tag) is Just one 
of 80 trade and professional 
associations in the process 
of setting up shop in the city. 

■■It was not a lack ot suc- 
cess that led u> a refoniiulat- 
ins of our business 
ment operations, exp lains 
Norbert Meisner. Berlm s 
senator (minister) for eco- 
nomic affairs and teciinolo- 
o V "The ciiv has been very 
successful in attracting new 
investment. If *, been even 

more successful in taking on 

new roles - and These h*e 


mandated the reformulat- 
ing" 

The corporate nursery 
In no city in Europe - and in 
few regions - have so many 
companies been founded 
over the last four years as in 
Berlin. Now home to 70,000 
“youngsters” (the net figure 
after allowing for insolven- 
cies), the city is now being 
described as a “gigantic cor- 
porate nursery." in the play- 
ful words of a local busi- 
nessperson. 

These companies general- 
ly started out their corporate 
lives with a stock of highly 
innovative products and ser- 
vices. To develop - and stay 
alive - most have needed, at 
one time or another, infu- 
sions of either capital or pro- 
fessional counsel. 

Providing just that are 30 
institutions - banks, venture 
capital funds, technology 
transfer agencies, trade advi- 
sory centers and more. Their 
ranks include the BBB 
Btirgschaftsbank zu Berlm- 
Brandenburg GmbH, a pub- 
lic-private venture supplying 
loan sureties to companies in 
both states. . 

Berlin’s Innovationsfonds 
(innovation fund) furnishes 
equity capital to young high- 


tech companies. Serving the 
same target group is the 
“state program for the sup- 
port of technology.” This 
support takes the form of 
transfers of personnel and 
expertise. 

Doable-digit growth 
Thanks in part to the efforts 
of these organizations, the 
output of Berlin's young 
companies is currently 
growing at a double-digit 
rate. Some 120,000 jobs 
have been created by these 
companies over the last four 
years. This increase in com- 
panies and production has 
meant considerable work for 
the BAO Berlin Marketing 
Service GmbH, a longtime 
source of support for 
Berlin's companies. Owned 
by the city’s chamber of 
commerce and trade associa- 
tions. BAO supplies counsel 
and services forming the 
link between local business- 
es and the national and inter- 
national public and private 
sectors. 

Berlin has a new role in 
die eyes of the international 
business community, ac- 
cording to Mr. Meisner: 
‘The city has gone from be- 
ing the ‘easternmost outpost 
of the Free World’ to ‘the 


site for the 21st centuiy in 
Europe.' With this alteration 
of perception has come a 
drastic upgrading in the so- 
phistication of investor re- 
quests and needs.” 

In die old, preunification 
days, companies setting up 
shop in West Berlin general- 
ly required only a single pro- 
duction facility or a single 
suite of offices. Since 1991, 
major companies' needs 
have been changing. 

Wirischaftsforderung 
Berlin GmbH (WFB) has 
been meeting the post- 1990 
generation of investors’ 
needs for comprehensive 
packages of facilities and 
sites. This “one-stop” source 
of business development in- 
formation and services has 
been in business since 1976. 
The agency’s capital is held 
by both the city of Berlin 
and banking institutions. 

Facilitating business 
in 1993, according to the 
agency's figures, WFB’s ef- 
forts resulted in the success- 
ful conclusion of 1 12 invest- 
ments yielding more than I 
billion DM in capital alloca- 
tions in the city and the cre- 
ation of 6,662 jobs. 

In figures detailing the 
stepped-up pace of invest- 


ment in - the city. 
Wirtschaftsforderung Berlin 
is currently facilitating some 
230 projects with a total vol- 
ume of 3 billion DM that 
will create some 15,000 
jobs. 

Commitment and pride 

Berlin now boasts a growing 
business community, a long- 
term sense of belonging and 
a new instrument to make 
use of both. “A deep bond 
was forged between the city 
and its business community 
in the past,” says Mr. Meis- 
ner. “In searching for ways 
to attract further investment 
to the city, we came up with 
the idea of making frill use 
of our companies’ sense of 
commitment to and pride in 
their community.” 

On Oct. 7, Partner fiir 
Berlin Gesellschaft fiir 
Hau p t st ad t market ing 
launched its operations. This 
“public-private partnership” 
taps corporate funds and 
other resources to proclaim 
the advantages of doing 
business in Berlin. 

Much of the city’s future 
business will be centered on 
one of the elements of the 
new organization’s name. 
Hauptstadt is German for 
"capital city.” 


f- r : ■'v' V- ' \ r^.* v . s . , - '. u 

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a^start, but 'tie 

:• y^er’s touristic Isghptertt 
-already, l^wd. Berlin- 
Marketing; ' 
GmbH (BTM>. die cirg’s 
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rtfe=wappiug of. The 

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\ 









INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY* DECEMBE R 19, 19 94 


^ONSOrT p SF.CTiON 


Page 16 


SPONSOR!-,!) Sl.< I l»> N 



ERMA NY 


The Historic Confluence 
Of the Havel and the Spree 

. ■ return's rivers is a journey back through time. 


A journey down , I le region t row* » ■ j— ■ 
The Spree is not exactly the Mississippi, 

raSssstSSw 

tfie Rhine and Mam, but rather by a jumble 
^^flSrneverthe.ess.dmt 

££ Inhrivedin lhi« EE anmeSng *«Uers 
ro the region. A bit more than to and a half 
centuries later. Berlin was founded. 

rivers were the fledgling 
IZ's nJn source of raw materials and mam 
S f 0 ie outside world. Over the centuries. 

of canals was builL shortening , and 
improving the city’s links to the Elbe and the 
Oder and through them to the North and 
“fd'e tos 160 kilometers 1100 miles) 

away as the crow flies. 

The canals are still there, and the Havel 
and the Spree are still prime transport arter- 
ies The largest of the 104 harbors and dock- 
ino areas in the city is the Westhafen, which 
has a throughput of 1.3 million tons ot 
freight a ye5r. Today, however pleasure 
craft predominate among the traffic making 
its wav on the 163 kilometers ot tederal wa- 
ter hi Eh ways” in the city. These craft are 
making their way outward to the Grosser 
Plessower. Rietzer. Grosser Wusterwitz and 
hundreds of other lakes in Brandenburg. 

On the rivers' banks is a stream of week- 
end warriors and peace-seekers heading to- 
ward their recently acquired or raMtuied 
dachas and farmhouses in Ketzin. Prulzke 

and Lehnin. . 

-We call it the Fridav attemoon exodus, 
savs Christoph Westecker. television execu- 
iiCe and longtime resident of Western 
Berlin, "because around 4 P.M. on any Fn- 
dav afternoon, all of Berlin -or so it seems - 
is migrating to Brandenburg. 

The river of time 

With even, kilometer the migrants progress 
down the’Havel. the countryside and the 
communities they puss through get older. 

Headins southwest, the Havel starts its 
post-confluence life as a lake. For four post- 
World War II decades, the Wannsec was 
West Berlin's inland sea. its place for a Sun- 
dav sail and a .summertime swim - lor those 
willing to brave the water quality. The lake 
is bordered on the west by the relatively rur- 
al community of Gatow-KIadow. and on the 
east by the Grunewald. Beyond the park's 


green expanses are the mansions and gar- 
dens of Zehlendorf and Wannsee, areas set- 
tled at the height of the German Empire' s af- 
fluence and disproving the perception that 
Berlin is largely urban and congested. 

Through a variety of lakes and canals, the 
Havel makes a sharp turn to the west in Pots- 
dam, once the residence of the Prussian 
monarchs, today the capital of the state of 
Brandenburg. As it enters the city, the river 
is diverted into the ponds and brooks run- 
ning through Sanssouci, Chariottenhof and 
the other 18th- and early- 19th-century royal 
seats and gardens. 

The meandering Havel 
“An indecisive river,” is how Theodor 
Fontane described the Havel: He may have 
had the rivers 25 kilometers from Potsdam 
to Brandenburg in mind. In its meanderings 
and rambhngs, the Havel has created a land- 
scape of marshes and islands and lakes. 
Growing in the fertile riverside soil are long 
ranks of fruit trees and vegetables. Collec- 
tively. the area is known simply as the 

Havel land. _ . 

The region to which the city of Branden- 
bura save its name has had a tumultuous ca- 
reer. It was successively “Germany’s sandy 
Siberia,” a poor but aspiring duchy and then 
the core of the aggressive, self-aggrandizing 
kinedom of Prussia. Its name then disap- 
peared from the map for half a century, only 
to become, recently, that of the largest in 
area of Germany's new states. 

Historic Brandenburg 
The city of Brandenburg had a much quieter 
time, spending the last millennium evolving 
and growing at a relaxed pace, with the no- 
table exceptions of the depredations caused 
by war. The oldest community in its region, 
Brandenburg was founded in 928. The 
buildinss forming its historic core date from 
the 12th to the 18th century. Today, Bran- 
denburg is a town of 95.000. . 

Here the Havel slips and slides its way to 
another change in direction. After a succes- 
sion of half-turns, the river finally veers 
northward toward its junction with the Elbe. 
The turn keeps the river largely within the 
state. Along the way, the Havel passes 
through pine woods and sparse grasslands 
showing the region's characteristic sandy 

soil. . , 

Only 100 kilometers as the crow flies Irani 
downtown Berlin, this is the Brandenburg of 
before - before the Industrial Revolution, 
: before the Hohenzollems, before the Chris- 
i lionizing kings from the West. 



On the Up and Up 
In Vibrant Berlin 

The numbers are eloquent: the city is continuing to set 
new records in all sorts oj fields. 



T hanks to the recent 
foundings of a school of 
business" administration at 

Eastern Berlin's Humboldt 
University and of a Berufs- 
akademie and a Fach- 
hochschule for Teehnik und 
Wirtschuft (post-secondary 
institutes of professional and 
technical studies). Berlin s 
universities and comparable 
bodies of education started 
out the 1993-94 school year 
with an enrollment of 
150.000, up nearly 3 percent 
over the previous year's 
record. In keeping with 
Berlin's old-new role as 
Germany's "international 
city," some 1 1 percent of 
these students are from out- 
side Germany - about the 
same as the proportion of 
non-Germans to the city's 
entire population. 

With the founding of an 
air transport exhibition hall, 
the number of museums in 
Berlin recently reached 1 67. 
Among them are the world- 
famous Gemaldegulerie in 
Dahlem and the Pergamon 
museum in Eastern Berlin. 

At latest count, Berlin 
also had over 50 stages, 
three operas, 352 galleries, 
nine symphonies, 881 choirs 
and 131 movie theaters. 
Some 45,000 people are em- 
ployed in the city’s cultural 
sector. 

And more are coming 
Retaining its perennial lock 
on this category, Berlin once 
more welcomed more non- 
German travelers in 1993 
than any other German city. 
There is no shortage of ac- 
commodations for them, or 
for the hundreds of thou- 


sands of participants and 
visitors to the city's trade 
fairs and congresses. After 
an extensive period of con- 
struction. Berlin now has 
475 hotels and pensions 
with a total of 44,000 beds, 
well ahead of runner-up 
Munich. Another 108 hotels 
with 4.500 beds will be 
completed over the next two 
vears. 

A new record was also set 
in the financial sector in 
1993. Boosted by an influx 
from Western Germany, the 
number of banks and related 
institutes reached 147. with 
a third of those under non- 
German ownership. 

It is a postwar record: 
some 3.45 million people 
live in Berlin. That's 48,000 
more than at the time of the 
fall of the Wall, and an 
amazing 244.000 more than 
10 years ago. 

Nowadays, most cities are 
glad to have two major daily 
newspapers. Berlin has 1 1. 
giving die city a breadth of 
opinion and coverage remi- 
niscent. of New York in the 
1920s. 

in 1993. Messe Berlin (the 
local trade-fair authority) set 
new records for exhibitors 
and space rented, and nearly 
beat the previous year’s nu- 
berof for visitors. In view of 
its ongoing business expan- 
sion. it is not surprising that 
Messe Berlin is undertaking 
a major expansion of facili- 
ties. 

By 1997, and after 2 bil- 
lion Deutsche marks ($1.27 
billion) in investment, the 
modernized trade- fair 
grounds will have 56 per- 
cent more space. 


V ' ' • 

-•■’s' V 




• ■ 


With a pop ulatm density of only 90 peopie per square kilometer, the state of Brandenburg still has 

■ . - Ann) no >ualf 3C linrmvHpfi ^stTBCtjOTIS (above L 






v? .yearajafftei' they ; CQrhe; thfeAJ- : 


for consfrtjcfian on a'numbdr Of these sites s: ; 


Beilin'S internationalism extends to its university system, where 11 percent ot students are from out- 
side Germany. 


: j : <&ced ocribrranSi rates) or given prc^ertfes ddveiteg B6 
hectares to the 1 city-'ol Berfin. One of them, tbo fontter- 
■; J ffoisgiao pariiarrtent -budding, now, houses the' ■■ 

house of; assembly. Anpflwr Is; bang- into/v 

• One of foe' city’s tersest industry a^ techHotogy parks.' .. 


I «£* ,***•** . 


%%4 

.! pH 




Berlin’s SO stages offer a wide range of venues tor dance as well as for theater and concerts. 


<;■$ -k%-. a ; ; ,;v/S-JPP 



ierfin’ si basing devefojjmeot 

; v ' ** •. :!*• • ■ 

Wtrtschaftsforderung Berted, GmbH 

Skfiersttasse# ' v " • N -• 

10587 Beriirt * 

Tel.: (49 30) 399800 . . ! 

(49 30) 399 80 239 : 

' Hans Heuer, Managing Director .'•••• 

. Bwm^enbut^Vbtisine^ 
ineid agency: 

VlTjrtschaftsf5rd^ung Braodfioburg 
GmbH 


14476 Nfcu Faftriend 
Tel: (49 331)96750 
\ : rax;t49m)96;7S.t60 
.■Leonardo G.Noto, Co 4 ^fomtgKjg&-. 


' ^ ; on Bran- 

^ • t '.-P •• •. .. * lee 107 

■ tS^SSoS 660. 

TeL ; (4930)3i5i9Qv * : ; Fak: ; (49 331)866 1418 

Fax; (49 30) 3I5W316 

Jdtg Sehfegel, ManagingESTCctor , 

E^O^^Ted, 35 

: r $oa& bf ^kwdentwrg/-. : . ? .. m bo 

l4mifotsd«ri £ v - ? - 00066 

■'■Fax: (4mV6.ll ■ f • ■: ; ' .. ' ■ "• : , • . . 


half of Berlin: , , 

FtoBrandenbum " \ 

' Bmgxtrasse^Sl • . -* • ■ 

(4467 Potsdam * . ' 

Tel.: (49 331) 293 48 7 
. Fat: (49 331 >292 959 . .- . 


Senate of ^ 

Technology- ■■ . 

Maitin-Luther-Stnjsse iv5 . 

1Q820 Berlin . . . - 

Tel.: (49 30) 783 341 8 .. 

Fax: (49 30) 783 82 8I V ■. 


Messe Bferfokv:; 

(tradertoirmabbrity) 

POB 14046 , 
l40S5 Betfift . ■ 

TeL. (49 30)30380 ■ 

Fax: (49 30} 30 38 23 25’ .• 

Manfred Buschc, Chairman- of. the 
■ Board . .. ■■■ • “ .• ;■ 

Berlin T ou rismus .Marketing 
GmbH • ; :r . .■ 

Hans Peter Nerger, Managing Dhcc- 
tot . : 

Am KarLsbiid II 

10785 Berlin 

Tel: (49 30) 264 74 80 . 

Fax. (49 30.) 264 74 899 . 7 . 


Tourist tnfenaatioa at tfec 
Center, ' 

. Martin Luther Sfra«ie:X05 ' . .: : y- / ,H$ 
1(^20 Berlin . . •/* ^ . ... -r : * > 

- TeL t4930) 2626031 / ' *: : ^ 

Fax: (49 30.) 212 32 520: . .. : . ;< s 

■ . : ■ ’ ; .,i f 

For tourist hrforraarioH tm j&fasir 
denborg: 

Landesfremdenyerkehrsverbanii: ' 
Brandenburg e.V; : v *7; 

Friedrich-Ebert-Stri^se f 15' : 

14467 Potsdam * ‘ * • . . v -J- 4 

Tel.: (49 33 ) ) 295 632 • • : -2 ti 

Fax:.(4933l)2966$3 >y 




. i'‘- •* 























INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1994 


Page 17 




f OR FURTHER 

\WOWAM\GH ^ovn 
THISt ADS, PVt^St REFER 

TOTHtOASSmtDSta\OH 

M UH\OUt ttAGMWt 

UAHUWV FtWU ^ MlSS !12 


SELECTED IN UNIQUE 


THE FIRST INTERNATIONAL MAGAZINE FOR PRESTIGIOUS HOUSES, CARS, YACHTS, CRUISING, AIRCRAFT, ARTS AND UNIQUE PEOPLE... 



FRANCE 

U»"id Few Caused Immubiltei. wed known far hoary 
P re P eT, “' ia d premier qnfify Du, loaui m ik Seat 
treat of Pam ud Ae «CHfni wfacBto* and B Jt i 
0«»euin dc Fanes spetufeed m dir sak of country 
raara aid brink progenies, are leafing estate agora 
" prewef qua&y properties in Fiance. 

“■"< Ftam Td Ml 40 M »M - Mac Daam da 
"P«wa= tcL 03) 1 48 H II 31 - My rod 
iMinrtc M.(xni caret/? 



NEU1LLY PARIS 


Sinuud raid ptemv in tbe hen of i wooded 1,000 
“p»rr-rnare garden, this 450 StJBWMOetre ttiwiikroie 
and arijannr pies home combine elegance and 
prime 

Ilk Terfar- U, A*. War hft. 75116 ft* • HttKL 
Td (D) 1 45 S3 25 25 - te PJ) 1 47 55 63 97. 



ARUBA -DUTCH CARIBBEAN 

V cncmrfengy irTingxo wnb tpctmuLi vkwofthc 
Caribbean, near mi oiinu g new golf aw m.tkc fans- 
nbfaax-dimjre of Mho: Superb SoaueMtrfc maniioa 
13 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, tnng/dmmg roam, kitchen, 
renndal, a riSa with 2 i paw ae na . Iras garage, maid's 
quanto. Swimming pool, — frfU| USS 23 mrOfen 

laberl 1 SoiL MBU. U. (1978} 61126. 


SAINT-CLOUD, NEAR PARIS 

Matters Imne m an c me ptintal am dare m die park. 
ISO nr Swag softer am. Vay luge roepomi mom. 
mdu t hn g a Drug mam. i dining man, an office . S 
bedraomi with 3 b at hr oo m and a game's room. 
Cnwfccri home. Superb endued park an 1400 nr . 
EFT* adurivity. Price 11 aiSioasJ?. 

BHOnPtOHODWWUMa 
M at 4t Flnw ISOM MS - FUKtt 
W.OT 1 44*1 95 IS ■ te (33) 149 « B 62 


V^- ' * 


■.jmtf/om*... 


• / / v ' : ^k \ ' • '-'ti'" 


LUBER0N 

JOi 

renored Charm See on 75 ha, i«M«g a SMn 
riaeyini xnd x Imdsexpod pack with a pudenda 17tb- 
uukay barin. french oytegxden- frdjy eqaippal [age 
eelir far winemaking. 174 canary faros, wclniltSng^ 
raaaka's borne. Prodncrion aT organically piren AOC 
□weal CSce cfe Ldwsn wine. 

Uhkm M-hs fenfemre - WUKL 

w, paj 99/240 m - Fm. caj oo n oo «. 



SIGNED VASES 

Matty wxyinqxmintaaM ace fium the private mfleaion 
of da arris 26 ray tare uses made l iy Fiance's mm 
bum CDBempaaiy arris, Jem Qmde NOVARQ, HE 
ms are spied and dated H» magnificent aJecrioo 
bis ennnnoas nneamor pMEndaL 

CaMhRMH 

Td (331 41 It H 07- Ire. (33) « 71 71 25 



1992 25MMOONEN 

HoBwdF.Mnldg dcrip i. Ahm tenririnph hri. 23 ba 
mat 2* 1.100 HP MAFU200mrlaai^ MOeogbra 
Fo4 ofap. M width owner mroOBvd dUe gm ok 
sq» ralioei 4 oew, praoi. bond matiefloemm bade, 
bda poof fjbas sdoon ♦ bridge Utnqpe nppon to boy 
an abram new yack, befew new com. Seraneif Sir safe 
lllBSBIYUKSSp*. 

U. (MB nitWS - te. |M) 71 7WS1 


PARIS AND THE WESTERN SUBURBS 

ffenad Foam Ban std harm nmafewita t 
Sr-Oeraafe AvPln. “MM Ikn ■ TA Ii3l I « tT 3D 00. 
Li Baadonrurv-rW- Pm. ■ Td Q3i 1 1“ 05 Ml 36. 
U Bocae, "5008 Puis. - Td (331 I 40 06 10 IS. 
Amctri. 'lOlf. Pm*. . Td (331 I 4H 24 08 7i 
Tigsmi. “Ml - Park - Td (Ml » 42 r 9* SO 
NwfflT. 4220(1 NauSv • Td l«Jt 1 4~ 45 22 60. 
Borignc. 42*0 Botriopr . Td »3-’l 1 46 04 M) 69 


FOREST OF RAMB0UILLET - PARIS 

A banubl and dunning aid property, 45 Unmen e s 
from Pitkin she foren of Rmtiiornjlet Tbe xxumo- 
daion carnprna « luge drmrag reotn wiib fraab mb- 
dons, dmn^ mom, kudn and S baboons. Tbe 
gmmdsindadegangp. a beau] nnnmsng pool and i 
4J- beaare park wirfa prwL 

„„ L .„ UiMnllwrnrARM 
133, W Hanm 750tt PMs • RIHCEi UL (33) 1 40 
M IS 36 ■ fm. OBM *3 94 M U 



CHALET AT CHAMONIX 

Skmcil in nnwwl» Fnncc a ^ has dcvq 
been lived in una in rtnoraom. 700 nr 1 fring aim. 
entasnng of 2 separate spamnenu. widi own onrana. 
5 bedrooms. 4 ™ht, (uk trasnx Be doniu room Eoc die 
1 h one. 3 kdroomr it bubs, bring & dming room, fee 
ibe 2nd one Heated swimming pool, snma, pnVmg. 

CarM fe FBARKI: Td (331 1 43 04 II M • Fb. OH 1 43 
S3 64 14 ■> EUMUE Mi ■ EVAKE: Id (33) I 42 30 (1 M 
-In. [33)1 42 Z4 DO 72 



NEUILLYSUR SEINE -PARIS 

Town bouse m residential ndgUmnbood of Si Junes. 
Low!) exposure with view on die Seine. Rre aonyi of 
jpprmimudy 440 nr no 800 nr gmnnds. liadodo 
deab rrofnioa mom ghng rfireedy onto two senacts, 
de*amr. munnai^ pud, gym, iakpendaic service sra- 
dio, Japanese gardai and podniig &dboes (or ihrct can. 
anopEPRowmoNUHOnua 
U na 4. tain 7S0H M • RAM 
M. (131 1 44 9 1 95 IS ■ Fn. (H) I 49 W B2 62 


FRANCE CHATEAU DEU LOIRE 

EntWy Named crade. 2500 m2 iiuonr m in 30 ba of 
pubs Luxuriously decora ed wnb period fanner. 
SwmnmmgrpaoL nuns ann, 3-ar gprage, FosASiyof 
glaring an sdrirrinrol 7(1C In isf kHrusrs^ pn.»w( 

fwfarl fe r Mund a i rn lad nw—'r office la Fnn 

Id(X)} 1 45 38 30 >3 - Fax. (33] 1 45 38 36 SI 



ALMAVIVA 


143' 14dm) jbimiiimni M/1’, budi h HoOmd, Peter 
Baddmqer dcs^sKamcwa wuajm, 2 ■ 2300 bp 
MTl 1 . 20 kn. Lnnrioui an ri u n ivKlwi t i p for 10 pacm in 
5 dnide dbtm.8 orw. Pinny of BraruianHn ipset. 
For ole and duns 

lussa TAons Sp*. 

T«I(34)7I IN44SFn.P4)7l 76MSI 



SWITZERLAND 


Shadow, a uniqne proporr bob in the trafiamia! Swiss 

rustic mmnet. All firing areas are dmridy radtted. Bther 


in dijtnd or fireboanL F&gjiat tpnfiiy finrib. Intbida 


a laichea firiv eipnpped. wnb j| safata finnbed in ho- 


nl wood, brinies aim a lumthy and a •finodo- sanns. 

;.’ Vs '>«>>' 



Td(41|2l 962 UlH.Fiix.HUn 962 »lf. 


FRENCH RIVIERA 


ooSaini Jean Cap Fcnx. 
odadao divided into iwu 



-a#» I. \ 


CANNES 

Asa place. *42, La Crobeoe’ in Cannes is neither rate 
euepriamt k is ■mph' nniqoe. Here is nothing to 
chit for those hoping m more in the nor fame mm 


ROT 
ffmh 

ibe bess nut of La Crawra. mo s new ;aparenaa. The 

price of these i 


i excepaosil spaces woold be mtmhc. Za 
were noe justified 

M» Iqhr. SS, U GUs 044M Cm - BAM 
Td BStnUBO 66-lm.03 W 3SI3 65 



PORTUGAL 


nxnriau country ■»■««■» with 6 bednaem on 4JQ0 
■ran metres boot m 1993. 20 Inn off the beach. USS 
WJJOO. 

nGRAD mOBCB 
WnbbMramettl W L 
Dm* 2194 #<■ d b» 1135 Anmt Pertqdl 
Td OS1] tf 399KS - he. (3SH M 3T96S7. 


NEAR MONACO saotuubhtd'eze 

3 km bom Monaes with a mmning new, property fee 
sale, or so let 450 nr hd. space; 5 000 nr of wooded 
pmmk Dima prime access m ibe tea. Landing stage. 
Caretakers hoax, solarium. Heated sea wurr rw ranuug 
pool of 12x6 m. Lux. bidL Aw oanSdonmg. SaadEie 
TV, Baij^rikna. 6-argangt Re£ WV 1743. 
pisnsi hmmjb ■ mwo. 

Td CO) 11 01 04 13 - Fox. (33) « 01 II 96 


SWITZERLAND, VALAIS COUNTY 

Your wmoer re tremner non wnb no car uorad. h die 
privileged ambiance of a big ribge. take adeamagp of ibe 
bmdsrape and ibe aarumoodatioas of one of ibe brpsa 
do ttsom mdsewwkL Lnxnry apartments fiwn mxfios 
m 5-nmns. Defray be Cbrisraxai 9t frsm 298, 000 to 
1, 887, 000 Snisj Fana. InfonMooa on nxpieiL 
arnawaai m 1 1 rer u n 

RAKLTd (33)42 26 41 47 -Fax, (33) 42 26 12 13 



BLUE LEOPARD 

Tbe boom •flh* Leopa n b is for salt Tint 34 metre 
(111 fall yachl is now amiable fcr ardy the remnd rime 
m ha Kt Acknowledged at playing ao impantm (ok m 
the history of marithae desert, she ofe* bath pctfce 
maaceaadcwdbn. 

PMartamTs Twfe HwtMkf 

Td 03) 93 31 44 55 - ta. 03) «3 34 92 74 



PROVENCE 

rentals jtjihMf n the ban of Pranmcr, tbe 
Addles and ibe Lnbema. .460 days of enchanting sun- 
shine per year in dassified and protected nits. Come 
visii oar man beautiful properties- houses, farmhouses, 
secret hide paradise grtawayv-Vc aho represent char- 
mme and beandul properti e s far safe 

‘i* tr~ *T**ii hutaom 
la Caohe - M220 Gmdrs - RAIKE 
Td 03) wn 07 55 -10.(331 16 72 OS 97 





VIBAUDANNEARSTTROPEZ 



FtwjwmiiiI im ■■■» III flppnWHim- dfgjnjwww pwijwT 

on s property of 17.000 nr wnb a beancifal viSi, mdmfiag 


Igl&lB- . 

3 bedroom. Mxgu'ficein view. 35 Im from the sea. 



Potential far ibe ansancDoa of a 6,830 nr btnqj area 


Price lOmiffioo FF (ncgoriaUcJ 


rnookou 

51 IM de Cadre ■ 1225 (MmHtaPg - SUIIZ1RUIB. 


M HU 22 341 3773 -te. HI) 223413230. 


AIX-EN-PROVENCE 

Thu 800 nr basode is bated M a proseoed 5-ba pro- 
posy. and is arepoied of a park, a gardes and a wooded 
landscape. Cueuker s home add several oarboildn^S 
Swimaniig pool and l cruris conn. Information on 
request. Ref; 3650 13 JR. Price l2nriBn»FF 


LVMB&iar reinB4AvsiH«raiR 
FWflO. Td m n 26 41 47 « ta. 03) 42 26 «2 *3 



LOT ET GARONNE 

MjgjtificQii 1 ■ dt-CBmur tlawn cuucK kbuquI 
17^6 m 1 of Esbf, space, brebm wffiiepbae, t&ning room 
"/fireplace. 4 thing nxuns. If) bedrooms, 6 bathrooms + 
caretaker s hone. New roofing. Hraed ssrianaing pool. 
3 oatbmtfnp. Errimawd price 17 miSau wS kB 
Ex (2.7 mil Son FF withoat fomtnm 
W6KDSA 

SI rat do Gam - 1225 Oeretaraf - SWOZaim 
Td(4l) 22 348 1771 -ha. (41) 22 348 32 30. 



PORTUGAL 

Camtrud farmhouse with 3 bedrooms on 7 .700 square 
metrex nugnifiaau views. 9 bn off the bach. 
USS6504U0. 

nunnaiai 

SodaUr fo Nabrsoa hmhBafe UML 
Apaffc 21 W, tpAX. d hy. >135 Ifemfl Pwt«|d 
Td PSI) 8V 3990S5 - Fat (351) 89 399057. 



MONTE CARLO 


Soared not m the Casino, the dab is x hanry benmg 
dap, mooter mom, racnmi. bar. pdj. ff 4 JIHUbHL 


fora 

M. (33) 92 16 16 10. 



PALACE IN MARRAKECH 


Snmed in the historic hart of Manakeck, ibe Mafia, 


this eorirriy restored pxlice bis a 1000 m2 firing area on 

2. laris, metaling 4 alma and b nines - cash of dare hu 

■ bedroom, i dressing roam, a bath, a firing room. 2 
perias. Large Bring area for tbe caretakers. Heated xwiro- 
ming pool, jacnxzi and snma Pariringfor6 can. 

(■•tact fa FIANCE: Td (33) 1 43 04 18 06 - 
te 03) 1 43 03 64 84. w UHQIEfWi- HUUKfc 

Td (13) 1 42 30 81 00 te (331) 42 24 M 72 


ft 

SEA CREST -36M1W 


-TbrvtnW. ynkLmi‘i.»lg>»QulbWanial 

abo aviHahte for charter. For fufl inform riuii. plow 


cosua om office in Attriba France 

Tatar knff s Yadt Mndndq 

Td (33)9334 44 55 -te (32) 93 34 92 74 



UDY CHRISTINE 

Whirlwind II 43m ibonririmn raoutyacki. 5 cabin, 

4 hst jutMimt, » m«wnihrim faf 8 crat Lunched id 

Sept 93- Timfioonl inerior. -dxoy wood. Orabip 
Design Tom, xaperrired \g FnnkLxtpmiii. 

■m% B» Td ft) 305 356 16*9 
Fp PI 305 0564616. Ill uni II *»6 
Id P1> 4120 32510 Fax. PI) 4120 3715 


FRIDAY STAR -VENDREM 13 

Far darter 139* (42,10 m] nSog pda. I w a Aed m 
1994. 5 obmi wkb doable bed K batbroon, nr nmi- 
Dotring, HabSxtix Water ika ng S n o rinffi ngaid dty 
sa fisbreg^at. SaSboaed. jet do, eoaaaobMn eqmp- 
Btn. Crew 4/5- 

Slufest iwiai- Frana. 

Td PW I 40 68 W 68- Fax PI} 1 40 61 68 69. 
Td K4) hStStmL |Jtn 619 09 II 


BRISTOL 1985- 54,4' -I6,6M 


each with noire bead ltd iborar. Ted ded* »d J 
terit im Wcseerheke 106 hp tfcsd eng ♦ 8 kw tfexdgai. 
Cornpfau deeanniB and 7 nl iDremmy. Looted MamL 



LUCKY DREAM, km sue. 

Aho available fur charter, USS 30,100 per week fcr op 
to eight peas in bar double private flavrooms. For 
sole ashing USS (.5 M. For foil mExmarion please fax 
bfidCbesDO. 

U0UUHD . OCSm 8 BBC 

Td (U) 93 34 92 45 - Fna. (33) 9) 34 M 25 


LALYSS0S 

For rhatitr 104’ (32m) motor yack. Lan nArd m 1994. 
frigme 2x1458 HP. Mxxiuiin xpeed 25 knots. 2 cabins 
with twin beds cravenibir mm a dreUe bed and 
bathroom. Saeddling sod deep-sea fidring gear. 
Sdbanf, jo ikL cnmmninaHon apapnax Crew 4/5. 

• Sradot Mirfei - Ftwrct. 

Td (33) I 40 68 61 68 - Ire (S3) 1 4# 68 61 69. 


Stwfoxt frife-M 

Td (44)71 629 97 99 - Fax. (44)71 


629 0981 


1270 ILW. 11* itnw, mad, R. 3J12S. Kd 

Td 0)305 S472658-te.fi) 385 547 2664. 



OCTOBER ROSE 

pffrirri far nle. !«’ (58.51ml Cmtnm WWd Cnmei. 
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KW ■Ltmmiex. oew (mdeu. Seep ten m fire dauMe 


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INTERNATIONAL 



TRIBUNE, MONDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1994 




Opening The Door t o 
The Most Important 

People in China. 


The International Herald Tribune and The State Commission for Restructuring The Economic Systems Present 

The 1995 China Summit 

APRIL 10-12 1995 ‘BEIJING 


The International Herald Tribune and the State be an opportunity to hear and personally meet the 

Commission for Restructuring the Economic people who are driving China's economic direction 

Systems of the PRC are opening the door for your into the next millennium. ★ If your corporation has 

corporation to meet the most important people in a stake in the future of the Chinese economy, the 

China. ★ The success of the inaugural China Summit 1995 China Summit is the gathering that you cannot 

in May prompted the Chinese government to call for afford to miss. This unparelleled event is open to only 

an annual gathering in Beijing where the leaders of thirty seven sponsoring corporations. Act now to 

China and world husiness can work together in order ensure your place. 


to promote better understanding between China and 
the world. ★For the second time running, there will 


!VTF,R VATIOXVL 


pi ii.tsHrn mm no vw i 1 "' " v«hini.tii% n,KT 


Dun'l mis-* llii» opportunity In Genome one of the world players in the 
future «f tin- Chinese economy. This global event is limitrd lo thirty seven 
sponsors only. To ensure your place, complete this rnupon and return it 
to the IHT now. 


Paris The Publisher. 181 Avenue Charles de Gaulle. I I 

9251 Nniilly Crdr.x. France. 

Tel: GW 1 ) 4h 37 93 ftl Fax: |33 I ) 47 45 53 21 

Hong Kong Andrew MaeArlhur. 7th Floor, Malaysia Bnilding, j I 

50 Gloucester Road. Hong Kong. 

Tel: (852 1 9222 1 174 Fax: (852) 9222 1 190 

New York Richard Lyneli. iOlh Floor. 850 Third Avenue, New York, ! — | 
NY 10022. USA. Tel: ( 1 212) 732 3890 Fax: (I 212) 755 8715 1 — ' 

I urn interested in sponsoring the 1995 China Summit. Pl.-ase rush me more 
information. I understand that places an* limited. 

★ Simply altaeh business rard OR Till in the details Mow. 


Jo!, Till.-:. 
Coni}, any: 
V.ldrews: 


19 - 12-94 












I 


It 


I 




Germany a 
Tussle, 2-1 



KAISERSLAUTERN, Ger- 
Germany played like a 

world champion for 

aaaw* 

sjttsasss*' 

goals fa y Lothar 
J* att £? us on an eighth-minute 
^alty and then by JOrgcn 
K™smann nme minutes later 
Gennany ran ns record to 3-0 in 
the group. It is tied with Bulaar- 

1 k ?“*** Germany in 

^WorldCnp quarterfinals. 

Altm Rraldii scored Alba- 
nia s goal, in the 58th minute, 
oafa pass from fellow forward 
indnt Fortnyj. 

C^eece 1, Scotland 0: In Ath- 
ens, Stratos Apostolakis con- 
verted a first-half penalty kick 
to give Greece the victory in a 
Group 8. 

With four victories in as 
many games, Greece is atop the 
group with 12 points. 

Scotland is behind with seven 
pants in four game s 
The penalty was awarded 
when. Tom Boyd downed Ale- 
cos Alexandra in the 1 8 th min- 
ute. 

Portugal 8, Liechtenstein 0: 
Domingos Oliveira danced over 
the rain-slick pitch in Lisbon 
and the visiting team’s dispirit- 
ed defense for two goals, in the 
2d and 11th minutes, and got 
two assists as Portugal ran its 
record to 4-0 in Group 6. 

Spain 4, Belgium 1: Midfield- 
er Luis Enrique Martinez broke 
down the hone team’s defense 
on Saturday as Spain ran its 
record to 4-0 in Group 2. 

After striker Marc Degryse 
gave Belgium an early lead, 
Spain rallied on a goal by Fer- 
nando Hierro, a penalty by 
Donato and a counterattack 
goal by Julio Salmas. Martinez, 
after setting up the first two 
goals with sterling play on the 
right wing, scored the fourth on 
a run through the center with 
two minutes left 
Macedonia 3, Cyprus 0: 
Bosko Djurovski scored all 
three goals, in 15th, 26th and 
90th minutes, as the home team 
won a Group 2 match. 


• . '/Tv7t. r Vv • A "• 

. .. • v* * ♦ .* *V * . X * . ygj s * * > * 

* • . -' v 


Yon Griiiiigen Wins Race, 
Injured Rib Stops Tomba 




V ' 

• * * * A. * 

. /• r. 








•W- •; *.y ■ . ■, 


■tr*% *«'. SJa 


• •- . .'^-Cv.isy s -n r “ - — 


r>¥ Tnil _ _ . Taoyi MikcywiTCb* Auooucd Press 

U k 1 I Libor Procchazka of the Czech team sailed head first into the boards Sunday when Sweden’s Mikael 
Kenberg tripped him up at the Izvestia Ice Hockey Tournament in Moscow. The Czechs won the nofeh, 3-Z 


Australians Win Ruling 
On America’s Cup Yachts 

Coaqtiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

SAN DIEGO — An international y achting jury has ruled 
that a controversial Australian boat is eligible to race in the 
1995 America’s Cup. 

The America’s Cup trustee, the San Diego Yacht Club, 
contended that Australia’s Southern Cross Yacht Club built 
three boats for the competition, which violated a rale limiting 
competitors to two new boats, and that Southern Cross 
attempted to circumvent the rule by selling its first boat to the 





the clubs were separate entities and neither had built more 
than two new boats. 

"We looked closely into the effects of the rule and we 
thought we were on the right side of the ledger from the start,” 
said Peter Morris, president and CEO of the oneAustralia 
sailing syndicate that represents Southern Cross. 

Had die jury ruled against the oneAustralia sailing syndi- 
cate , its 53 milli on boat would have been ineligible for the 
America’s Cup, which begins Jan. 12. 

The two-boat rule was instituted for the 1995 competition 
to put a lid on skyrocketing costs. 

Meanwhile, Challenge d’ Antibes of France announced its 
withdrawal from the competition. The syndicate reportedly 
faced serious financial difficulties. France America, under the 
leadership of Marc Pajot, is now the only challenger from 
France. Its yacht, was damaged during a fall Dec. 7, is 
scheduled to be back on the water Dec. 28. 


Albert Tomba: “The problem is going up and 


VAL DTSERE, France — 
Michael Von GrOnigen of Swit- 
zerland won the men’s giant sla- 
lom Sunday, for his second vic- 
tory on the World Cup circuit, 
as Alberto Tomba was forced to 
withdraw from the race with 
sore ribs. 

Von GnLnigen, second in sea- 
son’s first giant slalom two 
weeks ago in Tignes, was timed 
in 2 minutes, 25.09 seconds for 
the two runs. He won by nearly 
a second over last year’s overall 
World Cup champion, Kjetil- 
Andre Aamodt erf Norway. 

Aamodt was clocked in 
2:25.90. Gflnther Mader of 
Austria was third in 2:26.84, 
followed by Lasse Kjus of Nor- 
way and Urs Kahn of Switzer- 
land, who tied for fourth at 
2:27.03. 

Tomba was ninth after the 
first heat but did not ski in the 
second beat He said that his 
side hurt too much for the long, 
sweeping curves of the giant sla- 
lom on the relatively flat 
Oiefiler-Killy course, but that 
he will compete in the slaloms 
on Tuesday and Wednesday in 
Lech Am Ariberg, Austria. 

“The problem is going up 
and down with the body while 
in slaloms you are mostly 
straight up,” Tomba said. 

He hurt the rib last Monday 
night when he ran into a pole 
during the warmup for the sla- 
lom in Sestxiere, Italy. He won 
that race but was examined by 
doctors Wednesday because he 
still had pain in his ribs. 

Tomba, who turns 28 on 
Monday, won the first two sla- 
loms of the year and remained 
in the overall lead of the World 
Cup standings with 250 points. 

Von Griinigen moved up to 
249, with Patrick Ortlieb of 
Austria third with 230 points. 

Von Grtaigen had a smooth 
first run of 1 : 12.24 in establish- 
ing a big lead over the rest of the 
field. Although Mader posted 
the top time m the second run,. 
1:12.68, he was too far bade to 
challenge the Swiss rider. 

"The big lead in the first leg > 
let me rein during the second ! 
and that helped,” Von Grttni- 
gen said. “It’s very competi ti ve ■ 


on the Swiss team and we have 
a good group.” 

Josef Strobl of Austria, who 
made a sensational start in the 
two previous downhills with a 
first and third, did not qualify 
for the second run after finish- 
ing more than four seconds 
back of the leader. 

But teammate Annin As- 
singer triumphed Saturday as 
the Austrians went 1 -2-3-4 after 
a 1-3-4 finish mi Friday. 

Assinger, in winning his 
fourth World Cup race, was 
timed in 1:56.07 with Ortlieb 
next in 1:56.46. 

Ortlieb finished just .03 sec- 
onds ahead of rookie sensation 
Strobl, who won Friday’s race 
in his first downhill start. 

Mader finished fourth, timed 
in 1:56.79 on the course that 
was 3.625 kilometers (2.25 
miles) long with a drop of 1,020 
meters (3,345 feet). 


Pietro Vitalmi of Italy was 
fifth in 1:56.87, just ahead of 
another Austrian, Hannes 
TrinkL in 1:57.00. 

“We are a very equal team,” 
Assinger said. “During the 
summer we were accustomed to 

push bard against each other.” 

Besides the two slaloms later 
this week, the men have a giant 
slalom in Alta Badia, Italy on 
Thursday. 

Then there will be a Christ- 
mas break before the men and 
women return to France;, the 
men for a giant slalom at Meri- 
bel on Dec. 29, the women for a 
slalom on Dec. 30. 

Aamodt said he may undergo 
a slight knee operation around 
Christmas. 

“1 suffer a bit cm jumps but 
not as much as Tomba, appar- 
ently,” he said. 

(AP, Reuters) 


Schneider Triumphs 
In Slalom Under Lights 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

SESTRIERE, Italy — Vreni 
Schneider of Switzerland cap- 
tured her 53rd World Cup ca- 
reer victory — and her first ever 
under the lights — Sunday in a 
night women’s slalom, at Ses- 
triere, Italy. 

The 30-year-old Swiss veter- 
an rider, the defending World 
Cup champion, docked an un- 
beatable combined time of one 
minute, 3855 seconds down the 
demanding Kandahar course, 
beating runner-up Pemilla Wi- 
berg of Sweden by 0.87 seconds. 

Katja Korea of Slovenia, 
who was second after the first 
run, fell near the end of the 
second leg. 

Her error helped Beatrice Ffl- 
liol of France claim a place on 
the podium in third, in 1 : 39.74 
minutes, pulling up from 11th 
on the first leg. 

Sabine Egger of Austria 
edged Annelise Coberger of 
New Zealand for fourth place. 

Schneider, a three-time 
Olympic and World champion, 


was the fastest in the first run 
in 47.68 seconds, and added 
50.87 seconds in the second 
heat 

The Swiss ace, who scored 
her second consecutive slalom 
triumph this season, is going 
after a World Cup all-time re- 
cord of 62 wins held by the 
retired Austrian ski queen 
Anne-Marie Moser-PrdlL 

Schneider could add another 
victory in the next World Cup 
race, a giant .slalom scheduled 
at Val Badia, Italy, on Wednes- 
day. 

Heidi Zeller-BfihJer of Swit- 
zerland retained the overall lead 
in the Worid Cup standings, 
with 445 points, although she 
did not start in Sunday's sla- 
lom, the first women’s race held 
under floodlights. 

Slalom is Zeller-Bahler weak- 
est event 

Sunday’s victory lifted 
Schneider to second place over- 
all, with 357 points. 

(AP, Reuters) 









































** 



Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1994 


... O N D A Y 

SPORTS 


Baseball Negotiations to Be Resumed Monday 


NEW YORK — Negotiators for 
major league baseball’s striking P 
ears and club owners are to resume talks 
Monday in Washington, taking anoth- 
er swing at the opportunity they might 
have missed Last week. 

But just three days will be left before 
the owners* new deadline of midnight 
Thursday for imposing a salary cap, 
and the head of the union, Donald 
Fehr, has sent the players a memo 
wanting them not to expect a quick 

settlement. . , .. 

“While it is a positive sign that me 
owners want to continue tal k i n g, it will 
not be easy to reach an agreement, 
Fehr said in the memo to players ana 
agents. “If there is no breakthrough, 
we expect the owners to impose the 
cap on the 23d. 

“We do not agree that the negotia- 
tions are at impasse, or that the owners 
can l egally impose the cap. According- 
ly we are prepared to contest the own- 
ers’ right to impose the salary cap 


system should they actually imple- 
ment.” . . 

A management lawyer, speaking on 
condition he not be identified, had 
said earlier that the owners* negotiat- 
ing committee bad recommended 
pushing the deadline back to Dec. 22 
on the advice of the federal mediator, 
Willian J- Usery. 

The lawyer said there were conver- 
sations among Usoy and lawyers for 
both sides after negotiations broke off 
Wednesday afternoon in Rye Brook, 
New York, and the telephone talks 
that led to the owners’ decision. 

According to participants in Thurs- 
day's meeting in Chicago, several own- 
ers still argued for immediate imple- 
mentation. Three spoke against the 
move and voted against the resolution 
that gave the executive council the 
power to impose the salary cap. 

The New York Mels’ president. 
Fred Wapon. brought along Lewis Ka- 
den, a partner in the New York law 
firm of Davis Polk & Waidwell, who 


they could lose before a judge or jury 
and be forced to pay tens erf millions of 
dollars ill damagaa 

The Baltimore Orioles’ owner, Peter 
Angelos, in a short speech on why he- 
wa$ against the move, criticized man- 
agement's last luxury tax proposal, 
which he said was so complicated that 
he thought some on his own ride didn’t 
understand it. 

The Toronto Bine Jays’ president, 
Paul Beeston, looking ahead to the 
possibility of replacement players, said 
u would be “crazy” to have his team 
play all its games on the road. Ontario 
law prohibits using replacement work- 
ers during a strike. 

The Los Angeles Dodgers' owner, 
Peter O’Malley, according to one par- 
ticipant, asked many questions during 
the meeting and expressed some reser- 
vations before votmg with the major- 
ity. 

The New York Yankees’ owner. 


George Stembrenner, who did not at- 
tend the meeting, was said by one 
friend to be livid over the owners' tax 
proposal of last Sunday. That plan 
would reward what a management 
lawyer, Rob Manfred, called “compli- 
ant” teams rather than small-market 
dubs. 

Id th eir agreement to restart talks, 
the players and owners also agreed cm 
pushing bade three dates in the offsea- 
son calendar that owners say are forc- 
ing their decision. The deadline to of- 
fer salar y arbitration to a dub’s former 
few agents — 73 players are in this 
group — was reset to Dec. 23. It al- 
ready had been pushed bade from Dec. 
7 to Dec 17. 

The deadline for players to accept or 
reject the offers, which previously has 
been pushed bade four days to Dec. 23, 
was moved to Dec. 30. The dale for 
dubs to offer 1995 contracts to un- 
signed players was moved back three 
days to Dec. 23. (Wp ^ Ap) 


NHL Continues 
Low-Level Talks 

The AJSOdaxed Press 

TORONTO — The stretch run in 
the National Hockey League's labor 
tR Tk« began Saturday with five hours ol 
low-level negotiations in Toronto. 

Ndther ride would divulge informa- 
tion about the session, attended by two 
representatives each. 

There were no plans to meet Sun- 
— --j resident and 



SIDELINES 




the meeting. 

“When the next meeting will be held 
depends on what Gary Bettman and 
Bob Goodenow decide,” said Fletcher, 
speaking of the NHL’s commissioner 
anri the head of the 1UUOZL. “Both rideS 
will have to take stock and then I 
fl« riTnc they win then decide when the 
next meeting will be held.” 

The meeting was the fourth m four 
days since toe low-level negotiations 
began Wednesday. 


once in Japan and 

times m use uiuu** ~TV_ - .T.„ 

Johnnie Wetter in 

m^record62 on Saturday — were another shot back. 

McCmnber and Faldo with 67s, Woomam 
and Azinger with 68s and Faxon with a 64. - 

Lara Dismissed, by Woman Bowler 

SYDNEY CAP) —Brian Lara, who earlier this year broke the 
«3d record for the highest Test innings, was Sunday dmscd 
bya woman bowler during a chanty match played at the Sydney 

Cl j^ was caugh t behind by wicketkeeper Steve Rhein off the 
bowling of Australian mtemationalZoe Goss for 23. 
finished with figures of 2-60 from 


SCOREBOARD 




NBA Standings 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Atlantic Division 



W L 

Pet 

GB 

Oriondo 

77 S 

J73 

— 

New York 

12 8 

ADO 

4 

Boston 

70 U 

.435 

TVs 

New Jeraev 

9 15 

J7S 

9 

PtilledeiBMa 

8 14 

.364 

9 

Mteriitagton 

4 13 

-374 

9te 

Miami 

4 14 

Central Division 

joa 

10 

India no 

14 6 

-70Q 

— 

Cleveland 

14 8 

636 

1 

Charlotte 

12 10 

545 

3 

Chicago 

11 10 

SI* 

IW 

Detroll 

9 12 

jW 

S’* 

Atlanta 

9 14 

291 

6<* 

Milwaukee 

7 13 

250 

7 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Mummotnum 



W L 

Pet 

GB 

Utah 

15 8 

652 

— 

Houston 

13 8 

-619 

1 

Dallas 

11 8 

27V 

2 

Denver 

11 9 

-S50 

Vn 

San Antonia 

11 9 

250 

2W 

Minnesota 

5 17 

Pacific pteteioo 

227 

9Vt 

Phoenix 

17 5 

.773 

— 

Seattle 

14 7 

467 


UA. Lakers 

13 8 

AW 

3/i 

Portland 

10 9 

534 

51V 

Sacramento 

11 18 

524 

5>4t 

Golden State 

8 14 

264 

9 

LA. Clippers 

3 19 

.136 

14 


FRIDA VS RESULTS 

aeratond 22 ja 30 

PMJadelpmo 17 U 27 

C; Brandon 5-ID 34 IS. Price 3-7 7-7 W; P: 
Weatherworn s-H 44 14, Barra 9-U Tl-1 1 30. 
Rebounds — Cleveland 54 (Hill 14>. Philadel- 
phia 37 fflrattfer. wripftf 71. Cleve- 

land 16 (Price S), Philadelphia 17 (Burton 5>. 
Chicago 19 22 to 24-45 

At fan ta HAN 13-4# 

C: Pippen7-i3 7.i2 22.Kukoc54 04ils A: 
Blaylock M7 M 21. Long 54 2-2 14. Rf 
Bounds— Chicago a (pinoen Si. Atlanta 45 
(Austrian. Koncnk. Norman 7). Assists— OU- 

— ■ ««»■■ ■ — «»■ MM>U ISI wto d i 41 . 

Charlotte nos is— er 

in dm 23 25 » if— #3 

C: Burrell 7-102-2 IV, Johnson 9-1764 22; I: 
Miller 6-14 7-7 23. Smite 7-18 2-4 iLRebooods— 
Charlotte 44 (Maurnteg. Parish SI. Indiana 45 
(DJJovij rn. Assists — Charlotte If (Bosum 
it, Indiana 22 (Jackson 10). 

New Jersey 20 25 23 19-93 

Miaaasata 27 23 20 «~-ff 

N : Cataman 4-13 U-lt 22. Anderson 5-12 5-7 
T7; M: Rider 9-20 44 Z7. Rooks 7-10 34 17. 
lU bo on ds H ew Jersey « (Beniamin 121. 
Minnesota <5 tlaettner K». Assists— New 
Jersey 14 (Anderson f), Minnesota 21 (Gar- 
land U|. 

New Turk 24 IS II 28- as 

Phoenix 30 25 37 34-14* 

N: Ewing 4-13 3-4 U, Starks 4-13 1-2 11; P: 
Barkley f-12 7-10 26, Manning V-U *4 24. Re- 
bounds— New York 45 (Ewing I2J. Phoentx *1 
(Barkley 121. Asslste— New York 24 (Harper 
C), Phoenix 28 (Moicrte 5). 

Orlando 32 27 34 34 10-131 

Golden Slate 25 34 24 34 7—121 

O: O'Neal 15-2010-21 40,AJ4ardawoy 14-245- 
738; G: Sprewell 1M1 54 40, Gatling 10-1254 
25. Rebound*— Ortanda 57 WNeallBJ, Go Men 
State 47 (Gugilatte TO. Aowste-OrJanflo 32 
(AJtardawav 13), Gatdan Slate 38 
ITJtardowav 221. 


SATURDAY'S RESULTS 
Detroit 27 2* 23 21-57 

PBIIadcIntlla 21 C4 32 15—52 

D: Mills 12-19 2-3 32. OumoraMO 74 22; P: 
Burton 4-14 0-0 14, Barns f-12 1-2 23. Re- 
bounds— Detroit 47 (Mins 7). Philadelphia SO 
(Bradley 13). Assists— Oetralf24lDumars7>, 
Philadelphia 21 (Weainerspoan 4). 
Minnesota 21 32 38 23-5* 

Washington 24 27 i* 17—47 

M: West 11-22 3-S 25. RWer f-20 4-4 2; W: 
Webber MS 2-3 21. Ovtmer 4-14 X 15. Re- 
Munds—Mlnncsota 41 r Rooks 10), Washing- 
lan 44 (Webber 10!. Asststs-Mtonesato 34 
(GoriarW, Smlfh 61. WasWngton 24 (Cfwaney 

Atlanta 25 19 IQ 31-85 

Miami IS 27 19 2 5-54 

A. Ehlo 6-11 (Mi 14. Smith 3-12 44 12; M: 
Willis 12-14 (Ml 24. Gamble 7-10 3-3 14. Re- 
bounds— Atlanta 53 (Lons. Koncck 4), Miami 
44 (Willis 1 1 >. Asslste— Allan fa IB (Les 71. Mi- 
cmi 19 (Coles (I. 

Denver 28 30 27 17- 52 

Charlotte 33 25 38 If— 111 

D: B.WUU01RS 5-4 4-4 U,AMid-Rotrf 5-11 5-5 
15; C: Hcwklm 12-18 2-2 28, Mourning 7-12 7-9 
21. Rebounds— Denver 51 (Mufombo 11). 
Chorfette 34 (Hawkins 8). Ass is ts Denver u 
(Abdul- Rauf 3). Charlotte 27 I Booties 10). 
Utah 24 31 27 25—97 

CMcago 19 » 27 lf-89 

U : Malone U.22 2-3 30. Stockton 6-10 4-4 14; 
C: Pipnen 4-15 8-11 17, Kukoc 7-12 2-2 19. Re- 
aaaado— 1 Utah 4S (Malone 14). Chleapo 44 
(Plppen 7). Assiste-utan 22 (Stockton 151. 
Chicago 20 (Armstrong 6). 

Boston 27 35 2S 25-112 

Hoastea 34 25 23 25—109 

B: Wilkins 14-27 4-9 <3, Brown 5-11 24 14; M; 
Otaluwon 10-2S 1-1 21, Maxwell 9-22 0-0 25. 
Rebounds Boston 51 (Mantras 12). Haustcn 
48 (Ola fuwon 121. Assists— Boston 25 (Wester 
11), Houston 24 (Smith 7). 

LA. Lakers 25 25 15 29-102 

Son Antotrio 28 23 Jl 34-114 

L: Campbell 7-183-4 17. Van Exel 5-15 ~-Z ’?; 
5: El Hon 8-1B 4* 23. Robinson I’. -19 10-13 32. 
Rebounds— Los Angeles 44 (Campbell 11). 
Son Amunia 45 (Rodman 19). Assists — Lcs 
Angeles 1 9 1 Van Exel 6).5cn AntontoJl (John- 
son 10). 

Sacramento 35 22 24 15— 58 

Phoenix 21 39 27 21 —TO 

S: Williams 7-154-520. Richmond 7-205-6 SC: 
P;. Bar Kiev M2 5*27. Manning 7-12 7:13 22. 
Rptwandi— So u am e nta 3s (Patentee 7>. 
Phoenix 44 (Barfcrer 14). Assiste— Sacramen- 
to 32 (Webb 71. Phoenix 25 (Manning 4). 
Ortaado II 14 22 28- M 

Seattle 29 32 25 M-124 

O: Gnm» 5-6 1-1 1 1. O'Neal 6-15 3-7 15; 5: Gin 
4-14 7-8 25, Peyton 11-15 7-4 31. Rebooncs- 
Ortando 47 (Anderson 8). Seattle 41 (Kemp 
)4). Assists— Orionda 17 (Owed. Scoff 4). Se- 
attle 24 [Pavtan 7). 

Dallas 31 21 27 27—194 

LJL Clippers 22 12 30 22- 17 

D : Mashbum 11-22 6-8 MLjodcson 10-15 10-1 2 

31. Tarpfey f-14 3-321; L: Murray 10-250022. 
Vaught 10-17 3-7 23- Rebaapds— Dallas 63 
(Tarptoy 16). Las Angeles 51 (Vaught 131. 
Asslste— Dallas 21 (Kidd 9). Las Angeles 22 
(Richardson 14}. 

Top 25 College Results 

HOW me top 25 teams In The Associated 
Prats'inea'scol lege boskatbailpatitorefl Sat- 
urday; 

V North Carolina (40) beat VMI 129-85. 
Next: at Hawaii. Thursday; 2, UCLA (40) 
beat L5U 92-72. Next: vs. George Mason, 
Thursday; X Kamos ISO) lost to jndltm 30- 
61. Next: vs. Santa Clara. Tuesday; 5>Masso- 
rt ws otts (5-1) beat western Kentucky 91-72. 


Next: vs. West Vtrgtaia, Wednesday, Jan. 3; 4 
Kentucky 15-1) boat Texas Tedi 1304. Next: 
vs. Marshall. Tuesday, Dec 27. 

7, Artxaaa (7-1) beat Texss-EI Paso 7541, 
Next: at no. I6 Syracuse, Thursday.!, Florida 
(5-1) beat Florida State 71-45, 20T. Next: vs. 
Jacksonville. Wednesday. 1L Minnesota (4-2) 
lastto California ta-75. Next: vs. Taxas South- 
ern. Wednesday; IX Arizona side (5-1) beat 
UC 1 rvlne 87-68. Next : vs. TexasOan Antonio. 
Sunday; M, Georgia Tech (4-1) laet fa Louis- 
ville 77-72. Next; vs. Furman. Monday. 

IS. O eorge to wn (5-1) beat Maryland-East- 
ern Shone 6S-46. Next: vs. Grumbling state at 
Casoer, Wye. Wednes d ay, Dec 38; 14 Syra- 
cuse (5-11 beat Princeton 67-43, OT. Nad: vs. 
Robert Morris. Monday: 17. OncJnnatl (64) 
Beat Wyoming 81-80. Next: vs Cal State 
Narmridge, Monday. 

H. Michigan State (4-1) beat Detroit 8043. 
Next: vs. Tennessee, Tuesday; 19, Ohio Uel- 
versify (7-3) Iasi ta Xavier. Ohio 50-71. Next: 
vs. West Virginia Tuesday; n. Welce Fferesr 
(5-1) beat Collage a I Charleston 7444. Next: 
vi. Citadel. Tuesdav; 24, New Mexico State (7- 
2) beat New Mexico 5049. Next: vs. Texas- 
Arlington. Tueidny. 

Other Major College Scores 

EAST 

Army 41, Corned 48 

Colgate 66, Harvard 54 

DHcwar# St. 104. St. Fronds, NY 102. 20T 

Drexel 64. Ferdham 57 

Falrleteh Dtcklnson «7, Dartmaum 61. OT 

Manhattan 73, E. MIcMaan 71 

Md.-Baltlmara Cauity 71, Washington, M0. 45 

Meant SL MarYS, MtL 71 Lovola, Md. 65 

N.C-Greensboro 75, SI. Fronds- Pa. 40 

Niagara 96. American U. 44 

Nerthcasnm 45. Flu. Interaattono, 57 

-Sefon Hall n. St. Pefert 46 

Towson St. 84. Delaware 83 

Virginia Tech 83. west VlroMo 73 

Wagner 68, long 76 

SOUTH 

Alabama 55. Florida A&M 48 
Auburn 102. Atatxuna St. 62 
Centenary US. ShsXwn Fjudki 107 
Coastal Carolina Ml Fronds Morion 75 
Copai'i 51. 99. Bowie St. 67 
David Mm M N.C Charlalte 55 
Georgia 47. Pittsburgh S* TOT 
Geero.a S'. 103. Grom Wing Si. fe 
Joints Mcdtson 8& Howard U. 49 
Liberty 9(1 King, Term. 58 
Lfjlslana Tech 79. Texas Chrfsllan 73 
Memphis 5a Tennessee 44 
N.C- Wilmington 83. SW Louisiana 43 
Nidwiis St. 14a Faim Baptist 51 
Radford 74. WMener 40 
S. Carolina St. 40, Furman 54 
5. Illinois 77, Austin Peay 72 
Samfont AS. N.C-AahevlIle 61 
South Florida 71. Jceksonviile 47 
Southern Miss. 64. Mississippi St. U 
Southern U. 117, 5oufn Alabama 104 
Tennessee Tech 104. Clinch Valiev 73 
Tulane 71. Mississippi 42 
MIDWEST 

Bradley 79, Florida Atlantic 45 
Cleveland St. 7£ Ohio St 73 
Creighton 75. Mc-Kanscs City 61 
Dayton 70, E. Kentucky 45 
DePauf 84, Northwestern 49 
Evansville 97. Campbell 4S 
IIDnots 75. IIL-Qik»Bo 60 
Iowa 102. Long ishmd U. 72 
Kansas St. 61 Washington 62. OT 
Missouri 74. Mercer 73 
N. Illinois 81 Maine 46 
Nebraska 49, W. Illinois 43 
Purdue 7k New Orleans 48 
SW Missouri St. 86. Jndkna St. 64 
St. Louis 101 Bettnme-Cookman 49 


Tuba 91 Drake 76 
W. Michigan 89, Chicago SI. 44 
WkMta St. 44. N. Iowa 41 
WlA-Green Bay 49. Bowl tag Green 42 
Wts^MIlwcafcce 71 NE lltUiob 49 
SOUTHWEST 

Arkansas St. 102. Abilene Ctirlstfan 81 
Lamar 64. Houston a 
Okl ah oma 9L Jocksan St 70 
Oklahoma SL si TaxafrPon American 72 
Orai Roberts 107, Baptist Qrtstton 55 
FAR WEST 

Brigham Yeung 87, NE Louisiana 49 
Cal St.- Fullerton BL UNLV 80 
Colorado SL 71, Mesa Cota SO 
Idaho 87. Washington St. 77 (FrU 
Idaho 99, &. Oregon 76 (Sat) 
tdofto SL » Montana Tech 47 
Lsvoto Mamnount 30, Laveta, IIL 71 
Montana n Cent. Washington 75, OT 
Montana st 9a Texas A AM 78 
Nevada 91 Cotarodo 91 
Oregon 74 St. Marys. CoL 64 
Pacific 72. Oregon SL 44 
Portland 12. Cal Paiy-SLO 43 
San Diego SL 65. UC Rtverside 42 
Stan ford 98. San Fronctsco 40 
Utah 95. Adams St. *3 
Utah St. 74 S. Utah 43 
WWtwortfi 85. E. Washington 77 
TOURNAMENTS 
HawoH-Mbe Festival 
First Round 
Hawaii 04 Baylor 57 
Old Dominion 54 Wsber St 04 OT 


N.Y. Giants 

7 

7 

9 

5W 

248282 

Arizona 

7 

7 

0 

508 

201 250 

PtdMxtelnMo 

7 

7 

0 

500 

265 259 

Washington 

3 

12 

0 

.143 

32374 


Central 





W 

L 

T 

PCL 

PF PA 

Minnesota 

9 

i 

0 

M 

335 300 

Detroit 

9 

6 

0 

M» 

337 315 

CWeano 

1 

6 

0 

571 

3(1281 

Green Bay 

7 

7 

0 

500 

327 251 

TampQBav 

5 

9 

0 

257 

215303 


west 





w 

L 

T 

PCL 

PP PA 

x-SanFrrodscD 13 

2 

0 

567 

491275 

NewOrteans 

6 

f 

0 

-429 

3H30 

Atlanta 

6 

8 

8 

A35 

250 358 

LA Rams 

4 

10 

0 

284 

20 314 

x<tlnchcd eOvfcrton 





y<j betted playoff spot 




1 

ktfordayfe Gams 

1 


Detroit 4L Mktnesoto 19 





Hawaii 71. DM Dominion 43 
Third Place 

Weber St. 105, Baylor 84 

UAB Classic 


Aid- -Birmingham 75. Mbs. Valiev SL 42 
Santa Oars 84 Georgia Southern *4 
Champtansblp 

Santo aara 80, Ata-Birmlnotiam 45 
TMrd Place 

Mbs. Valley SI. 44 Georgia Southern 61 
ifSAir Chaste 
First Round 

WrtoM St. 5a Prairie View 65 
Youngstown St. 54 Murray SL a 
Champtoashlp 

Youn gs town SL 62. Wright SL 54 
Third Place 

Murray SI. 1M. Prairie View 57 


NFL Standings 


AMERICAN CONFERENCE 
East 



w 

L 

T 

POL PF PA 

yWHIaml 

9 

5 

0 

A43 3S6 297 

New England 

8 

6 

0 

571 297 29J 

Buffalo 

7 

7 

0 

500 314 305 

N.Y. Jets 

6 

8 

0 

AO 348 273 

Indianapalls 

4 8 

Central 

a 

JCB 387 305 


W 

L 

T 

PCL PFPA 

y-PIttsburah 

n 

3 

0 

284 2*5 150 

V -Cleveland 

10 

4 

0 

214 258171 

Onctanatl 

2 

12 

a 

.143 234 348 

Houston 

1 13 
West 

0 

JIT! 153211 


W 

L 

T 

PCL PFPA 

SanDleao 

9 

5 

0 

543 323 266 

LA Raiders 

8 

6 

8 

571 277292 

KrosaiCiry 

7 

7 

8 

500 269280 

Denver 

7 

■ 

8 

567 315 366 

Seattle 

6 

8 

8 

529 242 271 

NATIONAL CONFERE NCE 

East 


W 

L 

T 

Pet PFPA 

* -Dallas 

11 

3 

0 

284 388217 


San Francisco 42, Denver if 


World Cup Resufts 

MENS DOWNHILL 

Rasults of S u t ui d a ys race ao tee tewlk. 
LMS-taat dreg OraOtar-ICBy course at Val 
OH tner 

1, Armtai Assinger, Austria 1 minute 5487 
seconds; X Patrick Ortlteb Austria 134:46: 
X Josef StrebC Austria, 1:5449; 4 G uenth e r 
Mader.Austrta.1 :547g: X Pletra vttalfnL Ita- 
ly. 1 -J6A7; 4 Hanoes Trinu, Austria 1^7 AO. 
7, me Alohand, France, 1 J7 j 08; 4 Wfemer 
P wuf li u ii c r , Italy. 1 A36; 5, Jean-Lac Cro- 
fter, France. 1:5733; 14 Lasse Kfus. Norway. 
1-J7XI. 

World Cua Dowxbfll Standtees (Alter two 
races): 1, StrabL 140; X Onltets >30; X af 
phono. 114; 4 Moder, 110; & Assinger. 105: 4 
Cnrfler.49; 7, Werner Pe ro thcn e r. Italy, 44; 4 
VUaltni. 58; 9. Kins. 50: TO. Werner Franz. 
Austria 47. 

MBITS GIANT SLALOM 

Results tram Sunday** race at Val Dnsero 
with skier, coun t r y , and two boat time: 

1. Michael Von Gnientoen. Swit z erl an d 
(1:1X26-1:14851 2 minutes. 25J9 seconds; X 
KlettFAndro Aamadt. Norway 0:13.18- 
1:1232) 2:25.90; X Guenther Moder, Austria 
0:1414-1:1248) 2:2484; 4 (tie) Urs Koelta. 
SwUxeriand 0:1380-1:12231 2:27 JD; Lasse 
Kius. Norway / 1:1294-7 ;73kC7> 2^83; 

4 Steve Locher. Switzerland (1:1192- 
1:1154) 2-J7M; 7, Jure Kasir, Slovenia 
(r:U2f-7:KOJ) 2:77X2; 4 Tobias Bamessol. 
Germany 0:1320-1:1490) 2:2745; 9, Herald 
Strand-Nllsen. Norway (1:14J5-I;13A6) 
2:2431; 14 Ian Plccaro, France (l:U4*- 
1:1X60) 2:2824 

World Cop Giant Siatam staodtngs (After 
two races) : 1, Van Gruentoen. 180 ; 2 Aamadt. 
14); X Ach bn Vogt Lekhienstoln,134; 4 Kac- 
I in. 95; X Matter, 86; 4 Kcalr. 76; 7. Brnnessei. 
54; 4 Strand-Nllsen, S3; 5, (lie) Alberta 
Tomba Itahr. 50; Klux 54 

OVERALL WORLD CUP STANDINGS (Af- 
ter seven e m its): 1. Tomba 250; 2 Van 
Gruadgea349; XOrUteazS; 4Motter,22D;4 
Aamadt 213; 4 Alphand. 176; 7. Josef Strobl. 
Austria 140; 4 (tte) Thomas Fogdoe, Sweden, 
140; Michael Trttscher. Austria, 148, 14 As- 
singer, 132 


MANDELA TROPHY MATCHES 
Pekbtae vs. Seatti Africa 
Saturday, in Durban, South Africa 
South Africa inrdngs: 206-8 (58 avers) 
Pakistan innings: 204-2 (35 oven) 
Result: Pakistan won by 8 wickets. 


Sri Lanka «. New Zecdand 
Sunday, to East London, sooth Africa 
Now Zealand Innings; 255-1 (50 overs) 
Sri L«»"fcg tanings: 2S7S (47.1 overs) 
Result: sri Lanka won by 5 wickets. 


FRENCH FIRST DIVISION 
ManfneSter 1 Sabtt-Etteme 2 
Marttgues 1, Bordeaux 0 
Nice 4 Le Havre 2 
Rennes 4 Lens 1 
UDe L Sochaux Q 
Coeo a Nantes 7 
Atoms X Monaco 2 
Mete x Cannes 2 
Lyon 4 BasttaO 
Parts SG I. Strasbourg Q 
Standings: Nestles 45 oobds. Parts SG 41, 
Lvaa 35, Cannes 34 Bordeaux 32 Auxerre 32, 
Lens 32 Strasbourg 3l,Martteues34 Mats 29. 
Monaco 27. SoW-EHenne 24 Le Havre 24 
Lille 24 Reran 24. Nice 2L BasNaSLCaea 14 
Montpenter 14 Sochaux 14 

ENGLISH PREMIER LEAGUE 
Arsenal I, Leeds 3 
Coventry 4 Ne wc as tle 0 
Crystal Patace 4 Norwich 1 
Everson 4 Totteabam 0 
Leicester 4 Btodtburn Q 
Ma n ch ester United 2 Nottfnsham Forest 2 
Sheffield Wed. 4 Queens Park Rangers 2 
West Ham X Manchester Ofy 0 
Cheteeo 4 Liverpool 0 
Stood! oas: Blackburn 43 point* M an riws 
ter Unifett 41. Newaatote 34 Nottingham Ftr- 
esi 34 Uvernool 33. Leeds 3L Norwich 34 
Cheteeo 24 MunehesterOtY 24 Totte nh am 24 
ArMnoi24.CavenSry2CQiMefftPartRonB- 
ers 22, Wtmbtedon22. Southampton 71. Crystal 
Palace 21, Wat Ham 2l.ShaffleU Wednesday 
21. Everian 19, Aslan VITia 14 Leta w ier 14 
Ipswich E. 

TT ALLAN FIRST DIVISION 
Bari 1, Parma 2 
Cr mnenese X Torino 0 
F tergnHn a l, Foggla l 
(nteraaztonofe 4 Lazio 2 
Juvgntus L Genoa 1 
Resgicna X Padova 8 
Roma 4 Milan 0 
S nnmJu tQ 4 Cwltort 0 
Standings: Parma 3L Joventus 34 Ftaren- 
Una 24 Lazio 24 Roma 3«. Bari 72, Sampdorfo 
21. Ftmla 74 AC MUon 77. lot mm a z to n oH 17, 
cagriorl 17. Torino 14 Nagolt 14 Cromonase 

14 Genoa 12 Padova IL Reastaia9.Bi«sdo4 

DUTCH FIRST DIVISION 
Redo JC X FC Vofcnttam 1 
Ga Ahead Eagles 2 FC Gro nin gen 4 
Dordrecht to 1. MW Maastricht 2 
NEC 2 Willem It 2 
Vitesse 4 FC Twerrte 1 
Ferenoord 1. RKC 0 
KAC Breda 2 A lax Amsterdam 2 
Standfast: Roda JC 24 potato. Afax 24 FC 
T wrote 21 PSV 21. Vitesse 24 Ferenoord 19. 
Heeronvero 14 wniem It 17.MW 14 fc Gro- 
ningen 14. FC UtroeW IX Sparta IX NAC 12 
FC Volendam 72 NEC 11, RKC 14 GA Eagle* 
7. Dordrecht TO 4 
mi. 


- r : 6 ._5i , ■) Z-: ■> :: 

is .-^At.-^aaia= drA > '‘ -r . - Ja . 

IZVEST1A CUP 
Group A 

Friday 

Finland 2 Hate 0 
Russia 7. Franca 2 

Saturday 

Franca X ftoly 2 
Russia 2 Finland 2 


Russia 4 Italy 1 


Colleague Says Ma May Have Cancer 

BEIJING (Reuters) — China's running coach, Ma Jnioren, has 
a severely swollen thyroid gland and doctors fear he may have 
some form of throat cancer, although further tests are required,' a 

colleague said • ' : : ' . . 

“Mh has had this thynsd problem for Syr or sot yeah) but 
recently it has become much more serious," the colleague said 
Saturday by telephone from Ma’s former office in Shenyang in 
northeastern Liaoning province. 

He said that Ma’s thyroid gland was extremely swollen, but that 
Ma had not had time to seek, proper treatment because he was 
attending his afling father. 

For the Record ; 


Midtael Sdamndher, die Grand Prix 
Elf Master Karting Indoor title in Paris; 


. also wai the 
PrOSt finished 

third, behind Emmanuel Collard of France. (1ST) 

Orestes Destrade’s, the Florida Marlins’ forme - first baseman 
who has rejoined the Saibu Lions, has been given a 53.7 million 
contract for next season, a record for Japan, the Kyodo News 
Service rqiGrted. . (AP) 


' ’ FOOTBALL . 

Neflonaf FaafbaB Leant . 
CAROLINA— Stoned Tear smith, wtffle 
Groan m Eric WMr, wide racelvare; Randy 
CWftaerL na a d ne back; M uN fww Oaawbefl 
and Lawyer TUmaro fight ende; Otxryl 
Moore end Cartoon Leamfti, guards; and 
Mice Finn and kgvln Farim taddgx - 
CLEVELAND — Signed FnnkHaroay.MB- 
backr off Arbonati practice hwxl Ru ato n ed 
PJ. KIHIan, linebacker, to their u radtae 


Czech Republic & Norway 6 ■ 
Sweden 7. Switzerland 3 


Sweden 7, Norway 2 

Czech Republic 4 Swttzerfteid 3 


RUGBY 


INTERNATIONAL RUGBY UNION 
France 24 Canada 9 


TRANSITIONS 


BASEBALL 


DENVER— Maori Loonori Russell nth 
n to Bbttd4anln1i j re d reeervg.Ac Hv qledDeog 
Strother, running back, from the pradlca 


COLORADO— Agreed ta terms with MBte 
Kingery. autfleMer, an Hreor c o n f racL . 

LOS ANGELES— Stoned Rudy Scanez, 
pri c be r . to 2 ye ar c on tr act and Al Oauna, 
pitcher, ta l-ygar carrtract: Acoutred WUUam 
Bruraon. pitcher, from dn c h watl for Ban 
VanRyn, Pitcher. 

MONTREAL— Named Pat Kelly manager; 
Bo McLautoinn pitching coach: and Atax 
Odn trainer of Harrisburg of fhr Euetern 
LiQBue. 

PITTSBURGH— Agreed to terms wftti 
Dave dark. autfleMer. on 2-year ooafroct 
Stoned Lute ffie ne de x . ouffHHder. la mtaon- 
league contract. Stoned Jeff King, third I 
man, to 1-vew uniIiucl 

BASKETBALL 


JACKSONVILLE— Signed Chris WlUiarrn. 
Ricky Sutton, Joan Stamm, Ernie Logoi' 
and Ferric CoOmdafaralva Hnamen; Gresi ’ 
Huntington and Rfckto Sbaw. offensive line- 
men; Shannon Baker, wide" receiver; Randy' 
Jordan, nmnina bedu end HBiarY Butter, 


ATLANTA— Released Sergei Bazorevlch, 
guard. Stoned Grog "CadBlac* Andersen, for- 

CHARLOTTE— AcNvatod Tom Tolbert, 
forward, from Intoned reserve. Released 
James Biocfcwgfl. guard. 

DENVER— Adtvatad Resale wttliaiiH,for- 

ward, from Ihe Mured Oat. Ptoemt Damoll 
Men guard, on the injured list. 

New YOR K Re l eased Doc Rivera, guarA 
and Ron Gnmdteoa torwarxL Activated Char- 
lie ward, guard, from the inlurad Hat. 

SACRAMENTO — Activated Lionel Sim- 
mans, forward, from the inlured list. Placed 
Truvor WDean. guard, an the taiured llsL 


Kansas ctry— Placed Jcrfme nub fine- 
badar, an Mured merve. Stoned RtakHam- 
Rtoa,Dnebacker. Rnteoeed ShawnbeWrloW- 
Farto nmntag bade, from fheprocflcB sauad. 
Stoned Perry Carter, comertxjck. to thdr 
pracMce sauad. 

N.Y. GIANTS— Ptacad Thomas Lewte. wide 
receiver, an taiured roeervw. 

N.Y. JETS— Acttvated Fred Laster, toii- 
bactoofftheirproctlco squad. Placed Tiitaeau 
Altoate. il nebo cke r, an the practice sauad. 

PITTSBURGH— DeocMvotettAntacny DaJ- 
gle, running back; Ovules Davenport, wide 
rKdvtr; and Jerry Oteavsky and Eric Ro- 
vfoffl, Itaetas cku ro. 

SEATTLE— Stoned Forey Duckett, safety. 
Removed Lamar Smith, running back, from 
fhe active raster. 

TAMPA BAY— Placed Courtney Hawfckts. 
wkte receiver, on injured reserve. Signed Ty-. 
re* Dovtx wide receiver, aft their practice 


COLLEGE 

BALL STATE — Announced mat Mike Gib- 
bons, assistant baseball coach, has resigned 
tobsc ome oeoouftorfho Mlhvoufcee Brewera. 

POK E Named David Kobtentz assistant 
basebal l coach. 

IOWA STATE— Named Sam Pce>afll rod 
Steve Looney as sistan t toalball coaches. 


DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 



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Jtnttac venom AFBOfl BEABLY SUBURB 


«nmr (M 8w teaw »W ffl iwi — 

ON «. ROAD -ffTT 


Education Directofy 

Evety Tuescfay 

Contact Kimberly Guerrand-Betroncuurt 
Tei.: (33 1)46 37 94 76 
Fax: (33 1)46 3793 70 
or your nearest I HI office 
or representative 



BEETLE BAILEY 


YOU WRECKS? 
MY JEEP?/ 


yOU KNOW THE PACK POOR YOU 
ALWAYS VWJTEP IW THE BARRACKS? 

■^1 ma 




WIZARD of ID 



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W O N D A Y 

SPORTS 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1994 


Page 21 


Patriots Cloud Bills 9 Playoff Picture, as San Diego Downs Jets for Berth 

The Associated Press » C/ 


The Associated Press 

'This year, elimination was all IS 8 ™ 5 ? f^-8) will miss 

but assured a month earl^toJ IteJSSEfon? ^ 
the Buffalo B ills. y J 110 * ^th a victory Satur- 


tiace of the injured Jim Kelly, 
rad never lost in six starts for 


playoffs, beating Los Angeles 
with a sohd running game and a 


Dins. Aim* n uuiiotu. a misncu UuS game 

The New England Patriots -- ^ Qnca80t Ngw ^g - 19-of-29 for 207 yards, with one 
a»red 38 unanswered points vet DAinunim touchdown and two imereep- 

Sunday, taking advantage of - pifl KUIJJVULP tions. Thurman Thomas, who 

four straight Buffalo turnovers land u , missed practice all week with a 

for a 41-17 victory in Orchard offs f rWK • ma ^ e . *^ e hyperextended knee, gained 70 
Park, New York. ZSoSfiES, ° a L 986 - yards in the fimt half buTonly 7 


Buffalo. He finished this game steady defense. Then they wait- 
19-of-29 for 207 yards, with one ed few help. Because Green Bay 


touchdown and two imercep- also won, the Bears still needed 
tions. Thurman Thomas, who two things to happen to qualify 
missed practice all week with a this week: Philadelphia had to 


Chargers 21, Jets 6: In East 
Rutherford, New Jersey, San 
Diego sputtered into the play- 
offs by taking advantage of the 
New York Jets' stagnated of- 


^ ssassm 

F0Ot ‘ for toeir first winning 

season since 1988. 

Without help from Qve other Frank Reich, starting in 


yards in the first half but only 7 
in the second. 

Drew Bledsoe was 22-of-31 
for 276 yards and three touch- 
downs for the Patriots. 

Bears 27, Rams 13: In Chica- 


two things to happen to qualify fense to give them their second 
this week: Philadelphia had to AFC West title in three years, 
lose or tie with the New York The Chargers tlO-S) had 


Giants, and Arizona had to lose 
or tie with Gncinnati. 

The Bears stopped the Rams’ 


rushing game, allowing only 37 
yards. Jerome Bettis, who need- 


yards. Jerome Bettis, who need- 
ed 30 yards to reach 1,000. was 


go, the Bean moved closer to the held to 7 yards on eight carries. 



John C. MabangkVAgpncc FittcrhtM 

Denver quarterback Jolm Ehvay was besieged afl game, with the 49ers’ Dennis Brown and Bryant Young getting this sack. 


The Chargers tlO-5) had 
plenty of defense and three 
touchdown passes by Stan 
Humphries to hand the Jets (6- 
9} their fourth successive defeat 
and officially eliminate them 
from playoff consideration. 

The game turned when line- 
backer Junior Sean knocked out 
the Jets quarterback Boomer 
Esiason with a shot to the head 
in the second period. Esiasou 
stayed cm the ground for several 
moments, then beaded to the 
locker room with a concussion. 

No penalty was called on the 
play and the Jets got a field goal 
on the nest snap for a 6-0 lead. 
But perhaps inspired by Seau's 
hit, the Chargers came alive of- 
fensively for TD drives of 64 
and 65 yards. 

Humphries was 19-for-26 for 
280 yards and three scores. 

Esiason completed his first 
five passes, but the Jets could 
manage only a 3-0 lead through 
one quarter. Nick Lowery made 
field goals of 38 and 30 yards. 

Packers 21, Falcons 17: The 
Green Bay Packers bid farewell 
to Milwaukee after 61 seasons 
and Brett Favre’s fantastic fin- 
ish kept them from also kissing 
their playoff hopes good-bye. 
Favrc scrambled for a 9-yard 
touchdown with 14 seconds to 
lift the Packers over Atlanta. 

The Packers (8-7) have 
played a portion of their home 
schedule in Milwaukee since 
1933, but in a revenue-generat- 
ing move, they decided to play 
all their home games in Green 
Bay beginning next year. 

The Packers can get into the 
playoffs with a victory next 



Mkfcad E- Sfuaqedca/Agesae Fiance-Pmc 

Barry Sanders left the Vikings’ Todd Scott behind on one of his two touchdown runs. 


week at Tampa Bay and some 101 yards and rushed 13 times 
help from other teams. for 46 more. 

Green Bay fullback Edgar Bobby Hebert entered the 
Bennett caught eight passes for game on the Falcons' second 


Indiana’s Defense Stymies No. 3 Kansas, 80-61 


The Associated Pros Haase led the Jayhawks with 16 

The Indiana Hoosiers, often on the points, while Williams added 11 and 


pulled away in the sercond half. Rhodes, 
who had been averaging just over 12 


defensive, are learning to win that way, 
too. 

: Brian Evans scored 29 points and 
Alan Henderson added 22 Saturday as 
the Hoosiers beat No. 3 Kansas, 8&61, 
in Bloomington, Indiana, to extend the 
nation’s longest. college basketball home, 
winning streak to 47 games. 

**As we grow as a team, we’re learning 
how to execute the things we practice 
and carry them over into the game a 
little better,’* Henderson said. 

“Definitely defense is the key. We 
know we don't have the kind of team 
that can just go out there and out-shoot 
somebody night in and night out. So we 
know that defense is where we’re going 
to win games.” 

The Jayhawks (5-1) went seven min- 
utes without a point as the Hoosiers f5- 
4) went an a 15-0 run and stretched the 
lead to 39-19 with just over two minutes 
left in the first hair. Two five throws by 
Jacque Vau ghn snapped the Kansas 
drougjht, but Evans countered with a 3- 
point basket. Then, after baskets by 
Greg Ostertag and BJ. Williams, 3- 
potnters by Evans and freshman Neil 
Reed gave the Hoosiers a 48-25 ha lftim e 
lead and Kansas never recovered. 

Evans and Henderson, dominating 
the boards, grabbed 12 rebounds apiece 
and the Hoosiers outrebounded Kansas, 
57-40. . M 

The Jayhawks, shooting S3 percent 
from the field for the season, managed 
only 26 percent in the first half and 36 
percent tor the game. 

“Indiana kicked our tails every way it 
can get kicked,” said Kansas’ coach. 


Raef LaFrentz 10. Reed added 14 points 
for the Hoosiers. 

No. 1 North Carofina 129, VMI 89: In 
Chapel IfiQ, North Carolina, Dante Ca- 
labria hit six 3-pointers in the first half 
and North Carolina tied a school record 
for xpo$t. paints in a game. .The Tar 


points a game, finished with 23 for Ken- 
tucky. Tony Dclk, who was instrumental 


in the go-ahead rally, finished with 14 was the third victory in a row for the 


COLLEGE ffiGHLTCHTS 


points. 

No. 7 Arizona 75, Texa»-EI Paso 62: 
In El Paso, Texas, Damon Stoudamire 
- scored 24 points, including two 3-point- 
ers in the second half that broke open a 


an alley-oop slam at the buzzer, as Lou- 
isville upset Geonria Tech. Sims’ late 
flurry came after Tech had cut a 51-32 
deficit with 16: 12 remaining to 65-64. It 
was the third victory in a row for the 
Cardinals. Samaki Walker led Louisville 
with 16 points and DeJuan Wheat add- 
ed 15. Drew Barry led Tech with 18. 

No. 16 Syracuse 67, Princeton 65: In 
Syracuse, Nw York, Otis Hill’s first 


dose g am e , as Arizona won its seventh points of the game gave Syracuse the 

: iirom u _ oo .> ! 3 • • 7 . 


_ , in a row. UTEP held a 30-28 lead at the lead in overtime, and the Orangemen 

Heels showed no Sltffecauom a nine- dose the first half, but Stoudamire hit a opened a nine-point lead before holding 
day *ay°n> s i nk i n g 31 of 41 shots in the 3-pointer with 12:16 rem ainin g to give on to win by two points. Syracuse had 
first 20 mmutes and blocking 10 shots the Wildcats a 43-42 advantage and be- only four fidd gods in the second half 
write bunding a 77-42 lead l at jmtermis- gin a 15-4 run that put the Wildcats up but sank 16 of 21 free throws to slave off 
sion. Jerry Stackhouseled the Tar Hods 5^46. They coasted from there. the upset-minded Tigers. 

No. 8 Florida 71, Florida State 65: In No. lTCmchuiatiSLWyoiinnggO-. In 
Chiando, Florida, Dan Cross put Honda Laramie, Wyoming, LaZefleDurden 


first 20 minutes and blocking 10 shots 
while building a 77-42 lead at intermis- 
sion. Jerry Stackhouse led the Tar Heels 
with 22 points, and Jeff Mdmris added 
20. Lawrence Gullette led VMI with 22. 


„ 2 t “bead for good with a pair of free throws, scored 45 points, including 10 in the 

Rouge, Louisiana, Ed O’Bannon scored ^ Oame&i H21 added two more with final rq seconds and lhxeefree throws 


only four fidd gods in the second half 
but sank 16 of 21 free throws to stave off 
the upset-minded Tigers. 

No. 17 Cincinnati 81, Wyoming 80; In 
Laramie, Wyoming,, LaZefle Durden 


ts and Ms brother, Cbaites, had 17 
l UCLA to vitray-UCLA wore 


final 89 seconds and three free throws 


16 J seconds left in the second overtime after the final buzzer, as Cincinnati 


game. LSU, wruen maat 
pointers and only 5 of 16 
led by Ronnie Hendezsoi 


•JP*. of 13 ^ points, but teammate Bob Sura was held 
to 11 on 2-for-l8 shooting before fouling 
oat in the second overtime. ^ 
mSE! California 82, No. 11 Minnesota 75: 


ink Henderson with 22 points. 
Massachusetts 91, Western 
72: In Amherst, Massachu- 


CSndnnati’s full-court press started to 
work. Durden missed a 20-foot jumper 
at the buzzer, but he was fouled by 
LaDrefl Whitehead and made all three 


Williams had 21 points, four InjMdand, .California, Monty Buckley shots to win it for the Bearcats 

. . .... V. , 21 nmnts and Tremaine Fowlkes on innkui 


rebounds and three assists in Ms first 
start of the season and led Massachu- 


semed 21 prints and Tremaine FowUtes Xarier, Ohio 90, No. 19 Ohio U. 71: In 


added 16 off the bench as California Cincinnati, Michael Hawkins scored a 


auui ui Uiv awi.yufi ouu ivu iticuomuiu' ■ - . . - • ... . • fc it,.-,. « 

setts to its fourth straight victory. Dana renuuaed unbeaten by upse tting ™ume- career-high 26 paints, and Xavier held 
Dingle and Donta Bright each added s 9 ta » t0< J 1 Hn SC< ^ 1< ?. stra X 11 u’ Gary Trent to 17 points, Ms lowest total 
hadl4 points for the MBnutemen, who a of the seasra, by switching defenders on 

led, 50-39, at the half and then went on a were coming ofi a 9 ImSS overtime loss to almost every possession and double- 
w*awa OnciiTnati eariicr this week. Townsend > ■» 


Roy Williams. 


22-7 run starting with 10:32 left to finish 
off the Hilltoppers. 

No. 6 Kentucky 83, Texas Tech 68: In 
Gndnnati, Rodnck Rhodes kept Ken- 
tucky dose with 13 first-half points until 
the Wildcats wore down Texas Tech and 


almost every possession and double- 


Cincu n iati earlier this week. Townsend ^ triple-teaming Mm. Hawkins’ 3- 


Orr, who had two points at halftime, led 
Minnesota with 21 points. 
Lowsv9e77,No. 14 Georgia Tech 72: 


point jumper from the top of , the key 
with 8:21 left in the game started a five- 
minute. 16-0 blitz that wiped out the 



series after linebacker Bryce 
Paup blindsided quarterback 
Jeff George, breaking the little 
finger on ms left hand. Hebert 
completed 20-of-4I passes for 
221 yards. 

Buccaneers 17, Redskins 14: 
Washington wound up winless 
at home for the first time in 
franchise history, losing to 
Tampa Bay on Emct Rhett's 3- 
yard touchdown run with seven 
minutes left 

The Buccaneers (6-9) won 
their fourth straight game, their 
longest winning streak since 
starting out 5-0 in 1978. 

For the eighth time this sea- 
son, Washington lost a game in 
which it led in the second half. 
Tainpa~Bay got the winning 
touchdown after Vernon 
Turner returned a punt 37 yards 
and Craig Erickson threw a 13- 
yard pass to Scott Armstrong. 

Enckson finished 19-of-34 
for 267 yards and two intercep- 
tions. Rhett ran 23 times for 64 
yards and two touchdowns. 

The Redskins' quarterback 
Heath Shuler finished 17-of-35 
for 201 yards and two touch- 
downs. 

The Redskins did not score in 
the second half. 


In games played Saturday: 

Dons 41, Vikings 19: There 
was no catching Barry Sanders 
and no keeping up with Detroit, 
as both started fast and finished 
in a blur, leaving Minnesota 
wheezing in their wake. 

In the third quarter, Sanders 
Moke touchdown runs of 18 
and 64 yards and finished with 
110 rushing yards. 

Mel Gray returned a kickoff 
98 yards for a touchdown. Dave 
Krieg. who is 5-1 as the starting 
quarterback, passed for 160 
yards and two touchdowns for 
the Dears. 

The Dons improved their re- 
cord to 9-6 with one game left, 
on Christinas Day at Miami. 

Minnesota slipped to 9-6 
with one game to play, against 
streaking San Francisco. 

There is big concern over the 
status of the Votings’ quarter- 
back Warren Moon, who left 
with 7 mmutes 33 seconds to 
play after he was Mt while in the 
pocket. Moon’s left knee was 
twisted and there is concern 
that there is ligament damage. 

49ers 42, Broncos 19: San 
Francisco’s victoiy over Denver 


Bob Padgett/ Rano» 


In Atlanta, Alvin Sims scored seven of only second-half lead for Ohio and put 
his 14 prams in the final 4:28, including Xavier ahead, 79-64. 


Denver’s Reggie Slater hangs onto rim, wondering where 
bis shot, blocked toy Charlotte’s Alonzo Mourning, tended. 


CROSSWORD 


ACROSS 


1*1981 John 
Lennon hit 


leWeartnghOUt 
point for pants 


i Came up 
a Good farm soft 
to Son of Seth 


19 Formerly 
io Songbird 
17 ‘Bfithe Spirit' 

playwright 


20 Creek 

21 Tidy 

22 Vintage 
a* Fr. ladies 
28 Toboggans 
as Fondle 

*1 "Not guilty 
e.g. 

33 Stow In a ship’s 
hold 

a* bomb 

20 Miss Cinders of 
eariy comica 


1 Bristles 

2 Cheer (for) 

3 Hebrew dry 
measure 

* City of witch 
hunts 

s Pitch tents 

o Temperature 
extreme 


*0 Spy work, tor 
short 


41 Songs sung 
from house to 
house 


44 Succinct 
49 Looped handle 
4* Within: Prefix 
47 Kind of hammer 


40 Tncas pioneer 
Houston at at. 


GJV 


CABAN JACHE 


si as Salaam 

92 Midnights’ 
counterparts 
94 ‘Ance" diner 
99 Pussy 
si Tie fabric 
ee Lariats 
§4 SI H5 SOlO 
as Seasonal 

worker 
•a Bridge feat 
as Heinz number, 
to Ovid? 

70 Happening 

7i-o — Nigra" 

r* Town near 
Padua 
raSchmoes 


t even keel 

a Lots of lots 
. 8 Mffltary awards 
to Antlered animal 
ii Not much Hma 
ft Pitcher 
Hemhlsar 
13 Calendar i la 
Variety 
isEggs-and- 
cheesedieh 

22 Aquarium Ash 
29 1965 march site 
27 Lawn mower 
brand 

aa Agreements 
29 Mbs Barrymore 
aoUkea 
downpour 
22 Astronaut 
Shepard etai. 

34 Upper 

(now Burkina 
Faso) 

39 TV newsman 
David 
3TEjt 

39 State of India 
43 Lines 
43 Minolta, e.g. 

49 Isolate 

MCut 

93 Serbs and 
Croats 
» Bound of 
cheers 



With Payton Pointing Why, Sonics 
Post 40-Point Victory Over Magic 


The Associated Pros . game a gains t his former team as Mavericks 106, Clippers 87: 

Gary Payton showed the Or- Miami beat Atlanta. Willis spent In Anaheim, California, Jim 
lando Magic and ShaqtuUe the first nine years of iris NBA Jackson scored 16 of Ms 31 
O'Neal that a point guard can career in Atlanta Craig Ehlo led points in the third quarter, and 
dominate a game. Atlanta with 14 points. Kevin Jamal Mashbum added 28 as 

Payton scared 31 paints in 31 Gamble added 18 for Miami. Dallas ended their 11-game Ios- 
mmu tess had seven assists and a Pfstoos 97, 76ers 92: In Piril- “*g streak against Los Angeles. 


its in the third quarter, and 




season-high seven steals and adelphia, Terry Mills Scored 32 
tndn t even play the fourth quar- 


ter Saturday night as the Seattle 
StiperSonks romped to a 124-84 
victory over Orlando in Tacoma, 
Washington. 


NBA ROUNDUP 


is and Joe Dmmrs added 


ing streak against Los Angeles. 
RctyTarpleyhad 21 points anda 
season-high 16 rebounds in 31 
minutes off the bench. 

Jazz 97, Bufis 8^: In Chicago, 
Karl Malone had 30 points and 


y . | BM w HUi M y* ivi HIV LMliJVUCf 

a Los Angeles. legitimized quarterback Steve 
2SJ? rtf Young — on paper. Young 
31 tossed Ms 32nd, 33rd, and 34ih 
e Detwn. touchdown passes of the sea- 
19: In Chicago^ son, surpassed Joe Montana’s 
130 points and franchise record of 31 in 1987. 


as Detroit broke a five-game 14 rebounds and John Stockton Young was 20 of 29 for 350 

: -a 7 - i « ^ -m »« ariHpH IS Qcncte oliAtnct fniPo. m ^ 


uTi t w _ _ w i ^ uivnbduvv-gouib - - - — ; _ _ — _ . p l UU1U 

“It was by far our best game by beating Phil a- added 15 assists agamst Chica- 

of the Season, said the Somes xjIu:. nun ij.v:. on ns lllnh nuUnl awav lute for 3 tl. 


^ s om c s’ ddphia. Philadelphia connca- gP as Utah i pulled away late tor The 49ers almost readied 


taBtobySUMrL. 


OJVbu York Ihaes/EtSted by WUl Sharis. 


Solution to Pmrie of Dee. 16 


as Neither check 
nor charge 

97 Singer Guthrie 

98 Make stockings 
81 Far East weight 
«2 Polly, io Tom 
83 Fast planes 

ea 1946 song 
“Once In Low 

With ' 

97 Come out even 


non HHOEIfU E30H3 
HUH miaiDaa aaaan 
odd OI31I1B0 ndaaa 
aadadaodHaaoda 

snnisa aaa 
anoa sanas aanin 
segaaano amaaaa 
asaHHaaaa 
aaoisao anaanaa 
saaa dehdsq anaa 
aaa ana aaaaa 
maacjaaaaaiiiaQaa 
OQaas amaaa aaa 
[jljuulj aaaaa aaa 
QQBEJ snacja ana 


coach, George KarL “Gary was 
fantastic. I don’t know if I’ve 
ever seen Mm play better.” Pay- 
ton scored 24 points on 9-for- 10 
shooting in the first half, which 
ended with the Sonics leading 
by 61-34. 

The Magic appeared a step 
slow from the start. Even An- 
feraee Hardaway, the Orlando 
point guard who had a career- 
Mgh 38 points the previous 

night, was no match for Payton. 

Tiradbernohres 96, BuBets 87: 
In Land over, Maryland, Doug 
West scored a game-high 25 


ed on 10 of 23 ^pointers and ’ seventh consecutive road their scoring average of 32.7 

o is mptmv Tr»n« Kntonr cmrwi T Q - _ _ _ 


Detroit hit 8 of 14. 


Hornets 111, Nuggets 92: In 
Charlotte, North Carolina, 
Hersey Hawkins scored a sea- 
son-high 28 points to lead all 
Charlotte’s starters in double 
figures as the Hornets beat 
Denver. Hawkins hit on 12 of 
18 shots against Denver. 
Alonzo Mourning scored 21 
points. Reserve Mahmoud 
Abdul-Rauf, with IS points, led 
five Nuggets in double figures. 


Subs 109, Kings 98: In Fine- 


points as Minnesota beat Wash- nix, Arizona, Charles Barkley Mt 
ington to extend the Bullets’ Jos- season highs with 27 points end 


victoiy. Toni Kukoc scored 19 
points and Scottie Pippen 17 
for Chicago. 

Celtics 111, Rockets 109: In 
Houston, Dominique Wilkins 
scored 43 points, including five 
of six 3-pointers, as Boston 
downed Houston. Dee Brown’s 
3-pointer with 35 seconds left 
gave Boston a 108-105 lead. 
Brown, who finished with 16 
points, then added three free 
throws and W ilkins sank anoth- 
er with 5.4 seconds left. Kenny 
Smith missed a 3-pomter for 
Houston as time ran out. 


points a game by halftime. 
Their first two touchdowns 


ing streak to five games. Isaiah 
Rider added 19 points and 


season highs with 27 points and Spurs 116, Lakers 102: In 
14 rebounds as Phoenix beat San Antonio, Texas, Dennis 


iuaer aaaea iv points and Sacramento for the franchise's Rodman scored 14 points and 
Unstian Laettner had 22 for record 22nd consecutive home had a game-high 19 rebounds, 
Mmnes< ” a - victoiy. Danny Manning added helping San Antonio beat Los 

Heat 96, Hanks 85: In Jfi- 22 for the Suns. Walt Williams Angeles. Sap Antonio’s David 


amt, Kevin Willis had 24 points and Mitch Richmond each had Robinson led all scorers with 32 


and 11 rebounds in Us first 20 to lead Sacramento. 


points and had 17 rebounds. 


Their first two touchdowns 
came 22 seconds apart and the 
score was 28-6 by intermission. 

Defensive tackle Rhett Hall 
body-slammed John El way 
from the game in the third quar- 
ter forcing Denver to replace 
him with backup Hugh Millen, 
who lit a match under the Bron- 
cos, putting together a streak of 
20 consecutive completions and 
two touchdown drives — one 
after a 76-yard pass to wide 
receiver Anthony Miller. 

Bnt Young wasn’L finished. 
After throwing touchdown 
passes to Ricky Watters and 
Jerry Rice and getting two 
soores on running plays from 
Wil li am Floyd, he delivered the 
second touchdown pass to 
Watters, for 65 yards, and the 
last touchdown. 








Page 22 


INTERNATIONAL TTFRAI.D TRIBUNE, MONDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1994 


language 


Metaphors and Other Gifts of Gab 


By William Safire 

W ashington — The best writes know 

how hard ii is to make took«W- 
That’s a flat sentence; no color m 
Pope, in his “Essay on Cnticism, 

the thought by using a terpsjehorean 


into 


metaphor: 

True ease in writing canes from art, 

Astho^mwe easiest who have team'd 

To dance. 

I found that mental picture in the nwMeto- 

da don to lovers of language, whidi Roben Loms 
Stevenson called “but a poor bull &-eye lantern 
wherewith to show off the vast rathedndof 
world." (And what ever happened to therewith. 

Beats with which.) , . 

Been a fine year for slang ^ Dick- 

son’s “War Slang: American fighting . Words 
and Phrases From the Civil War to the Gulf 
War” (Pocket Books, $25) is a dictionary Henry 
Shrapnel would have enjoyed. Chu-hoi is a Viet- 
namese word for “surrender" that was used often 
by GIs (that’s rooted in “government usue”) in 
Iraq, showing how slang travels; in the Cold 
War, a sought-after substance or desirable piece 
of hardware that could not be procured was 

called unobtanium. . . _ 

Getting a Gyppy tummy? That is the Egyptian 
equivalent of Mexico’s “Montezuma’s Revenge” 
and is nearly the last item in the first volume (A- 
G) of the Random House Historical Dicticma^ 
of American Slang, Jonathan Lighter, ed. (550, 
but it runs a thousand big pages, with only a 
dozen devoted to the F-word). This is the major 
work of lexicography published this year, on the 
scholarly level of the Dictionary of American 
Regional En glish. The HDAS is a kind of under- 
side of the OED; indeed, on a word like double- 
cross, its fust citation is from 1826, written as 
double X. and beats the Oxford by eight years. 
(That shows original research; for first use, most 
of us just crib from the OED.) 

“How Does Olive Oil Lose Its Virginity?" 
(Quill, $8.95 paper) is the questioning title of 
Bruce Tindall and Mark Watson's enter tainingl y 
educational series of essays on “the enigmatic 
questions of contemporary life.” I have dealt 
with the mystery of extra-virginity in this space 
(you slowly grind the olives at room tempera- 
ture), but Lhe authors break new linguistic 
ground with “Why is there a sperm whale but no 
ovum whale?” as well as “Why aren’t there any 
Grade B eggs?" 


While we await Robert Burchfield's updating of 
Fowler’s “Modem English Usage,” the competi- 
tion to the University of Chicago’s Manual of 
Style will be The New York Public Library Writ- 
er’s Guide to Style and Usage (Andrea J. Sutcliffe, 
ed.; HarperCouins, $35). I never met a Library 
Writer, but this book is most helpful on punctua- 
tion, abbreviation and the arcana of desk-top 
publishing, and it gutsily takes positions. 

“The preferred term to describe a person in a 
homosexual relationship," the NYPLWGSU 
opines, “is companion, not lover or partner, both 
of which have other CGnnotarionsy(I*d use each 
instead of both, which implies the two together.) 
However, animal rights activists prefer compan- 
ion animal to pet, and “long-term nurse" is an- 
other sense of companion; for “person of the 
same sex sharing a life," I prefer partner, but 
that’s what makes usage horse races. The li- 


brary’s scylebook is worth buying, even though it 
itheii 


permits the interchangeable use of each other and 
one another, which I think confuses “between 
two" and “among three or more." 

Turned on by net stockings? The Macmillan 
Visual Dictionary. Multilingual Edition (560; it 
seems you have to be rich to be literate), is a 
Duden-style lexicon that puts a big picture of an 
airport chi a page and then names everything from 


If s especially useful in English, Spanish, 
and German (in which a net stocking is a 

mpf). 


mediae de matta , has reside or a Netzstrump 

□ 


Of course, the best way to learn to write, or to 
appreciate the power of language, is by reading 
good writing by the Old Pros. “The Afterlife” 
and other stories by John Updike (Knopf. $24) is 
an example of “true ease in writing" as described 
by Pope. The historian Daniel J. Boors tin’s es- 
says, “Cleopatra's Nose" (Random House, $23) 
— especially his disquisition cm the White House 
— deal unexpectedly with the unexpected. And 
Herman Wouk*s novel “The Glory" (Little, 
Brown, $24.95) uses fiction to accurately portray 
the Yom Kippur War in a way no military 
historian can match. 

To conclude in a blaze of metaphor, these 
writers know, in Winston Churchill's words: 
“Writing a book is an adventure. To begin with, 
it is a toy and an amusement; then it becomes a 
mistress, and then it becomes a master, and then 
a tyrant. The last phase is that just as you are 
about to be reconciled to your servitude, you kill 
the monster, and fling him out to the public ” 

Catch what they’re flinging. Give the gift of gab 
this Christmas. Lasts longer than a Netzstrumpf 


New fork Timet Service 


Reflections From Canada’s Liter ary Zeus 


By Clyde H. Farnsworth 

New yiont Times Service 


r p ORONTO —When American in- 


vaders crossed the Niagara fron- 
tier during the War of 1812, they came 
upon the family farm of one of the 
forebears of the author Robertson 
Davies and were astonished to find 
angry youths shooting at them from 
the farmhouse windows. 


“They thought we’d be delighted to 
lay down the hat 


ireful British yoke, but 
they didn’t think they were bringing 
another kind of yoke with them," said 
the man some conader to be Canada's 
greatest living writer. 

Four of his ancestors fell in that 
engagement, the Battle of Stoney 
Creek, and he is proud that it helped 
to turn the tide against the invaders. 

That Canadians are distinct from 
Americans is a subtheme of his novels, 
the most famous of which are the 
Deptford trilogy, “Fifth Business," 
“The Manticore" and “World of 
Wonders." 

In the Uth and latest novel, “The 
Cunning Man," the aging hero — not 
untike his 81-year-old creator — -rues 
the with ering of Canada’s British con- 
nection and the growth of the Ameri- 
can connection “under the caress of 
the irou hand and buckskin glove." 

Greg Gaienby, the literary scholar 
who directs the Harbourfront Interna- 
tional Reading Series in Toronto, said 
tha t “in anyone’s delineation of the 
pantheon of Canadian writers, Davies 
holds a place dose to Zeus.” 

With his magnificent snowy beard, 
great white mane and protuberant 
brow, Davies has a magisterial look as 
welL He talked about his views of 
Canadian nationality at his office at 
Massey College, the University of To- 
ronto’s graduate college, where be is 
the founding master. 

Davies, who was bom in Ontario, 
said the biggest difference between 
Canada and the United States is in 
their underlying myths. 

“The myth of America is a very 
powerful one and one that we in Can- 
ada look toward with envy," he said. 
“You have your heroes. You have 
your great men of the past, you have 
your myth of tradition, of the con- 
quering of the west, and the pioneer 
life and the gold rush life and all that 
sort of thing , which is enormously 



sWCttSSKw 

not become violent. 

“Our civil war is a 

ntte.” hesaid.“U’sa 

fight because it's very ynrm* 


kind of war 


to 


There is never any letup- 


__ There is 




dians -«*Sf5aSM. 


that Davies “comes from a traditional 
male, English-Gmadian base, >, 
The French are “always cpi^ ant- 


ing," Davies contended “Theyhave 


n£er got over the defeat on UreRami 
of Abraham," the battle m - TOMat;. 
established British rule m Canada. 

“TTie/re terribly unrealistic about 
this sort of thing, but they -are also 
very shrewd and very practical. They 
know the dollar better than they know 
their mothers, and if they think thatis 
threatened by leaving the dommion, 


they will stay. . 

Davies* reflections on politics come 
from a certain academic distance. / 
His cozy office is dominated by a' 


Robertson Davies savs Canadians “don’t go for heroes. 


romantic, and nations feed cm the ro- 
mantic tradition. 

“We don’t go for heroes. As soon as 
a man begins to achieve some sort of 
high stature, we want to cut Him down 
and get rid of him, embarrass him." 

He also sees Canada as “very much 
a northern country, much more like 
Scandinavia or Russia than the Unit- 
ed States." Moreover, he said, “Cana- 
da is a socialist monarchy. You hate 
monarchies and socialism, and we’re 
both." 


Davies is just as eager to see Canada 
hold together as he is to avoid an 
American yoke. “The present hullaba- 
loo about Quebec is precisely that,” he 
said. “It will not die down, but it will 
not come to anything." 


He contends that economic consid- 
erations will keep Quebec in the fold. 
“What happens to the thousands of 
French Canadian cavS servants who 
are no longer on the public payroll?” 
be said. “Tney’re suddenly going to be 
without a job, and certainly the new 
Quebec wouldn’t be able to provide 
them with comparable income. And 
what would Quebec do with its share 
of the national debt? They wouldn’t 
want to shoulder it." 

He also expects pressure from the 
United States. “I don’t imagine for 
one instant that the United States 
wants a balkanized Canada to the 
north," he said. The United States 
says officially that it supports a strong 
gnd united Canada. 

Quebec separatism is Canada’s civil 


ImS'oFs&espeare, Rabelais, Kok: 
ert Burton — whose “Anatpmy of 
Melancholy” provides induration for 1 
the latest novel — and John Cowpcr 
Powys, the 19th-century novelist, 
whom Davies called “a great, great, 
undervalued man ." 

Davies is now working on an articlc ’ 
for the Dictionary of National Biogra- 


phy on a 19 th-century English adjjt, 
Hen 


_Iemy Irving. But his main creative 
work is done on his 150-acre estate ni 
the Hilts of Caledon East, about an 
hour from central Toronto, where be 
lives with his wife, Brenda. 

He taught literature at the uniyera- 
ty for 21 years and still confers with 
students, i ncluding many, bcYohjn- 
teers, who ask whether getting a job 
on a newspaper would harin their 
writing style. 

A former editor of The Peterbor- 
ough Examiner, as well , as an actor 
and playwright, he tells them that 
journalism “teaches you to write more 
concisely and to get busy and write 
when you must, instead of just sitting 
around waiting for the inspiration, 
which isn’t going to crane.” 


WEATHER 


POSTCARD 


Europe 


Today 





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Forecast for Tuesday through Thursday, as provided by Accu-Weather. 


w 


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CK3ura«»onaMy ROT Lfcseoaoruola P^Hewry 

iSSSi Hpl Snow 


North America 

Sunahlna will bs the rule 
from Boston to Washington, 
D.C.. Tuesday, then 
Wednasday will ba partly 
sunny, and a norm la possi- 
ble later In the weak. Detroit 
and Chicago will ba much 
milder than normal for the 
second pan of Dooembar. 
Rains will aaak Vancouver 
and Samoa mldwoek. 


Europe 

Chlly winds and showers wi9 
cross Ireland, UK. and west- 
ern France lo Germany 
Tuesday and Wednesday. 
One or turo days of unset- 
tled, rainy weather wtH span 
northern and western Italy to 
Turkey. Much of Spain and 
Portugal will be brisk and 
dry. The cold will Blowly 
lessen In Russia 


Asia 

Increasing c too os m Tokyo 
and Osaka Tuesday, then 
rains are likely Wodnesday; 
they could be heavy. Thera 
la a cnenco of snow in Seoul 
Tuesday foltovrofl by iranquN 
weather Wednesday and 
Thursday. Rains from Tropi- 
cal Storm Axel could fill 
Manila during the middle of 
the weak. 


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In Japan, Old Tale of the 47 Assassins Enjoys New Vogue 


Middle East 


Latin America 


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By T. R. Reid 

Was hngion Past Service 

T OKYO — The economy is shaky, the 
government shakier yet. Even the 
vaunted trains are r unnin g late because of 
technical problems. And so. as they always 
do in tough times, the people of Japan hare 
turned back to one of their beloved nation- 
al sagas — the tale of the47 loyal assassins. 

This otic story of a great vendetta has 
been borfo at the box office in Japan for 
nearly three centuries. But this year, there is 
a whole new boom for the dranu known 
here as the “Chushingura," or “The Trea- 
sure Chest of the Loyal Retainers." 

In Western terms, the "Chushingura" is 
something like a combination of the Alamo 
and "Hamlet" — a dramatic historical event 
that was turned into a great theatrical mas- 
terpiece. In 1994, this old war-horse has 
been trotted out anew in the form of a best- 
selling novel, two movies and a series of TV 
d ramas and documentaries. 

It all stems from an actual assassination 
on Dec. 14, 1702. Racing barefoot, for 
silence, over the snow, a band of 47 samu- 


rai broke into a Tokyo fortress to slay an 
evil warlord who had wronged their master 
two years earlier. The loyal assassins then 
marched through the streets bearing the 
head of their victim and eventually lined 
up, one by one, to commit hara-kiri as 
atonement for their act of violence. 

The story is considered such a store- 
house of Japanese values — long-term 
planning, undying loyalty to authority fig- 
ures, sacrifice for the group — that all 
performances were banned by the U. S. 
occupation forces after World War II. 

But you cannot keep a good tale down. 
In recent years, the classic eight-hour ver- 
sion, first performed 250 years ago, has 
been a staple of kabuki and bunraku pop- 
pet theaters. Book and video stores are 
jammed with offerings on the famous 47.. 

“In unstable times, people naturally 
want to get back to the old traditions, 
explained Hidekazu Aizawa, a media ana- 
lyst for a large advertising firm, Dentsu. 
“Many Japanese love this story. And they 
love to see it again, because each new 
director adds new twists.” 


Of the two new movies that just opened 
all over Japan, *Tbe 47 Assassins," based on 
a best-selling novel about the vendetta, tells 
the old story in straightforward terms. It- 
features Ken Takakura, a Bogart-like toogto- 





*. V • " 




& 


ty: 


miC 


<-> 


a': 


)fe Harsh 

faun? 


in countless gangster films, in. the role 
of the vendetta leader. 

The other new version, ‘‘Chushingura 
and the Ghost of Yotsuya,” combines the 
serious and historically accurate revenge 
tale with an old Japanese ghost story about 
a dead wife who comes back to torment the 
husband who murdered her. 

Some analysts say this is the most inter- 
esting twist yet on the familiar old story; 
This modem, increasingly Westernized so- 
ciety is changing so fast that people no 
longer respond uniformly to the values 
upheld by the loyal 47. 

“Many Japanese, probably most, still 
love this story,” said Aizawa, the analyst 
with Dentsu Advertising “But there are 
some now who hate it, who say that the 
long conspiracy and the assassination 
amount to a terrible waste of human life.” 







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