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Russia Steps Up Grozny Assault 

Chechnya Sees Bombing as DemnralbMtion Tactic 


By Michael Specter 

Ne» Yotk Tima Sarin 

“ majorescala- 
separatisi Chechen 
jeis struck ai the center 
ojpromy on Monday night after helicop- 
tereMd anfll^ units unleashed a fierce 
rafensive on the ^dllages that ring the capi- 

Tle bombing b^nn late Sunday when it 
PCCM nccI^ that the negotiations between 
cadent Bons N. Yeltsin and the Che- 
OTM ie^er» Dzhkokar Dudayev, were not 
w^'ancing, but it increased throughout the 
day Monday. 

Mr. Dudayev called for new tnilfs. late 
Monday and said military action should be 
^ted. the Itar-Tass news agency said. 
Uy-Tass did not make it clear if Mr. 
Dudayev was offering a cease-fire. 

Reuters reported that Russian troops 
captured the village of Petropavlov^tayo, 
just 10 kilometers f6 miles) from Grozny, 
pushing Qiechen fighters back to the edas 
of the dty. 

In Moscow, the news agency Interfax 
reported that Seigd A. Filatov, Mr. Yelt- 
sin*5 diief of staff, said that the blockade 


of Grozny would be convicted Monday 
and that the southern corridor, which Rus- 
sia had left open to permit civilians to flee 
the dty. would be blocked off. 

Tte gwemmeni issued a siatemoit re- 
peating its promise to step up military 
action to bring tbe republic into line. 

Russian soldiers were closing in from 
the west at Dolinskoe, which has -qi-t tain ed 
the heaviest fitting to date. In the last 
day, bombers have attacked the ci^ital’s 
television tower, a major gas pipeliro on 
the southern edge of the dty and an electri- 
cal station in the north. 

Although the Russians appear to have 
tried to bomb mostly strategic positicais in 
the capital, warplanes struck at a restden- 
tiaJ nci^borhood on Monday for the first 
time, hitting Oktoberskaya, on the edge of 
Grozny. There were no injuries in that 
bombing, but two houses were destroyed. 

The Chechen press serdee said (hat sev- 
en Russian tanlu had been destroyed and 
that many Russian solders hw hem 
i^le^ but (he number of casualties in 
fighting around Grozny on Monday could 
not be indqjendently determined. 

“We are now surrounded on all sides 


except for the mountains,** said Musa 
Miizhuyw, Mr. Dudayev’s personal mili- 
tary adviser. When ast^ wilder Russia 
was piddi^ its targets carefully or brab- 
ing indiscnimnatdy, he relied: “The Rus- 
sian empire was never capable of i«wig a 
scalpel It has always barged into other 
people’s gardens with a bear's claw.” 

“What can be more strategic than de- 
moraHzing the population," he said. “This 
is a psychologic^ attempt to drive our 
people from thrir capital." 

Nobody was flrang, in part, perfa^rs, 
because there was nowhere to go. In fact, 
there was little motion in the capital, whi^ 
was covered with snow and wrapp^ in a 
thick, impenetrable fog from dawn to 
dark. The fog may be the only thing pre- 
venting Russian troops from cutting all 
remaining roads to the city. 

U^ts were dimmed in the Presidential 
Palace, where enormous sides of were 
stacked on tbe tables in the unheated lob- 
by. Next to them, reserved for dozens of 
soldiers milling about tbe palace, were jars 
of spiced pickles and bread donated by 

See RUSSIA, Page 8 


The Harsh Tones Coming From Beijing 

Nervous About Deng’s Health, Chiefe Tiy to Prove Tou ghness 


By Patrick E, Tyler 

Nm York Tima Service 

BEIJING — Withanewwaveofrqjres- 
siem and nationalisric blaster on issues like 
trade and national defense, Communist 
Party leaders are asserting their authority 
in ways that Western diplomats attribute 
to the further decline of Deng Xiat^ing’s 
health. 

As Mr. Deng’s health has deteriorated 
throi^ the tbe Chinese leaderslup 
has banded down long prison sentences to 
dissidents, increased overall security in 
Beijing and threatened trade retaliation 
\ against the United States if Washington 
.tracks down on the rampant pirating of 
compact disks jo China. 

Trade Minister Wu Yi said last week 
that a trade war would erupt if Washing- 


ton decided on sanctions over ccq^gbt 
pir^ in China. 

“Tne day when the United States pro- 
duces its lirt for retaliation will be the day 
when Otina produces its own." Ms. Wu 
told the officiai People's Daily. 

What’s more, negotiatiims over China’s 
bid to enter tbe World Trade Organization 
by the Dec. 31 deadline have been mariced 
by rising political rancor. 

At the same time, while military cooper- 
ation between the United States and China 
has been improving, a cat-and-mouse ea- 
counio- between an American aircraft car- 
rier and a Chinese nuclear submarine in 
late October has rankled Chinese officials 
and resulted in shaip lecruninatioas. 

Pentagon and State D^artment offi- 
cials have confirmed the incident, which 
was first reported by the Los Angeies 


Times, saying that the carrier battle group 
of which the Kitty Hawk was a pan detect- 
ed one of Quna’s five Han-dass nuclear 
attack submarines in the Ydlow Sea. Tte 
caniePs anti-submarine escorts dropped 
sonar buoys to trade the submarine, ^ch 
headed for its base at Qix^jdao on the 
Shandong Peninsula, and Oiina scram- 
bled air force jets that flew within sight of 
the American battle group as it tracks tbe 
submarine. 

At a dinner with a U.S. mUitaiy attache 
in Beijing, a Chinese official later asserted 
that anotiier such incident could lead to a 
military dash. 

American analysts attribute tiie tou^ 
talk to political uncertainty in Beijing. 

“No one dares be anything but a strong 
See CHINA, 8 



Mr. Carter wahii^ to begin a tour of Sarajevo on Mondaty. 


The AiMcSsMd Pnu 





vnntaacB/atwcii 

A REAL COUNTDOWN ON HONG KONG — Tliree soldiers in 
fuMMvv Bmiine nassms aciodt instaBed in IlanaiiiDen Square on Mo^y 
<i«ys “rta Hong Kopg redinis to ewua in 1997^ 

Kiosk 


Iraq Misled Inspectors, UN Asserte 


UX«jITED nations. New York 

Iraq has imded UN inspectors 

investigating Baghdad’s hiolod^ nw- 
fare program has conceal^ rad« 
used to track ballistic missiles, the Umt- 
ed Nations said in a report issued Mon- 
day. 

The rwKMt is lifcdy to inCT^ oppo- 
sition in the Security for any 

early Bfiing of the UN ^ embargo 
Iraq. France and Ri^a have 
for an easing of sanctions once 


Iraqi pr o gram s to devdr^ wes^tons of 
pia-M destruction are dismantled. The 
rqxnt was rdnsed by (he qiedal com- 
mission set up after tbe Gulf War to 
dismantle and monitor Bagdad’s 
we^x>ns programs. 


Book Review 
Chess 
Crosswmti 
Weather 


Page 9. 
Page 9. 
Page 19. 
28. 


Clinton Proposes a Dramatic Overhaul 


By Paul F, Horvitz 

IrttenuttuMiel fferald Thtew 

WASHINGTON — Presideat Bill Qin- 
ton announced a nuyor effort on Monday 
to shrink the size and reach of the federal 
governmoit, and he challenged ^e new 
RepubHcan-controUed Congress to help 
him vrithout “rhetoric and reddessness." 

Many the suggested changes would 
have consideied revolutionafy only a 
fewyem ago. 

But in t& context of the lean-goyem- 
crient demands of Republicans and inde- 
pendent voters, the House has be- 
come an ardent Udder in a political 
process that has the poteotia] to remake 
quickly ihe very conc^t of what tbe U.S. 
government should be. 


Czechs Seize 3 
And Suspected 
Uiximmm-235 


Con^ikJbfOirSi^FnnPapatdia 
PRAGUE — Czech police have seized 
nearly three kilograms of vriiat they sus- 
pect IS uranium-^S, whidi is used m nu- 
clear waiheads, and detained three pec^Ie, 
induding an esqiert in nuclear phyrics, the 
Interior Ministry said Mond^. 

A ministry sp<dresman, Jan Subert, said 
tests were still under way on the radioac- 
tive material which came from the former 
Soriet Union and was seized in Prague on 
Wednesday. But he said Chech egqierts 
were 90 percent sore that it was a highly 
eauidbed isotope of iuaniuin-235. 

Mr. Subert said two of those arrested 
were dtizens the former Soriet Union, 
but he refu^ to say from which coimtiy. 
The third "lan was a Czech nuclear phyri- 
dst. The material, which was safely 


“We are rethinking what it is that the 
federal government ought to do," said the 
White House budget director. Alice M. 
Rivlin. 

R^ublicans, for example, insist that en- 
tire deputments of tbe government should 
be diminated, a course the White House 
rgected on Monday. And Rqrublicans 
vow to come up with even deeper overall 
spending cuts. 

Tbe next House Budget Committee 
chair man, John R. Kasicfa of Ohia said he 
was “encouraged" by the president’s ac- 
tk» but declared: “He h^’t gone far 
enough." 

Notably, the current wave of cuts is 
largdy d^gped to c^sel tax breaks that 
bou the White House and the Republi- 


cans are promising. Only 18 months ^p, 
tbe fever for cuts was focused on reducing 
the federal deficik 

These are some of the major changes 
envisioned by Mr. Clinton, derigned to 
save some S20 billion over the next five 
years and decentralize government func- 
tions: 

• The Dqiartznent of Ener^ would 
turn over management of its national pe- 
troleum reserve to private companies 
and slop selling below-market dectric 
power from fedm^ hydrodectric dams. 

• The Transportation Department 
would transform the dr traffic control 
system into a quasi-public corporation. 

See CLINTON, Page 3 


Serbs Agree 
To 4-Month 
Cease-Fire, 
Carter Says 

White House Cautious 
After Rejecting EarUer, 
CondBt^ry Approach 

By Joha Pomfret 

n'takiiigum Pai Service 

PALE, Bosnia-Herz^odna — Fonner 
President Jimmy Carter announced Mon- 
day that Bosnian Serbs had agreed to stop 
attacidzig Muslims and blocking thdr food 
as long as the two sides resumed peace 
negotiations. 

The Clinton administration k^t its dis- 
tance from Mr. Carter’s first day in Bosnia. 

While Wasbingtou may not back Mr. 
Cartes negotiating stance, the Serbs will 
undoubtedly be able to use the pronounce- 
ments to become even more intransigent in 
the face d international pressure to end 
Bosnia’s war. (European o^dals are skep- 
ti^ Mr. Carter’s misston. Page 2) 

“1 would only say that I thmk we’ve 
been pretty clear as to who we think the 
aggressors are — the Bosnian Serbs are the 
aggressom in this war," said the White 
House spdeeswoman. Dee Dee Myers. 
“The American p^le have had two years 
of vriiat’s happ^i^ on the ground there 
and to see bou sides of the story." 

Ms. Myers was re^nding to a state- 
ment ^ Mr. Carter, was invited by the 
Bosnian Serbs’ leader and who contended 
Xhat Ihe American public had “heard pri-- 
marily one side of the story" about Bos- 
nia’s war. 

“It nu^ be that today is one of the rare 
chances to let tbe world know tbe truth 
and to explain the commitment of the 
Serbs for a peace agreement," Mr. Carter 
tbld his Serbian hosts. 

While Mr. Carter said any new talks 
must be bdd on the “basis" of an intema- 
tionaJiy brokered peace plan, tbe Serbs 
understood Mond^’s agr^ment to mean 
that the plan would essentially be disman- 
tled in a move that could throw peacemak- 
ing efforts in Bosnia into disarray mid 
leave the Serbs sitting on 70 percent of this 
country. 

“Yes, it is open to negotiation, yes. tbe 
whole pl^" a joyous Nikola Koljevic, 
vice jprerident of the setf-proclaimed Re- 
pubiik Srpska, declared after talks ended 
with Mr. Carter. “This is a victory for 
democracy, for us, for the Serbs." 

The re^ts of Mr. Carter’s mission to 
Bc^a anxNjnted to a triumph for the 
So-bs who have opposed tbe international 
peace plan from the rnmnent it was istoed 
in May. By winning the ear of a former 
American president, the Serbs won their 
first important pubb'c relations battle over 
the Muslims, who so far have done far 
better in tiiat arena than th^ have in the 
battlefield. 

Tbe Serbs also garnered several other 
diplomatic points from the fonner Ameri- 
can presidrat, who told Serbian leaders, 
blamed for the woist bloo^hed in Europe 
since World War II, that their image had 
suffered from bUsed media coverage. And 
in an extraordinary statement, Mr. Carter 

See CARTER, Fage 8 


Japanese Troops Show the Flag in Style 


By Keith B. Richburg 

Wailmgien Poa Service 

COMA, Zaire — jEnter the Japanese military camp situated 
' awifmg Coma’s squalid refugee camps and ymir shoes are 
spray^ with disinfectant by a soldier fitted with a yellow' tank 
on his back. FreA vegetables and meat are flown in on 
Japanese Air Force C-130 tranqxnt planes from Nairobi 
prqiared J^Moese style, then served in a spotless mess tent. 

After dinner, troops can call home tvdoe a wed: on satellite 
phtmes or relax at the “Goma Hot Springs." a traditional 
Japanese bathhouse constnictol in tents conqriete with slip- 
peis lined up at the entrance, potted plants and a view of 
Nyiragongo vt^cano as a scenic badedrop through an opening. 

The 260-inan Japanere military contingent here is served in 
style. It is tbe last foreign military unit assisting more than a 
atiOion Rvrandan Hutu who fled to Zaire in July after tiie 
takeover of thdr coumiy by the Tuta-dominated Rwanda 
Patriotic Front 

This operation is considered a first for Jap^ an economic 
powerhouse still feding its way to a larger political role — tbe 


first tiine Japanese troops have been di^tebed overseas for a 
humanitarian mission under their own co mman d. 

Jwanese trot^ assisted in Cambodia and Mozambique, 
but both of those misaons were defined as “peacekeeping" 
operations under a UN command, and the Japanese were 9 ven 
a limited rde in areas considered safe and protected by troops 
from other nation. 

After three months in Goma, tbe Japanese are now leavii^ 
— they are due home brfore tbe end of tbe year — but their 
officers hope thdr brief tour has advanced an image of Japan 
in a little-known comer of this poor continenL 

“When I arrived here, 1 asked 'Do you know Japan?* and 
they said yes. because tb^ know Toyotas" and other products 
made in Japan, said Yoshio Nagawa, a UN refugee official 
who laid the groundwork for the airiv^ “But they never saw 
the face of a Japanese." 

That has changed. Jape's militaiy doctors at tbe Goma 
bo^tal treat about SO patients each day. Its mflitaiy engineers 
are building a drainage system at one refugee camp, and its 

See GOMA, PftgeS 



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enridied uranium,’’ 
niiirw- iss functions as an ezplorive and it 
is used in tbe warhead of rowis." 

The Intemational Atomic fioeigy Agen- 
cy in Vienna said it was concerned that 
sndr material could available ille- 

gaDy, but noted that the amount was not 
enough to make a bomb- 

The pohoe, who had been tipped off, 
caught the three unarmed men as they 
drove through a suburb of Frague, he said, 
adthng that seizure was the bigiest cS sudt 
matenaJ in the Czech RepuUjc. The 90 
peroent enrich^ untnhip-^5 was stored 
m two t^lindrical containers. 

Tbe three men were charged with ilie^ 
po^esaon of nuclear material a senior 
pohoe officei said. 

The Czech sooitist has not been 
cially onplttycd in the nuclear industry for 
sevml years, the police smd. 

SmaOer amounts of nudear material 
have 'been seized, notat^ in Comany. 
^wdalists believe this was the first setzure 

See URANIUM, Page 8 


Who^s Chasing Whom in Fox Hunting? 

New Law Allows Police to Go After Animal Bights Protesters 


By Damton 

Hew York Tima Sance 

SWINDON, Eng^d — A curious ritu- 
al plays out some eariy daricening afto'- 
noons on rural &ig|and*s colling green 
hills. Figures dart bade and forth across 
tbe landscape, through the woods and 
ttvoss the glades. Evoybody seems to be 
diaang evi^body else, 

The cliain-<rf'-beiQg goes like this: First 
comes the fox. Then Um hounds. Then the 
hunters on boisebadc. Then the hunt sabo- 
teurs. Then the pcdice. 

And these there is apt to be a 
journalist or two in the mix, along with 
pbotognq}faers and various video crews, 
some taking pictures of the huntere, to be 
used in the animal ri ghti^ crusade. 
otiiers utiuQg pictures of the saboteurs, to 
be used in court. 

Hunt “sabs," as thty call tbemsdves, 
have been aroimd at \sut rince the 19^ 


Their guorilla tactics and occarionally vi- 
olent dust-ups with tbe men and women in 
jodhpurs and scarlet, black and tan uinics, 
vho sometimes cannot rerist the teinpta- 
tion to deliver a sound blow with a riding 
crop, hardly quality anymore as news. 

But what is difierait is the new Criminal 
Justice Act, a centopieoe of Conservative 
I^islation meant as an nmnih»s anti-crime 
measure to lift the party's saepng popular- 
ity. Its draconian provirions make life dif- 
fuailt for dozens of nonCTn fonnis f British 
groups, including tbe counterculture danc- 
ers kiK^ as ravers, as well as squatters 
and environmental protesters. 

The provision aimed specifically at hunt 
sabmei^ is “aggravated tre^Ms^” which 
applies to disrupting lawftil activities on 
someone else's land. It mates hunt sabo- 
taging an easily prosecutable offense, and 
it sets a three-month jail sentence. 

So far, it has led to the arrests of 70 


people, none of adiom have yet been set 
tenced, said Ba Ponton, spokesman fo 
the naticMial headquarters Hunt Sa^ 
teurs. But it has not slowed the movemeni 

Aubrty Thomas, 37, is acasein poinL r 
worker at Heathrow International Ahpor 
he is a vetoun of the movement. He fin 
went to tty to break up a hunt as some 
thing of a ask but was horrified Ity what 1 
sow. 

“It was in Sunpy he recalled. “The 
chased tbe fox until it went to groun 
made a drainpipe under the A23 motoi 
way. Tb^ tried to dig it out, and final] 
cme man mcked up apitdifa^ and 
it and piuled it out and tossed it to tfa 
hounds. 

“That was 21 years ago, and I’ve bee 
sobbing just about every week ever sina 
I’m not g(^ to qidt now." 

Hunt Sabotenrs say there are 3,000 t 
See HUNT, Page 8 






Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HF.HALn TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 20, 1994 



Carter Bosnia Trip WORLD BRIEFS 


Enrages Europeans 


Diplomats Say ‘Grandstanding’ 
Could Give Serbs Respectability 





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Dmd JMboVltaNEn 

WHATS THE BEEI^ -—French pig fannen protestiiig inaiiKt price of poifc Mood^ OD a taigibnray near Nantes. 


By Joseph Fitchett 

ttoamdoHt^ Herakl Tridiaie 

PARIS ~ In his free-lance 
stateananship in Bosnia, Jim- 
Carter is treading espaaally 
tnd^ new ground beeme tins 
time, unlike in North Korea or 
Hai^ lus actktts can damage 
the intearests of European gov- 
eromaits involved in the cdsis 
aioqgsd^ the United States, ac- 
cerdmg to (^dals in Eun^ 

"Pot politely, we are skqptt- 
cal; acuity, we are livid at 
sonal grandstanding liable to 
give the Bosedan Serin a few 
minutes of respectalrili^,** a 
European diplomat at the 
Noth Atlantic Treaty Oxgani- 
zation said Mmiday. 

1^. Carter seemra be losng 
his footing fast in Bosnia, pub- 


Priest’s Crusade for Homeless Vexes French Leaders 


Roam 

PARIS — Abb6 Piene, a Roman Catholic priest 
who champions the poor, has burst into France's 

Euousade on behaIfof*Sic^meS^'”^ 

The 82-year-old priest, who has personified 
France's consdence for 40 yean, led 300 activists 
the Right to Housing aaodation who took over an 
empty building in Paris's chic Saint-Germain-des-Pres 
district on Sunday. 

**I declare that we are here with 60 famiUes in the 
name of the law," be told a small crowd. 

He said the action was intended to highlight, a weric 
before Christmas, the plight of 600,000 to 800,000 
homeless people in France and 2 million more living in 
slum hounng while many btddings stood empty. 

"We won't leave here until there is a guaranteed 
rehousing solution," said the squatters’ l^er, Jean- 
BaptisteEyraudL 

Edouard fialladur, the conservative prime minister, 
a likely contender in the two-round presidential elec- 
tion in April and May, immediately met Abbe Pierre 


and the association’s founder, Albert Jacquard. The 
prime minister promised that the police would not 
take any action to remove the squatters until alternar 
tive housing was f^ound. 


As a gestuie respect, Mr. Balladur also provided 
an official car for Abbe Pierre to take him bade to his 
mmiastery in Nmnandy. 

Not to be outdone. Mayor Jacques Chirac of Paris, 
Mr. Balladui’s rinef rival and the only dedared con- 
servative preadential candidate, quii^y aimounced 
he would institute l^al procedures to commandeer, 
for the homeles^ enq)ty apmtmeats and r^ces owned 
large finaridal oorpmrations. 

"1 will do tins xmmediatdy, but I stress that we are 
taSdng of those apaitments and offices belor^ng to 


large nnanctaL groiqis and empty for qjeculative rea- 
sons." Mr. Chirac TFl tdevision. 


sons," Mr. Chirac told TFl tdevision. 

Mr. Chirac, seddng to strike a more sodal-minded 
tmaga as the presideiiti^ election neats, was eager not 
tofn^en tte middle-class voters who are among his 
staunchest supporters; some them own apartments 


thiu they Iseep off the rental market for ^eculati%« or 
other reasons. 

Abb6 Herce’s action was an embarrassment for 
Chirac, who is often held responsible Fot the "gentrifi- 
cation" of Paris by property developers ance he be- 
came mayor in 1977. llie developers have driven 
property prices up, forcing poorer families oat of the 
city. 

The squatters led by Abbe Nerre picked a five-story 
building m the nddst of chic boutiques and restaurants 
and slated for conversion to luxury apartments. 

The president of the poverty action group ATD- 
Qoart Monde, Genevibve de GauQe, said her orgamza- 
tion would chaiignge aU pfeadential candidates to 
]^edge to enact a law to fight poverty. She is a niece of 
Qjaries de Gaulle’s. 

Abb6 Piene has fought fen* the poor since 1954, 
when he began a campaign to provide food, shelter 


and dignity Tor thousands of homeless people threat- 
ened with Lreeang to death in France’s coldest postwar 


Feud With Greeks? Albanians Puzzled 


Parties File 


By Henry Kamm 

VorA Times Sernce 

: GJINOKASTER, Albania 
>— There are many ethnic dis- 
putes that keep Balkan govern- 
'.raents at loggerheads, but the 
.one between Greece and Alba- 
'nia seems to find little echo 
^among the people themselves. 

Greece and Albania speak to 
each other harshly, have ex- 
^peOed ci4>lomats and have end- 
led Dulitary cooperation. There 
'has been a fatal 1x)rder raid as 
well as repressive measures 
jagainst ethnic txunoriries and a 
■poliUcal trial that recalled the 
'practices of Albania's Commu- 
nist role. 


Most Grerics in Albania live 
in southern r^on; and, 
across the border m Greece, 
about 250,000 Albanians have, 
since the fall of the dictatorship 
in 1991, found the employment 
that their own country, Eu- 


rope’s poorest, cannot 
Ine money thsy send borne is 


But In this mountaintop town 
;near the Greek frontier, whose 
peculation of 29,000 conrists 
tnaint y of etimic Albamaos, a 
viritOT found no one to say an 
imlcin d word about G r eece. 

Tsmafl Kadare, a writer who 
• comes from here and who now 
'lives in Tirana, said: "There is 


something deeply wrong in to- 
day's relations. The dilute is 
aruEdal; there are too many 
friendships between Greelu 
and Albanians." 


The money they send borne is 
the largest source of oonvertibK 
money in Alb^a. Its own cur- 
rency, the Idc, is not accepted 
abroad. 

Because rirtually all of the 
migrant woricers have eitiier no 
Greek visas or ones that do not 
entitle them to work, Greece- 
regularly sends some back 
across the border. But it tder- 
ates the huge majority because 
tiiey fUljobs that Gre^ refuse. 

Officials know that those 
who are expelled socmer or later. 
Teturn. 

There is widespread belief 
that the roots of the conflict 
may lie less in etimic rivaliy 
than in histoacal antasemism 
between north and south. In a 
rtferendum in November on a 
dj^t constitution. President 
Sali Berisha of Albania, a 
northerner who heavily pro- 


moted the draft, suffered a far 
heavier defeat in this r^on 
than is the north. 

Mr. Kadare, the writer, spoke 
of his lifdong affection for eth- 
nic Grndc classmates whose 
names he recalled fondly. One, 
Ihasas Dido, a local journalist, 
echoed his friend^s views. 
Asked to deiioe his sense of- 
nationality, he smd: "Fm a 
Greek of Albania, but in con- 
science and qnrit Pm more Al- 
banian." 

How many Greeks tiiere are 
in Albania is a statistic that has 
faBen victim to the dispute, 
which began in the Communist 
days when Greece accused Al- 
bania of singling out ethnic 
Greeks for q>ecial mistreau 
meat. 


Mr. Berisha said in an inter- 
view in Tirana that there were 
70,000 to 80,000 Greeks. Na- 
dmialists is Greece , who con- 


sider this r^on as having been 
stolen from their land wb^ Al- 
bania was frauded in 1913, pot 
the number at 400,000. A 
diplomat with close knowdedge 
of the area estimated the total at 
120,000. 

In a Jotnt mterview, two eth- 
nic Greek leaders^ Thoma 
Mico, a member of Pariiament, 
and Varil Cako. a senior r^on- 
al offkaal, sharply contn^ted 
thdr strong loy^ty to Albania 
adth what they de^bed as re- 
pression of campaigners for 
Gredk rights. 

Citing what he said was re- 
pression by the secret politx 
and the iinprisoiunent of ethnic 
Greek advocates, Mr. Mico 
said: "The message to the nu- 
nority is, Tf you are an activbu 
you risk prison.’ We as repre- 
sentatives are isolated, and the 
minority is ffightened to tight 
for its legtd ri^ts." 


3 Censure 


Motions on 


Berlusconi 


Peasant Rebels in Mexico 


Warn of Renewed Fighting 


By Tod Robberson 

Wakii^fon Foot Semee 


For business women 
going places, 
liere’s the place 
to stop. 


MEXICO emr —The peas- 
ant rebel Zapatista National 
Liberation Aimy announced 
Monday that it had mobilized 
for an isumnent renewal of 
righting and that thousands of 
its guenillas had skirted a Mex- 
ican Army cordon to take up 
positions in towns across south- 
ern Chiapas state. 




Although no fighting has 
been reported. ne«'s services 
said that arm^ and masked 
peasants bad been seen at rood 
blodcs in some parts of the state 


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HereW Tribune readers 


and that at least one town hall 
had been srized by gunaiai. 

Mexico Cxt/s Radio Red 
network re^ortni that a dyna- 
mite eiq>losion oocuned in one 
rural village seised by peasants, 
but the report could sot be con- 
tirmed. 

The mobilization threatened 
an 11 -month cease-fire that 
went into effect iwo weeks after 
the Zapatistas, anned mostly 
with hunting rifles, launched 
thrir tmrising on New Year's 
Day. The Za^iistas have on at 
least two previous occasions de- 
clared "rra alerts" in anticipa- 
tion of reaew*ed righting with 
the Mexican Army, only to dis- 
solve back into the jungle. 

The latest announcement, 
however, marked die first time 
the Zapatistas had clmmed to 
have spread b^ond their gov- 
ernment-recognized zone. 

At a jungle news conference, 
the Zapatista leader. Subco- 
mandante Marcos, described 
the mobilization as a "military 
action" to gu^ ^ost any 
surprise ait^ bv the Mexican 
Anny. 


■’* Ageme Fnmer-Prase 

ROME — Parties of Italy’s 
opporition and governing^ooaU: 
tion presented thiw separate 
censure motions to lawmakers 
Monday against (he govern- 
ment ol Pniaoe Mhuster l^vio 
Balusconi. the parties said. 

The embattled prime minis- 
ter and bw^essroan hit back 
by calling for early riections 
and doiouDciog what be called 
the "betrayal" of the electorate 
that the motions represented. 

The first motion was made by 
a Marxist party, the Commu- 
nist Re-establishment Party, 
the second jointly by the feder- 
alist Northern League and the 
centrist Popular Party, the for- 
mer Christian Democrats. Ihe 
third motion from the former 
Communists, the Party of the 
Democratic Left The League is 
nominally a Berlusconi ally. 

The motions will be dented 
Wednesday and are to be voted 
on Friday. Mr. Berlusconi's 
government could fall if a sig- 
nificant m^ority of all four par- 
ties* back the c^. 

Before the emsure debate, 
deputies are to vote on Mr. Ber- 
Jusconi's 1995 draft austerity 
budget, which was approsed in 
the Senate on Monday. 

Mr. Berlusconi repeated ear- 
lier calls for early elections "to 
let the voters sp^ again.” 

Addresring supporters of his 
Foiza Italia party in his Milan 
stronghold, he denounced the 
motions as a "betrayal" of the 
electorate should they lead to 
the formation of a new adminis- 
tration incorporating the “non- 
liberal" former Coimmmisls. 

The Northern League leader. 
Undxxto Bossi, said earlier that 
Mr. Berlusconi was "ail fln- 
isbed" because more than 60 of 
the party's 103 lawmakers 
pledged to vote for the censure 
motion and their votes and those 


of the three opposition parties 
would topple UK govenin^t. 


Hdy ooncniring in claims that 
the Bosnian Setts* cause has 
been misunderstood and De- 
fected in the Umfed States. 

While European govern- 
ments have sought to mainUBn 
a posture of neutrality in B(s- 
ma, DO experienced n^otiator 

would have made a simflar con- 
ciliate statement in public at 
this juncture. 

Mr. Cartel's comment (fid 
nothing to dispd Europeans’ 
fears that he unB be mas^ulat- 
ed hy Radovan Kaiadzs^ the 
Bosnian Serbian leader. 

Spokhig in Pale, die Bosnian 
Serbs’ stronghold, Mr. Caiter 
heard Mr. Karadac describe 
the Bokiian Serbs as people 
fighting for their hcao^ not as 
aggressors from Sertia. 

Mr. Carter rq^lied that be 
could not dispute Mr. Karadr 
z^s statmneat that the Ameri- 
can people had primarily heard 
only <nie side of the story. 

Despite their conoera. West- 
ern governments, too embar- 
rassed by their own perfor- 
mance in Bosnia to object 
publicty to letting another new^ 
comer tiy peacemaking, have 
aqoepted the Carter missioa, 
with France even providizig a 
cautious endorsement. 

The ray o( hope is that hfr. 
Carter’s trip will provide the 
occasion for the Bosnian Serbs 
to move out of their diplomatic 
isolation with a st^ toward a 
poUtioti settlement. 

Mr. Carter, 70, said, "It may 
be that today is one of the rare 
ehaneea tO the WoHd ICDOW 
the tn^ and to erolain the 
oommibneat of the ^bs to a 
peace t^Teemeat.” 

For Mr. Karadzic, the meet- 
ing may rin^y be an opportu- 
nity to surest that there are 
g rades in the international sup- 
port for the peace plan. 

For most European and LUS. 
officials, the risk looms mudi 
lar^ that Mr. Carter’s conver- 
sations will fud confidence 
among Bosnian Serbs and cor- 
responding fears among Bosni- 
an Muslims and undermine the 
current international backed 
peace plaxL 

Unfortunatdy, a &iropean 
poHcymaker said, Mr. Carter’s 
trip *%ts a broader picture that 
the plan is suddenly no Icmger 
sacrostaici, at least aot as joueb 
as it was a wedc when 
em governments were looking 
for a diplomatic rebound." 

Already, be said, leaders in 
Bosnia are anxioudy waiting 
for signals from the talks that 
open^ Monday in the Nether- 
lands among Western govem- 
menls about how to uxq>rove 
the effectiveness of their peace- 
keying forces in Bosnia. 

ITiat military agenda, he 
said, will be dosely scrutinized 
in Bosnia for hidden Western 
political incentions. For exam- 
ple, a key suggestion for better 
wintertime logistics involves se- 
curing a land corridor from the 
Adriatic to Sarajevo. 

In Bosnia, that is liable (o be 
read as scHnething more, as a 
sgn that the Western govern- 
ments are shifting the focus 
away from the Muslim-held en- 
claves in western Bosnia, 

If Mr. Carter’s trip ends in 
fmlure, a European official 
said, it "is hable to be seen as 
more di^uised Araeiican med- 
dling — In Europe, not in Haiti 
or Asia." 

The Carter trip has already 
aroused suspicions in Europe 
because of the Clinton adminis- 
tration's last-minute decision to 
give it serai-offidal status by 
extending some U.S. logistical 
and political support. 


Another CMd Kills Himself in Japan 

m easteni Jap^ the ^ in ^ 

aanlar youth suiddes in Japan in the last nKfflui- 






A Vji rning toForeigDei^i^Karaciu 

KARACHI, Palastaa (Renters) — For^ 

ing then- naSmals to take extra praautions in 

iSt 140 people have been IriUed in ethnic and sectarian vMaeoce 






to 140 peoDlfi have be<m kflied ra etimic ana sccuiu^i 

*TheU.S, CoiSaw*?lat^*adTCe to Americ^ ^ 

southern port city is to stoy aroy from dist^ «tog^ 

bc*o n^TOted to ilK last few dtya A cMis^^ 

U.S. dtizens to “avoid crowds, marches, funerals or protest^ 
congested areas or obstacles (like burntog tires or v^cte) 

ft cantions them not to go waflemg or jogging in public 




long m rate, me oosDian packs or on roads. I s 

describe trail HftTps Iraq Sell OiL U«S* Asserts fiiihlU ^^* 

mCOSIAfSutcrs)— Tlie United States hM accused iMrf : JlllJ 


NICOSIA (Reuters) — The United Sta^ hM acco^ to 
bef^ Iraq violate the United Nations 

em fresh uN action to discouran sudi activity, tlm hfidole East 
Economic Survey troorted MooKwy. . 

The new^tm' said the accusation was made m a Irtter to^ 
United Nations Security Counefl’s Sanctions Coanmittee, wb«* is 
charged with e nr*^T*y"s the embargo on Iraq's oil, imposed after 
Iraq mviU^ Kuwait to 1990. 


hrud Bloc Survives BibUctd^:orm 


JERUSALEM (Renters) — TTie Israeh gqvcnai^ ot 
M onday eaaly defeated a no-confidence motion cato by 
rabbis m Paifiameat in a feud over the character of the 
UUical King Daind. , t 

Supporters of Prime Minister Yitzhak Rahm’s Labor-led 
coalition beat tte motion, 56 to 41. 

Ultrared^Ds members Pariiament forced the vote 0^ 

a comnKm^^ Prveiga Minister Shimon Peres last week that 
King David may have acted immorally 3,0(W years ago whn 
he slept with the wife of <me of ftis warriors and sent the 
huriwd to die to battle. 


Bulgaria Elects Former Ckwtinmnists I 

SOFIA (AP) — Popular discontent over linttrii^ instabil^ 
and faHiiig Irnng standards ptopdled the Biiigarian. SociaBs^ 
Party, the ronner Communists, into power to the country’s parliar* 
mentary Sections. ! 

Aoccuding to the election oommissioa, the Socialists will conn 
mand an majority 124 seats to the 240'seat Pariiament; 

Their main rivals, the Unimi of Democratic Forces, w31 gm 68i 
seats. { 

Compntatiem of the distritoition of seats was based on 92) 

percent of the votes counted to Sunday’s election. Few dian^ 
were expected in the final tally, acocuding to an dectioa commis-i 
rion spokesman. ! 



Tamil Rebels Kins, but Talks Go Qu I 


COLOMBO (AP) — Tami} guecriUas kOled three soldtor^ 
Monday; but rebd leaders and government officials went ahrac^ ' 

with ^scussions for their next round (rf* p^ce (idks. . i 

The predawn attack on an aimy bunker occurred in Weli-OyaJ 

«...n • .1 y-"—,— 1.:^ r? — , 


For the Record 


A chartered plane ouiynig families home for Ouistinas re** 
unions crashed to a ronote mountainous area of Psyma Nem^ 
Gutoea, kfllmg all 28 people aboard, aviation officials said Mon-> 
day. The plane had been chartered by the Misaonazy Aviation} 


Fdtowship of Mdbourne. 



TRAVEL UPDATE 


i. .' -1 . I 


Cnnard Yields to Angiy Passengers | %FromPof 


LONDON (Reuters) — The Canard shipping company agreedi 
on Monday to produce individual compensaticm packages foi! 
about 500 passoigers wdio mi^ed out on a Quisti^ cruise otf 
their Qi^ Imer bwause a refurtoshment was not finished on time.} 
It came up with the offer after one of the frustrated passeugers^ 
David Steene, an attorney, picketed its London headquarters. 
have received an unieser^ apology both for me and the otoer 
paMcngefS," Mr. Steene said alter meeting with Cunard offiaalsj 
wdio at first refused to see him. i 

The Steenes, wdio paid £I9,(KX) ($29,600) for the trip, wer^ 
among 190 passengers left on the do^ when the QE2 sail^ from 
Southampton on Satui^y for New York. Another 300 people tout 
been told ty Cunard eazlier that they w^d not be able to crawri.' 
Their cabins were not ready because contractors had failed t4 
complete tbe plumbing. Cunard initially offei^ a refund, plus a 
free cruise next year and £250 pending money. 


ifcv.;' 


I . ' 


2 Isradi Soldiers Die 
In Ldianon Attacks 


Agenee Fnmrt-Prase 

MARJAYOUN, Lebanon — 
Two Israeli soldiers were killed 
and at least three wounded in 
guerrilla attacks in southeni 
Lebanon on Monday, security 
officials said. 

Israeli troops and their proxy 
militia retaliated by pounding 
Hezbollah positions in south 
Lebanon while Israeli war- 
planes buzzed the region. 


U.Su e rtiz e n s gmi^ to Bahrain should av<M oow ds and exexcise 
caution, following anti-government protests there, the State De- 
partment advised Americans traveling abroad. (Reuter^ 

Seven peofde died and S3 suffered frostidte in Mosm after 
temperatures phmged below minus ZS d^rees centigrade (xninirt 
13 degrees Fahrenheii) over tbe weekend. The Interfax news 
agency said all the victims had been drinkmg hCTvily, (Reuters) 

HuDdreds of railroad workers raarcbed to Oslo and held wildcat 

strikes around the country Monday to protest cost-cutting 
by the state railroad. 

GasoBne stations in L^os, Nigeria's commercia] center, had 
long Imes Monday due to shortages of fuel that have spread 
throughout most of the country. (Reuters) 

Albaida slowed to a crawl as electricity was ratified by tire 
government because of drought in the river system supplyinamost 
of the country’s h;ydroeIectnc power. The capital, Ttotwas lit 
only by car headlights. (Reuter^ 

Lebanon win try to get the United States to lift a travel ban on 
^ci^ins » that cwmry imposed in 1985. at tbe height of the 
1975-90 <a«I war. a Ubanese official said Monday. TKeban also 
prevents Middle East Airlines from flying to and from the United 
Slates and selluig tickets there. (Reuters) 






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I^ots Thought They Were in South Korea^ Tapes Show 

BV Stevan ^ MT 


PigeS, 



“The Ameiicaii pecmie are cleariy Mr. he ha« agiw>rf 

very concMsed abwt the fate of these rcsentadve Wilfiaffi B. Riduudson, a 
two crewmen,” said Mike McCutry, New Meidoo Demoecai who was v^tp 


seconds lata help detennine how fast the United 
■ i^^^^INGTON — The Pentaann vP|^v^*“*®“®*®**(*7®des)awayin States moves to improve rdations with 
rele^ tapes Monday the North. 

Oiai the two amy piloS ihnSSf^ ^ ^ “The American people are cleariy 

hehcopter strayed into North Kniv, “ 5 ^ were, asmorP^ta «)0 very conceised about the fate of these 

Wore going down were not on a h^^ said at a news bneCing. ‘‘^y two crewmen,” said Mike McCutry, 

^ surveillance missioo Md^hoM^hi J?' ™ “ot we they thought th^ the State Dq)artnient spokesman, 
tha were in SouSkSL. ^ “The AmS^ people wiD in some 

The Clinton administration aie^ u Clmlon vowed at a sense form a jud^nent about North 

warned that relaliow^dd 'o push for an “early Korea bas^ on^wNorth Korea re- 

a turn for the worse if North mcideni and said, spends to our repeated requests for 

not soon release one of the ‘Sf ^ information and more details 

pilots and iurn^v“*?r^aSSSi about the incident,” he said, 

other. Their hcUcoDiS P“ ^ ** adnmusira- North Korea has said it shot down 

H-« “"J'^^r^tuOWnFn- tion was “nressinB verv hard** for Ihe .K-. i.:ii:«» kx- uji^^ 


the fadicopter went down, while Mr. 
Hall was in North Korean custody and 


sparentW unhyured. 
Mr. Qmttm said he 


mtrn Quittm aid he has asked Rq>- _ ,>■ . . . «« . ^ «« ^ ■ 

resentaiive Wilfiani B. Ridiaidson, a ® M^loa Halliea Along tforaer 
New Meidoo Demoecai who was v^tp U.S. defense o ffi cial s , who asked 
ing North Korea, to extend his stay to not to be identified, said that hdicc^ 
seek to negotiate the idease of Mr. lets from the 4th Battalion of the SOfst 
and the remains of 1^. Hilemon. Aviation R^inient based at Caim 
“Pve worked on this gj] weekend,” Page northeast of Seoiil would not uy 
Mr. Clinton said at the news briefing, along the bender imtfl an investigation 
“I’m gomg to ke^ woriung on iL” of the downing was comideied, news 
Amoiean officials said Mr. Rkb- agencies reported, 
ardson had several meetings Mcmday The Democratic administration’s 
in North Korea, while United Nations ddicate handling of the atuation was 
military i^cials met with North Ko> matched by caunous statemcDts b^ in- 
rean military dd^tes at the border coming leaders of the new Republican- 
village of Panmunjom. In addition, the mqotity Congress. 

State Department said therehubeen a ”I think we should be patient and be 
finny or faxes and phone cailig to calin,'”saidtheittcomiiigHon5espeak- 
Notu Kor^ dipdomats at the United er. Newt Gh^cb. “Let’s work our 
Nations in New Yoric. way through tms.” (Reuters, Af\ 


“We dearly want an early resolution 
to t^ matter and a full accounting,” 
Mr. McCnrty sdd. 


xrkesman. 
le win in some 


spozids to our repeated requests for 
more information and more details 
about the incident,” he said. 


Mr. Clinton said at the news briefing, along the bender imtfl an investii 
“I’m going to keqi woriung on iL” of the downing was comideied. 


day night north <5 ihedeS^^ beUcopier, kiiling Mr. Hilemon in North Korea, while UajS NaUoii 

zone. nulitanzed j ^ Warrant and captui^ Mr. H^ But the Penta- military e^cials met with North Ko- 

• Assmiing that the niimc h^A ■. Hilton and tl» return gon said Monday that it could not rean military dd e gat es at tte border 

tingly strayed north ^of the^^SS confinn whether the hdicopter was village of Panim^Si. In addition, the 


American offidals said Mr. Rkb- 


Nonh Korea has said it shot down ardson several nvw»tifip«8 Mcmday 


rean military dd^tes at the border 

R«gnmngU.a.No.lh K»^Lsi dS™"-S- "^niSi^tauidbep 
UfflilMt7adioS„S„h£i'^ «™rgH>csl»>dii>s. fhmvTfaMs and ptaona calls lo calmr’ said the incommg 

said they were at a site^ South KilrS^ ^.** *^,? The White House announced Sun- No^ Korean diplomats at the United er. Newt Gii^ch. “Le 

s real a site in South Korea, way Pyongyang handles the cnsis wiU day that Mr. Hilemon was killed when Nations in New Ybrk. way through ti&.” j 

Suburbia’s Emerging Political Oout May Redetine the Rules 


way through 


(Reuters, AR) 


By Karen De Witt 

New Vorfc Timet Seniee 

WASHINGTON — While 
the 1990 census found that the 
i^jority of Americans live in 
the nation’s suburbs, the na- 
tional dection last month con- 
firmed the demographic phe- 
hon^on: suburban voters, 
particularly those living in the 
South, now hold the key to po- 
litical power. 

! And poUtidans have already 


begun to see their futures shi/i- 
mg, with Rranbiicans predict- 
ing a rosy future among the 
land of malls and Democrats 
bemoaning their (ate. 

Yet political analysts, de- 
mographers and academicians 
say the picture emerging of new 
political muscle in the suburbs 
presents a murkier picture than 
a simple win or Jose scenario for 
either major party. 

Some contend that the very 


diversity of today’s suburbs 
prevents one party from locking 
up the votes. But others say the 
suburbs present a fundamental 
realignment between urten and 
suburban needs, between the 
haves and the have-nots, as 
more affluent citizens physical- 
ly distance themsdves from the 
problems of poor urban resi- 
denis. 

But experts concede, that an 
electorate thai resides primarily 


in the subuibs has implications 
for the future of the nation as 
profound as the shift from rural 
to urban at the end of the 190 
century. 

“America has b^un a subur- 
ban era of politick emtroU” 
said William Sdineider, a poht- 
ical analwt at the American En- 
terprise Institute. 

If party affiliatirm is any in- 
dication, that would appear to 
bode well for Republic's, and 









es- f-. ■ 



% 


Kni Tri(alu||ii/nie Amaued Pioi 


BOSTON'S LATEST TEA PARTY — Modeni-dayMiiiuteinendimipiiig British tea iirio Boston Haiiror to nark 
the 221st annhrersaiy of tbe Boston Tea Party, die cotonial protest against ftrftirii taxation fritfMNit representation. 

Away From Politics 


• An idr force r^icer accused m coonee- 
tioo witta the dowtring of two U3. briict^ 
ten over Iraq in which 26 died, Ca p tam 
T im Wang, will be court-martialed. 
rTiaig ay against four other officers on 
the radar plane he served on have been 
itiamiaoiiH, the air force said. (AP) 

• Ao autistic teen-ager cfraig^ vrith mw- 
der after aD^edly throwing his S-month- 
old nnhew out a fifth-floor window has 
a fixatitm with throwing bonsehold items 
from the apartment. New York police 


say. Even Mifle police were intervieMng 
hi^ 17-yeai-old Mh±ael Holmes threw 
toiletries and other thin^ out the win- 
dow, a detective said. (AR) 

u A unm waBced fado a Chinese reriaonid 
and kOled a casUer before he and another 
person were killed following a 100-shot, 
fbur-block chase through a middle-class 
neighborhood, Rem Park in Queens, 
New York, the p^ce saiA (Reuters) 

• Fhe days after it was stolen ftinia a 
bedi grave asid left on a sednded road, 


the body of Melinda Ann Lee, a 20-year- 
(rid ooU^ honors student, was reburied 
in Dallas. Ihe police have no motive or 
respects but were investig ating eiqilana- 
tions ranging from the occult to an ob- 
sessed admirer. Miss Lee, a junior at 
Texas Tech Umverrity, died D^ 7 from 
itguries in an October aeddrat invdving 
an all^edly drunken driver. (AP) 

• One <d five hmAig gears on a TWA 
Boons 7^ partly edfa gw ed as the jei 
landed Sunday at Kennedy airport in 
New York Q'ty from San Juan. (AP) 


CNN Wifl Admit (XI]V1X)N: One a JLeoner Ccmrnnierit 


Error in Showing 
^ iVqpes on Noriega 


TheAsMdMiPrta 

- MIAMI Faced with a 

large fine. Cable News Networ k 
agreed Mdnd^ to tdl viewers it 

made a ndst^ by tooadcast- 
ing taped jaiZhouse cemversar 
ci Manuel Antonio Nor- 
iega as be awaited his drug triaL 
As he prnared to sentence 
the network for contempt. 
Judge William Hoevder of U.S. 
District Court gave CNN a 
choice: pay a substantim Gm 
for contempt of court or broad-, 
’fact an adnusatm error and 
j>ay only the costs of prosecu- 

After a diort recess, CNN 
agreed to admit it had made a 

•ed the prosecution andoetenre 
‘attorneys 10 work out the word- 

.ingofieCNNbroadcart. 

Four years ago* the nctww 
Iquoted from 

■deoosed Panamanian lead^ 

:^ESe conventions wth 

■S^era. Mr. Nonega was latff 

: SJSvicted of drug diarges and IS 

Sving a 40-year senteo^ 

TTifl Atlaaia*bascd networit 
•g^ed it was legacy 
I^dcast the tapes beca^ it 

KdaiooiiiaBsticresponsfihty 

■^^JSreent ®isconduct for 
l^jringJ^-Nooegas calls. 


T., subscribe hi ftgnca 

05437 437 


CoaShtaed from Page 1 
although oontrollers would still 
not be permitted to strike. 

• Die Doaitment of Hous- 
ing and Uroan Devdopment 
would consdidate funds frmn 
60 disparate housing pro^ams 

give states the authority to 
dbbuise them. Residents of 
some public bousing pngects 
would be ^ven voud^ to ob- 
tain li QHipTig elsewhere if they 
preferred to move. 

• The 60-year-dld Federal 

Hnasing AftmiTrig t ration wonid 

be privatized and oonqiete in 
the msurance marketyls^ 

• Die General Sendees Ad- 
ministration, the gpvanmoii's 
landlord and diief proenrement 
agency, vriiich directly or indi- 
rectly controls neaity $60 bil- 
lion m federal spending, 
says it will offer some i»eces m 
its (^leratioDS for sale to its em- 
ployees. 

Mr. Clinttm was also said to 
be considering cuts in rail suba- 
£es, in frmds fcff roads and for 
nndear waste cleanup. 

Some of the. White House 
prc^sals could be ordered 
without Iqjslation; othms vrill 
require oongresdonal ^^provaL 

Dereite the simflarities in the 
dhectim bring taken Ity Mr. 
Clinlon, a PreiocraL and ^ 
Republican leaders, mqm- dif- 
ferences in theii aii^iioaches 
mam. Many i^bca] analysts 
forecast a titanic battle over the 
federal budget that Cmigress is 
to pass next year. 

On Monday, the president 
laid down afizm optical maric- 
er for the Republicans, sa^ng 
that tax ents must be offset, 
“d(^ for dollar,” by spending 


cuts. He also said he would not 
pennU new cuts in the Social 
security pension or in 

the Mracare heal0 insurance 
pro g ram for the ridexty. 

“We have not let rhetoric and 
recklessness dominate,” Mr. 
Qintmi said. “Dus has been 
about reaHty.” 

“I will qmose certain cuts,” 
bfr said, “if they undennine our 
econonuc recoveiy, imdernnne 
middle dass living standards, 
undermine our attenqits to sup- 
port poor peqile who are doi^ 
their best to raise their childzmi 
and want to woik their way into 
the middle imriarmine our 

attoiqits to improve education, 
protect our enviromnent and 
move us into the futnre with a 
taigb-wage, l^b-growth econo- 

Uty." 

RqmbScans have promised 
oaty to leave Serial Seeurity off 
the table as they fashion their 
own budget plan. And in their 
view, some tax cuts will not 
need to be offset Ity qiending 
reductions because th^ 
themetically stimnlate econom- 
ic actirity and proAice more 
tax revenues. 

Dns thesis is rqected tty the 
White House. 

Die TVanspcxlatica, Eoeigy 
and Housing dq w t m eats have 
often been menticmM bp Re- 
imblicans as targets for riunimh 
tion, but Qmfa jn adoonustra- 
tion offidals argued Mraday 
that the nation needed a wity to 
ensure hi^bw^ and air saf^, 
that a national energy strategy 
was vita] and that housing 
problems needed a coordinated 
approach. 


The dhaUenge for Rqwbli- 
cans appears to be far ^eata 
than for the White House. Mr. 
Qinton has said he iflans a mid- 
dle-class bill of i^ts that 
wonld indude $60 bimmi in tax 
cuts and job training von^ers. 

Many RqpnbHcaDS are rafly- 
iz^ beiund a proposal for some 
$^ billion m tax cuts. They 
promised over the wedtend that 
thi^ would enact tax cuts only 
after enacting offsetting q>en4- 
ing cots. 

Mr. Qintoo’s plan envisions 
$76 bflUmi in qiendmg reduo- 
tions to pay for $60 biflion in 
tax cuts sw $ 1 6 billion for defi- 
dt reduction. In addition to the 
points annoDneed on Monday, 
Mr. Clinton has proposed 
stretdbiag out a freeze on dis- 
cretionary federal spending 
throi^ the yew 2000, or two 
years bey<»d its 1998 Iqise 
date. Diat riuiuld save about 
^2 bfllion, the White House 
says. 

Repidflicans say their pbm, 
the details of whiim have yet to 
be announced, will nritiier add 
to nor reduce tiie federal defidt 


5 Q^thaiit KiDeis to IBe 

Xeuea 

BEUING-~A Qooese court 
has s entenced five men, indud- 
ixis two pdicemen, to death for 
kifinig 16 endangered dqjhants 
for their tusks, People’s Crairt 
Daily said Monday. Die Jfi- 
shuangbanna Intermediate 
Peopled CcHirt sentenced 14 
otbm to suspended death sesa* 
tenc^ life sentences orimspec- 
ifiedjail terms. 


it represents a reversal in tradi- 
tioom party constituencies. 

The Rqmblicans, who have 
long been identified with big 
business, are now viewed Ity 
many voters^ rightly or wroiml^, 
as a populist party. And tow 
incresfiii^ cooservatism on so- 
da! issues in recent years dove- 
tails comfortaUy vriin Southern 
attitudes tovwd issues the 
role of religioa in public life. 

But the major wvmg force 
behind the smft, say p^tical 
scientists, is rebuild qirawl 
and the conservative attitixles it 
qiawns. 

According to a survey con- 
ducted by VNS, the organiza- 
tion that does the exilBcdluig 
for the NBC, Cfe and 
Fox tdevision networks, 0e 
dectwate in 1992 identic it- 
sdf as 38 percent Democratic, 
35 percent RqHiblican and 27 
permt ind^MmdenL In the 
suburbs, the hneiro was 35 per- 
cent Democrat, 38 percent Re- 
publican and 27 pereent inde- 
pendent 

In l994,thenatioDasawlKrfe 
identified itself as 37 percent 
Democrat, 35 percent Rmubli- 
can, and 28 percent inaqren- 
dent The submbs were 33 per- 
cent Democrat, 37 percent 
Rquibhcan and 30 pereent 'm- 
d^endent 

“The suburbs Fq>resent a 
pretty heavy swing vote today,” 
said MuitW Fddman. the 

of VNS. 

- But whether this means a rise 


in a Rqniblican electorate, as 
some analysts predict, is debat- 
able. 

Espedally in electicMis for the 
House oS Reprreentatives, vot- 
ing in 1994 was mariced by 
stnkmg Rqniblican gains in tim 
suburbs, some of v^h eca^ 
aboorm^y high Democratic 
votes just two years before. 

“It’s true that histmically the 
suburbs have been Rqiubli- 
can,” said Curtis Cans, presi- 
dent of the C ommit tee for the 
Study of the American Elector- 
ate, a ixx^iartisan research in- 
stitute. “But there is no reason 
to believe that will ctmtinue. 

“Looking at long-term polls, 
what you see is that reboiban 
voters are moving more and 
more to iDdq)eDdreL Die sub- 
urbs are too vdatSe and too 
varirais. One set of appeals may 
worir in one suburb, but not in 
another.” 

Until this year, a big Demo- 
cratic maigin in the lai^ indus- 
trial and unitMfaed cities in 
states Hire lUmols, Ohio and 
Midugan virtually guaranteed 
the dection of a Democratic 
governor despite the more con- 
servative R^bHcan leanings 
of the historically rural parts ^ 
those states. 

But in November, the Re- 
publican gubeniatorial candi- 
dates came out on tq> despite 
strong urban support for thrir 
Deinocratic rivals. Ajod it was 
the suburban voters who made 
the ^ference. 


A- PO LIT r CAL \OTFSiC 


Cash Props Went to CUntow, FUot Alleges 

WASHINGTON — An independent counsel. Donald C. 
Smaltz. says he is investigating auctions made by a fomwr 
pDot for Tyson Foods Inc. that he ferried envelope from the 
company that were liili of cash destined for Bill Clinton while 
Mr. Clinton was governor of Arkansas. 

The piloL Joseph Henrickson. who was dismissed from 
Tyson last year and later sued the company, alleges that on at 
least six occasions, mostly in the 1980s, he carried sealed 
white envelopes intended for Mr. Clinton from Tyson’s 
headquarters in Springdale. .Vkansas. to an airstrip in Little 
Rock. 

Mr. Henrickson contends that, in each case, Tyson officials 
told him that the envelopes, which he said were a qiuuter- 
inch thick and filled with SlOO bills, were for Mr. Clinton. 
M osi of the limes he gave the envelopes to receptionists at the 
airstrip, but once Mr. Henrickson said he handed an enve- 
lope to a plainclothes state trooper who was waiting on the 
tarmac for the drop-ofT. 

Mr. Henrickson’s allegations arc contained in this week's 
issue of Time magazine. The 43->'ear-old pilot declined to 
discuss the charges that he ouUint^ in the magazine. 

David E. Kendall, the personal lawyer for the president 
and Hillary' Rodham Clinton, said: “I’m extremely surprised 
that these vague and baseless allegations are being irresponsi- 
bly bandied about. They are totally false and do not meril 
further comment." (WP) 

Gay»Rights Foe Has Friends in Capital 

WASHINGTON — When it comes to rules and regula- 
tions that confer equality on homosexuals, the Reverend 
.Louis P. Sheldon is u tireless crusader. Against them. And 
given the new* conservatism of Congress, he may have more 
influence over such measures than many gay or lesbian 
leaders have. 1 

Mr. Sheldon, a 6U-year-old Presbylerian minister, is the 
founder and chaiiman of the Traditional Values Coalition, a 
national church network bused in Anaheim, ^lifornia. He 
puts the membership ui about 31.000 churches, representing 
at least a dozen denominations. 

Mr. Sheldon counts as u friend the new assistant majority 
leader of the Senate. Senator Trent Lott of Mississippi. The 
Republican senator was featured in the coalition's 1993 
videotape. “Gay Rights/SpedaJ Rights; Inside the Homosex- 
ual Agenda.” 

In the House. Mr. Sheldon expects hearings on the subject 
of public school programs about homosexuality under a 
commitment he said he received in September from Repre- 
sentative Newt Gingrich, Republican of Georgiy the incom- 
ing speaker. Mr. Sheldon said Mr. Gingrich did not “want 
kint^garien children or elementary school children being 
taught, where federal dollars are involved, that the homosex- 
ual lifestyle is just another kind of diversity.” 

Although Mr. Sheldon's base is Orange County, Califor- 
nia, the coalition has a substantial Washington office, in a 
pale-yellow Victorian town house on Capitol Hill, not far 
from where Mr. Sheldon grew up. 

”We are here at the capital b^use the churches sent us 
here,” he said in au interview. “We stand upon the principles 
orjudeo-Christian values und beliefr. And there is noway we 
are going to say that homosexuality is viable.” f N YT) 


Qttote/Unquote 

Representative Dan Glickman, Deraocrai of Kansas and a 
loser in the November election, joking about Washington's 
notorious repulution for abandoning those out of power: 
"The only one working in the family now is our son, and he 
won’t take our calls.” (NYT) 



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■ I 

• 1 # 


Pl8ge4 


TUESDAY, DECEMBER 20, 1994 

O P I N 1 O IV 


Herald 


INTERNATIONAL 


StlJwUtC Yeltsxn Should SeekAccornrnodation With Chechnya 


KIBI.ISI1ED WITH THE WEW YOttK TIMES AND THE WASHINCTON POST 


Clinton Loses His Way 


Tliere was a q>cedj to be gven by ^ 
piesideiit the other night, but, 

didn’t give it And there IS surely d^jy 

; felt and well-jusUfled u^appmess 
‘ flni o"g vast numbers of middle-mccme 

’ Americans who—to quote a phrase ttoi 

Bill Oinion has made familiar -- play 
: by the rules" and yet find the fed^ 

. govenunent in a vancty ^ w^s shoving 

' tiMtm around, misusing theu’ tax doUais 
and 1^‘ng preny ha^ty and smug 

. about itSl the wWle. But the rcmedi« 

the president set out don’t get^to the 

- source of their grievances and don t really 

- even acknowledge, let alone address, 
what those grievances are. The proposals 

- ha d * hush-money quality to them. 

All tins is why we found the speech 
' dis^ipoinring. With its blithe revei^ of 


a sound poli^ regarding the danger of 
the federu dendi and its piecemeal offer- 
ings to a hostile electorate, the adminis- 
tratioa eaters a bidding war vn\h the 
Republicans that it can’t win and in fact 


loses merely by entering. 

For the first two yearn of his adminis- 
tration, Bili Clinton said that the defidt 
was the great tiueat to future prosperity. 
Thai was be felt that at no small 
political cost to himself he had to propose 
raising taxes in Year One; it was also 
partly vrby he proposed h^th care re- 
form and health care cost containment in 
Year iSro. The health plan he actually 
introduced may have been a mess, but this 
reasoning was right. The first-year steps he 
took to drive down tbe defidt were Mr. 


Qmton’s greatest accoi^IidiffienL 
But ali^y the deadt threatens to 
' head bade up again. What sense does it 
• make in the face of such, a recurring 
threat to reverse poli^ And, to get down 
, to political particulars, how can it be 
. smart to invite a wider defidt that must 
inevit^ly drive up interest rates, hurting 
many of tbe samepet^ tbe tax cuts are 
.V tnmqieted as helping?^e preadent says 
his tax cuts will be paid for, unlike, pro- 
snio^y, tbe laiger ones the Republicans 
propose But scraping together bu^et cats 
to pay for tax cuts when tbe governipeat is 
running defidts the size of tbtee is circular 


Ban Olympic Cheaters 


Prince Alben of Monaco, a member 
of the (ntemational Olympic Commit- 
tee, rates a gold medal for urging that 
athletes who use drugs to enhance their 
p^ormance be banned from the Olym- 
pics for life. The problem has reached 
such ^turbing proportions that only 
the most draconian penalties for all con- 
cerned — athletes, trainers, coaches, 
pbyadans and national ^rts federa- 
tions — can deter further abuses. 

The latest outr^ is the diug-en- 
haocedperfonnaoce of the Chinese wom- 
en’s swummng team, wtucb surged from 
nowhere a few years ago to overpower all 
odier rivals. The Chinese took four silver 
medals at (he 198g Summer Olympics in 
Seoul four |olds and five silvers at the 
19^ Olynmics in Barcelona, and 12 of 16 
gdd medak at die world championships 
in Rome last ^tember. Their domi- 
nance was so swift and so awesome that it 
immediately nused suspidons that they 
used drugs to build tqi muscle power, 

China at first issued blanket denials. 
Th^ after a dozen athletes, mostly 
swimmers, tested positive for steroids be- 
fore or during cbe November Asian 
Ganws, China acknowledged tbe abuses 
bat daimed that the athletes had acted on 
th<^ own, not as part of a systonatic 
program. Q^a's dn^-driven records 
nmnic the earlier sui^ to world domi- 
nanoe by the East German women's 
swimming team, whose top medal win- 
ners later admowledged uting steroids. 

Eq^y prodigious feats Russians 
and East Europeans have been attritoied 
to drugs, and Olympians from Europe, 
the Unit^ States and other nations have 
also been caught by drug tests and sent 
home from the Games. Such abuses are 
bad for the Olympics and for any sport, 
professional or amateur, wbm thes' oc- 
cur. Drug cheating discourages atliletes 


who play by the rules, and no doubt 
entices many to use drugs themselves. 

Moreover, the false coin of drug-assist- 
ed UOfairiy dimini nhaat the 

compUshments of drug-free athletes. The 
Canaan ^nioter Ben Jdmsou may 


have been stripped of his gold medal at 
the 1988 Seoul Olvimncs Tor Tnii ng ste- 


the 1988 Seoul Olympics Tor Tnii ng ste- 
Fteds. But the rusaa-up, America's 
Lewis, never quite felt li^ tbe champion 
he deserved to be. The entire world bad 
seen Ben Johnson bust powei^y from 
(he starting blocks and crush him. 

Prolongra use oi dn^ is dangerous 
for the athletes. Stermds can increase 
the risk of blood dots and adversely 
affect the sex organs. And Dr. Gary 
Wadler, a leading expert on drug use ojf 
athletes, recently suggested that myste- 
rious deaths in Europe a few years ago 
among cydists and oiienteers (cross- 
coun^ runners who tear through rough 
terrain at hi^ speed with map and com- 
pass) may nave been causM by the 
abuse of drugs that enhance enduianoe. 

Tbe goveniiiig bodies of various pro- 
fessional and amateur sports nave 
cracked down by conducting drug-test- 
ing programs and imposing penalties — 
but not with enoi^ force to end the 
abuses. The testing must become far 
more comprehensive and bard to evade 
in all affected ^orts, with random tests 
administered virtually anywhere at any 
time, without advance warning. There 
must be safeguards to avoid tanxng the 
innocenL But there must also be severe 
penalties for clear violations. 

If those who use, administer or con- 
done performance-enhancing drugs 
were banned from sports competitions 
for life, all concerned would hesitate to 
take even the smallest step toward 
chemically enhanced suudom. 

— THE NEW YORK TJMES. 


Other Comment 


Ydtsui and the Checbeiis 


whether tbe Cfaecbesis have tbe right to an 


Until now, Moscow had been able to 
ensure its interests in tbe Owragiftti region 
by means that at times were highly dubi- 
ous, but nliich always fell shon of direct 
bnite force. But by refusing to care in to 
pressure, threats arc subversion, tbe Ch^ 
Chen leader, Dzhokhar Dudaye\’, has 
foioed Moscow to show its true coic^ 
Boris Ydtrin's intervention in Qiecbnya is 
no doubt intended as a warning to other 
Russian republics with separatist ambi- 
tiras. It will is any case, contribute noth- 
ing to the fiulher democratization of Rus- 
aa. Mr. Dudayev not be a paragon ct 
democratic virtue, but the question of 


independent state must be answered by 
the Chechens, not by Russian tanks. 


the Chechens, not by Russian tanks, 
— Nette ZRreher Zeitm$ (Ztffidt). 


Boris Yeltsin’s faesication in the face of 
the Chechen rebels shonld come as no 
surprise. The Rusaan prerident may weO 
be playing for his poUucal survival in this 
affair. Nothing \rould be worse, in cbe 
sitnatiOD facing him, titan a demonsua- 
tioo of foiue tumum into fiasco. And it is 
dear that the Cheemens, rarvivors or de- 
scendants of survivors of Stalixtian depor- 
tations, are not impressed by the noise 
of Russian boots and tanks. 

— Jacques Amalrie, Liberation (fans). 



Intemaaonai Herald Tnbune 

ESTABLISHED /fB7 

KATHARINE ORAHAM. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

R1CH.4R0 McCLEAN, PtiNts/UrA Chief E^evtivr 
JOHN VINOCUR. Eua^Eiior A VkePraiikni 

• WALTER \VmS. \nn £fiur • ABT. lUlHERINE KNORR owi 

CHARLES MTI'CHELMCUIE. Defmtv EiStort * CARLGEW1RlZ.AsaicK8r£i&ir 

*ROTERTJ. DONAHUE. 5i^ri^ifK’£U&LinafAjsc<*J0N.A'THAN GAGE, fimmss ml fmncrfiitKir 

* RENE BONDY, /Afvin- AiMisA(r*JAMES McLSOD, AcAwenv^ Amxr 
•JUANTTALCASPARLlhtfDiatrfuf AaiifsnwDirv^ ROBERTFARREan^nDmxr&ipe 

DiKcy^ffii!bPiiiliaakm:liidardD.Stmiom 
DuvacurA^tmideki PuMcatim KuAvineP. Dannv 


btematianaf HxaU Tnhmc. 181 .AienckrChariadeGaiiik:. 92.‘i2l Nniliy'fiiff-Sdre, Haaoe. 
TcL ; 1 0 Pax : 463?/16il; Adv.. ‘46J7 1 1 Inentec IMT’damikaiue 

EiBlorJbrAskL- HMukI Ridunista 5 Caaetbun RL Su(^- Q5U. TeL (6Sl 472^7768. Fax: 165) 274^ 
Mug. Dir. Am fMfb. KrmqtJiSOGkiiKnUT Hd. Hang Ktwig. Td R>:jKS 2 IIS8. Fac SS2 <l232.lfn 
Col Hw. Gernaf.: T. jutof. Fndahsn. I?. FspAmM Td /ftw) T /575S EarfOmT??? 10 
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SJi. au cspiial Je l.20Q,W0 F. RCS ,Viuvi*f7r B 7J2l>2)l2&, Conaissum Periiaire No. 61337 
<iilv94,bmttalKnilHeiWiTriiiw. AMri]doftsmvd.lSSS:02^4-SI^ 



W ASHDD4GT0N — The Checbecs 
are hoodlums and reludons fanat- 


pdicy at best Officials say ibece could yet 
be dmdt reduction propel in tbe rest 
tbe budget, but itrs hard to see where 
serious savh^ mi^t come bom. 

Some of the tax proposals would be 
wasteful in other rejects. In the nune of 
increased saving the prea^t prtqroses 
an expanaon oi IRAs, or individual re- 
tirement accounts. But most of tbs eri- 
deooe suggests tto IRAs have not in- 
emsed saviqgs in the past Some of these 
v^d also be so-called bactioaded IRAs, 
whose true cost is understated because it 
wouldn’t occur mtS wcH after the five- 
year es timating pedod that the budget 
ndes requite: House Rqiublicans have 
also proposed backloaded tax cuts, inchid- 
iQg a backloaded which before last 
ThnfsdiQr night adsdnistration offiriak 
reasonably denounced on sounds that the 
understate costs are a time booti). 

Thepretident likewise propoeea grant- 
ing tution deductions for coU^ and 
other post-secondary education to tax- 
payers with incomes up to $100,000 a 
year. The cost would be met in part ^ 
unporiog fiirtber caps on so-callM dis- 
cretionaiy ^lending subject to tbe annual 
apprt^iriatioQs prooess.U is not theprea- 
dient’s intent, but among the programs 

most of tte^nrent form^ aid 
to education, inclnding grants to ibc low- 
est-inoome coDm students. The third tax 
cut would be a -^droi’s credit for fam- 
ilies with incomes up to $75,000 a year. 

We ra>eat: The president is ri^l to 
bdieve that many onddle-iDcaine pecmle 
in tile country ^d that hard tfaoi^ tn^ 
work, they can bai^ keq> their bea^ 
above water and that the government 
s^ts them, taxing more thm ever it 
Sves back. What isn’t dear is that tax 
cuts of at most a few dollars a day are 
either gmng to maVa tfigp i c bAu gg tb^ 
minds TriieD th^ see vibst the benefit is 

or chang e the eir emwataneea ahnatf wlUCh 

they are unhappy. In some respects the 
cuts could mue those ciicumstanoes 
wrase. If that’s a political yrinner, it wffl 
be the news of the century. 

— TBE WASHINGTON POST. 


TV are hoodlums and rel^kins fanat- 
ics; their criminal dans are zunning an 
islwd of banttitiy within the Russian 
Federation; their gross natioad product 
is stolen goods. is more, were 
on tbe side ^ the Nazis in World War IL 
That is what Moscow wants the urorld to 
bdieve, as tbe Red Army moves to crush 
the secessum Cbeehnya, a of a 

idbUion fiero^ mdependent Mudtims. 

AniDkliiiguatthe^^azR^i^assesa- 
meat of Chechens nmy be Kranua disin- 
formation came in a New Yoric Tunes 
opinion piece by John le Cani, the spy . 


By W iHiam SaBre 


Hitler's invaders as Ubraators from St^ 
lin’s tyranny; for they were 
dered and scattered by tbe vengeful di(> 
tator until Nikita Khrudidiev restored 
survivors to their hmndand. 

And Hke Ukraine, Chechnya seized the 

mrandit of the breda^ of the $ov^ 
Union to declare its indqiendeaoe as 
199L But it controlled no nudear weap- 


ons aud boasted no large army or navy. 
Although Prestdeat Boris Ydtsin pro- 
mised to leave it alone, he has refused to 
bro^ seceaaoa and has now sent his 
»ttmA forces in to loestabUsh Russian 
rule in the capital, Oxomy. 

The reaction of the Qmton adminis- 
tration has beim establisbmentaiiaiL 
The United States understands the need 


TheUSpoUcyistofrmsnon 

oi^roddngofdieBjubdoai 

boat^tofaporaabiUty^ 


for Moscow to. defend its sovereim^ 
tluoughout tile federation. If the Che- 
chens are pomitted to secede, other 


novelist and longtime student of Islam. 
Other nonegtflh Kshinai t Qmes have been 
roundingoot tbe picture of me 1991 seces- 
sioa of Qiediitya from die Soviet enqiire. 

For two centuries, these moontainetes 
have retisted Roasian rule and foi^t 
against the eradication of tbai culture. 
TJke many Ukrainians, th^ wdeomed 


rnniblics would Pos^le results 
of Lhis slippage toward subdivision: an- 


ar^, tumult, dvQ war. 

The tJ.S. poliQr is to frown on any 
rockz^ of tbe Russian boat — to favor 
stability within the present fdletation. 
The State Department therefore “imder- 


stands” Mr. Ydtsia’s fraceftd im^tioa 
of natUmal authority, with tanks and 
witiun Chec^ya- 5!^ 

hoA of Rjosria’s igection of Chedien 
secessiopisupeqoivo^(ly=^ 

Carter has his hands fell dsciTO^> 

Diis is not an ou woous or outlM^tra 
American porititHJL Tne Russian mam IS 

peoneated by Ch ech e n enforcers; (nX)z- 
ny is a center of crime and corruptionj 
atiS mnitfln* jt$ symbtil a crossed 
crescent and Kalariunkov, is a threat to 
peace. If Russia is to retain soveresgnty. 
It must take reywi.*BbiKy for law and 
Older witiun its boidexs. 

h^](reover, tim fonner Soviet airforce 
general the md^ieiidenoc move*. 

DzhdoT Dudayev, is no Jeffetsm 
Davis. The Cbeclien leader’s hwocrisy 
was on di^lay when he asked Tuikeyi 
whidi is wiping wax m its Kurdirii Mus- 
lim minoriiy, to intercede with Russia on 
KAaif of itt CheefaeB Moslbn minori^. 

Thus, agood riiort-tennaigaineatcan 
be made mt tbe US. interest is in the 
stability that Mr. Ydtsm’s erededown 
dnxikl bring. But is aiwbody in Foggy 
Botttnn thwknig past the next election, 
to the long-term interest of the United 
States? To be pragmatic: Any event that 
dnninishBs the Ukdibood of R ussia's i&- 


' wining supeipowcr status is 
^^^^<aat\eastnotdiscoas^ 
®“^^rGcoie Bush, in ha mf ^ M 
**Cbicfcea Kiev” speech, uig^ Ukraine 
to remain subservient to Mosco'^ m 

made the Wggest geostcat^c nnstake of 

his preadency. Let Russia be 

and the smaller its imperialistic ba» the 

better for peace in tbei^t cgyuy. 

To be princ^led, if that is allow^ 

modem fiplomamr: The 

should not set its face against sffl-deter- 

ywinafinn, WhCtt a distfoa 

in a spedSc place has a histoiy of fight- 
ing for its fteedom from oppression 
and if it is aWe to protect onnon^ 
within its territory — then America 

shouM be on the side of evolving antooo- 


— - - - w . 

zhvand, ultimatdy, sovorignty. 

What should outriders be root^for 
in the riwwdown between the Ktqdw 

and the fitfoe, of ten crooked secesriomst 
ChschcDS? An aooommodatimi. 

Pxerident Ydtsin does not have to' re- 
cognize the secession. Washxn^on 
should qmedy urge tbe Russians to 1^. 
<rff to a victoiy for res traint in a 
fti»gy<ywwpmitiis g,andtoinakeahiCroof 
the tzmk oommander who would not fire 

OQ civilians jn his way. 

The New York Times. 


After Afghanistxm^ Russia Faces Another MusUm Challenge 


N icosia — Boris Yeltrin 
seems to have decided to 


Sj John K* Cooley 


sulgugate Chechnya by milit^ 
force. He should bear in mizid 
the Cbecbens* historic Ktil« to 
nuhtant Even if ills swift- 

ly cozz^leted, Pcerident'Ydtrin’s 

ndtitaiy eam paig n agulrurt the 

tou^ nzlers of what he once 
called a ’^state of bandits" could 

witail for bOth 

Eastern a^ Western Birope. 

Frustrated by thdr inabiUty 
SO far to prevCTt a Muslim 
feat in Bosnia, srane Muslim 
powers, sn^ as TUikQr, Iran 
and Saudi Arabia, may fed 
drawn ^ the totqitations of 
both history and strata to sup- 
pan the godfatber-like Chechen 
pierident Dzhdear Dndayev. 

I encountered vriiat Russian 
gangbuster police call the 
**Chechen mafia” by aeddent 
in Moscow last winter. Emerg- 
ing from a central Moscow met- 
ro station on a cold Saturday 
morning 1 faced wdl-anned 
men wearing astrdthan coals 
and sheepskin bats. They 
guarded a huge open-air market 
fra: big luxuiy cars. 

’^I’d avoid that place, if I 
were yon.” said a Russian 
friend later. *^056 guy are a 
law unto, themselves. AU tho^ 
can you saw were stden, in 
Europe or the Middle East.” 

It is the West’s “Middle Easf 
which seems, to Rmsians. some- 
how to dazninaie tbe histoiy of 
the Chechens and the other non- 
Russian peoples, mainfy Mus- 


lim^ who lire in ethnic islets in 
their mountains and vaB^rs. In 
our am time, when no one out- 
side Chechnya recognized its de- 
clared from die 

fonsm* colonial power in Mos- 
cow, Mr. Dndayev has mdeed 
turned southward. He appointed 
as his 'Toreiga mmister” a Jor- 
danian busiziessman. 

In May last year, hb. Du- 
ds^ made an unpuldicized vis- 
it to Lebanon with srane of hts 


Xknocr^oniement 

place$wiIlbeonaUGta$ 
Ydtaintries to keep Ike 
UAontheCaucQStu* 


ministers, including those for re- 
li^ous affairs, oil the econo- 
my. 'Ibe Lebuese government 
reused to receive th^ butth^r 
contacted leaders of Lebanon’s 
Abbarii Islamic Welfare move- 
meot, vriiicfa is active in the Cau- 
casus and Central Asia. And 
monbers of Hezbollah, the Ira- 
nian-backed Par^ of Cod, have 
reportedly commuted b^ween 
Borut and Grozny. 

NATO intelligence reports 
say that one of Dudayev’s 
ch^ domestic allies, in his con- 
stant strife with a recalcitrant 


Chedien Parliamoit, has been a 
local branch of that grandfather 
rtf all in temariftnal frfamkm, 

Kfririim Brotbediood. Mr. Du- 
dayev’s critics have said he was 
gemg too far, it ntiriht be all 
ri^t to upiuiiA iad^cndence 
Nfoscow, ^ not to set up 
an Iranian- M Saudi-6^ Iriam- 
ic rqmblie in Grozny. 

Gnoziy, after the Soviet witik 
drawal from Afghanistan in 
Fdiruaiy 1989, became a rally-' 
ing and Iranrit pomt for Arab 
veterans of the anti-Soviet war. 
From there tiuy would take off 
to fight tile new gueniBa wars in 
E|mt, Algeria, Bos^ Kashmir 
anddsewnere. Some went to Su- 
dan. These th^ have reportedly 
been igipartitig their wtHwg 
skips, learned in ClA-managieS 
traini^ by UJ5. Pakistani 
special forces, to you^ goerxiUa 
tiocxorist reoruits who ila& to tbe 
gram hawnw f>f 

Through tbe long faisto^ of 
Rnman -Tiwkk'h-Pgnaiin xrralry 
in the tun the tan gled 

skeins of strife be t ween the Is- 
lam predominant in Grozny and 
the c^dal atid now, in post- 
Commnnist revived Rns- 
sian Orthodox (Tiuinh- 

Catherine the Gi^ Czazizia 
of All the Russians, unleashed in 
1762 a crusade. She sought ac- 
cess to the Black Sea’s waimr 
water ports, and wanted to free 
Constantin^le from the Otto- 
man Thrks, who had conquered 


it frean the Byzantine Greeks in 
1^3. Hercraaadefafied. Duri^ 
its course, Rusrians tiied to sub- 


jugate Chediens, Georgians and 
bandzeds oi smdler nations and 
dang along way. 

Also in 1762, Shdkh Man- 
aoor, xCheefaen religious leader, 
imlc^ed h^ war a^inst the 
Russian mvadeis. He rqecsed 
the serfdom inflicted on other 
Caucasus people. Fierce strug- 
ries continued until 1829, ^rb/as 
Cxar Nicholas I demanded, in 
the ondest racist terms, tiie to- 
tal imrooting of tbe Cancasian 
’TiladtsT (almon^ most Canca- 
siaiis are actuzdly. quite vritite). 

hfidtolas’s caztpiugn of ethnic 
riftawdng Bgamst Murizms in 
C3ieclm3ra and elsewhere led 
only to even fieroer tebd vio- 
lence. A new hero noyth grew tqi 
around the figure of a leader 
called JanriL ms deeds were cel- 
eSsatfid in zoore than 30 bodes 
published frran 1854 to I860. 

On^ in l^, after more than 
a oeotmy Gt war, were the Chn- 
casus rebels cnislied. A half mD- 
Hou Cheebeas, Qrcasrians and 
othe:^ buzmng with hate for the 
Russii^ were dt^iorted into the 
already dyizig Ottoman Eini:^ 

It took a fonner Geo^ian the- 
ology stiKlcat_ai]d czazist police 
spy named Drirngadivill laser 
the Communist dictatra Joseph 
Stalin, to repeat the uprooting d 
the Chediens, their next-door 
neighbor tbe I^iish and Da- 
gestanis, and tins time tbe Cri- 
mean Tatars as wdL 


Stalin imistiiisted their hUe- 
gifttic fe in 'World War II z^ainst 
the invading Geeznans. Cbecfaen 

villages were w^ied out ovem^it 

by artiUeo^. FUw Chediens were 
overiodted in the mass droor^ 
tions to Central Asia. - Nikita 
Khrusdiev, in tiie fizA laz^iy 
false dawn of tiw Soviet lefona • 
era, brooght bade in 1957. . 

That Dzhokar Dudayev, car- 
ried into exile, he has ^d, as a 
child on his father’s itiiouldersi 
was able after bis letam to make : 

a znilitazy car eer that eventuaDy 
won him tiie stars of & Soviet 
gcoeral is one of the more mir ' 
plausible success stories of the 
dd Coznomiuat empire . 

Those stars are nomore use 

to Mr. Dudayev. He may hc^e, - 
hofwever vahi^, for hdp from 
Muriim allies hbread. Whiu Mo^ 
cow and NATO powers tiioold 
carcfnQy watch sow is whether Ite 
has the cqMhilily, d which bis 
supporters have boasted, to 
linrrifh toxodst kttacks in Russia 
or otii^states -w4^ tiie C3>e- 
dm^ invdved in tiie dn% and 
gun busiiwss from Moscow to 
Brooklyn, and Los Angdes, be> 
lieve may have crossed tbenL 

l^w eafoicanmt agencies in 
far-fluM places will be on alert 
as Rresiaent Ydcsia tries to keep 
the Ud cm tbe boiliiig Caucasus. 


Mr. Cooley, anABC Fws cor’ 
re^pomieHt, kprqmru^ abooken 


consequenca Ae Af^uodsian 
vrar. He contrihuied Otis oommaU 


war. He eontrunaed this eommaU 
to ihe HavldTribme. 


America Needs China in GATT and the World Trade Organization 


S TANFORD, Califoniia — 
With the 'World Trade Oraa- 


O'With the World Trade O^- 
iiizatioa scheduled to oome into 
existence in Januaiy as tbe suc- 
cessor to the Cenerd A gr eement 
on Tariffs and Trade, China is 
eager to achieve adrmssaon in 
time to become a dtarter mem- 
ber. It regards U.S. policy as the 
principal obstacle to this goaL 

B^mg’s derire for early mem- 
bership m GATT is understand- 
able. So is the interest of other 
nations in subjecting Qtina to 
the disciplines of the multilateral 
trading system, and to tbe re- 
qmrezzzeals for transparency and 
recipiodty that GA'IT member- 
stu^ requires. 

China has become one of the 
world's biggest economies. In 
terms of purchasing price parity, 
it is aiguabiy already (he second 
or third laigreu China is a major 
force in world trade. And forahe 
last few yeara it has been the en- 
gzne of growth in the Asia-Fac^c 
xs^oa, the world’s most dynanuc 
economic zone. The relatively low 
levri of China’s indigenous 'ced- 
nolt^ and its msatiable demand 
for investment imply a huge and 
growing market for capital goods 
that few trading nations can af- 
ford to ignore. 

And w rapid growth of Chi- 
na's foreigD trade is unlikdy to 
threaten the overall balance of 
the global trading system. Since 
the demand for domestic invest- 
ment T^ulaily exceeds China's 
supply of savings, the defidt is 
n^ulaiiy made up throu^ im- 
porta CoQS^ent^*, QuzuTs wid- 
er participation in tte global trad- 
ing system is likely in gieoeral to 
have a latgv trade-creating ihag 
oade-diveriiDg effect on others. 

Moreover, rince China mostly 
imports high technology and 
be^ industrial goods and ex- 
ports light manuuctured goo^ 
Its entry into the world market is 
likely to improve the terms of 
trade ttf devdoped countries su^ 
as tbe United States. Hence, 
America shares an interest in see- 
ing B^'ing take its place witiun 
themoItOateral trading system. 

U.S. policymakers hive consis- 
tently declared support for Chi- 
nese membership m GATT, but 
thw started detailed talks with 
Chznese r^resentatives over the 
terms of a protocol of accesstoo 
only a few months ago and 
siaiindily resist China’s entry as a 
**deveIopiiffi couiiiiy.'* 

Other atNanced mdustrial de- 
mocracies have reservations about 
Oiina’s admission with such sta- 
tus, but have been more dreum- 


Byr Michael H. Armacoet and Lawrence J« Lao 


^pecL are content to leave 
the onus in tiie protocol n^tia- 
tiozis on the Umted States. 

Beijing wants to join GATT for 
a variepr of reasons. PoHticaJ con- 
aderatitms are certainly in play. 
Prior to the Qinion administra- 
tion's decuTcn in May to de-link 
Quna’s most-favored trading sta- 


Earfy admission to GATT 
viouldbeavicUnyfor 
those in China who ore 
strug^ing against the 
vested interests thsa 
seek to dek^ or reverse 
the reform ptdicy. 


*tus from specific human rights 
conditions, Beijing saw GATT 
entry as a way to assare most- 
favored treatment ^ all mem- 
bers. This ai^ument is now moot. 
Bat China is still eager to gain 
GATT eotzy before Taiwan, not 
least to have a vc^ in determin- 
ing titt terms of admisaon for Tai- 
waiL And Bering is eager to enjoy 
the status and prestige assodaied 
with being a ebaner member of tbe 
qignoization that wfll fix and po- 
lioe multilateral trading rules, 

Accesaoo to GATT offers Chi- 
na maor potential economic bene- 
fits, to tbe results of the 

Uruguay Round of global trade 
negotanons that are now in the 
fiziri stages of ratificatkm. A main 
benefit wiD be abc^tica of the 
Multi-Fiber Agreement, which 
limited Chinese textile exports. 

Hbtrevo', GATT membership 
may also cause some ambivalence 
vritiun Chizm. Tltt country’s po- 
litical leadership is determined to 
join, a^ the sooner the better. Its 
objective is to lock China into 
market-oriented refora and an 


opm door policy. Acceding to 
GATT rroresen (5 a Chinese com- 


GATT rqiresea (5 a Chinese com- 
mitmal to progressively open its 
economy — a commitinent v^ch 
is liJu^ to become less and less 
reversible with the pass^ of 
time. Thus, early admission 
would be a victory for those in 
China who are struggling against 
tbe vested interests seeking to de- 
lay or revise the reform poli^*. 

And resisiance there surely is. 
State enterprises in particular 
doubt their abil^ to irithstand 
competition from Imports. They, 


along with some elements m tbe 
burreiKra^. might prefer to de- 
fer China’s admission until they 
have perfected thdr ’’defense” 
against foreago competition in tbe 
fram of standards, health and 
safety certifications, oontzols on. 
tbe domestic t&tribution tysteni, 
and other nontaiiff bazriers. 

In short, it would be a serious 
mislake to assume that Bering’s 
committisent to join GATT is 
unzversally supported, or that the 
Chinese government is prepared 
to accept admisaon at any price. 

A r^ection or projonged delay 
of China’s appUcatioD would 
weaken tbe bands of those advo- 
cating a more opea economy. 
Meanwhile. Deng Xiat^ing, the 
strongest advocate of si^ open- 
ness. iziay pass from tbe scene. 

America stands to benefit from 
China’s admission. U.S. compa- 
oite operate bet in open, noiidis- 
criminatory trade, whi^ can be 
znqstreatUy assur^ if China par- 
tidpaies in GATT. China has 
come one of tbe most rapidly 
mowing markets for U.S. exports. 
Scores of U.S. multinationals are 
falling in line to com p ete for tbe 
huge infrastructure projects in 
energy, tranroort and tdecom- 
mimicatioas toat Bering will pass 
out in coming yezus. 

Aside from hastening China's 
devdopmeot and its consequent 
ability to import more goods 
from trading partners. GATT 
membership will ensure that Bd- 
jisg remains committed to imple- 
mest tbe trade Uberalization mea- 
sures of the Uruguay Round. 

The United States stands to 
gain as China iocreases its im- 
ports of food and agricultural 
commodities. America, as a ma- 
jor exporter of higb-technology 
products, needs the additional in- 
tellectual property protection 
ttot Bdjing would be obli^ to 
give as a GATT member anrf 
Urug^ Round signatozy. 

If China is not admitted to 
OATT promptly, the opportunity 
and politica! costs could be sub- 
stanbaL There will be a loss in 
trade and other areas for nearly 
every country. U,S. political rela- 
tions OTth Beijing would suffer, as 
America^ would be seen as the 
paity principally responsible for 
Quna s exclusion, 

If China suys outside GaTT 
and the new World Trade Oig^- 
zation, it will have stronger incen- 
tives to resort to bilateral action 
on trade and other econooiic is- 
sues. It IS doubtful that ihi.s would 


serve American interests, since 
other developed countries can 
supply most of tbe products that 
the United States esqxms to Chi- 
na, and Beijing win be eager to 
underscore tbe consequences of 
W«.tiHngtan*5 obstrueboo. 

Deoy^ China OATT mem- 
bership co^d also have a native 
effect 00 the fetiae c^AF^, the 
Asia-Padlic Ecoooaiic Coopera- 
tion forum which is coouzuttM to 
achieve free trade and investment 
in tbe i^on by 2020. Would a 
China excluded from OATT ex- 
tend meaningful support to trade 
liberalization and tr^ faciUta- 
tioo wiifaiD APEC? 

Tbe nub of tbe diroute between 
Washington and Betjing is over 
wbetlzer China shtmld be conrid- 
ered a developmg country for 
GATT purposes. This is not a 
small issue. By any measure of 
real GDP per capita. 15 a 
developmg country and urill re- 
main one for at least several de- 
cades. It is not surprismg that 
Brijing inssts on tbe same treat- 
ment in GATT as otha develop- 
ing countries, such as fedia. 

At the same time, the rigy- of 
China's population, the dar^Ung 
speed of Its mnomic growth and 




‘i 08-' 


fi 


'j: • 

-■• 1 . • 

P 


p*' ■ 

.'t- 


ic • 


It is entirety reasonable fra U.S. 
negotiatois to seek to reduce tiiis 
transitional period to Jess than die 
10 yew nonnaSy granted to de- 
vdoping countries. But the pros- 
pects for reserving tins and other 
issues in tbe protocol n^ptiatioos 
win (teipd heavily 00 tbe 
with wniob tb^ are approached. 

tb^r be oonfronted as obst^* 
des to be overcome or as oKQses 
for deity or inaction? 

^ Tbe United States has impres- 
sive leverage. Qima wants adnns- 
siOD and is eagear to get an eazty 
decasioiL America offers China a 
huge maiket. It supplies invest- 
ment foods and ^e transfa of ; 
technology needed by the Chinese. ! 

However, W ashington should 
oof overplay its hand. It has an 
interest in reinfoxczng Chhia’s 
ooznmitmeDt to an open mteroa- 
tiooal trading tystepri and gtyisg 
it a stake m GATTs success. ^ 

America ought to stropoit ear-F 
ly entry of Chma into GA'Tr and 
do eveiything possible to ensure 
that n^tiauns on both sides 
act with the flexibility necessaiy 
to adzieve that result. 


its prowess in inieroa&aal trade 
make developed nations nnder- 
siandably nervous about tbe long 
periods of transitioo allowed to 
developing countries by GATT 
before toey m required to extend 
full reciprocity and naHonai treat- 
ment to thdr trading partner 


Mr. Armacost, a feemer 
ambassaiortoJtqion, istke Waber 
H. Shorenstein tSningiuidied se- 
fdorfeUowaadirisixmgprei^ssorie 
Stanford Unrverszty’j Asia/Pac^ 
Research Center. Mr. Lau is Kwotr 
professor efeeowmiedevd- 
cpment and a>-€hrector cen- 
ter. They contributed this eommeat 

to the H&tdd IHbiate. 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1894; Dreyfus on Trial 


PARIS — The trial of rii ptain 
Dityfus for treason commenced 
yesterday [Dec. isj. The charge 
against hz^ it will be remem- 
bered, is of having sold secret 
documeuts from tbe War Office 
to the Nfilhaiy Attach^ of one of 
the Gennaa Embassi^ A stoim 
of polemics has during the devel- 
opment of the case been ra ginp 
b^use the captain is of JevdsS 
nationality, a fact which has been 
taken ad^tage of Ity a certain 
portion of the Paris press to start 
an anti-Semitist agitatioiL 


that even the most of 

Parisian males win yidd to tbe 


a lasoions m toe rreacn rap* 
ita l, a H endd conespondent vhs 
mformed by a ptomiiieat teks* 
(he gradual aoc^tance.of 
boghter colored suitings. 


1944: Bdlgiaiis Stunned 

7,'WrTV.H^r _ ... ' 


1919: l]iini£Qed Baris 


PARIS — Ltmdonaiaystartiethe 
fasluon world by adopting, as Its 
newspapers suggest, mue breech- 


newspapers suggest, blue breech- 
es and ruffled shirts for ev ening 
wear for men, but it is unlikely 


IGNDON — [Firom dor N*** 
Yoik edition:] VTitit the Getsds 
Atm;^ drivhte bade into 
Bel^an cancans are bunWw 
scrubbing from waUs and 
togs dogaos dero^umy to tiie Ns* 
^ front di^pzUefaes said 
5*c. 19]. One correroondeat Iw 
of seeing a man hastily.' wadihtf 
fnnn the side of his heme a racti^ 
Gl Addf Hhlftr TBrri wng a nik iP 
the pants. The Bdg^ he 

were stunned Ity the turn of eveai^ 


: cr-'-' 










INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 20, 1994 


Page 5 


O P 1 N I O M 


^ His Upstream Swimming 
Has Toughened Gmstoph 


TTTAot By Jim 

■ W^fi/iNGTON _ After uvc 

• in upstream 

' POst.a>id w- 

Pharsuddenly-acte 

I? opportunilics ihai fd- 

• Sr h «>Jv- 

ing IS lainuiar lerntory. 

“"Shi argue that HanwgP 

use CUnion administration. If the 
; fn%"® J^ubUcaa vicioiy 

of Bnr;®v*t narionalism 

^ 9^^ “® °ot enough 
M^-.^*^siopher a chance to 
® . btf aides and rivals in the ad- 
mimsiration v.iU supply more. 

I tiai IS the case with the adminis- 
irauon s lunge forward on NATO 
expansion, which is now being 
V having upset Mr. 

Yelism fw no tangible U.S. gain. 

Bosnia's crisis is now SO bleak that 

holding the line, wherever the line 
happens to be, is a major accom- 
plishment. Ditto for Mr. Chiisio- 
, phers unrelenting efforts to get the 
Israelis and Palestinians to slick to 
iheir autonomy deal and to keep the 
Israelis and Syrians talifing 

This sdf-effacing Los Angeles law- 
yer wtxild never see things that way. 
But in a reflective conversation, Mr. 
Chnstopher qx>ke with uncharac- 
I teristic relish about looming policy 
battles with the Republicans and 
about canytng out his “‘major re- 
^tmsibility for keeping An^ca's 
Hgpower relationships good." 

Toe most immediate battle is over 
Bosnia, where Senattx- Bob Dole and 
other Republicans demand a lifting 
of the United Nations arms embargo 
against the Muslim government and 
air strikes gainst the Serbs. Mr. 
Clinton and Mr. Christopher (who 
initisdly advocated and then aban- 
doned a lift-and-strike plan for Bo^ 
nia) sugg^t that their Republican 
critics risk plunging American 
troops into war in the Balkans. 

Lifting the embargo would trig- 
ger a withdrawal of the NATO- 
. nation peacekeeping troops now in 
Bosnia and spark all-out war. That, 
Mr. CliatOQ said recently, could 
force the deployment of up to 
20,000 U.S. soldiers to cover the 
withdrawal. Was the president's 
unexpected statement a warning to 
;V. the Republicans as much as it was a 
reassurance to the allies? 

"The president's statement," he 


er 


Hoagland 

replied in lawerly fashion, ““has 
been one of a series trf things that I 
hope have brought home to people 
on Capitol Hill the reality that a 
unilateral lifting of the embargo 
has far-reaching consequences. 

“I detect a more sob^ attitude on 
Capitol HiU," added Mr. Christo- 
^er. who recently labeled Mr. 
Dole’s stand the t^lion. 

Would be urge a Clinton veto of 
Dcde le^slation to lift the embvgo? 
Won't say, was Mr. Christopher's 
predictable reqionse, [(^owed by: 
“But we ought to strongly oppose a 
unxlaieral lifting of the embargo." in 
Christopher-spe^ that's as close to 
““yes’* as you get 

What about Mr. Ydtsin’s unex- 
pected Dec. 6 blast in Budapest at 
the administration's recent dYort to 
show leadership in NATO by gin- 
ning up talk of expanding the alli- 
ance into Central Europe? 

Mr. Christopher not con- 

cede that Was^gtoQ misread Mos- 
cow and pushed too hard too fast, as 
others claun. But be did admowledge 
that “something happened to make 
them think that we were going too 
raindly" when view^ £rt»a Moscow. 
He will meet with the Russian foreign 
minister, Andrd Koz^ev, for sevonl 
days in January, prob^ly in Geneva. 

Mr. ChristopfaW's tone was concil- 
iatory, indirectly underscoring re- 
ports that the administration is ton- 
ing down of NATO expansion 
now that the U.S. midterm elections 
are past “The hows of NATO mem- 
bership" will be discussed next year, 
he said, “not who and when." 

He emphasized the administra- 
tion's Partnership for Peace plan, 
which is “not just a transmisaon belt 
to NATO membership*’ for former 
Soviet satdlites but an rxganizaiioa 
with value of its own. 

He said he could not comment ca 
Russian desires for a formal security 
paA with the United States, an idea 
winch Eim^ieaa diplomats say is 
gaining grotsid within the aiHan^. 

Biggest (fisaster avmded in 1994? 
He smOed uneasily and then refoied 
to Bosnia as '^ibe most serious unre- 
solved matter we have." It would 
have been “a serious mistalce to start 
a massivB bombing canqraign" in a 
situadoa that would take 200,000 s(^- 
<hers on the ground to resolve. "I 
hope that mistake wfll be avoided as 
wol in the yem to ocune.” 

So the Qinton administratiem’s 
chief diplomat is playing defense 
against the Repubficans a gamgr 
events. It is not a hooic posture, but 
it is one that Warren Christopher 
■wj i M to hi m to his advantage. 

The Waskiagion Past. 



MUeZ* ew q wft 


Come to Berlin and Learn 
All About Cutting Around 


By Karl 

B erlin — Americans who tem- 
ppraiBy set up house in Berlin 
experience a succession of shocks, 
some pleasant, some otheivinse. 

Ceviain prices seem outludish; 
laundry detergent and postage 
stamps are four times the U^ price. 
Even so, there are bargains: exed- 
lent French table wines at die equiv- 

MEANWHILE 

alent of S3 a bottle smoked salmon 
at half the American price, the best 
British marmalade at S2 a jar. Bui 
then this is wfaai you would expect, 
since the European Union has 
slashed tariffs. 

What you do not expect, and what 
is a most agreeable surprise, is the 
eacodlence Berlin's ptiblic transit 
system. It is one of the be^ urban 
tnmqxnt bargains in the world. 

Most of the buses on 200 lines are 
dooble-dedcers. Seats are almost al- 
ways available, and buses keep to 
scD^uIes posted at each stop, arriv- 
ing at 5-, 10- or 20-imnute intervals 
(30 minutes in dead of night). 

Not only do drese vehicles move 
with surprising speed on buses- 
only lanes, but most passengers 
havejiasses, so the driver has to 
collect fares for only one out of 10 
— by my mformal count. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


llie Flow of Lofonnatkiia 

Regarding '*To Combat Hale 
Broadcasis, Let's Try TrapagpriAa 
far Peace" (Opinion, Dec. 12) 
by Keith Spicer: 

Tlie sugg^on that organizations 
such as Article 19, the International 
Center Against Censorship, might 
be enlisted to advise the UN of hate 
campai^ that preach violence and 
to participate in broadcasts that 
“fl^t baclc with facts and balanced 
comment" is ingenious, but fraught 
with poUtied pitfaQs. 

Governmental fear of the “inva- 
aoD of sovereign airwaves" is only 
one difficulty s tanding is the way of 
establishing a UN broadcasting ser- 
Nice that would hope to proride uni- 
vorsalJy accepted “balanced com- 
meni." When senritive conflicts 
involve vital interests, even demo- 
cratic gpvmimeats wffl not bow to 
anyone rise’s intapretation of what 
constitutes balanced reporting. 
Consider the notorious oensorshm 
by the British government ctf BBC 
rqmrting on Northern Irriand, even 


thou^ the BBC has a remarkable 
repuiatimi worldwide toe accurate 
and balanced reporting. 

In spile this caveat, we wel- 
come Kdth Spicer’s omstnicUve 
contribution ia this important de- 
bate. We support the careful phras- 
ing of his most contentious sugges- 
tion. that the jamming of the 
transmitters of mass killers could 
only be justified in tiie most extreme 
situatitms: “the gnnphatts should al- 
ways be on freedom: on countering 
evil voic^ not silencuia them." 

There is one method of counter- 
ing evil voices, single and ine:q>eD- 
sit«, which Spicer surprismgly 
n^ects. Tltt present UN sanctions 
in Serbia and Montenegro (the Fed- 
eral Republic of Y ugoitiavia} inriude 
an onbargo on books and journals. 
The exclusion these vmces from 
the outside wmld gives nationalist 
Serl^n propagandists &ee rein. In- 
teUectual and political debate in 
Serbia has suffered greatly as a di- 
rect result We sug^t that wfaeoev- 
er the intOTational c ommunity inh 
poses sanctions, a.clause should be 


included exempting materials aeces- 
saiy for the free flow of inf oimation. 
FRANCES lySOUZA. 
Executive Director. 
Article 19. London. 


people woridwide now realize that 
the accord was made in otot and 
needs to be reworked. 

ABRAHAM HUSARSKY. 
Rehovot Israel. 


Rework liie Oslo Accord Don't Indodc Greece 


RegardEng the Washingfott Post, 
editorial ''Caving In to Hamas?" 
(Opinion, Dec. 9): 

The impending coDapse of the 
Oslo acccra cannot be attributed 
sol^ to Ismri and the inaction of the 
White House, If anything, tlie agree- 
ment has fallen apart as a result of 
Yasser Arafat's rntransigence and 
dictatorial ways. Stalemenis such as 
“we must wage a jihad for Jerusalem" 
and “the intifada oontmues" hardly 
reassure the Isradi publia 

Mr. Arafat has consistently re- 
fused to amend the charter cf the 
Palestine Liboation Oigpnization, 
vriiidi stiD calls for the destruction of 
Isiari, a direct violation of the decla- 
ration (tf principles. Whh the increase 
in terrorist activity and Mr. Aiafaf s 
refusal to contain it, most rational 


Regfoitng “Threats to Human 
Rii^ts in Europe Are Threats to Se- 
eurity as Weil" (Opinion. Dec. 15): 

Surprisingly, Aaron Rhodes in- 
cludes Greece among those Europe- 
an countries where he sees threats to 
h««wii>T> rights. It is dan|Brous for 
freedom and democracy m Europe 
to present a state of law like Grec^ 
in such a li^t; it after all, the 
only one of its kind in the region. 

Conceming the case Mr. Rhodes 
cites, that of Nikodimus Tsaridnas, it 
is for purely ecclesiastical reasons 
that he was dismissed from his reli- 
gious functions. Hecontinued to pre- 
sent himsrif as a representative of the 
Greek Orthodox Church, though he 
had no right to do so. 

DIMITRiS MAORIS. 

Ambaasador of Greece. Paris. 


E. Meyer 

These passes are the secret of the 
system. You can bw them in vend- 
ing foT the year, month, 

week or day. The monthly Umwelt- 
tarte, or environmental ticket (to 
use of cars), is fully 
tracsfei^le to other users from 
Monday though Saturday; it costs 
82 Deutsche marks (SS2), and 1^ 
for readents of former East Berlin. 

There are further discounts for 
seniors, students, apprentice work- 
ers, the jobless and welfare rec^- 
eats, eadi pass bearing an identify- 
ing photograph of the purchaser. 

As a paastolder, you never have 
to fuss with change and can scram- 
ble from the bus to S-Bahn trains, 
which are mostiy devaled, or U- 
Bahns, mostly underground. 

Or. in Eastern Berlin, you hap 
aboa^ fast-moving streetcars, di- 
vided into 50 lines. The bus, train 
and streetcar systems spread 
through 800 kilometers (500 miles), 
with nee service for pa^oldeis in 
bordering cities like Potsdam. 

On buses, drivers glance St 
but on subway and elevated lines it 
is overwhelmingly an honor system. 
Sngle-ticket holders punch tbeir 
own tickets in platform madunes. 

ware p^sengos that those 
cau^t without tickets or passes face 
flnes, but enforoemeni is sporadic. 
Doubtless many freeloaders take 
their chances, but most Berliners pay 
their share because the share is fair. 

Dcmbiless, too. the system penal- 
ize tourists, since a tingle fare good 
for two hours costs the equivalent of 
$2.30, but 1 have noticed tiret most 
Strang^ catch on quickly and buy 
the (iaily or spedal weekly pass. 

When Berlin was unified in 1991, 
so were subways, buses, streetcars 
and suburban railway lines. With 
remarkable speed, the East and 
West systems were amalgamated. 

The system s^es a bfllion riders 
a year and nms an annual deficit of 
about $6(X) million, which is covered 
by the City of Berlin. The cost can 
be readily justified by merely look- 
ing at cpieues at bus stops: Every- 
body uses the system. 

To ride these trains and buses is at 
once puolm and chastening for an 
Amencan. Tm system developed in 
a dty prostrated by bombers, shat- 
tered by the Battle of Berlin, occu- 
pied four wartime victors and 
tiiced in two for nearly four decades. 

Yet New York, cultural and com- 
mexcial capital at the nation that 
won the Cold War and the last glob- 
al hot '(var, cannot even manage an 
audible sound system in subway sta- 
tions fit for puigatoiy. 

The Ne» York Times. 


\ 
j 





.V- 


'V 


y- » 


ADVERTISEMENT 

ERICSSON $ 


*•- ! 


ICr>. . 




ADVERTISEMENT 

ERICSSON 


Sales in mobile 
telephony up 72 % 

ConUtiued heavy investments in ^cbnology 


In Die third quarter of 1994, Ericsson's 
order bookings rose again. This twefth 
successive rise has further contributed 
to a 22% Increase in order bookings over 
the first nine months of 1994, compared 
to the corresponding period of last year. 

in the »me period, net sales rose by 
29%. and pre-tax income soared 88% to 
SEK 3,492 m. After all deductions, 
income per share was S£K f 0.38. 

Though every Ericsson business unit 
showed an increase in net sales, the 
Radio Communications Business Area 
posted the strongest growth, and 
accounted for more than half of net sales. 


For mobile telephony, sales increased 
by 72%. 

Commenting on a very favourable 
year, Ericsson CEO Lars Ramqvist 
explained the poHcy of heavy investment 
that continues to ensure prosperity 

‘A subsmnda/portidn ofourtnwssfrnenf 
in te^mology is for ffie further dev^op- 
menf of the AXE system and of mobile 
telafdtony. As a resu/f of success and 
predit^Myh these areas, we can also 
simuitaneousiy invest heavily in such 
other areas as broatStand, transport and 
access networks, and systems for 
(^ration and mainterjance.' 


Glol^ purchasiflg 
agreemeattb 
cover 75 xities 

Ericsson has s^ed a USD 300 m. 
global pim^ating ^reemerti vrith 
one of the leading US co/nmun- 
Icationa services providers, MFS- 
Communicaflons Company Irm. 

UrKler theagreemerti, &icsson 
will supply a full range of AXE 
switching equipment ^nd 
associated ^sterns, ter e^mandlng . 
the MfS United States and 
Intematidned networks. ; 

The' networks. Which . use 
Erics^ products, are instaJled or 
under construction In 32 dtias and 
three major European financial 
centres MFS has plm te eiqtend 
its swvipes to 75. cities, ihdiKfir^ 
to intertiational firiaridaf centres.- 


Creating new opportunities 
through co-operation 


gr jt,yyftn ,cQnaondgtlngltsslieiiuUiin 

global partnershipa, is responding to 
new market demands by tnereasing 
cooperation with Its customers. 
More and more new and existing 

operators are keen to make more effirient 

, 1 ^ of ce^xtal investment by forging new 
relationships with suppBeis. 

One example is a partnership with 
Telecom of Australia, where nw tele- 
services are being Jdntly marketed with 
Ericsson. Swedish support Includes 
produdng user manuals, and ananging 


training for the operator's sales team. 

By involving itself with the actual 
Implementation arxi use of its products 
euid serWees, Ericsson gains valuable 
feedback for product improvement, and 
is better able to tailor its offerings for 
future custorriers. 

• (n a similar drive to ^>eed product 
development, create new market opp- 
ortunities and use capital investrnent rnore 
effectively. Ericsson Is continuing its poli^ 
of buikffrtg partnerships with other worfd- 
class telecommunications manufacturers. 


A new Joint venture with Raychem 
Corporation of the US. will see Ericsson 
help devtiop; manufacture and market 
fibre of^ communications systems for 
telephone networks worldwide. 

The new company, based in California, 
employs more than 700 people. By 
combining an existing Raychem 
subsidiary with Ericsson's technical 
expertise and international marketing 
strengths, the vertture is expected to take 
a leading position In the fibre optic 
communteations maikefol^. 



First wafers from Ericsson’s 
new semi-conductor facility 
yield good chips 


One month ahead of schedule, arxi only 
nine months after construction work 
Started. Ericsson’s new USD 1 00 m seml- 
coTKluctor manufacXurfng plant produced 
its first tiHconvrafers. . 

The new water fabrication facility, or 
fab, produces state-of-the-art 16 Mbit 
technology components where the 
smallest tfimensions are 0.5 ndcron. Eabh 
chip manufactured contains more than, 
three miUion transistors. 

Located at Kista in Sweden's silicon 
valley, the advanced facility will help 


extend Ericsson's self sourcing in 
advanced micro elecfronics. 

The plant, will be used as a rapid 
prototyping facility for new products, 
and tOL manufacture new ASICs, or 
appUcationepecrfic integrated dreuits, kt- 
small volumes r^allovrir^ cornponents 
of Ericsson tetecommunlcatiorts products 
to be more highly' tailored to market 
•demands. . 

it wiH also le^ to product 

development tirries,. rnaldng Ericsson . 
- more, re^xxislve to ite customers. 


China becomes 
fiDh largest 
Ericsson market 

The Peopled Repuribfie of China to now 
a market for Eriesaon - durtog 
this year it grew to become the 
comftenyte fifth largest 

Ericsson has already installed 3 million 
AXE dgital telecommunicalions lines, and 
provided a mobile telephone capadfy for 
IB mIBion subscribers hi China. 

Recent new agreements, worth nearly 
USD 375 m, include the supply of AXE 
digital switches, Intelligent Networks, 


mobBe commurfoadons. SDH (^nchron- 
ous OgRai Hierarchy) transport systems, 
ATM (Asynchronous Transfer Mode) 
equipmertfanda wide area paging system. 

The AXE equipment forms part of 
two significant contracts: one to extend 
the teleoommuitieations netwoik in the 
Liaoning Province; the other for use in the 
Schuan Province - the largest in CNna, 
with 111 minion inhabitants. 

A wide-araa paging network is being 
provided as a turnkey project covering 
four regions within the Guangdong 
Province. It will eventually be expanded 
to cater for more than a million 
subscribers. 


Mobile data continues to grow 

Two major contracts for Mobfiex mobile 
data networks from Ericsson underscore 
the woridwide success this advanced 
technology is acNeying. 

In Germany, n a contract valued at 
SEK 500 m, Gesellschaft fOr Datafunk 
chose Mobitax for Its new nationwide 
public mobile date network. In Belgium, 

RAM Mobile Data Js histaling a Mobitax 
rietwoikvafoedatSS<60m, which will be 
the countr/s first national and privately 
owned mobile data network. 

Mobile data Is one of the fastest 
growing segments in mobile communi- 
cations. Network access and other erxf- 
user products based on Mobitax techn- 
ology are now available from a variety of 
hardware suppliers. Major software 
vendors induds MoUtex support in thdr 
products, and the large number of 
Mobttex ^ipUcations continues to grow. 

Ericsson's latest kfobHex products are 
the BRU3 base radio unit er^ the M21 90 
wireless modem. The BUR3 is an 



extremdy compact 18 kg base station 
suitable for oufaioor mounting, ft enables 
operators to provide rapid and Inex- 
pmsive coverage.Tbe MoUdem M2190 
wireless modem, whidi is packaged as 
a PCMCIA type ill card. Is the world's 
smallest radio modem. 

Mobitox networks are in operation in 
13 countries on four continents. They 
already provide coverage for nearty aA 
of North America. 


Qu^ty rewarded 

TTjff Ericsson worldwide commitment 
to Total Quality Afanagement has been 
rewarded in Spate, Denmartt, and die 
Netherlands. 

in all three countries, Ericsson 
cbmpanJes have won vestige quality 
swards. Ericss on ^ of Spain won the 
■BjropeanQu^ty f^ize sponsored fy the. 


fi/ropean ComndsshtvLM. BicssonAS 
of Denmark won the Danish Quality 
Award; and h the Netheriands, Bicsson 
lyecommurfcalieBV received die Dutch 
Qu^ty Irtyyrovement fhIzB. 

The award schemes operate on 
similar principles, recognising that 
international competition can only be 
■ '^Adtstood d an wgan^aSon knf^arnents 
continuous qi^ty kr^rrovements. 


High-pex^xmanc^ commercial 
product meet defexice needs 


in an unusu^ moire, Ericsson has com- 
bined two high-perfoimarMie commercial 
(xxTirnisiktetiDns-proefuiris. a^ 
suitable'for defence appiktetioRs.' • 

The new product, StaffTalk, is an 
ac^nced-fteW exchange for mos types of 
telephone that covers up to 300 metres, 
and supporis up to 100 subscriber It Is 
based, on Freest, .Ericssbrfs hew 


eontiess telephorie, and BusineesPhone, 
a popular butinees telephone exchange. 

Built to the DECT (Digital European 
Cordtess telecommunication) standard, 
the cordless system is ideal for defence 
applications. It uses very low power 
transm iss ions, making it dWicuft to detect, 
and fe liEfitto depkty. It features encryption 
to furtiier protect it from eavesdroppers. 


World round'Up 

Australia; A new electronic messagteg 
. systwnutirig ah Ericsson MkE.platibiTn is 
^vbig.lAxlafCne Pty a strong cornpetitfve 
edge in AuBtiaiBis irrtensely competitive 
djgna/ cellular telephone market MXE 
stores, notifies and Ibrwaids afl types of 
oiessag^-voioe, tax, data andted. 
Japan; Ericsson is to supply a Personal 
DW.CeBular (PDQ network to Digital 
Tu4te ttyushu tor a new rrxtofo teiephoiie 
. servtoa Theordei; wortti SEK ^ m, vmR 
rneen thaUbur Japanese mobte telepf^ 
-operators now use the Ericsson PDC 
system. 

Ericsson wH alsd provide equipmerkto 
extend ffte' ffensai Ofeitel Phone cellular 
.netwexk; which signed 50,000 sub- 
soibm te rte first six rrnnihs. Thte order is 
* worth SEK^m. 

RehcK Enbsson .is to upgrade one of the 
Rerich Tetecorh nationwide paging n^- 
ywrks vrilh a new ERMESbased systarn. 

It wn pio^ a hi^t-qraed service witii 
vjituatiy unfimited capadty, and enable 
Merhati^ roaming, savings oh battery 
. pdwwandwimBichedpricefperfoiniance. 
Lithuante: A SEK 22 m order from . 
Tblekome^ the Utiiuarian PTT, wK brir^ 
the numberof countriesusngAXE to 111. 

: :.The order also includes Ericsson SDH 
titetsportnetMTOik equipmert and optics 
, Are cables!. 

. Mstaystec .^arikat Teteton Wlretess has 
chosen Ericsson celular taefo technology 
j'kxa nmnetworkfri Mate^ Itis expected 
that Erlcsspri eiquipcnent worth about 
US^ ^ in vriH be instaBed over the next 
. fiyeys^:' 

KoiweThekbreaBectricPbwsrCoriip^ 

, .h%.birderiklan Ericsson EDACS 
metoltertejfoqytewhtoirrf^^ 
Jte!hetwqri(te!Sepii.Thefour-eleeyslarn . 
te^frststegetoifigiacfogfocoiffib^^ 
i^oq^tneaSorw^stem!' 
..UNtedKInjadipiteTheUKeubsk^ - 
' .Ausbaiten tekroomfnunfcafions operator, - 
:;ieistra; hae.'signed an agr^ment with'. 

. Ericsson rfo'rT-tee 'prcMsion of a hew . 
tetepornrniteloaE^ (nfrastiuclure. The ; 
eysterrt .te'designjed to boost . Ttestra's 
teteinaliorialseiC^ces. 

■ ;.Ericssoh.iMateosi49plyte)infraslnxft^ 
to BiriobeO (Southwest), a cable leinrision ' - 
opeistarpepAfihgsetvicestoSoulhDevorv ! 
. The.hAwxK-whU Indutes A>£ dgtiai ^ 

■ sw fi ch s s ^ MO110 PBXs, wB servea.'’ 
.'patertiiali^.0a0hornea . 


Te te f o naKBrtfoteget LM Ericsson, 

S-126 25, Stockholm, Sweden. 

Ericssarfs 75.(100 erriiAaiyaes are aodveki 
more than too eotsmies. Their oompteed 
experienoeinswkaihg. taiioandn^wortAng 
mates Ertessen a WDrid tearter te 
talecommuniGadons, 






Page 6 


international HERA l.n TRIBUNE, TIHESDAY, DECEMBER 20, 1994 


Old Attitudes and Structures Impede Russia’s Long-Haul Road to 



AinaiHkT OnBtraadiufc/Rcuwn 


A Rus9Ui lira gging his beloiigiiig^ akM^ a Moscow street A quarter of die popidadon fires at or bdow subastenoe levels. 


By Fred Hiatt 

h'a^itg/aH Ptm Service 

MC^COW — Duii^ one ol 
Moscow's recent gasoline short* 
ages, as motorists idled in 
hours-long lines, a city offida) 
attacked private gas stations for 
raising prices loo hi^. 

“Of course, there are free 
prices*'^ the official said, mean- 
ing unregulated prices. “But 
they stQl have to be agreed 
upon “ * 

Both the comment and the 
rituation — a g;^ shortage in a 
nation swinuning in or! '■* 
p<^led to the uneven nature of 
Russia’s economic reform three 
years after tlK Soviet Union's 
collapse. Despite seismic 
chan^ and convincing rfaeto* 
lie. much remains uodhanged. 
And dte persistence of old atti- 
tudes and structures is blodung 
further progress in-myriad 
ways. .. 

These unreconslnicted sec- 
tors — from a^cuUure to so- 
cial v^tfare to real estate — 
work together to block creation 
of new businesses, impoverish 
the stale, keep workers from 
moving to new jobs, foster cor- 
ruprioQ and in general prevent 
die recovery that President Bo* 
ris N. Ycitsin needs to vindicate 
the very idea refonn. 


“In practically all .areas, re- 
foim is only at the initial stage, 
or there’s nothing going on at 
all" said Boris G. Fyodorov, a 
reformer who resign^ in f™5- 
iraiion last January from the 
post of finance minister. “The 
president hasn't decided^ whaf 
^d of society be wants.*" 

Some observers might con- 
sider Mr. Fyodorov's comment 
exaggerated, but th^ would 
agree that Mr. Yeltsin's early 
policy of promoting reform has 
given way to a caretaker ap- 
proach io which stability often 
seems the only goal 

“Change is occurring in Rus- 
sia. and it's basically in the right 
direction." said Charles Blitzer. 
chief economist here for the 
World Bank, “ffs frustratingly 
slow at times and fnisinitingly 
inconsistenL"' 

The risk. Mr. Blitzer said is 
not that Rt^awill revert to the 
failed cortunaod economy of 
.Soviet days, but that the transi- 
tion to a more prosperous mar- 
ket economy wilJ t^e too long. 

In some areas, the lack, of 
change reflects consistent ideol- 
ogy. Ineffident and often im- 
poverished coUeciive farms — 
now renamed “joint stock com- 
panies" — endure in part be- 
cause many Russians believe 


the buying, sellmg and renim^ 
of farmland is simply wrongr 

Parliament does not enact laws 
needed to safeguard contracts 
or mortgages peruse rnwy 
lawmakers remarn deeply suspi- 
cious of private wealth. 

But as in many counincs. 
change often is stymied because 
it ccets more in the short term 
than lumbeiiag on the old way. 

A further disincentive comes 
in the profits that Russia's elite 
reap from the incffideacies. In 
an underdeveloped democracy, 
with infant political parti^ and 
a government unresjwnsive to 
citizens, such elites^ burrau- 
orats who gve out licenses, mo- 
nopolists who control the grain 
trade — are espec^y power- 
ful. The gasoline lines in Mos- 
cow and other cities provide a 
clear example of just how un- 
ranov'ated Russia's economy re- 


education and science _ 
them — suffer far more than 
they should during this rcstruct 

tunng period. • | 

The bureau6r®*s* grip on reid 
estate has a amilarly chiUm^ 
effect In Moscow and some 
other cities, residents now ihajj 
privatize their apartments. As 
m Communist days, millions of 
people also own dachas or gar* 
den plots. - * 

But in Moscow and dse{ 
where, the apartment buildings 
ihemsclves remain muiudpalljl 


owned. Almost all land does 
* " ■ ■ s.iha 


Demons of Insecurity Haunt a Nation Longing to Be ‘Civilized’ 


By Steves Erlasger 

Nenf VifriL Times Serviee 

MOSCOW — Once agai^ in Chechnya. 
Russia finds itself in conflict with iis owt 2 
demons — ihe embcxdimenl of particular na- 
tional fears and anxieties in what remains a 
multiethnic empire. 

Naiionaiity not only is a category in the 
Soviet passports that Russians still use as a 
means for racial and ethnic ideatificatioa. but 
is a set of assumptions and ambivalent feel- 
ings in Russian heads as well. 

in confronting (he latest Chechen chal- 
lenge to Russian sovereignty and reopening a 
Caucasian conflict that has'siinineFed for 150 
years, the Russians ore also reopening a Pan- 
dora's box of feelings about the restive minor- 
ities in their midst from Muslim Tatarstan to 
Y^iilia in Siberia. 

To he sure, every imperial nation has its 
own collection of ethnic and racial generaliza- 
tions. 

Bui the Russian demonolc^v finds ils spe- 
cial nature in Russians' deep insecurity about 
their place in the world — culturally, reli- 
giously, technologically. Are they a European 
people or some mongrel Asian one? Is theirs a 
superior culture, destined to rule, or a be- 
sieged one destined to flail forever at relent- 
less enemies burrowing in from every direc- 
tion? 


More pai 

“civilized," the way Westerners are, or primi- 
tive and somehow inferior, doomed always to 
lag bdiind countries like Germany and the 
Unitel States. 

Those worries arc heightened in a period of 
humiliation and dislocation like the one Rus- 
sia is going through. Having lost one huge 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


empire and set of beliefs, without entirely 
understanding why. it now fears to lose even 
the smaller empire, the Russian Federation 
itself. 

So traditional Russian demons — Che- 
chens and Caucasians. Jews and Asians, for- 
eigners generally — e\-oke special anxieties 
now. As Russians enjoy u new form of free- 
dom. there is ai.>o a new chasm of uncertainty. 
and they feel beset on all sides hv alien 
influences and cultures. 

Even the new and welcome influ.x of so- 
phisticated consumer gex^ds. many of them 
Asian and European, has underlined a strong 
and sharply embarruNxing sense of just how 
bad “our" Russian products were and ore. 

It is a form of moral confusion that mokes 
it easier to embrace old m>1h.s about them- 
selves — the simple, honest, spiritual Slav — 
and the ethnic stereotypcx that bespeak the 


insecurities of both past and present, given 
that so many of the minorities m the Russian 
ambit were once conquerors, like the Tatars, 
or tormidable milita^ adversaries, like the 
Chechens. 

So the Chinese and C«itral Asians are- the 
barbaric, faceless, yellow horde that may once 
again drawn the noble Slavs; Esumians are 
tte cold, icy blondes who should choke on 
their own contempt: Azeris, courins of the 
Turks, are criminal and cheat us at the mar- 
ket, and the Jews are greedy, calculating and 
so devious that tb^ ruined us by making the 
Bolshevik Reveriudon. 

Similarly, the predominance Muslim 
Chechens in the criminal gan gs that bedevil 
Russia — and the general predominance of 
Caucasians and Jews in the wild new world of 
semicapiialist business — have only added to 
the deep conviction among Russians that they 
are somehow congenitally unsuiied (o the 
modern world. 

While Russians may have hitter, more 
spiritual values than other pei^les. thi^ fed, 
(hey are uniquely prey to the more wily dark- 
skinned people of the south. And even their 
spiritual values are thr^iened as thdr chil- 
dren turn from intellectual pursuits to make 
deals or forsake Russian Orthodoxy for West- 
ern evangelists. 

TTus sense of difference is deeply ingrained. 
The ethnic label “Slav" itself ts believed to 


have come from “slovo," or word, to signify 
people with the gift of speech. The label 
“Nemtsi." meaning “those who are dumb,’* 
was ^ven to all other Occidentals, and later. 
specmcaUy. to the Germans. 

Under the czars, and especially under the 
Soviet UDJOn. the Russians wore'their ruling 
positions arrogantly. They were patronizing 
to other nationalities, who mosuy paid lip 
service to their overlords. Russians under- 
stood, in their hearts, that they were hated by 
many of those who kowtowed. 

Just as Gogol and others lavished contempt 
on the Jews, the Chechens and Russia's long 
war to suppress them stirred some of the 
country's greatest writers. 

Tolstoy's marvelous story about a Chechen 
leader, Hadji MuraL who defects to the Rus- 
sians and is betrayed by them, offers an acute 
portrait of the w^’ relationship, even as the 
Chechens vrere losing the war for indepen- 
dence that ended formally in 1864. 

From the Russian side, there is admiration 
for Chechen bravery, intelligence and love for 
freed^ coupled with the~fear of the road, 
swarthy fighter, lurking just outside the fire- 
light. sharpening his sword, preparing to cut 
Russian throats. 

As for the Chechens, there is no trust in (be 
honor of Russian intemions. just loathing for 
the p>ower that ruins iheir lives. 


mams. 

R^ular gas in Moscow sells, 
by mayoral decree, for about 60 
cents per gallotj. This is much 
closer to world prices than two 
years ago, but still well below 
what Russia's oil could fetch on 
an open market. 

.As a result, sales have to be 
lulled by a ^stem of raupoos. 
obtainable with bribes or 
through official connections. 
Outside M(»cow's Ring Road, 
where the decree no longer ap- 
plies, tank trucks set up shop in 
random locations, charging 
twice as much for unregulated, 
and often watered-down, gaso- 
line. 

To keep enou^ oil in Russia 
at bdow-market prices, the gov- 
ernment also must impose ex- 
port quotas so that aD of. Rus- 
sia's oil is not sold more 
proritably overseas. These quo- 
tas. controlled by Moscow or 
r^^ai bureaucrats, are ex- 
tremely valuable commodities 
— and a notorious source of 
corruption. At the same time, 
oil businesses do whatever they 
can to avoid selling at below- 
market prices, which accounts 
for the periodic shortages. 

Because it cannot chvge full 
value for its product, the oil 
industry does not collect 
enough to repair and rebuild its 
aging infrastructure. The lack 
of investment, in turn, leads to 
steadily dwindling oil produc- 
tion, which limits Russia’s bad- 
ly needed foreign-currency 
earnings. 

At the same time, the oil and 
gas industiy manages to avoid 
paying mu^ in the way of tax- 
es, even as top executives build 
luxurious dachas. 

And because the sector con- 
tributes so little in taxes, other 

Hivicirtne nf 


too, even beneath factories.^^ 
have been privatized. So, asaim 
local bureaucrats throu^iou:{. 
Russia control who may set up 
shop and where, and not aearijj 
eoCHigb conunercial ^paqe -is 
available. As a resolu commeri 
dal rents in Moscow ri^dtose 
in and New Yorfe ali 

though average salaries and liv^ 
ing standards are far lower. | 
'Hie transformation is mori 
obviously dow in farming. 
a burst of enthuaasrii for prit 
vate enterprise, enou^ diy 
dwellers and former coueedvf 
fanners peeled awayJrom thdr 
old lives to form l$3,<H)0^prif 
vate tanns by the eiid -;of. the 
new Russia’s, first year.' 1^ th^ 
summer of 1993, the number 
had grown to 258,000, > . . | 

But many : fanner^ 

discovered dtac'Rus^'^ not 
r^y for their bardlwo^- Rej 
gjonal or federal' moiKspoUes 
still set prices: Radteteeri 
blodt^ access to maftets. ^ 
this summer, the number 
vate farms had barely risen, to 
277,000, and they farmed only 5 
percent of Russia's agricuhuia! 
land. I 

Russia's sod^ welfare sy» 
tern remains^ for the mbst'par^ 
unrefonned as'welL While oo^ 
quarter of the peculation live 
at or below subsisteoce levei^ 
the government pays chOd al- 
lowances to ail families, T^ardj- 
Jess of incomeL 
In many cases, the gove^ 
meat sttB rdies on big factories 
to m.tintitin ho^Htals and hoQs^ 
ing for workers.. That saps 
funds that factories could use to 
modernize prcKlucCioa lide^ 
and it ties worirers to dying fac- 
tory towns where Tabor 
cannot be used profitably. 

Behind many of these barri- 
ers rits the vast bureaucracy 
that controlled all aspects of 
econcMnic life in Soviet day& 
'Today, the apparatdiiks canncK 
block grass-roots economic ac- .. 
tivi^. but they can interfe^ 
mi^tDy while soaking up i 
large chunk of the nation’s 
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utorn atiokal herau tbibuwe . Tuesday, DECEsram 20. i 994 

Page 8 

UJL- Sinn Fein Talks to Go On 

Escahtes 

BatDi8C««y ofUtetetBoinbBattlesFk.lilidans 

* . ■ -r \u9c mulih/ avulflble 3l klOSKS, 


RUSSIA: 

War Escalates 


By William E. Schmidt 

Sen York -Piii^Senkt 

KSSSSSi 


^SS£!S33?«S;K 

;;^Ss 5 i=aa« 

SSSffl Llmonist pohacians 
toTextremists on the a 

Sg^explosivc. !?sdis^a^gj« 
^turestCtte in the border town of ^taDem 
No group look responsibility for^ 
wtu dSS after the poKcc received an anony- 

on *e eve of e 

round <rf talks in B^asl betwcM the Bnush 
oovemment and trftidals of Sinn Fein. 

Among other things, the talto were 
British tonands that the IRA diss^ and sun- 
der its huge stocks of weaponry. W 

quantities Semtex, before being able to join 


wider poUiical talks on the future of the 
progress was r^ort^ 

^ii^Mon^afternooii, but the two sides 
SSthly would meet again in JanW: , 

officials called the d»swv^.^ tte 

bomb “a most serious rnadent 

Sinot regard the incident as changmg its w^ 

ing assi^^ fiiai ^ 

“*^t^*offirials said the ^b 

about a kilogram of Semiex and chscovered 

S along with a half-^of 

gasoline. It was mred to two 

Sr and dectrical batteries. Had 

.ih^ said, the bomb would have caused extensive 

bomb ini^t have been the work of extMJ^ 
Se SflRA, wh^ bwond of 

the Sinn Fein- leadership and are detemuned to 

Ma^^’SmSber of ±c 
mont and spoii TT*"”" on security mat^ for toe 
Ulster Unffi^. 

as having been manufacnired from IRA Semtex 

and detonators. . 1— rtf the 

But Martin McGiiinne^ the me 

Sinn Fein ddegaUon meeting with ^ Bntish, 
^ that “dirty tricl^ ™ m- 

volved in planting the bomb, suggesting it nu^t 
to o' Protesunt provocateurs. 


GOMA: Japanese Troops Import Serenity to Camps 

^oL, •Without Mte Ogata. I don't officer Major Kalsuyuki Ka- 

five^tonng stations around u^ed for this type of Mti^ SSo^^onc^^ biggest 
ne^ volcanoes. said Mr. Nagawa, a UN refu^ ® 

“Our mission is to con^ct in Tokyo who jananese casualties 

this operauon succMsfuUy., ^ dispatched here to act as . TJe 

aidC^nelMitennobuJ^ uSon'Wen to Japanese ?■ J?' £™ 


“Without Mrs. Ogata, I don’t 
think me Jwanese Self-Defe^ 
Force would have been mobi- 
lized for this type of acti^. 


live nioniuwiii5 for tms type 01 

nearly volcanoes. g^id Mr. N^wa, a UN refu^ 

“Our mission is to convict i„ Tokyo who 

this operation successfuUy. ^ dispateb”^ here to act as 
said Colonel Mitsunobu Kam- ^3^011 1bet««ea ihe Japanese 

moto, the Japanese commander nnd international relief 

here. “If our operauon sue- 

ceeds, Japan will coimucnnore as in the two previous 

humanitarian <^eraU^. Japanese uoops 

The Japanese Sclf-pefenre . -y-rseas, this mission has 
Force m itself as paitici^y ^^racted controversy back 


WUliiM. . 

The mily Japanese casua m es 
is the Goma ope^on have 
been two journalists, whose 
chartered plane crashed. 

Besides the security con- 
cerns. the biggest problem fao- 
ine the Japanese is meir inabil- 

with 


ine Japanese went ovmeas. mission nas u»s ^ „;*v 

Force sees itself as paiticulaily aitracted controversy back ity to communicaU 
wdl suited for Uiist^K of ho- J^'p^niciilarly among legis- ^g^ or Zamans. who speak 
manitanan missioD, since m Ja- others who sec in it a *^*5^?* — ertiHier 

pan me soldiers are routmely StSed miUtary role, and a . O?**? 

SSed upon to assist after natu- violation of Japan’s m the 260-man cwtingent 

ral disasters like earthquakes -peace” constitution. 

... '^bS^.Pariiameut.a^ 


and volcanfc crupuons. ^Mernbms^ Parliament and 

The mission ^ n^e posn- QffloiaJsfromlhcpiimeiniius- 
blc after the W High COTun^ ter’s office have visited, and me 

sioner for Refug^ Sadato ^ soldiers have been closely 
Ogata, made an impa^oned ^ajejjgd by an almost equal 
appeal during a one-week vaca- jjmnber of Japanese journalists, 
tion in her nabve J^an waiting mainly to 

Tokyo assist in the Rwandan 53. dug operation might mark 

crisis not amply wim money . = . ^orid War 


but also wim manpower. 


Seeeur 

Business Massage Center 

eveiy Wednesday 


n that Japanese troops would 
be forced to Ore their weapons 
in ht^tilities. 

The Japanese have faced no 
conflict, aimou^ they, like oth- 
er relief workers, say gunfire is 
beard nightly. “Sometimes near 
this camp, we hear rifles, even 
hand grenades,** said me press 


in the 260-man contingent 
g p f^ics French, and vdule many 
tuve stuped Fnglish, few claim 
to spe^ or understand it weU. 

Some of me Japanese, includ- 
ing First Lieutenant Michiaki 
f ^ayaki, have tried to learn 
some Swahili, which is uidcly 
understood ly Rwandans. 

At the Kituku refi^ camp, 
where Japanese are digging 
drainage ditches, Lieutenant 
Okazaki carries a list of phra^ 
in Japanese, Swahili arid Kin- 
yarwandu, and draws a crowd 
of screaming chUdren as he 
practices saying “Good morn- 
ing” and poses for snapshots 
wim childi^ whfle shouting “I 
love Rwan^l” in En^ish. 


GoiitiBDedfnBFagel 

local residcDts. Althou^ food 
was readily aviulable ai ^kiosks, 
it was far too eu^penave for 
most pei^le, and there were 
Icmg fines at neariy every state 
store that sfM 1 k^ or sugar. 

After s puming MOSCOW’S of- 
fer of peace n^tiadons on 
Sunday, Mr. Dudayev made no 
public appearances on Mon- 
nay^ aiihniigti reporters wanted 
hptn to «initngnt on ncw mmois 
fiiat Rusaa was planning to 
send addition^ troops to the 
T^jon. When asked to com- 
ment on me nature of the fight- 
ing bis foragn minista, Yusef 
Shamsudin, said, “Thw h^ 
too BTB^b bombixig all 
m^tlOTg.” 

Cbedien telcvirioii. before it 
was krmdmd of f the air by Rus- 
sian b<CTbers, broa d cast 
tailai info rmati on about the 
most vulnerable place on the 
Russian^ T-72 tmks and ad- 
vised residents to attack them in 
any way possible. 

The worst fitting took place ^ 

in Dolinskoe, 20 kilometers 
west of Gioz^. Russian tank s - 
pel t^ the viuage throughout 
the day with iragmentation | 

bombs. By evesung, the Rus- 
sians awQued on the verge of 
occuenmg me village, which 

would i^ve them unhindered ac- 
cess to me capital 

In Shalaamyuit, 16 Idlome- ; 
: • teis east ci the caQr, Chechen 
t fighters have dug deiro trenches 
to ward off expect tank at- 
s w»!«ian soldiets were ad- 

i vanedng cm those trenches, and 
e machine-gun fire could be 
heard in me distance. Several 
- of the troops there were 

!- huddled in fremt of fires against 

1- the bitter cold, and many did 

b not even have gloves to wear. 

^ Khusan isabayev, 34, the 
emnmander of the brigade m 
, Shalaamycrt diarged wim as- 
„ saulting helicopters wim rock- 
ets, acknowledged that me 
j“ “Russians can go m Grozny 
j any time mey want” 

Id But he said that mey wanted 

m to humiliate Chechnya more 
ly tban to occupy it, and ^t mat 
would always remain impossi- 
p, ble. 

at Many residents of the capital 
es appear to agree. They are fond 
n- of dting me example of M- 
^ ghanistan, saying it would be 
he Spo^Tile for Russia to occupy 
n- me region ftiUy without many 

)is soldiers dying, which ^ vi^ 
“I as a political impossibility for 
My, ^elt^. , . , 



A wim baying bread in Gmzny on Monday « Ramian foKas stepped up d«ir aasmdt^ 

Simpson Outburst in Jail Stays Secret, Judge 

^ frtr fiimnscHi uow because the 


oiirtiitJiH to a friend in jail wfll oupwaw* 
mnain s m et. a Judge ruled A. Ito, in a written ruling Mon- 
Monday. He also turned down 

a reauat to cancel a full-scale ordered me DNA b«nog “ 
DNA admissibility hearing set begin Jan. 5 outside me jury’s 


The Avodated Pres wedc asked to incorp^te me 

LOS ANGELES — The issue into the trial before, the 
stetement dtet. Of. Simp»u ju^ 

•m.~ • - Sifnn- 


to ooufidmti- *'■ Mr. Grin- a P'^ 

aUty of Mr. Simpson’s shouted sion®lfootbaU pl^andn^ a 

remark to his friend Fo^ 

Grier was a victory for me de- son on N^'. 

FMse. The DNA filing was a son yelled somellung that a 

depuv overheard. The remark 

The defense initially sought a b“ 

full-scale hearing on whemer Judge Ito said m his 

scientific genetic evidence ruling that^&mpson^^ 
should be admitted in Mr. 

Simpson’s trial. But m an vacy when he made an outburst 
about-face, the defense last inajailvisitmgarea. 


presence. 

Mr- Grier, a fonner 


“Counsd for Simpsmi now becauw the jailer was 

mssrsSfeK 

mfTrtt^ “Under the highly un- Hgioijs adviser is a seiwuscfTM 
factual setting in this case, mth But he added 

pn^r H tn this simde incident, Mr. Simpson waived the dg gy: 
the argument is wdJrtakcn. Tne pigiitent privilege of se^ecy. • 
demand for discovery is there- i^everthekss. Judge ltd s«d, 
fore denied." since Mr. Simpson -had . Iw, 

Mr Simpson is dwrged with guaranteed 

muSeri^^Smer wife visitiim aie^ bsoOTtotiah^ 

_ - hAP fnMid iMii«t he wittintA-neo- 


muroering Kwiuci wuv 

Brown amwon and her fnend must be imtintarn e A 
Ronald L. Goldman last June. The judge did not ej^Oun the 
Jndee Ito noted that a dier- legal basis for'to decisio n .<m 
ifrs deoutv overheard Mr. .the DNA hearing, but^morety 

Simpson was yelling, and not soieaUle. 


CHINA; Nationnlistic Rancor Rises in ReiJingAmid Uncertainly on Deng 

. . .. m#- /-I.— in«.oe tft the oartv in this sensitive season 


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.Address:. 


Intezxiatirmal 


CoothiDed hum 1 

nationalist in these circumstances." said 
Michel Oksenberg. a While House aide on 
China in the Carter administr^on and 
now prerident of the East-West Center, m 
Hawaii. “I think in each major dimension 
<rf relations wim China, one cm expect to 
see recakatrance as Chinese leaders and 
the various contestants for power pt^tion 
themselves to make sure they don l lose 
meir nationalist bona Tides." , , 

Chen Yizi, a onetime top Commuoist 
Party official now fiving in the UnK^ 
Stati, said: “I beUeve that me situation in 
China right now is in a very delicate state. 

“No matter what, Deng’s health isn l 
goiog to get any better. The second rea^n 
foTtiic fragili^ of me situation is mat 
there is a scries of sensitive problems fac- 
ina Chinese society, for instance: 
corruption, and the l^y of me June 4, 
1989, inddenu*’ the mifita^ crackdown on 
studCTt-led prodemocracy demonstrauons 
at T iananm en Square. 

“If something goes even slightly 
wim the handling of these quesUons, ^ne 
“the consequences will be severe. 

Mr Deng's declining health, a Western 
diplomat added, “has been a factor for the 
last year, but more so in me laat^^ fow 
months — eveiything is just waiting.” 

Western officials say that me 90-year- 
old paramount leader is extremely frail 
and that his doctors are using life support 
systems to sustain him. Mr. Deng report- 
edly suffers from advanced Parkinson .s 


disease and omer rilments. Mr. Chen ^d 
his sources had him that Mr. Deng has 
suffered from progressive kidnqr failure 
since October 1992 and undergoes fre- 
quent dialyas. 

The Chinese government and memo^ 
of Mr. Deng's family continue to m^tam 
that he is in good health, but 
officials indicate that he has markedly 

weened. . .. . ^ 

" Harsh senicnces — induduig one tw W 
years * were handed down last *5 
iine prodemocracy dissidents had 

been held in jail for 30 months. The ^- 
ishment followed the sentencing of 
Yu last roonm to six years in prison. »«. 
Gao, a prominent journalist who was invit- 
ed to Columbia University as a visitmg 
scholar this year, had written aruclcs abom 
the political maneuvering of China s lead- 
ers for Hong Kong-based magazmes. 

Hu Shigen, a 39-year-old lecturer at the 
Beijing Languages Institute, received the 
heaviest sentence, 20 years, for ’^spj^ding 

counterrevolutionaiy propagMda. 

Robin Munro, the Hong Kong director 
of Human Rights Watch, called the sen- 
tences “appallmgly severe,’’ . 

The other dissidents sratenced on rn- 
day recciv^ terms ranging from 3 to 12 
years. Five others were convicted and 
leased, and one was placed “under surveil- 
lance'' for two more years. 

China’s leaders, who certainly approved 
of the length and the timing of mese sen- 
tences, appear to be warning dissidmu 
and int^ectuals mat me slightest chal- 


lenge to the party in this sensitive season 

will be sever^ puniahed. 

China's most vocal campmgiw to de- 
mocracy and foee speedh; 
remains a c^tive of the State Security 
Ministry, which Tcfuscs to ch^ 2 
release him. Mr. Wed was imoally rele^ 
in September 1 993, after serving more tot 
14 years in prison, but was real rested m 
Aprd. 

Chen Zimms, one of two dissidents re- 
leased from 13-year pito terms i^t 
spring, remains a captive in a tiny ap^- 
ment^bere as many as 56 poUcemm have 
kept him under guard and survoUa^ 
Mr. Chen and Wang Jimtao, sentenced m 

1991 to 13-year prison terms, were accused 

of being bdiind the Tiananmen Sqi^ 
eprising. Htey were rdeased tm meto 

S le, and Mr. Wang went to the United 

!s for treatment. 

Although Commerce Scoetary Ron^ 
H. Brown annotmoed in August that he 
had won China’s commitmeac to renew its 
dialogue with Washington on human 
rights, four months later the dialogue has 
produced no results. 

The State Department’s top human- 
rights official, J<mn Shattuck. has an- 
nounced that China ^reed to resume talks 

with the International Committee of the 
Red Cross to i^ow access to mousands of 
politicri piiscmers. But China has yet to 
resume negotiations wim the Red Cross. 
And no date for a meeting in 1995 has been 
set. 


46 

Ceian 

□ 


SwitzezlaBd 

□ 

47 

Eools Letnania 


UJE. 

□ 

48 

SelsSdioob 


Art SDosign Schools 



France 

□ 

49 

Pazsoos Sdiool otDeagn 


Saly 

□ 

SO 

Tte UeznaiioiBl Sdnol of Alt 


n.s,R. 


51 

Barvaxd Graduate ofDeagn 

□ 

52 

Paxsens Sdiool of Design 

□ 

53 

SqhoolofF^diiaiDesign 

□ 


HUNT; UK. PoUce Go After Animal Rights Protesters 

%.M .1 inn rtnnneitirtn thcv’rc OH tO mc fOX, WC tlV IC 


Continued from Pi^e 1 

4,000 protesters, irymg to dis- 
rupt about 50 of Britain .s 340 
hunting expeditions each week. 
Some of the belter known hunts 
have hired security men who 
patrol in Land Rovers lo keep 
me saboteurs away. Although 


More than 100 opposition 
Labor members of Parliament 
signed a motion regretting his 
action. 

Each Friday. Mr. Thomas, 
ihc saboteur, .scans the listings 
of hunts in Horse and HouniL 
circles a town cn u map and 


me saboteurs away. Alihou£i ^ convoy of old van.s bear- 

rag a dozen young protesters. 

1600s. IS sometimes culled the t ■' u ,i u., 

English national sport and One recent weekend, he 
servM as a social magnet for the chose Vine and C raven, a huni- 
I horse set. it is not wildly popu- inggroup 


Hold MmgQiMiit Sdnob 

SJvritzedand 

54 HotelCeasolt □ 

55 RostaEcoIeHotelieie □ 

56 BotrihatitiiieMantreux □ 

57 ffp*rT fatfwwirfwwial Hotel XTaarigBi Q 


lar among everyday people. 

Fox hunting is still the pre- 
serve of the aristocracy. The 
hunt saboteurs seem mostly to 
come from the omer side of the 
sodi^ divide. 

Prince Charles infuriared an- 
imal rights groups by t^ng his 
two sons. Prince William. 12. 
and Prince Harry. 10, fox hunt- 
ing in October. He said he 
wanted his children to Icam 
about “the thrill of the hunt.” 


S To 10 miles in the hill.s and 
dales 75 miles west of London. 

Mr. Thoma.s eschews the bat- 
tle paraphernalia of other sabo- 
leur groups — the ski masks 
mat hide identities and lend ^ 
air of menace and the speciid 
trumpets and cans of Anti- 
Mate, an animal repellent, to 
draw the hounds off me scent. 

He relies on speed and travels 
light. “We jusi stick as close as 
we con lo the liounds." he said. 
“And at the key moment, when 


they're on to me fox, we try to 
lake controL It's all done by 
imitating the huntsman's call.” 

An hour later, the group 
tracked doivn me hunt. A fox, 
allegedly, was hiding some- 
where in a mickly wooded delL 
The hounds were running belter 
skelter, me hunters were posi- 
tioned on all sides, and me sab- 
oteurs poured over a fence to 
the rescue. 

They set off a chorus of high- 
pitched two-note bleats — the 
equivalent of “come here" in 
htnin^peak. Sure enou^ a 
handful of me hounds aban- 
doned the chase and came 
bounding over. They looked 
confused and soon ran bade. 
The hunters looked down their 
noses, as if at vermin. 

By me day’s end. Vine and 
Craven did not catch a fox. But 
that seemed to have more to do 
with the fox's ability to lie low 
than with the saboteurs success 
at confusing the hounds. 


URANIUM; 

Material h Seised 

Contimied from Page 1 
of weapons-grade material 
here. “It would appear from the 
inirial anal ysis dme by the 
Czechs that it is indeed top-of- 
the-line qoaliQr,” said a sp^^ 
man for the eneigy agency, m 
Vienna, David Kyd. “Thai is 
reason on our part for concern 
simply because it would indi- 
cate that mere is a source avail- 
able for sudi malertaL" 

But, he added: **70 make a 
warheMi you need 25 Idlo- 
graic^ so this amount, although 
seemingW significant, is wdl 
below what you would need to 
weapons purposes." 

Uranium pdl^ as wdl as 
very small quantities of plutoni- 
um, have come on to the blade 
market in the past year, but 
“this is pn | i$ ua] in terms {tS 
comporition and the rize of the 
conagnment,** Mr. Kyd said. 

(Reuters, AfP) 


CARTERj He Says Bosnian Serbs Aa^pt Immediate, 4rMondi Cease-Fire 

. _ ^ ^ 1 - 1 .!. . 1 !_. — ■■ ■■1 Q t VI ^ A AsiAll^t vW* 


CooldngSchoob 


Ikance 
58 LeCoidoaEtai 


SonunarStiAs 

UnSA. 

59 gn iveuu ty otViiginia 


from Page 1 from its backing of the Muslim 
cause lo one closer to the Euro- 
called for the lifting of iniema- position, which contends 
tional economic sanctions op Serbs have won the w-ar 

the ^bs in exchange f®*" and that any settlement is better 
compliance with a senes of UN continued bloodshed. 


an integral country, but the Ser- 
bian part would be gua^teed 
political, economic, social and 
cultural autonomy from me 
Muslims and the Croats. 


Job Title:. 


compliance with a senes of UN jj,an continued bloodshed. Despite these provisions, the 

S^urity Council The key is.suc Monday was an rebel Mvbs rgect both the idea 

ihat have no relation to a sciu iniemaiionul peace plan, bro- that Bosnia should remain one. 
ment of Bosnia s war. kered by the five-nation “con- country and the actual division 

From me first announcement tact group” made up of the of the lerritOD’- Instead, they 
of Mr. Carter’s visit last Thurs- Unit^ States. Russia. Germa- want independence and the 
day, Bosnian Muslim officials ny. Britain and France. Under right to join in some kind of a 
have expressed fear that Mr. the term.*; of ilmi agreement, me conJfcderalion with Serbia, the 
Carter, who is not familiar with plan would divide Bosnia main backer of Yugoslavia’s 
the Balkans, would come to roughly m half between the wars of secession. Ibe Serbs 
Bosnia and end up. unwittingly Scrh.s and .i federation of also want better territory — in- 
or not, aiding the Serbs. Some Croat.s and Muslims. Serbs, eluding more mines, factories 
have said m^ worrit mat ihc who occupy 72 percent of the and urban centers despite the 
Clinton adnunsiration was cm- country, would see their hold- fact that most Serbs lived on 
ploying Mr. Carter's visit us a ing decre^ise by about one- farmland in Bosnia before the 
method to move its policy away third. Btisnia would still remain war. 


I I^IL LW JVIIl l&A JWIIIW Vt M 

conJfcderation with Serbia, the 
main backer of Yugoslavia’s 
wars of secession. The Serbs 
also want better territory — in- 
cluding more mines, factories 
and urban centers despite the 
fact that most Serbs lived on 
fa^and in Bosnia before the 
war. 













V-v. 


ft:. 


. Since August, when the 
Serbs* self-styled Parliament 
fonnaOy rgected it, the Serbs 
have fought against tire plafr' 
Undbr the terms of a deal 


S&R;: 


Demite these provisions, the signed \pf Mr. Cait«, Mr'. Kar- 
rebei ^bs rgect both the idea adzic and Ratko Ml^c, cooi- 
that Bosnia should remain one. mander of the Bosnian SerinaO ' 

QFTVMf T fl fTf ■ ^ 




army, the Serbs ^reed to ac- 
cept me “contact group*' jdan. 
as a “basis" for furtto taUcsi 
wim the Bosnian Muslims; 
exdiange for reopenii^ 
vo’s airport, a ceasefire lea<mig. . 
to a complete gft«ption (rf-1^ 
tilities, the free movement* of • _ 
aid convoys and me cofflfdete. 
freedom m ail people 
less of age, sex cm* etlmic.ori8ht . 
to choose where they wirii tp *. 
live," among other things, 








**3Va , .yis r.f, 


^ jii tj* \Sa 










V'' ,:0;*': ■;:. ;■ :.: ■ ■„ . . 

■■:. ^.: A"} ; . \y\- '.■ n>'f^'/ *■'.■' ' / 

' -A- 


From left. Nina Ricci's floral-stripe stockings with taffeta dress: legwearjrom Valentino. Gianni Versace. Christian Lacroix ami Donmi Karan. 

Some Christmas Stocking Staffers: Legs 

effect Of Virtorian ^ in dance exeidsc class. At ni^t. fashion vibea suburban housewives StricUy for teenagers and the eaj 
T ^ f^S— This ““}*^f5‘^8S“!P“ty*»«e,as thqr m the Io<* of stoddngs fwith- wore tan stockiigs. 20s (and for those wih slim legs), a 

a bumper yo“ out tfis^ belt). Hie flash of flesh “IfeelKkelgavemylegaface-lifU” thewhite rights, redolent of the swii 

I finest hn^t at the lEgh is something new for the she said, to explain the effect of an ing 1960s, or the Loliia-style hold-i 

C^nnstmas Valentino, too. has taken initniratinn nantv.hna^ 0 MA«>ati<vn r .u... i : i i.„_ 


tmemaiwnal BenU Tnime 

P ^S— This 
is a bunmer 
year for 
Christmas 
stockings not the 
kind that Santa fills with toys, but the 
sheer glamour lacy hosiery. 

Tbe ubiquitous little black dress is 
no longer complete without equally 
well-dressed limbs. %nderw^ of in- 
iricate decoration or a siinple stripe 
ninning down the side oilrven party 
hose for the end-of-year festivities. 

Stretch fabnes that gleam and shim- 
mer, fancy lace, a scattering of Qowers 
or even fanta^ pattcnis, from gfnity to 
teddy bears, ns^ a focus of atten- 
tion. 

Sodiely has come a long way since the 
Victorian era, when a gli^se of stix^- 
ing was somethiiig sbocld^ But now 
that short ;ddrts have beocmie absc^utely 
acceptable in the Western wc^ there 
is sometbiDg sedu^ive and audacious 
abMt decorating the revealed legs. 

“It is a way of dressing up short 
sses,” ssys Christian Lacroix, one 
di the first designeis to fancy up the 
with a trao^ of lace. 

“As sotm as 1 see a blank surface, I 
have to decorate it,” he dainis. ”Bnt 
the reference was to the 19th century, 
when stoddngs woe erotic.” 

Lacroix's lacy fantaaes have includ- 


ed the patterned effect of Victraian 
soubrette*5 stoddngs on paoQr hose, as 
well as the delicate designs you might 
eimect to find on the finest lingerie. 

Valentino, too, has taken inspiration 
from the boudoir for the flowery l ary: 
h^ that he riiowed coqoette-siyle 
with feather-t rimm ed ankle bwts. Va- 
lentino also made sturdier patterned 
hose to blend in with day time looks — 

StOTMElSKES 

but stin with feminine floral patt erns 
rather than the plain opaque finish 
that is more f amili ar 
Gianni Versace tpojk a shine to 1^ 
•— as well as' dorim. Ms silvered 
stockings gave an eerie phorohoFe^ 
cent that matc^ the 

Shiny vinyi lacquer^ silk ai^ metal 
dresses were finished off with 
s h i mm ering hose and shoes. 

From Versace came another of the 
l^Swear trends: hold-tq) ho^ The 
ovei^^e-knee stoddngs (call Uict su- 
per-high sodts) ^ve a disconcertingly 
Lolita look to them — e^pedally when 
diown osx the nmway witii baby-doll 
dresses and Mary Jane shoes. But this 
unlikdy sQ4e has been taken up on the 
stieets m in clubs. For daytime, in 
tiiick knit, the hcdd-im stoddngs are 
just a variation <xi the 1^ warmers 


worn in dance exercise class. At ni glit ^ 

' tbQT give the look of stoddngs (with- 
out the garter belt). Hie flash of flesh 
at the thigh is something new for the 
panty-hose generation. 

The undisputed queen ctf k^wcar is 
New York's Donna Karan. $h e is the 
designer who made the woridng wom- 
im’s wardrobe work — by creating the 
rig^t foundations. She niade a smooth 
connection between underwear and 
oalerwear with the mat-black hose and 
bodysuit that she (tioneered in the 
I98Qs. It created a new attitude to 
career clothing, for with those under- 
garoients as backdrop, a wriq) 
skirt and jacket could be jugged along 
with OCbia easy pieces. 

For her fall DKNY sportswear ling, 
s j^w w -s hQgsd hold-up hose ~ but in 
imaginative ways, including as a 
stretch-stockmg bo^ so that shoe and 
hose were all in one. (At Chanel, Kari 
Lagerfeld had oeated a shnflsir effect 
ly making an over-the-knee tweed 
boot — just as be bad created ^ “sltin 
dress** as a new generation of 
bodywear in his KL collection.) 

Now Karan is moving chl Having 
broken the smooth line from torso 
through the feet with the hold-up i 
stockmgs, she started experimenting i 
with the bared 1^ For her fall ccdlec- 
tion, she promoted nude hose — lastin 


fashion vriien suburban housewives 
wore tan stockings. 

“1 feel hire I gave mylega face^lift,” 
she said, to explain the effect of an 
uhra-sh^ Lycra that gave the desired 
nude effect in a modern way. This new 
devdopment means the microfine 3-D 
Lycra witii stretch in every stitch, rath- 
er than alternate stitdies, giving ^eat- 
er dynamism. 

High technology is the key to mak- 
ing the enrrent legwear look new — 
rather than something tha t belongs in 
the can-can on of the Mcailm Rouge 
or on the stage at the new revue at the 
Paris lido. Du Ponfs Lycra revolu- 
tionized expiKtations of comfort and 
pafonnanoe, 2 ^ut as with the rest of 
fashion, women now seem to be yearn- 
ing for something feminine and frivcK 
lous, as wdl as practieab'-: .... 

T he choice available at ho- 
rioy counters is now over- 
whelming. So how to choose a 
Christmas stocking — to go 
with cunent fashions or as a gift? For 
daytime, tartan ti^ts from Ralph 
Lauren or Calvin Klein's argyle stock- 
ings make a cheerf ol ^ash of pattern 
against plain wool sldrts — especially 
If thqp fan to midcalf or are the so- 
called “new length,” with the tiemiinf. 
on the knee. Su^ country plaids gp 
naturally with dumpy shoes and boots 
that are now also worn in the dty. 


Strictly for teenagers and the early 
20s (and for those rvitb slim legs], are 
tile white tights, redolent of the swing- 
ing 1960s, or the Lolita-style hold-up 
hose. 

For evening, any stylish, sophisticat- 
ed woman can play viith the lace pal- 
tems — Lacroix signature hearts-and- 
crosses designs or Valentino anti 
Versace flowers. On the same principle 
as plain hose with plain dotites. the 
fanc^ tights look good with wispv lace 
ling^e-inspired dresses. 

Although designer hose come at 
high prices. simiJiU' effects can be 
found at malnsirearc stores, where 
styles range from bold arabesques lT 
deration down to a mere sbjdov^- 
play of pajtem or rairtt. .o.ripes. 

Decorative hose come a.< sc>cks. a's ' 
wdl as stockings, und «n:en fur women 
who find the idea of the decorated les 
too fanciful, a flash of iacc at the cufr 
of black pants can be effective, in fact 
fashion seems to have come full circle 
in the course of the century. Sinde 
skirts started to rise in tiie flapper era, 
w^en have revealed lalmost) every- 
thing. But now that the raised hemlLne 
barely raises an eyebrow. co\ering uo 
can seem much more seducij\-e. 

One hundred years after .shc-x'iing iJie 
ankle seemed the height c>r e.\ciienieQt 
in the Nau^ty ’90s. a brief flash of lace 
beneath tuxedo pants is the mode^ia 
woman's way to rrfresh a jaded paleice. 



BOOKS 


ivirt 


' J. v; 


CHESS 


By Robert Byrne 

V ALERI SALOV beat Ana- 
toli Kaipov in Round 9 in 
the Polugayevsl^ ToumamenL 
In the Richter-Rauzer Varia- 
tion of the Sicilian, character- 
ized by 6 Bg5, the branch with 
8...h6 is not^ for making it 
difficult for White to press any 
initiative: 9 h4 is crasidered an 
unsound gambit after 9...Ne4! 
10 Qf4 Ng5 11 Nc6 be 12 Qa4 
Qb6 13f4Nh7 14f5Rb8. 

The fearsome-looking 9 Bf4 
is restrained by 9...Bd7, a major 
tactical point being that on 10 



KABPiW.<wHrre 

PosItkHi after 64 KC 

Nc6 Bc6, White gets no adv^ 
ta ae from 1 1 Bd6 Bd6 12 Qd6 
Od6 13 Rd6 Be4. 

A piece of important knowl- 
• Mtee for using this defense is 
I^Nf4M6 

RdS Bd8 17 b4 0-0 18 Qe3 

NdS, Black’s rook-plus-bishop 
and chances for a matog 
“mpensate for the white 

new move. 14...Rc^?, 
>,was logical in aiming iminedi- 

becaure in the 

tove rebuffed J9 


e5 by 1 9...QfS > 20 QfS ef 21 Rd4 
Bb6 22 Rd3 Be3 23 Re3 Nf4. 
which saddles White with an 
isolated e pawn and ^dds 
Blade pressure against the white 
kingside. But after the actual 1 9 
Rd4 Bf4 20 Br4 Qf4 21 Qf4 Nf4 
22 g3 Ng6 23 Kd2 NeS, Salov 
had the slight advantage of the 
more sdid pawn structure. 

In relying on 28 Rh3, maybe 
Karpov overlooked' that 

28.. .Rg3! 29 Kf4 Rgl could not 
be exiMoited by 30 ReS? in.view 
or30-.f6 31 Rn5 Or was this 
part of a deep plan with 30 Nd5 
BdS 31 ed Ng6 32 Ke3 Rg3 33 
Kf2 RgS 34 Rb4! to create a 
counterattack? 

After the reduction of mate- 
rial ending in 42 BbS, Kanxw 
was a pawn down, but the bladk 
pawns were rolit and the wtite 
bishop should have been potent 
in advancing the b2 pawn while 
it interfered vdth the progress oi 
the black Mwns. 

Salov*s finish was cute: after 

64.. Ji3! 65 Kg3 Rgl 66 Kh2 

67 Khl NhSl. the threat of 
6^.Ng3 shatter^ all resis- 
tance. Kaipov gave up. 

naLUNDEFEKK 
Whhe Stack mili« Stack 

iCcqiov talmr Karpov Salov 

1 N iS .RC8 

2 Nia NiS as ub Ob 

a d4 rd ' 37 dr RhS 

4 Nd4 Mb m BM • Rc2 

s NrS dS 3P Kr3 Rcb 

b Bps dt 40 Bc3 RcO 

T 002 a6 41 KR ta . 

hOOO h6 42 BM KM 

9 St4 Kd? 43 Bda bS 

10 M-; Br« 44 Rr4 ReS 

IT 13 dS 4S Xel RaS 

13 Qcl Bb4 . 46 KR RB 

13 a3 BaS 47 Re3 RgS 

14 Im: KcO 48 KR RB 

15 Oca d4 49 KcS Ne7 

16 BeS Sc7 SO Rh4 Res 

17 (4 NM 51 KR RdS 

IHORO QW S2Bc4 . RO 

19 Rd4 614 59 Kcl RM 

31 Bi4 0*4 54 im RR 

21 0*4 NI4 SS Kgl 7M 

22 h 3 Nf;6 36 Rc4 NM 

23 Kd2 Nrf S7 l>4 ReS 

24 BrS Kr; SS Kfl rS 

SKi3 GO B06 Rb9 

2 e h4 rcrii . a* Rc4 ru 

27 hft RfC!< SI M M 

29 KtiS 02 RcS XrS 

r29 K!4 Rsl 53 M RU . 

30 NdS m 54 KR U 

31 nl NgS 65 BrI 

33 ICe3 Rg3 • « KU Rg3 

U KR Rft5 67 KbJ NK 

34 Rb4 bT 65 Reoigno ' 


BEYOND THE 


PROBQSED LAND: 

Jews and Arabs on the 
Hard Road to a New Israel 

B)* Gkm Frankd, 416 pages. 
S24. SimM A Sdtuster, 

Reviewed by Cbristopber 
Lehmann-Haupt 

B y the main title of his bode, 
‘*B^ond the Promised 
Land,” P lain Frankd mnan* 
that in the last seven years, Isra- 
el has undergone a d^ change, 
iimn “a amSl, collectivist, mo- 
tnlized garrison state under 
ri^ to a more open, pluralis- 
tic, bouigeois and d^occatic 
sodely.” 

In other words, Israel has 
been forced by evoits to go be- 
yond “the <tid 23onist state” 
perceived as a utopian ideal to 
a new post-Zjonist Israel” that 
is part of the real wc^d. 

Hus break is a result, be ar- 
gues, of several other momen- - 
tous changes: the rise of new 
political f<mes in Israd; thefalL 
the Soviet Union and the 
arrival of neai^ half a million 
Jewish immigeants; the death of 
socialism an*! the birth of a 
maiktt eoonon^ the defeat of 
Iraq in the Gun War and the 
ascendancy of the United 
States, and perhaps most sig^- 
icant, alterations in the Arab 
wori^ b ^mnmg ppifh the Pal- 

eplmian iqsrigiQo Imn wn as the 

mt^ada. which 'bteraUy maatia 
“shaking off” hi Arabia 
This eruption Friuded, a re- 


ESCAEA 

in Paris 

REDUCED PRICES 
ONWINTER 
COLLECTION 

Marie-Maitine 

8, niede Sevres, 

Pari«6tti ' 


• Adrian Liverpool 

poet and painter, is reading **Se- 
beted Poems" by Carol Ann 
Duffy. 

*T think rite’s the best young 
poet writing in Britain today. 
Hiere’s tile added bams 
new poems written from the 
point of view of the wives of 
f^Bmousmen — from Mrs. Midas 
to Mrs. Darwin.” (Roderick 

Conway Morris IHT) 



porter for Hie Washington Post 
who has spent many years in 
Israel, conadeis to have been a 
spontaneous boihng over of 
TSSfi at Isradi egression on the 
WM Bank and in tiara 
paradoxically, he says, the inti- 
fada empounmd the Palestin- 
ians to set forth on the path that 
eventually led to the han^ahaifR 


on the White House lawn in 
Sartember 1993 betwm Prime 
bumster Yitzhak Rabin of Isra- 
d and the leader cd the Pal^ 
tine Liberation Oiganization, 
Yasser Arafau 

As one P^estinian lewder 
told the author: “W^d been 
fightmg these people for de- 
cades and yet we know 


_ them. We thov^t we could of bow and ' 

, learn. Hie intifada made it pos- Yi trfiak Shs 
• rible^ creating a sense of pow^ Party blund 
er made us, a sense equality with the Bi 
with them. It wasn't master and and thus gs 
slave uynxxuL We could talk.” Labor Part 
To illustrate his thesis, Fran- which was si 
kfil examines these various ble to peace 
c h a ng es Iw focusiim on some of Int^i^i 

the people and places he h^ tation of t 
come to know m Israel over played by th 
more tban two decades. gious panic 

For instance, his close-iqis of tuimofl. 

' Isradi soldiers and Palestinian Frankel’sr 
comnumity leaders powerfuDy actiy lift the i 
dramatize the impossible dilem- He ejects i 
aas forced on both si^ by the (rf the physk 
intifada riothtg and its brn^ thai^ say A 
repression. “JerusalCT” i 

^ Ms portraits of disillusioned in ‘T'o Jerust 
IdblMitzniia and striving busi- Hispmtiui 
n essmen give the reader a sense are more fuo 
of how the econonty changed as kUng.Yourii 
^ (dd dream of a vast ooopera- {ticking up fs 
live farmland was ^dually stfirtc s for a i 

®***5**<»^ Hie history 

M^ fasematm^ of all is lates is coher 
Frankds penetratmg accoont Particularly i 


of bow and why Prime Minister 
Yitzhak Shamir and his lihid 
Party blundved in its dealiop 
with the Bush admiiiistration 
and thus gave way to Rabin's 
Labor Party administration, 
which was shgbtiy more amena- 
ble to peace negotiations. 

totdiigent too is his inteipro- 
tation of the complex roles 
p^yed by the conservative reli- 
9 tius parties throughout the 
tuimofl. 

Fiankd’s nairative doesn't ex- 
actiy lift the reader off the page. 
He ejects to convey the senyg 
of the physical setting of Israel 
that, say, Amos EIod does in 
“Jenisalon” or Saul Bdlow does 
in ‘n'o Jerusalem and Back." 


are more functional than spar- 
kling You riog through his text 
{ticking up facts as if th^ were 
sumes for a new Jerusalem. 

The histoy that Frankel re- 
lates is cttiieirat and dramatic. 
Particulaiiy provocative is hb 


{Mint that by the time the l^rMe'is 
and the PLO reached agreenicriL, 
American Jews bad losl touc'i 
with what was going on. * 

Whether or not this i.s fail-, 
you reach the end of Frankel's 
narrative as if emerging from 'a 
daik tunnel into a landscai^ 
that has been radicallv tran>- 
foimed. As he presents Israel 
attitudes, possession of the tef- 
ritories doesn't seem so essen- 
tial anymore, if only becauie 
Iraq’s attack with Scud missiles 
during the Gulf War demoti- 
strated the irrelevance of terri- 
tory as a buffer zone. J 

Whether or not {>eacee\'enlu- 
ally comes to the Middle East 
and Frankel's vision of a lanjJ 
beyond the promised land '!s 
fulfiUed, his book shovi's wir» 
ineluctabK' the parties had :«i 
take the gamble that pesoe 
could happen. 

Ckrisn^her Lehmemn-riau^i 
is on the su^f of The New > or(.- 
Tifnes. .| 



Les Roses de Noel 


[ocifs d’oreilles, or, 
trail et brillants. 


>GJ^ 


11 est stgna/jies auxg ^sonj ietit *. 



Brochc or. L'i;«r:iil, 
et brillants.. 


Clccf .Arpcls PARIS 22, place Vend6me T^l: 42 6l 




58 58 GENEVE 31, Rue du Rhone. Tel; 3l 1 fiO "'(j 




■v- 


























































































*V«i|S-s 

International Herald Tribune, Tuesday, December 20, 1994 



Tage 11 


€B€L 

the architects of time 


the TRIB INDEX- 11P 91 

index 

by Bloomberg 



100 


"\ty‘ y • • , f 

90 f ^ y T •>.• ■ 'e . .t ■ , f ;, ' 


World Index 

1Z''19/D4 close: 112.21 
PrC'/ious: "i 12.12 


D 

1994 


Approx. tiQighiing; 32 % 
CI 06 &: 124.23 Prev.: 123.61 


150 
130; 
110-^ 


Appnw. weighing; 37% 
Oose; 112.79 Prev.- 112^1 




J A S 0 N D 

J A S 0 

N 

1 



H North Ame^a': - 

ka 1 1 


Appigx.«dstiiing: 2 e% rnffil 

CI[ise; 96 g 7 Pr 8 Vj 96.21 

150 

Approx. weigMing. 5 S 
Close. 12 BS 7 Prev.- i 30 . 7 l 



1994 


130 


llOr^br:-^ 


‘V'' •‘'.•V' 

** J A S O N D- 

1994 

VltaddlndM 



J A S O N D 


1994 


77ie Mex hacks U.S. dWtar iqAms of stocks «l Tokyo, New Verk, London. «id 
ArganttRa, Auetralia, Auetrie, Beigiuin, BraiiL Canada, Chile, DennHk, Ffadwid, 
France, Germany, Hong Kong, IMy, Ilexfea. Wethertenda, New Zealand, Norww, 
angepore, Spiitn, Sweden, Swftzerfand and Veneouela. Pbr Tohyob Atow VM and 
London, ffw index i> conymsetf oT hw 20 top isBues hi temw of mwkor crpttd&Btwrv 
otfisnMHt tfie ten MP siocfts ate (reeked 


BMW to Drive Rolls-Royce Cars 

German Firm Will Supply Luxury Autos’ Engines 


By Erik Ipsen 

/menwriana/ ftavU Tnbme 

LONDON — For the secrad time this 
year, the maker of BMW cars has hdped 
Itself by comizig to the aid oi the British 
automobfle industiy. Bsyerisdie Mo- 
torea Werke AG Monday 

that it would simply Rolls-Royce Motor 
Cats Ltd. with tnemasrive V-8 and V-12 
engines it needs to power its luxury cars. 

For Rolls, a subsidiaxy of Vidrecs PLC 
— tritich nukes tanlcs for the military, 
among other thmg e — the announce 
meat was a long-expected acknowledge- 
ment that it coiud no longer bear the cost 
of devdojnng engines on its owil 

For BMW, the deal rqitesents an ad- 
ditional outlet for its tc^^-the-line en- 
gines — and a little added prestige. 

**It does no harm at all to BMW cus- 
tomeis to know that Rr^Royoe is using 
some o[ the same engines,” said John 
Lawson, an auto in£i$try analyst at 
DRl/MoGraw Hill in London. 

Soroe^ however, rndiaad that for BMW, 
the accord paled in oompaiisai with the 
deal the Monich-based company an- 
nounced in January, when it bwght Brit- 
ain's last lai^vohim carmaker, Rover 
Groiq) PLC rm- £800 miffion ($1 bil^) 
from British Aero^iace PLC 

As Rover’s fortunes have unproved 
and sales of its four-wheet-diive Discov- 
ery and Range Rover models have 
sbaied, that acqnisidoa has locdred better 
and better Sot BMW. 

The price they paid for all of Rover is 
basically equal to the cost of develcmir^ 
a new four-wheel-drive vdtide,” said Sai- 
rah Middleton, an analyst at CS First 
Boston. 9ie said BMW got not just a 


successful four-whed-drive vehicle but 
the whde car conquiny. **Ii was ilm deal 
of the year,” she said. 

Some also have luaised BMW for its 
decision to set up production in the 
United Stales, its lar^t export market. 
Keith Hayes, an analyst at Merrill Lyndi 
& Co., said BMW and its rival, Mer- 
cedes-Benz AG, had led the European 
car industry in tiyine to make their pro- 
duction woiidwide. He also sai^ that in 


'It does no harm at all to 
BMW customers to know 
that Rolls-Royce is using 
some of the same engines/ 

John Lanrson, anto analyst at 
DRI/McGnm HID. 


a way, they were the most unlikely pair 
to do sa 

Th^ have the most to be complacent 
about,*^ Mr. Hayes said. 'ThQ- are the 
two oonqaam'es that hai« achieved the 
greatest success in selling Eurc^iean- 
made cars abroad.” 

Others said BMW had managed in- 
creasindy in recent yet^ to out(^onn 
Meroeda's parent, Daimler-Benz AG. 

In head-to-head competition in the car 
market, BMW's J-series has held its own 
against Mercedes's new C-dass cars, 
/md in broader corporate terms, vriiile 
Daimler has been burdened with its un- 
profitable AEG AG appUance-mal^g 
unit and its struggling Fokko* NV air- 



craft arm, BMW has pressed ahead with 
— to make jet endues with RoUs- 
PLC (umich is not related to 
Motor Cars). 

“Put alongside Daimler, it is BMW 
that has made the more senable moves,” 
said Bob Barber, an analyst with James 
C^)d & Soas Ltd. 

He said Daimler's earnings had fallen 
in five oi the la^ six years, compared 
with two down years m the last ax for 
BMW. And, uiuike eitbo' Daimler or 
Vtdkswagen AG, BMW had managed to 
stay profitable throughout the receswHi. 

Such conmaiisons are made aU the 
more pakfoi for Mdeedes by tte fan 
that in Rrdls's year-long seat^ for an 
engine-maker, it was Mercedes that was 
long thought to have the inade track. 
Wim Rolls-Rc^ce and Bentley produc- 
tion totaling ouy 1,500 cars a ^ar, the 
deal may not be a msgor me in volume 
terms, but the leailt is still siguficaDt 

BMW’s successes have come in the 
face of increasing cmzmedlion in the. 
luxury-car market Analysts have com- 
plimented the nunpuy Set its perfOT- 
tnanoe uot only agaiost Mercedes but 
al» against Toyota Motor Cofp.'s up- 
market Infiniti mvision and Nissan Mo- 
tor Ca’s Lexus. 

There is always room for nidie play- 
ers like BMW,” Merrill's Mr. Hayes saia 
The problem is that niche vr^ui^ in 
the i 9 per end are rising.” 

In addition to the two Japanese com- 
pedtois, he died Ford Motor Co.’s push 
ria its Jaguar unit and that oi General 

See ROUS, F&ge 12 


1 Indus 

trial S 

ec^r 

s 

* ' . 





Ikn. 

eloM 

Piml 

dOM 

% 

date 


itoiL 

dM 

teL 

d«M 

% 

date 

Energr 

11125 

112.83 

40.38 

CapDI Goods 

11141 

113J2 

-aio 

Utilities 

125.67 

125.87 

-0.16 

Rasrlblenals 

129.93 

130J0 

-028 

Finance 

112.72 

11241 

■fO.28 

Consumer Goods 

102.82 

102.75 

+107 

Services 

11100 

11126 

-0.23 

WsceHaiieaus 

115 JO 

114J1 

+027 

For more intosmatkin about ihe lndBx,abooldetisavallablo6rgeofchaiga. 

Write to Tii) Index, 181 AtsBnueCharleeiieGat4g.XS21Net^CBd^ France. 


GATT Chief Likely to Be WTO Caretaker 


O International Herald Tribute 


By Alan Friedman 

Itaematiatal BeraU Triinme 

PARIS — With member na- 
tions sdn unable to agree who 
win lead the new Wo^ Trade 
Organiution whoi it comes 
into existence on. Jan. 1, diplo- 
mats say they will meet 
Wednesday and eaq>ect to agree 
to a^ Peter Sutfaodand to lake 
the job for a period of at least 
three months. 

Mr. Sutherland, 48, has been 
director-genenal of the General 


Agreeaneol <» Tariffs and Trade 
smee July 1993, and he is widely 
credited for having hdped to 
push through the Uruguay 
Round worid trade accord la^ 
year. It is this a^ a rdated 
agreement that paves the way for 
GATT being convened to the 
Wcnld Trade Qrganizatioa. 

In ApiQ of this year, Mr. 
Sutheilmid, a fonner European 
Uniem commissioner and attor- 
ney^^oal in hts native Ire- 
land, said he ^shed to leave Ids- 


Thinking Ahead /Commentary 


Bigger EU Awakens de GauUe^s Ghost 


By Reg^d Dale 

haenaikmal HereU Trtbime 

W ASHINGTON — An evoca- 
tive word with a pedigree 
reaching back to the French 
Revolution is beginning to 
be heard again as France bids to m^- 
tain its influence in today’s r^idly 
ptianging EuTOpe. 

The word is directare — an elite exec- 
utive body on the lines of the five-strong 
revolutionary Directory that ran France 
just before Napoleon took power at the 
end of the 18th century. 

The woid became notorious in mod- 
em European dipUnna^ in the 196te, 
vriioi President cWles de Gaulle secret- 
ly proposed a directoire of France, Ger- 
many, Britazs and Italy to nm Euzop^s 
political affairs, bypusing the fledgling 
federal institutions in Bnissds. 

The plan, righdy seen by France’s 
partners as a violation of the “Con unuTii - 
qnriL,” under vdiidi big countries are 

not supposed to gang up <m smaller <»es, 

pa mg to nothing. 

Now, with de Gaulle's political heirs 
once aga«" Hoveraing France, the ghost 

of his directoire is stalking the European 

Union. And though it has lakra on a 
slightly different form, the idea is likdy 
to^ Just as str^y opposed by the 
smaller countries and by supporters of a 
more federal Eurt^ , 

Seen from Paris, the problem IS how to 

mamtain Fnaice’s poBtM leadership^ 
inflnence over GcnnMy — 

damental objectives of France s European 


policy ance Wenid War n — in aUoion 
that is like^ to ejqjand to as many as 27 
members oaziy in the next century. 

Paris is now resigiied to this huge en- 
lai^ement — provided the Union’s insti- 
tutions are Gist reordered in a that 
will allow France to retain as much con- 
trol as possible over the Unum's future. 

The ihinirmg seems to be as ftdlows: 
France akme — even France and Ger- 
many together — could eas^ be outvot- 
ed in thk vast new grouping. 'Vi^t is 
needed u a bloc of states that winild 


France is looking for a 
way to organize a strong 
bloc of states ibat wiD 
share hs interests. 


broadfy share Frendi interests and be 
lam eaoo^ to gel its way. 

The obvious candidates are the cur- 
rent five big countries — de Gaulle's four 
plus ^pain — in irindi France would be 
neatly in tiiB swing podtioh between two 
North European and two Latin mem- 
he^s. 

It would be much eaaer for Fiance to 
lead this group than to lead a 27-nalioa 
Union stacked with friends of Gennany. 
Prime hfinister Edouard BaDadur, vmo 
may wdl be France’s next president, has 
started preparing the ground hy c^lUng 
not only for stronger links with Gennany 
but wito Britain, Italy and ^pmn, too 


Givea their dommant share of the HU'S 
tx^mlatico, Mr. Bdladur argues, it would 
be “imaoyptable" for the five countries to 
be put in a mmority under the votu^ 
procures that wiD have to be worked 
out for an esqianded Union. 

But eofcwdng this prin^ile would 
mean cfatiiCTg voting to tiie detri- 
meot of smuler couabKS, vrinch will eexn- 
plato Uttedy that they are being margina- 
lized. French officials admit thi^ cannot 
yet figure out how to get awa 3 |F with it 

So Paris is now floating -various for- 
mulas to make the directoire more at- 
tractive — perhaps ty making it an offi- 
cial offshoot d the EU^s Onmcil of 
Afinisters and inehiding smoe smaDer 
'countries on a rotating basis. 

France has not clarified how this would 
fit in with the German proposal for a 
'^ard oore^ of countries to move ahea d 
more quickly to economic and political 
iminn — OT with Mr. BaDadn's own con- 
cqit of a Europe oS amcentric dtdes. 

Britain, Italy and ^pain would be un- 
likdy to be founding members of Ger- 
many's hard cmc or of France’s inner- 
most cude. And the directoire iqiproacb 
also runs counter to Germaiy’s wirii for 
a fedoal Europe with strong central in- 
stitutions. 

French t^dals say that Germany pri- 
vatdy favors the directoire but does not 
daresay sa Bat unless Fiance can recon-' 
cile th^ contradictions, and somdiow 
sway tire smaller counttks, the latest 
directoire will suffer the same fate as its 
Oliistrions but riiortrlived predecessors. 


job shortly before January 
1995, when GATT is replaced 
by the new organization. 

In recent months the 125 
members of GATT have been 
unable to achieve the consensus 
needed to approve a new direc- 
tor-genial, and as a result sev^ 
eral diplomats said on Monday 
•they planned to ask Mr. Suther- 
land to stay OD as a caretaker 
for at least three memths. 

Although Mr. Sntheriand's 
contract nms until June 1995, 
be has told friends be wants to 
^qutmore time with bis family 
in Dublin. Ha is, however, like- 
ly to agree to stay on for a few 
more months in order to ensure 
an orderiy transition for his 
successor at the Geaevat-based 
organization. 


EU Ministers Bless 
World Trade Poet 


CURRENCY A INTEREST RATES 


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By Tom Buakle 

iHUmatioiiBl Hendt mb ame 

BRUSSELS — European 
Union foreign mznisters end- 
orsed the Un^nay Round global 
trade aoeement on Monday, en- 
surii^thatalloftbewc^'sma- 
j<s trading nations will put the 
accord's cuts and ower lib- 
eralization measures into effect 
begiming Jan. 1. 

‘^e have given a bi^ boost 
to the Eor^aean economy,” 
said Sir Leon Brittan, the EU 
trade commisrioner. Ilae global 
accord will lower tariffs by 
more than one-ti^ exiena 
trade rules to services and sen 
up a powerful World l^ade Oc^ 
ganization to resolve disputes. 

Separately, Sir Leon ex- 
press hope of resolving W 
year«iid a tariff dilute with 
the United States over semicon- 
ductors and other items that 
threatens to mar the start-up of 
the Uruguay Round pact 
Sources said SSr Leon apedee 
tdephtxie last wedc with the 
S. trade lepresentativa hfick- 
ey Kantor, after earlier talks be- 
tween <^dab ended in dead- 
kxk. & Letm lefiised to give 
details of the discosaon but said 
the Union made a "reasonable 
offer” that should lead to a tem- 
sohition oi the diqxite. 
.S. sources said cCfidals would 
resume negotiations via a phone 
conference on Wednesday. 

The Uiuted States is de- 
manding condensation Sot the 
adcdtimi of EU tflriffK ^ Swe- 
dor, Finland and Austria -iriun 
they enter the Umcm cm JaiL 1. 
Washingtoa daims the move 
win nuse duties on U.R exports 
by more than S200 mnUou and 
affect some $3 bUIxm woi^ of 


a 




trada ranging from dups and 
conputer parts to oranm juice. 

The CDoarement of the Uru- 
gnt^ Round accord was a low^ 
key end to nicne than a year d 
wnndiing ddxue over Dnope- 
an trade pdi^. The onl^ dissent 
came from a group of set coun- 
tries led by Germany, Brfgnim 
and the Netberiands, whid said 
tiodr si^d^ ^ ^ extend to 
the Uoioa's banana quotas. 

As part ctf their move, minis- 
ters alto endorsed a tnnghemng 
erf Europe's trade ijefenMit that 
will mate it easier for corpora- 
tions to initiate cormtamts and 
strengthen the deimitioiis oi 
subsidies used in anti-duuding 
cases. 

Formal EU ratificatiem will 
come Tlnirsday. ^ of the 12 
EU partiameats also have rati- 
fied, while France, Spain, Por- 
tugal, the Netheriands, Belgium 
arid G reece have pled^ to fol- 
low suit Dec. 30. 

Sqmratdy, Greece oontinned 
toblockagreeaimtonestaMish- 
ing a customs unkm bertreen the 
lAkm and Tbdcey, but 
indicated a bceaJtiifaroti^ was 
likefy early next 3 Fear. 

AD odm ministers endorsed 
the posite of Foreiga hfinister 
Kl^ Kinkd of Germany, who 
said the Umon riNxdd complete 
a deal as qaiddy as possi^ even 
as it protests the lei^t]^ prison 
senteMes handed down recently 
to Knrffidi membera of Itirkey’s 
Pariiamcot 

Offidals oi France; whidi 
will take over the EU preadeur 
cy in January, said tb^ would 
hedd off talks on EU member- 
ship Sot Cyprus, a key Gr e ek 
aim, until Amens lifts its otgeo- 
tiems to closer ties with 


Sameas: Navtars. Staembarg, Marrllt 
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ivarfeasi Nnr yw* Owk* iFmvorv.) 
Saaraa: Naalara, 


^ THE AIRCRAFT 

FOR YOUR 
V BUSINESS 

CHARTER • SALES • MANAGEMENT 


ALG AEROLEASING 


Gz'.s'.'i • :uc:ct . • ve'.v '-cnK - rCJ-rT;!; ■ 

p;,Plc . • 

KlIV ■ K'MH'Ai- ■ :,3i?:'FE ■ 3E ..'.3 


cfigi 


Geneva 41-22/798 45 10 Zurich 41-01 /S1 4 37 00 


Chinese Firms 
Vow to Contest 
Suit by Lehman 


The tiiree men now candal^ 
ing Sot the job being vacated^ 
Mr. SntheimQd are Carios Salir 
nas de Goctaii, the fmma- presi- 
dent (rf Mexico, Renato Ri^ 
^iero, an executive at Hat ^sA 
m Turin, and Kim Omlsu, 
South Korea's trade minister. 

Mr. Safinas has the baddng (rf 
-the United States and most 1^- 
in Amerimin gove mmentfij and is 
said by dqdmnats to be piddng 
ito Inroad ^poit fiom Afiican 
countries, induding South Afri- 
ca and Morocco. 

Mr. Rnggiera ^riio served as 
Italy’s foreiga trade minister un- 
der fmmer Prime Nfinister Ghi- 
lio Andreotti, has the baderng (rf 
the European Unkm as wdl as 
the siqip^ oi some former Eu- 
ropean colomes. 


By Kevin MurpJiy 

/JMarwflrtiflwiB/ HiwmXhBtf 

HONG KONG — A leading 
CUneseindnstrialgrooptiueat- 
ened M<xday to oountersoe in a 
di^te with the U.S. securities 
hoose T Amam Rrothm thiit 
has failed to soar foragn inves- 
tor^ percqitiosis of Cfama. 

Tvro metals and minerals. 

ng companies of 

said th^ would contest a 
rmSiOD lawsuit filed against it 
inNew YoriL 

The case, now widdy watdied 
as a barometer of corporate Chi- 
na's wflfingness to nonor ctm- 
tracts and pay its debts, will see 
die state-backed China National 
Metals & Mmerals Import & Ex- 
port Coip. and hfimnetals Inter- 
natitmal Noa-Ferrons Metals 
Tnu^ Ca fight charges alleg- 
mg liamlity for losses stistained 
in derivative trading in and 

June this year. 

“We intend to respond v^or- 
ously to Lehman's claims, 
wfaidi we 'bdieve are entir^ 
without merit,” said Cao Yong- 
f an^ preadent (rf hfinmetals. 

hfirunetals said that it m^t 
pursue co u nterclaims against 
Ldunan’s allied "improper 
marlf^Tig , trading 
and investment advistny sei^ 
vices.” 

The (xxnpany suggested that 
a young trader had been 
"hired” into incrasingily ri^ 
trades beyond his expertise, 
Bloomberg Business News re- 
p(Mied. 

Minmetals has retained 
Kjiye, Scholer, Fierman, Hays 
ft Handler, a New Yoik-basra 
law finn, to repreirat it The 
&XD ^lecializes m litiga^n in- 
volving derivative securities. 

TAtnan did not comment 
Monday (m the cast but has 
saM {ueriously that earlier suc- 
cessful trades conducted by 
.Minmetals demonstrated its 
awareness of the lirit invtrfved 
in surir transactions. 

T-rfiman ’s de(a9on to resort 
to mmg the two Minmetals 
conqpahira and China United 
Petroleum Chemicals Sot a 
axate $44 millKHi ciaim in Fed- 
eral Court in New York is a rare' 
poUic move and has broupbt 

the frustration of some fc 

businesses enooonteiing 


culties with tThinese cooDpaiues 
into the open. 

The Gim-^ating conqiany 

Standard & Porn's Coip. earlier 
tiiia fiwnth noted a string of 
diqmtes over breadi of con- 
tra^ as wdl as rqxvts that a 
group of 31 foreign banks had 
u^ittled for he^ from China's 
i^uty prime minister, Zhu 
Rmiai, in recovering S600 mil- 
lion m bad debts onm them by 
state indngtri es. 

• Standard & Poor's said these 
developments should be reflect- 
ed in assessments of China's 
sovereign credit rating. 

“The percqition that sotoe 
Chinese «wi T^ie» will walk 
aw^ from tbieir obligation is 
out there in the market,” said a 
fixed-income seoirities ana^ 
in Hong Kmig. *Tt means it 1 ^ 

See LEHMAN, FEge 13 


CaesarsWoM 
Soars on ITPs 
$1.7BaiwnBid 

The Assodalei Prats 

NEW YORK — Caesars 
World Ina’s stock price leaped 
46 percent Monday after iTT 
Co^. (rflered to buy the tng 
casino operator for about $1.7 
bilfion, in a mqor eiqMnsioa oi 
the ccnglomerate's hold and 
entertainment business. 

The fiiemfly trid would unite 
one of the best-recog nized 
names in liming with HTs 
SheratCHi hotel 
nr said (hat in Iq^t of (he 
deal, it would scr^ plans to 
build a $750 nolfion resort ca 
the Las Vegas St^. It had an- 
nounced in May it would build 
a lai^ resort next to its Shera- 
tem Desert Inn. 

rrr (rffered $6730 a share 
for an of Caesars’ stock, a 49 
pooent premium to its (doting 
price (rf S452S a share Friday. 
Caesars shares soared ^.7 5, to 
$66 in heavy trading, while ITT 
.slipped 37.50 cents, to $81.50. 

ITT has been expanding its 
lodj^g and entertainment 
businesses as it series a balance 
between that division and its 
insmance and manufacturing 
units. 


EDUCATION DIRECTORY 


UAA. 

^OES ANYONE 
NEED AN 
EDUCATION 
THIS GOOD? 

To learn about Adelphi University's 
nationally recognized Core Curriculum, 
its groundbreaking Honors College and 
innovative professional programs, and to 
learn about Adelphi University's bucolic 
Garden Qty, New York campus (just 45 min- 
utes from Manhattan), call Adelphi 
University in Europe at (Oil) 301-701-7288, 
fax (Oil) 301-7S2-1633. In the USA, fax 
516-877-3039 for admissions infonnation. 


Office of Admissions 
Levennore Hall 1 14 
Garden City, New York 1 1530 



A Commitment to Intellect 



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\ 


- - -..i. 









I^hare Prices Ease 


Before Fed Meeting 


» NEW YORK— Stock prijw 

I retreated Monday after gai^ 

I five tines in the six prevtous 
I sessions, ami d nervousness 
' about the Federal Reserve 
I Board*s monetary-poliq^ a>ee£- 

j-''*«*^ieDw^Jbnes industrial av- 
I ffage (dosed at 3,790.70, dowo 
I points. Declining issues 


■j. U.S. Stocks 

^‘i tmimb ened gainers bv about a 
^40-3 ratio. Volume was moder-i 
^ at 271.d9 mSlion shares. 
Twhfle most of the day’s sell- 
ih n was attributed to technital- 

to motivated ptofit-takizig, ana- 
^ts said th^ had detected 
some anxieQr wout the central 
tfank’s Open Market Commit- 
tee t n^^"g - Tlie Fed has raised 
rates six tunes this year to try to 
meveDi inflation. 

. jThe bond market reflected 
tiiis wariness, as the benchmarir 
30-year Treasury bond moved 
’littie during die day and ended 
at a price <rf 96 3/3^ up 4/32. 
TTie yield slipped to 7.84 pCT- 
cent mm 7.85 permt Friday. 

Takeover news inspired In- 
'threst in several stocks. Caesars 
World rodreted 20% to 66 and 
led the Big Board’s active list on 


volume of 6.9 mihioo riiares. 
nr offered $67.50 a share, or 
about $1.7 billioii, for the gam- 
bling company. 

In other takeover-rdated ac- 
tion, U.S. Shoejumped 2% to 19 
in reroonse to word that Nine 
West Group was ne^tiating to 
buy its f(X)twear division. 

One of the sesrion’s Invest 
losers was C^rix. which tum- 
bled 9% to 19W in over-the- 
counter trading and was the 
day’s most actively traded issiK 
The ccnniHiter cmp maker 
sued a grim forecast for the first 
half of 1995. s 

Intel was the next-most-ac-i 
five issue, falling 1 11/16 to 57 > 
13/16, as news rraorts said a • 
New York bank and a company | 
had dis^ered calculation er^ 
rors caused by Intd’s Pentium . 
microprocessor. 

Quantum Health Rescuirces 
fell 3% to 3114 on trading of 1.8 
million shares. Analysts at 
Needham & Ca reduce earn- 
ings estimates for the health- 
care concern. 

Retailers fell relinquishing 
some of Friday’s gains amid 
concern Christmas holiday 
sal es won’t meet expectations. 

{AP, Bloomberg) 


1: 




Dollar in Doldrums 
As Market Awaits Fed 


‘ ''catftieefyOirSi^Fnm Df^uldia 

NEW YORK — The doUar 
'^‘ihoved little on Monday as 
'’triers awaited the outcome of 
'-the Tuesday meeting of the 
~^F«jeral C^Ten Maiicet Commit- 
'• 'tee, which determines the cen- 
.-tral bank's monetary policy. 


‘*A m^ori^ the market 
thinks, like I do, that the Fed 


Poralgn Brchange 


won't hike rates," said Richard 
"-VuUo, currency sales manager 
■I at Bayerische Hypotbeken- & 
Wech^-Bank. 

. The dollar closed Monday at 
.v;;L: 5735 Deutsche marks, slightly 
' Ipgher than a closing rate Of- 
"''5:5728 DM on Friday, and at 
TOO. U 5 yen, little chan^ from 
-clOO.220 yen. 

' Although U.S. economic sta- 
.-itlstics such as housing starts 
and (capacity utilization showed 
strong growth in November, 
.^ed poUcymakers — - including 
Vice Cbairman Alan Blinder — 
Jiave indicated: that they want to 
X» economic data for Decem- 
r ber before rairing rates again. 


Those numbers will not be re- 
leased un^ January. 

Many analysts predicted the 
Fed would ti^ten its credit 
reins again at the meeting 
schedule for the end of next 
month. 

The dollar also gained some 
support Monday from intensi- 
fied fighting in Rusaa's Chech- 
nya re^on. *Ihe U.S. currency 
often is considered a safe haven 
in times of world turmoil. 

Volume was light **Activi^ 
has geme down to near zero and, 
barring surprises, it will remain 
near zero for the next two 
weeks," one trader said. 

"Most people see the d^ar 
rising above 1.60 marks next 
year," smd David Gilmore, part- 
ner at Foreiga Exchange Azialyt- 
ics. For the rest of this year, he 
the dollar would bold at 
1J800 DM to 1.5850 DM as 
traders vnnd down operariems. 

Against other currencies, the 
dollar slipped to 1.3325 Swiss 
francs from 13328 francs on 
Friday and to 5.4210 Freoefa 
francs from 5.4235 francs, Tbe 
pound was steady at $13605. 

(Bloomberg, AFX) 



'H;) S. 


IHT 


NYSE Most Actives 


Coesv 

TMMX 

HensOT 

0«ied 

GenSs 

ffiM 

Compoqs 

arcus 

CdMOn 

USShoe 

Borden 

Merck 

WoMMt 

FordMS 


VnL Hieh 

Low 

Lost 

Cbg. 

MI77 6686 

6S>A 

64 

+208* 

r-.r?,*-*'* 

sta 

S'Ti 

— ta 

40305 0 

09b 

0H 

—1)6 

33713 lOta 

179h 

10 

*)b 

3011 

24 

taVb 

—■A 

94263 SVb 

499b 

a 

— V6 


70'+ 

71'+ 

*16b 

33007 0N, 

0H 

3796 


r- 0^-0 

alb 

22ta 

• IVb 

r7r*ld3 

iTta 

IT** 

*Vb 

9050 1916 

iste 

19 

*346 

010 136, 

130 

13H 

—'A 

193)7 30'* 

97Vi 



1B4A1 &1» 

2291 

230 

— lA 

1763S 9«V, 

»tb 

MIA 

— ta 


NASDAQ Mosf Actives 


CyrtxO 

MM 

Nowei 

Mohawk 

Orsrie 

ApoieC 

Ma 

Gsces 

ArOec 

BMmet 

MisRs 

QuortHlI 

Deinptr 

BovNfws 

Qiiran 


VaL Mgk 
919S« UU 
87378 89 Vj 
M 7S8 Tea* 
31fM Ifh 
2VM3 WA 
27708 am 
29S79 18Vi 
34S1D 33*fe 
24767 
21078 14M 
196C1 UTS 
18«5 32M 
167SB 38'A 
1A41S 3AV* 
16073 7B1A 


Low 

lAt 

CbB. 

Itei^ 

19'A 

— 9‘A 

57Vi 

57tait 

— I'Va 

15)b 

l6Vi 


iim 

19 

— 3>/b 

0ta 

Mih 

• 6b 

0'A 

0V6 

*126 

181A 

1014 

■•Vu 

V% 

SYm 

-Vb 

IS 

161b 

— ■« 

i3ta 

U 


6liVu 

096 

— )6 

a'A 

31 'k 

— 3ta 

3696 

37)6 

—1 

25 

35 

-lib 

76 

78 

•3 


AMEX Most Actives 


usBtose 

SPDR 

ThwnOy 

VtocB 

EOmBciv 

(iHefOrO 

Betinoc 

RoralOo 

vtoevrr 

XCLLW 


VoL 

22103 V'u 
11102 4 SiVa 
701? » 
S747 40 
873 I0*k 
8337 4 
4547 Vu 
4417 S'* 
3466 IVi, 
3272 


Low Lost CbB. 
2Vta 2Vfe 


45)^« 4S>Vii 
<Vb H 
37H 2r.k 
10U lOH 
3>*k, 4 

V« 
3Vk 
lu 
'Vu 




3 

1 * 1 . 

xfu 


—Vi 

• Ik 

*Vi, 


-Vu 


Market Sales 


NYSE 

Amest 

Tedoy 

Clem 

2710 

2^0 

Pray. 

cons. 

Aiumlnwn,lQ 

Capper etetanlyNc U> 
Iren FOB. ten 

Lead, lb 

snver.fravK 

Statl(ecrap),ton 

008 

10 

313*0 

X64 

4X8 

100 

In mWMns. 



anc.ifa 



Indus 37MJi7 3807.19 378094 377070— 14.4* 
TVons 141SA7 l«]7a7 1407X5 I409XS 

WJ9 >8031 IS0X7 WJ2 — (La 


Camp 12S6A0 1299X0 1289X5 1354.15 — SX4 


Slmdard A Door’s Indasos 


induftra te 

iTfonsOs 

utnmes 

SP8D0 

5PM0 


Hbfa Low OOIO ChVO 
54457 S41M 54351 —151 
3C.17 34&57 34558 — (LM 
UB5I5 1S155 15353—0^ 
4110 4109 42.10 +e.H 
4S05D 4SU4 45751 — 0J7 
4351 4StX4 4348—153 


NYSE Indexes 


Low Loa oio. 


Cenwosne 

Indusidais 

Trarap.. 

UMIv 

Hnonce 


25054 347X7 S0J04 -050 
3IA50 31457 31558 — «50 
flfM 31954 -452 

30158 20045 30070 -096 
147.S 19077 197X8 *019 


NASDAQ Indexes 


MM LM Loa rao 


OonwosRe 

Induairlas 

Banks 

liWiiwee 

Bnotice 

Tnoisp. 


729.10 72/M 73019 -OM 
73354 73027 73101 —054 
67142 40073 40757 —149 
9a7!94 90553 907.13 <-07« 
85118 84753 851.18 *352 
635.91 43352 43U2 *071 


AMEX Slock Index 


MM LM Lost a«. 
43654 42015 0553 -050 


Dow Jonso Bond A 


30 Bonds 
10 Utilities 
wi n dii strluJa 


asst aras 

9456 —013 

87X8 —013 

7055 —013 


NYSE Diary 


Oose Prav. 


Advanced 

970 

1364 

Oertbisd 

1277 

738 

Unownped 

60 

636 

Total bsuas 

2949 

2V3S 

NewHiots 

If 

90 

New LOWS 

0 

88 


AMEX Divy 


Oose Pm. 
740 303 


Un eh pnaed 
ToM issues 
New Hints 
New Lows 


331 267 

814 248 

JDS Blf 

6 IQ 

20 14 


NASDAQ Diary 


AdvoiKed 

OMinM 

Un ct i on oed 

Total Issues 

NewHWts 

MmLows 


1503 

1723 

|9» 

5144 

49 

ia 


1526 

1683 

1936 

5145 

49 

137 


Spot CommodKIea 


Cemmodirr 


Todor 


059* 

1X1 

21950 

43^ 

12750 

45096 

05651 


OOSB 

BM Aik 

ALVMiKUM {two araow 


ASk 


iS|r^"^^1»58 1» 188350 


nriwtd taMoqjMsw 2«5D nuM 

COPPER CATHODES (Hlfk OraM 


DDnwtptraetrtctM _ 

Seat 300B50 308758 vaLM »6.n 

Peniertl 39S75B 385080 2MS5D 90158 

LEAD 

Weerm^SDa 

^TMOrtf 44UB 44758 45750 45000 
NICKEL _ 

g^rspwunmejHi 

Spot 830050 anS58 iSjUD 

pSnMrd 855050 ioSiO 168550 

TIM 

SSSr^"S^^na5D 5S050 
Foraord 586850 68SB5D 

ZIHC BP8CI0I KM oradei 
DeHoriw BMincton 
ter iittdB 1I0S5B nnjo tm. 

Pwword 113150 113250 113850 IIM 


Financial 


HWi 


Lew Ooie Ck te o 


MdOHTH STERLINC (UPPB) 
808500 -PtietlM pet 


Dec 

Mar 

4on 

Sk 

Mar 

JOB 

sop 

Dte 

Mor 

Jun 


93X0 


8151 
9258 
9152 

91X5 
91.17 
9158 
9093 
9852 
8059 
9051 
9053 

9050 _ 

EsL volwnerte27. CWSQ ML: 481471. 
SMOfTTH BUROMLLARS (LIPPEI 
nmiBlon.ptsMiaOpel 

■ —005 
+ 051 
+084 
+001 


fW 

9152 

9151 

9095 

9099 

9097 

9097 




9S*S 

93*5 

93*3 


N.T. 

N.T. 

92B1 


N.T. 

N.T. 

W97 

0B 

N.T. 

N.T. 

91.91 

BM, velum*: 9X Opun InL: 4,356. 


MSQMni ■UR04MKS (LIFPD} 
DMi mBtlse.ptsafTiope 


Dec 

Mar 

JW 


Dec 

Mar 

Jun 


Dee 

Mor 

4m 



9150 

P45f 

9454 

9370 

9335 

9307 

9308 
9343 
9248 
92X0 
9251 
912S 


—003 


^%tLvMiime: 73566. Open ML: 770850 
SMONTH PIBOR (MATIR 
FfB mmoe - MS Of 180 PCI 


—006 

zSS 
— 002 
— niff 

—on 

UiKk. 

—m 

—051 


MC 


Job 

ssp 

Dec 

Mer 

4W 


9401 

9351 

9113 

9250 

9370 

92.15 


94M 

9338 

8301 

9231 

9258 

9341 

7330 

9307 


9450 

93X3 



EeLiNilunw: 37,140 Open M.: 213.131 


LDN«SILT^<UFgg^^ 


BQjaO-PtsASMS 

Dec TC0^ lOMI +IHM 

Mer in^ 102410 WMO +M5 

JON N.T. N.T. lOI'IO +IMS 

BsLwBlmer 13510 OpM ML: 191587. 
9BRMAN GOVERNMENT BUND CLIPFB) 
DM 350500 - Pie Ol 100 PCI 
Mer 8058 »5B OJO — M 

Jm N.T. N.T. 07.10 —021 

Est.vaKimeiSASOOpenlnl.: 171370 
ULYBAR FRENCH BOV.BONDS IMATIF) 

gS“’T«Sl"'?go3 112« -003 
Mer 11151 11051 IWM —0X0 

Jee 11064 11044 11U4 —0X0 

SM IWM UOM »7X6 —040 

EsI.veliinw: 53,477. Open InL: 157X90 


DOC 


Mlk LOW 

U7JS WM 
15150 14750 
N.T. N.T. 

8:T: 

I4^‘ 


Loci settle CkVt 

14755 147J5 —US 

«.tC 15250 -'Ug 
NT 15355 —150 

ict: n:t: iES -i||. 

19750 19950 19950 — I5S 


Eol. volume: 11404. Open M. 4M503 




FOB 


Jhr 




Dec 

Pek 



EsLvoIuim; 38587. Open ML 161X91 


PTSEinCU 

mperfpdn 


Stock Indexes 

:uF^ 


Lew OOM ORMPe 


in par 

wr 3055 38485 MU +385 

m HT. N.T. Smx +215 

Eat. velinw: 9532. Qpcp M.: 9B5M. 


gMO (MaTIR 


«Mpw(BtePBlO „„ 
Dee 195M6 183550 

- 1W$D 18M50 

inSB 195750 

1900 1NS50 
Job 19470 19400 

SM /a. N.T. 




mam 

194650 

195650 

mom 

186350 

197450 


+450 

+400 
+450 
+450 
+ 450 
+ 450 


EatvSune: 19558. Open ML: SML 

sovrees: iMor/6 AsMCfote pries, 
London tnH HnateM Rdires ExdNfwes 
AW7 FsAWHMr endlonpe 


DMdands 


Pir AMT Eoc Per 

IRREGULAR 


Dravts UPlEamy 
EuraPoclt Grwtti 
FetGerSune 
Grove MBsiTr 
KMHimI Ben Ais 
Newecemmy 
New Perieedne 
PlInceineFd 
sihe us tem Thrwt 
wash AWH inv 


58 13-15 12.U 

J 12.16 13-19 
12G7 1-17 
lam 1-10 
.IE 1H0 1-17 
51 1340 1^ 
150 1»14 l|.19 
1.15 1»22 IMO 
XIB 043 13-M 
XI 043 047 


. 35% V2 143 


STOCK 

Owmeien Indus 

REVERSE STOCK SPLIT 
Cortex Phonn I ter 5 meres epIlL 
STOCK SPLIT 
Tennnv HiMsar 2 ter 1 eellL 
INCREASED 


gcolob 
FtilCDn PrOts 


.05 040 
58 14 


1-17 

1-17 


, 50 043 047 


56 1247 
.135 13-30 


747 

1-8 


. 54 040 l-M 


InduEMals 

High LOW Loel Seme CKMe 
S^SoKnlS' meMc w+Ms of MO lens 

MSTS 144J5 145X0 14150 —AS 
14645 14650 14650 14650 -ATS. 
14650 14650 146JD 14750 — OJO 




SPECIAL 
RCMOratateOv 

EXTRA 

AWctfCepLeadMo 
Quest VdIDIPurp 

INITIAL 

ISI System 

YEAREMD 

AinCqp6vTargM97 . 525 12-14 Ism 

BMta&VM . X4 12^ VO 

Del GnGIDhtAInc . .16 1>0 1-30 

JHeeaOnshere . X4tf 1341 1-31 

A^lteyolty -5525 ^ 141 

PfinnMngnmt - .14 042 1440 

TELOffNMre . 5X04 040 14 

REGULAR 

BolMCascedt 


CBALOSE 

EKpiteml 

MiiSfct. 


BdObTrd 


. . Ntlin Iren 
llPwrndtPf A 
lIPwredlPfB 
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Q .15 1*1 
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S X3 12-27 
X725 041 
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Q 1.15 1240 
. JS 1-10 
. 575 1-10 
O 5BR 041 
Q 51 040 


»«BHU0l; 0 leyeMi M C eewB ee Badv hi- 

meelklri wwmrtsrly; i leiiiT iiniiuiil 


of Sachs 

The deal was snuck ^ ^ partne ghip V, whidi u . 

Whitehan Street Real Centa 

managed }». the 


Pi 


hSr»J13 fuitas to retire ahori- 

kr Center real estate compiw; derivatives. 


raal estate comF‘«^ ” derivatives. 

tttfm debt and reduce will recaye i^ to. 


Goldman Sachs also win have 

aw right w choose one director. . . 



^nder the two^ off^ f6r‘cash.iii a leader 

together 23. Follow^ 

offer that is expec Sd-1996, Buriingtrin would ^y 


which is expected m 
; I ^mwi-mng shaius thfougb a stock swap^ 


uip reii i ii ii nH B w i s -w --g- ui -ri i • e ••• : 


(OnnbmedESspamhes)-^^^ 


NEWYORK(Cc_ 

‘"that KiAt Foodservice’s manageo»« . 

Iregulatoiy and other approvals. (Knighi-Ridder. AFX, Bloomberg) 


Exor to Biiy Xerox Insuiance IJnrt 

STAMFORD, Connccticiit (Blocmberg) — gjP- 
stock puicfaare agc«mcnt to sdl itt 


ance^iSrSS^SSS fSr^ than $400 


UC UDli ttJ SAUe vrivui/ UAMW W- ^ - 

Constitiition Re Coip. is theNew Yoric-bas^ «SSl 

intion Reinsurance C^., a reinsurer m^y 
al and special^ insurance cmnpanies. The company wrote net 
pteariinns of $454 ndllimi in 1993. 


LTV Joins in Sontheast Steel Yentu^. 

CLEVELAND (AP) — LTV Corp. announced M(mday;a jttol 


venture with Briti^ Steel PLC^n? Sumitomo Metal IndostoM 
Ltd. of Japan to build and operate a $450 milhon plant m the 
.southeastem United States to produce flai-roUed st^ ^ . 

LTV win own 50 percent of a new firm, Trico Steel Co., with the 

other companies each owning 25 percent. 


FortheReconl 


Mattel to Slash 1,000 Jobs ROILS: BMW to Supply Engines 


Bn & Jerry’s HomeBsade bic. said it would rqi^ a. fom^ . 
quaitesr loss of as much as $900,000, its first rince gmng pnl^ in 
1984, because amsumers have been opting for inmqieiisive ice 
.cream. Ihe company said it expected.a profit for ^ye^ (AP) 
Mobile CoBDMmicatioDS Hblffi^ lac. said its board had unani- 
'mou^ igected a revised takeover prqpo^ made Metrocall 
Inc., vuutng Molffe at $ 14.50 per riiaxe, or $214 million, and 

that MoWe Communicatiems wasgioing forward with. a mei^ 
vriih Preamere.Ps^ the assets ctf Metrocall had mcloded in 

its offer. (Kw^-JUdder) 


CoH^iled by Our Su0 Fnm K^aidiet 

NEW YORK — Mattel Inc. announced Monday it would cut 
1 ,000 jobs as part of a restructuring involving the consolidation of 
manufacturing c^ieratioas and the reduction of expenses at its 
headquarters. 

Mattel also announced a S-for-^ stock split and smd its board 
planned to maintain a regular quarterly dividend of 6 cents per 
share in 1995 on the inerrased (^ilal. 

Ihe restructuring wQl result in a pretax charge of $70 miUion to 
earnings is 1994 but should produce pretax savings of about $25 
miUios in 1995 and more in later ye^K^rhfi^toqyQgUf added that 
the restructuring was taking place despite expectations for a sixth 
year of record results. (KnigJU'Ridder. Reuters} 


Coothnied trom Page 11 
Motors Corp. through its share 
in Sweden’s Saab Automobile 
AB. 

Against larger rivals at home 
and abroad. BMW which 
produces subtly fewer than 
600,000 cars a year has man- 
a^ to remain active and pros- 
per. Mr. Lawson of DRl said 
the company had jumped at ey> 
cry opportunity that had come 
its way this year. 

Analysis said the next big 


challenge for BMW would be to 
draw tzp detailed plans for 
Rover, which so far has laigdy 
been left to run its own affairs. 

Some in the industry said 
they were waitiqg for BMW to 
say which Rover models would 
be pushed in the long term and 
which ones might be cut from a 
product list tbu many insist is 
too long for a company produc- 
ing 400,000 vtiricTes a year. Its 
products now indude ^ four- 
wbed-drive Range Rewer. 


WkwidNoKOfBcw 


7^8 i4j90da(«4 Aesf 

LOS ANGELES — "Dumb and Dumber" dommated the U. S. 
box office with a gross of $16.2 mfllkm over the weekend. 
Following are the T(^ 10 moneymakers, based on Friday .tideet^ 
sales and estimated sties for Saturday and Sunday. 


1. "Dumb and Dumber*' 
XTh* Santa 00100” 
AiaftKIiHure’ 

A"Speec3d eM ** 

S.'DrapZWe^ 

ArnwLJanKinp" 

7, *Star Trek GeneroltoH” 
A''Jtniar 

8. "A LxwOttwn Dirty Shame’ 
H *MlroGle en 34111 StrMf 


(MoaUnoatMTKU 
rvMTcuMew 
nramorBTomoro} . 
fMafro-Co W Wyn- M gyeri 

rAoramouMU 

OunUtOanno 

fftawMontJ 

IBuono VMo PfetuTM^ 
fTuvntwh CMturr-ftK; 


St44fnllllan 
. Mjmuiioo 
S75m»llfln 
SiTmHiicn 
.ssjimoion 
X15nili(laa 
"tUmllim 
KUmllilm 
nx mlinon 
OIXmniion 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Ague Rowee Pietw Dee. 18 


ClestPrpv, 


Amsturdam 


ABK AmreHM 
ACPHeMhw 
Aspen 
Ai«M 
AlBPMtel 
aoD-Weseencfi 
- csw 
.MM 
-E la owler 


saw 6050 
41 3X10 

mjo 111 
sa3 &9D 

194 inio 
33X0 33X0 
0 66 
13550 13410 

nxe nxo 
18 nxo 

708 74X8 
4650 46JD 
»6 365 


36150 3^1 


..AortteAMEV 
' SIsLBrocades 
-'MBG 
rHelnekca 
.Heogevene 
HumerDoueies 
’ mCGeMnd 
irilir Mueller 
Inn Nederland 
"KLM 
*'KNPBT 
; KPN 
.NedUoM 
‘ OceOrinten 
> Ponhoea 
.. gtwwpa 

Polvararn 
' Rebeea 
.'Radamea 
. RoRwo) 

Berente 
Royal Duleti 
- Stark 
'.Unilever 
* VonOmmeren 
vnu 

WellerVKhn»er I3S.M 


74X0 

78 77 

82 0150 
4450 43X8 

S^SS 

56 56X0 
n.io 77 
a 4650 
058 51 

79X0 7X10 
11150 11150 
4X38 47.W 
11350 112J0 


a» 8X10 

iK^ latjo 


4X20 S 
199 199 

4550 4S5D 
17X30 174 


122 




BnissNs 



Eleetrebel 
Itodraiina 
' RsrtisAG 

Immebel 
-Kredletoifc 
.Meeeine 
Peirmno 
"Penortln 
..Reclicel 
Reyole Beige 


4775 


igGenBepeue 8108 ai 


GenBeietaue 2105 21 . 

13035 1^75 

14900 14975 

99081011 
9490 97 
34M30. 
3499 2518 
40S8 4090 



JCB 
JnlenMIiUtn 
WooeneUta 




Pankftirt 


AEG 

'AleetalSEL 

rAllloniHeid 

.■.Mtana 

.Aska 

’BASP 

. Beitar 

.. Bov, Hypo bonk 


& 

Sib 2^ 

as 

31X1030950 
3SSX03SI5B 
407 412 


’'BtayVerelmbk 44450 444 


660 660 


+B8C 

BHF Boik 

. BMW 7U 748 

* CoffmorskORlt 33X50 @ 

r-CmtlnenlQl 32158 S 

4 Dofffller Benz 75750 w 

;OeBii8H 44858 448 

oiBaback 2317D_JD5 
. Deurxiw Bonk 7285071758 
,Deil^ 08 436 

• Dreedner Bonk 4105041050 

‘Pektaiuehta 380 388 

.^KrupaHoeseD 20120058 

Homener 325 32B 


Henkel 
• Hodillef 
■HoeCKI 
. KoiznHvin 
Horten 
'IWKA 
‘KoHSolz 
.'.Korttoitt 
o-KovSief 
'Lkho 
X ioecKnerwerke 
LMe 
'L-efllKBsa 


31950 330 

3SS ^ 

33250 329 
154 190 

865 5^ 
49758 457 
116 118 


Gleet Prev. 



Helsinki 


Amer-YMynw 07 89 

Ense.Giftaeil 0X0 WXO 

Humamaki 194 149 

KAP. X70 X7S 

KvoMnene 122 120 

Metre 132 10 

Neklo 493 480 

Pohlola 56 6X10 

Renela 13X0 0120 

StackirMnn 3*7 347 




Hong Kong 

Bk East Asia 37X9 37X8 
Coihov Poeitic 11.10 1X90 
Oieune Kong 31X0 050 
enkw UeM Pwr 3350 3X3D 
Dairy Form Inyi XfO ' " 
HonoLungOev 

Hone Sene Bonk 

Henderson Land 

HKAIrEnx 
HK China Gas 
HK Elecsiic 
HRLOM 
HK Realty Trust 
HSBC HoMnas 
NR Shone Hfis 
HKTelecennn 
HR Ferry . .. . 

Hirteh Whampoa flXO 31.10 
HveonDew IXIJ 15X9 

Jardlne Math. 

Xordine Sir Hid 
Kowieen Motv 
Mandarin Ortcnl 
MtramarHM 
NewWerMDev 
SHK Props 
St^wc 
Swire PocA 
Toi Chsunp Pfps 
TVS 

WiMirl Held 
WheelnckCa 
wiBgOnceintt 
Wlmarind. 



a sixs 

3750 27X0 
13X8 1X10 
X70 9 

1650 16X0 
2050 2X30 
0 4650 
XTO 2X8 
0X0 46X8 
750 7X8 
3X0 138 
3S50 25X0 

9X0 9L40 
07854 


Joharuieeburg 


ABC! 

Allerti 
AneioAmer 
SarlDW9 
BvNOlS 
De Beers 
Drtefbnlelrt 
Geiinr 

GPSA 


Porte 

il^Aon 

GtasQ 
Grand Met 
ORE 
Guinnees 
GUS 
Heneon 
Hilbdcnm 
HSBC Hides 
■Ci 


inchope 

RfnMher 


Ladbreke 
Land Sec 
Leporta 
Lasme 

LcPBlCcnGrp 

Lloyds Bank 

Marks Sp 

MEPC 

Non Fewer 

NoTWesl 

NiiiWst Water 

Peorsen 

PBO 

Pllklneten 

Powero ei i 

Prudenttai 

Ronk Ore 

Reekrrtcm 

Redtand 

Reed Inti 

Reuters 

RMCGreup 

RotleRovee 

Relhinn (unit) 

Royal Seel 

RTZ 

Salns&urv 
Scot Newcos 
Scot P ow er 
Sears 

Severn Trent 
Shill 
Slebe 


SnnttiKii 



aetoPrm. 


CdnUniA 


FhrtSvc 
ptaicore 
.Metre 
. Wfesfutaeo 
HeesInriBcp 
Hudsons Boy Cq 
irnoeesLid 
Investors Grp Inc 
LoboniJahn) 
LoOiowCes 
MetsnnA 
Non Bk Canada 
OshawoA 
Ponedn Peirehm 
Power Coro 
Power Phil 
QuebeearB 


ReoenCemnB 
TkCda 


Royal Bk 
Seers Canada Inc 
Shell CdoA 
Soutlwn Inc 
SteiGoA 
Tiiion Fhit A 




43M! 43ta 
13lk 12 
33ta asNi 
4^ 6 »k 

mt >8 

1016 18 

12 12 ta 
2IH Xlta 
121+ 12W 
a+ta 3496 
5986 37 

I 6 ta 14M 

i$ 2 ti 2 

181b 1816 
Tta 916 

low law 

37M TtVt 
14M 141b 
191A law 

asw 3 BW 

8 

42W 41»e 
15W ISW 
SW 8 U 1 
350 3M 
1191X7 


Paffe 


Madrid 


BBV 3369 3345 

Bee Central Msp. jtSJ 3IS 
Bonce Sontander 5340 5370 


jPSA 

Nwmgny 
HiotiveM Steel 
Kleat 

NedbonkGrp 
Rgndle n taln 
ltdiBka 
SA Brews 
Sonl 

Western Deep 



London 



x» 

5X1 


4.17 

552 


152 iS 

5^ IS 

427 430 


2M 358 
658 XOi 


-A6AN 39X9039^ 

.AionrHsmonn 


.JOuendil 

-Perecrw 

;Preusaag 

PMW 

'Rwe 


878 
19470 194 

39X90r- - 

xtn a^ j 

13613550 
3908 2858 

655 680 

443X044350 
33458 3SI 
0^43758 


T 
ET 

ikieareie 
Group 
Boots 
Boweter 
BP 

Brtt Airways 
Brtt^ 
BrttSm 
Brtt Teleoen 
BTR 

CeOtaMflre 
Cadbury Sdi 
Coroden 
Coots VIVMId 
Cotnm Union 
CouNouMS 
ECCGraup 
Enterprise Oil 
EurgjkmnOf 
Ftsens 


X1S 


SX6 

453 

154 

178 

758 

453 

4X2 


426 423 

357 3X1 


357 

154 

17$ 

351 

35T 

451 

IS 

T.71 

5X8 


&40 

352. 

2Xb 

l.i5 


Bmesta' 956 965 

CEPSA 040 3I7S 

3038 2040 
5808 5830 
10 10 
8$0 851 
367D ^ 
3620 3625 
1610 1643 



Milan 


ABesnm 151881050 

Aaitaile m 9355 

Aunsirodeerfv 1790 200 
Beo Agrieeitara 5059 3720 
Bee Comnwr Itol 3335 SS 
BeeiteLemire isifs 12250 
BcoPapNovard 8MI 8660 
BoieedlRewn 108 1468 
BeoAnioreaiwte 4278 oaos 
Bee NopoH rlsp lOTS I 
Benetton 


CredftaiMHane 


EnMiemAiiB 
Rernn 
Fletspo 
FlnORKAorMnd 
PtafiMccniica 
F und l Of ta apa ... 
Gtnerell ASSle 36W03670D 
iFit 






RAS 
RMceCOllte 


San Poota Torino 9100 9000 
IP 3948 3800 

.MS 3M0 3m 

Sntabpd 1728 110 

Stanaa 36400 asm 

Stef 078 0 B 

ToroASSlC 21888 21708 

MIBTOteOMMCKIITM 


Montreal 


AtaPLWI 

BaWMontreol 


1416 14ta 
36 2Sta. 


Accor 558 569 

AlrUoulde 7» 712 

Aieetei AisihoRi 465X0 471 

Axa 349 348 

Bonemre fCle) SSD 546 

BIC 678 679 

BNP 261^21X88 

Bomwes So jB4 

Donene 773 770 

Corretaur 2230.,^ 

CC.P. 22X103^3 

Ceros B9J0 86 

anrgeurg 1191 1211 

OmeidsPneK 22532750 
ClubMed 44450 40 

EN-Aoultalne 3MX0 38450 

Eura Disney 955 9X5 

GeXEQIR 507 514 

Havas 42442750 

IPtetP) 575 07 

Lototde Coppse 381^37x10 
Leerend 6630 6630 

LyerbEows 4ia70 485 

OreoKL') 1128 1120 

LVJIIIH. 873 884 

Motre+tartiette 1185011950 
NUChlllnB 18X5019850 
MouHnen loijoioixo 

PorfbOS 37)J0 374 

Peoiiney inH iel ui 

Pertiad-RIcard 32350 32450 

PCMVOt 733 «5 

Pinoull Print 987 93 s 

RodtoteOmlaue 502 SC7 

Renoiet 177XD 17X58 


Rh-PeutencA 12 x 10 125X0 
R8TL».Leiils 108 1»6 


SmcH 

Soldi Goboln 

XEA 

Ste Generate 
Suez 

TlWfinn^SP 
Tetot 
UJLP. 
vueo 


291X0 3(7W 
618 414 

523 533 

577 578 

2S7.9Q2S1X0 


Clew Prev. 


SentaOMone 

Stme StanoMre 


152 

Sing A sr gwoce 2X6 Xia 
Sina Airlines torn 1X10 U10 
SliwBviSye XM X8p 
Slop Land 830 XSS 

S6ne Peilm .U1 .2X5 
Step Pidiy tarn 
Skie ShtaWdo 
Ship Telecomm 
SiroNs Steam 
Straits Trodlne 
Tai Lee Bonk 


SXD 


2X3 
2XB 252 
458 45t 
XS4 358 
4X0 


(Mtadystriert .1X6 1.^ 


UldO*seaBklern ISXO 
UtdOtesiAta 2 x 8 2X3 
318X19 


Stockholm 


AGA 
AseoAF 
Astra AP 
Atlas Copcn 
•EleeiroiusB 
'Ericseen 
Esselte« 

Hondebbonk BP 
Investor BP 
Norsk Hydro 
PtionnaeloAF ill 
Sondvlk B 
SCA-A 

S-EBonkcnAF 
SkoMSoF 

SloroAF _ 

TroliebereBF loejo iDB 
VOIva BF 13113850 



12813950 
06 440 




Sydney 


dnarp 
SMmozu^ 
ShinetM Own 
Sony 


SumltamoBk 

Own 


Sumitomo _ 
SumI Marble 
Sumf tam o Meipl 
TaietiCerp 
TokedeCtiem 
TDK 
TMIIn 

Tokyo Marble 
TekvoEieePw 
Toiman Prtntino 
Ind. 


W 

Toveto 
VomoirtilSoc 
O.-xtSA 

28Si 


Cloee Prev. 
1716 ITDO 
685 481 
1910 1980 
5508 S3» 
lOSO 15» 
554 SS 

828 ta 

715 314 
SR) 5W- 
1190 1190 
X65B 4628 
534 584 

1150 1150 
2780 2790 
1380 1300 
70S 478 
701 TOO 
2080 3060 
712 700 


Toronto 


32390 


14X40 146X3 
245 247 


Sao Paulo 


BoneedeBrosn ixiO 1X38 
Bonisnu _13 1U0 

BrndesCD 
BreMin 
cemip 
EiftTEbres 
tiQubsice 
LiBtit 

rOrsnONOfififiio 

Petrebra 
SouaCruz 
Teiebras 
TcteSP 
UoMUnn 
Vote NIo Decs 
Vbrtp 


75 s 7.70 
3S7.12a»UD 
92 93 

as9 30 
7S0JD 343 
30 358 
15 15Xe 
131 1?4 

7X8 7X5 
4119 43X8 
429 415 
L33 1X3 
m 158 
Ul W 




Singapore 

Asia Pee Brow 17.58 iSXO 
Csrebes 7X8 7JB 

City Devetannnt XM 7X0 
CydeBCorriege 13X0 llio 
DBS 1X30 1X30. 

DBSLond 436 4X6 

PELevhlSPtan A48 450 


FrsserSN||m 


GtEostn - 
HeneUtenn 
inetieepe 



JinnsiShtPWd 11J9 IIXO 

KoyNlpn ■ 


Reppei 

N utate et 


XCPPN^^ ,X 4 


Nentime orient 
OCBCfe 




BCforetgn ISvN 1450 
Untaera 658 &7D 
Union Eat xi$ xis 


Ameer 
ANZ 
8HP 
Barai 

BOUMMirltte 
Coles Mver 
Cemoico 
CRA 
CSR 

Festers Brew 
GeoMi wn FieM 
iCi Awstreita 
fMopetlon 
HUM 

Not Aust Bonk 
News Core 
NSroicenHiff 
POC DuniQP 

Pioneer Inn 

Nmndv Pesetoen 154 
Publlstie Brdcstp 355 
OCT Roseurees IX) 
Santas u> 

TNT X22 

Western M)nbie 7X9 
OVestnae Bonking «3I 
weodside <7t 

AODrdteartesJflde*: ); 

prev hius : ion 



Tokyo 


Akat Eteetr 
Asms C h eni ic ot 
ASQMGICSS 
SatkofTakye 
Brtaeestane 
Caron 
Cash) 

Ooi Ntpnen print 1700 itod 
D ekm Housp )4oe im 
DdhieSecwriHes U60 USD 
Ponue 


364 365 

no 7H 
1280 1190 
1510 1490 
1570 1570 
1730 T7D6 
1340 1230 


Full Bonn 

FuNprioio 

Fnlllsu 

Hilpcta 

Mndenicofite 

HoRde 

itoyakede 

itechu 

joDon Airlines 
KelMna 
Konsel Power 
KewosBkl Steel 
Kirb! Brewery 
Komaisu 

KuDOta 

Kv 


AWNW Price 
Ah-Conado 
Alberie Enerov 
AiemAlvmhium 
Amer Borrlcfc 
Avener 

BkNondScatfe 
BCE 

BCTetecomm 
BemberdterB 
Bramelea 
BrasdmA 
Cdrrwcn 
eiBC 

Cdn Natural Res 
CdnOeddPof 
CdnPociflc 
Cascades Paper 
Conitnee 
Consumers Gas 
Dotoseo 
Oonion ind B 
DuPwitCdOA 

Echo Bov Mines 
Emeir«Ca.A 
Pciew ib ridge 
FtetetwrOioiiA 
Franco Nevada 
Guardian Can A 
Hemio Gold 
HorstioiTi 
ImaerlalOII 
IncQ 

iPLCnerev 
LaMiowA 
LoMlawB 
Laewen Group 
Lenpon Imur Go 
MocmiU Biocdei 
MaenafAflA 
MoMeLnaf FOs 
Moore 

Wew br ldee Netw 
NoronOa me 
Nortmde Forest 
NOrcen Cnerpy 
Nlttern Teieoom 
Nova 
Onex 

PeireCanodo 
Piccer Dome 71% 
PotasbCnSrek 4636 
Provioo . 5 


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279b 2 H 3 
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261b 260 
440 0V, 
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68S 688 

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MNiabhMBK_ 3M 200 
MliSUbQwmicol m « 
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Mdsubisbi corn iw 
AUfSHlondCo 889 & 
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Mitsumi 

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Nippen Steel 359 W 
riSpSi Vueen 541 M 
Htesen 8)4 815 

NotnureSee 2000 1980 
NTT 83980 84380 

OfvmmisOPttoai ^ m 

Pioneer 2SD0 200 

RKOh 90 937 

aSSpEteC M ^ 


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Seogrom Co 
stone Censote 
ToMsmonEny 
Teieoiebs 
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1130 1130 
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TransCdaPiM 
Utaosminien 
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western 

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M)9 7446 
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1396 13*6 
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40W 40Vi 

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681 60 
7300 71S0 
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789 70 , 
1060 1085 
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U.S. FUTURES 


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US Marta 10 3X999 19516 XfS .X03 26.244 

IXIteAUvtaUIb lAIM 3019 IJI 3XH 

a.1699Jul4S 151 35599 353 3547, .XOtU 407 

U« Sa*s LSI 30 156 156)9 144 

353 Oocta 355 10 34 ] 353 — XOI 0 

Ed.wSes HA. Fri’v.sdes 95U 
Fri“9aoenint ALOH uP >70 
CORN ICBOT7 saPBumliMwun*., 

177 1ID19DKM IISC, Ilf 

25299 ■ ■“ 

10 

ISSVs ..... _ .. 

?0 $0ta 254 2A4W ZO’A 

las^Deeta ?0'9 20 7019 


2jeiiMarfS 2J9U 1206 
US Mav*SlMt9 & 


2ja»i 

2M 

240ii 

247 


i3299Jul9S 10V9 141 
■ teta 2J4 


15Vi 116 — O0U 20* 
0)9 12««-aB^7l405 
34 U4<4-«1B19 44410 

iVb 25119-40 «20 

20W— 00 L077 

10)9-XQ1M 2X10 


70 

70'., 

70)9 


SliS’: 


tM —0019 

610 6.10 — OJM BT 

X14W-40V9 « 

LOIVi 10 


uyktlltarta ISiU 156V, 2519, 253 -XDIU 100 

25SHJUIM 24019— AOIH l.$0 

Esi.sam NA. Prrs.Mia Mjoe 
Prrsaoenve 944332 up st* 

SOYBEANS ICBOT) s0Pbv>numMn-utPwyawaMw* 

SJ7'',JWI«S X45V, SM19 IWVi S5*V,-XD6W V.7W 

&0'‘,Mteta XrtV, inVi S4fVi X70V9-05M9 34370 

556 rJlovta50 55719 &7S<>9 X78M-e!87 ^4 

X6)19Julta 5019 inVi Ul'., SJ6V9-05SW 2X16* 

UlViAueta xn S.9S 5B7<-. S57V,-aMlh 2X0 

sxi Septa xn 1*3 ui>u sjn,-xe4'j i3m 

S. '8'', Nov 75 600 402 9.749, &fS'4— 0019 lltllb 

416 Xta Jwita 4061, 6D7 - - 

Xir 60''lMW*6 6.13 414 

6» Xf919JUIW 

«07 U4 Mwta 65S 605 

E'jl edCb MA. Pn-».Mle6 36X11 
Ffsopenmi f36xn off 6U 
SOVeSAMMEAL iCBCm iWM-nmpwwi 
7070 IMIODmM 1^0 lyio 1940 1940 -XU 157 

I00jpnta 157.70 ista 1570 1570 rXXD 25X71 

m»Mwta I6IXB 100 1410 161.0 X517 

ISiaXloyta 16X0 16430 IH.«e 165.10 -XIO I4«y 

ISlOPMfS UV0 >7830 M70 1470 -430 12571 

17004110*5 1710 1710 1710 1710 -XSO 3.115 

intescpta trim 1710 1110 1730 -00 15 a 

l7J0Od7S )7Xtf inM 1750 77510 -00 X4C 

ITXSQDecSS ITBje 17X0 1770 177.0 -0.10 3.01 

.... mnjonw 1770 le 

Eu laies NA Ft.-tsalai Httf 
Fri'sopenirt fS.01 off 1377 
SQVBEANOX. ICBOTI (OMD^. deeafipw IMW^ 

77X5 770EeCM 270 290 34.15 27X4 -OJR 507 

»59 216SJan7S 2155 21.22 7755 9X7 -4X3 33570 

30 nf1Marf5 270 270 3653 2651 —X33 9*563 

■ ■ ■ 260 - 

2&8S 
9S6S 
290 
7455 


7070 

3O>0 

2970 

010 

inu 

ISITO 

Ui0 

I7U0 

IB10 


AM 

770 

370 

7SJ2 

9X05 

74.40 

A58 


:?B5MllV9; 260 
B.76JUI99 M0 
92.73*00 79 950 
21795CPta 250 

n.tsoclta 3409 . ... 

tlMDreta 340 240 340 

23X5JanM _ _ 

Ed.salK NA. Fh'S.saMs 3X1151 

Fri’tOPWlM 111718 OH 174 


350 A74 -435 1X733 

250 2555 -0X4 1)524 

150 150 -00 2X73 

»n 240 ..00 9X43 

740 M73 -0J9 401 

9450 -00 1336 

340 —00 0 


Livestock 


Cattle (CMer) 40«Dta.-<e,4'Mrw_ 
740 MX5DKM niS 7X73 7X37 


7475 

7X10 

WX3 

010 

670 

6655 


M.VPebta 7US 7DXS >0X0 
DXTAlbta 7X40 71.20 7M 

640JunfS 65.95 6617 65X7 
•30AuefS 440 6417 6115 

dWOOfS 640 M7S 6440 
_ 6U9Dec95 ttXO 4$30 65.18 

Ep.eoks 4.340 PrI'LSdn 13X15 
67X0 10 1316 

PEEDERCATTLE (CMIER) t|l0e*»-Mi 
0K TiajwifS 7559 7540 7595 

AI$MarfS 7U5 730 7U7 

67.99*075 n.lS 730 710 
690IMiy95 71 19 710 7043 

05»AI«ta 71.05 /*U5 7)JB 
6B.7SOCI95 

iMSNavOS talO A79 7X70 
00Sep«* 

EN lOies 106 Prl'Luiet 3X15 
7yi-,iwenin» O.eSO ON 319 
NOGS (Ct4ERt eMaOM.emnpwn 


7X45 

KUO 

71.13 

66.15 

640 

6*79 

650 


-00 2.765 
31,175 
-017 31517 

«0X3 7,ff5 
*0X3 3,131 
,XIS 1541 
338 


82X5 

7470 

740 

730 

7X9 

00 

n« 


044 W. 

7ije 
AID 
71.90' 
710 
71, U 
7050 


1379 
,-X07 U7* 
^17 1X06 
-00 90 

-XIS 169 
-4.10 B 
6 

-aij 0 


A9 
980 
wan 
479 
45.0 
440 
4} 90 
440 
450 


3a40DK94 350 350 360 
ABFCbta tea 38X5 120 


36j)6Aorta 380 3US 9.^ 


00Jun«S 4355 4155 
AUSJulTS 4)0 4355 41)9 

4IL60Aue45 43 0 410 015 

auooeiH 41.70 41 x 9 00 

370Oecta 410 4U0 420 

ilOFcbM 0.95 095 43X5 

ESI. Min 607 Fr.'S.uPK 16X07 
Pfi'seoeniH rxM ip 675 
PORKOELUES (OMER) 4400* in. - mN aw 
00 39.lSF«b9S 3710 AN 3X0 
0»Atarf» 3*56 39M 38.95 
16.teMov9S 00 00 3*0 

90JUt*9 00 410 093 

aiTOAwe*: 070 00 3*0 
390 Feb B6 
ABOMcrta 
EU to*". 1.7*7 FirLMiM 3X*5 
Fri'SBPCPini *.706 OH 43* 


3470 

V.9I 

sr.n 

013 

015 

0a 

0X7 

017 

075 


-X9 W 
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-OS ft57| 
-on 401 

-OXS 102 

fxn 

-00 100 
-453 378 

-xjB a 


OJO 

61.19 

UHB 

44oa 

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$7.90 


to. 

092 

370 

010 

410 

4U7 

480 

480 


-4.13 6.«i0 
^107 1X37 
-0X9 5S 
• XOI m 
•Xta Ss 
-050 IV 
-455 « 


Food 


COFFECC (7ICSO M.mM--Dn<,pwn 
2440 D.IOOK74 19*0 IH0 1008 

Afoatarta 1980 I0M 1560 

A20May95 1010 I6I0 iAiD 

85nJul9i 1400 I6L79 1000 

isi0tee99 1610 10a 1055 

UBOKK 1410 I0» 100 

151J5Mar46 
l3Q0Mw«b 
Estsor^ 3.977 Fri'LMPn MkSKI 
Ftt’vapenM a.VR » 136 
SUGAR-WORLD II mcSEI llsaSM-ewn 
190 tataMorVt IS.)7 1X75 uao 

liJl lOSTMovta 1610 1514 MBS 


2440 
7410 
345 IQ 

WfW 

foot 

tnUQ 

170X0 


1520 

15X15 

IU0 

100 

1610 

MXIP 

15*0 

lA'N 


-60 n 
• 00 17.306 
1 X 0 6.471 
-XIC 24*7 
-10 2.171 
-XIO 107 
•0« 2U 
•00 M 


mrX 

lets 

140 


-XM 974)7 
-00 V.79I 


Season SeoKii 
Hieh Low 


open Hieii Low OPS* Om OtM 


tSM 

140 

110 

130 

1175 

130 


)a57Jbl» 1477 WJI MJH 

loJDOcita ixrr 1W !30 


IXMMvTl 1345 13X8 *184 

- --- ,55 jjj* 


II.IIMoyM 1246 
110 JU *6 1175 1175 1175 

llOlQctTl 1135 1135 120 

Est.KPaf 17577 W's-teNu XEteP 
FtTsoPWlW IkLOD up 4*7 
OOOQA (NCSB) MmWicMn-SPWlan 
1407 ie77MarfS IM 

U78Mgv9S 13 a 130 1304 

laSAllta 1344 130 13 a 

ilUSeata IM " ' 

llTOOKta 130 
ISnMorTS 1379 
)225MayM 
14100176 

l44SSepN 1460 140 40 


1457 

130 

11*3 

IV3 

nm 

1126 


-«» 0)16 
-ca2702 
-«XS 4i5a 
-0X5 2MP 
-ex5 )06 

-X34 0 


l|H 130 
ira 130 
I4BS 1377 


1277 

lao 

13» 

1X54 

10 


EW-seMf 500 Fin.s0iB 707 


ue 

1451 

140 


-53MB} 

-512XM 

404 

JiS 

4 XB 
6J7/ 
S 607 
-5 2X15 
-45 0 


FtTsOPenM 755*2 oR 


ORANGEJUIS (NCTN) UAM^- 

— 00 Jai 7 » 1170 1 )^ 


]M0 

930Mar9S 100 1210 1280 


«70Mayta 134X0 1260 12175 
teOteJulta ■■ “■ ■ ■■■ 


1270-700 7270 


iSM 
ISlXS 
124*5 
100 
1300 
<3*0 
)3U0 

IIXS 

1160 1260May«6 

^sole* MA Arxoelox 5X« 
ftTsopenint 3604 up 6*7 


)O05wVS UBXir 190 1300 
'laS ia0 13X00 


100NOV9S 

IOS0Jw>W ia0 1370 1390 
l36XSMcr96 1300 1300 13X0 



AAeftifs 


MtatAOECOTPBt GICMX) MMn+-*S*4*wX 

14X0 757SOK74 1360 1370 13U 13660 

AfO^ta iSui 100 1360 1360 
730teta 1350 1^ 1350 I3te 
TMOMteTS )330 iSw 1320 13)0 
yi.lOAprta l»0 100 100 13X0 
760Uay4S1DXO 12X0 100 1310 
iOCIOJunta i»te 

780095 122X5 1210 10.0 1230 
lll.0AueV5 100 

n.lOSepta 1170 11X0 1170 1180 
ii30o«tvs iixra 

•XMDKfS 1120 1130 1120 II18D 
eXMJviM 111.55 

ATOMorta t0*.M 

l00May94 1080 

ID50Jul46 IV0 

fOSXSSepK 100 

lUKNwN 116X5 

Ep. sales 1000 ftTlsocs 6*ll 
Frt'samhV $(571 
su.vn (H06X) 


100 

1170 

1370 

1320 

1310 

lADO 

lAKI 

inn 
100 
1190 
HITS 
III ID 
iiua 

in.» 

1070 

105X5 

II19S 


-1X5 3X77 
-40 1.949 
-90 D8 
-10 2007 
-XIO 701 
—10 300 


.IS 3517 
• xa 

*00 I,9U 
•ITS 
.95 3*56 


• 00 

•00 

• xn 
*00 

• XIS 


5*9 


fW* 

0M 

477* 

tOiO 

iOU 

610X 

40.5 


UM ppy « - ewn par bw «. 


6120 

4»a 

594X 

60X0 

5360 


snXDCCf* 477* 477* 075 4769 

mOjanH 065 065 065 4769 

47IOFebVS 47X7 

4l6*Mar9S 4I1X 04* 47f* 0.7 

4l80May*5 405 4*00 010 487* 
teHAjulta 4*2* 4fSX 492* 494X 

477*Sceta 503* SOU 550* SBU 

teieoKta siix Die jho 51 x 7 

P40JaiH 5163 

mOMwta 571* 521* 5310 SIX 

4y*0Steyta 595 

STXQJirita 5364 

S34*tep9e SG.S 

EP.Mle* lim FN-LMm 1008 
Frl'soenilnl inXDS oft 1138 

PLATMUM IMMER) Mbprei .sowr, wireyBZ. 
00 STMjBita 414*0 4)70 4)19 4)50 

00 39XnAar*3 4170 4)40 4140 41X10 

0*0 4040*493 4Z1M 47100 ««» 4AI0 

4410 4l30Od9S 4270 070 4270 0610 

43t.S0 OO0Jan*6 42*0 

EU.Ma*« NA Prl's.Mtles 60*7 
Fn'sepmhu 77,1a on >34 
GOLD (H06X) 'dAnom-oakinpwMvp, 

4310 3430DKW 379X0 3790 379.20 3790 

3790Jen9S 3010 

a630FOb9S 381.00 3120 3000 301,70 
M60Aar95 3U0 38640 1B6A 38SJD 
MI0JunM moo 3(00 3090 387.90 
3BXSOAU095 3940 

4010009$ 391.70 

3990Dee95 40X50 4(00 4CX0 0140 
O660Fab96 080 

4ll0AerOI 4120 

4iadOAHi96 4)70 

Auota 422.10 

oass 436.90 


-U 71 
— IJ 
-IJ 

-IJ Tins 
—15 lOXR 
-15 7551 
—15 

-14 16907 

—1.4 

—t.4 

—14 

—15 


-130 701 
*20 16554 
‘lie 2*14 

*10 

•10 114 


30X0 

41)0 

4170 

4780 

<140 

4190 

4240 

OXM 

4300 

4310 


la 


Ew.fOtS 11500 Pri-Vtotet AMP 
prl'5 open bit 177,194 oft 30Q 


<00 
•00 
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-00 906 

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Financtot 


UST.BILLS (MER) limSlgn-ffbWinsei. 

f&ta 9Xi3Merta 7351 990 9140 

94X4 V20JIP19S 41U 470 4224 

ta*7 92X5509$ 920 9X54 430 

Ew.Mief NA PrfLsaw IJIS 
Fri'soPenM n.l 49 to 3 


9357 •XOS ir5M 
taU .00 X20 
<30 -00 va 


SJH^TREASURT (OOTI VM5teP,in-pi,6»raiBllMPO 

M 10X37 lOB-a I00-2r fOXT^ DIS 


iM-MtoM OtaTeraxiu nn-H loo-rr tox?^ ois 3A2S2 
lia-0( 99-15 M»990I),IOS10I|.I1S10B'07S ID8-0$- OIS 188*47 
taSO* 44-06 Jun9St0-2IS lOO-n 99-11 VX3l - 07 ^Kt 
^-3a 99-07 SePVS 99.2I5— 0 

p sohR MA FrI'LWbs 300 
'lepcnM 31201 mp 10*1 


1IYR. TREASURY fCK)T) UOunprUi-nOBMiWlMM 

MiQ 0 .a loxr 100-91 10 x 26 


16*31 

7«I0) 

2*08 

n 

n 


114-21 9942 Oee94 

Ill-Of 91-n Mor9510D-» UD-W 77-0 10X07 » 

lOS-B 97-D Abies 99.1$ 97*18 99-1$ VMS • 

10146 97-11 $eP9$ 994$ 9948 7^ 9*41 > 

)I8-3I M*30 009$ 7949 99-0 9XW 7*49 • 

Ed 400. MA. Fri'LWm 71*66 

Fn-^oHnne 26xai oft 1975 
WTREA5URV BONOS (0017 Ubef-UOUeMnaBnAWMpai 

iiB-n 91-19 D*cV6iin40 10X13 9X38 in-io • 09 n.i0 

Il4-a 9$>I3 Mte9S9*-l4 99-2$ 9X11 99*8 « OB 34606 

(t$-I9 ta-97 Abl9S9B.3l e9‘l3 (O-X 9946 * V 135*2 

117-15 94.10 SaPta 98-» 9941 98-25 9X00 * 0 677 

113-14 93-27 Ooc9S 9X24 900 98-R 914$ • 0 364 

111-06 93-13 MteW 98*19 * 0 0 

iOO-a 9346 Ante 9X13 » V 27 

^14 91-03 tep96 1044 • V 14 

Ed MIK NA Fn*LUM5 I7S.927 
pn 'iepc nini 38»,9M alt 1MI2 
MUWOPALBIWSS tCBOD tM(tenb«4BA3M»4'iaeM 
91-n (0-11 DwUlXIO 84-29 86-18 oxa • 0 4*K 

88-09 a-M ltoV$84-IO 84-34 8447 8XB • 13 3X051 

EP HUH KA Fit's, sates <738 
e n'^twen im AI06 up 164 
EUROaOLLARS (MEM tlnaSBDwnwMsn. _ 

75180 leilOOKW Tldte 71488 *1430 KM 
9DX4QMar95 91780 91870 91770 9105 
TOnOAbiW eilTD 91240 7XUB 91^ 

7'J<0SrafS 91*70 91.990 97*60 n08 
ei.iaoDecta 9100 9i.7« 9100 eiiso 


Season Season 

Hah LOW 


Open Man Low One .0« OPJnt 


+ 2SX6D 
49,042 
t77 

9 4 


1^ 
-+4l*19 
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—5 MB 
—5 2 a 
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94X20 TXTBlMcrW 9IJS0 *1710 91730 *1732 — 40TT75H 

n.110 TltaDAmta 9100 91*20 91780 91^ -BlteAM 

91571) 91505996 9108 91*70 91*10 9100 —0114771 

ai»ics MA F^setes 
Rrsopfoim ^*0 cor 17402 
BRmSHPOUm (CMEiU npwenwW-lpaMwaiiteUdMI 
LMH ?5S0 Om; 9* 100 IJgX IMP 15& 

L^ l5640Mtar« LSR 1*630 lilw 1*06 
100 )*3«Ain95 l*aM 1*616 1*50 1*402 

1*60 LSM059P7S ^ 1096 

Estsetos »LA^6ste0 1X10 
FrPsapenbil TABS up KS 

CANAOiANDCXlAB OtiW »ewdrOflM«aueteMlWi 
S^PQOTOaDecN OJIB U1M X710 X717I —11 I 

070$ omawteros 0710 xtib otib xtiu 

X3S22 0590*095 0710 07151 X7U3 0710 

0J438 OJTUSepOS 0710 07145 X7U0 XTIX 

0740 X7D0OK0 ' 07113 

07335 O7)4OM0’96 07077 

E5t.0les NA Fmsetes 8*e 
PrTsepsnlnt 4650 up 931 

dBMIANBIARK (MBD s«arpiw*-ippwr«qwniaMn 
0573) OSSMDeeta 0044 0054 0044 0051 —19 4870 

0*70 xsnoMervs 0065 O0n 000 0064 -- 

05/47 OJtOXJtnta 052B 0530 a43M U27) 

0570 X430Sc^ _ X6119 

EAteMS^ WLsdes 1605 
At'seoenM ))XM6 eli 3786 

380488858 tp 4 iGNIS0_4PWiwn-ipWiil«pijWi4e*DOVI 

e*IO47O*Q7S2SDee0 0*079711X009780 Q096SXOanS4 
aMi84tt0W8flMte'Waj)OP6gjmiaB4BL8ieftiteOT^ 
OJ1l)iTW*OB778Jun95 XOIOIOSODUBOHUIIDI^IM 
00112998 flWWBjep 95 0010331 

aina78ixoioaBee*5xoio40a0W6S2OM46^(l*6i 

XO1OnDB0OS4OMlert4 0*10509 

»sates MA Fnlsetec 12507 
F+soeenW )S2*I7 up 10 
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OJIB 0000*094 07406 X7496 07486 ^4^ 

05)14 OTSBMarTS 07511 X7549 X2SI0 07544 

0510 XaVSAbita 0750 07871 XW 

0*10 X74taSra9S 0^ 

EW. sates MA miswes IXTtD 
Fri'seponko 4«j0 oH 100 


—10 7X375 
— » 1*93 
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*2 005 
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a 


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17579 
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OOTTON2 (NCTN) »4H>in..GMP,sP,B 

550 ASBAIWTS 52*3 •X'TS «•« piw 

00Mav9S Has 14X5 ^ htS 

000195 83 XS &0 K 0 BJn 

440Oer«f 74X0 740 

46XSDee9S 7175 ^ ^0 1 ^ 

gfSJtota 72X5 7JX5 72X5 nS 

w nTOMovta 14 •< 

Est. sates XSZ) Fn's sdes I2*03 

Fn's open mt 58*55 o«30 

“XSJte'ta 00 0 .» gM A 0 


I6XQ 

es*D 

7139 

7150 

73*2 

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54X0 

550 

nu 

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g-fo ^ 3x0 40 

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542B 00Mav9$ 47.90 Su 2^! 

^XOAlKS 47,90 40X5 OM SS 

07OAua9S A4S 400 Sig 

4045S*P« 4958 OM 33 3in 

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DiOOeeTS 039 5X0 |z.I0 00 

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-.056 21X73 
-057 4X953 
—022 35X0 

• 00 1X716 
*0X3 X146 
*030 6515 
•X43 75M 
*00 3J22 
•051 2X52 

•00 1537 

• 073 1X37 
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I9.U 

1034 

20X0 

190 

19*7 

1040 

19.1; 

1*0 

300 

}l.1$ 

100 

100 

1017 

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n.w 
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•00 0*07 
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•00 t*S7 
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- 40 ..^ 


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11.32 Am *4 

— 1 J.SS 15 

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6 l 0 Jul 9 s nx RS 5355 

SltaSoPta 530 

si*oqi« aw 

$OA5Nav9S 510 

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50X0 

57.94 

56X5 

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54.25 


■^1X0 17 
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jgw 5100 ^ 
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9800 
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ftcuiors 

Puturos +W 50 ' ' 

Cam. Rneorta) 1 SD 55 

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international UERALO TRJBlfNE, TligSDAY, DECEMBER 20, 1994 


dge 13 


I® RuIk 


1 


Northern Electric Rejects 
»1.2 Billion Trafalgar Bid 

^‘MfyOu-Su^From DtSOOir^t M 


LONDON — TrarTi 
H<Mise Plr* .u ‘•^a'algar 
anH^niSL ^ constnicUon 


SS. »h “®’ * -the 

aliernalivc implies a value 

for Nonhem Eleciries business 
of only iX.48 per share with a 
af lii®/?'' holding in Nation- 
al Ond of only £2 per share.” 

Northern Electric owns 6.5 
percent of National Grid Hold- 


"We see it as bdi^ calling- 
enhancing and we will sigaif- 
icani lax g ains, - said Cmef &cec- 
uiive Ni^ Rich of Trafalgar. 

But in a dig al Jardioe, North- 
ern Electric said; **77ie financial 
attractions of Northeni Qectrk 
to Trafalgar House and its major 


TkTJr V " uiaacquaie Fcrecnt oi National Grid Hold- ” » raiatgar nouse ana its major 
lie Offer by Trafalgar Hou^ mgs PLC. which operates the shareholdcrarcobvious.lncon- 
18 pyt of the Hong Kong- cleciriciiv disirrbutinn frast Northern Electric can see 

oasco jartoe Maiheson group “^twork and is owned bv the P advantage to its shareholders 
wucd each Nonbem Electnc and Welsh elecinc uiiU- “ becoming part of a financially 

sto at £10.77, a premium of i!“- expected to be pubUcIv challenged conglomerate, effec- 
twIj over the price “o^^cd and Northern Electric com™Ucd by an off-shore 

Wedn^y —just before Swiss " planned to distribute its ”“ority shareholder, whose in- 
am Corp,, Trafalgar’s adviser ®bare to its stockholders. tercsis may differ from those of 

said It might make a bid ’ -n, u j ,• -r- public shareholders.” 

Later Mondav Northern i * r Trafalgar House's Investors geoerally wdcomed 
Electric rdected the offer •>« !il^ ™ acquiring inx-cstmenis the bid and Northern Electric’s 
*Vholiy inadeauate” it provide steady eaminas to share price climbed 40 pence to 

“Nearly 60 percent of the ha«.’ company's con- 1,025 pence, while Trafalgar 

offer consists of oaner of unrer projects, which take shares rose half a penny, to 74J 

pa(^l Wl uuccr- lune in r.>nr'h ru>P.yw> . A rVi 


*^nipjemeni the company’s'eon- 
siruciion projects, which take 
time to reach maluriiv. 


1,025 pence, while Trafalgar 
shores rose half a penny, to 74J 
pence. (Bkionfb^ AFX) 


Wmhurg Director Exits After Busted Deal 


Reuters 

— .?■ Warburg Group PLC'.s 
aborted talks with Morgan Stunlev & Co 
apparatly claimed its first victim Mondav wiih 
the toaiture of a Warburg director. ' Peier 
iwachtmann, sources said. 

Mr. ‘IWa^tmann was co-director of Warburg s 
important rwed-inieresi division, respoasible fiir 
and trading bonds. Warburg communicat- 
ed ^ departure in a two-line announcement. 

A ^keanan coofinned that Mr. Twacht- 
maim s summary exit was unprecedented for ^ucli 


a senior director, but denied a comment he had 
made during merger n^oiiations was renionsible. 

. ‘'There was a review of the leadership of the 
division." the spokesman said. “That was made 
clear i»» people some time ago.” 

But banking sources said Mr. Twachtnumn had 
been asked to leave Friday after saying in a 
newspaper interview that his division could not 
match Morgan Stanley’s expertise, making job 
losses there inevitable. 

Mr. Twachimann wa.s not in his office on Mon- 
day and could not be reached for comment. 


Lira Hits a Low 
As BerlusconVs 
Ctmlition Totters 

Cau^ikJbf Om St^ Fran t^^ekes 

LONDON — The lira stabilized at weak levels on Monday 
after ^un^ng to a record low against the Deutsche mark as 
investixs braoed for as many as three no-confidence votes in 
Pufiament dns week against Mme Minister Silvio Berlu$c<Nu. 

The mark fetched as much as 1,047.60 lire when the lira 
dove to its low in cairly trading, but the German currency 
fiiabiiffe d slij^itly in later trading and closed at 1 .046.05 lire in 
Milan, still hi^er than the 1,032.60 dose on Friday. 

Analysts said that if Mr. Bo'lusconi resided, that could 
initially drive the lira down about 2 percent. But in the longer 
term, a clarification of the Italian political situation could 
hdp the currency, tf^ said. 

“Berlusconi’s credibility in financial markets is exception- 
ally low his resigoatiOD would not necessarily be a bad 
thing for the lira,” said Mark Ceddes. an analyst with Mid- 
land Global Markets. Since it left the exchange-rate mecha- 
nism of the EuiY^>eaii Monetary System in late 1992, the lira 
has lost nuMC th^ 37 percent of its value against the marL 

Paul Lambert, an analyst with UnioD Bank of Switzerland, 
said that it was not Mrl Berlusconi's possible d^arture as 
such that worried de^rs “but rtuher the uncertainty about 
the nmne of his successor.” 

The votes are not expected m come until Thursday at the 
eariiest, after a controversial 1995 budget bill has been passed 
into law and Mr. Berlusconi has addressed ParliamenL 

Italy’s markets have suffered rq:^Led blows over recent, 
months as Mr. Beriusa^''s fragile coalition fell pr^ to infighting. ‘ 

In the meantime, the government unveiled plans Monday 
for sweeping reform of Italy’s cumbersome lax system, but 
the proposals could be stillh^ in view of the fra^ty of the 
government. The reforms, w^b aim to cut red tape and give 
local authorities more power to raise cash, partly satisfy the 
demands of the federalist Northern League, the rebel coali- 
tion party that is trying to oust Mr. Beriuscooi. 

(Reuters, AFF) 


EUBejectioii 
Slows Plans 
In Norway 

AFF-£xtel Vews 

OSLO — Norsk Hydro AS 
said Monday it would postpone 
two plannM export-oriented 
projects to be built in Norway 
wmih several billion kroner b^ 
cause of the counts rgection 
of European Union member^ 
ship last mrath. 

A S billion kroner (S735 mil- 
lion) pregect to double capacity 
at an ainminiim plant in Sunn- 
dalsoera has been put on hold, 
according to Tor Steinuxn, a 
Norsk Hydro spokesman. 

Norsk Hydro's magnesium 
division has postponed the es- 
tablishmerit of a car compo- 
nents factory in Porsgrtum, he 
sauL adding that Norsk Hy- 
dro’s prradat, Egil Mykelbust, 
has indicated the factory will 
most likely be located in anoth- 
er country now. 

Investments to increase pro- 
duction capadiy in Norway will 
be put on bold “until the neces- 
sapr confirmation comes that 
this 'no* vote will not negatively 
affect our exports to die EU 
countries,” Mr. Steinum said. 

'These are just two examples 
of the types of investments that 
could be caneded in the fu- 
ture,” Mr. Steinum said. “There 
may be more to come.’’ 

“Our domestic markets are 
secured,” he stressed. 


Fmnkfurt 

OAX 


efurt Lonefon 

FTSE lOO-hldmc 

33®-.—-. 


Paris 

CAC40 



N.ff 

1894 

Exchange lnd( 

Am^erdani AEX 

Brussels Stop 

RanMhtft OAX 

Franirfurt FAZ 

Helsinfcr HEX 

London Finai 

London ^ 

Madrid Gent 

MBan M1B1 

Paris CAC 

StocWiohn Affas 

Wanna ATX 

Zurich SBS 

Sources.' Feuters. AFP 


TITS' OITff 

ISM 

Monday 
Close ■ 

AEX 410L85 

Storic index 7,208.71 

OAX 2.07S.84 

FAZ TfZM 

HEX IfflSSO 

Finance Times X 2 , 329 l 10 
FTSE 100 3 j» 4 A 0 


iTd. 

ISM . 


Gen«ai index 
HlffTEL 
CAC 40 
Affaersvaerteten 
ATX Index 
SBS 


297 A 8 

9 , 744.00 

i,92aa9 

1J085L35 

9 t 7.68 


40&38 • ■*O;a0 

7,2CS.97 HIjW. 
2,070j06 +0.^' 

774.16 ■ ■ ■rO.gS 
1.80S78 tfl.4e 
2,315.10 -jO.gO ' 
3,0ta60 

297.76 • -pLlg. 

9,682.00 +0.^ 

1.924.16 +0,20 

134^1 -A04' 

1.02728 40.71^ 

918.40 -OjOB 
biKituiMrul Herald TnWne 


UNnSDSTAlES BANKRUPTCY CfM ntT 
60UTUE2tNDISnuCT0FNEWY0RK 


R. H. MACY & CO., INC., et al , 


Ovapterlt 

Com: Nck<. 02 B40i7?<BiU.I 
(Juifith* Adminiiaeftxn 


Saatchi Shares Slip on Ouster 


Ddxofs, 


Btoaidterg Businas Meats 


expressed support for the deposed Saatchi broth- 


INTERESTS IN THE ABOVE-CAPTIONED DEBTORS AND 
DEBTORS IN POSSESSION AND ALL OTHER P t RTIES IN INTEREST. PLEASE TA KE NOTICE THAT: 

_ _ , ... CQNnRMATION OP THE PL AN 

oyOnitfraatedtAicemberB. l9^uhe“ConfinnuiiunOnler''t.ihisCoufiha!.conrtfniL-dihiiSecund AmenrigtllflintP lati nf 
Ke^uizUon of R. H. Macy & Co.. Inc. and Certain of Its Subsidiaries, os modified (the “Plan"!. Unlewi oiherwi v defined 
in this Nonce, capitalized icrnis and phrases have the meanings assigned to them in the Plan and die Confirmation Order. 


LONDON — Shares io Saatchi A Saatchi Co. er; U.S.-based candy company Mars Inc., British 
dipped Monday after the company’s 4S-year-Dld Airways PLC and Mirm Group Newspapers of 
chairman and co-founder lost a bedroom bat- BiitaixL Together tbl^ account for abcM 8 per- 


tie to keep control of the company. 


cent of the ad agenc/s £800 million (S1.2S bil- 


EtL'Cpi tL^ oLberaifie provided in tfac Plan or the Connntiulion Order, the rights jiTordcJ under che Plan und the treaitncoi of 

Claims and interests under the Plan will be inexchange for and incomplelCiiiiisfJetion.disehaQ'eandivleasc of all Clai ms nnd 

lermiiiation of^ Inieresu. iKludine any intercM accrued on Claims ln«m the K-iilion Date, ^cupt as otherwise provided in 
wPlanortfKCnnnniuiUon Order.incDebiomure.asorihefaTrivlive Dale. UiNchatgrdrmmall Claims oroiher debts Uiatarose 
berore the EfreciiveDme.includingulldebisorihe kind specil'ieU in<eciiiMi5U2lgl.ihinr«i)(irihe RankrupieyCodc, whether 
ornoL' (li a proof of Claim based on such debt is filed or deemed filcdpur>uuntlM .set lion 50] of the Bankruptcy Code (ilia 
Clwmbasedon such debt iyallowed pursuani to section 50: of (he BankruptcyCudeoniiitlheholderofaClaimbasedonsach 
debt has accep^ the Plan, to addition, except as othcnvisc provided in the Plan ur the Confmoaiion Order, the entry of the 
CoarumauonOrderisdecniediojienrunaiealllnieresLsandoihcrrighlsurcouify^x'uriiyhaldervintheDetxtirs. Inaixardaikewith 
iherorNOUig.excKpi as provided in the Plan ortbeCoodmuuioflO^.any judgment otMained against die OelMarsai any time.uihe 
exienttnai!nicbJtidgnicfltn:laiesioaClaimdis(:hargddorlnierKiicrminaiedpursuantiotbePlanordb:corinraiatioiiOider.uvoid. ' 

INJUNCnON 

As of (be effocUve Date, except as prmioed in the Plan or dicConnmuf ion Order. jlleniiiK'MirepenrMnendyenjoined from 
assertiM against the Debtors, the RoirEanized Debtors, ibeirrespective successor. orthuirre*:pecuvc properties, any other or 
ruiureOaims.denuiids. debts, ri^cs, causes oracUoo,liabili(ies<:>rcuiiityimcrcM.sbajed upon any act,(Knission.ir3nsacUan 
Droiheraciiviiy of any kind or nature thaioccunvd prior tu the Effeciiw'Daie. 

Except as ouierwue provided in the Plan or the Confimuiuon Order, as of the Efluciive Daie. all eotiiies that have held, 
currently hold or may boldaClalmor other debt or liability that is discharged onm liiu'ru'ii or odierrighlof^ii equity security 
holdertnaiisiermiiutedpurMutmtotbeiernisoribePlaaarepcniianentlyenjoincdlromtakinganyorihefdllowingaciionsoa , 


Maurice Saatchi, who founded the advcftising lion) in aimual revenue, 
agency in 1970 mth his brother Charles, was Colin Marshall, chaiman of British Airways, 
ousted the board late Friday because of pres- which has an account worth about £14 million a 
sure from a group of shareholders led by the year, wrote to the board of Rantrhi & Saatchi on 
Chicago-based fund Harris & Co. He has been Friday requesting that the company sort out its 
given until “early January” to decide whether to management situation as quickfy as possible. 


stay on in a lesser role, a company spokesman 
said. 


A Europeim consultant who has advised BA 
on iu marketing strau^ in the past said it would 


The company’s shares finished Monday at a be difficult and eiqxmave for ^ to untangle its 
four-month low of 151 pence (S2J6), dowri from KpIm with Saatchi & Saatchi 


laurice Saatchi has been offered the ceremo- 


Maurice Saatchi had been unbrotled ance 
March in a struggle for control of the cewnpany 


nial title of co-president with his brother and with Chief Executive Charles ScotL 


Very briefly: 

• Iberia asked for Spanish government permission to cut 5,220 
jobs, nearly 22 percent of its work force, a Labor ^nis^ 
si>okesman said, but the state-owned airline pledged to negotiate 
with unions in the next 30 days to try to r^uce tiie job cuts. 

• UnBever Gro^ tbe Anglo-Dutch food and consumer products 
company, said it was swjt^ng from a r^onal marketing strategy 
for its f(m products to a gloM one, a move that would ^ve 
responabilities to three ^ropean executive. 

• The Court in London approved a S1.8 billion coiiq>eQ5a- 
tion accord between Abu Dhabi and tbe liquidator and cr^tors 
of the collapsed Bank of Credit & Commerce Intemational SA,ihe 
first of three approvals needed before the liquidator. Price Water- 
house, can proceed with the compensation a^eemeoL 

• Britain^ economy will grow 3.4 percent next year, neariy the 

same as this year, but slow to 3 percent ^owth in 19^ as short- 
term interest rates rise and inflation again becomes a potential 
threat, the Organizatioo for Economic Coc9>eratioo and Develop- 
ment said in a sennanmial repon. awwj. afp. afx 


German Recovery Rolls On 

Reieen -fjig decline vriU be caused 

FRANKFURT — Tbe Ger- partly by a positive statistical 
man economic recovery will effect related to the fud tax 
continue unhampered by infla- levied in 1994 and a dowdoTvn 
tionaiy pressures, but unem- in service-sector costs, 
plqymeot remains a problem, 

the German central bank said Economic growth, {nddngnp 

in its December report. noticeable speed during 

The Bundesbank said utfia- dimmer niftnth<, i$ now iint^- 


chmrmanship of a subffl^, Saatchi & T^e jigger f^ the shareholder revolt, led by tion may fall bdow percent domestic^ 

nRme Af hi^ldtno TV^o«e4 v *\ esf U^rvac an a pUXll t/j f 


Advertising Worldwide. The naii>e of tbe holding David Heno of Harris Associates, was an cxecu- 
aniq)any also is to be changed- tive inceutive package that would have netted 


ccmqiany dso is to be changed- tive moeative package that would have netted reasonable to expect lower infla- 

A priori^ for the new management will be to Maurice Saatchi neariy $8 miDion if the compa- tk>n rales in the future. West 1*®“^ 
stop key cheats desating tbe agency. At the top ny’s share price doubled, to 300 pence, in tbe German consumer innatiftn was are definitely pointing 


of the list will be three companies that had nescl three years. 


* - 2.7 pereeot in November. 


upward,” it said. 


ih.*countoranysachdischarje(iCl2ims.4^isorliabiliUeKorienniautcd1nbnnLsornghb: liKomnicaciii^orcoiuiauiDsioany 

manncranyactioporotberproc eHB i iBapiiJisohf Pebiorx.UigRgorgJnutfJEtetiOfsufUitfirre'specttvcpropeitiai; |iM<alon:iiig. — , - - — _ a mT 

anaching.conectmgrerccovenngia«niiaimeranyju4(;in«ii.award.«lccTce(nor,kr»gain5itheDd)iofVtheR«xgijnzed T L Ll-lh/l A 

Debton or tiKir respective properaes; (ni icieaiin^ perfecting or enfnving any lien or encumbrance against the Debtors, the B zB z 1 ■ I vB / ra I ^ ^ 


anaching. conectmg ot rccovenng to wy natmer any jualgmcnt. award, decree m order against the odnorv the Rcorgantzed 
Debtors or their respective praperaes; (ni icieaiing, perfecting or enfnving any lien or encumbrance against the Debtors, the 
Reorgaiuzed Debtors ariheuTBSpeciive prDperiteUivjioihelullesiuxtempvrTnisxibkuniicraf^licablelaw.axBerUiigaseic^. 
righi of xubrogatioo or lecoupment of anv UniJ against any debt, liability nr obligaiion due to ihe Debtors, the Reot^ganized 
Debiorx or (heir respect! veprap^es; ana iviconuneacinE or continuing any action, in any manner, in any place that tioes not 
comply with oris inconsistent with the provisiois of ctie PLui and the Confu-mdUuii Order. 

As of the EfTcctive Dale, ill entities that have held, currently hold or may hold a claim, demand, debt, right, cause of action 
or Utility that is released purwnnt to Section IV.G of the PlanaiepermancnUyertioined from lakinganyuf toe following actions 
on accDtuiiorsuchrrleasraciaiiRs.deinaods.debts. rights, catisesof action or liabilities: (iicommencingorcontiaiiinginany 
manner any action or other proceeding: tiilenfoicing. attaching, colleciing nr rveovering in am- runner any judgment, award, 
decree or order; i iii i creating, wrfecling or enforcing any lien or eocumbrance; ■ iM to the luJlesl extent permissible trader 
applicable law, asscrtiacaseiofr, right orMibrogatioaorrecoupmcniorany kind against anvdebt liability orobfigaiion due to 
any i«leasedeniiiy;and|v)coinmenciuorcon(inuing any action, in any manner, in any place ihaidoes not comply with or is 
ioconsisteni with the provisions ofihe Plan or the Confirmatiun Order. 

By acceptingdistiiDuiions pursuant to dm Flan, each holdcrof on Allowed Claim rccci-.'ing distributions pursuatii tothePlan 
iH deemed to have specifically consented to the injoDctioxis set forth in the Cuofirmation Order. 

All iojunctionsorsiays providedfor in the Reorganization Cases pursuani losecikras IU5ar363oJTheBanknipicyCodcor 
olherwise extant will renuSn in Full force and effect until the Effective Date. 

RIGHTSOFSUBORDINATION 

On ihe Effective Dale, all contracnioi, legal or equitable subordinoiion rigtauthar a holderofaClaimor Interest nay have with 

to miy ^ mfidg pOfWRnf PlananA H wiiaiwH nnei , ffliiH all rart aniiA to rtte^fnnaF.iiigut 

ofsii^ subo'rdination rights arc permanently eojoined. AevorduigTy. divcribu lions punuiani lo (he Plan to holden of Allowed 
Claims will not be sub^toioyrnentioabewflciaiy of such rerminaiedsubonluulKra rights. (iriuievy.ganushniaK.aaachBKiK 
or otto legal process by a beneficiary of such tenninaied subocdinaiioo rights. 

EMWnONS ITROMTAXATIQN 

Pi, r»^.p..nn e.»rtinn MJiticiof the BanfcniPtcv Code: ri)tbeLwuance.dxscribuiion.u-ansfcforexdiange of New Securities and 
NewCamHnedCwpony Sham Purchase Rigntsttii) the cfention. modification, assignmenuconsolidaticin. filing or recordSng 
ofanv mongngc, deed onnist. security agteaoent or similar Uistrumeot: (iii) the securing of additional iadebicdness by such 
meaiK or bvMhCT means or the additional secucine of existing indebiednev. by such means ur by other means twbetber in 
conottiion with the issuance and distribution of themwMong;^ Notes or otberKiseinrurtiicraiioeof.ormcoonecuQnwidi, 
the PiiiBi‘(iv| the creation, modification, assignroent.deliveTy.nlingortecoTdingorany lease arsublease:or(v)the creation. 
rTndini?atioa.assiciuneot, deli veiy.ruioj or recording of any deed orotherinsinunemoriransfer under, in furttoance of, or in 
cMMTtianwitb i&Plan includingtheFiHleiated/Macy'sMergerAgieeiDcnt.anyaitaeragreeiDeoisorGenincaiesor merger. 
cons^idatkin.dissuiuDonorliquidauoR,deeds.biiIsorsale,asugnmenisnroiha-insiruinenuortransR.Tcxecuiedrnoonncc«ion 
Plan. iheCooTinDation Order, the Resiniciuring Transactions or the RcfiiiaiiceTraosactioiulas such lennisdefloed in 
^ Confi^tion OidCTJ or any tnnsactions arising out of. conlempbied by or in any way ivlated to tbe foregoing, whetiw 
n^Ti^no nil or Berthe Effective Date, shall not be subject 10 anydocumeoi recording (ax.sump uxor stamp act. conveyance 
r^T^^iumiciorclmilarux mo ngag '-'-ss.reidesiaic transfer tax, mortgage recoedinpux or othersimiiar tax or piventinemal 
and the aomoDriale state or local govcmiuental offlriaLsorapcoisaredi reeled lo forego the collection of any such 
and to accept for filing and recordation any of the foregoingjiumunems or other documents 
withomtte payment ofanv such tax or governmental assessmenL 

RA B DATES FOR ASSERTTMLCERTAIN CLAIMS 

r. .n, ,r-rtfnnhhrli 7 w unlessptevionslyfiled.teqnestsforpaymentnfAdtnmistiaiiveClaiinsraustberilcdaiidservcd 

the EffeMve Date and (Mj 60 days afier the filing of the applicable request fm- payment or 

AdnUniSt i at i Ve Claims. _^:.....u..MnMicaiiAnAr rmmhiin.i.mra, nfi><TW<nsixmiruiniiiin(M4inn«lS7- ITR. 130.^31. 


SOStbjand 1 103 ofihe Banw 
pufsmnl to sectioa 503(bK3/ 


‘**®*^SF‘**^A5S.xf^^fvBDate-£wwi2w.A(»»'eivr.(haianyPirofessionalwhoinayreceivecoinpensaiionorreiraburseiiiBnt flawdOTC faw to some ex- 

!5>™&^lSS£chTUnarr’SS^«^:p|tier^.^ 


Suit Threatened 

CooteMd fron Page 11 

take a little bit extra to sen sew 
China deals.” 

Beying is clearly coimenied 
that recent conuoversies may 
hamper its ability to raise mon- 
ey from interaauoaal securities 
markets or slow direct invest- 
meut in Qtisa, but the authori- 
ties have recently moved to dis- 
tance the government from 
liability in individual cases. 

A front-page article in tbe 
offidal China DalW newspaper 
on Sunday blamed “vague and 
distorted forei^ i^jorts" of re- 
cent commercial disputes in- 
volving state-backed companies 
for “misleading” foreign inves- 
tors, who committed S26 billion 
to China last year. 

Also, in a China News i^xxl 
tlml blamed emptoyees of Qtic 
Shanghai Co. for losses in 
trades conducted through the 
London Meta ls Exchange. , Xu 
SSiiwei, CmC Shanglw's se- 
xrior adviser, said that foreign 
oomp^es bad to sbvt Um le- 
^xmsibility. 

"I must regretfully point 
.oul” he said, “that certain for- 
eign counterparts have got 
some screws loose in their own 
bouse, in other words, what 
they have done has to some ex- 


-NYSE 

IfpiidaY’s dosing 

Tables include tfie nationwide prices up to 
the ciosing on Walt Sheet and do not reflect 
late trades etoewheie. ViaTheAsmjdataiiPmtB 

(Contibued) 


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pfexpeawtarservic«rBn^ 


”**P*?S.**"'-“^i'??w£^Obi«:iionsiouM)licauonsolProfcssionjili.wolhCTeniitidxrM-compcns*d«iarr 
of mepensa rausi m ^ applicable request for the paymeoi uT.Adniintsmuive Clau 


isttion or reimbuisemeai 
Tofi ti>75daysaftertbe 


pening intentionally or unin- 
tentionally.” 

“In the final analyris, nhnsy 


AdmimstrenveClainbtnat^' qqiq) and Adminishnlivc Claims arising from or under those exeemoty tne government $ aedlQillty is a 

related to tax irind described in Section V.Eof the Plan will no! be required to file or serve any request thinly veQed attempt to mar the 

^iffi“o?SStcClaimsuntomevidencedbyiheDIPCn«lhAerecn«DtwUln«bcrequoed.ortieors^ 

in the Reorgsuiizattoii Cases shall File an applicauon cetpestiag final allaw ance o f | port of the baddash in oommer- 

cw toMTd China. 

incunedinconnecuonwwpw'^ |^.Q^yggfi2fi]^(;gtiyofaFiDalOrTleroaihefuia]alknvaoceciffeouidexiH;Qsesof However, many foreign busi- 

'®'”5STf!iS“^hS«'®SoittWsuchimpI?^oninittibeh!cdaiKlsci%cdre[lKRe(*BaDia^ privately reported 

porn- no later than 30 days sf^t^^^^J ^ jJj^tos^rguanttoSection V.A of the Plan gives rise toaClaimlnicluduig that Chin^ trade COuntopar- 
lfthere|ecDonofaney:tu^^"; j ^fi„,itm adL‘.ii:ribedinScctionV.P.I.boftiiePI«ijbytbeoiherDanvorpartieK hayc Wuq tO slow then- 

anyClaiiiisarisingtomtb(^l^™^^^fj^*„t^edajMiwiUiiwtwenPon»^te^aiiiatheDel^^R«ir8aniz^ payments, a dcvdopmcnt at- 

SSS to large partS tbe ex- 

DebionnolaierioaniqwswCTiwium . , istence of a huge and complex 

V.A.lorV.A.2rftbelto^^“^ggjjg.yp^yCoixn. web of todebtodscss betweco 

provided in aoiibsequeni v roNTRACTS AMP ITNEXPIRSP LKASES domestic Chinese enterprises. 

*' ^f!?i!^ * 3^ ! n^on and a™g"« »g”orrgTe^o°of^**”"wycogtnictorunexpiiedleMe _ , , . 

Eacbpost'Oonfinnauonasnmpu^^^^.^^Qpjjg^a^myiptionandasrignmentorrejeciiooeffecRiaieaasaresult Some analysts bdicve the 

imSmiUo^onV^ofil«^»e^“^g^V.s!5iothePlan.Mconrantp1atedby^or}s^j^landV.A.2(rf specter of bad debts may to- 

oSS^ndaUnon-Debtorpaitra^w^x^i^^^yjij^ jj„„uiitoanirapiOTrlaieMnboctongoito9fiheC^^ Slow down an qx mmny gw^g 

assumplionandasaigninemori^J«j^»™*^ j.jj„3ankniptcyCode. Nniwilhst^iig^as$urop(iooofanexecutoiy atmOrethan llpercenL Urtxui 
beforeibe Confirmaiim Daiet^ ^ ihc Plan and the Cmfinnanon iT sn^ w lease is inflation to rhma readied 26 

nr uflexcif^ Icosc ptifstuini 10 aecui^^^ y A-lrfl or V.A.2 punaiani to SeeijOD VJk of die Plan and the . • -troviuiru av 

by a«^2?SSSi?,5^lSio^^sballbedecrap.iol«re^,^^ “ percent m November. 

CMfimS(«^jrf^" 5 &SS^l 5 Snedb>-ielephoningMr.WalterC^ “A case like tiUS WOTl't StOp 

iiK:*ra[liSTO^S677or(2I2i620'5600. BY ORDER OF THE UNITED STATES pOTle doing busui^ in China, 

nSed-htewSrk. New York BANKRUPTCVCOURTFORTHE saiclPWerf^dart, head Of Sal- 

■ December A 14W SOlflHERNDiSTRJCTOFNEWYORK omofl Brolhcis Asia-Pacific 

COUNSEL: BEAVBAPOGUE 

WEILGOraaAUtMAW^ 

^^MysforDetaMFsand pppn#wiiefit Stores. loc. raised by the L d u n a n dispute. 

p rfriiffl to Pomession North Prfff ‘But it will prompt some who. 

10153 

C 212 ) 3 im«!? (216)58^39 whether they have been cutting 

coEDfiTS or not,” he said. 


reimDurseminiiuicjwi^u^. -- 7 . .... 1 . mua ne ntco ana serveo nn uic KeorBanizen L>eoox 3 aaainerequewng 

coonsel toihcDebt««. Otyreo mi,,- appiicatimi. 

pony no later than 30 days afttf t™ ^ purguont [oSection V.AofibcPlaarivesriseioaCIaini(nicluduig 

iosiichconnactorIease.»t^L'^*^j^_ectiveproperticauiiles»aproororClaim.isfiWandfervBdonibeReo«ini2ed 
Debtms.iheirreniecDvesoccmMi^j'’^ Ogif^di^jeJiwiyofanotice of aracndmenlpunuani to Stolons 

Debioniiolaieriton30^si^JK'^f;^^-^j^^ofiheapplicableexecuioTycoiilracioriiiiexptTed (ease and (iiUadole 
V.A.1 orV.A.2« toP™P]^.^gg„jg.ap,£yCoixn. 

provided .n asubsequeni rONTRACTS ANP ITNEXPIRSP LKASES 

. „ . ^mption assignment or rejecuon of an execiiiDiy cqntniw or uoexpiicd kare 

Debtor imdaUnon-Debtorpai^ww^s^j^^^yjij^ jjyyuiito an irapit^leMnbonangoito 9 flheCouft entered 
assunmdon andasaignme^" of jie Bankniptcy Code NoiwilhstMiding yy Ksuro^ of on executoiy 

beforeibe Confirmauon Daieiumw ^ ^ ^ p,^^, gnd the Confinnanon Order, if such contract or lease is 

^mt or uoexptred lease AM»dlS» V.A.U or V.A.2 punraam to Section of die Plan and the 

f^bseou^y rejected by an a>^'^||^^^^J? 3 ^tiacioflcascsballbedecmednoitolimocciiiTed. 
CMfifflcmOJdw. the pn«w«*BinPj™“^pjt^.,elq*oniiig Mr. Walter CuinmragsalTbeCtoni^ 

I«*^fSS^7“2iM0-56&. BYORDEROFTHEUNTTEDSTATES 

Iteted* N«» York. New York BANKRUPTCVCOUCTFORTHE 

“**"• Sobers, 1934 SOI/THEKNDISTRJCTOFNEWYORK 


ynai^fiOTSHAUtMANGa 

AiWfoeysftirDdwraaiio 


COUNSEL: 


S£,'^SSS»«*.o.« 


jONB,I>AY,BEAVIS*KXiUE 
j^ lfnm eynfi>rFederet<g 
D^p^ftOKiit Stores, loc. 
NorthPirin* 

SSSt&BriSrelDHWUl 

Bf/<haf rfM.QerilRCb6^1 


n os i9 

Si 

:ta ^ IS 


T? 

'iBS 


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£» to) T’! 

Ihl 


!,■ 3i n 


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m fils 


\s B (7,r 


M 0 S 'I 

a a ^ J 

JH at z 4 

^ ^ 17 l| 


ail 


i53 il3 «« 


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Ebge 14 


EQUITY INVESTMEMT FUND 
FCP 

2, boulevor d Royal. L-2953 luxembourg 

DIVIDEND ANNOUNCEMEVr 

equity investment a'ND win pay a dividend of USD 22.00 per 

shite on December 2 M994. 

Shaieewill be traded cx-dhddcnd on Dcci-mbcr -0. IW- 

The dividend U payable to holders of bearer ahnres against 

presentation of coupon no. 3 to the following 

banque bwswationale a lux^ourc 

M ro«tedTEicli,1470UKeBalwo«| 

OF LUXEMBOURG 
The Board of DiredufS of 


I he unaru oi 

EQljnV INVESIMEXT FUND 
management COMPANY 
Soeiete Anooyme 


For ThriUs and (MU, It’s Jakarta 


Mutual Funds 

From U.S. Face 


i.peMetoAA 

^ viouS three yeais»- 8 





By Paul Blustdn 

. marttBgfw Am Sevire 

JAKARTA — Among the mai^ tl»t 
have sprout^ and sni^ throughoui the 
develop worid — 
years, few are ye 

Indonesia’s capital ^ , .. 

The Jakarta Stock Eschanw was bawy 

functioning six yeais agp, ™n a typical 
day’s traSg was a half-houfs deiltory 
swapping of the two dozen listed ^su«. 

Today the exchan^ has more than 200 
listed companies and is one of the da n ings 

Shares ofdie biggest 
companies can mwe 5 


- 


)Ilars m mqor mt* .j 
„ «it*s a oioblcm that will improw wu 

great iQng-tenn story. . time.’’ !i«^lw»tl^ saii 

^MSS-SSSK 

j e ^Qi ariMwntc in Anm 19W 


plunged &om 681.90 pomts m April 1990 


„ vious three y^. accordii^ 

JO Salomon Brothemlnc 

TOKYO — Amencan Ihjs month, Amen- 

mutual-fund operattHS are ca*slaise5t mutual 

finding out that uwesMg Rddity 

Asia can Sd^its customs 

sending troops to a battia jjqq j^jUjon oo^ *5* 

Once committed, at is not ^ 


WMB mm w I— w-TP- — 

LIVING IN THE US.? 
Now Printed IN 
New YORK 
FOR Same Day 
Delivery in Key Cities 

TO SUBSCRIBE, CALL 

1-800-882 2884 

(IN NEW YORK, CALL 212-752-3890) 


m ^aci Asia cany lu uib mm 

Indonesia, the wori<f s fourth-most-p(^ 
ulous country, possesses vast natural r^ 
sourees and has seen annual econo^ 
erowth of neariy 7 percent for the past five 
wars. The World Bank recently praised 
the counttys economic performance ow 
the past 25 years as one of the best m the 
developing world. 



to 224.70 in October 1991, then roared 
back to 612.80 in Janw 
before retreating again- It dosed at 459.39 
Monday, to 0.61 for the day. 

Sham w ewen the biu^ Indonesian 
oompanies often rise or faff by 5 percent or 
evai8 percent in a single day, and a 
idatively small order from a forem bro- 
spark a frenzv that drives a 


seaidi director at aiiuiu« 

what the results will be. 

For these and other reasons, loolb^ 

leers advise fordgners agamst mv^^^ 
recthr in Indonesian companies and w 

on mutual funds that specialize m 
the ooimoy*s shares. 

Among the better-managed fro^ a?- 
coSSgU) brokers here, are JF InAm^ 
Fund, managed Iw Jaidine FlOTngSecun- 

aged by Templeton Investment M“a^ 
and Batavia Fund, manag ed by 
Morgan Gtaifdl Investment Management. 

Indonesian authorities are takiM 
to correct some of the market’s defio^ 
des. The stock exchange is bang moviM 
into a new fadlity that will allow 
automated trading, and flie geweramrot is 
drafting a securities law aimed at tMten- 

. r:,-.:..— ....j UnletMTio Rrmndence 


always easy to 
'vKth most markets in the 
Pacific Rim re^ register- 
ing big dedines this year, 
American funds “win cw- 

tainlypayapncetogetoirt,^ 
-On.a,aal T inner. DieSlr 


funds in November, 
totlKV had been net sdk^ 
in eighf nxmths. . 

0^ later, 

ddiw’s $37 MBk» MaS^ 
fund, the worid’s larges^; 
tirould caned, a year-end 

. • ...nrtnrrrr TwMIllfle 


i.v>> : 


ae.'-, *■' 


of acaicuiaotmcnui • 

nor shock waves through 
Asian maikets as myes^ 

SoaJotcqtalfiie- flB«. dajB. . 

Mating matters worre are 
"'T' i am. using 


^ pay a different price; 

I^iany fund manager^ ^ 
pf^ aii y in smafftf 
have piles 
cannot un 

sale prices. , . 

Yet thqr need cadi to hanr 

• •mf v,,vu4 


share’s price very S*^u£Ss“and Sistcriiig confidence 

S^t^Ssf-ixoess. 


Give the IHT as a gift 

and give yourself a gift as well. 



Up to SO®'"® qfftheea^rprh^ 

A subscription to the IHT is ^ ideal year-long 
gift for a friend or busine^acquamtance - 
especially at our special gift rate of up to 50 /o ofl 

the cover price. ^ u • 

For each sLx-or twelve-month ^ si^cnpdon 

that you order we will send you theXbcford 

SpeekU htmus 

: for current stAsetibers : ^ / . = i 

We will extend > our own subscription ' 

V ‘ by one week for each month's gift 
' : subscription vou enter. For ex^ple, if you 
' • two one-vear gift subscriptions, vour •. 

1 subscription will automatically be 
extended bv 24 w-eeks. 


■.order 
own 


Encyclopedias illustrated above - absolutely free. 
And. of course, we will send the new; subscnl)er a 
handsome card, signed as you specify, announcing 
your gift. 

SubscHbeyours^ 

If you are not already an IHT subsc^^. you 
can also take advantage ol this specif gift pflen In 
addition to your subscription you will receive these 

Oxford Encvclopedias — free. • j 

Just compfete tlie coupon below and send 
(or fax) us a copy for each order. And leave the rest 
to us. . 

CaU US toll-free 

AUSTRLA: 066081.'>5 LUXEMBOURG: 0880 2703 

BELGIUM: 0800 17538 SWITZERLAND: 135 57 57 
FR.\.NCE:05 437 tt7 THE NETHER1.;\NDS: 06 022,3158 
GERAIANY; 0130 848585 UNITED KINGDOM: 0800 89 .5965 


Coumry/Currenqr 

t2morrths* 

2fTunlhsFREE 

e months* 

1 mon^FREE 

Austria 

6J000 

3,300 

lUlraim BFr 

14,000 

7.700 

Denmark D^r- 

3>to0 

1,900 

Finland FM 

2,400 

1,300 


1.950 

14)70 


700 

385 

GrealBrftain *- 

210 

115 

Greeee 

75.000 

414)00 

kdarid 

230 

125 

italv 

470000 

2604»0 

lioenibourq 

14.000 

7,700 

Ndholonds ^ 

770 

420 

Ncm 

3.500 

1,900 


474)00 

264)00 


484)00 

26,500 

- hand ddiv. Madrid 

55,000 

27,500 

Sweekn {ornidl) 

3,100 

1,700 

-hwdddi-erv SXr 

3,500 

1,900 

SwAzskrid 

610 

335 

Red of Eureoe. bleep) CS ' 

485 

265 


630 

345 

CMlrd and Latin Arneioi. 

SnAArneo 

, 780 

430 

Reslof^ieo 

> 900 

495 


nea«- indicate which gift snhscripUon lerm you pn-fer^d fill in 

addr«. Q i*--"-" □ ?82L^ ^ 

□ Hcasc cherk herr If yo.. prefer to ^.-nd the ft, v (.txford KiKy elopcdia., to ih.- rtvipient. 

RwipientV Name * 

Address 


Glv.'l’lode/Counliy - 

Mv name a-i il should appear on ihr gift can! . 
.'Vddress — 


Qlv/(^ode/Country — 

Mt subscription account nunilicr. 


„ My check or money order Ls enclosed (iKtyahle to U.e Intemaiional Herald Trihune). 
n Plpayp charge mv credit curd; f— i., , PH » ■ 

□ .Mx«s □.\merict.oE.xp.e* □ E..r».-ard □ Diners □ MW-^rd □ Ve 
Credit rard changes mU be made in French Franc at currr nl exchange raits. 

Card Nil ~ 

Exp. Date .Signature. 


For business onleis. please indiiale your V.AT number: y „u;„her : KR74732U2( I2bl) 

INTERNADDNiVL i 


o. 

C*l 

6 

CN 



S-S; 


nVLKIICD «*TM THE ^OHK UMB- «® HU WMIUkKlW WnT 

Sprelul pit n.l..s tnr -Jecrihrr. only. lOT. r r-lid thn«gl. Jnnuan. .1 1. ffn. 


tioDS in recent wedcs tv ^ i- th-ce bw 

inwtstoa whic* aw wai^ 

that oertaizL . ktodcs 

even further. 


iTr; 


month in Hoog fixmg s £iiui£ 

Seng Index, and riang yidri* 

in the bond marifft 

Investors signal^ tl^ 
flagping confidence in Asiro 
st^markets in November 
by polling $218.5 minion om 
U American muturf funds 
investing in the r^;ion, a^ 
PCffrirng to Lipp^. . 

Mutual funds dedicat^ 

to Asia were one of the main 
. oainfi m 


^me brokers say^.the 
American funds’ piwca- 

ment provides a spod oroor- . 

tiwiity to buy Aaan stoats. 

Once the funds have ad^ 
justed their boldinffi to ^ 
fleet demand back nome.in 
America, th^ say, J^an 
markets will ceare to » 
vulnerable to Clifts m U.S. 

year, when the b e nch niaTk 
im x/foiatima's rose 90 


md« in Malayan’s rose 90 
pezoent and Hong Kongs 
more doubled. 

Moreover, .American in- 
vestors supplied 91 per^t 
of the ^.4 billiTO that 
moved into funds mvesti^ 
in Asia, exdiiding Japan, m 
the first three quaztere of 
1994 and about 60 percent 
^ the totrf inflow in the pro- 


as corporate profits .nnd 

boomnig ecTOomies. .. . 

The Vickeis Balias Invest- 
ment Rweaich Ltd- broker- 
age house, in fact, h^ al- 
ready soured the call. Its 
strategy report for I995rco- 
ommends buying stods^ <rf. 
several Pacific countnes, 
saying “buoyant Asian 
economies'* wmild amtinne 
to attract fonds.' 


H 


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Forft/rtfter ftiftvmatoJ, cw^ 

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liNTERINATIONAL UEKALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 20, 1994 


P&ge 13 


BOJCh 


®**S conference Monday, 
ai, bank governor 

^ aJliiough the level 

w nonpeifonning loans at Jao- 
aacM commeraal banks \ir« 
^caching a peak, it would siill be 
a long tune” before ifae prob- 
lem was sdved. 

He said banks were makina 
S^ow pro^ at clearing ihei? 
balanre sbwis of bad loans in- 
cuned during the speculative 
boom of 

^ aod having diffi- 

selling properties they had 
takro oyer as coUaiera! because 
of the Sluggish market. 

Mr. Matsushita, who suc- 
ce^ed Yasushi Mieno on Sat- 
iny. cited an interruption in 
the recovery of consumer 
spending, continued adjust- 
ments in company balance 
sheets and large corporate in- 
ventories. as ^ said, “We are 
not in a situation to be optimis- 
tic without reserve.” 

One result of this fragility in 
die economy, be said, is that 
there isn’t going to be a big 
chan^ in central bank policy.” 

Mr. Matsushita, 68. said he 
viewed price stability and the 
health of Japan’s ba nkin g svs- 
tem as his two biggest concerns. 

As of Sept. 30, Japan’s top 2 1 
banks had 13.3 trillion yen 
($ 1 34 billion) in nonperformj ng 
loans on their books. 

Asked whether banks needed 
to disclose so-called restruc- 
tured loans, or loans on which 
they had waived or reduced in- 


ASIA/PACIF 



s Recovery Fragile 




leresi payments. Mr Matsu- 
shua sjud u ncccbbar\- for 
iinancial insiiiution.s ui in- 
crease the transparency of their 
mMagemeni opcruiionN. 

But he said there was no erm- 
wnsus on how to define and 
Oisclo« such loons and that the 
«nira! bank needed to consider 
the impact of di.sclosure. 

On the cuniruJ bank’s recent 
move to help two credit unions 
tnai had been on the verge of 
bankruptcy. Mr. Matsushita 
said the Bank of Japan had de- 


cided “after intensive consider- 
ation” to extend money to the 
bailout plan. 

One week before his retire- 
meni. Mr. Mieno surprised fi- 
nancial circles in Japan by an- 
nouncing that the central bank 
>^‘ould provide public money to 
ret up a bank to save the two 
Tokyobosed credit unions. 

It was the first dme in postwar 
history that Bank of Japan 
had agreed to use public money 
to save financial insiilutioos. 

“If that were the last such 


Toyota Rxpects Sales to Rise 
And Revises Profit Outlook 

Bli'ttiiifvr); BiiiiiKS\ Nttri 

TOKYO — Twota Motor Corp. expects its domestic vehicle 
Mies to rise 10 percent, to 2.24 million units in 1995. President 
raisuro Toyoda said on Monday. 

have begun to see the light at the end of a Jong 
Mr. Toyoda said at a year-end news uuifereoce. He also 
he expected his companv to beat its initial earnings forecast 
for the six months to Dec. 31. 

Toyoda aitribuied the company’s improving profitability 
to Its efforts to reduce production cost's. He also said he expected 
demand for automobiles to grow thunks to an income-tax cut in 
Japtm, the introduciioo of new car models, demand from buyers 
seeking to replace old cars and interest generated bv the biannual 
motor show next fall. 

Toyota’s current profit, before taxes and extraordinary items. 
Will be about 10 percent higher than the 130 billion yen <51.29 
billion) forecast earlier this year, Mr. Toyoda said. Operating 
profit will come in 20 percent higher than the initial forecaitt of 70 
billion yen, he said. Toyota shares rose 20 veo. or nearly I percent, 
to 2,080 on Monday. 

Toyota estimates domestic sales of motor vehicles from all 
Japanese manufacturers will rise to 6.92 million in 1995. Mr. 
Toyoda !»aid. Thai compares with Toyota’s forecast for a 0.5 
percent rise in sales, to 6.5 million units in 1994. 


case, it would be fine.” said Ma- 
suru Takagi. chief cxx>nomist at 
Fuji Research Institute. “But fi- 
nancial institutions .still have 
huge nonperforming assets, so 
Maisushita'.s first and foremost 
task will be lo ensure the stabil- 
ity of the financial system.” 

Mr. Matsushita, ' a former 
chairman of Sakura Bank Ltd., 
also previously worked in the 
Finance Ministrx’. where he 
held the administrative post 
of rice minister before moving 
lo the private sector. 

In selecting him 05 its gover- 
nor for the next five years, the 
central bank maintained a tra- 
dition of rotating the job be- 
tween former Finance Ministry 
bureaucrats and career central 
bank officialK. 

(AFP, Bloomberg, Reuters) 

■ GovemmeDt I^aiis Guts 

Japan's Finance Ministry, 
faced with slumping lax reve- 
nue, proposed an austere na- 
tional budget for the next fiscal 
year that would cut spending 
for the first lime in 40 years, 
news agencies reported. 

Finance Minister Masayoshi 
Takemura unveiled a draft bud- 
get totaling 70.99 trillion yen 
for the year starting April 1. 
1995, down from 73.08 irillion 
yen in the current fiscal year. It 
would be the first decline in the 
national budget, which includes 
subsidies to regional govern- 
ments as well os debt service, 
since 1955-56. 

The budget included a target 
of 2.8 percent economic grov^ 
for the year, a figure many pri- 
vate e^nomists said was loo 
optimistic. {Reuters, AP) 


Luxury Buildings 
Banned hy China 

BEIJING — China on Monday banned new luxury con- 
struction projects until 1996 and hohed golf course and 
racetrack development, the JUnhua press t^ency reported. 

“Launching new lux^ pixgects is obviously inapp^ii- 
ate.” it quoted an official ctf the State Plarmirig Comnusaon 
as saying, at a time when the government wants more invest- 
ment in infrastructure. 

The official said approval would not be granted unto the 
end of 1995 for luxury projects involving hotels, office build- 
ings or villas. CotutructioQ of golf courses, racetracks and 
Other enierlainnient facilities will be frozen. 

A Japanese ecemomist voiced doubt on enfeneement 
Beying. “It has issued bans like this before, but provincial and 
local authorities have ignored them, eq>edally because these sorts 
of projects are among the most profitable,’' the economist said. 
■ Condhion for Color TV Ventnres 

China prohibit joint-ventiire pnxliiction of color televi- 
sions unless the foreign companies mvolved in^rt advanced 
technology, Reuters r^ned Monday from Beijing quoting a 
report in China DaDy. 

“No advanced technology, no mailcet: that is the minisc^s 
policy,” the minister of the electronics industry, 2iang 
qiang, told die paptf . 





m 

Hong Kong 

Singapore 


Tokyo 


Hang Seng 

Stn^ 1111165 

Nikkei 225 

ll 

llflQB - • 

-- 2400 - - c 

A,-' 

22000 



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A S"0'‘lT0‘ 

g o H 0 *3 

.1994 

Exchange 

1994 

bMtex 

Monday 

1994 

Prev. 

% 


Ctose 

Close 

Chang 

Hm^Knig' 

Hang Seng 

8,178-34 

8,168.39 

•fO.15 

E^igafmiie 

SO^l^nes . 

2,185.13 

2.169.78 

+a7i 

Sydney 

MOrdmtfiK 

i;gQQj» 

1,897.00 

-*0,16 

'nricyo • 

Nadcef225 

19,270-85 19,163l43 


[ Kuala Lumpw CMnpostte 

957,25 

945.40 

.+1.15 

Bangkitic 

SET 

1,887.78 

1,336^: 

.*+0.10 

Seotd- 

C(vnp(3ate Stock 

1J>28.61 

1.036.S4 

-O.Tt 

Tb^ 

weighted Price 

74)65,30 

6^937.33 

+1.70 

Manfla 

PSE 

2,723,60 

^708,99. 

+0.54 

Jdnrta 

Stock index 

459^ 

4SS.78 ■ 

+0.13 

NdfiaZMtiantf 

NZSE<40 

1,927.39 

1,924.86 

+0.13 

Sombay 

N^ianal index 

1,858-35 

1,862.99 

-0.25 


Souicas: Reuters, AFP 


Iniernaiinul Herald TnhuiiM 


Very briefly: 


e Moore Corp, of Canada said it had agreed to sell a stake of 35 
percent in To|qian Moore Co, to its partner, Toppan Printing Co. 
of Japan, for M.4 billion yen ($342.6 million). 

• Alan Bond, the Australian eno^reneur, might be out of bank- 
nmtey by the end of the week amid media reports in Australia that 
Mr. Bond's personal creditors and those of a fan^y company were 
prepared to cancel a considerable part of bis debt buraen. 

• Kobe Steel Ltd. and Texas Instraments inc. plan to invest SO 
billion yen to more than double their semiconductor output at a 
jointly operated plant in Japan. 

• PSrdB SpA and PT Kabetanetal Indonesia said they would form a 


S70 million venture that will include the construction of a factory] 
in Jakarta for fiber optic and power cables* 

• Honda Mtotw Co. said it has signed an agreement with Anad^ 
Endustri Holding AS of Turkey for a jmnt venture to make and ^ 
motorcycles in that country. 

• Korea Teleooai Corpi, South Korea’s slate-owned telephone 
company, wiD lead a oonsortium to invest SICK) million in a ^obal 
motw phone prtgect that will use a networit of 12 sateUiles to 
allow ct^ to be made with pocket-sized telephones from any- 
where on earth by 1999. 

AF, AFF, Km^t-RtdJer, Bhamher^ 


NASDAQ 

Momlay's 4 pjn. 

This list GompUad tiy the AP, consists of the ^ .000 
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Cardmembers over the years. Because every day, everywhere around 


the world, so- many ol our Service Representatives have gone beyond the call-. .- ..' i; i -. 
h^ping-tp solve problems not' lust about lost.Card.s or Travelers Cheques,-biit' 7 ~ I 
about the unpredictable nature of Ijfe itseif. So »rtie.lher you're: upriver witiiouJXi. ^ V 
paddh? or downtown without a hotel, American Express 'is the^e ter- you. and rea^j^f -sV . \ 




to be of servi.cfe. Whatever name you .want to give it. Just give vs a ; - ' 





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Bpge 18 


INTERNiUnONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 20, 1994 


SPORTS 


fr 




■? 


SwimminginaPoolof Drugs: How the IOC Netted Chinese 


By Jere Longman nese phyacum wbo collected the 

' NevywkTanaSanee Uline Samples fOT FINA, 8Wimr 

ATLANTA — As they climbed ooWs world governing body. 

£e^ the pool on Sq>t. 30 after a Tnese urine saiiq)!^, along with 
in Hii- ftshima, Japan, 16 Cht- Others tafcco during the Asi^ 


nese phyacum wbo collected the with athletes who are using increas- 
uiine samples for FINA, swinir ingly sophisticated techniques to di' 


not say. It is difficult to say what is chemical fingerprints that would coaches ft'Mnttefonno’ East 

the amount of collective criminal en- positively identic DHT in a urine which, it to beentwajm^M 


i]ftw swimmers were met with an un- Gao^ produced a stardiog^ dis* 
e9y}ec(ed request. Not for interviews, tubing xesult: the first iadicadoa ^ 


s worid governing body. cumvent the rules of sportsmanship 
5se urine sanq)!^, along with and fair play. 

'$ taken during the Asian **rhis u wto makes this occupa> 
s, produced a startling^ dis* Uon so interesting,'* said i>x. 


ergy behind iL** 

For two decades, Donike’s labora- 
tory in to pioneered test- 

ing for an^>rac steroids. It recorded 


wnphe, Uatil now, liowever, only since reuazfica&osif opemiea a sia»* 


V Su^kaon of drug use by Chmese 
ssimumers had reached a feverish 
st^ Sevml wedcs eariier, the Chi- 
nese women had won 12 df 16 gold 
at the world championships 
hutome. 

.'•Qlficiab from die United States 
aSd otto swimnung powKS, con- 
vinced t^t the Chinese were uring 
i|Ucit, but undetected, substances to 
e^iance th^ performances, had de- 
manded more surprise, out-of-oom- 


commonly known as DHT. leis of iaoiog controL epi^tosterone, a related hormon^ 

Sten^ are used by to The ftm^ed tests have led to in- as dm pwnt at which a drug tKt i$ 

build muscle mass and speed recov- creased aisiacmn of institutional- considered posih^ 
ay firom workouts and injury. Tests ized deming in Chiiia, and to broad I^g-test r^is, called ^t^md 
taken duibig the Aslan Gimes yield- dcepdci^ about the credibility of profiles, resemble a pharaarolo^icai 
ed poativ^HT results from 11 Qd- Chip’s einer^izg^rts empire, mountain range, with chenucm 


nese athletes, seven of than swim- 


Accor^ng to ugures prodded by 
linese ofScials, 36 Chinese ath- 


meis, including three wtMnen’s world Chinese officials, 36 Chinese ath- 
diampions. So many poddves among letes in various sports have tested 


petition testing. 

. JThe Asian Carnes were set to be- 
an in two days. Ehning the games. 
^ mnneis of each event would 
h^ Toudnety been expected to un- 
d^godrugt^ts. But the SepLW test 
caOgbt the Chinese off giu^ 

were surpris^ but after 
a^ut iO minutes they cooperated,'* 
said I^. Yosfaiteru Mutoh, a J^a- 


athle tes from one country at one positive for bannra substances this 
event is believed to be unprecedented, yeu^ and 45 sino6.1988. In swim- 


Allof the athletes were suqjended 


for two years, w4udi will prohibit 
them from parUdDatina in the 1996 


them from parU^iating in the 1996 
Summer Games m Atlanta, where 
Olynqnc officials from 192 natums 
gathered for meetiogs last week. 
The test results rq>resented a sig- 


ming, there have been 22 positire 
drug tests since the 1972 Olympics 
— 13 by Chinese athletes. 

*Tt a my personal in^pression 
that, in swimming, the use was at 
least widespread*’ by Chinese ath- 
letes at the Asian Games. Donike 


pttks T^resenting excessive levels 
of b anne d substances. Testosterone 
is produced natui^ly in both men 
and women, but is banned when 
introduced exteraalty as a perfor- 
iDance>eiibancing substance. 


was no perceived widespread pfob- would be confirmed on an astoona- 
lem, only a few of the lOCs 24 m g s r?lf 
j^*ted iaboratoies lou- ^ j officials dmply 

tmdy tested for the steroid. approved the Chinese smmmiers 

**I would not have expected die on S^L 30 as they ^e pool and 
extent that in one nation, one switDr requested an imnwdiate oriire sani^ 
rniz^ fedoatfoo, that DHT would pl^ To have refused wtRild have 
have been systematically used m- mis- suspgiBfm. 


used,** Domke said of the Chinese. champion 

StiU, mmois had b^im cdrculat- swznuners tested positive in the 
ing that DHT beoc^ the latest tests: Yang Aihua for excessive tev- 
derigier drug. The Chmese women ds of testosterone and Lu Bin for 
were under suspicion, particularly excessive DHT. 
for meteoric succes^ in swimming t tmw a sectmd set of tests, 
and distance nmning. A Ounese whidi were f?u ndii ^ ed during the 
wmnan did not win an Olympic Asian r¥anK»a and vriudi also raised 
medal m swimming until 1988. Six susuaon of DHT use. Both sets 
yean l^.tb^wm dominating the of te^wece analyzed at the Mitsubi- 
world riiampionships. 5 lij laboratory in Tokyo, which 

Further adding to sa^cion about {noved critical to carrfwng (he Qti- 
Oiina was (he influence there of nese. It is one o£ the few lOC-sano- 


As testosterone metabolizes in the were unda suspicion, paiticuU^y 
body, one of the by-products pro- for meteoric successes in swimming 
is DHT. U is more powerful nnd distance nmning. A Oimese 
th.m testosterone. Thus, it is effec- wmnan did not win an Olympic 
five in s mall er, less detectable medal in swimming until 1988. ^ 


nificant breakthrough for Olympic said, referring to DHT. *‘Systemati- 
sdentists, wbo have been engaged in cally, if it has been used on the order 

ck trainers and functionaries. 1 can- 


a high-tech cat-and-mouse game 


amounts when used illicitly through years later, thffl wae dominBtmg the 
iiyection, tablets or by b^g rubbed world riiampionships. 


into the skin. 

In 1988, Donike developed five 


tinned labs n^ulariy testing for I^v 

With the test results m, Domke 
was coata^ in earfy Octaber^hj 
Dr. Yosh^ Kuioda, presideiitof.die . 

Asian OJynqnc Coomtitto . ' 

**Nobo^ thought die T<^;la^ 
could detect DHTr Kuroda Stnl , 
‘ThaYsakqrpoint.’* V/ - • 

On Nov. 27, Domke 
Gennany to T<Ayo to exammekie* 
Aiwriant set of tests ftotB die 
Asisn Games. A few da^. later, die 
results were announced. 
nese athletes, indudiDg In, 
a third wteld ebao^HOD swiaanB^' 
Zhou Guani^ bad tested-poritto: 
for DHT, tbeir steroid proffies sho^- 
ing pbannacological MatteriKnns..' 

"Young athletes have no koovd-' 
edge of how to take thiC Enrbda. 
said. "Somebody mitybe gave, them 
thediup.** 

The Ch»««e ^ynmie CoBBmttee, 
whidi to acknowledged tbe po^ 
bility that ccMcto and trainers s^’ 
pliea the drugs, is oondJUting an. 

inquiry. The swimmetSy'wfao 
have denied knowin^ty taking DHL 
are qqieaiing their saq>aisi<ws7 . 


Se0)‘ 

0^ 


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It.- 

■ U1'» • . 

FrJi' • ' 


ASl^ 




Arizona St 
Ip>me8 Up 
Short in OT 




'TEMPE, Arizona — Playing 
ior the second time in as many 
Qi^ts, No. 15 Arizona State 
out of energy in the final 
lanute of regulation against 
Ihxas-San Antonio. 

,;The Roadimmers made up a 
Saven-point deficit in the fin^ f 
minute, and Phillip Chime’s 





’A"" 
-*1^^ 




BOARD 




COUEGE BASKETBALL 


layup with 10.7 seconds left in 
overtime lif-ed them to an 87-85 
LBS-;: ;.* lie Sun Demi’s. 

Si^t'te ;5-2> squan- 
d^'cd its lead in tbs fmal min- 
Uto by committing a pair of 
li^overs and missing two of 
tour free-throw attempts. The 
Sun Devils’ efforts were hin- 
toed by the absence of the ju- 
ijj^r forward Mario Becmett, 
who fouled out witii 1:34 re- 
maining in regulation. 

Tin the only other Top 25 
game. then-No. 22 VUlanova 
lest 60*57 to Sl Joseph’s. The 






NFL Standings 


ChorMta 

Oiteega 

EMratt 

Aftaita 

MIIWNikW 


‘I 

I 


AMEKICAN COHFBaENCS 


v.Mtam] 

NewEmtaM 

Bufiata 

mdtanawHs 

N.Y.Jett 




x-PfltHNirgh 

anOmBlI 

HeiKton 




*aonDIiSB 

LAAaMen 

KangnCttv 

Denver 

Seattle 


Bar 

w L T 
9 4 0 

9 4 0 

7 8 0 

7 8 0 

4 9 0 

ceaim 
W L T 
12 3 0 

10 5 0 

2 13 0 

1 14 0 

West 

W L T 
10 5 0 

9 4 0 

0 7 0 

7 0 0 

4 9 0 


WESTERN CONFEBBICE 
■NWweatMvWw 


Pd. PPPA 
400 3ajn 
400 330309 
487 33134* 
487 297311 
4BD 2S4 294 


Utah 

Hewten 

DoiiQe 

D enver 

Son Antonia 

AUnneMta 


Pet «a 
487 — 

419 m 

479 2W 

400 3 

480 3 

427 10 


Pd. PPPA 
4D0 282197 
487 385195 
.133 3(3 37* 
487 3023« 


Pd. PP PA 
JSr 344 272 
400 294 300 
433 300389 
487 319 34* 
400 238300 


IUTIOIUt.OONFERENCE 




* * . 


x.Dallaa 

N.Y,Olaits 

Artano 

PMioMphla 

WoEiInBlM 


Bat 

W I. T Pet 


t) 3 Q J8f 


8 7 0 433 
7 8 0 467 






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Oilcxse 

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TatnpQSav 


2 13 0 .133 

CmM 

w t T Pd. 

9 4 0 400 

9 6 0 400 

9 4 0 4D0 

8 7 0 43) . 

4 9 0 .an 


PacHICDIVMM 

Phoenix 17 5 J73 — 

Seattle M 7 487 2tS 

tALafc e ra 13 8 419 3M 

Portiotf 11 9 480 S 

Soe wm e n to 11 M 4B4 sw 

emoinswe 8 M J34« 9 

LACiWnen 3 19 .m u 

UINDAYE RESULTS 
utdt 28 3i 3i 28-in 

dl he n iRei 3i 21 » 9— M 

U: Molemliao »S27.Honiaak 7-1444 20; 
M: MurOoeft S-1 1 H 19, Day 7-13 47 2L Re. 
han g Ut a h 37 (Bonoit n, MUwouiwe 40 
tBeiMr,Uateri8).A liii U tdiPt a ocwen 
15L iHUMowlEa 19 (Safcer. Mayhenr 4). 
MtonM Si 22 ■ 2S^ 

Newiener s 88 so 27.-fii 

m; wHHs i»« h 2L cola 7.13 44 SO; N: 
Beniamin P>14 4*10 34, GlUtani 47 34 is; Re. 
bewd»-Mlbm)44 twilMa W.NOnr Jersey 5l 


7. Konea 
a nortdo 
9 . Duke 
ia Cenmettcaf 
11. aMrvtaml 
IX Geometovin 
11 O ' Xj f HW tJ 
It avineuje 
tXAdsoaoSt 
ILMbneHla 
17. NUcMson SI 
IXGeomlnTcdi 
19. WWW Parent 
28 I WeoHehi 
21. New Mexla 3L 
2X Vlroido 
2L iHbMla 
BA URIHNINQ 
21 Inna St. 


S-1- '1,190 i 
5 .). MSO 0 

5-1 Lie 9 : 

44 . LWD . U 
M 901 U 
5-1 . 119 . 15 

M . 810 17 

S-1 ' . 451 . 14 

-a-2' -m. R 

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4- 1 ',509 18 

1^1 '831 -14 

5- 1 - . 411' ' 21 

5>1. .488- 35 
72 238 M 

52 :284 S' 

M ■ 174 - 

'UC . 

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SKIING 


WorMCupRatuHa. 


WOMRUESLAOM 


I 7h MUwoulwt 49 L Viwl SdnoMor, Mtaertood WM- 
i-UtdiPtaocteten 3047), 1?388; X PemtOB.VHOoi ii, SaoOw 
r, Atoyherrr 4). MJMUS), 1:3MS7 X BnoMa RWeL 
It 22 ■ 25^ PraKt 149.194045 i:39M; 4, ScMwEosd,.' 
a 28 30 ST-fB Auetrta <4tU4Ba), fdetm 8r AnneUie.Cfr- 
Ma7-1354»;N: bireer,NewZHlena(4Uoai99>,l;39J9;-4 
lltaiR 49 34 iX Re. PoMela Qinivet .Rona MXOSLil)/ 

I R), NOW Jersey 51 1;3MW7,lCr3fflneAiidersM»5 »ud eH t49j4- 


(Benlomin. Brawn 13K A«M»-NUaml » 3832), 1:3948; % EKt Edsr. AOdrto (4849.. 


Tlie Nets’ PJf. Brown and S9iaim*s Billy Owens racing for the ball during Naw^Jersey’s last-se^rd'lQ^^.vi^^ 


WQdcats dropped out of the 
*K^ 25 00 Monday. Arizona 
State's loss dropped it from 
I^th to 15th. 

Texas-San Antonio (3-2) 
Eduttled away at the Sun Devils' 
72-65 lead as Marlon Anderson 
lut a 3-pomter and Tbaddeus 
Wordlaw and Darren W^ber 
added layups to make it 13-12 
with 13.2 seextods to pday. 

.The Arizona State guard 
Isaac Burton made a free throw 
td mve the Son Devils a 74-72 
lead with 17 seconds r emaining, 
J)Ut Anderson sent the game to 
lorertime when he tipped home 
4^ebber miss with two-tenths 
of a second remaining. 

Arizona State had rallied to 
defeat Cal-Irvine, 87-58, on Sat- 
urday night. 


Blazers and Drexler GlideBast Knicks 


The Assodated Proa 

Clyde can still glide. 

Oyde Drexler put on a vintage show 
against tee stumbling New York Knicks 
cm Sunday in Portland, Oregon, scoring 33 
points, 3] in the first three quarters, as the 
Trail Blazers rolled to a 1 1 1-87 victoiy. 

At age 3^ notlung irks Drexler more than 
the si^gestion teat his skills are erodix^ 
"V/bat do you mean?,** he said when 
someone said his breakaway stam Ainic 
during the rout may have suipri^ peopte 
who felt be no longer was capable <n such 
moves. **1 don't know what you’re talking 
about I mean, Fm only 21.** 

Drexler made 14 of 19 field goal at- 
tCTpts and did not have a turnover. 


Clifford Robinson added 24 points in 
what was probably Portland's best overall 
effort of the season. 

**We haven't played any better than teat 


NBA HIGHIJGBTS 


that’s for sure.'* Blazers’ coadi P. J. Carle- 
sinio said. 

Rod Strickland added 17 points and II 
assists as Portland’s starting guards out- 
scored their New York counteipaits 50-15. 
John Starks and Derek Harper were a 
combined 4-for-l9 shooting. 

JitB 101, Bodts 98: In MUwaukee. Kart 
Malone scored 27 points and Jeff Horna- 
cek 20, including nine fate in tee fourth 


<]|uaner, leading Utah to its team-record 
eighth consecutive road victory. 

The Jas, playing their fourth game in 
five lughts, won their fifth straight game 
overall and sixth in a row against tee 
Bucks. Todd Day led MUwaukre with 23 
points, Eric Muniock had 19 and Glenn 
Robinson 18. 

Nets 103, Heat 102: In East Rutherford, 
New Jersey, Benoit Beojamin scored 12 of 
his season-high 24 points in tee fourth 
quarter, including two free throws with 2.4 
seconds remaining. 

The Nets trailed 84-78 early in the 
fourth quarter before Benj amin scored 
nine points in a 22-5 run that gave New 
Jersey a 98-89 lead 'with 4:05 remaining. 


Virol 

W L T 

x-SanPrandseo 13 2 0 

NewOHMns 4 3 3 

AtlontQ 4 9 0 

LA Roms 4 11 0 

*43lncned illyfslcn 
v<lliKtKa ptayoH spot 

SutotayY Goows 
Grten Bay.n,Ana»)o J7 
Chlcoao 27. LA Rams R 
Now Enaloid 41, Buffalo 17 
Son Dtooa 21, N.Y. J«t9 4 
TompQ Bar 17, Wcnhlngton 14 
iMlonopoiis 1& Whimi 4 
Ariaona 28. CladmoH 7 
Kma C»y n. Houston 9 
N.Y. Giants 14, PtiHockKRiia 18 
PlttsDuroh 17, ChMlcntf 7 
LA ReMers 17, 5eotti» M 


Pct PPM 
J87 4»13]« 
A29 302 355 
J» 307379 
287 345 341 


(Coin 12), New Jtroy 21 (AnOnon Rl. 
IWW Vertc 28 81 21 25~ » 

Pentaa 27 21 M 23-111 

N: SfMttl M4 4.4 laEuRlS 4-13 n-MM; P: 
CRoWnion 10-20 1-1 2L Droder 1*49 98 3X 
R el Min di 4fcv» York S7 (EwbEi 14). Pol^ 
land SI (Dudley M). AnBti-Neiv YWH 21 
(Horpor 4). Porttand 33 (SfrUMoid II). 


Sunday’s College Scores 


'•rtr'.-V—'- i-ge ' . . ji 


EAST 

Dortmoirtti ID, Hofstra 70 
SL' 4R Vlltanavix Xt ,■ 

St. Rom 91, MoHov C3 
StoncMIt n. MoorLmell 79 
Stony Brook 1UL DowIbiB 90 
Vemtonr 00. Horvoird 19 
soerrw 

cionwofi 77, aiQdM 44 
Tn^hattanoaoa 109. Catowtw |9 
MIDWEST 
Clorfce 8ft Marfan n 
ItUmis SI. 77, Ml cummoRtMaiHi 48 
lawn St 9ft W. Coralli« M 
81. Amtaroe 12. S>. Xavier 44 
SOUTHWEST 

Norm Texa 9ft E. Teme BoMbl 79 
TmohSan Aittonto 37, Artana 51. 3& OT 


sun, 1:8850;. ft UrOo HrawL StoveMo 
148574859), 1 :8U4; 18, Mortoia Ktonidd, 
Nemoy letSMUSh l:40ulB. . 

WWW Ca 'SMHB TtgSRH (AfMr tm 
ran): 1, SdntMer. 3D| oMw ft WOiwb. 
13ft ft PtM4Lllft‘4,>Marao>L98: ftCiMHveL 
85; LMttfttM Aeeala,SwlUi1nwLS}; 7.C»* 
benwr. 71; ft KtoerWod, 82; ft Egsar.SO; ift 
SpNo Pnemor, StoMHdd.^ 

OVERAU. WORLD CUP 9TANDillOfr(A^ 
tweCwevaM: l.HeMfZiaiir«Hfiler.0wn- 
zenand>445polms; 2rSclirM)dBr.557; ft Kotto 
SeMnser. Geranny, M1|'4,'Kllary Lindb, 
uoflwf Sim» 3M;.ft.lHliem.3Bft A PKabo 
Stravl. United Sia»ce, '3Si '7, 'Morllni &tL 
OertnaiK 205; ft Kfoeretud. 117; ft Bibtim 
Pcno. Nolv. US; 1ft Borbivo Merfla Holy, 
154. 


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IlSTERNATiONAL HERALD TRIBLNE, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 20, 1994 


P^ifF 



Season ’« ftuspeets Oim 
^ISomiTalksAreSet 

XTBnr TTte Aaodimtf Psyry 

entered League lockout 

Weared that it s^eduled and it 

would be an NHLsS^ ^ whether there 

«*iladelplua Flvei?SJ?«i ourselves,’’ said the 

niniiingS£?^of1S.e?^ “^e are 

told The 

sotting loeether were planing on 

problems, if fuU talks begin 
pegouauons likely u*ould adj^ 

rnaay to aflow the paiudpants to retxira home ^ 


Owners May Give Last-Gasp Baseball Talks 2d Wi 


CoHpikdbf Otr St^ Fnn Dufatcha 

WASHINGTON -<- What could be 
the biggest week in the bitter baseball 
talks o%an slowly M^oo^y, all 
there was a cluioce that ^ 
laved deadline for implementatioii of a 
salary cap could be extended again. 

Bacall’s actiiig commissicKier, Bud 
Selig, speal^g from his home in Mil- 
waukee. said Thursday’s deadline for 
an agreement between striking players 
and ownership stood for the hme be- 
ing. But he said the owners m^t 
pause once again if the two sides came 
closer this wedc. 

'*We*D see what kind of prt^ress 
there is^" Sel4> the Milwaukee Bcei^* 
owner, said Sunday. ‘Hhat’s something 
wcTl have to use common sense on.** 


On Dec. IS, dm owners voted to 9 ve 
the ruling executive eouncQ. headed by 
Sdig, the authmity to dedare an im- 
passe and impose a salary cap if there 
was not a deal by Thursday. 

’’That’s a date the dubs agreed to,” 
Seim said. ’’But let’s see what happens. 
At mis point, 1 don’t want to reenilaie 
on that. This jrotxp has until Friday to 
make a deaL*^ 

Tte playos were expected to have a 
new prr^)osal in the last-ga^ talks on 
Monday, basing it on some of the 
things th^ he^ from the owneis* 
group last wedL 

‘’We’re iM^xlng for one,” said Stan 
Kasten of the Atlanta Braves. “That 
would be he^fuL” 

Only one member of the owners’ six- 


perstm negotiaUi^ committee was to 
attend the sesaon on Mondw. Dave 
Montgomery of the Pbsla^pm Phil- 
lies was CO join the top two manage- 
ment lawyers, Chuck ^Cosncff and 
Rob Manfred, and a couple of dub 
financial <rflio^ 

The news that Sdig might be willing 
to extend the deadline once again, this 
time past Christmas, ^'d not come as a 
su^nse to the bead dl the players’ 
umoD, Donald Fe^. 

“We’ve had a kM. Rggrfit«eg in this 
thing that haven’t meant mudi, wheth- 
er it was our original strike date or 
ibeir one last wedc,” Fehr said. “I have 
absobuety no expectations — Fm tak- 
ing this d^ ^ day. That we’re bar- 
gauiz^ at all is better, of course, than 


not talking. But 1 wouldn’t venture a 
guess as to triiere this leads us.” 

The talks Mond^ were expected to 
be conducted at a low lesreL with staff 
meetiz^ ratiitf than fuU-bargabung 
groups. 

If the talks fail, and the owners tdre 
stq>s to impose the salaiy cap that is so 
steadfastly tmposed by die players, 
Fehr warned mat the next battle would 
Gcoitmue is Ut^tion. 

‘The geoeraTpcwt is, if tb^ declare 
an impasse and anplemeDt the cap, 
weYe not afraid of our l^al optiox^” 
Fehr said. *^0 beli^ we have a vride 
range of approaches, and well pursue 
all of than.” 

“We’ve been hying all the way^ to 
make a deal, but we've been n^tiai- 


ing among ourselves,” he added. 
*^ere’s b^ veiy little movement on 
the otba and it takes two.” 

Lw we^ the two sides thought 
they were maldiig p r ogress. Mana^ 
meat’s Kof g^nmg team expected v 
new <^er from the union on wednes^ 
day. but the owners left after no offer 
was made. Union officials claim 
never promi^ a new plan. i'* 

Some people on the player^ 
believe the owners would prefer pih^ 
ting tire salary cap in place rather th^ 
Degotiatmg a de^ that might require 
smne oon^ntUBise. Kasten eDiq>hatic^ 
ly denied that. % 

“As forcefully as 1 ban tell you,” te. 
said, “it is not true. It never has be^ 
true.” (AF. HYTX 


A Slew of Postseason Unknowns Remain 

Missed Opportunities Keep Dolphins and Patriots Uncertain 


Hu Adored Pros Spurred by a lowel-waving, re- 

■ in the Na- cord crowd of 60,808 at Three 

00 !^ FotXball League hoping Rivers Stadium, Pittsburg won 
to unproye their postseason its seveo^ straight game, 
ct^ces failed to do so Sunday. Neil O’Donnell threw a 40- 
The New England Patriots yard TD pass to Yanew Ihig- 
.have clinched a playoff pen and Barry Foster ran for 


berth if Seattle had beaten the 
Los Angeles Raiders at night, 
but Kasay a 43- 

WFL ROUNDUP 

yard fidd goal atten^t with 
nine seconds left and the S^- 
hawks lost, 17-16. 

The Miami Dolphins would 
wra the AFC East with a 
victory in TnriianapnR s hut the 
Cedts made a goal-line stand in 
rite dodiu minutes and held tm 
for a 10-^victoiy. 

The Pittsburgh Stedos, al- 
ready assured a playdf berth, 
wrapped up the AFC Central 
ana home-field advantage 
through the playoffs with a 17-7 
victory over Qevetand. 

In me NFC, San Frandsoo is 
the West champion and Dallas 
has won Ee^L Bnt the Cen- 
tral lead is shared hfinnesota, 
Etetroit and Okic^^o, and all 
three — along with Green Bay 
— migfat wind iq) in the playoffs. 

Miami (9-6) is tied with New 
England (9-6) atop the AFC 
East Miaim, alrouiy in the 
playoffs, wins the division if 
both teams finidr with the same 
record. The Patriots get into the 
playedfs with a victory at Odca- 
goonSatuidw. 

In the AFC C^srtraL the 
Steders (12-3) are the winners, 
with the Browns (10-S) in as a 
wild card. 

In the West, the Chaig^ 
(10-5) are the chatnpgj with 
Kansu Gty (S-'D and the Los 
An^es Raiders (9-6) still in the 
wild-card Tunning. 

In the NFC, Dallas (11-3) is 
in with the New York Giants 
(8-7) and Arizona (8-7k a 28-7 
winner over CSnchinan, posst-' 
ble for theplayoCfs. 

Rsidexs 17, Seahairtcs 16: Loe 
Angdes escaped at the Kii^ 
dome when Kasay missed after 
earlier making thm fidd goals, 
includiiig a SO-yarder. 

Seattle (6-9) was ahead 13-10 
wi& a firA down <m the Raid- 
er^ 10 in the foonb quarter 
when a remole-contrd car an- 
OQ rite Kbgdmne SdA 
game was daayed fm* a 
ooupie of ounutes and the Sea- 
hav^ stalled with a penal^, a 
run for no and two incom- 

plete passes. 

Alter Kasay made a 33- 
yuder, the Raiders took the 
lead 21 seemds later oa Jeff 
Hostetler’s 77-yard pass to Urn 

^lOWtL 

Steclers 17, Browns 7: 


106 yards and a touchdown. 

Colls Itt, Dol|Aiiis 6: Dan 
Marino moved Miami to a first 
down at the Indianapolis 2 in 
the closing minutes, but could 
not produce the go-ahead 
touchdown. Dewell Brewer re- 
turned a punt 7S yards for a 
toudidown for the Colts (7-8). 
The playoff-bmmd E3<dphin$ 
can cunch the AFC East with a 
triumph over DetroiL 

Canfiials 28, Ben^ials 7: In 
Coach Buddy Ryan’s first sea- 
son, Arizona askued its ^t 
nonlcsing season since 1984. 
The Car^als (8-7) must beat 
Atlanta on Saturday and then 
have Dallas beat the Giants and 
the 49eis beat Idinnesota to 
make the playoffs for the first 
rime since the strike season of 
1982. 

Ibe viriting Bengals (2-13) 
lost tfac^ fifth in a row. 

(Sants 16^ Ek^lies 13: New 
York surviv^ some last-second 
drama in I%iladelphia to win its 
fifth straij^t game. Dave M^- 
gett scored on a S-yard run with 
3:S4 Itft and Brad Daluiso 
kicked an 18-yard field go^ 
with S4 secrads left as the Gi- 
ants (8-7) sent the Eagles (7-8) 
to thm rixth consecutive Ices. 

Hme ffl>peared to run out 
with rite B^es driring. Bnt af- 
ter the referee pot two seconds 
back mt the dock, Bubby Bris- 
to*, subbing for the bracbed 

RsildaH CnnnnighafTi, spiked 

the ban. Then, Eddie Murray 
missed a 44-yaid fidd goal at- 
test 

Im loss ended 
chances for a 

Clnefs31,CMere9: Joe Mon- 
tana, out for two weeks with an 
injured left foot, came back in 
time to revive the C3ue£s’ play- 
off hopes. IBs two toudidora 
passes hdped host Kansas Gty 
e^ a three-game losing streak. 

A victmy next wedc over the 
Raiders w{^ give Kansas Gty 
a wild-caid played spot. Hous- 
ton (1-14) lost its llthinarow. 

In earlier games, reported 
Mcndm in srme editions of the 
HanlaTr&nme: 

Patriots 41, BSb 17: Drew 
Kedwe threw riiree touebdown 
passes and New Endmd over- 
came a 17-3 deOdt. The crowd 
d 56,784 was the smaDest at a 
noosuike game in Buffalo rince 
SepL 20, 1987. 

New England won its rixth in 
a row. Ihe Patriots ate trying 
for their first played ^>ot since 
1 986. Ihe Bills were diminated. 


however, meaning they will not 
have a chance to reach the Su- 
per Bowl for the fifth straight 
year — and win it for the fu^ 
time. 

Chaigm 21, Jets 6: Stan 
Huiuphiies thi^ three touch- 
down passes and San Di^ 
surged after lioebacka Junior 
Seau sidelined New York quar- 
terback Boomer Esiastm vatb a 
concussion in the second quar- 
ter in East Rutherford, New 
Jersey. 

ihe Chargm (10-S) cUnched 
the division title and a playoff 
berth after having lost thor pre- 
vious two games and missing a 
chance to wrap up the AFC 
West both times. The Jets were 
dntimated from the playoffs 
with their fourth straight 1^. 

Pad»rs 21, Falcons 17: Brett 
Favre scrambled 9 yards for a 
touchdown with 14 seconds 
that kept Green Bay in the play- 
off iMctnre and elunmated At- 
lanta. 


The Packers (8-7) played tbdr 
final game in Mlwaukee af ta 6l 
yearn of a portion d 

their borne sdiedule there eaiA 
season. Atlanta (6-9) lod quar- 
terback Jeff Geoige to a brdcoi 
finger in the first quarter. 

Bears 7S, Rams 13: Raymont 
Harris and Lewis TiUman 
scored on short touchdown 
runs for Gucago (9-Q at Sd- 
dier Field. Steve Walsh had a 3- 
yard TD pass to KeiUi Jeamin^ 
as the ^ears sent Los Angeles 
(4-11) to their axfh stimght 
loss. 

Buccanee r s 17, Redeems 14: 
Washington, in Coadi Norv 
Turner’s first year, wound op its 
first winless season at home. 
Tampa won its fourth 
straight, hs longest winnii^ 
streak since startiugS-0 in 1978. 

The Redririns (2-13) set a 
team record for most kx^ in a 
season. Ibsy lost their seventh 
in a row, their longest losing 
streak since 1964-6S. 



Bartm L JofaBMoo/ReMcni. 

The GiftDt^ Dave Itill RonoaiiowskPs tadtle en route to New York’s 16-13 trimiiiAi in PUSadc^pIna. - 


ihia's 


Big Time ImH Stuff 
(^Dreams in NAIA 

The Associated Prea 

PORTLAND, Oregon — In the smallest verrion of.cpUegG:, 
footbaD, the biggest emotions are often on di^lay. 

There are no athletic sebotarsbips at these sdimls and no 
bis piofessiaraal contracts on the horizoo. The love of the 
game drives these players. 

When Westminster of Pennsylvama beat I^dfic Lutheran, 
27-7, for the NAIA l^visicm U title Saturday, two quarter- 
backs played in their final games. 

One walked off the fidd in elation and could not su^ 
talking about bow good it fdt to leave a winner. Ihe other 
barely back tears and pot off for as long as he could 
taking off his uniform for the last time. 

‘To be a senior and know you’O never p^y the game again 
for the rest of your life, to leare as a chanqrion is a dream you 
have from the veiy first nBnute you play the game and I started 
vriien I was 8 years dd,” said Westminstei*s Sean O’Sh^ 

“i^e lost two championships, one was here last year and 
wboi X was in hi^ sdiool, at Three Rivers Stadhun,” he 
added “1 would not go to my grave 0-3.” 

O'Stea threw two touchdovm passes as the Titans (12^2) 
dominated the Lutes in a rematch d the 1993 title gai^ 

Last year. Pacific Lutheran’s quarterback, Marc Wedety, 
threw fm 4^ yards as the Lutes won 50-^. 

This year, Heseth. a senior, was rite quaiteibadc. But 
the Lutes (11-2) couldn’t move the ball consistently, and 
Hoseth thiw rim mtooeptions. 

“1 f^ in some w^ it was one of the hardest seasons for 
awUle for me to ded with,” he said. “But we kept at it and these 
Ian few wedcs have been the greatest w:qr to end this career.” 

He dkhi’t want it to end. He was the caty player in the 
interview room who was stin wearing his uniform. 

Tjust wanted to keq) ntypa^ and myjeis^on as lo^as 
1 001 ^ because this is the net time Fm gc^ to be wearing a 
Pacific Lutheran unifonn,” he said as & vmce cracked. 

‘Teople dream about playing at Miami or, in Wasbmgton, 
to play W the Hnsldes,” Hosem said. “But rby dream since I 
was little was alwa^ to play for Pacific Lutheran, and tny 
dream came true.” 


CROSSWORD 


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Eage 30 

ART BUCHWALU 


Thanks for the Money 


W 'ASHINGTON — I was 
jogging past tbs C^itw 

tbe other momiog when a Dem- 
ocratic congressman, Doug 
derson, supped me and sai4 
“Are you a tnember of the mid- 
dle dassT . ,, 

“You better believe 11, I told 
him “Everyone who kn ow me 
says that Tm 
middle class.’* 

'* 11160 ,” he 
said, putting 
his hand into 
his briefcase 
and pulling 
out a fistful of 
dollars, “you 
are eotiUed to 
ataxcuL** 
r was em- 
barrassed to 
accept it *1 thought you people 
were trying to balance the bud- 
get” I said. 

“We are, but that doesn't 
mean we can't afford to d^e the 
middile dass a little *walkuig- 
aioimd’ mon^. After all you 
are hard-woricmg. God-fearing, 
salt-of-tbe-earth people and a 
credit to the class you r^re- 
sent” Anderson cj^lained. 

□ 



I was about to take the cash 
when a Republican named 
George Cloutier came up to me 
and said, “Don’t take his mon- 
The Republicans are pre- 
pared to offer wu twice as 
mudi relief as the Democrats 
cmi come up with. We'll even 
throw in a capital gains reduc- 
tion of 50 percent” 


Cj^ ot Cnltnre for 1995 

Keuttn 

LUXEMBOURG-- Luxem- 
bourg wiU take over from Lis- 
bon as the European City of 
^ture in 1993. Already on the 
program are the Spanish tenor 
Josi Carreras, the American 
chtMcc^pber Merce Cunning- 
ham and the Vienna Symphony 
Orchestra. 


“That’s very nice of you,” I 
said to Goutia. 

“But wtm't your cuts add to 
the national detidtT* 

“Of course not. The less taxes 
pet^le pay, the more they can 
home and spend. Hiat will 
encoun^ investment in the 
countty and create jobs for the 
cheats on welfare.” 

Qoutier went to his briefcase 
and pulled out a bunch of Or- 
ange County, California, deriv- 
atives. 

“What are those?” I asked 
Qoutier. 

*'Th^re as good as gold,” he 
assured me. “Take them to any 
brokerage house and trade 
them in for cash. By the way, 
tfa^ is only for the middle class. 
Do you have an^roof that you 
are one of them?^ 

“All my suits are from Sears 
Roebudt, shoes are from 
Thom McAn, and 1 have a dog 
named Spot” 

Cloutiersmiled, “That's good 
enough for me.” 

O 

Anderson was furious that 
the Republicans were stealing 
me away. He said, “We'll give 
you a tax cut of 25 percent and 
an additional 25 percent off the 
price tag.” 

1 took the money and ran. As 
1 was jogging past the White 
House, President CUnton came 
out and spoke to me. “1 notice 
by the way you are perspiring 
that you are a middle-cla^ per- 
son and 1 would like to give you 
a tax cut” 

*T was just given one on Cap- 
itol HUl,*’ 1 told the president. 

He said, “Mine is more 
breathtaking than anything 
they’re offering, and it doesn't 
conflict with my strict Hscal 
policy.” 

“How can you afford to do 
thatri asked. 

“We have a saying in Wash- 
ington: "If ycHi have to ask what 
a tax cut cost the country, 
you can't afford it.’ ” 



By BiU Keller 

ffnt York Tunes Stnice 

J OHANNESBURG— James Eaii 
Jones recalls that whmi he was 
offered the in a new film adapta- 
tion of Alan Patou’s cdasric, “Cry, the 
Beloved Country,” his first reaction 
was: ”WoijldQ’( that be a museum 
piece?” 

The novel after all predates ipR 
offida] radsi order caHed ^artheid. 
It has been for decades a staple of 
high school and college reading jdsts. 
It has been dramatizra twice before, 
as an ? <«ifliTned Broadway musical 
and a rather less-acdaim^ film. 

What can it possibly say afresh to a 
world that has watched South Africa's 
convulrive rebirth as a democracy? 
But the malrers of the new pfoductioa, 
who recently concluded 12 weeks of 
fllming hoe with an eye to opening at 
the Cannes film festival next May, 
coovinoed Jones that in this 4d-year- 
old standard they bad found the per- 
fect film oS the new South Amca, 
They may be righL In both its tight 
and its daiicoess, in its devotion to 
the redemptive power of reconcilia- 
tion but afo) in its reminder that, as 
Jones put it, “tiiece's a bottom to that 
bucket,” Baton's story has much in 
common with the S^th Africa of 
Ndson Mandela. 

“It's all about the wisdom of for- 
^veness,” said DarreO Roodt, the 
South African director best known 
for the musical “Saraiina!” We 
4^dn't ^ve to change anythmg. The 
tone is exactly the same as h was in 
the 1940s. If we*d made it five years 
ago, it would have had more of an 
anU-tmrntheid stance. But now we 
can tell the stoiy with hindrigbt.” 

“C^. the Belo^ Country' is the 
story of a rurel Zulu parson, Stephen 
Kumalo, who journeys to Johannes- 
burg in seardi ot his missmg son and 
rister. In the maelstnxn of the dty he 
discovers that his sister has fallen into 
prostitution and his son has been ar- 
rested for the murder of a white man. 

In their mutual grief at the loss of 
sons th^ never really understood, 
the fati^ the murderer and the 
murdered man become tiieods across 
tbe racial divide. 

The book's hopdulness is held 
short of sentimentali^ by omiaous 


r eitim ders that the country choosing 
up ladal sides and ninning cut of 
patience. *T have oos great fear in my 
heart,” the young black priest 

who becomes Kumalo’s guide in the 
dty, speaking of his cotmtiys whiles. 

one day when they turn to loving 
tb^ will find we are cunied to hating 

CoQtenmlating the> cunent rele- 
vance character be portrays, 

Jones s^: “Stephen Kuiisalo ^ a 
man of abiding ^ntlenes that must 
be cdebnued, because that's what 
gm us to tbs point withtMJi the 
bloodshed we ba>w seen in Somalia 
and Bosnia, ^th Africa could have 
goue that way.” 

But Jones does not see the charac- 
ter as naive —“he is almost poetical- 
^ aware” — and the actor says he 
balked when Roodt desoibed the 
parson, in a planning meeting, as 
“humble.” “1 said, ‘I dcm't buy 
that,’” Jones mused at the sunilio 
nofft of Jtrfiannesburg where he was 
perfo r ming his final scenes. 

“Gentle, I buy. Humble to me 
means you aye away something of 
yxHOsdf. f he's a very selfish 
man He'S as srffisb as Christ w^; he's 
sayng can work, asd he's 

gang to impose it on everybody.” 

Upon its publication in I94S. the 
book's success was instant and be- 
yond Paton’s wildest impes. By the 
tune Paton died in 1988. more than 
15 million copies bad been sold in 20 
faiyiagfes, lauding Zulu. 

raton, whose life as a writer, edu- 
cator and politician is the subject of 
“Alan Paton: A Biography ” an en- 
grossing new profile by Peter F. Al- 
exander (Oxford University Press), 
fell out of favor with many cam- 
pai^ecs against aparthdd. He 
po^ tactics like trade boycotts and 
came to favor tbe idea of a federatum 
of ethnic states as a stepping stone 
toward m^ority rule. 

By Itaton's lights, the two previous 
efforts to dramatize his masrerwork 
were failures. The 19SI British film 
Erected by ^Itan Korda is recalled 
mainly as one of the earliest ^peor- 
ances of Sidn^ Poitier, playing tbe 
young Soweto preacher who showed 
St^hen Kum^o around the urban 
jungle. Paton found the morie plod- 
ding, for wlurfi he, as a partner in the 
screenplay, was partly to blame. Tht 



movie was a failure at the box office. 

“It was a bit coo much on the 
nose,” Roodt said. “It was too aware 
that it was the anti-aparthead film.” 

Jones brought a cassette of the 
1951 version with him to study, and. 
said he admired Canada Lee's per- 
formance of Kumalo as “a stalwart 
oak.” His own Stephen Kumalo. he 
said, would be less oaklike, perhaps 
more Christlike in his almost dog- 
matic insistence on turning the other 
cheek. 

“Young people will probably fe^ 
more comfortable with Canada's 
than mine.” Jones sakL “Ihere's 
something ve^ unsettling about 
someone who insists on nimmg the 
other cheek. Because we're all afraid 
we won't survive that way.” 

“Lost in the Stars,” the 1949 stage 
adaptation by Maxwell Anderson 
with muac by Kurt Weill was a criti- 
cal triumph, although Paton loathed 
everything about it but the muric. 


Alexander suggests tluu Paton, who 
mas rdigtous and hopeful found the 
Broadway version too agnostic and 
bleak. The subtitle of “Gy, the Be- . 
loved Country,” after all is “A Stopr 
of Comfort in Desolatkm." “Lost in 
the Stars” found tittle cause for com- 
fort. 

Hie new verskm to be mme 

faithful to the author's intent, and to 
his prose. Much of the incantatoiy 
narrative, biblical in its cadence and 
evocative of nual Africa, is voiced 
over in Jones’s familiar baritone, 
with what he calls “my attempted 
Zulu accetiL” 

’The production was filmed on 
South African locations that are 
drendied in history. 

Om night Winnie Mandela, the es- 
tranged we of Preadent Mandela, 
dit^ped to watch Jmies, as the 
oounliy parson, arrive bewildered in a 
Pretoria square transformed by period 
street tights and vintage buses into 


1940s Jobannesburg. Tbe badcdrop 
was tbe Palace of Justice where m 
1964 Mis. Mandda watched her hus- 
band being sentenced to life anpasoo- 

menL The trial of Kumalo’s son, Ab- 
salom, was nimed in courtroom Q 
where Mandela was tried. 

Aside from three leading playets 
— Jones, Richard Harris as tbe fa- 
ther of the murdered white man and 
Chartes Dutton as Stephen Knmalo’s 
brother, a d^ticitous firdnand — 
cast and crew are South Africans. 

The screenwriter, Rontdd Harwood 
vriio was an Oscar nominee for *'rhe 
Dresser,” is South African-bom. 

Anant Singh, the South African . 
pr^Dcer, sard he bought tfaeri^ts to 
the novel six years ago, planmng to 
hoard the story until hie could make it 
as a celebration of the country's free- 
dom. “Of course Paton never imag- 
ined that it could ever happen in this 
century,” he said. 


WEATHER 


PEOPLE 


Europe 


Forecast lor Wednesday through Friday, as provided by Aceu-Weather. Asia 


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North America 

Unuaually mIM wsolher for 
lat« Dscernbsr will bs the 
niko from Colgay to Denver 
10 Chicago to Boston loie 
this week. A sto'iii could 
toh an arao hoin WashPM- 
ten. ox;., to New Yotf. Cay 
at the end of the week wnh 
»t(OT9 winds and a driving 
rain. Vancouver will have 
W01 vwaBior law m tha wevA. 


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dense tog in London and 
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will bring soaking rains to 
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and there couM be rams hi 
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have strong winds WeAies- 
day, Thutoday arid pertwpe 
Fftday 


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Typhoon Axel will hit me 
Philippines Wednesday. 
Moai likely, heaviest rains 
wd winds wiD remem aD4iUi 
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Will have soma sumhine and 
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Thundersomis ere poanlito 
to Singapore. 


Middle East 


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T he Rolling Stones wound up the 
North Andean s^ment of their 
world iouTWih a performance in Vancou- 
ver. British Columbia, on Ktitii Richards's 
Slst blrtiiday. The groui> will take a three- 
week break for tbe holidays and resume 
the tour in Januaiy in Mexico CiQr. 

□ 

Tbe columnist Mike Rqyko was hand- 
cu/Ted, put in the back of a patrol car and 
char^ with drunken driving and reristing 
arrest after a two-car accident is suburban 
C^cago. tbe polkx said. Royko. 6Z who 
writes a syndicated column for the Chicago 
Tribune; was slightly bun but refused treat- 
meuL 11 k other dnver was treated at a 
bospiial and released. 

D 

Vux^^Canby, the Sunday theater critic 
of The New York Times, b^ been named 
chief theater critic. Dsrid Rkhards. Tbe 
Times's cUef theater critic since 1993. is 
returning to The Washington Post as na- 
tional cititural affairs correspondent. 

□ 

In a Chivtmas tradition of her own. 
Princess Diana is expected to join her es- 
tranged husband. Mnoe Charles, and 
Quera Elizabeth for only part of the royal 


on nirtetmas Eve and attend church on 
Christmas with tbe queen and Charles. But 
she'll duck out of lundi, as she has done 
since separating from Charles in 1992. 

D 

“Little Women” wasn't exactly a bodice- 
itpper, but another novel writtm by LtMdsa ^ 
May Aleott is fiooDy headed for print “A' 
Long Fatal Love Chase” was sold to Ran- 
dom House for an undisdosed amount by-a 
coBectorof AJoott memorabilia, 
neB. It should be published next year, ac- 
cording to Tbe New Yoricer magazuie. Tbe 
story o( a strong-willed young woman 
stal^ all overEun^biyhocfizst lovo-was 
rgected in 1866 1^ Alik's puUii^ as 
“mo long and too sensational “This is an 
adult book, and it's not just for dusty sdb^ 
ais.” Bicfcnell told tbe magazine. 5 for 
people at the beach.” 

Q 

Broca Springsteen won a l^al battle on 
Monday to prevent Dare, a small British 
record comity, finom releasiag a double 
album of songs be made before be became 
famous. “Prodigal Son” contained trades 
recorded in 1S171 at a studio in New Jers^. 
^jingsteen released his first record in 1^3. 
shortly after rigmng with Columbia. 


Kdtfa and Mick: That's aO fw ^ 4 . 


holiday observances, according to British 
newspapers. Diana plans to see ber sons, 
Wnii^ 12, and Harry, 10. open presents 



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