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INTERNATIONAL 



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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 

Paris, Thursday, December 22, 1994 


No. 34.778 


Dozens Hurt 
In Firebomb 
Blast inN.Y. 
Subway Car 

Compiled Ip Our Staff From IXspaidurs 

^RK — A firebomb ex- 
ploded on a crowded subway train 
Wednesday near Manhattan's finan- 
cial district, injuring at least 37 peo- 
ple. four of ibezn critically. 

Hundreds of passengers rushed out 
of the Brooklyn- bound train as the 
device went off in a fireball, leaving 
oner cases and purses behind as they 
staggered to the street Others were 
aimed out by rescuers. Some swatted 
names off the clothes of fellow pas- 
sengers. 

One passenger, Denfield Otto, an 
off-duty transit police officer, said 
there was a small series of popping 
noises before a larger explosion 
rocked the train as it sat in the Fulton 
Street station, near the World Trade 
Center, about 1:30 P.M. 

“There were people on the ground, 
burning and rolling around/ 1 said 
Bennett Fischtal, a passenger. “It 
looked like a couple of people were 
unconscious. " 

“1 was in the car directly next to the 
explosion, he said. “Once the explo- 
sion happened there were people run- 
ning and trampling, it was mayhem, it 
was chaos." 

The incendiary device apparently 
went off in the lap of a passenger in 
the sixth car, Police Commissioner 
WflHam J. Bratton said. The device 
appeared to be a glass jar, filled with 
flammable liquid and with an external 
igniter, he said. 

A police spokesman, John Miller, 
said the device was “not the kind of 
bomb that blows out windows.” 

Mr. Bratton said police want to 
speak with one victim found “with 
particularly severe burns." The man, 
whose injuries were too serious for 
investigators to interview him imme- 
diately, was found two stations away 
in Brooklyn, police said. 

CBS News reported that the victim i 
was in custody at the Cornell Univer- 
sity Bum Center in Manhattan. 

Subway service to Lower Manhat- 
tan and Brooklyn was halted, sus- 
pending service to half a million pas- 
sengers, and all trains were bong 

See SUBWAY, Page 3 



Berlusconi Set to Quit 
As Coalition Collapses 

Italy’s Attempt to Break With Past 
Is Torpedoed by Political Rivalries 


Prime Minister Berlusconi girding himself on Wednesday for a parliamentary debate cm the future of Iris government. 


By Alan Cowell 

i View Turk Times Service 

ROME — After only seven months in 
office. Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi 
was described Wednesday night as being 
on the brink of resignation in the face of a 
revolt within his coalition by the insurgent 
Northern League. 

His spokesman, Jas Gawronski, said it 
was “99 percent certain** that Mr. Berlus- 
coni would tender his resignation to Presi- 
dent Oscar Luigi Scalfaro on Thursday. 

“The one percent uncertainty is that he 
might ask for a confidence vote, but he's 
very likely to resign,” Mr. Gawronski said. 
Mr. Gawronski said Mr. Berlusconi hpd 
authorized him to make the statement 

The development came after Mr. Berlus- 
coni delivered an aggressive speech to Par- 
liament, where he faces three no-confi- 
dence votes sponsored by his 
parliamentary opponents and by the rebel- 
lious Northern League. 

The move means Mr. Scalfaro must de- 
ride whether to permit political negotia- 
tions between Mr. Berlusconi’s opponents 
on forming a new government or to autho- 
rize new elections. 

But it also means that Italy's first at- 
tempt to break with its corruption-stained 
past through the elections last March that 
brought Mr. Berlusconi to power has foun- 
dered, torpedoed by political rivalry over 
who should lead the land to its vaunted 
"Second Republic.” 

Mr. Berlusconi’s speech to Parliament 


Yeltsin Vows to ‘Spare No Effort 9 in Chechnya 


By Margaret Shapiro 

Washington Prat Service 

MOSCOW — President Boris N. Yelt- 
sin pledged Wednesday to continue his 
military assault against the breakaway re- 
public of Chechnya, but he also told the 
Chechen people that they were not the 
target and would not be penalized when 
the. hostilities were over. : 

Mr. Yeltsin instructed his ministers of 
defense and interior to “spare no effort to 
restore the rule of the Russian constitution 
on the whole territory of the Chechen 


republic/’ Itar-Tass press agency reported. 

[Russian warplanes bombed’ the Che- 
chen capital, Grozny, for an hour around 
midnight Wednesday in the heaviest air 
raids since troops intervened Dec. II, an 
AFP correspondent said. The planes made 
1 1 bombing runs over the city and about 
30 explosions were heard. Two of the 
blasts were not far from the city center, 
and three were on the outskirts.] 

Mr. Yeltsin’s statement Wednesday to 
the Chechen people, after thousands had 
formed a human chain on snowy roads to 


protest Russia’s invasion, was an attempt 
to lower the resistance of the population to 
(he idea of eventual reintegration into Rus- 
sia. 

The republic declared its independence 
in 1991, and Russian now says it has be- 
come a base for arms dealers and gang- 
sters. _ 

In several communiques about the mili- 
tary situation Wednesday, Russian offi- 
cials reported growing resistance by Che- 
chen fighters that was slowing what they 


had hoped would be a fairly steady ad- 
vance of troops on Grozny. 

The Russian Security Council noted a 
“drastic increase in the activities of unlaw- 
ful aimed formations,” and said that 
“commando groups and snipers were oper- 
ating everywhere, as a result of which casu- 
alties among servicemen have increased.’’ 

The council also said that mercenaries 
from Afghanistan, Azerbaijan and 
Ukraine had joined the Chechen forces. 

See RUSSIA, Page 6 


Fruits of Carter’s Down-Home Diplomacy 

Ingenuous Approach Apparently Wins Serbian Commitment 


North Koreans to Return 
Body of U.S. Army Pilot 


By John Pomfret 

Washington Pan Soviet 

SARAJEVO, Bosxua-Herzegovina — 
He couldn’t pronounce anybody’s name. 
He confused one faction with another. He 
looked more like a golfer with a Southern 
patrician air than a high-flying interna- 
tional Mr. Fjx-It. He was stem but brief 
with the victims, and long-winded and 
understanding with the aggressors. 

But turning even gaffes into gains, for- 
mer President Jimmy Carter waded into 
the Balkans morass this week and left, 
seemingly without getting any mud on his 
spanking white turtleneck or his growing, 
reputation as the Houdini of American 
foreign policy. 

And what he obtained was s ign ificant — 
a commitment to silence Bosnia’s guns by 
Friday and the first negotiations between 


Serbs and Muslims since a breakdown last 
summer led to a nasty autumn erf more 
war. 

In a final show of his good fortune, the 
70-year-old former president made it out 
erf town a day before a blizzard blanketed 

NEVSAmYSB 

this crumbling capital, shutting the airport 
that Mr. Garter’s kind words to the Serbs 
had helped reopen. The tempest was per- 
haps a sign that even nature was on Mr. 
Carter’s side. Nothing quells the guns of 
Bosnia better than a good snowstorm. 

Mr. Carter’s down-home routine has 
worked before, particularly in Haiti, where 
during negotiations to remove General 
Raoul C6dras from power he invited the 
strongman to speak at the Sunday school 
in Plains, Georgia, and complimented his 


wife and children. While a U.S. invasion 
force roared toward the Caribbean Sea. 
Mr. Carter concluded a deal with General 
Gfedras and the attack was called off. 

In North Korea, Mr. Carter defied the 
Clinton administration and walked off 
with an agreement with Kim II Sung to 
halt his country’s nuclear program, avert- 
ing the imposition of U.S. economic sanc- 
tions, which North Korea had said would 
be an act of war. 

But it was here in Bosnia that Mr. Car- 
ta’s “aw shucks” style merged with his 
obvious ignorance of this messy conflict 
into one of the strangest, but most potent, 
one-two punches so far in the Balkans. 

While it is still undear whether Mr. 
Carter’s mission will do much more than 
provide a short hiatus for Bosnia’s blood- 

See BOSNIA, Page 6 


By Paul Blustdn 

Pogj Service 

SEOUL — North Korea has agreed 
to return the body of a U.S. Army pilot 
who was killed when his helicopter went 
down in Neath Korean territory, U.S. 
officials said Wednesday, but a second 
pilot who survived wifi be held until 
Pyongyang completes its investigation 
of the in cad eat. 

Representative William B. Richard- 
son, Democrat of New Mexico, was 
scheduled to bring the pilot’s body 
across the border into South Korea on 
Thursday morning, a U.S. Embassy of- 
ficial said. 

The CKnton administration said it 
welcomed the agreement to repatriate 
the body of Chid Warrant Officer Da- 
vid Hflemon. The administration had 
cautioned Pyongyang that further delay 


in returning the crewmen, whose heli- 
copter went down Saturday, could af- 
fect relations between the two coun- 
tries. 

The White House press secretary, 
Dee Dee Mym, said that the United 
States hoped the surviving pilot would 
be released by Sunday, Christinas Day. 
But U.S. officials said they had no con- 
crete assurances be would be released. 

Mr. HScmon and Chief Warrant Of- 
ficer Bobby Hall were flying along the 
Demilitarized Zone separating North 
and South Korea when their OH-58C 
helicopter strayed into North Korean 
territory and went down. Mr. Hilemon 
died a n d Mr. Hall was taken captive. 

The official North Korean press 
agency, KCNA, said Wednesday that 

See KOREA, Page 6 


Republicans Plan a Tough Bottom-Une Approach to Foreign Aid 


By Steven Greenhouse 

Sew York Tuna Service 

WASHINGTON — Republican leaders in Con-: 
sress are planning a tough new approach that treats 
f 0T dgn aid much like welfare: as a mritibfllion-dollar 
handout that needs to be overhauled and cut. 

In mapping strategy for the foreign aid budget, 
vhicb is S13.7 billion this year, the congressional 
Zfpublicans want to focus on advancing UJs. national 
ecurity and economic interests rather than what they 
ay is an entitlement program for poor nations. Many 
.f them talk about using their new majority to cut 
■ueign aid by 15 to 20 percent 

Indeed, aid to Africa is even more vulnerable be- 
iuse the Congressional Black Caucus, which, had a 


larec say in shaping aid when the Democrats con- 
trolled Congress, will exert little influence on Republi- 
cans, who have voted to efinunate fi n ancing for that 
group. . 

The Republican lawmakers with (he greatest influ- 
ence on foreign aid suggest that assistance to Africa 
will be cut sharply, while aid to the Middle East and 
former Soviet bloc nations — two areas viewed as vital 
to national security — will be maintained at or near 
current levels. 

These lawmakers say they intend to slash the $1 
billion in annual aid to Africa because in their view 
African countries have little strategic importance and 
have grown too dependent on aid. 

“The only way to break .the devastating cycle of 


dependency is to end foreign aid entitlement pro- 
grams,” said Senator Mitch McConnell, the Kentucky 
Republican who will be chairman of the appropria- 
tions subcommittee on foreign operations, if we're 
going to change welfare hoe at home, we certainly 
ought not to be using American tax dollars to foster 
that kind of dependency abroad.” 

Representative Sonny Callahan, the Alabama Re- 
publican who mil head the House subcommittee on 
foreign operations, shares that view. 

To that end. Republican lawmakers have proposed 
tighter strings on assistance and barring aid to coun- 
tries unless their policies promote free markets, free 
trade, and private property. 

But Clinton administration officials, in an effort to 


prevent such cuts, gave several speeches last week 
asserting that Republican aid strategy takes a myopic 
view of the security interests of the United States and 
undercuts its leadership role and moral authority 
overseas. 

“We cannot exercise influence ova the internation- 
al community in some rosier future if we abdicate 
responribflity now ” said J. Brian Atwood, adminis- 
trator of the Agency for International Development, 
the government’s chief aid arm. Senator McConnell 
and other Republicans have proposed eliminating the 
agency and having the State Department administer 
aid directly. 

In part, the dash reflects a difference in philosophy. 
See A ED, Page 6 


was a final effort to thwart (he no-confi- 
dence moves, but he evidently calculated 
Q he could not win. 

a As be has done on several occasions, he 
g told Italians who have seesawed through 
a months of crisis that the only way out of 
x the country’s woes was an early election. 

But even as he spoke, his closest allies 
t seemed to be saying that the battle to save 
„ his wounded government had already been 
. lost. 

“The bottom line doesn’t change,” said 
. Gianfranco Fini the leader of the neofas- 
s ost National Alliance who also favors ear- 
ly elections. “Everyone knows that this will 
j end with a government that doesn't exist 
anymore. How we get there is a Byzantine 
issue. Let’s go to the ballot box.” 

Mr. Berlusconi told a packed Parlia- 
ment; “If this government majority dis- 
i solves, we must return to the voters — 
decisively and calmly — to seek their opin- 
ion.” 

While only Mr. Scalfaro may, by law, 
call new elections, Mr. Berlusconi went on 
to say: “I am convinced that this is a 
mandatory step that we have no alterna- 
tive but to take.” 

The no-confidence motions were lodged 
by the forma Communists, the Popular 
Party — successors to the old Christian 
Democrats — and the Northern League, a 
nominal ally within Mr. Berlusconi's coali- 
tion. 

But it was for the Northern League 
leader, Umberto Bossi, that Mr. Berlus- 
coni reserved most of his invective, accus- 
ing him of fraud and bad faith for breaking 
with the rightist alliance that brought his 
party into the government for the first 
time. 

In the March elections, Mr. Berlusconi's 
Foiza ItaHa party struck an electoral pact 
with Mr. Bossi in the north of the country 
and with the National Alliance in the 
south to secure a parliamentary majority in 
the Iowa house and thus form a coalition 
with two other small, centrist parties. 

By rebelling against the coalition, Mr. 
Berlusconi argues, Mr. Bossi has forfeited 
his political legitimacy because it was that 
same alliance (hat enabled his pony to take 
power. 

“Sovereignty belongs to the people and 
no one has the right to cany it off,” Mr. 
Berlusconi said. “Whoever works against 
the will of the voters, for whatever reason 
and at whatever time, offends the spirit 
and soul of the democratic constitution/' 
The tone and content of Mr. Berlus- 
coni’s speech suggested that he was setting 
the stage for a re-election campaign, pro- 
jecting himself as the victim of treachery. 

Mr. Bossi and his allies in the parlia- 
mentary opposition reckon to command 
about 325 of the 630 lower-house seats — 
enough to topple the government despite 
the opposition of dissidents in the League. 

Almost since the government took of- 
fice, Mr. Bossi has railed against Mr. Ber- 
lusconi, criticizing him on a broad range of 
issues. 

He has depicted Mr. Berlusconi as unfit 
for office because of a conflict of interest 
between his political position and his huge 
business holdings. He has accused him of 
seeking to monopolize Italian broadcast- 
ing by controlling state television in addi- 
tion to bis own three commercial networks. 
And he has frequently criticized the Fas- 
cist roots of the National Alliance coali- 
tionpartner, as he did again in Parliament 
on Wednesday night. 

In doing so, Mr. Boss! is primarily pur- 
suing Ms own political agenda, seeking to 
stake out an independent position from 
Mr. Berlusconi and Mr. Fini so as to avoid 
an erosion of support for him in his north- 
ern heartland. Most Italian analysts say 
that, in new elections, the Northern 
League would lose support in a straight 
fight with the Berlusconi camp. 

Mr. Bosri has thus sought to energize the 
crusading, rebellious image with which he 
built support as he tilted against Italy’s 
discredited political old guard before this 
year’s elections. On Wednesday night, he 
again cast Mr. Berlusconi as a direct de- 
scendant of Italy’s corruption-stained 
past 

“It is my responsibility today lo bring to 
an end the First Republic,” he said, using 
the political shorthand for Italy’s postwar 
era, and accusing Mr. Berlusconi himself 
of breaking the agreements on which their 
electoral and coalition alliance was found- 
ed. 


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Kites ..11JDFP Morocco 12 Dh 

^raw'-i^CFA Gator 8 00Rm!s 

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ST" 9.00 FF Saudi Arabia ..9.00 R. 

M0CFA Senegal W0CFA 

300 Dr. Spain -2O0PTAS 

^"'.7. AMO Lire Tunisia ....T.000 Dm 
^ ,,»CJA 

m --‘.U5S l -50 U.S. Mil. (Bur.) fl, TO 


Taking Credit for a Problem 

Seoul Targets Heavy- Spending Youths 


The Associated Press 

SEOUL — South Korea, fearing that 
heavy spending try young people is con- 
tributing lo inflation, has decided to pre- 
vent them from receiving credit cards, gov- 
ernment officials said Wednesday. 

Starting next year, banks wfll be banned 
from issuing credit cards to college stu- 
dents, people aged under 20 and workers 
with Jess than one year on the job. the 
Ministry of Finance raid. 

Such people who already have credit 
cuds will race further scrutiny of their 
income sources when the cards expire, and 


the cards could be taken away, it added. 

Officials have voiced concern over 
“overconsumption" by children of well-to- 
do families. 

South Korea’s high economic growth, 
estimated at 8.4 percent this year, has 
raised fears of inflation. The government 
hopes to keep price increases at about last 
year’s level — S.3 percent 

It is common for Korean students to 
cany several credit cards. Credit-card 
companies have been criticized for issuing 
cards “indiscriminately,*’ targeting stu- 
dents whose wealthy families can pay their 
bills. 



FVENCH GAMING CHIEF 


G&ard Cote, when he was 


Kiosk 

Pele Is Appointed 
To Brazil Cabinet 

BRASILIA (AP) — President-elect 
Fernando Hennque Cardoso aTmrom^ 
a cabinet Wednesday with one suprising 
newcomer — the soccer legena Pe]£, 
named to head a new cabinet-level Spe- 
cial Secretariat for Sports. 

“He will bca symbol of the Brazil that 
succeeded and that started front the bot- 
tom,” Mr. Cardoso said. 

Since retiring as a player, Pete, 54, has 
become a millionaire businessman. 


bead of the French lottery. He was charged Wednesday with fraud. Page 2. Book Review 


Page 8. 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 1994 



Who’s Helping Wham? 


WORLD BRIEFS 


By Joseph Fitchett 

Internal Herdd Tribune 

PARIS — By buying lottery tickets, French 
people knew that they were helping the govern- 
ment budget and getting a I-in-3-imhon shot at 
rocketing to riches. 

What they were also buying, without knowing 

it, was a lavish lifestyle for some , lo P.P^Jl^ 
\ with the state-owned louety^s chief exec- 


ai Uiv tup oiuiu a Kiia ui 

implicating government and business. 


Ignoring the dmmbrat of court nsvelaUaas. ^ 

“the named AbbePiene. ^ of 

iucians The {h?aovemment to requisition 

nave cnosen instead to escalate their rhetoric Pans, caUed Jr invests, 

about the deprived classes. This week, it’s the empty -^kW denounced . by 

When challenged in the past about his spend- homeless. ■ „._wichment — and even publicly , 

ins, Mr. Cole died in his defense hi s successful Unlike the violent radicals of revolutionary French —for a inove mddy 

management of state-ren gambling games in **?> Jehomeless have been politically docile, “^id to Mrb himsdf m GaulUst 

Fnmoe and .broad Mytoario^S^. co~. mate** for pobnea! *■«,■ ^ ^ 

intbeirviews • 


Brother of Hezbollah Militant 
Is Killed by Beirut Gar Bomb 

BEIRUT (Reuters) — -.A brother of Lebanon’s mom wanted 
civil war hostasgotaker was killed, by a car bomb in Beaut on 
Wednesday* Heaboflabsouices said. 

i ■ •< ... J CmaA It/fuinKniikak b 


u, fr«j a r-hi^f exec- rranw oxiu auiuau. LUC T— 

Ste rtoioess Mud^e te appear to be sfaiftingio riieir views . W ^ ^ 

construction of a swimming pool in his compa- by scratching die cards. to see a widening gap between rich and poor as tfSe SoKts, who have 

wsfSjSsartasa •^ssswsss.'asa.'- sssrassssffk^j 

^ Helto ^Mbiffion, with profits rtactogooariy JSSSSWpSSSd Wednesday, to W -BPfigMSSOTS 

S*div^npSfor bis own profit- 1200 nnlhon last year. ambnnts U tTa niv version of tie classic Prune Vfimrter Michel Room caneo . 

rCera^TSuse or uapayers' money „ Ff? 0 *! prosecutors reportedly found that Mr. French wemes about unemployment and ten- anmrfBdd. ^ „ ^er to the 

”5 SSEUL m reports of fraud charges Colfc had misused company funds by takmg sons with immigrants. . Neither Itf t or n^i rw* the entire polid- 

wtThSded the national friends — “in the hundreds” — to exotic destma- The homeless, covering all these categories, corr^uon^^ ^ passed a 

froin 1989 to 1993 tions for vacations disguised as seminars. offer convenient symbolism. When a group of cal Class. gn j jq-,* iqd dv3 

was The case willfud recent revelations about how demons^iors oc^ied an ***** birildin* law reoumng elected officials and m top 


ivu. wiw, — : . r 

named to the lucrative post after hewing Fran- 
cois Mitterrand, a Socialist and critic of easy 
money, recraft his image in ways that won 


parts of the French elite have abused public 
funds with a nonchalance verging on notions of 
divine right. 



Ebrid Jotn/Apocc Fiano-tasc 

AIR CRASH IN ENGLAND KILLS S — Rescuers examining wreckage of a cai^o plane titafrotshed Wednesday 
on approach to Coventry, England. Three Algerians and two Britons were killed. Tie Boeing 737-200, owned by Air 
Alggrie and leased to Phoenix Aviation, dipped roofs and an electricity pylon, catting power, the pofice sad. 


in the driest GenJidn-d®-ftis neighborhood servant todotoelhoriiriWOT^ 
of Paris this week. Prime Minister Edouard Bal- tew—utorh™ aiOTg^cmMs^beforepass- 
iadur condoned?! and had his own car drive mg— willlreep the statements secret. 

After Years of Yawning , 
House of Commons Acts 

The Assodcaed Press 

LONDON — The House of Commons has decided to 
rt»nyipf» its working hours for an. experimental period, curbing 
the number of late-night sittings and introdnemg more day- 
time sessions. _ _ __ 

At present, business in the 651-seat Commons starts at 2:30 
P id. and often continues into the early hours of the morning. 

fl ig httime sittings, a hangover from the past when the 
House was all-male and members dined at their London dubs 
before returning late in the evening to vote, are btamed by 
some legislators for a high rate of marriag e breakdowns 
among members. 

Arafat and Peres 
Move to Speed Talks 


EUROPEAN 

TOPICS 

French Government Tunes In 
To Snrge of Dish Antennas 

Are the thousands of parabolic anten- 
nas popping up on roofs in French cities 
— most conspicuously in some of the 
poorer neighborhoods — realty bringing 
a flood of Islamic fundamentalist propa- 
ganda? 

The number of dish antennas in 
France has soared in the past year, and 
some 150,000 of th em ar e now pointed 
toward the Eutelsat HF3 satellite, which 
carries about 15 Turkish and Arab sta- 
tions, according to the French weekly Le 
Point 

The French government is sufficiently 
concerned to have commissioned a con- 
sultant, Fouad Benhalla, to explore the 
possibility of starting an “alternative*’ 
Arab-language channel under govern- 
ment control 

Eutelsat EF3 does carry something, 
called Muslim TV, which is Pakistani- 
funded. But is the satellite a vector for 
Islamic propaganda? Farhad Khosrok- 
havar of the School for Advanced Stud- 
ies in Social Sciences thinks not 

“You can't realty attribute the spread 


of I si ami sm in the suburbs to television,” 
he says. The prime target of Islamic pros- 
etytizers, according to Mr. Khosrokha- 
var, are the young, and in France young 
people of Arab ancestry watch tittle tele- 
vision and often speak no Arabic. The 
programs — some half of which come 
from India or Anglo-Saxon countries — 
are most often nonreligious in content, 
and are watched by older immigrants as 
a way to maintain ties to the old country. 

The French government channel could 
go on the air next year, if funding is 
approved. About 3 million Muslims live 
in France. 

Around Europe 

The church that graces the Prague sky- 
line belongs to the church, a court has 
ruled. A government claim to the soaring 
St Vitus Cathedral, the heart of Prague 
Castle, was rejected by a Prague court 

President Vaclav Havel bad asserted 
state ownership — the castle is also the 
traditional home of the president Mr, 
Havel’s office insists that the cathedral's 
“psychological owner is undoubtedly the 
Czech nation.” It says Parliament still 
could address the issue. 

Business executives faced with last- 
minute Christmas shopping for col- 
leagues or clients should think twice be- 
fore polling out their credit cards, says 
Manfred Bruhn, a marketing professor 
at the European Business School. 


Thoughtless presents — the 10th foun- 
tain pen for a laptop computer enthusi- 
ast, another bottle of aftershave for a 
bearded business contact — can do more 
harm than good. “Nowhere else is so 
much money wasted so thoughtlessly” 
Mr. Bruhn told the German weekly Fo- 
cus. He said 91 percent of all presents 
given by business executives are passed 
on to friends or relatives. His tips: Ana- 
lyze your relationship to the person 
you're buying for. Think about what the 
gift is intended to convey. Above all, 
study the person's reaction — and figure 
out bow to do better next year. 

Christmas was nearly stolen from the 
1 i residents of Norway’s Bear Island, far 
north of the Arctic Circle. The island's 
only Christmas tree had been brought by 
coast guard cutter, and the residents, 
who work at a weather and radio base, 
carefully packed snow around it to keep 
it green. But when they went to dig the 
tree out, only pine needles remained. The 
rest apparently had become a snack for a 
polar bear. 

It looked like the crew would have to 
hang their Christmas decorations on a 
potted rubber tree. But colleagues in tbe 
Svalbard islands, 400 kilometers farther 
north, saved the day. They found a new 
tree and sent it on by transport plane. 


Brian Knowlton 


Complied by Our Staff From Dispatches 

GAZA CITY —Yasser Ara- 
fat, the PLO leader, and For- 
eign Minister Shimon Feres of 
Israel said Wednesday they 
were determined to break the 
impasse over West Bank troop 
withdrawal and would move to 
secret, top-level talks to get re- 
sults. 

“We fed tbe best way to ar- 
rive at an agreement is doing it 
discreetly” and on a “very high 
level," Mr. Feres said after talks 
at Mr. Arafat’s office. 

Mr. Arafat said he would 
communicate with Mr. Peres 
and Prime Minister Yitzhak 
Rabin “through the telephone, 
faxes and meetings He said he 
and Mr. Feres made progress in 
their talks Wednesday, but nei- 
ther divulged details. 

The Palestinians told the Is- 
raeli delegation it was impera- 
tive to reach agreement soon 
because of eroding support in 
the West Bank and Gaza for the 


peace process. 
“I think 


tbe foreign minister 
is aware of tbe urgency,” sard 
an Arafat spokesman, Marwan 
Kanafani. 

Under the Israel-Palestine 
Liberation Organization ac- 
cord, Israeli soldiers were to 
pull out of Palestinian towns in 
the West Bank on the eve of 
Palestinian general elections, 
initially scheduled for no later 
than last July. 



Les Roses de Noel 


Motifs d'oreilles, or, 
corail et brillums. 







B roc he or, eor.ril, 
ut brillunrs. 


4> 

a 


**// est des signatures auxquelles on tient ? 

I 


Van Cleef & Arpels PARIS 22, place Venddme Tel: 42 61 58 5S GENEVE 31, Rue du Rhone. Tel: 31 1 60 70 


The schedule has been de- 
layed because Israel is wary of 
redeployment, following a se- 
ries of attacks on Israelis by 
Muslim militants. Israeli com- 
manders have said they will 
have a hard time protecting the 
120,000 Jewish settlers in the 
West Bank once soldiers left the 
Palestinian towns. 

Israel reportedly is offering 
the Palestinians a gradual troop 
pullout, and Palestinian offi- 
cials said Wednesday that Mr. 
Arafat was ready to consider 
the idea. 

“If they proride us with a 
timetable for redeployment, we 
are ready to discuss it," said 
Azmi Shuaibi, a member of the 
Palestinian self-rule govern- 
ment 

Israeli leaders reportedly told 
Mr. Arafat in earlier meetings 
that he had two choices. 

He could either agree to elec- 
tions In the near future in a 
move to win broader legitimacy 
for his rule, but with troops re- 
maining in most Palestinian 
towns. 

Or he could decide to negoti- 
ate the whole redeployment 
package, including complicated 
security arrangements for the 
Jewish settlers, but that this 
would very likely postpone elec- 
tions for right or nine more 
months. 

It was not clear from state- 
ments Wednesday whether the 
two sides had opted for one of 
the two approaches. 

Mr. Peres and Mr. Arafat de- 
cided in their talks that 
dures for elections would 
discussed by second-level nego- 
tiators in continuing talks in 
Cairo. 

In a related development, the 
Israeli president, tier Weiz- 
man, ended his first visit to 
Egypt as head of state on 
Wednesday without securing a 
guarantee that President Hosni 
Mubarak would make a long- 
promised return visit 

Mr. Weizman, who was de- 
fense minister when his country 
and Egypt signed their historic 
peace treaty in 1979, held three 
rounds of talks with Mr. Mu- 
barak on the Middle East peace 
process and also met Egyptian 
ministers during his three-day 
visit. 

Israel Television said last 
week that Mr. Mubarak would 
visit Israel for the first time 
within the next three months, 
but the Egyptian foreign minis- 
ter. Amr Moussa, was noncom- 
mittal. 

"It’s always a . 
that’s better than it not 
possible.” he said. 

(AP, Reuters) 


. __ the pro- 
killed in the 


Q2U ill uiw 

** He*)! OTSpected of involvement in the bdnfflpin g.^ _ seve ^ 
Western hostages in Beirut, including the Associated Pressure- . 
soondent Teny Anderson, the .British Anglican etrvqy Teny / 
Waite and the dean of agrientare at the American University of - 
Beirut, Professor Thomas Sothedand- 

Mitterrand Stopped Chemotherapy 

PARIS (Be nt? *) — President Francois Mitterrand had to drop 
chemotherapy for his prostate cancer after eroeriendng severe., 
side effects but is recovering from the III effects and is now 
undergoing radiation therapy, his doctor said Wednesday. 

Dr. Gutter said m. Mr. Mitterrand's regular six-month . 

health bulletin that the 78-year-old president’s overall health 
could not be definitively evaluated until several weeks after the 
radiation treatments at the end of tins month. r 

Mr. Mitterrand, who underwent a second prostate cancer 
operation in July, has pledged to stay in power until May, when 
Ins second seven-year twin ends. Dr. Gutter said the chemothera- 
py caused severe inflammation and did not help reduce the cancer. 
Bat tbe subsequent radiation therapy, combined with hormone 
treatment, was having “significant results.” 

Jordan Sentences 11 Militants to Die 

AMMAN, Jordan (Reuters) — Jordan’s state security court on 
Wednesday sentenced to death 11 Muslim militants accused of a 
plot to riasiabniwt the kmgdom, including a series of bombings « 
and plans to assassinate leading officials. 

Three of those sentenced to hang were tried in absentia and * 
remain at large. They include Mohammed Khalifa, a son-in-law of 
a Sffndi Arabian businessman, Ussama Laden, who is an alleged ^ 
Rmmriw of Muslim hard-line groups across the region. 

Of the 25 men cm trial three had death sentences commuted to - 
life terms and one death sentence was reduced to 20 years. Three , 
others received sentences from 7% to 20 years, rifle seven men 
were acquitted. The sentences win automa tic all y be appealed to a t 
hi gher court King Hussein has commuted all previous death . 
sentences for political crimes. 

U.S. Lends Support to Liberia Talks 

ACCRA, Ghana (Reuters) — President Bill Clinton’s national - 
security adviser, W.Antiiony Lake, made a surprise visit to Ghana , 
on Wednesday to lend support to efforts to broker peace among - 
Liberia’s warlords and politicians. 

Ghanaian officials said Accra peace talks, which entered a 

second day on Wednesday, appeared to be making headway on a 

draft agreement to end the five-year-old civil war, which has killed 
an estimated 150,000 people. 

In Liberia, the authorities began an investigation into last 
week’s massacre of civilians in tne capital, Monrovia, and aid 
workers said further bodies had been discovered that could push 
the toll to as high as 68. 

Japanese Politician Fined for Bribes 

TOKYO (Reuters) —A former member of Pariiament received 
a fine and a suspended prison term on Wednesday after bring 
convicted of taking bribes in a shares-for-favore scandal that 
implicated many top politicians, Japanese media reports said. 

K&tsuya Ikeda, 57, a former lower house member for the now- 
disbanded Clean Government Party, got a three-year prison term 
suspended for four years and a fine of -28.35 million yen 
($183,500). 

Mir. Ikeda was found guilty of receiving, between August 1984 
and September 1986, about 7 nhHion yen in checks and cash, and 
5,000 unlisted shares in Recruit Cosmos _Co n a real estate subsid- 
iary of major Tokyo-based job information firm, Recruit Co. 

Hundreds Mark Stalin’s Birthday 

GORI, Georgia (AP) — Hundreds of people nostalgic for a lost • 
empire shivered in snow, rain and sleet Wednesday to mark the . 
1 15tb anniversary of Josef Stalin’s birth. 

Nearly 1,000 people marched to the huge statue of Stalin in - 
Gori, birthplace of the man historians say is responsible for the 
deaths of at least 20 million pet 

In another Georgian town, 
gathered for the unveiling of a 1 
for more than 30 years. The bust was removed from a local 
kindezgaitea in 2961 when Stalin's successors began to quietly 
play down the late Communist leader’s near-deity status. 



TRAVEL UPDATE 

Airport Bomb Scanner Due for Tests 

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Aviation Administra- 
tion said it hopes to begin testing next year a computerized airport 
explosives-detection system that works much like CAT scans in 
hospitals. 

Prompted by the December 1988 bombing of Pan Am Flight 
103 over Lockwbie, Scotland, the U.S. Congress ordered the 
aviation agency in 1990 to develop new devices to protect airports 
and planes from bombs. Field tests of the new scanner may take 
up to two years. J 

developed by In Vision Technologies of Foster 
City. California, and Imatroa Federal Systems of Burke, Virgmia, 
takes multiple views of the contents of luggage to create cross- 
sectional images or slices. A computer then reconstructs the slices 
to determine the density of objects. 

The United States has issued a travel advisory for flights over 
Afghanistan, noting a warning by the International Civil Aviation 
OrganbatKra that there is no reliable communication with Kabul 
air traffic control. (AFP) 

A typhoon slaamjed into tbe central Phffippmes on Wednesday 
with winds of 125 kilometers per hour, threatening Cebu City and 

m divers “°n of domestic and international 
flights filled with holiday travelers. fjfj 

gwerament has denied Air Canada a route to 
^2°? ^ on I^ or lhe foreseeable future, a Transport Department 
officud in Ottawa said. Air Canada had sought to compete with ■ 

Cana^A^ htOTalima I, which S3gJ . 


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** 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 1994 


Rage 3 



Armed Guards Watch Gingrich After Death Threats Rise 


new York™' * i, " ,la “ d , ’ reu 

; “ P? c,rD Pied incre^J‘ U “ ber of death threats 


»6 Ho2Z%Sg^ secu nty for the 
round-the^i^^Newt Gingrich, inc 

k bodyguards and an armored 


Published report! 


incom- 
including 


police and the FBI are in- 


v «ttgatmor;h7S, P? uc « and 
quoting unnamed^ X° r .^ Daily News reported, 
death threats 35 ***“« 

I? a memo loMfoi ^^ 51 ! 8 recently. 
Pouce chief GarvAh 2? gnch ’ tbe CapiwI Hill 
U P wuriSSa^S ^outlined thestepped- 


Mr. Abrecht also said that Mr. Gingrich would 
have to abandon his frequent walks from his 
Capitol Hill apartment to his offices. 

"My primary concern is for your safety, and 
the simple fact is that we live in a world where 
security must play a major role in the life of a 
person in your position,” Mr. Abrecht said. 

The reports of threats to Mr. Gingrich came as 
federal officials defended the sbootine of a knife- 


There 

federal officials defended the shooting of a knife- 
wielding homeless man outside the White House. 


lSec «rity which iritis . “ uumea «« steppe 


The officials said the shooting Tuesday was 
justified because the man did not follow orders 


-iiviin.'vitVi, 

<*« °utside" wV7 e w ^ 3rd5 ’ offi- 

’ ms new offices and an armored 


sasaSSjpK-.. 

Mr GinSrhv ^ 16 P* l P er reported, 
also bH ?* 4 s P^ecessor, Thomas S 
* had “ a driver but cm tte 


to^pve up his weapon. 


. an armed 
secum y measures. 


other 


Trite House security precautions have been 
increased in light of a string of recent security 
threats, but the police rejected any suggestion 
that they were more prone to shoot. 

Marcelino Comiel, 33, was in very critical 
condition at a hospital after being shot twice by a 
Park Police officer during the sidewalk standoff 


on Pennsylvania Avenue, just outside the White 
House grounds. 

“1 fed this was just a normal police reaction to 
a man with a knife," Major Robert Hines, the 
Park Police spokesman, said Wednesday in a 
broadcast interview. “We have had numerous 
people call questioning what we did. If the offi- 
cer bad not fired when he did, the man could 
have turned and run.” 

Major Hines said the officer who fired the 
shots was an experienced employee who would 
be assigned to administrative duty in keeping 
with routine procedure. The officer was not iden- 
tified by name. 

On Saturday, four shots were fired at the rear 
of the White House in what investigators said 
might have been a drive-by shooting. 

On OcL 29, a gunman sprayed the front of the 
White House with a semiautomatic weapon. In 
September, a small plane crash-landed on tbe 


rear lawn of the White House and its pilot was 
killed. 

Prosecutors planned to charge Mr. Corniel 
with assaulting a federal officer, said Monty 
Wilkinson, a spokesman for the U.S. attorney’s 
office. Additional charges could be added later, 
investigators said. The assault charge carries a 
matimiim penalty of 10 years in prison. 

Witnesses said Mr. Comiel charged across 
Pennsylvania Avenue from Lafayette Park 
armed with a knife and threatened Park Police 
and Secret Service officers before the shooting. 

Video footage from the Conus television ser- 
vice shows that in the final moments of the 
confrontation, Mr. Comiel stood practically mo- 
tionless facing four officers, one of whom then 
advanced and fired. 

Witnesses said officers had repeatedly ordered 
Mr. Comiel to drop the knife, which it turned out 
was taped to his han d. 


exican Rebels Flee 
oops Take Town 

rising Ends Without Shots 





By Tod Robberson 

Waiting tcm Pear Service 

S1MOJOVEL, Mexico — 
i'-iosi government counterinsur- 
gency forces withdrew Wednes- 
day from positions in the south- 
ern state of Chiapas after 
clearing road blocks and chas- 
away peasant rebels who 
had seized dozens of towns and 
villages. 

No gunfire or bloodshed was 
reported during the two-day oc- 
cupation by the rebel Zapatista 
National liberation Army. Ex- 
cept for trenches dug into paved 
roads, a Tew looted stores and a 
ransacked municipal building 
in Simojovel, virtually all rem- 
nants of Lhe guer rilla presence 
had been erased by sunrise 
Wednesday. 

The quick and nonviolent 
dispersal of the Zapatistas by 
more than 300 Mexican soldiers 
•inci counterinsurgency police 


handed a modest political vic- 
to President Ernesto Ze- 


iory to President 
dilio Ponce de Uson, who took 
office Dec. 1 promising to re- 
solve the rebel conflict without 
£ return to the combat that left 
1 50 dead when the rebel upris- 
ing began in January. 

Business and political leaders 
nere were trying to determine 
,hy the Zapatistas selected 
ilieir region for an occupation 
’hat. until this week, had been 
jrrJied mainly to areas aroond 
ihe Lacanddn rain forest in 
.southeastern Chiapas. 

“They seemed very young 
and very short in stature,” the 
Reverend Joel Paditin said of 
the occupiers. “It is clear they 
were indigenous people.” 

"Here, there is a general re- 
jection of the indigenous,” the 
priest said, adding that “one 
can easily see how marginalized 
their community is becoming.” 

Father Padrtra said a dwin- 
dling share of arable land, un- 
equal distribution of public re- 
sources and a general feeling 
ihat Indians lacked government 
representation may have con- 
mbuted to the uprising. ' 
“Some of them had their chil- 


dren with them. Instead of 
guns, some had slingshots,” 
said Luis Anzures, a local busi- 
ness and community leader who 
sought to minimize the impor- 
tance of the occupation. “One 
man was standing in the plaza 
with his mask and rifle, and a 
little boy Lugged on his hand 
and said, ‘Papa?* " 

Like other influential towns- 
people, Mr. Anzures described 
the rebels as “hooligans" and 
“delinquents” who were more 
bent on stirring up trouble than 
furthering tbe goals of land re- 
distribution and political re- 
form espoused by the Zapatis- 
tas. 

He noted that the rebels had 
looted a pharmacy and at least 
two general stores before with- 
drawing. “It’s getting to the 
point that all you have to do is 
put on a ski mask and green 
pants, and, all of a sudden, 
you’re a Zapatista, too.” 



Jrr Cavuttu/Thr Auocsucd Pro* 

Mexican policemen puffing down a flag erected by rebels of tbe Zapatista National Liberation Army in Chiapas state. 


Tabloid’s Simpson Articles Fluster Mainline Press 


By Howard Kurtz 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — The National 
Enquirer is getting some journalistic re- 
spect from an unexpected quarter: The 
New York limes. But the Enquirer still 


I’d be criticized for it It was from a 
source that had proven itself reliable in 
the Simpson case,” he said of the En- 
quirer. “and I'd be doing my readers a 
disservice if I didn’t mention iL" 

Asked why, if he bdieved the "I did 


“It was an unattributed story from an 
unreliable tabloid. All it did was sensa- 
tionalize it, which it certainly doesn’t 
need at this point," Ms. Deutsch said. 
“To me it was astounding that The New 
York Times did that" 


has a credibility gap with The Assodat- ; ill" account, he relegated it to the sev 


ed Press, where a 


this week enth 


reporter 

threatened to puB her byline rather than 
mention the supermarket tabloid. 

The Enquirer cited an unnamed “ lo- 
ader” last week as saying that OJ. 
Simpson, meeting in jail with his minis- 
ter, the farmer football star Roosevelt 
Grier, shouted, “I did it!” while clutch- 
ing a Bible: The paper said his tearful 
outburst was oveiiieard by a jail guard. 


)h rather than lead his sto- 


paragraph 
ry with it, Mr. Margolick said: “It’s a 
tough one. Given what the Enquirer 
conjures up to people, I thought this was 
a judicious compromise, to put it into 
the dialogue." 

The Chicago Tribune picked up the 
same report, crediting the Enquirer, 
days later. But the Enquirer piece 
sparked a heated debate Monday at Tbe 


Michael Silverman, an Associated 
Press deputy managing editor, said: 
“Our general policy has been to try not 
to pick up unsubstantiated source re- 
ports of this kind. It just came down to 
you either believed the Enquirer or you 
didn’t” 


the purported comments as evidence. A 
deputy sheriff testified that he had over- 
heard Mr. Simpson talking to Mr. Grier, 
but Gerald Uelmen, a Simpson lawyer, 
said the unspecified remark could have 
been heard out of context 

"We can all pretend this publication 
doesn’t exist and isn’t beating us," Mr. 
Margolick said. "But that’s not doing 
anybody any favors." 

“It’s extremely nice to be recognized,” 
David Pend, tbe Enquirer’s articles edi- 
tor, said. “It's a mainstream verification 


'Mr POLITICAL 


Did Dole Maneuver to Undercut Gramm? 


WASHINGTON — In a quest for the Republican presi- 


a qu 

dential nomination in 1996. there would be no better perch 


for Senator Phil Gramm of Texas than the Senate Finance 
Committee, which will be at the center of efforts to cut taxes 
and change the welfare system. 

That may be why Senator Bob Dole of Kansas, who has 
also set his sights on the Republican nomination for the 
White House, saw to it that Mr. Gramm was not likely to get 
the seat, an assignment he had expected and talked about for 
months. 

Although both senators deny it publicly, several Republi- 
can lawmakers and their aides said privately that Mr. Dole, 
who will be majority leader when the new Senate convenes 
next year, maneuvered to make sure that Mr. Gramm would 
be denied a seat. 

“Any effort to keep me off the committee would be petty 
and mean-spirited and I don’t choose to believe it,” Mr. 
Gramm said. Richard L. Berke, Ni T 


Some Republican Advice for Clinton 


WASHINGTON — David Gergen. the departing presi- 
dential adviser who has filled the awkward role of house 
Republican in the Clinton administration, urged President 
Bill Clinton to focus more, speak less and hire some experi- 
enced aides. 

Mr. Gergen. who leaves at the end of the month to become 
a visiting professor at Duke University, finished his 18- 
month adventure in the Clinton inner circle with this counsel 
for the president: 

• Mr. Clinton should resist the notion that “more commu- 
nication is better communication" and limit his public ap- 
pearances to those in which he has something meaningful to 
say. 

• He should concentrate on two or three domestic policy 
initiatives and two or three foreign policy problems and not 
get distracted by the daily static of public life. 

• And he should widen his circle of advisers to include 
more White House veterans, more Democratic gray beards, 
and more moderate Republicans like Mr. Gergen. ( LAT ) 


Conservative Democrats Stay In Party 


WASHINGTON — Representative WJ.Tauzin, who had 
threatened to join the new Republican majority in the House, 
said he will stay with the Democrats for at least a year. But 
the Louisiana lawmaker said he planned to form a coalition 
to put pressure on his party to be responsive to conservative 
issues. 

Representative Mike Parker of Mississippi, another con- 
servative Democrat who had been talking about signing up 
with the Republicans, also said he would stick with his party 
and work with Mr. Tauzin to create an active conservative 
caucus. 

Mr. Tauzin said at the outset the group would "aggressive- 
ly support" the House Republicans’ “Contract With Ameri- 
ca," including a constitutional amendment for a balanced 
budget. He predicted about IS Southern Democrats would 
join. Mr. Parker said the membership could go up to 25. 

(WP) 


Quote/Unquote 


Alice M. Rivlin, director of the Office of Management and 
Budget, on the role of the midterm election results in tile 
administration’s decision to pursue new budget cuts: "The 
election dramatized what we thought we knew — that the 
American public wants a smaller and less-intrusive govern- 


ment — and makes possible some things that might not have 
been possible — bolder options, more radical thinking.’ 


( WP) 


Mr. Simpson is on trial for murder in tbe Associated Press when top editors at Lhe 
June 12 killing s of Nicole Biown Simp- wire service asked that it be included in 
son, his former wife; and Ronald L. a trial story. 

Goldman. Linda deutsch, the lead trial reporter 

The Times’s legal correspondent. Da- for Tbe Associated Press, told her edi- 
vid Margolick, who is covering the trial tors Monday that she would remove her 
in Los Angeles, reported the alleged in- byline if the Enquirer account were add- 
cident ana credited tbe Enquirer. ed to her story. After lengthy discussion, 

“I didn’t do it lightly, and 1 thought they agreed to leave it out. 


Clean Frankel, the editor overseeing 
trial coverage for The Washington Post, 
offered a similar reason: “Our basic 
standard is we don't like unsourced sto- 
ries. especially when we don’t know if 
it’s from prosecution or defense sources. 
When tbe National Enquirer uses an 
unsourced story, my reaction is I’ve got 
to know more.” 

Mr. Margolick mentioned the En- 
quirer again Tuesday in reporting that 
Judge Lance A. I to had refused to admit 


of what our readers already knew, that 
we’re first and we’re accurate." He said 


the paper, which sometimes pays for 
information, had multiple sources for 
the report but declined to say whether 
any had been paid 
Footnote: Neither The Times nor the 
Tribune used the lead of the Enquirer 
story, headlined “OJ. Finally Cracks.” 
The article said Mr. Simpson had told 
his lawyers he would agree to plead 
guilty if he could avoid a long prison 
sentence. 


Dean Rusk, Symbol of U.S. Vietnam War Policy, Is Dead at 85 


By Eric Pace 

New York Tuna Service 

Dean Rusk, who as seme 
of state in the 1 960s was a vl 
erous, combative and roueb- 
cri tidzed defender of U.S. in- 
volvement in the Vietnam War, 
died Tuesday at his home m 
Athens, Georgia. He was 85 

and suffered from heart disease. 

Mr. Rusk; a former president 
„ 0 f the Rockefeller Foundation, 
*was secretary of state through 
‘ the Kennedy and Johnam ad- 
ministrations, from 1961 to 
1 959 He returned to his native 
OeorsLa and taught intema- 
rionalJaw at tireOniversity of 
Georgia until he retired m 198£ 

He became such a tireless 
champion of the mnshroonring 
American role in the war that 
£f5rly 1968 be was a living 
symbol of that fiercely disputed 


Ddlicy. 

' In those 



□am in 1969, allied with the 
shaky South Vietnamese Army 
against the North Vietnamese 
and the Vietcong. 

But he failed to forsee that 
the Vietnamese Communist 
forces would keep on fighting 
despite the massive United 
States intervention. 


J * S Prudent Lyndon 

^Xornwhosaid:^^ 


Dean Rusk, then the 
mara and President J 


secretary of ste 
ohnF. Kennedy 


vui/ ® 

Courage. A Georgia cracker. 
When you’re going m 
Marines, he’s the kind you want 

came to be 
-eviled by anti-war protesters, 
mobbed his speaking «q>- 
and shouted insults 

^Then^and in later decades, his 


work as secretary of stale drew 
mixed reviews from historians, 
biographers and foreign-policy 
experts. James Ghace of the 
Carnegie Endowment for Inter- 
national Peace wrote in 1988, in 
The New York Times Book Re- 
view, that he was “a good man 
loyal, intelligent and self- 


Fidng 

fatal 


by a fatal lack of 
and who came to bear tne onus 
for perhaps tbe most tragic fail- 
are Of American foreign policy 


in tins century, tbe waging of 
m War.” 


the Vietnam 
Mr. Rusk’s views on Vietnam 
evolved somewhat, but in the 


mid 1960s he believed finely 
that that the United States must 
be extremely forceful in con- 
fronting North Vietnamese ag- 
gression in South Vietnam. 

While Mr. Rusk was secre- 
tary, the Ame ri can role in the 
war grew until almost 550,000 
U.S. troops were in South Viet- 


Yet when Mr. Rusk was 
asked “What went wrong in 
Vietnam?" at a press confer- 
ence shortly before he left office 
in 1969, he quickly responded, 
“What wait wrong was a persis- 
tent and determined attempt by 
the authorities in Hanoi to take 
over South Vietnam by force.” 

In interviews in later years 
and in Ms nxanoirs, however, he 
said that he had underestimated 
the tenacity of the North Viet- 
namese and overesljmated the 
patience of tbe American peo- 
ple. 

Mr. Rusk came to spend 
most of his time as secretary 
dealing with Vietnam, and his 
rale in some other notable for- 
eign-policy spheres was less 
publicized ana less crucial. 

In the Kennedy administra- 
tion, which he joined when be 
was 51, Mr. Rusk was an impor- 
tant figure, but not a member of 
John F. Kennedy’s inner circle, 
as he was under Mr. Johnson. 


Despite the criticism he en- 
countered, Mr. Rusk became 
the second-lougest-serving sec- 
retary of state in U.S. histmy 
after Cordell Hull, who served 
from 1 933 to 1 944 under Frank- 
lin D. Roosevelt The length of 
Mr. Rusk’s tenure was due to 
the esteem in which be was held 

S r President Johnson, who took 
ficein 1963 and was, like him, 
a self-made Southerner. 

In good times and bad, Mr. 
Rusk generally radiated self- 
confidence and solidity. Even 
near the end of his time in office 
he remained “dogged, durable, 
unfailingly courteous and con- 
siderate," as be was described 


Away From Politics 


• The former diplomat Fefix Bloch, who was investigated by 
the FBI in 1989 on suspicion of espionage but never charged, 
has been accused of shoplifting from a grocery store in 
Carrboro, North Carolina. A security officer said he saw Mr. 
Bloch, who now works as a bus driver, stuff two bottles of 


headache tablets, pepperoni, pita bread, and lemonade mix 
into his jacket and pants. (AP) 

• Death threats against abortion doctors rose in 1994, with one 
four abortion duties reporting threats to doctors and staff, 


m 


even as other forms of violence and harassment aimed at the 
dimes declined, according to a survey by the Fund for the 
Feminist Majority. (L47) 


• An hNfictraent in a case involving smu ggling of Chinese into 
tbe United States, unsealed in New York, alleges that eight 
people took part in a plot to kidnap about 100 of the illegal 
immigrants and subject them to extortion. (Reuters) 


• Bias-related usings of homosexuals axe often gratuitously 
violent and many go unsolved, according to a report by 23 
anti-violence groups. The report listed 151 murders in 29 
states and the District of Columbia from January 1992 until 
early this month. Almost 60 percent involved four or more 
gunshots or stab wounds, the repeated use of blunt objects or 
more than one killing method. (NYT) 


SUBWAY: Firebomb Explodes 


Continued from Page l 

checked, a transit spokesman 
said. Most service was restored 
about two hours after the inci- 
dent. 

Mr. Otto, who grabbed a fire 


Thirty-seven people were in- 
jured, foi 


jured, four critically, said an 
Emere 


the flames, descrit 
chaos. 


a scene of 


then by Max Frankel of The 
Yea 


“I got two people in flames, 
i floor of the train,” 


New York Times. 

Before he became secretary, 
Mr. Rusk gained wide knowl- 
edge and experience in Asian 
matters and foreign affairs in 
general He was a student at 
Oxford as a Rhodes Scholar 
while in his early 20 s and also 
did some studying in Germany. 

He was an army staff officer 
in the China-Burroa-ln di a the- 
ater during World War £1 and a 
high State Department official 
during part of the Korean War. 
Asia was an area in which be 
took particular interest as head 
of tbe Ford Foundation from 
1952 to 1960. 


lying on the i 
Mr. Otto said. “Some brave 
passengers took off their coats 
and tried to beat back tbe 
flames.” 

Mayor Rudolph Giuliani ar- 
rived at the site about an hour 
after the blast Victims wearing 
oxygen masks were on stretch- 
ers along Broadway several 
blocks south of city hall and 
one block east of the World 
Trade Center, site of a 19 93 
terrorist blast that kffled six and 
injured about 1 , 000 . 

The FBI joined the subway 
investigation when it became 
dear some sort of bomb was 
involved. 


lergency Medical Service 
spokesman, David Bookstaver. 
AH suffered bums or smoke in- 
halation. 

The streets around the sta- 
tion were crowded with fire 
trucks and rescue vehicles on a 
once-qiriet afternoon just four 
days before Christmas. 

Tbe blast occurred on the 
Lexington Avenue line, which 
snakes from Brooklyn, up the 
East Side of Manhattan, and 
then into the Bronx. 


Six days ago, a teenager was 
burned aboard a train when an 
incendiary device caused his 
coat to catch fire. Transit police 
were still investigating the cause 
and said there did not appear to 
be any connection with 
Wednesday’s incident. 

(AP, Reuters) 



This prestigious conference will assess the 
new developments in France following the 
Presidential elections anti will feature key 
‘members of the new government in addition 
w major industrialists and finance and 
government leaders from around the world. 


THE NEW FRANCE 

Implications for Global Business 


*T» IV MTurmuNu.M 

ItcralbJ^gnbttttC 


LE GRAND HOTEL, PARIS 
OCTOBER 17-18, 1995 



FOR FURTHER DETAILS, 
PLEASE CONTACT: 


Fiona Cowan 

International Herald Tribune 
63 Long Acre, London WC2E 9JH 
Tel: (44 71) 836 4802 
Fax: (44 71)836 0717 


Investigators initially report- 
ed that a second device was 
found, but Mr. Miller said that 
proved to be untrue. 


J 


Jl 


s 9 




i - 




Plage 4 


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 1994 


OPINION 


Jterali* 


INTERNATIONAL 



tribune 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


Jimmy Carter Again 


Helpful if It Works 


If Jimmy Canal's controversial media- 
tion effort brings Bosnia closer to peace, 
more power to him. But the odds on an 
early end to the two-and-a-half-year war 
remain long, despite Tuesday's agree- 
ment oa a cease-fire that could start as 
soon as Friday. The Bosnian Serb leader, 
Radovan Karadzic, began reinterpreting 
his agreement with Mr. Carter almost 
from the moment he signed it Monday 
night. It remains unclear what he has com- 
mitted his side to beyond a veay temporary 
truce and a willingness to talk about revis- 
ing the latest international peace plan. 

Under that plan, Britain. France, Ger- 
many, the United States and Russia of- 
fered the Serbs title to 49 percent of 
Bosnia's original territory. But Mr. Kar- 
adzic’s forces currently hold 70 percent of 
that territory. Given the unwillingness of 
the five powers to use force, no one has 
figured out how to get the Serbs to pare 
down their holdings. 

Mr. Carter coaxed Mr. Karadzic back 
toward the peace table with soothing 
words and a promise that territorial de- 
tails could be renegotiated between the 
parties. That promise represents a retreat 
from the take-i t-or-leave-i t position that 
the plan's sponsors presented last sum- 
mer. Mr. Carter is not responsible for the 
retreat; it was publicly announced before 
he arrived oo the scene. 

What the Serbs really seem to want is a 
permanent cease-fire in place, with the 
rival armies separated by United Nations 
peacekeepers. That would let them hold 
on indefinitely to the 70 percent of Bos- 
nia they now possess while negotiating 
for territorial exchanges that would give 
them an economically viable indepen- 


dent state. Such exchanges would mean 
evicting hundreds of thousands more 
Muslims from their homes. 

For its part the Bosnian government 
recognizes that it has lost the war, can 
expect no outside help and must swallow 
a compromise. It wants that compromise 
to come as dose as possible to the 
nal five-power peace map, which wot 
minimize further evictions. 

The Clinton administration did a good 
job of briefing Mr. Carter for his mission 
and persuading him to work within the 
framework of the existing peace plan. For 
a change, Washington and Europe main- 
tained a united position against aban- 
doning the basic outlines of that plan. If 
they can maintain that unity from now 
on, it would greatly improve the chances 
of an acceptable agreement. 

The history of this war is full of one- 
sided international concessions to the 
Serbs that brought nothing is return. 
None of the governments involved in that 
sterile diplomacy have grounds for com- 
plaint if Mr. Carter has now managed to 
trade one of their past concessions for 
renewed peace talks. 

For reasons best understood by him- 
self, Jimmy Carter, known during his 
presidency for outspokenness on human 
rights, seemed to minimize the ethnic 
deanring , mass rapes and other atrocities 
committed by Mr. Karadzic's followers 
— the most widespread violation of hu- 
man rights in Europe since the time of 
Hitler. Americans, Mr. Carter contended, 
had heard only one ride of the story. 

Nevertheless, if he succeeds in re- 
opening peace talks on the basis of the 
five-power formula, he will have made a 
valuable contribution. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Playing President 


Jimmy Carter seems to be coaxing Bos- 
nia's warring Serbs and Muslims into a 
cease-fire. It sounds promising enough. 
Who can oppose a halt in the carnage? But 
what is Rally going on? How does an 
ostensible private person suddenly appear 
to acquire U.S. and “contact group au- 
thority to make proposals, to pass around 
signed papers, to assign rales to those not 
at his portable little table — in effect, to 
play a president? Is ibis not the same man 
who insisted that he represented only the 
“Carter Center'’? Can his works be repudi- 
ated if a need arises? Is he actually not 
operating in the penumbra of the Clinton 
administration's self-doubt and uncertain- 
ty and creating political facts whose conse- 
quences others will have to sort out? 

A cease-fire: The Muslim-led Bosnian 
government wants a breather, the better to 
get through the winter, rearm and fight on. 
The Bosnian Serbs want a permanent halt, 
the better to nail down their gains. Unless 
the Muslims agree to this in two weeks, the 
Serbs say, the four-month cease-fire sup- 
posedly accepted under Mr. Carter's medi- 
ation is off. So what has been agreed to 
beyond a Christmas respite? 

The peace plan: The Muslim-led Bosni- 
an government had favored the compro- 
mise plan written up on & take-it-or- 
leave-it basis by the “contact group” 


consisting of the United States, Russia, 
France, Britain and Germany. Bosnian 
Serbs had rejected it They now accept 
the plan except for its territorial and 
political provisions — except, that is, for 
its essentials. So, again, what has been 
agreed to beyond an assertion of the 
familiar divide? 

Timmy Carter has used his own person- 
al standing and negotiating skills and 
others' pessimism and fatigue to insen 
hims elf into a deadly stalemate in a man- 
ner defying order and accountability' He 
has only ms reputation to lose. Others 
have much more. It is incredible that he 
should have gone so far. 

And unless there is an entire dimension 
to both these proceedings and the trum- 
peted agreement that has not been dis- 
closed, it is more incredible that the Clin- 
ton administration should have let him. 
Mr. Carter is a man of peace. He has also 
all too often been a loose cannon. This 
was the moment when Bill Clinton was 
supposed to be restoring his claim to be 
“presidential” He has done the opposite 
by appearing tofall into a Carter-fronted 
undercutting of the Muslim position. War- 
ren Christopher — you remember Warren 
Christopher, our secretary of state? — has 
condoned an intervention that diminishes 
both his office and the foreign policy inter- 
ests of the United States. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Getting Back to Work 


Almost every new report issued on the 
problems facing welfare recipients in 
America tells a story that few want to hear 
right now: that moving long-term welfare 
recipients into jobs is hard, complicated 
and costly. Welfare recipients who fall 
onto the rolls because of temporary set- 
backs usually get back to work quickly, 
and almost always within a couple of 
But people who are on welfare a 


tune 


face large problems in 
their personal lives. If it were easy for them 
to take jobs, they wouldn't be on welfare. 

That is the real import of a new Gener- 
al Accounting Office study of the JOBS 
program — that stands for Job Opportu- 
nities and Basic Skills — passed in 19S8 
and designed to do what welfare reform- 
ers say they want now; to give welfare 
recipients the skills they need to move off 
the rolls. The GAO report is critical of 
JOBS, arguing that it failed to establish 


problems confronting so many of the 
country’s poorest people? It ought not be 
a shock that scarce JOBS funds are more 
Bkdy to be spent on recipients without 
this huge load of difficulties, since they 
probably stand the best chance of getting 
and keeping jobs. The GAO report cov- 
ered 16 states containing most of the 
nation’s teenage mothers on the Aid to 
Families With Dependent Children pro- 
gram. It found that “only” 24 percent 
were enrolled in JOBS. But again, how 
many people can one program funded at 
this level be expected to help? 


Il is entirely true, as the report says, that 
lomovelong-i 


ig-tenn wel- 
fare recipients into jobs for real do need 
closer relationships with employers. This 
task involves a real commitment on the 
part of government, employer and welfare 
" lient alike. Other studies of welfare- io- 


adequaie links with employers to help 
. ana keep it' 


welfare recipients get and keep jobs, and 
that the most “at-nsk” welfare recipients 
tend not to be served by the program. 

“Various sources indicate that pro- 
blems such as substance abuse, learning 
disabilities, emotional problems and do- 
mestic violence are not uncommon 
among adult welfare recipients. If left 
un addressed, these problems can inter- 
fere witii a recipient's ability to get or 


work programs such as JOBS have found 
when 


keep a job and may result in long-term 
ivelfa 


welfare dependence.' 

No kidding. The question is: How 
much can any program, especially one 
financed at just $1.1 billion a year, deal 
with what amounts to the full range of 


that when the commitment is there, inten- 
sive efforts to help welfare recipients can 
have a real payoff. But there is no magical, 
solution, no perfect program, for the ago- 
nizing problems facing so many recipi- 
ents of public assistance. 

Whether welfare reform is ultimately 
carried out primarily by Washington or 
by the states, the basic reality of reform 
must be confronted: Helping people 
who have been on public assistance for a 
long time to become self-sufficient is a 
task well worth undertaking, but it will 
require patience, experimentation and 
some money. Is the current political 
mood up to that? 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 



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JapanFw 


W ASHINGTON — The recent con- 
troversy over the postage stamp 
with the mushroom cloud provided a 
grimly appropriate backdrop for a little- 
noticed but profoundly significant clash 
over nuclear policy between Japan and 
the United States that was taking place 
simultaneously at the United Nations. 

As the only victim of nuclear war, Japan 
is increasingly disturbed by the failure of 
the United Slates and the other four nu- 
clear powers to honor Article 6 of the 
Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty, which 
requires than to “negotiate in good faith” 
on phasing out their nuclear weapons in 
return for the commitment of the non- 
nuclear states to remain non-audear. 

A long-festering conflict over this issue 
burst into the open on Nov. 2 when 
Japan introduced a resolution in the 
UN First Committee urging the nuclear 
weapon states “to further pursue negoti- 
ations on progressive and balanced re- 
ductions of nuclear weapons in the light 
of Article 6 of the nonproliferation trea- 
ty, with a view to the intimate objectives 
of the cessation of the manufacture of 
nudear weapons, the liquidation of their 
existing stockpiles and the elimination 
from national arsenals of nudear weap- 
ons and the means of their delivery.” 

Coming from a military ally, this reso- 
lution was a bombshell to the United 


By Selig 5. Harrison 


passage would complicate U.S. efforts to 
marshal a majority m favor of indefinite 
extension of the nonproliferation treaty 
at a critical conference next April that 
will consider thefutureof the accord. But 
Japan insisted that prospects Era a re- 
sounding majority, now uncertain, would 
be enhanced if the nudear powers showed 


that they were serious about steadily re- 
ducing their. 


States, which promptly launched a high- 
ipaign behind the scenes to 


pressure campaign 

dilute it U.S. diplomats argued that its 


t r nuclear arsenals. 

After two weeks of intense diplomatic 
maneuvering, Japan backed down. A 
bland revised draft made no mention of 
Article 6 or of negotiations, requesting the 

nudear powers “to pursue thfiir efforts for 

/>n<*lfv r disarmament with the ulti m ate 
objective of the elimination of nudear 
weapons.” The United States, Russia, 
Britain, France and Israel were among 
those flfrrtflinmg . China supported iL 
Anything to do with nuclear weapons 
arouses deep emotions in Japan. Memo- 
ries of Hiroshima and Nagasaki underlie 
both the passionate anti-nuclear senti- 
ments of the majority and the nationalistic 
hawkishness of an influential minority. 

The majority view is that Japan has a 
special responsibility to promote nuclear 
disarmament. But for the minority, Hiro- 
shima was a humiliation that must be 
erased from the national psyche by achiev- 
ing sufficient strength to stand up to the 
United States as an equal in every respect 


— militarily as wdl as economically. In 
the hawkish view, if America seeks to 
presave superpower status by maintain- 
ing nuclear weapons, Japan cannot rule 
out the nudear option fra itself, especially 
in the face of potential nuclear threats 
from Russia, China and North Korea. 

At the Group of Seven economic sum-_ 
mit in June 1993. Prime Munster Kudu 
MSyazawa, bowing to hawkish sentiment, 
refused to support a U-S.-sponsQred res- 
olution calling for the indefinite and un- 
conditional extension of the nonprolifer- 
ation treaty. More recently, the Japanese 
government has backed indefinite exten- 
sion, provoking criticism from hawks 
and doves alike; both sides are suggest- 
ing short-term extension periods ranging 
from two to 25 years unless the nuclear 
powers beg in to implement Article o. 

The nuclear controversy in Japan ex- 
emplifies in acute form similar debates 
P flinfag jaomentuin in other countries as 
the April conference approaches. In the 
eyes of the non-nuclear countries, the 
nonproliferation treaty envisaged a nu- 
clear-free world, not a permanent divi- 
sion of tire global power structure in 
which five favored countries enjoy a 
dominan t position. Thus there was wide- 
spread dismay when the United States 
unvdkd its long-awaited Nudear Pos- 
ture Review in late September. 

The review carefully avoided a com- 
mitment to further reductions in nuclear 
weapons bdow the 3.500 level envisaged 


*^ w ES3 , uSSE& * 

53K ^ «f 


U.S. strategy, pointing to the potential 
om Russia. 


threat from awm* wtaitm 

Any reductions below to START-. 
level, said to review, would depend 
progress toward “a more democratic and 

START-3 agreement, acco^am^bya 
“treaty on nuclear security” in which all 
five nudear do wars would 


five nudear powers would agree to set 
targets for continuing cutbacks. - - 
Defending to review, a Pentagon offi- 
cial, Ashton Carter, told a Washington^ 
seminar tot “we’re watching and wait- 
ing to see where the world’s going. As 
the Japanese case shows, however, the 

worid is watching and waiting with grow- 
ing restlessness to see where to United . 
States is going- 

The US. review points to the Russian 
menace, but uncertainty about American.' 
strategic goals feeds nuclear nationalism . 
in Moscow, jeopardizing ra tificati on of 
START-2 by the Duma and to entire 
future of nudear arms control. - 


The writer is director of a Carnegie 
Endowment program on Japan's role in 
international security affairs. He contrib-: 
toed this comment to the. International 
Herald Tribune. - - 


With Its Western Alliance at Stake, Germany Becomes Responsible 


M UNICH — During the Gulf 
War, some Germans hung 
white sheets from their windows 
to show off the proper pacifist 
spirit Other Germans paid for 
tot display in cold cash: $6_ 5 
billion into the coalition's kitty, 
Bonn's shamefaced contribution 
to the war effort. 

Today, three years into the 
Bosnian war, two-thirds of Ger- 
mans oppose the dispatch of 
Luftwaffe Tornadoes to Bosnia. 
But this time Bonn won't resort 
to Deutsche marks. Late on 
Tuesday to government opted 
for a profound break with 40 
years of abstentionism. 

If the withdrawal of United 
Nations troops in Bosnia has to 
be secured, those Tornadoes will 
fly and, if need be, hurl their 
anti-radar missiles against the 
“eyes” of Serbian anti-aircraft 
batteries which have recently 
sprouted all over Bosnia. Before 
any NATO rescue operation, 
those missile batteries will have 
to be suppressed if NATO is to 


By Josef Joffe 


achieve air supremacy. Bonn 
would also supply medics, logistic 
support and naval forces. This is 
the beginning of the end of the 
Kohl Doctrine — and of an era. 

With a view to the former Yu- 
goslavia, Chancellor Helmut 
Kohl had produced a tidy little 
principle: The new German 
could not tread where the 
irmacht had struck. Of 


course, that did not leave many 
places in Europe where the Bun- 
deswehr could venture — Swe- 
den, Switzerland, Portugal and 
Ireland. There is scarcely a coun- 
try where Nazi Germany was not 
involved in Worid War H. 

The recourse to history has 
been prudent, but it baa also 
been profitable. For the heirs of 
Hitler, discretion in matters mil- 
itary was wise. After two world 
wars, after unspeakable crimes 
committed by Nazi Germany, it 
was right to trade the jackboot 
for the felt slipper. 


There was also a genuine re- 
vulsion against the militarism of 
Wilhelm's and Hitler's Germa- 
ny. That revulsion contributed 
mightily to the flowering of the 
liberal democracy now sturdily 
implanted in German soil. 

But the new pacifism was also 

g rofi table. Look at the United 
rates and France. While they 
squandered blood and treasure 
around the globe — from Indo- 
china to Algeria, from Korea to 
Vietnam — the West Germans 
could tend their garden and add 
to their gross national product 
The war in Algeria destroyed 
the Third Republic, and the Viet- 
nam War almost tent asunder the 
United States. West Germany, by 
contrast, lived happily ever after 
in deep domestic peace. 

This twin lesson — to disas- 
ter of militarism and the sweet 
wages of pacifism — is not easily 
unlearned. Indeed, during to 
rity of W< 


Germans confessed to pollsters 
tot they would prefer to live like 
Switzerland and Sweden. 

But today the Kohl Doctrine 
rings a bit hollow. The point is 
not lebensrartm, hegemony and 
Germany fiber alles. The issue is 
to responsibility that goes with 
power. Can a nation of 80 mil- 
lion act like Switzerland writ 
large? “No," says the Kohl gov- 
ernment — and “no," although 
much more grudgingly, says 
even the Social Democratic op- 
position, whose pacifist roots 
reach bade into the 1 9th century. 

It it were just Bosnia, the nays 
would have prevailed even in 
1 994. But suddenly the issue was 
no longer a “war of conscience" 
but the core of German postwar 
policy by the name of NATO. 

Once the alliance was drawing 
up contingency plans for the in- 


sertion of 45,000 men to protect 
l Uni 


Britain and France 
up to largest UN contin- 
gent) as they fought their way 
out of Bosnia? That would have 
been the end of aDiancewith the 
West, to sturdiest home Germa- 
ny has ever had. 

For the time being, Tuesday's 
cabinet decision in favor of alli- 
ance solidarity does not come 
with a price tag attached.. No- 
body wants to withdraw the liN 
Protection Fence, and neither 
France nor Britain is asking 
Bonn to send its Tornadoes into 
baffle preemptively. So Germa- 
ny has signed no more than a 
promissory note. 

Stiff, five years ago it was 
straight cash in exchange for 
miring out of real commitment. 
Germany has now made half a 
commitment: to maturity and 
international responsibility. 


Gulf War a majority 


lest 


the withdrawal at 23,000 united 
Nations troops, to issue came 
down to hard realpolitik. Would 
Bonn refuse to protect its allies 


The writer, foreign and editorial - 
page editor of Si 


J S&ddeutsche Zeitrng, 
contributed das comment to the In- 
ternational Herald Tribune 


i 


The Toys Come From Asian Sweatshops, but Who Wants to Know? 


N EW YORK — On to after- 
noon of May 10, 1993, a fire 
broke out in a four-story factory 
complex in Nakhon Pathom 
Province in Thailand, near Bang- 
kok. The complex belonged to 
Kader Industrial Toy Co., a ©ant 
operation that over the years has 
manufactured toys distributed 
and sold by some of the most 
prominent names in corporate 
America, including Toys “R" Us, 


By Bob Herbert 


J. C. Penney, Fisher-Price, Gund 
and Hasbro. 

Described by witnesses as a 
the fire killed 188 


“living hell/ 
panicked and screaming workers, 
of whom 174 were women and 
teenage girls. It was the worst 
industrial fire in history, its death 
toll surpassing the 146 workers 
killed at to Triangle Shirtwaist 
Co. in New York in 1911. 

In the United States, toy com- 
pany executives are immersed in 
the sweet season of Christmas. It 


is jackpot time and they do not 
want the 2 


holiday mood spoiled 


by reminders of the Kader horror. 

These executives know that 
their profits come from the toil of 
to young and to wretched in to 
Far East; they can live with that 
— live wdl, in fact. But they do 
not want to talk about dead wom- 
en and girls stacked in the factory 
yard like so much rubbish. 

Listen to Lampan Taptim, who 
survived to fire: 

“There was to sound of yelling 
about a fire. I tried to leave the 
section but to supervisor told me 
to get back to work. My sister 
who worked on the fourth floor 
with me pulled me away and in- 
sisted we try to get out. We tried 
to go down the stairs and got to 
the second floor. We found thaL 
the stairs had already caved in. 
There was a lot of yelling and 
confusion. I couldn’t go down 
farther. In desperation I went 
back up to to windows and went 
back and forth looking down be- 


low. The smoke was thick and I 
picked the best place to jump on a 
pile of boxes. My sister jumped, 
too. She died.” 

Nearly half of all the toys sold 
in to United States are produced 
for brand-name companies by 
contractors in China, Thailand 
and other countries in Asia. The 
toy companies have embraced the 
Far East sweatshops for the same 
reason as other industries have: 
There is an enormous supply of 
semi-slave laborers, including 
women and girls, who will work 
for grotesquely low wages in ex- 
tremely dangerous conditions. 

China is to champ is to low- 
wage sweepstakes. With mini- 
mum wages that hover around 80 
cents a day, China is forcing a 
further decline in to already hid- 
eous working conditions in neigh- 
boxing countries. 

Western executives are flock- 
ing to China to do business. Ac- 


cording to the Toy Manufactur- 
ers of America, a trade group in 
New York, $3 j billion worth of 
toys made in China were sold in 
to United States in 1992 alone. 

UJS. executives keep to misery 
at a distance through contracts 
and subcontracts. They act as if 
they bear no responsibility for the 
exploitation on which so much of 
their profits rest 

The atrocities remain well hid- 
den. A comprehensive report on 
to Kader fire, compiled by the 
International Confederation of 
Free Trade Unions in Brussels, 
also documents a series of fatal 
disasters that have befallen work- 
ers in China. In 19 91 about 80 
people died in a fire at a raincoat 
factory in Donghuang, and in 
1993 84 workers, nearly all wom- 
en, were killed in a handicrafts 
factory fire in Shenzhen. 

Most corporations will follow 
the trail of profits no matter how 
gruesome the human costs. Con- 
sumers are another matter. I be- 


lieve tore are very few American 
parents who would not be trou- 
bled by the knowledge that a toy 


they were buying was produced 
by laborers, often t 


children them- 
selves, in a permanent state of 
degradation and danger. 

The New York Times. 


Expensive Toys 


The Thai Prime Minister Survives a Murky Storm 

Bv Philip Bo wring 


B angkok — u is easy io 

dismiss developments in 


Thailand’s convoluted politics 
with the comment “The more 
things change the more they re- 
main to same." One opportunis- 
tic move two weeks ago landed 
the country in its biggest political 
crisis since the return of democra- 
cy in 1992. Bui that was soon 
followed by another move that 
surprised even those hardened to 
the fickleness of party politics. 

The net result is trial Prime 
Minister Oman Lcekpai of the 
Democrat Party remains at the 
helm but with a restructured cabi- 
net and coalition. 


This outcome is good for poli ti- 
the epis 


cal stability, but the episode has 
been a reminder of three enduring 
factors in Thai politics: 

• The breathtaking opportun- 
ism of many elected polticians. 
and the ephemeral nature of most 
of to parties, which are based 
more on personality than polity. 

• The continued desire of some 
in the military to influence the 
political system. 

• The importance of to mon- 
arch, King Bhumibol Adulyadej, 
as stabilizer of last resort. 

Already, General Sunthorn 
Kongsompong, the 1991 coup 
leader and participant in to re- 
cent anti-government maneuver- 


ing, has quit the Senate in a buff. 
Thel 


; latest crisis was sparked by 
to opportunism of the retired 
general Chavalit Yongchaiyudh. 
He teamed up with senators origi- 
nally appointed by the military 
National Peacekeeping Council 
regime to frustrate a promised 
extension of democracy to local 
government By doing so he con- 
fronted Prime Minister Cbuan 
with the prospect of struggling on 


with a minority government or 
calling an election, which few 
wanted. Mr. Chavalit hoped, one 
way or another, to be able to come 
to power amid the confusion. 

His action effectively ended the 
divirion into “devils” and “angels" 
— those parties that had been 
compromised by association with 
to National Peacekeeping Coun- 
cil and those that had not. This 
had been the main fault line be- 
tween government and opposition. 

The political confusion threat- 
ened by Mr. Chavalit’s departure 
appeared to add strength to those 
who argued that Thai democracy 
was too immature to bring stable 
government. Whatever to out- 
come of an election now — 18 
months before the end of this 
Parliament’s four-year terra — it 
almost certainly would not have 
salved to underlying problems 
and would instead have drawn 
attention to to politics of money. 

In fact, there is no imminent 
danger of to military returning, at 
least overtly. The present military 
leadership has been cooperative 
with the government; memories of 
1992 are still fresh. The democrats, 
and particularly Mr. Chuan's 
Democrat Party, can use the mili- 
tary bogeyman as a rallying point. 
But tore is little doubt tot rem- 
nants of the old military regime, 
and their supporters in the bureau- 
cracy and business communities, 
wifl help any tendency of the dem- 
ocratic system to sdf^destrucL 

For now, opportunism has 
proved a defense as well as a 
threat. U is not easy to figure out 
to motives of the former prime 
minister, Chaucbai Choonavan. 
who came to Mr. Chuan’s rescue 


soon after joining with other op- 
position parties to try to bring 
him down. His subordinates' de- 
sire for office may be one reason. 
Another seems to have been the 
role of former Prime Minister 
Prem Tinsulanonda, a privy coun- 
cillor known to be erase io the 
palace and ixnmezisdy influential 
in military and civil circles. 

The king, in a Dec. S birthday 
address, stressed to importance 
of unity in decision-making. Mr. 
Chavalit appears to have ignored 
the plea ana could end up in politi- 
cal limbo as a result 

The entry of Mr. Chatichai's 
Chart Pattana Pony in one way 
weakens the Chuon government 
by admitting a party with past 
associations with money politics. 
It has widened splits in other co- 
alition members, such as Palang 
Dhanna, the party of the saintly 
but erratic former Bangkok gov- 
ernor and democracy hero of 
1992, Chamlong Srimuang. 

The Democrats themselves have 
been weakened by a corruption 
scandal over land reform. Mr. 
Chuan has a reputation for being 
colorless and indecisive, compared 
with figures like Banham Silpa- 
archa, a likely candidate to unseat 
him. But it is generally agreed that 
the Chuan government, wfcrica in- 
dudes several apolitical techno- 
crats, has a higher standard of in- 
.tegrily than most. 

Modernization of institutions 
and badly needed investment 
outside the metropolis are going 
on while economic growth rolls 
along at 8 percent. Mr. Chuan 
remains respected by the urban 
middle class, which is the back- 
bone of the Democrats. He is 


also a shrewd operator. Some see 
him as a civilian version of Mr. 
Prem, a quiet and courteous man 
who survived as prime minister 
for eight years despite numerous 
attempts by military men to 
unseat him. Having survived 
this latest and greatest threat, 
there is now a fair chance that 
he and this Parliament will see 
out four years. 

Thai in itself would be a major 
advance for a Thailand still strug- 
gling to create political institu- 
tions that provide stability but 
reflect a society changing as fast 
as its economy grows. 

International Herald Tribune 


T HE lack of health and safety 
requirements reaps tremen- 
dous savings for foreign investors 
but has disastrous results in to 
producing countries. 

Industrial accidents are fre- 
quent in Thailand. Indus trial in- 
juries increased at to rate of 20 
to 30 percent during to 1980s, 
and by 2 992 there were more than 
130.000 industrial injuries a year. 

In most of the countries which 
produce toys for to international 
market, trade union activity is se- 
verely restricted. In China, trying 
to organize an independent union 
is a crime. (Forty percent of all 
toys sold in the European Union 
oame from China.) Trade union 
rights are denied and trade union- 
ists are intimidated in Mexico’s 
export processing zones. 

Manufacturers must nssnrpe di- 
rect responsibility for accidents, 
but giant toy companies and laige 
retailers in consuming countries 
are also involved since their con- 1 
trading policies lead producers to 
ignore health and safety norms. 

Where workers are able to form 
unions, and negotiate coflcctivdy 
For better conditions, safety im- 


proves. This is to rationale be- 
hind tin 


the argument for inserting a 
social clause in all mtetnatioual 
trading agreements under the fu- 
ture World Trade Organization. 
— Bill Jordan, incoming general: 
secretary of the ICFTU. 


fN OUR PAGES; 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1894c Rat Plots Lights Out 

BALTIMORE — Parts of this 
aty that depend on electricity for 
light were suddenly enveloped in 
darkness on Thanksgiving night 
until morning. The cause of all 
the trouble was a rat, which set 
fire to the switchboard in the elec- 
tric tight works by forming a cir- 
cuit between two brass terminals. 
The remains of the little animal 
are preserved at to works. 


1944: The Tribig Back 


1919: A Political Tool’ 


BRUSSELS — The Dutch gov- 
ernment has officially informed 
to Allies that it wfli not hand 
over the former Kaiser for trial. 
(The Herald says in an editorial:] 
Is Holland prepared to enter 
into conflict with the Allies for 
the sake of the sinister refugee 
from justice, characterised as 
“one of to greatest political 
fools in to world’s history? 


PARIS — The European edition 
of the New York Herald Tribune 
resumed publication in Paris , te- 
day [Dec. 22] after a lapse of fair 
« d The New York: 

Herald Tribune was to l ay * free 
newspaper to be printed m the 
French capital before the entry.of 
to Germans. Since September, 
its modern printing plant st’R 
nie de Bern had been turned <ncr 
to the American Army for to 
publication of its official troop 
newspaper, “The Stars, and 
Stripes." From today on, to 
Army daily and to New Yd* 
Herald Tribune will publish side 
by side in the same plant 
new executives inherit an 
PV*fc a past closely w — : — 
*jth the growing consciousness 

2 £ American life. The 

old Pans Herald" made its ftdl 
snare of contributions to to 
progress of the press in Europe 


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OPINION 


Friend to the Foe’s Friend 
But Blindly Cold at Home 


By Jim Hoagland 
; \yASHlNGTON — Officially the 

‘ Lihv. r mte ? Slates to Punish 

FTiPh, *> rabin S of Pan Am 

• v«S£ J, 03 ^ 1 bcfore Christmas si* 

; EJ? Jp- But in practice U.S. offi- 

• hS -\ e himed their responsibil- 

■ » U ^ de ««■ While diplomats rea* 

: th£w£^ nmar , Gadhari ’ s fneiuls 
. J2S Wa shmgton bears them no hard 

• jeehngs for supporting Libya, other 

■ ^i r ? ucr ? ls harry families who lost 
. relatives in the Pan Am tragedy. 

‘ k ^^.{ohn and Barbara Zwvnen- 
: ^BofNyack, New York. Their son 
- one of ^ J 89 Ameri- 

■ Sff hy the powerful bomb 
. that hurled their jetliner from the 
. sky over Scwtland on Dec. 21, 1988. 

! * 116 terrorists evidently struck an 

• civilian target to avenge 

■ me U.S. bombing of Libya in 1986. 

• n ~ sl roonlh the Internal Revenue 

; “railed the Zwynenbergs a 

. hhi for $6.4 million, payable in 90 
. days, based on an estimate of what 
; drair son’s estate may get someday 

■ rom a still pending suit against the 
! *?? w defunct airline and its insurer, 
i Jhat followed earlier IRS warnings 

• to the Zwynenberg family to pay 

• smaller amounts to settle the cl aim 

• , Mistakes happen. Computers do 

• dumb things. The IRS can’t be seri- 
ous. Those were my first reactions, 
and those of the Zwynenbergs as 
well. But their calls and my follow- 
up contacts elicited only stonewall- 
ing from the Hartford, Connecticut, 
district office lhai mailed the retired 
couple the estate tax liability notice 
dated Nov. 17. As far as the IRS is 
concerned, the bill stands. Merry 
Christmas. And good-bye. 

Margaret Milner Richardson, the 
IRS commissioner, should check 
into what is being done in her name 
in this case. It is Kafkaesque. 

As a group, the families erf the 
victims of Pan Am 103 have repeat- 
edly spurned attempts by highly 


ernment has shown in this case is 
being lavished instead on the Egyp- 
tian government, which is upset over 
articles in the American press calling 
attention to President Hosni Mubar- 
ak’s close ties to Colonel Gadhafi. 
Assistant Secretary of Slate Robert 
PeUetreau recently traveled to Cairo 
to reassure the Egyptians that the 
Clinton administration was not criti- 
cal of Egypt for its lies to Libya, 
according to a Dec. 4 Egyptian news- 
paper interview with Mr. PeUetreau 
that the Stale Department has not 
officially challenged. 

Mr. PeUetreau will have an oppor- 
tunity to spell out what he said in 
Cairo. Senator Edward Kennedy has 
taken a consistent interest in Pan Am 
1 03 and has written asking Mr. PeDe- 
treau to explain the department's 
view of Egypt's links to Libya. 

The unnecessary stroking of Pres- 
ident Mubarak for the Egyptian 
public smacks of the kind of clienti- 
lis — - the kind of patronizing ex- 
plaining away of a client’s vulnera- 
bility — that has led the United 
States into disasters in Iran, Iraq 
and elsewhere in the Middle East. 

It reinforces my sense of a letting 
down at the State Department in the 
official rampwign against Libya, de- 
spite Secretary of Stale Warren 
Christopher’s commitment to “main- 
tain the rigor of sanctions and in- 
crease them” soon. The Near East 
bureau seems to have bought the 
Egyptian line that Colonel Gadhafi 
represents “a bulwark against Islamic 
f undamentalism ” — that he is a less- 
er evil The vigorous protests that 
Algeria has recently made over Colo- 
nel Gadhafi’s support for fundamen- 
talist revolutionaries there puls the 
he to that view. 

Nor has he abandoned his support 
for terrorism, as Cairo claims, when 
the French recently arrested and then 
quickly released Ali Omar Mansour, 


96 




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The Kovalski Christmas Star\ 
With a Hindu-Muslim Glow 


By Dominique JLapierre 


P ARIS — Christians represent a 
small minority in Calcutta, yet 
the birth of Jesus is celebrated with 
as much devotion as are the births of 
the Hindu god Krishna, of the 
prophet Mohammed, of Buddha, of 
the Sikhs' guru Nanak. or of Maha- 
vira, the saint of the Jains. 

I spent a memorable Christmas in 

MEANWHILE 

a place called the City of Joy, one ot 
the many slums of this megapolis of 
12 million people, in it, more than 
75,000 people are crammed together 
in subhuman conditions. There is 
only one water fountain for every 
3,500 inhabitants, one latrine for ev- 
ery 3.000. Average family income is 
less than 20 cents a day. ii is, in many 
ways, hell on earth. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


““J uil. * Uk IIU11- 

tlies want justice, not money. They 
want the two Libyan agents identi- 
fied as the bombers by history’s 
most extensive c riminal investiga- 
tion handed over for trial in Britain 
or the United States, as United Na- 
tions resolutions demand. 

The IRS falls to the level of the 
Libyans’ hired legal guns by reduc- 
ing this tragedy to one more payday. 
The Zwynenberg case is a ludicrous 
example of the bureaucracy’s insen - 


the State Department’s counterter- 
rorism unit blandly assured me that 
he had no idea who Mr. Mansour was 
and expressed no concent about the 
French action. 

Maybe that is business as usual 
for counterter r orist heads, just as 
dunning a bereaved family is for the 
IRS and stroking clients is for assis- 
tant secretaries of state. Taken to- 
gether, they are the acts of a govern- 
ment that has lost sight of the 


Wi Miv U UIMU UUU UOO 1VJL V« lllv 

sitivity to the large issues of moral- meaning of the terrorist crime of the 
ity, justice and America’s standing century — not just for the families 
abroad that the unresolved bombing but for America’s sense of itself and 
of Pan Am 103 raises. its national honor. 

What solicitude the American gov- The Washington Past 


Expect More TVouble at Sea 

Regarding “ U.S. carrier and Chi- 
nese Submarine Raise Tensions ” 
(Dec. 15): 

The October incident in the Yel- 
low Sea is consistent with long- 
standing U.S. naval policy under the 
Freedom of Navigation, or FON, 
program. The program is most fam- 
ous feu similar incidents in the 
1 980s, in waters claimed by Libya in 
the Gull of Sidra and by the Soviet 
Union in the Black Sea and the Sea 
of Okhotsk. But it has also been 
used to contest claims made by 
about 40 other countries, including 
friendly ones like Canada. Although 
the program is meant to reinforce 
the right of innocent passage, activi- 
ties under the program are secret. 
Critics say the program has become, 
in effect, the navy’s own, indepen- 
dent foreign policy. 

China has been ripe for such U.S. 
exercises for a long time, but especial- 
ly since 1992. In that year it promul- 
gated a law asserting Chinese sover- 
eignty beyond its internationally 
recognized territorial waters to in- 
clude most of the Yellow Sea, as well 
as contested island groups in the East 
and South China seas. The United 
Stales has not accepted these dahns 

China has developed its own vari- 
ant of the FON program with a 
series of cruises meant to “exercise 
territorial sovereignty on behalf erf 
our ancestral land," m the words of 
Vice Admiral Zhang Xusan. 

Although the Law of the Sea Con- 
vention, which took force on Nov. 16, 
stipulates how teni tonal waters and 
exclusive economic zones should be 


defined and provides for innocent 
passage through areas like the con- 
tested island groups, it does little to 
help resolve conflicting claims to is- 
lands and enclosed seas. The United 
States, which contests the conven- 
tion’s assertion that seabed resources 
are the “common heritage of man- 
kind,” accepts the convention’s defi- 
nitions of territorial waters and ex- 
clusive economic zones. 

The inescapable conclusion is 
that incidents like the one in Octo- 
ber are the shape of things to come. 
While few observers expect China to 
use force in dislodging rival claim- 
ants, it has shown its willingness to 
engage in low-level naval skirmishes 
as part of its effort to create a fait 
accompli in the South China Sea. 

As China develops a greater capa- 
bility to confront challengers 
through its naval modernization and 
comes to see its claims as more le- 
gitimate because of its series of de- 
monstrative cruises and exercises, 
we should expect more incidents be- 
tween the U.S. and Chinese navies. 

When they occur, it should be re- 
membered that they do not signal a 
special angularity or deterioration of 
U.S. -Chinese relations, as reflected 
by tbe unwillingness of U.S. officials 
to raise a fuss over the Yellow Sea 
inridenL Rather they are evidence 
that neither side's navy has aban- 
doned what it sees as a legitimate role 
in establishing order on the seas. 

ERIC ARNETT. 

Stockholm. 

The writer is author of “ Gunboat 
Diplomacy and the Bomb" and “ Mili- 
tary Technology; The Case of China." 


Bosnia In Another Light 

We hear a lot of discussion about 
what we should for should not) do 
in Bosnia, but almost none regard- 
ing what we could do. After the 
wars in Vietnam and Afghanistan, 
it is not at all clear that a foreign 
intervention on any scale in the 
Balkans would be effective. What is 
clear is that even the present level 
of outside interference is deeply re- 
sented, if not actively opposed, by 
many countries here.which see the 
situation in Bosnia in an entirely 
different light. 

TIMOTHY DeVINNEY. 

Hania. Greece. 

Delors’s Restraint 

Regarding “ 'No’ From Delon 
Stum French Left” (Dec. 12) fra 
Joseph Fitcheti: 

The article fails to mention the 
age factor (Jacques Delons is 69), 
which Mr. Delors himself evoked 
as reason for not r unnin g. Further- 
more, the Frenchman’s “choked 
voice" sounded quite focused 
to these ears. 

PHILIPPE ARONSON. 

Paris. 

Ml havas, vi havas, si havas 

Regarding “ France to Propose EU 
Pupils Take 2 Extra Languages" 
(Dec. IS): 

To promote European under- 
standing, France intends to propose 
that two foreign languages be taught 
in all secondary schools in European 


Union member states. Great, but 
how will a Dane who has learned 
English and German be able to un- 
derstand an Italian who has learned 
French and Spanish? No, as Umber- 
to Eco writes in “In Search of tbe 
Perfect Language,” “The only possi- 
ble solution is the full adoption of a 
European auxiliary language,” and 
he indicates how Esperanto can 
serve this purpose. 

ESKIL SVANE 
Pouzols, France. 

Dog Days in Rottweil 

Regarding “ Rottweiler Signals 
From Newt" (Opinion. Dec. 5) by 
William Safire: 

Mr. Safire is right: The Rottweiler 
dog is in fact named after Rottweil, 
a town of 20,000 inhabitants on the 
Neckar River between the Black 
Forest and the Swabian Jura moun- 
tains. Until die beginning of the 
19th century Rottweil was a so- 
called Free and Imperial Town. It is 
still picturesque, with its ancient 
walls and buildings. The centuries- 
old carnival of Rottweil is famous 
beyond Germany’s frontiers. 

The dog that bears the town's 
name was once bred there — mainly 
by butchers who, in that region with 
its relatively poor soil, were the only 
ones able to feed such big and mus- 
cular animals. But the modem visi- 
tor to Rottweil will be at a loss; there 
are nowadays no more Rottweilers 
(the dogs, that is) than there are 
in any other town. 

ERWIN HARTMANN. 

Bonn. 


Yet, I found there more love, 
more sharing, more capacity to en- 
dure — and to celebrate — than in 
many affluent Western cities. 

Only a few Christian families live 
in this overwhelmingly Hindu and 
M uslim slum. But once a year every- 
one shares in the celebration of the 
greatest Christian event Rickshaws 
and tea shops, butcher shops and 
vegetable stalls are decorated with 
flower garlands. Hindu and Muslim 
neighbors help their Christian 
friends build a monumental creche. 
Loudspeakers broadcast carols and 
hymns above the rooftops. 

My friend Stephen Kovalski, a 
European monk, has lived the life of 
the poor here for 15 years. A group 
of young girls helps him paint the 
walls of his modest room. They 
place a small creche under his cruci- 
fix and plant sticks of incense. They 
hang garlands of marigolds and 
roses, forming a canopy. 

Forme, tbe most beautiful symbol 
of Christmas magic in this slum is the 
enormous luminous star on the end 
of a bamboo cane suspended over 
Mr. Kovalski ’s hoveL Two neighbors, 
a Hindu and a Muslim, had the idea 
of hoisting this emblem into the sky, 
as if to say to the slum's inhabitants: 
“Don’t be afraid, you are not alone. 
On this night, when tbe God of the 
Christians is bom, there is already 
a savior among us.” 

I have never entered a church so 
full of flowers as the nearby parish 
church. In the dark. Our Lady of the 
Loving Heart looks like a mahara- 
ja’s palace on coronation night 

Splendid bouquets of amaryllises, 
roses and marigolds decorate the 
altar, offered by inhabitants of near- 
by slums grateful for some gift from 
God — finding a bit of paying work, 
or the miraculous healing of a family 
member from cholera. 

Services are held at churches else- 
where in Calcutta, loo. What a con- 
trast! Around Saint-Thomas, a smart 
parish in tbe Park Street area, dozens 
of private cars, taxis and rickshaws 
unload affluent worshipers. Garlands 
glitter. The night resonates with car- 
ols. Children from the slums sell the 
little Santa Clauses they have made. 

Now it is midnight. Jesus is bom in 
Calcutta, for the rich and the poor. 

The writer is author of “The City of 
Joy. ” In the Calcutta area he supports 
schools, clinics and rescue centers for 
leprous and handicapped children; he 
asks that donations be sent to Action 
Pour les En fonts des Lepreux de Cal- 
cutta / 26, Avenue Kleber l 75116 
Paris / France. This comment was 
contributed to the Herald Tribune. 


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”... reputations? The best way we know is to borrow a little from each. And that’s 
just what wef.ve done with. the new Neon. From Chrysler’s Vision wefve taken 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 1994 



Chechnya War, Live on TV, Shakes Moscow 


By Steven Erlanger 

New York Tunes Service 

MOSCOW — Wounded sol- 
diers being interviewed in field 
hospitals. Bloody corpses being 
polled from a downed helicop- 
ter. Russian officers refusing^ 
advance. Baby-faced boys dig- 
ging trenches in the snow. 
Women ba gging Russian sol- 
diers not to EUUwir children or 
raising the Russian president 
for trying to stamp out their 
independence. 

This is Russia’s first opportu- 
nity to watch one of its own 
wars as it happens, on officially 
uncensored Russian television. 
Those are the images the public 
is s eeing of the Russian offen- 
sive against separatists in 
Chechnya, and they are not 
making the Russian govern- 
ment very happy. 


“Television coverage has cre- 
ated a controversy with the gov- 
ernment as never before.” said 
Konstantin Eggert, an Izvestia 
correspondent “For the first 
time, Yeltsin is in a real dash 
with the media.’’ 

Pavel Fdgengauer, military 
correspondent of the daily 
newspaper Sevodnya, says the 
government is complaining, de- 
spite some self-censorship by 
Russian television, because of 
its own weak efforts at manag- 
ing coverage. 

“The presidential staff very 
much understands what a pub- 
lic-relations disaster they’re in,” 
he said, adding that “they know 
it’s bad but they don’t know 
what to do about it,” especially 
with President Boris N. Yeltsin 
acting so distant and declining 
to go on television since his 
nose operation. 


“Our television is absolutely 
free, and it’s a problem for our 
government, of course,” said 
Leonid Smirnyagin, a senior 
Yeltsin aide on regional issues. 
“It’S very painful for us, and 
points to a big drawback of this 
campaign from our side, which 
is the lack of good propagan- 
da.” 


Oleg N. Soskovets, first dep- 
uty prime minister, named by 
Mr. Yeltsin to coordinate 
Chechnya policy, has 
plained bitterly about “unveri 
fied,” “unreliable,” and “sub- 
jective” news reports, and he 
threatened to withdraw the 
broadcasting license of tire 
mqin nongovernment television 
station, NTV. 

That was a warning heard by 
everyone, said Yevgeni Kiselev, 
the anchorman of “ItogLT a 


weekly current-affairs program, 
and one of the founders of 
NTV, a commercial station 
made up of journalists who had 
tired of state television. 

“Unfortunately, : I'm taking 
the threat very seriously,” Mr. 
Kiselev said. “Many things in 
Russia now are done without 
great respect to laws or the leg- 
islature. There is a mass media 
law, of course, which would 
prevent the license being 
com- pulled. But if the country will 
i- be ruled by decree, and to some 
extent it already is, then any- 
thing can happen.” 

NTV, or Independent Tdevi- 


On Dec. 2, paramilitary 
troops who would not identify 
themselves raided Most head- 
quarters in Moscow and beat 
up employees. Later, it was re- 
vealed that the troops belonged 
to Mr. Yeltsin’s personal Krem- 
lin guard. The motive for the 
raid remains unclear. 

Many analysts suggested that 
the Kremlin wanted to nre a 
shot across Mr. Gusinsk/s bow 
as the political campaign for 
parliamentary and presidential 
elections begins. 

Mr. Kiselev said the attack 
on Most “was a warning to ev- 
eryone, but first and f oreraost it 
was a warning to independent 


sion, is largely owned by the journalism.’ Moscow-baseo 
Most Group, headed by Vladi- newspapers are^graerallymde- 
mir Guansky, a 42-year-old pendent, he said, so I ^ 

- * ‘ J television" Within the two 

state channels, Ostankino and 


Guansky . 

multimillionaire, reformer, and 
former cheater producer. Most 
also owns Sevodnya. 


Russian Television, he said, 
“independent journalism also 
exists, so it was a warning to us 

all-** . . 

But there has been no official 
censorship of television cover- 
age, Mr. Kiselev said. 

Vladimir Molchanov, a pop- 
ular television anchorman of 
“Before and After.” a weekly 
news program produced with 
Reuters Television and shown 
on Ostankino, said CNN's five 
coverage of the October 1993 
parliamentary revolt was “the 
best lesson for us, and that war 
seemed not less serious than 
this one.” 

Russian coverage was spotty 
that October, and the best of it 
was recorded on film and 
broadcast after the fact. 

Still, despite official criti- 
cism, there is a lot of self -cen- 
sors hip now, Mr. Molchanov 
said. In particular, the view- 
point of pro- independence 
Chechens gets too little cover- 
age on Russian television, he 
said. 

Mr. Molchanov, too, is con- 
cerned about the warning lo 

RUSSIA: Yeltsin Tells Forces to ‘Spare No Effort ‘ to End Chechen Revolt puffing oTotv' 



■ " 

. v> " • »r.V' 

AtaUVNter ZanEmkhcnfco/Tbc Associated ftew 

A Chechen woman and her son gazing from a vehicle near Gozay as they fled the embattled capital Wednesday. 



U.S. Seeks Vatican Tie on Aid 

Clinton Writes to Pope, Urging Cooperation 


differ- 



New York Times Service 

ROME — At a tune of sharpening tan’s foreign aid budget, which is set at #13.7 

rates in Congress Written billion this year, on the grounds tiiat it repre- 

dm aid. President Bill seats too much of a handout and Often, par- 

peSanaBy to Pope John rt P ySUL P u S^d ocularly in Africa, serves no American strate- 

assssMMar” • 

The idea is to rap into the wide netwmk of m times of need” ^ suggested 

Catholic relief and development services by writing together more closely and 

around the world, both pnvate organuations coordinating our responses to humaw- 

and those directly sponsored by the Vatican, ta ^ an we could alleviate the suffering, 
that often have the most up-to-date ana ae- like to share information, rn- 

tailed information on the needs of people in reports, on a more systematic 

disaster areas, U.S. officials said. basis,” the letter said, according to UiS. om- 

Tbe proposal represents a departure from ^als ^ gp^ e in remra for anonymity. It 
□raviolis practices. But it could also inspire ^ « X)ke 0 f a new cooperation between the 
‘ ■ liberal Amencan Catholics Vatican and the -Clinton administration, in 


^Seof the Vatican’s efforts, most recently 
at a conference on population problems m 
Cairo, to stamp its conservative views of 
abortion and contraception on development 
policies. 

Mr Clinton’s letter was presented to Ange- 
lo Cardinal Sodano, the Vatican’s secretary of 
state, on Dec. 5 by Raymond L. Flynn, the 
former mayor of Boston who is now the U.S. 
am bassador to the Holy See. 

Vatican officials said the proposal was fil- 
tering slowly through the Vatican bureaucra- 
cy, but no formal response had yet been 
made. 

The development coincides with growing 


the areas -of crisis prevention and mediation 
and proposed “the development of a system 
Of infonnation-sbaring and a coordinated ap- 
nroach to our humanitarian response ef- 


Mr. Flynn said in an interview that the idea 
has assumed a particular significance since 
the newest Republican suggestions to cut for- 
eign aid. • , . 

“This will save money to the extent that it 
will ensure that the process is effective and 
professional” he said, “It will ensure that the 
American tax dollar is not being squandered 
but is g»»ng directly to the. people in over- 
whelming need.” 


AID: Republicans Plan a Tough Bottom line 


Continued frew Page I 
Russia closed its borders at 
midnight Wednesday with 
Azerbaijan and Georgia, direct- 
ly to the south of Chechnya. 

At the same time, reports 
from Grozny, which has al- 
ready suffered heavy bomb 
damage, said that Chechen 
fighters were either running 
short of military supplies or 
husbanding their resources for 
later. 

According to a report by The 
Associated Press, anti-aircraft 
guns, winch had been offering 
some resistance to the Russian 


fighter-bombers, ran out of am- 
munition Wednesday and fell 
silent, allowing the Russians to 
bomb the capital at will. 

Grozny was awash with ru- 
mors that all Chechens would 
be deported to Siberia if Russia 
succeeded in its military take- 
over. Such a bitter scenario oc- 
curred in 1944, when Stalin, 
suspecting the Muslim Che- 
chens of Nazi collaboration, 
had Chechens shipped in cattle 
cars to Kazakhstan and Central 
Asia. Many died en route and 
none were allowed to return to 
their homeland until 1957. 


The rumors of a new deporta- 
tion appeared designed by some 
Chechen leaders to rally the lo- 
cal populace against the Rus- 
sian side. 

Mr. Yeltsin went out of bis 
way to offer reassurance in his 
statement, which was released 
by his press office Wednesday. 

“Under no circumstances 
will the deportation of the Che- 
chen people repeat itself,” he 
said. Referring to those who 
have fled the fighting, he said, 
“AS those forced to leave their 
homes will be able to return.” 

Mr. Yeltsin accused the Che- 


chen leader, Dzhokar Dudayev, 
of having misled his people and 
promised that once Russian 
troops had taken control and 
re-established “legality, law and 
order” in Chechnya, human 
rights would be observed, Rus- 
sia would provide generous as- 
sistance to re-establish the local 
economy and the region “will 
be given a chance to decide its 
own fate." 

Foreign Minister Andrei V. 
Kozyrev said at a news confer- 
ence Wednesday that the Rus- 
sian military assault on Chech- 
nya was entirely justified. 


new and serious putsch, 
it would be worse for our future 
than what's happening in 
Chechnya, even with the blood- 
shed there.” 


with Republicans viewing foreign aid primar- 
ily as a means of cementing alliances, and the 
administration focusing on what it sees as the 
long-term benefits of combating poverty and 
environmental problems. 

“My view is, it ought to be directly targeted 
toward areas of die world where we have a 
clear national security interest,” Senator 
McConnell said. 

Under this approach, he and other Repub- 
licans say aid — including military assistance, 
which represents almost one-third of the aid 
budget — should be continued to Israel 
Egypt Ukraine, Georgia and Armenia. To 
further the use of aid for strategic purposes, 
he has proposed cutting off the $700 million 
in aid to Russia if it intervenes militarily in 
any other former Soviet republics. 


Supporting the S3 billion in annual aid to - 
Jsrad, Mr. Callahan said: “Aid.to Israelis not 
an entitlement Israel is our greatest ally in 
the Middle East and we ought to do every- 
thing we can to continue that relationship." - 

Mr. Atwood responded .that while aid to 
strategic allies like Israel is vital, it is also 
valuable to provide money to the poorest 
countries in Africa and elsewhere. He assert- 
ed that in the post-Cdd War era, problems 
like Rwanda and Somalia increasingly cause 
conflicts that ensnare the U.S. military. In his 
view, such aid is not a handout, but preven- 
tive medicine. 

Accusing many aid critics of being isola- 
tionists, be said: “If we don't deal with pro- 1 
grams to help stop these countries from fail- 
ing, we'll spend a lot more money in. the . 
aftermath dealing with their crises.” 


Carter Bosnia Mission Serves White House 

Trip Provides a Cover for Granting Key Concessions to Serbs 



By Daniel Williams 

Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — Jimmy Carter’s 
peace mission lo Bosnia provides the Clin- 
ton administration with a fig leaf -to cover 
plans to make key concessions to Bosnia's 
Serbs — a conciliatory strategy that be- 
came a practical necessity after the Serbs 
successfully resisted several months of eco- 
nomic pressure and flaccid NATO military 
threats. 

Washington's stand results from one 
overwhelming desire: to persuade the sep- 
aratist Serbs to negotiate with Bosnia's 
Muslim-led government and conclude the 
war, even on conditions that were once 
considered unthinkable. 

Under the cloak of anonymity, adminis- 
tration officials acknowledged that a soft- 
ening had taken place. 

“People will be happy if we can just get 
everyone to the table," a Slate Department 
official said. 

In part, the eagerness to settle reflects 
the administration fear that Congress 
might force it to begin arming the Mus- 
lims, an act that many administration offi- 
cials believe would drag the United States 
directly into the war. 

A settlement also would put an end to 
disputes over Bosnia that have fractured 
the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, 
throwing into doubt the alliance's role in 
the post-Cold War world of ethnic and 
regional conflict. The inability of the Unit- 
ed Stales to persuade NATO last month to 
systematically use bombing as a diplomat- 
ic tool contributed to the turn to concilia- 
tion. 

For the Muslims, it means the latest in a 


series of retreats on the part of their staun- 
chest big-power supporter, the United 
States. Unable to muster diplomatic and 
military support for the Muslims, Wash- 
ington is pushing them back to the table at 
a vast disadvantage on the ground. 

The bait for the Serbs to talk is the 
chance to fashion a territorial solution to. 
their liking. In effect, Mr. Carter has 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

opened the way lo negotiate new terms of 
the once-inviolable international proposal 
to diride up Bosnia. Originally, 5 1 percent 
was offered to the Muslims and 49 percent 
to the Serbs in a deal worked out by the 
“contact group” of mediators from the 
United States, Britain, France, Germany 
and Russia. 

The division was termed a take-it-or- 
leave-it proposition. The Muslims accept- 
ed the plan, which was presented to them 
as the minimum requirement for a viable 
state. The Serbs rejected it, since it would 
require them to give up significant con- 

g uests. They control about 70 percent of 
osnia. 

The Serbs' rejection was supposed to 
result in tightened sanctions and air 
strikes. But those threats were never car- 
ried out, principally because of opposition 
from Britain, France and Russia. 

A critical change in the U.S. approach 
has to do with whether the Serbs must 
formally endorse the contact group pro- 
posal before sitting down with the Mus- 
lims in final negotiations over minor terri- 
torial alterations and how much autonomy 
the Serbs would be allowed. 


“Before, it was the Serbs must accept the 
plan, and then negotiate details. Now, it’s , 
negotiate and then see what plan comes i- 
out,” a State Department official said.. 

• The contact; group tried ..to signal the 
softer attitude on Dec, 2, when foreign 
ministers from the five countries met in 
Brussels and issued a coll for negotiations 
“on the baas” of the plan. Gone was any 
mention of force or deadlines. 

Then the administration dispatched 
Charles Redman, the ambassador to Ger- 
many and former contact group mediator, 
to Bosnia. He delivered the proposal to 
Radovan Karadzic, leader of the separatist 
Bosnian Serbs. But Mr. Karadzic showed 
no inclination to come to the table. 

On Dec. 5, the current crop of contact 
group negotiators traveled to Belgrade to 
brief legislators from Mr. Karadzic’s 
breakaway territory. In this briefing the 
group made it clear that the Serbs would 
not have to sign off on the 51 percent-49 
percent map. 

It was autumn's second major step away 
from the hard line. In September, the con- 
tact group told the Serbian president, Slo- 
bodan Milosevic, that the Bosnian Serbs 
would get a chance to link politically in 
some way with their allies in Serbia, the 
dominant region of the Republic of Yugo- 
slavia. 

Combined, the concessions mean that 
not only are Bosnia’s original borders in 
doubt, but so are its reduced borders, 
worked out through the contact group and 
accepted by the Muslims in return for a 
promise that the Serbs would be pressured 
to agree. 


BOSNIA: Carter’s Down-Home Diplomacy Seems to Win a Commitment 


Continued from Page 1 
shed, given die abysmal record 
of international efforts lo end 
the war here, the fact that a 
cease-fire is even being consid- 
ered is no mean feat. 

Stumbling over tongue- twist- 
ing names, such as Alija lzetbe- 
goric. the Bosnian president, 
and calling the Bosnian Serbs ai 
one point “the Serb-Croats,” 
Mr. Carter gave the impression 
that here was someone who did 


not know the history of the war. 

Fot the Serbs, blamed for the 
lion’s share of the killing rap- 
ing and “ethnic cleansing,” Mr. 
Carter's visit was a godsend. 
For Bosnia's Muslims, widely 
considered the victims of the 
conflict, Mr. Carter's appear- 
ance was troubling indeed. 
Asked if Mr. Carter understood 
the history of the conflict, Ejup 
Ganic, vice president of the 
Muslim government, replied: 


“To be frank with you. I don’t 
think so." 

But Mr. Carter was not inter- 
ested in cultivating the Mus- 
lims. They had already agreed 
to sign an internationally bro- 
kered peace plan. They were 
not the problem; it was the 
Serbs. 

"Everybody with whom I 
meet knows that today here in 
Pale,” he told the Bosnian Ser- 
bian leader, Radovan Karadzic, 


KOREA: North Promises to Return Body of U.S . Pilot 


Continued from Page 1 

the government in Pyongyang 
had “decided to Lransfer’ the 
body of David Hileraon soon to 
the U.S. Army," 

It said Mr. Hall was “now in 
good health” and that when the 
official investigation was com- 
pleted. “a step will be taken 
according to the relevant legal 
procedures of our army.” 

The developments suggested 
that the helicopter incident may 
blow over soon after haring 
threatened lo spoil a budding 
thaw in relations between the 
United States and North Ko- 
rea. 

The Pentagon has acknowl- 
edged that the two-man crew of 
the helicopter apparently be- 
came lost during a training mis- 
sion Saturday and strayed 
across the DMZ. The helicopter 


was not armed. U.S. officials 
said. 

Just what caused the helicop- 
ter's downing is in dispute. The 
North Koreans said they had 
shot it down; the Defense De- 
partment said it had made an 
emergency landing. 

U.S. reaction to the incident 
grew heated when the North 
Koreans initially stonewalled 
Washington's pleas for the 
prompt release of the surviving 
pilot and his crewmale’s body. 

Secretary of State Warren M. 
Christopher warned Tuesday 
that a “further delay” by 
Pyongyang “would affect the 
atmosphere in which we’d been 
hoping to improve our relations 
with North Korea." 

The secretary's comments 
appeared to be a veiled admoni- 
tion that, if the incident were 
not resolved soon, political 


pressure would mount in Wash- 
ington for calling off a deal 
struck by the Clinton adminis- 
tration in October to furnish 
North Korea with a new nucle- 
ar power plant Many Republi- 
can members of Congress are 
critical of the deal, which is 
aimed at eliminating Pyong- 
yang’s alleged nuclear-weapons 
development program. 

The North Korean authori- 
ties said Tuesday that they 
could not discuss U.S. requests 
about the helicopter crew until 
the incident had been properly 
investigaied 

But late Wednesday, word 
reached the U.S. Embassy in 
Seoul that Mr. Richardson, who 
happened to be visiting Pyong- 
yang to discuss the nuclear deal 
would bring Mr. Hilemon's* 
body to (he truce village at Pan- 
munjom. 


as their talks began on Mon 
“will be the key to the sue ce 
failure of my mission.” 

Mr. Karadzic, who bad ii 
ed Mr. Carter lo Bosnia, 
obviously Umlled at the \ 
ibe international media at 
lion and the boon Mr. Car 
stay would do to his posi 
among Serbs throughout 
former Yugoslavia. 

Minutes into their mee 
Mr, Karadzic gleefully told 
Carter that all Muslims o 
naUy were Serbs, that 400 
pilots owed their lives to. St 
an forces during World Wi 
and that Americans could 
be blamed for misunderst 
ing “what is happe nin g her 
a small spot on the map ” 

Mi. Carter responded i 
the first of what many thoi 
were m^or bi c !ain 
that his Serbian hosts had fc 
misunderstood and misra 
sented by the American me 

But Mr. Carter’s misu 
had a purpose, according to 
West European diplomat i 
closely followed the affair.- 

Because he appeared so 
ive, so ignorant, the Serbs St 
ed to relax,” he said. “Nob 
else has been able to do tl 
Carter got them to relax." 

For the first time since 
peace plan had been preset! 
to the warring factions : 
summer, the Bosnian Serbs 
tually mentioned it in a.sigi 
agreement. 




nr,. 




? - • ;• 
Ui 


Offer on War Debt 
Rejected in Taiwan 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 1994 


Page 7 


TV Associated Press 

— Ja pan said 

wedne^y lt woulc f d 35 

yen over 0.= SS five 
S ° *" 1 * Wor W War II 
But 'h people from Taiwan. 
sr°“ps denounced the 
as insulting and said 
“ey would not take the money. 

nwhu j r Span's calculating 
W ^° Were owe ^ 
montM 40s , e< 5 u,val c°t Of a 
2 s salary will receive 
bandy more than 1,000 yen, or 
JJO. Japan s offer of 35 billion 

lm S ^ 1 iSL? U,Valen, or aboot 


women who were forced to 
scrv ? “s slaves for Japanese 
soldiers in the war have already 
denounced Tokyo's plans for a 
private compensation fund, 
saying they want reparations 
from the government directly. 

Yoshiki Mine, an official in 
the prime minister’s office re- 
sponsible for handling the 
claims from Taiwan, said that 
Japan will pay creditors 120 
times the original war debt. 

The typical depositor in a 
savings account in Taiwan had 


Claims include military nav- 
” postal 


11 yen, about the same as a 
soldier's monthly salary, he 
said. That depositor now would 
be eligible to receive 120 limes 
bis debt —1,320 yen. or $13.20. 

In 1943, the last wartime year 
for which exchange rale records 
are available, SI was considered 


— — — in i/ujiul 

savmgs accounts that was never 
paid back. Taiwan was a Japa- 

mU.., . 


■ — . — was a japa- 

<»Jony between 1895 and 
^end of World War n in 

„ proposed reparations 
are ndiculously low.” said Liu 

2nfSS^ Uns ’w a member of a 

^uu.uuo-member association of 
creditors in Taiwan. “The Japa- 
n«e have no sincerity at all. 
They just want to have this issue 
settled quickly to smooth their 
bid to become a member of the 
UN Security Council." 

The issue is the latest in 
which Japan has found its halt- 
ing efforts to make amends for 
World War II met with anger 
from an Asian nation. Asian 


equivalent to 425 yen, meaning 
I f yen would have been worth 


about $2.60. 

Soldiers from Taiwan typi- 
cally are owed much more than 
11 yen, Mr. Mine said, and 
some may be eligible for the 
equivalent of several thousand 
dollars. 



■ 

Burmese Defend - 
Political Detention 1 


Agettcr Fhmcc-Presse 

BANGKOK —The Burmese 
junta has outlined a legal baas 
that would enable it to hold 
Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, the 
leading opposition figure, ap- 


But Mr. Liu, who represents 
his 76-year-old father-in-law, 
said that if his father-in-law's 
debts had been repaid after the 
war, he could have bought two 
apartment buildings. Now the 
money is enough only for an air 
ticket to Japan, he said. 


Will Bntgos/Rmcn 

DEFIANT IN BEIJING — Members of a Beijing family carrying a box with the ashes of a loved one to a cemetery 
on Wednesday, in defiance of a government campaign to get people to scatter, not preserve, the ashes of the dead. 


leading opposition figure, ap- 
parently indefinitely, a Bang- 
kok daily newspaper reported 
Wednesday. 

The report in The Nation co- 
incided with growing interna- 
tional speculation that Daw 
Aung San Sun Kyi, who has 
been under house arrest since 
July 1989, might be released in 
January. 

In a letter to the United Na- 
tions* special monitor, Yozo 
Yokota, Burma’s foreign minis- 
ter, Ohn Gyaw, died a 1975 law 
that enabled the cabinet to pro- 
long at will the detention of 
anyone who is held for anu- 
govemment activities, the pa- 
per said. 

U Ohn Gyaw was responding 
to Mr. Yokota’s request for 
identification of the “specific 
legal authority" governing Daw 
Aung San Suu Kyi’s detention 
and an indication of when she 
would be freed. 

The Nation said that it had 


Japanese Parents gyrfa Calls Militias 5 Shots Even as Lebanon Revives 

bue School Over J 


Suicide of Son 


Singapore Takes Issue 
With a Critical Article 


Reuters 

SINGAPORE — The Singa- 
pore government has rebuked a 
local political science professor 
for a newspaper piece he wrote 
about the city state. 

Bilveer Singh, a lecturer at 
the National University of Sin- 
gapore, wrote in the Jakarta 
Post this month that Singapore 
was facing "growing impover- 
ishment" and that a majority of 
its citizens “are basically living 
hand-to-mouth.” 

Singapore's chargfc d’affaires 
in Indone sia denied the claims 
in a letter published on Tuesday 
as “preposterous” and “outra- 
geous.” The chargfc pointed out 
the high level of home owner- 
ship and recent rises in real in- 
comes. 

The Straits Times newspaper, 
published in Singapore, said 
Wednesday that Mr. Singh had 
now written to the Jakarta Post 
withdrawing his allegations. 


The paper quoted Mr. 
Singh's letter, which has not yet 
been published by the Jakarta 
Post, as saying: “I admit that it 
was a gross error on my part 
and apologize for the negative 
impression created.” 

Mr. Singh could not be 
reached for comment on 
Wednesday. 

Last month the attorney gen- 


eral pressed contempt of court 
charges against Ouistopher 
Lingle, an American professor 
formerly at the National Uni- 
versity of Singapore, and offi- 
cials of the International Her- 
ald Tribune, for a piece Mr. 
Lingle wrote in the Oct. 7 edi- 
tion. 


A high court hearing is sched- 
uled for Jam 9 on this case. 
Senior Minister Lee Kuan Yew 
is also suing Mr. lingle and 
newspaper officials for libel 
over the same article. 


Reuters 

TOKYO — Parents of a Jap- 
anese schoolboy who allegedly 
committed suicide because of 
bullying have sued his school, 
charging teachers stood by and 
allowed him to be tormented. 

Takanori Otsuki and his wife, 
Kimie. are seeking 68.7 million 
yen ($687,000) in damages from 
a high school in Akita, in north- 
ern Japan, Japanese media re- 
ported on Wednesday. 

Their son Koichi 15, banged 
himself at home last year, a 
month after he entered the 
school He did not leave a sui- 
cide note, but be told a friend 
that he did not want to go to 
school because he was bullied, 
the reports said. 

Media reports quoted his 
parents as saying Koichi’s class- 
mates had forced him to mimic 
a monkey and eat noodles with 
too much pepper. 

Schoolyard bullying has 
drawn national attention since 
a 1 3-year-old boy hanged him- 
self last month, leaving a note 
saying classmates had beaten 
him and extorted money from 
him. Five other youths have 
lolled themselves since then. 


By Nora Boustany 

Washington Past Service 

BEIRUT — After years of 
civil war during which armed 
militias held sway across Leba- 
non, the legitimate government 
has put on an uncharacteristic 
display of authority recently, 

arresting a militia chief and & 
big-time drug smuggler. But the 
long-standing issue of armed 
groups operating with the ap- 
proval of Syria on Lebanese soil 
remains unresolved. 

President Bill Clinton came 
away from his meeting with 
President Hafez Assad of Syria 
in Damascus in September with 
vague answers on the terrorist 
groups, guerrilla bands and Ira- 
nian-inspired Islamic networks 
still operating in Lebanon, ac- 
cording to a Lebanese official. 

Damascus is considered the 
place to ask about such groups, 
since Syria wields derisive in- 
fluence in Lebanon, where 
40,000 of its troops still help 

maintain order. 


The armed groups would find 
it difficult to operate without 
their copperation. But Mr. As- 
sad avoided a c ommi tment to 
halt acts of “national resis- 
tance" against Israelis and their 
Lebanese' allies until the price 


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of peace with Israel was in his 
pockeL 

Mr. Assad has supported ac- 
tive resistance against Israeli 
forces in the strip of southern 
Lebanon that is held by them 
until Israel removes its soldiers 
from the Golan Heights. Israel 
captured the heights from Syria 
in 1967. 

Divisions have appeared 
within the main Lebanese Is- 
lamic group, the Shiite-domi- 
nated Hezbollah, over what di- 
rection to take should Israel 
and Syria reach an agreement 
that includes an Israeli with- 
drawal from southern Lebanon. 

The differences are likely to 
surface in debates at Hezbol- 
lah's third general congress, 
scheduled for mid-1995. 

Derisions made at that con- 
gress will help shape Hezbol- 
lah's role in a new Middle East 
Although some Hezbollah lead- 
ers privately speak of a political 
role, such die-hards as Sheikh 
Subiri Tufaily have vowed that 
Hezbollah guerrillas, estimated 
to number 2^00 to 3.000, will 
keep up anti-Israeli attacks 
even after Israeli troops have 
left southern Lebanon- 


More than a dozen Israeli 
soldiers and militiamen of the 
Israeli-sponsored South Leba- 
non Army have been killed in 
such attacks in recent weeks. 


Neither Syria nor Iran has 
tipped its hand on any of these 
Lebanese extremists wbo, al- 
though proclaiming to defend 
Lebanese seal from Israeli in- 
truders, have become instru- 
ments of Middle East realpoli- 
tik. 


Iran is still spending money 
in Lebanon, but there have 
been cuts in social services, the 
basic salary of the fighters has 
been slashed to $175, from 
$300, and women who used to 
get $100-a-month stipends for 
wearing the chador have beat 
cutoff. 


Palestinian refugees, includ- 
ing their aimed groups, also re- 
tain a degree of autonomy here, 
in part because of Syria. The 
Lebanese Army, for example, is 
still not allowed to enter the 
Palestinian camps in southern 
Lebanon. 


nization leader, control the 
camps of Buij el Brajneh, Sa- 
bra, Chatfla, and Mar Elias. 

"There are rings around the 
camps in Beirut," explained a 
spokesman for one of the Pales- 
tinian factions. “The first one is 
composed of Syrians, and the 
second — the outer one — is 
Lebanese Army.” 

When Hamas, the militant 
faction opposed to the PLO, 
rallied in Gaza last month, 
srmrmp Palestinians in 
Gaza were widely predicted. 

Instead, the violence came in 
the Palestinian camp of Ain el 
Helweh, just north of the Leba- 
nese port city of Sidon, between 
supporters and opponents of 
Mr. ArafaL 

The battles left at least 7 dead 
and 21 wounded, causing many 
Lebanese to sneer at what they 
saw as a double s tandar d 

"What is upsetting us is this 
lie we are all living,” a Lebanese 
businessman said. "We were 
told the war is over, all the 


In Beirut, Palestinian fac- 
tions opposed to Yasser ArafaL 
the Palestine Liberation Oiga- 


the Lebanese Army, and then 
we hear of fightmg in the 
camps.” 


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INTERNATIONAL 


pi/i nom far nni ^ihnTibm- onK. Of&r infid ihroupti Januan 31, I99S, 




/) 


obtained a copy of U Ohn 
Gyaw*s letter. 

The Burmese minister wrote 
that tiie opposition leader had 
been detained "for her own 
good and the good of the coun- 
try” and "to prevent hex from 
promoting the cause” of anti- 
government elements, The Na- 
tion said. 


Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, the 
1991 Nobel Peace Prize recipi- 
ent and daughter of the Bur- 
mese independence hero Aung 
San, was also accused of “sedi- 
tious speeches inciting the peo- 
ple to acts of violence and to 
division in the armed 
forces and division between the 
armed forces and the people,”' 
the letter said. 


A central body, consisting of 

three government ministers, nas 
the power to arrest and detain 
people up to one year, the re- 
port said. Further detention, for 
one-year periods up to five 
years, required the approval of 
the full cabinet, it indicated. 

The document was not dear 
on an upper limit for deten- 
tions. 


There is a cardinal rule that 
Lebanese officials must not 
even ask about how other peace 
talks with Israel are proceeding 
before Syria clinches its deal 
But many Lebanese fear that 
Syria would like to institution- 
alize the vacu um. 

Lebanese officials firmly in 
Syria's grip appear to believe 
there is no alternative to wait- 


ing. 

In the meantime, opposition 
to Syria is risky. The only mili- 
tia leader who dared defy Da- 
mascus by not joining a Syrian- 
tailored government — .Samir 
Geagea, a Christian — is «l<y» 
the only one who has been 
made a defendan t in the first 
postwar trial for misdeeds dur- 
ing the civil war. 

Prime Minister Rafiq Hariri 
says he expects to sign a peace 
treaty in June or July. With 
Lebanese negotiators left out of 
any talks with Israel, no one is 


quite sure what kind of treaty 
Lebanon would si an. Many 


Lebanon would sign. Many 
here are b eginning to doubt 
that either Israel or Syria is seri- 
ous about pulling out of Leba- 
non. 




Page 8 


PiTEBWATIOWA I. HERALD TRIBUNE, TBUKSPAY, DECEMBER 22, 199* 

HEALTH /SCIENCE 


Cold Fusion Is Back: 
It’s Still a Long Shot 


By Malcolm W. Browne 

ffent Yak TunaSernce 




EW YORK— Ever since the first 
hydrogen bomb was detonated in 
1952 , scientists have sought to 

_ ha rness thermonuclear fusion as 

a peaceful power source, but that goal has 
proved tantalizmg ly elusive. Now, howev- 
er, there seems to be an outside chance that 
a sew technique could achieve it. Bom- 
barding microscopic bubbles with intense 
sound waves could convert the bubbles 
into minuscule fusion furnaces. 

Recent experiments by a half-dozen lab- 
oratories suggest that a mysterious phe- 
nomenon called SOTolummescence may be 
capable of raising the temperature of gas 
trapped in a tiny bubble to 1.8 million 
degrees Fahrenheit or more — enough, in 
principle, to ignite fusion. 

If fusion were achieved, a microbubble 
could be expected to radiate neutrons, nu- 
clear particles produced by thermonuclear 
reactions. So far, the laboratories experi- 
menting with son oluminescence have failed 
to detect any neutrons, but there are other 
sig ns that the project is far from hopeless. 

In the 1930s German physicists discov- 
ered that when intense sound waves vibrat- 
ing at a fixed frequency are blasted into a 
liquid filled with tiny bubbles, the bubbles 
oscillate, collapse and emit Bashes of light. 

In the decades since the discovery of 
sonoliurdnescence, physicists have occa- 
sionally experimented with the phenome- 
non, but only in recent years have many of 
the most startling characteristics of sono- 
luminescence come to light. 

In 1987, a research group led by Dr. 
Kenneth S. Suslick, a chemist at the Uni- 
versity of Illinois in Cbampaign-Urbana, 
created clouds of sonoluminescent bubbles 
in a bath of liquid dodecane, a hydrocar- 
bon solvent similar to gasoline. 

By measuring the colors of the spectrum 


of light emitted by the bubbles. Dr. Suslick 
rfflir- piatad that the gas in the bobbles had 
to be at a temperature of about 9,000 
degrees Fahrenheit, a startlingly high tem- 
perature, considering that the surrounding 
liquid did not appear to be heated at all 
Dr. Suslick’s group created clouds of 
light-emitting bubbles by a process called 
cavitation, amply by exposing fluids to 


intense sound 
environment of sound created by trans- 
ducers (little loudspeakers) surrounding 
the fluid. In a typical reaction flask. Dr. 
Suslick found, bubbles farmed and col- 
lapsed at a rate of several million a second. 

At the University of California in Los 
Angeles, a team of physicists headed by 
Dr. Seth J. Putterraan reported last year 
that they had achieved vastly higher tem- 
peratures using a different technique. 

Dr. Puttermau's group has focused on 
the behavior of single bubbles rather than 
clouds of them. In has technique, a reaction 
flask is filled with water and evacuated of 
every trace of gas. 

A tiny piece of heating wire is used to 
bod just enough of the water to create a 
smp)g microscopic bubble: As the water 
vapor ipade this bubble cools, it leaves a 
vacuum, into which gas dissolved in the 
surrounding water is drawn. 

Once the bubble is formed, the sound 
field blasted into the flask suspends the 
bubble in place and forces it to begin 
o scillating in and out, in synchronous 
rhythm with the sound frequency. After 
about five seconds, something very pecu- 
liar occurs: The bubble begpns to emit 
intense bat very brief pulses of light 

What happens, Dr. Putterman and his 
colleagues believe, is that a spherical in- 
ward-moving shock wave traveling faster 
than the speed of sound is created by the 
violent, sound-induced collapse of the 
bubble. Since the bubble is almost perfect- 
ly spherical the imploding shock wave 



Spacecraft Maps Sun 
From a New Angle 


Dr. Sear. 


. Rabat fflUer/UCLA 


Equipment for generating sonoluminescence, a new approach to coldfusion. 


crashes in on itself, the gas within it is 
apparently heated to an astronomical tem- 
perature and the bubble emits a flash so 
brief that even equipment used to study 
hydrogen bomb explosions has proved in- 
adequate to measure its duration. 

I N a paper published by the journal 
Science in October. Dr. Putterman 
and three of his colleagues, Dr. Rob- 
ert Hiller, Dr. Keith Weninger and 
Dr. Bradley P. Barber, calculated that the 
sound energy pumped into a test flask is 
concentrated by the collapsing bubble in- 
side to an intensity one trillion times its 
initial density. 

Because the light that escapes from the 
flask includes fairly strong ultraviolet radi- 
ation, which is produced by incandescent 
objects only at high temperatures, the 
UCLA group has calculated that the tem- 
perature of the sonoluminescent bubble 
must briefly reach at least 180,000 degrees 


with each collapse. Some other scientists, 
including Dr. Suslick, believe the tempera- 
ture within an imploding single bubble 
could exceed 1.8 million degrees. 

But a major obstacle to achieving fusion 
is that this process must join together at- 
oms of isotopes of hydrogen (either deute- 
rium or a mixture of deuterium and tritium 
— the same mixture that fuels hydrogen 
bombs). Ibis yields helium nudes and tre- 
mendous amounts of energy. The problem. 
Dr. Putterman said, is that getting bubbles 
of hydrogen isotopes to produce sonolu- 
minescence is proving to be “very, very 
difficult — one of the mysteries of sonoha- 
minescence." 

Dr. Putterman remains undaunted by 
the slow progress. “At this point no one 
has stood up to disprove sonofusion, and 
that’s what keeps us going,” he said. “If it 
worked it would be a fabulous event Until 
someone shows it’s impossible we’re going 
to forge ahead.” 


By John Noble WHford 

Nat YorkTbmSenfce 

P ASADENA, California — More 
than four years and a bfflion nnles 
out from Earth, a spacecraft 
named for the legendary wander- 
ing hero, Ulysses, is traveling in unexplored 
parts of the solar system. These are rep 0 * 15 
above and below the plane in which the 
sun's retinue of planets reside, empty quar- 
tos dominated by the magnetic fields and 
streaming particles from the sun’s poles. 

k took the gravity of Jupiter to bead the 
Ulysses spacecraft's trajectory “downward” 
and away from this plane of the ecliptic, 
sending n where no craft had ever traveled. 
In observations over the past four months 
from this new perspective, the spacecraft 
■has presented scientists with some fi ndin g s 
they did not expect. 

“A number of long-standing questions 
have been answered, but, as usual there 
have been m^or surprises,” said Dr. Ed- 
ward J. Smith, chief scientist for the $750 
million Ulysses project at the Jet Propul- 
sion. Laboratory here. The project is a joint 
venture of the European Space Agency, 
which built the spacecraft, and the Nation- 
al Aeronautics and Space Administration. 

Launched from a space shuttle in Octo- 
ber 1990, the Ulysses spacecraft last month 
completed the first survey of the sun’s 
southern polar region, pasting over it at a 
distance mean than twice as far from the sun 
as the average distance from the sun to 
Earth, or about 185 million mOes. (The two 
Voyager spacecraft, after exploring the out- 
er planets, climbed out of toe plane of the 
ecliptic and toward the edge of the plane- 
tary system.) Scientists described the new 
survey results in interviews and in. reports at 
a meeting of the American Geophysical 
Union in San Francisco. 

The findings concern magnetic fields, 
cosmic rays and solar winds, the electrical- 
ly charged atomic particles that blow out 


from the sun’s outer atmosphere, ory- 
na. in all directions and at great speeds 

jERMfayiSag 

cosmic rays, high-energy^ particles, that 
arrive from elsewhere m the 
from exploding stars. These parades were 
somewhat more dense near the solar poles, 
but not to the extent expected. 

"The cosmic ray results were a total 
surprise,” said Dr. Bruce E Goldstem, the 
laboratory’s deputy 

When the sun is relatively quet, asit is 
now, the cosmic-ray intensity should be at 
its peak. The sun’s magnetic fields are less 
powerful at the p<3es, and saenUSts 
thought that would allow perhaps 50 per- 
cent more cosmic rays to enter into the 
solar system there than near the suns 
[uator and out along the plane of the 
liptic extending from the equator. 

UT Ulysses data, which showed 
. ’• ’ cosmic-ray 

solar pole, 
^ a more com- 
plicated stray. Other instruments may be 
providing an explanation. The spacecraft s 
m agnet ometers revealed strong waw-like 
variations in the sun’s magnetic fields m 
the polar region. A possible explanation 
for the waves, scientists suggested, is that 
the ends of the magnetic fine of force 
attached to the sun are being subjected to 
churning motions of the sun s surface. _ 

Tjy surprising but also mystifying was 
the measurement of solar-wind speeds. A 
team led by Dr. John Phjffips of Los Alamos 
National Laboratory in New Mexico re- 
ported that near the pole solar wind flows 
away from the son at about two xrnDion 
mites an hour, nearly twice the velocity of 
the wind nearer the sctlar equator and where 
the wind arrives in the vicinity of Earth. 



Sea Level Rise Confirmed 




New York Tuna Service 

EW YORK— During 
the first two years of 
its operation, the most 
accurate system ever 
devised for measuring changes 
in global sea level has discerned 
a steady rise of more than three 
millim eters, or about one-tenth 
of an inch, a year. It may not 
sound like much, but if this 
trend continues for another few 
years, scientists say, it will be 
solid evidence that the Earth is 
undergoing a long-term wann- 
ing trend, probably related to 
increases In atmospheric car- 
bon dioxide. 

Older and less reliable data 
had strongly suggested that 
global atmospheric and ocean 
temperatures were rising but 
doubts about the reliability of 
these measurements had lin- 
gered until now, the new satel- 
lite measurements enormously 
improve the precision and reb- 
abtiity of such estimates. 

It is posable, scientists con- 
cede, that the current trend 


might reverse at some point But 
if the seas continue to rise from 
one decade to the next a time 
will come when entire countries, 
Ban gladesh and the Netherlands 
among them, are inundated. 

The satellite sea level data 
were presented this month at a 
meeting of the American Geo- 
physical Society, at winch about 
70 papers described results ob- 
tained by the Topex/Poseidon 
satellite, a joint French- Ameri- 
can project designed to study 
ocean circulation patterns. - 

The rate of sea level increase 
measured by the satellite’s ra- 
dar altimeter, powered by a gi- 
gantic array of solar panels, “is 
m reasonable agreement with 
tide gauge results,” according 
to Dr. R. Steven Nercm of the 
National Aeronautics and 
Space Administration’s God- 
dard Space Flight Centex in 
Greenbdt, Maryland. 

The traditional method of 
measuring sea level uses me- 
chanical tide gauges placed in 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscott 

V ICTORY has not been 
staled by repetition for 
Nick Nickel!. After leading his 
team successfully in the Rd- 
singer Board- a-Match team, he 
was whooping with joy. This 
was his fourth win in five at- 
temps at major national team 
titles in the last 18 months. 

His partner on each occasion 
was Richard Freeman. Their 
teammates, all experienced pro- 
fessionals, were Bob Wolff, Bob 
Hamman, Jeff Meeks troth and 
Eric RodwdL 

The Rdsinger was a two- 
horse race. The Nicfcdl team 
battled the team of James 
Cayne, Chuck Burger, Bob 
Goldman, Paul Soloway, Mike 
Passell and Mark Lair. 

On the diagramed deal when 
playing each other, both teams 
rase to the occasion on. defense. 
In one room. South settled in 
three no-trump after his partner 
had used a fourth-suit two- 
spade bid en route to making a 
strong raise in clubs. 

Freeman, as West, avoided a 
spade lead, since the king was 
clearly on his right. He chose a 


the ace and defended expertly 


harbors and other coastal rites, 
from which readings are aver- 
aged. But Dr. Lee-lung Fu of 
the Jet Propulsion Laboratory 
in Pasadena, California, the 
project scientist of the Topex/ 
Poseidon project, said that tide 
gauges were too widely spaced 
and too few to provide reliable 
data for the Earth’s oceans. 

The satellite, by contrast, 
makes about 500,000 sea level 
measurements a day, each of 
than at a different place and 
each precise to within two inch- 
es. Because the instrument 
■makes so many measurements, 
local sea level variations caused 
by wind, tides and other factors 
are averaged out, he said. 

The satellite oovers all oceans 
lying between 66 degrees north 
and south latitudes, omitting 
only the ice-covered polar re- 
gions. 

Dr. Fu and other participants 
in the project acknowledge that 
two years of observations can- 
not prove the existence of long- 
term climate treads. Neverthe- 
less, these observations 
corroborate the trend of sea lev- 
el measurements made over the 
last century using ride gauges. 

Malcolm W. Browne 


How the Brain Works: Thinking Modular 


By Curt Suplee 

Washington Post Service 


M m WASHINGTON — For 
■||b those who study die brain, 
mmWm perhaps the toughest 
W Wt question has always been: 
Who’s minding the store? 

From Plato to the late 19th century, 
the answer was simple: There must be 
one central control mechanism (Des- 
cartes imagined it as a homunculus, or 
little man) that oversees all the sepa- 
rate mental functions. But lately — 
and especially in the past few years — 
many scientists have come to believe 
that the brain is more like a committee 
without a chairman, in which rogue 
members may sometimes act alone or 
fail to show up for meetings. 

Such discoveries, the Washington 
neurologist Richard M. Restak ex- 
plains in Ids new book, “The Modular 
Brain,” are part of a “truly revolution- 
ary theory of the brain’s operation, 
modular theory.” This view “holds 
that our experience is not a matter of 
combining at one master sice ... all 
the separate components into one cen- 
tral perception. As strange as it may 
sound, (here is no master site, no cen- 
ter of convergence.” Instead, many 
different sections do their work si- 
multaneously in parallel. 

It now seems probable, he writes. 


that “knerwiedge within the brain is not 
stored as a unity (a tiger) but according 
to separate components or modules 
(the sight of the tiger, its roar, its smell 
etc.). Farther, some of these modular 
components may malfunction without 
affecting any of the o there.” 

Take the strange case of patient 
S. M-, reported by a team from the 
University of Iowa College of Medi- 
cine in the journal Nature. This 30- 
year-okl woman with a normal IQ but 
a “remarkable” history of “defective 
personal and social decision-making” 
suffers from a rare form of brain dam- 
age that destroyed an almond-sized 
structure called the amygdala. 

As a result, she is almost completdy 
deficient at recognizing fear in pic- 
tures of faces. She also does not per- 
ceive much similarity between even 
closely related facial expressions such 
as happiness and surprise. Yet she can 
immectiatcly recognize pictures of fa- 
miliar individual faces (including 
some she has not seen in years), and 
can easily learn to recognize new ones. 

The findings indicate not only that 
the tiny amygdala may play an enor- 
mous rale in discerning the emotional 
significance of social situations but also 
that mental processing of facial identi- 
ty and facial emotion are very different 
activities that take place in “anatomi- 
cally separable neural systems.” 


“It’s really no different;” said Anto- 
nio Damario, a neurologist who heads 
the Iowa *«»«, “from what we now 
know is happening in language sys- 
tems” — for example, that noons and 
verbs are processed in different parts 
of the brain. 

Other lands of localized brain dam- 
age can lead to a variety of peculiar 
problems that Dr. Restak describes, 
including one su bject who lost tire abil- 
ity to name animals but could easily 
name inanimate objects, another who 
could recognize tools but not 
instruments, and yet another who was- 
nnable to tell whether a bee or a house 
was larger, though she knew exactly 
what bos and houses were. 

Neuroscientists have two ways to 
study such conditions: surgically al- 
tering the brains of animals to see how 

individual parts affect perception or 
behavior, and waiting for the rare hu- 
man patient who has a highly local- 
ized Drain defect 

P ATIENT S. M.’s care is valu- 
able because only her amyg- 
dala was destroyed, tints al- 
lowing researchers to 
investigate tbe specific role of the organ 
and to compare their findings with the 
results of animal experiments. 

There have been enough of those to 
indicate that the amygdala is intimate- 
ly involved in mating correct social 


judgments as well as imprinting mem- 
ories with emotional meaning. When 
lab monkeys have their amygdalas de- 
stroyed, they lose their normal hostil- 
ity to the approach of human experi- 
menters and much of their ability to 
determine which direction a face is 
looking. In the wild, such animals can- 
not find their place in the group hier- 
archy and “lose their ability to pick op 
the social signals that bind members 
of the colony into a unit,” Dr. Restak 
writes. 

In addition, the amygdala appears 
indispensable in learning fear; Joseph 
LeDoux of New York University 
trained rats to fear a sound by follow- 
ing it with a stomp of the experiment- 
er's foot But when their amygdalas 
were damaged — and everything else 
was normal- — no amount of stomping 
could make them afraid. 

Patient S. M-’s impaired recognition 
of fear provides new evidence of the 
human amygdala’s function and the 
brain’s moranarity. Ten years ago, Dr. 
Damasio said, it would have been rear 
sonable to assume that the amygdala 
was involved in processing perception 
of all emotions. Bat “the very stating 
finding of this study is that it seems to 
he that it is preferentially involved with 
fear," he said. That suggests that per- 
haps “in many other aspects of brain 
function, neural systems are not gener- 
al purpose, but are highly selective.” 



contract 

East had provided for the 
possibility of the actual situa- 
tion, knowing that this would 
be wrong in one unlikely situa- 
tion: if South had held king- 
queen-nine of spades, a low re- 
turn would have been better, 
but in that case, the defense was 
probably doomed in any event 

NORTH 

*32 

O A KQ98 
OKI 
* Q 10 7 3 


BOOKS 


WEST 
4 AQ J7 
C J 76 
0 543 
* J92 


EAST 
A 10 8 5 4 
y 10 4 3 2 
o A 10 7 
*86 
SOUTH <D) 

* K96 
95 

0 Q J 9 3 2 
4AK54 


Neither side was vulnerable. The 



bidding: 

South 

West 

North 

East 

f 0 

Pass 

1 <7 

Pass 

24 

Pass 

24 

Pass 

2N.T. 

Pass 

3 4 

Pass 

3 N.T. 

Pass 

Pass 

Pass 

West led the heart six. 



PROFESSING FEMINISM; 

Cautionary Tales From In- 
side the Strange World of 
Women’s Studies 

By Daphne Patai and Noretta 
Koertge. 235 pages. $24. A New 
Republic Bookl Basic Books. 

Reviewed by 
Michiko Kakutani 

T OWARD the end of their 
dulling new book, Daphne 
Patai and Noretta Koertge 
draw some rather unflattering 
analogies between contempo- 
rary feminism (or at least femi- 
nism as they say it's being 
taught in many women’s studies 
programs today) and religious 
cults, expe rim ental communes 
and creationist science. 

Like many religious sects, 
they argue, women’s studies pro- 
ave grown increasingly 
itic, increasingly obsessed 
conformity and increasing- 
ly intolerant of deviant beliefs. 
Like many experimental com- 


munes, they say. these programs 
tend to evince a “bunker mental- 
ity" that regards the outside 
world with a mixture of hostility 
and disdain. 

And like creationists, they as- 
sert, many teachers in these 
programs dismiss traditional 
science and intellectual inquiry 
as biased, while trying to re- 
place these methods with alter- 
native systems of their own. 

As Patai and Koertge see it, 
the brand of feminism promul- 
gated by many university pro- 
grams today is not simply about 
equal rights for women or the 
study of gender and sex. “Femi- 
nism aspires to be much more 
than this,” they write. “It bids 
to be a totalizing scheme resting 
on a grand theory, one that is as 
all-inclusive as Marxism, as as- 
sured of its ability to unmask 
hidden meanings as Freudian 
psychology, and as fervent in its 
condemnation of apostates as 
evangelical fun damen ta li sm. 

Feminist theoiy provides a 
doctrine of original tin: the 
world’s evils originate in male 


WHAT THEY'RE READING 


• Todd Gitfin, author of “The 
Sixties: Years of Hope, Days of 
Rage,” is reading Marcel 
Proust’s ” Remembrance of 
Things Past." 

“It's a momentary exit from 
ordinary time -” 

(Anne Dziubak, IHT) 



supremacy. It regards the male's 
(usually: the white male’s) insis- 
tence on main taming power as 
the key that unlocks the myster- 
ies of individual actions and in- 
stitutional behavior. And it of- 
fers a simple prescription for 
radical change: reject whatever 
is tainted with patriarchy and 
replace it with something em- 
bodying gynecmtric values." 

Fatal a professor of Spanish 
and Portuguese at the Universi- 
ty of Massachusetts at Amherst, 


and Koertge, a professor of the 
history and philosophy of sci- 
cnce at Indiana University, are 
both longtime veterans of wom- 
en’s studies programs, and they 
identify themselves as feminists 
who have become disillusioned 
with the direction that femi- 
nism has taken in recent years. 

We are treated to laments 
about feminism’s insistence on 
depicting women as victims in 
need of self-esteem. Once again, 
we are shown some absurdities 


resulting from feminism’s ef- 
forts to police the English lan- 
guage. Once again, we are given 
a litany erf horror stories meant 
to illustrate the dangers of po- 
litical correctness. 

In “Professing Feminism," 
Patai and Koertge cite cases in 
which students are chastised for 
failing to toe the party line and 
are charged with “resistance." 

They recount the story of a 
woman who is accused by her 
colleagues of exhibiting “mas- 
culinist categories of thought” 
because she is an economist and 
another story about an “art pro- 
ject" exhibited on a University 
of Maryland campus that “list- 
ed as ’potential rapists' male 
names pulled randomly from a 
student directory." 

When it comes to analyzing 
the basic tenets of radical femi- 
nism and their practical conse- 

S uences in academia, the au- 
jots are convincing. “It is 
ironic, and tragic as well" they 
write, “that feminism, which 
originally denounced tradition- 
al education for its failures to 


act in accordance with its 
proclaimed precepts of jui 
fairness, equality and di 
sionate evaluation, has sc 
thusiasticaBy trashed the 
principles on which its ■ 
(and, on the whole, warrai 
denunciations rested.” 

Patai and Koertge repeal 
illustrate in these pages thi 
fortunate tendency of ra 
feminism to replicate son 
the very unfairnesses and 
reo types feminism once 
cried. They point out that v 
en’s studies programs ten 
reinforce the simplistic th 
that associated intellect 
logic with men, and sentu 
and emotion with women. 

The new feminists, they 
have simply reversed the c 
tional hierarchy of values i 
oated with these idemti 
tions: subjective, “fern 
impressions are now simp 
to be more valid foo 
constructed, “male” argum 

Michiko Kakutani is ok 
staff of The New York Tun 


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Page 9 



THE TRIB INDEX 1 1 i^7oM 

SSWaa'ssL'S e- * -S 

fayBloomfaerg Bus, ness fta£ SlXglfr*" 63 ' “ m P“« ) 


Inside Intel: Saga of Chip Switch 

Chief Says f I Didn’t Know the Scope of the Problem’ 





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J A S O N D 

1994 


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ISM 


North America 


Latin America 


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$£ WortOIndtt 19M 


*; :■ ■.. *'• -. .j /. V : 


By John Markoff 

New York Times Seme* 

SAN FRANCISCO — Ii was during 
the weekend after Thanksgiving that 
Paul OteUini, Intel Corp.'s senior vice 
president for worldwide sales, first real- 
ized that his company bad a crisis on its 
hands. 

Customers were angry about reports 
of a flaw in the company's Pentium chip 
that caused errors in same division calcu- 
lations. 

Even as he was discussing the problem 
with his boss, Andrew S. Grove, the 
president and chief executive of Intel, a 
message was coming out of Mr. Otellini’s 
home facsimile machine, his computer 
was receiving electronic mail and his 
cellular phone was rin g in g. It was at that 
moment, he said, that his wife threw up 
her hands and walked out of the room. 

“I thought to myself, Thank God, I 
don't have another phone line,' ” he said. 

As plugged in as they were, Intel offi- 
cials were out of touch with the new 
consumer market they had cultivated. 
They had based a big advertising cam- 
paign on the "Intel Inside" thane, seek- 
ing to make their chips a household 
name. 

Inside Intel, however, executives had 
not prepared themselves for the new ob- 
ligations and responsibilities that came 
with being a consumer-products compa- 
ny. The story of the past month at Intel is 
one of the re-education of a high- tech- 
nology company. 

One immediate result of the telecon- 
ferencing after Thanksgiving was that 
Mr. Grove composed an apology to be 


posted on a computer bulletin board on 
the Internet. On that web, Intel was 
under broad attack for not having dis- 
closed the Pentium's problems when the 
company discovered them last summer. 

Because he was at home and had no 
direct Internet access, Mr. Grove asked 
an Intel scientist, Richard Wirt, to post 
bis message from Mr. Win’s home com- 
puter network account. But because it 
bore Mr. Wirt’s electronic address, the 
note’s authenticity was challenged, 
which only added to the fury of the 
Internet attacks on Intel 

At 8 AM. the following Monday, in- 
side the company’s headquarters in San- 


Discovery to ApoiW 


| Oct 30 Dr. Thomas R. Nicely, 
a mathematics professor at 
Lynchburg College In Virginia, 
publishes a note on the Internet 
about the flaw In the 
Pentium chip, i,* ^ 


ta Clara, California, Intel executives set 
to work on the crisis the way they at- 
tacked all large problems — like an engi- 
neering problem, Mr. OteUini recalled. 

Tt was a classic Intelian approach to 
solving any big problem," be said. "We 
broke it down into smaller parts. That 
was comforting." 

During the following days the com- 
mittee grew to several dozen Intel em- 
ployees, drawn from all parts of the com- 
pany. Each day there would be an hour- 
long meeting beginning at 8 AM. 

During those sessions, participants re- 
ceived stacks of photocopies of the day’s 
newspaper articles about the Pentium 
problem and executives were briefed 
from reports culled from Intel's sales 
representatives and from the customer 
hotline that had been set up. 

The executives would then adjourn. 


Plunging Peso 
Stirs Doubts 
About Mexico 


devoting the rest of the workday to In- 
tel's regular busness. But afternoon 
at 5 P.M-, another meeting 1 


55- intol Dec. aoH- 

r: Intel says it 

will replace all 

• j M flawed Pentium 

chips and suspends 

* , ■. its qualification process. 

'AStuuliuiUuilMuiuiiiiuiuitUiulmdii 

••• Oak **••«* -9 -sf.-i 

! :M m -.. •■•••an 'v-.- 

Source: Datastream NYT 


at 5 P.M^ another meeting would be 
convened and those went much longer — 
sometimes well into the night. 

Throughout the next two weeks, the 
company continued to believe that its 
customers were listening to its explana- 
tion that the Pentium’s computational 
errors were so infrequent that ordinary 
users did not need to worry. 

Mr. Grove was struck by the way some 
of his best customers — large computer 
retailers and mamifacturers — formed 
ranks and expressed their solidarity. 

“I don’t normally talk with managers 
of retail chains as a matter of course," he 


See INTEL, Page 10 


nwfrKfeir tracks US. doOar values of stocks in : Tokyo, Nm York, London, and 
ATBontina. Australia. Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, CM* Danmark. Finland. 
Franco, Germany, Hong Kong, Italy, Mexico, Nottwftnds, Nn Zealand, Norway, 
Sfengapora, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and Venezuela. Far Tokyo. New York and 
London, the index b compoaod of the 30 top laaues ki terms of marker capnakmtion. 
rthBmriso the ton top stocks are tracked. 


EU Plans to Liberalize Cable TV Laws 


U Industrial Sectors |( 


Wad. Am % 

dOM dost dungs 


WdL 

daw 

Pm. 

don 

% 

dang* 

Energy 

112a 113.10 -0.72 

Capital Goods 

11225 

11229 

+023 

Utilities 

121.87 125.15 -2.62 

Rsv Materials 

129.76 

129.79 

-0.02 

Rnancs 

112.86 113.17 -027 

Consumer Goods 

103.12 

10277 

+0.34 

Sendees 

110.65 11128 -0^7 

Ifisceiteneaus 

11520 

118.17 

-022 

For mom information about the Index, aboaklstisavallabietrBeofchanje, 

Write lo Trb Index. 131 Avenue Charles de Gaulle. 92521 Neu&y Codex. France. 


C International Hamid Tribune 


Compiled by Ov Staff From Dispatcher 

BRUSSELS — The Europe- 
an Commission said Wednes- 
day it planned legislation to en- 
sure that cable television 
networks can cany multimedia 
and other telecommunications 
services across the European 
Union by Jan. 1, 1996. 

It said cable operators should 
be free to offer services includ- 
ing borne banking, interactive 
video games, borne alarms and 
mobile communications with- 
out being hampered by national 


laws that restrict them to one- 
way broadcasting. 

“Liberalizing access to cable 
infrastructure should permit a 
lowering of costs and a signifi- 
cant increase in the amount of 
capacity available for new ser- 
vices." the commission said. 

But the proposal stops short 
of allowing cable television oper- 
ators to offer telephone services, 
which some analysts said would 
be the most lucrative business 
for cable TV companies. 

The commission did set a 


deadline of Jan. 1, 1998, for lib- 
eralizing all telecommunications 
infrastructure, including tele- 
phone services, in most coun- 
tries. So far, Britain is the only 
member of the European Union 
that allows cable TV networks to 
cany basic phone sovice. 

The proposal put forth 
Wednesday would considerably 
cut costs for companies wishing 
to provide mulitmrvtia services 
because access to cable compa- 
ny networks is “lip to 10 times 
cheaper" than for state-owned 
telecommunications monopo- 


lies, said Karel Van Miert, the 
competition commissioner. 

Mr. Van Miert said that Den- 
mark and Belgium were among 
countries opposing rapid liber- 
alization of telecommunica- 
tions but that he did not expect 
major political obstacles. 

The percentage of EU house- 
holds that subscribe to cable 
television service ranges from 
none in Italy and Greece to 95-5 
percent in Belgium and 86.4 
percent in the Netherlands, the 
commission said. 

(Reuters, AFX, Bloomberg) 


By Tim Golden 

New York Tima Service 

MEXICO CITY — Mexico's 
economic stability was threat- 
ened Wednesday as the peso 
came under heavy pressure af- 
ter a 15 percent devaluation on 
Tuesday, interest rates soared 
and the values of Mexican 
stocks plunged. 

The panic subsided by the ear- 
ly afternoon, with major stock, 
indexes regaining more than half 
of the nearly 11 percent that they 
fell in the course of the morning. 
The peso also recovered slightly 
against the dollar. 

But the episode represented a 
debacle for President Ernesto 
Zedillo Ponce de lion just three 
weeks after his inauguration. It 
also left sharp doubts among in- 
vestors and economists about 
the viability of an economic 
strategy that has depended on 
the inflow of foreign capital to 
cover huge shortfalls in Mexico’s 
trade ana other accounts. 

"This has been a major crisis 
of confidence in the Mexican 
ravtxnmenl,” said Geoffrey E. J. 
Dennis, head erf Latin American 
equity research at Bear, Steams 
& Cain New York. “They may 
well be able to handle it. But 
we've not had an adequate ex- 
planation of why they did the 
devaluation, so we don't know 
that they won't do it again * 

The Bolsa stock index fin- 
ished down 3.1 percent, at 
2^03.67 points, after being 
down nearly 11 percent in early 
trading, the dollar rose to 
3.9870 pesos from 3.9750 pesos 
Tuesday. On Monday, it was 
wrath just 3.4620 pesos. 

Mexico's central bank raised 
short-term interest rates 
Wednesday to try to support 
the currency, and the move 
drew funds away from equities 
as rates on 2&-day Mexican 


away from both the economic 


dent Carlos Salinas de Gortari 
and the promises of new gov- 
ernment spending and lower in- 
terest rates with which Mr. Ze- 
dillo won election in August 

Like his predecessor, Mr. Ze- 
dillo had expressed confidence 
that a projected deficit of more 
than 530 billion in Mexico’s 
current account, the broadest 
measure of its trade, could be 
handled even if interest rates 
fell and spending rose. Just last 
Thursday, the new finance min- 
ister, Jaime Serra Puche, had 
also vowed that a devaluation 
was not in the offing. 

In briefings for investors 
Wednesday, however, govern- 
ment officials acknowledged at 
least implicitly that the pres- 
sures felt on Mexico’s financial 
markets throughout the year 
were the result of a fundamen- 
tal weakness in the economy. 


They promised to address the 
problem by cutting spending. 


problem by cutting spending, 
scaling back loans to private 
companies for imports and rais- 
ing interest rales. 

[Investors were only partially 
reassured by the government's 
statement, Bloomberg Business 
News reported. 

[“Everyone is trying to get 
through the same door — out,” 
Ron Villa, an equity trader at 
the Mexican brokerage Invex, 
Casa de Bolsa SA told Bloom- 
bog in Houston.! 


treasury bills, known as Cetes, 
rose 2.25 percentage points, to 


rose 225 percentage points, to 
16 percent. 

The government has backed 


■ Aid Approved for Haiti 

The International Develop- 
ment Association approved a 
540 million emergency credit 
for Haiti on Tuesday and said 
the funds could begin flowing 
before y ear-end, Reuters re- 
ported from Washington. 

The World Bank plans a 
meeting in January in Paris to 
seek more aid for Haiti, as part 
of an 18-month, $660 milli on 
plan to help the country estab- 
lish democracy. 




Fancy Footwork by a Couple of Giants 


Xerox Tmds New Niche Spring in AT&Ts Step 


By John Holusha 

New York Tima Service 

L EESBURG, Virginia — John Nelson and a dozen 
fellow middle-level executives sit in a classroom at 
Xerox Corp.’s training center here, earnestly studying 
the digital future. In all-day sessions at the modem 
complex in the hills of Virginia, they listen to lectures op the 
new technology and computer-age sales tactics. The training 
program lasts a week, and this group of Xerox students seems to 

be getting the message. _ . . _ 

Mr. Nelson, a district business manager in Hartford, Con- 
necticut, and his colleagues speak fluently of “digital solu- 
tions” in business and the need for the coper company to 
“capture the benefits of digital technology. 

This corporate re-education is a critical step m Xerox s 
strategy to bring its copier business into the computer revolu- 
tionTa early, the days of simply selling copiers and then 
enjoying the annuity income from continuing sales of paper, 
toner and service are rapidly receding. 

Todav when an office worker wants a few copies of a memo 

or letter, the person is as likely to push the “print" button on a 
personal computer as to walk over to a copying, machine. 

TtacasetfPC printing is just one example of the inroads 
diiriS technology uas made in the office. Xerox has not only 


By Mike Mills 

Washington Post Service 

B ASKING RIDGE, New Jersey — No wonder AT&T 
Carp, is feeling like Superman these days. It has been 
more than a decade since Judge Harold Greene 
brake up its old monopoly, but the company is 
finally seeing the payoff for adjusting to a competitive world. 


Fop business or leisure, 
there s no place like borne, 


Consider this array of accomplishments in 1994: 

• More than a milli on new customers for long-distance 
service, the first annual net gain since the Bell telephone 
monopoly was broken up 1 1 years ago. 

• America’s largest cellular telephone system, which AT&T 
purchased in September for $11-5 billion. 

• A series of new partnerships and mergers to enhance 
AT&T’s technology and market base. The allies include other 
U.S. giants such as Lotus Development Corn., Intel Corp. and 
Xerox Corp^ as well as video-game and information-services 
providers and telephone companies in other countries. 

Through acquisitions, layoffs and a wrenching change in 




corporate culture (the old promise of lifetime employment is 
long gone), AT&T has become a very different company from 
the one that was bom at 12:01 A.M. on New Year's Day 1984, 
when Judge Greene’s order to dismember the Bell Telephone 
System took effect 

Executives working in AT&T’s sprawling, pagoda-style 
headquarters here in New Jersey exude a sense of confidence 
and excitement more typical of small Silicon Valley software 
companies. 

“It’s an altitudinal change," Chairman Robert E. Allen 
said. “It’s about being more aggressive." 

Now Mr. Allen is looking onto a broader horizon: fulfilling 
AT&T’s long-held, and often frustrated, vision of using its' 
vast global resources in computing, equipment manufactur- 
ing, software production and switching capability to become 

See PHONE, Page 11 


trying lot rapture much of the 

s S 5 ssffiaa BS^- -°g- 


began in 1990, when Xerox introduced mam- 
DocuTechs, which cost as much a. 

See XEROX, Page 11 


'CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


p .,.- Dec. 21 

Cross olfi aJ=. slf. es non 

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- SS" - 


Eurocurrency Deposit* 



— A Join our 
.New Year's Eve 1 
> celebrations.. 

7 Featuring 
HouidaQ-Hachem-* 
Special ran rate:. 






The Holiday Im Crowne Raza Hotel and Residence. 


alt* 

Swiss 

Froac 

Starting 

French 

Franc 

Yen 

Dec. 21 

ECU 

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MenW LvkA 3Mav rmlr 


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WwrOAT 0.15 AM 

Sources.- Rooters. Bloom boro, Merrill 
Lynch, Bonkof TWm Gemmanhonk. Credd 
Lyonna is . 


The next time you're in Dubai on business or 
for leisure, stay with us. That way, you’ll enjoy 
all the comforts of home. With all the 5-star 
amenities of the Holiday Inn Crowne Plaza 
Hotel and Residence. 

• For business, we've got it alL One of the Gulfs 
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* For leisure, the options are endless. Eight 


international restaurants and lounges, open-air 
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all that Dubai has to offer right outside. 

So the next time you visit, feel truly at home. 
In the privacy of your own fully-fiirrirshed - luxury 
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CROWNE PLAZA 


AO lot 2311S, Dubai United Arab E>NKRM,T« 3111 M. Fax. 31SSS5 


DUBAI 


lHiwM 


480 480 
4J0 05 

155 155 

W5 585 
£15 155 

751 787 


OoM 

AM. PM Orte 
Zones XUS mu +ais 

UMkm 38180 38285 +au 

New York 38430 38380 -080 

US. donors per ounce. London official fix- 
kmt Zurich and Hew Yerkumboandck*- 
mr prices; New York Gama (fVmarrJ 
Source: Reuters. 




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C^eSftbanu 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 1994 


•** 


MARKET DIARY 


Shares Rebound 



On Profit Outlook 


NEW YORK — US. stocks 
rallied Wednesday after two 
Jays of io»$£S amid prospects for 
a year-end rally and optimism 
tha t growth in oorporate profits 
would accelerate. 

Gains in software, retailing, 
semiconductor and financial 
stocks fueled the advance. 

The Dow Jones industrial av- 
erage rose 34.65 points, to 


U.S. Stocks 


3,801.80, and at one point had 
advanced as much as 50.47 
points. 

Two rounds of computer- 
guided buy programs added 
23.5 points to the average, ac- 
cording to Birinyi Associates. 
The 50-point gain triggered the 
New York Stock Exchange’s 
“downtick" rule, curbing some 
trades in connection with stock- 
index arbitrage, for the first 
tirne since Oct. 28. 

“All the liquidation pressure 
was over a week ago, and there 
is no serious selling interest," 
said Michael Metz, market 
strategist at Oppenheimer. 
“This is creating something of a 
supply vacuum, which is allow- 
ing the stock market to lift" 


Advancing stocks outpaced 
dediners by a 5-to-3 ratio on 
the New York Stock Exchange, 
where volume expanded to 
378.81 mfllion shares, up from 
32533 million on Tuesday. 

Shares of Intel rose for a sec- 
ond day, climbing 1% to 62% 
after adding 3 7/ 16 on Tuesday. 
The company bowed to criti- 
cism Wednesday and said it 
would replace its defective Pen- 
tium computer chips at no cost 

Optimism about earnings 
helped fuel the gain in software 
stocks. Oracle surged 3 to 42% 
after reporting late Tuesday 
that second-quarter net income 
rose 51 percent on record sales. 

Microsoft also staged a recov^- 
ay, climbing 1% to 61 Vi, after 
the company said it would delay 
release of its Windows 95 oper- 
ating system until August. It had 
fallen sharply on Tuesday. 

Elsewhere in the sector. Mo- 
torola surged 2% to 57% and 
IBM climbed 2% to 73%. 

Retail stocks rallied as well, 
as some investors said the drop 
in share prices on concern 
about holiday sales was over- 
done. Seats, Roebuck climbed 
1% to 46%, while Dayton-Hud- 
son rose 2 to 76%. 

( Bloomberg, Reuters) 


Dollar Gains as Money 
Returns From Mexico 


Compiled by Ovr Staff From Daptucha 

NEW YORK •— Financial 
turmoil in Mexico and a round 
of speculative dollar buying 
against European currencies 
jolted the foreign-exchange 
market out of pre-Christmas 
sluggishness Wednesday, push- 
ing the U.S. currency higher. 

The dollar finished ai 13806 


Foreign Exchange 


men Is in Latin American mar- 
kets, analysts said. That height- 
ened currency market 
expectations for a rally m 
American securities if those 
funds are repatriated. 

Traders said a rally in U.S. 
stock markets also helped the 
dollar. 

The Federal Reserve Board’s 
failure to raise interest rates 


Deutsche marks, up from 13702 
DM Tuesday, and at 100.475 
yen. up from 100.170 yen. It also 
rose to 5.541 French francs from 
5.414 francs and to 1334 Swiss 
francs from 1-328 francs. 

The pound weakened to 
SI 3420 from SI 3605. 

With financial markets in 
Mexico, Argentina and Brazil 
suffering sharp declines, traders 
said it stood to reason that some 
of the money pouring out of 
those markets found a home in 
the United States. 

Mexico’s currency was deval- 
ued on Tuesday and stocks and 
the peso were under pressure 
Wednesday. The turmoil 
prompted a panic among U.S. 
money managers with invesi- 


Tuesday after its policy-making 


Open Market Committee met 
did not dent the dollar's value. 


* 




If 

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NYSE Most Actives 


VOL Htob 

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42to 

441% 


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HJRWob 

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384 

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16* 

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Market Salas 


Today 

dose 


NYSE 

Anwx 

Nasdaq 

in millions. 


37U1 405,15 

19S1 22 .96 

319.97 32550 


3771-52 381755 3757.15 3*71 JO -3*. 65 
1397.28 141157 139776 140100 *070 
181.58 182^0 181 75 18173 —0.19 
124779 12*1.57 124558 1254X4 -*X* 


Standard & Poor's Indexes 


Industrials 

Tram 

Uffllfles 

Flncnc* 

SPS00 

SPIN 


HM tow daw OH 
54849 MM 54 6X9 +185 
345J0 34174 343.11 +076 
15211 151X7 15170— 020 


42JD 41« 4178 +004 
45)70 457.10 459.il + 221 


42815 +233 


NYSE Indexes 


CaiwostK 

industrials 

Trortsp. 

Utifitv 

Finance 


High 

Law 

LOt 

am. 

251 J8 

Z49.77 

2509* 

♦ 1.74 

318.13 

315.17 

317X8 

♦ 1.91 

3flfJ« 

71E5S 

71405 

*1.11 

201X0 

20032 

20033 

—OJO 

198. S3 

197,75 

197J6 

♦ OJO 


NASDAQ Indexes 


M Law Last Ota. 


Composite 

Industrial 

Banks 

Insurance 

Finance 

Tronsp, 


73515 731 JH 73615 *815 
73479 73157 73579 *475 
592.91 09.63 592.91 + 1J4 
91813 909.76 918x3 *714 
855 28 851.18 85578 *474 
43411 528.97 63X27 —218 


AMEX Stock Index 


Mail Low LM aw. 
427.93 424.72 427.93 +213 


Dew Jones Bond Averages 


20 Bonds 
10 utilities 
10 Industrials 


Ck’M 
9*06 —077 

89.23 —005 

96259 —0.10 


NYSE Diary 


Advanced 

Declined 

Unchanged 
Total Issues 
New HUM 
New Laws 


1451 1125 

893 1125 

612 711 

2955 2952 

41 27 

M 100 


AMEX Diary 


Advanced 
DecAned 
Unchanged 
Total Issues 
New Hie its 
New Lows 


344 

255 


253 

321 

251 

835 


NASDAQ Diary 


Class Prev. 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total issues 
New Highs 
New Laws 


ten 1707 
1472 1617 

i7so i m 
5142 5144 

97 TO 

144 174 


Spot Commodities 


Commodity Today 

Aluminum, lb 0154 8B44 

Copper electrolytic, lb in 113 

Iran FOB, ton 7mm 213.00 

Load, lb 014 014 

Sllw.troy w 4795 483 

Steel (scran). Ion 127 j» 1273X1 

Tin. lb na 

Zinc, fb 05594 056 


Close ^ 

■H 

aluminum itflyh an**) 


78MJJ0 1&LDC 

Forward WMU iviyjiu 189770 189880 

COPPER CATHODES WW Ondu) 

DsHarsFwmSrtc 

Spot ZW. 

Faward 2947, 

LEAS 

tar mw Wmm 

Forward asm 

NICKEL 


2970.00 Z9UJJJ 
294800 2M4O0 


63X50 

EOJ5D 


NICKL- 

S Q '?” PCr,, fflo S390XO 639000 840000 
w£m WUH 6SSOJOO 

SiaOTMrnH H tlc l on 


5nd 


Forward 593000 


05000 587800 


££53&B?JSk 


995000 597000 


*"ll05fl0 110500 110700 
1)3400 113300 1135X0 


Financial 

High low Close atoose 

MVtONTH STERLING (LJPFE) 


Dec 

Mar 

Jim 

Sip 

Dec 

Mar 

Jao 

Sen 

Dec 

Mar 

Jin 


9X58 

9272 

9205 

9104 

9103 

9109 

9098 

S«5 

9894 

90.95 

9004 

9009 


nss 

92X0 

ss 

+M) 
+ 110 

9154 

vzjn 

+ 0® 


91 J2 

+ 0X3 


9L25 

+ 004 

91J74 

VI .07 

Unch. 

90.9S 

90X8 

Unch. 

90-97 

9095 

+OB2 

9CL92 

MM 

+0X4 

9092 

90.96 

+0X4 

'MS2 

9094 

+0X2 

WO 

5S88 

Unch. 


147 JO 147 J# 147 JO 147* — 

5® N.T. ttf: SlT. M 1-035 
Est, volume: 11 J69 . Opafl W. 9*001 


UAOBiiari ^ )U2 U|Z -0X7 

it?" ffiB 


Feb 

Mar 


Jmf 

Jiy 


m US H:i 


Sen 

Ott 


Dec 

Jan 


ir i5 ttfi 

1*2? 1505 15X6 IWU-MS 

1*25 1624 1524 I5JT) +BM 

N? ILT. N.T. 1625 + MJ 

WS l«3 15X1 -.5“ 

ut M T JSLT. HL2S UnCh- 

fe & itS MSI™ 


Esf.«aMiw:aW53. Open W. 1530» 


Stock Indexes 


Lew Oase CHOW 


Ejt. volume: 41J05. Open lnt.: 49X754 

MMMiTH EURODOLLARS IUFFH) 
si minion -Pts o» wend 


Jan 


N.T. N.T, 92X2 +307 

9223 92 23 9222 — 0JD1 

N.T. NT. _ 9L80 -0JI9 


FFSirriWoa-i 


Jun 

Sea 


EH. volume: 58 Open ML: 2X2* 

J-MONTH EUROMARjaiLIFFE) 

DM) eatWM ■ pti of NO PCI 
MOT 9443 9435 94*3 +006 

M 9*09 9*04 9*07 +0*3 

Sap 9323 9359 9321 +001 

Dec 9335 9333 9334 +O01 

mtr 93JD9 93X5 9304 Unch. 

jSa 92X4 92X2 92X1 Unch. 

Sep 9244 9251 9252 Uncft 

BBS; 9255 9254 9254 Unctl. 

& %£ %% 

^ S3 %% 

6 si. volume: 28437. Open mt.: 589A2L 
SMONTH PIBOR JMAT1F7 

4 fW nai 9325 —0X5 

O 92X5 92X7 — 0X7 

6 92J S 92*7 —mi 

6 9254 9257 —OOS 

Mar 9238 9229 9231 —0X5 

JH 9223 92.16 9220 —0X1 

5CP 92X9 92X3 92X8 + 0X1 

Dec 92X5 91 JB 92X5 +0X2 

Est. volume: 48X51. Open InL: 188419. 
LONG GILT (LI FFE) 
isaM* - pts « arts or wo pci 
DCC 10*31 102-23 103-00 +0X6 

Mar 702-14 KKMD 102-71 +0-07 

Jan N.T. N.T. 101-11 +0X7 

Est. volume: 7354 open ML; 131X43. 
GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND CUFFE) 
DM m«n • Pis 0MBO PCI 
Mar 8935 89 AQ 89X4 —0X5 

JOB N.T. N.T. 8934 —0X5 

EsL volume: 21X31 Open Mt: 170306. 
18-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS IMAT1F) 


FF5MXM 

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Mar 

11092 

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Jan 

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110X0 

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Sew 

109.42 

107X7 

109X0 

Dec 

N.T. 

M.T. 

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Unch 

Est. volume: 54639. Open MU 142X10. 


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|»L volume: 5J40-OPenMt: 5M25, 

CAC 48 WATIFl 

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EsL volume: 24X49. Open tot.: 5U7*. 

Sources.* Motif. Associated * "***_ 
London Inti Financial Futures Exams* 
inti Patrotovm Exchange. 


Dtvktenda 


^5/ ATjHEftOSE 


U.S., Canada 

OTTAWA (Combined on Thuisday. a US. 

Canada Trill unveil as open- skies agre™* 
government source said. . . understanding,*’ said , the 

“HKy tave reached iSed to the year^w 


O^TLWTW ITM V IPIIAIWIP «A4V a i 

KKR Says It Has Control of Borden 

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Kohlber^ K^^Itoberte <>• 
said Wednesday it had enough shareholder support wpiete 
its $2 biUion takeover of Borden Inc. th t J 

KKR, tfae New York-based investment <gmP«™ 
controls the food-and-tobacco conglomerate BJR Nacnsco m , 
said it acquired 63.5 percent of Borden s stock, or W. , 
shares. KKR needed at least 40 percent to complete thc deaI b > r 
the time its tender offer expired at midnight Tuesday. 


TCI Investing in Microsoft Network 

REDMOND, Washington (Bloomberg) — Tele-Communica- 
dons Inc. said it will invest $125 million in Microsoft Corp. s nea- 


Online Services partnership. . 

The cable giant's TCI Technology Ventures umt will acquire a 
20 percent minority interest in the on-line partnership; Other 
financial terms were not disclosed. 


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d-CjoTTOcHna amount 

e-Ccrr acting record data. 

INITIAL 

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Czach Republic - ,-lg 

Emero Thiers Fd - -1239 

FW Adv Emm Asia - 

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Household lnt! 
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1230 M3 
12-30 1-18 
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1-2 1-16 
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12-30 1-15 

1230 1-17 
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1-5 1-13 

1-10 2-1 
1-3 2-15 

1231 7-25 
13 1-16 


Cray Sees Mediocre Year, CEO Quits 

EAGAN, Minnesota (Bloomberg) —Cray Research Inc^ strug- 
gling with a customer shift to low-end supercomputers, said 
Wednesday that it expects only to break even next year before 
restructuring charges- 

It also said John F. Carbon, 56, chief executive for the past two 
years, would retire Dec. 31. “I am not satisfied with our results to 
( foi e and have reluctantly concluded that I should turn over 
responsibility to new leadership,” Mr. Carlson said. 


Investor Interested in Pickens’s Mesa 


DALLAS (Bloomberg) -— T. Boone Pickens, who spent much 
of the 1980s trying to take over other companies, may be faring a 
takeover bid himself. 

The investor D ennis Washington said in government filings 
Wednesday that he intends to acquire more than S15 million 
worth of Dallas-based Mesa Inc., the natural gas company, that 
Mr. Pickens heads. At the current price, that would be almost 3.9 
million shares, or about AJb percent of Mesa's outstanding shares. 

Mr. Washington said he eventually may buy more tbah-25 
percent of Mesa’s stock. 


For the Record 


HeaUhsource Inc. said Wednesday it would boost membership 
in its managed health care plans by acquiring the groups medical 
business of Provident life & Accident Insurance Co. for S3 10 
million in cash and stock. (Bloomberg) 

The Federal Trade Conmosaioa modified a 1978 antitrust order 
a gains t T-evi Strauss & Co. to clarify that it did not bar the company 
from opening stores selling Levi products. (Reuters, Bl 


‘There was really no reaction 
to the lack of Fed action, be- 
cause no action was expected," 
said Kevin Weir, vice president 
of foreign exchange sales at 
ABN-Amre Bank in Chicago. 

Many currency traders in- 
stead are expecting die central 
bank to raise rates at the end of 
January. 

In Germany, meanwhile, the 
Bundesbank council will meet 
Thursday for the last time this 
year, and analysts said they ex- 
pected the central bank to leave 
interest rates unchanged. 

(Bloomberg API 


INTEL: Management of Computer Giant Wrestles With Pentium Crisis 


Continued from Page 9 
said in an interview Tuesday. 
“But several of them called me 
to offer reassurance and advice 
and give me pep talks." 

By the end of the second 
week it looked to the executives 
as if they had turned a comer 
on the crisis. The number of 
phone calls to the hotline was 
falling. 

Then disaster struck again. 
On Monday, Nov. 12, Interna- 
tional Business Machines Corp- 


abmptly announced that its 
own researchers had deter- 
mined that the Pentium flaw 
would lend to division errors 
much more frequently than In- 
tel had indicated. IBM said it 
was suspending shipments of its 
personal computers containing 
the Pentium chip. 

Mr. Grove was stunned. The 
head of IBM’s PC division, 
Richard Thoman, had given 
him no advance wanting A fac- 
simile from Mr. Thoman ar- 


iqua 

Monday morning after the IBM 
announcement saying that he 
had not been able to find Mr. 
Grove’s phone number. 

Mr. Grove, whose telephone 
number is listed, was so upset 
that he called directoiy assis- 
tance twice to ask for his own 
number to make sure that he 
was reachable. 

With the IBM announce- 
ment the tide turned. A deluge 
of phone calls into Santa Gar a 


from concerned Pentium cus- 
tomers overwhelmed the capac- 
ity of AT&T's West Coast long- 
distance telephone switching 
centers, blocking calls. 

Only then, Mr. Grove said, 
did he begin to realize that an 


engineer’s approach was inap- 


propriate 

lem. 


for a consumer prot 


And then, during this past 
weekend, Mr. Grove read an 
opinion piece in the San Fran- 
cisco Examiner, written by 


Thomas R. Nicely, the mathe- 
matics professor at Lynchburg 
College in Virginia, who had 
first reported the Pentium 
problem in an Internet message 
on Oct 30. 

In the weekend newspaper 
essay. Dr. Nicely concluded 
that he would have to tell his 
young students that the Pen- 
tium machines they were using 
were not perfect. The thought 
had a profound impact on Mr.” 
Grove, an engineer trained to 
pursue perfection. 

On Monday, the Intel crisis 
team met all day. During the 


meeting, marked not by yelling 
or screaming but by passionate 
discussion, the decision to 
change the policy on the Pen- 
tium replacements was adopted 
and rescinded several times. 

Mr. OteRini said that at one 
print he was scheduled to begin 
calling Intel’s 20 largest com- 
puter manufacturing and retail-? 
ing customers at 2 P.M. to tell 
than of the new policy — Intel 
would replace computer own- 
ers' Pentium chips, no ques- 
tions asked. But at 1:45 PJVL 
the task force was still fighting 
about whether to go ahead. 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Agencc haw Prana Dae. 21 
CkMPrav. 


Amsterdam 


ABN Amro HM 
ACF Holding 
Aegon 
AhoM 
AJtzefft**l 
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CSM 


DjM 

Elsevier 


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KUO 5290 
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33 JO 3X10 
67 JO 67.70 
13*30 13540 


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Catand 4X30 4X20 


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KLM 
KNPBT 
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1220 7X1 
7*80 7*50 
4*90 4*50 
761X0 264 

264 261-90 
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Polroronj 
Robeco 
Radomco 
RodncD 
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Stark 
Unilever 
Vanommeren 
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WolKrs/Khftwr 72*90 12X50 

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Nokia 682 691 

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Dalrv Farm Inti BX5 asa 
Hang Luna Dev 1150 UJO 
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HK Air Ena. 2*15 27 

HK Chino Gas 1110 1X70 

HK Electric 21 XS 21 JO 

HK Land 1*93 1*30 

HK Realty Trust 13X0 M 

HSBC Hokllnei B*75 BX7S 
HK Snano Hits 9 jk 8X0 

HK Telecomm 14 jo 14J0 

HK Ferry 7JS ?.n 

Hutch Whampoa 32J0 31J0 
Hvson Dev 1115 

jardna Moth. 55.75 
Jardlne Str Hid 27 JO 27 JO 
Kowloon Motor 1X25 7X30 


Mandarin Ortent 8.70 .fJO 
Miramar Hotel 


17JO ’7X0 

New World Dev auo 20JO 
SHK Props 47 JO 47.10 
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Swire PoCA 47.® 47X0 
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Kingfisher 

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Loparfe 

Lasmo 

Local Gen Gro 
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Marks So 
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Natwest 
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Pearson 

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Severn Trent 

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Smith Neahew 
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Tate & Lyle 
Tesco 
Thom EMI 
Tomkins 
TSB Group 
Unilever „ 

Utd Biscuits 
Vodafone _ 
War Loan 3Vi 

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Wtumread 
williams Hdas 
Willis Carman 

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Argyll Group 


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Bank Sea Hand 207 


Barclays 



BAT *44 

bet ua 

Blue Circle 2X7 

BOC Group 7.10 

Boob *80 

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Brit Gas 347 

Bri t steel 1 J 6 

Brit Telecom 102 

BTR 187 

Cable Wire 177 

CaAurvSCh *21 

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Air UouldF 713 707 

Alcatel Alsthom 458 458X0 
256 22.90 
Bwjcolnt lOe) 548 545 

BIC 6«® 652 

BNP MOM 25850 

BOUTOues 535 07 

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Carretour 2237 2212 

CC.F. 221 221.90 

Cm-m 89 JD 89 

Charaeurs JJtj IW 
amems Franc 220 l90 21«.io 
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Havas 43230 430 

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3930 3940 
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Stag Bus Svc 
Slna Lana 
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Sing Press tom 
Slna S hlptaldo 
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Straits Steam 
Straits Trodtafl 
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UW Industrial 
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Altos Cacao «7 97 JO 

Electrolux B 37*50 379 

ErfcsMM 415 

Eeseitedt 94 w 

Handelsbank BF 92J0 94 

Investor BF 18*90 105 
Norsk Hydra 26I-S0 267 

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19X8 »J5 
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10.70 10X0 
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Goodman Field 
l Cl Australia 
Magellan 
MIM 

Nat Aust Bank 
News Corn 
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Foe Dimkm 

Pione e r Inti 

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Pawling Brdesta X» 3J2 

OCT Resources 1J7 ijs 
S antas UO 3J» 

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Westaoc Booking *79 *32 
WoadsWe *83 *78 


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Asahi Chemical .HI . 71 * 
Asohl Glass 
onkot. Tokyo 
itdae s tane 


1190 1200 
1510 1510 
1580 1580 
1710 1730 
7250 1240 
Nippon Prim ion urn 

Mouse 1380 125 

Do two Securities 1400 1300 


Fanuc , 

Fufl Bank 
Fall Photo 
Fujitsu 
HiWtftl 
Hitachi Cable 
Hcitao 
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japan AbUmi 
Kallma 
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1700 1710 


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Shi mam 
Snlnctsu Chem 


Sum Homo Bk 
Sumitomo Chem 
Suml Marine 
Sumitomo Metal 
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Tokyo Elec Far 
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Torov J»d. 
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4720 4720 
532 536 

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2060 2070 
717 717 


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ABHIM Price 
Air Canada 
Alberta Energy _ 

Alcan Aluminum 354 . 35 to 
Amor Borrlek 301 k 30 

Avenor 

Bk Novo Scotta 
BCE . 

BC Tdocomm 

Bombardier B 

Bramolca 
BrascanA 
ComeCQ 
C 1 BC 

Cdn Natural Res 
CdnOccid Pel 
cdn Pacinc 
Cascades Poser 
Camlnca 
Consumers Gas 
Dofasco 
Daman ind B 

Du Pant Cda A 
Echo Bav Mines 
Empire Co. A 
Fatconbrldge 
Fletcher Own A 

Franco Nevada 

Guardian Caa A 
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imperial Oil 
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Loewen Group 
London lnsur Go 
Macmlli Btoedel 
Maena infix 
Monte Leaf Fds 


Noranda inc 
NonmdaFOrmt 
Naretn Enerav 
Nttiem Telecom 
Mswo 
Ones 
Petra 1 


2765 27«t 
271* 3646 
4496 4496 
TPH 23 
25 2496 
1X6 1X0 
2096 WO 
30k. 29* 
tat 34vi 
1496 75 

3196 3196 
21 »>k 

« sty 

. 35 35 
1696 1596 
!»«. 19 

livy livs 
Itti 1896 
1499 1496 
1317 1396 
24 2316 
1796 171* 
WV. 5996 
8 B 
13Kr 13W 
17V, 171* 
459. 4SVS 
4096 40VS 
381* 28 

m* iik. 

livy nv, 

179* 1796 
491* 491* 
121* 1195 
27 269* 
479* 4*9* 
2696 25% 
1196 171k 
159* 16V* 
4596 469* 
1390 13V, 
UN. m 
1196 II9i 
2B*k 28V 


Canada 

Placer Dame __ T 

Potash Cora sask 459 t 45 V 

Provloo 4^ 5>i 

PINA 0X3 0X1 

print IS 1496 

Env 28 V 2 M 


Atoorn 
om Co 
. .. Cansoid 
. jllsman Env 
Tetoatabe 
Talus 
Thomson 
TorDotn Bunk 
Traacrtto 
TroraCdo Pine 
Utd Dominion 
Utd Weslburae 

WW W B B s r Eny 

wesnn 

xma Conodo B 


»«i WV 

419* 401* 

i6to i6to 

23H. 231* 
189* 1896 
16 * 1592 
15* Wn 
21*6 7 ) 1 * 
14V* 14 

179* 1796 
2596 26 

11V 11 

58 35 

4496 45 




Zurich 


Adtafntre 
AUrsufcsse Bmw 


217 

550 


210 

538 


BSC STMT BovB 7133 1720 


ciboGMoy B 
C5HPWM0SB 
EMdrowB 
Flutter B 


inlerdhcDimf B 
ilmoil B 


Jelmoil 

Landis Gtr r 
M oevenpick B 
Nestle R 
Oenik. Buehrte R 
Parana Hid B 
Roche HdO PC 
Satra Republic 
Sauna 
SD*i«erB 
Sutler PC 
5 urvetllcnceB 
Swiss Bflk carai B 
Swiss Retneur R 
Swttsair R 
UBS 8 

WHiieriinF B 

Zurich AatB 


779 776 
550 554 
355 354 
1S70 1 570 
TS80 ISM 
710 70S 

iw m 

477 475 

1354 1251 
120 128 
1480 1480 
5300 6180 
111 103 
576 479 

7300 7300 
850 BP 
1$55 1830 
355 355 

774 770 

783 793 

1077 1078 
671 578 
1268 1259 


tout: 


U.S. FUTURES 


Via Awuckx ed tosi 


Dec. 27 


Season Season 
hfign Low Own 

High 

Law 

Oase 

aw 

OpJnt 


Grains 




WHEAT (CBOT) SJXCbu mlnunan- **oni*rBu*i& 



4J6te 

XZ7 Mar 95 J.99 

*02% 

0S7 

197%, 

♦ 0X09. 45.240 

X98to 

il*ViM<r/»5 UTb 

179 

3J6 

376% +0X01* 

7X92 

3JJ4* 

111 Jui 95 i46to 

3X7% 

145% 

146% 

♦ 0X1% 15,195 


339 Seu 95 LSI 

3-53 

151 

151 

-0X2 

779 

3.75 

149 08C95 160 

16 ito 

3M> 

3X1 

♦ 0X2 

292 

1549, 

335 Jui 96 



3X5 

♦0.01 

13 

EsL suka NA Tue-s-stfes 

18X53 





Tub’s open ini «J97 rtf 385 





WHEAT (KBOT) LOM u. mrirnr^ aMn c— buiLri 



4X7to 

115 MarlS AM 

*04 

199 

3.99% +001% 28601 


IJltoNUyVS 183VI 

1X3 V. 

179to 

3X0 

*0X0% 

UM 

Itf'* 

Xli'/M 93 151V, 

1S3V, 

lil 

151 to 

♦ 001 

5X29 

177 

339 Seo 95 356 

3X4% 

154to 

154 to ♦ 0x1 to 

170 


*949 





Tue's opentai 17 JIB uo 1351 





CORN 

(CBOT) UQOfou rr*rM7xwj^ t**k*r, por 



2X2 ’7 

23DteMor95 230 

1371* 

029% 

2J9W 

♦ O.OM.JMJ4J 



2X0 

137 

2J7to +0X1% 45.759 

285V, 

233VS Jul 95 2*IV» 

2X35* 

141 to 

2XU* 

♦0X1% 41332 


138 5ep9S 145 

2X*’<i 

0441* 

2X5 

*0X1% 

5.120 

1*3 

135’'. Dec 95 2J4 

2K 

2J2to 

252% 

*0X1 

536 

140'.) 

149 to Mur « ZSS'S 

2MV, 

055% 

2JS» 

+0X1% 

I.N1 

267 


2X3H 



*0X1% 

1.570 

Esi. sates NA Tile's, uric* 

303*3 





Tua'&oactTrfff ?4k430 up 753 





SOYBEANS (CBOT) ^QoObumfawvHvri-iMv^fJcrrantvM 



5J7«jan*5 5Xlto 

167 

*59to 

5X4 

-axr.v S2XM 

7.0S 

5X7 1 AAAar95 5J2 

178% 

170% 

174% 

•0X2% 39.121 

7X5to 

556 Mav 95 iXOto 

IMto 

179V. 

5X2% 

-0X2 

19,773 

7JPV, 

563toJu>95 5X6% 

192 to 

5X5 

1X7 

-0X2 to 27X67 

6.12 

166"»Ai* W S.90VJ 

191 to 

into 

5.91% 

•0X2to 

2.245 

4 15 

477 ScpOS 190 

£*4to 

190 

191% 

♦0X3% 


6J»!l 

STO'-tNovIS 5.97Vi 

6X1 

1*6 

199'.* 


Ml 

195 JWI96 *03% 

6X7 

6X3 to 

tJCto 

-0X2 

136 

4.17 

6X3 '-'i Mar 9* 612 

613 

*17 

*12% 

*002% 

34 


IVItoJui** 6.15 


*15 

*18 

'0X2', 

64 

*07 

1« Nov 96 *or 

*03 

*01 

6X3 

+0.02 

197 







TueMmenM 13*3*7 «■ 453 





SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOT) l D o> F ,.M n Mr m 



207X0 

15150 Jan«5 ISO 30 

1*3140 

199 JO 

162.70 


207 JO 

1593) Mar 95 76150 

16*80 

1*130 

16*20 


•07 00 

161 50 Mav 95 167.00 

17050 

166X0 

189X0 

•3J01M42 


I4&4DJUI95 171X0 

171X0 

170.70 

77340 

-3J0 12,00 



175X0 

11170 

17140 

• 170 

3X60 



177 80 

17*50 

177X0 

-3X0 

1J64 



178X0 





18530 

17150 Dec 95 179 JO 

■11X0 


181.30 



181 JS 

1G0X0JB196 



182X0 

♦2 JO 

70 


30.164 





Tub's ouen mi 97.491 w 170 





SOYBEAN OIL (CBOT) «.«J *n- «*«> » too ta. 



3855 

2265 Jan 95 17X5 

27X1 


27 J7 


7830 

22.9IASO-95 2*57 

2667 


2*43 


28X5 

22. 65 Mov 95 IS 70 

2578 




27X5 

22.76 Jul 95 2530 

21X5 

2117 

25J4 


27.30 


2S.17 





15-40 

22.75300 9} 24X0 

34.90 

74X5 

2*68 

—0.12 

2J7S 

25 05 

22.75 Dei 95 7*65 

2*70 

2*50 

2*53 

-OJO 

4.1) J 

3*50 

23 25JD19* 



2U5 



Ext. sates NA Tin's, sates 

27X45 





TWlOOrtitat 108,22? an 2021 






Livestock 




CATTLE (CMER) taxooea.- 





74J0 

6675 Ok 94 7000 

70.15 

69.90 

?0X2 

— 0,28 

1.317 

7*25 

6*47 FK) 5 7035 

70X7 

70.10 

70.40 

-0.22 31J82 

75. HI 

6737 Act 95 7175 

71.15 


71.10 

♦8)0 22X85 

69 JO 

64X0 Jun 95 65X0 

6*10 

6170 

6*. 07 

•0.1J 

7.241 

6870 

62J0AUO95 63X5 

6192 

63.7} 

63 15 

-002 

3JI0 

67 JS 

611000 95 6«5 

6450 

6*25 

6*50 

*0X5 

U n 

66JS 

64X5 Dec 95 6*90 

*105 

*4X0 

65X0 

•0X1 

243 

Est. jotei 7+m Tun'* sates 






Tue’* op*" ■« *9.571 un 14 






FEEDS) CATTLE (CMER) O.MDt-cmnrb 



80.95 

71 40 JOr 9 5 7140 

71X3 

7100 

7120 

-0JZ 

1047 1 

6025 

70.15 Mar 95 72X7 

73.95 

72X0 

72X2 


1575 

7*90 

69.95 Apr 95 71.90 

71X7 

nj4 

71 817 


U0S 1 

7430 

*930 Mov 95 7025 

70JS 

7035 

70X0 

-0M 

9SS , 

73X5 

69J5Aug95 70 75 

70.90 

7070 

70X5 

—0X5 

778 

70X0 

48.750a 95 7015 

70.15 

70.10 

70.10 


52 ■ 


69 00 Nov 95 



7040 


9 1 

71A1 

67 00 Sea 96 



70X0 

-OX5 

U 

EsL sates Wa Tue 1 ! sates ' 

U3? 





Tue’SOpenW 9.199 up 709 












KMOect* M. W 

3*85 

33.10 

3*70 

•OJO 

710 


3* 02 Feb 95 PXO 

3865 

3780 

3BJ2 

•0X2 13.741 

4U0 

35057^94 J7.72 

-HUB 

37.12 

3830 

■0X0 

8.565 

47X0 

40 35 Jun 95 4335 

43X0 

43.15 

4170 

•833 

4.7V7 


*0 65 A* 75 

4367 

43.10 

4355 

-830 

1X09 

4420 

4040AU0 9S 0.11 

045 

41.12 

4137 

• OJ7 

1X9S 

42J0 

HMOC195 40.90 

41.45 

40.40 

41 J7 

•0X2 

i.on 

4105 

39 00 Ok 45 Also 

OS7 

aso 

4Z.90 

■tun 

m 


41 .« Feta 9* 43.10 

4165 

43X0 

41*5 

♦ 015 

48 

Erf.jOteS i.995 Tiif tsirifs 

AUJ 





Tua'S open lnt 11.78V alt 149 





PORK BELLIES 1CMER1 jaxa0DS.-anlsHrB. 



40X5 

3S 14 Coo 95 3870 

396) 

3855 

3905 

♦823 

6X93 

4020 

35 50 Mar 45 3995 

39.95 

3890 

39 XS 

♦0.18 

1.122 

41.15 

36.98 May 95 40.00 

*0.90 

3995 

40,21 

-0+0 

537 

5*00 

37X0jul95 mm 

11.60 

41.00 

41X0 

♦OJO 

53o 

44X0 


aua 



*1X37 

234 


»X0l=Ct]9t 4890 

4890 

48.10 

4810 

-822 


S»« 

39X0 NW 96 




-822 

9 


1X41 





Tue' '.open tat 9J57 off 94 



- 





Season 

Seasra 


MMP 





Huh 

Low 

<Men 

«8h 

Low 

Oase 

an 

OftM 


ll.lOMay 96 

12J5 

12X0 

1175 

1170 

-0X4 

2X86 



12-40 

12X5 

12X0 

12X2 

-0X6 

IJ40 

1250 

12X0 OcMM 

1110 

1119 

1119 

7118 

—0X6 

113 

1 Esi. sales NA Tue's.sales 

12X16 





Tue*S ooen tail 792XS 

Off 1403 






(NCSEI IfinHVdclm-SPWlcn 




1605 

1077 Nlar 95 

1340 

1345 

1321 

1322 

—78 35X56 

1612 

taro Mav 95 

1351 

1356 

1337 

1340 

— 10 11.980 

1600 

1225 Jul 9$ 

1373 

1375 

1360 

1362 

-7 


1560 

1263 SepS 

IJM 

1394 

1376 

1379 


2,263 

1633 

1290 Dec 95 

1422 

1422 

1405 

1406 

4X15 


1350 MaN 

1445 

1447 

1464 

1*01 

-13 

6.746 

1642 

1225 May 76 




1457 

-73 

4X00 

ISOS 

141031496 

1472 

1475 

1461 

1476 

-13 

2X15 

1531 

1445 Sep M 

IXH 

74W 

7473 

IMS 

-13 

30 


15X89 





1 Toe's open ini 71933 

on 92# 





ORANG&JUKE (NCI2Q lSjntov-caiurwn 


8756 

13100 

89 X0 Jm 95 

11800 

11860 

115X0 

1I7J0 

-830 

124-25 

9100 Altar 75 

121.90 

122,90 

179X0 

12140 


7,157 

13*50 

97X0 May 95 I2SX0 

12*20 

122J0 

12180 

-835 

2X77 


70050 Ju( 95 

124X0 

12*50 

13*00 

12880 

-0.10 


13200 

I07J5SBO95 

IJ9.7S 

129X0 

128X0 

127X0 

*815 

2X58 

129X0 

709J»I*W9S 

I2UXU 

120X0 

12100 

128X5 

• 805 


129 JO 

105-50 Jon 96 




129X5 

♦aos 

699 






129.90 

-0X5 

91 

laujo 

l2»X0AtavM 




rnw 

-WU 


Est sates NA Tue'* scries 

3J94 





) Toe's Open tal 27X41 

UP 130 






Food 


COF F EE C (NCSEI rwh-mkiefB,. 
M400 7t.VMarn J67J0 I75W WJO 
82.50 Mav « lstxa I7SJ0 WXO 
[iOOJuUS 16940 IMS <6940 

m.eouww 
1180 Dec 95 
tsi I5i*jt« 

1 70.00 Mov te 

Es f.scriw NA Typi. jam 7X26 
Tue'sosonim jijtj eh W 

wap 
****»& iis iJB 

13X1 
1288 


IM40 

24510 

73*00 

242X0 

20JJ0 

17000 


173 75 
I74JJ 
16V.60 
IW.50 
149. ID 
766X0 
1S7I5 


•1270 I6.9M 
■lit! 7X57 
- 6X0 2.745 
• 600 j.lyj 
•44# 3X45 
•400 in 
•600 2 * 


153a 

1537 

15-00 10J7JU7+S 

1409 

112* 


10.570095 UH 

WMmkrW 12.8S 


1145 

1284 


MV* 

14.79 — 0 lj 92,383 

t*»S -015 37X15 
MJ2 -cm MJJ4 
IJJ7 —0.09 27.151 
1309 -one 6X39 


Metals 


140X0 
127X0 
137X0 
137X0 
13250 
177 JO 
126X0 
125.70 
120.00 
121X0 
HiJfl 
11575 
11170 
1I2J0 
109 JO 
70770 
10525 
11293 


104.10 Jun 9S 
7*00X895 
111X0 Aug 95 


113000095 


B*50Jon9* 

6270MOTVA 
107X0May96 

iouoxum 

10525 Sea 95 
11295 MOv 96 

Esi.MOes 7.500 Tue’s.(ahn 
Tua'sanenM ».t28 up 41 
SAVER INCMX1 UDorovaL-wnwiwo. 


137X0 

13SXV 

13*80 

♦US 

1117 

137X0 

135X0 

13*95 

*1X5 

2X63 

13*30 

135-70 

13*15 

*1X5 

(25 

11190 

133X0 

USL2S 

♦ T.9S2SX4 



1305 

♦ US 

811 

129X0 

72800 

IS9J0 

♦1X7 

-4244 



127X0 

*1.10 

520 

12L7B 

123.10 

12*10 

♦ 1X0 

3X64 



121X5 

*0.95 

357 

118J5 

1)0X5 

119JD 

•890 

2X27 



177.15 

• 0.90 


'1150 

11150 

17170 

-850 

3X61 



mis 

-820 




11820 
10870 
(07 JO 
107 JO 

♦820 




7)525 

•870 


18162 






W8 

574J 
477 JJ 

404.0 
60*5 
610X 
602J 

638.0 
612X 
6220 

599.0 
6«W 
S34J1 


3800 Dec H 482X 4820 47*0 4707 

XJJXXWPi 4797 

4710 Fee 95 481 2 

41*5 Mar 95 4*9 487 J 4*9 4542 

41*0 MOV 95 4930 493J 48SX 4902 

4200X1195 499 j 501.0 4920 49*6 

477J5ep«S 5037 

4850 Dec 9$ 51*0 5150 5100 5113 

5140 Jan 96 5160 

49BOMDTH 5270 527X 5BIX 5217 

499 J) Mpy 94 53*0 5340 SMO 530X 

52tt0X«« 5370 SSTJ 5310 5370 

. 53*0 Sep 96 54*9 

Est. soles lexoo Tuas. sates now 
Tue-soaenim 131X34 off 1041 
PLATINUM MMER) mwoL.gpmwtmn 
4J5J0 374X0 J0n 95 47**0 *19.40 *1700 4T7X0 

IO0 39000 Apr 95 431X0 *2250 *20.00 *»J0 

43900 4D9J0Jul95 425X0 42300 425X0 42*60 

441 JO 4129000 95 42MQ 

419X0 42000 jot 96 <OJQ 

Esr.iain NA Tun's. sckK *539 
Tug's Open int 21221 Bft 745 
COLD INCMX3 Wtam-MtanrMva. 

4U.n Doc 9* 31200 30200 311 JO 281.40 

vuajenfj msn 3szoo 30200 3*123 

16150 FN) 95 X4J0 38*H 3*110 303X0 

06*50 Am 95 38*10 311X0 3(9.10 387X0 

WJOAmW 392X0 39278 397 07 172« 

MOJOAuaW 39*50 39*50 39*00 396X0 

601000a 95 408X0 

JW .50 Dec 9 5 60630 40*30 4OSJ0 405X0 

*04X0 Feb 9* 410JD 

4l8jaApr96 47500 

41100 Jun 96 419.98 

Aupta mm 

0df5 (294 

Est. soles NA. Tims. SOM 2*320 
Tin's open lot 175X46 alt 1425 


—2X 63 

-in 68 
-2J 

— 2J 73,737 
— 2.5 HL910 
—2-5 6.901 
— 2J 

— 2J 17,003 

-2J 

— 2X 

-2.7 

-47 

—17 


-4160 *784 
—0X0 15.4*8 
—0X0 2X49 
-0X0 
-0X0 


380X0 

411X0 

417.00 


41*50 

41920 

639X0 

*3*50 

AJOJ0 

431J0 


-OJ0 94 

-OJO 

-0X0 8*18* 
-0X0 13J3* 
-043 21X84 
-0X0 12X75 
-0X0 

-OJO 9X93 
-0X0 3X33 
-0X0 

-0JO M?S 

-OJO 

-4U0 


Financial 


US7.WLL5 (ONER; ii mOon- Mat ton pa. 

WXJ inverts 91J7 91ffl 9155 9158 *103 16,126 

NX MJJJun95 92.91 9191 9185 92J7 ~0X? 3,720 

93.BS9P_9S.93J1 9tB 9245 92XS -VV 7» 


*157 _ 

Esr.sdes 7X53 Tue's.ialm 4JB4 
rut's open lnt 20J7* 

JYR. TREASURY (CBOT) udoxuu era. me nra* eiinact 
I0J-00 *W I MartSOO-lM 100-74 TOG-109 100-125 • 01 185X01 

10W» 9M5 Jun ¥5100-975 100-05 100-07 100-04 - 025 787 

99-335 09-07 Seats 99-76 - 02J 

Eft. saws 6LA. Tue'v sates 3*322 
TutfjaocriW JBJBjJf «97 

II YR.TRKA5URY (CBOT) liaueopifhiai* 3k«hi«imecl 

3-" W9510MI 10IH* 96-30 100-05 - 04 769,991 

704-23 97-77 junfj f?-T« 99-24 99-14 «-2[ - as 3.153 

101-05 97-11 StpOJ 99-03 99-11 90-03 90-11 • « 7 

_ Morn 98.78 99-03 91.28 99-03 

EU.SOIM NA Tin's, sales (0,195 
Ju^toomw 2*0,713 rtf 4+0 

^ ICBOT1 isea siD*aae-ma.3»iino(iocBcii 
W-M 60-15 90-83 • 07 252,125 
«*W AT9S 99^6 09-13 99-01 99-10 ♦ 07 

-IS M-IO S«p 9S tra-01 99-01 99-00 99-00 . ol 

i/4-0i 92-73 Mirk 08-13 . 06 

700-30 V3-4M Jun VS 90-10 » 05 

98-' 9 73-05 5n>M 9M7 - 05 

Eat.sate* NA Tge'hiMs 19U37 
Tue saponin) 376.011 rtt 87)3 

MUNICIPAL BONK (CBOT) iiehnu*liS>Ml«U0K> 


Season Season 
Hah Lem 


Oeen Htoh Low Otoe Die On. tm 


.95.126 


97X20 9IJ7BD9C96 91X00 91X80 *1.770 9IJB0 
Est. sales NA Tun's, sales 53*11* 

Tuvsaxn k* 2 xlft»» 

BRITISH POUND (CUBO Iwwrt - 1 KMoauabSCOOBl 
1X440 1X640 Mar 95 1J5U 15510 15400 1J4M — 1B2 48J61 

1X380 15348 Jun 95 15994 15600 15410 1-5*10 —182 410 

15430 1J600 SeaVS 15404 —183 4 

Est sales 70-753 rue’s, sates 3.932 
TUe's mental 73J60 all 631 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMOR) lK<»-iMMnmpjan 


07605 

Q7S22 

07431 

07400 

07225 


I46JB0 
—4 1J09 
—4 1,174 
—t 250 
-X - 46 


0.7030 Mar 95 07173 07178 07155 07166 
0X990 Jun 9S 07154 07199 07143 07 1 50 
06965 Sen 95 07143 07142 07135 07135 
07040 Dec 95 0,7123 07123 07120 07118 
_ .. 07140 Mar 06 07107 

Est. sates 25*0 Tub's, soles 2X09 
Tim's open M *7,155 up 380 

GERMAN MARK (CMER) ipermt.. 1 PMVeewbMlOODI 
0X745 *5310 Mur 95 0X379 0X387 0X338 0X344 ~H 69X13 

06747 0X980 Jun 9S 0X197 0X487 0X350 0X370 -V 1732 

0X7*0 '14347 Sen 95 0X399 —33 138 

Est. sates NA rue’s, sates vjjm 
Tub's open Int 110793 oH 2S0 

JAPANESE YEN (CMER) nwtn-imnntattMa) 
lunQ5«R009t84Mar 95 QjnOOTTO.OI 00750X100320X1 0038 -31 «X*2 
0JOUH7auO9776Jun 94 *01 01 85*01 01 9*. 010 1630X1 01 63 -31 2X63 

Oflffl77SJJJKE!OflSepM 04710291 —31 327 

OjnO76Q0.OllM2flDeC 95 0JIMM*5aOlO4*5O.<nOn 50.010471 -31 132 

OlOIOWD. ' .'BJUMor 96 0070557 —31 Jt 

Est. Mies 19,568 Twrs.Mles 9.951 
Tim’s men int 99X21 rtt 3» 

SWISS FRANC (CMER) tw Irene- ) cran men UXoul 
0X136 07287 Marts 075*6 07W> 07S22 0JS3» —19 J7JJ1* 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 1994 




\ 


Page 1] 


Credit Lyonnais 
Sells Its Stake 

In Italian Bank 


EUROPI 


e £T£i£' ° ur Su * Fnm ****** 

sJdVjS Cr6dil Lyonnais 

S!iy^f dneSday il w « con- 

its Italian banking 

P 4 ^ il would 
SL? I 57J . Percent stake in 
“anca Lombards to Crediio 
Agrano Bresciano. 

an T i,2? Ch ban ^ which had 

an aggressive expansion pro- 
gram m Europe before financial 
«* to retrench, 
said Credito Agrario Bresciano 
paid about 650 million French 

GATT Head Stays 
Extra 10 Weeks 

Reuters 

GENEVA — Peter Suther- 
land, head of the GATT trade 
body, confirmed Wednesday 
that he bad agreed to serve until 
March 15 as the first chief of the 
new World Trade Or ganiza tion. 

But he made clear that he was 
staying on in a caretaker capac- 
ity only to allow trading powers 
to break a deadlocked race be- 
tween three official candidates. 

Renato Ruggiero, a former 
Itali an trade minister, leads the 
pack, according to delegates, 
followed by South Korea’s 
trade minister, Kim Chul-su, 
and former President Carlos 
Salinas de Gortari of Mexico. 
Mr. Sutherland’s extension, 
aimed at smoothing the transi- 
tion when the WIT) is set up 
Jan. 1, was to be approved by 
the General Agreement on Tar- 
iffs and Trade late Wednesday. 


stak” ^ ,2 ° milUon) for Ae 

... L y°“"ais said the sale 
would be completed after ap- 
proval from government regula- 
tory authorities. 

■j - e state-run French bank 
said it planned to concentrate 
its Italian banking operations in 
another bank, Credito Berga- 
tnasco, “in the course of 1995.” 

Crfcdit Lyonnais became the 
largest single shareholder of 
fredno Bergaraasco in May 
1989. Credito Bergamasco is 
due to merge with Banco San 
Marco next year. 

But some analysts have pre- 
dicted a wave of bank mergers 
in Italy and said Credito Berga- 
masco could find itself a take- 
over target. 

Those predictions followed 
Credito Italiano SpA’s drive to 
take over Credito Romagnolo 
SpA. Italiano’s bid ignited two 
other bids for the Bologna- 
based Romagnolo, and analysts 
said consolidation in the I talian 
banking industry was overdue. 

Credit Lyonnais posted a loss 
of 4.5 billion francs in the first 
half of this year. 

But the bank has said that it 
hopes to post a net profit in 
1.995, when it expects that past 
liabilities will no longer weigh 
on its core commercial banking 
operations. 

Jean Peyrdevade, the chair- 
man of Credit Lyonnais, made 
the prediction this fall, saying 
he believed the h ank had man- 
aged to overcome its worst 
problems. 

( Bloomberg, Reuters, AFP) 


Telekom Complaints Ring True 

Phone Fraud Inquiry Doesn ’t Surprise Some Germans 


By Brandon Mitchener 

International lleraU TrtSmr 

FRANKFURT — News that German 
authorities are investigating employees 
of the German state phone company and 
organized crime collaborators for phone 
fraud came as no surprise to Doris Belz. 

For two and a half years, Mrs. Belz has 
led a campaign against Deutsche Tele- 
kom’s insistence that its phone system was 
flawless and that strange jumps in phone 
bills were the fault of its customers. 

Because German phone bills are not 
routinely itemized, Telekom for years 
has been able to demand payment with- 
out proof that its customers actually 
placed the calls for which they were 
billed. 

Mrs. Belz got involved after receiving 
a bill in 1992 for 1,200 Deutsche marks 
($763). Telekom asked her whether any- 
one in her family had been dialing long- 
distance “party lines,” a euphemism for 
phone sex services. 

“1 was enraged that wc had no way to 
prove our innocence and was sure 1 
wasn’t alone,” said Mrs. Belz. who start- 
ed a nonprofit group called interest 
Group Against Exaggerated Telephone 
Bills. The group has since collected more 
than 5,000 complaints from Telekom 
customers, including more than 1,500 
cases with documentation of claims, in- 
cluding itemized bills. 

“We have unexplainable cases where 
the same number abroad was someiimes 
dialed again and again without pause, 
sometimes afl night Tong or while people 
were on vacation,” she said. “We warned 
Telekom that organized crime must be 
involved, but the company was so sure of 
itself that they didn't want to hear it. 
They slept on it for a long, long lime.” 

During the past two weeks, German 
authorities have conducted searches na- 
tionwide and interrogated dozens of sus- 
pects, including Telekom employees. 

Telekom dropped its initial objection 
to suggestions that Telekom employees 
might be involved after at least two em- 


ployees. who were arrested in Braun- 
schweig. confessed to manipulating Tele- 
kom’s phone lines for personal gain 

Mrs. Belz said there was certain to be a 
“snowball effect” as searches continued, 
suspects confessed and Telekom custom- 
ers, encouraged by reports of widespread 
abuse, came forward with more stories of 
sky-high telephone bills that defied ra- 
tional explanation. 

Ursula Simon, a prosecutor in Co- 


The German telephone 
network is a hacker’s 
mecca.’ 

Kim Schmitz, a former hacker 
turned consultant 


logne who is coordinating the investiga- 
tion. told the newsweekly Focus, “We've 
just begun an extensive investigation the 
end or which is not yet in sight.” 

But while Telekom admits it is theoret- 
ically possible to abuse its extensive net- 
work, it still maintains there is no proof 
that outside interference has run up any 
individual customer’s phone bilL 

“There are no indications, either in the 
prosecutor's investigation or our own. 
that customers were bilked in these 
cases,” said Klaus Gzerwinsky. a Tele- 
kom spokesman. 

The company continues to describe its 
system as secure except for “isolated 
cases” involving “technical problems” 
exploited with “criminal energy.” 

Kim Schmitz, a former Munich hacker 
turned consultant, told Telekom in a 
letter Sept. 9 of slx methods that hackers 
and employees were using to bilk Tele- 
kom and its customers. Far from denying 
his allegations, the company replied that 
its technicians had found “no new as- 
pects” in his letter. 

“The German telephone network is a 


backer's mecca." said Mr. Schmitz, who 
also goes by the code-namc Kimbel. 
“The damage probably goes into the bil- 
lions of marks, not just 500 million.” 

“The customer always pays in the 
end,” he said. 

Over the last two years, seven German 
courts have turned the tables on Tele- 
kom. One ordered it to repay an elderly 
couple 2,100 DM after they had refused 
to pay their bill unless Telekom could 
prove it had provided the service for 
which it bad billed them — winch it 
could noL 

Because the current investigation be- 
came public, politicians from Germany's 
two main parties have proposed making 
Telekom give all its customers itemized 
bills. Itemized bills now cost extra, and 
few people request them. 

Despite its other denials. Telekom 
confirms that complaints about high 
phone bills have doubled since contro- 
versial long-distance phone sex services 
were legalized three years ago. 

In one common scam, companies that 
operate out of the Netherlands or Britain 
offer phone sex services based in the 
Netherlands Antilles or the Bahamas. 
Calls to the Caribbean — often made by 
automated dialing devices attached to 
the phone lines of individuals or compa- 
nies just long enough to establish a con- 
nection — generate revenue for the for- 
eign company. 

One industry insider said the fraud 
involved “astronomical sums.” 

Mr. Schmitz, the Munich consultant, 
said most of the damage involved isolat- 
ed incidents that were difficult to detect. 

In his letter to Telekom, he wrote: 
“Calls are placed from nearly every long- 
distance switching station, and col- 
leagues generally know it. On one chat 
system in Chile there's a virtual Telekom 
confessional where workers talk openly 
about the possibilities of manipulation. 
Judging by the substance of the conver- 
sations, the bills are always paid by Tele- 
kom customers.” 


Investor’s Europe 


Frankfurt 

DAX 


London 
FUSE 100 Index 



a‘so'm'6 

1994 


OND 


UK®T'a sojfo 

1994 . 


Exchange 

Index 

Wednesday Prev. • 

' Close - Close. 

% 

Change 

Amsterdam 

AEX 

413.35 

410,64- 

+0.86 

Brussels 

Stock index 

7,173*24 

7,17450 

.'■0.02 

Frankfurt 

DAX 

2,08066 

257953 

40^2 

Frankfurt 

FAZ 

78059 

778.00 

+0.32 

Helsinki 

HEX 

1,799.83 

1,81459 

-0.84 

London 

Financial Times 30 

2,35020 

2,349.90 

+0J37 

London 

FTSE100 

3,070.40 

3,058.10 

+0.40 

Madrid 

General Index 

291.82 

204.48 

-0.00 

Milan 

MIBTEL 

10,0234)0 

9,865.00 

+1.60 • 

Paris 

CAC40 

1,94089 

1524.72 

+084 

Stockholm 

Affaersvaeriderr 

1,84*40 

1,846.52 

-0.11 

Vienna 

ATX Index 

1,045.19 

1,035.31 

+oid 

Zurich 

SBS 

927.53 

921.52 

+085 


Sources: Reuters. AFP 


[nirntmonal HettldTnhtinc 


Very briefly; 


• Lufthansa AG said its operating earnings would cover its 
planned dividend for this year, which would be the company’s 
first payout since 1989. 

• Lloyd's of London must pay £80 milli on (5125 million) to 
compensate for losses incurred by the backers in the Gooda 
Walker syndicate, a court ruled Wednesday. Many traditional 
backers of the insurance market are quitting, but new institutional 
investors are filling the gap, Lloyd’s said. 

• Aerial Sped ah Term SpA’s sale to a German- Italian consortium 
led by Knqq> Hoesche Stahl AG has won approval from the 
European Commission. 

• Caisse des Depots & Consolations said the 22 cable television 
systems in its COM-DEV unit would be sold to Lyoonaise des 
Rum’s Lyoonaise Communications unit and France Telecom. 

• Fiance's trade surplus widened to 1 1 .28 billion francs ($2 billion) 
in October from 9.07 billion francs in September, while consumer 
inflation slowed to 1.6 percent in November from 1.7 percent in 
October. 

Bloomberg, AFX. AFP, Reuters 


PHONE: AT&T \ Shedding Old Habits , Positions Itself for New Market XEROX: Copier Maker Creates New Identity in Age of PC-Bated Printing 


Continued from Page 9 

the ultimate networkin g com pan y jbe fu- 
ture AT&T wants to handle every commu- 
nications need, from home entertainment 
to wireless video conference calls. 

The company even says it might get back 
into local telephone service, if regulatory 
barriers are eased in the near future. 

While most communications and com- 
puter companies talk about delivering to- 
morrow’s cornucopia of interactive video 
communicating, shopping and education, 
AT&T may be the company best posi- 
tioned to do iL 

AT&T already has all the right stuff: 
computer hardware, software, wireless 
technologies, local and wide-area comput- 
er networks, telephone systems, video con- 
ferencing, on-line services, computer 
games, document distribution. The com- 
pany's goal is to put it all together. 

“AT&T, in our opinion, has emerged as 
the only company in the world with all the 
pieces to the telecommunications/data 
processing puzzle,” George Reed-DdSn- 
ger, an analyst for NatWest Securities 
Coip., said in a recent report 

But even AT&T's boosters caution that 
the downsizing and corporate culture revo- 
lution still have a way to go. There’s still a 
bit of old Ma Bell* — the comfortable, 
regulated monopoly — in the new compa- 
ny. 

Still, AT&T has been hailed in recent 
years as one of the few large U.S. corpora- 
tions to make a credible showing a g ainst 
their more nimble, and often smaller, for- 
eign and domestic rivals. 

For this Judge Greene’s divestiture or- 
der deserves much of the credit. It forced 
AT&T to respond to challenges at home, 
from the likes of MCI Communicatioiis 


>. and Sprint Coip., while also taking 
on Siemens AG, Northern Telecom Inc. 
and other international players in the 
worldwide equipment market. 

But it was Mr. Allen, when be was chief 
executive, who really made the new AT&T 
work. 

He was promoted after the death in 1988 
of chairman James Olson. Right about that 
time, MCI and Sprint were zooming 
ahead, installing high^apari ty fiber-optic 
cables while AT&T was stuck with its 
largely copper system. 

Mr. Allen immediately took a 57 billion 
write-off to upgrade the network. He also 
moved to reorganize the company into 
self-sustaining business units and hired 
marketing wizards from such companies as 
PepsiCo Inc* Microsoft Coip., RJR Na- 
bisco Holdings Corp. and even MCI. 

“Bob allows deviants in his family,” said 
Joseph Nacchio, president of the consumer 
long-distance operation and a longtime 
AT&T employee. 

“He doesn’t tom the asylum over to the 
inmates But he allows the right degree of 
freedom with the right degree of gover- 
nance” 

Mr. Allen’s moves quickly bore fruit: 
The $12 biltioa business unit — which sells 
phone systems, private switches, business 
software and add-ons such as voice mail — 
became profitable for the fust time in 
1992. 

In addition, AT&T's acquisition of 
McCaw Cellular Communications Inc. 
this year gave it instant ownership of the 
largest player in the fastest-growing seg- 
ment of the communications industry. 


The $11.5 billion that AT&T paid for 
McCaw stunned some analysts, but AT&T 
counters by pointing to McCaw’s num- 
bers: $2-2 billion in 1993 sales and an 
annual customer growth rate Oi 30 percent 
to 40 percent. 

McCaw President James Barksdale said 
AT&T’s financial backing would give him 
flexibility to penetrate further into the 
consumer cellular market. Meanwhile, 
AT&T is bidding aggressively on a handful 
of federal licenses to offer wireless services 
in major cities in which McCaw lacks a 
presence. 

The McCaw deal dwarfed AT&T’s 1991 
acquisition of NCR Corp. for $7.5 billion, 
in which the company literally bought its 
way into the computer industry after fail- 
ing in several attempts to create its own 
presence. 

The NCR acquisition never produced 
the “synergies” AT&T had sought But 
AT&T seems to have learned that — in the 
computer industry, at least — it is not 
necessary to swallow tbe competition 
whole just to have a piece of the action. 

' This year AT&T has tried a different 
approach. Early in 1994, it signed a mar- 
keting and development agreement to 
make Lotus's widely used Lotus Notes 
software available to businesses on 
AT&T’s public networks. 

While the Lotus venture did not get 
much press attention, John Petrillo, AT&T 
business unit president, said it marked 
what promises to be the next focal point 
for the entire company: bringing the pow- 
er of desktop software to the public tele- 
phone/data network for all sizes of busi- 
ness to use. 


Coothmed from Page 9 
$300,000 each. They scan paper 
documents and convert them 
into the 0s and Is of digital 
code. Once in digital form. Lhe 
coded text or pictures can be 
easily stored, modified, printed 
or sent over computer net- 
works. 

The DocuTechs have proved 
a success, with sales expected to 
reach $1.5 billion this year. Yet 
Xerox still depends on tradi- 
tional stand-alone copiers for 
80 percent of its core, nonfman- 
cial- services revenue of more 
than $14 billion. By 2005, the 
company predicts, digital prod- 
ucts will account for the major- 
ity of its business. 

To help get there, Xerox has 
introduced a flurry of new digi- 
tal printers, copiers and scan- 
ners in recent months. The 
company has also introduced 
software, which it calls the Doc- 
ument Services Platform, to 
link its machines over computer 
networks, allowing them to 
communicate with each other 
and with the machines made by 
other companies. 

Today, analysts say Xerox 
should be in a strong position to 
push its high-tech plans because 
it has put its own bouse in or- 
der. For years, the fear at the 
company’s headquarters in 
Stamford, Connecticut, had 
been rim* something would re- 
place dry copying as thoroughly 
as xerography obliterated the 


messy, wel systems that pro- 
ceeded iL 

In fact, the real threat came 
in the 1970s from companies 
such as Canon Inc. and Ricoh 
Co., beating Xerox in its own 
bailiwick. In the 1980s, after 
losing business to Japanese ri- 
vals, Xerox made big strides in 
improving its quality and low- 
ering its production costs. 

So tbe company has managed 
to confine the Japanese compe- 
tition to smaller copiers, and 
Xerox remains the dominant 
supplier of large machines, 
which are more profitable. 

Today, the company is ac- 
knowledged to have the broad- 
est product line in the business, 
ranging from simple copiers 
and fax machines costing $300 
to high-speed printers capable 
of printing, collating and bind- 
ing books at close to $300,000. 

Yet when hs copier business 
appeared to be faltering in tbe 
1980s, Xerox made a foray into 
insurance and other financial 
services. “It was an unprofit- 
able distraction,” said Jack L. 
Kelly, an analyst for Goldman, 
Sachs & Co. 

Now, Xerox is gradually try- 
ing to sell off its insurance busi- 
ness. and concentrating on 
moving into lhe computer age 
with its basic business — which, 
property managed, is a lucrative 
burin ess indeed. 

Last year Xerox's core nonfi 
nan rial services business earned 


$620 tmOion, or $5.46 a share 
before special charges reflecting 
tbe costs of a restructuring pro- 
gram ahneri at reducing its 
work force by 10.000. 

This year, analysts estimate 
the company will earn $6.70 a 
share, and the consensus is that 
will rise to $8.30 a share next 
year. 

To broaden the potential 
market for its document-imag- 
ing technology. Xerox has 
formed alliances with a bevy of 
computer software and service 
companies, including Microsoft 
Corp., Novell Inc., Sun Micro- 
systems Intx, EDS Corp.. Lotus 
Development Corp., Interna- 
tional Business Machines Corp. 
and Hewlett-Packard Co. 

These projects are intended 
to ensure that Xerox offerings 
work with those of other ven- 
dors. As is so common in to- 
day’s computer business, some 
of the alliance partners, such as 
IBM and Hewlett-Packard, are 
also competitors. 

The Xerox digital strategy 
will make it more like a comput- 
er company. Xerox has a rich 
legacy in the computer industry 


— a curious blend of innova- 
tion and failure. 

Once, Xerox had visions of 
becoming a computer compa- 
ny. Roughly 25 years ago, its 
executives searched almost 
frantically for a computer com- 
pany to boy. It even made a bid 
ror Digital Equipment Co. 
Eventually, Xerox did purchase 
a computer maker. Scientific 
Data Systems, but that quickly 
turned into a financial mill- 
stone. 

Later, in the 1970s, Xerox de- 
veloped the first personal com- 
puter with a mouse and icon- 
based software at its Palo Alto 
Research Center, known as Xe- 
rox PARC. 

This time, Xerox executives 
hope they have found a formula 
for success by working hand-in- 
hand with the computer indus- 
try instead of competing toe-to- 
toe in it. 

“The most important thing to 
understand is that our strategy 
now is fundamentally different 
than our digital strategies of the 
past,” said Peter van Cuyien- 
berg, a computer industry vet- 
eran Xerox hired last year to 
manage its leap into informa- 
tion networks. 


COMMUNIQUE OF THE NATIONAL BANK OF POLAND 


Tfie National Bank of Poland announces that an the basis of the Act 
of 7th July 1994 on the denomination of the zloty f Dziennik Ustaw - 
Polish Journal of Laws No. 84, Item 388). starting from 1st January 
1995t 0:00 hours, the Polish zloty shall be denominated in the 
relation: 10,000: 1. This means that starting from that date all 
property rights, as well as pecuniary liabilities and receivables which 
arise before 1st January 1995 and payable after that date, shall be 
subject to conversion in the above mentioned ndation. At the same time, 
new exchange rates shall be established according to the above 

mentioned conversion coefficient 

As a result of this denomination, new currency signs shall be 
introduced into circulation: 1 grosz. 2 grosze, 5 groszy . 10 groszy. 
20 aroszy, 50 groszy. 1 zloty. 2 zlote, 5 zlotych. and banknotes: JO 
zlot^ch. 20 zlotych. 50 zlotych, lOO zlotych, 200 zlotych. 

The National Bank of Poland would like to draw your attention to two 
facts resulting from the content of the above mentioned act 

1 ) for two years. Le. from 1st Jan. 1995 to 31st Dec. 1996 currency 
1 J si{jns w hlch are not ivtthdrawnjrom circulation until 31st December 
]qq 4 shall function simultaneously with the newly introduced ones 
and shall be treated as legal tender having equal rights, 

9) framlst January 1995 retail prices of goods and services and values 
of payments shaft be announced to the public in the old and the new 

nominal values. 

wars**. 22nd. Decent 1994 ^ 

of the National Bank of Poland 
(H. Gronkiewicz-Waltz) 


Table of co n v ersi on equivalents of nominal values of monetary signs 
introduced into circulation fro m 1st January 1995 and nominal 
values which are legal tender before that date 

COINS 


1 grosz = 100 zlotych (old) 

2 grosze = 200 zlotych (old) 

5 groszy = 500 zlotych (old) 

10 groszy = 1.000 zlotych (old) 

20 groszy = 2,000 zlotych (old) 

50 groszy = 5,000 zlotych (old) 

1 Zloty = 10.000 zlotych (old) 

2 zlote * 20.000 zlotych (old) 

5 zlotych = 50,000 zlotych (old) 

BANKNOTES 


10 zlotych 
20 zlotych 1 
50 zlotych 
lOO zlotych 
200 zlotych 


100.000 zlotych (old) 

500.000 zlotych (old) 

1.000. 000 zlotych (old ) 2 

2.000. 000 ziotych (old) 3 


1 Banknotes with lhe nominal value of 20 zlotych shall not have their conversion 
equivalents because the old nominal value of 200 thousand zlotych In 2991 was 
withdrawn hum the currency circulaHon. 

2 at 3 New banknotes with the nominal value of 100 zlotych and 200 zlotych shall be 
introduced to currency circulation in tbe first half of 1995. Until that time only their 
equivalents with aid nominal values shall be used U.000.000 zlotych and 2.000.000 
zlotych). 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE* THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 1994. 


Tokyo Drops 
Trading Hours 
For Currency 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches -t, ... 

TOKYO t" Up to now” said a bank 

ing official Tn£^, ^ aboljsh ‘ trader “we have had io call 
trading hours after 'SS ICy banks in Singapore or London 

i? r Prices when we want to deal 

^sS?® 3 ^ ssu SJff 101 outside 

J/mo pKuflli? 0 “3* **" wJSfSiy.^e -Min is- 

day the Bank of JanSJ^n Fn ‘ of Finance announced that 

3d? fao£i£ rateT* Pr °‘ S^“ bo ? ds,ssued o v CTseas.lo 

The rnm™;. J ■ , J a P an cse m vestors as of April 1 . 

ioab5uS^hSf,S Ud * 1 l £l ded Accordin g W Nihon Keizai’s 
it ■™ I f ****"?: London under- 

^f 3 ^ters wfll be able to sell Euro- 
Sa f deaJ ’ y en bonds to investors residing 


. a 

consortium of domestic and 
foreign banks and brokers and 
the Bank of Japan 
“It is known to all that deals 


! Exchanges’ New Vehicles 
Two Asian exchanges an- 


have already been made wi JETi/™. “““S® 5 
OUI restrictions on trading SS?* 1 "SL, ^ 8 ° p ' >ortu ' 
hours," the panel said, addiS" 5 °? Wednesday, Agence 
that the abolition would be part h™. J re5Se report,:d fronl 
of efforts to “revitalise lhe^> Hong Kon & 


kyo market.” 

“The move will add to Tokyo 
market liquidity and is likely to 
help the easing of other market 
regulations in the long term.” 
said Yasuhiko Malsunaga, se- 
nior manager of Industrial 
Bank of Japan's international 
treasury department 


Hong Kong's stock exchange 
plans to start options next Au- 
gust following several months 
of trials that will include 20 se- 
lected members, its chief execu- 
tive, Paul Chow, said. 

The Singapore International 
Monetary Exchange said it 
would launch a fu lures and op- 


__ * — * — - — ” — - "uuiu launcn a iu L ures ana op- 

ine extended hours also lions contract in February 
mean the Tokyo market will be- based on Japan’s 1 0-month-old 
come more self-sufficient Nikkei 300 stock index. 


Karaoke Firm’s Sad Song 

Regulation Chokes Its On-Line System 


By Steven Brull 

International Herald Tribune 

TOKYO — Karaoke clubs, where inebriat- 
ed crooners take the mike to amuse — if not 
inadvertently annoy — their friends, are go- 
ing on-line in Japan. But if the popularity of 
karaoke-on-demand continues its crescendo. 
TadaJbiko Hoshi, president of Japan's biggest 
supplier of karaoke music, Daiichi Kosbo. 
fears he will be singing the blues. 

Of 500,000 karaoke bars and clubs in Ja- 
pan, about 70,000 have plumed into karaoke- 
on-demand, which allows the latest hits to be 
downloaded electronically over phone lines. 

Daiichi Kosho’s system, one of several on 
the market, uses a hard disk that can store 
more than 15,000 tunes, an immense, easily 
accessed and compact repository. The audio 
tracks include lyrics that appear on the 
screen, but the video landscapes accompany- 
ing the songs are stored on video CDs and 
number only 50. 

In just six months, the company has in- 
stalled 20,000 of the 2 million yen ($19,950) 
systems. Yet while strong sales would put 
most company presidents in on upbeat mood. 
President Tadahiko Hoshi of Daiichi Kosbo 
grows more apprehensive with each sale. 

“If all of the 150,000 clubs we now serve 
went on-line,” he said, “we'd go out of busi- 
ness." 

The problem, he said, is that government 
regulations concerning royalties to musicians 
for electronic distribution of karaoke are too 
onerous. Yet negotiating with the group that 
sets the fees, the Japanese Society for Rights 
of Authors, Composers and Publishers, is like 
boxing with a referee: The society has a mo- 
nopoly and, with the Agency for Cultural 
Affairs that supervises it, ultimate authority. 

For now, Daiichi Kosho is putting aside 
but withholding the extra fees due the society 
for karaoke-on-demand. Meanwhile, negotia- 


tions are under way between the society and 
an association of karaoke music suppliers. 

The popularity of karaoke-on-demand is 
evidence that even in Japan, where regula- 
tions have stunted the development of multi- 
media services, the right mix of hardware and 
software can create a hit. But it is also another 
warning that Japan will have difficulty devel- 
oping multimedia services unless the govern- 
ment loosens its regulatory stranglehold. 

If the information superhighway is mostly 
a driveway in the United States, it resembles a 
twisted mountain path in Japan, where the 
trade and postal ministries are fighting a turf 
battle for the regulatory high ground 

“Frankly, I don't think that Japan can 
afford to put off deregulation much longer,” 
the U.S. ambassador to Japan, Walter F. 
Mondale, said in a recent speech to Keidan- 
ren, Japan’s leading business federation. 

Tokyo has put deregulation near the top of 
its agenda. But with bureaucrats in charge of 
drawing up deregulatory measures, progress 
has been slow. 

The biggest barrier to the karaoke-on-de- 
mand business, Mr. Hoshi said is the rights 
society's demand that suppliers pay 2,000 yen 
in monthly transmission fees for each club 
that is oQ-line. This is in addition to the 
standard fees for mechanical and perfor- 
mance rights that apply to karaoke music and 
videos supplied on laser disks, the most com- 
mon medium used by karaoke clubs. 

A society spokesman refused to disclose or 
confirm the figures. But he said the additional 
fee for on-line karaoke distribution stemmed 
from the society’s treating electronic distribu- 
tion of karaoke in the same way as cable 
broadcasting. 

Karaoke is a major money spinner for the 
society. In the year through last March, it 
brought in revenue of 7.86 billion yen, a 20 
percent increase from the year earlier, and 
about 10 percent of total income. 


JAL Sells 5% Stake 
In Air New Zealand 

Bloomberg Business News 

TOKYO — Japan Air 
Lines Co., cutting costs and 
in need of cash, said 
Wednesday it was selling its 
5 percent stake in Air New 
Zealand Ltd. to Brierley In- 
vestments Ltd. for 101.2 
million New Zealand dol- 
lars ($64.65 million). 

Brierley said it was pay- 
ing 4_55 New Zealand dol- 
lars a share for the Air New 
Zealand stock, which was 
not traded on Wednesday 
but was last quoted at 4.50 
dollars. Brierley*s holding 
will rise to 425 percent. 


China Bans Grain Exports to Curb Price 


ConfpUed by Our Staff From Dispatches 

BEIJING — China announced on 
Wednesday an immediate ban on exports 
of rice and corn in a sweeping move to 
curb soaring prices of grain and food oils. 

The Fanners Daily quoted an an- 
nouncement by the National Grain Re- 
serves Bureau as saying the ban was one of 
a series of measures to curb rising prices. 

“We must increase imports and strictly 
control exports. Exports of com and rice 
are immediately banned,” the announce- 
ment said. “We will appropriately reduce 
exports of peanuts. This will increase the 
domestic supply of grain and edible oil.” 

A trader with a foreign brokerage said 
China would honor existing contracts but 
would not sign new ones. He said he expect- 


ed the ban to Last at least through February. 

Inadequate government purchasing of 
grain last year and drought and flooding 
that cut production this year are to blame 
for a nationwide supply shortfall, he said. 

But the government insists the country 
will have enough grain to feed its people 
through 2000, provided agricultural devel- 
opment is made a priority. 

Wang Chunzheng, vice minister of the 
State Planning Commission, said Wednes- 
day that the flooding in some areas and 
drought in others would cause only a slight 
drop in grain output this year. 

China produced 495 milli on metric tons 
of grain last year and will probably produce 
450 milli on tons this year, Mr. Wang said. 

But prospects for a shortfall have caused 


grain prices to surge. The price of grain in 
China's 35 major cities was 61.6 percent 
higher in October than in October of 1993, 
according to the most recent official fig- 
ures available. Grain prices continued to 
rise in November but the government has 
not yet issued a breakdown. (Reuters, AP) 
■ Shanghai Firm Declared Bankrupt 

The government has declared the No. 2 
Elastic Webbing factory in S hang hai bank- 
rupt, the People's Daily reported Wednes- 
day, according to a Reuters dispatch. 

The factory had debts of 7.9 million 
yuan ($928,000). Creditors received 58 per- 
cent of their money after the state took its 
cut from the sale of Elastic Webbing's land 
and fixed assets, which fetched 10 million 
yuan, the report said. 


Page L 

ASIA/PACIFI4 


Indonesia 

Restricts 

Potential 

Monopolies 

Compiled (y Our Staff From Dispatches 

. JAKARTA — Seeking to 
curb monopolies, President Su- 
harto has ordered limi ts on ma- 
jor corporations moving into re- 
lated industries, an industrial 
leader said Wednesday. 

Mr. Suharto has instructed 
the minis ter for investment, 
Sanyoto Sastrowardoyo, to stop 
issuing permits for suppliers of 
raw materials that seek to set up 
refiners and fabricators, said 
Adi Taber, general chairman of 
the Association of Young Indo- 
nesian Bu sinessme n. 

The order is aimed at stopping 
large economic conglomerates 
from controlling the entire chain 
of production of a particular 
product, which has allowed 
some businesses or groups to 
monopolize various sectors. 

The new restrictions could, 
for example, stop oil producers 
from setting up oil refineries. 

“The president wants to see 
new industrialists grow,” Mr. 
Taber said. “What we see now 
is big investors controlling both 
upstream and downstream in- 
dustries, giving little chance for 
smaller investors to grow.” 

Mr. Tahir said the president 
also called for a review of per- 
mits issued to upstream groups 
to set up downstream indus- 
tries. (AP, AFP) 

■ Last Bapmdo Sentences 

A Jakarta court ordered pris- 
on sentences Wednesday for 
two bank executives, the last 
defendants in Indonesia’s big 
loan-fraud case, news agencies 
reported. 

The Jakarta Central District 
Court sentenced Syahrizal, a 
former director of the embat- 
tled Bank Fembangunan Indo- 
nesia, or Bapmdo, to six years 
jail and fined Him 30 milli on 
rupiah ($13,720). 

Bambang Kuntjoro. another 
former director, was sentenced 
to four years jafl and fined 15 
milli on rupiah. 

Both were convicted of cor- 
ruption and ignoring standard 
bank practices. 

They will join Eddy Tamil, 
an Indonesian, and three other 
Bapmdo executives behind bars 
for their roles in the $450 mil- 
lion in losses incurred by Ba- 
pindo. (Reuters, AP 1 


Hong Kong 
Hang Seng 
11000 


Singapore * 
Straits Times 


Tokyo 
Nikkei 225 



21000 .-- 


J A S O N D 
1994 


j A SONO 
1994 ' 


4 AS ON 0 
1994 


Exchange 

Hong Kong 
Singapore 
Sydney 
Tokyo 


Wednesday Prov. 
Close Close 


Hang Seng 
Straits Times 
AS Ordinaries 
Nikkei 225 ~~ 


8,331.56 

2£17-4S 

1.S0&50 


Close 

8,267-33 

2,183.46 

1,898.60 


% 

Change 

+0.78 


19,340.67 19,406.98 -0.34 


Kuala Lumpur Composite 982.17 966.19 +1.65 

Bangkok SET ~ 1.365.28 1.352.68 +£» 

Seoul Composite Stock 1,026*5 1,Q23£9 +0.28 

Taipei Weighted Price 7,010.60 6,925.26 +123 

Manila P5E " 2,79039 ZJ4Q.04 +134 

Jakarta Stock index .46&40 462.78 +0.78 

New Zealand NZSE-40 1.93&27 ' 1.930.50 +040 

Bombay NabonaUndex 1,86238 1358.12 +023 


2,740.04 +134 

462.78 +0.78 

1930.50 +040 

1358,12 +023 

InrrnuiHKul Hrrakl Tribune 


Manila PSE 

Jakarta Stock Index 

New Zealand NZSE-40 
Bombay National index 

Sources: Haulers, AFP 

Very briefly: 


• Hong Kong's Monetary Authority and China's central bank 
agreed to set up a real-time settlement system for trade in 
financial instruments by 1996. 

• Acer Inc. said it was confident it would win back a “preferred 
supplier” agreement with Australia that was suspended over what 
Canberra said were violations by the Taiwan computer maker. 

• Bank of East Asia warned that rising costs could drive some 
multinational corporations (Hit of Hong Kong; it predicted the 
territory's inflation rate would rise to 8.5 percent in 1 995 from the 
official forecast of 8.0 percent for 1994. 

• Thailan d's central bank sajd the country’s economy had grown 
8J5 percent this year and would expand at least by the same rate in 
1995 while inflation eases to 4.8 percent from 5 percent. 

• Sumitomo Life Insurance Co-'s financial-strength rating was 
lowered by Moody’s Investors Services Inc. to A1 from Aa2 
because of deteriorating asset quality. 

Bloomberg, Reuters, A FP 


Ford Plans Vietnam Venture 


The Associated Press 

HANOI — Ford Motor Co. 
vying for an early foothold in 
Vietnam's small but growing 
car-and-truck market, expects 
to start bu3ding an assembly 

P lant near Hand next year, a 
ord executive said Wednes- 
day. 

The carmaker plans to apply 
for a license from the govern- 
ment early in 1995 and begin 
construction as soon as the li- 
cense is approved, said Wayne 


Booker, executive vice president 
for international operations. 

Ford and Song Cong Diesel 
Factory are completing a feasi- 
bility study for a joint venture to 
manufacture a full line of cars 
and trucks. Mr. Booker said. 

He said Ford would own a 
majority stake in the operation, 
but refused to say how much it 
would invest. Initially, the plant 
would assemble vehicles from 
imported parts, but Ford has 
agreed to help Vietnam develop 
local parts manufacturing. 


NYSE 

Wednesday’s Closing 

Tables Include the nationwide prices up to 
the dosing on Wall Street and do not reflect 
late trades elsewhere. Via The Associated Press 

(Continued) 


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NASDAQ 

Wednesday's 4 pm 

This list complied by die AP, consists erf the 1,000 
TO»t traded securities m terms of doflar value- K is 
updated twice a year. 




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AMEX 

Wednesday’s Closing 

Tables inchide the natioowtde priws up i » 

the closing on Wall Street and do not retlec 

tlate trades elsewhere. Via The Associated Press 


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1 — Avidend note tWs y ear, emi tted, deterred, or no action 

K^fflvtSnd’dS^d or po m this year, an acapnuUHve 

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with the Start tflradhiB. 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 1994 



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ff CHI Asia Capital Gtd Fd s 

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w NA V 16 Dec 1994 — Jl 
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CREDI5 INVESTMENT FUNDS 

tf cs Portf me DM a dm 

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ff CSPortflnc5FRA SF 

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ff CS Portf Bai DM DM 

rf CS Portf Bal (Lire) A/B Ui 

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tf CS Portf Gro (Lire) A/B Lit 

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tf CSPurtf Growth USS S 

tf C5 Money Moriiet Fd BEF.BF 

d CS Money Market FdCS CS 

d CS Money Market Fd DM—DM 
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d CS Euro Blue Cl** A DM 

d CS Euro Blue Chips B DM 

d CS France Pbnd A FF 

ff CS Franco Fund B FF 

tf CS Germany Fond A DM 

ff CS Germany Fund B DM 

tf CS Gold Mines A * 

ff CS Gold Mines B S 

tf CS Gold Valor. S 

tf C5 Htoano ibtrto Fd A — Ptu 
tf CSHtepano iberta Fd B. 

ffCS Italy Food A _ 

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d CS Joran Megatrend SFR—SF 
tf CS Japan MogatnoKt Yon _Y 

d CS N ei horh m fls Fd A FL 

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d CS North- American A S 

0 CS NarttFAmerfcm B 
tf CSOoko-PratecA 



ADVERTISEMENT 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 

bglmrtxltvtod.wtabmulUed by MCHOPAL PAINS (TM.3S-1 40280888). 


Dec. 21, 1994 


The 


Meyo 


Hot «aovl valpo quotaliaa m nppBod by the Faado Bstod with the oacepden at ooeoo queleo booed an tom price*. 

1 Indeote frMMncy of quototlomi aUPpAMt: |d) • dsttn M • woukty; tal - Wenonddy: ft) tartnigMIy [evwy two WMkx); (r) . ngUsrty; (Q - 


DIT INVESTMENT FFM 
ff Ccncentro-F ■■■,■■ 
ff Inrt (fentenfond +- 


SUM 

6181 


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La Toucnv Haute - IFSC - Dublin t 
BSB Thanuon Lai Am Sol Fd 
ff CanqBtMader Fund. * 948 

DUDIH& 5WIECA ASSET MANAGEMENT 
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b Hlofibridoo capital Cera-— * T22S6J3 

mover look FertormonCB Fd— * 2007 JO 

m PoclUc RIM Oa Fd 1 97.92E 

BBC FUND MANAGERS [JerMTl LTD 

1-3 Seme SLSfHoflW ;0SS4OO31 

EBC TRADED CURRENCY P UNO LTD 


tf Capital. 

tf IIWW « 

INTERN ATIONAL INCOME FUND 
tf Long Tern). 


2*122 

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-DM 


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tf CS Gulden Bond B . 
ff CS Prime Bond A. 

tf § ^JvCtoldWAA DM 

S§SS:?:fflK±-- 

ff CS Slwrt-T. Bond* B - * 

tf CS Sorts# Franc Bmd A SF 

ffCS Swiss Fnmc Bend B SF 

tf CS Eurareoi—— — — — DM 
CREDIT AGRICOLE 
INDEXIS , 

rf indextaUSA/SBPSg S 

ff Index t. Jopon/ Wftto ) Y 

tf lodexb G Brrt/ FTSE 1 

ff Indexh Fronat/CAC AJ FF 

d IndexfsCT FF 

MOHAXI5 _ - 

ff Court Tonne USD- * 

tf Court Tame DEM dm 

ff Court Tonne JPY Y 

ff Qxrt Terme GgP s 

d Court Tonne FRF FF 

tf court Terme ESP Pta 

tf Court Terme ECU Eat 

MOSATS 

tf Actions Hord-Amertcolnes-5 
d Actions Joponotw 
tf Actions Anotc mes. 
tf Actions Altemonde*- 

ff Actions 1 
tf AcHansI 
ff ArttottUu 

ff WtotanWvortifloe* 
tfOMtaN 
ff CtallgJi 
d ObflO An 


rf obngAlle wimdes 
tf ObflBFrana^esj 
ff ObUo E5B.3Portj 



1367 

17 SK 

1281 

13979 

1130 

1740 

3944 

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1*183 

3M*84 


12884 

2154 

176089 

1184 

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3446 

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3941 

M7J5 

366773 

14041 

2X60 

nJO 

1*357 


d ObllO COmrerL IDlBrnJ 

gjg&ffiN &eiAL 06 

IdtSSXSvSDB S 112121 

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dbSJSJmnkgroup I 
w Enron* 

wK. America EowWM 
w Podflc Ernfftygd 
wDdvuiaaod. 


S 5 

97.M 


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971750 

890631 

29087 


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w MuMcummcv 



120377 

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13*7.17 

*717,18 

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ff Lena Term- DMK 

ERMITAGE LUX USMBTJ 38) 
w ErnUleoe inter RntvStral_DM 
w ErmHooe Sett Fund - .. * 
w EnnHooe Astai Hedge FdJ 
w Emutogo Euro Hodov Fd_DM 
wErmttago Crosby Aola Fd_I 

wErmdooeAmerHegFd * 

■v ErmHoav Emer Mkts Pd 5 

SUROPA FUNDS LIMITED 

d Amvriam Eguttv Fund s 

ff American OMkm Fund S 

w Aston Emilty Fd * 

w European Eoolty Fd * 

EVEREST CAPITAL (M9) 292 BM 

m Everest Coaltal hul Ud S 

FAIRFIELD GREENWICH GROUP 

m Advanced StriPegtea Ltd s 

m Chorus intenwto n ol Lkt 5 

wFodrfletd inn LM * 

■v Fairfield Sentry Lid * 

m Sentry seted Lfd. 


10.12 

31.90 

858 

941 

1*40 

754 

1642 

26*29 

16243 

12X20 

12320 

13141 

159J733 

9X22 

2IUS 

346J5 

5T28275 


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tf Dbcnvvrv Ftmd. 
ff Far East Fund— 
tf Fid. Aunt. A ssets, 
ff Frontier Fund — 

tf GUM indFiAU 

ff Glooal Selection Fu 
ff New Euroao Fund, 
if Orient FUnd. 


tf Special Growth Fund . 
d world Fimd- 


1949 
7740 
19340 

3471 

1887 
1845 
1X64 
12X45 
3881 

__ MM* 

FINMANACEMENT SMxoaeO{4Un/2S33tS) 

iv Delta Premium Carp— 5 122580 

POKUS BANK Ai 4R 4» 555 

wSamlanas toll Grown FUJI 084 

FOREIGN A COLONIAL EMERO MKTS LTD 
Tet ; London 071*2# 1234 
tf Argentinian invert Co Status 2751 

tf Brazilian Invert Co Slcov—S «U7 

wCotombton invert Co Stem J IS* 

tf GlMEmMktslavCo5tcov4 1047 

tf Indian Invert Co stcou * 1244 

d Latin Amer Extra Yield Fd* 95984 

tf Latin America Income Co-5 9J1 

a Latin American Invert Co_I 1249 

ff Mexlccei invest Co Sirov * *5.19 

w Peruvian invest Co Slcav-4 1*10 

FUND MARKETING GROUP (BID) 

P.O. Box 2001, HomltiDA, Bnrnmto 

ntFMGGtoM 138 Novi $ 

m FMG N. Amer. IX Nov) * 

mFMG Europe (X Nov) I 

m FMG EMC MKT IX Nov)_S 
fit FMG O UO Nov] S 


mFMG Fixed (X Nov). 

FX CONCEPTS (BERMUDA) LTD 

w Concepts Forex Fund S 

GAM CURRENCY FUNDS 

w Gala Hedge li S 

■v Goto Hedge III I 

C Gaia fx. 


m Gaia Guaranteed CL i . 

m Goto Guaranteed CL 1 1 

GARTMORE INDOSUEZ FUNDS 20/12/94 
Tot .-(352) 46 SI » 478 
Fax : (352) 46 54 X 
BOND PORTFOLIOS 

d OEM Bond I7H57Q DM 

tf DIverhaixL— DU 258 


1122 

1BJ9 

IMS 

1252 

94* 

1057 

946 

12199 

1499 

11753 

8042 

7199 


tf Dot la Band— D IS 216 * 

tf European Bd— Disi.12 Ecu 

d French Franc— Dta9jB ff 

d Gtobal Bond— Ota 206— J 
EQUITY PORTFOLIOS 
0 ASEAN * 


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Id Conthwntal Europe— 
d Devetop InoMoikets- 
ff FrenteJ 


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d Germany 

tf international. 
tf Japan. 


,FF 


rf North Aroertcn- 
ff SurttKrtor 


387 

245 

159 

1278 

247 

142 

441 

141 

382 

1046 

556 

242 

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252 

U» 

149 


tf United Kingdom- 
RESERVE FUNDS 

ff DEM DtsSJHD. 

ff Dollar, 

d French Fame. 

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GEFIHOR FUND5 
London [71499 41 7LGoneva:41-23 735 55 X 

w Scottish World Fund I *475468 

. SL American—. 5 34.97 

GENC5EE FUND LM 

tv (A) Genesee Eon to * 157.17 

GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT 
OFFSHORE FUNDS 
1 Athol S t OouptoMof Mon 44424-626037 


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tv GAM Japan ^N 


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tf DoSterttaa t 

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ff Do DeutaUwuXXk DM 

ff Do Yen — , — Y 

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w GAM MUFGtaMd USS . 
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wGAM Trodtag USS % 

wGAM Overseas— -. 4 


wGAM Podflc 
wGAM Pan Ena — 
wGAM Pan European - 
w GAM Retattve Valne- 
w GAM Saledton 


-SF" 


w GAM Stopopero/Maidyrta -4 

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’ Twfte. 



44645 
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28948 
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117191 

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14*15 

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9644 

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wGAM Bond US* SpocW. 
wGAM Band SF. 
wGAMBond Yen- 
wGAM Band Dl 
wGAM Band t. 
wGAM tSMCtod Bond— 
wGAM UnlvendUSS— 

w gsam Compastta 

w Global strategic A— . 
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w European Strategic A. 
w Europerm Strategic B. 
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wEmorp Mkts Strategics — I 
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iv jutimii iiTiiionotr rn n 

SWISS REGISTERED FUNDS 4VM&206 
WVjWetodHlras* I73XH Ml^Zurich 

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W East 57th Strieurr WQJ25KM8M00 

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wGAM GMx4_ S 1B52 

wGAM International S 17093 

wGAM Jam Capital S JJW 

wGAM North America s ije 

wGAM Padflc Basin J I7M3 

IRISH REGISTERED UC1TS 

656* Lower Mount SLDubtln 2553-T-O60I0 

wGAM Asia Inc. DM 1045 

WGAM Europg y D M mw 

w GAM Tokyo Acc DM 14*54 

wGAM Total Band DM ACC— DM V&M 

wGAM (Mweroal DM Acc — DM 17083 

IDF INVT AND DEVT FINANCING LTD 
tf IDF G UUvU-- - * B2J 

GLOBAL CAPITAL MANAGEMENT LTD 

JWH GLOBAL STRATEGIES LTD 
w (A) Original investment — S ».» 

wrq Fkxxidol fc MoroJs J J*J£ 

w 16) Gtaoal Diversified * 11899 

w (F) G7 Curr ency- S S«2 

w (H) Yen HoamM— _ — * 15«6 

w (K) 

wJWHWORLDWIDE FUNDS 17.17 

GLOBAL FUTURES JrOPTKHS SICAV 
m FFM ltd Sd Prour-CHF a JF 97.79 

GOLDMAN SACHS 

wG5 Adi Ra te Mori. F dll. 

mGSGtobmeurrmy- 
GS Wortd Bond Find 
_ GS Wtorld tacome Fund— — 5 
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GS Earo ShkjS Cat Port— DM 
G8 Gtobal Equity— — - — S 
GS US am Growta Port. 


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987 

129958 

1057 

954 

9584 

1185 

954 

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80499 

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7357 

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22.11 

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1752 

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2187 

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GT North Amerioo Fd B »5 
GT Siralegle Bd Fd A Sh_ * 


ff GT Siroregic Bd Fd B 5h * Ui 

ff GT Telecomm. Fa A snares* 1*M 

ff GT Telecomm. Fd B Shares* 105 

r GTTechnatogyFimdASh-S 62.17 

r GT TMMatoBV Fund B Sh-J 6251 

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tf G.T. BtoMch/Haatni Fund—* 1988 

if G.T. Deuteaitana Fund ■ ■ * HAS 

0 G.T. Europe Fund * 4650 

wG.T.GMOl Small CaFO S 26JH 

tf GT. Investment Fund J 2685 

wGT. Korea Fund . . * 4J2 

w GT. Nwrtv Ind Countr Fd S 6*57 

wGT. US Smart Companies— S 2540 

GUERNSET CAPITAL MANAGIMENT LTD 

( GCMmt.Ea.Fd * IM9Q 

f GCM USS special S __ 97940 

GUINNESS FLIGHT FD MNGRS (GMOV) LM 
GUINNESS FLIGHT GLBL STRATEGY FD 
ff Managed Currency . . J 34S 

ff Gfatxri Bond * SMB 

tf Gtobal HHh Income Bond— S 2886 

ff GUI A IBonff £ 1042 

tf Euro High toe. Band 1 3055 

tf Gtobal Eaultv S 9155 

ff AmorlaM Blue Chip * 2785 

rf JMiond Padflc * 12483 

ff UK ( 2523 

ff European * 11754 

GUINNESS FLIGHT INTX ACCUM FD 

ff DeorichemartiMeiwv DM 9152# 

tf US Donor Money— — s 39531 

tf US Donor HM Yd Bona # ss.1* 

ff Inn BaiadCad Grib * 36.12 

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wKwenhWltorCora AG S 790*00 

wHaunUcNorDiu * U344 

wAFFT % 153780 

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irttandlnveai Europe— -—FF 1296.14 

wMonOnvtrt CroMmco— FF 133189 

wMondlnvtrt One mtteo— FF 128644 

w Mandtav ort Enwrg Grawlh.FF 138489 

wMonatavertFuhirao— FF 131644 

HEPTAGON FUND NV (399941*55*) 

/ HaplaeMi OLB Fund—* #685 

C Heptagon CMO Fund 5 5689 

HERMES ASSET MANAGEMENT LTD 
Bermuda: (8091295 4M Lux : I332MM 6* 61 
Final Prices 

aHormei Earoaean Fund— Ecu 32B8B 

m Hermes North AmortaxiFd* 2*125 

m Hennas Asian Fund I 36*92 

m Hermai Emeni Mkts FumLS 13188 

m Hermos Strateaios Fima s 67802 

mHormes Neutral Fund S 11*21 

mHormes Gtobal Fund * 6*226 

mHormes Band Fund Ecu 05785 

m Hermes Sterling Fd t 1X87 

m Hermes GdM Fund. 


(186 


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m Pegasus P.P. Par tfoHa— s 
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(4*J1)<»91» 
.Y 2713000 

Taj 106678V 
A 229241 

17*454 


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w Aston Fixed income Fd— I 10731 

fl Money Morioet Fd * 18054 

IHTERINVE5T (BERMUDA) LTD 
C/o Bank of Bermuda, Tel : 809 29*4888 
m Hedge Hag <• Conserve Fd-S 943 

HITE RNATTONAL ASSETS FUND 
X Bd RoynL L-2449 Luxembourg 

w Europe Sad 6— Ecu 1857 

INVBSCO HOT. LTft POB 27L Jcngr 
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ff Maximum Income Fund. 

ff Starting MflBdPtfl 

tf Pioneer Martels 

tf Gtobal Bond. 


tf Okntan Global Strategy- 

d Asio Suoer Growfh 

tf Nlpaoa WarrmH Fund 

d Asia Tiger Warrant 

tf European Warrant Fund, 
d OMMJH 11W- 
d Gtobal Lelsuro, 


PREMIER SELECT FUNDS 

tf Amortan Growth S 

tf American Entonxisa— — l 

tf Asto Tiger Growth * 

tf Dollar Reserve, 


d European Growth-— S 

tf Eurnpem Enterprise —S 
tf Global Emerging Markets-* 

if Gtobal Growth S 

if Nippon Enterprise S 

d NIbw Growth s 

tf UK Growth _.r 

d Sterling Reserve I 

tf Greater Chino Duos J 641 

IRISH LIFE INTL LM, (tax) 3*3-1484 1921 


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sung 

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55509 

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3.74U 

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55300 


tf Internal tonal t 

tf International Bakmcod- * 

tf [ntermfftonaJ Growth S 

ITALFORTUNE INTI. FUNDS 
w Ctoss A (AHff. Growth iiaL)S 
w Ctoss B (Global Equity ) — S 

w Class C (Gtobal Bend) S 

D (Ecu Bond) Ecu 


uns 

0893 
0891 

7624808 
1153 
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1*62 

JAR DINE FLEMING, SCO Bex IMUHgKo 

tf JF A5EAN Trust S 5*42 

tf JF FOr East WmtTr. s 1499 

tf JF Global Cam. Tr S 1285 

if JFHona Kong Tract 1 1X18 

tf JF Japan Sm. Co Tr Y *23*708 

tf JF Japan Trust V 1047700 

‘ ’ ’ 2*96 

1189 
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tf JF Padflc hie Tr.. 

tf JF Tho Hond T rutf s 

JOHN GQVETT MAKT (LOJIU LTD 
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wGevefl Mon- Futures r 

w Gavefl Man. Fut USS— 5 
w Govetf * Geor. Carr— 5 
wGovetf * GW BeL Hdge — A 
JULIUS (USER GROUP 


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SF 



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Ugulboer .. -4 


if Europe Band Fund, 
i tf Dollar Band Fund-i 
tf Austro Bond Furrtl 
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tf DM Band Fixid-H 


ff Convert Baud Fwd. 
ff Gtobal Band Fuad— 
ff Euro Stack Fund— 
ff US Stack Fund — — 
d Padflc Stack Fund 
tf Swiss Stock 
rfSpedal Swiss 5toc 
ff Japan Stock Fund. 


-Ecu 


tf German Stock Fund 
tf Karacn Stack Fandj 
tf SvdseFnmcC arti i 
tf DM Crab Fund 
Id ECU Corti Fund — 
ff SterflrwCdrti Fimd. 
Id Deftar Cash FurcLw 



tf French Franc Cash— FF 
KEY ASSET MANAGEMENT INC 

m Key Asia HoMtaga * 

m Key Gtobal Hodae— J 


j»Ker Hedge Fund HI 
|KI PACIFIC ASSET MANAGEMENT INC. 


1074 

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mKI Asia Pocflic Fd N 
KIDDER, PEABODY ■ 
lb OwwA w ufc e F und LWj 
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1181 

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119180 

1X451 

174*69 


LEHMAN BROTHERS 38/12/M 
tf Artan Draaon Port NV A _S 
tf Artan Dragon Port NV B — 3 
tf QobotAdvwroli WA — S 
tf Gtobal Advtsan II NVB — s 
tf Gtobal Advlson Port NVAJ 
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tf Lflhaxm Cur Adv. A/B S 

tf Natural Reseurcxs NV A — * 
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LIPPO INVESTMENTS 
34/F Uppo Tower Certro. 89 QuoonpngyJIK 
Tol (BSD 867 6X8 Fax U52) 5960388 

w Java Fund S *» 

w IDR Money Market Fd — -A 13.19 

w USD Money Mortal Rf f 1854 

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w Artm Growth Fund-— S JX 

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945 

943 

1*16 

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1851 


LLOYD GEORGE MNOMTOO MS MB 

w Antenna Fund S .1759 

w LG Asian Sdioiler Cos Fd_s ltamw 

w LG Indta Fund LM 1 1165 

WLGJmn Fd 3 1*K 

WLO Korea Fd PlC S 1087 


LLOYDS BANK INTL (BAHAMAS) Ltd 
w Liard* Americas PorHoBo-S 
LOMBARD, ODIER* GE- GROUP 
OBL1FLEX LTD (Cl) 
tf MiffitcVTOncy S 


941 


tf Doitor Medhgn Terni- 

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tf Japanese Yen. 


ff Pound Sterling. 

d Deutsche Mart. 

tf Dutch Florin « 


tf hy Euro Currebries. 
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tf us Daflor short Term, 
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ff SwtosMulHaifrency- 
tf European cmrancy. 
tf Be ' _ 

d Caaverttate. 
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d SwhsMuM-DIvidnd. 
rf Sh 

tf Canadian DoUcr. _ 
rf Duteh Florin Muffl . 
tf 3>m Franc wv« Pay- 

tf CADMuttlcvr.Dhr 

tf MoOHli iteiopn Purr— SF 

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ff DwtadHnaTic Short Tirm-DM 
MASMUM PONDS tote ef Mb 
T el 44624 688328 Fax 44401 688 334 

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r MAoaum Aaprec Grwfh FdS 9188 

IALABARCAPMBMT (Bermudd) LTD 

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MAN INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 

mMM Limited- OnBnary. 


3246 

2447 

1948 

496700 

27.15 

1747 

1844 

1568 

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mMtafGtdLM- Doc 1994 S 

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m Mbit 5o Ra Ud (BNP) — s 
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mMM Gtd Currencies SOI S 

mMMGGLFBil 
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m Athena Old FW 

m Athena GM Corytncto9__s 
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mAthena Gtd Ftamdals lnc_J v-g 

mAHL CobBal M»sFd_ J 1186 

m AHL Commodity Fuid S U8I 

jHAHLC-itoUrFuad— _ — 1 777 

mAHL Real TWie TroU Fd — S 8LX 

mAHL Gtd Rcol Tlrne Trtl — S XX 

m AHL GW Cap MartLW- — J 9« 

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:££.s«ss*”a. 

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MATTHEWS INTERNATIONAL M8T 
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ffldOMA S ttJg 

* nrm ■» » 9179 

MAVERICK lOmHMMXn 90*790 

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MEESPIERSOH 

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wASto POC. Growth Fd N.V.—I Site 

w Aston Capital HaMngs S *579 

w Artan Sweciton Fd fi-v Fl *206 

■rDF Amer. Grawm Fd n.v. J 3441 

WEMS Offshore FdN.V. -Fl M248 

w Europe Grawpi Fund K.V.-R 5909 

wJonan Diversified Fund S *353 

wLavereocd Con Maid S SMI 

MERRILL LYNCH 

tf Dollar Assets Portfolio S 180 

tf Prime Rato PortMto . .1 979 

MERRILL LYNCH SHORT-TERM 
WORLD INCOME PORTFOLIO 

tf Class A « 8.14 

tf Ctoss B « *14 

MERRILL LYNCH 

GLOBAL CURRENCY BOND SERIES 
AUSTRALIAN DOLLAR PORTFOLIO 
ff Category A . .as 


tf Category B. 


-AS 


CANADIAN DOLLAR PORTFOLIO 
tf CS 

ff Category B_ 


CORPORATE HIGH INCOME PTFL 

ff CUn« 0-1 « 

ff Class A-2 A 

ff aassB-1 * 

rf Class B-2- 


17.93 

17JD 


1*26 

1385 


DEUTSCHE MARK PORTFOLIO 

tf Category A -DM 


ff Category B. 


-DM 


EUROPEAN BOKO PORTFOLIO (USS) 


-DM 


966 
80V 

962 

IMS 

1277 

EUROPEAN BOND PORTFOLIO (DM) 

rfOBsA-1 S 1346 

ff Ctoss A-2 3 1542 

ff ClagB-1 1 1360 

ff Oass B-2 S 1*04 


IBS 

976 

885 

986 

1*23 

1587 

1150 

1387 

1209 

1262 

2281 

2159 

9JB 

940 


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05437437. 


For information on how to list your fund, fax Catherine de VIENNE at (33-1) 46 37 21 33. 








^age 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 1994 


SPORTS 



JNHL Settlement 
Reported Closer 


By Joe Lapointe 

ffew York 1 ones Stniat 

TORONTO —The National 
Hockey League dispute is near- 
ing a possible conclusion, ac- 
cording to people with knowl- 
edge of the collective 
bargaining negotiations, who 
have confirmed that the team 


done. Dus is very, very com- 
plex.” 

That meeting set the stage for 
a general membership meeting 
here on Wednesday that is ex- 


owners have offered the players 
dude a 


a deal that doesn’t incl 
payroll tax. 

It is the tax, which the players 

call a salary cap in disguise, that 

has kept the players locked out 
so far and postponed the start 
of the season for 82 days, as of 

Wednesday. 

The league also has offered 
the Players Association a deal 
that includes a salary tax, but 
the player representatives from 
the 26 teams emphatically re- 
jected that approach Tuesday 
night when they met at a lake- 
front hotel here. 

“There won’t be a deal with a 
tax in it," said Adam Graves of 
die New York Rangers, when 
he emerged from the three-hour 
session. *T imagine that talks 
will continue, but not in a vein 
with a tax included. The basis 
of a deal is in place for the most 
part. We’ve moved in the mid- 
dle ground to get something 


as. No one in the union would 
speak about details of the even- 
tual compromise, but it is ex- 
pected that the players will give 
further ground on arbitration 
procedures, which many own- 
os have said is a primary cause 
of the salary inflation they are 
seeking to controL 

No formal negotiations are 
scheduled, although they could 
resume soon. Full bargaining 
broke off Dec. 6 when the com- 
missioner, Gary Bettman, re-in- 
troduced the concept of a pay- 
roll tax, which he called a 
‘‘contribution.’’ 

But last week, during sub- 
committee meetings attended 
by two persons from each side; 
both sides explored solutions 
that did not include a tax. 

The players already have 
agreed, tentatively, to major 
concessions on an entiy-ievel 
salary cap and reductions in ar- 
bitration and free agency for 
young players. The owners have 
offered increased free-agency 
privileges for veterans. 



A Rookie in a Closed Arena 


Finally, Beard Can Prove Himself as a Coach 


By Harvey Araton 

Hew York Times Service 

NEW YORK — The black- 
and-white snapshot is in one of 
Butch Beard's old photo al- 
bums, in the back of some clos- 
et He is a 17-year-old high 
school senior, a college basket- 
ball recruit, posing stiffly with 
the big man on campus at the 
University of Kentucky. 

Pat Riley’s hair wasn't long 
enough to grease, but he was 
Beard recalled before bis 


as 


stormy New Jersey Nets 


Sic*v J-iITe/RnHcr, 

Baseball onion chief Donald Fehr looked more pleased than he sounded in Washington. 


McMorris Is Baseball’s New Designated Deaknaker 


Compiled by Ow Staff From IHspmdiu 

WASHINGTON — As the 
major league baseball players' 
strike passed its 131st day, 
matching the length of the ab- 
breviated 1994 season, the club 
owners turned to Jerry McMor- 
ris, the owner of the Colorado 
Rockies, as their latest hope for 
a settlement 

After meeting alone with the 
head of the union, Donald 
Fehr, for more than two hours 
Tuesday night, McMorris 
sounded optimistic that the 
strike could be ended this week 
without the imposition of a sal- 
ary cap, although he admitted 
that the discussions had led no- 
where so far. 


declare an impasse and imple- 
ment a salary cap. 

"Neither one of us saw a way 
out of it tonight,” Fehr said. 
"The gulf that separates us re- 
mains essentially what it once 


was. They're insisting on an ar- 

i an is m that 


tificial mechanism that drives 
salaries down. They admit that 
that’s what they're doing.” 

McMorris, who said be spent 
a large part of his private meet- 
ing with Fehr discussing reve- 
nue sharing and payroll taxes, 
said that "it would only be fair 
to say we’re suD in a deadlocked 
position. I hope that won’t be 
true tomorrow." 


Fehr sounded pessimistic, 
and negotiators face a manage- 
ment- imposed deadline of 
Thursday midnight to reach 
agreement or have the owners 


After arriving in Washington 
during the afternoon, McMor- 
ris said, “It’s time to make a 
deal if we’re going to get one 
done. Compromises need to be 
reached, and we need to get this 
behind us.” 


Implementation of a salary 
cap system by the owners is the 
“last option,” McMorris said. 
“It’s not a choice I want to 
make: There are solutions to 
this problem. We’ve got some 
flexibility. We have some issues 
that are very important to us, 
and die union has some issues 
that are very important to 
them.” 

McMorris said be thought 
more members of manage- 
ment’s bargaining team would 
arrive Wednesday, but wasn’t 
sure. 

“If we can come to some son 
of agreement in the secondary 
tax area, I suspect” a deal 
would fall into place, McMorris 
said. "1 think there's ground for 
compromise in other areas.” 

The National Labor Rela- 
tions Board ruled against the 
owners Tuesday for the second 


time in less than a week, dis- 
missing their unfair labor prac- 
tice charge against players for 
allegedly making threats 
against potential strikebreak- 
ers . 

Last week, the agency said it 
would issue, two unfair labor 
practice complaints against the 
owners for withholding a S7.8 
million contribution to the 
players' pension and benefit 
plan on Aug. 1. 

Bud Selig. the acting commis- 
sioner, denied that the Colora- 
do Rockies' owner had been 
sent as the designated deal- 
maker. but a person dose to the 
talks said it appeared that 
"McMorris has been empow- 
ered with more authority than 
before.” 

He became the third man sin- 
gled out for that role. 

Richard Ravitch, the dubs’ 


chief labor executive, was the 
first, but be has resigned, effec- 
tive at the end of the month, 
when his contract expires. John 
Harrington, chief executive of 
the Boston Red Sox. was next 
given the title of chairman of 
the negotiating committee on 
Nov. 10. 


Hope From History? In Post, the Fewer Talking the Better 


By Oaire Smith 

New York Times Service 

Washington — More than two 
months ago, the Dodgers’ Brett Butler 
proved to be a sound student of the history 
of baseball labor negotiations when he 
made the following observation: When ne- 
gotiating teams are reduced to the smallest 
common denominators, deals are made. 

Because, in keeping with labor history, 
there does seem to be some downsizing of 
negotiating teams and a recalibration of 
the bargaining process. 

In 1981, Lee MacPhaiL then president 
of the American League, stepped in to 


replace Ray Grebey, the owners' hawkish 
chief negotiator, whom the players had 
rigorously battled for most of the 50-day 
in-season strike. MacPhafl and Marvin 
Miller, the head of the union, were then 
able to tit down and work out a settlemenu 

In 1985, another strike hit, and owners 
and even a commissioner, Peter Ueber- 
roth. moved in and out of the negotiations. 
But in the end it was MacPhafl who 
wound up going one-on-one with a muon 
chief, this time Don Fehr. They worked 
out an end to a three-day in-season strike. 

In 1990, another one-on-one was need- 
ed, this time during a spring-training lock- 


out Again, it produced results. Fehr and 
the deputy commissioner, Steve Green- 
berg, locked themselves in a room to have a 
go at the logjam over salary arbitration 
eligibility. About 12 hours later they 
emerged, with a solution. 


But neither Harrington nor 
three other members of the 
committee have been involved 
in the talks this week. Dave 
Montgomery, chief operating 
officer of the Philadelphia Phil- 
lies, was the only committee 
member who attended Mon- 
day's session. 

Selig said from his office in 
Milwaukee that “it was just felt, 
quite frankly, that Dave Mont- 
gomery and Jerry McMorris are 
the appropriate people. 

“The rest of them will be 
there when it is appropriate. 
Dave knows the numbers. Jeny 
is there because of his back- 
ground. He's had a long back- 
ground in labor relations and 
has had a reasonable relation- 
ship with the Players Associa- 
tion." 


Now, in 1994, all of baseball wails to see 
if history is somehow repeating itself, as 
one owner. Jeny McMorris of the Colora- 
do Rockies, prepares to take the lead role 
for management. 


“Jerry’s coming in,” one union lawyer 
said. “We’D have to see what happens after 
that” 


Selig added that “obviously 
we’re hopeful that the next few 
hours will begin to produce a 
meaningful dialogue. We can 
replow the same ground only so 
many times.” 

Of the Thursday midnight 
cutoff set by the dubs, be said: 
“If there isn't an agreement or 
something remarkably close to 
one. that’s the deadline." 

(W'P, NJT. AP) 


stunned Riley’s slumping New 
York Knicks. 85-83, Tuesday 
night at Madison Square Gar- 
den — a pretty smooth talker. 

“I thought it was because he 
was from New York, and the 
rest of them were from Ken- 
tucky and Illinois,” Beard said. 
“Pat could really jump, Kke a 
lot of black kids. You could tell 
be was different, even then.” 

Riley, a sophomore from 
Schenectady, New York, was 
most likely chosen to usher 
Beard around the sprawling 

cause ^ewas ntTfa^mtoy, be- 
cause be was different- And so 
was Beard, who in 1965 was 
offered a scholarship by Adolf 
Rupp to become the first blade 
player at the country’s premier 
basketball factory, at least for 
whites. 

A year earlier, Wes Unseld 
bad been Rupp's first recruit, 
but he stayed home, at the inte- 
grated University of Louisville, 
rather than blaze a frightful 
trail 

“It wasn’t a factor with the 
yers, at least not that I 
ew " Riley said. “But it was a 
big deal for others. I know Wes 
got death threats." 

Rupp, under pressure from 
the state, set his rights on 
Beard, 1965*$ Mr. Kentucky, a 
6-fooi, 3-inch (1.92-meter) 
guard from Hardxnsburg High 
School, about a half hours 
drive south of Louisville. 

Beard can still see Rupp, the 
so-called Baron, in his living 
room, ripping his mother May~ 
bei’s iced tea, bragging about 
how reviled he was in a South- 
eastern Conference rick of be- 
ing dominated by his Wildcats. 

“He told us how they cursed 
him in Tennessee and threw 
bottles at him in Alabama," 
Beard said. “At one point, my 
mother asked. ‘If that happens 
to you, then what’s going to 
happen to my son?’ ” 

Rupp, recalled Beard, smiled 
and said, none too reassuringly, 
or respectfully. “Miss Beard, 
aTim gonna take reel good 
carah yoah boy ” 

Beard bad grown up a rabid 
Wildcat fan. relishing Cawood 
Ledford's play-by-play calls 
from various pits around the 
Southeastern Conference. As 
the radio happens to be a terrif- 
ic cloaking device for segrega- 
tion, it never dawned on Beard 
that Rupp's program wasn't 
one he should aspire to. 

Then, t h a nks to 1960s poli- 
tics, the door was open, and all 
Beard had todo to make history 
was walk on through. He talked 


it over with his parents. He am- While the coaching <Joore do 
suited UnsekLxhoa he called open for blacks, the f °Uo"-up 
Louisville’s couch. Peck Hick- 

fll “We decided that Rupp «as Russell in Boston the two iiota- 
under pressure to recruit a ble exceptions, the jobs wacK 
blade player, but he didn’t real- coaches generally gf * 
ly want one,” Beard said, lar to the seemingly hopeless 
How did they know? “Believe one Beard was given by_ tus 
me,” he said, “you know” friend Willis Reed. Of the four 

He went to Louisville. black coaches now working m 

A year later, Beard watched the National Basketball Assoa- 
2 from his dorm room as Riley, atioa, three are in rebuilding, or 
Louie Dampier & Co. were collapsing. situations. The otb- 
drubbed by predominantly 


black Texas Western in the na- 
tional championship game. The 
lifelong Wildcat fan was beside 

himself. 

"I felt like they had proved, 
once and for all, that black 
players could win big games at 
that level,” Beard said. - 

Almost three decades later. 
Bond now looks across the 
great Hudson River divide, to- 
ward the establishment Gar- 
den. and, ironically, Pat Riley is 
its shining star- Riley is a legend 
as a coach. Beard a rookie. 
Though he’s only two years 
younger, it has taken Beard 13 


'/ears longer to get his chance. 


lot quite the same chance. 


er, waterable Lenny WSkens, 
wfll soon break Red Auerbach's 
record for most career victories. 

Riley, right out of the radio 
booth, was handed a champion- 
ship roster in' Los Angeles. 
Mike Dunleavy replaced Riley 
and briefly rode Magic Johnson 
to a rich deal in Milwaukee. 
Orlando’s Brian {fill has stum- 
bled into Anfernee Hardaway 
anH Sbaq iriBo O’Neal 

It would be a shame if Butch 
Beard, after waiting so long, 
never got the chance to prove he 
could win big games at this lev- 
el Just the same, another photo 
souvenir of him and Riley at the 
game might have been a good 
idea. 


Ceballos Gets His 50, 
Lakers Reach 2,500 


t 50, and 
got 


Cedric Ceballos 
the Los Angeles 
2 ^ 00 . 

Ceballos scored 50 points 
Tuesday night as his Lakers 
beat the Minnesota Timber- 
wolves, 108-95. It was the 


Wfl- 

of 


the Hawks’ coach, 
kens, leaving him three si 
breaking Red Auerbach's NBA 
record. 

Magic 108, Trafl Blazers 104: 
Shaq tulle O'Neal scored 30 
oints as Orlando won in Pon- 
d, taking control with a 20-4 


Z500th victory for the franchise, 
second most in NBA history be^ third-quarter nm that gave it an 
bind the Boston Celtics’ 2,635. 85-69 lead. But the Trail Blazers 

But the night belonged to Ce- nearly caught up with a late 


ball os, a 5-year veteran ac- 


NB A HIGHLIGHTS 


quircd from Phoenix in an off- 
season trade. He scored 18 
points in the fourth quarter, 
sinking a 3-pointer with 5.7 sec- 
onds left that made him the 
fourth player this season to 
score 50 in a game. - 

"I started thinking about it 
with about two minutes left,” 
said Ceballos, whose previews 
best was 40 points. “Tony Smith . 
came over to me and told me I 
can’t come in the locker room 
unless I get 50. 1 had my clothes 
and my car keys in here.” 

Ceballos made 21 of 31 shots, 
including 3 of 5 from long 
range, and was 5-f or-9 from the 
free- throw line. 

“Once he got to 42 and then 
44, then we really wanted to see 


rafly. 

Nets 85, Knicks 83: Armon 
Gilliam, who scored 22 points, 
made a jumper off a broken 
play with 20 seconds left to put 
New Jersey ahead for good at 
New York. 

Patrick Ewing’s jumper had 
put die Knicks ahead, 82-81, 
with 43 seconds left Kearny An- 
derson then dribbled the ball 
off his foot, but regained con- 
trol and threw a desperation - 


pass to Gilliam, who sank an 
18-f 


him get 50 ” Smith said. “I 
don’t think Minnesota liked it 
too much. They didn’t say any- 
thing, but you could see that 
they picked the defense up ev- 
ery time he touched the ball” 

Hawks 115. Bucks 97: Ken 
Norman scored 28 points as At- 
lanta, playing at home, broke 
out of a shooting slump. 

It was the 936th victo 


victory (or 


footer from, the comer. 
HorteCs 99. Pacers 95: In 
Charlotte, Alonzo Mourning 
and Hersey Hawkins each 
scored 22 points as the Hornets 
beat Indiana for only the third 
time in 13 meetings. 

Reggie Miller gave the Pacers 
their first lead of the fourth 
quarter with a 3-pointer that 
made it 91-90 with 3:03 to go. 
But the Hornets answered with 
a 6-0 run to pull ahead 96-91 
with 32 seconds left 
Mavericks 110, 'Warriors 107: . 
In Oakland, Jamal Masbbura 
scored 27 points as Dallas 
handed Golden Slate its 10th 
straight loss. Jason Kidd made 
a successful professional debut 
in his hometown with 19 points 
and 10 assists. 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 




GARFIELD 


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DOONESBURY 


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SPORTS 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 1994 


Rage 17 


Ia’iuII: Much Irony 

But Few Regrets 


By Robin Finn 

Ne » Ya* Tuner Service 

New York 
It was, be said, “ironic-” the 

“me impeccably-honed nhv- 

that had made himi 
icon within his profes- 

ar forad 

Jr who made such a 

J^OTcf phyacai fitness that 
a shortage of God- 
jven talent and transformed 
into the No. 


would 

10 ^ Psychiatrist’s 
couch or the rocking chair. 

do “’t freak out that easily, 
other than at a bad call in a 
match, he said, “and I can’t be 
bitter that this happened to me 
after such a long run, and such a 
decent run. I just wish 1 was still 
able to run.” 

As for regrets, he’s had a few. 
He attributed his inability to 
win Wimbledon to his unwill- 


player in the worid for \ “ffiess to tinker with his game, 

270 weeks, was n>tir;*» &bd the Czechoslovak-born 

player, who gained his U.S. titi- 


. weeks, was retiring. 

. Alternately misty-eyed and 

SS!l ar . a fii e ^ hekl 601111 ^ the 

® t l |he Grand Slam tennis 
facility be owns here, the 34 - 
year-old Lendl said he had fi- 
nally succumbed to the back 
problem that last March was 


zenship in July 1992, said he 
always wished he had become a 
citizen soon enough to be a via- 
ble contender for the Olympics. 

“Not winning at Wimbledon 


.. mwj wttS isnot going to bother me forev- 

diagnosed as facet joint syn- cr ’ said- “I'm fully aware of 
^ome. The condition manifest- 
ed itself in crippling back 
spasms during many erf his 
matches this year. 

After exhausting several 
courses of therapy that ranged 
from rest to exercise regimes to 
a minor surgical procedure he 
likened to “a root canal for your 


e The only fear I 
have is that HI miss 
it too much; I 
would have liked to 
walk away from 
tennis when I didn’t 
enjoy it anymore, 
not now. 9 

back,” Lendl said he made his 
decision after his back prob- 
lems worsened following his 
aborted second round match at 
the U.S. Open in September. 

A painful three-city stint on 
the seniors circuit in October 
confirmed his suspicion that his 
back could no longer support a 
tennis career of any kind, 

“I was a disaster,” he re- 
called. 

“It’s the running and pound- 
ing on hardcourts that bring the 
spasms on, and once they start, 
fpey just keep on coming, not in 
>ne spot, but all over the middle 
of my back. If I wasn’t a profes- 
sional athlete, I’d be just another 
guy with a sore back, but be- 
cause I am, now I’ve had to give 
up my career just when I was 
starting to enjoy playing without 
the pressure to produce.” 

He is still lean and mean, but 

the°flghtmg machine that 
earned him 94 titles, 8 of them 
at Grand Slam events, and an 
unprecedented $20 million in 
prize money. 

*Tm being forced to make 
this decision,” said Lendl, who 
in the past few years had come 
to grips with his dwindling 
ranking, which dipped from 
No. I at the start of 1990 to 54th 
in 1994. He had intended to 


my shortcomings on grass, and 
maybe if the Australian Open 
hadn’t changed its surface, we 
would have been talking about 
two Slams I hadn't won instead 
of one. But I’m pretty much at 
peace with what I did accom- 
plish.” 

Lendl said he bore no sour 
grapes toward the tennis fans 
who returned his cold shoulder 
during his heyday and became 
sympathetic only when he was 
the underdog. 

“They started rooting for me 
when 1 wasn't winning,” he 
said. 

Because of his ailment, which 
cannot be corrected by surgery 
and can become degenerative if 
unheeded, Lendl described his 
retirement from the sport he 
ruled a decade ago as uncondi- 
tional and absolute. T ennis at 
any level, including the senior 
exhibition tour on which he had 
hoped to renew his battles with 
Bjorn Borg, John McEnroe and 
Jimmy Connors, is out of his 
league. 

“Maybe 50 years from now 
they’ll find a treatment for it,” 
he said of his condition, “but 
if s not going to happen in time 
for me to ever think realistically 
of playing tennis again. But I 
don’t think Fm gong to lie 
down and not compete at any- 
thing. Last summer I played 
golf in the championship at one 
of the dubs out here, and the 
same intensity was there. I was 
even nervous about it, which 
kind of came as a surprise.” 

Lendl hadn’t experienced 
stage fright in quite a while. 

Over a 17-year professional 
career — in which he was 
ranked in the top three for 10 
years and finished four years at 
the top spot — Lend! made it 
his business to conquer the 
nerves that undermined him in 
four Grand Slam finals between 
1981 and 1983, and the body 
that later folded from the exer- 
tion of finally capturing his first 
Slam crown with a five-set 
comeback against McEnroe at 
the 1984 French Open. 

“That first Grand Slam title 
he said. 



Tomba Wins 4th Straight, 
And Despite 6 Big Mistake’ 


■ ^ i . 


54'3C r *-.r«Mi3*. .. . o 

v’V- * 

*»■ i S’/iMV 


Rental 


Alberto Tomba, after his “incredible*’ ran, threw snow at Italian fans near the f in ish Kw- 


Auguin Breaks BOC Challenge Record 
As Yacht Struggles Into Sydney Harbor 


Cetnpikd bv Oar Staff From Dispaidta 

SYDNEY — Christophe Auguin of France 
finished the second leg of the BOC Challenge 
in record time Wednesday night, increasing 
his chances of winning the ’round-the-world 
solo yacht race for a second straight time. 

Auguin, aboard his 60-foot (18.3-meter) 
sloop ScetaCalberson, crossed the finish line 
inside Sydney Heads — the entrance to Syd- 
ney harbor — after having been stymied by 
three-knot winds and a two-meter swell that 
led race organizers to put bade his estimated 
arrival time by more than 24 hours. 

He still completed the leg from Cape Town 
in 24 days, 23 hours. 4 minutes and 16 sec- 
onds to slash 1 day, 7 hours, 7 minutes and 7 
seconds off the record set by South African 
John Martin’s four years ago. 

The 35-year-old Auguin had already 
d aimed the best 24-hour run for a solo-sailed 


mono-hull, covering 350.9 nautical miles be- 
tween Dec. 16 and 17. 

“The last four days were the worst part of 
the journey,” he said. “I was working all the 
time on the deck. Now I’m exhausted.” 

He had taken the overall lead from compa- 
triot Isabelle Autissier during the 6.700-nauti- 
cal-milc leg across the southern oceans. Autis- 
sier, who set out from South Africa on Nov. 
27 with a five-day lead off her first-leg record, 
had her boat demasted in a storm. Late Tues- 
day, she was almost 2800 miles out of Sydney. 

Auguin’s nearest challenger was Jean-Loc 
Van den Heede of France, aboard the Vendfe 
Entreprises. He was about'300 nautical miles 
behind and expected to finish on Thursday. 

After Sydney, 27 , 000 - mile race continues 
to Punta del Este, Uruguay, in late January 
before finishing in Charleston, South Caroli- 
na, where it began. 


Compiled bf Oar Staff From Dispatches 

LECH AM ARLBERG, 
Austria — Even Alberto 
Tomba was amazed Wednesday 
at the way he had won his 
fourth consecutive slalom of the 
season after nearly stopping on 
the second run. 

Counting the last two races 
of the 1993-94 season, Tomba 
now has a six-race winning 
streak in World Cup slaloms. 
No one has done that before, or 
even opened a season with four 
consecutive victories is that dis- 
cipline. 

Again, it was Thomas Sykora 
of Austria who wound up sec- 
ond. 

Tomba, having beaten him 
by nearly 114 seconds in Tues- 
day’s slalom, trailed Sykora by 
.02 seconds after Wednesday’s 
first run. Then came the second 
ran, bordering on the unbeliev- 
able, as Tomba had lo brake 
hard to just get his skis inside a 
gate and regain his rhythm. 

“1 made a big mistak e at the 

bottom,” he said. “I lost maybe 
a second.” 

“At one moment I even con- 
sidered the possibility to stop 
and dropping out.” 

He shook his head in aston- 
ishment as he finished his ran, 
then watched Sykora come 
down the slope. When the Aus- 
trian’s time was posted, Tomba 
had won. By .02 seconds. He 
puL his hand to his mouth in 
disbelief. Then he went over to 
a group erf I talian fans near the 
finish line and sprayed them 
with snow. 

Tomba’s total time was 1 
minute, 4357 seconds. 

Michael Tritscfaer of Austria 
was third, in 1:4434. 

Tritscher spoke for most 
when be said “Respect Re- 

? ?ect. There’s no one but 
omba who can win with such a 
mistake.” 

Thomas Fogdoe of Sweden 
was fourth in 1 :4452, with Ole- 
Christian Furuselh of Norway 
fifth in 1:4452. 

Jure Kosir of Slovenia, third 
on Tuesday, was sixth, 1:44.98. 

Five-time overall rhampinn 
Marc Girardeffi of Luxembourg 
came in eighth, posting the fast- 
est time in the second run. 

It was Tomba’s 26th slalom 
victory and 37th title overall, 
not counting a parallel slalom 
triumph from 1988. He leads in 
the overall World Cup stand- 
ings with 450 points, and his 
two closest challengers will be 
out the rest of December. 

Michael Von Grufiigen of 
Switzerland, second with 294 


points, was hit by a slalom gate 
pole halfway down his second 
run Wednesday and dislocated 
his shoulder. Kjetfl-Aodre Aa- 
modi of Norway, third with 
252, is to have a knee operation 
over Christmas. 

The men next race in a gian t 
slalom in Alta Badia, Italy, on 
Thursday. The hard, steep slope 
there is one that Tomba favors. 

“I hope after Lhis I can be 
better in the giant slalom to- 
morrow,” he said. 

Tomba’s best season was in 
1987-88 when he bad nine vic- 
tories, six in slalom and three in 
giant slalom on his way to gold 
medals in those events at the 
Winter Olympics in Calgary, 

Panada 

He started this season with a 
fourth in the opening giant sla- 
lom at Tignes, France, coming 


from 22d following the first run 
with the best time m the second 
beat. He had to drop out of 
Sunday’s giant slalom at Val 
dTsbre, France, when the ribs 
he injured in a Sestriere, Italy, 
slalom last week became too 
painful. 

Swiss team officials said that 
von Grunigen was being sent 
borne and would be unlikely to 
ski again until the grand slalom 
at Addboden, Switzerland, on 
Jan. 24. 

“He wiD go for a medical 
examination in Fribourg to- 
morrow. Then we will see,” said 
the team’s doctor, Markus Ros- 
ter. 

Doctors put von GrUnigen’s 
shoulder back in position after 
he hit the pole and Roster said 
further tests would determine if 
any ligaments had been torn. 

(AP, Reuters) 


Italy’s Day in Skiing: 
Panzanini Also Wins 


The Associated Press 

ALTA BADIA, Italy — Sa- 
bina Panzanini won her first 
World Cup race Wednesday, a 
giant slalom, to make it Italy's 
day in Alpine skiing 

Panzanini, a 22-year-old 
from nearby Merano, beat 
Anita Wachter of Austria by 
0.47 seconds, then broke into 
tears and whispered, “It’s a 
dream, I can’t believe it.” 

Two-time Olympic champion 
Deborah Compagnoni, who 
had missed the nine previous 
races because of a kidney infec- 
tion, took third place as, for the 
first time in World Cup history, 
two Italian women placed first 
and third in a giant slalom. 

P anzanini was timed in 2 
minutes, 21.03 seconds down 
the Gran Risa track, Compag- 
noni in 2:22.14. 

Wachter was clocked in 
2:2150 but was unhappy with a 
second-run mistake that proba- 
bly cost her her first victory this 
season. 

The overall champion in 1993 
was the fastest in the first run, 
with a one-hundredth of a sec- 
ond edge Over Panzanini. 

But .she then lost her balance 
on the steep upper section and 
completed the second run .48 
seconds behind Panzanini, who 
had the best heat time of 
1:1137. 

Panzanini, who had finished 
second in a giant slalom in Park 


City, Utah, last month, skied 
aggressively on both runs, 
marked by 51 gates, on a tough 
course usually used for men’s 
races. 

She said that a summer diet, 
which allowed her to lose sever- 
al kilograms and become more 
agile, had helped. 

“It’s a great victory cm a tech- 
nical trade,” said the bespecta- 
cled skier. “It’s my first win, and 
it came in Italy. I'm overjoyed.” 

The women’s World Cup cir- 
cuit continues with a slalom at 
Meribel, France, on Dec. 30. 

Sweden’s Permlla WTberg, a 
form» world giant slalom cham- 
pion, was among those who did 
not qualify for the second run. 

“It was a tough race,” Com- 
pagnoni said. “Fm happy with 
my performance and with Sa- 
bina's victory. Losing to Sabina 
is sweet to me. It*s a great day 
for the Italian team.” 

Heidi Zeller- B abler of Swit- 
zerland was a distant sixth in 
Wednesday’s race but still held 
first place in the World Cup 
overall standings. 

Zefler-BahJer, who won two 
giant slalom races in the United 
States, has 485 points from 10 
races. 

Defending World Cup cham- 
pion Vreni Schneider finished 
ninth Wednesday following 
consecutive slalom victories 
and remained in second place 
overall, with 386 points. 


SCOREBOARD 


NBAStandbigs 


play a few more seasons merely waslike a wakeup call, 
for the joy of competing. “Before thra, I was just 

Instead, he said, hell have to out there. But itnotordyhel. 
find hisjoy on the golf course, 

where he Surprised Wmsdf re- it stowed me I badto 

cently with a holo-in-one, and njakc myself 
atthe estate in nearby Goshen, 

Connecticut, that he shares with w21, but what reaHyhappened 
^S&mautha, their four is that I made myself much fit- 

dS^^TSmsponding 

oumiber of German shepherds, supported by fitness. 

“The only fear I have is that Unmatched fitness, be said, 
FH it too much; I would was the weapon that made him 
have liked to walk away from a champion with titles second 
tennis when I didn’t enjoy it any- only to Connors and winning 
more, not now” said Lendl, who streaks second tonone. 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
AtkmHc Dtvbtan 



W L 

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12 10 

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New Jersey 

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8 15 

J48 

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Miami 

6 15 

J86 

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Washington 

6 15 

amtral Dhrtstao 

286 

11 

Indiana 

14 7 

A 67 

— 

Cleveiond 

15 8 

452 

■ — 

awwie 

13 10 

365 

2 

Cnicaea 

1) 11 

300 

3ft 

Detroit 

9 12 

429 

5 

Atlanta 

18 M 

ATT 

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Milwaukee 

7 15 

318 

7ft 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 
MMwest Dhrtstao 



W L 

Pet 

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Utah 

17 8 

388 

— 

Houston 

13 8 

319 

2 

Data 

12 8 

300 

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Denver 

12 9 

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11 9 

350 

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Mtrneeata 

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317 

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Phoenix 

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Seattle 

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UA. Lakers 

14 8 

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Sacramento 

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Portland 

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Golden State 

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LA Coppers 

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TUESDAY’S RESULTS 


MBwaakee 

27 16 

19 ] 

5— 97 

Atlanta 

31 29 

11 

29-113 


M: Dakar 8-13 3-4 20, Robinson S-Z1 22; A: 
Mormon 16-13 *9 20. Btaytacfc 8-16 2-5 20. Re- 
b eeodt MHwu Id — * 8 (Baker i3),AltantaS3 
(Lana, Lana U. Astftta-MUwaukM 30 (Mur- 
dock ■), Atlanta 27 IBtoytack ill. 

Indian 21 17 25 20-95 

charion* sun tv—n 

l: Sri Its 0-19 2-J 18, Milter 6-13 4-4 18; C: 
Moumtno 8-12 6-6 22. Hawkins 5-« 11-14 22. 
BeOMiwn Indiana W (Smite «},Chorlofh?g 
1 Mo u mtno m Atmt»— Indiana 25 (Jackson 
IS), Char- lotto as [Booties 81. 

Utah 22 W 21 

PNIaMMa II 26 27 

U: KJMaloM Ml HMIMHomuoak 5-1047 
17; P: Berras 7-20 8-8 24, Groton 7-9 W 20. 
RshMMt*— Utah 35 (Spencer T2J, PhnothH- 
pMa 38 (Bradtor 71. Antals— Utah 24 (Stock- 
ten u>, PhHadatpMa 16 (Berras 11). 


CROSSWORD 


ACROSS 


i He reached hte 
peak in 1806 


9 Wahlne’s 
welcome 
to Steep 

14" closa to 

schedule" 


is Screened over 

10" Ever Need 

Is You" 

17 Overpriced 
Insects? 

20 "Ne 


* For reservations: 
Fax International 
31-2060654 54. 


21 Three minutes 
In the ring 

22 Kosher 

23 O.R-’s locale 

»« Party cheese 
20 oneself 

too) 

as Aussie’s hefto 

so Mortgage agey. 

33 Skylit courts 

34 Hoodlum 

35 Oscar rale In 
"The Killing 

Fields- 

38 Where to buy 
Maid Marian 
mums? 

SB Goes out with 

40 FKhy lucre 

41 "I Love Trouble’ 
star 

42 Pre-Columbian 
asLJkataIBngoffa 

log 

44 Climbed up 
4a40's White 
House name 
4a Fraud 

47 March honoree, 
tor short 
*o Express 
alternative 
92 Kicker 
■B Scans 
departure 

screens? 
so Science 
magazine 

m "Cookery Is 
become—-": 
Burton 
#o Film 
91 Look 


•2 Looks at 
« Tabloid topics 

DOWN 

1 Spender, In- 
one 

2 "New 

Sensation" rock 
group 
a Crackpot 
4 Go wrong 
s Tuneful 
s Abate 
7 “The Plague" 
setting 

a Relinquished, 
asafootbai] 
•Farm critter 
19 Western capital 
tlFbstnamein 
fashion 

iSJal 

13 Star tuna 

it Rather rival 
i# Castigate 
a Components of 
locks 

29 Part of Boone's 
signature 

2B He sings low 
27 Mis. Mertz 
2 B Cornered 
asOevout 

30 Something 
extra 

31 ExpedMous- 



22 21 21 Tf— 85 
New Yurt 25 24 n 14-0 

NJ : GdHam 9-204-7 22. Anderson 6-1748 18; 
NY: Swing 7-28 8-10 22. Anthony 6-8 2-3 17. 
Reboom te New Jersey S (Gflllam 9). New 
York 51 [Bwtne 1)1. Anuta— New Jersey 18 
(Ammon 13). New York 2D (Oovla 4). 

26 31 31 17— ne 
88 20 17 25—184 
o: KfcGRrtlO-13 0-0 2A O'Neal 031 M4 3ft 
HordowoY K-15 33 23; P: CJUbfcBM 1-1737 
20. Striddond M6 4j 28, Dreader 21* 3-4 24. 
Betwoodt— Orlimdo 48 (O'Neal 11), Portland 
52 (CRobinson 12). Assets— Of1ando30 (Shaw. 
Hardaway 10), Portland 23 (Strickland •). 
I_A. cuppers 21 35 16 II— 75 

Seattle 15 V a 24— l» 

LiSecfy 9-123-522. Moseenmn 5424 12:8: 
Ke/m>*-165-723.SUI5-VKKn 71| Peyton 6-17 4- 
522.I Uh o ep d» L ns Aneele»5) (Mawenburg 
9),Seattte47 (Kemp 13). Assists— Los Anseles 
15 (Richardson 5). Seattle 25 (Payton 5). 

28 Z7 27 O- 55 
31 28 27 B— W 
M: Rider W-IB 11-1231 Durham 7-14 14 16; 
CamaMI 9-13 34 21. Cebaika 21-31 H 50. 
H e ft o nfls M)ie wnnfn 48 (nooks 6), Los An- 
geles 46 (CeMIOS 9). Assists— Minnesota 22 
(Garland*), urn Angeles 27 (Van End 13). 
DaS« 31 21 23 36— 118 

eefchn State 21 » 36 n-W 

D:Maareurn*-a&5* 27, Jacksen 12-2222 26; 
G: sedtaly 9-13 M 20, Hardaway 8-19 1-3 20, 
Sprewell 1343 23 28. Retwende Dallwi 64 
(Tarptoy W), Golden Slate 50 (SeOcaly 5). Av 
Ota— Data 28 (Kidd TO). Golden State 37 
(Hardaway 181. 

WWfMBSUn 22 87 25 28— M 

iacwmente 25 2* 23 18-4*5 

W: Webber 9-g 1-3 W. Duckworth 7-T044 19; 
S: Richmond 11-23 34 2&Wintams 4-14 M19. 
R ta a wh W a sh i n g to n 53 [Howard i2).Soc- 
romenio 55 (Potynlce 15). Asei Ma WB s hln e- 
tonll (Sidles 4), Sacramento 27 (WUItons9). 

Top 25 College Rewrite 

Hew the toe 25 teams tn The Ases doted 


Oklahoma State Thursday; 17, MfdUpae 
State (5-1) beat Tennessee 7M8. Next: vs. 
Ban State Thursday, Dec. 25. 

If, MMcs Forest (6-1) beat CMadet 81-68- 
Next: vs. MarWioO, Friday. Dec. 30; *1# New 
Mexico Stale (8-2) beat TexofrArHratan 102- 
68- Next: vs. B et ta e-Ceekman. Friday. Dec. 
381 

Other Major College Scores 

EAST 

Army 79, Dartmouth 75 
Temple 67, Tern Tech 44. 20T 
Youngstown St 78. Magma 81 

SOUTH 

Ctemsoa 75, MJam 55 
Manhattan 78, Fte Internat i onal 57 
MtatfMippI 75. Detoware St. 61 
N.C Owrtorie 92, Appatoritian 5t SO 
South Alabarea 185. Atau-Birmtaehani 86 
South Carol bn B0, Oiariestan Southern 65 
Southern Miss. 77. NE Loutslona 56 
Stetson 87, Rodfard 78 
Tib-Chattancnaa 88, Aktaama St. 68 

MIDWEST 

Catorodo St fa SE Missouri ID 
E. MkMaan 81, Jackson St 68 
UL-GMcaao 87, Mon w ctle 65 
Iowa 85, w. CoreBn 40 
OMe U. 84, West Virginia 78 
Toledo 74. Sacramento st 64 

WkMfa St. 63. Evansvfite 81 

SOUTHWEST 
Colorado 88 North Texas 70 
JOmes Madison 70. Arfconoas st 52 


TOURNAMENTS 


East Carolina 78, N. Artiana 56 
TMrd Place 
E. Illinois 88 atom Inode 61 
UNO Classic 

FM Round 

Now Orleans 72. WUltam & Mary 61 
Northeastern 82. Bradhry 77 


•Jbii 




ITALIAN FIRST DIVISION 
Torino & AC Milan 0 
S i mony*. Parma 31 points, Juvsntus 30, 
Ftarentlna 36. Lada 25. Rama 24, Bari 22. 
Somadorta 21, Pearta U, AC Milan 18. Inter- 
aazlonole 17, Cog Barf T7, Torino te Napoli U, 
Crsmonesel&Genoa 13. Padova 11, 1 
9, Bresda 5. 

INTBRNATIONAL FRIENDLY 
South Korea 1, Saudi Arabia 0 


IZVESTTA CUP 
Ffoal 

Russia 1, Czech Republic D 
TOnl Place 

Finland 2. Sweden 1 (OT> 


7, Kansas (8-1) beat Scxita Ota 8078 Nad: 
w Rice, Thursday; IS, Mbh State (82) 
beat Cal Patpsan LutsOMspo 5843. Next: m. 


St. Edward's, Texas 57 
Oktahama St lit L5U 67 
Texas vs. Staphen FAustfn 94 
Texas-EI Paso 1U, Cardfanl Strltch 51 

FAR WEST 

Cal St-FuBertan JO, sm iMeea St 73, OT 
Loyola Marnnauaf 80, Washington 61 
Montana St 89, S. Utah 88 
Nevada 79, San Dleeo 54 
South Florida 73. Pepperdtae 60 
Southern Cal 82. Ma4Cemae atv 74 
SI. Monte Cat 8L UC Santo Barbara 77 
UC Irvine V, Oregon St 73 
Utah tOB, Chicago St 38 


Norway Z Italy 8 
France X Switzerland 3 

K&iiiZI 

World Ctqp Results 


MBITS SLALOM 

Hotels of Wednesday's race In Lech. Aes- 


LAtoertoTenba. Italy (5245-51.12) 1 mbt- 

uto^57 seconds; 2. Thomas Sykora. Austria 
(S243-] U4SJ9; XMfchoel Tritscher, Austria 
(S279-5L55) 1 :4L34; Thomas FapdooSwe- 
den (5272-51 JW 1:4432,5, OtoChristfan Fur- 
useih, Norway (5127 - 5140) 1:4481; 

fc Jure Kastr.Slaveata (5245-5249) 1:4458; 
7, Sebastian Amksc. Franca (S3J3 - SO?) 
7IA5-12; t Marc CJrardem, Luxembourg 
(5414 -SUM) 1 Mis; 9, Maria Retter, Austria 


CS5JS-9U9) 1;45J4; Id Ftan-Chrfatlan JaBM. 
Norway (5423-S1.13) 1:4SJ5 

VMrid Cap Skriaai S ta d ta e s (After taer 
races); L Tomba. 400: z Tritscnor, 250; X 
Sykora. 216;4, Fogdoe. 190; 5, Furuselh. 1ST; 6, 
Koati’, 158; 7, Michael Von Gneilgen Switzer- 
land, 114; A Reiter. 113; 9. KletD- Andre Ao- 
modt Norway, HM; 1b Thomas Stanoas- 
stnoer, Auetrta. 10b 

OVERALL WORLD CUP STANDINGS (Af- 
ter pine events): 1. Tomba. 450 potato: Z Von 
Granlaoa 2M; 1 Amodt. 252; -4 Tritscher, 
250; & Patrick Orilleb. Austria 230; A Kosir, 
ZN; 7, Gunther Matter, Austria,22B; B. Sykora. 
216; 9, Foodoe. 98; lb Luc Atphond, France. 
17b 

WOME1TS GIANT SLALOM 

RaeaMs of Wedn esd ay 1 * racoal Alta BadBe, 
Italy (beat thees In earenlbesas): l.sabkw 
Panztminl, ttaty 11:»J6-1:1U7) 2 minutes. 
21 JD seconds; Z Anita Wachter, Austria 
(l :09J5-1 :11 JS) 2:21 JO,- x Deborah Campae- 
noM, Italy (1 : M40-1 :1 L54) 2^2.14; 4, Martina 
ErtL Germany ( I:1L33-1 :1TA6) 232J1; 5. Eva 
, United Stales, (l:hLlVl:ll75) 

232K 

6. HSMI Zeher-Baehler, Swttmriand 
(1:1127-1:11^8) 2SU05: 7,Uraka HravaLSio- 
uenla (ItlDM-l :T2J4) 2:2X48; 8,Y)va Nawen, 
(1:1153-1:1141) MU4: 9, Vreni 
Ozertand n:llM-l;lZlD) 
2T24D4. lb Marianne Kkarstad, Norway 
(1:1IJ8-1:12JQ) 2:3411. 

Giant 5laloai Standtaas (Altar Km 
races): L ZeOer-Baehler. 340; Z ParaanM. 
21Z X Schneider, 169; 4 Kioerstad. 131; 5, 
BlreH Heab, Llachtensteln.1 IS; A HrawaL 187; 
7. Wachter, *5; b Ertt 98; 9. On Kvlrdoa. 
Norway, 81; lb Leila Piccard. France, 72. 

OVE RALL WORLD CUP STANDIMCS(A>- 
ttrM events) :l,Zeller-Baehler,48Spotorta; 2, 
Schneider. 386; 3. Kalla SeWnuer, Germany. 
361:4 Hilary Ltadh, US. 384; & Pernllla WV 
bera. S we den. 308; b ErtL 2®; 7, Ploobe 
Street. U-&- 225; L PanzanlnL Italy. 211; v, 
Kleeratab 193; lb BAIana Perez, Italy, 165. 


TRANSITIONS 


BASEBALL 


CLEVELAND— He-*tan#d Omar vbauaL 
shortstop, to 1-year cantracL 


hnbfertaw 


ib New York Tima/ESted by 1PW Sham. 


as Chipped In 
34 Agrees 

* 36 Tournament 

type 

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31 Available tor 
duty 

43 Grub 
44Treats 

irpactwrously 
as Hindu ascetic 
4BAlann 
«7 Hog food 


4MConsk>eraMa 

volume 

m Com product 

si Kind of tradition 

ei End-of-week 
exclamation 

aa "This cant bel* 

•4 Vous (you 

ere):Fr. 

5« Toy merchant 
Schwarz 

st Enter, locale 


Solution to Pnnle of Dec. 21 


□ 00 a □assn nziaa 
□□□□ snasQ naan 
00 bh nanas aaaa 
□□□□ncaaniLiiaaaa 
□no ana amaaa 
□nananasaanna 
maaaa aaaa 
bqqq aaaaa aaaa 
□□□0 □□□□□ 

□□nsciaaiaaaaiaa: 
anasa asa aaa 
□□□Banaaaraaaa 
□□□□ aaona aaaa 
naaa aaaaa anna 
anaaa □□□□ 


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(Continued From Page 7) 


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svHa<s«g-&f> " F ^ IT^JTM^ 


Plage 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 1994 


] 


ART BUCHWALD 


Merry Voice Mail 


TI7ASHINGTON — h was 
YV bound to hapc 


happen sooner 
or later. Santa Claus installed a 
voice mail system on his phone 
at the North Pole. Telephone 
salesmen had persuaded him 
that he would save $5 a month 
on his calls. 

I discovered this when 1 
urged my three grandchildren 
to call the 
North Pole 
and tell Santa 
what they 
wanted. 

Ben rang 
first and a 



voice an- 
swered. “This 
is Santa Claus. 

I can't come to 
the phone 
right now, but 
leave a message and I will gel 
back to you as soon as possible. 
J appreciate your cal].” 

Ben waited three days with- 
out getting an answer, and then 
Jason decided to tiy for it. The 
voice said, “This is the North 
Pole. If you wish to speak to one 
of Santa’s reindeer, press three, 
four, five, six or seven. If you 
would like to speak to the ship- 
ping department, put your 
thumb in your mouth and press 
star.” Jason pressed all the 
numbers and a recording told 
him, “All of the reindeer are in 
a meeting right now, and Santa 
is away from his desk. If you 
remain on the line we will play 
Handel’s ‘Messiah* for 30 cents 
so that your call won't be a 
complete waste of tune.” 


Disgusted with this response, 
Adam picked up the phone. It 
turned out that when he pressed 
three numbers he heard the fol- 
lowing; “Congratulations, you 
have just won SI million in the 
Santa Claus Publishers Sweep- 
stakes. Send us $10 and we will 
tell you where and how to col- 
lect your money. Don't hang up 
before taking down our fax 
number or you will forfeit your 

w inning s.” 

Adam pressed another num- 
ber. The voice said, “We're sor- 
ry. Due to an economy drive, 
Santa is no longer working on 
Christmas Eve. But for an addi- 
tional $30 you can make a 900 
cafl that wtU give you an oppor- 
tunity to hear a blue message 
from one of his elves.” 

□ 

My grandchildren turned to 
me as a font of wisdom, and 
Ben asked, “Why can’t we get 
Santa on the phone?” 

“Because he's very busy,” I 
explained. “If he took every- 
one’s calls, he would never get 
to all the houses by Christmas.” 

“How does he know we 
called?” Jason asked me. 

“Because he has a beeper on 
his sled, and Mrs. Claus for- 
wards his calls for him.” 

“Why is Santa Claus unable 
to come to the phone himself?” 
Adam wanted to know. 

“Because he's probably in a 
meeting. You can’t run an en- 


terprise as big as Christmas 
/ithouti 


without attending a lot of meet- 
ings. We should be thankf ul to 
the phone company that we can 
even leave a message for him.” 


TtiDers' Wing UJK. Release 

Reuters 

LONDON — The British 
Board of Film Classification, the 
country’s film censorship board, 
has certified “Natural Born Kill- 
ers” without any cuts for adult 
audiences. The censors post- 
poned the November release of 
Oliver Stone's film because of 
afflamd iinfa to iriOings in the 
United States and France. 


Adam picked up the phone 


and dialed one more time. The 
voice said, “We’re sorry, but 
Santa Claus no longer exists. 
He has been replaced by a 
voice-activated computer. If 
you have been a good boy, press 
one; if you have been a bad boy, 
press two; if you are not too 
sure, wait for an operator to 
come on the line. For an extra 
30 cents we can get Mick Jagger 
to sing ‘White Christmas.’ ” 


India Beauty Queens: Good or Bad Models? 


By Molly Moore 

Washington Pott Service 

N EW DELHI — The British Rq 
may have been overthrown and 
the Indian princes and maharajahs 
dethroned, but the economically liber- 
ated, Western-looking India of the 
*90s has embraced a new breed of 


ro 


>yalty: the beauty queen. 


the international glamour sweep- 
stakes, India this year bagged the two 
biggest crowns in beauty pageantdom 
—■Miss Universe and Miss World. 
Now the nation's pundits are tom 
between boasting that the titles are 
s hining examples of India's emerging 
visibility in the global marketplace 
and angst that grooming international 
beauty queens is doing nothing to im- 
prove the plight of the vast majority of 
India’s women who are poor, rural 
and oppressed. 

To be sure, India is debating many of 
the same feminist issues that have 
weakened the prestige of beauty pag- 
eants in Western nations in recent 
years. But the controversy here delves 
deep into the psyche of a country that is 
undergoing massive social transforma- 
tions at au levels and mirrors India’s 
struggle to embrace Weston ideas and 
marketing while trying to preserve its 
native identity and traditions. 

The queens’ “success symbolizes 
new, confident and modem India,” 
gushed one newspaper headline. The 
Bombay magazine Society declared it 
“logical that these twin victories 
should be happening just when the 
liberalization process is forcing India 
into the world’s spotlight.” 

In an era when satellite and cable 
television are bombarding even the 
remotest villages with images of flashy 
Western clothes, sleek models and 
lifestyles beyond the comprehension 
of the average Indian, Miss Universe, 
Sushmita Sen, and Miss World, Aish- 
warya Rai, have emerged as overnight 
idols to tens of thousands of Indian 
teenage girls and young women. 

Both Rai and Sen represent the new 
elite of India's upper middle class — 
the social stratum that is benefiting 
most from the opening of the Indian 
marketplace to outside investors and 
companies. And wh lie the India they 
symbolize is an India that is now acces- 
sible to only a small percentage of the 



Winners: Aishwarya Rai, Miss World; Sushmita Sen, Miss Universe. 


population of 900 minion people, it is 
the India that business leaders and oth- 
ers want to project across the globe as 
they court international business. 

“The image that India seeks to pro- 
ject of itself through its women has 
undergone a radical transformation, 
reflecting the political and economic 
change the country has witnessed 
freon Nehruvian socialism to the glob- 
al supermarket,” the Sunday Times of 
India said recently. 

Die newspaper, however, also raised 
a more troubling side of the issue: 
“How much of this change is cosmetic, 
masking the deprived status of the 
great majority of Indian women?” 

While major newspapers carried 
front-page photographs last month of 
Rai striding down the ramp as the 
newly crowned Miss World in Sun 
City, South Africa, the same papers 
buried a story about a 22-year-old 
pregnant village woman named 
Kamla who was stripped, tortured 
and burned to death by her fellow 
villagers because a soothsayer claimed 


he had teamed from his vision that 
Kamla was a jewel thief. 

“The reason why this kind of story 
rarely makes more titan a few para- 
graphs in our newspapers is because 


they are fairly routine,” wrote Tavleen 
: of the* 


Singh, one of the capital’s most promi- 
nent columnists. “So do we really have 
that much to gloat over if two Indian 
women are chosen this year as the 
most beautiful in the world?” 

When Sen, 19, made her triumphant 
return to the Indian capital as Miss 
Universe in September, she rolled 
down the main street of the city in a 
chariot pulled by four white horses, 
waving and blowing losses to throngs 
of admirers. Her every move and every 
word were recorded on the front page 
of every newspaper in the city. 

The same week, six Indian women 
made history by becoming the first of 
their sex to qualify as pilots in the 
In dian Air Force. One Delhi colum- 
nist lamented, “Their projection in the 
media was negligible compared to 
what Miss Sen got.” 


And despite the pobticaUy p-^ 
answers both beauty contestant S a ^ 
judges during interview pomoo 
the international pageant?, as 

made a particularly good 
an intellectual role model back home- 

In a country where 66 percent or . m 
adult women are illiterate and fewer 
t han one-third of all girls remain in 
school beyond the primary level, a 
s niffing Sen angered many educators 
when she stated in a news conference 
that she has only read one book ana 
prefers Archie comics. 

Even more disturbing to educators 
looking for a new national role model 
for InSia’s youth was her follow-up 
declaration; 

“Perhaps people won’t tike me say- 
ing this, but I loved to bunk school- To 
know what life is all about, it’s a must 
to play truant ... I would even say 
that such a phase is essential for a 
teenager's all-around development 

Rai lost the Miss India pageant to 
Sea this year as a result of what one 
magazine dubbed “a momentary flash 
of arrogance.” When asked what date 
in histoiy she would change if given 
the opportunity, the 21 -year-old mod- 
el said she would change her birthday. 
The flub left Rai as first runnerup to 
Sen and sent her to the Miss World 
contest instead of the slightly more 
prestigious Miss Universe pageant. 

Although Rai's cash prize of 
580,000 is 275 times India’s average 
annual per capita income of 5290, she 
and Sen are products of one of the 
fastest growing consumer markets in 
India. It has only been in the last few 
years that the country has developed a 
fashion industry, marketed reaay-to- 
wear clothes and established the ac- 
couterments of glamour as an indus- 
try in itself. 

Sathya Saran, editor of Femina, a 
women's magazine that is a major 
sponsor erf the Miss India pageant, 
boasted after the double victories that 
Sen and Rai have “placed India firmly 
on the glamour map of the world.” 

Another journalist writing for a dal- 
ly newspaper does not see that as a 
virtue, saving, “Forty-seven years af- 
ter independence, Indians are waking 
up to . . . the marketplace of contin- 
uous consumer titiUation and com- 
mercialized sexuality.” 


PEOPLE 


JJoUywod Heights: 

Big Buch for Stallone 

Savoy Pictures to af*® 1 !° 
oavSvIvestw Stallone S20 nul- 
K, _or poiBitisDy ™ unprec- 

....Ac ___ |/> star m y^t-to-be 
determined movie in 1996. 
£Sces told the L« Angeles 
TtoTthat the deal 

-ffia-awsra 

Hanks and Michael Doughs 

D 

Prince Rainier of Monaco 
used bis first official appearance 
Since heart surgery last month i to 
show that he was reconciledwitii 
his daughter St6pbaow : -Both |*£ 
tended a party to distribute toys 
to children. Rainier was said not 
to approve of Stfcphanie s liaison 
with her former bod} guard, 
Daniel Dncmet, with whom she 
has two children. 



Brian Wilson, the co-founder 
of ihe Beach Boy s, has agreed to 
pay the group's singer, Mike 
Lore, $5 million in cash to settle 
a lengthy and acrimonious dis- 
pute over royalties. A jury found 
that Love’s" name was left off 
copyright applications and song- 
wnting agreements for nearly 
three dozen tunes he helped 
write. 

□ 

The model Christie Brinkley 
and Ricky Taubman, a real es- 
tate developer, plan to be mar- 
ried Thursday atop Telluride 
Ski Mountain in Colorado, near 
the site of a helicopter crash 
they were in in April. 

□ 

fiw» Minnelli is oat of bed 
and exercising, three days after 
surgeons gave her a new right 
hip Her spokeswoman, Carol 
Stone, said. “She’s already up 
and beginning a very strenuous 
rehabilitation.” 


WEATHER 


WEEKEND SKI REPORT 


Europe 


Forecast for Friday through Sunday, as provided by Accu-Weather. 



TodJrr 


Twatma 


Mgh 

Lew 

W 

High 

Law W 


OF 

OF 


CIF 

OF 


I5«« 

to, SO 

B 

14 157 

to/so PC 

4m«eraa*n 

7,44 

tK 

PC 

8 M6 

2 ns pc 

ArUwua 

4/30 

1/34 

f 

6*43 

0.-E r 

/urans 

13-85 

8*46 

Ml 

14*57 

9/46 &h 

Bwortona 

11*51 

3,37 

lie 

I1.-52 

8/4J Bh 

OwjiBda 

4.39 

s.-» 

S#1 

4/39 

2/29 t 

Bww, 

2/35 

■iw 

DC 

5 *41 

1/34 1 

BobsMb 

BMJ 

1/34 

tK 

8*46 

3/37 s 

SnOMpM 

*m 

3^7 

1 

4*9 

If V r 

Copoinhaowi 

4/39 

■i ni 

t 

6*43 

2*35 S 

Com Dal Sd 

15Q3 

8*46 

K 

16-59 

8/48 s 

Diitn 

9/48 

8«3 

Stl 

rt MS 

4/39 , 

Eoirtu/r^ti 

8«6 

7*44 

Sh 

B/4S 

6*43 l 

Ftartiocw 

8/43 

ana 

St, 

8/46 

2/35 «ti 

FivMurt 

1/37 

O-E 

oe 

8MU 

S/35 1 

Oaneva 

3/36 

•1/31 

c 

4/39 

0*32 DC 

Hater*, 

•3/37 

•7/20 

pc 

0/4S 

-2*29 » 

Mautx4 

10/50 

7-44 

I 

11/52 

7/44 f 

LasPokites 

24/75 

17/62 

pc 28/79 

17/62 « 

Lsocn 

*3*55 

Ifl/SO 

PC 

13*5 

10*0 ec 

London 

8,46 

2 35 

PC 

10/50 

6/43 * 

liBdrtd 

9*48 

■rss 

PC 

10*50 

2 *33 C 

Milan 

S/35 

1IM 

1 

4/39 

1/34 Wt 

MOBOOI* 

•10/15 

•14,7 

si 

-4/24 

-7/20 bh 

Mntl, 

104 

-2/29 

■n 

2/35 

-2/28 Ml 



-Wrtnlraare 


■jjt-jHiuwv 
Brow 


Nfc* 

Orte 

Pakna 

Parts 

Piagua 

tahterefl, 

Home 


7,44 3/37 pc 

0 Hi -3«7 pc 
9M$ 3/41 pc 

BUB 002 pt 
0/32 -279 sn 
4,39 1.31 


1/34 -zm an 

9. -40 7/44 tf, 

8*46 2/33 B 
-zest pc 
2.os ■:« Srt 


North America 

A major wind and rain storm 
will disrupt air (ravel along 
the East Coast over the 
weekend. Meanwhile. Chica- 
go and Toronto mill have 
mild and generally dry 
weather. Florida will turn 
cool. Dry weather wN prevail 
In Los Angeles but there wil 
be rah farther north. 


Europe 

Stormy weather will prevail 
In the central and eastern 
Mediterranean over the 
weekend with ram from 
southern ttaly to Turkey mi 
perhaps snow from northern 
Italy to Yugoslavia. Areas 
tiom Spain to Germany will 
have dry weather while Eng- 
land has a few showers. 


Asia 

Typhoon Axel wil move west 
ot the Philllpines over the 
weekend. Some of its mois- 
ture wiH be pulled north by a 
nan-tropical system and 
cause ram northward toward 
Taiwan. Most ot Japan. 
Korea and Interior China wfll 
have dry weather. Thunder- 
showers will affect parte of 
Malaysia. 


11/52 fl/43 Wi 11/52 4/39 sn 


SLPmniwg.ia.’it -is* « 
fflo*holm 1/34 -3 <27 

StragOMT? 1/3* -2/29 

Tamm -2/29 -002 

vwn S/41 C/38 

Vienna 2/3S 1/3* 

WjfMw -2120 -3/27 

Zurich 032 2.39 


sn 


0,32 -4/25 i 
3/37 -1/31 « 
4.38 0/32 PC 

7/44 >2/29 B 
7/44 2/35 r 

3/37 -1,31 sn 
2/35 -2,29 s 
2/39 -1/31 sr 


Mlddie East 


Latin America 


w 


Oceania 


22/71 14/57 pc 23/73 18/BI pc 
25/02 21/m ( 27/00 ie«S4 pc 


Mn4 

C/UK 

□nmtscui 

JMUMWTI 

Uomf 

Wyaai 


Today 

Htflh low IN High 

OF OF OF Op 

IB'S* 12153 PC 17/02 14/57 HI 

21/70 8'46 C 22/71 1233 B 

15*39 439 ■ 14*57 7/44 * 

15/59 d/40 s 14/ST 10*50 S 

27*00 2/36 l 31*00 12/53 » 

20*60 11*52 • 22*71 12/03 C 


Today Tomorrow 

Mali Low W Won low w 
OF CIF OF OF 

Bjonos/Urea 29*84 a, 7, pc 33/91 23.72 DC 

Caracas 2B/02 2068 u> 29*0* 20/08 ah 

Una 23*73 1064 pc 23/73 ta«4 pc 

MencoCcy 22/71 flz*8 pc 23/73 7«4 pc 

fltodoJansini 27*00 23/73 i 28/02 23*73 pc 

SanMgo 31*08 lS6l a 31 -OB 14/57 pc 


Legend 


■ s-sirany pc-panty daudv. c-daudy. sh-ghewera. t-ttaerieratuum, r-ran. cl-annr fkertea. 
i.Hce. W-WesOiar AS iimom. forecasts end data provMod try Accu-Woortisr. Inc. B 1904 


Asia 


Tatter 


Tomorrow 


High 

Low 

W 

ngh 

Low w 


OF 

OF 


OF 

OF 

Borgia* 

29 /Bt 

22*71 

pc 

28 HR 

22/71 ah 


4/39 

- 2/29 

pc 

7*44 

- 4*25 * 

Hens Kong 

21*70 

17*2 

DC 22/71 

17/82 3 h 

Mama 

29*84 

23/73 

tfl 

31*86 

24.78 f 

New Den 

24/75 

12*53 

pc 

25*77 

8*46 S 

9 eouf 

9«8 

3 * 1-7 

3 

errs 

• r. 3 i * 

annual 

13/56 

5/41 

3 

13*5 

7’U Sh 

S*noa»w« 

31 *BP 

23*73 

PC 

30.88 

24.75 1 

TaSW 

22/71 

16*81 

c 

22*71 

17*2 sh 

Tokyo 

12*3 

3/37 

pc 

13*5 

4/39 8 

Africa 

4 /gro 

14*7 

9/48 

DC 

13/55 

8/48 Bh 

Capo Town 

20 W 8 

11 ffi 2 PC 

14*7 

HJ >50 sn 

Cuaawanai 

18/64 

8.46 

V 

17*2 

8/46 s 

Honuo 

18«4 

8/46 

PC 

23/73 

8/48 3 

U 0 M 

3**8 

24,75 

5 

91*8 

25/77 * 

Nterab 

20*6 

11*2 

sh 

22/71 

12*3 i 

Tunto 

12/53 

4/39 

*1 

13/55 

0*43 pc 

North America 

Aixavjfog* 

- 0/18 

- 18/4 

c 

■ 10/15 

• 18*4 pc 

Ailarta 

10/50 

6/43 

r 

14*7 

8*43 PC 

Boown 

13*55 

5/41 

i 

12*3 

3/37 DC 

aveago 

9/48 

2*5 

c 

11*2 

4 Z» PC 

Draw 

12/53 

- 4 / 2 S * 

11/52 

- 3/27 ■ 

Derail 

11/52 

2/35 

PC 

HAW 

4/38 PC 

HorawAi 

28/82 

23/73 

PC 

26*2 

23,71 PC 

HtXcJWn 

IB -84 

3/37 

3 

l«*l 

7/44 K 

lB 9 Amenw 

20/68 

9/48 

PC 

22/71 

8/48 pc 

Mam 

28/79 

15*0 

Bh 

27*0 

10/84 DC 

taenoapofa 

6/43 

• 3 «» 

PC 

0 .K 6 

1/34 PC 

MorlraffiJ 

6«8 

■ 3,77 


7/44 

■ 3*27 pc 

Noeaau 

25/77 

22/71 

an 

28*2 

22*71 ih 

Nbw yo* 

12*3 

8/43 

• 

> 1*3 

5/41 c 

Pncwrtt 

23/73 

11*2 

w 

10*6 

8/46 s 

San Fran 

13/55 

8*43 

DC 

13/55 

7 .144 sh 

Seama 

11/32 

6/41 

Oft 

10*50 

S >41 Hi 

Taomo 

10/50 

1/34 

DC 

0*48 

- 2/29 pc 

Wasrungton 

12*3 

4 /-JB 

3 

11*2 

3*7 r 


Reaort 


Depth Mtn. Rea. Snow La* 
L U PMN Plate* Stats Snow 


Comments 


Depth Mtn. Res. Snow Last 

rur - - ■ - - - 


Comments 


Andorra 

Pas do la Casa 


30 45 Good Open Pwdi 2i;ia Mote mu ana pates opening 


GeOo 


Austria 

tachgl 

KHzbuhef 

Obergurgi 

Saafbach 

SLAmon 

Zurs 


30 30 Fair Open Va 16/12 AH 18 Hits. 20km cress country 


10 75 Good 
10 20 Fair 


35 65 Good 
25 SO Good 
15 100 Good 
25 BS Good 


Cnd 

Qsd 

Open 

Open 

Ctsd 

Open 


Pwdr 21/12 
Pwdr 21/12 
Pwdr 21/12 
Pwdr 21/12 
Pwdr 21/12 

Pwdr 21/T2 


14 /ns open, fresh snow. off levels 
Snow continues to fttlf. rryvowig 
12 21 Ms open, good sMng 
Fras/i snow improving empoans 
16- 32 Arts open. a» Cefieni slung 
Great skong. fresh powder 


Spain 

Baquiem-Beret 


50 BO Good Open Pwdr 21 .'12 60tm fresh snow. WsooenJXth 


France 

Alped'Huez 
Las Arcs 
Avert az 

Leg Contamines 
Courchevel 
Lbs Deux Alpea 
Mag eve 
Mdrfeel 
La Plague 
Serre Chevalier 
Vgnes 
Val d’lsfire 
ValThorens 


10 go 

20125 
20 65 
5 70 
15 B0 
5150 
O 10 
10 80 
20100 
0 10 
45100 
40140 
50105 


Good 

Good 

Good 

Good 

Good 

Good 

Ctsd 

Good 

Fair 

n/a 

Good 

Good 

Good 


An 

Some 

Open 

Ctsd 

Art 

Qsd 

Cfsd 

An 

Qsd 

n/a 

Open 

Open 

Open 


var 20/12 
Var 21/12 
Pwdr 20*12 
Pwdr 20/12 
Pwdr 21/<2 
Var 20/12 
Var 20/12 
Var 21/12 
Pwdr 20-12 

Vat 20*12 
Pmt* 2012 
Pwdr 20/12 
Pwdr 21 12 


8 Sfis open, snow noctvnes on 
Good suing above 2000m 
Open pisses sknng wed. 8 Ms 
30cm of snow af 1800m 
Zi 68 Mis open, open runs good 
Skkng possrtta 0o*n to 2600m 
Stong at nearby Los Contam/nes 
iScmotsnowjtmottarei, 1700m 
Besrs/lmgongiaaer 
Snow meermos m constant use 
Excellent pen slung 
Great sk>tng. 35/51 Ms ppm 
Excellent suing with treshsnow 


Ariel boden 
Crans Montana 
Davos 
Gstaad 
Klostws 
Saas Fee 
St. Moritz 
Vorbter 
Zermatt 


25 40 
10 40 
10 60 
10120 
ID 00 
10 230 
10 70 
15 90 
15 135 


Good 

Good 

Good 

Good 

Good 

Good 

Good 

Good 

Good 


Qsd 

Ctsd 

Qsd 

Ctsd 

Ctsd 

Ctsd 

Qsd 

Qsd 

Qsd 


Pwfr 2V72 
Pwdr 20/12 
Pwdr 20--12 
Pwdr 21/12 
Pwdr 20/12 
Pwdr 20/12 
Pwdr 20/12 
V«r 20/12 
Pwdr 20/12 


6/23 Bits open, iiasd/impm- 
1 f -40 Ms Open, gfacter stik t- • • 
17. 36 Mts open, good doing .. 
AB upper stooes in gotxt shape 
Good skang on open runs 
13/26 Ms open, gnader verveott 
W24 tins open tree* snow, good 
75*39 <tts great oo coon petes 
25/37 Ms open very good Saw? 






I-'" 

P 


Germany 

BercftMsgaden 

Garmlsch 


10 20 Fair 
10120 Good 


Clod Pmfa 21/12 Stmg limned Out snom taong 
Qsd Pwdr 21*12 She only sugsp&e SfcaOfe 


Italy 

Bormlo 

Cervfnia 

Gotirmaysur 

Selva 

Tonale 


10 70 Good Qsd Pwdr 21/12 5 l6M5flnd 75.*257rm of pate 
10 200 Good Open Crusty 20/ 12 10- 27 /its. good, some ca 
0 70 Gooo Qsd Var 19/12 30cm ol snow al 1700m 
to 15 Fair Qsd Var 20/ 12 10 UK open, open pistes good 
40 200 Good Open Pwdr 2Q't 2 Grgatskimg after fresh show 


IAS. 





Aspen 

85 90 

Good 

Open 

Petal 15*12 AB 6 Ms open 

Mammoth 

210 240 

Good 

Gpan 

Var 15/12 AB3QVtsapen 

Steamboat 

90 '25 

Good 

Open 

Petal 1 6.' 1 2 AB 20 Hits open 

TeRuride 

86 115 

Good 

Open 

PcJcd 14/12 AB wm open 

Vail 

60 85 

Good 

Open 

Pckd 15 *12 AB2S mts op°n 

Canada 

Whistler 

SO 250 

Good 

Open PvwJr 20/12 20/26 Ufa. 35cm fresh snow 


Key; L.U Deqtn In cm on tower and upper mopes. Mtn. Plates Mountainside prses 
Pistes Runs tearing to resort visage. ArrArtifcleJ snow 


Reports supffied by mo Ski Club of Great Bream 


■* 



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AT&T VSADirecf* and World Connect* Seri ice. 


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fc,: 

*3i 

v- 

fr 

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V':- 


ASIA /PACIFIC 
AUSTRALIA IBOfl-BI-irtl 


leWZEALU* 

PHILIPPINES’ 


ox-mi 

105-11 


CHINA. PRC*** 
HONG K0HG 
INDIA* 
INDONESIA* 
JAPAN 'i 
KOREA 
MACAO 
MALAYSIA" 


10811 

ana-mi 

000-117 

001-801*10 

0030-111 

000-11 

BOO-0611 


RUSSIA ‘ /(MOSCOW) 155-5042 
SAIPAN' 235-2072 

Cl'JGAPOHE WM-OUHIt 

5 fll CM-Mi 

TAIWAN' mn-1025B'D 

1HMLAND* Wn<u»M!1t 

EUROPE 

ARMENIA-' B;i4111 


AUSTRIA*"' 

BELGIUM" 

Bulgaria. . 

CROATIA' •. 


022-903411 
. 0-BW-i 00-10 

m-m-wo 

99 - 30-0811 


CZECH REPUBLIC 00-420-00101 
DENMARK". . BW1-0W9 


FINLAND" 
FRANCE .... 
GEHMANT 
GREECE" 


9800-100-10 
. 19V-W11 

0130-9010 
W-808-1311 


HUNGARY" 
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IRELAND 
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UECHTWSTHr 
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. . . 999 081 
1 - 088 - 559-090 
. 172-1911 
155 - 00-11 
83190 
B-MU-0111 
0800 - 990-110 
190-0011 


NETHERLANDS" 06-0224111 



800 - 100-11 
D* 010 - 4 * 0-0111 
05017 - 1-298 
01 - 800-4280 
00 - 420-90101 
980 - 99 - 00-11 
. . 021 - 795-611 
155 - 00-11 

. o:ioo-ii 

0500 - 80-0011 


RIDDLE EAST 

BAHRAIN. . 800-001 

CYPRUS* - WD-WulD 
EGYPT' (CAIRO)* 510-0200 

ISRAEL . 177-100-2727 

KUWAIT BOO-3® 

LEBANON (BEmun 1 120-001 
S-UP AMNIA . . !-»»•»!> 

TURKEY’ 00-008-12*77 

UAHABWfflATES" . BtW-IJI 


AMERICAS 

ARGENTINA* Ihil-Bui -^OU-11 11 


BDlT/lA- 
BRAZU 
CANADA 
CHILE 
COLOMBIA 
EL SALVADOR-. 
HONDURAS'. 
M£7l-;n V' 


. ii 8001112 

090-0010 

i-wii.stv.t.v.' 

00'-- 0312 
000-11 0010 
190 
123 

n») 4.|4| | 


PANAMA. ]{ | B 

PER'." ;*}! 

VENE7UBA". 30-011-120 

AFRICA 

GABON" OOC-081 

GAMBU - 001 11 

IVORY COAST' BQ-111-11 

KENYA « OMM 10 

LIBERIA 797-797 

SOUTH AFRICA B- BOO -99 -17123 


l y MeWorkt~ boHnectiQHs 



ATsT 


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