Skip to main content

Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1994, France, English"

See other formats




** 


Paris, Friday, December 23, 1994 


No. 54.779 


Air Raids 

intensifying 

Over Capital 
Of Chechnya 

Russians Vow to Press 
Bombing Campaign to 
Prepare 'Resolute Steps 9 


By Steven Erlanger 

Vt+k Timet Xer \ w 

• _ STOW ~ Russian bombing raic 
intensified sharply Thursday over Grazm 
tae capital of breakaway Chechnya, i 
reports of strong dissent wi thin ihe Ru 
Sian military command continued t 
emerge. 


At least 24 people were reported to have 
ued m Grozny, the Chechen capital, in a 
jharp escalation of bombing and sh ellin g 
that hit apartment blocks as well as more 
strategic targets, like the Lenin oil refinery, 
and caused panic in the streets. 

Some missiles hit crowds of people who 
were working to clear away the debris from 
nighttime bombing, Reuters reported from 
the city. .Among those killed was an Ameri- 
can freelance photographer, Cynthia El- 
baum, 28. 


. Russian officials said the intense bomb- 
ing raids would continue through the night 
as a prelude to “resolute steps” to try to 
P u j a quicker end to what has become a 
full-blown mill tap,' and political crisis in 
Moscow. 


At the same time. President Boris N. 
i el ism told the Russian Parliament in a 
letter that he was preparing a solution to 
the conflict “based mainly on using politi- 
cal methods” and that he would address 
the Russian people “in the coming days" 
with his plans. The Itar-Tass news agency 
said a group of Yeltsin aides was at work 
on proposals for a peaceful resolution. 

Mr. Yeltsin's statement may have been 
prompted by new and strong indications 
that his military commanders are balking 
..t the idea of an all-out assault on Grozny, 
* town with practically no air defenses. 

The semiofficial Itar-Tass reported, 
«.ien retracted, a story detailing a large 
purge in the Russian command 
The agency, in a report from the Russian 
military headquarters in Mazdok, said that 
the defense minister. Pavel S. Grachev, 
relieved six top commanders of their duties 
for “indecisiveness and inaction,” imply- 
ing that they had opposed the new military 
iine. It said General Grachev would as- 
sume full, operative command of the oper- 
ation against Chechnya, a tiny mountain- 
ous state of only 13 million people that 
has been defying Moscow for three years 
since declaring independence. 

The report said the officers who were 
relieved included Fust Deputy Defense 
Minister Georgi Kondratyev and the dep- 
uty commander of Russian ground troops 

See CHECHNYA, Page 4 


North Koreans 
Offer Airspace 
And Landings 

By Andrew Pollack 

Hew York Times Service 

TOKYO — In what could be another 
step toward ending its international isola- 
tion, North Korea announced Thursday 
that it was planning to allow commercial 
airlines from other countries to fly over its 
territory and land at its airports. 


facilities and services for appropriate 
ie operation without discrimination 
ireign aircraft. It said North Korea m 
cuJar wanted to establish an air route 
ng Tokyo and Beijing through Pyong- 
, the North Korean capital, 
lalysts said the move could improve 
Lh Korea’s economic relations with the 
jf the world, but cautioned that it was 
gar how far the Communist nation was 
og to go. But some said it appeared 
h Korea was more interested in letting 
les fly over its territory thanm aUow- 
hrai to provide service to North Kore- 
iS which would have a much bigger 

,ct on opening up the reclusive nation. 

of its new open- 
See KOREA, Page 4 



jmjwdaH 

i eorwt 



1.5806 


1.5*68 


100-25 


5.4405 


100.47B 

5.451 


Prices 

xemb°urgML.Fr 
STUCCO— •< 

rtcr 3.00 Riols 

•union ....11 -20 FF 

udi Arabia ..9.00 R. 

negal 960 CFA 

ohT..... 200 PTAS 

mlsia ....1-OMDin 

irkev .3-1-35.000 

A E 830 Dirh 

S.Wil.(Eur.)*1.10 



Etna LukMikyfTbe Aacdsnd Ptm 

Rescuers carrying a woman wowded in a raid by Russian bombers on Thursday in the Ch ech en of Grozny. 


Russian Troops in No Fighting Mood 


By Lee Hockstader 

Washington Pan Service 

SLEPTSOVSKAYA, Russia — All qui- 
et on the western front — except for the 
griping of unhappy Russian soldiers. 

At a bleak country crossroads an hour’s 
drive from the Chechen capital, Grozny, a 
sorry little detachment of Russian troops 
has dug into the frozen ground while the 
politicians in Moscow argue about their 
fate. 

Few of them want to be here, and fewer 
still are enticed by the prospect of an 
assault on Grozny, where several thousand 
Chechen fighters swear they are ready to 
kill Russians in the name of Allah. 

“Of course it’s not woithTt,” said Alex- 
ander. 18, a draftee with a wisp of a mus- 
tache. “It’s a struggle for power, but sol- 
diers shouldn’t be used in a power 
struggle.” 


Less than two weeks after they moved 
into Chechnya, Russian troops in the re- 
gion are in a funk. Poor morale, frigid 
weather and political indecision have 
stalled their advance and sapped their will 
to fighL 

The general in charge of the armored 
column west of Grozny announced last 
week he would not advance against Che- 
chen civilians. Anti-Chechen propaganda 
in Moscow appears to be more damaging 
to the Russians than the Chechens. 

Only sketchy news reports reach the 
Russian troops, most of them heavy-hand- 
ed propaganda from Moscow. Several sol- 
diers here said they had beard, for exam- 
ple, that Chechen fighters are being 
assisted by Afghan mujahidin rebels. 

True or not, that information is very 
likely intended to depict the Chechen drive 
for independence as under the influence of 


Russia’s former enemies. But the unin- 
tended effect here is to stir anxiety among 
the troops, who are acutely aware that the 
mujahidin are experienced fighters who 
bloodied the Russian nose in Afghanistan. 

The poor morale of the Russians is in 
contrast with the armed defenders in 
Grozny, whose resolve seems to stiffen 
with each Russian air raid, artillery bom- 
bardment and civilian casualty. The Che- 
chens “are determined to fight at any cost 
because people are so angry,” a Chechen 
Foreign Ministry spokesman told the BBC 
on Thursday. 

The morale problems further suggest 
that, despite overwhelming Russian supe- 
riority in firepower, any order to storm 
Grozny will be met with scant enthusiasm. 

One young recruit from Volgograd, who 

See TROOPS, Page 4 


Markets on Edge as Mexico Floats Peso 


By Lawrence Malkin 

International Herald Triixme 

NEW YORK — Mexico freed the 
peso on Thursday, letting it float against 
other currencies as a way to combat 

speculators. 

The United States offered financial 
support, and investors said the Mexican 
government was doing the right thing, 
although reb uilding confidence would 
take tune. 

As the peso lost about 14 percent of its 
value agamst the dollar, on the heels of a 
15 point drop Wednesday, anxiety 
spread to other Latin American markets 
that have shared in the boom in so-called 
emerging economies markets the last few 
years (Page 11). 

Officials in Mexico and other coun- 
tries, meanwhile, tried to reassure inves- 


tors, and the Argentine government em- 
phasized that its currency was linked to 
the dollar by law. 

After the U.S. Treasury activated a S6 
bflhon facility to help bolster the peso, 
Finance Minister Jaime Sena. Pucbe of 
Mexico flew to New York and sum-' 
maned representatives of an internation- 
al group of about 70 commercial and 
investment banks to a meeting in the 
Federal Reserve Bank of New York at- 
tended by Treasury Undersecretary 
Lawrence Summers. 

Mr. Sena Puche, a former commerce 
minister who moved to his present port- 
folio Mien a new government took office 
Dec. 1, said Mexico's currency adjust- 
ments were a one-time measure to deal 
with speculation. 

He pledged that the government 


would cut domestic demand by 5 percent 
and maintain an anti-inflation program 
with the cooperation of business and 
labor. This adds up to a classic post- 
devaluation austerity program; what 
worries foreign investors is whether the 
new government of President Ernesto 
Zedillo Ponce de L£on can keep the 
social peace to see it through. 

After the government angered many 
foreign fund managers Tuesday by de- 
valuing the peso by 15 percent without 
warning, the Mexican central bank spent 
more than $4 billion buying pesos in an 
unsuccessful attempt to hold the new 
rate as foreigners and Mexicans pulled 
out their money. 

Interest yields on government securi- 
See PESO, Page 4 


Subway Suspect Arrested in Bum Ward 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — A man critically in- 
jured by a firebomb that shot Dames 
through a crowded subway car was arrest- 
ed in his hospital bed Thursday and 
charged with attempted murder and as- 
sault. Officials said the bomb may have 
been part of a planned extortion attempt 

Edward J. Leary, 49, an unemployed 
computer operator from Scotch nams. 
New Jersey, was charged with 45 counts. 
The bomb went off in bis hands, and more 
bomb-making materials were found in his 
home, Police Commissioner William J. 
Bratton said. 

Mr. Leary was undo- police guard at the 
New York Hospital-Comell Medical Cen- 
ter, where he was in critical condition with 
burns to his face, knuckles and legs. He 
was one of 45 people injured, four critical- 
ly. 

Mr. Bratton said that Mr. Leary evident- 
ly planned to use the firebomb in an extor- 
tion plot aimed at the Transit Authority. 


“Significant evidence,” including boml> 
making materials recovered at Mr. Leary’s 
New Jersey home, led to that conclusion, 
Mr. Bratton said. 

It was still not clear if the bomb went off 
accidentally or intentionally, Mayor Ru- 
dolph Giuliani said 

The explosion of the crude firebomb 
Wednesday seat holiday shoppers into 
hysterics and triggered an emergency re- 
sponse that tied up downtown streets for 
hours. It occurred just one block east of the 
World Trade Crater, where a terrorist 
bomb killed six people and hurt 1,000 in 
February 1993. 

Governor-elect George Pataki issued a 
statement urging the death penalty for the 
person responsible for the firebomb iag. 

John Kifner of The New York Times 
reported earlier: 

The man in the Clark Street subway 
station in Brooklyn was hurting. 

His sneakers and the legs of his blue 


jeans were singed and shredded, his legs 
bloody below the knees, Michael Ruiz, a 
police officer, remembered later. There 
were burns on his ami, his face and bum 
marks on his knuckles through the tatters 
of his gloves. 

The two encountered each other about a 
half-hour after the bum of flame in a 
crowded No. 4 train injured 45 people as 
the subway pulled into the Fulton Street 
station in the Manhat tan financial district. 
Mr. Ruiz and his partner in the 84th Pre- 
cinct, Anthony Roa, were answering a ra- 
dio call for aid at the first stop in Brooklyn. 

“I’m in pain,** the man said, staggering 
near the token booth. They put him in an 
ambulance. 

Then, as they sped toward the bum unit 
of New York Hospital-Comell Medical 
Center, a description came over their radi- 
os of a suspect in the subway explosion. 
They looked at the man riding with them: 

See SUBWAY, Page 4 


Berlusconi Resigns, 
Leaving Italy Mired 
In Political Disarray 


By Alan Cowell 

Sew York Times Service 

ROME — Prime Minister Silvio Berlus- 
coni resigned Thursday after seven months 
in office, confronted by a revolt within his 
governing alliance that has left Italians 
facing confusion, possible elections and 
the near certainty that, whatever their next 
government, it will not survive for long. 

To add to his woes on a bleak day, Mr. 
Berlusconi’s younger brother, Paolo, re- 
ceived a five-month suspended jail term on 
corruption charges, recalling the scandals 
that brought down the country’s onetime 
political elite and now haunt its successor. 

Mr. Berlusconi handed his resignation 
to President Oscar Luigi Scalfaro, who, in 
turn, “reserved judgment” on whether to 
accept it, a formality designed to allow Mr. 
Berlusconi to stay on as caretaker while the 
president series a way out of the impasse. 

But the complexities facing Mr. Scalfaro 
seemed only to deepen with word that the 
Northern League, the coalition partner 
that inspired the parliamentary rebellion, 
had started to spat, with some of its 105 
Iowa- house deputies remaining loyal to 
Mr. Berlusconi. 

The developments brought the end of 
Italy’s 52d postwar government But Mr. 
Berlusconi’s resignation also marked the 
failure of Italy's first attempt to devise a 
new political system after years of scandal 
that destroyed a political old guard mired 
in what investigators believe to have been 
endemic graft. 

Paolo Berlusconi was sentenced in Mi- 
lan on Thursday after magistrates found 
him guilty of paying illicit contributions 


worth 590,000 to the now-discredited 
Chris tian Democrats, funds be said were a 
personal contribution. However, the court 
found that be had paid the money to secure 
a garbage-removal contract. 

The sentencing came only days after the 
prime minis ter himself was interrogated 
for seven hours by the Milan magistrates, 
who. ova the last three years, have uncov- 
ered Italy’s huge bribery scandals. 

After being questioned. Mr. Berlusconi 
said the magistrates had produced no evi- 
dence to substantiate their suspicions that 
he knew of bribes paid to the tax police by 
executives of his Fminvest empire, includ- 
inghis brother. 

The interrogation nonetheless damaged 
Mr. Berlusconi politically, even as the 
Northern League and the parliamentary 
opposition, the Democratic Party of the 
Left, successors to the Communists, and 
the Popular Party, successors to the Chris- 
tian Democrats, were preparing to chal- 
lenge him. 

Mr. Berlusconi resigned to avoid the 
humiliating spectacle of defeat in no-confi- 
dence motions prepared by his adversaries, 
who claimed the support of 325 legislators 
in the 630-seat Iowa house. 

Unda Italian law, Mr. Scalfaro may 
appoint a prime minister-designate to seek 
a new parliamentary majority among the 
array of disparate groups — from neofas- 
cists to hard-line C ommunis ts — who have 
replaced Italy’s forma political players. 

Mr. Berlusconi, however, is pressing Mr. 
Scalfaro to reappoint him to lead the na- 

See ITALY, Page 4 



Pnlritk HcnzoK'i\|CSce Franot-Pitne 

Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi leaving the Quirmale Palace in Rome after 
p resenting his resignation on Thursday to President Oscar Luigi Scalfaro. 



Bistro Is a Vanishing Breed as 6 Le Stress 9 Takes Its Toll on the French 


By Marlise Simons 

Hew Turk Timet Sendee 

PARIS — Henri Miquri, the owner, 
knows what most of his regulars want The 
early-morning customers at Le Dufrenoy, 
his bistro, wolf down croissants and 
espressos, sometimes laced with a burning 
shot of calvados. 

At midday, copious plates of beef stew 
or ipniik with ham zip along the Formica- 
topped tables. Afternoons are for flirting 
students and lovers of pinball machines. 


The after-work crowd comes in to decom- 
press. 

- It seems a suitable spot to ask why the 
bistro, that monument of French street 
culture, has been declared a vanishing 
breed. According to Le Limonadier, the 
trade journal, some 4,000 bistros — 
Frances homey cates — are going out of 
business every year. ' 

"The French lifestyle is changing,” said 
Mr. Miguel, who has reigned ova his 
counter for 18 years, 1 5 hours a day. Late- 


ly, though he has started to close at 8 
instead of midnight 

“The Parisians are becoming like Ameri- 
cans,” he went an with tangible disdain. 
“They're in a hurry. Theybuy take-out 
food instead of sitting down and eating in 
peace. At night they rush off to watch 
television.” 

The dwindling of France’s caffes has be- 
come a subject of study and debate. Caffes 
after all have served for plotting revolu- 
tions, organizing artists* and workers* 


movements, writing books, reading news- 
papers and forgetting one’s troubles. So 
why, after almost three centuries of using 
the bistro as Uving room, study, game 
pailor and confessional, are the French 
now staying away? 

Th e answer invariably includes “le 
stress,” that plague of the new urban gen- 
eration, which keeps busy schedules and 
leaves little time for idling ova drinks, let 
alone for writing or playing cards. 

Lunch breaks have shrunk from two or 


three hours to one. “Only people who are 
the boss or work for the government stay 
out long.” said Genevifeve La Tortue, a 
waitress who has watched bistro clients in 
the heart of Paris for 15 years. The many 
people cm diets are also bad for business. 
Ana there is the rise of “le cocooning,” 
relaxing at home at night 

Behind his counter, Mr. Miquel com- 
plained that he and his fellow caffe keepers 
“now suffer a lot of unfair competition,” 

See BISTRO, Page 4 








kb B. s. 3 . 8 sre-s &?_, If “rUSiiwl 11 II&P id 2 irr)w 


Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1994 


New Albania: Wishful Thinking and Exported Workers 


WORLD BRIEFS 


By Henry Kamm 

New York Timer Sariee 

TIRANA Albania — The grand boulevard 
that is this bedraggled capital's marastreet has 
sprang to a life it never knew before. The avenue 
once bore Stalin's name but now has a name 
good for all political seasons — Boulevard of the 
Heroes of the Nation. It stretches from the uni- 
versity built in the 1930s in the Fascist style 
favored by Mussolini to the vast square with the 
dilapidated museum, concert hall and hotel m 
the mode of the 1960s Communist heyday. 

Over the last year it has sprouted any number 
of shacks with a few plastic tables and chairs, 
inside and out, featuring espresso machines as 
their num equipment They are caffe. One, the 
Las Vegas, has mken over the spot once filled by 
the Statin Monument. 

Commerce, exemplified by these caffe and 
street vendors, had never been a feature of the 
broad boulevard. It is a street not meant to be 
lived in but to awe the people. 

In a country that has known only foreign 
occupation and native dictatorship, the boule- 
vard was the translation into stone of the menac- 


government and the omnipotent Communist 
Party, and the auditoriums for command perfor- 
mances of enforced enthusiasm. 

The most modem of them, a museum to the 
glory of Enver Hoxba, the late leader, is now 
called the International Cultural Center, al- 
though the few occupants of its offices, devoted 
to commerce, do not warrant die name. 

“Museum of Hoxha?” a janitor parroted a 
visitor's auety. “His temple,” he scoffed. He 
spoke in Italian, which Albanians of all classes 
learn from Italian television, this once secluded 
country’s main window to the world. 

Albanian officials and well-wishers in the resi- 
dent foreign community, eager to see progress in 


Europe's poorest country, point to the coffee 
shops and bar iriosks in the capital and other 
towns, as a sign of growth of a private-enterprise 
economy and material progress. 

Yes and no. said a United Nations official of 
long Albanian experience. 

“The kiosks give a very deceptive impression,” 
he said. “Even though they generate some in- 
come, they tell you a sad story. They are full from 
early in the morning till closing time. This speaks 
for a lot of people who are in all likelihood 
unemployed.” 


ing power of Albania’s harsh regimes. 

Its massive buildings housed the authorities of 


Unemployment statistics, like other data, are 
unreliable. 

Critical Albanians say they tend to reflect 
wishful thinking in a capital where even such 
elementary things as household electricity and 
tap water are more often wished for than 
forthcoming. 

Dylber Vrioni, who was governor of the Bank 
of Albania before becoming finance minister in a 
recent cabinet reshuffle, said about 18 percent of 
the work force of 1.7 million was jobless. He is 
also chairman of the governing Democratic Par- 
ty for Tirana and does not deny his interest in 
painting a positive picture. 

Among diplomats, the consensus of the unem- 
ployment rate is at least 30 percent. 

Even this number is misleading. About 63 
percent of Albanians are subsistence farmers, 
now that the big collective farms have been 
parceled out to private owners. They are counted 
as employed, which is only partly true. 

Nonetheless, the resumption of fanning has 
greatly reduced Albania's reliance on foreign 
gifts to feed the nation. 

Throughout the country one sees the wrecks of 
what in the Co mmunis t years was an important 
source of exports. They are the skeletons of large 


greenhouses, their windows shattered, with no 
visible effort to repair them. . 

In the past they grew early-season fruits and 
vegetables, which went to Western Europe for 
hart currency, still Albania’s principal scarcity. 

In mindless rage against the collective regime, 
Albanians at iisfaH smashed many of its struc- 
tures — factories, storehouses, stables, climes, 
970 of the country's 8,000 schools. 

Few have been repaired. Except for stepped up 
residential building sparse signs of urban eco- 
nomic revival are visible. 

Moreover, Mr. Vrioni conceded that it was 
uncertain whether Albania’s principal money 
earners of the past, its copper and chromium 
mines, will ever resume production. 

Thar equipment is so antiquated that unless 
world metal prices rise sharply the foreign invest- 
ments needed to Tnafre tsem competitive are 
unlikely to be obtained, he said. 

The houses being built, like the cafes, are 
financed from the country's principal export- 
workers. Mr. Vrioni said that 300,000 to 400,000 
Albanians were working abroad, mainly in 
Greece. Virtually all work illegally at less than 
the g oin g wages, but they will send home $250 
million to $300 million this year, he said. 


Man Shot Outside White House Dies 

lTiaii ^ uul v — knife-wielding homeless man 

WASHINGTON Hob * has died after 

dtotby.^pohcamfrOBtofthe . 


shot oy tne prow; “ - - 

undergoing two long ‘^^ edne sday from canfiac amaa in 

dBS&Sesrrzsi 


afcr be ran across He was shot after 

sidewalk with a hunting knife tapedto nis arm. 

failing to obey orders to drop the knife. , 


failing to uuej ~ j m • 

A New Low in Poll for British Tones 

LONDON (AFP) - 

.o^tast MOW opiate 

"■oSb they we* satisfied 

poll of 1,769 voters interviewed from Dec. 15 to 

19 was published in the Tmes. Party at 61 

The poll ago, while support for 

KSSSteTa ^remtdowti from 24. Support for the 

1116 Libenl DsD ° Cra ‘ i ■" *° 

fallen, from 17 to 13 percent 

Chines e Dissident Goes Into Hiding 

cannot go home,” Mr. Wang said dining 
thecaUL“I need sane quiet to read books, and I cannot stand the 

harassment, so I was forced to leave. 

TbeNeW York-based China Human Rights group demanded 
that Beijing stop what it called police harassment 
former studentleader of the 1989 pro-democracy demonstrations 

that were crushed by the army. 


Swiss Budget Gutters 
Clip Army’s Platoon 
Of Carrier Pigeons 


By Robert L. Kroon 

IiUenuttiemU Herald Tribune 

GENEVA — Lack of both 
funds and potential invaders 
j)Ius geopolitical Change have 

hallowed bulwark of Swiss neu- 
trality, the 600,000-strong citi- 
zen army. 

Under the Swiss Army 1995 
Doctrine, the militia will be re- 
duced to 400,000, border and 
mountain-fortification brigades 
will be abolished and the accent 
will be on a more mobile, high- 
tech defense force. For starters, 
the air force has ordered 32 
U.S.-built F-18 fighter-bomb- 
ers to replace more than a hun- 
dred 37-year-old British Hawk- 
er Hunter jets, which were 
phased out last week. 

Grounding the Hunters 
caused less controversy than the 
budget hawks’ decision to also 
eliminate 30,000 doves — in 
this case, the army’s 77-year-old 
carrier-pigeon detachment 

This has raised a ruckus in 
dovecotes around the country. 


German Team 
Gives Birth to 


where private pigeon-keepers 
train their birds for an annual 
two-week military refresher 
course. That involves dispatch- 
ing unaccompanied homing pi- 
geons by train to some border 
destination, where the station- 
master releases the doves from 
their baskets. The birds then fly 
home at an altitude of 2,000 
me te r s f&500 feet), at speeds of 
about 73 kilometers an hour (47 
miles per hour). 

“Homing carrier pigeons 
mingle with other birds and are 
invulnerable to enemy counter- 
measures,” says Joseph Dom- 
jan, an officially certified mili- 
tary pigeon-keeper. “They are 
as useful today as they were 70 
years ago” 

Grounding the birds will save 
the Swiss government 600,000 
Swiss francs ($460,000) a year 
in pigeons* railroad fares, feed 
and 25 centimes per dove a year 
for upkeep expenses. Protests 
notwithstanding, the govern- 
ment says the measure stands. 

The first affected will be pri- 
vate owners’ 23,000 bird con- 
scripts, because the army in- 
tends to hold onto its own 
squadron of 7,000 “ military li- 
aison doves” for the time bong. 

“Ultimately, they w£Q have to 


A New Element 


go as well,” says Patrick Cu- 
dree-Mauroux, spokesman for 
the Defense Department. “But 
we don’t intend to exterminate 
them. They will be sold or given 
away.” 

The nation’s 266 keepers of 
carrier pigeons have offered to 
assume the cost for the military 
preparedness of their birds. The 
Defense Department says it is 
impressed by the patriotic ges- 
ture, but it has not formally 
responded. 

Even some high-ranking 
Swiss officers say scratching the 
pigeon detachments is a bird- 
brained decision. This year. Di- 
vision Commander Hans-Ru- 
dolf Fehrlin said that modern 
military communications can 
be intercepted by the enemy or 
jammed by electronic counter- 
measures, in which case “one or 
preferably two homing pigeons 
could be highly usefuL” 

“During World War JL” he 
said, “pigeons played an impor- 
tant role in safeguarding our 
neutrality.” 

Sam Iselin, the Defense De- 
partment’s carrier pigeon spe- 
cialist, concurs. “A good bird 
can cover a distance of 950 kilo- 
meters, more than enough for a 
country the size of Switzer- 
land.” 


New York Times Sorter 

NEW YORK (NYT) — A 
team of German physicists re- 
ported that they bad succeeded 
in creating, detecting and iden- 
tifying three atoms of a new 
element. 

Although the atoms survived 
for less than two- thousandths 
of a second, scientists hailed the 
achievement as a landmark in 
nuclear physics. 

The creation of Element 1 1 1 
in the periodic table, with a nu- 
cleus containing 111 protons 
and 161 neutrons, was the latest 
achievement of theGeseVsch&ft 
fflr Scbwerionenforschimg (So- 
ciety for Heavy Ion Research) 
Laboratory at Darmstadt Last 
month, the laboratory reported 
the discovery of Element 1 10. 

The chemical and physical 
properties of an element cannot 
be investigated during the 


ephemeral existence of only 
three atoms, but because of the 


three atoms, but because of the 
number of protons in its nucle- 
us, Element 111 falls in the 
same column of the periodic 
table as copper, silver and gold, 
so it is presumably a metaL The 
dement has not been named. 


BEAIARJVAGE PA1ACE 


ENJOY CHRISTMAS AND NEW YEAR’S EVE fN LAUSANNE 


Christmas Package Sfr. 485.- per person 
2 nights inducing breakfast, cSrner on Christmas Eve 
and lurch on Christmas day 
New Yearis Package Sfr. 610.- per person 
2 nights including breakfast 
New Year's Eve dinner bal The imperial Vienna" 
and lunch on New Year's day 

Caff and ask for farther information at flat 41-21-613 33 33 or tax 41-21-&3 33 34 


Universal 




Dublin to Release 9 IRA Prisoners 

_ . «. ■ _ -pi _ j 


DUBLIN (Reuters) — The Justice Ministry said Thursday it 
would free nme convicted Irish Republican 
early release last month was halted by a fatal IRA robbery m 

The move, which had been expected, was amooncoi by Justus 
Minis ter Nora Owen after a review of their cases, offioalssaid. 
Officials said about 30 more IRA prisoners would be released on 

Christmas leave: , , , 

They said those to be freed indefinitely would have to meet very 
strict criteria of good behavior and would be expected to report to 
police regularly. 


Malaysia to Cane White-Collar Crooks 

irmr a t m/mro Parliament has flD- 


in* 


• ■ a*?? ^ . ' * ■ 


CluikSoldontirilcAsaodHcd P r u t 

MOSCOW METERS — Russian motorists Thursday frying out the newfangled objects set in the city’s streets. 


KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia (AP) — Parliament has ap- 
proved a law that makes earring mandatory for white-collar 
crimes, which are on the rise here, accounting for 15 percent of all 
offenses. 

“The purpose of caning white-collar criminals is to shame 
them,” Justice Minister Syed Hamid Albar said. The law provides 
for whi pping for sodi crimes as embezzlement, tax fraud and 
bribery. 

The biD ai«n eliminates jury trials, which were being used only 
for first-degree murder cases. The whippings for white-collar 
orimmals vriU not be as severe as those given to violent offenders, 
nffirials said. - - 


Seized Uranium Is Weapons-Grade 


Burundi Sets Curfew After Ethnic Killings 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

BUJUMBURA. Burundi — 
Soldiers patrolled the Burundi 
capital, Bujumbura, on Thurs- 


day after a surge of Hatu-Tutsi 
killings prompted a French 

f [overrun eat minis ter to voice 
ears of ethnic massacres on the 


scale of those in neighboring 
Rwanda. 

The government announced 
a night curfew to try to curb 
violence, centered in Bujumbu- 
ra’s northeastern district of 
Bwiza, that has killed nearly 30 
people. 

But shooting and grenade ex- 
plosions could be beard over- 
night coming from Bwiza, a 
mixed Hutu-Tutsi area from 
which Hutu residents are con- 
tinuing to flee. 

indoors^Th ursday, and most 
business was at a bait 

The French cooperation min- 
ister, Bernard Debre, said he 


at least a dozen homes and sent 
hundreds of people fleeing to 
other districts and to Zaire. 

In October and November, 
hundreds of people in Burundi 
were killed in attacks by Hutu 
extremists and in reprisals by 
the Tutsi-dominated army. 

The United Nations’ special 
envoy to Burundi, Ahmedou 
Ould- Abdallah, said Wednes- 


day night he believed the 
curfew was a positive measure. 

He called on the army to use 
restraint in enforcing law. and 
order and said the army and the 
police had not been at sufficient 
strength in trouble spots at 
times on Tuesday and Wednes- 
day. 

Burundi has remained unsta- 
ble since the first democratical- 


ly elected president, Melchior 
Ndadaye, a Hutu, was assassi- 
nated by soldiers in October 
last year during an abortive 


coup attempt. 

Power in Burundi has tradi- 


tionally been concentrated in 
the hands of Tutsi, who make 
up 14 percent of the population 
and who control the armed 
forces. (Reuters, AFP) 


For die Record 


Liberian Warlords Pledge End to Fight 


Israel has accepted Jordan's nomination of Marram Mnasber, 
38, a U-S-~educated computer entrepreneur and Jordan’s former 
Middle East peace team spokesman, as the kingdom’s Gist ambas- 
sador to the Jewish state, Jordan said Thursday. (Reuters) 


feared Burundi might face mas- 
sacres between the Hutu maior- 


sacres between the Hutu major- 
ity and Tutsi minority similar to 
those in Rwanda, where up to a 
million people have been killed 
this year. 

“I hope reason wifi prevail 
but, if it doesn’t, there could be 
1 million to 2 million dead,” 
Mr. Dcbrfc said in a radio inter- 
view after a visit to the country. 

Burundi radio, quoting Inte- 
rior Minister Jean-Baptiste 
Manwangari, said the govern- 
ment had imposed a curfew 
from 7 PJVL to 7 AM. 

Fighting on Tuesday and 
Wednesday in Bwiza destroyed 


Compiled ip Our Staff From Dispatches 

MONROVIA, Liberia — Li- 
beria’s militia warlords have 
pledged to end five years of civil 
war, but the accord was greeted 
with skepticism by many Libe- 
rians, who have seen numerous 
previous pacts fall apart. 

The latest agreement, signed 
in the Ghanaian capital, Accra, 
shortly before midnight on 


Wednesday, calls for a cease- 
fire from midnight Dec. 28 and 
elections on Nov. ]4. It includes 
agreement on the composition 
of a five-member ruling council 
to run the country until an 
elected government can take 
over on Jan. I, 1996. 

The accord offers hope be- 
cause all seven warlords signed 
it But it is a pact that many 


Foul Condition of QE2 
Has Cunard in Hot Water 


'Mawy.’i &wt. 


LONDON — Cunard’s chairman agreed on Thursday to 
meet passengers on the luxury liner Queen Elizabeth II who 
threatened a mutiny after faulty plumbing and repair prob- 
lems turned their holiday into a foul-smefling fiasco. 

A spokesman for the shipping line said the chairman, John 
Olsen, would fly to New York, where the vessel was due to 
dock, and meet passengers pl anning a sit-in Friday. 

Many of the 600 travelers are demanding compensation 
after the ship set sail with its refit unfinished and plumbers 
desperately trying to repair “exploding” toilets. “It’s hell on 


board,” said a passenger, who railed the ship the “QEPA.” 

About 500 passengers were left behind in England when the 
Christmas cruise began earlier this week because renovations 
on their cabins had not been finished. After picketing Cun- 
ard’s London offices, they were offered compensation. 

Those who did sail were also demanding money back. 
Cunard insisted that conditions on the ship were not as bad as 
portrayed. 


“lice angina]" 

Just tell the taxi driver, 
* Sank mo doe noo” & 


5, rue Daunou Paris (Opera) 
, TeL: 0)42.61 .71.14 


Liberians fear could allow one 
guerrilla leader, Charles Taylor, 
to mount a new siege of Monro- 
via, the capital. 

Many also worry that this ac- 
cord, like many in the past, will 
not hold. 

“We have seen so many 
agreements and the killing nev- 
er stopped,” a local business- 
man said. “We will celebrate 
when the fighters put down 
their guns.” 

Ghana’s president, Jerry J. 
Rawlings, who brokered the ac- 
cord. was equally restrained. 

“If you make it possible for 
your people to know peace once 
again," he told the waning fac- 
tions, “they will remember you 
with pride but if you fail to 
restore normalcy to your coun- 
try their judgment will be 
harsh.” 

Liberia, Africa’s oldest inde- 
pendent republic, was settled 
by freed American slaves in 
1 822. An estimated 1 50,000 
people have died in civil war 
and anarchy since rebels led by 
Mr, Taylor, a former civil ser- 
vant, invaded on Christmas Eve 
in 1989. 

The latest agreement builds 
on one signed by Mr. Taylor 
and two other militia leaders in 
the Ghanaian town of Ako- 
sombo in September. 

(Reuters, AP) 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


7 EU Nations to End Border Controls 


BERLIN (AP) — After years of delay caused by worries about 
crime and waves of refugees, border controls within Europe will 
be eliminated March 26, at least for seven of the 12 members of 
the European Union. 

The accord “is a historic step on the way to full freedom of 
movement in all Europe and means an increase in security for our. 
citizens,” the Goman minister of state for security services, Berod 
Schmidbauer, said Thursday in Bonn. 

Ministers from the participating countries — Portugal, Spain, 
France, Germany, Luxembourg, Belgium and the Netherlands — 
met in Bonn to complete the accord, which means that inner- 
European border controls that already have partly disappeared 
will fall away completely. Italy and Greece have said they will join 
when they overcome technical problems. The only EU members . 
not in the pact are Britain, Ireland and D enmar k 

Die first regular Channel Tunnel shuttle trains for vehicles and 
passengers made the crossing between Britain and France on 
Thursday, arriving on schedule and taking 35 minutes for the 
journey. (AFP) 


most other railroad employees were planning to strike Fndav 
disrupting traffic on the Christmas weekend. The drivers, who 
struck Dec. 2 and 1 1, plan another strike Dec. 30. (AFP) 

Croatia has ordered striking railroad workers to return to work 
under a law designed to prevent threats to national security, 
govemment officials said Wednesday. The two-week-old strike 
has paralyzed passenger and cargo traffic. (Reuters) 

. JftKTSL 0 * ********** *J> Athens for the Christmas 

and New Year weekends were dealt a blow bv two rMi 

ouployee strikes scheduled for 48 hours befor? Sdi hohd^TT* 
first strike was to begin at midnight Thursday, and tbeaSidat 
the same time next week. The action was expected to after 70 
percent of domestic and foreign flights. 


To call from country to country, or to the U.S., dial the World Phone® number of the country you're calling from 


Antigua 

(Available from public card 

Argentina* 

Austria! CO* 

Bahama* 

Bahrain 

EMgitinMCCl* 

Barmud*-*- 

Bohvia* 

Brazil 

Canacfa'CC) 

Cayman Islands 
Chfcucc, 

Colombia' CO* 

Costa Ifisa* 

Cyprus* 

Czech Ropubfeaco 


phones only.) 42 
001-300-333-1111 
022-903-012 
1-800424-1000 
800-002 
0800-10012 
18008238484 
0-800-2222 
000-8012 
i-amnoo 

1-800-K4-1000 

00-0315 

980-18-0001 

162 

080-90000 

00-42-000112 


Damns* ICO* 

Dominican Republic 
Ecuador* 

Egypt) CO* 

(Outside of Cairo. dM 
El Salvador* 
RnlencKCQt 
FranoatCO* 

Gambia* 

GermanylCO 

(Limited avaiLabinty in 

GreraICCH 

Granada* 

Guetamala* 

HaWiCCn- 

Hondinw 

Hur&aryicq* 


8001-0022 

1-800-751-6824 

170 


02 first.) 355-5770 

195 

9800-102-80 
19T-00-19 
00-1-99 
0130-0012 
eastern Germany.) 

008WM211 

1-8008248721 

189 

001800-444-1234 

001800-87 4-7000 
00v 800-01411 


IratandtcC) 
braoirco 
Italy! CO* 

Jamaica 

Kenya 

(Available from moat major chios.1 


999-002 
(Special Phonos Only) 
1800-55-1001 
177-150-2727 
172-1022 
800874-7000 


Kuwait 

LabanocKCCi 

(Outside of Beirut, dial 01 RrcU 
Uech te na t alni eo* 

Luxembourg 

Mexico* 

MonacofCCi* 

NetherlaiidsflX)* 

Nofherimta AntBtef'CCM- 


800- MQIB00-624) 
600-624 
425-036+ 
155-0222 
0800-0112 
95800874 7000 
19T 00 IS 
06822-91-22 
001800950-1022 


Ntearaguaicci 
(Outside of Managua, 

Norway ICO* 

Panama 
Military Bases: 
Paraguay* 

Peru I Outs i do Of Lima. 
PotandlCO 

Portugal! CO 

Puerto RJcoiCa 
Oatarico* 
RpmaniaiCCM- 
RuseloiCC!* 

San MarineiOCi* 
Saudi Arabia 
Slovak Republic (CC> 
South Ahica<cei 


dial 02 first) 


(Sal 190 firaL) 


rst) 168 

800-19912 
108 

2810-108 
008-11-800 
rat) 001-190 

Ov -01-0 4800-223 
00017-1234 
1-800-888-8000 
0800012-77 
01800-1800 
Bt 10800 -497-7222 
172-1022 
1800-11 
00-42000112 
0800-990011 


SpaMCB 

SwedantCO* 

SwtearttlKKCCt* 

SyriMCCj 

Trinidad & Tobago ISp 

Turkey* 

Ukrafna* 

bnfcad Arab Emirates 
United iOngdomrca 
To can the U.S. using BT 
To caU the U.S. using MESCUHY 
To cell anywhere other 
than the U.S. 

,Col, «3 not available.) 
U.S. VWytn hiendsico 
Vatican City (CO 
VaM«uela+* 


900890014 

020-7BS822 

155-0222 

0800 

(Special Phones Only! 
008001-1177 
8*10-013 
800-111 


0800898222? 

0500-898222) 


f; ■ - w 

■ *,■ »«» ..-a* y- ™ ™ 


•a. 


■■} Use your MCI Card . 9 local telephone card or call collect-all at the same tew rates. 

(CC) Country-tocountry calling available. May noi bo available loffrom eU international locations. 
■“ Certain restrictions apply. 4- Limited availability. ▼ Wait (or uoeond dial tone. A Available from 
•• LADAT1L public phones only. Hate (Jeponds on call origin in Mexico, f WemabonaJ communi- 
cations carrier. * Not available trom public pay phones. ♦ Public phones may require deposit of 
“ coin or phone card for dial tone. 




0500800800 

000-412 

1-80O8W8000 

172-1022 

800-11148 


From MO 


Let It Take You Around the World. 


hnpririK par Offprint. 73 rue de / ’Evangik. 75018 Paris. 


jif t 


PRAGUE (Reuters) — Final results from tests on the biggest 
seizure of illicit uranium have confirmed that it was highly 
enriched, weapons-grade material, the Czech Interior Ministry.* 
sazd Thursday. 

The material, which the police seized from a car on a Prague ' 
street last week, was 87.7 percent enriched uranium-235, just 
slightly below the 90 percent level preferred by bomb makers but 
still of weapons-grade, a ministry spokesman said. The radioac- 
tive material seized weighed 2.72 kilograms (6 pounds), he said. 

The police detained a Czech nuclear physicist and two citiz e ns 
of the former Soviet Union when they stopped their car in Prague 
on Dec. 14. 




tj* 


Victory fo? 






v, . •_ # _ w .—t t r . 'i- 




r- 






e Hi 


kilo] 


^ L . . 

'"'Vi..- 
r *-tev r >:■ 

. n, r : • : 







TSeamericas / 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1994 


Page 3 
















^to Hij- 




mvpri, 




Frequent Use of 2 Painkillers 
Raises Risk of Kidney Failure 


By David Brown 

iJ'fclWlMII /'.HI V| 111 ! 

use u f Prolonged or frequent 

medicines. c< ? rni J ,W[ } «mrr-ihtf-eininier pain 
most Doni.ii m V lu l t J 1 l 1 n S aceiunvnophen. ihe 
- i S mkj ler . in lhc Uaital *»««• 

irn vXShu 9*"*°" * rfwnces of developing 

ltudy r s hoL. k,dnC> fji,Ur ^ ^ a new 


some can reach concentrations that damage 
or kill cells and. over time, destroy kidney 
function. 


The toxic cf reels of some painkillers — and 
in particular one called phenacciin. which 
was pulled from the market two decades ago 
— have been known for some time. The new 


^^the equivalent of more 


for ken 

fwo TaWets ^ ""l ,n pc °P lc who lake aboul 
<Kn»Ur , a cck - ™*»ding to the repon. 

orm m^? SU , mp ,!! l,n of aeeuminophehap- 
proximate)}- doubles the risk of kidney fail- 


study, done by epidemiologists at the Johns 
Hopkins University School of 


Hygiene and 
Public Health, is one of the Tew to estimate 
the magnitude of the risk in (he general popu- 
lation. 


hJil h 0 ": 1 ™' 1 - aspirin users seem to 

tw a t no tnv reused ri.,k. wrote the authors of a 

Journa Melficin J* 1 urs ^ a ' " s New En S ,and 

nr ?'f ra11 - U P lo 10 percent of lhc new cases 
.. . ; . h Jnc -’ fjl,urc might be avoided annuallv 
n f,K1 "-nHXlcrate use or the drugs. 

.‘f 1 . ! hc Use OI pain medicine is common 
Jnd kidney fa, lure is rare. Even if the level of 
sk uncovered in the new study is accurate, 
kiuncv failure remains an extremelv uncom- 
effect of painkiller use. ‘ 

There are about 199.000 people with irre- 
versible kidney failure in the United Stales, 
w/ih about 50.000 new cases a year. Overall, 
the prevalence is 732 cases per million people. 
Hypertension or diabetes cause more than 
half the cases. 

.. TJ 1 ? kidneys help regulate the volume of 
fluid in the blood, and are a crucial route for 
the excretion of waste products. As drugs in 
the bloodstream are filtered into the unne. 


Telephone interviewers talked with 716 
adults in Maryland. Virginia, West Virginia 
and the District of Columbia who had recent- 
ly developed “end-stage renal disease.” the 
medical term for kidney failure requiring dial- 
ysis. They asked about their use of acetamino- 
phen. aspirin and the family of “nonsteroidal 
anti-inflammatory drugs.” or NSA1D. of 
which ibuprofen.* until earlier this year, was 
the only member available without prescrip- 
tion. A similar battery of questions was posed 
to 361 adults without known kidney disease. 

People with cumulative lifetime ingestion 
of more than 5.000 acetaminophen pills had 
2.4 limes the risk of kidney failure found in 
people with intake of less than 1.000 pills over 
a lifetime. For similar NSA1D intake, the risk 
was 8.8 limes higher. Aspirin use was not 
associated with higher risk. 

Acetaminophen became available without 
prescription in 1955. It is sold under the trade 
name Tylenol, but is available genericalfy. 
Ibuprofen. sold as Motrin, Advil and other 
brands, as well ns genetically, became avail- 
able over the counter in 1984. A second 
NS.AID. naproxen, joined it last January. 


U.S. and Russia to Trade Nuclear Arms Secrets 


By R. Jeffrey Smith 

U'lnluirjnai I'm! Seme 

Washington — The 

United States and Russia have 
agreed in principle to give each 
other classified data next year 
on ibe size and composition of 
their nuclear arsenals. 

The new spirit of openness in 
Moscow and Washington ex- 
tends only to government chan- 
nels, however 

None or the nuclear secrets is 
to be made public, a circum- 
stance that has provoked criti- 
cism from independent experts 
that the two nations are still 
trying to keep the rest of world 
from learning how many nucle- 
ar warheads they possess and 
plan to keep. 

A detailed U.S. proposal for 
the private exchange of nuclear 
weapons data was presented in 
Moscow last week by Vice Pres- 
ident Al Gore after extensive 
interagency discussion in 
Washington. 

Under the proposal, U.S. and 
Russian military officials would 
exchange a detailed account of 
how many warheads each na- 
tion has made since 1945. war- 
heads that have been retired so 
far. or are scheduled to be re- 
tired when the two historic nu- 
clear adversaries fully put into 
effect the arms treaties they 
reached during the Reagan and 
Bush administrations. 

The two nations also would 
say where they are storing ex- 
cess fissile materials for nuclear 
weapons, but they would not 


divulge where individual weap- 
ons are kept or say anything 
about weapons designs. 

To accomplish the exchange, 
the administration persuaded 
Congress this year to amend the 
Atomic Energy Act of 1954. so 
that Russia could, for the first 
time, receive classified nuclear 
data that Washington has pre- 
viously shared privately only 
with dose European allies. 

A similar revision of Russian 
rules is still pending, partly be- 
cause the Russian government 
must first figure out how to 
share its own secret nuclear 
data for the first time with key- 
members of its Parliament, a 
senior U.S. defense official said. 

Other U.S. officials said the 
aim of the information ex- 
change was to help build confi- 
dence in the two capitals that 
each military establishment was 
currying out its stated plans to 
dismantle thousands of war- 
heads and ensuring that the fis- 
sile materials withdrawn from 
those arms did not fall into un- 
authorized hands. Washington 
also wants to lay the ground- 
work for eventual routine in- 
spections by each nation of the 
other's storage sites and dis- 
mantling facilities. 

Thomas B. Cochran, a nucle- 
ar weapons expen ut the Natu- 
ral Resources Defense Council, 
an environmental advocacy- 
group. said “the overall num- 
bers of weapons and amounts 
of fissile material ought to be 
made public” 


Mr. Cochran charged that 
administration officials “want 
to hide a lot of this data because 
they are concerned that the 
American public will be 
alarmed at the number of nucle- 
ar weapons that will be retained 
in a reserve category" for po- 
tential activation if U.S .-Rus- 
sian relations should tum sour 
again. 

The council has estimated 


that the U.S. military i> plan- 
ning to keep as many as 3.500 
.strategic or long-range nuclear 
weapons on reserve, in addition 
to the 3.500 weapons it is al- 
lowed to retain in an active ar- 
senal of missiles, bombers and 
submarines under existing amis 
treaties. Russia may want to 
keep thousands more such 
weapons, the group states. Each 
nation is estimated to have 


TOGO to 4.500 nuclear weapon., 
activated now. 

Secretary of Energy Hazel R. 
O'Leary" proposed this year that 
the total number of U.S. and 
Russian warheads eventually he 
made public. Bui l he senior de- 
fense official said Washington 
was not making the information 
public because “for now. what 
we're interested in is to gel in- 
formation from the Russians.” 


U.S. Gets Soviet Air- Defense Equipment 


Tin- -f i'll a ititl 


WASHINGTON — A Russian military trans- 
port plane that delivered cargo to a U.S. base in 
Alabama earlier this week was carrying Soviet 
anti-aircraft and anti-missile equipment, accord- 
ing to Pentagon officials. 

The delivery had attracted attention because a 
Russian An- 124. one of the world's largest 
planes, made the delivery. 

The precise contents of the plane are still 
classified. But Pentagon officials, speaking on 
condition of anonymity, said the plane carried 
air-defense technology developed by the now- 
defunct Soviet Union. 

“None of it is nuclear and none of it is lethal.” 
said one defense official. 


The United States purchased the equipment 
under contract as part of a continuing effort to 
study in detail the capabilities of weapons sys- 
tems used by foreign governments. The identity 
of the seller is also classified hut it was probably 
one of the former Soviet republics. 

The air-defense system delivered Monday to 
the Redstone Arsenal, a U.S. Army base in 
Huntsville. Alabama, was sold hy the Soviets to 
foreign countries and is still in use in several of 
them. 

“We routinely acquire foreign equipment for 
evaluation.” another U.S. defense official said. 
”We study and analyze that equipment, deter- 
mine capabilities and limitations, and then use 
that information to our benefit. ” 


i;:!e-G.iila r rj !l 


\X 


raponMyRl; 


POLITICAL VO TPS 




Qualified Victory for Owl 


WASHINGTON — A Federal 
judge has approved the Clinton ad- 
ministration's much-disputed plan for 
logging in the Pacific Northwest forest 
that is home to the spotted owl and 
other imperiled species. 

The policy, approved by Judge Wil- 
liam Dwyer of die District Court in 
Seattle; would let the timber industry 
cut up to a billion feet of lumber each 
year in the ancient forests of Washing- 
ton. Oregon and northern California 
— less than one-fifth of the harvest 
during the 1980s. 

In deciding one of the most hotly 
contested environmental issues in re- 
cent years. Judge Dwyer, who bad 
first halted logging in 1991 to protect 


the spotted owL, turned aside objec- 
tions to the administration’s plan 
from both the limber industry and 
environmentalists. 

Judge Dwyer’s ruling was seen as a 
victory for die administration’s twin 
policies for handling disputes over 
natural resources: to seek a balance 
between development and conserva- 
tion and to defend its decisions on the 
basis of scientific judgments about the 
workings of ecosystems, rather than 
on individual species. (NYT) 


million. Nearly all of the money is for 
a nonfiction book that will articulate 
his political vision. 

Mr. Gingrich's press spokesman, 
Tony Blankley, would not say what 
his boss intended to do with the ad- 
vance. He implied an unspecified 
amount would go to charity. (WP) 


the House Agriculture Committee and 
was a key figure in the writing of the 
1 990 farm bill, which expires tms year. 
That legislation will be rewritten in 
the new Congress and that process, 
along with managing the cutbacks in 
the department begun by the Clinton 
administration, will be key tasks of the 
new secretary. (WP) 


Gllcfcman to Agriculture 


Gingrich Does Book Deal 


WASHINGTON —Two weeks be- 
fore taking over as speaker of the 
House, Newt Gingrich has sewed up a 
two-book deal worth in excess of $4 


WASHINGTON — President 
Clinton has settled on Dan Glickman, 
the Kansas Democratic congressman 
who lost a re-election bid, to be secre- 
tary of agriculture, replacing Mike 
Espy, administration officials said. 

Mr. Glickman, SO, a nine-term con- 
swept out of office in the 
rublican midterm wave, served on 


Quote /Unquote 


The Democratic campaign consul- 
tant James Carville, on the reported 
S4 million book deal signed by Newt 
Gingrich, incoming speaker of the 
House: “This is the first guy who tried 
to cash in before he was sworn in. Are 
you sure he’s not going to give it to 
some orphanage?” (WP) 



VanCleef &Arpels 


PARIS. GENEVE. BRUXELLES. CANNES. MONTE CARLO. MILANO. ROMA. BEVERLY HILLS, 
HONOLULU. NEW YORK. PALM BEACH. OSAKA, TOKYO. HONG KONG. SEOUL. SINGAPORE 


• l: * s'." Jr’ 


.. *Utp= 


t’OATE 


I ;\i\ ?M*nltTG& 



Ij> I n.ii lh \***huViI I 

Mexican federal police watching a hillside from which rebels had hurled objects at lawmen in Chiapas state. 


The Bishop in the Eye of Mexico’s Storm 


Tfu' tuer/urnl Prvt* 

SAN CRISTOBAL DE LAS 

CASAS. Mexico — Bishop 
Samuel Ruiz kneels al an altar 
,o the Virgin Mary, praying and 
fasting in a plea (or peace in the 
.southern state of Chiapas. 

The 70-year-old bishop has 
been accused by critics of fo- 
menting the deadly Indian re- 
bellion that nearly led w new 
clashes with the army and po- 
lice earlier this week after Indi- 
ans briefly occupied several 


"Indians in traditional garb. 


some of whom have walked 
barefoot through mountain jun- 
gles, run to him and kiss his 
hand. Still others sit throughout 
the day watching him. 

The bishop, who is a diabetic, 
has not eaten since Monday as 
part of a hunger strike being 
joined by Mexicans across the 
country. 

“We are here in solidarity 
with a people who are always on 
a hunger strike, an unwanted 
one,” said Sister Lidia Solorio. 
52. a nun who joined Bishop 
Ruiz's fast. “We don’t under- 


stand the government. They say 
one thing, do another.” 

Bishop Ruiz wants to force 
the two sides, now in an armed 
face-off, back into negotiations. 
At least 145 people died in a 12- 
day uprising by the Indians last 
January. 

Bishop Ruiz had been the 
mediator between the govern- 
ment and the Zapatista Nation- 
al Liberation Army rebels, but 
the talks broke down in Octo- 
ber. 

Although he has denounced 
the violent methods used by the 


rebels. Bishop Ruiz agrees with 
their demands. 

In Mexico City, eight people 
have started a fast at the Monu- 
ment of Independence, along 
the capital’s main thoroughfare. 
On Wednesday night, hundreds 
of people holding candles gath- 
ered around the hunger strikers’ 
tents at the foot of the monu- 
ment. commonly known as The 
Angel. 

In the federal congress, doz- 
ens of deputies and senators 
held a 24-hour fast Wednesday 
to show their support. 


Away From Politics 


restricted in nearly all 
New York City, mdud- 
pubbe places TeS t aU ran ts and offices 

a* E? outdoor 


all 


log a ban ^7 

and* . for rity Council decided after 

S^obb^l. flWJJ 


th e wor 5Sc an overall decline m non- 

Si ain«*s, Ub ° r 

fatal The number of repeh- 

34/700 nationwide. 


• A timber wolf chewed off the right arm 

of a 2-yearoid boy who wanted to “pet 
the dogs” at the zoo in Manitowoc, Wis- 
consin. Two wolves were in a pen en- 
closed by a chain-link-fence and a wood- 
en fence. The openings in the chain-link 
fence were large enough for a small child 
to get his arms through, but it i c not clear 
how the boy got that close. (AP) 

• A Baltimore boy has been charged with 

first-degree matter in the killing of his 
best friend with a sawed-off shotgun the 
two 10-year-olds found in an alley near 
their homes. “It is our determination at 
this point that this was a willful act,” a 
police spokesman said. (AP) 


• A 3-year-old girl was ordered taken 
from the adoptive parents who had 
raised her since infancy after a judge in 
Sl Petersburg, Florida, learned they 
were infected with the AIDS virus. Cir- 
cuit Judge Horace Andrews said he did 
not know the couple was infected when 
he approved the adoption in March. 

m 


• Tainted with the nickname “Dumbo” 
for his oversized ears and humiliated by 
snowmen built to mock him, a 14-year- 
old boy in Bismarck. North Dakota, won 
a restraining order under a law intended 
to help battered women. (AP) 



« *v 





~.Jj 


jn 









Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1994 


Cease-Fire or Not, 
Outlook for Bosnia 
Bleaker Than Ever 


By Roger Cohen 

New York Times Strike 

PALE, Bosnia-Hozegovina 
— Nenad Tadic, a Bosnian Ser- 
bian soldier, looked at the snow 
falling heavily on the moun- 
tains surrounding Sarajevo and 
said, “The weather would 
achieve a four-month cease-fire, 
with or without the politicians.” 

He was right. With snow fall- 
ing and the weather bitterly 
cold, the fighting season is 
largely over in Bosnia. The 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

cease-fire announced by Jimmy 
Carter is therefore relatively in- 
significant unless it can be de- 
veloped into a real disengage- 
ment of forces. 

Such a disengagement, buff- 
ered by United Nations forces, 
took place earlier this year in 
central Bosnia, where there had 
been brutal fighting between 
Muslims and Croats. But in 
that instance, under U.S. pres- 
sure, the rival armies and politi- 
cians decided to end, or at least 
bury, their differences. 

TTiat is far from the case in 
the war between the Muslim- 
led Bosnian government forces 
and the Bosnian Serbs, based in 
Pale, outside Sarajevo. An- 
nouncing Mr. Carta’s agree- 
ment, Sarajevo Radio said it 
was signed by the government 
“and the war criminals in Pale." 
Conciliation is not yet in the air. 

At least not among the politi- 
cians of Bosnia. Among the 
populations on either side there 
is, however, an immense fatigue 
that would, if it could find po- 
litical e xpr e ssi on, open the door 
to peace at least a crack. But 
politics in the Balkans does not 
seem to work this way. 

“The war has destroyed us 
psychologically,” said Milja 
Gluhovic, a Bosnian Serb in 
Pale who lost her husband and 
brother- last May to a single 
shell that landed in their trench 
in the mountains above Saraje- 
vo. “Everyone wants peace, ev- 
eryone,” she said. “But the 
prospects are dim.” 

In Sarajevo, an accountant 
named Amra who declined to 
give her last name said: “It is 
very sad when, after two and a 
half years, you see there is noth- 
ing left. I hate this place. I hate 
these people. If I can ever get 
away, I will never come back.” 

Such weariness, disillusion- 
meat and disgust with political 
maneuvering are now rampant 
throughout Bosnia. But the 
grim scheming continues un- 
abated, and the political postur- 
ing seems particularly outland- 


ish because Bosnia is still a 
country to be invented. 

Despite all the words on both 
sides, Bosnia- Herzegovina has 
no recall history as an indepen- 
dent state and Muslims, Croats 
and Serbs disagree totally as to 
what it is ana what it should 
become. This was, and is still, 
the root of the conflict 

The Bosnian government of 
President Alija Izetbegovic, 
outraged by the Serbian cam- 
paign of terror against Muslims 
across much of Bosnia, wants to 
“liberate” the country from the 
Bosnian Serbs and their leader, 
Radovan Karadzic. 

If that remains the case, Mr. 
Izetbegovic will try to use an 
eventual four-month respite 
from fighting to continue re- 
arming and building an army 
that has m ade immense strides 
in the last two years. 

Despite the Serbian on- > 
si aught on the western Muslim ‘ 
enclave of Bihac, the Bosnian 
Army continues to put the 
Serbs under pressure m other 
parts of the country. The Bosni- 
an government has some reason 
to see a long-term military 
trend in its favor. 

Mr. Karadzic, meanwhile, 
persists with a dark vision of an 
ethnically pure Serbian entity 
within Bosnia, including a sec- 
ond Sarajevo for the Serbs. 

His recent promises on im- 
proving human rights and his 
statement that he has “nothing 
against Muslims, only a deep 
objection to Izetbegovic’s fun- 
damentalists” cannot mask the 
fact that almost all Muslims in 
the territory held by the Serbs 
have been driven out or killed 
since 1992. 

Both these political visions — 
Mr. Izetbegovic’ s of some sort 
of liberation and Mr. Karad- 
zic’s of a big slice of Bosnia for 
Serbs only — are probably im- 
possible. 

A Bosnian military victory 
would almost certainly take 
years; moreover, there would 
still be many Serbs left who 
would not want to live under a 
Muslim-led government The 
toll of isolation that goes with 
Mr. Karadzic’s ideas would ul- 
timately prove crippling. 

If the United States, Britain. 
France, Germany and Russia 
— the countries that make up 
the so-called Contact Group 
that has drawn up a peace plan 
for Bosnia — can convince both 
sides of the futility of this essen- 
tial stalemate, there may be 
some chance of a real cessation 
of hostilities that would outlast 
the effects of the winter. 


ITC 


INTERNATIONAL TELEPHONE COMPANY 

WORLDWIDE CALL BACK SYSTEM 

Now offers Direct Dial to anywhere 
in the world at Call Back Prices, 
i Fax & Data can also be used with ITC's Direct Dialer. 


International Telephone Company 
290 Pratt Street, Meriden, CT 06450-2118 
1800-638-5558 ext 111/ 203-238-9794 
Fax: 203-929-4906 


International 

Classified 

Marketplace 

■ Monday 

International Conferences and Seminars 

■ Tuesday 
Education Directory 

I Wednesday 
Business Message Center 
I Thursday 

International Recruitment 

I Friday 

Real Estate Marketplace, Holidays and Travel 

■ Saturday 

Arts and Antiques 

Plus over 300 headings in International Classified 
Monday through Saturday 

For further information, contact Philip Oma in Paris: 
Tel: (33-1) 46 3794 74- Fax: (33-1) 46375212 

?♦ fk INTERNATIONAL*** ♦ 4 



CHECHNYA: Heavier Bombing 


: . ■ - .-i_ X. -- ----- SosaTettrin/lteten 

Grozny residents di gg in g Thursday for possible survivors in the ruins of a house destroyed by Russian air raids. 

2 Die in Sarajevo, but Truce Seems Near 


Continued froffl l 

in the North Caucasus, Colonel 
General Eduard Vorobyov. 

The Defense Ministry later 

denied the reporu callmg it 

“ /tidnf nrmatkfli aimed at dew* 
Kiiivmg the situation m the 
North Caucasus.” - 

But what gave the report add- 
ed weight was an earner claim 
from tiie chairman of Parlia- 
ment's Defense Committee* 
Sergei Ynshenkov, that General 
Vorobyov had asked to be re- 
lieved after refusing a request 
from General Grachev to take 
command of the military opera- 
tion against Chechnya- 

Moscow’s increasingly bla- 
tant efforts to subvert the Che- 
chen president, Dzhokar Du- 
dayev, had all failed, prompting 
General Grachev to boast on 
Nov. 27: “It would be possible 
to resolve all questions within 
two hours with one parachute 
regiment." 

On Thursday, 12 days after 
Russian tank columns moved 
into Chechnya in great 
strength, with up to 40,000 sol- 
diers and Interior Ministry 
troops, the military announced 
the deployment of two battal- 
ions, or about 800, of elite Rus- 
sian marines to shore up the 
forward troops. There were un- 
confirmed reports that Moscow 
was also sending the elite and 
marc historically loyal Taman 
division, which is based near 
Moscow and attacked the Rus- 
sian Parliament in October 
1993. . ^ 

Chechen offi cials in Grozny 


said Thursday that the Russians 
had begun “mass bombmgs of 
residential areas,” diqpmng up 
to 60 missiles and bombs and 
tiling more than 100 people, 
including 17 chfl&J®. 

TheCbecben leaders ap- 
pealed for help to the United 
Nations, the Conference on Se- 
curity and Cooperation m Eu- 
rope and the world community 
geherally, while also appealing 
to its North Caucasus neigh- 
bors W come to GitWs assis- 
tance with arms and aia 

The Chechen spokesman, 

Moviadi Udugov, alsosmdtiiat 

a bomb hit the Chechen Parlia- 
ment bmlding Thursday after- 
noon, killing seven people. A 
Russian legislate* and human 
rights offiSTSergei Kovaljmv. 
stiff in Grozny, said the Rus- 
sians had bombed “residential 
areas in the center of the aty. 
At least 12 people died over- 
night 

The Russian government 
press office denied any bomb- 
ing during the early hours. °f 
Thursday morning and denied 
hitting the apartment buildings. 
Instead, officials blamed the 
destruction cm Chechen leaders 
themselves, accusing them of 
“imitating” Russian bombs m 

order to make it seem that Mos- 
cow was waging war on the citi- 
zenry. 

Russian officials said that so 
far 20 Interior Ministry troops 
had been killed and 30 wound- 
ed, while at least 14 paratroop- 
ers had been kfllea and 36 
wounded, according to the De- 
fense Ministry. 


CoapUtd by Our Staff From Dispatcher 

SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina — 
Bosnia’s Muslim-led government was dose 
to an agreement Thursday on how to carry 
out a comprehensive cease-fire with Serbs, 
despite a mortar attack that killed two 
people in a Sarajevo market. 

Vice President Ejop Ganic said after 
talks with the United Nations envoy, Ya- 
susfai Akashi, that “we hope the cease-fire 
will be starting more or less on schedule” 
at noon on Friday. 

Mr. Akashi, who later went to Serbian 
headquarters at Pale outside Sarajevo, said 
the two rides were very close to agreeing on 
the text of a comprehensive cease-fire 
agreement. 

He acknowledged the groundwork of 
former President Jimmy Carter, who nego- 
tiated the deadline with Muslim and Bos- 
nian Serb leaders when he visited Sarajevo 
this week. 

The UN and the Bosnian government 
appeared determined not to be blown off 


course by the attack on the market during 
the morning. Two men were killed instant- 
ly and seven other people were wounded, 
two of them seriously. 

A UN spokesman, Michael Williams, 
cautiously suggested the Serbs were at 
fault, saying, ^Initial reports on the inci- 
dent in Sarajevo would appear to indicate 
that the mortar fire came from the Grba- 
vica area of the city, which is basically in 
Serb hands.” 

Mr. Ganic said angrily: “Nothing has 
dhang ed. This is just one more example of 
how Serbs talk peace and make war.” 

The Bosnian Serb army denied responsi- 
bility and accused the Muslims of attack- 
ing themselves to be able to blame the 
Sobs tor upsetting the cease-fire. 

The blast happened near the main open 
market in Sarajevo where 68 people were 
killed by a mortar in February m the worst 
single atrocity of the 32-month war. 

The mam obstacle to the cease-fire tak- 
ing place is the Serbs' insistence that reluc- 


tant Muslim forces withdraw from Mount 
Tgman, west of Sarajevo, where they are 
gnardfng the only free road to the capital 
that Muslims control. 


TROOPS: Russian Morale Low 


that Muslims control. Contimnd bom Page * “We Eve like ^vernee, said 

The Bosnian Serb leader, Radovan Kar- is bong transferred from the barely o ting 

adzic, said Thursday that he had ordered front Friday, was barely able to “**“**■ 
his men to cease fire on Friday, even if contain his relief. “I don’t know Pobap mostwwmg onrae 
Muslim troops did not withdraw. what they’re doing,”, he said, 

A further complication is that the Carter pointing with his chin at his imowledee 

and UN proposals do not include Croatian comrades in aims. “All I blow ra . lh _, 

Serbs and rebel Muslims who are fighting is that I'm not going to Groz- 

government forces in the Bihac enclave of ny. J 

northwest Bosnia. That sentiment was no sur- b<Kttie temtory. - 

This is the only part of the country P rise ' & yca moved through the Ingush re- 

ojherr. tions for most of the Russian raovea raroug» me ag»n 


where serious fi ghting is still mlting place “Ons tor m 
and there is no guarantee the cease-fire ! lere - 


would stop it. 

The Bosnian Serbian leadership also 
called Thursday for the suspension of in- 
ternational sanctions against themselves 
and rump Yugoslavia for the duration of 
the cease-fire. 

(Reuters, AFP) 


KOREA: 

Airspace to Open 

Contmoed from Page 1 
skies policy occurred less than a 
week after a US. military heli- 
copter that strayed into North 
Korean airspace was either shot 
down or made an emergency 
landing, resulting in the death 
of one of the two pilots. 

(North Korea said Thursday 
that it was still questioning the 
surviving pilot. Chief Warrant 
Officer Bobby Hall, and 
charged that he had been on a 
spy mission, Reuters reported 
from Geneva. But Han Chang 
On, a senior diplomat to the 
United Nations in Geneva, said 
his country hoped to resolve the 
problem of releasing the airman 
on a “humanitarian basis.” He 
gave no date. 

[Mr. Han accused the United 
States of carrying out about 200 


ITALY: j Berlusconi Resigns His Post After 7 Months 


fraitiinrf from Page ] called Freedom Alliance, made 
tion to a quick, new election. £ 


Bed is a pile of hay under a 
crude lean-to. What Ettle heat is 
available is afforded by a primi- 
tive wood-burning oven. To- 
bacco (and what Russian sol- 
dier doesn’t smoke?) comes in 
rude-smelling Ettle plugs in sog- 
gy packets called dymoks. 
“Fifth-class cigarettes,” one 
teenage private said with a 
sneer. 

The only splotch of color on 
the icy rural landscape is the 


“In the interests of the country. 


itfe^S tiratTbel^i an« and the Northern L^gue. 

government remains until the 1 

elections,” Mr. Berlusconi said aIlmnce 10 m elections last 


March that were seen at the 


'Th rcHnv iwuui uuu uiu 

He sfid any other govern- time: as awtterdiaU jutappear 
mart installed withonl a new to have been only the beginning 

election would be a “caricature rad morc 

of democracy." plat transtuon. 

“My resignation is not an act “Whether it is Berlusconi or 

of surrender,” he said. “I am someone else who is in charge 
absolutely determined to hold does not really bother me,” said 
firm.” Interior Minister Roberto Ma- 

lt is by no means dear, bow- roni, who leads the dissident 
ever, that Mr. Berlusconi could faction within the Northern 
secure a mqority, even (hough League, 
many from the Northern “What is important is that 
League, though apparently not the government includes the 
the majority of them, have sided League and the Freedom Alli- 
with the prime minister’s so- ance and is led by someone who 


the icy rural landscape is the progress m 10 days 
knows how to govern,” he said. green c f Russian glaciaL 

For his part, the Northern fighting vehicles and anti-air- During the day. 
League leader, Umberto Bossi, craft gw,* There is no hot wa- here buy bread an 
who has made insurgency his ^r. Troops in some units are from Ingush villager 
political stock-in-trade, and his ^ j be drinking heavily. At erally s ympa t hi z e wi 

new allies insist that a transi- . this - frozen crossroads, there c hens. But when dai 
tional government be formed of seemed to be Ettle activity be- there is the sound < 
the League, the Popular Party yon d the troops who were chip- nearby. “At night, 
and the Democratic Party of ping ice from their armored know who anyone is 
the Left to oversee institutional personnel carrier. der said. 

and electoral reform before any 

new ballot 

SUBWAY: Bombing Arrest 

Continued from Page 1 to have last worked 


Berlusconi campaign machine Continued from Page 1 to have la* worked for MetriD 

supported by the pome minis- a white man, around 200 Lynch, lived in Scotch Rams 
ters three television networks, pounds (90 kilograms), between co-op apartments m 

But such is the unwieldy and 40 and 50, burgundy sweater, Brooklyn. . 
self-contradictory nature of dark blue three-quarter-length A neighbor m Scotch Plains 
their alliance that many argue it coat, blue jeans lorn below the ** a PP eare d that Mr. Leary 
would soon collapse. knees, bum masks. , been unemployed for the 


would soon collapse. 


[Mr. Han accused the United - 1 — each other. “Wait a minute,” 

States of carrying out about 200 1>TCTDA x r . , „ - _ . . r r , , Mr. Ruiz said. “That sounds 

“espionage activities” against Venerable trenCfl institution MS CJUtaneerea like the guy that we have.” 

hie r/umtrv in Nnvpmhpr fllnnp ^ T PCC man an hnur nf rhp py_ 


his country in November alone. 
About the recent incident, he 
said: “We warned the United 
States several times about not 
conducting such military espio- 
nage activities."] 

It was not clear that there was 
any connection between the he- 
licopter incident and the civil 
aviation announcement, be- 
cause North Korea appears to 
have made its decision on the 
dvil aviation policy in early De- 
cember. 

On Thursday morning. Rep- 
resentative William B. Richard- 
son, Democrat of New Mexico, 
brought the remains of the dead 


iees, bum marks. had been unemployed for the 

The two officers looked at last few months, 
cb other. “Wait a minute,” At the co-op buildiiig in Park 
r. Ruiz said. “That sounds Slope, Brooklyn, he had left dis- 
;e the guy that we have.” tinct impressions. He was once 


Continued from Phge 1 
like that from the nearby butch- 


Young Parisians, who see bis- 
tros as old-fashioned and ex- 


er and the baker, who not only have switched to ght- 

have begun to sdl sandwiches aer places, forcing caffe owners 
but also sell them at prices lew- 1° see ^ 3 sleek, high-tech look 


er than his. 


or turn themselves into wine 


Many caffe owners agree that bars or se ^ Crepes or lap as. 


high rents in Paris are making it 
very hard for family- run bistros 
to compete, especially since the 
big fast-food chains have now 
penetrated almost every neigh- 
borhood. 

This summer, a “Macdo,” as 
McDonald's hamburger places 
are known, opened even on the 


army helicopter pilot. Chief venerable Avenue Victor Hugo, 
Warrant Officer David Hile- “ a * bastion of proper, bour- 
mon, to Panmimjom, on the S 8 ** 5 Pans. 


Television programs about 
the bistro's decline have pro- 
duced that uneasy sense that 
overcomes the French, that 
sense that in every mutation of 
life something of profound val- 
ue has become lost. 

Many establishments have . Jg- JjP* 0 * “■ 

dropped the tobacco Ecense he ssay . , because the 

from their “cafe-tabac” sign be- 

cause selling cigarettes and t°S e ^^Th c y already talk less, 

stamps meant much work and ^ ^ 

little^ profit. don J laii h 8° to j£ e su P® r ' 

market in silence. Then they 

Elsewhere in France, bistros waich television. The cafe will 
are not doing much better. continue, because people need 
According to the French to talk.” 
union of bistrotiers and cafe 

owners, in 1960, when France — 

had 46 million inhabitants, TVWT' O /""V _ 

there were 220,000 cafes. To- I LuU! MOTK€tS 
day's 58 million inhabitants 

support fewer than 65,000 ca- Continued from Page I 
ffis. 

. D . . . , . tics climbed as high as 30 per- 

Jean Boon who heads the ^ such ^ 

union, said that above all* the wou]d faavc helped re- 

nauon s dnnking habits haw duce Mexico’s $18 bi I honTrade 

c ian8 K d j F ? rt 2n 5 i^ arS a ^°* deficit, they would have done so 
French drank 60 liters of pure by ensuring recession — 

alcohol p« person per year, he would ^ death to the 


border between South and 
North Korea. 

Mr. Richardson arrived in 


To be sure, the bistro of old. 
with its checkered tablecloths, 
lace curtains and a waiter in a 


Pyongyang on a previously b>E blue apron, has been cfaang- 
scheduJed visit shortly before “S f° r some time. 


Less than an hour of the ex- president of the co-op board, 
plosion, the police said, the “Ed was weird,” said David 
man, Mr. Leaiy. was the target Ehicb, who served on the board 
of the investigation not only of with him and now lives dse- 
Wednesday's explosion but of a where. “He’s your classic coin- 
similar incident last week. puter person — great with ma- 
Tbe main link between the chines, not so good with 
two coses, the police said, were people.” 
similarities in the construction At one point, Mr. El rirh ro- 
of the incendiary devices that called, the infighting over the 
started both subway fires: each question of spending money to 
consisted of a glass jar about decorate the co-op building 


wires leading from the liquid to the pro-spending faction, who 
a battery and a crude timer. opposed Mr. Leary’s efforts to 
Mr. Leary, who was believed keep down maintenance costs. 


PESO: Markets on Edge as Mexican Currency Floats 

Continued from Page 1 about one-quarter of the stock in Mexico, and the stock mnite 


the helicopter went down on — , eai1 wn ® neaas me cenL While such high rales 

Saturday. iirnon, said that above all, the wou ld certainly faavc helped re- 

There was some speculation I arap l n ^ Dor M J? 1 — 18 habits have duoe Mexico’s $18 bilEon trade 

that Pyongyang madVthe an- from Israel change* Forty years ago. the deficit, they would have done so 

nouncement about ml avia- And Syria Will Meet 2SS S w Hte by r 

don on Thursday to divert at- J al Yj Q HL p ~f P”? 00 P er Jj' n j which would be death to the 

ten tion from the helicopter Return said. “Today that has dropped f ore i^Q investment that was a 

affair. But analysts said it was . DAMASCUS — Syria offi- 10 18 tilers. principal engine of Mexico’s 

more likely that the announce- dally announced that a meeting Foreigners, who come to growth during the last six years 
ment was timed to counter the between the Syrian and Israeli France at the rate of 60 million under President Carlos Salmas 
start of direct air service Thurs- ambassadors to the United a year, account for most of the de Gortaii. 
day between South Korea, States would be held in Wash- clientele in the famous old cafes Mr. Salinas led Latin Ameri- 
North Korea’s mam enemy, ington on Thursday. of Paris and other cities. But the ca in liberalizing trade and fi- 

and China, its main ally. The official Syrian news idea of the cafe, a convivial nance and reassured investors 

North Korea now has air ser- agency, SANA, said Syrian and place with lazy, sunny terraces by stabilizing the peso's ex- 
vice only to Beijing and Mas- Israeli military officials also in summer and a warm cigarette change rate. Before the devalu- 
cow and a handful of other would attend the talks at the haze in winter, still appears ation, foreigners owned $50 bil- 

State Department. dose to many a French heart, lion of Mexican shares, or 


about one-quarter of the stock in Mexico, and the stock market 

ra ,.,f ' , changed direction repeatedly in 

if was a disastrous! v inXma n*. r ■ > j 


Tfyf , changed direction repeatedly in 

Envoys From Israel 

And Syria Will Meet SSS 2?’$' by ^ !U ^! r ra; f Sio11 r Ih '? J had 10 dcfendTitle ih ey Investors in emerging mat- 

J ^ ould death to couldn't hold anyway. Mean- k L els bw® already recognized 

nAUACHiT c - tf: to ^ h as dropped foreign investment that was a while, they kicked the foreign ^ they have definitdy^Sag 

DAMASCUS — Syria offi- 10 re mere. principal engine of Mexico s investors in the teeth.” open and are not some to dose 


dally announced that a meeting Foreigners, who come to growth during the last six years 
between the Syrian and Israeli France at the rate of 60 million under President Carlos Salinas 
ambassadors to the United a year, account for most of the de Gortaii. 

Slates would be held in Wash- clientele in the famous old cafes Mr. Salinas led Latin Ameri- 


mgton on Thursday. of Paris and other cities. But the ca in liberalizing trade and fi- 

The official Syrian news idea of the cafe, a convivial nance and reassured investors 
agency, SANA, said Syrian and place with lazy, sunny terraces by stabilizing the peso's ex- 
Israeli military officials also m s umm er and a warm cigarette change rate. Before the devaiu- 


of Paris and other dlies. But the ca in liberalizing trade and fi- policy,” he said, “and the cur- S^P bankers. 


With the float, he said, Mexi- 3 & a * n . said Geoffrey Bdl, a 
can officials were “acting more Ncw *< ork investment consul- 
sensibly.” They “bought more l * nl executive secretary of 
room for maneuver in domestic “ e Group of Thirty a research 

nnlim " “ ] .1 PITH in for 


o s ex- 
dcvalu- 


p laces. 


State Department. 


dose to many a Frencfc 


lion of Mexican shares, or 


racy has hit its bottom soon- ‘■Wha, they now have to rat 

In late New York trading, the 12 030 Sow* 

dollar rose to 4.65 pesos from Latin wfaether 

about 4.00 pesos the day before County,” 


THE NEWSPAPER OF RECORD FOR THE INTERNATIONAL MUTUAL FOND INDUSW 

Listings - Daily ★ Money Report - Weekly ★ Fund Performance Focus - Monthly 

REACHING PERSONAL INVESTORS IN OVER 180 COUNTRIES 




. .»• V’l&i- 


hostfle territory. 

When the western column 
moved through the Ingush re- 
gion on Dec. 11, it was met by 
an gr y people in the streets who 
blocked the troops’ advance 
and set fire to more than 30 
military vehicles. 

Since then, the troops Jhave 
settled i m easil y into positions 
west of Grozny, generally stay- 
ing away from the towns and 
villages. Nearly all of the 
mound fighting has been left to 
Russian mlnrmts approaching 
Grozny from the north, whose 
progress in 10 days has been 
glaciaL |' 

During the day, the troops 
here buy bread and sundries 
from Ingush villagers, who gen- 
erally sympathize with the Che- 
chens. But when darkness falls 
there is the sound of shooting 
nearby. “At night, yon don't 
know who anyone is,” Alexan- 
der said. 


k Spirit fi 

liikiiiii-aiid Set 


11 

* ie 

“ :a*r 


“Wial Dispt 

^ Forbids P, 


:--vv»r 

■ 2H 

5ecjj 

p€ 

-• fi sUd 

— F 1 


INTERNATIONAL W * 

/Ik « 


l&D 


nvusmn "rm tw w hha imk m® nu< hwbugitw nw 





Page 5 



** 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1994 


3 Ministers 
Quit India’s 
Cabinet to 
End Crisis 

By John F. Bums 

KICTut YOrk T,ma Sen " c f 

WUioSKn 1 ° f mvolvem «« in 
biUioii-doUar corruption scan- 
dais resigned. 

Bui Mr Rao’s hold on power 
remained shaky, and many j n 
the governing Congress ill p ar - 

KS^T 16 ? he "“^h 1 not last as 
Indm s leader uniil spring 

The resignations allowed Mr 
Rao to escape, at least tempo^ 
ranly. from what had becomes 
burgeoning political scandal in 
itself: his reluctance to dismiss 
the mimsten after they were 
hnk«l by official inquiries to 
stock market and commodities 
scams that netted speculators 
huge profits. 

B**" 1 newspapers suggested 
that Mr. Rao held off dismiss- 
ing the ministers for fear that 
they might drag his name, or 
those of other Rao family mem- 
bers. into the scandals. 

By quitting, the cabinet 
members — Baburrao Shankar- 
anand, the health minister; 
Kalpnath Rai, the food minis- 
ter , and Rameshwar Thakur, a 
junior development minis ter’-- 
gave Mr. Rao an opportunity to 
respond to widespread calls 
that he name a new, “clean” 
cabinet. 

Leading newspapers, as well 
as opposition leaders, have 
charged recently that the Rao 
government was at risk of be- 
coming the most corrupt in In- 
dia’s 47-year history as an inde- 
pendent’nation. 



Clinton Targets 9 Communities 
For Aid to Ailing Economies 


By Guy Gugliotta 

II iidkwrt&n !“>■'< Vn «, «• 

WASHINGTON — Presi- 
dent Bill Clinton has doignaied 
ihe nation’s first “empower- 
ment zones.” making six urban 
and three rum! communities eli- 
gible for millions of dollars in 
federal grants and tax breaks to 
stimulate economic activity in 


depressed areas. 
The i 


ILhrcndran/Acmx France Prrje 

Supporters of a campaign to carve out a new state In northern India breaking through barricades in New DeSri near 
Parliament on Thursday. Hie police used water cannon and arrested hundreds of demonstrators. They were demanding 
the creation of a separate state to be called Uttarakhand comprising eight tin districts in Uttar Pradesh state. 


Such attacks have marked a 
sharp reversal in political for- 
tunes. In his First three years as 
prime minister, Mr. Rao. who is 
73, surprised detractors by initi- 
ating an ambitious program of 
free-market economic reforms 
that began to break up socialist 
monopolies built up by Con- 
gress Party governments over 
four decades. His efforts at- 
tracted defectors from other 
parties, giving the government a 
parliamentary majority, and 
were widely applauded abroad. 

But the Congress Party en- 
dured crushing election defeats 
this month in three of India's 25 
states, including Mr. Rao's 


home state, Andhra Pradesh in 
southern India. 

Party leaders voiced concern 
that a similar shock might be in 
store in five state elections that 
are scheduled in February, two 
of them in large states dial are 
among the few still governed by 
the Congress Party, Maharash- 
tra and Gujarat. 

At first, many Congress lead- 
ers attributed the defeats to dis- 
affection among poorer voters 
over the economic reforms, say- 
ing they considered the reforms 
as favoring India's moneyed 
elite. 

But after studying exit polls 
taken in Andhra Pradesh and in 


New Spirit for Japan’s Military 

Job Options and Sense of Pride Bolster Ranks 


Reuters 

YOKOSUKA, Japan — A new sense of pride 
in Japan's peacekeeping activities abroad and 
the chance of a stable career in a tough job 
market are luring Japanese youths into the mili- 
tary in record numbers. 

% It is a far cry from just a decade ago, when 
'seeking a job m the 240,000-member Self-De- 
fense Forces, as Japan’s aimed services are 
called, was considered an act of desperation. 

The defense forces, which are barred from 
.military attack. under^Japan’s pacifist constitu- 
tion, were still so tarnished anti mistrusted from 
World War II days that some officers shunned 
wearing their uniforms in public. 

Joining the military was a so-called “3K” job 
— kurai, kitanai and taken, or dark, dirty and 
dangerous. 

But now, recruiters are enjoying a windfall 
from intense media coverage of Japanese peace- 
keeping operations in Zaire, Cambodia, Mozam- 
bique and the Gull 

The military life has suddenly become sought- 
after with the activities of peacekeeping troops 
regularly on the front pages of newspapers. 

Japan’s recession is also channeling high 
school and university graduates into the military 
as job opportunities dwindle in die private 
sector. 

Latest official statistics show Japan’s unem- 
ployment at about 3 percent, which is small by 
many nations’ standards but for Japan an un- 
precedented high figure. 


Commander Asao Ikeda. head of the navy's 
Yokosuka Training School for petty officers, 
said on a recent media tour that many recruiting 
stations around the country get as many as 10 
times the quota needed for the armed forces. 

This is a dramatic turnaround from a decade 
ago. when they had trouble filling the quota. 

“Peacekeeping activities are a factor,” he said, 
“but also many qualified youths want stable jobs 
that more and more they believe they can only 
find in the public sector.” 

Most of the 800 recruits who complete one of 
three four-month basic training courses a year at 
Ikeda’s school are 18-y ear-old high school gradu- 
ates, both men and women. 

“We even got 19 college graduates this year 
and five of them w ere women,” Mr. Ikeda said at 
the campus in Yokosuka, south of Tokyo, near 
Japan's biggest naval base jointly operated with 
the U.S. Navy. 

At the army’s Youth Technical School, also at 
Yokosuka, a high-school level institution to train 
tec hnical sergeants, students' eyes are on travel 
abroad. 

“I saw these men on TV, in Cambodia,” said 
Yosuke Kubota, 16. “I thought that was very 
cooL” 

At the nearby National Defense Academy for 
officer cadets, also in Yokosuka, there were 80 
rimes the number of applicants this year for the 
quota of 450 students. 


In Eternal Dispute on East Jerusalem, 
Israel Forbids Palestinian Conference 


activity closely and'bars official 
Israel Palestinian representation in 
Jerusalem. 

■ 2 Held in Beirut Bombing 
Security forces have arrested 
two people suspected of carry- 
ing out a deadly bombing that 
the pro-Iranian Hezbollah 


. agency 
up road- 
erusalem 


-simians 
over the 
. Israel 
divisible 
i rejects 
; to its 

:onomic 


blamed on Israel, Agence 
France-Presse reported. 

The blast on Wednesday 
killed four people, i nclu d in g 
Fuad Moughniyeh, whose 
brother Imad has been widely 
suspected of being the master- 
mind behind Hezbollah’s tak- 
ing of Western hostages. 


con- 


a 
non- 


iister 
bject- 
ri, a 

i A li- 


the 

>lice 

the 


at 


Saturday 


ART 


Art expert Souren Melikian 
covers both art and auctions 
throughout the world in this 
well-read weekly column. From 
major exhibitions to small galle- 
ries, from impressionism to 
ancient pottery, this feature 
brings new insight for the viewer 
and the collector in the popular 
and often lucrative art world. 


Every Saturday in the 
International Herald Tribune. 


INTERNATIONAL 



neighboring Karnataka, many 
Congress leaders concluded 
that the defeats were mainly 
caused by disillusionment 
among voters with what they 
saw as widespread corruption 
in the states and in New Delhi. 

Mr. Rao headed off the chal- 
lenge to his leadership by win- 
ning crucial support from a 
group of younger parliamentar- 
ians, who pledged to support 
him as prime minister if he rid 
his government of the three 
ministers who had been linked 
by official reports to the two 
major corruption scandals of 
the Rao years. It was these three 
ministers who quit Thursday. 


Two of the ministers, Mr. 
Shankar anand and Mr. Thakur, 
had been named by official in- 
quiries as major figures in the 
1992 financial scandal, in which 
SI .5 billion in government secu- 
rities held by Indian and for- 
eign banks were diverted into 
speculation on the Bombay 
stock exchange. 

The third minister, Mr. Rai. 
was nam ed in a government re- 
port as the key figure in delay- 
ing a million tons of sugar im- 
ports, allowing sugar 
companies to earn hundreds of 
milli ons of dollars in windfall 
profits in the first half of 1994. 


; urban winners are Atlan- 
ta, Baltimore. Chicago. Detroit. 
New York and Philadelphia- 
Camden. The rural winners, eli- 
gible for S40 million and tax 
breaks, were the Kentucky 
Highlands, Mid-Delta in Mis- 
sissippi. and the Rio Grande 
Valley in southern Texas. 

Mr. Clinton’s announcement 
was a benchmark in the pro- 
longed debate over how best to 
revitalize the nation's cities, pit- 
ting the Republican approach 
emphasizing tax breaks for in- 
ner-city businesses against the 
Democrats' belief that any 
benefits for businesses should 
be tied to an overall program of 
community development. 

The new program marked a 
victory for the Democratic view 
and an accompanying change 
in terminolgy. whereby what 
Republicans called “enter- 
prise” zones become Democrat- 
ic “empowerment zones" and 
“enterprise communities.” Un- 
der the Clinton plan, first devel- 
oped during the 1993 budget 
debate, cities and rural areas 
will receive block grams to im- 
plement 10-year development 
plans. Urban zones may serve 
up to 200.000 people and rural 
zones were limited to 30.000. 

In addition, zone businesses 
are eligible for tax credits for 
hiring residents of the area and 
for expanding their activities. 
Congress in 1993 earmarked 
S2.5 billion for this purpose. 


Although the plan was devel- 
oped by a Democratic adminis- 
tration! it tracks closely with the 
views of Republicans in the in- 
coming Congress holding that 
local communities should have 
more freedom in the way they 
spend federal dollars. Mr! Clin- 
ton couched his announcement 
in the context of last week's 
“middle class bill of rights," 
and his belief that “we have got 
to rely on the energy’ and capac- 
ity of people to work at the 
community level.” 

Jack Kemp, the former secre- 
tary of housing and urban de- 
velopment. and the leading Re- 
publican champion of 
enterprise zones, pronounced 
the current effort “a zero-sum 
approach” with “not enough 
zones” and with “no incentives 
for new businesses.'* 

Mr. Kemp noted that tax in- 
centives apply principally to 
businesses already within the 
boundaries of the zone, an ap- 
proach he said would discour- 
age new firms from moving into 
the area. He also noted that 
zone businessmen w'ould have 
an incentive to lay off outside 
residents in order to hire local 
people and receive the hiring 
tax credit. 

"They’ve taken what was es- 
sentially a wonderful idea ic 
jump start inner city economies 
and turned it into a rather tim- 
id. pale version.” Mr. Kemp 
said. “It’s the very same trickle- 
down idea of which they are so 
critical — it does nothing but 
target more federal spending.” 

The announcement Wednes- 
day came after a yearlong com- 
petition in which about 500 cit- 
ies and rural areas submitted 
comprehensive revitalization 
plans to a Community Enter- 
prise Board chaired by Vice 
President Al Gore. 


The six urban zones are eligi- 
ble for $100 million in social 
service grants spread over 10 
years, as well as tax breaks for 
zone businesses. Los Angeles 
and Cleveland, designated as 
Supplemental Empowerment 
Zones, will receive SI 25 million 
and S90 million respectively 
from the Department of Hous- 
ing and Urban Development. 

In addition, 99 other urban 
and rural areas were named as 
“enterprise communities.” eli- 
gible for reduced benefits. 

■ L.A. Mayor Snubs Clinton 

Mavor Richard Riordan of 
Los Angeles, bitterly disap- 
pointed that the Climon admin- 
istration denied his city's bid to 
be designated an empowerment 
zone, snubbed Mr. Clinton by 
refusing to lake part in a confer- 
ence call as the president told 
leaders of other U.S. cities how 
they had fared in the competi- 
tion. the Los Angeles Times re- 
ported. 

“1 decided it would have been 
disingenuous on my part.” Mr. 
Riordan said, “to make it look 
like I was happy about what 
had happened.” 


Ex-East German Guard 
Is Freed in Shootings 

Reuters 

POTSDAM. Germany — A 
former East German border 
guard walked free from court 
on Thursday after receiving an 
18-month suspended sentence 
for shooting two people trying 
to flee to the West- 
Prosecutors had sought a 
two-and-a-half-year sentence 
for the guard, identified only as 
Gunter D. 


nnNiui urn n» M* mk im.< inr HWRwim i 


Give the 1 1 IT as a gift 
and give yourself a gift as well! 



Up to 50 o/ ° off the eoverpriee l 


A subscription to the IHT is an ideal year-long 
gift for a friend or business acquaintance — 
especially al our special gift rate of up to 50% off 
the cover price. 

For each six-or twelve-month gift subscription 
that you order we will send you the Uxford 

Special bonus 

pm ME for current subscribers t - 

-§| We will extend your own subscription * . 

by one week for each month’s gift 
^subscription you enter. For example, if you$* 
^ order two one-year gift subscriptions, your*.\ 
^ own subscription will automatically be **;. 

extended by 24 weeks. z* 


Encyclopedias illustrated above — absolutely free. 
Ancf. of course, we will send the new subscriber a 
handsome card, signed as you specify, announcing 
your gift 

Subscribe yourself 

If you are not already an IHT subscriber, you 
can also take advantage of this special gift offer. In 
addition to your subscription you will receive these 
Oxford Encyclopedias — free. 

Just complete the coupon below and send 
(or fax) us a copy for each order. And leave the rest 
to us. 

Call us toll-free in 


AUSTRIA: 0660 8155 
BELGIUM: 0800 17538 
FRANCE: 05 437 437 
GERMANY: 0130 843585 


LUXEMBOURG: 0800 2703 
SWITZERLAND: 1555757 
THE NETHERLANDS: 06 0225158 
UNITED KINGDOM: 0800895965 


Country/Currency 

12 months* 
2monthsFR& 

6 months* 

7 month FREE 

Austria 

ASeh 

6,000 

3,300 

Belgium 

BJt. 

14,000 

7^00 

Denmorfc 

D.Kr. 

3 *00 

1,900 

Finland 

FM 

%A00 

1,300 

France 

FI. 

1,950 

1,070 

Germany 

DM 

700 

385 

Great Britain 

£ 

210 

115 

Greece 

Dr. 

75,000 

41,000 

LreJond 

£H 

230 

125 

Italy 

Lire 

470000 

260,000 

Luxembourg 

LFr. 

14,000 

7,700 

Netherlands 

Ft. 

770 

420 

Norway 

NJCr. 

3,500 

1,900 

Pbrtagal 

Esc 

47,000 

3^000 

Spain 

Ptas. 

48,000 

26400 

— hand detrv. Madrid 

Ptos. 

55,000 

27,500 

Sweden (airmail) 

S.Kr. 

3,100 

1,700 

— hand delivery 

S.Kr. 

3400 

1,900 

Switzerland 

S.Fr. 

610 

335 

Red of Europe, Except CB 

5 

485 

265 

1 CH, North Africa, Forma- French Africa 
| Miocre East, Guf Stales. 9 

630 

345 

Centred and Lttft America, 

South Africa 

S 

780 

430 

Rest of Africa 

S 

900 

495 


Please Indicate which gift subscription term you prefer and fill in the recipient’s name and 
complete address, j | ]2 months (+ 52 free issues, I I 6 months (+ 26 free issues. 

I — » 364 issues in all.) I — ' 182 issues in all.) 

□ Please check here if you prefer to send the free Oxford Ency clopedias to the recipient. 

Recipient’s Name 

Address 

City/Code/Cou ntry 

My name as it should appear on the gift card 

Address 


Gty /Code/Country . 

My subscription account number. 


□ My check or money order is enclosed (payable to the International Herald Tribune). 

□ Please charge my credit card: 

C Access Cl American Express D Eurocard CD Diners O MasterCard EH Visa 
Credit card changes will be made in French Francs at current exchange rates. 

Card Nn. 

Exp. Date Signature 


For Mormato concerning hand-debv&y 'in major German ates cal Jofl 
free IHT Germany at 0130-84 85 85 or tax (069) 175413. Under 
German regutaeons. a 2-woak free period b granted tor all new onteia. 


For business orders, please indicate your VAT number: 

(IHT VAT number .- FK 7473202 1 1261) 

Return your completed coupon to: Subscription Manager, IHT. 181 Avenue Charics-de-Gaulle. 
92521 NruiHy Crdex, France. Fax: 33.1 Ui 37 0<> 51 - Tel.: 33.1 46 37 93 61. 

HeralfcSIfeEribunc 

muMQn krh nrr mu mint mt rutr 

Sjicrial pifi rali> fur new »ul*iTUw-r< unit. I Wit nihil ihrmiph Jiimiun 3 1. lW.!. 




asas.s.sg'g-g ^ I?- 8 11-11 tmm* bd Tzi' rrJDIf 




Page 6 


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1994 


OPINION 


Herald 


INTERNATIONAL 



FUBMKHED WITH THE MEW YORK TIMES AMD THE WASHINGTON POST 


Italy Should Vote Again 


tribune I In Much of Africa, RepairedFoundatwns to Build On 

° ** ± the creation of better 

waercata acceptance of fbe pnva e 

engine of growth. 


Savior of Italy eight months ago, now 
just another failed prime minister: Silvio 
Berlusconi has not done touch right in his 
brief speD in command. Yet his parting 
advice is at least half-correct. Italy, he 
says, n ee ds another election. So it does, 
although under more rigorous rules than 
Mr. Berlusconi would wish. Like other 
countries that have lately found them- 
selves emerging from years of one-party 
rule, de jure or de facto. Italy was never 
going to remake its politics by a single 
visit to the ballot box. 

A post-Berlusconi glance at the present 
Parliament shows why. A new coalition of 
the right between the Northern League of 
Umberto Bossi, the man who brought Mr. 
Berlusconi down, and the National Alli- 
ance of Gianfranco Fini? Hardly, because 
the ex-fascist, strong- Italy National Alli- 
ance does not like the liberal, decentral- 
ized Italy the Northern League wants. 

A deal between the Northern League 
and the ex-communist Democratic Party 
of the Left? Probably not, because the 
shopkeepers of northern Italy still mis- 
trust those ex-Communists. 

An allian ce between Mr. Bossi, the de- 
moralized followers of Mr. Berlusconi and 
the fragments of the old ruling parties that 
were blown apart in last March's election? 
That does not look as if it would endure. 

A caretaker government of nonpoliti- 
dans, then? That just dodges the issue. 

The fact is that Mr. Berlusconi failed 
for two reasons. One was his reluctance 
to separate prime minis terial power from 
his continuing grip on his huge business 
interests. In an Italy desperately needing 
dean-handed government, that would 
not do. But the other was the failure of 
March’s election to produce a solid new 
governing majority. 


Mr. Berlusconi never seriously tackled 
Italy’s vast public debt; this month’s bud- 
get, anyway feebler than it should have 
been, was ruined when, under the pres- 
sure of strikes and demonstrations, he 
put off the necessary cuts in Italy’s over- 
generous pension system. His budget fail- 
ure meant that he could not restore confi- 
dence to Italy’s markets, which in turn 
meant (hat he could not make a start on 
his promise to create a milli on new jobs. 
The chief cause of this weakness by a 
supposedly strong man was the wo holi- 
ness of the three-legged coalition that 
the election gave him. 

So back to the ballot box it should be, 
once a couple of things have been done to 
make a new election a better election. Mr. 
Berlusconi's present domination of Ital- 
ian television needs dose scrutiny. The 
constitutional court’s recent ruling that 
nobody should own more than two televi- 
sion networks is a step in the right direc- 
tion. And the next election should finally 
scrap proportional representation, which 
tends to produce a blurry Parliament of 
too many parties. A referendum on that 
subject is due in March. 

I.ilcft Japan, and like the countries of 
the ex-Communist world, the Italy that 
so recently escaped from its corrupt old 
regime is still groping toward a coherent 
new system of government. Such a sys- 
tem is best based on two or three parties, 
all committed to democracy but each with 
its own dear identity and its own agenda 
to pul to the voters. To construct a new 
system out of the rubble of the old one. 
lute rebuilding a city struck by an earth- 
quake, needs care and skilL In entrusting 
itself to Mr. Berlusconi. Italy showed nei- 
ther. The work should now begin again. 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. 


After a World Recession 


For four long years a recession rolled 
across the world. Now at last it is over. 
The United States was the first to go into 
it and the first, in the spring of 1991, to 
begin to pull out of it, although slowly 
ana haltingly at the beginning. Then the 
rest of the English-speaking world fol- 
lowed — Britain, Canada, Australia and 
New Zealand. In Europe the recovery 
began only last year — again, weakly 
until recently. Filially, a solid recovery is 
now under way in Japan. 

Each of the rich countries has its own 
particular responsibilities to meet in 
keeping this recovery going. The United 
States' is to keep working on its budget 
deficits and its inflation rate. Those fa- 
miliar admonitions come this week from 
the Organization for Economic Coopera- 
tion and Development, which acts as a 
sort of international council of economic 
advisers for the industrial democracies. 

In the United States, the economy’s 
growth rate probably puked in the past 
year, with the Federal Reserve Board now 
hard at work to slow it to a safer and more 
sustainable speed. Meanwhile, for the next 
couple of years growth rates in Europe and 
especially Japan are Kkdy to keep rising — 
which among other things means expand- 
ing markets for American goods. The 
huge American trade deficit will keep 
rising next year, the OECD forecasts, but 


will then level off as foreign demand 
strengthens for American exports. 

As Americans struggle with their bud- 
get deficits, they quarrel over whether 
entitlements (Social Security and the oth- 
er benefits) are too great a burden. The 
OECD observes that the United States is 
only in the middle of the range among the 
rich countries. Entitlements are much 
mare generous in Western Europe, and 
one result is that budget deficits there 
tend to be even higher than in America. 
Deficits are financed out of savings, and 
because Europeans save much more than 
Americans do they can handle big deficits 
with less strain. But the anguished debates 
over deficits and entitlements now go on 
throughout the industrial world. 

The economic success of all these 
countries and their governments depends 
heavily on what is going on elsewhere in 
the world. It is a system that puts a high 
premium on cooperation. The subject 
makes many politicians uneasy, since it 
rightly implies that no country really 
controls its own economic destiny. 

Whether the American economy is 
performing well or badly during the next 
presidential election campaign probably 
depends as much on decisions to be 
made in Tokyo, Frankfurt and London 
as on decisions in Washington. 

—THE WASHINGTON POST. 


For Korean Detente 


A navigational eiror by a U.S. Army 
helicopter crew and an overreaction by 
North Korean defenders have threatened 
to undo months of arduous negotiations to 
defuse tensions. Now North Korea has 
taken a step to defuse the crisis by repatri- 
ating the remains of the dead American 
crewman. But it should have released the 
surviving American crewman as wdL 
North Korea needs to return him by 
Christmas and provide a full accounting of 
what happened to the helicopter and its 
crew. Once the pilot is returned. Washing- 
ton and Pyongyang need to discuss ways 
to avoid similar incidents in the future.' 

From the air, the demilitarized zone 
that separates North and South Korea is 
not well demarcated, especially under a 
blanket of snow. The hills beyond it bris- 
tle with artillery and anti-aircraft batter- 
ies- When the helicopter strayed off 
course, it was on an orientation flight to 
familiarize one pilot with the ins and outs 
of a self-imposed flight exclusion zone, a 
five-mile-wide ribbon that runs along the 
demilitarized zone. In their last radio 
message, the crewmen reported that they 
were flying south of the no-fly zone; in 
fact they were north of it, and already 
made North Korean airspace. 

It is Dot dear just how they were shot 
down, or whether they had attempted to 
land, the usual procedure when helicop- 
ter pilots realize they are lost In any case, 
the incident must not be allowed to under- 
mine a just-concluded accord in which 
North Korea agreed to freeze and then 


dismantle its nuclear program in return 
for Western aid and U.S. diplomatic ties. 

A major object of that accord is to put 
American relations with North Korea on a 
new footing. It is already having that ef- 
fect. The two sides’ reaction, mainly one of 
diplomatically nuanced words, might have 
been far more venomous and provocative 
had the agreement not been in place. 

The two sides need to build on (hat 
accord. South Korea must be involved as 
wdL The demilitarized zone is a good 
place to begin. Washington, Seoul and 
Pyongyang together can establish new 
rules governing airspace near the zone, as 
well as a hot hne that provides preflight 
notification. Next, the two Koreas can thin 
Jout and move back their forces, which are 
provocatively deployed! far forward near 
the zone. Some good might come of this 
.tragedy if the United States and North 
Korea edge back from the brink. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Comment 


Next Year in Ulster 


Has the IRA, the world’s most tena- 
cious, ruthless and professional terrorist 
group, accepted [compromise]? The over- 
whelming majority of people yearn for a 
permanent peace. Sometime next year, as 
talks progress, they will find out whether 
(he IRA will let them have it 

— The Economist (London). 



International Herald Tribune 

ESTABLISHED 1887 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chaumm 

RICHARD McCLEAN. Publisher <£ Chief Executive 
JOHN VINOCUR, Eaxuan fifittr A VS» President 

• WALTER WELLS. Altafifex- • SAMUEL ABT. KATHERINE KNORR and 
CHARLES Mil CHELMORE Deputy Edam ■ CARL tib'WIR'IZ, Associate Editor 

■ ROBERT J. DONAHUE. 5Jb 'ref the fifinrW Pages • JONATHAN GAGE. Busbtess and Finance Editor 

• RENE BONDY. riepury Publisher * JAMES MdJEOD. Advertising Dinxtor 
■JUANITA L GYSPARI. Iraematknal DevAfmavDmcw DtDER BRUN. GiafaunDiretior 

DinraeurdehPubtkaaotL- RkhardD. Samoa 
Dirnrteur Adjrins de la Publication: Katharine P. Danaw 


lnk.mitii.indl Herald Tribune. IS 1 Avenue Gvarks-de-Gauflc 9252 1 NaiiDy- sur- Seine, Francc 
Td. : f 1 1 46-’7 V? CO. Pm : Cue. 46 J 7 . 0 SJ 5 1 ; Adv’. 46 37 JH 1 1 1 Internet IHr^ctsukonvie 

fiififev ftv Aim Mkfvrl Rkbardxn 5 Gmifrfun ft! Sin&porr 651). TeL <6S) 472-7768. Fax: (65) 274-2334 
Mng Dir. Aula RtffD. A'nwpaM SO douceur Rd, Hmg % TeL 852-9222-1188 Fax: 852-927211%. 
(irn Mgr. (jtrmcm: T SHiakr. Fnabkbar. 15. 60323 FmnifitrfftL TeL (0691 72 fit 55. Fax: <069) 7273/0 
Pns L'Sc JAW Crmi Sill Third Alt. New York. N.Y. 10021 TeL < 2121 752-38% Fax: (212) 7558785 
K. Athrmdng tty fir: 6} Ding Acre. Ltnuhw WC2. Tel. {07! > 836-4802. Fax: (071) 240-2254. 
5..A. tiff iitpititl de 1. 2001)00 F. PCS Nanlerre B 732021126. Commission PariUtn No. 61337 
IW4. ha nmmal Herald Tribune. AS rights reserved ISSN: 02/48052 



W ASHINGTON — It is almost two 
thousand years since Pliny wrote 
that “there is always something new out 
of Africa.” Tragic images from Rwanda, 
Zaire, Sudan and other countries mired 
in civil strife make it seem almost as 
long since there has been any good news 
out of Africa. But the successful politi- 
cal transition in South Africa was truly 
good news that a decade ago seemed 
inconceivable. Back then only a handful 
of nations embraced democracy. Today 
more than 30 countries have held elec- 


Bjr Edward V. K. Jayeox 

The writer is the World Bank vice president 
responsible for the Africa region. 


All of this change translates 
into incentives for farmers 


for private business. From 
farmers inside Africa to fund 
managers outside, people 
are responding to these new 
economic signals. 


This growing confidence should not be 
overstated, but it is based on some very 
promising economic signals as the severe 
distortions that characterized these coun- 
tries in (he early 1980s have eased. 

The most dramatic change occurred 
earlier this year when the 14 member 
countries of the CFA franc zone agreed 
to devalue their currencies, instantly 
eliminating a massive distortion. A grow- 
ing number of countries now have con- 
vertible currencies. Black market premi- 
ums are now largely a thing of the past in 
many countries, arid a number of govern- 
ments are now in the previously unheard 
of position of having to manage a surplus 
of meaning capital 

Pri cing distortions are being removed in 
country after country. Negative real inter- 
est rates, artificially low agricultural pro- 


tions, and most indicators of political 
liberalization, like freedom of the press, 
have improved significantly. 

There is also something new out of 
Africa on the economic front It is re- 
flected in the fact that the fledgling stock 
markets of the continent have shown the 
largest gains in U.S. dollar terms of all 
the world’s markets in 1994. 

Despite many problems, from lack of 
liquidity to the comparatively high risk 
involved, fund managers are starting to 
look seriously at the growth potential in 
Africa as they see a leveling off of the 
boom in emerging markets in other 
parts of the world. 


discretionary foreign exchange allocation 
regimes are systematically being reformed, 
along with inefficient public enterprises. 
As public expenditure programs have 
been cut back, unproductive projects 
have been weeded out and replaced by 
in ve st ments offering the potential of high 
returns to African economies. 

All of this change translates into in- 
centives for farmers and income for ru- 
ral areas, as well as greater opportuni- 
ties for private business. 

From farmers inside Africa to fund 
managers outride, people are responding 
to these new economic signals. The flota- 
tion of the Ashan ti Goldfield shares in 
Ghana elicited a highly positive response 
from both domestic ana nonresident in- 
vestors. Latest data on private transfers 
to the continent indicate that at least $2 
billion has returned to African countries 
in each of the last two years, in contrast 
to the negative net transfers of the 1980s. 


Merchandise exports increased by4.4 
percent per annum from 1988 to 1993-— 
a modest amount by most standards, 
but reversing a steady decline through- 
out the early 1980s. 4 

These g ains are all the more notewor- 
thy in that they occurred during a penod 
erf massive political transition within Af- 
rica, a global recession and deteriorating 
trims of trade for the continent These 
were very adverse conditions in which to 
embark on economic reforms. 

AD the encouraging signs should not 
lead to complacency. Africa still faces 
tremendous challenges, and the fives of 
very large numbers erf poor peojrte ra- 
piain blighted by years of economic dis- 
tortions, misguided investments and in- 
adequate services. In fact the economic 
imp rovements have brought the human 
and institutional needs of the continent 
into sharp relief. 

Health indicators generally continue 
to show steady improvement. 

In education, the bedrock of Africa’s 
potential for prosperity, the picture is 
more mixed. In eight countries, wars 
and other disruptive factors have pre- 
vented any significant improvement 

Of the rest 12 countries have nearly 
achieved universal primary education, 
and of the remaining 23 about half made 
significant progress m expanding prima- 
ry en ro llment rates during the past five 
years. This is a significant accomplish- 
ment in light of the rapid growth in the 
school-age population and the economic 
constraints faced by governments. 

Economic growth is undermined by 
population growth, so the benefits are 
being spread thinly. Some countries have 
manag ed to bring the population explo- 
sion under control, but more widespread 
declines in fertility must be achieved. 

At the same time, growth must acceler- 
ate »nd die ensuing benefits must be more 
equitably distributed if poverty in Africa 
is to decrease. Effective investments in the 
social sectors must be complemented by 




about to fall down, aUthenuccd^mn. 
The evidence of the last few years ts mat 
the foundations of the buildmg that is 
Africa are now much stronger. 

Africa’s future is incre^ingiy mi- 
ca’s hands. African leaders and «»- 
nomic managers now carrythebt^^ 
of convincing investors and Sonora 
multilateral and bilateral — that they 
remain committed to reform and have 
taken ownership of g°°d programs 
which reflect the real needs of their 
people. If they can build on recent de- 
velopments, they will ensure not wily 
thatAfrica is not deserted, but that it is 
a continent of opportunity. 

International Herald Tribune. 


Forward in Mozambique 


T HE success that South Africa is hav- 
ing in budding democracy is influ- 
encing all erf southern Africa. 

When the civil war factions in Mozam- 
bique got off the democracy track before 


the October elections there, a regional 

id South 


conference led by Zim babwe and 
Africa’s first deputy president, Thabo 
Mbcki, told them to shape up — : demo- 
cracy or else. The region thus supported 
the people of Mozambique, who are fed 
up with 16 years of civil war. 

In the end the elections were a suc- 
cess. President Joaquim Chissano’s Fre- 
limo movement won a confidence vote. 
It remains to consolidate dem 
with a promised role assured for 
Renamo opposition group. The men 
and women of Mozambique have their 
future in their hands. 

— Robert H. Phinny, a former US. 
ambassador who observed the electoral 
process in Mozambique. 


Chechnya Crisis: A Democratic Russia Can’t Play Imperial Games 


A NN ARBOR, Michigan — 
. Hundreds of miles south of 
Moscow, 40,000 Russian troops 
have surrounded Grozny, the 
capital of the breakaway republic 
of Chechnya. One-ton bombs are 
falling on simple wooden houses 
and decaying Soviet-era build- 
ings, and twi« of thousands of 
refugees are fleeing the war zone. 

On Wednesday, as Russian 
troops tightened the siege of the 
city, evidently holding bade from 
an all-out assault, President Boris 
Yeltsin promised the Chechen 
people economic aid once the 
fighting ended 

In using force against one of 
Russia’s indigenous peoples for 
the first time since the collapse of 
the Soviet Union, Mr. Yeltsin has 
fundamentally changed the na- 
ture of relations among the na- 
tionalities of the Russian Federa- 
tion. Retreat now may be as 
difficult as returning to the pre- 
carious political balance between 
nationalities that has kept this 
huge state from splintering. 

From Moscow, the conflict 
looks like a rebellion against the 
state and the rule erf law. For 
many Russians, the Chechen re- 
bels are uncivilized bandits who 
use their tiny republic as a base 
for raiding their neighbors and 
exporting criminals to the centers 
of Russian civilization. 

As seen from Grozny, Russia is 
the hated colonial power against 
which the Chechens’ forefathers 
fought for centuries. 

And as seen from Washington, 
the conflict is one more ancient 
tribal struggle, but at least this 
time it is Russia’s problem, not 
America’s, for Chechnya is recog- 
nized internationally as part of 
the federation. 


By Ronald Grigor Sony 


While pundits despair that na- 
tionalism based on primordial 
hatreds is part of the human con- 
dition, eternal and unavoidable, 
students of history remind us how 
modem, constructed and often 
fragile nations are. 

At any one time most people 
are at peace with their neighbors, 
despite religious, cultural and lin- 


By using the military 
against Qiechnya, 
Yeltsin undermines his 
own democracy. Only 
negotiation— endless 
talking and compromise 
— can keep the 
fragile states of the 
post-Soviet tcorld from 


guistic differences. And although 
identity, ethnic or otherwise, is 
buDt on a sense of distinction 
from others, difference does not 
inevitably descend to murder. 
What leads to war is more often 
the failure of leaders, if not the 
manip ulation of fear and insecu- 
rity by opportunistic politicians. 

Peaceful resolution of conflict 
in a democracy requires the oppor- 
tunity to express discontents, and 
evenhanded mediation by stale 
authorities. Most of the require- 
ments for a peaceful settlement of 


the Chechnya conflict are absent 

Yet, although Chechens may 
see Russians as vicious imperial- 
ists and Russians deem Chechens 
criminals, these images are not 
the only lens through which one 
side sees the other. 

Independent and culturally 
distinct as Chechens are, they 
have lived for 150 years within 
tiie Russian and Soviet empires, 
have been educated in Russian 
schools and universities and have 
imbibed much of the culture and 
mores of the Russian people. 

Almost all Chechens speak their 
native Chechen language, hut 
three-quarters can speak Russian 
as well. And Chechens have not 
taken their anger out on the hun- 
dreds of thousands of Russians 
who live in the Chechen republic. 

The conflict in Chechnya is fun- 
damentally not about ethnicity or 
religion — although in some ac- 
counts the specter of Islam has 
been raised once again as if it 
explains everything, since the 
country is predominantly Muslim. 

It is true that as Chechens devel- 
op their post-Soviet identity, open 
identification with Islam has be- 
come more common and the use of 
Islamic symbols more prevalent. 
Some of the rebel soldiers have 
been waving flags bearing the 
crescent moon ana star. 

But far more important is their 
mistrust of the Russian govern- 
ment. which they feel has misruled 
their homeland. In an era when 
self-determination and the belief 
that ethnicity gives a people the 
right to teniioiy and statehood 
dominate international relations, 
the Chechen arguments make a 
good deal of theoretical sense. 


The dztenuna of Chechnya’s fu- 
ture, however, is complicated by a 
second internationally recognized 
principle that often tuns counter 
to national self-detennination — 
the sanctity of benders. Here Rus- 
sia has the. superior argument. 

If Chechnya is allowed to se- 
cede unilaterally from Russia — 
or Abkhazia from Georgia, Ka- 
rabakh from Azerbaijan, Trans- 
Dniester from Moldova or Cri- 
mea from Ukraine — the way 
will be open for other national 
regions within the Russian Fed- 
eration to declare independence. 
A war of all against all will begin 
over borders that are as artifidaJ 
as any in the wodd. 

, Is it impossible to find a com- 
promise between national self-de- 
termination and the sanctity of 
borders, and to lay out a path 
toward negotiation rather than 
war? If the intensifying conflict in 
Chechnya is not quickly defused 
it will create an intractable pro- 
blem far more difficult to solve — 
an escalating interethnic war on 
Russia’s southern frontier and the 
possible collapse of the fragile re- 
lations between Russia's many 
ethnic groups. 

Although no solution will be 
easy, negotiations in these con- 
flicts must include maximum 
concessions on each side. The 
Chechens — and the other na- 
tionalities — should agree to stay 
in Russia, while the Russians 
must recognize the right to de 
facto self-rule for the Chechens. 

The war will end only if both 
sides are convinced to accept less 
than their maximum goals. An 
imposed victory will simply lead 
to simmering resentments that 
will boil over into new conflicts. 

Meaningful negotiations re- 


The West Should Not Indulge Moscow’s Brutal Attack 

By flora Lewis 


quire a means of enforcement, 
and enforcement is possible only 
when state authorities are recog- 
nized as legitimate and authorita- 
tive. Dzhokar Dudayev, Chech- 
nya’s leader, was elected 
president in 1991 but in dubious 
circumstances, and his govern- 
ment is being challenged by rival 
leaders who are only adding to 
the instability. New elections are 
imperative so that the rule of law 
can be established. 

Russia most also work to cam 
legitimacy as a state. Much of th% 
problem with the Caucasian bor- 
der stems from Russia’s own 
identity crias. Is it to be a multi- 
national, democratic state within 
its current borders, or the hear to 
the Soviet empire with c laims on 
its independent neighbors? 

Internally, Russia is too weak 
to frilly control its army or even 
collect all its tax revenue, much 
less bring to heel dissident repub- 
lics, and thus is compromised in 
the eyes of its constituents. 

The age of empire, in which 
one nationality exploited and 
dominated another, is over. Che- 
chens will not accept Moscow as 
their ruler if the Kremlin does not 
demonstrate its right to rule and 
show in good faith that the small- 
est peoples of the Russian Feder- 
ation can expect to receive real 
benefits from their association 
with the giant in the north. 

By using the militaxy a gains t 
Chechnya, Mr. Yeltsin under- 
mines Ins own democracy. Only 
negotiation. — endless talking 
and compromise — can keep the 
fragile states of the post-Soviet 
world from splintering. 

The crisis in Qiechnya is the 
result of the failure, so far, of 
democratic state-budding in the 
Russian Federation. 

Washington needs to caution 
its friend in the Kremlin that 
Russia’s war against its own dti- 


P AR1S — It look the Clinton 
administration but a mo- 
ment to proclaim the armed Rus- 
sian attack on Chechnya just an 
‘‘internal matter," none of 
America's business. This was a 
knee-jerk application of the poli- 
cy of supporting President Boris 
Yeltsin no matter what, and a 
mindless negation of America's 
stand on human rights. 

It is a flagrant exception to — 
or a reversal of? — decades of 
insistence by Washington that 
bow other governments savage 
their own citizens is a proper 
subject for international con- 
cern. This was enshrined in the 
Helsinki final act of 1975 and 
renewed in the Charter of Paris 
of 1990, both formally signed by 
the Soviet Union, whose treaty 
commitments Russia assumed 
and vowed to fulfill. 

True, there is nothing practical 
the United States can do about 
the destruction of Grozny. But 
that doesn’t mean it needs to pre- 
tend it doesi't notice and doesn’t 
care This is a significant new step 
in the turbulent development of 
what is supposed to be the new 
Russia, ana it will have conse- 
quences that may reach very far. 

The implication is that Ameri- 
can support is for President Bo- 
ris Yeltsin above all regardless 
of the threat his orders mean for 
a peaceful Russian democracy 
and for his people. 

Not all countries have accepted 
the Helsinki principle that nation- 
al sovereignty is no excuse for vio- 
lent repression. China doesn't, 
Burma doesn't. Iraq didn't, and 
the United States joined with allies 
to establish an aerial protection 
zone for Iraq’s northern Kurds. 
But the Soviet Union did, grad- 


ually at first, giving no more than 
lip service to Helsinki until Leo- 
nid Brezhnev himself began to 
make minor concessions, ft took 
then President Jimmy Carter to 
push human rights successfully as 
a serious foreign policy issue. 
And we thought President Bill 
Clinton had endorsed it. 

It isn’t even “realpolitik,” let 
alone “idealpolitik,” to ignore 
what is happening, quite apart 
from the intricate issues that 
Chechnya’s attempt to secede 
from the Russian Federation 
provokes. 

Russia’s democrats have pro- 
tested bitterly against the warlike 
assault on civilians, and even 
some notoriously nondemocratic 
senior generals — including Gen- 
eral Boris Gromov, who was the 
last Soviet commander in Af- 
ghanistan, and General Alexan- 
der Lebed, commanding the 14th 
Army in Moldova — expressed 
opposition. That is presumably 
because they foresaw better than 
Mr. Yeltm’s closer advisers how 
badly it was likely to go. 

There is no doubt that persistent 
Russian force can overwhelm the 
million and a half Chechens, and 
sympathetic neighbors for that 
matter, as it did several times in 
the last two centuries. But doubts 
about the reliability and readiness 
of the troops have been confirmed, 
to the embarrassment of Defense 
Minister Pavel Grachev, who pre- 
dicted that the offensive would 
succeed in a matter of hours. 

More important, the daring of 
the young general who refused to 
lead his tanks into Grozny, saying 
thai the Russian army does not 
shoot at its own people and that 


its mission is not to kill civilians, 
shows that a new Russia is indeed 
alive in unsuspected places, if not 
yet dominant. 

The precedent set by the Che- 
chens’ 1991 proclamation of inde- 
pendence is a menace to the co- 
herence of the Russian Federation. 
It is possible to understand Mos- 
cow's frustration and irritation, 
lest others in their stew of nation- 
alities follow the example, with- 
out accepting Moscow's methods. 

Apparently, Mr. Yeltsin 
thought that the general disdain 
and dislike for the Muslim Che- 
chens among Russians, who con- 
sider them crooks and thugs, 
would make his aggressive deci- 
sion popular. He has been trying 
to overthrow Chechnya's bom- 
bastic President Dzhokar Du- 
dayev for some time — since the 
summer by covertly arming and 
aiding a rebel force. 

That failed, but it did achieve 
a rallying of the people to a lead- 
er whom they had widely de- 
nounced, by making him the na- 
tional symbol against intolerant 
Russian power. What would have 
happened if instead Moscow had 
just waited for another election 
in the republic, offering induce- 
ments for continued links? 

Nobody will know, because re- 
gression to czarisi and Stalinist 
tactics aroused a fierce resistance 
that will last and perhaps spread 
to neighbors. 

It will not improve Moscow’s 
relations with unhappy Georgia 
(forced to accept Russian troops 
as “protectors” against a Mos- 
cow-inspired revolt two years 
ago) ana Azerbaijan that their 
borders with Russia have been 


sealed as part of the camp ai gn £ C 
isolate Chechnya. 

Whatever happens, Mr. Yeltsin 
has weakened himself again and 
undermined his own assertion of 
faith in democracy. The United 
States does not help him by deny- 
ing its principles, and it weakens 
friendly forces in Russia at a 
time when Moscow’s leadership 
is playing up to nationalists with 
anti-Western gestures. 

Right, the West can't save the 
Russians from their own worst 
impulses. But the least it can do is 
speak up with alarm and distress 
when they head for disasters. 

B Flora Lewis. 


zens hardens the differences be- 
tween ethnic Russians and non- 
Russians, who make up nearly 
one-third of its population. 

The White House cannot af- 
ford to be unconcerned about 
the conflict along Russia's most 
vulnerable frontier, for the fate 
of democracy and political sta- 
bility in Russia is not Moscow’s 
problem alone. 




Ik 


.liars** 1 


i alll !.I»‘‘ Rl 


. . Vfcfed 




ftm 

.. I iiA. »-> 

. „ i.aW 

. . t.j*j C- i 






7^- 


The writer, professor of political 
science at the University of Chica- 
go. fr author of “The Revenge of 
the Past: Nationalism, Revolution 
md the Collapse of the Soviet 
Union. ” He contributed this can- 
mem to The New York Times. 



IN OUR PAGES-. 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 
1894: Dreyfus Sentenced 


J 


PARIS — The trial erf Ca ptain 
Dreyfus was concluded yesterday 
[Dec. 22 j. The prisoner, by unan- 
imous verdict of the Court, is 
sentenced to imprisonment for 
life jn some fortified place and to 
military degradation, for deliv- 
ering documents of interest to 
the national defence to German 
agents. The penalty of military 
degradation, said a staff officer 
yesterday, is more terrible for an 
officer than that of transporta- 
tion for life or even that of death. 


panon by going on strike for high- 
er wages and better conditions: 


--Cv. 4 


1944c Jews Destitute 


1919: Waiters on Strike? 


LONDON — Servility is no long- 
cr one of the attributes of English 
waiters, and the public is likely to 
be inconvenienced as the white- 
fronted, napkin-bearing knights of 
tiie table are considering follow ing 
the lead given them by nearly ev- 
ery other branch of human occu- 


— Almost one half of 
w.000 Jews now in Paris are des- 
“ d “ desperate need of 
□dp. AH of them lost virtually all 
SLw 1 tetoogings, even their 
cjotibe^ «*en the Germans and 

Vlc ky French confiscated Jewish 
Property. Their hoases and apart- 
ments were taken away and for 

Sl 2 ° Sl ^ Hrt ** stm ^ve no- 
r^T^'Wisnonewsof 
W l°, werc deported 
to femany OT Poland. T htwotst s 
fears are held for their fate. Many “ 
Jewish children 

under*™ 1 T*- were kc P l 
underground, scattered in small 

“d false identity p* 


irS* P: 

As j- 


>0 




"’■TV 




’ * t* 

* S ;b 




4 ■ 






’'fttSfcj 

t VT 


y— w >rr . n . y„ an n ii m i r . H M W iW F 

1 \Sj> 

fer in ■ , .!■!> . — * 













5 <’^>41. 


, • Cj} ^ 

-- • 


• V> ■" ies^u* 
'-0-7. ^O s ".4, 

: ;^c^3f' 5S *5 

" =>* -* = =?t2% ; 

<-. -C; (fc i 
.■-i- 7-i ! 

;J 

::. -■'•- 1 - ■’Bv ! 

_ -V-. -«’>i!,, . 


-a. 


« Ufe 


•- 


:: “: rj** 


:.JT; , " -’5* 

:r 5 - . ' *=*& 
::r-^ 

Vw *«*, 
: '.;_ -r ^c.*5. 




•• '- . v.. :■■•*’■•* 

-:,■ ■ . " -Steer*; 


- -‘S irar 


'ia! Gann 


— _.•. i.n ..k 
• • »' •• :■. 


^ t:.<* 

. : :vr-.' i; 


-.- • _.*i — 

. ., -_r^ 


IM 


l- jr* 


> "•' • •. -• - 


— ■. U*~ ■> 


* 'v ■• •* , 


.-. >1 ‘ ^ ¥ '‘ C-’"? 4 ' 




. ^V'*‘ 


J ■" 



OPINION 


U e Marxist Notion of Class 
Shouldn’t Rule in America 


Tt 7ASH7 w/-“iy~. W Uliana Safire 

W Hc^SP^ * 1 "2JJ and producUve as greedy Upper?? 


TY Houv Tk- ^ r“ ew|| i*e 
have i^ e ^^hphrase must 

^ve s^jed ^ good idea: Mar- 

Righis*' with Bil? n ri™. C f iU 0{ 

E?“ of a “middfe-SS 



tax cut** »« V-- “uuuie-ciass 

piacation “ P a necessar y 

^S 32 &£j£L o^rtaxed as J 


^e-Qaasmu of ^.. ai a 

is rirSt ^“8 we don't need 

SL*. J " assertion of economic 
n^is, long the basis for budeet- 
bwhng “entitlements.” p£3£i 
fJP*®? proposes that all taxpayers 
subsidize a large portion of whS 

SSfrJiEKS WiU spCDd on col- 

IC 8® *or their youngsters. 
^^ g ^ dedu . cUb,e what some 


^nd on higher educational 
peaL But by increasing demand, it 


The notion that equal 
opportunity can be 
Snaranieedby sprinkling 
college degrees on everyone 
■ is going out with the 
welfare state. 


That applies political demography 
to outdated sociology. The divisive 
Marxist concept of class is social as 
well as economic, and Americans 
should never accept its confines. 
Class is not determine d by income 
alone; richies can be low-class slobs 
and the genteel down-at-the- heels 
can be higb-class povertarians. 

Only because the vast majority of 
voters are near the non poor, nonrich 
median do pols lump these diverse 
individuals together in a deliciously 
average economic-social “class," to 
be flattered and cosseted. But the 
people with the most voting power 
are not a dass of any kind. 

The “middle-class tax cut," which 
is at the heart of (his rhetorical de- 
meaning of America's real Bill of 
Rights, is the newest way of saying 
"Let's keep on soaking the rich.” 

Since the poor, who pay little in- 


LOW 

fi£T 

SANTA 


HAVE \OU 

EVERA&KEI? ffrCfc" 
YOURSELF-- 

whose is rr Jx^- V 

AU-GOlhJGb 

TOENDP / jCE 


The Anticipation of a Gift 
Retold in Basses and Altos 


By Edwin M 

VIJASHINGTON — The Christ- 
W mas tree had been trimmed 


Yoder Jr. 


and its lights set twinkling in the 
gathering darkness of the twilit 
room. “Listen!" 1 said to my com- 
panion. “Just listen to the des- 


MEANWHILE 





come tax anyway, arc not much af- 
fected by Mr. Clinton's plan, the 
meaning of the M. C. T. C. is plain: 
Exdude those nasty richies from the 
relief we give the deserving middle. 
Republicans with their own 
M. C. T. C. labeling go along with 
the politics of populist resentment. 

But the evokers of class warfare 
are out of step with Che people they 
purport to sjrealc for. Most of them 
see the problem with taxes not as 


.pushes up the exorbitant costs of 
• college and does nothing to encour- 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


An Urgent Nuclear Issue 


age students to work while studyin g “The rich are not paying their fair 
The only free- market way to encour- share,” but “We’re all paying too 
age prestige colleges to cut costs and much, especially me." 


age prestige colleges to cut costs and 
become competitive is to reduce 
' subsidies and tamp down demand. 

Let’s say the unsayablen Higher 
education is a privilege, not a nght, 
best to be earned by high-school 
scholarship merit and willingness to 
work or borrow. The notion that 
equal opportunity can be guaranteed 
by sprinkling degrees on everyone is 
going out with the welfare state. 

The second thing we don't seed is 
the embrace of "class” as a way to 
categorize American society. 

Here’s the current state of 
warfare. To be a member of the 
Lower Class is to be a helpless vic- 
tim of an unfair system, or a lazy 
bum. To be a member of the Middle 
Qass is to be a wonderful main- 
streamer, justly resentful of being 
put upon by the leeches below and 
top-hatted bloodsuckers above. To 
be a member of the Upper Class is to 
be selfish and sinful 

What kind of a warped outlook is 
this to apply to a quarter-billion 
Americans? Why let jpolitidans par 
tronize the poor as pitiable Lowers, 
lionize those closest to median in- 
comes as long-suffering Middles, 
and satanize the most successful 


People near the median would like 
to keq> what they earn, make the 
savings work for them arid thereby 
become "upper class." Such ambition 
is not to be apologized for; it used to 
be described as the American Dream. 

Central to the Clintonite exclu- 
sionary sell is that the richies stole 
everybody else blind in the *805. But 
from 1982 to 1989, as Reaganites cut 
tax rates, the income of those closest 
to the middle rose sharply. 

Another big he is that the Republi- 
cans caused the deficit explosion. 
Throughout tbe '80s, the primary 
pressure to spend came from Tip 
CTNeOl’s Democrats. As tax rates 
fell, tax receipts rose, as supply-adere 
predicted, but the spending binge — 
insufficiently resisted by Ronald 
Reagan — came from House Demo- 
crats who now pretend that the Re- 


for quadrupling the deficit 
In Mr. Clinton's coming Republi- 
can half-term, the healthiest and 
fairest tax relief will be across the 
board, flattening rates and closing 
loopholes for everyone — all-class, 
no^lass economic policy. 

The New York Times. 


Regarding “ After the Nuclear 
Party, Cleaning Up Isn't Optional" 
(Opinion, Dec. 14): 

Jessica Mathews highlights some 
of the nuclear legacy of the Cold 
War — the rising stockpiles of fissile 
materials from disman tled warheads 
and all active reactors, the lack of 
dependable accounting and the par- 
alyzing conundrum of nuclear waste 
disposition. But asserting that “the 
largest and most immediate nuclear 
threat comes from theft” discounts 
the inherently unsafe Russian-de- 
signed RBMK and WER reactors 
now running in Eastern Europe, also 
a part of that legacy. 

High-priority financial commit- 
ments from the Group of Seven, tbe 
European Investment Bank, the U.S. 
Import-Export Bank and the Europe- 
an Bank for Reconstruction and De- 
velopment to retrofit safety features 
on these reactors attest to the urgent 
need to doing something with them. 
It is significant that the International 
Atomic Energy Agency has designat- 
ed Bulgaria’s Kozloduy plant tbe 
most dangerous in the world. 

Kozloduy's reactors lack an emer- 
gency core-cooling system, contain- 
ment for primary pipe ruptures and 
sufficient fire protection, while their 
pressure vessels and welds, subject 
to embrittlement, cannot be proper- 
ly inspected. Kozloduy lacks ade- 
quate storage for its 600 tons of 
spent fuel — all this In an earth- 


quake-active area. Kozloduy, on ac- 
cident waiting to happen, is a real 
and immediate nuclear threat. 

JOHN OTRANTO. 
Executive Director. 
Global Care. Munich. 


A Necessary Grounding? 

Regarding "U.S. Curbs ATRs In 
Icy Weather" (Dec. Hi): 

A French-Italian plane, the ATR. 
has been grounded by U.S. red tape 
for rather vague reasons. Of course, 
every time a Boeing crashes there is 
nothing to worry about. This shock- 
ing behavior calls into question the 
notion of basic free trade. 

JEAN M. G. CHESNEAU. 

La Croix- Valmer, France. 


aggression initiated by Japan, they 
would have remained civilians. 

Whether it is right or not to put 
a mushroom cloud on a stamp, as 
the Ll.S. Postal Service proposed to 
do. I don't know. But it is wrong to 
.suggest that war is only “between 
soldiers." War always involves ordi- 
nary people, who are forced to shed 
blood because of lousy leadership. 

ERLING GARATUN. 

Bergamo, Italy. 


canL” From the stereo speakers 
sounded the grand chords of the 
grandest of Adveni hymns: 

Lo! He comes with clouds de- 
scending 

Once for favoured sinners slain; 

Thousand thousand saints at- 
tending 

Swell the triumph of his train! 

Most of our ways of celebrating 
Christmas, as T. S. Eliot wrote 
many years ago, are unsatisfactory. 
But for me, one reliably satisfac- 
tory way is to hear again the music 
we reserve exclusively for this sea- 
son. And nothing rekindles the 
spirit so well as the yearly Advent 
services recorded by the choristers 
of King's College, Cambridge. 

These great works of word and 


ng scheme of things gave those who 
lived in it a sense of cosmic impor- 
tance. In such a world, the reappear- 
ance of a cloud-girded messiah must 
have been easier to imagine than it 
would be in A. D. 1994. 

Not that apocalyptic interests 
are extinguished. Books like "The 
Late Great Planet Earth,” with 
their timetables of catastrophe, are 
as minutely coordinated with bibli- 
cal passages as the chronologies of 
Archbishop Ussher. They sell by 
the millions and are taken seriously 
by many. Every now and then you 
read of devotees gathering on hill- 
tops to await doomsday. 

For me, however, the more sub- 


dued apocalyptic imagery of "Lo! 
He comes with clouds descending,” 
magnificently sung, is a more plau- 
sible — and certainly more pleas- 
ant — substitute. We earthlings 
have had to gear down our sense of 
cosmic centrality. Our adventurous 
cosmology has distanced us by 
hundreds of light-years from the 
Ptolemaic universe, demoting us to 
a min or position in a fifth-rate gal- 
axy, one of thousands or millions. 

Yet this demotion has not dimin- 
ished our human longing for a prin- 
ciple of transcendence, a palpable 
connection between our small world 
and the music of the spheres. The 
small er our little gram of sand on 
the great beach of time, the more 
necessary it is to find a reliable link 
to the unseen, the ultimate, the holy. 

In his book “Real Presences,” 
George Steiner has labored heroically 
to put this universal longing into 
warns and to explain why it is that 
music is so often found to be its 
mediating language. “Music,” he 
says, “puts our bong as men and 
women in touch with that which tran- 
scends die sayable, which outstrips 
the analyzable ... It continues to be 
the unwritten theology of those who 
lack or reject any formal creed. 
... For man y human beings, religion 
has been the music which they believe 

in.” Yes, something Kke that; and it is 
no mean belief. Otherwise, why ex- 
claim to my companion as the last 
notes of the great anthem die away to 
echoes: “Heavenly music!” 

Washington Post Writers Group. 


song are, in their way, a protest 
asainst the distortion of a season of 


Soldiers and Civilians 


The issue is not comparing the 
number of dead, nor is it the Japa- 
nese reaction to the war or to the 
U.S. postage stamp commemorating 
the bombings. The issue is whether 
we are to glorify the weapons of war. 

KIYOKO fWASAJCI. 

London. 


In “Remembering the Bomb” 
(Letters, Dec. 7). Leslie Shenck ob- 
jects to the argument that it was 


'Ahead of Her Time' 


necessary to drop the atomic bomb 
on Hiros'hima and Nagasaki to save 


on Hiroshima and Nagasaki to save 
the lives of U.S. soldiers. She states. 
“I always thought soldiers were 
supposed to kill other soldiers." 

There is no difference, with re- 
gard to the worth of human life. 
between a soldier and a civilian. 
And a nation must first and fore- 
most do what is necessary to protect 
its own citizens. 

Most Americans who served in 
World War II did so not by choice 
but by obligation. If it were not for 


Regarding “ A Gaffe Too Many: 
U.S. Health Chief Out" (Dec. 10): 

Dr. Joycelyn Elders, the UJS. sur- 
geon-general, was very clear about 
her job but too far ahead of her time. 
If inching masturbation in school 
is, for the moment, too much to 
expect, it should at least be made 
abundantly dear to youngsters that 
the practice is normal 
It is a pity for America to have let 
Dr. Elders go, and a loss for Ameri- 
can children. 

EFROWEIN. 

Uithoorn, Netherlands. 


against the distortion of a season of 
renewal and meditation by frantic 
getting and spending. They also re- 
mind us, yearly, of the neglect of 
Advent, the season of preparation. 

Advent in its origins reflects a fas- 
cinating constant of human psycho- 
logy — that the anticipation of a gift, 
however great or modest, is often a 
greater part of the pleasure. And that 
must be doubly true of something so 
astonishing as the gift of redemption 
to a weary and errant world. 

By now, listening to the choir, we 
can imag ine the scene in King's 
great vaulted chapeL The last great 
affi rmativ e strains of expectation 
boom out in basses and altos under 
the embroidering descant of boys' 
voices. Magic. 

Tbe wards they sing, should we 
care to notice than, are EteraHy apoo- 
alyptic. These voices are singing of 
the second coming of a messiah to 
earth, veiled in douds, and surround- 
ed by saints. Those words, taken oth- 
er than poetically, would challenge 
tbe credulity of listeners now many 
centuries estranged from early Pales- 
tine — or even from the compact, 
earth-centered cosmos we recall from 
our reading of Dante and Milton. 

In that earlier universe, as yet un- 
extended by anything like the Hub- 
ble telescope, our small middle-aged 
star hangs majestically suspended in 
its central place, a little below heav- 
en itself and serenaded by the music 
of the starry spheres. That comfort- 


Letters intended for publication 
should be addressed “Letters to the 
Editor" and contain the writer's si- 
gnature, name and full address. Let- 
ters should be brief and are subject 
to editing We cannot be responsible 
for the return of unsolicited ma- 
nuscripts. 




BOOKS 


9 HIGHLAND ROAD 


WHAT THEY'RE READING 


By Michael Winerip. 451 pages. 
$25. Pantheon Bodes. 


Reviewed by 
Terence Monmaney 


F ROM the opening of insane 

asylums a century and a 
half ago to the emptying of gar- 
gantuan menial institutions be- 
ginning in the 1960s, the care of 
people with mental disorders 
has been a recutring nightmare 
of false hopes, willful abuse and 
shrugging neglect. 

In the booming 1980s, the 
failure to follow up on patients 
who had been blithely de-instt- 

rationalized became manifest m 
the ragged multitudes of home- 
less psychotics left in the dust 
by prosperity’s gold chariot. 

Now, in this heyday of self- 
actualization, the issue of the 
homeless mentally _ ill comes 

down to “quahty of hfe — not 

theirs, of course, but ours. 

The compound plight of peo- 
ple who are poor and insane has 
languished atop the heap of in- 
tractable social issues for so 
long that Michaud Winerip s ^9 
Highland Road” is a sweet sur- 
prise. 


Brooke, the director 
of tbe Clark Art Institute in 


TViBianistown, Massachusetts, 
is rereading “ Portrait of Max ” 
by S. N. Behrman, a series of 
interviews with Max Beerbohm 
at the end of his life. 

“He comes over as a delight- 
ful character, an amusing dan- 
dy Kke some of the cartoons he 
drew.” (John Bnaxton, IHT) 


The author, now the deputy 


news at The New York Times, 
spent two years observing the 
comings and goings at a govern- 
ment-financed group home for 
the mentally m in suburban 
Long lytoitd. 

In the past, crusading jour- 
nalists who ventured into the 
man t pi -frftflitii -care system re- 
vealed it to be a disaster, a 
snake pit. Winerip produced 
something wonderfully differ- 
ent: an expose of progress. 

He was there from the start, 
reportin g on the fracas that 
arose when the health authori- 
ties first proposed converting a 


bouse on a leafy Glen Cove 
street into a supervised resi- 
dence for a dozen mentally ill 
adults. Neighbors formed a 
“civic association” to oppose it 
A local chiropractor lea the at- 
tack, hinting darkly that a 
school bus stop was nearby and 
the residents might be danger- 


ous. Tbe mayor said privately 
that he would back the home; 
then came out against it The 
town hired a powerful law firm 
to block the project in court 

After a delay of nearlytwo 
years, the residence at 9 High- 
land Road finally opened, 
rtianlrs largely to state laws that 
protect such facilities and to tbe 
persistence of a social worker 
named Linda Slezak, the 
home's director. 

Winerip does not hide his ad- 
miration for Slezak, who grant- 
ed him full access to the home, 
and she is a convincing heroine, 
racing up and down Long Is- 
land to battle angry citizens, 
inert bureaucrats and robo- 
shrinks. 

Winerip conveys the group 
home's workings in braring de- 
tail, down to the Hve-in counsel- 
ors’ meager $T6,640-a-year 
starting salary and the kilowatts 
the place used. 

As a rule, the residents were 
sufficiently competent to get 
along outride a hospital but not 


BRIDGE 

By Alan Truscott tnunp 


National r ■ - 

niors. and a 

Richard Hunt, John Suthfr^’ 
Dan Morse, Zeke Jab hour, 
Russ Arnold and Chuck Said. 

The losers of IheJ ^«- n jf!’ 1 
playoff were Harnsh Bennett- 
Joan Remey. WillMiEdwj; 
Howard Hertz berg, Robert Ky 
der and Duncan Phillip- Esbeirg 
as South brought borne four 
hearts on the diagramed deal 
from the semifinal stage- 

A diamond was led and the 
ace was held up for ong round 
South’s remaining d,amo .“‘J 
w ruffed, and a heart was 
to the king- This revealed the 


trump split, and West held up 
his ace. South cashed the king 
and ace of clubs, collecting the 
Queen, and led to the spade 
king. He finessed the spade jack 
successfully, cashed tbe spade 
ace, and reached the endtng at 
left below. 

Esberg knew that West was 
down to four trumps, so he lefl 
the dub jack. West had to niff 
and lead a trump, permitting 
South to make a contract that 
failed in the replay. 


sure-footed enough to make it 
mi their own. Counselors and 
social workers ran group meet- 
ings, doled out the residents' 
medications, helped organize 
their daytime activities and oth- 
erwise guided their tentative 
forays into the world. 

When illnesses flared into 
crises, counselors ushered resi- 
dents to hospitals and saved 
their beds at 9 Highland Road 
nntil the storms passed. 

Winerip easily convinces us 

“most^humane treatment for 
mentally ill people, but we still 
wonder how often it succeeds. 

Still, there’s no doubt that the 
group home is the best ap- 
proach and happily among the 
cheapest. It costs taxpayers 
135,000 a year to care for seme- 
one in a group home, compared 
with $120,000 in a state hospi- 
tal, Winerip reports. 

This apparent savings is no 
reason to cut government men- 
tal health budgets, only to 
transfer the vast sums long con- 
trolled by state mental institu- 
tions to community-based pro- 


This ground-breaking, im- 
passioned expose w31 change 
the way you look at menial ill- 
ness itself, not to mention com- 
munity-based mental health 
care. It’s one of those rare inves- 
tigations that should prompt 
Congress to pound the gavel 
and get to tire bottom of this 
incredible use of taxpayer mon- 
ey. 

Hie workers at 9 Highland 
Road should be summoned to 
Washington and held account- 
able for their actions. Then they 
should be given a ticker-tape 
parade. 


Terence Monmaney, who has 
covered science for The New 
Yorker and is the writer of "Asy- 
lum," a documentary film about 
caring for the mentally ill, wrote 
this for The New York Times. 


north 


WEST 
*Q1Q3 
O A 10 8 5 2 
0343 

♦ Q1B 


NORTH 

♦ A J5 
09743 
062 

♦ AJ86 

EAST 

49972 

t P- 

0 K Q 10 9 5 
49752 


INTERNATIONAL 



4 — 


SOUTH fl» 


097 


4K64 


0 — 


<? KQ J8 


*J8 


0 A87 

WEST 

east 


♦ K 4 3 

O A 10 8 5 

49 • 

9 — 

Neither 

^ was vulnerable. The 

0 — 

4 — 

0 K 
*97 

bfekling'- 

South 

Wes i North East 
Pam 2* Pf 5 

pS 


SOUTH 

4 — 

IN.T. 

2V 


9QJ6 

0 — 

pass 

West led the diamond three 


*4 




LIVING IN THE US.? 
Now Printed in 
New York 
For Same Day 
Delivery in Key Ctiies 

TO SUBSCRIBE, CAUL 

1 - 800-882 2884 

ON NEW YORK, CALL 212-752^890) 


JEWELERS SINCE 1847 


PARIS - LONDON - NEW YORK - GENEVA - MILAN - MUNJGH - HONG KONG - TOKYO 
and one hundred and forty Cartier stores in m^jor cities worldwide. J : 


4 TT 5 T 

-rim 





SI 








a.* n .\ s srs-s? KS ^ S* 8 f 6-S II lfM° Sa * -j M iron 


International Herald Tribune 
Friday , December 23, 1994 
Page 8 



A Few Quiet Days 
In Busy Hong Kong 


By Lenore Magda 


H ONG KONG — Hong Kong's 
culture may be one of the 
world’s most ancient and ven- 
erated, but the British colony 
usually prefers to live very much in the 
present. These days, its no-nonsense dy- 
namism and entrepreneurship are more 
intense than ever, as it reacts to the conflu- 
ence of two fever-pitch forces. 

On one hand, anxiety is high over Hong 
Kong’s impending return to Chinese con- 
trol at mi dnight on June 30, 1997. On the 
other, the territory is thriving as the entry 
point for droves of international business 
people who want a piece of the booming 
r hinaw mainlan d. 

Characteristically, Hong Kong’s 6 mil- 
lion people are responding to these dual 
pressures with meat energy and a dose eye 
on the bottom une. Construction is every- 
where- Perfectly fine buildings are unhesi- 
tatingly tom down to make way for more 
profitable office towers. Stretches of the 
stunning harbor are being reclaimed to 
create land for still more building. And 
neither the din of a jackhammer nor a ride . 
on a subway can keep dealmakers off their 
cellular telephones. 

In such an environment, it seems fitting 
that the traditional New Year’s greeting is, 
in Cantonese, “Kune Hei Fat Choy" — 
which means “Wishing You Success and 
Prosperity.” Just as practical and unsenti- 
mental is the traditional New Year's gift 
to young people: leu see, crisp new bills 
and shiny coins in red envelopes em- 
bossed with gold characters. 

And yet, the Lunar New Year, the most 
important festival in the Chinese calendar, 
also brings out aspects of Hong Kong that 
sometimes seem buried beneath its dense 
and lively commercial surface. Tradition 
reigns, businesses dose in favor of family 
gatherings, and the city is resplendent 
with decorations. 


Hong Kong can be fairly chilly, it’s gener- 
ally more hospitable weather than the hot, 
humid summers. 

(Note: As of Jan. 1, all Hong Kong 
telephone numbers will have eight digits. 
Except as noted, preface all numbers list- 
ed here with a 2 beginning on that date. 
The country code for Hong Kong is 852.) 

The earnest traditional festival of the 
season is the Zigong Lantern Festival, 
through Jan. 2 at Sha Tin Central Park in 
the mainland New Territories. The festi- 
val will showcase more than 400 lanterns 
made by artists from Zigong, China's Lan- 
tern City. Admission is free; the park is 
accessible by the Mass Transit Railway, 
Hong Kong’s subway. 

A particularly colorful seasonal tradition 
is the lion dance, with its bright costumes 
and noisy performances intended to scare 



The Cirque d’Hiver: 
A Big-Top Tradition 




r.% N* 


By Brad Spurgeon 

International Herald Tribune 


P ARIS —Before arcuses became 
synonymous with tents, the first 
shows in the 18th centiny were 
usually hdd in buildings deagnea 
for them — theater-in-the-round, you 
might say. Indoor shows remained popu- 
larthrangh the next century and many 
cities in Europe, and in Ruraa, still have 


created the festival in 1977 to showcase 
the young who are beginning their careers, 
to show that in France we have arcus 
artists. of quality-*' •; 

“But the next year, every country rathe 
worid wanted to partidpaie, ^ 

“And so it has become the big market for 




“**52 


a "a it®! 


.. .<■ ■ . 


great arcus careers. ... - 

The Cirque d’Hiver was chosen as du: 

site because, as Manc^ put it, the braid- 
ing is “a treasure chest for they amts.. 
Their acts take on a different cbmension 


i f\t Mb 

. 4 

r. ' xedm 


circus buddings. None can top the gran- ^ afl want to come. And because 


3P1 


off evil spirits and bring good luck. Hong 
Kong’s fourth annual Lion Dance Festival, 


Kong’s fourth annual Lion Dance Festival, 
from Jan. 8 to 22, will feature competitions 
among 20 troupes from Hong Kong and 
elsewhere. The opening ceremony and car- 
nival Jan. 8 is 1 to 5 P. M. in Kowloon Paik. 
The competitions, scheduled for Jan. 22 
and 22, 'mil be at Hong Kong Coliseum in 
Kowloon, with admission from about $2.60 
to $5.20 (computed at a rate of 7.7 Hong 
Kong dollars to the U. S. dollar). For infor- 
mation, call the Hong Kong Tourist Asso- 
ciation at 807-6177. 


nil 


H IGHLY recommended for 

those traveling with children in . 

Hong Kong this winter (and a 

pleasant excursion even for 

those who aren’t) is Ocean Park. The 215- . . . 

acre site on the south ride of Hong Kong keeping with the Fringe Club s mission of 
island is a combination theme Dark and showcasing talents that are new or off- 




Nimfae Asdn/IHT 


The coming year — the Year of the Pig 
— begins on Jan. 31. As is the case each 
year, the first three days of the new year 
will be public holidays. Those days are as 
quiet as it gets in Hong Kong, but the 
weeks before and afterward are especially 
festive. Indeed, because Hong Kong also 
zealously celebrates Christmas and the 
Jan. 1 New Year, December and January 
are fuO of festivities. And though winter in 


oceanarium. It also features a long cable- 
car ride with spectacular views. For the 
first time, Ocean Park has planned special 
Lunar New Year programs. From Jan. 31 
to Feb. 12, a Chinese God of Wealth will 
bless visitors and give them lai see packets 
filled with chocolate coins, and there wfll 
be a variety of entertainment — from 
jugglers to Peking Opera street shows, 
from downs to a Dragon Dance Parade. 
Admission is about $16.80; children 3 to 
11, $8.40. Information: 555-3554. 

Farther off the traditional path wfll be 
the Fringe Festival, Jan. 6 to 28, spon- 
sored by the Fringe Club in Hong Kong. 
The dance, music and drama perfor- 
mances and various exhibitions wfll be in 


beat. Events will be at the Fringe Oub, 2 
Lower Albert Road, and at various other 
places. Call the Fringe dub at 521-7251. 

Hong Kong's commercial buildings and 
hotels, particularly those along the harbor, 
spare no expense (and no electricity) in 
their holiday light displays. Huge designs 
— including Santas, bells and holly — 
light up the town for weeks. 

For particularly good views of the 
lights, stroll near the Star Ferry terminal 
on either side of the harbor. The feny ride 
offers another vantage point And in a 
town once famous for its bargains, this is 
one of the few that remains: about 20 
cents for adults, 13 cents for children. 

Indeed, although Hong Kong has in 


many respects become a very expensive 
city, it’s still inexpensive — and generally 
easy — to see the place. Public buses and 
so-called mini-buses go almost anywhere; 
fares vary with the distance, but are usual- 
ly under $1. The Mass T ransi t Railway is 
efficient, clean and safe; fares range from 
about 45 cents to about $130. For travel 
into the New Territories, the Kowloon- 
Canton Railway charges from 40 cents to 
$1. The crowded upper deck of the tram 
on Hong Kong Island between Western 
Market and Snan Kei Wan offers a real 
sense of the heart of Hong Kong life — 
and the fare is only about 15 cents. 


dear erf the Cirque d’Hiver in Paris. 

For nearly a week each January a tradi- 
tion is revived at the Cirque d’Hiver, vmen 
it hosts the international arcus festival for 
young, up-and-coming performers the 
combined Festival Mondial du Cirque de 
Demain and Festival Mondial do Cirque 
de F Avenir. 

I went to the most recent show with my 
young sera as much to discover the braid- 
ing — it was the setting for Edmond de 
Goncourt’s novel “Les Fifties Z emgan no” 
— as to see the performances. 

We arrived early for the Sunday mati- 
nee, anA spent half an hour outside admir- 
in g the circular budding, which looks simi- 
lar to a tent, but with a bronze statue of an 
«m97fm on the roof and two bronze war- 
riors on horses over the entrance. Com- 
pleted in eight months in 1852, by the 
ganv» man who redesigned the Place de la 
Concorde, Jacques mttorff, it was chris- 
tened the Cirque Napolfton for Emperor 
Napolfton IIL It became the Cirque 
d’Hiver, or Winter Circus, in 1870. 

Its life as a circus was never simple. It 
was used periodically as a concert hall for 
classical music, and in 1908 was erne of the 
first cinemas in France. It moved in and 
out of presenting arcuses until it was 
taken ova by the Bougtione brothers, 
Alexandre, Joseph, Sampian and Fimtin, 
60 years ago. They used it for their circus, 
and it became known to an international 


it’s in Paris.” : 

' When I entered the auditonum*w3tn its 
red velvet chairs, I could immediately un- 
derstand its attraction for a young arcus 
artist: It is beautiful, and looks made, as 
outside, like a circus tent. But none of. the 
seats are obstructed by pillars: There are 
no pillars. The ceding seems to reach up 
higher >h«n any opera, and in the center of 
this universe that seats 1,650 spectators is 
the single circus ring. There is a band cm a 
stage practically among the spectators. 
The French social register, the Bonin 
Mondain, says that of all the Paris the- 
aters and operas, this room is “at once the 
most beautiful . . . the most comfort- 
able, the most agreeable, and the best 
ventilated.” 

From the opening of the show, I knew 
we had arrived at the best of the cimis arts 
as wdL ■■■;•'..■ 

My only worry was that the finesse of 
the acts might hie too subtle for my son, 
not yet 3 years old. There were fewer 
children in the audience than in the tented 
shows we had seen. But he sat, as. usual, 
hypnotized throughout the three-hour 
show, which included clowns from the 
Moscow Bolshoi Circus, Chinese glass 
balancers, Mongolian contortionists, 
Hungarian jugglers, and French and Ca- 
nadian trapeze artists. 


it i-orndj. 






.*0 mS 
. mtctrf 
•’c firw 
- .t Ajncri 
ihr ** 
snp'ff 
-*• *£*. A& 
■ r.,i -4 15J 

-- *n<hAi 




Vt» - 


i.i frxr.'fl 

A 

'• Waft* 
,;■* it j A 


-t rMifq 
.•-■rremSy 


Lenore Magida , a journalist who lives in 
Hong Kon& wrote this for The New York 
Times. 


audience in the Burt Lancaster-Tony Cur- 
tis film “Trapeze” in 1956. Then, after 
many years of trying to preserve the in- 
door mrus, the Bouglione family changed 
tactics in the early 1980s, and these days 
they rent out the hall for everything from 
fashion shows to pop concerts. 

Now the true experience of the Cirque 
<T Hiver comes only during the circus festi- 
val. The organizer, Isabelle Mauclair, said 
that she and her husband, Dominique, 


F OR both of us the best act was 
tiie Russian Kurbanov Trrope’s, 
which consisted of three children 
and three nvwt in leather drivin g 
motorcycles- It was a modernization erf an 
act created by the famous Risleyfamfly 
acrobats in the 19th oentaty. They parked 
the motorcycles oh their kicks tanas and 
the men lay. an diem and juggled, the 
children with their feet. 

It was afairiy representative act for the 
festival, which Mauclair says is appreciat- 
ed by the artists because the organizers 
“have always tried to show the new things 
in the drcus arts.” 

“The drcus evolves Hke the theater,” 
she said, “and we have always wanted to 
show, for example, how lots of artists 
now use opera music to create more pro- 
found emotions, or how sometimes cele- 
brated directors take part in the creation 
of an act. Whenever we can move toward 
modernity we do, while at the same time 
maintaining the essential traditional 
technique.” 

Although I had had no trouble getting 
tickets only a few days before the show, 
the au d ience was filled with drcus aficio- 
nados, show-biz and other personalities, 
and with many of the artists who had 
performed in the past. 

“Those who have taken part in the festi- 
val travel the worid and speak of it as their 
festival, and they come bade just to watch 
it,” said Maudair. “It has become a very, 
very big famfly.” 

T h i n k ing about how I would have loved 
to have had the chance to perform there as 
a teenager, when I worked in a circus I 
could only envy them. And when my son 
informed me after the show that he want- 
ed to do that too, I realized it was indeed a 
family affair. 

The festival runs from Jan. 12 to 16. 
Reservations: 44.61.06.02. 


iii unit uni 


Dumb and Dumber 

Directed by Peter Farreify. 
U.S. 

If critical traditions count for 
anything, Jim Carrey can 
loot forward one day to be- 
ing discovered by French 
fflmgoers and canalized as 
the new Jerry Lewis. There 
are moments all through his 
newest movie, “Dumb and 


Dumber,” when the rubber- 
faced actor with a chipped 
front tooth, his hair in bangs 
and his cough-drop eyes 
ablaze with maniacal mis- 
chief, is almost a dead ringer 
for Lewis on one of his hy- 
peractive jags. Carrey’s ver- 
sion of Lems, it should be 
noted, adds hefty dashes of 
sex and scatdogy in a 6-year- 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


HOTELS 


7%eDelfnonico 

Difference! 

Not a hotel room. 

An oleffint Park Avenue 
Apartment Suite! 

Traveling to New York ? 
Discover tbe Delmonlco 
difference. Spacious, beautifully 
appointed one and two bedroom 
Apartment Suites in the heart 
of Manhattan on Park Avenue 
andSStb Street 

Reserve now for 
Special Winter Rates 
Thru February 28. 
One-Bedroom - 1215 + Tax 
Two-Bedroom - S3 7 5 +Tax 
TEL212-486-0508 

Apartment Suites on Pert Amour* 
HOTEL 


Treat yoi$self 
to Pa||, 
with luxj|jy. 

'■Smmk- 


w 

1. RUE SCRIBE - 75009 

■ at the Opera) vj^i ; 

FF1380* 


old’s style. The funniest scene 
in the movie involves a pow- 
erful laxative and a broken 
toOeL “Dumb and Dumber" 
fully lives up to its name, 
right down to an opening 
credit sequence rife with in- 
tentional misspellings and 
grammatical errors. Paired 
with Jeff Daniels, whose 
hangdog goofiness makes a 
perfect foil for his spasmodi- 
cally edgy comic style, Carrey 
plays Beavis to Daniels’s 
Butt-head as they go an a 
wild cross-country road trip. 
Carrey is Lloyd, tiie worms 
clumsiest limousine driver, 
and Daniels is Harry, Lloyd’s 
dog-grooming roommate 
who travels around in a 
“Mutts Cutts” trade, a van 
transformed into a giant 
sheep dog, complete with 
tongue and wagging rail. 
“Dumb and Dumber’ is a 
movie that knows much bet- 


ter than to try to make sense. 
It is essentialW a strung-to- 
gether series of gags. 

(Stephen Holden, NYT) 


his assignment The object of 
his desire is Charo, a heroin 


addict, played by 19-year-oid 
Ruth Gabriel, mainnp her 


DlmContados 

Directed by Imanol Uribe. 
Spain. 

The Basque separatist group 
ETA has ldfled about 750 
people and wounded 3,000 in 
its quarter-century fight for 
an independent Basque 
homeland in northern Spain. 
Imanol Uribe is of Basque 
lineage and his latest film 
tells the story of an ETA as- 
sassin whose mission is to 
blow up a Madrid police sta- 
tic® with a car bomb. Die 
provocative movie makes no 
apologies for ETA's deadly 
violence. But it shows that at 
least one ETA activist, Anto- 
nio (Carrodo G6mez) is ca- 
pable of faDing in love; which 
causes major problems for 


Ruth Gabriel, making her 
screen debut with much nu- 
dity. Their dig anted affair is 
credible and wefl acted. Its 
development does not engen- 
der affection for the ETA 
killer, but perhaps a recogni- 
tion of his human dimensi on, 
which nonetheless is often 
subordinated to his fierce 
cruelty in the name of the 
canse. Not do the rest of the 
drug-world characters — 
from petty dealers to vice- 
squad cops — offer great role 
models. The film is shot ef- 
fectively and grimly, and its 
tone at times resembles Pi- 
casso’s blue period. The ter- 
rorist actions depicted are 
not pure fabrication. ETA in 
years past has struck essen- 
tially in the same manner. 

(Al Goodman, IHT) 



Carrey and Daniels in “Dumb and Dumber. ’ 


• .iifft tm 

.a w 

.*■ j-.-vbfcf' 
zsrd Got 

• : 

• - ; ffv 


v* 1 

4 

im 

t 

y-m 

in 

• <>/ . F* 

ran m 

A 

: -H** 

• jj&dfRb 





I E I A i 


f f / B / 


’Efomt Oeambff 1W - jsumy 
ftt ttmple. per roam, pn mgk. bfq&Hinricdrd 
13 njgbc fflirtmtiay * 

Cram tout Bard agn* Ct'aS ib dsia 

Tet 33 il 1 44 71 H2 J-Fk 33iU42b5!997 


AUSTRALIA 


Sydney 

The Australian Opera, tel: (2) 319- 
1088. Janacek’s "Katya Kabanova" 
Directed by Neil Armfield, conducted 
by Sir Charles Mackerras, with Elene 
Hannan and Christopher Doig. Jan. 
12. 17. 20 and 23. 


BRITAIH 


HOTELS 


London 


LEBANON 


HOTE AL BUSUN. Bast of Bon*. 
5 ster dduts. Fxqy ii n nai locatio n. 


stanhr, comfort. Ene assne, convcn. 
tom, wanes* services. sonBte TV. 18 


Horn, taaness services. sonBte TV. 18 
ran. transfer Prom airport fr ee. UIEL 

fm (1-7121 4781371 ■ (33-11 <7700007 


A1IPOKT TOANSFB SERVICES. 
Genera. Lyora, Grenoble, fasortti 
Chamonix. Megeve, In Qosoz, Vd 
rftaie, Me u bSr Co wc hene l Mnfcus 
and Lunoudne 1/8 persons. Td/fae 
(33J 5053 63S7, A. Qaaw Tranporl 


The Whitechapel, tel: (71) 522- 
7888, dosed Mondays. To Feb. 12: 


PHILIPPINES 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


ADMIRAL HOTEL. 2138 tea BM, 
Mania Tel: 521071 !. Tele* 

74240*88 ADHOTH. PM Rut doa, 
110 ream feeing Mania Bay- 


ROMt HOTEL VICTORIA ■••• 
nxxferoto rata, rortauisni, centra. 


ST. MOOTS SKOAL FUGH 1 SI 
Chnsbros/New Yeor/WMar 1994/ 
1995 from ZLB3CH Airport ckxhr Dec. 
Itfi V4 mH Jtn 4th VS. Adcteod 

Bgta to/irani an f ofa nl al 

ra«er on imooL For re sm vcOo ra 
Enmive Traveller Tel: +41-1-803 09 

JP.Fw +4I.MDB0444. 


7888. dosed Mondays. To Feb. 12: 
"Wbrids In a Box.” Surveys the cun- 
ous history of art in boxes from the 
1920s to the present day. Features 
130 works by 70 artists, inckxfing 
Marcel Duchamp, Man Ray, Claes 
Oldenburg and Yoko One. 

■jranr*- — ■ - 

imancnwmm 

Whitworth Art Gallery, tel: (61) 
273-4865, dosed Sundays. To Feb. 
4: “Anthony Caro: Table Sculp- 
tures.” The show spans nearly 30 
years of the artists work, ranging 
from early sculptures and distract 
painted steel constructions. 



BOATS/YACHTS 


» i BREAKFAST N NEW YCKX 
"TM Hotel Ateneti w“. Bat looMm 
GDam to Mq r h OR ft. Cel us ht 
hades or unhaded apert rrants. $90- 
160 per liOR. A HospEofry Co. T«fc 
DM# Foe 212-427-8599 USA. 



HOLIDAY RENTALS 


LOW COST FLIGHTS 


CARIBBEAN 


ACCESS VOYAGES 

THE BBT FARES TO 


STJMTIBEMY, F.WJL- OVS 200 


THE UNITH) STATES , 

ail Over 500 more de d wo te p 
wide on 40 d fa nrt KteUed corners. 


Tt± PAWS 1-40 13 02 02 or C 21 46 94 
fm 1-42 21 44 20 
MMTEL 3615ACCBSVOYACE5 
TafcLVON 78 63 P 77 or 72 56 15 95 



FRENCH PROVINCES 


BOOK NOW by phone «hh aedl cad 
Governmert Inna: 175111 


SCHEDULED 


WO*U> AVIATION SCHEDULED 
FUGHTS Ijl bunas, Monoi ay c 

tew in lei IFT An IH«W5I 


NEAR UBBKMOORRMVIGNON 
renting From Ig May Vi Provencd 
Ma Mb nwinnng pool, 5 bedrooms. 
2 barrooms, ten room, dring 
room, krtrinn. Tefe Q3| 90 76 67 32. 


FHAHCE 

Paris 

Centre National de la Photogra- 
phic. tel: (j) 53-76-12-31, dosed 
Tuesdays. To Feb. 27: "Bid Brandt: 
50 Arts de Photograp^e.” A retro- 
spective of the works of the British 
photographer. Indudes photographs 
of London during world War II. por- 
traits and nudes, as well asSuneaBst 
collages. 

Jeu de Paume, tel: (1) 47-03-12- 
50, closed Mondays. To Jan. 29: 
’'Charles Smonds/’ More than 40 
sculptures, instaBafions. films and 
photographs created since 1970 by 
the American artist, induing some 
day works created for a nomarfic. 
mythical onx*) of "little people'' in 
the 70s. 

Mu5de de 1‘Art et du Costume. Pa- 
lais Gaffiera. tel: (1) 47-20-85-23. 
Closed Mondays. Continuing/To 
March 12: "Kstoire du Jeans de 
1750 a nos Jours.” Documents the 
development of denim and jeans, 
from the American workers’ and 
termers' overate to present-day teen- 
agers' uniform. 

MusQo Galerie de to Salta, tel: (1) 
45-56-60-18, closed SUideys. To 
Feb. 25: “Pasdn, 1885-1930.” More 
than 100 paintings and drawings by 



War ll, Hayden 
a combination 
principles. 


Hayden's style evolved toward 
Qination of Cubist and Realist 


and Realist LUXEMBOURG 


ISRAEL 


Jerusalem 


^ ‘SSTaSinul!^ ^W.SSK.ng.y influenced by C*- 
Jan. 9: "The Jacob Pins Collection of . 


Musde National d'HJstofre et d’Art, 
tel: 47-93-30-214, closed Mondays. 
To Jan. 15: "J. Kutter.” A retrospec- 
tive of the works of the Luxembourg 
Expressionist painter. Joseph Kutter, 


Zurich 

Kunsthaus, tel: (1) 251-6765. 
dosed Mondays. To March 5: "De- 
gas: Portrarfete.” Portraits by the 
French painter and sculptor. 


UWTED STATES 


Japanese Art" More than 1 70 Japa- 
nese works from the collection of 
Jerusalem artist Jacob Pins, includes 


prints by Utamaro. Hirostege and Ho- 
kusai, Zen and landscape paintings, 
and Chinese and Japanese sculp- 
tures. 

Tel Aviv 

Tel Avfv Museum of Art tel: (3) 
696-1297, open daily. To March 18: 
“Keith Haring.” A retrospective of the 
works of the American graffrlist. Har- 

a came to fame in the late 1970s 
his drawings on the New York 
subways. His pictorial language in- 
cludes recurrent images such as fly- 
ing saucers, barking dogs and radiat- 
ing babies which mingle with 
universal symbols and high-tech ob- 
jects. He tfed of aids at age 3t . 


NETHERLAiePS 

Amsterdam 


Riiksmuseum, tel: (20) 6-79-81-46, 
closed Mondays. To Feb. 26: ’The by Wlnstow 
Art of Devotion. 1300-1500." Fea- John Sngei 
tores 50 late-medieval objects of pri- and others, 
vate devotion, such as paintings. New York 
miniatures, prints and wood carvings. MetroDolfo 
Among the artists represented, are ro i2V5m 
Mantegna and Mending. ToMarchi; 

RoOwdam the East in V 

Kunsthal Rotterdam, tel: (10) 44- es Western 
00-301. open dally. To .lan. 22: assimilation 
"Faces of the Golden Age: The Dutch Eastern drw 
Portrait in the 1 7th Century." More and a 
than 70 portrats by 1 7ll>century art- clothes to 
ists, including Rembrandt Frans Hate ations. 

and Adriaen van der Werfl. 


Houston 

of Fine Arts, tel: (713) 
639-7300, closed Mondays. To 
March 26 : American Painters in the 
Age ot Impressionism.” 19th-centu- 
ry American painting including wort® 
by VWnstow Homer, Mary Cassatt, 
John Sngar Sargent ChBde Hassam 


doEed Mondays. 
£^L2**** v *sions of 
ast in Western Dress.” Address- 
e e.y^estem fashion’s fascination and 


it in the 17th Century." More and 


^ 16th -century 

10 modem designers' cre- 


Self-portrait and other portraits by Degas, in Zurich. 


ITALY 


SPAIN 


Barcelona 

Fundadd Joan MhA tef: (93) 329- 


Waahlngton 

of Art, tel: (202) 
iS£ 1 &®p? n daily. To March 19: 

^^ecture." 
Proems be- 


one of the leaders of the Ecole de 
Montparnasse in ffw 7920s. 

Musde du Louvre, Pavilion de 
Flore, tel: (1) 40-20-51-51, dosed 
Tuesdays. To Feb. 13: "Fra Barto- 
lommeo et son Atelier.” 100 draw- 
ings and a few paintings document 
the wolution of the Florentine painter 
production at the time of Raphael and 
Michelangelo. 

Mus6e Rodin, tef: ( 1 ) 44-13B1-10. 
dosed Mondays. Continuing/To 
Jan. 8: "Dessms de Zadkme." 


Martin-Gropius-Bau, tel: (30) 
25486-738, dosed Mondays. Con- 
tinuing /To Feb. 5: "Der Riss hn 
Raum." Paintings, sculptures, instaf- 
fatrons and video presentations by 49 
German, Polish, Czech and Slovak 
artists from 1945 to the present day. 
Neue Nfltionalgalerie, tel: (30) 266- 
26-53, dosed Mondays. To April 17: 
"George Grosz: Berlin-New York." A 
retrospective of 50 paintings and 250 
works on paper. Grosz was a found- 
ing member of the Dada group in 


TdatroComunafe. tef: (532) 20 - 26 - 

75. "II Barbiere di Siviglla," drected 
ter Stefano Wriofi, concluded by 
©audio Abbado with Roberto Fron- 
tau, CecHia Gasdia/Sonia Ganassi, 
Rainer Trost. Enzo Dara. Ruggero 
Raimondi /Hdebrando d'Arcangelo. 
Jan. 10, 12, 14. 


19-08. dosed Mondays. To Feb. 12: D! r S®LE!! er * s m Rome > Duomo 
"MirO on Stage." Drawings, stage ^ cat ^ ed ral in Pa- 


mapuettes, photographs anti paint- 


S'2 h 7TSSl C ir ese ^ngs as 
wefl » 74 works of art bv MidSwv 


Ings relating to the ballets and plays Ol art by Michelan- 

In which Miro was involved. Buontalanti and their 


MaAtd 


1 C.H rn n-ti — — til IU UIH1I 

2SS* rtu 7 l contemporaries. The 

Museo Nactonai Centro de Arte Sti travd to Parts - Benin 

Reina Sofia, tel: (91) 467-5062. ° 


Milan 

Teraroatia Scaia, tel: (2) 80-91-60. 
5 ’’La Fanduila del West.” 
by Jonathan MHIer, con- 
teided by Giuseppe Sinopdl, with 


closed Tuesdays. To Feb. 27: "Co- 
ddo y Crudo." Recent paintings. 


Some musoons may- be closed 


sculptures, wdeos. installations and on holidays. Check hrfnr* 
performances by 50 artists from 25 oqore going. 

coditries. 


GERMANY 


Berlin in the 1920s. His works depict Alain Fondary. Mary Jane Johnson 
file In his native Berlin and In his and Sergio Bertocchi. Jan. 12. 14. 


SWITZERLAND 


Berlin 

BrOcke-Museum, tef; (30) 832-20- 
29, dosed Tuesdays. To Feb. 26: 
"Erich Heckef: 82 Neuerweibungen 
Zeichn ungen und Aquarelle." Draw- 
ings and watercofors by the German 
Expressionist artist who was one of 
founders of Die Brocke. 

Deutsche Oper. tef: (30) 34 38-1. 
Verdi's "Alda." Directed by Gotz 
Friedrich, conducted by Stefan Sot- 
tesz with WUhelmenia Fernandez/ Ju- 
fia Varady, U» WaJther and Kristjan 
Johansson. Jan. 3 and 7. 


adopted second home. New York. 
The exhibition will travel to DcsseJ- 
dorf. 


15,17. 19. 20. 22 and 24. 


nms 




JAPAN 


MiK). tel. (292) 27-81 1 1 . 


Hugh Lane Mumopal Gauery or ooseo Mondays To Feb 26- "Rotv- 
Modem Art, tel: (1) 872-218 2, wholyover a Qrcus: John Cage." A 
dosed . To Jan. 22: “Henri Hayden, complex intermedia event by com- 


Museum far Volkerkunde, tel: (61 ) / '§§f 

266-5500, dosed Mondays. To Jan- 

uary 1996: "Wfe Ste Sfch Betten. " ^ _ 

Focuses on our sleeping habits c Fr °m Cezanne to Ma- 

through reconstructed bedrooms. French Palritings frOT A 

and other miscellaneous objects, of foundation." ArmaH«v f 

dating back to the 18th century Toronto. ‘*»sfy 

PouMn-™,™ 


1883-1970." The works o« the poser John Cage. II includes sefec- 
F ranch painter, who started as a irons of Cage's graphic works, draw- 


Cutest alter meeting with Gns and and music scores and 
Delaunay, then turned to painting 200 works by &o artists, 
from nature in the 1920s. After Wbrid Marcel Duchamp 


more than 
including 


osuiuuawMuuic ioui txniury rv, , 

Geneva ^^^sPoussto" and on 

Musde d’Art et dTHistoire. tel: (22) 1894 " 1848- 

31 1-43*40, closed Mondays. To May Paris. 

7: "leones: Donation Mavromicha- Tate WhiStier." 

Its." Icons from Crete, tiie Ionian is- On Jan 

lands and Venice, dating from the spective Tvv °mbly: a Retro- 

16th to the 19th centuries. New York. MUSe ' ,,n Modem Art, 


em Art, 



\. .. . 












S A A A 7 


International Herald Tribune 
Friday ; December 23, 1994 
Page 9 


*•>1 


■ xJ 




1 * 

■ a 

. - ' 'v - 

- r~ '• 




• -1L . 


J*n & 


**• 





Don t Lose Expiring Flier Miles 


By Roger Collis 

fmenumonal Herald Trihu** 


PH^Gust about) developed 


Y « s * Ta 5SSy f° r acquiring frc- 

right mix 

ftv Km. « P TO Br9SOS t which airlines ynu 

2°“ P 3 ^ which phone card vou 
forjpendmg your miles before ih^K 

fr.r t f Selh0n ,? r !ose '■*»> » the message 
"if* m 1995 as airlm«bri!£ 
m stiff new rules that make ii harder to 
rara mfles by raising award levels along 

^ for redeeminl 
tnfleage points. There’s no expiry date (so 

£2®* on uSSr, ConS 

SwI?i an ?rT W ^' 06113 ^ Lines’ new 

^SiS-£L fecu f ve **** h I995 > «- 

P*rethr«w years after your last Delta flight. 

L>ec. 31 is the deadline with many air- 
hn« for cashing in mfles earned over the 
past three years. On Alaska Airlines, Amer- 
Am erican ’ Df * Ul ' Northwest and 
United, mfles earned before 1992 will ex- 
pire at the end of 1994. Many major FFPs 
wD make changes during the first six 
months of 1 995. Airlines such as American. 
United and USAir have raised the award 
level for domestic U. S. round-uip coach 
octets from 20,000 to 25,000 miles; Alaska 
will require 20,000 miles instead erf 15,000. 
United, Northwest, Continental and Amer- 
ica West are raising award levels for inter- 
national travel by up to 20,000 miles. Some 
airlines have dropped the minimum mile- 
age per trip for which they will credit you 
from 1,000 miles to 750 or 500. Watch out 
for more blackout dates when award travel 
is not allowed, and more seat limitations on 
certain flights. 

Upgrades will be harder to get, even for 
some “elite-level” fliers. For example, 
USAir* s elite-level fliers can currently get 
a one-way upgrade for 10,000 mfles no 
matter how long the flight: From Jan. 1, 
they will have to use 10,000 miles for every 
800 miles they fly — which can double the 
number of bonus miles they need. Conti- 
nental no longer allows its top One-Pass 
members a free upgrade when they fly on 
restricted fares. 

Asian and European airlines are less 
generous with upgrades (except for elite- 
level fliers) and expire mileage credits 
typically after two years — although not 
in sync with their U. S. part- 


of the meteoric rise in FFP membership, 
with more than 120 million people signed 
— up worldwide, and the contingent liability 
if everyone cashed in their miles at the same 
tune. Pundits reckon that there are enough 
un r ed ee med frequem-flier miles floating 
around the system to fill 600,000 747s. 

“Nine percent of passengers on Ameri- 
can Airlines flights arc traveling on free 
tickets in all classes — which is about the 
limit for serious concern.” says Tony 
Clarke, managing director of Internation- 
al Customer Loyalty Programmes in Lon- 
don. “This is why U. S. earners are reduc- 

Tie Frefmt Tmehr 


ing the value of the miles, making 
redemption more difficult and imposing 
stricter time limits. They don’t want to 
keep that liability on their books.” 

Most airlines give extra perks and privi- 
leges — such as access to a lounge (which- 
ever class you fly), priority wait-listing, 
special reservation phone numbers, bonus 
miles and sometimes free upgrades — to 
travelers who reach elite status. Typically, 
you'll need at least 30,000 actual miles to 
reach the first level. Programs worth going 
for are Silver memberships of BA Execu- 
tive Club (25,000 credit miles) which gives 
you the run of lounges worldwide; North- 
west World Perks Gold (60.000 credit 
miles) gives unlimited confirmed upgrades 
on any fare; United Mileage Plus ( 100.000 
actual miles) offers upgrades, bonuses and 
a special lounge: JAL Global Gub (60,000 
miles or SO flights) brings coupons for free 
nights at Nikko Hotels, standby upgrade 
certificates, and use of lounges; and Ca- 
thay’s Marco Polo Gub (40.000 kilome- 
ters in six months) which provides up- 
grades, lounges and hotel discounts. Delta 
Gold Medallion members (60.000 credit 
miles) earn double miles for every flight. 

One way to salvage miles that are about 
to expire is to redeem them even if vou 
aren’t p lanning an immediate trip. This is 


nets. With Japan Airlines, for example, 
mileage earned during 1993 and 1994 
must be used by Dec. 31, 1995. From 
January, JAL’s FFP members can earn 
and redeem mileage on American Air- 
lines’ AAd vantage program and vice versa 
— so travelers facing mileage deadlines 
, f jcould switch from one program to the 
■other. British Airways’ Air Miles expire 
after five years. 

Airlines are raising the hurdles because 


■ A better mousetrap for sure: 
Specialized Bicycle Components, a 
California company, is working on 
making a bike with a motor. Matthew 
Wald of The New York Times 
tells us. Whenever the going gets too 
rough (or steep), the battery- 
powered electric motor gives you a 
little extra energy. If you let the 
motor do all the pedaling, however, 
the battery only lasts 15 minutes. 

The company hopes to market the 
bike in 1996, for about $800. 


possible with most airlines, although rules 
vary. Fcr example, as an AAdvantage 
member with miles about to expire on Dee. 
31. 1994, you could request an award certif- 
icate at the last minute, which would allow 
you another year in which to request a 
ticket. You could then gain an additional 
year by postponing the date of your award 
ticket, which means you could actually fly 
as late as December 1996. Another device is 
to get your award combined with new miles 
for a higher level award, thus receiving 
another award certificate. In theory you 
could go on doing this indefinitely. 

You may want to spend surplus miles 
on hotel nights or merchandise. JAL, for 
example, has a sumptuous catalogue of- 
fering a Marklin executive train set for 

25.000 miles, a Samsonite briefcase for 

50.000 miles, and for 100,000 miles a Roy- 
al Copenhagen porcelain coffee set, or a 
Nikon F-801 camera. 

First there was money laundering; now 
there is mileage laundering. Hilton HHon- 
ors* new Reward Exchange program al- 
lows members to exchange airline miles in 
Alaska Mileage Plan, Delta Frequent Fly- 
er, America West Flight Fund or United 
Mileage Plus for HHonors points, which 
have no expiry date, and vice versa, effec- 
tively beating most of the new expiry rules 
imposed by airlines. HHonors members 
can thus launder airline mfles through the 
hotel program back into participating air- 
lines’ FFPs. 

Y OU could theoretically convert 
Alaska Mileage Plan miles into 
United miles. Bui as with money 
laundering there is a premium to 
pay: 5,000 airline miles equals 10,000 
HHonors points — which can only be 
exchanged back again for 1,500 airline 
miles. Hilton's intention is not to devalue 
miles. You need only spend $1,000 ai 
Hilton to earn 10,000 points — the point 
being that, if you have more Hilton points 
than you need, you can exchange them to 
top up the last few airline miles you need 
for an award on a partner carrier. Hilton/ 
Conrad HHonors Reward Exchange is 
valid until Dec. 31, 1995. You can also 
trade American Express Membership 
Miles for HHonors points in the plan. 

Anyone who wants to make the most of 
FFPs should subscribe to Inside Flyer, a 
mo nthly magazine edited and published 
by FFP guru Randy Petersen. The maga- 
zine tracks frequent-flier programs and 
keeps you up to date on changing condi- 
tions. Inside Flyer costs $33 a year in the 
United Stales ($38 elsewhere) from (1- 
719) 597-8880 (fax 597-6855). Petersen 
also publishes the Official Flyer Guide- 
book, 368 pages of detailed information 
on 53 FFPs worldwide. Price: $19.90 (in- 
cluding P&P) from Inside Flyer, 471 5-C 
Town Center Drive, Colorado Springs, 
Colorado 80916-4709. Frequent Flyer 
Services, (1-719) 597-8893, keeps track of 
your mileage in FFPs. 


OCTOBER 1995 


17 


ESDAY 






-^rPafig^- 


MARK YOUR DIARY! 

The International Herald TYibune and Institut Francais 
des Relations Internationales are convening a m^jor 
new conference on the theme, “The New France: 
Implications for Global Business." This prestigious 
event will assess the new developments in France 
following the presidential elections and will feature 
key members of the new government in addition to 
major industrialists and finance and government 
leaders from around the world. 

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT: 

Fiona Cowan 

International Herald Tribune 
63 Long Acre, London WC2E BJH 
Tel: (44 71) 836 4802 
Fto: (44 71) 836 0717 




i 




■ ■ ,~Jr 


IT I SI IKE: SO 


TUT El EE IIS 



Carrier/Hotel 

Location 

Deal 

AIR CANADA 

Britain to Canada 

Save up to £1,750 (52,735) on the round-trip business-class fare 
from London to Calgary, Edmonton or Vancouver. Fourteen-day 
advance purchase and 14-day minimum day. For travel commen- 
cing between Jan. 1 and March 31. 

AIR UK 

Britain to Amsterdam 

Buy a full-economy round-trip ticket from a provincial airport 
(Aberdeen, Edinburgh, Glasgow, Humberside. Leeds/Bradford, 
Newcastle, Teeside, or Manchester) to Amsterdam and claim one 
free night at the Golden Tulip Barbizon Schiphot. Until March 31. 

GRAND HYATT ERA WAN 

Bangkok 

Winter Wonderland package for 14,000 baht tor single, 15,000 tor 
double (5560 and $600) indudes three nights deluxe accommoda- 
tion, airport transfers, American breakfast use of fitness spa and 
late checkout till 6 P.M. Until Feb. 28. 

LAUDA AIR 

London to Vienna 

Round-trip business class-fare of £379 (5590) saves £105 off 
BA/ Austrian published fares. 

LUFTHANSA 

United States to Europe 

Discounts from 10 percent to 50 percent on Miles & More 
frequent-flier awards. Until March 31. 

MARSEILLE 

Tourist Office 

Two nights for the price of one at 41 participating hotels, for arrival 
Friday or Saturday, eight-day advance booking. Ask for 'Weekend 
in Marseille" promotion. Tel: 91 54 91 11. Fax: 91 33 05 03. Until 
Oct 31. 

NEW WORLD HOTELS 
INTERNATIONAL 

China 

Winter discounts feature room rates from 5114 a night at the Jing 
Guang in Beijing, 599 at the Yangtze in Shanghai, and deluxe 
rooms for $1 1 1 and suites 5148 in Guangzhou. Until Feb. 28. 

NORTHWEST 

United States to Europe 

WorldPerks members can travel to London, Paris. 
Frankfurt or Amsterdam with a companion for 20,000 miles plus 
S299 on nonstop flights from the U rated States. Tickets must be pur- 
chased by Jaa 15 for travel before March 14. Not valid before Jan. 
8. 

RELA1S DU POST1LLON 

Antibes, France 

Three-night New Year package (Dec. 30 to Jan. 2) for 795 francs 
(5145) per person in double room includes Continental breakfasts 
and six-course gourmet dinner. 

ROYAL GARDEN RESORT 

Pattaya, Thailand 

Chinese New Year package, from 2,870 baht (Si 15) for one night to 
7,200 baht for three nights, includes welcome drink, American 
breakfasts and Chinese New Year gala dinner with show. From 
Jarr. 27 to Feb. 5. 

SAS ROYAL HOTEL 

Beijing 

Standard rooms for 595 and executive rooms for 5125 a night in- 
clude breakfast, a city-shuttle service and late checkout till 
3 P.M. Until Feb. 28. 

SONOMA VALLEY 

California 

Super Saver rates at 20 participating hotels and bed and breakfasts 
in Sonoma Valley wine country. Rates from $55 a night. Until 
March 31. Sonoma Valley Visitors Bureau. (707) 996-1 090. 

TRANSAVIA 

London to Amsterdam 

Full-fare business-efass passengers on last flight of the day or trave- 
ling at any time Sunday can claim a free night at the four-star Ascot 
Hotel. Additional nights at 25-percent discount 

VIRGIN ATLANTIC 

Hong Kong to London 

Passengers buying a round-trip economy ticket can daim a round- 
trip ticket between London and New York or Boston. Tickets must 
be bought by Dec. 31 for travel between Dec. 24 and March 31. 


AXtvki&t the WTcaneiiAf checks these ottois. please be towomoMat some travel ageim may tie imeme of them, cr uiabto to book them 


Valuable 

every day. 



Priceless 
throughout 
the year. 


It"» remarkable bow many internal innal business people find ihe 
International Herald Tribune gives them a valuable perspective on 
world affairs. Whether its polities or sport, finance or the arts, ihe 
International Herald Tribune ensure** >nu gel a fully rounded daily 
picture of what's going on. 

The Inlemalional Herald Tribune pocket diary complements the 
newspaper throughout die year. CompneL intelligently designed, smart and 
full oT useful, authoritative fuels und figures, it’s a priceless accessory for 
the busy bus mess person. And yet ul just £22, it’s exceptionally good value. 


Measures 8 \ 13cm (5'fc x 3i») • Black leather cover with gilt metal comers 

• Week -al-u-gl once format printed on French hlue paper with gilded page 
edges • Notable dales, and national holidays in over 80 countries: world 
lime-zone table; international telephone dialing codes and country prefixes; 
conversion tables of weights, measures and distances ■ Blue ribbon page 
marker ■ Removable address book • Each diary packed in a blue gift box 

• Corporate personalisation and discounts available. Fur details, fax 
Paul Baker at (44-81) 944 8243 • Blue nolepaper sheets fit on the back 
of the diary — a simple pull removes lop sheeL 100 refill sheets inrluded. 


Pleiw tfeml me . 


1HT Pocket Diarif". 


23-12-94 


Price include* initials, parking and p.nMafie in Europe: 


Cant No:. 
Exp: 


.SipuluiK. 


1-4 .Jiarim I’K £22 

M diarim UK £20.5(1 

10-19 tiiario I'KXIS 


It S. 5531 ear* 
(LS.S3l)nu.-h 
(LA SS7i each 


INITIALS 
up m3 per diary 

Mill] 


Name:. 


AddieiK. 


City/Codr: — — 

Company EEC VAT ID No: , 


.Cnunin:. 


I 1 Additional pmuge outaidt Europe: £4.50 (U5. S6.90) 

[ ' , Check here fnr delivery ouuidr Europe hr regb-iered or notified nail: 

£5.75 fliJS. SfljjQi per package plus postage 

Payment ia by credit card <*nly. AD major cords accepted. 

Pino# dnigr to my credit card: 

PI Aecre* Q Atom Q Diners O Etuucnnl MasterCard Q Vina 

Mail nr fax this order toon iu: International Herald Tribune Offers, 3 ? Lumismi Rood. Lurtrinn 5W20 0LW l .K. Fax: (44 81 j 944 6243 

































































































































fj£o 






W: 

'v ■■■*■$ ,,;i ‘r.r.i :^;y ■ ?<V-' ' ••/'• 

International Herald Tribune ; Friday, December 23, 1994 


\ ^ifc- 
<« 4 pV5— ^ 


% ‘ *i ^ 'f , 

V 


f,--' 


• rr.-vv?^' 



THE TRIB INDEX- IIP qnD 

byBloomberg compiled 


„ ; • ■ • ... 


Asia/Pacific 


«Ppro-weiBmr^:3Z% 
Ctose: 12&42 Pthvj; 124JB 


APIWx. weighting: 37% 
Ctow: 114.QBPre*.: 11106 


S O N D 
1894 


North America 


Approx, we&taq: 28% 
Close. 9628 Prgv- 35.38 


Latin America 


Apprex weighting: 5% 
Ooaa 107^4 Piev.: 11153 



irtxi i-dA •- • 1" •• :. * , 


J A S 


77w index trades US- dollar votes w of stocks n Tokyo, Now York London. «W 
Arawittw. Australia. Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Chile. Denmark. Finland. 
Franca, Germany, Hong Kong, Italy. Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand. Norway, 
Singapore, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and Venezuela. For Tokyo. No* York ana 
London, the index is composed of tfw 20 top Issues m terms d market capitafeadon. 
otherwiso tfw fan lap stocks oia tracked. 


Industrial Sectors 


Ths- fter. % TM. Pm- % 

do— dOM draqe doaa do* deny 

Enarsy h& 48 11229 -d.17 Capitol Goods map tfeas ^AO 

UMMes 122.19 121,87 *<126 Rawlhtertah 13Q.63 129.76 +0.67 

Rnance 11195 112.B6 ->037 Consumer Goods mts 103.12 40.06 

Sendees u0£1 11065 +0.14 MaceOamouB mm 115.80 +104 

For mom Intonnatlon about the Max, a booklet la avaiteWo free of c/ra/ge. 

Wrim to Trfb Max, 181 Avenue Charles tie Gau5e. 92521 NeuBy Codex. Fiance. 


Ripples 
Of Mexico 
Widen 

Currency’s Float 

Sinks Debt Prices 


Reuters 

LONDON — The battered 
market in beads of emerging 
economies was dealt another 
blow Thursday os Mexico float- 
ed its currency, and analysts 
predicted more volatility in 
debt instruments from Latin 
America to Russia. 

Third World debt securities 
already had been slumping af- 
ter a 15 percent devaluation of 
the Mexican peso Tuesday, 
which was largely a response to 
a threat of renewed insurrection 
in its southern state of Chiapas. 

On Thursday, Mexico in ef- 
fect gave up defending even the 
lower value of the peso by al- 
lowing the currency to float — 
“which scared people all the 
more,” one trader m debt of 
emerging economies said. 

East European debt was also 
hit by the sell-off. 

“People are getting crushed 
in Latin America, and where 
there’s an opportunity to take 
profits elsewhere, they are do- 
ing so,” another trader said. 

Concern over another insur- 
rection, in the Chechnya repub- 
lic of Russia, also weighed on the 
market, dragging down bonds of 
Russia’s foreign trade bank to 
26 5 percent of face value from 
28.75 percent Wednesday. 

The costs of quelling the 
North Caucasus territory’s bid 
for independence could harm 
Russia’s budget, but the main 
concern was a broader one of 
political volatility, analysts rai d . 

“You can draw parallels with 
Mexico — there is civilian un- 
rest, and the administration is 
shaky at the best of times,” one 
debt trader said. Another add- 
ed, “People are talking about 
the Chiapas-Chechnya factor.” 

Mexican par bonds slid four 
points in London to 54 points 
bid in afternoon trading Dis- 


Thyssen Is Fit to Be Wired 

Steel Titan Wants to Be Phone Giant 


By Brandon Mitchener 

International Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — Thyssen AG, a titan of 
German heavy industry with interests in steel, 
elevators and dviJ engineering, plans to be- 
come one of Germany’s biggest phone com- 
panies by the end of the decade, company 
executives said Thursday. 

Thyssen is widely considered an also-ran in 
Germany’s booming market for telecom- 
munications services, but Dieter Vogel, chair- 
man of a newly founded unit, Thyssen Tele- 
com AG, said the company was “better- 
positioned than many imagine” and would 
rise to the head of the pack. 

“We expect annual revenue of 10 billion 
Deutsche marks [$6.36 billion] by the end of 
the decade,” said Mr. Vogel. The company's 
entire 1993 revenue, of which telecommunica- 
tions accounted for less than 50 million DM, 
totaled 33.5 billion DM. 

Thyssen shares rose 7 JO DM. to 290.50 
DM on Thursday. 

If realized, the company’s ambitions in 
telecommunications would propel it to a star- 
ring role in a sector that is expected to surpass 
car manufacturing to become Germany’s 
most important industry, doubling in size to 
around 100 billion DM by the year 2003 from 
50 billion DM in 1993. 

Many analysts remain skeptical about 
Thyssen’s promises, however, which they say 
presume a stellar performance that is costly, a 
long way off and far from certain. 

“ft might have been better to save their 
money, bolster their balance sheet and stick 
with steel,” said Jenny Tora, a capital goods 
and steel analyst at Merrill Lynch & Co. in 
London, of the company’s diversification. 

“It’s generally considered that diversifica- 
tion, which was fashionable in the 1970s and 


early 1980s. was often os not a mistake,” said 
Mrs. Tora. “Most companies that have read 
the textbooks are busy sp inning off noncore 
businesses. I don’t see why Thyssen should 
succeed where so many others Have failed.” 

Starting virtually from scratch, Thyssen 
plans to invest 3 billion to 4 billion DM in 
telecommunications services over the next five 
years, including mobile and stationary voice 
and data services as well as interactive media. 

It will apply for a license to operate a 
telephone and data network when that mar- 
ket is liberalized in 1998, according to Mr. 
Vogel. He also said Thyssen had taken a stake 
in the GeseQschaft fflr Datenfunk consor- 
tium, which is led by RWE AG and includes 
Mannesmarm AG and Deutsche Bank AG, 
Germany’s biggest bank. The consortium 
won a government license for data communi- 
cations earlier this year. 

Mr. Vogel did not disclose the stake's size. 

Many analysts said RWE, VEBA AG and 
Viag AG, three diversified utilities that are 
the company’s major domestic competitors in 
the private sector, have what could be an 
unbeatable edge over Thyssen in telecom- 
munications. “There's a lot more in the cul- 
ture of a utility company that makes you 
think they could run a phone company ” said 
Mrs. Tora, worrying that Thyssen would ne- 
glect its relatively competitive specialty steel 
business. 

Thyssen posted a loss of 1 billion DM inits 
steel business in the financial year that ended 
on Sept 30, 1993. 

“Thyssen has no infrastructure or know- 
how that apply to phone services, and its 
pockets are not as deep as those of VEBA, 

See THYSSEN, Page 13 


Fed Was Split on Last Rate Rise 


By Keith Bradsher 

Sew York Tina Service 


ciiwiutfiaiaiHBnwwtaii See DEBT, Page 12 


WASHINGTON —The U.S. 
central bank’s policy-making 
committee was deeply divided 
over whether to raise short-term 
interest rates by three-quarters 
of a percentage point on Nov. 
15, according to minutes of the 
meeting released Thursday. 

While the final vote was unan- 
imously in favor of the rate in- 
crease, a minority of the mem- 
bers of the 12-person Federal 


Open Market Committee initial- 
ly favored a half-point increase; 
the minutes said. These mem- 
bers argued that the effect of five 
earlier mterest-rate increases this 
year on the economy had not yet 
been felt, and that such a large 
increase could damage consum- 
er and business confidence. 

But these members eventual- 
ly went along after deciding 
that, “they could accept the de- 
gree of restraint preferred by 
the majority because of the 


Page 11 


Canada Slaps 
Excise Tax on 
US. Magazine 


quite small difference in the ef- 
fects of the alternative moves 
on the economy over time,” the 
minutes said. 

The disagreement is signifi- 
cant because it represents the 
first time this year that some 
members of the Fed have ar- 
gued for a slower pace. Until 
now, the committee has been 
unusually unified, with only the 
occasional dissent in favor of an 
even faster pace of interest rate 
increases. 


By Clyde H. Farnsworth 

New York Times Service 

TORONTO — The Canadi- 
an government on Thursday 
announced measures to protect 
its recording and publishing in- 
dustries, including a punitive 
tax on some U.S. magazines. 

The tax, which would affect 
Panaditm issues of Sports Illus- 
trated and possibly other maga- 
zines, could provoke direct U.S. 
retaliation, although such a tax 
is not specifically prohibited by 
the North American Free Trade 
Agreement. 

Although the two countries 
enjoy the world’s largest ex- 
changes of goods and services, 
cultural tensions overhang the 
relationship. Ottawa has come 
under increasing pressure from 
rianariiwn magazine publishers, 
who complain that Sports Illus- 
trated attracts Canadian adver- 
tising that should go to their 
publications. 

The argument that the eco- 
nomic health of Canadian pub- 
lishing underpins a national 
cultural identity has high reso- 
nance here but wins little sym- 
pathy in the United States. 

“We have made our feelings 
very clear to them at high lev- 
els,” said James J. Blanchard, 
the U.S. ambassador to Cana- 
da. “There may well have to be 
retaliation or a separate, special 
301. We are looking at aB our 
options.” 

Section 301 of American trade 
law empowers President Bill 
Clinton to strike at imports from 
countries that take unfair trade 
action against UB. exports. 

NAFTA, which also covers 
trade with Mexico, exempts cul- 
tural industries from the dis- 
mantling of trade barriers. But 
while Canada would not violate 
the accord by taking discrimi- 
natory action against Time 
Warner Ino, the publisher of 
Sports Illustrated, the United 
States also would not violate 
the agreement by retaliating. 


“We have no problem if they 
want to subsidize these indus- 
tries,” Mr. Blanchard said. 
“Whore we object is when they 
act to penalize our industries, 
making us pay the cost.” 

Time Warner publishes six 
Canadian issues a year of Sports 
Illustrated through a satellite 
printing operation in Montreal. 

Under what i$ called a split 
run. Tune Warner essentially 
takes the American magazine, 
adds a few pages of Canadian 
editorial cod ten i and turns it 
into a Canadian product that 
competes for advertising. 

Through satellite printing. 
Tune Warner found a way to 
bypass 20-year-old Canadian re- 
slnctions barring Canadian 
companies from writing off their 
advertising costs in American 
magazines for tax purposes. The 
restrictions originally covered 
magazines printed in the United 
States and trucked into Canada. 

Canadian publishers have 
worried that if Sports Ilhistrat- 
ed’s split run is not challenged, 
foreign F.n^iiah-ianflMugft maga- 
zines with significant circulation 
in Canada could follow suiL 

■ Progress Seen in Tokyo 

The chances of clinching a 
U.S. -Jap an agreement on great- 
er access to Tokyo’s financial- 
services industry before a year- 
end deadline have brightened, 
sources famili ar with the talks 
said Thursday, according to a 
Reuters dispatch from Tokyo. 

“They might get something 
when they get together next 
week, so the prime minister and 
the president can point to it 
when they meet,” a source said. 
Negotiators from the two sides 
are expected to meet in Seattle 
on Wednesday and Thursday, 
while Mr. Clinton and Tomuchi 
Murayama, Japan’s prime min- 
ister, are to meet on Jan. 11 in 
Washington. 



WALL STREET WATCH 


Deriving Profit From Banks 9 Losses 


By Saul Hansell 

Sew York Times Service 

NEW YORK — High-rolling hedge- 
fund managers Eke George Soros were 
the first to disclose that they lost money 
in the plunging bond market this year. 
Then came Piper Jaffray & Hop wood 
and other staid mutual-fund m an ag ers. 


risky interest rate bets gone bad. 

Now banks are coming dean. Some 
big ones, including PNC Bank Corp., 
Keycorp and Banc One, have already 
said they would be hurt by problems m 
their investment portfolios. But banking 
analysts said there were many more that 
compiled similar losses but have not yet 
been as forthcoming. 

Analysts said it was difficult to deter- 
mine which banks were hardest hit. That 
is because banks provide only hnuteo 
disclosure about the effects of changes in 
interest rates on their balance sheets. 

Indeed, the reason that banking losses 
are just starting to trickle out now — 
rather than in the spring when thenrob- 
lwr« at mutual funds first emerged is 
not because the losses are newer. 
it is because accounting rules make it 
easier for banks to hide their mistakes. 

For buyers of banking shares, the sil- 
ver Erring is that the expectation of this 
bad news has already depressed pnees 
indiscriminately across the board. Ana- 
lysts said there was an opportunity to 
buy undervalued banks that have not 


been hurt, or may even benefit, from 
rising interest rates. 

Analysts said many banks would face 
up to their losses by early 1995. They 
would do so by selling losing investments 
to concentrate the pain in one quarterly 
reduction in earnings. 

Some likely candidates, analysts said, 
include the Fleet Financial Group, Boat- 
men's Bancshares and Huntington Banc- 
shares. Other blinks — including Shaw- 

Rising interest rates 
have depressed banks’ 
stock prices — even 
those that stand to gain. 

mut National, Central Fidelity and 
Integra Financial — will probably not 
take big one-time write-offs. Instead, 
they may simply suffer through the next 
few years with depressed earnings be- 
cause their credit-market investments 
pay low interest 

The problems could get worse before 
they get better. “If we see another in- 
crease in rates, we will see some more 
banks start to hemorrhage,” said Thom- 
as Hanley, a bank analyst with CS First 
Boston. 

The interest-rate losses are concentrat- 
ed among regional and local banks, which 
turned to investments in bonds when the 
drop in loan demand in the late 19S0s and 
early 1990s cut deeply into earnings. 


Many banks borrowed at low short-term 
rates to pour money into higher-yielding 
longer-torn bonds that appeared to offer 
safe returns with little effort. 

“It’s like putting a bowl of candy in 
front of a child,” said Frank DeSantis, a 
bank analyst at Donaldson, Lufkin & 
Jeanette Securities Cojp. “It was there 
for the taking.” 

U.S. bank stocks have lost about 10 
percent of their value as a result of the 
problems. Among banks that analysts 
said might now be undervalued is First 
Interstate Bancorp, which gains ground 
from interest rate increases because an 
unusually high percentage of its deposi- 
tors’ money is in checking accounts that 
do not pay interest. Thus, when market 
rates rise, its interest costs do not rise as 
fast as at other banks. 

The big New York banks, such as 
Citibank and Chase Manhattan, also do 
not face sharp losses from rising interest 
rates, largely because their investments 
are more diversified than those of small- 
er institutions. 

Even with the sketchy information 
that has been disclosed so far, it is clear 
that many banks with paper profits on 
their bond investments at the end of last 
year now have positions that are deeply 
in the red. 

A study by Morgan Stanley Sc Co., 
which includes information not dis- 
closed in bank statements, shows that as 
of Sept. 30, the value of the $217 billion 
of bonds in the portfolios of 24 big 
regional banks hat! declined $5.4 billion. 



CURRENCY A INTEREST RATES 


Dec- 22 

Cross Rates ^ Y<B « 

s C EXM. F.F. £*6 UBS- ia*l 14*0* 

- --- — ivu usi un U0H * Itz __ 1QB ua 212225 wo* 

nwaT a* sac s asas sms lMS! . ius« urn* uw usj 

2SJS, H — = — SS-SKS" 

ST SS^iJSaSS -“| SSS-H 

Porti see ms «« Q4C its m® ta M. - ue* 

52 2® £ •» SS — SS* u» "*• 

TSDR UD ..^^.^izartetonxinsn to other Oirrtor^ Taranto 


Eurocurrency Deposits 

Swiss French 

Dollar D-Mark Franc Sterling Franc Vei 

1 month S -5 - 5^s>4 3-3 5 ■* . S 4 1U-1 

3 months 6 ■ 5>*-5*o «s-4'J. t> ■* ?’« ! 

6 months * -* t*** l 't 6 -t 

1 rear 7 -7 • SW-5** 4 -4 7 *b-fv. 4-7 7-3 

Sourcrs-- Rwtr**. LtoyOs Bonk 

RUes apaMooWr to Maraank atoosfts o> Si mutton adnhmm tor eovlvaletitL 


ft •&'- 
6'. 4*. 
2 *-2’» ft’ 


Key Money Rates 


i ECU UW MW MU) 15402 4S«* w ‘ ^ 

TSDR uw ^Y^ZdZartctoftxinoa ^ centaf3 -' Torant ° 

Ckninos to AtiBjmdarrc London, now - .... 

rotes at 3 run. doUar; Units of ISO.- NO-' rot 

o: To buy one pound; b: To bov 

mn rk M e 


Other DoBer Values 

Contact Pvt 

sr«~* » 
as » sags 

CMneserwn MU* iSe*** 04556 

% enchkonmo W» p ** xdaM 
1 panto krone 4.W 

FhLRMfidui 


Cmmaot *** 
Mcx peso 

Non*, w** 

pooibPMv i® 
PortcscaOo HB32 

RW».n»** »ZH» 

s * d,rtwI ss 

SIM.S 1,401 


Currency 
j. Air. rand 
5 .icar.maa 


Taiwan J 

■nsnww 

Tnrtdsh lira 

UAESrhom 

Vonex-bafiv. 


6U fV> 
Mi M 

. . Ih A 

Mnantb Interbank 64ft 6% 

AHMantft Mertxmk «*■ 

&46 146 

France 

imwvenHon ref 5JH UO 

CaHmoaer 5* 546 

vnwnn Morton* S*. 5*. 

himA totarbonk 6JW &jOO 

e^nantti Interbank M M 

ia-rw OAT 103 135 

Sources: Renton. Bloomberg, Merrill 
Lynch, Bankof Tt#mCammont>onk,GnKHt 
Lyonnof*. 

Gold 

am. pm. am 

Zurich 381J5 W1J5 -tUfl 

London 381 JO 3S1J5 — 15D 

New York 3*350 38250 

US-doUamparoutca- London ofRdUBx- 
Inm Zorich end New York aponMF and dos- 
ing prices: New York Carnot (FebnoryJ 
Source: Reuters. 


o«™rd»rf»* ^ ‘SE’SS 

KSU, « « ^ SSST SB - - 

SS:r E-S-S-BSSSttSSS® 

taros; inc to* {Ams ^^ J [ P^SBaik of ratos m*yoi. ***“ 

t 


Co* money 
I-monlt Mertwn* 


n^wr GeMftnMnt Mod 








■ ■" '■ 'w.'V ? : 


We wish 


all of our clients and friends 
a happy holiday season and a prosperous 

New Year. 


JBf°B 

BANK JULIUS BAER 

THE FINE ART OF SWISS BANKING 


ZurfA, Befnfafaram 36. CH-BOfO Zia«irefcpl»ne(pi|ZM5l » 

Genera, Park, Bordeaux, Monaco, Guernsey, r r a id dn rt, London, New York, Los Anpeha, San Francisco, 
Psfcn Be ech, Montreal, Lugano, Mexico dry, Hong Kong 




V* V 












JN 

B 


T 

Hot 

ing 

cor 

edj 

bar 

ha> 

OW 

a i 
i»: 
1 

cal 

ha* 

so 

of 

W 


tb 

tb 

tb 

th 

je- 

m 

fr 


Page 12 

MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1994 





Earnings Outlook 
Gives Lift to Stocks 


Vio Auedand Prm 




Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

NEW YORK — Blue-chip 
stocks rose on Thursday as in- 
vestors grew confident about 
corporate earnings and as mon- 
ey flowed out of Mexico and 
into American investments. 

The market turmoil in Mexi- 
co, where the government decid- 
ed to let the peso float after a 15 


with expectations. The govern- 
ment revised its estimate of 
third-quarter gross domestic 
product growth to 4.0 percent 
annually from 3.9 percent Ini- 
tial unemployment claims rose 
3,000 last week. 


Cyclical and technology 


U.S. Stocks 


percent devaluation proved in- 
sufficient, depressed Telefonos 
de Mexico, American depositary 
receipts of other Mexican com- 
panies and a few bank stocks. 

But otherwise, the develop- 
ments helped to boost UJS. 
stocks as money repatriated 
from Mexico went into the 
American market. 

The Dow Jones industrial av- 
erage rose 13.12 points, to 
3,814.92, extending the 34.65- 
point rally on Wednesday, al- 
though declining issues held a 
slight lead over gainers. 

Volume on the Big Board to- 
taled 339.67 milli on shares on 
Thursday, off from 378.81 mil- 
lion shares on Wednesday, and 
Tettfonos, the most actively 
traded share, fell 4V4 to 4<H4. 

Economic data released 
Thursday morning were in line 


stocks were again leading 
market higher on hopes of im- 
proved earnings in 1995. 

“The autos and the alumi- 
nums should be up bemuse the 
economy seems to be still pretty 
strong," said Donald Smith, 
president of Donald Smith & 
Co. in Paramus, New Jersey. 

Auto stocks rallied as Chrys- 
ler said sales at its Jeep-Eagle 
division climbed to a record and 
as CS First Boston began re- 
search coverage on Ford with a 
“buy” rating. Chrysler jumped 
IK to 48K, GM gained IK to 
3954 and Ford added 54 to 26K. 

Intel, continuing its rebound 
from recent troubles with its 
Pentium chip, rose 54 to 6354. 

Citicorp dropped 2 to 41 K 
and BankAmerica declined ¥o to 
3914 as bank stocks fell after 
reports that SLG. Warburg had 
downgraded Citicorp and some 
analysts voiced concern about 
banks' exposure to Latin Ameri- 
can economies. (AP, Bloomberg, 
Knight- Ridder) 


The Dow 


Daily dosings of the 
.Dow Jones industrial average 



4 4 A 

1994! . 


S O N D 


JHT 


NYSE Most Actives 



Vat. Htoh 

Law 

Lost 

Chg. 

TeWlmc 

902343 42 Vj 

40W 

4016 

—4ft 

YPFSOC 

4*136 21 Yi 

30% 

31«. 

—ft 

RJRNoh 

45009 5H 

svy 

5ft 

—ft 

Qticorp 

45340 4366 

4116 

41*6 

—1 ft 

GrtVWr 

37427 39% 

38 

39ft 

tlft 

FordMS 

36886 27 V0 

26V6 

26ft 

_ 

GTtoavsa 

31701 34 

3116 

32ft 


PnBMr 

28906 57 Vi 

Sfifth 

56ft 


GTrttxao 

27257 20M 

UK 

lift 

—3*4 

Cocoa 

26696 52 W 

51 Vh 

Sift 

—1ft 

FBM 

2S9SS 74M 

7318 

73ft 



AT&T 

25575 51 W 

50W 

51ft 

- 1 

WWMart 

34786 23% 

22 V* 

22 ft 

— ft 

wdsfd 

23690 2116 

20 *h 

20 ft 

—ft 

Merck 

31469 3*16 

3816 

38ft 

—ft 


Dow Jones A ve r age s 


(Mi Utah Low LMt Ota. 


Indus 3IW.O 3«M« MOW? 3814." *1X13 
Trent UtB-OS 140MS T 400J7 1409X8 -US 
Utfl 182J4 182JS 111.26 IBl.ffl -Ut 
dm 12SSX81H9J1 123191 1JS9.10 -S.06 


Standard A Poor’s Indexes 


industrials 

nano, 
utilities 
Fl nonet 
SP 500 
SR 100 


rtta* Low 
54199 54L* 
J4&M 343X0 
15135 151.39 
4Z03 41X9 
46121 459J3 
43027 428X1 


Oose OlVs 
547X3 +0X4 
345X1 +2.19 
151X7—0X3 
41X3—045 
459X7 + 0X6 
429X5 + 0X9 


NYSE Indexes 


High Low Lost Ota. 


Compo si te 

Industrials 

Tramp. 

Uiatr 

Kronen 


351X8 250X6 25071 —0X3 
318X9 317X8 317X9 *0X1 
21857 217X0 218.38 - 0X3 

mw mxo I99J5 —an 

197X6 194.11 196X6 —1X0 


NASDAQ Indexes 


High Low Law a»g. 


Composite 

industrials 

Banks 

msortnee 

Finance 

Trow. 


739.11 737.9T 
738X5 734X7 
69446 69177 
91142 9IM9 
B5&S1 85370 
636.73 632.13 


73804 +892 
737X7 —0.05 
69270 —0X3 
911X6 —165 
853.96 —1.69 
63619 *471 


AMEX Stock Index 


High Low Last Otg. 
428X3 426*8 427X3 -841 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


Metals 


aw . 

M Ask 

ALUMINUM <HW*6radgl 
Del kin per maMCto” 

Scot 1893X0 WMXO 

Swrt 1127X0 19Z7A 

COPPER CAT HOC E5 (Htoft 
Donors per 

Soot 30X00 3 0 0 6X0 

Forward 2974X0 2975X0 

iSUd tSs eS 

iMUnwtnttricIgn 
cbm B473X0 8474X0 

p^wni 8620X0 8630X0 

Man per metric to* 

Spof 5905X0 WiM 

cSword 600800 601000 

UNC iseedal High Crude J 
□Star* per mWi-Ktra 
St 1117X0 1110X0 

forward '145X0 1M6X0 


Praytoo* 
BM Ask 


1081X0 1002X0 
1918X0 1919X0 
Crate) 


2967X0 2970X0 
2947X0 3940X0 


634X0 635X0 
653X0 654X0 


8300X0 83NX0 
8535X0 8545.00 


bub juoxo 

5930X0 594X0 


1104X0 1106X0 
1132X0 1134X0 


Financial 

Hick low aese change 
MMONTH STIRLING tUFFE) 
isqaom • cts oi m pci 


Mar 


S3 

92X6 

*1.97 

9271 

9201 

+0X1 

Llnch. 

91X4 

91/7 

91X3 

Unch. 

91.25 

91.18 

9122 

— 0X3 

91X5 

91X0 

91X1' 

— 0X4 

90.96 

90X3 

9093 

-0X5 

9092 

90/9 

90X2 

—0X3 


90X9 

90.90 

9093 

9053 

—0X3 
— 0X3 

KL9S 

90.90 

9054 

Unch. 


90X8 

50.90 

9090 

9091 

+ QX2 
+M1 


Est. volume: 16. 467. Open ML: 396X21. 
MAO NTH EURODOLLARS tUFFE} 

Si mDihui - pts of HI pet 


NASDAQ Most Actives 


Dollar Stumbles After 
Traders Take Profits 


CanpUed by Our Staff From Dispatcher 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
slipped against other major cur- 
rencies Thursday as investors 
paused to reassess the impact of 
the collapsing Mexican peso. 

The dollar had been under- 
pinned in recent days by a repa- 
triation of funds from Mexico 


The dollar closed in New 
York at 1.S743 Deutsche marks, 
down from 1-5806 DM Wed- 
nesday and at 100.250 yen down 
from 100.475. The dollar rose to 
5.4705 French francs from 
5.4510 but slipped to 13315 
Swiss francs from 1.3340 francs. 


Foreign Exchange 


The pound strengthened to 


after the government devalued 
the peso late Tuesday. The Mex- 
ican currency has continued to 
slide since. The dollar traded at 
4.65 pesos Thursday, up from 
3.9870 pesos late Wednesday. 

But some profit-taking be- 
fore the year-end and thin trad- 
ing took the steam out of the 
dollar's rally, traders said. 

“Most people have estab- 
lished positions for the end of 
the year," said a Zurich-based 
dealer for a major Swiss b ank. 
“When something is offered, 
people are just not ready to 
change their positions.” 


To subscribe in France 


just cdl. toll free, 
05437 437 


513468 from $1.5421 

But the dollar pushed to an 8- 
year high against the f!an«tian 
dollar despite the Bank of Can- 
ada’s intervention in support of 
its currency. 

The dollar rose to 1 3987 Ca- 
nadian dollars from 13940 on 
Wednesday. 

Traders said several factors 
contributed to the Canadian 
currency’s weakness, including 
relatively steady Canadian in- 
terest rates amid higher U.S. 
rates, a worrisome budget defi- 
cit, and Quebec separatism. 

On back of those concerns, 
investment has stopped flawing 
into Canadian instruments, said 
Dave Glowacki, a trader at 
NBD Bank in Detroit. (Reuters, 
Knight-Ridder, Bloomberg) 



VoL Mgti 

LOW 

Last 

Chg. 

Intel 

44047 ail 

63ft 

63ft 

*ft 

Cx*s 


33ft 

34ft 

-ft 

Gentacor 

39457 18ft 

17ft 

18ft 

*116 

BavNTw 6 

39039 27ft 

26ft 

27ft 

-ft 

Novell 


17ft 

I7>V|» 

• 9U 

MksAs 

* - \rr-m 

60ft 

60ft 

—ft 

Oracle 

33650 4314 

42ft 

43ft 

-1ft 

MO 

//-lira 

lift 

18ft 

—ft 

Avkfreh 

26832 38ft 

33ft 

36 

—5 

TdCmA 

26087 22ft 

21ft 

21<V« 


DSC s 

23561 35ft 

32W U 

35 

-2Vu 

SaecHd 

71131 17ft 

IS'A 

16ft 

-1ft 

SunMic 

71009 36ft 

35 

3*17. 

♦ I 

rrtormi* 

20854 29ft 

28ft 

29 

-ft 

SaOck 


34 

34ft 

-5ft 


AMEX Most Actives 



VOL 

Mgh 

LOW 

L4Bt 

Chg. 

InterOig 

8816 

5ft 

5ft 

5ft 

-ft 

Vlaevrl 

7007 

1ft 

IV, . 

lVu 

— W. 

X CL Lid 

5669 

14 

ft 

*Vi» 

— V. 

USBiosd 

5543 

2 

Ift 

1ft 

— V. 

Greycne 

4417 

29. 

HVit 

9 

-47. 

Amdhl 

3933 

10ft 

10ft 

10ft 

-iii 

Stephen 

3914 

12ft 

11 

12ft 

US Ale 

3899 

31. 

79k 

3V. 


RavMOB 

3533 

3ft 

3ft 

3VU 

-v. 

VtacS 

3517 40 

39ft 

40 

• ft 


Market Sales 


NYSE 

Amex 


Today 

CKm 

339X7 

78A2 

319X2 


45050 

2477 

349X0 


in millions. 


Dow Jones Bend Averages. 


20 Bands 
19 Utllllta* 

TO Industrials 


Close 

93X1 

89,13 


Cft-ge 
—025 
— OilO 


NYSE Diary 


Advanced 
Declined 
UnchOTged 
Total Issues 
New Hiatts 
Now Laws 


1115 1473 

1215 881 

634 All 
2964 29A5 

36 41 

119 96 


AMEX Diary 


Advonced 
Declined 
Uncttoioed 
Total issues 
New Htons 
New Lows 


295 344 

307 257 

213 224 

815 825 

6 7 

25 a 


NASDAQ Diary 


Oose Prev. 


Advanced 
Declined 
U ndna M 
Total issues 
New Highs 
New Laws 


1650 1690 

1684 1473 

1807 1780 

5141 5142 

90 97 

131 144 


Spot C om modities 


Commodity 

Today 

Pray. 

Aluminum. Q> 

0X99 

0XS4 

Copper etectrotyttcr lb 

140 

1X1 

iron FOB, ton 

213X0 

71X00 

Lead. 10 

044 

0.44 

Stiver, trey a 

4755 

47*5 

Sleet (scrap), Ion 

127X0 

127X0 

Tin. to 

NA 

NA 

Zinc lb 

05574 

05994 



N.T. 

N.T. 

91X6 

—OQ6 


N.T. 

9LT. 

92X9 



N.T. 

N.T. 

9173 

fl(T7 

EsL votum*: 0. Open Ini.: 

2X76. 


VMOWTH EUROMARKS (UFFE) 


DM1 mflDot 

-at* of we pci 



Mar 

94X7 

94X0 

9447 

+ 0X4 


94X9 

94X4 

94X9 

+ 0X2 

Sep 

9X72 

9125 

9369 

93J1 


+ 0X1 


93X6 

93X0 

93X5 

+ 0X1 


92X1 

9278 

*2X1 

Unch. 


*2X1 

92X8 

92X0 


Dec 

9X44 

9ZXZ 

9245 

+ 0X1 


92J6 

W2S 

9138 

+ 0X1 

Joa 

9230 

92J0 

9230 

+ 0X1 


*234 

9270 

92X4 


Dec 

9120 

7270 

9270 

Unch. 


Est. volume; 41X33. Open tat: 667X14. 


S-MONTH PI BOR (MAT1F) 
FF3 DHIDM ■ PtS Of 100 pet 



Mar 

93J7 

73X8 

9136 

+0.11 

Jan 

71X0 

9270 

9199 

+ 0.12 

SaP 

91X0 

9153 

9179 

+ 0.12 

Dec 


7275 

92X5 

+ Q3B 

Mor 

7272 

7236 

+aos 

Jan 

9728 

72XB 

7277 

+ 0X7 

Sap 

92.15 

91.98 

92.1S 

+ 0X7 

Dec 

*2X7 

9101 

92X9 

+ 0X4 

Est.voUitrw: 65211. Open tat.: 1*5X40. 


LONG GILT {UFPE1 
■58X00 • pts 8 32nds of IN pet 
Dec 1W4J3 102-30 102-29 —M3 

Mar NO-15 102-05 Ttn-OB — 0-C3 

Jon N.T. N.T. 101-Oe —043 

Est. volume: 9,157. Open Int.: T71X87. 
GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND (LIFFE) 
DM 250X00 -Pt»Ot IN pet 
Mar 89X4 09X3 89X9 + 0X3 

Jon 89X6 8858 8974 +820 

EsL volume: 37X31. Open bit: 178171 
18-YEA R FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MAT IF) 


FFSoaxae 

Mar 

-ptsaMMpct 
in jo no. <2 

11136 

+070 

Jun 

11050 

109X0 

11070 

+ 072 


10972 

10972 

ira.12 

+ 072 

Dec 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

Unch. 


Est. volume: 103.137. Open Int.: 140705. 


May 

Walt 

NT. 

June 

1«X0 

MM0 

Jaty 

AW 

N.T. 

Sep 

N.T. 

Oct 

N.T. 

N0« 

N.T. 

Dae 

N.T. 


BRENT CRUDE OlMJPEl 

UX. Mien Per 

Mb 16« 8« SS ts 


APT 

Mar 

Job 

Jtv 


oa 


PK 

Jai 


1602 15.90 15X5 15X5 +80 

1 iw 15X8 15X7 +ft» 

&£ 15X9 16X0 15X9 +881 

14X7 16X1 16X7 1503 + 1H3 

lAifV taAS ]kA5 1AJJS Q.Q2 
ttt 16X2 1U2 16^-804 
NX NX NX 1514 -OX? 
NT NT. N.T. 1518 -MJ 
BtI N.T. N.T. 1822 —80* 
N X ILX NX 14 a -U* 
IMS 1630 16X0 16X4 — <UB 

150 1447 1647 1647 — 002 


FTSE Ml tUFFE) 
IT IQMX POlOf 


Stock Indexes 

HMi LOW Clew CMoge 


m per IIWIUJI 

MOT 3T3SX 31000 3125X + KL0 

j« N.T. NX 3137X +325 

Esl. volume: 9,555. Opon lot.: S&AZL 
CAC 40 (MAT1F) 

1963~ +H* 
££ 19 NX ,9 nx I982M +UJX 

as ^ ^ isa tug 

sS 200600 200600 2001X0 +14X0 

Est volume: 31X25. Open Int.: 55955 

Sources: Mai If. Associated Press, 
uEStinn FtncneXri Futons Exchange, 
Inn Petroleum Exchange. 


DtvMands 


Per Amt Rec 
IRREGULAR 


AmCopCvSea 
Centnnr ShsTr 
Emerg Mexico 
France GrttiFd 
GrtrCWno Fd 
India GrttiFd 
JardhtoFtom Ind 
Pilgrim Resell 
Stan Africa Fd 
u jb Fin odipfB 
WWdDJrVest 

STOCK 

ChemlTTol Chcm _ 10 96 

INCREASED 

a .15 12X0 
S M 1-3 
a AS 1-5 


- JS2S 12X0 

_ 74 12X2 

- 244 12-30 

_ 58 T2X0 

- .TO 12X0 

- XI S3 12-30 
_ .143 12-30 
_ Xt 12X0 
. -215 12-30 
_ JO IX 
. .1(06 12X0 


1-17 

12-22 

1-19 

1-13 

1-13 

1X5 

1-19 

1-16 

1- 13 

2 - 1 
1-13 


3-5 3-15 


CTS Cora 
Pst Lena Island 
Ro chester G&E 


2-5 

1-20 

1-25 


SPECIAL 


Amor FMEntera 
comma Bkstnin 
Ftamnatn NaftBk 


JO 12X0 
.10 12X1 
X5 12-29 


12X1 

1-17 

1231 


Brkteevllta Sva 
FFVA Fin! 
Humphrey Hasp 
WstmBkPR 


XS 12-31 
.15 IX 
X44 T2X0 
A0 12-31 


V31 

1-18 

2-5 

1-16 


AmlsdMtplitv06 
AmStratlncPrt 
Gemini n Inc 
Pilgrim PrmRT 
Temn China 
TemoDrcRKHi 
TemoGrblnc 
Temp Vietnam Dap 


.12 1231 
.125 1230 
43 12X0 
X72 12X0 
.10 12-30 
X95 12X0 
-B3S 12X0 
XS5 12X0 


2-1 

1-12 

1X1 

1-19 

1-12 

1-12 

1-12 

1-12 


CentMolnePwr 


Comp CervUntdas 
Fed One BM 


Industrials 


High Low Last Settle CVoe 
GASOIL (I PE) 

ux. dollars per metric ta»4ets of MO lens 
JOB 141X0 14075 14075 14UM —825 

Feb 144X0 14X25 143X0 143X0 UnctL 

14125 145X0 14575 —125 

14575 146X0 V642S UlKh. 


BMWVa) 

Highlander incFd 
InctaPSa tnc 
MB LA Fin* 


MatanRttyiiw 
ke GalCo 


Roanoke ( 

Summit pptys 
System Sattwara 

Utd Natl Bcd 
W estern Bk PR 
Wlrtfon Ffni 


725 1-10 
276 12-29 
JB 12X1 
.116 12X0 
.115 12X0 
jn 12X0 
425 12X0 
75 1-U 
3675 1-11 
.12 12-27 
3J 1-13 
M 12X1 
.10 1231 


1X1 

1-26 

1-20 

M3 

1-10 

1-10 

1-20 

2-1 

2-15 

IX 

2-1 

1-16 

1-17 


Bankers Trust to Settle 


EE 

severdaentstotlMtmilhonsgdo^ra^^. . , 

only in connection that were too complicated for 

The US. bank . S0 ^;^ D RaTlt . pr , then gave the Gtncirinafi 

Gibson, die a^aes^said; for ^ derivative, which 


t, the agffloes sata “^^^^vatives. which 
^ te company’s annual reports. . 


subsequent^ 

BAT Wins Tobacco Battle 

WASHINGTON (Bloomberg) --BAT Miwte : 

chained tire moger would cut compebfaon m the US, Qg^e ; 
SSS? WtZE* to spin off several American Tobao» ag* : 

braai a^MAmOTcan Tobacco factoryin Nortii Carijto^- 
Among the brands to be relinquished are the discount Montdmr 
brandand the full-priced Tareyton brand. : 

American Brands said it would repurdiase up to lO^Ihoa 
shares of its common stock after the BAT 
another 10 mfllion-share purchase authon^i by the MfflKtfmy’s 
board three weeks ago, American Brands could buy 
percent of its outstanding common shares. American ttamas-> 
stock jumped SI on the news, to $37.75. • • \ • 

MascoTech Unveils Divestiture Plan 

TAYLOR, Michigan (Bloomberg) — MascoTech Int said 
Thursday it would take a $300 miBion after-tax charge ^'. the 
fourth quarter to dispose of certain business groups, resulting la a 
substantial loss for the fourth quarter and year. - ■ ■ ■ _ 

As part of an anticipated restructuring in tended to focus du its 
automotive parts business, MascoTech wiB other liquidate ^ 
divest businesses with antnial sales of about $700 millioiL -Masco- 
Tech said it believed these businesses, when disposed of^will 
garner c ash and other proceeds of about $400 milli on. - 

Borland Tumbles to All-Time Low 



$0 (ot 


ut?T* 

mud 


- ■ 




SCOTT VALLEY, California (Bloomberg) — Borland Interna- 
tional Inc. shares tumbled to an all-time low, slunmmg $3.ih;laie 
trading to $8375, after the software publisher said it ejipected a 

**_ ^ Ic-vqc that tts rhirf nawal i nff nffipw 




“5bstentiar third-quarter loss and that its chief operath^ officer 
resumed after less than a year on the job. Borland, once the thlrd- 


largest U.S. software company, also said it would make unspecified 
“significant changes" in operations because of operating losses and 
lower revenue. The company also hired Boot, Allen & Hamilton, a 
management Firm, to help it formulate a long-term strategy: . 


For the Record 


Salomon Brothers Inc. said it sold $405 million of corporate 
securities on behalf of the Orange County investment pool after 
receiving bids of $2.8 billion for the securities. (AFX) 


mil 

*»■ 

nf 

sw 

roc 

At 

H- 

Stil 

M 

i%S 

*k> 

I 

u»Q 

sale 

< 

jut 

9m 

MM 

fwr 

S 

W 

lies 


DEBT: Mexico’s Currency Moves Depress Emerging-Country Bond Prices 


Dmtimied from Page 11 
counted Mexican bonds were 
bid at 76, a fall of more than 
three points. The bonds were 
issued as part of the restructur- 
ing of Mexico’s bank debt, in 
which some loam were repaid 
at face, or par, value, while oth- 
ers were redeemed at a discount 
from the full value but higher 
interest rates. 

Other Latin American instru- 
ments fell in tandem, with Ar- 
gentinian par-value down more 


than three points at 39.625 bid 
and Brazilian bonds down four 
points at 79-5. 

“The market’s clearly uncer- 
tain and has taken a lot of pain. 
Mexico has always been a 
benchmark asset and has re- 
rated the whole sector down,” a 
trader said. 

Analysts said it was difficult 
to see where the bottom line 
was in the emerging debt mar- 
ket, but with the Christinas 
holidays about to begin, there 


was unlikely to be a rally before 
year-end. 

“It's just chasing the market 
down which creates problems. 
It keys stop-loss sells, becomes 
self-perpetuating." 

“Some very good values have 
been exposed in this panicky 
sell-off," said a British trader. 
“I'm looking for when I might 
take advantage of prices, but it 
doesn't make much difference if 
I do that now or in January. 
Sellers are in more of a rush 


than buyers at the moment." 

But analysts said the sell-off 
throughout South America was 
essentially a knee-jerk reaction. 

“It’s nothing to do with fun- 
damentals," Ingrid Iversen of 
Morgan Grenfell said. 

Analysts said Brazil and Ar- 
gentina were unlikely to deval- 
ue their currencies, although the 
shock waves from Mexico sent 
their stock markets plunging 6 
percent Wednesday. 


Ukraine Loan Is Geared 


Compiled by Our Staff Fnm Dispatches 

WASHINGTON — The World Bank on Thursday an- 
nounced a $500 milli on loan to Ukraine and praised the 
policies of President Leonid Kuchma. 

“The government under President Ku chma has demon- 
strated strong commitments to reform by inmlementing'a 
series of difficult and far-reaching measures, 14 the lending 
agency said, including ending most price controls and export-' 
quo tas, unifying currency exchange rates, reducing subsidies 
and setting up a safety net for Ukraine’s poorest citizens. 

Mr. Kuchma said last month that after Ukraine agreed to 
dismantle its nuclear weapons and to reform its economy. 
Western countries should come through with more aid. 

The loan is designed to help stabilize and restore growth to 
Ukraine’s economy after sharp, declines that followed the 
collapse of the Soviet Union. The World Bank estimated 
Ukrainian per-capita income at $1,190 last year, compared 
with $2300 in 1990. ( AP, Reuters ) 





1 . , ■ 


ttm 

1 

tjw 

nru 

** 


* 


m 

«nM 

Dm 

m 

asm 

1 


KYSE 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Agoncv Fran™ Prime Dec 22 
CtaMPrtv. 


Amsterdam 


ABN Amro HM 

ACF Holding 

Aegon 

Anoid 

Akin Nobel 

Bols-Wes5anen 

C5M 

DSM 

Elsevier 

Father 

FarllS AMEV 

Gist-Brocudn 

HBG 

Heineken 

Hoeaavent 

Hunter Douglas 

IHC Calond 

Inler Mueller 

inTl Nedorlond 

KLM 

KNP BT 

KPN 

NedllOVd 

Oce Grinfen 

PaMioed 

Philips 

Poivgrom 

Robeco 

Fodomca 

Rollnco 

Rorenro 

Royal Dulcn 

5tor* 

Unilever 

Von Ommeren 

VNU 

Wallers/ Kiuwer 


61.10 60.70 

33.90 34.10 
11220 112 
5320 53.40 
:?770 195.10 
30.70 33J0 

68 67.70 
138X0 13630 

17.90 17X0 

12.10 1220 

"9 iSR 

262X0 261X0 
264X0 364 

7t 76X0 
78X0 78X0 

43X0 43 JO 
91X0 91X0 
97 30 82.10 
4320 4340 
4920 4850 
5140 5920 
5670 56 

7820 78.40 
4640 4740 
52X0 5220 
80.10 80.10 
11260 112 
48X0 48.70 
IIS 11380 
83.20 83.20' 

188.90 16840 
4420 4130' 


Rhelnmetall 

Sobering 

Stamens 

Thvssen 

Vorto 

VeDo 

VEW 

VIOO 

Volkswagen 
Wei la 
OAX Index 


204 JO 207 JO | 
45X0 


*5 

181 178X0 
125 124.90 




Brussels 


Almonll 
Arbed 
Borco 
BBL 
Behoerl 
CBB 
CMB 
CNF 
Cocker III 
Coteoa 
Colruvl 
Dehnire 
Elecirobel 
Elect rallna 
Forth AC- 
GIB 
CJBL 
Gevoerl 
Gkrvertxjl 
immobei 
Kredtalbank 
Mosone 
Petrollna 
Powerfln 

Pedicel 644 446 

Bovale Beige 49S0 «io 
Soc Gen Bonoue 8120 8070 
Soc Gen Belgique 2165 7165 


7630 7700 

4960 4810 
2470 2<M 
4400 4400 
22750 22725 
17050 1 7000 
2585 2525 
I960 1990 
200 200 
1040 1036 
7480 7740 
1284 1762 
5690 5670 

2860 2820 

2720 2610 
1252 1250 
I860 3800 
1498 1476 
4400 4400 
2720 2700 
6690 6680 

1390 1360 

9390 9330 
2970 2915 


Sonna 
Solvtiy 
Tessenderlo 
Trociebel 
UCB 

Union MnliCtt 
Wagons LIK 


Mus : 717 


13100 13100 
15400 15100 

10400 1022S 

9640 9600 

74600 24125 

2480 7475 

6020 6020 
722421 


Frankfurt 


AEG 

Akotel 5EL 
Allkmz Hold 
A llano 
Asho 
BASF 


150X0 149 JO 
285 260 

2503 2498 
673 619 

764 765 

316X0311 SI 
Hover 3M JO 357 JO 

Bav. Hypo Dank 404 406 

Bav Vereinsbk 434441X0 

450 450 

379 373 

„„„ 769 749 

Comnwraonk 329X0328J0 
Coni Mental 220X0220X0 

Daimler Benz 
Deaussa 

Ol BobcocV 

Deutsche Bank 776X0725-30 
Douglas 442 ,436 

Oresdner Bank 
Feldmuehle 
F Kruno Hoesdi 
Harpener 


sec 

BHF Bank 

BMW 


769 JO H9 
447X0446X0 
20120 203 


Henkel 
Hacniiei 
Hoectist 
Halzmonn 
Horten 
IWK A 
Kali Salt 
Korttatlt 
Kaufhat 
KHO 


40840740 
298 305 
215 MS 
332 NA 
547544X0 
926 913 
330X0 326 
858 855 

210209X0 
339 337 
183X011850 
575X0 5*5 

482 460 
127.10 H7J0 


Kloockner Wen. e 174X0 125 

- ' 099 883 


Linde 
Lufthansa 
MAN 

Mannesmonn 

Mrioiigeseii 

Muencti Hv«>« 

Parse** 

Preussoo 

PWA 

BWE 


199198X0 
406 404 

41441 U0 

133 133 
7890 2895 
687 693 
44 5X0 441 


236 232 
414 438 


270 27Q 

1007 ID04 
648X0 644 JO 
290X0 233J0 
2TO 290 
S3* 534 
412 412 

47*50 473 

435.90C4X0 
950 928 

318865 


Helsinki 


Amer-YWvma 

8* 

87 

=nso-Girtzeil 

3/ 

r'JD 




«O.P. 

574 

5L70 


124 

136 


115 

134 

Nokia 

680 

682 

Pah low 

58 

58 

Reooto 

ttu 

83 

Stockmann 

244 

249 

HEX GeneraitaCtex : 17*472 
Previous : 17*1X3 


Hong Kong 

Bt East Asta 
Coitioy Poclllc 
Ciieiina Kang 
China Light Pwr 
Dairy Form Int'l 
Hong Lung Oev 
Hong Seng Bank 
Henderson Lana 
HK Air Erw. 

HK China Gas 
HK Electric 
HK Land 
HK Beoltv Trust 
HSBC Holdings 


HK Telecomm 
HK Ferry 
Hutch Whom uoo 
Hyson Dev 
Jaraine Moth. 
Jardlnc Sir Hid 
Kowloon Motor 
Mandarin Orlenl 
Miramar Hole! 
New World Dev 
SHK Praps 
Slelux 

Swire Poc A 
Tol Cheung Pros 
TVE 

Whorl Hold 
Wheelocfc Co 
Wing On Co Inll 
Wmsor Ind. 


Hon gseng 


Prev togs : 


31X8 31.30 
11J0 1120 
3X10 3X40 
3470 14.10 
P.70 US 

11.40 11X0 
57 JS 57*5 
36X0 36X0 
76.15 26.15 
13J0 >XI0 
71.95 71 AS 
15.10 14.95 
1X40 1X60 
85.75 84 JS 

9 9.25 
IXI5 14X0 

7.90 7JS 
32X0 32J0 
1X70 15 15 

54 55.75 
77.70 27.70 

1X70 1X25 
8-70 8.70 
17.20 1720 

21.40 M.90 
4B.10 47X0 

170 168 
49 47-60 
TM T/t0 
X» 320 
76 25X5 
1X40 73J0 
140 8X0 

9.90 9.75 

841166 


DO I 

DrWonldn 
Genaw 
GFSA 


Johannestmig 

AECI 29X0 » 

Anglo Amer 237 236 

Bortgwa 36.79 37 

ButtalS 37 37.75 

De Beers W _94 

6025 59X0 
14.40 14 

174 125 

39X0 39X0 
40 3725 
59 5725 
4225 42 

4*25 45X0 
107X0 105 
9625 98 

3175 3175 
165 165 

•BBBSW 1 " 


HWrvdd 5teel 
Kloof 

NettoonkGra 
Randtontatn 
Ru»lof 
SA Brews 
Sasai 

Western Deeo 


London 


Abfier Nal'l 

4J3 

475 

aiiim Lyons 

153 

S53 

Arlo Wiggins 

7J* 

239 

Argyll Groue 

2X6 

255 

A» Brit Foods 

5X1 

5X9 

BAA 

4.73 

4.70 

BAe 

479 

478 

Bank Scollond 

2.10 

2X7 

Barclays 

617 

6.13 

Bass 

5.18 

5.1? 

BAT 

4.40 

4A4 

BET 

1X4 

1X3 

Blue Circle 

2.«2 

2X7 

BOC Group 

7.15 

7.10 

Bools 

4.06 

4X8 

Banoier 

4.2B 

431 

BP 

4J2 

439 

t Brit AirwOrS 

357 

3.5* 

Brit Gas 

314 

307 

Bril Sleei 

1X7 

1X6 

Bril Telecom 

3X4 

187 

BTR 

191 

2X7 

Cable wire 

3B9 

J77 

CodOur, 5th 

479 

4J1 

Caroaon 

157 

153 

Coals vivella 

IBS 

189 

Comm Union 

5.10 

5.14 

Court ouldS 

460 

4.49 

ECC Group 

155 

349 

EnferprtseOii 

3*0 

3B6 

E utolunncl 

2.80 

272 

F'tans 

1 10 

1.12 



Oael 

•rav. 

Forte 


2A1 

GEC 


7.1b 

Geni Axe 


572 

0(040 

rcfl 

685 

Grand Met 

4X6 

4 

GRE 



A5D 

4A7 

GUS 

S41 

5J1 

Hanson 

134 

2J3 

Hlllsdown 

176 

1.77 

HSBC Hldns 

7.22 

7.11 

ICl 

7.72 

Kl 


OS 


Kingfisher 

433 

4J0 

Loabroke 

1.70 

1A3 


5.98 

■- * - 1 


7.1 S 



1A3 


Legal Gen Grp 

ft -■ 


Lloyds Baik 



Marks Sp 

ft Ll 


MEPC 



Natl Power 



NalWest 

■ 


NinWsi Water 

B. t 


Pearson 

5 A3 

SAO 

P&O 

114 

6X8 

Pllkhigton 

1A2 

1A2 


SJI 

574 


118 

3.17 

Rank Org 

4X7 

A10 

PeCkltt COl 

5.96 

5.92 

Pcdlond 

4X9 

4X5 

Reed inti 

7.98 

7X9 


4.79 

4.71 

RMC Group 

9X8 

9X3 

Polls Rovce 

176 

1.73 

Pommn lunrl) 

4X6 

4X8 

Rovoi Sait 

3.9* 

4X6 




Somshurv 

4.07 

4X2 

Scot Npwcos 

5.12 

5X5 

Scot Power 

3.40 

3J4 


1.09 

1X9 

Severn Trent 

5.33 

573 

Shell 

7X2 

6.95 


5X7 

5.44 

Smith riennew 

1X4 

1X3 

SmithKIInc B 

4A9 


Smith (WHI 

4 68 

4.44 

Sun Alliance 

1*5 

2.99 

Tote & Lyle 

475 

477 

Tcsco 

2 AS 

2.39 

Thom EMI 

1070 

iai5 

Tomkins 

2.19 

2.14 

TSB Group 

7J5 

2J7 

Unilever 

llAl 

11 A3 

Ulfl Biscuits 

326 


Vodalone 

111 

2.10 

War Loon 3ft 

4170 


Wollcome 

708 

703 

WhliDreod 

5.75 

VAi 

Williams Hdas 

375 

320 

Willis Cartoon 

138 

1J5 

FT Jl lades : 237470 


Previous : 30704 

30*170 

0 

1 Madrid 


BBV 

3305 

3320 

Hco Central Hist 

3155 

3140 

Banco Sontanoe 

5330 

53» 

Bonesfo 

149 

940 

CEF5A 

31/U 

3155 

OragodoS 

2015 

1985 

Endesa 

5630 

5620 

Ercres 

134 

138 


84J 

HM 

Rcpsol 

3630 

3620 


J+Hl 

J63U 

Telefonica 

1545 

I5BS 

gglSfSS'**' 1 ""’ 

( Milan 



156B5 15750 

AisJioua 

9790 

9700 


2055 

2055 

Bca Agricahuro 

2890 

29» 


34/S 

3450 


12200 12345 


88*5 

>900 


1562 

1530 

Bco Ambroshtoo 

4290 

4280 


low 

1065 

Benetion 

18920 18800 

Crodita irottono 

1691 

1690 


3005 

3000 

Fertln 

121X1 

1IVS 


588U 

5VH) 


9020 

9100 

Flnmecconlca 

I4V0 

1490 


11040 11060 


37900 MOO 

■ Fit. 

5720 

5800 

itoleementl 

11050 11310 

Hams 

4490 

4610 

Meaiobanco 

12860 12870 


1182 

1176 

Olivetti 

1955 

1972 


2135 

2140 

RAS 

T L J 


K2E1 

Util 

San Paolo Torino 

93M 

EE1 

SIP 

4t» 


SMC 

3*10 

3930 

Snio bad 

1800 

1828 


34500 36150 i 

Stet 

4580 

4560 : 

Toro Aulc 

22700 22550 , 

MiB Telemqtico: 
Previous : 10023 

9982 


j Montreal 


AteoLWl 

14ft 

Wft 

Bank Montreal 

26ft 

26ft 


CtoeePrav. 


BCE MoMto Com 

CdnThteA 

CdnUtflA 


CTFInTSvc 
Extendtcorr 
Gaz Metro 
Gt-West Ufeco 
Hoes Inti Bat 
Hudson's Bay Co 
Imtztco Ltd 
Investors Grp inc 
Labatt (John) 
LobtawCos 
Mol son A 
Natl Bk Canada 
Oit uwra A 
Pancdn Petrolm 
Power Com 
Power Flnl 
OuebecorB _ 
Rogers Comm B 
Royal Bk Cda 
Sears Conoda Inc 
Shell Cda A 
Southern Inc 
Stolen A 
Triton Flnl A 


ZSSSfiXSi 


44 43W 

11W 12 

24 23* 

71* 7 

18* 18* 
im is* 
12 12 
71* 221* 
12* 13* 

25 2¥K 
40* 40* 
161* INh 

19* 19* 
9* fVi 

171* in* 
IB* IB* 
28* 28V, 
77k 7* 

421* 4J4S 
IS* 14* 
on i* 
3X5 U5 
19WJ7 


Paris 


Accor Sro 556 

Air Llmikte 730 71J 

Alcotal AlsPwm 4*7.90 J48 

Am — 

Banco. re (Clel 
SIC 
BSP 

Souvgues 
Danone 
Correfour 
C.C.P. 

Ccrus 
Chorgeura 


239.90 256 

550 548 

657 660 

2Ma0 26X.11 
534 535 

788 793 

2249 2237 

220X0 271 

89X0 8920 

N-nuivcura 1186 1192 

Cimenta Franc 718-50 270.90 
Club Med 44310 444X0 

EH -Aquitaine 391X0 388^1 
Euro Disney 10 45 10 JO 

Gen. Eaur 538 525 

Havas *3*XO433J0 

Imefol SI3 

Lafarge Coaoee 393 

Logrond 

LvoaEou* 

Dreol IL'I 

L.V.M.H =. 

Matra-Hoehelte 1»X0 lW*0 

Mlchelin B — 

Moulinex 
Paribas 
Pechmcv Inti 
Pemod-Ricard 
Peugeot 
Plnoult Print 
RodWecrrlaue 

Renault 
Rh- Poulenc A 
Raft. Si. Louis 
Sanoti 

Sami Genain 


509 

— 389 

6650 4650 
*74. 10 475 

1119 1170 


SE &raral« 


Stac 
Suer 
Thomson- CSF 

TOIOI 

U.A.P. 

Valeo 


CAC-40 index : NS3XS 
Prevtous : 19*39 


199.10 195.90 

105 ins 
368 371 

159.90 TM) 

333 325J0 
7*3 729 

9*7 947 

SIB 516 
176X0 176*0 
129X012X80 
1400 1400 
256X0 253.70 
633 628 

577 520 

581 578 

2S«.W 215*0 
168 166 
377.40 37980 
1S1 148.90 
254 248X0 


Sao Pauto 

Banco do Brasil HW 16J0 1 
B onesp o 
Braaesco 
Prtf w na 
C etniB 
EletraUros 
ItautaKD 

LlgM ... .. 

Pnranasonema 13.15 14 

106 116 


10J9 >1X0 
7.10 7 JO 
260 27S 

7SJn 8ZD1 
290 322 

223244J0 
310 330 


Souza Cniz 
Tetataras 
Tefcsp 
Usiminas 
vole Rio Doc* 
varlg 


7 T 30 
3640 39 J9 
355X1 370 

1.10 1JD 
MO 142 
2X0 274 




: 42312 


Singapore 

As« Pac Brew 17.80 17.J0 
Cerebos 8 8J0 

City Dovdaoniitr 8.10 B.IS 
Cycle 8. Carriage 1340 13.40 
DBS 10X0 1040 

DBS Land 4X0 446 

FE Levingston 7.io 640 
Fraser a Neave 14.90 1510 
Gl Easln Lite 
Hong Leong Fin 
Ircncaae . — 

Jurana SMavard 11X0 11 JO 
KOVHlanJ Cental 1.7* 1.75 
Keooel 
Ngtstcd 
Neptune Onem 
OCBC foreign 
O'sesr. Union Bk 
O'segs Union Enl 825 a 
Sembauxme 1070 10X0 
Sime Singapore 
Sing Aerospace 


27X0 26 

410 4J4 

125 115 


12 JO 12X0 
7.99 297 
1.97 1X9 

1540 15X0 
4.90 680 


1X4 1-03 
220 2.17 



CtaMPrav. | 

Sine Airlines torn 

14 

14 

Sing Bus Svc 

190 

BS0 

Sing Land 

8.75 

8.90 

Sing Petlm 

133 

133 

Sing Press torn 

27 

26 

i vj -- mm 

278 

J44 


273 


5.10 

5 

Strolls Trading 

3A4 

16* 


4J4 

4J0 

rn'.i n 

1J9 

1 A0 

I'lrfoviySl 

15X0 

[5X0 

ti ■!•*" rrr.’Tl 

2X6 

2X1 

issiaf?fM!r :a “ 

Stockholm 


AGA 

67X0 

68X0 


539 

534 

Astro AF 

1*5X0 193X0 

Allas Cooco 

97X0 

’7 

Etectroiu* B 

378376X0 | 


420415X0 


9? 

94 

Hondelsbank BF 

95 92X0 

Investor BF 

185)84X0 

Norsk Hydro 

265261X0 


I19J0 

119 

Sandvlk B 

120120X0 

SCA-A 

117 


S-E Bcnken AF 

42.90 

42 

SkondlO F 

179 

128 

SkonskO BF 

170 

1*9 

SKF8F 

134 

123 


444 

440 

Trelledorg BF 

108X0 

107 

Volvo BF 

125X0115X0 


155678 

Prevtous : 1M4AS 



1 Sydney 


Amcor 

90S 

9X7 

ANZ 

+15 

4.13 



IV 48 

Bora! 

142 

14? 

Bouoamv'lle 

078 

OX2 

Coles Mvcr 

+M 


Comotco 

5.15 

J70 

CRA 

1780 

18 

CSR 

4 44 

4A4 


1.15 

1.13 


170 

171 

iCI Australia 


1070 

Mage Hot 

1X3 

1X3 

■"AIM 

273 

123 

Not Auy Bonk 

10A8 

10X2 

News Carp 

5X3 

499 

N Broken HIM 

3 A0 

340 

Poc Dunloo 

148 

1«7 

Pioneer inti 

373 

373 

Nmndv Posetoon 

1.96 

1.9* 

Pudlisng Hr del K 

3A0 

350 

OCT Resources 

1A2 

1J7 


IAS 

3X0 

TNT 

2.10 

2.11 

weslcrn Mining 

7X0 

7X8 

westooc Bankint 

432 

42* 

vjooaikle 

4X2 

4X3 

AHOj^rj^raneotu# 

Tokyo 


Akai Etaclr 

384 

370 

Asatu Chemical 

rtv 

71/ 

Asoni Gloss 

1210 

11*0 

Bank cl Tokva 

1540 

1510 

Brldgeyane 

1570 

1580 

Canon 

1710 

1710 

Casio 

1770 

1760 

DaNinecnPrm 

1770 

1600 

Ooiwa House 

MfO 

1 JM 

Ddiwo Securities 

ICO 

I4U0 

Fonuc 

4600 

4490 

Full Bank 

2180 

2150 

Full Photo 

2290 

3260 


980 

971 

HFaCIM 

*69 

960 

Hitachi Cable 

UO 

U3 

Hondo 

1770 

1/30 

no V 0*000 

5260 

6180 


727 

71 1 


680 


Kanina 

SB 

828 

Kcnsal Power 

240(1 

23/0 

Kawasaki Steel 

4U8 

*M 

Kirin Brewery 

MOO 

1(180 

Komatsu 

W> 

*00 


717 

700 


7380 

7360 

Matsu Elec inas 

1590 

1570 

Matsu EteewVa 

1010 

1000 

Mitsubishi Bk 

»10 

7380 


Ml 

541 

Mitsubishi Elec 

705 

692 

Mitsubishi Hev 

743 

732 

Mitsubishi Cara 

1290 

1270 

Mitsui and CO 

US 

834 

Mitsui Marine 

7J9 


MifSufrMht 

1010 

mo 

Mitsumi 

1430 

1400 

NEC 

1130 



1000 

99* 

Nikko Securities 

HMD 

10*0 

■ Nippon Koeoku 

941 

"JO 

Nippon Oil 

655 

654 


368 

361 


645 

wo 


B 1 

810 


»» 

2020 

NTT 

»40a8390g 

Olympus Opitcal 

1100 

1060 

Pioneer 

7450 

7450 


*70 

9» 


STB 

S74 

Sharp 

1710 

1700 


Close Ptgv. 


Shlmazu 
Siiineisu awm 
Sony 

Sumitomo Bk 
Sumllomo Chem 
Sum i Marine 
Sumitomo Metal 
Toisei Coro 
Tokeda Chem 
TDK 
Tellln 

Tokva Marine 
Tofcvo Elec Pw 
Toppan Printing 
Toroy ind. 
Toshlbo 
Tovoin 
Yamaletu Sec 
a: * t 00 

B^usr 


697 682 

1920 1910 
5590 5530 
1880 1850 
560 555 

830 822 

370 315 

598 518 

1700 1180 
4780 4720 
535 532 
1200 1190 
2800 2750 
1380 1J70 
730 725 

704 699 

2080 2060 
740 717 


Vitiays C:o*2ng 

}■ •••-"' * ' ' -s*' 

* ■-■■■W. 


U.S. FUTURES 


VSoAa»olaMn«u 


Dec. 22 


Season Season 
Hah low 


Open Utah low Close Chg Op.tnt 


Grains 


Toronto 


AMllbl Price ij* 
Air Canada 8 Vj 

Alberta Energy 18 
Atom Aluminum 36 
Amer BarrlcA 30* 
Avenor 279k 

Bk Nova Scot la 77* 
BCE 45 

BC Telecomm 23H 
Bombardier 8 2j<5 

Bramaled 1X7 

BrasconA »V: 

Cameco 3tFu 

CISC 34* 

Cdn Natural Res 14* 
Cdn oedd Pet 31* 
Cdn Pacific 21V» 
Cascades Paoer 5* 
Convince 25 

Consumers Gas 16»* 
Dofosco Tf 

Daman Ind B 11V) 
Du Pent Cda A 18 3 * 
Echo Bav Mines 14* 

Empire Co. A IJA 

FokBnbrtdge 2P» 
Fletcher Chou A 17ft* 
Franco Nevada 691* 

Guardian Cap A 8 

Hernia Gold l»g 
Horsham 17* 

imperial 011 46 

Inca 4ffta 

IPL Energy tSP* 

LoWtawA IV* 

LaldJowB 11* 

Laewen Group 35* 
London Insur Go 23 
Mocmlll Bloedei 17* 
MOfiaa Inti A id* 
MoMeLeaf Fds 12 
Moore 26* 

NewDrldoe Netw *7* 
Noranda Inc 26> 
Neranda Forest 11 
Norcen Energy 
Nthtm T e lec om 
Novo 

On«« _ 

Petra Canada 
PtaarDome 
Potash corpSask 45* 
Prurigo 4J5 

PWA 043 

OvtaKpr Prtat 15 
Renoissanca Eny 2Sta 
Rio Algom 251* 

Seagram Co 41W 
Stone consow 14* 
Talisman Ear 
Tejegtobe 
Telus 
Thom son 
TocDom Bank 
Tronsoltg 
TronsCda Pipe 
U id Dominion 
Utd Westburae 
Westcoast Env 
wejton 

Xerox Canada B 


19* 

■* 

If* 


zn * 

25 

1X6 


14* 

31* 

21 

5* 

25 

19* 

lift* 

u* 

14* 

131* 

24 

17H 

69* 


1» 

17* 

<5* 


28* 

m 

in* 

341 

23<* 

17* 


M* 

47* 

13* 

I2*k 

m* 

2B«k 


12 * 

27 

47* 

26* 

11 * 

16* 


13* 

12* 

11 * 

28* 

45* 

4X5 

043 

15 


23* 

18* 

16 

16* 

21 * 

14* 

17* 

25* 

11 * 

22 * 

41* 

46 


26* 

41* 

16* 

23* 

IB* 

16* 

16* 

21 * 

14* 

17* 

25* 

11 * 

22 * 

41* 


Zurich 


Ad>a mil B 
Aluswisse B new 


218 

657 


BBC Brwn Bov B 1137 1)33 


790 779 

565 M 

JM 055 
1C.10 1570 
1578 1580 
715 710 

795 790 

479 477 

1268 1264 


Cl bg Geigv B 
CS Holdings B 
EtaktrawB 
Fischer B 

Inlerdiscount B 

Jeimali B 
Lendls Grr R 
Motvmpick B 
Nestle R 
OeriiL BuenrlrR 130X0 1J9 

Porgosa Hid B 1480 1480 
Roche Hdg PC 
5ctra Republic 
Sondoi B 
5chmdler B 
5ul;er PC 
Surveillance B 
Swiss Bnk Carp B 
Swiss Retnsur R 
Swbsoir R 
UBS B 

winrertriur B 
Zurich Ass B 




6315 6300 
101 III 
678 676 

7300 7300 
880 859 

1875 1855 
367 3« 

783 774 

784 783 
1095 1077 

675 671 
1270 198 


WHEAT (CBOT1 moo bu mn ftiw-etewiiereuingi 

*J*«4 177 Mar* 197 LOO 196 199* -0.0! *7.7« 


iSS 


1*5 

ITS 

3X4* 


H6\iMOy95 176 
111 Jui 95 146 
139 3«P 95 151 
149 Dec 95 3X1 
125 Al«6 


177ft* 171 176 -AOO'i 7.987 

746W ion. lAsvj-aoiv. ljjw 
3.49 149^-fl.0P.» 779 

3X9': 161 290 

345 73 


if! u 


Season Season 


Est.sctas NA. Wed's, sales 19X83 
Wed s open irt 71J91 uo 1994 
WHEAT CKBOT) SOHbunnrwnufn-OMWsewlwilW 
4J7'-j 235 Mar 95 198* 4AI 197'* 4.00 W -0X0* 29 JM 

4jn 1319.660995 178 181 171 111 *601 3.7*5 

148W 116VSJUIVS 349* 3X2V. 14»Vj UO*-OOOW 5.534 

3.97 339 See 95 3X3 ’-9 3X4* 153L. 153'.. -OO!'* 15) 

1691; 157 Dec 95 16)’. 161* 3 a! 161 *4 

ESI. soles 33)97 Wetfi-sokts 4.S30 
Wed's open in 38.527 uo 130* 

CORN ICBOD S6a0bunw»Twn- aeew,ec'tuin*i 
ZSTh 2J0WMor9S 2-29 730* 2J9 7399. 117,993 

239 Mcv 95 2JBW Ul<.. 2J7ft* «.*»! 

2J7 1 '! AP95 241* 243 241 7^ -OAO 1 * 44.230 

2JB Sea *5 245 2.46* 245 24519 -O.OO'.i S.110 

US'S Dee *5 7X3 153 2X2 2X3* -ODO* 578 

J.49V,Mor9e 2X6 2X7 2XS* 2X6 -0X0* 1430 

260 MOV96 740 260'. 240 240* 4 

ZX5V.JU196 2X3' • 164 143 2X391-000* 1X5) 


2X5 
2X5* 

2.7DW 
2X3 
2X0* 

160W 

2X7 _ . .. 

Esi.vPei HA. wed's, sales 44471 
Wedi open int 7XUBS uo 7405 


SOYBEANS (CBOT3 1 ■Dwn.nrun. pgrtvM 
704 5J^.J«X195 564 SX6ftS SiJ'-, 5X3* -080* 27.139 


7X5 
7J)5Vt 
7 06'r; 
617 
6 15 
4iO': 
616 


... ._ . W 1 . 

54T’-.Mar95 S.7J": 577 5.74 5.74 '.i 

556 May 95 543 'a i 65* 547 '.j 5BJ* 
S61WM95 589ft. 5.9V. 1 SJOW 589 
SMSAUBTS 5.93 199* 59? 592 

S.7I 500*5 5*1* 5.95ft. 5 92 S92 

5T8'iNov*5 5.9*W 601 198 1*9*- 


40,909 
M.SOfi 
36.992 
OOOft. 2J4S 
0X0’-, 1.389 
O0‘. 12.933 


J 95 Jon 94 6 06 a 60s’; llli'ft 60S'.-(LOO 
*tnSMor96 617 —000'. J5 

629 JFSjUM 6.(8 6J0 619 618 67 

6.07 5.94 NOW 94 6JH'.': 603 4 07ft; 682ta-000"i 167 

E SJOCS NA wed", coin 41177 
wedsooen ml 13441V oh *49 
SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOTI IWftw,. .raHnwriwi 
207X0 15SX0JO196 16240 16300 140.90 161.00 —1.70 16439 

1S9J0Mar95 166X0 146 70 I64J0 164X0 —1 70 34.470 

14150MOV«5 14* JO 169.(0 16)60 167.60 — I 90 >5X66 

16I40JU17S 17380 173 » 17140 17I7Q —1.70 11.010 

17060 Aug 9S 17490 17500 17380 17380 -1.80 1335 

1— M Sep 95 177X0 177X0 175 70 175..T1 —MO 1^49 

174X0 Oct *5 17*00 17900 17640 174.60 -1 50 5468 

1*6X8 DOC 95 180 80 181 00 179X0 179.70 -1X0 3.960 

10 


207X0 
2072)0 
204 00 
187x0 
182.70 
18180 
lasjo 


181X0 

1 KUDO Jot 94 





Eit. son- 

NA. Wnfi sates 

3A3« 



Wed’S aocn-fli 1S.HN 

off 1SB3 



SOYBEAN ML (CBOT) M 000 tet- txAqr, pw 


78X5 

3265 jot IS 

27 55 

m 



AX 


»SI 

36* 



3« 

22 B5 Mav 95 

25.75 

7590 

2570 


J7.BS 

Z3.7s.Aji is 

2SJS 

IS 50 



2770 

22nAug95 

2573 

2525 

2505 

2513 

254 ) 

ajiscovs 

24X5 

2500 



2505 

32 73 DO U 

3462 

2A7B 



34X0 

2375 Jan 96 




7400 

ESI SONS 

NA Wed’s. SONS, 





•0.52 29.44 

• 0.47 33.743 

• 0J5 19.948 

•OIB 10X81 
•016 2X50 
•017 7.398 
-oar 4.IN7 
-0 05 80 


Wolfs opened I04.HB oh 1504 


Livestock 


74J5 
75 M 
6»30 
48.10 
67X5 
66X5 


B 0 JS 
7690 
7630 
>185 
78XD 
ICLOO 
7140 


CATTLE (CMERJ tHH-amint 
‘438 46 7 5 Doc M 7083 70X0 48 X2 

M47Fe&*5 10 47 70.75 70J5 

472) Apr 95 71.15 H47 71.17 

64.00 Jun 9 5 4615 6620 6665 

42. M Aug 95 4600 64 10 6365 

43 ID Del 95 64X3 64X5 64.15 

6185 Dee *5 65X5 6587 6480 

Est. sales 7857 Weds sates 8.560 
Wsrsooenklt 17.343 on 328 
FEEDER CATTLE (CMS?) 40800 In., otm 
00.95 71 A) Jew *5 7112 75J5 7S02 

70.15MV 95 7282 2113 72JD 

69.95 Aor 95 7185 T2J0 7125 

69 JO MOV 70 7 5 HAS 70 70 

»XSAU0»5 BLI7 11.15 70X7 

tBJiodts 

65.80 Ptav 95 7060 70X5 70X5 

49J»SW»6 

ESI JONS Unt Wodl 5Ctes 1.126 
wecrsaoenim 9JJ7 up IB 
HOBS (CMERJ 40800 k MiiMk 
wxa 3040 Dec 94 35.10 3620 35.10 

- 34X3 FeC 95 38.95 19JQ B.40 

35 85 AP* 95 3970 39.15 3967 

4U5Jun95 40.95 44X0 4110 

40X5 Jul 95 43.75 4610 OxS 

4K0Auq95 415 <7 <190 43X0 

39J0OOI9S 4185 42.00 4185 
39 OODecVS 42.90 4120 42.90 

41 DO FoC 94 4165 4480 4165 

Est.saia KUDO wed’s sales 6381 
wed’saoenint 31859 up 70 
PORKOCLUS (CMERI eMh.cwrar 
EST »1SF»95 40 00 43X0 39.73 

40J0 jlSOMorib 40 40 40.70 4082 

3690MBV95 4140 4190 4IJL5 

37 80 Ju> 95 4200 fl« 4115 

16 70 Aug *5 40X0 4405 «X0 

JtOOFAW 49 50 4IJ0 «J0 
39806607 96 


5080 
4880 
47X0 
4500 
4U0 
42X0 
41 JE 
4120 


61.11 

5600 

4600 

50X0 

59.90 


Est. totes US* WW". *•» 
weffsopenrt 10438 UP 4» 


69.S7 

—0.45 

OS 

7DJ7 

-0B3 11,622 

71. Z) 

■ 0.12 22,351 

64X7 


7AM 

6X90 

-a as 

1.146 

64.S 

— Q.M 

1.717 

64X5 

-0.IS 

2*7 

nr* 



7SJB 

-A IS 

2.166 

72.90 

-002 

3A77 

Tin 

—0X3 

1.317 

tan 

-000 

1.004 

Taw 

■005 

781 

Tin 


S 

7X55 

-0.IS 

9 

7025 

•0X5 

65 

3600 

*t JO 

470 

29.02 

-DJ0 11621 

3907 

■ 0.77 

0.871 

6X40 

■ 020 

4X75 

44X5 

■0.50 

1X66 

as: 

•0X3 

r.sis 

41.91 

-0» 

1.176 

4115 

■035 

«« 

44X0 

■ 0JS 

9 

'te 



40.15 

-MO 

» 1G 

40 AS 

• too 

1.5* 

41 J5 

• 1 10 

533 

42J2 

• 092 

SJ? 

41X0 

■tfXI 

7*6 

48J0 

• 0 70 

70 

*760 


« 


Food 

CflFFfiEC (NCSEI HWW-ifiiwb 
^- TSVQliSn 171.20 172X0 1*8 25 

8150 MOV <5 17190 17300 l*f.H 


246 DO 
24640 
74110 
23000 
247 DO 
203X0 
170 00 


J*7 TtJ MOV *3 ir»ra I'lra •mr-tJ 

axoo jui 95 inn I.U5 i.moo 
15IJ0So95 172.75 ITS JO in JO 
81 JO Dec 95 171 00 173X0 17080 
1J1 JS Mar 56 

■ <11 up ITUOOMmrW 

EsL sales 10.110 Weds sows 13 771 

wwrfSww 


171.75 

177.75 
1*3 20 
174 JS 
173 JO 
in 7j 
171 75 


-2 00 17.1*0 
-150 ))i’ 
• 180 2.93* 

•4.85 2.1*2 
420 7 70) 
■ 4 25 29J 

610 76 


89,00 j<n 95 T17JS 117.90 115.80 
7100 Mar 95 12180 1J1 90 130.00 
9780 May 95 12635 11625 122.90 
100JDJJ9S 126X5 12*60 1JLB 
I07J3SCP95 129X0 130.10 129.00 
10980NOV95 13690 12690 12690 
105X0 JOT 94 

1267SMOT9* 129.90 I29J90 129.90 
llsJBMoy 9* 

Efl.sdes HA. Wed’s, sates 6791 
Wed’S open W 27.554 an 285 


132X0 

124X5 

174X0 

121.00 

132X0 

129.00 

171X0 

130X0 

12600 


11615 
120X0 
12X50 
126*0 
12980 
127 JO 
17630 
129X0 
130.00 


-1.13 7X81 
—0.90 123)69 
— QJ0 2.033 
-020.IJBS 
247) 
-075 1X71 
—075 

-aio «o 
- 0.10 


Season Season 


High 

LOW 

Ouen 

WBh 

LOW 

Oose 

Chg 

Oamt 

High 

Lm Open 

t*gh 

Low 

Close 

□to OP-Irrt 





1298 

12.96 

12.76 

• 0X6 

7X88 

91)80 

9 1 AM JOT ft 91.730 

913® 

91A3D 

9JA3D 




11 30 Jui 94 

12A2 

12AS 

I2AU 

12A8 

-0X4 

1.539 

92X70 

91 AM Sep 96 91.780 

913*0 

91.700 

91300 

—80113X21 


12X0 

12000096 

12J0 

1235 

1230 

12J0 

*0.12 

MB 

91X70 

91 .770 Dec 96 91380 

91390 

11X90 

91300 

-SO 96.739 







Est. sales TLA. wed’s, sates 

577,353 




Dff 12*4 





Wed-sooenin! 7A06A02 oh 

3953 





COCOA 

NCSEI ID mrJr* ton*- 1 per Ajr 





BRITISH POUND (CMER) l 

Mural- 1 pawteaura, u omn 


1605 

1077 Mar 95 

1303 

132* 

1303 

1320 

—2 35.266 


1.4640 Mar 95 1X400 

1X502 

1X396 

1X448 


■ 



1318 

134T 

13)8 

1334 

—6 11X79 

1.6380 

1X248 Jun 95 1X450 

1X470 

1X414 

1X442 



1600 

1225 JU 95 

13® 

1363 

13® 

1352 

-10 

6,7*1 

1X670 

15600 See 95 



1X442 

-38 , 4 


1560 

1263 Sep 95 

1358 

1375 

1358 

1171 

-8 

7342 

Esi. sates NA w«rs.sates 

44,9) ( 




1633 

1290 Dec 9S 




1398 

—8 

4X39 

, WetfSOOOTlnt 50A94 off 22B*6 





1(7 6 

1350 Mar 96 

1420 

1479 

1419 

1420 

—3 

6.738 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMER) I n-Off . 1 now nuto uoooi 


1642 

1225 Mov « 

1640 

1440 

1430 

1454 

— J 

4X57 

03*05 

0.7020 Mar 95 03165 

03167 





rsos 





1473 


2,340 

03522 

06990 Jun 95 03136 

03131 




lm 

mi 

1445Sep 96 




1411 

—3 

417 

0.7438 

0A9*5Sep95 03130 

0.7130 





ESt W6fS 

7.«S7 Wed’s. sc4e» 

KL284 





03400 

03040 Dec IS 03111 

03111 





wed's open int 74X34 

UP 601 





03335 

031 40 MOT 96 



03074 

-38 46 


ORANSEJUKE (NCTN) tuoa u.- cv4* «r 

■x 



EsL sates NA wed's, sales 

20X71 


7 *. 


Metals 


HI GRADE COPPER CNCMX) KDDBps- rempw h 
14000 75-75DCC94 137 20 137*0 13610 137.05 

7490 Jan 95 137310 137 X0 134X0 136.95 

nCQFebK 13680 73680 13180 13610 

7X00MCT95 I1SJ0 1364) 134X0 13625 

11 10 Apr IS 131 JO 

7685 May 95 171.40 130X0 129 JO 121.15 


119X0 
137X0 
137 20 
132X0 
UIJO 
17600 
12670 
120X0 
12100 
115X0 
11S7S 
111.70 
*1230 
101.50 
107.20 
105 25 
1 1395 


10610Jun95 
78X0 Jui 95 
11140 Aug 95 
79. IQ Sep 95 
11300 oa 95 
B6C0Dec95 
98X0 JOT 96 
(7.70 Mor *6 
107X0 MOV *6 
105X0 JUI 96 
105.25 509*4 
111*5 NOV 96 


12690 

IJ4 10 17660 174X0 121*5 
171 JS 

11960 11960 111.40 1 1680 
11675 

11170 114X5 113.70 U1X 
172.10 
10980 
108JO 
107 JO 
10480 
114X5 


Ed. sates 4X00 Wed's, sales 8.710 
wmrtooenM si.isi uo ion 
SA.VER (NCMX) snoirmru-annbifiTOrM 

S»7X 380 ODec 94 “ ‘ 

P65 *01 0 ian IS 

477 0 4718Fn095 

4J.1MCT95 


•0 25 2.721 
2J64 
— XX5 828 
1*J82 
— 0X5 SHI 

-0X5 6298 
- 0.10 
-a is 

-0J0 

— 0 40 :.I7? 

—040 

-0 40 3.879 
-0X5 
—060 
—0.40 
-060 
-0.40 
—040 


M6X 

4I0X 

tdJX 

LTD 

4I2X 

477.0 

999X 


420X Jui 95 
477.5 Sop 95 
4E50DOC *5 
SI-XJOT 94 


5M0 


477 0 

47BX 

477X 

475* 

— 2X 

52 

477 0 

477 0 

477 0 

476.9 

— 2J 




478.0 

— 13 

1 

482.0 

484.6 

400 

481X 

-12 )1*53 

4f9X 

4900 

4860 

97.0 

—33 >0.827 

®5X 

4MX 

494.0 

4 «W 

— i y 

7X39 

5015 

503 5 

S01X 

499 9 

—11 

5I3X 

5I3X 

509X 

510 1 

— 3.3 1«~U7 

5U6 

-12 


522X 

J7?X 

572J 

5206 

—11 

7X97 




577X 

-10 

1005 




U40 

—10 

1X33 


541.1 


4*91) Mav *4 
5700 jui «6 
534 0Sea96 

Es!. sates 10X00 Wed s sotes 14X40 
Wedsapcnmt 1J2J27 uo 793 
FJ-ATWICMA (NMERI M m» ni - uun et, frav OJ 

IKS -ii®-® 4I43» 414X0 -JXO 63794 

5222 22^5***?* 0030 flaw 4r7Ja 4i7xo -j» i* «p 

426X0 42*00 <21*0 -X20 2.051 

431X0 420 00 JOT 14 42130 —120 114 

Est. stoes NA Wed s soles 7J62 

Wed s open nl 25 79* up 573 
OOLp (NCMX) loOh-ovai-dBilOToeeiro, or 


JOMDecM 381.50 381 JO 381X0 381X0 
j79X0jot95 381 40 

363JQFOT95 363X0 38410 382X0 382.90 
344X0AW15 W 40 3*7 8 0 382X0 384.10 
3*1X0 JunIS 392X0 39210 391.10 391.10 
J9i6d 

401X0 Oa 9S 400X0 

3*9 50 Dec 95 405X0 40550 40500 405X0 
4M4QFCOW JCNro 

418. JO APT 9* 414X0 

41100 Jun *4 41*60 

AuO *4 47410 

oa<* 42110 

Est. soles 17X00 Wed's. sc*n ISJ35 

WtxTsoocninl 1)6415 UO 779 


42650 

382X0 

411X0 
1417X0 
478X0 
4I4J0 
419 JO 
429X0 
424X0 
430.70 
431X0 


-040 73 

-0X0 

-OS0 64J3I 
-0«0 13.504 
—«10 21.371 
-axo 11X76 
-Q?0 

-080 1.411 

-0X0 

-4LS0 7.S70 
-4) SO 5,915 
-0X0 


ISO 


Financial 


UST.BUX (CMER) 

si mAon. rn U MB pet 




9610 

94.1 3 Dec 94 

92JS 

9175 

7714 

*114 



94JJS 

9113 MOT 95 

*158 

9159 

9164 

93AS 


9434 

•3X5 Jot *5 

97.84 

17X7 

12.68 

9271 



»3 57 

T7XJSCP9S 

*7*6 

92 A7 

mo 

92J1 

-014 


ESI. jalOS 

NA. W«Ts sOTes 

3J4» 






1138 
15 37 
1SJ» 
14 00 
1128 


10 5? Jui H 

ias?od» 


1481 

14 91 

14 74 

14.9ft 

•017 

*2 310 

tvnw 

14X5 

15.02 

14 82 

lAft 

■0.12 

37.154 

9d r® 

14X1 

14*9 

ii so 

14*8 

• OIS 

14 4)9 

94 5S0 

13X3 

fJ.7B 

(UO 

1367 

•0 10 

If HO 

Cj M0 

12X1 

13.94 

12X3 

1?.*5 

Oh 

6.711 

*4 770 


Wed’s ocon inc 19622 on 1142 

ITR, TREASURY (CBOT) MM8iono- man* at Mod 

103-09 99-15 Mar 95100-11 100-17 100-X05 100-015— 11 1BA.587 

100-08 *9-06 Jlin 95 100-03 100-dJ 91-745 99.765- 095 283 

91-735 19.07 5rp95 _ 99-155- 105 

Est. «*es NA wed's, som 22471 

Wed's aoen ml 210X30 uo 370) 

10 YR. TREASURY (CBOT) siwxSBorir^ on a ami 91 rgooct 
Hl-07 98-11 Mr9SlCO-04 IOD-05 09-25 99-78 - 09 752 «82 

1 05- 77 97-77 Jun 95 99-27 W-23 *9-13 91-15 - 06 J.S39 

'01-06 97-11 SCP 95 99-11 19-1 1 9+0* 99-08 — 03 8 

llfi-31 96-30 Dec 95 «M& - 01 75 

99- 03 98-2) Mir 96 19-07 — 01 I 

Ed sides NA wed’s. sates 36.946 

Wed-sooenW 265.961 UP 5246 

US TREASURY BONDS (CBOTI Hpci-(1IUB-oH ■.TTraHW IWbcii 

116- 30 95.13 Mar 95 19-71 99-74 99-10 99-18 - 07 350.101 

115-1* 94-27 Jot 75 99-07 99-09 98-31 W-05 - 05 13.717 

117- 15 94-10 Sep 95 98-30 *8-30 98-25 W-7* - 03 809 

113- 14 93-27 Dec 15 18-23 78-23 91-71 98-33 - 82 26? 

114- 06 13-13 Mart* 98-17— 01 77 

100- 70 11-04 Jun 96 98-10 27 

W-14 13-05 Sep 96 97-27 10-03 97-27 9M3 ■ 01 18 

_ Dec 94 _ W-27 

Esi sates NA. wed's, sales W.0J0 
Wed * onen inf 372.680 otl 3331 

MUNICIPAL BONDS (CBOT) niw. U xte,-«.61InU.« »* 

88-09 19-28 Mu-95 84-31 14-17 04-26 — 04 29.720 

83-77 83-25 JOT 95 83-25 83-27 *]-H 83-27 10 

Esl. sales NA WWi. sates 335+16 
w«l ilHDH 1626667 IB 1512641 

Eurodollars (CmbU n mJravuMoiiwivi 

MJ40MW95 92940 92.940 12X10 12X20 -110495.257 
•0 710 jot 95 92310 92710 12X30 92X50 -150344.M2 
tlJ105eD95 9* 800 91X00 91X40 9l6?D 
9 1.180 Dec 95 91X80 91. WJ 91650 91460 -rBTO.ria 
n/SOlWP** *1480 91 *40 71550 91 569 —120171084 


Wed’s open W 50,127 off 17028 
GERMAN MARK (CMER) Soormork I oMramWCni 
06745 OJBTOMor 75 06343 04358 06328 HAIM -12 73644 

04747 0X930 Jun 15 06369 06383 OaTm 063B4 -Is TjS 

0 4748 06347 5ep 95 96414 . 5 i* 

EM. sides NA Wed's, soles 58.434 
Wad’s open Ini 75J37 oil 35056 
JAPANESE YEN (CMER) spar vtm- 1 ooPitcwols 10X0000 1 

L0105<mXima0M{r 950X100340.0100670.01001)0X11)061 -23 71,940 

~ -IS 1SST 

-27 3Z7 

-2* 129 

-31 38 


r 


0X101 WW10I900XI0151 0X10188 
00107731flia200Sep9S 0X10318 

00107400 m0415D«9S 0X1M50 

0X199300.0105*0Mor94 OXlBsS 

Est. sates n a wotfs. sates J9.5S* 
weffsooenim 73.985 off 24636 
SWISS FR ANC (CMER) l per franc- I dot pauefe lOJJODr 
0X136 0.7287 Mar 95 0J528 0.7547 lL75lTT/S40 

a7 ® 5 O- 7548 0.7WI 
081 55 076185CP9S DJ647 


Est sates NA Weds. sates P.7Z 
weds open inf 35X05 off 25547 


*3 38635 
-6 516 

-8 54 


Industrials 

COTTON 3 (NCTN) M6CS K-cM;n,b 
85X0 MOO Mar 95 84.18 86 18 

86.20 M.C0Moy95 WTO 86.S 

MXO 6»J3JU95 8380 85.75 

7530 4460 Od 95 74.15 74*0 

72.80 44.25 Dec 95 7160 77.50 

71X0 66X0 Mar 96 73.10 7120 

£4X0 T. 10 Moy 24 

Est.sotes NA wed's, soles 7Xn 
Wed's ooon m 59,529 up 456 


(2J5 
58.75 
S7J0 
55.15 
MJO 
53X0 
5* JO 
55*0 

aio 

S3 95 
5440 
5760 


49.9000 95 
50.90 Nov *5 


59 30 
54.19 
S4X0 


S3 00 Fed 16 
520? Mar «. 

- — *6.00 Apr 94 J1JV , 

,^.4-jft-Rsr 


64.00 

86.18 

84X5 

86X7 

8335 

85J5 

7AI5 

75 SO 

7180 

72® 

»110 

73.M 


73X0 

esparaoi 

47.75 

47.95 

4120 

484ft 

48X6 

4836 

48A0 

Aftl 

StZ 

® 36 

48.10 

4831 

®J0 

«41 

48X5 

48.96 

49.90 

49 B1 


5an 


5161 

52A0 

52X1 

5290 

5101 


52.9ft 


5234 

51 JO 

51 At 


-2X0 31699 
-2X0 11X0 
•148 763* 
- 1-25 1X15 
-0.74 6X4* 
-Q 6 S 

-0.75 2 


-0.01 23636 
-0.16 42X34 
-0.11 24,105 
- 0.11 14X13 
-211 7603 
-Ml 7X73 
-Ml 7,790 
-0.11 3X63 
-OAs 2629 
- 0.06 

-OX* 1643 
-0.06 5X75 
-004 1XM 
-004 

-0X4 

-0-04 


■S S 

•/i 1 


«■: H 

*: -v 


19.40 
2046 
19 48 

19 74 

20 30 
19X7 
19X2 
18*3 
1*17 
19X6 
70X0 
:r 15 

1884 

18X3 

18.17 

18J2 

2080 

184) 

2000 


*«Mar»5 19.12 17.17 iTo* 171, 

iMADrTS 1 7 JO 17X5 i;jl J’JS 

{H?" ov ’ S U23 '7JT 17X2 17*25 

J^JUf’S 17J0 I7J7 I7jg 

}4 05 Jui 95 1760 19.44 Irj* 

1769 1769 173$ 7J* 

nts ! 74S I9.« nja 


-am 105X86 
■ 55X41 


H 4ZOa *5 

17 rjMnrTS ,,~ 

IMOgCW .760 I960 17JS 


17 JO 17J0 1767 
17 50 


KiKSS "" "* j’| 

l ? li Apr 94 ' 7A> 


17X7 

I7J2 

17.77 


17.90860*96 

17.89 17X9 17 M 

. - itxSdSK ,W/ ,ao7 >j.JJ 

WtEADraGAS°LWE INVER) «j»0oot.«nrap- 


-004 

-0X2 22371 
-0X1 12,113 

-0.01 13X34 
-0» 10X26 
—OX3 14X47 

~S£ 

-005 4X39 

— 2-06 10657 
—0X7 ILH9 
-0X7 2.975 
-0-W 6J94 

“2S 7 780 

—407 I 5.cn 
—0.08 
-0XB 


2 % tis aS M 

MIS 5*35 

PM H 

UJ35ep9S g-JJ 

fl«Oc 195 
3 M 5 NOVB 5 

so took is 5 JJ) 

S 3 CO Aug 96 
E4*\jotes 16. Jo) wee's, totes NTm 
wed-6 open i« tom Son 


S6.9S 

«XJD 

58.70 

58 30 
57.94 
S6J5 
55 JS 
5500 
54.75 
57 29 


-fl«2DXS2 
— 009 t n o 
-om 9X86 
—0X7 5609 1 
-0X7 1JM 
-0.W ixnz 

“SS 4| * 

—0X7 681 

-XW 451 

”SE 

—0X7 783 


'*•' .* 


iii 




* > ;f 
r * \ 


f - 

V. 


- : 1 


■««« ,^‘I naexes 

2J*i fl'ao^iV 469X0 Sit -' , «2D4J62 

"" - |]| 

“HlWwti 

II ata» ss is II »> 

M-,^5. fc SS,J5£ 11 ^ S3 =Sfi ™ 

y/erf seamen 4 «jb ^ mb * 


34 


Moodies 
Reuters 
O J. Futures 
Com. Research 


Commodity Indexes 

Close 


U«U9 

US&E 
2X83 . 


Previous 

16UL80 

2.T9180 

1031 

23194 


: ik 
* 




:k'a 

Si’ 


T-J-. A 

• r s 


^ ft 


:• .=/: *!i 4 






.. \ tf: 


fr?' 


\& -- 


6 riir 


: ** * 






CM ijStO 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1994 


Page 13 


ive r . ^ Bundesbank 

liti 0tl Leaves Rates 


Unchanged 


Germans Reject Biotech 

Firms Feel Forced to Invest Abroad 


Compiled by Our Staff Fnxn Dupauius 

FRANKFURT — The 
Bundesbank on Thursday held 
its key interest rates shady as 
weU as its target range for mon- 
ey supply growth in 1995. 

The central bank said its dis- 
count rate would remain steady 
at 4.5 percent and its Lombard 
rate would stay at 6 percent 
while the target range for M-3 
would remain between 4 per- 
cent and 6 percent for 1995. 

In spite of the decision to 
leave rates unchanged, many an- 
alysts said German interest rates 
have probably bottomed out 
since the economy is growing 
strongly and more quickly than 
GKpGCtfid* A shift to rate in- 


Telekom to Cut 


^ Use of Computers 
To Combat Fraud 


Bloomberg Business Kent 

FRANKFURT — Deutsche 
Telekom said Thursday it 
would begin manually connect- 
ing calls made to some so-called 
telephone-sex lines to thwart 
fraud being committed with 
automatic-dialing computers. 

The national phone company 
said it would Start manuall y 
connecting calls to some for- 
eign -owned toll telephone ser- 
vices to prevent unscrupulous 
companies from using comput- 
ers to repeatedly call their own 
services, generate phony 
charges and collect payment for 
them from Telekom. 

Telekom said it would use hu- 
man operators for selected for- 
eign-own ed services that it “sus- 
pected" of criminal activity. 

This month, German police 
arrested more than 60 people 
suspected of setting up pay- 


phone services, usually sex 
lines, and using computers to 


lines, and using computers to 
generate phony charges. Under 
most pay-service phone ar- 
rangements, Deutsche TeJekom 
receives 52 percent of the reve- 
nue and the owner of the service 
gets 48 percent. 

^ Telekom said it would take 
other steps early next year to 
stop fraud. It did not elaborate. 


wou,tl dovetail with U.S 
and British moves to Ufi rates in 
a bid to limit inflation. 

But Bundesbank watchers 
will have a hard time getting 
interest-rate signals from Hans 
lietmeyer, president of the 
Bundesbank. 

As 1 ve made clear many 
times, we are in a different situ- 
ation than other countries." he 
sa ~- “The question is not just 
when or how far upward to 
raise them. We are looking at all 
options." 

The figure for growth of M-3 
has only recently fallen to 6 
percent, having exceeded the 
target range for most of the year 
since January, when it showed 
annual growth of slightly more 
than 20 percent from the aver- 
age Figure for the last quarter of 
last year. 

The bank has explained that 
while it retained its faith in M-3 
as the chief guide io the setting 
of monetary policy, the mea- 
sure had been distorted by tech- 
nical factors. One of these was 
the legalization at the beginning 
of August of money-market 
mutual funds, which attracted 
5.45 billion Deutsche marks 
{53.47 billion) in November 
alone. 

M-3 comprises cash in circu- 
lation. checking accounts and 
savings placed for up to four 
years. 

Germany’s key rates were 
last changed in May when the 
Bundesbank cut the discount 
and Lombard rate by Half a 
percentage point each. 

Mr. Tietmeyer said he ex- 
pected inflation in Western 
Germany would be at a moder- 
ate level of 2 percent in the 
medium term. 

The German government ap- 
peared pleased by the actions of 
the Bundesbank, which by law 
retains independence from the 
government 

“This money-supply target is 
appropriate to the economic sit- 
uation," said Finance Minister 
Theo WaigeL, while Economics 
Minister Gunter Rexrodt said 
that continuation of the 1994 
corridor would “allow suffi- 
cient liquidity for economic 
growth in the coming year.” 

(AFP, Reuters, AP) 


By Nathaniel C. Nash 

A '«■»• York Time* Sertuv 

HOECHST. Germany — Hoechst AG, the 
pharmaceutical company, has poured $90 mil- 
lion into its biotechnology operations. Its rival 
BASF AG has opened an $80 million biotech 
research operation, and Bayer AG has just 
entered a $25 million biotech joint venture. 

These investments by the three German 
pharmaceutical giants were made not in Ger- 
many but in the United States and elsewhere. 

German businesses are reluctant to invest 
in biotechnology at home not only because of 
innate caution about risky ventures, but also 
because of opposition from militant environ- 
mentalists and the bad name given genetic 
engineering by the Nazis in World War 11. 

“Biotech is almost nonexistent within Ger- 
many," said Ulrich Laager, a chemicals ana- 
lyst at Commerzbank in Frankfurt. “Public 
opinion is still very much against it, so Ger- 
man companies find they have to go abroad, 
to the U.S. or Japan.” 

The problems were illustrated when 
Hoechst decided a decade ago to open Ger- 
many's first production plant for genetically 
engineered human insulin. 

Ten years later, after batties with Ge rman 
laws, rod tape and court challenges from local 
politicians and environmental groups, the 
plant sits unfinished at the company's home 
base here. Hoechst executives do not expect 
to start selling insulin until 1996 and estimate 
the years of delay will lose them more than 
5300 million in revenue. 

When Hoechst. BASF and Bayer gave pre- 
sentations to analysts this month, none of the 
biotechnology investments they outlined were 
in Germany. 

“North America has not replaced Germany 
as a location for business, but there are cer- 
tain innovative activities which are best per- 
formed in the U.S ? " Manfred Schneider, 
Bayer's chairman, said. 

With Germany struggling to emerge from 
its worst recession in decades and with more 
than 3 million unemployed, exporting biotech 
jobs to other countries carries some long-term 
ramifications. 

Pharmaceutical industry officials predicted 
the majority of new wonder drugs wul emerge 
from genetic engineering. This has led to 
doubts that Germany can compete with com- 
panies from the United States and Asia. 

Lack of domestic support for the biotech 
industry here has also created a brain drain, 
with Goman scientists being hired away by 
companies abroad. 

President Roman Herzog of Germany la- 
mented in a recent interview with the news 
magazine Focus, “Especially for gene tech- 
nology, l have the feeling that there is no 
more chance for Germany here." 

Resistance in Germany to producing such 
wonder drags as EPO, which stimulates growth 


patients, has roots in German history as well os 
in more recent political movements. 

The ghastly experiments by Nazi doctors 
during the war on prison camp inmates plus 
the Nazi notion of creating a superior race 
still haunt Germans, giving the concept of 
gene manipulation sinister overtones. 

The politically powerful Green movement 
in Germany has led public opposition to 
genetic technology research and production. 
Scores of Green groups around the country 
file lawsuits to stop biotechnology work, and 
elected officials have put up local barriers to 
biotech companies. 

Some environmentalists have trampled ge- 
netically engineered vegetables on experi- 
mental plots and burst into laboratories. The 
most vociferous opposition is aimed at geneti- 
cally engineered plants and animals. 

There are no more than 5 experimental 
plots in Germany where scientists can grow 


With genetic engineering 
seen producing new wonder 
drugs, there are fears 
Germany cannot compete 
with the U.S. and Asia. 


genetically altered vegetables, compared with 
30 in Belgium, 30 in France and more than 
1,000 in the United States, said Peter Bucket 
director of genetic engineering at Boehringer 
Mannheim GmbH outside Munich. 

Boehringer Mannheim, a conspicuous ex- 
ception to the dearth of biotech facilities in 
Germany, functions partly because the com- 
pany is based in the conservative state of 
Bavaria, where the Green Party has relatively 
little influence. 

German suspicions about biotechnology 
have given rise to European centers of biotech- 
nology emerging beyond Germany’s borders. 
The Alsace region of France, for example, has 
attracted Swiss and German companies. 
Hoechst recently built a plant north of Paris to 
make Hirudin, an anti-coagulant medication 
found naturally in leeches. 

When Germany’s legislature passed the 
Genetic Engineering Act last May to encour- 
age biotechnology at home, Hoechst applied 
to make Hirudin out of baker’s yeast, but ran 
into a logjam from local politicians. 

“The derision was made to shift the plant 
to near Paris and we received authorization in 
six weeks from the French government,” said 
Dieter Brauer. head of Hoecbst’s biotech re- 
search and development. Within months the 


company had invested more than $10 million 
in the French plant 

“We need to do research to find the adven- 
ture gene," said Mr. Buckel at Boehringer 
Mannheim- “American are so much more 
wilting to take risks. We*ve been sleeping in 
Germany. We need to wake up." 


of red blood cells vital to dialysis patients, or 
TP A, a blood-thinning agent for heart attack 


NYSE 


llMflrtn 

hwi low node pin via we 10 m 


I HMontti 
Low LO—fl 01*96 High Lows 


SK 

thw relate 


Thursday’s Closing 

Tables include the nationwide prices up to 

Hi. Mndnn nn Wall fitnmt 9nri rwit mflprt 


I sores inrauae me nmonwniw up hj 

the closing on Wall Street and do not reflect 
late trades elsewhere. Via The Associated Press 

(Continued) 


rfaMSwaoac b» YMPEin High Low Lomu PVo> 

>0 ift! “ 




43 13 t! 
M 43 l5 

3 1 







* ] 
via a IB 

mo 33 n 


!s 




<4 if* jj 


■ iTi 

M n 
flS 

147 *1 (a 



I3t* *■* 


■IR * R 



THYSSEN: 

Phone Ambitions 


Continued from Page H 
RWEor Viag," said one Frank- 
furt analyst 

Despite such criticism, Thys- 
sen executives said it would be 
irresponsible to count them out 
Together with VEJBA, Voda- 
fone Group PLC BellSouth 
Corp. and a handful of other 
investors, Thyssen owns 28.4 
percent of E-Plus, the second 


private cellular phone venture 
to be approved in Germany. 
Untike the first one, Mamies- 
r na nn Mobilfunk. E-Plus aimed 
immediately at a mass market 
with lower user fees and small, 
user-friendlier handsets. It now 
captures a third of all new cellu- 
lar phone customers in the areas 
where it is available. 

Moreover, Thyssen is count- 
ing on the support of strong 
partners. “We’re in intense dis- 
cussions" with partners “with 
access to international mar- 
kets," said Mr. VogeL 


Thyssen already works to- 
:ther with EDS Corp-i the 


gether with EDS Corp-, the 
Genera] Motors Corp. data- 
processing unit, and Itochu 
Corp., the world’s biggest trad- 
ing company, in Spaceline 
Communications Services 
GmbH, a subsidiary founded in 
1992 to offer business televi- 
sion, videoconferences and 
multimedia services. 


ADVERTISEMENT 


HITACHI LTD. 

((SR*) 


Tyi | AMSTERDAM IIFPOSTTAHY 
Jg (30MPAIW N.V. 


Airwlcnlam, SI llrmnlirr 1994 


PORTFOLIO MANAGER 

Swiss Economist 

long experience, reafiy 
Independent responsible 
market approach, accepts 
accounts from $2 rrio 
Multilingual: D/F/l/E 

Pleas* contact pob 2496 
CH69P1 UJGANO/Swteeriaid 



irr-T.Tin 


Giba to Buy 
OTCDrug 
Unit From 
Rhone 


Compiled hr Our Staff From Dispatches 

BASEL, Switzerland — 
Clba-Gdgy AG said Thursday 
it was buying Rhdne-Poulenc 
Rorer fnc/s U.S and Canadian 
over-the-counter line of drugs 
for 5407 million. 

The products involved include 
the antacid Maalox, the laxative 
Perdiem and the coated aspirin 
Ascriptin. Ciba also will lake 
over a production facility in Fort 
Washington, Pennsylvania. 

Ciba said the acquisition 
would bolster its share of a grow- 
ing market and would add about 
5160 million in sales next year 
for its self-medication division. 

The news sent Ciba's shores 
up sharply, to 790 Swiss francs 
($595) from 779 francs Wednes- 
day. On the Paris bourse, shares 
of Rhdue-Poulenc SA, the par- 
ent company of Rh&ne-Poulenc 
Rorer. rose to 129.50 French 
francs (524) from 128.80. 

Analysts said the deal was 
positive for both sides. Arvind 
Desai, with Mehta & Isaly, a 
New York pharmaceutical’ re- 
search firm, said Ciba acquired 
“a great franchise of products 
at a reasonable valuation." 

Rhone-Poulenc, meanwhile, 
“had made it quite clear that 
they were too small in the U.S. 
OTC market," said Christine 
Lebreton, drug analyst at the 
Oddo brokerage in Paris. “It 
seemed they would look for a 
U.S. partnership, but, looking 
at it, this is a fair price." 

Rhdne-Poulenc retains the 
right to sell Maalox outride 


I Investor’s Europe 

Frankfurt 

London 

Paris 

DAX 

FTSE 100 Index 

CAC40 

2300 

3300 

2200 

2200 A fl, 


2100 

z, ”/ww 

zf VAf 

2000 It] 

2000 

2900 

1900/ 

1900 J A S O N D 
1994 

2000 J A SOND 
1994 

A 

1994 


Exchange 


Thursday 

Close 


Amsterdam 

Brussels 

Frankfurt 

Frankfurt 

Helsinki 

London 

London 

Madrid 

Mian 

Paris 

Stockholm 

Vi enna 

Zurich 

Sources: Reuters, 


AEX 

Stock Index 
"DAX 
FAZ 
HEX 

Financial Times 30 
FTSE100 
General Index 
"mibtel 

CAC40 

Affaersvaeriden 

ATX Index 

SBS 

AFP 


415.35 

7,22421 

2,100.65 

786.18 

1,794.72 

2374.7b 

3,091.70 

292.07 

9,982.00 

1,952.05 

1,856.78 

1,052.50 

93Z21 


Prev. % 
Close Change 

413.35 +0.48 

7,173.24 +0.71 

2,066.66 +0.67 

7B0l59 +0.72 

1,799.03 -024 

235620 +0.79 

"3070.40 +0.69 

291.82 +0.09 

10,023.00 -0.41 
1,940.69 +0.57 

1,844.40 +0.67 

1,045,19 +0.70 

927.53 +0.50 

iMcnuiiiiiul Hirruli] Tntai « 


Very briefly: 


• Aramco, the Saudi- American oil company, is negotiating to buy 
half of the Greek oil company Motor Oil (Hellas) Corinth Refiner- 
ies SA from the Vardinoyannis family, banking sources said. 

• TdeT6nica lntemadonal of Spain said it had signed an agree- 
ment with a group of banks led by ABN-AMRO Holding NV for a 
Sl.l billion credit to finance acquisitions in Peru. 

■ Tlu European GmumssfoD said it had cleared Lhe acquisition by 
the French pay television channel Canal Plus of a 24.9 percent 
slake in the German television company Vox. 

• European Union ministers cleared the GATT world trade pact 
for ratification, opening the way for the EU to complete approval 
of the treaty in Geneva Dec. 30. 

• Britain posted a current-account surplus of £846 million (51 
billion) for the third quarter, the first surplus in that account since 
the first quarter of 1987. 

• Coca-Cola Amatil Ltd. of Australia said it would acquire the 
Polish soft-drink operations of Coca-Cola Co. for 5237 million. 

Return, Bloomberg, AFP 


right to sell Maalox outride 
North America and should ben- 
efit from its marketing partner- 


shipwith Ciba, analysts said. 
Ciba said the deal would plac 


Ciba said the deal would place 
it among the 10 top sellers of 
over-the-counter drugs in the 
United States. (Bloomberg, AP) 


Dow Agrees to German Deal 


■ Zeneca Expands in U.S. 

Zeneca Group PLC said 
Thursday it would pay 5195 mil- 
lion for a 50-percent stake in 
Satiric Health Care Inc, news 
agencies repealed from London. 

The deal gives Zeneca the 
right to buy the rest of Salick, 
which provides health services 
for patients with cancer and oth- 
er chronic illnesses, after two- 
and-a- half years for 542 per 
share. That option could cost 
Zeneca an additional 5255 mil- 
lion. (AP, Bloomberg) 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatcher 

BERLIN — The German 
privatization agency Treuhand 
has agreed to sell three chemical 
plants in the former East Ger- 
many to Dow Chemical Corp. 
in a transaction worth 4 billion 
Deutsche marks ($2.5 billion), 
the Treuhand said Thursday. 

The purchase, which was an- 
ticipated, will give Dow control 
of chemical plants in Leuna, 
Buna and Bdhlen. Dow will in- 
vest 4 billion DM to modernize 
the plants. 

“We spoke intensively with 


the Treuhand in December and 
are very happy over the pro- 
gress reached during those dis- 
cussions," said Elmar Deut- 
sche, vice president of Dow 
Deutschland GmbH, the com- 
pany’s German subsidiary. 

Markus Kaiser, a Dow 
Deutschland spokesman, said 
the company planned to make 
chlorine- based alkatines at the 
Buna plant and plastics, includ- 
ing polyethylene, in Leuna. 
Bdhlen will process the chemi- 
cal raw materials for both. 

( Bloomberg, Knight-Ridder ) 


FIDELITY FUNDS 

Societe dlnvestissement 5 Capital Variable 
Kansallis House - Place de 1'Etoile 
L- 1021 Luxembourg 
RC Luxembourg B 34036 


NOTICE OF EXTRAORDINARY GENERAL MEETING 


Notice is hereby given that in Extraordinary General Meeting of Shareholders of Fidelity 
Funds ("the Corporation" 1 will be held at the registered office of the Fund in Luxembourg on 
Friday 6th January 1995 at noon to consider the following proposed amendments to the 
Articles of Incorporation. 

AGENDA 


1. Deletion in paragraph 2 of article 22 of the Articles of Incorporation of the terms "in 
Luxembourg" in the two places where they appear. 

2. Amendment of paragraph 9 "Valuation Regulations", sub-paragraph Blii) of article 22 of 
Lhe .Articles of Incorporation so thai it reads as follows: 

"(ii) securities which are traded on stock exchanges ore to be valued at the Iasi available 
closing price on the Valuation Date (or if there has been no sale, at the closing bid price) 
quoted on the stock exchange which is normally the principal market for such security, or. 
if the Board so decides, at the last available price at the time when the valuation is carried out. 
or. in unusual circumstances of trading activity such that the Corporation considers that such 
price dues not reflect fair market value, at fair market value in the opinion of the Corporation". 

3. Deletion in article 22 of the Articles of Incorporation, paragraph 9. subparagraph B{v) of 
the term "closing". 

Subject to the limitations imposed by the Articles of Incorporation of the Fund with regard to 
ownership of shares by US persons or of shares which constitute in the aggregate more than 
three percent (3Qr) of the outstanding shares, each share is entitled to one vote. A shareholder 
may attend and vote at the meeting or may appoint a proxy to attend and vote. Such proxy need 
not be a shareholder of the Fund. 


Shareholders are advised that a quorum of fifty percent of the shares outstanding of the 
Corporation present or represented is required in order to constitute a valid meeting and the 
resolutions must be carried by a majority of twaAhinls of the shares ut the meeting. 

Holders of Regisiered Shares may vote by proxy by returning to the registered office of the 
Fund the form of regisiered shareholder proxy sent to them. 

Holders of Bearer Shares who wish 10 attend the Extraordinary Geitcral Meeting or vote at the 
Meeting by proxy should contact the Fund, or one of the following institutions: 

ill Luxemhiiurg 

Fidelity Investments Luxembourg S.A. Bankers Trust Luxembourg S.A. 

Kansallis Hihikc 14. Bd F. Roosevelt 

Place de J'Eioile. B.P. 2174 L-2450 LUXEMBOURG 

L-I02I LUXEMBOURG 


'iltr iUNJrrM 9 V*il annnunmi iturf an &>nn 
January . 1 , 1995 at kaa-iWorialir N.V. 
.\Mdrnbw iG%- rpiL nn. - 1 > (wrm n n u inl 
ha an "AtlalaviO nT (hr tjlR* litanH lid. 


by an -AtTabri'} ..ft hr CPU. Uteri d liiL 


will hr pYaliJr will. FHk fljll prr l □ML 
mr. Sal «J m am) with IHk. SC/® prr < .1 Mi. 


rrjir. :uai «ih ami wan 1 dm. prr urn. 
rrjir. l.tkM dw. (div. |kt mnbrfr TKUM.Ot. 
pro Yrn fCKl n. «fij nflrr rfnhirlinn of 
15% JnpanrM- (ax - Yrn -1 12.50 - tHk 
7.21 nrrCDK irpr. 5m s»au Yrn KZSdMI - 
niklf.mp-f-UHtrrpr. IjUOflrh*. 


WHluan an UIHMa JlS Japaitrar lax — 

Yit» 551) — IHU *W, iht OiR rnr. -HKI 


im will - out ’««» INT um iwir. 

4k. Y m I.MMI - IHk l9.1l) prr tJHl rrur. 
t/XKt Jkt. wiS hr JnhidnL 
Aflrr .11.(0.95 (hr ifiviilrml w3 tally hr 
pail mulrr ifc-dmtiun <4 3W Jap. lax wilh 
IHk :UUO; llfk 77Jh rrpr. ma. 500 and 


lots. .uuxK iiik ri^at rrpr. mp. .kid and 
in animbnrv wilh (hr Ja)nmr«r 
tat irgutirfiunt 


in tin ’ United Kingdom 

Fidelity Investments International 

Oakhill House 

1 30 Tonbridge Road 

Hiidcnhomugh 

KENTTN JI9D2 

United Kingdom 

ill Cicnininy 

Bankhuus B. Mel/lcr seel. 

Solm & Co. KGaA 
Gmtic GuliiisxlraUc 12 
D-00311 Frankfurt am Main 

in Fruiter 
Banqiic IiuIomilv 
W>. Boulevard Haussnuinn 
F-75371 PARIS Cedex OX 


in lirhind 
Bmdwcll Limited 
41-45 St. Scphen's Green 
DUBLIN 2 
IRELAND 


in Su m itzriliiiid 

Union Buncuiro Priviie Geneve 
9b-M8. rae du Rhone 
CH- 121 1 GENEVE I 


in The NerlierhiiiJx 
l-ldclity investments International 
Alexander Bivrsiraat 10 
NL-U171 KX Amsterdam 


in Hniif; Kiwi; in ,\u\lriti 

Fidelity tuvesimenls Managemenl Cruditanslall-Bankxenrin 

(Hong Kong) Limited SelhiUengasse b 

I fHh J’lcHir. Cililxink Tower A- UNO Wien 

3 Garden Road, central 1 long Kong 

To be valid, proxies must reach the registered office of the l : uml on the 3rd January 1995 at 
17.00 pm llaixcinbiniTg time) ai the latest. 

Dated: November 25. 1994 
By ( Met of lhe Board of Directors 


Fidelity 


Investments 


/) 











INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1994 


NASDAQ 


HWomi 
Hgh Lw Stack 


SB ISMonSl 

□Iv YW P6 lQOs « 9 h LawLOcdOi'n I HiohLow SMc 


□hr YM re 10U high LowLotetCh'** 


12AMI 

Man Low Slot* 


Thmtfay’s 4 p.m. 

TWs tot compiled by the AP, condsts ot the 1 . 0 D 0 
most traded securities in terms of doflar value- It Is 
updated twice a year. 


ISMontti 
I-Wi Low Stock 


tar yw re r»j HWu»mp»Q |, to 


Jfi&ikttft- 

30 IlftABTBM 


»%13%ACCC 

n'h Em Acs e 


— shs 

" 8 3M 17* « 12* -» 

.WO 3 1 ™ 1» >£*=& 

“ 3? 3a 2% §* + - 

Z _ 381 17* UN 17 — * 


340 10% 10% 10W —ft 

-“inssja 


22W twamhh 
27% WWAceWn 
77 '/i 15 AoneMef 
MW TWAcW 


I » MS a* 28 28% - 
Z _ 4877 IP* is 15V« — jfo 
Z 37 1543 MW 23% 23* + % 
_ 15 583 7 , ,4ft 4ft —VS 


: I B Irt 17* 17Vu — Vu 
.. 1512308 14* 13% IMS **h 
_ 7 923 18 14% 17ft +ft 


rinse =!J 

14 Adaptc S - 14 TVs 


_ U 749 8ft SM . 8* - 


Z 31 173 21 20ft Mto —ft 
_ 32 S7 27% 27. 27ft - 


gsrag; 

35 12ftAdvHlt 
19ft 12 ft Aoimjb 
9ft 4%AB*Tl55 
AlftM’AAdvtnM 
37ft ZJWAgwrtB 
23ft 17 ARCmpS 
14% 9 Asojrn 
WftW/aAtrEXPS 
63V.44V.Atao 
30ft 9'AAkntoc 
Mft wftAtoonfc 
19ft WAJcfilas 


_ It 7033 21 20%2PVu -VU 

__ 702 7ft 0 8ft Bft —ft 

A 16 54 35ft 35ft 35ft —Vi 


3 2813115 Wf 29% 30, + % 

„ - SBirAN 39ft 40ft + % 


Z » 13 81 MW 30V, —VS 
_ _ 214 18 17ft 17ft - 


_ _ 214 18 17ft 17ft 
MB 8ft Jft 8ft 


_ IB II 484 Mft 27V.57.Vu ♦ Vu 

* “USES ssrin 

_ „ 171 12ft 1114 lift _ 

.14 J 14 478 u 19ft 18% 19 4ft 

1J04U _ 187 S4 55ft 55ft ♦ * 

_ _ 49CBu33ft 29ft 31 *ft 

.40 1.7 11 196 22ft 22ft 22ft * ft 

_ 14 5B70 10ft 10 10ft +ft 

.88 4.1 13 6M 22 21ft 21 ft —ft 

_ 27 4451 21ft 21 21 

1823 4ft 6 4ft 4ft 

_ 34 5658 31 28ft 30ft —ft 
it 2J i 250 25ft 25% ZSft 4ft 
„ -. 1520 11 8% 10ft -1% 

_ 24 3816 40 38ft 88ft —ft 

_ _ 333 20 2 7ft M 4ft 

_ 14 293 a a 22 —1% 

140 9B12u53% 49 S3 ft *3* 
32 XD 9 1535 MM 23ft 2314 —ft 
_ _ 721 17 16ft 14ft 4ft 


28%21%AtaxBkl 
25ft 10ft ACosR 

ir'psgi 

22 % "*7W aStobRi 

40ft 21ftA*erg 

31% 16% AW? mc 
M 10ft Akron 
51 23»AmarOni 
26ft 19 ABnkr 
nft JftAmBWo 


: 3*i 


19ft 12 AdosVW .14 121388 284 14 13% 13ft 4% 


2S% IQft ACoDofci J4 | J 19 407 14ft 13ft 14 _ 

5ft 12ft - 14 !S IS# !3> 14% — % 


37ft 12ft AmEoola 
24ft ISftAmFrorn 
34%25ftAGraot 
24ft 4ftA4HhC0 
18ft 12 AMS S 
17ft 5 AMedE 
21 % 1 1 ft AmMbSo* 
soft MftAPwrCnv 


_ 25 1991 20% 19% lift — W* 
2 j 0 14 2397 27ft 23 27ft 4ft 
_ 8 730 5% 5 S —ft 
_ 2D 324 17ft 17% 17ft —ft 
_ 11 3131 5% 5ft 5ft _ 
_ _ 375 12% lift 12 — % 
_ a 7727 14ft 15>Vu 14% — % 


15 10 APumirJl BSe J 83 10% 10 


23ft 15ftASavfq- 

24ft 14ft AmSuors 
11 10ft ATrovsl 
24% 19 Amled 24 
60% 34%Amgan 
33% TftAmtchCp .08 
17ftll*Anc*Ba> 

17ft loft AnenGm 
S3 24 Andrews 
71% MMAndm 
MW 15 Amec 
12ft TftAnertuS 
19ft 12 amok 
49ft 24ft AnpleC M 

18% lffWAMSoui 02 
25% 11 AMetMOl M 
12ft 3% AodExIr 
24% >3KAodOod 
33 15 Afcdlnovs 

54ft 33%AMdWlatl 


_ 9 2242 19% 1 9ft 19% -ft 

_ _ 1612 25ft 24ft 24ft „ 

_ 11 722 16 15ft 15% —ft 

J4 1.1 19 12B 21% 20% 20ft —ft 

_ 1911977 57% 56 SWu— Vi» 
.08 3 II W>8 lift lOftllVu+Wu 

_ 0 9S2 13% 13ft 13% — % 

_ 13 10 15ft 15 15 —ft 


_ 11 1237 14% 15% >4 6% 

_ _ 29» 18% 17 17% —ft 

_ _ 2626 10ft ID 10% 4% 

_ _ SO 15ft 14% 14% - 

12 1511775 38ft 38% 38ft 4% 
3 77 130T 12% 12 12% 4% 

3 V 935 15% 15 15 —ft 

_ 46 453 11% lift lift —ft 

_ _ 1757 77% 21ft +ft 
_ 34 299 25 34 25 *1 

_ 1610048 42% 40% 41 — Vu 


22% 16 ArtxvOni JO 1 J 22 1204 20% 19% aft _ 


25 15 ArtMTHI 
31 lO’/uAltirNtl 
22 13ft Actions 


„ 20 47 IBM 18 18% - 

_ 23 192 ISft 14ft 14ft —VS 

.19 1j0 17 316 2D 19% 19% - 


32% 26%ArfloCP 1.16 d I n 28ft 27% 28ft 


77 10 Areosv 

15% 10M ArkBest 
24 18 Armor 
aft 18 Arnold 
24ft 7% Aran 
40% ll%AscendC 
13% 7ftAshwrtti 


4 6 » a seam 

20% IlftAstec _ 


30 IlftAlHoSn 
26ft 14ftAuBon 
9Vu 3%AumSy 
10 JHAittpec 
4D% TlftAutodks 
34% 16% AutOftld 
29% 10ft Autototc 
43% 17 AvkfTdi 


_ 47 1149 12% U% 17% 41% 

314 3 17 626 11% 11% 11% _ 

M 33 16 54 19 10% 18% —ft 

M U 17 941 19 18 19 4% 

_ 10 3070 0% a 8Vu 4 ft* 
_ _ 1410U4IW 39% 41 41 

_ 19 7047 7% 7% 7ft —ft 

_ 21 1956 33% 31ft 33ft. 42ft* 
_ 9 144 12 lift lift —ft 

_ _ 436 34ft 34 26 —ft 

33 23 9 3317 15% 14 14ft — % 

28 2040 35ft, 33% 33ft— 1ft 
_ _ 1091 28% 27% 27W —ft 

_ 23 1134 15 14ft 14ft —ft 

_ _ 1945 4% 4 4ft 4ft, 

_ TO 7713 7 4% 4% —ft 

24 ^ 30 9491 40% 39 39% — Vu 

_ 11 3241 lflft 18 1BVS - 

_ V 3145 13 12 13 4ft 

_ 3226832 38 % 33% 34 —5 



25%17ftCFftod 
29% 7%CTI 


□hr YU re ms Holt LowLowroroe W*i L OW Sodv __ g* 

if IpBBK BO 

t 




ft 3 «!w pS3tw 8~ '■®° 
% 

16% eft PoPrai 
33% 21 PopaJenn 

Itisa ssso %* 

^^Peni^r. 31 


YU PE 1 W Wj L BWLtf8»Ch'—_ 

“ 1 s 3T A 3 - 

- « m 14% lift 13% — % 

- s SS „ iSv! a *% 

- Si?™ »% 31%a3ft4lVS 

Z loe 34 * 2l 

'l a IB SP SSI" 4 


12 Month 
HMiUm 1 


E 

= »fK|L3 
E -nS® SSSrS 
rNW 8 !* *MS!b S 

- Siffi VL S*# tS 


i 


sf 


Ma J 1144047 


lrtilOftPoeoAn 


lift 12% — % 

’iS'ifiTSS 


fawagB* 

SB MNWlCWS 
30'AlSftPtwsCpA 
27ftl7%Phy5ffilf 
23% 10 

lm 1 


_ M 194 
Z 38 1512 
„ ft CTS 
- 17 J?3 


WS» - 

»% 25% MVS _ 


3 ?4 2 W S# ?g4 34 -% 


30% S PBencr 


23% r a Pierre 
29%14%Ptov*ra 
9% 5ftPknHrne 
» aftPo BoTrp 
79H^ft PwraU f 
18M iShPrmrBc 
27 6%PreaRVT 
50 !4%PrasiUcs 

21%12ftPnce&J 

33% 04% PrieeTR M 
a 20 Prtmodn 


2flSl4%SSSw 

56% 27 PTBSofl 

2yftU%Projgg 

39% 7%Prwdma 
14 5ftPureTC 
18% 7 Piswc 

P 15 PurtSS .12 

SftPvrmT 
14 Pvxft» 

29% C7VC 

33% IS 1 * SJotan s 
27 19 QfFo Ot) 30 


^1£!3* 3 

z si 92 10% 9 % 9ft *% 

T V*™-- 

" i,8 184^ 13ft W% 13ft 4ft 

= !!««?»« 

iSli >g ^ 21^2l%Tg 

_ IIS WW 12 Igs n% +£ 
A _ 3192 Mft 19% 20 — % 

_ _ 2201 12% 12VS 12ft 4% 


_ n 4411 im i»m 19% 

Z 54 1437 41 ft 41ft 41ft —ft 

Z la 741 12 lift 12., r% 

_ 94 -MW 26% 25% 26ft 4ft 

3 17 22 20 21*41% 

_ 7 7439 14% U% 14% _ 

_ 22 1354 31 30% 30ft — % 

2 “ a 25 24ft 25 

_ 19 133 13% 12 13 +% 

Z 28 2645 11% 10% 11%+lft 


32ft K%C 

8 m 9v.c 
■ VAC 
■ ?%C 

■ime 

■ iVAC 

CTS12 C 
23 16% C 










_ 14 119 14% 16% 16% — % 
3 22 77 25ft 25% 25ft 4% 

Z _ 880 28 % 24% 28% 41 
1.9 9 938 12ftd11ft 11* — ft 

_ 16 355 17ft 14ft 17 —ft 



m 




ft 
% 

-ft 

% 

.% I 31% 10 

ft a%io% 

•M I 22% 9% 




% 17% 6ft 

ft 25% 19% 

ft 54ft 44% 

ft 22ft 17 










Zt i i 


Thursday's doling 

Tables Include the nationwide prices up to 
the dosing on Wall Street and do not reflee 
flats trades elsewhere. Via The Associated Press 


12 Mown S3 

HWi Low Stock Dhr YU re 100s 


k i 


-78 O S3 ~ 
„ IB 
J2 X2 13 


u«e 93 is 


3 2 — 

°I4 JTu— 

5 5% 4 % 

18% 19 +% 

9ft 10% -ft 
d 7 7 —ft 

19% 19% -ft 
19ft 19ft — % 
■ftr Vu *Va 
ItoS 2 Z 

19 17 —ft 

24ft 24ft —% 
ft Vu -Vu 
10ft 10ft 4% 
14ft 14% -ft 
3ft 3>V.i ‘ft, 
1ft IV» -% 
4<a 4% 4ft 
2ft 2ft 4 ft. 





38% 38ft 

k ss 

8 P 

4ft 4ft 

2 . TWu 


’ft N 


1 » iSg 






m « I 

J9I 6JS 21 


_ _ 58 % % 

- 31 « 2ft 2Vu 

„ _ loi i% 1% 
„ 30 180 7 4% 

_ - m 5U 4ft 
_ - *7 6% 6 f A 

- - 701 2to, 2Vu 

_ .. 70 % n/u 

_ 13 15 5ft Sft 

L3 5 56 TV, nr* 

LB 21 a 5% 5ft 
J 16 12 34ft 34ft 

J TO JIG F7% I7ft 


lft 

17% 11% 
ASM 30ft 


_ 10 20 4% 4V H 

10 I sun. 3Wu 
Z ff Ito aS 

._ _ 61 12ft 12ft 

- 25 144 14. 13% 

_ 10 a 5% 5 

_ - 1 'Vu W-4 

_ 9 11 9ft 9% 

32 2J 18 75 14ft 14% 

3 73 _ 183 8 7% 

10 - 406 B% 8ft 
■40 6B - 56 B% 8ft 

— 9 72 4ft 4ft 

27 8ft 8% 

- - 36 2to, 

_ - 84 aft 22% 

- - 30 23 21% 

M X4 12 17 13ft 13% 

1J3 SB _ 173 aft 32 

■»„ 3 75 2641 10ft 10% 

32b 06 S 33 


MS W; 
4m 30% 

32*15% 


2ft 2ft —ft, 
. 4Vu 4% +Vu 
36% 36ft - 
i (lift 1% -Vu 
ft ft -ft. 
24ft 74ft - 
84% 84% —ft 
19 19 — % 

26ft 27% - W 
26ft 27 *1 

% ft —ft 
7% 7ft — % 
2% 2ft -Vu 
10% 10% — % 
11% 11% - 
10 10% ~ 
10 10% _ 
10% 10% - ft 

40 40% _ 

14% 14% —ft 
46% 46% —ft 
13% 13% -% 
14% 16% -ft 
7% 2 W* — Vu 
41% 4I%— 2 


15 Vr 1J% — % 
17% 17% — % 
14ft 14ft _ 
Mu 3Vu 
1% 1%. -ft 


19% 10ft 
lift 6% 

16ft 12% 
12% 7% 
12ft 7% 
18*12% 
5% 0ft 
15% 13 

3% % 

15% 6 % 
1% ft 
20% 13ft 
6% 3ft 
3"u 1% 
36ft 
14% 

14ft 
II 
7ft 
12ft 
145 1 
16 
10 ft 
6 % 

34%; 


_ _ 30 73 21ft 

M X4 12 17 13% 13% 

IJ3 SB _ 173 32% 32 

■0 7 3 75 2641 10% 10% 

32b Xi 6 33 9ft d8% 

_ _ M lVii 1% 

_ B 37 4% 6ft 

_ _ 277 3ft 3ft 

_ B 1298 34ft 34 

- _ 1C 19ft 19ft 

.168 l3 19 10 “ft 

, _ _ 458 1-V„ lft 

748 9 J - 128 7% 7% 

- - 97 J% 2% 

_ 81 19 6ft 6% 

_ 19 3113 12 11% 

- „ a 6ft 6% 

_ 9 581 10% 10ft 

- « «} n 19% 

2J0 1A712S 20 13% 13% 

1B0 1BJ _ 44 Oft 8% 

1B0 18J — 5 8% 8ft 

JSe 1.9 ._ 16 13% 17% 

_ 893 1 % 

B0 AS 21 2 13% 13% 

_ _ I 17 2« JC’u 

78a 37 9 4 7ft 7ft 

_ 21 ft Y» 

M 3J 9 438 13% d 13ft 

37 e 6J 10 33 t 5ft 

_ 40 IVu lift 

M 2.1 12 31 30% 30V, 

_ .. 37 6% 6 

_ 5 50 27ft 27 

.00 5.9 20 _ 3 67V, «7ft 


B0 AS 21 
_ I 
78a 37 V 


_ S 50 27ft 27 
400 5L9 20 3 67V, «7ft 

1.168127 _ 952 9% 9% 

.90010.1 -. 1393 9 SW. 

.13 17 7 86 7% 6ft 


70 1.9 10 10 10% 10% 

UB IB 9 6 135ft 135ft 

77 SI 13 7 14 14 

.. _. 143 7ft 7ft 

„ 4 5 2% 3% 

JO IB IS 1BZ 27ft 27 


2JB IB 9 
77 SI 13 


44 



*7& MtfGftlk. 

2(9 % ft, Vu 

i IS^S! 


SCI 

H® 

a j£ 

» A 


I I 


2% 3% 

ini 15 % 


23ft 23% 
15ft ISM 
14% 14% 
19% 15% 
16 15% 

14 15* 


16% 16% 
13% 13% 


14% 14ft 

aS its 


13 17% 

B L IIS 

92 10ft 10M 

38 12ft 11% 

96 m 7 
79% 7ft 
V'h, 1% 


1 ^ 


m 


is ovS a 

15 3 14* 14 

17 1? 18% 17 


ft a 

11 


1 J 0 1 ?T 8 


27 22 21* 

2 R a r 
* % *a 

01 2 % Ift, 

50*1 V J5 ^ 
44 <’*, 4*V„ 

’B a % 

43 10ft 10 
82 6ft 6* 

28 49% 49 ' 

1% IV., 
3ft 3% 

% ft 

1 Y«, - 


- 35 546 13ft 

S3 Z *2 i% 




Sa Z 44 6M 

m — . 237 1% 

13 Z 24 W 

13 a 

-. « 1074 ljft 

; : 'i? ?vl 

? *«S W 

.. 98 4M 14% 
- - 40 ft 

= = « a* 


12 % 12 % — % 
2ft Vk 

32% 33 a% 

1ft 1%— %i 

VS w *!! 

»% 13 % -% 

7ft 2ft „ 

2ft 2ft _ 


7 % 

'ft 

1 % SS 

14 % in, 

13% 8% 






199 *3 
230 63 
102 9.1 

7.12 116 


- 13 13 TVu 
_ 70 54 S 


1 r 


iSigiS 

ft 

l l-e 

b% ift— % 

*i w +v» 

3% 3Vu — Vu 
3ft 3<Vu _ 
4% 5 +15 

3% 3% -ft 


T wrrv 




i * 1 1» 


15% 4% 
12V: Vi 
10% TV* 
1* % 

’?% e 

lift 4ft 
lift 4% 
5% 4V U 
27% 17ft 
71 9 . 

15% 4 ! 
6ft T<u 
5>;t 4ft 
4% 3 
Z3%1SYi 
19 V, a* 
10ft 6ft 
3* I* 
6 L’% 

2% 

72'i 

*3ft 


_ 13 79 1% 

3 14 2448 1|% 


6 4 —% 

ifi£ :# 

l'Vu . 1 * _ 


97 14 10 5% 

_ „ « 7ft 

2518 4% 

_ _ 60 ft 

SB _ » 11 

_ _ IIO 1ft 

.10 12 

_ _ 22 21* 
- - .15 5% 

« -8 W 7 ft 


17% 17* -ft 

R i RUS 

4«ru 4% _ 

.H ..ft - 


10* ID* —ft 

*• F - 

21% 2f% 


.- 22 44 23% 

23 fi 7 9ft 


6.5 _ 857 4ft 
_ _ S 2% 
-17 17 Aft 

_ 10 87 3% 

_ J1 333 14 
_ 11 8 17* 

_ 33 174 7% 

= = "JMfc 

= U ”S iVfe 

4B 14 200 1 4* 
_ _ id rw„ 
- 4 49 4Vi 

. I 111 » 
_ 325 104 5ft 
.. 10 10 11% 
„ 18 600 9ft 


5ft 3ft -ft 
5ft 5ft -ft 
4* 4ft » 
23 23* _ 

9% 9% _ 

4% 8^ *(% 


ft ftTS2 
ift 18ft -ft 


17% 12ft —ft 
7ft 7% _ 

I'Vu 2ft— %, 


Sfc ft IS 
1 % ift ts: 

9% Vft -ft 


a 


■ i ‘" lw (p 

■^rcasiha 




-a— 3 


A si,- 


CUr E for t 
^REIGn 



t&o 
































































































\£j> 



\ 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1994 



Page 15 


China s GATT Bid Failed Because Money Talks 

R,. o. . . _ • 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


By Steven Mufson 

RPI ||Mr < #W Senn c 

BLUING — For w^>Uc 
leaders tried — unsucces?f,,irc ™ onihs * Ch,n ^’' 
to bluff, bluster SSbSES?' " turned oul - 
World Trade 

deadline, even thouah .° re a . vear-end 

trading rules did not m«»f r na V? n;> China’s 

Chita’s standards. 

its market was so immen^ h” ^ bel,ef [hal 
governments and thal 

overlook rules just as WOuld bend or 

man rights violations i^Chi^T ° vcrIooked hu ‘ 
It did not work. This week 1 1 ■ j „ 
and major European nauons 
— refused to bend the rules f«r cv J or novv 

further talks until February Thl™ “S off 
needed to open its mark^'J^l f y ■* ud Ch,na 
more convertible and stop riratW U 7 C1,C> 

compact disks and oiherprodul^ PCS ' 

(China said Thursday it would nm 

Tariffs and Trade, as ,'S fiKEtoS 


join GATT, which will be succeeded h> ihc WTO 
3 * i^»/ r " cnd ‘ ^■ culeri reported. 

u c ? nruM vnjoy the rights accorded GATT 
members” because Beijing was not allowed to 
join, a Foreign Ministry spokesman. Chen Jian. 
*“£« J weekly news briefing. 

I Since we will not be uble to enjoy the rights. 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


of course we will not undertake anv obligations, 
he said.”] " 

China miscalculated, in the absence of ,i mean- 
ingful human rights dialogue or a Soviet strategic 
threat. C hina s reluctance to abide by trade rules 
went io the heart of its relationship with other 
nations — money, an issue less easily dismissed. 

“We threw in the towel on human rights." said 
one U.S. executive in Shanghai. 'Most business- 
man think that was the right thing to do. Now 
we’re down to what really counts.” 

The executive’s company made a chemical 


product that it had developed exclusively. Now 
the product has been copied by 30 Chinese 
companies, many of which have links to the 
state. At least seven of those Chinese companies 
started exporting the product, threatening the 
U.S. company's prospects not only in Chiua but 
abioad loo. 

"When it affects you and your survival as a 
company, it’s a lot closer to home." he said. 

Such problems undermined the coalition that 
helped China pressure the United States ic> sever 
its link between human rights and China's trade 
status. When that decision was made six months 
ago. most American companies had been trying 
to help China win concessions. 

Now. U.S. companies arc urging American 
and European trade negotiators to insist that 
China meet the standards of other nations. Thai 
changed China’s bargaining position. 

1 1 is easy to understand why China got the 
impression it held all the cards. Despite the 
problems involved in doing business here, for- 
eign officials and companies still parade through 
Beijing eager to sign contracts. 


Big Truck Demand 
Drives Up Output 
At Japanese Firms 


Moreover. China argued that ii deserved spe- 
cial treatment as a developing nation. Several 
officials from other governments endorsed that 
view, but U.S. negotiators said China was an 
"export powerhouse.” 

China is already the world's lOth-largest trad- 
ing nation, and the fastest-growing one. In the 
first 1 1 months of 1994, China’s foreign trade 
came to $200.28 billion, up 21 percent from a 
yeai cariici 

But trade is a two-way street. If trade is dis- 
rupted. the southern Chinese province of Guang- 
dong, which has boomed with the growth of its 
toy. clothing and other light-manufacturing in- 
dustries. would suffer. And if Guangdong suf- 
fers. and its millions uf migrant workers from 
Sichuun go home, then Sichuan suffers too, and 
the ripples would continue to roll throughout the 
Chinese economy. 

China desperately wanted the prestige of be- 
coming a founding member of the WTO, even 
though it had been a member of GATT and 
pulled out in 1949 when the Communists who 
still rule China carae to power. 


Reuters 

TOKYO — Robust demand 
for heavy trucks and recreation- 
al vehicles is pulling Japan's ve- 
hicle oulput higher after more 
than two years of declines or 
flat grow di, industry sources 
said Thursday. 

Japan's November vehicle 
output rose 25 percent from a 
year earlier, to 950, 199, marking 
a year-on-year gain for the sec- 
ond straight month, the Japan 
Automobile Manufacturers As- 
sociation said. The gain in Octo- 
ber, the first year-on -year rise in 
25 months, was 0.4 percent 

An association spokesman 
said the November rise was 
caused primarily by strong de- 
mand for heavy (rucks, and in- 
dustry sources "said they expect- 
ed more gains in December. 

Japan's domestic truck out- 
put has been rising since June, 
helped by tighter rules on over- 
loading introduced in May. In 
November, truck output rose 
16.6 percent, to 251,611. 

Hiroshi Suemasa. an analyst 
at Kankaku Research Institute, 
predicted Japan's total vehicle 
^output would rise by 3 percent 
■ or 4 percent in December as con- 
sumers who bought cars during 
the economic boom of the late 
1980s begin to buy replace- 
men is. He also predicted exports 
would remain strong. 

The automakers' association 
agreed that car output was 
headed For recovery, although 
in November it slipped for the 
20th straight month, dropping 
1.9 percent from a year earlier, 
to 694.567. 

"The rate of decline in No- 
vember was the smallest this, 
year," the association spokes- 
man said. “It's a matter of time 
until car output posts gains.” ^ 

November output by Japan’s 
biggest carmaker, Toyota Mo- 
tor Corp., rose 3.5 percent from 
a year earlier. 

"Toyota’s December output 
will continue posting year-on- 


year gains in view of strong do- 
mestic sales and exports," a 
Toyota spokesman said. 

Mitsubishi Motors Corp.’s 
domestic output rose 13.8 per- 
cent from a year earlier, and a 
spokesman for the company pre- 
dicted output would continue to 
rise in December. He cited de- 
mand for the company’s Pajero 
Mini and FTO sports car. 

Mazda Motor Corp.’s output 
rose 18.4 percent in November, 
and a company spokesman said 
this was helped by production ol 
the La Lis model, known as the 
323 F in Europe: 

Nissan Motor Co.'s Novem- 
ber output fell 13 percent, but 
the company said it expected a 
turnaround next month. The 
company said it was launching 
new models in January and ex- 
pected strong demand for its 
Rasheen recreational vehicle. 

■ Isom Returns to Profit 

Isuzu Motors Ltd. said 
Wednesday that strong truck 
sales and streamlining of its 
production facilities led to its 
fust pretax profit in four years, 
news agencies reported. 

Isuzu, which is 37.4 percent 
owned by General Motors 
Corp- posted current profit of 
4,739 billion yen ($47 million) 
in the year to OcL 31, reversing 
from a loss of 10.20 billion yen 
in the previous year. 

Isuzu’s shares gained on the 
news, closing up 6 yen, at 495. 
Since Monday, the company’s 
shares have climbed 5 percent 

The company’s turnaround 
to profitability came in the sec- 
ond half. Isuzu posted a first- 
half loss of 6.2 btffion yen. 

Isuzu’s overall sales fell 15 
percent in the year, to 359.055 
units, but the decline in unit 
sales was linked to the compa- 
ny’s move out of the passenger- 
car business, a spokesman said. 
Truck sales have been rising. 

(Reuters, Bloomberg) 


Japan Reaches a Young Market 

Girls Snap Up Children’s Version of Digital Assistant 


By Andrew Pollack 

.Vtir JVfc fmie* .SVn>i,i 

TO KAO — Apple Computer Inc.’s 
persona) digital assistant, the Newton, did 
not exactly catch on with American busi- 
nessmen. Maybe the company should 
have focused on Japanese girls instead. 

Hand-held electronic organizers de- 
signed for children are beginning to 
catch on in the United States. But in 
Japan, they are all the rage among pre- 
leenage girls, and they are being snapped 
up us Christmas presents this year. 

Prices range from $30 to more than 
$200 for the devices, which are made by 
Casio Computer Co.. Sharp Corp.. Sega 
Enterprises Co. and to> makers >uch as 
Takara Co. and Bandiaj Co. 

Casio expects to sell 500,000 children’s 
organizers and 500,000 adult organizers 
in Japan this financial year. 

Die company predicts total industry 
sales of children's organizers in Japan 
will reach 1.2 million this year, compared 
with 800.000 last year and 400,000 in 
1992. Takara introduced the first chil- 
dren’s organizer in 1991. 

The petite digital assistants include 
many of the same functions as the adult 
versions, such as appointment calendars 
and phone directories. 

Bui they also offer games such as for- 
tune-telling and computer-animated 
“virtual pels” for the many children who 
live in apartments that prohibit animals. 
In a digital version of whispering, some 
of the devices can transmit short mes- 
sages to another device across the room 
via infrared light beams. 

At least one top-of-th e-line model also 
can store short diary entries — encrypted 
to keep them from being read by parents 


or anyone who does not know the code. 

Analysts say the products present a 
good example of bow to make electronics 
appeal to children, something that is in- 
creasingly important as the personal 
computer becomes a family appliance. 

It is a lesson some American compa- 
nies are eager to leant. Last week, for 
instance. Apple turned to Bandai, the 
Japanese toy company known for its 
popular Mighty Morphin Power Ranger 
characters, to make and sell a multime- 
dia game machine that would be a sim- 
plified version of the Apple Macintosh 
personal computers. 

The children’s organizers, with related 
children's word processors and new ma- 


The devices allow 
children to keep 'virtual 
pets,' send messages by 
infrared si gnals and make 
encrypted diary entries. 


chines that print adhesive stickers, are 
also rare examples of electronic products 
that appeal primarily to girls, who have 
generally shown less interest than boys in 
persona] computers and video games. 

Before such products were developed, 
magazine polls found that electronic or- 
ganizers were among the products most 
desired by such girls, perhaps because 
they saw their parents using them. 

The gender preferences vrerc evident 
at the Sogo Department Store in Yoko- 


hama. which was filled with Christmas 
shoppers on a recent day. 

A crowd of boys waited in line to try 
out the newest video game machines 
from Sega and Sony Corp. But a few feet 
away, an equally big crowd, almost all 
girls, gathered around a counter display- 
ing a variety of electronic organizers. 

So far. few such models have been 
offered for sale outside Japan, as the 
Japanese companies dial pioneered the 
concept have been concentrating on sup- 
plying their own market first. 

Casio Computer Co., probably the 
leader in the children's organizer market, 
began selling one such product in the 
United States last year and is offering 
three this yeai 

They range from the relatively simple 
My Magic Diary, with a list price of $40, 
to the $80 Secret Sender 6000, which 
allows for infrared transmission of mes- 
sages over a distance of 25 feet (8 meters) 
and can be used as a remote control for 
the television set or videocassette record- 
er as well. 

C asio expects to sell 600.000 children’s 
organizers in the United States this year. 
Sega and Tiger Electronics Inc., based in 
Chicago, have similar devices in the 
American market this year. 

■ Japan’s PC Market Picks Up 

After three sluggish years. Japan's per- 
sonal computer market expanded 30 per- 
cent this year and will continue to grow 
rapidly. The Associated Press reported, 
quoting a private research company. 

Dataquest Japan credited the combi- 
nation of low prices and the spread of the 
IBM-compatible standard for this year’s 
growth. 


Sega to Make Saturn Video-Game Machine Abroad 


Bloomberg Business News 

TOKYO — Sega Enterprises Co. said 
Thursday it would have its new video- 
game machine, the Saturn, manufactured 
elsewhere in Aria starting next year to cut 
costs and battle increased competition. 

A spokesman for Japan's second-larg- 
est maker of video games said the com- 
pany had not decided on a manufacturer 
yet but that a “major Taiwanese comput- 
er maker” was the most likely choice. 

The Saturn is now made in Japan by 
Hitachi Ltd- A Japanese newspaper. 


Nikkan Kogyo. said a Hitachi unit in 
Taiwan was also being considered for the 
manufacturing contracL 

A Hitachi spokesman declined to 
comment, saying the company had not 
heard from Sega about the plan to move 
production overseas. He declined to dis- 
close the value of the current contract or 
how many units Hiiachi produces. 

By shifting production overseas, Sega 
hopes to cut costs enough to make it an 
even stronger competitor in the $15 bil- 
lion world market for video games. The 


competition is intense everywhere, espe- 
cially in Japan. 

Sega said it had been discussing mov- 
ing production of the game player over- 
seas for some time. 

In November, Sega reported a 43 per- 
cent decline in current profit for the six 
months ended Sept. 30. 

Separately, Agence France- Presse re- 
ported that Sega said it had asked die 
British government to drop plans to ex- 
tend gaming duties to commercial 
amusement machines. 


1— -• — 1 

! Investor’s Asia SI 

Hong Kong 
Hang Seng 

Singapore Tokyo 

Straits Times Nikkei 225 


1KD0 

2400 : i 

M. 2201,0 ' 


1Q0 “ A* 

2330 



9000 


hi 




■ H. « 

run - • 

Hi/ 

7500 j AS ON O M JA SO N D JJTS ON D 

T9S4 1994 199* 

Exchange 

Index 

Thursday 

Close 

Prev. 

Close 

% 

Change 

Hong Kong 

Hang Seng 

&41ZS6 

8,331-56 

+0.97 

Singapore 

Straits Times 

2£19£8 

2217.48 

+0.10 

Sydney 

AO Ordinaries 

1,908.20 

1,90530 

+0.14 

Tokyo 

Nickel 225 . 

19.63&53 

19,340.67 

+J.51 

1 Kuala Lumpur Composite 

9904 

982.17 

+1.24 

Bangkok 

SET 

1,36440 

1,36528 

-0.U7 

Seoul 

Composite Stock 

1,04020 

1.028.85 

+1.30 

Taipei 

Weighted Price 

4S6S.G8 

7.010.60 

-0.64 

Manila 

PSE 

2#stm . 

2.79059 

*0 JSQ 

Jakarta 

Stock Index 

46029- 

466.40 

+0.62 

New Zealand 

NZSE-4Q 

1,911.05 

1,938.27 

-1.40 

Bombay 

Nattonai Index 

1,85079 

i ,862.38 

-0.19 


Sources: Reuters, AFP 


buvnuiic<ful HcrahJ I rihuiw 


Very briefly: 


• Wbedock & Co.’s consolidated profit attributable to sharehold- 
ers during the six months to September rose 13 percent, to 1.06 
tuitio n Hong Kong dollars ($137 million), with its Wharf (Hold- 
ings) 1^1 property unit contributing 66 percent of the totaL 

• Japanese companies gave their workers raises averaging 3.0 
percent in 1994, the smallest increase in 25 years, the Labor 
Ministry said. 

• ftmwf omo Construction Co. will close its U.S. subsidiary at the 
end of January and Tokyo Construction Co. will close its unit in 
Hawaii at the end erf the month because of unprofitable results. 

• Heavy Industries Corporation of Malaysia BhtL has asked Deut- 
sche Aerospace AG to help Malaysia’s entry into the satellite 
component industry. 

• Japan’s leading economic index stood at 50.0 points in October, 
down from a revised 58.3 points the previous month, the Econom- 
ic Planning .Agency said. 

• Electronic industries Association of Japan predicted that elec- 
tronics production in the country would expand by 22 percent 
next year. 

• BTR Nylex Ltd. said it would buy FM Holdings Inc_ the U.S.- 

based parent of Formica Coqx, for 800 million Australian dollars 
(S621 million). Af AFp 


Thai Airways Profit Triples 
Amid Rise in Passengers 


Compiled by Ovr Staff From Dtspmrha 

BANGKOK — Thai Air- 
ways International Ltd. said 
Wednesday ilsprofit more than 
tripled in its financial year to 
Sept. 30 because of an increase 
in passenger traffic and greater 
efficiency. 

The airline earned 3.12 bil- 
lion baht ($124 million) in the 
year, up from 1.02 billion baht 
in the previous year. The airline 
did not break out fourth-quar- 
ter figures. 

“These are surprisingly good 
numbers,” said Narongsak Pkjd- 
mwrhai^ an analyst at Dhana 
Siam Finance & Securities. 

The airline credited increased 
efficiency and a 13 percent rise 
in passengers, to 1 1.5 million, in 
the year. “I think the airline is 
running a tighter shipthanks to 
restructuring,” said Tbanmoon 
Wanglee, who just completed 
his first year as president of 
Thai Airways. 


The airline’s overall load fac- 
tor, the measure of average 
plane occupancy in terms of 
passengers and cargo, was 69.2 
percent for the year, up from 
65.6 percent the previous year. 

But some analysts wanted 
that the airline's load factor 
could decrease because it added 
three Airbus A-330s to its fleet 
this month and three more are 
scheduled for delivery next 
year. Each Airbus costs about 
$110 million and seats about 
350 passengers. 

“Capacity is growing faster 
than p asseng er demand,” said 
Gerard Kruithof, research man- 
ager for Peregrine Nithi Fi- 
nance & Securities. He predict- 
ed the carrier's net profit would 
fall to 25 billion baht in 1995. 

Amaret SSla-on. who was re- 
cently named chairman of the 

airline, said the carrier's first 
priority next year would be 
safety rather than financial per- 
formance. (Bloomberg Reuters) 


Moody’s to Review Guangdong’s Rating 


Bloomberg Business News 

NJG KONG — Moody’s Investors 
5 Inc. said Thursday it was reviewing 
og on bonds from two publicly con- 

corupanics in Guangdong Province, 
in “apparent weakening” in central 
men t support. 

idYs said it would be looking at the 
of Guangdong International Trust 
stment Corp. and Guangdong fin- 
es* both controlled by the govern- 
f China’s most prosperous province, 

bow Ihey fared mdo- thc cmmtrys 
i: AlAnt, mmorations and local 


gSkd the omttr. 

JSL* record of wtat they wfll do 
new authority. 

se of its location next to Hong 

Guangdong’s economc progress 
)acc d that of most other Chinese 


provinces to 
Shanghai, 


The two companies have a total of $700 
million of long-term debt outstanding. 
Guangdong International Trust’s debt is 
rated Baal, and Guangdong Enterprises’ 
raring is Baa3, just one level above specula- 
tive grade. 

t is the only one of China’s 23 
credit ratings, although 
long and Jiangsu 
are strong possanmies for future credit 
ratings, Mr. Taran said. 

The credit review process does not nec- 
essarily mean the debt will be downgraded. 

Last week. Standard & Poor’s Corp. 
criticized what it called China’s “capri- 
cious behavior,” saying that recent cases 
involving bad debts and the breaking of a 
contract with McDonald’s Corp. could 
As* magi* its credit ratings. 

T-ehman Brothers has filed two lawsuits 
in New York seeking to recover nearly 
$100 milK on in debts owed by Chinese 
trading companies. 

An executive of Guangdong Enterprises’ 
Hong Kong office said that “from the per- 
spective of mark et reforms, it can be argued 
that the relationship of central government 
and local government is not so strong.” 


International said it would 
review me Moody’s announcement before 
making a comment. The company is one of 
China’s largest regional channels for for- 
eign investment It has raised $4 billion in 
foreign investment in the last 14 years, 
including, bonds, syndicated loans and ex- 
port crediis. 

m McDonald’s Site Dispate Goes On 

A Hong Kong company that wants to 
build on the site of a McDonald’s restau- 
rant in Bering denied it had stepped work 
on the project or that the project lacked 
approval. The Associated Press reported. 

Cheung Kong (Holdings) Ltd., the flag- 
ship of Hong Kong billionaire Ii Ka- 
shmg, said instead it was seeking to expand 
its planned $1.2 billion commercial com- 
plex on Wangfqjing Street, Beijing’s busi- 
est shopping district 

Beijing officials told McDonald’s in No- 
vember to vacate its two-stoiy restaurant 
on Wangfnjing — the worldwide fast-food 
chain’s largest outlet — to make way for 
the OrientaLHaza commercial complex. 

McDonald’s said it had a lease on the 
site and insisted on talks with city officials. 


CURRENCY AND CAPITAL MARKET SERMCES 


^ C A DFV 


SFA & IPE 
MEMBER 


FUTURES LIMITED 

* 24 Hour margin based foreign exchange dealing 

* Fast competitive rates with a personalised service 

* Catering only to professional investors. Fund managers 
and institutions, for theii speculative & hedging needs 

* Up to date market information and technical analysis 

* Full futures brokerage in all major markets 

33 Cavendish Square London W1 

Reiners Dealing: SABX. Reiners Monitor SABY/Z (4- Daily fax.) 



MHY FAX SBtVm fer 38 frkni • ftaSon fcado wuh specific ’mfeWoari/riaps. 

ProM m pea 6 mocAi exceedi $100,000, * 0*0 «» oarteod far ■onaigndL 
iacribe for ZmanllBfcr USS 2J0ft or 6 mondu lorUSS 6,50$ or I yarior S12JXX 


TeL: (071) 412 0001 Fax: (071) 412 0003 j 

s Phase eaO for further information. | 


tadUAm G c &oovpo?& 

Capital Management 

** LI H IT ID 7 * 

Kn9MP, Bahamas 

***** 

JRmmOe P) (809)39.43284 
SM»nc fl) (309) 3*38777 

$32,81 7.04 

NET REALIZED raCffnS 

PER SKWU) UNDER MANAGBMBNr 

June 27, 1994 through October 31, 1994 


Sufaicribe far ^ manlhi Lr USS ZSOO; or 6 monAi brUSS 6 J0Q; o' 1 year tor S 1 Z000 

’ NOTE: EACH HAS WU MOtET-SAOC GUMUfflE. Wa m set aA\ cb nofnro™ infebqMcrfxu 
I ACCOUNTS bmmm USS35jOCCt at about CUSTOM PROdUMS^ VD0R 
Cal 305-251-6762 or BOO-392-2664 - Fajc305-254-3272 
LIMITED AVAHABOITY AO NOW1I _ 


SucnUiI CoOiai Oran, Lf 

Keystone 

UOS-MwaakFIni 

OfcapxniMtttHU 


800 - 967-4879 

312 - 207-0117 


US Commodty Etttmgn 


FaMhMHiOlM 
Kama In PluFMt 


M 


Currency Management Corporation Plc 
II Old Jewry - London EC2R 8DU 
TeLr 071-865 0800 Fwc 07J-972 0970 


MARGIN FOREIGN EXCHANGE 


24 Hour London Dealing Desk 
Competitive Rates & Dally Fax Sheet 
Call for further information & brochure 


For further details on bone to place your listing contact WILL NICHOLSON in London 
let. (44J 71 8364802-Fax: (44) 71 2402254 

ItmlhS&ribune 



ry you’re visiting, end you’ll reach an English-speaking Sprint Operator - at no extra charge. It s that easy. 


A SIMPLE 

CURE FOR THE FEAR OF 
FOREION phones. 



COUNT1UE5 

ACCESS NUMBERS 

COUNTRIES 

ACCESS 

COUNTSES 

ACCESS NUMBERS 

COUNTRIES 

ACCESS NUME 

Amaricon Sanaa 

633-1000 

Cyprus SU 

080-900-01 

Nand + 

V-BOO-S 5-2001 


02-171 

Antique 

« 

CamS tapuUk+J 

0042-067-1X7 

mat 

177-102-2727 

Norway + 

80049877 


I-800-36C-4663 

Demuuifc + 

■00.1.0877 

Ml + 

172-1877 

Panama 

IIS 


00.1-800-777.1 Hi 

Dumlnimu lipubfeA 

1- *00-731-7877 

Kaaota - 

1-800-877-8000 

PorvS 

196 

AraonJn 

t-lO-IM 

Eawfcr/ 

171 

Japan «>q + 

0066-56-877 

WiBlpplao* (HW Mu ■ Ml O 

105-01 

AvCDoSa fOpfcfej + 



356-4777 

Jap«i>rD: 

0039- V 

PMBppnoi [PbaCoa) A 

102-611 

AaMraBa + 

1-SOO-U1-S77 


03-356-4777 

lOnrya . 

OBOO-.i 

PWUppinB* (PUJTJ 

105-16 

AinMaM 

072-903- OM 

D 5alwo€lai' *• 

191 

Xaiwa (Boon t 

0039-13 

Poland + 

00106+00-115 

Bahama* 

1.800^89-2111 

F3 Wondi 

004-8 90- >00-3 

*»•» [41, 

009-16 

Portugal + 

05017-1-877 

Mwah 

eoo 7-n 

Hnland + 

9800-1.0284 

•Ui.ai; 

800--;; 

Pvurtoftica - 

1-800+77-8000 

taWni 

I- 800- 177- 8000 

Fnmu 

19+0067 . 

UKhlrf^hii 

155-777, 

Romania +■ 

01-800-0877 

Wghm + 

080O-IO0M 

Oannany T 

01304013 

UkwdD 7 

8+W7 


155-6133 

Imtite/ 

1^00^3^877 

Oraaca + 

006.00U4I1 

Luumfaauig 

OBOO-Oi 15 

Euuia (slnitoi) +■ 

809S4SS+I33 

lefas 

0800-3333 

Guam 

990.136* 

haeaoo 

0800-121 


235-0333 

■nxzU 

000^016 

GuaMmola + 

195 

Mahytia + 

8000016 

SdpmnWHailHIta 

1-23541331 

BfBMiVfaflinManrft.S 

1-800-877.8000 

Humkioi 

V3) 

Mr-ic + 

95-800-87? -8000 

Son Marino* 

172-1877 

Bulgaria A 

00-800-1010 

Hanfl K»s 

300-1877 


19+0081 

Soijcfc Arnbla 

1600 15 

Canada- 

VSO&d77-B060 

Hoag Ko«g3 

0)1 

NnOwitaarf* 

06 +022-91 19 

SiigapMu * 

BOOO-r-7-17* 

euk. 

0040317 

Mrngary +/ 

OO+SOCMH.877 

NclturlunA 


Saab Africa'*- 

(,.*00-99-000! 

CUmV 

108-13 

kaland +■ ' 

999-003 

Kuaailaauj + 

001400-745-1111 

Spain 

900+94MH3 

CotamUa 

990-130-010 

Mat 

000437 

Tmlanil (1. M «mrra«.| 6 


Mm* 

0204994)11 

Cam Elea T 

163 

hriennh Mnaj 

001-801 -t5 

»h.ZMAn) 

000-999 

5wborion4 4- 

155-9777 

Ciwh^ 

99340043 

Moat-sir 

3M -Mi-15 

Virarague - 


Sj.lc “ 

.N 1 ' 


COUNTRIES 


ACCESS NUMBERS 


Taiwan c 
ThoBandS 
Turkay + 

UA Vasin hkuxb — 
IL&A- “ 

Ultra la* 

Orbed Arab EnWioMf + 
UnM Kingdom PO) 

I Kingdom Pun 


001-999-13477 


VHDJ174000 

uoa-tTMon 

9-100*15 

800-131 

0500*94877 


VoKamCBy + 
Venezuela 


172-1877 

800-1111-0 



Sprint, . 


To order q free FQNCARD 
CALL COLLECT TO THE U.S. 
402-390-9083 


Ctrl tart. h/UifJc.k 

oabflflbiify. A I _ 
iwmnalJCfl only. ♦♦ 


,• .-A* (i icanl., U-cimc, waiting wudbftlt .lUuQ -Jtl m: Io dwngt fa. mbtiuiol «v*bo'. :i S* 

SCi ullBM oolv Use Global Calling ~S)\ " MbaC & PW Global Calling iokr. appi*. ♦ Woil ta «and Ichu + Publk 
r.nmpgy phonos push led bodoo, - jwII bf tone. Ihon del *02*.* O AmJobtaariyhM deflected ttoesm pa> phones 


H TCe d> ■! t.k jfjfiii. AlCv:: r-iwnbnr of llv '.bur.1:, /wU 
pboo*s lOT, Itjifju? coin oi taid / Area table o' i«ca 
n local or w-couMry taBg-dakaco Parpen nay apply. 


j. fahO- ed-i- DiiOt* nliifc m i he US Bold denotes country-to-country calf 
l*vmi. A I tei available lino pay phones ~ FOnCaSO bAI'afe Col lea call I 
o osoUnme Horn dedicated phonos « majoi anpotis and holds. £)I994 Spi 






Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1994 


U.S. Agency Shielded Aides in Harassment Cases 


By Stephen Engelberg 
and Deborah Sontag 

.Vfw- Yuri. Tima Strmr 

WASHINGTON — The ha- 
rassmenl of Ginger Kramer be- 
gan shortly after she took a job 
as an automation clerk in the 
Livermore. California, office of 
the Border PatroL In a sworn 
statement to investigators, she 
said that her boss. J. William 
Carter, crudely invited her to 
have sex on his office couch. 
She pushed him away as he 
tried to embrace her. she said. 

A few weeks later. Mr. Carter 
ordered Ms. Kramer to deliver 
his newly laminated identifica- 
tion card to his office, she told 
investigators. He grabbed her 
again, and this time forced his 
tongue into her mouth, peered 
down her blouse; and declared 
that he would not lei go until 
she “did it right." 


Mr. Carter denied the 
charges. But the Immigration 
and Naturalization Service con- 
cluded in 1990 that there was 
**no question” that Ms. Kramer 
had been sexually harassed. 

And the Justice Department, 
finding that Mr. Carter had en- 
gaged in “highly unprofessional 
conduct with Ms. Kramer and 
other female employees,” urged 
the agency to punish him or 
remove him from the manageri- 
al ranks. ' 

Even so. the agency balked at 
taking any disciplinary action 
against Mr. Carter until last 
year, when they suspended him 
for three days. Today, he is the 
second highest ranking official 
in the Border Patrol. 

Mr. Carter’s case illustrates 
what many immigration offi- 
cers see as the agency’s historic 
failure to hold its managers ac- 


countable for egregious wrong- 
doing. They sav a “good old 
boys dub" has often protected 
people like Mr, Carter, the third 
generation of his family to serve 
m the Border Patrol. Cynics 
within the agency sum up its 
personnel practices with the 
motto: “Screw up — move up.“ 

"There is a philosophy 
among the top-ranked manag- 
ers that you can’t touch top 
management.” said James 
Dorcy. the agency’s chief inter- 
nal investigator from 1980 to 
1990. “For some reason, they 
seem to think it would bring 
down the whole damn agency if 
you messed with a certain level 
of person.” 

Immigration officials say 
that the handling of misconduct 
cases over the years has eroded 
morale at one of the govern- 
ment’s most troubled agencies. 


Richard J. Hankinson, the in- 
spector-general at the Justice 
Department from 1990 to 1994. 
told Congress last year that the 
agency's “happenstance” sys- 
tem for imposing punishmenL 
had taken its toll, encouraging 
corruption and poor perfor- 
mance. 

The immigration service, in a 
statement, acknowledged that it 
had “an admittedly checkered 
record” in disciplining its em- 
ployees. But officials insisted 
that Doris M. Meissner, who 
became INS commissioner a 
year ago. is cracking down on 
"officials who deserve to be dis- 
ciplined by establishing an Of- 
fice of Internal Audit. 

And in October, they say. the 
agency be°an doing back- 
ground checks on ail job appli- 
cants for top managerial posi- 
tions. 


Family’s Plight Melts City 

Washington Couple’s Two Children Have 


Hard Heart 


_ . fri en d because there's nothing you can 

By Phil McCombs There’s no program to fix this. 

P*"t same i in nn 11 Dek Potts is a 36 -vear-old. 

WASHINGTON - "Good morn- up^on . commerciaJ ^ estate 
ing.” says Ramon Casso w-ilh a warm a swarm <>f file folders on the 

smile, opening the door of the big down- , a v 0 f ^ Wall Street Jour- 

town office building for a woman. They desk* He ^ nows what it’s like 

exchange pleasantries as she breezes by. inl0 vou r own little space and 

Then, as if remembering something, she t J ..8. Q ' n t0 make your way 

slows and turns to the doorman. • Fhrouah the dav." 

“How are you and your family to- tnr ?V . ' oupie 0 f little ones at 

day?’’ she asks in a tone lhat says she But ms go ^ ■ 

really wants to know. . “Somethin* like this makes you step 

“I’ve got a lot of people praying for S q fortunate many of 

us.’’ Mr. Casso relies. Hfssmde fades to to live a nightmare.” he 

gentle sadness. Thank you. “ ^ human spirit is remarkable. 

’£*£ Softer, you donVs.op to help .he guy 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


TQPA YIS 

HOLIDAYS 
& TRAVEL 
SECTION 

Appears 
on Page 8 


PERSONALS 


MAY nc SACRED HEART OF JESUS 
be odored, gonfied, lowed end pr»; 
served ifiou?iou» me worfcL nan fi 
iorewr. Sacred Hurt of Jean, pray 
for us. Sail* Jude, warier of mirodK. 
pay for in. Sdrt Jude, Wper of we 
hopeless. pray for us Soy ns prop* 
rme femv a day. by we iwnlh day 

KTsr*Jviricu>: 

mud be promised. A.V. 


announcements 


Attention visitors 
from the U.S. I 


MOVING 


^INTERDEAN 

FOR A F8S BTIMATE CAli 

PARIS (1) 39201400 


If you enjoy reading the IHT 
when you travel, why not 
also get it af home ? 
Same-day delivery available 
in key U.S. cities. 

GJ (1) 800 882 2884 

It iSwViA 212 752 3890) 

ftrralh^jftbJEnbunf 


MW YEAR'S EVE DMMR CHRSE 

on die MS INTfNS. n Pore. Enter- 
lamer*, dtnanaM menu wrti «Mt 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 



BUSINESS SERVICES \ CAPITAL AVAILABLE 


hmsavarabie 

FOR 

ALL BUSINESS PROJECTS 
OR FO R 

LETTERS OF CK HXT 
BANC GUARANTEES 
One ACCEPTABLE COLLATERAL 

Brofer's commoBW flurwwdced 

Hwiwi M-LP-KJ. A c» 

THEX 20277 



surthagssj CSeck or rota 
for any couetnesand 89* how 
you or flwt saving today. 

Cafl us now and well 
cal you right badd 

Td 1-206*284-8600 
Fax 1-206-282-6666 

Lina open 24 fan. 
Agents mpuries wokomd 


COLLEGES & 
UNIVERSITIES 


COMPANE5 £195 

Idcd hm-avodm* veWffc 
low profile, kx free & Euopeaa Sat- 
dile far tracing, e o nwtoicy & other 
adnitM. For e uu ed u le service contort 

Dhftn Morpny, unowi 
CooMmiy Swim. 56 RhwaBan 
Sqm, 2. frakmcL 

Tut +353 I 6618490 Fax 6618493 


419 Second Avenue Weil 
Seattle. WA 98119 USA 


LEGAL SERVICES 


^° < 5dS^fi± R, LondS DIVORCE IN I DAY. No trawl. Wr**. 

***** 81748^ EJajRCjas* 


BUSINESS TRAVEL 


UNRESTRICTED lit/BUSTNESS 
trawL Impend Conada - trawl can- 
su&anis whose expertise has aeded 
amaong savings ft r our WORLDWIDE 
dientele Far Free coredtab oft 
Trt 514-341-7227 Fax.- 514-3417996. 
E-Mail — WSCAMCGULCA 


International 

Herald Tribtuc 
ads work 


[l a iM.WV « h a ;Vi l* 


HJMHNG PROBLEMS? 

Venture CopW - Equity Loom 
Red tucee - Business 
FWiorang- tong Term 
CcAahnd SupportetTGuanrteia 
BorAc** uanoftes to secure tuning 
for viable projects arranged byrs 

BANCOR OF ASIA 

Cameron earned oidy upon Funting. 
Broker's ConmsBon Assured. 

Fax (63-2) 810-9284 
Td: (63-2] 894-5358 
or 810-2570 




YOUR OWE M LONDON 
Bond Street - Med. Phone. Fret We* 
Trt 44 71 499 9172 Fa* 71 499 7517 


AUTO RENTALS 


ROT FROM DBtGJAl/rO 
WEEXEMi FF 515 
SPEOAt OFFER • 7 DATS: FF 1.400 
PARS TEL: (1) 45 87 27 04 


gentle sadness. “Thank you.” 

Mr. Casso, 44. and his wife. Maritza. 
30. learned in September that their 8- 
year-old son. Juan, has ALD. or adreno- 
leukodystrophy. the rare and often fatal 
metabolic disease portrayed in the movie 
“Lorenzo’s Oil." Since then, ihe boy has 
gone blind and is beginning to lose his 
hearing. If the disease, which is inherited, 
continues as doctors expect, this will be 
followed by loss of his menial faculties, 
paralysis and an early death. There is no 
cure. 

In October, doctors confirmed the 
couple's worst fears: Their 1 -year-old. 
Jose, also has ALD. He could begin 
developing symptoms when he is 4. 

“When I called my wife and told her." 
Mr. Casso says, “she just screamed: 
‘Why the baby, God? Why the baby?’ ” 

People in the Brawner Building, in the 
northwest section of Washington, where 
Mr. Casso has worked for four years, 
have been deeply affected They are 
amazed he can bear misfortune so well, 
showing up for work, friendly and help- 
ful. 

The building's 30 corporate tenants, 
comprising roughly 300 souls, have 
chipped in $9,000 to help pay Tor the sick 
boys' medication and special diets, 
which cost hundreds of dollars a month. 
People drop off checks at the Brawner 
office or hand them directly to Mr. Casso 
as thev stream through the door past the 
gaily decorated Christmas tree with their 
cups of coffee and briefcases in hand. 
Often he greets them by name. Often 
they stop and talk. 

“ Ramon’s been kind of a beacon down 
at that front door. He doesn’t cany his 
burden on his shoulder.” says Carlene 
Owen, a grandmother who is’ the recep- 
tionist at Flather & Perkins Inc., fine art 
insurers. “The whole building has been 
kind of brought together as a family, if 
that makes any sense.” 

Debbie Walsh is retiring after 12 years 
with Waters Travel. “It’s just unfair." she 
says. “You can’t pick up the phone and 
ask someone to do anything for our 


Jose, 1 , and Juan, 8 , 
have an incurable 
metabolic disease 
portrayed in the movie 
"Lorenzo’s Oil.” 

on the side of the road, or you don t even 
stop to say hello to someone. But when 
you do. it can turn out to be a great 

thing.” . , 

Though Juan takes 30 milligrams daily 
of the costly Lorenzo’s Oil. Mr. Casso 
and his wife have been told their son s 
illness was probably discovered too late 
for the medication to slow his deteriora- 
tion. Their insurance does not cover the 
oil, a mixture of fatty adds named for 
ALD sufferer Lorenzo Odone. because it 
is still being studied by the Food and 
Drug Administration to determine its 
effectiveness. 

The Casso boys’ doctors at the Kenne- 
dy Krieger Insdtute in Baltimore, how- 
ever. say both will soon be enrolled in an 
experimental government-funded pro- 
gram that will pay for their medication. 

Brawner’s vice president. Michael 
Lowe, wrote in a recent company circu- 
lar that the support his tenants have 
shown for the Cassos “confirms that 
even in this day and age of violence and 
distrust, deep within all of us lies a caring 
person." 

Mr. Lowe. 38. calls himself the office 
tough guy — actually, he uses a more 
colorful word — but when talking about 
Mr. Casso. his eyes get glassy. 

“I used to work till 10 every nighL” he 
admits, “and I don’t want to work that 
late anymore. You want to spend a little 
bit more time with your children, enjoy 
what you have. When you see Ramon 
and what he's going through, you hug 
’em one extra lime.” 


■The man is like a family 10 . 

Casso savs. “Since I mei him m l 991. 
Always been there -m everything. . 
Maybe^ it lakes a tough man to run a . 

leI Ramon'casso arrived in the United 

r^rbii^iiSinoS 

fhosegreat family sagas of imnupaudH 

■ upon ^h historical nwels and ^itl> . 

sonian exhibits are. based. He 

fleeing the upheavals ui h' s homeland . 
.with his sisters _ to join his paren^jn. * 

^TTie^dder Casso. a butcher by " 
was happy to .find work domg ;■ 
setups at a hotel: Ramon attended -Mg?- , 
coin Junior High and also worked nights ; ; 
at the hotel. His mother was a cleaning, 
woman. When he was \1. the - fargjx; 
moved to Boston, where he firuslga. 

school and became a 
father died, the family drifted ..back 
south, and now his SI -year-old mother 
lives in Silver Spring, Maryland: at 
hub of her large family. 

Ramon and Martiza live with ffiar 
sons in a rented apartment They mef-ur. 
1989 when he made an emergent^ rankly ■ 
visit to Santo Domingo. It was loye'at 
first sight. They began a commuter mar- 
riage as Ramon, who had become a 
citizen, struggled to bring his wife- 
her young son Juan , to America. . , 

In October 1993, after intervention 
Representative Connie Morelia. Repub- 
lican of Maryland, Maritza arrived m 
Washington veiy pregnant with Jose. it. 
took half a year to get young Juan 
cleared, and he arrived on June J. r. 

Mr. Casso remembers how Juan 
sprinted across the crowded ai.rport.lpb-; 
by and leapt into his arms. At last all- 
four members of the little family.. wer®: 

together. ' V - . 

Three weeks later, the boys uncle 
tossed him a soccer ball and it went right 
past . . '••• 

He hadn't seen it. 

Mr. Casso opens the apartment door 
in shirtsleeves, cradling little Jose in the 
crook of his arm. - 

Inside, Juan is smiling shyly and cling- 
ing to his mother. 

“My name is Juan Casso,” Juan says .' 
in English, giggling proudly at his ac- , 
complishment. . ' 

Then he dings to his mother again. His 
movements are awkward. 

Juan’s biggest disappointment about 
losing his vision, his father says, .is that ; 
he will not get to see snow. When the boy . 
arrived, he had never- experienced 'a 
northern winter and was thrilled at the 
prospect. So he prays to see snow.- ' - 
Just a little bit 


n 

C’>‘ ^ 4* it ' f. # ' ' ' 

' ««* 

i 4 . ' ; 

: ** 

■■ # m 

fig*.;'. 4 

i *3 j 

- 4 -I’Wre 


r - r ^ 


REAL ESTATE MARKETPLACE 



REAL ESTATE 
SERVICES 


EXPERIENCED REAL ESTATE 
Monogement Co. m PWoddf#iofor 
nooTtsdent owners, experi mootfe- 
nonce and repax fatfes. M. Alperin 
TeL- 2154844600 FAX: 2156840158 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


EGYPT 


HKH CLASS RAT M CAIRO. *rtewi 
river Ffle, Coxa Opera, 5 own from 
ofy center. Aim ran and Brrtnh em- 
bm Amenaxi IWwsty, ne*» to 
die Semrarns MerconXnertd Hold. 
S1Z50.000. Coniod Sedky in Para, 
Office 14700992 Home: 1-47364191 
m Egypt (202) 2910240 or 3540952 







Yow 56«So or Apartment .. 

- -.'-•INIWBf — 

For 1 dor, 1 ww* w nwre 
A -4*“qudByc*3* ,l “ pncei 
OTAWB HAUSSMAWI 
129-131 Bd Ho uw um 
75008 PARIS 
Td m 517707X9. Fax fl) 4563X664 
A& abort oar saead retfatoa 


j* about oars 
for HmuUTr 


t reductions 
raaderz 






SBH 






\ >.(* : ■ 




■iP> L 


Lv 1 ' 

n‘iTlW 1 ' , ' , irFT 

Iff* 



PRMOPAUTY OF MONACO 

DUREX apartnert *i a Katvma 
buldng, writi mdaar twinxnng pool, 
rear the Craws, 326 lfrnyweHoofang 
itv Fort ond me Sea, 

Lovdy terrace. Garage. 


166 - RAN BAGH GA RDOT 

in very high ckm huAfina 95 wot.- 
Ewna Sbedroomt 4th floor, ft. 
Tab (1) 42 81 50 33 


USA RESIDENTIAL 


NYC/56 9. Wed -Gty-Spn 10 ROOMS 

SENSATIONAL CQMX) 
WITH WRAP THKACE 

NewenAnive. 5pedaaAx space invde 
& out. 1000 iq n wap terrace. Open 
views tram every room. One af a kind 
m Oty Spre. 

MARIE HANCO 
21 2-89) -7083/ Fat: 212-891-7239 

DOUGLAS HUMAN 


Uj, 


»Te V*,, I ,, r »' • ' ■ 1 iT* 




PARK 




Lb Peril Paiace 
25 Avenue de loCccta 
MC 98000 MontoCarlo 
Td: 93 25 15 00. Feet 93 25 35 33 


MONTE CAKIO 

REBDBVnt AREA Spaaaa 5room 
apcrtmitin perfect condaon. 

200 iam Sea view, odbr J parting 
space. F6j00,000. (Hm 

AAGEDI 

//?, Bd da Moutm. MC9SOOO Monaco 
Td 33-92 Id 59 59 fax SO 1942 





CAPHAIE • PAfnrtiB 
Handpided quoBy op atm enh, 
c41 iin P«xu and suburbs. 

Td 1-4614 821 1. Fax 1-4772 3096 


PARIS AREA 


SSEEIISl 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


FRENCH RIVIERA 


Take advantage of this new level of luxury 
currently under construction. 

Portofino Tower- a 44 story landmark in the 
South Beach skyline, features spectacular, 
multilevel mansions in the sky. Priced from 
5250,000 to $3,500,000. 

404 Washington- 55,000 sq. fr., of office 
and retail space, combining vintage Art Deco 
and modem Southwestern desim, establishes 
a completely new standard for the market. 

The ideal oceanfront lifestyle is only minures 
away from the city's business and finance 
centers, airport and sea port. 

BE A PART OF IT ALL. 

Far leasing, buying or investment 
opportunities call (305) 532-2519. 


Ic has been 35 years since Miami Beach 
offered such an exciting opportunity. 

South Beach has become the world's most 
dynamic location, giving rise to a new level 
nf luxury in living* office and retail space. 





Partofiro Tower, scheduled MiKptetar.ditc, June, IPVA, 


K 

Portofino Tower 



SOTHEBY’S 

IKTLflMAncWU. ROUTT 



Embassy Service 
YOUR REAL ESTATE 
AGENT N PAMS 
Td: (1) 47.20.30.05 


PARIS 

74 CHAAVS B.YSOS 
“OARBGE" 

High dan, ready to use Hols 
ray equipped and fumohed. 

Fbf Rent: by die day, wade or more. 
TeL I-M.113333. (rax 142J50488 




77m GEMS cF me HtBKH 0V8M 

CAPFSRAT 

Siurerag WATBtfSONT Property 
with private harbour wid boat house 
500 sq.ni. haa» in perfect axxStion. 
Indoor pool Beanfd wwj over 
VUefranche Boy. HAM OPPOtiUhSTY 

Cdl: Madaa Barca 93 38 00 66 
or Fax: 93 39 13 65 


E 7 F 


Igggjffigl 




SOUTH BEACH HOBO* 


TO 5 END FOR BROCHURE 
PORTOFINO GROUP 
44b COLLINS AVENUF 
MIAMI BEACH. Ft 111 W USA 

" PORTOFINO TOWFR 


AHPRFS5 
STATE. PROVINCE 
POSTAL ZIPCOOF 


■1 IN WASHINGTON 





Far sale 

{penrmmaa hrfiemgmn *r%M4e} 
orient 

in boil hm h’ fli u . 

1-3 bedraoim aponmerh. 
Karting 5F9 355,000.-. 
AGENCf C S E MATTI 
CH-3780 Gwexl. Switieriord 
Tefc 41 +30/4 3S 25 Fm 4 69 64 


-M l,.,|l fUfP.x.T 1 


KAinfflLSUS-MB 


Fix roof droe d vilas, 3 la 6 
bedrooms overlooking sea, wA 
swimming pod, same nghr on the sea 

19, Bd du General Uderc 
06310 BEAULCUSUB^ER 
Td (33) 9301 M 13. Fax ^930111 96 


HOLLAND 


Are yw looking for fuly/wily 
ItfiHMd quatiy aaommodaMn T 
OM ROTSrVAST 

Anwerdam +31 20 6391149 

The Hague +31 IQ 346 4840 

Rtthrim +3110476 2323 

Sre offcw x» Aft Ndtelmi 


HOTHOUSE MEMAI1QNAL 
No 1 nHotori 
far isem) (unshed houei/ftan. 
Trt 3130-6448751 Fax 31-206465909 
NTwven 19-21, 1083 AM Amsterdam 


G t 0 0 P 


I — I 

ssrisss 


ST. TROPEZ 

■ Luxurious villa with apptox 5000 m parti and gardens, swimming pool and 
lerwK-couit Splendid wew to bay oi Si T roper, very quiei location, only a lew 
minutes ol city and beaches. Auiom jraidcn sprinkling system with ibrec 
independent ground waterwells C*ti. pnvaie rood 

• Sat-TV lor all rooms * bedrooms d li with en-suiie baihrooms. Beautiful 
interior decoration. Large separdie uncsi-house plus two-roomod flat lor 
employees 

PfrM vf«4 *3 u tM'fif pkmir xax.h-1 rr No Svulrcrldnd 41 1-493 10 43 afldW 
41 1-493 12 91 We wB be pleased to >wd you ,i rf,» umcniumn with prewres and Video-Tape 




19M. S3JOO. Fax 
: 212-305*995 USA. 


Mcralb^^Sribunc 

PLANNING TO RUN 
A CLASSIFIED AD? 

UNTTED STATES 

Ells "Sfiaas 

NYAIgWAACBirML wHw»T7212 

OPfc,FranUi»i. He 427 17s 

Bgtegd CHICAGO: 

069] 72 73 10 Tel: (31ZJ 201 -9393 

A4llRajB0URG:Bras!»k 2)^1 -9398. 

34318.99,343-1914. _ W FrecfeoCI] 53S6M 

34WJ353 FlOWDArCrx^Gob^ 

1 CYPRUS: Mwn. l A: 662-561 1. 

gJSgP 6 lOsM: 6627101 

SBBW- 

ft H Mi. 


EUROPE 

RANGE 9K»Pe*n. 

Tel- (M 46 37 93 B5, 
rae 11146 37 93 70 
GatMANr. AUSTRIA & CENRAL 
EUROPE:, FronUixi, 
r«l:jp69f7267 55 
Fx |fi69]72 73 10 
eaCUM&lUXEMUURG: Brauek 
Td: 343 18.99,343-1914 
Fbc 346^053 
6BEECE1 CYPRUS: Mm, 

Td: IXM653H46 
Few 654 55H 
OSMAKCoprakogan, 

Td : 31 42 93 257 ' 
fMAND: Hdiidu, 

U. 35810)647412 
be 4171 1 
ITALY: Mfano, 

W -5831^38 
Far 583 20936 
HIHB8ANDS: Arejladam, 

Td. 31 20.684108a 
Fax 31.206881374 
NORWAY & SWEDEN: 
BmenNpwqjr. 

Td [471 5J 9(3070 
Fax: (47| 55 91 3072 
PORTUGAL Lrtfcon. 

Td: 351-1-457 7293 
Far 351-1-457 7352 

SPABtMorfrid. 

Td 35D8789 
Fsr 35092S7 
swirrauNftpjfkr. 
td. 10211728 Jo 21 
Far (021172830 91 
UMJBJWNGOOMiLxdon. 
W:PT1|836 4TO2 

far P71] 240 2254 
. Ide*-26J009 


CANADA 

Him'?™* 


TORONTO: 

ErB 


MIDDLE EAST 

ASA/PAC3RC 

honokong! 

skS^ ibs '"^ 

]d : 723 6473 
Fk 224 1566. 

-atE-"* 

W.:S^02 10 
Tg 333673. Fr 32 01 Q2 09 





^5- 




■vfS 













































































































































Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1994 


SPORTS 


Again on the Brink, Baseball Players Make New Proposal ^*22^ 

<wr Fnx* Dinardte another extended reach. It’s a significant owners’ negotiating committee to uy to chises would decrease those teams’ incen- whk* iuuJct labcff law i^e_^walrat of 


ers 


Compiled fy Our StoffFmm DapOtAe 

WASHINGTON — Less than 1 1 hours 
before the midnight deadline the owners 
had set for either reaching a settlement on 
contract tal ks or imposing a salary cap, the 
sinking major league oaseball players 
made a new proposal Thursday. 

“We've been working on something the 
last several days,” the head of the players' 
nnin n, Donald Fehr, said at 2 P.M~ about 
30 minutes after negotiations were re- 
sumed. “Wedid present a modified propos- 
al to the owners a few minutes ago. They're 
lookin g at it and will get back to us.” 

The owners had voted on pec, 15 to 
declare a labor impasse and implement 
their salary cap demands unless an agree- 
ment was reached by 12:01 AM. Friday. 
Thursday's meeting was the first formal 
bargaining session since contract talks 
were broken off eight days earlier in Rye 
Brook, New York. 

“We think it addresses their concerns,” 
said David Cone, a pitcher for the Kansas 
City Royals. “We feel like we’ve made 


another extended reach. It’s a significant 
proposal.” 

The federal mediator William J. Usery 
Jr. had spent Tuesday and Wednesday 
morning shuttling between the sides. 

The two sides did not meet at all during 
the day. Each did meet at separate loca- 
tions with Usery — the players three times, 
the owners once — then awaited further 
word from the mediator, who apparently 
was not having a happy 71st birthday. 

“We're doing everything we can to keep 
it going,” he said late Wednesday, “but it’s 
tough.” 

The atmosphere was painfully similar to 
that which existed just before the players 
struck on Aug. 12 and just before Bud 
Selig, the acting commissioner, announced 
on Sept. 14 that die World Series would be 
canceled. 

This had followed a three-hour, one-on - 
one meeting Tuesday night between Fehr 
and Jerry McMorris, owner of the Colora- 
do Rockies, who was designated by the 


owners’ negotiating committee to uy to 
make some progress in the dispute. 

McMorris appeared to have gained no 
more ground than Richard Ravirch, the 
soon-to-be former chid labor executive for 
the clubs, and John Harrington of the 
Boston Red Sox, the chairman of the own- 
ers’ negotiating committee. 

McMorris, too, had tried to sell the 
players on a luxury tax on team payrolls as 
a way of gaining control of salaries and 
labor costs. But, Fehr, speaking afterward, 
said:“This meeting, although mendly on a 
personal level and candid, leads to a can- 
did description of our differences, which 
remain. That's what we talked about” 

Several management sources had said 
they were wilting to compromise on the 
level of a payroll tax. But before address- 
ing that issue, Fehr had said he wanted the 
owners to rework the revenue-sharing 


agreement they came up with in Fort Lau- 
derdale, Florida, last Jan. 18. The union’s 
economists think the subsidies that deal 
would produce for small-market fran- 


chises would decrease those teams’ incen- 
tives to win and lower salaries. 

“It’s difficult because they say Fort Lau- 
derdale is sacrosanct,” Fehr said. 

It took owners a year to reach the reve- 
nue-sharing agreement, and management 
is reluctant to revise the way their teams 
will split the money. 

“They told us it’s complicated and it’s 
tied to Fort Lauderdale and revenue shar- 
ing,” the Philadelphia Phillies' co-general 
partner, Dave Montgomery, said, “we say 
make whatever assumptions you want on 
revenue sharing and make us a proposal on 
a secondary tax.” 

In the only development on the 132d 
day of the strike, the National Labor Rela- 
tions Board formally issued a complaint on 
the union’s unfair labor practice charge 
stemming from the clubs’ failure to make a 
57.8 million payment to the players’ pension 
and benefit plan last Aug. 1. The board 
scheduled a hearing for March 14 before 
an administrative law judge in New York. 

The board’s seven-page complaint. 


which under labor law is the equivalent of 
an indictment, covered two issues, saying 
the owners did not make the payment 
because the players had announced then 
intention to strike and that the failure to 
make the payment served as discrimina- 
tion against the players, who would be 
discouraged from joining the union. 

The board also said the owners “have 
been failing and refusing” to bargain with 
the union in good faith. 


After Tax Talk 


The question of good-faith bargaining 
wiB be at the core of the union’s challenge 


to the owners’ impasse. Darnel Sflvennan, 
director of die labor board’s New York 
office, said the case would be handled on 
an expedited basis. 

If the board’s investigation detennined 
there was cause to issue a complaint, the 
general counsel, Fred Fein stein, would rec- 
ommend to the board that it seek an in- 
junction in U.S. District Court blocking 
the owners’ implementation of the salary 
cap. (AP, NYT) 


Wilkens Closes on Auerbach’s Mark 


By Ken Denlinger 

(tas/iim’tim Post Servuv 

WASHINGTON — Lenny Wilkens and 
Red Auerbach were raised in Brooklyn, 
and that's where the obvious similarity 
ends. 


They are from different sporting genera- 
ons and affect dramatically different per- 


tions and affect dramatically different per- 
sonas, Auerbach as forceful as a punch in 
the mouth and Wilkens as dignified as a 
tap on the shoulder. 

Yet they share the rare ability to move 
exceptional athletes toward a common 
goal at the highest level of the most grace- 
ful team game, basketball. 

Soon, likely before the New Year, their 
coaching accomplishments will intersect at 
a phenomenal number: Auerbach's 938 
regular season National Basketball Associ- 
ation victories. And then the Atlanta 
Hawks' Wilkens quickly will have every- 
one cha s in g him. 

“This will be huge," Wilkens said of the 
victory that will push him past Auerbach. 
“This will top everything.” 

Auerbach has been waiting for this 
sneaker to fall, and for more years than he 


charge, but they also let the players play. 
That’s rare." 

Sanders chuckled over the telephone 
about his old coach and said. “Red had an 
unreasonable interest in wanting to win 
every game." 

“Red was a big inspiration in my ca- 
reer," said the Cleveland Cavaliers' general 
manager. Wayne Embry. “Lenny has been 
able to stay around at a time when many 
coaches don't.” 

Embry played two seasons for Auer- 
bach's Boston Celtics and worked with 
Wilkens during the latter’s seven-year ten- 
ure as the Cavaliers’ coach. 

In one way or another, NBA coaches 
and general managers have been chasing 
Auerbach ever since he joined the league in 


and a few others will top that 1,037 mark. 
Bur no one wjH surpass Auerbach as the 
NBA’s seminal figure. 

From Auerbach through Wilkens, the 
NBA has changed so much. Auerbach had 
the same cornerstone players for nearly all 
of his extraordinary run. Wilkens has the 
advantage of faster and more orderly trav- 
el. 

“There are a lot more teams now, not so 
much quality depth.” said Rod Thorn, the 
NBA's vice president of operations and a 
former assistant to Wilkens. “With free 
agency, it’s hard to get talent — and harder 
to keep it But with more tools available to 
a coach, such as tape, there* s more to do 
after a game." 

Auerbach is 77. He had quintuple heart 


"It’s taken 28 years for 
somebody to break it, so I 
feel pretty good about 
that* 


bypass surgery on June 18, 1993. A hand- 
ball injury led to a permanently crooked 
right index finger. Ironically, Auerbach 


was only 48 when be quit coaching. 
“Burned out after 20 years,” he a 


Red Auerbach 


ever expected. Waiting in Boston initially; 
herein Washington of late. Waiting with a 


contradictory attitude that comes across as 
gracious arrogance. Going into Thursday 
night's games. Wilkens was just three back. 

Auerbach is ready for the exchange of 
places at the top. though not without a few 
parting shots that wiu delight those who 
remember him — some not too fondly — 
as one of the great competitors in sport 

His first thought on the matter: “Re- 
cords are made to be broken." 

His second thought: “It’s taken 28 years 
for somebody to break it, so 1 feel pretty 
good about that.” 

His third thought: “It's taken Lenny 
more than 20 years to do it — I did it in 
20.” (Indeed, when Wilkens has one more 
victory than Auerbach, he also will have 
more than 300 more losses.) 

His fourth and fifth thoughts: “They 
play more games now. But Lenny deserves 
it Hell of a guy. Good coach. Solid. I'm 
glad for him.” 

Talk about unparalleled longevity; ei- 
ther Auerbach or Wilkens has coached 
during all but three seasons of the NBA's 
48-year history. 

“Red and Lenny always seem a bit flexi- 


1946, in its initial season. When he retired 
from the bench, after the 1966 playoffs, 
smoking one of those postgame cigars that 
had come to symbolize glorious victor y to 
his admirers and smelly haughtiness to his 
enemies. Auerbach had all the significant 
records. 


Gradually, a few have fallen. Pat Riley 
is passed Auerbach for most playoff 


ble. as far as players are concerned," stud 
Tom (Satch) Sanders, the NBA’s vice pres- 


Tom (Satch) Sanders, the NBA’s vice pres- 
ident for player programs, who played for 
Auerbach and has observed Wilkens close- 
ly. “They let the players know they’re in 


has passed Auerbach for most playoff 
games coached and most playoff victories. 
Jack Ramsay had a chance at Auerbach's 
regular season mark, but fell 74 victories 
short. Dick Motta was the next challenger, 
but couldn't get past 856 victories before 
being fired by the Sacramento Kings dur- 
ing the 1990-91 season. 

Once Wilkens sails past Auerbach, sev- 
eral others also will. In his second life with 
the Dallas Mavericks, Motta has a fine 
young team. One of Auerbach’s Celtic 
pups, Don Nelson, is about four seasons 
away. Riley is about five. 

Riley is the coach who may concern 
Auerbach the most. All the others who 
may pass him in total victories have win- 
ning percentages that pale in comparison 
to his .662. Riley’s, however, is .720. 

Even so, Auerbach still is (he only coach 
to have won more than 1,000 NBA games. 
That’s 938 in the regular season and 99 in 
the playoffs. Wilkens won’t hit 1,000 until 
a few games after he passes Auerbach's 
regular season record. Eventually, Wilkens 


“Burned out after 20 years," he admit- 
ted. “Years ago, it was very easy for that to 
happen. Travel. Hostile fans. Referees. 
You wouldn’t get the shake tike you gel 
today. As a result, you had to be fighting 
all the time. It was tougher on you emo- 
tionally.” 

Wilkens started as a player-coach with 
the Seattle SuperSonics in 1968-69, three 
seasons after Auerbach retired. He took 
the dual role only after some powerful 
persuasion from the general manager. 
Dick Vertlieb, and said earlier this week 
during a conference call: 

“I never had a clue I'd be where 1 am." 

Wilkens has a fond memory of that first 
season: being down to the Cincinnati 


Royals by four points with 28 seconds left 
He designed a play that resulted in a dunk. 


He designed a play that resulted in a dunk, 
then ordered a full-oourt press that pro- 
duced a basket to force overtime and even- 
tual victory. 

“I said to myself: “Yeah. I think I can 
coach in this league.’ ” 

There has been just one NBA title for 
Wilkens. with Seattle in 1979. He called 
that “incredible” and added: “I want to 
have it again.” 

Wilkens says his strengths are being 
consistent. That includes making everyone 
accountable and respecting one another. 
Like Auerbach with the Celtics. Wilkens 
stresses defense. 

“So far,” he said, “it’s worked.” 

Including bis exceptional career as a 
player, Wilkens has been involved in near- 
ly 3.000 NBA games. How could he possi- 
bly get himself so energized over such a 
long haul? 

“If you can’t turn the game loose, you’ve 



TORONTO — The locked-out National 
Hockey League players have tak^M wen- 
stronger stand against the owners pro- . 
rSpayroU tax following a lecture from 
an economics professor. 

Jerry Ha usman of the Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology toW 240 planters 
of the NHL Players Association meeting 
here Wednesday that the tax would work 

much like a rigid cap in stifling salaries. 

“There’s no deal to be made with a tax. 
That’s what came out of this mating, 
said Larry Murphy, a Kitsbuigh defense- 
man. “They’re not goinrto get all the 
concessions we made and then lay a tax on 
top of iL If they withdraw the tax, the deal 
will be done in a day." 

Although sources had said .that we 
league had offered to take the tax off the 
table; the NHL's spokesman. Arthur Pin- 
cus. denied Wednesday it had been with- 
drawn. A fax to the 26 teams, read by a 
management source, said: “The news re- 
port that the NHL has made a proposal 
that does not include a tax is erroneous. 
The last proposal the league made to the 
players association was Dec. 6. 

Formal negotiations between the two 
sides broke off Dec. 6 in Chicago when 
NHL Commissioner Gary Beitman rein- 
troduced the concept of a payroll tax, a 
new version that would tax total payrolls 
by as much as 25 percent if they exceeded 
S18 million in the first year. 

Subcommittees from both rides met last 
week and discussed the possibilities of a 
settlement with and without a payroll tax. 
A league official involved in the bargaining 
confirmed Wednesday that those discus- 
sions took place on a conceptual level 
without an official proposal being formu- 
lated for a settlement without a tax, at least 
from his point of view. 

But a union attorney who was part of 
those talks said it was his impression that 
the league was discussing an authentic pro- 
posal without a tax. Several players said 
Wednesday that no proposal without a tax 
had been presented to them, on a formal 
basis, in writing. 


- The league executive, speaking on the 
condition of anonymity, said the league 
remained willing to continue to discuss a 
settlement without a tax because the 
league thought it is important “not to draw 
a line in the sand and paint ourselves into 
corners.” 


part of the deal. > 

The tax has been the primary sticking 
point in attempts to end the lockout, which 
has wiped out the first 82 days of the NHL 
season and endangers-the rest- 
With no new talks scheduled, it ap- 
peared as if there would be no solution 
until after the holiday weekend. 

“I do not have a plan when negotiations 
will resume,” Bob Goodenow, the execu- 
tive director of the union, said following 
Wednesday's meeting. “At the proper 
point in time, Gary and I will be in con- 
tact" 


Hnihi.ji A;,ti«v i rami-taw. 

CORRALLED — Derrick McKey slid by Toni Kukoc to score as the Pacers 
held the Bulls under 100 points for the fifth straight game and won, 107*99. 


Although Stephane Richer of the New 
Jersey Devils has said many players would 


agree to a tax, those leaving the meeting 
Wednesday said any dissension was based 


got problems." he said. "I've been form- Wilkens deflected comparisons with 
nate lo be able to turn loose when I leave Auerbach, but admitted: “I think I’m as 
the arena. I’m devoted to my family. I also good a coach as any ... I work. Once 1 
enjoy economics, politics. I read a lot." start on something I want to be good at it." 


Wednesday said any dissension was based 
on a misunderstanding about the tax. 

Hausman’s lecture “showed there would 
be a problem for each and every guy nego- 
tiating a contract,” said Tom Kurvers, a 
defenseman for the Anaheim Mighty 
Ducks. (NYT AP) 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 




RAT5! NO ONE 5ENT ME WELL. DID YOU Y DID I 

A CHRISTMAS CARD.. SEND ANY V WHAT ? 
. i — YOURSELF? S 


DID YOU SEND 
ANY YOURSELF? 


DID I 
UJHAT 7 


a xt 

OOU HUM 


#*A 


OQMtWtl 

OOIWMH 


COAWM 

WAHHU 

/ 


I WStt 'rfO GED At> 
AQUARIUS ! 










st l . 




m 




GARFIELD 


SIGH- I LOVE THE J r THE LIGHTS, THE PRES£NTaJfr4f fcAQCICl DUf fc?- 
■ \ H OLIPAM SEASON / o THE caroling-... 1 u Ll/1 i I 

i Z_/J V THE (BtJRPj 


WIZARD of ID 


"1 TSY TO BE REALLY GOOD RIGHT BETCRE 

BUT THl£> >EAS TU£ TLVt JUST OOT WtW FR&Y\ /WE.* 


the (BURP) 
Christmas 
i COOKIES.. 


fr(/ MAPF let? AZNOlsP? , 


m //: 


mt. 






.3 6 / c ( 



firrT\w 


AMR/? IE [7 FIVE 

ti Ate*, ami? irh 

COZ1W& MB 
A 0UNPLE! 


raw- A „ n. 

wvop.ee c** Be )/ \ a 

. ©<pgj give J\ mpfeef ) * 


7>UT SCMMBU9 WORD OUC 
v nr Hurl* I iM«i< 




" - a on . a, " 


tour «a™r» wo**. 

[ FORAV I 


s^Ag. 


BEETLE BAILEY 



VAN EH 


t 

V* 


THESE REPORTS 
FROM LT. FUZZ 
PRlVE ME MAP/ 


LIVER! 




AT LEA5T IT SHOWS } THIS ONE'S A DETAILED 
HIS CONCERN FOR ? EXPLANATION OF WHY HIS 
CAMP SWAMPY £ CHRISTMAS CARPS WILL 
| BE LATE THIS 


THE FAR SIDE 


BLONDIE 


ROVEXTi 


wminewAsu© 
woeGoaxs 
rr usPr mcm — 


NtM mge ckjw tone* to 
tow m MM arw*»r. “ »9- 


'f\m 


print answer tors: 


© 


• 

L. 1_ i 1 




fWSM&i 


■ ;; 

(W jl 


l» aii » M l»l 

JinWl OflMW FUNNY STOUD BUZZER 
lUmri; tow rf 0,1% PCJiiuriijlirfttUjr^N 


DOONESBURY 


ncMOMM IM — IWflMXfii 


For 

investment 

information 


wsBJBaeawe 
wfirweuHoefss^aF 
\ FStam-wspoNsiBitfrY 
X 6OrAMtYFR0MlG». 

O \ ° ‘ 


MiEmosatappmF 
\tnsaipiBneMVNr 
\B5aegtajnBKrMP 
eWBMBfT. #*&&&- 
ffESS&fiUNBNSTO 
, msiaewrwH&. . 


Read 

the MONEY REPORT 
every Saturday 
in the IHT 


0 ojVTft; 



so mew Tfcw<Kfi£*.T| 
BamraA R kwwaw F 
mneasr : waswh 

«jUX5£7? XU? >■ 


-•-a-n-s Jl 

>7^. yj 






rp; ppf-cf , 'ijxxT'' 

n.‘ ~prj i : rt^rvY 

-jLXU-JIXr ■■■ ; , v'cV- 'r - 


I J? CONTROL/ / 

HSHE'l -L. 


m 




i pm 




A - 




I0IIBOAIM 






But the league executive stressed that 
the league would prefer a payroll tax as 

nni-r nf thp rifial ® 


l *«■■■ 


'? •- 
• - 


M, _"*i- 
a- >. 


iv: * - 


,'t • * > .. 


.IN .! "■ V . 

v : • 


A. 

1 S.’-V-v. 


J \ 

L 


LJS l£jD 



x \ 


SPORTS 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 23. 1994 


Page 19 




Tomba, Winning First Giant Slalon i in 3 Years, Runs Victory Streak to 5 










into Hi 


:.]rM 




£*V/ 







V 

r - ,, 


HU Pri, 






*one* 


\ -w nr.- I'.i.f,. K 


Alberto Tombs got a warm welcome from his friend Yukon after an incredible three days that saw three victories. 


SCOREBOARD 




Top 25 College Results 


MBA Standings 


how the too is team la The Associated 



EASTERN CONFERENCE 
AitaMle DtoMoo 

W L Pet 

GB 


Orlando 

19 S 

J92 



' 

New Yam 

12 18 

545 

6 

‘ . y 

New Jersey 

12 15 

J44 

8V> 

■ . ■ 

Boston 

IB 14 

*17 

» 


PtModetahto 

8 15 

348 

10VS 


Miami 

7 15 

318 

11 


waeMnaton 

6 15 

Central Dtviskw 

386 

111* 


Indiana 

15 7 

482 

_ 


Cleveland 

15 ■ 

A 52 

to 


Charlotte 

13 10 

565 

2to 


Chicago 

11 12 

*n 

4to 

^‘inv^rair 

Atlanta 

10 14 

Art 

6 

Del rod 

9 13 

409 

6 

Milwaukee 

7 16 

3B4 

Bto 

• _■ 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Mkfwcat DtvbJoe 


• . i .■ 

Stub 

W L 

pa 

GB 


17 ■ 

MD 

— 


Houston 

13 B 

419 

2 


Dallas 

12 B 

400 

2to 


San Antonia 

12 * 

571 

3 


Denver 

12 W 

545 

3to 


MtaMsata 

5 » 

317 

11 

- ~ 


padftc DtvtaMn 



■ 

Phoenix 

IB 5 

JBJ 

— 


Seattle 

15 7 

482 

ZVk 


i_A. Lakers 

14 8 

436 

3 to 


Souixnento 

12 H 

545 

5to 


Portland 

11 W 

534 

6 


Gofcfen State 

B 15 

3« 

10 


LA. Clippers 3 71 -TO 

WEDNESDAY'S RESULTS 

ISto 


X Aranas fT-lJ beat Florida a&m 97-51. 
Hex!: vs. Turn, Friday; & Florida 15-2) lost la 
Jacksonville 63-47. Next: W St. Francis. Poo 
Friday; 13k Oacfnaatl (7-3) iositaNa 24 Call- 
loralo «*-7t Next: vs. Na it Georoki Teoi at 
Honolulu. W edno sd ov. 

U. Minnesota (Ml last to Texas Southern 
7t -S3. Next; vs. San Jase State. Friday; K 
CaUorala (6-0) beat No. 13 Onrinnatl 39-76. 
Next: vs. Colunibta at Berkelov. Calif. 


Madrid 12. Seorilnp de Glion 12. Racing de 
Santander M. Albocele II. Valladolid la Lo- 
a rones i 

DUTCH FIRST DIVISION 
NEC Nllmeoen a Ajax Amsterdam 2 
Standings: Alax Amsterdam 24, Rada JC 
KerLrode U. Twenfe Enschede 23. PSV Eind- 
hoven 71. Vitesse Arnhem 2a Fevenoord Rot- 
terdam 19. Heerenveen 13. Willem II Tilburg 
17. MW Maastricht 15. Groningen MUIrecnt 
11 Sport o Rotterdam 11 MAC Breda UVolen- 
dam 12. NEC Nllmeoen 11. RKC Woolwllk 10. 
GA Eagles Deventer 7. Dordrecht *90 ft. 

INTERNATIONAL FRIENDLIES 
Argentina 1. Roman lo 0 
Italy 1 Turkey 


PITTSBURGH— Signed Roo Leary, first 
baseman, to a minor tooaue contract. 

SAN DIEGO Announced me sale at the 
team from Tam Werner to John Moores. 


Other Mafor College Scores 


S'MATE 


* flunks 


Detroit »1 27 22 19- 99 

New Jersey 23 39 23 37 — 117 

D: Mills 10-18 0-2 23k Hln 0-19 1V13 23; NJ; 
Gilliam 11-13 54 V. *Wrt» 8-11 7-7 22. He- 
boamts— Detroit 47 (Lecfcner 9). New Jersey 
*1 1 Brawn 91. AtolstS-DefrqHIB Will. Dq»- 
Kins 6). Mew Jersey 33 (Anderson 171. 
Milwaukee » M M 19 3 IHB 

Miami 33 16 31 33 8 33-123 

ML : Baker 10-21 6-1 23. RoMnson 7-21 6-8 21, 
Oay 7- IS 4-3 25; Ml: R*a»MDM3AWHU*n-lft 
•jjf g. Coles 7-20 0-11 22 I te bo wH MHwou- 
kee 48 (Baker 131. AMcM 45 (Wlltts Ml. As- 
Ntis— Milwaukee T7 (Murdock 8). Mkxnl 25 
IColes 9i. „ „ _ _ „ 

cnicaao 33 w is *3— 99 

i£»ano 25 3*33 *^-107 

C* Kukoc 11-17 2-2 24. Armstrong JT223-427; 
Smlto 9-12 7-9 25. Workmen 0-10 +4711 to- 
uoomts— Chicago 44 (Kukoc, Wonnlnatan 9>. 
Indiana 38 (D-Dovts ill. AMWs-Oitooao 26 
^TLlndkm- 19 

SOB iuuuvin 24 ^ u yj 

S' RbUMM F it 14-11 34. Del NM3W154 
u. tiiimiinffi T-- Antonio 44 (Rodnxm 
( Jonran .21. V5E± 


EAST 

Folrfelgh Dkklnson 49. Wright SI. 67 
Now 81 Florida Atlantic 64 
New Homastilra 74, MJoroi. Ohio 71 
Pittsburgh BZ Vermont 63 
Providence 85k Brvanl 60 
SI. Francis Pa 77, Cent. Connecticut SI. 58 
SOUTH 

E. Tennessee St. 81 Carson- Newman 82 
Georgia 89, Wlnthrgp 56 
Memphis 92, Nfchalis St. 72 
Tennessee Tech 89, Oral Roberts 31 OT 
Texas Christian TO Middle Term. 78 
Va. Common wealth 76, Tennessee St. 67 
Vbndsmrn 8L Austin Poay 71 OT 
W. Kentucky B2. E. Kentucky 77 
MIDWEST 

Dayton 76. Furman 61 
Indiana 89. Butler 66 
M. minuts 71 Air Farce 49 
Neftrasfco TOT. NE Illinois 61 
W. Illinois 81 Narthwastem 43 
Xavier, Ohio Ml. CS North ridge 65 
SOUTHWEST 
Houston 31 McNcese St 76 
SW Texas St. 61 ArX- Ultle Rock 65 
Sam Houston St. 81 SI. Edwards. Texas 64 
Texns-Ei Paso 31 Seattle 61 
FAR WEST 
Boise sr. 71 San Jose Si. 61 
Lana Beach sl 79, Montana 69 
New Mexico 71 Idaho 54 
Portland 39. Cantatas 78 
San Francisco 121 Mount St. Mary's. Md. 91 
Weber SL 81 Brigham Young 74 
TOURNAMENTS 
UNO Clas s ic 


World Cup Results 


Results el Thursday's race la Alta BocBa. 
Italy (hem limes In parentheses): 

1. Alberto Tomba. Italy 0:0* 17-1:3113) 
2.I7J5; 1 Ur* Ko eUn. Swliiertand 1 1:0*. >7- 
1:0163) 2' 17-80. 1 Chrfcllon Mover. Austria 
(1:09.78-1:03126) 2:17.96; 4. Klein Andre Aa- 
modl. Norway (1:0*51-1:81771 2: IBJB:& Har- 
old Christian Slrcxid-Nilsen. Morway 1 1:10.16 
1:0*54) 2: 19 Jo. 

4. Marc GirardellL Luxembourg 11:1145- 
I.-ML15) 2.19-30; 7, Losse Klus. Norway 
(1-10.29-1:0931) 2.1960; 1 Tan Piccard. 
France ( 1 : 1038-1 :0M0> 2: 19.73; 9. Jura Kosir. 
Slovenia (1 : 1174-1 -09.101 2: 1934; 11 Paul Ac- 
cMa. Switxertand (1:1193-1:09411 2:3031. 

Giant Slalom Staorfings (After three 
races) : 1. Aamodl. 190; 2 Michael Von Gruen- 
V«iv Switzerland 180; 1 Koelia 175; 4. 
Tomba. ISO; 5. Achlm Vogt. Liechte ns te i n. 
112; A Mover, 109; 7, Kosir. 105; 8. Guenther 
Mader, Austria 100; 9. Strand- N item. *3; 10. 
Klus. 86. 

OVERALL WORLD CUPSTANDINGS (Af- 
ter ten races): 1, Tomba S3) points; 2 Ao- 
modl. J02; A VW Gr uerlgen. 294; 4, Kosir, 255; 
5. Michael Trllscher. Austria. 250: 6. Mader. 
234 ; 7. Patrick OrlBeb. Austria 230: A Thomas 
Svkoro. Austria, 216; 9, Tomas Fogdoe. Swe- 
den. 190; iflk Luc Atphona Franca. 176. 


FOOTBALL 

Nntta nu t Football League 

ATLANTA— Placed Chuck Smith, defen- 
sive rod. on Inlured reserve. Signed Dunstan 
Anderson, defensive end 

CINCINNATI— Placed Steve BroiHsord. 
running bock, and Eric Moore, offensive tack- 
le, on Inlured reserve. Acquired Derek wore, 
tighl end, off waivers from Arizona and Lo- 
motil Holllnquost, Itoabocker. oH waivers 
from Washington. 

KANSAS CITY— Placed Pellom McDan- 
iels. defensive cm and Donnell Bennett. lulF 
bade on Inlured reserve. Signed Tommie 
Stowers, running back. Activated Ronnie 
WaoHork. linebacker, tram the practice 
muocL Wan to n ed Shoumbe' Wrtoht-Fal r. run- 
ning bock, to the practice squad. 

SEATTLE — Signed Dion Lambert and Dei 
Speer, safeties. Pioced Rick Mirer, quarter- 
back. and Duane Bickett llnebocker. on In- 
lured reserve. 

WASHINGTON— Waived Lomanl Hollirv- 
auest, linebacker, signed Colemon Bell. Hahi 
end. 




New Ortaam 77, Northeaslem 70 
Third Place 

Bradley 79, William 5 Mary 68 


BASEBALL 
American Leaaee 

CLEVELAND— Signed Dovta Lynch. Pilch- 
er, to o minor league contract. 

SEATTLE— Agreed to terms with Jay 
Buhner, outfleUer. on 3-year cantracLPtoced 
Erie Anthony, outfielder, on waivers for the 
purpose of giving him Ms unconditional re- 


f a Gilman fi " " n 

oSw-M 4-1532. Anderson 6-W 2-2 19; 
. f: Xhemw (MB M <a. vaught 7-T7 1-2 IS. 

gates 60 (3«HY9)^f»^^“ ‘ 

4), Las Anastas 22 (Rfehardson »n- 


SPANISH FIRST DIVISION 
Dcporihta do La Coruna I. Cetta 2 
Barcelona 1, Bells 1 
□vtodo 1. Logrones 0 
Real Soctedad 2. Albocete 0 
Tenerife 1, Athletic de Bilboo 0 
Valencia o. Sporting de Glion a 
Alieltco de Madrid 0. Racing de Santander 1 
Zaragoza 1, Espanal 0 
Sovilta 3k Compostela 0 
Stan din gs: Zaragoza 23 Points. Real Madrid 
21. Deporilvo La Coruna 21. Boratiana 2ft Ath- 
letic de Bilbao 18. Bet Is 17. Sevilla 17, Espanal 
1ft. Cello 1 A Tenor He lAValencta 14,Comoos- 
teto 14. ReaiSociodad U.Dvfedol& Alfelicode 


TORONTO— Signed Mike HuH. outfielder, 
to 1-yeor eontr o cL Sent Scott Brow, rihher, 
outright to Syracuse, IL. 


COLORADO— Re-signed Marvin Freemoru 
pitcher, to 2-year contract Declined to exer- 
cise their 1995 option on white Blolr. Pitcher, 
making him a tree ooent 
HOUSTON— Re-Signed Milt Thompson, out- 
fletder. to l-year contract 
NEW YORK— Stoned Doug Henry, pffcfter, 
to I wear cixitract- 

PHILAOELPHIA— Stoned Dave Hoiilns, 
third bape m o n . lo l-vear controet 


MANDELA TROPHY OMR DAY MATCH 
Sooth Africa vs. Sri LaNco 


South Africa (nntogs: 2JM (50 aveflU 
Sri Lanka Innings: 139-6 (34 men). 

Sri Lanka* score adlusled due to rtdn 1134). 
Result: South Africa wins by 44 runs. 


CROSSWORD 


ACROSS is Shocks 

1 Mischief-maker »Gulnaap^ . 

1 , ia Numbers on a 

7 Pokes tetter 

13 Snub rg Go-aheads 

g« cartoon tot 


zo Bluejackets 
22 Comedian 
Olsen 

23Wtfi awhoie 
new 

appearance 
22 Big Bill of the 
court 

si Kind of musk: 

. notation 
32 Sunburn 
soother 
29 Musk: 

Appreciation, 
tor one 

3» Lead- in for Bops 
or hertz 

*• Certain crimes 
M Domain for 
Athena 

«o Cleaned, in a 
way 

42EncBngwtthpay 
or plug 

« Preparing, with 

"sen 0 

up 

4* Famously coid 
Maine town 
«e “Stop on the 
gas!' 

BRPftfty beverage 
B2 Beeson tube 
84 "The Gathering” 
star 

OS Plants used In 
tu p e m fl Wn fl 
MSIIp 
s7Tantmma 


4Tdte-&-ttte 
s Fancy cabinet 
• SXT. taker's 
need 


7 Shropshire 
mothers 


a Landlords 


•Tropical 

kernels 


10 Attentive 

11 BfbScai verb 

12 Mouth off 
14 Attitudes 
io Hauler 

*i AH together 
2 « Pleading the 


i Edible 
rootstock 


jrV 

Uo 

\ ' reservations- 


For lesetvations: 

Fax intem^'Orial 
,1^0606545^ 


i Brothers 

(otd ram 
Slapstick team) 
a Cultural 
opening 
a Fractures 


2 B Ancient 
Khuztstan 
erFRIngaids 
2 S Pelvic bones 

29 Type at 

| I lift i~i i-J 

S1BQSDC91 

dtatribuflan 

30 Most 
pernicious 

34 Texas 

37 Swaziland's 
capital 

ae Crackbrained 
41 Sherman was 
his Veep 
44 sl Otars 
subjects 
49 More thane 
murmur 
4eForG,s.g. 

47 Opera set kr 
Memphis 

4e Baltic Sea feeder 
ao “Monty Python” 
regular 

si 1976 Nastassja 
Nnskirofe 



ikf Ftt A Lox fl o 


© New York Tones/ Edited by fPTB Shorts. 


Solution to Pkmie of Dee. 22 


□nns ananin sacua 
hded □□□□□ naisn 
□□HnannncioaaQaa 
QE3Q Q00C3E3 aaaaO 

00BQ aaaz] 
□sanas □□□□ scan 
□□□no assn □□□□ 
□□□□aH0SQfsaanaa 
□BQQ QQBQ aaBOS 

hhq □□□□ □aaasa 

QQHD □□□□ 
snana aaaaa □□□ 
naaaQQaaaaaDaaLi 
aaan □□□□□ anas 
qbbq aaaaa aaaa 


- .-.Jr 


The -fiv* :,HL\l Ai« 

ALTA BAD1A. ltal> — Al- 
berto Tomba won his first 
World Cup giant slalom race in 
nearly three years Thursday as 
he ran his sensational streak to 
three victories in three days and 
five this season. 

The 28-year-old Italian su- 
per-star. a three-time Olympic 
champion, clocked the fastest 
time in both runs to beat Urs 
Kiiltn or Switzerland by 0.45 
seconds down the sLeep Gran 
Risa track al this resort in the 
Italian Dolomite mountains. 

Christian Mayer of Austria 
was third. 0.61 seconds behind 
the winner. 

“I had been expecting this 
day for a long lime." Tomba 
.said. "1 really wanted io win 
this giant slalom, in this place. 

"The latest victory is always 
the most exciting but I can't say 
today's was better than yester- 
day's. 1 love them all.” 

Tomba, known as La Bomba 
— The Bomb — for his explo- 
sive style between the gates, hud 
won four slaloms prior to this 
giant slalom, with two victories 
at Lech Am Arlberg. Austria, 
on Tuesday and Wednesday. 

Including the two last races 
from the 1 993- ’94 season, he 
has won a record six consecu- 
tive slaloms, surpassing the 
men's World Cup record of five 
turned in three times by Inge- 
mar Stenmark and matched 
once by Marc Girardelli. 

Thursday’s triumph, before a 
partisan crowd of 5.000 that 
played trumpets and shoutecL 
“Alberto you are the greatest!” 
widened Tomba's overall lead 
in the World Cup standings. 

He has now a iota] of 550 
points. 248 ahead the defending 
champion. KjeiU Andre Aa- 
modl of Norway. 

AamodL who will have a 
knee operation over the holi- 
days. finished fourth Thursday. 
1.23 seconds slower than 
Tomba. 

Tomba. whose previous giant 
slalom victory came a l Crans 


Montana on March 20. 1992. 
celebrated in typical "La 
Bomba" style. 

He turned a somersault at the 
finish line, threw kisses to his 
fans, then knelt on the snow to 
exchange kisses with his dog. 
Yukon. 

He then set off on a victory 
parade on skis, pulled around 
by the white dog. a gift from his 
sister Alessia. 

“I am not crying. 1 got some 
snow on my face alter the som- 
ersault." Tomba said. 

“It's a greai year for me. And 
I*nt building up a lot of confi- 
dence for the next races." 

He and KOI in were tied for 
first place after the initial run. 
in 1:09.17. 

In the second run. Tomba 
was clocked in 1:08.18. for a 
winning combined time of 
2:17.35. 

Kiiltn. who nearly fell at mid- 
way down course and brushed 
the snow with a glove before 
recovering his balance, had a 
second run of 1:08.63 for a 
combined of 2: 17.80. 

“Tomba is almost perfect this 
season and you must ski two 
faultless runs to beat him." Ka- 
lin said. “I did a mistake and 1 
finished behind." 

Tomba, off to better start 
than in even his golden I9S7-8S 
season, when he won two Olym- 
pic titles and nine World Cup 
races, said he knew from the 
opening giant slalom in Tignes 
that a victory in this discipline 
was possible.’ 

In the French resort, he ral- 
lied from a 2Jst-place first run 
to finish fourth, docking the 
fastest time in (he second run. 

Blaming sharp pains from a 
injured rib, he did not start in 
the second run of the giant sla- 
lom at Val DTsere in France, 
after posting the ninth best time 
in the first heat. 

He had badly bruised his 
fourth rib while wanning up for 
the Sestriere slalom that he won 
on Dec. 12 and said he took 
anti-inflammatory medication 



uni.. \.r» ■ 1 1. in. i IV 


On the slopes he was all business, and fastest in both runs. 


prior to Thursday's race. He 
had to resort to injections of a 
pain-killer in Lech. 

Girardelli finished sixth here, 
trailing Tomba by nearly two 
seconds. 

The five-time overall champi- 
on said he was getting in form 
slowly, as usual for him. 

“Marc is improving race after 
race." said Tomba. “Look out 
for him in the January races and 
in the world championships" 
next year. 

Tomba's nexl opportunity 
for victory will be the giant sla- 


lom at Meribel. France, on Dec. 
29. 

He does not compete in 
speed races, which has prevent- 
ed him from winning the overall 
title so far. 

Tomba predicted that the 
downhill and super-G specialists 
will start dosing the gap on him 
in the early January races. But, 
in the meantime, be has already 
piled up about two-thirds of the 
822 points drat earned him third 
place overall last season. 

Aamodt won the title with 
1.392 points. 


St. Andrews Opens Door for Palmer at British Open 


COLLEGE 

WESTERN ATHLETIC CONFEREN- 
CE— Named John McNamara asudale com- 
mliilonar. 

CORNELL— Named Brian Austin asso- 
ciate athletic director. 

FRESNO STATE — Extended the cataract 
ot Jim Sweeney, football coodu through 2000. 

JACKSON STATE— Fired W.C. Garden, 
athletic director, effective Dec. 1 9. Announced 
Elvalee Banks, rica president, will iervr as 
inf rim otMeMc director. 

LSU— Suspended DovM Boslev. guard, and 
MMn Mutovtbk, center, lor on* game tar 
violating an NCAA rule fay partldpotWig In a 
pickup baskctaall game last simmer in Wcsl 
Virgin lo. 

MARYLAND— Announced that Kevin Fo- 
ley, sophomore qvartarfcacfc. b leaving the 
StflQOL 

MICHIGAN STATE— Nomad Gary Tran- 
quill offensive coordinator; Jim Bo H men of- 
fensive line coach; Kon Manale strength and 
candlffetana coach; Glenn Plres defensive 
line or llnetxictiere cooch ; and Mane Dvtanio 
secondary coodi 

MINNESOT A -Named Jhn Zorn quart® - 

frry Iry CDOCh. 

RICHMOND ""Named Jim Retd fooiaall 
coach. 

SOUTHERN CAL— Named Rad Martnelll 
defensive line coach. 

TEXAS CHRISTIAN— Signed Pat Sullivan, 
football coach. 1a a five- year contract exten- 
sion through ItM 1999 season. 

TULANE— Announced that Danny Thiel, 
I rock and field caactl, will reston an Dec 31. 

VIRGIN IA Named Craig UHlepage Inter- 
im athletic cfl rector. 


The iwiHiahil Prc\\ 

ST. ANDREWS. Scotland — Arnold 
Palmer will be invited to make a farewell 
appearance at the home or golf. 

The Royal and Ancient Golf Club 
announced Thursday that it had made a 
change in the rules that will allow Palmer 
one more appearance at the British 
Open, which returns lo the Old Course ot 
SL Andrews in 1995. 

Instead of offering all past Open 
champions under 65 a place in the event, 
the club has altered the rule to read “65 
or under." Palmer, who won the Open in 
1961 and 1 962. celebrated his 65th birth- 
day on Sept. 10. 

“We had read that PaJmer wanted to 
come back and play at Sl. Andrews," 


said the club’s secretary. Michael Bonal- 
lack. “And if Palmer wants to come and 
play for his final Open, we thought we 
would accommodate him." 


players but also offers tangible support 
to our far-reaching exemption policy. 

“There is no doubt that these two 
elements are still the most effective wav 


In response toconcems voiced by U.S. 
golfers over the high cost of taking part 
in the tournament, the club has also 
raised the minimum prize for those mak- 
ing the halfway cut. It was boosted by 25 
percent, to £5.000 ($7,750), with the win- 
ner's purse raised from £125.000 lo 
£140.000. 


elements are still the most eriecuve way 
of maintaining the international strength 
of the field, which is what sets the Open 


“We believe it is important lo spread 
the prize money as widely as possible.” 
BonaMack said. “It is a philosophy that 
not only recognizes the cost of compet- 
ing in ihe championship for overseas 


of the field, which is what sets the Open 
apart." 

The total purse for next year’s tourna- 
ment will be £1.25 million, an increase of 
£150.000. 

Exemptions will be given for the first 
lime next year lo the winner of the Senior 
British Open, Tom Wargo of the United 
Slates, and to the current European Am- 
ateur Champion. Stephen Gallacher. 

The field will be increased to 159 to 
accommodate the new exemptions. 


AL Slugger Franco to Play in Japan 


Fox Loses Out to NBC-HBO 
On Wimbledon TV Contract 


CHICAGO (AP) — Julio Franco, the designated hitter for the 
Chicago White Sox last season, has agreed to a two-year. $7 
million contract with the Chiba Lotte Marines in Japan, his agent. 
Chock Berry, said. 

Franco, who wfll be reunited in Japan with Bobby Valentine, 
his former manager with the Texas Rangers, hit 319 with 20 
homers and 98 RBI in his one season in Chicago. 

Omar Vizquel. the best AL’s Fielding shortstop the last two 
seasons, has re-signed with the Cleveland Indians for $2.85 
million the first year, with a dub option year worth $335 million. 


York Tuna Serrice 


For the Record 


NEW YORK — After sever- 
al weeks of delays, NBC and 
HBO have renewed their rights 
lo the Wimbledon tennis tour- 
nament. beating out Fox. The 
combined five-year deal is 
worth an estimated $26 million 
to 528 million annually, at least 
44 percent above the’ previous 
deal. 


pay a lot more for a property 
that has iosi money for the net- 
work, Dick Ebersol. the presi- 
dent of NBC Sports, said: “It’s 
a good deal, and if tennis comes 
back, it'll be a terrific deal." 


He added: “As people get 
more and more TV choices, the 
more events you have, the 
greater the likelihood that peo- 
ple will sample you.” 


Takanohana, 22, was promoted to yokozuna in rankings an- 
nounced by the Japan Somo Association; the New Year Grand 
Sumo Tournament will now be the first in three years to have two 
grand champions: Takan ohana and Akebono, as Chad Rowan of 
Hawaii is known. (AP) 

Andreas MftOer was ordered by a Frankfurt industrial tribunal 
to pay the Eintracht Frankfurt soccer chib 2.6 mQlioa Deutsche 
marks ($1 .6 million) for breach of contract two years ago when he 
signed with Juventus. (AFP) 


Negotiations between the Thoroughbred Raring Associations 
and the Jockeys’ Gtnkl over insurance financing reached an 


and the Jockeys’ Guild over insurance financing reached an 
impasse and, with time running out before the contract expires on 
Dec. 31, the leading U3. riders could join baseball players and 
hockey players on the sidelines on Jan. 1. (NYT) 

The University of Colorado is considering an invitation to leave 
the new Big 12 Conference and join the Pacific 10. (LAT) 


Fox pulled out of the bidding 
Wednesday after the All Eng- 
land Club abruptly changed the 
length of the deal to five years 
from six. Fox. which says it of- 
fered $168 million for six years, 
an average of $28 million annu- 
ally. said it needed the extra 
year to rebuild sagging Wimble- 
don ratings and to balance ex- 
pected early-year losses with 
the potential for an extra year 
of profits. 


NBC has televised Wimble- 
don for 26 years, HBO for 20. 

By most measures, including 
TV ratings, tennis has been slid- 
ing. NBC's Wimbledon ratings 
have fallen from an average 4.1 
from 1985 to 1989 to a 33 from 
1990 to 1994. Ratings have fall- 
en at HBO, too. 


“We basically declined to bid 
on a five-year deal," said Vtnce 
Wladika, a Fox spokesman. 
Although NBC will have to 


“We wish NBC and HBO all 
the best with the event," said 
David Hill, the president of Fox 
Sports. “But can you imagine 
what we would have had to 
come up with to make Wimble- 
don sexy?” 


ESCORTS* GUIDES 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


GBEVA * AU1ANCE 


EkoI Senna & Tnnol W u Hn n ri 
Dial Geneva 082/311 07 *4 


INTERNATIONAL 

ESCORT 


(Continued From Page 16) 


SERVICE 

Head offia « Now York 
330 W 56 SINK 10019 


ZURICH •• VtOtET •* , 
Escort Soniee. Craft eonh ocaried 
Tei £B7 / <S3 83 32 


212-765*7896 

MAJOR OB OT CABS AMD 
OEQQ ACCEPTS 


MADISONS 

LONDON MBS Enrt Agaaqr 

UK OH 2660586 


OBOA ESCORT SEMGE. 

Sl BaoKtoapnaca, London SW3. 
t£o71-5W 6513 


LONDON'S NO. I ESCORT 

3 SfcauMm SL lamlea W1 
AGHfCYOn 2SB0090 


MAME - ASTBD AN D HBEH DS 

• LOfOOTS * ESCORT SBMCE 
Tdechcwe , 081 361 7283 


MUNICH ’WELCOME 

ESCORT ft GUDEAG&Cy. 
PIEXSECAU.0B9-912314. 


BELGRAVIA 

ORCHIDS 


AM5TaUDAM’DREAMS ‘ESCORT 
Dnar detos ft pgiaaN aoida min. 
Tat +31 P 2 & 64 Q 2 111766 03 666 


tOMMN MBS GENEVA ZURKH 
Eteart Agancy CiadB Carfrl VMoom 


TO OUR READERS 
IN GREECE 


VBMA*2UBCH*MI8S*MMCH 
UGH 900EIY bfemrimN Escort 
Cel faw + <3-1-83541 0L 


HAMOURT KOtN DQSBDOV 
dl arses, Escort Servict. 


UK 071 589 5237 


NIBNA710NALESC0HS 

Senka-yiMtwida 

Ttk tl1-765-7t96 Nnr York; USA 
Major Crc&C*dsAosap& 


LOffttN BRAZUANEscort 

Service 071 724 5597/91 . acd* ank 


It's never been easier 
to subscribe 
and save. 

Just call today 
(1)99-19-328 
in Athens. 


VBMA’MUflS’ROME’ZUKH 

EUROCONTACT INI Eicon + Travel. 
Senio. GJ Ylawn -f <3-1-712 31. 


ZURKH - RAMS - MONACO 
AMEIHY STE W EwBrt/Troud Service 
CAU. SWTTZBtAND OBMIO 22 9. 


EXECUTIVE” 

LONDON ESCORT S8MCE 
TEL- 071 722 5P0B GirffGufc 


EXOTIC ESCORT SOYKE 

6 W. Surrey aid cards 
Tdettoc 0932 IBffll 


*SOOBE ANONYMS CUB* 
Amsterdam Esfflrt Sonin. 

TeL +31.20*18282 / 66249S2. 


X/ 





Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1994 


POSTCARD 

A LovismUe Legacy 


New ‘Jungle Book’ Leaves Kipling Behind 


PEOPLE 


By Robert F. Moss 


By Mel Gussow 

New York Toms Service 


G lenview, Kentucky — 

Mary Bingham lives alone 
in an Italianate villa at Mel - 

combe, the newspaper family's 

estate 15 minutes outside Lou- 
isville. Surviving traumas as 
well as tragedies, sbe remains 
vigorous and self-composed. 
On Christmas Eve, she cele- 
brates her 90th birthday. 

Eight years ago, her family 
was split by a bitter and very 
public conflict that resulted in 
the sale of the Bingham media 
empire, the cornerstone of 
which was The Louisville Cou- 
rier- Journal, the Pulitzer Prize- 
winning newspaper known for 
its liberal positions. 

The battle became front-page 
news and later provoked a 
chorus of investigative books. 
Bingham said that when her 
husband died, in 1988, “I hard- 
ly knew what would become of 
me, because our lives were so 
intertwined.” Married for 57 
years, Mary and Barry Bing- 
ham Sr. were always “the Bing- 
hams,” the most famous couple 
in Louisville. 

The Binghams bad long been 
generous supporters of the arts, 
education and social programs, 
and the Mary and Barry Bing- 
ham Sr. Fund became her an- 
chor. Taking over her hus- 
band’s role in the foundation, 
she continued the distribution 
of money, which has now to- 
taled S59 million, for everything 
from folk an. to the Kentucky 
Center for the Arts, which in- 
cludes an orchestra and ballet 
and opera companies. With the 


N EW YORK —"Phew,” says Ma- 
jor Boone after tasting the liquid 
dripping from a dank corridor in a 
ruined Indian city. Major Boone has 
kidnapped the lovely heroine, Kitty, 
and a second after he touches a match 
to the liquid, the two of them stare in 
wonder as flames race along a pas- 
sageway. 

Who are these people? Major 
Boone, a smirking villain, and Kitty 
are certainly not in Rudyard Kipling’s 
books, nor were they in the two previ- 
ous “Jungle Book” movies, neither the 
1942 live-action version with Sabu or 
Disney’s animated version in 1967. 

Still, Major Boone and Kitty are at 
the center of “Rudyard Kipling’s The 
Jungle Book,’ ” a $30 milli on Disney 
film which opens Sunday in the Unit- 
ed States. 

Stephen Sommers, the director and 
principal writer, says he decided to 
transform the familiar tale because no 
one could compete with the earlier 
animated effort. Nor did he see any 
way to weld the eight stories about 
Mowgli as a youth into a coherent 
narrative, as Alexander Korda tried to 
do in his 1942 version. 

Instead. Mowgli, Baloo, Bagheera 
and the other famous jungle creatures 
become a point of departure for what 
Sommers calls a “romantic adventure 
movie” in the tradition of his favorite 
director, Michael Curtiz. 


her dtyShe says her philan- 
thropic activities have made her 
realize she “didn’t have to join 
the battalion of widows who 


Actually, she does play 
bridge, but it is not a major 
interest. And while on the sub- 
ject of widows, she said: "They 
gathe r together in enclaves to 
go to the arts. There are not 
enough men to go around, and 
they complain about it. I see 
men all the time. Now and then 
l have lunch with them.'’ 

An enemy of E-mail and a 
foe of the fax ("They are not 
literary documents,” she says}, 
she is committed to the written 
word, and traces her literary 
tastes back to her childhood. 
She has created an annual prize 
for an essay in Latin in honor of 
Edmonia Lancaster, who 
taught her Latin at Miss Virgin- 
ia Randolph Ellen’s School for 


Girls in Richmond. 


Although she and other mem- 
bers of tbe family had allowed 
themselves to be interviewed ex- 
tensively for several of the books 
about them, sbe found all tbe 
books “extremely painful.” In 
one, she said, “Barry emerges as 



an Kipling, who spoke Hindi before 
he spoke English. 

But Sommers and his colleagues 
faced obstacles in trying to Elm the 
stories in any form. The Korda film 
was by far the most faithful to Kipling 
and starred a genuine Indian teenager, 
Sabu. but it suffers from its artificial 
back-lot look and the obvious artifi- 
ciality of the scenes between human 
characters and animals. 

By contrast, Sommers, Patel and 
the co-producer, Edward Feldman, 
thought it essential that much of the 
fflm be shot in India and that as Som- 
mers put it, “actors and ani m als be 
shown interacting in the same shot.” 

But $30 million doesn’t buy. as 
much authenticity as it used to, and 
the filmmakers had to work hard to 
film the Indian portion of their film in 
only six weeks. All the Indian location 
work was done in and around Jodh- 
pur, near the Pakistani border. 

Indoor scenes were shot on swelter- 
ing sound stages in Bombay (at tem- 
peratures up to 137 degrees Fahren- 
heit or 59 degrees centigrade ), where 
the movie's centerpiece, a lost city, 
was meticulously constructed from 
mahogany, concrete and brick. 

Creating the animal sequences in 
the new Jungle Book” were the most 
daunting problem the filmmakers 
















Sommers rites Curtiz’s “ Captain 
Blood” and “The Sea Hawk” as im- 


Kipting (here in Reims durin 
fOm version of “The Jangle 


C HttBsqac-VtoOn 

War I) might be confused by latest 
“based on characters” he created. 


Palace Denies Report 
Of Rainier's Abdication 


Parts Match reports that 
Prince Rainier of Monaco is 


preparing to abdicate next year 
m favor of his 36-year-old son. 
Albert, for health reasons. The 
palace denied that any such 
thing is going on. Paris Match 
said that the palace had ordered 
new uniforms for its staff with 
Albert’s initials engraved on the 
buttons and that Monaco police 
had been ordered to cancel any 
vacations for February ana 
March, when the abdication 
would take place. “We have no 
comment.” a palace spokesman 
said “but you can imagine that, 
if such an important derision 
had been made, there would 
have been a press release.” 
Rainier. 71. underwent a dou- 
ble heart- bypass operation last 
month. 


faced. In Kipling’s complex, anthro- 
pomorphic world, wolves hold parlia- 
mentary debates, bears offer tutorials, 
and small boys ride panthers and py- 
thons. Such episodes could probably 
only be dramatized through anima- 
tion or computer graphics. 

Sommers was determined to avoid 
cinematic tricks. Accordingly, more 
than SO animals — wolves, beats, ti- 
gers, elephants, panthers — and their 
almost equally numerous handlers 
were flown in and propped For their 
roles. Except for an animatronic snake, 
all the animals in the movie are real. 

Lowell the orangutan, who plays 
King Louis, is the most likely Acade- 
my Award nominee among the beasts. 
Toying with his crown and mugging 
wildly, he is the reincarnation of the 
Louis Prima character in the animated 
film. 

Robert F. Moss, the author of “Ru- 
dyard Kipling and the Fiction of Ado- 
lescence, " wrote this for The New York 
Times. 


manipulative and indecisive,” 
and the portrait of her “seemed 


help of the Binghams, Louis- 
ville has become a thriving cul- 


vflle has become a thriving cul- 
tural community. 


A primary beneficiary has 
been the Actors Theater cl Lou- 


isville, which opened its new 
Bingham Theater this fall as part 
of a $12.5 million expansion. 

Three days a week. Bingham 
is in her office, working with her 


to imply that I was a domineer- 
ing sort of person.” She said nei- 
ther picture was true to life. 

Bingham lives an extremely 
private Hfe. She still spends long 
summers in her house on Cape 
Cod, and La June she is going on 
a Mediterranean cruise, sailing 
from Istanbul through the Greek 
islands, with a stop at Ephesus, 
which she visited many years ago 
with her husband. This tune her 
granddaughter Emily, and Emi- 
ly’s husband, Stephen Reily, wQl 
be with her. She is looking for- 
ward to the voyage as “my 90th 
birthday present to myself.” 


Russell Baker is on vacation. 


portant influences on tbe current film, 
while the director’s only previous fea- 
ture, the 1993 Disney remake of “The 
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn,” 
did not stray far from Twain’s text, 
Kipling purists should note the caveat 
in the opening credits of the new f ilm: 
“Based on characters created by Ru- 
dyard Kipling.” 

As retooled by Sommers, Kipling's 
fable of a boy raised by wolves and 
forced to choose between the jungle 
and the “man-tribe” is now a costume 
drama set at a colonial outpost in In- 
dia, where the feral Mcrwgfi, captured 
by the English, learns the customs and 
speech of man and finds romantic love. 
He also falls prey to treacherous British 
Army officers who coerce him into 
leading them to — what else? — a 
fabulous treasure in a lost dly. 


The cast includes Jason Scott Lee as 


Mowgli; Cary Elwcs as Major Boone; 
Sam Neill as Colonel Brydon, the regi- 


Sam Neill as Colonel Brydon, the regi- 
mental commander, John Cleese as 
Dr. Phnnford, a sort of kinder, gentler 
Basil Fawlty, and Lena Headey (the 
upstairs maid from “The Remains of 
the Day”) as Kitty, the Colonel’s spir- 
ited daughter. 

Despite the liberties Sommers took 
with Kipling's text, he incorporated 
some of the original work into his 
script, including the treasure-laden ru- 
ins that Kipling called the Cold Lairs, 
a jeweled dagger that substitutes for 
the “king's ankus” (a kind of elephant 
goad) and a motif derived from the 
metaphor Mowgli uses for fire, the 
“red flower.” 

In this film, the flower is a hibiscus, 
which Mowgli and Kitty sniff together 


as a form Of courtship, apparently 
unaware that hibiscus has no scent. 

Tire latest “Jungle Book” project 
began when Raju Patel, an Indian 
producer, decided it would be appro- 
priate to commemorate the 1 00th an- 


niversary of the publication of Kip- 
ling’s stories. “The Jungle Books,” 
written in 1894 and 1895, were origi- 
nally two volumes containing 15 sto- 
ries, mostly about animals. But “The 
Jungle Book” gradually became iden- 
tified exclusively with the eight 
Mowgli tales, which were soon em- 
braced throughout the world as a mas- 
terpiece of adolescent fiction. 

Mowgli’s world can be viewed as an 
exuberant myth of boyhood, a parable 
of empire, a coming of age story and 
even a kind of coded autobiography of 
the culturally conflicted, Anglo-Indi- 


A court of appeal in Ver- 
sailles. France, awarded 
600,000 francs ($ 110 , 000 ) ip 

damages to. the heirs of the di- 
rector John Huston and 1 cc- 
script writer Ben MaAfow for a 
colorized version erf the black- 
and-white 1950 classic “The As- 
phalt Jungle.” The court said 
the defunct French TV channel 
La Cinq and the Ted Tamer 
distribution group had. “dam- 
aged the creative activity” of 
Huston and Maddow. 


George and Barbara - Bush 
will celebrate their 50th wed- 
ding anniversary next month at 


a gala country concert in their 
honor at the Grand Ole Opry. 

□ 

Pearl Jam, the Seattle rock 
group whose touring plans were 
derailed last summer by a battle 
with Ticketm aster over service 
fees, will return to the stage in 
Washington for the first of what 
is expected to be a series of 
shows sidestepping the ticket gi- 
ant. Tickets to the benefit shows 
on Jan. 14 and 15 will be sold 
without a surcharge through a 
mail-order lottery system. 


WEATHER 


WEEKEND SKI REPORT 


Europe 


Forecast for Saturday through Monday, as provided by Accu-Weather. 



Today 


Ton 

sorrow 


High 

Low 

W 

Mgh 

Low W 


OF 

OP 


OF 

OF 

Algarve 

14/57 

4*39 

a 

14/67 

10*0 s 

Aratamem 

fl/43 

1/34 

pc 

7/44 

3*7 pc 

Ankara 

6 '43 

2*5 

t 

6/43 

•101 r 

Alf>en« 

14*7 

0/48 


15*9 

9/48 cn 

Bartolcne 

1050 

8/43 


12*3 

7*44 3*1 

Bate race 

4/38 

1/34 


4*9 

0*3Z r 

Bamn 

3*7 

■3*27 

■ 

SMI 

0/32 a 

Bnwaela 

7 '44 

1*4 

pc 

9/48 

•*8 a 

Budapest 


2*5 

s/1 

4*0 

2/35 r 

CODOnrDQQfl 

5/41 

•1*1 

■ 

6/43 

104 9 

costa Dm Sd 

13*5 

3*7 

1 

14*7 

0*48 3 

Out* 

9/48 

5/41 

un 

8/48 

307 r 


0*40 

8/43 


6/46 

8/43 r 

PKirenc* 

0*46 

4*9 

srt 

B/48 

3*37 r 

FrarWun 

4*9 

-1/31 

■ 

5/41 

206 s 

Qonava 

2*5 

-1.31 


4*9 

104 pc 


7*44 

•3127 

c 

4/39 

-2/28 d 

totamwl 

11.52 

B/4fl 

I 

11 *Z 

0/43 i 

LrepBlrnao 

24/75 

17/82 


28/78 

17*2 e 

IMxtn 

13*5 

8/43 

t 

13*5 

S/48 8 

London 

9*48 

3*37 


11*2 

5/41 pc 

Madnd 

7**4 

-a /a? 

a 

0/48 

3/37 PC 

MWm 

4*9 

1** 

an 

4*9 

104 Bi 

Mores* 

-4/25 

•r*j 


-2*9 

-fl/ZZ s 

MunWt 

3,37 

-2*9 

pc 

2*5 

-101 pc 

Nca 

10*0 

4*9 

an 

11/52 

4/30 M> 

OHo 

1/34 

-1*1 

1 

104 

-2/29 an 

Pakm 

9/48 

7/44 

PC 

11*2 

7/44 in 

Part, 

a <*6 

1*4 

s 

0M8 

3.37 3 

Pregusa 

1.34 

-3/27 


2*5 

-2/20 «l 


2*5 

0*3 

CTl 

2*5 

■ins 3* 

Honie 

12*3 

8/48 

i 

10*0 

4*9 nti 

51 Ptfentxnc 

-1*1 

-6/22 


•1*1 

■5*4 pc 

SmckPolni 

3*7 

-1*1 

pc 

2*5 

■1.31 PO 

Smstnag 

2/35 

■2JBB 

pc 

5/41 

r*j4 j 

Ijiarn 

7/44 

-2CT 

c 

4/30 

■2/29 <* 

VBrtca 

6/43 

4/38 

an 

7/4J 

3/37 I 

Vtaona 

2*5 

0*32 

an 

3/37 

002 sn 

(Wflisaw 

1.34 

•J/Z7 

pc 

3*37 

-1/31 6 

Zuneh 

1*4 

-1/31 

pc 

2/35 

-1/31 d 

Oceania 






Auddana 

23/73 

15/50 


23-73 

15*8 pc 

Sydney 

2B*B 

18*8 

flh 

26/78 

18/84 1 



Today 
High Law 
OF OK 


Oepfli Mb. Dm. Bnow Last 
L UPbtea Ptotaa State Snow 


-Oepfli Mtn. Rm. Snow Leri 
L U Pfatee Ptetea State Sow 


Bangkok 

MW 

Hang Kong 

Mam 

NawDaH 

Sochi 

Snanghm 

Stogvnro 

Taipei 

Tokyo 


29AM 21/70 
2/35 -4/85 
21/70 15/58 
Z7ft0 23/73 
24/7S 12/33 
11/GS -2*9 
13/a 7/44 

30/86 24/75 
22/71 16/01 
13/55 «/» 


PasdetaCesa 60 BO Good Open PwarZM2 Rosen 7096 open, paw ttNng 


10 IS Fair Cted Vai 20/12 10 Weapon, open pates good 
40 200 Good Open Pwdr 2D/12 G/eeasXiing otter fresh snow 


JaMream 


I lMaaaacmb/y 
Cold 


UiMaiaratfy 

Hoi 


teehgl 

KHzbuhol 

Obergurgl 

Saaibech 

SLAnton 

Zura 


10 75 Good Cted Pwdr 22/12 MBflsopen. fresh snow 

IS 25 F Or ClEd Pwdr 23.' 12 Snow continues to taB 

35 65 Good Open Pwdr 22/12 14.'31 htts open, good skSng 

25 SO Good Open Pwdr 22/12 Freeh snow, improving conditions 

20110 Good Open Pwdr 22/12 16/32 hits open. excefentsMng 
25 90 Good Open Pwtk 22n2 17 Vis. great skmg. tresh powder 


H om ey 

Geflo 


30 30 Fair Open VW 16/12 AS 16 Hits. 20Uncmss t 


Baqutora-Baret 


SO BO Good Open Pwdr 21/12 60cm tosh snow, ms open 24B> .*■■ 


North America 


Stormy wsalfter will lash 
New York City and Boston 
Saturday, as there will be 
strong winds and rain The 
storm will move away Sun- 


day inro Monday Chicago 
will have a very nrtd Christ- 
mas weekend, as will Den- 
ver. Rains are likely In San 
□lego over the weekend. 


Europe 

Rome wHI have e tew rainy 
episodes this weekend, and 
much ol the Metfterranean 
Sea will have unsettled 
weather aa wen. The sun ml 
snirae Saturday and Sunday 
In Pans, Brussels and 
Copenhagen, as well as In 
Bonn and Berfm Rams are 
possible in Glasgow and 
Edinburgh. 


Asia 

After being hit a couple of 
d*ys ago by Typhoon Axel, 
the Philippines could be hit 
by Typhoon Bobbie late In 
rhe weekend Or Monday. 
Rare could soak Shanghai 
Sunday Into Monday. Seoul 
will have a cold wind Satur- 
day, then vM not tie as cold 
Sviday and Monday. 


ApMm 12/53 
Cage Town 16/01 
CasaHonCB 18/BI 
Harare 16*4 
Loom atm 
Nemo aura 
Tunis 13/55 


10/50 Mi 13/55 BMfl =H 

10/50 C 17/62 li<S2 pc 

4/3# « 17/62 8/46 S 

7/44 pc 24/75 6/46 S 

24/75 • 3S/B9 am a 

11/52 «h 22/71 13/55 I 

7/44 pc 14/57 6/43 M 


North America 


Middle East 


Latin America 


TcnMi Tom or row 

High Low W Mgh Lam W 

OF CIF Off OP 

18/64 uaa pc 19*8 is/ea s 
21.70 8/48 ■ M/79 1457 * 

1J/55 4,39 PC 17.62 9«46 B 

14/57 B '45 a 17/BZ 11/52 t 

29.34 5/41 S 3*m 13/55 > 

21/70 8/46 pc 21/70 8,48 » 


Today Tomorrow 

Mgfl Low W HQh Low W 
Of OF Of OF 

BunnOfiMM 35193 2373 » 33/95 Z3/73 pc 

Caracas 30/88 IPV6 ih M'S* 19/88 pc 

Urns 22/71 18«< pc aa/71 ia/w pc 

MexKoClr 22/71 11/52 pc 22/71 SMC pc 

Aod&JvMrQ 27/80 23/73 r MAM 22/71 pc 

Sartagp 28/8? 14/57 a 30/55 IS*! pc 


Anchorage 

Attorns 

Boson 

CMcago 

Owner 

Drew 

HoraMu 

Hounon 

Lot Angolas 


Franc* 

AJpad'Huaz 
Los Arcs 
Avorfaz 

Las Contamines 
Courchevel 
Las Deux Alpes 
Meg eve 
NWritjel 
LaPlagne 
Sena Chevalier 
Tig n«s 
Vald-lsAra 
VodThorens 


Var 3Q/TZ 
Var 21/12 
Pwdr 21/12 
Pwdr 20/12 
Pwdr 21/12 
Var 20/12 
Var 20/12 
Vor 21/12 
Pwdr 20/12 
Var 20/12 
Pwdr 20/12 
Pwdr 20/12 
Pwdr 21/12 


Buns open snow machines acSng 
17ms. good skmg stove 2000m 
Open pistes skBng we*. 13 Ms 
6/25 lifts open. 30cm at 1600m 
21 ‘68 lifts open, open runs good 
20-75 Mte open, s kttng to 2600m 
Suing or nearby Las Comammes 
1 5cw of snow at moftarei 1700m 
2 1.112 tins open, best on gbeter 
Snow machines in constant use 
20-50 Bits, greet pste Stomg 
Groat skiing 35:51 6 Its open 
19-30 Sits open. exceOem skong 


Swttnrlud 

Adelbodan 
Crane Montana 
Davos 
Gstaad 
W outers 
Saas Fee 
SLMorftz 
Varbtor 
Zermatt 


Cted Pwdr 22/12 
CM Pwdr 22/12 
Cted Pwdr 20/12 
Clod Pwdr 22/12 
Gad Pwdr 20/12 
Cted Pw* 20/12 
Cted Pwdr 20/12 
Cted Var 20/12 
Cted Pwdr 20/12 


6/25 Hits open, vastly improved 
1 1/40 fits open, gtmror stSl tiesf 
17.‘36 60s open, good Puing 
All upper slopes m good sr&pe 
Good sMng on open r ws 
15 '26 Ms open, giaevr esryc&d 
10- 24 Bits open, tnseti snow, good 
16-‘3S Ms greet on open pistes 
25 -37 Utts open vary good sbmg 


09. 

Atu»n 

Mammoth 

Steamboat 

Teflurlda 

Vail 


85 90 Good Open Pckd 15/12 ABB Ms open 
210240 Goad Open Var t5/!2 All 30 Mts open 
60115 Good Open PfcW 16/12 AK20 Ms c*wn 
85 115 Good Open Pckd 14/12 AH mm open 
60 85 Good Open Pckd 15/12 All 25 Mts open 


Berchtesgaden 20 40 For Cted Pwdr 22/12 5 -Ji bits open. Out srvn taBmg 
GamUsch 10130 Good Cted Pwdr 22/12 Sltt only cugspUzo siaabie 


50 250 Good Open Pwpr 20/12 20*26 Hits. 35cm or snow 


Legend: s-sumy. pc-partty douny. cloudy, atvahowere, whu/wenuomw, i-ram. oi-snow furrica, 
srvanaw. I4ca. W-Wavhgr All mapa. foraenta and data prevtdad by Accw-Wa a thra. tnc-SIW* 


San Fran 
Seattle 
Twcnw 
Wactunglan 


Italy 

Bormlo 

CendniB 

Courmayeur 


10 70 Good Cted pwdr 21/12 5 16 Ms ana I5*m ol p&eapen 
10200 Goad Open Cray 20*12 10-27 hits open. good, some toe 
5 70 Good Cted Var ig/12 11.23 Mts open. 30cm ot at 
1700m 


Kef. Ui Depth In cm on kmar and upper slopes. Mtn. Ptetea Moymalnstde pww Rea. 
Ptete8;Rws lewtoo to rased village. AmArtMioaf snow 


Reports svppUea ov it>e sm Out ot Gnm Man 


political 

ftalV'S E 1 


p „k0‘ n:er 

CJ s f° r 

OfDef tcit 1 


v- ‘ . " •• 




- .-r 

Mr