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INTERNATIONAL 


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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


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Yeltsin Orders Air Force 
To Stop Bombing Civilians 

In Address to Public, and to Troops, 
He Vows to Subdue Chechen Rebels 


Paris, Wednesday, December 28, 1994 


No. 34,783 



By Alessandra Stanley 

New 1 ork Times Sen ice 

MOSCOW Hoping io stem growing 

B2££2 P 2? , - 0n v° !he war in C“chnysL 
President Boris N. Yeltsin announid 

Tu^day night that he had ordered toe 
^jmbmg of civilians in the Chechen capi- 
tal of Grozny to stop. p 

It was the first time Mr. Yeltsin, whose 
K send tanks to the rebel republic 
on Dec. 1 1 touched off a political crisis in 
Russia, spoke up publicly to justifv his 
actions. It was also the first time the'Ru*- 
sian i government had admitted to killing 
civilians in the secessionist republic. 

By limiting air strikes and holding out 
an offer of new peace negotiations, the 
Russian president seemed to be reachjne 
out to supporters who have broken witfi 
him over the conflict in Chechnva. But 
wilh his leadership under fierce attack. Mr. 
Yeltsin mostly seemed intent on pressing 
forward and finishing the job of seizin® 
Grozny. 


Vowing that Russian forces would not 
turn back until “law and order" was re- 


stored in Chechnya, Mr. Yeltsin said: 

. “The Russian people have for a long 
tune justly rebuked us for indecision, for a 
.ack of political will, for the reluctance to 
restore order to the territory of the Che- 
chen republic, an integral part of Russia. 
The extremely complicated situation re- 
quired the gravest derision — to use the 
armed forces on the territory of Chech- 
nya.” 

Mr. Yeltsin, who had been out of sight 
for most of the crisis, reportedly recovering 
from a minor nose operation, looked stiff 
but in good health as he made his televi- 
sion address Tuesday. 


Mr. Yeltsin said that the first phase of 
the military operation was complete, and 
that “the circle around Grozny is light.” 

But Russians have mainly watched in 
shock as the Russian military has almost 
unraveled over the Chechen operation, 
with senior generals and field commanders 
refusing to fulfill their missions. 

Mr. Yeltsin indirectly tried to address 
those problems, saying that Russian sol- 
diers “have found themselves at the fore- 
front of the struggle against the most dan- 
gerous. powerful and arrogant forces of 
the Russian and international criminal and 
extremist world." 

He dismissed the fierce Chechen resis- 
tance as the product of “deceit, money and 
threats” as well as foreign mercenaries. 

He appealed directly to Russian soldiers 
for their support. 

“Remember, the outrage of gangsterism 
on the Chechen land is a dangerous threat 
to the whole of our country," he said. 
“Your kin could even be among its vic- 
tims." 

“I understand that it is not easy for 
soldiers today." he added. “It is not easy 
for the minister of defense and the minister 
of interior either. You are in difficult con- 
ditions, you are not praised by the mass 
media. But I call on you to do' everything 
you can to fulfill this* task.” 

Mr. Yeltsin lashed out at the media, 
politicians and the Chechen enemy. He 
dismissed his opposition by saying, “There 
are people among them who are motivated 
— let us say this directly — bv their politi- 
cal ambitions." 

Mr. Yeltsin also blamed the unusually 
negative Russian press coverage on cor- 

See YELTSIN, Page 6 



Agcncc Erucr-fttac 


WEST BANK UNREST — Israeli troops moving protesters on Tuesday 
who were contesting the expansion of a Jewish settlement Page 2. 


Modern Scandal Greets Big Stone- Age Art Find 


By Marlise Simons 

New York Tunes Service 

fr PARIS — Along the banks of the Coa River in 
northern Portugal, in a spot where only shepherds' paths 
tell of the presence of humans, a prehistoric art gallery 
has been discovered on the rock face, setting off excite? 
nient, nervousness and accusations of a cover-up in the 
world of archaeology. 

The images form a parade of more than 60 animals, 
like bison, horses, ibexes and deer; archaeologists esti- 
mate that they were chiseled into the rock face with 
sharp stone tools about 20,000 years ago. 

Historians have described it as the most important site 
oi outdoor an of the Stone Age in Europe, revealing 
human settlements In inland areas previously thought 


too inhospitable for the coast-hugging early inhabitants 
of the Iberian Peninsula. 


But there. 130 kilometers <80 miles) from the Atlantic 
coast, animal images were found, grouped in dusters, 
stretching for two miles along a deep gorge. 

-Historians see this open-air site as important evidence 
that Stone Age art was not mainly made indoors, or in 
what are held to be the human race's most ancient 
sanctuaries: the caves or rock shelters where most other 
mural art from the Paleolithic era has been found. 


Although the surprise of discovering a huge open air 
gallery of Paleolithic art inevitably raises questions 


about its authenticity, the dozen or so experts who have 
seen the engravings so far say that they have no reason to 
suspect forgery. 


“I believe it*s genuine and probably one of the most 
important, if not the most important, outdoor Paleolith- 
ic site we know of,” said Jean Gottes. France’s leading 
rock art specialist, who was called in by the Portuguese 
government. 

Yet. coinciding with the discovery has come the 
knowledge that the rock carvings may soon be lost. One 
portion, the lowest tier, has already been flooded. It was 
engulfed by water from a hydroelectric dam in the River 
Douro 12 years ago. Now a second dam is bong built to 
create a backup reservoir and, unless the project is halted 
or c h a ng ed, the remaining images will disappear under 
300 feet of water four years from now. 

Indeed, it is only by chance that the existence of the 

Sec PORTUGAL, Page 6 


Economic Clouds Over Japan Are Starting to Clear 


Compiled by Our Stuff From Dispatches 

TOKYO — Fresh evidence emerged 
that Japan has finally entered a sustainable 
economic recovery with low inflation and . 
with little risk of double-dip recession, as 
the government reported Tuesday that fac- 
tories were working harder and fewer peo- 
ple were out of work. . 

declining for two months, indus- 
trial production, the engine driving the 
economy, rose 2.7 percent in November 
from October, the International Trade and 
Industry Ministry said. The rise was 
broad-based, with 12 of 14 categories 
showing an increase. „ _ , 

“We’re clearly recovering, said Geor- 
frey Barker, an economist at Barmg secu- 
rities. 


The “surge in the manufacturing sec- 
tor’s spending appears to be indicating an 
overall recovery, a ministry official said. 
In addition, sales at large-scale retailers 


U& bonds rise to highest level in three 
months on signs of slowdown. Page 9. 


increased for the first rime since July, and 
housing starts rose. Construction orders, a 
key indicator of corporate investment in 
factories, warehouses and offices, jumped 
an impressive 20.8 percent. 

Meanwhile, Yasuo Matsushita, Japan's 
new central bank chief, said Tuesday that 
he would maintain an easy credit policy to 
smooth an economic upturn. 

“The economy has reached the phase 


where it is recovering gradually,” he said. 

The central banker is a firm believer in a 
free market mechanism and economic 
growth led by private-sector activity. “The 
most crucial point is how the economy will 
stand cm its own feet and recover with the 
help of private-sector capital investment,” 
he said. 

It was also announced Tuesday that 
Japan’s unemployment rate dipped to 2.9 
percent in November after hovering at 3 
percent for four months, although the 
number of job offerings remained little 
improved for toe third consecutive month. 
Japan’s all-time high jobless rate of 3.1 
percent was set in May 1987. 

In spite of the various signals of a recov- 
ering economy, inflation remains modest 


magement 

cy said. Excluding food and vegetables, 
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Drug Trade Scars Idyllic Canadian Isle 


By Anne Swardson 

Washington Post Service 

NANAIMO, British Columbia — People have flocked to 
this isla n d city off Canada’s west coast m recent years and 
lapped up afl Nanaimo has to offer: beautiful ocean scenery, 

r* * ■ V.L! I J ...J lit ,1 a mnn, anrl 9 


boating, fishing, hunting, good schools. Ut^ snow and a 
style ’ ' * ' * 


lifestyle far more peaceful than that in bustling Vancouver 
across the strait. . . . . ... 

Recently, however, Nanaimo s offerings nave expanded a bit 
•too much. Heroin and cocaine trafficking have increased 
d ramaticall y here, and law-enforcement officials and political 
leaders sav toe situation is getting worse. The perpetrators, 
toev say, are principally Vietnamese immigrants, who are 
periling their wares to a younger and younger clientele. 

Tensions are high in this city of 70,000. Many Vietnamese 
are angry that they are being blamed for a problem sown by 
only a few, and they fear reprisals from drug dealers if they 
name names. Some while residents are calling on toe federal 


government in Ottawa to enact new restrictions on immigra- 
tion, effectively blaming Canada’s open-door policy for their 
drug troubles. A magazine recently dubbed Nanaimo “Cana- 
da’s heroin capital.” 

Mayor Gary R- Korpan doubts that his city is any worse 
than the major hubs of Toronto, Montreal or Vancouver. “You 
can never exactly estimate the extent of toe problem,” he said. 
“But more people are overdosing, more crimes are being 
committed by people who are strung out If we don’t take 
strong action now, it will get way out of control.” 

Nanaimo, founded more than 140 years ago by British coal 


miners, is a port city that has always had its share of illegal 
drugs. It is on two ferry lines from toe i 


: mainland, and, because 
it uf an easy drive to the provincial capital of Victoria in the 
south or toe lumber country up north, it serves well as a 
distribution center. 

For years, toe Hell's Angels motorcycle gang reputedly ran 

See DRUGS, Page 6 


France Acted on Tip: 
Hijackers Planned 
Explosion Over Paris 


By Alan Riding 

iVrn- York Tunes Service 

PARIS — The French government said 
Tuesday that it ordered the assault on a 
hijacked Air France airliner after learning 
that toe Islamic militants who seized toe 
plane in Algiers were planning to blow it 
up over Pam. 

French police said that, after toe four 
hijackers were killed and 171 hostages 


were freed Monday in the dramatic opera- 

ices of 


tion at the Marseille airport, 20 sticl 
dynamite were found on board toe Airbus 
A-300. 

“Their objective was a suicide operation 
over Paris with the plane,” Interior Minis- 
ter Charles Pasqua said, “so we couldn’t let 
it leave.” 

The Armed Islamic Group said it had 
ordered toe hijacking in reprisal for 
French economic, political and military 
support for the Algerian government. 

Angered that the gunmen were able to 
boara the Air France plane at Algiers 
airport on Saturday, France has also de- 



resumption 
and sea finks between toe two countries. 

Prime Minister Edouard BaOadur none- 
theless expressed confidence that Mon- 
day’s commando operation would discour- 
age new terrorist actions in this country. 
“France will inexorably fight terrorism 
and will not give in to blackmail wherever 
it comes from,” he warned shortly after toe 
hijackers were killed. 

French government officials said that 
Paris, fearing that Algeria would order its 
police to end toe hijacking, immediately 
offered to send its own commandos to 
Algiers airport. Then, after the gunmen 
killed a French hostage, France demanded 
that Algeria accede to their demand to fly 
to France. 

Since the plane lacked fuel to reach 
Paris, the gunmen were given toe option of 
Nice or Marseille. Once they landed in 
Marseille early Monday morning, Mr. Pas- 
qua said, they were offered the chance of 
bring tried in France — and not bring sent 
bade to Algeria — if they freed all toe 
hostages. 

“They said they wanted logo to Paris to 
hold a news conference,” the interior min- 
ister explained Tuesday. “We said there 
were plenty of journalists in Marseille. We 
saw there was little chance the hostages 
would be released so toe decision was 
made yesterday morning to free the 
plane.” 

He said an anonymous tip to toe French 
Consulate in Oran, Algeria, said that the 


S ws’ real purpose was to destroy the 
over Paris. “Analysis of toe dyna- 


mite found on board confirmed that toe 
See HIJACK, Page 6 


4 Priests Slain 
In Algeria; 

3 Were French 


Compiled by Oar Staff From Dispatches 

ALGIERS — Four Catholic 
priests, including three Frenchmen, 
were shot and killed Tuesday in Tizi- 
Ouzou, about 100 kilometers east of 
the capital, officials in Algiers and 
Paris reponed. 

The other slain priest was a Belgian, 
the archbishop of Algiers said. 

The four were members of the Or- 
der of White Fathers. They were ma- 
chine-gunned in the center of Tizi- 
Ouzou, 60 miles from Algiers. There 
was no claim of responsibility. 

The attack came a day after French 
commandos stormed an Air France 
jetliner hijacked from Algiers to Mar- 
seille, killing toe four Algerian hijack- 
ers and bringing an end to the three- 
day drama. 

The kflfings brought to 75 the num- 
ber of foreigners killed in Algeria 
since the Islamic Armed Group, 
which has claimed responsibility for 
the hijacking, ordered all foreigners 
more than a year ago to leave or face 
death. Twenty-five of those killed 
have been French. 

The number of foreigners living in 
Algeria has fallen sharply since Sep- 
tember 1993. Embassies are reluctant 
to give precise figures, but observers 
beheve only a few thousand non-Alge- 
rians remain, with toe French group 
of fewer than 1,000 forming toe larg- 
est single community. 

The French priests were Christian 
Cbeissel, 36; Jean Chevillard, 69, and 
Alain Dieulangard, 75, according to a 
government communique. The Bel- 
gian was Charles Deckers, who turned 
70 on Christmas Eve. 

“Deeply shocked and disturbed by 
this new act of barbarism, France con- 
demns in toe strangest terms this odi- 
ous crime,” toe French Foreign Minis- 
try said. 

It said toe French Embassy in Al- 
giers had been in contact with Algeri- 
an authorities to express France’s 
“deep concern" and obtain more in- 
formation, toe statement said. 

It also repeated its warning that all 
nonessential French citizens should 
leave toe country. (AP. AFP, Reuters) 


Tokyo consumer prices were only 0J5 
percent higher in December than a year 
ago, the government said, showing that 
inflation continued to pose no threat in 
Japan. The consumer price increase was 
the smallest one, year on year, in TVi years, 
toe Management and Coordination 


Tokyo consumer prices have declined 
steadily over the last five years. 

“Normally, one would have expected 
inflation to go up as the economy — pro- 
duction, particularly — improves,” said 
Robert Feldman, chief economist at Salo- 
mon Brothers. “But it hasn’t done so.” 

He said that meant that Japan would 

See JAPAN, Page 6 



Phibppc WqiBcr/ Reuter* 


President Frangois Mitterrand meeting Tuesday with a wounded member of 
the commando team that stormed the hijacked Air France aircraft on Monday. 


Horse Racing in Vietnam: When They Cry ‘They’re Off/ It’s True 



Andrew Beyer, the horse racing columnist 
of The Washington Post, spent the past 
month traveling in the Far East. 

By Andrew Beyer 

Washington Post Struct 

HO CHI MTNH CITY — I pride myself 


on toe ability to handicap and bet in any 
country and any language. So when I con- 
cluded that Ha Ngoc Chau was the fastest 
horse in a field at Phu Tho racecourse, 1 
confidently wagered 40,000 dong in exac- 
tas. 

Among more than 3,000 Vietnamese 
racing fans, mine was surely the only voice 


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The Dollar 

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Third in a series 


yelling, “Come on. Number Four!” when 
Ha Ngoc Chau turned into the stretch with 
a dear lead. Only when he approached toe 
finish line did 1 notice what was amiss: Ha 


Ngoc Chan had nobody on Ins back. 
Hisii 


lis jockey had fallen off somewhere in 
the preceding six furlongs. This, I would 
leant, was not an unusual occurrence. 
Horse racing in toe city that used to be 


known as Saigon is filled with uncertain- 
ties. 

Vietnamese racehorses are a genetic 
mixture of French thoroughbred stock and 
Mongolian ponies, and most are so small 
that, by U.S. standards, they look as if they 
belong in an am u se me nt park rather than 
at a track. 

Races here are classified not by age or 
sex but according to the height of the 
horses, in order to give a fair chance to the 
smallest of toe small. In toe lowest classes 
the weight assignment for a horse may be 
as low as 64 pounds (29 kilograms); even 
the “big” horses cany no more than 96. 
Bill Shoemaker in his prime would have 
been too gargantuan to ride here. 

Riders at ran Tho must be tiny, so the 


a Westerner, as if they might be 10 and 


jockey colony here is composed entirely of 

>Iook,to 


children, 14- and 15-year-olds whole 


. is if they 
don’t have the strength to control a race- 
horse. 

When toe gate opens for races, at least 
one or two of toe horses will be left 1 0 or 20 
lengths behind. When the field turns into 
the stretch, everybody loses control; horses 
that had been near the rail drift beyond the 
middle of toe track. The stretch run is 
reminiscent of little kids driv ing bumper 
cars; horses swerve right and left, banging 
into each otoer. As far as I could discern, 
however, Vietnamese horseplayers seemed 
to accept all of this as a part of the game. 

Racing in Saigon dates back to 1893, 
when it was organized by French military 
officers. The present Phu Tho track was 
built in 1932, but its operations have fre- 
quently been disrupted by war. When toe 
Japanese occupied the country in World 


War IX, they rounded up horses from stud 
farms and sent them home, dismantling 
the small breeding industry here. 

Phu Tho did conduct racing during 
much of toe “American war.” Bill Nack. 
now toe turf writer for Sports Illustrated, 
served in toe U.S. Army here and he re- 
called: “I went to the races and the past 
performances were all in French and Viet- 
namese, so I looked at the horses in the 
paddock and Number Two was a stand- 
out. But when I tried to bet my piasters on 
him, they told me, ‘All the tickets on Num- 
ber Two are sold already. You can have 
Numbers Three, Five or Eight.’ Naturally, 
Number Two won by a mile. 

“Another time 1 started to go to Phu 
Tho but thought better of it — which was a 


See RACES, Page 16 


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Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28* 1994 


In Croatia , Impasse at the Serb- Croat Divide 


By John Pomfret 

Washington Pm Service 

MRKOVCI, Croatia — dad in a 
mustard-yellow Italian suit and looking 
as though he bad come a long way since 
his prewar days as a mechanic, Miomir 
Craogorac smirked behind his huge 
beard when asked whether he believed 
the oil wells he manages in rebel Serbian 
territory would ever return to Croatian 
control 

“It’s a joke," said Mr. Crnogorac, 34, 
who was recently appointed general 
manager of NIK, the oil company ran 
by the Croatian Serbs. 

“Our country is a reality," he said as 
secretaries scurried around his office 
and soldiers armed with automatic 
weapons patrolled outside. “We are only 
lacking one part — international recog- 
nition. We hope that comes soon." 

Although a cease-fire has long since 
suspended the war in Croatia, there is 
little sign of a peaceful solution to 
bridge the deepest divide in the Balkans 
— between Croats and Serbs. 

While Croatia and the Croatian Serbs 
have recently concluded a deal to restore 
some economic links and open a high- 
way for the fust time since fighting 
erupted in 1991, few United Nations 


2 Bosnian Troops 
HurtinBihac 
Despite Truce 

Tht Associated Press 

SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herze- 
govina — Two government sol- 
diers were wounded in fighting 
in northwestern Bosnia despite 
United Nations efforts to 
broaden a cease-fire officials 
said Tuesday. 

The UN commander for Bos- 
nia, Sir Michael Rose, met the 
Bosnian vice president, Ejup 
Game, and made plans to visit 
the troubled northwestern Bi- 
hac region. 

Continued attacks cm gov- 
ernment forces in the region by 
rebel Serbs from Croatia and 
renegade Muslim forces have 
threatened a truce that took, ef- 
fect Saturday. 

During a half-hour of incon- 
clusive talks with General Rose, 
Mr. Ganic said he bad insisted 
that Croatian Serbian troops be 
withdrawn from the Bihac en- 
clave. 

Mr. Ganic said he had reiter- 
ated to General Rose a Bosnian 
government demand that UN 
peacekeepers take control of 
the border between Croatia and 
Bihac to stop infiltration by re- 
bel Croatian Serbs and allied 
Muslim separatists fighting 
government troops. 


officials believe the agreement will lead 
to broader links. 

As UN and international negotiators, 
backed by mediation from former Presi- 
dent Jimmy Carter, focus their attention 
on resolving the 32-month-oId war in 
Bosnia, Croatia and the Croatian Serbs, 
who occupy 27 percent of the country, 
r emain in a tense stand-off. 

Many observers predict that a resolu- 
tion in Bosnia without sufficient atten- 
tion to the tinderbox in Croatia would 
transport the war back hoe. 

In recent weeks, Croatian and nation- 
alist Serbian military leaders have ex- 
changed threats. On Dec. 1, Croatian 
Army troops battled Serbian forces. 

Several recent trips through Serb-held 
areas and Croatia proper revealed two 
worlds spixming rapidly apart. When it 
rains in Zagreb, umbrellas are opened. 
In Knifl, the rebel capital, an AK-47 and 
a camouflage hood suffice. 

Croatia, a nation of about 4 million, is 
throwing off its Communist past, priva- 
tizing industry and contemplating a fa- 
tnre in the underbelly of Europe. 

Serb-occupied Croatia, with about 
500,000 people, is more like a giant 
aimed camp, split into three pieces — an 
oil-rich swath of land along Croatia’s 
border with Yugoslavia, a triangle bor- 


dering Serb-held territory in northern 
Bosnia, and a long stretch of land paral- 
lel to Croatia’s Dalmatian Coast Every- 
thing, from NIK’s (til wells to substan- 
tial wheat and meat production, goes to 
the army. 

Phil Corwin, the chief of the UN civil 
affaire operation in eastern Slavonia, the 
Serbian area that borders Yugoslavia, 
said of the Croatian Serbian world: 
“More pigs than people, more guns than 
pigs." 

Colonel Kosta Novakovic, acting 
commander of Croatian Serbian forces 
in the cityofVukovar, was more precise: 
“We don’t have a professional army, so 
all of our inhabitants are in the army. 
That is a lag difference with Croatia." 

Serbs began moving to Croatia in the 
13th and 14th centuries. The migration 
intensified after the defeat of the Serbs 
in the famed battle of Kosovo Polje in 
1389 at the hands of Ottoman Turkish 
forces. 

Under a deal with the Croatian kings, 
the Serbian refugees were permitted to 
settle the rock-strewn bonier region be- 
tween the Croatian kingdom and the 
Turks. As such they earned the sobri- 
quet krqjina, or border, Serbs. 

Famed for their toughness and ability 
to live in some of the harshest conditions 


in Europe, the Serbs developed a reputa- 
tion as good fighters and better thieves. 

In 1991, opposing Croatia’s declara- 
tion of independence from Yugoslavia, 
they proclaimed themselves a state and 
with the Yugoslav Army’s help, pushed 
Croatian forces back. 

The Serbs appear to have a better idea 
of what they want than does the Cro- 
atian government. While Croatia con- 
tinually demands the return of its occu- 
pied territory, its leaders still do not 
app ear decided on the best course of 
action. 

General Janko Bobetko, 74, com- 
mander of the Croatian Army, backed a 
military solution to reunite Croatia 
within its UN-reoognized borders. But 
at the same time be also repeated Cro- 
atia's concerns that the West would crit- 
icize an attack. 

“We’re tired of waiting for the West 
to help us recover our territory,” he said. 
“At a certain point, we’ve got to go it 
alone.” 

A UN mili tary officer said General 
Bobetko’s remarks reflected Croatia’s 
fears that it was not strong enough to 
beat the Sobs, as wed as a desire on the 
part of the Croatian leadership to be 
accepted by Europe. 



Gtcg Boa/Kcsim 

US THE SEASON FOR A DEAL — A line of bargain-hunters waiting in front of an Oxford Street store on 
Tuesday in London as merehantstfaroiigfaout Britain started the country’s annual tradition of post-Christmas sales. 


Basic Science Losing Out to Bottom Line in U.S. 


By Boyce Rensberger 

Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — Of all 
the forms of research, the most 
misunderstood by the public 
and by politicians is baric sci- 
ence, scientists say. But it is the 
kind of research that built the 
knowledge base underlying all 
the practical benefits that soci- 
ety has realized from technol- 
ogy. 

And yet, it faces repeated 
challenges as a luxury the Unit- 
ed States can no longer afford. 
As recently as last year’s con- 
gressional budget-making pro- 
cess, a Senate science commit- 
tee told the National Science 
Foundation, which was estab- 
lished to support basic science, 
to divert more of its money to 
applied science, which promises 
immediate practical results. 

In response, numerous scien- 
tists tried to explain that with- 
out bask science to enlarge the 
body of knowledge, science 


cannot continue to produce 
practical benefits. 

“The bottom line has always 
been that the more we under- 
stand the nature of the physical 
universe, the better we are able 
to use matter and energy in use- 
ful ways,” said Robert Hazen, a 
scientist at the Carnegie Institu- 
tion of Washington. 

Basic science, which also goes 
by such names as fundamental 
research and pure sdcoce, is the 
type of research aimed simply 
at lea rn in g more about bow na- 
ture works, be it the inrides of 
stars and atoms or the behavior 
of cells and proteins. Its direc- 
tions are dictated chiefly by 
what scientists find interesting. 

This kind of research, some- 
times called curiosity-driven 
science, can appear to be the 
most indulgent of luxuries: get- 
ting a government grant to do 
whatever you want to do. Ask 
most baric researchers why they 
work long hours for low pay, 
and they will tell you how excit- 


ing it is to probe the most inti- 
mate workings of the natural 
world and to discover some- 
thing that nobody ever knew. 

For several decades, this is 
exactly what thousands of 
Americas scientists have been 
doing. They are supported by 
tax dollars not to work specifi- 
cally on any of society’s prob- 
lems or even to develop a prod- 
uct that will make money, but 
topursue their own curiosity. In 
1993, the government spent an 
estimated S16-5 billion for this 
purpose, most of the money be- 
ing disbursed by the National 
Institutes of Health and the Na- 
tional Science Foundation. 

In the past, such expendi- 
tures prompted only occasional 
challenges. A decade ago, for 
example, then-Senalor William 
Proxmire. Democrat of Wis- 
consin, made a sarcastic ritual 
of giving “Golden Fleece” 
awards to scientists who had 
won grants for research projects 
whose titles seemed frivolous. 


In recent years, many scien- 
tists say the challenge to baric 
research has become more 
threatening. The Clinton ad- 
ministration’s science budgets, 
for example, have given huge 
boosts to industrial technology 
programs but only cost-of-liv- 
mg increases to basic research. 

Last year, the Senate Appro- 
priations subcommittee that 
deals with the National Science 
Foundation issued a report crit- 
icizing the agency for not hav- 
ing clear enough practical goals 
for its grants and said that if the 
foundation did not move more 
to practical research, “future 
federal R&D budgets should 
instead be allocated more gen- 
erously to agencies such as the 
National Institute of Standards 
and Technology, NASA the 
national energy labs, or the Na- 
tional Institutes of Health, all 
of whom seem poised to pursue 
critical technologies with entre- 
preneurial vigor and enthusi- 
asm.” 


Karl Schiller, Former German Minister, Dies at 83 


The Associated Press 

HAMBURG, Germany — 
Karl Schiller, 83, a Social Dem- 
ocrat whose tenure as econom- 
ics minister in the 1960s helped 
establish his leftist party as a 
responsible partner in West- 
German politics, died of ab- 
dominal hemorrhaging Mon- 


day, his doctors said Tuesday. 

He had been hospitalized 
since Nov. 17. 

A professor of economics at 
the University of Hamburg, 
Mr. Schiller became economics 
minister in 1966 when the So- 


cial Democrats joined the so- 
called Grand Coalition headed 
by the conservative Christian 
Democrats. 

In the following Soda] Dem- 
ocratic government of Willy 
Brandt, Mr. Schiller took the 
additional post of finance min- 
ister in 1971, becoming known 
as the “super minister” until his 
1972 resignation over policy 
differences. 

Mr. Schiller directed a policy 
of pump-priming that helped 
puli the west German economy 


out of its first severe postwar 
recession and, dealing with a 
crisis in the coal industry, 
moved the industry toward pri- 
vate ownership rather than to 
the socialist goal of nationaliza- 
tion. 

Cardinal Pavan, Key Figure 
In 2d Vatican Council, at 91 

VATICAN CITY (Reuters) 
— Cardinal Pietro Pavan, 91, 
an important figure at the Sec- 
ond Vatican Council, died 
Monday, the Italian Catholic 


newspaper Awenire said Tues- 
day. 

Cardinal Pavan helped shape 
Vatican positions on social is- 
sues, wrote an important 
church document on religious 
freedom, and was a leading; 
contributor to the Council, 
which met from 1962 to 1965. 

The Council approved major 
changes in liturgy, such as al- 
lowing masses in local lan- 
guages and making commit- 
ments to greater dialogue with 
non-Catholics and non-Chris- 
tians. 


Perhaps the most visible 
challenge to basic science came 
last year from that subcommit- 
tee's chairman. Senator Barba- 
ra A. Mikulski, Democrat of 
Maryland, when she said the 
government should divert more 
of its science funding to what 
she called “strategic science” 
Because she seemed to mean 
applied science, her statement 
threw scientific leaders into 
pandemonium. The National 
Science Foundation was creat- 
ed to support fundamental sci- 
ence and has traditionally been 
a powerful defender of the con- 
cept 

Moreover, last year’s cancel- 
lation of the largest fundamen- 
tal science project in history, 
the Superconducting Super 
Collider, though motivated by 
huge cost overruns, was per- 
ceived by many in the scientific 
community as a sign that Con- 
gress was prepared to sacrifice 
fundamental research. 

Prospects for basic science in 
the 104th Congress are unclear. 
Support for science as a whole 
has generally not divided along 
partisan lines, but because not 
all the science subcommittees 
have new leaders yet, it is not 
evident how science and espe- 
cially baric science might fare. 

“The present scene is disturb- 
ing,” said Edward E. David Jr., 
who served as President Rich- 
ard N bum's science adviser, lat- 
er headed Exxon Research and 
Engineering and now runs his 
own consulting firm. Mr. David 
told a science policy sympo- 
sium last winter that the strug- 
gle for control of the U.S. scien- 
tific agenda was between 
scientists oo the one hand and 
“politicians and social engi- 
neers” on the other. 


Troops Beat 
Palestinian 
Official in 
West Bank 

The Assoctoied Press 

AL KHADER, Israeli-Occu- 
pied West Bank — Israeli 
troops battling Palestinians 

K ing the expansion of a 
settlement knocked a 
Palestinian official unconscious 
on Tuesday- 

“This is the graveyard of the 
peace process," said Saeb Ere- 
kat, minister of local govern- 
ment in the Palestinian self-rule 
authority, after he had regained 
consciousness. 

“Rabin must deride whether 
to have the Deace or the settle- 
ments," be 'said, referring to 
prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin. 
“We cannot accept this.” 

Four other people were in- 
jured in the scuffle, and 45 were 
arrested. 

The confrontation between 
Mr. Erekat and the troops start- 
ed when he joined a group of 
villagers trying to block Jewish 
settlers from uprooting olive 
s apling s planted as a protest 
against expanding the settle- 
ment of Efrat, 

Dozens of soldiers and bor- 
der policemen surrounded the 
demonstrators and began beat- 
ing them frith their fists and 
rifle butts. Mr. Erekat was 
knocked to the ground and 
dragged away. 

The chairman of the Pales- 
tine Liberation Organization, 
Yasser Arafat, issued a state- 
ment condemning Israeli sol- 
diers for working with settlers. 

Leftist Israeli ministers sup- 
ported stopping the expansion. 

“You cannot negotiate with 
the Palestinians and at the same 
to create an impression that we 
are taking lands from the Pales- 
tinians and establishing settle- 
moats cm them,” said Environ- 
ment Minister Yossi Sarid. 

Deadly Year 
For the Press: 
114 Deaths 

Agence France-Presse 

BRUSSELS — At least 114 
journalists have been killed in 
1994 around the world, making 
it the deadliest year for report- 
ers ever, Aidan White, secre- 
tary-general of the Internation- 
al Federation of Journalists, 
said Tuesday. 

The Brussels-based federa- 
tion this year has registered “at 
least 1 14 confirmed cases of vi- 
olent death, some in gruesome 
circumstances,” Mr. While 
said, adding that IS other kill- 
ings and reports of journalists 
missing were still being investi- 
gated. 

A total of 12 journalists and 5 
other members of news teams 
were also killed in accidents 
while doing on-the-spot report- 
ing. 

More than half of ail journal- 
ists died while reporting on the 
ethnic unrest in Rwanda and on 
Algeria's violent showdown be- 
tween Muslim fundamentalists 
and the military-backed gov- 
ernment; 48 journalists from 
the ethnic Hutu and Tutsi died 
in the Rwanda conflict, while in 
Algeria 19 journalists were 
killed, according to a federation 
tally. 

“But the Mafia and political 
terrorists also claimed ibeir toll 
notably in Russia and Latin 
America, where journalists have 
been brutally assassinated." 
Mr. White said. 

Beijing Acts to Protect 
Its Endangered Pandas 

Reuters 

BEIJING — China is to 
build six more nature reserves 
for its dwindling number of gi- 
ant pandas next year and plans 
to improve five of the existing 
1 1 panda protection zones, the 
Xinhua news agency said. 

Eight hundred of China's 
1,000 pandas will then live in 
reserves, Xinhua said. The new 
preserves are part of a project to 
“protect the giant panda and 
provide it with proper living 
space," initiated by the govern- 
ment in 1991 


WORLD BRIEFS 

8 Criminals Are Execoted^ in Beijing 

nprfTNr. /API — Eight murderers, robbers and tots were 

Ac official press repwted 

*at by November the 



dotal evidence suggests that crane is on tlte rise. 

Neo-Nazi Suspects Held in Germany 

HANAU. Germany (AFP) - About 20 
have been arrested in central and southern 
connection with several politically motivated offenses, the pdice 

here said Tuesday. i.*— -.s* mitral state of Hesse and 


Police raids on suspccu. uoiuoim**'*"—’' -jz — 

in Bavaria in the stodts of weapon* ammunition 

and bomb-making equipment as well as propaganda matmaL 
The suspects, most of than youths or teenagers, are believed to 
have bwomvolved in attacks on hostels for asyltmj-seekets or on 
a synagogue. 

U.S. Urged to Block Arms to Turkey 

WASHINGTON (AF) — Amajor human rights g^ is asking 
Secretary of State Warren M. Christopher to bforic the saketf U£ 
duster bombs to Turkey on the grounds that they might be used 

a ^fl5bwtohfr^^stopher released Tucsfoy, HumatfRjghts 
Watch also urged tighter controls on future U.S. arms transfers to 
Turkey. It wants to see written guarantees that the ar ms wou ld be 
used “only in NATO contingencies or with the pnor approval of 

the U.S. government” __ ' 

Human Rights Watch accused the Turks of attacking Kurdish 
villages in the guerrilla wax. Affiant Tecfctystianspf suburban 
Minneap olis signed a contract June 21 to sell 493 CBU-87 duster 
bombs to Turkey for an estimated $7 million to $8 mfflian, and the 
export license awaits State Department approval. ' 

League Rejects Berlusconi Appeal 


spokesman said, adding that work on the^SSn guilder « 
million) project should start within 18 months. B (jp) 


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it wanted a nonpartisan government. ' 

“We are all agreed on a solution which we have called The 
government of the president’: one that is open to aH" said the 
League’s institutional reforms minister, Francesco Speroni* after a 

meeting of the party’s members of Parliament . 

The apparent show of unity among the League members may be 
bad news for Mr. Berlusconi, who had hoped that about 40 rebels 
within the party would help him form a new government at bade 
his calls for elections- Post and Telecommunications Minister 
Antonio Maxano said the party had agreed on the need for a 
broadly based nonpartisan government to pass institutional re- 
forms, such as changes in the voting system. 

Chinese Strengthen Ties With Burma 

RANGOON (Reuters) — Prime Minister Li Peng of China 
HicrwKw! border and economic issues with his Burmese counter- 
part on Tuesday on the second day of a visit aimed at sealing ties 
with the Burmese military regime. 

Chinese officials said they were satisfied with the development 
of border trade with Burma, and the two governments urged the 
state and private sectors to expand trade links, a Chinese spokes- 
man said. 

Mr. Li and General Than Shwe, chairman of the State Law and 
Order Restoration Council, which came to. power in 1988 after 
suppressing pro-democracy protests, also discussed joint effort^ 
to combat drug trafficking. China has supported Burma against 
foreign criticism for Hitman rights abuses and is its main trading 
partner and arms supplier. . - • 

U.S. Troops GtiardHai^ 

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti (AF) — UJS. soldiers and tanks 
occupied a main plaza Tuesday faring army headquarters, where 
four Haitians died in a firefight after former soldiers stormed the 
buOding to demand back pay. 

Later Tuesday morning, US. soldiers used tear gas to disperse a 


crowd that attacked two honses near Haitian Army headquarters. 
Scores of youths and boys began tearing apart a two-story wooden 
home behind army headquarters, claiming that Haitian soldiers 
used it to hide guns. Local businessmen said soldiers had lived 
there and in an adjacent cement home. 

When the youths began breaking into the second house, tiro. 
U.S. soldiers used tear gas sprays to chase everyone away from 
both homes. During (he night, US. Army soldiers deployed 
concertina wire across much of the huge Champ-de-Mars plaza to 
dose off access to army headquarter. 

For the Record 

Walter Sisrin, 83, one of President Ndson Mandela's closest 
advsens, is seriously ill, the South African Press Association said 
Tuesday. Mr. Sisulu spent 26 years in prison with Mr. Mandela for 
plotting to overthrow the white minority government. (AFP) 


TRAVEL UPDATE 

Iberia Pilots Cancel Planned Strike 

MADRID (Reuters) — Pilots of Iberia Air Lines of Spain 
called off a threatened 12-day strike Tuesday after last-ditch t--»lkr 
with the company. 

A joint statement from the pilots' union, SEPLA, and Iberia 
said the two sides had reach aJ agreement on salary cuts that 
allowed the strike, due to start at midnight, to be called off. It did 
not give details of the agreement on salary cuts. The pilots had 
called the strike to protest a tough wage- and job-cuts plan 
designed to save the unprofitable airline from bankruptcy 

On Friday, drivers employed by the national rail network are 
due to strike and severely disrupt traffic before the New Year 
weekend. In Madrid on Wednesday and Friday, employees of the 
Metro plan to strike for two hours, and employees of the urban 
bus service are to strike Thursday, Friday and Saturday. 

Tourism has been tanned in Egypt's desert regions for five years 
to protect endangered species of animals, Tuesday's editions of A1 
Abram daily reported. (AFP) 

Belgian trackers erected road blocks around the southern city of 
Mons to protest a highway tax. As many as 200 tracks were used 
for the protest m the home town of Transport Minister Elio Di 
Rupo, Belgian radio said. (Reuters) 







fr-vu- - 


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b m 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 1994 


Page 3 








Privatize Government? A Bold Idea’s Mixed Success 




By David E. San 


tT political notes tE 


■ r ‘SSS_ 




ism™?.**. 




bi bi.,n year and paid nearly SI 
billion in federal taxes, there is an 
Amtrak or a Postal Service, both of 


can't let them go completely on their traffic. (The agency is hardly a drain 
own, and we certainly can’t let them go on general revenue: it is financed by a 


ana rue power of the federal 0 h ! ch chro ™ally Jose money. AmtraK, a grouping of former rad- ets.) Then, too, there would alwavs be the 

mem, but as President Bill n , . "? on S the plans Mr. Clinton un- road companies that were unified by Instead, as the Clinton administra- need for a federal bailout if 'the new 

looks for ways to pav for his mid-u ^ cd ,asl weeJc are some that have the government in 1970 in an effort to lion acknowledges, the plan to priva- corporation were in danger erf failing, 

class tax cuts he is turnine l« , , e ' "f 60 talked about For a while, among save the nation's inter-city rail passen- tize the aviation agency is really in- Passengers have an alternative should 

drawn from the Republican nlavK Cl i! c . m lur7lin S the Federal Aviation Ad- ger system, faces a deficit of SI 95 mil- tended to free air controllers from an airline go bankrupt, but the govem- 

sclling ofr some government nw-m “titration into a govemment-ebar- lion this year, even with federal subsi- federal budget rules that have con- men: would have no choice but to keep 

and functions and turnine a numS 1 '^ 1 o cor P oration - <**« of nearly SI billion. damned them to technological antiqui- the air controllers in business, 

agencies into private cornorai irt ° Cr nf Sometimes, however, government The Postal Service losi S914 million ty. Under those rules, the purchase of a Washington's biggest commercial 
The siran*™ s ' savings from privatization have proved in the fiscal year that ended Sept. 15, new computer system or an overhaul success story is the Federal National 

hearts of nSv ■ W °- l ^ addcn lhe , ‘ lusor >* particularly when a federal nearly three times the loss of the previ- of airport radar systems requires push- Mortgage Association, or Fannie Mae. 

Clinton «h U i- 41 ! 8 w hom Mr. agency has been turned into a corpo- ous year, although its defenders point ing a huge expenditure through Con- which was privatized bv the Johnson 

shm inrim?™ 5 r U e ,dc °to®i«»l kin- rale monopoly, sheltered from the rig- out that Congress still requires it to gress, with the whole project paid for adnunistration more than a quarter- 

aid Rcao 08 . ormer President Ron- ors 311(1 risks of competition. In some deliver mail to every small village and in the first year. The inevitable result is century ago. 

anrf in i' r ■? tried privatization cases, privatization has meant simply town, no matter how remote, at a stan- that purchases are delayed, and then It competes for its main business — 

Thafrhm^ 6 ^*, fai ed • . a °d Margaret moving an agency off the government dard rate — a burden not faced by the delayed again. the packaging of mortgages for sale to 

Rrita" Wh ? as Pri me minister of ooolo*. with an unstated presumption United Parcel Service, for example. Once it became a corporation, bow- investors — with another government 
amain was far more successful at 11,81 501X16 kind °f federal bailout will Some of the Clinton administra- ever, the aviation agency would be spinoff, the Federal Home Loan Mort- 
turaing government agencies into pri- fol3ow if it sinks. lion's privatization ideas are indisput- freed to dip into private capital. It gay. Corp. 


under." 

Amtrak, a grouping of former rail- 


traffic. (The agency is hardly a drain the licensing of pilots, for instance, or 
on general revenue: it is financed by a the certification of new aircraft — 
10 percent federal tax on airline tick- would be politically untenable. 


Cuomo's Career: A Promise Unfulfilled 


Then, too, there would alwavs be the 


Instead, as the Clinton administra- need for a federal bailout if the new 


■ ■ n j. c ^, 


meat would have no choice but to keep 
the air controllers in business. 
Washington's biggest commercial 






fOlmri WW. and XsS 

2K5 er - as prime minister of 


Britain was far more WSui at 

vr^, e % v n e ™’ em p- 


«^ iJe ^ uch P ro P°saJ^ have a nice 


JL-iSl government experience with 
bringing market discipline to bureau- 
cracy has been mL\cd. 

For ever. suri'ML< c 


moving an agency off the government 
books, with an unstated presumption 
that some kind of federal bailout will 
follow if it sinks. 

"There is privatization, and then 
there is real privatization,” said Don- 
ald F. Kettl, of the University of Wis- 
consin who wrote a Brookings Institu- 
tion study on the subject. "Sometimes 


m tne nrst year. I he inevitable result is century ago. 

that purchases are delayed, and then It competes for its business — 
delayed again. the packaging of mortgages for sale to 

Once it became a corporation, bow- investors — with another government 
ever, the aviation agency would be spinoff, the Federal Home Loan Mon- 


freed to dip into private capital. It gay Corp. 


able money-savers. For example, the could get bulks or other investors to Today, F anni e Mae is remarkably 


I Don- president is reviving a decades-old finance a technological overhaul, then 
rf Wis- plan to sell or lease a navy-run oil field pay back the debt over a number of 
nstitu- that dates from World War I, when years while depredating its investment 
dimes admirals insisted that the government along the way. 
d over must pump its own battleship fueL But even advocates of the idea con- 


finance a technological overhaul, then profitable, and its top executives are 


cracy has been mixed u ‘ government functions are turned over must pump its own battleship fueL But even advocates of the idea con- market competition, which forces us to 

For ever, si to the private sector lock, stock and Savings are not the chief motivation, cede that not all current agency func- be relentlessly efficient," said Fannie 

Mae ihe Sl0r ^ Wie Fannjc barre L m hopes that will create real however, in the case of the aviation tions could be divorced from the gov- Mae’s spokesman, John Buckley, 

er thfli m !? rl S :i & e undcrwnt- efficiency. In other cases, like Amtrak agency the agency that directs the eminent. Relinquishing to private "That is hard to replicate in govem- 


doing far better for themselves than if 
they were serving in the government. 

"What makes it work, though, is the 
market competition, which forces us to 
be relentlessly efficient," said Fannie 


er that nn • m ? ng:i f &e underwrit- efficiency. In other cases, like Amtrak agency the agency that directs the eminent. Relinquishing to private “That is hard to replicate in govem- 

an a profit of nearly SI.9 or the post office, we’ve shown we country's commercial and private air operators the agency’s safety tasks — mem” 


e Jail, Simpson Seems to Have a Lock on Celebrity Comfort 


NEW YORK — Confiding to his diary on the eve of his 
first inauguration as governor of New York, Mario M. 
Cuomo noted a certain “queasy feeling in the stomach." He 
felt "captured.” he wrote, by the problems of the state, by the 
loss of privacy in his life’ and by the fear that “we will 
disappoint so many because of our inability to do all wc 
would like to do." 

When Mr. Cuomo steps down on Saturday', he will bring to 
an end one of the longest and most celebrated governorships 
in recent history- Mr. Cuomo was, almost as soon as he was 
elected, a national figure, attracting admirers even in pre- 
cincts where they couldn't pronounce his name. He was twice 
a shadow candidate for president and was regarded by many 
as the most inspiring speaker in contemporary politics. 

Yet despite these' achievements, there hovers about Mr. 
Cuomo as he leaves office the sense, predicted so long ago in 
his diary, that he has disappointed many. For reasons that 
often seemed mysterious, even to his supporters. Mr. Cuomo 
time after time failed to rise to challenges that he seemed 
eminently qualified to meet — and in many cases that he 
himself had sought out. 

Nothing illustrates this reluctance so well as Mr. Cuomo's 
long agony over the presidency, a drama that ended three 
years ago — on the last day he could have filed for the New 
Hampshire primary — with the spectacular symbolism of 
two planes wailing empty at the Albany airport. 

The governor never worked out a strategy’ for dealing with 
legislative inertia. Instead of concentrating on a few critical 
issues, he spread his energies out over dozens of proposals, 
with the result that his record includes many small victories 
but few major innovations. In running for a fourth term this 
fall, he noted ruefully that one of his most enduring legacies 
would be one he had sought to avoid: a doubling of the state's 
prison capacity’. ( Elizabeth Kotbert. N YT i 




Wifi 


Las Angela Tunes Sen ice 

LOS ANGELES — Through 
a combination of court orders 
and administrative decisions. 
OJ. Simpson is receiving bene- 
fits that most other inmates in 
Los Angeles County Men’s 
Central Jail can only dream of, 
interviews and court records 
show. 

He is allowed to shower more 
often, sleep later before going 
to court and make use of more 
than 10 additional hours out- 
side his cell each week to stretch 
his legs, ride an exercise bike 
provided for his use, talk on the 
phone or watch TV. 

But the biggest difference is 
in the area that prisoners care 
about the most — contact with 
outsiders. As he left the jail re- 
cently after charges were 
dropped, a former gang mem- 
ber, Derrick Nelson, said that 


he was allowed only an hour a 
week in the regular jaii visiting 
room, where be was locked in a 
cage in the midst of as many as 
240 other inmates talking to 
friends and relatives across a 
glass barrier and over phones. 

Mr. Simpson, meanwhile, has 
been allowed unlimited non- 
contact visits with his girl- 
friend, Paula Barbieri. and oth- 
ers while silting at a desk in a 
private glass booth located in 
the jail's less crowded attorney- 
visiting room. 


Not only has Mr. Simpson 
recently been given exclusive 
use of the auomey visiting area 
on weekends, his arrangements 
also allowed him to see outsid- 
ers on Christmas, when jail- 
house visiting was suspended 
for all other inmates. 

What appears to be a double 


standard has some in the crimi- 
nal justice system grumbling. 

But in a recent interview. 
Sheriff Sherman Block said any 
apparent favoritism was geared 
to the smooth operation of the 
jail. “Those things we are doing 
that seem to give OJ. special 
treatment are being done for 
our benefit,” he said. 

Putting Simpson into the 
general population would cre- 
ate chaos because of his celebri- 
ty status, he said, and would 
open him to attacks by any in- 
mate with designs of grabbing a 
piece of the spotlight in the 
highly publicized case. 

Records show that keeping 
Mr. Simpson in jail just through 
October had already cost Mr. 
Block's department more than 
5232,000, much of it for deputy 
overtime. 

"1 get letters all the time from 


citizens out there who complain 
and ask why he is getting spe- 
cial treatment, " Mr. Block said. 
“Now, everything else he gets 
outside of these visits is what 
everybody else gets, but in his 
case it’s a one-on-one basis. He 
eats the same food as the rest of 
the inmates eat but instead of 
going to the dining room, it's 
brought to him on a tray." 

Robert L. Shapiro, a Simp- 
son lead attorney, bristles at the 
suggestion that his client is get- 
ting favored treatment. He said 
he had asked for and been 
granted after-hours visitation 
rights because of the extraordi- 
nary complexity of the fast- 
moving case, which has Mr. 
Simpson and his defense team 
tied up in court during the nor- 
mal visiting time for attorneys 
at the jail. 

He added that Mr. Simpson 


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GAY ADOPTION — Gaflan, 4, enjoying a hog from one of his adoptive parents, Ross Loptoo, as his other parent, 
i jiag Lopton, watches. The couple won custody in Seattle after die boy’s mother was found to have neglected Mm. 


Away From Politics 


o Edward J. Leary, the man accused of 
firebombing a New York subway tram 
on Dec. 21 is suffering too badly from his 
burns to be arraigned cm attempted mur- 
der charges this week, his lawyer said. 

(AT) 




• A 10-foot inflatable boat capsized dur- 


ing an outing on Tomales Bay north of 
San Francisco, killing a mother and her 
1 0-year-old son. They had ignored advi- 
sories to stay out of the water because of 
dangerous conditions. (AP) 

• An Iowa woman snrrved five days in 
the Arizona desert on three manges while 
she wandered in search of help for her 
dying husband after their pickup became 


stuck in the sand in a remote area. Paul- 
ine Herink, in her 60s, finally found help 
but was too late to save her husband, 
Donald, 64. (AP) 

• A car carrying five teenagers to a mall 
in Brewster, New York, collided with 
another vehicle, killing four of the teen- 
agers and a 54-year-old woman in the 
other car. (AP) 


6 §erene 9 Spy Says CIA Believes He 9 s Holding Out 


By Walter Ptncus 

Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — The 
confessed spy Aldrich Hazen 
Ames says he is being held m 
solitary confinement angihat 
the CIA does not beheve he has 
told all he know because he 
acts “serene” and not like a 
guy who’s going to spend the 
rest ofhis life in jaiL 

Tn his first televised inter- 
view, with C3W,.Mr ; Ama 
cussed his life in the federal 

prison at AUenwood, P<mnsyj' 

Vania, but at the sametimecon- 
tinued to play down the srerets 

A 31-year veteran CIA c® 8 ** 

aswasgjj®: 

cow to identify tq 0 f 

SM2SSS2i«-« e i ,D - 

iHs’ssasrg 

and Russian 

. ties in return fo r /' his wife, 
^XccU.ofCan^ 1 - 


give Rosario Ames the mini- 
mum, a five-year sentence. 

In the interview, Mr. Ames 
said one (rf his CIA debriefers 
told him that one of the reasons 
“we don’t believe” you is “be- 
cause you don’t act Hke a guy 
who’s going to spend the rest of 
his life in jail." Mr. Ames said 
the debriefer used the word “se- 
rene” to describe him. 

As he bad in earlier press 
interviews, Mr. Ames told 
CNN he did not think he 
harmed national security by re- 
vealing the names of Soviet 


said, which is "about two 
weeks." 

He called his life sentence 
"the next step from capital pun- 
ishment" but said for his own 
peace of mind he had to live in 
the belief that one day he would 
be a freeman. He added that he 


has no “scenario or realistic ex- 
pectation” that his sentence 
would ever be changed. 

“Forever is a long time," Mir. 
Ames said, who is 52. “And at 
my age, forever — wdL forever 
may — may not be such a long 
time.” 


K.GB and nrilitaiy officers who 
worked for the OA. They did 


not provide “significant politi- 
cal information,” Mr. Ames 

said. . 

He did admit, however, that 

some of the agents he exposed 
had turned over “mflitaiy or 
technological development in- 
formation," but that was, he 

-sayK-t docu. 

Ames’s information allowed the 
Soviet and Russian govern- 
ments to dose down more than 
100 intelligence operations. 
Among the agents he exposed 
CSe two Soviet military leaders 

wto to ">° re yf« 


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PARIS 

2 FG. SAINT HONORE 




may be worse off than other 
high-security inma tes because 
he is being kept in isolation — 
where he is monitored via video 
camera, has little contact with 
guards and prisoners and is not 
taken to the jail roof for exer- 
cise. 

Mr. Simpson is the only oc- 
cupant in a seven-cell wing of 
the unit that is reserved for 
high- security inmates such as 
accused drug dealers, bad cops 
and ranking gang members. 

Mr. Simpson, who has plead- 
ed not guilty to murdering his 
ex-wife, Nicole Brown Simp- 
son, and her friend, Ronald 
Lyle Goldman, on June 12, is 
not the first inmate to receive 
individual attention in the jail. 
The mass murderer Charles 
Manson and the kidnappers 
William and Emily Harris were 
isolated, as was Siihan Sirhan, 
Robert F. Kennedy’s assassin. 

But interviews and records 
indicate that in general Mr. 
Simpson is enjoying some im- 
portant benefits afforded to 
few, if any, other inmates. 

For example. Deputy George 
Ducoulombier, a Sheriff's De- 
partment spokesman, said Mr. 
Block decided to give Mr. 
Simpson additional “freeway 


time" — the period during 
which an inmate can roam the 
corridor outside his cell — 
basal on complaints from the 
former athlete about an undis- 
closed medical problem. With 
that extra time, about 14 hours 
a week compared with up to 
four hours for most inmates, 
comes more opportunities to 
watch TV, talk on the phone or 
take a shower, the spokesman 
said. 

Mr. Block allowed an excep- 
tion to jail policy against con- 
traband when he permitted Mr. 
Simpson to have football cards 
in his cell, Mr. Ducoulombier 
said. Mr. Simpson was honor- 
ing a pre-existing contract call- 
ing for him to autograph 5,000 
cards as part of a profit-making 
venture. 

Although some attorneys say 
they admire Mr. Simpson and 
his lawyers for their gumption 
in extracting more “rivUtzed” 
treatment from the jaiL they la- 
ment the fact that their less 
wealthy and less prominent cli- 
ents cannot do the same. 

For example, Mr. Simpson 
won a court order guaranteeing 
him a hot meal when he returns 
from court after dinner is 
served in jail, authorities said. 


Harlem Gears Up for Tide of Public Funds 


NEW YORK — Having been selected as one the nation's 
first urban empowerment zones, with S300 million in public 
funds available for a broad spectrum of new projects and 
services over the next 10 years. Harlem. Washington Heights 
and a part of the South Bronx must now agree on a shopping 
list. And it may not be easy. 

“Now comes the really hard part," said Representative 
Charles B. Rangel, the Democrat from Hariem who was one 
of the chief congressional architects of the federal empower- 
ment zone program. 

The empowerment zone designation, announced last week, 
means that the area stands to reap a huge windfall in direct 
government assistance at a time of fiscal cutbacks at every 
level of government. 

Officials in the zone must abide by an outline they submit- 
ted in their application for the federal designation. The 
outline included adult education; AIDS prevention and treat- 
ment; day care; job training; small business loans; cleaning up 
vacant lots; improvements to La Marqueta, the shopping 
strip along Park Avenue between 1 10th and 116th Streets, 
and jump-starting the long-delayed plan for the Harlem 
International Trade Center on 1 25th Street. ( N YTl 


Quote/Unquote 


Ron Ricks, a rice president of Southwest Airlines, on the 
proposal to privatize the Federal Aviation Administration, 
which directs the country's commercial and private air traffic: 


"You have to wonder if, from the customer's perspective, 
there would really be a difference whether the FAA was a 

S ivemxnent institution or not Any idea, however good in 
eory, that has the potential of increasing the cost of travel 
to consumers raises a warning flag.” (A'lTI 


For more than a century and a half, Patek Philippe has been known as 

the finest watch in the world. The reason is very simple. It is made 

differently. It is made using skills and techniques that others have lost 

or forgotten. It is made with attention to detail very few people would 

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* 

result will be a watch that 
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A watch with a distinction: 
generation after generation 
it has been worn, loved and 
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those who will only accept 
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INTERNATIONAL 



PUBLISH!® WITH TUT NEW VORX TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON WOT 


Democracies in Need 


SribUBC Vietnam: An Emerging Power With Security Fears 

, tub nucHiNRmii post n man in make it easier to draw V 


There was at least one report issued 
this month that contained some good 
news. Freedom House, a New York- 
based organization that releases an annu- 
al study of how democracy and basic 
liberties are faring around the world, 
found that 114 countries — the largest 
number in history — were democracies, 
defined as places having “elected govern- 
ments with a framework of basic repre- 
sentative institutions.” Of these 1 14, all 
but 37 were not only democratic in struc- 
ture but also guaranteed the essential 
human and political rights that make a 
country genuinely free. 

But there was also bad news; that 
many of the emerging democracies are 
fragile indeed. The 37 democracies that 
the group rated only “partly free” includ- 
ed countries beset with '‘interethnic and 
intersectarian strife” and with wide- 
spread corruption, or lacking in effective 
civic institutions, including “a truly free 
press and independent judiciary." The 
outstanding case of a country that is 
formally democratic but unable to pro- 
tect the rights of its citizens — or the 
citizens themselves — was Bosnia. 

In stressing the fragility of many of the 


new democracies, the report made a use- 
ful point that the U.S. Congress needs to 
consider as it begins what win be a very 
difficult debate on the foreign aid pro- 
gram. Many of the nations striving hard 
to build democracy find themselves not 

some <«? basic institutions of^civil 
society that need to be strong if democra- 
cy is to remain strong. The report sug- 
gests that the foreign aid debate ought to 
take into account the need “to strengthen 
and solidify fragile democratic institu- 
tions by rigorously redirecting economic 
assistance to countries that are playing by 
the democratic rules of the game.” 

Rather modest amounts of aid can in 
fact do a great deal to help build the 
infrastructure of democracy. 

Of course America cannot, on its own, 
build democracy everywhere. The ulti- 
mate success or failure of democratic 
institutions depends on the citizens of the 
democracies themselves. Bui America 
surely has both a practical and moral 
interest in democracy’s expansion. It is 
an interest that needs to be recognized in 
the coining battles over foreign aid. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Military Preparedness 


Republicans in Congress are taking 
dead aim at the Clinton administration's 
defense budget. One target sure to draw 
their fire is military “readiness.” The Re- 
publicans believe that the Pentagon has 
provided too little money to get the 
troops in combat trim. Just how ready are 
the armed forces and how much more 
needs to be done? As it happens, the 
answers are not as simple or as bleak as 
the Republicans would have it. 

Representative Floyd Spence of South 
Carotins, who will chair the House 
Armed Services Committee, last month 
accused the administration of exhibiting 
“the classic symptoms of denial” when it 
contended that UJ5. forces are readier 
than they have ever been. The view from 
the field is “disturbingly different,” he 
said, citing the low readiness ratings of 
three army divisions — the 1st Cavalry, 
the 2d Armored and the 24th Mechanized 
Infantry. Defense Secretary William Per- 
ry quickly agreed that the army, at least, 
was not as ready as it should be. 

A few days later President Bill Clinton 
said he would add $25 billion over six 
years to his defense budget, much of it 
earmarked for readiness. No sooner had 
he done so, however, than Eric Schmitt of 
The New York Times discovered that 
commanders of the divisions cited by Mr. 
Spence had painted an overly gloomy 
view from the field to help the army claim 
a larger share of the defense budget 

By most measures, the Pentagon is 
already spending far more on readiness 
and die armed forces are readier than 
they have been in a long time. The oper- 
ations and maintenance part of the Pen- 
tagon budget, which pays for readiness, 
is currently $93 billion — twice what it 
was in 1980 and one-third more than in 
1985, at the height of the Reagan build- 
up. At the same time, the aimed forces 
are roughly 25 percent smaller. With 
fewer troops to train and fewer weapons 
to maintain, there is much more readi- 
ness money to go around. 

That money is yielding results. The 
Pentagon sorts units into five categories 
from C-l, fully combat ready, to C-5, in 
overhaul. According to a Congressional 


Budget Office study, the readiness of ac- 
tive air force and navy air units equaled 
the late 1980s highs. Other indicators are 
at record highs. To describe this as verg- 
ing on "a hollow force,” the study con- 
cludes, is “misleading" 

That does not mean that every unit is 
in fighting trim. By the same token, a low 
rating does not mean that a unit is unfit, 
says Lawrence Korb, who was a Penta- 
gon official during the Reagan years. The 
1 st Cavalry, for instance, can be classified 
mar ginall y ready even if it is fully 
manned and among the world’s best 
equipped but has not been able to train 
for a month because funds for that pur- 
pose have been used for troops in Haiti. 
Readiness, in short, is only one aspect of 
what most people mean when they talk 
about being prepared to wage war. 

Categorizing units is a subjective judg- 
ment, which can be influenced by the 
desire for a bigger budget. A similarly 
subjective judgment is whether every unit 
should be in top fighting form and wheth- 
er it is worth paying to assure that. 

Take Mr. Spence’s three “unready” 
army divisions. The 2d Armored and the 
24th Infantry are heavy divisions — the 
sort that were designed to wage tank 
warfare with the Red Army. Since lighter 
and more mobile units make better sense 
today, the army could shortchange both 
divisions this year and bring them up to 
par next year. It turns out, however, that 
the army plans to demobilize the 2d Ar- 
mored and the 1st Cavalry as part of a 
force reduction to 10 divirions from the 
current 12. Keeping them at full readi- 
ness may be a waste of money. 

If the object is to have the armed forces 
in fighting trim, downsizing them makes 
sense. U.S. strength is far greater than is 
required to meet potential threats. Why 
waste money supporting every army divi- 
sion, navy carrier battle group and air 
force wing when reductions would im- 
prove the readiness of the remaining 
forces? In any case, readiness requires 
painstaking attention, not political and 
budgetary grandstanding, by members of 
Congress or by military commanders. 

— THE NE W YORK TIMES. 


Rethinking Farm Policy 


President Bill Clinton is said to be 
about to nominate defeated Kansas 
Democratic Representative Dan Glick- 
man to be secretary of agriculture. It is 
not dear what instructions Mr. Clinton 
will give the new secretary, whomever he 
chooses. The administration has no clear 
farm policy, and agriculture is a subject 
about which the president in two years in 
office has said very little. But a text exists, 
a kind of guide to the issues, that the 
president and his nominee might both 
profitably consul L It comes from the Re- 
publican chairman-to-be of the Senate 
Agriculture Committee, Richard Lugar. 

For a combination of reasons, some 
philosophical, others having to do with 
cost. Senator Lugar has decided it’s time 
to ask some fundamental questions about 
the farm programs. He has compiled a list 
in preparation for next year’s hearings. 
These are not your ordinary politician's 
questions. Rather they are of a kind that 
people in Mr. Lugar’s circumstances are 
most often careful not to ask. like wheth- 
er the programs soon to be under his 
jurisdiction serve a useful purpose any 
longer, do more harm than good, can be 
justified in terms of cost 

Examples: “Why are acreage reduction 
programs sound public or fiscal policy 


when they require fanners to idle produc- 
tive land and spread their fixed costs over 
fewer acres, negatively affecting their 
ability to turn a profit?” “Would our 
nation run a serious risk of losing its 
abundant food supply if commodity pro- 
grams did not exist?” “Why should tax- 
payers subsidize fanners when they do 
not subsidize small businesses, which 
have a failure rate hovering around 50 
percent?” “What is the rationale for sub- 
sidizing some crops but not others? Is 
there evidence that producers of nonsub- 
ridized crops have prospered less?” “What 
is the rationale for transferring public 
funds from taxpayers, most of whom have 
moderate incomes, to all farmers, includ- 
ing those whose incomes ... are substan- 
tially above . . . average?” “Why is subsi- 
dized crop insurance and disaster relief 
appropriate for agriculture, and not for 
other sectors of the economy?” “Why 
should there be any government involve- 
ment in the production of tobacco?” “Why 
should sugar production be protected and 
imports restricted if the result is higher 
sugar prices for American consumers?” 
They are good questions all, and the 
next secretary ought to be able, cm behalf 
of the president, to answer them. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 



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H ANOI — Vietnam, a Communist- 
ruled state that once terrified the 
non-Coaununist states of the Assocabon 
of South East Asian Nations, is set to join 
ASEAN in the new year. Hanoi's antici- 
pation is marred by concerns about di- 
minished status and the future of region- 
al and great power politics in East Asia. 

Worries begin with an awareness of a 
quasi-colonialist attitude on the part of 
some ASEAN states toward Vietnam. 

The proud Vietnamese, who have de- 
feated French, American and Chinese 
armed forces in living memory, bridle at 
the tendency of ASEAN states to talk 
down to Hanoi Vietnamese worry about 
exploitation by ASEAN corporations. 

Vietnamese know that it is of ' 
primary importance to 
establish a normal relationship 
with the United States. 

They fear relative neglect of Vietnam’s 
security concerns about China by an or- 
ganization that avowedly seeks to play 
down worries about an aggressive China. 

Vietnam feels that by virtue of its his- 
tory, its population (second largest in 
ASEAN) and its economic potential, it 
should be taken more seriously as a mid- 


« 3 way to make it wrier to draw Viet- 
nam closer to the United States.^ 

It is of primary importance that Viet- 
nam establish a normal relationship with 
the United States. Both eouatnre are 


By Gerald Segal 

die power. Its officials note that ASEAN 

accents for only 17 percent of coal a aCTmt »for20 pa^t tampered by conserva^ve forces atbome 
foreign direct investment in Vietnam. *or.i obvtons mufialm: 

compared with higher figures for Taiwan avoid the mistakK ey active terest m closer relations. Much progress 

SrKonfrffi are ages IrnTbetm made toward norm Ration, 

that, even before Vietnam has formally and hotels are certainty full of visiting 

intnMl ACPAM it tc Innlrifitr fhi* WflV.Q lO did SO OCfOTC It WSS AMAftAnol A ffipflCftTlS. 


that, even before Vietnam has formally 
joined ASEAN, it is looking for ways to 
improve its position beyond ASEAN. 

Vietnam finds itself in Southeast Asia, 
but it apparently fits better with North- 
east Asians. Japan and South Korea ac- 
count for 10 percent of foreign direct 
investment in Vietnam, and the figure is 
set to grow much faster when Korean 
and especially Japanese businessmen get 
their projects under way. Japan and 
South Korea also show a far more robust 
attitude to the potential Of Chinese mili- 
tary power than does ASEAN. 

We can expect a developing security 
dialogue between Vietnam and the North- 
east Asians. At the same time, Vietnamese 
officials expect to have difficulties with 
the more passive ASEAN states who 
counsel caution at all costs. 

Vietnam recognizes the need to avoid 
antagonizing China. Hence its low-key 
relationship with Taiwan, despite the fact 
that Taiwan is the largest source of for- 
eign direct investment in Vietnam and 
shares deep worries about China. 

Ylctnams’s search for a wider role 


France, Britain and the Netherlands 
le ad the way. German business has yet to 
wake up to the Vietnamese potential, but 
it will soon do so and thereby give a 
major boost to the European role. 

Vietnam does not expect Europe to 
play a major role in easing security con- 
cerns, although its officials are pleasantly 
surprised that the Europeans have re- 
turned without many hang-ups from 
their colonial experience. Vietnamese 
also know that when they are ready and 
rich enough to afford military modern- 
ization, Fiance and Britain are likely to 
play an active part in providing military 
equipment and technological assistance. 

Vietnam’s interest in closer ties with 
the West is also manifest in an obvious 
desire to strengthen relations with Cana- 
da and Australia. Both have large ethnic 
Vietnamese communities and have led 
the effort in the Asia-Pacific zone to 
develop mechanisms for regional securi- 
ty. Both can be partners with Vietnam in 
more active militaiy cooperation, in part 


emotional Americans. 

But Vietnam knows that much more 
needs to be done to attract American 
investment and entice the United States • 
into helping deter China should Beging 
reignite its drive to control the disputed 
South China Sea. \ ... 

Vietnamese officials laugh with a mix- 
ture of intrigue and unease about the 
notion of the United States and Vietnam 
exploring common strategic concerns. 
Yet they know that in the end, if Vietnam 
— or other East Asians, for that matter 
— is going to have a chance to stand tall 
as a middle power in the new regional 
balance, it will have to articulate and 
advance policies that help attrart.the 
United States. Not an easy task with the 
new Republican America. 

The writer is a senior feBow at the Inter- 
national Institute for Strategic Studies, in 
London , and director of Britain’s Pacific 
Asia Initiative. He contributed this com- 
ment to the International Herald Tribune, 


Cambodia : Friends Can Help Halt the Slide Down to Tyranny 


P HNOM PENH — Cambo- 
dia’s fragile polity is again in 
jeopardy. The country is still fre- 
er than it has been under any 
Cambodian regime in the past 
25 years, but 19 months after the 
United Nations successfully or- 
ganized elections and 15 months 
after a new coalition govern- 
ment pledged to democracy took 
office, the strains are becoming 
deadly serious. 

One of the dearest signs of 
trouble is the government’s cur- 
rent attempt to muzzle the free 
press — an indication that it is in 
danger of reverting to tradition- 
al forms of authoritarianism. 

As a result of the United Na- 
tions’ 1991-1993 administration, 
Cambodia has had one of the 
freest presses in Asia. It has been 
unlicensed and, admittedly, in 
some cases unprofessional. Any- 
one can publish a paper. Jour- 
nalists can and do accuse minis- 
ters of being dogs, and rats, or 
propose violent ends for offi- 
cials. It is not nice for the prime 
minister’s wife to read that she, 
too, is a pig. 

But at the same time many 
newspapers have run important 
exposes of corruption and have 
revealed, for example, the way in 


By William Shaw cross 


which Thai and Malaysian com- 
panies have profited from cor- 
rupt deals. Such exposes seem 
even more unpopular with min- 
isters th«n the personal abuse. 

Newspapers are constantly 
being threatened by the govern- 
ment and suspended or dosed 
down. Foreign correspondents 
have been threatened and ex- 
pelled. Much worse, outspoken 
and responsible journalists have 
been murdered. On June II, 
Thou Chbam MongkuL an edi- 
tor who had repeatedly reported 
on corruption, was found dying 
in a main street of the city. The 
government said it was a motor- 
cycle accident 

On Sept 7, Noun Chan, editor 
of the popular paper Voice of 
Khmer Youth, was shot dead in 
broad daylight in the center of 
Phnom Penh by two men on a 
motorbike. The minuter of the 
interior denied rumors that the 
murder was officially condoned. 

On Dec: 8, Chan Dara, a 
newspaper reporter investigat- 
ing illegal timber sales by the 
army, was shot dead. 

Now the cabinet has submit- 
ted a draft press law to the Na- 


tional Assembly. This draconian 
measure would impose criminal 
penalties on editors and journal- 
ists. If passed* the Law would 
prevent any criticism or even ex- 
amination of the government 
The worst aspect of the bill is its 
imposition of criminal rather 
than civil penalties. Article 10 
allows a jail sentence of up to a 
year for defamation. 

Article 13 makes it a crime, 
punishable by up to three years’ 
imprisonment and a fine of 10 
million rid (540,000). to “violate 
the King.” This vague offense 
could mean anything. 

It is worth noting that King 
Sihanouk himself, vmo is now in 
Beijing undergoing treatment for 
cancer, has repeatedly pledged 
himself to defend press freedom, 
and is thought to to be opposed 
to any such restriction — indeed, 
to much of this draft law. 

Article 14 makes it a crime, 
punishable by up to IS months 
in prison, to publish anything 
that “humiliates or degrades” 
public officials or organs. 
Again this means anything that 
the government does not like. 

In many ways the law is far 


fiercer than that which the old 
Communis t regime had imposed. 
Its penalties are disproportion- 
ate. The fines it proposes would 
dose many newspapers. Quite 
apart fh>m destroying the press, it 
could also prohibit any nongov- 
ernmental organization from is- 
suing a press release pointing 
out shortcomings in the country. 

The first prime minister. 
Prince Ranariddh, has said that 
it is better to have the law than 
more dead journalists. That 
should not be the choice. 

Pen Sauritthy, editor of one of 
the most successful papers, Ras- 
md Kampuchea, argues that the 
country needs a press law, but not 
this one; “We must force the 

natism. IftheTaw forces than to 
respect more than this — a gov- 
ernment leader who doesn't want 
certain facts printed, for exam- 
ple — it is not good.” 

The bill is to be debated by the 
assembly, which should amend it. 
Better still, the cabinet could 
withdraw the draft and produce a 
new version that does not breach 
the International Covenant on 
Civil and Political Rights that 
Cambodia signed while the Unit- 
ed Nations was here: 


The donor governments — of 
which the United States. France 
and Australia are the most influ- 
ential — have been strangely si- 
lent on this key issue. Yet they 
have great influence. Hie royal 
government depends absolutely 
on foreign aid. The donors should 
make dear that they cannot per- 
suade their own electorates to un- 
derwrite a government that tram- 
ples on the basic rights and 
covenants that the United Nation 
intervened in Cambodia, at great 
cost, to restore and guarantee. 

In Phom Penh there is now no 
opposition. (In a sense. King Si- 
hanouk is in opposition to much 
of what his government does, but 
he is rarely at horns.) The press is 
the only control on government 
excess. The Cambodian govern- 
ment has a responsibility to pre- 
serve press freedom. Those coun- . 
tries mat support and sustain the . 
government have an equal re- 
sponsibility to persuade it to do 
so. Otherwise all the g»im of the 
UN administration will be lost. 

The writer is chairman of Article 
19, the International Center 
Against. Censorship, based in Lon- 
don. He contributed this comment 
to The Washington Post 


The Story This Year’s Toys Tell Is About an American Cultural Ruin 


N EW YORK — The Christ- 
mas season might seem an 
odd time to assess the debate over 
multiculturalism and American 
history. And the American child’s 
floor, littered with crumpled 
wrapping paper and Mighty Mor- 
phia rower Rangers, might seem 
an odd place from which to do so. 

But children's floors, and the 
games played on them, have al- 
ways offered dues about the 
kinds of stories that really capti- 
vate young minds. And this 
week's fioorscape provides so- 
lace for neither multiculturalists 
nor their opponents. 

In the early 1950s, my child- 
hood years, boys — and some 
girls — spent hours acting out 
tales of American battle with ge- 
neric fighting figures: a crew of 
cowboys and bluecoats to defeat 
the Indians and win the West; a 
bag or two of olive-green marines 
to storm the beaches of Iwo Jima. 
If ours was a sanguinary tale of 


By Tom Engelhardt 


warfare against savages in which 
pleasure came out of the barrel of 
a gun, it was also a recognizable 
part of an American story that 
could be found in any neighbor- 
hood movie theater. 

There, we cheered as an enemy 
who looked nothing like us 
dropped in his tens, hundreds, 
thousands before our blazing 
guns, proof of the triumph of a 
distinctly American goodness. 

On floors nationwide, we were 
left alone, without apparent in- 
struction, to reinvent such epi- 
sodes in American history. Who 
was good and who was bad, who 
could be killed and under what 
conditions, were all an accepted 
part of a collective childhood (hat 
drew strength from post -World 
War II adult culture. 

As the Cold War progressed, 
America’s faith in manifest desti- 
ny was slowly and unconsciously 


Turning Children Into Hunters 


By Col man McCarthy 

W ASHINGTON — Reflec- 
tive debate ended some 
time ago on the question of 
whether humans are inherently 
violent. The consensus among 
psychologists and behaviorists is 
unwavering: While assuredly we 
are capable of violence — from 
outbursts of rage that end in mur- 
der to the organized hate that is 
war making — it is neither innate 
nor biologically inevitable. Vio- 
lence is a learned behavior. 

To accelerate the learning pro- 
cess in America, purveyors of vio- 
lence axe pursuing the youth mar- 
ket and its potential for profits. 
Classrooms are becoming learn- 
ing centers to recruit new custom- 
ers for guns and ammo in the 
academics of reading, writing and 
slaughtering. 

Public schools in 23 states cur- 
rently offer classes in hunting 
education. Instructors are certi- 
fied by state wildlife agencies, 
which also supply pro-hunting in- 
structional materials. To aid 
young minds that might be bored 
by mere book learning, agencies 
in at least 26 states help organize 
field trips: children’s hunts in 
which k>ds get to blast away at 
doves, deer and other wildlife 
that fly or amble into gunsishts. 
California recently staged 29 
pheasant hunts for kids. 

The drive to entice adolescents 
into the daughter of animals is 
because hunting is iu decline. 
From 1977 to 1990 a decrease of 
nearly 12 percent in the number of 


hunters occurred, reports the Na- 
tional Opinion Research Center. 

This thinning of the gunners’ 
herd has several causes. Urban- 
ization has taken away space, the 
killing fields. Animal rights 
groups have been persuasive in 
portraying hunting for what it is: 
a sadistic blood sport. 

Exposing kids to one-sided pro- 
paganda in schools and on chil- 
dren's hunts is a marketing strat- 
egy designed to create future 
buyers. Heidi Prescott, director 
of The Fund for Animals, which 
recently released its report “Tar- 
geting Our Children, 1 ’ states: 

“It is an article of faith among 
hunters, and widely supported by 
research, that people who do not 
begin bunting by their late teens 
will never hunt One reason so 
few adults take up hunting is re- 
pugnance at the blood and death 
which are central to the activity.” 
She adds: “There is absolutely 
no justification for the use of pub- 
lic funds, public agencies and pub- 
lic lands to teach children to kill 
harmless animals for pleasure." 

Such thinking is heresy at the 
Interior Department's Fish and 
Wildlife Service. Killing animals 
is good, it says. Not in those 
words, for sure, but in the cosme- 
ticized languag e of fake conserva- 
tion: “Hunting ... is a valuable 
wildlife management tool." 

in addition to metal detectors 
at the school doors to keep out 
guns, now another device is need- 
ed: hokum detectors to bar the 
gun-happy Interior Department. 
Washington Post Writers Group. 


relegated to the world of the 
child. Thai American children 
should have inherited a national 
tale of battle triumph, just as Eu- 
ropean children had once inherit- 
ed rituals of knightly battle long 
discarded by adults, was not in 
itself extraordinary. 

The surprise was that after a 
300-year trip the story would, in 
barely a generation, pass wholly 
into the realm of children and 
then out of American society al- 
together. 

When the original GI Joe ac- 
tion figure was furloughed by its 
maker (Hasbro) in the wake of 
the Vietnam War, childhood war 
play left the American century 
and planet earth for good. 

To wheel a shopping cart down 
the endless aisles of Toys “R" Us 
is to experience the story that has 
resulted, one unrecognizable from 
anyone’s version of American his- 
tory — or any history at all 

No children in 1995 will defeat 
Geronimo or refight the Battle of 
(he Bulge. Nor will toy marines 
burst into Iraqi bunkers made of 
Legos. No modern-day Custer 
will lead a last stand in a mini- 
Mogadishu. No toy GIs will pa- 
trol a Port-au-Pnnce made of 
wooden blocks. 

But while the national story of 
battle triumph has disappeared 
along with the toys that animated 
it, the replacement figures do not 
come from the moluculturalist’s 
playbook, cither. 

On no floors this week will 
Native American warriors defeat 
the cavalry, or enslaved African- 
Americans rise up against their 
Southern masters, or toy Rosies 
rivet up a storm. Yet there will 
still be battles galore — in outer, 
or inner, or alternate space, or on 
some future roboticized earth. 

The powerful Red Dragon 
Thonderzord will mix it up with 
Lord Zedd’s Evil Space Aliens. 
Dr. Cyborn, the evil Cyber scien- 
tist of the Skeleton Warriors 
(“They're Bad to the Bone!"), will 
aim ins add blaster at Wolverine 
of the X-Men, and Drago from 
the Superhuman Samurai Syber- 
Squad (“Samurized for your pro- 
tection!”) will launch its shoul- 
der-mounted Pyro- ironic miss- 
iles at Kilokhan, overlord of the 
digital world. 

Around the world, lO-centime- 
ter $6.95 plastic action figures 
from “Teen-Age Mutant Ninja 
Turtles"— or “Street Fighter II,” 
“Alien,” “Predator” and 
“Spawn” — will levitate off 
shelves and into children’s rooms 
to take part in battles never imag- 
ined in the confines of any ver- 
sion of American history. 


A mix of traditional American 
toy making and modem Japanese 
design fabricated in Chinese fac- 
tories, these Day-Glo figures 
speak volumes about the strange 
path Americans have traveled 
since our national story col- 
lapsed. Twenty years of muili- 
billion-dollar toy industry sales 
suggests that no one is likely to 
paid) that stoiy together again. 
Yet the void m national con- 
sciousness where it existed has 
not been filled. 

Once, there was a clear connec- 
tion between the official Ameri- 
can story taught in the classroom 
and the versions acted out at re- 
cess, on floors and in backyards. 

Today, the teaching of history 
in some schools may be hardly 
different from that of my child- 
hood. In other classrooms it may 
involve a new kind of stoiy telling 
giving emphasis to those people 
previously overlooked. 

In many schools it is probably 
some uncomfortable combina- 
tion of the two. In any case, to 
step beyond the classroom into 
the world of toys is to enter a 
space disconnected from history. 

When Syber-Samurai Santa 
morphed down the chimney this 
Chnstmas, acid blaster at the 
ready, he was an embodiment of 
the true curriculum of our times. 
So ignore media arguments about 
what books should be read and 
what history should be taught, 
and look at your child's floor. 

Out here in the cyber-market- 
place, ail history has been super- 
seded by a new kind of story 
telling. On lhat floor is a set of 


“stories” barren of historical con- 
tent, reflecting only the stripped- 
down global selling environment 
from which they arise; so insular 
— yet all-encompassing — as to 
be no stories at all 

Battles rage cm with added in- 
tensity. Weapons proliferate in 
fantastic forms. Yet without see- 
ing the collector cards — or the. 
television cartoons, movies, vid- 
eo games and comics from which 
the toys spawn — it is virtually 
impossible to tell the good guys 
from the bad. 

The enemy, stiB horrific yet 
now ill -defined, lives in our shad- 
ow, opening op ever more chitting 
secret realms, hopeless yet thrill- 
ing, into which to plunge. 

The toy companies feed like 
Jurassic Park’s raptors on the re- 
duced narrative carcasses of more 
than one culture. 

For parents, there can be a 
soothing sort of surrender, per- 
haps even relier, in buying into 
such strange stories from the 
outer spare of pop culture. 

Yet the view from floor level 
this Chnstmas shows that our 
children — like us — are living in 
a cultural afterlife What path- 
ways lead out of the ruins of our 
national tale neither the tradi- 
tionalists nor the multicultural- 
ists neither we nor our chil- 
dren — seem to know. 

The writer is author of the forth- 
coming "The End of Victory Cut - 
ture: Cold War America and die 
Disillusioning of a Generation. m 
He contributed this comment to 
the New York Times. 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEAitS AGO 
1894: Church on Congo Scaso ° or unprecedented winifi 

_ ® Snort IS mnci^BHul w. 


PARIS — It is stated in the Yos- 
sische Zeitung that the Christian 
village on the Congo, the means 
for founding which were gained 
in Brussels by the collection of 
old postage stamps, is now in ac- 
tual existence. From aU parts of 
the world more than forty million 
Old stamps were collected and 
sold for a large sum. The village is 
called “Saint Tradoo,” and the 
colonisation has begun. Negro 
boys and gjris who were educated 
by the missionaries are now unit- 
ed in marriage, and have been 
settled there, each pair receiving 
a separate bouse. In the centre of 
the village, on an eminence, 
stands a church- 

1919: Winter Sport 

CHAMONIX — With almost 
three feet of snow already on the 
slopes. Chamonix' prospects of a 


season or unprecedented winter 
sport .is considered excellent The 
spoftmg programme for January is 
especially good, with mnnv «4iAfiv 


ponship contests as its principal 
tenures. On Januaiy 5 , ihcrcwli 

jumping contests on Mead 
soou! of Europe’s not- 
ed ski-ists m attendance. 

1944: Atomic Bomb 

LONDON — The German radio 
swoon, which has been trying to 
start a panic among the Belgians, 
said today [Dec. 27] ihattteN^ 
as are using an atomic bomb in a 

P^. aitack - “This *s a type oM 
bomb on which the AffieTbafl 
claimed to have a monopoly” the 
announcer said. “The Gomans 
St £ ? L 7 ith * Whawsr such 

! J"?* “ dr °Pl*d all animals 
and plants cease to exist and huge ■ 
areas oflaad are scorched, woods 
are consumed and any human be- 
m g is shattered to smithereens.” 










■No* 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28 , 1994 


Page 5 


OPINION 


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8 ! 


■ • - • .. 


SiSt 




V^, 
■. ^5*' 

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Those Outside the Prison 
Oi Tibet Should Protest 


By A. M. Rosenthal 


N EW YORK — From concen- 
tration camps come few dis- 
patches, not even when a whole na- 
tion is imprisoned. Silence is as real 
as barbed wire. For the captors, it is 
at least as effective. 

So, when occasionally I write 
about the captivity of Tibet, readers 
sometimes ask why I care so much 
They ask why they should involve 
themselves. Isn’t so much else more 
important to American interests? 

And since the occupation by the 
Chinese Communists has been go- 
ing on so long, almost a half century 
now, with Beijing making it ever 

Every day ice commit the 
'crimes' of the Tibetans . 

We talk, we write , we act, 
we think, we pray. 

tighter, forcing more and more Ti- 
betans out of their own country, and 
the world not even talcin g note, are 
not Tibetans and foreigners just per- 
petuating an impossible dream 
when they insist that Tibet live? 

As the years pass, the questions 
become ever more important to an- 
swer — else the silence will become 
eternal, and the concentration camp 
one more national grave. 

But before they can be answered, 
another question must be put: Why 
is it that Tibet, a nation with a 
history almost as old as man's mem- 
ory, a nation with a culture unique 
in the world, with a religion that not 
only binds together its own people 
but embraces men and women all 
over the world, why is this nation, 
almost alone among nations, denied 
the most elemental rights of nation- 
hood and personal freedom? 

When I was a young reporter. The 
New York Tima assigned me to the 
bureau it had just set up at the brand 
new United Natrons. The total 
membership then was 56, and new 
countries were asking to be admit- 
ted. One day a British delegate 
warned that if the United Nations 
kept growing, the membership 
would be as high as 70, maybe 80. 

Today the membership stands at 
184. Among them are countries that 
are minute in population and size; 
their most important industry is the 
bureaucracy created to run than. 
And there are other members whose 
boundaries and identities were 
qpirved out of the map by the colonial 
powers of Europe for their own ad- 
ministrative and imperial conve- 


niences. And yet there they all are. 
nags waving on First Avenue, their 
ambassadors treated as they should 
be, wi Ln dignity and attention, 
i n5 ut Tii J ct “ not only barred from 
un membership; its representatives 
are usually not even allowed in its 
halls and meeting rooms or in die 
state departments of the world. 

Why? The nations know what has 
been happening — the massacres, 
tortures, pillage, the deportation of 
millions of Tibetans and their re- 
placement by Chinese, the stone-by- 
stone, temple- by -temple destruction 
or a great culture. The truth is that 
almost all the nations of the world 
made a deliberate decision to aban- 
don Tibet to its captors. 

these nations were many 
UN members ruled by dictators. At 
least they bad some rationale — the 
brotherhood of tyranny. But for the 
others, including America and Eu- 
rope, the reason was money. Beijing 
constantly warns that trade with 
China will be cut off for any nation 
daring to do all that the Tibetans 
really ask — speak up for their ele- 
mental human and political rights. 

Once, President Bill Clinton did 
that. But that was long ago — a 
year or so. Now Washington talks 
about sending his wife or the vice 
president to visit Beijing, the heart 
and head office of the Chinese and 
Tibetan concentration camps. 

So, after all, what do we outsiders 
have in common with Tibetans? 
Shared criminality. The same politi- 
cal crimes that bound us to the vic- 
tims in the Nazi camps, to the dissi- 
dents in the Soviet gulag, to the 
people in the Khmer Rouge death 
pits and in the torture chambers of 
the Middle East bind us to the Ti- 
betans. Every day we commit the 
crimes for which Tibetans have been 
made captive, tortured and mur- 
dered and for which their nation is 
sundered and occupied. We talk, we 
write, we act, we think, we pray, 

Tibet has no ethnic or national 
constituency in the United States. 
But in America, as around the 
world, are thousands of people who 
do what they can for Tibet — write, 
talk, act, pray, help the Internation- 
al Campaign for Tibet. Among them 
are intellectuals, business people, 
members of Congress, working peo- 
ple, Democrats and Republicans. 

This constituency is staunch and 
slowly growing. That is the best rea- 
son I can give for hoping for the 
future of the imprisoned nation in the 
Himalayas — the international con- 
spiracy of the criminals for freedom. 

The New York Times. 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


NATO and the East 

Regarding “Russia Gains. Germany 
Loses, America Should Stay" (Opin- 
ion, Dec. 15) by Brian Beedham: 

How can there be doubt over 
whether Russia (with Ukraine and 
Belarus) could ever accept NATO 
poised at its borders, even should 
the merely defensive nature of the 
alliance be made perfectly clear and 
if new aims were imagined for a 
treaty organization that since its 
birth had only the aim of containing 
the Soviet Union and preventing a 
Communist takeover of Europe? 

This undoubtedly has been a 
great achievement of NATO, for 
which any right-thinking person 
should be grateful, the more so in 
that the Cold War remained cold 
and a world war is by now an almost 
forgotten possibility. 

Yet, if Russia were to begin to 
believe that the aim of America and 
Europe is to apply the Yugoslavia 
treatment to Russia, the appear- 
ance and growth of violent extrem- 
ism of both the right and the left 
would be immediate. 

Since 1990, little has been done to 
assist Russia in extricating itself 
from the economic and social mess 
caused by 75 years of Communist 
dogmas and illusions. Now is the 
time to truly assist Russia. 

I agree with Mr. Beedham when 
he writes that America should stay 


in Europe. The question is, in what 
mann er? It is not so much America's 
physical presence that is now need- 
ed. but an economic and cultural 
one, and most of all the moral pres- 
ence of a great democracy. 

Mr. Beedham’s article is extreme- 
ly interesting and I find myself in 
agreement with most or his reason- 
ings, as I do not belong to the cate- 
gory of persons who believe that 
“realpolitik” can be put to rest 

Prince NICHOLAS ROMANOFF. 

RougemonL Switzerland. 

• Regarding ", Extending NATO 
Eastward Would Be a Grave Error ” 
(Nov. 30) by Charles A. Kupchan: 

NATO has always been far more 
than a military alliance. Otherwise it 
would have gone die way of the 
Warsaw Pact. It is in essence a fam- 
ily of democratic values and a trans- 
Atlantic consultative framework 
that the Central European countries 
feel, rightly, they are entitled to join. 

It is the primary American link to a 
continent whose nations still cannot 
decide with which neighbors they 
should be best friends, and who, left 
to themselves, would unlikely be able 
to agree on responses to threats or to 
take decisive action when fundamen- 
tal human rights are trampled upon. 
Witness the absurd attachment to the 
safety of peacekeepers rather than to 
the sanctity of the lives those forces 
are supposed to protect in Bosnia. 


Watch Goodness Well Up tl 

On the Bad-News Screen — , 


By Frederick Buechner 


Although security guarantees are 
important, NATO's primary mis- 
sion in the years ahead will be to 
refine its unique ability to contrib- 
ute to peacekeeping. Surely Poland's 
20 divisions have something to con- 
tribute in an era of declining mili- 
tary budgets and resources. 

Cost calculations on new NATO 
membership are abstract in the ab- 
sence of a permanent threat Spain 
entered NATO after six months of 
negotiation, the details of participa- 
tion being worked out 10 years later. 
Why erect double standards now? 

NATO membership would assist 
reform by providing an important 
stimulus to foreign investment and 
domestic stability, and an incentive 
for countries not yet ready to join to 
improve their record at home. 

NATO expansion would be con- 
sistent with a new European security 
community, not a hostile alternative 
to it Nothing rules out parallel steps 
such as makin g the CSCE a truly 
collective security organization. 

NATO expansion triggered only 
by a new Russian threat would, as 
Zbigniew Bizezinski has described it, 
not only prove “objectively” antago- 
nistic. It could lead to crisis if not 
apocalypse. Better a transparent and 
orderly process starting today by 
making dear the ultimate destiny of 
the Partnership for Peace. 

JOHN BORAWSKl. 

Brussels. 


P AWLET, Vermont — Martin 
Luther said once that if he were 
God he would kick lhe world to 
pieces — and who doesn't know 
what be meant? Only, these days 
we're so good at kicking the world to 
pieces ourselves that we hardly need 
God for the job. 

It is not so much the terrible things 
— Bosnia, Haiti, Angola. AIDS, ho- 
melessness. crime and the rest of it — 

MEANWHILE 

because as Thornton Wilder pointed 
out, we always manage somehow to 
survive the terrible things by the 
skin of our teeth. It is rather our 
obsession with the terrible things. 
News has come to mean almost ex- 
clusively bad news, and the badness 
of it has got into our blood. 

ln America, The fatal beating of 
Jeffrey Dahmer, Susan Smith 
drowning her two babies in the fam- 
ily car. close-ups of the disease-rav- 
aged body of the latest person Dr. 
Jack Kevorkian has helped to die, 
the O. J. Simpson melodrama — 
these stories take precedence over 
events of historical significance, not 
because they are more important, let 
alone because the media hope they 
will somehow be good for us, but 
because they feed our addiction. 

Good things as well as terrible 
things happen all around us, but 
when was the last time they made 
the headlines? Who pays much at- 
tention to the genuine accomplish- 
ments of President Bill Clinton, 
who, despite his mistakes, strikes me 
as arguably the most promising 
leader America has had for years? 
The daily vilification of him by the 
likes of Rush Limbaugh and the 
Christian right fills the airwaves. 

The word “Christian” is itself 
another case in point It no longer 
conjures up the image of Christ but 
rather the narrow, bigoted, authori- 
tarian political faction that calls 
itself after him. 

A character in Woody Allen's 
“Hannah and Her Sisters” says 
that if Jesus Christ were to come 
back and see what is going on in 
His name. He would never stop 
throwing up. 

1 suspect that God will not kick the 
world to pieces, if only because if that 
was on His mind. He would probably 
have done something about it long 
since. But those like me who believe 
in God spend a lot of time asking 
themselves what He is doing in the 
world instead — this world where He 
is so often most conspicuous by what 
seems like his absence. 


The other day I was handed a card 
with these words: “Prayer does not 
change things. Prayer changes peo- 
ple. People change things.” If one 
substitutes “God” for “prayer” and 
can overcome a distaste for slogans, 
maybe that comes as dose to suggest- 
ing the answer as anything dse could. 

I don’t think God goes around 
changing thing s in the sense of mak- 
ing bad things happen to bad people 
and good things happen to good peo- 
ple, or of giving one side victory over 
the other in wars, or of pushing a bill 
through Congress to make school 
prayer constitutional. I believe that 
most things that happen in the world 
happen, for better or worse, by 
chance. But I also believe that 
through the chance thing s that hap- 
pen, God opens up possibilities of 
redemptive cWnge in the selves even 
of people who wouldn’t be caught 
dead believing in Him. "Possible” 
means that we are left free to deride 
that for us such change is impossible, 
and to go on with business as usual. 

I am almost never moved by what I 
see on the television news, where suf- 
fering is apt to be an such a grand 
scale that it ceases to be quite real, 
but one report not long ago was an 
exception. What I saw on the screen 
was only a handful of people bring- 
ing flowers to set down at the edge of 
the lake in South Carolina where the 
two small boys died strapped into the 
back seat of their mother’s car. 

Suddenly there were tears in my 
eyes. It was the children my tears 
were for, and maybe even for the 
unimaginable — or all too imagin- 
able — mother. They had to do also 
with the people bringing the flowers, 
who apparently had no special con- 
nection with the family but simply 
needed to bring them and leave 
them there in the grass. 

Beyond that, I think my tears had 
to do with seeing something holy 
welling up out of the world's unholi- 
ness. Or call what was welling up 
something of great and potentially 
transforming beauty and hopeful- 
ness and mystery, if religion and 
religious woods cause discomfort. 

It doesn't matter all that much 
what one calls such moments, but it 
does matter immeasurably that we 
recognize than, and maybe even fol- 
low in the direction they point — 
toward a true humanness that could 
save this demon-haunted world, if 
there is anything anywhere to save it 

The writer, a Presbyterian minister, 
is author mast recently of “The Son of 
Laughter,” a noveL He contributed this 
comment to The New York Timex 


BOOKS 


iirai Ruin 




BITING THE DUST: The 
Wild Ride and Dark Ro- 
mance of the Rodeo Cow- 
boy and the American West 

By Dirk Johnson. 239 pages. 
S22. Simon & Schuster. 

Reviewed by David Rieff 

T HE American West is, by 
now, as much a state of 
mind as a place. Perhaps it al- 
ways was. The revisionist histo- 
rians, whatever their own preju- 
dices, surely are right to insist 
that while the mythic West was 
a land of un trammeled individ- 
ualism, in reality the course of 


pioneer settlement was largely 
determined by federal land pol- 
icies, the wishes of railroad 
magnates and decisions about 
subsidized water and grazing 
rights. 

And yet, as Dirk Johnson 
points out early in “Biting the 
Dust,” his lucid and engaging 
chronicle of the world of the 
rodeo cowboy, “As the rest of 
America becomes noisier, an- 
grier, grimier, the cavernous, 
echoing, mystical West, real 
and imagined, beckons.” 

Johnson, who is Denver bu- 
reau chief for Hie New York 
Times, knows the New West that 
that city embodies as intimately 
as he knows the disappearing 


West of small towns and family 
farms. 

But he also understands that 


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lhe “Mountain West” of Colo- 
rado, Utah, Montana and Wyo- 
ming — the mythic weight of 
the West in the American 
imagination has grown stron- 
ger. “The cowboy has become 
chic,” Johnson writes acidly, 
“or at feast his clothes have.” 

In “Biting die Dust,” he 
chronides the itinerant rodeo 
cowboys. They are, be points 
out the descendants or the 
whites who settled the Old West, 
lhe last vestiges of the America 
in which half the population 
lived on ranches and farms. For 
the most part, they come from 
dying small towns. Most of 
tht-n ri j including the hero of “Bit- 
ing the Dust,” the bull rider Joe 
Wimberly, will not succeed in 
makin g a living on the rodeo 
circuit, yet few can give it up. 

The problem is that the rodeo 
cowboys Johnson came to know 
understand that they are enter- 
tainers, performing m a specta- 
cle that came of age after the Old 
West had largely disappeared, 
and, at the same time, are com- 
pletely caught up in a vision of 
themselves as the last cowboys. 


Asa portrait of this world that 
is at once inordinately attractive 
and pathetically self-deluding, it 
is hard to imaffne anything bet- 
ter than “Biting the Dusl” Joe 
Wimberly's story is movingly 
told, without a hint of conde- 
scension. What does not entirely 
coalesce in Johnson’s book is his 
own point of view as narrator. 

At one moment, he can be 
tough-minded and analytical 
about what rodeo and, more 
broadly, (he American West 
really represent, only, a few 
paragraphs later, to fall into the 
kind of sentimental appraisal of 
his characters and their world 
that could well come out of a 
publicity brochure for a rodeo. 

But in a time when so many 
writers, journalists and biogra- 
phers alike seem to want to do 
their subjects in, the moments 
of uncritical affection Johnson 
allows himself, however ques- 
tionable they may be intellec- 
tually, are refreshing. 

It is dear that he believes that, 
however artificial the myth of 
the West may have been, we 
shall all be poorer for its passing. 

David Rieff, whose latest 
book, “Slaughterhouse: Bosnia 
and the Failure of the West, ” will 
be published in February, wrote 
this for The New York Times. 


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Page 6 


BSTEimATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, "WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 1994 


Oil Delay 
For Pilot’s 
Release? 

U.S. Seeks Lever 
With North Korea 


Rrutcrs 

WASHINGTON —The out- 
going chairman of the Foreign 
Affairs Committee of the 
House of Representatives said 
Tuesday that Congress might 
delay a scheduled U.S. oil ship- 
ment to Pyongyang to force the 
release of a captured U.S. Army 
pilot. 

“If this airman is not re- 
turned, then it is bound to have 
a negative impact on our rela- 
tionship with North Korea,” 
Representative Lee H. Hamil- 
ton said in a television inter- 
view. “It's bound to have a neg- 
ative impact on the altitude of 
the Congress toward this agree- 
ment,” he added. 

The United States is to pro- 
vide 50,000 tons of heavy fuel 
oil, valued at about $4.7 mil- 
lion. to North Korea by Jan. 21 
as pan of an agreement reached 
in October aimed at eliminating 
the North's suspected nuclear 
weapons development pro- 
gram. 

“It’s difficult for me to see 
the Congress doing that unless 
this airman is returned,” Mr. 
Hamilton, an Indiana Demo- 
crat said, referring to the cap- 
tured pilot. Chief Warrant Offi- 
cer Bobby HalL 

Mr. Hall has been in North 
Korean hands since his army 
helicopter went down in North 
Korean territory 10 days ago. 
His co-pilot was killed in the 
episode, which North Korea 
says was a spy mission. The 
United States blames a naviga- 
tional error. 

Representative William B. 
Richardson, who dealt with the 
North last week for Mr. Hall’s 
release, said Tuesday that the 
United States was being sub- 
jected to “water torture” but 
should stay calm and negotiate. 

“Obviously the North Kore- 
ans are squeezing us,” the New 
Mexico Democrat said in a tele- 
vision interview. 

Mr. Richardson had arrived 
in Pyongyang for previously 
scheduled talks on implementa- 
tion of the nuclear agreement 
when the helicopter went down 
on Dec. 17. After five days of 
what he termed tough negotia- 
tions. Mr. Richardson came out 
with the body of the dead pilot 
and what he called assurances 
that the North would release 
Mr. Hall in a few days. 

“There’s a lot of splits there,” 
Mr. Richardson said, adding 
that he believed a power strug- 
gle was under way. 

The Clinton administration 
sent Thomas C. Hubbard, a 
U.S. deputy assistant secretary 
of state, to Pyongyang on Mon- 
day in an effort to gain Mr. 
Hall’s release. But North Korea 
said that what it termed an act 
of espionage needed further in- 
vestigation under military law. 







■JL.-} 















A Chechen volunteer checking 


Ok* Nikufara/ApKc Frmoct-ft 

out a piano on Tuesday In one of the debris- littered streets of the capital, Grozny. 


Conthtoed from Page 1 

ruptkm, saying, “1 am aware that Chechen 
money is involved in the fnnctionmg of 
some mass media in Russia.” 

“That is a serious accusation,” said Yev- 
geni A. Kiselyov, host of the news program 
Itogi. T would prefer that the president 
provide some proof. Otherwise, it isjust an 
example of campai gning a gains t the part 
of the press that is not doing propaganda 
for the government forces.” 


Chechnya has a bitter, centuries-old histo- 


ry of defiance toward Moscow. Led by 
Dzhokar Dudayev, a former Soviet Air 


.-rich, mostly Muslim republic of 


Force general, Chechnya declared its inde- 
pendence from Moscow three years ago. 
Russia has been struggling to regrin con- 
trol of the territory ever since. 

There was no bombing of Grozny on 
Tuesday, and fighting was reported to be 
light, but Mr. Yeltsin did not rule out 
renewed bombings in his speech. Govern- 
ment officials said laser-guided missiles 


DRUGS* Drug Traffic Leaves Deep Scars on an Idyllic Canadian Island 


Gaumed bom Page 1 

the drug trade. But in the last two years, 
the police say, the drugs coming in have 
become stronger and more plentiful, and 
the dealers are Asian. 

In contrast to the established Vietnam- 
ese community of several thousand, many 
of whom arrived from South Vietnam in 
the 1980s, the new arrivals tend to be from 
North Vietnam. Many of those engaged in 
drugs appear to have learned their trade in 
the refugee camps of Hong Kong, the po- 
lice say. 

A large majority of drug trafficking is 
done by Vietnamese dealers, said Sergeant 
Phil Humphries, head of the drug squad 
for the Nanaimo section of the Royal Ca- 
nadian Mounted Police. 

“They are trafficking in large amounts 
of cocame and heroin,” he said, “and their 
visibility and blatant methods make than 
obvious to tiie public as a whole.” 

Many dealers or their operatives work 
out of cars, using pagers and cellular 
phones to make contacts. Others enlist 
their families. 

In March, an undercover policeman ar- 
rested an 8-year-old Vietnamese gjii for 
selling heroin in her home: Her parents 
were not there, and the child apparently 
was not aware of what was in the packet 
she handed over; she said she was just 
imitating what she had seen her father do. 

The police say the dealers are targeting 
high schools. Last April, two boys, 17 and 
18, died of heroin overdoses, bringing the 
total number of residents of the Nanaimo 


region who have died of overdoses this 
year to 25. Drug-related suspensions have 
doubled at high schools. 

Drugs also apparently have led to homi- 
cide. In September, the body of Quang 
Long Tran, a local resident believed by the 

*More people are 
overdosing, more crimes 
are being committed by 
people who are strung out 
If we don’t take strong 
action now, it will get way 
oat of control. 9 

Mayor Gary R. Korpan 


police to be involved in drugs, was found 
outside Nanaimo. The case has not been 
solved. 

“Crime here, like crime in the United 
States, is a growth industry,” said Kate 
Lowe, who works at the local health ser- 
vice. She helped organize a petition and 
letter-writing drive asking Prune Minister 
Jean Chretien to require deportation of 
non-Canadian criminals and to screen po- 
tential immigrants more carefully. She was 
told the drive generated 10,000 letters to 
Ottawa. 

A local member of Parliament. Bob 
Ringma, pushed for more resources, and 


PORTUGAL: A Modem Scandal Greets a Major Prehistoric Art Find 


art near Vila Nova de Fozcoa 
has become publicly known. An 
archaeologist identified the first I 
engravings more than two years 
ago, but the find was kept a 
secret by the state-owned elec- 
tricity utility, Bectricidade de 
Portugal, which apparently did 
not want to disrupt construc- 
tion of the dam that started in 
September. 

More surprising, the prehis- 
toric murals also were kepi se- 
cret by the government’s ar- 
chaeology institute, the 
Institute Tor Architectural and 
Archaeological Patrimony, 
whose president visited the site 
a year ago. 

Even now the survival of the 
art has not been secured. And in 
recent weeks archaeologists 
have spent as much time in 
campaigning to save the en- 
gravings as in analyzing them. 

“We want the dam project to 
be stopped and the Coa valley 
turned into a major cultural re- 
source,” said Joa Zilhao, a pro- 
fessor of archaeology at Lisbon 
University. The valley, he said, 
also holds later engravings and 
paintings from 3.000 to 1,000 
B.C. and remains from Roman 
and medieval settlements. 

“Some of the images are ex- 
ceptionally beautiful” he said 
in a telephone interview after 
visiting the Paleolithic site. 
“There are some unusual 
scenes, like two horses touching 
and some animals running. 
They're not in the more com- 
mon frozen positions.” 

The discovery, and its appar- 


ent cover-up for more than two 
years, has now become a scan- 
dal in Lisbon, with historians 
and other intellectuals this 
month publishing open letters 
and demanding a parliamenta- 
ry inquiry. 

But around Hell's Canyon, as 
the gorge is known, the fanners 
and shepherds apparently are 
surprised by the fuss about 
sera tellings in the rocks that 
they had long known about. 

“People of the region knew 
about the pictures,” said M33a 
Simoes, a rock art specialist 
who has vis ted the area three 
times in recent weeks. “They 
treated Hell’s Canyon as a mag- 
ic place. They said the old peo- 
ple always told them that those 
rocks were inhabited by spirits. 
That children should not go 
there or touch anything." 

The ancient art gallery 
carved into outcroppings and 
walls is reachable only % river 
boat or by hiking along the 
steep and windy shepherd's 
paths. Yet evidence that local 
people knew of the markings, 
Mrs. Simoes said, is offered by 
the contemporary carvings and 
scratchings in the rocks, some 
of them close to the prehistoric 
images. In one case, she said, a 
modem bypasser had d a m a ge d 
an ancient engraving by retrac- 
ing its lines with fresh scrap- 
ings. 

Archaeologists first learned 
of the discovery less than two 
months ago from Nelson Re- 
banda, a 33-year old archaeolo- 
gist from the area. With financ- 
ing from the electricity utility. 


Mr. Rebanda. a government 
employee, had been quietly 
studying and photographing 
the images, retracing a number 
of them on paper for the past 
two years. 

“Suddenly I got a call from 
Nelson Rebanda in the middle 
of the night,” said Mrs. Simoes, 
the rock art specialist who lives 
in Lisbon. Tt was November 
seven. He sounded in a panic. 
He was shouting that I should 
come quickly, that there was 
rock art that would soon be 
inundated.” 

Because Mr. Rebanda had 
sounded so worried, she said, 
she and her husband, Ludwig 
Jaffe, also an archaeologist, 
made the seven-hour trip the 
next day. 

“What we saw was amazing, 
magnificent,” said Mrs. Simoes, 
who has worked elsewhere in 
Europe and South Africa. She 
said tile had learned that Mr. 
Rebanda had called her be- 
cause the Douro dam down- 
stream was briefly lowering its 
water level and would bare 
many of the flooded engravings 
for just a few days. 

Mr. Rebanda told her he 
wanted her as a witness to tes- 
tify that the rode images were 
genuine. “He said he would 
publish a thesis and a book, bur 
by then the images would be 
covered by water so he needed 
to authenticate them.” 

When Mrs. Simoes demand- 
ed that the discovery be an- 
nounced “because the Portu- 
guese people must decide if they 
want a dam there or not,” she 
went on, “Rebanda made a 


scene. He started shouting. He 
even threw his hat on the 
ground and jumped on it He 
said he wanted nobody to 
know, that he wanted to keep 
all this for his book.” 

Once Mrs. Simoes had alert- 
ed her colleagues and the local 
press, Mr. Rebanda and his em- 
ployers at the government ar- 
chaeology institute had 
changed their account of the 
events several times. At first, 
they announced that “dozens of 
Stone Age animal designs” had 
been discovered in recent 
weeks. 

Bui in a telephone interview, 
Mr. Rebanda conceded that he 
had identified the first engrav- 
ings in 1992 and that he had 
reported those and subsequent 
findings to the institute in 1993 
and 1994. Although he had sev- 
eral meetings with officials of 
the arrhadogy institute and the 
electricity utility — “we even 
talked about moving some of 
the rocks somewhere else” — he 
said that neither body “seemed 
interested in what I bad to say.” 

In November 1993, he said he 
asked officials from the utility 
to lower the waters in the down- 
stream Douro dam to enable 
him to study the flooded im- 
ages. “They told me that was 
too expensive,” be said. 

He said he also suggested 
other solutions, like creating a 
diy-dock around the rocks or, 
fading that, making underwater 
explorations. 

Asked why his own institute 
did not back him, Mr. Rebanda 
said: “The people responsible 



there are architects. 1 hey are 
not much interested in archae- 
ology.” 

Archaeologists have called 
for urgent test excavations in 
the area to further date it 
through other signs of human 
presence. like tools, bones or 
charcoal. 

Only two other sites with art 
from the Stone or Ice Age have 
ban found in Portugal: in a 
cave at EscouraJ in the south 
and a small patch at Mazouco, 
in the Vila Nova region, which 
has just a few open air animals. 

Interestingly enough, it was 
Mr. Rebanda who as a student 
first reported the Mazouco site, 
near his home village, in 1981, 
but it was hisprofessor who got 
the credit. Colleagues of Mr. 
Rebando’s have said that this 
time he was determined to keep 
the credit for himself. 


The U.S.- Algeria Connection 

Fundamentalist link Under New Scrutiny 


YELTSIN: Order Given to Halt Bombing of Civilians in Chechen Capital 


would be deployed that could more accu- 
rately pinpoint strategic targets in the city. 

■ Chechen Leader's Son Wounded 

Mr. Dudayev’s son has been seriously 
wounded in a battle with Russian forces, 
Chechnya’s deputy foreign minister, Rus- 
lan Chimayev, said Tuesday, according to 
a Reuters dispatch from Moscow. 

Mr. Chimayev told Russia's Interfax 
news agency that Avlur Dudayev, 23, was 
wounded in fighting outside Grozny. He 
gave no details of his condition. 


four officers are being added to the 
Moun ties’ federal drug staff in Nanaimo 
next year, doubling its size. In addition, 
the police have started regular patrols in 
area high schools. 

Local officials doubt, however, that 
more police alone will solve the problem. 
Last spring, the police in Nanaimo and 
nearby Victoria staged a major bust, ar- 
resting 40 people, 15 of them Nanaimo 
residents. All were Vietnamese. According 
to Sergeant Humphries, drug activity was 
virtually uninterrupted. 

“It’s just a game," be said. "You knock 
off one guy for drug trafficking and there’s 
a dozen more waiting to take his spot.” 

Local officials say they are frustrated 
that the Vietnamese community has been 
of little help in supplying names of dealers 
or other information about them. The drug 
squad has no Vietnamese officers, and the 
police are hampered by their appearance 
from infiltrating or even keeping labs on 
drug gangs. 

To Trang Pbam, a nursing student who 
is vice president of the Nanaimo Vietnam- 
ese Society, those who demand coopera- 
tion from her community do not under- 
stand the potential consequences. 

“It is really a small enclosed communi- 
ty, and we aU know each other, so it’s really 
hard to stand up and say those names,’’ she 
said. “And the volunteer could get himself 
into trouble. If I said, ‘So-and-so did it.' 
tomorrow they could find my body in the 
forest.” 


By Joseph Fitchett 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — The international fallout from 
the hijacking of an Air France jet willmdi^e 
fresh scrutiny of a U.S. connection with Alge- 
ria’s Islamic fundamentalist 
largely symbolic foothold established m 
Washington by human-rights groups and a 
few political exiles to gam visibility for their 

cause. . . , . 

For months. Fiance has been u nrated by 
U.S. doubts about the policies of Algeria 5 
military government and calls for dialogue 
with the Muslim-led opposition. 

The threat of a fundamentalist takeover m 
Algeria is France’s deepest foreign policy 
worry, and French officials publicly insinuate 
that Washington has been heedlessly belpmg 
the' radicals. 

In private, French officials frajuently 
mai-ff the point that no American has been 
killed bv terrorists in Aigena who have mur- 
dered 25 Frenchmen and a number of for- 
eigners from several other countries. 

The implication is that Islamic fundamen- 
talists have some special UU. tie, a charge 
rejected by U.S. officials. They say the small 
number of Americans in Algeria explains the 
absence of casualties. 

The French government, anxious to avoid 
an Tgfamic takeover in Algeria before elec- 
tions in France in the spring, has resisted any 
dialogue with the Muslim groups and sought 
instead to bolster the Algerian government 

French have complained publicly 

about the unwillingness of the United States 
and Germany to provide more financial sup- 
port to Algiers and their readiness to give 
political asylum to opposition leaders. 

The emotional force of French concern, 
however, seems have more to do with history, 
specifically the growth of U.S. importance in 
Algeria after the war of independence with 
France. While largely unofficial American 
aid to Algerian revolutionaries who won inde- 
pendence still rankles in France, which has a 
traditional postcolonial interest in Algeria 
and the rest of North Africa. 

U.S. anti-colonialism in the 1950s and '60s 
was aimed primarily at preempting Soviet 
influence. But independent Algeria expanded 
its U .S. political and economic ties, especially 
in the oil business, in a way that is rare among 
former French colonies. 

Current French suspicions about U.S. in- 


tentions offer an eerie echo of jhose_^J 

fa£s of a U.S. desire to supplant French - 

interests in Algeria. . . ’ l;-. 

This friction may now ease, officials sad- . 
Tuesday, because Western govanmra^wffl. 
^Tto Jake a harder look at the options ip ; 

^Clinton administration officials repeated 
thefrview on Tuesday thatPans shojHafc 
tempi to find and nurture a 
exato front and, in any case, : 

an government to offer a calendar for. 

elections. ' . . It/-*'*- 

In the US. view, the Algerian . 

_ • _ l _ iwn riminf Tmr 


a scorcnea-eaim puuvjr 
tryside in recent months in winch lriffing has 
been widespread — has strengthened, not , 
weakened, the r esistance. . • • 

American officials predicted th at there; 
would be greater Frau* interest in < starts 
with the ream opposition group, the Iaannc 
Salvation Front, as an alternative 
ists who are gaining control of the hard-fine 
jnititazy and to the Muslim teiTOnsl undCT- 

ground. . - 

The Air France hijackers, despite an nnhal 
demand for the release of imprisoned lstoc ; 
Front leaders, appear to have belonged to the ' 

Armed Islamic Group. jL‘- - 

The movement is considered ro be the most 
radical and dangerous of Algeria’s Mm b 
fundamentalist groups. It is an umbrffla 
name for several terrorist ceOs that ha^e 
sprung up as repression has grown. - 
Dialogue with the Islamic Front, not re- 
pression. has been urged by the Uni ted Stales. 
But France dismissed the idea as a naive 
notion that would send Algeria the way. of 
Iran and Sudan, which have Islamic govern- 
ments. ' , . 

Before the hijacking, however, there were 
dgns in Paris of movement in that direction 
durin g talks in the fall between the State 
Department's top Arab expert and French 
Foreign Minis try officials. Since then, Wash- 
ington ha*? managed to curb anti-French com- 
ments by Algerian opposition figures who 
have sOTgbtpolitical asylum. 

And the Canton administration has accept- 
ed French calls for the West to promote other 
Algerian political factions is order to prevent , 
an isiaiTwr takeover that could destabilize 
nei ghb oring countries in North Africa. 


How Dr ama HIJACK: France Acted on a Up 

rv T> Gwtmued from Page 1 the hijackers, he never be* 

Un nimway explosion would devastate the them expxiss “the .intention 
J plane,” Mr. Pasqua added, turning the plane into a flyi 

Was Filmed “whteh seems to have been thear t *^' Tuesday French pol 


International Herald Tribune 

Dramatic night pictures seen 
around the world of the storm- 
ing of a hijacked jet at Marseille 
were shot with a standard video 
camera and a measure of inge- 
nuity. 

Although night had virtually 
fallen when anti-terrorist com- 
mandos stormed the aircraft on 
Monday, the photographer, 
Jean-Frangois Bramard, man- 
aged to obtain vivid color pic- 
tures of the raid. 

He obtained a vantage point 
close enough to be able to use a 
normal lens rather than a tele- 
photo lens, which brings distant 
objects closer but lets in less 
light. Mr. Bramard used a sim- 
ple ring, known as a focal 
length doubler, to obtain close- 
ups with the normal lens. 

By keeping the lens at maxi- 
mum aperture and boosting the 
video signal he was able to ob- 
tain images that appeared to 
have been taken in daylight 
The gain in luminosity was off- 
set by a considerable loss in 
picture sharpness. 

Because be used a normal 
camera, Mr. Bramard was able 
to capture the scene in color. 

The pictures provided a 
scoop for the French TV net- 
work TF1. Still pictures taken 
by the Reuters news agency 
showing the armed gendarmes 
entering the plane were taken 
with a conventional camera and 
telephoto lens. Although stQl 
cameras are less useful in low 
light than video cameras, it is 
possible to increase low-light 
possibilities by manipulating 
film development 


explosion would devastate the 
plane,” Mr. Pasqua added, 
“which seems to have been thear 
plan.” 

After the drama was over, 
some freed hostages also said 
they had heard the gunmen 
talking about destroying the 
plane over Paris. “They de- 
manded 27 tons of kerosene to 
- fly to Paris, which was more 
than was needed,” said Ferhat 
Mehenni, a well-known Algeri- 
an singer who was (me of the 
hostages. “Their idea was to set 
Paris ablaze.” 

The co-pilot, Jean-Pan] Bor- 
derie, who broke an elbow and 
a leg when he jumped from the 
cockpit window at the start of 
the assault to free the hostages, 
said sticks of dynamite were 
placed behind his chair. Anoth- 
er cache of dynamite was found 
in the middle section of the 
wide-bodied airliner. 

“I was terrified they were go- 
ing to blow up the plane,” an 
Algerian woman said soon after 
she was freed. But Marseille’s 
police chief, Alain Gehin, said 
that, during negotiations with 

Circus Acrobat Ranges 
To Death in Blackpool 

Reuters 

LONDON — A high-wire 
acrobat plunged 50 feet (15 me- 
ters) to his death in front of 
hundreds of horrified specta- 
tors at a circus in the seaside 
resort of Blackpool police said 
on Tuesday. 

The performer, in his early 
20s, was balancing on steel 
rings high above the ring at the 
Blackpool Tower Circus on 
Monday night when he slipped 
and fell a police spokesman 
said. 


the hijackers, he never heard 
them express “the intention of 
turning the plane into a flying, 
bomb." 

On Tuesday, French politi- 
cians of all parties praised the 
Gendarmerie’s elite anti-terror- 
ist unit for its successful opera- 
boa, in which 9 police, 13 pas? 
sengers and 3 crew members 
were hurt. The commandos 
. were received I Tuesday rooming 
by President Francois Mitter- 
rand, while Mr. Balladur and 
Mr. Pasqua flew to Marseille to 
visit some of the wounded in a 

hospital 

■ Ban on Air-Sea Traffic 

France said Tuesday jt was 
maintaining a ban on French 
planes and ships traveling to 
Algeria while it worked out how 
to boost security, Reuters re- 
ported from Pans. 

Transportation Minister Ber- 
nard Bosson said after a minis- 
terial meeting that he would 
meet heads of French transpor- 
tation firms to discuss extra 
safety measures, focusing on 
those carrying passengers. 

On Monday, before the end 
of the 54-hour hijacking, 
France banned its ships and 
planes from visiting Algeria, a 
former French colony. 

It kept its ports and airports 
open to Algerian transporters. 
Both Air France and the Algeri- 
an carrier Air Algfcrie had sever- 
al flights daily in each direction. 
Passenger ferries also regularly 
ply the maritime route. 

The statement did not say 
how long the halt of passenger 
traffic might last But in talks 
with shipping firms on Tues- 
day, Mr. Bosson wanted to 
work out immediate security 
measures to allow a resumption ^ 
of maritime freight “as quickly 
as possible:” 


JAPAN: Signs That Economy Has Turned the Comer 


Corrinued from Page 1 
probably have a long, subdued 


rate will remain below l percent 
next year. 

In fact, deflation is occurring 
in many sectors of the Japanese 
economy as a result of cheaper 
imports that have forced Japa- 
nese producers to lower their 
prices. Foreign beer, for exam- 
ple, sells for less than half the 
price of domestic brands. 

In addition, in thdr drive to 
become more efficient, compa- 
nies are dismantling Japan’s 
multilayer distribution system, 
a key cause of exorbitant prices. 


At the same time regulations 
that keep prices high are slowly 
being relaxed. 

The rise in industrial output 
in November was led by pro- 
duction of mobile telephones, 
motor vehicles, air condition- 
era. computer chips and print- 
ing machinery, the Internation- 
al Trade and Industry Ministry 
said. 

Mobile phones have sold 
briskly in Japan after the gov- 
ernment this spring abolished 
regulations prohibiting con- 
sumers from buying the phones 
and expanded the area in which 
they can be used. Previously, 
mobile phones could be leased 


only from telephone compa- 
nies. 

. T bc improvement in Novem- 
bers unemployment rate was 
aisnnssed by many economists 
as temporary. Others, however, 
said it meant that Japan’s labor 
inarket was recovering faster 
roan expected. 

While the unemployment 
rate itself improved, the Labor. 
Mroistiy said the ratio Of job 
openings remained unchanged 
m November from the two pie- 

vrous months, holding at Q.64. 
l}*-*? 10 means *k®re were only 

M J°o openings available for 
every 100 wwfe. 

(Bloomberg, Reuters, AFP^iP} 




*fog? 


*•- 

*-■ 




This prestigious conference will assess the 
new developments in France following the 
Presidential elections and will feature key 
members of the new government in addition 
to major industrialists and finance and 
government leaders from around the world. 


THE NEW FRANCE 

Implications Jor Global Business 


B mtt^ Sribnnc 


LE GRAND HOTEL, PARIS 
OCTOBER 17-18, 1995 


FOR FURTHER DETAILS, 
PLEASE CONTACT: 

Fiona Cowan 

International Herald Tribune 
63 Long Acre, London WC2E 9JH 
Tel: (44 71)836 4802 
Fax: <44 71 ) 836 0717 









iKi*j i/uSfi 


STAGE /ENTERTAINMENT 


International Herald Tribune ,. 
Wednesday ; December 28, 1994 
Page 7 




. ” ~.VrP ia Nki; 
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■ .• . -rt *.!• 



Surviving Yet Another Year — 


By Sheridan Morley 

International Herald Tri bune 

L ONDON — It was the year when 
a High Court judge solemnly 
banned “Maxwell the Musical, 
not then even in preview, on the 
ground that it might do damage to the case 
?Or the defenseT“Moby Dick” was, howev- 


. . (l>xt*r.‘ irofl' '*>p fall Otic ftn-ti l><tai Kant CXxuU (Vnpcr-CMtoar 44nnoft 

c tockwisejrom top left: From "Copacabana . " “New England . " “Sunset Boulevard" and “ Three Tall Women. ” 


For the “Moby Dick" was, howev- 

er, allowed to continue at the Barbican, 
even though it concerned a great white 
whale disappearing mysteriously into the 
ocean. The case has yet to come to court. 

It was the year when it took 88 living 
English dramatists to write a letter to the 
Guardian «j#m»n<fiwg as of right that their 
work should be seen on regional stages, 
specifying three new plays a year, but no- 
where explaining how an audience for such 
work was to be similarly guaranteed to 

theater mannge rs who would be happier 
presenting Australian soap stars in panto- 
mimes with wrestlers. 

It was the year when two Evening Stan- 
dard drama critics solemnly fell out over 
whether or not there were too many gay 
plays on West End stages, and when the 
dr ama critic of The Observer equally sol- 
emnly suggested that good directors 
should not be allowed to make money with 
marathon musical revivals when they 
could starve for their art on studio stages. 

It was the year when Richard Eyre an- 
nounced he would be leaving the National 
Theatre, and when several regional play- 
houses announced they would be closing 
for good or at the very least operating only 
as receiving houses, always assuming there 
was anything still on tour to receive. 

It was the year when as many American 
actresses got Hied horn die leading role in 
“Sunset Boulevard” as were actually al- 
lowed to play it. It was the year when the 
playwright with the greatest number of 
first nights in London over Christmas was 
Charles Dickens. 

It was the year when the Japanese sent 


us “Out of the Blue,” which very soon went 
Into the Red, and when Barry Manilow's 
“Copacabana” survived some of the worst 
reviews since Pearl Harbor. It was the year 
when our greatest living actor was finally 
given his own theater in Shaftesbury Ave- 
nue, an honor be should have been accord- 
ed 30 years ago. 

It was the year of the solo show and the 
tribute concert, which is much the same 

LONDON THEATER 


except that the star erf the latter is 
y dead in a plane crash and has to be 


It was the year when “Miss Saigon” 
overtook “My Fair Lady” to become the 
longest-running Drury Lane musical, 
when Vivian EUis got to be 90, and when 
Ian McKellen admitted tearing anti-gay 
pages out of Gideon bibles in American 
hold bedrooms. 

It was the year when the RSC staged an 
entire Shakespeare Festival to prove how 
much better they were at it than any for- 
eign company, and when most of the best 
drama at the Barbican surrounded the res- 
ignation of its Baroness O’Cathain. It was 
the year when Vanessa Redgrave gave us 
“Brecht in Hollywood " under her usual 
mistaken impression that foreign wars and 
social injustice allow her to give appalling 
performances in the nam e of charity. 

It was the year when the Samuel Beckett 
estate insisted that his works be performed 
exactly as the author intended; fortunately 
for Sean Mathias at the Warehouse, the 
Nod Coward estate is somewhat less intol- 
erant. In contemporary drama there was 
major new work from Arthur Miller, Brian 
Friei, David Edgar, Jonathan Harvey , Ke- 
vin Elyot and Teny Johnson, though none 
of it originated anywhere near a commer- 
cial bouse. 

Performances of the year would have to 
include Maggie Smith in “Three Tall 


Women” and Clare Higgins leading the 
National’s belated but welcome discovery 
of the neatness of Broadway drama with 
Lillian Heilman’s “The Children’s Hour” 
»nd Tennessee Williams ’s “Sweet Bird of 
Youth.” Actor of the year was undoubted- 
ly Tom Courtenay in a breathtaking return 
to greatness as the peripatetic, alcoholic 
Muscovite in “Moscow Stations.” 

My personal award for the most under- 
rated play, production and performances 
of the year would go to Richard Nelson’s 
“New England,” at the Barbican Pit, a 
marvelously Chekhcrvian study of dis- 
placed Brits in America which, as so often 
with Nelson, got largely dismissed because 
we somehow expect our American drama- 
tists to shout rather than whisper see also 
A. R. Gurney. 

Theaters of the year include as usual the 
Warehouse, Bush, Hampstead and Rich- 
mond's Orange Tree, though as usual I'm 
told 1 stay far too close to London. On the 
other hand anything good seems to get 
here pretty fast anyway, and my experi- 
ence of what does come in (largely from 
the Edinburgh Festival) suggests that in 
general rave reviews are given in precise 
correlation to the distance the critic has 
had to travel in order to write them. 

So what of 1995 in London? Diana Rigg 
as “Mother Courage,” Alan Bates as “The 
Master Builder," Stephen Sondheim’s 
darkly obsessive “Passion” from Broad- 
way, new plays from David Hare, Tom 
Stoppard and Simon Gray, and Judi 
Dench reunited with Ian McKellen for “A 
Little Night Music.” All that and the 
BoubHly Schonberg “Martin Guerre.” 

Not a bad lineup for an art form reck- 
oned tO be in te rminal d eclin e yet a gain. 
But as several regional theaters post dos- 
ing notices, and the much-promised Na- 
tional Lottery cash has yet to trickle down 
to us, the fears are still well-founded. In 
the West End too, it may soon be possible 
to make a killing but not a living. 


‘ • '• ‘.m (i 


:t O'* 


Peter Handke and the Eloquence of Wordlessness 


By Alan Riding 

New York Times Service 


P ARIS — A play with- 
out words? Mime, of 
course. Well. no. in 
muse, gestures replace 
words and, in the end, little is 
left unsaid. Peter Handke's idea 
is different. He looks around 
and sees myriad brief encoun- 
ters that never reach the stage of 
words. So be has written a play 
before words. 

It is not hard to imagine. In 
the hurried solitude of urban 
life, individuals send out “here- 
I-am” messages through their 
appearance and body language. 
Without a word, they set off 
responses of fear, respect, curi- 
osity, arousal, indifference, dis- 
approval Then the moment 
passes and the crowd moves on. 

In “The Hour We Knew 
Nothing of Each Other,” 
Handke, the Austrian-born 
playwright and novelist, has 
taken this to its theatrical con- 


clusion, turning the stage into a 
piazza where, over a 24-hour 
period, 400 characters played 
by 33 actors and actresses ap- 
pear, observe, are observed and 
then disappear. 

They include a gum-chewing 
airline captain and his crew, an 
old fisherman, grinning roller 
skaters, a sexual deviate, tour- 
ists, a transvestite, a man in a 
tuxedo who has a heart attack, a 
leggy actress making a movie, 
and more. 

There are even surreal cameo 
appearances by the likes of Mo- 
ses, Jacques Tali, Papageno and 
Tarzan. 

The 100-minute play, first 
produced in February by Ber- 
lin’s SchaubQhne am Lehniner 
Platz and acc laim ed by British 
critics at this year's Edinburgh 
Festival, was given 10 perfor- 
mances at the Th6Stre du Cha- 
telet in Paris this month. It was 
generally well received by 
French critics. 

The production stirred spe- 
cial interest because it com- 


bined the recognized talents of 
Handke, who now lives in Ger- 
many, and those of the 46-year- 
old Swiss-born theater director 
Luc Bondy. who began his ca- 
reer in Germany in 1971. 

Handke’s experimentation 
with literary forms and his pub- 
lic squabbles with Gunter 
Grass have made him one of the 
best-known writers in the Ger- 
man language. He is a poet and 
essayist as well as playwright 
and novelist, and be also wrote 
the screenplay for Wim Wen- 
ders’s film “Wings of Desire.” 


H ANDKE, 52, has 
said that the inspira- 
tion for “The Hour 
We Knew Nothing 
of Each Other” came amply 
from sitting in a caft in an Ital- 
ian piazza and watching the 
world go by. 

From his reflections came 46 
pages of stage directions for a 
play that, rime wordless, echoed 
the sounds of bis piazza: church 
bells, a distant radio, plates 


breaking, a passing motorcycle. 

It was then up to Bondy to 
orchestrate the flow of people 
and scenes across Gdles Ail- 
laud’s minimalist set, with a 
whitewashed facade of a Span- 
ish-style hacienda on one side, 
an abandoned car hidden under 
canvas on the other and, in the 
center, a pole with a basketball 
net and a statue of an Egyptian 
dog deity. 

Holes in the floor provide ad- 
ditional points of entry and 
exit 

What the audience does not 
see is the extraordinary scram- 
ble backstage as the cast of 
French and German actors and 
actresses disappear and reap- 
pear, sometimes barely a min- 
ute later, in different costumes 
and roles. Most of the players 
act out 10 to 15 characters in 
the course of each performance. 

As it happens, Bondy did not 
want much acting from them. 
Even though there are many 
moments of humor, some of 
slapstick and a few of sentimen- 


tality, the director was eager for 
the cast to appear as normal as 
possible — as normal, that is, as 
the weird characters who might 
cross a pi»™ thinking of them- 
sdves as noimaL 

Early in his career, Bondy 
spent two years at Jacques Le- 
coq’s minm school in Paris. To- 
day, he drinks of mime as “too 
talkative.” 

In this case, he wanted his 
casL to remain silent, but also to 
signal nothing too obviously. 
“Theater can extract the hidden 
relationship between people,” 
he told an interviewer. “When- 
ever I see people, I imagine 
something more; 1 fabricate 
stories.” 

Here, he invites the audience 
to do likewise: to spot the exhi- 


French Playwright Is Taking Off £§§1 


HAESJE CLAES 


By Thomas Quinn Curtiss 

International Herald Tribune 


P ARIS — Eric-Emmanuel 
Schmitt’s first move into the the- 
ater, “La Nuit de Valognes,” 
wherein Don Juan is punished for 
his misbehavior, did not linger long al- 
though it displayed great literary grace. 
But his second try, “Le Visiteur,” is a gold 
mine and has established his reputation. 

The 33-year-old Schmitt is now prqnuing 
his next play, which bears the title “Golden 
joe,” a variation on “Hamlet set m the City 

SHOUT CUTS ~ 

• “JACKY TERRASSON” (Blue 

Note): Following Ma ^^ obei SJih y 
Hargrove and Joshua R edman . French- 

sense and humor are ia™cht^h^ nito 

orbit Billboard magazmecaUed this al- 
bum, his first as leader, a 

^et-up-and-run-across-the-room kind 

of record.” 

• VOCAL SAMPLING, “Um Foma 

^ SMSSffiS 

with vocal cords and !^^L m £^r a icr 
(Where’s that cowbell coming from?) 
about body language. 


in London in the future. In the year 2010, 
Hamlet’s father is a stockbroker and his 
brother has murdered him for his position. 
It is to open at the Tb&itre de la Porte Saint- 
Martin on Feb. 1. Girard Vcrgez is direct- 
ing and Robin Renucri is the lead. 

“Le Visiteur” has run for more than a 
year in Paris to packed bouses, and received 
three Moi&rc awards, for best play at a 
private theater, best author and the theatri- 
cal revelation of 1994. Foreign rights have 
been bought up and “The visitor,” which 
doses on Saturday at the Tb&ue de Paris, 
will be seen this season in New York, Lon- 
don, Beriin and in Scandinavia. 


• JOHN P1ZZARELLI, “New Stan- 

dards” (MG): When Nat King Cole was 
producing hit after hit, his color was rued 
as a factor denying him the superstar sta- 
tus he deserved. In those clays, black 
crooners serenading white ladies was a no- 
no. Now we have a Cole-done crooner 
nobody can object to except donophobes. 
Any way you listen to it, it s a great sound 
to have around. Whatever happened to 
Billy Eckstine? _ 

• NIELS LAN DOKY, “Misty Dawn 
(Columbia): Pianist Nids Laa Doky is 
part Vietnamese and pan Danish, he 
Speaks French and English fluently. He 
playsa Swedish folk song as though they're, 
both from Brooklyn. New ^Dimensions of 
universal language. (Neils-Henmng Orsted 
Ped ersen, bass; Alex Riel, drums.) 

Mike Zweim. IHT 


The play takes place in the library of 
Sigmund Freud in Vienna on a night short- 
ly after Hitler has annexed Austria and 
involves a meeting between Freud and an 
unin vited guest who claims he is God. 

Later in 1995, Schmitt win bring out his 
translation of “The Merchant of Venice," 
to be directed by Jean-Luc Tardieu. 

“I am dusting off all the archaisms to 
expose the greenery of Shakespeare’s lan- 
guage of 400 years ago,” Schmitt said. 

“Ten years ago, tbe Parisian stage was 
bursting with American plays: now there 
are more young French playwrights than 
ever,” he said “I understand someone like 
Ionesco whose philosophy is akin to meta- 
physics. The mystery is divine, it is spiritu- 
ality, a ‘promise of sense,’ Personally I 
express myself through myths.” 

“Racine is the greatest French drama- 
tist,” he said. “Racine is almost miracu- 
lous. He does not show his craftsmanship, 
he hides it and makes it disappear, a very 
extreme elegance.” 

The stage is not Schmitt’s only occupa- 
tion. He has just published his first novel 
“La Secte des fcgoistes” (Tbe Egoists’ 
Sect), about a would-be philosopher who 
has set up a dub for people who are 
assured that no other creature on the globe 
exists. Tbe period is the 18th century, and 
an inquisitive scholar seeks to trace the 
past. There is a flavor of Diderot in this 
sophisticated spoof. 

Schmitt has written for television, too. 
His various works reveal an artist of re- 
fined style, for as be says, “Art should be 
an art of refinement.” 


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bitionists, the self-important, 
the defeated, the cruisers, the 
handicapped and those so self- 
absorbed as to notice nothing. 

Do Handke and Bondy make 
words redundant? Not really. 
The words are there, felt or 
thought or about to be spoken 
or spoken and unheard. It is 
simply up to the audience to 
pick them. 

More simply, perhaps, the 
play makes the ordinary s eem 
less ordinary. One recent eve- 
ning, as the audience headed 
home, the scene at tbe Ch&telet 
subway station looked strange- 
ly familiar. An elderly immi- 
grant swept the platform, a 
young couple embraced, a 
homeless nian slept on a bench. 
No words were being spoken. 


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International Herald Tribune, Wednesday , December 28, 1994 


Page 9 


IS.iJlKIS.jFl*® 13,^1 i 2 .ou 6j®p 

S^Sssvssn 

120 ‘ ’ 


worn 25 counines, compiled 
1992=100. 



World Index 

1 2/27/94 close: 1 12.3; 
Previous: 172.33 


■‘ » i < ' I I 


Asia/Paciltc 


D 

1994 


Approx, westing: 32% 
Ctaaa: 12622 Piwj 126.38 


ISO 
130 1 


Approx, weighting: 37% 
Cfcse: 1145? Prev.: 113.95 


lift ;.• & "■ : 


90 -*• 


150 


J A S O N D JASONO 
UW 1994 

Approx, weighting: 26% |fl|!}B Approx, wetgtitng: 5 s * 

EES Close: 100.B9 Prev : 10936 


Close: 9721 Prev.:9&44 


130 


110 

r/L* j - * I.' ' ' 




J A S 
^ Worid hide* 


N D 
1994 


7?w Mb* trucks U.S. dollar rates o I stocks in : Tokyo. New York. London, and 
Argentina, Australia. Austria. Belgium, Brazil, Canada. CfiHa, Denmark. Finland, 
Franco, Germany. Hong Kong, Italy. Mexico. Netherlands, New Zealand. Norway. 
Singapore, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and Venezuela. For Tokyo. New York and 
London, the Index is composed at the 20 top issues m terms of market capaakzaoon, 
otherwise the ten top stocks are (racked. 


[ Industrial Sectors 

* ! ‘ i i 


' j, ( 



Tib. 

PlW. 

% 


Tib. 

Ptm. 

% 


dose 

C*XE 

dange 


dote 

dose 

etonjje 

Energy 

112.66 

112.14 

+0.46 

Capital Goods 

11135 

11113 

+0.19 

UtffltiM 

120.69 

122.12 

-1.17 

Raw Materials 

131.82 

131.54 

+021 

finance 

113.73 

113.88 

-0.13 

Consumer Goods 

104.15 

10159 

+054 

Services 

110.09 

111.01 

-0.83 

lfiscefianeou8 

116.81 

11651 

+0^6 


For more Informs fori about the Index, a booklet is available free of charge. 

Write to Trib Index, 181 Avenue Charles da GauOe. 92521 NeuUfy Codex, France. 


Trygg In 

Deal With 
Zurich on 
U.S. Unit 


Hewers 

STOCKHOLM — Trygg- 
Hansa AB said Tuesday ic bad 
provisionally agreed to broad 
Cooperation with Zurich Insur- 
ance Co. that includes the Swiss 


company's takeover of Trygg’s 
troubled U.S. operation. Home 


Holdings Inc. 

Hie deal would cancels a pre- 
vious agreement with a group ot 
American investors to take over 
Home Holdings, Trygg said. 

The Swiss company, one of 
the world’s biggest insurance 
groups, will help restructure 
Home Holdings and take over 
tts current insurance business in 
exchange for between $200 mil- 
lion and $150 million. 

The deal sent Trygg’s B 
shares up 2 kronor, to 80 ($10}. 

The chief executive of Trygg, 
Lars ThuneU, in the job for less 
than two months after being 
drafted to fix the troubled com- 
pany, said the deal offered sev- 
eral advantages. 

“We are starring strategic co- 
operation with a world-leading 


company with a global net- 
work,” he - :J ~ ¥ ' L - - 


i said. “This will give 

great advantages for Trygg- 
Hansa and our industrial insur- 
ance clients, both in Sweden 
and abroad.” 

The deal with Zurich does 
not include exchanging equity 
stakes, Mr. ThuneU said. 

Trygg’s write-off costs doe to 
Home wiD be limited to 23 bil- 
lion kronor with the Zurich deal, 
compared with a 2.8 trillion kro- 
nor burden that the U.S. -bro- 
kered deal would have left 


Canada 9 s Wild, Wild West 

Vancouver Slowly Reforms Its Exchange 


By Anne Swardson 

Washington Past Service 

VANCOUVER, British Columbia — 
Think there’s money to be made in spray-on 
appetite suppressants? Or baldness cures? Or 
the world’s largest cultured pearl? The Van- 
couver Stock Exchange is the place for you. 

Forget Denver, forget U.S. penny stocks. 
This 87-year-old exchange on the western 
coast of Canada has been called North Amer- 
ica’s biggest den of white-collar scalawags, 
scoundrels and scam artists — as well as. 
occasionally, real venture capitalists. 

Take Cross Pacific Pearls Inc., which at- 
tempted to be the first grower of cultured 
pearls in North America but generated only 
$42,000 in revenue while shipping millions of 
dollars of investor money to Panama before it 
folded. The proprietor of the enterprise has 
temporarily relocated to the Cayman Islands. 

Or International Nesmoar Industries 
Corp., a gold refiner that inflated its inven- 
> by substituting brass bars for some of the 
ones. 

Or Harvard International Technologies 
Inc., which was going to sell french-fry ma- 
chines to Brazil and Guyana until two proto- 
types started smoking in the lab, prompting a 
call to the fire department No machines were 
ever sold. 


When he is feeding optimistic, Dean £ 
isor of brokers for the British 


Holley, supervisor 
Columbia Securities Commission, estimates 
that more than half the 1,600 companies list- 


ed on the Vancouver exchange are making a 
legitimate effort to earn a profit. Mr. Holley 


Some other products with which Vancouver 
exchange companies have enticed investors: 
shark cartilage as a cancer cure, vitamin piSs as 
a diabetes cure, a beehive- shaped cone that fits 
over the head to cure baldness, a spray to kill 
the AIDS virus and a self-watering plant pot. 
Most of those companies have come a-cropper. 


did not give an estimate for when he’s feeling 
pessimistic. 

An eight-month, $500,000 report commis- 
sioned by the British Columbia government 
to suggest reforms for the Vancouver ex- 
change and its regulators concluded last Jan- 
uary: “Some companies financed by the VSE 
have realized significant successes, particular- 
ly in the resource sector. But these successes 
are overshadowed by the con tinuing occur- 
rence of sham*, swindles and market manipu- 
lations.” 

The reins may be tightening, however. 
Spurred by the report, the provincial govern- 
ment is implementing reforms for the Van- 
couver exchange and its regulators, inclu “ 

— for the first time — creation of a 
office to investigate fraud. 

In addition, investors wiD be given in- 
creased latitude to file class-action suits, a 
remedy little used in Canada. The exchange’s 
board of governors will be expanded to add 
public members, one of whom will be the 
chairman. And the securities commission will 
have the power to make legally binding rules. 

Still, the reform plans are weaker than the 
report recommended, and the handful of peo- 
ple in Vancouver who have made a cottage 
industry of exposing Vancouver exchange 
scandals say the problem is not so much the 

See VANCOUVER, Page 10 


ITT Sheds Unite 
For $5.5 Billion 
To Focus onFun 


By Lawrence Malkin 

lnscmoBoml Herald Tribune 

NEW YORK — ITT Corp. 
announced Tuesday it was 


shedding its financial divisions 
SS.5 bilK< 


Investors Bail Out of Mexico 


© International Herald Trtouna 


provide H< 
with a 10-year loan worth $98 
millio n and take over some of 
the firm’s operating credits. It 
also will buy shares in Home 
from Trygg, and Home will offer 
to buy back its own shares not 
owned by Trygg or affiliates for 
$10 each. 


Coepikd by O* Stuff From Dirpoicfia 

MEXICO CITY — The pe- 
so's value eroded by 11 percent 
on Tuesday as foreign investors 
dumped Mexican holdings and 
local businesses clamored for 
government help to ease the im- 
pact of Mexico’s growing eco- 
nomic crisis. 

The dollar rose to 5.650 pesos 
here Tuesday, up from 5.075 
pesos Monday. Mexico’s Bolsa 
stock index dropped 2.84 per- 
cent, to 2^76.21 points. 

The peso has lost about 40 
percent of its value since Dec. 
21, when the government deval- 
ued the currency and then al- 


lowed it to float on foreign ex- 
change markets without 
restrictions shortly after. 

The country’s currency crisis 
has sparked feazs among inves- 
tors mat Mexico will have trou- 
ble repaying some of the more- 
than-55 billion worth of dollar- 
denominated debt maturing 
over the next six weeks. 

About $774 million worth of 
Tesobonos, or government se- 
curities, mature on Thursday. 
The dollar-denominated instru- 
ments are repaid in pesos at the 
prevailing exchange rate. The 
bonds are popular with foreign 
investors because they guaran- 


tee th p* gains from the securi- 
ties are not affected by fluctua- 
tions in the exchange rate. 

That means the Mexican gov- 
ernment could be in a tight spot 
if investors fail to roll over their 
holdings of Tesobonos. The 
central bank’s foreign-currency 
reserves were depicted by a 
two-day battle to defend the 
peso last week. 

The central bank managed to 
sell just S27.6 million worth of 
91- and 182-day Tesobonos at 
its auction on Tuesday, out of a 
total of $600 million of debt 


See PESO, Page 10 


for 55 .5 trillion to pay for its 
expansion into the entertain- 
ment industry, positioning it- 
self to seize opportunities in one 
of the most rapidly changing 
sectors of American business. 

The buyers include Germa- 
ny’s Deutsche Bank AG, and 
for both sides the transaction is 
pan of the trend for companies 
to concentrate on core business- 
es by buying into markets that 
offer them more potential than 
the companies they have sold. 

lTTs shar e price rose $4375, 
to $88,125, in New York Stock 
Exchange tr ading on Tuesday. 

ITT took in only SI billion 
from its finance subsidiaries 
fast year, compared with reve- 
nue of $10 billion from insur- 
ance, $8 billion from manufac- 
turing, and now a projected $6 
billion from entertainment with 
the addition of sports teams 
and gambling casinos to its ho- 
tel chain, “We now are concen- 
trated in three major business- 
es,” said a spokesman. 

Deut sche Bank, which 
bought lTTs North American 
commercial finance division, 
and Norwesl Corp., a Minneso- 
ta bank hold ing company that 
bought ITrs Caribbean con- 
sumer finance operation, are 
both eager for regional expan- 
sion. ITT said it also had a 
“handshake” deal to sell a 
package of real estate, small 
business and equipment fi- 
nance companies to a third buy- 
er whose name would be dis- 
closed when details are agreed. 

For Deutsche Bank this rep- 
resents an extension of a strate- 
gy to attract major corporate 
customers in North America 
through its experience with in- 
dustry and its standing as the 
world’s largest bank with a tri- 
ple-A credit rating, which en- 


ables it to offer financing on 
better terms. 

ITT Commercial Finance 
lends money to major American 
manufacturers to build inven- 
tories. Deutsche Bank said it 
would pick up about $3.75 bil- 
lion wrath of receivables, which 
would raise the asset portfolio of 
Deutsche Bank North America 
above 55 billion. 

The two sales to Deutsche 
Bank and Norwesl are expected 
to yield ITT $3.7 billion in cash, 
ana the third $1.8 billion when it 
is completed. A spokesman ex- 
plained that ITT planned to pay 
off $3.4 billion in debt, leaving 
the parent company with an ad- 
ditional $2.1 billion in cash and 
a stronger balance sheet. 

Last week, ITT agreed to pay 
$1.7 billion for Caesars World, 
which operates casinos in Neva- 
da and Atlantic City and pro- 
vides a fit with the ITT Shera- 
ton Hold chain that operates 
the Las Vegas Desert Inn and 
casinos in Egypt, Australia, and 
the Dutch Antilles. In Septem- 
ber ITT teamed up with Cab- 
levision Systems Corp. to pay 
51.1 billion for New York's 
Madison Square Garden and its 
crowd-puffing home teams. 

During the fall ITT was re- 
ported to be one of the suitors 
for the National Broadcasting 
Co., but ITT said Tuesday it 
was not actively pursuing the 
purchase of the network. Given 
the strength of its balance sheet 
once it completes the current 
transactions, however, he would 
not rule out new acquisitions in 
the entertainment business. 

ITT is one of the world's most 
diversified multinationals and 
last year earned $913 million cm 
$22.8 trillion in sales, a ratio that 
has remained relatively steady 
for the past five years with the 
exception of 1992 when it posted 
a loss by writing off recession 
losses in its consumer finance 
busin ess legal settlements by 
ITT Hartford insurance: 


MEDIA MARKETS 


Ad Firms Seek Superhighway Entrance 


By Daniel lilies 

Special to the Herald Tribtate 

P ARIS — The so-called Informa- 
tion Superhighway has the adver- 
tising industry abuzz. Virtually 
every executive in the business 
agrees interactive technology will pro- 
foundly alter the way advertising looks, is 
delivered to consumers and functions. 

Beyond that, however, ideas turn 
vague. Presentations on the subject from 
chief executives of advertising agencies 
highlight the uncertainty: they are most- 
ly a mixture of broad industty hypothe- 
ses and hype, with the occasional simu- 
lated interactive TV commercial thrown 
in for show. 

But while executives struggle to make 
sense of a complex and rapidly evolving 
big picture, many are seeking to position 
their agencies as key players in the 
emerg in g interactive world. Companies 
such as Interpublic Group of Cos., uic 
New York-based holding company for 
the ad agencies McCann-Erickson, Lm- 
tas Worldwide and Lowe Group, have 
been se eking alliances with software, en- 
tertainment and technology develop- 
ment companies. .. 

At the same time, IPG and other ag en 
ties are launching interactive advertising 
projects with clients, gating 
wet together in the world of cybermar- 
lreting . . , 

“People are uncertain because it s ver y 
diffkadtto predict wind the consumer 
really wane and wbal •* K ^ rc J 
pay /or,” said Martin Sorrell, 
tire of WPP Group PLC, the British com- 


ly that owns J. Walter Thompson and 
Ivy & Mather. “There’s a whole lot of 
technology in search of a solution,” added 
Eric Salama, director of strategy at WPP. 

The problem is twofold. Although vir- 
tual reality, interactive television and on- 
line computer services are all in relative 


There’s a whole lot of 
technology in search of a 
solution. 9 

Eric Salama, director of strategy 
at WPP Group. 


states of infancy, they are still further 
iced than the i 
applications 


advanced than the marketing and adver- 
tising applications that win use than. 
Moreover, nobody knows which sys- 


tems will ultimately be accep t ed by the 
public and which wili fail leaving mar- 
keters, like everyone involved in the in- 
teractive world, a bit reluctant to take 
huge risks. 

“You need to put information out 
there to see what people want,” said 
Fann y Baker, a media analyst for Salo- 
mon Brothers Inc. in New York. 

Experimentation is exactly what agen- 
cies and marketers are starting to da 
Bates Doriand in London, part of the 
Bates Worldwide agency, has begun ad- 
vertising for Grolsch beer on the Inter- 
net Combining pieces of current TV 
advertising with newly created on-line 


characters, users can follow a series of 
steps and ultimately win T-shirts. 

“The Internet is a way to try and make 
Grolsch more contemporary,” said Andy 
Bryant, board account director at Bates. 

Chiat/Day/Mqjo Inc. Advertising, in 
New York and Los Angeles, is taking to 
the Internet in January. The agency will 
offer potential clients the opportunity to 
test ideas before making a financial com- 
mitment, said Ira Mat&thia, managing 
director of the New York office. A com- 
pilation of agency commercials will be 
on-Hne, too, as will discussions of inter- 
active media topics. 

“It’s a destination site for people inter- 
ested in the broader issues facing media, 
marketing and advertising," Mr. Ma- 
tatbia said. 

A second question facing agencies is 
how advertising wiD evolve in the inter- 
active world. Although traditional TV 
commercials will probably play a role for 
years to come, “we expect a sea change in 
advertising creativity,” said Philip H. 
Gder Jr, chairman and chief executive 
of Interpublic. 

He predicted that pr o gramm ing and 
advertising would eventually merge, turn- 


ing into what he called advertainmenL 
Andrew Frank, vice president of new 
technology at O&M Direct in New York, 
die direct marketing group at Ogilvy & 
Mather, said marketers would need sub- 
tle techniques to advertise their brands 
and corporate images. 

O&M is working on a project with 
Knowledge Adventure Worlds, a San 

See FUTURE, Page 10 



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Source: Reuters. 


Banks Were Established to Protect 
Depositors' Funds. It's Still 
Our Most Important Mission. 



T hroughout history, man 
has sought to safeguard 
the tilings he values. 

It was true in the Middle Ages, 
when banking institutions 
emerged to shelter the wealth 
created by an expanding market 
economy. It’s equally true now. 

Today, however, safety isn't 
a matter of having the biggest 
strongbox or the heaviest 
padlock. In today's fluid world, 
safety is tied to prudenr poli- 
cies, a strong balance sheet and 


a conservative banking 
philosophy. 

Those are the very qualities 
that have made Republic 
National Bank one of the ‘Safest 
institutions in the world. Our 
asset quality and capital ratios 
are among the strongest in the 
industry. And our dedication to 
protecting depositors’ hinds is 
unmatched anywhere. 

As a subsidiary of Safra 
Republic Holdings S.A. and an 
affiliate of Republic New York 


Corporation, we’re part of a 
global group with more than 
US$5 billion in capital and 
more than US$50 billion in 
assets. These assets continue to 
grow substantially, a testament 
to the group’s risk-averse orien- 
tation and century-old heritage. 

So, while much has changed 
since the Middle Ages, safety 
is still a depositor’s most 
important concern. And it’s 
still our most important 
mission. 


REPUBLIC NATIONAL BANK 
OF NEW YORK (SUISSE) SA 


A SAFRA BANK 


Timeless Values. Traditional strength. 


HEADOFFKB GENEVA 12Q4-2, PLACE DU LAC 'TEL. (OZZi 705 S5 S3 - FOREX: 1 022 ■ 70B 58 SO AND GENEVA 1201 -2. RUE DR. ALFREIF-VINCENT I CORNER 
OUAI DU MOKT-BLAMCi BRANCHES; LUGANO 6901 • I, VIA CANOVA ■ TEL (091) 23 03 32 • ZURICH 3039 ■ STOCKERSTRASSE 37 * TEL. {01 J 288 18 18 * 
GUERNSEY - RUE DU PRE ' ST PETER PORT * TEL. (481 1 711 781 AFFILIATE REPUBLIC NATIONAL BANK OF NEW 1OT* IN NEW W)HK OTHER LOCATIONS: 
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MONTREAL ■ NASSAU • NEW YORK • BUENOS AIRES ■ CARACAS • MONTEVIDEO - PUNTA DEL ESTE • RIO OE JANEIRO ■ SANTIAGO ’ BEIRUT ■ BEIJING • HONG KONG • 

JAKARTA • SINGAPORE * TAIPEI ■ TOKYO 





J ■ 





ge 9 






** 


Page 10 

MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 1994 


Bonds and Mexico 
Support Wall Street 

I il TIP 


Compiled bf Or Staff From Oitpmthe 

NEW YORK — stocks 
prices rose in light volume 
Tuesday, as bond Prices 
jumped and as investors shifted 
away from foreign markets as 
the Mexican peso slid. 

Electrical etjuipn^nt makers, 
aut omaker s and soft-drink is- 
sues paced the advance. But re- 


peso supported the U.S. market 
as investors swindled from risk- 
ier, so-called emerging market 
investments into U.S. blue-chip 
stocks, said Michael Metz, in- 
vestment strategist at Oppen- 
heuoer&Co. 

On the NYSE most-active list 
was Tetefonos de M&tico, which 


ULS* Stocks 


dropped 2 W, at 38H, and Mexico 
Fund, whii 


tail stocks and Mexican issues 
traded on US. markets bucked 
the upward trend, ending 
sharply lower. 

The Dow Jones industrial av- 
erage rose 28.26 points, to 
3,861.69, helped by General El- 
ectric, which closed up 1%, at 
Slto, and by United Technol- 
ogies, which ended 1 higher, at 
63to. 

Advancing issues outnum- 
bered declines by a 7-to-6 ratio 
on the New York Stock Ex- 
change, where volume totaled 
211.2 million shares. 

Jittere about the Mexican 


, which fell 2%, to 20%. 

American banks that make 
loans or hold securities linked 
with Latin America also came 
underfire, making the banking 
industry among the day's worst 
performers. Citicorp dropped 
Hi, to 40 to. Chemical Banking 
dropped to, to 36to. 

The 30-year Treasury bond 
yield fell to 7.76 percent from 
7.83 percent os Friday as prices 
rallied, partly in response to a 
report from the National Asso- 
ciation of Realtors that said 


sales of previously owned 
> fell in November to the 


homes 

lowest level in 17 months. 

(AP, Bloomberg) 


PESO: Economic Crisis Deepens 


Continued from Page 9 

scheduled to be sold. The slug- 
gish demand drove interest 
rates on the 91-day securities to 
10.49 percent, the highest level 
this year. 

Mexican businesses, mean- 
while, are becoming convinced 
that the government has lost 
control of the economy. 

“Mexican society must have a 
clear vision of where this country 
will be headed in the coming 


Foreign Exchange 


months,” said Antonio Sanchez 
Diaz de Rivera, bead of the pow- 
erful business lobby Coparmex. 

But that may not be forth- 
coming soon. President Ernesto 
Zedillo Ponce de Le6n post- 
poned a speech on the govern- 
ment’s strategy for dealing with 
the economic crisis that bad 
been scheduled for Tuesday to 
until at least Jam 2. 

Adding to worries for inves- 
tors and businesses are signs 
that the year-old uprising in the 
southern state of Chiapas is 
about to heat up. The Zapatista 
guerrillas there are engaged in a 
game of cat-and-mouse with 
government security forces af- 
ter evading a military cordon 
around their jungle stronghold 
in the east of the state: 

Government troops were re- 
ported to have moved closer to 
the Zapatista stronghold in the 


past few days, raising tensions 
m the area even though neither 
side has tired a shot in more 
than II months. 

U.S. government officials are 
keeping a close eye on Mexico's 
economy, especially in light of 
the closer ties being formed un- 
der the North American Free 
Trade Agreement. 

- “We are in close contact with 
the Mexican and Canadian au- 
thorities regarding the situation 
in currency markets and recog- 
nize that excessive depredation 
is in no one's interest,'’ Lawrence 
Summers, the U.S. Treasury un- 
dersecretary, said Tuesday. 

He contended that Mexican 
economy was fundamentally 
more sound than the peso's 
drop suggested. 

Meanwhile, the dollar 
slipped against European cur- 
rencies in New Yore trading 
and edged up against the yen in 
thin trading marked by specula- 
tion as to whether the Federal 
Reserve Board would raise rates 
at its next policy-making meet- 
ing on Jan. 31. 

The dollar ended at 1.5758 
Deutsche marks, down from 
1.5793 DM Monday, at 5.4420 
French francs, down from 
5.4525 francs, and at 1.3302 
Swiss francs, down from 1.3329 
francs. It rose to 100300 yen 
from 100.120. 

(Bloomberg, AP, Reuters) 


VisAiiodBledfan 


Dec 27 


The Dow 



•• •**: . ■ V .. i-> ';■! ■ 

— 1 ' > ••• - .::W *.:i 

V. * S'*. j *:.' 

! CM; 


Dow Jones Averages 


e pan HM im Lwf 


intiU* 3846X0 3UA40 3E&43 3661.49 +»X6 
7JWK U3V3 J 1434*4 144X4? -MS 

uta 381.91 iisji m.w mu +o.« 

camp 127222 1277.13 1268X1 1276.13 ->.M 


Spanish Stocks Fall 
On Political Unease 


StamtanlAPoon IndexM 


High Lew Lost Or* 


5P100 432J5 439X3 43224 -2 JO 

5P5Q0 44271 459 JU 44147 -144 

mtotrtCfc 5S1J0 547,47 SSI .09 *142 

Tramp. HO 39 348.56 349.91 *12» 

Utinttal 1SL0S 131X6 151.95 +OB7 

finance 41X5 41X9 41X7 *0X6 


NYSE Indexes 


Lew Lust dry. 


Compute 252.16 3S693 251X9 *1X4 

Industrial 319.55 217X3 319X9 *1X6 

Trow. 221 .92 23058 220X2 -A2D 

UMtly 199X7 198.99 199X9 * 0X1 

France 197.10 195X9 196X7 *026 


NYSE Most Actives 



VoL Man 

LOW 

Lott 

cm 

TelMex 

134X10 40W 

37 

aw 

— 3 V, 

RJRNOb 

32973 51k 

SH 

M 

■*Vm 

WcriMort 

30083 22 

21 

21 W 

— V> 

YPP50C 

23604 3)% 

20H 

2064 

—94 

Kmart 

23050 >3'4 

I2» 

ifi 

—44 

GnMotr 

21837 4Irii 

41% 

+ 44 

MexJ=d 

18737 Z2V. 

I9W 

2Mk 

—2W 

GTetewa 

18592 32 

» 

2714 

—354 

Amocu 

17667 57* 

58% 

5044 

—1 

Offcerp 

17595 41 W 

4016 

401k 

—114 

GenEls 

17263 516* 

49M 

51 Vb 

+ 114 

EmpfcQ 

16488 18H 

lP-li 

15H 

—314 

SPrinl 

16250 Z7U 

26Vj 

269i 

— V4 

GTrtxao 

15850 19* 

17 

17 'A 

—244 

P« 

15430 21W 

19’A 

BFte 

— \4 


NASDAQ Most Actives 



VoL High 

Loot 

Lost 

aw. 

BoyNtuvs 

47779 30Vk 

29 VI 

30V, 

+1\. 

fterSOTv 

■ ■ M 

4’X 

*9i 

— 2W 

Oracle 

22413 45W 

43 V* 

43 

- I'Vu 

NOTdst 

21176 43'A 

40 

40 V. 

—34+ 


19573 7Y«, 

#k 


— Ym 


17184 1846 

18 V* 

+ V» 


17125 35Vh 

35V. 

3S9» 

- W 


17035 63 V, 

63 

63>Vm 


AptdMatl 

15623 42'X 

40 V* 

42 Vi 

-IV. 


15370 141X 

1314 

14V4 

— “A 

Contia 


24V. 

24Urit 

+ "rU 


E - 'il 

27'A 

2214 

— W 

MiCSfts 

12843 614h 

6044 

60V. 

— Vk 

DSC 3 

12267 37 

36 

36% 


Intarrrdx 

11500 31 V* 

29 W 

31 W 

+2 


AMEX Most Actives 


Vtocvrt 

Interfile 

Epitooe 

USBJwci 

VJocfl 

RayatOg 

Androa 

NtoCp 

SlyieVid 

CoiDota 


VoL 

MW 

Law 

LOST 

Otg. 

23900 

1V6 

TVte 

IM* 

— */l* 

inn 

714 

Xte 

71* 

+v» 

10578 

359, 

224k 

2344 

— 1V» 

10140 ruu 

2 

29. 

+ 'A 

5300 4716 

40 

4016 

♦ 44 

4293 

3'n 

3 V. 

3V* 

+ W. 

3608 

28'+ 

36 

264* 

+ 216 

3493 

1844 

I7H 

IS 

-V* 

3434 

4Yu 

2'A 

70/h 

—I'Vu 

3169 

144* 

1394 

14*4 

♦ 1'4 


Market Sales 



Today 

Prey. 


CtOriO 

c on 

NYSE 

211.18 

244*2 

Amo 

Noridoa 

17XS 

200X4 

19*5 

214*3 

in militant 




NASDAQ Indexes 


Wsh Low LW On. 


QMPOOte 745J5 74029 745X8 *U7 

Industrie* «4X3 7<ls\ 2*70 -la 

Bonks 595X4 «2J3 « 2*8 — 0X2 

Insurant* 915X1 909X8 912J4 —0']] 

Rnonce 536X1 854.13 SS5X3 + JJ4 

Transp. 552X3 6*5.16 *6.70 


AMEX Stock Index 


Mgh Lew Lax? Cfcs. 
429X2 *26X0 *»J7 *059 


Dow tfones Bond A 


lQUtflM^m 
■ Industrials 


9350 

69X8 

9043 


Otoe 
+ 016 
+ 0.15 
— 8X5 


NYSE Diary 


Advanced 

Declined 


Tom* issues 
Now Highs 
Now Lows 


n 

2924 


1223 

949 

750 

2922 

25 


AMEX Diary 


Advanasd 
Dedtnea 
Unchanged 
Total Issues 
New hearts 
NewLsM 


£ 


301 

249 

219 

759 

8 

24 


NASDAQ Diary 


Advanced 
Declined 
unchanged 
Total issues 
New Marts 
New Lows 


1561 

1568 

1985 

5134 

117 

94 


1643 

1452 

3042 

5137 

49 

79 


Spot Commodities 


Today 

6X59 


commodity 

*S! 

”3 

Sllw. trw az 09 

Steel (scran), tat 127*0 

TTn-lto 19703 

zmc.IL 05410 


0X59 

1X1 

213X0 

044 

*77 

127X0 

NA 

03467 


Complied by Ow Siafi From Mspadta 

MADRID — Stock prices 
' Tuesday 


fell to 1994 lows Tuesday as 
opposition parties demanded 
the resignation of Prime Minis- 
ter Felipe GonzAlez over al- 
leged illegal activities by former 
government officials involved 
in anti-terrorism. 

Spanish bond prices also feu, 
driving yields to near 20-month 
highs, as the widening political 
scandal threatened to under- 
mine the Socialist government. 

The Bdsa de Madrid’s Gen- 
eral Index dropped 8.26 points, 
or 2.82 percent, to 284.62. The 
IBEX 35-share index ended the 
session down 101.23 points, or 
3,17 percent, at 3,088.05. 

The yield on the 10-year gov- 
ernmentbond rose to 11.59 per- 
cent from 11.56 percent on Fri- 
day, the highest since May 1 1, 
1993. The price, which moves 
inversely to the yield, dropped 
to 79.89 from 80.10. The five- 
year bond yield rose to 1137 
percent from 1135 percent 

The uncertainty about the 
government’s future stems from 


charges that the former head of 
state security, 

high- ranking officials involved 
infighting terrorism by Basque 
separatists, created an unoffi- 
cial police force that used some 
of the terrorists’ own violence 

a gains t them. . . 

Two former police officials 
were quoted in the newspaper 
El Mundo as saying the unoffi- 
cial force, known as the Ann- 
terrorist liberation Group, was 
set up and backed by other gov- 
ernment officials. 

Mr. Gonzalez has denied any 
government involvement 
Traders said the bearish sen- 
timent that prevailed through- 
out the day became more in- 
tense after the call for 
Gonzalez’ resignation. 

“Panic took over investors 
today, and they opted to seB a 
good part of their shares before 
concerns about Gonzalez’ pos- 
sible resignation cause prices to 
collapse erven more,” a trader 
for one Spanish bank said. 

(Knight-Ridder, Bloomberg 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


Financial 


tiraXBRflGF 

ssr gg ™ :ss 

££ 9274 92X9 9272 +M4 

EMC 9255 9250 9153 +0X3 

Mv 9255 9279 9275 +0X6 

Jno 9274 9270 9272 +05* 

Sop 92.14 92.10 92.13 + 0X5 

Doc 92X6 92X2 92X7 +0X7 

Esl. volume.- SJV.OpanM.: T9&409. 


10-YRAft FRENCH OOV. BONDS IPAAT1F) 

P ni5£ 1 ** mxe 111 x 2 +074 

11046 11048 1KU6 +078 


Dec 


10950 109.90 110X8 +078 

HT. N.T. N.T. Unch. 


Est volume: 10694. OP*tn bit.: 137X41 


Stock Indexes 


CACMtMATIF) , 

199SX6 -9X0 
Jen 197750 IWflXO 196350 -9X0 

Feb 1 98750 196750 197350 — 9X0 

Mar 1999X0 198350 T9B3X0 — 9X0 

Jan H.T. H.T. 196450 —9X0 

Sap N.T. N.T. 1993X0 —9X0 

Ed. volume: 17425. Open biL: 61516. 
Source: Motif. 

London intemotHxtd Fbtondot Futures 
Exctranoe was dosed T uu dor tor a holiday. 


Dfiridends 


Per Ami Rec Par 
IRREGULAR 

BC0 Find Sve - X4 12-31 1-20 

cSSXs^Rrwinc - X6 12-30 1-13 

LL5E Roy C XT91 1-5 1-13 

LxwtsFedSvo - 70 1-4 +1? 

Norwct) PLC <1 & '-n 2-20 

&4 Fd - .1619 JJ-g 12-30 

SeaMCmnSik - U1 12-D 12-30 

Strrtnl Grit, . - 251 13-23 1330 

oreaorting pov data 
(Sapprex amount pw ADR. 

INCREASED 

Pranler Blasts Q -1* M 

trtwmcm SvsttS* Q M 1W7 hi 3 

RcnoMcLiMSA Q 545 2-3 3-1 

CORRECTION 

Amor All Son y i" l X 7 12-30 1-16 

h25& c£b« ( x«74 1331 V30 

rcorreeted record arm Davrates. 
t-arev. o nnoonezd Oodoratfon Is on initial 
payment 

REGULAR 


ABC BCD . X95 12-31 1-M 

Bay View Can Q 75 1-13 D 

CB Bella Q 725 14 1-30 

CS8 Find Q X75 1-13 1-31 

aortwBota S -2S 11 

Moruan Grp Q X2 V3 1-16 

Oppen MJtGvtTr « ^ 1-6 V-a 

Sontni GvSec M 12-» 1M0 

Scntni PA TxFr M xn 12-3 IhX 

Sentnl TxFr M X5t I2-23 12-30 

Stratton NWhly M 76 12-30 M 

SfrawOrMpeCaA Q 575 1-3 3-1 


o-awnaal; p payable in Onwdln n (toads; m- 
mafbhr; a-aoarUrty; t aW n wl 



Confidence Surged in December 

istfw YORK (Combine*! Dispatches) -—Consumer cmifidQice 

ConierenceBcord 
research group's index of consumer sentiment, 

aisaeaa«M>5s 

rfSemaite. Sales diopp2l2.6 perceni to a sessonXly adjusted 
»n final rate of 2.81 nufiton. . 

Separately, Visa said that a record $1 bahmi crf r^-^a 
tr^^te^were made using its credit cards on 5S 

is the rwxsti for mail transactions on a angle 

total transactions amounted to $1 WBion JP aSSSfSjdsSSS 
during the holiday shopping season. (AP, Knigto-Kidder) 

Vehicle Production at 16 -Year High 

DETROIT (Bloomberg) — North American car and track 
P rS™WtaTye?high of about 15.75 gtefa 19* 
including record output in Canada and Mexico, Ward s Automo- 
tive News said Tuesday. 



i’ .TV. - r-r^*w 
Cr- 1, 


"V - ' \ 1 

•1> : : u-V- VT* ? 


V 

•n 

■ —.IT* V 


tive News said Tuesday. . . 

With all vehicle plants having ended production for the year on 
Monday, car and truck output was «tu^ed n^ 10.4 pocoit 
from the actual count of almost 14.23 xnilhon m 1993, the weekly 
statistical publication said. _ ‘ - 

Ward's attributed robust levels m 1994 to production capacity 
increases in Mexico, transfers by Asian-based automakers of 
capacity to North America, and a strong U.S. economy.- 

UPI Says AT&T Seeks Joint ^ Venture 

WASHINGTON (Bloomberg) — United Press Intenmfiooal, 
the news agency that was bought by Middle East Broadcasting 
Co. m 1992 , said Tuesday it was in talks with AT&T Corp. to form 
a venture, possibly to provide on-line information services. 

A joint-venture agreement would further enhance AT&T’s push 
into the $6 billion on-line services market. AT&T bought Ziff 
Co mmuni cations Co.'s on-line business last week. 

MCI Communications Corp- and Ameritech Coro, have also 
faTirwt to UPI about a joint venture, said Ron MacIntyre, UPrs 
vice president of marketing. 




V n 






(fl C 


Two U.S. Healthcare Firms Team Up 


»-i _ ,’j 


TAMPA Florida (Bloomberg) — Beverly Enterprises Inc. said 
Tuesday it would buy Pharmacy Management Services Inc. in a 
stock swap valued at $148.5 million, or $1630 per Pharmacy 
Management share. Pharmacy Management, which had $113 mil- 
lion in revenue last year, sells drugs, medical supplies and equip- 
ment to workers’ compensation insurers and claimants in all 50 U.S. 
slates. Beverly Enterprises, which had $2.9 billion in revenue last 
year, is die largest U.S. provider of long-term bealth-care services. 


-sir; A 


Sack Fro 


For the Record 


VANCOU VER: Reforms to Curb Some Excesses at Frontier Exchange 

Continued from Page 9 

rules as the regulators. “They 
don't have a regulatory mina- 


Rite Aid Corp^ the largest U.S. drug store chain, said it hod 
agreed to acquire Peny Drag Stores Inc. for $11 a share, or about 
$132 million in cash. ( Bloomberg) 

GTE Corp. said it increased to $25.30 a share from $22.50 the 
amount it plans to pay for 10 million shares of Conte! CeHuhr Inc. 
and ConteTs board approved the transaction. GTE already owns 
the rest of ConteL (AR-DJ) 


?r ; : - *' " “■» 

. . • • ;■ r.Cj. 


i ! * : ■ 


seL It’s, Vhatever we can do to 
help these guys out,’” said 
Adrian dn Plessis, a former 
trader and author of a book 
about the Vancouver exchange. 

Mr. du Plessis worked for 
several months as an investiga- 
tor at the securities commis- 
sion, then quit earlier this year. 


charging that regulators were 
not interested in going after the 
bad guys. 

John Woods, president of the 
publication Stockwatch, said the 
commission displays ‘’an as- 
tounding lack of curiosity.” 

Mr. Holley denied this, say- 
ing the problem is that the com- 
mission lacks resources and le- 
gal backup. With more support, 
he said, lie commission could 


easily triple the SO to 60 cases it 
brings each year. 

In Canada, the securities 
business is regulated by the 
provinces, not the national gov- 
ernment This gives the stock 
exchanges a regional character: 
the Toronto Stock Exchange, 
the second-largest in North 
America, is highly respectable. 

In British Columbia, howev- 
er, there is a long tradition of 
un trammeled free enterprise. 
The Vancouver exchange was 


founded in 1907 principally as a 
mechanism for finanrino the 
growing mining and, later, oil 
and gas industries. Even then, 
the Vancouver exchange was 
known as a frontier exchange. 
But in the 1980s, the Vancouver 
exchange’s managers decided to 
move into commercial and in- 
dustrial sectors. 


Weekend Box Office 


I | j .. 




The Associated Press \ 

LOS ANGELES — “Dumb and Dumber'’ dominated the U. S. 
box office again with a gross of $15.7 million over the weekend. 
Following are the Top 10 moneymakers, based on Friday ticker 
sales and estimated sales for Saturday and Sunday. r: 


Donald J. Hudson, president 
of the Vancouver exchange, 
said the exchange suffers most- 
ly from image problems. 


FUTUKE; Ad Industry Seeks Ways to Tap Information Superhighway 


\ "Duwto and Dumber" 
Z “Street FtaMer- 
X The Santa Clause' 

4. "Disclosure' 

5. "Little Women" 

A "The Jungle Book" 

7. "RlChle Rich" 
tiwr 

9.-I.Q.- 

10. "Speechless" 


(New Uoe Cinema) 
(Universal) 

(Won Disney) 

(Warner Brothers) 
(Columbia} 

(Wan Disney) . 

( Warner Brothers) 
(Tnentiem Cenfurv-Fox) 
( Paramount ) 
(MotroOaUvrvn-Mavor) 


Si 57 million 
siix million 
sii million 
so miuien 
U5 million 
ttmUHan 
SSmHVon 
137 million 
SSXmlUtai 
53.1 mil Hon 


Continued from Psge 9 
Francisco-based company, that 
will create a three-dimensional 
virtual reality “World’s Fair” 
for launch on the Internet next 
autumn. Pavilions and other at- 
tractions at the fair will be 
sponsored, and fair goers will 
be able to enter these pavilions, 
receiving product information 
in a number of nontraditional 
ways. 


do an end-run around classic 
ads. Messages will have to be 
hidden.” 

Absolut Vodka sought a 
more subtle sell with an interac- 


tive project launched in 1994 
called the Absolut Museum. 


let consumers manipulate the 
advertising,” said Steven Weiss, 
chairman of Quest & Asso- 
ciates, an Atlanta research 
group owned by Interpublic 
Mr. Wass said it would one 


“Traditional advertising met- 
aphors simply won't work any- 
more,” said Rob Schmults. 
sales and marketing manager 
for Knowledge Adventure 
Worlds. “Users can still gel the 
product content they want and 


Working again with O&M and 
using a combination of CD- 
ROM, or compact disk read- 
only memory, and the Compu- 
Serve on-line service, the vodka 
maker created a virtual art gal- 
lery whereby users could view 
more than 200 color print ads 
done for Absolut 
Agencies also are racing to 
understand what consumers 
will want from interactive ad- 
vertising. “The imperative is to 


day be possible to call up an ad 
nle 


for a specific automobile on a 
7Y or computer screen at home, 
day or night with as much ad- 
vertising detail as desired. Push- 
ing a button could instantly gen- 
erate a coupon offering a free 
test drive at the nearest dealer. 

Still, he cautioned that mass 
acceptance of advertising-on- 
demand and other techniques 
would be measured in years. 

“If you think you can create 
an experience which will be so 


powerful it will change consum- 
er habits overnight, that's 
wrong,” he said. New advertis- 
ing technology “will have to 
drive a consumer demand 
. which doesn’t exist yet” 

Still another consequence in- 
teractive technology will have 
for agencies concerns the elu- 
sive notion of ad accountability. 

Consumers will be able to 
“choose what they want when 
they want it” said Michael 
Bungey, the chief executive of 
Bates Worldwide said recently. 
“In an interactive environment 
answerable advertising will give 
us instant feedback as to bow 
well our message is going over, 
both in form and content.” 


U.S. FUTURES 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Agmca fronca fas» Dae. 27 


Amsterdam 


ABN Amro HM 6170 60.40 

ACF HoWlflB 34X0 

Aegon 112 111x0 

Ahold 54 

AJuo Nobel 201 196X0 

Boig-Wossaner. 3370 3110 

CSM 69-30 6850 

DSM 13950 13970 

Elsevier 16 

Fokker 12-30 12.10 

ForHS AMEV 74.90 7470 

Gtst-Bnocodes 47.10 46.91) 

HBG 262 26170 

Hlrfnefcwi 264 26150 

Hoooavens 797D 78.10 

Hunter Domrias 7970 7970 

IHC Calami 44.10 4X40 

Inter Mueller vixo tijo 

inn Nederland 8X10 62.10 

KLM 4X40 42.80 

KNP BT 4970 48X0 

KPN sa.40 3770 

N«dUavd 5650 56 

Oce Gflnlen 78JD 7850 

mhCOd 46*0 46*0 

PtHIIPS 5250 5270 

Palvaram 8050 *0.10 

Hobeca 11X20 172X0 

Rodomco 4850 4890 

RqHneo 115.10 11*70 

ffommfo 83J0 SUO 

Roval Dutch 19050 18870 

Stork 45*0 43 

Unilever rajornn 

Van Ornmereu 46 45X0 

VNU 11170 181 

Wallers/ Khmer I2SJ0 124X0 


KVASS’* 


Almontl 
Artoed 
Boren 
BBL 
Bekaert 
CBR 
CMS 
CNP 
CodieHII 
Cobera 
Colruvt 
Deitiabe 
eiKtroM 
Elect rnfl no 
Form AC 
GiB 


Brussels 

76 


J771D 

TRo <0001 
2*75 2470 
4770 4400 
22600 227751 
12100 «■ 


imiDObn 
Kredtetbank 
MdSOIW 
Polraflna 
Potoerfin 
Rectlcrt 
Rovde Beige 
Soc Gen Banaue 


1980 I' 
an : 
1040 1042 
7440 7S40 
1290 1290 
5750 5740 
2660 S~- 
2710 2 
1270 T 
3920 3 
1500 I 
*400 4450 
2640 2700 
6710 6740 
1352 1390 
9510 9*40 
2945 2930 
*48 448 
m i join 
BIB) 6060 


Soc Sen Betgimie ZtHO 2195 


Soil no 
Sotvav 
Tei lender iq 

Tnicletiei 

UCB 

S o Ion Mlnlere 
afloniLlti 


13150 131 25 
I 5325 15*00 
10400 10400 
9660 9660 

34550 2*780 
7475 2400 
6030 6010 




Frankfurt 


AEG , 15120 15W0 

Alcatel SEL 272 266 

Alllane Hold 2sas 2477 


Oom Pm. 


Altana 62 1 uu 

Aska 720 750 

BASF 317X0317.90 

Bovrr 359X0 360 

Bay. Hvuo bank 4Qixo 402 

Bay verelnsbk <3X50 429 

BBC 630 650 

BHF Bank 379 378 

BMW 7737*850 

Commensank 33&50 331 

Continental 230 220 

Daimler Bens 77250 763 

Deaussa 457.50 «sj_» 

D1 Babcock 20150 

Deutscho Bank 724 

Dowlas 434JO 439 

Dresaner Bank *0540+50 

Fddmuetile 310 304 

F Kruoa Hoesch 310 31 1 

Haruener 331 330 

Henkel 39950 SS6 

Hochtief 9ir 920 

Hoecnst 33033850 

Holzrnann 850 852 

Horten 209 209 

IWKA 346 M 

KallSdlz 1735018950 

Karstodt 5665056650 

Kaufhof 48248050 

KHD 1205011750 

KioecknerWerke 12512450 
Unde 905 900 

Lufthansa 197 IM 

MAN 41S *11 

Mannesmatm <21*1X50 

13255 134 

2892 2695 

Porsche 665 67s 

PrwsSOO 44950 446 

PWA 234X023450 

RWE 438*37X0 

RMnmetnll 27* 270 

Seherltw 1006 1004 

Siemens 4264550 

Thysson 291JE26U0 

Vorto 29) 292 

Veba S*C» 539 

VEW *12 412 

Vloo 480 *77 

Volkswagen *33 423 

WMId 93$ 940 

Pnwtou 


MetatigesdlH 
Muench Ruedi 


is: 754X8 


Markets Closed 
Hong Kong. Loa 
don. Montreal, Syd- 
ney and Toronto 
stock markets were 
closed Tuesday for a 
holiday. 


Helsinki 


Am*r-YhtYU» 65X0 66 

Enso-Gutzeit 40.10 3920 

Huhtamokl 158 153 

IUXP. 575 573 

Kvnwfiene 130 125 

Metro IM i» 

Nokia 6*1 681 

Pohloia 58 SB 

Seaaki 84.90 84 

SloeknWM 245 245 


Cate Prrr. 


Johannesburg 

AECI 2650 2950 

Ateert, 96 NJL 

Antojo Anw n&sozaso 

Bar Iowa 36 -U.K 

Buffo Is 1775 3750 

De Boers 94 9175 

Drletonteln to to 

Geneor 14.40 1450 

GF$A 125 124 

Harmony 39 

Hhmveid Steel 40 4cxs 

WOO! 56.75 5X75 

Nedbank Grp «Z50 030 

temdfontehi tsjs 45 

Rusolat 10710750 

SA Brens 96 9650 

Sasd 32.75 V 5° 

Western Oeeo 162 1&3 


S?!WS8S. ;5W -« 


Madrid 


3260 3350 
Ekco Central Hbp. 3133 3193 


BBV 


Banco Santander 5060 

Banesto 928 — 

CEPSA 3X0 3200 

iSS” ss s 

ftertrwa 811 Wi 

R«aal 3595 3665 

TW? 


Milan 


14 


9585 

28601 


3460 


AUearem 
Assltala 
AvtuJtrad* artv 
Baa Aortcohura , 

Beo Coimrar Uni ,-q- 

Bco Naz Lflvoro 126001^0 
BcaPopNovora 8W 6W5 
Banco dl Roma Igf 7W 
Bai Antoimlaiio 4360 4300 

bSnSSuST 1060.1060 

Benetton 
Credlta Itallana 
En^NawAtm 

Ftalsua 
HmsuAafQind 
nnmeceanfca 
Fondi tala soo 
Generali Asaic 
IFIL 

ItaWetnentJ 
wSSSonca 

Montemson 
Olivetti 
Pirelli sn 
RAS 

Rlnoscenie 


1W0 19300 
1*94 16&5 
3050 3100 
1261 1197 
6110 
900 




38600 38250 
5980 S75B 
USB moo 
4460 4340 
13*50 13090 
1229 TIB 
2065 2030 
2230 2165 
16800 16430 
9135 9160 


s*P Wte T6,ira <5 

SME 39SS 3940 

Sole bod 1910 1BJS 

5tondo 

5tel 4620 470 5 

Tara Asslc 2KW zmo 

KsarmF"* 


Goto Prav. 


Parte 


A«or 569 577 

Air LtaMe 738 741 

Aioate* Atstnam 473 474.90 
An 34050 26150 

Boncalre iciel 5*1 548 

B1C 675 673 

BNP 241X02*4.117 

Boursues 536 539 

Danone 785 789 

carrwfovr jjT2 2243 

C.C.F. 220 22150 

C ana 9050 91X0 

Qtaarurs 1177 W79 

Chmenis Franc 21850 214 

OubMed 44944050 

EW-Aaulfafne 39350 39650 
Euro Disney 1155 11.15 
GeikEaux 544 s « 

Havas 09.90 43150 

Irrerfal 5D0 511 

LOfarge Coanee 3T1J0 395.90 
Ltgrand 6590 6620 

Lyon. Ecus 479 400X0 

Oreal IL'i 1149 1140 

L-VALH. 876 869 

Matra+iochette 11911950 
WIctWllnB 280JD 200 
Moulinex lotxo 101x0 
PWlbOS 3*7X0 34950 

PfcMner Inti 163 162 

Pernod*Ricord 325.10 mao 
Peoaeol 747 750 

Pftioult Print 942 910 

RtxfiolKtinhwe 520 5T2 

Renoult 17650 176*0 

Rh- Poulenc A 12&7Q 128.90 
Raft. SJ. Louts 1404 1 - 
Sanofl 25X90 

Saint Gabam 630 
S.ea. 530 

5t« General* 578 

Son 252.90 Z4 

Jlwfrrum-CSF 166.10 16620 

TaW 32530 32T.9Q 

UAP. 14850 151 

Valeo 261 260 


Saopaulo 

Boko do Brasil 1550 16 

Boikm 10.90 TUB 

BrodescD bit) 7 

Brahma 260 265 

CenMfl 73X2 80 

entrabras 2B0 291 

IhwBancs 224 223 

UaM 293 305 

Panmananemo 11/1 1450 

■ ‘ ‘ TO HO 


S& Cn “ 


-tlebra* 
Teton 
Usiminas 
Vale Rla Doce 
Vorto 


6JD 7 JO 
35X0 38-10 
Ml 364 
1.15 UO 
149 ISO 
2X0 260 


*X?8i w 


Singapore 

AaisPKBnw 1620 1630 
CeftotoM 6-10 _ 8 

City D wiopmn t 6-IS 7 -« 
- Carrion 13 13 

1050 10X0 


Utvuev 


Goto Free. 


DBS Land 4X8 452 

FE Levlnsston 6X5 6X5 
Fraser 61 Heave u.90 15 

Gl EasfnLHe 2750 26X0 
Hans Leans Fin 4.16 4.17 
Incheon 5X5 520 

Jurono sniprard lUf I1J0 
Kay Hlan j Capei 1J5 US 

Kerael. 12 x 0 1250 

Natsfeei 2Jt 266 

Neoturte Orient 158 158 
OCBC tardsn 15X0 1520 
Otoras Union Bk 6X0 4.90 
ffseas Union Eftt 8.10 820 
Sembawana 11 10X0 

Slme Singapore 1X4 1X4 
SJra Awnspoce 218 219 
Sira Airlines tem 14 14 

Sing Bus Sue 6.90 X90 
Sing Land 8X0 8X0 

sma Prtlm 2X2 222 

Sira Press lorn 2750 2720 
Sing SMomdg 2X3 2X3 
sing Telecomm 277 279 
Straits Steam 5 5.15 

Straits Trading 3*0 3X4 
TOt LX* Sank 434 434 
UtO industrial 125 1J7 
UWQ'SM Bfc fom ISM 16 
UWtrsecs Land ZM 2M 

V^STS^ :7Bi:b 


Stockholm 

AGA 68 67X0 

AlcaAF 538 53S 

Astro AF 19519450 

Afka Coses 94 97 50 

Electrolux B 382 379 

Ericsson *17 *17 

EssettaA « *J 

Handehfaank BF 96 9450 

investor BF 186 IBS 

Nome Hydra 366 366 

PhannadoAF 11911950 
SandvIkB 15011950 

SCA-A 11650 117 

S-E BankanAF 4210 4210 

StendiaF 15*50 129 

5kanska BF 170 170 

SKFBF 13313350 

Store AF 444 442 


Trelletoon) BF 1095010850 
139)3750 


Volvo BF 


Tokyo 

Akal Electr *34 4)3 

AwW Chemical 749 744 

ami Glass 1550 1330 

Bonk of Tokyo 1530 ’5S 

Bridges ten* 15*0 is?o 

Canon 1716 1710 

Casio 1278 1270 

Oaf Nippon print >690 mo 

DohM House 1*10 1*10 

DoIvkj 5ecw11lcS WO 1*50 

Fame 4M8 4640 

Full Bank 2180 7190 

Fu I Photo 33M 2300 

Fujitsu 1010 22 

Hllaeni 984 978 

ttlfachi Cable m ,638 

Honda 17* iwo 

I ID vokodo 5350 5370 

itocra 7M 722 

Japan Airlines 706 7m 

Kolima 660 BM 


Hansel Power 
Kawasaki Steel 
K irin Br ewery 
Komatsu 
Kubota 
Kyocera 
Matsu Elec tods 
Matsu EleeWks 
MrtsuWsWBk 
Mltsub Owmfcaf 
Mitsubishi Elec 
Mitsubishi Hev 
Mitsubishi Cara 
Mitsui and Co 
Mitsui Marine 
MitsukasM 
Mitsumi 


NGK insulators 


Nlkko Securities 
Nippon Kegafcu 
Nimmou 
N logon Steel 
Nippon Yusen 
Nissan 
Nomura Sec 

Clympus Optical 

SST 

Sanya Elec 
Sham 
SMmazu 
5hlne«u Chem 
Sony 

Sumitomo Bk 
Sum Homo Oietn 
Sum) Marine 
Sumitomo Mewl 
T artel Corp 
raitafaChem 

Toiiin 

Tokyo Marina 
Tokyo Eta; Pw 
Tew»i Prtntjno 
Torov Ind. 
Toshiba 
Toyota 

YamoletilSec 

a: * 100. 

225 : 19711 


2390 2390 
408 409 

1100 1080 
900 899 

711 705 

7390 7420 
1600 MOO 
1010 1000 
2470 2450 
546 547 

704 704 

753 754 

1300 1300 
B44 B40 

750 743 

1040 1020 
1430 1450 
11J0 1150 
990 998 

mu mo 

949 9S7 

642 45S 

37* 374 

B09 £ 

5070 210 0 
5770a S79Ga 
1080 1W0 
2*55 2440 
«S 980 
57S 576 
1790 1770 
708 706 

1950 1950 

5640 561 D 

1B80 1900 
562 571 

no aso 

314 31* 

602 604 

1200 T200 


Via A u odofcd Pnm 


D»o 27 


Season Season 
Utah Law 


Open Mgh Law Oov Ov OoJnt 


Grains 


X98V6 

L75 


4X5^ «xa'4 *0X39, . 
xao in'* *iun 
345W 146 *ftX0W 
LSI 151 *QX0W 


1S4V, 


144 


■ oPnMrewn< 


4X7 


U 

1M 3X49, .0X1*1 
142V5 143V, 


2*5 

1BH 

now 

251 

7XJT4 

240W 

3X7 

243 


■rMM 

231 ’b 133 W- 

HIV* 240V, 
tO 1 '. 245 1 * 
1X7V, 2X7*. 
LM'a 2J1 
257U 25S 
2*3 

2X4V. US'; 

2J3 254 


53S 


538 

ltW 1710 
2770 2800 
1390 1390 
735 TV 
71* 715 


766 




WHEAT (Caon SXOaOu nwunwn- 1 
426%. 157 Mar 95 4X4V, <09%, 

116V5Mciy95 190 0X29, 

111 JulfS 14415 3X8 
139 Seo 95 151 2S3 

14» Dec 95 3X7 142 

Mar 94 174 274 

135 Jul 94 

Jfltes 11000 RflMto 9X01 
Frfs open frv 6«.SM off 6*5 
WHEAT (KBOTI unDuirawrum- 
4-27”. 325 Mot 95 COB 4X*V, 

4X3 12IMMay9$3I7K 188*4 

14854 HtViJWfS 152rt 155 

777 IB SOT, 95 pi 157V, 

LW'*! 352 Dec 95 3X4 1X5 

Est-SOTe* NA. Frl'lwtrt 6X20 
Fri'sooenkn 39,946 up 1310 
CORN tCDOT) mhimnlnwn. 

2X3 W 220V, Mot 95 131 V, 125 

121 Moy9S13r.il 2 X2S 

ZJO W Jul 95 ZXJV 2X7': 

23* Sep 95 247 Vi 2X9'* 

2X9 Duets 250% 252’V 

IXt+Mort* 25 Ta 2J» 

7*0 May 96 

3 -55V, Jul 96 744". 7X5W 
2X5^1 Dec 94 253*- 7.54 
Ea. sales «X00 Fri's. w+s 75X7* 

Fn-iOPminf 251^* UP 2256 
SOYBEANS (CBOT) JOTOOum—w 
7X4 SJ^AJantS 546 5.68 

7X5 S47'*AV»«5 L74'V S’*'. 

156 MOV 95 5X5 5*>v, 

5439, Jul 95 591 5.9J', 

i*4VrAw95 IM S95 

571 Sot>«S S94U, 5.95 

5J*ViNoyf5 600'^, 602 

5.95 Jun94 dft' 4.® 

6X2WMOT 94 4 17 4 14’-, 

199'-, Jill 96 620 620 

594 NavM 404'y 6X4W 

Ed.soin 30X00 Fri-S S4*es 74JT0 
Ri'sooenlnl 133.135 up 136 
SOYBEAN MEAL ICBOTJ iMtmv a 
arxo 155 50 Jon 95 159.90 156 90 

159.10 Mot 95 1 62 JO 16290 

l6JL»Mav«S 16S.AJ rn to 

1 68X0 Jul 95 1 69 JO 149. B0 

l70*0«4igM 171 JO 171 JO 

l7ZJOSn>95 17330 17U0 

17-L00 Oct 95 174J0 175X0 

17x50 Dec 95 177 JO 177.50 

180.00 Jan 96 

Ed. serin 17X00 Frfs. serin 14X08 
FfTiapenW 90.659 ofl 1617 
SOYBEAN OR. (CBOT) VM006H- ortorsacr Wot 
28X6 22X5 Jon 95 79.10 29X1 2171 29 J* 

2820 22X1 Mot 95 28.00 2SJ0 27J1 78J6 

778SMov9S 24 95 97.10 26*0 77. OS 

22.74Jum 2428 TAM 25.W &J9 

22J5Aug9S 2SJ0 2190 21.70 Jito 

227SSea9S 2545 2155 2535 25X5 

22750C165 2520 7135 2100 2533 

25X0 7435 Dec 95 34.90 25X5 24.70 35X2 

2450 2125 XT' 5* 3+50 

E5I. safes 24X00 Ffi'S. sacs 34X26 
Int fit 


• 0X1'. 


1146, 116 6, *aaiw XS24 
■“ ISJ'* -O-OO'-k 5464 


a01‘* 114.609 
0X1 V, 49X41 
0X3 46,777 

0X0^. 5X82 
•0.00'*. 23X59 
OXO'm 7XS9 

o.»rt t 

0-00+ 1.741 
0X0V, 597 


Season 

Seascn 

* * 

mmm 




High 

Low Open 

High 

La** 

Oose 

era 

OPint 

11X8 

1 0*8 MOT *6 1100 

1105 

il® 

1106 

• an 

6*08 

11X0 

11.18 May 9e 12.98 

12.98 

I2.V9 

13J1 

+ 0X3 

2089 

12X5 

11X0 Jul 96 



1272 

+ 0X2 

«*» 

12*0 

1200 Od 96 



12X5 

• 0J7 

119 

Esi. sales , JIB Fri's. scries 

A443 





Fn'soocnn 191425 off <77 
COCOA IHCSE1 icmarcim-livnn 




1603 

1077MOT9S mi 

1317 

1307 


-11 3L497 

1412 

107BMcv 95 mo 

IJ25 

1327 

1330 

-1311.933 

MOO 

1225 Jul 95 1353 

7358 

I3S7 

1353 

-7 

7X0.' 

15*0 

1263 Sep 93 



1373 


2438 

1S33 

1790 Dec 93 



1400 

-7 

4.539 

1674 

USOMcrW 



1434 

—2 

6.730 

160 

1225 Mov 96 



1450 

-7 

4X60 

1SQ5 

1410 JU 96 



1469 

—7 

2.760 

(£31 

144556*, 96 



1495 


W 

ESI. scries 1,170 Fri's. scries 

IAV 





Fa’s open Bit 75392 ofl 184 





ORANSt JUICE (NCTNI ISJrilrit.-c<rw-.Dcr u 



112.00 

89 JO Jan 93 11485 

114*5 

nixo 

113 J5 

— 3.90 

6 *10 

124XS 

9100 Mar 95 118.0a 

119.10 

11160 

116X5 

— *40 13.195 

126*0 

97JBMay9S 1*585 

WHO 

118.90 

119X0 

—1X0 

:joo 

129X0 

10(LS#Jul9S 122*0 


122*0 

122X0 


1.046 

13200 


12S+J0 


125.40 


175X0 

109.00 New 95 



123.40 

— 3.10 


129X0 

105*0 Joti 94 



12440 

-110 


130X0 

IJ4XSMOT 96 



12S.90 



ntxo 

lXdJOMav 96 



176.9a 

—3.10 


1 EF. safes NA FrYi. safes 
1 Fri's open liri 70,027 up 112 

7.169 






7X5’’> 

7.06 , '« 

4.V 

6.15 

6JDV, 

4.14 

6.17 


XM+ 

174 

584 

5*9'/, 

i9?W 

591', 

S99 

6X66, 


607 


•VJ0 


14SL. — 10146 
i74'<-a0)%, 
185 V,— OXIV, 
5.9046 — 0019, 
JWh-OOI 
5.94K.-OOOL, 
6.00 L— 0X01, 
6.079, 

614 V, -0.00' V 
4X0 • ft (XU , 
4X4*5 ■ ftOOli 


21079 

44.788 


r.ots 

1347 

1X33 

13X00 

157 

n 

74 


171 


207 JO 
307 00 
206X0 
182-60 
187 JO 
■ 81*8 
11530 
181 JO 


1X80 1».00 -090 
>41X0 16190 -0.90 
r«40 I«xq -oxo 
168X0 168.90 —0.90 
170.80 171X0 -0X0 
172.70 172*0 
17430 174.70 
I76J0 17710 




TT8J0 —a JO 


14X14 

w 

’jxS 

1X95 

5.549 

4.124 

W 


27X5 
27 JO 


•0.50 25X54 
•0X1 33472 

• 0X4 39.149 
•0^2 11.153 

• 0 18 2.631 

• 0 25 3,512 

•0.25 4X10 
*0.17 5X82 
-025 80 


Fit’s t 


111*07 up 3777 


Livestock 


CATTLE (CMERI •JOBIn.- amn Pf t> 

7425 64X7Fet>95 70.70 7|*a JtoJO 

6727 Apr 95 71.47 7Z10 71X7 

44-00 Jlfe 95 6622 64.70 66J0 

6150 AUB 9$ 4615 64.50 4415 

43.190095 44 60 6465 *07 
6X85 Dec 9 5 65.10 45.20 4510 

Ett. safes JftM« Wi«h 1517 
Frl's oom let 64,925 cH 355 


75.10 
69 JO 

48.10 

az 

64J5 


7122 

72X0 

64*7 

44X2 

MU 

4520 

64X7 


•0*5 31229 
•0J3 22,516 
•OJ7 2X18 
•0JS 3.194 

• as 1.754 
•0JS 3D 


FSDER CATTLE 1 CMERI 59xann..mi»i 
nXjjOTTtl 75.40 75 95 75X9 


80.95 


76S 

7420 

raw 

7050 

KUO 

71*0 


Zurich 


Aifla Inti B 210 310 

ASttulrse fi new 647 tje 


SBC Brwn BOY B 1142 1130 
Cl txj GetWY B 798 794 


_ Holdings B 570 565 

Eiektron B 335 B* 

FbdtoB 1590 ia» 

iiBeroLseount B isje isoo 

Jelmeril B 716 720 

Landis Grr R m wo 

MaevenPKkB 4vo m 

Nestle R 1268 1265 

Oerflk-Buehrle R I30J0 13159 
Potvmo HW B 140 1X80 


Roche Hdg PC 6390 6W 


Sofro Republic 103 

SanduB 699 480 

seWMierB 73a? 7303 

Sitter PC 892 885 

Surveillance 9 U7S 1870 

Swiss Bnk Carp B 364 363 

Swiss Reinswr R 7*5 787 

Swissair R 783 78S 

UBS B 1TH TUI 

Winterthur B 484 470 

Zurich Ass B 1286 1267 




:nus 


47 JO 

6SX0 


8025 7015 MOT 95 7115 >4X0 7115 

76 M 69*5 Aor 95 77 JO 77.90 n2) 

69JOMayK 71 JO 7f,65 71.20 

69SAU395 njfl 71,70 71X0 

86250095 70.80 70X0 7047 

89X0 NON *5 70X3 T0.9S TftK 

(9X0 Sea *A TWO 70.« 70JO 

ER Idea 1X6X 496 

Rr%openrt*,i74 cri n 
HOG5 104ES) OTXBOM. cents swa. 

3x0 MXJFt**i »» »07 36*> 

35X5 Apr 9J J8.70 MX0 36J0 

40J5Jun9S 44.00 4420 41*5 

OjKUK 0.12 4K7 *162 

X040AUO95 *135 «US 43JJ 

38JOOd95 41.« 41X5 41.15 

I*X9 DeC*S USA 0.4C *L35 

41X0 Feb *8 43*0 4180 43J0 

Mrfl 

Esi. scries 4.195 FH-s seto 3.388 
FORKKL^EMCMR) 

« U 53 

3690 MOV f$ *-» 40» 40JO 

31X0 Ju!« 0X5 COS 41X0 

3420 AW 95 40*5 4085 4020 

39X9 Fob toi *8LOS 48X5 472 3 

„r.™ 39X0 *6 _ 

&sato MW Wiseto l.JW 

FM'Soewi W 10X35 on 37 . _ 


7i» 
7192 
72J7 
71.77 
71 JO 
70.70 
70,75 

Tarn 


4ft» 2.784 

• 0X5 3X0» 
*0.77 1.787 

• 0*5 1XM 

*143 W 

• 025 a 

*040 g 
*123 66 


*2J0 

64XS 

4520 


3**0 

38JS 

44.17 

* 1*1 

43*5 

4125 

*7X1 

030 

045 


*6X8 14,601 
—0.15 1974 
—0.13 5,724 
-fttO i.nt 
—0.15 1*27 
-O.I0 1.228 

—ox at 

— ft!2 60 


4020 

tt.is 

54X0 

44.60 

aiai 

S9.93 


39*1 

39.10 

40*5 

41.90 

4023 

47.J5 

46.70 


-0X6 7.107 
-0.07 1.354 
—0X5 568 

560 

• 028 238 

-04J 21 

-020 * 


Food 


C MCSei |F*9ta-cnfc« 
78. 9U Mar *5 177X0 17140 
a£ffl Moves 1>400 174.38 
8100 Jill *5 125.00 173 43 
IJ1X050A95 '75.75 176.15 
B1X0DK95 174X0 174.75 
ISlS»or*6 174 N 174 00 

,s * smza «.» 

10 57 Ju> 95 *■" 

10570295 


SUM 
344 40 
24110 
738 00 
242.00 
JWJS 
•70X0 


I7IJD 172X0 
17100 1 7130 
174.00 > 74 75 
174.38 174*0 
17400 174 75 
17400 173*5 
122 « 


—a 01 16X25 
-005 7.819 
■ 0.55 3.1*2 

• 1 10 7.300 
■0 65 7.703 

• »X5 393 

• 7X5 » 


'5J 

1808 

1480 


14*4 

118* 


U 60 
1181 


..ewmtOT 1 j 

1 29 1S.1I 

14X7 1J15 

14*1 14X0 

13W 1182 


■009 91X17 

■OH 77.41 1 
• 0 1 2 H.703 
■0 H 77.121 


Season Season 
t*ah Lon 


Open High Lon Close Chg Qpjnt 


90134.973 
90112X12 
*0 94291 


♦74PJH 
+2 51* 


r2 


-/ 46*14 
—3 1*14 
— 3 123a 
-10 257 

—* 4* 


Metals 


MORADECOPPeR (NCMX) J\000 ttL- confcpr- ", 
140X0 75J5Dec94 136X0 I37J0 IJeXO 1J7J0 

7* 90 Jon 95 134*0 137.10 134 25 137X0 
7100FeD95 136.10 136.10 136.10 134.60 
73.00 Mot 95 13420 I3SX0 13428 135 45 
91.1 a Apr 75 13100 

7*X5Mov»5 178*0 12* JO 13BX0 12*35 
10410 Jun 9J 126*0 

7B.00MH I2X7J 133.75 IZ3.75 124 IS 
MI40Aua*5 17I&5 

TJ.lOSeotS 119.00 

1 1 3 BO Od 95 117.00 

88 80 Dec *5 11335 

S8JOJon*6 
6Z70MOT96 
107 0077Unr*4 
105 JO Jul *6 
105X5 Sep 96 
1 13*5 Nav *4 

Esi scries 3X00 Frfs. series 7X64 
Fn'sooenint 51.107 off 455 


13**8 
11720 
137.20 
13258 
131 JO 
12400 
125X0 
120X0 
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77528 
115.75 
111.70 
IIL30 
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I07.JO 
10525 
11X95 


•1.15 1.997 

•110 2250 

• I JO 822 
-0.95 29J10 
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-0*5 3X2* 
- 0 85 

• 11*5 2.179 

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6100 
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5012 

5115 


3»XDcc94 4780 
40IX Jon 95 476.5 
471 0Fct>*5 
44.9 Mar 95 481* 

4(BXMav*5 4842 
4300 Jul 95 4150 

4772 5*0 95 491 j 
4050 Dec 95 5122 
5140 Jan 96 
498 0 MOT *6 
*WXMOV*6 
5200 jm 94 
5340 Sn *6 

-- - S.0BB M-ksam 3X82 
Fri's ooea 4>» 1X1X27 up 363 
PLATINUM (TIMER} ■ I'd, r. dears w i»o* o, 
«J0 374J0JOT195 414. DO 416X0 414X0 41470 

4J9X0 39000 Apr 95 417.00 420X0 41620 418 40 

429X0 409JSD Jul 96 424*0 414*0 42400 «72JO 

4£1 JO 41XOOOC 95 426.70 

a* JO 420X0 Jm *6 4)0 40 

EP safes 7,546 Fri'v strips 1.209 
FrTsooenw 24,399 aft iQj 



112X0 

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*3270 *1*70 Sep 96 91-730 91X70 91X10 91.770 

91*20 91X70 Dec 96 91X20 91X70 91X10 91X70 

Est. scries NJL Firs, sates 140X95 
Fn’i open Int 2X16.92} aft 2274 
BRrriSHPOUW) (CMERI spvpouid- 1 aakBcvKris 10X801 
1X440 1X640 Alfer 9$ 1J432 12466 »2C0 1J4S2 

1X380 123* Jun *5 1*450 1*450 1*440 1*452 

1*620 1*600 Sep *S 1*452 

Est. scries NA Fri’s scries IMi 
Friiciwnirt 60*42 up 578 
CANADIAN DOLLAR (C64ER) spotOt- 1 poM«m 
QX60S 8X020 MOT *J 0X141 0XMI 0.7137 0X133 

0X322 OXOto Jun 95 0X115 0.7118 0X115 0X115 

0X« 0X965 SOP 95 0X102 ft 71 02 0X100 0.7100 

0.74W XSVBOtc95 0.7095 0X095 0X065 0X015 

0X335 0.71«Mot96 0X080 0XUS0 0X075 0X070 

K soles NA Fr.' i. soles IX7S 
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0X745 OJWOMOT95 0X338 8X362 0X32S 0X360 til 71^88 

0X747 (LWaOJunPS 0X388 *11 1*29 

06740 0X347 Sep 93 0X410 0X415 0X410 0X41 B 411 138 

MOT 96 0X47* *25 X 

Ed-OTrie* NA Fri's. safes 6*23 
Fri sopenlnr 73,975 up 1)4 
JAPANESE YEN (CMER) 

sparven- iBarVaourimunan 

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0.01 067HL00977LJun93 0*101 731*10173^0101 <600101 77 — *6 JX44 

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• 69X0 Jul 9$ 87X0 W 10 07X0 


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37.00 

7600 

7720 

71X0 

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■090 4200 
■1X0 173778 
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380 JO Aug 9S J9SJ0 195 50 39SJ0 396*0 

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57 60 

58 JO 
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5490 
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96.10 92.UDCCT6 92.18 >004 I 

M*5 91)3 MOT 95 90X5 93X9 93JO 91*1 DJ&) 

94.24 92.55 Jun 95 9J.7S 92X9 9171 92X5 -OOS 3 704 

«*7 92X3 5oo tS 92X1 92X1 92J9 92.39 • 0*8 734 

Est. soles NA Fff't ! am 1.177 
FtYsacwnH 19.928 UP 2 

SYR. TREASURY IOOT1 lMM(0P'1,-i*,61M6i4IVK' 

135-09 rif-15 MorriStOMW (00-105 100-0) IKL1C- 105 
190-08 99-06 JOTI9S 100-025- ICS 

99-235 99-07 S#P9$ 99-7$ . |1 

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FffsBPWlM 206.703 off 128 

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m-ar vs-n motoswoo 100-17 v?-xi 100.1a ■ n ruxw 
105-22 97-27 Jun 93 99-21 100-63 99-71 100-03 • J5 6,537 

I0NM 97-11 5cFriS 99-14 *f-» *»-M P9-78 - 37 (•’* 

110-31 94-30 Dec 93 99-23 ■ 70 » 

99-ca 98-70 MOT 96 99-27 ■ 70 1 

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116-20 93-11 Mar 95 99*77 100-22 9»-36 100.21 > V 347.6SJ 

113-19 96-27 Jun 95 9f-» ICfl-lO 99-2Q 100-09 

112-15 M-70 Sep 95 99-15 1 00-01 ri9-ll KWI 

99-77 99-70 99-21 

TV-24 99-14 99-20 

99-13 99-04 79.1] 

99-05 
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66X5 Dec 95 72,90 73*0 72B0 

4U0MOT96 71J0 7150 7150 

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47*0 Mpy »5 *X0 49 JO 4120 

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47^ Jul »5 56X0 48.65 4155 

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17.77 

17.79 

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♦ 0X7 14*27 
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58.20 
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r: .1 


Stock Indexes 


113- 14 9307 Dec 95 99-72 

114- 06 +3-13 Mar 9699-15 
100-70 not Jr IL 99-04 

98-14 91-05 SM196 
_ _ Oecto 

E« Uriel 120.000 Fil l Urin 33.727 
Fri'ioren ini 347.790 cm 63*1 
M1MICIPAL BONDS (CBOT) into. v*u,-aKtmn<* mac 


11.177 

871 

317 

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ta09 79-29 Mlri 9613-11 86-07 85-11 86-01 

W-27 13-15 Am 95 SSI 3 85-13 85-W 85-0* 

EU.yat-i 7.000 FriV^Kn l.Mt 
Kr. '. 28.988 up 98 

(CMERI IImuvotomHM 
*5309 907*0 Mo, 9J 91820 92X60 92.190 97*10 

90.710 Jun 93 92070 97.130 92M0 92*80 
9l.3103n,n 91.890 9IJ00 9IM0 91 760 
<1 I88[tee95 91 HP 91*48 91 470 91 UO 
9O7S0MB96 91580 91430 91J70 *1*20 


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94 280 
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Commodity indexes 

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INTE RNATION AL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 1994 


: ... "*A J 




Strong Sales 

Drive Eai nin 


Ukraine Deal a Wet Firecracker 


Up at Mercedes 


U.S. Firm Chases Peace Dividend in Recyling Project 


SU 


x- 


~i i.'4 W 


•-•a;-... 


Ceafikd by Our Staff From Dispatches 

STUTTGART — Mercedes- 
Benz AG said Tuesday that it 
returned to healthy profit this 
year and expected to be ‘Veil 
mto the black” after posting a 
loss of 1.2 billion Deutsche 
marks {5762 million) in 1993. 

Helm ut Werner, chair man of 
the management board, said 
1994 bad been a successful year 
for the Daimler-Benz AG sub- 
sidiary and that a turnaround 
had been achieved in man y sec- 
tors and started in others. 

*We have good reasons for 
optimism because the direction 
and the speed are right,” he 
said. “But we are still far from 
our goal.” 

He said Mercedes sales world- 
wide would be up about 9 per- 
cent this year at around 70 bil- 
lion DM. Mercedes accounts for 
two- thirds of Daimler's sales. 

Vehicle deliveries will be 
about 15 percent above those in 
1993, with 585,000 cars deliv- 
ered and 290,000 trucks and 
buses sold. The company said it 
expected deliveries of cars to 
increase at a similar rate next 
year, despite the redesign of its 
E-Class car. Commercial vehi- 
cle deliveries should post “a 
dear rise to over 300,000 units.” 
Mr. Werner said. 

The company’s new, modest- 
ly priced C-Class model ac- 


9 ounled for much of the sales 
increase, selling 300.000 units. 
Unit sales of the S-Class will be 
around 60,000 in 1994, repre- 
senting an increase in its market 
share globally, compared with a 
year earlier, Mr. Werner said. 

He added that the company^ 
outlook in the auto sector next 
year depended on the reception 
of the new E-CJass models. 

Overall sales this year re- 
mained positive in growth mar- 
kets such as Eastern Europe 
and Asia, the company said. 


■ Adidas Predicts Advance 
The parent company of Adi- 
das AG. the German sportswear 
maker, said Tuesday it expected 


group 1994 revenue and pretax 
profit to show a significant rise 


from year-ago levels, Reuters re- 
ported from Fr anlrf nrt, 

Adidas International Hold- 
ing also said profit would im- 
prove further next year. 

The company said earnings 
this year would top 100 million 
DM, up from 34.2 million DM 
earned in 1993. Revenue should 
rise around 20 percent from the 
2.6 billion DM seen in 1993. 

Adidas said the rising profit- 
ability confirmed the strength 
of its recovery begun in 1993 
after it posted a loss of about 
150 million DM in 1992. 


f Reuters. AFX) 


By Jane Periez 

New York Times Service 

1CHNYA, Ukraine — When Affiant 
Techsystems Inc, one of the Pentagon's 
biggest munitions suppliers, signed a con- 
tract with Ukraine last year, the company 
believed it was on the fast track to mnking 
money out of the end of the Cold War. 

Transforming large quantities of un- 
wanted conventional weapons for civil- 
ian use looked like the wave of the future 
for Affiant, which is based in Hopk ins, 
Minnesota, and until four years ago was 
a part of Honeywdl Inc 

Alii ant makes weapons ranging from 
torpedoes to cluster oombs, but — like 
other U.S. defense contractors — it faces 
declining orders. 

With the Ukrainian government shar- 
ing the profits and with Ailiant provid- 
ing the industrial equipment needed for 
the conversion of >«nk ammunition, ar- 
tillery shells and mortar rounds to scrap, 
there seemed little to stop the project 
from roaring ahead. 

But as with many business deals in the 
former Soviet Union, the process here 
has been slower and more painful than 
Ailiant anticipated. 

More than SO rail cars, loaded with 
5,000 tons of punctured rocket cases to 
be sold as scrap steel in Turkey, sit at the 
Druzhba military base near inis village, 
waiting for export licenses. 

Several hundred tons of brass, cut 
from artillery shells into flat rods by 
AJliant's newly patented high-pressure 
water equipment, are bound for the 
United States but have been hdd up by 
Ukrainian customs. 

Die sorting, defusing and cutting of 
the munitions at the Druzhba base, 160 
miles (258 kilometers) northeast of Kiev, 
represent the first industrial-scale effort 
to demilitarize weaponry in the former 


Soviet Union by using new technologies, 
according to Larry Blagdon. general di- 
rector of ordnance for Ailiant. 

In the past, the amount of weaponry 
discarded in the West and the former 
Soviet bloc was relatively modest, and 
the most common methods of disposal 
were burning, dumping or detonation — 
none of which are considered environ- 
mentally sound. 

Finding new ways to dismantle scone 
of the weaponry has not been easy. Al- 


'The project fits the 
needs of the Ukrainian 
government, and Ailiant 
needs to make a profit . 1 

Larry Blagdon, general director 
of ordnance, Ailiant Techaystenw 
Lac. 


liant officials say they have met walls of 
suspicion in their efforts to see blue- 
prints of how 1930s artillery shells were 
made. Understanding how the shells 
were constructed is a precursor to taking 
them apart safely. 


“In spite of the fact that the scuff is all 
relatively ancient and has been sold all 


over the world, the blueprints are still 
officially a secret,” said Felix Sahlin, the 
financial officer of AUiant-Riev, the 
joint venture that Ailiant formed with 
the Ukrainians. 

More tension ensued when a Ukraini- 
an genera] asked Ailiant for a 5100.000 
loan to meet a monthly military payroll. 
The company refused. 

Then there is the labyrinthine Ukrai- 
nian bureaucracy, with its differences 


from U.S. decision-making methods. 
“It’s more top-down in Ukraine, more 
bouam-up in the United States,” Mr. 
Blagdon said. 

Mr. Blagdon. who is the principal ar- 
chitect of Affiant's foray into demilitari- 
zation, said the obstacles have been frus- 
trating. “The fact of the matter is the 
project is a good idea.” he said on a visit 
to Kiev to try to iron out the difficulties. 
“It fits the needs of the Ukrainian gov- 
ernment and Affiant Techsystems needs 
to make a profit.” 

The concept of the Ukrainian deal is to 
concentrate on weapons that produce 
high-end scrap, like brass, and export it to 
the West. Explosives Grom the ammuni- 
tion will be recycled for use in Ukrainian 
coal mines. Demand for brass in the West 
more tlmn covers low Ukrainian salaries, 
which run bom SI to 55 a day, and the 
padring and transportation of the scrap. 

Affiant has calculated the value of ma- 
terial from the munitions at $100 million 
and the cost of rfimarnBug at S57 mil- 
lion. The $43 million difference is to be 
roughly split between Ailiant and the 
Ukrainian government. 

The contract with Ukraine calls for the 
destruction of 220,000 tons of weapons 
out of an estimated 750,000 tons of ex- 
cess inventory. But Affiant has its eyes on 
much more business in Russia, which 
Mr. Blagdon said had an estimated 35 
million tons of unwanted mumtions. 

AQiantsaid it had invested $11 million 
of an expected $17 million in Ukraine so 
far. It has built a 12-mile (19-kilometer) 
power transmission Hne, constructed a 
road and installed equipment from the 
United Stales. 

“I expect to be cash positive by next 
year,” Mr. Blagdon said “But there is a 
Lade of appreciation for the fact that our 
only source of revenue is production.” 


Back From the Brink 9 Banesto Is Recovering Its Balance 


Bloomberg Business News 

MADRID — A year after the Bank of Spain 
moved to end the financial chaos at Banco Espa- 
flol de Crfedito SA. that bank is slowly regaining 
strength, while its former president, Mario Con- 
de, ponders his future from a prison celL 
Banesto has survived the crisis that nearly 
caused its liquidation and cut short the career of 
Mr. Conde, analysts said. 

“It’s been recovered from bankruptcy,” said 
Jason Maude, manag in g director of DilloD Read 
Securities in London. “They've imposed proper 
credit controls, and they have recovered some 
debt The share price has reflected that.” 

“What we're looking at now is the hard grind to 
tabling Banesto up from a bank that’s been saved 
from bankruptcy to a profitable retail bank.” 

Mr. Conde, 46, was remanded to prison Friday 


by a criminal-court judge on charges of fraud 
and embezzlement of up to 7 billion pesetas ($53 
million) of Banesto’s shareholders' funds. His 
lawyers said they would appeal the measure. 

The detention came almost a year after the 
Bank of Spain fired Mr. Conde and his manage- 
ment team, citing a shortfall of 605 billion pese- 
tas in shareholders’ funds. The resulting crisis 
ended in April, when Banco Santander bought a 
controllin g stake in Banesto for $2.28 billion. 

Since then Banesto has been slowly regaining 
the confidence of depositors and investors as its 
new owners make good on their promise to sell 
nonbank assets and focus on retail banking, 
Banesto’s real strength. 

Santander has predicted that Banesto will turn 
a 20 billion peseta profit in 1995, increasing to 30 


During the year, Banesto recovered 120 billion 
pesetas of the 869 billion pesetas in bad loans it 
held on Jan. I. 


billion pesetas in 1996 and 40 billion pesetas the pesetas per share. On Tuesday, Banesto shares 
year after. dosed at 928 peseta. 

_ Analysts said confidence in Banesto was un- 

During the year. Banesto recovered 120 billion derecored by a recent share sale to Santander 
pesetas of the 869 billion pesetas in bad loans it shareholders, which ended Dec. 20. Santander 
held on Jan. I. stockholders bought 63 percent of the 8.7 per- 

Banesto also regained between 350 billion and cent of Banesto they were offered, at a price of 
400 billion of the500 billion pesetas in deposits 783 pesetas per share. Since buying a 73.45 share 
withdrawn in the months after the intervention, of Banesto m April, Santander has whittled its 

It also earned 45 billion pesetas by selling mdus- Fxm A by j. p. Morgan & Co. 

trial assets formerly held by its Corporaabn of ^ Unitcd States, was one of the buyers. It 
Fmanaera Industrial. bought 1 percent of Banesto, raising its stake to 

Investors have welcomed these moves, as re- 4.19 percent. Before the Bank of Spain s inter- 
fleeted in Banesto’s share price. After a one- vention. Corsair was Banesto’s largest individual 


Banesto also regain ed between 350 billion and 
400 billion of the 500 billion pesetas in deposits 
withdrawn in the months after the intervention. 


It also earned 45 billion pesetas by selling indus- 
trial assets formerly held by its Corporadtin 
Fmanaera Industrial. 


month suspension from trading after the inter- 
vention, Banesto returned to trading on the 


shareholder, with nearly 8 
Morgan had been helping 


Madrid bourse cm Feb. 1, at a price of 686 before the Bank of Spain stepped in. 


it of the stock, 
to raise capital 


NYSE 


Dtv YU PE IMS H» LowLffledC 


Oh» YW PE 1DQ1 KWl LflWLflteaOYg 


Tnonlfly'ii Cipalnp 

Tables include the nationwide prices up to 
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Hi 

ia) a i 


Page 11 


Frankfurt 

DAX 

2300- ~ 


London 

FTSE 100 Index 


CAC40 

2200 - — 





J A S ON P 

199* 


J A S 
1994 


J ' A SOTO 
1994 


Exchange 


Amsterdam 

Brussels ■ 

Frankfurt 

Frankfurt 

Helsinki 

London 

London 

Madrid 

Wap 

Paris. 

Stockholm 

Vienna • 

Zurich 

Soutces: Reuters. 


ABC ; ; ’ 

Stack Index 

DAX 

FAZ 

HEX , • . 

Fhwnctei Times 30 

FTSE too 
General Index 


■CAC4Q- 
Affaersveeriden 
ATX Index ■ 


Tuesday 

Close 

417.96 

7,255^8 

2.106.15 

787JJZ 

1,83637 

Closed 

Closed 

287.01 

10260 

1355.98 

136039 

136538 


Piw, % 
Qose Change 

414.40 +0-86 

7355.44 +0.00 

239431 +038 

784.40 +0.33 


1,813.72 +13B 

■ 2370-30 
3383.40 
291.65 -158 

10096 +1.62 

1.36637 -0,54 

1.855:32 +032 

1,05138 +0-32 

932.88 +0.76 


Inunurinul Herald Tribrae 


Very briefly: 


eKauEhof AG, the German retailer, is se ekin g permission from the 
German cartel office to merge its travel unit with the travel 
company Touristik Union International GmbH. 

» Turkish Cyprus tax authorities said they were paid about 
$390,000 in tax debt several hours before the expiration of a 
government deadline horn the assets of PoBy Peck I n ternati on al 
PLC by Asil Nadir, a fugitive tycoon. 

• Cifefit Suisse, a unit of CS Holding AG, said it was the lead 
ladder for a stake in Hungary’s state-owned Budapest Bank. 

• Russia’s producer of Lada cars, AvtoVAZ, was the leader in East 
European new car sales in the quarter ended in June. 

• Internationale Nederianden Groep NV, the Dutch financial 
company, said it wanted to team up with De Postebeque, which 
runs Bdghrm’s post offices, to use those outlets to sell ING 
savings products, mortgages and insurance. 

• Swdh SpA, an I talian machinery producer, said it bought the 

bottling machinery operations of Figgie International Inc. for an 
Undisclosed amount. Ream. AFX. AFT, Bloomberg AP-DJ 


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REPUBLIC OF LEBANON 
MINISTRY OF MUNICIPAL AND RURAL AFFAIRS 
COUNCIL FOR DEVELOPMENT AND RECONSTRUCTION 

Solid Waste Management Sector 

Pre-QtBUflcttion of centractors for the supply of 180 Compactor TYudcs 


iilil 


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Furflier to the p re viou s aanoencement relating to the above mentioned project, the Council for Development and Reconstruction (CDRL 
a nnoenr e * that the sn b m bston dale of the pre-qualification documents relevant to the above mentioned project, at CPR offices, has been post- 
pened from Thursday, December 22, 1994 to Wednesday, January 18, 1995 before 12.-M Hrs noon, Beirut local time. 


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REPUBLIC OF LEBANON 
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PreQuaUncatlen of cmfeactora ter the supply of 5200 Garbage Containers 


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Continued on Page 12 


Forthtr to the previous announcement relating to tbe above mentioned project, the Cooodl for Devefopment and Reconstruction (CDR), 
anrew D cra that the submission date of the pre-qiraHHcation d o c uai e nb idnnt to tbe above mentioned project, at CDR offices, has been post- 
poned from Thursday, December 22, 1994 to Wednesday, January IS, 1995 before 12.-00 Hrs noon, Beirut local time. 











































































































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 1994 



Page 13 

ASIA/PACIFIC 


China Congress 
To Scrutinize 
Central Bank 


Reisers 

BEIJING — Waxy of grant- 
ing a reforming central bank too 
muc* autonomy, members of 
the National People’s Congress 
have called for tightened gowrn- 
ment supervision of die People’s 
Bank of China, the Xinhua news 
agency said Tuesday. 

Members of the congress said 
the central bank should report 
on issues such as money supply 
and credit balance to the legisla- 
tive body to ensure effective su- 
pervision. 

The standing committee of 
die National People's Congress 
is reviewing a draft of the central 
bank law during its current ses- 
sion, which ends Dec. 29. Under 
the draft, the central bank will 
no longer engage in commercial 
or policy-related lending. 

The central bank once served 
as a provider of funds in a 
planned economy, but it is now 
struggling to modernize and 
distance itself from provincial- 
level political interference. 

The legislators suggested that 
the congress and the State Coun- 
cil, or cabinet, exercise tight con- 
trol over the bank’s Monetary 
Policy Committee, Xinhua said. 

Instead of being affiliated to 
the central bank as stipulated in 
the draft law, the monetary pol- 
icy committee should be com- 
posed of “figures from different 
quartos'' to ensure effective su- 
pervision, the deputies said. 

Government subsidies for 
bank losses should undergo 
strict examination by the cabi- 
net and parliament, they said. 

The standing committee bad 
not been expected to ratify the 


draft into law but had been due 
to pass it [or final approval by 
the State Council before it is 
ratified by a full session of the 
National People’s Congress. 

■ Bank of Korea Policy Hit 

Jhe Bank of Korea's labor 
union on Tuesday criticized the 
government for neglecting the 
union's call for the central 
bank's independence, Reuters 
reported from Seoul. 

“The BOK independence is 
critical to a more effective man- 
agement of the economy,’' a 
union spokesman said. 

The ruling Democratic Lib- 
eral Party and the main opposi- 
tion Democratic Party 
last Thursday to start debates 
early next year on revising the 
Bank of Korea Act. 

Analysts said they doubted 
the expected revirion of the act 
would grant the central bank 
independence to the extent the 
union and other civil organiza- 
tions demand. 

“The government has wield- 
ed strong control over the bank 
for the past three decades. It is 
most unlikely it will give up its 
rights in a day,” Kang Seog- 
Hoon of Daewoo Research In- 
stitute said. 

“Instead, the government is 
exported to call for a more coop- 
erative relationship with the 
BOK, leaving the current system 
almost untouched,” he said. 

Korea’s president currently 
holds the right to appoint or 
dismiss the central bask gover- 
nor after consulting with the 
ministers of finance and the 
economy. 


Tokyo Lifts Listing Limit 

High-Tech Firms to Find More Capital 


Compiled hp Ov Staff From Dtptudta 

TOKYO — The Ministry of Finance and 
securi ties- industry executives said Tuesday 
they would take steps to help small compa- 
nies to go pub lie. 

Japan’s stock exchanges will loosen restric- 
tions on the number and kinds of stocks that 
can be traded in hopes of attracting more 
companies and investors to the markets. 

The Japan Securities Dealers Association 
and the Tokyo Stock Exchange said they 
would remove the limit on how many stocks 
may be listed in one week. The current Hunt is 
five. Starting next April there will be no 
weekly limit. 

In addition, the association will create a 
new section of the over-the-counter market to 
help small high-tech and venture-capital com- 
panies raise money. 

Kanamc Seki, head of the securities dealers 
association, said a group of brokers, compa- 


nies and other specialists would be formed 
□ext month to ritsarw the new section. He 
said the group would prepare a proposal by 
June. 

Industry sources said it usually takes about 
30 years from a company's establishment for 
it to trade its shares in OTC markets. It 
usually takes less than 10 years in the United 
Slates. 

Analysts said allowing risky companies to 
list may not help the markets. 

“You have to be very, very selective.” said 
Caroline Stone, an analyst who covets small 
companies at Klein wort Benson Internation- 
al Inc. 

If listing requirements are eased too much 
Japan's electronic market will become “an 
AmericaorSiyie Nasdaq with a lot of compa- 
nies and more frequent delistings,” she said. 

f Bloomberg, Reuters) 


Manila to Expand Exchange’s Menu 


Reuters 

MANILA — A series of capital-market 
reforms to be implemented here next year will 
give investors new kinds of securities to buy. 
Eduardo de los Angeles, president of the 
Philippine Stock Exchange, said on Tuesday. 

The Philippine stock market is one of the 
oldest in Asia but is also one of the least 
developed, offering few investment instru- 
ments. It has only 189 issues; most of them 
are common stocks. 

Mr. delos Angeles said the exchange would 
start listing bonds and warrants in the first 
quarter of 199S. 

“We have received interest from a major 
firm to list their bonds and other convertibles 
on the board.” he said. 

The Philippine Congress is drafting a law 
which wiD abgn the tax treatment of trading 
bonds and warrants with that of common 
slocks. 


At present, interest derived from debt in- 
struments is subject to income tax ranging 
from 20 to 35 percent. This compares with a 
0.5 percent tax on every stock transaction. 

Congressman Exequuti Javier, the sponsor 
of the bill, said: “For of preferential tax 
treatment and the tax bias for shares of stocks, 
the local bond market failed to develop.” 

“Local companies, instead of selling bonds 
in the local market to raise needed funds, 
floated their bonds abroad,” he said. 

Mr. de los Angeles said the bill was likely to 
be endorsed by President Fidel Ramos. 

Apart from introducing other instruments, 
market regulators are also installing a com- 
puter surveillance system to help detect slock 
manipulation and insider trading. 

The system will be set up by June, Mr. de 
los Angeles said. 

A central clearing and depository system 
will also be put in place, aimed at reducing the 
settlement period from four days to three. 


China Trust 

Acquires 

U.S.Bank 

CatpBai by Ow Staff Fran Dispatches 

TAIPEI — China Trust Co. 
said Tuesday it had bought a 
California bank for $30 million, 
becoming the first Taiwan com- 
pany to buy a UJ5. bank. 

Jeffrey Koo, chairman of 
Chinatrust Commercial Bank, 
said the purchase of the Trans 
National Bank with its five 
brandies was a first step toward 
establishing a network across 
the United States. 

The bank, which has three 
brandies in Los Angeles and 
two in San Francisco, will be 
renamed China Trust Bank of 
California, he said. 

The U.S. Federal Reserve 
Board approved the purchase 
on Dec. 19 and China Trust 
said it hoped all formalities 
would be finished in February. 

Trans National Bank was 
owned by a Hong Kong busi- 
nessman and had assets of $100 
million, Mr. Koo said. 

Mr. Koo said the recent North 
American Free Trade Agree- 
ment would bring “limitless op- 
portunities” to the banking busi- 
ness in California because of an 
expected jump in trade between 
the United States and Mexico. 

Chinatrust Commercial Bank 
has a branch capitalized at $420 
millkni in New York and plans 
soon to set up branches in other 
major cities, Mr. Koo said. 

Chinatrust, Taiwan’s largest 
credit-card issuer, has pursued 
global expansion by setting up 
branches and offices in Asian. 
European and American cities. 

China Trust aims to expand 
into Southeast Asia by setting up 
a branch in India, a jainr-v&j- 
ture bank in Indonesia and buy- 
ing a bank in the Philippines, 
Mr. Koo said. (Reuters, AP) 


[ Investor’s Asia | 

Hong Kong 
Hang Song 

Singapore. . • 
Straits Tunes 

Tokyo 

MBckei225 



W 


pjQna. — - 

Xj 

wS “TV -- 

t 


8000 


oTTb' 

Tuesday 
Close - 

Ckma 

w jTs'o v n'd n 

IBM 

Prev. % 

Close Change 

8^311^88 

J A SOnD. “" J A S 
199* • 1994 ■ 

Exchange ■ ' - Index , ' 1 
Hong Kong Hang Seng ' 

Singapore 

Straffs T8nes 

2&73S 

■■ Z&\ 92$ 

•ffl.36 

Sydney 

AflOrtfinarfes 

dosed 

1 ,909.30 

- 

Tokyo 

Nikkei 225 

j%711.3B 19,726.75 


Kuala Lumpur Composite 

98T54 

9S&87 

-0.13 

Bangkok 

SET 

lassie 

1,35250 

+052 

Seoul 

Composfte Stock 

•tfBS . 33 

1,024.60 

+OJJ7 

Taipei 

Weighted Price 

6^82.91 

fi.994.11 

■file 

Manila 

PSE 

2,79458 

• 2.791.40 

+0.11 

Jakarta. 

Stock Index ‘ 

466.15 

' 46fi20 - 

-0.01 

New Zealand 

N2SE-40 

dosed 

1&1&23 

- 

Bombay ■ 

National Index . 

Cfoaad 

1,862.78 

- 


Sources: Reuters. AFP 


hnenjariotul Herald Tribune 


Very briefly: 


• Time Warner Inc; is set to announce soon a new cable television 
venture in Japan, with Itochu Corp. and Toshiba Corp. as partners, 
Toshiba said The Japanese companies jointly own a 12J percent 
stake in Time Warner Entertainment LP. which owns Time 
Warner's cable operations, but Toshiba denied reports that Time 
had asked for 5200 milli on to help it buy U.S. cable operations. 

• Bandai Co, which makes the popular Power Ranger line of toys, 
plans to sever ties with small wholesalers in response to price 
competition triggered by tin U.S.-based retailer Toys 'R* Us Inc. 

• Mafayria Helicopter Services Bhd. will sign an agreement 
Wednesday with the Cambodian government to create a regional 
airline based in Phnom Penh. 

• Mitsubishi Electric Co. plans to invest 40 billion yen ($400 
million) on a new plant to produce advanced liquid-crystal display 
panels used in color notebook computers. 

• Japan's major steelmakers have agreed with China's state im- 

porter to raise prices of steel products shipped to China between 
February and July by 10 percent. BJnmtivrg. Reuters. .4FP 


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419 Seaind Avenar We*f 
Soatfla, WA 98119 USA 


FOUND MONEY! 

DKAMATK SAVMGS 
NOMVESTHBff 

Cd Now To Save on 
Int'l Phone Calk & fines 

WafihrideOAniftm/Aiiyvriiere 

US. Id 1^07-676-9500 
US fin: 1-407-676-4909 

Service EeprejeuAAm Lines 
open 24 In every dcr/t 


104 S. U5.I, Mribaam, PI 32901 
D he o ntf For Caiporafct 
WaVa Seeking Distnbutonl 


_ SIAIE HBCMG ADOKBS 
The mad datoquBted odtfam in USA. 
Mat PferaTfeTTel (7T2J 736887Z, 
Far: Ota 541135. 


C AU MONACO M OHIEOUttO 
C o rnu m ocf rndfiemap. 
ffiaae +33 09 18 X) 14 foOKACO 

CONSULTANTS 


FKUBCr KK7 Of We ratify ad 
ftoied Study. Fa de- 
30S1 4492 


•ah Fat +49 030 c 


Sfeconnwr ENGUSfi Aemam 
m. Cooetaa cMdable hraxJtaa. 
Detah Foe ftri»p3-11 43 28 7655 


COMMESOAL 
PR] 


3IAIK13C 


MBS Sflt Large shop/cffice far rani 
as rae 5( Jbcqms. 3 ran on poind 
Hoa + 2 rooms on lit tow + 
ala- Tab turner (I) <3 5465 69. 


TAX SERVICES 


145. TAX A LEGAL SEKWCE5 
UJS. altorner to Ewope. Kurt 
ur. MAJD. Podforfi 249. A- 
Vife*, Aastria. Jet 434254 
3985 a Foe 4342543987. 


BUSINESS TRAVEL 


, , jw Fraquert Travtfcrs 

WartfwvJe. Up to it n, off h b cn> 
para, no restndtora. Impend Canada 
514341-7227 For 5143<W99X E+tai 
#nsemjacAMJGiLCA 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


ROJECT HNANCE 
Vam«E CAPITAL 
AwriaUe from 
One nOon US Dolan (fee 

TefcM. +599543451/0667 
Ft* WT, + 599543449 (Sl Marten) 


CAPITAL WANTED 


SHQU TERM MVESTMENT CAPITAL 
wanted. SIX retora. Edward P. Gd(- 
ag her, Anoniry-at-Lw. 3 Britesfa 
Mara Center tX750i Mirada, WO 
2DBI4HSAlrie:pon 9833439. 


CAPITAL AVAILABLE 


PROKT FV4ANCB4G 
VBOUC CAPItAL 

■ MmawB USS 25OJO0O 

* No Mann 

■ Term Loan 

* Cady Finance 

* Brokers Protected 

ANGLO AMERICAN GfiOUP PIC 

Ha +44 924 201377 


IMMHXA1E A UNUMTED 1 

Capird avsdcMe fa 
ALL business prof^tls! 

MM U4. 52 mi' no an. 

[7171 3977490 (US. FAXJ 


FINANCIAL SERVICES 


FU4ANOAL GUARANTEES. We 
provide laseranca Guaranren. as 
aafrt efa a aael far etemal ionpl 
banner ptofcOs. Td 407-9983222 
fin tfP-99B-526U5 


VBtWtB CAFTTAL AVAAABlt hr 
rrotecJea rue w -wxjwjj 


RJNDD4G PROBtBAS ? . 

VeOtre CapM - Eqwly Loos 
Ml Edoto - Business 
Fb rr ong - tang Term 
Colawd Supported Graartera 
BonbAfe groewtea to Mart f uming 
fry male projects a ranged fays 

BANCOR OF ASIA 

Coaenm eaned ady ubm Fmfiag. 
Broker's Caminai Awed 

Fax (63-2) 8104284 
Tab (63-2) 894-5358 
or 810-2570 


MANQNG AVARABUi 

WOMDWHDE 

AU COMMNML PROJECTS 

NO IBS 

NATIONAL BU5N5S 
EteORTWG BUREAU 

TeL 2127024821 Fox: 21230-5127 


I AM ABU TO HADE P110HTABLY m 

Fan, bonds, gold, crl eto. If you 
need gg Td/mt 165} 4488273. 


SERVICED OFFICES 


lomoN wi Busses awm ai 

fatites. 24 ham ac cess TeL UK (44) 
71 935 4048 Far RQ 71 935 7979. 


Your Office in Gornmy 

we ore “at your mrwct" 

• Can^iele office services a too 
presay addresses. 

• My equipped offices far ihort 
tern a tong term. 

• toternattorely bainrd office 
and ptafessond aoF al your 


• Con bo legdy aed as w 
cprpcmte doaiab for Germany/ 
Europe. 

• Your harness operaiem tan start 

necncdctety. 

• Stoee 1972. 


leto fc ee s n Serv i cw GrafaH 

Lairco-Haa an Ibfalmtnfxri 
JudtooBJiasse 22, 

60322 Frankfurt am Man 
Germany. 
TettoM24$530 
Foe Un 595770 


PSTAKI OFFICE to Nov (am 
Prime Locoten Ful EmAra Seoe- 
tand Swparl incorporate aid Cor- 
e Wn AuctfocSc Business 


Don# 1 

SSL i 


. Fra psq 2S305937. let |8SJ} 
25220 198 


YOKE AND FAXMAX M BHjGUM. 
Be aviabto 24 hra roand the world I 




IQ 3223222223, far 2191047 


YOU* ADDRESS near Cha^s I 
ISP. tone* 195n Sned-Artob ^ 
P nrivTd (1j43&<70< fa 4256 2835 


YOU* OWCE W LONDON 7Dp per 
day. frtal Photo, fat, U*. ^ jerwas. 
Tra 71 436 O/fife Pot 71 580 3729. 



ARGENTINE REPUBLIC 


PROVINCE OF SANTA FE 

SBISIRTOFECONOIff-IflOVIClALBOasnOlffDBWIMBir 
WBTRYOFDOItESnCAfFAfflS 
Financial Improvement and Economic Development Program of the 
Aigenfir* Provinces 

PUSUC BSTTERNATIONAL BID Na 007 . 

To contract the execution oh Refurtrtrixng and Mantenancs of School 

Tenders: Febmary 1 5, 1995. af 9 am at IheytonOancd’ 
S^Govemment House, 2651 3 de Febreto sL 1st floor, Pmvmce of 

l^^roSS^fS^Sumigafto^ove^ rational 

Government, will devote part of toetoan 


^iwf^Lriioned b^etosubml their sealed tendeism cxdefto 

or toinBy cootie wort, gmups 


WotoOnw 

1 EP.MgLMttaia-I-frtWg 68 ^*^^ 

a EF.i«ava«s«ritoUEmwa6Baa4**> 

CP MiianQanoOeitoreto. 

locator TM 
Sarto Fs 

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Sarto Fe 

m(nur*5l 

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4481903.73 

6*689778 

T**38M1 

3 EseudifrtedB Simon ttelrtrto 

4 EP. M-2 «. BeSgrano 

Sarto Fe 

e 

88825682 

5 ^.W8LN./^^ : N ^ ft - aC ^“ 

Ftoorio 

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788.11285 


ftosarto 

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nrtnr. Gtonz 

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79181556 

8718088* 

EP.rmt^ cp OT,ITft *SSrSiLSM^ 

11 EP.!+1OOJ.lrOEni0n«t pW11W 
EPWIZWAM.ifc-Wfa... . 



Mr.GaUex 

C-*rG*Br 

SatoFo 

4 

S' 

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80875320 

51889885 

818857X0 


^sasasdsssaa 


BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 


MTC 



Ffesqurtlatera^mud 

Passport International 

MTC, lire woHd leader in 
international lelecommuni cations 
leading 
development 
Aflitiairs anti 
distribute Passport and many other 
new Innovative, software and 
proprietary hardware based 
telecommunications products and 
services. 

If you're cunenlly setting dial back 
services, have a piofessional 
approach, persona J inteoity. and 
desire a lorar failure wnb a htoh recn 
leader. MTC'may be lonking lor you. 
If you haven't sold 
telecommunications products but 
believe you hare what it takes to 
operate an international sales 
erganizstioa with unlimited earning 
pcxeodaL 

Contact; 

MTCs Marita Devriopment Group 
in the United States at 
Ftu 1.W7-JW-5S25 or fiat f-707-76Wl» 

l MTC, Simply die best. > 


OfFSHOftE COMPAMGS 
tHSURANCSREWSWANCE 
COMP AIKS OFFSHORE BANKS 
ASSET/INCOME PROTECTION 
62 yaras established -pravfaina 
pratassfanto services tntanwttonwy 
for al types oJ business 
ASTON CORPO RATE 

trustees 

tSPtel Road, Douglas, 
isle of Man, Mi 4LS 
1W-: 0624 628501 
Fox. 0624 625126 
or London Tat (71)2228666 
Far (71/233 I5I& 


OFFSHORE BANKS 

♦ Merchant/tantmercial bank 

♦ Class A unre5tridEd fcense 

♦ No quafific^iori requirements 

♦ No tax es or treaties 

♦ Total anonymdy 

♦ Bearer shares OK. 

♦ kwhedtete deftrery 

♦ Indudes trust company 

♦ Jndudes offshore administrative 
services 

♦ Corrptete package USS35.000 

♦ Umhad number of banks available 

Cat or tax for free detest 

Ron Jensen 

London Te/.: 71 394 5154 
Fax: 71 231 9928 
Canada Td.: 604 942 6169 
Fax: 604 942 3179 


TkxPrteUS.torpQr«&M* 
farmed corrtcUy by 
teAStonetpi 

tareacartte Nctafa oar spec tty. Sorter Ea 
d 50 Gao. Gmce of oonplctt aaoapakr. 
Wr dftr US uUtess wih ptooc A fa senice. 
office xnta, tLS. bod icraaots. U4 (Atras 
to sene k (firoctoa, eonpfete kgd services A 
assbuace, InclwJlog OTC notoet entry ft 
bnsisDtios Pteae irgaot os free htodwt 
anUfttaE^AftCcH. 

Dr. Jur.WUBam A. Wright 
Atto rn ey at taw 
U5L Oorponrioo Services, Inc 
5430 Batumi Drive. Suite *10. 
Sacramento. Cafiforxris 95821 

araRot (USA) 916/78^3005* 


SCULPTURE WORLD 71 

Discover A Gold Mine hi 
New Aciyfic S culpture Art 

You Transform 

Posters Wo Art 
That SeBs from 
$100-52,000+ 

Greet Profit* 

POum Potential 
NoDinctS4eS 
PaqAed 

AM eauffitnetrtJFuA Control 
awestmentSIS^ogga^ 

716-691-1750 

rax: 716-691-1766 



OFFS H ORE CENTRE 
st. Kirrs & NEVIS 

Intemation^Busmess Companies 
Asset Pro lectoiTmsts 

Tax Free Dtxrncle 
GtBtFORD HaWITON & ASSOOAIB 
iMTED 

Fatt: 1-809-465-1147 


Off-Shore Comp any 
Incorporation 

In • aao tajofion fjAut&on Mnned Wh a 
uri^iBNn nnfcrenrm raytovlimft- 
oxrency Empean Bark Aceout You n 
g ua ta n tead lOOXananyrrity, sacufy, 
ai fidenfeayAatecMsconfagL 

(gyitfH.gQqwfiteJa RbGvUM 
Ttt: <LBQ 44 700 628406/138138 ' 

L ft* 1WQ44 709630903 J 


♦ HOW TO LEGALLY* 
OBTAIN DUAL NATIONALITY 

Dam Ac scorn af ftai nnafily IDO 
cmsiei aasbel AobctaneigL (FKEyXXB 
TAX PAYER!, ad IqpBj Itoid »» pnoiat* 
ad totsle. Disams the hrakr bds tbato ux 
hxcnaritm tobennei IqdTAX EXLE. 
Fto-JwFRESSXOCHUBEMtfnU- 
VACV NEWS UETTER that «BW|> 
raake and srenre year toaocy wrfu tv; 
Scape toll L44 Bra 43I& 
7oTK*4*r Howe - FensoUe 
Ponteoh Cade - Haate ■ 909 (EE - U.X. 
T«t;*44TO6JI75l-F«c + 44 7Q5fi3l322 


f Offshore Baa corps with X 
Dutch Branch Office 
No Bank Licence required, no 
mlnimom liquidity rules, total 
anonymity, no taxes or treaties. 

anonymous bade accounts 
established, cn take deposits 
without IhnitatioflS. 
IMMEDIATE deftaeay far $ 9,900. 

, FtouNL+3149DMS902 J 

V Sate teaa te i to lK S 


Sale of debtor's 

Fishing rcssek of difereot types. 

LOW PRICES! 

May be toed as metal scrap also. 

Ph.(*J70 8820811, fix 8820012. 


LEGAL 

SERVICES 


55,000 

Permanewt Residency 

Visas for 

AVAILABLE NOW. 

FOR INFORMATION , M3 
APPJKXnON, CONJACT 
BY FAX OR WRITE TtX 

l)S & European Coro., Inc. 

1953 NE 148 Street 
Maud, Florida 33161 U.S A 

Faac 305 - 947-3911 J 


INTERNATIONAL FRANCHISE OPPORTUNITIES 


Master Franchise Opportunity 

AiphoGrophics. tie 24-yea worldwide leader in the quick print 
and related services Industry is seeking additional Master 
franchisees fo develop our 330-store network 

AiphoGrophics h seeking Master Franchsees far selected countries 
InAfrkxi.Aski.Ewope.latinMiericaandtheNeaEast. Consider 
you - future as a Master franchfcee. devefoping franchise locations 
In your country of interest. 

AlphaGrcpnics centers offer offset primttig. electronic printing, 
computer-assisted graphic design, btncfng and fMshing. and are 
tied together by our wortdwtde electronic network. 

AiphoGrophics currently operates high technology business 
service centers in Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada. China. 
Holland. Hong Kong. Hungary. Japan, Mexico, the PhiSplnes. 
Russia. Spain, Sweden, Turkey, the United Kingdom, the United 
States and Venezuela. New centers witi open shortly in Chfle. 
Germany. Saud Arabia and IhdUand. 

For an information packet oo our Matter Franchise opportunity, 
please cc£ BS Edwards at 1 (602) 293-9200 or fax vow reex/ejf to 
1 (602) 887-2850. 

(if you are hterested in a franchise In an existing AiphoGrophics 
territory, •vewflbe happy to (award your request fa information 
to the appropriate Master Franchisee.) 

■ cxer M raw 


*P*®pra 

ftrtSwpsOflhuFUvK- 


3760 N. Commerce Drive 
Tucson. Arizona B57D5 USA 


TELECOMMUNICATIONS 


ITC 


INTERNATIONAL TELEPHONE COMPANY 

WORLDWIDE CALL BACK SYSTEM 

Now offers Direct Dial to anywhere 
in the world at Call Back Prices. 

Fax & Data can also be used with ITC’s Direct Dialer. 


Distributors Needed Worldwide 
For Call Back / Call Centers 
and Prepaid Calling Cards 
International and Domestic. 


International Telephone Company 
290 Pratt Street, Meriden, CT 06450-2118 
1800-638-5558 ext 11V 203-238-9794 
Fax:203-929-4906 


Own the Internet 

Country Exclusives Available 


IDT is looking for Inf 1 Joint Venture Partners to become 
our exclusive Internet Access Providers in your country. 
Great Revenue Potential. Internet is the World's 
fastest growing communications service. 
Contact Jonathan Rand U.S.Tel: 201-928-1000 
IDT! ext141 or fax: 201-928-1057 


Ore ci -iii. Tslsphop.e sni hterr-ct C 

294 State St. Hackensack NJ 07601 



YOlI SAW THIS AD. 

So did nearly half a million potential 
investors worldwide looking for new 
investment opportunities. 

Shouldn ’t you place 
your business message in the 
INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE? 








nvTFRN ATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 

.ugein. uiwUtfesOrtt 


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Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28,1994 


SPORTS 



Olympic Doors Are Finally Open for the Ori 



By Jere Longman 

New York Times Service 

STILLWATER, Oklahoma — Donnie 
Belcourt had no phone, so the message was 
brought to hwn by the tribal police. A 
r unning camp for American Indian ath- 
letes would be held at the Olympic Train- 
ing Center in Colorado Springs. He bad 
two days to get there. 

This was early August Belcourt, a Chip- 
pewa-Cree, was living with his mother on 
the Rocky Boy reservation in northern 
Montana. He longed to attend the camp, 
but he had no racing- shoes and, more 
urgently, no car. 

So Belcourt awakened at 5:30 the next 
morning, stuck out his thumb and hitch- 
hiked 100 miles to Great Falls, Montana, 
where he made the flight to Colorado and 
his connection with the Olympic people. 

“It was the best trip of my life, as far as 
my career,” Belcourt said recently over 
dinner in tins college town, where he once 
attended school and has returned to live 
and train. 


At 29, in the prime of his running career, 
Belcourt is one of die athletes benefiting 
from a new, overdue embrace by the U.S. 
Olympic Committee of American Indians, 


m 


who have been successful but rare parties - 

Gaines. 


pants in the Winter and Summer 
Tim Thorpe, arguably the greatest ath- 
lete of the first half of tins century, won the 
decathlon at the 1912 Summer Olympics in 
Stockholm. Billy Mills, a gold medalist in 
Tokyo in 1964, is the only American to win 
die 10,000-meter track event 
Sport has been part of American Indian 
culture for centuries; from these indigenous 
roots modern UJS. team sports have blos- 
somed. Yet as a group, American Indians 
have remained as outsiders, and some tribal 
officials once considered the possibility of 
competing as a separate nation at the 1996 


welcomed into the Olympic commu- 
ast month. American Indian athletes 
have increased access to Olympic 
training centers in Colorado Springs, Lake 
Placid. New York, and San Diego. 

The year-old Native American Sports 
Council mil gain a seat on the USOC 
board of directors and access to the Olym- 
pic committee’s expertise in marketing and 
frmd-raiang. 

“We cannot be ignored, we cannot be 
separated,” John EagleDay. die NASCs 
executive director, said during the council's 
induction in Nashville. “We cannot be de- 


percent Those who leave the reservation 
for college often fed a pull to hurry back. 


The council’s mission is twofold. One, to 


say athletes, coaches and American Indian 
leaders. Or a subtle push. 

“I grew up with feelings of shame or 
inferiority," said Mills, the 1964 gold med- 
alist and an Oglala Sioux who was boro in 
Pine Ridge, South Dakota. 

“I never felt I truly belonged. I felt 
different By die time I arrived in Tokyo, I 
still felt different but I understood the 
difference. Now I had feelings of pride and 
strength and beauty and tradition. On the 
victory stand, I was very aware of the 


establish yonth sports programs to pro- 
mote “wellness” in American Indian corn- 


er hope that If kids can see me succeed- 
ing, they will think, ‘Hey,/ Jfom do it, l 
can t< xv ” Belcourt said. "Look at the 


mote “wellness m American moi Cte* they were a laugMngstock 

munities sickened by alcohoL dnjfcj e«- itey m because they 


w*. 

"l 


suicide, and pm. to nmaing, No* they ™ because 

m toStio^ “mpetidocs. . Native American SporteOsmica pnmded 
2£ll aovTbut the Bdcourt with a new par of rac^ flats. 


i. 

.V. 

s; 


' ' X\ c- 

*-*• 


Summer Olympics in Atlanta. 
“I thmlr we have 


addressed those con- 
cerns,” said Mike Moran, a spokesman for 
the USOC 

la an emotional ceremony, the fledgling 
Native American Sports Council was offi- 


aied the opportunity for our young people passion my teammates and the audience 
to soar to the heights of their ambitions, showed for nay victory. 

That’s what the Olympics represent.” “I had a feeling of great pride that is still 

Only a dozen American Indians have with me 30 years later. But intermingled 
competed during the 100-year era of the with that feeling was a deep ache, knowing 
modem Olympics, most earlier in the cen- that this wonderful country didn't under- 


The numbers are small now 
talent pool is significant Of the 1-96 mil- 
lion American Indians, about- half arc be- 
tween fee ages of 14 and 27. . 

Todd Riech, a Flathead-Kootenai ww> 
keeps negatives from photographs that ms 
grandfather took of Jim Thorpe, is the 
national javdin champion. 

Mike Jones, of the Tolowa tribe, came 
off the Ttvtian basketball circuit out West 


Since November, the council has provided 
$400 a month toward his rent, $200 a 
month for groceries. It will also provide 
airfare for certain races. 

Belcourt lives— still without a phone- 
in a modest one-bedroom apartment near 
Oklahoma State University, where , he 
trains with its track coach, Dick-Weis. He 


‘'i£ * 
_ \v 


s:‘ 


tury. The reasons are as harsh and 
as a Montana winter isolation, lack o: 
access to facilities and coaching, alcohol- 
ism, a poverty rate double the national 
average, a high school dropout rale of 35 


Stand me as a Native American.’ 

Now he lends his name and time to such 
organizations as the Native American 
Sports Council and the Wings of America 
running program. 


to nrafat die national squad in team hand- 
ball last summer and is in training for the 


bought his first television the other day, 
and Weis j< 


£' . 
•c-‘. 




1996 Olympics. 1 

Belcourt competed in the 1992 01 
trade and field trials at 1,500 and 5,< 
meters. 


RACES: Betting the Horses in Vietnam: Win 5 Place and Oh What a Show! 


Continued from f^ge I 

. This was during the Tet Offen- 
sive of 1968; the Vietoong had occupied 
the track and were using it as a field 
hospital.” 

While the sport survived during most of 
the war, it could not survive the peace. The 
Communists viewed racing and gambling 
as forms of capitalist degeneracy, and after 
Saigon fell in 1975, Phu Tho was shut 
down and transformed into a sports and 
education college for coaches. 

But in 1989, as the Vietnamese govern- 
ment liberalized its economic policies, rac- 
ing was revived, with state ownership of 
the track and private ownership of the 
horses. With little capital available. 


though, Phu Tho was forced to adopt a 
wagering system that even track officials 
concede is primitive. 

Only exacta betting is offered at Phu 
Tho. Clerks sit at a table, behind which is a 
board holding paper tickets for all the 
possible combinations in a 10-horse field. 
If a customer asks for tickets on the 4-6 
and 4-10 exactas, the clerk simply tears 
thf-m off the board and hands them over. 

Because there is a finite number of tick- 
ets for each combination, it’s posable (as 
in Mr. Nack*s era) for tickets to be sold 
out. The minimum unit of wagering is 
2,000 dong (about 9 U.S. cents) and mak- 
ing a serious bet is virtually impossible. My 
40,000-dong plunge on HaNgoc Chau cost 
me $3.63. 


Bating is halted two minutes before 
post time, so that clerks can phone wager- 
ing information to a central control room. 
Payoffs are hand-calculated and an- 
nounced about 10 minutes after the race. 
Phu Tho takes a burdensome 35 percent 
from all wagers, and I was told that illegal 
bookmakers thrive by offering more at- 
tractive odds. 


Although Vietnamese racing is now con- 
ducted on an exceedingly modest level, the 
industry has plans to grow — just as many 
of the country’s other new economic ven- 
tures are now starting to gain momentum. 


Arts & Antiques 


Every Saturday. Contact Fred Ronan 
Tel.: (33 1) 46 37 93 91, fax: (33 1) 46 3793 70 
or your nearest IHT office or representative 


Phu Tho has enlisted an English firm, 
International Racecourse Management, 
for counsel on its operations. It secured 
Martell cognac as the sponsor for its cham- 
pionship races. The country has recently 
imported a few thoroughbreds from Brit- 
ain to bolster its breeding industry. 


And I hope the Vietnamese don’t take 
offense when I suggest another possible 
improvement: a jockeys* training school. 


Because of the holiday. Rob Hughes's 
soccer column, which usually appears in 
Wednesday's editions, will appear on Thurs- 
day this week. 



less joked that he was finally “laying 
down roots.” ■ . ~ 

His goals for 1996 arc reahstic. He is not 
Hkdy to make the Olympic team. But he 
wants to have the chance. When be retires, 
he wants no could haves, should haves,, 
would haves, no lapses into regret. 

He is a distance runner, but his career, 
his life, has been more like a steeplechase, 
over hurdles that many American Indian 
athletes have sot been able to dear. 

Bdcourfs natural father is while; he left 
early and Bckourt has no memory of him. 
Two of bis brothers have sport time in jail, 
he said, and a teen-age sister has entered a 
rehabilitation program for her part in a 


- ,:y 




cariadting. 
Golden 


toe Gin/ Rasters 

OOPS — Gheorgbe Muresan, stealing the ball from ShaqiriHe O’Neal, helped 
fool out file Magic’s center but the injury-ridden Buffets stiff lost, 128-121. 


Gloves boxing, then running, 
took Belcourt . in a different direction, 
led doors Into the white -world on 
others in his family had been hesi- 
tant to knock. 

“I don’t know if I was lucky or chicken,” 
Belcourt said. 

After high school in Billings, Montana, 
he attended the Haskell Institute in Law- 
rence, Kansas, a junior college for Ameri- 
can Indians that Thorpe and Mills had 
attended before him, and became a junior 
college All-American. 

Then, in 1985, he received a rare oppor- 
tunity at the time for an American Inman 
runner, a chance for a scholarship at a 
Division I university. 

Even now, of the 87,739 athletes who 
competed in Division I and H sports in 
1992 and 1993, only 315 were American 
Indians. But Weis offered Belcourt a fuH 
scholarship at Oklahoma State and he took 
it. . 

“That was an important step/* said 
Mike Daney, who coached Belcourt at Has- 
kdl and now coaches at an Indian comnm- 




- 


. •: * 


V 2 

V.' 


ruty college in Albuqucxque, New Mexico. 
*1 went to a small school; I 


SCOREBOARD 


NBA Standings 




ivr.MV*-. 


EASTERN CON FERE MCE 
Altaaflc OMthn 



W L 

Pcf 

OB 

Or kudo 

21 5 

808 

— 

New York 

12 12 

J00 

8 . 

New Jersey 

12 17 

.414 

IBVj 

Boston 

18 16 

J8S 

11 

PMtooetpMa 

10 16 

J85 

1! 

Miami 

8 16 

333 

12 

WatailriBtan 

7 17 

-292 

13 


Central Dfvtsioa 



Cleveland 

18 8 

Ml 

— 

Indiana 

IS 8 

A52 

m 

Charlotte 

14 11 

-56Q 

3W 

Chicago 

13 12 

-520 

4Wi 

Atlanta 

11 » 

M3 

7 

Detroit 

9 14 

on 

7Vh 

Milwaukee 

8 17 

JOB 

9Vi 


Seattle 

17 8 

480 

2V0 

LA Lakers 

15 8 

A 53 

314 

Portland 

12 11 

sn 

6Vj 

Sacramento 

13 12 

520 

6Vi 

Golden Slate 

9 Iff 

-375 

TO 

LA. dinners 

3 23 

.115 

>7 

MONDAYS RESULTS 


Boston 

24 

24 24 

28-102 


la SO (Racks 10). Assists— cos Angolas 73 
(RkAordsan II). Minnesota M (Garland 5). 


The AP Top 25 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Midwest DMslaa 

W L Pet 

Utah is s Mn 

Houston 15 9 JOS 

San Antonio 13 9 Sn 

Denver 13 VI S42 

Dallas 13 11 S32 

Minnesota 6 19 J*0 

PocUVC Division 

Phoenix 20 i set 


SB 


4W 

im 


31 3* 3) 37 -123 
B: Mon trass 7-12 2-2 14, Dowlas M3 1-3 IV: 
C: Price W-16 V-9 36, Mills 54 5-4 16. Re- 
botwds Boston 3* (Cuban I). Cleveland 41 
(Drentng 8). AMHS— Boston 32 (Dowlas 7). 
Cleveland 30 (Price 7). 

Orlando 27 35 26 36 14-128 

Was M uten 32 32 21 34 7—121 

O: tmeol I1-2D4-1) S&Amfemm 13-23 MK 
Hardaway MV 18-14 2V: w: Howard §-2i M0 
24. Sfclfes 8-16 2-2 to. Rebounds— Ortanda 43 
(Grant 12), Watfdneton 58 (Howard 14). A»- 
tasto-Ortondo 37 (Hardaway 11). Washington 
14 (SkHes V>. 

Houston 24 24 S 28—181 

Miami 18 28 » 73— 88 

H: Olaluwan M4 64 24. Elle M5-2B; M: 
RtoeW2 2-2 20, Reeves 513 0014 Rebounds— 
Houston SI (Olaluwan 12), Miami 49 (Rica, 
wims 7). Assists— Houston 27 (Otaluwon, 
Maxwell 5). Miami 24 (Owens 41. 

LA. Cuppers M W *1 38— 81 

Minnesota » ll 23 24— 82 

L : Murray 4-1 J 2-2 12, Vaught Ml 20; m: 

Loettner 7-1* 1M3 7k West 7-18 44 IB. Re- 
bounds — Los AnoWcs41 (Outlaw 7), Minneso- 


ta 24 25 28- V7 
» 31 21 38-181 
M: Anderson 8-21 6-7 7% Morris 10-19 2-2 21: 
M: Baker 1M5 6-4 26, Robinson M6 34 20. 
Rebounds— New Jersey 47 (Beniamin 12), 
Milwaukee 4V (Boker8).A ni li tt Ne w Jersey 


Tbe lea 25 teems (it The Associated Prats’ 
college boeketaoB BOH, witb (Ini ntuui votes 
in noraatfeesesi record tbroggh Dec. 75, total 
points based on 25 Points taro Ural atom rota 
throiMh one poM lor a Mtgtaca vat*, and 


23{Anderscn 12), Milwaukee 23 (Murdock it). 


Deltas 31 25 28 29-113 

Phoenix 31 * 3* 33—139 

D: Jackson 11-23 5-4 7k Ntaetttum 10-1* 8-1 
21. Barkley M7 3-4 IV, Johnson 7-ro 64 20. 
Rebounds— Oallas S3 (Williams 14), Phoenix 
47 (Berkley 12). Assisto-DaHas 34 (Kidd 11), 
Phoenix 38 (Barkley. Perry 8). 


27 22 22 JS-181 
25 24 27 18— V4 
PH : Wemhersaoon M8 7423. Barros M 1 1- 
I23;PO: Strickland 9-17 7-7025 Oraxfer 2-18 7- 
V 21 Ratameds— Philadelphia 46 IWriuht 8), 
Portland 43 (Dudley 131. Assists— PNiadet- 
pMo IV (Barros 18). Portland 20 (Strickland 
V). 


22 24 29 24— M3 
34 34 48 15—123 
SA: Patvnlce 18-14 84) 2G Orcnl M0 1 M3 217 

Schremn* Ml « 21. Perk ms 7-9 mi 26. Re- 
8aoBds— >Soeramenta56 (SmMh 131, Scott* t2 
(Kemp V). AsUsto— So crom enl u 24 (Webb 4). 
Seattle 28 (Sdtrempf 8). 



Record 

Pt* 

Pry 

1. North Coral too (561 

7-0 

1,540 

1 

l UCLA (57 

M 

IJJfc 

Z 

X Arkansas (3) 

8-1 

1/442 

3 

A Massachusetts 

5-1 

141V 

4 

1 Kentucky 

5-1 

1JS8 

5 

A Kansas 

7-1 

1J2V 

7 

7. Duke 

*1 

1,197 

9 

A Connecticut 

5-0 

1.185 

10 

9. Maryland 

H 

1JB4 

11 

10. Arizona 

7-3 

989 

6 

11. Syracuse 

7-1 

942 

14 

1Z Georgetown 

51 

116 

12 

IX FtarMa 

52 

801 

8 

14. Cal Horn la 

50 

441 

34 

15. MicMcan St 

51 

554 

17 

1A Arizona SL 

7-2 

520 

IS 

17. Georgia Tech 

7-1 

4V2 

18 

IX Wake Forest 

51 

437 

>9 

19. Wisconsin 

51 

3V» 

20 

20. Cincinnati 

7* 

377 

13 

21. Iowa St. 

51 

310 

25 

22 New Mexico Sf. 

52 

294 

21 

21 Nebraska 

9-1 

182 



24. Indiana 

54 

154 



2S. SI. Johns 

50 

129 

— 


Others receiving votes: Stanford 103, Min- 
nesota 98, Missouri VI Penn 56. Illlnots S2. 
Itma 41, St. Louis 41 , Virginia 40. Vtilonovo 3k 
Oklahama St. 23 Tulane 31. St Jose Oh's 29. 
Alabama 27. Louisville 17, Oklahoma 17. Vir- 
ginia Tech 17. Xavier, Ohio 14, Ohio U. 15. 
Hawaii 10, Penn 51. ia Brigham Young 9, Utah 
7. Florida Si. 4 Mississippi St. X Texas X La 
Salle X Marquette X Texas Southern X Clem- 
son I. Gonswa I. Manhattan 1. 


k-Oatlas 
tiy, Glonts 
Arizona 
PttUoMcMo 
W as hington 


Pet PFPA 
-750 414 248 
J43 279 305 
-500 235247 
43S JOS SOB 
.188 320412 


Rnaf NFL Standings 


AMERICAN CONFERENCE 
East 

W L T 
x-MJaml 18 6 0 

v-New England 10 6 0 

JndtanopoMs 8 8 0 

Buffalo 7 V 0 

N.Y.Jets 4 10 0 

Central 
W L T 
72 4 0 

11 5 0 

3 13 0 

2 14 0 

West 

W L T 
11 5 0 

9 7 0 


Pet PFPA 
-425 38V 327 
425 3S1 312 
-500 JOt 320 
AM 340354 
■375 264 320 


x-PJHsborgfi 

y-Cieveland 

Cincinnati 

Houston 


Pet. PF PA 
JSO Sit 23* 
■688 340 204 
.188 274 404 
.125 224 3S7 


LA Raiders V 7 0 J63 303 327 

Denver 7 V 0 ASS 347394 

Seattle 6 ID 0 -375 287 323 

NATIONAL CONFERENCE 
£a>f 

W L T 
12 4 0 

V70 
8 8 0 
7 9 0 

3 13 0 

Central 
W L 7 
10 6 0 
9 7 0 

9 7 0 

9 7 0 

6 10 0 
Wes! 

W U T 
x Son Francisco IS 2 0 

New Orleans 7 9 0 

Affcxtfo 7 V 0 

LA Rams 4 12 0 

x-won dMston 
v -captured Ptavoff spot 

MsadOVS Oosee 
Minnesota 21, San FroncNoo 14 


Staamas: Btackbum 44 Points, Manches- 
tar United 44, Newantte 39. Liverpool 3ANoi- 
ttaaham Forest 3x Leeds 3X Norwich 3X Tot- 
tenham NX Chetoea 2A Manchester City ZL 
Arssftal 23. Coventry 21 Wltnhie(kxi2X Sou(h- 
ampton 34. SteffleW Wednesday 24. Queens 
Pmk Rangtn 2X Crystal Paiaoe 2X West 
Ham 22 Evertan 19. Aston Villa 17. Leicesfv 
K Ipswich IX 


was afraid to 
take a risk. Now I use Dooay as an exam- 

' pie to my kids: be wiffjag to 

ammm F m gamble.” 

Still, injuries, finanrigl diffi- 
culties and a peripatetic lifop 
style have hindered Him. To- 
support his running, he has 
worked odd jobs, , waiting ta- 
bles, washing dishes, painting 


* 

• <* .- 


houses, mopping gyms, sweep- 
malls. llte tribal elders in 


mg 


x-Mlrmesota 
v-GreenBav 
y-Detralt 
y-Chlcago 
Tampa Bay 


Pet. PFPA 
425 356 314 
.563 382287 
.563 357 342 
M 271307 
J7S 251351 


PCI. PFPA 
J13 SO 2ft 
A3S 348407 
A38 317385 
250 384 345 


SECOND TEST 
England n. AiMraOa, 88 Day 
TWtdmr, ta Msihsaree 

Enaiana 1st Inninas: 20 (ail out) 
Australia 20 Iminas: 17W 

SECOND TEST 

New Zeakaoi vs. Sooth Afrtafr 2d Dor 
Tuesday, ta DertMo 
New zeakmd lit Inninas: IBS (on nut) 
South Africa 1st Mnffias: 122-S 


Rocky Boy have hdped with 
mall amounts of money, pro- 
vided an occasional plane ticket 
and invited him home to speak 
to young athletes. 

One day, he may return home 
to coach. But he hears re- 
proaches, too, that he has be- 
trayed tribal culture by leaving, 
that he “thinks he’s a white boy 
now.” 


V • 7 

■h- r 

j 








rf S 


BASKETBALL 


x-San Diego 
V-KonsasCity 


Pet PFPA 
488 381 306 
M3 319 298 


ENGLISH PREMIER LEAGUE 
Mcmchester aiy 1 , Btockburn 3 
Tottenham X Crystal Palace 0 


MINNESOTA— Suspended Isaiah Rider, 
guwiL wfihQirfCT tar amaomelor vioiatfita 
team rules. 

SAN ANTONIO — Signed Doc Rivers, ward, 
ta o o no^year contract. Waived Corey 
Crowder, guant 


Taking a Greyhound, he ar- 
rived in Stillwater in September 
with everything he owned: a 
duffel bag, $800 and his dream 
of tbe Olympics. Now he is get- 
^P» with coaching, rent 

The rest is up to him. 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


PEANUTS 


®NES 


i: 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 







iMj >1 lm (jSJd 




SPORTS 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 1994 


Page 17 




: - 
■ 

■=— vrs- 


Matchups 
To Watchin 
NFL Playoffs 

By Leonard Shapiro 

Washington Pass Service 

MIAMI — The first weekend 
of the National Football 
League playoffs offers several 
intriguing story lines, including 
a matchup of two of the game’s, 
all-time marquee quarterbacks 
and a reprise of a game between 
the New England Patriots' 
coach. Bill Parcells, and the 
Cleveland Browns' coach. Bill 
Bdidrick, who was Parcells's de- 
fensive coordinator when both 
were with the New York Giants. 

And, oh yes, the National 
Football Conference Central Di- 
vision — once and perhaps still 
appropriately known as the 
Black and Blue Division — gets 
to beat up on itself all over again 
in the NFC wild-card games. 

The quarterback duel will 
take place in a Super Bowl set- 
ting Saturday in Joe Robbie 
Stadium — site of this year’s 
Super Bowl XXIX — when Dan 
Marino and the Miami Dol- 
phins play host to Joe Montana 
and the Kansas City Chiefs. 

Both teams have staggered to 
the finish line and both quarter- 
backs probably will be limping, 
Marino on a leg that’s been 
bothering him since last year’s 
Achilles’ tendon surgery and 
Montana on a knee bruised in 
Saturday’s must-win against the 
Los Angeles Raiders. 

The outcome of Monday 
night’s contest determined the 
two NFC wild-card rites. Since 
Minnesota won, the Detroit Li- 
ons will play the Packers in 
Green Bay on Saturday and the 
Chicago Bears will play the Vi- 
kings in Minneap olis on Sunday. 

None of those NFC Central 
teams is expected to go much 
farther, not with the Dallas 
Cowboys and the San Francis- 
co 49ers looming in the next 
round. 

The49ers, whose 13-3 regular 
season record is the league’s 
best, open their drive to the So- 
per Bowl on Jan. 7; the two- 
time defending champion Cow- 
boys (12-4) play Jan. 8. 

The Stedeis, 12-4 and with 
the home field throughout the 
AFC playoffs, play at Three 
■(Rivers Stadium on Jan- 7; the 
San Diego Chargers (10-6) host 
the game mi Jan. 8, with both 
teams’ opponents, to.be deter- 
mined tins weekend. 

The Dolphins come in as the 



Vikes Undermine 49ers 
For NFC Central Title 









MINNEAPOLIS— Only the 
Minnesota Vikings had some- 
thing to gain from the National 
Football League’s final regular 
season game. And they got 
what they needed: A tough de- 
fensive performance and the 
NFC Central championship. 

Rookie Dewayne Washing- 
ton returned a fumble for a 
touchdown and John Randle 
had two of the VBrings* three 
erw-w in a 21-14 victory that 
ended the San Francisco 49ers’ 
10-game winning streak. 

“It feds great,” said corner- 
back Anthony Parker. “We 
wanted to win the Central Divi- 
sion, that’s the bottom line.” 
The Viltings (10-6) already 


connecting cm a 6-yard touch- 
down that tied the score at 7, 
yet Young still set two NFL 
records. 

He surpassed Joe Montana’s 
passer rating of 112.4, set in 
1989, with a 112.8, and he 
eclipsed Ken Anderson's NFL 
record for completion percent- 
age, set in the 1982 season at 
70.55, with a 70.7. His 35 TD 


jhis season broke Mon- 
tana’s record of 31. 

After Elvis Grbac replaced 
Young, the San Francisco of- 
fense did little the rest of ihe 
game. „ 

“This just sends a message, 
end Roy Barker said of the de- 
fensive effort- “We’ve been crit- 
icized a ton, but we’re not dog 
meat.” (AP. NYT) 


failed to clinch the title 10 days 
earlier in Detroit they finally 
won their second division 
crown in Dennis Green's three 
years of coaching the te am . 

Minnesota now will play host 
to Chicago in a first-round 


s" 


A m : ~v, 

ms ^ - * v - : £ ~ 


playoff game. 

The Vikings did it without 
Warren Moon, the Pro Bowl 
quarterback who stretched two 
ligaments in bis left knee 
against Detroit, but turned in 
their most inspired defensive 
performance in weeks, albeit 
against a San Francisco offense 
that played without four regu- 
lars, while Steve Young and Jer- 
ry Rice saw action for little 
more than a quarter. 

The game meant nothing to 
the 49ers (13-3). They are guar- 
anteed home-field advantage 
throughout the NFC playoffs, 
and will take next weekend off. 

The Vikings got on the board 
first because of their defense. 
Comerback DeWayne Washing- 
ton scooped up 49er ru nning 
bade Ricky Watters' fumble and 
returned it 17 yards fen a score. 
It was W ashing ton's third touch- 
down on a return of a turnover 
this season; that tied him for the 
most ever by rookie with Ronnie 
Lott erf the 1981 49ere and Lem 
Barney of the 1967 lions. 

Minnesota also got two field 
goals from Fuad Revdz, who 
extended his string of consecu- 
tive field goals to 28. Thai s the 
second longest in NFL' history, 
one .short of John Carney’s 
league record. 

Young and Rice left after 


Gtfdyn SKWlCIta Attoaottd 

Todd Scott made Ricky Watters fumble, and comerback DeWayne Washington got the Votings’ first touchdown. 

_ _ . ... Tk., mac ttu> lad timp IS 


mystery team of the playoffs 
because no one, including 
themselves, can figure them 
ouL Will it be the team that 
scored 27 first-half points 
against the Lions on Sunday 
nigh t, limiting Detroit to 17 
yards no first downs over 
the same span? Or will it be a 
tenTn tha t scored no touch- 
downs a gains t Indianapolis the 
week before? 

On Monday, their coach, 
Don Shula, wasn’t in much of a 
mood to explain his team’s in- 
consistency in a year when the 
Dolphins started 7-2, then lost 
four of their next six before 
rltnrhing the AFC East title. 

“Are we the only team that 
has these problems?” he bris- 
tled. “Everybody but San Fran- 
cisco could ask the same ques- 
tion, too.” 

The Dolphins had little diffi- 
culty handling the Chiefs in the 
teams’ Monday night game in 
Miami three weeks ago. Miami 
prevailed, 45-28, but Montana 
did not play because of a 
sprained foot 


“Having a healthy Montana 
makBs a big difference to their 
football team,” Shula said in 
understatement. “The playoffs 
are a whole new season and 
we’ve got to be ready to play a 
fine football game.” 

Playoff dance 

WILD-CARD GAMHS 


Detroit at Grew Boy. '7X GMT 
Kauas Cttv at Miami. 2100 GMT 
soaday. M.1 

Now EnotawJ at Cievntond 1330 GMT 
oowwi at Mtonaoto. 2IB0 GMT 

DIVISIONAL PLAYOFFS 
Saturday. Jan. 7 

CJmtand. Kansas CMv or New England al 
Pittsburgh. 1730 GMT 
Oilcooa, Datrofl, Groan Bay or Minnesota al 
San Francisco. 2100 GMT 


Detroit. Groan Bay or Mtonasoloat Dana* 

TOO GMT , 

Ctevahml. Mtanl or Now England at son 
[Mega 2100 GMT 

NOTE: inadMsIancftainnlon oBBt nabcw 
record plays Itiesurrtvtos wflGcard «*uwr 
Mtth the towesMonklna roemtL Ttia dMslon 
champion wHti the se cond bes t raenr d rtayi 

ttwolherramainWwwtld-canlolaytrftwVinar. 

AFC and NFC CHAMPIONSHIPS 
Sunday. Joa IS. 1730 gmt and 2100 GMT 
SUPER BOWL 

Sunday. Jan. V. ZSOO GMT In Miami 


The Dolphins believe they 
can. 

“We have all the potential of 
all the rest of the teams,” said 
defensive end Marco Coleman. 
“We have just as good talent If 
we do the same things we’ve 
been doing, we’ll be fine.” 

Said linebacker Bryan Cox: 
“It’s not the lottery. It’s not 
putting a dollar down and hop- 
ing I win. It’s putting all my 
work and all my time and hop- 
ing we can beat Kansas City. 

While Miami-Kansas City 
has all the makings for lots of 
passing fancy, the New Eng- 
fand-Oeveland get-together on 
the shores of Lake Erie ought to 
be down and dirty, just like the 
last time they met at the same 
site Nov. 6. , . . . 

The Browns prevailed that 
day, 13-6, in a game marred by 
an officiating controversy. New 
England safety Maurice Hurst 
was flagged on a questionable 
pass interference call against 
wide receiver Keenan McCar- 
dell to set up OeveUnd’s win- 
rang fourth-quarter touchdown. 


That was the last time New 
England lost this season. The 
Patriots have since won seven 
straight after a 3-6 start and 
come into the game as the hot- 
test ftmni in the AFC. 

The Browns, on the other 
hand, looked dreadful two 
weeks ago in a loss to the Steel- 
era with the AFC Central title 
up for grabs. 

.Bet Parcells knows the 
Browns can be a dangerous 
football team, just as he knows 
how much fun he’s having right, 
now winning games. 

“The feeling is like a narcot- 
ic,” Parcells said this week. 
“Once you fed it and you know 
what it is, it’s hard not to want 
more. It’s going to end some 
day. It’s afun thing while yon re 
going through it-” 

• Rich Kotite, whose Phila- 
delphia Eagles lost their last 
seven games after starting 7-2, 

was fired as coach by the owner, 

Jeff Lurie, who seems intrigued 
by the possibility of luring the 
former coach Dick Vermeil 
back to the organization. 







* ^ JenChrisicoieii/Rcuiaa 

Young (left) and Rice played tittle, but put up six points. 

Record-Setters Young, Carter 
Among the Season’s Leaders 

. _ ItL 


The Associated Press 

Among the league leaders 
this season, two set NFL re- 
cords. 

San Francisco’s Steve Young 
established a passing rating 
mark with his 1 12.8, surpassing 
Joe Montana’s 1 12.4. Cris Car- 
ter of Minnesota had 119 recep- 
tions, beating Sterling Sharpe’s 
record of 112. 

Barry Sanders of Detroit led 
the league in rushing with 1,883 
yards. San Francisco’s Jerry 

n ; ntori iwmirino 


era with 132 (22 touchdowns). 
San Diego's John Carney led 
the league with 135 points (33- 
for-33 PATs and 34-for-38 field 
goals). 

Aeneas Williams of Phoenix 
and Eric Turner of Cleveland 
each had nine interceptions, 
while Kevin Greene of Pitts- 
burgh Steders was No. I with 
14 sacks. 

Sean Landeta of the Los An- 
geles Rams had the best punt- 
ing average, 44.8. The top punt 
returner was Brian Mitchell of 


yams, zwm nauuwj a returner was Brian Miicneu oi 

Rice had the most receiving Washington at 14.1 yards per 
yards, 1,499. runback. Mel Gray of Detroit 

Cminitt Cmifh was 1 m) in kirk return averaee at 


Dallas* Emnritt Smith was 
tops in points among non-kick- 


ied in kick return average at 
28.4. 


- ■* ^ . * 


SIDELINES 

Men’s Downhill Is Also Postponed 

GENEVA (Reuters) — Poor snow conditions continued to 

resort of Crans Montana on Jan. 6. 

The FIS said conditions had improved enough for a men’s 8^* 

Races originally set for there on Dec. p 
because ofthebek of snow plaguing Europe. 

yaking it difficult. 

or 

• Charles Barkley: “If he played with that kind of enthusiasm 
every night, he’d still be in Phoenix. 


Star Yankee Pitcher Reynolds 
Dies From Cancer at Age 79 


The Associated Proa 

OKLAHOMA CITY — Al- 
lie Reynolds, a star right- 
hander pitcher on six World Se- 
ries dianmionship teams with 
the New York Yankees from 
1947-54, died early Tuesday af- 
ter a long bout with cancer. He 
was 79. 

Reynolds, 182-107 with 49 
saves and 330 earned- run aver- 
age in 13 years with Cleveland 

and New York, become the first 

American Lea g ue pitcher to 
throw two no-hitters in a season 
in 1951, then went 20-8 in 1952 
when he led the league with a 
2.06 ERA, 160 strikeouts and 
six shutouts. 

Reynolds, known as “Chief,” 
was 7-2 with four saves and a 
2.79 ERA in 15 World Senes 
games, going 2-1 in the Yan- 
kees’ seven-game victory over 


CROSSWORD 


ACROSS 

1 -x* denotes it 
•Swiss abodes 
ts Continental, 

o-B- 


ie Regular 

17 No (easy 

decision) 
is Radius, e.g. 
ig Defeats 


Jti 

For reservations. 

Fax International 
31-20 600*122 — 


ao Brit legislators 

22 Posts 

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lucre 

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products 
ao Crow’s cry 
art Move bar* 
(from) 

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pry to pick up) 

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cooperative 

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offshoot org. 

4 « Besmirched 

44 Computer'* 

he«t Atobr. 

conveyances, 
for short 
43 Handed (out) 
BO Suffix with slug 
or song 
si Old hat 

M Trojans’ seh. 

M — -the good 

(benflfioafl 

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rows and 
columns 

h -The flower of 
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song 

"SS®- 

tiRlnperfe cfl y 
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DOWN 

« Female tafines 

i Taka on a 
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announcements legal se rvices 


SWITZERLAND 


Brooklyn in 1952. He won the 
deci d in g game at Ebbets Field 
that year in relief. 

He was forced to retire after 
the 1954 season because of a 
K»olc injury sustained when the 
team’s bus crashed into an over- 
pass in Fhfladdphia. 

• Peter May, one of En- 
gland’s finest batsmen and re- 
spected cricket officials, died 
Tuesday in Lip trot, England, 
after a short Alness. He would 
have been 65 on New Year's 
Eve. „ _ _ , 

In 66 tests for England from 
1951-61, he scored 4,537 nms at 
an average of 46.77. As captain, 
he led the team to 20 victories, 
with 10 defeats and 11 draws 
before he quit Test cricket com- 
paratively early at 31. He re- 
tired from the game two years 
later because of business com- 
mitments. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 1994 


POSTCARD 


Music Returns to Haiti 


By Larry Rohter 

flew York Times Serrtce 

P ORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti 
— For two months now, 
ever since President Jean-Ber- 
trand Aristide returned from 
exile, one particular song has 
been playing everywhere in 
Haiti. Called “Reconciliation," 
it has become a symbol of the 
mood of hopefulness that now 
prevails here. 

But until this week, the Phan- 
toms, the group that wrote and 
sang this infectious anthem of 
the new, democratic Haiti, 
could not themselves be found 
in their homeland 
Like the president they ad- 
mire, they had been in erile in 
the United State. They record- 
ed “Reconciliation” there last 
S omm er, hoping that their vi- 
sion of peace would actually 
come to pass. 

To Haitians, therefore, the 
return of the Phantoms and 
other performers is also a sign 
that the worst is over. 

After three years of a military 
dictatorship that routinely used 
censorship and intimidation to 
control artistic expression. Hai- 
tian music is flowering a gain. 

Songs and videos that were 
banned because of their coded 
political messages are again be- 
ing broadcast. Bands that could 
not perform in public because 
of assassination threats have re- 
sumed playing. Record compa- 
nies that had to shut down be- 
cause of an economic embargo 
are back in business. 

□ 

“The police aren’t dragging 
people out of our shows at gun- 
point anymore, it's safe for us to 
rehearse after dark, and I’ve 
even gpne two or three weeks 
without scanning the crowd for 
weapons,” said Richard Morse, 
lead singer of the voodoo rock 
group Ram, which had several 
hit songs banned by the mili- 
tary but remained in Haiti. 

The creative resurgence 
comes at a time of heightened 
interest abroad in Hainan mu- 


sic. Several compilations of 
Haitian music have been re- 
leased by labels in the United 
States, a Ram song, “Ibo Lele,” 
was included on the soundtrack 
of the movie “Philadelphia,” 
and a Haitian band has opened 
for the Rolling Stones on their 
“Voodoo Lounge” tour. 

But for Haiti's 7 million peo- 
ple, the restoration of free ex- 
pression through music is seen 
as an essential pan of tire de- 
mocracy they hope to build. In 
a country where three out of 
four people cannot read, songs 
are more than entertainment; 
they are a means of disseminat- 
ing and debating ideas and 
opinions about politics, society 
and religion. 

□ 

“As a top Haitian band, 
we’re in a position to teach Hai- 
tians what democracy is all 
about, what human rights and 
education are worth,” said King 
Kino, lead anger of the Phan- 
toms. “The problem in this 
country is one of information 
and how to get it to the people, 
and that is something we have a 
duty to do.” 

For the group Boukman Ek- 
speryans, things got particular- 
ly difficult after they wrote a 
song called “Dangerous Cross- 
roads” to protest the 1991 over- 
throw of Father Aristide. 

“The military never attacked 
us directly, but a colonel told 
me never to go out at night,” 
said Theodore (Lolo) Beau- 
brun, founder of the group, 
which is named for the leader of 
an 18th-century rebellion 
against French colonialism. 


Aristide has returned,” Be 
brun said. “But we have to 
further than that and not let 


Vanessa Redgrave: Her Life and Convictions in Print 

. . . artress DortravifW 


going cm and talk about what 
we feel, to awaken the people 
and change the system.” 


By Diana Jean Schemo 

flew York Tima Service 

N EW YORK — In the 30 years 
since Vanessa Redgrave dazzled 
fflmgoers as the loopy rich girl ditch- 
ing an impossible, hammer-and-sick- 
le obsessed husband in “Morgan!,” 
this English actress often seemed to 
be living at cross-purposes. She 
would win raves for her perfor- 
mances, then lose jobs with her sup- 
port for unpopular causes. 

In the late 1980s, she became a 
shadow in newspapers and maga- 
zines by demanding that reporters 
wanting to interview her about acting 
agree not to ask her about politics, as 
if th ere were two Vanessa Redgraves 
whose passions remained strangers, 
perhaps enemies. 

But in her recent “Vanessa Red- 
grave: An Autobiography” (Random 
House), Redgrave says she has come 
to see her commitments as a river 
that does not so much divide as nour- 
ish her. 

“I thought long ago that life was 
more categorized, more compartmen- 
talized, and that was wrong,” she said 
in a recent interview that began over 
lunch and continued at her dressing 
room in the Union Square Theatre, 
where she is appearing with Eileen 
Atkins in “Vita and Virginia.” 

She speaks quietly, her head 
dropped forward as if sculpturing 
sentences in a private workshop, au- 
burn Hair falling in a half-curtain 
over her face. 

At 57, Redgrave remains one of 
the more intriguing figures of her 
age. Daughter of the actors Sir Mi- 
chael Redgrave and Rachel Kemp- 
son, aster of Lynn Redgrave and 
mother of Natasha and Joely Rich- 
ardson, she was once hailed as “the 
greatest actress of the English-speak- 
ing theater” by Tennessee Williams. 

Others have praised an originality 
and raw truth of her performances, 
whether she is portraying the hump- 
backed 17th-century ursuline nun of 
smoldering, frustrated hungers in 
Ken Russell’s film "The Devils,” the 
insecure wife of a Southern bigot in 
Tennessee Williams’ “Orpheus De- 
scending” or the celebrated creator 
of modern dance, Isadora Duncan, 
shattered by age and sorrow. 
Writing in The New York Times, 


David Richards described her per- 
formance as Vita SackvjUe-West in 
“Vita and Virginia” as a “vivifying 
force of nature.” 

As much as she has been praised 
for her acting, Redgrave has been 
scorned for her radical politics. She 
has run for Parliament several times 
on the Trotskyist Workers’ Revolu- 
tionary Party, never gathering more 
than a few hundred votes, on a plat- 
form that included nationalization of 
major industries without compensa- 
tion and that warned that a Conser- 
vative victory in the 1970s would lead 
to dictatorship and concentration 
camps in England. 

But it has been her fervent anti- 
Zionism that has done the most to 
keep her off American stages. 

In 2977, she sold both her houses 
to finance a documentary about the 
Palestine Liberation Organization in 
Lebanon, which showed her dancing 
with a Kalashnikov rifle. 

Later, after a successful lawsuit 
against the Boston Symphony Or- 
chestra for canceling an engagement, 
in what she said was blacklisting for 
her political activities, she sought a 
cultural boycott that would have 
banned British actors from perform- 
ing in tbs Jewish state or having their 
work shown there. 

Redgrave's book suggests an evolu- 
tion in her priorities and some of her 
positions that coincides with major 
progress in struggles with which she 
has identified in the past, and that has , 
in the process, freed the actress to 
mend conflicts that have sundered her 
own life. Among these, she counts the 
end of apartheid in South Africa, the 
peace talks on Northern Ireland and 
the start of an accord between Pales- 
tinians Israelis. 

The book is a patchwork of snip- 
pets from her private life and recol- 
lections about different roles she has 
played, which inevitably give way to 
lengthy passages about her develop- 
ing political sense and involvement 
in different causes, particularly the 
ever-splintering Workers’ Revolu- 
tionary Party of Gerry Healy. 

She seems to live from one crisis to 
the next through these pages, wheth- 
er it be mobilizing opposition to the 
U. S. involvement in Vietnam among 



SttwAfa'Giflw 


Redgrave sees her commitments as a river that nourishes her. 


GIs stationed in Britain or support- 
ing a teachers’ strike in Los Angeles. 

In one plausible, but unintentional- 
ly hilarious passage, Redgrave segues 
from being in labor with her second 
child to an anal ysis of bow capitalism 
has forced more Caesarean births cm 
mothers because they cost more. 

The years, she says, have brought 
her to appreciate the importance of 
art in all its forms — drama, dance, 
music, painting, sculpture and litera- 
ture — to “human bongs, as opposed 
to dehumanized beings.” 

“When 1 was very young, I loved 
these personally, but I didn’t really 
understand how vital they were to 
human beings, as vital as oxygen." 
says Redgrave, who seems to nave 
found a unity of purpose in her new 


role as Unicefs special representa- 
tive for the performing arts to the 
besieged city of Sarajevo. 

Her bode acknowledges sow that 
the colors of a person are not distinct 
bits of stained glass, but mix freely 
wi thin, and it is from this under- 
standing that her most interesting 
observations unfold. 

Her role in a 1960 production of 
Robert Bolt’s antinuclear play called 
“The Tiger and the Horse,” she 
writes, prompted her involvement in 
nuclear disarmament, and a visit to 
Fidel Castro's Cuba for a film festi- 
val with Tony. Richardson, her hus- 
band at the titirwi, “fundamentally 
transformed” her political outlook. 

Isadora Duncan’s fervent support 
of comm unism became a source of 


inspiration for the a cum 
her while reading for Si Jo an o f the 
Stockyards.” she writes, became a 
Source for the development of my 
political consciousness. „ . 

vVben she says that the qualities 
that force her to politick mh» 
meet are the same ones that make her 
a fine actress, she does not mewnt in 
the obvious sense, that an ability to 
sink into a stranger’s psyche means 
considering the world through lus 
eyes after the curtain falls. 

Rather, Redgrave's starting point 
.is political; in tackling a role, she 
studies the historical context in 
which characters operate to uncover 
their natures, it is from this extra 
d imensio n, she asserts, that her per- 
formances draw their richness. . 

Those Redgrave has alienated by 
her strenuous stands against Zionism 
may remain offended by her book, 
which describes the 1948 United Na- 
tions partition plan for Palestrae as 
illegal and calls Israel a state created 
“through terror and mass expulsion." 

Redgrave blames Israel for such 
“massacres” that, she contends creat- 
ed Palestinian refugees as the 1948, 
1967 and 1973 wars, in .which Israel 
either responded to an immin ent mil , 
itaiy attack or had been attacked 
first by its Arab neighbors. 

But Redgrave embraces the Decla- 
ration of Principles signed by Pales- 
tine Liberation Organization chair- 
man Yasser Arafat and lsareii Prime 
Minister Yitzhak Rabin, and goes so 
far as to say that she counts the 
opening of the U. S. Holocaust Me- 
morial Museum in Washington as 
one of the “great achievements” of . 
recent years, along with the movie 
“Schindler’s list." 

“There’s Zionism and there’s Zion- 
ism,” die says now, asserting that 
there are partisans of humanity as well 
as bruiahty in every group. “There’s 
Christianity and Christianity, tunes : 
when some beastly things have been \ 
done in the name of Christianity.” | 

“That’s true of all ancient religions, 
in the sense that they have a long 
history, but they've also got progres- 
sive people,” riie says, “wonderful 
people. One has increasingly to look 
at life in this way, because if we don't, 
we'll be bade in the old dogmas.” 


WEATHER 


PEOPLE 


Europe 


Forecast for Thursday through Saturday, as provided by Accu-Weather. 



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New York, Washington , 
D.C.. and Toronto will have 
dry weather nto Friday. Rain 
is likely by Saturday in 
Washington. D.C.. and New 
York, with snow in Toronto. 
Chicago may have arrow or 
flurries Friday and Saturday. 
Los Angoies may have 
n how oi s Thursday, then dry 
wasther Friday. 

Middle East 


M*t law W HI on law W 
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Europe 

A strong storm will lash the 
British Isles, northern Europe 
end Scandinavia Into the 
weekend with wind end peri- 
ods of rain. There may even 
be snow in secdone of Scot- 
land and northern England. 
Southern Europe and the 
Medfienpneen wfl be gener- 
ally dry and seasonable. 


Asia 

Japan wil have dry weather 
Thursday, then perhaps 
some ram Friday Into Satur- 
day. The mainland (Korea 
and eastern China} will be 
dry and seasonably chilly. 
The south-central part of 
China may have some rain 
or snow. aspecttHy by Satur- 
day. Singapore wM be humid 
with a shower or two. 


Latin America 

Today Tomorrow 

High Low W High law W 
OF OF OF OF 

BuanaaAWM 33/61 22/71 ■ 34,03 21/70 I 

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!■ 



A LEADING ROLE — The French 
actress Emmanuelte Beart will star 
opposite Tom Cruise in the forthcom- 
ing Brian De Palma film, “Mission: 
Impossible,” according to Variety. 


T O Les&e Uggams, Mitch Miller is 
much more than the maes tro of the 
sing-along. Miller discovered Uggams and 
stuck by her when times could have gotten 
tough- That’s why she'll present him the 
Congress of Racial Equality’s lifetime 
achievement award at a dinne r on Jan. 16. 
A year after Miller saw Uggams as a game- 
show contestant, his “Sing Along with 
Mitch” went on TV. and he asked her to 
make a guest appearance. She became a 
regular on the show, which ran from 
January 1961 to September 1966. Some 
stations in the South refused to air the 
programs with Uggams, who is black. 
“Mitch was told either I gq or the show 
goes,” Uggams said. “He said, ’Either she 
stays or there’s no show.’ ” 


The son of a French artist has been 
charged with setting four Christmas trees 
ablaze near Rockefeller Center in midtown 
Manhattan. Bertrand Delacroix, the son of 
the painter Michel Delacroix, told Rocke- 
feller Center security wards that he and a 
business assistant torched the trees — caus- 
ing more than 55,000 in damage — because 
“it is a custom in France," New York News- 
day reported. Bertrand Delacroix, the own- 


er of an art gallery in Greenwich Village, ‘ 
and his assistant, Jean-Mfcbel Herbert, 
were charged with criminal mischief and ~ 
arson charges are being considered, the pa- 
per said. No such “custom" in Franc& nas - 

been discovered. ” 

□ . # • /.- . 

James Brown is making it easier for .'... 1' 
some disabled people to get on up and get . 

on in. Brown donated a van modified for 77 
use by the handicapped to the Reverend . . . 

Calvin Peterson of Disabled in Action, a 1 ; 
suburban Atlanta group that serves the 
disabled. ... A rally by area businesses, ; 
churches and schoolchildren, together with '■;/ 

a Jon Bon Jovi benefit concert has saved ” 

the Manna House homeless shelter in Ab- • 

erdeen. New Jersey. The shelter, with a ,. r - 

$37,000 deficit, was facing the prospect of / - 7 - : 

closing by year-end. 

□ 

Elizabeth Dole, the president of the >7. 
American Red Cross and wife of Senator - L. 
Bob Dole, has been released from a hospi- £ 
tal in Boston, six days after surgery to clear hf.'V 

a blocked artery in her neck. *Tm full of " 

energy and just feeling great,” she said. 

The blockage was discovered during an "* 

examination in November. j* 


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Your stomach’s growling. 



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Mother Nature’s c a I fin g .. 


‘ -Civ ' i’V ' 


r ■.*: : 7f*. * ; 


Your flight’s boarding. 

****“*' >4-.-, • 




Plenty of time to maprr^ay./ 


ten calls. 


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