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BliLBHED WITH THE NEW VORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


No. 34,500 


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Paris, Tuesday, February 1, 1994 



BMW Extends Its Range 

Last British-Owned Mass Carmaker 

By Richard W. Stevenson 

.Vf» y«* 7 hm* Sifrncf L . _ . 

s=&avss 

“^te deal advances 

homc_martccl in Raymscbe Moioren Wer ke is 

1116 ^ hJStoSilwIf into an effident 

acqumng a wn^wjy ^ decade while also building its Land 

or four-wheel drive uuhiv 

Ssssseh^sses 

g^gg^sssss 

Germany, which fw; no C a-d , t difficult to com- 

Busmess,^ wn*"™*® 

an hour. 



^ BMW’s ourchase of Rover, which has been owned bv British Aero- 
J^PLC^Zl^. will end nearly a century** tradition of 
independent mass car production in Britain. 

BuiBernd PischeisriederB^s 

tinue lo be mu by iis British managan nd to *e toabraM name 
would be maintained. There are no plans to produce cars unoer 
BMW name in Britain, he said. . .. me c r 

meet British Aerospaces demand for a fuU bu>M wim^ 
BMW’s hands, the German company will be able to 

n^^o^H^^pScnt. Nobubiko Ka^oto^d Bmisb 

sarferasK .®SSK 

See ROVER, Page 2 


Wall Street Bulls Run Past 

iterest Rate Caution light 



• WafMn^^Savm ■ 

; ATtANlA.^Y^jcytir knw 

SSdW4fs i»tsomc|Jlayti»iy<^cj^' 

§S^Scws»rf'tin»» ,j£" 

^tim cy.vour dander as an*iKMfc 

moment iftit bat a crucial Pf^ * 

^ABO-m whote' want taw?® ib*Vr- ■£££ 

prryafl,it jm^sumn^i ri^°smg aberve 
its collective Tailings and fears. . .. . . 

In the jirst minute -of tiw 

sssasa$SS 

of the second mad. For the span d two 
SLSmtW knew that a&pa Boud 

GSta^:W“ 

Now, the Bills' fate Is probably seaiea. 


fr~. i*' *i ■£*«.•• ' ■ v- / -• -i' 

only Jearo cwrjogPtw 
tnonniL disintegrated. 

. ■ ...Ai^JntffllOm JJCJT- 

•died. 




For nearly i i mmuia 

ly everything went the Bills way. 


be heated. Troy Aumwft ™ ““ „ 

the Mis for four touchdown passwma52- 

17 drubbing m this game last ye ar . 

seven-days removed from, a concn^cm. U 
STrnw«>vs needed to jump offsde on 
SL^md-short, or throw an Interception 
Sa ma^Sn deep or rough the punter. 

See FUMBLE, Page 3 


9 s Recession 

sprite, and tputeto wce^ndto 'KjS 

ProdDCi WES 

(fisturbing. 

Prime hfinisterVa^v Klaus, wto is mast^ 

rinding the economic metanwrphoss^ fc4- 
mimiuf, . . . 1 m mstead of applying 


By Lawrence Malkin 

International Herald Tribune 

NEW YORK — Alan Greenspan told Con- 
jess on Monday that the Federal Rraerve 
Board was starting to think about raising inter- 
est rates as the American economy strengthens 
but didn't yet know when to tighten. 

The Federal Reserve Board chairman con- 
fined what Wall Street had long suspect^, 
butthe stock market, instead of wonymg about 
higher interest rales, chosew foots t on motor 
of Mr. Greenspan s remarks — about rmla 
tion’s being under control The Dow Jones 
tothiLSTverage of blue chip stocks gauuxla 
strong 32 points; at one point in die s day, . u JJ® 
nearly 40 points higher, not far from the 4,000 

leveL(Page8) , v , r ,. r _ 

the dollar, was some way off; Treasury douu* 
ncwf^U*™"! 

, , P» T Yiwaiidmfl toici ihe joiui Economic 

SHoVirwhRL less accommodate levd 

.^^SS^hich-ute^ 

SOTS Gmmapao, “abnormally 
low in real terms. 


“At some point,” he continued, T abi *?ii? 
unexpected and prolonged weakening of ccty 
S, « Willie to move to a more 
neutral stance. Such an action would notbe 
Siken in order to cut off or limit the eOTnomic 
expansion, but rather to sustain and enhance 

lU The chairman spoke after a r «R? rt 
showed the best quarterly growih f or ihe Alb- 
ican economy in six years. He also noted I teat 
“the broad measures of mflauon have ^mamod 
well behaved." Last year, the U.S. economy 
n^edtethe best record on ^auonmatot 
30 years except for 1986- when ofl prices col 

the Federal Reserve Board, battlo- 
■u-irred because it moved too late u> curb die 
mftation of the Vietnam War and the ofl price 
stStaof the 1970s, is if anything readytom 

mTtiie side of monetary r® 511 ® 1111 . 

5J; stern reputation il won back during th 

]980s 

Its ‘dilemma is complicated by Mr. Green- 

S&MSt 

SeS, rim short- 

term ones. _ , . 

Some on WaD Street and within the reaerai 
Reserve Board itsdf have been talking about a 


4? 3Z.93 

& 3,978.36 

^ hT 

S S:i 
02 

" Up ^ 
3.2 7 % ^ 

119 02 M 

Tti"eDolTar 

Mon-dou 

[yeviouS dose 

DM 

1.7342 

1.742 

Pound 

1.5055 

~ 1.4965 


108.55 

109.80 

FF 

5.885 

5517 


“pre-emptive strike" to raise short-ienn raws as 
2c economy strengthens even brfwe mna^u 
is evident in the statistics — by which time, they 
arnie. it will be too late. _ 

^Sr. Greenspan was asked about this by Soj- 
ator Paul Sarbanes. Democrat of Mayland, 
who sharply reminded him that Congress ex- 
pected lew rates in exchange for takrng *e 
political heat for reining back the fedenT bud- 
defidL But Mr. Greenspan ducked the 

^ U Mr°Ointon also referred to that supposed 

decided to raise short rates, "^»!«Xre’sM 
it won’t raise long-term raLes because there s no 

DC ^e°Federal Reserve Board fMin^ins,^^ 
long rates are up lo the rmanoal mar ke^ . U 
investors fear inflation is coming badt and the 
SETbS? rignoring il they vnB demand 
higher rates for their money over long gwiMS; 

Mr Greenspan staled the dilemma this way. 

-We wfflTS?te make the judgment “^how 
lcniR we can continue monetary accommoda- 
S without sowing the seeds of another bout 

See RATES, Page 8 


Tokyo Stocks 
Leap Despite 
Warning on 
Low Growth 

Hosokawa Han Sets Off 
Buyer Frenzy > Nikkei 
At Three-Month High 

By Paul Blustein 

Washington Post Service 

TOKYO — The imminent introduction of 
Janan’s biggest economic stimulus packa^sent 
the Tokyostock market into a buying freniqr 

Son^ buT^conomisis cautioned that whfle 

the nackaee may be necessary to avert disaster 
if Mil mn keep the economy from posting 
another year of subpar growth. 

The Nikkei 225-shie mdex soared 7.8 1 
rent to 20.229.12, closmg above the 20AXXJ 
level for the first time in three months. Trading 
volume was an unusually heavy 800 million 

Propelling the surge was jubilation ova - the 
news°ihat mme Minister Morilriro Hosokawa 
secured a last-minute compromise Sanmiay 
Sal ended a long batde over l^cairform 
and saved his government from coUa^^The 
development dears the way for a .mam of 
economy-bolstering measures later this wrek, 
“We now haw the exact reverse of last week s 
market, when sentiment was so 
said Kathv Matsui, a strategist at Barctays de 
Zoete Wedd Securities (Japan) Ltd., rdemng 
to the events following the pMtamemjJ de- 
feat of Mr. Hosokawa’s reform bflls on Jan.- 1 .- 
At that time, investors feared the tumiml 
would prevent the government from deliwnng 
astimulus dose that the economy badly needed 
to avoid sinking further into recession. 

SpMesepress rq»n*d ihn ^8^; 
mem is pl anning to put the final touches Thure 
day on a combination of public works spends 
and income tax cuts toiahng around SI 35 bil- 
lion. That will enable Mr. J Hosga ’ w * 
in his Feb. 1 1 meeting with Om- 

ton that Tokyo is taking steps rogeiiL^Konc^ 
mV moving " gain. The issue of considerable 
ScenTto Washington, which warns to sec 
faster growth in Japan so that demand for 
Ame rican products wDl increase. 

toSi though the SI 35 bflhonteteljs 
bigger than any of the other packages intro- 


• *«■* <■ 




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s ' 


lot is s is M*ks »M* 

s SsSSSaasR. 

vsssgs esses?"* 

-; TteOechaepill 


■SBE^yS W=jiSS ; 
vSSS=^Sst 5SS' 

1 »wiyCDtrt.V¥»cFA Yo^;;^ 8 ^od1i+i 

I SSrsiS 


he Botmsiring because the 
made.*™ *** 



S«e CZECHS, Page 2. 


Radovan Karate, the Bosnian Sett®* 

yrirntteer in the Bosnian Serbian Army 

Pepsi or Coke? The Mayan Elders Know 

i/. . . «nn Avenue advertising executives who b« 

‘ M the which he poured from a cattle-hora son 

Rtoid wh«c botmm he 


^ — phu tiaganitoc/Reo an 

t a^MEtaMBSBW 


is here beueve mai um: ™ 

5^owit rates typical of late 1980s m 
’^SaSl Lynch’s Tokyo economist. Peter 
Morgan, for example, predicts that the econo- 
STS'vSr atL6 percent in 1994. as« 
thi stimSSpackagr is put onto place^With^ 
out it, we'd get minus 0.2 percent growth, he 

^Even the governmental Economic ; Planning 
Agency beliwes that the economy will grow at 
See JAPA N, Page 2 

Serbs Hail Vow 
By Zhirinovsky 
To Protect Them 

By John Pomfret 

Washington Post Semce 

BUELJTN A, Bosnia —The Russian uinrana- 
rionalist, Vladimir V. Zbinnovsky, brought his 
campaign of hate to Serb-wniroUed Bomiaon 
Mondav, idling crowds of Serbs that a NATO 
bomb dropped on Serbian positions here would 
mean a bomb dropped on Russia. 

In a hour's visit to this city, where tens of 
thousands of Muslims were ethmcally 
cleansed" from their homes by Se^tan P^ 
military units more than ayear ago. Mr amn- 
ovskv met with several alleged 
walked near the sue of a demolished mosque, 
wSkfa is Sw a parking lot. and pledged Rus- 
sian support for Serbian nationalism. 

The trio continued with a journey to the 
Croatian Sty of Vukovar. which was destroyed 
by the Serbs in 1991. 

Last week. Slovenia, another breakaway \ u- 
-odav republic, asked Mr. Zhtnnovsks jo leave 
fts territory as quickly as po^ble^ter his 
bodvEiiards engaged m a violent dnnking bout 
riSt tSffit month, Mr. Ztanw^r 
was expelled from Bulgaria for infiammauiry 

commons about that cmmtry’s pr^Jen i a ° d 
was subsequently refused a visa to Germany. 

Mr. Zhirinovsky's trip was organizedby a 
Vienna-based businessman. Petar Ivanovic, a 
M.tiw ofMOTtenegro, which with Serbia makes 

See CAMPAIGN, Page 2 



^TtoSonW day of 


awn uquiu . ■ . 

~jlje cocm boy caJU.fw ^? a _ a nd 
N Scbe'B alfowed,” ^9 aa S!^S£ t 

• SS tx stamped withimages d Roman Catiio- 

fc f^^bare>4eg»crL drier, dressed like Mr. 
JSffioSSls. akna>lcngth coomt 
SSSJStesS'ol feted up a sample 


aWsa-JsEl 

chaser f« poch. 

Qxa-Cola. for aample. ■» a cer- 
tmnrotrtetooKtwasm. „ ■* niego 

“It m»kes them very angry, sun 
■ M&cd^25, a Tzdtal who said be does no 

ssft'sesssfi'K 


£d« ago- 

Smce but a declaration of political affSauon 
or even religious belief. 

About 25 kilometers (15 miles) west of here 
m Chamula, Trotnl Mayan w^pers^a 
local Catholic church routinely offer re&^- 
ment to their favored saints by ckannM JJ 1 
■«n the stone floor, lighting several dozen can- 

fames while chanting in theTzwzil dialect, 
the worshiper cS\9M* at the altar. 

It is impossible to teU which aob Amk is 
f Wy worshipers, but a qtnek tany 

the floor suggest 

See PEPSI, Page 3 


Kohl Warns Croatia on Bosnia Attacks 

x had intervened, as ha 


WASHINGTON (AP) — Ctanudtor 
Helmut Kohl of Gennany ttotro^ Mon 
dav to act against Croatia if Croatian uoops 
X*ed SThc said he W » 
mation of any such ana^and^d notsay 
what kind of action he might 
after a meeting with President Bill 

Th^ Scrton afld 

have officially remained aloof from the con- 
flict MhKohl would not say that Croatian 


gpvcrnmcm forces had mwvwA ,* has 
bOT^dely reported. "I can t confirm that 
Sof so, it wwld not really change my basic 
view which is that I would disapprove of 
that very highly, and not simply m theory, 
St I wwld find a way of 
nroval into practice, he said. He added, 
“particularly since we urged the recognition 
of Croatia and Slovenia, we take a very great 
interest in this question." 


General Hews 

The earthquake m I*® Angeles is shapt 
as a record disaster. 

TheUAdedsiontog— , . 

of Siim Fein dismays Britain. 


Book Renew 
Chess 


Lade of European Leadership 

Executives of multinational corporations 
said European governments had failed to 
lead their countries out of recession, raising 
1 the specter of social unrest. Page 7 - 

Page 16. 
Page 16. 


Page 6. Crossword 

Page 6- Weather 




j 



<r -i 


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Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 1994 


if/ 


Arafat’s Fatah Is Losing Ground as Peace Accord Nears 


WORLD BRIEFS 


By Clyde Habennan 

New York Tunes Service 

JERUSALEM — As Yasser Arafat pressed in Swit- 
zerland for a breakthrough in peace talks with Israel, 
his faction of the Palestine Liberation Organization 
lost further ground in the Israeli-occupied territories. 

Public support for Mr. Arafat has slipped steadily 
since the PLO and Israel signed their outline agree- 
ment in September on introducing Palestinian self- 
rule, be ginnin g with the Gaza Strip and the West Bank 
town of Jericho. 

In ways unimaginable only a few months ago, even 
old allies criticize him. They accuse him of having a 
questionable commitment to democratic change, of 
keeping too much power to himself, of mishandling 
the negotiations with Israel on fleshing out key details 
of the September accord and thereby contributing to a 
long delay in the planned start of an Israeli troop 
withdrawal from Gaza and Jericho. 

Some loyalists of El Fatah, the faction led by Mr. 
Arafat, have warned that he is unlikely to brake this 
slide until the agreement is carried out and his forces 
assume control. “Reaching a settlement now with the 
Israelis is more important for him than ever,” a sup- 
porter said. 


An Israeli official, speaking anonymously, said a 


and one in the West Bank. While imperfect guides, only armed men accused of nothing their leadership's 
such elections are often a gauge of the mood of the cease-fire promise. 


“They tell you that people are not satisfied," a 
Palestinian journalist said of the elections, in which El 
Fatah and its allies lost their majorities in the Gaza 
Engineers Association and the West Bank Lawyers 
Association. 

In addition, armed Fatah militants in Gaza claimed 
responsibility Sunday for a grenade attack Saturday 


■ Negotiators Are Inching Toward Peace 
Israeli and Palestine Liberation Organization nego- 
tiators inched toward ending a deadlock over their 
landmark accord Monday, hoping to remove key ob- 


Mr. Peres's deputy, Yossi Bolin, said in Jerusalem: 
“We cannot speak about an agreement. We can speak 
about a step forwards toward an agreement-" 

Israeli and Palestinian officials said they hoped to 
bridge the gap in time for a meeting in Cano on 
Sunday. 

Mr. ftrilht cited as obstacles the control of border 


stades within a week, news agencies reported from crossings over the Jordan River to Jericho, the size of 


Davos, Switzerland. 


the Jencho area to be administered 


Yasser Arafat. the PLO chairman, and Foreign and security for Jewish settlers in the 


that wounded three Israeli soldiers, a clear violation of Minister Shimon Peres of Israel, meeting at this Swiss «« swakins about actually," he 

the cease-fire pledge that the PLO gave brad in ski resort, failed for the second consecutive week to ^ « We about very small which 

September. PLO leaders in Gaza insisted chat they overcome hurdles delaying lasers troop withdrawal cr-akina of course, this 

were abiding bv that co mmitmen t- If so. the assault from the Gaza Strip and the West Bank town of • a AMMViAn mP nrwiKnlicm Fnr lh» PT A anfl cATltrltV 


jPafe piniflns 
za Strip. 


were abiding by that commitment If so, the assault from the Gaza Strip 

raised questions about how much authority they wield Jericho. 

over their own mili tants. Mr. Peres played d< 


Mr. Peres played down .remaining differences, say- 


is the question of symbolism for the PLO and security 
for usr 


tensions in Gaza because of iog he was more optimistic than ever before. 


the delay in starting self-rule, armed Arafat loyalists There had been very complicated problems, ^ — .. • , . Wfrh : n . fora wav to meet 

have increasingly clashed with Israeli forces and even said. “We were able to negotiate many of them, maybe . J* 

with Palestinians who accuse them of running rough- most of [hem." jsrah concerns about taping out wr ongs w M» not 


The question of border control around the new 
Pal estinian areas has been thorny. 


shod in seeking to. impose their will. 


Militants from a new Fatah- allied group called the laughingly replied. The drafting.” 


When asked what the two sides disagreed upon, he infringing on the Palestinian sense of sovereignty. 


(Reuters, AP) 


Crimea Chief Seeks 
Independence Poll 


Compiled fo Our Stuff From Dispatches 

SIMFEROPOL, Ukraine— The 
victor in Crimea's presidential elec- 
tion, the Russian nationalist Yuri 
Meshkov, vowed Monday to seek a 
referendum on independence from 
Ukraine. 

A referendum, if it were held, 
could sharpen ethnic tensions on 
the strategic pe ninsula and provoke 
bitter conflict with Ukrainian au- 
thorities. 

Mr. Meshkov told the Interfax 
news agency that he would like to 
bold the referendum March 27, the 
day Ukraine is to elect a new par- 
liament. 

“If he wants independence,” said 
Alexander Piskun, Ukraine's depu- 
ty minis ter for immigration and 
ethnic issues, “it could mean a very 
serious conflict with Ukraine.” 

The Ukranian president. Leonid 
M. Kravchuk, did not comment on 
the outcome of the election, but an 
aide, Nikolai Mikhalhenko, said 
that Mr. Meshkov would face 
“tough measures” if be tried to 
hold a referendum. 

Mr. Meshkov said Crimea could 
serve as a span between the two 
former Soviet republics, and vowed 
that it would never see ethnic con- 
flict. He won the runoff election 
Sunday with 73 percent of the vote, 
according to preliminary results re- 
leased Monday. Nikolai Bagrov got 
23 percent 

Mr. Meshkov said his immediate 
priority was providing relief for 
Crimea from the mass poverty of 
post-Soviet Ukraine, not rqoining 
Russia. 

“Crimea should be a bridge be- 
tween Ukraine and Russia,” he 
said. “Our links with Russia will be 
the supports and those with 
Ukraine the roadway. Economic 
well-being is what’s important Ev- 


erything else is of secondary impor- 
tance." 

Russia administered Crimea, 
where about 70 percent of the resi- 
dents are ethnic Russians, until 
1954. when Soviet leaders ceded 
control to Ukraine. But Moscow’s 
initial reaction to the election re- 
sults was one of caution. 

The Itar-Tass press agency 
quoted a Foreign Ministry official 
as saying that Russia would build 
relations with Ukraine on the basis 
of existing agreements. But the of- 
ficial also indicated that Moscow 
would not ignore the Crimeans' 
choice amply to please Kiev. 

Mr. Meshkov’s victory, the offi- 
cial said, “signifies that his position 
on most urgent issues was under- 
standable to the residents of the 
Crimea." 

The Russian government has re- 
peatedly recognized the territorial 
integrity of Ukraine but Russia’s 
former parliament, dissolved by 
President Boris N. Yeltsin in Sep- 
tember, effectively demanded the 
return of the Crimean town and 
naval base of Sevastopol 

Ukrainian politicians were also 
cautious. Dmytro Paviychko, head 
of the parliamentary foreign affairs 
commission, called Mr. Meshkov 
“unpredictable." 

“The situation could become 
more complicated with potential 
involvement from Moscow." he 
said. 

Mr. Meshkov has said be favored 
a gradual reunion with Russia, be- 
ginning with Crimean indepen- 
dence, closer economic ties, a com- 
mon cnrrency, and dual 
citizenship. 

“In spirit, the Crimean people 
have been and remain part of the 
Russian people," Interfax quoted 
him as saying. (AP. Reuters) 



•*<. •’* iff . # 0 « •» . 


Um Ckoe/ Afcflce Prae-Prw 

UCEO THEATER BURNS — Firefighters salvaging some pamtmgs from the 19th-«e&tiffy 
Uceo Opera House in Barcelona on Monday. The theater was destroyed in a fire that began 
when a spark front a workman's Mow torch ignited a stage curtain. One person was injrod. 


Bosnian Serbs Order Call-Up 


Free-Market Support 
Is Solid in Kyrgyzstan 


By Margaret Shapiro 

Washington Past Service 

MOSCOW — Free- market pro- 
ponents in the former Soviet Union 
got a significant boost as voters in 
the remote mountainous republic 
of Kyrgyzstan gave nearly unani- 
mous approval to President Askar 
Akayev and his promise to speed 
up economic reform. 

Mr. Akayev, a former physicist 
turned radical reformer, has been 
applauded by the West and its 
lending agencies because of his de- 
termination to bring pluralistic de- 
mocracy and capitalism to this 
Central' Asian nation. President 
BUI Clinton last year termed Mr. 
Akayev’s Kyrgyzstan "a model" 
for former Soviet republics. 

But like President Boris N. Yelt- 
sin and other reform-minded lead- 
ers in the republics, Mr. Akayev, 
49, has had to contend with an 
increasingly hostile parliament, 
dominate d by former Communists 
who have criticized his reforms. 

Mr. Akayev, who has been pres- 
dent since just before the 1991 col- 
lapse of the Soviet Union, called a 
referendum to end the political 
conflict. 

Mr. Yeltsin tried a similar ma- 
neuver last spring that provided 
only a temporary lull in bis battles 
with Russia's now-disbanded Sovi- 
et-era parliament. Whether Mr. 
Akayev* will have more luck re- 
mains an open question. A spokes- 
man said that he w ould press ahead 
with reform, but also seek to work 
with the parliament. 


Interviews by Reuters after the 
Sunday vote suggested that many 
voters in this remote, resource-poor 
nation attributed current hardships 
to a recalcitrant parliament and 
continued to trust the soft-spoken, 
erudite Mr. .Akayev despite plum- 
meting living smndards. 

In the actual voting. 96 percent 
of those going to the polls backed 
Mr. .Akayev and his free- market 
course. Election officials in Bish- 
kek, the capital reported that 95 
percent of the country’s 22 million 
voters had participated in the refer- 
endum. _ 

Mr. Akayev, who unlike his com- 
patriot presidents in Central Asia 
never served as a Communist boss, 
has welcomed Western advisers, in- 
cluding the International Mone- 


By John Kifner 

New York Tunes Semce 

SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Heizegovina — The Bosnian 
Serbs ordered a general mobilization Monday to push 
for “a successful conclusion of the war” by a military 
victory. 

The entire able-bodied population will be mobi- 
lized. either into military or labor units, and special 
women’s units will be formed,” the general command 
of the self-styled Serbian Republic of Bosnia 
announced. 

The mobilization appeared to presage a new offen- 
sive against the Bosnian govemment 

Momcilo Krajisnik, speaker of the Bosnian Serbian 
parliament, declared, “The Muslims will never be able 
to defeat the Serbs.” 

Bosnian Serbian military leaders issued the order in 
the face of continued strong resistance by Bosnian 
government forces, who earlier this month pushed 
back a large Serbian offensive near the key road 
junction of Olovo and are now pushing into Croat- 
held territory in the Lasva River valley. 

Among the measures is a crackdown on black- 
market dealing, apparently aimed at an illicit arms 
trade in which the Muslim-led Bosnian forces have 
been buying arms from the Serbs, especially in western 
areas where the Bosnian forces are fighting Croats. 

The Serbian move comes at the same time when 
Croatian forces, bolstered by a large infusion of regu- 
lar Croatian Army troops dispatched by Zagreb, ap- 
pear to be preparing their own offensive in Bosnia. 

It also appeared to be aimed at forcing the Muslim- 
led Bosnian government to abandon its straggle to 
regain territory and accept a peace settlement. 

The Bosnian Serbian command said it was ordering 
a full mobilization now because the "international 
community has derided to support the Muslims' war 
option and recognize the results of their struggle.” 

The Serbian forces also expressed defiance of the 
United Nations, which wants to reopen the Tuzla 
airport for relief flights. The United Nations has said 
it was considering approving air strikes to force the 


reopening of the airport, which would greatly expand 
the distribution of food and other supples to hard-hit 
areas of central Bosnia. 

ManojJo MBovanovic, the second-tanking general 
in the Serbian militia, warned: “Not a single aircraft 
will be able to land ar the Tuzla airport using force. If 
this happens, the aircraft will never take off again.” 

Other measures in the mobilization are to include a 
roundup of deserters and draft dodgers, a redirection 
of “the entire economy toward mditaiy purposes” and 
a tightening up of discipline in the army and the 
police. 

Mr. Krajisnik said Bosnian Serbian military leaders 
had ordered the measures after a meeting Sunday in 


the town of Bijeljina. He said the meeting had been 
called “after the Muslims’ refusal to accept a political 


called “after the Muslims’ refusal to accept a political 
solution, and after open assistance from the major 
Western centers, primarily the United States.” 

He called them “preventive” measures designed to 
counter “ Musl im aggression.” 

The Serbian forces inherited large stocks of heavy 
equipment, including tanks and artillery, from the old 
national army when the former Yugoslav state broke 
up. The more lightly Bosnian forces have a big advan- 
tage in manpower, and over the last half year have 
reorganized their army into a more effective infantry 
force, which is now seen as gaining the advantage in 
the civil war. 


■ 3 Suspects in Aid Worker’s Death Killed 
Three men suspected of involvement in the murder 
of a British aid worker were killed Monday after being 
stepped by Bosnian forces while trying to fiee, Agence 
France- Presse reported from Sarajevo. Baraia- 
Heszegovina. 

A police statement said the trio, thought to be 
involved in the IdBing Thursday of a British driver al 
Zenica in central Bosnia, took two hostages while 
attempting to escape via Sarajevo airport 
They were later ambushed by Bosnian Army forces 
on Mount Igznan south of the city. The three men and 
one of the hostages were killed in the gun battle. 


CZECHS: Robust Economy Defies Europe Recession 


tary Fund, and actively sought 
their guidance in restructuring his 


their guidance in restructuring his 
country. He has moved forward on 
privatization, introduced a new na- 
tional currency and liberalized 
trade and investment laws. In re- 
turn, Kyrgyzstan has received some 
5100 million in aid. 

Still the economic situation is 
far from good, with once-subsi- 
dized industries crumbling, impov- 
erishment growing and many peo- 
ple here feeling that they are 
retreating toward the nomadic 
backwater this region was until So- 
viet power brought roads, schools, 
airstrips and industry. Right now, 
according to government estimates, 
the minimum wage is only about 
$4.50 a month, one of the lowest in 
former Sovier Union. 


Continued from Page 1 
particularly regarding the disman- 
tling of subsidies to unprofitable 


industries. 

Others attribute the Czech suc- 
cess to a confluence of positive fac- 
tors. One is the historic beauty and 
low cost of travel in the republic, 
which drew an influx of tourists 
that injected $1J billion to the 
economy in 1993. 

The pick-up in tourism allowed 
the private service sector to absorb 
many of the employees shed by big 
industries. 

Czech exports are extremely 
competitive because labor costs un- 
dercut those in Hungary and Po- 
land. 

And unlike Poland, the Czech 
Republic started out in 19S9 with 
virtually no debt. With its history 


as the industrial center of the Haps- 
burg Empire and one of the stron- 
gest pre-Worid War II European 
economies, the Czechs had a sobd 
base to build on. 


continue. The banks that bold bad 
loans to those industries cannot let 
the situation go on much longer, 
critics assert. 


Although the workers are paid 
less than they were, the government 
has yet to hear any complaints 
from the trade unions. In 1991, real 
wages declined by 24 percent, but 
there were no strikes. 


But the rosy employment situa- 
tion cannot be maintained forever, 
economists say. There will be more 
layoffs as industries are restruc- 
tured through privatization and 
others are declared bankrupt. 


Mr. Klaus's analysts counter 
that a worst-case scenario of 6 per- 
cent unemployment is possible by 
the end of the year. But other econ- 
omists are more pessimistic, saying 
10 parent is possible by the badn- 
ningof 1995. 


So far. critics of Mr. Klaus's gov- 
ernment say poli tical peace has 
been bought by allowing bloated 
and unproductive industries to 


Other danger points are looming, 
ft is not dear how long the tourist 
boom wifl continue. The Czech Re- 
public is 80 percent dependent on 
oQ and gas from Russia, and a 
planned pipeline from Germany is 
taking longer than many expected. 
And now exports can be kept up 


And how exports can be kept up 
given that wages will inevitably 


have to rise is not dear. 


CAMPAIGN: 

Russian (Steered 


A New Battlefront Opens in Kabul 

KABUL. Afghanistan (AF|— Forces loyal 
din Hefanaiyar rained rockets on southwestern Kabul on Monday, 
opening a new front in their battle to overthrow the 
Until Monday, the frontline in the monthlong ^ 
been confined to the south and east of tteaty/lhc J 
presented anew problem for Preadeat Bm*annd*nRnbta because i it 
SSd bring his traditional enemy, the heavily armed Stows, fotfray. 

belong to the Izamm-badted I^a^CoahhOT Council 
Afghanistan, coatrol most erf southwest KaboL Until now they haw 
f ttffliine rf neutral in the factional fighting that has destroyed map? parts 
of the capital But it may be difficult for them to reman ncutral if the 
fi ghting encroaches on their territory. Mr. Hetaaatyar already nasjotneo 
forces with a northern Afghan warlord. General Abdul Rashid P nsrmn , 
whose fighter jets haw pounded residential areas and government brew- 
ings in Che capital. 

Sect Leader Reportedly Slam in Iran 

TEHRAN (AFP) — The Iranian Anheoian teller of a Protestant 

who had been missing for two weeks has been found slam, his Assembly 

police had nrfora | «dthe church on 

Sunday dial the body erf Mike Hoseraan, 49, had been fwmd man alky ra 

Islamabad. a suburb of Kazan, 45 kilometers (28 m2es) west often. 

He was kffled on Jan. 20, the official quoted thepo&e as raying. TOe 
police have not publicly reported the 
whohave seen pictures of the body, said it had 
o fficials be had disappeared while en route to Tehran s Menrahad 
airport to receive a guest from the central dly of Isfahan. 



/ ' 5 * 
6 '- 


Continued frotti Page l 

ie rump Yugoslavia. He 


up the rump Yugoslavia. He came 
to Serb-cootrolled Bosnia from 
Serbia, where he failed to meet Yu- 
goslavia’s minister of minorities 
and human rights, Margie Savovic, 
as planned, a sig n the government 
did not want to make an official 
visit oat of a private trip. 

To the cheers of a crowd of sev- 
eral thousand, who stood for sever- 
al hours in a freezing ram to see the 
Russian parliamentary deputy, Mr. 
Zhirinotsky praised the Serbs for 
waging war to “save Orthodoxy.” 
“Don’t worry brothers,” he said. 
“We will protect you.” 

He added, “If a single bomb fails 
on Serbia, we will consider that an 
attack on Russia.” As be spoke, a 
Serbian turbo-prop with rmfitary 
markings drded the town square, 
in violation of a NATO-enforced 
no-flight zone for Bosnia. 

In recent days, Western leaden 
have debated the use of NATO air 
power to force Sobs to allow the 
opening of an airport for humani- 
tarian supplies in Ttizla, the largest 
Muslim-held region in Bosnia, and 
to permit the rotation of a compa- 
ny of Canadian soldiers protecting 
the UN Safe Area of Srebrenica. 

Mr. Zhirinovsky criticized such 
threats and urged the Serbs to cre- 
ate one nation from aO the lands in 
the former Yugoslavia where Serbs 
now reside — a tall that parallels 
his dream of reuniting the lands in 
the former SovietUnion where 
Russians live. 

“Russians and Serbs, 200 motion 
strong,” “Zhirinovsky, Orthodox 
Saviour,” read posters held by the 
crowd. Loudspeakers blared a pop- 
ular Serbian rod: song, “We hear 
the Russians are Coming,’' along 
with a hymn, “Oh! Yoa Ortho- 
dox.” Serbian gunmen dressed in 
camouflage blue and g reen jump- 
soils patrolled streets. 

Mr. Zhirinovsky's appeal to the 
Serbs stems in part from his bellig- 
erence toward the West and partly 
from his adoption of “(he Ortho- 
dox cause.” Ultranationalist Serbs 
and Russians say that traditionally 
their two peoples have been allies, 
sharing the same religion and what 
they both call “the great Slavic 
souL" 

Mr. Zhirinovsky, who has threat- 
ened Germany, Poland and Japan 
with destruction and wants Alaska 
returned to Russian control on 
Monday visited two places that 
have suffered some of the worst 
devastation since World War IL 
“Once we punished France; 50 
years ago we did the same to Ger- 
many.” be said. “Now the same 
treatment waits anyone who mis- 
treats the Serbs.” 

Arriving in Bijdjina, Mr. Zhirin- 
ovsky kissed the Bosnian Serb lead- 
er, Radovan Karadzic, and met a 
Russian fighter who has joined Ser- 
bianparamitjtaiy forces. 

“Zhirinovsky, he's a real Serb!" 
exclaimed an obviously inebriated 
farmer, Mitoslav Vulovic, 60, who 
bad waited for two hours tor a 
glimpse of the Russian. 

Sava Todorovic, 53, a construc- 
tion foreman, called Mr. Zhirin- 
ovsky “the best guy." He added, 
“He’s going to help us. You have to 
love ban.” 

Dzordzo Kqjic. 67, a veteran of 
World War 0, died history as a 
reason he came out to cheer Mr. 
Zhirinovsky. 

“Vladimir understands that 
Serbs protected the world in 1389,” 
he said, citing the battle at Kosovo 
Fdje that Serbian soldiers lost to 
invading Turks erf the Ottoman 
Empire. “Today he’s come to pay 
us back.” 

He then reeled through a series 
of minorities in what used to be 
Yugoslavia — “Muslims, Albani- 
ans, Croats — all of them don’t 
deserve to five.” 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


Minister Opposes Pompidou Closing 

PARIS (Renters) — Culture Minister Jacques Toubon said he hoped to 
avoid a complete closure of J’aris’s Georges Pompidou modem art center 
— one of France’s most popular attractions — for urgently needed 
renovation work. 

Mr. Toubon said cm television Sunday that technical e xpert^h ad 

speed up essen^^^airs. Bm he said he favored spreading out the work 
over a longer period and doang ooly one section at a time. 

shS^edute^OT^.^HTto^^t the government's low offer on 
wages in 1994. (Honors) 

Pilots at Lebanon^ two aadhies decided against a 24-hour strike due to 
be held Feb. 1 after Prime Minister Rafik Hariri persuaded them to 
resume pay negotiations with manag ement. (Rotters) 

President FMd Castro, opening a new G unu aa -n mhotel at the beach 
resort of Varadcro, said Cuba’s tourism industry was improving impres- 
sively, with sign* erf increasing viator numbers and better sendee. Hie 
state ta nrism ent e rprise Cnhanacan said the number of foreign visitors to 
Cuba reached nearly 700,000 in 1993, up from 438,000 in 1992, and 
generated gross ewmmg s of more than $660 mBHon. (Reuters) 


'■■nst 




JAPAN: A Leap Despite Warning 


Ccwfawd from Page 1 

only about 2 percent in the fiscal 
year starting April 1, following es- 
sentially flat growth in the current 
fiscal year, Kyodo News Service 
reported. Other agencies believe 
that the official forecast should be 
set higher, at around 2_5 percent to 
3 percent. 

Some private economists argue 
that the stimulus package will bare- 


ly hdp at aSL 
“It’s not a 


“It’s not going to be the .elixir 
that puts Japan back on a recovery 
path,” said Donald Kimball senior 
economist at Mitsubishi Bank. 

l«|uwi«w! miiniil« i t nm a , he said, 
are still burdened with so much 
excess capacity and personnel that 
they will be forced to shed hun- 
dreds of thousands more workers 
lata this year. 

“We simply don’t think any fis- 
cal measure that the government 
could enact will get us out of the 
fade,” be added. The problems are 
too great and too structural in na- 
ture" 

The package will be the first to 
include a major income-tax cut that 
Tokyo has introduced since the 
economy began to slow in 1991. 

But toe stimulative effect of the 
income-tax cut will be diluted 


somewhat, because Mr. Hosokawa 
and other top cabinet members 
have said they mtend to finance the 
tax cut by snnuhancously introduc- 
ing legislation for an offsetting rise 
in the consumption tax. after a de- 
lay of perhaps two to three years. 
That position reflects die Finance 
Ministry's view that the govern- 
ment should avoid the sort of tax- 
cutting that generated large deficits 
in theUnited Stales. 

Why would an income tax cut 
induce consumers to roend more if 
they knew they would have to pay 
It bade via tbe co nsump tion tax -in 
the future, a Finaiwe Ministry offi- 
rial was asked. He replied to re- 
porters that Japanese consumers 
would not necessarily behave with 
perfect rationality. 

“If my disposable income in- 
creases now, 1 fed more in a re- 
iaxed mood and think of spendhif’ 
right now” be said, adding: “Obvi- 
ousfy^tMs is sometinug that will 
have to be tested in the market.” 

The biggest party in the govem- 
ingcoalitzon, the Social Democrat- 
ic Party, is opposed to raising the 
consumption tax, and there is some 
possibility that its members will 
rebel over the issue. That might 
cause a new dday in the introduc- 
ing the stixmdns package. 


•IfolU! Polit 




ROVER BMW’s $ U Billion Deal 




Confirmed from Page 1 

operations in Britain. But Rover’s 
^mrman^^Hge Simpson, said: 

some change in°that refatiraj&|>/’ 

Mr. Pischetsrieder said at a news 
conference in London that there 
was little overlap between BMW’s 
and Rover’s product lines and that 
BMW would be able to expand 
distributionofRover'scaxs T partic- 
ularly inter markets like Germany 
and the united Stales. This, he 
said, might enable Rover to expand 
production. 

“Producing in En gland offers 
BMW advantages," said Gcbhart 

Khngens tan, managing director in 

Frankfurt of Barclays de Zoete 
Wedd, a brokerage controlled by 
Barclays Bank, “wages are lower 
there, costs are lower there, so 
building there makes sense.” 

Rov er sold 442,000 cars last year, 
primarily in Britain, and was the 
only European automaker to se& 
more cars than in 1992, reflecting 
Britain’s recovery from the reces- 
sion that continues to plague mn^ 
of the rest of Europe. Rover bad a 
pretax operating profit fast year of 


£56 miHioa, or $84 million, on sales 
of £43 billion. In 1992, Rover had 
an operating loss of £49 mfifion. 

BMW sold 534J0Q0 of its luxury 
cars worldwide, inciudmg.78,000 in 
the United States, wbere its sales 
have been rebounding, aided by an 
ingjroving economy and ugrestive 
pnee cuts. BMW is bufldmg an 
assembly plant in Spartanburg, 
South Carolina. 


aw.: 




;V- 


Mr. ftsebetsaeder said BMW 
saw an opportunity to sefl toon 
Land Rovers around the world, in- 
dudiogin the United States, posa- 
bly by distrRmting them through 
BMW's dealer network. 

But analysts said the real motiva- 
tion for BMW was to establish ft. 
self in the market for smaller, less- 
expensive can. Rover’s strengths 
axe at that ad of die market, in 
ears like its Micro and Mini and its 
200 and 400 series.. 

“There’sno doubt rhat it’s going 
to be very difficult , to survive in 






$°n Fr«- 
^leCa„ a 


and executive cars,” said John 
Lawsrai, an automotive analyse at 
DRI/ McGraw-Hill in London. . 


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TKTEBWATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 19 


THE AMERICAS/ NOT- 


Hr POLITICAL NOTES * 


How Clean Is Clean? Reprieve on Toxic Sites 

'! ■ . i. ' .. .. r — rrr - 1 ■ ■ . ' . - . i .n 1 1 » . ii ■ 

WASHINGTON —The Clinton administrate is about to p^ 
nose a major rewscin. of the Suwrfund law that would ease require- 




USTE RivAnui^ ^^-- _ I ___ 1 « 4 * n s * p% 

p ^ ^ 1^1 lg 3p 

fc t & a __ 

^U^jrmprSmn FetnO^^^^yf^f !?-- » 

' sc:::sis=si^i 


By William Schmidt 

Ww Y»* Fimej 


lUUHUOJami UiBUGOUl HkVUUUIlKUUU K^auuuu T” 7" 

this year. H is expected to be made public this week wim me 
endorsements of several congressional leaders. . - • • : ' ~ ’ 

. The 1980 Supafund law, which created ■ the largest program 
administered by the .Environmental Protection Agency, was intend* 


co ai.jou immrn luojuu uuuuu.*yi rr , 

where hazardous substances wete dumped! Bui llto Emed^ro 
achieve many of its goals, wte slightly nwrethan 
.in and with veareVistto costly htizauon over who should pay for the 


up and with yearslost to costly Hu^uonovcrwnosnmua pay u* 
work. One reason is the law’s inflexibility, a problem the new 

approach ismeant to redress.- ■-; •■•,•.. -. 

^Carol M. Browner, the agamy's bead, rad other Senior officials 
cairi that tefc ehannes the admimstration was proposing were miens- 


^/Ethel«derof^F^v^mw3a 

wai 

: 3S£5eKas®as 


d. dta rf f M -1 U*o lb. BA 1 n> » “dthe 

^Askedtf iheBri^ should leave Northern Ireland. The “SSSSST -^KT"* 

2sHsw»*.Sjr »^^saa?sss5s 

5-£ *i « •“ *• aWe 10 buM s p ““ f " ! 

££££§ 


ESSSSS SiSgS SiSSHSS^ 

dssasaEss %m%rH=s; ^sssssrr 

w,ih 


at many urban sites. 

question ihat never has a simple answer. “How clean is clean . 
q mSe wffl be different levds of dran,” Ms. Bn™** 
said that the legislation would reqmre dcamnga ate ^ 
level possible ifthe land was intended for r^daiualdevelopmrat, 

jfesi£tasiS.«as 

for commercial or mdustrid tfadopmott, where tee tisks expu- 
sure would be less. ' - . .. _ - .. . . . . 1 . 

CllBten SoiH rtl ww Beiti Prw »Oirtft» P°g^ 

WASHINGTON — President BiB Clinton feds 

not hupperaxl be routinely 


produce a denribtarned nation. - M »j 


t-Srt in ^ dim 10 begta American diploma ^ Bat the „ « ‘any end u> all violence anu ^ 

Sfet—iaS SSsfeS ^SSsttsasssM 

SSpenniasion u> oavel » Aej W* ^idSlS- «W« -**> »* ' 1“* gT* ®Sft£KS^i- of rioUceon the pan 

^g5Sa ar.« — , — . 


Quake Shaping Up 
As Record Disaster 

. . 1 15 i 


— " — — • ; f » A! Sfii *■ -d'fgSM 

a r r ' w „ i «- 


Rouen 

LOS ANGELES - More than 
200,000 victims have flooded rebel 
offices with aid requests following 
the Los Angeles earthquake, vnm- 
- 11 .. _,.M«in>inD il WlH SUTDaSS the 


White House press secretary, 

: OTthbot embradng” d» notw&.ihat-he does not leave, the 
House without taking ,iwi^. era ( 


said helSS Wlrite Housed times last year wthSeCTetSaj^ 
agqus-in tow but without his usual trail of npatim. I don't think 

■sq/ Mr. Ointon said. ^ j t t^ir 

for my mother's funeral you 

yes. I do.T wish it weren’t so. " . . " 1 1 

&^Bo«Iob M— w ¥W9h» Ooi iwiiaraWn.nnn* 

ifct is more than ai 50*50 ^ fm eoveomt back in 

•' bfr.Ffe^'hmtedathismtesertmrm^^^^^^^jgjjjjjj 

He fAPj 


«IV niaiauiraufi » ™r-- . , 

himi^e in southern Florida m ■ 
1992 as the costliest HiL disaster. , 

Even as federal funds poured in. 
the authorities began cracking 

front for one of the major scam 
operations that have sprung up. 

The Federal Emergency Man- 
agement Agency reported that it 

-BssSrsfes 

than in the first six months after the 

hurricane’s onslaught. 

- The latest figures provided fur- 
ther evidence of what Governor 

Pete Wilson had already predicted 

; that. d"*"flges from the quake 

would top the S30 bfflkm in losses 
- Florida sustained in 1992. 

■.StfMSSSffig 


and apartments. At least 25.000 

people were left homeless. 

Scientists working to unlock the 
secrets of the earthquake have con- 
cluded that its epicenter — where 
the first seismic waves reach the 
surface— was actually in the town 
of Reseda, several miles south of 
Northridge, which had been 
thought to be the epicaiter. 

As the authorities investigated 
hundreds of complaints of pnee- 
Kouging, consumer activists fanned 
out to confront merchants whom 
residents accused of cheating them. 

They were demanding that store 
owners sign agreements pledging to 
charge fairly or face boycotts. Peo- 
ple had reported paying up to 510 
for a gallon of milk, or about S2.65 

a Federal agents arrested 10 peo- 
* r fkAitcon^c nf dollars 


* j« 




v ■ 














9sr*a'»iii 

mm 

Wm4 


PFSSP^ ■-* /;■■• s * * ! " v ^-' 




Die anu vgu * u uwiw— — -- — 

U, cash and food stamps from an 
operation suspected of illegally 
laundering coupons that were sup- 
posed to have gone to poor people 
Eider an emergency disttbuhra- 
Los Angeles city officials, an- 

gBsrss 

tenants illegally and raise rents, 
warned building owners they 
would be dealt with harshly. 


mmsEm 

Doom Cook The Anconal Pun 


noum C»A TV Annual no. 

55f5S— S-SS-— 

. • .1 C Dmnl 


5*^?? : -ra - *■'■'■■ — - y 7 j y .• ■ - v.jj, . • - • • 


Mrs. Clinton Takes On 


■-■• ,'yv'viriV. 


Away 


“* r® 01 ' -r •r, ,T A nalMHbinS 


lirtn thftXHfc An aimual surrey 
idey oaths found that moreJ ne 

y.19 perqeut ra 10th graders and 

p^tof 


2 J£ 

sold their gall bladders ^ 3im Tack Lee, 35, 

authorities SrotsSfl^ tamting rad 
• diuttlc s pdov 

pm? •» tK pbnnbDgmm^ 




Gags on 


By Charles Trueheart - 


ByAdamOymer 

New York Tima Service V 

LAS VEGAS— Is there enough 
D ^ ^^hticalsldn i Wribd J« 

plan to get it, or souwdung dtw to 

itTpa^ ? I 1111 * 03110115 i 

there are doubts. _ . v-, 

' But the plan's hard-tracing ^ 

champion, W it 

that the uncertamty is ^ 

^.^hnoassionedcoristiturar » 

aes, eqjedSS^fo^^ific.I?® 115 J® 

S’lSSm.” she said, atmg tee 

entlSKrfbhte.AmraMMtor g 

the plan’s prescription drug brae- w 
fits, or organizations conwtnea 
^^Sratotee promise of * 

, of pasdon out » 

and it’s g<^ to be^or; 

tail to get h focused rad dxrectra, s 

she saidin Las Vegas after ) 

Sring an AIDS ward at tbs 
v^sS? Medical Center rad spar- i 
ring with doctras ai a forum. 

While acknowledging teat sonte. t 
promised political lw^ Crom bs^t- : 
ness and other groups ^s not yn 

focus on something, 

-When it comes to passing bUis, 

painstaking pohcy dcsign,^ch 

feeCHnion plan has m spades, 
pSes compared to tee right combi- 
nation of favor and skUL 

■ The last time Cangt^wMracea 

• wite enacting vast s^.chm^it 

.took the bravery of avil nghis 
demonstrators and tee hmiahty of 

Binnmgham te get the lawma^ 

attentkHLP Ius tee petsuMiw skfl« 
of President Jchnson and his aide, 

' Laiiy O’Brira,- to wfo passage of 

. _ ... inci rt.^1 Diohtc Art. 


ka^as&i 

debate and . 

■sswA 

''^+*32^?'' 

beginning to qi^ -mpgssion 1 
activists airi a 

£ad: toward gffttsrau ^ 
otbers,^ 5 ^^^ for social or r 
aCCBstoe ^Canadian arm- 
der. IN* x ^_ a t e copfous. rt1 ^’ 

■SsS%«S 

'■S*S 3 ass«S' 

SSSSfeKrS 


^^‘^Wassmoit^h. 
■ha^beentraddng foryears: Ca** 3 ". 
df customs tffiaali.aefae 

^aJBSS» 3l5g«l t& 

^^ScaygqrBldteshian 

Ssss ffit gj? 
■SS^SSSS^ 


uun “ — ■ ‘ - 

the 1964 Ctvfl Rights Act . 

Brit ever smee Mr. Clinton pro- 


posed the health plan with a spec* ] 

W7 23, it ha* seemed that his : 
oratory and tee salesmanship of 
Mrs. Clinton are the main engines 
of change, and allies and potential 
SkgiGvM Hffl wony they 

are not enough. 

A maw concern of supponere 
has been that some outside groups, 
which tee administration wooedas 

i, drew up the plan, have oHterf 

only qualified support, wseowj* 
to want still more favorable treat- 
ment 

Big business, for example, was 
given the expensive promise thauts 
radical costs for eaihr retirees 
would be picked up by the gpvcm- 
; rant and yet tee National Associ- 
ation of Manufacturers remains 
i neutral. 

Mis. Clinton said that was to be 
• expected. But she pndmLthat 
f nowthat the plan was actually bo- 
i- fore Congress, mray groups would [ 
:- swing in bdund h. 

“I think you are going to see a lot 
«. of strong support and aloi :of- 

ta Se worked With an this year. 
vc she said. . 

■’* On tee question of potential 
Is, compromises with otha pjras. 
cb Mrs. Ointon deferred to Congress. 
£ She would not say just how strict 
D was the definition of permanent 
, universal health insurance, without 
which tee president has threatened 
jf" to veto any bflL 
frf She would not say. 
as’ whether fufl coverage couW ,be cte- 
alls layed beyond tear tergal date^ 
ids, 1998, or achieved with a 

•of benefits package, erf wth a low 

employer’s share of the cost than 

pro- the 80 percent they urged. 


FUMBLE: HwniUati 

Continued from Page 1 
then they did whatever it took to raise Buffalo 

^en Thurman Thomas fumbled. Agin. 

done it a g ain . ., 

The ball squirted out of a pUe near mia- 
e.ij James Washington of tee Cowboys 

^ J ^andSto^*eBilk'end 

”&«!&££* when Washington 


rSK STS Ten Gawb^s 
bounced up off the artificial torf. looking for 
somebody to block. Seven Bills lay on the 

^True. it takes spunk to bounce off the 
around en masse when you know that youll 


arisen and loped toward tee play. The other 

^Suddenly, tee most important P 1 ^’ 0 ^' 
per Bowl XXVIII had turned^toa joke_ 
Wfl-chin«non realized teat he had 10 blockers 
SK a cS of Bills to beau So. he ran 

everywhere, cutting back and f o^nukmg 
sure no Bill even got close to him. in an. 
Washington's touchdown on a fumble return 

ySRt** about mm* 

S^r^l line - abojri 
after tee plav began — Six Bills were suu ai 
midfield. No six players were ever so alone. 
No Cowboy was within M vards of teem. 
They werein tee end zone celebrating a 13-1- 

UC At tee Super Bowl you hear that ^ ® 
ni «»5 Thev beat so many AFC teams so badly 

£% «U «****> 

iheir raw talent, teey slop 
Knowing teat teey c^Jhis 

St— MW- 


the lowest imreisioiijsuLj.^^ -—— f teams ever nave. — y --- 

such moments rad get back m the play, eves away from each other. and contem 

tec Super Bowl E^afiyif ^rfterirBUl-ness. When sdf-destrucuon 
yo?Se tee Bills, history’s leading Super Bow P 1 1 {0Jtc ^ it happens thing, greai 


SotaFma. 

Sa?i3& h S5tfM 


Sav. Buffalo got the baD 

Therminator w-as standing on the sideline 

•oSU the Cowboys, like a peat m 
studied tee kill. Still tee way tee Bills rolled 
over was vintage. 


•They hit a lull 1 really believe teau said 
the ^me's most valuable play a, Emmiti 
Smi^They fell into a slump. 

Ke iiv poi sacked by a multitude of ujw- 

ffiwv, the ban at ibdr 45. An£JimW 
XS told bis Pokes to test the stomach of 
ihe Bills defense. . 

On eight snaps. Smith carried seven m 
always between tee tackles, always attacking 
SggCT men. “We ran tee same play 

Smite said. “I’m not going to tdl you 
what play because we’ll have to use Mtnem 
year. But if you can't stop it, we re going to 

run it and run it and run it. 

It was Smith for 9, 3. 9. 7, 

16 ^^H=SSt^helong T ah 

nm the ball very^wefi at any other tune, 
except teal drive.’’ „ 

“You have nothing to be as h a m ed of. 
Levy told each player afterward m tee lodrer 
m^a. “I have no words of wisdom. I couMn t 
have any higher regard for you as a person if 
we'd won." 

Don’t be too forgiving. A* “ LS" 

rhing. Rfeat sports even is are about moments 
: rfmi^rad what teams do when teeyamvr 

. Fewteams have left as vivid animageof teeir 
; resuonse to such crises as tee Bills. Firsk they 
5 S^tmiSftee deck very fast. ^ they 
don’t band together and fightback You 
1 say anything much worse about a team than 

teat- 


rear ena ai iuiujiwu. — — 

PEPShl^IlbymEl^ofSoulhemUa^S^^^^^’ 

a_»p,' _ jffssKswsas 


UW'UUu™ - “*» , 

that Pepsi holds about a 3-to-l lwd over Coke, 

^Ac^ding to Mr. MfaJS Tenqapa’s pr^ 
tai actually has little to do with 

mtmm 

^.S^^HProsi-b.ctmsshehssto 


erg o; sou irwm 10 m downIan 0 r m>. 

Other a Pepsi If someone is caught stealing. Mr. To demonstraie their P°]jjjcal 

l^pef him ut apologize by buying a few “££££ to smU. 

cassfor Ihe town. . Mmrn ~. Coca-Cola as tee unofficial \Tllage beverage. 

^y^r r — ^ ^gg^ESSEtSZ- 

ing to a Jan. 1 upriring near ^ 'nationwide. . 

Ssant rebels of tee Zapatista Nraonall^ To accompany its expansion. Coca-Cob 

aiion Army. Elders, bundled a new Overusing campaign m Chia- 

ple, have mastered tee stock response to jour ^ ^ l0 promote a new two-lner 

nalisis: “We know nothing about it. rtiaif-Rallon) bottle. The company, however. 


oitiy ^ribotteng cmioession in tee area," Mr. P«5« a n^ two-liter 

■ . ffists- “We know nothing about it. ^iSan boule. The company, however. 

S&A*SflgS j^-^isysrSS SKa w.®= 
S«=3S5S5sS5 


Hint « Iteumpd«. of Miltary E»^ 


One sadt ban«>vaai-^^ 
-jtjramabased oiracase 

& Catholic orphanage 

ffithe reaHifc<W“dan ts ’ wcrc 

■iS'ssssssgs- 

w»* from the intrusKm 

hi^ier courts rtmtweu the 

twJicvc tee-law doesu t ^ apply to 

wSToromo StM,.Cm^s>S- 

^Twe'rt like evayOM ™ 


■ SEOUL 3 K^^ hold rn^Of ^ 

• But Prm» Wfinisw Lee hoi & a ^ to 
recent 

Nation the Pamptmi^^o 1 ®®^, threat 

did not mm that tee nation faced a gnaua 

^S.£^® toKnre “ safflrit,!i ^ 

Sd Sh it'vat, hot dc*dopmg nuclei » 

.-sHKgSSSS 


iHars^forimrasimiandhasloiigtoiihtotoihQ' 

increase m^gtmce-gattKTing -jgggmes taken by 
“The mihiaiy and mtdngence measui 


the United States.” a «« 

from peaceful o^hjjonand P^ rimlion 0 f the 

StBSS’JS ^SffSSttM phase of 

war." Mid it was awaiting 

Sta demands for nceess i° 


certify no ntldeat material had been diverted to the 

1? S“» «-P'y- toe- 

lions teen could be imposed. 

* ik. A.ef f^n. 1 itavS— ■ a VlSll 


Nuclear Anns Report 


The Associated PH** 

TOKYO — Japan on Monday 
denied &S groundless a British 

needed to make 


Atomic EncTg 

' Pyongyans 


SS& nuclear arms but is 

Encrev Aaency for access to nucl ear fari lmtt- 
Sa&^Team Spirit mraeuvem a re- 


4UU*“ * 

biko Saito said at a news «*|f 
cnce that tee report m TlK 
Times was “contrary to tee facts. 

tesaid his rnmisoy was pil- 
ing tee matter with tee Bnn*Mgj 
isuv of Dtfense. The report saw 

Sf British ntinis try had warned 


Prime Minister John Majorteat 
North Korea’s nuclear 
mayforce Japan to abandon ns 
nonnuclear stance. 

Mr- Saito sad Japan maintained 

JfflSWSSg 

ssOTiiSJsr-S 

oping nuclear weapons, he added. 

Another Foreign Ministry offi- 
'dal added teat since Japan had not 
dmugbt about produang nudear 


arms, “we don’t even think about 

what parts are necessary to make a 

nuclear weapon.” 

The official, who spoke on con- 
dition of anonymity, said, “The use 
of nuclear technology m Japan is 
limited to peaceful putposes and 
the report is groundless. 

A Defense Agency spokesman. 
Takahiro Goto, also said Japan was 
maintaining the teree-poini policy 
outlined by teen-Prime Minister 
Eisaku Sato in 1%8. 


StZn m W^hiitpon « P^ K-' deploy 

Datrimc wffl to bave dapened suspicion. 

Pa {Jl -.ju-o oartY daily, Rodong Sinmim, accused 
wLhington uang the “fictitious nuclear threat to 

^ilteOT^tarv officials have wnfiimed teat 

similar to those possessed by Pyongyang. 

The Defense Ministry spokesman, citing constant 
military threats from tee Stalinist North, also tajkedof 
LI .S. plans to deploy Apache attack helicopters and 
upgrade military equipment- 
gut he declined to comment on a report m the 
Chosun II bo daily teat quoted a senior navy official as 
raring Seoul planned three new submarmes to in- 
crease its submarine fleet to nine by JWi. 

But South Korean leaders appeared eager to calm 
anxieties. f Kmtn.AP) 


t 






<0* f'Swi 


Page 4 


TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 1994 

OPINION 


Hcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 


Incentives to Make Renunciation o 


FfiBI LSHbll WITH THK NK* YORK TIMM A*!! THE WASHINGTON POST 


Now for the Budget Battle 


i SS! 


Last year, Bill Clinton and Congress had 
their big budget battle. This year they count 
the wounded. The budget rules are lighter 
than the critics suggest. For just about any 
legislated spending increase there has to be an 
offsetting cul To finance the various spend- 
ing increases be will propose, the president, 
according to his budget director, will recom- 
mend cuts in inflation-adjusted terms in more 
than 500 programs. Many of these have been 
dear to Democratic hearts. There has already 
been some skirmishing over proposals for the 
Department of Housing and Urban Develop- 
ment. the Department of Health and Human 
Services and the Department of Labor. Advo- 
cacy groups that used to be allies find them- 
selves rivals in the scrap for funds. There has 
not been a budget like this in memory. 

Three questions occur as the president 
prepares to submit the budget next Monday. 
The threshold issue is whether Congress will 
make the cuts he wants. The second is wheth- 
er, if it dees make the cuts, it will also agree 
to spend the proceeds as he wants it to, or 
follow an election-year agenda of its own. 
The third is whether the tightness of the 
budget will help to deflect such further 
showmanship as the misbegotten balanced 
budget amendment to the constitution, due 
to come up in the Senate in February. The 
administration rightly hopes so. Last week 
the Congressional Budget Office confirmed 
the salutary effect that last year's budget 
agreement will likely have on the deficit over 
the next few years. Budget director Leon 
Panetta pounced on the report to observe 
that “if you're willing to make tough choices, 
you don't need to change the constitution.'' 

Here, from three great domestic depart- 
ments that have always been home to Demo- 
crats, is a little of what you can expect At 
Housing, to free up funds for dealing with the 
homeless and for other purposes, the adminis- 


tration is said to be planning to cut appropria- 
tions for the mainstay public housing pro- 
gram by as much as a third. The theory is that 
enough' public housing modernization money 
is in the pipeline to sustain the program for a 
year. Public housing groups say that this is not 
so. and that the administration is basically 
asking one group of poor people to finance 
increased aid for another. What kind of Dem- 
ocratic program is that, they ask? 

Likewise at Health and Human Services, 
where, to finance increases in Head Start and 
federal child care subsidies, among other 
causes, the administration is contemplating a 
sharp cut in a program that helps low-income 
people pay their bearing bills. Fifty-one sena- 
tors. including majority leader George Mitch- 
ell of shivery Maine, have signed a letter of 
protest Officials have the problem as well of 
trying to finance the welfare reform proposal 
that the president has promised to make this 
year. One possibility is cutting aid to legal 
immigrants. A cut in such aid produced an 
ugly break among Democrats in the House 
last yean Hispanic members accused the par- 
ty of immig rant-b ashing . 

As to Labor, Secretary Robert Retch made 
a spend) Last week in which he said a number 
of existing job training programs don't work 
and are going to be scrapped in favor of others 
that do. The speech was a kind of preemptive 
strike. The administration wants to create a 
large new job training program. It needs funds 
for that, and faces skepticism about the effica- 
cy of older programs. By cutting or merging 
out of existence some of the older programs, it 
begins to solve both problems ax once. In fact, 
it's a healthy winnowing process that the sec- 
retary is undertaking, but each of the older 
programs has a constituency; a few have al- 
ready begun to make themselves beard. It's a 
sound you are going to hear all year. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Secrets, Secrets, Secrets 


Washington's secret war over secrecy has 
taken a predictable turn. A year ago, Presi- 
dent Bill Clinton asked an interagency work- 
ing group to establish a less secretive' system 
for classifying documents. The working group 
labored, and came up with a draft executive 
order in November, which < naturally) was 
kept secret- Fortunately, a copy was leaked to 
the Federation of American Scientists. And 
lo. the federation found Lhat while suggesting 
a few modest reforms, the draft order would 
actually close the shutters tighter. 

The draft order proposes, with a few excep- 
tions, a maximum classification lifetime of 40 
years. As the federation's analysts point out, 
Richard Nixon set a maximum of 30 years for 
most classified documents, and Jimmy Carter 
fixed the limit at 20 years. This extended 
period outweighs the hypothetical benefit of a 
“balancing test'* that "would allow declassi- 
fies to weigh the public interest against na- 
tional security concerns. 

The acting archivist of the United States, 
Trudy Peterson, made the point in a recent 
letter to Vice President Al Gore: “In our expe- 
rience. there is virtually no information over 30 
years old that requires continued classification. 
Most documents of (his age are so irrelevant to 
current security concerns thai continued with- 
holding seems inappropriate if not laughable.’' 

Ms. Peterson is custodian of 325 million 
classified documents, including files dating to 
World War I. The secrecy establishment op- 
poses en bloc declassification, and favors an 


arduous reviewing process that would take de- 
cades. Otherwise, it is su'd, the genuinely sensi- 
tive morse] might fall into the wrong hands. 

Granted, that is a risk. But how much 
greater is the danger to democracy in exces- 
sive secrecy that denies Americans informa- 
tion essential to accountability. 

A more direct approach to weeding out this 
secret garden is advocated by Representative 
Dan Gtickman of Kansas, chairman of the 
House Intelligence Committee. Most docu- 
ments are classified by executive order, with- 
out defined standards on who decides what to 
keep secret. Mr. Gtickman would open the 
whole process to debate in public hearings 
and is drafting a bill that would establish clear 
rules and fix a 10-year or six-year limit, wher- 
ever feasible, on classified security matters. 

Those House hearings might also illuminate 
another murky front in the administration's 
avowed war on secrecy. In 1993, for the third 
successive year, the Senate adopted a resolu- 
tion urging disclosure of the now secret bud- 
get of the Central Intelligence Agency. Yet 
Mr. Clinton only a few weeks ago refused 
again to divulge the aggregate intelligence 
budget With the Cold War over, this secrecy 
is hard to justify. 

The case for sunlight was expressed long 
ago by James Madison: “A popular govern- 
ment without popular information, or the 
means of acquiring it, is but a prologue to a 
farce or tragedy, or perhaps both." 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Comment 


Emironmenlal Protectionism 

The European Commission’s president Jac- 
ques Delots, let the cat out of tbe bag when be 
cited the danger to Europe's prosperity from 
Asian imports as his reason for welcoming 
Presidra I BlU Clintons attempt to impose envi- 
ronmental and labor standards on developing 
countries. True, this was a French cat: but the 
bag is Western and it is loaded with hypocrisy. 
Fortunately. the Western camp is not united in 
opportunism. The European Union's trade 
commissioner, Sir Leon Brittan, has repudiated 
Mr. Clinton's new trade agenda on the ground 
that he did “not want to have a pretext for 
protectionism in the name of the amranment.” 

This is not to deny that many Asian cities 
and waterways, and some agricultural land, 
forests and air quality, have deteriorated as 
the region grows apace. But Western industri- 
al states experienced far worse damage at 
comparable stages or their development. The 
West's attempt to champion environmental 
concerns is. therefore, a poorly camouflaged 
form of rearguard action lhat pays unwitting 
tribute to Asia’s present and potential status. 

— The Straits Times (Singapore). 

Mysteries of Health Care 

It doesn't make any sense to me that our 
nation accounts for 40 percent of all health 
care spending around the world, and we have 
only 5 percent of Ihe people. It doesn’t make 
any sense to me that what we get for that 
additional spending is a lower proportion of 
citizens with health care than tbe other indus- 


trial countries. A typical insurance policy’ here 
provides less coverage than in any of the other 
major industrial countries. 

I think we agree on universal coverage with- 
in an employment-based system. We need to 
reduce job lock and to start agreeing to insure 
unhealthy people instead of only healthy peo- 
ple. We agree we need to do more in the way 
of preventive medicine so that doctors don't 
have to see children coming into an emergen- 
cy room because the parents couldn’t afford 
an immunization shot. We agree consumers 
need more information, need to know more 
about quality and the costs of their care. And 
we agree lhat to be effective the plan must 
achieve real cost containments bead-on. 

In this town, you don't do anything big 
anymore if it's not going to reduce that deficit. 
— From a speech by U.S Treasury Secretary 
Uayd Bentsen. quoted in The Washington Fast 

ASEAN Aid for Asians 

The burgeoning wealth of Southeast Asian 
nations means that they are in a position to 
become aid givers. It is tune they did so so 
seriously, especially since traditional donors 
have become more reluctant. 

Where should ASEAN’s aid go? The most 
immediate targets ought to be Vietnam, Cam- 
bodia, Laos and Burma — economic laggards 
that are showing new' potential and an appe- 
tite for development. Grams could be tied to 
purchases within ASEAN. Soft loans would 
open fresh trade opportunities. 

— Asiaweek ( Hong Kong). 



international HeraJd Tribune 

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W ASHINGTON —Tbe pending nuclear 
deal with Ukraine should serve as a 
model for the Clinton administration in pur- 
suing a settlement of its nuclear inspection 
controversy with North Korea. 

If the Moscow agreement is ratified by the 
Ukrainian parliament, Kiev will get SI billion 
in enriched uranium for its power plants over 


By Selig S. Harrison 


in enriched ur anium for its power plants over 
a nine-year period, starting with 560 million 
in the next 10 months, with an initial influx of 
S300 million in World Bank import credits 
and the promise of unspecified additional 
billions in trade, investment and US.-sap- 
ported help from international lending agen- 
cies during the years ahead. 

To Ukrainian leaders, tins is a modest price 
for giving up their nuclear option while the 
United States, Russia and other existing nu- 
clear powers keep their own nuclear weapons 
and continue to rely on them in their mihtary 
strategy. Similarly, North Korea wants to 
exact its price for acceding to what it secs as 
inequitable U.S. demands. 

The “packa ge solution" to the nuclear dis- 
pute proposed by Pyongyang on Nov. 11 
envisages North Korean concessions on VS. 
nuclear inspection demands synchronized 
with U.S. diplomatic recognition, together 
with the removal of restrictions on trade and 
investment and help in obtaining multilateral 
credits similar to the role being played by the 
United States in the case of Ukraine. 

Diplomatic recognition is tbe top priority 
because the North feats that the United 
States wants to promote its collapse and ab- 
sorption by South Korea, repeating the Ger- 
man unification modeL In the North's per- 
spective, tbe normalization of political and 
economic relations would signify U.S. readi- 
ness to coexist Equally important, economic 


of the economic subsidies provided during tbe 
Cdd War by Russia and China. 

Tbe North is also seeking a U.S. pledge not 
to use or deploy nuclear weapons in Korea, 
through a trilateral agreement with North Ko- 
rea or a multilateral accord involving Russia, 
Chinn, North and South Korea and Japan. 

In an effort to convince Washington that it 
has no intention of developing nuclear weap- 
ons, Pyongyang has asked for nelp in shifting 
from its graphite-based nuclear reactors to 
light-water reactors, which are less easily 
adapted to a weapons program. This would 
involve an estimated $2 billion in credits over 
10 years to be shared by the United States, 
Japan, South Korea and multilateral agencies. 

Pyongyang, for its part, has signaled that it 
is prepared to return to foil membership in 
the Nonproliferation Treaty and to open up 
its declared nuclear facilities to unimpeded, 
regular International Atomic Energy Agency 
inspections: This would include full access to 
the key five- mega watt reactor and reprocess- 
ing plant at Yongbycn. 

A compromise formula to permit inspection 
of two suspect waste dumps appears increas- 
ingly likely, provided these are not designated 
as “special inspections,” thus setting a prece- 
dent far inspection of other undeclared nodear 
facilities. The North Korean aimed forces fear 
that random access to mOitaiy bases through 
“special inspections" could be used for espio- 
nage purposes by U.S. and South Korean intel- 
ligence agents working under IAEA cover. 

Ukraine is in a stronger bargaining position 
than North Korea because it possesses inter- 


continental nnHcar mi ddle s that pose a dear 
threat to America. North Korea, by contrast, 
poses a hypothetical future threat 
firing identical evidence available to all of 
them, American intcffigcaoe agencies differ 
on whether North Korea has accumulated 
enough pfaf 01 ™*" to make one or more 
bombs and whether it has the trigger tedmo- 
logy necessary to detonate a nuclear weapoa- 
Neverthdess, the United Slates is property 
concerned that -continued uncertainty over 
North Korean capabilities is stiimilatmgpio- 
nuclear sentiment in Japan and South Korea. 

Tlx essence of Pyongyang's position is its 
insistence on simultaneous concessions. 
Washington has argued that the North must 

nous as a signatory of the Nuclear Nonprofif- 
eration Treaty. The tortuous preliminary ne- 
gotiations during the past three months have 
been over bow much Pyongyang would have 
to concede on inspection before (he United 
Stales would agree to link a nuclear settle- 
ment with political and economic issues. 

The Gin ton administration is deeply divid- 
ed over w he the r to engage in negotiations on 
a “package solution" at all and what trade- 
offs to offer if it does. Hard-liners argue that 
giving too much would tempt Iran and other 
would-be nuclear powers to engage in “nucle- 
ar blackmail" of their own. Bnt the benefits of 
getting North Korea to give up its midcar 
option outweigh this concern. 

Apart from defusing pro-nudear sentiment 
in Tokyo and Seoul, resolution of the nuclear 
dispute with Pyongyang would remove the 
need fora costly conventional nffitarybaOdtp 

S Northeast Asia. The Pentagon is 
TTrmg for a possible increase fa U.S. 
in South Korea, mduding Patriot 


xpiriaiwi and for an $8 MBon UA-Japanese 
Amt DefienssSvstCffl to 


die threat that would be posed by 
m idfa T^gpabkNorth Korean missiles. 

Perhaps da most important benefit of a 
“package solution” is that it would accderate 
ft) e ftptfjng to tbe outside wood 

recently initialed by'Pyongyang. Ea the new 
Rqin-Sac^raag free trade zone, foreign in- 
. vesture can establish fully foreign-owned en- 
terprises, get a five-year tax holiday and a 14 
percent tax rate and enter the zone without 
visas. Like Chm*, where economic liberaliza- 
Hrm atm started in carefully circumscribed 
special zones, North Korea is likely to find 
tfiB< the processes of change are difficult to 
control and localize once they get under way. 

The lesson of Ukraine and North Korea 
alike is /bar other countries win inevitably put 
a price tag on refinqtrishing their sridear 
option so long as nuclear weapons remain the 
principal global currency of power and status. 
The only way to stop nuclear proliferation 
without paying off would-be nu clear powe rs 
in one form or another is to move purposeful- 
ly toward a nuclear-free world. 

General Andrew Goodpaster, author of a 
recent Atlantic Council report, has proposed 
that tbe United States and Russia redu ce thear 
nuclear weapons in stages from tbe current 

3.000 each to 1,500, then 200, thatzero, contin- 

rng ? Nomcretiumt^e naive befief that Ameri- 
ca can get other countries to forewear nuclear 
weapons without malting it profitable for them 
in terms of their own national interest 

The writer, a senior associate of the Carnegie 
Endowment far International Peace, contribut- 
ed this comment to The Washington Post 


Let’s Put a Proper Price on Trees 


W ASHINGTON — Two- thirds 
of tbe world's original forests 
have been felled, 2 nd despite a de- 
cade of well-meaning global initia- 
tives the chainsaw is working faster 
than ever. Halting deforestation will 
require radical changes in property 
rights to forests, pricing of forest 
products and political power over the 
fate of forests. 

Current policies in both developed 
and developing countries accelerate 
forest loss dv subsidizing disposal of 
timber at cheap prices. In the United 
States, for example, the federal gov- 
ernment's Forest Service, which long 
denied that it was subsidizing log- 
ging, said in April that it would stop 
s elling timber from 62 of the 136 
national forests it administers be- 
cause they bad consistently lost mon- 
ey on timber sales. 

Trees are worth a lot more stand- 
ing than as lumber. The prescription 
drag industry alone is estimated to 
earn more than $ 100 billion in annual 
sales of drugs with active ingredients 
derived from forests. No one knows 
bow many new medications may be 
developed from forest products as yet 
untested Flood prevention, watershed 
stabilization ana fisheries protection 
services provided by forests are each 
worth billions of dollars a year. 

Because such sendees fail to show 
up in conventional accounting sys- 
tems. these benefits and the trees that 
provide them remai n undervalued. 
Governments should tax, rather than 
subsidize, forest destruction. Then 
more of the value of forests would be 
reflected in the price of wood. 

Charging visitors to U.S. national 
forests just S3 per day would generate 
more revenue than selling timber from 
those forests does now. The proceeds 
would be a powerful incentive for the 
US. Forest Service to preserve areas 
under their control instead of promot- 
ingtimber cutting and mining. 

The first priority for creating a 
sustainable forest economy is a prop- 
erty rights system that allies the inter- 
ests of forest dwellers with the health 
of fewest ecosystems. Reforestation 
initiatives in developing countries 
routinelv fail when the forest land is 
coder the exclusive control of the 
state rather than of local residents. 

Thousands of recent examples 
show that joint management systems, 
in which residents benefit from forest 
use and protection, produce tangible 
results for conservation. Some 10,900 


By Alan Thein D timing 

villages in India are sharing manage- 
ment responsibilities in an area of 
about O million hectares. The con- 


where in Asia and in Africa. 

Meanwhile, a few nations in the 
American tropics have taken more 
decisive strides toward finest tenure 
reform. Under intense grass-roots 
pressure, Bolivia. Brazil, Colombia, 
Ecuador and Venezuela have all re- 
cognized land rights of tribes that 
have inhabited and conserved tbe 
forests for hundreds of years. Each of 
these countries has demarcated vast 
areas in tbe Amazon basin as indige- 
nous homelands. While there are seri- 
ous problems in enforcing these regu- 
lations in the face of pressures for 
development, it is nonetheless a hope- 
ful sign for the world's forests. 

Goods and services from the 
woods provide more money and jobs 
than chopping down trees. The scenic 
and recnational benefits of forests 
earn billions of dollars for both the 
growing nature tourism industry and 
local residents. In the United Slates, 
the marie el value of non timber forest 
products, such as berries, decorative 
plants and mushrooms, may exceed 
that of solid wood harvest. 

The market for just one forest 
product from Southeast Aaa, rattan 
palm stems used to make wicker fur- 
niture, is worth S3 billion a year. In 
Belize, expert gatherers of fewest 
products can earn between two and 
ten times as much per hectare as 
fanners who clear the trees for crops. 
Without secure control of these re- 
sources, however, their potential for 
sustainable employment will be lost. 

Ecological pricing should be the 
second priority for creating a sustain- 
able forest economy. Virgin timber is 
priced far below full cost 

For instance, the price of teak does 
not reflect the costs of Hooding that- 
rapacious teak logging has caused in 
Burma. Nor does the price of old- 
growth fir from the U.S. Pacific 
Northwest include losses suffered by 
the fishing industry because logging 
destroys satioon habitat. 

Few attempts have been made to 
calculate tbe full, ecological prices 
of forest products, buL they would 
undoubtedly be astronomical One 
hectare of Malaysian tropical forest 
is estimated to provide carbon stor- 


age services worth more than $3,000 
over the long tenn. Such services help 
prevent the world’s donate from 
warming that could have catastroph- 
ic results. A mature forest tree in 
India is worth $30,000, according to 
the Center for Science and Environ- 
ment in New Delhi. The full value of 
a hamburger produced from cattle 
that graze on pasture cleared from 
rainforests may be about $200. 

Tbe greatest value of forests is 
probably tbe diversity of life they 
contain. Forests harbor the wild rela- 
tives of dozens of valuable commer- 
cial crops. These related strains are 
the first recourse of scientific breed- 
ers in seeking to protect crops against 
new pests and diseases. Export sales 
of coffee, cocoa beans and other com- 
modities that trace their origins to 
forests in the tropics and subtropics 
exceeded $20 billion in 1991. 

To create a permanent forest eco- 
nomy will require political change. 
Unless the strong grip of big timber 
interests — die miners, ranchers and 
other resource extractors — can be 
broken, forest conservation will be 
difficult if not impossible. 

In Malaysia, clear^curting is driven 
by handouts of logging licenses that 
are a major form of patronage for 
politicians. Officials distribute con- 
cessions to loyal supporters, who lev- 
el the trees for quick profits. 

In varying degrees, this bond per- 
vades all the world's major timber 
economies. From 1985 to 1992 in the 
U.S. timber states of Washington and 



Qrpgan,^ the wood products industry . 
. onispent environmentalists 6-to-l in 
contributions 10 congressional candi- 
dates. As a result, those grateful 
members of Congress set higher log- 

S targets for national forests m 
districts than tbe Forest Service 
itself recommended. 

The ultimate challenge is to make 
ecological services sufficiently remu- 


nerative for. aR groups involved — 
residents, logging towns and govetn- 
mem agencies — so that they act as 
defenders, not destroyers, of forests. 

Thewriter is a researcher for World- 
watch Institute in Washington and au - 
thar of "Saving die Forests: What Will 
It Take?”Be contributed tfer comment 
to. the International Herald Tribune. 


Asians, Too, Want Good Environment 


S INGAPORE — There is a link 
between development, on tbe one 
hand, and environment, population 
and poverty on the other. Some Asian 
states, such as Indonesia, have shown 
remarkable progress in economic de- 
velopment and the reduction of pop- 
ulauon growth. Others, such as Ma- 
laysia, have made impressive strides 
in reducing poverty. Yet major envi- 
ronmental challenges remain. 

As China and India indnstiialize 
and grow, they will exert tremendous 
pressure mi the earth’s carrying ca- 
pacity unless they avoid tbe path of 
progress at any cost and follow a 
course of sustainable development. 

In the past, due to insti rational and 


Spouse Used , Abused and Discarded 


N EW YORK — It's a sad but 
familiar story, the story of the 
discarded executive wife and the 
small family business of which she 
was once a part. 

The division of labor was this: 
He would have an important job, 
leading to ever more important 
ones. And to make sure that this 
would be so. she would give dinner 
parties, care for their children and 
their home, participate in the right 
Charities, construct a life of shared 
privilege and success. 

And then he ditched her. Perhaps 
a new wife reaped the benefits of aD 
the climbing. Perhaps she wound 
up with little more than a big house 
that she could no longer afford to 
heal, la any event, the life she had 
known was' kaput. 

This is a variation on that story. 
But Lucille Stephenson Bloch is not 
a woman discarded by her husband, 
although the two have agreed to 
divorce. She was jilted by toe Unit- 
ed States of America, asd she is 
madder than hell. 

Mrs Bloch. 5S. was for nearly 35 
jears the wife of Felix Bloch, the 
former Stats Department official 
who. in 1989. was described in news 
reports as a spy for rite Russians, 
or.e erf the highest-ranking Ameri- 
can diplomats suspected of espio- 
nage since Alger Hiss. 

Beginning with the ex erting when 
ABC led Ihe new s with a "re-enact- 
ment" of t«o mm pasting a brief- 
case full of secrets on the street, 
Mrs. Bloch's life as a private citizen 
disintegrated. 

She and ftc husband were fol- 
lowed everywhere b> FBI agents 
and reporters. Her home was 
bugged, her phone tapped. By the 
tine the Viennese hooker who said 


By Anna Quindlen 

Felix liked rough trade weighed in, 
the case was such a circus that when 
the Blochs went to visit their daugh- 
ter at her suburban home, neigh- 
bors watched from lawn chairs and 
children sold lemooade. 

Although she says she cooperat- 
ed fully with the government and 
knew nothing of any espionage, Lu 
Bloch lost many of her friends, as 
wdl as the job she had found after 
the couple's return to the United 
Stales from Vienna. 

Although Felix Bloch has never 
been formally charged with any- 
thing, he lost his job and was 
stripped of his health benefits and 
pension. Most recently he has 
worked as a bus driver. 

But wrhaiof his wife, who consid- 
ers herself to have been an unpaid 
government employee? She gradu- 
ated from the School of Advanced 
International Studies at Johns 
Hopkins, but she knew it was futile 
to pursue a career as a diplomat, 
not only because it was virtually 
impossible for a woman 33 years 
ago. but because of Felix's career. 

So she followed him to DtisseL 
dorf and Caracas, Singapore and 
West Berlin, putting on white 
gloves and calling on toe ambassa- 
dor’s wife, giving dinners for visit- 
ing dignitaries, silting on commit- 
tees. balancing her husband’s 
Teutonic hauteur with her easy, 
outgoing Southern charm. 

Tve taken more shopping trips 
with toe secretary of state's wife 
than I care to remember," says Mrs. 
Bloch with a throaty laugh- 

Foreign Service wives — spouse 
is the preferred word now, but the 


truth is that in those day? they were 
all women, all wives — were ad- 
juncts in the diplomatic corps. A 
survey once snowed that some 
spent more than 40 hours a week in 
unpaid work. Lu Bloch considers 
that she was a hardworking State 
Department employee who has 
never done nor been accused erf 
doing anything wron& and that tbe 
least she deserves is her share of 
what would have been her bus- 
band's pension and health benefits. 

But more than that, she wants her 
reputation restored. She has hec- 
tored members of Congress and 
government officials, ana the only 
definitive response she has had was 
from Sheila F. Anthony, an assis- 
tant attorney general: “Tbe FBI 
does not provide ‘formal exonera- 
tion' of persons who are or who 
may have been at any time of inves- 
tigative interest-" 

“Kafkaesque” has become the 
most overused word in the literary 
toriccrn, but there is no better word 
for that statement. They follow you, 
they tap your phone, they give the 
world reason 10 believe you are a 
traitor to your country. And then 
they walk away, leaving you to Uve 
with the stink erf suggestion. And 
secondhand, at that: guilt as com- 
munity property. 

“I would like somebody to stand 
up and say *Lu Stephenson Bloch is 
an innocent woman,* " says Mrs. 
Bloch, fit the dreumstanoes, any of 
us would expect toe same. 

This story shows that that’s not 
how the U.S. government behaves, 
that it can dismiss a woman who 
has served it well just as summarily 
as any mean-spirited male; Ami 
with as little care and compassion. 

The New York Times. 


By Tommy T. B. Kolt 

polity weakness, toe needed infra- 
structure in many Asian countries 
and dries, such as sewerage and in- 
dustrial waste disposal systems, 
faded to keep pace with economic 
expansion. As a result maw Asian 
does suffer from serious pollution. 

Tokyo and Singapore are excep- 
tions to toe rule — models lhat other 
Asian dries can emulate. According 
to studies by toe World Health Orga- 
nization, five of the seven dries with 
the worst air pollution — Beijing, 
Calcutta. Jakarta, New DeQri and 
Shenyang — are in Asia. Two of the 
dries with the best air quality, Tokyo 
and Singapore, are also in Asia. 

When Singapore began to industri- 
alize in tbe 1960s, the government 
legislated and enforced high environ- 
mental standards to protect toe land, 
air and water. Contrary to a belief 
then prevalent in the Third World, 
tbe increased costs to indostiy did 
not deter investment. 

The gpvemmBit also built com- 
mon treatment facilities to hdp in- 
dustries. including fadh ties to pro- 
cess and dispose of toxic and hazar- 
dous wastes. As a result of these - 
policies, throe decades of rapid indus- 
trialization in Singapore have not de- 
spoiled the land, air or water. 


ptoach to protecting tile quality of its 
air and preventing me dy Cram stran- 
gulation by motor vehicles. Tbe gov- 


ernment has invested heavily in public 
transport. There are an underground 
mass rapid transit service, an rsland- 
wide bus system and many taxis. 

Growth of the motor vehicle popu- 
lation is controlled by setting a quota 
for each month, auctioning that quota 
by tender, and inmosing a tax of about 
200 percent on thepnee of a vehicle 
plus a heavy road impost based on 
engine size. Tte govennneat keeps the 
central business district free of couges- 
tkni by making drivers of vehicles buy 
a license to enter tbe area. It encour- 
ages scrapping erf old vehicles and pro- 
vides a tax incentive to use tead-rfree 
petrol and discourage leaded petrol 

Zn another two years, Singapore 
wifl in trod ace an electronic road prio- 
ing system. Each vehicle will be fitted 
with an dectrcmic tag. Drivers will be 
billed monthly based on usage of the 
roads. If Singapore succeeds in its 
experiment, it mil have set an exam- 
ple for the world, not just for Aria. 

I am confident rfatf in the years 
ahead, Asia win meet toe environ- 
mental challenge, not because of ex- 
ternal pressures but because Asians 
are demanding toe right to live in a 
dean and healthy environment as 
well as the right to development. 

The writer, d&rector of the Institute 
°f P ottcy S tudies in Singapore, served 
as chairman of the main committee at 
the United Nations Conference an En- 
vironment and Development in Rio de 
Jmaro. He contributed this amount 
to the International Herald Tribune. 


IN OUR PAGES; 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 

1894: TTieyHadABafl ab& “8 certain demobilized men to 

* leanm » . 


NEW YORK — The much talked of 
Bachelor’s Ball, at the Hotel Wal- 
dorf, was a most i m port an t event in 
society [on lan. IS}. Excepting at 
Newport or Lennox, the bachelors 
of society have not in years given a 
balL Their last ball here was at the 
Hotel Brunswick, on the night of 
May 7, 1885, and toe majority of the 
hosts have since become benedicts. 
The ball last night was given by 
thirty bachelors and Mr. Theodore 
Frelmghysen, who is a widower. The 
ball was called toe Knickerbocker 
Bachelors’ BaH 

1919: Rations Revised 

PARIS — M. Victor Boret, the Min- 
ister for Agriculture and Food Sup- 
plies, has decided to increase the 
monthly ration of sugar for Parisians 
by 250 grammes — Or approximately, 
half a pound. M. Bona also considers 
that the outlook, as regards <atg^- 
supplies and tbs necessity for en- 


abling certain demobilized men to 
resume their former emplo yment, 
warrants the resumption of the man- 
ufacture of certain confections, par- 
ticularly sweetmeats of a nourishing 
natnrt provided that toe confection- 
ers do not employ mine ox butter in 
toeir factories during the present 
dearth of those products. 

1944: A liberator Raid 

LONDON — prom our New York 
edition:] An American Liberator raid 
cm the scwalled rocket-juu or inva- 
tion coast of tbe Pas de Calais area in 
France kqjt the all-out aerial war 

S Nazi Europe going today 
after the Royal Air Force, 
wteenth time since Nov; 18 
tod the third time in four m g ht ^ hit 
Berlin last night in another tarific 
attack. Telephone communications 
between Berlin and Stockholm were 
CUt WgU B tQnkhL msohlv inri i ftilmt 


e \ '*. 


C-; , : 


- - • 


i - 
1 • -■ 


'jv:: : 

: 

w . 

?*£?>- - .. 

. . 

.r • • 

-fc, • 

* V, • - 

SZl^r ■ 

• . . 

# - - 

ss*-; r - ••• 

*577-:.- 

: 

••• 

. ... 


• ! -c . - . 


i-iX--.? • ■ 


• ; ■■ 
■ it,-" 

sfe«i U- :••• r;; 








another British attack on th« fiwmin 
carataL The Liberators encountered 
no fighter opposition and little fink. 


XVli, 1 





j.«V‘virV «: "7 





HF.RALP TRIBUNE. TUE SDAY. FEBRUARY 1 . 1994 

— h p 1 n 1 o N 


Page 5 


This Small Russian Plans 
While Featherbedders Rule 


ByWiffiam Safir e 


D AVOS, Switzerland — You 
couldn't throw, a snowball at the 
.World Economic Forum in this ski 
resort without hitting a rejected 
Russian reformer. 

Early last week, Rnssia’s reformist 
finance minister, Sons Fyodof ov, 
walked into President --Boris Yeltsin’s 
office with a him-or-me ultimatum: 
Either Tire the inflationary central 
bank chief, Viktor Gerashchenko, 
who was oh a ruble-printing binge to 

nrnn ut> inefficient industry, or I quit. 


-500 days’! ; — the serious capitalist 
-reform plan that Mikhail Gorbachev 
rejected, sealing his doom —the 41- 
year-old economist heads a bloc dt 
about- S percent of the. seats. m. the 
new State Duma.. ... • 

I- collared him lor a- threfrhour, 
late-night talk in irn alpine hold- lob- 
by. "No wonder the reformers lost the 
election, Mr. Yavlinsky says: AD that i 
was offered was quasi-reform-' 

The promised stabilization of the • 

ruble never happened; what little pn- . 
valuation was done was more nke col- 
lectivization; since 1989 , gross nation- 
al product declined by half; instead or 

more democracy, the people saw more • 

dime and corruption. And ttas-was- 
supposed to be “reform”? 

what seemed to anger Mr. .Yav- 
*■’ ■ linsky most was that ’‘payments-were 
• never made”: Last year, after prices 
were negotiated to buy goods from 
- farmers and producer, the 8 0V «£' 
meat double-crossed the sellers- (Mr. 
Fyodorov glumly confirmed tnas, 

■ blaming oveiprotmsing by Mr. Cher-/ 
. nomyrdih.) .N& wonder qpasi-refarm 

was rejected at the polls. _ ' 

Mr. Yavlinsky has positioned him- 
- . seif as a constructive critic of the 
-r Yeltsin government today, ana disso- 

r. dated himself Ironv its faltermg 

s, rdonns of the pasL He voluniem^ 

le to be prime minister with a new team 
s, last wedii and thus cannot be Warm*! 

■ '■ for j ump ing ship as it headed into 

in hyperinflation. _ . , 

n- More to the political point, Mr. 

■ %• i irviTiff to nrovc 


mistake, he’s out,” Mr. Yeltsin prom- le 
iscd, Mr. Fyodorov tells me, Unsatis- al 
fied with this delaying straddle, the n 

^ ^ ^ ^ a 

Yavlinsky haxpositioned * 

himself as a constructive • 
critic of the Yeltsin - ' - f 

govenmumt today, cmd ' j 
dissociated himself from j 

iu faltering reforms. 

35 -year-old economist followed other 
free-marketers, abandoned by Mr. 
Yeltsin and spurned by; the voters, 
over the side. “If you take the blame 
for what you have not done,” he says, 
“that’s just stupid.” . 

That leaves Russia’s government in • 
the hands of Mr. Ydtrin’s prime min- 
ister Viktor Chernomyrdin, champi- 
on of the featherbedding state indus- 
trialists. -His strategy: Let inflation 
roar up- over 20 percent a .month — 
that’s a month— then become a popu- 
lar hero by imposing price controls. . 

. How_ can Russians who 'belieye in 
freedom avoid this7, Evidently Mr* 
Yeltsin wants power more to preside 
than to lead; thisr may prevent dicta- 
torship. But the reformer do not have 
a leader; the democratic wp to fight 

it out or make a political deaL Their 

imagt^maker who talked the Russian 
mtn iptiinp Mr. Yeltsin speak 


'iNOoS^l^ 

- — -y'7 m 


The Chair Blocks Their View 
Of the Man Who Copes in It 

By Rise Gersten 


lit* 


' '' 




m 










letters to the editor 


Constructive Differences 

Regarding U A Destructive Culture of 
Critique " ( Opinion, Jan. 181 : 

In arguing that argument, per se, is an 
evil, or at least a non-desideraium —Out 
it causes people to, among other things, 
not listen to each other, distort fa cts m 


the principles, virtues and values that 
have long made it a magnet drawing the 
hopeful of the world. , 

Tbe longer we lived m Europe, die 


M ore to the political poini, mi. bona nae asscruuus — — 

Yavlmskyhas stopped trying to prove ^ against the wrong culpnu gwmg 
tointeSretuals that be has brains and argument a bum rap. For it u not 
v.„! wr,n tnllrine bluntly to people mem. per se, thans guilty of these evils. 


Several of the candidates ior saww. 
of Russia after the coming hyperinfla- 
tion and freeze were lined 1 up - in a 
seminar at Davos. A tall Swedeatting, 
in the audience next to me was highon 
Anatoli Chubais, in ebargeof privati- 
zation, as a political comer, he 

ters; lotsa bigshots here.) . , 

m RussiS who Arn^tod 

the proceedings 

and presence was Qn#n Yavtos^ 
Known in the West.as the man oT the 


to intellectuals umt us u>» — — - 

has begun talking bluntly to 
about organizing a movement or 
nascent party . He wants to pull Rus- 
sia’s 89 states into seven manageable, 
regions; he wants to give Rushans 
u another choice besides paxalyas ,be. 
is trying to find the "pro-Russ^, not 
anti-Western” language to connect 
free-market ideals to people 
“I want to create what we dp not 
' have — a political biop^hy, Mid 
Mr Yavlinsky, an elcctnnan from 
Lvov, who makes no secret Itot tas 
Other’s father was a Jew- Pobti- 
dans now appear ovetmgbt--whOT 
from? Where didthwaand during i the 
Soviet Union’s cotiapse? 1 want to 
have a history people can, ««nmn e - 
So he warns and nartidpatK ““ 
- organizes and .waits. I am very op 
mistic, but not for this year. 

" The New York Tunes.- 


betters intended fir publication 
should be addressed “Letters to the 

EtStor^ and contour Ihem^ersag- 

nature, mine and fad address. Let- 

wsshou Idbe brief tri are stfyea to 
txBdngr We amnot be responsible for 
the return cf unsrikded manusenpa. 


amimem a oum * « ** " — 
menu per se, that is guilty of these evils, j 

but rather arguing in the wrong spmt. , 

There are two ways one can argue, , 
which 1 call “adversarial” (or confronts- 

rive.” In the &rsk the motivation is to 
destroy one’s opponent; in thesecond. to 
learn the truth, through a search conduct- 
ed m collaboration with one’s opponent. 

Ms. Tannen has the right wea when 
sheasserts that “modeling mtdleciud 
interchange as a fight” is dangerous; but 
why does the fact that such an miCT- 
ebange is an “argument necessarily 
makeh a “fight”? why can * not simply 
be a game? Both sides win, no matter 
who tms the argument by moving clos- 
er to the truth. 

ROBERT S. SEGELBAUM. 

Le Diamant Martinique. 

A Magnet’s Attraction 

Returning to Atnerica aftCT as«-y 
assignment in Europe has been raaer 
thanmany had led me to bdieve. I w ^s 
warned about ailtnrc sbock, ^olerK£. 
educational dedine, the breakdown of 
the nation’s infrastroctnre. . . 

But what I found was a society with 


hopeiui oi me wunu. , 

The longer we lived m Europe, die 
more we came to realize how prescrip- 
tive the society was. Just before we left, 
my son asked' if we had to register with 
the police when we moved back. 

The talk now is of partitioning Bos- 
nia. an apartheid solution just wnen the 
world desperately needs more brother- 
hood. Europe is Bosnia, filled with perry 
distrusts and deep-seated xenophobia. 

In contrast. America remains a re- 

Mexican immigrant wins a scholarebip 
to the University of Chicago, an Afri- 
can-American was chairman of ihe joint 
chiefs of staff, a Jewish woman is named 
to the Supreme Court. 

America has always benefited from 
the contributions of iis imnrigrants. l 
hope that those voices that would have 
us close our doors are few in number. 

NICHOLAS H. SOMMERS. 

Chicago- 


that was before the jury. 
comment on whether the pumpmen' 
was deserved. But if n was d^ened, 
the amount seems not unreasoMb^. 
To a big company today, a S10 million 
fine can be a slap on the wnsu 


SAM ABRAMS. 
London. 

Slavery Then and Now 

Reztirdin* “ Britton Rebuffs Clinic 
Over LabJr Standards" I Bus, ness/ Ft- 
nance. Jan. IS r. 

Accordina to Sir Leon Bntian. 

trade commissioner of jjlf , 

Union, “restricuons on child ana slave 
labor^ eas\ to support in ineory but 
difficult to enforce through the world 

“tWidnhell^Enrcp^ 

and Americans who opposed slave labor 
were not so pusillanimous. 

DENIS MacSHANE. 
Divonne. France. 


P aris — Like many people. 1 used | 

to feel awkward and confused w h«L « 

: 

But how- could! act normal with such 

for a person to live m a 
Hovrard, my h^andj^ ^as 
ft Q metcra) before his acmdenL tic was 
LphSSmau Who loved outdoor acuv- 

MF.ANWHILE 

itics He adored cvcling. and takmg 
S“g. long walks. ^ had never been 

[ ^^one day he feU from a roof, and 

the worid tred ^ddeoly into one of 

hospi ^ 

' ^fS’er.ffiard hid broken oitiv a 
- couple of vertebrae, but that “L 
look. He was pennanmtly paralyzed 

- fr °S^ oSfi^^h in 

,t 

S'. 

c - ities. Slowly. Howard, and I hy*n to 
a»i™md_mome». who, I ** 


punitive Indeed 

Regarding “ Good Sense and Law" 
(Letters. Jan. 19): 

Sanh-Victor Elias is wrong: There is 
nothing insane about the S78 milbon in 
S SS^es levied in the Do^o 
Hzza case because, in this context S78 
million is not that much money- Some 
receive that much m annual 
compensation; for large cor^mtions. 
S^Uarnetfarenotun^uJ 

A punitive award is, of course, m 
tended to punish; it has to he larg 
to hurt. Without the eMdence 


Gtros and Them 

Regarding “ Don't Gel Comforudde 
Under This Volcano ” ( Meanwhile . Jan. 
27 ) bv David Reid: 

Mr. Reid mentioned the 

quote from Fred AUen, Jie 19Ms Jgo 
and movie comedian, who said. Can 

?Srai?rgreat, if you are an orange. 

PHILIP REAVIS. 

Paris. 


that awKwaru uiumw,, , a , 

P Thadn't yet understood that the ^ca- P 
dent had consigned my husband to *e t( 
fringes of society, that he wottid aever 
again be looked at casuaDy onthe street. J 
Hehad won instant memb^ship m 

little-seen, much-neg)ectal mmon^. 

And so I was enraged when pejP« 
sured at him as if be were on chrolay. 
nr when they spoke to him through me, 

damaged and 1 were his interpreter Fe* 
neoole seemed to imagine lhat on this 
ShSlchair sat a perfectly "“f 

— except for a bruise on his spmalMrd. 
We had prepared ourselves mentally 

J V tefflSii i, , diflicult etty 

for ihe wheelchair-bound, but we dido t 
theaters, grocery stores were now off 

■ gSBssgS 

, Satars£?S 

{ and unexpected steps became insur- 

ssteMga 

chair maneuver. Besides, they 


shrug, it was too late to change anything 

“i&’IS'bfctr Howard’s life 
arm ild be. 1 told an American visitor not 
fouottjd ten. 

StpTcof & United S^tB -harc W^ 

gfisStt^SSg 

Smplete equality of access everywhere. 

feel if say he were suddenly wheeldiair 

of a public loileu (This can be a senous 
mauer Urine can back up into the fad 
nevs requiring prolonged hospualiza- 

ihis, just make an effort to understand. 

Todav 1 no longer have that ^ 
feeling when l see someone in a wh«l 
chair Our friends and close acquauti' 
2S are very aware of the disabled; 
jEfuSi rav husband like any olha 
man StiJL there are few days when 
Howard does not suffer the shame and 
SSatio^f not being able to seem^ 

a counter, to make a phone call to boaro 

a bus, to take a stroll on a sidewalk, to 
: Office, a theater, a restaurant, to 

' H °wwd wm 

i popular with the young pe opte«n 

? toys, techair is a wondetfd accom- 

;; 

- 

^ Se It's his back that is broken, keeping 
3 hhn frornmoving his l^TTreys^ 
,i c comprehend: Howard had sa sfflilflji 
Jf Mw’his legs don t move, and he rolls 
ae' around on a chair. That s all 



The writer is a Paris-based jourrudiA 
She contributed this comment to the Inter 
national Herald Tribune 

Snow Happens 

F OR YEARS, residents of many, Ohio 

d tie haveassumed an °bhgauon to 

shovel their sidewalks within 24 hour; trf 
a snowfall Should they not do so. and a 
passerby fall and be injured, a lawsuit 

has ruled that since everyone knows that 
s^w makes the ground slippCTy. ho^ 
miners aren’t liable for uyurKS Suf f oed 
because of snow or icexovered sidew^te. 
^Tsocicr, 

s^«—ysrBS 


general news 


.. ... - GEiNiittAL 

trudia: The Battle That 


Somalia: j 

By Rick Atkinson , J 

Washington Past Service 

nisssssystes | 

«Miih Mog^ishu that tire Somahs 

sardonically cdl ! 

Colond Afi Aden tad fenced fas ; 
Sunday lunch Oct. 3 
lounging with h» “ 

uigmtorder canreovaj^.rajho. , 
tjl soldiere hads^tmtoa 
buUding near the 
about 

Somali prisoners, ? K ^ din ^ i S° 

"Reinforce the western 
hewastoWbybtoa^rm^^ 
Sharif Hassan Chnmstiejrao 


*Arocket-propelled grenade had . 
already d2nred two Amencan 
lives. At 43) PAL, « nunuw 

ter the assanh be^ a rmmdhM 

fatally crippled the Bfack Hwik 
htfcqpta “own w Swpa &-L 

been orbitoig ova^. 

It crashed into an -alley off Free- 
dom Roadabout 

the buadmg that Task Force Rang* . 

cr hadassaulled. ; . ' 

The loss df a hdicopwi.had not 
been unanticipated by Major. Gen- 


/v • j. Reaction FoiCC IDUSlCTCd 

Ttett0f fl B pri f o ? a f w^ta ss £arj5 S^ssix^b 

killed before tire ordeal ended, as Warrant Officer bfi- c^rriere. /SfalS P.M-. a 

Ss"- 


Second of two articles. 


^^SSpSerHowitalto a 

ssagisSs i 

i 

would dug it out in ] 

and AnKncwM 

^rfd^cftoeUmt^Na- 

raraed the . cnmaha. 

•ftSSfftw- 

p * ^^^Force Bflngo* . 

ment of commandos. 

“ “ S^S« of n ? btUL 

did and other icauw ^ . 

This accwnL^ So0| ^ i and 
views with doz^s^ details the 

U5. rfwtot- 

Force Ranger’s 
°f sc°to 


eral WiDiam F. Garrison, com- 

ssSaSsSSL^k : 

xoptei used mthat eMrosews™ 

anW-6 Lattie Bird sloped m 

next to the wreckagt One of *e 

pDots dashed into F® 
hdped two Ddta .snmo^ one of 

perino, .hurried _east 
■ trooDS. traifing fire with Somali 
5 pmmendsora^ to^^^ 

J ^tS^or so U^ ^drers 
- cxmsoHdatmgnear ttedown^h^ 
^mtaTFrcedom Road and tihre 

i- search-and-rescue team suffered 

L Arable casualty Sc 

« mnnnt rhmnph the neigh - 


sfisagffSS TSaiav-a:: 

ss?**® 1 BgiS&a: 

^L^ton a l^p^UandedS^ north. Thw wereto^jj 1 ^ | 

♦hi* Olvmmc Hold, Mohammed a full ammunition dip redeet-prop^ed menade 

ssa-jssa sS-ams agsssrs 

-BSf*-. ? -a- £S&iai i 5Art 
W BSSESfitfraffl sAwij* — «• 

^ than 15 meters (.50 fed) from Fof coospkmous gallantry m of- Bed through Ranser 

he was sitting. Tbs hdiew- f ^wir lives to defend their bushes to reach Task Force Range* 
S^rWhKeen bit inife Shngart and ^ , :5 5 AM. They remamed jhere 

S ^froS’et-propdled grenade ^™fc 5 oSwould be nomi- mitfl 

vlul? orbiting almost dkectly ^ovct the Medal of Honor, .Of- tow rope succe^mpiying^^ 

the wreckage of the first Blade ^ Durant would survive 11 days the wreckage of Super . 

- SfSiS to bear witness to their to extract the body ^ 


JOBS 1 

..peace , 


■ 

* 1' ^ •' • 



feslEs SzsttSP affiSSEir 

sMsasS' Sbs^s ass^^. 

of the first Hadt SSSSSS1 SSg^rSCS § oma lis niA Attacking Envoys 


The destruction at 4:40 P.M. ot ^ or ‘ Chief warram 

« Black Hawk, Super 6-4, -rh- battle would wax and wane Wolcott- _ , 

con^uSmd planning fOTGcmoal ^ ^ ^ dawn. In his offiaat Meanwhile, C j5^ c -S C StwLn 
SU. Tn<A Force Rangw had UN aanpouud, M^or General ^ infantry s-d Batum_ 

S^ouafa troops to defend one Thomas^Monlgomeiy. com- pushed souto from NauondStrMt 

^^^overiM two was impossible. ^ conventional UB. forces t search the wreckage of ^ 

apnareStiTsir- SS ordered the i Quid, Rj- ^ed Black Hawfa 

SSfSw from the 10th Moun- blood trails suggest^ the fare of 

The aviation commander. Lieu- ^ jjjviaon to regroup for anoth- w bo to the 

=? Tl n-su^n,^ - — J 


ml of 1?6 P^Sin tire m- 

S ties last j™' nrivate waten- 

dogsrwP-^S^Sd Older, 
Restoration « 
said berc Monday- 


vnrniub i — -v- ~-_ n 

sas»is' 

to coocentrale ontoem^^^ 1 

■ in theb^t 

of a five^ tiuc^ Bstcning m us- 

riffle 

gsirMsrs- 

would bi,yisibte 
- ^SkFwxRanger 

to take the prisoners by cwjg 
‘ 'directly to the surfi^ tojjj 

Raneer battalion commanoer, 

LkSSmui- ^ Colonel. Dajiny 
McKnight, was ordered to ron- 

. force the crarit sUe. 

Gunfire raked the ccmvoy at ev- 

; enxntmsecfioiL.SoinalBs^W 

\.i^s^sss& 

t nr*** 1 against the cab of a truck m 
* of WarsaroeT decapitating the 

■ T American driver. . 


The DdUL squadron cotaim*** the Pakistam ana — Uysian kniea, pius ** r 

also twice rdrcted a similar request manders, askmg to boi^ a£d 7 Malaysians wounded. Somau 

SS. He *0 "Wg* ““ i^putltolo^atSlItolled 

the sectad crash sire by Black omimander and asked him to ms- ^ 814 wounded. 

Hawk — then agreed to a third patc h several dozen tanks to Moga- ^final act was played out Jan. 

Swt learning the Qtnck Reaction ^ from ibeir base at Baled, 30 ^ eight Sonuh pm- 

Force had been ambushed- miles away. . ^ oners in UN custody were releasea 

JSSfiSKS* 

found a clearing about 

v .j '»r aLb ikvwiH rrSMl Sim — 


«- Somalia _ ssrAtwst ^CJurlX; 

SSsr.™ 

“alppona. of *<&- bu J$? cia]s ta mo hospiui coo- 

a-skst^ 

malis were killed m the clash, whi ^^fsomali Nauooal Allmnre. m w six people 

toed a few mmuas “Ironicany. tire convoy was uk- woods ” a doctor at 

There was no independent con y_s. diplomats to meet said, 

finnatioo. Ta«h be- SNA representatives to complain on *.JjL g ( J another hospital smd 

Mcrcasing viol.ee, nan- J^^bad be^admiued 

^si^'GSralAidid|smhtu was fired upontirerc^ 

declared a unilateral cease-fire m nsaiuu« ; 


SwettbTtesecondc rashsn^ “ 
He touched dowD long enough for 

ter Ssgeant Gary L^ Gordon, ti 
leap from the Black Hawk bay 
Ten minutes later, a rocket-pro- 

tfJS&SSaB5 

cSpter, knocking his co-pilot m- 
oonsckms and shearing away the 
leg of a tirirdDeUa snip« tnannmg 

S door gun. Officer Goff ena kep t 

the helicopter airborne long 
enough U> make a crash landing at 
the New Port 

With their overhead protection 
oone. Sergeant .Gordon and ber- 
Kot shughart found themselves 
diSoerately outnumbered by *■ 
jMbgunnren swarming toward the 
tolfcTsupa^ 64. Ttf ^ 
vanished from tire cockpit shortly 
after the crash. He was never seen 


Tbeltahanscot^u^-*^. - ^ 

tanks would not be needed. The mwoga _ . TT 

firne B<«lle w™» - 

. ,nni, AUvander Adamovidi, w, u^ni « Rossi ^ at f 


Reuters 

PARIS — Pierre Boulle. SI, the 

French writer whoK £ 

spired the movies “Bridge on tire 
liver Kwai” and ^anet of the 
Apes,” died in Pans after a long 

illness. 

Bora in Avignon to J*aMn 
Boulle trained as an engneer aim 

&«sSjg 

He was awarded several medals 
forbravety. 

-Bridge on the ^ver Kwai, one 
of his earliest works, was tinned 


into a movie and became a tnpk 
Academy Award winner in m/. 

The movie won an Oscar for best 
film, while David Lout was named 
best director and Alec Guinness 
was best actor. 

in “Planet of the Apes.” dtiecred 

by Franklin Schaffner in l?68 “J? 
starring Chariton Heston, a^ 

^Sraiught in a ume waip find 

SSSba* on Mu Je 


of apes. ... I 

JSSSXZttZt 

titled “Hlon” 


Alexander Adamovki, 66, 
Belamssian Aothor-Aclmst 

New York Times Service 

Alexander M. Adamovich, 66. a 
•prfflra srian author and advocate ra 
oolitical democracy, died of a heart 
Snack Wednesday in Moscowjn- 
terfax reported. He had beeuactM 
at the heart of cultural land polgKrt 
life in Moscow since the late lsous. 

He gained renown in the Soviet 
Union for his stirring prose about 
the struggles of the 
against the German Army in Be- 
larus during World War n. 


Count Rossi De Montetera, 
Heeded Martini e Rossi 

TURIN — Count Napoleonc 
Rossi Di Montdera, who hdp^ 
make tire family Martini e Rossi 
drinks company famous aiwmd 
the world, died of natural causes at 
92. 

The count helped expand a spar* 
kiing wine and vermouth company 
founded by his grandfatiwr m 
1863. investing heavily with his 
three cn^rins suter World War IL 
He held the posts of managing 

>• a wKulnii of the COm* 


frequent visitor 


rin, despite having offidally re- 
tired. 

Yevgeni P. Leonov, 67, one of 
Russia's best-known movie and 
theater actors, died Saturday m 
Moscow. The cause of douh was 
not immediately known. His career 
covered dozens of movies and stage 
producuons. . , „ 

Nick Cravat, Burt Lanwster sac* 
robatk sidddek in his circus days 
and in 1950s movie, died of lung 
cancer Saturday in Woodland Hills 
near Los Angeles. They teamed up 
, io perform stunts in two films, 
“The Flame and the Arrow ^ m 
l 1950 and “The Crimson Pirate” in 
■ 1952. 



International Herald Tribune 
Tuesday , February 1. 1994 
Page 6 " 



Male Bohemians in Velvet 

Up-and-Coming Designers Steal Show 




By Suzy Menkes 

International Herald Tribune 


P 


ARIS — Ii was poetry in 
motion. Down the mens- 


wear runways came plush 
velvet jackets, soulful cor- 


*■ velvet jackets, soulful cor- 
duroy suits, shaggy sweaters, shirts 
cut like artists' smocks and floppy 
cravats ousting neckties — clothes 
redolent of dead poets given fresh 
life for die fall season. 

“For poets with a few cents," 
said Paul Smith, to encapsulate the 
Bohemian mix of tweed and tartan, 
the pepper-and-salt flecked sweat- 
ers, the short velvet coat and elon- 
gated jackets of his new collection. 

“Poetry and suffering, inspired 
by Proust." said GUles Rosier, 
whose models in the GR 816 collec- 
tion had a languid turn -of-th e-cen- 
tury decadence with their painted 
eyebrows and insolent mixes of 


included teddy-bear-fur sweaters 
from Smith, and mohair every- 
where. 

But the revival of corduroy was 
the biggest story. Was there a single 
collection without its furrowed fab- 
ric? Givenchy made corduroy gen- 
tlemanly For a sturdy navy blue 
Norfolk jacket with a Jim belt. 
Gaultier made corduroy hip by 
showingjacket. vest, pants and kilt 
His powerful collection mixed 
countries and cultures, with a focus 


also gleamed through the season, 
with Rykiel showing a silver velvet 


-Sr** , 

.i. 


* 


with Rykiel showing a silver velvet 
jacket and gray flannel an impor- 
tant fabric m many collections — 
like Comrae des Ganjons's perfect- 
ly plain long shirt coat The color 
focus was also on brown, which has 
become a substitute for black, and 
bordeaux. 


PARIS MENSWEAR 


hairy tweed and tactile velvet 
The new man for the 1990s 


The new man for the 1990s is a 
soft touch. The unifying theme of 
the menswear season was soft sur- 
faces: the deep-pile luxury of a 
cranberry chenille vest at Hermes 
and Claude Montana's alpaca jack- 
et; or fluffy sweaters from the Bel- 
gian designers Dries Van Nolen 
and Dirk Bikkembergs. 

What about the suit? The three- 
or four-button jacket has become a 
new classic. But even houses known 
for tailoring have smashed up the 
suit, with Lanvin showing subtle 
mismatches or checked jackets and 
striped pants and Balmain’s Ber- 
nard Sanz bringing vibrant colors 
and soft textures to his confident 
show Monday. 

Even the master- tailor Nino Cer- 
ruti presented jackets as soft as a 
cardigan or ns light as a shirt, with 
suits mixing flecks and checks. 

Knitwear was big in every sense. 
There were cuddly comfort-blanket 
sweaters slopping bom neck to 
knees from all the strong designers: 
hairy purple mohair against liquid 
satin pants from Bikkembergs; 
Jean-Paul Gaultiers ethnic sweat- 
ers studded with buttons; Issey 


Miyake's feathery finish. 

the jacket is often a cardigan, 
with Rykiel Homme showing easy 
styles (or knits with matching mit- 
tens) and Kenzo producing magic 
carpet jackets to match the tribal 
rugs on his runway. The lush look 


SPRING SUMMER 
COLLECTION 


ESCADA 


Paris left bank 
For orders 


FAX: (1)42 84 2415 

Marie-Martine 


8, rue de Sevres, 

Paris 6th 


on Russia and Tibet, which en- 
abled Gaultier to dress up his fine 
tailoring as a regular jacket heaped 
with ethnic accessories or as an 
alpaca kimono coat slung like a 
priest's robe across the body. 

Kenzo — like most designers — 
sent out corduroy as a staple suit, 
but also as denim-style workwean 
blue-corduroy clad workmen, each 
carrying his tools of the trade. Us- 
ing “real’’ people is the current 
fashion diche, so Yohji Yamamoto 
had a motley group to emphasize 
the weirdness of his circus theme 
(wide clown pants hanging from 
suspenders and long boxy jackets). 
Yet he also sent out an impeccable 
cream corduroy coat. 

The only rival to corduroy was 
velvet: Dominique Merloni's elon- 
gated dandy jacket with tapestry of 
fancy flowers; or Masatomo’s vel- 
vet primed like tweed. 

There was also a revival of speck- 
led, hairy bowl-of-muesli tweeds, 
which emphasizes the switch away 
from the flat fabrics erf the 1980s. 

The shows were not all poetic. At 
Comme des Garmons, the tweeds 
looked as lumpen as a bowl of 
porridge. They were worn two sizes 
too small by shabby models, who 
turned out to be a troupe of acro- 
bats. Their antics could not conceal 
the fact that designer Rei Kawaku- 
bo’s apron dresses, kilts and boiled 
wool jackets were nothing new. 

By contrast. Smith’s regular 
clothes, touched with color and 
fantasy, but never looking weird or 
unwearable, were a service to fash- 
ion — the citation Smith received 
when he was made a Commander 
of the British Empire by Queen 
Elizabeth in the New Year. 

R unning counter to the aesthetic 
velvets and dapper tweeds is a 
tougher tribal feeling, expressed at 
its most elevated in elegant blanket 
stripes at Claude Montana and 
Hennts, or in Gaultier’s kills with 
their plaids vibrantly recolored. 

Men’s fashion also seems to hark 
| back to the Middle Ages — and not 
just because Nikos showed bits of 
armor with bis body-sculpted un- 
I derpants and had his models joust- 
I ing. Armor was the inspiration for 
I sweater patterns at Miyake, where 
I themes of destruction included 
denim treated to look as though it 
| had gone rusty or the hem of a shirt 
scorched in a fixe. 

The dull silver of a suit of armor 


Although the most inventive col- 
lection was from Gaultier, the 
men’s fashion seasOQ proved that 
the force is mostly with the up-and- 
coming generation. For all the inci- 
sive tailoring, the rich color palette 
and impeccable details at Montana. 
his macho image seemed all too fa- 
miliar. Thierry Mugler also stuck to 
his firm silhouette, enlivened with 
plaid (a strong trend) and by using 
quilted fake-leather trims. At Her- 
mes, Veronique Nicfaanian just tin- 
kered with color and texture as takes 
on modem luxury. 

Dries Van Notea gave a simple 
presentation, with waiters serving 
beer and mussels (to reflect the 
designer’s Belgian background). 
The show had all the right modem 
touches of romance in the soft fab- 
rics and cravats, and a new young 
silhouette, with flared cuffed pants 
slung low on the hips. 


B ikkembergs (who 

lured the fashion crowd 
into an underground car 
park) had soft pajama 
pants, piped at the hem. and well- 
cut jackets with triangular seaming 
at back. He also had fine knitwear, 
including red stitches on cream. 
Sudden shafts of color is a trend, 
with Van Noten offering a flash of 









fSSfc-ifc 







• £r-=~-' v - 




pink (a new hot color) and SO’s 
Dutch designer Alexander von 


Dutch designer Alexander von 
Slob be sending out peacock blue 
leather suits in a show that was 
mostly played out in subtle colors 
and textures. 


Jos£ Levy' — a young French de- 
signer — used bright blue for his 
Tin-Tin silhouette of short pants 
(bound in satin) with short jacket 
The younger generation seems to be 
moving away from the casual 
sportswear to tidier tailoring. John 
Rocha, showing at the SEHM (Sa- 
lon International de rHabiOezneni 
Mascuhn) exhibition, blurred the 
line between long jackets and brief 
coats. 




The power of the French fashion 
season is its international flavor. 
Claude Miserey, SEHM*s presi- 
dent, said Sunday that for the first 
lime foreign exhibitors, at 55 per- 
cent, had overtaken the French. 
The 1, 107 exhibitors from 90 coun- 
tries include the first manufacturer 
from mainland China. That, as 
much as changes in men’s fashion, 
may be the shape of things to come. 







m vM! 


sm 



* V* •- J HtnHXrn S -T>- 1 




Clockwise from lop left: Jean-Paul Gaultier’s tailored coat with sloppy cream sweater patterned in' red; GiUes Roster’s Proustian 
Tibetan theme; Paul Smith’s pattern and plaid; Dirk Bikkembergs speckled tweed suit; Dries Van Noten’s neo-romantic vest and cravat . 


BOOKS 


SEPARATION 




By Dan Franck. Translated from 
i French by Jon Rothschild. 22'/ 
| pages. $19. Alfred A. Knopf. 


The Savoy Group of Hotels and Restaurants 


Reviewed by 
Michiko Kakutani 



D AN FRANCK’S novel “Sep- 
aration" was first published 


LJ aration” was first published 
in France in 1991 to enormous crit- 
ical and popular acclaim, winning 
the prestigious Prix Renaudot and 
selling 350,000 copies, a record that 
can be compared with that of Mar- 


guerite Duras’s huge 1985 best-sell- 
er, "The Lover.” 

Readers of both books will no- 
tice immediate similarities, most 
notably a solemn, willfully con- 
trolled’ approach to emotionally 
volatile subject matter, and a man- 
nered. reductive style that attempts 
to turn the specific into die generic. 

Both books, in short, present 
themselves as an anomalous com- 
bination of die French nouveau ro- 
man and the supermarket romance. 

Whereas Duras recounted the 
exotic storv erf a sexual ‘liaison be- 


tween a 15-year-old girl and a 
wealthy older man in French Indo- 
china. Franck tells a decidedly 
more bourgeois tale. 

“Separation" concerns the mari- 
tal difficulties of a writer and his 


wife, and takes place in the comfy 
imper-middle-class environs of 


upper-middle-class environs of 
Paris and the south of France. Its 
characters feel like cliches. 

“They sent money to the Kurds 
and to the restaurateurs who do- 
nated rood to the homeless,” writes 
Franck, ‘’gave 10-franc coins to the 
panhandlers on the rue Mouffe- 
lard. and imbued the children. 


whom they called ‘the boys,’ with a 
multicultural education. 

“She went to sales at Sonia Ry- 
kiel, he owned a par of Westons. 
They traveled by air, took taxis, 
went to openings, and never drank 
less (and rarely more) than appela- 
lions conaviiex. They planned their 
July vacations in February and do 
longer bought Moroccan sausage 
sandwiches at demonstrations.” 

Though such descriptions help 
delineate Franck’s fictional territo- 
ry. his characters never emerge as 
anything but blurry representatives 
erf this milieu- They arc referred to 


CHESS 


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TWI BERKELEY ■ lUUUDC-E'S THE CO.NMALOHT • THE SAVOY • THE LYCOS ARMS 


By Robert Byroe 

A lexander shabalov 

met Larry Christiansen is 
Round 9 is the 1993 United States 
Championship. What began as an 
English Opening turned into an old 
variation of rite Queen’s Indian De- 
fense after 5 d4 cd 6 ed e6. Black 
does not have to worry about being 
cramped by 7 d5 because 1..3\A 
puts pressure on the white center. 

The situation was altered by 7 
a3, which renews the poational 
threat of d5 forcing 7_d5. After 8 
cd Nd5, there are ways to exploit 
the weakening of the a4-e8 diago- 
nal, yet none seems to work. Thus. 
9 Ne5 can be met bv 9_Nc3 10 be 
a6. and if 1 1 Qa4. then 1 l~.Nd7 12 
c4 Bd6 13 B/4 Be? 14 Bc5 0-0 15 
Bd6 Re8 leaves White behind and 
Black with attacking chances. 

Christiansen chose 9 Bb5, but 
after 9~-Bc6. be backed away with 
10 Bd3 and Shabalov sensibly re- 
duced White’s attacking chances 
by exchanging a set of minor pieces 
with 10_Nc3 1 1 be. 


SHA3ALCYIB1ACK 

' -V.J'rT.El 


■Will 


m % ^ m 


errr, -rsa 

fe '-Jr* i 3 


sacrificed a pawn with 17 Rel Ba3 
to get an attack going with 18 Ng5, 
which threatened 19 Nh7! Kh7 20 
Qh5 Kg7 21 Qh6 KgS 22 Bg6!. with 
destruction to follow-. 

ShabaJov's knight returned in 
time with IS...N/5. He had ana- 
lyzed 19 Bb5 Re7 20 Be5 as harm- 
less after 20.. *6 21 Bd3 Rd7 22 
Ne4 Be7. 


Christiansen’s 37 Rd6? was sure- 
ly a time-pressure blunder. He 
must have overlooked that after 
37_Rel 38 Kg2 Qh8!, there was no 
defense to 39_Qhl mare. Thus, 39 


« 3 r c m I g n 

OfiUSTIAJISENiWHTrE 


Position after 37 Rd6 


After l6...Bb7. a classical ritua- 
tioa arose: the « kite d4 pawn gave 
Christiansen an advantage in space 
ia the center and the possibility of 
a mating attack: ShabaJov’s hope 
for advantage lay in the endgame 
where he could attack the pawn 
couple at c3 and d*t. Chri'tiajisen 


Christiansen's 19 h4 gave Shaba- 
lov time to exchange off an attacker 
with 19...Bd6 20 Bd6 Qd6. The 
black queen could now play a role 
in the defense of the king. 

The advance 27 d5 was a last 
chance for Christiansen to stir up 
complications, bat Shabalov had 
no need to fear. His 27. J6 28 Re6 
Ne6 29 d6 Qf8 i29-Qd8 does not 
stop 30 d7!) 30 d7 Rcd8 31 de/Q 
Re8 left him a pawn up. 

On 32~Kh8, Christiansen could 
not recoup h is material with 35 
QaT? since after 33-Nc5 34 Kg2 
Re7 35 Qb6 Ne4. White loses a 
piece. 


Rhl 43 f4 Qh2 44 Kf3 Rfl 45 Ke3 
Qf4 46 Ke2 ends in 46_Qf2 mate. 
Also 39 Kf3 Qhl 40 Kf4 Re4 41 
Ne4 leads to 41.-Qe4 mate. Chris- 
tiansen gave up. 


only as “he” and “she.” Thor as- 
sorted friends are simply denoted by 
letters — C, G, R, S, etc. Most of 
these people, we’re told, were radi- 
cals during the student uprisings of 
die ’60s; m later years, they have 
come to regard themselves as yup- 
pies with a conscience. 

Though we’re told that the hero 
is a writer, we know little about the 
bocks and screenplays he has writ- 
ten; we know even Iks about what 
his wife does for a firing. His back- 
ground is sketchy: his parents were 
divorced when he was 10; he still 
looks to his father for approval. 
Her background is virtually never 
mentioned. 

No doubt Franck has adopted 
this sketchy, minimalist approach 
in an effort to lend Ms story a kind 
of universal resonance: his hero is 
constantly drawing comparisons 
between his maritm woes and the 
woes erf others, between his travails 
as a cuckolded husband and the 
plight of men in genetaL 

Unfortunately, the lack . of detail 
in “Separation” makes for a vague, 
disembodied narrative and charac- 
ters who fed more fike tDostratioos 
in a psychology textbook than Qcsh- 
and-blood human beings. 


The plot, such as it is, concents 
the unraveling of the marriage erf 
Fiandfs man and woman. The man 
notices that his wife is acting dis- 
tant: di strac te d, preoccupied, cooL 
At first she insists that nothing is 
wrong; 3aier, die reveals die has 
fallen in kive^ with another man. The 
husband is alternately angry and 
sad, vengeful and fcrgmn& hostile 
»rwt toder. 

Sometimes heproends to be sym- 
pathetic, hoping his wife will con- 
fide in him and appreciate his stead- 
fastness and idrahOity. Sometimes 
hegives her ultimatums, hoping she ' 
wffbe frightened by the prospect of 
divorce; Sometimes he acts cold and 
dismissive, hoping his chilliness will 
drive her bad: to his arms. 

. Though some of Fiaw4'sdescrip- 
titms erf the couple’s slow dan/y to- 
ward divorce arc genuinely moving, 

his narrative bogs down in increas- 
ingly strained and sentimental im- 


The book’s other problems — its 
trite use of lan gnay. and its reli- 
ance on doll, meaningless abstrac- ' 

bans — have no such easy solution. 


Michiko Kakutani is on the naff 
of The New York Tones. 


QUEEN'S INDIAN DEFENSE 


Ghrtam Sbabalor 


WHAT THE y RE READING 


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Herald Tribune World Slock Index ©, composedof 
stable stocks from 25 countries, compiled 
News. Jan. 1, 1992 = 100. 


m A ■■ -ap 

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Imam tional Henild Tribune, Tuesday. February 1, 1994 

s Governments in the Dock 

^ European CEOs Bemoan Leadership Void 

^ _ . c,w^ nr«iJ«ir of rte Kiel Institute of Work 


Page 7 



. ; :: . ■: ■ ■ 

World Index 

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ItSaysBeform 
h * Irreversible 9 

By Kevin Murphy 

Jlttermuwoal Herald Tribune 

■■■ BOMBAY — Urging intcma- 
tiooal credit-rating agencies to ac- 
knowledge a' "ronatkable .«£ 

' n> Mf °o tnrnaround, the head of the 

Sjeserve Bank of India called Mon- 
day for a reassessment of his coun- 
try's sovereign risk. 

“Our reform program is on 
course; we can’t go back," the cen- 
tral bank governor, said Chakra- 
vasty Rangarajan. “With the re* 
markable turnaround m our 
balance of payments and the stabil- 
ity of the rupee, our credit rating 

riwnld be re-exanrined.” ■ 


By Alan Friedman 
and Jonathan Gage 

fnientadoaol Herald Tribune 

DA VOS Switzerland — Top executives of major 

leadership that threatens to prolong recession and 
le °QaloDe 1 Bm^etti, chairman ^0/nwJi^. jte 

„/b«, mri/arunion Troup, warned that the 


Skben. president of the Kiel Institute of World 

Economics in Germany. 

Following are excerpts from the 

"wfSodi: Steel is the least fashionable 
most difficult industry in the world. We ha e 
divided our big steel company in three P^.pm 
the companies on the market for privatization, 

. . rTTT: ■ local nartners and 


Fiat Sees Loss 
Ol $1 Billion 
As ’93 Sales Fall 


in demand affecting i* principal 

TUMN-FialSpA.M)J^. to m would be tm- 

' apliVS S?”^TlTSmmto other “difficult year." but would 

car sales in Europe dumped far lhe C0BW said it 

beyond ffipec^ons. was determined to press ahead with 


1C M 

in an v country in Europe. 

He sooke during a roundtable discussion of corpo- 

manic Forum. 

Mr De BenedettL in remarks that wm 

!SSa 3 s£ 55 ans 

^Jdefoo “fl rdigious position on interest rates that 
was stifling European industry. 

M L..L..v.£,.inAirmi nfl roundtable pama- 




Latin America 


Appns.weqnH^» 
OoMCTOtlS Piw- 13B.77 



A S O N D J ” • •• • 

1993 MM 1993 ^ - 

§£| World Index ' . ; ' 

T7» Mm fda UJ. 

in amm. Od'rp-i-f 

aharwts&ewtentdaaadaamtmdari. — ~ a. 


Industrial Sectors 


. Ilea. .*•£ ai±"' ' -dow dope (bmp 

Utsues ,27^4 122:97 +!U7 Rwl UlwleU. . .l?t-7P. i 2 ^ . 

i-»- ,r"" mm tot.io dj. 

^ „ a ,SZ : .ma*mz Mm. 

- MaraUTrixinB 

•’ ! - .NDIpr,-.*- j Jt- n-.-.v*.- • ' ■• _ • ; 


below mvestmcni grauc 
sessed in February 1991," Mr. Ran- 
earajan said, noting the study was 
made before the current refotmist 
government ^rne to power m June 
of that year. 

In New York, the nagor credit 
a er ri^ defended their ratmgs of 
India, pointing out they were the 
same as Mexico’s, another country 
in the throes of reform. Moody's 
Investors Service raws both coun- 
tries Ba2, which is two levels betow 
investment grade, and Standard & 
poor’s Carp. BB-plus. which is one 

level below. 

Vincent Ttuglia, Moody’s senror 

analyst for India, noted that India 
had a high debt-to-exports ratio of 

25, andTemaiiis vulnerable finan- 

. daily.” 


Thev said that to survive the recession it was neces- 
uuytomake savage cuts in operating 
Sici/ig work force levels and establishing more 
manufacturing operations and new vemur«m£rw- 
'inglw-wage markets in Southeast Asia and Eastern 

Europe. „ _ 

jsisews 7 HS 

company; Romano Frodx, chairman of!RI.the/ta/ 
timsteel-to-airlines state conglomerate, and Horst 


making onc-imraoi idcuuuito «* , 

dant using a pre-pension scheme and layoffs. 

Mr. Murofushi: We started 
our company in 1989 and we nM 
of managers, placing more weight on operating 

^ WeTSave lifetime employment in Japan, so we 
are seeking some early retirements and putung 
^^w^tocreides. The concept of Ufeume 
emplwnent if threatened now, and subject to 

re wTalso have decentralized the organization 
which indudes 160 offices in 92 counto^d we 
have given more authonty f ^, mvesir ^L“„ 
financing to local managers. We are aUoa i g 

alliance in growing busmesses siwh as our amance 
with Time Warner in the United Slates, in order to 
devdop multimedia businesses not only in the U.S. 
hut aSo in Japan and all over the world. Weare 
also putting more emphasis on growing markets 
such as China and other Asian countries. 

Mr. Gtimour: Td menuon two areas 
worked on during the recession. First of all cost 
See DAVOS, Page 9 


jng prdiminary results, the ; ““P 3 " 
ny said revenue last yeu feU_ to 5- ^ 
trillion lire from 59.1 uiDionm 1991 
If confirmed, the operating loss 
would be the first for the European 
automaker since the 1970s and 
would reflect the drop of about 15 


for this year, the company sain « 
was determined to press ahead wiin 
its strategy of boosting investment 
and cutting costs. The company is 
locked in a bitter strode wjjt 
unions over plans to lay off 1 5, JOO 
workers, which is about 7 percent 
of its Italian workforce. 

Fiat Auto posted 1993 net sales 

r iin> iJnwn from 


would reflect lhe drop of about .15 ■ triton lire, down from 

percent in European car sal« J* in 1992. Its invest- 

year. Fiat made a profit of 551 were 5 06 f) uiilion against 

billion lire (S324 milhonl m 1992. uiilion a year earlier and its 

The company dro raid tt ^ ^ b Tof employees fell to 
launching a 1 trillion bre fixed rate 33Q from 12 5.37R. 

10-vear bond issue and a Lhance to - ^ . three brands, 

win a car as an incentive Fat. sold 

tors to buy the issue. The company miUjon cars and commercial 

Win give away 200 car pnzes as which U5 mil- 

incenuves, it said. . ]d m Europe, where it 

n * Sdts^SShei: boldsar, 113 pe^ern sbtae of the 
°TTjr . w nf about car market _ . . , 


^cfln Operating loss of aboul 

J r~ .. J :• kid in rttvTaie U1 3 


car maniCL , 

In Italy, Fiat’s market share rose 
close to 45 percent and should con- 
ihtankc to the “e.xcd- 


lysts expated a sinular loss. thanks to the “exed- 

Fiat said it had to operate in a ^ f ^ ew pumo 

“critical and worrying" economic tot launch ot tne 

environment m l993 ’ ,? riI ^, 1 ^ ' (Reuters. AFX. Bloomberg) 

“drastic and widespread decline 1 Kemtr >- 


Market 


r nr vear through March, Minister Morihiro Hosokawa s 
more than the past yeas . ^ks are trading at a package of political reform biDs. 
America* and n^^amdJeof Qf ^ ^ pB ^Wing conossions to Ae 


definitely tooviDgmt^^ldu^ propdling TWkyo sb^epnos to Jailuaryj helping boost 
OOT, it is dear that wtlhm pohtical Jevds that, by_ some meaaires .me by 16.14 percenL 

institutions this proc^ is stm cot- already n^nrationdttan three Ewt £ Monday 

— *• Mr Trnfifia said. He « r the neak of the bubWe economy ,a I'm 1*1 the inrlnc n 


* c : noc r nr ,he vear through Marcn, Minister Monniro nuswfc-»« = 

Rv Steven BruU mme than the past yeas . To] ? 0 ^jes are Jading at a package of political reform bills. 

jSseffiS 

ol .1 than thncp SiAUl, _ .. ^ 3 LToised onW on the nump-priiniDg measures to be un- 


ing&tunons uus *~r aireao 

troversial," Mr. Tragfia said. He atthepa »«“»■ ^ jo 229.12, tne inao ‘cuu““ j“- 

added tbatthe vulnerability of the titan four years ago. above half its peak levelhit at the 

reform process to a change m lead- analysts said that despite r | A ^ n n session of 1989. 

enhip wbs amply demonstrated by Mondays 7.84 peiamt surg^the j^gse investors, who have 
the fears that it would be derailed ^tird-biggest ever for tbe NIkkei ^y^mostiy at home, are making 
wbec Finance MmisterManmohan index, overseas and domestic ftmds a dollar shifL After a tronendous 
Sinrii recently threatened topstgn. would Kkdy continue to pour mto rally, ihw are taking pnrfits out of 
Guido Cipriani, SAP's analyst for •pojjyo stocks, if only for lack of ^ bond market ana putting uw 
India, said dial whik external pra- better alternatives. ftmdsintostocks,which bave fflU- 

suies had eased and he would expect p OT foreign investors, UB. and a worse decline since l 9«w 

thi. «*tml bank to stress this, India c^iusast Asian stocks are seen as th __ ii_s. shares in the first four 


^ Even with Mondays spike to 
: of the bubWe economy __ jt index remains just 
four years ago. . above half its peak level hit at the 


annear unconcerned. m compiling a seno 

P ^pSrple are focused only on the pump-pruning measur^ to be un^ 
supplvdemand relationship, and veiled later this week. The padcagp 
SaT definitely favors Japanese eq- could be worth as much as a r«wd 
iiities." said Paul Migliorato. a se- 15 trillion yen, including 6 trtihon 

SSTuSm * JaJtoe Fleming yeninincome taxcuts.andgmmon 
SSiritiS^ m public works spending and loans 

Tn essence, the argument for for housing investment and small 
shares in the world’s second-big- and medium sized ' 

MLUO . .1 . !. iU eamP tn TonlinMP mess reDOTtS. 


suns had eased and he wouiompow. For fonagn investors, u^. auu 

the cotiral bank to stress this, mma Southeast Asian stocks are seen as 
See INDIA, Page 11 overheated, having boomed for 


nmas imu — , nOQ 

fered a worse decline since 1989 
than U.S. shares in the first four 
years of the Great Depression. 

•qfahqmfityjo^gf^- 


ey- formula that was used to justny runcanu »»» -Tg 

Se rally in the bubble era of the duef economisi at the Fuji Re- 
late 19S0su “The fundamentals sull search Institute. 

In’tareue for a big rally, but Still he and others said, toe out- 
don t argu . trt tananesc economy re- 


ThinkingA he«wl — 

Oia-W«ild Charm Works 


yens (X UK --r-T"-. . . for a fog rally, DUI suu.neanaouwi»Mi»i.M»*v» 

“It’s hqmdityloofang f«al^ drat tor w lock for ^ Japanese economy re- 
gard market, siud Canreron g^^^uraid. mains clouded at besL . 

Umetsu, semor e^omist at MMS ^,000, Mr u oudoo k is Many uncertainties remain over 


umcuUi scuiui wws»w » ->- — - — . 

lnternaticmal “Funds are Dowmg 
to the relative safety of Japan. 

Yet based on prospective earn- 


ZJ.UUU, ivu* vtuww- — 

Key to toe bullish outlook is 
pewfound confidence following 
last weekend's passage of P nme 


fl UU wuuw«i — 

Many uncertainues remain over 

See TOKYO, Page 11 


Paris , London 
Stocks at Highs 

Reuters 

LONDON — European ex- 
changes ended toe month m 
high gear Monday, with record 
dosing highs set in Paris- Lon- 
don and Brussels, while 
Frankfurt's DAX index 
gained 2.06 percent. 

I The European component | 
of toe International Herald 
Tribune World Stock .Index 
rose 230 percenL to 120.32. 

London and Frankfurt got a 
boost from BMW’s purchase of 
Rover Croup from British 
Aerospace, while toe C AC-40 
index in Pans was lifted by 
lifted bv hopes for an interest 
rate cut In Brussels, a Belgian 
interest-rate cut boosted stocks, 
and toe move was seen as a 
harbinger of European easing 


'w n-u-'- the enlargement of the dnb of freomaik 

By Reginald .... democzaaes). 

International Hendd . .; . nhmi may not be ranch intoested in 

WASHINGTON affairs in the classic sense, but he is 

/ . eager lo eoonorac^ toneme 


Some peralc in Washington now see the 
aHX)r porat^ of the countries of Cratral and 

ffiwsassBSflas 

Thatistoofacfle. Americans tendtor^md 

EU membership as a quick fix, «£***£ 


role in lus mtemamjiw* year m cance. 

After so much ?A&tihe Uruguay RotimTs corn 

European IHot’s mirformre^toe : • — 

two years, ^’^Wj^S^officials ; " 

^S^ra^’ s ^ wast0 iS The president has 

ous«SLaistrations. - ^ can help open markets 

iorUS. goods and 
gtabflSxeEast Europe. 

< ^frartner ” SoffidaJs are agam sttessmg ^ necessary it was. fOT jJ*Umto 
S^ P ^SScans and Europeans storey ^ ^ Eur0 ^ U ^ t o^ tof 
- Amazmgly, 5°®“ ^ , write thendes of world trade. 

Wnh ten™ World Trafettg. 

. J^^t^teEtmpatri is obvious ttoi die 


Round-, conduoon ^ 

- Mr. Clinton’s pledge m Brussels to *todp 
■ . ' ■ lead" Europe’s integration suggests a degree 

The president has of overt A merican inter ference that coul 

figured outlhat the EU ««- 

wnihelp open markets 

“for U.S. goods and economic and political union- 

gtabiliae East Europe. 

' '— tions in otoer ways — even if they wron^y 

• , . . believe there is a better chance of temmg one 

kft much to be desired — and European voice at toe other end ^ 
onfimshed-— toe doang phasesof Atiraticphone line now that the Maastricht 
^^Staou^t homc to has come into forax 

Bekrw te amtegic leveL 


§ REPUBLIC NEW YORK CORPORATION 
SAFRA REPUBLIC HOLDINGS S.A. 

f ConsoUdated Statement of Condition 

and Summaries of Results 

I 1 c k mo a HFP1 IRL1C 


REPUBUC NEW YORK 
CORPORATION 


SAFRA REPUBUC 
HOLDINGS S.A 


December 31, I December 3 1, _ 

IQO, 1992 I 1993 ^992 

7^ thousan J>ofVS$ except r«r share Jaia» 

' a C 1 4 


figured outt 

hTTo?^^r-^two more 

Eastern and Oaiiral FmopL^ gut it is not just trade that is ai stake. The ^^!X-ntial visits to Europe scheduled this 

“U 5 . officials have key Mr. Cfinton wffl not be afcwed to 

¥ft£ZS5S^ , SSSB<tt S^SMCT- ^ fr^r dm Did Worid ^mn so essdy. 


Bdovrtestrategic leveL diere art 

id the Euro^U™ tourodt together mdutong 

rite thenfles of world trade. . mvironmeatal and competition P^o^rad 

W* the new World TratkOrgamzanra ^ where the relationship could 
soon to indude Russia and C3nn^ and tne we0 ^ strengthened, 
power of the developing S b« toe main point is that the pwW«»of 

tomorrow’s worid are mi^mmuadyw^ 
States will nosd toestr pport o f toe European and Europeans aetto- 

Uniou even more mfutoR.. .. t, « rnrtimats that, with two more 


aTtiBiSptifiwtai 

other two being auc 


Stip wth the United 


Assets _ , , $ 636,633 

Cash and due from banks 5346.647 

Interest bearing deposits with banks- “““ 1,1 10,434 

Precious metals.-.- - 14,949,793 

Investment securities..... 1.182,093 

Trading account secunues “V 

Federal funds sold and securities purchased 2 J 22 ,465 

under resale agreements 9.508358 

Loans, net of unearned income (3 i \ ,855) 

Allowance for possible loan losses — 9 196 703 

Loans (net) - — 4J48304 

Other assets “ 

S39.493.47i 

Total assets — . — - — 


$ 490,711 

10362,885 
412,105 
12331,471 
702.479 

1305,274 

8,007,457 

(241,020 ) 

7,766,437 

3375.026 


$ 32,082 

3,660,269 
145 
6,182,495 
87,381 


1,128,746 

(102304 ) 

1,026342 

310,435 


5 34,915 

3,759,581 
619 
5,194,337 
37327 

1.101,451 

(52,376 ) 

1,049,075 

276,005 


S39.493.472 137.146388 S 11,299.349 SJ035US59 


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oth«P°«« v ^ u " -:ij£ -TEX'S* 

Sr ss -E* s BSSi'S « - 

M^-V. HUM-*"** PWtpm ZZ 






Sr a ag a 

S5SS: SS gsa 3®Si-. B -iSSr. 'S. 

knes wws ^^“2Tisttoe uAEttura im- 

"■““S-SS *“- oH, jS Br ^5S *»■* ,jn? 

KsvstMOffl A^J2 Maka.rW* i- - 

FKLiBWkw " ; i. *' 

ForWsrd S22*"“r :3 Sh 

TS-g-.a sss.sr ^ ^ 

POMPdSItfUwS ■ irBB U3« 

ammo***** sM* I nes t**uu**l: BatKaamrnen^mjfauano 

s -^ wnC |MC * ***** 


D Mart SterUi* Franc Y«a ec 

, • Drtlor Mfcrt 2 >w 2 ^ ,tfW» 

-imootfi M* ^ fSJJL 6 V^W 2 VWW. 4^ 

1 manna SMtt »-S» 5 %-<W» Wj* 

s 5 ^ iSs.SWI* **** 

•. SSSSSSSSS^w^ 

Ksy Monsy Rates 

tinned Stales CRae Prw. E2SS m ff 

3 J» 3j» B«* b«e rate Sh SV 

My”" 11 ” * ijn 4J» CamnOWW 5 „ si 

y rt * n, _?* t - »l LOO i^noota Uiiunon* 5h 5 , 

KSSf 2J7 W s '®??5!l2SSS 5 *‘ ?■ 

.Kiwaaros ■ , lg j_22 Smuodi letwhoeh ^jo 4; 

warn TreMonr bin 137 T33 . 6 JZD « 

' >w w T m u e rr aet* ~ AT2 inttrvwiHM rate 6 H 4 

WneaorrNte «J CaHmay M f 

^wwTitaaarreaJ* .. . ^ i^rtSSeS 1 

3a^Tra«unfbQ^_ g & 


liaW'rirs 

Total deposits — 

Short term borrowings “ 

Other liabilities — 

Shareholders’ Equity 

g--S£ffi=S==^ 

net of raxes - 


$22,801350 

4375,439 

4,814,746 

2382,875 

2371.940 


556,425 

723,229 

1,204,818 


$21,102,187 

5.738.822 

3,408,529 

2,502,497 

2,130.924 

556,425 

708,642 

998362 


$ 7344362 
1,760,951 
213.081 
700,000 


5 6.S97.172 
1,542,287 
233,053 
547,600 


Total shareholders’ equity 

Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity . 


emote 

BotabtfMrate 
coll mow* 

1-montti linemen* 

^Borfei ntnrwmli 
u innnftl Uiterboek 


5Vj 9ft 
SH » 
Sh 5 *W 
5h SN 
5*. » 

6 JP 


Book value per share — 

Client portfolio assets in custody 

Net income, for the year ended-....--— 

Net income per common share (pnnrn^) 

Average common shares outstanding (primary)-.- 


262,750 ~ 

2,747322 2.263,429 

$39,493,472 $37,146388 

$ 4137 $ 32.71 

$ 301,205 $ 258,883 

$ 5.20 $ 4.42 

52,466 52.204 


903,613 

287,179 

89,963 

1,280,755 

$11399349 

$ 72.24 

$ 5,656,795 

$ 121,595 

$ 6.87 

17,703 


902.490 

229.257 


1,131.747 

$10351,859 

$ 63^92 

$ 3,057,002 

$ 92,466 

$ 5.22 

17,709 


Ride-Based Capital Ratios ,. , 

As of December 31, 1993, Republic New accordance m&t 

total qualifying capital ratio was applied to Republic New York Corporation on a folly 

the requirements of the at&fc Hidings SA. Total consolidated assets * te WPflSf?^’ ^ L?° 

^^T^a^p^tnc^lng minority Intent ttnJ ^din.ted debt, needed USi 5.6 btUtotv^ 


(estimated) and 




Maewatratc - 
CoU tngotr 


»Iw O u » «l ' »« i M »» 


CM mam* 

VmwAMMR 
awtHiWert—k 
MMMtHllltRMaX 
, inwr#“« 


m 1^ 

3«. 2»k 

2 2h 
m 2W 

■ IS MB 
• LD2 in 

-ii. t* 
- 1M V* 

■ 6.10 *-W 

SS 0 SM 
sjo sja 
SJD SJ2 


fiH2« 6JD MB 

InttnfWiHM rot* Slfc 

CUmW MV m S% 

MW* W* 8 * 6% S*i 

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Mwmtt liW* \a 5J1 

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^^SUL T ?J5S» 

?■“ AJ*L ™ 

ist .a S 3 
S:r^ 

6»0rtM*. - iwwT'orlf CatnewiApeW 
Source: Beat"* 


Republic New York Coepo«*So« 

^Fifrh Avenue ar 40ih bireer 
New York, New \orV 10018 


i Republic Holdings S.A. 
32, boulevard Royal 
2449 LuxeniN*utg 


Rfi tilring L oca t ions 


Geneva 






/ 


r * 




i.."» y rrT — ’’ 


Page 8 

MAR KET DIARY 

Stocks Set Record 
Despite Rate Talk 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 1994 


Via AuoGBfstf ftm 


Dow Jonw Awragw 

iw. wm i»- w « 

!*» ®8^®SgSS38;£S 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


Compiled ty Ovr Staff fr*n Dispalckes 

NEW YORK — VJL stocks 
surged lo record levels, with invest- 
ors shrugging off hints of rising in- 
terest rates to focus on the inunedi- 
aie climate of subdued inflation, low 
rates and rising corporate profits. 

"We’re now operating in an envi- 
ronment where interest rates and 

H.Y. Stock* 

inflation are benign, while earnings 
are growing at a 20 percent rate,” 
said Abby Cohen, market strategist 
at Goldman, Sachs & Co. "You 
can’t get a much more bullish com- 
bination than that.’’ 

The Dow Jones industrial aver- 
age rose 32.93 points, dosing at a 
record 3,978.36. 

The Nasdaq over-the-counter in- 
dex closed up 3.94 points, at a re- 
cord 800.47, crossing the 800 level 
for the first time. On the New York 
Stock Ex chang e, gainers outpaced 
dediners by an Il-to-6 ratio. 

Investors paid little heed to re- 
marks from the Federal Reserve 
Board chairman. Alan Greenspan, 
who hinted the central bank was 
dose to raising interest rates. Slock 
investors have been depending on 
an easy monetary policy and low 


inflation to ensure adequate funds 
for business expansion. , 

Rising gold prices, sometimes 1 
seen os an indicator of inflation, 
also failed to check the stock mar- 
ket’s climb, especially after Fri- 
day's report that inflation was run- 
ning at the lowest pace since 1967. 
On the Commodity Exchange, gold 
was quoted up 54.60 an ounce, at 
S383.60. 

Teiefonos de Mexico was the 
most actively traded issue on the 
New York Slock Exchange, rising ^ 
to 43%. with interest ignited when 
Lehman Brothers raised its 12- to 
18-moo th price target for four Latin 
American telephone companies. 

Cidcoip was second, up VS io 
43%. Duff & Phelps raised its rat- 
ings of the company’s credit, citing 
improved fundamentals. 

General Motors was the third- 
most-aciively traded issue, rising 
2V4to 61%. afLer the company's 
chief executive, John Smith, hinted 
that 1993 earnings would be above 
the automaker’s goal 
Aetna Life & Casualty rose 3 3 A to , 
63%. The insurance company on ! 
Friday announced a restructuring 
that included cutting 4,000 jobs 
and a 51 billion after-tax char ge. 

(Knigfu-Rlddcr, Bloomberg) 



urn zmxi mar asa sasm +*» 

CO(TW 1437.74 1«KL17 1419.94 1447.04 * 13.17 


Standard & Poor's lndu» 


High Low Clue Ca** 
559-5* 53MB 55B.lt 4 3.11 
5*73 *53141 4-768 

' 17155 17139 173.10 + 8X1 
4*73 *6.18 4*36 + 068 
482X5 47070 48131 +2.91 

*4*70 *nm usm +isr 


Irwu a tnnla 

Trunsft 


NMr Law ftw.OMe 


S^wilirmrtislgfrWiolliTpiu 

ss is ns 3? £ w e 

SoF ri* m m rn nt m 

5*H 933 93S 938 933 937 BB 

Est. volume: 9S2 

Mtai WBSrKtwHofiolJtow 

iSr u» urn I'.ITO S:li Ian 


NYSE Indexes 


D J 

•' : ' : iS83 ' '. '• . 1894 


NYSE Most Acttm 


Tel Me* 
cnicorp 

OnMctr 

WnlMrt S 

RJRNdb 

Merck 

BonkAm 

Alcan 

CirtIBk 

PWtNtr 

Matorias 

Humana 
Men_yn & 
CtabM 
IBM 



M«i 

LOW 

Lust 

cm. 

Composite 

indudrieis 

Tronso. 

unntv 

Rnonce 

2*764 

3K77 

+1< Cl 

231.19 

22*118 

34562 

3MX3 

2KL51 

2296* 

22363 

257.12 

324X1 

285X1 

230X9 

22468 

-1.70 
+ 1.94 
+667 
>163 
+ 1-56 

8 

i 


Mar 1,170 \,m 1,183 1.170 1,177 1,178 

Mn 1,113 1.T74 1.1W J.176 MB M» 

Jol N.T. U6B 1,182 1,143 1,175 1,178 

Sap N.T 1.149 LW 1,175 1173 1,177 

MW HIT: U« KX. K.T. 1,175 1,777 

JU N.T. 1,149 N.T. N.T. 1,175 1.177 

Est. volume: 950 

High Low doe Ch*B8 

58BS%S^SUo. «*» 

EX ^3«3gli§i;3 

D*c NX N.T. 283X0 WOO + 1J0 
NX N.T. SB5JH 28600 4- ISO 
Ett volume: Zita Ouei In!.: UXVH 


HWi 

Low 

Last 

1 74ft 

72ft 

73V 

■ 44% 

42ft 

43ft 




1 27 

24V 

26ft 

t 7ft 

7V 

r* 

1 34ft 

3* 

Xft 

1 44V 

45V 

46V 

1 74ft 

23V 

24ft 

1 35V 

34ft 

35 

> 41 

£0V 

40ft 

’ 100ft 

98V 

90ft 

1 20V 

1W 

20ft 


43 

44V 


3V 

A 

1 57V 

54 ft 

56ft 


Mo* Low Lad Gris. 

Gamppsfla 800.11 797.79 799X7 *3.14 

InduStridS 83861 835.7S BJ7X8 *3X2 

BCD** 70447 70063 711224 *2JD1 

tnsuranca W2.71 937.13 942X4 -6X2 

Ftnunoa WUO 89*80 90160 *«X» 

Transat 787.99 7m.M 7B653 *5X0 

Utilities 18*46 183X9 18*09 —O.10 


AMEX Stock Indss 

Utah Lew East a» 
485.90 483.72 48549 +147 

Dow Jonss Bond Avsragss 


am arcs 

105X6 -no* 

11034 — BBS 

1B7JSB -007 


AMEX Most Acttvaa 


RATES: They’ll Rise, but When? 


CoBtinued from Page 1 
of inflationary instability accom- 
panied by steeply rising long-term 
rates." w 

Wall Street economists saw Mr. 
Greenspan as setting the stage for 
what they all expected him to do as 
the economy recovered: some said 

Foreign Exchange 

he would wait for the markets 
themselves to raise short-term rates 
as credit demand increased. 

The Federal Open Market Com- 
mittee meets at the end of this week 
to discuss policy not only for the 
□ext six weeks but also for later. 
The broad lines of polity will be 
discussed by the board prior to Mr. 
Greenspan* semiannual testimony 
before Congress late next month 
under the Huniphrey^Hawkims law, 
which makes him give numerical 
targets for money supply. 

But with the Fed admitting that 
financial restructuring and global- 
ization of markets makes those tar- 
gets increasingly irrelevant, the 
general stance til (he central bank is 
more important, and Mr. Green- 
span’s testimony Monday gave as 
many hints as Wall Street is likely 
to get. 

David Jones of Aubrey Lanston 
& Co. said Mr. Greenspan would 
follow his policy of gradualism, 
raising short-term rates one-quar- 
ter of a percentage point a few 
weeks after his Jiumphrey-Haw- 
kins testimony and another quar- 


ter-point in the spring on the the- 1 
ory (hat even if inflation is low. "a i 
stitch in time saves nine" 

Sam Kalian of Fuji Securities 
said the psychological signals sent 
by the central bank when it finally 
raises rates would be much more 
important, because "once Green- 1 
span makes the first move, a wait- 
ing game will Stan.” 

“Lf be shows he's ready to stay 
the course, the bond boys will come 
over and kiss him on both cheeks. 
It’s going to be a tough call, be- 
cause Wall Street wants the Fed to 
tighten, and Main Street doesn’t 
give a damn- The prosperity of one 
depends on the other, but they're 
not aware of it." 

■ Dollar Broadly Lower 
The dollar fell across the board in 
New York, AJFP-Extel News report- 
ed. Dealers said that although a rise 
in interest rates did not appear im- 
minent based on Mr. Greenspan's 
testimony to congress, he was seen 
to be suggesting it would happen 
later in the yean which prevented 
more aggressive selling. 

The dollar dropped by nearly a 
pfennig against the Deutsche mark, 
to end at 1.7342 DM after 1.7420 
DM at Friday’s close. The currency 
fell by more than a yen, to 108.55 
yen from 109.80. 

The dollar fell 10 5.8850 French 
francs from 5.9170 francs and to 
1.4565 Swiss francs from 1.4690 
francs. Tbe pound rose to 51.5055 
from SI .4965. 


HmwtB 

ENSCO 

EUnBar 

intwDHi 

Wltitro 

ICH 

Hasbro 

snefld/md 

R'jvao a 

ALC 

Gov IC w) 

IvaxCo 

OmvSA* 

Manors 

5PDR 


Vat Mtti 
15315 H 
9671 3 V. 
8938 13ft 
63*7 5 
£248 916 
S482 716 
*7*8 341c. 
4155 716 
39*4 4<V U 
3656 32V. 
3486 51* 
9443 3116 
3324 3766 
3223 TV. 
3128 48V|| 


Law Last 

'Va 

3Vu 3 <Vh 
12*, 13ft 
4V6 4ft 
916 966 

7 716 

3216 331* 

4*6 7£6 

4l6 4W„ 

3116 3116 
S 5» 
30ft 3364 
Am 371k 
TV, 71k 
48 48 Vi 


NYSE Diary 


Total issues 
New Wens 
New Lam 


Amax Diary 


Advanced 
Declined 
(Jnchonued 
Total issues 

New Wahl 
New Lows 


NASDAQ Diary 


Advanced 
Oedlnad 
Uncnanoed 
Total bsue9 
NewKohs 
New Laws 


1399 1324 

7*1 770 

£25 £89 

2765 2753 

207 149 

13 8 


S 355 
280 

218 213 

BOO 848 

47 33 

7 3 


30 Bands 105X£ 

jouhhSw iraj4 

— 10 Industrials 107JB 

— Market Sales 

ho. ■ “ - 

L-_ NYSE * ML volume 
if NY5Epnv.com. dose 
. 1? Am«x4CLm. votone 
JZ An«oc pnv. cons, dose 

NASDAQ 4 nj-n- volume 
,5 NASDAQ crev. 4 pjrt voUim* 


N.Y.SkE. Odd^Lot Trading 

Buy Soles Short* 

jon.28 1A&807 1A6 XBff «M*1 

Jan. 77 mil W6J97 SL1ST 

Jon. 26 U21J32 IA7MM 219£6 

Jan. 25 ijusSS TAO^m «4D 

jan. 34 mm jsaxir vjm 

•ladudm In tfm sain nouns* 

SAP IOO Index Options 


Metals 

bS®** Ask 
ALUMINUM (Htth Grade) 

Dollars per ipeWeton_ 

Soot 1215JB 131*00 

Forward 123100 123150 

COPPER CATHODES (Hloh 
DaUWr per rKfrtcjon 
Spot 184*80 1*4*00 

Forward 18C7SQ 188900 

LEAD 

Oortars per mtrtrta ton 
tool 50600 50700 

Forward 5TBOQ 51900 

NICKEL 

B^Wshbhibb 

TIN 

Dollars per medic toe 
Saar 5Z4ooo 

Forward 529000 529SD0 

ZINC tspecM Woh Grade) 

Mian per turtle &Ki _ 

Fontard 100700 108800 


Previous 

BM Ask 


131900 133800 
123700 123808 
Grada) 


Industrials 

HWi Low Lost Stifle COTW 

U^SwmTH«r metric too-Wh of 188 rota 
Peb 1*473 vwa 1075 *" 

Mur USM l*ae mgs 

Apr 1*425 1*3X0 1413 

MOT W4J» 1 4IJ5 1«13 

jST 14*00 14*08 14400 

Mov' inn in£ lrabd 

Dec 15*25 15500 1SL50 

MO N.T. N.T. NX 

Eat. volwne: 14521 . Open kit. 112*43 

Si^^hSfefflllAOOhanob 
JC? m 3 tin i« mS — oS 

Mdv UK IXM 1*06 1*44 —>084 

jST 1*3 VU1 1*14 1*14 —808 

S| 1409 1425 was VCS -0.1] 

Aop 1*82 U*S 1*45 U45 —005 

i So? 1*86 H83 1*83 1*85 — 

OC* N-T. N.T. N.T. 1*7* — IUI9 

Mw 1*82 1*193 KOI 1*95 -006 

j esLvotwne: 3*384. Qpw tot. 1*2.982 

Stock Indexes 

FTSE«a. , Sfe ^ Cta ** a — 

i DSMTlBdexDolit 

Mar 2MiO 34750 3«J) +200 

Jan 35050 35050 33028 +1M 

1 to N.T. N.T. 3S7IO +210 

Eat. votume: 11011. Open InL: 7*885. . 

Sources; Re uters. Motif, Assoctoted Awn, 
i London infT Financial Futures Exctmte, 


Saudis to Stretch Out Anns ^^ente 

WASHINGTON 

rP'SKtoT -SBTua defense offidnls 

also de.^forareponed plan by *eSaudis W 


two governments and of Motas Corp. The 

J» S& Saudis » buy 72 

JVfcDooodD F-15 fighters. 

Xerox Takes Loss on Restructuring 

STAMFORD. Connecticut fAF) —Xerox Corp. ^Mowlay^^cd 

afouith^uartff less of 5577 irnffiat ^ I bc ^? j ^ £L M3S 
cow Se cost of a previously announced ^ dunm^lftOOO J^ 
THe sho^.conS^th a 1m 


it#" r 

nkollt* - 


SpotCommodlttoB 


58608 50700 
51800 51900 


528300 521300 
529000 su/un 


99700 99*00 
181*00 101700 


Own modify Today Pr*». 

Aluminum. B> OSS2 0LS4 

Ctritoc, Bra*, lb 00*5 OOJ 

Cooper dcdrofytlc. lb urn ay?* 

Iran FOB, tan 21300 21100 

LearLIJJ 034 834 

Sliver, troy ez *95 503 

steel tocraoJ.tan 13333 13333 

Titv lb 35159 148M 

Zinc lb 04777 04*18 




Financial 

Hlnb Low Ctoee Ombm 
SMONTH STERLING t Cl FEE) 

■908088 -PR Of 188 pci 
Mar 9*73 9409 9*89 —004 

Jun 9*95 9*87 9*90 —003 

sm r*» MJO 9*93 -am 

Dec 9*92 9*88 9*89 —801 

MOT 9*82 9*79 9*08 Unch. 

J m 9*85 9450 9*82 +001 . 

to 9*48 9*45 9*46 +001 1 

Oec 9*32 9*29 WJ +002 

MV 9*18 9*15 94.18 +0JDQ 

JW» 9*04 9*64 9*05 +803 

Eel. volume: 4*411 Open tnt: *H*W2. 
3-MONTH EURODOLLARS ILIFFE1 
II mllllaa-ptsariMPCf 
MOT 9687 9*63 9684 —002 


Am RE panic 


Par Amt Pay Roc 
CORRECTION 

C X J1 2-7 2-15 


1829 

1454 

1320 

1390 

1419 

1774 

4768 

47*8 

251 

IB2 

34 

34 


strike CatoUaf ntoUat 

Price Feb Mar tor Mar Feb Mv Apr HW 

H . - 8 - » j k > 

m ----- * H - 

Ml----***- 
n tph — — - n *i i * m 

B.-.-NkH- 

in - w - - i i R - 

as — - - - b |K 16 A 

b iw m - - v» »»- 
430 n<9 15 lib lit 6 26 81 » 

*B I* HP* — — » *• S = 

1404*67 IK - 16 A A lb 

445 2 It 416 dlk — i 716 I 

Cetb:MH ML 03317. Mai CPenk* £091 

PHU MM vd.iB59i; MQKMP bn. 44392 

Price Deeft uecfJ toe* Men Me* Dec* 

IS ^ 

sv, - - — n — — 

4D - - - 4 Tb6 - 

cv, - - - 1ft 316 

4B — — — 2N— — 

Colli: MM <M.I:WnlepenWLl8flG 
Pm (CM vaLiOil; au< aeen «MHerKt: 14US 
Sduror: CBOE. 


9647 

96X3 

9*64 

9668 

9668 

9663 

9*88 

«LBS 

MX3 

9SJ1 

95X1 

95X4 

It 

S3 

95.14 

9551 

9528 

95X8 


Est volume: 551 Open lnt~ 1011. 
3-MONTH BUROMARKS fUFFE) 

DMi MMiaa - pis of 180 pd 
Mar 9*46 9*41 9442 —081 

JUP 9*94 9*88 9*89 — tun 

SOP H24 9520 9521 +M1 

Dec 9542 9517 9538 +081 

Mar 9555 9558 9552 +081 

JUB 9558 9553 *554 +081 

Sea 9557 9553 95-54 +0JJI 

Dec 9148 9543 9544 (inch. 

Mar 9135 9534 9534 +081 

Jan 9525 9522 9524 +082 

Est volume: 7*382. Open tat: 881222. 
LONG GILT <UFFE> 

BA0B8 - pti & Ml el 188 PCt 
Mar 119-09 118-23 11947 +0-13 

Job TIB-15 118-15 11A-19 +0-13 

Est. volume; SI .79* Open lot.: 1DM22. 
GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND (UFFE) 
DM 330088 -Pto ot m act 
Mar 10088 10030 TO8J1 +0.14 

j<m mn 10029 mm* +0.13 

Est. volume: 81838. Open InL: 1NM01 


Beduim Iratrumnt Q .» 

Callaway Golf 4 .if 

Premier Finci Q .W 

Xtra Corp Q .M 

INITIAL 

Peoples Fir* n - .105 

IRREGULAR 

Duke Power inv _ 45 : 

NkmaraMaadlpfC . 44 

Palmer Tube ADR x 81 : 

W asf i l noln MM Im .83 

x«ppn» omeeM per Hmr*. 

REGULAR 

msr 

Atax&BaMvrin 
Ambac Inc 
Bov State Gae 
ns Prod 
I induet 
Delta Air 
Ferro Cdrp O J35 i 

FranUIn CA TxFr M .037 

Franklin CarpQuai Ni J»b 

Franklin Fedl M 863 

Frontier AdTust Q ms : 

.Jwtens Inc Q 32 ' 

Kovdan Corn Q .10 

McDonnell Douatos Q x 

MtaeratsTach Q JOS : 

M.iS 

PatlalcJi Carp Q 89 : 

Reinsurance Grp . 06 

Robkaan Nugent Q ms 

Smiths Food Q .13 

Student Loan Q MS 

StudntUiamptA - 425 

Valley Fern Q 875 

we s ta m er Bncp a .15 

wmwoodCerp a ,ji 

WBcansta Enarav Q JW 

D-awwal; s-pavaMe ta Cenodtap 1 
monthly; a^marterty; w*i*op» 


3-11 M 
s-m 3-s 
MS MB 
Ml 2-28 


M* MB 
2-7 *31 
Ml +11 
M 3-21 


Ml 3-1 

1- 31 »1$ 
MB N 

2- 10 3-1 

2-14 3-1 

2- 7 221 
34 3-25 
29 M 

mj 3-ra 
1-31 215 
1-3T MJ 
1-31 MS 
218 210 
215 21 

341 +4 

3- 4 +* 

214 231 

27 231 


27 Mi 
MS 215 
224 210 
211 225 
24 215 
+15 Ml 

u « 


quarter of 1992. In the latest quarter, the company 

totaling S813 million after taxes to cover the costs of restructunng its 

document-processor business. 

Soros Joins GE in Power Venture 

NEW YORK (Knight-Ridder) — General Ekctnc Co.’sfeanocmn 
and the financier Geome Soros on Monday announced the formation of a 
nntitibaiion-riollar fund to invest in pr xyaldy owned electnc power 
generating facilities in emerging market countries. 

GE Capital and Quantum Industrial Holdings, a pew ftmd to be 
managedby Soros Fund Management, will each provide S20Q imDron 
toward the venture. ^ 

Tbe venture, GkAal Power Invesliiiiaiis, will primarily invest m the new 
construction at power plants. Initially, it is ocpected to focus on 
particolariy C hi " a , India and Indonesia, and Mexico, the companies said. 

Upjohn Profit Up Despite Sales Fall 

KALAMAZOO, KficMgan (Bloomberg) — Upjohn Ox s aid M onday 
that fourth-quarter profit from continuing operations rose 2 percent flom 
a year earlier as lower expenses and taxes overcame decreased sales of the 
anti-anxiety drug Xanax, M 

Profit from continuing operations increased to $156.9 million, <ff 88 
cents a dure, from S153.1 million, or 86 cents, a year earirer. 

Saks of Xanax, an anti-anxiety medieme and Upjohn 5 biggest-seimig 
product, declined 39 percent, to* 120 mflfion,hnrt by a parent expiration. 0 

U.S. Suspends Some S&L Mergers 

WASHINGTON (AF) — Federal isolators imposed a moratorium 
Monday on imagers in which the stock of depositor-owned savings and 
loan institutions will be sold to the public. 

The Office of Thrift Supervision said it called a temporary halt to 
protect depositors and prevent insiders from reaping windfall profits 
when tbe institutions are acquired by coimnercial barks. 

Tie action affects only stock craiveraons of m u tual , or depoa tor- 
owned, S&Ls that merge with other ctm^anies. Standard conversions m 
which the mutuals cn tiieir own offer sto« to the public are not afftected. 


i Ifflt** 4 ' 


ifi r - ' . 


ilUVOS: h>r:i!ir- 


For die Record 

American^ pessond income rose fin 
jsish earnings for 1993 up 4.7 percent 
the U.S. Commerce Department anne 
IVflaK Fbandal Carp, of Toronto sa 
to seD its Triathlon fleet vehicle-lea 
Capital Canada Inc. for about 225 
ntillKm)- 


I fjowcL-jr^' 


pecflit in Deoembec, hriping to 
riy twice the rate of innatiem. 
id. (AP) 

loads# it signed an agreement 
business to General Electric 
ion Canadian dollars ($170 
( Bloomberg) 




Record Companies Plan to Challenge MTV 


Bloomberg Business Sews 

NEW YORK — Four of the world’* larg- 
est record companies, joined by a ticket- 
selling agency, are set to give MTV a run for 
its money. 

Time Warner Inc.’s Warner Music Group; 
Sony Corp.’s Sony Music; Thom EMI PLCs 
EMI Music; Polygram Holding Inc„ majority 


owned by Philips Electronics NV; and Tick- 
etmaster Cbrp^ said they would launch a 24- 
hour, advertiser-supported music video chan- 
nel at the end of tins year. 

The channel will be launched in the U.S. 
and Puerto Rico in the fourth quarter. The 
service will then be expanded overseas. The 
four giants involved have launched a music 
video channel in Germany, called Viva. 


It will take years, though, and possibly 
more than $100 million, to match the world- 
wide readi of Viacom Inc.’s MTV. which is 
pbed into 57 million US. outlets and 58 
motion overseas. VH-1, a second Viacom 
music channe l aimed at an older audience, is 
in 47 million households. 

It is expected the new channel will have a 
home-shopping channel aspect. 


WaakandBuxOffiot - - 

The Associated Press 

LOS ANGELES —“Mrs. Doubtfire" topped the weekend box office, 
earning an estimated $8. J ueffion. FoBowicg are the Top 10 moneymak- 
ers based an Friday ticket sales and estimated sales for Saturday and 
Sunday. ■ 


1. "Mrs. DmiMflrc* 

ITtmnHeih CmdurHPax) 


SU mflitan 

iThHpdrtPhta- 

(Tn Star) 


57.8 mutton 

X "Grumpy OM Men" 

IWnrnw BrottmnJ 


55.1 mltnon 

4_*BBnk“ “■ 

' (New Une Clnemay ■ - 


*44 million 

5,'lnlereecrtarr 

. (Paramount) , •« 


846 mH Don 

6. "Schindlers LIST 

■ WnhmruaU ' . 


SUmllllan 

7. "Iran wltT ■ 

(«WDftnn9 - 


SKXmHNon 

XTIw Pelican Brief 

1 Warner Brothers) 


SU million 

9.~Shadawtand3" 

t-Savoy Pictures) 


SUmHIIan 

10. -Tombstone’’ 

{HaOrmod Plcturm) . 


513 million 


••3 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


U.S. FUTURES 


(non Season 
Men Low 


Opon HWi Law CtoK On QpJrC 


Season Sun 
HWi Low 


Op«i HU Low - DON aw OnM 


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Aflna fiim os tana Jan. 31 


Amsterdam 

ABN AroroHhj 
ACF Hohflno 
Akoon 
Ahold 
Akzn 
AMEV 
Amst RuBOer 
MHWssmiw 
CSM 
D5W 
Elsovlor 
F ok leer 
Gist-Brocades 
HBG 
Heineken 
Hooaovsns 
Hunter Douatas 
IHC Cafand 
Inter Mueflsr 
Inn Nederland 
KLM 
KNP bt 
N edllovd 
QceGiinten 
PaUioed 
Philips 
Polvgram 

Rooeca 

Radamca 
Ronnco 
Oerento 
Royal Dutch 
Stork 
Unilever 
VonOntmentn 
VNU 

WottnVKIuwer 

OfiMz?®?:-** 71 


Brussels 

Aorc-UM 
AG Fta 
Arced 

Barca 

Bekaeri 
Cackeriil 
Cobena 
Delhalro 
Electratwl 
GIB 
GB* 

Gtrrocrl 

RredietCank 
Petr crfl no 
Powrfln 
Roval Beta* 

Sac Gen Banawe 
SoeGea BWgiaue 
Saftaa 
Sohfav 
Trodcbel 
UCB 

tBSBL SMf :7m43 


Frankfurt 

AEG 

AilkBsHaM 
Altana 
Asks 
BASF 
Bayer 

Bov. Hywj bank 
Bay Varirett 
BBC 

SHF Bimn 
BMW 

CorofrwnMnlt 
Catilnemal 
Daimler Bern 


Amer-YJitvmo 

Erao-Gutirlt 

MuMatnaki 

K.O.P. 

Kvmnwne 

Metro 

Nokia 

Pohfota 

Resala 

Stockmann 


Helsinki 

Mvmo 119 11* 

ar 

1*20 15WJ 
ne T74 173 

2,4 

317 319 

97 93 

116 H« 
inn 304 388 




Hong Kong 

5X50 5DL50 
1170 1X20 
4X25 47 J5 
47JS *8.75 
1X70 1340 
1X40 taso 
76 75 

53 KLSO 
4SJ5 4575 
2150 2250 
29.40 29.40 
3750 2740 
25.70 26 

115 113 

1X60 1348 
li 15.«0 
13.10 II 
4050 40J5 
2840 27.90 


34 3358 
1830 1570 
1150 1140 
2130 3130 
JT SI 
&S58 £5 

565 565 
6150 63 

S160 1X71S 
160 1*5 
3525 3*75 
1460 1*30 
1*30 1*10 

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tnchcape 

5X8 

SXJ 

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*38 



2.03 

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Land Sec 

7X7 

744 


*19 

864 


U£ 

163 


561 

565 


*42 

669 




ME PC 

*43 

5X2 

Non Power 

4X3 

U4 

NoTWesl 

191 

59b 

NtaWStWoter 

5X7 

i/9 

Pearson 

*.» 

678 

P&O 


692 

PUklnoton 

1.92 

1X1 


$42 

544 

Prudent Ml 

3.70 

342 


1*95 

1065 

ReckltlCot 

6X7 

683 

Redland 

£65 

£62 

Reed inti 

7X7 

967 


I9-96 

19.75 


7 .73 

9.75 

Rolls R erree 

US 

IJU 

Rorhmn lie'll) 

448 


Roval Scot 

4.95 

4X5 

RTZ 

*M 

84/ 


365 

1»S 


SJ5 

574 


449 

464 

Sears Holds 

165 

16b 

Severn Trent 

£60 

618 

Shell 

763 


Sleoa 

576 

5X1 

Smlin Nephew 

163 


SmlthKIlne B 

469 

469 

Smith 1WH| 

5.18 

S.U 


4X7 



4X9 

4X1 


261 

763 


11X5 

10.»0 


171 

2X9 

TSB Group 

Z7B 

174 


1115 

1I.VS 


165 

34/ 


5X6 



SU3 

S3JU 

Wellcome 

659 



5X4 


Wll«amsHtJ« 

ise 


WllllS Corroon 

120 



Johannesburg 


AECI 1825 1825 

Ailed 94 W 

Anglo Amer 19330 191 

Boriowe NA 30 

Hlyvoor 8 750 

BuiOtjfc 4*Sl NO. 

De Beers 10160 100 

ortotonreJn sxzs a 

Gencor R?0 H7Q 

GFSA 97 7850 

H orun m 26 26 

Hiahveid Start 17 17 

KloM 4925 49 

NedbonkGro 27 Z7J0 

Rcndtanlrtn 41 40J5 

RUSMOt 7S 75 

SA Brews BS JO 84 JB 

Si Helena na jijd 

som 19 19 

Wellram 4| 4250 

Western Dees 157 154 


FXWInto*: »488 

Madrid 

88V 3470 3340 

Bro Central HUB. 3l« 3199 
Banco Scntandw 7rm 7270 


CEPSA 
Draoarios 
Endesa 
E rents 
ibemrata 1 
Reowl 
Taboeatera 
Telefonlco 


3305 3190 
2570 2545 
7030 7830 
158 159 

1195 1175 
4810 4720 
4300 4250 

1995 1945 


London 


D! Babcock 
Dcutscne Bank 
Douatas 
Dremner Bank 
FeUmuebb 
F Kruoo Ktaesd 


Hotonatwi 

Hontn 

IWKA 


wrsttsr 1 *" 


BaneaCamni 

Bastagi 

Benetton sroua 

CiR 

Cred IM 
Enideni 
F«fln 
Ferfln Rlso 

Flat SPA 
Finmeccanica 
Canefoli 
IFI 

iwtoem 

iMaas 

iMmebiilare 

Madkibancs 

MonMBMan 

Olivetti 

Pirelli 

RAS 

RtaaKcme 

Sawem 

San Paata Tor hto 

5IP 

SME 

Snta 

Stands 

stet 

TaroAssI Rl» 


Accor 
Air LlquMe 
AlCOtM AWtIOfn 

Bancalrv {Clef 
BIC 
BNP 

Bouyaues 
BSN-GD 
Carrrtour 
CCF. 

Cenn 
Oiaroeurs 
Chnents Franc 
Club Med 
Ell-Aouitalrw 
Ell^araiH 
Euro Disney 
Gen. Eaux 
Havas 
i metal 

Latcrsc Catsee 
LcyrwuJ 
Lyon. Eauv 
Oreal (L i 
L.VJA.M. 
Maira-Hochettr 
MtatoOn B 
Moulinex 

Paribas 

PeailnoT Inn 
Pernoo-Rlcara 
Peuaeat 
Prlniemas lAul 
PadlarecMknic 
Rh-Pouienc A 
RaH.SI. Louis 
Rndaute I La) 

Saint OotXJIn 

fttoenerae 
Suez 

Thoroson-CSF 
Total 
UJLP. 

Vedeo 

SfiSBTMr* 


Sao Paulo 

Banco ac Brasil «A 99C0 


Brahma 1140a H90o 

Parana DQnen>a 9400 HTOO 

Pelroorm 8S0Q 735W 

Tehjtjras 21800 mm 

veneRh) Oace sww 54000 

varhi 90000 90008 

a:x NU. 


Singapore 


Sydney 

Amcor I860 10.1* 

ANZ 559 544 

BHP 19.18 taSB 

Bora) 433 *27 

Bouwrlnvllle 1.18 IJD 
Coles Mxer 547 534 

Comalco 535 350 

CRA 1838 17^0 

CSR 535 5Z 

Dunlcp 538 528 

Fosters Brew 136 131 
Goodman Field L77 127 
ICI Australia 11 10*> 
Maoellan 2.10 110 

MIM 2*3 2JR 

NOt Aus> Bank TZHS 1254 
News Can* 1034 9 jo 
N ine Network 4J12 6ID 
N Broken Hill 325 Z65 
Pioneer Inn 2.91 IO 
Nmndv PaseKan 254 250 
OCT Resources TJ8 136 
Santas 

TNT 232 235 

western A Unfits 7J3 7.40 
westaac Banking 549 529 
Wooaside *24 *20 

%!&!SVS£r :m ' kM 


bsn wd 
375 365 
2.93 285 


Can Packers 
Can Tire A 
Cantor 
Caro 

CCLIndB 

CtaeMcx 

C omlnco 

Conwest C*ol 

Denison Min B 
OldtensonAMnA 
Dokaco 
Otter. A 

Echo Bay Mines 
Eauity silver a 
FCAI ltN 
FedluflA 
Flel Cher Chall A 

FPI 

Gentrp 

GcMCorn 

Gu« Ota Res 

Heesintl 

Hernia GW Mines 

Holt taper 


Tokyo 


Akal Electr 
Asctu Chemical 
ASCM Glass 
Bank of Tokyo 
flriUwWn* 
Canon 
Casta 


473 413 

TO 579 
1TB0 1129 
168C 1600 
1430 13*0 
1630 1560 
11713 K90 


Dal Nlouan Print 175C 1640 
Daivi-.- House 16*0 1400 
Dotwc Securities 1TO 1510 


Frsiuc . 

Full Bank 
Full Photo 
Fulltsu 
Hitachi 
Hitachi Caolo 
Honaa 
iia Yokodo 
Itochu 

japan Airlines 

Kallrno 

Nansof Power 
Kawasaki Steel 
Kirin Browery 
Kcntotsu 
KuData 
Kyocera 
Matsu Elec inch 
Matsu Elec WlH 
MltSubWIBk 
Mitauwsm Kasel 
MlflwBIsnl Elec 
NlKsuOMn Hew 


4280 4040 
2250 2030 
2630 2560 
1C2C 915 
•VS 533 
345 769 

T74C 1430 

60C0 5359 
446 £07 

£55 422 

1C2B 913 
2B80 2720 
381 J4Q 
1270 1200 

859 Sri 
6» WO 
£880 £360 
1735 l£10 

mo wo 
ZtaB ZS£C 
435 4*2 

SS9 5*8 
711 £64 


Inca 

imanKavMpe 
jennack 
LaOOtt 
LoaiawCa 
Mockers li 
Magna mil A 
Maruime 
Mark Res 
MacLoan Hunter 
MaisaiA 
Noma lad A 
Nonsnea Inc 
NoranOa Forest 
Horten Energy 
Mltorn Telecom 
Haro Coro 
OUawn 
Paourln A 
Placer Dame 
Pant Petroleum 
PWACero 




CereMs 

ChvDev. 

DBS 

Fraser Neave 
Gemma 
Golden Hope PI 
Haw Par 
Hume industries 

Inchcnpe 

r.etxmi 

kl Keacrna 

Lvm Oiano , 

Matavan Banks 

OCBC 

DUB 

OUE 

Se u iBow on o 
Shongrlkj 
Slnie Darby 
SIA 

SUcre Lend 
Staoro Press 
Slno Stoamsnlo 
Store Trteamm 
Strolls Trod tag 
HOB 
U0L 


■ 8.n 

7.15 6.9* 
1240 72.10 
17.70 17 

18.10 17J2TJ 
285 281 
368 368 

424 *76 

625 6J05 
1148 1140 
XI* 310 
IBS too 
9J6 9 5D 
13211 1170 
825 BJ0 
7.9S 7.90 
1*40 1*10 
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190 3B0 
768 753 

^ *8 
196 284 
34* 362 
188 147 
11.18 TWO 
117 116 
: 209.18 


Mitsubishi Coro 1290 1940 

Mitsui and Co 730 485 

Mltsukashl 910 

MltBuni 1950 ucu 

NEC 1370 «6 

NGK insulators veo lOK 

Nikita Seourtltes 1«0 '20 

Nlaaan Koaaku 938 885 

NMpon CM 
Nlaaan steel 
Ntaaon Yusen 
Nissan 

KSMiraS": 

NTT VTSOc 871Kfa 




Montreal 

Alcan Aluminum 3?M 30Y: 

Borne Montreal 3IP* XV. 

Bell Canada *»• *2* 

BomtartOerB 71 19% 

CamMar Zt* 22 

CosoodH tan Bli 

DorrurUan Teiri A Ivy Bta 

Donohue A XV, 25^ 

MacMillan Bi 31^ 2Tto 

Nail Cartooa Tl-i Mje 

Power Con* 23» 2M 

Quebec Tel ' 22 n 

Qweaeeor A W W. 

BmmavB Mi Wvs 

Teieakibe 71«i 21 

Unlwa 7VS TVi 

videaMM 28'- SUM 


Stockholm 


725 «0 
359 229 

429 £03 

7*4 755 

232 3 JC73 

NTT wage 871Kta 

Oiymous Out loo) 1O0 too 

Pio n eer 
Rlooh 

Senvc Elec 
Sittro 
Stilmmu 
Shlnetsu Ow 
Sony 

SumtaxnoSk 
Sumitomo ChMn 
Sutnl Marine Jia 

SunlMnio Mala) gff 2® 

Talset Coro jn 47c 

Taisho Marine 532 799 

TatwOD Own 1331 1"" 

TDK 4210 3 

Tallin «e « 

Tokyo Marine T31B 1238 

TMtyaERWfto W£8 3M 

Taaoan Prtniiita llg 1250 

Toroy Ind. «0 MO 

TAshiM ra to 

Toyota 1948 Igc 

YomoJchl See 888 7BB 

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FtoaersB 22*: 

R a tin' n on » 100 
Ravel Bonk Can 31ft 
Sceptre Rn* ixl 
S sutrsHaso W* 
Sen u i cm 40ft 

Sears Can 7ft 

Shell Con 3W* 

SherrKt Gorton 11^1 
SHL SntemftK 8ft 
SouncRi 18ft 

Sow Aerospace 20V 
SWcaA 
Talisman Enere W* 
Teck B 25ft 

Thomson News T7ft 
Terumo Dunn 23ft 
Tarstar S 27Vs 

Tronsaita Util 16 
TrcniCea Ptac 20% 
Trilon Ftaffl 195 
Trlmoc 15> 

Trhee A u 

Dnieoro Eneroy 0*5 

SSBfiWT" 


Ctaie Prey. 

17 73 
13V 13ft 
46ft tVA 

5ft 5ft 
Uft inn 

365 3ft 
38ft TOT* 
ZPk 22ft 
027 027 
4ft 4ft 
25ft 25ft 
1ft 1ft 
17% 17ft 
UJ4 1M7 
*15 *85 
9ft 9ft 
22ft 22 
Sft «V 
066 848 
M Bft 
460 460 
IM 14ft 
13ft 13ft 
14ft 14ft 
19ft 18ft 
32ft 32ft 

*3 42ft 
36ft 3Sft 
33ft 33ft 
2Tft 21ft 
23ft 22ft 
23ft 73ft 
lift lift 
66ft £6 
24ft 24ft 
Bft Bft 
Mft 14 
Z7V 27ft 
7ft 7ft 
26ft 25ft 
12ft 77ft 

1* 15ft 
43ft 41V 
9ft 9ft 
23V 23V 
365 S6S 
33ft 32ft 
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1J0 1ft 

18 17ft 

30 39ft 

27*: 22V 
180 101ft 
31ft 31V 
13ft 13ft 
Vft 9ft 
40ft 39ft 
7ft 7ft 
39ft 39ft 
lift lift 
8ft 8ft 
18ft 18ft 
20V 19ft 
Bft 9 
29V 77ft 
25ft 2S 

IK J5 4 

23ft 23ft 

27ft 77ft 

16 14 

20V 20ft 
195 190 
15V 14ft 
MM l 
0*5 am 


Ouen Hah Law Close eng OoJrt 


Grains 


WHEAT (CUT) UBbunWW'ium-a 
194V 380 Mar 94 365ft 177'- 

372 HD MavM S49H 3J4ft 

XSi 264 Jut 94 337ft 343 

1 sru HO SaP 94 138ft 343V 

365 1» DSCW 3L4* 150ft 

127 111 -MVS XZJ 125ft 

Eat. tries HA. Frrs-Iries 15.929 
FrrsepenM 5 Buffi ail 743 
WHEAT 0CBOT1 M»ft.B*iepunt-d 
392 2.98 Marw 359ft 364ft 

3J9ft 298 May 94 145 150 

XS5 267 Jy»9» 136V, 340 

345ft JJDftSmiM 137 340ft 

348 inftD*c94 343 348 

157ft 141ftMri-ff 
EsLsrirs NA Fffvtoes 8453 
Fits o pen Ini 376G off 273 
CORN (CBOTJ Mkhi nW wr ww - 4k> 
111ft 2JtftMw94 ZOtft 390ft 
118V 138ft May 74 264 265 

316ft 341 JUH 395ft 2» 

392ft t40ftSep94 378ft 379ft 
373ft 736 ft Dec M 263ft 185 

2J9Vi 353ft Mar 95 230ft 370V 

262 374 MOV9S 373 374 

2J2ft 375 Jri»S 375 175ft 

258ft 351ftDK95 152ft 2J2ft 

Est. soles HA Rn.sries «*99t 
FrrsaMnH 341392 alt 2*47 
SOYBEANS (CUT) MNDenWWngn 
7JI 589ft *33ft *87V 
7J1 562ftMav74 *54 £60 

ISO 564ftJrif4 tM *90ft 

7J5 *28 AuaM 47Bft 6B7 

669ft *17 Sri> 94 *9 460V 

7J7ft 5J3ftNo»94 SAT* 645 
£70 618ft Jan 95 Sri *59*4 

873ft *42 Marf* 

173 642ft Jul 95 *54 *55 

150ft 561 ft Nov »S *24 *24 

Est-sries «A erf's. ones 4S77J 
FrTsoeeniri VXZB an UNO 
SOTMAN MEAL (CBOTJ Moam-d 
23769 IBS7»MorM J9U0 79530 

23260 IKSJOMoyM W*40 195*0 

23060 miOJllIM 19*60 19590 

223. CO )93)0AligM 19360 IVL8D 

21860 IIUttoM 19160 191 JO 

20*00 lSSTODdM 18860 I896D 

WOO 440 Dec 9* 1OL00 11*10 

20060 18868 JOI95 18*30 11840 

Est.sries KA Fre* soles 23342 

Fn-sOOenM 90339 up ay7 
SOYBCANt*. 1CBOT7 dtMtt-ri 
3075 21.13 Mar M 2860 28M 

30.45 71 60 May 94 2*75 2843 

SUV 71J5JUW 3*0 2*50 

2960 2I43AUSM 27.93 2*05 

2840 22riSep9t D40 2760 

2745 231000 94 2*70 2*80 

2668 0.90 Dec 94 2*20 I860 

2665 2245 Jv 95 2*00 2460 

2560 2SJ0MO-95 

EN-scto ka> metrics 

FiTseoenee 91,701 ell 2788 


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CATTLE (CMBRJ amtomtHra 


365 171V 1 067ft TOM 

147V 357ft -065ft *773 
337V 342V » 064 ft 15422 
368ft 343V *06ift MB 
345 JLSPft HL0«ft 2655 
363 335ft tOUDlft 5 


X59V 364V 4- 064ft 16.106 
344ft 150 -*065 *384 

165V 340 +D6TA 10.198 
364V 340 ♦OJOft 2,191 
342ft 346 *064 976 

345 rtUlM S 


390V -060V 18*938 
394V ♦OlOOV 91 690 
395ft -aoms 80648 
279 -060V 16483 
26* — 060ft *3402 
369 ft— 061 ft UTS 
274 ]H 

2JSft sra 

352 ft *anaft is 


drift -am srjsa 

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*90V -‘063ft 33401 
*82 *064 SSM 

659ft *060ft 1752 
643ft DJB7 

641ft ,060ft 1 654 
*54 -OJJOft 304 
*55 —402 IM 
621V -CXI V 730 


7KUB 19*10 -048 3U71 

IMM 19S40 *070 )4319 

19*40 19560 *060 17689 

KUO J912D *770 

19040 19160 *0.10 IM 
HMO 18860 —160 1.987 
0860 187.30 -0.90 5J31 
18760 187 JO -070 257 


2*43 S63 

2868 2U3 

2868 28JB 

17 JO 2865 
2743 77 J* 

2865 3675 

2*99 2*15 

2515 3595 

2575 


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-aw 3*5 
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1800 153C 
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£370 sm 
2270 2090 

915 Z 


vea 99* 
tm 575 
465 448 

1428 1408 


AGA 430 417 

Asea A 577 578 

Astra A 189 188 

Anas Coxa <38 *38 

Electrolux 8 S3 354 

Ericsson 382 355 

Esjelte-A 133 138 

Handel sbanken 143 U1 

iiMrilorB 304 19S 

Nook Hydro 358 153 


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TreileboTO BF 9X50 91 » 

vmvc m 479 


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BF Reattv Hds 
BramotoJ %£* 

BrunMnck 9ft 

CAE *ft 

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AdtafnHB 

AlusuHse B new ... 

cSSSK'lT' 8 1,47 im 

C5 HohJtaBJ B 

*190 4)90 
FfteherB 1220 M7J 

i nterdh eount B 2410 MB 
Jelmon B 933 935 

LanriiGvrR =*■ iS 
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Nestle R 1428 I4D6 

Per Ilk. EvchrtcR iff 

ParoeWHMB 1880 1880 

Roche HOP ly 7180 7095 
Setra R esuMlc M3MJ6P 

acrtOPS B 442O 44a] 

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SwtotaqnceB _ 3308 2120 
|"t»gnkCon»B 522 512 
f "■» *?*ta»»r R nn 899 
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INTERNATIONAL herald TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 1994 


Page 9 

EUROPE 


Competition Lags in Europe’s Sty 

But Passengers Wise Up to Promotional Air Fares 


UnAi.,v; ' . .yi."-'- - .>■•■*' ’’'i'iifW •"'. :-K' ’ 1 .■<!’>■»». . 

"'M ' ; ! • -.v • S- ;v" ' 


AMSTTERDaM — E rik-Jan Ne- h 
derkoom, chairman of the Dutch- 

■ German airplane maker NY Fok- r 
ker, resided Monday in an .a 
apparent dispute over restructuring e 
the unprofitable company. . ... y 

The airplane maker said its super- 
visory board granted' a request by 

• "I 

IGMetatt Stages 
Warning Strikes 

Compiled by Our SlaffTrom Diipmcha 

' FRANKFURT — Thousands of j 

metalworkers staged warning 
strikes across Western Germany cm 
-J Monday, demanding pay raises 
(hat recession-rocked companies 

■ said would bring layoffs. 

The action disrupted operations " 
at 13? companies in Gamany’.s cru- 
cial metalworking and autopotivc 

• sectors, mdnrimg Baycrischc Mo- 

* terenWerice AG and the Mercedes- 
Benz unit of Daimler-Benz AG. Tbe 
powezfullG MetaB onion said more 
than 54,500 workers had joined the. 
stoppages. It warned that mot in- 

.. dnstiial action was in stare later tins 
week. The action was aimed « 
bringing employers back to the ne- 
gotiating table, a unkm official said. 

Soaring unemrdoyment, plunging 
orders and weak company profits 
- .have made coo-entting and job se- 
“ nrrity the two main watchwords of 
current pay talks. Bui the two sides 
-■ are at odds on how these joint goals 
' can be achieved. . (AP, Reuters) 


MnNederiixwmtotekaselamfnm . . 

bis duties for “personal reasons." 

FokkersaidMr.Nede*oom,50, 
resigned effectively imme diately 

and would be temporal 
ed -ay the deputy cnamnan, Rrindcr 
van Dttinen. • y 

Company spokesmen refused to 
comment further. Some sources said 

Mr. Nededooro had been opposed 
U) changes aii^ at pulfing die com- 
pany out of the red. But at least one 
source send be wanted more than 
others to cut costs. , : 

Pokier is 51 percent-controDed 
by the Deutsche Aerospace AG aim 
of the German industrial co opnm - 
erate Daimler-Benz AG. 

Andre Mulder, an analyst at Bar- 

days deZocteWcdd in Amsterdam. 

said relations between Mr. Neder- 
koom and tbe supervisory board 
had been strained since Deutsche 
- Aerospace bought a majority stake 
in Fofcker in nnd-1993. 


1QC jLmitn luuusuj t .ET 

at Fokfcei said he sold out to DASA 
too early and too cheaply and was 
too moral of a yes-man to the Ger- 
mans,” Mr. Mulder said. Yet at 
Kempen & Ca in Amsterdam an- 
other analyst, Vofcko Tuyn, said Mr. 
Neederkom “warned to cut costs 
more rban others on tbe board.” 

Fokker produces short and me- 
dium-haul jet mid propeller an- 
GT&fti 

Fokker reported a loss of 127 
million guilders ($65.6 million) for 
the first half of this.year, conmaral 
- with a restated profit-of 5.89nul- 
lion guilders for die like period tat 
year. (AR, Bloomberg. AFX) 


By Tom Buerlde 

Internationa] Remit! Tribune 

BRUSSELS-Ayearaftatbc j 

European Union deregulated its 

airline industry, cpmpflm® 
been slow 10 lake off, fares re- 
mam .h&h on nKBt ***** * 
and big price differences between 
countaes make a mockery of the 
Union’s single market, passenger 
groups and analysts say. 

Fare reductions have bear con- 
centrated on routes to and from 
Britain, Europe’s most deregulat- 
ed air market, and on a handful 
of other routes where startup ior 
low-cost camera have mtroduceu 
competition. Airlines are still fac- 
ing pressure, however, as increas- 
ing numbers of travelers eschew 
unrestricted fares in favor of pro- 
motional tariffs. 

The HU’S open-skies pohey, 
which freed camera to pick mar 
awn routes and set their own fare* 
-hasn’t been widely used because 
it requires a competitive market 
mSnt," said Ga^eyLi^ 
man, head of tbe Weald Travel 
and ToarimCoundl m Brussels. 

With traffic on most European 

routes still dominated by duopo- 
Kcs of national flag carriers, u*ey 
lend to operate in the old way. 
That’s no incentive for them to 
try new products or new prices. 

Mr. Tinman sat on a 12-mem- 


Airlines Are Told to Stop 
Looking for Crutches 

Reiners 

protests ui hs final 

would beiaappropiiue rad sdMefeatraf. 
Commission «, allow suic sid to mrima 

■Rmmnn De Croo airlines needed a c han ge of • 

Ah^n^an^^ 

SSva^ng current rules contain safeguards which can be used m 

L^^ g^ud spimis- in air fara and 
lod* aircarnors ailow for 

temporary intervention in extreme cases, its»d. 


bTpa^ has advised the 
European Commission to press 
P wi with its airline deregula- 
tion efforts despite the indreoy’s 
huge losses, which totaled S2-2 
bSon in 1992 and are ejected 
to show little change m *993. 

The nonbinding report, which 
was due to be ftmnAy released 

on Tuesday but which orculatfid 


Monday, urges authorities to fos- 
ter competition and resist pres- 
sure from unprofitable siaxe- 
awned carriers for bailouts. 

That line is vigorously contest- 
ed by several continental earners, 
led by Air France, Sabena and 
Alitalia. They want to turn back 
the dock on deregidatiom and 
draw on government funds while 
they restructure. 

The report should strengthen 
the commission’s ability torduse 
those requests, said one commis- 
sion official who spoke on condi- 
tion of anonymity. The key rest 
will mmp next month, when Am 
France is expected to submit a 
restructuring plan indudmg huge 


new injections of stare capital on 
top of a 1.8 bQKon-franc (.53-05 
million) borrowing last yev. 
which the commission is already 
inves tigating , this official said. 

Whatever tbe outcome, tbe ex- 
perience of the past year suggests 

that more deregulation, not less, 
is needed in Europe’s skies. 

The Federation of Air Trans- 
port User Representatives in the 
European Community, a passen- 
ger lobby group, complained to 
the commissi on last week that im- 
restricred fares, the type paid by 

most business travders, are far 

too high. . . 

In a letter to the commission, 
the passenger group’s chairman. 


1 -buries Flocard, cited the unre- 
stricted fare from 
Madrid, a distance of 1400 
metcra (925 miles), which at £423 
pounds (S282) was nearly double 
the £219 pounds charged for the 
marginally longer London-Ma- 
drid route. 

Mr Flocard said airline meffi- 
cieoev and an attempt to subsi- 
dize 'unprofitable routes else- 
where were keeping European 

pI Tb bcsiirq, deregulation has 
fostered new competitors and 
lower fares in some markets. Brit- 
ish Midland’s growing presence 1 
recently forced Sabena to match 
its business-class fare of 17,840 
Belgian francs (5498 ) for a Brus- 
sels-London roundnip. undercut- 
ting British Airways by about 15 
percent- , 

But the biggest unpact so far is 

stemming from a consumer re- 
volt, led mainly by business trav- 
ellers seeking to cut costs m the 
recession. 

i Tony Vanbdmom, a manager ! 
5 at Belgium International Travel, 

the country’s largest agent, say® 
v about three-quarters of his corpo- 
rare clients now fly economy- 
L _ rather than business m tu- 
ts rope versus just 10 to 15 percent 

s, three years ago. ^ , 

As a result, only 29 percemof 
s- passengers on European flights 
ie SdSfi fare last yen, down 
n- Eot 33 percent m 1992 and 39 

to percent in 1990, according to the 
n- Association of European Air- 

t>v lines. . . 

But the discounting is haying 
the desired impact: the carriers 

m, filled 58 percent of their seats last 

m, year, up from 56.8 


" «iSw<^- T:?,! 3^58E'=- 

Exchangh -i ,• .. / . 

• Amsterdam a ASX > ••• • • v . s 

Frankfurt PAX V:'.- ; ^ 

: : • • 


London - \ 
Madrltf ! ^ 
Milan ; r. 
Paris . T 

St ockholtiT 

Yienna ' : ~; 
Zmich..- 


W*:.:. :••• S; -.ww 0 

•«ic . •'ATf;--p42M»;-..--,-«ej!8 

" StA^ 2.177 A5 . 2.133.47' 

1 .• , l ‘ J6M* i. 

; ; /;.^at:80 ,'3,44 Irir; ■ 


imp,-.,.; 

CAC40* 


Stodt index 


r^taas.OO •; 

r ; " • 2 ^ 34^6 :' L teigyy..^g i- 

1A3 344^ 

• ' •gT7^3‘ - ' SQgi?T • ' "■ +lA!L 
— lmentwii'nifll Herafcl Tribune 


Very briefly: — 

• BSN SA’s nei profit Ml monTt^tom 1 !^ an 

1993; the companv said ^^v^or 1 ^Sonal 10 percent or the 

to holding «. ta 

SsE-3ss«: 

Matra Hachette share. 

• Rh&oe-Poulenc Rorer Inc’s n S196fiamS?10; die two-thirds- 

. Kolbenscfamidt AG, . car 


— > ^ 

can be achieved. : (AP, Reuters) year. (At, woomperg , [_ ‘ 

Tessas 

Mr. BtipevikiWeto^.^ts^ ^d^m^r- stuff mWestero Einopa and Am^ ^fSS^SSLt Industry vffl take the tatacl 


Coutmned from Page 7 
reduction, whore if we use 1991 as a 

- base we’ve reduced cnr.oogouK 
costs by about $3 biffion worid- 

T wide, including everything from 
travel and telephones to outride 

*' purchases. The cost bare is roughly 

r . 5100 bilfion. ' - 

. We also reduced employment 
’ here in Europe fhsn 100,000 fifteen 

- months ago to about .83,000 nerw. 

But we did not cut back our. capitol 

speofflng on new products or mod- 
emizafion during the recessioa so 


Mr.Bamevik:We^.re&^.nents mEi^ stuff in Western Europe and Amo- Industry wffl take the burtkn rf 

our work force by 45,000 mWert- and ^“SSefitjof jea and Eastern European prod- order to act-*ve recovery- And weshould 

on Europe and America m tbe last nets. I see Eastern Europe as an Siebert: Restructunng wffl that there are religions 


SSW3™»&| tT JBSiTBS - - Mr. Siebm: Restrucmring wOl SStSTH religions 

but we are tmehanged .g^SjSSJSes inSra opportunity, not a threat to trade. Itsnlt m a serious tmempioymrat "hXamnot be apphed anymore 
in total becansewe are^panefing turbines \t.DeBenedetti: We have been problem and that’s a big isueto be ^ons Ub: inurest raies, like^e 

in Aria and in Eastern Europe. . . & polio- hit^ the general climate in En- Solved. Goman mamrfh^rmg ^esbank pob^ to tsfo > a ^ 

To get in shape we reduced pro- ^^^^^^^Gomanyand ropa where we do arou^ W po- has to respond iwnTnda sinrole example. To 

ccit^I^takesomeeram- is to JSuf our business. We decided to crease in wagps smcelWO mi it wfafle the real devfl 

lym are now delivered m Swedra to raamt mnoaitrate on core businesses and ^ jj, hourly productivity of only m t ^ something that in my mma 

SffiSrf 60 months, S^ng costs. W c tore “brolete. is harmmg J5JJJJ 

_ ... i stmim Dover pano msiae r~ » "*7“ 0 r manage- nf rlMlmc with the wage an commumtv but the social 


irurers Bankers had called for the gover- 

53 bW!P;® iW! »s 

E^d^uanonrftoto. h.d««d g 


We are bnildin 
plants one and a 


smzatkm dtnrng tne reccsauu ----- ^ to 

s^LTwr ^’ ** 

’cars and truA^ !We havekgt bm^tn^OTinro^ mtereal ihaep«J/ ?3000^ June 1994, which will be 
retafl enstomere focus wen nwre. - ^ . . . - - ' . ' ' " 


ZZTZ jars * r55 “ Erao ?- 


nse in Jiouiiv J»uuiw-v — - -- mmi is miukuuui, — — —j , 

8.5 percent. And we have no expen- . obsolac , is harnung 
ecceof dealing with the wage *f- busiDess commumty but the soaal 
taenti'al between East and West Jaj^y of sod^. We cannot srn- 
Gcrmany. vriiicb is l-to-10. yjye having real interest rates whu 

Mr De Benedetti: What worries the U5. and Japan have zero real 

me^n^eLlackofpohti- interest rates. 




I W Month ^ WIPE iw HW 1 LowLXtHQr'Be 


r»ct week's devaluation oi tne ura. Central Bank naa usca au 
Bui cut GulteJrin, who had been tools to soothe the markets 

governor since Aug. 26, said it was ^ devaluation, 
the Treasury’s overuse of dotn^ Hc said the bank “was left tmrid- 
borrowing that ed" after two international credit 

ish finanaal markets with excess _ _.. Turkey's rating on Jan. 

liquidity andhadled to thedevalu- ^v^ors Servire and 

auon last Wednesday “ght & Poor's Corp- cited ij: 

The lira strengthened Monday. . ^ and trade defi- 

Tbe dollar TeU 450 liras, » lTjl» “Jgf g uSxxl tat these 
Before the deyauhmon, a dollar w ^ pcndst coming yeare 
was worth 15,186 uras. 


i lzMonm on/ vw pe i ws Hw" LnwLci edOi'ae 

- & HUh HHV'-r??... 1. Z 


NASDAQ priM»^ 

































































































China Tuning In on Commercials 

Foreign Agencies Expect Profits in Once-Adless Land 


Investor’s Asia 


. BEIJ ING -- The government’s 
dampdQwn on new construction 
projects this ;ye*r wfll be difficult to 
enforce, Chinese and foreign econ- 
omists here on 

The Stale Council, China's cacn- 

□el. OTer the weekend pm stikt con- 

trols'oa bufldmg, bank lending, tire 
oparing of deyefopment zones and 
the issuance of stocks and bonds 
op Bade the government plan, man 
attempt to wrestle inflation down 
from the dangerous levels more than 
2D percent it reached last year. 

- The idea ls to prevent a repetition 

China’s Austerity 
Hits OTIC Sales, 
Delays Projects 

Bloomberg Businas Nan ■ 

HONG KONG — China’s aus- 
terity program, introduced in July, 
is still hurting vehicle sales and 
delayi ng fa y investments, accord- 
ing to erne Pacific Ltft, China’s 
main lisied-investmcnt company in 
Hong Kong. 

Demandfrorn many of the Chi- 
nese companies that were buying 
imported cars, vans andtrocks from 
CrnC Pacific's Dab Chong Hong 
trading wing,' has slowed dramati- 
cally because t hey c annot get Hank 
financing, said CTTIC Pacific’s exec- 
utive director, Robert Adams. 

“There was just not the bank 
financing, th e cred it wasn't there," 
he said. The CTTIC group’s plans 
to build a tunnel under a Shanghai 

river may also be delayed because 
the local Chinese partner is finding 
it difficult to raise the financing. 

Last July, China introduced an 
austerity policy aimed at cooBng 
down its overheating economy, in- 
cluding a severe tightening in bank 
credit. 


of the credit-fueled economic boom 
in the first half of 1993. The con- 
struction frenzy that turned parts of 
tte sou* and tire coast into a forest 
of building cranes has been a key 
factor befamd the price rises. 

Control of construction projects 
“is the key subject in the govern- 
. meat’s- control of .the economy," 
said one Chinese economist He 
added: “If they are unable to re- 
strain fixed-asset, investment, they 
have little hope of attaining for*? 
economic targets this year." 

The government jus set a 9 per- 
cent limit on economic growth this 
year after 13 percent growth in 
1993, and it wants to hold inflation 
Wow 10 percent 

“It might be a difficult order to 
enforce, but there is really no other 
way as China's monetary system is 
not developed enough to use West- 
ern-style naturals such as interest- 
rate manipulation," the Chinese 
economist said. 

“China's inflation is investment- 
driven," a Hong Kong-based eco- 
nomic analyst concurred. 

Some confusion remains as to 
whether the State Comal drealar, 
which slated that “ra principle, no 
new projects wfll be approved this 
year,” amounted to an outright ban. 

"*1 see it more as an extremely 
strong exhortation aimed at provid- 
ing the authority needed to incle- 
ment (he government policy," said a 
Bering-based Western economist 
with an internabontd esganization. 

Jofil Edouard, deputy manager 
of Credit Lyonnais’s branch in 
Shanghai, said: “The problem for 
the central bank is checking that 
the policy is carried out in the prov- 
inces, which have. diown them- 
selves to be very independent- 
minded in the past” 

A Western diplomat: said: “Tins 
sounds like yet another of these 
warning notes from the center that 
the provinces just pay Hp service 
to." " (AFP. Roaas) 


. . . Bloomberg Business News 

BEIJING — When the actress Gong Li, 
known internationally for her award- winning 
role in “Farewell My Concubine," made a 
cool I mzHron yuan { J 1 15,000) last summer to 
hawk an air conditioner in. a. local television 
. commercial, nobody was more pleased than 
the China's foreign advertising community, 
- After years of disappointing returns, ad- 
vertising executives from New York and Lon- 
don say recent economic reforms and China's 
eroejgbg .consumer class wfll finally allow 
them to recoup their initial investments in 
China 

During the past two years, such agencies as 
DDB Needham Worldwide foe, ^Walter 
Thompson Ca and Saatdii &Saatchi Co. have 
set up joint ventures. Including tie-ups from 


agencies cased in Hong Kong ana laiwan, 
China now has about 60 foreign agencies. 

“Chinese enterprises are also beginning io 
. realize the value of high-quality advertising." 
rays Gary Bmant, president and chief execu- 
tive officer of Denisu. Young & Rubicam 
Partnerships, which set up the China's first 
advertising joint venture in 1986. 

“The lion’s share of the tagger accounts 
win be won tty multinational agencies in joint 
ventures with major Chinese firms," he said. 


cy balings jumped an estimated 65 percent, to 
8 billion yuan (5919 million), this year, fol- 
lowing a 93 percent increase last year, China's 
Stale Administration for Industry and Com- 
merce reported. 


It said it expected that by the turn of the 
century billings wotuld hit at least 28 billion 
yuan a year. 

“The 28 billion yuan figure is a conserva- 
tive estimate because by the end of the de- 
cade, enterprises will be operating in a much 

When an actress got 
$115,000 fora 
commercial, nobody 
was more pleased than 
advertising executives 
from overseas. 


fiercer market environment,'' said Liu Bacifu, 
director of advertising at the state agency. 

Chinese advertising is certainly evolving. 
Four years ago, most television 2 ds amounted 
to a picture of the product and its brand 
name. They typically climaxed with a black 
screen showing the general manager's address 
and phone number. 

Now, prime-time Chinese television ads 
often play to the foibles of China’s newly 
rich. In one spot, a middle-aged executive 
naps in a huge leather chair while his lap-top 
computer plays a lullaby. 

Affluent characters are being portrayed in 
ads, and with cause. Income levels are rising 


quickly in China, indeed, urban incomes 
grew by 29 percent during the first nine 
months of 1993 over the year-earlier period, 
according to government statistics. 

And about 4.5 million Chinese average 
about 30,000 yuan a year these days. While 
small, compared with salaries in the Wcsl 
that money more than covers basic necessities 
for most Chinese. Whai is left over can be 
used for discretionary purchases. 

Perhaps mindful that there is more money 
being plowed into advertising, the Chinese 
government is now charging a lot more for 
access to the airwaves. ~ 

China Central Television earlier this year 
more than doubled rates, to 25.000 yuan from 
10,000 yuan, for a time slot right after the 
evening’ news, which it claims is watched by 
up to 600 million viewers. Shanghai's Libera- 
tion Daily charges more than 1 million yuan 
for a front-page ad. 

While a boom in advertising may he ahead, 
few foreign agencies are maltin g much money 
vcl Dentsu's joint venture oiuv moved into 
the black in 1992. 

Yet things have come a long way since 
19*79, when there were no ads at all in China. 
As of June; the country had 23.000 ad agen- 
cies with 244,000 employees, said Mr. Liu, 
the slate agency's advertising director. But he 
added that nearly half of these had been in 
operation less than a year and his organiza- 
tion regarded onlv JO percent as “compe- 
tent." 


Clinton Presses Hosokawa on Trade 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

TOKYO — President Bfll Clin- 
ton of the United Stales telephoned 
Prime Minister Morihiro Ho- 
sokawa on Monday and asked that 
Japan work toward the success of 
the UiL-Japan trade framework 
talks, a Japanese spokesman said. 

Mr. Hosokawa’s chief cabinet 
secretary, Masayoshi Takemura. 
said the two leaders spoke for about 
15 minutes and said they would do 
their utmost to bring about a suc- 
cessful conclusion of the first phase 
of the trade negotiations. 


The two governments are expect- 
ed to hold lower-level negotiations 
later this week. They face a Feb. 11 
deadline, when Mr. Clinton and 
Mr. Hosokawa are to meet in 
Washington. 

At that meeting, the two leaders 
are supposed to sign agreements 
aimed at opening Japan's automo- 
bile and insurance markets and at 
reforming Japan's government pro- 
curement of telecommunications 
.•mt! equipment. But the 

countries remain far apart on all 
these issues. 



TIT? 


Monday’s doting 

Tables induda the nationwide puces up to 
the dosing on Wan Street and do not reflect . 
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Before the Washington summit. 
Deputy Foreign Minister Kumhiko 
Salto said Monday, the U.S. trade 
representative, Mickey Kan tor, and 
other U.S. officials may visit Tokyo. 

U.S. officials said they hoped 
Mir. Hosokawa would come up 
with a compromise to salvage tire 
talks. They said they were hoping 
to get the prime minister and other 
high officials to intervene. 

Mr. Hosokawa saved his job dur- 
ing the weekend with an lltb-bour 
c ompr omi se aimed at the reform of 
Japan’s political system, an issue 


that has preoccupied him for weeks. 
With that oul of the way. Mr. Ho- 
sokawa “is now in a position to 
participate a little more actively in 
resolving this." a U.S. official said. 

So far. trade negotiations have 
been conducted mainly by Japan's 
bureaucrats, whom Washington 
sees as recalcitrant. The U.S. gov- 
ernment has been trying to bring 
the talks io the front burner as a 
political issue, hoping politicians 
might be more amenable to com- 
promise. (Knight-Rijekr, NY7) 


TOKYO: Foreigners Swarm. In 



Continued from Page 7 
bow much of the headline spending 
figure will represent fresh Keynes- 
ian stimulus and bow much wtQ 
merely replace funds that would 
have been put into the economy in 
the form of loans from commercial 
banks. In addition, the impact on 
consumer spending of an income 
tax cut is unJcnown, especially if the 
: government states its intention to 
make up for the lost revenue by 
raising consumption taxes once the 
economy recovers. 

Even with the spending, and an- 
other cut in Japan’s record-low of- 
ficial discount rate of 1.75 percent, 
the consensus forecast is for Ja- 
pan’s economy to contract by 
about half of one percent in 1994. 
That suggests further pain for Jap- 
anese companies, many of which 
could suffer a fifth straight year of 
declining profits in the coming fis- 
cal year through March 1995. 

To bears, the stock market is 
getting way ahead of economic re- 
ality and has an ominous echo of 
January a year ago, when the Nik- 
kei index began a rapid climb from 
just over 16.000 to more than 
20,000 in April only to lose all its 
gains later in the year. Then as now, 
they note, it has been foreign inves- 
tor piling in while Japanese com- 
panies and b anks sell to book prof- 
its and pad accounts before 
accounts close at the end of March. 


“Tbe same things happened one 
year ago," a foreign fund manager 
said, “There will be big selling from 
Japanese companies sometime be- 
fore the end of March." 

■ Taiwan Stocks Soar 

Taiwan's benchmark index 
soared on hopes that a 5.9 pereeni 
surge in U.S. economic growth in 
the fourth quarter would pronrot a 
broad global recovery, Bloomberg 
reported from Taipei. 

Prices also rose on seasonal buy- 
ing ahead of the Lunar New Year 
holiday. 

The weigh led price index of the 
Taiwan Stock Exchange soared- 
99.04. to 6,115.12 on trading vol- 
ume of 89.2 billion Taiwan dollars 
($3.37 billion). 

“The U.S. growth figure was very 
strong, and there’s hope that the 
U.S. can be a locomotive for the 
sluggish world economy," said 
Roger La research manager with 
Saxopo Securities. The Commerce 
Department said Friday that the 
U.S. increase was its best gain in six 
years. 

Textile stocks, bellwethers for 
the export industry, gained on ex- 
pectations of rising pritKS. said Ste- 
ven Yang, chief dealer with Presi- 
dent Securities, one of Taiwan’s 
largest securities companies. 

Far Eastern Textile, one of Tai- 
wan's largest textile companies, 
rose I JO dollars a share to 43.1. 


Hong Kong 
Hang Seng 

fiOtt— 

11903 

\m- — - rf 
m- 


^toinT 


Singapore ■ 
Straits' Times 

m 

mm - ---- - 


Tokyo 

Nikkei 225 "■ 

2!W» jpr — 
198B — 1 — \ 


1933 

Exchange 


1994 

Index 


X s O wlTd" ■ 


17500—.-- 
i MM-cris 


a s-on-d r. 

1893 . 1994 


Hon g Kong Hang Seng' 

Singapore ' Straits Times 
Sydney ; MQrcfinaries 

Tokyo i*kkoi225'V‘'' 

Kuala Lumpur Composite • 


Monday Prev. v 
Ctosa • ■ Cfose ■: ; Change 

11,487.00 li.377.8a +0.98 


Bangkok 
Seoul' 
Taipei . 
Marsha 
Jakarta 


2439.10 2,300-07 +I.70; 

2^10 A0 2.25990 >255* 

20.229.12 1 a. 757 .Ba 
1,106.99 . .1,030.06 .;+t.55; 

XmM I^OTISS-". "- 0 T 92 : 

945.71 946.11. '004 

6.115.12 6J316.D3 +1.65 


2439.10 

2^10.80 


'SET ' V .1^93,45 

Compose StodT* ~S4S.7i” 

. Weighted Price 6.115.12 


Cotnpd^te 
Stock Index. 


2^74;S6'‘ .a^so 

592.02 • 592.65 ' 
2,397.92 2,333.^ 

1,921.49 1,944.13 


Hew Zealand ' HZSE-40 ' 2^97.92 2.338.B& ■ 42S5 

Sombay HattonaUndex ' .. 1^21.49 1.SM4.13- -t 16 

Sources* neuters. AFP lmenuu«isl HcnW Trftumc 

Very briefly: 

• Malaysia^ consumer price index rose 3.6 percent in 1993 after 4.7 
percent' in 1992, the government reported; economists predict inflation 
will accelerate to 4_2 percent this year and 4.5 percent in 1995. 

• Australia agreed to phase out the use of European geographical names, 
such as chi anti, champagne and burgundy. lor its wines, in return for 
greater access to European Union markets. 

» Aztech Systems Ltd., which makes an attachment that enables personal 
computers to reproduce sound through speakers, launched an initial 
public offering to raise 62-5 million Singapore dollars (539.1 million). 
m Taiwan’s Finance Ministry is weighing plans for Taipei's first bond sale 
on international markets since 1949, to raise up to 5300 million. 

AFP, Reuters, Bloomberg 



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Continued from Page 7 
“is in a league of its own in foreign 
debL" The country, he said, needs to 
pros ahead with fiscal reforms to 
cut the budget defidL 
India has been brought back 
from the brink of ruin by an Inter- 
national Monetaiy Fund-induced 
program that, masterminded by 
Mr. Singh and steered past en- 
trenched opposition, is changing 
the socialist-style economic system 
that evolved over 40 years.. 

Policies that lowered tariffs and 
taxes and promised changes in In- 
dia's financial system and privatiza- 
tion of parts of ’its inefficient public 
sector have started to bear fruit. 

In dian industry, freed from lay- 
ers of interfering bureaucracy, has 
moved to put itself on a more com- 
petitive footing. Exports have ris- 
en, interest rates and inflation have 
f allen, and economic growth is hit- 
ting 5 percent. 

*Tm quite sure the credit rating 
ag en c ie s will eventually follow the 
market," said Mr. Rangaraan, re- 
ferring to mushrooming demand 
for Indian securities issued in inter- j 
national capital markets. 1 

Several large government and 
corporate issuers may follow the 
Industrial Development Bank of 
India, which announced last month 
its intention to raise S250 million 
with a five-year Eurobond. 


Glaims Against 
UnittoStates 

V CtoVEBNMENT 

PAGE and ROSE 

ATTOBNETT9 AND COUNSEl.O«S 
WASHINGTON ® c 
(3WH 

nans 
4/ 19 IS.4I 
UJC MCCLES 

■3101 577 3000 




#2* 


KictiAfln BitAiWKv, ForNiifK *m» Ciiiff K\u.iatv<>. VifwiK Atiaxtm: Aura ws 


People at the top read die Trib. 

No local i»ias. No national slant. No partisan viewpoint. 
Simply n balanced editing of (he news 
for people with a stake in intemationa! affaiiR. 

79 dW international^ * f 

iicralo-aS^enbunc 


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Paze 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 1994 


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SPORTS 


Gillooly Guilty Plea Expected Today 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 1994 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dapatcha 

PORTLAND, Oregon — U.S. 

figure iVh ring champ ion Tooya 

Harding's name was submitted 
Monday as a member of the U.S. 
Olympic ream, but whether she 
would compete in the Games in 
Norway appeared to have beat put 
further in doubt. 

Harding's former husband, Jeff 
Gillooly, has a court bearing sched- 
uled for Tuesday morning at which 
he i$ expected to plead guilty to a 
charge of plotting the Jan. 6 attack 
on Harding’s skating rival Nancy 
Kerrigan. His lawyer, Ron Hoevet, 
said Gillooly will make a statement 
and answer questions following his 
court appearance. 

Gillooly, bodyguard Shawn Eck- 
ardi, the alleged assailant Shane 
Slant and the alleged getaway car 
driver Derrick Smith have all been 
charged with conspiracy to assault 
Kerrigan, who was hit above her 
right knee with a police baton at a 
practice rink in Detroit just before 
the national championships there. 


Slant and Smith are scheduled to 
appear in Multnomah County Cir- 
cuit Court an hour earlier than Gil- 
looly for a hearing on their legal 
representation. 

Harding didn’t okjject to the plot 
to eliminated Kerrigan from the 
c hamp io nshi ps, though she didn’t 
think- Eckardt could cany it off. 
The Oregonian newspaper report- 
ed Monday. 

Gillooly, in a confession to au- 
thorities, said that be came up with 
the plot because be felt the judges 
had unfairly ranked Harding fourth 
at a December skating competition 
in Japan and wouldn't give her a fair 
shake at the national champion- 
ships, the newspaper reported. 

Deputy District Attorney Norm 
Frink declined to comment Mon- 
day on The Oregonian report and 
said, “We’re still interviewing wit- 
nesses and gathering evidence,*’ 
adding that the investigation 
“could be days, it could be weeks. 
I’d put the emphasis on weeks." 

Harding has not been charged. 


She returned to the ice after a 
weekend off, as a large crowd 
pressed around the rink and the 
r ailing above it at the shopping 
center where she skates. 

The U.S. Figure Skating Associ- 
ation went through the formality of 
telephoning the U.S. Olympic 
Committee to say that Harding was 
still on the roster for the Olympics, 
along with 1 1 other skaters and 10 
alternates. 

The USOC was to deliver the 
paperwork Monday to the Interna- 
tional Olympic Organizing Com- 
mittee in LUlehammer, Norway. 

The association made the call 
with the understanding that alter- 
nates can be named until Feb. 21, 
two days before the Olympic skat- 
ing competition begins. 

The alternate is Michelle Kwan, 

1 3. who finished second to Harding 
at the national championships. 

A special committee of the skat- 
ing association is to meet Tuesday 
to start considering whether Har- 
ding violated the organization's 


Ski Federation President Says Speed 
Of Women's Races Must Be Checked 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

VIENNA — The president of 
the International Ski Federation 
called Monday for speed restric- 
tions on the women’s World Cup 
races following the death of Austri- 
an star Ulrike Maier. 

“It has become imperative to 
check the speed of the women,’' 
Mare Hodler told Austrian radio. 
But he would not say what mea- 
sures would be taken or considered. 

The federation has been put on 
the defensive by the threat of legal 
action by Maier’s fiance after her 
death during Saturdays downhill in 
Garmiscb - l^rtenkirchen, Germany. 

The two-time giant slalom world 
champion fell while skiing at more 
100 kph 160 mph) and hurtled into 
a tuning post, breaking her neck and 
inflicting severe internal injuries. 

She will be buried Thursday in 


Rauris, her home town near Salz- 
burg. The federation said it will 
organize a special event to raise 
money for Maier’s 4-year-old 
daughter, Melanie. 

Hubert Schweighofer, Maier’s fi- 
ance and Melanie's father, criti- 
cized safety measures at Garmisch. 
Maier’s lawyer. Harald Lettner, 
said Monday that three areas of 
concern would be highlighted: that 
some of the safety installations 
were SO years old. that the timin g 
post was on the narrowest part of 
the Kandahar slope, and that the 
federation's safety chief, Jan Tiscb- 
hauser, was absent. 

Hodler, in the radio interview, 
said “it is impossible to foresee 
everything and protect against ev- 
ery risk." 

But, he said, he was ‘‘concerned*’ 
about state-of-the-art equipment 


and ski suits that had cut times. 

“We had hoped that the safely 
measures would be sufficient," 
Hodler said. “It was the women 
themselves who wanted to race on 
the slopes used by the men.” 

The federation said this week- 
end’s men’s races at Garmiscb- Par- 
tenkirchen would go ahead, with 
Saturday’s downhill on the Kanda- 
har slope and a slalom on Sunday. 

• LiHehammer organizers and 
international ski officials said the 
Olympic women’s downhill course 
is safe and requires no alterations 
for the Feb. 12-27 Games. 

“We think we have done the job 
as well as it can be done." the race 
manager, Svein MundaL said about 
safety at the Kvitfjcll ski run north 
of Lulehammer. “We are not plan- 
ning any changes but we will sharp- 
en our eyes" for hazards." 


code of conduct. It has set a dead- 
line of Feb. 10 to make its recom- 
mendation. but could act sooner, 
said the committee chairman, Wil- 
liam Hybl. 

Gillooly appeared before a grand 
jury Saturday and reportedly has 
agreed to plead guilty to racketeer- 
ing and testify against Harding. 
The charge carries a two-year pris- 
on term. 

Gillooly agreed to testify against 
Harding only after learning that 
she had dropped their cover stray 
while being interrogated by the 
FBI. according to his brother, John 
Gillooly. 

“Jeff would have fallen on his 
sword for Tonya if Tonya had told 
him the truth. But she didn’t," Hoe- 
vet told The Oregonian. Hoevet 
didn't return telephone calls Sun- 
day and Monday. 

Quoting sources said to be famil- 
iar with GOlooly’s confession to (he 
FBI The Oregonian gave this ac- 
count; 

Gillooly batched the plot and 
began discussing it with Eckardt 
before Harding returned from skat- 
ing in Japan. Harding, following 
her foarm-place finish, had com- 
plained that after skating a clean 
technical program she received 
lower scores than skaters who had 
fallen. 

The first she heard of the plan to 
attack Kerrigan was when she re- 
turned the week of Dec. 12. 

She and Gillooly both felt the 
U.S. Figure Skating Association 
was prejudiced in Kerrigan's favor, 
in part because Kerrigan was fea- 
tured on brochures and the cover of 
the magazine promoting the na- 
tional championships. 

When Harding said she doubled 
Eckardt could successfully knock 
Kerrigan out of the competition, 
Gillooly told her someone else 
would do the actual assault The 
plan then seemed forgotten. 

But Eckardt, acting on his own, 
contacted his friend. South, who 
bad recently moved to Arizona. 
Smith agreed to carry out the at- 
tack with the help of his nephew, 
StauL 

Smith and Slant drove from Ari- 
zona to Portland. On Dec 28, Eck- 



} 




ardt met with Gillooly and Har- 
ding and they agreed to go ahead 
with the plan. 

Harding called the skating rink 
outside Boston where Kerrigan 

g racticed to get her schedule. But 
tanl could not cany out the attack 
in Massachusetts, and went to De- 
troit tO try a g am- 


Harding got Kerrigan's room 
number at the hold mar she was 
staying, and relayed it to Gillooly, 
who arranged for it to get to Smith 
and Slant in Detroit. They had. 
hoped to attack Kerrigan in ha 
bold roam, but faded. 

(AP, Reuters) 




Loses No. 1 Ranking 


TheAssodattd Frm 


srveness ofCaEforioa’s Jason Kidd 
and - Lamcaad Mtmay. The Bruins 
(Hdn’tknow about 
so^fieyhdcanie thelateit team to. 
have itejnqgn as No.- 1 cot short. - 
, Buckley’? Career-high 23-' points 
led Na.m€d- 02-4 vnatk 5-2 

tSSa*2 Ifimls™ 

Oakland, irakmg UCLAQ^, 7- 
I).the last Division! team to losers 
undefeated’ stated. '• . *?:.?**'* ; 

stepped npfra 

Edtiey said: ‘'Wc'^tf^vrantod 
the other guys to have to step, up 
and beat os, and they diet” 

While the'Brams were basytry- 

a offense/mid Mthjkjk the 


MVUl/Hnic« 

Tonya Harding gave a wave as sfw set off for practice in Portland. 


of 12 ^^^Gommg in, as 
pcrcem shootex from -3 -point 
range, the^Hfbo^'6-indi^lJW^BB- 
- ter) junior guard was left open"on 
the peraneGcr and went Mb #. . 

“I looked 'at my percentage* a rat 
I would have left myself open, toes’’’ 
he said. . : . . 

Alter rite Bears andedthelirsr 
half with a 45-33 lead, Boddey ' 
soared 11 of Cal’s first 13 points of 
the second half for a 58-43 advan- 
tage with 15:08 to play. Kidd fin- 
ished what Budctey started, scoring 
nine of .CaTs last II posits arm- 
posting 18 points, a career-high 14 
rebounds and 12 assists. *. . 

UCXA^which dropped to fourth 
in the new poll, never fed andfafied l 
to score more than 70 points for the 
second time in two games. The^i- ' 
ins ascended to the No. I spotlast 

week raily to get knocked off JEte 
NortfaCanjKna, Kexrtnd^’AftWf- 
sas and Kansas. ••_. . 

“It’s hard to Swalkw,” said for- . 
ward Ed (^Bannon, vib6ae l 2A 
points led the Bruins. “We- wtxc ■ 
used to wimting." 

Said UCLA’s coach, -Jim Har-' 
rick; “We came back. Wegot toihe- 


mountain. We just couldn’t get 
° V ^ L 2 North Carolina 85, Wag 

of Wake Forest (12-7. 
scored virtually all its pom ts from 

7° ISncky 9L Anbo® 
Tony Ddk scored 25 feistt. and 
keyed a sec ond-half surge as Ken- 

CQT1EGE BASKETBALL 
; facky {16-3, 6-2) kept ^ A^un 


cm Conference. The score was 40- 
40 at halftime, but Auburn wilted 
under Kentucky’s defenave pres- 
sure and 76 percent shooting m the 
second half. 

No. 11 Maffiadmsetts 76, Rhode- 
Han# 47: Marcus Camby scored 
iSpoints and Massachusetts (16-3, 
WJAtlaiitic 10) held visiting 
Rhode Island (6-9, >5) scorekss 

for more than seven nrinntes during 
a run spanning both halves. 
^tari3s 88,l*). 14 InSana 81: 
Rfaiard Keene, scoreless m his last 
game, matched a career-high with 
Typranis as host Illinois (1 1-5, 4-3 
-B^; Tea) ended a six-game losing 
streak wgains t the Hoosiers (12-4, 
whoibst for the fourth time in 
fiveroadgames. • ■ 

r ;No.lTAIa--^inijigbam 60, Day- 
fc» *2; Rebcrt Shann on scored 23 
tirants for UAB (16-2, 4-1 Great 

^ B-3), ^uch. lost its eaghib in a 
row. 

- ^WlBrnesotM 92, St John’s 
64: YesfeoB Lenard scored 27 
pSmstnd Karriy Carter added 17 
pointy and 12- rebounds as Mhme- 
^to^d^bcal the Redmen (8-9) 

■ »'«..•**. faJ- fiS u 

^ : r fT.-. . 

*.^.C^0-l,753a 


Field Is Expanded for British Open 

ST. ANDREWS, Scotland (AP) — The hottest golfers on the three 
major PGA tours in the weeks preceding the British Open win gain 
automatic entry to the tournament under new qualifying rules, officials 
said Tuesday. 

The Royal and Ancient Golf Club said it has created 15 new qualifying 
exemptions, divided equally among the European, Japanese and U.S. 
tours, for the July 14-17 tournament at Tnmberry, Scotland. 

• Bill Glasson shot 7-under-par 64 and came from two strokes behind 
to win the Phoenix Open by three strokes over Bob Estes. 

Evans Promoted to Manage Liverpool 

LIVERPOOL, England (AP) — Roy Evans was promoted Monday 
from assistant manager to replace Graeme Souness as manager of the 
English Premier Division soccer dub Liverpool He signed a 2Vj contract, 

C °Evans, 45, iiasbeen at Anfidd since signinguTrT^ear-oId apprentice 
in 1965. He played in only nine games in four seasons before being 
advised by Bill Shankly, then the manager, to concentrate on coaching. 

• Salvatore Moschclla, 22, an army conscript from Sicily, jumped from 

a train window and plunged to his death Sunday after being assaulted by 
a group of fans from die Sicilian team Messina, Italian television reported 
Monday. (Reuters) 

For the Record 

Dan Jansen of the United States set a world record in the 500-meter 
event at the World Sprint Speedskating Championships, docking 35.76 
seconds to break his old mark of 35.92 seconds, set Dec. 4 in Hamar, 
Norway. (AP) 


NBA Standings 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Atlantic Division 


Nm York 

Orlando 

Miami 

Boston 

NmJorscv 

PtilkxMpnkj 

Wknhtaoton 

Atlanta 

Chkxvo 

Qtartontt 

Offvofcmd 

Indiana 

Milwaukee 

Detroll 


W L 
30 II 
24 17 
SI 21 
20 23 
■» 22 
IB 24 
14 27 

Central Division 
29 II 
29 12 

a ao 
20 21 
17 23 
12 !0 
9 32 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Midwest Division 


Houston 

Son Antonia 

Utah 

Denver 

Minnesota 

Dallas 


Pet OB 
.754 — 

-474 3 

A51 A 

.483 11 

J4I 17 
■DTI IS'.- 


Poctllc Otvhton 

Seattle 3'. 9 .775 — 

Phoenix 23 13 483 l'i 

Portland !S 17 7 

Golden State 22 18 9 

UA. Cllpaere IS 25 T75 16 

UA. Lakers U 24 J50 IT 

Socramerno 12 19 J93 :;ir 

SUNDAY'S RESULTS 
Pteenix 23 21 23 34- H 

Botfoa 36 29 29 23—13* 


P: Cetmias 11-23 5427, Materia 7-18 1-4 16; 
B: Radlc 9-13 3-3 21. Brown 7-15 1-1 15. Re- 
botme te— Fno et ri x 55 (Milter in, Bastmi 45 
(Parish 171. Assists— Phoenix 28 (Milter 9). 
Boston 29 (Dowlas 9). 

New York 20 33 » 24— M3 

Part load 21 21 H 21— 9S 

NY: Evwno 10-2D4n5 74, Harper 7-10 7-8 22; P: 

awnitors s- w lo-ia m striedwid w? ao is. 
Memos— new York SO tOaumr I4J. Portland 
54 (awBitams 19>, Assists— New York 25 
(Starts 13). Portland 19 (Slrtcuand. DtaxterS). 

Major College Score* 

EAST 

tovola. Ma *4. wlNtam A Mary IT 
Massochuseits 74. Rhode latond 47 
MtaMSOtQ 92. St. John's 54 
5L Peter's 43, Manhattan 52 
SOUTH 

Ccppln St. 7t Delaware SJ. 54 
Kanrvckv 91, Auburn 74 
North Carolina 85. Wake Forest 6! 

Trov St. BL Buffalo 72 

MIDWEST 

AkLrBimunghaai 40. Dayton 52 
Illinois U, indkna 81 

PAR WEST 
CalUorms 85. UCLA 70 

NHL Standings 

EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Atlantic Division 

W L T Pts OP OA 

N.Y. HeijSTJ 32 12 3 *7 177 125 

Mew Jersev 27 14 6 60 175 137 

Fiorkla r 17 10 S3 140 ua 

PlriladefPhla 2* 23 3 51 183 IN 


w u NU mt ea 22 

Tamm Bay 19 

N.Y. Islanders 17 

Northeast 
Pittsburgh 24 

Boston 24 

Montreal 24 

Buffalo 33 

Quebec 20 

Hartford J7 

Ottawa 9 


34 4 48 158 157 

26 6 44 133 152 

25 S 39 160 MS 

Division 

13 11 59 177 164 

14 9 57 160 M3 

19 B 56 160 141 

22 S 51 la 137 

24 5 43 144 173 

29 3 39 148 774 

34 7 23 OS 341 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Central DMstai 

W. I- T Pt» QP 4SA 
Taranto 28 74 TO M 177 144 

Detroit 28 16 5 41 221 189 

Dalk» 27 19 7 SI 184 165 

St. Lou Is 26 18 7 99 181 144 

Chicago 22 20 4 50 143 08 

Winnipeg 17 29 6 40 154 206 

Pacific Division 

Calgary 24 19 9 57 190 144 

Vancouver 21 33 2 50 160 161 

Las Angeles 19 24 6 44 784 193 

Anaheim 20 29 4 44 147 US 

San Jose 14 22 11 43 141 157 

Edmonton 13 31 8 34 150 189 

SUNDAY'S RESULTS 
Denalt 13 1—3 

Washington 113-4 

First Period: W-SJaney 5 (Cote. Hunter}. 
Second Period! D-Sheppard 34 (Ykemtan, 
PrimeouJ tool ; W-Peafce 8 (Cote, RJdlgy ) ; W- 
MiHer 5 (Hatcher. Peake) 1 w- Hunter 3 
(KhrtsnaL Andergonli D-Shewwrd Z (Prt- 
meau, Yierman). Ttrird P eriod: D-Yierman 
10 (CMaeson, Sheppard) (mi); W-RMtey 18 
(Krygterl (pp); W-Bandra 13 (KhrMIch). 
Shots ea goal: D Ion Beauore) 1VB4-21 W 
(an QwvtMael IMO-ll-a 
Florida 1 1 1-3 

Buffalo 1 • i-a 

First Parted: B-oawe 1 ( Badger) j p^m- 


tanoy 21 (arefla. Brawn). Secoed Parted: F- 
Belanaar 13 (Ntedenmver, Murphy) (pp); 
ThW Period: F-Betanger 14 (Brown); BAu> 
ditto 13 ( H aw er c hu h. Ptante) (noKSbeh an 
goal :F (an Hasek) 10-11-5-26. B (an Vdnbtes- 
brauck) 13-12-14-39. 

PltflafleMda 0 3 2 8-4 

Montreal 3 11 7 — 9 

Pint period: M -Ba B owe 2D (Damphaagee. 
LeGoir) (pp); M-Nonan 3 fDesXmSna, Le»- 
man); M-DtannelO (Mutter, Petrov). Second 
Period: P-Fedyk M (Undroe, ReecM); p- 
□ mean 16 (Ramaga. Pausfl.ThM Parted: P- 
Rodne4 {Renbem. Galley) (npl.-p-DInewi 17 
- (MMSunai, BrlacDAmaur); (W-Moller IB (Pe- 
trov). Overt im e : 8 4 C u r uu i u ie uu 71 (Keane, 
Bnmet). note ae goal: p (ah Roy) TOB-I* 
2-w. M (on Soderetram) U-M-KK6-47. 


- - - - i - 1- 1 - -v-7: - r — 

Klevdienta,14S21.3LltiMwl4SJ7.4,Sblsitxu.- ybydlJino^C«»ada3SSAChrtottanRl- 

146A1. IScotLMASl. 4. 22j e l»wlcy. 74444^7,^ ?iavectlte*riov3»&&aohdLS d ioePbDc hte r J 

KarolWM M7JI9. B, YaonMon Kim, 747-2*. _7 ~ ' 

Horn Bo liu, China, WJB-NVPdtKeUyrOeio- -> 1 . . 

da 147J9. - - 7, tW chnrbseva.' - (hbe l i le lan, 171.14 

' WOMEN'S 5M - * - rC -»0tefa^4lotatfeOr>Mi^ 1 0I J 9; 3, 

7, Board* Stair, U&.39J2 seconds; X.Ra) Nttft StettfttS. WM; 4, Krtsten Porter. 
Ham Xoe. Chtoa 3922; VSoo-m* Ytoa,So*rth ^ BtarThaU, Australia. 

Korea, 3944; A Kyoto Shtoaakb Jtoan . 14741 ri. Jaeaul Q»per, ADitroKa, 00.79; 7, 
STJOt 5 . sum Auefv Canada 39^4; 4 Ahgelo . E Jfify C«r- 

Houck, Germany. 3944; 7, Catrtana La May, ri, Gmaf Biflato M5J4; 9>CMMte Brand, 


Speed Starting 


The tap II llalefeera Sun day te the world 
Sewd Staflto Sprint otanpteashipe la Cto 
onry (lOstancBS in meters); 

MKtTSSIO 

l.Dan Jansen. U 4. 3176 eeconde; X Jiedctri 
Inoua. Janan, 3405; X Htravan; SMmtzu, Ja- 
pan, 36JBB; 4. Takahlra HamarakhL Japan. 
36.12; s, Sergei Klevdienla, fhmia 3647; 4, 
YaaiHHsn Kim. South Korea 3643 f 7, Kevtn 
Scan; Cmoda. 3445 ; & syteam Baucnoto. 
Canada, 3643; 9. TeeMvukl Kurahea, Japan, 
3643; 10b Atamider Mabn, RueNa, 344 a 
UN 

1, Kievritanta. 1^1255; 2, Ineiw, 1:7284; X 
loorZhetesavikv, BMaros. 1:1242; 41 Jormn, 
lilSJM; 5, Gerard van Velde, Netherlands, 
1 :12J0; 4, Kurotwa 1:1224; 7, Patrick Kefty. 
Canada, 1:1X40; X Scott; 1:1342; 9, sMmizu, 
1:7343; 70. Syfva 81 Bouchard, Comte 1 

MemtoteBaae: l.Jaaeen, 74441 point*,- 2 


Canada, 39JM; X Svetlana Batarklaa^cotoa, Sri fa J l o ^ .l d33^ mMnfii SttfttVSwmer- 

39J4; 9, Qlaaba Ye. China. 39J0I IK Moritow |o«d,‘T404’4.-- : T 

Carbreritt 

Remanta. 1 :7947;A SMbo 

TdEOO; 7, OarorarM 1 30.17; XQIaeto V0,. .... 

China, 130431 9. Ank* Baler; -Gerntaim 7 ....^ 

l dtoi; 10- Rul Hom xae. l^OJT. ; . : 

Hoe You. 15942; X Otaobo YS, U944; A Gar- ^ 

broebt, 15944; 7. Kyoto Shhmool* Japan, ^ 

160421 X Stdho Kueunoew Jontfe 71084; », 

AWfe mw; IE U 8 toy,76182 , - "• Bioirar^^Belir, tL£874M947-r272 

World Cup Freeatyte . - Tom Lenmon ux rewe-to 

■ — - ■ . ~ 1 1 t -.TUetCfdfa?UJc,<HiM9-77--a73 

ResuttsSandayofagrtalesidenMrtat.Lefle- Curtle Btronpr U*. W-TO4M4-<74 
IH SW Cwter te Loc Berweei t Cto edS - ^IW i WaeMh 4>MHWH*-aM . 

Mm - . • _ F7otfft»h.(«.4P«Bd4-aW 

LPhlMPPeUrRoche. Canada. 71740 pokite; >.»gve Pofe uJe 60 4»d» 44 - 074 


CRICKET 


XRoy FuerstjUA,19S92; XKrtkFedderaen, Sealf Hotfe.UJL IN4MMN 

OS. 19286: AAndvCOnlclk, Canada, 19143; (L 

Richard Cobtow, Britafe m.10; 6, Kip Offl- 
Ife U8. 19181; 7, MdM DeRWter* tteiher- ; 

knis, 78*43; x Jean-Darntep Ohaonet, . - : THIRD TEST 

Prance, 74782; % Datrld Bettmtieur, Cano**, • Ae«k uB evs, Sovlh ARSca 

1087; UL Trace WOrE U nglen. UA, 10641. Otowtey, lg Adelaide 


•"ro-Uncjfer 

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Prux' 

t. ■ 


Etertd cep BhMie 1, LoRotJie, M AttorotoEnd-bnitoK 124«(M ovorTO 
paints; 2, Nteokn Foatain*, Canada. 354;2..^u!h Atrtcpltol tanl ms: UM(22 avert) 


























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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 1994 


Page 15 


*I%1 Probably 
Get Over It, 9 


air for Bills as Cowboys Romp Again 

Dallas Wins Its 2d Straight , 30-13 



By Timothy W. Smith 

Wew York Tima Service 
v ATLANTA —Two Soper Bowls 
ag£V someone hid Thurman Thom- 
as’s hdmel under a bench before 
: itestan of the game and he missed 
thefiist two plays while trying to 

: ' By the end of this year's Super 
Bowl, Thomas would have gladly 
traded places with that 
helmet. Three- wasn't a hc5e tdg 
enough on the sideline for Wm to 
crawfmto/ 

The gifted running back had two 
fumbles that resulted in 10 points 
for the Cowboys. And the second 
one, returned 46 yards by safety 
Janies Washington, shifted the vxy 
men turn of the game in. the third 
quarter and paved the way for Dab 
Las’s victray. 

Thomas spent the final 10 min- 
utes of tbfrjpme with, his H ead in. 
.his hands. Teammates said he was 
inconsolable. For Thomas it was 
another -Super Bowl nightmare — 
Ins third in. a row. His numbers 
have been miserable in the last 
three. He had ; 10 carries for 13 
. yards against the Washington Red- 
skins in "1992, 11 carries for 19 



By Thomas George 

Nik York Tunes Smite 
ATLANTA — It was the Buffalo 
Bills in Super Bowl XXVfll run- 
ning up ibe middle and around the 
ends and into the end zone. It was 
the Bills putting pressure on the 
Dallas Cowboys' potent offense 
and limiting it to two field goals. It 
was the Bills with the better passing 


the Dallas Cowboys and four over- 
all for the franchise. 

It is four straight loses now for 
the Buffalo Bills in the Big Show. 

No team in any American sport 
had ever lost four straight champi- 
onships . 

This one ended in large measure 
like last year's Super Bowl — the 
_ pills turned ihe baD over and the 

game, the better kicking game, the Cowboys made them pay. Buffalo jsbed with another Smith score, a 1- 
better scheme and with fewer mis- did not make nine turnovers as it yard ran on fourth down early in 

did in last year's rout, a 52-17 vie- 


the offense gave the ball to the man 
who takes care of the ban and the 
Cowboys best — running back Em- 
mat Smith. 

In the third quarter. Dallas drove 
64 yards for a touchdown that 
made it 20-13. and Smith ran for 61 
of those yards on 7 of the 8 plays. 
He completed the drive with a de- 
termined 15-yard ran. Dallas frn- 


Tooth, Cby/Apate Fontx-Prow 


55 seconds into the second hatf and the SiqierBoiritiinied nasty to 

for 37 yards Sunday ni ght 
' .'Take away las 135 yards 


takes. 

It was Buffalo, 13-6. 

Problem was for the Buffalo 
Bills, it was only halftime. 

“We ran into the lacker and gave 
them another chance on a drive,*' 
said offensive guard Nate Newton 
of the Cowboys. “We made holding 
mistakes, we' blew some early as- 
signments on defense because they 
came out with a three-step drop 
and quick throws underneath and 
we didn't expect that At halftime, 
we said: ‘Forget Buffalo. Let's take 
care of ourselves first Let's con- 
centrate on the Dallas Cowboys. 
Let's remember why we are the 
world champions." 

And once Dallas did that it was 
over. 

It was a 14-0 spree for Dallas in 
the third quarter and 24 consecu- 
tive points by game’s end. It was 
Dallas 30, Buffalo 13 in Super Bowl 

xwra. 

It is two straight titles now for 


tory by Dallas. Bn t it had three 
turnovers (his time and all three led 
to points, 17 in alL by Dallas. 

the biggest turnover was by run- 
ning back Thurman Thomas only 
55 seconds into the second half. 

Thomas dropped the ball once in 
the first quarter, and it led to a 
Dallas field goal and a 6-3 lead for 
the Cowboys. Buffalo overcame 
that, with Thomas providing the 
punch on his 4-yard scoring run 
with 12: 26 left in me first half. That 
score gave Buffalo a 10-6 lead. 

But Buffalo would not overcome 
bis second drop. Dallas tackle Leon 
Lett smashed into Thomas, he 
dropped the ball, safety James 
Washington picked it up and ran 
and kept running- He zigzagged his 
way 46 yards into the end zone for 
a touchdown. 

Dalias tied at 13-13 on Lhai play 
and the extra point 
And then, once the Cowboys had 
tied, their defense dominated and 


35 yards rushing 
! the New York Giants in the 
1$90 Super Bond, and Thomas has 
been a nonfacior in each of the 
Bills’ Super Bowl losses. Bat in this 


• Tm not 
drink 



to go bat and 
br do some- 


say to him I don’t think he was 
hearing," said Kenneth Davis, who 
replaced Thomas in the tineop. 

Thomas said he couldn’t remem- 
ber what the Bills* coach, Marv 


than Thomas. He seemedsnnmed, 
dazed and on the verge of tears on 
; the sideline at the end of the game, 
although be appeared none the 
worse for wear as he stood on a 


it was a devastating feding 
for Thomas. ImmediatdY after the 
he was more than thru —he gamohewasmet<mthefiddby the 
was a dowmjght fiabffity. DaU« hunting back Emmitt Levy, said to the team afterward. 

And no one fell worst about that Smith, who was named the’ game’s *• — *“ — “ * L 

most valuable player for bis 30 car- 
ries, 132 yards and 2 touchdowns. 

Thomas was asked about their 
conversation: . • . 

“He was.-, idling me that he 
wasn’t going 'to thfcPro Bowl be- 
cause he vvas going to have shoal- 
der so gay," Thomas said. “He 
had his little niece with him and be 
tdd her tint I was’, the greatest 
running bact ^eyei- I tdd Mm, 

‘Don’t even ra n that!”* 

Thomas wasn’t an the fidd ler 


It wasn't until he was in the 
shower that he snapped out of his 
haze. He said center Kent Hull told 
hmrhow the second fumble hap- 
pened. 

“Kent said Leon Lett knocked 
the ball lose,” Thomas said. “Kent 
said he got a good block on him. 
but he got one hand free and 
knocked the ball oul” 

Whim he was holding Ms head in 
his hands, Thomas said he had sev- 

end thoughts running through his 

iter, hut I’ve never been afmnblcr. ■j. frfhrh -nf Thrifrmt quarter when ihe mind. 

I can't nm with two hands on ibe. JCcwfooystgck control of the game. “I was thinking that we were 0-4 
ball That’s not my style, rmnota s^d he bad cramps in both tn Snpcr Bowls and that I wished I 

fullback.” ” . V.v^'.. t V 0 tHtfJid.in Ms- ride and was try- — , * 1 -* — J *- -**— ” *— ~~ :J 

. But, he added, :Tfl pndw^yget ipgto stretch Ms~mnsdes and get 
overit ondie|dflne ri^|o thefto batik into Ms body. He 

BowL A loss is .. 

sWH&Og OB' the 

slrins and 'pfanmmtes tried to 

play the game and go Mn&Bttl Thomas coulda’i 

those two &nMes:Tbe<)ajy tM^T^ r^^OT. wou^ bear them. , 

can do is go toward. \ . • “A tot of thirigs I was trying to 


i minutes afterward, dressed in a 
^yellow blazer, black shirtarid Made 
sunglasses. 

“There was no doubt that they 
were the key to the game,” he said 
ctf his turnovers..- 
Tve been frustrated in my car 


could have played better,” be said. 
-*T was wondering bow we as a 
football team win deal with this 
whoa we get back together. There 
are gong to be a lot of jokes about 
me Buff ato Bids. There are going to 
be a: tot of guys that leave, because 
: of free agency. But we as a team 
have to stick together ” 



The Right Fumble 
At the Right Time 


AafSaaomme Andud Pm 

Quarterback Jim Kelly found a fourth straight loss hard digest 


By Mike Freeman 

.Vff York Tima Service 

ATLANTA — What turned the 
game around was a 46-yard fumble 
return for a touchdown on a play 
where the credit should be shared 
by the most unlikely people. 

One was Leon Lett, ibe defensive 
lineman nho has had Ms own prob- 
lems with fumbled balls, Another 
was a sixth-year player out of 
UCLA, safety James Washington, 
who had asked to be traded earlier 
this season and doesn't even start. 

“1 think the fumble return 
pushed us over the top,” said 
Washington. 

It happened after a sluggish first 
half for the Cowboys. Only seconds 
isto_ the third quarter. Leo, who 
received hate mail for botching a 
blocked punt in the Miami game on 
Thanksgiving Day, stripped run- 
ning back Thurman Thomas of the 
balL The ball hit the turf and 


Records 


INDIVIDUALS 





bren’t the Only Losers 


'VMf.w. 


Ptrte.- .(^amaedbf Ov Staff From Dopadns 
tte Buffalo famtoaraewd: JpnSW - • • 

emd in smr ema iv ana «di Kart* tn COLXJSGIT PARK, Georgia 

a &hmKhwl migry Mexican foot- 

MMI tOlMfc MMW* lOlKJiaowili ^ . ILli a.,,. 1 .jj , y * i re 

Tluianqsi T))oMioii ftuffato Cptqv^ ««l. uQS, ’VOK) (BW t get SUpCT 

3tMrfd tv TfwnoK Franco Harris, mD Lynn Bowl tickets after paying a total of 
8’wna; . _ -in' a package deal, 

. MWMMicwwwwawNwitwicn- . , ■. a ■ 

ttowra— LTlwmn (pr*vlwis moort: 3n«d WEKaiettTt Oft tefevison. 
bv Thonw*. Harris, ana smnwtI. "We M, some 600 angry peo- 

dssssasaa sst 

In 3wwr Bowl XiX3_ . uJC. OOtlCC- oOIOC QI tOCXDL IOSI 

S5jQob or Slfl,00a”. 

Cbfirec P*tt Ttofift d^atcbtxl 

about SO officers to the suburban 
Atlanta botd where the Mcsdcans 
were staying, after! bring notified 
thal troubfc was brewing. Officers 
said there was no violence but a lot 
of ^touting and anpy words di- 
rected at Victor Ortiz of the Mexico 
City travel agency, Viaje FHor SA, 
who was in Atlanta coordinating 
thepackage tour. • 

Tne lour incfdded airfine tickets 
from Mexico Qty.hotd rooms and 
game tickets. Twenty hours before 
the game, FQor had to tell the Mex- 
icans they apparently .had been 
cheated. Cooper said. 

“He’s legjtt,*' Ctobper 'said. “He 
just got caught in this. When the 
aixrved from Mexico, he 
to tdl them that- tins was a 
possible scam. • 

. “After wo got Mr. Ortiz out rf. 
there, they settled down." ' f 
Cooper said an attorney for Or- 
tiz tola Mm that he had been told 
by a lawyer; for Capital Tickets of 
Aiimsum, Texas, mat the money 
would be refunded. 

He said Capital’s representative, 
after learning there were no tidtets 
available, bad left Atlanta rather 
than face the ire of -tiie customeis. 


Mamt pastes— M5. Kolfv (pravkm record: 
XZL hry ioe Montana). 

-MWiMI awnptetlon ptfcanteg* (mlnhmwi 
m posm) — 71* TW AlKroan. MM. (w 
vim record: tan. Montana}. 

27,Andr«fWLBuftato 

_ twtaMMU own mcord). 

Most SHOO. Matt XVIll — 3». Chert** 
Hat«y. Danas (previous recant: * bvHds*. 
' Dowry SbOta, and AAonard MmholD. 

. Most consocuilv* aannu.hsad CDacb — 4: 

’ Mprv Livr, BufMo (previous record: % IMd 
bv Lew and Don ShutoJ. 

Most eonspeutlvp poo« lost heed coeOi— 
Levy. 4. (oxtenciad wn reeortt. 

ttottrds TW . . 

Mesteensoeutittgeinwwvhsod cnocSi — 
% JbTimv Jatwwon. DeUas Uhered by Chock 
MU X Vtnoe Lombardi end Den Shota). 

Most booms too f, hood coach — < Levy 
(shared by sod Grant and Don Shota). ■ 

Man eomecuttv* aarMS lest, bead cnicta~ 

4. Low Whored Croat). . 

Most nostas interasptod — X kmv (H*t 
Crate Morton). 

Moot fumbto recovorhs. career — Z Ken- 

noth DavH. Buffalo (MSd toy ntonyi. ■ 

Moot points, censer — 24 Thomas ( Aared 
by France Harris, Boost Crate and -tarry 

■ Wool. . _ 

Most wcMsm aw — 4, Ttounas 
(shared ov Harris. Crate and meet. ■ 

Mat touchdowns ivstUno. career — 4 
Thomas died Harris). _ _ 

Moot touchdown* rinWrej, ao«i* “ Z Bta- 

MW Srarm. Paflas (hridmr naav). 

most omtas, jODar^nmyteThivww—z 
Stntth (Mod Larrv Csoaka. Super Bawls VII 
and VIII). __ 

Mori coiwtcvKv* oaiwa 
ruNuna — Z Srhtm (tied Csorita,®<»or Bawd 
VII and VIII). ■' ■ • . 

Most tooetwwwra locteita rovartfen 1 — I. 
jams Vtarittnnxm. doMos (shored av MBN 
8mWU Hopman. Jbnmto JoaoxanS Kss 

■ M ^ri«ada. oome (ri» xvu ) -imi 
W rtBht Boflolo (hold ft» tnonrl.- 

TEAM 

• - Records Sri 

Mori 00M9 —■ Z DoMas (oririidtd won re- 
cord). 


Correction 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — The Dallas Cowboys, and not the Buffalo Bills, as was 
reported in Saturday’s editions, are going to win the Super Bowl The 
error has been attributed by the reporter to several mistakes in 
typing. 

In all references to Buffalo's superiority, the words “Dallas” or 
“the Cowboys” should have been typed instead. 

For example, ihe entire paragraph Saturday which might have left 
readers with the dear impression that the Bills were going to seize 
control of the Super Bowl and perhaps even blow out the Cowboys 
— this has been attributed by the writer as the result of a massive 
equipment failure. The writer now states that the paragraph was 
intended to point out that Buffalo will never win the big one, and 
that no one should evnr dream of betting on them, even when they're 
getting 10V4 prams, because you can lose a lot of money that way. I 
mean a tor of money, aB becaure 3 foa put your faith on a quitter uke 
Thurman Thomas, who makes something like 53 million; a year for 
spitting out footballs like they’re infia ted sunflower seeds dimngthe 


The newspaper is investigating the failure in typing. 

Unfortunately, the investigation has been postponed indefinitely, 
following Thomas’s second fumble, when the laptop computer was 
uncharacteristically thrown out of a third-stray window by the 
afraxanentxmed writer. The computp, along with several pieces of 
-office equipment and furniture, is being held by police as evidence in 
what the writer refers to as an ‘‘unrelated’’ seven-car pileup in the 
street below. . 

The newspaper regrets the error. IAN THOMSEN 


six figures, including one 5250,000 
bet on the HSQs at plus 10& 

At Button's Horseshoe, a 


• Hundreds "of other < S*rmnaK rt 
of radio station promotions never 
got their tickets, either. 

“There was like 250 of us here 

-«• , that have won tickets from radio . . 

.stations from all over the Dotted SSreSw 

SK=iS ^ 8S$jafS^?a*2; J «te-*-«terte.Ott: 

interview with Honolulu television 
station K3TV. _ _ 

None of than got m to see the 


bier won 530,000 by betting ther 
would be a score during the first six 
minutes of the game. 

Early indications showed Sun- 
day’s game could break last year’s 
Bowl handle of $563 
nnffion derate one less week of 
betting, a disappointing matchup 
and a double-digit point spread. 

The Mirage sports book wrote 
more than $1 razllioa on halftime 


vtocs 

Mb l 

(ntoMtod own record). 


• Best attempt to get a ticket: A 
women standing outside the Geor- 
gia Dome just prior to game time 
ndd up a ogn that read, "Need five 
free tickets. Tm from Raleigh- Dur- 
ham.” When last seen, she was still 
five tickets short. 

• Some fans, desperate fra tick- 
ets, were willing to buy media cre- 
dentials. Unfortunately, the cre- 
dentials were counterfeit. 

Best Soper Bowl week Shopping 
Spree: Donya McKeller. wife of the 
HOIS’ tight end Keith McKeller. 
Spent $2,690 on clothes and several 
accessories in a mare seven min- 
utes. (AP. LAD 



Washington, who practices picking 
up fumbles every Thursday, 
scooped it up. Then, behind a con- 
voy of blockers, and with some nif- 
ty moves himself, he bolted for the 
touchdown. 

‘Tm not the fastest guy in the 
world.” said Washington, who runs 
the 40-yard dash in 43 seconds, “so 
Fve got to read my blocks. It 
seemed like I ran forever. 1 got 
some good downfirid blocking 
The first person I looked for was 
Beebe.” 

That would be the Bills' receiver, 
Don Beebe, who last year knocked 
the bah out of Leu's bands as Lett 
celebrated before reaching the end 
zone with a scooped-up Buffalo 
fumble. 

Washington's hustle tied the 
score at 13, then after the Dallas 
defense stuffed Buffalo, the offense 
scored oo Emmitt Smith’s 15-yard 
touchdown. So the play was a two- 
touchdown turnaround. 

Then in the beginning of the 
fourth quarter, with the score 20- 
13. Washington picked off a pass 
by Jim Kelly that ended any hopes 
of the Bills making a comeback. 

In the locker room. Dallas defen- 
sive players jokingly mocked the 
fact that Smith was named the 
game's most valuable player. 

“James should have gotten it,” 
said safety Thomas Everett. “The 
fumble recovery turned it around. 
It got us totally fired up.” 

Washington hardly plays and 
when he docs it is in the Cowboys’ 
“nickeT package, thdr defensive 
scheme when at least five defensive 
backs are in ibe game. Earlier this 
season he had said (his was going to 
be his last with the Cowboys. He 
didn’t say if he had changed his 
mind, bui he talked like a man on 
his way crat the door. 

“I hope other teams were watch- 
ing,” he said. 

He added: “Over the years 1 had 
a lot of faith in myself and my 
slriDs. Good things come to people 
who wait-” 

Defensive lineman Charles Ha- 
ley said he was going to dedicate 
this game to Lett. 

“The guy has taken so much 
abuse,” he said. “Today, he came 
through.” 


SUPER BOWL CHAMPIONS 

1947— Green Bov 3i Kansas Cl hr 10 

1948- Green Boy XU Oakland U 
I9df— «.Y. Jets U. Baltimore 7 

1970— Kansas Cl tv 23. Minnesota 7 

1971— Baltimore U. Dallas 13 

1972— OtHla* M. Miami 3 
1970— AUaml H Washington 7 
1974— Miami 74. Minnesota 7 
ms— Pittaburgn 16. Minnesota 6 

1976— PittsOuran 21. Dallas 17 

1977— Oakland XL Minnesota 14 

1978— Dallas 27. Denver 10 

1979 — PltTSburBti 35. Dallas 31 
W»~«ffs0uTon 31. Lax Arnietes 19 
lOT—OoWand 37, FbUadrJpMo 10 
1982-6671 Francisco 26. Cincinnati >1 
190— WosMnolon 37. Miami 17 

nt* — LA. Raiders 38. Wash! noton 9 
1985-son Frandaea 3ft Miami U 
lysfr-ancaao 46. New England 10 
1987 — N.V. Giants 39. Denver 20 
19*8— Washington 42, Denver 10 

1989— San Francisco 2ft Cincinnati Is 

1990— Sen Fronctera 53, Denver 10 

1991— N.Y. Giants 20. BuftalO 19 

1992 — Washington 37, Buffalo 74 
tm— Danas si Buffalo 17 
1994— Dallas 30. Buffalo U 


(he fourth quarter, and with Eddie 
Murray's 20-yard field goal with 
2:50 to play. 

“There is no doubt the key play 
to the game was my fumble.” said 
Thomas. “James Washington took 
the ball the other way and that was 
the game. It changed the momen- 
tum. I have not been a Tumbler for 
my entire career. 1 can’t run with 
two bands on the football all the 
time; it’s not my style. They obvi- 
ously really practice stripping the 
ball. You can see it in the film. You 
could see it in this game.” 

Buffalo and everyone knows it 
now: Emmitt Smith is the real deal. 

“You can’t ask for anything 
more,” SmiLh said. “Before every 
game, all we talk about is turnovers 
and touchdowns. That’s wbai we 
gOL” 

Smith carried the football 30 
times and caught it four times and 
he did not fumble. 

He finished with 132 rushing 
yards, and coupled with his 108 last 
year, is only the second back to 
finish with 100 rushing yards in two 
straight Super Bowls. Fullback 
Larry Csonka, with the Miami Dol- 
phins, did it in Super Bowls Vll 
and V11L Smith won the most valu- 
able player award of this Super 
Bowl, after winning league MVP 
honors this season, plus the NFL 
rushing title. 

Somebody in Ihe Bills' locker 
room said something about Five in 
*95. 

“I don’t know, is it the players, 
the coaches, what?’ asked a frus- 
trated fullback. Carwell Gardner. 
“We start fast, then we fizzle all 
over the place. When you lose four 
in a row you wonder what is ibe 
poim in coming back? Same old 
song. Ii gets old. It really gets old.” 

Dallas 6 0 1418-30 

Buffalo z to 9 8-13 

First awirtcr 

DoL— FG Murray 41, 2: 19. Drive: 24 vordiS 
piavs. k.ev ptavs: K.Wi||lams SO kickoff re- 
turn; Atkman 30 boss la irvtn. Dallas 3. Buffa- 
lo <L 

Bui— FGCJirlsIle 54.4:41, Drive: 43 yards, E 
otavs-kev rto vs: Kelly 11 Bass to Reed; KeUv 
24 pass lo T.Thormw. Dallas 3. Buffalo X 

Ool— FG Murray 2s. Urns. Drive: 4j yords. 7 
Ptovs. Kev ploy*: Woodson reca verso 7. Tho- 
rn os tumble w 50; AIKmon 24 pass la Harper. 
Dallas 6. Buffalo X 

Second Qoarter 

But— T.mooujs 4 nm (Christie kick). 2:34. 
Drive: 80 vends. 17 ploys. Key piavs: S-vard 
running hdo kicker penally on Cowboys' 
O. Thomas; Keffy r pass to Beebe; Ketfv W 
pass to Urea. Buffalo m Donas 4 

Buf-FG Christie 28, 13:00. Drive : 38 raids. 
7 Piavs. Key mays: OOames interception and 
41 return n Cowboys' 47: Kelly 12 pass to 
T.Tnomos; Kelly 22 pom to Reed Bvliaio 13 
Dallas X 

Third Quarter 

Oaf— XWttsninafon 46 fumble return (Mur- 
rey kick I, ;5& Kev Ploy: Lett Stripped T.Tno- 
mos. Buffalo 13. Dallas 1ft 

Dai — tLSmitti IS run tMurrav kick), 0:18. 
Drive: 64 vows. 8 Wavs. Kev Wavs: E-Smimf, 

9 and M runs. Dallas 20. Buffalo IX 

Fourth Quarter 

Dal— E-Smim 1 run (Murray kick), 5:10. 
Drive: 34 yards. 9 plays. Kev piavs: J.Wariv 
Inpton Interception and 12 return to Bills' 34; 
Antman9P(m to E.Smlth; Ataman i6possto 
Harper. Dallas 27, Buffalo ix 

Ool— -FG Murray 20, t2;lft Drive: 4» yards. 

10 Plays. Key Plays: Ataman 35 ross to 
Harper; on ist-and-aoai tram Bills' 1, 5-vard 
false start penalty on Cornish. Dallas 30. Buf- 
falo IX 

TEAM STATISTICS 


First downs 

20 

22 

Rushes-yonis 

39-137 

57-87 

Posilns 

KM 

257 

Punt returns 

1-S 

1-5 

Kickoff returns 

5-72 

0-144 

interceptions ret. 

Ml 

1-41 

Comp-ati-lni 

19.27-7 37-58-1 

Socked- yards Iasi 

2-3 

3-33 

Pums 

4-44 

9-38 

Fumbles-iost 

CM 

3-2 

Penoltles-voras 

A-SD 

1-10 

Time at oossesston 

M:29 

25:31 


INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS 
Husains 


Dates 


No 

Yds 

AV0 Lb TD 

E .Smith 


30 

132 

4 A 15 

2 

K.WII llama 


1 

6 

A0 6 

0 

AIKmon 


T 

J 

3j0 J 

0 

Johnston 


1 

D 

an o 

0 

Kouir 


1 

-1 

-ID -1 

0 

Cotemon 


1 

-3 

-in -3 

0 

Total 


IS 

tv 

W IS 

2 

Butfotn 


NO 

Yfls 

Avg La TD 

iCDavts 


9 

38 

4J 11 

0 

r.Tnomas 


16 

37 

23 6 

1 

KeUv 


2 

12 

A0 8 

0 

Total 


■a 

87 

13 11 

1 



Passing 



DalkB 

Cam 

AH 

Y05 

td Loiigtm 

Aik man 

19 

27 

W7 

0 35 

1 

Kosar 

0 

a 

0 

0 0 

0 

Buffalo 

Cmn 

Att 

Yds 

TD LonglM 

Kelly 

31 

SO 

260 

0 24 

1 


Receivinu 



Dallas 



No Yds LB TD 

Irvin 



£ 

66 20 

0 

Nouoeefc 



f 

26 9 

0 

Ejrattn 



4 

36 10 

a 

Horner 



3 

75 35 

0 

Johnston 



2 

14 IT 

o 

Total 



19 

207 35 

0 

Buffalo 



No Y4s L9 TD 

Brooks 



7 

63 IS 

0 

T.Triomas 



7 

S3 24 

a 

Reed 



6 

75 22 

0 

Beetn 



6 

60 IS 

0 

KJJavls 



3 

-5 7 

0 

MotMriaara 



1 

B B 

0 

McKeffar 



) 

7 7 

9 

Totol 



31 

260 24 

t 


(nfedeeaffoiK— Oatfas. j.Waj/iinston; Buf- 
falo, Odomex 


Mo»a*BBiet1«te*o^ 
vfaus now: AsWiw* W ^ 

8o»rf XIX and Sirftotota Sapor Bowl XXVI)- 

McordsTM 

mum fkUnOdtt. haw team*— 5. Dallas (3) 
vs. Buffalo tt) !t»*d 
XXUI, cintMwff v*. San 

Wteltled BalMmora 
v». tt.Y. Jets. Suoer BowJ HU aid «lc»l «. 

Fewest part rstasns. 


The Hawaii residents raid -they • 
saw a riqnesaiiadve tbe con?^ 
ay that was supposed to distribute 
the tickets, as he was seUing tickets 
outside the Geac^a Dome More 


Army Football Star Stabbed at Bar 

NHWBURGH, New York (AP) —Fullback Aldli King, who led Array 
in rashiiig last season, and another cadet were stabbed and seriously 
a fight ai a bar, U.S. Military Academy officials said 


bofhtoorrw-z.svHo' rtJu ^ after . King, asflphomorei was nabbed in ihoehesl jwi below his heart, and 

JiSSj2^S?*!5i :r.- ■? taaffr 1™“ » fwmg Amy f ooiM ptay a. wwtM m 


relmftariWiw-n ra^fftaklDvmony) 

FttHbwsft amt San FrancBcai. ■ 

Mat poo** man uu£t 

(ttarae br FWrtwrrfi 29W Bov.AMamL 
and San Frandsea). ^ 

Mart ar , m „ 4 , Buffalo ignored ov 

MhmabBia anil oenvor). „ . 

Mate caaioeBn* aontt *^ ** Odtfata 
(i tiered tn MtafteW* a** 1 ts-nV * r1- ‘ 


:Tw o«r Marian b» 

h’s never been ««er » 

- and tarn vwlh 04F ”*• 

-service. . . __ 
• : WciAw today ^ 0W37-437 


■5500 on the Bills even before Jack- 
ofL The bettor had wagered ai the 
lijmerial Palace sports book; that 
Buffalo "would win the cwn flip. 
Vumy MagMo,. sports book 
atCacsart Palace, sjud his 


the thighs trod the buttocks, a West Point spokesman said. Both were in 
tost stable condition. 


. PoticeinNessl 
New York Gty, 

3: 


place had handled several huge v 
indudmg a 1220,000 oct 


As ihe Las.Vc^as H3ti» 

book, there were o^wageis 


Kiuft Ray and threefriends bad jnstieftabar about 

were approached by a man who got into an 

iwith the group. Tfie man punched one of the cadets, leading 10 
in which others apparently got involved. Officials said no other 
TrereavaiWik. 

“There are still a lot of thinte bring investigated as to the arcum- 
. stances of the incident,” aW«iPomt spokesman said. It was not dear if 

the cadets, three of whom are 20 and the other! 9, ra a teenage frirod were 
d rinking at the bar. The legal drinking age in New York is 21, 


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INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


(Continued From Page 13) 


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Page .16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 1994 


ART BUG H WALD 


Bobbitts Anonymous 


W ASHINGTON — The Bob- 
bins Anonymous organiza- 
tion was started by Arthur £ to 
help Teeners who were so addict- 
ed to Bobbin stories that they 
couldn't write anything else. 

We met in the basement of the 
Second Unitarian Church in Bc- 
thesda, Mary- 
land. There were 
30 of us — men 
and women ail 
addicted to the 
same story and 
hoping to find a 
way to quit the 
Bobbitt habit. 

Buddy B. was 
the first to tell 

his tale. “When I 

first read about Huehwala 
the Bobbins I couldn't believe my 
eyes. I never thought that a family 
newspaper would touch their story. 
But when I arrived at the office [ 



foundtiu.* entire staff studying Re- 
fit 


get’s Thesaurus trying to find new 
words to describe Mr. Bobbin’s 
loss. 

“In the beginning I told a joke 
about it, but pretty soon l became 
addicted, and no matter what I 
tried to up into the computer, the 
word '• Bobbitt’ kept popping up. I 
was much more interested in the 
why than in the how. Now 1 can’t 
think of anything else except “Why 
notr ” 

Ellen G. stood up and said: “As 
you know, I cover the United Na- 
tions, which is very exciting, but 
their sessions didn't compare with 
what happened between the Bob- 
bitts. 1 kept writing tilings like 
“Cambodia knifed the United 
Slates in the back today.’ and “Bo- 
ris Yeltsin received another unkind 
cut from President Clinton who 
sharply criticized his economic pro- 


Gtyndebourne to Open 
New House on Schedule 


The A Beamed Press 

GLYNDEBOURNE England 
— The first opera house to be built 
in Britain for 60 years will open at 
Glyndebourne this spring on sched- 
ule and on budget, the chairman. Sir 
George Christie, said Monday. 

The new theater, a privately fund- 
ed venture costing £33 million 
<$49.3 milHcm). replaces the original 
buQl in 1934 by Christie’s parents 
beside their Tudor country bouse. 


gram.’ I couldn’t concentrate on 
my work. 1 used all my grocery 
money to buy the supermarket tat 
loids that played up the story . I was 
unable to get enough of the Bob- 
bitts. and my editor warned me 
that if 1 wrote one more story stat- 
ing that LIN funds had been pain- 
fully cut off I would be fired. He 
advised me to come to BA for treat- 
ment." 

□ 

Herb B. stood up. “I am a car- 
toonist, but everyone I draw lately 
looks like John Wayne Bobbitt — 
even Margaret Thatcher. The 
strange pari is I am not one of 
John’s biggest fans, and there’s no 
reason for rae to put him in my 
cartoons. After all, he’s just a pri- 
vate citizen and has never been 
appointed by President Clinton to 
public office He doesn’t even have 
anything against Bill Safirc. But as 
soon as I take my pen in hand, a 
drawing of Prince' Charles ends up 
looking like John Bobbitt." 

George W. spoke: “To me this is 
< he American dream gone awry. 
The Bobbitts had everything that 
anyone could warn — but there was 
a void in their lives that Mrs. Bob- 
bitt tried to fill in her unique way. 
What she said was, *’I am woman. 
Listen to me and hear my story.' 
John didn't, and he paid a price. 
The country is hooked on this story 
because it deals with the family and 
a new way of avoiding having one. 
My problem is that every time I 
write about them I persist in mak- 
ing the article personal. I should 
treat the subject like yet another 
piece of sleaze." 

Billy B. bad a question: “If we 
get rid of the Bobbitts, is Olympic 
ice-skating just behind?” 

□ 

Finally, it was mv turn to speak. 
1 was nervous as l faced the group. 

“I was wrong because I believed 
that there were laughs in the Bob- 
bitt story. I milked it as much as I 
could, only to discover that there is 
nothing new to say. I wish that the 
couple go back to the lives they 
deserve and leave the press alone. I 
declare tonight that I will never 
mention the Bobbitts in my column 
again." 

Obviously 1 have lied because 
I’ve written* this. 

But when it comes to Bobbitt 
stories, you can't kick the habit 
after one lousy meeting. 


A Troublemaker’s Long Road to Fame 


By William F. Powers 

Washington Post Service 

W ASHINGTON — For a man who says he is “a 
sponge for pain," Arid Dorfman is a jovial sort. The 
Chilean playwright, novelist and political troublemaker 
has spent three decades writing fiercely about torture, 
repression and assorted other features of life in a police 
state. Yet he’s a hugger, a joke-idler, a boyishly and 51- 
year-old. 

And for a man who became famous fulminating against 
what be considered Washington's imperialist meddling in 
Chile, he seems very much at home here, where he recently 
arrived to see the Washington premiere of his play “Death 
and the Maiden" at the Studio Theatre. 

Dorfman. like his play, is a study in ambiguity. And also 
like his play — or rather, thanks to it — he is a planetary 
success at the moment, which may help explain his high 
spirits. 

After trying for so long to connect with the world through 
novels, poetry, essays, journalism and plays — some hits, 
some misses, no masterpieces — be sat down in 1990 and in 
three weeks wrote a play of which the world can’t seem to 
get enough. It is a tinnier in three acts about life in “a 
country that is probably Chile but could be any country that 
has grim itself a democratic government after a long period 
of dictatorship.” he wrote on the fust page. 

The play’s central character, Paulina, believes she has 
met. by chance, the doctor who tortured and raped her 
under the dictatorship. Paulina makes Dr. Miranda a 
prisoner in her home with the intention of putting him “on 
trial" (here — a prospect that bonifies her husband, (he 
rational lawyer Gerardo. Essentially. “Maiden" poses the 
question: Which is more important, personal justice or 
national reconciliation? 

In the summer of 1991. the play became a critical and 

r ular sensation in London, winning the Olivier Award 
best play. Its 1992 New York production was a 
siarfest, with Mike Nichols directing a cast that consisted 
of Glenn Cose, Richard Dreyfuss and Gene Hackman. 

“Death and the Maiden" may well be the most per- 
formed contemporary play in the world, with productions 
in more than 40 countries and counting, according to 



"And I began to ask myself questions," Dorfman says, 
“about wbal would happen if I was on (he road and I met 
somebody like him who picked me up. I fell gratitude 
towards him because he was fi ring my esc, but what if il 
mmed pot that this person was responsible — as he probar 
bly was — for the death of some people who I considered 
patriots fighting to the- liberation of El Salvador?" 

He tried to turn the though into a novd, this story of an 
encounter whh a good Samaritan who nay not be what he 
seems, but after a few chapters he knew it wasn't writing, 
and he put it away. Years px p&A The Dcrfmans had 
obtained U.S. readme® permits, and in 1985 they moved to 
Durham, North Carolina, where Ariel became a professor 
at Duke University. Dorfman kept on writing; there were 
novels and poems about exile, and about fife under politi- 
cally repressive governments. • 

In 1990, when democracy returned to niilt, the Dorf- 


mgns did too, and suddenly the stay about the Samaritan 
resurfaced. Chile was in the midst of a 


national recGodEa- 

^ to heal the scats of the Pinochet era. Dorfman 
tins was the atmosphere in which the story would 
work, but be now saw it not as a novd but a play. He locked 
himself i * 

with “Death and the Maiden." 


The play was a disaster m Santiago, where, in eariy 1991, 
it was performed *“ *- m ‘ J “ 


Aatafea ttraTUThc W*bing)oa Me 

Playwright Dorfman: a planetary success. 


Dorfman. In Germany, where the political situation lends 
it special resonance, be says there have been 56 produc- 


tions. all of them since reunification. Roman Polanski will 
bean directing a film version in March (.which Dorfman 
will co-produce), with Sigourney Weaver in the lead. 

And to think that this international star vehicle, this 
dramatic juggernaut, this sophisticated play about torture 
in a land very unlike the United States started in Bethesda. 
Maryland, with an old Volkswagen. 

il was 1980 and Dorfman was in his seventh year of 
involuntary exile from Chile. The grandson of European 
Jews who migrated to Aigentina in the beginning of this 
century and the son of a United Nations economist, Dorf- 
man spent 10 years of his childhood in New York City. 
When Joe McCarthy started making noise about Commu- 
nists. Dorf man’s father — a “lefty," he says — moved the 
family to Chile. Ariel became a literature professor, an 
outspoken writer of a distinctly “lefty" variety himself, and 
a passionate supporter of the socialist government of Salva- 
dor Allende. which hdd power in Chile from 1970 to 1973. 

intellectual notoriety came his way, both in Chile and 
abroad when he co-wwie a 1971 tract called “How to 
Read Donald Duck." Written, he says, in 10 days, it 
deconstructed the Disney comic, discovering imperialist 
messages of all kinds. Two years later, when Allende was 


overthrown by the dictator General Augusto Pinochet, 
Dorfman was forced to leave the country. 

With his wife, Angelica, and son Rodrigo, he went first 
to Paris, then to Amsterdam. In 1980 he won a fellowship 
to spend a year in Washington at the Smithsonian Institu- 
tion’s Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. 
The Dorfmans lived in Bethesda — another son, Joaquin, 
had been bom by this time — stateless intellectuals who 
moved easily among Washington's writers, journalists and 
academics. Susan She ehan, a Washington-based staff 
writer for The New Yorker who was also a Wilson fellow 
at the time, remembers the ebullient Chilean as “by far the 
most intriguing person" at the scholars’ program, a gregar- 
ious, creative extrovert bouncing around among all the 
dry, retiring scholars. 

Which bnnj£ us back to the Volkswagen, and the play. 
Dorfman says he didn't have much money during this 
period, so when the family needed a car, they opted for an 
ancient VW station wagon, purchased from a Salvadoran 
they knew through friends. The man offered to come over 
and do repairs, when needed, at bargain rates. 

Those bouse calls Jed to an easygoing acquaintance, aid 
over time it emerged that the man was not on the tun from 
the rightist Salvadoran government — as Dorfman had 
assumed — Inn had in fact been a member of the militar y, 
which had been fighting the leftist guerrillas whom Dorf- 
man supported. 


•a makeshift profesaanal company m a 
350-seat theater. For out thing, the . female rote was too 
strong for a macho society, and male actas kept dropping 
oat, unable to stomach oring spoken to the way the in- 
flamed, assertive Paulina speaks to Gerardo and the doctor. 
And the pnbfic — even Docfman’s friends, he says — was 
not ready for such a bald confrontation with its own 
national reality. Others resented die fact that Dorfman, the 
famous exile, hadn’t Kved through the honocs they had. and 
therefore couldn't understand bow difficult this story was to 
watch. But the playwright himself insists, “Only an exfle 
could have written tins. It’s as if I could say whatever I 
wanted, because toy roots had been cut in some way." 

Dorfman says other Chileans, inducting some officials 
of the new government, considered the play's timing 
“inopportune and simply stayed away. 

That initial reception among ms coumrymen caused him 
great pain, be says, and it’s obvious he has spent consider- 
able time analyzing it* “What I think people m Ode didn’t 
want to look at — and wbal I think they still don’t want lo 
look at — is, what did the dictatorship do to them?" 

Meanwhile, in London, a reading of the play in English 
was held for a small group of celebrities and haman-rights 
activists, with Dorfman in attendance: His friends who 
were there — people like Peter Gabriel, Harold Pinter, 
John Berger and Dame Peggy Ashcroft — raved about the 
play. Pinter championed it at the Royal Court Theatre, 
promising that if the company staged ithe would throw in 
a new one-act play of his own. The theater agreed, and the 
sensation began. 

“I don’t think there’s any other play (hat has achieved 
the universal resonance of Death and the Maiden' in 
Latin America." the Mexican writer Carlos Foentes says. 
Fuentes, who has seen the play four times in three coun- 
tries, says that in this worit Dorfman speaks in a stronger 
voice than ever before — “a very ample, almost Grok 
voice; the voice of a Sophocles, almost " But he adds that 

riofeooefc still difficult, “most deny the 

existence of the play and of Dorman." 


people 


GATT and die Quake: 
yalattiShootsBack 

the Motion Picture 

America, has respond m andjfcn 

letter to the French film executive 

dispute with tl* U S. Sin ados- 

try. “How could you announce m 
so casual a tone that God has m- 

„ . j _ . Mlnmitv rinrrmo- 


*1 


St 1 UUIMU ** I t 

dieted a violent calamity on inno- 
cent people because God seemingly 

• q] 


shan* your views about *<xa»jro- 
versy which seems soaautil and so 

unhmrortantihtltef^rfjlwun- 
Valmt; Mlrat 


□ 


“What Happoied Was"' tpdk top 
feature honoss al this .Sun- 
dance Film Festival a showcase for 
American independent movies, 
founded by Robert Bedford; “Free- 
dom on Mv Mind,” a Hm about the 
avil rights movement, wear ra the - 
documentary category. - ; . Earara 7 
Thompson was named best actress 
in the Evening Standard British 
Film Awards for “Die Rmrams of 
the Day" and “Much Ado About 
Nothing," and Darid Thewfe won 
for best actor m “Naked.’V Km 
Loach's “Raining Stones" won the 
best film award.- . • - 

Japan’s tabkad press is bursting 
with h^mes like "Princess Ma- 
sako: The Road to Motherhood." 
Rumens tbs* Princess Masakn, the 
wife of Crown Prince Narahito, 33; 
& expecting began to droilate after 
a palace announcement that die 
pnneess would have to nriss some 
rtffir»3J duties because of -a cold. 
Nothing to the rumors, the palace 
says. “It really is just a cold.” an 
official said. “She’s getting better" 

Q 

Elvis Predey has been spotted 
again — in a TV ad promoting Ten- 
nessee tourism. The commercial fea- 
tures a computer-animated version 
of tbe young Elvis dancing moss a 
postcard for about 10 seconds and 
singing tbe state tourism tingfe, 
“We’re Playing Your Song. The 
vocals are supplied by the country 
singer Ronnie McDowdL 


EWERMHONAl 

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the central and eastern Unit- 
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Local*/ heavy snow *nH !aU 
downwind ol the Great 
Lakes, while lighter snow 
tails trem Chicago to Toron- 
to. The West Cdara »H have 
dry. mild weather late this 
week. 


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Heavy rains will soak Ire- 
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and western France Ihis 
week. High winds Wfflsweeo 
through the British Isles at 
midweek. Pans and London 
will have seasonable tem- 
peratures and scattered 
showers Thursday. A lew 
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later Thursday. 


Asia 

Cold, blustery weather will 
overspread Japan Wednes- 
day. Snow will (all In the 
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week. Cold weather n Seoul 
later tnis week will be 
accompanied by sinshme. 


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Today 
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Tomorrow 
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14 Ur locale 
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2 f Names in a 
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23 Cut and run 


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29 Playwright 


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30 Army rank, ter 
short 


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34 Brazzaville s 
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34 H 

40 Faberge objet 

41 Collection 

42 Candied items 


Solution to Pucde of Jan. 31 


□□SOS 


□anna 



43 1969 Three Dog 
Night hit 

44 Pup'S 
complaints 

45 Talent for 
cocktail talk 

47 Some heirs 

4a Time founder 

48 "Orlando" 
author 

32 Forum fashion 

S3 Quarry 

58 Y 

bo Organ setting 

81 Type style 

82 Eros 

63 Ruptured 

04 Toll's target 

88 Currycomb 
target 


DOWN 


1 1nvestigate. In a 
way 

2 Tribe whose 
name means 
'cat people' 

3 Old gray 
animal? 

4 Some ratings 

5 Newgate guard 

8 1968 Caine rote 

7 Wagons 


» German cry 
• Bishop's 
domain 

10 Solo 

11 Candid 

- cameraman 

i 20 er 

(Adenauer} 
is Krupp family 
home 

is Tall writing? 

10 Tiny swimmer 
23 Took off 
a* Director 
Mars had 

2S“OtheHo" plotter 

26 Item in a locket 

27 Collimate 

28 Moose, e.g. 

29 Divans 

so Opera prop 
ai Pioneer atom 
splitter 

32 Kingfisher's coil 
3# debaHet 

37 Opposite of hire 

38 SL pstnek's 
home 

38 Publicity 

45 Conductor 
Ormandy • 

46 Analyze veree 

47 Skier’s site 


.© New York Times Edited by Will Shortz, 



Her® 


48 Dietary 
4« — ■ — Point 


30’ — : victory!' 
si Sfittk' 


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35 Home of 
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Travel in a world without borders, time zones 

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CattittgCard 


Imagine u world where you cm call country to country as easily as you can from home. And 
reach the L'S. directly from over J2? countries. Converse with someone who doesn't speak your 

gei the message in 


B 3 b ODD $$ language, since it’s translated instantly. Call your clients at 3 a.m. knowing they'll g 

: y//, your voice at a more polite hour. AJ1 this is now possible with AT<£T - 

\ To use these services, dial the ARtT Access Number of the country you're in and vou‘11 get all the 

help you need. With these Access Numbers and your AIS3 Calling Card, international calling has never been easier. 

If you don't have an AIKT Calling Card or you'd like more information on AT-ST global services, just call us using the 


com- en ienr Access Numbers on your right. 



Hong Kong 

800-1111 

Liechtenstein' 

155-00-11 

India* 

000-117 

Lithuania* 

8*196 

Indonesia* 

00-801-20 

Luxembourg 

WOOOlll 

.Upon* 

IKiJO-m 

Mate* 

oecoapo-no. 

Korea 

009-11 

Monaco* 

19*-00U 

Korea** 

11* 

weiheriaoda* 

06-022-9111 

Malaysia* 

8000021 

Ptorway* 

800-190-11 

New Zen land 

000-911 

Poland**** - 

0*010-4800111 

Philippine** 

105-1Z 

Pom&r 

05027- 1-288 

RusBia*TMoscow) 

155-5042 

HOBMsh 

01-800-4288 

Saipan* 

235-2872 

StonUa 

0(K2<MW10l 

Sin^pon: 

80041 11-111 

Spain 

90WMO-U 

Sri Lanka 

4.VM30 

Pweden* 

020-795-611 

Taiwan* 

0080-10288-0 

Swltacrlanrt* 

155-00-11 

ThaiLimJ* 


UK. 

050089-0011 

EUROPE 

MHMXJEEASr 

Armenia** 

8*14131 

Bahrain 

■ - .800-001 

Austria* - * 

022-903011 

Egypt* (Cairo) 

5108200 

HcJjtio/j/* 

toilf-OOfO 

ouna 

177-100-2727 

Huljuru 

ito-tsc«wimo 

Kuwait . 

800-288 

Croatia** 

99-38-00 U 

Lebanon (Bdmi) 

4a6«n 

C>pru>* 

Ow-CkkilO 

Saudi Arabia 

1-800-100 

Czech Rep 

00-42000101 

Turkey* 

0O800-12277 

Denmark* 

8001-0010 

* AMERICAS • 

Finland* 

9800-100-10 

Argentina* 

OQ1-800-200-UU 

France 

19*-0011 

Bribe* 

555 

Germany 

0130AJQIO 

SotMa' 

MKHUI 

Greece* - • 

00-800-1311 

ifiqp 

OOOOOIO 


Ecuador 1, 


El Salvador^ 


190 

-Guaoanala* . 


190 

Guyana*** 



Honduras’* 


• m 

Mexico*** ’ 

9W0W62-424O 

WcwbKMmmbbQ 

17* 

Panama* 


. ' .109 

Peru* 


191- 

Uruguay 


000410 

Venezuela** 


own 1-120 


CARIBBEAN 


'B er m u da* 


1-800-872-2861 


British Vi. 


1-800-872-2881 


1-830-87^2881 


Cayman Islands 
Gre n ada* 

Ha&T 


-1-80047*2881 
“ 1-800472-2881 


Jamaica** 


001-830-972-2863' : 


Netb.Anxfl 


0-800472-2881 


&HttaAfevta 


jMIHffBB 


1*800872-2882 


AFRICA: 


Gabon- 




00*4611 


ftqya* 


00X11/ 


liberie. 


08004a 


Malawi** 


TW4#7* 


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