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international 




PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW 


YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


VS? 


Tniidon.. Thursday, February 3. 1994 



No. 34,502 


** 



Courts in an 
Indian State 


-i 


By John Ward Anderson . 

Washington Post Service 

CHATRA, -India — There was no judge in 
black robes, no defense attorneys, no rules of 
evidence and no right to appeal. Budhua and 
Puthua, poor farm laborers in their early Jjs, 
were dragged to a small forest a month ago and 
judged guiliv of robbery- by a group of [bar 
peers. Justice was as swift as the ax that sliced 
off their left hands. ..... . . 

“There were five of us. and they 
other three in.front of me by cutting them heads 
off with a knife." said Puthua. who admitted 
that he and his friends had robbed passing 
vehicles of 50,000 rupees (about $1,700) earlier 

^hu*ead of turning the bandits over to the 

.. , i ... ah hu mfflllvr; CH 


Instead of tummg the banaits over iu 
police, local residents, egged on by members of 
a violent Communist farmers' group, tookmat- 
iw nwn hands and impaneled a 


a violent communist iarmcn 
'ters into their own hands and impaneled a 
“people’s court" — a kangaroo court in which 
villagers dispense instant justice. In recent 
months, these courts have boomed in populari- 
ty and ihe punishments have become particu- 
larly gruesome, with criminal suspects occa- 
sionally having noses and chopped off. A 
police informer was recently killed and nailed . 

• ^Th people's courts are just one example of 
dw collapse of government in this region of 
Bihar, one of India’s most corrupLjmpovcr- 
ished and backward states. Angered by govern' 
mem corruption and a feudal land ^tem iha 
has kept millions of families in slavery for 
generations, people are rebelling against pohn- 
S£ the pOlhi and large landowners, and 
seizin a power for themselves. 

I rtninnlino In dOOl 



Tokyo Offers 
Big Tax Cut 
As Stimulus 


For Recovery 


But Socialists Reject 
$55 Billion Package, 
Threatening Coalition 




, - '-w. - (Votnc OifkJi FrjfcfPw * 


lndia r is struggling to douse these drveree 
fnlS The v^fvl,Naipanl «***£ 


O.- l^a*|Jaui 

“iriliion "mutinies.’' This- explains why urn. 

ixofien cited as an extreme 


her P akistani coumenwm — — ^ 

EU Joins NATO in Cold-Shouldering tteEast^ 

T~*.- ^ . ... and West- And Germ^y’s t Scandinavian counin* and Ausuw. 



teuton. a comma onww. 
from upper cm and . U*«ta £££ 
* one of . t Bom- 



is one of manv acrossiawa. rr~r~ 

bay usnallv have, religious, caste or ethme cOD- 

roads. 

LL.il^ V oArlraunffC ftTl- 


People’s courts senie evemuuis — 

Stop* ... 

SieTand fields. Gunsmiths lmlK ^ffltliceffirf 
Unidentified in the F” 55 

SeS d ““r bas fepShSUy been nn- 

plicated m 36 killings-. i—* , Vbiee 

“We' are trying to bimg the people s 

Klling'ddsrupas a solution to a problem, not to 

SSSsE^ sstt 

See BIHAR, Page 4 • 


.. By Tom Buerkle 

t International Herald Tnbune 

R o i icc ELS — The countries of Eastern tu- 

rope/denied speedy entry 
ricTrcaiy Organization Iasi month. are knock 
•mp S on the door of the European Union 
BSE? Seal, security and trade com- 
idtmeni/butgetting a familiar ^ 

Officials and diplomat say that the urno 
jaS^KSill to ofTer much more dm 
jb eaWeman pf^mumiions. __ 

• The Eastern demands ^preMedWWn»j 

dav hv Prime Minister Waldcmar PawVak_ of 
PofflwhoTold the European 
membership for his countiy would accelerate 


•He. in (top ration of Europe’s Eastern and West- 
ern halves and increase the Union's competi- 
tiveness and security. „„, 1 J cl rtW 

-If Poland remains outside, dus amid slo _ 
integration and could create tnsuib > „ 

countries around the European Union. 
Pawlak fold a parliamentary committee here. 
The demands, which follow a call 

d^JiS^nfor^oModo^ror 


l ior me mv ... — .- 

^SStSi 

Commission, said last, week -that the 

Sways to speed the integration of Eastern 
Europe. 


And Germany's foreign minister. KlausKin 
t-rf said Wednesday in Bonn that the L nion 

in the EU presidency tn the second half or thi 
Year 10 work for such agreements 
' Officials and diplomats say fe ■ 

SS rdK"in^«nS no. 
X full erreci until 1995 and ° 

Sin S'gaSy date for the start or member- 
ship negotiation's with the East, pen i the ^e*» 
j^strams on their budget and infighting ovei 


te acanuma* rrwn- 

The countries 

mitment that fhe> w wi ^ conditions, 

bow we can add to this. 


The 1 a inaleJ Ptmi 
TOKYO — Prime Minister Morihiro Ho- 
ioka^a earlv Thursday announced a P 1 ^ 10 ^ 

"iriUion «'n <S55 bilhonl 

j. ni v taxes in an effort to get r^cssi 

strapped Japanese consumers hack into the 

however, the cut is to be offset by an increase 
in sales tax from 3 percent to 7 percent begin- 

o™ ocnnic Party. H« «* 

Mr. Hoadkaua^^u-pa^cuab- 
lion denounced the plan. They and other j-J-" 
lion legislators argued that the plan would ha 
‘7a chance oT restarting the economy if 
wnsumers Say would hava .0 pay .aa m 

aix Soaialisi aabiaa, mambart 
might resign, the Japan Broadcasting Grp. 

^towerful Finance M.nistry had insisted 
on a shift in the tax burden, rather than an 

^fimem^'dissension left Mr Hosokawa 
^ifh a second big headache 3 week before he 
was to meet President BHl CTtimon ninj Washmg- 
ion A wide-ranging trade agreement is sup- 
n n«-d to be ready bv the Feb. 1 1 meeung. bui 
U.S. and Japanese negotiators apparently ma e 
no progress in trade talks 
The tax cut, announced by Mr. Hos-.Ka a 
, a m press coiderence, meets one U.h. 

demand. Washington had called fora lug ™ 
cut belierina consumers would use some o 
toeir extra dsh to buy foreign goods and help 
See JapSs annual S 50 billion surplus m 
trade with the United States. 


ttSS Headerstoldium. 
at amidnighi meeting that they “cannot agree 
... .i ,..v inrrease. 


iw we can aao iu i» t 

For Poland and Hungary, which Uns*£^ 

-aesasraraas 


IIIUII'J - 

See EUROPE, Page 4 


fOUIQ ^ 

Militants Warn Foreigners to Urn ^gyP* 


By Chris Hedges 

SffgSStaSSYS jow ta-P» ■ Wednad,y 10 

leave Bsvpt f® r own safe ^‘ . - , h - 

extremely ferocious and strong. 


iremeiy terocioua ^ — o- . . . , 

The statement, w^ch ^‘oiTthird warning to 

killed seven members of the group, was tne 


foreigners ro leave the coumry. W«.enr diplomat said Ihey 

took the threat seriously. murists on at least five 

Islamic plants atiack^fom^ioui^^ aUacks tjUed 
occasions after thejmt . woun< j e d 30 tourists. 

SJ KwSjS "borer Wh “ “ 8U °' 

man opened fire in 3 ^edand 670 wounded since 

rbe^M^^S isiaorie srare. began 

2ggEar»sB«K 


' 3 t IS K 3 S», fl 5 K SVS S^a 

wwn pct cM “^^"Js^rily officials had been 
given orders to kill ^ vKdnesdav lhat security 

a- hidwuu in an 

effort to "crush terrorism. h oliceman was 

,M lhe raid - 


at il liuuias&r** . V 

with the sales tax increase. 

The prime minister attempt^ jo smc^ih 
over the tax increase by saving 

welfare m." But he conceded that 

be used for welfare cosu>. 

The tax cut is to be part of an economK 

sSSSSHsi 

trifhon and 16 trillion yen altogether. 

The tax cut and offsetting ma ^‘ i 
the other economic measures, will ^ ^bnuited 
^ a supplementary budget to Pf ^ ‘ 
Hosokawa would need support 
opposition Uberal Democrat to pass the bud- 
get if the Socialists oppose it. 

Rut first he must successfully conclude hi> 
summit mcetirig'viih Mr.Clinton - a task that 
is appearing ever more difficult. 

The United States wants Japan to -boos 

equipment 


It’s a Four-Power Rivalry 


Kiosk 


Over Next OECD Director 

■ mally apolilical job had rrirped uno a bone 


Bv Alan Friedman 

Iruemanimal Herald Tribune ... 

PARIS — The ^ l ^gSipo^?o 

ingitwanistat^^*^^ n ^ ve 

p^oie Ammcan taogg^ “J, its 

£!£^y^Sto^candida S of a 
weight Wednesoay as the new 

"IgSSS Z Parisrbased ecouourie 

-or — 


Russia Seeking 
To Keep 5 Bases 

■ r*... — Koc^c : 


Vietnam, Open lor Trade? 

Clhuon Ruling on En^goJmmme’U 

The .A uocuued Prers ur S . r rtr ihe Vietnamese Fo 


it “strong Liberal Party, for 

Sf OEcSIob Shines endojuegent 

S 3 S 31 

wa.and Canada giates ■ 

Jotnsion. It imrn^j gbviOTiiient of 

Priiw Minister ft^J’chanceilor of the 
Nigd rhTfHeanization for Eco-, 



^rrnanv said it . would nominate Lorenz 

^SoeTS^Tr.de.roheadmc 

ff^tr Sd Wednesday .bar be 

torS *e «rrid^acing -a*lr 

" dcr - 

: ^ official said ib« 

"ndudS’wTT ^reement. asaaurg R"®.* 
JSSSrt rtSTS imepanns nerviy 

. , See OECD, Page 4 


Russia wants to keep five army 1 b««“? 
static about 23.000 troops outade its bw- 
der« in the Caucasus Mountains region. 
RUssilf s defeo« cnbdsfer said Wednesday m 

General Pavel S. Grachev. 
l^So^in Azerbaijan- (Page 2) 


wP* w ™i 




¥ 


General Hew* 

UK. ofTK^sou^totirmithepropa^^ 

effect of an IR-A leader sU5.visil Page- 

Health / Science 

- 


The A ucctanrJ Pren 
WASHINGTON — President Bill Clinton is 

insisted he had noi made a tuial dwn^on. 

■TH have a decision in the next couple ctf 
d M- Ur Chmon said before a meeting. with 
Republican and Democratic congressional 

'“Ad^SonoS! speaking on ^ndv- 

tion of anonymity, said die P^em*as pr 

--it 

U S business interests- and by propres o 
issue of 1200 U.S. servicemen missing from Ui 
Vietnam War. 


ur ? “i2r 

r^tf=pr^nin 

H i noi express^ relief iPsge J 

go lo cover [he enure country after boutn 
Tn'lctK" rauved Ub cra- 

Sj=ss 5?«5S 

complaining that competitors in other na 


iueof 2^00 U.S. servicemen |UKBU, 6 Fu n normalization ot 

i=s5£3fSCS “43=®=*= 


iwiinw - . . rr 

If you're worrying about the nsks in me. 
you’re probably worrying about 
things. 


Rnuoi 


Book Review 

Bridge 

Crossword 


Wifliam Pern’, 

of defense, warning 
“nightmare scenano m Korea. Page 


St 3m- -M ww 

caning 

^■nSE?St Senaic vecd. 6: lo JS. » 


said last week. 


O^an-d wba. a 

.■‘TtfSS^SS-S"' <*• SSSf* * ^ ^ 

.loSri a t «SS' 8 d^ V »^rid fbing ». *S : ’ 
Cleveland. .; about a woman television 

Hf * *^*E?L , S!ta. breast?” - «£ 


"I fee. wnible WJES3B! 

caused her.- he tc SO varTfrorn CBS. 

»b«e camera was sc. up »rnc su y^ ^ „ 

Mr. Hoke’: 


.petition tor me meutu s^uag*.- 
“Hcv ” he added hopefully, invoking a Geveland land- 
mark. “maybe somebody will call tn a bomb threat to the BP 

bW M wtoh remark Mr. Cassidy gave a tiny, half-fallowed 
erv accompanied by a full-body ennge. 

'/to. Mr. Hoke had about as tad srajht on Gctcland 

mmmm mm-s ssss 

advance . - *«.**!. - •• 

^7. rmlv hone, it seemed, was that the c 



xt^Hoke said he was “not whining" about his predica- 


— E ‘ P 'i JD South Africa 6- 
. jorton--..--J ffA,E. .....3-50 Dirh 

SPSi^Sg- ^AAiU^dSt^ 


iras cuurttt on -Ojas for Mi. Hoke, on 

Addr^l^ TT^jshinston ?*l 

■TbgfSS?, 1 dtSTreponer to Mow bin, through 

p ,a linu«d success to quell the 


10 accept as niut.it ai’twv - ---- . - 


respuuNt'iw. n*i *». , 

mirror of my own imperfection*. 




.t/Pi 



Ip"* rta *J 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 1994 


ILK. Acts to Limit Propaganda Value of IRA I reader’s Trip __ WORLD BRIEFS 


By James F. Clarity 

Sew York Tunes Service 

DUBLIN — The chief British official for Nonhem 
Ireland sought Wednesday to discredit the assertion 
by Geiry Adams, the political leader of the Irish 
Republican Army, that be could not endorse the Irish- 
British peace Framework until its provisions are clari- 
fied by the British government. 

Mr. Adams, on a 48-hour visit to New York widely 
seen in Ireland and in Britain as a propaganda coup 
for the IRA and its political wing, Sinn Fein, said be 
could not yet accept the peace plan, which would give 
him a place at formal peace negotiations in return for a 
convincing cessation of violence by the IRA. 

He said be needed clarifications of the plan and 
other steps he wants London to announce before he 
tries to persuade the IRA to lay down its arms in the 
guerrilla war that has killed 3.1 14 people since 1969. 

[Peace depends on how soon Britain is willing to 
“cooperate.’' Mr. Adams said in New York, The 
Associated Press reported Wednesday. 

[Mr. Adams also offered to debate Prime Minister 
John Major on the main issues. 

(“What on earth is the British government doing in 
mv country?" Mr. Adams asked Wednesday on CNN. 
“Can it not give the Irish people the right to govern 
themselves?") 


Both the British and Irish governments welcomed 
President Bill Clinton's call for Mr. Adams to endorse 
the peace framework, known here as the Downing 
Street Declaration. 

On a visit to the northern British province, the 
Northern Ireland Secretary, Sir Patrick Mayhew. dis- 
missed Mr. Adams's New York statements as cynical 
deceptions and said, “He's never asked f or the clarifi- 
cation of any specific matter whatsoever in the 
declaration." 

In recent weeks. Mr. Adams has also refused to 
explain to Irish officials and journalists what exactly 
he wants clarified. Mr. Mayhew has said Mr. Adams's 
demands amount to renegotiation, not clarification . 

Sir Patrick said that Mr. Adams had “whitewashed" 
IRA violence in his appearances in New York . " 1 have 
great confidence in Americans.' 1 he added. “They 
understand very' well that in a democracy you cannot 
bring a bomb to advance your political aims. .Ameri- 
cans don't approve that any more than we do. It's 
disgusting." 

Mr. Mayhew. whose government strongly opposed 
Mr. Clinton's decision to allow Mr. Adams a visa to 
visit New York, noted that while Mr. Adams was in 
New York on Tuesday presenting Sinn Fein as favor- 
ing peace, the IRA had attacked a British .Army base 
in the north with a mortar round that missed. 


but broke windows in many nearby civilian homes. 


In his demands for clarification, Mr. Adams has 
repeatedly declined to say what be wants clarified. He 


“A child could have been injured." he said. repeatedly oedtued to say wnat ne wants ciaium ne 

In London. Prime Minister John Major's office said has added that he thinks Mr. V^or, m on 

that “while he was idling Americans he favors peace, the declaration the day it was issued, Dec. 15, coatra- 
his movement was firing mortars in Northern Ire- soinC lts provisions, but he does not say 

land." The statement added that Mr. Adams’s “smo- which ones. 

kescreen of evasions and falsehoods has not deceived Mr. Adams also Crisis that the Protestant majority 
people." must not have a veto on a united Ireland, which tt 

In Dublin. Prime Minister Albert Reynolds, who would have in a referendum. But he h«» also 
has been seeking to clarify the declaration in public that C inn Fan understands Protestant feats and 
and in private statements to Mr. Adams, appeared to would not advocate coercion into an Ireland joining 
express mild impatience nhen asked about the Adams the North with the Irish Republic. 

"V il'hdp^ard moving UK prasss Of pact Sinn ,F < m fav ors 

along it will have been worthwhile.” he said. “I have two sides, but has t roubl e pereuadmg officials that 
spent some time now in giving out an abundance of fhere is not a ronfhet between i advocating ‘ £mnt- 
darifica lions. The lime is reining when i expect to get * settiemem agn remmt but denying the ftotes- 

some clarifications in reverse. I want to see the debate tarns the veto they would Ihave m a d«n°cra!K rtf era- 


finished. but I don't believe in deadlines.’ 


Few in Russia Polls 
Write Off Reforms 

Strong Public Opposition 
To Zhirinovsky Also Noted 


By Margaret Shapiro 

H'm fling ton Post Service 

MOSCOW — Political opinion 
polls released in the lost week sug- 
gest that despite the anti-reform 
backlash of fast month's parlia- 
mentary election few people here 
expect Russia to reverse course and 
many are strongly opposed to the 
uJiranationalist Vladimir V. Zhir- 
inovsky. 

Polls in Russia have been less 
than accurate; they were notorious- 
ly wrong in the recent parliamenta- 
ry elections, dramatically underes- 
timating the strength of the 
ullranationalists. 

But these latest surveys at least 
indicate that it is loo soon to sug- 
gest as some in the West have done 
that Russians are ready to abandon 
the free- market economic policies 
and pro-Western diplomacy that 
have characterized the last two 
years. 

The only significant reformist 
holdover in the government also 
said Wednesday that it was too 
soon to write off the reforms or 
conclude that the newiy structured 
cabinet, in which former Soviet bu- 
reaucrats now predominate, was 
going to reverse course. 

Deputy Prime Minister Anatoli 
B. Chubais, who beads the privati- 
zation effort, said that the depar- 
ture from the cabinet of Yegor T. 
Gaidar, architect of Russia's trans- 
formation. and Boris G. Fyodorov, 
the free- market advocate and for- 
mer finance minister, had been a 
big blow. 

But Mr. Chubais said that Prime 
Minister Viktor S. Chernomyrdin 
may end up sticking with many of 
the reformist policies, including 


tight monetary control to reduce 
Russia's high inflation. 

“The government's reform poli- 
cy has come under threat," Mr. 
Chubais said. “But at the same time 
it is so far a potential threat." 

In the next week or two. Mr. 
Chubais said, decisions would be 
made about the 1994 budget that 
would show whether ihe reform 
course will continue or be watered 
down or reversed. Until then, he 
said, “it is wrong to try and make a 
final assessment about the govern- 
ment’s course." 

A survey of 1.000 Muscovites 
conducted by the Mnenie polling 
firm last week found that little 
agreement about whether Mr. Gai- 
dar's resignation would make 
things better or worse. But nearly 
50 percent ihoughL it was possible 
to have his policies continue even if 
be was not in the cabinet. 

Meanwhile, a survey by the Cen- 
ter for Public Opinion and Market 
Research gave Mr. Zhirinovsky the 
highest negative rating among 13 
leading politicians. 

About 63 percent said they did 
not trust Mr. Zhirinovsky, whose 
neofascist party scored surprising 
victories in the parliamentary elec- 
tions and whose open threats 
against neighboring countries have 
caused extreme alarm in the West. 
The center surveyed 1.600 people 
in dues and urban areas across 
Russia. 

Mr. Yeltsin, by contrast, had a 
“trust" rating of about 44 percent, 
with 40 percent saying they do not 
trust him. 

In the Moscow poll by Mnenie, 
about 50 percent of respondents 
said they feared that a war would 
result if’ Mr. Zhirinovsky were to 
come to power. 





The ^wcuKd Pro* 


A soldier on duty Wednesday in Tokoza to stop dashes between Inkatha and ANC supporters. 

Inkatha Rejects Plan for Security 


Reuters 

KATLEHONG. South .Africa —Zulus from the 
Inkatha Freedom Party brandished clubs and rat- 
tled shields on Wednesday in protest against a 
township peace plan drawn up by their foes, the 
African National Congress and the white govern- 
ment. 

Chief Mangosuthu BuiheiezTs Inkatha party, 
which is boycotting the ANC- and government-led 
transition to democracy, officially rejected the 
plan as “treacherous." 

“This action by the National Party government 
and the African National Congress is just another 
capitulation of a lame duck government." said 
Ziba Jiyane, an Inkatha spokesman. 

Party members in Katlehong and Tokoza, two 
of the worst trouble spots in four years of township 
violence, .said that the plan was one-sided and that 
they would resist it. 

ANC loyalists in the two townships said they 


feared for their lives if Inkatha spumed the plan. 

President Frederik W. de Klerk and the ANC 
leader. Nelson Mandela, announced on Tuesday 
that troops would be deployed to Katlehong and 
Tokoza. east of Johannesburg, to replace the Inter- 
nal Stability Unit, the widely despised while-led 
police force regarded by thousands of blacks as the 
main enforcer' of apartheid in the townships. 


The troops will be charged with restoring order, 
cleaning up battle-scarred streets, repairing dam- 
aged houses, restoring amenities and helping refu- 


gees return to their homes. 

Followers of Inkatha and the ANC have been 
fighting in Natal province and around Johannes- 
burg for the past four years of apartheid reform. 
About 14.000 people have died. 

About 500 Inkatha protesters carrying dubs, 
spears, shields and placards marched from Katle- 
hong to Tokoza against the withdrawal of the 
Internal Stability Unit. 


Cologne Police Ban Rally Featuring Zhirinovsky 


Reuters 

BONN — The police have 
banned a rally in Cologne planned 
by an extremist German party and 
billed to feature the Russian hard- 
liner Vladimir V. Zhirinovsky, or- 
ganizers said Wednesday. 

The German League, an anti- 
foreigner fringe party with several 


seats on the Cologne City Council, 
said the police had ordered the Sat- 
urday rally canceled as a danger to 
public safety. 

A city council member. Manfred 
Rouhs, said his parly would appeal 
the ban in court. 

It was not immediately clear 
whether Mr. Zhirinovsky, who has 
called for a Russian- German alli- 


ance to rule Europe, would visit 
Cologne. 

The German League said last 
month that Mr. Zhirinovsky had 
accepted an invitation, but a For- 
eign Ministry spokesman said he 
had not applied for a visa. 

Bonn barred Mr. Zhirinovsky 
from entering the country in De- 


cember. arguing that his often out- 
landish and aggressive statements 
could damage German m t crests. 

Foreign Minister Klaus Kinke! 
later said he might allow Mr. Zhir- 
inovsky to vis: t Germany, prompt- 
ing ;hc German League to invite 
him to Cologne and to a four-day 
congress of European far-right par- 
ties stoning Thursday. 


Russia Wants to Keep Bases in Caucasus 


By Fred Hiatt 

W'asAmgim Pus l Service 
MOSCOW - — Russia would like 
to maintain five military bases and 
about 23.000 troops in the three 
independent nations of the Cauca- 
sus. Defense Minister Pavel S. Gra- 
chev said Wednesday. 

General Grachev, touring Geor- 
gia in advance or a visit there 
Thursday by President Boris N. 
Yeltsin, said Russia would like to 
keep three bases in Georgia and 
one each in Armenia and Azerbai- 
jan. with agreement of the host gov- 
ernments. The troops' mission 
would be to provide regional secu- 
rity in the former Soviet territory, 
he'told the Interfax news agency. 

Russian troops inherited the po- 
sitions oT Soviet forces in much of 
Central Asia and the Caucasus and 
ia many cases have remained at the 
request of the host governments. 


But Russia's long-term military 
and economic role in former Soviet 
republics has become increasingly 
controversial since the strong 
showing by extremists in Russian 
parliamentary elections in Decem- 
ber. 

Many of Russia's southern 
neighbors, weakened economically 
and tom by civil strife, now look to 
Moscow for help, but many also 
fear the strings that might come 
attached to that help. President Bill 
Clinton acknowledged Russia's 
special interest in the region during 
his visit to Moscow last month, but 
the UjS. administration has also 
warned Russia not to interfere in 
other states' affairs without their 
approval. 

The Russian political and mili- 
tary establishment appears similar- 
ly ambivalent, with many leaders 
calling for Russia to play its “his- 


toric" role in the region but many 
others fearful of costly entangle- 
ments. 

That ambivalence was evident 
Wednesday when (he leaders of ev- 
ery major faction in the lower 
bouse of parliament, or Duma, ex- 
pressed opposition to a friendship 
treaty that Mr. Yeltsin and the 
Georgian leader. Eduard A. She- 
vardnadze. are expected to sign on 
Thursday. 

Like many of the 15 former Sovi- 
et republics. Georgia declared its 
sovereignty after the Soviet Union 
collapsed in December 199] and 
vowed not to cooperate with Mos- 
cow even within the framework of 
the loose successor alliance, the 
Commonwealth of Independent 
States. 

But the subsequent two years 
have wen the overthrow of Geor- 
gia's first elected president, three 


separate civil wars and an inmost 
total breakdown c-f law and order 
throughout the country. Russian 
officials have expressed concern 
about Mr. Yeltsin's safely during 
his one-day visit Thursday. 

Last fall. Mr. Shevardnadze 
turned to Russian troops to save his 
regime after troops loyal to him 
had len one war — against the 
ethnic separatist*, of Abkhazia — 
and seemed or. the verge of losing 
another, v supporters of the de- 
posed president. Reversing course 
and rhetoric. Georgia joined the 
Commonwealth . 

Now Mr. Shevardnadze is look- 
ing for mcre Russian help. .Among 
other things, the agreement would 
allow Russia tc help Georgia create 
its own armed forces out of the 
competing band? of gangsters and 
warriors who now roam different 
sectors of the count rv 


Russian Vows 
To Kill Muslims 
In Weapons Test 

Reams 

ERDUT. Croatia — Vladimir V. 
Zhirinovsky said Wednesday that 
he was giving orders to test a new-, 
top-secret weapon that would kill 
Muslim soldiers in Bosnia- Herze- 
govina. 

The extreme Russian nationalist, 
in a wild and extraordinary state- 
ment. promised that IS Muslims 
would die in Lhe first test of the 
“Hipton” weapon. 

He said it would kill by produc- 
ing a massive impulse of sound that 
human beings could not withstand. 

“There will not be a single uracr 
or firearms wounds, not one drop 
of blood, not one damaged build- 
ing." he told reporters. "There will 
just be the corpses of IS Muslim 
soldiers lying there." 

Mr. Zhirinovsky, who is visiting 
the former Yugoslavia, has several 
times promised to demonstrate 
such a weapon, but has produced 
no evidence of its existence. As an 
opposition leader, he holds no for- 
mal powers and has no authority to 
(est Russian arms. 

Chraa-India Troop Talks 

France -Prose 

N EW DELHI — A delegation of 
Chinese officials arrived here 
Wednesday for talks on troop re- 
ductions- 


Communists Linked to Italy Scandal 

MILAN (Reuteis) - The Democratic 
Communist Party and core of a leftist alliance for watershed ewcaMs, 
was thrust into the glare of Italy’s corruption investigations on w eanss* 
day when an indiistrialist accused it of taking kk&bam- „ 

A former Ferranti groan managing director. Carlo Sama, tBrnyrng 
Milan ccxruption trial, realhrmsom earlier accusation that the party naa 
taken a 1 bffliem lire (5590,000) bribe in 1989 and gave new details ot roe 

Bttttlto Democratic Party of the Left, widely seen as ^ Huai Sy n ?f 
March 27-28 general elections, immediately branded the acwsatianasa_ 
politically motivated slur. The party denies it took bribes non) business 


dam. He also wants the British to become active 


Mr. Reynolds and other officials say that in the convince Protestants that they should 

declaration Britain has made “historic” and “unprece- favor a nniled Ircland - 

dented" concessions, agreeing that it would facilitate Many Protestant leaders feel that by rig ni^ g the 
and encourage any settlement reached on the status of peace declaration, London has already become a per- 
lite North between its Protestant majority and sunder. Many officials, diplomats and analysts say 
the Catholic minority. The document also refers ?hai Mr. Adams may be »wmg the issue to delay a 
to the issue as “self-determination” which has been a decision because he is having difficulty convincing 
key phrase used for decades by the IRA. which hard-line IRA commanders that they mould accept 
wants a united Ireland Free of any British control the declaration. 


Bosnia Serb 

Defends 

CaOrUp 

By John Pomfret 

Washington Petr Service 

PALE, Bosnia — The defense 
minister of thesdf-prodaiffied Ser- 
bian Republic of Bosnia said 
Wednesday that Bosnian Serbian 
authorities, aided by the Serbian 
police, were rounding up male refu- 
gees in Serbia and bringing them 
back to Bosnia-Herzegovma in 
preparation for war. 

The official, Dusan Kovacevic, 
said the conscription was part of a 
general mobilization, announced 
Monday. 

His comments, in an interview, 
highlighted the deteriorating secu- 
rity situation in Bosnia where all 
three rides — Muslim, Croat and 
Serb — have made it dear they are 
girding for more, and possibly 
more extensive, war. 

The highiftnirig twiw on was un- 
derscored Wednesday night in Sa- 
rajevo. the capital when the city 
was rocked by its heaviest fighting 
in weeks. 

GeneraJ Kovacevic, a ccriond in 
the former Yugoslav Army and 
now a major general in the Bosnian 
Serbian pa ramil itary structure, re- 
peated threats that if United Na- 
tions relief planes landed at the 
Turia airport, Serb guns in range of 
the airport would will open fire. 

“We mil do everything in our 
power to make sure the airport 
does not open,” he said. 

General Kovacevic asserted that 
the mostly Muslim government 
wanted to use the airport to sneak 
weapons into the region. 

He confirmed claims made last 
month by the government military 
commander, Rasim Delic, that 
Muslim forces had overrun several 
villages between the Serbian-con- 
trolled dry of Zvornik, on the Dri- 
na River, and Han Pijesak, a moun- 
tain town west oT the Drina and the 
rite of what is believed to be a huge 
bunker system holding Serbian 
military supplies. 

The defense minister also ac- 
knowledged that General Delic had 
had some success in creating a 
command structure from the 
hodgepodge of guerrilla units that 
made up the Muslim .Army until 
recently. 

“They are forming well-orga- 
nized units and are hoping to create 
a fighting force of 200,000 men," he 
said, echoing claims by the Muslim 
ride. “They also have rather well- 
developed military production." 

Muslims Consider 
Boycotting Talks 

.Men- York Times Service 

SARAJEVO. Bosnia- Herzegovi- 
na —The Muslim-led Bosnian gov- 
ernment is considering breaking off 
tire Geneva peace talks in hopes of 
forcing the United Nations to find 
some new. way to end the war. 
Prime Minister Haris SQajdric said 
Wednesday night. 

“We’ve used this medicine for 
two years, and tire medicine obvi- 
ously did not core the ffiness.” he 
said. “Instead, it cost 200.000 lives. 
We have to start something new.” 

The next talks are scheduled for 
Feb. 10. But the government is 
searching for some new way out, 
Mr. Silajdzic sard, possibly by 
throwing the matter back to tire 
Security Council, possibly by offer- 
ing a mutual recognition agreement 
to Serbia. “We do not see these 
Geneva negotiations are going to 
achieve a result," he said. “We can- 
not keep going to Geneva forever.” 


Italy’s largest graft scandaL 

Japan Ma y Review Defense Policy 

TOKYO(AFP) — Prime Minister Morihiro Hosdkawa is considering 
the appointment of an advisory panel made up of forma government 
officials, businessmen and a college professor, to review Japan s defense 
policy, the Mainidri newspaper reported Wednesday. 

The paper «id a fin'd decision would be made after the government 
finished work on its next fiscal budget. A panel could be in place by late 
February, charged with compiling a . report on Japan’s defense program 
by August- : . 

Japan's post- World War II constitution bans the use of force in settling 
international disputes, and its military is allowed to serve only m a 
defensive role. Japan sent troops to join United Nations peacekeeping 
forces in Cambodia in 1992 on the condition that they would not be 
en gaged in combat, tnigsmng Japan also maintains a policy against the 
production or deployment of nuclear arms. 

State Seqrete Trial Opens in Moscow 

MOSCOW (WP) —The Russian government, in a case which witics 
likened to the worst of Soviet-era justice, began prosecuting a scientist on 
Wednesday for suggesting that tire nation is developing a new generation 
of cbeadcal weapons. / 

The. scientist, VB Mmayanov, 59. d former researcher at a secret 
Moscow laboratory, went on trial behind closed doors for allegedly 
revealing state seams. It was apparently the first such case since the 
demise of the Soviet Union. The judge in the case rejected Mr. Mioayan- 
ov’s contention that the dosed trial violates Russia's new constitution, 
and Mr. Muzayanov then refused to answer questions, according to his 
lawyer. 

Mr. Mirzayanov, who could be imprisoned for up to eight years if 
convicted, made his allegations tit comments to the Baltimore San and in 
a Moscow News article he co-authored in September, 1992. The scientist 
alleged that Russia tested a new form of binary nerve gas in 1992, after 
President Boris N. Yeltsin had agreed to outlaw such tests. The Security 
Ministry, successor to the KGB, investigated, and Mr. Mirzayanov was 
charged with violating a law which itself is not public. 

U.S. and Russia Set Pacific Exercises 

TOKYO (Reuters) — The United States and Russia may soon hold 
joint military maneuvers in the northern Pacific as part of efforts to build 
m utual trust, but Japan win not take part. Japanese officials said 
Wednesday. - • 

The UJL-Russian war games appeared an the agenda of the fim two- 
day meeting of the Trilateral Forum on North Pacific Security, which 
brought together officials, military officers and researchers from Russia, 


Japan and the United States. - 

The forum was designed to provide an exchange of views for possible 
policy recommendations to lhe three governments. The next round is to 
be held in Russia in the falL A dispute over a group of Russian-held 
islands claimed by Japan has frozen relations between Moscow and 
Tokyo. 

Statue Stolen From a Rome Church 

ROME (Renters) — Thieves stole the BombineUo, a 15th-century, 
jewel-bedecked, miraculous statue of the Infant Jesus in Rome. 

The venerated work of art is in the church of Santa. Maria in Aracodi 
on the Gapfcoline H3L Parents from all over Italy traditionally bring 
newborn or rick children to it They ask for a blessing and leave jewels, 
which are sold by the Franciscans for the poor. 

The police said the thieves broke into the church after it dosed Tuesday 
night while the monks were elsewhere chanting vespers. According to 
legend, the small wooden statue was .carved from an dive, tree in the 
Garden of Gethsemane in Jerusalem. The thieves also took jewels and 
money in its ornate glass case. In the past, thieves have stolen such objects 

as well as relics of saints and demande d ransoms. 

Another Politician Killed in Algeria 

ALGIERS (AFP) — Islamic fundamentalists have lolled another 
Algerian poKtictaja, the fourth in six days, the Ch a l le ng e Party announced 
Wednesday. 

The body or Mohammed ToualL who was employed by a state-run 
company in the eastern city of Constantine, was discovered after he was 
kidnapped overnight Tuesday, the party said, without giving further 
details. 

The slaying came after the killing hereof the first foreign journalist, 
Olivier Quemener, a Frenchman, fueled fears that hard-line Muslim 
fundamentalist groups had kept their premise to launch a February terror 
campaign. ... 


Correction 

A front-page article in of Wednesday's editions on the International 
Monetary Fund’s rejecting criticism of its lending practices for Moscow 
incorrectly reported Russian inflation data. Inflation in the fourth 


incorrectly reported Russian inflation data. Inflation in the fourth 
quarter of 1993 was about 16 percent a month and aright have accelerated 
to 18 percent a month in January. 


TRAVEL UPDATE 
A 'Drop in Speed’ on Lyon Autoroute 

LYON (Reuters) — The police in Lyon said Wednesday that they had 
installed a computerized radar device along the A43 amoroute leading to 
Grenoble. 

Using a remote-controlled video camera called Survidar, officers in a 
distant office can read a car’s license number, record its speed and even 
take a picture of the driver. The camera, in place since the be ginning of 
last month, has so far enabled authorities to ticket 400 offenders. “We’ve 
noticed a real drop in speed," a policeman said. 

Dutch experts are designing a streetcar foe for Td Aviv, IsraeTs first 
The projected routeof 24 kilometers (15 miles) would cany aboil 130.000 
passengers a day. the Hague transport authority said. The authorities of 
Amsterdam, The Hague and Rotterdam win design the stations, tracks 
and trams. They will also manage the line, if Israel approves their desi gn 
The estimated cost is about S460 millio n (AP) 

fefiriwgfa will pay city employees trim cyde to work in the hope of 
reducing pollution and and easing traffic. “Paying 25 pence (35 cents) a 
mile Tor travel by bicycle will cut pollution by reducing the nmphnr of 
cars on tire road at peak periods — and the exercise win help improve 
staff health.” City car parks will allow for bicycles. (Reuters) 

Northwest Airlines wffl cut services between Australia and tire United 

States. Northwest said the move was an eemotny measure in an “intense- 
ly competitive industry." It means the carrier has all bnt abandoned the 
services it fought last year to expand. (AFP) 



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it POLITICAL NOTES It 


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^miiIIs. Turn Thumbs Pawn on tlyS. Envoy 

r ^ ®W administration has decided 

against tKMmnaimg ibe forauraiobassadwib iq^t Edward W. 
£*“&> uflctan Jr„ to be ambassador to Saudi Atahia because itfce 
■jattoi gwemmem iias-said h win ngi apy totl fc posti ng 

dt *5 s ^, rare event- bui the Saudis haw d sc ^ 6 “* for ^ l4mba * Mr 
forced the Reagan administration 
ar, Robert G. Neumann; in 1981 after 
1988 the Saudis booiedout Hrime A.Hu« 

M carea officer. who could speak Arabic, 

Like Mr. Horan/ Mr. -Gnehn^.a career 
speaks Arabic, which, could jrirn a 1 , 
proponents of. alt those messy democratic IWIUU) , w . VUCUi0 » 
push foe democratic changes in Kuwait apparently did not set well 
with Riyadh either. 


, . before. . , 

[racall a Mideast schol- 
1 * 6 -months. In early 
jother highly r^ard- 
ff-cioly nine months.. 
[onagnSerwce officer, 
for those Saudi 
Mr. Gnchm's 


Defense Nominee Sees Potential 6 Nightmare 9 in Korea 


administration recalled the career diplomat Chas Freeman and o yd 
to push through the Texas oilman John Bookout. a friend of then- 

\nvi>t«unFCni. A n~t *T J - - « 1 .. .... ‘ . . 


— — ■> — . ; , * ucjwc utcvicuuou. dul uic 

Ltemocrat-contfoned Senate Foreign RdationaCommittee hatfc«Kf 

-TJ* S, “^* eari y °? *“«* beqj, pushing for a *inend of BflT or 
not a- career- diplomat someone reasonably dose to 

President BiD Clinton, Wre George Slephanopoulos> bis senior advis- 
er, or Thomas F. (Mack) McLarty, his chief of staff. (WF) 

Banking Panels to Plplnto WWtowotor Affair 

WASHINGTON^—: Dernocratk: cfadcnfesn of. the House and 
Senate, banking committees agreed to schedule savings and kwn 
oversight bearings thmRepubfi^^ as forams for 

inquiries about meWbrtewaier DevetopmemCoip. and Madison 
Guaranty Savings & Loan. •. 

Underpressure from Republicaxi^. Senator Donald W. R kg le Jr., 
- Democrat of Michigan, and Representative Henry Gonzalez, Demo- 
te agjmcy disposin^f failed S 

investigation into Madison's 1989 failure led to the continuing 
federal criminal investigation involving the Whitewater real estate 
development and Mr. and Mrs. Gin ton’s ties to the failed S&Ls. 
Investigators also are examining the Clintons’ Whitewater real estate 
venture, die financial dealings of Governor Jim Guy Tucker of 
Arkansas and other pttmm^t state f^pres.-' - 

Mr. Riegle and Mr: GonzaJei refus<al however, to hold full- 
fledged hearings on Madison-They have contended that the investi- 
gation should be left (0 the newly appointed independent counsel; 
Robert B. Fiske Jr. . , . • (M) 

Mwrfropowjito Reduce Water Pollution 

WASHINGTON — The Clinton admini«rq tio p an d Same Dem- 
ocrats spelled our ambitious proposals on Tuesday jo revise die 
Clean Water; Act. broadening ti to include ionoff from farms and 
other previously unregttialed. sources x>f portion, - 

-The proposed legation by the administration tins year would 
also further restrict discharges of toxkrdbemictils, tougf^ enforce- 
ment of pollution laws.- expand federal- subsidies for. local- witer- 
treatmcnl programs, and put into Daw the goal of preserringwetiands 
at their current total area. ‘ r‘- \ - . ... 

And. in an important change m howTeguJatory agencies look at 
the nation’s water problemsahe bill would call on states to set water- 
quality goals for entire tvatershed-'v, rather than controlling pollution ' 
one spot at a time: How formas bandte. the. manure from their 
animals, how households fertilize their lawns; and how cities design 
their asphalt landscapes could aU be ^trailed tty the* stHte 
watershed plans. ’' T . 

The Clinton administiatioa estimates that' the proposals, if en- 
acted, would leave state arid local governments and businesses 
paying 170 biltion a year for clean water, against the J62 billion they 
pow spend camptyjagw^^J^^ 

-M . «i V ^-1^ 11^,.. ^ .. , lii r > i . I-.. . ' 

Quoto/Unqiloto 

of/visitorsin 
news is. you 
fAP> 



The Anonaisd Pros 

WASHINGTON — President Bfll CKnlon’s choice 
for defense secretary told the Senate on Wednesday at 
his confirmation bearing that the United States faced 
a posable “nightmare scenario” in Korea. 

Wiffiam Perry, now the No. 2 man at the Pentagon, 
said the end of the CoW War had not eliminated the 
military threats facing the United States. 

“CHd threats can still pose new dangers to peace and 
security — I refer to the potential for conflict on the 
Korean Peninsula,” Mr. Perry told the Senate Armed 
Sexvioes Committee. 

“The prospect of the rogue regime or North Korea 
acquiring a nudear weapons capability to add to their 
massive conventional forces is emblematic of prolifer- 
ation problems we face.” Mr. Perry said. 

Mr. Perry said the United States was pursuing 
aggressive “diplomatic efforts to deal with this night- 
mare scenario," and said the presence of 100,000 U.S. 


soldiers, sailors and airmen in the Western Pacific 
served as a deterrent. 

In Russia, Mr. Fcny predicted, the path to stability 
will be “rocky and twisted.” He said that the Clinton 
administration hoped to use diplomacy in promoting 
Russian democracy. 

The main challenge facing the defense secretary. 
Mr. Perry said, was the decline of defense spending at 
a time of world instability. 

“Historically, we have not managed well such bud- 
get declines." Mr. Perry said. “This ume we must get it 
right or we will pay the cost later, either in blood or 
treasure or both " 

Cto Korea. Mr. Perry said be supported sending 
Patriot missile systems to South Korea but said a final 
decision by the* president was awaiting consultation 
with the South Korean government- The Patriots are 
defensive missil es deigned to deflect or destroy ene- 
my ballistic missiles. Noah Korea has strongly object- 
ed to the proposal to send the Patriots. 


Warlike Noises on Peninsula 

North Blames U.S. for a f Momentous Crisis’ 


By David E. Sanger 

New York Times Service 

TOKYO r— North Korea threatened Wednesday to 
break off its talks with the United States over unclear 
inspections, claiming that the Ctinioa administration 
haa “created a momentous crisis" and shown in recent 
days that its negotiations were only “a pretense for 
strangling” the government of Kim 0 Sung. 

. The statement was tire latest in a series of almost 
dafly and increasingly belligerent-sounding warnings 
from Pyongyang. 

. It charged tint Washington’s proposal to deploy 
Patriot anZMnissiJe batteries in South Korea, com- 
bined with tire recent visit to Seoul by R. Janies 
Woalsey, the director of central intelligence, was evi- 
dence that the United Slates had moved to “the full- 
scale stage of the war preparations,” 

American and South Korean officials said that they 
were concerned by the tone of the North Korean 
dispatcher which were broadcast Wednesday and also 
handed over to the International Atomic Energy 
Agency m Vienna. 

But the officials mid that it was difficult to deter- 
mine whether the warnings were originating with the 
country’s leadership or with other, lower-level 
officials. 

Some snggsted that the North was trying to use the 
Patriot missile deployment as its newest reason for 
refusing go along with any detailed inspection by the 
atomic energy agency. 

“Sometimes they are bluffing and sometimes a 
steady buildup in the rhetoric indicates we have a real 
problem on our hands.” one U5. official who moni- 
tors the North, said. 

“Frankly, this time we can’t telL” 

[In Seoul Foreign Minister Han Sung Joo of South 
Korea urged caution Wednesday in the dispute with 
North Korea. Agence France- Presse reported. Speak- 
ing to senior South Korean diplomats. Mr. Han called 
for a shift away from confrontation, saying chat in a 
zero-sum game “a gain for one side entails a corre- 
sponding loss. for the other.”] 

In' recent cfeys American South Korean and Japa- 


NoithXorea until Feb. 21, the start of a meeting of the 
atomic energy agency’s board of governors, to. allow 
mtemationaJinqrecJors to resume their visits to Yong- 
byon. North Korea's nuclear complex. 

K there is no progress by then, a senior Japanese 


official said Wednesday, tire UN Security Council 
would be asked to impose sanctions. 

A formal deadline has not been presented to the 
North. 

The statement came a day after the U.S. Senate 
adopted a nonbinding resolution urging President Bill 
Clinton to take a harder line with the North. 

North Korea has not responded to that resolution, 
but it did denounce the plan by the United States to 
set up a “Radio Free Asia.” 

la its six-page statement. Noah Korea's Foreign 
Minislty denounced the International Atomic Energy- 
Agency. accusing it of participating in a conspiracy 
with the United States to force it into far more 
intrusive inspections than it agreed to with the United 
Stales. 

It appears to have envisioned that inspection as very 
limited, and far short of the kind required under the 
Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty. 

The North said in March that it was abandoning the 
treaty, but it later suspended that decision, deeming 
that the move would depending on the outcome of its 
talks with the United States. 

Since then it has claimed it bolds a special status, 
neither in the treaty nor out of it, that exempts it from 
the inspection requirements. 

The energy agency, it said Wednesday, “tried stu- 
pidly to force full-scope inspections” that would be 
the "equivalent” of North Korea’s “de facto return to 
the treaty,” and deliberately delayed consultations 
with North Korea to provoke a crisis. 

The agency, saying its own reputation for thorough- 
ness and integrity was at stake, has refused to negoti- 
ate over the terms of its inspection. 

David Kyd. the agency’s spokesman, said: “We 
have told them that a limited inspection is not enough. 
We can't just look over the fence.” 

The American approach, the North said, is "simply 
a stratagem aimed at devising a pretense for stran- 
gling” North Korea and at “stalling for time needed to 
this end” 

It added that the Slate Department’s “sophistry 
that the deployment of the US. missiles can in no way 
be considered provocative'* is “the height of 
impudence.” 

The North repealed its usual warning that, if the 
United States derided to “take other options ” pre- 
sumably including sanctions, “we will also take our 
own countermeasures.” 


Commerce Chief Says Payoff Inquiry Cleared Him 


Jbsaerf- 

WASHINGTON r- .Commerce Secretary Ronald H. 
Bruwtt said Wednesday thai tfce; .Jastioe TJ^artmen t bad 
cleared him of allegations that ht agreed io worir to lift the 
U.S. trade embargo against Yretnamfora 3701000 payoff. 

. Mr. -Brown said a justice Dq?iqtincnt letter stated: 

We appraaate^^^^^rown’s ax^ 
eration with the mvestigation/’ 

- Hesaid that he was phased that the inquiry had “fully and 
fairly exonerated” him of any w rongdoing jand that “this 
mailer has been brought to an cffipaT dose.* . 

■ No Evidence to Support Allegations 

Jerry Knight of The Washington Post reported earlier from 

WAshingfori: • . • . • * ’■ " v • 

A federal '-grand jury m Miaou found no evidrace to 
support claims by a Florida businessman, Binb Ly, that the 
two businessmen recruited Mr. Brcwitobefo dewtiop buar 
ness ventures in Vietnam as soon as tte trade bail could be 
lifted, sources familiar with the investigation said. 

Mr. Brown has. consistently; denied the allegations and 


predicted for several months that be would be exonerated. 

Independently, the Clinton administration has been mov- 
ing to end the lerog prohibition on trade with Vietnam. The 
Senate last wed: voted to support ending the embargo, and 
, the White House conld Uft the embargo soon. 

The investigation invohdngMr. Brown began last summer 
and was carried oat by the FBI the Justice Department and 
the Miami grand jury. 

Grand jury investigations that produce no criminal 
charges nutally end without any statement, but the Justice- 
-Departmem reportedly is preparing to agree to demands try 
Mr.- Brown’s attorney. Reid Wringajten, that his client is 
; entitled to a pabEc exoneration because of his prominence 
and the pubhdty given the investigation. 

Carl Stern, Justice Department spokesman, refused to 
confirm reports Trom Brown supporters and administration 
.' officials that the Florida investigation was about to be 
terminated without any action. 

This grand jury has Investigated allegations by Mr. Ly, 
who came to the United Slates as a student in the 1970s, that 
two of bis bnsness partners obtained Mr. Brown's help in 



By Tom Redbtirn : 

Sew Yw*; Times Service 

N EW YORK Women in New 

York Citv came a lot closer to 
matching the earnings of men dar- 
ing the 1980 s than elsewhere inthe 
nation, according to a study. 

The study, which covered New 
Yorkers over 25, fotind thai except 
for women who lacked 1 &' high 1 - 
school diploma; w»to?g women 
gained cm men of.ooropaiahle eflu- 
cation during that d«ad& And 
those income gains are Bkdy to 
continue in the 1990s, aperis said, 
although probably at a slower pace. 


In New- York, women who. 
worked foil time in 1989 earned. 

' 775rimtsforeach dollar earned by 
men — up from 71 cents bn the 
doflar in 1979; Comparison with 
men’s earnings is considered the 
jriostbasic measure ofwomen’s sta- 
tus in the workforce. 

•: In 1989, American women in . 
goeral were paid only 6tiper«rit 
of tbdr male counterpart's earn- 
ings, accpnfing to. data from .the 
U-S.Burcau offhe Census. For the 
previous ihtoe decades that level 
bad hovered around 60 percent. 

* The research,’ conducted at 


Teachers College of Columbia Uni- 
versity, -was based on census data 
gathered in. 1980 and' 1990. Other 
on labor markets said the 
findings were consistent 
with recent snidies showing strong 
economic gains for women in the 
,1980s. But they cautioned that 
some ooadusiom about New York 
City may be less reliable because of 
the (fifficulty of gathering hard 
data -'about incomes. 

Women, who work in New York 
Gty fared better than most women 
elsewhere hugely because the jobs 
SO numerous hoe — white-collar. 


professional and managerial ser-. 
vioe-sector employment — tend ro 
be much mope open to women. At 
the same time, the sharp decline in 
manufacturing jobs in the city, 
much greater than in the nation 
generally, tended to hit men harder. 

Younger women and wdl -edu- 
cated women fared exceptionally 
weD. In. New Y ork, those aged 25 to 
34 in 1989 earned 883 percent of 
what men of the same age were 
paid. And women between the ages 
of 35 and 44 made the greatest 
Strides, raising their earnings from 
ti93 percent of the men's wage to 


on Men 


79.3 percent, according to the 
Teachers College report. 

Women who graduated from col- 
lege earned 25.4 percent more, ad- 
justed for inflation, at the end of 
the 1980s than they did at the be- 
ginning of the decade. Their aver- 
age earnings in 1989 amounted to 
535.677, up from 528,451 in 1979. 
Similarly educated men saw their 
average earnings rise by 21.9 per- 
cent to S4Z.057. 

Poorly educated women and im- 
migrants, however, did not share so 
much in the progress of other wom- 
en. 


Archaeologist Finds an Ancient Port in Mexico 


By Tod Robbersbn 

WatftiHgwn Peat Serwe 

EL P1TAL Mexico —An Ameicani 

***% fl 1 * ** ^ 

Although ocavalion Ins c« 

g5^S?a«sss 

inhabited the aty audits stiburbs at its pe« « 

........ 

such ^^ ^ ‘^^v^ gatiered at ihe ate by. aTcam 


been livmg and wodidg here in the Gulf Coast state of 
/Veracruz for more ftan : 20 years. 

. - - “The inpresaon w’re getting is that this win turn om io be 
‘the faraest urban-center cm the Gulf Coast for this time 
■ .periodv. Mr. WSkecson sod whfle touring the site, named 
after a vfflagp that now ats atop some of the min & T think this 
wk i he ncybr terminus of a cultural corridor leading from 
. Teotihnadm to the Guff. This is sometiting of a missing Hnk.” 
- ; The core city, its suburbs and satellite com m unities mea- 
sure about 40 kilometers long and 20 kilometers wide, with 
carth-and-stone pyramids tq>. to 40 meters high. Despite its 
. size,' (he ate is vuiua&y nmable at ground level because of 
' thick veusation. . 

Accarfing to Mr. WCkereoa, prdiinmajy studies indicate 
a 2300-to-3, 000-year .human chronology around E Pital. 
Situated 15 kdometers <9 m3es) west of the Gulf, H Pital is 
- -ditectly . linked to the ocean by two slow-moving rivers, the 
Tries .Boas, to .the north and the Narnia to the south. 


tea his theory that it served as an ancient port, Mr. 
a .'WfltoMri traveled both, rims by raff and said titey .were 
eas3y navigaWe with oars in bom directions. He described 


^gateway stnichires”at sirale^jnhcturesaJdnglwhriv^ 


which could have served as toll stations or other control 
points for boat traffic serving the city. 

“It is quite possible the city controlled coastal trade at a 
time we know the meso- American civilization was reaching 
its zenith,” aid George Stuart, director of archaeological 
projects at the National Geographic Society in Washington. 

“Anytime you find a huge rain, unknown and undug. it 
adds another part to the larger mosaic,” he added- “This is of 
far more than routine importance.” 

El Pital appears to have been contemporary with Teoti- 
’h.ioz-jm which arose early in the first millennium and domi- 
nated the valley of Mexico for roughly 750 yean. Mr. 
Wflkcrson said he discounted the theory that E Pital some- 
how served as a subservient outpost to the larger, more 
powerful Teotihuatrim. Rather, he says he believes it was an 
independent and setf-mpporting city with its own distinct 
trade Unks and sphere of political power. 

Nevertheless, the two dries prohably maintained some 
cultural or commercial Unks, he said. Teotihuac&n and Q 
Pital both shared common architectural and artistic styles, 
and their inhabitants had an affinity for an andent ball- 
game ritual played with a hard rubber ball and a stone hoop 
imbedded in the walls of a long, narrow court. 


J 


Senator .John S. McCain 3d. Republican of Arizona, 
while supporting the Perry nomination, accused the 
administration of pursuing "a policy bordering on 
appeasement” with North Korea. 

Mr. McCain said that given the choice between the 
carrot and the sticks the administration is overly prone 
to the carrot in its dealings with North Korea. 

“I have no objection to carrots.” Mr. Perry replied. 
“And there are sticks downstream also. I'm not anx- 
ious to precipitate the use of sticks.” 

The Senate aiso has been voicing increasing alarm 
about tensions in Korea and the need to stem the 
violence in the former Yugoslavia. On Korea, the 
Senate on Wednesday overwhelmingly approved two 
amendments that seek international sanctions against 
Noah Korea and a renewed U.S. nuclear presence on 
the Korean Peninsula. 

Asked about whether the United States should 
continue to press for human rights reforms in China or 
seek China's support in dealing with North Korea, 


Mr. Pmy said North Korea had to have priority. 

Softening the pressure on human rights in China 
would “pale in comparison with the prospect of a 
nuclear war on the Korean Peninsula." Mr. Pem said. 

Mr. Perry was nominated to replace Defense Secre- 
tary Les Aspin after Bobby Ray Inman was offered 
the job by Mr. Clinton but backed out. 

Senator Sam Nunn, Democrat of Georgia, the com- 
mittee chairman, said Tuesday that there was a chance 
of Mr. Perrys being confirmed this week. “I think he'll 
do a very fine job.” Mr. Nunn said 

Mr. Perry, 66. founded high-tech defense compa- 
nies, directed military research under President Jimmy 
Carter and became a millionaire as a consultant to 
weapons makers. 

He came to Capitol HQ! a week after Mr. Oimon 
told Congress, “We must not cut defense further.” and 
days before the president presents a S264 billion 
defense budget, a slight increase over this year's de- 
fense plan. 


working to end ibe trade embargo after promising to pay 
him $700,000 through a secret bank account. 

Mr. Ly has acknowledged that he never met Mr. Brown, 
but has said be was told of Mr. Brown's role by his partners. 
Nguyen Van Hao, a Miami convenience store owner who 
was once an official of the Vietnamese government, and 
Marc Ashton, a Haitian-boro Florida frozen food entrepre- 
neur who is a longtime friend of Mr. Brown’s. 

Mr. Ly had said he was originally a partner with Mr. Hao 
and Mr. Ashton in a plan to develop businesses in Vietnam, 
but withdrew from the venture after his partners told him 
they had made an arrangement to bring Mr. Brown into the 
ventore and pay him to work to end the trade embargo. 

The grand jury investigation began last summer after Mr. 
Ly sent letters to the press, the Justice Department and 
several members of Congress making the allegations. 

Last September, Mr. Brown acknowledged that he had 
met three limes with Mr. Hao and Mr. Ashton. He has said 
that he met with them only because of their personal rela- 
tionship and that he never agreed to participate in any 
business venture with them or sought payments. 


Cultist Cites Mass Suicide Plan 


Bv Sue Anne Pressley 

U cslxn£i*u Pent SiT»r«f 

SAN ANTONIO. Texas — 
Victorine Hollingsworth did not 
want to kill herself. Four days 
after a Feb. 28 shootout with 
federal agents at the Branch Da~ 
tidian compound near Waco. 
Texas, the cult's leader. David 
Koresh. planned for tus follow- 
ers to draw authorities into a 
final firefighL commit mass sui- 
cide and “Now up” their armed 
compound, she testified in feder- 
al court. 

By then. Mr. Koresh felt cer- 
tain he was dying from gunshot 
wounds he had received in the 
shootout. His body would be car- 
ried outside on a stretcher by 
men armed with hand grenades. 
Everyone “would die a quick 
death, and we would all go home 
to Mother.” Miss Hollingsworth 
said Tuesday. 

But even as she stood in tine to 
bid Mr. Koresh farewell, even as 
she joined in a last prayer with 
the others. Miss Hollingsworth. 
59. was deeply troubled. “1 knew 
if I committed suicide.” she said, 
“1 would not have a place in 
God's kingdom." 

She was spared - the decision. 
Mr. Koresh suddenly called off 
the plan, announcing that he had 
bad a vision from God directing 
him to do further work. 

The testimony by Miss Hol- 
lingsworth. a British citizen, was 
the first by a Branch Davidian in 
the murder and conspiracy trial 
of 1 1 other members of the reli- 
gious sect 

The cult’s 5 1 -day standoff, 
which began the day "of the shoo- 
tout, ended on April 1 Q with a 
huge fire and the deaths of Mr. 
Koresh and more than 80 follow- 
ers. 

Miss Hollingsworth testified 


V • ‘.a 



Pal SiAvnv Tie a MOOJ led Pie 


Miss HoUmgsworth being escorted to the courthouse in San 
Antonio to testify in the trial of 1 1 Brandt Davitfian members. 


that on the rooming of the shoo- 
tout- she saw two of the defen- 
dants, Livingstone Fagan and 
Brad Branch, holding guns and 
boasting about shooting federal 


agents. But she also said that Mr. 
Branch, who ran from room to 
room firing and yelling at people 
to keep low. was “protecting” the 
women and children. 


Away From Politics 


• Purcvsutawney Phil should have stayed in bed on 
Groundhog Day. With the temperature a bracing 
minus 2 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 19 centigrade), 
the famous groundhog saw his shadow, or at least 
cast one, when he was pulled from his cozy, hay- 
filled burrow on Wednesday in Purtxsutawney, 
Pennsylvania. Tradition has it that this means six 
more weeks of winter. About 2,000 people showed 
up to take part in the forecasting fun. They jeered 
the had news. 

• The killer of a 16-year-old store derk died by 
lethal injection in the state prison at Huntsville. 
Texas, in the slate’s first execution of 1994. Harold 
Barnard, 51. shot and killed the youth during a 
1980 robbery. He was pronounced dead nine min- 
utes after riming a lethal dose of chemicals, a 
state prison spokesman said. 

• The prosecution's case against Byron De La 
Beckwith ended with the surprise appearance of a 
former prison guard who testified that the defen- 
dant. screaming with anger, had confessed to “get- 


ting rid” of the civil-rights leader Medgar Evers. 
Mr. Beckwith, on trial in Jackson. Mississippi, is 
charged with murdering Mr. Evers in !%3. 

• Insults would no longer be banned at die Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania under a speech code proposed 
to replace the one used against a student who 
called a group of blacks “water buffalo." The new 
approach, under which threats of physical harm 
would be outlawed. Li essentially what the First 
Amendment stipulates, said a university spokes- 
man, adding. “The rules inside the campus cannot 
be different from those outside." 

• New York Gty cannot offer a 10 percent “price 
preference” to companies owned by women or 
minorities in bidding for municipal contracts, a 
State Supreme Court judge ruled. Justice Walter B. 
Tolub ruled less than a week after Mayor Rudolph 
W. Giuliani issued an executive order eliminating 
the preference, saying it cost taxpayers too much 
moaey. 

4P. Reuters. II P. ,V» T 



CRANS-MONTANA 


2 FORUM IN BUCHAREST 

21-24 APRIL 1994 


ROMANIA 

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Under the auspices of the Government ot Romania 

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Jean-Paul Carlerort 
President ol me Crans -Montana Forum 


Guests from political circles 

Heads of State, Prime Ministers. Ministers ol Economy, 
Ministers. Presidents of Central Banks, high ranking officials 
and experts. Over 5Q countries and numerous international 
organizations will be represented at Bucharest. 

Participants from economic circles 

Decision makers, presidents, CEOs and western 
businessmen - Delegations comprising businessmen from 
the invited states. 

An original concept 

Conviviality and a limited number ot participants make it 
possible to establish personal contacts among businessmen 
and between the latter and politicians, up to the highest 
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The main objective 

The establishment of personal and direct relations between 
the participants from the economic and political circles, 
leading up to the definite conclusion of commercial, 
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>' ca ■ . .-,--0 1 -• 


Page 4- 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 1994 










• nfPr. 

“"i, ■ 


i&jj 



Austria Foreign Minister Acts to End Scandal 


By David B. Ottaway 

Ht'nsfcmg ion /*cor Service 

VIENNA — Foreign Minister Akw Mock acted Wednra- 
day to pul an end to the presidential marital scandal that has 
been plaguing Austria for the past month. 

In a statement, Mr. Modi announced thai President 
Thomas Kleslil's mistress. Margot LGfflcr, was quitting her 
job in Mr. KlestiTs office immediately and going on vacation 
for several weeks starting Monday. 

Mr. Klestil, 61. had stirred up more controversy by an- 
nouncing his intention to take Miss Ldffler with him on his 
visit to Egypt that begins Monday, even though he has 
already agreed to sever his relationship with ha. 

Apparently acting to head off more publicity at home and 
abroad about Mr, KlestiTs affair. Mir. Moeh was able to 
intervene to stop Miss LOfflcr, 39, from accompanying the 
president to Cairo since she is officially a Foreign Ministry 
employee. 

She had been serving as the president's deputy cabinet 
chief and appointments secretary since his election in 1992. 

Mr. Mocfa said that “in agreement” with Mr. Klestil and 
after a talk with Miss LOfflcr. he had “granted her wish to 
end her assignment to the presidential office.” 

He promised to arrange “a quick positing abroad" for her 
although be gave no indication where she would be sent 

MrT Klestifs affair has already caused a break with his 


wife of 37 years, Edith, 55, and shattered Ins image as a 

famil y man. 

The Austrian magazine News reported dial Mr. Klestil 
had hired a lawyer to begin negotiations with h» wife.for a 
separation but not a divorce. The lawyer was quoted as 
saying he had been instructed to reach a generous settlement. 
But the magazine saki a legal battle appeared likely over the 
division of property. 

Austria scans ill at ease with the debate the breakup is 
causing. The final strew, Mrs. Klestil told the press,. was.her 
husband's request that Ins mistress join them in the presiden- 
tial box at the Musikverdn to listen to the traditional New 
Year's Day Concert. 

“Tm not prepared.” she was quoted as saying, “to become 
an abandoned, embittered, nasty old wife for the sake of a lot 
of grief. Tm not ready to be dragged into a comer in which ! 
don’t belong. 1 have done the best I could.” 


affair with a woman who had first been a campaign official 
and then an aide. 

By press accounts. Miss Loffier is a hard-driven, ambi- 
tious promoter of the president and had a knack of often 
appearing with a sutile just behind him and his wife. 

The sandal has again tainted the moral authority of the 
presidency, which was beginning to recover from the accusa- 
tions against his predecessor, Kurt Waldheim, of serving in 
Nazi military units involved in war crimes. 


The Viennese press had team a*** 
nothing. Affaire of Austrian pobnoanswwe KgaratfM 
pSratemattcre and off-limits to photographers and reports 
ere; . - *- ’■ 

Now the tabloid press, has gone to town. It 
asking in headlines whether he will resign as president touve 
with hi mi stress, drop her and reconcile with ms wife, or 
separate, from both. 

Mrs. KJestfl has kept the media Juried ly spea king d ot 
about her feelings of betrayal and of bong used to promote 
Ms career at her life’s expense. 

Public s ympathi es seem divided owr whether she should 
have spokea out or kept her silence. But she was gtverran 

the Philhar monic Bull 

Still, the polls show that ah ovcrwhdnring^m^arity of 
Austrians — 80 percent or more think Mr. Klestil should 

continue as .president. 

- A dark-horse candidate in lhe-1992 ejection* Mr. Ktetil 
had run an effective campaign and dunned Austrians with, 
bis approach Rod nis app csl to f&nuty values- It was 
said >h«i this image was a factor in his victory. 

Although he was the official ca n didate of the conservative 
AnstriaiiFeopIe's Party, Mr. Hestfl was riot a member.pf 
any party. 


'' ^ ?:<{ v.-" • 




.£*? 


Add HawThr Auooued Pic 


Israeli soldiers kicking a Palestinian youth in Gaza Gty on Wednesday after a stoning incident 

No Slowing of West Bank Violence 


GENEVA — Killings, torture and land confis- 
cation have continued in the occupied territories 
since Israel and the Palestine Liberation Organiza- 
tion signed a peace accord in September, a Unicoi 
Nations investigator said Wednesday. 

The investigator. Rene Felber, a former Swiss 
foreign minister, called on Israel to free its 12,000 
Palestinian prisoners and urged Israel and the 
Palestinians to halt violence among groups on both 
sides that oppose the accord. 

He singled out members of the Islamic militant 
group Hamas for using incendiary bombs and 
Israeli settlers in the West Bank and Gaza Strip for 
attacking Palestinians. 

“The Israeli authorities in particular should en- 
sure that the army exercises restraint in responding 
to outbreaks or violence.” Mr. Felber wrote. 

Mr. Felber, who met Foreign Minister Shimon 
Peres and the leader of the Palestine Liberation 
Organization. Yasser Arafat. in recent weeks, pre- 


sented his report to the LIN Human Rights Com- 
mission, which opened its annual six-week session 
Monday. 

In another report the rights group Amnesty 
International said it wished to draw attention “to 
the detention and imprisonment of some 10.000 
Palestinians, the situation in south Lebanon and 
the killings of Palestinian and Israeli civilians.” 

Amnesty said it suspected Israel of torturing 
prisoners in parts of Lebanon that it or its allies 
control. 

Mr. Arafat, who addressed the UN forum on 
Tuesday, said 14.000 Palestinians were being held 
by the Israelis and also called for their release. 

Last month, Mr. Felber was the first UN "spe- 
cial rapporteur” in 25 years allowed to enter the 
Gaza Strip and the West Bank 

"The number of incidents resulting in the loss of 
Palestinian and Israeli lives in the occupied territo- 
ries has not declined.” he said. At least 45 Palestin- 
ians and 20 Israelis were killed between the signing 
of the accord and the end of December. 


EUROPE: Union. Too, Gives East the Cold Shoulder 


Continued from Page 1 

promise of membership. That is all 
the more important following the 
North Atlantic Treaty Organiza- 
tion's Partnership for Peace formu- 
la, which included neither a prom- 
ise nor a timetable for membership, 
officials say. 

Given that membership talks 
will take years to conclude. Poland 
wants the Union to commit to a 
review of relations in 1996 that 
would lead to negotiations, said 
Jan Kuiakowski. the country's am- 
bassador to the Union. 

Hungary’s ambassador. Gyorgy 
Granaszioi, said Budapest was 
likely to make a formal request for 
membership in coming weeks, even 
though it did not expect formal 
negotiations before 1997. 

Following the electoral success 
of Russian ultranationalists led by- 
Vladimir V. Zhirinovsky. Hunga- 
ry’s ruling coalition needs tangible 
support from Brussels for its pro- 
Union policies before parliamenta- 
ry elections in May to fend off the 
extreme right and left, which in- 
stead urge alliances with the former 
Yugoslavia and Russia. Mr. Gran- 
asztoi said. 

“We hear a lot of declarations 
that it is a wrong policy, that in 
1956 the Western world showed us 


they would abandon Hungary." 
Mr. Granuszioi said, adding that 
his country needed “a stronger 
commitment” from the Union. 

Union governments rebuffed 
commission efforts last year to set a 
1996 review date for East European 
countries, and they remain just as 
unwilling to gel boxed into a time- 
table, said a senior commission of- 
ficial. Mr. Delore meets with Mr. 
Pawlak on Thursday, and officials 
said the commission president was 
likely to offer little more than the 
prospect of more frequent meetings 
with EU ministers and officials to 
k«p Poland abreast of Union poli- 
cies and regulations. 

Similarly. French and German 
efforts to calm Eastern Europe's 
security fears by offering them as- 
sociate membership in me Union's 
defense aim the Western Europe- 
an Union, are likely to be blocked 
again, officials and diplomats say. 
Most governments believe that a 
defense body thai still includes 
only nine of the 12 EU states is 
hardly ready to extend security 
guarantees to areas where NATO 
fear, to tread, an EU diplomat 
said. 

"Who is going to guarantee the 
Eastern borders of these coun- 
tries?” the diplomai asked. “Only 
Europe, or also the United Stales? 5 ' 


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TRAVEL CULTURES AND LANGUAGES 



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For a New Finland, 
A Different Choice 

Woman Likely to Win Vote 


Clearly, neither the Western Eu- 
ropean Union nor NATO has an 
answer today, be added. 

On trade, the Union has turned a 
deaf ear to requests that it open its 
market to the bast's most competi- 
tive exports, namely farm goods, 
steel and textiles. Although the 
Union will lift quotas on most in- 
dustrial goods from Poland. Hun- 
gary, the Czech Republic and Slo- 
vakia beginning next year, the three 
sensitive sectors will not be affect- 
ed. 

EU officials point out that their 
domestic sted industry is awash in 
excess capacity and a" complex re- 
structuring plan is on the verge of 
coltopre. And farm goods are polit- 
ically untouchable as evidenced by 
the global trade negotiations, 
which “almost foundered on agri- 
culture,” a commission official 
said. 

If the Union cannot open its 
markets any further. Mr. Kula- 
kowski said' then it should loosen 
up its aid budget to help Poland 
and other countries restructure 
their economies. In particular, he 
said Mr. Pawlak. whose coalition of 
former Communists won office by 
questioning the social costs of eco- 
nomic shock therapy, would seek to 
redirect some of tbe 300 million 
European Currency Units (5265 
million) of EU money spent on 
technical assistance to programs 
aimed at cushioning the burden on 
retirees and low-income people. 


France Will Issue 
High-Tech LD.s 


PARIS — France said Wednes- 
day that it would soon replace pa- 
per identity documents with high- 
tech. plastic-covered cards that are 
linked to a central computer system 
and are harder to forge. 

Interior Minister Charles Pasqua 

said the new blue cards, already 
used on a trial basis in a handful of 
regions, would be phased in by the 
j end of 1995- The Interior Ministry 
j is also considering replacing resi- 
dence permits for foreigners with a 
computerized stamp attached to 
passports. 

Mr. Pasqua said none of more 
than 500,000 new cards issued since 
1988 in one region west of Paris 
had been forged, while in 1992 
I alone there were 10,000 cases of 
fake cards out of 3 million old-style 
documents issued elsewhere in 
France. 


To our rtwd w s in Franco | 

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J end save with our new toil free i 
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By W illiam E. Schmidt 

Nets York Times Service 

HELSINKI — When Elisabeth 
Rehn joined a televised debate last 
month among Finland's 11 presi- 
dential candidates, a questioner de- 
manded to know what she was do- 
ing there: As the nominee of a tiny 
party composed mostly of Swedish- 
speaking Finns, the journalist de- 
clared, Mis. Rehn sorely did not 
believe she had a serious chance of 
winning. 

But the 58-year-old candidate of 
the rump Swedish People’s Party — 
and Finland's first female defense 
minister — only confounded politi- 
cal pundits here last month by 
finishing a strong second in the 
first round of presidential ballot- 
ing. And now Mrs. Rehn is tbe 
odds-on choice to win the runoff on 
Sunday and become Finland’s first 
remale president. 

Her pony, tbe junior partner in 
the center-right parliamentary co- 
alition that governs Finland, 
counts barely 6 percent of the 
Finnish electorate. But Mrs. Rehn 
has opened more than a 10-point 
lead in public opinion polls over 
Martti Ahtisaari. 56, a career diplo- 
mat who had the most votes in the 
first round of balloting. Mr. Ahti- 
saari. who has never before held 
elected office, is the candidate of 
the much larger center-left Social 
Democratic Party. 

At a campaign rally last week in 
Raumas, a struggling port city on 
Finland’s west coast, Mrs. Rehn 
was mobbed by young people and 
supporters who gathered in sub- 
freezing temperatures. Several of 
them hugged her and held out auto- 
graph books covered with her press 
dippings. 

“She's different from other poli- 
ticians I’ve seen in Finland," said 
Anne Aronen. a caterer who 
brought her three children to see 
Mrs. Refan, who is married with 
four children and ninq grandchil- 
dren. “1 don’t know, but I feel like I 
know her.” 

With Finns getting their Fust 
chance ever to vote directly for a 
presidential candidate, as opposed 
to casting ballots for competing 
slates of presidential electors, tbe 
campaign has been tbe most unpre- 
dictable in memory. 

In large pan, the campaign re- 
flects doubt and uncertainty 
among voters over the slate of Fin- 
land's economy — the unemploy- 
ment rate last month topped 22 
percent, tbe highest in Europe — as 
well as renewed anxieties about in- 
stability along Finland's long bor- 
der with Russia. 

“Like evetywhere else, people 
here just don't seem to trust the old 
politicians," said Jaakko Iloniemi, 
the former Finnish ambassador to 
the United States and now the di- 
rector of the Center for Finnish 
Business and Policy' Studies in Hel- 


sinki “In that sense, I think this 
campaign has had more to do with 
personalities than issues." * 

But in whmowmg the choice 
down to Mrs. Rehn and Mr. Ahti- 
saari. voters have made (me clear 
policy choice: Whoever wins, they 
will get a president committed to 
pushing for Finland’s membership 
m the European Union. Under 
Finland’s constitution, the presi- 
dent is charged with shaping Fin- 
land’s foreign policy. 

In the primary, candidates of 
parties who campaigned on a plat- 
form opposing tie European 
Union finished m the bottom half 
of the vote count. 

Fmland is looking to redefine its 
role in Europe, after the collapse of 
tbe old Soviet empire. For decades, 
Helsinki pursued a policy of stud- 
ied neutrality that not only assured 
harmony with its dangerous neigh- 
bor, but guaranteed Finland a mar- 
ket for nearly a quarter of its ex- 
ports as wdL 

While public opinion polls say 
most Finns are still divided on the 
question of joining the European 
Union, they appear to be increas- 
ingly receptive to arguments that 
European unity holds out the best 
prospect of new jobs and markets. 

At the same time, Fmns are more 
anxious about security, given tbe 
growing instability across the Rus- 
sian border. Although neither can- 
didate yet favors Finland's joining 
the North Atlantic Treaty Organi- 
zation, Mrs. Rehn has said that as 
defense minister, she is the best 
equipped to tackle the security is- 
sue. 

In 1992, she not only led the 
campaign u> acquire 64 U.S.-buiH 
F-18 jet fighters for the air force, a 
move unthinkable in the days when 
F inlan d would have shied from of- 
fending Moscow by buying Ameri- 
can weapons, but also donned a 
flight hdmei before cameras and 
rode shotgun in one of the fighters. 

Finland has never had a woman 
as president, but woman have high 


political visibility in Finland, 
which in 1906 became the first Eu- 
ropean nation to give women tbe 
right to vote. Currently, a thud of 
die government cabinet and a third 
of the parliament are women. 

Until a few weeks ago. most polls 
predicted that Mr. Ahtisaari was 
the favorite to succeed President 
Mauno Kovisto. who decided not 
to run for reelection this winter 
after serving two six-year terms. 
Mr. Ahtisaari is one erf Finland's 
best-known diplomats. 

Because Mrs. Rehn is a member 
of the present cabinet, Mr. Ahti- 
saari has been seeking to convince 
voters that she must share pan of 
the responsibility for government 
failures to remedy Finland's eco- 
nomic malaise. “If people make a 
rational choice.” be said in an inter- 
view, “I should win in a landslide." 


EUROPEAN 

TOPICS 

life in Brussels 
Without a Car 

Life without a car. Tempting 


driving in the Belgian capital, 
have agreed to do without their 
automobiles for a month. They 
handed over their keys in a cere- 
mony last Saturday. 

The experiment, supported by 
Brussels officials, the League of 
Families and the Inter- Environ- 
ment group, requires the couples 
— all are young, with chfldrcn — 
to keep a log of their movements, 
their pleasant and unpleasant 
surprises, their moods, and costs 
incurred. 

In exchange, reports LeSoir, a 
Brussels daily, each couple re- 
ceives a “survival kit," It con- 
tains passes good on subways, 
trams, buses and commuter 
trains, a complete set of maps 
and schedules, bicycles, a small 
can for groceries, access to a 
delivery service and price lists 
from car rental companies. The 
cost of the kit is said to equal that 
of maintaining a car for a mouth 
in Brussels. 


Aroond Europe 

The Dutch government wants 
tonufce Frisian the nation's sec- 
ond Official language. Frisian, 
once spoken along the North Sea 
coast as far as Schleswig in Ger- 
many, is now the language erf 
about half a tmOioii people m the 
northeastern province of Fries- 
land, and in some offshore is- 
lands, A form of Low German 
with hints of Old Danish, its re- 
semblance to En glish is so eerily 
dose that Engfch-speakcre bear- 
ing it from a distance often mis- 
take it for their own language. 
Road signs in Friesland are al- 
ready in Frisian, and newspapers 
have Frisian news sections. Tbe. 
proposal to give the language of- 
ficial status, which is expected to 
pass parliament this year, would 
require translation of official 
documents into Frisian. 

BBC’s Redo 3 plans to adopt a 
new tone that more dosdy “re- 
flects tbe sued of the nation." 
j “If yon turn on Radio 3/* Liz 
Forgan of BBC told The Daily 
I Telegraph, “you lmow immedx- 


impeccable linguistic formality 
I of the oWTM Program, which 
obliged its unseen annooncers to 
wear evening dress. 

Hard times seem to have* 
brought out the gamma instinct In 
the ftendt: The 142 French cast- 
nos, imported a 3f percent risem 
receipts last year, to 3.9 bfifioa 
frabes ($663 minion). The big- 
gest share— -2.S bffiion francs — 
comes from ska: machines. The: 

. most lucrative casino is Cannes- ■ 
‘ Croisette, followed by Divotme-- 
les- Bains outside of Geneva*. 
Deauville and Nice-Rubi, each. 
oT which takes in more than 200 • 
mfllioa francs a year. - 


has not taken- tire fte. out'w- 
Guunpagne sales -r-they wereup - 
7 percent last year. But at least 


the big suburban supcnnaxkctv 
wtricb sometimes sell abottiefdr 
as liuk as 40 francs (about $7). 


atdy whai it is. Many people 
find It off-putting. R is so tmfike 
any other part of English life, it’s 
an enclave. However valuable 
and beautiful BBC pnonuoda- 
tion is, if it is stopping people 
enjoying muse, it is not worth 
it" She said listeners would in- 
creasingly be bearing hash voices, 
and “lovely rich Brummie,” or 
..Birmingham, accents. This new 
diversity is a far ay from the 


Brtfsh women prefer bAg . 
wi&edand *>ed to nudaigkKe, 

according to a new stiryey- A. 
plurality of- the 1,010^ respon- 
dents in a Good Housduiqxag 
magarine scuvry said thc pros- 
pect of a delicious meal in a re*-, 
raurant was more tempting than 
making love. Those who ga their 
kicks from good food, named 
Itatian restaurants as =toeir favor- . 
ite, Mowed by Chinese and 
French. Spanish cuisine fimshed 
'last-'. ' ' ' 

Brian KiiORdUm 


Vow Kept, Hosokawa 
Bides High in the Polls 


Complied by Our Staff From Dispatches 

TOKYO — Public support for. 
the government of Prime Minister 
Morthiro Hosokawa rebounded af- 
ter the enactment of political re- 
form legislation last week, accord- 
ing to a opinion polls. 

A poll pubHdbed Wednesday by 
the Yonnuri Shimbun indicated 
that Mr. Hosokawa’ s government 
had the backing of slightly more 
t h a n 72 percent of the public. 

The survey, based on more than 
2,000 respondents nationwide, was 
consistent with two other newspa- 
per polls on Tuesday that gave him 
74 percent backing. 

The findings suggest that ordi- 
nary Japanese hi^ily value Mr. Ho- 
sokawa’s good intentions despite a 
half-year during which his coalition 
had only limited success in putting 
them into practice. 

Mr. Hosokawa, 56. took office 
on Aug. 9 after his fierce anti-cor- 
rupuon campaign helped to topple 
the long-governing Liberal Demo- 
cratic Party. 

Hiis coaEtioa of seven parties, 
from hard left to pro-business cen- 
ter right, faced an immediate test in 
how it handled Japan’s persistent 
economic downturn. 

At the same time, Mr. Hosokawa 
said his government would give pri- 
ority to pasting a series of radical 


political and electoral reforms 
aimed at curbing the graft long 
rampant in Japanese public Efe. 

Months of stalemate over these.: 
proposed changes delayed action 
on vital ecxntomic legislation. In 
December, the publie bttan to 
show disquiet, cutting Mr. Ho- 
sokawa’s approval rating in one 
poll to 58 percent. 

Yet, when the Liberal Demo- 
crats forced him into a compromise 
last weekend to get the reform ' 
package through, cutting some of 
its strongest anti-corruption 
clauses, voters seemed to under- 
stand.. 

The latest Yotniuri survey, taken 
on Saturday and Sunday, showed 
the cabinet’s approval rating im 65 
points from December, to T2Apcr- 
ceaL 

Almost two in three voters, or 64 
percent, welcomed passage of the 
reforms, even in ducted form, al- 
though only 36 percent thought 
they would be effective in curbing 
political corruption. 

Just last year, the scandal- 
steeped Liberal Democratic gov- 
ernment of Prime Minister Knriri 
Miyazawa was struggling to 
achieve a 20 percent approval rat- 
ing after at one point di p pi ng into 
single figures. 

(Reuters, AFP) 



Tohsifanl KjamaTAtnoe ftiw an wc 

Mr. Hosokawa, whose approval 
rating is at 72 percent 


OECD: Rivalry Over New Chief BIBAR: A Regional Rebellion 


Continued from Page 1 

independent central and Eastern 
European nations into the WesL 

The U.S. endorsement, which 
came just 24 hours after Downing 
Street indicated its support for 
Lord Law son, w another political 
snub for London, which is still reel- 
ing from President Bill Clinton’s 
decision last weekend to provide a 
US. visa to Gerry Adams, leader of 
the political arm of the Irish Re- 
publican Armv. 

The Sure Department insisted 
that although it respected Mr. Law- 
son. it believed Mr. Johnson would 
provide superior leadership for the 
OECD "at a time when the admin- 
istration is putting more emphasis 
on tbe OECD m recognition of the 
fan that the world has changed 
dramatically over the last several 
years.” 

A British official, using the same 
argumen t the United States offered 
on behalf of Mr. Johnston, said, 
"The OECD needs real clout, 
meaning a political figure and not a 
bureaucrat." He added that Lord 
Lawwn sprite excellent French, a 
talent that is shared bv the bilin- 
gual Mr. Johnston, a' Montreal- 
basal lawyer who has served as 
president of Canada's Treasury 
Board, as science minister, as eco- 
nomic and re^onal development 
minister and as Canada's Attorney 
General. 

The OECD, founded in I960 as a 
successor ;o the Marshall Plan, has 


been called a rich man’s club. It 
brings together 24 industrialized 
nations to collect economic data 
and discuss joint policy initiatives. 
But critics have called it moribund, 
and only last week Peter Suther- 
land, director-general of GATT, 
castigated it as inadequate to meed 
the challenge of tbe emerging world 
economic order. 

Although the State Department 
said Mr. Paye bad done a good job 
at the OECD, another Clinton ad- 
ministration official said that his 
stewardship of the organization “is 
not really held in very high regard; 
be is considered a bit flat/* 

Diplomats said several Europe- 
an governments say they fed it is 
time to break tbe near monopoly 
that Frenchmen enjoy in running 
the world’s leading economic and 
political organizations. Among 
these Frenchmen is Michel 
Camdessus, managing director of 
tbe International Monetary Fund; 
Jacques de Larosifcre. president of 
the European Bank for Recon- 
struction and Development, and 
Jacques Delors. president of the 
European Commission. 

The formal derision on who wifl 
bead the OECD will be made at a 
meeting of the organization's coun- 
cil sometime this spring, and rati- 
fied at the OECD's ministerial 
meeting in June. The job comes 
with a salary of S165.D00 a year, 
plus $42,000 of annual entertain- 
ment expenses, a large apartment 
and a chauffeur-driven car. 


back the landowners. All of them 
are fighting among themselves and 
with the poOce in lightning strikes 
using gooriDa tactics. 

The police and observers said 
that these groups had more than a 
million ideological adherents and 
that their armed wings employed 33 
many as 250 soldiers in some dis- 
tricts. 

It is axiomatic in India that if 
something is tbe worst in the coun- 
try, it is in Bihar. Tbe state has tbe 
lowest literacy rale (38.5 percent) 
of India's 26 states and a per capita 
income of less than $70 a year. 

Farmhands, the largest section 
of the work force, typically earn 
one meal and three poinds <rf grain 
— but no money — for a day’s 
work. Until about 10 years ago, a 
bride would be forced to sleep with 
the local land baron on her wed- 
ding night 

The Maoists have persuaded la- 
borers to strike against big land- 
owners — generally, anyone with 
more than 25 acres — and to squat 
on parcels of land. 

Gradually, entire towns have 
grown up around land seized by 
farmhands- Tbe residents of Stalin 
Nagar (until 10 years ago. the vil- 
lage of Dintwan) said they had no 
idea who Stalin was or what he 
stood for. 

For the landowners, the straggle 
is simply a fight against common 
criminals who want to steal their 
land and their crops. 


“I say to my neighbors, *1 don't 
care if you have dothes axzd grain 
in the house, but you should have a 
store of bullets and cartridges,*" 
said Rana Jogeshwar Kumar 
Singh, 58, the bead of the small 
village of Nagamagarh, south of 
the city of Gaya in one of Bihar’s 
most troubled areas. 

Four miles from the nearest 
paved road, the village is a tempt- 
ing target for the Maoists and 
bands of thieves. Villagers rarely 
walk outside without guns, Mr. 
S i n g h said, and four sentries are 
posted at the edge of the village 
every night. 

According to Shan-E-AIi, 24, 
wbo heads Sunlight, the largest 
landowners' militia, the Maoists 
are “threatening us and teBing us to 
submit —that the land belongs to 
the laborers." 

“But we've owned land for gen- 
erations.” he said. "How can we 
just hand it over?" 

Mr, Afi, who claims to. have 
killed more than 200 people in re- 
venge for tbe beheading of his fa- 
ther by tbe Maoists in 1988. said his 
group was formed by landowners 
angry that the police were leaving 
their lands unprotected and the 
deaths of their relatives unoun- 
isbed. 

“If the government and the po- 
lice coukl be trusted, this wouldn’t 
be happening,” he said, echoing the 
words of an rides here. “We were 
forced to take this path of vio- 
lence;" 


& * 


A Devil of a lime 
In Tokyo Getting 
This Boy Named 

Angela Tima Service 

TOKYO — The Family Court 
has granted the wish of a 30-year- 
old roack-sbop operator who want- 
ed to give his son a Japanese first 
name no ope would forget: It or- 
dered the city of Altiriuma to regis- 
ter the boy as Akuma, or DeriL 

Shigeharu Sato and his wife, 
Ayako, 22, agreed that their first 
child, who was boro July 30, should 
have that unusual name. But when 
they tried to register it, officials 
balked. 

Their case, which attracted wide- 
spread attention, brought into 
<p»estiqn whether the government 
could apply its widespread practice 
erf “administrative guidance,” or 
intervmtkm without specific hffll 
ttttbonty, even to Ibe ‘process of 

nemirto iAII J r 


Tbe Family Court, ia effect, said 
it could — but ruled in favor of Mr. 
Sato on a technicality. 

It said Mr. Sato had “misused” 
the right of parents to nanv» their 
children. But it added ihardty offi- 
cials, having written tbe name in 
the Satos' family register — tbe 
way a name is recognized officially 
m Japan — failed to follow legal 
procedures when they lal& had sec- 
ond thoughts,* removed it and 
asked Mr. Sato to choose -another 
nanw 

The battle may not be over, bew- 
cver. City officials said, they 
planned to seek the Justice Minis* 
fry's intervention. 


Rabin Visit Madrid 

Reuters 

MADRID — Prime Minister 
Yitzhak Rabin of brad will meet, 
with Prime Minister Fehpe Gonza- 
lez of Spain during a visit Feb. 21- 
22, a government statement said 
Wednesday. 







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Page 6 


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 1994 


OPINION 


Hcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



tribune 


mDLLSIlRX) WITH TW. NEW VOfcX TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


Guard All Plutonium Now 


TTie United States and Russia have a greed 
to dismantle many of their nuclear weapons. 
But this wonderful idea has a potentially seri- 
ous downside. The nuclear material — urani- 
um and plutonium — extracted durin g the 
dismantling process can. conceivably, be sold 
to or stolen by other countries that hope to 
build nuclear weapons of their own. What to 
do? The National Academy of Sciences has 
some useful ideas. 

Highly enriched uranium extracted flora 
warheads is relatively easy to render militarily 
harmless. Once blended down, it can fuel 
power plants but cannot be used for warheads 
without re-enrichment. In contrast, plutoni- 
um separated from spent fuel is usable in 
warheads. It needs to be securely stored and 
disposed of. The academy's experts recom- 
mend that the nuclear material be stored un- 
der international safeguards, pending dispos- 
al or civilian use. “In the interest of speed" 
they recommend joint U.S.- Russian monitor- 
ing, which would later be joined by the Inter- 
national Atomic Energy Agency. The Clinton 
administration should begin negotiating such 
arrangements without delay. 

The experts would dispose of plutonium in 


either of two ways: by mixing it with highly 
radioactive waste, then combining the mix 
with molten glass into large logs, which can be 
securely stored: or else by using it to fuel 
reactors, turning it into radioactive spot fuel 
They see no need to build new reactors to 
bum up the plutonium. 

Their conclusions have important implica- 
tions for the production and use of nuclear 
material in civilian reactors as well. One 
implication is that, given all the plutonium 
to be disposed of, the world has no need to 
manufacture still more plutonium — as Rus- 
sia, Japan and many European countries 
now plan to do. 

Another implication is that it is as impor- 
tant to safeguard plutonium used for civilian 
purposes as it is to protect material extracted 
from warheads. At least two of the three 
confirmed thefts of nudear materia] in Russia 
came from civilian installations. The United 
States should do what it can to help the 
Russians make these facilities less vulnerable. 

Plutonium plowshares need to be safe- 
guarded soon, and forever, lest they be turned 
back into swords. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Vacant Seats at the Fed 


Making appointments to the Federal Re- 
serve Board is harder for a Democratic presi- 
dent than for a Republican. A Democrat like 
Bill Clinton has to contend with the fragments 
of his parly who still think that inflation is 
good Tor the poor and bad for the rich. The 
experience of the past two decades has mas- 
sively demonstrated the opposite, but not ev- 
eryone has yet got the message. You will hear 
plenty or cries for candidates committed to 
pushing single-mindedly for low interest rates. 

President Clinton now has two seats on the 
board to fill — his first nominations to the 
Federal Reserve. Wayne D. Angdl's term has 
expired, and the board's vice chairman, David 
Mullins, has just announced his resignation. 
Mr. Mullins's reason for departing is interest- 
ing. He says that the board has slain the 
dragons he came to Washington to right, and. 
with the economy apparently on a steady 
track toward greater prosperity, he has decid- 
ed it is time to leave. 

The inflation rate is down to 3 percent a 
year. Short-term interest rates — the only 
rates the Federal Reserve can control directly 
— are at the same level or a little less, meaning 
that m real terms, adjusted for inflation, most 
savers are actually paying the banks where 
they keep their money. The board's chairman. 


Alan Greenspan, has been musing in public 
that at some point in the unspecified future it 
may be necessary to raise rates (did anyone 
ever doubt it?) to keep the threat of inflation 
away. There are some serious votes ahead. 

What Mr. Clin ion needs is a couple of 
candidates who have fully absorbed the les- 
sons of the 1970s and the 1980s. Economists 
used to think there was a trade-off between 
unemployment and inflation, in which raising 
one would reliably lower the other. In die 
1970s they discovered that the trade-off is a 
mirage, and inflation, once let loose, devours 
jobs. In the following decade they discovered 
that the process of bringing inflation bade 
down is exceedingly slow, painful and costly. 

Since 1979, first under Paul Volcker and 
now under Mr. Greenspan, the Federal Re- 
serve has provided strong and skillful mone- 
tary management. While two new appoint- 
ments will not formally change the direction 
of a seven-member board, Mr. Clinton’s 
choices will be highly influential indications 
of presidential intention. The vacant seats at 
the Federal Reserve give him an opportunity 
to reaffirm the careful and pragmatic style of 
economic policy that is now serving him and 
the country exceedingly well 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 



jgS? ■ WRUK1* 

^ WCfciCANt? 

ITSTWR 

frosts* 1 



And So It Continues in Sarajevo , Death by Death 


S ARAJEVO — Those of us who live in Saraje- 
vo have seen nothing more absurd during the 
course of this disgusting war than the incessant 
flights of NATO's awesome warplanes as they 
cruise over our city. We have watched them now 
for months, and our feelings have turned from 
curiosity and hope — when we first heard their 
thundering voices over Bosnia — to cynicism. 

We joke like kids about how the few panes of 
glass left in the window frames here tremble 
when these powerful machines plunge down 
from the heavens to buzz over our heads. 

A couple of days ago. 1 watched an old woman 
drag a branch from one of our few remaining trees. 
After the deafening roar of the Phantoms, or 
whatever they are called, had passed, she waved 
scornfully toward the sky and shouted: "Go back 
home, you cowards, and bother your own moth- 
ers! Stake your own mothers' windows!" 

We are spending our last reserves of hope in an 
effort to survive until the final act draws lo a close. 
Even those who had been considered brave and 
optimistic, who refused to scurry in fear across tbe 
street but continued to stride nonchalantly, are 
□ow hanging on by a thread. 

The futile precautions we all go through — 
mknlaiing where the next shell will fall, guessing 
which streets are safe to walk, listening carefully 
for the whistling of passing shells — have brought 
even yesterday's heroes to ruins. 

In just the last few weeks, shrapnel has found 
its way to a child asleep in bed, a young woman 
setting tbe table for her first wedding anniversa- 


By Zlatko Dizdarevic 

ry. an old man alone in his kitchen drinking tea, 
an entire family of six. And so it continues, word 
by word, story by story, death by death. Near tbe 
grave of my father, whom I buried on Jan. 10, 56 
new graves appeared within three days. 

My lather and 1 were together the day before 
he died. As if be sensed he was about to depart, 
be told me of his three unfulfillable wishes: that 
be would see his grandchildren again; that he 
would see his birthplace, Mostar. again; and that 
he would play his violin agpin. 

Tbe violin had been demolished a few days 
earlier when a shell exploded nearby. But at least 
I know where his grave is, and with my biends 1 
was able to bury him. My father was lucky 
enough to die of "natural causes." 

Sarajevo's Jews have steadily been leaving tbe 
city. There have been Jews boe for 500 years; this 
has been Lbeir borne, and they have had as much 
right to it as anyooedse. They arc being driven out 
by officials in Belgrade and Zagreb. Ibex men are 
well aware that if aO the Jews depart it would 
signal tbe destruction of one of tbe four pillars 
upon which Sarajevo has stood, one of the com- 
munities that has given the city its flavor, along 
with those of Muslim, Serbian and Croatian de- 
scent Then it would be easier to destroy tbe three 
that remain. And then tbe two. And finally, tbe 
last pillar propping up dvil humanity, tolerance 
and cosmopolitan life will falL 


Until that moment Sarajevo wfll do its best to 
continue as it always has. 

A group of our soccer players had a parting 
match with some United Nations troops who are 
being sent bade bane: They have beat here too 
long and have begun to understand all too wdl 
what is going on in our aty, so replacements are 
being shipped id — oonfteed new recruits who 
think that "all three sides" are equally to Name for 

I Kin nwHnws «nrf tha t thk is advfl W3T rather than 

genocide. The Sarajevan players fdt lousy about 
the likelihood of trouncing tire UN soccer team in 
their last match, even though they had always won 
lopsided games before, so the game exuted in a tie. 

All of us Sarajevans are fully sated with things 
as they are. Our -lives; h umani tarian aid. planes 
booming overhead, it's all fine by us. It's the 
world out there, beyond our walls, that is less 
than inspiring. That is why we are satisfied to 
remain in Sarajevo, our -city that we refuse to 
abandon. We don’t hate you, those of you out- 
side Sarajevo. We just take pity on those aSyoa 
who have accepted this latest form of totalitar- 
ianism that lays a dvihzation to waste. 

Most likely, in Sarajevo we shall die together 
and in love. Tbe fascists will die alone mid in 
hatred. This is no small difference. 


The writer is an editor at Oslobodjenje, Saraje- 
vo's daily newspaper and author of “Sarajevo: A 
War Journal. ” This comment was translated from 
the Serbo-Croatian by Ammiel Alealay for The 
New York Times. 


Free to Come and Speak Post-Communist Russia Isn’t a Docile Guinea Pig 

A T~\ AVflS Swil7prl»rd —Ths mad i*„ w-il* nf.tf ww nvmmyivniin onvnaiwni 


Gerry Adams is no hero. The Belfast Cath- 
olic. who is the leader of Sinn Fein, the politi- 
cal arm of the Irish Republican Army, was 
granted a \i<j to enter the Uni ted States for 48 
hours to attend a peace conference and do 
some speaking. The granting of a visa, after 
eight earlier denials, does not confer an hon- 
or. endorse IRA violence or indicate any 
change in U.S. policy, which is aimed at 
encouraging a peaceful solution to the Irish 
troubles. But it does say something about 
America and its new leadership that is com- 
mendable. namely that American borders 
are open to visitors who come to speak and 
not terrorize, even when the views expressed 
are likely to enrage and scandalize. 

Mr. Adams is careful to emphasize the 
distinction between the IRA and his political 
puny, although the two are clearly inter- 
twined. He was. for a time, an elected member 
of the British Parliament, and although as a 
matter of principle he refused to sit at West- 
minster. he wants to be seen as a man who 
shares the goals of the IRA but works through 
the political system. Although he has not 
renounced violence in the terms that leaders 
in Britain and the Irish Republic have urged, 
he has made statements in connection with his 
visa application that suggest a move in the 
right direction. Moreover, he has for some time 
been engaged in secret negouations with tbe 


British, now apparently at an impasse, working 
toward an agreement that would end violence 
and establish a peaceful working relationship 
among the warring factions in Ubier. 

In Britain and Northern Ireland, neither 
Mr. Adams nor anyone connected with the 
IRA is allowed to be heard on radio or televi- 
sion. It is impossible to imagine such censor- 
ship of any participant to a conflict of such 
overriding importance in the United States. 
Many Americans, including most of the Irish- 
Arnerican politicians who urged the president 
ro gram a visa, have the same view of the IRA 
os do the British. But in America there is no 
prohibition on debate about public issues, 
and there should be no denial of visas to 
quash speech, either. 

Perhaps Mr. Adams will be challenged and 
chastened by television and radio interviewers 
who arc free to confront him as they would 
not be able to do on his own turf. And perhaps 
he will be encouraged by the Irish- American 
community, whose support he seeks, to get on 
with making peace. But whatever the outcome 
or this trip, it is right (hat it was allowed, not 
for the sake of the IRA or Sinn Fein but for 
the sake of Americans who believe that free 
speech is an unassailable good and arc prac- 
ticed in listening lo and sorting out all the 
players in a complicated game. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


D AVOS, Switzerland — The road 
show performance of Russia's 
reform debate just concluded at tbe 
1994 World Economic Forum in Da- 
vos proved more n tranced, and the 
outcome less transparent than some 
accounts have made out. 

Tbe Western-trained, market-ori- 
ented reformers got a far more sym- 
pathetic reception than did Russia's 
prime minister. Viktor Chernomyr- 
din. who had come to answer them 
and also the criticisms of former 
Western advisers to tbe Yeltsin gov- 
ernment who have left Moscow and 
were also present in Davos. 

The reformers accuse their rivals erf 
an “economic coup d’etat" and say 
that the new government’s programs 
will install hyperinflation by mid- 
summer. Mr. Chernomyrdin denied 
this, saying that Russia must be sta- 
bilized but must also continue eco- 
nomic reforms. He said the country' 
cannot turn back, but also cannot 
slavishly copy a Western model 
which rests on assumptions irrele- 
vant to Russian conditions today. 
"We will look after ourselves," he 
said. He warned, ominously. "Don't 
look down on Russia.” 


By W illiam P£aff 


Mr. Chernomyrdin's speech 
[today was understandably del 


on 

Sunday was understandably defen- 
sive. The Western press interpreta- 
tion of the Russian reform struggle, 
and the reactions of the business and 
political leadership gathered in Da- 
vos. all but unanimously have held 
the Chernomyrdin approach wrong, 
if not perverse, and the young reform 
leaders — Yegor Gaidar, considered 
the architect or the previous reform 
policy, and Boris Fyodorov, former 
finance minister — dearly right. 

Another young Russian present, a 
new entrepreneur, remarked to me 
that neither Mr. Gaidar nor Mr. Fyo- 
dorov had ever before run anything 
beyond an academic or banking sem- 
inar. The policies they have tried ti> 
apply in recent months are those of 
the Western academic consensus, and 
also reflea what Western business- 
men believe. They rest on the convic- 
tion that radical privatization of state 
enterprises (whatever the cost in 
bankruptcies and unemployment), a 
total opening to market forces and 
tight monetary controls are the only 
way for Russia to construct an econo- 


my that works and wiD be able to 


rmpete internationally. 
The ar 


argument against those poli- 
cies is the practical one that they 
already have produced politically 
dangerous conditions, with increas- 
ing poverty and wealth discrepancies, 
and much social unrest Their posi- 
tive results to date are inconclusive. 

A defender of those policies says, 
on the other hand, that in today’s 
Russia it is “easy to make money if 
you are clever — you can make a 
killing easier than anywhere else." 

He seemed to think this the right 
line to take with potential foreign 
investors, but it is an approach to 
privatization and the market which 
has an obvious connection to the fact 
that most new Russian private enter- 
prise today is wholly or partially 
criminal — which is not what foreign 
investors like to hear. 

Marshall Goldman of tbe Russian 
Research Center at Harvard Univer- 
sity estimates that the Russian mafia 
now has a band in 70 to 80 percent of 
Russian private business. 

The reformers' case against the 


Other Comment 


Tlie HoM)kawa Difference 

Prims Minister Morihiro Hosokawa is still 
• >n «Mur-tf m h» campaign to lead Japan into a 
new political era. His victory in securing sig- 
nificant political reform signals a changing 
Japan dial ma> at lone last put consumer 
interests ahead of Japan Inc. Should that shift 
occur. Tokyo will find it j popular and prag- 
ma lie move, and not just in Japan. 

After more than five years of seemingly 
e miles- debate o'ci political reform, parlia- 
ment finally passed a reform package last 
Saturday. It is short of the sweeping initiative 
Mr. Hosokawa sought at first, but it overhauls 
Japan'- electoral system and puts new limits 
»n political donations. 

Mr. Husokawas reformist efforts extend 
well beyond these changes. His coalition 
government virtually has upended the tradi- 
tional >t\ le of Japanese politics, back-room 
dejlings'and party alliances. Voters arc be- 
ing listened to. and the public prosecutor's 


office is aggressively rooting out corruption. 

Mr. Hosokawa now turns to economic 
problems at home arid lo stalemated U.S.- 
Japun trade talks. 

Will the reformist Hosokawa make any 
difference in U.S. -Japan trade negotiations? 
In public, he has taken a less than concilia- 
tory tone on the basic points of disagree- 
ment. But during his few months in office 
Japan bos agreed to open its nee market to 
imports and to increase foreign access to 
public work projects. Both will benefit U.S. 
businesses. The next step is to push Japan's 
bureaucrats to reduce the S50 billion trade 
imbalance with the United States. 

Still, when Mr. Hosokawa arrives in Wash- 
ington for his Feb. 1 1 meeting with President 
Bill Clinton, he must be bearing more than tbe 
traditional "gifts" of a tax cut and vague trade 
promises. Thai was pro forma for old Japan. 
His new Japan must deliver substantive com- 
mitments on trade. 

— Los Angeles Times. 



International Herald Tribune 
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Time for a Switch to Public Transport 


W ASHINGTON — After San 
Franciso’s 1989 earthquake, 
the rapid transit system shut down 
for one hour. It Ls four years and 
counting for the damaged Freeways. 

The two-level Erabarcadero 
Freeway, which barricaded down- 
town from the bay, was not re- 
paired but replaced by a street-level 
boulevard with a trolley line. To- 
gether. the street and trolley cany 
as much traffic as did the freeway. 
Opening up the waterfront has 
sparked a real estate boom. 

Los Angdei would do weD to 
ponder its northern neighbor's expe- 
rience. good and bad. Not only does 
it need a transportation system able 
to withstand a much stronger quake 
than the one of Jan. 17, it also now 
has one of those rare postwar mo- 
ments to rethink its infrastructure. 

Heaven knows, no American city 
needs it more. By 2010. average 
speed on its ever expanding free- 
ways is projected to drop to II 
miles ( 18 kilometers) per hour. 

Los Angeles i« living proof, if 
only Americans could open their 
eyes and see it. that there will never 
be enough dollars to meet transpor- 
tation needs by only, or mostly, 
building roads. New roads generate 
new traffic. The new traffic grows 
Taster than new roads can be built 
This is no recent insight Plan- 
ners debated it in the 1930s as 
bridge after bridge was built into 
Manhattan, and each became as 
congested as the cue before. Sena- 
tor Daniel Patrick Moynihan de- 
scribed it brilliantly in a prescient 
piece entitled "New Roads and Ur- 
ban Chaos" written 34 years ago. 

For the past 20 years in America, 
urban highway capacity has risen 
by 4 percent. Road use has nearly 
doubled. The resulting congestion 
costs S 1 00 billion a year. What does 
it take lo try something different? 
Perhaps an iarthquake. 

In the 1940s. Los Angdes was 
robbed of one of the world's best 
electric rail systems, a sprawling 


By Jessica Mathews ^ r ^ s i 

network of quiet, pollution-free 
trains that earned 80 million people 
a year. It was bought up and 
scrapped by American City Lines, a 
from financed by General Motors 
and Standard OU of California, to 
make way for GM buses fueled by 
Standard Oil diesel fuel Soon the 
buses gave way to cars, but some of 
the abandoned rail lines still exist. 

One runs parallel to America’s 
busiest road, the downed Santa 
Monica Freeway. Light rail service 
could be quickly brought back. 

Tbe public utility commission 
could open access to private jitney 
companies like Ihe already popular 
Super Shuttle. And the city’s new 
commuter rail service can" be ex- 
panded with new track, new feeder 
buses and unused freight lines. 

Revolutionary possibilities are in 
tbe offing, Chicago is testing a rap- 
id transit system that bears watch- 
ing. Three-passenger cars are de- 
signed to zip along at 30 miles per 
hour on raised track that can carry 
as much traffic as a multilane high- 
way. No operators are needed for 
this 24-hour-a-day service. The cars 
wait at the station instead of pas- 
sengers. There are no stops — ser- 
vice is direct because stations are 
off the track. The anticipated con- 
struction cost is a fraction of that 
for heavy rail systems. Speed, safe- 
ty. energy efficiency, immediate 
service and privacy — - on paper, at 
least, a commuter's dream. 

Many of these options could 
shorten Los Angeles's commuting 
nightmare and cut its economic 
losses while the roads are rebuilt. But 
when the roads arc reopened, will 
the passengers disappear? The an- 
swer depends on money. 

Americans are not irrationally 
car-crazed. They sewn wedded to 
the automobile because policy after 
gov ernment policy — many of them 
involving heavy subsidies — en- 


tbem to be. The gas tax 
and the other charges that drivers 
pay cover less than two-thirds of 
the cost of building and maintain- 
ing roads. These and other costs not 
borne by drivers — including tax- 
subsidized parking; health and en- 
vironmental costa of auto-generat- 
ed pollution; a share of military 
costs in the Middle East; tbe loss in 
property values from noise etc. — 
amount to something in the neigh- 
borhood of $300 billion a year, a 
staggering 5 percent of GNP. 

On a more personal scale, it has 
been estimated that drivers going 
alone to work in major, downtown 
business districts pay only 25 per- 
cent of the cost of their commute. 
No wonder people like iL 

If automobile use bore even a 
heal thy share of its full costs, public 
and household funds would beawni 
quite differently. Choices would not 
be between well-funded roads, frag- 
ments of a transit system and practi- 
cally nothing else. The options 
would include high-speed intercity 
rail convenient transit (including 
new types that could serve suburbs), 
walking or Inking in hospitable sur- 
roundings, and, as a consequence of 
these alternatives, congestion-free 
auto travel that served convenience 
instead of ruling people's lives. 

American consumers spend more 
on transportation than on anything 
but housing. The mystery is why the 
country has doggedly pursued the 
same self-defeating, policy — feed 
autos, starve the alternatives — no 
matter what the cost in pollution, 
oil imports, immobility for the 
young and the okL and consumption 
of land for parking and roads that 
lead back to the same traffic jams. 

There is a different future out 
there. Los Angeles could be the 
place to begin. 

The writer is a senior fellow at die 
Council on Foreign Relations. She 
contributed this comment to The 
Washington Posl 


new Chernomyrdin government is 
that it is made up of people from the 
Gorbachev era who don't understand 
a free economy. They allegedly do 
not understand the importance of 
monetary policy and the struggle for 
sound money. They only understand 
production. The reformers say the 
new government lacks tbe political 
wfll lo dismantle obsolete and unpro- 
ductive industries. 

Mr. Chernomyrdin replies that tbe 
country needs production, and needs 
stabilization and employment. His 
policy amounts to managed change 
— industrial policy, in the language 
of the Western economic debate. His 
critics say this cannot work because it 
distorts tbe working of the market. 

The uncomfortable thing about 
this is that a Western theoretical de- 
bate, far from settled in the West 
itself, is being acted out experimen- 
tally in Russia. 

Ihe case for total faith in market 
decisions, and subordination of a0 
social considerations to economic ra- 
tionality, has only in (be last decade 
or so become conventionally accept- 
ed among professional economists 
and by mainstream Western politi- 
cians and journalists. As recently as 
the 1970s, these were controversial 
ideas, while state industrial policies, 
managed trade and Keynesian mone- 
tary policy were ail widely defended 
ana practiced. 

While the debate over what Russia 
should do was going on in Davos, in 
other meetings businessmen and eco- 
nomists were arguing over whether the 
Western countries should, or can, cou- 
tinue to accept current levds of unera- 
pkryrraatt in the name of perceived 
economic rationality, in a world labor 
market which pits unprotected work 
forces or even slave labor against 
workers in the developed countries. 

Tbe West has been advising Russia 
mi tbe bass of ideas about unchecked 
market forces which it continues itself 
to question. This is a dangerous situa- 
tion and has invited the nationalistic 
reaction that took place in December. 
Tbe time dearly has arrived for the 
Russians to work their way through 
these matters without foreign interfer- 
ence, however wcU-intentianed. 

International Herald Tribune 

© Las Angeles Times Syndicate. 


For Peace « 
Li the Seas 
OfOima 

By Mark J. Valencia 

H onolulu— i. . 

of the East China Sea to k 
by foreign dl companies. Beijing has 
raised ok. economic and political 
stakes in the region. Grata's assertion 
of sovereignty over the continental 
shelf and the resources beneath it 
riactvn: with claims by Japan. South 
Korea andTahvan to parts of the area. 

Chinn has already made its neigh- 
bors nervous by its assertiveness in 
disputed maritime areas. 

Under a new law, China claims 
the Diaoyutai Islands, northeast of 
Taiwan. Foreign mCitary vessels 
now require permission io enter the 
surrounding waters, and Beijing has 
granted itself the right to evict those 
it says trouble the peace. 

Chinese warships have fired on 
Japanese cargo vessels near the 
Dikoyulais. Japan also claims these 
five uninhabited specks of land, 
which it calls tbe Senkakus. Posses- 
sion would confer tide to about 
21.650 square kilometers (8.500 
square miles) of tbe continental shelf. 

Ghifaa has awarded a South China 
Sea concession to a U.S. company on 
part of tbe continental shelf claimed 
by Vietnam. Lest there be any ques- 
tions about iL Beijing made a show of 
landing troops on a nearby atoll. 

China has also obstinately pursued 
a claim to the Sp rally Islands in tbe 
South China Sea Taiwan. Vietnam, 
Malaysia, the Philippines and Brunei 
claim parts of the Spratiys. 

Meanwhile, few offshore areas — 
at least those in ice-free latitudes 
near large markets — have the po- 
tential for oil and gas finds that the 
East China Sea does. The new 
blocks in that sea being offered by 
Beijing slightly overlap a line equi- 
distant with South Korea and Japan. 

The northern block overlaps 
South Korea's claimed shelf in two 
areas that have potential oil and gas 
structures; the southern block ap- 
parently overlaps with an area held 
by JAPEX, the Japanese state oil 
exploration company. 

More troubling is the major over- 
lap of both Chinese blocks with Tai- 
wan's concession system. Of course, 
both Taipei trad Beijing claim juris- 
diction over all of China. But while 
the lines of their de facto territorial 
control are clear, jurisdiction and 
control over tbe seabed are not. 

China's offer for (adding on areas 
adjacent to Taiwan raises questions of 
who controls tbe maritime areas, and 
it challenges the modus vivendi be- 
tween Beqing and Taipei. Although 
Tokyo has said it will only discuss die 
Diaoyutais. or Senkakus, with Beijing. 
Taiwan's proximity to tbe islands and 
the overlapping of claims make it a 
significant player in the dispute. 

To resolve the continental shelf 
problem, China proposes the cre- 
ation of joint development zones. It 
says questions of sovereignty should 
be put aside for now. Meanwhile, 
there should be joint exploration and 
development of oil or gas found in 
areas of overlapping claims. 

China and South Korea are dis- 
cussing joint development in the Yel- 
low Sea. Japan and South Korea have 
undertaken a similar program in the 
northern East China Sea, although 
both Beijing and Taipei have object- 
ed because they were left out China 
has asked Japan to cooperate in ex- 
ploration ana development of oil in 
the East China Sea and is encourag- 
ing Taiwan to join. 

Another maritime dispute seems 
likely, however. Poaching and piracy 
in the East China Sea have combined 
to force Begiug to consider declaring a 
200 nautical mile Exclusive Economic 
Zone. Tbe recent detention by Chinese 
authorities of a Russian fishing factory 
ship in the East China Sea, and Rus- 
sia’s strong protea, have underlined 
the touchiness involved in deciding 
who owns the fish there. Woe Beijing 
to declare an exclusion zone, it might 
raise the question of which China rules 
those seas, and exacerbate problems 
with Vietnam as wdL 
The issue could be finessed by 
something like the joint development 
concept. China, Japan and South Ko- 
rea could agree to ad hoc cooperation 
to prevent piracy and poaching in 
areas of overlap. 

China and Japan arc consulting on 
ways to enhance security in the East 
China Sea. China and South Korea 
have agreed to cooperate in combating 
marine pollution in the area. 

Such ad hoc solutions are one wav 
to avoid the consequences of formal- 
ly declaring exclusion zones while 
preventing pirates and poachers. 

The writer, a member of the pro- 
gram on international economics and 
politics at the East-West Center in 
Honolulu, contributed this comment to 
the International Herald Tribune. 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1894: Catholic Victories 

PARIS —The Austrian Catholic par- 
9 , with tbe support of tbe Anti -Semi- 
tists. by degrees have regained ail the 
advantages of which they were de- 
prived hy the signing of tbe Concor- 
dat The chief victory has been g a m ed 
in the schools. Within a year the cteigy 
have succeeded in restoring thecrad- 
fix in tbe schoolrooms, revived com- 
pulsory communion and established 
the saying of the Pater, Ave and Credo 
at the beginning and end of school 
hours. As Icog os the Clericals only 
win triumphs on refigknrs ground no 
harm is data But it is to be reared that 
they will meddle with politics. 

1919: U.S. Guardians 

PARIS — Europe is not going to 
release America from the obligation 
of physically participating in the so- 
caJfcctf mandatory system which it is 
now agreed will be applied in princi- 
ple to -all extra-European territory. 
America may shudder ai the pro- 


of guardianship of the Near 
t, but her protestations are not 
going to relieve her of entire respon- 
siblity if Allied diplomatic insistence 
means anything. The British particu- 
larly look to this one radical, perma- 
nent departure in our foreign policy 
as the greatest angle, conclusive 
proof that we meant what we said 
about die League of Nations. 

1944: Russian Progress 

LONDON — [From our New York 
edition:] The Russians have smash ed 
across the old Estonian border near 
the mouth of the Narva River, cap- 
turing more than forty towns on the 
approaches to Narva, Moscow an- 
nounced today [Feb. 3]. One Soviet 
spearhead reached the town of Ven- 
kule, five miles across the pre-war 
.frontier. Russians, celebrating the an- 
niversary or the German defeat at 
Stalingrad, now 800 miles behind the 
battidipe. could see the Red Anny 
developing a new pincers attack such 
as that which doomed the 6th Army 











"N 


% 

S 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRI BI NE. THURSDAY 

O P I N ION 


FEBRl’ARV :i. 199 1 


Page 


A Flight From Real Discussion 


w 


rASHlNGTON — Some- 
, » . thing is going wrong in the 
opituon-prodoction business. It is 
not just that there is a difference 
between honest debate and themy- 
voice-is-touder-than-ycurs school* 
yard stuff that often passes for it.. 

The problem is that increasingly, 
no distractions are being made be- - 
tween opinions and facts, and be- 
tween sound arguments and those 
that merely sound good. Slowly, the 
crucial distinction between what is 
true and what is not gets losL 
This issue was raised powerfully 
last week in a New York Times 
essay by Mrctriko KakuiariL The 
danger she sees is that of “a com- 
pletely relativistic universe in which 
all theories — however reprehensi- 
ble or preposterous — mnst be ac- 
corded respect, a universe in which 
truths are replaced by opinions." 

Her point has huge implications. 
The most obvious evidence of the 
problem she describes is the re- 

>4T iLL.Ln 


By E- J. Dionne Jr. ' 

Republican's adversaries to attack 
him as an apologist for the. rich, as 
indifferent to the poo;' or as an 
ambitious politician who will say 



alf or "Latinos" —then they have 
no obligation to learn anything 
from anyone they 
Think of it this way. In 10 years, 
it wifi matter to Americans wheth- 
er Mr. Clinton or Mr. Cooper or 

ambitious politician who will say ^S^^Sng of the 
anything to be president lus a sure problem and bow to fix 

way to avoid senous discussion. or posationmg. 

From Mr. Gramm's friends on on the 

ihe n^uronxs an equaUy eva^ve and whether they were 

attack: that the president and Mm. ^ -cemnsf or 

Clinton are not really mouvated by ^ ^ n0 longer matter, 

a concern for getting health msor- JtTh - 1 ~ ,,u **“ 

ance for those who haye nonfc.- 
What drives them, in the rightists’- 
view, is a desire to expand govern- 
ments role. Why? Because they 
belong to a “new dass” of lawyers 
and other government junkies who 
just hate business and love to build 
new bureaucracies for their- ’60s 
friends to staff. This is a nifty argu- 
ment for critics of the Clinton 
health plan, since it lets them avoid 
dealing .with the issue of what is 
wrong with the health system. 



A Blank Screen Would Be Better 

„ . he bothered t>v the labels cv 

nf By William RfiSphe rfj M rKin( as. -a guide tO which 

9 


TLANTA — “In my field of 


Russia: One-Way Ticket ^^thund^s of Ukrainians i 

The slowing of the Russian mar- met or brushed elbows with. Any 
kei-refonn train does not mean the 
end of the railroad. It is inconceiv- 

- _ . ■ n ■— voiiim trt 


UimgS illLC, l ira muuuuauiw (or 
uncomfortable) with Clinton," rath- 
er than. “1 think Clinton is right (or 
wrong)." There is no obligation on 
the person who makes the first 
statement to defend it. Who can 
argue about someone dse’s feelings? 

Another- sign of the flight from 
real discussion is the pretense that 
giving something a label explains 
everything important about it. 

Representative Jim Cooper,' a 
Tennessee Democrat, has gotten 
much attention for his health plan 
because he has won it the label 
“centrist." His is a serious propos- 
al But you usually do -not hear 
much about it. Instead, you hear 
variants on the theme that ‘XJoo- 
per's plan is gaining popularity be- 
cause it's closer to the center, be- 
cause it's more moderate, than the 
president's proposal.” . 

But the words “centrist and 
“moderate" teD nothing about how 
Mr. Cooper's plan would affect an 
average citizen compared with other 
nr Hru'np nothing at alL 


UVUl Ultr liumuvvu V. — 7 

met or brushed elbows with. Any 
“ethnic problems” I _sa w were 
mostly in the minds of visitors. The 

"'mprta^ie'Srafropmions 'Sn. .o Ukrainians M d Ru^' 

halcsqLl^hasbacnn^- S'S^^kides ot S^lia ^ "“.T? 

!>’ <tomkBiag to Abates about race his Conmuoist succksoij ; stores and 

offices that might have turned vio- 
lent in American or West Europe- 
an dues, but which Ukrainians 
handled in a mature, compromis- 
ing. often humorous way. 

SETH 1. ARON IE- 
Pierreme, France. 


have equal vamc nas occn opo-wu- economic pouaes 01 auaui 
ly ^ imaging to debates about race ^ Communist successors. 
and gender. For some advocates of state ownership oT basic tndus- 
“raulticulturalism," merely being a wiih a gradual move toward 
member of a group described as privatization, has met with success 
oppressed is' enough id give a per- £ ^ former East Germany and 


son's statement legitimacy. 
The right often repli® ®- 


m me, iviiuw r* V 

now Poland; the other East Euro- 


oow ruiaiiu, uiv 

ine ngni uwu icj/u» «*. — ; — pean countries are dose benina. 
Try to argue that racism and sexism “ S hock therapy” approach 

are real problems, and you will find dear j y was too abrupt: in retro- 
conservatives readv to dismiss you —gM the Gorbachev approach 
for being “politically correct” and. - *«*- — ■ * 

therefore, stupid. The notion is that 


3S uO\ UU Uii uiw iimuiw. 

uKiuvm ~-j — ; . And consider China. It remains 

anyone who worries about unfair- a Communist country but. mov- 
ness or inequality is merely pander- at lts own pace, it has allowed 
ina io some group or other. Once ^ivaaon of Western and Asian 
the right lab els an idea “PC" it — :.«> fwi»oin» » bonanza to the 


ait invasion u 

the right labels an idea “PC. it capital bringing a bonanza to the 
becomes as undebatable as a country and the foreign investors, 
thought associated with “dead -• so let ns give the Russian gov- 
miilrinittiiral tVDCS. , in address the IID- 



substance by attacking motives. 
Senator Phil Gramm seems really 
to believe that smaH government 
and free markets are almost always 
belter than new programs that im- 
pinge on markets. That is why be is 
skeptical of almost everybody s_ 
health-care proposals. _ 

1 a v Ut aamm* fjv iKr^ TfTCaS 


thought associated wun u«tu -• so let ns give — - 

white males" by multicultural types, moment time to address the im- 
We in journalism have our own me diate requirements of ordinary 
wav of getting around the hard is- M-opte. many of whom have not 
sues. It involves highlighting tactics. been p^d in months and who can- 
The big issue after the president s ^ w buy basic needs. 

State pf the Union speech was WILLIAM C. BALL1N. 

whether he was wise to threaten to Geneva. 

veto any health plan that did not . 

provide coverage for everyon^But The Ukraine 1 Saw 

#32§§t &SM 

■.SSS5^S@@®F 

their roles and identities ■ *« 

«,‘*^rtncj»rvatives’" 


An Alpine Tragedy 

As an avid skier and former rac- 
er, 1 have been in shock smee 
watching the tragic and fatal acci- 
dent involving Ulrike Maier. one 
of Alpine skiing's best Although 
downhill racing is extremely dan- 
gerous. fatal accidents have teen 
Pare. Whether what happened at 
Gannisch-Partenkirchen was the 


result of poor safely measures by 
race organizers or simply a freak 
accident, it should not be blamed 
on the International Ski Federa- 
tion as a whole. 

Ulrike Maier will be remem- 
bered as a skier who took risks and 
accepted their rewards. She will be 
missed — at the Olympics in Ltlle- 
hammer. and for years to come. 

MICHAEL HIRSCH. 

Budapest- 

Read It While It’s Hot 

Regarding “77ie Eternal Butler " 
(Features. Jan. 25l : 

The article about the training of 
the English butler missed a more 
important reason for ihe ironing of 
the newspaper. This did indeed re- 
move creases, but its vital function 
was to dry the printer’s ink. which 
otherwise would attach itself to the 
master’s hands, or. worse sull. to 
his white gloves. 

DAVID F. ROBSON. 
Tourrettes-sur-Loup. France. 


I Lni' in — . 

* jk. psychology, there s a lot l 
ambiguitv." Arnold Goldstein 
concedes. “But after a while, 
there's enough research to say we 
have a fad.” And ihis. he says, is a 
fact; Television violence begets 
real-world violence. 

Mr Goldstein, director of the 
Center for Research on Aggression 
at Syracuse University in New 
York, was in Atlanta as the fea- 
tured consultant at a two-day con- 
ference on school violence. He has 
made a sideline of instructing pro- 
fessionals — this time members of 
the National .Association of School 
Psychologists — in ways of reduc- 
ing violence. His books on teaching 
social skills to anti-social youth — 
“skill streaming." he calls it 
are uidelv respected. 

But he believes his work would 
be much easier if television were 
not so aggressively violent. 

“There's just no question of the 
effect of television." he told me. 
“Literally hundreds of studies all 
point to this conclusion. The only 
people who seriously question the 
link — like the tobacco industry 
questioning the link between *^6^" 
rette smoking and cancer — are the 
TV people themselves, and even 
many of them are coming around. 

Mr. Goldstein lists three major 
categories of effects; the aggres- 
sion effect, the victim effect and 
the bvstander effect. 

The first includes so-called 
copv cat violence. "There are 
separate studies, involving 244.UU. 
viewers, showing dial a substantial 
number of viewers will become 
more aggressive, more violent after 
watchins. violent TV shows. \ oun- 
ger children are affected more than 
older ones, boys more than girls. In 
terms of types of show, the violent- 
ly erotic are the worst.” 

He said studies show that there 


is more copying of violent acts 
when the script tries to justify the 
violence, or rewards it. when how- 
to specifics are offered, and when it 
is shown as being relatively pain- 
less. or when victims are shown 
quickly recovering . . 

The "victim effect principally 
involves an “increased level of 
fearfulness about the world in een- 
eraL" Mr. Goldstein said. 

-What troubles me most, 
though, is the bystander effect 

MEAN WHILE 

you know, the Kitty Genovese 
syndrome. Televised violence in- 
creases the degree of callousness 
and indifference to actual vio- 
lence. People who watch TV vio- 
lence become less helping toward 
the victims of violence and dis- 
play more tolerance for higher 
and higher levels of aggression. 

Most of us know, or strongly 
suspected, what Mr. Goldstein s 
analysis confirms. Television 
knows it. too. The question is 
what to do about it. 

For Mr. Goldstein the answer is 


he bothered t»v the labels — ex- 
cept perhaps, as a guide to which 
are ihe really cool shows. 

Channel-blocking devices 
could help to keep children from 
watching, say. certain cable chan- 
nels. But what busy parent would 
lake the time to check each dav s 
listing and block out specific 
shows — assuming u was dear 
which shows were objectionable 
and that there were machines ca- 
pable of such blocking. 

.And who. in households where 
parents can’t even tape tonight s 
-Jeopardy" show without help 
from the kids, would i prtmant 
those machines? V'O-ls ... _ Mom. 
I've got it set so n 11 only- get PBb 
and the Gospel Hour. \ou and 
Dad have a nice evening. > 

The violent influence cited by- 
Mr. Goldstein may be beyond the 
means of technology to control. 

Indeed, it is hard to set what, 
within the confines of the First 
Amendment, might control it. The 
most frequently mentioned alter- 
native is a boycott of sponsors of 
the worst-offending programs. Bui 
there are two problems with tnaL 
First, many cable shows (including 
some of the raunchiest and most 
gratuitously violent) are unspon- 

^ j . _ J itw* rv. 1 <uin IV 


to our dirty little secret; 

We want it. 

Washington Post Writers Group. 


For Mr. Goldstein the answ er is ^ ^ ^ reason TV 

something short of official censor- 3tofS keep dishing up the stuff 
ship but “something beyond the t ^ numbing us and. 

tips- to- parents advice — sitting ™ - u f is that they are: pnvy 

with your children, talking about 

the violence, monitoring their 
viewing, that sort of thing.” He 
doesn’t know just what. 

I don’t, either. 

The violence-content labeling 
recently adopted by the industry 
(following a major public outcry 
and congressional heatings) is a 
help, but principally for at -home 
parents of small children. Older 
children, including “latchkey 
kids” who baby-sit themselves un- 
til their parents get home, won t 


Letters intended far puhhcaitiw 
dw add be addressed "LnitTs to the 
Editor" and tvniain the *nter s n.c- 
natitre. name and full address. Letters 
should he hnef and are sidyea to 
editing, »V imm be responsible p* 
the return nf unsolicited manuscripts 




wnw 

GOVERNMENT OF INDIA 

SEVENTH ROUND 


i 

-1 


MARK MORRIS 

By Joan Acocetta. " ' • _ 

Illustrated. 306 pages. $27,50. 
Farrar, Straus & ($$¥& .: • 

Reviewed by . . 

John Rockwell . 

J OAN ACOCELLA has written 
a distinguished, piece . otu- 
rism. It will be seized on Jy those., 
who think tharMaA^^^ 
overrated as further proof that «« 
young (37 years old) and flamboy- 
ant dancer and riioreogri*pher 
critics' darling. But mweiact 
that Morris could lospue a 1 book as 
eood as this is a credit, to tarn as. 
well as to Acocella. whose analysis 
is keen and generally free t rf the 
technical jargpn that dogs so much 
arts criticism. . Amv ,. 

Acocella was ihexiurf dance 
critic of the short-lived New York 
magazine 7 Days sad* “ 
daSwriter for The : Daily as 
well as an occasional con^ 10 ^ 
many other magazines- She b a 
great reader of subtexts, andparser 
5 artistic intenuons; mdc^l. ter 
book will provoke *£*£ 

reads meanings into Mornss 
dances that he never 
there. She is also an Oponf 111 .® 1 
aw-shucks plainness a l A™™’ 

Tim is » *>l& ■* ■■■#■ 

analySsof the nftswtthm the Am» 
icartdance entre 
through which there 
more tagged fault line than Mare 
detractors ^ 

erTatic, sdf-indulgenL campy ^ 
-iwrliteral in his treatment of music 

iWissssSS 


■ . • James Gustave admm- 
- istrator-of the United Nations- De-. 

’ vdopntot Program, ^ «admg a 
j novel about slavery, Charles jo^- 
son’s ■'Middle Passage, a 1990 
winner of the National Book 
Award in the United States. 

• “It’s a tale as much about today 
as about the slaw trade.” 

• .(Barry James, Int) 



Oil & 


on to Bid for 
oration for 
Natural Gas 


ris" is an effort, and a brfltiantiy 
persuasive one, to explain why tius 

cultural (and in some cases polin- 
cal) conservatism of some of me 
leading dance reviewers of the 
United States. They form l«s a 
xandom.coDecdcHi of writers i than a 
band of disciples thatlooks teat to 
c^ n rvnhv and ud to Arlene 


sites who Su -ee-- V . 

ss'syswV*- 

parallels 

fi* 

to tte 


Dana oi . 

Edwin Denby and up to Arlene 
Croce, the dance crioc of The New 
Yorker and their acknowledged 
leader. This group shares a classir 
dsL formalist bias, and for Aco- 
cella and her allies Moms is him- 
self a not-so-closet classicist, 
concerned with form, respectful of 
tradition, infused with music and 
committed to universal values. 

AH of this is - expounded wtut 

great thoughtfulness, deftly Wend- 
mg biography, dance history, teck- 
sJiffl^Seuul and critical analysts. 
Aoocdla'-s organization is very dev- 
er setting the scene, laying out Mor- 
ris's youth, switching to chaptets at 
various- themes and issues m his 
- dances, then .picking up the nanar 
rive for his tumultuous and rus 
evolyihg .company’s three years 
JI5 s 8 to -1991 ) at tte Ttejtre Rtwl 
de la Mdnnaie in Brussels. At tte 
end she brings us up to *e presoj. 
with Morris living [^Ar- 

thur Foundation feBowslnp and in- 
vesting his fees and royalties in ms 
conrpanv, which is now based tn 
New YoA City. . ; - 

Whai is espauaDy impressive in 
Acocdla's book is how everything 
in it supports evetylhing else; there 
is no waste. Biographical tntoma- 
lion contributes to analytical m- 
sight Particolar dances are dis- 


cussed in themselves, but also in 
relation to larger themes in Mor- 
ris’s work and times; his spiritual- 
ity and simultaneous celebration or 
the body, his preference for the 
love of community over heterosex- 
ual monogamy as idealized in the 
balletic pas de deux; bis unusual 
involvement with text, narrative 
and the inner workings of music. 

The author maintains a tem- 
pered tone, a prevailing judicious 
adoration that only occasionally 
breaks into outright rapture. Her 
study, lavishly illustrated and wiut 
a detailed chronology of Mornss 
work, is impressive on its own ctas- 
sidsL touts and equally convincing 
for those who do not fully partaKe 
or this critical bias. 

Of course, one could quibble. 
There is. for example, too little at- 
tention to tte works Acocella con- 
cedes are failures, and too great an 
emphasis, in this age of dance nota- 
tion and video, on tte epheowrabty 
of choreography. One could fauk 
occasional slips in musical termin- 
ology (her use of the word ra- 
dence" is correct as English but 
misleading in a m us cal apnteact) 
and some vacuous ponttiicaitpn 
(“All art is concerned with the rela- 
tions of thingO- . c . 

But one feels almost emtexrassed 
mentioning such specks. “Mare 
■ Morris” is a book that clarifies 
jt«rw«s you’ve seen and makes you 
want to see those you haven't. It sas 
warm and wise as Joan Acocella 
would like ns to believe Moms is 
himself. And. thanks to her, we da 


John Rockwell is the European 
cultural correspondent pf The Sew 

York Times. 



Bv Alan Truscott 

r ra VrffiSF® 

^sssws- 

^ Idfc T«<vd«y 

SSI frora 

ivire to vjra. . a 5 - 

involve^ a io come in 

o^y ^ibind- but that was 

001 ruuL In. 

rrora Swartz 

room Hcdin|« ^ 




Eventually .five hesm mcksjvere 
scored by casting the ace and. the 
queen and taking a matted Rn«se 

erep^ South ptawl ton 
hearts and the lead- was die dob 
queen. Gwirtzman as West. shifted 
to tte diamond king andoonunued 
the suit when he vras p^mued w 
win. South was not joeW. he put 
up dummy's ace and med a spade 
to tbejaclL But when thtslosl to the 
-queen. West reverted to dubs, fore- 
ing dummy to ruff. South cquld no 
i^ger uncover the- bad uump 
Sk and deal with iL and he failed . 
by a trick after plying for normal . 
splits in the major suits; 

, The moral of thB is. a singidariy 
unhelpful one;, always avoid : ite 
suit that is due -“ break 
badly. The Hofing team gamed 10 
imps against a team.ibai was.ctel- 
lertgjng' them for tte title.-. . 


north 

♦ K 6543 

t?Q96 
0 ATS2 

♦ 5 


WEST 
4QH 
P2 - 
OK1Q96 
*Q J8842 


EAST (D) 
*87Z 
t? J 653 
OQ83 * 

* A K 3 


SOUTH 
* A JS 
0 AK 1074 
0.M 
*1097 


as’ part of the continuous round-the-year 
bidding scheme for exploration acreages, 
the Government of India announces the 
Seventh Round of Bidding for exploration 
in India. Companies are invited to bid for 
the exploration blocks on offer. Over 40 
blocks are on offer, both offshore and 
onshore. Companies may bid for one or 
more blocks, singly or in association with 
other companies. 

CONTRACT FEATURES 

Production -sharing contracts would be 
entered into by the Government of India 
and Oil and Natural Gas Commission or 
Oil India limited with successful 
companies, with a number of anractiye 
features, the more prominent ot which 
are as follows: 

• The possibility of a seismic option in 
the first phase of the exploration 
period 

• No minimum expenditure 
commitment during the exploration 
period. 

» No signature or production bonus. 

» No royalty payment 
■ Progressive fiscal regime with sharing 
of profit oil/profit gas being ued to the 
post-tax profitability of the venture for 
the companies. 

• No ring fencing of blocks for corporate 
.tax purposes. 

• Provisions for encouraging the 
production and marketing of gas. 

• Purchase of company's share of oil at 
international market price. 

• Provision for assignment. 

• Provision for international arburation. 

BID ITEMS 

Companies would he required u> bid Dr: 

• Profit oil and profit gas shares 
expected by the contractor at vunoits 



' • •• «* ' • .'v.S&tT* Vy 

^ .V v '.. t 



levels of rate of return or multiples of 
investment recovered. 

• Percentage of annual production 
expected to be allocated towards cost 

recovery. . 

• Total length of exploration period, 
number of phases in exploration 
period and minimum work 
commitment in each of the phases. 

information 

availability 

A brochure giving details of the blocks 
offered, their geographical location on a 
map of India and the contract terms will 
be made available free of cost to 
companies. 

To enable companies to assess the 
geological prospects of the blocks on 
offer, information dockets and data 
packages are available on sale. Separate 
information dockets on each basin are 
available, containing information on 
regional and local geology and the 
current status of exploratory activities in 
the blocks in each basin. The data 
packages contain seismic sections, ^gravity 
and magnetic anomaly maps, wireline 
logs and structure contour maps etc. and 
have been prepared for most of the 
blocks. 

Companies interested in inspection and 
purchase of information dockets and data 
packages and in obtaining further details 
regarding the offer may contact; 

Mr. R.N. Desai 
Head, EXCOM Group 
Oil & Natural Gas Commission 
Upper Ground Floor, GAIL Building 
16 Bhikaji Cama Place 
New Delhi 1 10066, INDIA 

Telephone: 602703, 602351 
Telex: 031-65184, 031-66262 
Facsimile-. 3316413 


. Neither side was vulnerable. Tte 
bidding: 


South West 
l 

. S * 

4 9 Pass 

Puss 

Vest led the club queen. 


East 

.Pus 

Pass 


North 
1 ♦ 
3& 





i 










INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBI NE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 1994 


HEALTH /SCIENCE 


What Should You Worry About? 


By Daniel Goleman 

VfK YYvA Time- Strtiiv 


trying m reach people more effectively with 
hdpful information about hazards, have turned 
lo psychologists to fine-tune their messages. 

Late Iasi summer, many New York City 

parents were distressed to hear that in some 
public schools asbestos was flaking and ex- 
posed. In response to their fears, the beginning 
of the school Year was delayed, even though 
health officials explained that the risk of dying 
from exposure to asbestos was less than the 
likelihood of getting hit by lightning and that 
the children were probably at greater risk from 
playing in the streets during the weeks schools 
were closed to fix the asbestos. 

-There 3re often large discrepancies between 
the risks experts womed about andihosc lay 
people were most concerned about” said Dr. 
Baruch Fischoff. a psychologist at Caraegie- 
Mellon University who is a leader in the study 
or risk perception. “We've tried to unravel the 
bases for these disagreements.” 


EW YORK — The list of worrisome 
risks seems to extend on and on like a 
litany or plagues — earthquakes, fires, 
hurricanes, asbestos in (be schools, 
ozone depletion, bacteria in drinking water, sal- 
monella in poultry, toxins in fish — to name but 
a few that have spawned anxieties or late. 

Too often, psychologists say. people's wor- 
ries about a given risk are out of proportion, 
with the fear either far greater than the actual 
danger or. occasionally, less. Now studies are 
showing that these skews in perception follow 
psychological reasons that can explain why one 
risk is exaggerated in people's minds while 
another is played down. 

These findings on the mismatch between actu- 
al and perceived risk are of special interest to 
public health and environmental officials who. in 


In a classic study. Dr. Paul Slovic. director of 
Decision Research, a consulting firm in Eu- 
gene. Oregon, compared the responses from 
two groups, 15 national experts on risk assess- 
ment and' 40 members of the League of Women 
Voters, on the relative risks of 30 activities and 

technologies, and found striking disparities. 
While the league members rated nuclear power 
as the greatest risk, the experts ranked it 20th; 
while the experts put X-rays at No. 7, the league 
members ranked it 22d. 


The perception of a given risk, from exposure 
to asbestos or toxic waste, is amplified by what 
psychologists call “outrage factors," which can 
make people Teel that even small risks are 
unacceptable, according to an article by Dr. 
Abraham Wandersman, a psychologist at the 
University of South Carolina, and Dr. William 
Hallman, a psychologist at Rutgers, that ap- 
peared last year in the journal American Psy- 
chologist. Other factors determining perception 


of risk have been identified in a variety of 
studies, and include these: 

• Risks that are imposed loom larger than 
those that are voluntary. People will accept the 
risk from skiing, for example, but not from food 
preservatives, even though the potential for 
injury or ill health from skiing b roughly 1.000 
times that from preservatives, according to a 
1987 article in the journal Science by Dr. Soyic. 

• Risks that seem unfairly shared are also 
seen as more hazardous. “If Pm not getting 
anything from it. while other people benefit, a 
risk is more objectionable.'' Dr. FischofF stud. 


• Risks that are associated with catastrophes 
are especially frightening; the accident at Bho- 
pal, India, amfriified people's fears of chemical 
plants, just as the recent earthquake in Los 
Angeles has made people's fears of a repeat 
more vivid. 


• Risks from exotic technologies create more 
dread than do those involving famifiar pnex A 
cram wreck that takes many lives has less impact 
on people’s trust of trains than would asmaUer, 


• Risks that people can lake steps to control 
are more acceptable than those they feel are 


beyond their eontroL “What you choose to eat 
is under your control, but what's in your drink- 
ing water is not.” Dr. Slovic said. 

• Natural risk s are less threatening than 
man-made ooes. 


“The greater the number aTWt cmraKnw nf 
these factors, the greater the likelihood of public 
concern about the risk, regardless of the scientif- 
ic data,” concluded a 1991 report by Dn Caron 
Chess and coUeagpes at the. Environmental 
Communication Research Program at the Cook 
College campus of Rutgers University. 


as to scientific findings on n®. 

M* officials JE- 

84p«*“t knew about a ggg- 
XtbeySd take against getnng the disease 
only 43 percent took it. 

“Why don’t people take the prec^oosT 
ggtgft j^r Hallman, who did the study. ^They 

Kk* •We’re just going to be here lor a uuie 
diseare « ■ 
matter of bad 1 m*. They have a sense of fatal- 

» M 


Recurring Cycles, 
Thaw and Cold, 
Marked Ice Age 


By Walter Sullivan 

Vtn Yi-rt Tinu‘\ Sfrrue 


EW YORK — In a burn 
or new discoveries, cli- 
matologists are begin- 
■ wB ning to reconstruct a re- 
curring cycle of events that 
changed the Face of the world sev- 
eral limes during the Iasi great ice 
age. 

Each of the proposed new cycles 
seems to have included the buildup 
of a North American ice sheet 
whose centra) region was two miles 
thick: a series of warming fluctua- 
tions in the world's temperature, 
followed ov the breakup of the ice 
sheet into armadas of icebergs that 
invaded the North Atlantic. These 
cycles occurred at least five times 
during the last ice age. which lasted 

100.000 years and ended about 

10.000 yean, ago. 

In a picture that came together at 
a recent meeting of the American 
Geophysical Union, geologists and 
others reported finding many dif- 
ferent fingerprints of the cycles in 
both the Northern and Southern 
Hemispheres. One of the earliest 
clues to these great events came in 
1988 with the discovery of six lay- 
ers of liny stones in cores drilled 
through the ooze on the bottom of 
the North Atlantic. 

The researcher. Hartmut Hein- 
rich of the German Hydrographic 
Institute in Hamburg, had studied 
13 cores of bottom sediment ex- 
tracted from under f 3.000 feet 
(about 4.000 meters) of water 
from a small area west of France. 
The same six layers occurred in 
most of them’ and were, he 
thought, dropped by armadas of 
; cebergs from Canada. Before they 
broke off from the continental ice 
the icebergs had scraped up rocky 
debris from land beneath the ice. 
then depostied it as “dropslones" 
when melted over this spot. 

Thai icebergs sometimes drifted 
this far did not seem very remark- 
able. but now layers with identical 
composition and spacing have been 
found at a dozen sites spanning the 
Atlantic from Labrador to Europe. 
They testify to gieat armadas or 
icebergs that in intervals 5.000 to 
10.000 years apart, invaded the 
ocean in vast numbers. 


The sites are confined to a broad 
zone ihaL presumably marks the 
drift path of the icebergs from the 
Labrador Sea southeast to the lati- 
tude of Portugal. Sea floor sam- 
pling north as well as south of that 
path has failed to show evidence of 
the “Heinrich events," as these ice- 
berg invasions are now called. 

The Heinrich events have turned 
out to occur in step with other ice 
age cycles. One of these is a series 
of sudden warmings in climate, in- 
dicated by the ratio between two 
oxygen isotopes in the annual lay- 
ers of snow packed into the Green- 
land icecap. 

The ice core data have shown 
that every 500 to 2.000 years during 
the last ice age the climate appar- 
ently warmed abruptly, then gradu- 
ally cooled back to full ice age con- 
ditions. 

These warming phases have been 
named Dansguard-Oeschger 
events, after Dr. Willi Dansgaard 
of Denmark and Dr. Hans 
Oeschger of Switzerland, who 


3 


Iceberg Armadas 

Scientist speculate that 
recurrent periods of 
warming in the last ice 
age led to the launching 
of great armadas of 
Icebergs into the Atlantic. 


IN BRIEF 


Dome 


Slippery 

boundary 


Ice river 
/ Water 


a; 


Cancer Bisk Minimal 
in Use of Hair Dye 


Icebergs 


•v*.. 


ry— 

• v 


In each cycle, the Ice sheet over North 
America built up some two mite thick, gp 
until the earth's trapped heat started to 
melt the bottom layer. The slippery 
boundary let ice flow in great rivers. 


.A 




m-’i 

m i 


helped identify them. 

That these events may have also 
have been fell in the antarctic has 
been reported by Dr. Todd Sowers 
of the Lamonl-Doherty Earth Ob- 
servatory of Columbia University 
and Dr. Michael Bender of the 
University of Rhode Island. They 
believe they have found nine such 
sudden warmings in the tempera- 
ture record preserved in ice extract- 
ed by the Russians from their deep 
drill’ hole at Vostok. Bui efforts to 
dale them have been imprecise be- 
cause the annual layers there are 
too thin to count. 


Ice Cubes 
In The Ocean 

One idea 
suggests that the 
iceberg armadas 
cooled the 
surface water, 
disrupting 
the Gulf Stream 
in the Atlantic. 






% fepr 




-"V . — . 

4£)f 

\j iXm 



;’G)/ 

//‘A 


A SECOND type of cyclic 
event was a series of 
warmings discovered by 
Dr. Gerard Bond and 
others at the Lament observatory. 
Their icc age thermometer was a 
species of plankton that lives on the 
surface of the ocean and indicates 
temperature by its abundance. 
From the fossil skeletons of organ- 
isms buried in sediment on the 
floor of the North Atlantic, they 
identified a series of warmings that 
correspond remarkably closely 
with the Dansgaard -Oeschger 
warmings found in the Greenland 
ice cores. 

Dr. Bond noted that at the end erf 


A Worldwide Impact 5 

Iceberg deposited stones r 
in ocean at end of each 
cycle; sediment layers found 
in Florida lake and elsewhere 
suggest warming events 
were felt around the globe. 


•earn 

jm wt 




8BH 


Ky 

t*7 


Correlating Evidence 

> From Many Sources 
/ ■7 Kv ' Cores drilled from the ocean 
. 1 bottom (dark dots on map at left) - 

. .. yield six separate layers of tiny ; 
stones, dropped by melting 
Icebergs released by the North . 
American Ice cap. The iceberg 
episodes are called Heinrich events 
after their discoverer. The sites are 
aU in a broad zone that maric&.the- . ! 
presumed drift patti of the Jcebwgs, 
Heinrich events are prominent 
among the data now suggesting a 
repeating cycle of climatic events in 
the last ice age. 1 


WASHINGTON (AP) — Con- 
trary to some earlier studies. Hair 
dye causes almost no risk of lethal 
. cancer, according to an Amen can ^ 
Cancer Society analysis of health 
data from ntore than a haiT-nuDiotv 
women. . . - 

A study published in the Journal 
of tire Natrona! Institute of Cancer 
showed that only a small fraction 

of women studied appeared to have 
an increased risk of lethal- cancer 1 
from hair dye and that even for 
these women, the risk of developing 
two uncommon cancers is small.' 
Dr. Michael J. Thun, pn American 
Cancer Society physaaxi iri Aflan- 
ta and lead author' of - the study, . 
said the conclusion was based on 
an analysis of data from 573,369 * 
womenenrolled in acancer mortal- 
ity study started in 1982 by die 
American Cancer Society. 

The only link of terir dye to fatal 
cancer came in 0.6 percent oT the 
women who used black hair dye for 
20 years or more. These women, 
Dr. Thun said, had about a.four 
times greater risk of :devdicp8ig 
non-Hodgkin's lymphoma or nxHi- 
tiple myeloma than women who 
did not use the dye. 


Drug Shows Promise 
InTroatlng Arthritis 


LONDON (Routes) . -r- . Two, 
British scientists who won a key 
battle in the search for a-cme .for 




has £rown promise m a etistesu 

trial — ' ■ ■■ 

Professors liny Maini and. 
March F rfdmgmr ’ot tlw fCerinedy 

don, said the test, published in the 
scientific journal Arthritis and 
Rheumatism.: showed -an impres- 
sive improvemart Htpatients.’ rheu- 
matoid arthritis^- lasting three to 
■ five mm As,- foSowmg tiro weeks 
. of treanDeat -w^h die drug, devd- 


Gkm WaST/Tk New York fii 


each series of increasingly intense 
warmings there was a Heinrich 
event, the extensive release of ice- 
bergs into the Atlantic. One of his 
colleagues named these series Bond 
cycles, of which there seem to have 
been at least five during the last ice 
age. 

In the current issue of Science, 
five American and French scien- 
tists warn against excessive reliance 
on oxygen isotopes in Greenland 
icc as dues to sudden warmings. 


They said computer simulations 
showed that the abundance of 
those isotopes could have also been 
controlled by wind changes that 
suddenly brought in warm air from 
distant sources like the North Pa- 
cific. 

“Implications for future cli- 
mate." they wrote, could only be 
assessed by understanding the 
combination of factors responsible 
Tor past sudden changes. 

Nevertheless, many pieces erf evi- 


dence now seem to fit together 
around the Bond cydes and the 
Heinrich events that terminate 
them. They seem to have been glob- 
al phenomena, even though their 
cause and mechanism are far from 
understood. Evidence of wanning 
periods has now been found all 


over the globe, from sediment be- 
neath a Florida lake to the glaciers 


neaih a Florida lake to the glaciers 
of Chile and New Zealand and ibe 
sea floor sediment off Western 
South America. These findings in- 


dicate that the cycle affected the 
Pacific as well as the North Atlan- 
tic. 

The report of effects on glaciers 
in sou than Chile and the Southern 
Alps of New Zealand was widely 
discussed at the December meeting 
of the American Geophysical 
Union in the San Francisco. The 
findings had been made by Dr. 
George Denton of the University 
of Maine in Oron-o and a colleague. 
Dr. Thomas Rowell of the Univer- 


sity of Cmdnnati in Ohio. They 
found that glaciers tbere.seemed to 
have advanced and retreated; m 
synchrony with the Heinrich 
events. . r-. ■ ■ 

The mechanisms that dane-the. 
global ice age cydes are a matte' of 
continuing research. When they are- 
understood they should give ebma- 
tologists a new insight into opera- 
tion erf tire world’s climate system 
and factors that may produce such 
cycles in the future 


- - Sri-Mainivsaid me trials- took 
srffereis of^rfreuma- 

■foid afferitHtr 'Se new drug con-' 
-tains .an agent called a monoclonal 
mtibody, produced by genetic en- 
gmeding atCestocor. a biotech* 
nofogy eparoanybased in Philadel- 
phia, that mtifccule. 

-The scientists’ re$ara*-over the 
past ei^t yeara ; Jia&^ a 
molecule called tumbfnticrosis fao- - 
lor that jrfajrracentnd Atom caus- 
ing the cnppfiqg disease,, which : 
damages joints. \ 


CROSSWORD 


ACROSS 

i "The Nazarerie 
wr-ter 

s 'ElepMarit Bov' 
fray 

9 — -mcjhl 
iaCnee» ro'Sii/ 


14 Am -- Lo.e" 1 
ii&52 


IS 1990 Bes-t 
Supoorlmg 
Actress 
17 Juarez >r/er 


ia rJewsAoman 

Complon 
19 Twiggy miIIoas 
21 Sinner J3m*s 
23 : Jurse a dnni- 

25 Conductor 
Derail 

26 Poverty 
27‘V/aieriiiies" 

ariis,: 

29 - Z 


30 Panying nth 
Eddie Canior' 


34 Ren^ or Renee 


Solution in Puzzle of Feb. 2 


□hdodh fnnfanaaa 
[§□□□□□ anaaQaaa 
QSHQQin rDEDsansnia 
HG1B QE3G1 □□□□ 
DHaan oao aaa 
□□□□□□□ 313313 
naSHH 033 3333 
maBEaEinciaaaaaa . 
□□□O 333 33333 
3333 33013333 

□on 333 3aaaa 
H3C13 aaa aaa 
□3333333 333303 
3D33DD33 333300 
Q3333D3 333333 


35 Toy mat' er 

96 Noisy 0*rd 

43 Scale noies 

44 Lambaste 

45 Composition 

48 Road from 

Dawson Creek 

s« Kind oi hill or 
Iron 

52 Feast 

53 Canned tomato 
style 

55 Truchers 
watchdog 

57 An, ship 

58 Nothing to 
shout about 

62 'Xanadu' roci> 
group 

63 Noisy festivity 

64 Manuel s intro 

65 One of a mo m 
Scandinavian 
myth 

66 Pursue 


Chnsfmas' 

2 - up ffifm 
genre) 

3 Bill S partner 
«'Mavl } ' step 


5 Hires 

6 Acl of contrition 

7 Biblical month 

8 Hairstyle that 
needs hairpins 

9 Coordinate 
ia Listen in on 

ii Unappreciative 
one 

<3 Airline to 
Karachi 
is Songbird 
ia Scouting org 
20 Kind of gin 
22 Town m a 
WW II neve* 

24 Notre Dame 
bench 

27 Copycat 

28 Heat unit 

31 Keystone officer 

32 Rock 

ljufc ebon brand) 

33 Land — 
might locale) 

36 Package 

37 Han products 
maker Cun>s 
and others 


O Sew York Times EdilcJ hi Will Shortz. 


New Clues on Migration to America 



By John Noble Wilford 

■Vr» font Tunes Smirf 


EW' YORK — New genetic research 
has produced more evidence that the 
first people to settle .America proba- 
bly arrived from Asia as early as 
29,000 years ago. 

The findings provide ammunition for esca- 


lating attacks on the traditional hypothesis 
bolding that the migrations occurred about 


duded that the results favored an earlier-entry 
hypothesis for the initial American settlement. 

Archaeologists agreed that the finding were 
powerful dreumstaatial evidence foreariier mi- 
grations. They noted that their excavations 
were turning up more dues of human occupa- 
tion well before 12,000 years ago. But these 
results have yet to be accepted as authentic. 

“It’s fascinating stuff." Dr. David Meltzer, 
an archaeologist at Southern Methodist Uni- 
versity in Dallas, said erf the new genetic re- 


Based bn linguistics, dental variatiori. 'blood 
groups and other traits. American Indians are- 
classified into three major groups: Amerinds, 
who inhabit most of the Americas; Na-Debe iri 
northwest North America, as we& as the Nava- 
ho and Apache, arid the InuR, or Eskimo, ^ and 
Aleuts,' vrtip 'five' manly in the arctic.. ' 


Pudrb, * J 8— 


iWarnng 
Seminole chief 


39 Brady Di'l 
opposer 


40 Father 

41 Become 
popular 

42 Occurrence 
4« Loose a bra 
<7 Filter 


«9 Parker. 

I904cancidate 
for President 
90 Mint 

54 Ho*v the answer 
to this goes 


i Ceiling 
» Greek letter 


l Typewriting 
abbr 


8i Star: of a bray 


12,000 years ago. 

In a study of linguistically related Indians in 
Central America, tire researchers developed an 
evolutionary time dock that they said should be 
more accurate than any in current use. Applied 
to 18 widely dispersed 'Indian groups, the clock 
showed that their common ancestors most have 
reached America 22.000 to 29,000 years ago. 
After scattering, they began evolving their cur- 
rent degree of genetic diversity, the researchers 
said. 

The results were reported in The Proceed- 
ings of the National Academy of Sciences by a 
research team led by Dr. Antonio Torroni. a 
geneticist at Emory University in Atlanta. 

Such genetic rereszstructims of evolutionary 
patterns are controveraiaL and the scientists ac- 
knowledged that the migration estimate “carries 
a large but indeterminate error” StHL they con- 


“Ulturatdy, though, the solution is go- 
ha ve to come from archaeology. You 


mg to have to come from archaeology. You 
can’t date a gene like a piece of charooaL 
Mutation rates change” . 

Dr. TatronTs team derived a rate of genetic- 
mutation change from a study of seven modern . 
Indian tribes in Central America, all of which 
speak the Qribcha language. From Bngmstic- 
and archacologicai evidence, it is estimated that 
the tribes formal a single genetic group 8J00 to 
10.000 years ago and then began to diverge. 

By analyzing samples of mitochondrial DNA, 
a fast-evolving genetic component of the cdL in 
the modem Cmbcha-speakmg people; Dr. Tar- 
ram determined the teDtaie dements of tbar- 
gcoetic diversity, presumably the result of their 
separation over or more years. The scien- 
tists thus established ibemntaiioa rates over that 
period, which they then used to determine the 
genetic history of many other American Indians. 


D R. TORRONTS research concerned 
Ody the Amerinds, fire larged trf rite 
. groups, if they enteired-tlie .New 
' World as- a angle group, the yfen- 
tists coriduded from- the mmatiorf rates; that 
enay occurred no later than 22JJOO;jeara ago 


and nrorelikdy 29 , 000 yearaagoi 

Bat’anotiyer team erf geneticists, fed--W Df. 
Ridiard H. Ward of toe Uaiyexsi^crfUtah.anct 


■ . ■■■ w un, \yiiivuoUj AJX yl^lLalAI 

Dr. Svante Paabo of toe Universi|y of Mnnicfa. 
has produced- findings that question^ 
sanction drat this genetic variaMpy bcgan 
“ter people crossed the land bridge in the 
Bemg Sea. wbidi oosied when sttetevefs were. 
RBK * lowe r m^tb e roe age. Some oftheigenetic 
n^it haveb^un back in A^ they 


In a; commenraxy aocotmanying Dr. Tor- 
ronPsTepoit, Dr. KomethiMWeus, manthro- 
^(^a^edalizinging CQ< ^ 1 ^j K jj <K atPemf- 
state Unrvcisity^aid the new research 
mowed “tire potential of genetic method to 
address prehistMical questiraos.’’: v - 


CALLING ONL LOKLIGN COL/NTRV 
F K O i\ l A N O T HER I S N O 


Whether j 
customer. 


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Tntornnrinnnl Herald Tribune, Thursday. February 3, 1994 


Page 9 


** 



THE TUB INDEX: 119.^^ 

International Herald Tribune World Stock Index.©, composed of 
280 Internationally investabte stocks from 25 countries, oompuea 
by Bloomberg Business News. Jan. t, 1992 ■ 100. 

120- 


In Vietnam , 

Relief lor U.S. Business 


o’s Patierwe Pays 


France Plans 



' By Philip Shenoa 

Mrw York Tuna Struct 

BANGKOK — The govem- 
tneni of Vietnam and American 
businesses operating there wrf- 

. • - TU^imHlav mmrts tOSI 


that represents Chrysler Corp. and 

other large American companies 
wiring a market in Vietnam. 

“The timing is good," Mr. 
Rockwell said. "The Viemainese 
like and respect Americans. 

The Hanoi representative of 


Japan Gets an Opening 

« n 1 1 ■- _ j iii Vii nOe-sl 


Rv Steven Brull United States. its bigpi wgJS 

iSSs 

t j iU vi Mau fnr iflnan to 


New Subsidy 

ForAeros 


patiale 

.... h U.i:~t<ila 


traoe oiuwibu - -- 

would clear the way for Japan to 
assume a dominant position in an 
, MiMK is destined to 


mou W * «v«~ -- , title nn 0 resoeci ftiuciuuu. assume a - 

businesses operating there wd- representative of economy u bdieves is des 

Wednesday reports that said that boom in the years ahead, 

the 19-year-old U.S. trade embar- wb3e American investors But Vietnam s tacrere 

an aaninct Vietnam was nearly , rh/»v had structure and tortuous 


ep against Vietnam was nearly 
Sver. Vietnamese and Americans 
alike predicted a flood of ^vest- 
ment in a nation that is full of 
- ■ recover- 


WDue some 

seemed to believe that they had 
already “missed the boat” be- 




J1KUI ui u »*»••«■“ — — 

tiSZySttr* The end of the 

Whik the Foreign Ministry embargo Will Be 

said it had not yet received formal o 

Ln WMhineum. an excellent 


Asia/Pacific 


Europe 


Appro*. wdtfiSng: 32% 
Close: 132.49 Piwj 13430 
140—— — — 

130 9-sr 
120 ** 

110 


Approx, weighing: 37% 

CtoGK 119U8 Pier- 11939 




saia u uau um 

notification from Washington, 
the Vietnamese governments 
chief spokesman said the lifting 
of the trade embargo would be 
“good news not only lor the two 
people —the Vietnamese and the 
Americam - but also for the 
world community 
The reaction from American 
businesses in Hanoi wm one of 
relief that they would finally be 
able to otter one of the world s 


development/ 
James Rockwell, 
consultant to U.S. 
companies in Hanoi 


Oin ID UK ,TW“ , . , 

Bui Vietnam’s tattered infra- 
structure and tortuous bureau- 
cracy will stow the expansion or 
Japanese investment and confine 
it largely to public works and 
natural-resource projects in the 
coming years. It will likely be 
nearly the end of the decade be- 
fore Japan, which is the biggest 
investor in Southeast Asia by far, 
hits its full stride in Vietnam. 

“As UJS.- Vietnamese relations 
improve, Vietnam will be drawn 
into the international economy', 
and this will improve the overall 
: »nvirnnmenL. said 


prmirew 

lienee and discretion, companies 
refrained from rushing m and 
shutting the door on American 
business prospects. Execuuves 
took their cues from the govern- 
ment, which coordinated closely 
with Washington and made sure 
its policies were just one step 
ahead. 

“The embargo has been a psy- 
chological obstacle.” said Hiroshi 
Kadota. deputy director of to 
Asian .Affairs department at Kei- 
danren, Japan’s biggest business 
federation- “If it is vaote 
and more big companies will try 

to invest.” . 

Tokyo’s biggest concession to 
the embargo was to suspend its 
official development assistance to 
Hanoi after Vietnam’s invasion ot 

_ .1 ■ 1 mo Iftnan I hi® 


Rv Rosier Cohen 


company AXA. Banque Nationale 
de Paris, Credit Agricole. Groupe 
Albert Frere. Paribas, Renault SA. 



North America 


Latin America 


• investment environment, said „ • \iemams invasuu ui 

Morihiio Kosuda, gSS r ta T97S. Japan, the 

. ager of the Indochina office of the hiasest aid donor, has 

cause so many competitors from company Nissho Iwai mJwv to set the staee for 

other nationshad a&eady moved jKJtn* menu of torment 

_ into Vietnam, the truth is that ^ expand, but the pace econ . disburses most 

fastest-growing markets, a mar- “there are tots of boatt out there at which Japanese J, - funds m Asia, with resource- 

ket that their Asian and Europe- __ some of them missed, some of grows will depend on V letnam. Indonesia setting the biggest 

an competitors have been able to them noL he said. ^are 

at for years. . “The Vietnamese are empha- Japanese executives ^ ■ resume d ej\ing develop- 

portumtv m Vietnam. Many view —p . , v , : — „„ ; n Nnvem- 

. : „ jnmnni dnbin. 


Appro*. wlgWing; 28% 
dose: 10032 Pm: 9936 


Appro*-weigt*ng:5% 
Qoac 14635 Ptovj 146.44 




otpldl for years. “The Vietnamese are empha- 

Wbfle American cotp^nons ^ ^ infrastructure areas 

are now allowed to open offices m ^ petrochemicals, telecom- 

Vietnam and to bid on large pub- mun ications, transportation and 
licjwoiks projects underwritten by -j^g^eration, all areas where 
the World Bank and the unema- companies ex 


mi Luuii\ u, * — y 

the country as a dormant dragon, 
only a decade or so away from 


JiUiIU iwuimw S' 

meni aid to Vietnam in Novem- 
ber 1992, iust alter the u.S. prest- 

. . . UiMit month 


DOVrCJ 

U5- companies excel he said. 


xnc woiiu — — _ 

tional Monetary Fund, th^[ “« F ‘ Matthews, an Ameri- 
flD barred undojre emfcag consulting 

company represents several lar^e 
nam and from conducing m«>i t t n ^Tli L;** ; n Vietnam, said 


Oris > docaae or ^^3^ oos . Tl« new monU. 

ffSB rd,xed “ 


Tte Max baas US dofiar '**** at Y |>TOwirtrW!a»A I 

r. Bra Gw i my Hsnfl Konfl, Ml, cj> Toml'NM Wirt and 

S W^an, Swttzwtand and Van*****- 

« »p «««. in *** « nvmcap**™. 

othgn*cetf» w n >opgrocte are irachatf . • ■■■ — 


Tpnn ttuu uvui — w 

0l ^SSl t be b aLa client devd- 

opmmi for the United Stairs and 

^Vietnam,” said Jams Radc- 
wdL, itmtmg iii g director of Vatico, 
a Hanoi-based consulting firm 


company njliwav"*" — Tj 

U.S. companies in Vietnam, said 
that a lifting of the embargo 
would have an valuable psycho- 
logical effect on the Vietnamese. 

“It’s going to mean a lot to 
them,’' be said. 


has a \oung “k 10 open offices and 

«c B in vmw Fun 

low-paid. Moreover, the country 
has enough food and oil to export, 
and it is in Southeast Asia, the 
most economically dynamic re- 
gion in the world. 

Bui out of deference to the 


compa- 
nies to open wrw 
tracts in Vietnam. Further loos- 
ening the restrictions. President 
Bill Clinton last July gave : the 
preen light to the World Bank 
and the Asian Development 


said 

billion irancs ikphv* .uu-^ --- 
Aerospatiale S.A. the vmpnrfiuble 
state-owned aerospace company. 

■STderision to boost the apijd 

oT Aerospatiale, which has been bn 
bv Tailing commercial aircraft orders 
and declining mihtaiy cOTLran^ 
likely to be controversial. Aciospa- 
tiak owns 37.9 percent of the Euro- 
oean aircraft con so ru inn. -Airwis In- 
dustrie, whose rivalry with Boemg 
Co. has been embittered by persis- 
tent disputes over subsidies^ 

The economy minister. Edmond 
Alphandiry and the defease mons- 
ter, Francois Leotard, said, “This 
decision bv the state will alio* .Aer- 
ospatiale to benefit fully from a 
gradual recovery in aerospace mar- 
kets, notably through new projats 
hke the Airbus .A-330 and the Air- 
bus A -340." 

The ministers' statement under- 
scored the fact that France was pro- 
viding money to help boost .Airbus 
programs that are directly competi- 
tive with U.S. aircraft makers. 

In the first six monins of last year. 
Aerospatiale lost 870 million framai. 

* TTR billion franc shortfall in 


mon Bank of Switzerland ^ 
Meanwhile, Groupe Bull SA, the 
state-owned computer maker, pre- 
dicted a 1993 net loss of 3.42 billion 
francs and said revenue for the year 
fell 6.4 percent. 


V.S., Japan 
Weigh Panel 
On Car Trade 


By Andrew Pollack 

"\W York Times Sertice 

TOKYO — In a possible sign of 
movement in deadlocked trade 
ulks. the United States and Japan 
are looking favorably at the idea of 
creating a private commission to as- 
sess progress in increasing sales of 
foreign automobiles and parts in Ja- 
pan. officials said Wedneaiay. 

The commission would give the 

privaK satof rather Uian Uieiw 


See INVEST, Page 10 


Aerospatiale lost uiuumu 

S iaiJ=lopr " Ewisfiftsss 

nu,ivnnliv£ nroducts. 


nah 

- 9 fcr 


fend ostrial Sectors 


Volkswagen Wins Round Against GM 

_ _ Adm Ood AG, the Goman sub- 2m£te‘n3’«» 


WeA flit -i;W 

cbm . rtm conga 

Enemy 

11721 115.71 +1.12 

Daffies - 

131.00 131.10 31,08 

Finance 

124.1B .12426 -4152 

Sendees 

12924 129.12+0.17 

Far mominlaiTn^^adBnM 
Write to Trib index. 18 tAmma* 


- J« C T .,...- t-. i.- A; 


■■■ .. 


doM 


116:42 11651 


124.77 12521 -035 


ftWHBlff Qoiodt ' 


1IW. 03 102J96 dim 
>028 


142.64 . 143JM 


court ruiea wcuutawj 
Goman carmaker had not broken 
the law by luring seven managers 
fiwn GM in March. 

' rthft suii was filed last year by 


South Africa 


ave denied commmmB ^ 

»*“ v* German prosecutors and the ua 

purcnasmg m March dm I ura P“f Department arc continuing 

KOTSmDe^L^.Uipabad allegations that 

been chief of purcfaasmg at GM. » ^ ^ cohorts conmnG 

The ruling ted Industrial espionage. Wed ™*; 
cd a minor victory m avD icownto J* ^ ^ bearing on that 

Volkswagen but ,w» ty™ ««« in^sugatioo. , 

the end oflhe Salso has filed a separate law- 

tween Europe’s laigeat auiomalw Lopez accusing him 

and its American iV _ 0 f stSig proprietary information. 

GM and Opel damn Mr. LOpez « i k 


Thai case is expected to come to 
court in the next two months. 

Last month, the FranWurt Supe- 
f— /*«..«• J«MTiiccR({ oD 3 IClDIU - 

i Opel for an 
injunction that would have blocked 
the seven former managers «rorn 
working for Volkswagen. 

In Wednesday's decision, the 

Frankfurt State *^“5 

Opel’s contention that 

had gained an unfair competitive 

advantage by binog lhe rcven fo^ 
mer GM managers after Mr. Lopez 
jumped ship. 


bv 1995. 

■ Shares Offered in EU 

The French government took a 
step in its privatization drive 
Wednesday, announcm* that 
shares of the statiMxmtroltod oti 

companyElf AquitainewotJd ^ 
offered Thursday « j®fran» 
(S65J3I the Associated Press re- 
ported. The f sale is expected to ?« 

5?e government at least 34 billion 

francs. . . . , „ 

The nrivatization is to mcluae a 
public offering, sales to 'msutution- 

al investors, sales to present and 

«*3s l ?!r»SK5 


automotive products. 

Negotiations have been stalemat- 
ed. with only nine days to gp before 
agreements are supposed to be 
Sited by President Bffl Clinum “d 
Prime Minister Morihiro Hosoka- 
wa. The main sticking point is Ja- 
pan’s resistance to what n views as a 
US. desire to set sales targets. 

Mickev Kantor. the U.S. trade 
representative, armed here Tues- 
day. meeting with Tsulomu Hata, 
the foreign minister, and Hiroshi 
Kumasai. the trade minister. 

In the automobile sector, the 
idea for an independent numitor- 
• « «ii\ in early stage 


fVjrmereinployees of Elf. and place- ,dea tor an inacp««». 
former rap sla ble core ingcoramissioti is still l in — . - 

of discussion. Sou« J.pm« off. : 

sarsyfs Ufi-r sjsc s? 


rnram OV fottnerty con- dab vi» me iaa a t jwv 

Scldcaof ihe commission. «W « 

^ouM as only one element. 


By Bamaby J. Feder. 

Ntw York Tana Senioe 

ESSfiasasS*: 

SS^Asaga 

Siraeas that 

business thcy«pe« 

5“ * different kind of payoff- an 


con- 


1'- 


SXtasi 3«c. The company 
abouj » Mb™ ™ 1 employees. 

has deuoled Mlbs » 

■^’sSu?aSs^r3S'S ,1 ° consider ;■ 

b«* •be Soudr Afrran 

operation H Stecicadistribo- 

Tbe quesnon unBiou 

eyrelTsworldw* huponant," said 

sp“5as wsass-^- 


fourinonths ago, when Nefaon Mandela^ae i leadr 
CTof the African Natioori Congress, wat to to 

United Nations and caUo^f'X an ^ to 
nonne sanctions agamst South Am«- 

Spoti^Sary it sold 

tions m South Africa have annual saleso) aoou 

^o^tneem is wai be 

■ “People want to know if South Afnca^wffl be 
ooli^Sy stable and what to eom^c poticy ^ 

^SSor of the IntoW Sup^ UmL^ 
greuD of 53 companies that has stoy^ m Soum 

AftSi through *e *»d 
JSStoSr a ide of. induct ddN by to 
Rf^erena Leon SuBivan of Philadelphia. 

Hooeywell’s finandfll risk in going ahead 
smauSto timing makes sense. The tennsunder 
Si it sold Martech m 1986 TO MiJ»y&^ 

See HONEYWELL, Page 13 


Banks Gird 
For Talks on 


CURKENCY AM) ( AIM I U MVUKl l SERVICES 


Euro Disney 


m 

To »n...'*° 


By Jacques Neher 

International Herald Tribune 
PARIS — After getting the first 

SKWETcSSSS 

French and inteniational bankstot 
put up more than S3 bilhon to budd 
the amusement pajk decided 
Wednesday to start talks with Walt 
Disney Co. oo restructuring to 
debt- 

With the clock ticking toward a 
March 31 deadline set by W alt Dis- 
ney, which owns 49 percent oT i *e 
complex east of Pans, to bmkera 
formed a steering committee to 
gotiate preliminary terms for to 
French company’s financial 
structuring. 

The decision followed a report 
by KPMG Peat Mamck, an out- 
side auditor. It also Wtajed an 
announcement earher m to day 
that Euro Disney's net \oss m its 
first quarter deepened significant- 
ly mostly due to spiraling financial 
Ssts related to its 22 billion francs 
($3.74 trillion) in debt 

Thai report contributed to afall 
in Euro Disney^ stock on 
Bourse, to 3620 francs a share at 


Currency Management 
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Page 10 


international herald tribune, Thursday, February 3, 1994 


** 


MARKET DIARY 


Stocks Recover 
As Bonds Stabilize 


Compiled tn Our Slot'/ From fJitpuithe* 

NEW YORK — US. srodci rax 
Wednesday amid evidence of a 

strengthening economy and a sta- 
bilization in Treasury bond prices 
after a sharp drop oh Tuesday. 

Oil stocks led the advance, react- 


I.Y. Stock* 


trig to a jump in heating and crude 
oil prices os cold weather spurred 
energy demand. 

The Dow Jones industrial aver- 
age closed up 11.53 points, at 
3.975.54. 

On the New York Stock Exchange, 
advancing issues led decliners by 
an 1 l-tp-8 ratio m active trading. 

Commerce Department data 
showing U.S. new-home sales in 
December at the briskest pace since 
1 986 meshed with an uptick in 
leading economic indicators For the 
month to fuel optimism about the 
health of the economy. 

The data Failed to push up Trea- 
sury bond yields, which was a posi- 
tive for stocks. Weak Treasury 
bond prices and corresponding 
higher yields on Tuesday ended a 
succession of record doses for 
stock indexes. 

The bellwether U.S. 30-year Trea- 
sury bond was up 14/32 at 99 18/32. 
The credit market focused on the 
details of the Treasury's quarterly 
refinancing auctions, to take place 
next week. 

The Treasury said its refunding 
would total S40 billion, in line with 
expectations, but the breakdown 


included more 10-year notes than 
some analysis were looking for. 

The announcement's other sur- 
prise was that the Treasury was 
considering selling floating-rate 
notes for the first time. Rates for 
the securities would fluctuate with 
market interest rates. 

A Treasury spokeswoman down- 
played the chanco for such an of- 
fering this year, but the govern- 
ment has been shifting toward 
short-term instruments for its fi- 
nancing needs and floating-rate 
notes would fit with (hat trend. 

Meanwhile, stock investors con- 
centrated on the more immediate 
interest-r3te picture, which was sta- 
ble despite the signs of economic 
growth. 

Strength in overseas markets 
added to the bullish tone in the 
United States. London's Financial 
Times-Stocfc Exchange 100 index 
and the C AC-40 index in Paris set 
record highs Wednesday. 

Among oil stocks benefiting 
from the rally in energy price* were 
Exxon, which rose 1 to 67‘*. and 
Amoco, up ’« to 54 V 

But the Dow was held back by a 
fall m Sears, which led the New 
York Stock Exchange's most-active 
Hsl dropping 2‘i to 514. Sears was 
hit by concerns that the recent Cali- 
fornia earthquake would cause 
losses at its Allstate insurance uniL 

A downgrade to hold from buy 
by Prudential Securities Inc. also 
battered Sears stock. 

(AP. Kntght Ridder. Bloomberg) 


Vio AaedeMd Prm 


F*2 


Daly dostogSirf foe ■- 
Dow Jonss industrial average 



3408 


A SO N 0 4 F 
1993 1994 


IHT 


NYSE Most Actives 


Traders Kept Guessing 
Over Mark and Yen 


AFPF.uel 

NEW YORK — Trading of for- 
eign currencies was confused and 
tentative on Wednesday as dealers 
waited for interest-rate moves from 
Germany and tried to figure out 
whether developments in Japan 
would help or hurt the yen. 

The dollar rose slightly against 
.he Deutsche mark, ending at 
1.7334 DM after 1.7310 DM at 


Foreign Exchange 


Tuesday’s close. The U.S. currency 
also gained against the yen. to 
108.05 yen from 107.b5 veri. 


Hugh Walsh, a dealer at fNG 
Bank, said fund managers had sat 
on their hands ahead or Thursday's 
meetingof the Bundesbank’s policy- 
making council and Friday's U.S. 
nonfarm payroll data for January. 

"The only activity in the market 
consists of interbank dealers trad- 
ing ranges." he said. 

Mr. Walsh said he expected the 
Bundesbank to cut its Lombard and 
discount rales by 25 basis points. 


"which should actually benefit the 
mark after the initial seli-off. 

“The Bundesbank knows that if 
it does not cut tomorrow, then i i 
could be seen as an act of weakness 
by the speculators and they could 
attack the mark." he said. 

Fuji Bank's chief dealer. John 
Griffin, said traders were trying to 
interpret news from Tokyo about 
U.S.-Japan trade talks and the So- 
cial Democratic Party's threat to 
leave the coalition government in 
opposition to tax components of 
the fiscal stimulus package. 

"The dollar’s upside is capped by 
the threat of a possible statement by 
the U.S. Treasury on the yen should 
the trade talks break down.” Mr. 
Griffin said. “On the other hand, the 
yen's upside is limited by the poten- 
tial breakup of the Japanese govern- 
ment and strong investor interest to 
buy dollars at 107.70-80." 

The dollar gained a little against 
the French franc, to 5.8825 francs 
from 5.8775. and against the Swiss 
franc, to 1.4510 francs from 1.4485. 
The pound slipped to SI. 4956 From 
SI. 50 10. 


Scons 

Unh« 

ELoMdn 

RJNWob 

WolMHs 

wochovs 

TelMex 


PorCom 

Hanson 

MavOSs 

Gtawj 

Humana 

CnMatr 

IBM 


VoL 

Meh 

Loot 

Last 

Ota. 

48075 

5249 

5tH% 

$11$ 

—rt> 

43471 

14Vfe 

13W 

141k 


47016 

34 

34 S. 

351k 

... 

42005 

TH 

7=6 

7*6 


40*90 

28 

27 

7754 

• % 

34043 

34 Vj 

32 Vj 

32% 

—11. 

33704 

7*V| 

73 Vi 

74 

... 

33420 

I9L. 

WJA 

19% 

_% 

30637 

78 VS 

77k. 

71% 

—1% 

77036 

271-1 

21 Ni 

23% 

• % 

76515 

39W 

38 

38% 

— % 

26191 

2tHk 

I9W 

70% 

♦% 

75941 

21 to 

21 'v 

71% 

- % 

3100 

•110 

60V. 

41% 

-H 

21143 

56 Vi 

45 ‘*7 

56% 

—4k 


AMEX Most Active* 



VOL 

High 

Loot 

Uni 

a*. 


33471 




- V|, 

ENSCO 

13867 J-V. 

3% 









ShefWM 

9382 

9% 

7 

B% 

— % 

Ecnoear 

5802 

14 

13% 

13% 


PovuiOg 

540 

5 


41, 


CtzFv 

5*07 

8% 

8% 

8% 

• ’’1 

Atari 



7'-» 

71*. 

■u 

Hasbro 

4737 

34% 

34 

34% 

-% 

OlHMed 

4537 

23% 

J3'k 

23% 








PlvGem 

<238 23% 

2(% 

22% 

-% 

OlraJH j 

35 VI 

7 

6% 

4% 

— % 



4V, 

4 

4<j 


SPDR 

3063 48Vc 

4 » = 

48V. 

-9K 


NYSE Diary 


Total issues 
New Highs 
Nan Laws 


1277 

941 

855 

110 

416 

647 

370 

3751 

10 

135 

14 

13 


Amex Mary 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Tan* issues 
NewHOTto 
New lows 


341 m 

Ml 3«3 

310 340 

K» 85* 

28 40 

9 i 


NASDAQ Diary 


Advmced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total issues 
New Highs 
New Lows 


1534 1499 

1487 lUi 
1750 1047 

4771 4777 

156 171 

51 49 


Dow Jones Averages 


Open IM Ln» IM* 


ffil 3 £S 5 SSa«*!SS‘-a 


185679 INW 'Stfc .nil 

i£» SS5t»®S,2ii; “ 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


dot* HJsft Low Prev, Owe 


Food 


Standard & Poor’s Indexes 


industrials 

Transs. 

UI I lilies 
Finance 
SP 500 
SP 100 


High Low cm 
50048 SIAM 56059 +173 
45309 44971 452.96 + 102 
1 73 as 170.4? 17D06-Q07 
46J7 44.14 4025 — 6JN 
48023 «907 482X0 + 2JS 
44720 44423 *4647 + Z42 


NYSE Indexes 



H*h 

LOOT 

Last 

csg. 

Composite 

Industrials 

Tngrsfl. 

UtRUv 

Roona 

267-78 

32S.07 

28*34 

33**5 

22A25 

26*44 

32580 

783-38 

27*02 

72797 

7*7 .71 
327.93 

sq, ns 
22*41 
274.07 

-1JT7 

*2.13 

• 049 

**JS 

-0.01 

NASDAQ Indexes 


mot 

Law 

Last 

OUF 

Camaosita 

inaustrtals 

Bonks 

InsunxicB 

Fmancr 

Tnnw. 

UffUftes 

79983 

837 04 

703.70 

945.0*- 

900.91 

79588 

183A7 

79*83 
83188 
TO.04 
939 65 
99984 
791-73 
1820 

799 J2 
837.04 
702.18 
W137 
900-71 
79SA8 
1*7-87 

*20 

**23 

—1-56 

—10 

—087 

*358 

-7J3 

AMEX Stock Index 


HWh 

Law 

Last 

Qig. 


07.to 

JR? 

070 

*IJ 9 

Dow Jones Bend Averages 

20 Bants 
HI Utilities 
10 industrials 


Close 
UU7 
193 JO 
107 J4 


Ctrge 
— *06 
— ojn 
—am 


Market Sales 


NYSE 4 pjn. volume 
NYSE prev. cons, dose 
Amex 4 tun. volume 
Amex prev. cons, close 
NASDAQ 4 (Lfn. volume 
NASDAQ prev. 4 pjtl volume 


XXJ7QMC 

37SJ6JMJ 

24ASS015 

29.192400 

29*040000 

339254200 


N.Y.S.E. Odd- Lot Tracfirig 


Buy Salas Short* 

Feb. I 982.105 1492201 30274 

Jon. 31 1271414 1 .509,457 41453 

Jon. 28 1035407 14630B7 40261 

Jan. 27 1250471 M74J77 S7.1J7 

Jan. 24 1221212 1474004 22264 

•inamed h i /fie sales mures. 


SAP 100 Index Options 


Strike 
Pace Feb 

COBbUSl 
Mo r Aar 

MBT 

fob 

PUMAS 
Mr Mr 

Feb. 1 

Mr 

*0 

_ 

ma 

— 


% 


•k 


35 



•OT 


OTOT 

»• 

— 

— 

%- 

s 

_ 

_ 

_ 

— 

% 

>. 

% 


795 

_ 

_ 

•OT 

*- 

l a 

— 

— 


48 

441* 





__ 

to 

VJ 

)% 


45 


_ 


— 

N 

% 

1% 

Not 

tie 









% 

1*9 

7- 

415 

_ 

IPs 


_ 

V. 

% 

1% 

OTP 

4K 

in* 

25 

2* 

_ 

% 

1% 

V> 

Pi 

43 

mi 

2SP, 



% 

1% 

VO 

w 

41 

146: 

16 

It's 

_ 

1* 

7* 

TO 

SVi 

as 

10% 

til 

W? 


In 

T« 

4P* 

— 

44 

6 

(t* 

n. 

IKl 

7% 

4% 

6N 

5H 

US 

2% 

S 

7 

— 

3% 

»■* 

IV. 


40 

% 

T-. 

4«i 

Pi 

1% 

•% 

w*. 


65 

1* 

Dt 

7^ 


n. 

U. 

u 

OT. 

tec 

% 

1* 

1*. 

Tr 


1TN 

17V. 

If^ 

415 

* 

k 

— 


— 

— 

22% 

— 

C4h: Mol vd S7JB7. hPol «P*n mL t2MB 


PUB: Mat vol. WIMBr Wat open tot 49&SB 



ma Dec W occts McN DrcN nets hen 

STn - - - % - — 

35 - - - % - - 

<8 - - - •« I - 

*2% - - - l‘j 1 ’• - 

45 - - r-e » - 

47V, _ IN - - *»* — 

Cab: tow val SB; total aoen ky. IU(5 
Pots: total v«* 1423: WolooenlM. 1474M 
Source: CBOt 


COCOA JLCE) 


Mar 

Mar 

Jol 

Sea 

Dec 

Mar 


853 854 

142 843 

BM 25 
892 ■« 


Jut 


9J7 


864 

847 

856 

857 

sn 

853 

859 

BM 

885 

868 

873 

874 

904 

890 

895 

BM 

919 

911 

916 

915 

934 

927 

N.T. 

930 

9*2 

93S 

K.T. 

«J 

N.T. 

N.T. 

K.T. 

933 

N.T. 

I4.T. 

N.T. 

964 

N.T. 

N.T. 

970 

900 


SOP »55 

OK 945 

Esj. volume: 4.139 


1.150 1.152 1.159 1M 1.1« l.|g 


Jot 

Sep 


1,158 1.160 1.149 1.150 U57 

]*1S2 1.152 1.1*3 1.146 1.144 1.147 

1*152 1.155 1,157 1.147 1,V*4 1.148 

Nov N.T. 1.153 N.T. H.T. 1,1*6 USD 

jS H.T. 1.153 1.152 1.152 1.144 ll» 

Mar N.T. 1.153 N.T. N.T. 1.1-0 1,751 

Ett. volume. 2J2S 

High Law Com Qr*ge 

WHITE SUGAR IMattfi . _ . 

Dollar* per metric too-lali of St leas 
Mar 29920 27600 29650 2*900 + 240 

Moy 29600 793 JO 29500 29500 + 240 

AM 79700 N.T. 277 .DC 29800 + 1.90 

Set 28450 26350 26450 28650 + 100 

DOC N.T. N.T. 28200 28450 + 150 

MV N.T. N.T. 2*450 + 350 

ESC. volume: 1416 Open hit.: 13066 


Metals 


Bid 


ALUMINUM (High Grade) 
DotSan per metric too 

Spot 125750 1238S0 

Forward 127 ADO 1277.00 

COPPER CATHODES <900* 
Dai lor* per m e tr ic ton 
Spot 191150 T71250 

Forward 193450 I935J0 

LEAD 

DoUot* per metrleloa 
Spot 50650 50758 

Forward 51950 51950 

NICKEL 

Dollars per matrtcjoo 
SpoI 592QJ30 393050 

Forward 598550 999050 

TIN 

Dollars per metric ton 
Spot 539550 540050 

Forward 544S0O 545050 

zinc (special »«lt Grade) 
Dollars per metric tan 
Soot 100750 100850 

Forward 102850 102850 


BM ASk 


12*240 

126150 

Grade) 


124340 

126240 


minn 

188800 


18*540 

188940 


52150 


50940 

571.50 


581050 

587550 


582050 

588050 


9*1 9 fl n 534540 


99450 

101558 


99550 

101640 


Financial 


HMli Low CJc 
3-MONTH STERLING (LIFFE) 
BOOM - pi* oi iee pcs 


Dec 

Mar 

JN 


Mar 

Jen 


9471 

9863 

*864 

— 08* 

toJW 

9881 

94*2 

-0J7 

94.94 

9484 

9484 

— (LOB 

94Jh 

9881 

9482 

— 0J7 

9482 

9874 

*875 

— *06 

*467 

94j» 

*860 

nrw 

94.51 

94.45 

9846 

— *03 

94J8 

9830 

98J3 

— 083 

94.23 

94.19 

9821 

— on i 

94.10 

9+05 

9807 

— QJB 


Est. volume: 49482. Open tort: 42X809. 
MtONTH EURODOLLARS <UFFE) 

11 raBBOT • 89* Of ISO pet 

9*36 —053 

9*25 —852 
9554 —OB2 
9537 —052 

«47 — QSl 

95.10 —051 

94.90 —002 


Mar 

96J0 

*658 

Jot 

9427 

9426 

Sen 

9555 

9*93 

Dec 

N.T. 

N.T. 

Mar 

N.T. 

N.T. 




Sep 

N.T. 

N.T. 

Est. volume: 8Z7. Open In 

3+60MTH EURO (MARKS <L 

DMlmShX 

-PtIBtlOOpct 

Mar 

9444 

9440 

Jon 

98*0 

9865 

Sep 

9522 

95.T7 

Dec 

9540 

MK 

Mar 

955* 

9549 


9441 —051 

9<M —053 


95.19 -052 

9537 —052 


JUB 

Se» 


9531 —052 


95,55 —053 

9S33 —8® 


9551 9533 

9534 9532 

DOC 9545 9541 

MOT 9533 9531 

JOT 9322 9519 9120 —0*0 

Est. volume: 64495 Open Ini.: 889454. 


9541 -054 

9532 —053 


U3NG GILT (LIFFE) 


- pts & 32ad* at 100 pd 
JOT 11004 117-26 117-30 —Ml 

Est. volume: 62444. Open InL: 1102)8. 
GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUHO (UFFE) 
DM 250080 - ptS OflM pd 
MOT 10048 10029 10035 —ON 

Jon 1D0J9 10025 10029 —ON 

Est. velum*: 90979. Open kit.: 169481. 


industrials 

Lost Settle Cfa'gc 


Leer 


Ft* 


High 

GASOIL (IP£) 

U J. dBiion nr moMc toMotsef wo ten 

WWS 14*30 34*25 16945 +449 

15050 1*745. 15025 15000 + 450 

1*946 1*645 14025 1*025 +331 

3*740 S3 3*730 14700 +343 

3*746 14500 147J0 14700 + 200 

1*025 MB 3D 74025 14SJJ +345 

N.T. N.T. N.T. 15&S +173 

K.T. N.T, N.T. 15245 +245 

N.T. N.T. N.T. 15*35 + 245 

NLT. N.T. M.T. MOOD +100 

ec I59JS 15945 15945 15945 +345 

m N.T. NJ. N.T. 16025 +33 
Est volume: 2242*. OoenM. 113340 


MOV 

Jot 

Jut 

Aao 

ss 


BRENT CRUDE OIL OPE} 

UJO doom per BorreMoK at 1488 barrels 


Si 


§3 


1443 

1444 
3*47 3*33 

1433 1(77 

M41 t<90 

1*43 1505 

N.T. N.T. 
1535 1585 

35.18 3548 


1440 +006 
3+59 +007 
1*43 +009 
1*41 +019 
KM +02 0 
lCWf +023 

1341 +0J9 
1545 + 03* 
IMA +04* 


Est volume: 4A847 . Open IM. MO071 


FTS* HO (UF?E) 
as nr (MW Petal 


Stock Indexes 

> dee* Ctatt* 


35380 36*60 35300 +4U 

353*0 357AJ1 354*5 + 490 

35500 35*71 D 35610 +49JB 

K volume: 20160 Open bit.: 7*556. 
S ource* : Reurera. Mom. Associated Press. 
j-°rkfcr> inti Financial Futures EJKticnae. 
Inn Patralaum E x chang e. 


Jen 

■fa. 


Spot CcMwmoc B ttas 


Commefflty Today Pm. 

Aluminum, b 0571 05*4 

Coffee. Braz, 0) 0645 0645 

Copper etectnyytic. to 1036 0989 

Iron FOB. letl . 71300 21340 

Lead, Id 034 034 

Silver, tray az sjos 5.19 

Steel (scrap), ton 13343 13343 

Tiato osaM n& 

zinc. R) 0*686 04745 


DM 


Company Per Amt Pay Rec 

CORRECTION 

Nuv PA OoaUnco > 8815 2-35 3-1 


Allen Organ B 
Arctcolnc 
Motorola InC 


INCREASED 

8 

G 

IRREGULAR 


2-18 34 

2-17 3-2 

>15 +18 


All Amir Term Tr 
Kemaer MuMiwtf 


.10 

88 


2-11 2-25 
2 -15 >28 


AFLAC <nc 
Aim Strati nco 
EQK Green Acres 
Emerson Elect 
Fails FntS 
IBM 

Interprovtnda PLnS 
Johnstown SvaeBk 
Keilev OOGas ptnrs 
Kyiar Indus 
Mid Iowa Pnd 
Normiond CronBer 
PalneWb PremTsFr 
Penn VA Cp 
P otaratd Coro 
Rolans Truck Lem 
Sal Bros 20DVWW Gvt 
So ihm CA water 
Tantorands Ik 
U 5P RsolEstlnv 
Uld atles Gas 
Zwolg TotlRet 



RESUMED 


MorW# Fnd Cp 
Qidncy SvgsSk 


M >25 
>14 >28 


REVERSE STOCK SPLIT 


Fountain Powerboat l for 2 
Sparta Surstml 1 lor 8 
vostro Foods 1 tor 30 


SPECIAL 

• XGt >11 >18 
STOCK SPLIT 


Mid kawo Fnd 6 for 5 
Motorola Inc 2 tori 


U.S./ATTHE^kOSIs 


Paramount Expects $35 Million Loss . 

NEW YORK (Corabmed Disp^cbes) ^ ! 
io, the prize in a heated takeover battle between QVC lrt : 




* I 


Ina, the prize in a heated takeover battle between w ^ n ik>n to : 

Viabom fnc^ said Wednesday it expected to post a loss of S3S mimon to ? 
S40 linTlinn fnrTlc thmt mrartwr orhirh ended JSH. 31. . . ■ 


$40 million ror its third quarter, which ended Jan. 3 *- ; 

The aitertaimrieaitcongloinerate blamed poor ratings an^ ^^ . 

USA Netwodc cable channel and its disappointmg ; 

‘liXilamc Camllu ll.l— ” — II „ amlmnotnl IflSSCS IS pUWlSflUJg ■ 


Addams Family Values.” as wcH as anticipated losses in p«J 

television production. . . haw . ' 

lie results added support to speculation that QVC and Ap] \ 

Kd far more than- PaiSurn is worth. (Bloomberg, AP) . 


Leading Indicators Up 0-7 Percent 

WASHINGTON (AP) —The U& govemroem's chief 
casting gauge, rose in Dasmber for the fifth straight month, a repwi 
suggests the Anyjrican economy will continue to expand later ™ 

^ie Comroero Department said Wednesday its Index oF Leading 
Economic Indicators, rose O. 7 percent in December. That follows uj 

percent advances in October and November. , , - 

With the economy improving and mortgage rates the lowest in wo 
decades, sales of new boosing shot up 9.7 percent last year, to the tugnest 
level in five years. ‘ ' 

Incp’s Loss, Doubled in Quarter 

TORONTO (Bloomberg) — Inco Ltd. said Wednesday its loss for the 
fourth qtranerof 1993 doubled, to $38.2 million, as thepnceof the niorel 
it produces fdl 20 percent- c . 

Inco. the^woricFs largest nickel producer outside the former soviet 
Union, said revenue fefl 15.7 percent, to 5515.8 million, compared wuh 
the fourth quarter of 1992. . 

“The company's realized nickel price for 1993, the key determinant ot 
the company’s profitability, was the lowest since l987, T ’ Inco said- Inco 
sold its nickd for an average price of $2.42 a pound daring the quarter. 


ifC. 


; : r' 

if 


'it'. - 


■ir’ ‘ 




'*■ 


Canadian Cable Merger Overture 


u m : . 


rV-T. 
-TC ' 
"if 


TORONTO (Combined Dispatches) — Maclean Hunter Ltd. said 
Wednesday that it had received an unsolicited takeover overture from 
Rogers Communications Inc.. Canada's largest cable television company. 

Rogers is offering a combination of caih and its nonvoting stock for all 
the shares of Maclean Hunter, which controls the Toronto Sun newspa- 
per and also has extensive cable TV operations. Madean Hunter' s stock 
is valued at 2.85 bilbos Can adian dollars (S2J5 billion). 

Edward Rogers, chairman and controlling shareholder of Rogers 
C ommunica tions, has already acquired a 7 percent stake in Maclean 
Hunter, the company said. • (Reuun, Knigfa-Ridder) 


Tribune Co.’s Earnings Rise 38% 

CHICAGO (AP) —Tribune Co„ parent of newspapers, television and 
radio stations and the Chicago Cubs baseball team, said Wednesday that 

i_. : l l - no .. «co l — niiw. 


its quarterly earnings had risen 38 percent to S58.1 million. 
Revenue for its 1993 fourth quarter, which ended 

li rc t 4 in* — 


Dec. 26. slipped U 

percent, to 55 14 million. * ' 

Tribune Co. said its fourth -quarter newspaper publishing profits were 
up 44 percent. 


Buyout Lifts McGraw-Hill’s Profit 

NEW YORK (AP) — McGraw-Hill Inc. said Wednesday that net 
profit and revenue rose in the foarth quarter of 1993, a development the 

~ ■ 'iase of the rem : ' 

Pubiishing Co. 


; IUUJU1 wa 17/j, A VIWtV.lV|/»l*w** UIN 

company attributed to its purchase of the remaining half interest in 
Macmillan-McGiaw Hill School ! 


Profit for the miarter ended Dec 31 rose 4 percent to $44.9 million, on 
revenue of $682.6 million, up 18 percent 


For the Record 


JJB. Acqmsitioa Co. a Colorado-based partnership of Jones Intercable 
Inc, PameWebber Cable Capital Inc. and Sandier Capital Management, 
said it had purchased four British cable companies from PacTd Cable 
The purchase price was not disclosed. ■ (AP) 


INVEST: End of Embargo on Vietnam Will Clear Way for Japan to Assume Dominant Position in Economy 

semigovernmental Japan Petroleum 


Continued from Page 9 

Bank to extend credit to Hanoi: he 
also gave permission to U.S. com- 
panies to join in international pro- 
jects there. 

Free to expose its hand. Japan in 
November pledged 60 billion yen 
(S557.4 million) in aid to Vietnam. 
The commitment included 52 bil- 
lion yen in yen loans: 6 billion yen 


in grants: and 2 billion in technical 
assistance. Little of the aid has be- 
gun to flow into specific projects. 
But once it docs. Japanese compa- 
nies are expected to win a substan- 
tial percentage. 

But Japan will be playing catch- 
up. Taiwan, Hong Kong. Singapore 
and Australia have already secured 
lucrative contracts and become 


Vietnam's biggest foreign investors, 
while Japan ranks number six. At 
the end of last September, Japan 
had invested a cumulative ratal of 
S335.6 million, compared with Si. 44 
billion by Taiwan, according to 
Vietnamese government statistics. 

In bilateral trade, Japan has long 
been Vietnam’s biggest partner. 
The two nations' trade was worth 


an estimated Sl-5 billion in 1993. 


May. 

said 


Keidanren’s Mr. Kadota 

ExfrforaDon CO. and Indonesia Pe- 

By the end of 1994, Japan’s in- , . xr . trdeum Ltd. 

vtstrom could mwc up several Bu.JfanraisliWy.obetaan.l- 

notches. Its cumulative total would . _ . ; _■ TT 1 ^ • «d ■ m. its. attempt to lure mvesl- 

ncariy double with an expected 
S300 million investment in a Hanoi 
cement venture by Mitsubishi Ma- 
terial Corp. and Nihon Cement Co. 

A final decision is likely in April or 


In another major project. Nissho 
Iwai and tvro other Japanese compa- 
nies are dose to signing a contract to 
explore for oil off the southeast 

shore of Vi etnam. Mobil Corp. will Toyota Motor Carp, or 'Nippon 
be the opantor and biggest investor, Sted Corp. until it improves its 
with a 50 percent stake. The tiro regulatory framework, Mr. Kadota 
other Japanese concerns are the said- ' 






e.f / 
r~ * 


i- 




jj- . 

-■ V 

IT*-' .■ 

• HI 


Sr.- 

jy.. ; 

1 : 


u:" ' . 

ue< 

•j* “ 

■A.-":" 


rxr~- ■ 

IF>=7"- 
rr-r ■ 1 
%tsr-‘ 


«1S 




Fr 


men is for highcr-valiie added pro- 
jects from the likes of Sony Carp„ 




at. :* 

RaL’UCw.l,. 




I l-rr’.l .. 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Froncr lnu» M> 2 

cimPw. 


Amsterdam 


ABN Amro Hid 
*CF HoMIlia 
A«Ofi 
Ahold 
Akia 
AMEV 
Amsf RoUOae 

BoJs-W«san«i 
C5M 
DSM 
ElMvler 
Fokker 
GIV-Brncodn 
HEG 
Heinrten 
Hoaaavens 
Hunter Douglas. 

IHC Caland 
lnt*r 7Aa*«cr 
inn Neoertana 
F.L7A 
I5NPBT 
NrOUOvO 
Oc* Grhwen 
Fatnoea 
Philips 
Polvgrain 
Roeeco 
PwSomca 
Rdinca 
Porwlo 
Ho*0l Dutch 
Stork 
Unilever 
Van Ommeren 
7NU ----- 

Wollerxi r lower 132*9 IJ9L20 

AEX Irene index : *37 J8 
Previous : 43874 


71.78 71J4I 
&2J0 62*0 
IDS 30 106.40 
52*0 52*0 
210 60 208*0 
B*J0 8*50 
250 1*0 

4440 4530 
7530 7570 
10950 UW 
194 0 193.10 
71 BO 22.90 
56.10 56 

!60 2 DO 

2J2J0 2U.70 
19 M 60 
83 82 

41*0 41.31 
87 8650 
91*0 90.70 
49 46 40 
47.95 40 40 
7460 7140 
7170 7250 
5*10 54 JO 
4700 4830 
82-40 81*0 
111 13030 
*5.10 65 

135 JO 13*50 
100J0 10CL1Q 
710 40 21030 
44 10 43*C 
23030 728-60 
46*0 *7.90 

199.70 1 87 JO 


Brussels 


Aeee-uv 
AD Fin 
A rhea 
Bar co 
Betoeri 
Cockerili 
Coeeoa 
teihaue 
EMtdroM) 

GIB 
GBL 
Gevuerl 
Kredletnank 

Fvlrofina 

PoeWdn 
Bora i Beige 
SocGen Etonaue 


2780 2830 
3070 3090 
630 42*$ 
2380 2400 
7210011750 
180 1B1 

5780 N O. 

1488 1498 

6510 6500 
1510 1570 
4730 4790 
7590 7650 
7890 7720 
10700 10675 
3*90 3500 
5080 5990 
50)0 89 SO 


dose Prev. 


Helsinki 


Amer-YhtYihg 

128 

120 

enso-Gutwii 

«J 

**» 

Huhiomakl 

215 

215 

IX.P. 

16.60 

1430 

Krmmene 

125 

’S 

Metro 

21* 

217 

Nokia 

33* 

Jib 

Pohiaia 

102 

1DJ 

Pews la 

117 

117 

Slack mam 

2*0 

305 

HEX. Index.: 173745 
Previous : 172984 



14 14 70 
5030 SI 
4630 4BJ5 
14 14.10 
18.90 iaw 


Soc Gen Beiqioue 2720 ?7» 
Son no 15525 15575 

Sfllvuv 1JI25 15300 

Tracteoel II050 H475 

UCB 25210 15350 


Hong Kong 

Bk Easl Asia 55 5430 

Camor Paciilc 
Cheung *jxy) 

China Llgnt P»r 
Oalrv Form Ini ( 

Hang Lung Dev 
Hang 5eng Bant 7730 
Henderson Land 5530 55-50 

HK Air Eng 

HK China Gm 
HK Electric 
HK Land 
HK. Reoiiv Trull 
HSBC KoMingi 
HK Shang H1I5 

hk. Telecomm 
hk. Fern- 
Huleh wnamooa 
Hvsan Dev 
jardme Mam. 

JorUme Sir Hid 
Kowloon Mo*or _ . . 

Mandarin Oriem IIJO 11*0 
Miromar Morel 2380 23.W 
New World Dev 
5HK Pram 
5lelu« 

Swire Pac A „ 

Ta> Cheung Prm I3."0 »4 

■p/E 3 70 170 

Wharf Hold 3*75 35 

tons On inn 15.10 n a 
Wiraor ind 14 20 14J0 

Hang sene moe*- 11715*0 
Previous : us2kJ9 


46.25 4«.7S 
22J0 221(1 
30 »30 
79*0 2*30 
26 26 
121 121 
I*4fl 14.10 
16J0 1*40 
13 I3J0 
41 41 

3125 30*0 
SO so 
3SJ5 3530 
1*10 1810 


3*75 3*50 
69 6730 
*50 *40 
64 6*50 



Close 

Prev. 

Inchcaee 


5.72 

i:lrmf)9ttr 


6J3 


ZDS 

102 



749 

La carte 

*25 

*18 


U4 

1.27 


SJ* 

5-15 


640 

6J9 


4-37 

4J6 


545 

540 

Nari Power 

+86 

4.77 

Harwell 

5*1 

50/ 

Ntnuyji water 

5*2 

50J 

Pearson 

7 19 

7 

P&O 


7JH 

Pilkington 

1*0 

1.90 

PowerGen 


5-57 

Prudenliol 

172 

7JII 



I04J 

Recklft Cot 


b-TI 


625 

631 

Reed mil 

94? 

943 


1943 

1900 


9.7B 

909 

ROUS Rovce 

1 B5 

102 

Rothmn (unill 

445 

44* 


5J» 

5.01 


**5 

800 



304 


5.78 

5.78 



446 


1J5 

1.25 


637 

616 


73S 

732 


SB* 

5.90 


1-53 

10* 

SmhnKlme B 

4J0 

437 


512 

5 12 

Sun Alltpnce 

4 14 

411 

Tale 6 Lrle 

450 

4JI 


233 

2 IB 

Ttwrn 6fAl 

11 JO 

11 

Tomkins 

*0 

26S 

T50 Group 

282 

234 

Unilever 

IT JS 

IZIS 


169 

165 

.'ocoloee 

6.14 

597 

war Leon !■: 

5341 

5332 


642 

640 

whiroread 

537 

5.80 

Williams HOPS 

J.*S 

196 

Wlllrs Cor roan 

2.17 

230 


Johannesburg 


Previous : 7WJ 


Frankfurt 


AEG 

Allioni Hold 
Altana 
*1*9 
BASF 
Barer 

Bav. H >06 bant 
Ban verclnsto* 

BBC . 

BHF Sent 

, 

Commerinont 
Conllnenlol 
Dolmler Ben; 

Dfgu-. 50 

Df Bobcoct 
Deutsche Bor* 

Douglas 
Orevtner Bant * 39.90 JJj 
Fewmuehle 333 333 

F Kruse Honcn lrt l?l£0 


16*20 168 
312 2818 
66666*50 
1239 1275 
X2J0J02.70 
367 5 0 366.70 
480 478 

55* 5 S3 

690 TOO 
45150 4S I 
788 79050 
375)74*0 
2625026250 
024 818 

47SJ0 47E 
260.8076050 
6*1 83e 

573 560 


Haroener 

Henkel 

Hochtief 

Hoecnsi 

Holimann 
Horten 
IWKA 
Kail Sol: 
Ksrswdl 
Kaulhof 
khO 


320 123 
6*35064*50 
1248 1235 
3175031*20 
1026 lOW 
24550 744 
38950 3ea 
1575015550 

S50H550 
50*20*50 
119 30 172 


KJoeckner rtTrfcem 50 12020 


Linos 
Lufmanso 
MAN 

/Aonnesmonn 
rjieloilgeseli 
Muencn Ruegk 
Porsche 
Preu*so7 
r«A 

awe 

Rnemmeiall 
Schering 
SEL 

Siemens 
Thvueri 
vorta 
V6D0 

VEW 

Vlag 

VoRswogen 

welia 
DAX woe* : MO*** 
Previous : IBW 

Previoui : BaM 


89650 9Q0 

192 192 

4125040750 
<215041150 
2222X50 
J49S 3S30 
EOT BI5 
*63 *66 
2J4 233 

49449U0 
33050 138 

1103 Mil 
J«6 39? 

rt5J0 716 
ZSTJS 25® 
373 366 
511 511 

34S 367 
*87 JO *84 
4*780*4*50 
830 820 


AECI 

1*50 

1*50 

Aiiech 

95 

74 

AngH Amer 

2tO 

1*6 

Bor loon 

N4 

3000 

Bl.vocv 

0 

■00 

Buttets 

51 


Dr Beers 

10) 

102 

Dr ie tonic in 

55 

5450 

Gen cor 

840 

3 JO 

GF5A 

9*50 

to 

Harmon. 

26 

25 

Hignveld Sieei 

17 

17 

hioot 

51 

5000 

Ned honk Grp 

2600 2625 

Randioniein 

4100 

4100 

Puutlat 

73J0 

7200 

So 3re««5 

0700 

86 

5; Helena 

Jl 

41 

5osoZ 

70 

19 

Aelkom 

4235 

43 

Western Deed 

172 

IM 

CompoNle index 

099.14 

prevtotn ; <70101 




London 

Abaev Nan 5.12 
Allied L»om 
Ar|0 Wiggins 
Argyll Group 
Ass Bril Foods. 

0AA 
BAS 

Bank Scotland 
Borciavs 
Bess 
BAT 
BET 

Blue Circle 
BQC Group 
Bods 

Bonnier 

BP 

Brn Airwo.'j 
Brit Gas 
Bril Sled 
Bril Telecom 
BTB 

Caaie Wire 
CadBurv Sen 
Carodan 
Cools Viyello 
Comm Union 
Court ou Ids 
ECC Group 
Enter or Iso Oil 
Eurahimei 
Fisons 

Fgrie 

DEC 

Gen'l Ace 
Gtoro 
Grand Mel 
GPE 

Guinness 
GUS 

Hanson 

Hllbdoxm 
HSBC HKws 
lCi 


6.*8 

281 

266 

587 

1053 

5M 

130 

6J9 

555 

5.l> 

155 

358 

75: 

S65 

488 

381 

*83 

JJ* 

154 

*77 

3.91 

536 

5.19 

439 

275 

68 * 

538 

*12 

*.T 


1.37 

25» 

3<? 

in 

6 77 
485 
2*1 
5.3* 
637 
2W 
1.77 
10J7 
8 11 


4.97 

637 

281 

256 

£81 

1053 

547 

232 

619 

SJ9 

*28 

IJI 

367 

7JI 

SJ1 

*80 

376 

4.7* 

JJ) 

1.40 

4.71 

3.9J 

533 

532 

43S 

273 

6.95 
535 
5.13 
4»1 
185 
138 
2e5 
1*2 
7.16 
*35 
A77 
241 
538 
635 
£99 
1 78 

1032 

7.96 


F.t. 3D index : 271*16 

Prrvloqs : >67640 

F.T J.E. 100 index : JS2B30 
Previous : 3*8180 


Madrid 


B8V 3445 3405 

BCO Central Hisd. 3140 3IM 
Banco Scnfaneer 7790 niq 
CEPSA ~~ 

DrnOOCtoS 
Emm 
E rcros 
■Derdroio i 
Peosoi 

Taoocaiero 

Tcietomco 


3230 CTO 
7660 2555 
7710 77*0 
ISO 152 
1185 1175 
4790 47*5 
*215 «60 
2105 2030 




Milan 


Banco Comm 
Bov OB i 

Benengn orouo 
CIB 

CrOT IfoJ 
Enicnem 
Fortin 
Ferlln Risd 
Fiat SPA 

Finmeccanica 

Generali 


llalcem 

HatoOS 

itoimaCMiiare 

Mediobanca 

Manredlsan 

Ollrelll 

Pirelli 

PAS 

Rinascenie 

So* pem 


SOfl 5000 
U «9 
77100 26690 
7*44 2209 
7391 7350 
2570 7*00 
19*1 

773 750 

50 i: *070 
1530 1530 
40*30 *0400 
19606 19375 
!23» 123*0 
5610 56E3 
40100 39750 
ItfOB 15940 
1745 1160 
3488 2*20 
4420 4400 
27*0 27970 

91M 9149 
3280 3250 


San Poole Torino 10580 10500 

4J4® 4290 


S!P 
SME 
Sr to 
Smndo 
51*1 

Toro As» RHP 


3820 38*5 
1764 1671 
78300 27(80 
4720 *705 
30960 )0800 


Montreal 


AKon Aluminum 
Bonk Montreoi 
Bell CanodO 
aomDordier B 
Came lor 
Cnwaan 
Dominion Teal A 
Donohue A 
Mnc/iutian Bi 
Null Bk Canada 
Power Coro. 
OueDec Ttl 
OueMcor A 
OuoDecor B 
ToMgloae 
Univu 
Video Iran 
Indirtt HoHIOTer. 
Prenous : 199988 


32'* 32'7 
TV's 30»e 
tgfz at. 
21 

77 -v 33*4 
ip* Sto 
»'■. 

2^ 25 s * 
22h» 2T* 
11'- llto 
23 23'* 
22 ret 

19'. 19*6 
19" « 194* 
71^: 2lto 

1*9 T1 
N.O. 20'1 

191484 


Ctose Prev. 


Paris 


Accor 

751 

741 




Alcatel Alsthom 

780 

781 

A»a 

1576 

1545 

Boncalre (C«t 

676 

656 

etc 

1357 

1341 

SNP 

778 

28? 

Bouvgues 

730 

724 


952 




4325 

CCF. 

793287.90 

Cenn 

14930 149 JO 


101 

1435 

Clmentf From: 

3823038200 


380 

363 

Ell-Aquitahre 

*3030 

424 

Elt-Sanoh 

1093 

1111 

Euro Dtsnev 

3630 

37.75 

Gen. Eou. 

2850 

2866 

Havas 

47600 45400 

Imclol 

630 

640 

Lafarge Canoe* 

478 47900 

Lear and 

5650 

5960 

L.on. Eaue 

606 

599 


1378 

1367 

L.VJWH. 

4006 

3962 

Mafro-Hactielie 

Suso. 

26600 

163 

Micheiln B 

261 

tooullne* 

UI 60 13200 

Paribas 

589 

563 

PecWnrv Inti 

_3I 

231 

Pernpa-Rlcara 

*2630 

■KB 

Peugeot 

867 

861 

Prlntemos (Aul 

HOT 

1033 

Radlarechniaue 

516 

523 

Rh-Poulene A 

15400 15300 

Patf Jr. Lours 

1685 

1661 

Redou'e (Lai 

10(2 

1044 

Salm Gcbain 

697 

695 

5EB. 


589 

Ste Generate 

781 

783 


3+5 

361 


213 

209 

Total 

34630 32*40 

UA.P 

218 2 

U1J 

Volga 

I486 


CAC 0 mors ■ ZS603 
Previous : 232631 

1 

Sao Paulo 


Bonco do Brash 

12*0 

tt.10 


730 



815 



14S0O 1400a 

Paranoooneino 

96* 






2320 



6250 


Vortg 


a: r 100 . 



Bovespa Mdex: 
PrevtOOT : 82606 

82305 


Singapore 



*65 

*20 


7.15 

70C 





17 60 















630 





k’.L Keoong 

112 








0CBC 

1190 



8.45 

845 

DUE 

700 

7.95 


14.10 

14JU 

Shanorho 

6 






705 



735 



1*90 

u.ro 

Smg Sleomsnto 

3.W 

iat 

SDqreTH«omm 3. TO 



104 

14* 

UOB 

11 


UOL 

229 

237 

SSS^^-S”* 


Stockholm 


AGA 

ASMA 

Astra A 
ABw Coaeo 
Eieoroiux B 
Ericsson 
Esse lie- A 
HondeUbOTken 

investor B 
Norsk M»dro 
Procardia A F 
Sandvlk B 
SCA-A 

S-E Bonhen 
5kondto F 
Skanska 
SKF 
Stora 

Treilebora BF 
VAIvO 


0SBnH 


425 471 

577 574 

»5 1W 
438 *38 

38) 155 

362 356 

130 in 
1*3 1*2 

207 201 

758 356 

148 150 

137 116 

149 l« 
7150 69 JO 

701 70* 

277 228 

1*5 1*7 

455 *57 

04 97 

m bio 

183*1? 


Cion Prev 

1 Tokyo 


Aval Eledr 

457 

464 

Asahl Chemical 

tub 





Bank Ol Totrvo 

1650 

1660 


1440 

1440 


1580 

1620 


1140 

1140 

Dai Nippon Print 

1818 

1800 


1650 

1690 


1750 

l»0 

Fonuc 

4210 

4460 

Full Bark 

2250 



7600 

2630 


IW0 

1040 

Hitachi 

830 

*02 


M0 

845 


1620 

1700 

iroVokoda 

mr/ 1 

5*40 




Japan Airlines 




M . ij 1 

HOT 

Konsai Power 


2970' 


268 

373 


12X 

1260 

Komaisu 

9*5 






6880 


m r,: , i 

1730 | 


p I pi 

1120 ) 



7930 ‘ 


474 

*93 1 

MiteuBrshl Elec 

567 

587 : 


70* 

• >4 I 

Mitsubishi Corn 

nso 

11T0 





915 

*23 


I860 

18*0 





nso 

1173 


1340 



949 



rts 

736 | 


350 

355 


6J0 

615 1 


841 

823 | 


i' l 

2360 


993o 1010a 

Olrmous Optical 







794 

*10 


456 



WOT 

! S 








6ITO 



220 

227C 1 






SsLi 

5umllomo Metal 

3*9 

w 





364 

864 | 




TDK 


*410 


0) 

4T? 


1330 

132C 


36CS 

3650 1 








72« 

i 


I960 

l«60 i 

Ycmalchi See 

s ' » nco 

*17 


kssms ugu 



Prevwas : 160 



Sydney 


Amcor 

IQ-76 

IC80 


tv 

143 

BHP 

1*22 

19 IJ 

Bars! 

449 

4*2 

Bougainville 

1 II 


Calcs Mrer 



Coma ICO 

515 


CRA 

1*0 

18.46 ! 

CSP 

541 

5*0 ; 


SJ4 

545 


I JJ 

i j* ! 

Goodman Flew 

107 

1 r 


11 

»*C : 

Mawtlon 

2.10 

H6 


7.*5 

2.7E 

Nut Ausl Ban* 

1206 

1786 j 

News Coro 

mu 

7C 12 | 

Nine Network 

603 

Ml 

M Brgken Hill 

uc 

ir 

Pioneer Inri 

3 

101 I 

Nmnd» Pose Won 

145 

US ; 

OCT Resources 

IJ3 

ixo 


4 0? 

t | 

TNT 

ZJC 

2-3S 

Weslern Mtninfl 

7*5 

8X3 

Westpae Banking 

50 

541 ! 

Woods we 


*JC | 

ADOTOto^Wd*. :23,2.,0 


Close Prev 


Canadian Pacific Z3?« 


Can Puckers 
Ccn Tire A 
Cantor 
Cora 

CCL ind B 
Cmeole* 
Comlnco 
Ccmvest Sjcoi 
D enison Min B 
Dickenson Min A 
Dotascs 
Dvto* a 

Echo Bav Mines 
Eowilv Silver A 
FCA Inll 
Fed Inc A 
Fletcher Choi I A 
FPI 
Gentro 
GddCcm 
Gull Cdo Res 
Inti 


13 *« 

*7 

5V. 

10*4i 

140 

71*9 

22*g 

029 

7 

2SW 

0.*0 

18 

187 

*15 

ri 

2>v» 

S4k 

054 

8=4 

*65 

It's 


Henrto (Wd Mines 13=v 


Holiinger 
Horsham 
Hudwil Bar 

; (TOSCO 

inco 

inter or ov ense 

j onnoc k 
LO0O17 
Lohiaw Co 
Mackenzie 
vagna Inn a 
M criiime 
Mark Res 


1«*» 

19V, 

30ig 

42’» 
37 
33' • 

2V, 

23 

23 

IV* 

67W 

a 

9» 


24=5 

12f» 

13*5 

47 

Sta 

10’v 
365 
21 ■* 
22to 
0-28 
AH 
25^ 
l.W 

live 

1.02 

*15 

91k 

21H 

5=. 

OjJ 

I>1 

*60 

16*5 

1JA. 

14W 

19H 

rto 

43'. 

36k. 


72Vs 

23 : 4 

2JH 

11*9 

47^9 

24 -S 


MOcLeen Hun!er IPs 


Molson A 
Noma Ina a 
H uron d o ins 
Nsrardo Forest 
Nersen Energy 
NShem Telecom 
Nova Coro 
C share 
PaaurmJi 
Plaeer Dome 
Paco Pe*roto«m 
PV9A Coro 
Por+ook 
Rencitsance 
Rogers B 
Rom mans 
PO.OI Bonk Con 
SceeireRcs 

Scon's Hsso 
Seagram 
Seers Ccn 
Snell Can 
Sherrill Gordon 
SHL Svslemhse 
Soumcm 
Soor Aeresocce 
S»l= A 

Talisman En erg 

Te<k B 

T Wi soa Ne«s 
Toronto Dor-ji 
Torslor B 
Trsnsoito Uiii 
TrcnsCOs P oe 
Trilor. F.rl A 


27 


IV* 

27»r 


26W 

I3 l « 

1F5 

4?Sfl 

9k. 

74 

3k. 

»•» 

ID'b 

138 

17=. 

XA, 

21*5 

no 

3’k 

141, 

43'-! 

8 

T»H 

I1H 


26'fl 

ir-* 

15 =. 

42=5 

9L 


3178 

35H 

11 

130 

17'-. 

30-1 

22’- 

109=41 

Jl’« 

14=5 

9=5 


41 


19 

T: 

26 '; 

18 


3**5 

Ills 

8=9 


Tr jec a 
jn.cors £nerg> 


15=9 

J8 

to": 

1 

NO. 


19S. 

a's 

30 

264. 

ITS. 

23'k 
Z7 U 
16 
19”9 


I5E 380 InflM : 4571*8 
P mtoo x ; *27738 


15*5 

184 

061 


Zurich 


id»o 'n*t b 
A tou.ssc 3 new 
BB- Brwn 3ov B 
C.CC <Z*«} i S 
lS Hoie.r-as B 
Electro* B 
F.scner a 
inters SCOgnl a 
je'mo'i ? 

Landis G.r p 
Lew Ha 5 
u»rtrp,;« R 
:*es?’e P 

Gerl.k B'jehrie ff 
“orgesa his a 
Pocne -log pc 
S oPe «epue;ii 
50rac*B 
Stfimster E 
5u':e' pi; 

:-jrve- ]-3,o B 
Swiss Sr* Coni 3 
5»iss Pgmsur P 
Sp'SSOir R 
JB5 B 

Wmteroiur 8 
Zu*i:« Ajj B 

9BS (nogs ; Hmtg 
Previous ■ iaiu7 


256 

,6« 630 

lia 1125 
W1 955 
7SB 743 

*170 *170 

151 ,SM 

2420 2400 
»30 925 

9*5 765 

»*3 675 
*51 460 
1395 1«8 

,1£ ,S5 
172C 1670 
7165 7070 
1*3 141 

*)?0 4)75 
7^0 7750 

2290 2210 

S n * 

703 TOO 

07Q BSD 

’510 I486 
838 8*0 

157b 1J74 


Toronto 



16% 

1*7, 


15% 

1S" 0 


6% 

4: 

» _ a i T 

7C'-» 

l*% 


36’’i 

JS 

BCE 

0% 

_a 

Bk Nava Scana 

23 

a : 

BC Gas 

:4'« 

16‘s 

| ti 

»■> 



002 

am 

Bramaiea 

048 

64- 

BnmiOTiCT 

9 

9 

CAE 

t'1 

6’t 

Camdev 

Si.- 

5'- 

CIBC 

35% 

3>. 


IP* ecsy to niliiuHiu 
aVerey/ 


U.S. FUTURES 


Sealer 

MOT 

Season 

Law Ooen 

HiOT 

Low 

Ooto 

Chg 

Qp-OT 


Grains 










3-75% 

166% 

374% 

•061% l*39S 



1S» 




106* 

20* 

2.*6 JU94 3 43V i 

347 

1® 

346% 

-Q03U 11312 

307 V. 


347% 

141% 

147% 

-003% 

2445 

145 

aw oecto ia’-s 

106% 

049 

J0» 

-003% 

30*6 





155 



127 

111 JU19S 



136 

•8.10% 

5 

ES.udeS 15X00 Tue-v SCOTS *8to 




Tue saoemm **.170 UP 51* 








197 

2.98 Ma-to 241 

346 

259% 

165% 

• 003% kLflW 

J.7Tj 

2.W A6av94 14BW 

152 

148 

ia 

-002% 

741* 



142 

13Pi 

141% 

•tun ’A 

BJto 

30T-, 

JiBSSento 141 

143 

139 

142% 

.801% 

X201 

160 

112% Dec to 147 

148% 

345% 

34B% 

• 001 

9AS 






001 


Est sales NA. Toe's sates 

5330 





Tue'soCOTirt 36.146 OT 214 





CORN 




3.114, 

2J2V.MOT94 209% 

i*2\i 

287% 

292*. 

-801% 96934 

3.16'-. 


197% 

291 

297V; 

-801% 91092 

3 14’ i 


198V; 

29H1 

291 

-001% 01.219 

2.92'. 

240%Smto 17* 

1801, 

276% 

203% 

001 

17487 

?73». 


264% 

242 

264% 

-001 

140S7 

2J*S 

203V> Mor95 24fVr 

270% 

24*% 

270% 

-000% 

73*3 

2J2 



2Q 




2«2'i 

175 JI4 9J 775 

275% 

274’^ 

275 


JC 

3JB? 

701 Vi Dec *5 203 Ui 

253OT 

203 

in% 


37 

Est soles 70060 Traev sain 410W 




Tue'sODenrt IMS rff 1912 








704 

509*4 Mar to 6W1 

644% 

675 

683%-AD3% OJO* 

701 

5*J"iMav94 U> 

68* 

*7*1i 

688% -002% 40709 

700 

LM'*iJUt*4 6 89 

690 

680% 

689% — 002% 32973 




67! 

679% -003 

i486 

4P’.: 

6.17 S«P to 640 

660 

60? 

605%— 0W% 

X9I2 

707V, 

505%rto«to 6X7*7 

642% 



L70 

6 10% Jan *5 4«’-i 

6*7 

641% 

644 ',-1—003 Vi 

10*3 

6J3V, 

60 Mar 95 647 

60S 

647 

650 — (103% 

300 

613 

643% 0/1 95 603 

6S3 

449 

651% — 202% 

204 

(00's 

SJ1VjMdv95 4-20 

6je 

61) 

6IS%_a05’V 


Ed sdn 7i-000 32.117 




Tue’sooen W lffi.566 OT 469 









ZU 00 

ttSJOMarto 1*440 

19400 

19228 

19410 

-040 35422 

7PW 

tSJDMovto 19400 

1*680 

19260 

19*40 

-870 18.740 


maojmto 19490 

>9500 

19100 




19100AUO94 19100 

1*130 

19100 

H2J0 

-100 

6378 


19040 Seato 19070 

191.00 

197 JO 

19000 

-040 

348! 



18800 

1*7. Id 




709 00 

<40 Dec to 18700 

18730 

1*490 

187.10 

-8 OT 

54*8 


18731 Jon « 1*640 



•**J0 



ESI. saws 1*000 Tue-S. SOOTS H.79S 











®v- 2-k^.er 

* t3 



38 75 

71 13Marto B0» 

29 JD 

2801 

2ajw 

‘801 32J48 


71 J06*cvto 28.71 

28.92 

2840 

2891 

-80*23033 





2809 


79-25 

21 65Auato 2795 

2805 

2746 

78.03 


S0S7 





2748 




22.10009* »*0 

2655 

2630 

2601 

—816 

30» 





2693 


63M 


2245JW195 25 75 

2545 

2540 

2505 


<22 


JSSMarn 



2500 

—820 

19 

rv . van 75J»a Tue’s-KPes u.c* 




Tuesaoenmt *4.712 UP 212* 






Livestock 




CATTLE ((MM) cMtn.- 

otMtiparto. 








7242 

• 815 20772 


1300 Apr to 75JO 

75* 





JAB 



7100 

73.92 

• 812 19008 


hUOtojgto 7170 



7735 


730? 

rtJPOoto JJ? 

7275 

7250 

72*2 

•007 

7031 


77-35 Dec to 7345 



7342 






TUB 




Est. sates 13.714 Tue’vsdss 22X60 









r.-Tr 









8107 




79 MAS* 94 500 

Wjo 


80* 

-405 

3431 



794) 

79J2 

79.J0 

•0 13 

i.m 










8825 

79.97 

8075 


233 



8085 

*0 60 





79 JO Oct 95 **00 


7987 

8002 



19X0 

7*00 Jan 96 



rt.15 

■815 



2017 





TOTSOoenrt H+31 UP 7* 







CMERJ «nito'cnnpr« 






ajOFeuM soso 

50 TO 

49 99 

sn.30 




PJ7AWW 9 JO 

5105 

SOJO 

1165 

•0*5 IX37I 


3537 Junto &60 

5600 

5535 

sin 




453049* 5*n 

S577 

5405 

a is 

■ 835 

3,751 


4*35 AugH C 67 

5125 

57 JC 

nos 

• 038 

3022 


4300 Od to *9.00 

4930 

4870 

49.15 


14S 


4U9DKH 4940 

4*00 

<905 

f?S3 

•a IS 



*U9F*b*5 *9.90 


45 90 

49.97 




40.90 A*» 95 




-0.10 

SJ 

l=ji8-"-»/r-.'Tr¥yr- 3 

7090 










r:”T 



» 




J9 .10FOT9* 940 

UH 

Fn 

6035 

•1.91 

3022 


»»Mo r« 90S 



4002 




40J0Mov« 59.55 


59.53 

6107 




390044*4 5575 

4147 

045 

61 A7 

-200 

XKS 


*2.00600 9* 5735 

sa 

5735 

597$ 

• 200 

441 

aim 3036 Turs sues 

503' 












1 Season Season 


MM 



MOT 

Lm Open 

High 

Lew 

Oast 

Ou OpJat 





1804 

HUS 31, 


1007 jm 95 



KL04 

*805 270 


10070095 



1804 

♦ 005 m 

EStJcfcs 187*9 TOT'S. SOOTS 19,929 



T LOT’S open rt 109371 ott 1509 




COCO* 





1495 

953 Mar 9* IftS7 

1052 

H47 

105, 

-4 2M19 



I0M 

H*3 

10W 

—4 22J6* 




1110 

1112 


1377 


1153 

1137 

,1*4 

—6 745* 

!» 


1185 

1172 

IT72 

-7 6735 




1205 

1203 




IZ2S 

,222 

1214 

— 7 5052 

1*87 

1725 -M 95 



1232 

-7 3J49 

1330 

1320 SOT 95 



1247 


Ed. sales 11,138 Tua’s.uies 58201 



Tub’s caenint 89456 up 1327 




ORANGE JUICE (NC7NI I64MOT.- 


OT 


U625 

865QMSM 10440 





13500 

8900 May 94 107 JS 

10*05 

10700 

10805 

♦105 306* 

U50O 

IBUOJulto 109.90 

1,100 

10700 

,1045 

• 1.10 ,J» 

13*00 

10650 Sot to 



11245 

*105 819 

1X00 

W8O0NOVM 



)M45 

*105 

13200 

10100 Jan 95 115.90 

11500 

11890 

11600 

• 100 

1X05 

HM0OMcr9S 



116H1 

-100 


May 95 



11600 

•100 


JJ95 



11600 


Estioies ljoo Tiers. sales 

933 




| Tlot’s open W I7JB2 art 63 





Metals 



MGKADCCOPPSt (NCM3D 

KB 

■s-arPHrb 


TC70C 

030 Mar to 8900 

9100 

*890 

9030 

•070 3*038 




0860 

0*00 

•815 722 



MX 

8810 

0850 

*000 11443 

8*00 

7410 Jun 94 M30 

■900 

0820 

8005 

•005 847 

102.95 

7630 Jut to (64) 

09 JS 

88 HI 

8865 

•005 6321 


M.905OTM 8830 





10100 

TxTSOecto 0.90 

8700 

1850 

8800 

•are 3J85 

9858 


B8J0 

8870 

8800 

*0,0 


7X00 Feb 95 86*0 

9810 

8740 

9000 

•070 882 

8U0 

62-70 Mar 95 0.95 

09 JO 

0895 

0890 

•0.10 1056 

8800 

76856*0995 B*0O 

89 JU 

*00 

0900 

•OKI 253 

0800 

7800 Jl* 95 



B9.W 

*010 2*5 

86*0 

TSJOAupJS 88J9 

087D 

0870 

0863 

•006 











*005 

•005 

8700 

77J5Nov9S 



8870 

♦005 


DOC 95 S»JB 

0900 

B»J0 

8700 

*010 

Est. SOOTS 28000 T LOT'S w 

13066 



Toe’s min 66129 UP 680 




silvo 

MCMX) S400VBVK 

-aril 



sao 

46S0FWI94 



SXLS 

•54 a 

5565 

3660 Mar to 5)90 

5370 

5580 

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5380 


56S0 

371009 94 5360 

5*60 

U3l8 

SIL3 

■SJ 94,3 

5610 

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5*60 

5*20 

5440 

■SJ 1*0 

5720 

mo Dec to 5*60 

SS20 

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54*4 

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542-3 

4010 Jan 95 



5500 

*67 




5088 



58*0 


5550 

5560 

55*9 

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5950 

4200 JUI 95 



5*29 

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S390DBC93 SU 

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5700 

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• 57 732 

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tone 114078 up 7276 




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29X70 


4300 

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37600 

3*330 

39400 





37*00 






38300 

3*630 

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39700 

«L*«r93 



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GOLD 

NdfUQ taa»ov ax- odkamp^frOg 



415.70 


31640 




3MJi 





*040 




38650 

• 84) 6SJ43 

41730 



31800 

3W0O 


41500 


39200 

J9QJ8 

r-i-Jl 




39190 

37130 

id-i 

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42600 



39*00 

LiU 


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36150 Feb 95 397 JO 

377 JO 

2770S 

jd.k 

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comec (nCJE) yjavi-wm 
n is *ijd»r« Tin 7i is 

~ 63J5M«« M* 

tijqAjIM 7SJ0 
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Ea.jdes 1»*I7 Tue's’C*" 
Tue-ammM 53.905 pw 0 9 


4*50 

B7J0 

8*50 

9100 

t/JB 

KUO 


74.70 
7*20 
77 JO 
7423 

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77 IS 
73.90 

7L50 

7*9S 

7870 

0B 49 


72.95 

7*B 

it? 

Win 
79. IS 

mm 

■11s 

C.73 


•055 2*118 
•IUS 1*098 
•050 M» 
•060 3.190 
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• 8* 77 


HJW worloh tOCSO in«n 


11M 

llel 

1IJJ 

1185 

1107 


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1051 

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1089 
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1*95 

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-OUT B. 544 

• ft06»,l» 
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to. II Mar 94 9687 


96.97 

9476 


96*4 —083 24, m 

9658 —083 Itb*N 

9429 -OS 
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- _ «JB 96*7 

94. IS Am 94 9448 9*63 
9686S0DM 9629 9631 9421 

96.10 960 Dec ** 908 *W» *S.W 

ESLOTBS 4.795 Toc'v 5tC*» 6552 

TWsaamM 37* 76 on tea - 

SYS. TREASURY (CBTO 

113-QSS110-T2 NOT MILS 111-70 II1-S1H-M* 80S 1W4W 
IITMB 109-24 JOT 91 II) <0 HI-81 I.W4H MB* W 1I.HB 
110-195 U0-0S septo 110417 110-47) IHM7 UXH5 ■ 81 <B 
Est- sake, 40JW ran. OTrs JftMt 

Tue'^oonun) 2BLS14 tg 188 

IB Y8. TREASURY ICBOT) DU 

116-07 toe-00 MOT9AI3-S 113-33 113-20 ll>£ • BJ 7IS424 

115- 71 toe-19 Junto in-!? tins ]g-2 

iis-01 u>ie seato hmb h 2 -<b na+B m+B 
IM-2I 109-29 Doe 94 !!•-» 

IIJ-B7 109-09 Mores 

ES.50K3 6*437 Tile's. SO** 81.173 
Tte'IIMiM 20806 UP 3M 
USTSEASUKY BOHCS (C»OT1 IHMWMU 
'20-31 9*80 MorWll6-SS IU-1S >11 J J- * * 

119-39 91-06 JOT 9*114-79 lli-U 1J4-W 115-11 i 
118-36 98-12 Sop 94 11M9 114-12 1J-29 114.12 * 

116- 08 91-19 Octo 113-73 113-30 113-19 IM * 

116- 70 1B248 Mor7p:>75 JJWB JI2-0 {«-« - 
115-19 98-15 JOT 95 UJ-0D 112-08 TD-« JMI - 

117- 1$ 109-00 sen 73 m-08 tll-IS U'-to 1I1-1S • 

1l3-14 1Qt-3) Doe 95 1W«3 


IK-9 - 


I5C 

72 


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Est soles 300800 Tue's.sMB 39AJ47 
- - M 47VO UP «4 


24871 
3*176 
34,947 
V 
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17 
7 


Tire s open (rt 421^ B_- _ .. . 

MUHK3FALBOHM (CBOT1 1 ^ OT A»OT NOTOT 
IBS-27 9>22 MgrWDUl ItU-H WJB «*-» r 87 27^ 
1G4-07 100-07 Junto MS-13 KO-16 10+4 HB-10 * 02 3J0 


ES.*sn 7800 Tte'sidn 
TiOTtUBWOT 77592 OH 899 


EURODOLLARS (CMBU SI OT I g OT OMtopg. 


9669 

9675 

962* 

96*1 

9M0 

9580 


9*21 Mur 94 BUI 
9*4 JOT 94 9*18 
9*36 5*pW 9*96 
9071 D*Ct* 94® 
9*34 NOT VS 95*7 
9071JOT9S 9*17 


9659 

9629 

9597 

9)80 

95** 

9521 


*6-51 

9623 

9191 

9155 

909 

95 . 1 s 


7655 -4844SK323 
*6.3 -883C58H 
9SM — (LaJStfuOM 
9556 -SUJ225AHI 
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9517 —083 15(233 


Op*n kfigh - -Low Oato Os OpJnl 


95*3 


Ml 

MR 


9151 Sep 95 9580 9581 9496 

9581 • fl.llDecf) 9*75 94J6 9470 

Est. sales NA. Tue'l.sNe* 57*381 

Tue^aponint S*765» UP *1067 - 
BBTTSHPOUNO (CMBU ion pound- inHwfe* 
15304 l.*5flOMtv» 1*280 1*910 L*BM 1*93 
1813 1*500 junto 1*877 XMH 1*8*0 LM60 

I.4O10 16660 Sep to l*7» 1*13 1*790 1.4808 

1*SW 1CI0 Dec 94 • _• 1*772 

Buitoes N>.TW*Ktos 15J71 
TOT'S ODOTW 54576 UP OS 
Canadian oou-ar icmcm uwd > -iothjmi 
* 8712 *7724 Mar M OJ510 DJSD *7506 *7576 

Q-7SQ5 0-7365 Am 94 *7505 0JS30 17S0J 0JSU 

07740 0-7345 S*p to - . 0J519 

■ADD 0J3 15 dec to 0-J51I 

*7*05 0J374MB-95 0J519 

*7500 07SB -km 95 ' 07HT 

Est.sdes N-A Tor's, sales 6.153 
Tue'sopOTlnt 79,112 OT UM 

GERMAN MARK (OMR) Wmrt-lnWMUlU 
*6205 05*67 Mcrto *573 05767 *5743 057 SJ 

06U3 0560' Junto *5729 0573) *5773 Bj7W 

*6065 *5*105-0 to 65707 

05731 dunaacto 05190 

&3i uwuRiua 

Tub's open «* 143*25 oh 14 
■lAPANeMYBt (OMER) OTwl OTOT OOTI 
Q8Q^3aL Bg8*aO Mar94g 8B72toO -Ooe3050JI09777QMW*3 
0809S49JI08B71 Junto *IOTaVIU8B22S*8a922QU»3l3 
aawwuoewjSOTto SJxmminrisumsi 
».sto9 NA. Tue^-saln 42.747 
Tue-saoOTint 84*61 up 3890 
SmsSKtUUK (CMERI lw Pane- 1 nUnahlMn 
*7195 asKONOTM *6897 0*906 0*8*3 *6801 
OTtoO 0*885 *4406 *6M0 08879 

Est sates iLA. tots, salts n.eaa 
Tub’s ooen OT 4*379 up i«ia 


— 083178*53 
-*83 9*508 


— JJ n iui 

—32 13 

-JJ 17 


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*15 580 

*16 447 

+17 347 

♦ W J 


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fS 8JIO 
♦ 5 370 

+5 35 


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-2 6,747 

-3 670 


41.®* 

693 

41 


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TtX 


2-99 

17*38 

72551 

5«o 


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7*36 HAINOTto 77J0 77_75 75.40 

57^ MOV to 77 JO 7730 J5JS 

5*30 Jut M 77 JD 7750 7S« 
2-59??? H-S rtJI 7040 
S9.JSDecto MX 69J5 «*< 

O50M0T9S OK 6975 050 

6U0MOV9S 7*25 7*25 7025 

7050JW9S 

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Tue*30POTH S9JD7 UP so 
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GJOtorto 4*20 080 000 
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435SJOT94 4680 4*30 4585 

4450 AjIM ’4625 4670 4628 

*^75 Aug to 4725 4720 47.10 

4U0SOTM -4*10 «KJ 4*70 
2-S9?” 4,30 9920 

4*50 Nov 94 5020 to In 5020 
« JO Dec to 51.10 5125 5180 

512 n -“ ajD 

S82SFeb9S 5150 5150 5U5 

050 KOT 95 5055 S0J6 £3 
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0_5J «M 0_B 

020 Junes 055 076 055 
0408495 5085 50-24 5*05 


7545 

7528 

JSS 

"7070 


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7888 

7*10 


— 159 7*998 
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5750 
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5720 
5620 
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5750 

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2185 

2*78 

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70-23 

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1923 

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USJtojgto 1627 1432 16J9 

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1S87CX1W 1455 1655 140 

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Page 11 



in- 


— — — ADVERTISEMENT 

international FUNDS 


Feb.2.19W 


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es 


Threat to Aluminum Pact 

Russian Producers Oppose Output Cut 


BONN The German cabinet 
approved plans Wednesday to start 
privatizing stale-owned postal and 
telephone services in 1996. 

The telecommunications agency 
Deutsche Bundesposi Telekom; 
the postal service, Deutsche Bun- 
despost.Postdienst; and the Deut- 

Industrial Output 
In West Germany 
Grew in December 

Complied br Our Staff Fran Dapatcha 

BONN ; — West German indus- 
trial production rose 0.7 percent in 
December from November, ac- 
cording id preliminary. seasonally 
adjusted figures released Wednes- 


day by the Economics Ministry. 

“ Tbe rise in output was the first 
since August U followed a revised 
fall of \2 percent in November. 

The December figure was 0.9 
percent below that of December 
1992, however, and for 1993 as a 
whole,- industrial output in Western 
Germany was 7 percent below 1992 
leifcb, reflecting the depth of post- 
’ war Germany’s worst recession. 

A iwo-moaih comparison, which 
is Intended io iron out short-term 
fluctuations, showed a 1.5 percent 
drop in industrial production in the 
November- December period from 
September- October. 

All manufacturing sectors record- 
ed rises in December except for con- 
sumer goods, where output fell by 
1-2 percent Building output surged 
by 5 percent in December largely 
due to a cold snap in November; 
which had depressed that month's 
figure. ‘ (Reuters, Bloomberg ) 


sdte Bundesposi Posfbank will be 
turned into three separate compa- 
nies in 1995. The privatization is 
expected to be completed in 1997. 
Initially, the companies will be 

owned the state. But the govern- 

ment plans sell a block of node in 
Telekom, worth around 15 trillion 
Deutsche marks ($8.65 biBion) in 
19% in what is expected to be one 
of the world's largest privatiza- 
tions. It is to privatize the other 
agencies Jater. * “ 

“Thiswfll create the conditions 
for the postal. agencies to survive in 
an increasingly liberalized world- 
wide market,” said Post Minister 
"Wolfgang BOtsch. 

Cabinet approval marks (he start 
of. the legislative process after sev- 
- eral years of tortuous, negotiations 
amora the government, the opposi- 
tion Soda! Democrats and postal 
unions worried about the future of 
the 630.000 Bundesposi jobs. The 
government estimated up to 
100,000 jobs would be shed. 

The federal government will 
keep a majority stake in Telekom 
and the postal agency Postdlenst 
for at least five years, but may sell 
off up to 49 percent of each. 

Most of the proceeds of privati- 
zation will go to the beavilyjndebt- 
ed companies themselves; This rep- 
resents a concession by Finance 
Minister. Theo Waigd. who had 
wanted some of the raonev to re- 
duce the federal budget defidu 
Mr. Boise h said Bonn hoped to 
get the post reform legislation 
through parliament before next Oc- 
tober’s national elections. 

The three postal companies anil 
be able to offer their services out- 
ride the country and. to compete 
with other private companies, he 
said. ' (Reuters. Knight- Ridder) 


Bhomberg Business Sm s 

MOSCOW — Russian aluminum makers arc 
undermining an agreement to reduce excess global 
supply by threatening to fight the government’s 
promise to cut production. 

“We’re a private company now. and we deride 
what to. do,” said Valentin Gavrichkin. economic 
director of the Volgograd aluminum plant in 
southeastern Russo.. 

Vasily Borov, finance director at the Bogos- 
lovsky aluminum plant, agreed. "There’s not a 
single aluminum producer in Russia who is happy 
with production cuts," he said. 

The government agreed Sunday to cut produc- 
tion by 500,000 metric tons a year in returaforcuts 
totalling 1 million to 13 million tons by producers 
in the United States, the European Union, Cana- 
da; Norway and Australia. Western producers will 
also provide Russian producers loans and invest- 
ment worth $13 billion to restructure the industry. 

The two Russian executives, however, de- 
nounced the agreement. Mr. Gavrichkin said pro- 
duction cuts and: closures “would be terrible for 
Volgograd," already a “depressed city.” 

It could also destabilize Russia, he said. “All 
those people who work at the factories, standing 
idle at the moment, are a potential army for 
[Vladimir] Zhirinovsky.” the extreme-rightist poli- 
tician who advocates Rusrian expansionism. 


Mr. Borov said "a catastrophe” would result if 
tile government forced his plant to shut. He also 
said'he pul link faith in the promise of aid; “I 
haven't heard of a single factory reconstructed 
with aid from the West.'' 

Even if such aid came, said Mr. Gavrichkin. the 
world aluminum glut would worsen. "If they mod- 
ernize our aluminum industry , it will only increase 
aluminum output,” he said. ' 

Russia produces frost of the aluminum exports 
from the Commonwealth of Independent States to 
the West, which last year rose 25 percent, to 1.6 
million tons, six times more than in 1990. Western 
producers blame the exports for depressing prices 
to seven-year lows. 

Although world demand for aluminum grew 17 
percent last year, industry leaders say there was an 
excess of supply of between 13 million and 2 
million tons. 

"1 don't see how exports can remain static or fall 
under current conditions." said an official of the 
DOaferrous metals ministry, who requested anonym- 
ity. “Producers have to export to survive. We will 
probably have (o have more discussions with our 
trading partners later this year if exports go up.” 

But some specialists said exports will fall be- 
cause domestic demand is increasing. 


Banesto Investigation Ordered 


Compiled fee Our Staff From Dispatches 

MADRID — The Bank of Spain 
said Wednesday that it would in- 
vestigate possible management in- 
fractions by the former board of 
Banco Esparto! de Credito SA. 
which it dismissed five weeks ago 
because of Banesto' s huge financial 
shortfall. 

A Bank of Spain spokesman, 
Aoselmo Calleja. said banking leg- 
islation forbade him to release de- 
tails of posable infractions by the 
former board of Spain’s fourth- 
largest bank, which was headed by 
Mario Cootie. 

The central bank intervened at 


Banesto on Dec. 28 after finding a 
financial shortfall of 503 billion pe- 
setas (S3.6 billion). Liter audits 
raised this to 605 billion pesetas. 

Mr. Conde and the other former 
board members filed an appeal Fri- 
day with the Economy Ministry 
against the Bank of Spa in for inter- 
vening in the bank's affairs. 

The central bank governor: Luis 
Angel Rojo, said last month that 
inspectors had found “accounting 
tricks” and inflated profits that had 
given the impression Banesto was 
in better shape than it really was. 

The central bank on Friday 
reached agreement with other 


banks on a rescue plan for Banesto 
that will involve pumping in 180 
billion pesetas in new capital. 

When trading in Banesto shares 
resumed Tuesday, they closed at 855 
pesetas, down sharply from 1.995 
pesetas w hen trading was suspended 
on Dec. 28. The stock regained 15 
pesetas on Wednesday to S70. 

Mr. Calleja said tinder Spanish 
law (be investigation and any disci- 
plinary proceedings must be com- 
pleted within 18 months. News re- 
ports said the former board 
members could face fines of up to 
10 million pesetas tS7 1.483). 

(AP, AFX) 


Renault 
Cuts Stake 
In Volvo 

Complied ht t>jr Surit Fr-'m Dtqwks 

PARIS — Renault said Wednes- 
day it void about 4.85 percent of the 
stock of Volvo AB. apparently at a 
sizable profit following the failure 
of plans to merge the carmakas. 

Renault denied the sale was a 
step in dismantling its alliance with 
Volvo, with which it had an embar- 
rassingly public breakup j month 
before the planned Jan. 1 merger. 

Renault built up its stake in Volvo 
over several yean*, buying shares on 
the open market until September. 
That was jn addition to a cross- 
shareholding agreement, under 
which the Swedish concern look a 
20 percent stake in Renault and a 45 
percent >take in the company’s truck 
division. Renault Vehicules Indus- 
triels. In return. Renault acquired 25 
percent of Volvo’s car division and 
45 percent of Volvo Trucks. 

Renault said i( now holds 3.45 
percent of Volvo’s capital and 8.76 
percent of Jls voting rigbis, instead 
of the S.3 percent of ihc capital and 
9.99 percent of the voting rights it 
had previously held. Reaault said 
the stake the French sute-con trolled 
carmaker acquired in the open mar- 
ket wav considered a financial in- 
vestment and treated as such. 

Executives .said Renault reaped a 
substantial capital gain from the 
sale of its Volvo shares, but they 
would not elaborate. 

According to financial sources, 
however. Renault made close to 
75U million francs ISI2.76 million) 
from the sole. Renault sold 3.2 mil- 
lion Volvo shares at 655 kronor 
Tuesday for a total amount of 2.1 
billion kronor i $267.06 million t. 

The plans to merge the companies 
would have resulted tn the world’s 
sbcth-largest automaker. The plans 
collapsed when it became clear 
Volvo shareholders would not ac- 
cept the deal out of fears France 
would seek w control die merged 
enterprise. I IP. Bhomhergi 


Frankfurt 

DAX 

2400 - 

2300 

288 - — — 

■ is&V— ~ 


London 

FTSE 100 Index 

35 ® 

m w~ 

3300 J 


Paris 

CAC40 



%-oTSTF' ^-£-<5 kHTj-T 


1993 1994 

Exchange Index 

Amsterdam AJEX 

Brussels Stock Index 

Frankfurt DAX 

Frankfurt FAZ 

Helsinki HEX 

L ondon Financial Tin 

London FTSE 1 00 

Ma drid General Index 

Milan MIB 

Paris CAC 40 

Stockholm Atfaersvaariden 

Vienna Stock Index 

Zurich SBS 

Sources: Reuters. AFP 


1894 1983 

Wednesday Prev. 
Close Close 

437.38 435.74 

7,784.14 7JBQ9X 

2,164.01 2,179.? 

835.89 835.04 

1,939.65 1,9294 


% 

Close Change 

435.74 +0.38 

7309.89 *0-33 

2, 179.67 40.20 

835.04 +0.10 


HEX 1,939.65 1,92934 +0.52 

Financial Times 30 2,710.10 2,676.40 +1.26 


332030 3.48130 +1.11 

353.47 353.72 -0.07 

1,057.00 1,065.00 -0.75 

2,355.93 2.326.71 +1J2B 

1,838.19 1 ,807.81 +1.68 

509,43 510.41 -0.19 


509.43 

1,090.60 


1 ,083.97 +0.61 I 

InrcntthMml IkiaU Tribune 


Very br i efly: 

• Preussag AG. the German trading and steel company, sard its net profit 
dropped 56.1 percent in the year ended Sept. 30. to W million Deutsche 
marks 15111.4 million). 

• Arista Records, a division of Bertelsmann Music Group, said it had U.S. 
sales of more than 5220 million in 1993. the largest in its 18-year history. 

• LtaUrver PLC said Unilever France would renew us request to the 
European Commission for approval of its acquisition of the French 
frozen food and ice cream business. Ortiz-Miko. 

• The French Automakers Committee said new registrations, at 1 29.600. 
were 9.5 percent higher this January than in January 1993. 

• Electrolux AB reported profit after financial items rove 533 percent to 
1.55 billion kronor ($197 million » in 1993. 

• Poland's labor minister. Leszek Miller, has reportedly agreed to aban- 
don his proposal for a 0.5 percent ia\ on stock exchange transactions. 

• Britain is to introduce a tougher law* on insider trading on March (. 
extending the scope of existing legislation to cover all securities, including 
gilts, or government bonds. 

4FW Union. tFP. Rlmmihen. IP 


HONEYWELL: Return to South Africa Stresses Social Responsibility DISNEY: After Euro Disney's Latest Loss , Banks Gird for Debt Talks 


Goafmned from Page 9 

whether ii would continue to distribute prod- 
ucts through Manech or sever ties. ' 

Honeywell figures that Manech can double 
its sales in the next five or six years and stave as 
a base for doing business in other southern 
African nations: Mr. Jackson stud. . >’ • 
Honeywell deemed thecostof tbeaomtistion 
too insignificant, to disclose, but it ciletUeveral 
other conditions. H said it had named a multi- 
racial board of directors for Manech- and- 
formed a standing committee mSouth Africa of 
female and WackempIo?<KseJ«$*3 tfyvrifters * 


to stress equal opportunity, career development 
and family-support issues. 

Jr also said it had pledged to donate money 
and other resources lo education and training 
for South African children, employees and cus- 
tomers: to invest in local schools and recreation 
siiesfto support a mentoring system with South 
African universities to develop black profes- 
■ sionals, and to audit purchasing with the aim of 
steering a sizable chunk of business to black- 
owned suppliers. - 

With variations, such programs are also like- 
ly to be standard policy for many other Ameri- 
can companies planning their return. They re- 


flect guidelines drawn up by the Executive 
Leadership Council a group formed by Mr. 
Jackson of Honeywell and about 100 other 
black executives in large companies. Setting 
standards for re-entry into South Africa be- 
came one of the group's interests in the early 
1990s as the government moved in stages to- 
ward dismantling apartheid. 

Mr. Jackson said the effect of the consulta- 
tion process and the attention to local needs in 
planning investment should be broader. “As a 
practical matter, this is really the right way to 
do business around the world,” he said. “The 
politics of race make it a Jot more visible here.” 


Continued from Page 9 
Wednesday’s close from 37.75 
francs on Tuesday 
The negotiating team comprises 
nine of the lenders. They are Ban- 
que National de Paris. Banque In- 
dosuez. Barclays PLC. Caisse des 
Depbts & des Consignations. Cred- 
it Agricole. Credit N a tionale. 
Deutsche Bank. National West- 
minster Bank and Long Term 
Credit Bank of Japan. 

A spokesman for BNP would not 
comment on the auditors initial 


findings, though other bankers said 
they did not bear much new. The 
bankers are expected to meet in a 
few weeks to hear the auditor's fi- 
nal report. The final report was due 
last month, but was delayed after 
tbe auditing firm complained that 
Euro Disney and its own auditois 
were not cooperating — a charge 
disputed by the company. 

Euro Disney, which opened its 
park in April 1992. said that its net 
loss for the October- December 
quarter grew 3| percent, to 553 


million francs, from 423 million 
francs in the year-earlier period. 

At the same time, price cuts 
aimed at drawing more visitors 
from an economically distressed 
Europe resulted in a 12 percent fall 
in revenue, to 828 million francs. 

Euro Disney assened that its cost- 
cutting. including 950 job losses, 
was paying off. as the operating loss 
remained steady despite the lower 
revenue. It did not release a figure 
for the operating loss, however. 

“This gives a still gloomier back- 


drop for the banks as they enter 
negotiations with Disney." a Lon- 
don analyst who follows the com- 
pany said. 

Walt Disney has agreed to pay 
operating expenses through the end 
of March, but its chairman, Mi- 
chael Eisner, has warned that it 
might be necessary to shut down 
the Paris operation if the debt was 
not restructured by that lime. 

Financial specialists now say it 
will be difficult for the adversaries 
to come to an accord on time. 



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Rafehanr Nederland 

Raychem Coioruncn 

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Zaga PtirnleumAS 

Saudi Barac Indiunn^ Crap <SABiC» 

ScxnJmRvian Airlines v. r .irml;-AGt 

Shell tni’l Petroleimi C\.nip.iny Ltd 

Singapore Aulinec 

Slandia 

SVAiidmavi^a Ensl nda Banlen 

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The 5t Prml CcmpaniK 
Swedish TiaJe Counnt 
Telecom Eueann 

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Thames Warm Ptr. 

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a- •** 





NASDAQ 

Wednesday's Prices 

NASDAQ prices as of 4 p.tn. Now YorK time. 
This list compiled by the AP. consists of the 1,000 
most traded securities hi terms of dollar value. It Is 
updated twice a year. 


1 ? Monti 

►ft* LOW S*0Cfc 


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12 Monti 

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Wednesday's Closing 

Tables include the nationwide prices up to 
the closing on Wall Street and do not reflect 
laie trades elsewhere. Via The Associated Press 



94. 8W AIM Sir XS 5.1 _ 

8 4. 17’uALC _ 31 

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14* _ 19 

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INTERNATIONAL HERAU) TRIBUNE. THl RSIIAV. FEBRUARY 3, 1994 


Page 15 


ASIA/PACIFIC 






Bloomberg Business News 

- T AIPHl — Taiwan joined tbe 
scramble Wednesday io provide 
programming to Asa's growing 
Revision audience as Pd HstriEa- 
teruunmeat Inc. announced it 
would launch the country's first ca- 
ble channel aimed at viewers 
around the region. ...... 

Po Han. 45 percent-owned by 
Taiwan’s ruling Nationalist Party, 
hopes to begin broadcasting Chi- 
nese-Ianguage news and entertain- 
ment programs throughout China. 
Taiwan and Southeast Asia inOc- 
lobet^.ViM'Prefldeai Johnny Sand 
said. 

. AFTSatdfite Co, a Beijing-caa- 
trolled company based in Hong 
Kong, signed an agreement 
Wednesday with PoHsin to pro- 
vide space for the Taiwan compa- 
ny's broadcasts on its Apstar-1 sat- 
ellite. which is scheduled to be 
launched this summer. 

The agreement with APT is a 
rare business pact involving the 
Nationalist Party, and mainfan d- 
comrofled company. Taipei and 
Beijing have been political rivals 


since Cfcinajs Nationalist govern- 
ment lest a civil war totheCommo- 
iusis in 1949 and. was forced to 
move its capital across the Taiwan 
Straits to Taipfs- ' • 

Po Hsin's announcement is part 
of a battle for tdevisiofl viewers 
among some of the world's fastest- 
growing economies. 

Turner Broadtetsiing Inc, • the 
U.S. media and entejiainment gi- 
ant, said -last week that it planned 
to launch a film-and-cartoon chan- 
nel for East Asia in the fourth quar- 
ter. qf this year., 

Tamer is one of several interna--’ 
penal programmers that recently 
joined forces to compete against 
STAR TV, the redottal satellite 
broadcaster controlled by Rupert 
Murdoch's News Coip. -. 

The programmers have agreed to 
take space on Apstar-2, wttdt is due 
to be launched in 1995. The other 
broadcasters include Time Warner 
Inc's Home Box Office and Tune 
Warner Entertainment Co. opera- 
tions; Discovery Cotrenumcations 
Inc; Viacom In ternatknal Inc; and 
TVB International. 


Jakarta Businesses Shirk 
Mimnuim-Wage Rules 


Cmpiled hr Our Staff From thqxncha - 

JAKARTA — Indonesia’s 
armed forces chief blamed busi- 
nessmen Wednesday for not 
paying workers the minim um 
wage, triggering a wave of 
strikes as a Uf>. trade deadline 
on worker rights edges closer. 

“Our businessmen want very 


low labor here for too long,” 
Feisal Tanjung said before a 
cabinet meeting. 

Thousands of Indonesian 
workers have gone on strike this 
week to protest the failure of 
employers to pay the minimum 
wage, which was increased to 
3,800 rupiah (SI. 80) a day from 
3,000 rupiah f or Jakarta and 
surrounddng areas oo Jan. -1. 


Indonesia, which has aver- 
aged economic growth rates of 
around 6 percent oyer the past 
two decades, has long used 
cheap labor to hire, foreign in- 
vestment *. 

The U.S. government will'de* 
dde on Feb. 15 if Indonesia has 
done enough to improve work- 
ers' rights to avoid losing pref- 
erential trade concessions 
worth $650 unDion. Indonesia 
submitted a report of its pro- 
gress Jan. 20. - 

Although human rights 
workers say Indonesia has 
made only token gestures, ana- 
lysts say there is too much mon- 
ey at stake — and too much of it 
American —for Washington to 
taken bard line against Jakarta. 
. (Rauers, Bloomberg) 


Malaysian Stocks Set for Rebound 

But Meteoric Gains of 1993 Unlikely to Be Repeated 


By Michael Richardson 

hiumadonai Herald Tribute 
KUALA LUMPUR — The Malaysian 
stock market, after losing nearly 25 percent of 
its \alue' in' just over a week last month, 
appears set tp advance again but is unlikely to 
repeat meteoric gains made in 1993 when 
share prices doubled, analysts said. 

P. Gtmasegaram. research manager in the 
Kuala Lumpur representative office of Stan- 

iyiYBMTlOm STOCKS 

dard Chartered Securities Asia Ltd, said that 
without the recent correction, the overheated 
Malaysian market would have been in danger 
of a much sharper pufl-badc later on. 

Tbe Kuala Lumpur Stock Exchange Com- 
posite 1 ndex plunged to 1 ,005 on Jan. 1 3 from 
1,314 eight days earlier. Since then, investors 
have adopted a cautious approach. 

The index ended at 1,148.04 on Wednes- 
day, up 3.7 percent from Monday. Tbe mar- 
ket, which has regained nearly half of last 
month’s tosses, was closed for a holiday Tues- 
day. Brokers reported substantial buying by 
foreign institutions on Wednesday. There is 
“a lot of fundamental value to be found in 
better-quality" Malaysian slocks, Mr. Guna- 

X tm said. 

. kers are recommendmggaraing compa- 
nies that will gain from higher disposable 
income in Malaysia, and construction and 
buikirag-Hiateriais concerns that wiQ get in- 


creased orders from a massive program over 
the next few years to improve tbe country's 
public works. 

Selected banks, finance companies, resi- 
dential property developers and motor vehi- 
cle manufacturers are also seen as benefiting 
from government and consumer spending. 

“We arc looking for corporate earnings 
growth of about 19 percent this year and 16 
percent in J995. compared with 20 percent in 
1993." said Richard Jones, head of research 
at Baring Research (Malaysia) Sdn. 

Many analysts predicted the Malaysian 
economy would continue to grow about 8 

AsaW?j 

- j 

'135 V'-'i ‘ ! ; 


i V 

Vi. 960- 

“ ’’ < 


percent annually in 1994 and 1995. after 
adjustment for inflation, which was 3.6 per- 
cent last year. 

“The macroeconomic outlook makes it dif- 
ficult to be anything but positive on Malay- 
sia." said Colin Bradbury, regional strategist at 
Jardine Fleming Securities Ltd in Hong Kong. 
“There is ample liquidity in the financial sys- 
tem and the potential for significant interest 
rate hikes looks very limited." 

In a recent assessment that took account of 
the correction. Merrill Lynch & Co. said the 
Malaysian market was “not unduly expensive 
considering Malaysia’s economic growth and 
the ongoing infrastructure and privatization 


’.Vedrssdsy s close: 
*, 143.04 


: J 50 -. A '-S-'O • H 6 4 F 

\; i998 ’V. ■ * «»« ’■ 

rSourcfi B&jamawjr. V " 


us in corporate tax rates nil! also stimu- 
late profits. The government cut the rate by 2 
percent, to 32 percent far 1993. There will be a 
further 2 percent reduction this year. 

Brokers said they expected the Malaysian 
composite index to have moved up to beeween 
1>250 and 1.400 by midyear. 

However, some analysis cautioned that if. as 
widely anticipated, the government calls an 
general election between June and September 
— more than a year early — it could halt the 
advance of the market in the second half of tbe 
year. 

“If the government is reelected with a mas- 
sive majority, as expected, it may want to 
apply some nasty economic medicine to slow 
demand and inflation." said one analyst. 
“Thai could have a sobering effect on the 
market." 


Investor’s Asia 


HongKcing 
Hang Seng 
12®D- 
IWffl- 


Trikyo 
Nikkei £2$ 



t ~ -250D- 


£400 


1QDQ& 


7 ®^8in5 _ jF 



1993 


m 
m 
■m' 

1900- 

m sTNTjr 

1993 ■ 1994 IMS 1994 


1994 


Exchange 

.Index’ 

Wachesday Prev. 
Close Close 

%. 

Change 

Hong Kong . 

Hang Seng 

11,785.83 

11 £26.80 

-0.35 

Singapore 

Straits Times 

2^38.08 

2,349-08 

-0.47 

Sydney ’ 

Afi Ordinaries • 

2*12.1.0 

2,310.10 

40.09; 

tokyo 

Nikkei 225 

2D,250j03 

20,416.34 

-0.81 

Kuate Lumpur CompositB 

1,148.04 

1.106^9 

+3.71 

Bangkok 

SET 

1^453^4 

1.455.58 

-0.15 

Seoul 

Composite Stock 

374^6 ‘ 

960.10- 

+1,47 

Taipei 

Weighted Price 

6,25951 

6,176.91 

+1.33 

Manila 

Composite 

2,906.14 

2,835.49 

+2.49 

Jakarta 

Stock Index 

591^5 

592.02 

-0.01 

Hew Zealand 

NZSE-40 

2,418.68 

2.42362 

-0^0 

Bombay 

National Index 

1,931.46 

1,893.97 

+1.98 

Sources: Reuters. AFP 


IplCtnaii'vul Hcnlil Tntew 

Very briefly; 


China Opens Up Its Telecom Monopoly 


Bloomberg Business Neves 

BEUING — China has ended its 
decades-old telephone services mo- 
nopoly by setting up two new com- 
panies — one to create a so-called 
information superhighway and an- 
other to form a potential second 
national telephone network. 

Jiloog Communications Co. and 
Uantong Communications Co., 
both developed by the Ministry of 
Electronics Industry, have approv- 
al from tbe cabinet and Jitoug is 
busy setting up shop, its president. 
Lu Sbouqun, said. 

Some foreign analysis said that 
could eventually pave the way for 
an end to the ban on foreign equity 
investment in the country’s tele- 
communications industry. . 

’ “It is another step forward to- 
ward China’s telecommunications 
industry eventually opening up to 
foreign equity,” said Andrew Har- 
rington. Salomon Brothers Inc’s 


Hong Kong-based regional tele- 
communications analyst 

The Post and Telecommunica- 
tions Ministry is trying to cope with 
the kiss of its lucrative monopoly. 
Mr. Lu said. While Xiong concen- 
trates on information services large- 
ly neglected by the ministry. Liao- 
tong will be m direct competition 
with it in the core business of tele- 
phone cults for China's 12 billion 
people, added Mr. Lu. 

“Some people say Uantong is 
China's second telecom network. 
Maybe it could develop into the 
second network," be said. He 
warned, though, that many in the 
ministry were not happy about 
Lianiorig. 

Jin Yuting. the telecommunica- 
tions ministry’s chief of informa- 
tion. said Uantong would be under 
his ministry's management, but 
that the scope of Lian tong’s busi- 
ness has not been decided. 


He said that measures to split his 
ministry’s regulation and business 
functions would be published this 
year as soon as it had cabinet ap- 
proval This will involve setting up 
a national idecomm uncations ser- 
vice company that will manage re- 
gional companies. 

He said regional telephone bu- 
reaus would not be transformed 
into independent companies, along 
the lines of the breakup of the Bell 
system in the Unites States. He 
reiterated the policy that foreign 
companies are not allowed to pro- 
vide telecommunications services. 

.Analysts said the Chinese gover- 
nemnt's backing for tbe rival com- 
panies was a bitter blow to the Tele- 
communications Ministry. “The 
MPT has been fighting very hard to 
maintain its monopoly, which was 
under threat from the regions, other 
ministries and foreign companies, 
and now looks like n has lost that 


battle," said .Andrew HalL research 
director at Morgan Grenfell (Aria). 

Some analysts said the decision 
was to punish the Telecommunica- 
tions Ministry for failing to keep up 
with China's moves toward 3 mar- 
ket economy and its drive for rapid 
modernization of its infrastructure. 


• Taman's Securities and Exchange Commission will in June and July 
accept applications from foreign brokerage houses that want to open 
branches to unde securities on the local market; 13 firms that have had 
representative offices in Taiwan for more than one year will be eligible. 

• China has officially adopted the word “jobless" to refer to the 700.000 
unemployed registered in the first 10 months of 1993. the Beijing-funded 
Hong Kong China News Service reported: under previous, socialist 
terminology, the unemployed were “waiting for work." 

• Bank of Korea said South Korea’s gross national product grew by about 
5J percent in 1993. surpassing a government projection of less than 5 
p ercsnL. as Japan’s strong yen diverted export business Korea s way. 

• South Korea's Finance Ministry said 357.9 million packs of foreign 
cigarettes were imported in 1993. up 34 percent from a year earlier: 
foreign cigarettes accounted for 6.7 percent of the market in 1993. 

• The Philippines' gross national product grew by 2.3 percent in 1993. 
much of it from a surge in remittances of overseas workers. 

AFP. aP 


Weekly net asset 
value 


on 24.01.94 


Toi 

Pacific 

Holdings us$224 .( 6 

Listed on the 

l « Amsterdam 

^*5 ~ 2= Stock Exchange 

Information; 

Atees Pierson Capital Management 
Rolan 55, 1012 KK Amsterdam. 
Tel.; * 3J-20-S211410. 


COMPANY RESULTS 


Revenue and profits or. 
losses, in mtffions, are in 
local currencies unless 
otherwise Indica ted. 

United States 

Eastman Kodak 
ouar. . nn im 

Rnwm «Stt *ASL 

NoMne. __ 201.00 WJB 
Par Shore — 0*1 DS7 

Year VR WJ 

taEre*— . UM1. .wm. 

Netlrtc._-~.al SIS. IJAk 
p»r Share — . — 3JS 

o;*» -- ■ 


Humana ’ 

wreay r, : . «g . "g 

Revenue Wt-OO 7JIOO 

Met loc. _ . 29-00 «£0 

Per Share — 018 004 


rear mg .nn 

KMwwe — .WB. offn. 

Mel Inc. - — : wjQO aWMO 
Per Share — OJi .— 


o: has. 1997 - vrqy results 
Charge of Silt mHNan. 

ingersoK-RxmU ■’ 
«W. ms im 

Rerxvnu* i/»9. lift 

Net rnc. 4i7M 3Zh 

Per Share; — OJA 031 

Johnson and Johnson 
ettfluer. -ms im 
Revunur isn. 15W. 

xctlnc. — _ 335.00 307.00 

Per Snore _ OS 041 
Year . .. im im 

Revenue — M.I* 


McDonotfs . 
etooear. . , ' W m* 

. Revenue WD- raffl- 

Helmc 36<S0 TDM 

■ Per Share • 072- IL61 


PepsiCo 

Per Shore — BJS 032 

Veor . . mi. im 

Revenue 2i02i- . 1I8A 

Nel Inc. 13% 3#ijo 

Per Shore— 1J« 0 M 

19fS res 


Moxxom 

u» im 

5D3J» 57t» 

*etLa»_ 040 lftM 


of SI9XS mllUoa. 

Procter 4 Gam We 

nr Hoff • -ms ms 

SJvea ue iWg. 1W]>. 

Het Inc. im- tm 

Per Shore. — 1JU. l JO 
1993 1st haf/ results restateO. 


■ fLR. Donnelley & Sons 
«0 floor. w im 
Revenue — ijia 

Net Inc IM1 U? 

Per Share — 051 Off 

. . ScoW Paper 
«hQ>or. ms nw 

Revenue ISO. tsDs 

O per Net — (a 13*07 40M 

Oper Shore— . — 0*1 

Year 1993 WP 

a evenue — 4W9. 5JJ91. 

•fine. 1 Ol 219.1 M73 

Per Share—. — 23* 

A.-MK 

staff on 

eHiQnor, rm im 

Revenue Wft. M91. 

Net Inc. — _ 15200 TUB 

Year mi m2 

■mfsz 


Southern pacific Rail 
4H, floor. 19*3 mi 

Revenue 7«2^o 711^ 

Net me. iw szm 

Per Shore — 003 050 

Year llW im 

Revenue 2.919. W1 

Nel Inc. 0149.10 33.10 

Per Shore — — 024 

o: hss 

Sun ast rand 

«mo«»r- m» im 

Revenue 37i» afljIJO 

Oper Net — 3070 3050 

Opw Share— 035 084 

Year im im 

Oner Share— 256 I.** 

imvtu net hcmchs choree 
at 1204 mutton. 1*93 nets ex- 
cMe choree oISS million. 

Teaneco 

lit Ouar. 1993 MM 

Revenue V70 WJ 

Oner Net i&OO 29d0 

Oder Show- 0J3 017 


Year 1993 1992 

Revenue — — 1X255- llW 
Oner Net — 45t» ltMJ 
Oner Shore- «» ’-W 

Texaco 

W* floor. _im m* 

Revenue 

OoerNef — 349 j 00 Jff.« 
Ooer Share— ias t32 
Yew 1993 1997 

Revenue 3fJ71. 3*J£- 

OPer Net — 

Oner Shore— Off Iff 
nets extiude tosses of SlOmt- 
Uon vs. SM million in Puarrers 
andofSt*! mlltlan ns. S3* mil- 
lion In full rears. 

Texas Instruments 
4th floor. ?m im 

Revenue i 

Net lac. i Otoe 73J0 

Per Shore— iff OJ0 
Yew WW I9J7 

Revenue — Ua 4ffO 

Nel Inc- 47230 3*7M 

Per Share — 5JI3 2a 
Per shore a«er preferred 
cavUenOs. 


INDOSUEZ HIGH YIELD BOND FUND 

Societe d'lnvestissement a Capitol Variable 
Siege Social: 39, Allee Scheffer 
1-2520 Luxembourg 

R.G Luenbevg B: 43 962 


A ATS AUX ACTIOIWAIRES 

l? c«f parte a la connoiewncc d» Arlinnn»irre dr IND05UKZ 
HIGH YIELD BOND FUND qiir U- Cons. il d’ Administration a 
drridc dr payor un acromptc swr dividendr dc US S2_par action 
dr distribution. L’cx-dividend date «l lixcc au 24 janvirr 1994 rl 
fc paicnicnt sc frra rn date riu 3 1 janvicr 1994. 

Lr Conscil dMdmimsfrUion- 

I. 1 International Herald Tribune rrgrerrr lr retard dans lu 
publication de cette annonre par suite dr probl ernes tie 
imnsmission. 


LVMH 


MOfT HENNESSY . LOUIS VUmON 

CmiMiliduu'ii sale* »*l ihe I.VNIH Mfti Hcimc'st 
Louis Vuilton Group fur 1**93 Jiiittumcd in FF 
23. N hillj.vn. reproenung a rise nt IO • c m«r ihc 
comparable iiaurc nl 1902 On a constant 
currency basi>. consolidated sales «ould have 
increased by 3.7 •'». 

The trading performance at the end ul the year 
u;ih belter than expected. During the Iasi iwo 
innnihs of 1993 Miles were In *"i higher ihun ihe 
comparable 1992 figure. This irend (.oniinucd in 
January 1994. 

The breakdown of sales by segment was as follow .- : 


Jn millions of FF 

1992 

1 1993 

Champagne and Wines 

5.245 

! 5.446 

Cognac and Spirits 

5.553 

| 5,846 

Luggcge and Leather Goods 

4,700 

5.665 

Perfumes and Beauty Products , 

5.487 

0.128 

Other Actaties 

673 | 

737 

LVMH 1 

21,658 j 

23,822 


IVMH. THE WORLD'5 LEADING LUXURY PRODUCTS GROUP 


INTERNATIONAL RECRUITMENT 





Ttva Intemaffonaf Air Tkanspoft Association 
for the scheduled crirflne Industry, 
and Its 200 plus Member companies 
. fly over 96% of an International traffic. 

1AXA has its headquarters in Montreal, Canada, 
and a main office in Geneva, Switzerland. 

We are reci siting a 

PUBLIC RELATIONS 



Thg Potto u 

♦ To^ design arid knptement effective c<>n^ri^caticm 
strategSsmat wi eohcnce the. Image af lATAaod of 

the^ ^alf&7e industry- 


. thePwso a: ^ ' . 

♦ At least 10 yerais’ experience ® a senior iHtemcmcnaJ 

PR prof 6 ssfonctf . 1 

other langudfl® dewatte.^ - 

disciplinas. 

posHk»i. • ■* 

. send yout ajuti CVr ? 

Director. Human Resowro* 

: lATA Centre, P-O. Box 672, ... 


WORLD LEADER IN INTERNATIONAL TELECOMMUNICATIONS, 


Ini I CRISftl IUI WL 

PERSONNEL MA 


Paris Base 

We are seeking our 
“International Personnel 
Managef, to provide a 
human resource function - 
Involving advice, cfirection. 
control and audit - to about 
3 500 hi-tech staff 
distributed worldwide, over 
. ten main decentralized 
geographical areas. 


cf highly motivated H.R 
Spedafets,your 

responsBsBateswB 

encompass: 

* Development of Human 
Resources Policies 
and Procedures 


• Harmonisation of 
Employment Terms 
and Conditions 

• Definition and control of 
Budget/Headcount levels 

•Establishing expatriation 
conditions and supen/ision 

of irnsmafonal transfers 

• Audit and control ot 
remuneration and 
benefits systems 

• Implementation of 
Computerized personnel 
data systems 

Candidates will have : 

• sound experience of 
H.R. administration of 

■ internationally based 
local staff. 


• a proven record of 
experience in 
compensation, job 
evaluation, recruitment, 
employee benefits and 
development and 
implementation of 
personnel policies, 
preferably with an 
international bias, 

• diplomacy and 
persuasion skills to 
Influence decentralized 
Personnel Management 
practices locally. 

• communication and 
presentation proficiency for 
interactiTg with high level 
functional executives. 

For consideration, please 
forward your resume 
including salary 
requirements, and quoting 
ref. 419 on the envelop 
to COMMUNIQUE 
50/54 rue de Silty 
92513 BOULOGNE 
BILLANCOURT CEDE* 
FRANCE, who wtD transmit 


■ EXECUTIVE 
POSmONS AVAILABLE 

wn EXPOBT MMUGBL tatafed 
wU haoou* tUS. cMHW/pxm- 
sonal - tend oocl m ai u faetaw is 
u pe n eoead ffnogsr. 

le ri 0J.Y^M»4 Goods. 

Mm be ban! in Engfeh, Fiardi & 
GenrtCn. Ai into soWy wutnnn. 
Reply Bo* S3S7F. LHT, Thrd 
Ave, 5h a NT. W ?00a US* 
ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT; 
EUingud, French. EngtA. tax or 

GcMW kxzAon taaiw inmtf 
rewied. Beuble heuv Resaw to 

faelTgMBy^IhlSA. 

EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 

MARKETING AND SA1ES bnoAn. 
4 4. boim/SoMne no bo rai . 


«< 

seds Untaong poiiien Abe «pe- 
.neoee n *5m£togy, safes flirt 

fc 

EBOOTDCi rCo WOmL 


EnaWi, Gorrot BrAon, Kwot, 
(jedv Stovoc o«o SertsoCreot netse 
leafy to Ban 8% HT, via Gwole i, 
aiaWortatay 


M1SNATKWAL tXrfCH EXECUTIVE, 
muhiKnfluol, . dl round nxiw^w. 


proven quabe h etnxlrwKto, pro-, 
dbcean. orawhtt ond mW; 
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fmedaKs] Mb job rf oteiH*Q«r 
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wt perionwo w e w«ld«*ae Bia/or 
(Kerin to gnqgaax*. Tet r 31 
92991 Fsst JT1LS33240. tedeneoo» 
1 NL-5664 TV Bed. Hofand 


MTl SALES MANACSt 
45i ni bofXnf, 20 outoneb* 

OJE. Mt speosfaf, ftoem bate, 
french, IxAto. Gerowet, Spate 
bntdi, boric Rota» 4 Jopmm to 
Corepjtonf, efiwWe n muiMeaftnp, 


joflet. 

CattfVeir (31-1)4251 JV 10 

WCCBSfUt AMP ' 5w£5 V 
e<perienoe^ Buoneu 

Moragei in the hegh tedtnologr me 
Let. a being l« new bneess op 
«rtrtB to Mptort he 2b ytm w- 
pencnce <n toe Eurofm wd US 
marWr, an a berm or bng im 
c ore aa bosh wi rdocam tiwriL b- 
fefephem/tm: Hotad +* 1 
HD' 


TRUNGUAL CHEMICAL WSm. 


J yea _ , . . . . 

engineer for mqor MBOOBW l edDr n- 
(tonnes m France ( USA. seels pa» 
ticn n en pn ecn eg field 4rtm tax 
area Vrfd worfang papers. Td. tax 
til 43 74 36 38 Bewe messotiel 

AGS) 35 living si Fnsn«, 
jf, large experience ■> rt' nope 
— , pounon woh txrv**/ ™» 
brareb m ore or me taopeon 
touririK. Orta ptraods iw tawe . 
Dented CV ovotoble. Wrte M f. 
Kora neb. t0 bo bd GonbefB 73000 
CHentoery. Fftro or cal 33J996W6 
US ATTOHNET, LlW to, II rears 
•xpmenae. WI Seo pecn MfiA. ft*rf 
pennon. US 8 K eterieps *ee« 
poybon. Tef/Fm Faro 23-My*33^<_ 

GENERAL POStTlONS 
AV1UU8LE 

OfflCE MANAGfit tar tANGUAGt 
50XXX m tax. uue be uff mhr, 

nw ( Bdy o rgann e d and compiler 
Stedta Son* ficndi naceuory, ee- 
counfing eroenence o te Sen d pf 
Kt tone bofcd Court. TCVSBl 
FtOMATfON CONSra JO. -ue 
Godd de Momy. 75QW Pare. 


0or anssfao is to provuh vmridvritle talecotunuaications and inhn- 
rnation sccvjces fa airitKS and related mdcstnes. Wn wish to nrcrtuf 

T elecommunications 

Engineers Geneva base 

YOUR TASKS 

- Programming, networking, design, sizing and provision ot various 
Digital PABXs. {ref. PV11 

- Design, development and implementation of PABX system 
management equipment. |ref. PV2) 

-Development and implementation of compressed and 
packetised voice solutions. (r£f. PV3) 

YOUR PROFILE 

- Engineering degree in Electronics, or Information Technology. 
-Extensive experience in Telecommunications field, 3-7 yaars 

with a PTOfPTT or large private network. 

- Excellent written S oral communication skills. Fluent English 
and French written and spoken. 

Please send your application in English stating which position 
you are interested in, anti including complete CV to SITA, ref. PV 
26, Chemin de J oinvil le - Case 31 
1216 Cointrin - SWITZERLAND. 


6L0MI TBEC0lff«tfWr*TK»NS AND WHmMATION STOV1CES 


HNANCIAL TRANSLATOR 

Treocft to Engfirii 
Dne faw hiSwne pogMnvx* 
eonocnof taobreed nanstaun 
torn ipecafced m icp^jucfcty 
to tro d ocfa^JUttonu. noow 
opfty entf i ttpencresd n 
ccodicifl report tranStOKn, 

pertedfy bAnguaf (Engfah nudra, 

tayjuel, Fiench vvtreMpm Beum 
iTta. 35W. ULT. «©lr*te 
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LA BGE HONG KONG READING CO. 
jeeta Freetance Mcvkmg Gep * 
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riens seek arecnm veei i e ta to cm- 
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7 yeor* ezpeneace to (iXtase writ 
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very tttvncMtive, wgcmoioncf 
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or Travel Qonpman k> top toll 
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ISJCOPT8 PHOT, irwlii engmt 
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BOmCHICAN YOUNG WOMAN, 
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MOHVATH), HSNCH LADY, vabng 
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chcritewfl pabhor re PA or vwot>- 
■ng Ifnvri Tel Ppm ) 42 63 44 90 

MULTILINGUAL JAPANESE. 32. 
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EA5TC5N EUROPE/ WAU STRffT. 
Emelefti command of rtwganon, 
Ccech. Stow*. Enotah & french wjh 
tovtool r«« Wei S««i enpetYnce 
Uu*4U to f rtu*»<K5na OpprrtuwPv 
Fan: 2T2.9VtS.WXQ ffliK Ms. Wnahi 


SECRETARIAL 
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4 MONTHS PAJTT-nME JOB 
Japanese Bari n Pans 5EBC5 
Tr Lingual Assetant Japanese A French. 
te geneicf seaewvri dreet Send 
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IJH.T. 92521 NeuJr Cede., F.a>v* 

in TAX A LAW F IBM sceis SSt 
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SECRETARIES AVAILABLE 


ASSISTANT/ SECRETARY 

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Expenence wtti inti newspaper, 
compute Steiaie. 
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lepfe ta 3505. LH7 . 92521 Nw», 
Cede* or Ire. f&i) 4* 07 93 » 


EDUCATIONAL 
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osamvc ianguace sbmcb 

Wal House Pore seeks Dvedor o' 
Siute Teacta deretepmen. Hiper- 
vmon wna. cornea nonng mm- 
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•qwvalert knowledge frenm mcrlei 
red busmess counre. iluem wimen.' 
spoken hefire, papery CV S 
tadwrJten toiler to D Preey. 25 W 

de Sebastopol 75001 fare 

IHE CCt. of M£AU*.MAirr*: IA 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 1994 


SPORTS 


; . e- ■ 


i .'1“ 


Bulls Are Doin 


By Harvey Araton 

jVctv 1'arA Times Service 


NEW YORK — Four mouths after Mi chad 
Jordan jilted them for a batting glove and a chaw 
of tobacco, the Chicago Balls arc still in the thick 
of a hectic race for the best record in the National 
Basketball Association. 

Etui now that his team has drawn up shoulder 
to shoulder with the East's preseason favorites, 
the New York Knicks. and those Hawks that 
have taken wing in Atlanta, Jerry Krause does 
not want to crow about it. The Bulls' general 
manager does not want to pinch himself either, 
but not because there is plenty there to pinch. 

Even if he does not get enough credit, this has 
been Jerry Krause's dream half-season. He is the 
architect of what is becoming perhaps the great- 
est success story in pro basketball history. 

But. for yean, this 5-foot -5-incb rotund former 
scout was taunted as the inheritor of Jordan. 


Now Jordan is gone, leaving behind a team en- Jackson, and Pippen to bring them another scri- 
tirdy constructed by Krause, from B. J. (Arm- ous player in the salary slot vacated by Jordan, 
strong! to Z. Seattle landed Declef Schrempf and Kendall 

Without the injured shot-blocker Scott WU- GflL The Knicks replaced Doc Rivers with Derek 
liams from the start, and without Scottie Pippen Harper. Orlando is reportedly trying to add Dan- 
for 10 games early on, and with Pete Myers, the ny Manning to Shaquille O'Neal, Anferaee 
former scrub for the Knicks and the New Jersey Hardaway and Nick Anderson- 


done, Steve Kern the suddenly and shockingly 
potent Bill Wenningon, and a hard-boarding 
rookie named Cone Blount. 

“Am I looking? Sure Tm looking.” said 
Krause. “But I'm also looking at my team, too. 
I'm looking to see just bow good we really are 


Idenly and shockingly me anin gless. But not "because it gave the" Knicks ' 
and a hard-boarding the borne-coon playoff advantage. ... 

1 • He bad just .been . antidmtkg a nationally 

: Tm looking,” said tc * cv i sed battle as be would have aspraitencous 
inng at my |wm too. ‘ ^hsflenge to arm wrestle.. It never entered his ■■ 
,w Bood we realiv are that he couldn’t come la the Garden and 


Manhandles 

Connecticut 


; f 


Nets, starting Tor Jordan, the Bulls are 30-12, and 
winner of nine of their last 10. 

Yes. there is a talent dilution in die NBA. 
especially in the East But the Bulls are still a 
great story, a thoroughly entertaining, slick-pass- 


Krause has a response to those who say that 
the Bulls are a shooting guard away from going 
over the top and that he must simply add a 
veteran scorer like JefT Homacek. 

“A few years ago it was Walter Davis,” be said. 


a lu aw vw iiw uvi* awvw •»» i viij wv ■ _ . ■ 4 . . . . 

because I don't really know. This has all been wmj one playoff game; which, of comse; heffia. 


nice, but we haven't won anything yet 


These Bulls - are four multit alente d playss 


“1 can’t get emotionally involved. I have to be 
otgective. Can we win? I don’t know. We haven’t 
even had our full team yet" 


involved. I have to be G ? M - K^fnd Annslraig) 


by bench people who. accept their 
ae can say that their leading men have 


On the Gist day of training camp, Jackson 


roles. No one can say that ii 

reached their fall potential. 


the AsrodoteJ Proa 

-^-Fifth-ranked Connecticut bri no de- 
fense for what was done to it oy oy 
Lawrence Merten and No. 15 Syracuse 
w .Moten scored 31 P^s and 0£ 
anseroen raraed Tuesday 
to at home in Syracuse. Yc«, inW a 


happen is crazy." said Krause. “Nobody knew. 

Jf Krause had better looks, he’d have been on 
the cover of GQ by now, or at least have bad 
something nice written about him in The Chicago 
Sun-Times. The man known as Crumbs is instead 
being harangued by demands from the news 


principally by Jordan, and the builder of nothing. ‘ media, talk-show callers, the Bulls* coach, Phil 


not doing his job. When he chased the Croatian arrogance,” the ability to take over the opposing Hcjust cannbf be sure th^ wiD tnake euoaRh 
star Toni Kukoc to the ends of the Earth, he was crowd and the fourth quarter m another contend- to win on the road, in the playoffs. That is -why 
not doing his job right. ing team’s building. the Bulls, should Krause make no additions, wfli 

In the meantime, just in time for Jordan’s. Jordan was good and peeved when the Bulls really need' home-court advantage this time 
departure. Krause was making the Balls deeper lost a game in Charlotte last spring that rendered around. That is why Krause did not want to be 
than ever with Kukoc; John Paxson's spot-up the Sunday re gul a r -season finale in New York pinched. 


niog streak. ■ - ■ - 
“Asa team, we played a perfect ^ me 
tonight ” Moten said. “Wecouldn t have 


rmi-EOK BASKETgAIL_ 


5 Teams Yyingfor Lead 


The Assoaated Press 

Who’s the best team in the NBA? 

With the Seattle SuperSonics 
and Houston Rockets continuing 
to lose while the New York Knicks 
and Chicago Bulls keep winning, 
the result Wednesday was that five 
teams had nearly identical records. 

The Sonics, 31-10. still own the 
best record in the NBA. but just a 
half-game behind are the Knicks 
and Rockets, at 31-11. with the 
Atlanta Hawks at 30-11 and the 
Bulls at 31-12. 

The hottest teams in the NBA 
are New York and Chicago. The 
Knicks won their fourth straight 
and 13th of 16 on Tuesday nighu 
beating Boston. Chicago beat Den- 
ver, for its ninth victory in 10 
games. 

Seattle lost to New Jersey for its 
fifth defeat in six games, and Hous- 
ton lost to Utah for its fourth 
straight defeat on (he road. 

Knicks 114, Celtics 79: In New 
York, the Knicks held an opponent 
to less than 80 points for the fourth 
time this season, oulrebotmded the 
Celtics. 56-35, and held them to 33 
percent shooting from the field. 

Seven New York players bad at 
least 10 points, led by Patrick Ew- 
ing with 23. 

Bulls 118, Nuggets 98: Scottie 
Pippen scored 28 points. Horace 
Grant and BJ. Armstrong each 
had 19 and the Bulls shot 59 per- 
cent from the field in Denver. 

Nets 104, SuperSonics 103: The 
Sonics were playing for the last 
shot when Ricky Pierce dribbled 
the ball off his Tool He retrieved it 
at halfcourt and missed a wild book 
shot as time expired. 

Kenny Anderson led New Jersey 
with 26 points. Shawn Kemp had 
26 for Seattle. 

Jazz 1W, Rockets 88: Karl Ma- 
lone scored 29 points, 15 in the 
fourth quarter, and visiting Hous- 
ton was held scoreless for the final 
4:56. John Stockton added 26 
points and 13 assists and, while 
center Felton Spencer, who fin- 
ished with 12 rebounds, held Ha- 
keem Olajuwon to just seven, two 
on the offensive end. 

■ 2 Rare All-Star Choices 

Latrell Sprewell and John Starks 
represent two rare choices for the 
NBA All-Star game Feb. 13 in 
Minneapolis. The Associated Press 
reported. 

Sprewell, of the Golden State 


1983. to be chosen to play in the 
game even though he wasn’t among 
the 100 players listed on the All- 
Star ballot. 

Statics, of the New York Knicks. 
is only the third alumnus of the 
Continental Basketball Associa- 


Mouming of Charlotte, and guards 
Mookie Blaylock of Atlanta and 
Mark Price of Cleveland. 


NBA HIGHLIGHTS 


lion to play in the AU-Slar game, 
joining Rickey Green (1984) and 
Michael Adams (1992). 

Sprewell and Starks, both 
guards, were among 14 reserves — 
seven each from the Eastern and 


Western conference - picked $larks averagillg 20.1 points 
Tuesday by the head coaches in game and a team- high 6-2as- 
each conference to join the five ^Ttbe Knicks, leaders of the 


Starling for the West will be for- 
wards Charles Barkley of Phoenix 
and Shawn Kemp of Seattle, center 
Hakeem Olajuwon of Houston, 
and guards Clyde Drexler of Port- 
land and Mitch Richmond of Sac- 
ramento. Opening for tbe East will 
be forwards Derrick Coleman of 
New Jersey and Scottie Pippen of 
Chicago, center Shaquille O’Neal 
of Orlando and guards Kenny An- 
derson of New Jersey and BJ. 
Armstrong of Chicago. 

Staiks is averaging 20.1 prams 
net game and a team-high 6 2 as- 



startera for each team Atlantic Division. Sprewell is the 

AJso selected as subsuiutes on jvjb a Ie ader in minutes played with 
the Western Conference tram were anaveragcof 44.9pergLe andthc 
forwards Karl Malone of Utah, S5 .J? 1 ?, 7 



Danny Manning of the Los Ange- 
les Clippers and Cliff Robinson of 
Portland, center David Robinson 
of San Antonio, and guards Kevin 
Johnson of Phoenix and John 
Stockton of Utah. 

The East's reserves, in addition 
to Starks, will be forwards Horace 
Grant of Chicago and Dominique 
Wilkins of Atlanta, centers Patrick 
Ewing of New York and Alonzo 


Warriors' scoring leader at 2 1JZ. 

He is one of six first-time All- 
Stars among the reserves. The oth- 
ers are Mourning, Starks. Blaylock. 
Grant and Cliff Robinson. Among 
the starters making their All-Star 
debuts will be Coleman. Anderson 
and Armstrong. 

Lenny Wilkens of Atlanta will 
coach the East and George Karl of 
Seattle will coach the West. 


Y- ft 


UndUatoMbmc 

Scottie Pippen showed teammates his new haircut before tbe Bufis cfyped tbe Nuggets for their nmrti victory in 10 games. 


' played airy belter. 1 would never have 
believed we amid score 108 points on 
CoanecticuL” . 

Syracuse (M-3, 7-3) matched its high- 
est point total in a conference game, set . 
in 1983 against Boston College. 

Connecticut (18-2, 8-1) played its sec- 
ond game withemt its coach, Jim Calhoun, 

who has been hospitalized with pneumo- 
nia. ThelHuskies, who beat Syracuse, 75- 
67, at Hartford on Jan. 10, led fay 51-48 al 
halftime but could not hold cm. . 

John Wallace bad 25 points for tire 
. Orangemen. He and Moten each had 10 
^rebounds. 

Donydl Marshall scored 30 points 
v. 1 and Brian Fair had 25 for Connecticut, 
which gave up 100 points for the first 
time this season. 

. No. 6 Arkansas 89, Vaderbflt 76: 
Roger Crawford and Scotty Thurman 
each had three baskets during a 19-0 run 
early in the second half that got' the 
Razprbacks (15-2, 6-2 Southeastern 
Conference) past visiting Vanderbilt 
(10-7, 3-5). -- 

NO. 13 MBdugan 63, Na 8 Plate 62: 
Jnwan Howard, who got 17 points and 
17 rebounds, scored off an offensive 
rebound with 21 seconds left and Michi- 
gan (14-4, 6-2) woh at Puidne (17-3. 5-3) 
in a battle for first place in the Kg Ten. 

doin Robinson scored 36 points for 
Purdne, bul be and two teammates each 
missed short shots in the final seconds. 

No. 10 Temple 84, Rutgers 45: Eddie 
Jones equaled a career-high with 30 
points as host Temple (14-2, 7-1 Atlantic 
10) ran away from Rutgers (6-11, 2-6). 


N ik 


IARD 


NBA Standings 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Atlantic Division 


Warriors, is only the ninth player, 
and the first since Bill Lairabeer in 


New York 

W L 
31 11 

Pel 

.738 

-IS 

Orlando 

24 17 

405 

JVI 

Miami 

21 21 

500 

10 

New Jersey 

20 22 

Mb 

11 

Boston 

20 24 

ASA 

12 

phltodetahla 

IB 24 

AW 

13 

Washlngion 

14 28 

Central Division 

913 

17 

Atlanta 

30 11 

JJ2 

— 

Chlcogo 

30 12 

Jl* 

VS 

Charlotte 

22 20 

524 

BVi 

Cleveland 

21 71 

500 

9to 

Indiana 

IB 23 

.439 

12 

Milwaukee 

12 31 

J79 

19 

Detroit 

9 13 

214 

71 VS 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Midwest Division 



W L 

Pet 

GB 

Houston 

31 11 

.738 

— 

Son Ant onto 

30 14 

482 

2 

Utah 

39 15 

JB> 

3 

Denver 

70 22 

Mb 

11 

Minnesota 

T4 27 

J4I 

T6»* 

Dallas 

3 40 

Pacific Division 

570 

28’t 

Seattle 

31 10 

.754 

— 

PhoenU 

29 13 

490 

2VS 

Portland 

25 18 

581 

7 

Golden State 

23 IB 

541 

8 

LA Clippers 

15 27 

557 

I4VS 


LA Lakers W 27 .341 17 

Sacramento 13 29 J10 lavs 

TUESDAY'S RESULTS 
Boston HUM 23—79 

Now York 31 29 29 25— 1W 

B: Rodla 6-142-6 14 Gamble 4-105-5 13. N.Y.: 
Smith 5-10 « M. E wring 10-17 3-5 23. Re- 
bounds— Boston 49 (Abdeinotjy 7>, New York 


43 (OeriiHry 151. Assist*— Boston U l Fox, Utah 


Chicago 29 33 32 39-1 is 

Mover 27 II 23 30— SB' 

C: Ptoeen 11-17 54 21 Grom 79 54 19. Arm- 
straw 9-UM19. □: SITlh 5102-2 12 Raows 7-9 44 
H, B. Wiltons 5-7*2 12 Rcbauods-Oiicago 30 
(Ptapen 7). Denver 47 (Mutambo 9). Assists— 
CNcod 38 (Kukoc I). Owner 21 (Ftodc 9). 
Houston 24 21 14 »— 88 


Brown 3). New York 27 (Bonner 51. 

Seattle 34 22 24 it—m 

New Jersey 31 21 30 IT — 104 

S: Kemp 12-192-4 2LPOyton 9-19 S« 23. NJ.: 


14 94 37 77—141 


{Bonner 51. H : Olaluwon 10-70 3-4 23. Maxwell 7-192-2 14. 

M a 3b 31— SU Brooks 58 3-4 1* U: K. Malone 9-1* II- 13 29. 
31 21 30 17— 1M Stockton 9-14 M 26. RltlWHl Houston 44 
rtan*-l95523.NJ.: (Olaluwon. Herrera 71. Ulan 52 HCMolone. 


Anderson KM? 2-2 2A Edwards 7-14 44 19. Re- Spencer 12 J. Aisists— Houston 20 (Maxwell?!, 
hounds— Seattle 51 (Kerns 12). New Jersey 51 Utah 25 (Slockfan 131. 


(Coleman 141. Assist s S e attl e 2B I Schrempf, 
McMillan 7), New Jersey 25 {Anderson I). 
Washington 23 1? 29 25— 94 

tndkma 29 28 24 35—114 


LA cappers 25 28 34 19—164 

Phoenix 33 a a 31 — IN 

ULj Manning 12-23 2-534. Harper 12-244728. 


«■ GuoHoHu7-J44-4 18, Chewier 10-182-2 22. g: 

I: McKey 4-1244 It, Smlts 8-129-10 25. Miller . j*. r. 1 ?? 1 .-* ..." 


11-14 1-1 25. Rebouods-Washinota. 41 (Mure- I 

on 91. indtano 45 (SaiH* 9). Assists— Wash- (Jackson. Morning 91. Phoent* 32 (Perry mi. 


New Hampshire 77, Harvard <8 
Rhode Island KL Northeastern 42 
Svroane 108. Connectic u t 95 
Temple H Rutgers 45 
Vermont IDS. American U. 82 
SOUTH 

Citadel SO. Ersklne 44 
Jacksonville 77. BtAtota 77 
Pittsburgh SO. Miami 71 
Southern Miss. 97, Miss. Valiev St 73 
Tennessee 97. Tennessee Tgtfi 78 
w. Kentucky 87, Oral Rohorti 55 
MIDWEST 

Iowa SI. «9. Colorado 69 
Michigan 63. Purdue 42 
S. Utah 85. Butler 78 
SW Missouri st 45, Indiana 51. 9 
WIs, Milwaukee 9i Wright St. 80 
SOUTHWEST 
Arkansas 8«. Vanderbilt 76 
Texas 85. Rice to 

Tojcw-EI Paso 74, W. New Mexico 71 


TOipWibu le We evert: I, Seizfttger 282 
points; 2, Face 268; 3, SucTwt 222; < Knflnor 
198; SLUndh 144. 4, Veronika StoHmaler.Aue- 
Irta. 157; 7. Anla Hoav Austria. IS; a Wor- 
wcsnZeicmkolu Russia, I3i; 9, Bouvler,T09; 
W, Renate GoetsctiL Austria, lot. 

Overpfl World Cop Staodtoas: T. WAorg 
UB9 points; % Vreni Sc h neider. Switzerland. 
W0; X Anita Wachter. Austria. 898; *. SM- 
kkmr 744: 5. Uimco Motor. Austria. 711; 4. 
Doborrti Compagnort. Italy. 482; 7. Martino 
ErtL Germceiy, 512; a Manama KEoarsfod. 
Norway. 432; 9. Moreno Gallixta. I taly^Ol; TO, 
Unka Hrovot. Slovenia, 397. 


HOCKEY 


TUESDAYS RESULTS 


NHL Standbys 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 


NY Ransom 
Now Jersey 
Ftortta 
PhUodeiptitQ 


Zl If M S T4I 132 
24 23 . 3 51 183 IM 


I no ton 23 iCheonev 41, Indiana 34 {Miller 91. 
Miami 21 28 15 34-88 

Milwaukee 24 a 22 14-82 

M: Rice 8-22 68 23, Smith 7-18 3-4 19. M; 
Edwards 7-15 3-4 IX Murdock 7-15 M 17. Rw- 
boends— Miami 9 ISeikotv IS). Milwaukee 54 
C Baker 131. Assists— Miami 17 (Smith «L Mil- 
waukee 18 (Murdock 11). 

LA Lakers 25 18 34 39— 97 

San Aafonto 35 28 25 34—112 

LA.; Divoc 6-136-8 18. Van Exelt-184-4 24. S: 
Ellis 13-23 2-2 32, RaWmon 11-19 8-11 3a Re- 
bounds— LA Lakers 47 (ConpOeH 101. Son 
Antonio 42 1 Rodman 16). AssMs— LA Lakers 


Portland 18 33 19 27— 97 

S ac ram ento 25 29 24 22-102 

P; C Robinson 9-17 11-11 30. Porter 5-1346 
19. S; Tisdale 17-17 4-7 3a Richmond 10-22 1-2 
21. R«Mtmds— Portland 51 I Stria, land »», 
Socromento57|W)lson Wl Assists— Portland 
21 (StrickkxxJ ill, Sacramento 27 (Webb I). 


World Cup SkHng 


Major Cofiege Scores 


Boston U. 84. Holstro 75 
Coaisius 99. George Moson 85 


19 (ComobelL Von Exrt 4). San Antonio 24 George Washing ton 86. west virglnlo 73 


(Del Negro 4). 


Mount SI. Mary's. Met 82, Cant. Connect. 51. 71 


WOMEN'S DOWNHILL 
Results W etk m dor (ram Starro Nevada 
Spain: 1. Hilary Undh. United States. 2 min- 
utes.0L2l seconds; X Motanie SucTwr. Franae, 
2-.BL22; j. Isolde Kostaer. Italy. 2:04A5; 4 
Kollo Set zinger. Germow, 2:0454; 5. 5wt- 
tanc Gtadishiva. Russia. 2:0500; 4 Nathalie 
Bouvter. Franco, 2:05314; 7. Kate Pace, Can- 
da 2:05.13; & Krista Schmldlnger, united 
Slales.2 :01l4j 9, Btatona Pera. ltaly.2:05J4; 
10. Prrnilla Wlberv, Sweden. 2.-05A2. 


FREESTYLE SKIING 

Results Wodgafknr tatbe women's feaM la 
Lo nnmr. FYance: 1, Ellen Brgoiv United 
States, 26SS points; Z Oksavi KutsdHnko. 
Russia, 2180; 1 Jeanette Witte. Nerthertand* 
22-75; 4 Amlin Johmsson, Sweden. 21 5B; 5. 
Tarsha efabern, Austria. ZL5B; i. Ouffiy Fe- 
rtias, France. 20J0; 7. Mala Sdnnid. Swttesr- 
lamt i960; & Ashley Herod. Canada. K93. 

Results la the m en's battel in Lo Ctam: 1. 
Hew Boumgcrtnor. B w Waortqnd.343i.-X Fo- 
brk» Becker. France, 2425; 1 AmHn Webs, 
Germany. 2ZJ5; 4 Ian Edmondson, .untied 
States. 2L65; iOorcv DownfcCanoda,ZL1d: 4 
Jason Bodnar. United Stator, 2L10; 7. Pavel 
i-andev Czech Republic. 21.10; B. Ride Mose- 
ley. Untied States. 2025. 


Tampa Bay 
NY Islanders 


44 133 152. 
4T .145 M? 


Pittsburgh 

Boston 


Hartford 

Ottawa 


SOCCER 


SPANISH CUP . 


Real Madrid (L Tenerife 3 


WESTERN CONFERENCE . 

Central OMskm 

W L T PH OF ©A 
Toronto 28 14 11 87 .181 149 

Detroit 28 14 5 41 221 149 

DOUOS 27 19 7 61 .184 149 

St- Loots 24 18 . 8 48 145 149 

Chicago 23 - 20 6.32 146 138 

Winnipeg 17 29 6 48 154 204 

PadRc Division 

Calgary 24 1? 9 57 190 144 

Vancouver » 23 2- 58 I7T 144 

Anrtielm 28 . 29~ '4 « 147 145 

LOS AngetoB • 19 25 6 44 187 194 

son Jan 14 29 IT 49 131 .142 

Edmonton 13 31 ■ 34 UB W 


nortde ■ ' i 8—1 

Pittsburgh V 1.1 -f-a 

. — - First Period: FBrown 13 (I- Murphy. Sto- . 

M • - wens), Secaed Period; P-i_Muraify 12 (Strata!, 

? Ei * CE - . Brown); FBaraes lfl'CKirtaML G. Murpbvl. 

(ppL S ho ts o u gort : F (BrtWteggert 9-l4^-34. 

3 p « » P (onVortbltriepuck. FdzpatrWO ltwn-ai 

4 '40 ITS W Hartford 1 ‘8 ' 1—0 ' 

M S T41 132 Oeetet 1 ... f_» 1-.J . 

3 51 183 tt4 Ftost Ported ;H-Propp 9 (KroaGodyn yak). . 

4 41 131 157 ThiraPerfedrB-Suilsi 7 (Kamensky, Bakic); 
t 44 133 152. (pp). H-Godmyi*2 (Cimneyworttv Pronger ). 

3 4T .145 .189 Shots o n OBrt; H {On TTiIbauiTl 99-4— 04. Q ton - 

doe Bbrkel 15««-9L- 

II 61 182 172 s,a Jove “ « 2 1-4 ' 

r 59 164 146 N,Y. IstaMtors ' 2 J 1—5 

5 m iS’iw H* P«rt0«.K.YrPW*ev 7 (Ktagl; R.Y.- 

* FWley t {Farrow Knipp). (upUecaad Pert- • 

s ™ • gd:5XOdgetslO((!aodieathEnM,*{pp).N.Yj- 

, „ to „ Ftattey.9 (Acton, Kasparants); (shlN-Y.-Hague . 

•wewSr 22 (Lnctioncel; (shMLL-WWtney 5 (AWcamv, ' 

OzolhBh). Third parted; SJ.-Norton 3 (Mo- 
t pm nc aa hntav>;U^WIs—iaN.Y, H aB mP tnuwoB 

* " ", 7Z MokAhovL Shots w goal: SJ. (on McLennan) ’ 

5 U TRW H.Y. iort lrtJe) Ml -4-02. 

7 61.184 149 • 1 1 2 B-4 ■ 

B 48 145 149 *t Inrtl 8 3 18-4,' 

6 32 146 138 Pbst Period: T-Anfifevchuk41 (Gllmaur). 

6 48 154 204 Snead Period: SL-Hua 34 (MHlor.Montgom- ' 
m . btyI ; SL-S h on ohon 32 (HuH. Brawn); (pp).T- ’’ 

9 S7 190 144 Perreault 3 (Anderson. Grab); SL-Holl 35 ' 
3- 52 I7T 144 {Montgomery, Baranl. Third Period: SLrHati 
4 4* 147145 341 Jannay.BroWfl) ; (pfd.T-GretoedAocoon. 

4 44 187 194 Psnsaottl; T-Gilmoar 18 (AacbsyaiiA, EL 
IT- 49 131 .142 lertL Sbob on goal: Tion Joseph) 1 1-7-1 V ■ 
B 34 W IP 3—31 5J-; (on Patvin). 11-12-124—37. 


* K, 


II 41.182 172 
9 59 Ut 146 
■ 56.140,148 
5 51 163 137 
5 45 Ul 179 
5 .41 150 17S 
7 25 TE 342 






■ '* - t 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 




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CarytftJfy Ov Shaft From Thspaichm . 

PORTLAND, Oregon — The 
VS. t Figure Skating Association 
annotinad^cdheiday : that Mi* ' 
cbrile Kwao will go 10 Norway to 
be ready to skate for ihe U.S. team, - 
while Nancy Kerrigan was prepar- 
ing to show that. she has recovered 
from the attack' that injured her leg 
and can compete in the Olympics, 

Her dociorsaid she should have 
naproblem.-- 

Kwan. 13, was the runner-np for 
the ,1994 .U.S. title won by Tonya 
Harding, whose fonher husband, 

Jeff Giffoofy. in a dad with prosecu- 
tors, pleaded; guilty. Tuesday, to a 
charge of radceieerihg in connection 
with the Jan. 6 assault on Kerrigan. 

Gillociys lawyer, - Ronald H. 

Hoeveu said lhe evidence was 
“ o verwhd mi ng” 7 to show Harding 
was dteepiy involved in the scheme 
to keej> Kerrigan from staring in 
the national championships. 

Harding' has' steadfastly denied 
any involvement in planning ihe 
attack. Her lawyer. - Robert C. 

Weaver Jfl, aroused Hoevet of ; try- 
. . . wing the case in public. 

~ •• ' Theskaring association’s spokes- 
woman; Kristin Itott&saidin Col- . ;a • 

orado Springs that it was important Jeff Gflkxrfy, left, with his lawyei 
to gel Kwan to Uilehammer, Nor- " : ■ ■ -• 

wajy to “^ve her rime to train and ^ . .. __ 

. getaedimatedijj case she’s asked J\J-g ; UP *1 , 

to cctfipete dr represent the U.S;" ^ 8 4 

Travel date!, and Kwan’s train- *T . 

ing site in Norway remain undedd- _ . , 1 , 

ed,.Mana said. As long- as Kwatj By Mark Asher 

remains an alternate she cannot ' Washington PoaSermt .. 

live in the Olympic village or train nrAcunjf-r rt vr T 
at the Olympic venue. ^HWGTON The Tonya 

, Kwan was included as the alter- Hardmg-Nancy Kerngan nv^ 
hate for women’s singles- figure ■ for “ Olymptc^d n^mfig- 
skariug on the team roster prowled we skating, and 510 mrihon m.po- 

by theU.S. Olympic Committee to toutalmOTcUiy rewards, « in- 
ibetillehamnver Olympic Organa- jjgP 

ing Committee on Mtmday. ^ thecon^tm betwam P^te 

Kerrigan, meanwhile, was pre- 
paring tosbow a special committee 

that rite has recovered from her aUflehc footwear and clothing 
.. r injury. She was forced out of the • md usiiy. ■ 

national championships wlwn she . - Harding, who lives in Portland, 
was struck on her righl.leg in. De- Oregon^ and Nike, which is head- 
. . Treat. but was put on - the UjS.' ' quarfored in its suburbs, have be- 
CHympic team on condition a spe- -come iHleriwined. 1 with Phil 
cial skating association panel KiughLNi&’schier executive offi- 
found her fit to skate. • ■ cer, ahrioimdng that his company 




U.S. Skier Lindh Wins 
Depleted Women’s Race 


CiwyiliW M Our Staff From Dispwjtts 

SIERRA NEVADA. Spain — 


But world champion Kale Pace areas that the snow is no longer 
of Canada, who had been lied with adequate. 


u-i . i 1i * * Seizineer. dropped back after fin- <J tinier Huja 

Hilary bndh. who won an Olympic seventh mg at the Interr 

silver medal two van ago but had saw a rare downhill tiJn. said that 

never before stood on a ^orld Cup 


<J tinier Hujara. director of rac- 
ing at the Internationa! Ski Federa- 
tion. said that “in light of w-hat 


its*!? i,,h appearance by Swiss technical spe- happened last Saturday. 1 cannot 
podium, got there V* ainrtda> with c ^jj st V/eni Schneider, the overall rake ihe responsibility to run the 


a victory in the last downhill race 
before the Lillehammer Olympics. 

“Obviously, there was more fo- 
cus on the Olympics than in the 
World Cup — even when we com- 
pete on the weekends instead of a 
Wednesday — but lit take il" said 
Lindh. who joined Ihe rircurr in 
1988. “Eight years is a long wail." 

The 24-year-old Alaskan, sinn- 
ing from 23d position, clocked 2 


World Cup leader. race. 

Schneider, who hope to pick up The weather has been mild since 
extra points in the combined event Sunday, with rain forecast for the 
which twins the downhill with Sun- next few days. But a slalom re- 


day’s slalom, clocked 2:01.10 down 
the long Sierra Nevada course. 

• World Cup organizers in Gar- 
misch-Panenkirchen. worried 
about safely after Maier death on 
the same Kandahar course, on 
Wednesday called off a men's 


minutes. 4.21 seconds down the downhill slated for Saiurdav. 




NIK 


i*l Smlti- The Aumtttrd to* 

Jeff Gttiooly.Mt, with his lawyer, RoaaMHoevdvaf ti»e hearing in which Tonya Harding was implicated in the attack on Nancy Kerrigan. 

Nike’s $25,000 Gift: A Foot in the Door? 


. to Nike. Kerrigan has an endorse- ing the contribution to Harding, turned basketball scar Charles 
mem contract with Reebok and is a said, “There is a real drive to de- Barkley’s negative image into a 
brand spokesman for the compa- dare her guilty before she has a veiy successful ad campaign, 
ay’s commitment to women’s trial." Refer* said Nike had considered 


By Mark Asher • - to Nike. Kenjgan has an endorse- 
Washmgmt Post Senict • mem contract with Reebok andisa 
brand spokesman for the compa- 
WaSHTNGTON ~ The Tonya ny’s commitment to women’s 
-HardiM^Naxtcy Kerrigan rivalry sports, said a company spokesman, 
for an Olympic gold medal in fig- Dave Fogelson. Kemgan is one of 
ure skating, and 510 nrilbop inpo- three Olympic medalists appearing 
tciuial monetary rewards, U in- in a new Reebok advertising cam- 
tense. Bui it pales in comparison paign emphasizing women athletes 
with the competition between Nike overcoming obstacles to be success- 
ion,. and Reebolc megarivals for fiiL H will debut with a 30-second 
mega bucks in the midabiJliotHiol- Kerrigan spot during the second 
Jar athletic footwear and doihing week of the Winter Games. Fogel- 
indusUy. , sop said. 

' Harding. who Uv^s in Portland. .. Nike .had a net income of $363 


Peters said Nike had considered 

Under the Amateur Sports Act. 


nrhTI X, ZZ months ago and decided not to 

which set up a system of due pro- ...... .. _ 

cess for athletes and was passed by 5^ nsp . r her , ^ Winter 

ih Olympics and the products .that go 

197ifS USOC S final arbitra- ^ 


“She’s proven to everyone. that 
she’s safe to compete,’* said . Dr. 


ftiL H trill debut with a 30-seoond 
Kmigan spot during the second 
week of the Winter Games. Fogel- 
son said. 

. Nike had a net income of $363 
million on rota] sales of $3.9 billion 
in its last fiscal year. Reebok an- 
nounced Tuesday a net income in 
tts last fiscal year of $223.4 million 
oo sales of S2.9 billion. Those fig- 


tor of wbetiw an m^eie out par- act busing categories we are m- 

ticipaie in the Olympics. Harding voh '^ d 01 ' 
was named to the U^. team on “If everything came out to the 
Monday, but she can be replaced good in the courts. therestiHiso t 
until Feb. 21. the date of the draw an endorsement w e would seek, he 


for the figure skaters. 

When the subject turned to an 
athlete abiding by an organiza- 


added. 

Reebok’s Fogelson said the deci- 
sion to have an ad campaign using 


Don’s rules. Peters replied: “Now Kerrigan was made a year ago. and 
we’re getting into a very gray area." not as a response to the attack on 


will contribute $25,000 to help ures rank the companies 1-2 na- 
Hairixngdefend herself against the tionally in their industry. 


MaftJon Bradley, the orthopedic US. Ofympic Committee should it Keith Peters, a N&e spokesm 

specialist who has monitored, ter try to remove her from the U.S. saM concerns for an athfew’s rig 
recovery. “Medically, d*’*: ready .rearp btf ore shc has her day in of due process — and not bosin 
to go. She has full range of ly tibfr' : dotritl ' ''f.y j; : ; ; reasons — drove Knight’s think 

in tlre.knixaiid fiittstt^^ T^rt&ftha^no Osntracnial ties on- this issuer KnighL in annou 

; Harding shewed up An hour late . J r - -. 
far practice Wednesday after her - 
truck's battery diedand a teterisian. meg 

crew gave it a jump start. .. 

The five-member figure-skating . — — *; — - — ; — ! 

‘S’rcSST : Redskins Hire Turner as New Coach 

United States in the Olympics held 


hhtfribedolraaDal ties 


Keith Peters, a N»e spokesman, 
said concerns for an athlete’s rights 
of due process — and not business 
reasons — drove Knight’s thinking 
on- this issuer Krughu in announc- 


Some have suggested that her. He said Reebok also believes 
$25,000 is a small investment to that a person is innocent until prov- 
make in Harding if she is found not en guilty, but that “the law or the 
to have had prior knowledge of the land" has resulted in the USOC 
attack on Kemgan. especially with “setting up a system for evaluating 
her name recognition. One coach whether they should be a member of 
affiliated with Nike, who asked for the team ... and it’s clearly a pro- 
anonymity, recalled that Nike had cess we would not interfere with." 


course which will be used for the 
world championships next year. 

That put her one-hundredth of a 
second ahead r«[ Melanie Suchci of 
France, who had a half-second lead 
until she made some mistakes in 
[he lower part of the course. Isolde 
Kostner of Italy . the winner of Sat- 
urday's downhill in Ganmsch-Par- 
tenkirchen. Germany, tn which Ul- 
rike Maier of Austria was killed, 
finished third in 2:04.65. 

The entire Austrian teamand 
many of the other favorites, 
stunned Maier 's death, did not race 
Wednesday. 

Kerrin Lee-Gartner. a friend or 
Maier’s. flew home to Canada on 
Monday instead of coming to 
Spain and said she did not yet 
know if she would defend her 
Olympic downhill title in Lilleham- 
mer 

The downhill was brought for- 
ward from Friday because of pre- 
dictions of bad weather later in the 
week, with a practice ran held early 
Wednesday. 

Thursday — designated a day of 
mourning for Maier — and Friday 
will now be rest days, with a super- 
G on Saturday and a slalom on 
Sunday expected to go ahead as 
planned. 

The sunny weather suited late 
starters on the fast downhill course, 
SucbeL who was second in Gar- 
misch, wore No. 24 and the 25th 
racer, Miriam Vogt of Germany, 
was a half -second ahead than 
Lindh when she fell. 

Vogt flew out of control on a 
jump, picked herself up and skied 
off the course, apparently unhurt. 

Katja Sdzingerof Germany, the 
world super-giant champion, kept 
the World Cup downhill lead with 
fourth place. 


“The race would be too danger- 
ous." said a race spokesman. Rudi 
Marti. 'The temperature in the 
past days has risen so much that in 
key parts of the slope and run-out 


mained scheduled for Sunday. 

Some skiers were baffled by the 
cancellation. 

“I can't understand the decision, 
but well have to live with it,” said 
German downhill star Markus 
Wasmcier. 

It was the last downhill sched- 
uled before the Olympics, and for 
many skiers it would have been the 
last chance to clinch berths on their 
national teams. 

tAP. Reuters) 


Lillehammers Problems: 
Stray Elk, Fatting Snow 


LILLEHAMMER. Norway — A record snowfall was causing 
unexpected problems Wednesday just 10 days before the Winter ' 
Olympics begin. 

Extra clearing equipment was called in as the depth of the snow 1 
reached 1.22 meters t4 feet), and forecasters predicted that the ' 
Lillehammer record of 1.35 meters, set in March 1951. would be 
broken during the Gaines. 

“Temperatures are usually at their lowest in the last part of 
February, so there's little chance of snow melting," said Stein 
Kristiansen of the Oslo Meteorological Institute. 

Lillehammer officials warned residents to clear the snow from the 
roofs of their houses, or risk collapse, while there was speculation in 
the Norwegian media that a continuation of the severe weather could 
lead to another problem: The danger of elk straying onto Olympic 
venues. 

The elk could be forced to emerge from the pine forests in search 
of food, with the risk that they would run amok if suddenly faced 
with large crowds of people cm race days, some worried. 

“We’ve never seen an elk here, but they live out in the woods, so 
you never know,” said Miriam Henriksen. spokeswoman for the 
Birkebeineren cross-country track, “f know there have been a lot of 
elk out near the railway this year. But I doubt if it will be a problem." 

Organizers brought in snow-making machines iast October, when 
temperalures reached the freezing point, because of fears there could 
be a shortage of snow for the Games. But with ihe the town having 
been blanketed in recent weeks, officials said some 7.000 truckloads 
a day were now being carted out. 

The snow continued to fall Wednesday and forecasters said it 
would continue through the night until Thursday morning. Bui the 
Oslo Meteorological Institute had some good news: Skies would 
dear Thursday and no more snow was expected before next Tues- 
day. 


United Stales in the Olympics held 
its first meeting in . Colorado 


ASHBURN, Virginia (AP) — The Washi 
Dallas Cowboys’ offensive coordinator, Norv 


Redskins hired the 
■. as their new coach 


„ TiwcHav hit ufinnmed 1 -rauas v^owroys uncoaivc okhuuimm, i wuq, uku wbv.ii 
Sm ■ Wednesday, Terms vrerenoidL«Jt^hin a ^^i^ofiidal said Tinner was 

. aSSr 9V“ a .nve-jrai .comracL He ameab RrfiK Pcutbon, m who* one 


most face a deciplinaty hearing: : 

• That decision is exposed no ear- 
lier than Friday, when the panel is 
to reconvene lo hear aTeport from 
John Bennett. He is the. Portland 
lawyer assigned to gather informa- 
tion about the attack on Kerrigan 
just before the national champion- 


season the Redskins went 4-12, their worst finish in three decades. 

'■ in Tamer, the Redskins see many similarities to Joe Gibbs, who Compiled tn- Our Staff From Dispatches ■ 
coached the team to four Super Bowls in 12 seasons before retiring in BUENOS AIRES — At least 
1993. And. Eke Gibbs, Washington will have wide-ranging authority on five journalists reported slight inju- 
peraonneL matters written ip to his contract. The WashmgtonRost reported, ries Wednesday after being hit by 
'• Jr • _ air rifle pellets fired from the home 

More Baseball Salaries Escalate 

NEW YORK — In settlements as major league baseball's arbitration crouching with two other peo- 1 

season began, outfielder Eric Anthony and Se attl e agreed at SI .1 million. pj e behind a car. rifle in hand and I 
more than triple the $350,000 he made in 1993; mfielder Mike Bordick gtming ai the camera. | 

and Oakland agreed al $1 .05 millioa, more than twice his $400,000 salary -jf you don't get out of here.] 
last season; and catcher "Brail Afayne and Kansas City settled a! we ' re gomg sign shooting real | 
5500,000, more than double bis $225,000 salary in '93. bullets,” he shouted. 

Right-handed pitcher Kenny Rogers and the Texas Rangers worked The national team’s captain. 33. 
out a SZ3 mfflibn, one-year deal just before they were to appear for their had been either fired by or quit , 
arbitration bearing. Rogers, who made 51 million last season, asked for Newell’s Old Boys on Tuesday af- 1 
S23 million; the Rangers bad offered S2 million. ier just four months and five 1 


Maradona, 
fired, fires 
Back at Press 



More Baseball Salaries Escalate 


shi ps in DetroiL 
if the panel decides a disctpliar 
ary heaneg is warranted, it will 
conduct the bearing, at which Har- 
ding wiB have an ojqwrtimity to 
defend Jaasell^ ; ag^i»i any charges 
that she violated the association’s 
code of sportsmanship and ethics. 

. v But even if the panel decides , to 
convene a hearing. Harding would 
be entitled to a 30-day notice, 
which means the Oiympics would 
be over before die would be re- 
quiredtodefend herselL - 
Despite GiUody’s staiements to 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


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L5 million; the Rangers had offered S2 million. ier just four months and five 

matches with the club team. 

r nr t|w» Ttp/vmi - 7116 dub PreadeoL Waiter Cat - 

r or UK iieouru taneo, noting repeated failures to 

The AdantB Cflnniis' orcgected cost has risen about 550 trulBon, to show up for practice, said Mara- 

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leased Tuesday -that linked 
Hading to the plot Oregon law 

demands more than £ f Marseille, and planned to move there from Berlin. (Reuters) the decision to cancel his S7 million 

mony or accomplices to cnargp ^ Aneefcs Memorial Coliseum will undergo 535 million in repairs on contract was Cauaneo's. 
someone uia conspiracy - . canhquake damage, but will not be tom down and could reopen in time • Wall Disney Co. has with- 

for fSibaU^roSTofficials said. (API drawn as product of thk summer’s 

joolyand Harding, auibimnesre- j^j- y sn g n g Australia said he will defend his WBC fight heavy'- World Cup opening ceremony in 
teased cOTifesaom fromtoe am- ^ against No. I challenger Randall Yonker of the United States Chicago over what organizers de- 

ressed assailant, Shane ^ V <®asra Man* 4.- \ (AP) scribed “artistic difft^nces." 

tite getaway 031 . . Mario Botn, the leading scorer of the Italian basketball league, was “It was never a financial dispute 

Smhh, uwi were made touwrni- u^ w e ^ for. two years for taring steroids, the Italian, federation an- at all. The dialogue centered as to 
Ha*dmgsMl^^ sl, ^,T* nouticed; - . .. ■ . " M« how much of the show would be 

tanged her explanatroo tor fete- • • - , Disnev ■focused and bow much 


to build a $180 million arena that wiB keep the basketball 76ers in the city cal emotional depression, 
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Sergei Bid&a, the world. pole vault champion, told the French newspa- Cat taneo called the mi 

per lofomatin that he had bought an estate in Saioii-de-Pnmxice, north “mutual derision. “ Marado: 


cat emotional depression, that's 
where the serious trouble starts." 

Cat taneo called the matter a 
“mu Inal derision." Maradona said 
the decision to cancel his S7 million 
contract was Cauaneo’s. 

• Walt Disney Co. has with- 
drawn as producer of this summer’s 
World Cup opening ceremony in 



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TOn.iY'S 

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Appears on Page IS 
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WORIOCUP USA 94 

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THE MAN WHO FOOtH) 
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BUSINESS MESSAGE CENTER 


i&Ofve caUs tb Kerrigan’s prarik* V. 

araia ih'Mbsachuscio more than OnOtflDlC.,, . . 

efeht hours into SS e Mkhari Jordan, on his aitempl to become a professional basebaJi 

aner ajvesugiuors irfd. ey -igygj- ama ix>ui,toiuiti'31yearsoW.Ia m notaMi]d.I know what fra 
khw sh^w lyin^ - J^L \ there are people who have said: ‘You retired from the Bulls. 

.sofigp away and let us remember what usedto be.’ 1/ these people are 
Harding had not • vw Jhetuins. m Y name, then they ought io quu saying it so often. 


scribe as “artistic differences." 

“It was never a financial dispute 
at all. The dialogue centered as. to 
how much of the show would be 
Disney-focused and bow much 
World Cup-focused,” said Jim 
Trecier, spokesman for World Cup 
USA 1994. (he organizing commit- 
tee. 


U The reason ' So^ I know there are people wl» have said: ‘You retired from the BuDs. “In Hollywood parlance, you 

Mr, ytaver .soSgp away and let us remember what used robe.’ If these people are might say we had arostic differ- 


ment said. 


(AP. flYTj 


rhe'NBA,.cffl'M»cibad Jordan: “Michad has a better chance in ba 
than making Ac PGA Tom..rve.gotfed ,with him." 


t io quit saying it so often." cnees. We parted amicably because 
i he majors before switching to we couldn't reach something both 
tas a better chance in baseball sides were happy about-" 
dth him." " (AP. Reuters) 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 1994 


ART BUCHWALD 


Tribal Casino Warfare 

W ASHINGTON — This eoi- Keeno sent out a fax asking oil tl 
umn is politically correct be- casino chiefs to gather in the Hi 


The Kirov Opera: Frayed but Fighting 


PEOPLE 



& 


W umn is politically correct be- 
came Native Americans are open- 
ing more and more gambling 
casinos in the United States. The 
largest of these is owned by a tribe 
in Connecticut. 

Everything was going smoothly 
among the tribes until the Caesars 
Palace Casino 
Wars started in 
April 1995, over 
a minor dispute 
between the Ma- 
sha tucket Pe- 
quots of Massa- 
chusetts and the 
Passmaquoddy 
tribe of Maine. 

Hostilities 

broke out when 

they got into an Bucnwald 
argument over the mitlion-doliar 
super payoff on the $5 slot ma- 
chines. 

Rolling Thunder, the manager of 
the Pequnt Casino, accused Silting 
Keeno. the Passmaquoddy pit boss, 
of upping the bonus prize on one of 
his one-armed bandits in violation 
of tribal laws. 

Sitting Keeno said that when it 
came to slot machines, the Passma- 
quoddy could pay out any amount 
of money they wanted to. and no 
Pequot was going to tell him what 
the payoff on his machines should 
be. It 'was no secret that Rolling 
Thunder was giving free hotel 
rooms to his high-rolling crap- 
shooters. which not only hurt the 
other casinos in the New England 
area, but was not even socially ac- 
ceptable. 

This was loo much for Rolling 
Thunder, so he gathered 300 brave 
croupiers and rode down lo Sitting 
Keeno's parking lot and let the air 
out of everybody's tires. Sitting 


James Joyce Plaque 
Goes Up in London 

The AssitnaieJ Prerj 

LONDON — English Heritage 
unveQed a plaque Wednesday mark- 
ing the only London home belong- 
ing to the Irish author Janies Joyce. 

Joyce hated the apartment on 
Campden Grove and called it 
“Cnmpden Grave." but English 
Heritage put up the plaque because 
while he lived there, in 1931. Joyce 
married Nora Barnacle. 


Keeno sent out a fax asking all the 
casino chiefs to gather in the Hia- 
watha Room of his establishment 

He told the chiefs. “We must 
teach Rolling Thunder a lesson. No 
Native American in the gambling 
business can be allowed to walk 
onto another's parking lot without 
suffering the consequences." 

“Why don’t we kidnap Wayne 
Newton so he can't play at the 
Pequot Starlight Ballroom on New 
Year's Eve?" the Apache chief sug- 
gested. 

“We could bring Rolling Thun- 
der in from of the council and let 
him uy to make six the hard way." 
another chief said. 

A Seneca chief then spoke: “We 
could tie his arms and legs to a 
roulette wheel and spin it until be 
begged Tor mercy." 

Silting Keeno dealt himself a 
hand of chemin de fer. “If we allow 
Rolling Thunder to get away with 
what he did, casino gambling as 
Native Americans know it will nev- 
er be the same. The people of this 
country depend on us for their 
games of chance. IT it wasn't for us 
the white man would still have to 
go to Las Vegas for his fun. My 
grandfather once told me many 
moons ago that no one should ever 
have to drive more than one hour 
from his home for a game of black- 
jack.” 

□ 

Sitting Keeno continued: “We 
must drive a herd of buffalo 
through Rolling Thunder's horse- 
racing betting parlor just before the 
Kentucky Derby. This will make 
him realize that the council is seri- 
ous." 

One old chief asked. “Are you 
going Lo reduce the payoff on your 
jackpot?" 

"It’s too late to do that. We were 
forced to raise our payoff because 
the Bloc Idea were doubling theirs 
on blackjack. My great-great- 
grandfather Sitting Bingo once said 
to me. ‘Your casino is your home. 
What the white nun comes to visit, 
make him think that he's going to 
leave with some of your money. 

" ’What impresses a white man 
the most is a large jackpot. If he 
believes that you pay the most 
money on your machine be will 
come back again and again. 

“ ‘Proof of this is that when we 
raised the slot payoff to a million 
dollars General Custer came here 
and lost the family farm.' " 


By John Rockwell 

Xtv York Tima Semce 

S T. PETERSBURG — Before the Kirov Opera made 
its much-admired visit to New Yorit in the summer of 
1992. the company seemed suffused with a kind of guard- 
ed optimism. Yes. the Russian economy was in disarray. 
But changes were in the works, and in the meantime the 
company’s performances were at a high level of achieve- 
ment and freedom promised much for the future. 

Now. as the Kirov begins a weddong Rimsky-Korsakov 
Festival here that has attracted many western critics and 
visitors, that optimism seems frayed. Both Valeri Ger- 
giyev, the artistic director of the opera and music director 
of the Maryinsky theater, which also houses the Kirov 
Ballet and Anatoli F. Maikov, the administrative director 
of the theater, sounded grim and pessimistic compared 
with their mood in 1992. But they were hardly ready to 
give up the fight Tor artistic quality and financial indepen- 
dence. a fight that has solidified the Kirov Opera's reputa- 
tion as Russia's best. 

“There is bigger freedom, much bigger than even two 
years ago.” said Getgiyev before a performance of Rim- 
sky- Korsakov's opera "Sadko." "Some pans of the econo- 
my are slowly improving. But it is much more difficult for 
us now than in 1991 It’s almost impossible to expea 
serious financial support from the state. What we must 
count on is our own energy, our own ability to create 
something that will support our artistic plans." 

Maikov agreed. “1 can't see now any stability or im- 
provement in the financial situation in this country." he 
said. Eighty percent of the theater's income is Trom outside 
the traditional Russian state-support system, he added, 
most of it from the WesL He cited audio and video 
recording arrangements with Philips Records in the Neth- 
erlands. NHK in Japan and the BBC in Britain: co- 
productions with European and American companies; 
tours (including the company’s first to Japan. last year) 
and lowest on the list corporate and private sponsors both 
Western and Russian. 

He said that in addition to three wage increases last year 
to keep pace with Russia's runaway inflation, the theater's 
1.240 employees had gained a 50-percent raise in real 
terms when the Maryinsky theater was named to the short 
list of Russian cultural treasures by President Boris N. 
Yeltsin, with an increased subsidy to match. 

The company's artistic accomplishments since Ger- 
gjyev, now 40. took over in 1988 are internationally 
recognized. Its production of Prokofiev's “Fiery Angel," 
seen in New York in 1992. was voted best opera produc- 
tion in Japan for 1993. Maikov said. Gergiyev received 
Russia's highest musical honor from Yeltsin in December. 
He was named conductor of the year at the Gassical 
Music Awards in London in January. And the company's 
audio and video recordings have been highly regarded by 
critics and the public. 

* The ambitious Rimsky- Korsakov Festival which began 
with a concert Sunday night, seems to be stretching the 
theater's hard-working staff to its limits. Within one week 
there will be four operas by Rimsky*- Korsakov: “Sadko." 
“The Maid of Pskov," “Kashcbey the Deathless" and a 
new production of the monumental “Legend of the Invisi- 
ble City of Kitezh." 

“Kashchey" is being paired with his tone poem “Sche- 
herazade." and there are four other concerts, some of 
Rimsky- Korsakov alone, some offering his orchestrations 



V aleri Gergiyev, the Kirov's artistic director. 

of other composers and some intended to place the com- 
poser in the context of his predecessors, contemporaries 
and successors, including Stravinsky. Debussy, Ravel, 
Respighi, Prokofiev and Messiaen. Gergiyev said his next 
festival would be devoted to the music Stravinsky com- 
posed while still in Russia. 

The current festival, which follows similar celebrations 
or Mussorgsky in 1989 and Prokofiev in 1991-92, has 
attracted several star Russian singers who have active 
careers in the West. They include the soprano Galina 
Gorchakova, who has just flown in from a run of “Fiery 
Angels" at La Seal a and who will sing the leading roles in 
both “Kitezh" and “The Maid of Pskov." 


“The more ilk Importance of our projects, the more 
chances are that major singers will want to come here, 
Gergiyev said. “Importance includes, of course, t he Qp - 
ponumty for audio and video exposure; Philips is record- 
ing the- festival for possible future release. 

Still, the constant struggle for money sometimes scons 
•to war down both Gergiyev and Maikov. Esperiatywhen 
Western sponsors and artists are frightened by tM cam- 
try’s political turmoil- "People could be scared off by the 
political tension." Gergiyev worried. “Not to speak or 
tanks in the streets of Moscow." 

A major concern is keeping ticket prices within reach of 
the increasingly impoverished Russian public; h y one 

international estimate, 40 percent of all Russians are now 
below the poverty line. 

“It's a moral issue,” Getgiyev said. “We could raise 

is a new class here, although they are not all serious music 
lovers.” 

Despite Gergiyev's assurances that the Rnnsky- Korsa- 
kov Festival is proceeding exactly as he plan ned U, s ome 
recent Kirov stars are absent, and Maikov admitted that 
money was a problem. . 

Without specifically conceding the issue, Gergiyev had 
a waled warning for his missing stars. “Singers know that 
if they are too often absent here, that empty places must 
be fined," he said. “We had wonderful angers, and it 
looked as if they were irreplaceable. Bnt there are superb 
young voices, and no one is irreplaceable.” 

Unable to afford the regular fees of Western artists, 
Gergiyev hopes to win them through personal contacts 
aod the pleasure of working with his forces in this opulent, 
acoustically flattering theater. Pl&rido Domingo, whom 
Gergiyev will conduct in VerdTs “Otello" at the Metropol- 
itan Opera in March, has already been here for the same 
opera and is president of the international Friends of the 
Kirov Opera. 

Gergiyev said he wanted to persuade Domingo to ap- 
pear in Verdi's “Forza del Destino" and Wagner* s “Parsi- 
fal,” the latter linked with “Lohengrin" in one abstract 
production. He said he would also like James Cordon, Esa- 
Pekka Salonen and Christian Thielemann to conduct here, 
either at the opera or as part of the White Nights music 
festival from May through July, which Gergiyev took over 
as artistic director last year. 

For all the explorations of Italian and German reper- 
tory, the Kirov remains a Russian company, the primary 

E reserver and revitalizrr of the Russian operatic tradition, 
l his frequent excursions to the West. Gergiyev seeks to 
assert his company’s claims on that repertory and not to 
succumb to Western promoters' insistence on the same 
tired round of war horses: “Boris Godunov," “Eugene 
Onegin" and maybe “The Queen of Spades.” 

“You can't la commercial concerns overcome artistic 
priorities.” be said, speaking obliquely of the many Rus- 
sian performing institutions that have done just that. “I 
had to fight to get Paris to accept ‘Kitezh.’ The promoters 
arc right: they want to sell tickets. Bnt I am right, too: we 
can't always do the same things.” 

A judgment of the Rimsky- Korsakov Festival, reflect- 
ing both the current state of the Kirov company and the 
long-suffering reputation of Rimsky-Korsakov as a com- 
poser, must await its conclusion tins weekend. " 

“When it's over, we can all together decide if it was 
really needed," Gergiyev said. “Then, the imparlance of 
this festival win become dearer.” 


wood: There’s another cease-fire m 
the trans-Atlantic culture war afterff 
French film executive apotori ' 
for comments he had made ah 
the Los Angeles earthquake. Dwarf 
Tosoo du Pkmtier said last month 
that the quake showed that God Was 
on France's side in the GATT d& 
jural wars, bat he insists that the 
messenger was to blame for the rift 
He said the comment was “a bad 
private joke toid among fri ends” 
that was blown up by “the iadc- of 
professionalism of some aDy jour- 
nalist." Jack Valenti, head of the 
Motion Pictures Association of 
America, accepted las apology. 

□ ... 

A computer backer claims that he 
obtained personal pfeoe, numbers 
of members of Britain's royal fandy 
and once called Queen EBzafeA a 
The man, who kteatifkri^hunself 
only as “Mike,” told the Press Asso- 
ciation that be bad gained access to 
the British Telecom system . to scan 
files containing confidemialnjfar- 
matioD- Buckingham Palace had no 
comment on bis c l ai m . 

□ 

The wrap artist Christo suffered 
setback in his 22 -year campaign to 
swathe the Reichstag buMng in 
Fortin in ■silver fabric, when deputies 
of flw wrilw Helmut Kohl's coaB- 
tioin just said no. Christo has 
‘Snapped” islands off Miami and 
the Font Neuf in Paris. Kohl told 
the deputies that be respected Chris- 
to’s work but was conscious of the 
building’s di gni ty and urged that the 
project should be voted on by thd 
full parliament. 

□ • 

The disinh erited adopted dan; 
ter of Doris Duke sued to block 
tobacco heiress’s SIJZ billion WQL 
saying the butler had forced her out 
of ber mother's good graces. The 
will gives Bernard Lsw foty, who 
was hired six years ago as Dul 
butler and administrator, S5 mUkm 
in executor's fees and S500JXW a 
year far life. He also controls the 
foundation that controls most of the 
fortune. Gaud Heftier was es- 
tranged from ber mother when 
Duke died in October. 


JTVTER1VATIOIVAL 

CLASSIFIED 

Appears on Pages 15 & 17 


WEATHER 


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Forecast for Friday through Sunday, as provided by Accu-Weather. 



Bangkok 

Bafng 

Hong Kcng 


North America 

Snow will blanket the area 
from St. Louis to Toronto 
Saturday Into Sunday In the 
wake oi this snow, btler cold 
air will spread southward 
through Ihe Prairlos at 
Canada into the central 
Plains. This hitler cok) air wdl 
reach the East Coast early 
next week. 


Middle East 


Europe 

A slow moving storm will 
generate heavy rains and 
strong winds from Ireland 
and western France to 
northern Spain Friday into 
Ihe weekend. London and 
Pans w# tie windy with a lew 
periods ol rain. Snow is 
expected around Oslo. In 
contrast, southeast Europe 
w* hove dry. mM weather. 


Asia 

Milder weather 

overspreading northern 
China Friday wil last into the 
weekend. A moderation in 
temperature win also occur 
this wee k e n d horn Seoul to 
Tokyo Hong Kong through 
Shanghei will turn cloudy 
and damp late ihis week. 
Locaty heavy ravn wiH linger 
over me central Ptelppaies. 


Today 
High Low 
OF OF 
31/88 aSSTB 
10/50 3/39 

1B/B4 15/59 
31/BS 23-73 
28179 12153 
5141 «122 

11152 4,30 

281B2 24175 
20188 13158 
2135 -405 


Tomorrow 
W mgh Low W 

OF OF 
1 31/88 35177 1 

S 8/49 -1/31 e 
n h 18*4 15/59 ih 
pc 31/88 33/73 ah 
» 28182 13/53 re 
a 8/43 -4/25 s 
pc 9/48 4/39 ah 
pc 29/84 24175 ah 
pc 2i>70 ie»i ah 
pc BZ48 -2129 pc 


Alpora 

CapaTowi 


17/82 11/52 S 13(56 8143 I 

23/73 16/51 S a/73 14/57 a 

17(02 a/46 • 12/53 OM3 pc 

24,75 1/34 ■ 28182 B/46 a 

30(88 M/79 pc 29184 26178 ah 

27180 9148 I 29<B4 13/55 a 

20/88 BM 9 17152 6143 pc 


Today Tomorrow 

Mgh Lew W ugh Low W 

CJF OF OF OF 

Brru 17/62 9/48 pc 1l-«4 12/53 pc 

Cam 1 7*2 7/44 pc 21/70 9148 a 

tturoocus 12/53 3/37 pc 14/57 4 HB a 

Jmiutoni 12/53 7.44 pc 16*1 B/4* a 

luw» 23.T) 2.35 s 2984 7/44 a 

Riyn* 22/71 11*2 a 23/73 11<S2 * 


Latin America 

Today Tomorrow 

Ugh Low W Ugh Low W 

OF CJF OF OF 

BMnnAm 34/93 25/77 pc 32189 18/84 I 

Caracas 29/82 24/75 pc 29/84 24.75 pc 

Lana 28/79 20*8 pc 20/79 21.70 pc 

Mm > C4y 21170 10/50 pc 22/71 8/48 pc 

RndcJhiwao 308B 21/70 a 30/88 23.73 pc 

SMnp, 31/88 10/50 a »W 14.57 pc 


Lagan* s-sunoy pc -parry ckXJdy. C-aoudy, tfvshcwcn, I-Pmrxjersfcxms. r-ratn. sl-wxiw diaries, 
sn-snow. nee, w -Weather. AB map*, lorec a ta and data p iea h wd by Accu-Wesdier. Inc. 5 IW4 


North America 


<■139 -3JZT 
14-57 134 

2-35 -e'18 

•ions -14 /t 

7/44 -e/18 
-8/18 -13/9 
26179 19 *6 
17.6? 7144 

2068 1050 
Z>.T1 14,57 
-13 ’S -21 ■& 
8 TZ -lao 
24.75 2H70 
1.34 -10 T5 
2068 9-40 

13105 6 43 

9 '48 IW 
•62? -15* 

4 >23 -e;te 


Moron 

LooAnjafrs 

Mam 

UongA 

Mcrtiwl 

Nassau 

NcwYort 


Tor win 
Washn£On 


1 -8/18 pc 
! ?.r*5 pc 

} - 12 H 1 * 
i -15/4 pc 
I -9-’l6 pc 
l-12/ii pc 
( 21.79 pc 
! Jh 

i I960 ah 
I 1S.W pr 

■»--irpc 
-24M1 pc 
I 2088 (C 
i -11/13 a 

I 7 44 *h 

> am pc 
•■Ol pc 
1-1712 pc 
i -9-T8 » 


WEEKEND SKI REPORT 


Depth ton. Res. Snow Laat 
L U Pisteo Plates Stale Snow 


Andorra 

Pas de la Casaios. 155 
Soideu bs 165 

Austria 

Igls 15 BO 

Kitztouhel 45 »50 

Saalbach 80 165 

Schladmmg 50 185 

SLAnton 60 305 

Rinoa 

Alpe cTHuez 130 230 

Las Arcs 120 340 

Avonaz 155 185 

Cauterets 145 225 

Chamonix 40 340 

Courchevel 150 220 

Les Deux AlpesliM&N 
Flame 90 290 

(sola 130 215 

MOribeJ 80 190 

La Ptagne 155 325 

Serre Chevalier 40 160 
Tignes 130 290 

val d'Jstee 1 15 330 

Val Thorens I4Q 300 

Germany 

Garmisch 5 265 

Oberstdort to >70 


Good Open Var 1,20 Fteacn tuBy opan 

Good Open Var 1 ,20 Ham packed snow 

Good Worn Var 1 '28 Mtrn patches vflage towt 
Good Open Var 1 .'31 Good slung 
Good Open Rcfcd I '31 Excettonf sMbng 
Good Open Var t /31 Pistes vary good 
Good Opan Var 1. 31 AB B8s open, good Mng 

Good Open Var 1/29 Some ico in lt» mamino 

Good Open Var 1/28 Goad plsm siding 

Good Open Var 1 /26 Very good string 

Good Open Pckd 1/17 G^nmSygood. some worn spots 

Good Open Var 1/28 icy or ratoy fever 

Good Open V» 1 /28 £*cefl*nf piste skang 

Good Open Var I '28 S5 63 «ts open 

Good Open Hvy 1/28 Good pom siding, some Icy spots 

Good Open Var i- ifl Good sUmg 

Good Open Pckd I /28 Vary good mcm 

Good Cfcen Var 1 '38 Supers pitta slung 

Good Open Var 1 '26 Goad stUng. some hantmek 

Good Open Var 1 28 fiweflenr slang, great nenftor 

Good Peon Var P28 Ctosrr snow otfipme 

Good Open var 1 728 SxceBm pate siting 


Good Ctsd Var 1/29 Upper slopes sUng we* 
Good Some Var 1 '28 X-27 Uts open 

Good Open pcm 1 -26 AS Bits open, some Imdpeck 


Cervinta 

Cortina 

Courmayeur 

Selva 

Se atalfl i e 


Depth too. Dae. Snow Laat 
L II Malm jPhrtaa SMa Snow Conaoenta 

85410 Good Qpen Var 1/27 Sartw wind podahed snow up mgti 
20110 Good Opan Var 1/6 Good on tmdpecSed snow 
85 220 Good Clad Var 1/27 Good Uttofr 
48100 Good open Pckd 1/6 Sato rvnda open . 

55 125 Good opan Pckd i/15 Some hard petetm 


UUdhammar S5 140 Good Opan FVCr i/ao.BssBaent siting 

Spafei 

Baqmera-Berat 135 235 Good Open Vnr U27 AS MBs and plstee open 
Srottzertasd I ' •• ' 

Arosa 80 110 Good Open Pwdr i/Sl ExceOent slOng 

c ram Montana 60 180 Good Open Var 1/28 Good siting, moguls dgvdopng 

Davos 90 175 Good Open Pckd 1/28 Very good siting veryuthsre 

GfindehvakJ 20 110. Good . jcyCiusty 1/29 GBrwsiy ptMd. a MNcy'»om 

Gstaad 30 80 Good Qpan Var 1 /28 Good siting most erase 

StMorta 30 70 Good Opan Var 1/28 Chafe Skang. sunny shies 

Wengen 40120 Good Open Var 1/28 very goad piste slung 

Zennatt 802K Good Opan var 1/26 Hard pecked snatr some areas 

UJL “ “ 1 " . 

Aspen - 12a 130 -Good Open Pckd i /3t ak b m open 

Breckenndge 120150 Good Open : Vw 1/30 1 Sr t6 Uts open 
Created Butte 80 145 Good Opan AM '1/28 11113 m open 
Mammoth 45 135 Good Open AM 1 130 24/30 Us open 

Park City 70 125 Good Open AM 1/31 14 Ms open 

Steamboat 110 180 Good Open Var. 1/27 19.-20 m open 

Tellurkfe 105130 Good Open AM 1/30 At 10 Us open 

Vail IDO is Good Ooan Var 1/30 AS 25 Uts non 



20110. Good _ .fey 
30 80 Good Cpan 
30 70 Good Opan 
40120 Good Open 
80 235 Good Open 


IcyC/usty 1 /2fl . Generally good, a tit icy, worn 
Mi Var 1 /28 Good s king most areas 
wn Var inn Great mng. amny slues 
wi Var 1 / 28 Very good piste slung 
an Vor 1 /26 Hard packed snort some areas 


Aspen - 12a 130 -Good Open Pckd 1/31 AB 8 m open 

Breckenndge 120150 Good Open : vair W30 is/t6 Uts open 

Greeted Butto 80 145 Good Open AM't/28 11/13 m open 

Mammoth 45 1.35 Good Open AM l /30 24/30 Us open 

Park City 70 125 Good Open AM 1/31 14 Ms open 

Steamboat 110 180 Good Open Var. 1/27 I9.-20 Us open 

Taflurlde 105130 Gmd Open AM U30 Al 10 Us open 

Van IDO 125 Good Opan Var 1/30 At 2S Us open “ 

Wy UJOeodi n cm on to-er ana upper slopes, ton.- Ptetes Mountainside pisus. Res. 

PMerRuns fearing 10 resort yflage, AnAntCcM enow . 

Repods suppbed oy mo 3a dub of Grea Bntsm 


t I 


Not 


Travel in a world without borders, time zones 

or language barriers. 


^kut octavo** ■ Imagine a worlj where you can call country to country as easily as y. >u can l'p>m In »mc Atxl 

, resell ihe L'S dimity from over 1 2S countries. Cr>nverse with some* >ne win » cl. »esti*i >jx-:tk y« >ur 

B3b 000 languaise, since it's translated insmnily. Cill y« »ur clients at 3 a.m. kn- m- tlie\ 'll ,i*ei ihe message 

J . •& '{£ f > < >ur voice at a more j> i!ite h« >ur. .Al l this is n« w fK issihie will; .ATsd: 


| . vour ai a in* >re jt* jiiic m >ur. aai tuts ts nt w posstnie wtti; .Al&l. 

— — a f ( , use tiiese services, dial the .XIKr Access Number < >i the c* *urur*' y« m’re in and you‘li tjer all [he 

helji you need W’iih [liese Access Numbers and your AT&T Calling Gird, intemati* mai Tallinn iias never lieen easier 
If yt hi d »n’i hat e an /VTAfT Calling Gird or y« >u d like more informain >n on .AlitT gkihai ser. ices, just L all us usinj- the 
tin enienr Access Numbers on your ri^ht. 


AT&T 


© 1994 /ATSlT 


A3KT Access Numbers 
How to call arourxJ tire world. 

I r sin^il a- rf tin hekm . liml the i<nimi> yiNim* railing fo mi 
J I hjl iIk- li intsp> Rhiinx AJ&l .Vtiiss NuitUxt. 

4 a&T l.n'di4i~o[x-jfajigO])cr.U'irtiri<iki , pn>miH will ask fur the ptumc number \nu niqiKii.-pUorciinnL-cti'i/utou 

mjnI' tiiwthu iv rqVt'M.'rplii e. * 

1 ii revive >our free waBa card of .JffiaN Access Numbas, just dial the acres: number of 
tbccountrs- imurir in and x 4 c forQtsiomerScn’icc: 


COUNTRY ACX^SS NUMBER 
ASIA/PACBF1C 

Australia 0014-881-011 

C hina J PBC#** 10811 

Guam ' 018-072 

Hong Kong 800-11 n 

Indfei^ <WMI7 

Indonesia* 00 - 801-10 

Linin' i"».V7-UI 


Korea 

009-11 

Korea aa 

11 * 

Mabjsia' 

8004)011 

V-l\ /a-.lLlIkf 

urn mu | 

Philippines* 105-11 

RnssiafUoscowl 

155-5042 

Saipan* 

235-2872 

Slil-ilp 'TL* 

»4«-0|J|.u j 

sn lanlj 

-t.m~i.vi 

Taiwan' 

0080-102884) 

lllill/IHl* 


EUROPE 

Armenia*" 

Ho. 14111 

Austria — 

022-90.44)11 

IMiaiini* 

in>-n-mitu 

IMjt.iii.i 

»ll-I.SI6M*(lll 

Croatia** 

99-384)011 


f- vjiru s* 

Czech Rep 

Dcnmarif 

Finland* 

France 

Getmom- 

Gtttte* 


0 Hn-»<iui n 
00 ^ 20-00101 
8001-0010 
9900100-10 
1~9*-0PJ1 
Oj 30-0010 
00«00151l 


CXMJWTBY ACCESS NUMBER COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER 


Hungary - 
Uc-bixi’w • 
Ireland 
Haiy- 

Uechmaidn* 

Uthnmto* 

Luxcmlxwiy 

Malta- 

Monaco* 

NedteriandP* 

Norway* 

Poland**** 

PortMgjl* 

Romania 

Slowkb 

Spain 

Sweden* 

S i ri n erian d*' 

UK. - 


QOa- 800-01111 

WXMI 

1-800-550-000 
172-1011 

i5»oo-n 
8*196 

U-HtlMHlI 
QBOQ-890-110 
19a-0011 
06-022^111 
800-190-11 
<U01»fegMilll , 
05017-1-288 
01-8004286 

oo-fao-ooioi 

90099-00-11 

020-79^611 

155-00-31 

0500-89-0011 


q»ae 

Colombia 
CoaaRIca-fe 
Ecuador 
S SalvadoTa 
'Guatemala* 
G u ya u ar* 
Hooduas% 

Mccrmaaa 

W *f»r a gn a(M 

Panamaw 

Peru* • 

Suriname 

Uroguay 

Vene2tteLa** 


OQa -0512 

980-11-0010 

114 

319 

190 

190 

165 

m 

95-600-462-4240 
h) 174 

109 
. 191 

156 
00-04 H) 

r 8 G 011-120 


CARiiihfan 

Mtotato 1-800^72-2881 


MIDDLE EAST 


Bahrain 800-001 

Eteype (Cairo) 5UM1200 

land 177-100-2727 

Kuwait 800288 

Idran o ttCBelntf) 426-85 

Saudi Mbb 1-800-100 

Tariccy* 00800-12277 

AMERICAS 

Arftendna- • ' 001 - 800 - 200-1111 

Bcfizr* 555 

Bofava* ownn 

Rnutil . 0008010 


0500894)011 1-80 0872-2881 

EEAST 1*™^ VI 1-800872-2861 

800001 Cayman isbnds - 1-800-872-2881 

5104)200 - Crcnadg* >800872^2981 

177-100-2727 . • 001-800-972-2883 

800288 - fimiar - 0^00872-2881 - 

42fr«n WedLAiafl - 001-800^72-2881 

1-800-100 - StKhpJMa-te . 1-800872-2881 

OMPO-limy AFRICA 

ICAS Gabon* oqa- 001 1 

ooi-aoo- 200 -ini Gjgpbbr - 00111 

_ 1 I 1 ®? Kenyr - - . oaooin 

-MOO-lllI LMa . 7*7.TV7. 

000-8010 Mahwr- 

5,1 Mvatthh d JJVI, . 

4- 4 L 

sy^mtiJuSX****** 

■r-a UAI TUWQMKa • Xtlu-Mawiny, .. 


til. - .uBn. . iuT woH4CawivM v ^’n«v 

I ‘•■••r'lr . , jJnu1,i*„,in,Hi >h.n “1 ... roar*-. OLCTunemtor. ' 

>°fv <i)di. 4 ii.fhfiip •reart.spilioJ Jvm 

' lurfdCODBHI S*-uC|6D|s^ ( , > 

U-‘ l.vnmvvr. 

S-g.. .kn. '-4--*n-«|!»« n(d . a ||, ( agrf|, 4kl 

\ ‘..I l-d A—-I*t !•« 4(1 . 


Gabon* 

CanWa’ 

ifenya* 

Lgmria 

Malawi-' 


iew 


KSv 


•K 

1 

■-Vs/-’-. 
L..V- ‘ ■ 

VS^v :: - 



l bU‘h 


• l’- r - — 

1. '*■ S ji. 

V ;*"««• 

A 


V