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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


** 


Paris, Wednesday, February 9, 1994 


No. 34.507 


Japan’s Move 



Fails to Win 
U.S. Applause 

'Short-Term Stimulus 9 


Heated Summit Likely 


gave 

Japai 


} 


By Thomas L. Friedman 

Nti* York Times Service 

NEW YOR K — The Clinton administration 
a downbeat reception cm Friday to t be 
l span esc government's econ omic-stimulns 
package, saying it was too short in duration to' 
produce the stmt of increase in Japanese pur- 
chases of American goods to shrink Japan’s 
huge trade surplus with the United State* ' 

_ The tepid American response to the Japanese 
tax cats that are the heart of the package, 
-coupled with the near total absence of progress 
to date in the negotiations between Japan and 
the Clinton administration to open certain Jap- 
anese markets, is making it increasingly Hkdy 
that the meeting on Friday in Wadnngton bo- 
tween President B01 Clinton and Prime Minis- 
ter Morihiro Hosokawa is going to be highly 
confrontational. ' • . " " . " 

- American oCGtials were still hoping for a . 
last-minute concession by Japan, but there are 
ho signs of that so far as Mr. Hosokawa’s 
government is incressmgly engulfed in political 
turmoil. 

It was partly in an effort to have something 
to bring to Washington to placate theAmeri- 
gans that Mr. Hosokawa put together a $140 
billion package of temporary tax cots and pnb- 
lie-works programs, designed to Eft Japan out 
.of its two-year recession and hdp shrink Its 
trade surplus by stimulating Japanese coosum- 
;er purchases. 

• To get the package through his parliament, 
Mr. Hosokawa had to placate opponents of the 
i tax cuts by agreeing that the 20ixroeat income 
-tax reductions at the heart rtf his program 
would be only for one y«ar. -.1' 

“I am concerned that his only for one year^ 
Treasury Secretary Lloyd Beaten said- in an . 
.interview. Because the period is so short, hie 
added, it leaves the prospect for a long-term 
'Stimulus “indefinite." • ■- -• 

Mr. Benisen said, the American experience . 
had been that “when people see-a-jd^t-usm 
stimults they usually, save rather than spend,” 
and there is therefore no long-term change in 
buying habits cava red. sustmnabfc suree io 
inqxats. Bdth«rc critical if 
trade suiptos'wiUi tiwlJin; “ ” 

reduced. 'v ; -- v '?• ; 

Mr. Bentsen sccmcdto bc-trying to-send the 
Japanese a signal -that if tins is att that Mjc._ 
Hosokawa is able to bring to Washington foe ' 
his meeting with Mr. Ornton, their talks could - 
be in trouble. .... 

American officials have said for weds that- 
they win not disguise their differences with 
Tokyo far the sake of a sunny meeting. 

Mr. Hosokawa is going to Washington to 
review the last six months of negotiations be- 
tween the Gin ton administration and Japan. •• / 

The Japanese stimulus package was half of 
what the United States was looking for from: 
Tokyo in those framework talks. The other half 
consisted of concrete Japanese agreements to 
open their markets in tire areas of automobiles 
and auto parts and government procurement of 
m ed ic a l equipment, tdocornmnnirations and 
insurance. 

Progress in these market-access talks has 
been virtually nonexistent, or as Mr. Be aten 
put it: “I don’t see a breakthrough happemng 
yet.” 

He said that where the Japanese government 
could really decide to make a breakthrough . 
quickly, if it wanted, was in the areas of govern- . 
mem procurement, but that so far there had 
been little movement. 



NATO Appears Set 
To Issue Deadline 
On Sarajevo Siege 


Arse Dcdcn'Rnm 

Bosnians evacuated after the Sarajevo mortar attack resting Tuesday in makeshift quarters at a US. Army hospital in Germany. 

German Joblessness Tops 4 Million 


. By Brandon Mitchener 

International Herald Tribute 

FRANKFURT — Unemployment in Ger- 
many rose to a postwar reconl of more than 4 
milHcra people m January, the goveriimeat re- 
ported Tuesday, as toe country’s largest union 
offered to accept temporary pay cuts in order to 
-save jobs. - 

? January’s official jobless figure, which nuder- 
,- Slatcs act^unmrotoyrooit in Europe's latest 
■ econdtoy, was Ettfe surprise in-itsdf. Records 
f for unemployment have been set in each of the 
Jaslseyeral months, and more arc mostlikdy to 
’follow:. 

■_ But coming amid a simmering labor conflict 
and a month before the first in a marathon 
series of state and local elections this year, the 
: news was received by toe government Eke an 
/uninvited guest. . 

• Western German, unemployment was 9.9 
peread in January, and toe eastern German 
• tally was 17.8 percent Neither figure includes 
toe thousands of people in mandatory work- 


training programs or government job creation 
schemes. 

“This unemployment figure is of a dimension 
which is not acceptable," Economics Minister 
Gflnter Rexrodt said. “We must be aware that 
lasting high unemployment threatens not only 
our economic order but the very foundations of 
our society.” 

A .senior economics, adviser to Chancellor 
Helmut KrM,'Friedhelm Ost, said the January 
jobless statistics were a signal to unions ana 
employers alike to place a priority bn job secu- 
rity. 

1G MetalL which represents 3.6 million 
workers in Germany’s key automotive, elec- 
tronics and metalworking sectors, said Tuesday 
that It was willing to accept lower pay along 
with a shorter working week in order to save 
jobs and prevent a walkout that could stum toe 
country’s feeble economic recovery. 

But employers dismissed toe uni cm’s overture 
as an effort to divert attention from a call for 


overall labor flexibility, which would include 
working longer hours. 

La a speech Tuesday, Mr. Kohl said German 
joblessness was made worse by high wages and 
a lade of inventiveness, among other factors. 
Germany has also “fallen behind important 
competitors in research and high technology," 
he said, and could create more jobs if more 
attention were given to these Fields. 

Although government officials and some 
economists said tocdaia suggested the rise in 
joblessness was beg innin g to plateau, toe report 
contained no sign that new jobs were being 
created rapidly enough to offset new unem- 
ployment 

Hung Tran, managing director of Deutsche 
Bank Research in Frankfurt, predicted overall 
German unemployment would peak at around 
10 percent but not until sometime late next 
year. 

“We see toe economy malting a tentative 

See JOBS, Page 6 


fol that before Friday Japanese and American 

See JAPAN, Page 3 



By Roger Cohen 

Net* Yon t Times Sonar 

BRUSSELS — NATO, building on an un- 
usually strong partnership between the United 
States and France in recent days, appeared to 
be set Tuesday to establish a deadline for the 
lifting of the siege or Sarajevo, after which 
military force would be used. 

“A consensus is emerging that toe time has 
run out on inaction," a senior NATO diplomat 
said “The West and its institutions nave a 
responsibility now to demonstrate that enough 
is enough." 

Il appeared that toe balance within toe 16- 
member North Atlantic Treaty Organization 
had toted, probably decisively, toward using air 
power as a result of the mortar attack Saturday 
on toe Sarajevo market, which killed 68 people. 

[A senior White House official confirmed 
Tuesday that Washington had agreed to threat- 
en NATO air strikes to lift toe siege, Reuters 
reported. 

[The official said that strategy now included 

Serbs’ mobile weapons would be hard for 
NATO planes to take out. Page 6. 

upgrading American involvement in negotia- 
tions aimed at aiding toe war, precisely defin- 
ing a threat of NATO air strikes against Bosni- 
an Serb gun positions around Sarajevo to deter 
attacks on civilians, and providing United Na- 
tions commanders with the authority to call in 
air strikes quickly should Serb attacks on civil- 
ians occur.] 

The diplomat in Brussels, a central figure in 
the alliance's planning for the Bosnian war, 
suggested that an agreement was all but in place 
forNATO, meeting Wednesday at ambassado- 
rial level to deliver an ultimatum for toe lifting 
of toe 22-month siege of toe Bosnian capita] by 
the Serbs. 

“The objective is to stop and prevent the 
shelling of Sarajevo," he said. “We will set 
requirements on where artillery is permitted to 
be and make clear what our response would be 
if these requirements about the positioning and 
use or artillery are not quickly met. Will and 
capacity are. 1 believe, combining to take deci- 
sive action.” 

Asked how much tune the Serbs would be 
given to pull back their artillery from toe hills 
around Sarajevo, the diplomat said the deadline 
would be “timely.” Foreign Minister Alain 
Juppfr of France said this week that any NATO 
ultimatum should allow a few days at most. 

Conversations at alliance headquarters Tues- 
day suggested that Canada, Greece and, to a 
lesser extent, Spain and Britain, continued to 
have some reservations about NATO commit- 
ting itself on a firm course leading to toe use of 
force in Bosnia. These reservations center both 
on strategic considerations and concern over 
toe welfare of UN peacekeeping soldiers. 

Asked about these issues, toe diplomat said: 
“There has been a thinking through on a very 
deliberate basis of all toe alternatives. What 
you see now is toe result of months of wrestling 
with some of toe deepest problems ever to face 
toe aHian ce. But I believe we are now ready to 

See ALLIES, Page 6 


For Clinton, 
Decision Time 
hat Hand 


By R. W. Apple Jr. 

Herr York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — For many months 
now. President Bill Clinton has tempo- 
rized on toe war in Bosnia, finding one 
reason or another to avoid American in- 
volvement. 

Now, in the wake of toe slaughter in 
Sarajevo's central marketplace last week- 
end, there are signs that toe frightful tele- 
vision images of toe carnage may have 
broken, or at least denied, the shell of 
American pubhc indifference. At toe least, 
they have given toe president as good an 
opportunity to an firmly in Bosnia as be is 
likely to geL 

[An ABC News survey, made pubhc 
Tuesday and quoted by Reuters, found 
that 57 percent of Americans favored air 
strikes against Serbian positions outside 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

Sarajevo, while 37 percent were opposed. 
Only 17 percent said the United States 
should act alone, while 79 percent opposed 
unilateral intervention, ABC said.] 

Two months ago, only 26 percent of toe 
respondents in a CBS News poll said they 
thought toe United States had a responsi- 
bility to act. as opposed to 65 percent who 
said that it did not. 

There was little public outcry two weeks 
ago when toe president scarcely men- 
tioned toe strife m Bosnia-Herzegovina in 
his first Slate of toe Union speech. 

But in recent days, toe anecdotal evi- 
dence — chat on radio talk shows, calls to 
congressional offices — suggests a shift 
Some people, at least are starting to worry 
as much about toe United States’ seeming 
callous and selfish as about toe potential 
for a new geopolitical quagmire. 

Or so it looks from Washington. Bob 
Dole, toe Kansas Republican who leads 
his party in toe Senate, is no mindless 
hawk; grievously wounded in World War 
II. he hesitates before advocating Ameri- 
can mili tary intervention. He can also read 
the sentiment on Capitol HiB as well as 
anybody who serves there. 

So when be urged toe president on Sun- 
day to order air strikes and said such a 
decision would have “strong bipartisan 
support in Congress." it was taken here as 
a signal that doing nothing might not be 
toe safest course any longer. 

The questions are these: Does Mr. din- 
ton wish to seize toe moment? Does be 

See CLINTON, Page 6 


Sudan Army Sweeps South 
In Drive to Crush Rebels 


Hubert Iwk/Affaa I 

Jobless Germans fining up to apply for federal benefits in Berlm. Unemployment, at more than 4 nfiBomisalapost-WoridWarllhigh. 


Ulster’s Deadly Codes of Violence Make Peace Elusive 


By Steve Coll 

W m f nag ten fast Service 

BELFAST — It was a routine stat emen t about a routine 
shooting, toe sort of terrorist press release that passes with 
numbing regularity across news agency fax machines here, 
providing updated box scores for a grinding war enhveaed 
lately by talk of peace. 

This time it was the Protestant-dommated Ulster Vohmteer 
Force taking responsibility for toe sbootmg last wedt of a 
in Catholic bus driver who ran prison visitation shuttles 


U nm an Catho lic dus omw wuo ran raiauu 
for toe relative of jailed Irish Rejhtobcan Army members. The 


driver was slightly wounded, but a passing woman motorist 
took. abuBet in toe abdomen. She suffered throe heart attacks 
■ on a hospital operating table and barely survived. 

The Ulster Volunteer Force did not apologize, but its state- 
ment sought to clarify: Just because they shot toe bus driver, 
who they said was aiding the IRA, did not mean they were 
aiming at any IRA relatives normally in his minivan. 

Apparently fearing retaliation against their own wives and 
children, toe Ulster Volunteer Force affirmed an unwavering 
c ommitment not to murder relatives of its mostly Catholic 
enemies in toe IRA. 

In toe madness of Northern Ireland’s civil war, two sets of 


rales increasingly compete. On one side are formal rales of law 
and treaty favored by poEticians who seek these days to exploit 
what many describe as the best chance for peace in Northern 
Ireland in 20 years. Against them stand informal, labyrinthine 
codes of street violence, a twisted logic constructed over long 
years of desperation. 

“That’s the fury of the whole situation,” said Jeff Maxwell, 
leader of the Belfast human-rights group Families Against 
Intimidation and Terror. Violence and cotmterviolence has 
produced over toe years “a well-orchestra ted pact between 

See ULSTER, Page 2 


By Keith B. Richburg 

Washington Pest Service 

NAIROBI — The Islamic fundamentalist 
mili tary government in Sudan has begun an 
offensive against rebels in the largely Christian 
and arnmisL South in what diplomats and Telief 
workers here said might be an all-out effort to 
wipe out toe costly, decades-old rebellion. 

Fighting across toe South is said to be the 
most intense in years. Sudanese troops, backed 
by warplanes and tribal mQitias, have reported- 
ly advanced from toe garrison towns of Juba 
and Wau to anadr the guerrilla fighters of toe 
S udan People’s Liberation Army along the Kit 
River. 

The fighting has seat tens of thousands of 
refugees fleeing toward toe Ugandan border. 
About 47,000 refugees have deserted their camp 
at A me, which was attacked over the weekend, 
aid officials said. The International Committee 
of toe Red Cross has been asked to evacuate 
about 50 patients from toe nearby Aswa ca mp . 

“It sounds like there’s a large number of 


wounded." said Sally Burnheim of Operation 
Lifeline Sudan, toe United Nations umbrella 
group that coordinates relief to toe area. 

The government of General Omar Hassan 
Ahmad Bashir appears to be trying to capture 
the town of Nimule on the Ugandan bonier, 
and to us to cut toe rebels' military and supply 
lines to Uganda. In that region, the rebel move- 
ment has had virtually unlimited freedom of 
movement across toe border, which has enabled 
it in effect to govern a zone of southernmost 
Sudan. The border routes are also essential to 
the international relief effort to feed millions of 
Sudanese. 

If toe rebels lose those supply routes to 
Uganda, “they will have w go back to being an 
old-fashioned guerrilla movement,” said David 
Evans, toe program officer for Norwegian Peo- 
ple’s Aid, which operates in toe area. “The 
SPLA will defend toose areas with everything 
they have, because they have nowhere else to 

See SUDAN, Page 6 



In India, Endangered Crane Is Running Out of Time 


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By Molly Moore 

Washington Pott Service 

, BHARATPUR, India — The scientists were 
ready., armed with electronic transmitters and 
six baby cranes who had been reared on crane 
chow and fed by human parents dressed in bird 
costumes. 

The young cranes were supposed to migrate 
to Stbena with their wild counterparts. But for 
the first time in memory, the snowy white 
Siberian cranes did not appear at their Indian 
wintering grounds, alarming preservationists 
and dashing hopes for one of toe international 
scientific community’s most unusual and ambi- 
tious efforts to save an endangered species. 

With the number of Siberian cranes that 
winter in India dwindling from 200 in 1965 to a 
mere five last year, crane experts converged on 
the Keoladco Ghana National Park here last 
month, planning to take six tanne shirks bred in 
captivity and Tel ease them with their migrating 
wild relatives. . 

Scientists hoped the adults would teach the 
youngsters the centuries-old migration route 
over toe Himalayas between India and Siberia. 


The young birds’ electronic transmitters would 
be monitored by satellite. Unlike many other 
birds, cranes are not born with the instinct to 
fly their migration paths. 

“We’re running out of tune," said Katie 
Richter, an Ohio native among the group of 
preservationists working on toe crane project, 
partially sponsored by toe U5>. Fish and Wild- 
life Service and the Wisconsin-based Interna- 
tional Crane Foundation. “It already may be 
too late to save them." 

The Siberian crane —a tall stately bird with 
white plumage and a bright red face and beak 
— has become a symbol for international ef- 
forts to preserve endangered birds and their 
environments. 

The Sibes, as toe big birds are known among 
enthusiasts, have been particularly hard hit by 

rapid development, deforestation, uncontrolled 
hunting and the lack of wildlife preservation 
efforts in many of the developing nations they 
visit on their treacherous twice-yeariy migra- 
tions. 

A few years ago. several Siberian crane car- 
casses were rumored to have been discovered in 

the meat bazaar in Kabul, toe capital of Af- 



ghanistan. In Pakistan, migrating flocks of Si- 
berian cranes and other large biros have report- 
edly been downed by hunters hurling rocks tied 
to twine. 

Omitooiogjsis say they think the Siberian 
cranes that migrate west to India and Iran are 
near extinction. None of toe cranes have so far 
reached India this year, and only one small 
flock of six Sibes has been spotted in Iran. 
Another branch of the Siberian crane family, 
toe shrinking eastern flock of about 2500, win- 
ters in China. No other flocks are known to 
exist in the wild. 

For two years, scientists from the United 
States, Russia, India and Japan have collabo- 
rated in an elaborate scheme to try to replenish 
the dying western flock. 

First, eggs were taken from the nests of 
Siberian cranes raised at toe International 
Crane Foundation’s preserve in Wisconsin and 
flown in insulated plastic boxes warmed with 
hot water bottles to Moscow, where they were 
hatched in incubators. Scientists blasted cool 
air on toe eggs each time they were turned to 

See CRANE, Page 6 






** 



Seoul Vows to Keep 
The Dialogue Open 


By David E. Sanger 

New York Tima Service 
TOKYO — Measuring the rhet- 
oric from North Korea as increas- 
ingly ominous. South Korea's pres- 
ident, Kim Young Sam, convened 
the country’s national security 
council Tuesday and then issued 
conciliatory messages, saying that 
“dialogue will be maintained as 
long as possible** over the inspec- 
tion of the North’s nuclear sites. 

Mr. Kim's meeting came just be- 
fore South Korea's foreign minis- 
ter, Han Sung Joo, hurriedly head- 
ed to Washington in an effort to 
come up with a new strategy to 
persuade the North to relent on 
inspections before the Internation- 


al Atomic Energy Agency’s board 
is in Vie 


of governors meets in Vienna m 
two weeks, on Feb. 21. Unless 
North Korea has permitted a thor- 
ough inspection by that rime, the 
agency is expected to refer the issue 
to the United Nations Security 
Council for the imposition of sanc- 
tions. 

Mr. Han, in a telephone inter- 


Q a telephc 

view Tuesday, said he had ad- 


“We can always go the Security 
Council route,” one South Korean 
official said recently, “but it will be 
difficult to turn back from it once 
we start. So we have to explore 
evenr avenue first" 
rh'mx has also expressed dis- 
pleasure with the Clinton adminis- 
tration's recent handling of the im- 
passe, according to officials in 
Japan and Korea. 

The United States, meanwhile, is 
moving fairly rapidly to insure that 
it is prepared, in case the North 
Korean government of Kim Q Sung 
tries to cany through on its vague 
threats of military action in re- 
sponse to economic sanctions. 

A small team of supervisors from 
the Central Intelligence Agency 
was recently dispatched to Seoul to 
beef up the agency’s station there 
and to step up monitoring of North 
Korean troop movements. 

At the same time, American offi- 
cials are declaring that unless the 
North has agreed to inspections by 
the time of the atomic energy agen- 
cy meeting, they will move ahead 
with plans for a small-scale version 


vanced the previously scheduled 
trip to Washington by a week be- 
cause “there needs to be a calming 
down on both sides.” 

The meeting and Mr. Han's trip 
underscored a growing anxiety in 
South Korea that sanctions against 
the North are almost inevitable. 

Now, the cautions are mowing 
louder than ever. Sooth Korean 
and Japanese officials say they are 
particularly concerned that several 
announcements from Washington 
in recent weeks, including the im- 
minent deployment of Patriot anti- 
missil e units to South Korea, have 
created an atmosphere in which the 
North Korean leaders fed they 
canno t back down and allow in- 
spectors into the nuclear sites in 
Yongbyon, 100 kilometers (60 
miles) north of Pyongyang, without 
losing face. 


of “Team Spirit,” the annual joint 
: Unit- 


military exercise between the 1 
ed States and South Korea. 

The exercise, which the North 
has frequently denounced as a “nu- 
clear war preparation” and a 
“grave provocation,” would in- 
volve only about 40,000 troops, 
maifing it a third of the size of the 
exercise hdd last year, according to 
rrffirial.t familiar with the plan. 

North Korea asserted Tuesday 
that the United States was also 
strengtheningits forces in Japan in 
preparation for a possible confron- 
tation, 

“The United States employs 
smiling diplomacy at the negotiat- 
ing table/ the North said in a dis- 
patch, “as if it were interested in 
peace; and tries hard to isolate and 
stifle its dialogue partner behind 
the scene; This is really the height 
of duplicity and impudence.” 










11 


i ln 'l - i 






Saga Karpaktao/TWAModNcd Ttm 

A customer checking an im po rt ed brand Tuesday at a Moscow street stand after domestic vote prices headed skyward. 


Russian Vodka Industry Staggered by New Tax 


Lot Angeles Times Service 

MOSCOW — Squeezed by high taxes and 
cheap imports, Russia 's biggest vodka distill- 
ery has shut down for two weeks and seat 900 
workers on unpaid vacation, to the 

country’s recession and choking one of its 
train sources of revenue; 

Officials at the KristaQ distillery here said 
they hoped the temporary closure on Mon- 
day would persuade thegovernment to cancel 
a liquor tax increase. They said the new tax 
was counterproductive, pricing Russian vod- 
ka out of its native marke t. One of KristalTs 


popular brands, Stofcfanaya, sells for 3^00 
rubles fS~ 


; (52 2D) for a half-titer bottle, op from 
2,800 rubles before Jan. 1. 

Butin Moscow, which consumes 1 million 
bottles of vodka daily, Stohchnaya is bard to 
find. 

The fiquar sections of kiosks are dominat- 
ed by Finnish, German, T'rerh Polish, Ukrai- 
nian and Belarussian vodka, which have be- 
come cheaper tlwm local brands despite. 
Russian import duties of 150 percent Sane 
of the imported vodka is smuggled in to avoid 
die tax. 


Reportedly invented by Russian monks in 
the 25th cat tiny, vodka is Russia's leading 
source of drunkenness and a symbol of its 
chronic inefficiency and despair. With its 
production under stare control since czaxist 
times, vodka is also the source of about 10 
p e r ce n t of government income 
Until Dec. 27, the state took 85 percent of 
the vodka industry’s profits in taxes, leaving 
the rest to distillers to mam min equip- 
ment. On that day the tax rose to 90 percent, 
dropping the distillers’ cut by a third »nd 
creating an industrywide erins. 


Grand Farewell in Grandest Basilica for Ivory Coast’s Father’ 


By Kenneth B. Noble 

New York Tima Service 

YAMOUSSOUKRO. Ivory Coast — 
Two months after his death, Resident F&-_ 
lix Houphoufet-Boigny of the Ivory Coast, 
one of the last of a generation of African 
leaders to guide his people from colonial- 
ism, finally received a somber state funeral 
in the world’s largest church, which he had 
built in his ancestral village. 

The 7,000 guests inside the basilica of 
Our Lady of Peace of Yamoussoukro, and 
the tens of thousands of mourners who 
endured withering equatorial heat in the 
huge esplanade outside, witnessed on 
Monday what it seems safe to say was the 
most lavish ceremony ever hdd to pay 
homage to an African leader. 

AD the panoply of Western religious 
liturgy mixed with traditional African cus- 
toms were on display here, Mr. Hou- 
phouet-Boigny’s birthplace; the stirring 
music of Handel and Gounod; the undu- 
; muse and dance of ancient African 
a huge chorus dressed in bright 


multicolored togas of kente and korhogp 
doth. 

It was a day carefully designed as a 
tribute to the late president and as a show- 
case for a country rooted spiritually some- 
where between the brutal competitiveness 
of Western commerce and the brilliantly 
complex and often mystical culture of an- 
dent Africa. Indeed, Ivory Coast has long 
regarded itself as an oasis of relative afflu- 
ence and tranquility amid the excesses of 
war, famine, religious and ethnic hatreds, 
and other seemingly intractable problems 
that have maned much of post-indepen- 
dence Africa. 


Mr. Houpbouet-Boigny died Dec. 7, at 
the official age of 88, but he was widely 

ltn 


batik dress singing, “foagoh budji gnia, " the 
Baule-langoage words for “Lard, it is you 
who has made aQ things”; a military hon- 
or-guard dressed in bnght red coats and 
brandishing glittering swords; and hun- 
dreds of village elders* resplendent in huge 


believed to be much older. The two-mont 
delay before his burial, which is not un- 
common among his ethnic group, the 
Baule, allowed time for many ceremonies 
leading up to Monday’s funeral. 

Baule chiefs are traditionally buried with 
tools, mementos — and it is widely ru- 
mored, even friends and relatives — they 
treasured in life. 

Mr. Houphoufit-Boigny had ruled the 
Ivory Coast since it gained independence 
from France in 1960, and, at the time of his 
death, he was Africa’s longest-serving lead- 
er and the third-longest-serving in the 
world after Fidel Castro of Cuba and Kim 


H Sung of North Korea. Still, although Mr. 
HouphouSt-Boigny’s funeral attracted rep- 
resentatives of more than 140 countries 
and international organizations, many 
Ivorians were privately bewildered and an- 
gered because several countries that were 
considered dose allies failed to send what 
they considered sufficiently high-ranking 
representatives. 

Ivorians w ere especially disappointed 
with the United States, whose 15-man dele- 
gation seemed to many a telling illustration 
of the Clinton administration’s inatten- 
tion. if not outright indifference, toward 
Africa. The U.S. delegation was led by 
Energy Secretary Hazel R. O’Leary and 
George Moose, the assistant secretary of 
state for African affairs. 

U5. officials acknowledged that Mrs. 
O’Leary, who bolds cabinet rank, has little, 
if any experience in dealing with current 
African issues. The best that a press release 
distributed to reporters coukl muster about 
Mrs. O’Leary, who is blade, is that “like 
President Houphouit-Boigny, both 
O’Leary’s parents were physicians.” 

Earlier, Daniele Bom Oavarie, the min- 
ister of communications, said rh»r die was 
disappointed with the size and composi- 
tion of the U S. delegation. “If we had been 
sent a vice president we would have been 
happier,” sbesakL 


By contrast France, the Ivory Coast’s 
colonial ruler, sent a formidable delega- 
tion, incHuting President Francos Mitter- 
rand and Pr ime Minister Edouar d Baha- 
dur, former President Valfcry Giscard 
d'Estaing, six former prime nrinfatm, and 
more than 70 other dignitaries. Mr. Hoo- 
phoufit-Boigny himself had nurtured dose 
persona] ties with several generations of 
French leaders, culaanafing with several 
ministeri al posts under President Charl es 
de Gaulle. 

Mr. Houphoutt-Boigny’s death is not 
only the end of a political era here; but 
perhaps also the end of die peculiar 
French- African relationship that be came 
to symbolize. Many Ivorians were stunned 
that just a month after the d«*h of their 
leader in December, France supported the 
50 percent devaluation of the CFA franc, 
the French-backed currency that is used in 
14 Francophone countries, and Equatorial 
Guinea. Mr. Houphougl-Boigny had vigor- 
ously opposed any realignment of the CFA 
franc, and devaluation has been widely 
seen as a betrayal by France and a worry- 
ing sign of things to come; 

Still, [or the vast throngs outride the 
basilica, it was, as many of them said, 
among the most deeply spiritual events in 
their fives. Tens of thousands had slept in 
nearby bus stops, soccer fields, and 


- fy 


try in deep recession, was at the time wide- 
ly derided* 


as a scandakws extravagance. 


French Barred U.S. Test for AIDS, 
Reportedly to Work on Own Version 


By Barry James 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Officials blocked the 
sale of an American test Tot AIDS 
to give a French manufacturer time 
to catch op on development of a 
similar product, according to docu- 
ments published Tuesday. 

Several hundred people who re- 
ceived transfusions during the 
nearly seven mouths that the U.S. 
lest was available, but kept off the 
French market, were infected by 
the virus that causes AIDS. 

According to documents pub- 
lished by the daily Liberation, 
Francois Gros. scientific adviser to 
tben-Prime Minister Laurent Fabi- 
us, warned on July 3, 1985. of the 


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danger of the U.S. product “flood- 
ing the French market.” 

Almost six rnooths earlier, Mr. 
Gros had recognized in another Id- 
ler to Mr. Fatmis that AIDS “can 
also infect anyone suffering an ac- 
cident or an operation who receives 
a transfusion.” 

liberation said the documents 
came from the prime minister’s de- 
it and formed part of aju- 
inquity into France's spread- 
ing blood scandal, for which four 
former senior health officials have 
already been convicted. 

During the trial of those officials 
in 1992, Mr. Gros affirmed that he 
had not been informed before June 
1985 of the hazard to hemophiliacs 
of receiving potentially infected 
blood products. 

About 1,250 hemophiliacs con- 
tracted AIDS, many of them be- 
cause the French authorities re- 
fused to take a clotting agent out of 
circulation evm when the danger of 
its contamination by the human 
immunodeficiency virus had been 
wdl documented in mid-1985. 

As a result, Michel Garre tia, for- 
mer head of the National Transfu- 
sion Service, received a four-year 
prison sentence, and his former di- 


rector erf research, Jean-Herre Al- 
lam, two years in jafl. 

Although experts warned that 
liberation had published only a 
few documents from a complex le- 
gal dossier, the new evidence ap- 
pears to indicate that senior gov- 
ernment officials were aware of the 
danger at an earlier date and in 
greater detail than has been ac- 
knowledged up to now. 

Liberation said it also indicated 
that authorities put commercial 
protection of a French-made prod- 
uct ahead of the needs of patients. 

A spokesman for Mr. Fabius de- 
clined to comment on the allega- 
tions, and Mr. Gros could cot be 
reached. 

According to the documents, it 
was cot until July 23, i985, that 
Abbott Laboratories, an American 
firm, received permission to market 
its AIDS test, which had been au- 
thorized for use in the United 
States as early as March 1 

By the time the test was autho- 
rized for sale in France, a French 
product developed by the Diagnos- 
tics Pasteur company had been de- 
veloped. and was then used almost 
exclusively to screen donated blood 
for HTV antibodies. 


Dreyfus Affair Is Back in France 

Army Historian Is Dismissed for Doubting Innocence 


By Alan Riding 

New York Tima Service 

PARIS — On the centenary of the arrest of 
Captain Alfred Dreyfus on charges of treason, the 
Dreyfus Affair resurfaced here when France’s de- 
fense minister Aicmicwi the of the army’s 
history section for publishing a study that cast 
doubt on the Jewish officer's innocence. 

Government officials said the minister, Francois 
Leotard. was furious when he read the three-page 
study, winch described the deep drviaoos m 
French society created by the Dreyfus Affair but 
concluded merely that “Dreyfus’s innocence is the 
thesis now generally accepted by historians.” 

For the French state. Dreyfus’s innocence was 
proven by an appeals court that ordered his reiate- 
gration into the French Army in 1906. The officer, 
who had been accused of spying for Germany, 
served in World War I aim was promoted to 
lieutenant cokmeL 

Yet the purification of the study in the army 
magazine. Actuality and Mr. LriotanTs rapid dis- 
missal of Colonel Paul Gaujac as bead of the 
army's history section, fllustrmed how the wounds 
opened by the Dreyfus Affair at the turn of the 
century have; sail not fully healed. 


trial in 1899, he was sentenced to a further 10 
years’ imprisonment. 

By then, though, demands for Iris rehabilitation, 
were growing spearheaded, among otheo, By the 
author Emile Zola, whose famous newspaper arti- 
cle. “TAocuse,” charged that dreannygeneralslaff 
had concocted the case against Dreyfus. Finally, in 
July 1906, a civilian court overturned the verdict. 

For the powerful “anti- Dr c y f usard s.” who in- 
cluded rightists, monarchists, prominent Catholics 
and anti-Semites, this ruling was a major political 


setback, Imt they nonetheless worked. to keep alive 
doubts as to Dreyfus’s innocence. Tbe officer died 
in 1935, but to tins day French military justice has 
not reversed its 1899 verdict. 

In the study published last week in Actuate^ tbe 
“Dreyfusards" are described as socialists, Freema- 


„ Dreyfus was arrested in October 1894 after a 
French spy u 


French spy in the German Embassy in Pane found 
a document that supposedly carried his handwrit- 
ing. Tbe case set off a wave of anti-Semitiau and. 


stripped of his rank, he was deported to Devil’s 
eh Guiana, In ; 


Island, off tbe coast of Fnmch 


a new 


were intent cm breaking “the military caste,” while 
tbe right — the “anti- Dreyfusards” — saw tbe 
affair as an attempt to destabilize the army. 

The study glosses over the wrongful conviction 
and the army’s persistent efforts to cover up its 
responsibility, emphasizing “the disman- 

tling of French military intelligence and a reduc- 
tion of funds for tbe anned forces at a time when 
Germany was rearming." 

A French historian, Jean-Denis Brfedin, the au- 
thor of a biography of Dreyfus, said tbe study was 
a caricature. ‘TJnfortnnairiy, it c o n t ain s tire per- 
sistence of the dd anti-DreyrusaTOmeutaliw, con- 
served and transmitted for over a century,” he said . 
in an interview with Liberation. 


WORLD BRIEFS 


French Fishermen’s Chiefe Urge End 


To Strike After Import Tightening 

PARIS (Reuters) — Leaders (rf French fishermen called for an end to a 

10-day stnkeoa Tuesday after tbego veroment tightened border contras 
on fish imports despite a diplomatic dash with Norwa y- 
Leaders of the BnltanySurvivai Committee, which organized violent 
protests against cheap imports last week, said they were satisfied with 
their with Agriculture and Fisheries Minister Jean Puech- “We wiE 

tusk fishermen ro re turn to wort,” rhecammrttee’s leader said. 

In thelatest protest, fishermen occupied two espiessway tailgates in 

western Franco-emptying two trucks canying imports from Norway and 

Denmark bawfeng the fiA to motorists, the police said. 

. ‘Anxious to end the Strike, the Agriculture and Fisheries Ministry 
announced sanitary and customs controls. A iUmrcUiy spokes- 

woman said new restrictions wotild be imposed, at ports, in enufing Le 
Havre, MmshIIr , Nice, and Bodogne-sur-Mer, and at Orly airport near 
Paris. Norway protested that thePrtnchmeasufa amounted to a ban on 
fish from outside the Eur opean Union. 


f Some Progress’ in MdeastTalkg 

. CAIRO (Reuters) — Israefi and Palestiman negotiators aid Tuesday 
that they were making slow progress and that it was too eariy to say tf 
a gregnenl was imm i nent m details of Palestinian self-rule and Israeli 
withdrawal from the occupied Gaza Strip and Jericho. 

“I would say tins mormngtiiowed some progress,” said a Palestinian 
Nabil Shaath. “One is hesitant to draw cttucfatitns because 
these things take time.” Env i ron me nt Munster Yossi Sand of land said, 
“Tbe beginnings are always vety promising bat sometimes there are 
rfjfrtriilrii-c translating the good atmosphere into practical results. It’s too 
early” : 


Charges Dropped in UǤ. Scandal 

NORFOLK, Virginia (AP) — A mMaiy judge dismissed charges on 
Tuesday against three U-S. Navy aviators in the Tailhook scandal, 
rejecting the testimony of the navy’s senior admiral and accusing him of 
trying to manipulate the investigation. 

The decision by Captain W illiam T. Vest Jr. means the navy will have 
tostart from the begmmngif it intends to pursue cases sta&nnng from the 
1991 TaShoak avatars’ convention, against Commander Thomas R. 


Miller, Commander Gregory Tritt and Lieutenant David Samples. . 

1 that the i ' ‘ ’ “ ‘ * * 


l Vest ruled flat the chief of Naval 
B. Kelso 2d, used “unlawful command influence” to 
initial investigative process arid the 
designed tosmdd has peisonal invotvemeatm 


Egypt Militants Issue Tinal^ Warning 5 

CAIRO (Combined Dispatches) — * Islamic militants, in a “final 
wanting,” have again caHed on uH foreigners to leave Egypt immediately. 
“This is cm final wanrin&” said the umitatrf Islamic Group, “and those 
who read it should take it seriously. Those who do. not will suffer the 


consequences. • • 

The warnings to foreigngs were /a xed to international news agendesin 
Cairo. They are the closest the Islamic nrifitants have oome to saying tbty 
win kill foreigners. There have been five warnings since last Marat calling 

for frwjnwrj to fa ry- Hn». mnntry And atthongh most embassies advise 

their nationals to be cautious, none have soggerted that they leave Egypt 


yards overnight to be sure of good vantage 
points. Huy were in a uniformly somber 
mood, some rin g in g or praying quietly to 
themselves, others waving small flags or 
handkerchiefs with the late president's por- 
trait. 

There was also a faintly carnival mood 
about tbe occasion. Hawkers sold hastily 
printed black-bordered photographs and 
posters of the president 'Regime sat cm 
sidewalks. Coffee trucks pulled up, and 
crowds gathered to pass around a angle 
cup and drink. 

The paheemen and troops deployed in 
an enormous security operation were in a 
somber and fatgivmg mood, and no serious 
incidents erf any kind were reported. - 
. Though Mr. Houphooftt-Bcagny often 
describal hmrerif aa a devout Catholic, he 
was tolerant of traditional African reli- 
gious beliefs, known as animism, which 
range from a faith in spirits to forms of 
ancestor worship. In a natron of about 14 
million people^ Catholics are only about 15 
percent of the population, wfaife40 percent 
are Muslim, 5 percent Protestant, and the 
rest arumisL But most Catholics here prac- 
tice some forms of animism. 

Mr. Houphouet-Boigny*s decision to. 
bufld tbe baalica, especially with the awn- 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


Aeroflot flight Too Eventful, Two Say 

LONDON (Reuters) — The British government said Tuesday that it 
h«<i Russut’ s-uYiation - authorities to took into complaints by two 
British passin g* * of lax safety procedure* on an Aeroflot flight from 
London to Moacow hut month. 

The Britons, Andrew Caucus and Francesca Baldi, said passengera were 
allowed to smoke during takeoff,' there ros nopre-ffight _ safety briefing, 
no seatbelt check, tire “fasten seatbelt” arid -“no smoking” signs were 
never switched oa and the cabin carpet was rqroed and seats broken. 

Aeroflot Flight SU 242 rat Jan. 14 was also farced to make an 
emergency bndmg in Bedin after roockpil window New out, they said, 
sanding the jet into a laid nose dive. They said that after spending the 
night at & Bedin hotel, they deckled not to continue their flight. 

A top l e rd piagefafggcria^eMtUBgjerricehMbems tartedby the 
■rafitarygovernmeot, Busbkssbmd smftimrentio^js rKtotPclsini oocrap: 
tioa. 'Hie comptroller-general and aB jfa.-dcpot»g -and a ss ista nt s ~ba*e 
been ordered out of thar offices on indefinite leave. (Batters) 

UA pmengm trardhg to Mexico « ipackage bus toms nmy no 
longer face two-hour delays at the bonder. The Mexican Tounsm Secre- 
tariat has streamlined the entry process for chartered buses. It said the 
wailin g period under natural conditions sboukf be about 15 minu te s . 

The US. Natfand Part Service fr charging SI 0 for it* Golden A & 
pass, which was previously free. The lifetime pass, available to American 
citizens over 62, admin the holder, and anyone else in the car, free to any 
part where there is anmrtrmoe charge. 

Two exfafthtous of art (ram thekfagdora of Berta in southern Nigeria 
will be opening in the United Stales sobd; one Feb. 13-April 3 at die 
Museum of fine Arts in Houston, and the other, starting May 3, in 
Cleveland, Baltimore ;imd Seattle. (NYT) 


ULS TER: A Set of Deadly Codes 


Continued Enmi Page 1 

bothsetxaf pararmCtaries that they 
don’t knock off their lop members. 
IPs a very comfortable situation 
and they don't want to upset the 
status quo." 

Undoing rules of. political vio- 
lence is acentral, as yet unrealized 
challenge for negotiations over 
Northern Irelands future; The 
peace process was reborn in De- 
cember with a joint declaration of 
principles by Britain and Ireland 
and is presently n u rtu re d in hope- 
ful talk among all parties about a 
democratic peace to end a war that 
has claimed about 3,400 fives since 
1969. 

But addressing the actual con - 
violence here is 
ly difficult and that’s 


These details were Included in 
Amnesty's catalog: 

• From 1985 to September 1993, 
IRA sdldkxs murdered 30 people 
—fruit vendors, wood seflers, en- 
tering workers, building supply 
contractors — solely became they 
performed outside contract wort 
far the roughly 18,000 British secu- 
rity forces stationed in Northern 
Ireland. 


• Since 1991, Protestant and 
Catholic armed groups -have car- 
ried out well over 200 vigilante 
of dvflians far at 
& of such community 


duct erf po 
“extremely 


standards as drug dealing, car "rob- 
bery and refuting to permit the 

theft cf vehicles demanded by 

paramffitary squads to cany can 
anned operations against thar eofr- 


imes. 


Mr. Maxwell said. The accumula- 
tion of carnage has fostered a cul- 
ture Of political murder which 

serves as “a. method of confroL of 
suppressing protest and question- 
ing. The entire community has 
been censored.” 

Tbe human-rights group Amnes- 
ty International p ofcfahcd a 48- 
chmnirie and analysis of 
iem Ireland’s street violence 
on Tuesday, describing in detail 
political lrilBng? by all tides from 
1982 to the autumn of 1993. 


• In the face of persistent evi- 
dence that .British security farces 
have sometimes chosen to defiber- 
aldy kill terrorist suspects rather 
than arrest them, Britain's g o v e ro - 
ment ^ “evades xesponsflrffiiy by Md- 
ing be hind an anay of legal procfr 
dues and secret inquiries which 
serve to dond the issues,” Amnesty - 


In a sense, the report catalogs 
informal codes of political violence 
that would have to be superseded 
by credible rule erf law if peace were 
ever to take hold in Ulster. 


o 

V 

E 

R 

H 

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080-90000 

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Ferry Passes Some Tough Tests, Only Slightly Dazed 


By Eric Sduaitt 

New York Tima Service 

Washington - in his &* 100 
•nw^^ensc^crel^VrtffiamJ.Peny 

Swm in Thursday lo replace Les Asow, 

' 5S' uS? J S ied officials at 

the White House the nesa day to tighten 
.economic sanctions on Haiti’s nriKiary 
gjwemment: Then ** towded an nr fort* 
jet lor Munich and a conference on Euro- 
pean security issues. 

Some legislators and even administra- 
tion officials have raised doubts about 
. ^rcther Mr. Perry, who made his name as 
. a technocrat, not a diplomat, can han d l e 


forago-policy matters. But in Munich he 
sounded Eke a statesman in uiging Europe* 
an support for Rnssia’s economic and po- 
litical reforms, and in beckoning nations 
outside of the North Atlantic Treaty Orga- 
nization to join the Partnership for Peace 
program that seeks to bring nonmembers 
mto closer relations with the alliance. 

On Sunday, with the carnage from Sat- 
urday's attack, on a Sarajevo marketplace 
domi n a ting the news, Mr. Perry deplored 
the attack and urged a- common approach 
to ending tbe strife. “He was precue and to- 
die point,” said Volker Rflhe. Germany’s 
defease' minister. 

_ On the flight borne Sunday, an engine on 
bis four-engine plane cooked out, forcing 
the jet lo land at MfldeohaQ Air Bare. 70 
□tiles (110 kQometeis) north of London. 


Mr. Perry took the detour in stride. He 
mingled with the troops at the officers’ 
club until a second plane, full of legislators 
who also attended the Munich conference, 
swung by to pick up the stranded secretary 
and ms entourage. 

From the Dresscd-for-Success Depart- 
ment: Mr. Perry said last weekend that one 
Of his first secretarial acts was to bay a suit 
— off the rack — for his formal swearing- 
in ceremony later this month. 

Mr. Perry was referring to those critics 
who said Mr. Aspin did not help his sham- 
bling image by wearing rumpled. light tan, 
ill-fitting suits. 

When asked what color be picked. Mr. 
Peny said: Dark blue, you bet I learned 
my lesson wdL” 

Mr. Peny, frequently identified as a far- 


mer engineering professor with a Ph.D. in 
mathematics, his a reputation for bookish- 
ness he is eager to shed. 

But he did not advance his own cause 
last weekend when someone interrupted 
his talk about peacekeeping, Ukrainian nu- 
clear weapons and the Bosnian crisis to ask 
if he believed Fermat's last theorem had 
really been proved. 

Suddenly, Mr. Perry’s eyes lighted up. 
Fermat’s last theorem — it says that X 
raised to the N tb power plus Y raised to the 
Nth power equals Z raised to the Nth 
power is true when N equals the integer 2 
and no other — is one of the most enduring 
and difficult problem in mathematics. 

Fermat, a 17th-century French math- 
ematician, wrote in the margin of one of his 


notebooks that be had proved it but that 
there was no room in the margin to write it 
out. Then he died, and mathematicians 
have been struggling with it ever since. A 
Princeton mathematics professor an- 
nounced last year that he had discovered a 
proof. 

Mr. Perry confided that off and on dur- 
ing a year of graduate school at Stanford he 
had tried to solve the 350-year-old problem 
— unsuccessfully. 

But that does not make him a scholarly 
type, he maintained. “Someone wrote that 
I was bookish.” said Mr. Peny’. who quoted 
the poets T. S. Eliot and W. H. Auden in 
his speech to the conference on European 
security. “I haven’t had a chance to read a 
book in six months." 



He Supports Israel 


The Associated Pass 

WASHINGTON — Strobe Tal- 
bott, President BUI Clinton's choice 
for the No. 2 post at the State 
Deparuiient, insisted Tuesday in 
-Senate hearing* that he was a 
staunch supporter of Israel in spite 
of writings critical of the Jewish 
state. , 

. “I have always believed that the 
. U.S.-lsraeli relation is unshak- 
able,” Mr. Talbott said at a Senate 
Fore ign Relations Committee con- 
firmation hearing, 

Mr. Talbott was questioned by' 
.Democrats and Republicans about 
his Writings as a T ime nwpyine 

'reporter before he joined the ad- ■ 
.ministration last year. Questions 
focused particularly on a 1981 arti- 
cle in which he suggested that 
American Jews had political influ- 
'dnee far beyond their numbers and 
.that Israel had become an “outri g ht 
liability.” - 

“I certainly don't feel the way I 
'did 13 years ago on this,'* Mr. Tal- 
bott said in the issue of Israel’s 
strategic importance. “I simply 
changed my opinion.” 


Several Jewish _ 
the Jewish Institute for Nal 
■ Security Affairs and tie National 
Jewish Coalition, have called on 
Ml Clinton to withdraw Mr. Tal- 
bott’s nomination to be 
retary of state because erf an 
anti-Israel Has. ' 

two Republican senators, Con- 
nie Mack of Florida and Alfonre 
M. D’ Amato of New York, spoke 
against Mr. Talbott became of his 
“extreme views.” -However, Israe- 
li’s deputy foreign minister, Yogs 
B eilin, defended Mr. Talbott as “a 
very good man,” 

Mr. Talbott,* close friend and 
former roommate of Mr. dmion's 
at Oxford, is currently the State 
Department's ambassador-at-large 
to thexepubOcs of the fanner Son- 
et Union. He easily won confirma- 
tion to that post a year ago. 

In his new post, he would be 
responsible for the management of 
the Stale Department as well as 
bong involved in key policy deci- 
sions. 


Richard Bissell Dies, 
Planned Bay of Pigs 


• New York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — Richard 
-Bissell Jr„ 84, the senior govern- 
meal official who tookrespousibiT 
ity for the Central Intcffigmce 
Agency’s -failed attempt to-topplr 
the C&stTO go v e rnme nt at thccBay 
of Figs in Cuba in April 19fil, died 
Monday in Fanrongton, Connect!- . 
cut, Hu assistant stud be had been 

While Mr. as a prin- 

cipal architect of *$ut became a 
disaster for the newly installed 
Kennedy admixnstratidn is 
remembered, he had 
‘great, larady unsung coti ... . 
jn other fields of government ser- 
vice during end after World War H. 

.As a special assistant and later : 
deputy director of plans for Allen 
■DuBes, the CIA chief, Mr. Bissell 
grided the agency’s clandestine 
program for building tine high-fly- 
ing U-2 reconnaissance aircraft, as 

well as its .sopcrsonK successor, the 
SR-71, and the first orbiting spy 
ateUite, called Corona. 


- He became known within the 
agency and in aviation circles as a 
pioneer of aerial reconnaissance. 

Recalling that Mr;. Bissell 
“helped design and develop the 
specifications for the U^~. Rich- 

- aid He lm s,- a -fanner director .of 
central fatefligcncc, said Monday 
that he would “be remembered in 

- the intdfigcacc co mmu n i ty as one 


aphic reconnaissance which, as 
it developed, did much to improve 
intelligence dating the Cold War.” 
• In ms capadty as head of clan- 
destine operations, Mr. Bissefl also 
was responsible for the CIA’s or- 
ation — at President John F. Keu- 
nedy’s iequest after the Bay of Pigs 


ject, code-named ZR/Riflc, wl 
target was Fidel Castro, primenrin- 
ister of Cuba at the time. 

‘ TEanaLenmftz, 96, a German so- 
prano whose performances of Wag- 
ner and Mozart from the 1930s to 
the 1950s brought her fame, died in 
a Bedin hospital Saturday. . 


Witold Lutoslawski, 81, 
Leading Polish Composer 


The Associated Press 

VRSAW — Witold Luto- 
Id, 81, the dean of PoHsb cam- 
5, died Monday in Warsaw, 
news agency reported. 

. Lutoslawski was a leading 
: in edntemparaty music after 
1 War n, a penod is which 
d was virtually the only epan- 
t Eastern Europe producing 
: related to tbe Westeni avant- 
. Many of Ins compositions 
openly, influenced by the 
t of Bda Bartok. 
i Symphony No. 3 brought 
he Grammy Award for bat 
xaporary composition . in 
It nl*n won the oast Univera- 
? Louisville Grawemey er 


Award for Music. Several other 
compositions received Grammy 
pnmrnat inns. In January, Mr. Lu- 
toslawski received Britain's Classi- 
cal Music Award for his Symphony 
Na4. 

Bom in Warsaw in 1913, he first 
studied mathematics before pursu- 
ing muse at the Warsaw Conserva- 
tory. Since 1964* he had frequently 
appeared world wide as conductor 
ai ms own works. 

Krzysztof Penderecki, another 
leading Polish composer, said that 
“the man wbo created the great 
of Pottsh 20th ocartmy music 


us Polish music and 
it to Europe.” 


mi 


JAPAN: A.Tepid U.S. Response 


Continued from Page ! 

ifiaicffs would be a ble to c ome 
ith some concrete agreements, 
with that looking increasingly 
cely, American officials are 
more about how they 
Id deal with what canid be & 
abeat, and openly coofrania- 
d, 

in ton administration officials 
Jay believe that they are in a 
wmidluatioD when it comes to 
nesting: either Mr. Hosdkawa 

make sbmelast-aanum amcM- 

5 and Mr. Omwn wu be able 
tid up the results as a victory, 
te president will take a barah 

public line with the Japanese, 
h officials believe will play 

with the American puWK. 

i Capitol ffiH there * 8 a* 00 * 
r ribot for taking a Hfflgb 
1 with Mr. Hfisokawa, mdo« 


ican trade sanctions to 
ik open Japan's closed 


. Ml Hosokawa’s plan involves 
the largest such stimulus program 
ever proposed in Japan. It mchides 
a one-time income-tax rebate total- 
ing nearly $55 billion- 

The plan also includes S21 bil- 
lion for gqvemme&t purchases of 
land for public works programs, 
wbicb would have the effect of re- 
viving flue moribund real estate 
tiwrireL where prices have tumbled 
more than 50 parent over the last 
fouryeara. 

Despite tbe agreement, the 
zeal datnagg has been dona 
Showed Tuesday that Mr. Ho- 
sokawa’s approval ratings have 
plummeted more than 20 percent- 
age points, to around 50 percent, 
since he set off a storm last week 
with his proposal for the saks-tax 
increase. 

Economists have said the new 
plan should make the difference 
' between Japan’s economy shrink- 
ing again tins year or posting mod- 
est growth as part of a longer-ienn 
recovery. Nevertheless, the consen- 
sus seems to be that growth win 
- remato ai abotit 1-percmr or less. 


-■ -r f*\\. .<< : • ... 




" 7 .; ■ : 


- • - '■ ‘ ! • 


Mari: Cmtadl/ltaBcn 


ANOTHER NORTHEAST BLIZZARD — A New Yorker trying to find a cab in Tunes Square daring a snowstorm Tuesday. 
Flights into Kennedy International and Newark ItUernatitMial airports were halted, am) delays woe reported at La Guartfia Aijport. 


AMERICAN 

TOPICS 

LA- Public Garages 
Bit Hard fcy Quake 

Of aD modem buildings dam- 
aged in the Los Angeles earth- 
quake rat Jan. 17, public garages 
were hardest hit, according to a 
.preEnrinaiy report by the Ihriver- 
■sity of Caluornia-Berkeley’s 
Earthquake Engineering Re- 
search Center. New parking 
str u ctures were more damaged 
than older ones built at a time of 
weaker building codes and less 
engineering knowledge. 

S I, public garages fear 
pans and open archi- 
ll) to save money and 
park the largest number of can. 
Interior partitions and walls, 
winch would dissipate part of a 


quake’s destructive energy, are 
kept to a minimum. Exterior 
walls also have large openings, to 
hdp light and ventilate tbe build- 
ing, thus providing fewer struc- 
tural elements to absorb the 
shock. 

The worst damage was to ga- 
rages assembled from precast 
concrete sections. More expen- 
sive, but more quake-resistant, is 
pouring the concrete into forms 
to harden as a single unit, or 
building with steel, which is the 
most quake-resistant material of 
aD, the Los Angeles Thnes re- 
ports. 

Short Takes 

Sugar, It is widely befieved, is 
bad for driUren because it not 
only damages their teeth, but also 
can send them spi nn i n g into a 
frenzy. Yet study after study has 
found that sugar has no effect on 
behavior. Scientists say children 
may indeed get overexcited when 
they eat sugar — excited by ex- 


pectations of a sweet treat, that. 
The New York Tunes reports, is 
why researchers design studies to 
make sure tbe children and their 
parents do not know when they 
are eating sugar. 

Most new cars me equipped 
with air bags. Now Breed Tech- 
nologies or Lakeland, Florida, 
has begun selling an “after mar- 
ket" driver's side air bag — actu- 
ally a replacement steenng wheel 
that contains both air bag and 
sensors to delect a crash — for 
people wbo would like air bags 
but are not ready to trade in then 
cars. The cost is 5700 to 5900. 

Gem of the Day, from the Ann 
Landers advice column: If at first 
you do succeed, try something 
harder. 

Of Patriotic Paintings 
Hanging in the Mind 

WaslMgtan crossing the Dela- 
ware, the Pilgrims’ first Thanks- 


giving and William Penn’s treaty 
with the Indians are featured in 
“Picturing History: American 
Painting 1770-1930,” currently 
showing at Washington's Corco- 
ran Gallery. 

Paul Richard of The Washing- 
ton Post is moved to reflect, “Its 
canvases are chestnuts, their 
pomposities are painful” Indeed, 
“most wiH make you cringe." For 
“the boringly good-looking peo- 
ple in these paintings — the hum- 
ble, pious Pilgrims, the Founders 
in their pondered wigs, those 
brawny pioneers — strike the sort 
of poses one sees in silent mov- 
ies. In a word, “this exhibit drips 
with hokum.” 

And yet: “There is something 
that prevents us from laughing at 
these pictures. . . . For most erf us 
have in some comer of our brains 
a patriotic hall (rf fame, a gallery 
of icons, and much of it was in- 
stalled by images like these.” 


Arthur Higbee 


POLITICAL NOTES 


HQ"SmokIng Public BuikUnga? 

WASHINGTON —-The Clinton adminis- 
tration is backing legislation to ban smoking 
in all buildings used by the public, from 
taverns to hardware stores, saying the nation 
could save teas of buttons of dollars each 
year; aloqg with 38,000 to 108,000 lives, with 
only small enforcement costs. 

In addition, each (rf the last six smgeons 
general of the United States, from four Re- 
publican and two Democratic administra- 
tions, has spoken in support of the measnre al 
a House stibcommittee Mating. They echoed 
the theme that this single measure could do 
more for the public health than any other bill 

Speaking against the measure was f*tmHwe 
O. Whitley of the Tobacco Institute, winch 
represents large tobacco companies. 

*Thi5 attempt to ban snaking is an exam- 
ple of social engineering cm a vast scale,” Mr. 
Whitley said. “Such massive intervention in 
the private lives and choices of ane-qnarter of 
our adult population recalls the extremism of 
Prohibition, the last national crusade against 
a supposed social evfl." 


The proposed legislation, the Smoke-Free 
Environment Act, was debated al a hearing 
of the Subcommittee on Health and the Envi- 
ronment. It would ban smoking in every 
building regularly entered by 10 or more 
people at least one day a week, not including 
residences. 

Bmkfing owners could have special smok- 
ing rooms in public buildings if the rooms 
were not used for anything rise and were 
ventilated directly outride, rather than circu- 
lating air back into the building. The bill 
would also ton smoking within the immedi- 
ate vicinity of the building entrances. (NYT) 

'Earth Budget* Draws Pral— 

WASHINGTON — While President Bill 
Clinton has taken a few lumps from environ- 
mentalists recently, his second budget is be- 
ing viewed widely as broadly protective of 
America’s natural resources. 

From spending more money to protea 
wetlands, rivers and lakes to gating Ameri- 
cans to burn less oil instead of ariHing for it in 

an Arctic refuge, the Clinton proposals 
brought praise from environmental leaders. 


“This is an Earth budget," said Ralph 
DeGennaro of Friends of the Earth. 

(AP) 

Early Betlre*nent» Made Easy 

WASHINGTON — Three of the largest 
federal departments — Agriculture, Interior 
and Transportation — have been given ex- 
panded authority to offer early retirements 
any time and at any location to eligible work- 
ers. Nearly 35,000 people in tbe three depart- 
ments could quality for early retirement on 
immediate pension. 

If coupled with cash buyout payments, 
which Congress may consider next week, the 
expanded authority could permit federal 
agencies to meet the president's 252,000 job 
cut goal without resorting to last-hired-first- 
fired layoffs. (WP) 

Quote /Unquote 

Treasury Secretary Lloyd Bentsen: “The 
American job machine is new op and run- 
ning." (AP) 


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A Health Plan Study 
Sees Deficit Swelling 

'We’ll Fix That,’ Clinton Says 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — President 
Bill Clinton's health plan would 
drive the federal deficit up by 574 
billion over the next six years, not 
cut it by 53S billion as the White 
House has forecast, the Congres- 
sional Budget Office said Tuesday. 

The budget office said Mr. Clin- 
ton's program would require more 
subsidies for employers than the 
White House had initially project- 
ed. It also prediaed that more low- 
wage workers would qualify for tbe 
promised subsidies. 

In another setback for the White 
House, the budget office said Mr. 
Clinton's mandatory premiums for 
employers should be included in 
tbe federal budgeL Mr. Clinton 
wanted the premiums treated as 
private transactions, off the bud- 
geL 

Mr. Gimon said the new esti- 
mates would not deter him. “We'D 
fix that,” he said in Louisiana after 
makin g a speech. “That's not a 
problem. That's a Washington pol- 
icy wonk deal No serious person 
out here in the real world will be 
too troubled by that." 

The director of tbe budget office, 
Robert D. Rrischauer, in testimony 
before the House Ways and Means 
Co mmi ttee, said Mr. Clinton’s pro- 
posal would bolster national 
spending on health in its early 
years. But, he said, the plan would 
“reduce spending for health in the 


longer ran” and could reduce the 
deficit after 2004. 

He estimated the plan would re- 
duce the deficit by S1Q billion in 
fiscai 1995, but then increase it 
from 1996 through 2000 by more 
than $80 billion. 

The office estimated that em- 
ployers’ subsidies would cost S3 8 
bilhon in the year 2000 alone, or 
“S25 billion more than the admin- 
istration's figure of S33 billion." 

Mr. Clinton's program, which 
seeks to guarantee private coverage 
for aD Americans no later ihan Jan- 
uary 1998, should be included in 
the federal budget because “it es- 
tablishes both a federal entitlement 
to health benefits and a system of 
mandatory payments to finance 
those benefits.” the budget office 
said. 

It said tbe regional alliances 
where mosL Americans would gel 
their coverage “would operate pri- 
marily as agents of the federal gov- 
ernmenL” 

Accordingly, the report said, the 
budget office “believes that the fi- 
nancial transaction of tbe health 
alliances should be included in the 
federal government's accounts and 
that tbe premium payments should 
be shown as governmental receipts 
rather than as offsets to spending." 

Bui it said the alliance opera- 
tions should, like Soria! Security, 
be listed separately from other fed- 
eral operations. 


Clinton Tries to Deflect 
Insurers’ 'Propaganda’ 


By Ruth Marcus 

H ashmgtor Post Service 

SHREVEPORT. Louisiana — 
President Bill Clinton assailed 
what he called misleading “propa- 
ganda” about his health care plan 
from the insurance industry on 
Tuesday and said “enlightened 
business leaders” understood the 
need for coverage for aD Ameri- 
cans. 

Mr. Clinton told workers at a 
General Motors plant here that in- 
surers now had too much power to 
decide who gets health insurance 
■and who does not “We ought to 
stop it,” he said. 

Mr. Clinton also criticized an in- 
surance industry advertising cam- 
paign that portrays the Clinton 
program as a government takeover 
of the health-care system that 
would deny indtvidnais the free- 
dom to choose their doaors. 

“I get tickled,” he said, “when I 
read these ads by these folks that 
are so desperate to keep the system 
we have now and they say, Oh, the 
president wants to have the govern- 


ment lake over the health-care svs- 
tem.” 

“That's not inie,” he said. 
“We’re moving the insurance com- 
panies out of the driver's seat and 
letting tbe people and the business- 
es have more influence.” 

Mr. Clinton’s appearance in 
Shreveport was part of an effort to 
rebut arguments against his plan 
and deflate the growing appeal of a 
rival plan proposed by two fellow 
Democrats, Representative Jim 
Cooper of Tennessee and Senator 
John B. Breaux of Louisiana. 

Mr. Clinton referred obliquely to 
that plan, which unlike his own 
would not mandate coverage for all 
Americans but would provide “uni- 
versal access" to health benefits by 
trying to make insurance more af- 
fordable. 

“Don't faD for all this rhetoric 
about universal access," Mr. Clin- 
ton said. Gesturing to a gleaming, 
new pickup truck, he said: “We 
have universal access now if you've 
got S 10,000 or 5 15,000. There’s uni- 
versal access to this truck, but only 
people with the money can pay it” 


Away From Politics 


• Intense downpours in Southern California from the most powerful 
storm of the winter lashed (he fire-denuded hillsides, unleashing 
destructive mudslides that inundated beachfront homes in Malibu. 
Commuter traffic, already crippled by earthquake detours, slowed to 
a crawl in many areas as low-lying intersections began to flood and 
vehicles started skidding on rain-slick streets. 

■ Two members of the U.S. Army’s precision parachute team, the 
Golden Knights, collided during a practice jump at Yuma. Arizona. 
One died and the other lost both legs. Sergeant Jose AguiUon of San 
Antonio suffered a fatal heart attack after landing in a tree. Sergeant 
Dana Bowman, of North RidgeviDe, Ohio, landed in a parking Iol 
suffering injuries that forced amputation of both legs below* the knee. 

• An 8-montb-oM girl was killed by a bowling ball dropped from an 
overpass in Jersey City. New Jersey. The baD slammed through the 
window of a car and struck the girl in the face. She had been riding in 
the back seat of the car with her 3-year-old brother. 

• Testimony on whether Michael Jackson sexually molested a young 

boy wfll be heard by a grand jury convening Wednesday in Los 
Angeles, according to a local television station. KNBC. ft quoted 
sources as saying Marlon Brando's son. Miko. a former Jackson 
bodyguard, would be the first witness. lat. ap. Reuters 



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Page 4 


WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 1994 


Reralfc 


INTERNATIONAL 



PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW \ORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


Let’s See if NATO Can Act 


The Challenge Is Clear 


The single, presumably Serbian-fired mor- 
tar shell that killed 68 Bosnian civilians in a 
Sarajevo market changes really nothing. But 
in the universe of CNN that we all now 
inhabit it has sparked a new round of interna- 
tional shock and indignation. The question is 
whether the embers of emotion will bum 
down before the bestirred governments atx 

As always, there are powerful reasons to 
evade a change. Air strikes, in their several 
modes, offer undeniable tactical uncertainties 
and tempt Serbian retaliation against peace- 
keepers and aid workers. Even lo keep on the 
old sanctions, let alone to add new ones, aggra- 
vates the mounting fatigue of nearby states 
crucial to enforcement. Lifting die arms embar- 
go to permit Muslims something closer to pari- 
ty with Serbs and Croats threatens to escalate 
the war and derail international diplomacy. 

But none of these considerations is over- 
whelming; all are judgment matters. Chi air 
strikes, the Gulf War showed the possibilities 
of precision bombing; political and military 
responses to Serbian retaliation are available; 
credibility has its continuing uses in the post- 
CoJd War world. As for sanctions, they may 
be a wasting asset, but while they last they 
hurt. To lift the arms embargo is to allow the 
Muslim-led Bosnian government, otherwise 


without effective international aid, an ex- 
panded self-defense. It fights, after all. for its 
own towns and to reverse the “ethnic cleans- 
ing** that others profess to deplore. 

Bui who at tins late date can believe that 
policy turns on position-paper analysis of 
options? Certainly standards of reasonable 
sense must be met. But, as the Sarajevo blast 
reminds us, the real issue is whether the Unit- 
ed Nations and especially NATO can act in a 
situation which has its contrary aspects but 
which remains in essence a case of rampant 
Serbian brutality. The American government 
occasionally grasps parts of the point but in 
general lends to conduct a rambhqg and end- 
less seminar with itself, rather than make 
timely decisions consistent with the obliga- 
tions of American leadership. 

How many times can the United States go 
up and down the hill on air strikes, for in- 
stance? How long can BQl Clinton talk of 
lifting the arms embargo without making it a 
forceful priority at the United Nations? How 
could he move over the weekend, suddenly 
and without explanation, from rejecting to 
accepting an unfair international deal resisted 
by the Muslims? How could he allow himself to 
muse, in a way comforting to Serbs, on the 
authorship of the latest mortar attack? The 
challenge before President Clinton is very dear. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


No to an Unjust Peace 


The mortar shell that turned Sarajevo's 
main market into a killing field Saturday 
afternoon heightens pressure on NATO lead- 
ers, Bin Clinton included, to find a way to 
hasten the end of the 22-monih-old Bosnia 
war. But it would be perverse indeed if this 
latest Serbian atrocity became the occasion 
for President Clinton to abandon his long and 
principled resistance to French and British 
pressure to impose an unjust and unenforce- 
able settlement on the Bos nian government 

European governments have been playing a 
cynical game. Until Serbian gunners pushed 
matters too far last weekend, the Europeans 
were perfectly wDHng to use the shelling of 
Sarajevo and other cities to pressure the Bosni- 
an government to accept a bad partition plan 
that denied than vital territory and transit 
routes. If they now agree to endorse NATO air 
strikes against the siege guru, they fully expect 
Washington, in return, to join in their diplo- 
matic gang-up, at the very moment when the 
Bosnian government has begun to gain military 
strength, reversing some of its earlier losses. 

Mr. Clinton must leU the Europeans no 
deal. Instead he should call on them to lift the 
one-sided United Nations arms embargo so 
that the Bosnians can property defend them- 
selves. In that context, and in that context 
alone. NATO air strikes, with European as 
well as American planes participating, could 
speed a decent end to the conflict. 

What has held up air strikes until now is a 
joint UN-European Union strategy based not 
on stopping aggression but on forcing a nego- 
tiated peace. While diplomacy is generally 


preferable to warfare, the flaw in this strategy 
has been the false moral equality it has ap- 


plied to the Serbian and Croatian aggressors 
and their Muslim victims. 

An arms embargo theoretically applied to aO 
sides has until recently disarmed only the land- 
locked Bosnian defenders, not the Serbian and 
Croatian attackers who manage to produce or 
smuggle in all the guns they need. Pressure on 
(be Serbs has consisted of economic sanctions 
that have grown increasingly porous; the 
Croats have received little more than words of 
warning. Meanwhile, the Bosnians have been 
pressured to accept a truncated share of terri- 
tory by the siege guns shelling Sarqevo and 
other government-controlled cities. 

In the name of this “evenhanded” strategy, 
European and UN officials left that artillery 
unmolested, despite Security Council resolu- 
tions proclaiming those cities protected safe 
havens and NATO resolutions threatening air 
strikes unless the Serbs lifted the sieges. 

The callous amorality of this “evenhanded- 
ness" rightly repelled the Clinton administra- 
tion. which, although it had no clear strategy 
of its own, refused to endorse the efforts of its 
allies to let the Serbian siege artillery batter 
the Bosnians into accepting an unjust peace. 
Not only principle is at stake. Given the 
bitterness of this conflict, a peace imposed at 
the bargaining table is guaranteed to be resist- 
ed in the forests, mountains and cities of 
Bosnia. Any international force deployed to 
enforce or even monitor such a sullen peace is 
likely to become a target for a B sides. 

Now the carnage inflicted by the Serbian 
artillery may be more than any democratically 
accountable government can abide. But as the 
Europeans soften their opposition to punitive 
air strikes. Washington must stand firm on the 
principle of not imposing an unjust peace. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


A Good Job on the Budget 


President Bill OintoQ moved on Monday to 
take possession of still another Republican 
issue. To crime and welfare reform you can 
now add spending restraint. He submitted a 
budget under which spending in the next fiscal 
year would rise by only 23 percent, or S34 
billion. That is less than the likely inflation rate 
and slightly less than the so-called “current 
services" estimate of what it would take to keep 
cbe government going next year on automatic 
pilot — no policy changes either up or down. 
In real terms under the Clinton proposal, 
reflecting in part some tough spending terms 
that Congress forced on the new administra- 
tion last year, the government would shrink. 

Criticism of the proposal was muted, again 
a reflection of the fact that it b a product of an 
agreement last summer in which Congress and 
the administration both bad a hand. But such 
criticism as did occur came partly from liberal 
Democrats warning to spend more, not just 
from Republicans claiming to want to spend 
less. Yes. there is going to be a debate over how 
to account for the spending in Mr. Clinton’s 
health care plan and whether to add it to the 
budget (even though most of it is occurring 
already;. But the president seems to have pretty 
well inoculated himself against the charge of 
tax and spend. He proposed (o practice a 
restraint that his predecessors mainly preached. 

The four great engines in the budget are 
Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid and in- 
terest on the debt- Together they are expected 
to cost about S50 billion more in 1995. De- 
fense is slated to cost S7 billion less. There will 
also be some savings from the economic re- 
covery — unemployment insurance costs will 
decline — and die government will make 
more next year than tins from the sale of 
assets acquired in the takeover of failed S&L&. 
The rest of the budget is pretty much a wash. 
The rules are such that just about any legislat- 
ed increase in spending has to be offset by a 
cut. The budget does include some increases 
in favored programs in the name of invest- 
ment. They are indeed offset, some of them by- 


cuts in programs — public housing is an 
example — that arc Democratic to the core. 

Republicans will say tins year, as they did 
last year, that Congress should pocket the cuts 
and forget the investments; the proceeds would 
go to deficit reduction. The Senate is also 
scheduled to take up this month the socaQed 
balanced budget amendment to the constitu- 
tion. But social policy should not be suspended 
for the next few years — the country has a 
social as well as a budget deficit to overcome — 
and the constitutional amendment would do 
less to balance the budget than it would to 
restore political gridlock. You do not have to 
hide behind the constitution to achieve fiscal 
responsibility: you just have to make a few 
tough calls. The president has done a good job. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


OPINION 




eribunc 



By Richard Cohen 


The Bosnia War Crimes Gould Well Go Unpunished 


G ENEVA — The daughter of 68 people at a 
crowded market in Sarajevo on Saturday 


VJ crowded market in Sarajevo on Saturday 
brutally demonstrates how ineffectual Western 
leaders and the United Nations have been in 
stopping the genocide in Bosnia. 

Less noticed is the discreet gutting of the one 
opportunity for justice — however inadequate — 
that the international community had promised to 
the citizens of that abused country. 

The teeth are bang polled from the Internation- 
al War Crimes Tribunal set up by the UN Security 
Council with fanfare last year. The UN War 
Crimes Commission, whki is charged with assem- 


Bj Sadruddin Aga Khan 


bling evidence, will soon be disbanded. 

This is bong done by the very statesmen who 


hailed the tribunal — at least publicly — as the 
means of ensuring that however unfavorable a 


means of ensuring that however unfavorable a 
peace settlement would be to the Bosnians, they 
could at least see justice done to the perpetrators 
of mass rape, murder and torture. 

For people who have lost family, homes, com- 
munities and country, the prospect trf^rotractcd 

and Croatian Milosevic, Franjo 

Tudjman, Radovan Karadzic and their Heu tenants 
aright seem cold comfort at best 
Yet, as the Nuremberg trials demonstrated, 
bolding a vicious regime to account is an important 
act of renewal for both sides. 

Now that opportunity may be lost 
The UN secretary-general, Butros Butros Ghaii, 
has indicated that he expects the War Crimes 
Commission to wrap up its work by April. This 
abrupt closing of the investigation before the tribu- 


are also likely to be To n| i | i* things 

worse, the Venezuelan appomted to be chief prose- 
cutor has now renounced the job to pursue a 
political career. This means further delay. 

International leaders are engaged in a monu- 
mental whitewash of Serbian ana Croatian lead- 
ers for reasons of political expediency, to keep 
them at the negotiating table. 

Reluctant to use air strikes or other military 
intervention. Western politicians offer these lead- 
era a new respectability and the promise of eventu- 
al financial support, grateful for any indication 
that they wfll stop the atrocious war. 

Many of the international negotiators who ini- 
tially went along with the idea of a war crimes 
tribunal probably never thought of it as a practical 


peace treaty between the warring parties could 
encompass. The agreement states that each side 
will prosecute its own, and that each regards the 
conflict as an internal matter. 

The implications for potential war crimes trials 
are significant. Under international law, ordyin- 
temabonal wars can produce such crimes. Tims, 
threats of war crimes prosecutions from die UN 
tribunal would become meaningless. 

Fortunately, the tribunal also has jurisdiction 
over two other categories, of crimes — genocide 
and crimes agains t humanity, the latter covering 
crimes such as mass rape. 

For these categories, international prosecution 
overrides national law. Yet even here jurisdiction 
without political will is ineffectual 


possibility, but as a convenient way to silence 
human rights activists and other supporters of the 


Bosnians. Perhaps they thought the tribunal could 
be used later as a bargaining chip to win Serbian 
and Croatian agreement to a peace settlement. 

T7— a. — 


For critics of the West's cowardly stance during 
this savage war, however, the tribunal mattered; It 
offered some prospect of accountability. 

Although it was never Ekely that the paper trail 
would exist lo implicate top officials, the success- 
ful prosecution of field commanders and local 
extremists who encouraged rape and murder 
might have begun a healing process after the war. 

Now, though, the neatermg of the international 
tribunal is under way. Only a facade will remain, it 
seems — one that can be counted on not to 
produce embarrassing prosecutions. A neat Ma- 
chiavellian bargain. 

by the Bosnian^^ml^^^Hl^Aldic with 
Serbia. It is an indication of what an eventual 


nal is property up and running is already having 
consequences on the ground. It has raised doubts 


consequences on the ground. It has raised doubts 
about the tribunal's legal authority for completing 
the exhumation of a mass grave of Croatian vic- 
tims of suspected Serbian war crimes in Vukovar. 
Future investigations, and therefore prosecutions. 


war. We owe it to the victims, we owe it to 
ourselves and we owe it to history. 

Above aB, by insisting on such a record, we 
reassert onr own humanity and decency and de- 
dare solidarity with those who have suffered. 

We also send a strong message to other poten- 
tial violators. There must be a clear threat that 
even if these criminals remain protected at home, 
they will be pariahs abroad. 

The latest outrage in Sarajevo requires an imme- 
diate response by the United Nations and NATO. 
But it requires more titan that An attack of that 
scale on ci vilian?; is a war crime. It urgently re- 
minds us of the need for a strengthened interna- 
tional trib unal that can pursue a full investigation 
and bring those responsible to justice. 


The writer was the United Nations high commis - 
»er for refugees from 1965 to 1977. He cantnbut- 


skater far refugees from 1965 to 1977. He contribut- 
ed this comment to The New York Times. 


NATO Is Realistic About Russia and Enlargement 


B RUSSELS — Even before the 
NATO summit meeting in Janu- 
ary ended, many commentators had 
singled out the wimps and the losers: 
NATO and Central and Eastern Eu- 
rope. For fear of Russia, the analysis 
said, NATO refused membership to 
the new democracies to its east; and 
in the Partnership for Peace, it of- 
fered them nothing more than a secu- 
rity placebo. In snort, NATO missed 
an opportunity offered by Russia's 
weakness, and betrayed the hopes of 
the new democracies. 

For more than 40 years, the think- 
ing classes have been predicting NA- 
TO's failure. According to the latest 
gloomy forecasts, the alliance's fu- 
ture is as grim as ever. Some see it 
dissolving into “abstract multilater- 
alism." Others say it must either go 
“out of area” — extending its reach 
— or “out of business." 

What is surprising here is not only 
the choice of terminology — any di- 
ch6. from “appeasement” (Richard 
PerJeJ to “echoes of Yalta" (Zbigniew 
Brzczinskfl, seems worthy ol reheat- 
ing — but who is talking. Manvof the 
commentators have adopted dramat- 


By Michael Rfihle 

really different stances from what cal overitiU \ 


they considered realistic in the past. 
Consider, for example, James Bak- 


Cousider, for example, James Bak- 
er, who demands dear criteria and a 
timetable for those countries that 
want to join NATO. As secretary of 
state, the smooth Mr. Baker would 
never have tied his policy to such a 
rigid framework. 

Or consider Mr. Perie, attacking 
NATO's ‘‘appeasement'’ of Russia but 
forgetting that the Reagan administra- 
tion joined in the “Gorbymania” of 
the late *805 that made even some of 
Mikhail Gorbachev’s European fans 
shudder. And then there is Henty Kis- 
singer, who eloquently questions a 
Western policy that he deems Russo- 
pWc. Is this the same Mr. Kissinger 
who was the architect of UiL-Soviet 
hflater aHsm, the virtuoso of secret di- 
plomacy and of ‘Track-channeling’'? 

Arguments about NATO have al- 
ways provided a convenient battle- 
ground for partisan straggle in US. 
domestic politics. If the current argu- 
ments are considered on their own 
terms, they hardly warrant the rhetori- 


cal overidD we hear. A took at today's 
security landscape reveals why the 
course charted by NATO’s 16 man- 
bers is both tight and Tar-reaching. 

One does not have to suffer from 
“Moscow myopia” (Senator Mitch 
McConnell's term) to conclude that 
Russia, the strongest nalitary power in 
Europe, will continue to require care- 
ful handling. This does not translate 
into a Russian veto on NATO policies, 
but it underscores that Russian per- 
ceptions have to be takoi seriously. 

NATO, which made a tremendous 
effort to contain the Soviet Union for 
four decades, cannot suddenly pre- 
tend that it does not care what is 
going on in Russia. This is especially 
true when NATO defense budgets 
are in free-fall — a fact that should 
rive pause to those who argue in 
favor of extending security guaran- 
tees to others . 

The goal of avoiding the isolation of 
Russia doe not denve from an iU- 
fotmded Western belief in some form 
of therapy for Russia. It derives from 
the realization that it is too eariy to 


other Comment Norway Hopes to Enjoy the Diversion 


Islam and Extremism 


Many people in the Islamic world genuinely 
fear Western materialism and mass culture as 
a deadly challenge to their Islamic culture and 
way of life. We fall into the trap of dreadful 
arrogance if we confuse “modernity” in other 
countries with their becoming more like us. 

Our form of materialism can be offensive to 
devout Muslims. We must understand that 
reaction. This would help us understand what 
we have cook to see as the threat of Islamic 
fundamentalism. We need to be careful of that 
emotive label, “fundamentalism.” and distin- 
guish, as Muslims do, between revivalists, who 
choose to take the practice of their religion 
most devoutly, and fanatics or extremists, who 
use litis devotion for political ends. 

We must not be tempted to believe that 
extremism is in some way the hallmark and 
essence of the Muslim. The Prophet himself 
disliked and feared extremism. 

— Prince Charles, speaking at 
the Oxford Center far Islamic StwSes. 


O SLO — After King Hsrald V 
opens the Winter Ohmoics in 


V-/ opens the Winter Olympics in 
Iillehammer on Saturday, Norway 
will be in the spotlight for two weeks. 
This prospect provides gratification 
but wflj also grant diversion. 

Norwegians me modest people. 
Most are content for their country to 
come into the news only when the 
Nobel Peace Prize is awarded. But 
Norway’s role in the Mideast peace 
talks brought it to center stage. For- 
eign Minister Johan Jorgen Holst’s 
funeral was a media event, especially 
when the Istadi-PLO negotiations 
again moved briefly to Oslo. 

Starting on Saturday, most Nor- 
wegians will spend two weeks in 
front of their television sets. They 
will proudly count the medals won 
by their countrymen. This will pro- 
vide a pleasant diversion from wfaat 


By John C. A upland 


preoccupies them, their second de- 
bate in a quarter centurv over their 



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bate in a quarter century over their 
relations with Europe. ' 

In fact, Norway became /irmly 
linked to the European Union on 
Jan. 1. when the awkwardly named 
European Economic Area came 
formally into effect. Norway and its 
Nordic neighbors, Sweden and Fin- 
land. wiD now gradually become a 
part of a Western Europe with (rel- 
atively) free movement of goods, 
people, capital and services. 

While toe public debate focused 
on membership in the European 
Union, the EEA treaty slid rather 
easily through the political process. 
Few Norwegians have the slightest 
idea of the treaty's contents. Some- 
day they will realize that they are 
already party to a trial marriage 
with the Continent. 

Given tire extensive reach of the 
EEA. a question arises. In view of 
the odds against membership being 
approved in a referendum, why go 
through the pain of negotiations m 
Brussels and a debate at home? 

The government would like to 
have a seal at the table in Brussels, 
and Prime Minister Gro Harlem 
Bnmdtiand is not one to give up 


easily. Although one must hope she 
will overcome the odds against her, 
I have a feeling at times of watching 
for the second time a melodrama 
moving to an inevitable conclusion. 

When discussing their relation- 
ship with Europe, Norwegians are 
hampered by a Lack of experience in 
debating international economic 
questions. In order to maintain 
peace within the Labor Party after 
the 1972 referendum, discussion of 
relations with the Continent was 
minimized. As a result, the Labor 
Party does not have an oversupply 
of leaders trained to croc with the 
challenges that now confront them. 

As the Oslo daily A/tenposren 
noted, the foreign minister brought 
into office by Mr. Holst’s death, 
Bjorn Tore GodaL is the first repre- 
sentative of die 1968 generation to 
occupy that post Like many of his 
generation, be once opposed mem- 
bership in the European Community 
and NATO. Most of this group dis- 
covered. however, that they could 
not get ahead in Norwegian politics 
and oppose NATO. Many have also 
come to see Europe as a potential 
alternative to the Pentagon. 

With so much attention focused 
on Europe, there is little left to 
worry about Norway’s security. 
Stifl. Norwegians are well aware 
that there is a great deal of military 
power just to the east of them on 
the Kola Peninsula. The reassur- 
ance provided by the fact that much 
of it is rusting has been offset by 
signs that Russia is beginning to 
reassert itself. The recent Russian 
elections reinforced these concents. 

The discovery that the Russians 
were even worse housekeepers re- 
garding their midcar waste than 
was realized causes a mm immedi- 
ate anxiety. As Prime Minister 
Bnmdtiand noted at the recent 
NATO summit, Norway is not the 
only country that needs to be wor- 


ried about nuclear pollution of the 
sea and reactor time bombs. It is 
not easy to detect much that is 
being done about this, Norway 
lacks the resources, and Washing- 
ion is concentrating on missfles tar- 
geted on the United Stales. 

Preoccupation with other mat- 
ters has meant that there has been 
little public reaction to the reduc- 
tion of V.S. activities in Norway. 
For example, the decline in U.S. 
interest in Norwegian electronic in- 
stallations has barely been noticed. 

In an interview. Defense Minis- 
ter Jorgen Kosmo stressed the im- 
portance of keeping up with nucle- 
ar activities on the Kola Peninsula. 
He was not so concerned about 
what Russian military authorities 
might do as about preventing on- 
dear weapons and fud from falling 
into the wrong hands 

U5. intelligence agencies are 
busy looking for new missions. The 
U.S. Navy has discovered that its 
devices for undersea surveillance of 
Soviet submarines cm also be used 
to keep up with whales. 

The Pentagon’s decision to re- 
duce US Air Force activity, with- 
out first consulting the Norwegians, 
ala) attracted little attention. With 
the help of quick diplomatic foot- 
work, quiet bilateral talks are now 
under way. U.S. Air Force opera- 
tions vSD be reduced but perhaps 
not as much as they would have. 

There was a time when the con- 
cern about Russia and tire reduc- 
tion of U.S. activities would have 
been big news here. Such matters 
cannot compete with the Olympics. 

And then there will be the ex- 
hausting debate on Europe. The 
outcome will not hinge on the diffi- 
cultissues being negotiated in Brus- 
sels — agriculture, fishing, oil The 
crux win be whether Norway should 
abandon the independence it ob- 
tained less than a hundred years ago, 
after centuries of frying the Danish 
and then the Swedish flags? 

International Herald Tribune. 


write Russia off as a senable partner. 

The NATO summit took place 
only a month after the first democrat- 
ic elections in Russia. It does not 
require a leap of imagination to con- 
clude that neither Mr. Baker nor Mr. 
Kissinger would now be advocating, 
if stifl in office, a policy of Russian : 
isolation, when they strove continu- 
ously to engage the Soviet Union 
constructively m the past 
.. If there is any false belief in therapy,' 
ft is in the camp of NATO-enlargers, 
many of whom ma i ntai n that an ex- 
panded NATO would be in Russia's 
interest In terms of staNKty in Cen- 
tral and Eastern Europe this may be 
true. But what constitutes Russian in- 
terests is a matter yet to he defined by 
the Russians themselves. “*• 

Events since the end of the Cold 
War have failed to persuade the Rus- 
sian mflitaiy that NATO’s motives 
are benign. Explaining to a humiliat- 
ed Russian military establishment 
that an expansion of NATO would be. 
a net gain for them, not another do- 
feat, would exceed even Henry Kis- 
singer's ingenuity. 

Critics of Partnership for Peace 
seem unwilling to appreciate the prac- 
tical value of the program. The coun- 
tries of Central and Eastern Europe 
wiD be riven an opport uni ty to make 
their unbtary structures compatible 
with NATO’s, an essential condition 
for future membership. And transpar- 
ency m defense budgeting and the 
need for democratic control of rimed 
faces are being promoted through co- 
operation in the Partnership. 

One of the gmdrngnriociples of the 
Partnership is seif-differentiation. Ev- 


with questions aboatwhM could 
sue. The answers, unfartanatdy. 


be done. The answers, unfartonaldy, 
are the same in private as they are m 
- public. Air strikes aright jeopardize 
UN peacekeeping troaps- Air stribss 
. might doom tae hu man i t a ri a n rid pro- 
graxn whicfr_so far, has largely suc- 
ceeded. Wide-sca)e starvation in Bos- 
nia has; been averted. To that extent, 
tile United Nations has done its job. 

The deliberate murder of non- 
combatants is an obscenity. But all 
rides in the* Bosnian war have com- 
mitted foul deeds. And the line be- 
tween ocsHbatants and civilians was 
obliterated : in World War IL The 
Serbs may be beasts, but they are not 


ery partner is given the same chance 
at the start, but NATO proceeds on 


at the start, but NATO proceeds on 
the realistic assumption that some 
might want to choose the fast track 
while others go slow. 

With its offer of enh-iwrant militar y 
cooperation through the Partnership 
for Peace, NATO has drawn the right 
ccodoaon from a security environ- 
ment that is still in flux. The Partner- 


. The Gin ton a dm inis tr ation seems 
to be arriving at a prudent policy on 
Bosnia. It is right not to react immedi- 
acy to what is seen on tdevisioa It 
will also be. right if, as h now seems* 
tire administration takes a leadership 
rote in bringing the warring parties to 
the negotiating table — and puts some 
anode behind its intentions with oo- 
vert operations rimed at the Serin At 
the same time, it can no longer afford 
to offer the Muslims the nope, no 
matter how understandable* that 
NATO air power will be used cm their 
side. To the Muslims, tar power is only 
an initial step — a hoped-for escala- 
tfch that ought to give everyone pauses 

The impulse to punish the Sabs is 
understandable. Bri those who advo- 
cate that course have an obligation to 
ask a bout the next step. Logic says it 
most be the bombing of militar y and 
infrastructure targets in Serbia prop* 
er and, if that fails, the introduction 
of U.S. ground troops — a step no 
one wants to take. 

In the CNN age, the desire is to 
balance one image with another — to 
respond immediately to wbai is seen. 
But Ml Groton understands the iro- 


ship is a prdmx 
framework tor an 


answer — a 
ng process. 


The writa-, senior pfenning officer in 
NATO’s political affairs division, com- 
ments here in a personal capital ) 
the International Herald Tribune. 


will do more harm than good and whai 
happens if the answer is the former.' 
The stakes are great, not just for Bos- 
nia-and Europe, but for the CEnton 
administration. Bosnia, not health' 
care, couldbewhat makes or breaks it- 
The Washington Post. 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO - 
1894: Setback in Africa er everywhere, although die cold was 


PARIS — The triumph frit in certain 
sections of the colonial party in. 
France at the successful occupation 
of Timbuctoo by Colonel Boomer’s 
column has been but short lived. Des- 


patches which arrived in Paris yester- 
day [Feb. 8] report that a French 
column at Timbuctoo has been mas- 
sacred to the last man. It is far from 
dear whether it is a question of the 
main column under Colond Boo- 
mer's command or whether it refers 
to a flying column detatched by him 
on some special service. 


er everywhere, although die edd was 
intense. The start of the giant aero-! 
plane aa hs inaugural trip to London* 
wm witnessed by a good number of* 
aviation enthnsfavts and experts, who! 
bad gathered to wish the rakri tmd> 
passaigers“Bon Voyage!” 


1944: A SpeedyDrop 


1919: Inaagand Flight 

PARIS — Delayed by the foggy 
weather of dre 1st week or two, toe 
departure of the first public Paris. 
London aero-car took place at last 


A FLYING FORTRESS BASE," 
Engbwd — [From our New York, 
edition;] After jettisoning their guns;* 
flaksuits and annor plating to tighten’ 
the plane, the crew oTaRying Foss 
cress badly damaged in today’s [FebV 
81 Frankfurt raid established a. mo^ 
chanical record by catting loose the! 
plane’s baB turret in fifteen minutes 1 


and dropping, n on Gennany. Secant? 
^^T^P.Com. bomba* 


dier, of Bamnm, Iowa, aid: "Tier 
told us over here that it bad nevd^ 


ywtoday [Feb. 8]. The Golia&the 

famous Fannaa passenger madrine, take at least two or 

bulletins had announced dear wearh- hit Hitter on the head” 


. hi" 


He Is Wise 
To Proceed 
With Care 




. . n«. 

4k 


M UNICH— The Ointco admin- 
istration finds itself m a bmd 
regarding Bosnia. Having talked 
toegb but acted meddy. threatening 
air strikes but amhorrang none, tt 

now finds itsetf in apfltdporsbnt-OT 

dilemma. For the moment, it has cho- 
sen the prudent — but to some, less 
satisfying — coarse. It has derided to 
shut up and think things ouL 
That is smart The insistent calls 
from members of Congress and oth- 
ers to punish the Serbs from the air 
are ottered as if air power was-some 
sort of panacea — and not, pcsribly, 
the first step toward escajatioa of the 
war, mchiAng the targetisgpf instal- 
lations in Serbia proper. But while 
bombings would hurt the Serbs, it’s 
not likely that they wifl end the war. 
Airpower never does. 

That was the lesson of Vietnam, a 
l os in g war, and even of Desert Storm, 
a winning one. Massive bombing did 
not bring the Vietnamese Commu- 
nists lotheir knees. Even in Iraq, it 
took ground troops to hringihe war 
to an And despite absolute con- 
trol of the air, the United States and 
its allies were never really able to 
locate Iraq’s Scud nrissBe rites. How 
air power will find and destroy mo- 
bile artillery in mountainous Bosnia 
is a question American policy-makers 


overrides national law. Yet even here jurisdiction And pAndwing they are. At a con- 
withoot political wiD is ineffectual. fercnee hero devoted to strategjc is- 

The goal of prosecuting and pumshmg offenders Bosnia was nowhere on the 

mnstnm be abandoned. It is not only a question of agenda but on everyone’s mind. The 

punishing barbaric crimes. It is just as important gf fig persons in a Sarajevo 

that we have a complete historical record of the market nwy to tbe conference hotel 


the conference hotel 


on CNN. Almost immediately. De- 
fense Secretary William Petty was 
asked what Washington was going to 
da He could onty repeat tbe adminis- 
tration’s long-standing pledge, a kind 
of wagging finger at the Serbs; Keep 
h np and we’ll bomb yon. . . 

But outride the meeting room, se- 
nior NATO militarY officers were at a 
loss to translate that pledge into a 
winning strategy to end the war. To 
tbe threat of using air power to Hfr 
the siege of Sarajevo and open the 
airport at Turia, a senior military 
official could only express puzzle- 


ment: How can tbe Sarsgevo airport 
be kept open wheat it is vulnerable to 


be kept open what it is vulnerable to 
fire frbm the surrounding moun- 
tains? As fair Tada, tbe Sobs have 
dosed the airport there to rrikf 
flighty, bat are allowing truck con- 
voys in. Air strikes there could mean 
the end of the convoy pperation. 

CNN’s pictures from Sarajevo lad 
an immediate impact on the confer- 
ence here. After a dinner, a group Of 
Americans including Senators John 
Glenn of Ohio and Christopher Bond 
of Missouri' peppered NATO’s lop 


i.* 








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I" 

Once the Bombing Starts, 

The Road Signs Grow Dim 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 1994 

OPINION 


Page 5 


• By A. M. 

XT HW YORK - VS. participation 
cJL m ^ strikes against Bosnian 
artillery and raortar; positions 
would be Act I of American military 
.involvement in the Bosnian civil war 
— jnsi Act 1. 

' ** “"P 15 f °r Act n and 

■Act IU ? The new secretary of defense, 

ui 18 ? Pei7y> “ked those questions 
publicly, but did not answer. But Pres- 
jdoit Bill Clinton wfl] have to answer 
“ he sends planes into action. 

Wisely, he has resisted pressure to 
get militarily involved andstiU wants 
to stay out of the war. But the latest 
murderous shelling of Sarajevo is 


Rosenthal 

Maybe the Bosnian Serbs will fight 
on regardless. Or, as they have before, 
maybe the Bosnian M uslims will walk 

away from a partition agreement. 

If bombing of Serbs and Croats 
does not bring agreement quickly, do 

- we just go on bombing and bombing? 
According to- the United Nations, the 
Muslims m (he past took mili tary ac- 
tion to provoke Serbian retaliation and 
keep the Western intervention alive. If 

- that happens again, would Western 


into Serbs by foreign bombs 
will guarantee guerrilla 
warfare— and the United 


the final act it dreads. 

.pushing him hard. The Bosnian Serbs • 
say Muslims did it to bring foreign 
intervention. The world does not 
believe it. 

The president will not act alone. 

. But with the participation of Enrope- 
. an allies he would go along — as some 
of his top people now urge. 

Then, as they should remember, ii 
becomes Mr. Clinton’s war. Abroad, 
allies and enemies will not let him 
. forget that. At home, Clinton’s future 
will ride on the outcome of his war, 
fair enough since he wflLhave brought. 
|the United Stales into it.' ' 

He pulled American troops out of 
Somalia, hesitated at the dockside in 
’ Haiti and wrestles with North Korea. A 
■setback in Bosnia, or confusion about 
his goals, will not be the best road to a 
second term, or respect in the first 
. The Act r bombing of artillery and 
, mortar positions win not knock the 
Bosnian Serbs out Act II will follow: 
air war against Serbia, the patron of 
.Serbs living in Bosnia. That means hit- 
ting Serbian bridges, supply roads and 
airfields, including those in Belgrade. 

. The United States will be bombing a 
nation that infuriates the West now. 
But the same Serbian nation: fought 
Hitler when other Balkan nations 
licked his boots. 

How win we then get out. of this 
Balkan horror? The theory is that Ser- 
bia win cave in; given its staggering 
economy that is possible. Then the 
West will impose terms. - 

The Muslims stand to get about 5 
percent more territory than has been 
offered them now by the Serbs and the 
Croats — . and, incidentally, it -may. 
ialso be necessary to bomb the Croats. 


stomachs stand bombing Muslim posi- 
tions? Where are we going? 

- Suppose after enough bombing, par- 
tition terms are signed. Mr. CHnton 
says U.S. ground troops will be com- 
muted to protect an agreement signed 
‘by Bosnian Muslims, Serbs and Croats. 

But an agreement pounded into 
Serbs by foreign bombs will guarantee 
guerrilla warfare. The United States 
will .be deep in the final act it dreads — 
American troops on the ground, in a 
civil war, every side’s target. ' 

Before Mr: Clinton took office, the 
West poshed Bosnian Muslims into a 
~ too-eariy declaration of independence 
that the Muslims themselves warned 
would lead to'dvil war. Then, during 
his administration, the West and the 
Bosnian rides diddled. to. death the 
Vanco-Owen plan, the one chance of 
building a multiethnic Bosnia. 

- Now only partition remains. The 
United States has no strategic reason to 
get into air or ground war for partition 
terms. Should we lift the embargo and 
aim the Muslims? Doesn’t anyone care 
that hundreds of thousands more peo- 
ple iit Bosnia and beyond would that 
wind up butchered? Prevention of more 
death is the only legitimate foreign 
business in Bosnia. 

Both the Serbs and the Muslims can 
stop Western air attacks before they 
start. But the Muslims see succor 
in those attacks. 

The Serbs also see themselves as 
victims. But it is they who have inflict- 
ed the most pain, gained the most 
territory and nave most to lose by 
American intervention. 

They can help Mr. Clinton avoid 
war by unilateral military withdrawal 
from the Sarajevo area and then bar- 
gaining more about that 5 percent 
There is time left but very little, 
before Act I. 

Correction: A statement in the Rosen- 
thal cdbann of Jan. 8 that Hungarians were 
naming plazas for dead fascists is incorrect. 

The New York Times. 


Letters intended for publication 
should be addressed “Letters to the 
■ Editor* andoontam the writer's sig- 
nature^ name and full address. Let- 
ters should be brief and are sutyea to 
editing. We camot be responsible foe 
-the return of ioaoBcited manuscripts. 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Saving Half of Korea 

Regarding “Korea: Long-Ago Ap- 
peasement Narrows the Options Today " 
(Opinion, Jan. 22) by A. M. Rosenthal 

Mr. Rosenthal charges that after the 
Japanese defeat in 1945, the United 
States turned over half of the Korean 
Peninsula to Stalin. I disagree, as do 
many historians and intelligence experts. 
From 1945 to 1950 I worked in China, 
Manchuria, Korea and Japan for the 
United Stales and the United Nations. 
From this perspective, I saw quite a dif- 
ferent geopolitical scenario unfolding: In 
1945, America saved half of Korea from 
bring swallowed up by Stalin. 

The Soviet Union entered the Pacific 
war very late in the game, during the last 


dying days of the imperial Japanese war 
effort. Soviet troops quickly swept down 
from Siberia, into Manchuria (Manchn- 
kuo) and into Korea. American troops 
consolidating victory could not be fer- 
ried to Korea swiftly enough from Japan 
or Pacific bases to exert any red, on-the- 
grqund influence on their World War II 
allies. All of North Korea was in Soviet 
hands almost overnight, and Russian 
officers were checking in at Seoul hotels, 
studring maps showing the area around 
Pusan, at Korea's southern tip. 

In a shrewd if desperate gambit, the 
Truman administration persuaded Sta- 
lin to halt his southward drive and agree 
on the 38th Parallel as an interim demar- 
cation line: Soviet troops would accept 
the surrender of Japanese troops north 
of that latitude and American troops 
would move in to repatriate Japanese 
south of the line. 

Without that initial agreement, Star 


tin's troops in 1945 would not have halt- 
ed their drive short of Pusan. 

RICHARD PATRICK WILSON. 

Mobile, Alabama. 

Security, Then Peace 

Regarding “ One Word at a Time " 
( Opinion, Jan. 19): 

The editorial on the Israeli-Syrian ne- 
gotiations rightly refers to Israeli doubts 
‘"about the wisdom of making any kind 
of peace with a cruel, dicta tonal re- 
gime.” President Bill Ginion tried to 
put a veneer of hope on the Jan. 16 
remarks in Geneva by Hafez Assad, the 
Syrian dictator. Israeli authorities were 
too polite to object, since Mr. Gin ton 
had invested so much political capital 
in this encounter. 

Is there an alternative to the woeful 
concept of “land for peace" — one not 
based on intangibles and wishful think- 
ing!? There is. and it is called “land for 
security" —no peace treaty, but security 
arrangements which, if violated, would 
be immediate cause for war. This would 
entail return of the Golan Heights in 
stages over 10 years, but with demilitari- 
zation of the area between the Golan 
and the outskirts of Damascus; high- 
tech defensive measures to make any 
quick remilitarization of the area impos- 
sible; and evacuation of all foreign 
forces from Lebanon. 

Feace will come lata, when there is a 
semblance of democratic government in 
Syria, responsive to its. people’s needs. 

ART STONE. 

Herndon, Virginia. 


'He Did the Right Things — 
And Look What Happened 9 


By Bob Herbert 


N EW YORK — I first heard of 
Evans Jean some months ago 
when his teacher, a woman named Elbe 
Weiss, showed me his autobiography. 
Evans was a senior at an alternative 
high school in Brooklyn, the Bush wick 
Outreach Center, and he bad the pecu- 

MEANWHILE 

liar idea that he could escape the ram- 
pant evils of the inner city by working 
hard and getting an education. He want- 
ed to be a nurse. 

The autobiography was a class assign- 
ment. Evans wrote, “I must and I will be 
successful in college to keep myself from 
becoming a statistic in a world that does 
not care. He added, "I have to accom- 
plish my career goals in order to achieve 
my personal goals, which are to fust 
prove to myself I am worth something.'' 

To get a sense of Evans's daily envi- 
ronment. imagine streets full of fear; the 
sound of gunfire is beard every night. An 


The Problem With Gags 

Regarding the report “ A Wave of Gags 
on Free Speech Unsettles Canadians’' 
(Feb. I) by Charles Trueheart: 

This article does not do justice to Ca- 
nadians' respect for free speech. The au- 
thor fails to describe the case of the neo- 
Nazi Erast Zundel of Toronto who, for 
handing out pamphlets in which the Ho- 
locaust was railed a hoax, was charged in 
1991 under a federal law against “the 
willful spreading of false news.” If that 


law were applied evenly, how many news- 
papers would still be in business?' 

At ibe provincial level British Colum- 
bia passed a law in 1992 against any 
speech that “might tend to discriminate 
or lead to discrimination" against an indi- 
vidual an the basis of sex. race, religion, 
sexuality, etc. It was said that the law was 
aimed specifically at a conservative Van- 
couver journalist who often wrote agtinst 
Asian immigration to the city. 

In Ontario, a convenience store owner 
was charged in 1992 for stocking Play- 
boy magazine, which he kept behind the 
counter with the cover hidden. Two 
women charged that the magazine “de- 

S ded and offended women.” They 
d that even if it could not be seen or 


two intended to speak for all women, 
although the women who had freely 
posed tor the magazine bad not thought 
it degrading or offensive. 

A common, and frightening, charac- 
teristic of the first two laws is their 
ambiguity and the subjectiveness de- 
manded in enforcing them: Essentially, 


ihey are political tools. In the third 
case, it is obvious thai censorship to 
protect one complainant's civil rights 
— defined as freedom from oppression 
based on sex, race and so on — can 
violate those of someone from the same 
social group. 

CHRISTOPHER HOUSTON. 

Milan. 

The Ulster Question 

Regarding “ Gerry Adams: Optimisti- 
cally Into the Irish Dark" (Opinion, Feb. 
2) by Edna O’Brien: 

Edna O’Brien is wrong. The issue is 
not whether Northern Ireland should 
remain part of the United Kingdom. It 
is whether the status of the province 
should be decided by the will of its 
people (which is the declared position of 
the British and Irish governments) or by 
force (which is the position of the para- 
militaries on both sides). 

Would Ms. O'Brien care to consider 
bow she would react if Britain admitted 
to its shores, and gave vast media public- 
ity to, the head of an organization claim- 
ing to represent the Hispanics of Cali- 
fornia, “oppressed" by the English- 
speaking population “planted” there in 


the last century and a half, and pursuing 
the “reunification” of Mexico by mur- 
derous violence both in California and 
across the United States, despite the 
declared opposition of the elected Mexi- 
can government to any territorial revi- 
sion except by the consent of the popu- 
lation affected? 

ALAN SOMMERSTE1N. 

Nottingham. England. 


untoward glance, the merest slight, can 
result in murder. 

Evans wanted to be a nurse because, 
as he saw it, “There's too many people 
trying to take a life out here and I want 
to be on the other side.” 

The bullet that killed Evans arrived on 
a Sunday night Evans was at his girl- 
friend's house when her ex-boyfriend 
showed up. As far as we know, there was 
no argument. There was no fight. Bui the 
ex-boyfriend drew his gun and ordered 
Evans, who was not armed, to lie on the 
floor. Evans complied. The authorities 
said the ex-boyfriend then leaned ova 
and fired a bullet into Evans's head. 

On Thursday, about 1 50 of his school- 
mates were brought together in an as- 
sembly of grief that is now common- 
place in inner-city schools. The students 
wept and they spoke out bittaly and in 
tones of despair. Evans had been excep- 
tionally popular and was widely ad- 
mired for his determination to avoid 
trouble, to work hard and to help others. 

“What's the use?” asked one student. 
“Evans did the right thing and look what 
happened to him.” 

Evans was the second Bushwick Out- 
reach student to be slain in a month. 
When a teacher at the assembly asked 
how many of the students had friends 
who had been killed, nearly all of them 
raised their hands. 

There was no consoling the stunned 
and grieving youngsters at Bushwick 
Outreach. The kids know the real deal 
They know that they are unprotected, 
that all toe tough talk, all toe bogus 
promises of safety and security uttered 
so promiscuously by adults will not save 
them when toe bullet comes. 

Even as toe students wept at Bush- 
wick Outreach, other youngsters testi- 
fied and wept at a congressional hearing 
in Washington, telling their representa- 
tives that they had seen murder and 
other honors and that they were afraid 
toe same would happen to them. 

The children are crying out, but it's 
not clear that anyone can hear them. 

Fourteen-year-old Alicia Brown of 
Washington told toe hearing how she 
had witnessed the murder of a close 
friend: “I saw Hank lying on the 
ground. He wasn’t dead yet, but he was 
lying there, twitching. It was a terrible 
thing, terrible to see someone you know, 
someone who used to make you laugh, 
lying there, dying right in front of you.” 

We talk but we don’t do much. These 
are just ordinary kids with no political 
influence and no money — no real claim 
to the nation's concern. 

On Thursday afternoon Elbe Weiss 
showed me a video that her class had 
made. Evans Jean was in it. Tall and 
angular, he looked into the camera and 
said fervently that toe best thing that 
had happened to him in 1993 was mak- 
ing it through the summer alive. 


He added, “To all my homeboys that 
didn't make it, ID be seeing you.” 

77it? New York Times. 


SELECTION OF CONTRACTORS - BUILDING AND CIVIL ENGINEERING WORKS FOR THE CONSTRUCTION OF THE NEW AIRPORT AT CHEK LAP KOK 


Over the past two yuan the Authority has drawn up a Hat of 
contractor* intemstadin un dr t aMn q construction vwrka for 
Hong Kong's now airport, 

An enquiiy document was sent to those who had previously 
expressed interest, to members of the Hong Kong Construc- 
tion Association, and to overseas contractors (chiefly through 
Consutatos based h Hong Kong and Dado Offices). Tha 
Authority ha* used the information gathered to generate a 
database categorising tteirarioiiscoinpanlei. 

lb data, companies accepted are categorised aa foUowK- 
CAT.I Denotes Contracts of unftnfted value. 

CAT. II Denotes Contracts up to the value ofW*50m. 
CAT- III Denotes Contracts up to the vakw of HK$1 Om. 


REGISTER OF CONTRACTORS 
CIVIL ENGINEERING WORKS 
CATEGORY 


Company 


CMR 

Engineering Structure! 
Work* POng Stenteoric 


REGISTER OF CONTRACTORS 
BUILDING WORKS CATEGORY 


Company 


Works ntagSMemk 


Alfred McAIpina international Ljmtod I 

AMEC International Construction Lid. I 

Aoki Corporation I 

Badiy Sotatanehe Group I 

Balfour Beatty limited 1 

BohM Oil Offshore Platform 

Fabrication Company I 

Boakafi* International BV I 

Builders Federal (Hung Kano) Lid. 

Campenon Bernard SGE I 

CompagraatfEntreposesCFE . .1 

ChatwinErepneerlngUmaed I 

Chuo Stung Foundation Umftad 
Cheung Kee Fung Cheung . 

Construction Co., Ltd. I 

China Civil Engineering 

Construction Corporation i 

China Fttfan Corporation for International 
Tochno-Econcxrik: Cooperation i 

China Harbour Ou gn t ea ring Company 1 

China International Wtiter A 

- BadrieCorp. .= ! 

China State Construrtfon 

' Engineering Corporation f 

Qrtjftg Ke« Consbudjan Company Limited i 
Ghul Hing Construction Co. Ltd. 11 

Ch ling Chin ConatnjdtanB. 

Engineering Co., Ltd. ™ 

Chung SUng Coratmcfion Co. Ltd. B! 

Oe«fefldSlnictiH , dBio^ 1 

Contfn tfHiAn TachntaUflB Ud. H 

Cott^Btftfir® end Cart Ens^ieering Ltd. I 
QjhfawlM; y MZPV. S A 1 

OMimBiflinBeribaCo^tltL I 

D^i^jncseta (Hong Kong) L«- ■ 

Defoe pong Construction Co. Ud. 

PrtHpon Construction Co- IM, . j 

DortjrtStnadwelStgineennp 1 

Downer 4 (Jwnpaw Limited 
Orag^efDWrauxPuMca - 

(Honfl Kong) Ud. 1 

Ertweandwy ■*«»*■ S *A* 

l*anu Comrade* Lid. . 

.ammonCORfflwJonW. . * 

GaeMWimpeyWarnati^linlW • 

Gaoworfcs Contractors (HW Ud* - ; n 


I I 

.11 
I l 

1 ' I 


l I I 


I 1 I 

I -i | 

i 

n h 

i ■ i i- 

i i 

i i i 

ii. i 
i i n 

i . i . i 
i t i 

I t , j : I. 

r m i 


GatiBamer Construction & 

Development lid. II 

HeUttWOemerBau-AG I 

Henryvicy Construction Company Limited I 

>tip Construction Co.. Ltd. I 

Hong Kong KWong Tai BuBders Limited 
HolandscheAannemingMaalschappyBV I 

Bsfri Chong (Foundations) Ltd. 

Hein Chong Construction Co„ Lid. I 

Hung Wan Construction Company. Limted 
Hyundai Engineering* 

Construction Co^ Ltd. I 

Itochu Corporation I 

JDG Corporation I 

John LaJng International Ud. I 

K. H. Foundations Ltd. 

Kam Kuen Constiuction Co. Ltd. II 

Kier Hong Kong Limited I 

KumagaLGumi Group I 

Largfiton Bruckner Foundation 
Engineering Ud. 

Life Construction & Engineering Co, Lid. II 
LiBey Construction (Hong Kbng) Ltd. 

Luen Cheong Tal Construction Co. Lid. I 

Maeda Corporation I 

MKkmr^bavMflContiructtvsUd. I 

Mitsui Construction Co., Ltd. I 

Ngo Kee Construction Co.. Ltd. II 

Nippon Steel Corporation 
tfistumadsu Construction Company Limited I 
NKK Corporation I 

Obayashi Corpora ti on I 

OLS International Untied 
Paid Y Construction Co.. Ud. I 

S. Y. Engineering Company Limited 

Samsung Heavy Industries Co., Ltd. I 

Samwhen Corpor a t i on I 

Shimizu Corporation I 

Shtd On CM Contractors Ud. I 

Shti On Conabuctkm Co., Urt- 

Sltdn Sting Construction & 

Engineering Co., Ltd. i 

Slides Construction Limited If 

SkanairalniameliorrtCirtEngineeringAB I 
Spie Batig noMea 1 

SunieyMiu'i Engineering^ 

' Construction Co., Ltd. 

T. S. Wong & Co.. Lid. 

. Tei Hing (Engineers & BuBders) Untied ii 

■fakenak# Corporation . f 

Takanaka Hong Kong Ltd. 
TbirnacCantirucfenLimted I 

ThytorWoodrow^msfiond Linked I 

lb’s Universe Conatrucbon Co.. Ltd. 

TbbishimB Corporation I 

Universal Dockyard Limited I 

Wah Sera General Contractors Ltd. 

Wai Kse (Zens) Construction & 

Transportation Company Untied I 

Water BtihAkSengeseSschaft I 

Wan Chung Construction Co., Lid. 

Women Construction Co, Ud. 

WeconUd. 

Wing Fai Construction Co. Ud. i 

.WuigMttCanstnjcfionCaLii II 

Wong PoKee Untied II 

Woon Lee Construction Co. lid. 

Yau Lae Construction Co, Ltd. Ill 

Zanti Steel BMg Co. Ud. 


CeapaiW 


BtdMng Worfca 

cramory 


Alfred McAIpina International Limted 
AMEC International Construction Ud. 

Aoki Corporation 
BaBbur Beatty Limited 
Ballon Construction Co., Ud. 

BuBders Federal (Hong Kong) Ud. 
Campenon Bernard SGE 
Compagnle (TEntrsprisea CFE 
Chatwin Engineering Limited 
Chee Cheung Hing & Co.. Ltd. 

Chee Shing Foundation Limited 
Cheung Kae Fung Cheung 
Construction Co., Ud. 

China Civa Engineering Construction 
Corporation 

China Fupan Corporation tor International 
Techro-EconomieCoopefatfon 
China Harbour Engineering Company 
China In te r nati onal water & Electric Gorp- 
China Slate Construction Engineering 
Corporation 

Chung Chin Construction & 

Engineering Co. LM. 

Chung Shing Construction Co., Ud. 
Cleveland Structural Engineering Limited 
Construction Techniquas LM. 

Costain Buikflng and Civil Engineering Ud. 
Cubiertas y Mzov, SA 
Deelm Engineering Co., Ud. 

Defoe Fong Construction Co., Ltd. 

Dextra Pacific Untied 
Dickson Construction Co., LM. 

Dtagages at Travaux Publics 
(Hong Kong) Limited 
Entrecanates y Tavora, SA. 

Gammon Construction Ltd. 

George Wimpey international Untied 
Gold Banner Construction & 

Development Ltd. 

Hip Hing Construction Co., LM. 

Hong Kong Kwong Tai Bidders Untied 
Hop Siting Construction Co.. LM. 

Hstn Chang Construction Co., Ud. 

Hung Wan Construction Company, Limited 
Itochu Corporation 

JDC Corporation 

John Lai rig International LM. 

Kan Wb Construction Company Untied 

K]n Tai Constiuction Co., Ud. 

KumageiGijiTii Group 

Life Construction & Engineering Co_ LM. 

Maeda Corporation 

Mitsui Construction Co.. Ud. 

Ngo Kee Construction Co., Ltd. 

Nippon Steal Corporation 

Nishi matsu Construction Company Limted 

NKK Corporation 

Obayashi Corporation 
OLS international Limted 
Paul Y Construction Co.. Ud. 

Proqrasa Construction Limited 
Samwhan Corporation 
Shtaim Corporation 
Shui On Construction Co., LM. 

Shun Shing Construction & 

Engineering CO.. Ltd. 


Ska rata International Civil Engineering AB 
South Star Construction Company Limited 
Sung Foo Kee. Limited 
TS.WbngACo.,Ud. 

Tai Hing (Engineers & Builders) Limited 
Takenaka Corporation 
lb kanaka Hong Kong Ltd. 
tarmac Consbuction Limited 
Taylor Woodrow international Limited 
lb's Universe Construction Co., Ltd. 
TbWsttina Corporation 
Wish Sang General Contractors LM. 

Water Bau-Aktiengeseftachaft 
Wan Chung Construction Co., Ltd. 

Wanson Constiuction Co., LM. 

WteonLM. 

Wing Fai Construction Co. LM. 

Wing Mou Construction Co. LM. 

Woon Lae Construction Co. LM. 

Yau Lee Constiuction Co.. Ud. 


The Authority is currently updating these Ests and 
invfles those interested but not listed above to apply in 
writing for a *PrequaRfication Questionnaire* by 
Monday, 28 February, 1 994. 5 pm (Hong Kong time). 
Thereaflerlhe Authority will update Its lists annua ly. 
Those interested should apply to:- 

The Project Director 
Provisional Airport Authority Hong Kong 
2Sth Floor, Central Plaza 
18 Harbour Road, Wanchai 
Hong Kang 


For the attention of Ms State Fok 
Fax No : (852)802 8231 
Tat No : (852) 824 7724 


From the M currently available the taflowing 
contractors have been selected to Bid for the works 
Hated below. 

Contract 301 • Passenger Term Inal Foundations 
Gammon Construction LM. - Niahimatsu 
Construction Co., Ud. Joint Ventura 
Leighton Contractors (Asia) Limited 
Shui On - Chee Shing Joint venture 

Franki Contractors Ltd. 

Hip Hing Constiuction Co.. LM. 

Dragagee et Travaux Pubfics (Haig Kong) Ltd. 
Amec - China State Jarnt venture 
Aoki Corporation 

Hsm Chong Chek Lap Kok Foundation JV 
CDE Joint Venture 


Bu ikflng W orts Contract 902A - Initial Workforce Accommodation, 
c * to B°nr Em p loyer's Office and Contractor's Thsnsft Office 
(Design and Construct) 

A 0 1 Leighton Contractors (Asia) Limited 

9(1 11 Shui On Construction Co., Ud. 

1 Airport Platform Contractors - Cwi Works 

3 | Joint Venture (APC-CWJV) 

1 Up Hing Construction Co., Ud. 

1 Shun Shing Construction & Engineering Co., LM. 

1 Dragages at Travaux Publics (Hong Kong) LM. 

1 PaulY Construction Co.. LM. 

I Hung Wan Construction Company, Limited 

II Yau Lee Construction Co., LM. 

I Kam Wo Construction Company Limited 

II Cneung Kee Fung Cheung Construction Co s LM. 

* Contract 904- Raw Water Submarine Pipeline 

11 Leighton Lama J.V. 

I( l Shui On Civil Contractors Lid. 

HI McConnell Dowell / U-DJ- Joint Venture 

I Costain - Nlshimatsu Joint Venture 

1 Dragages et Travaux Publics (Hong Kong) LM. 

Contract SOS - Tbmporary l/tflftiem, Roadworks 
and Brldgea 

, Bgfe ^ Leighton Contractors (Asia) Limited 

we to apply ta Airport Platform Contractors - Chrt Works 

Joint Venture (APC-CWJV) 

Kong time). Aoki Corporation 

te annua ly. Sung Foo Kee (Civil) Ud. 

China Fujian - Downer - McAlpine Joint Ventura 
Wdn Htn - CFE - Express Joint venture 
Henryvicy /Chun Hfo Consortium 
onQ Chul Hing Construction Co. LM. 

Wing Mou Construction Co. LM. 

Contract 907 - Temporary Feny Piers and 
Berthing Structures (Design and Construct) 
Gammon Construction LM. - China Harbour 
Engineering Company Join! Venture 
Shis On Joint Ventura 

Dragages ef Travaux Publics (Hong Kbng) Ud. 
Universal Dockyard Limited 

ring McConnsi Dowell Constructors LM. 

r the works Wan rtn - CFE Joint Ventura 

Contract 940 • Rock Crushing Fscllltlas 
unditions Niahimatsu Constiuction Com patyLimilad 

atsu Wai Kee (Zara) Construction & Transportation 

Aura Company. Limited 

China Fufan- Downer- McAlpine Joint tfenture 
Asia Stone Company. Limned 
Rod land Concrete LM. 

Pioneer Quarries (HK) Lid. 

Kong) Ltd. 

In adtfition, separate Hsts wID be compiled and 
puUshed in due course for electrical and mechanical 
on JV contractori, auppSars, minor works and specra&st 

systems contractors. 





Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 1994 


MP’s Death Is More Bad News for Major 


By John Darn ton 

Net* York Tima Service 

LONDON — Prime Minister John Major’s 
government faced more problems on Tuesday 
after revelations that a promising Conservative 
member of Parliament had been found dead 
under mysterious circumstances. 

The death of Stephen Milligan. 45, who was 
well knows From a career in journalism and had 
been regarded as a politician with a future since 
his election in 1992, consumed the front pages 
of British newspapers. 

He was found dead Monday in the kitchen of 
his West London flat, naked except for wom- 
en’s stockings and a garter belt. There were 
reports that he bad a plastic bag over his bead 
and a cord around his neck. Pending official 
results of an autopsy, the police could not rule it 
a suicide, a minder or an accidental death 
during autocratic sex or sex with a partner. 

The case promises to embarrass the Tories 
and hurt them politically, coming only a month 
after scandals in the private lives of minister 
and other government figures. 

The stream of lurid headlines about minis- 
ters' having affairs and fathering children out 
of wedlock has made a mockery of Mr. Major’s 
attempts to get hrs party back on the tracks by a 
campaign he calls “back to basics." 

This was intended as a battle cry for a return 
to family values, a strengthening of basic edu- 
cation and high standards of public service. 


With scandal* bursting to the left and right. 
Conservative leaden now argue that “back to 
basics” was never intended as a statement of 
moral rectitude. 


19£0*s scandal centering on Defease Minister 
John Profumo. who was forced to resign after 
denying a liaison with a prostitute whose clients 
included a Soviet defense attach^. 


Leaders in the opposition Labor Pam 
seemed too shocked and saddened by Mr. Mil- 
ligan's death to make an unseemly effort to turn 
it into political advantage. 

The prime minister has sunk to the bottom in 
the polls, with the latest showing Labor ahead 
by 20 points. The parties are facing local elec- 
tions May 5 and then elections to the European 
Parliament June 9. A bad showing in both 
would undoubtedly prompt a challenge to Mr. 
Major’s leadership, politicians on both sides 
agree. 

Mr. MUhg&n. as an Oxford graduate and 
former journalist who had worked as a reporter 
and editor for The Economist, as the Washing- 
ton correspondent and foreign editor for The 
Sunday Tunes and as a broadcaster for the 
BBC was a member of Britain’s inner circle. 

A bachelor, be was hard-working and seri- 
ous. fn a move that usually portends a cabinet 
post, he had been appointed parliamentary pri- 
vate secretary to the arms procurement minis- 
ter, Jonathan Aitken. in the ministry of defense. 

Government officials insisted privately that 
Mr. Milligan did not have access to classified 
information in the ministry. This reassurance 
seemed designed to head off comparisons to the 


Mr. Milligan's death reduces the Conserva- 
tive majority in the House of Commons to IS, 
with three by-elections for vacant seats to be 
held sometime in the coming months. Two of 


held sometime in the coming months, iwo or 
the seats are in districts that usually go to 
Labor. The third is Mr. Milligan's in Eastleigh 


A New Snag 
Delays Start 
Of Channel 
Rail Service 


Labor. The third is Mr. Milligan's in Eastleigh 
in Hampshire, which he won by 17.702 votes. 

The scandals that have dogged Mr. Major 
began after Christmas when the environment 
minister, Tun Yeo, who is married, was forced 


to admit that he had fathered a dxOd by a Tory 
town councilor. In January, he was fenced to 


town councilor. In January, he was fenced to 
resign by a constituents group. 

It then emerged that years ago as a 22-year- 
old student he had also fathered an illegitimate 
child 


Some days later, a member of Parliament 
from northwest Leicestershire, David Ashby, 
was said in a newspaper report to have shared a 
bed with a man during a trip to France, fie 
denied in en g a ging in a homosexual affair. 

'Then in January the wife of Lord Caithness, 
who is transport minister, committed suicide. 
Her parents asserted that die had been despon- 
dent over the Christmas holidays because her 
husband was in love with another woman. Lord 
Caithness then resigned. 


By Erik Ipsen 

International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — In a move that is 
becoming almost habitual, Euro- 
tunnel announced another delay 
Tuesday in the start-up of its rail 
service beneath the English Chan- 
nel. 

The company has neatly substi- 
tuted a question mark in schedules 
that had shown freight service be- 
ginning on March 7 and a passen- 
ger shuttle an May 9. 

Unaffected by the delay wQl be 
the formal opening of the tunnel, 
scheduled for May 8, with Queen 
Elizabeth Q and President Fran- 
9015 Mitterrand in attendance. Eur- 
otunnel officials would not commit 
themselves Tuesday to a date for 
the start of train service. 


They said only that freight ser- 
vice should now begin sometime 
before the official opening. The ser- 
vice destined to hunk passengers 
and their cars through the 31-mile 
(SO-kflometer) tunnel in 35 minutes 
is to be delayed by a few days 
rather than weeks, they added. 

The through-passenger service 
connecting London to Paris and 
Brussels is not affected by the latest 
delays, but no official date for the 
stan of that service has ever been 
set beyond “late summer.” 

A spokeswoman for Eurotunnel, 
Afiyson Andrews, blamed delays in 
testing the system's fleet of locomo- 
tives. 

“We would rather make sure that 
we have a safe, reliable service,” she 
said, “than open early and encoun- 
ter jlitcfaes.” 

She also insisted that the so- 
called “blue bottom” problem had 
nothing to do with the delays an- 
nounced Tuesday. British papers 
reported recently that some of the 
trains operating in the tunnel had 
encountered difficulties with toilets 
that erupted when flushed, spewing 
blue fluid. 

“Those are on the EuiOstar 
trains,” sbe said, referring to the 
passenger-only trains now being 
tested. 

Analysts who follow Eurotunnd 
predicted that the latest delays 
would have little effect on the com- 
pany's revenue. 

“The impact on revalues will be 
very, very marginal,” predicted 
Pierre Bosset, an analyst with 
James Capel in Paris. “It win have 
an impact on sentiment though.” 

Eurotunnel shares lost more 
than 1 percent of their value in 
trading on Tuesday. Mr. Bosset 
and others noted that investors 
were dismayed, given that less than 
a month ago Le Shuttle bad set its 
opening for May 9. 

The big question for Eurotunnd 
win be the length of the delay. The 
planned May 9 start-up was two 
months ahead of the peak summer 
travd period, so the revenue loss of 
a few days’ win not be great, ana- 
lysts said. But delays of weeks 
could put a substantial crimp in 
revenue. 


CRANES: ' Running Out of Time ’ SUDAN: Army Sweeps Rebel Area 


Continued from Page 1 
simulate the mother leaving her 
warm nest in the brisk Siberian 
temperatures. 

The crane chicks. Bugle and 
White, were released with their 
wild cousins in Siberia, but appar- 
antly did not have enough time to 
bond with adult birds and refused 
to fly south to India last winter. 

This year. Bugk and White, 
along with four other chicks — 
Gorby and Boris, hatched in Wis- 
consin, and Billy and Busby, raised 
in a Moscow preserve — were 
flown to the Indian sanctuary here 
at Bharatpur. For the first time, 
scientists were going to try to inte- 
grate incubator chides with adults 
at wintering grounds rather than 
breeding grounds. Although the 
procedure was considered risky, 
scientists hoped the six young birds 
would be adopted by the wild 
Sibes, who would then teach them 
the route over the world's highest 
mountain range to Siberia. 

“Anything is worth trying,” said 
Belinda Wright, a naturalist and 
filmmaker participating in the 
crane watch at Bharatpur. 

But teaching artificially incubat- 
ed birds that they are cranes has 


been a major problem. “If they 
grow up being fed by humans. they 
will not mate with other cranes, 
Ms. Richter said. “They solicit peo- 
ple for mating.” 

In an effort to a void confusing 
the young Sibes, the crane's care- 
takers dish out daily rations of 
crane chow and plant tubers while 
wearing a bird costume — a crude 
rendition of “Sesame Street's” Big 
Bird. Park rangers guard the se- 
cluded cages from a distance, keep- 
ing curious humans from venturing 
within visual range. 

In another experiment asing new 
technology, scientists planned to 
attach s mall electronic transmitters 
to the Bharatpur chicks so their 
flight patterns could be monitored 
by satellite. Experiments last year 
on the more plentiful common 
crane, which also breeds in Siberia, 
were not very successful 

The signals disappeared after a 
few weeks, an indication the batter- 
ies had failed, but erne transmitter 
inexplicably began working 
months later with signals indicat- 
ing the crane had moved to the 
border of Iran and Afghanistan. 

Despite years of studying Siberi- 
an cranes, scientists still know little 
about their habits. 


Continued from Page 1 

l“ Relief officials and diplomats 


go. Keuer ometms ana aipiomau 
familiar with the annual rhythms of 
this long, grinding war said the cur- 
rent offensive appeared to be far 
larger than in the past. The govern- 
ment has been reinforcing its garri- 
sons at Juba, Wau and Toni by 
plane, train and barge, sources 
said, and now seems to be attacking 
on several fronts at once. 

Various relief sources suggested 
that the Sudanese government, fac- 
ing an economic crisis, ought be 
trying either to win the war out- 
right — an outcome that seems 
unlikely — or to force more conces- 
sions by the rebels at the negotiat- 
ing table. 

Mr. Evans said be believed the 
government intended “to go for 
broke” in this offensive. “This war 
is bleeding the country dry.” he 
said. “The Northerners are in a 
fairly dreadful position. The gov- 
ernment is pouring minions of dol- 
lars down die dram. A lot of fam- 
ilies are losing relatives." 

Ms. Burnheim, whose agency op- 
erates on both sides in the conflict, 
said she had seen reports from 
Khartoum suggesting that the aim 
was “to break the SPLA.” 

The government also appears to 


be trying to take advantage of a 
two-year-old split within the rebel 
movement, caused when two of its 
senior guerrilla officers broke rank 
with its top leader. John Garang. 
Another faction later broke away, 
and, in recent years, the rebels have 
spent as much time battling each 
another as the government 

Richard Venegoni. director of 
relief operations for the relief agen- 
cy World Vision, said the govern- 
ment had begun its offensive from 
a stronger position than in the past 
It now controls more towns in the 
region, indiirfmg Bor and Wau, 
where in previous years it had to 
operate mainly from Juba. 

The government is “chewing 
away more and more,” he said. 
They’ve got in theory, two more 
months before it starts to rain.” 

Even if the government captured 
Nimule, he added, the rebels could 
still use back roads to receive sup- 
plies. 

Tt’s a huge border.” Mr. Akoi 
said. There is no chance whatso- 
ever that they can seal it off.” 

According to Mr. Evans, “Nei- 
ther side can win this thing mil inr i- 
ly.” But he added that the current 
push seemed to be General Bashir's 
^attempt to do just that.” 


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Sarajevo resMenls ranmng for corer Tuesday al m nrtersectkm that ame aoiler be*vy sniper fire, ^ 


A Headache for NATO Warplanes 


Compiled by Oar Staff From Dtspazcha 

SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Henegovi- 
na — Western warplanes would 
have trouble taking oat all the Ser- 


vo, a senior officer with the United 
Nations forces said Tuesday. 

The officer said UN figures 
showed that the Sobs had about 
300 artillery pieces within range of 
the Bosnian capital meaning 30 
kilometers (18 miles), and that 

most of the weapons were stationed 

southeast of Sarajevo. 

The figure includes cannon, 
which are in fixed positions, and 
mobile mortars. 

The officer said that although 
warplanes from the North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization would be able 
to zero in on the big guns, it would 
be difficult to pinpoint the mortars. 

“A mortar consists of a ample 
tube on a 60-kilogram metal {date; 
and all you need is two men and a 
pickup trade,” he said. 

He added that in addition to the 
mortars, the Serbs besieging the 
city also had multiple rocket 
launchers that are mobile and pow- 
exfuL 


ezmnent sohficzs would storm Ser- 
bian positions after air strikes, cap- 
italizing on damage to their foes. 

"The ftnenran government army 

strikes/^atid Paul Beaver^publish- 
er of Jane’s Defense Weekly “It is 
a major consideration for Weston 
militar y planners." 

Jonathon EyaL director of stud- 
ies at Britain’s Royal United Ser- 
vices In stitute, a mHit aiy think 
tank, said, “Yon will till the bal- 
ance Of the Fi ghting " 

“The Bosnian Muslims wzD ex- 
ploit the attacks," he said. “Para- 
doxicany.afr strikes wffl be a simal 
for their launching the wider offen- 
sive winch evetyone has been pie- 


‘Tifting a siege and using only 
air strikes is posable, but one must 


destroy eve 
said. “If we 


” the officer 
air strikes, we 


Continued from Page I 
recovery, but the jobless rate, being 
a la gging indicator. wiU continue to 
rise well in to 1995." be said. 

Uwe Jens, the economic affaire 
spokesman for the opposition So- 
cial Democratic Party, called the 
absence of new employment op- 
portunities proof of the economic 
incompetence of the governing 
conservative-liberal coalition in 
Boon, which has held sway for the 
last 12 years. 

Over all, 4,029,483 people were 


can't give up afterwards because 
they win come back and recapture 
their positions." 

A NATO military source in 
Brussels said that ground troops 
and weapons would be needed to 
secure the hills but that the 16- 
member alliance had not planned 
for that eventuality. 

Other analysts aid Bosnian gpv- 


UN officials said they feared the 
Bosnian Muslims would take ad- 
vantage of better weather to tty to 
capture militarily what they cannot 
wm at the negotiating table. - 

“It would be piecemeal stuff, .a 
hill here or there, ora few htmfihl' 
yards," Mr. Beaver said, “but thty 
are m>t strong enough to break the 
siege, even with air strikes.""” 

-Analysts say the Bosnian govern- 
ment's supply lines are stretehed so 
thin dial even if the Bosiian Sffbs 
were faced to pull hack they could 
stffl maintain a blockade of Saraje- 
vo. 

The Bosnian government army 
says it has large numbers of men 
but very little of the heavy artiDery 
it needs to support assaults. UN 
sources say the Bosnian Sezbian 
side had many fewer men but a 
large number of heavy weapons. 

“If you cancel out their firepow- 
er with air strikes you will begm to 


Charles Dick, director of BritahfS 
Conflict Studies Research Center. 

The Serbian response to Muslim 
pins, won with the help of NATO 
air power, mil be unequivocai, he 
said. "I find it very hard to bdSne 
the Serbs would not respond by 
attatkmg UN troops,” he said.' . 

To stop the Sots from justifi- 
ably securing UN troops of parti- 
sansfup, air strikes would have to 
be part td acmcfnHy planned series 
of nnlhaxy measures that would 
prevent the Bosnian g over nme nt 
from advancing, analysis '.say. . . 

“There needs to be an 'orches- 
trated package* of NATO mea- 
sures,” Mr. Beaver said. 'There 
would have to be an ultimatum to 
both sides. The Bosnian govem- 
ment would have to agree to hedd a 
line while. Ihe -Seths agree to puH 
hack their guns.” (AFP, Baden) 


1 

gf dsr- 
! eV:-- 


• hii-r 

' $c.2i— ' 

1 ktt- .t ^ 
i ’ 

I it'L-Z'-r 


Bosnian Cro^Xeifer, 


kfeti r 

•- 

ear-'. .* 

ter 


Q^lkkFresnmB 


Rouen . . 

ZAGREB, Croatia — Mate Bp- 
ban, the hardline nationalist lead- 
er of the Bosnian Croats, resigned 
Tuesday, apparently a casualty of 
growing international presnne oq 
his political backcre in Croatia. . ■ 
., Hb resignation was immediatety 
Raised as “wise and bonmabie” by 
Croatia’s foreign minister, Matt 
Granic, who attended the meeting. 
The Croatian ' government faces 
posable economic sanctions for its 
support for Croats fighting in! 
neaghborinH Bosnia. 


I 

j - 

■ hhetr 


i. ,;.i:V 


The Film ( 


C1JNTON: Decision Time at Hand for White House 


ContiDned from Page 1 


Including people looking for 
work independent of the state-con- 
trolled Labor Office, the real over- 
all German unemployment figure 
is easfly mere than 5.5 rntflion. pot- 
dug a strain on the country’s social 
fabric and public budgets. 

German companies have been 
laying off tens of thousands of 
workers as a result of the wrest 
recession in postwar German histo- 
ry in a desperate attempt to become 
more cost-efficient in an increas- 
ingly competitive global market 
German wages and benefits are 
among the world's most generous. 

The latest jobless report came 
amid sig ns of increasing nervous- 
ness in German industry, including 
a warning that 19,000 small ana 
medium-seed companies would go 
bankrupt this year. 3,500 more 

than a year ago. 

Mr. Tran said that a wave of 
layoffs was typical of ihe early 
stages of a national economic re- 
structuring and that Germany ap- 
peared to be repeating the pattern 
seal in the United States over the 
last few years. 

“If a cyclical recovery is in place 
in 1995, we should not exdude new 
hiring by companies that have cut 
their labor forces in the recession.” 
he said. “Job cuts come fast in the 
first phase of restructuring but hir- 
ing can rise in later phases.” 

He predicted that most of those 
new jobs would come in the service 
sector, however, indicating that 
displacements are likely to contin- 
ue for quite some time because the 
German labor market is much less 
flexible than that in the United 
Slates. 


detect a shift in the wind, and is it 
strong enough? Does he think the 
cause is worth spending some of his 
precious political capital? 

Does this man who won the pres- 
idency by promising to concentrate 
on problems at home dare roil die 
dice abroad just when the most 
important ini native of Ms presiden- 
cy, health-care reform, needs all the 
time and effort be can lavish on h? 

□early, there are risks. Ameri- 
can pilots might be shot down and 
captured and tortured, for exam- 
ple, which might lead to calls for a 
wider American role. Richard 
Johnson, the former head of the 
State Department's Yugoslav desk, 
recently quoted one of bis bosses, 
Undersecretary of State Peter Tar- 
noff, as saying that intervention in 
Bosnia “would destroy the Ameri- 
can presidency.” 

Ihe Vietnam War is a vivid and 
recent example of what inept and 
unwise military adventures can do 
to presidents, if not the presidency. 
But it is also true that preadents 
can tutu public opinion, if their 


riming is 

dear, and 
tense. 


their purposes are 
concentration is in- 


Preskiem George Bush did it in 
the months before the war in the 
Gult, and Mr. CSinton did it, lather 
belatedly, on the North American 
Free Trade Agreement. 

Senator Richard G. Lunar, Re- 
publican of Indiana, and Morton L 
Abramowitz, president of the Car- 
se^ Endowment to frxtematkmal 
Peace, both say they think the mo- 
ment for boldness has come on the 
strife in the Balkans. 

“The United States,” said Mr. 
Abramowitz, a retired Foreign Ser- 
vice officer, “has to decide whether 
it is going to continue to be a pseu- 
do-mqralizer or lead the West in 
resolving one of the most prof bond 
political and moral crises erf bur 
time:” 


Mr. lager, the leading Republi- 
can spokesman on fortagn affairs in 
Congress, said: “They have been 
hoping that Bosnia would go away. 


the TV news. But surety the presi- 
dent knows now that it wrarL He 


most take a leadership role he 
doesn’t want, that he’s uncomfort- 
able with, dial’s risky, because hcTs 
tiie only pcraonin the world who 
candort.* 

. For hs part, the administration 
has spent this week sounding any- 
thing but bold. The problem, Mr. 
Qrnlon said, was the allies, who do 
not want air strikes because snch 
action, might prompt re taliation 
against then troops on the ground. 
Tbe prcrfricm, a White House offi- 
cial said, can be solved -only 
through renewed negotiations. The 
problem, a State Department offi- 
cial said, is that no one can prove 
that the Serbians fired the mortar 
round that lot the marketplace: . 

But it may be that some limited 
action is hnwmwnt. Ihe' British 
have been the leading En rq p ean 
foes of air strikes, along with the 
Russians. But a senior British offi- 
cial said iris govemmait the other 
Europeans and the United States 
“are trying to work' something out, 
to red, by Wednesday ” 

To him, be said, it is dear that 
"tiie price of unity is going to be 
great, but that erf disuni ty greater .” 


kj . 

l 

SHjvv 

SSjt'' •• 










ALLIES: NATO Seems Set to Issue Deadline on Siege 


Continued from Page 1 
stop and prevent the shelling of 
Sarajevo.” 

In particular, Britain, whose atti- 
tude to military action has been 
persistently cautious and remains 
so, seems to have moved toa posi- 
tion where it win not stand in the 
way of air strikes if an ultimatum to 
the Serbs goes unheeded. 

“The balance of ridt and rewards 
has shifted,” Foreign Secretary 
Douglas Hurd said Tuesday. 

Specifically. NATO, while issu- 
ing yet another appeal to the belli- 
gerents to make peace, looks set to 


approve a recent request by the UN 
secretary-general, Butros Butros 


secretary-general, Butros Butros 
Gbali, for permission to launch air 
strikes agamst artiDery and mortar 
positions in and a round Sarajevo. 
At the same time, a deadline for the 
withdrawal of those emplacements 
and the handover of heavy weap- 
ons to UN troops would be set. 

Mr. Butros Ghali. in a tetter Sun- 
day to the NATO secretary-gener- 


al, Manfred WOmer, asked for a 
mandate to attack artillery posi- 
tions found to have fired on drit- 
ians, saying his current mandate 
only allowed th e use of fo rce in the 
event that UN peacekeeping troops 
are endangered. 

The UJS. secretary of stale, War- 
rea M. Christopher, said Monday 
that Washington would support 
Mir. Butros Gnafi's request 

It appeared that the United 
Stales mid France, long at odds 
over what to do about Bomia, have 
found common ground and have 
given a dedshre trash, to NATO 
planning that has been plagued to 
over a year by dithering. 

“What has enraged is Franco- 
American joint leadership,” the 
NATO dipfomai said. 

He added that partnership was 
bong broa d ened info a consensus 
in die 1 6-nation alliance. 

Last month, the United States 
and France dashed over what 
Washington described. as requests 
of dubious morality from the 


French for the Clinton a dnrims tr a- 
tion to put pre ssu re an the Bosnian 
Muslims to accept a peace settle- 
ment based on the dxvnriga of Bos- 
nia along ethnic fines. 

But a combination of- ni"* 111 ^ 
outrage in Paris and Washington 
over the mortar attack Saturday 
and a growmg.convict«m that only . 
concerted action by the Western 
afitowffl keep Use warfroro getting 
worse seemed to have ted to a vig- 
orous rccoudHation. . ' » " 

Thceffectof u-NATO jatinafttBi 
would be to {nit- unprecedented 
ftftesure on the three warring fac- 
tions — the MusUpt-ied "Bosnians, 
the Croats and' die Serbs — to 
reach some ltimLof agreement, -at 
least over the demflitarizatian of 
Sarajevo, when they meet in Gene- 
va on Thursday to resume talksO -. 

David Owen, "(he European me- 
diator, said tins week tint he had 
secured an agreement from the 
Bosnian Sobs to donifilarize Sara- 
jevo. But it was far from certain 
-’that they would keep (fiat pledge. 


TV 

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STAGE/ENTERTAINMENT 


International Herald Tribune 
Wednesday, February 9, 1994 
Page 7 



,, , • The Ne» Yotf Tuna ■ 

The Beatles’s 1 964 trip was a whirlwind of hype and hysteria, a tribute to the Mersey beat and modem press agentry. 


It Was 30 Years Ago Today, in N. Y. 


By Peter Marks 

Hew York Tima Service 



HW YORK — On a cold FebniaiY 
afternoon in 1964, . Linda Pkrtm- 
koff, a lovesick 12 -year-old from 
Sbeepshead Bay, got her first 
glimpse of the mop-topped men of her dreams. 
She had been standing for hours outside the 
Plaza Hold, clutching a record afhrim and 
waiting rageriy for the qpportramy to be trans- 
formed into a shaking sobbing mess. 

And then, suddenly, in a window high in the 
hotel the curtains parted. The Beatles were 
looking down at the crowd! Pandemonium in 
the streets! Dozens of police officers had to 
restrain the hundreds of JohnrPaiiHjebige- 
ind-Ringo-cntzed teenage girls who tried to 
rush the doors of the bold to get at their idols. 

“They came to the window,” recalled Linda 
PlotnOcofi, now Lind&Rd& 42,of Cooper Qty, 
Florida. “We were screaming and screaming. 
Jhst screaming and singing: ‘We love the Bea- 
ttesf I wasdymg for anything, screaming, smg- 
ing, just dying for anythin g from them. I just 
Wanted to, like, touch them and say heBo to 
PanL” 

: .Thirty years ago a quartet of cocky young 
men with thick Liverpudlian accents and neatly 
topped hair that brushed their cars descended 
on New York City, confounding parents, per- 
plexing pundits and. Him Frankie and Ehris 
before them, turning schoolgirls mtojefly. 

K was the Beatl& first visit to the United 

tftrtn it the saitiei Tbrirtrqj was a wiririwimfaf 

hype and hysteria, a tribute both to the appeal 

of the Mersey beat and the wonders of modem 
press agentry. 

The Beatles, it seems, made their mark on all 
who came into contact with them. From the 
teenagers who longed to touch them, to the 
bartenders who served the m drin ks, to the corn-: 
Ja on The Ed Sulhvan Show” whoseburdeait. 
was tq follow them, everyone ha&stora^ ahout . 
thattraimlmous week hrNefc York. ... 

“Every door, every alky, aQ over thelotdien, 
there was security, saW George Papadalds, a 
bartender then and now at tite Plaza, who so 
vividly remembers Us encounter with the Bear- 
ties he can rattle off the drinks ho saved; 


Scotch and ginger ale for John, Scotch and 
Coke for Ringo. Fd never heard of Scotch and 
Coke before.” 

The visit had such a lasting effect on Ameri- 
can pi^j culture that the taped 1 the Beatles’ first 
appearance on ‘The Ed Sullivan Show” an Feb. 
9, 1964, is one of the most frequently requested 
in the 60,000-program collection of the Muse- 
um of Television amt Radio in Manhattan. 

. "It was tremendously significant,” said Ron 
Simon, the museum’s curator for television. 
“The whole idea of the cross-cultural phenome- 
non, the whole idea of Beatlemania,il all came 
together here.” 

The frenzy started the moment the Beatles 
arrived on Feb. 7 at Kennedy International 
Airport on a flight from London and did not let 
up until they departed for "Washington on Feb. 
11. In between, “the boys,” as their manager, 
Brian Epstein, called them, were trapped in 
what roust have seemed like a city of wild-eyed 
teenagers. 

Brace Morrow, who as Cousin Brnrie was 
tboi a disk jockey on WABC and now has a 
show on WCBS-FM, recalls watching a group 
of young girls at one stop fHng themsdves at a 
cigarette butt that Paul McCartney had flicked 
into the gutter. “Two kids came up with the 
cigarette, smiling and bleeding,” he said. 

Joseph Szorentini, a doorman at the hotel for 
46 years who was an doty the week the Beatles 
came to town, said, “I think it was the wildest 
thing that ever happened at the Plaza.” Stand- 
ing at his post crn Central Park South last week, 
he pointed to a subway entrance across the 
street from the hotel: to avoid the teenagers 

who were main taming a virtual round-the-clock 
vigil oh the Fifth Avenue side of the hotel he 
explained, the Beatles were escorted out of the 
Plaza through an underground mimel that led 
to. the subway entrance, and a waiting limou- 
sine. 

In a sense, it was a divided city that the 
Beaties arrived in, for while the transistor-radio 
.generation hud been listening to Beatles songs 
for months, as; part of a, feverish promotional 
' campaign by record producers, radio stations 
and publicity people, many adults had a vague 
notion, if any, of who the Beatles were. 

Sid Bemstein, the promoter who booked the 
Beatles imo Carnegie Hall during that first 
tour, said the concert-hall booker was taken 


aback when she beard the gram's music. “She 
said to me after the concert, ‘Bernstein, when ' 
you said they were four young men, 1 thought 
they were a string ensemble .' r ’ 

Some of the newspaper coverage of the visit 
reflected an older generation's dismissiveness. 
The New York Times’s television critic. Jack 
Gould, for example, compared the Beatles' hair 
styles to “the square hairdo used every mo rning 
on television by Captain Kangaroo.” 

Ray Block, the musical director for “The Ed 
Sullivan Show,” was equally unimpressed. “The 
only thing that’s different is the hair, as far as I 
can see," be told a reporter. 

Ed Sullivan, the newspaper columnist who 
was host of the nation's most popular television 
variety show, was said by some to have been 
unable to grasp die nature of the group’s ex- 
traordinary popularity. But he was one of the 
first to recognize their potential for television. 

Walter Craniate, then anchorman of the 
“CBS Evening News,” said that some months, 
before the visit be received a call from Sullivan, 
a CBS colleague, after the news show broadcast 
a piece about the group. “The minute I was off 
the air, Ed was on the phone: ‘How do I get 
hold of those people? What do you know about 
them?’ ” Craniate said. “I told him everything I 
knew, which was very little. I said, ‘Get m touch 
with our London bureau.’ The next thing I 
knew, they were hocked for America." 

A N estimated 73 milli on viewers 
tuned into Sullivan’s show that Sun- 
day night, the pivotal event of their 
American stay. “It was everything,” 
said Charles Rosenay, who heads the Beatles 
Fan Chib, a New Haven, Connecticut-based 
organization with a mailing list of 36,000 
names. “If they didn't appear on Sullivan, I 
don’t think the world would have been swept up 
in Beatiemania." 

Linda Flotmkoff became such a devotee she 
wangled a job as a secretary at Apple Records 
in Manhattan, the Beatles' record labdjust to 
be dose to the Fab Four. Eventually rite left, 
married Arnold Rag, moved to Florida and 
had children. But one goal has eluded the girl 
who stood in the cold outside the Plaza. Shehas 
never met McCartney. “Just to hear Paul 
.breathing in the same room,” she said, “would 
be ecstasy." 


By Thomas Quinn Curtiss 

• Inttnuoiorml Hendd Tribune 


ARIS — The CSn&nhlhtqae Fran- 
wike is showing until Feb. 27 an 
expansive list of the movies of the 
American director WilBam Well- 


P 

Tpwri- 

As a youngster, Wellman was infatuated 
by aviation md became a flier. When World 
War I broke out, he enlisted in the French 
Foreign Legion as an ambulance driver, and 
on the entrance of the United States mto the 
toy, he switched to the Lafayette Escadrifie 
as a pilot. He was wounded and received the 
Croix de Guam. 


He wrote a book of his experiaxxs and then 
went to Hollywood, making his debut as an 
actor and scenarist. He was promoted to direc- 
tor," and one of his first tight comedies, “The 
Cat’s Pyjamas," had charm and humor, but he 
was eager for stronger stuff. He received it 
when he was appointed to take an the silent 
movie “Wings," a spectacle of war in the air. 

“Wings” won the fust Oscar for best 
picture, being voted the best film of 1927-28. 
Its script is simple and naive, recounting the 
stoty of two young U. S. airmen in France 
downing the Kaiser’s aces, but the sky scenes 
magnificent. 

Wellman gets high marks for many films. 
One is “Beggars of life," based on Jim Tol- 


ly’s autobiography of his hobo roaming. Lou- 
ise Brooks, disguised as a boy to escape the 
police; gives one of her finest performances. 

“The Public Enemy,” Wellman’s early 
talkie with its candid account of the life of a 
gangster Idfier, shocked moviegoers and the 
censors. It made the reputation of James 
Cagney, and the scene in which be crushes a 
grapefruit in his girlfriend’s face is surely one 
of the most memorable in screen history. 

Many of Wellman's colleagues undertook 
assignments beyond their capacities and suf- 
fered for their misjudgments. But Wellman 
was a wise man: Heknew what he could do — 
and he did it with great skill and professional- 
ism — and avoided things outside his territory. 


BOOKS 


ER Y PRIVATE PLOT 

WiBam F Buckley Jr, 272 
5 s. $20. Morrow. 

riewed by 
/id Nicholson 

[ AYBE its time fra WiBiam 
F. Buckley Jr. to retire Bladt- 
Oakes. Almost 70, the hero of 
[ley’s series of spy rands has 
[he CIA and been ehgMe to 
ii security for nearly five years. 
hk won his battle a gain st the 
Empir e of the Soviet Union. 
i e&sc is there for him to do? 

» poim is that Budcky faces 
same problem faced by other 
X 5 who depended an the cop- 
i of the Cold War to creme the 
*y ambiguous worlds oftbor 
rjetion. Events have overtaken 
l And now that the Soviet 
annnist regime has been ova- 

wn^ and Russia lurches fitfully . 

ad democracy, wbo s the ene- 

Buckley’s not entirety 
sohnkffl in “A Very Rav** 

’ is to go both fwward ana 

1995 with the 
Bl Democratic Senator Hugh 

SSRSSgW 

■ i,»wdUsa«sdatiOTto 
1 Qdd War records. Not 
bdieves covert 


Gorbachev during the mid-1980s. If 
he can confirm the details of Cy- 
clops, ffbminn intends to teO the 
world about it, usingil as anexam- 
plc of irresponsible CIA activity dial 
coqld have led to nuclear war. 

At that point in the novel the 
reader knows as Kttfc about Cyclops 
as Blanton does, and so the bulk of 
“A Veiy Private Plot” goes bade in 
time to 1968 (where we meet the 
young Nikolai Trimov, eventual 
leader of theplot) and to the mid- 
*80s (where Trimov, now a disillu- 
sioned veteran of the war in Afghan- 
istan, falls in with a group of young 
Russians who believe communism's 
ideahstteori^nshavebeenbetrayed 
by seif-serving bureaucrats). = 

When Oakes learns of the {dot to 
iriTl Gorbachev, he tells President 
Reagan, depicted here as an ami- 



«*wanis to corap * 1 
y about OA covert 

, Saate comnunet And to 
sntpriM, BbngJ 

£Jcvd °f*.tbeOAs®; 

at with a group ^ 

s who plotted tor 


able dolt who sees the world in 
terms of movies but is, more often 
than not, shrewdly right in his 
choice of cinematic metaphors. 
Oakes and Reagan most th«i de- 
cide whether to betray the plotters. 

One basic problem with all this 
has to do with the dangers of using 
people who are still alive (as op- 
posed to historical characters) m 
popular fiction. The world Buckley 
depicts is more or less ours, not 
some alternative, and we know, of 
course, that Gorbachev was not as- 
sassinated. Deprived of the what-if 
factor, we anticipate some other 
resolution. When it cranes, and the 
loose ends concerning Oakes and 
Blanton's proposed legislation are 
tied up, the resolution is, perhaps 
inevitahly, disappointing. 


albeit by a political matter whose 


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t DISCLOSURE, by Michael 
' CridlBm — : — I 3 

2 THE BRIDGES OF MADI- 
• SON 1 COUNTY, by Robert 

James Waller ; 2 78 

3 SLOW WALTZ IN CEDAR .. 

BEND, by Robot James- Wri- 
ter 3 M 

4 FATAL CORE, by Robin 

Cook : ;_'-4 2 

5 BAD LOVE, by Jonathan Kd- 

lerman — 5 3 

« LIKE WATER FORCHOC- 
OLATE. by Lain Esqubd _. 7 .43 
7-HONOR BOUNDjby W. £. 


R Griffin . 


6 - • 2 


8 WITHOUT .REMORSE, by • 
TomOangy _ 9 J 4 

OLDEST, by. Join Cat 


U NIGHTMARES & DREAMS- 
- CAFES, by Stephen Kina — 10 17 

12 VOYAGER, by Diana Gebal- 

(Jon . I 

13 THE BOCK OF CUYSTby 

Gairton KoQor 11 8 

W THE ROBBER BRIDE, by 

Margaret Atwood 7 

15 MR. MURDER, by Dean 
Kaantz 14 13 

NONFICTION 

1 EMBRACED BY THE 

. LIGH T, by Betty J. Etdie 1 39 

2 THE BOOK OF VIRTUES. 

by WilHnra J. Bmeu 2 7 

3 SOUL MATES, by Thomas 

Moore • 8 4 

4 SEE. I TOLD YOU SO. by 

Rash H. 1-imbaaafa 3d 3 (2 

5 THE HIDDEN LIKE OF 

DOGS, by Elizabeth MmiuH 4 24 

6 SEINIANGUAGE. by Jerry 
SeinfeM 


.9.THE 
ham 


8 47 


lO.SMILLA'S •' SENS OF 
SNOW.byFKer'I!oet__ IS -.7 


7 WOULDN'T TAKE NOTH- 

ING FOR MY JOURNEY 
NOW. by Mam Angdou 

8 HAVING OUR SAY, by Sa- 

rah and A. Flimberh Debcny 
with Amy HR! Hearth — 


5 22 


6 18 


7 10 


presumed expertise gives the reader 
the fllimi nn that the world of “A 
Very Private Plot” is representative 
of the real world. But to all that, 
one has a sense of reading about a 
private dub, some Yale fraternity, 
perhaps, whose doings are finally of 
interest coly to those who belong to ; 
it Aral to all their moralizing about ; 
good and evfl, there’s a disconcert - 1 
mg smugness about Blackford 
Oakes and his cronies — they know 
what's best for the rest of us, and we 
ought to shut up and let them go on 
with the important work. 

Fans of the Blackford Oakes se- 
ries wiB probably want to read this 
one. Everyone else is excused and 
directed to reread John le Carte’s 
Srafley trilogy. 


David Nicholson reviews books 
regularly for The Washington Post. 


9 PRIVATE PARTS, by How- 

ad Stern — 9 

10 WOMEN WHO RUN WITH 

THE WOLVES, bv Clarissa 
Pink qla Estfa — — — II 

U FURTHER ALONG THE 
ROAD LESS TRAVELED, 
by M. Sco n Pec k 10 

12 REENGINEERING THE 
CORPORATION, by Mehael 
Hammer and James Chamtry. 12 

13 FLY FISHING THROUGH 

THE MIDLIFE CRISIS, by 
Howell Raines 13 

14 A HISTORY OF GOD. by 

Karen Armstrong — 

15 LOVE CAN BUILD A 
BRIDGE by Naann Judd — 14 


ADVICE, HOW-TO 
AND MISCELLANEOUS 


16 

78 

18 

27 

3 

14 

9 


I STOP THE INSANITY! by 


StiMin Pawtcr — — I '5 

2 MEN ARE FROM MARS. 

WOMEN ARE FROM VE- 
NUS. by John Gray — 3 37 

3 MAGIC EYE. by N. E. Tbra* 

Enterprise* — 4 3 

4 AGELESS BODY, time- 

less MEND, by Deepak Cho- 
pra - 28 


Valenti to Star at Berlin Festival 


By Ann Brocklehurst 

B ERLIN —It isa sign of the limes that 
the Berlin film festival's most eagerly 
awaited guest isa businessman and not 
a movie star. Jack Valenti president of 
the Motion Picture Association of America and 
the U. S. movie industry's main lobbyist, is com- 
ing to Berlin to discuss the distinctly unglamor- 
ous topic of life after GATT. 

Valenti, a man seen by many European film- 
makers as Hollywood's biggest villain, has not 
talked in detail on the subject since the General 
Agreement on Tariffs and Trade deal was 
struck late last year. Under pressure from 
France and against the wishes of the United 
States, negotiators exempted movies and audio- 
visual products from the agreement leaving 
questions about quotas, subsidies and freer 
market access to be decided later. 

The Berlin festival, which begins Thursday, is 
the first major meeting of the international mov- 
ie community since the GATT deal. Along with 
Valenti, European filmmak ers will be airing their 
views on how they think the European film 
market should develop to avoid bring wiped out 
at the box office by U. S. blockbusters. 

But the festival’s manager. Moritz de Hadeln. 
is careful to point out: “The festival has nothing 
to do with GATT. We’re just giving it a podium.* 
The main business of the festival is showing 


250 films in 12 days to 8.000 registered partici- 
pants. including 2,000 journalists. Despite the 
obvious climatic disadvantages of Berlin in 
February, the festival is now ranked with 
Cannes and Venice as one of the top three 
festivals worldwide. 

"We have a pretty good bunch of European 
films added to the best .America could offer us 
at this time." de Hadeln said, “except for 
“Schindler's Lm.‘ ” Although the Berlin festival 
was eager to show Steven Spielberg's critically 
acclaimed movie about the Holocaust, the di- 
rector did not warn it released in a festival 
contexL 

The history of the Berlin film festival has, 
according to de Hadeln. always been tied to the 
history of West Berlin. Originally siarted by the 
British and American adnunistraiioos as a way 
to promote democracy in postwar Germany, 
the festival later took cm a bridging role be* 
tween East and West and became known for its 
strong selection of films from Eastern Europe. 
Some of the first Soviet films of the glasnost era 
had their international premieres in Berlin. 

While films from the former East bloc have 
since developed a reputation for being rather 
relentlessly depressing and no longer excite the 
attention they did a few years back, they contin- 
ue to be an important component of the festival. 

Movies from and about the former Soviet 
Union are featured this year in a section titled 
“Lookin’ East.” which includes "Eduard She- 


vardnadze,” a Latvian documentary about the 
Georgian politician directed by Ivars Seleckis, 
and "The Total Balalaika Show’’ by Ala tour- 
ism aki of Finland, a concert film staning the 
Leningrad Cowboys and the choir and orches- 
tra of the former Red Army. 

“The Year of the Dog," a Russian movie 
directed by Semjon Aranowitscb and described 
as socially critical cinema, is entered in the 
official competition for the festival's top prize, 
the Golden Bear. 

A S the hosts of the festival the Ger- 
mans devote a section to new Ger- 
man cinema. And this year they also 
have three films in the main compe- 
tition. Two of the movies — “The Blue One" by 
Uenhard Wawrzyn and “Farewell to Agnes" 
by Michael Gwisdek — deal with bow the 
country must continue to come to terms with 
the legacy or the Stas, the former East German 
secret service. 

In a similarly un cheerful vein, the competi- 
tion is featuring Jim Sheridan's “In the Name 
of the Father.” a controversial production 
based on the story of the Guildford Four about 
a man sent ro prison for a crime be did not 
commit, and Jonathan Demme's “Philadel- 
phia." about a lawyer with AIDS who fights 
unsuccessfully to save his job at a legal film. 


Ann Brocklehurst is a joumaiisi based in Berlin. 


'Dead Funny’: Very Funny Indeed 


By Sheridan Morley 

Iruenutionai Herald Tribune 


L ONDON — The best news of the 
week is the arrival at the Hampstead 
of the comedy of the decade thus far. 
Terry Johnson is hitherto best 
known for the surrealist meetings of unlikely 
celebrity pairs: Marilyn Monroe and Albert 
Einstein in the “Insignificance” that made his 
name, and Dali and Freud in “Hysteria” last 
year. Now in “Dead Funny” he' tackles the 
nature of comedy, in what is essentially AJbee’s 
“Virginia Woolf' released amid several vaude- 
ville routines. 

The setting is an Islington flat over the week- 
end in 1992 when both Benny Hill and Frankie 
Howerd were found dead. The owner is a doc- 
tor who specializes in hysterectomies, and who 
can’t bear to touch his wife. Their neighbors 
include a mother-obsessed gay and a sexually 
rfmiifflgfri couple with one of whom the doctor 
has had a brief and regrettable affair. 

But all except the doctor’s wife are founder 
members of a Dead Funny Society, which spe- 
cializes in recalling the apparel and acts of de- 
ceased comedians, and so we have here nothing 
less than a living-room farce in the course of 
which we also gel a running analysis of the 
nature of comedy. Utis is a breathtaking comic 
achievement, not only for Johnson but for Zoft 
Wanamaker, David Haig, NiaH Buggy, Beatie 
Edney and Danny Webb as the entire cast of the 
author's own production. The best-acted, best- 
directed, best-written comedy in town is also a 
bitterly hriffiant analysis of dead marriages and 
people who would rather die for a laugh than Hve 


for a relationship. It is at once heartbreaking and 
rib-tickling, and you can't ask a lot more. 

Amid lives of fonysomething North London 
despair. Johnson has found desperately unfun- 
ny people dying for a laugh to cover up their 
own lack of communication. As one husband 
ruefully notes. "We’ve dozens of common inter- 
ests, or at least 1 have.” 

These are people who arrive at parties in drag 
carrying rubber chickens because thaL's what 
the heroes of their favorite comic routines al- 
ways did, and what Johnson shows us is that the 


LONDON THEATER 


loudest laughter comes out of the worst pain. It 
is not a new discovery, but Johnson's treatment 
of it as author and director is unmissable and 
unbeatable. 

By contrast, John Godber s “April in Paris” 
(at the Ambassadors) is very thin, a 30- minute 
sitcom masquerading as a full-length comedy. 
A married couple (Maria Friedman and Gary 
Olsen) win a weekend trip to France and along 
the way get a life. Their escape from Hull 
closely resembles the liberation of Willy Rus- 
sell's “Shirley Valentine," and they too discover 
that whereas local British life is always in black 
and white, the continentals live in color, a 
discovery much aided by Robert Jones's set. 
which bursts into bloom during the iniennis- 
sion. 

The usual Brits-in-Paris jokes are looking a 
little tired, and it is lefno a valiant couple of star 
turns to hide the fragility of their material Like 
Terry Johnson. Godber directs his own script 


only be has given himself a lot less to work 
with." April in Paris” is scarcely worth the fare. 

And finally two solo turns of sharply differ- 
ent character. 

At the Albery, “Edtfie Izzard” is a show by a 
comedian spec ializing in a series of comic riffs, 
during which he will set off on a theme, be it 
parodies of old “Star Trek” episodes or laments 
for laundry, and see how far be can develop it 
before either he or the audience tires of the trip. 

The problem is that ii's an essentially undemo- 
cratic process. If there were some means whereby 
we in the audience could indicate that the avenue 
is unlikely to develop into one of any real inter- 
est we could save Izzard several dead aids. As it 
is, only when the laughter dries up altogether 
does he change direction, by which time it is very 
often too late, except of coarse for his many dub- 
night fans. This is not however the kind of show 
that suggest that the West End theater is in a 
particularly healthy state. It belongs in some sort 
of nightclub at best. 

On the other hand. Christopher Luscombe's 
“Half Time" (late nights at the Donmar Ware- 
house) is a brilliantly scripted and thought- 
through monologue in which Luscombe plays 
essentially a version of himself, a none too prom- 
inent actor who, rather to his own surprise, is 
asked to provide the entertainment for an old- 
boys reunion supper at his Cambridge college. 

Luscombe then gives us the college porter, 
the principal's intolerable wife, a sad misfit and 
various other onlookers before offering the en- 
tertainment itself, reflections in a dressing- 
room mirror that are equally perceptive and 
scathing about the backstage fife. An altogether 
exemplary show that could and should travel 



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Page 8 


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mjg&i 


Page 9 



WE TRIB INDEX: 116 23& 

He ? ah ? Tribune World Slock Index ©, composed of 




Asia/Pacific 


Appro weighing: 32 % 
Close: 129.35 Pws 128 S 4 


"J 

I 


s o N D 
1983 


J£* World Index 

pi 2'3/94 close: 116 . 2 C 
Previous: 116.00 
IfWSSS 


Approx, weighting: 37 % 
Ctose 115.38 Ptbvj 115-23 


«*• 
i 




S O N D J F 


1994 1993 


North America 


Latin America 

Approx weighing: 26 % 

ClOQe: 9804 Pravj 9&33 
i 

mu 

Appro, wdghftp 5 % 

Ctos& 152.61 Pm: 149.68 

Ip. 

) 



22S2SS5S^«a^5S| 


80 

SONDJF SONDJF 
1999 1994 1993 '1994 

:j#; World Imtox 

The Men trucks U S. dote values of stocks in- Tokyo, Now York, London, md 
Argentina, Australia. Austria, Botgium, End, Canada, Chto. Doom*. Rntand, 
Franca, Germany, Hong Kong, Italy, Mexico, NattwriNacfc, Nw Zealand, Norway. , 
Slngapom, Spain, Smoot, Swttzarland and Vtozmla. For Tokyo, Now York and 
London, Ota Index is composed of Ota 20 top Issues In (arms of market capkatbaBon, 
offKtmso Ote ten top stocks are tracked 


Industrial Sectors 


To*. Pot. G in*. hnu % 

dot daw deny . etat ctoM dmy 

Energy 11451 114J23 *0,80 CapW Goods 11 4 £3 114J38 40.22 

uawee 126.55 12620 +&2B RmlWMe 122-53 121.74 +0.65 

Finance 1202a 11087 +oi7 CoMBMr Goode 10059 101.06 -0.40 

Services 126,31 125.79 +0.41 Ws c egm eop a 136.78 13694 -0,13 

For more information about Bie briex,Bbooklat is avafabtatme of charge. 

Write to T/to Index, t8i Avenue Chafes de GatOB, 925Zi Natty Cedcx, Ranee. 

. T ' , O.Hamatanal Herald Trfbme 


Sheraton 
Gains in 
Ciga Bid 

Creditors Stud 
To Bock ITT Unit 


Compiled by Our Sufi From Dispatches 

MILAN — ITT Cap.’s Shera- 
ton Holds unit won support from 
the creditor banks of Ciga Hotels 
for its bid for Gga, sources dose to 
the negotiations said Tuesday. 

Hie sources said the creditor 
banks bad met Tuesday morning at 
the headquarters of Mediobanca 
SpA in Milan and approved the 
Sheraton offer. 

Executives of Ciga, an Italian 
hold concern struggling under a 
heavy debt load, said only that a 
statement was being prepared and 
refused to give funner details. 

Mediobanca has a policy of not 
commenting pubbdy on its activi- 
ties, and its executives refused to 
accept phone calls. 

The Daily Telegraph newspaper 
in Britain reported Tuesday that 
Sheraton had emerged as the buyer 
of the 35-hotd Gga chain. 

It said Sheraton was offering to 
pay about 900 billion lira (SS30 
milti nn) to win out over rival suit- 
ors Forte PLC and Host Marriott 
Carp. 

Richard Power, a spokesman for 
Forte, said his company had been 
informed of Sheraton’s offer Mon- 
day night and did not intend to 
raise its own bid. 

“The Sheraton offer seems to be 
well in excess of 900 bQlkni lire, 
while ours was about 650 billion 
lire,’' he said. “We felt that was a 
fair price to pay to make a reason- 
able return for our shareholders.'’ 

According to banking sources, 
Sheraton’s offer is entirely in cash 
and would cover 72 percent of Ci- 
ga’s debt 

Gga last year hired Mediobanca 
to find a buyer for it The hotel 
chain has not been profitable since 
1989 and has debt of about 1 tril- 
lion lira 

London-based Forte and Host 
Marriott of the United States had 
been battling for control of Gga, 
and Shoaioa ottered the bidding 
only shortly before the meeting 
Tuesday between Mediobanca and 
Gga’s creditors. 

(Reuters. AFX. Bloomberg) 


Toy or Supercar for Asia? 


By Jacques Neher Setdco, with ifa 

International Herald Tribune percent going U 

PARIS — Is the purchase of DiRaja, a Mala 
Italy's Lamborghini a S40 mil- vestment fund, 
lion toy for the son of Indone* The Mycora 
sia’s President Suharto and his yong Seong, wai 
friends or rather the core of a grace operaiiv 
Malaysian -Indonesian joint ven- — 
lure to create a local automotive fV , 

industry? * on " ave 

Western analysts said the for- whether t ] 

mer appeared the better explana- 
tion for the just-completed sale most COSt* 
by Chrysler Corp. of Autotnobili »• • 

Lamborghini SpA, the famed eillCient V 

maker or expensive sports cars, starl 

to Megatech Ltd ° 

Mega tech is a Bermiida-regis- industry/ 

tered company joint! y owned by J 


Setdco, with the remaining 25 
percent going to Koperasi Polls 
DiRaja, a Malaysian police in- 
vestment fund. 

The Mycora chairman. Yap 
yong Seong, was a police intelli- 
gence operative during anii- 

r You have to ask 
whether this is the 
most cost- 
efficient way to 
start an 


tered company jointly owned by 
Hutomo (Tommy) Mandate Pu- 
tra, the youngest son of Presi- 
dent Suharto, and Mycom 
Setdco, a Bermuda-based sub- 
sidiary of Mycom BhtL, the Ma- 
laysian property and gaining 
concern. 

In a filing with the Kuala 
Lumpur stock exchange Tues- 
day, Mycom said it had agreed 10 
sell half of Mycom Setdco to 
Setiawan Djody, an Indonesian 
businessman and the principal 
owner of the Setdco Group of 
Indonesia. 

It said Mycom would have a 
25 percent stake in Mycom 


Louis BailonL luxury- 
car analyst with DRI 
Automotive Group. 

Co mmuni st operations in Ma- 
laysia. The police investment 
fund has helped finance his vari- 
ous business ventures since the 
1970s, he once said. 

“The joint venture with the 
Setdco Group of Indonesia is ex- 
pected to present the Mycom 
Group an opportunity to extend 
and diversify its business activi- 
ties to Indonesia,’’ Mycom said. 

“Besides, Megatech also in- 


tends to to use the engine tech- 
nology of Lamborghini to devel- 
op commercial vehicles in 
Indonesia," it said. 

But Western automotive ana- 
lysts raised their eyebrows at this 
d aim, noting that much more 
investment would be required to 
adapt Lamborghini's high-per- 
formance engine technology to 
every-day requirements of a vol- 
ume vehicle producer. 

“It's plausible, but you have to 
ask whether this is the most cost- 
efficient way 10 start an industry," 
said Louis Bailoni. luxury-car an- 
alyst with DRI Automotive 
Group in Britain. “It would make 
a lot more sense to just go out and 
buy the engines you want for your 
cars." 

.Another London auto analyst, 
asking not to be named. said that 
buying Lamborghini in order to 
laun ch a local car industry was 
“ludicrous" and “a very strange 
way of doing it." 

Even Lamborghini’s lop exec- 
utive said there was little me Ital- 
ian company could bring to a 
volume car producer, outside of 
some research and development 
assistance. “We’re a small com- 
pany that produces a small □um- 

See CAR, Page 11 


Britain Trims 
Lending Rate 
To 22-Year Low 


By Alan Friedman 

International Herald Tribune 

The British government, in a 
move apparently aimed at soften- 
ing the plain of immin ent tax in- 


only a day before had sent share 
prices down in response to the rise 
in rates in the United States. Com- 
mercial banks reduced their base 
lending rates to 525 percent, after 
the Bank of England's cut during 


creases while sustaining economic 

recovery, cut its minimum lending ^ morning money-market opera- 
rate Tuesday by a quarter pomu to ^ Fmanda] Times _ Slock Ex- 

5 percent. change index of 100 shares reached 

The reduction, which contrasted _ T.,«Hav nf 1 471.70. truk- 


■ rraucuon, wmen comrasira # ^ of 3 , 471 . 70 , mak- 

wnh the Federal Reserve Board s ^ nearly all the ground it had 
move Friday to raise U.S. short- ] osl Monday, before closing at 
term rates, could offer solace to the 3 44020 up **l 10 points 
Bundesbank and other European * ciarite, Britain’s dtan- 

central banks as they consider the of che Exchequer, said the 


timing of their own rate easrags. 

But some London analysts said 
the cut, which brought the rale at 
which the central bank lends to 
commerrial banks to its lowest lev- 
el since 1972. was too small to have 
a significant impact on the econo- 
my and may have been made large- 
ly for domestic political reasons. 


cellor of the Exchequer, said the 
rare cut was justified by an easing 
of inflationary pressures. Speaking 
in Paris before a meeting with 
Prime Minister Edouard Bahadur, 
Mr. Qarke said inflation was run- 
ning well within his government's 
target range- 

The cut, the first since Novem- 
ber. came hours before the Bank of 


The rate cut nonetheless seemed England released a quarterly infla- 
te improve the mood of investors tion report projecting an annua l 
on London's slock exchange, who rate of increase 0 / 2 percent to 3 
percent in retail prices by the mid- 


Tank Maker Bids for Westland Helicopters 


Compiled by Our Staff Fnm Dispatches minister, to resign, along with Leon after its Westland slake exceeded 

LONDON — GKN PLC began a Brittan, who had been industry min- 29.9 percent, by offering its existing 
hostile bid for Westland Group PLC ister and is now the European shareholders the right to buy one 
on Tuesday, buying an interest in Union's trade commissioner. convertible bond for every five 

one of the worid’s leading helicopter In 1988, GKN purchased 22.02 shares of stock they own. The rights 


makers from United Technologies percent of Westland from Flat and 
Gap. and offering £366 nnffioa Hanson PLC for £47.8 million. With 
($542 million) for the 60 percent the additional stake from United 


die of 1994. The underlying British 

«ry- -m 1 TT 1 * inflation rate, which excludes inter- 

Westland Helicopters * * 

Tuesday’s rate cut was less than 

, , , , _ . , . the half-point reduction that had 

after its Westland stake exceeded fleet the prospects for its EH- 101, antiopated by analysts, and it 
29.9 percent, by offering its existing helicopter, but also, in part, specu- came sooner than expected, 
shareholders the right to buy one la non that GKN may have been JuliaD ^ economist at 

convertible bond for every five seeking to increase its stake. West- Kldnwort Benson Securities in Lon- 
sharesof stock they own. The rights land s price has been rising since ^ sueaested the interest-rate cut 


that remains in public hands. 

The purchase of the United 
Technologies stake for about $1 1 1 
million by GKN, which makes 
Warrior tanks and industrial 
goods, reverses the foreign control 


Technologies, GKN has secured 47 
percent of Westland's stock, which 
falls to 40.2 percent on a fully dilut- 
ed basis that takes into account op- 
tions and convertible brads. 

CRN’s planned acquisition of 


issue would be payable in two in- October, when it dosed as low as 

stallmen ts, the second coming 209 pence per share. 

when GKN's stake in Westland The EH-101 was developed by 


might have been politically motivat- 
ed. “One can’t help feeling that there 


when GKN's stake in Westland The EH-101 was developed by ^ overtones to this, with 

reached 75 percraL Westland and Agusta SpA of Italy ^ Sveramem trying to reaain the 

The Westland board, except and its prospects were an element political initiative Jta- a disastrous 
those members appointed by m the 1986 takeover battle. It is m ^ Year « 

GKN. said the offer was “unwd- production now, with the first de- Michael Portillo chief secretary 


come*' and that shareholders 
should not take any action until the 


liveries expected in 1996. 

“If you go back to 1988," 


of Westland that was at the center the entire company, however, wiD 
of a political controversy in Britain not be easy. It is bidding cash or 
in 1986. United Technologies and convertible bonds worth just 290 
Fiat SpA bought into Westland, pence per share, 5 percent below 
outbidding a consortium of five the closing price of 305 prace on 


company had considered its posi- Lees said, “the EH-101 had not gone 
tion Zafar Khan, an analyst at into production yet and indeed it 


Michael Portillo, chief secretary 
to the British Treasury and a Con- 
servative Party stalwart, denied 
this, saying “interest rate decisions 


Strauss Turnbull Securities tdd in- 
vestors to accept that advice, say- 
ing, "GKN will try to get board 


into production yetand indeed it ^£ 1 ^ n^rd to the pros- 
wasa t completely certain ir would for inflation, not political 

be taken mto production. That has .. 


try to get board changed . . . and it is now a major 


European aerospace companies. 

Prune Minister Margaret Thaicb- 
er’s approval of an Amoican-led 


Monday. Although the stock ini- approval from Westland and that flagship for Westland," he said. 


bid for the only British helicopter 2 pence, to 582. 

, i ■. ■ • -L nw . 


tiaUy rallied on Tuesday, it ended 
at 305 pence, while GKN edged up 


maker led currmt indusi 
Michael Hesdtine, then 


minister, GKN said it would finance part 
e defense of the bid, required by British law 


could cost them a few pence more." Mr. Lees said the Westland pur- 

David Lees, the GKN chairman, chase would provide GKN with a 
said, “I bSe our offtnTS “strong thind core business" inheli- 
priced." He said a recent price rise copters and light armored vehicles 
in Westland's stock price may re- (Bloomberg, Reuters, AFX ) 


events. 

A total of £8 billion in tax in- 
creases. including new levies on 
personal income and home beating 
bills, ts to take effect in ApriL In 
addition to the political storm 


(Bloomberg, Reuters, AFX) See RATES, Page 10 


TTTTTk 


Where Pirates Rule the (Air)waves 


By Kevin Murphy 

International Herald Tribune 

B OMBAY — When Rupert Mur- 
doch arrives ibis week to see what 
be actually bought when his News 
Corp. paid $525 million fra STAR 
TV in Hong Kong and an undisclosed 
amount for half of India's Hindi-1 an g uag e 
ZEE-TV station, he will be visiting Khusbra 
Khan, or someone like him. 


wary of spiritual pollution Dyure wewauu 
of the pan- Asian broadcaster’s intrati on s in 
particular, STAR TV needs to find a way to 
increase its profit in I ndia , its prospective 
second-largest market, just as conqKtmaa 
here is tntensif>iag. , , 

Mr. Murdoch will find — unless he cuts 
innovative deals with the government offi- 
cials, industrialists or entertainment luminar- 
ies he meets this week — that India s huge 
appetite for television does not necess ari l y 
mean easy pickings. _ .... 

Mr. Khan and tens of thousands or other 

ern entertainment groups face senous chal- 
lenges in profiting from Intfaas economic 
takeoff. 

From a padlocked rooftop om^nd cen- 
ter, Mr. Khan, who learned about rabletd^- 

vLira vdifle he was pun^««*nemNew 

York, controls a lucrative cable networkm 
Bandra. one of Bombay’s wealthier neighbor- 
hoods. . „ ^ . 


Wires splay tow^ a^rat^-^ 
niss-eross an area where su.wu 
subscribers live. From the e^hl-WuareTom- 
(sU-sqoare-meier) nerve crater 
Network. Mr. Khan distributes 12 channels, 


including those seen in 53 countries on STAR 
TV, grabbing the signals with five satellite 
dishes crowding the roof. 

Next door, under a lean-to, is the accounts 
department, where 1,000 rupee ($32) connec- 
tion fees, 150 rupee monthly subscriptions 
and advertising revenue from broadcasts and 
the company’s program guide are counted by 
muscular coQectira men. 

The. network, now seen in about 7,000 


Tens of thousands of 
rooftop entrepreneurs do 
not pay for the 
programs they distribute. 


homes, intends to greatly increase subscrip- 
tions and broadcasts of its own advertise- 
ments when STAR TV and other broadcast- 
ers take commercial breaks. 

This move would boost Mr. Khan's reve- 
nue and cast doubt on whether STAR TV's 
availability in 12 million homes in India will 
guarantee that all those subscribas wiU actu- 
ally see its advertisements. 

■ “We were the first to stow four channels,” 
Mr. Khan says. “Our technology, price and 
service are better than the competition.” 

That service includes pirated videos of big 
Hollywood films, often available the day of 
their theatrical release in the United States, a 
purchasing dub that gives viewers discounts 
at local advertisers, a dial-in movie request 
line and plans to have as many as 40 chaimds 
available a year from now. 

At this point, Mr. Khan’s business plan 


does not indude paying anyone for the use of 
their programming. 

“If STAR and the others encrypt their 
signals, we might pay for it for a while and 
then see if our customers are willing to pay,” 
said Mr. Khan, who has bought out smaller 
rivals and begun undercutting competitors’ 
prices along his service area's boundaries. 

“Television is like a drug, so they might 
want it," be said. “But with so many new 
chazmds coming, maybe they won't want the 
ones they have to pay for." 

Long dosed to foreign broadcasters and 
their programming, India has been trans- 
formed by the arrival of STAR TV’s mix of 
Western programming and youth-oriented 
local ZEE-TV broadcasts. Visions of foreign 
lifestyles, culture and consumerism have at 
once challeng ed traditions and attracted ad- 
vertisers. 

But success has prompted imitation and 
fierce opposition. 

“The sky ware are just starting over India," 
Alyque Padamsee. regional bead of the ad- 
vertising agency Tinian, said. “We will see at 


cue, the national government-owned televi- 
sion network, Doordarehan, has opened ad- 
ditional channels to rival producers and is 
accused of having blackballed producers 
whose work is shown on ZEE-TV. 

At the same time, most international enter- 
tainment companies are looking for their own 
way into the market — and a way of working 
with Mr. Khan and Ms peers or cutting them 
out completely. 

“The day pay television makes any money 
in India is very far away," said Lalil Modi, 

See INDIA, Page 11 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


tm Rate* 

t I OM. 

•Onto yen iw 

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| (Bl 11715 *22 

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530 jun aua ten *«*■ «w 

ssr un »s — .aa um 

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££ S3 m *»» MW- »» w m 

jww York end Zurich- dxSms m other <mtars; Tonxda 
_ ttallar ; Vttits Of m -• «* ItAJ not 


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sorting 

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Seances: RetdmUoyas Bonk. 

Rotas anpdcahle to interbank demits of SI mutton mtaknum (oreoutmtentt. 


r * Ceeriher 

s BB s 
s -ssr^s 
s EC ts 
s Stss 

mount- rtou- ^ 


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mkm> aw 

K-Z»ckind t IMS 

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pMLpmo 2WO 
mub dabr 21B34 

rmteeate mM 
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Omncv Pw* 
S.Afr.nHi 34325 
s.kbt.wh aim 
S wU tTBHO 7 Stt7 
Taiwan S . -2643 
ThotMtf 2545 
TWttalillra n»7. 
UAEOartwn 1672 
vamMOy. i»4s 


K*y Money Rafts 

umiwt States close 

DtaatoBf rota 130 

Prune rate UU 

Federal (sods UO 

Xussra cm 493 

Comm. Doper tea «fan 15B 

UnoBttTi'e Mw y bm &24 

l-reor Tteasnu b81 3JD 

Mear Treasury sole 442 

S y u ar Treasunrante £38 

7-rear Treasons note £52 

M-rear Treowry note £98 

DHear Tremor* boad £45 

MefriMLyaelilMBy Ready asset £72 

4021 


Britain 

Book base rate g* S? 

Can money 

- i-Hwitli Uiiw bank 5*% 

MMMtHi littwbanll V* 

frawaWH m etfH 5 1 ** 

454 652 

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MmmMi Inturtnnk 

531 50 

So ur cat: Reuters. Btoombo rS- hharrjtj 
Lrnclu Bank ot Tokyo. Ca/nmartoont. 
Greo w ett Montaw Credit Lyonnais. 

QOM 

AM. PM Ch'M 
Zurfdi aa 38BJ5 — 2J0 

London 38045 38055 — 2SS 

Mew York J81J0 3M.W +>49 

U&doUmser ounce. LomSonotfldalftx- 
host iarkn and New York ooetdna ctee- 
Ino prices: New York Contes (April) 

Source: /teuton. 


1 Currency **** »ew 

w ***** UMSthu aerter urn Ijmj VUB 

» {SI , l SS J-n— y- W 949 MMI MWS 

Si W7B1 aank /Brussels); BonasCa mm orclaisitotksK 

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can money 

l<aootti Interbank 
>ax»Bi intertask 
6 inontti Interwn*. 

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188 190 

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6.10 .6.15 
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SJ0 £70 
£84 £85 


OUR BANKING RELATIONSHIPS 
ARE BASED ON A STRONG TRADITION 



•-‘y •*:£ 

V' 


T rust. It’s the basic 

tradition of banking. 

At Republic National 
Bank, it's a living tradition, 
as vibrant today as it was 500 
years ago. 

We believe we must earn 
the trust of" our clients every 
day. So we dedicate ourselves to 
protecting their funds through 
all economic climates. We 
respond to their needs with pru- 
dent, carehilly-crafted products 
for today’s financial environ- 


ment. And we provide discreet, 
efficient service that is among 
the most respected in banking. 

Our emphasis on trust, 
strength and service has helped 
us become one of the world’s 
leading private banks. As a 
subsidiary of Saffa Republic 
Holdings S.A. and an affiliate 
of Republic New York Corpora- 
tion, we’re part of a global 
network with US$4 billion in 
capital and US$46 billion in 
assets. Those assets continue to 


r - f • • 

i. ^ 


grow at a healthy pace, a 
testament to the group’s strong 
balance sheets, risk-averse 
orienracion and century-old 
heritage. 

While many banks today 
search for new directions, we 
believe there may be nothing 
more innovative than a solid 
focus on traditional banking. 
Because crust, strength and 
service are not just values of the 
past. They’re a pathway to the 
future. 


REPUBLIC NATIONAL BANK 
OF NEW YORK (SUISSE) SA 


a safra Rank 


TIMELESS VALUES. TRADITIONAL STRENGTH. 


HEAD OFFICE: GENEVA 1204 • 2, PLACE DU LAC ■ TEL. l02Zl 705 55 55 'FOREX: (022)705 55 50 AND GENEVA 1201 • 2. RUE DR. ALFRED-VINCENT .CORNER 
QUAI DU HONT-BLANC) BRANCHED LUGANO 6901 * I, VIA CANOVA - TEL. (09U 23 85 32 - ZURICH 9039 - STOCKERSTRaSSE 37 - TEL. lOli 288 18 18 - 
GUERNSEY ' RUE DU PRE ' ST. PETER PORT ’ TEL. (4811 711 761 AFFILIATE REPUBLIC NATIONAL BANK OF NEW YORK IN NEW YORK OTHER LOCATIONS: 
GIBRALTAR • GUERNSEY ■ LONDON ■ LUXEMBOURG • MILAN • MONTE CARLO • PARIS • BEVERLY HILLS - CAYMAN ISLANDS • LOS ANGELES • MEXICO CITY • MIAMI • 
MONTREAL * NASSAU ' NEW YORK * BUENOS AIRES * CARACAS ’ MONTEVIDEO - PUKTA DEL ESTE ■ RIO DE JANEIRO - SANTIAGO ' BEIRUT ■ BEUING - HONG KONG - 

JAKARTA • SINGAPORE ■ TAIPEI ■ TOKYO 





Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 1994 


** 


MARKET DIARY 


Bond Market Drops 
On Tenid Note Sale 


NEW YORK — Slocks were lit- 
tle changed Tuesday, but Treasury 
bond prices slid after tepid demand 
for three-year notes at the first of 
the Treasury's three quarterly refi- 
nancing auctions. 

The benchmark 30-year bond 
fefl 23/32. to 97 14/32. in late trad- 
mg, with the yield rising to 6.45 
percent from 6 J9 percent Monday. 

The Treasury sold S (7.1 16 bu- 

H.Y. Stocks 

Hon in three-year notes at a lacklus- 
ter auction that reflected most mar- 
ket players’ reluctance to buy 
short-term securities ana'd uncer- 
tainty about the next increase in 
U.S. interest rates, analysts said. 

The credit market has been un- 
der pressure since the Federal Re- 
serve Board pushed up the bench- 
mark federal funds rate by 25 bass 
points in what analysis said was the 
first step in a tightening cycle. 

Investors are concerned the gov- 
ernment's sale of about $12 billion 
in 10-year notes Wednesday will be 
even less well received than Tues- 
day’s auction because longer-term 
issues are pricing in another 25- 
basis- point tightening by the Fed. 

The slumping bond market kept 
stocks from adding to Monday's 
gninc The Dow Jones industrial 
average slipped 0.29 point, to close 
at 3.906.03. Advancers led de- 
diners by a 9-to-8 ratio, however. 


on the New York Stock Exchange, 
with volume thinning from recast 
active levels. 

A snowstorm in the Northeast — 
which closed two of the New York 
area's major airports during trad- 
ing hours and caused some com- 
modity markets to end trading ear- 
ly — also served to limit stock- 
market moves because major 
players opted for early departures. 

RJR Nabisco topped the New 
York Stock Exchange’s most-active 
Hst, edging up Vi to 7V» on a report 
that the company was demanding 
higher returns for capital spending. 

The most-active over-the- 
counter stock for the second 
straight day was Spectrum Infor- 
mation Technologies Inc., which 
rose 5/ 16 to 2 9/16 after plunging 
Monday plunging Monday when 
its chairman, John Scull ey, re- 
signed. 

A shareholder suit against the 
wireless data company is pending. 

Among Dow components. Sears 
fell 314 to 47% in active trading 
after releasing lower-ihan-expccted 
fourth-quarter earnings. 

Tel ef on os de Mexico was active, 
gaining ]& to 75V}. 

Pfizer shares tumbled 2 Yt to S9W 
in active trading after the compa- 
ny’s chief financial officer said 
Wall Street's earnings estimates 
were too high. 

( Knight -Ridder, Bloomberg, AP) 


European Rate View 
Gives Boost to Dollar 


AFP-End News 

NEW YORK — The dollar rose 
Tuesday on expectations of de- 
clines in European interest rates, 
despite some reports of efforts by 
the Bundesbank to intervene and 
limit the U.S. currency’s gains. 

The dollar ended trading at 
1.7650 Deutsche marks, up from 
1.7587 DM at Monday’s dose. 
Against other European currencies, 

Foreign Exchange 

it gained to 1.4810 Swiss francs 
from 1.4685 francs and to 5.9830 
French francs from 5.9620. while 
the pound weakened to S1.4669 
from $1.4832. 

Against the Japanese currency, 
the dollar edged up to 108.75 yen 
from 108.60. 

Economists and traders said the 
dollar was attracting widespread 
support after last week's rate tight- 
ening by the Fed and this week’s 
cuts m interest rates by Britain and 
Belgium. 

lire Pedersen, an economist at 
Chemical Bank, said there was evi- 
dence the Bundesbank had been 
intervening in the past few days to 


try to slow the dollar’s advance 
against the mark. But some traders 
said they doubted that the German 
central bank had been active. 

Mr. Pedersen said any action by 
the Bundesbank would have been 
aimed more at a need to maintain 
the mark’s position against other 
European currencies than at con- 
cern about the dollar's strength. 

He added that he still expected 
the dollar to reach about 1.85 DM 
over the next couple of months, but 
only after the Bundesbank has 
been able to make sure the murk 
remains dose to its current levels 
against other European currencies. 


Yio AneckiNd P™ 


The Dow 



. *'3* *•* *v s s 

. • Ji'.'.Ayif'.'rt ..‘A'.Y. V ' 

• v vr U SV .* , . . s , , ; •" V 

- . -Ox-Sis 

, :&'*& U: %■ 


NYSE Most Actives 



VoL HH 

Lew 

Lost 

Chg- 

RJR Nab 

79107 7H 

7 

7ft 

— ft 

Sears 5 

r.>i m 

47ft 

*7ft 

—3ft 

TalMftx 


7*ft 

75ft 

+ Ift 

Pfizer 

1^111 

57ft 

99ft 

—aft 

GnMOr 


63ft 

64ft 

+ ift 

ABarcks 

30809 26ft 

25V. 

15ft 

—ft 

Ptaoero 

28560 36ft 

23ft 

24 

__ 

Manic 

27727 

36ft 

24ft 

—)% 

PhAMr 


57ft 

58ft 

—ift 

AmExc 

24429 31ft 

30V, 

3DU 

-ft 

Shows 

ZI76P 19ft 

left 

19ft 

♦ ft 

FedMog 

21399 36ft 

35 

36ft 

+ift 

IBM 

19638 54ft 

53ft 

53ft 

—ft 

AT&T 

19210 54ft 

54ft 

54ft 

j, 

PTChWn 

18949 36ft 

36ft 

36ft 

M. 


AMEX Host Actives 



VOL Mgh 

LOW 

Loft 

os. 

Echofiov 

18346 12ft 

12ft 

12ft 

—ft 

V(acH 

6609 32ft 

31 

31ft 

—ft 

Hasbro 

6672 34% 

33ft 

33ft 

—ft 

Ban 

<013 45ft 

43ft 

44 

—1% 

Atari 

sres 6V> 

5ft 

6ft 

-ft 

ExpLA 

528a ft 

ft 

ft 

—ft 

IvcCp 

*587 35ft 

34ft 

35% 

+lft 

P00GM 

3452 20ft 

19ft 

19ft 

—ft 

tatertMo 

RayalOB 

3264 6ft 

2827 4ft 

4 

4ft 

4*li 

+ft 

+ft, 

SaONPLfi 

2817 28ft 

27ft 

2M6 

-fft 

HanwtB 

2755 *Vn 

’Vn 

ft 

_ 

TWAvig 

2342 *>Vh 

*ft 

*ft 

+ft 

ChDevA 

2300 5ft 

4Wu 

5ft 

+ % 

Thermds 

■ lI'Q V 

12ft 

12ft 

+ % 


NYSE Diary 


Advanced 
DocOned 
Unchanged 
Total issues 
NewHfcrftt 
Now Laws 


AMEX Diary 


Advanced 
Declined 
unchanged 
Total Issues 
Now Highs 
New Lows 


305 030 

290 386 

713 2!M 

035 040 

17 10 

14 30 


NASDAQ Diary 


Aomad 
Declined 
Unchang e d 
TcM Issues 
New Highs 
New Lows 


Dow Jones Averages 


Open Mgh Low dost aw 

¥E£ — i£S 2 S 12 iE 8 =!£ 

0*11 - Z1W2 2T7JI 21823 -1.32 

Coma — M227B7.4MJ»7(4?0L4? — U* 


Standard & Poor’s htdans 


High Lew dose arge 
Industrial! 551.13 SOM 549.94 -827 

Troosp. 44X99 441.17 44241 —004 

umttles 10447 MUD 7652* — I.W 

Finance 4454 4135 U38— 0.13 

SR 500 47233 469JD *71.86— £70 

SP 100 43030 43104 437JV -0L12 


NYSE Index* 


High 


Composite 

Industrials 

Trmsn. 

Utilities 

Finance 


Low Close OTge 

— 26154—005 

— 32153 +ai2 

— 279.72 +070 
_ 72133— IjOD 

— 21656 +0.12 


NASDAQ Indues 


Composite 

Industrials 

Finance 

insurance 

Tefeawnm 

Banks 

Transa. 


High Low Close OCge 

7B2JO +350 
01057 +550 
■9227 +1.12 
925.99 +5.01 
17496 — (UZ 
69X60 +150 
707 JO +122 


AMEX Stock Index 


High 

Lew Close 

Cti-M 


477*0 

+ 004 

i 

l 


Close 

cm 

2D Bonds 

10423 

+ 023 

10 Utilities 

103.10 

+ 029 

ID Industrials 

106*9 

— 023 

Market Sates 


NYSE 4 cun. volume 
NYSE prrv. cons, dose 
Amex 4 tun. volume 
Anwxnnv.om.dsw 
NASDAQ 4 tun. volume 
NASDAQ prev. 4 tun. volume 


310044000 

41UM2J44) 

»®!H« 

zxsuxooo 

272710000 

377,4311151 


H.Y.S.E. Odd-Lot Trading 


Fed. 7 
Feb, 4 
Feb. 3 
Feb. 2 
Feb. 1 


Bay Sales 

1(779(456 1(824996 

1J37JA0 1.924079 

938.146 1(667,532 

UtHJca 1J65J74 

982.1 OS 1591801 


Sheri- 

scan 

*U09 


30374 


SAP 100 Index Options 


s Qdtv-um Pot+Led 

BFth W Mr MS M Mr Mr 
— — 559: — h. ft ft 


1173 

1044 

3K - 

SPk 

s» - 

H 

1W 

_ 

_ 

MS 

1178 

90 - 



k 

% 

ift 

— 

599 

527 

395 - 



_ _ 

A 

ft 

1ft 

p— 

2737 

2749 

400 — 

- 

Bft - 

% 

ft 

1ft 


66 

16 

415 - 

_ 


% 

1ft 

ift 

— 

35 

58 

411 - 

Tfik 

- — 

ft 

ift 

2ft 

4H 


m 

If 

19ft 

21ft 

22ft 

ft 

2ft 

3ft 

5ft 

425 

14 

It 


— 

1 

1 

4ft 

— 

42) 

9ft 

lift 

Uft 

15ft 

ns 

4 

6 

■ft 

635 

5ft 

Bft 

n 


2ft 

» 

1ft 

— 

m 

7ft 

S 

7 

fit 

41S 

7ft 

m 

m 

*45 

ft 

Ift 

re 


■ft 

Uft 

Bft 

mm 

458 

ft 

Ift 

2ft 

4ft 

% 

Uft 

17ft 

UVr 

4S 

ft 

ft 

Ift 


Uft 

20 

— 

UO 

ft 

ft 

ft 


M* 

an 

— 

— 

415 


ft 

ft 

— 

— 

— 

29ft 

— 


cmc mw wl oua teni am M.aun 
PM: M4 vOLaun total bom W. 512591 

Pita Dtcfi Dec 25 dk 94 DecN Dec 25 
Eft — — — ft - 


Been 


dose 

Prrv. 

27ft 



— 

ft 

_ _ 

1627 

1308 

1765 

I486 

1771 

1537 

41 

r 

Oft 

r 

1ft 

4ft 


2ft 

2ft - 



Cofls: takil ra. UU loU open ML 20171 

59 

89 

MB: feM sol ZOT: kM OMfl M. 152M4 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


High Lew Prgv.aew 


175 

875 

SS7 

857 

886 

006 

170 

071 

091 

515 

IS 

803 

898 

BO 

901 


Food 

COCOA ILCBI 

Storing per metric toe lotoailQtoM 

Mar 874 

May BBS 

JIH ®7 

Sw 913 

Est. volume: iul 
COFFEE (LCD 

Dollars per metric taHUta of 5 tea 
U— 1JT0 U11 1(317 1(200 1210 1211 

1 J09 1(311 1(220 lag 1311 1J13 

. -- 

1(215 

N.r. 

N.T. 

N.T. 


T.I9S IJOf 1(210 

1,190 1.208 U10 

N.T. 1(310 1^2 

N.T. 1,202 TOT 
N.T. 1J02 1OT 


Alov 

Jar UW 1OT 

sag iJD5 ijae 

not 1J03 1JM 

JH N.T. LZC 

Mar N.T. 1(307 

Est. vofutne: iul 

High Lew Oom arge 

WHITE SUGAR (MaUf) 

Denars per oNtrM lon-lDti of H tees 
Mar 30000 30530 30530 306J0 + 150 

Mav 30160 30240 -1W(W 3B2JQ — OlKK 

aS moo mSS £*m + a S 

Oct 29130 79Q.00 mss »ijw - i J0 

Dgc N.T. N.T. 207 JO 29000 — 070 

Mar N.T. N.T. 289-50 291 JO — 050 

EsL volume: 044. Qoen InL: 1X4B6. 


Metals 


dose . . 

Bid Ask Bid 

ALUMINUM (HM Grade) 

120X50 I3TJO 

Forward 1Z9SJ0 129620 130OM 130120 
COPPER CATHODES IHM 0rWW 

pSt” “er "wiJo“lB72J0 1071 JO 187230 
Forward 1B95JJO lWifiO 189420 1 195J0 
LEAD 

Daflm per metric Jon „„ _ 

Snot 490JD 499 JO 5D6J0 OTJ0 

Forward 51250 5QJD 51950 52050 

NICKEL 

PeMars pot entile lea 
Soot 577050 57BQ.OO SSI 050 

Forssar d 582550 584000 507550 

TIN 

Donors oer mSrictou 
Soot 332&0O 533550 537000 3390JM 

Forward 53K»iE3 599000 542550 343550 

ZINC (5POdal NM iCrude} 

Donors per metric tan 

Soot 9S3J0 90450 WID50 100450 

Forward 100350 100450 102350 103450 


London Internation al Fin ancial 
Futures Exchange (UFFE) prices 
were not available for this edition 
because of problems at the source. 


Certain offerings ef Kcurilks, flawdil 
saricxx or imeresa tn real esoee poUEdial ta 
ihll ncwipapcr nc net notarized n DerUii 

j BiHiBcik n i to rtfcfe ite hs e n a tked MenM 
Ttibnoc is JiMribnioL including the Ualted 
5ietei or Aaerica. ad do not con time 
olfufagi of e uciki i wi A services or iratn in 
these fnriuEciioos. The hgiMrinid Benid 
Tnlme monies eo icspmaibaity wi m never 
be any Ntaataneats fir eaniogs of ay Usd. 


Industrials 


High Low Lost Settle Ch-go 
OASOIL(IPE) 

U A dollars pgr name tenets of MB tens 

Fob 14550 14X25 144J0 14450 +075 

Mar — 

Apr 
May 
Joe 
Jrt 

act 

NOV 


MAg } 4» :m +i» 


14650 14X50 M 


mas +0J9 

144J5 +150 


Job 


MfH 14350 14475 U4.71 +»J3 

1*&« W& 14X25 14X35 +150 

N.T. N.T. N.T. 14X50 +150 

N.T. JLT, N.T! U0J0 +1J0 

N.T. NX N.T. (S3 +1^ 

N.T. N.T. N.T. 15535 +OJS 

I57J0 15750 J57J0 157 JO +050 

N.T. N.T. N.T. 15750 +0JS 


Est. volume; 16557. Open Ini. 1X313 
BRENT CRUDE OIL (IPQ 
UJL doim per banroHoM him barrels' 
Mar 1452 1055 1451 1454 — 056 

Apr 1436 1456 1459 14* UDCh. 

May 1438 14X 1472 ICQ +057 

JOB 1453 MJB 1442 1441 +X14 

J«1 J4J4 1AM 1A53 1*53 +0.15 

Aig MJ3 14JB 1*40 , 1450 -HUS 

SOP 1451 1456 14J6 1*07 +XI2 

Od N_T. N.T. N.T. 1555 -HL14 

NOV DLT. N.T. N.T. 1533 +OM 

Bit volume: 50540. Open lot 1SS515 


Spot Co m mocBti— 


Coatmodry Today . ' Pros. 

Aluminum, Bi BJ7S X5B1 

CcfJiV.Bratdh 0565 U65 

Copper electrolytic, lb 1518 . 1510 

Iran FOB, n» 2JH.gS . - •- 21X50 

Uod.tb - 03* 014 

Snvor.travoz mm 

Steel (scrap), ton . 13133 ia&3& 

Tlrvlh 3JM5 3J975 

21nc.lt> 04*15 X4B15 


DMdands 


Company Per Amt Pay- Roc 

INC REAS ID 

BankAmsrica Corn Q M 200 H4 

IRREGULAR . 

Camden Property x . M 

x-record A par dotes eoapBoonctd. 

Metro Find . 55 2-18 MS 

Senior HI IneoPort _ 5499- M5 - Ml. 
Senior Hthico 11 _ 575 2-15 ta 

REVERSE STOCK SPLIT 
Soiltec Inc 1 for 10 

RECHlLAR 


ACE Limited q .18 

BCGase TM 2-14 

C u r m otor Ind O 59 

Eouttobte town Q 305 

Geon Company Q J25 

Natl InsuranoD B 

Ookswod Home* 

PocHlc Telecom 
prospect StHUnco 
Purilai Bennett _ ... 

Ratston Purina Q JO 

SchunzJava . q .54 

Taurus MunlCA HW M 5603 

Taurus MunNY Hto 
Trust Co of NJ. 

Wynns Inti 


S SSI 

M 
Q 
Q 

M 5603 
M 5623 
O 50 
Q .11 


■Kosemal; g payable to Canadian 

a n nu ity: 


V31 +19 

250 

Ml +11 
3-34 3-15 
3-1 3-15 
3-16 3-1 

■14 205 
W 3-7 
2-10 2-20 
MS 205 
2-14 3-11 
MB . W 

2- 15 275 
21S 2-25 
MI M 

3- 34 Ml 

funds: m- 


"u.s./ atth*+l?« 


Washington 

poaefl the largsa gamma. year saidTueaday. 
stxramlined bperanous by dimmat^ following a 4 peroeat 

The 4 percent mercase m 

gain ill the previous quarter, was the sWfflgew Dmanromfsaid. 

percent nsein'd* final three moomsof m«iust 1.6 perceat 

Tuesday. However, forafl of last 

ftom the employment Son 


are in the coufitBtinmatfons industry. 

Sears Reports Rebound in 

.^CHICAGO (moomba^ -S^re. ye^. 

Street prqjectiOTis. Analysts expected Sears K\®arnSl. - - 

reported a loss of $1.8 billion for. I992’s fourth quarter. f , 

SSai mSlyst at.Stifel Kicoiaus. 

mg results from its Otnwnan retail operations. 


U.K. Bank Sues Metallgesellsdiaft 

NEW YORK (Bloombog) — Standard Chartered PLC has sued 
Metallgesellsdiaft AG’s UK unit in an effort to head off a debt 
restructuring contained in the rescue package between the German 
company and its banks. 

Justice Walter Schackman of the New York State Supreme Court 
granted the British bank a temporary restraining order halting the plan 
until he decides whether to grant a preliminary inj unction. The Judge said 
he expected to reach that decision Wednesday. 

Standard Chartered stands to lose S28 million if the debt restructuring 

S es forward. Vice President Richard Manner said in an affidavit. 

etallgesdlschaft’s creditor banks readied agreement last month on the 3.4 
Mlk® Deulsche mart ($2 billion) rescue package in the wake of oil trading 
losses at MetaUgeseCschaft Corp^ the UK subsidiary. The metals and 
mining company is to raise 2.7 billion DM through a r^fats offering and a 
debt-to-equity swap and would obtain a new credit tine of 700 miDion DM. 


RATES: Britain Trims Its Minimum Lending Levy to £25%, Lowest Level Since 1972 


Cootmoed from Page 9 

raised by the tax on home heating, 
the government of Prime Minister 
John Major has been beset by a 
string of sex and corruption scan- 
dals involving members of the Con- 
servative Party, the latest of which 
was set off by news that a member 


of Parliament had been found dead 
Monday in mysterious circum- 
stances. 

Although the British rate move 
was considered unlikely to have an 
immediate impact on the Bundes- 
bank and other Continental central 
banks in their deliberations, David 
Kern, chief economist of National 


Westminster Bank, said he hoped 
the cut would “encourage the Ger- 
mans to accept it doesn’t make any 
sense to use the rise in rates in 
America as an excuse to postpone 
their own cuts.” 

Mr. Kern listed three forces that 
he said had led to the rate cut and 
that made further reductions likely 


this year the likelihood that under- 
lying inflation would remain low 
over the next two years; the. fact, 
that the pound, despite having de- 
predated since its forced exit from 
the European exchange-rate mech- 
anism in September 1992, had 
proven “quite resilient” in recent 


months; and the expectation that 
lower interest rates would “coun- 
teract tire potential deflationary ef- 
fect” of the coming tax increases. 

Mr. Qarice, in an interview Mon- 
day, insisted he would decide on 
interest rates on the bass of domes- 
tic economic conditions, and espe- 
cially inflation. 


KdUogg Raises Cereal Prices 

BATILECREEK, Michigan (Reuters) — ^ 
was raising its cereal prices in the United States py an ^ 

percent. The locrease ts the second by Kdlogg m six 
" A Spokesman for Kdlogg attributed the move to higher commodity 
prices, partodariy for wheat and rice. . . , _ . . It . 

Kdlogg refused to identify prices for specific b rands of 
said the changes range from noincrease on some brands to a ^percent 
rise an others. The move comes less, than a mouth after KeHoggs 
chairman, Arnold Langbo, said the cereal giant hoped “ 
promotional spending— such as coupons and discounts — m me- united 
States this year; 

AnheuseoBusdi Quarterly Profit Up 

ST. LOUIS, Missouri (Bloomberg) — Anheuser-Busch Cos. said Tues- 
day'its fourth-quarter profit rose 3 percent on a 5 p ercent in crease m 
sates, and it projected a ficst-qiiarter sales growth of 4 percent- 

Tlie woridrs largest brewer added that it would have a “moderate 
increase in the second quarter, while earnings per share also should grow 
m the first quarter. Net income uz the fourth quarter was 5167 nriHiao, or 
62 cents a mare, up from $161 million, or 58 cents, a year earlier. Revenue 
after the payment of excise taxes rose to $2.85 b2Hon from S2.73 billion. 

Hie company s aid it maintained marke t share last year, with sales 
volume representing 44 percent of total br ewin g industry sales in the 
United States, according to estimates from the Beer Institute. 

AffledSignal Hans a Stock Split 

MORRIS TOWNSHIP, New Jersey (Bloomberg) — AfliedSgnal Ina 
sstui Tuesday that its profit in the fourth quarter rose 29 percent as costs 
anti ra pwMM dccHnod. The company also said it planned a 2-fctr-l stock 
split a 16 penxaitdrvutend increase, to 33 cons before die split 

AfliedSignal said it expected strong growth this year because 

of “significant new contracts wot,” continued cost-cutting in 1993, as 
weQ as acquisitions. Li the fourth quarter, income rose to $178 nriQkm 
while revenue at ^themaker of products for the aerospace and automotive 
industries rase to S3.06 bflliou from $3.05 billion. 

Swedea BacbUpjohn Patency Drug 

KALAMAZOO, Michigan. (Bkiomberg) — Upjohn Co. said Tuesday 
its Caveqect mate ixhpotency drug ha* received its first regulatory 
approval, from Sweden's MedkatProducts Agency. - 

The drug, which is sdf-4iriected, relaxes smooth mnsde tissue, which in 
tom enhances Mood flow to the penis, creating ah erection. Also known 
as alprostatfil,' it is derived from prostaglandin El, which has been used 
for ipany years to treat babies with congenital heart defects. 

Dr Pepper Earni ngs Rise to Record 

DALLAS (Bloomberg) — Dr Pqiper/Seven-Up Cos. said Tuesday 
that its fourth-quarter eammgsrose to arecordfuded by sales gains and 
reduced expenses. 

Tb eNa 3 UJS. soft dimk i qMke ri^ t Jt ppsted net income of K1J 
" snfficn, or 32 cents a riiare, Km fnm operatiods of $253 

mzhioQ, a year eadier. Shares otdstahding increased to 66H million from 
35.6 ndHon, from the company’s initial public offering in January 1993. 

Besides higher , sales, Dr Pepper/ Seven- Up’s fourth-quarter results 
benefited from reduced interest expense as a rrault of debt reduction and 
refinancing moves in the write of the company's stock offering. . 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Agenca Fiance Dw Feb. 8 
Cleae Frwv. 


Amsterdam 

ABN Amro HW 6950 <050 
ACF Holding 59JO 39.1P 
Aegon 10650 105JT1 

AhaW 5350 51 JO 

AKjo 209 30*50 

AMEV 8360 HIES 

BOfc-WeSHUWl 45.10 «4 JO 
CSM 7650 75.70 

D5AA 1®>J0 100.10 

Elsevier 191 107 JO 

Foklcer 21.9® 21 M 

Gfctf-Brocwles 55J0 54.40 
HBG 2B3 Z7B 

Helneken 232J0 2303B 
Hcooovbtji 6070 BILBO 
Hunter Douglas B6J0 07 
IHC Coland 4450 4250 
Inter Mint lor 
inn Neacrtand 
KLM 


KNPBT 

Nedllovd 

OeeGrtnten 

Pathoca 

Ptunps 

Polwrom 

Rabeai 

Rwfamco 

Ro linog 
Romnto 
Roval Dutch 
Stork 
Unilever 
van Ommeren 
VNU 


8670 
89.40 08 

52 S1J0 
47.90 46J0 
7650 6950 
73.10 71 

55J0 5370 
4&30 4670 
0250 B0.70 
13050 127.10 
6470 6450 
13450 13X10 
10070 10070 
20950 20650 
4X30 4250 
233 230 JO 
4770 4650 
199 19450 


Walters/ Kluwer 12470 12250 


Brussels 


2840 2800 
2995 2950, 
NJL 4220 
2400 2370 
23725 22925 
102 178 

5700 5000 
1480 1452 
6150 6380 
1520 1510 
4340 4270 
9020 9790 
7600 7720 
10675 107U0 

Ortin 3M0 J390 

J| Beige 5970 5950 

BenBanaue 0660 ew 

GonBetgtaue ^ 

* 15225 SB0 

OY 14900 14825 

MM 11775 11600 

| 247KI 24450 

id stq&J Mex : 777271 
Hoes : 774176 


C-UM 

Fin 


itrabei 


Uetbank 


Frankfurt 


AEG 16350 1 4X50 

Allianz Hold 2670 2655 

Altana MOJO M3 

Asko 1180 1120 

BASF 29429050 

Dover 357 70 351 JO 

Bov. Hypo Bank *53 *55 

Bov vereinstt 517 512 

BBC 694 684 

BHF Bonk 445 439 JO 

BMW 775 760 

Commerzbank 3613S450 
ConHnMMJ SI 747 

Dahmer Benz B06J0 m 

Degusia 467 454 

Dl Babcock 255 255 

DoutSOMBank 814792J0 
D Qualm 550 

Oresdner Ekmk 4I5J+I0S7D 
FeUmueMe 334 330 

F Kruno Hoesdi T79J017DJ0 



Helsinki 


Ainer-Yhtvma 
Enso-GubeH 
HuMamaki 
K.CLP. 
Kvmmene 
Metro 
Nokia 
Poll lola 
Repoki 
Slaeknum 


132 129 
1530 43 

233 200 

17 16J0 

a 130 
240 
331 321 

B it® 
113 
315 310 


Hong Kong 

Bk East Asia, 5X» 5350 
Cattw PocHlc 1170 U20 
Cheung Kong 4AJ0 OJ5 
China Light Pwr 457S 4775 
Dairy Ftpmi Inti 1X60 13J0 
Hong Lung Dev 10^17.90 
Hong Sang Bank 77 JO 76 
Henderson Land 53 503 
HK Air Eim 4675 £ 

hk China Gas 21^0 2U0 
HK Electric 3B-TO 30^ 
hk Land WJ0 2LSJ 

HK Realty Trosl 2530 2540 
HSBC Holdings 124 124 

HK Shong Mtti 1X90 14 

HK Telecomm isjo 1570 
hk Ferrv ixio 1370 
Hutch Whampoa 3975 39 

Hvsan Dev 2850 _ 79 
Jardlno Marti. 78 76J0 
Jardbie Str Hid .,35 35 

Kowloon Motor 1770 1770 
Mandarin Orient 12 13 

Miramar Hotel 25 200 
New World Dev 3625 35 

SHK Props 6250 65 

Stelux 530 5.10 

Swire Poe A 63 6X50 

Tal Cheuna Pros 1X80 1X60 
TVE X65 3JS 

Wharf Held 34.75 3475 


Johannesburg 


AECI 
Altech 
Anglo Amer 
Barlows 
Blyvoor 
Butte Is 
DeBoers 
DrMontem 
Gencor 
GFSA 


HlghveU Steet 
Kloof 

NedWAGro 

Rand font eln 
Rusntat 

SA Brews 
SI Helena 
Sasol 

Wtfkom 


1075 

tars 

95 

95 

205 

210 

NA 

— 

8 

9 

49 

NA 

in 

109 

5050 5275 

870 

STB 

91 

97 

2420 

26 

16 

17 

46 48J0 
2720 2775 

40 

40 

S3 

7420 

90 

40 

NA 

2175 

22 

41 

4275 

16SJ0 

160 




Index :4«»aJ8 


London 


Abbey Non 
Allied Lyons 
Aria Wiggins 
Argyll Croup 
Ass Brlf Foods 
BAA 
BAo 

Bank Scotland 

Barclays 

saw 

BAT 

BET 

Blue Circle 
BOC Group 
Boom 
B awdier 
BP 

Brlf Airways 
Brit Gam 
Bril Steel 
Brit Telecom 
BTR 

Cable wire 
Ca dbury Sen 

Cogh viyetla 
Comm Union 
Courtoukfs 
ECC Group 
Enter p r is e Oil 
E u rot u nnel 
f aons 
Forte 
GEC 
GenlAcc 
Gtaxo 
Grand Mel 
GHE 

Guinness 
GUS 
Hanson 
hdi sown 

HSBC Hk»S 
1C1 

incbcone 


5J3 

IOM 

5J7 

271 

W7 

5J7 

Ml 

1(44 

X71 

675 

US 

4jg 

104 

478 

13? 

141 

440 

1B2 

9.10 

5.10 
4.13 
173 
6JA 
576 
573 
44] 
5.70 
172 
2J3 
147 
642 
623 
440 
279 
572 
5-96 
274 
176 

1045 

006 

545 


5 

672 

2.72 

259 

5J3 

1055 

545 

276 

SW 

146 

045 

775 

552 

455 

176 

443 
379 
1J 

444 
340 

5.12 

507 

4.M 

176 

6J0 

577 

503 

443 

6 

1J4 

2J6 

349 

642 

645 

441 

2-13 

573 
604 
792 
1-75 

10J5 

7.91 

574 


Kingfisher 

Laflhroke 

Land Sue 

Laaarle 

LOW*) 

Legal Gen Gro 
Llavds Bank 
Marks So 
ME PC 
Non Power 
NafWest 
NthWsf WOler 
Pearson 
P8.0 
PIIMngton 
Power Gen 
Prodentlai 
RonkOni 
Reckltf Col 
Red land 
Reed Inti 
Reuters 
RMC Group 
Ralls Payee 
RBRimniunlt) 
Rmgii Scot 

Sotashury 
Scat Newcas 

Scot Power 

Sears Holds 
Severn Trent 
Shell 
State 

Smith Nephew 
Sm Hh Kline B 
Smith (WHJ 

Sun Alliance 
Tata & Lyle 
Tesco 
Thom EMI 
Tomkins 
T5B Group 
Unilever 
Utd Biscuits 
Vodafone 
war Loan 3Vs 
Wellcome 
WM thread 
Williams Hdn 
willls Corrom 

>T. 


6(43 

203 

743 

076 

176 

5.12 

607 

478 

576 

4J6 

543 

502 

7.10 

700 

142 

5.50 

145 


635 

2 

740 

070 

173 

512 

6.17 

470 

577 

4-76 

555 

503 

7.15 

7JJ7 

140 

553 

147 


HM6 1043 
i,M 645 


674 

976 


6.14 

977 


1902 19.15 

948 9J1 

1.74 1.K 

443 
5 

876 

343 
542 
4JSZ 
173 
670 
7.18 
549 
1(48 
4.10 
4.95 

344 
449 
221 


506 

040 

3J3 

542 

4L43 

L28 

670 

709 

577 

149 

4.11 

442 

343 

4J4 

119 


11.15 1170 
240 259 

249 Z73 

1270 1270 


3JA 

517 


155 

607 



E Madrid 


BBV 



Bca Central HIsp 



Banco Santander 

7320 


CEPSA 



Dmados 

2405 

2580 

Endesa 




144 


Iberdrola 1 



Reasat 



Tabacotcni 

4285 

424} 

Telefonica 

7166 

2135 

IS^fTS «“ SM 

Milan 


Bona Comm 

5478 

OK 

Bastoal 

B6J0 

M 

Benetton grow 

26750 25500 

CIH 

i-ri 




1.1 

Enlchem 

2710 

2660 

Ferfln 

m-7/^5 

k .. J 

Fertln RIsp 

809 

783 

Rat SPA 

4W5 

4810 

Fkimeeaamea 

182S 

W71 

CewertHI 

41000 40450 

IF 1 

19300 18789 

itotews 

12775 12500 


5850 


ItalmoOfllort 

40290 38600 

Medlabancei 

16400 T60S0 

MetMedlson 

1191 

1193 

Olivetti 

2490 

2350 



n-.-ii 

RAS 

7 .. 1 

SlswscBftte 

L'.'iVl 

I*- 

Saip«m 


I'M 

San Paolo Torino 10730 10600 

SIP 

4301 

4136 

SME 

3901 

3858 

snm 

1931 

1B45 

Stonda 

28280 28200 

Slot 

4610 

*550 

Toro AMI RI5P 

30450 29300 




— 




Montreal 


Alcan Aluminum 32*k 32 

Balk Montreal 26% 2640 
Bell Canada ' 
Bombardier B 
CanWar 


43V, 47% 
2M 20]W 
21 to 214% 
8 n> 

2V, 7ft 
7S * i 25 

TTA 22 
I) 11 
2246 22ft 
21ft 21ft 
19 IV 
10ft IF* 
21 21 


Dominion Text A 

Donahue A 
MacMillan BI 
Natl Bk Canada 
Power Cora. 
Quebec Tel 
Quetear A 
Quebecer B 
Toltgiote 
urvhra 
Vktaofran 


Parte 


Accor 

AlrUomde 
Alcatel A Whom 
A« 

Barajlrr (Ctal 
Bit. 

BNP 

BSJI+GD* 

Og^aur 

Cerua 

Chorgeure 

Md FronC 

IH-a 11 - 

Euro Disney 
Gen. Eaux 


3SO 2 
43050 4 

1089 10 
3510 31 


ImetQI 636 «7 

Latarge Cappec 474 473JQ 
Lea remd auo aaa 

Lyon. Eaux 590 510 

Drool CL") 1340 1349 

L-VJVLH. 3915 3910 

Matro+tachetto 16800 HA. 
MtctMln B 25940 256 

Moulinex 126J0 12240 

Paribas 07 548 

Pechlnev Inti ZZ9 22640 
Pornod-Rleard 421 417.10 
Peuteot S54 850 

Prtartamps (Au) 1016 1003 
RadJQtedxikwe 51B482JQ 
' 148JQ 





SaoPatrio 


Banco do Brasil 

Banesta 

Brodesca 

Brahma 

Pnranopanema 

Petrobras 

Tetobros 

Vale Rio Doce 

Varls 

a: jr too. 


1300 1250 

8100 7400 
8300 0300 
1400a 1400a 
□OD 1060 
9000 9700 
24700 23700 
63509 54000 
95000 95000 


Singapore 


aw 
DBS 
Fraser Neave 
Gonttng 
Golden Hope PI 
Haw Par 
Hume Industrtas 
inchcaae 
Keccei 
KLKteona 
Lum Chang 
g^MntBankg 

OUB 

OUE 

Sembawang 

Shangrlle 

Simeoarbv 

SIA 

SUore Land 
STOW* Press 
Sing Staomshlo 
STtaxta Tetecomm 
Strain Trading 
UOB 
UOL 


BJD BAD 
7.10 70S 
1140 1170 
19 1BJ0 
1800 17 JO 
200 200 
15* 3J6 
470 *79 
505 5JB 
1000 1070 
X10 302 
105 1J0 
970 9.19 
1X70 116a 
&40 075 
7.60 700 
1X40 1180 

575 573 
390 300 
7J3 7(45 
775 70S 
14 JO 1470 

AM 446 
ita m 
304 172 
1000 W70 
219 115 




232104 


Stockholm 


AGA 
Asea A 
Astra A 

Atlas Copco 
E lectrolux B 
Ericsson 
Essetta-A 
Handeisbankon 
investor B 
Norsk Hydro 
Procardia AF 
Sandvlk B 
SCA-A 
S-E Banken 
Stendla F 

siore 

Tredeborg BF 
Volvo 

fiJ2®Tvaertetao: 
mniuus : mj 


432 422 

^ ft 

% % 

353 344 

& S 
200 — 
263 ... 
145 142 

19 136 

149 145 

65A 67 

192 190 

716 710 
MO 142 
463 450. 


§ 


One Prev. 


Sydney 


Amcor 

ANZ 

BHP 

Bortl 

Bougainvllto 
Coles Myer 
Coma Ico 
CRA 
C5R 
Dunloa 
Footers Brew 
Goodman Field 
ICI Australia 


Magellan 

AMM 


Nat Aust Bank 1JJ6 1206 

Nows Coro 1008 947 

Nine Network 6.12 &m 

N Broken Hill 4.13 407 

Pioneer Infl Kn 3 

Nhmndy Poseidon 245 2X3 

QCT Resources 1(40 141 

5antas 400 4 

TNT 245 2M 

Western Mining un 743 

WestPcC Banking 532 525 

Wtoodslde 465 454 


Tokyo 


Akal Eiectr 472 455 

A*iW Chemical <99 696 

Asahi Glass 1100 1160 

Bank Dl Tokyo 1610 1600 

Bridgestone 1*60 1440 

Conor 1620 J6B0 

Costa 1150 1130 

Dal Nippon Print 1840 1850 

Dalwa House 1670 1650 

Datwa 5ecurfttes 1700 1660 

Fanuc . 

Full Bank 
Fuji Photo 

Fujitsu 
Hitachi 
Hitachi Cable 


ItaYakado 

Itochu 

Japan Airlines 

Kallma 

Kansal Power 
KasnasaU Steel 
Klrtn Brewery 
Komatsu 
Kubota 
Kyocera 
Matsu Elec l Mis 
Matsu EtacWta 
Mitsubishi Bk , 
Mitsubishi Kassil 
Mitsubishi Elec 
Mitsubishi Hev 
Mitsubishi Carp 
Mitsui and Co 


4450 4460 

223Q TZa 

38 ?£ 
23 S 

1630 1610 
5610 £610 
6W 600 
650 658 

960 964 

2810 2790 
360 349 

1270 1H0 
S79 87V 

617 613 

6870 6900 
1670 1680 
1120 1100 
2880 2£0 
470 474 

574 569 

705 703 
HID 1120 
735 730 

l&lS 

ion nun 
mo in® 

1320 1290 
949 946 

735 735 

352 343 
634 <UB 
840 J33 
2270 2250 
7790a 


Mitsumi 
NEC 

NGK Insutartoro 
NDcko Securffles 
Ntawa Kaaaku 
Nippon DM 
Nlooan Sled 
Nippon Yusen 
Nissan 
Nomura Sec 
NTT 

Olympus Optical 1080 MSP 

P io neer 32*o sow 

Rian m 7B5 

Sanya Elec 468 457 

Sharp 1630 1400 

Shlmazu 690 MB 

Shine tsu Onti TOO 1900 

Sony 6310 6290 

Sumitomo Bk 2160 2191 

Sumitomo Chem 432 424 

Sunil Marine 90S 908 

Sumitomo Metal 290 288 

Tatael Coro 7i» 710 

Taisho Marine ,859 850 

TakedaChem 1330 1300 

TDK 4370 <260 

Tetlln 463 464 

Tokyo Marine 1300 1290 

Tokyo Elec Pw 3450 3460 


ToaaanPming 1330 13X 



Toronto 


MOTH price 

17ft 

15ft 

Aon) co Eagle 

1SVS 

ISft 

Air Canada 

6>4 

6ft 

AteertaEnerav 

20ft 

19ft 

Am Borriefc Res 

34 ft 

34ft 

ace 

47ft 

47ft 

Bk Nova Scntki 

30ft 

31 

bc Gas 

16ft 

Uft 

HC Telecom 

3Sft 

2Sfe 

BF Really Mds 

N.Q. 

am 

Bramalea 

067 

0*7 

Brunswick 

9ft 

9 

CAE 

ift 

6ft 

Omaev 

5-- 

5% 

CfBC 

36% 

34ft 


Canadian Pacific 24Vs 


12ft 

12ft 

44ft 

J 

liTta 

100 

2DH 

22ft 

025 

6U 

25 

0.96 

16ft 

ijob 

400 


Can Packers 
Con Tire A 
Cantor 
Cora 

CCLIndB 
dneotox 
Com taco _ 
ConwestExpl 
Denison Min 8 
Dickenson Min A 
Dofasco 
Dylex a 

Echo Bay Mines 
Equity Silver A 
FCA inti 
Fed Ind A 
Fletcher Choil A 2Bft 
FPI 3ft 

Gentro 058 

GoUKorp Bft 

GuHCdaRes 4ft 
Hoes inti |« 

Hemlo Gld Attics 13ft 
HoU taper l^i 

Hoistxjm IMk 

Hudson’s Bay 30ft 
Imasco 39ft 

Inca 37 

interorov Mpe 33ft 
Jannoefc 21ft 

Labatt 22ft 

LobtawCc 23 ft 

Mackenzie lift 

Mngna Inti A 66ft 
AttrHftne 24ft 

Atartt Res 0ft 

jwocLean Hunter IMS 
Matson A 2gk 

Noma ind A 7ft 

Norandalnc Hft 
Moronda Forest 12ft 
Norcea Energy 15ft 
Ntharn Telecom 42ft 
Novo Coro _9ft 

Oshawa 22ft 

PoourtnA 160 

Placer Dome 32ft 
Poco Petrotoum 10ft 

pwa Coro iJi 

H ayrack 17ft 

te teroB^ 20ft 

RayrtBonk Can 29ft 
Sceptre Res 14ft 

Sc OirsHQ SP 9ft 

Seagrani 3Bft 

SearsCan 8 

Shell Can 39ft 

Sherrlft Cordon 
SHLSvstemhse 
Sauthom 
Spar Aerospace 

SMCOA 

Talisman Energ 

Tuck B 

Thomson News 
Toronto Dotnn 
Tarstai B 
Transalta Util 
TransCda Pipe 
Triion Fini A 
Trbnac 

TrbecA 

Uidcoro Energy 


11 

7ft 

18V* 

20 

♦ft 

29ft 

26ft 

17ft 

71ft 

26 

15ft 

19ft 

620 

16ft 

098 

IL7Q 


23ft 

12ft 

13ft 

44ft 

Jft 

10ft 

305 

20ft 

22ft 

026 

6ft 

25ft 

0.95 

17 

106 

4 

Bft 

20ft 

5ft 

0J3 

8ft 

4ft 

16ft 

13ft 

13ft 

19 

30ft 

42ft 

36ft 

33ft 

21ft 

22ft 

22ft 

lift 

66ft 

24ft 

Bft 

10ft 

26ft 

7 

25ft 

12ft 

15 
41ft 

9ft 
22ft 
300 
32ft 
10ft 
IX 
17ft 
29ft 
20ft 
MB 
29H 
14ft 
Bft 
39ft 
Bft 
40 
It 
7ft 
10ft 
19ft 
8ft 
29ft 
26 Vi 
17ft 
2Tft 
26 
15ft 
19ft 
400 

16 
090 
N.Q. 


TSE3O0 Index: 445200 
P revto og : 444870 


Zurich 


Adia Inti B 270 245 

Atusutoe B new 624 60S 

BBC Bntn BavB 1006 1090 
ObaGeleyB 958 945 

CSHOWlnasB 730 739 
Eleklrow B 4140 4120 
FHcherB 1270 1250 

■nten&sCDunt B 2270 2200 
Mmall B 975 S75 

Landis Gvr R 971 M2 
Lh Hid B 600 600 

Moevenpick B 435 «3S 

JSSJft jj 1357 1359 

paiULBinhrieR 15450 152 
ParoesoHid 8 1635 1600 

RCCteHdBPC 7W0 7040 
Sefra Republic 145 1*3 
ScmSazB 4240 4200 

sqdndtarB 7740 7450 
Sutler PC tos 807 

SwveJItoiaeS 7M0 2r« 
SwIssBnkCarpB 500 500 
Swiss Retasur R 603 6M 
Swtauir R B4S 845 

UBS B 1461 UM 

watermurB BOO 000 
Zurich Ass B NA 1532 

KMSr ; «P 


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U.S. FUTURES 


Via Assecteed PM 


Ml 8 


Season Season 


open HU Low One Ow OP.H 


X49V4— 0M3 19,155 

X57ft +IL01 BJ29 
346ft tAOlto 1+553 
X46ft*<UBU 1430 

155ft +001* 140 


3J0M~O02U 1X403 
X54V. tOJMft 7.96* 
143V. tOJOft 10.141 
X4ffl VOOI 0391 

xsoft+ojm* ijni 

152ft + 002ft 5 


Grains 

WHEAT (CBOTI &4NbunMnum-iloOarsM 
X9491 3J» Mar94 3J0 X72 3J7 

X73 XOO Mayta 156ft X59 3J6 

156 196 July* 144ft 348ft 344 

157ft 132 SepW X45W XWft 34Sft 

365 309 Decta X52 155ft X52 

1C? Sit AH 95 

EsL Hies 10JR0 Man's, sdet 7490 
Man's wen kitSU5S Olf 491 
WHEAT (KBOT5 urn baixMiun- damn M 
392 298 MOT 94 X62ft 163ft 160ft 

U9H 2S8 Mayta 154 XSSft XSH 

155 297 4494 341ft 344ft 341 

155ft atUftSteta 144ft 3L45 141ft 

160 112ft Decta 149ft X50ft 149ft 

XS2» 143ft MOT 95 
Est sales NA. Men's.idcs W 
Mat's open W 34J17 rft 729 
CORN iCBOn Smi>iiT66Ri(ii.MgHpelHM 

lllft 232ft MorM 291ft 242ft 25nk 191ft W4M 

116ft 2J8ft Mav ta 2.96ft 297* 296ft 2J7ft +(LDMr 9540 

116ft 241 JulW 298 299 297ft 290ft -HUOft 01 J99 

X92ft 240ft Sep W 2J1ft 243ft 241ft 24316+001*18.172 
173ft IMftDocta 245ft 241ft 245ft 240 +0u02ft 45JH4 

179ft 253ft MW 95 271* 224* 271ft 274 +0O2VI 2W7 

281 273 MOV93 275ft 277ft 275ft 277ft +20715 266 

ZOIft 2MWJSXH 277ft 279 277ft 279 fJUBft *3 

2JBft 251 ft Dec M 253ft 254ft 253 254* +000* 71 

srwL'““ 

7.51 5.92ft May W — „ «. — 

740 SMftJBIM 679ft 603* 677ft 

7J5 628 Augw 449ft 674 649ft 

619ft 617 Septa 651 656 651 

?Sft SJSftNovM 635 642 634* 

670 610ft JanW 6«ft 645ft 440 

tJ3* fcSftjSw* 6J7H 657ft 457ft 

650ft 541 ft NOV 95 6.15 620 635 

Est sales 40000 MonY. sales 39489 
Mai'soaaiM 1706W tft 301 
50YBBAN64EAL ICBOT3 IWlen+cWartiMr 
SjO USJDMorta 19520 19728 19440 

mm UUDMOYH >9420 19620 19650 

23600 193J»JlXta 19420 19640 TM20 

ra-l m ItlJDAugM 19X20 19*20 19X20 

21040 1 89 JO Septa I9IJV 17X00 19120 

20600 WJOOdta 19920 19120 M9J0 

2Wi» 440 Decta 11150 19020 18820 

m00 16650 Jon 95 1*920 19050 10920 

EASMS W200 NttUM H921 
Mari open imp ip ffl 

SOYBEAN OIL ICBOT3 HMta-(MnwmeL 
3025 Tl.UMarta BUD 28.17 27-W 2723 -US 28292 

3045 21 JO Mav 9* 3 840 ZS2I 2729 2723 -620 UK* 

M 2123249* 272] 2727 2741 2748 -0.16 1 UK 

»20 2TJSAU094 1725 2740 2722 2725 —025 540 

SS 2240S6P9* MJB 2600 2671 2622 -0.11 5OT 

£5 72. 10 CW M 2520 2SJ0 2577 2520 -022 3203 

26ta ayooecta 2S2S 2S2S 2&15 2529 +0JR 1331 

taS 2245 Jan ts 25.15 2530 2610 2529 +021 SB 

7SJD 25-50 MorfS 2690 19 

Etf.raes 19200 Men’iSdte 116J2S 

963B5 w» WM 


6 Man 673ft 677ft 671ft 
I 674 ft 421* 675* 


67*ft +020* STM6 
679* +021ft *6224 
621 +001*34273 

673 +022 6780 

655* + 024ft 1701 
640ft +1125 19726 

645ft +QW 1429 
651ft +121 197 

iJJft C-S3M3V] 2JS 
619ft ♦ 022ft 074 


19550 +120 2120I 

19540 +0J0 2BJ76 

19540 +020 17205 
19600 +120 7.119 

19X50 +140 3.991 
11050 +140 2.2** 

1040 +L30 6303 
19020 +1J0 637 


Livestock 


CATTLR (CMBQ •4eQte-eml»ra-ft ^ 
7651 7X90F«O« 7120 7247 7157 

KJ5 73J0Acrta 7420 76T7 707 

SSS 7125 Junta 7175 7340 

73J7 TOTOAugta 7147 7295 7Zg 

7185 71270094 £75 71F 7275 

l m +1 lUJHCW 7X40 7327 7325 

76S 7X00 FH) 95 7X25 7X25 7320 

eiGate *1471 Mjavrag, '*&* 

Munjopenw 91J26 gL. 4W ____ 

ruoen CATTLE taMK naepcWii 
9525 79 47 Marta 8640 BOJO Bfi 

ES'aa 7920APTW 1942 79.90 7VJ2 

tad 787UMOVM 7922 7940 79 JO 

nS njsAugta bus 1X97 auo 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 1994 


l^egussa 9 s Restructuring Pays Off 


By Brandon Mitchener 

JmsiKUtewf^^ 

— No longer burdened by 
□profitable minino u^nn^u n 


««iwnes, we German sp*. 
SfeS™ 6 *' P"^ 00 * metals ana rihanna- 
wufirak conglomerate Degussa AG ufpoised 
to boost its profitability with or without an 
- 1 -* - 

■ *T d P rofit * “* a tong way Iran soar- 
ing, but they are nsmg,” said the company’s 
manning director. Gen Becker, after azmouno- 
mg a j percent increase in sales, to 3.5 bfflion 
Deutsche marks ($2 billion) and a 25 percent 
Increase m pretax profit, to 6] million &M, in 
the fourth quarter of 1993 
to the year ended Sept. 30. sales rose 16 
pcroait and profit was flat at 121 nafficn DM. 

“If the economy expands in the second half, 
that is reason enough to start thinking about a 
higher dividend," he said. Last year, ns payout 
was unchanged at 7 DM a share. 

rVoilCCQ eknrup x_ _ 


* — •** i x^ivjl a huarc. 

profit nse. Analysts said the company appeared 

Granada TJ< 

Raises Bid 

For LWT S 


to be cm the road to; recovery after two years of 
restructuring that saw a 400 million DM reduc- 
tion .m opectfing costs and a IS percent, or 
5,180, cut in stall 

While part of the company’s performance Iasi 
year. can be attributed to one-time gains, analysts 
said Degussa’s successful restructuring showed 
the earnings potential that awaits olber Goman 
companies that started cutting costs later. 

“Degussa realized early that its overhead was 
too highT said Harald Gruber, an analyst at 
Nomura Research Institute Deutschland and 
author of a recent report on Degussa’s transfor- 
mation. from a metals conglomerate to a spe- 
cialty chemicals manufacturer. 

“They (fid everything right except for Ley- 
bold." Mr. Gruber said, referring to the costly 
sale of Degussa’s unprofitable vacuum- technol- 
ogy unit to - Switzerland’s OcrUkon-BObrie 
Holding AG in January. '“Now Ley bold is 
gone, and they are in a good position to use the 
money that has been wasted for the last few 
years more efficiently in developing their chem- 
icals and pharmaceuticals operations." 

Founded as a corn and precious metals con- 


cern in 1 868. Degussa is still widely regarded as a 
metals company. Karl Wagner, an analyst at 
Drcsdner International Research Institute, a 
subsidiary of Dresdner Bank AG. noted that 
Degussa’s shares rose sharply recently when Me- 
tallgeseUschaft AG, another company heavily 
dependent on metals trading, announced it was 
is trouble. “Degussa and MeiaUgeseOschaft are 
elastic investment alternatives." he said. 

Bui while metals- sector sales still account for 
half of revenue, their comribu tion to earnings is 
declining as diversification in other f idds, espe- 
cially pharmaceuticals, begins to pay off. 

“Degussa only uses their metals activities to 
guarantee a supply of materials for value-added 
products," Mr. Gruber said. On the other hand. 
“MetaUgeseUschaft saw metals as a profit cen- 
ter” and suffered when cheap imports from 
Eastern Europe undermined its prices, be said. 

Degussa has concentrated its precious metals 
activities cm refining and trading and selling 
products containing precious metals. It dis- 
solved its primary production division, which 
included mining activities, on SepL 30. 


Lloyd’s Loss Put at £2 Billion 


Complied by Our Staff From Dispatches 
LONDON — Granada Group 
PLC raised its bid for the television 
broadcaster LWT (Holdings) PLC 
on Tuesday, and some analysts 
called the new offer a good one 
despite LWTs quick rejection. 

The new bid to create Britain’s 
biggest commercial progr ammi ng 
concern values LWT at about £776 
million ($1.15 billion) and LWTs 
shares at 750 pence each. 

Granada is offering 13 of its 
shares plus 100 pence cash for ev- 
ery 10 LWT shares or 686 j*nce a 
slime in cash. The original bid was 
six Granada shares for every five of 
LWT, or 528 pence. News of the 
increased bid sent LWT shares up 
35 pence, to 737 pepet 
Anthony de Larrinaga, a media 
analyst at Panmure Gordon & Co., 
said, “LWTs shareholders should 
accept the offer if they have sense.” 

Bui LWTs chairman. Sir Chris- 
topher Bland, said the offer seri- 
ously undervalued the performance 
and potential of LWT. 

LWT has the London weekend 
broadcast license far JTV, Britain's 
independent television network. 

A merger with Granada, which 
has a broadcast license for north- 
western England and operates rent- 
al, leisure and computer businesses, 
would give the combined company 
a potential audience of 16 nnffion 
people. (Reuters, Bloomberg, AFX) 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

LONDON — Lloyd's of London 
is expected to sustain a £2.05 bil- 
lion (S3 bflhon) loss, its fourth con- 
secutive year of bad results, when it 
publishes its results for 1991 on 
May 25, Chatset Ltd. said. 

This was double Outset's esti- 
mate of £1 billion made in Septem- 
ber. The independent analytical 
company also predicted the insur- 
ance market would suffer a further 
£1 bfflion loss in 1992 before re- 
turning to profitability for 1993. 
Lloyd’s publishes its results with a 
three-year delay to allow for die 
settlement of insurance claims. 

Chaisef s estimates have proven 
more accurate than Lloyd’s own. 

“ftjar 1 underwriting in 1991 ac- 
counted for a deterioration of £700 
million," said Charles Sturge, co- 


editor oT Chaise fs guide, referring 
to losses carried over into 1991 
from claims on insurance policies 
from previous years. 

A total of £850 million of losses 
are expected to stem from insurance 
policies Lloyd's wrote in previous 
years, notably the 1980s and 1990. 
In addition, inadequate reserving 
for catastrophes were multiplied by 
the impact of the London-market- 
excess reinsurance spiral. 

The spiral was essentially a fee- 
driven phenomenon, in which some 
underwriters took on reinsured li- 
abilities without proper knowledge 
of the risks they were accepting and 
then inadequately reinsured these 
risks, leaving them with substantial 
exposure. This practice coincided 
with a spate of seven catastrophes 
between 1987 and 1990. costing 


INDIA; Widespread Piracy Poses Problems for TV 

Prtnimwd fnm Ptige 9 LtfL, the Mcxfi-Disney venture. With many operators aaosj 


who heads thepait of the sprawling 
family-owned Modi group that has 
farmed a joint venture with Waft 
Disney Co. to distribute and pro- 
duoeprograms in South Asia. 

“The future is in local-language 
programming and delivering a 
mil-defined advertising audience," 
aid Mr. Modi, whose first dubbing 
of a Disney production into Hindi 
is now broadcast on Doordarshan’s 
main channel That children's show 
is the country’s most successful 
program. 

Buena Vista Television (India) 


Ltd. the Mcxfi-Disney venture, 
says it can dub most, of the Disney 
catalogue into Hindi and India's 
other main languages and tap into 
Bombay's massive domestic film- 
production business. 

Mr. Modi also says he will an- 
nounce plans for his own Hindi- 
language entertainment channel 
within two months after negotia- 
tions for satellite access are com- 
pleted- 

But even if Mr. Modi. Buena 
Vista or others form their own net- 
works, they will still have to deal 
with the Mr. Khans of the cable 
world. 


Reuters’ Profit Rise 
Of 15% for 1993 
Exceeds Forecast 


Lloyd's an estimated £13.6 biflion- 

According to Chatset, catastro- 
phes such as the Exxon Valdez oil 
spill “are still churning around the 
spiral causing syndicates to find 
extra reserves as (heir reinsurance 
protection is threatened." 

A breakdown of where Chatset 
expects losses to be deepest shows 
that despite an estimated £4.13 bil- 
lion of premiums in 1991. marine 
insurers will sustain a loss of £1.2 
billion- This stemmed from “all- 
time record losses" of vessels for 
“bread-and-butter” cargo and hull 
insurance in 1991, Mr. Sturge said. 

Looking at 1993, Chatset said it 
was confident Lloyd's would 
bounce back: 1993 has “all the hall- 
mark of a first-class year." 

{Bloomberg, Reuters) 


BliwJvrg Busmen Sc*s 

LONDON — Reuters Hoi din as 
PLC said Tuesday its pretax profit 
for 1993 rose 15’ percent, to £440 
million *5652 million), from £383 
million in 1992. 

As it announced its sironger- 
ihan-expected results, which in- 
cluded a return ro double-digit rev- 
enue growth in the second half of 
tire year. Reuters also said it would 
recommend a 4-for-l split of its 
ordinary shares. It also said its 
American depositary receipts, 
which have each represented three 
current shares, would be redefined 
to rep resen i slx of the new shares. 


Stora Reverses 
Its 1992 Loss 

Bloomberg Businas .Whs 

STOCKHOLM — Stora 
Kopparberes Bergslags AB 
said Tuesday it bad profit of 
530 million kronor (S67 mil- 
lion) in 1993. reversing a loss 
of 1.4 billion kronor in 1992, 
largely because of favorable 
currency-rate movements and 
its cost-cutting program. 

The paper-and-forestry- 
products company also an- 
nounced plans to merge its 
packaging operations with 
those of the Ahlsirom group of 
Finland. 

In the fourth quarter. Stora 
had a profit of 236 milli on 
kronor, compared with a loss 
of 926 million kronor a year 
earlier. Its board proposed an 
unchanged dividend of 6.50 
kronor a share. 


With many operators across the 
country allegedly backed by crimi- 
nal organizations that provide pro- 
tection in return for a stake in their 
cash flow, buying out the indepen- 
dent operators will not be a simple 

fa-dr 

■ STAR TV Names Deputy 

Gene Swinsiead, formerly the 
general manager of the South Chi- 
na Morning Post in Hong Kong, 
will join STAR TV immediately as 
its deputy general manager, A grace 
Fran ce~Pr esse reported from Hong 
Kong. 


CAR; Toy or Hot Rod for Asia? 

fy>ntimi«l from Page 9 called supercars, expensive 


ber of high-performance cars," said 
Gianfranco Venturelli, general 
manager. “Making cars in mass 
production is a different culture." 

A more plausible explanation for 
the purchase, estimated to run the 
Southeast .Asian investors between 
$35 million and $45 million, was 
suggested by the seller. 

Tony Cervone, spokesman for 
Chrysler, said Lamborghini and its 
engineering department would aid 
the buyers in their interest in ex- 
panding into Formula 1 racing and 
developing technology for so- 


Page 11 

i 


The international news and fi- 
nancial information company's fi- 
nal dividend was 19.8 pence a 
share, bringing the total dividend 
for 1993 to 26 pence a share, an 
increase of 23 percent. 

“These results came in at the top 
range of estimates." said Brian 
Rusting, who follows Reuters for 
Yamaichi International. “They’ve 
seen order levels pick up during' the 
second half and could well see dou- 
ble-digit revenue growth continue 
in 1994“ 

Reuters shares rose 67 pence, or 
more titan 3 percent, to dose at 
£19.82. 

Analysts polled by Bloomberg 
Business News had predicted pro- 
tax profit would total £433.1 mil- 
lion. 

“Reuters is still a ‘buy/ " Belinda 
Clinton, an analyst at NatWest 
Markets, said in evaluating the re- 
sults. 

Some analysts said the most sig- 
nificant news for investors was that 
Reuters had resumed showing dou- 
ble-digit revenue growth in the sec- 
ond half after a couple of years of 
slower expansion. 

The company's revenue grew 7 
percent in 1992. but in the second 
half of 1993. its underlying growth 
— which excludes the effects of 
foreign -currency translations — 
reached an annual rale of 10 per- 
cent, its finance director, Rob 
Rowley, said 

Without correcting for foreign- 
currency translations, sales rose al- 
most 20 percent, to £1.87 billion, 
and earnings per share were up 29 
percent, at 72 pence. The figures 
were helped by the decline in the 
value of the pound during the year. 


Frankfurt 

DAX 

m 

2300 

22)0' 

2100— jt 


m\p — — — 

^s'ciircrJT 

1993 1994 

Exchange irtete 


London 
JFTSE 100 

' 3500— 

.:m — — 


Paris 
■CAC 40 



^sTcTiTSTF 


Amsterdam 

Brussels 

Frankfurt 

Frankfurt 

Helsinki 

London 

L ondon 

Madrid 

Milan 

Paris 

Stockholm 

Vienna 

Zurich 

Sources. Reuters, 


AEX 

Stock Index 

DAX 

FAZ 

HEX 

Financial Times 30 
FTSE100 
General Index 

MIB 

CAC 40 

Affaersvaeriden 
Stock index 
SBS 
AFP 


Tuesday 

Close 

436.54 

7.772.21 

2.107.21 
814.14 
1,943.57 

2.641.50 
3,440-2 0 
354.72 
1,083.00 
2^9945 

1.824.50 
502.33 
1 I 871L52 


1993 ■ 

Prev. • 
Ctose 

428.43 

7,741.96 

2,079.40 

800.65 

1.899-33 

2,632.90 

3,419.10 

347.24 

1,063.00 

Z287.Q6 

1301.45 

499.55 

1,067.29 


1894 

% 

Change 

♦1.89 

+D.39 

+1.34 

+ 1.68 

+2.33 

+0.33 

+0.62 

+2.15 

+ 1.88 

+0.56 

+1.28 

~+0.56 

+0.30 


InlcRUlHiul Herjlil Tribune 


called supercars, expensive high- 
performance racing cars sold for 
road use. 

Mr. Suharto and Mr. Djody. 
through their Bermuda companies, 
have invested S7.6 million over the 
past 18 months to take a 57 percent 
stake in Vector Aerornoiive, a small 
Wilmington. California, company 
that next year hopes to begin sell- 
ing its 5190,000 Avtecb SC Super 
Coupe. 

“They have no development 
skills," Mr. Cervone said of Vector. 
“With Lamborghini, they’ll be get- 
ting a huge set of brains." 


Very briefly; 

• Istituto M obi hare Itafiano SpA said the Italian government's initial 
public offering of a 33 percent stake was almost 10 times oversubscribed. 

• The European Monetary Institute, the forerunner of the European 
Union's central bank, has chosen Robert Raymond, the head of the Bank 
of France's credit department, as its director general. 

• Sobering AG. the German chemicals and pharmaceuticals company, 
said it earned 254 million Deutsche marks (S144 million) in 1993. down 3 
penreni from 1992. 

• Royal Dutch/Sbefl Group's proposed merger of its Shell Petroleum 
polyolefin business with the Nederland division of Montedison SpA is the 
subject of a European Commission investigation. 

• Codelouf & Ox, a Gibraltar-based investment company, said it will 
hold a 4 percent stake in Montedison SpA by the end of February. 

• Skandmaviska EnskOda Banken said it will sell three finance units in its 
FinansSkandk group to General Electric Co. of the United Slates. 

■ De Beets CoosoEdated Mines UtL, is selling £150 million ($222 million) 
in 15-year bonds in the British tnarkeu priced to yield 165 basis points 
more than the comparable British government bond. 

• Banca Nazionale del Lavoro SpA’s certificate of deposit and senior debt 
ratings were lowered by Standard & Poor's Corp.; separately, the bank's 
president, Giampero Canton!, resigned. 

• Royal KNP BT NV said it would sell its Korean graphics distribution 
company. BTl-Korea Ol and Modem Printing Ltd., of Hong Kong, to 
the Danish group East Asiatic Co. 

» PSA Peugeot-CStroeo SA. Europe's third -largest automaker, said sales 
in 1993 fell to 145.4 billion francs ($244 million) from 155.4 billion francs 
the previous year. 

• Digital Equipment Corp. will cut 5.000 to 6.000 jobs in Europe in the 
next 12 to 18 months as pan of a revamp of the unprofitable unit: Digital 
now employs about 29,000 in Europe. 

• Mirror Group Newspapers, leading a group of investors trying to buy 
Britain's Independent newspaper, sought to raise its bid for the troubled 
Newspaper Publishing PLC 

• Sodeta Fmanziaria Telefonica SpA's net profit for 1993 should exceed 
1.4 trillion lire ($82 billion I. in line with 1992 results, the managing director 

said. Bloomberg. AFX. Reuien. .4 FP 


NASDAQ 

TiKMdsy's Pj t Icot 

NASDAQ prices as aM pm. New York time. 
This list compfled by the AP, consists ol the 1,000 
mast traded securities in terms of dbtlar value, tt to 
updated twice a year. 


MMl LMfLrtStOTB* 
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Page 12 


ADC INVESTMENT ft SERVICES CO (EXJ 
Monomo-BahroliuPO TJO&F* STW* T Tl rifnc 

mABC Futures Fund Lkl 3 13443 

m ABC Islamic Fund IE. Cl — S I9U3 

m ABC Global Recovery Fd_s unit 

ABN AMRO BANK, PJO. Box 213, Amsterdam 


w Columbia Sfartt ta«_ ■ Cl l&ffl 

w Trans Europe Fund F( FI mis 

w Trans Europe Fund! s SIM 

■ Atrenta ei 2SU0 

AIG FUND MANAGEMENT Ud 

d AIG Anw. Eq. Trujl S JU 8 M 

■AIG Balanced Work) Fd s 1TL11M 

ITAIG Euroai Funa Pic Ecu IJUWS 

■AIG Euro Small Co Fd Pic -ft 1561032 
•»AlG Eurwo FaPtc—— J IHJUK 

wAlGJoaanFuM 1 1144(23 

■AlG Lotto America FdPlC-J 166J43J 

IV AIGMNIcummcT EM Fa PKS I 10 .IW 

»AIG South EasiAoEo Fd 1 270JBB 

0 High Ufe Fund Ecu 9.93 

a UBZ Euro-Optlmtrer Fund -Ecu 11*0 

d UB2UauKflrv fums I 11Z7M 

d UBZ UdvUllY Fund DM — DM 1Z11SJ7 

0 UBZ UauldiTy Fund Ecu Ecu lJUtoS 

d UBZ Umridlty Fund SF SF 110470$ 

ALFRED BERG 

d Alfred Bern Nonbrn I 1V9L03 

Alfred Berg Sian 

URjrEast S 17170 

a Garmon v DM ZB. II 

d Global s 1744* 

d Jam I . ■ V H7B7JW 

d Netherlands FI 24243 

d North America 5 1HU7 

d Switzerland SF TOkB7 

0U.K. 1 dll 

ALPHA FUND MANAGEMENT. LTD 
eg Por-Lo-VIIM Rd. Mammon. HMI1 Bermuda 


m Alpha Asia Hedee I Jem HI -S 109K 

m A loha Europe fa (Dec 311 -Ecu 27391 
m Alpha Futures Fd (Dec 3D J tom 

m Aloha GIU Pro Trod A 

mAipna Global Fdt Dec 31) S 100054 

in Alpha Hedge Fd (Dec 311 S 49IUM 

n, Alpha Japan Suec I Dec 31 IS 2*146 

at Alena Lain Amer (DhcHIA 27108 

m Aloha Pacific Fd (Dec 31) _l *49.75 

m Aloha SAM S 13221 

m Aloha Short Fd (Dec 311 S 0744 

171 Alpha Sm-T FU Inc (Dec 31)8 10044 

m Alpha T lUdate Fd lien 371-1 14621 

m Aloha Worthington (Jan JUS 11177 

m Burh-Aloha EurHdo Dec 31 Ecu 14&57 
roCurr-Aipno Him Cr Jan 31 _» 37141 

mGlooniveit Value Uon 311 _S 13*40 

■ Hefeel Japan Fund Y 12111 

m Hemisphere Neutral Dec Jl S 11440 

mLaHnwJ value— _J 

mNIdtAoDl Aurelia (Jem Jll—ft 187.77 

mPtxU RIM OOP BVr Jt*l J1 -5 17400 

m Hhisoen inn Fund | Dec 31 IS 1717 

m Save Inn FdIJan n | S T112D 

m Satus InTI Fd (Jan 11 1 S 11047 

ARRAL ASSOCIATES LTD 
w Arral American Quail Fd_4 14JM 

tt Arral Askm Fund. 5 *1170 

i* Amd Inti Hedge Fund— S 23023 

BAII. 13 Place VBMtanm. 7SH1 Parts 

■« inter mnrUwt FiMd 1 59634 

f inierpfil Convert fids FF 2277 J4 

I Intenttll InllBds S 52243 

r luterutf] Obl( Convertibles-! £7041 

liUermartet Multicurrency Funa 

mCioss A FF 2*U.*B 

m Class B --t US AS 

m Class C Y 53WUJ0 

BANK BRUSSELS LAMBERT (32-D SO »77 


tf BBL Invest America S ‘ 

d BBL Invest Hekrium B F 131 

d BBL Invest Far East Y 374 

d BBL Invest Asia S 3 

d BBL Invest Latin Amer i « 

0 BBL Invest UK i i 

d BBL Renta Fd lntl„ LF 43 

d Patrimonial LF ZH 

d Renta Cash 5-Medtam BEFBF 1233 
tf Renta Cash S-Medhim DEMDM 30 
d Renta Cash S-Medkan USD S 52 

d BBL IL1 Inv Goldmines LF I 

a BBL ILI invest Europe LF IS 

d BBL IL) invEura-imma LF IK 

d BBL tL) Invest world LF 40 

BANOUE BELGE ASSET MGMT FUND 
Sham Distributor Guernsey Ml 7200)4 


■* inti Eaullv Fund ISIcavi— ft 14JM d A< 

tv Inti Borel Fund I Slaw I S 1047 0 At 

w Dollar Zona Bd Fd (Slcavl J 1227 d At 

w Sferltna Equity Fd IStcavl J IJ7S 4 At 

■ Sterling Bd Fo (Stem) c 1342 0 At 

■ Oslo Pacific Realon Fd S 12. to d At 

BANOUE IND05UEZ d Ac 

w The Dragon Fund Sk»v S 1B4J5 d CM 

inJapan GfdFd A (l!/in/w_s 171 44 0 Ot 

m Japan GM Fd B HlrOI/WU 19*23 d Ot 

m Dual Futures Fd a A Units 1 130.15 d Ot 

m Dual Futures Fd Cl C Unltsft 11*30 d Ot 

171 Maximo Ful. FdSer. la.AJ 130258 d Ot 

mMavIma Fut. FdSer.lCLBl 1172S2 d Ot 

m Maxima Fut Fd Ser. 2 a. C J 19*23* d Ot 

m Ma>lnta Ful. Fd Ser. 2 Cl. DS 104541 d Co 

mlndosuez Curr. G A Units S 109*44 d Co 

in indusuez Curr. a B Units j 1UJ24 d Co 

• IPNA-3 I 4MM CRE 

d ISA Aslan Growth Fund 3 9453 d El' 

d isa Japan Res. Growth Fd.Y B7M» d So 

d ISA Pacific Gold Fund S 1*54 CRE 

d ISA Aslan Income Fund S 1241 d CS 

d I ndasuez Korea Fund S 11J1 d Bo 

nr Shanghai Fund. S 1140 d Bo 

bv Himalayan Fund } 1*34 d Bo 

u> Manila Funrt . s 77M d Bo 

w Malacca Fund s 2220 dBm 

w Siam Fund « 0144 d Ca 

d Indasuez Hang Kang Fund-S 61435 d Car 

d Oriental Venture Trust S 7LQ1B d CS 

d North Amer lam Trust S 3*. 155 d AC 

d Slnaap h Malay Trust S 373*0 d Eu 

d PocWc Trust. - — , HKS 38JS5 d En 

d Tasman Fund 5 7.13 d d Pa 

d Japan Fund. S 144*5 d CS 

» Managed Trust- — s RUTS dCS 

d Jaoan Warrant Fund S QJ8 d CS 

d worldwide Grawtti Fund 0Jt7 d CS 
iv fiMDsuez High YU Bd Fd— S NK52 d CS 

D Ma<l Frsmce FF 50059 « CS 

wMaxI France *5 FF 5001.16 d CS 

BANOUE SCANtHNAVE A LUXEMBOURG d CS 
BSS UNIVERSAL FUND (SICA V] d CS 

d Eurosec ECU a (DM ecu 1410*5* dCS 

d Eurasec ECU B iCtwl -„-Ecu 10*45* d CS 

d inlelsec USD A (CHv) A 221B15 d CS 

d tntatiK USD B (Coal S 224321 d CS 

d InletaondUSDAIDhr) S 1746*6 d CS 

d Intrtband USD B (Cap) S 20405 d CS 

d Flnnsec GftAal FM A (Dlvl FM 245.1*73 d CS 

d Rnnsec Global FMBICOPIFM 2*5.1*73 d CS 

d IntetbandFRFAItMv) FF 12UXM6 d CS 

d Intrtbond FRF B (Cap) FF 15843*2 d CS 

d Far Ensl USD A IDh#) S 787905 d CS 

d Far East USD B ICani S 28414* d CS 

d JaoonJPYACDIv) Y 1152.1451 d CS 

d Jaoan JPY B iCm>) Y 1152.1*56 d CS 

d Parsec FRF B team FF 12V481* d CS 

d Lalln America USD A (DtvH 27.1473 d C5 

d Latin Amerleo USD B ICopIS 27.1473 d CS 

d North America USD A (Dtvll 14.74*3 d CS 

d North Amer USD B iCOPt-S 16J0*2 d CS 

BANOUE SCAN D I NAVE EN SUISSE 4MSNEVA d CS 

wlnteftandCM SF 88-82 d CS 

•v Inteliec Oil SF 2235* d CS 

w SwISShmd CM SF 1*025 d CS 

BANOUE 5C5 ALLIANCE-CREDIT BANK- d CS 

(*•22] 3*6-1291. Geneva d CS 

i* Ptetade North Am Equities 4 107.13 d CS 

» Ptetade Europe Equities— Ecu MET* d CS 

iv Pielade Asm Pacific Ea s 10033 d CS 

iv Pleiad* Environment Ea I 10231 dCS 

>r Pieiode Dollar Bomb S 10*50 d CS 

tv Pielade ECU Bonds Ecu 11123 d CS 

w PhHaae ff Bomb ff iiimi d CS 

» Ptetade E um Conv Bonds _SF MOO* d C5 

iv Pietade Dollar Reserve S 19045 d CS 

v Pielade ECU Reserve— Ecu 1014* d CS 

w Pielade SF Reserve SF 10L02 d CS 

»» PiehweFF Reserve— .FF 10142 d CS 

BARCLAYS INTL FUND MANAGERS d CS 

Hong Kang. Tel: 1B52] 6281*00 d CS 

d China (PRO S 1050* d CS 

d Hcng Kang s itJH d CS 

C ireontsU J 1*672 d CS 

d Jaoan 1 *5*3 d CS 

a Korea s Ui/7 d CS 

d Matama S 2*952 d CS 

d PhlUptXnw S 28452 d Cl' 

W tJnmnnr. t 1B4B3 d CS 

d Tnolland 5 31541 d CS 

d South East Alla i *2.*SZ d CS 

BDD GROUP OF FUNDS d CS 

w BOD USSCwh Fund 1 S301JI d CS 

n BDD Ecu Cash Fund Ecu *02**8 d CS 


CREDIT COMMERCIAL DE FRANCE 

d Elvsees Monetalre FF 68 * 8*11 

d Sam Acttcmh USD B S 10*840 

CREDIT SUISSE 

d CSF Bonds— SF 

d Band Valor Serf SF 

d Band Valor US - Dollar s 

d Bond Valor D-Mark DM 

d Bond Valor Yen Y 

d Band Valor i Slerflns E 

d Convert Valor 5wf SF 

d Convert Valor US - Dollar _S 


d CSF International 
d Actions Su tens _ 

d Eurooa valor 

d Enatgio- Valor— 
d Pacific - Valor 

d C3 Gulden Band A. 
dCS Gulden Band B 
d CS HUM no Iberia 
d CS Htsaano Iberia 
d CS Prime Band A. 
d CS Prime Bond B. 
d CS Eurooa Band A 


n 

Fd A — Pta 
Fd B PtO 


EunoMBand 

EuroMBond 


B_ —DM 

I A DM 


Netherlands Fd A Ft 

Fixed I SF 7% 1/76 SF 

Fixed I DMI% 1/V6 DM 

Fixed I Ecu 8 3/4% 1/94, Ecu 


d CS Swiss Franc Bond B SF 

d CS Germany Fund A DM 


d CS Genwmv Fund B DM 

d CS Euro Blue Chips A DM 

d CS Euro Blue CMOS B DM 

d CS Shart-T. Btmd S A s 

d CS SJwrt-T. Band * B s 

d C5 Shart-T. Bond DM A SM 

d CS Sharl-T. Band DM B DM 

d CS Money Market FdS S 

d CS Money Market Fd DM— DM 


n BDD Swiss Franc Cosh SF 501*19 

» BDD hit. Bond Fimd-uSS S 582277 

» BDD Int. Bond Fund-Ecu —Ecu 74WJQ 
t> BDD N American Equity FdS 506558 
w BDD European Eaulty Fund Ecu 654453 

mBDD Asian Equity Fund S 267*55 

nr BDD US Small Cao Fund — S 194177 

w Euralinantlero Fixed Inc— FF 11399.13 

iv Eurofln MulU-Cv Bd Fd FF 1091077 

BELINVE5T MGMT (SSY1 LTO 

IV Beltnvest-BroUl 5 131134 

»* Beilnvest-Gtabal — S 19919J 

wBeilnvesf-iynel S 102184 

iv BeHnvsst-Muli(bond % 10*122 

w Beihivest-5usertor S 107*12 

BNP LUXEMBOURG 
INTEPCA5H 

/ Frzmce Monetalre FF 1*58325 

f France Seoir lie. „f F 1738744 

7 Inter Cash DM— DM 3T*63 

r Infer Cam Ecu— . . . Ecu Wu* 

I inter Cash GBP c 144542 

f Inter Cash USD— S 1230.48 

f Inter Casti Yen. — V 165170 

INTER OPTIMUM 

n Interoond USD S 1*4147 

wBEF/LUF BF 1087*140 

nr Mullldevises DM — DM 30*448 

if USD S 1382.13 

w FRF FF 1612178 

tv ECU — ECU IZ74J3 

INTER STRATEGIE 

nr Austro Ife S 134*42 

w France FF 133034* 

» Europe du Nona c 13*1142 

* Europe du Centre-— PM 30214* 

» Euraae du Sod Eat 9*846 

■v Japan Y 121338 

w Amer (aim du Nord. S M2*.*7 

w 5ud-EsI Asiatkrue. I 1M179 

BUCHANAN FUND LIMITED 
A Bank at Bermuda Lid: 10091 J95-4S00 

i Global Hedge USD S 14.1* 

7 Gtotxjl Hedge GBP t 1*7* 

I European & Atlantic S 1*10 

I Pacific s 11*8 

f Emerging Markets t 25.13 

CAIS5E CENT RALE DE3 BANOUE 5 POP. 

d Fructilux ■ OW Fsas A FF 6*3*12 

a Fruailux-ObL EirraB Ecu 15*087 

w Fnrdihi* ■ Actions Fsk C _FF 1014*16 


d CS Money Market Fd Yen_Y 
d CS Money Market Fd CS — a 
d CS Money Market Fd Ecu -Ecu 
d CS Money Market FdS F — SF 
d CS Money Market Fd HF 1 _F 1 

d CS Money Market Fd Lit Lit 

d CS Money Market Fd FF FF 

d CS Monev Market Fd Pta— Pto 
d CS Money Maket Fd BEF -BF 

d C5 Oefco-Protec A DM 

d CS Oeka-Protec B DM 

d CS Narth-Amerlcan A 5 

d CS Narth-Amerlcan B S 

d CS UK Fund A ( 

d CS UK Fund B ( 727.15 

d CS France Fund A FF 

d CS France Fund B FF 

d CSEuroreel dm 

d CS Italy Fund A — _Llt 

d CS Italy Fund B Lit 

a CS Nether lands Fd B — FL 

d CSFF Bond A FF 

d CS FF Band B FF 

d CS Capital SFR 2000 SF 

a CS Ganilrt DM 2000 -DM 

d Ci Control DM 1*77 DM 

d CS Capital Ecu 2900 ——Ecu 

d CS Camtal FF 2000 FF 

d CS Japan Megatrend 5FR — SF 
d CS Jaoan Megatrend Yen _Y 

d CS Pont me SFR A/B SF 

d CS Port! Bal SFR 5F 

d CS Port! Groom SFR -SF 

a CS Port! Inc DM A/3 DM 

d CS Pont Bal DM DM 

d CS Porn Growth DM DM 

a cs Pont me uss a/b s 

a cs Port! Bal USS — _ — — s 

d CS Portf Growth USS S 

d CS Eo Fd Emero Mhrs S 

d CS Ea Fd Small Cop USA— 3 

d CS Ea Fd Small Eur DM, 

DARIER HENTSCH GROUP 

Tel *1-72 708 £9 37 I 

d DH Motor Markets Fund SF mc*09 

d Herttscn Treasury Fd SF 1114*00 

d Samurai Portfolio,, - . — SF 12*20 
DISCOUNT BANK GROUP 

w Multlcurr. Bond SF I44S72 

iv Dolvol Bond — 1 123*27 

it Eunrval Eauhv Ecu 141S3S 

iv N. America Eauitv —— 5 1*3*45 

n> PocKtc Eoultv S 1*1*47 

DIT INVESTMENT FFM 

d Concentra + DM 5347 

d Inn Rentenfond *■ — DM 78J0 

DUBIN £ SWIECA ASSET MANAGEMENT 
Tel ; (BUT) 945 1*00 Fox : 180*1 *45 1488 

ft Hlghftrfdge Coaltai Carp S 12*323* 

mOvurlaok Pertarrnonce Fd_S 235447 

m Pacific RIM OP Fd 5 11646E 

EBC RJHO MANAGERS (Jerttvl LTD 
1-3 Seale Sl.St Heller ; 0534-36331 
EBC TRADED CURRENCY FUND LTD 

d Capital S 213*1 

d Income S 14452 

INTERNATIONAL INCOME FUND 

d Lang Term J 3L45S2 

d Lang Term - dmk — DM 110*863 

BOUIFLEX LIMITED 

iv Class C / North America R 1*64 

ERMtTAGE LUX (3KM073X) 
w Ermitage SeU Fund J 71.** 

w ermitage Aslan H edge Fd_s 1145 

ur Ermitage Euro Hedee Fd —DM 15.11 

ir Ermitage Cross* Asm Fd_l 2278 

w Ermitage Amer Hflg Fd— S 10-17 

iv Ermitage Emer Mkts Fd S 1641 

EUROPA FUNDS LIMITED 

d 4meriaai Eauitv Fund 5 2672* 

d American Ooffcn Fund S 21108 

iv Aslan Equity Fd J 14141 

w European Eauttv Fd 3 1X4* 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 1994 


ADVERTISEMENT' 


EX.) d Fructilux. Actions Euro D -Ear 186040 

ams d Fructlhj* - Court Terme E_FF 84*47* 

1JMS d Frucillux - D Mark F DM 1063.1* 

19443 CALLANDER 

10*26 wColtander Emer. Growth S 13643 

irdam » Callander F- Asset s 15046 

16540 if Callander F-Austrian A S 1*1178 

1IU1 w CMkMderF -Spanish Ptg W06740 

5276 i> Callander F-US HeaUh Cares 8283 

28040 nr Callander Swiss Growth SF 19*41 

CAMPBELL (BERMUDA) LTD 
31 4830 wGIbl Iwlrtuftonat (14 Jgn]— $ *344* 

7 Li 14 wGibi investors 114 jam s 100040 

307*96 CANADIAN INTERNATIONAL GROUP 

SLID32 d C! Conortan Growth Fd CS 673 

HJDf* d Cl North American Fd— CS 786 

1*4123 d Cl Pacific Fund CS 1841 

164633 a Cl Global Fund CS »72 

10.1167 d Cl Emerg Nlorken Fd CS W 

707032 d Cl European Fund CS 558 

9.91 d Canada Guar. MBrigageFdCS 1*48 

1340 CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL 
1278*6 tv Capital inn Fund— —5 17749 

0.1537 iv Capital Italia SA S *24* 

□5065 CDC INTERNATIONAL 

814765 w CEP Court Term* FF 17157045 

ivGFI Lana Terme. FF 151728840 

1*543 CIC GROUP 

d QMkk Court Terme FF 1744146 

1/176 d OMldc Monetalre ff 1675171 

23B.I1 aNDAM BRAZIL FUND 

17446 d Cbtaom Equity Fund S 1427173 

178740 d Ondarn Balanced Fund— 4 10L5J21 

2*243 CniBAMK (LUXEMBOURG] SA. 

1HL37 POB 1373 Luxembourg TeL 477 *5 71 

20847 d CM invest <5MK* Band S 

13.11 d Cttlnvest FGP USD S 12*253 

d CJlfnvasl FGP ECU Ecu Ut34B 

muda d Citirrveit selector S 172471 

16*48 d ailcurrandes USD S 161645 

371ft d aileumtKka DBM DM 741X7* 

22246 d CllicurrencfesGBP c 16041 

d ailcmrencto Yen Y 1234640 

OOOJS6 d CltlPOri NA Eauitv S 243J0 

4*049 d Clttaart Cant. Euro Eauitv,Ecu 1*1*0 

27146 d C Inport UK Eauitv [ I5Z27 

27546 d CJtfwrt French Eautty FF 1KU3 

*4*75 d atlport German Eauitv DM *45* 

■3221 d Cllleert Japan Eauitv Y 484340 

6746 d Clllport IAPEC S 261*5 

10846 d CMloort Eomec S 1*442 

14871 d Clffporl HAS Bond 5 1*651 

11377 d CHlport Euro Bona . . . Ecu 164.74 
14657 d Monoged Currency Fund— S 14242 

37242 d Cltlmarfcets Global Eaullv -1 ima 

13*46 d CIHmarhals Global Band I 12022 

12111 d CHtmarkefs Euro Equity S IJ145 

11*40 ivPltmktsGtaB EmergMfcHJS 166.19 

CITIBANK (PARIS) SA 

187.77 w Cltl H Cap Gtd S 101 12437 

11646 E CrTITRUST 

87.17 w US S Equities S 2827967* 

I1S7D iv US S Money Market I 1587868 

11047 w US I Bonds S 17.71742 

W Cl Aland S 13*844352 

1400 m CIHpertormance Pill SA S 154*442 

41S70 iv The Goad Earth Funa 1 1341482 

23433 COMOEST (31-1)4*717511 

w Comgeet Asia 5 1*2475 

*36 ft Campnt Europe 5F 126*41 

877J6 CONCEPT FUND 

52243 ft WAM Global Hedge FiL—S IUSA5 

67448 ft WAM Inti Bd Hedge Fd S 102074 

COWEN ASSET MANAGEMENT 
411.*S Cawen Eiderorlse Field N.V. 

msm wCkmAShs S 141256 

8*140 wCIOUBSta i 175546 

2937 CR EDIT AGRICOLE 

43140 INDEXIS 

€2940 d Index HUSA'S&P 500 S 1884 

(2140 d Inaexh Janan/NIkkel— Y 1801*6 

71145 d lndextsGBrvt/FT5E t 1441 

57371 d Indexls France/CAC 40 FF 1XL47 

26878 d InckMUCT FF 114.16 

25840 MONAXIS 

95549 d Court Terme USD 5 1670 

71240 d Court Terme DEM DM 3841 

d Court Terme JPY Y 2270.9* 

BbS5 d Court Terme GBP C 1122 

14166 d Court Terme FRF FF 13541 

Q440 J Court Terme ESP .Pfa 2*28.92 

«un d Court Terme ECU Ear 1974 

10*40 MOSAIS 

d Adlans mil Dtvenitlees— FF 13611 

d Actions Nord-Amerkabies J 2340 

14JS4 d Action* JoponalsH y 1*3654 

1647 d Actions Anglatees £ 1586 

1277 d Actions Allemando* . . DM 4BJ0 

1775 d Actions FranaMMS— FF 15744 

1462 d Actions Emi. 8. Port Pta 4290*3 

liio d Actions HaHenaes Ut 343567* 

d Actions Basshi Padflaue— J 3*78 

BOS d Obllg Inti Dlverslfleea FF 13244 

7146 d OOila Nord-Americalnes S 1*45 

9*73 d Obllg JmnaHeS— Y 236721 

3015 d Obllg Anglolses C 14.17 

1976 d Obllg Aiiemandes DM 4846 

10250 d Obllg Frencatses FF 1607* 

77S2 d Obllg Ew. & Pori Pta 31)40 

483* d Obllg Convert, intern. —FF 16041 

*441 d Court Terme Ecu Ecu 2151 

■946 d Court Terme USD I 1774 

1724 d Court Terme FRF FF 13*51 


INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 


Feb. 6,1994 


Opotabonx xupp E id by tunds »dq«L MM »s»qt vahro q uotat io ns tn snppSed by the Funds fated fritti Bta g xo eptio n at torn based oo too— griegs. 


The ntarglnxl xymbolt inJimf* t r*qu*n ey el quetoHana tupp&mt (d) - dflBy; (w) - w—ldy) (b) - M-mmdUy; (I) fartotgMlr two WHkaJt (i) - ngdwlR (t) • Met wewUK (m) - mon**. 


EVEREST CAPITAL WOT) 2*2 zm 

m Everest Capital mtl Ltd S 13133 

FIDELITY INTL INV. SERVICES (LUX) 
a DlBcavarr Fund__— 5 3170 

d Far East Fund— S 794S 

d FkL Amer. Assets, 5 20531 

d Fid. Arne, values IV 5 11745040 

d Frontier Fund S *023 

d Gtaboi ind Fund * 3042 

d Global Selection Fund 5 2152 

d international Fund— _S 2059 

d New Europe Fund ..5 1374 

d Orient Fund S 12644 

d Podlk Fund 8 40740 

d Special Growth Fund- 8 At* 

d World Fund. S I2I.* 7 

FINMANA CEMENT SA-L*geutg(4l7l/Z]*3iu 
w Delta Premium Carp— —5 116540 

FOKUS BANK AJL472 *3 585 
w Scanfands Inti Growth Fd J 1.13 

FUND MARKETING GROUP IBID] 

PJO. Bax 2001. Hamilton, Bermuda 

mFMG Global (31 Dec) S 15J1 

mFMGN.Amer. (31 Decl S 1245 

mFMG Eurooe 111 Dec) 8 1179 

mFMG EMGMKT (31 DK)_S 137* 

mFMG a (31 Dec) S 1070 

GAIA CURRENCY FUNDS 

it Goto Hedge H 1 1*14D 

iv Gala Hedge II I — — 8 19.14 

w Gala Swiss Franc Fd SF SS46 

w GAIA Fx— — 8 12058 

mGala Gunnxiteed CL I S 87.71 

mGaia GuoronteadCI.il S 8746 

GARTMOBE INDOSUEZ FUNDS sana/J* 

Tel : 13821 46 84 24 470 
Fax: (3531 46 54 23 
BOND PORTFOLIOS 

d DEM Bond — DIS 576 DM 664 

d Dlverhond DttZffl SF 375 

d Dollar Bond Os 271 S 251 

d European Bd Ols 1 71 Ecu 155 

d French Franc— DtslUO—FF 135* 

d Global Bond Dis277 S 259 

EQUITY PORTFOLIOS 

d ASEAN 8 *77 

d Asia Pacific S 576 

d Continental Europe Ecu 150 

d Developing Markets S 5.11 


d France FF 1259 

d Germany pm 5.73 

d Inlernortonal J 271 

d Japan ... Y 27000 

d Norm America S 273 

d Switzerland SF 475 

d United Kingdom C 174 

RESERVE FUNDS 

d DEM DtsSSZ DM 6.17B 

a Dollar Ota 207 8 2145 

d French Franc FF 1254 

d Yen Reserve Y 2857 

GE TIMOR FUNDS 

London : 071-*9W171. Geneva : 41-2235930 
w East Inv Kilment Fund— S 77871 

wScanwi world Fund s 4*oo*i* 

w State SI. American S 340*7 

GENESEE FUND LM 

» (A) Genesee Eagle S 13444 

■v IB) Genesee Short 8 6*75 

w (Cl Genesee Opportunity — s 15774 

■v (FI Genesee Non-Eitaltv S 14371 

GEO LOGOS 

wll Straight Bata B Ecu 105677 

iv II Pacific Bond B SF 144770 

GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT 

OFFSHORE FUNDS 

11 Athol SLOoiigto&l a( Man 4463662U37 

wGAMerica 1 43441 

» GAM Arbitrage S 3*144 

IV GAM ASEAN 8 51073 

iv GAM Boston S 380*5 

mGAM-Carglll Minnetonka 8 10577 

w GAM Combined. DM 1484* 

w GAM Cross-Market 8 1115* 

» GAM European. 8 *642 

wGAMFnmce— FF 217H46 

w GAM Franc-vat SF 27*4* 

wGAMGAMCO. 8 2225] 

w QAM HWl Yield 8 16073 

w GAM East Alia Inc 8 90154 

iv GAM Japan 8 84*49 

tv GAM Money Mkts USS 8 10024 

d Da Starting I 10052 

d Da Swiss Fnmc_ — JF 10040 

d DO Deutschemark DM 10060 

d Do Yen y 1000040 

• GAM Allocated Miti-Fd s 19676 

iv GAM Emerg MklsMItLFdJ 18*48 

W GAM Mitt- Europe USS S 15141 

w GAM Min-EuTOPe DM DM 15197 

w GAM MttLGIabal USS 8 2011 * 

iv GAM Market Neutral 8 11*71 

w GAM Trading DM DM 144.15 

w GAM Trading USS S 18247 

w GAM Overseas— _S 21214 

wGAM Pacific I *2*47 

wGAMSeledkai S 73853 

w GAM Singapore/ AfcjfavSo J 71047 

■v GAM SF Special Band SF 134.14 

wGAMTvche. S 32021 

w GAM U5 S 21286 

wGAMut Investments 8 B2S41 

iv GAM Value S 14074 

w GAM Whitethorn ] 18805 

w GAM Worldwide I 616.17 

w GAM Bond USSOrd s 146*5 

w GAM Bond USS Special % 21745 

w GAM Bond SF — . . S F 18572 

w GAM Bond Yen— Y 1457000 

w GAM Band DM — DM 12440 

iv GAM Band t I 17051 

w GAM (Special Bond 1 1514* 

ir GAM Universal USS S 17302 

trGSAM Composite s 37016 

SWISS REGISTERED FUNDS *1-1-422 7626 
Muhtobochstrasw 173104 OKRZurteb 

d GAM ICH) America-, SF 167544 

d GAM ICH) Earaae— SF 102*5 

d GAM ICH) Mondial SF 1*0549 

d GAM ICH) Pacific SF 30(146 

SEC REGISTERED FUNDS 

US East 57rd Street J4Y 10022717488-000 

w GAM Europe— 8 *140 

iv GAM Global S 16L30 

w GAM Intcrnattanal, 8 29*43 

w GAM North America 5 *05* 

■v GAM Pacific Bashl 8 1*142 

IRISH REGISTERED UCITS 
Edriefigt TerraeeDublln 1 3S3-I-676CW30 

w GAM Americano Acc DM *045 

tv GAM Eurooa Acc DM 14273 

■v GAM Orient acc DM 16*41 

wGAM Tokyo Acc— —DM 17236 

w GAM Total Bond DM ACC— DM 11343 

wGAM Universal DM Acc DM 19* JO 

GLOBAL CAPITAL MANAGEMENT LTD 
Bermuda: (80*) 2*54009 Fax: (1091 2*5-6160 
JWH GLOBAL STRATEGI ES LTD 

n> (C) FlnancM & Metdb 8 13602 

w (D1 KT Global 8 *631 

w IF) G7 Currency S BLI 0 

w (Hi Yen Ftaondot 8 16347 

W(J) Diversified Rsk Adi 1 11540 

w CKIintl Currency 8 Bond _S 10SS7 

w JWH WORLDWIDE FND-S 1642 

GOLDMAN SACHS 

w G5 Adi Rate Mari. Fd II 8 *08 

mGS Global Currency S 174*03 

wGS Global Eauitv I 1242 

wGS Work) Band Fund S 10.99 

w GS World Income Fund S 1052 

GOTTEX FUND MANAGEMENT 

wG. Swan Fund Ear 12*236 

GRANITE CAPITAL INTL GROUP 

w Granfie capital Equity S 14546 

wOrailte Capital MM Neutrals 1448* 

■v Grcmlte Capital Mortgoge— 3 13335 


HASENBICHLER ASSET MANOT GcuntM. 
wHasenbtaMer CemAG— 4 S5K40 

wHasmMcMerComlnc 8 12354 

irHasedMetiler Dhr S 10558 

WAFFT s 143am 

HEPTAGON FUND NV (599M15S8S) 

f Heptagon QLB Fund 5 1QS48 

m Heptagon CMa Fund 5 10945 

HERMES ASSET MANAGEMENT LTD 
Bermuda: 180512*54001 Lux : (352M04 64 61 
Esdmaled Prices / Bend - FmcJ 

m Hermes European Fund Ecu 35706 

m Hermes Norm American FdS 31136 

m Hermes Astan Fund S 3tBJB 

m Hermes Enter* MfctaFundJ 137.12 

otHennes Strategies Fund — S 7*2J5 

m Hermes Neutral Fund S 11741 

m Hermes Gkfccf Fund 5 66741 

m Hermes Band Fund Ecu 1312.18 

m Hermes Sterling Fd l 11344 

m Hermes Gold Fund 8 *38.17 

INCOME PARTNERS (A8I40 LIMITED 
w Aslan Fixed mconwFd— 5 HU02 

INTERNATIONAL ASSETS FUND 
2. Bd Rovol L-2*** Luxembourg 

w Europe Sud E Ecu 1MJ7 

INTERNATIONAL MGMT INCOME FUND 
w Treasury Compart m ent Fd JTL 1011*9 

1 NVESCO INTL LTD. POD 27k Jersey 
tel: 44 534 731 1* 

d Maximum Income Fund s t.1100 

d Sterling Mngd Ptfl C 2J340 

d Pioneer Markets c 74779 

d Okason Global Strategy— S 174200* 

d Asia Suner Growth S 267*80 

d Nippon WUrrord Funa % 24*80 

d Asia Tiger warrant S 62)00 

d Europeon Warrant Fund — 8 30600 

a Gtd N.W. 1994 8 *0900 

PREMIER SELECT FUNDS 

d American Growth 8 421 

d American Enterprise S 

d Asia Tiger Growth 1 

d Dollar Rrserve 8 

d European Growth 8 54300 

d Eunmean Enterprise 8 65300 

d Otabal Emerotna M ark ets -8 

d Global Growth 8 

d Nippon Enterorlse ■ 8 

d Nippon Growth ■ ..-.-8 

d UK Growth I 5.9500 

d Sterlbig Reserve t 

d Norm Amertaxi wa r ra n t — 8 45600 

d Grooter China Onpe 1 06300 

ITALFORTUNE INTL. FUNDS 
w Class A (Aggr. Growth ItaUS 7*8(740 

w Class B (Global Eauitv) S 1 106 

w Class C (Global Bond) S 1141 

w Class D (Ecu Bond) —Ecu 11.13 

JARD1NE FLEMING, GPU Bn 11441 Hg Kg 

d JF ASEAN Trust 8 62.10 

d JF Far East WmlTr- _s run 

i7JFG1abatCenv.Tr 1 1644 

d JF Hong Kane Trust 8 2535 

d JF Jcstan Sm. Ca Tr Y <8*7540 

d JF Japan Trust Y 1273040 

d JF Malaysia Trust 8 27J1 

d JF Pacific Inc. Tr. — J 14JJ 

a JF Thailand Trust ft 3644 

JOHN GOVETT MAffT (I.OAO LTD 
Tel: 46424 - 62 M 20 

w Govctt Men. Futures £ 1173 

w Govett Mon. Fut. USS 8 9 J9 

w Govern Gear. Curr JL 1152 

w Govett Man. Swlfcner Fd 8 144240 

JULIUS BAER GROUP 

d Baerbond SF 

d Conbar SF 

d Eauboer America — 8 


d Eauftner Europe SF 

1 d SFR ■ BAER SF 

d Stock bar SF 

d Swbsfcar SF 

d Lkulboer S 

d Europe Bond Fund— —Ecu 

d Dollar Band Fund s 

d Austro Band Fund AS 

d Swiss Band Fund SF 

a DM Band Fund—— —DM 

d Cancrt Bond Fond SF 

d Global Band Fund DM 

d Euro Steck Fund Ecu 

d US Stock Fund S 

d Pod he Stock Fin) 8 

d Swiss Stack Fund SF 

d Special Swiss Stock SF 15130 

d Japan Stock Fund Y 

d German Slock Fund DM 

0 Korean Slack Ftmd 8 

d Swiss Ftok Cash SF 

d DM Cash Fund DM 

d ECU Cosh Fund Ear 

d Sterilna Cash Fund t 

d DaDarCaO) Fund S 

d French F rare Cash FF 

tr Mutttodvtsor Forex Fd— 4 

KEY ASSET MANAGEMENT INC 

m Key Global Hedge S 277 JD 

m Key Hedge Fund me S 14747 

m Key Hedee Investments 8 145.91 

KIDDER, PEABODY 

b Otesmeake Fund Lid S 289623 

ft III Fund Ltd 8 108040 

ft mn Guaranteed FuikI S T277J6 

ft StanMienoeud 8 L5KL07 

LATIN AMERICAN SECURITIES 
Tel: London 071 6201234 
d Argentinian litrost Co SknvS 3072 

d Brazilian invest CoSfcnv— s 3LS6 

wCatomftton Invest Co Slcavj I 2 J* 

wLattn Amer Extra Yield FdS 124133 

d Lathi America income Ca_S M45 

tt Latin Anteriam Invest Ca_s 127] 

d Mexican Invest CP Sicav— S 50.11 

w Peruvian Invest Ca Slanr — 8 1477 

LEHMAN BROTHERS 
d Asian Draeen Pori NV A —8 MUD 

tf Aston Dragon Pari NVB—J 1040 

0 Global Advisor* Port NV AJ 1223 

0 Global Advisors Pari NV BJ 1218 

0 Lehman Cur Adv. A/B — 3 MO 

0 Pramltr Futures AttvA^_s *45 

LIPPO INVESTMENTS 
M/F Llpag Tower Centro 09 QueenswawHK 
TbI 1852) 8676488 Fax (6521 596 0388 

tv Java Fund. 5 VL23 

wAseon Fixed Inc Fd 8 HUB 

tv IDR Money Market Fd. S 123* 

iv USD Money Mortal Fd 8 1066 

w Indonesian Growth Fd s 2400 

w Aston Growth Fund 8 1443 

w Aslan Warrant Fund 8 *04 

LLOYD GEORGE MNOMT (85270454413 

w Antenna Fund 8 1935 

w LG Aston Smaller Cos Fd—S 206*50 

w LG India Fund Ltd 8 1547 

LOMBARD, ODIERBCIE- GROUP 
OBUFLEX LTD (CD 


d MulHcurrency 1 3470 

0 Dollar Medium Term S 2 ajn 

d Dollar Lone Term 8 224S 

0 Japanese Yen Y 504140 

0 Pound Sterilna 1 20a 

0 Deutsche Mark DM 1844 

0 Dutch Florin FI 1*43 

0 HY Eurocurrencies Ecu 17a 

0 Swiss Franc SF 1147 

d US Dollar Short Term S 1247 

0 HY Emu CurrDtvld Pay — Ecu 1244 
0 Swiss Multicurrency— -SF 1707 

0 European Currency Ecu 2307 

0 Belgian Franc BF 14349 

0 Convertible —ft 15.71 

0 French Franc FF 1 69 54 

0 Swiss MulIKkvtaerai SF 10 JB 

0 Swiss Franc Short- Term — SF 18572 

0 CcnaSan Dollar — — — CS 1450 

0 Dutch FkwinMuttl FI 1646 

d Swiss Franc Divta Pay SF 11.16 

0 CAD Multicur. Dlv Cl 1176 

0 Mediterranean Cutt SF 115* 

fl Convertibles SF 1052 

MALABAR CAP MGMT (BermoOG) LTD 

mMataber inti Fund S 2217 

MAH INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


OT ASSET MANAGEMENT (IRELAND) LTD 0 Swiss Franc Divid Pay. 

Tel: (44)71-71845 67 0 CAD Munkur. Dhr 

0 GTAseanFd A Shares 8 

0 GT Asean Fd B Stiares 1 

0 GT Asia Fund A Snares— ft 


0 GT Asia Fund B Shares— ft 
0 GT Aston Small Camp a Shft 
0 GT Aston Small Camp 8 Sh j 
0 GT Australia Fd A Shares—S 
0 gt Australia Fd B stwres_s 
0 GT Austr. Small Ca A Sh — 8 

0 DT Austr. Small Co B Stl 8 

0 GT Berry Japan Fd a Sh 8 

0 GT Berry Japon Fd B Sh s an 

0 GT Band Fd A Shares 8 2001 

d GT Band Fd B Shares 8 70.93 

0 GT Dollar Fund A Sh S 3578 

0 GT Doitor Fund B Sh S 

0 GT Emerging Mkts A 5ti— S 
d GT EnMrgtag Mkts B » — A 
d GT Em Mkl5mcl| CoASh _8 
0 GT Em MM Small Co B Sh J 
w GT Euro Small Ca F* 3h J 
w GT Euro »h 5 i: Co Fd B 5h_S 
u ur Hang Kona Fd A ShorosS 
0 GT Hong urn Ffl B Shores S 
0 GT Honshu Polhfinder A ShS 
0 GT Hansiki Pathfinder B Sni 
w GT jop O TC Stacks Fd A ShS 
w GT Joe OTC Slacks Fd B Sh* 

wGT Jap Small Co Fd A Sh 8 

wGT jop Small Co Fd B Sh— s 

w C-.T. Latin America Fd 8 

a GT Strategic Bd Fd A Sh_s 

0 GT Strategic Bd Fd B Sn 8 

0 GT Telecomm. Fd A Shore* 

0 GT Telecomm. Fd B Shore** 
r GT Technotogv Fund A 5h_S 
r GT Tochnatoav Fund B Sh_ft 
GT MANAGEMENT PLC (44 71 711 45 67) 

0 G.T. Buneen/ m i du i Fuma_s 24.*2 

0 G.T. DeutscMond Fund 8 1113 

0 G.T. Eixeoe Fund 1 <x n 

wG.T. Giobol Smell Co Fd 8 2337 

d G.T. Investment Fund 8 rom 

w G.T Korea Fund , . s 7 jO 

ivG.T. ftowlr ind Couitlr Fd—S 7042 

• G.T. us Smalt Companies _8 2171 


m Mbit Umlled -Ordinary * 5145 

m Mbit Llmifed- Income— ft 1 a42 

mWM Gift Lta - Soec issue— 8 3236 

mMM Gtd Ltd - Nov 2002—8 27.1* 

mkMnrGtdLtd- Jan 1*94— — s 2214 

m Mbit Gtd Ltd -Dec 19*4 — _ft 2346 

mMmf Gtd Ud ■ Aw I99S 8 17J4 

m Mini Gtd Currenefe* JS 11.10 

mMnr Gtd Currencies 2961 8 1147 

m Mint So Res Ltd(BNP) 8 1114* 

mAinena GW Futures 8 1136 

mAlheno GW C u rrencies 8 *42 

m Aitiena GW Fiocnetoi* Inc-S 1147 

m Altiena Gtd Firmnctott Cop ft 1103 

m AML Cadtal Mkts Fd 8 113Q 

mAHL Com mo dity Fund 8 1048 

uiAHL Carreney Fund 8 *.17 

mAHL Fed Time Trod Fd i fjj 

mAHL Gtd Real rune Trd 8 949 

mM«a Guaranteed 1**6 Ltd— 8 224 

rntooo Leveraged Recov. Lid 8 1160 

mMAP Guaranteed 2D0Q 8 1X17 

MATTHEWS INTERNATIONAL MOT 
EME RGING ASIAN STRATEGIES FUND 

m Class A S 11*05 

d OnccH x 12120 

CKIHLEY CAPITAL PARTNERS, LTD 

m The Ccrsar Fund Ltd 8 12438 

MEflSPIERSOH 

Pokbl 55. ldnSck. AmsterCtom 170-5711 IBS) 
w Asia Pec. Grswtti Fd N.V. _8 4158 

w Aslan Capital Holdings— —S 6742 

w Asian selectton =d N.V FT T»2S 

w DP Amer. Growm Fd N.V._S 

w EMS Offshore Fd n.v FI HIM 

w Eurooe Growth F jnd N.V._F I 7D48 

w Japan Dnmnlfifd Fund — * ksxs 

w Leveraged Can Hn H * 66.1* 

w Tokyo Pee. Hold. N.v * 245.1* 

/MERRILL LYNCH 

d Dollar Assets Portfolio.— 5 I CD 


GUERNSEY CAPITAL MANAGEMENT LTD 0 Prime Rate Portfolio.. 


f OCM Global SeL Ea. 8 11107 MERRILL LYNCH SHORT-TERM 

GUINNESS FLIGHT FD MNGR5 (Gusev) LM WORLD INCOME PORTFOLIO 

GUINNESS FLIGHT CLBL STRATEGY FD 0 OdWA * 

d Managed Currency qua 0 Class B s 

0 Global Band 8 3*43 MERRILL LYNCH 

2 S!?? l , r S2U nt=n,B B 0 " 11 -* GLOBAL CURRENCY BOND SI 

2 r jjfiiiSTff r nn. tr , '*■” Australian dollar portf 

1 B ® nfl — i US 6 co»«w a A! 

a Gtabol Eamrv 8 *571 * rnwnr. a 

d American Blue Chip 8 2449 ' M 

d JcBcm end Pacific— s 11*34 Canadian dollar portfoi 

b Ilk 1 tut 0 Category A a 

0 European 1 114.11 d Category B a 

GUINNESS FLIGHT INTL ACCUM FD CORPORA .£ HIGH INCOME P 

0 Deutsche meric Money DM 87783 tf CJasa A-l 4 

0 US Doitor Monev 1 J 1 I 2 # * 

rf US Ooitor HINi Yg Bond S 261e * 

0 inn Balanced Grth ft 3749 0 Class B -2 * 


0 Class B s 

66 ERR ILL LYNCH 

GLOBAL CURRENCY BOND SERIES 
AUSTRALIAN DOLLAR PORTFOLIO 
0 Category a _ *« 

0 Category n nr 


CANADIAN DOLLAR PORTFOLIO 

0 Category A C* 

d Category B £3 

CORPORATE HIGH INCOME PTFL 

0 Class A-l a 

d CknsA-7. * 

0 Class S - 1 * 

a class « 


AS - Australian Doflars; AS - Austrian Schifings; Bf - Wgfcn Frgrxs- CS- Canadun Do|}aro: W ■ Deutsche 
Ui- Rifw Uit LF-Uawnboura Frax^ Pas-?S«33; SlS - Sngapore Ooflars; §F-SwissFra 


e - misquoted earlier x-nrt r 


DeuBcftB Harts; ECU • Eu 

swefiK®*- 1 


of bii aid oltared price E estimated 


—Paris oat 

feted 2 days; 




DEUTSCHE MARK PORTFOLIO 

0 Category A —DM 1X71 

d Category B DM 1136 

EUROPEAN BOND PORTFOLIO (DM) 

0 Class A-l S 16.16 

0 Class A-?.. _.. 8 1739 

0 Class B-l S (6.16 

0 dess B -2 8 17.13 

EUROPEAN BOND PORTFOLIO (USS) 

0 Ckm A-l ——DM 1035 

0 OossA-2 DM 10» 

0 0088 B-l 8 1035 

0 Class B-7 5 1 UD 

POUND STERLING PORTFOLIO 

0 Category A jt 17.1* 

0 Category B t 1685 

US DOLLAR PORTFOLIO 

0 Cotgggry A I 1624 

0 CategoryB 8 134* 

YEN PORTFOLIO 

0 Cataeerv A Y 1326 

0 Category ■ Y IB* 

MULTI CURRENCY BOND PTFL 

0 OassA . .8 2332 

0 OassB - - - - « ww 

US FEDE RAL SECURITIES PTFL 
0 aoss A ... 8 *J 2 

0 Class B 1045 

MERRILL LYNCH 

EQUITY / CONVERTIBLE SERIES 

BASIC VALUE PORTFOLIO 

0 Class A * i jit, 

0 Class B 5 jxsj 

CONVERTIBLE SECURITIES PTFL 

0 OmsA 8 1XA6 

0 Class B— _I 

GLOBAL ALLOCATION PTFL (USftl 

* Tlnw A « mj 

d Cto» B « io *2 

GLOBAL EOUITY PORTFOLIO 

0 OnsA 8 1049 

0 Class B « 9 ** 

EURO EOUITY PORTFOLIO 

0 Class A j 111 , 

0 Class B — 3 13*9 

LATIN AMERICA PORTFOLIO 

0 Class A 1 IgA* 

dCtossS— — * 1774 

WORLD NATURAL RESOURCES PTFL 
H Class A « 12J2 

tt B « lire 

DRAGON PORTFOLIO 
tt Fit ire a | 17^4 

0 Class B | 1733 

MERRILL LYNCH MEXICAN INC PORT 

0 Mexican incl Ptfl a A 8 HUB 

0 Mexican Inc 5 Ptfl a 8 8 kub 

d Mexican Inc Peso Ptfl a A ft 1 B.U 

d Mexican Inc Pesa Ptfl a B4 10,13 

MOMENTUM ASSET MANAGEMENT 
w Momentum Navel Her Pert_S 10121 

m Momentum Rainbow Fd i 1173* 

m Momentum RxR R.U— 1 *441 

MORVAL VONWILLER ASSET MET Co 
w WlltarfiDKtsWllfefbond Cao* 1593 

w Wlllerfunds-Wniiritond Eur Ecu 1244 

wwtltoriundvwnierea Eur— Ecu 1440 

w Wliferfunds-WIDerea Italy -Lit 12*7440 

w WIUeriuKb-WIUerea NA S 1U7 

MULTI MANAGER N.V. 

w Orsh Entxmmnent 3 1044 

ir Emerging Markets Fd—S 206 

w European Growth Fd— _Eai 1640 

w Hsdae Fund— 8 1162 

w Japanese Fund Y 856 

w Market Neutral 8 1L90 

w World Band Fund Ecu 1346 

ALMGT 
14741 
14145 

.TD 

845 


ODEY ASSET MANAGEMENT LTD 
21 Grosvemr StJLdn WIX 9FE46-7V49* 29*8 


0 Oder European —DM 19078 

mt OdflY Eunnun t 

nr Oder Eimao GrewUi Inc DM I75L5D 

wOdev Eurea Growth Acc DM 17 am 

wOdev Euro Grth Star Inc t <7.1* 

wOdev Euro Grth Ster Acc— r 4744 

OLYMPIA CAPITAL INTL INC 
williams House. Hamilton HM11. Bermuda 
Tel: 80*297-1018 Fax: 80*295-2305 
w Finsbury Group—— J 22437 

w Olympia SecurneSF SF 17743 

wOtympfa Store Emerg MktsS 101373 

nr WlnctL Eastern Dragon 8 1093 

wWincti. Frontier * 31*95 

w winch. FuLOIvmpta star _ 1 151.13 

■vWlnctLG<SecliK.P1 (A) 8 042 

w Winch. Gl Sec Inc PI 1C) S 833 

w winch. Hldg Inn Madlson-Ecu MSUO 

wWInclLHIda Inn Ser D Ecu 171634 

w Winch. Hldg Inti Ser F Ecu 174141 

wWlmfLHIdoOly Star Hedge* 1281.92 

■Winch. Reser. Multi Gv BtLft 2135 

■ Winchester Thotond 8 3Xte 

OPTIMA FUND MANAGEMENT 

73 Front SLHammgaBeniwda 09 954658 
■Optima Emerald Fd Lid 8 Km 

■ Optima Fund 5 19.15 

■ Optima Futures Fund 8 1X39 

w Optima Global Fund 8 1X17 

■ Optima Pert ado Fd Ltd 8 1045 

w Optima Short Fund 8 631 

FACTUAL 

0 Eternity Fund LM— ft 3224013 

0 Infinity Fund Ud 8 5054*34 

MWBAMRMP™ LW * ni-*H 

■ Luxor, _.8 144 

0 PoreesfUSAB * 

0 Pgrvest Japan B——Y 
0 Porvest Asia Pactf B— — s 

0 Pre-west Europe B Ecu 

d Puniest Holland » ■■ 

0 Porvest France t> ff 

0 Porvest GennmvB DM 

0 Porvest ObtJ-Dollor B J 

0 Parvesf ObtHJM B DM 195947 

0 Porvest OblFYen B Y 164I764B 

0 Porvest Obli-Gufden B FI 16*830 

0 Porvest ObU-Franc B FF 215X92 

0 Porvest Obd-Sler B c 

0 Porvest Oblt-Eai B Ecu 

0 Porvest Obll-Berux B LF 

0 Porvest S-T Dollar B 8 

0 Porvest S-T Europe B Ear 

0 Porvest S-T DEM B DM 

0 Pnrvfst S-T FRF 0 FF 

0 Porvest S-T Bet PlinB BF 

0 Porvest Glotxd B LF 

d Pnrwst lip Band B . - S 

d Porvest Obd-Uro b 171 

d Porvest Int Equities B 8 111J9 

RE RMAL GROUP 

< Commodities Ud 8 106652 

t Drakkor Growth n_v * jodjm 

t Emerging Mkts Hides 8 HQU6 

f EureWBr (Ecul Ltd Ear 192944 

f investment Hktgs N.V 8 1*5573 

t Media A Caramualcatfons-S 11932 

' Nosco iLM 8 1(3142 

PICTET A CiE - GROUP 

■ PX.F UK Va) (Lux) l 7041 

w PJLF Germaval (Lux) DM W47 

w P.CF Noramval (Luxl 1 2*94 1 

wP.CF Vokber (Lux) Ptns 1102740 

wPJLF Vantalla (Luxl Ul 1012540 

■ PC.F Vattrance (Lux) FF 145146 

■ Valbano SFR (Lvx> SF 30634 

■ Vflibond USD (Luxl . _ . ft 24X01 

■ Valband Ear (Lux) Ecu 1*735 

w VatoandFRF (Lux)— FF 103299 

■Valband GOP ILm/, c 10347 

w Valband DEM (Lux) DM 310.1? 

w USS Bd Ptfl (Lux) -4 104*2340 

w Emerg Mkts (Lax) 8 21971 

w Eur. Opport (Lux) Ecu 15*49 

ft Gtabal Value I Lux ) Ecu 1554* 

■ Euroval (Lus)_ —Ear 204* 

d Pictet Vatsaisse (CHi _ _SF rjfao 

m Inti Small Can (IDM) 8 49749 

PREMIER INVESTMENT FUNDS LTD 

c la P.O. Ben 11DQ. Grand Cayman 
Fox: (809) *49(1993 

m Premier US Equity Fund —8 118X04 

m Premier Ea Risk Mat Fd— 5 137924 

m Prerotor Int! Ea Fund 8 132540 

n> Premier Saverelfn BdFd — s 1*141 

m Premier GlabalBdFd 8 150532 

m Premier Total Return Fd_S 134130 

PUTNAM 

0 Emerging Htth Sc. Trust s 4247 

■ Putnam Em. into, sc Troslj 4075 

0 Putnam Giab. High Growth 4 1SJB 

0 Putnam Hton Inc. GNMA Fas 943 

t) Putnam inri Fund 1 1431 

QUANTUM GROUP OF FUNDS 

w Emerging Growth Fd N.V—8 MtD 

• Quxitum Fund N.V i 2Z770TI 

w Ouantuni Realty Trust 8 14464 

■Quantum UK Realty Fund_( 117.16 

■ Quasar mtl Funa N.V 8 22747 

■ Quota Fund N.V 8 23430 



a RGDhri rente Fund R 

a RG Money PtosF FI FI 

0 RG Money Plw FS— — S 

0 RG Money Plus F DM DM 

0 RG Money Phis F5F sf 


d OassB-2 —3 

INCOME PORTFOLIO 

•0 Class A * 

0 QQBB— 3 

THORNTON MANAGEMENT LTD 

0-PadMnvt Fd sac — e 

0PadMmrtFdSADMi_ — DM 
d Eastern Crusader Fond-S 
0 Thor, UM Dragons Rd LM J 
0 Thornton Orient Inc Pd Ltd » 

0 Tiwnden Tiger Pd LM— ft 
0 MtxKwed Selection ft 


Mara Robeco see Amstertbm Stacks . 

MODE) 



6742 
111249 
11*641 
F 1027236 

■ LNcam 8 ‘M734 

■ Leverag ed Cap HoMlnga s 66. TV 

ft Pri CMhmuf Swtos Fd 5F 128X7* 

b Prhsqultv Fd- Eurooe Ecu RU» 

ft prteMty Fd+tetvefio SF 122511 

b Prleqotty Fd-Lotfn Am _S ISM 

a Prttand Fund Ecu Ecu 128404 

ft Pribond Fund USD 1 I1L547 

ft Pribond Fd HY Emer Mkts J* mm 

w Sdcdtvc Invest 5A ft 399460 

ft Source 8 7041300 

■ USGandPhn 8 183*47* 

■Vortaalus Ear 128X84 


0 Karoo ■ " - - 

NEW TIGER5EL FUND 
d Hong Kang —_J 

0 Joann I 

d Philippines ! 

0 ThoHana _ < 

0 Matoy 8 ta— ! 

0 Indonesia. 1 

a UW LtaijtoWy 1 

0 China - - — - 

d anaanara ! 

THORNTON TAIWAN FUND 

0 Equity Ih*m 1 

0 Equity Growth 1 

0 Liquidity— j 



106474 

1*049* 

1734 a 

MS 

3M7JM 

8106841 

5147JI 

LTD 

97841 

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136X17 
71454 

W1B7 

133346 

f uh Egmtinnq ran— ir IMl 

0 UBZWarto income Fund —Era 6096 
0 UBZ Goto FumL__— 8 ' 13X43 

0 UBZ NbMOA Convert XF 130.13 

0 'Asla Growth Convert SFR -ftF 115840 
d Asia Growfij Convert US*_ ft - 129UB 

0 UBZ DM -Band Pend DM NU6 

auBzo-Pgna .mw l isat 

a UBZ Swta Equity Fund— SF 12476 

d UBZ American Ea Fund 8 *X7* 

0 UBZ I- Band Fun]—: 8 WAS 

UNION BAHCAfllE ASSET MOT (VRAM} 
INTERNATIONAL. NASSAU 
■AraeOnvest— 
w Hi min vl ■ - s 

wAomBn ' . % 


SXANDINAVISKA ENSKJLQA BANKEN 
5-E-BAN KEN FUND 

0 Eorapolnc 8 1 

0 Flarran QsJem (nc 8 1 

0 Global inc— t 1 

0 Lotome d e t me * 1 

0 Vortden me s 1 

0 Japan Inc Y n 

0 MI (la Inc « 1 

0 Sverige Inc Sen 11 

0 Narawnerttn Inc * 1 

0 Teknoknl Inc $ 1 

0 Sverige Rantefond Inc - ■ Set 16 

SKANDIFONDS 

0 Equity InTI ACC S 17 

0 Eauitv Inn Inc S T4 

0 Equity Global 8 1 

0 Eauitv Nat Resource* * 1 

0 Eaufly Japan. Y no 

0 Eauity Nordic .8 1 

0 Equity ILK E 1 

0 Equity C on tinen tal R u ro itoJ 1 

0 Equity Med it erran ea n s 1 

0 Candy North America— S 2 

0 Enuftv F<r Emf S s 

0 Inn E merg in g Merkels —8 1 

It Onntt ImMArr « H 

0 Band bill Inc 8 7 

0 Band Eurara Acc— S l 

0 Band Ewooe me l a 

0 Bond Sweden Acc Sefc IS 

0 Band Sweden Inc Sek II 

0 Band DEM Ace DM 1. 

0 Band DEM Inc DM a 

0 Band Dollar US Acc — —A 1. 

0 Band Dollar US Inc I 1 

0 Curr. US Dollar s 1. 

0 CUir.SwedMi Kronor— _Sek 12 


■ Dtofutyre*. ,.8 1165.17 x 

^rntm^rt g 303X96 Z 

■ Dlnvetf Afttox S ' nmvir- 

■ □Invest Inn Fbt Inc Stratus 

■ Jootnveet 1 

■ Laron hnveef « 

w Moral nvrol S 

■Martlnvesl S 

■ etoirtnarot . - - X . 

wAtevrtnvsst cnmingtaif 3 

■ Maurtnvest Ecu Ecu 

■ Pulsar « 

w Pulsar Overtv ^J6 

■ Qu uui li nroJ — — ; 8 

■Q uon t l nve ai M 8 . 

w Stofnln rat S 

■TixHnveei. . - . . * 

■ UrxhTvest 8 

UNION MMCAIRE ASSET MST (UBAM) 
INTERNATIONAL, LUXEMBOURO ' 

■ UBAMS Bond S 119746k 

■ UBAM DEM Bond DM 113653 X 

■ UBAM Emeraira Growths* 10*522 z 

■ UBAM FRP Bond PP SKAtex. 

■ UBAM Germany DM I20S49Z 

■ UBAM Gtabol Band -Ecu TCPJMz 

■UBAM Japan v ffouox 

w UBAM 5th PocHS Asia -!_*• . 241.1*1 

■UBAM US Equities I 13SU2z 


UNION BANK OF SWITTERLAND/INTRAG 


5DCJETE BENERALE GROUP 
SOGELUX FUND (SF) 

■ SF Bonds A UJiA 8 USD 

■SF Bands BGarmany DM 3253 

■ SF Bands C Franca FF uus 

■SF Bondi E K-R * 1295 

■ SF Bands F Japan Y 2338 

■SF Bondi G Europe Ecu 1838 

■ SF Bonds H Worm Wide— 8 1172 

wSF Bonds JBetotom BF 85140 

■SFE 0 .K North America —4 1*40 

■SF Ea. L W£urope Ecu 17.13 

■ SFE0.M tactile Baton Y 15*4 

■ SF eo.P Growth Countries:! 19.11 

■SFEq.0 Gold Mines 8 3662 

■SFE0.R worldwide— 3 1614 

■SF Short Term SFronce—FF 1663367 

■SF Short TormTEw Ecu 162B 

SOOtTIC ASSET MANAGEMENT INC 

■SAM Bradl 20278 

w SAM Diversified 8 13460 

■ SAM/MoGorr Hodge 8 72540 

■ SAM Onrartunitv » I27.H 

■SAM Strategy . ... 9 12X61 

m Alpha SAM I . 13221 

■ GSAMGompaetto ; — 8 378.16 

SVENSKA MANDELSBANKniSJL 

146 Bd de la Petnm. L-23X) Luxembouni 

ft SHB Band Fund 8 5557 

■Svensko SeL Fd Amer SN_S l&W 

■Svenska SeL Fd Gernxmr_ft 1138 

w SvenAa Set. Fd Inti BdSlul 1236 

■ Svenska SeL Fd Inti Sh ft 6132 

■ Svenska ScLFdJawxi— _Y 408 

■ Svenska SeL FdMttWNM—Sck 12037 

■ Swmska SeL Fd PoritSh — * 843 

■ Svenska SeL Fd Swad fids— Sefc 145144 

.■ Svenska Sd. Pd Sylvia Sb_ Ecu U84J* 

SWISS BANKCORP. 

0 SBC HO Index Fund JF 

0 SBC Equity Ptfl-Austrnna_AS 

0 SBC Equity PtftCanado <3 

0 SBC Eauitv Ptfl-Eurape — Ecu 
0 SBC Eo Ptfi-Nethert om to — FI 

0 SBC Govern Bd A/B 8 8 

0 SBC Bond PNI-Aushr8A AS 

0 SBC Bond PttLAostr 8 B AS 

0 SBC Bond PffrConft A__CS 

0 5BC Bona Ptfl-Canft B CS 

0 SBC Bond Pttl-DM A DM 

0 SBC Band PtfWTM B DM 

0 SBC Band PNFDutch G. A— FI 
0 SBC Bend Ptfl-Outdt G. B-FI 

0 SBC Bond Ptfl-Ecu A Ecu 

d SBC Band Pffl-Ecu B Ecu 

0 SBC Band PtB-FF A FF 

0 SBC Band Ptft-FF B FF 

0 SBC Band Ptfi-PfasATB — Ptos 
0 SBC Bond PtfHMarUnBA—X 
0 SBC Band Plfl-Sterilna B —l 

d SBC Band Porttofla-SF A SF 

0 SBC Band POrtMtoSF B SF 

0 SBCBondPtfHJSJA S 

0 SBC Band PflHTSS B 8 

0 SBC Bond Ptfl- Yen A Y 

0 SBC Bond Ptfl- Yen B Y 

0 5BCMMF-AS AS 

0 56CMMF-8FR BF 

0 SBCMMF-Cimft CS 

0 SBC DM SiWrt-Term A DM 

0 SBC DM Short-Term B DM 

0 SBC MMF - Dutch G- H 

0 SBC MMF - Ecu— Ecu 


0 Bond-lnvest 5F 

0 Brit -invest SF 

d Oanoc SF 

0 CaurrMnvnf SF 

0 D-Mmk- invest DM 

0 DoDar-bniest 8 

0 Energies mres) SF 

0 Rspoc , ■ ZP 

0 Eeiif SF 

0 Ptotst— — SF. 

0 Frandt. SF ’ 

0 Greinoc — . SF - 

d GlaMnvest. « - 

0 GoH-InveM SF 

0 finMwrinwd - BV . 

0 Hetvettavest SF ’ 

0 Hal land- Invest SF 

0 Itnc— ' ■•RF 

d Japan-imrest SF 

0 Podfio-lnveat S F 

0 Safit: SF. 

0 SfcanSnavtm-invesr SF 

d Storfing-lnvest^ c 

0 Swiss Franfr Invest SF 

0 Sima— ■ M ? 

0 SwhsreaJ .s f 

0 UBS America Lottna SF 

0 UBS America Latter — 1 

d UBS Ada New Horizon SF 

0 UBS Aria New Horizon— _S 

d UBS Smaac Europe SF 

0 UBS SmolIC Europe DM 

d UBS Part Inv SFR inc. SF. 

0 UBS Part Inv SFR CrmO— SF 

0 UBS Port low Ear Inc SF 

0 UBS Port Inv Ecu Inc Ecu 

0 UBS Pori Inv. ECU Cop G_SF 
0 UBS Port inv Ecu Cow G_ Ecu . 

0 UBS Perl hw uss me 1 

0 UBS Port InvUSS Inc- SF 

0 UBS Port Inv USI Cap G_SF 
0 UBS Port Inv USS Cop G— 3 . 

0 UBS Port Inv DM Inc _SF 

0 UBS Part lav DM hie -DM 

0 UBS Port Inv DM Can G 5F 

0 UBS Part Inv DM Cap G DM 

0 Yerwnraf r 

0 UBS MM InvesMJSS 8 

0 UBSMMinvesMSt s 

0 UBSMMlntmd-Bcu. Eat 

0 UBS MM Irrmt-Ywi Y 

0 UBS MM IhvwHJf— UJt 

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0 UBSMMlRyosMFR.T— SF 
0 UBS MMInraS-FF— _— 3T - 

0 UBSMM Inveat-HFL FI . 

0 UBS MM Invest-Can St— — a 

0 UBSMM tltvesUFR -BF 

0 UBS Shari Terra ImMML— DM 


0 UBS Band htv-Eoj A Eat. ltuf y 


0 UBS Band inv-Ecu T_ Ecu. 

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d UBS Band Inv-DM DM 

0 UBS Band ImMJSS 8 

0 UBS Band Imr-FF FF 

0 UBS Band hrv-Om t CS - 

0 UBS Bond lov-Ut Ut 

0 UBS BJ -USS Extra Yield— I 
0 UBS Fix Terra lnv-US8M_S 
0 UBS FU Terra lmMSl«_C 
0 UBS Fix Term InwSFRW-SF 
0 UBS Fix Term lav-DM*6 — DM 
0 UBS Fix Terra Inv-Ecu ft-Ecu 

0 UBS Fix Term Inv-FF K FF 

0 UBS Eq Inv-Europe A— DM 

0 UBS Eq biv-EunweT —DM 

0 UBS Eq brv-SCOP USA__! 

0 UBS Port I Fbr Inc (SFR)-SF 
0 UBS Pori I Fh Inc (DM) —DM 


0 UBS Pori I Fix IDC (Ecu)— Ecu JD741 y 


0 UBS Port 1 Fix inc (US*) — 8 MU7 

0 UBS Cap InvWTBSFR-: SF 16858 

0 UBS Cop imrWlO USS 8 . 10746 

0 UBSCaolnv40710Gwra— DM 12*30 
WORLDPOUQ MUTUAL FUNDS • 

0 s Dalhr income l 140 

0 DM DaHy Income DM . 140 

0 S Band income — - . ; ft 1791. 

0 Non - 8 Bonds S 263 

0 rawhwi Bgpito « je ee 

0 Global Bakmced ft 1930 

0 Global EquMts » 1941 

0 US Cbnsorvatfve E«wffles_l 1546 

0 US Agresstve EaulNee S MN 

d European &wltlt3— ft • 1U2 

0 POdflceaWKe* 8 1443 

0 Natural Resuirce* ft 846 

YIELD ENHANCEMENT STRATEGISTS 
0 Enbtnoed Tre«L Return* _S 1.12667 


0 Regent GW UK Grth Fd_ 

m ILL. Cautery Wrw Fd 

■ undarvatued Assets Ser I. 

d Regent Sri LoritaFd 

m Regent PaetfleHdgFd — 


ROBECO GROUP 

FOB 9713000 AZ RottordanUJIlW) 22H226 

0 RG America Fund — FI 15740 

0 RG Europe Fund B WSl 

d RG Pacific Fund .FI 15610 


0 SBC MMF - Esc Esc 

0 SBC MMF ■ FF _FP 

0 SBC MMF - Lfi -Ut 

0 SBC MMF -Ptas Pta 

0 SBC MMF - ScfaUhtO AS 

0 SBC MMF .Sterling t 

0 SBC MMF - SF SF 

0 SBC MMF -US -Dollar S 

0S8CMMF-USS7II 8 

0 58C MMF - Yen Y 

0 SBC Gib)- Ptfl SF Grth .SF 

0 SBC GlW-Ptfl Ecu Grth Ecu 

0 SBC Gib*- Ptfl USD Gfttl .. * 

0 SBC GtM-PtO SF YU A SF 

0 SBC GHH-Ptfl SF YW B SF 

0 SBC GW-Ptfl Ecu YM A— Ecu 

0 SBC GM-Ptfl Ecu YW B .Ecu 

0 SBC GW-Ptfl USD YW A 8 

0 SBC GBtt-PH) USD YM B * 

0 SBC GUrl-Ptfl SF Inc A SF 

0 SBC GM-PtfiSFIltcB SF 

0 SBC GW-Ptfl Ecu Inc A Ecu 

0 SBC dbf-Pffl Ecu Inc B_— Ecu 
0 SBC GRN-PtB USD Inc A— ft 

0 SBCGftV-Ptfl USD Inc B 8 

0 SBC Glbl PttHTM Grawtti_DM 
0 SBC GM Ptfl-DM YId A/B J3M 
0 SBC GBU Ptft-DM Inc A/B -DM 

0 SBC Emer gin g Mor he t* s 

0 sac Small ft Mid Cops Sw-SF 

d AmertcaValor 1 

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d AriaPurttolto — 8 

0 Convert Bond Selection 5F 

0 DWIark. Band Sefecllan DM 

0 Dollar Bond Selection 5 

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0 Florin Bond Setecftai FI 

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0 Universal Fund SF 128.16 

0 Yen Bend SefcCflon Y 

TRMUPLETON WMfiDC IHVESTMS4TS 
GROWTH PORTFOLIO 

0 Clan A-l 1 M43 

0 Oaa* A-2 8 1848 

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m ta Asia Paetflc Fd Ltd * 12M 

■ KM Gtabol St 8W440 

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m LF. YloM ft Gnmffl Fd 8 TM41 

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m N5P FJ.T. LW ft 1297 

m Ocean StrotcstoeUml led— S 14240 

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dftelecOra Fid. Ptfl LM S . 94141 

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■Sinclair MutmMdLM 5 10714 

■ SJO GlillbOl (609)921-6595 — S 10U4 

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■ 5P JaternaltanalSAASb— 4 100*251 

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ft Tokyo (OTC) Fund Sicav— 8 

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id Triumph h - * 

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■ Tweedy Browne n.v. a A S 

to Tweed* Browne n.v. a B— 5 

d Ubatatures _FF - 

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0 Umbredo Debt Fund LW S 

d Umtorefig Fund LM 1 

w Uni Bond 

■ uni Capitol Alfemagne-— DM 
w UM Capital Omyertbies —Ecu 

■ Uni -Global Stay DEM DM 

w Unt-Gkibal Sicav Ecu— _Eca. - ' 

■ Uni-Gtabal Sicav FRF FF 

to Ualdabal Sfaav FS SF 

w Uni -Gtabol Sloav USD— J 
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0 Unta Inv. Pond DM 7146 

» Ud trades CHF SF 

miJnliradesCHPReo_i — -if 

mUnltrades FRF. FF 

mUnfiradesUSD j 

■ Ursa* I art LW 1 


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b Vaygger Intda i fe Pte — 3 

to Vulture Ud 8 

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ml KSSy 1111 1364 

w Oteas Pari _5 


For brveNnioit information 

Rsod TWMOfCY RffORT . 

every Satonday in thelHT ' 


For information on how to list your fund, fax Simon OSBORN at (33-1) 46 37 21 33. 


THE CONFERENCE WILL RE 
DIVIDED INTO THE 
FOLLOWING SESSIONS: 


Derivative and alternative 
investing approaches , 
Bond and currency. Equity , 
Emerging market 


GLOBAL FUND MANAGEMENT 

Which Way are the Markets Moving ? 


FOR FURTHER INFORMATION 
ON THE CONFERENCE: 


THE EXPERTS DEBATE THE TRENDS ■ DO LDER GRAND HOTEL » ZURICH ■ MARCH S3&24 • 1994 


l.1TEM.ineilI. Fete IlftEKTHEVr 


Hcralb^^^Sribunc 


BrcndaHagerty, 
International Herald Tribune 
63 Long Acre, London WC2E 9JH 
England 

Tel: (44 71) 836 4802 
- Fax: (44 71 j 836 0717 




l i, i* •?; -jp . 




JpJii l>115uP 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 1994 


Page 13 

ASIA/PACIFIC 





j|^ v fp : i 




1 


I Hits Low, Some 

I See a Rebound 


Oil Rush in China’s West 


TOKTO —Toyota Motor Corp. 
said Tuesday its fot -half operating 
profit saidc to a record low amida 
prolonged economic slump in Ja- 
pes and faffing exports. 

Japan’sJargest carmako; and the 


h« profit 

to 

9335 bfflwayen{S86 mfflkra), in the 
six months ended Dec. 31. 

It was Toyota's fourth consecu- 
tive year of faffing first-half profit 
Previously, its smallest operating 
profit for the first half of its finan- 
cial year was 143 iaffion yea in 
1 982, the year it was formed by the 
merger of Toyota Motor Co. and 
Toyota Motor Sales Co. 

Toyota’s poor performance zb* 
fleets the difficulties faring all Jap* 
anese carmakers, which include the 


y™ in the first half. In the United 
States, Toyota dealers have raised 
prices o n 1994 models by about 62 
percent, mostly because of the 
yea'siise against the dollar over the 
pastyear and a half. 

** 106 . main . reason behind the 
hard time we are having selling cars 
in the U.S. is the higher yen, " Ryuji 
Araki, a Toyota director; said. 

Toyota's exports fell 21 percent, 
to 678,778 units, largely because of 
a decline in exports to North Amer- 
ica and Europe, the company said. 
Toyota sold 1,002.000 vehicles in 
Japan; a decline of 9 percent from 
the year-earlier period. 

Toyota’s recurring, or pretax 
profit, plummeted 49 percent, to 
8334 billion yen. . Net income fdl 
46 percent, to 39.44 billion yen. 


Renters 

BEIJING — China on Tuesday signed a con- 
tract with five foreign o3 companies to explore a 
vast block in its far western desert. 

In the Great Hall of the People, the China 
National Petroleum Co. signed the contract with a 
consortium led by Agip SpA of Italy. It was die 
second such contract for toe Tarim basin in Xin- 
jiang, on the border with Russia and Kazakhstan. 

The other members of the consortium are Elf 
Hydrocarbons Chine of France, Japan Petroleum 
Exploration Co., Japan Energy Co. and Texaco 
China, part of Texaco Inc. Each of the five holds a 
20 percent interest in the contract area. 

The 9,814~squ&nHaloflQetcr (3,790-square-mfle) 
block is in the south of Xinjiang and one of five 
offered by Beijing for foreign exploration. In De- 
cember, Exxon Corp. and Japan -Indonesia Petro- 
leum Corp. signed a contract to explore one of the 
other blocks. 

Chinese officials said Tarim could boast cal 
reserves approaching 20.5 UDhm metric tons (143 
billion barrels). That is roughly equivalent to tire 
. *mmm of cal produced to date in the North Sea. 

“The chances of a commercial discovery in this 
block are, on a world scale, good," William Doyle, 
president of Texaco Middle East/Far East, said. 
He said production could start in 1998. 


Under the contract, the consortium will pay for 
seismic surveys and drill wells in the first explora- 
tion phase, with production starting after discov- 
er/ of a commercial field and construction of an oil 
or gas pipeline to the area. 

On discoveiy of a commercial field. CNPC has 
the right to participate in developing the block up 
to 51 percent 

Mr, Doyle said lhaL, with successful finds, the 
investment by the five firms could be substantially 
more than SI billion. 

The desen area is one of the most inhospitable 
oo earth, with sconcing heat in the summer and 
freezing cold in the winter. China is building a road 
from Korla, the railhead, to the center of the Tarim 
basin, Where oil has been found. 

This year. China wiQ become a net oil importer 
after 20 years as an exporter, as domestic demand 
surges. Domestic output this year will be 148 
milli on ions, up about 2 percent from 1993. while 
demand is rising about 8 percent a year. 

With woild oil prices at their lowest for five years, 
Beijing has decided to increase imports of crude this 
year and process more in its own refineries. 

Mr. Doyle said the terms of contracts are better 
than could have been obtained five years ago. 
because of the fail in oil prices aver the period and 
the remoteness and difficulty of exploring in places 
like Tarim. 


sales of Japanese cars overseas in 
addition, Japanese vehicle 
and production were down last 
year for the third consecutive year. 

Many analysts, however, have 


Asian Stocks 
Recover Part 
Of Steep Loss 


CatnpUeii by Our Stuff From Dispatches 

HONG KONG — Major Asian 
stock markets were calm Tuesday, 
stabilizing after sliding on Mon- 
day. The comment’s bourses were 
following the lead of Wall Street. 

where the Dow Jones industrials 
plunged Friday but recouped pan 
of the loss os Monday. 

After stock trading had ended, 
the Asian component of tire Inter- 
national Herald Tribune World 
Stock Index stood 035 percent 
higher, at 129.65. 

The Hang Seng index in Hong 
Kong rose 39.89 points, or 035 
percent, to 11,454.16. Bargain- 
hunters opted for bank and real 
estate issues, according to James 
Vinall of SBC1 Finance Asia. 

In Tokyo, a compromise by 
members of tire government coali- 
tion over tax reform pushed stock 
prices highcT, with the Nikkei index 
rising 236.83 points, to 20351.23. 

(Reuters. Bloomberg) 


ANA to Cut i,500 Jobs by 1996 Very briefly: 


by Prime Minister Morihiro Ho- 
sdkawtt Tuesday and a possible re- 
duction in the consumption tax on 
passenger cars. 

Steve Usher, an analyst al Klein- 
wort Benson International Inc, 
said he expected Japan's domestic 
vehicle sales to edge 13 percent 
higher in 1994 and said Ik rated 
Toyota's stock a “bay." 

Toyota said the surge in the yen’s 
value against the dollar bad. cut its 
operating income by 100 billion 


. . . Reuters ■ ■ 

TOKYO —AH Nippon Airways 
CO. said on Tuesday that it was 
taking drastic cost-cutting steps, 
mdndrng the dhnmation of 1,500 
jobs, in an effort to raise its operat- 
ing profit by ; 30 billion yen (S277 
hhUmm) by 1996. 

ANA win cut its workforce from 
to 12400 from 14,000 by the end of 
March 1996, am ANA spokesman 
s&hL Labor now accounts for 20 
percent of total costs, he noted. 

The cols will be through a freeze 
on most recnritmeoi and by using 
more oontract employees as cabin 
attendants, he- said.. 


Further cost-cutting will be 
achieved through enhanced ties 
with its group companies and 
greater cooperation with other car- 
riers. 

The restructuring plan also fea- 
tures a joint aircraft maintenance 
deal with the rival Japan Air Lines. 
ANA and JAL expect their cooper- 
ation to save 8 bilBon to 9 billion 
yen over five years from April 1. 

“The global stamp in demand for 
air travel, continued recession at 
home and increased competition 
have left ANA facing the toughest 
challenge since its foundation,” 
said the president, Seiji Fukatso. 


Established in 1952, ANA has 
Japan’s largest domestic flight net- 
work. JAL, with tire largest interna- 
tional network of any Japanese car- 
rier, in January announced cuts in 
jobs and capital spending. 

ANA posted a parent operating 
profit of 18.07 billion yen ($167 
million) in the year to March 31, 
1993, but the carrier projected 
poorer results in the current year. 

The restructuring plan is expect- 
ed to push up ANA’S parent oper- 
ating profit in the business year to 
March 31, 1996, by 30 billion yen if 
business conditions do not grow 
worse, the ANA spokesman said. 


CmCBuys Into HER 
In $440 MUUon Deal 


HONG KONG — CTTXC Pacific L*d-, the Chinese-controlled 
investment company, is buying 50 percent of Hare; Kong Resort Ca 
from HKR International for 3.4 billion Hong Kong dollars ($440 
million). 

The deal gives OTIC Pacific a half interest in a large homing 
development near Hqqg Kong's new airport. 

In one of the big gest re cent mansions by China into Hong Kong’s 
property market, GTOC will boy pan of HKR Ihlernattonu's 
Discovery Bay residential development on irtntyp Triimd- 

The island abuts the colony's new airport nrqject, for whjcb- 
f m ancigg has been a major irritant between Chtaa and Britain. 
Britain is to return Hong Kong to China in 1997, and Beijing has 
balked at the possibility ofinbexitinga large chunk of debt from tire 
world’s largest pnbfic works project . 

But the willingness of CHIC Pacific, a unit of the Chinese 
government's China International Trial & Investment Corp n to take 
a slake in land that is Kfcdy to soar in vataeif the airport is completed 
suggests a shift m Chinese government sentiment . 

CrnC “may have some positive implications in terms of the 
airport,” said a residential property analyst at Baring Securities. 
“That is, ihe government may approve some infrastructure develop- 
ments such as a tunnel finking Discovery Bay to the airport” 


COMPANY RESULTS 


Revenue and profits or 
losses, hi mfflions, are In 
local currencies unless 
otherwise indicated. 

Canada 


Y«r im 1992 Year 1993 1992 

Revenue 20944. 2dm. Revenue 1431. 1375. 

Met Inc. — U02.{n)82U Net Inc — — 77.m isjzt 

Per Shore 199 — Per Short — U0 024 

at Loss. 7W nets Include 1992 voar net Inciudeschatve 
ctnrroo of S32£e million. of U9A9 mUtton. 


Inca 

Ok Quor. 1993 1992 

Revenue SZ2.W 611.90 

Net LOSS 3SL2D 2840 

Year 1993 1993 

R e v enu e 2.131. zsw. 

Profit 28JaMo)17to 

Pw Shorn — . 033 — 

a: Lau. amsutts In UA dot- 
ton 

Petro-Canada 
toll Quor. 1993 1993 

Rovanuft. 1.151 1JSL 

Prom 3100 27 JB 

P*r Shore— 0.15 an 

Ysar 1993 1993 

Revenue ami. 4718. 

P r ofit ... 15200 PJOO 

Per Share— Or* 004 

United States 

AJliEtfSJmtal 
ttQm. 19M 1993 

Revenue — 10». urn. 

Ketinc T7BJJ0 moo 

Per Shore US OJfl 

Year 1993 1992 

Revenue 11BZ7. 1X042. 

Net inc 4UJ»la»rm» 

Per Share-. 2JC — 
a: Lays. 

Allstate . 

ton OMIT. T 993 1993 

Revenue 5310. 1141. 

Net Inc 2S9jD0(Q)U&9 

Per Share— 057 — 


Arvln Industries 
tohOwar. 1993 1992 

Revenue 44066 455J3? 

Net Inc hub mi 

Pm-Shone 046 0.43 

Year 1993 1992 

Revenue — 1X19. 1*90 

MM Inc 4034 6 JB 

PerShare— U1 LTD 

Brunswick 

«tt Quor. 1993 1992 

Revenue 5XU0 444.90 

Oner Net — 7J» (ail.M 

Oner Share— 007 — 

Year 1993 1993 

Revenue 1207. Z/m. 

Oner Net 5450 3970 

Oner Share— 057 (M3 

a: Loos. NH* exclude losses 
a/mSmUnoa Kt OS million. 
1993 quarter net also ex- 
dudes toss at St million. 

CPC tan 

movar. 1993 1992 

Revenue — 1J«. W9L 

Net Inc 12114 7080 

PerShare— OJQ 0*6 
Yew 1993 1993 

Revenue 6J3&. ub. 

Narine 4J447 22077 

PerShare— 195 Ml 
1992 nets include ettanxr of 
SW minion ond toss of S4&B 
mutton. 

Dale Food 

m Oner. 1993 1992 

Revenue 79459 7635® 

Net LOSS 3013 2234 


tohQeer. 
Revenue - 
Net Inc - 
PerShare, 
Yew 

Revenue „ 
Net Inc _ 
PerShare. 


MOPCO 

1993 1992 

494J0 739,10 

3490 12J0 

1.77 040 

1993 1992 

1715. 17K7- 

127i» 100.70 

434 337 


Pacific Enterprises 
tohQaW. 1993 1992 


Revenue 82500 «HJ» 

Net Inc 4*£fl (a)100 

PerShare— 052 — 

Year 1993 1992 

Revenue— 1899., 2.900 
Net Inc — 1440010)5*40 
PerShare— 106 — 

a: Lass. 

RuDherinald 
tobQuar. 1993 1992 

Revenue. — 47386 4343* 

Net Inc 5004 4404 

Per Share — . 032 028 

Year 1993 M92 

Revenue — 1 .**. IMS. 

Net Inc 21 Ml 144.10 

PerShare — Ml 102 

Sears, Roebuck 
MhQew. 1993 1992 
Revenue — 14444. m 

Net Inc 54t40an.WO 

PerShare — M* — 
Yew 1993 1992 

Revenue 50838. 52445. 

Net Inc 1409 012447. 

Par Share — 4.13 — 

a; Less. 


• Telecom Corp. of New Zealand announced record third-quarter net 
earnings of 134.6 millioD New Zealand dollars ($77 million), up 9 percent 
from a year earlier. The former state-owned concern now has as its mitjor 
shareholder a consortium including the American telecommunications 
companies Ameritecfa Chip, and Bell Atlantic Corp. 

■ Singapore Telecommunications Pte, said it had paid S78 milli on fora 17 
percent stake in American Mobile Satellite Cbrp* a U.S. company that 
will build mobile satdlite-commumcations systems to transmit voice, 
data and facsimile signals throughout the United States. 

• Commonwealth Bank of Austrafia, the country's fourth-largest bank, 
said it had a 32 percent jump in half-year profit, to 312.4 million 
Australian dollars ($223 million), because of lower bad debt provisions 
and a recovering property market. 


NEC’s Kaneko Is Named President 


Bloomberg Business Hens 


Mr. Kaneko, 60, was president of 


TOKY 9~ I ^ C .9 or P; 00 Tues “ NEC America from 1989 to 1991. 


day named Hisashi Kaneko. an ex- 
ecutive vice president, as tire com- 
pany's new president, replacing 
Tadahiro Sekimoto. 


He holds a master of science degree 
from the University of California 
at Berkeley. 


CURRENCY AND CAPITAL MARKET SERVICES 


M 


Currency Management Corporation Plc 
W inchester Bouse, 77 London Wall - London EC2M 5ND 
TeL 071- 582974 5 Ens 071-302 9M7 


FOREIGN EXCHANGE & GOLD 


24 Hour London Dealing Desk 
Competitive Rates & Daily Fax Sheet 
Can for further information & brochure 


For further details 
on bow to place your listing contact 
PATRICK FALCONER in London 
TeL (44) 71 836 48 02. 

Fax: (44) 712402254 

licralb^^gribunc. 


Hong Kong; 
'Hang Seng 


Singapore 

SlraSis Times 


Tokyo 




■ 1883 . 19M <1983 

Exchange tndax 


Hong Kong 
Singapore 

Sydney 
Tokyo 1 "." 
Kuala Lumpur. 
Bangkok . 
Seotj|'"' • . 

Ta»ei 
'^feniia 
JafulrtM . - . 
.NeurZeatand 
Bombay. .. 


EtengSer^'"’ 
■‘straBts Times 
fiS Ordriaries'- 
mcaisss “ 

.Composttft.. 

'■SET 

CompoEiia StexA- 
■ Weighted Prio© . .' 
Gompt^ite 
Stortcindef 

'mse-4a.. '-- . ..“ 
National index - 


1884 v 

Tuesday 
Qpse . 

11^S4.1Q 

JSt 

2505AO" 

- 20251.23, 
1,108.72; ^ 
1^85.73 . 
923.00 . 

TCkioed ' 
2^52J85.. 

. 594.12 • 
2^7169 ' 
.1JB88S 9. 



Sources: Reuters. AFP 


v 1983 1994 

Prav. 

Close .Change 
?1, 414^0 +0.35 
2514.45 ..'4031.. 
■■2i2&UQ! ;y+W)7- : 
.20014,40. +1.19 
1,0S4m ' +1^34 

. 914B& *0.89 

k 

.-dhs^ 

2390.94. 

NA v ,, /' l -' s 

^36&«j'- -*0«35 

1,982.11 . +034 

■_ — 

lutonuiaeal Herald Tribune 


• Matsushita- Kotobuki Electronics Industries Ltd. of Japan said it would 
invest more than 41 million Singapore dollars (S26 million) to set up a 
disk-drive production plant in Singapore and sell its output to Quantum 
Corp. of the United States. 

• Ekran Bhd. of Malaysia plans to invest $100 million in developing a 
casino, duty-free shops and a resort on Satnai island in the Philippines, 
the national news agency Be mama said. 

• Fujitsu Lid. wiQ report an unconsolidated pretax profit of 2$ billion yen 
($229 million) for the year ending March 31, reversing an 8.7 billion-yen 
loss in the previous year, the economic newspaper Nihon Krizai said. 

• Surra Tatemono Co., a Tokyo real estate developer, has filed for court 

protection, listing liabilities of about I24J billion yen, a private credit 
research agency reported. „ , 

^ r Reuters. AFP. Bloomberg 


WORLD BALANCED FUND 

SICAV 

2, boulevand Royal L-2953 Luxembourg 
R.C. Luxembourg B-24872 

Notice is hereby given to the shareholders, that the 

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING 

of shareholders of WORLD BALANCED FUND wiU be held 
at the company's registered office, 2. boulevard Royal, L- 29S3 
Luxembourg, on Febnuuy 18, 1994 at 1 1.00 a. m. with the 
following agenda: 

1. Submission of the Report of the Board of Directors and 
of the Auditor, 

2. Approval of tire Statement of Net Assets at November 30. 1993 
and of the Statement of Operations for the year ended as at 
November 30, 1993; 

3. Allocation of the net results; 

4. Discharge to the Directors; 

5. Statutory Appointments; 

6. Miscellaneous. 

The shareholders are advised that no quorum is required for the 
items on the agenda of ihe Annual General Meeting and that 
derisions will be taken on a simple majority of the shares 
present or represented at the Meeting with no restrictions. 

In order to attend the Annual General Meeting, the owners of 
bearer shares will have to deposit their shares five dear days 
before the meeting at the registered office of the company or 
with Banque Internationale a Luxembourg, 2. boulevard Royal 
L-2953 Luxembourg. 

The Board of Directors 


rjTjrj 


TutidBy’S d i) rin g 

Tobies include the nafionwWe Prices up to 
ths closing on Wafl Street and do not reflect 
late trades ateewhem. Vb The Associated Press 

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Page 14 

NYSE 

Tuesday’s dosing 

Tables include the nationwide prices up to 
the closing on Wall Street and do not reflect 
late trades elsewhere, via The Associated Press 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 1994 


12 Monm 

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■ POWER STATION FEASIBILITY ENGINEER ■ 

An international private power company wish to develop a moderately sized 
combined cyde gas turbine power station in Indonesia. As part of this 
development, a feasibility study will be produced. A power station engineer 
is required to assist with me study and ensuing construction contracts. 

This person should have experience ia or most of the following. 

• Design, construction and operation of combined cyde gas turbine 
power stations. 

• Technical and economic feasibility of power station projects. 

• Specification, comparison and selection of combined cyde power 
station suppliers and constructors. 

• Natural gas pipelines and high voltage transmission lines. 

• Power station project finance fundamentals. 

• Project development methodology in Indonesia. 

The position will be Jakarta based. An ongoing role during the negotiation, 
design and construction of the power station is foreseen. 

Individuals or companies arc invited to apply. A sample of previous studies 
produced by the applicant will be required. 

Please contact: Peter Cockcroft Jakarta, 

Ph. 0062-21-5213320, Fax: 0062-21-5213319. 


OfTSHOBECOHPjWES 

msmsmmmomm 

BANS 

rnmmmtim 

, Over JO jeac aoerience in providing »- ] 
sices imematioraUy to all types of bnaness 


ASTON CORPORATE MANAGEMENT ! 

IQ Peel Road. Douglas, ble of Man 
Tel • 0624 62&y>l ■ Fax 0624 625126 
or London 

iy.: (71 } 222 MM - Fax (71) 21J 1519 


OFFSHORE CORPORATE 
SERVICES & MANAGEMENT 
GROUP ESTABLISHED 1902 
LD.R. LTD n BOX 15. DOUGLAS 
ISLE OF MAN 
TEL: 0624 674ZZ8 
FAX: 0624 622252 


•BOW TO LEGALLY* 
OBTAIN DUAL NATIONALITY 

Discover (he roeU of dull mooiuGty u* 
over 100 cwmria eumined also beaxre i 
EL l PREVIOUS TAX PAYER), md legal- 
ly avoid taxes, rave radicals ud hank Dis- 
cover (be insider faett abwi rax havens. 
Mow [o become a legal TAX EXILE 
For your FREE BROCHURE and PRI- 
VACY NEWS LETTER that wffl bdp 
make and at core jour mooey write to: 
Scope Inti. Brn 4272 
| 62 Honey Rend. WaeriumDe. FA ML. UK. 
Td.: ♦ 44 705 592255 - Fnc * 41 70S S9I97S 


EXCELLENT OPPORTUNITY 

NO HIDDEN COMMISSIONS. 

NO TAXES. TOTAL CONFIDENTIAUIY. 
ForrariBfcrmdit'a mi writ or fa yosr 
sent, athbtsi rnul contact number to: 
BALMORAL CORPORATION 
Rue de la Presse 4. DPI l 
BRUXELLES 1000 - BELGIUM 
Fax: 133 2)213 3141 


We require funding sources, (private and institutional) 
to finance for and on behalf of quality clients, 

"HIGH INCOME” 

commercial investment opportunities, AAA-rated 
debt instruments available to guarantee repayment 
of capital and annual interest payments. Intelligent 
ipro-rato.i profit sharing construction. Almost any 
currency accepted, return of capita/ O00°o), interest 
payments 1 12% p.aj plus profits 0993/79%) in the 
currency of die lending source/participants choise 
in tax exempt jurisdiction, your worldwide partner 

GLOBAL UNDERWRITERS LIMITED, 

Belize City, Belize, C.A. Member of the Global 
Group of Companies, for more information please 
contact H.S.H. Princess of Sayn Wittgenstein, Senior 
P.R. officer at our European liaison (welcome + 
information) offices. 52, rue des Atrebates, 1040 
Brussels, Belgium. Tel: 32-2-732 96 52, Fax: 
32-2-734 65 66, Telex: 205 20 global b. 
^Brokers / Agents, Intermediairies welcome / 
protected). 


EXCLUSIVE DISTRIBUTORS 

EUROPE 

Exclusive Distributors needed for Ui 
ranu&cfurcr to sell well known U.S. 
auto polish in all EUROPEAN 
00tiNTRIE5. Product has been tested 
and used by major auto manufacturers 
in Ui.Land Europe. Restores paint on 
autos, boats and aircraft to factory new. 
Protects and maintains briliam shine 
for i full treat Excellent for retail and 
professional use. 

For more tnfo fax Mr. King, 
Holland: 31-70-355 4967. 


International 
Herald Tribane 
ads work 


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* CAPITAL GROWTH 

* 9 TEARS OUTSTANDING 
PERFORMANCE RECORD 

* SEND FOR PROSPECTUS 
AND FULL DETAILS 

Fax your mail address to: 
"12% FIXED” 
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or write: 

2Q7E P. del Duque 
£-29660 N. Andaluda, Spain 

Minimum US$40,000 
or equiv. any currency 


UK & OFFSHORE 

LIMITED COMPANIES 
BY LAWYERS 
LOWEST ANNUAL FEES 


■ g L J . i.l EE3 

FT 


Tvrr-ri 


• «a9auiracan)e(uunaM«irm> * 


UK LTD Ft 

£83.00 

■ 

UKPLC 

£139.95 

■ 

IRISH (NOM-flES) C165 


IRISH (RES) 

LR£2B5 

■ 

WYOMING LLC 

£495 


ISLE OF MAN 

£195 


BAHAMAS 

£265 


PANAMA 

£265 


CYPRUS 

£585 

■ 

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£265 

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£185 

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TURKS 

£265 

I ■ 

GIBRALTAR 

£225 


\ 
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Fttti ACCOUNTANCY & TRUST 
FACflJTCS AVALABUE 


\ SPENCER COMPANY FCRUATiCNS L'MITED \ 

SCOnFiO HOUSE. *.22 SYDNEY tTSE-T. CHELSSA 
\ LCSCC-N. 5*3 'JSTcD VN'j"4 N 

^44-71 352 2274/2402 
s 44-71 3522150 

a FAX: 44-71 352 2260 E3 


OFFSHORE WORLDWIDE 

Ready made companies (shells) 
* * full management 
• address services 
Fmhvdm t 

INTERCOMPANY MANAGEMENT 
R OBot 160, 949J Mitia 

t oiiv Lull 1 7ii 9 rm 

Fro 41-75-37? 4062 
IL an (979 


COMMERCIAL 
& INVESTMENT 
OPPORTUNITIES 


PALL MALL 
ST JAMES'S 
LONDON SWz 

PRESTIGIOUS OFFICE 
SUITES TO LET 

1.355 SQ.FT -2.315 Sg.FT- 
3.670 SQ.FT 
NE W LEA S EjS) - 
COMPETITIVE TERMS 

BAKES LORENZ 

TeL: U.K. 71-409 2121 
s, REF. : LS A 


GENEVA 

SWITZERLAND 

PRIME OFRCE SPACE 473 nwteo 

near Hotels, facing perk, a few 
minutes walk From Station, near 
lake. Furnished or unfurnished. 
Immediately available. 

Call Gemma 41 22 - 722 28 18. 
No agencies please. 


FINANCIAL 

SERVICES 


PRIVATE BANKING 

Full fiduriar/ services: 
project/corporate financing, 
trustee services, equities, 
portfolio management, etc 
Contact: 

Ww. attlg 

Brtndenberg Bank Ltd. 
H.C. AiMtrWB Blvd. 13 
DK-1553 COPENHAGEN V 
DENMARK 
Tel.: +45-33-939088 
Fax: 44M3-9390M 


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ESCORTS & GUIDES 

BELGRAVIA 

ORCHIDS 

LONDON PA£B SCO W ACB iq 
CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTS 

UK 071 589 5237 

FERRARI 

LONDON BCORT AGB4CY 
MAJOR CRHXT CARDS A COPIED 

071 823 4456 


B^IBtNAJtONAL ESCOKTS 

Service Avert* 

TmL 2 7 2-765-7896 New Tort; USA 
Mpor Crrcfr Qrds & OnchAcapkd 


IOWON - SARAH 

Escort Service. Days and Evgritn. 

Tekfl81«9WlS 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


PAMS 4 LUXEMBOURG 

CLABE ESCORT AG84CY 
Dcrjn & cvwingL Gedr avdt OOCBptod. 
Arport9aba.Ral tnrt (352) 4M^9r 


CIESA ESCORT SIVfCE 


RD4AISSANCE ESCORTS 

Ne* Yorit USA 212J5WO30 
MqorGteft Ctedt Accepted 


NEW DOLCE VITA 

Escort Servua. Frail & London 
Cal tondon 061-964-9727 


GENEVA * MISS * PARIS 

Escort agancy 346 00 89 aatk ards 


LONDON IBSUK ESCORT SBtVKX 
CfffTXAL MAYFAffi 
071 493 1020 * 0956 807916 

TOKYO 

Bart / Gujde Seme. Tetoph am Na 
(03) 3351 - xm . open •vorydoy d» 


LONDONBRjUSUAN Escort 

Service 071 724 5S77/91 <^»n 7 days 

” ZUOCH NEW VKX£T *‘ 
beort SmaCnit ccnkwoptod 
T«t OH / 63 83 32 

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••-*• 022 3Z1 9961 

VBMA*ZUDOt* PRAGUE 

ajffiMEJNRBcarrsawcE. 
eattVronol-H-q usgn 32 

n-ni&wH. LOWON 071 286 4KB 

• ORBITAL * 800*1 • SERVICE * 
••••EDINBURG H» • ■ * 

• ZURICH • SUSAN • 
tort Service 

, Tit 01/381 99 <8 

WAPROURT KOW DOSSHDORF 
gJ^OTbcrat Service,?^ 


Vtdarioi tort raid Grade Service. 
Phagcdt7riavEffm/25 32g2 - 

•PARIS l LONDON’ 
ELEGANT.* BXJGMH) ■ BtCLUSIVE 
Eicart Service London [7T1 3M 5U5 

•—•MEAN • JUUA** ,, ‘ 

ESCORT & 7SAVEL SERVICE. 

TRi p9 r q 4077367. 

TOKYO EXBOmvi " ~ 

Escort Sravxz. Cradt conk 
Tit; (&3479717U 

PMRHOWONIRBiai MVBtA 
ESCORT SERVICE AND TKAVB. 

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Prim* Escort Service. 

7 dan/emm. Tet 071 493 2784 

•• * ZURICH • • • 

CraoSne Esoorl ServicB 

TeL Oi/252 62 25 

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ZircfeOI /383 0B55. 

'G0CVA ANY* bcart A fo nc y* 
•kRT Dimen. Travel Stcang, 
nwAmd. <*? 022346.1 4jg« 
MUNICH ’WELCOME 
BCOKT & GU53C AGENCY- 
PlEASE CA1L08? ■- 91 23 14. 


f t a n k f u * t -.“ iw rar 

ESCORT SBMCE. TH.- 069 -597 4338. 

DAtLY R50M 2pcn- 

Zurich r tess/ basb. 

Beat S pvct 

W: 077/B8 06 60. EF7r88 06 70 _ 

VIENNA* PARIS ’MILAN* ZURICH 

E w w ff i W btfl Escort + Travel’ 
SSSSvtaiid^3.18t0d31». 

J APANES E CHMBE. THAI 

BCORT ffifMCE Da» oad evaningpk 
Plcme phone 071 2S3314 Loodrai. 

••••• LONDON WATHROW — " 
- MAYA - BCORT - SBMCE « 
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MJLTUNGUAL ESCORT SBMCT 
Londrai & Harfintor Td IP1 730 0405. 




LONDON CAMBCAN EXCLUSIVE 
saECITVEESCXWSSMCE 

077 - 233 -TOC Ail AKSAS 
•COSMOPOLITAN- 
London & Heothrow Enort Agancy 
Tel: 07t 352 4818 Aamx occrotod 

• ••VENUS” ”* 

• E SC08T - AGENCY • 
CAU: LONDON 071 -402 - 1838 : 


BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 


Established British based company 
in Dubai, U.A.E. Jebel Ali Free Tone, 

SEEKS PARTNERSHIP OR SALE 

of 2,400 sa.m. industrial plant for biscuit 
and cookie manufacturing on 10,000 sq.m, of land. 

Sale $3 Million U.S. 

Far-tnership negotiable. 

LIONS INTERNATIONAL 

Canada TeL: 514 - 737-7320 - Fax: 514 - 737-7248 


The Company is looking far stocks of different goods: 
FOOD STUFF: Coffee. Tea. Cbogiac Ban, Carnal ftafees. Including Mat, etc. 
GARMENTS in Benoal (shoe J 
ALSO Bectraria, Cipiettes, etc. . 

The minimum quantity should be one Truck (20 feet container). 

V & I FINANCIAL GROUP 
1 1, Rficisserie - P.O. Box 3508 - CH-121 1 Geneva 3 . 
Tel.: 41.22/3 1 1 I8 60 - Fax: 41.22/31 1 18 64 


CITIZENSHIP 


Tk&Free U.S. 


haansfox Nmdi an 900817 . Sailer n 
d SO Stta Gmb d casptae maojotf. 
Vc efc US iddies ptaic S ta rmre. 
cflkc srnica, 111 ted moods, US. atm 
u scnc is dbedns, ct*ptar niul 
misUBCc, tedndiag 0TC uitcl utryft 
i m i i y a tioB. FVasr iryat ourfite ho dm. 
mUk In fr&K frock 6Gm»i 
Dr. /ar. WOliaai A. Wrtgfax 
Anorocy zr Law 
US. CorportiOrt Services, Inc. 
3430 Balmoral Drive, Suie *10, 
Saaamento, CaAfcanb 958J1 
= Pax(U5A3 916/783-3005 = 


B high quality, latest styles, chronographs. 

divers, fashion. Large variety (ca. 50 
different models), brjmded or OEM. also 
available as unassembled parts. Entire 
stock sold at a fraction or actual cos! 

Fmc ++41 32 81 48 88. 


wealth country (not Antigua). Principals 
or their lawyecs only, plant octet 
Maritime International Ltd. 
P.O. Box 1302, 43C Reddiffe Street 
Si John's Antigua, West Indies. 
Fasc (809) 462-2718. 


20,000 CBM LUMBER & - 

woopraooucre pzitxai 

Good pnxbction spice, cotraminJcuioas 
sod tost retouices ln EsfoaZi. 
Out-aMaseequ^xneoL ’ - 
Sedctngtn&rtrktiamtfarfiMBlalpMljM 
AS FONSEKA LTD 
to:*37Z-5-24< T<5_ - 


Renowned University Professors 
wiD help you with your dissertation. 
Detailed information will be sent to 
serious applicants on receipt of 
resume (orCV). 

Fur Information pkese contact: 
(toeralCdwdttaeManasetnentGtobH 
TeL: + 49/89-99240-4) 
w F«: + 4W89-99240-tM 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


SHTEWI LfiYlfl SERVICES AGENCY OFFERS 

TRANSLATION. INTERPRETATION, 
SECRETARIAT SERVICES. 

ARABIC, ENGUSH, FRENCH, 

ITAUAN, GERMAN, RUSSIAN, SPANI SH. 

10. RUE ALFRED-VINCENT. 1201 GENEVA. SWITZERLAND 
TEL: ^41 .22.738.55.21/738.54.40. FAX: +41^2.738.54.80.- 


TELECOMMUNICATIONS 


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4IT Soak; WA.MUUIHA 


INTERNATIONAL FRANCHISE OPPORTUNITIES 


You’d be surprised how much 
money you can make helping 
people learn the difference. 


fiMx 


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Enter 


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F8 

Delete 

Del 

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gun_ 

EBlt ll'lndoms— 


THE ONLY 
MAJOR U.S. 
INDUSTRY 
NOT YET 
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I N T E R Nfi ilO N filL 

Franchise 


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business syrfem h America And only a 
fraction of the 3XXXH- US. franchise 
'. companies have exported fhefrs^tems. 

Visit the World's 
largest Franchise Expo! 

Meet hundreds^ ^of franchise companies 
. and finer hundreds of NEW Investment 
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DO YOU 1WNT A SOW GUD? find out how you 
may be (He to obtain o Grean Cad by buying a 
US. franchta buRnescndoporcding it In America 
jgg WgWO WjWlfoBRpiDmmrfieniiw 
ax3tuhxtatLi^»Q>poattEfxfoesi 


FtTScnal computer naming is one of 
the fastest growing industries in the world. As 
on mieznattouai Wader in the Beki, we're seen 
revenues for our ExecuTraiif franchise spaon 
in the U.S. grow aL an awe-inspiring 1900% 
in the past sue rears. 

Now. we're oOering you an opporturaiv 
to take advantage of ibis cfemendous growth 
in ycur ccamtrv. Master franchises are available 
in several countries around the world And 
EjcecuTram franchises are available in the 


United Kingdom, Republic of Ireland, Mexico, 
Spain, Australia, New Zealand, Italy C an ada, 
Southeast .Asia, France, South America, and other . 
countries as well. 

If you have a solid business background 
(not necessarily in computers! and hare at least 
5200,000 in U5. funds to invest, caQ or write 
Ms. Dawn Weiss, Franchise Sales Manager, 
ExecuTram International, 1000 Abernathy Rd, 
Suite 400. Atlanta, GA., USA 30328. Pbooe coBea 
404-396-9200 Ext. 3049. Fax 404-698-9180. 


WASHINGTON D C. INTERNATIONAL FRANCHISE EXPO 

APRIL 29. 30 & MAY 1. 1994 ? 0 s « 1 ™ ?*fc. fi wa 


^Exeailrain. 

TV Leader 


Z l«4 £xrrjl=d fa pMw 


The Road to Success... 

The fastest way to succeed in Qg 
business is to go with a proven 
leader. ZIEBART TiDYCAR is the W 

recognized brand name for a fi£J 
successful automotive aftermarket 
business in 41 countries. 

Ziebart TldyCar specializes in profession- 
ally applied and installed products and 
services for automotive Protection, De- 
tailing, and Accessories. These services 
meet the strong consumer demand for 
cars that look better and last longer. 

Extensive initial and ongoing training, 
marketing, advertising, technical, and 
promotional support is provided. 

Master Franchises are still available. Join 
our worldwide network of successful 



Master License Opportunity 

AIphaGraphics, 24-year leader in the quick print and 
related services industry is seeking additional Master 
licensees to develop our 330-scoie network, cunendy 
operating in 18 countries. ; 

Each AIphaGraphics center offers offset printing, 
electronic printing, computer-assisted graphic 
binding arid finishing, and is 1 tied to oar woridwide system 
through a d jg h al data network. Consider your future as a 
Master IJceasee, developing franchise locations in your . 
country of interest. ’ 7 .. ' ; 

AIphaGraphics is seeking Master LicenseesibriAfiica, the 
Caribbean. Central America. Southern Lain America and 
Western Europe. 

For to Information packet, please call Bill Edwards at 

1 (602) 293-9200. or fiut jour request to 1 (602) $87-2850. 


Master Franchisees in countries such as 
Germany, Denmark, Hungary, Mexico, 
Indonesia, and Taiwan. For .more infor- 
mation contact: 

Ziebart International Corporation 
P.O. Box 1290 
Troy, Michigan 
48007-1290 U.SA 
Tel: 1-810-588-41 00 
Fax: 1^810-588-0718 


aipsagrapMss” 

■ WildwpiOntWRAiB 


|TRAVlELN^I , WOkK 7 LiT) 

*1 USA TOAVEL agency chain 

Inf! Master Franchise Rights 
Joint Veranre Opportunity - 
RSVP i»r FAX to- roeel with 
Travel NetwoA Executive* 

to mSsn’CH 7 M«ck 2*8. 
USA' TeL 2fl 1/567-8500 
or Fax 201/567-1838 


3760 N. Commerce Drive 
Tucson, Arizona 85703 USA 


Page 17 

FOR MORE 

business 

messages 


-'J 

KX'n 


i 














INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 1994 


Page IS 





Europe's Best-Kept Secret 



w 


■■ 




ales is proba- 
bly the best- 
kept invest- 
— ment secret in 
Europe. Located on the west- 
ern side of Britain, Wales in 
the past 10 years, has attracted 
investments worth more than 
$7.5 billion, involving more 
-than 120, 000 jobs. 

Altogether, some 1,200 
new or expansion projects in 
Wales have been announced 
since April 1983. 

Over the same period, 
Wales has consistently re- 
ceived about 20 percent of all 
capital investment in Britain. 
In the past few years, invest- 
ments valued at more than 
$1.5 billion have been made 
by seven companies alone - 
Sony, Robert Bosch, Toyota, 
British Airways, Hamilton 
Oil, Ford and Dow Coming. 
Other blue-chip names that 
have invested in Wales in- 



Dawtf Rowe-Beddoe, chairman, 
Welsh Development Agency. 

elude Aiwa, Hawker 
Siddeley, Lucas, Matsushita, 
Brother, Valeo. Kimberly- 
Clark. Kloeckner Pentapak 
and 1’OreaL 

Once the greatest coal-min- 
ing region of Britain, Wales 
was lull of the traditional 


smokestack industries, iron 
and steel making. At the peak 
of the coal era. about 1 20.000 
people worked in the mines 
and steelworks. Today, that 
figure has dropped to under 
20,000, or less than half the 
number of employees in 
Japanese-owned companies. 

Wales' success in attracting 
major Japanese investment 
projects has been achieved in 
die lace of stiff international 
competition. Wales now has 
one of the highest concentra- 
tions of Japanese investment 
in Europe. This investment 
has contributed significantly 
to the country's successful 
transformation into a diversi- 
fied and modem industrial 
economy. 

One of the powers behind 
the investment strategy is the 
Welsh Development Agency, 
whose various functions in- 
clude not only direct inward 
investment, but also bilateral 
ma tchmakin g between Welsh 
companies and prospective 
overseas partners, outward in- 
vestment by Welsh-based 
companies, and a substantia] 
real-estate and land-reclama- 
tion program. 

“The development of a 
strong indigenous manufac- 
turing and service economy 
is. of course, the key long- 
term strategic aim of the 
WDA,” says its new chair- 
man, Welsh-born David 
Rowe-Beddoe. He says that it 
is vital for the WDA to main- 
tain die momentum on inward 
investment but warns that the 
traditional markets of North 
America and Japan could start 
to slow down; up to now, the 
United States. Germany and 
Japan have been the major 
overseas investors in Wales. 


“We are widening our 
search for investors to new 
markets such as Singapore, 
Korea, Hong Kong, Australia 
and South Africa,” says Mr. 
Rowe-Beddoe. He also points 
out drat there are possible 
changes in investment pat- 
terns, with a concentration of 
smaller and less labor-inten- 
sive projects. 

The WDA created the 
European Business Group, 
whose mission is to help small 
to medium-sized businesses 
in Wales to expand into the 
rest of Europe. “We are trying 
to help those companies that 
lack a certain self-confidence 
about going it alone into 
Europe.” says Give Votes, 
director of the EBG. Already, 
EBG has forged links with 
four of the most powerful eco- 
nomic “motors” of Europe. 
These are Baden- 
Wiirttemberg (Germany), 
Lombardy (Italy), Rhdne- 
Alpes (Ranee) and Catalonia 
(Spain). Last year, this 
“Eurolink” program resulted 
in 66 partneakiip projects with 
Welsh companies. 

Mr. Vokes is now trying to 
exploit European Union pro- 
grams, and the WDA - in 
conceit with other Welsh or- 
ganizations - has established 
the Wales European Center in 
Brussels. “We think there are 
big opportunities for us there 
to tap into EU aid programs - 
trade with aid,” says Mr. 
Vokes. 

An equally proactive ap- 
proach is being taken by the 
agency's inward-investment 
division, which has set up a 
string of offices in the Far 
East, from Tokyo to Seoul. 
“Our challenge is to try to 
raise the quality of the inward 



WALES AT A GLANCE 


POPULATION: JL&a88on 
AREA 2-Vm®onhac$ares(5mSonacres) 
GDP:Z}J3monpomds {$32M6w$ 
VKJRXKBCfcl® trillion." ■ 

937,000 • 

.Se4kmptGfy8d:ffi8J»0. - 
•Ureaptoywi: 127,000 ■ 

AVERAGE WEEKLY EAWJM3S: . 

Metf ’aoaajpwnfc . 

'Woraerr 231 .60 pounds 
SoawK-WWs® Dmnkvm**AOmcy- OMmber. 



Japanese in Wales 



opened 


tothe first nine months cf last year, 34 projects involving IQflQO jobs were secured. 


investor, to improve our local 
skill base and thus increase 
wages, which will help boost 
the Welsh economy," says the 
WDA’s Peter Price. 

The approach already ap- 
pears to be working, accord- 
ing to Brian Morgan , the 


WDA's director of economic 
strategy. The forecast for the 
gross domestic product this 
year looks good: GDP growth 
is estimated at 2.6 percent 
With growth in manufacturing 
content expected to be 3.4 
percent. By comparison, total 


GDP for Britain is forecast at 
2.4 percent. While other parts 
of Britain may be slumbering. 
Wales is awake and working 
for the future. In a world class 
of its own, Wales is wailing to 
be discovered by yet more in- 
vestors. 


he first Japanese 
company to set up 
in Wales was 
Takiron. which 
a factory near 
Caerphilly, in 1972 to make 
pvc sheeting. Today, there are 
45 Japanese companies in 
Wales that employ more than 
12,000 persons. 

The two biggest Japanese 
companies in Wales are Sony, 
which produces television sets 
for export to Europe and has 
been in Wales for 1 8 years, 
and the Matsushita Elec- 
tronics Group. Together they 
employ about 5,000 persons. 
Sony recently completed its 
seventh major investment in 
Wales - a new $200 million 
television factory near 
Bridgend. The company has 
increased production to 1.5 
million television sets a year, 
75 percent of which are ex- 
ported to Europe. Sony now 


does all its design and devel- 
opment work for the 
European market from its 
Welsh plants. Its latest facto- 
ry forms part of its new tech- 
nology center, which occupies 
a 162-acre (66-hectare) site. 

According to a study by the 
Cardiff Business School, local 
Japanese enterprise has 
played an important role in 
developing cultural and edu- 
cational links between the two 
countries. There have also 
been substantial social ties 
through football, softball, 
cricket and squash matches. 

In 1989, a “Japanese in 
Schools” program was intro- 
duced: in the same year, the 
Japanese Studies Center was 
opened at the University of 
Wales College in Cardiff. At 
the secondary level, several 
Welsh schools have been 
twinned with Japanese 
schools. 


This advertising section was produced in its entirety by the 
supplements division of the international Herald Tribune's 
advertising department. It was written by Michael 
Frenchman, a London-based free-lance writer. The next is- 
sue on Wales will be published on Feb. 16. 1994. . 




‘ tJvW 5 









GIANTS. 








A 7 



These days the Wfelsh Dragon is a 
real high flyer since two international 
giants of the aero engineering industry 
chose Wales. 

British Airways has its new 
engineering base at Cardiff Airport 
and recently General Electric (USA) 
has moved to nearby Nantgarw. 
where they service aircraft: engines for 
famous names like CFML Rolls Royce 
and Pratt & Whitney. 

With more than a little help from 
the W?lsh Development Agency, both 
companies were not merely able to 
find the right site, but also the right 
people from Whies’ skilled and flexible 
workforce. 

The WDA has also assisted in the 
development of a local supplier infra- 
structure to ensure vital components 
are always at hand 

To get your business off the 
ground, put the Welsh Advantage to 
your advantage. Call the team at 
Wfelsh Development International on 
+4-4 222 666862. or write to Welsh 
Development International. Welsh 
Development Agency, Pearl House, 
Grey friars Road. Cardiff CFl 3 NX. 


ONE DRAGON 


WDA 


THE WELSH ADVANTAGE. 








J 










jC** 








Page 16 



SPORTS 


3-Point Record 
Lifts the 76ers 


The Associated Pros 

Tim Peny made more 3- pointers 
in one night than he did in his first 
four seasons in the National Bas- 
ketball Association. 

Perry made a career-high seven 


NBA HIGHLIGHTS 


3-pointers and scored 31 points on 
Monday night, leading the Phila- 
delphia 76ers past Charlotte, 125- 
117, and sending the Hornets to 
their seventh straight defeat. 


Hall of Fame 
For Daly , Crum 


The Associated Press 


SPRINGFIELD. Massa- 
chusetts —Chuck Daly, coach 
of the NBA's New Jersey Nets. 
Denny Crum. Louisville's 
coach, and the Italian coach 
Cesore Rub ini were elected to 
the Basketball Hall of Fame 
on Tuesday. 

Elected as players were Car- 
ol Blazejowski, the shooting 
star of the women's game in 
the 1970s, and Harry (Buddy) 
Jeannette, a standout back- 
court player in the 1930s and 
1940s. 

They will be enshrined on 
May 9* 

Daly’s coaching career be- 
gan in 1955. in 1983. he took 
over the Detroit Pistons, 
which had never had back-to- 
back winning seasons, and led 
them to NBA championships 
in 1989 and 1990. 


Perry, a 6-foot-9 forward sent 
from Phoenix to Philadelphia in 
the trade for Charles Barkley, was 
5-for-I8 on 3-pointers from the 
1988-89 through 1991-92 seasons. 

On Monday, he saw that the 
Hornets were leaving him unguard- 
ed outside the 3-point line. 

Perry, who has a perfect rotation 
and high arc on his jumper, sent up 

15 3-point attempts. His teammates 
took 15 others, setting the team re- 
cord with 30 and coming up one shy 
of the NBA record for attempts set 
by Sacramento in 1989. 

Perry’s final 3- pointer wrapped 
up the victory. 

Philadelphia led. 120-113. but 
Nluggsy Bogues hit two free throws 
and David Wingatefollowed with a 
layup with 26 seconds to go to 
make it 120-1 17. Eight seconds lat- 
er. Perry hit his last 3-pointer. 

Hawks 141, Pistons 97: In Atlan- 
ta. the Hawks scored their roost 
lopsided victory since they moved 
from St. Louis after the 1967-68 
season. 

Atlanta shot a season-high 64 
percent in breaking its previous 
margin-of-victory mark of 42 
points. Stacey Augmon scored 26 
points to lead six Hawks players in 
double figures. 

Heat 96, Kiticks 85: In Miami, 
the Knicks ran out of energy in the 
second half. 

New York opened up a 17-point 
lead in the first half but scored only 
12 points in the third quarter and 
21 in the fourth. Patrick Ewing had 
an especially poor night, making 
just 6 of 23 shots from the field. 

Steve Smith led Miami with 25 
points, and Glen Rice and Rony 
Seikaly each added 22. 



Price of Soccer’s Principles 



humanaud fleraU Tribute 

L ONDON — Wha t pric e princip l es in the modem 
world of sport and commerce? ,‘ i< - 

Principle 1: Soccer success can only be earned on 
thefidd. ‘7.- 

That used to be the essence of the game. But there 
are entrepreneurs who meet regularly trying to bypass 
the necessity to win matches. 

They, the profit-seekers, are the putative founders 
of a European Su- 
per League that, if 
only ever they 
I agree among 

themselves, will 


Rob 

Hughes 


form an elite of rich (dobs skimming off sponsoritips 
and television rights. 

Their would-be leader, AC Milan's proprietor, Sil- 
vio Berlusconi, dismisses the risk dement in cup-tie 
soccer as “not modern thinking.'' . 

Berlusconi is now more in the running for Italy’s 
political leadership than his Milan players -are for 
silverware. AC Milan lost the Woria Opb Cup to 
Brazil’s Slo Paulo and was outplayed for the Europe- 
an Super Cup by Parma. 

The defeats were good news for those who spied a 
boQow ring to Milan, the defeated European Champi- 
ons’ Cup finalist, standing -in for the disgraced Oiym- 
pique Marseille. But they were bad news for Berius- 
confs ego and his dependent TV satellite company. 

The subscribers to BerinsconTs super league dimin- 
ished at least by one ou Monday wfaai Alex Fytm 
described it on BBC radio as a charter for greed and 
ambition that would destroy the game as we know it 


Principle 2: “In the whole civilized *orid, 

reinstatement of Anatoli Bishovets, who had been 

And this weekTafter fads alternative team thrashed 
Mexico, 4-1. in a friendly in the United State, Sadynn 
said: “This is the group of players to whom rn put mgr 
faith. There are enough first-class playexs m Russia. 

I wonder. The principle of the coach as god, the 
players subserviant, is relatively modem, and m my 
experience you need the co-operation of both. 

Confrontation is poison ill the locker room- woe or 
two dissenters, whatever their talent, would have to 
compromise or go, but 147 

Their act was published in Moscow newspapers. 
The letter speDcd oat “a good club coach does not fit 
the standards of a national coach. All that has been 
achieved m the qualifying games was the result of 
work done by Bishovets in Ms time.” 


Fynn seems to change his tune the way a player 

"of Berii 


ins- 


changes Ms shirt. For he was the architect 
corn’s 1988 super-league plan. 

“I got sidetracked by vanity” Fynn admitted on 
Monday. “I knew Berlusconi wanted a franchise sys- 
tem, so that’s what I gave Mm- 
“Fm glad UEFA turned it down, because I think its 
wrong having a system not on merit but by oligarchy." 

Fynn went on to express Ms continuing presump- 
tion to offer a different format He disparaged UE- 
FA’s latest formula — half way to the Berlusconi 
demands — as threatening soccer for short-tom gains 
by elite clubs, sponsors and TV. 


W ELL. WELL. Either Fynn has seen new light 
(the glaringly obvious lidr M 


Decs Cetoa/Agqw FmAoc 

MiamFs Matt Geiger ami John Safley put the heat on Patrick Ewing, and New York lost, 96-85. pleat the 


(the glaringly obvious light to many with no 
vested interest) or he is a brave con vet from the 


of a wealthy client. 


No. 1 Merry-Go-Round: Tar Heels on Top Again 


A salesman Fynn remains. His Monday comments 

, “Out of Time: 


The Associated Press 
Another poll another No. 1. 


For the sixth consecutive week 
there was a different team atop the 
e fai 


national rankings. But the latest 


COLLEGE BASKETBALL 


No. 1 has already been there a few 
times this season. 

North Carolina (19-3) moved up 
to the lop spot Monday, switching 
places with Duke, which it beat last 
week in the first 1-2 matchup be- 
tween the Atlantic Coast Confer- 
ence rivals. The Tar Heels were the 
preseason No. I and also held it for 
the second week of the parade of 
the top-ranked teams. 

Since Arkansas's five-week run at 
the top ended last month. North 
Carolina. Kansas. UCLA and Duke 
all had one- week stints as No. 1. 

The chances of North Carolina's 
surviving back-to-back weeks ap- 
pear good, with home games 
against Maryland and Georgia 
Tech this week, although Georgia 
Tech beat the Tar Heels earlier in 
the season. 

The Tar Heels were a convincing 
No. 1, with 60 first-place votes and 


moved up three spots to third and 
fourth. 

Kansas, the first team to win 20 
Mines this season, dropped from 
third to fifth after losing to Missou- 
ri last week and was followed by 
Connecticut. Louisville, Temple — 
which had a first-place vote — 
UCLA and Purdue. 


In games played Monday night 
Georgetown 60, Syracuse 56: Af- 
ter scoring 108points last week in a 
victory over Connecticut, the Big 
East leader, Syracuse (15-4, 8-4 in 


the Big East) was limited to almost 

tnat anv 


half that amo unt against George- 
town (13-6, 7-4) in Landover. 
Maryland. 


They played very good de- 
fense,” said Syracuse's Lawrence 
Moien, who scored only 2 of his 13 
points in the second half. 

With 19 seconds left and tr ailing 
by one, Moien found himself wide 
for a 15-foot jumper. But Ms 
n rimmed out and George- 
town's Othella Harrington pulled 


down the rebound, then made three 
free throws in the final 10 seconds 
to secure the victory. 

No. 18 California 93, Cal State 
Nortfaridge 63: Jason Kidd scored 
24 points and Lamood Murray 
added 22 to help California (15-4) 
overwhelm visiting Cal State 
Northridge(4-l5). 


coincided with the launch of Ms book, 

Why Football Isn't Working!” There, Fynn gives an 
insider’s view of wheeler-dealing in soocer, mainly 
, soccer. 

it is an intriguing, disturbing account of rake-offs 
by the game's paid gmntignu, and writ large is the 
wanting of a sport devouring itself far the start-term 
television and sponsorship spoils. 

Fynn now admits soccer was best served under the 
40-year-old European home-and-away knock-out sys- 
tem. “But,” he concludes, “We can’t g p back mid 
rewrite history.” 

Why not? if history had it right, then far heaven's 
sake say it: Go back to basics. 


T HER E WERE complaints of mismanagement 
beyond Sadyrin’s control Complain is abo ut bo- 
n uses , or lack oil them. Complain is about shivering 
(ywftrinns at a near Moscow where players slept 
in their overcoats because the beating was switched off. . 

-In a land where food and warmth are hard to come 
by, these mtnterings typlaym perceived as mercenar- 
ies in another world cut little ice. Sadyrin insisted the 
rebellion was the work of Bisbovete. The federation 
backed Mm by calling up more than 40 squad players to 
a t raining sessio n in Moscow, and when only 18 tamed, 
up, they fanned the team Sadyrin took to America. 

. By no means all of those are Russian-based -pl ayer s, 
or even Russians. Some flew in from Spain, some from 
Germany, amongthem Oleg Salenko, the Logrones 
forward, who tad signed the letter. 

Sadyrin still masts that the players wme doped by 
Bishovets, who had made them unauthorized promises 
relating to the millio n or so dollars Russia can expect 
to receive firmn the first World Cup round. 

Bat his ing^cation that the door will be closed on 
players who didn’t turn up for the warmup is harsh. 
Seme, involved in vital dub toumanieatt’ could not 
. have been released if they tad trial; -others, such as 
Igor Dobrovolski and Andrer£anchdsk&who fore- 
soak Ukrainian nationality, and Valeri Kaxpine, who 
is Estonian by birth, have given much to opt /or Russia 

and a WraW Cup. • ; 


a 


In addi tion, Saga Kniakov is a match-winning 
talent as well as a leading “dissident. ” Dmitri Kharine 
is a splendid goalkeeper, Alexandra Mostovoi' and 
Igor Stahmov are proven creators, VasaH Kulkov a 
worid-dass defender. 

There will be a Russian compromise somewhere en 
route to the World- Cup. Otherwise, the second-best 
Russian team will attempt to win the-Cup. 


Reb Fbqfrnhmtix nog tf The Tones. 


SCOREBOARD 


Poctfie Division 


NBA Standings 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Atlantic tWtHon 


it-pla 

1,617 points from the national me- 


dia panel while Duke (16-2) was on 
top of three ballots and had 1,486 
points. 

Arkansas, wMch had one firsi- 
place vote, and Kentucky each 



W L 

Pet 

New York 

33 13 

717 

Or km do 

26 20 

-565 

Miami 

23 22 

Jll 

New Jersey 

21 23 

jsn 

Boston 

20 26 

A3S 

Philadelphia 

2D 26 

435 

Mull button 

15 30 

Central DtoN Ian 

J33 

Atlonta 

33 12 

733 

ChkaBO 

32 13 

711 

Cleveland 

23 22 

J11 

Indiana 

22 23 

.489 

Charlotte 

22 24 

m 

Milwaukee 

13 33 

783 

Detroit 

10 3* 

217 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Midwest Dhrtslop 


W L 

Pet 

Housian 

13 11 

750 

San Antonia 

31 14 

702 

Utah 

30 17 

A3* 

Denver 

22 23 

M 9 

Minnesota 

U 3C 

J18 

Dallas 

4 42 

aa 


88 


7 

Wt 

1) 

» 

13 

T7V, 


Seattle 

34 10 

773 

_ 

Phoenix 

30 14 

482 

4 

Portland 

26 19 

sn 

8Vs 

Golden State 

25 20 

set. 

9VH 

LA. Clippers 

14 27 

-373 

17V4 

LA. Lakers 

16 28 

764 

18 

Sacramento 

13 31 

791 

31 

MONDAY'S RESULTS 


Chortotto 

33 

31 27 

28-117 


M; Rico 10-T9M22.5«lcaly 6136*22. iSrotth 
8-12 4-11 2S. Retocoads-New York SI (Ewing 
Ml. Mlccnl 47 (Selkslv 12J. Assists— nw York 
» (Stories S). Miami 20 (Show 81. 


Major College Scores 


mil 


1 

10 

n 

lIVi 

ZWj 

23V> 


N 43 30 n 29— 12S 

C: E-lohnsan 5-22 3-4 28 Bagues 9-1 1 6-6 24, 
Hawkins 8-13 14-14 31; P: Parry 11-27 2-3 31. 
Hamacefc U-20M36. Raftoaads— Chorlotfa* 
(W1 neats 13). Philadelphia^ (Weattierapoon. 
Kidd IS). Assists— Onrlatta 31 (Bogues 10). 
Philadelphia 36 (Waalharsaaen 13). 

Damn II IS 38 38- 77 

Atlanta 29 33 16 44— Ml 

D: Houston 10-22 2-3 22. Dumars 7-153-4 21; 
A: Auwnan 7-8 12-16 26. Blaylock 7-13 2-2 IB. 
Rebou n fls Patron 47 (Mills. Liberty 91. At- 
lanta 63 (Willis 11). Assists Detroit )3 (Hous- 
ton. Thomas 3). Atlanta 21 (Whatley 41. 
Gafctea Stats 3i 29 17 33— 79 


Georgetown 60. Syracuse 5* 

Pom 77. Buffalo 52 

Jamas Mae Hon 37. wnilom 8 Mcty 39 
N. Caroline St. 72. Tennessee 70. OT 
Tennessee SI. 77. Austin Peay 14 
Tulane 104. SE Louisiana S' 

Illinois SI. 41. Tulsa 56 
Oklahoma St. 96. Oklahoma 68 
UNLV 48. Lons Beach SL a) 


18 Purdue 

18-3 

987 

■ 

11. Michigan 

154 

955 

13 

12. Indiana 

144 

933 

14 

IX Massachusetts 

17-4 

908 

11 

14. Syracuse 

153 

775 

>5 

15 Missouri 

16-2 

695 

20 

18 Arizona 

174 

633 

» 

17. St. Louis 

18-1 

584 

18 

18 California 

144 

51* 

17 

19. AkL-BIrminaham 

17-3 

497 

17 

28 Florida 

114 

436 

34 

21. Wisconsin 

144 

364 

16 

21 Marauette 

155 

368 

— 

23. Minnesota 

15-7 

111 

22 

24. 1 Ninety 

12-5 

105 

— 

25. Xavier. Oh la 

163 

71 

— 


Pittsburgh 

Baton 

Buffalo 


38 )« llffl 172 186 
26 IB 7 81 170 132 


Ottawa 


26 22 
21 27 
77 » 
» 40 


57 177 142 
47 174 IBS 
44 IB 118 
25 141 255 


so— 77 The AP Top 25 


The ten IS teams In the coOoae basketball 
nelLflrst-ptace *stes In par entheses, records 
through Feb. 1. total paints based on 25 points 
far Hrst-pMB -rote threrah one pchrt lor 251b- 
place -rate, and previous rantoees: 


NHL Standings 


WESTERN CONGRUENCE 
Control Dtvtstm 

W L T Pis OP OA 
Taranto 28 16 

Detroit 30 17 

Dallas 21 20 

St- Leu Is 27 if 

Chicago 23 21 

Winnipeg 77 31 

Pacific DtvMan 
Catoory 27 77 7 

Vanaxrver 26 25 2 

Sen Jose » 34 11 

Anaheim 21 II 4 

Las Angelas 17 27 4 

Edmonton 15 33 a 


<7 IE 155 
65 »1 179 
63 172 179 
O 172 178 
56 156 147 
41 181 228 


63 208 173 
54 179 175 
O M8 M7 
44 154 172 
44 195 207 
38 173 202 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Atlantic DMJtoe 


MONDAY’S RESULTS 


Pint Period: N.Y. M en tor 22 (Nil. Second 
Parted: W-Knwwoichufc 6 (Peak* RUfley); 
W - P I uon h a* (Sww en ey JCrygler); W-Himter4 
(Anderson). Third Period: W-Bancfro 20 
(KhrKMdv Cats), shots on goat; W 1H6 
11-08 N.Yi 1644-88 Gaatfes— W/Tcdwr- 
ood. N-Y- RHWer. Hedy. 

Tampa Bay r 1 •— 1 

TBroata : 8’ 1 8^1 

Htst Partad: T-BergkmdS (Borgevim. Seo- 
o*d Period: T-PoescheU f ReeWADJMnfo) j T- 
Andrayehukfi Mu. Shots an grai: T 1367-37. 
T 3-14-8— 28 G oa l lee T, JaMarokLT, RnadnL 
Edmonton 1 8 3-8 

Calgary I 1 6-4 

First Parted: C-TOuv 19 (Wot& Atoetimb) 
(BP); C-RetetHH at ipp)jE-Amott2l (Baer* 
Olausaen). Second Period: C- Ratchet 8(716 
any than (pa). Third Parted: GMoclmfc 17 
(Piaary. RanMni); E-Cor*m 23 (Ofcstuta, 
ArnoMi E- ne e ra 9 (Canon, «MgM> (pc). 
ShalS OB goal: E 6612—23. C 14-12-11—87. 
Goadas-rE, RontonJ, -C KML - 


M.Y. METS— Suspended Brat Srtarijaeon; 
PtftSMT, 6ar first 5 days of T9M season. 

HOUSTON— Voided Feb. 4 trade that Mnf 
Robert Horry and Mott Bullard, ten ant s, 
OSiflT asf Hd u wd d r af tpfctsteDetrottteSean 
Elliott, tewara aftw Elliott laliad phvsiaot: 
HOCKEY 


f ,,n‘ 

,P {t , ■ 


■iifr h 


r ,, 


t - ; 

t-- v 

a 1 .- 


S'..' •;> 

K- -V ‘ 






PA 


S’ 

p- 

r’.- 

j?:-- 

<?/; 




V. Srtj 




H-% 


v-" ; 

tz?' 

C?-'' 

£&' 

X- Tl 

cz :L - 

btr- 1 

j:-:* 

cfc-* 

■ 

S3 


f/. 


1 1 


-1M 


SB 


1W 

Ob 

1IW 

17 

3a 


27 27 22 

G: Weour B-11 3-S if. sorawefi n-if 2-228; 
I: Smits 10-17 8-10 28 Miller S-ll 7-7 17. Re- 
boaads— Golden State 46 (Webber 1 1). Indi- 
ana 50 (5mlf3 13). Assists— GoMan State 22 
(Webber 7). Indiana 23 (Fleming 6). 

New York 34 18 12 21-85 

Miami 20 21 23 32—96 

NY: Ewing 6234-6 18 Anthony 6-11 44 17: 



Reccrt 

PTS 

Pei 


w 

L 

T Pis OF OA 

prmbeniti ■ i 6-1 

l.Ncrtfi Caroline i£>i 

»W 

1417 

2 

N.Y. Rangers 

34 

14 

4 

72 

190 

136 

First Period: ftfrMuOer 13 (Schnektor. 

1 Duke C) 

16S 

I486 

1 

New Jersey 

29 

17 

6 

64 

1W 

145 

□ampheusse) Ipp). Second period: #8- 

1 A r Senses O 

162 

1441 

6 

Florida 

23 

17 

W 

58 

150 

140 

Sctneldarii (Damphaum. Muller) (pp); P- 

8 Kentucky 

183 

1J69 

7 

Washington 

25 

25 

4 

54 

173 

U7 

Muflen 32 [Tpecfwt, U. Somuahsenl. Third 

5. Kansas 

SM 

1770 

3 

Philadelphia 

24 

28 

3 

51 

187 

110 

Period: M-LeOafir ML M-otaane 13 (Odeleta. 

4 Ccnnefictt 

1H 

1759 

5 

Tamea Bar 

20 

28 

6 

46 

139 

142 

Mutter). Shots en goal: M1W-13-3LP 1515 

7. LsulrrKe 

'82 

1751 

9 

N.Y. islander* 

19 

26 

6 

44 

T73 

177 

7—39. Goalie*— M. Ray. P, Wreroet. 

8 Temoie lit 

162 

17C5 

10 

Northeast DlvIUoe 




WUshtoetee 0 3 1—4 

7. UCLA 

152 

1M7 

4 

Montreal 

28 

17 

8 

64 

181 

154 

N.Y. Rangers 18 8-4 


TRANSACTIONS 


■ASKETMLL 


•BAN JOS E R ea ssig ned viosttwH Kraupa, 
d efe ns e men , to Kansas Ofy. im_ 

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. COLLEGE 

BOWLING GREEN— Joe* Gregory. Mtilet- 

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nattei of DkfcFMf, assistant football coot*. 

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sive c oordinator and auarterbacfcs coach, 
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Wtonive H n eonodu Grao Kandnskr'daton- 
■Ive One araefv Don T ro odwH rsedvare 
coach. 


ATLANTA— Agreed to toroto 
KaBer. pitcher, and Mike Kefir, 




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57 * ,- , 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 1994 


Jp-Ul C>»YiSJ> 


Page 17 


Ukraine’s Baiuk 
Like Heaven on Ice 

At 16, Skater Is a Favorite for Cold 


By Jere Lon gman 

New York Tuna Service 

As she stood backsrage in Prague 

in March, i 5- y car-old Oksana 

Bahil, suddenly aware that she was 

figure skating s world champion, 
began weeping. The U faSm 
mined to her coach and said, 
“These tears are God’s kisses from 
my mother in heaven.” 

At 13, Baiul was orphaned when 
her mother. . Marina, a French 
teacher, died of ovarian earner. So 
disconsolate was Oksana that, even 
three years taler, she cannot discuss 
her mother's death. Bm beneath 
this grief is a teenager ma ture be- 
yond her years. It is apparent in the 

heartfelt way she speaks, and in tbe 

joy and grace of hex Aatiru g 
“We must not forget that this is 
called figure skating," Band said. 
“Women should stop trying to be 
tike men with the jumps. People 
forget that the beauty is the key. 
The most important thing is the 


This season, though, skating 
hasn’t been enough. Baiul has 
struggled with hex jumping, espe- 
cially the landing of one jump in 
combination with another. 

At the recent European champi- 
onships in Copenhagen, Bahil 
landed five triple jumps, but Surya 
Bonaly of France lauded seven and 
took home ho- fourth consecutive 
title. At I S, Baiul was an unknown. 


Stanislav Kodiak, Oksana’s former 
coach, said of her mother. 

; At 13. she was without any fam- 
ily. And soon,- Baiul would be even 
without a coach. The Soviet Union 
baying splintered, its sports ma - 
chine no longer lubricated by the 
state, Koritek found h difficult to 
find work and moved to 

Oksana needed a new coach. 
Kontek*s father, Alfred, a vice 
president of the Ukrainian skating 
federation, phoned a renowned 
coach named G atina Znnevskaya, 
who lived in Odessa and tutored 
Viktor Petrenko, who would be- 
come the 1992 Olympic champ ion 

Znnevskaya was hesitant to take 
in Baiul, knowing she would have 
to be both a coach and a mother to 
her. Petrenko convinced bar: “She 
is only one girL How much can she 
cost?" 

Her rise was as meteoric as it was 
improbable. In 1991, sheJhrished 
12th at the Soviet championships. 
Two years later, at 15, she defeated 

Tcnya^H^Lg 8 ^!^^^ the 
youngest worid champion since So- 
nja Heme in 1928. flow she is a 
favorite for an Olympic gold medaL 

Hard work, her mother tdd her, 
would always win them over. 








& 



felt 


a&m- tffBF * 





Kcvm Lisurqic/ Rrutm 

Candles formed the Ofympc rings Tuesday in Lfflehammer, Norway, where hmdreds of people signed a message of solidarity with 
the besieged citizens of Sarajevo. Tuesday was the 10th anniversary of the opemng of the 1984 Sarajevo Winter Olympic Games. 


USOC Panel 

Sets Hearing on 
Harding’s Status 

The Associated Press The Olympics open on Saturday, 

but the women's figure-skating 
LI L L E HAMMER. Norway competition begins Feb. 23. 

A U.& Olympic Committee panel A USOC statement said the 
will meet in Oslo on Feb. 16 to hearing would deal “with issues of 
decide whether Tonya Harding conduct which have been raised 
should be removed from the figure during the last several weeks du ring ' 
skating team for the Winter Games ihe enforcement investigations 
because of the attack on her rival, into the attack on skater Nancy 


Nancy Kerrigan. 


Kerrigan and the U.S. Figure Skat- 


Harding s lawyers have been nob- j^p Association’s review as it rc- 
fied of the decision and she will be ^ the same issues." 


asked to appear, the USOC said. 
There was no immediate word on 


in a television interview Tuesday 
morning, Schiller said the skating 


whether she would testify. She has association's findings and Har- 
noi been charged in the case. ding’s own words were at the center 


Games Admimstra- of the USOC investigation. 


not bees charged in the case. 

If the USOC Games Administra- 
tive Board votes to expd the U.S. 
champion, she would have to go to 
court to try to win back her spot. 
Any decision is expected to be an- 
nounced immedia tely 
“I think it is a response that is 
required by the mounds surround- 
ing the attack on Nancy Kerrigan," 
the USOC executive director, Har- 
vey Schiller, said Tuesday. 

He said the inquiry would deal 
more with “sportsmanship and fair 
play aspects rather than c riminal 
culpability." 


No Sequins and Lace: As Ever, Harding Still Does It Her Way 


faces tbe most difficult opponent at 
the coming Winter Olympics? hi gh 
expectations. 

“The hardest year of your life is 
the year after winning die world 
championship," said Scott Hamil- 
ton, a four-tune world champion 
and the 1984 Olympic champion. 
“You have to live up to what world 
champion Once everything 
settles down, yon realize what you 
did. It can be emotional." 

How many athletes have we seen 


By Michael Janofsky Has was always a combative, contrarian Olympic materiaL" Hardin g was 5 years 

New York Tana Serrkx style amid the sequins rad lace that hdp old at the time. 

PORTLAND, Oregon — She was al- ®ake figure skating the most popular of In more recent years. Harding spoke 
ways different. When other littte girls were Winter Olympics sports and one of the often of days she and her mother would 
tentative and shy, Tonya Hardmg was all highest-rated of any sport on television. comb highways fra- bottles and cans to 
gn t* nwd a f w nlffif fi gmv drrtw mhn As other skaters projected grace and dam- collect the refunds. Golden also raised 


ghest-rated of any sport on television. comb highways for bottles and to 
As other skaters projected grace and dam- collect the refunds. Golden also raised 


couldn’t succeed fast enough. 


As other skaters projected grace and dam- collect the refunds. Golden also raised 
tiness, Harding stormed through routines, some money as a waitress; Rawlinson 


When she learned about gwrh things as determined to succee d in her own rough- raised more through donations, and coa- 
rfinm pi f ffl gtiire gold an d tfr* ntyfrv- hewn manner and h w n & M dc costumes. triboted some of her own. But it was worth 
tries, all gyef wanted was everything. As others chose Bizet and Tc ha i k ovsky, it. Young Tonya kept improving. 

Twenty years later, not much has Harding skated to apnlsatingrap song and Within 12 years, die won her first nugor 

"fir win- title, at the Northwest Pacific champion- 


Twenty years later, not , - . . . 

did. It can be emotional" theme music from “ Jurassic Pmi." In wm- title, at the Northwest Padfic champioo- 

How many athletes have we seen It has hfc om*. nwAnpc , the twncr j©. fling die 1991 national c ham pionship, the ships, which whisked ha into national 

confused and distractedby sodden, markable of » *nnct T wnarirabin gto- pmnadc of hex care er, she became the first prominence the following year, when she 

unexpected success? Especially a iy — the assault on her rival, Nancy Kerri- American woman to complete a triple axel, 

16-year-old whose mother and gan — that nothing has pried Harding’s * ^™ C0 ^J nn ? - 

grandparents are dead and whose eyes off die prize: • Peggy Fleming, she wasn t. PnA nn n An 

father left when she was 2? Not charges brought against four men in “Tonya’s big deal was that die didn’t T emaps me mosi 

Tbe only constant has been the the case, including her former husband, want to play the game with the hair, the remarkable 3£D€Ct of a 
beauty of Band's dotting, her whis- Jeff Gillooly, who pleaded godly last week dress, the look,” said Dody Te a c hman , her f 

pay glides and spark&ng expats- to a count of racketeering Not people who coach from 1988 through the 1992 Ofym- most remarkable story 
siveness. believe die helped plan the attack. Not pics, in which Harding finished fourth. . , i . v ■ .» 

"She puts Katarina Witt to even the enduring possibility die might be “I would never tell hex she had to do IS uiat notflmg Has pnetl 


grandparents are dead aid whose 
father left when she was 2? 

The only constant has been the 
beamy of Band's skating, her whis- 
pery glides and spaikhng expxes- 
aveness. 

"She puts Katarina Witt to 
shame, the wav she rungs for the 
judges." said Paul Wylie; a siBvtr 
medalist at the 1992 Olympics. 
"She’s just the girl they woe look- 
ing for" 

Ha father, Sergei, divorced her 
mother when Oksana was 2, and 
she did not see him again untilba 


lympic materiaL" Harding was 5 years She a ppears proud and happy until die 
d at the time. telephoned her mother, who expressed the 

In more recent years, Harding spoke feehng that she should have finished higher, 
ten of days she and her mother would In the video. Rawlinson asks Harding 
mb highways for bottles and cans to about the conversation, and Harding re- 
flect the refunds. Golden also raised plies: “She goes: ‘So I heard you missed 
me money as a waitress; Rawlinson your combination. You know, you didn't 
ised more through donations, and coa- get any credit for that at all.’ And I said, 
bated some of ha own. But it was worth ‘Mom.* She goes, “You did terrible, yon 
Young Tonya kept improving. know that? She said, “You sucked.’ And 1 

Within 12 years, she won her first major said, ‘Mom. I got half a credit for it.’ And 
le, at the Northwest Padfic champion- rite goes, *80, tbe rest of the program 
ips, which whisked ha into national sucked, also.' " 
aminence the following year, when she Harding has spoken often of painful 

episodes with her mother. Once she said 
" her mother hit ha with a hairbrush; once 

n 1 .1 she said she was thrown out of her mother's 

x ernaps tne most apartment until she helped pay the rent. 


even the enduring possibility she might be “i would never tdl ha she had to do 
arrested oc, worse, removed from die UJ5. anything. I'd suggest. I’d tdl ha it was Hke 
Olympic team. ajob, treat it Eke ajob. You need to look a 

•• Yet the name telescopic focus that certain way when yon skarr but you don’t 
brought her on to the world stage in sk atin g have to be the same person off the ice you 


jBCijuM we^ni uny wacwoi.* isucgu acr on 10 lacwunus iage in swuzuk nave to be the same person on the ice you 
ing for.” 1 has allowed ha tri persevefeanfid a broken are when you’re an me ice." 

Ha fatha, Sagd* dwureed her tone, financial distress, a troubled mar- AstheonlydrildafLaVona Golden and 
rootha when Oksana was 2, and pagpand, now, an ongdM nrvegimnoa ^ ht 4 an d. Albert Harding, who 

worked in a rubber company, Tonya Max- 
ene Harding lived in eight diffaent places 

old, Oksana was guided toward fig- of rnddfedass cmnfortand security. through toteemure years, 

ore skating by ha mother and But who would know? Skating through r . Y°“ 1 . .u , , , 

grandfatha as a way to stay fit fag daily practice at the Cl ac kamas Town Harding first skaied a the age of 3. and 
until she was 7, when she could Cotter ice rink inOregon these last tnmulto- ft year lata fou nd s c oach. Diane Schatz 

ous weeks, Hadir®, 23, has speared virtu- no ^ r Diane Rammson — who has re- 


Perhaps the most 
remarkable aspect of a 
most remarkable story 
is that nothing has pried 
Tonya Harding’s eyes 
off die prize. 


lighted by her performances in 1991 , which 
included ha first national seniors title, the 
triple axel, the second-place at tbe world 
championships and a victory in Skate 
America, an annual intemanonal event 
held in the United States. 

She was draring under Teachman, hav- 
ing broken temporarily from Rawlinson 
ova issues of balancing ha time between 
practice and outride interests. 

Harding and Gillooly separated in early 
1991, but reunited in the fall and spent tbe 
next 18 months or so in relative calm, even 
though ha level of performance slipped a 
notch through 1992. 

She finished third in the national cham- 
pionships and a disappointing fourth at the 
Albertville Olympics, after which she left 


riends and relatives have recalled other Teachman and rejoined Rawlinson. 


scenes of stress in which Golden would Tbe quiet lasted through the 1993 na- 
verbafly and physically abuse her daughter, tiooals, m which she slipped another place. 
It p*in« Golden to be asked now about to fourth. In March and again in July, 
those episode and others. arguments with Gillooly brought police to 

“I wouldn’t call myself an abusive moth- their apartment, 
a, nor would I say she had a bad child- She filed for a restraining order and 
hood." Golden said recently on a CBS divorce, which was granted on Aug. 28. 
ow. “And then some people, they 1993. But another reconciliation followed 
jure it’s right to swat a bottom. I almost immediately, 
a bottom needs to be swatted, fine. The couple begin living together again 
not spank. Spank is putting over until the events surrounding the K cm gan 
ees and going whop, whop. whop, assault pulled thou apart, 
r whatever. I did not ever do that" At the rink last week, the crowd was 
89, Harding had fully emerged as a growing as 10 AJvf. approached, the time 


begin to study baflet “When I was 
7, 1 woo my first competition, 50 1 
decided to stay in figure skating,” 
Baiul said. 

Ha home fife began to unravel 
as ba grandfatha died is 1987 and 
her grandmother passed away in 
1988. In 1991, ha motto died. 


r «*? *>"■ W then some people, they 

e when you’re an tbe ice." * — ; don 1 figure it s right to swat a bottom. I 

"wiS Stall i not^iL^^^s pS£ 

x fifth husband, Albert Harding, who «»a parents tooana out 01 scnooi, uiersne 1™: 

TonyaMw- Sp. or whateir. I didnm'everdo ^ 

le Hardmff hved m emht diffraent daces By 1989, Harding had fully emerged as a 

t po^tialsrar. While skrimping remained as 


through to teenage years. ga ^^^t^^^nonaimk Whikskrimpbg ranged as 

Harding first skated at the age of 3, and ® 1 . n . much pan erf ha routine as practicing, a 

a year lata found a coach, Diane Sduuz — third-place finish in the national champion- 

now Diane Rawlinson — who has r»- asthmatic, she was smoking a cigarette. chi™ and \ririnnps in twn mmnrtanf mfema- 


third-place finish b the national diampion- 
asthmanc. she was smokmg a cigarette. ^^vkaories in two important interaa- 

Her relationship with to motto neva tional events established to as a legitimate 
a p pe ar ed so warm as that with ha father, contender for the 1992 Olympic t eam 

. r . nflj* r . . J .» TT U A L . nntk 


ihransub than jhe has let m. From tl« start, two recurring themes In a 1986 feature videotape of Harding, About this time, ha relationship with 

While the thought of one warid-dass were evident: an abundance of ability and made as a senior project by Sandra Gillooly intensified, and in 1990, they were 
qthii** «g»>vrtagmg another is almost menn- a dearth of funds. In a Idling remark by Lockow, then a Yale University student married. She was 19, be was 22. Like the 

' J. tl - 1 J ton/iir, Tlu> rrairi- , rlnlar ntm nnc ,lcn r-mrVimt Ku iVffntTWT (hr OIK HnrHinP hid The rur- 


ally obfirious to an outside wodd that is mamedjvith to to now except for the 
panting to l«»Tn whetha she knows more of paioa Teacnman was m charge. 


dien, in three wedts, she was 


fopnity almngt eqnally with athletic skffl. With financial support, she could become competition. 


Even so, ha skating flourished, high- 


Harding was scheduled to begin practice. 

Hundreds of people stood three and four 
deep along the rad, and hundreds more 
crained from the upper levels of tbe shop- 
ping mall as the Zamboni machine finished 
smoothing the ice surface for Harding’s 
solo practice. 

Out on the ice, bounding around, she 
waved and she smiled and ha mother 
beamed proudly. And when ha daughter 
completed that first triple jump, the crowd 
roared in approval. What problems? The 
Olympics are almost here. 


* u.a. “We're responding in the main 
re to go to to figure skating's calling for a 
tospot. hearing of their body, which could 
to be an- lead to suspension and all the fac- 
tors sorrounding that," be said, 
ise that is “There are a number of issues to be 
surround- co ns jdered. And among them are 
Cemgan, statements that she's made in the 
ctor, Har- weeks about ha knowl- 

y- , , , , edge of the attack when she re- 
deal tumed to Portland.” 
p and fa ir jjj e board will meet privately. 

1 criminal jq t0 13 members attending. 

The U.S. Figure Skating Associ- 
ation is conducting its own investi- 
gation of Harding, a process that 
won’t be finished until after the 
Games, but that could result in ha 
expulsion from the sport. 

A grand jury in the United States 
91, which is bearing evidence to determine 
? title, the whether allegations by Harding's 
tbe world ex-husband, Jeff Gillooly, are true: 
in Skate That the skater gave the go-ahead 
nal event to attack Kerrigan, and was in- 
volved in the plot and the cover-up. 
nan, hav- Sc hitler refused to predict wbeib- 

Lawiinson a Harding, a two-time national 
: between champion and a fourth -place fin- 
isher at the 1992 Winter Games, 
d in early would skate at the Games, 
spent the “There are several reasons for 
aim. even the decision," Schiller said. "First, 
slipped a there was tbe evidence presented 
by the figure skating panel Second, 
ial cham- there is a variety of issues dealing 
mhailhe with the code of conduct of tbe 
h she left Olympic Winter Games, and with 
on. the code of conduct of the USFSA. 

1993 na- And cm lop of all of that, there is 
ha place; the code of ethics of the Interna- 
1 in July, tional Olympic Committee." 

. police to Harding will be allowed to ap- 
pear before the panel with or with- 
>rder and out ha lawyers. The board can ap- 
Aug. 28. point people to present evidence. 
1 followed and can examine evidence or testi- 
mony by Harding. 

ha again Kerrigan and Harding have been 
K cm gan teammates before, most notably in 
the 1991 World Championships, 
rowd was where they joined with Kristi Yama- 
. the time guchi fora U.S. sweep erf the medals, 
practice, and the 1992 Winter Games. 

- and four They are expected to stay in the 
eds more Olympic Village, but USOC offi- 
tbe shop- cials promise that they won’t be 
e finished neighbors. 

Harding’s They wflL however, share ice for 
practices. 


Following a long-held policy of 
having teammates train together, 
the International Skating Union 
assigned the two Americans to tbe 
same practice group at the Hamar 
Olympic Amphitheatre. 












































vOmm Ot: 




Page 18 


OBSERVER 


y4 HealthrCare Mess 

By Russell Baker ing a family of four with a 

N EW YORK— Afltheingredi- bling health record. 

rats arc in place for the mak- From the start, the Clinto 


iN rats arc in place for the mak- 
ing of another fine mess in the best 
Laurel and Hardy tradition. 

First, almost every politician in 
Washington needs something that 
can be called a ‘'health-care bill'’ 
and needs it quick. In time for 
autumn campaigning, in fact. 

Second, there is absolutely no 
consensus in Washington about 
wfiat this wondrous “health-care 
bill” should do or be. 

Third, there is no pronounced 
sentiment among the public either 
about what a “health-care bill” 
should do. This is because the pub- 
lic has only the foggiest notion of 
what's on ihe table. 

Fourth, this absence of public 

understanding means the real pow- 
er to write the bill rests with law- 
yers. social engineers, insurance 

companies, medical and drug lob- 
bies. corporate managers and the 
political action committees, or 
PACs. which now finance most 
politicians’ campaigns. 

□ 

The first thing to be noted about 
these people is that they are of the 
class that is least Inconvenienced 
by the shortcomings of the present 
healih-care system. 

Though doubtless decent citi- 
zens ah. they would be inhu man if, 
feeling little personal need for ur- 
gent change, they didn't use their 
special leverage to protect their 
own interests. 

Last week, for example, the Busi- 
ness Roundtable, consisting of top 
people in 200 of the biggest U. S. 
companies, threw their consider- 
able weight against the Clinton ML 
The Roundtable “task force" that 
drew’ up this position was headed 
by the CEO of Prudential, an insur- 
ance business. 

Fifth, the White House strategy 
from the outset has promoted pub- 
lic confusion — which breeds pub- 
lic indifference — about its own 
plan. This could be fatal, because 
attempts to create great changes in 
American life need maximum pub- 
lic enthusiasm to overcome Con- 
gress's natural inertness. 

Without public passion behind 
it. the Clinton plan was bound to 
get rough treatment from insiders 
whose interests lend to be more 
specialized than those of. say. a 
self-employed carpenter support- 


ing a family of four with a trou- 
bling health record. 

From the start, the Clinton plan 
□ever fdt or smelled like a great idea 
whose time had come. Just the op- 
posite. There were so many little 
ideas embedded in it that it was bard 
to find one that stirred the juices. 

Experts love details; the rest of 
us are too busy with the details of 
living to be carried away with en- 
thusiasm about the experts' de- 
tailed ingenuity. 

Often we are content to be 
rabble yearning to be roused. 
Amazing technical constructions 
like the gigantic (1,362 pages) 
health-care bill ihe Clintons finally 
produced do not stir the blood. 


And so while experts marvel and 
dispute, all sensible humanity 
slumbers, leaving the boys in tas- 
seled loafers free to have their way 
with the pols. 

What the Clintons needed was a 
drawing by Eero Saarinen. What 
the experts gave them was a blue- 
print by Rube Goldberg. 

In retrospect it seems clear that 
the wise way to start would have 
been to come out for the simplicity 
of the single-payer plan. Of course 
it would have produced political 
uproar, and a healthy uproar it 
would have been. 

At least it would have set pulses 
pounding Awake, we might have 
advanced further than we’re mov- 
ing in this coma lose mumble of 
experts about whether the Cooper 
bih is better than the Clinton bill 
and how fast the bile should be 
permitted to How before the insur- 
ance company cancels your policy 
and whether . . . 

If they'd started with the single- 
payer proposal, the Clintons could 
have negotiated back to something 
that would have saved the insur- 
ance industry's stake in the busi- 
ness without losing important 
points Idee universal coverage. 

Instead, their experts gave the 
game to the insurance people at the 
start, thus surrendering a big, big 
bargaining counter. 

The best thing might be for health 
care to be scrapped this year, so a 
fresh start can be made another day. 
The pols, however, need something 
they can cad “health care," no mat- 
ter what it does. Looks like Laurel 
and Hardy lime again. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 1994 


William Gaddis’s Law-Crazy America 


By John Schwartz 

Washington Peel Service 

N EW YORK— William Gaddis is beg- 
ging off. He had agreed to write a 
book review for a small journal The topic 
— people who do not believe that the 
Holocaust happened — fascinated him. But 
before long the man who has been called 
one or the greatest living American novel- 
ists discovered be had gathered enough ma- 
terial on the topic to write a book himself, 
and was getting perilously dose to drown- 
ing in his data. 

Now. on this frozen afternoon, he has 
called the editor from his Upper East Side 
Manhattan apartment to apologize and to 
extricate hims elf from the assignment- He 
doses the conversation with a promise: 
“111 call you if anything prospers." 

After hanging up, Gaddis shakes his 
head with regret. 

Research is William Gaddis’s gift — 
and his burden. The one time fact checker 
for The New Yorker would probably be 
uncomfortable telling you the time unless 
he had acquired a profound understand- 
ing of bow a watch is made. That dedica- 
tion to detail is the mark of an author who 
reportedly has 20 pages of research behind 
every paragraph m his 1955 debut. “The 
Recognitions, a remarkable novel about 
fakery and counterfeiting. 

Steven Moore, senior editor at the Dal- 
Icey Archive Press and author of three 
books on Gaddis's work, c laims. “His nov- 
els. taken together, constitute the greatest 
achievement in American fiction since 
World War IT' — though “if he had 
stepped in front of a truck the day 'The 
Recognitions' appeared, that alone would 
have made Ins reputation as one of the 
greatest writers of our times." 

In his introduction to the 1993 Penguin 
reissue of “The Recognitions." William 
Gass, author of “Omensetter’s Luck,” 
writes of Gaddis's work: “There's no need 
for haste, the pages which lie ahead of you 
will lie ahead of you for as long as you like 
them to; it is perfectly all right if some 
things are at fust unclear, and if there are 
references you don't recognize; we need to 
understand this book — enjoy its charm, 
its wit, its irony, its erudition, its sensuous 
embodiment — the way we understand a 
spouse we have lived with and listened to 
and loved for many years through all their 
nights. ... A few critics confessed they 
could not reach the novel’s conclusion 
except by skipping. WelL how many have 
actually arrived at the last page of Proust 
or completed ‘Finnegans WakeT* 
Across the decades of writing. Gaddis 
has honed an idiosyncratic style. He strips 
conversations of the usual “be said, she 
said” cues — and even of quotation marks. 
It's a little like trying to piece together an 
overheard conversation at a restaurant. It 


_.y 








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Con Wdi Bnm far TSc Waftnttan PM 

Novelist Gaddis. 71: “A Frolic of His Own* 1 is his fourth book. 


Nev. York Tima Service 


makes the reader work a little harder to 
follow the thread, but gives Gaddis's prose 
startling immediacy and strength. 

Let the following passage from Gaddis's 
new novel “A Frolic of His Own," be a 
litmus lest of his style. Oscar Crease, a 
hapless college professor, believes the Civ- 
il War play ne wrote some years before 
was pirated to become the basis for a gory, 
sex-drenched Hollywood spectacular. In 
this scene. Oscar is discussing his pros- 
pects for a lawsuit. After his lawyer. Har- 
old Basie, asks whether Crease had tried to 
publish the play, Oscar erupts: 

I didn't say it koj published! No, I sub- 
mitted it h wt some excerpts written as a 
novel the way I'd treat the whole thing as a 
novel and they turned tr down because of my 
age. they liked it they liked it a bt but they 
said / was too old to market, not the book 
but me, to market me! Talk shows, book 
tours ail the rubbish that publishing's turned 
into, not marketing the work but selling the 


author in this whole revoking media circus 
turning the creative artist into a performer in 
this frenzy of pubb'a'ty because I wasn't a 


baseball player with AIDS a- a dog that 
lived in the White House! was Just too old, 
tty to deal with these publishers all they warn 
is your coffee, put it down here Use not on the 
books! on those newspapers there, I sent a 
copy to myself registered mail in a sealed 
envelope against just such a piece of dirty 
work as this one. I did that when I . . 

Gaddis might be a wander, but he's no 
longer a Wimdericmd. He is 71. “A Frolic of 
His Own" is only his fourth book. Twenty 
years after the appearance of “The Recog- 
nitions” he brought out "J.R,** in which an 
11 -year-old named J.R. buQds a business 
empire through amiably boyish greed. In 
1985 came “Carpenter's Gothic," a work 
that takes on the excesses of televangelists. 

He grew up in WASP gentility, in an age 
of WASP decline. IBs parents divorced 
when he was 3 years cud. Much of his 


cMdbood’ires spent at his mother’s lag 
(rid family home on Long Island. 

Gaddis attended- Harvard; a childhood 
kidney disorder exempted him from fight- 
ing in World War H He agreed to leave 
the -school in his senior year, however, 
after a run-in with the Cambridge police 
during what has been called a bout of 
■‘youthful bdl -raising.” He did his stint at 
The New Yorker, then traveled for a few 
y«m, gattsaingstring for whax would be- 
come “The Recognitions.’' 

Although many today consider that first 
work a mastopKce, at the time most re- 
viewers blasted it as hubristic, blasphe- 
mous and -tedious.. It sank. (Gaddis’ now 
notes with. some satisfaction that a first 
edition of the book.will bring up to $700.) 

What followed were grim years, hard on 
him and onhis family. He was working at 
public relations, writing speeches and 
writing scripts for training and public rda- ' 
tions films for the U. S. Army. Gaddis has 
two children from a marriage that broke 
op is 1967. Daughter Sarah, now 38, is an 
artist and novelist. Gaddis's son. Mat- 
thew, 3S, is a filmmaker m New York. 

In' 1975, Gaddis l»ped “I R-” would 
change his fortunes. Inis savagely funny 
satire of “the childish nature of the bus- . 
ness world.” as Gaddis puts h. won the 
National Book Award but had disappoint-, 
ing sales. It was the quintessential '80s 
book, but was written in the TOs. “J.R." 
“did really, I think, in 1975, tell us what 
lira '80s were going to be,” Gaddis says. 
“And sure enough, thousands of J. R.s out 
there destroyed everything." . 

In the late 1970s, a second marriage 
foundered. From that low, things began to 
bun around. Hemet his current compan- 
ion, Murid Oxen berg Murphy, a televi- 
sion producer and a woman of -means 
sufficient to keep both of them comfort- 
able. Money begin coming his way. Gad- 
dis won a Guggenheim fellowship, and 
then in 1982 a five-year MacArthur Foun- 
dation award — “the shortest five years I 
ever lived through," Gaddis jokes. He be- 


in 1985, “Carpenter's Gothic" received 
strong reviews even though some critics 
say it is his weakest effort. 

“A Frolic of His Own” is about folks 
who see the rich suing each other for sport 
and want to get into the game. Gas calls 
the book “a trial of the American psyche." 
He says the book is weQ timed: American 
society has become lawerazy. ; 

What has gone wrong with the law, 
Gaddis says, is what has gone wrong with 
society; “This free enterprise society is an 
adversarial society, so the law emerges 
from that adversarial attitude. So here we 
are, all adversaries." 



people 


Another Battle Battle: 
The Met Drops Soprano 

The Metropolitan Opera dis- 
missed the soprano Kaftkan Baffle 
from its production af*Tbe Daugh- 
ter of the Regiment" for wbat it 
called “unprofesaonal actions dur- 
ing rebeaisaL Batde said. “To my 
knowledge we were working out all 
of the artistic problems is irfreara- 
als." Joseph Volpe, the Met's gener- 
al manager, said her behavior was 
-profoundly detrimental’ 1 The New 
York Times quoted sources as say- 
ing that Battle was “very nasty" to 
fdkjw cast members and uncoopfl-- 
ative even after the rehearsal sched- 
ule bad been changed to accommo- 
date her. She walked out Of a Met 
rehearsal lost year after a conflict 
with the conductor Christian Tiae- 
taujum, then quit the production of 
-Der Rosenkavaiier." 

- P. 

Jack Kent Cooke, 81. the owner 
of the Washington Redskins foot- 
ball fwnn, declared his marriage in 
1 990 to Marfena RmnaDo Chalmers 
void because her divorce from her 
Former husband, Cooke says, was 
“falsely obtained in the Dominican 
Republic”. 

. □ 

Pad Auka was honored at the 
French record industry’s annual 
awards ceremony for his classic song 
“My Way," which became Frank 
Strain’s signature song 25 years 
ago. Then Auka was named a knight 
of the Order of Arts and Letters by 
Cdture Minister Jacques Tauten. 

Ted Turner, the owner of T timer 
Broadcasting System, has pledged 
$25 million each to McCallie 
School a prep school in Tennessee; 
Brown University in Rhode Island, 
and The Citadel a military college 
in South Carolina. Turner was 
graduated from McCallie in 1956 
and BTOwn in I960. His three sons 
attended The ChadeL 


Wlatney Houston won in seven of 
the right categories m which she was 
nominated at the American Music 
Awards and received a special 
Award of MriiL This takes hra tatty 
at the awards to 19 — she shares the 
top spot with Kenny Rogers. 


HYTERIVATI OIYAL 
CLASSIFIED 

_ Appears on Pages 6 . 14 & 17 


WEATHER 


CROSSWORD 



Europe 




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Forecast for Thursday through Saturday, as provided by Accu-Weather. 



'**■„**" 

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North America 

Dry. coM weather wifl prevail 
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may arrve Saturday. A ma- 
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mo vo off ihe East coast 
Thursday with dry weather to 
lollow Fnday Heavy snow 
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and Fnday 

Middle East 


Europe 

Cotd w*l perSGl overScandk 
navia itns week 4 will snow 
Thursday in Lillehammer. 
The Bntlsh Isles will have 
scattered heavy rains later 
Ihis week. High winds are 
possible from Ireland to 
Scotland Saturday. Heavy 
rams will move tram Athens 
Thursday -mo southwestern 
Turkey Fnday 


Tokyo mil be wmdy and turn 
colder Thursday. Dry. chiTy 
weather will prevail Friday 
into Saturday Heavy snow 
wfl blanket northern Japan. 
Indud-ng Sapporo Thursday 
and Fnday Beijing art have 
dry. seasonable weather tare 
this week. A corridor of rain 
wil dampen southern China 


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ACROSS 

t Funny pages 
favorite 

ii Composer Satie 
15 Exciting 
adventure 
is 'I came." lo 
Caesar 
it Hecniiier's 
ob] active 
18 Professional 
suffixes 

is Three after B 
20 Cousin ol 
"Eureka'" 


21 Shows how 

23 Stout 

24 Hawaii's state 
bird 

28 Screen's 
partner 

27 Post 

29 Show anger, in 
away 

32 According to 

33 They make a 
bloom blossom 

as Satisfied 
subscribers 

37 Profligate 


Solution to Puzzle of Feb. 8 


□I3E3D DHQQ !!□□□ 
SBSQi asann anna 
HaaHHnciQaanaaan 
□so esb saaaaa 
annas ssasaa 
□□nod □□□□ aaa 
□ana ana aaata 
naaciaQaaanaaaan 
□□□□ aan aaaa 
□□a aaejs □«□□□ 
Qcjcissa saaaa 
□QQHina aan ulus 
□□□□□□□□□□□□□□a 
ansa aaaaa uaaa 
□□□□ □□□□ uaaa 


ao Tubular pasta 
aa Victoria's Secret 
selection 
«7 Blown-up 
photo Abbe. 

48 Discovery of 
1781 

si Stevedore’s, 
e.g. 

52 Philatelist's Hem 

54 Little pest 

55 One over due 
57 Shade maker 
ao Twosome 

•1 Season in 
St- -Lb 

■2 Turner and 
Pappas 
ss Way back 
*« Furniture wood 
57 Crudity 
ea Gum ness Book 
suffixes 
a Creator of 
1 -Across 

DOWN 

1 Start ofa 
Gardner btie 

2 C.B ers" names 

3 Brennan and 
Ford 

4 Calendar abbr. 


5 Match play? 
s Chung's partner 
7 Singer Nina 
•Beal ending in 
London 
• 1978 Yankee 
hero 

lORen owned 
costume 
designer 

11 Bounce 

12 Amend 

ia Whale amount 
14 "PowT places 
22 Quakers 
25 Loop for a. lobe 

28 Oscar 

Renta 

so Like Gen. 

Schwarzkopf 
an Prefix with cycle 
or sex 

34 Gym exercises 
as TV host. 

1955-82 

38 N.Y.C. div. 

39 Sambi's aunt 

40 Break 

41 Pipe openings 
4* Show anger, in 

away 
44 Hospital 
personnel 


O New Fork Tones Edited by Will Shorts, 



45 court l tRnWkt^ y ■® Lor, S- bon y 59 Actress Ofin 

aetncriasethir 53 ^ Gras «a Dutch painter 

angle of . .. Sights . Gerard 

etevatton . . 35 Friendly Islands 8orch 

48 WiltHMit causa SB First ed. - sa Thrash 




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Venezuela** 80-011-120' 

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Ba hamas 1-800-872-288 3 

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