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London, Thursday, February 10, 1994 


No. 34,508 


ismei and plo Sign NATO Vows Air Raids in 10 Dayi 

feSye, Unless Serbs Pull Back Artillery 

Covering Border Posts and Security 


CsmpM ftr Our Staff From Dupacha 

CAIRO — Israel and the PLO signed a 
partial agreement Wednesday on details of 
Palestinian self-rule and Israeli withdrawal 
from Gaza and Jericho 

Yasser Arafat, the PLO leader, and For- 
eign Minister Shimon Peres of Israel signed 
the .docu ment to loud applause at the palace 
of President Hosni Mubarak in Cairo after 
two days of talks. 

Mr. Peres said the agreement covered the 
border posts between the Gaza Strip and 
Egypt and between Jericho and Jordan, one 
of the main sticking points in the months of 

wrangling, as well as what he called the distri- 
bution of security. 

“We solved most of the problems," he 
added. 

Mr. Arafat said the agreement was an im- 
portant first step toward turning the PLO- 
Israrii agreement signed last September into 
a reality on the ground. 

“But still we have some things and we have 
agreed with Mr. Peres to continue with the 
work on other issues so that we can overcome 
all out problems," be' added. 

“We are sure we can create a new era for 
our people," he said. “We can say that Pales- 
tine and the name of Palestine have returned 
10 the map of the Middle East." 

The issues under discussion included con- 
trol of the crossings from the au tonom ous 
Palestinian areas to Egypt and Jordan, securi- 
ty for Jewish settlers who remain in Gaza and 
[he size of the Jericho area to be ceded by 
Israel. 


Mr. Peres said he and Mr. Arafat had 
settled “five or six of the most complicated 
issues," but added, “We didn't complete our 
work." 

As Mr. Peres and Mr. Arafat were speak- 
ing, members of the World Jewish Congress 
in Washington got word of the agreement 
from President Bin Clinton. 

“Another big milestone has been achieved 
today," Mr. Clinton told the group. 

The president also said progress was bring 
made toward, lifting the Arab embargo 
against Israel. “Israel must be the partner of 
these nations, no longer a pariah,” he said. 

On Tuesday, Prime Minister Yitzhak Ra- 
bin of Israel raid (hat even if Mr. ArafaL and 
Mr. Peres signed in Cairo, more work would 
be needed before an Israeli withdrawal, due 
to have started last Dec. 13, could begin. 

A PLO spokesman said the agreement cov- 
ered “certain issues." 

The overall agreement is to be negotiated 
later between Mr. Arafat and Mr. Rabin, he 
said. 

Uri Savir, the chief Israeli delegate, de- 
scribed the negotiations as a process of work- 
ing “sentence by sentence, word by word." 

“For each word we have an hour Of argu- 
ment," he said. 

Israeli and PLO officials both have said it 
could take at least two more weeks of negoti- 
ations to complete specifics. 

The Cairo talks began after more than a 
week of squabbling over results of the previ- 
ous Peres- Arafat discussions in Davos. Swit- 
zerland. The PLO accused Israel of backing 
off agreements; Israel denied it (Return, AP) 


A Message for Japan: 
Clinton Wants Results 

Talks Deadlocked Ahead of Summit 


By Peter Behr 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — A terse directive that 
President Bill CSmongavc jo cabaret members . 
the day after tus~SMe of Ihcr Union Bjasage 
underscores the severity of the spht between me 
United States and Japan over trade policy just 
before Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa’s 
visit here this week. 

“No bull — ” Mr.. Clinton rasped, according 
to a participant. 

This lime, he admonished his advisers, (he 
United Stales would not accept an agreement 
papering over the two countries’ differences mi 
trade, as has happened before and as recently as 
Mr. Clinton's summit meeting in Jiriy with Mr. 
Hosokawa's predecessor, Kiichi Miyazawa, 

As Mr. Clinton's blunt comment suggested, 
top U.S. officials have run out of patience with 
what they view as Japanese waffling on trade 
issues. 

Both Japanese and U.S. officials warned that 
Mr. Clinton's meeting Friday with Mr. Ho 
sokawa would probably involve a confronta- 
tion, rather than the Jasr-minule compromises 

U.S. Strategists 
Juggle Options 

Compthiby Our Sutff from Mftcudus 

WASHINGTON — Disagreement emerged 
among White House strategists on whether the 
United States should talk up the yen if no 
progress is made on trade issues at jhe Japan- 
U.S. summit meeting, a senior White House 
economist said Wednesday. _ 

One report quoted an unidentified U.S. offi- 
cial as saying that the United States would not 
try to bolster the yen — a move that m ak es 
Japanese goods more expensive but helps U.SL 
exporters — if negotiators did not reach an 
agreement. 

“It’s not one of tire options at the moment, 
the senior LIS. official told Reuters. 

That comment followed remarks earlier m 
tire day from a U.& official that the Umted 
States would seek to send the yen higher should 
there be a breakdown in the talks. Foreign 
Minister Tsuicmu Hata criticized the remark as 
imprudent, the Jiji news service said. ’ 

Other officials said that manipulaiwgthe 
Japanese currency was just one of a long fist of 
options drawn up by President B ill C linton's 
staff in anticipation of a breakdown in the 
bilateral talks. „ • 

This list goes on for pages, a unofficial 
See YEN, Page 10 


Compiled by Oar Staff Awn Dispatches 

BRUSSELS — NATO said Wednesday that 
it would order air strikes against Bosnian Serbi- 
an artillery or heavy weapons involved in the 
siege of Sarajevo unless they were withdrawn or 
placed under United Nations control 

It said in a statement that the strikes would 
take place 10 days rrom 2400 GMT on Thurs- 
day, in close cooperation with the UN secre- 
tary-general. Butros Bums Ghali, if the ultima- 
tum was not met 

The Bosnian Serbs should withdraw their 
heavy weapons to at least 20 kilometers (12 
miles} from the center of tire Bosnian capital or 
put them under UN control, the statement said. 

Greece added a formal note recording its 
opposition to the use of force in Bosnia but did 
not veto NATO action. 

The alliance warned that if the Serbs failed to 


comply with the deadline, their heavy weapons 
will “be subject to NATO air strikes." 

Diplomats said there would be no extension 
of the ultimatum and no further warnings. 

Moreover, the allies pledged to carry out 
raids against artillery or mortar positions “in 
and around Sarajevo" that are determined by 
UN peacekeepers “to be responsible for attacks 
against civilian targets in that city." 

Diplomats said that NATO's secretary-gen- 
eral, Manfred Wbrner, had immediately in- 
formed Mr. Butros Ghali of the decision. 

Mr. Butros Ghali had requested authority to 
caD NATO air strikes after a mortar slammed 
into a crowded market in Sarajevo last Satur- 
day, killing 68 people and wounding 200. 

In their statement the allies said the “Bosni- 
an Serbs bear the main responsibility for tire 
tragic loss of civili an life" as a result of tire siege 
of Sarajevo. 


Air strikes would also mark the alliance's 
first combat action since tire North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization was founded in 1949. 

Diplomats said NATO had agreed that Bos- 
nia's Muslim-led government should also put 
its weapons in the new Sarajevo “exclusion 
zone" under UN control. 

The NATO decision brought much closer the 
prospect of Western military intervention in the 

Serbs are suspected of planning a phony re- 
covery of US. air-dropped arms. Page 4. 

22-month war. despite strong objections from 
Russia and a last-minute pledge from the Bos- 
nian Serbs on Wednesday to withdraw the big 
guns around the Bosnian capital. 

President Bill Clinton called the Serbian 
pledge to withdraw its guns “a good beginning" 


... 


but said he would have to see whether it became 
a reality. 

“It's a good beginning, but it shows, again, 
every time NATO shows a little resolve there 
we get some results," Mr. Clinton said when 
asked whether he thought tire Serbian move 
fulfilled Western demands. 

NATO ambassadors discussed at length 
whether (he deadline should be 7 or IB days, 
how to coordinate with the United Nations, 
and whether to describe the agreement publicly 
as an ultimatum. 

The threat of NATO action appeared to have 
a dramatic effect on the Bosnian capital. Serbi- 
an and Bosnian military commanders agreed 
Wednesday to an immediate cease-fire for Sa- 
rajevo. ana the Bosnian Serbian Army said it 
would withdraw its siege guns from around the 

See NATO, Page 4 




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and handshakes that have marked past summits 
between the two nations. 

Mr. Hosokawa, concerned that the trade 
talks remained deadlocked, decided Wednes- 
day to send Foreign Minister Tsu Cornu Hata to 
Washington “to conduct last- minute political 
negotiations before tire meeting of the leaders," 
a cabinet spokesman said. Mr. Hata had. origi- 
nally been scheduled to leave with Mr. Ho- 
sokawa, who departs Thursday for the meeting 
with Mr_CBnton. 

[TTreU-S. trade representative, Mickey Kan- 
tor, said Wednesday that America and Japan 
remained at “loggerheads” in the trade talks, 
and that “we may or may not reach an agree- 
ment by Friday," Bloomberg Business News 
reported from Washington. 

[Japan's ambassador to the United States. 

- Takakazu Kuriyama, echoed this, saying: “I 
don't drink there has been sufficient progress in 
tire talks, considering the time constraints. At 
tire moment, I don't know how the differences 
can be thrashed oat."] 

What UJ5. officials want this time are firm 
commitments from Japan to shrink its massive 
global trade surplus, which totaled $131 billion 
last year — almost half with the United States. 
In particular, the administration wants Japa- 
nese pledges to buy more foreign cars, car pans, 
medical and telecommunications equipment, 
and insurance. 

Since 1980, the two countries have signed 29 
trade agreements covering a wide range of 
products and trade issues, including idecom- 
nramcalions, steel, wood products, supercom- 
puters, legal sendees, orange juice and auto 
parts, according to tire Congressional Research 
Service. 

“Many of these agreements are not working 
well," Mr. Kan tor sod earlier. 

He added, “I think there is a general consen- 
sus that the agreements are not as effective as 
they were designed to be." 

Tire administration's insistence on results is 
another way of saying that U does not trust 
Japan to fulfill less specific deals, U.S. officials 
say. 

- “The United States does not have confidence 
that Japan will deliver on trade agreements 
unless there are precise criteria to measure 
progress," Commerce Undersecretary Jeffrey 
E. Garten said Iasi week. 

Robert E. Rubin, chairman of the president’s 
National Economic Council, said: “Going bad: 
.to the Carter Adminis tration. I remember that 
Japan would say, ‘Well work it out and it will 
aficome to pass.' But it didn’t Now we simply 
have to . turn this into. a two-way trade relation- 
ship.” ■ 

Mr. Hosokawa and other Japanese leaders 
insist that they will not be “burned" into com- 

See TRADE, Page 4 




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Residents of Sarajevo passing a UN armored vehicle on Wednesday as the United Nations increased its presence in the dty after the weekend mortar attack in which 68 people died. 

Hanging On in Sarajevo as Bullets Rake the Apartment 


By John Pomfret 

Washington Post Service 

SARAJEVO, Bosnia -Hercegovina — In the 
last 22 months. Emina Dervisefendic has seen 
her apartment shrink from five rooms to two as 
Serbian snipers in the hills opposite her build- 
ing found new angles to send bullets into differ- 
ent rooms. 

Fust the 64-year-old widow lost the use of 
her bedroom when a machine gunner, soon 
after the war began in April 1992, raked the 


room, burying more than a dozen bullets in her 
mattress. A few months later, tire living room 
became a casualty of a Serb with a high- 
powered rifle who pumped bullets into a shelf 
full of books. 

Finally, tire dining room succumbed when 
bullets zinged through the two from rooms and 
bored boles in the walls that used to bold 
pictures of ha family, an oil painting of the 
now-destroyed Old Bridge of Mostar and a 
photograph of ha husband. One of those bul- 


lets, after bouncing around tire alcove, slammed 
into the leg or her daughter. Sabina*. 

Now she and her sister. Enisa, 62, also a 
widow, who moved into Mrs. Dervisefendic's 
place after Serbs occupied tire suburb where she 
lived, have squeezed into the kitchen and pan- 
uy — about 4.6 square meters (50 square feet) 
of space — where they sleep among pots and 
pans, little sacks of h uman itarian aid. photo 
albums holding memories of better times and 
two precious items — Marl boros and Nescafe. 


The sisters are among thousands of people 
living with an almost mundane terror in Saraje- 
vo. hostage to the whims of killers inhabiting 
the hills around (he city. 

While the daily struggle of their lives pales in 
comparison with the 'killing of 68 people in 
Sarajevo's packed open-air market on Satur- 
day. it is this slow strangulation — of the 
sisters’ apartment and of this city — rather than 

See BOSNIA, Page 4 


Are Newer Generations 
Facing Bigger Cancer Risk? 


Kiosk 

Senator Gtes Toxins in Gulf Ailments 


By David Brown 

Washington Port Service 

WASHINGTON — A white man of the U.S. 
baby : boom generation has about twice the risk 
of developing cancer as his grandfather, and a 
white woman of tire same age has about a 50 
percent greater risk than her grandmother, ac- 
cording to a new study. 

Even when cancers caused by smoking are 
disregarded and the aging of the population is 
accounted for, an upward trend of malignant 
disease in the United States is still evident in 
both sexes, researchers reported in Wednes- 
day's Journal of the American Medical Associ- 
ation. The findings “strongly suggest there are 
preventable causes out there that remain to be 
identified,” said Devra Lee Davis, an epidemi- 
ologist at the Department of Health and Hu- 
man Services who beaded the study. One possi- 
ble cause, she and ha co-authors speculate, is 
the presence of unspecified cancer-causing 
chemicals in the environment. 

The rise in cancer has been concurrent with a 
steady /all in death from cardiovascular disease 
over the past four decades. The researchers are 
confident, however, that a person's greater risk 
of getting cancer now is not simply a function 


of the decreasing chance that he or she will get 
bean disease. Whether the findings hold for 
other racial groups is not known. 

Dr. Davis and Gregg E. Dinse of the Nation- 
al Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, 
along with David G. Hod of tire Medical Uni- 
versity of South Carolina, used data collected 
by the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance. 
Epidemiology and End Results program. It 
gathers cancer statistics from nine regions in 
the United States that, together, encompass 
about 10 percent of tire population. Data on 
death from heart disease, stroke and noamalig- 
nani diseases came from the National Center 
for Health Statistics. The researchers looked 
specifically at cancer statistics for the period 
1973 through 1987 for persons aged 20 to 84. In 
addition, they reconstructed the cancer rates 
for various age groups in decades preceding 
that 15-year period, using statistical manipula- 
tions. 

CancaU predominantly a disease of old age, 
and as people live longer they are more likely to. 
contract it The cancer incidence and death 
rates used in the latest study, however, took this 

See CANCER, Page 3 


WASHINGTON (AP> — Biological 
agents shipped to Iraq with Reagan admin- 
istration approval could be the cause of 
mysterious ailments afflicting hundreds of 
American veterans of the Gulf War. Senator 
Donald W. Riegle Jr. said Wednesday. 

Mr. Riegle, Democrat of Michigan, said 
in the Senate that the agents exported to 
Iraq from 1985 to 1989 included Ecoli and 


salmonella and other dangerous bacteria. 

He pointed to a Pentagon report staling 
that by the time Iraq invaded Kuwait in 
1990, Iraq's biological warfare program was 
the most advanced in the Arab world. The 
Pentagon says it has not found any evidence 
that U.S. troops were exposed to toxins. But 
it has acknowledged the need to pinpoint the 
causes of the illnesses. 


Book Review 


Page 7. Crossword 


PageS. 



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The Winter Olympics 


Two weeks of spectacular competition, 
with its daily dramas of victory umf 
defeat, art previewed in color 
in Friday's editions of the 
International Herald Tribune. 

Ian Thomsen takes in the sweep 
and tension of the games 
through the eyes of a Norwegian ski 


jumper in the main article pointing 
toward the opening remony on Saturday 
In addition to colt *r phot, 'graphs and 
articles on the best athletes and the most 
coveted medals, the preview includes a 
day-to-day schedule of the Jarmiglti't 
events and an international guide 
to television tie wing. 


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With All the Shaking and die Mud Slides: Sleepless in L.A. 


By Sara Rimer 

Few York Tones Service 

LOS ANGELA— Three weeks after iheeanhquakc, this 
is still a city where people go to bed wearing shoes and 
contact lenses, with flashlights on their nights lands. 

Chris Sheffield, a music video producer, keeps a hard hat 
beside bar —forte- 5-moo (h-dd baby. Mrs. Sheffield and 
her husband, Patrick, are bolting their house to its founda- 
tionsy their bookcases to tire floor and their computer to the 
table. 

W5th aftershocks so routine that people begin conversa- 
tions by asking if you felt the one last night, this has become 
a city m hKomniacs. • 

Patricia,- Tonkin, a real-estate agent, flew to Phoenix. 
Arizona, last weekend with ha husband and their 13-year- 
ofddanghtajustso they could all get some-rest The)' missed 
the aftershocks at 5:19 A.M. and 5:22 AJM.on Sunday. A lot 
of people say (bey have been going to Arizona to sleep. 

Los Angela has often been described as a dty in denial — 


of a ging, of unhappy endings, of rain, of earthquakes. This 
week, iBerc have been two straight days of torrential rains, 
causing mud slides in Altadena and Malibu, which are soli 
recovering from November’s raging fires. Dozens of homes 
were damaged, and hundreds of residents were evacuated. 

As the residents of Malibu shoveled knee-deep mud from 
their driveways and hitched their Mercedes to tow trucks, 
they were like groggy boxers refusing to leave the ring. "It’s 
the easy life here/ Barry Moss, a semiretired aerospace 
engineer, insisted as be slogged through the muck in white 


But it does not fed easy. Anxiety is running high every- 
where. And these days Cos Angeles feels like one huge 
disaster preparedness classroom. 

Pulling into a parking k>i off Ventura Boulevard the other 
day, Linda ftariman. a 24-year-old actress, popped open 
her earthquake-ready trunk. It was crammed with dothmg, 
blankets, shoes, toilet articles, flashlights, bottled water and 
plenty of canned food. Her glove compart mem now holds 


ha most prized possessions: a locket with a picture of her 
forma boyfriend, a letter her father wrote ha in 1976, a 
needlepoint ballerina sewn by ha mother. 

None of this behavior surprises Lhe disaster preparedeness 
experts. 

“It is referred to in tile trade as a window of opportunity,” 
said Dennis Mileti, (be director of the Natural Hazards 
Research and Applications Information Center at the Uni- 
versity of Colorado. “A friend of mine who lives in Wood- 
land HOIS called me and said, "Dennis, where can I get that 
water pump you told me to get a year ago?' " 

ll may not last. Experience with past disasters has shown, 
that the kind of increased awareness now being exhibited 
here usually lasts from 6 to 24 months, Mr. Mfleii said. 

Still the proportion of Southern Californians who say 
they personally worry about earthquakes has been steadily 
increasing lor the last 15 years. According to a Field Poll 
conducted after lhe earthquake. 27 percent of Southern 


Californians say they wony about earthquakes, up from 18 
percent in 1989 and 5 percent in 1979. 

Veronica Barton is a new worrier. Before (he earthquake. 
Ms. Barton had only one flashlight, with dead batteries, in a 
kitchen drawer. Now. she has working flashlights in everv 
room of ha Santa Monica house. 

“I used to think earthquakes were a little exciting — like 
when it's thundering outside," said Ms. Barton, v>hc owns 
two skin-care salons. “Now, it’s serious." During facials 
these days, she and her clients talk about emergency plans: 
which out-of-state relatives they have designated as tele- 
phone checkpoints. 

There is bottled water everywhere. Linda Steiner, the 
assistant director erf public information for the University of 
California at Los Angeles, has two gallons under the desk in 
ha office. 

Jane Jacobson bas 10 quarts in her house in North 
Hollywood, a haphazard selection of Mountain Spring. 
See SLEEPLESS. Page 3 







Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1994 




Tfcr Auocuiedftai 


Deng Xiaoping. 89, being dosely supported, as he appeared on Chinese teierisioD on Wednesday. 
The film clip was from December, when he braved a Shanghai drizzle to visit a new bridge. 

Deng, Gaunt and Frail , Appears 
On TV for the First Time in a Year 


By Patrick E. Tyler 

iVin York Tutus Struct' 

BEIJING — Looking in e'er Frailer health. 
Deng Xiaoping, S 9. China's paramount leader, 
appeared on national television Wednesday at a 
celebration in Shanghai marking the Lunar New 
Year. 

Since 198S. Mr. Deng has appeared in public 
during the Lunar New Year festival, but persistent 
reports that his health is declining more rapidly 
put special emphasis on this year' s appearance. 

A three-minute video clip on evening news pro- 
grams was the first opportunity since last year at 
this time for China's 1.2 billion people to see the 
most influential retiree at the top of the Commu- 
nist Party hierarchy. 

A series of photographs of Mr. Deng celebrating 
his S^th birthday last Aug. 22 appeared in a Hong 
Kong newspaper the Following month. 

Visibly thinner and supported on either side by- 
two daughters. Deng Nan and Deng Rong. Mr. 
Deng was shown attending a reception during the 
afternoon given by Shanghai mayor. Huang Ju. 
jnd other high Communist party officials. Mr. 
Deng was shown at limes smiling, waving or clap- 
ping with weak and unsteady "hands. At other 
times, he evinced a vacant demeanor. 

The new> broadcast also featured Mr. Deng. 


wearing a scarf and overcoat, walking on Shang- 
hai’s Yangpu Bridge dining a cold drizzle on Dec. 
13 and. on Jan. I. visiting the city’s new Jinjiang 
Hotel. 

Mr. Deng is believed to be suffering from Par- 
kinson's Disease, diabetes and an unspecified can- 
cer. 

The state-run news programs did not broadcast 
the sound of any of Mr. Deng’s reported state- 
ments at the reception, but remarks attributed to 
Mr. Deng were carried in dispatches by the official 
Xinhua press agency. 

"I would like to wish the Shanghai people a 
happy spring festival.” Mr. Deng was quoted as 
saying. Referring to the large scale redevelopment 
of Shanghai now underway. Mr. Deng said: 
“Shanghai has done a very good job. The Shanghai' 
people have a special quality’ and character.” 

As has been the custom of Mr. Deng’s appear- 
ances for several years, his youngest daughter and 
biographer. Deng Rong. translates her father's 
utterances spoken in a duck Sichuanese accent to 
others. She then loudly repeats statements ad- 
dressed to Mr. Deng into his good ear. 

With his appearance on Wednesday, Mr. Deng 
ushered in the Year of the Dog. one of the 12 
animals used to denote the special characteristics 
of each vear in the Chinese lunar calendar. 


North Korea Seems Unlikely to Bend 
On Nuclear Checks, Diplomats Say 


YIENN \ — The Iniernational 
Atomic Energy Agency may have 
no choice hut to >eek United Na- 
tions Security Council action 
against North Korea if Pyongyang 
continue* to refuse nuclear inspec- 
tions. diplomats said Wednesday. 

They said that North Korea 
could still offer a last-nunute com- 
promise before the agency's board 
of governors meets Feb. 21. but 
that prospect* for fuli checks of 
declared atomic Mies looked slim. 

“If nothing happens before the 
hoard meets then it ml! be most 
probable they will choose to refer 
the issue to the Security Council." 
one diplomat -aid. 

North Korea first refused »o al- 
low inspections of its suspected nu- 
clear sites a year ago this month. 
Talks with the United States and 


China, atomic energy agency reso- 
lutions and a warning from the Se- 
curity Council have failed to budge 
Pyongyang. 

North Korea said last week that 
there was “no immediate prospect” 
of letting the IAEA conduct uncon- 
ditional checks. Agency' officials 
said Wednesday that they had re- 
ceived no further word from the 
Pyongyang government. 

The director of Central Intelli- 
gence. James R. Woolsey, said 
Tuesday that North Korea might 
be about to recover more plutoni- 
um. a main ingredient in nuclear 
weapons, hv shutting down an 
atomic reactor at Yonghyon. 50 ki- 
lometers 130 miles) north of Pyong- 
yang. 

“They nuy decide to shut down 
their Yonghyon reactor soon, en- 
abling them to extract fuel, repro- 


Indonesia and Nuclear Power: 
Mixture Worries Australians 


By Michael Richardson 

International Herald Tribune 

MELBOURNE — An extensive 
nuclear power program being 
planned by Indonesia to meet 
growing demand for electricity 
could result in a catastrophic acci- 
dent that would have a major im- 
pact on nearby countries, Austra- 
lian critics fear. 

Concern centers on the ability of 
Indonesian authorities to safely op- 
erate nuclear plants in a country 
that is prone to earthquakes and 
volcanic eruptions. 

Although a final decision has yet 
to be announced by Jakarta, Presi- 
dent Suharto indicated recently 
that he had accepted the case for 
developing nuclear power to make 
Indonesia an advanced technologi- 
cal power in the 21st century. 

“Nuclear power represents a 
source of energy with peat poten- 
tial,” Mr. Suharto said. ‘'History 
has shown that societies have been 
able to grasp and command science 
and technology, indudmg nuclear 
power.” 

A influential group in the Indo- 
nesian government led by Jusuf 
Habibie, the research and technol- 
ogy minister, wants to press ahead 
with an ambitious program that 
calls for up to 12 large nuclear 
plants to be built in Java and Bali, 
the country's two most densely 
populated islands, in the next 25 
years. 

Last month, a Japanese consul- 
tancy concern completed a two- 


year feasibility study on budding 
the first 600-megawatt planL It 
would be on the Mnria Perinsula 
cm tbe north coast of central Java, 
about 440 kilometers (270 miles) 
east of Jakarta. Nearby Mount Mu- 
ria is a dormant volcano. 

The study has not beat made 
public. But Indonesian officials say 
it concluded that construction 
could safely proceed and that tbe 
S\2 billion plant could start pro- 
ducing dectnrity by 2004. 

Companies from Japan, Taiwan. 
North America and Europe are 
competing for the project, and ex- 
ecutives said they had Been advised 
by Indonesian authorities that 
traders might be called in 1995. 

Give Hamilton, an Australian 
who has just spent two years as a 
senior economic and environmen- 
tal adviser to the National Plan- 
ning Agency in Jakarta, said one of 

his main concerns was that '‘Indo- 
nesia does not, at the moment, have 
the technical expertise to safely op- 
erate audear power plants.” 

He said Indonesia was “an ex- 
tremely unstable area geographi- 
cally.” 

If midear power were developed 
there, he added, then Australia and 
other nearby countries, particularly 
Singapore, Malaysia, Brunei and 
Papua New Guinea, “should be 
very concerned because there is the 
potential of a major accident” 

Wendy Lambourne, an analyst 
at the Peace Research Center at tbe 
Australian National University in 


Canberra, said, “It will be a chal- 


ar plants to ensure higher stan- 
dards are maintained.” 

In particular, she died a “lack of 
local technical expertise along with 
tbe corruption and nepotism that is 
life in tbe letting of contracts.” 

The Australian government has 
played down such concerns and 
said that h was ready to sell urani- 
um to Indonesian nuclear plants 
under appropriate safeguards. 

Indonesia's National Atomic 
Energy Agency has extensive expe- 
rience m operating several nuclear 
research reactors. Still, Australia’s 
conservative opposition has urged 
■tbe government in Canberra to be 

Indonesia goes ahead witit^faenu- 
dear planL 

Environmental groups and sev- 
eral politicians in Indonesa have 
said that if oQ and gas were in 
danger of running out the coun- 
try’s need for electricity could be 
met more cheaply and safely by 
using indigenous coal and thermal 
power. 

Apparently responding to fears 
the pro-unclear lobby would 
sleamroU a decision through the 
government, Mr. Habibie said (hat 
residents near the Muria site would 
be allowed to decide whether con- 
struction would proceed or not. But 
he did not say how such a decision 
would be made. 


King of Zulus Threatens War 

Pretoria Must Cede Autonomy, He Says 


WORLD BRIEFS 

French Fishermen to Vote on Strike 

PARIS (AP) — In a stormy meeting that was to end a violent weeklong 
strike, representatives of France’s fishermen decided on Wednesday to 
put (be question to a full vote Thursday. 

United States fish exporters, meanwhile, protested moves by the 
French government to limi t imports, saying tons of frozen fish were left 
rotting at French airports. 

Operator of smaller French vessels asserted that new government 
funding and measures to prop up prices were- mainly helping larger 
producers, and they demanded more relief, fishermen in the Brittany 

fishing Survival Committee, whomged thrano return to work. 

EU Angers Vatican on Homosexuals 

VATICAN CITY (Reuters) — The Vatican harshly criticized a Euro- 
pean FarSamrat resolution that homosexual couples should be allowed to 
marry rad adopt children, saying Wednesday “no man can take the 
place of a natural mother.” 

Homosexuality is an “aberrant deviation” and chOdiea adopted by 
homosexuals will bear thescars of sufferidgrad frustration, said L’Osser- 
vaiore Romano, the Vatican newspaper. 14 Encouraging homosexual ten- 
dencies means overturning natural order, set by God at the moment of 
Creation, 7 ' tbe newspaper said in an editorial 

The European Parliament resolution on Tuesday, which is not binding 
on the 12 European Union members, was drawn up by a German Green 
member of parliament, Claudia Roth, and was approved in a parliamen- 
itary vote in Strasbourg by 159 to 96. It also calls for an cod to the 
prosecution of homosexuality as a public nuisance or gross indecency, 
and to disc rimination in criminal, cavil, contract unri commercial law. 

Georgia Vows to Protect Jewish Sites 

TBILISI, Georgia (AP) — The Georgian leader, Eduard A Shevard- 
nadze, has ordered his government to protect Jewish historical rites after 
the recent desecration of a Jewish cemetery in Tbilisi, the Georgian 
capital 

Mr. Shevardnadze promised in his decree that he would not allow tbe 
disruption of “26 centuries of friendship between the Georgian and 
Jewish peoples.” 

Dozens of headstones in a Jewish graveyard in the Ortachala district erf 
Tbilisi were destroyed by vandals m late January. To demonstrate that 
Georgia wiB not allow anti-Semitism to take hold, Mr. Shevardnadze set 
up a commisBUni to protect Jewish religious and cultural monuments and 
ordered a team of investigators to try to find the people responsible for 
the graveyard modem 

For the Record - 


By Bill Keller gaining maneuver, those in the 

New Yet* Tines Semce king’s political circle insist that be 

JOHANNESBURG — In what is serious, and that unless he is 
some of his followers describe as a satisfied the Zulu areas of Sooth 
stunning display of independence, Africa face civil war. 
the king of tbe ^ulus has demanded **The king has told President de 

that South Africa cede him an en- Kkrk that he wants the Zulu king- 
tire province of 8 millio n people to dom back as it was in 1838,” said 
rule as a sovereign monarchy. 211 official of tbe Inkatha Freedom 
According to Zulu and govern- Party, which is led by tbe king’s 
merit officials, King Goodwill Zwe- chief minister. Chief Mangosuthu 
lithini has told President Frcderik ButhdezL “Everything is much 


W. de Klerk that he rejects South 
Africa’s new constitution, will not 
abide by tbe results of the country's 
first free elections in April, and 


intends to secede with ail territory deadlocked Tuesday. 


the British conquered from his 
forebears. 

There is almost no chance the 
king’s demand will be accommo- 
dated, but it has cast an unexpected 
new shadow over the country’s 
hopes for peaceful, all-inclusive 
elections in April. 

Although some government offi- 
cials suspect a Machiavellian bar- 


maneuver, those in the from Chief Buthelezi and thus 
ibtical circle insist that be force the Inkatha leader to be more 
&, and that unless he is compromising, 
the Zulu areas of Sooth According to some government 
ce civil war. officials, the king's abrupt demand 

ting has idd President de for a real kingdom is a sign that he 
it he wants the Zulu king- is still in league with Chief Butbe- 
k as it was in 1838,” said ka. Tbe demand, these officials 
il of tbe inkatha Freedom say, is a bluff contrived to make 
Inch is led by tbe king's Chief BuibetezTs position seem 
lister. Chief Mangosuthu more moderate. 

L “Everything is much Three Inkatha officials said this 
more difficult than it was.” was a drastic misreading erf Zulu 

Talks aimed at persuading In- politics, 
katha and rightist white parties to According to these officials, 
take part in tbe elections seemed Chief Buthelezi bad stiffened his 
ed Tuesday. position in the talks after being 


tion and Development, has woo symbolic damages of 1 franc in a libel 
suit against Le Point, a Paris weekly. The suit concerned a report that Mr. 
Attah had sought a a apartment worth 5 milli on francs ($837,000) from 
the government (AFP) 


Correction 

A back-page article in the Feb. 4 editions incorrectly credited Johnny 
Mandel for writing tbe muse for tbe television series “Peter Gunn.” The 
composer was Henry Manchu. 

TRAVEL UPDATE 


f7~t t'k of provincial governments be guar- 

fi hmf*r iu)7f0f) an teed against intervention bv the 
Ullffld lU/UgU central government 
-g- -gg Within the government and the 

I iflSf 1 fv/to/j f/j ANC, which have already begun 
■woC XJUot? M/ full-scale election campaigns, the 

prevailing view is that the king has 
PLva/tmi P/m 2, long been little more than a pawn 

rrmom ±€Hii of chief Bulbed 

Chief Buthelezi controls the roy- 
. _ _ al budget The king, in turn, deliv- 

~l r ?? r ^!7 r ' F y se the support of traditional Zulus 

PHNOM PENH — Government for inV^tha 
troops killed 32 guerrillas during The government has been court- 


Tbe holdouts said that barring 
major concessions from the govern- 
ment and the African National 
Congress in the next few days, they 
would boycott the election. 

Parties have until Saturday to 
enter the elections, which wifi select 
a national parliament and provin- 
cial legislatures. 

Chief Butbdezi and the rightist 
parties, united by fear of a domi- 
neering government run by . the 
ANC have demanded that powers 
of provincial governments be guar- 
anteed against intervention by the 
central government 

Within the government and the 
ANC, which nave already begun 
full-scale election campaigns, the 
prevailing view is that tbe long has 
long been little more than a pawn 
of Chief Buthelezi. 

Chief Buthelezi controls the roy- 
al budget. The king, in turn, deliv- 
ers the support of traditional Zulus 


Like Continental, USAir Cute Fares 

position in the talks after bang NEW YORK (/.F) — USAir has cut the price of some buriness tickets 
rebuked by the newly assertive king in half and lopped up to 70 percent oft leisure fares in answer to 
for not doing e no u gh to defend Continental Airfares’ cheapo* rates. 

royal interests. Tbe lower prices, which apply to % destinations, are not a sale bail new 

The Inka t ha officials say the rift fares USAir wifi charge for the mostly short- to medium-haul routes, a 
between the chief and the king is a spokesman said, 
resurfacing of tensions boned since 


between the chief and the lung is a spokesman said. 

resurfacing of tensions boned since Continental said it would match USAir s prices on routes where they 

an open dash in tbe 1970s. At the compete. Several other major carriers said they were studying the raring- 
tune tbe king, egged cm by ambi- boos and would probably match (hem on such routes, 
boas Zulu princes and a white gov- 
ernment that found Chief Buthelezi 17 '' 1 TT* 1 o 1 m • i-w ,i 

too independent, set out to assume frCDCIl Ill^U"IjpCCU lrRlQ UGIRllS 
many <rf his chief minister's pow- BESANCON. France 7AFR — A hiah-snefld train derailmt HI IM 


French High-Speed Train Derails 


snanderi ihaf ...m u m 1 BESANCON, France (AFP) — A high-speed train derailed at 105 

ananded that powers era. Chief Buthelezi threatmed to kflometera per hour Wednesday while gathering speed in leaving Be- 

onH rw san S° n ' »«*• » apparently hit abSfa Shad fallenoff a 

Lment ^ *«ght train. No iiguries were reported among the 200 people aboard 

SSnment and the ‘ On Dec. 21, a TGV ran off the tracks near the nbrtSera town of 

Chaulnes at about 300 kilometers (190 mOes) per hour after the ground 


said, the ki 
assert himst 
“Is the Im 
as to put Bu 


ilayingabadc 
eziinagood li, 


w person was injured. 

lso The number of traffic deaths In France last year, at 9,052, was still the 
t r» highest in Europe, the police said Wednesday. It was one and a half tiroes 


the seizure of a major Khmer ing the kii 
Rouge base in northwest Cam bo- Jeclhis bu 


with promises to pro- 
stand symbolic status, 


cess, recover the plutonium and use 
it to produce weapons,” Mr. Wool- 
sey said. 

But a North Korean diplomat in 
Beijing denied that on Wednesday. 
“We are not going to produce any 
plutonium." said Choc Han Chun, 
a counselor at the North Korean 
Embassy. “We mentioned several 
times that we have no intention, 
and there is no necessity, to pro- 
duce nuclear weapons.” 

The closure of tbe Yongbyon re- 
actor would ring further alarm bells 
at the Vienna-based atomic energy 
agency, which has made dear it 
wonts its nuclear inspectors to be 
present should tbe reactor be shut 
down. 

Without inspections, the UN 
agency will be unable to give assur- 
ances that North Korea is comply- 
ing with a nuclear safeguards 

agreement. 


dia. a Ministry of Information hoping to woo the monarch away 
spokesman said Wednesday. 

The Khmer Rouge denied that ^ 
the base bad fallen and said they 
had defeated the government |J| TTJi'VrjWT* A TVT 

forces, inflicting hundreds of casu- JCjU liUl. H l/VJ. 1 

allies. — 

The government side lost 20 men 
with 82 wounded, mostly by mines, J. 

in the attack on the base at Anlong 

Veng, near the Thai border in Siem 

Reap Province, the spokesman, Swiss Program Revives 
Sieng La Presse, said « T . - 

The casualties listed were for the Ufi tile Legalization Ot 
period of Feb, 1 to 6, he said, add- The beginning of a new Swiss 
ing that the base had fallen Satur- bution program for addicts, usii 

day. Government troops also cap- oin provided quite offi ciall y b 

tured 24 guerrillas while 45 others, company, has revived debate o 

including a general defected to the tion of hard drugs in Europe, 

government side and ISO weapons The Swiss program, begun rec 
were seized, the spokesman said. rich and six other cantons, is 
Anlong Veng has been the heroin, morphine or metbadoc 

Khmer Rouge headquarters and years to 700 volunteers under si 

supply base for guerrilla operations supervision. All those taking pari 

in north and central Cambodia. hair unsuccessfully tried detoxifi 
Prince Norodom Ranariddh, and were found by doctors to be 

who along with Hun Sen is prime physical deterioration. The prog 

minister, described the seizure as a help them reduce their dependent 

significant victory for the govern- down drug-related crime; in adc 

meat. The prince said the base, workers will try to help addicts I 

with its 3,000 dwellings, was even and work, 

bigger than the Khmer Rouge's Swiss authorities had to obtain 

main headquarters at Pailin in Bat- lions permission to buy 15 ki! 
tambang Province. pounds) of heroin from a Frenc 

Despite this. Sieng La Presse, Francopia, because such purcha 

echoing comments made by the Vienna Convention on narcot 

prince and Mr. Hun Sen, said the Francopia in turn received autta 

guerrillas hod not pul up tough the deal — kepi secret until the 

resistance. 


an Inkatha official mused. “Possi- Germany and twice as many as in Britain . fifruiOTj 

ble. But (here is a real tension that Al Nippon Airways has ranoanced that it will increase the distance 
has always been there. From my between, seat rows in business class by 25.5 centimeters, to 1 27 centime- 
own knowledge, I think Buthelezi ters (50 indies), starting next month, and that seals will be redin&ble an 
was genuinely shocked by the extra 10 degrees, w 49 degrees. (Reuters) 

king's position. He has never fa- The U-S. Embassy m Cairo takes serio u sly I slamic militants' warnings 
vwed an absolute monarchy or se- to all foreigners to leave Egypt immediately, the UjS. State Department 
cession.” said, and has informed Americans in Egypt of the latest threats. (AP) 


Swiss Program Revives Debate 
On die Legalization of Drugs 

The beginning of a new Swiss drug-distri- 
bution program for addicts, using pure her- 
oin provided quite officially by a French 
company, has revived debate over legaliza- 
tion of hard drugs in Europe. 

The Swiss program, begun recently in Zu- 
rich and six other cantons, is to provide 
heroin, morphine or methadone (or three 
yean to 700 volunteers under strict medical 
supervision. All those taking pari are over 18, 
hare unsuccessfully tried detoxification cures 
and were found by doctors to be in a state of 
physical deterioration. The program aims to 
help them reduce their dependence and to cut 
down drug-related crime; in addition, soda! 
workers wfll try to help addicts find bousing 
and work. 

Swiss authorities had to obtain United Na- 
tions permisrioo to buy 15 kilograms (33 
pounds) of heroin from a French company, 
Francopia, because such purchases violate ’a 
Vienna Convention on narcotics control. 
Francopia in turn received authorization for 
the deal — kepi secret until the heroin had 


safely been transported to Switzerland — 
from the French government 

Alain Labrousse, director of a drugs moni- 
toring organization in France, said be found 
it “surprising and paradoxical that the gov- 
ernment approved such a sale even though it 
refuses to take pan in a real debate on drug 
legalization.” 

In Portugal Health Minister Paulo Mendo 
said this week that the European Union 
should study legalization “Tbe notion that I 
can avoid crime by gening a drug addict and 
giving him drags is. from a medical view- 
point, perfectly sound,” he said. 

And in Rotterdam, Police Chief Rob Hess- 
ing said that only by legalizing heroin sales 
and possession could smuggling be combat- 
ed. 

Around Europe 

The entire panel of Gardeners’ Question 
Tune, one of tbe BBC% favorite radio pro- 
grams, has defected to a commercial station. 
The five panelists left after the program's 
chairman. Stefan Buczacki, was dropped in a 
makeover aimed at attracting younger listen- 
ers, according to the commercial station, 1 
Classic FM. 

“With Classic, the program trill retain its 
homely flavor.” said Mr. Buczaclti, “as it will 
continue to be broadcast from village halls.” 

GQT, as fans call the BBC program, has 


been on the air since 1947 and has 1J million 
regular listeners. 

The director of tbe morgue at Copenha- 
gen's Institute for Forensic Medicine has 
been suspended for allowing unauthorized 
people to view cadavers — for an admission 
fee of about 38. The director, Bjarue Hansen, 
even allowed visitors to touch ’and photo- 
graph bodies, according to SOddeotscne Zo- 
ning of Munich. The case has taken on politi- 
cal overtones. Jan Kopke. a member of 
parliament, said he feared that the Danish 
people's trust in the medical system would be 
seriously damaged and that fewer people 
might now be willing to leave their bodies to 
science. 

It buns oat that France’s new high-tech 50 
franc HI, developed al great expense and 
supposedly dose to counterfeit-proof, has a 
weakness. So learned a Carcassonne man 
when he innocently tried to pay for a pur- 
chase using one of the bills. The sfaopowner. 
finding tbe bill a bit odd, passed it through a 
detecting device, which rejected iL Only then 
did the man realize that the bill, retrieved 
from a load of washing, had noticeably 
shrank. The Bank of France insists that its 
bills are not designed to stand up to washing 
machine conditions. So money launderers. 
beware. 

Brian Knowlton 


\ V ® \ 

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For heaven’s sake, Grace, I know it’s easy. 
But ya gotta stop talking up a storm. 


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JpJii l**U-S4D 


BVTERINATlOiVAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1994 



fe ct; 

xv hi 1 *-■ 


.■g*» 

-MS? 



StS 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — The direc- 
tor of the Congressional Budget 
Office cautioned on Wednesday 
against reading too much into his 

n calculation that Resident 
Dion's health-care -plan 
would drive the United States defi- 
JjjJrJ.* billion between 1995 

The budget office directs, Rob- 
ert D. Reischauer. stressed, tha t in 
that same time period, the plan 
would reduce the nation's medical 
bills by a third of a trflticw dollars: 


'ojeeted Deficit 


the Hill,'’ said" Representative John 
D. DiagdL Democrat of Michigan, 
the chairman of the Energy and 
Commerce Committee. *Thc presi- 
dent has the only sensitive, work- 
able plan that provides universal 
coverage for every American.” 

The Senate majority leader, 
George J. Mitchell, Democrat of 
Maine; itemized some of the posi- 
tive points in the budget Office 
analysis from the administration's 
perspective, including its projec- 
tion that it would lower businesses' 
health insurance costs by $90 W- 














'm:£v 

j & 


Prosecution Rests 
In N. Y. Bombing 
Alter 207 Witt lesses 


m i 


oS: 




- - « . UM1U1 U1W1UAC V 

„Mr. Roschauer told the Senate lion in 2004 akme. 


»» — — — — uuu in av) mie. 

Finance Omnuttee on Wednesday Mr. Reiscfaauer. said that “the 
that without President CHn ion’s vast preponderance of that money 
proposed caps on msurance pram- would be roomed to woduas in the 
urns, the costs would be “quite a bit form of higher wages.” 
higher.” _ Senator John G Danforth, Re- 

Hei urged legislators to “design a publican of Missouri, who called 
neaUh-care plan that makes sense.” himself one of only, three Repubb- 
“You shouldn't let budgetary can senators who support the idea 
treatment dictate program ctergn,” of limiting insurance premiums, 
116 . said it would be hard for Congress 

Afta - Mr. Reiscfaauer's state- to muster “the will to stick with 
mem on Tuesday that the Ointon those caps. r - . 
health plan would add more than By resisting White House argu- 
J120 billion io the deficit within a meats to ke e p most of the costs 
decade, the Republicans claimed plan off-budget, Mr- Rrischauer 
that he had delivered a knockout became an instant hero to Republi- 
blow to the president's proposal. cans. Thai gives tfa»m an opening 
The House Republican whip, to label as taxes the in s u ra nce pre- 
Newt Gingrich.. of Georgia, said mi mm that employers would pay, 
that the budget office report made and to claim thai Mr. Ointon is 
Mr. Clinton’s plan “dead on arriv- palling for a hay tax me rely * 
aT and that the House should .get Representative Ridtard K. Ar- 

on with writing its own bipartisan mey. Republican of Texas, efutir- 
bffl- - man of the House Republican Con- 

Democratic congressional lead- ference, called the budget office 
ers consulted with Mr. Clinton on report “a victory for good govem- 
Wednesday and said there was no . meat and honest bookkeeping.” 
reason to panic. - Bat Senator Edward M. Kenne- 

“It’s not a problem.” said the . dy, Democrat erf Massachusetts, 
House majority leader. Richard A. said that when tfte smoke cleared, 
Gephardt of Missouri, stressing the budget office's analysis would 
that the report showed that the be seal as “a solid vote of conft- 
White House plan conld cover ah deuce io the administration’s 
Americans and still cut medical plan.” 

bills In the long run. “The plan in pvind economical- 

“The differences are relatively fy,” he said. “The numbers add 
small, and we will resolve them on up.” 





K.T.C TAXI 


8 £50 





blow to the president’s proposal 
The House Republican whip, 
Newt Gingrich erf Georgia, said 
that the budget office report made 
Mr. Clm ton’s plan “deaa on arriv- 
al” and that the House should get 
on with writing its own bipartisan 
bffl. \ 

Democratic congressional lead- 
ers consulted with Mr. CHntoo on 
Wednesday and said there was no 
reason to panic. 

“It's not a problem.” said the 
House majority leader, Richard A. 
Gephardt of Missouri, stressing 
that the report showed that the 
White House plan conld cover an 
Americ an s and still cut .medical 
bills In the long run. 

“The differences are relatively 
small, and we will resolve them on 


Cbri» Mamo/Tbe Auocutcri 


Milr Sega r Rnom 


BATTLING THE ELEMENTS — Two residents of Malibu, California, wading across a mud-filled highway to get to their flooded 
apartment Fierce rains toadied off heavy mod sfides in the area, where much protective vegetation had been burned away in recent 
fires. Ifl New York, a mail struggled into a taxi with his newly ptmebased snow shovel as storms renewed tbeir assault on the area. 


Cumptlni fa- Our Staff From Dispatches 

NEW YORK — Afier more than 

four months of testimony, the gov- 
ernment has rested its case against 
the four defendants in the World 
Trade Cenier trial. 

With the 207 witnesses the prose- 
cution called to the stand and the 
1,003 exhibits it presented to the 
jury, the prosecution was trying to 
produce an avalanche of circum- 
stantial evidence. 

Prosecutors rested their case on 
Tuesday after two final days of 
testimony by David Williams, who 
gave an overview of the evidence as 
the FBI's primary investigator of 
the terrorist bombing last Feb. 26. 

Defense attorneys are expected 
to start presenting evidence later 
this week. It is considered unlikely, 
however, that any of the defen- 
dants will choose to take the wit- 
ness stand. 

The prosecution has built its case 
entirely on indirect evidence 
against four people it calls “foot 
soldiers." who are accused of con- 
structing the bomb that devastated 
the World Trade Center, killing six 
people, injuring more than 1,000 
and disabling the building for a 
month. 

The chief prosecutor. Gilmore 
Childers, presented one element of 
circumstantial evidence after an- 
other to uy to show that the defen- 
dants rented an apartment and a 


storage shed in New Jersey to mix 
chemicals for the bomb and had 
access to joint bank accounts to 
finance their endeavors. 

One of the most discouraging 
moments tor prosecutors occurred 
when a Jersey City gas station at- 
tendant was railed to the stand to 
identify two defendants — Mo- 
bammed A. Salaroeh and Mahmud 
Abohalima — who he said filled up 
their yellow rental van before Lhe 
blast.” 

After accurately describing the 
physical features of Mr. Salameh 
and Mr. Abohalima. the wimes?., 
Willie Hernandez Moosh, was 
asked to identify them in the court- 
room. He unaccountably pointed 
to two members of the jury, leaving 
lhe counroom rocking in laughter. 

Witnesses said a third defendant. 
Nidal A. Ayyad. who held joint 
bank accounts with Mr. Salameh. 
ordered chemicals of the type in- 
vestigators believe were used in the 
trade cenier bomb, purportedly for 
a second bomb. Again, the evi- 
dence was circumstantial. 

Mohammed Ahmad Ajaj. the fi- 
nal defendant, was in jail on a pass- 
port violation at the time of the 
bombing The government's theory 
is that Mr. Ajaj provided bomb- 
making manuals to the conspira- 
tors as early as September 1991 
when he entered the country from 
Pakistan. (\YT. LAT\ 


Whether Nacho or Burger , It Sounds Appetizing to Asians 


$500,000 Is Vindication 
For a Harassed Taxpayer 

■. Sew York Thnes Seme* . 

WASHINGTON — In what is almost certainly the largest pay- 
ment ever by the Infernal Revenue Service for harassing a taxpayer, 
the agency has .written a J5DQ.OOO check to a prominent' Miami 
lawyer to settle his accasatkms thitf thiw viadkm've agency employ- 
ees violated his civil rights. • . . .. ■ 

The lawyer, T>anidN. Hefier, won the settlement last month alter 
a struggle with die ERS that began in .1975 and that resulted in, 
among other things, Mr. Hdkris serving four months in prison. 

‘TTbs $500,000 apology by the £R5 is my total vindication,” Mr. 
Heller said. “It proves I never cheated on my tax returns, newer owed 
any money to the IRS. paid all my taxes on time and was totally 
innocent of the trumped-up charges filed against me.” 

Mr. Heller’s troubles began when The Mush News, where he was 
general counsel, reported that an IRS team was engaged in illegal 
spying on the sexual and drinking habits of important local ritizens. 
The newspaper gave the spying activiry the name “Operation Lepre- 
chaun." The IRS, believing the newspaper obtained information 
from within the agency, asked Mr. Hell ex to identify the source. He 
refused, citing the First Amendment 
He had wnal a judge later called “a heated exchange of words” 
with one agent — a man the paper bad identified as bead of the spg 
operation. “They were very menacing and very threatening to me, 
Mr. Heller said in a telephone interview. 

After filing bis tax return for 1 976*Mr. Hefler was investigated for 
tax evasion, whh one of the three agents on his case turning out to be 
the head of “Operation Leprechaun.” In 1982, he was indicted and 
convicted. 


Away From Politics 


m A reporter Jbr The Tribane Obromde of Warren, Ohio, lisa A. 
Abraham, has been in jail three weeks, longer. than any American 
-reporter in a decade, because she refused to testify before a grand 
jury about an interview die conducted with a comfy official accused 
of improper use of government f und s. 

• A storm that draped another blanket of beany soon across the 
United States has followed that up with a sheen erf ice in the North. 
“It’s not going to thaw, it’s goingio be solid ice on top of whatever 
we have." a National Weather Service forecasta said, predicting a 


we have." a National Weather Service forecaster' said, Predknnga 
foot 130 centimeters) of snow on lop of the record 8.9 inches (23 
centimeters) that fell Tuesday at Newaik International Airport. 

» hanging isoxistitetioraL a sharply dmdea federal 

appeals court has ruled in San Francisco. By a <Ho-5 vote, the 9th 
LLS. Grant Court of Appeals rejected the claim, or a tnplemnrderer, 
Charles R. CampbdL who aigued that death by hanging cos&thmed 
“cruel and unusual punishment-* 

• A CaBforaia grand hay coadderfagdSd sex abose charges a g a ins t 

the dod star Nfich»d ladsoto heard testimony from the actor Marlon 
Brando’s son, Mika; who has worked for Mr. Jackson as a/bbdy- 


By Charles P. Wallace 

Los Angeles Times Service 

HONG KONG — The restaurant 
seemed strangely familiar: A Los Angeles 
limes news rack was nestled next to the 
front door, the LA. Raiders were playing 
on the large-screen televisions overhead 
and yuppies at the bar munched buffalo 
wings and “Dodger Dogs.” 

The menu offered Rodeo Drive nacbos. 
Santa Monica clam chowder and a vegetar- 
ian dub sandwich. The ambience seemed 
straight out of Hollywood. 

But barely viable, past the neon signs in 
the polished plate glass, loomed the Bank 
of rliin* building — an unmistakable 
Hong Kong landmark. Welcome to LA 
Caffc, a new restaurant chain, which is 
doing booming business by selling a slice of 
California to Asia. 

“This wouldn’t work in LA, where it’s 
old hat,” said J.R Robertson, an expatriate 
U.S. insurance executive who founded the 
restaurant a year am. “We’reselling the 
LA liTestyle, which seems exotic here. 
Asians are throwing away the values of 
older generations and this kind of place is 


different from anything they are used to.” 

While American gourmets increasingly 
experiment with the foods of Thailand, 
Vietnam, Indonesia and even Burma, 
Asian diners have been falling head ova 
heels in love with American food — from 
Big Macs to Haagen-Dazs. 

Id fact, when the fast-rood franchiser 
McDonald’s opened its first restaurant in 
Singapore in 1982, it quickly became the 
biggest-selling McDonald's in the world. 
Now. 8 of the world's top 10 McDonald’s 
are in Aria — 7 in Hong Kong and I in 
Beijing. 

Take a stroll down Bangkok’s Silom 
Road and you might think you had been 
transported to a suburban U.S. shopping 
mall: McDonald's, Pizza Hut. Swansea's 
Ice Cream and a Sizzler Steak House on 
one ride of the avenue. Arby’s and Burger 
King on the oiha. 

Tony Roma’s, a Dallas-based franchise 
chain that specializes in ribs, opened its 
doors io Singapore a year ago and has a 
line around the block every night. With 
only 130 seats, h sells 800 meals a day. 
Franchised by Indonesian entrepreneurs. 


Tony Roma's has expanded to Hong Kong 
and to Jakarta, where every month it man- 

r to sell a 20-foot container- load of pork 
in the world's largest Muslim country; 
15 more branches are to open in the region 
in the next three years. 

“Business is just terrific. ii‘s unreal,” 
said Karl Faux, an Austrian hotelier who 
oversees Tony Roma's operations in 
Southeast Asia for its f ranchise owner. Mas 
Millenium. “Anything that is American is 
really hot right now.” 

Another company that is advancing in 
Asia is Kentucky Fried Chicken, now a 
subsidiary of PepsiCo Inc. and renamed 
KFC. with "the colonel" demoted to a 
peripheral role. Tim Lane. KFCs presi- 
dent for Asia, says that in the last four 
years the number of its chicken restaurants 
in Southeast Asia has risen from 250 to 
600; the Japanese market has grown from 
600 to l.0(W. Thailand, where there were 
none as recently as 1989. has 50 KFC 
outlets. 

“Chicken is a great concept for Asia 
because it’s familiar and there are no health 
or religious issues.” Mr. Lane said. 


Although rents are often higher in Asia's 
congested cities than in the United Slates, 
increased business more than compensates. 
Mr. Lane said that while the typical KFC 
restaurant in Lhe United Stales does 
S200.000 a month in business, the average 
outlet in Asia rakes in $750,000. 

Daniel Ng, a chemical engineer who be- 
came a millionaire as the Hong Kong fran- 
chise owner for McDonald's, recalled that 
in the early 1980s. many people warned 
him against entering the fast-rood busi- 
ness. “Chinese won’t eat hamburgers,” he 
recalled being told. 

Mr. Ng now owns 72 McDonald’s in 
Hong Kong and 3 in China; he has a one- 
third interest in the Singapore franchise. 

One thing that sets Asia apart from other 
regions is the relative strength of its fam- 
ilies. Food outlets with the strongest appeal 
to families seem to have the most success. 

Some restaurant operators have found, 
however, that Asian tastes differ. In Thai- 
land. Pizza Hut puts pineapple on some of 
its pizzas and hot sauce on the tables; KFC 
offers a “hot and spicy” version of the old 
standby for Asians accustomed to piquant 
food. 


U.S. marketers also had to rethink strat- 
egies to accommodate cultural differences. 

The Hard Rock Cafe, for example, was a 
big success in Singapore and Jakarta, but 
stumbled in Thailand. For one thing, Thai 
customers were offended by the Hard 
Rock's legendary friendly waiters, who 
were encouraged to sit with the customers 
to take their orders, said James Choong. 
financial director of the restaurant. Thais 
were not used to sitting with servants. 

Another complication was the name — 
many Thais considered a "calc" a euphe- 
mism for a brothel. The company stuck 
with its name, but got its waiters to take 
oiden standing up: business is slowly im- 
proving. 

The Asian welcome, while warm, has not 
been universal. Many countries view with 
suspicion any him dial American values 
are being imported to their relatively con- 
servative countries. 

“We should nor be swayed by the trend 
toward eating nonrice food, including 
Western food" Indonesia's vice president. 
Try Smrisno. warned in September. 


POLITICAL MITES 



Clinton’s Mew AnU-Prug Pian 

WASHINGTON — President Bill CKmon on- 
veiled an anti-drug plan Wednesday that puts 
added emphasis on treatment and prevention, call- 
ing it an approach that is “both smart an d tough.” 

Overall, the $132 billion proposal would in- 
crease anti-drug funding by 51 bulioo — the first 
increase in anti-drug spatdmg in two years. It also 
represents a departure from the drug-fighting phi- 
losophy of the Bush administration. 

The plan increases spending for prevention and 
treatment by $826 J million — or 18 percent — to 
$5.4 billion. Mr. Clinton says the plan seeks to put 
140.000 more hard-core drag users into drug treat- 
ment in the next year. 

- “No nation can fight crime and drags without 
dealing honestly and forthrightly with the problem 
of drag addiction," Mr. Clinton said. (AP) 

Pant! Clears Talbott Nomination 

WASHINGTON — The Senate Foreign Rela- 
tions Committee approved Strobe Talbott’s nomi- 
nation to be deputy secretary of state Wednesday 
after pressing the former journalist cm his views on 

The committee voted, 17 to 2, to send Mr. 
■Talbott's nomination to lhe full Senate for confir- 
mation, with Jesse Helms, Republican of North 
Carolina, and Hank Brown, Republican of Colora- 
do, dissenting The nomination came under some 
fire because erf Mr. Talbott’s writings when he was 
a correspondent for Time magazine, which critics 
said displayed bias against Israel 

Mr. Talbott, Mr. dmton’s dose friend since 
they, were Rhodes scholars and roommates at Ox- 
fora University 25 years ago, is currently the State 
Department's ambassador-at-large for Russia and 
the other forma Soviet republics. Another old 
friend. from Oxford. Labor Secretary Robert B. 
Reich, was on hand at the confirmation bearing 
Tuesday in support of Mr. Talbott. 


Several national Jewish groups and at least two 
Republican senators. Connie Mack of Florida and 
Alfonse M. D’Amato or New Y ork. have come out 
against the nomination since last week, when the 
Zionist Organization of .America drew attention to 
Mr. Talbott’s writings. 

During the hearing. Mr. Talbott said he had at 
times deviated from his “core beliefs" on Israel “in 
the heat of forensic and journalistic battle.” But he 
said that he had always believed the U.S.-Israd 
relation was unshakable. (AP) 

Senate Approves 4 as Envoys 

WASHINGTON — The Senate approved the 
nominations of four Democratic loyalists to am- 
bassadorial posts after a four-month delay caused 
by questions ova their foreign policy expertise, 

M. Larry Lawrence, a San Diego developer and 
bote] owner, was confirmed as ambassador to 
Switzerland by a 76-to-19 vote. The oiha three, K. 
Teny Dombush for the Netherlands, Sidney Wil- 
liams for the Bahamas, and Thomas Sicben for 
Sweden, were approved by a voice vote. 

Mr. Lawrence was singled out last year by the 
American Foreign Service Association for his lack 
of foreign affairs experience and allegations of 
irregularities in his campaign contributions to the 
Democratic Party. 

Mr. Dombush has given more than $250,000 to 
the Democratic Party ova the past three elections, 
and Mr. Lawrence almost S 200.000. Mr. Williams 
is married to Representative Maxine Waters of 
California. Mr. Siebert was a classmate of Mr. 
Clinton's at Georgetown University. (AP) 

Quote/ Unquote 

Health and Human Services Secretary Donna E. 
Shalala; “In this administration, there are so many 
women at high levels that you literally can move a 
major policy issue all the way to the president's 
desk without ever touching a man’s hands.” ( WTl 


2 Top Pentagon Aides Take Aim 
At Balanced-Budget Amendment 


New York Times Serrue 

WASHINGTON — The Penta- 
gon’s two senior officials have tak- 
en an unvarnished stance against 
the latest plan for a balanced-bud- 
get amendment to the U.S. Consti- 
tution. 

Defense Secretary William J. 
Perry and General John M. Shali- 
kasbvili. chairman of the Joint 
Chiefs of Staff, have told Congress 
that the amendment would proba- 
bly force large and immediate cuts 
in’ the discretionary portion of the 
federal budget, about half of which 
goes to the military. 

“We are for. as I suppose most 
American citizens are for. a bal- 


anced budget” Mr. Perry said 
Tuesday. But under the proposed 
amendment which would mandate 
a balanced federal budget as early 
as 2001. he added, “you can con- 
clude that it would have a devastat- 
ing effect on our ability to maintain 
an adequate defense structure.” 

General Shahkasbvili said he 
was reluctant as a nonpartisan mil- 
itary official, to enter into a “politi- 
cally charged" debate, and then he 
did. “I fully align myself with Sec- 
retary P&ny on this issue.” he said. 

Mr. Perry’s assessment of the ef- 
fect on military programs assumed 
that Congress would balance the 
budget by cutting discretionary 


federal spending and leaving in 
place mandatory programs such as 
Medicare and food stamps. 

The last drive for a balanced- 
budget amendment in 1992, came 
within nine voles of the needed 
two-thirds majority in the House; 
in the Senate, n died in a filibuster. 

But the latest version of the 
amendment introduced last year 
by Senator Paul Simon. Democrat 
of Illinois, swept easily through the 
Judiciajy Corominee. 

It would prohibit the govern- 
ment from running a deficit" except 
in time of war or imminent war. or 
unless three-fifths of Congress vot- 
ed to suspend the ban. 


CANCERl Are Newer Generations at Greater Risk? SLE EP LESS; Aftershocking 


Coarinaed from ftgP 1 
into account They were calculated 
as ample fractions: the number of 
new diagnoses (or deaths) for a 
given age group divided by the size 
of the population in that, group. 
This made the rates “age-adjust- 
ed.” 

The researchers divided cancer 

into twogroop* 
larynx, esophagus and 

lv to be caused in part by smtaong; 

and ail others, such as colon, 

, .nil Ivnmh node. IQ 


people bom between 1888 and tbe 
mid-1950s. Only data on whites 
were used because cancer statistics 
for other racial groups for 1973 io 
1987 were, not reliable, the re- 
searchers said. 

Among tbe findings: 

• In the 15 years between. 1973 
and 1987, the ovoall mortality rate 
dropped 19 potent for people in 
the. 65- to 74-year-dd age group. 
Deaths from cardiovascular discasc 
dropped 36 percent, bat deaths 
from cancer rose 8 pereentl 

• During tbe 15-year period, the 
rate of new smokmE-rdaitd can- 


This trend appears to have 
peaked, with women born in the 
late 1950s now showing about a 
fivefold risk compared with those 
bean at the end erf the 1 9th century. 


They then moirea ai 
the change in cancer «“**£“*• 
the 15-vear period, and changes in 
the nsk of gening 
different age-grou p cohorts or 


To Mfbuvfe* In 

fast caHr*o6 
01308485 85 


oas in women rose by 50 percent, 
but stayed steady m men. The rate 
of cancer not related to sxnddn& in 
contrast, stayed -stable in women 
butiose^)ait20peFceaihLnKn. . 
■ . • Women bora in the I920stnd 
193Qshadaiu(k sixtmMSgrrata6f . 
developing a smoking-related caa- 
ccr than women boro between 1888 
and 1897— a finding that reflects 
the exp (os vc increasem women’s 
smoJrihg in arid-century. 


• Men bora between 1948 and 
1957 are three times more tikdy to 
contract a nonsmoking-related 
cancer than men bora shortly be- 
fore the turn of the century, and 
about rwo.times more likely to de-. 
vdop any type of cancer. 

•For women, the risk of non- 
smoking-related cancers peaked 
with the cohort bora between 1913 
-an d 1922. It has remained steady 
among women bora iu the three 
decades thereafter — a rale about 
3) percent higher than that seen for 
women , bom in the 1890s. When 
breast cancer is looted at akme; 
however, ridt of developing the dis- 
ease has continued to rise steadily. 
Women born in tbe 1950s have 2.7 
limes greater risk of gelling the 
disease than women boa 50 year? 
earlier. 


Castmoed from Page 1 
Oregon Spring. Sparklet tes, Evian 
and Crystal Geyser. “Everywhere 1 
go when I see wata. 1 buy it.” said 
Ms. Jacobson, a psychic. 

Last week, Karen K. Ross, a psy- 
chologist, and Matt Healy. a mar- 
riage therapist, ^ave a free earth- 
quake stress seminar at a church in 
Brentwood. Ms. Ross gaye a dem- 
onstration in deep breathing, which 
she advised for anxiety and fear of 
aftershocks. 

Mr. Healy put in a good word for 
d enial. “Doual gets a bad rap," he 
said. “Denial allows you (o hare a 
fuB bladder and drive anyway." 

Peter Berrocal, a real-estate 
manager who was there, shared his 
own post-earthquake, stress-bust- 
ing technique- counting to 100. “1 
don’t drive," he said. “I take taxis. 1 
say to the taxi driver. ‘Excuse me, 
you may think I’m crazy, but 1 need 
you to count to 100 with me: I’ll 
pay you extra.' I give them $5. Then 
we sort of chant together.” 


There are all kinds of ways of 
coping with aftershocks. Frank S- 
monelli, a marketing consul lam in 
Beverly Hills, eats doughnuts. Rick 
Sherman, the West Coast market- 
ing manager for Geffen Records, 
said that on the advice of a thera- 
pist he had taught his 2pyear-old 
son, Andy, to yeU, “Go away, big 
boom, go’ away!” 

The earthquake has altered life 
here in all sorts or ways. With some 
freeways shut down, and those that 
are open more crowded than ever, 
thousands of people have taken 
public transportation for the first 
time. 

Before the earthquake, tbe Santa 
Clarita route, fre>m the Antelope 
Valley to downtown Los Angeles, 
carried 950 passengers a day. ac- 
cording to Peter Hidalgo, a spokes- 
man Tor Meirolink. On Jan. 25. 
21,000 passengers rode that line, 
though the number is now at 10.000 
a day. 


UJ ROMANIA 

-J CRANS-MONTANA & ‘ . \ 

i FORUM IN BUCHAREST -- M 

> 21-24 APRIL 1994 

? Under the auspices of the Government of Romania /• 


For the businessmen... 




r9 






The Bucharest Conference will brng 
together in particular lhe countries of 
Central and Eastern Europe, 

Central Asia, 

the Arab countries 

and those of the southern 

Mediterranean area. 

which oner particularly interesting 

and often underrated markets. 


FOR INFORMATIONS AND REGISTRATION 
CRANS-MONTANA 
FORUM IN BUCHAREST 

rcnd“t:cn du Forum Universal; 

3. Ccn;r3-oY;-R:ve ■ )2Q4 Gensva {Switzerland; 

Te; 41 -22-310.93.95 
Fax r. -22-3 ID. 39. 05 
Telex 225 052 FOND-CH 


size can penetrate new 
the basic condition of having 
3g&$BSlipnfed personal contacts at the highest 
^raws^This is what we increasingly realize each 
year at the Cra ns -Montana Forum . 

Jean-Paul Carteran 
F*residenl of the Crans- Montana Forum 

Guests from political circles 

Heads of State, Prime Ministers, Ministers of Economy. 
Ministers. Presidents of Central Banks, high ranking officials 
and experts. Over 50 countries and numerous international 
organizations will be represented at Bucharest. 

Participants from economic circles 

Decision makers, presidents. CEOs and western 
businessmen - Delegations comprising businessmen from 
the invited states. 

An original concept 

Conviviality and a limited number ol participant ni3he it 
possible to establish personal contacts among businessmen 
and between tbe latter and politicians up to the highest 
level Many small committee meetings, workshops and 
round tables are being organized to facilitate contacts 

The main objective 

The establishment of personal and direct relations between 
the participants from the economic and political circles, 
leading up to the definite conclusion of commercial, 
industrial, financial and joint venture aoreements. 








Europe Parliament, 
A Home Divided 

France Insists on Strasbourg , 
Others Hold Out for Brussels 


By Tom Buerkle 

letenuimoa/ Herald Tribune 

STRASBOURG. France — The 
topic of debate on the floor of the 
European Parliament on Wednes- 
day was about lofty as it gets — a 

draft constitution for Europe. 

But in the corridors and back 
offices, the real debate was about 
whether or not to give in to French 
pressure to erect a new building 

here to stop the drift of the parlia- 
ment to Brussels. 

Paris has forced a showdown by 
threatening to block the creation of 
new seats and thereby disrupt Eu- 
ropean elections set for June unless 
the European Parliament agrees to 
build a new 2-biiiioo-fninc (£535 
million) edifice here. 

The pressure reawakened oppo- 
sition from members who nave 
long resented having to shuttle be- 
tween Strasbourg, where plenary 
sessions are held one week a 
month, and their offices in Brus- 
sels. where committees and party 
groups meet the rest of the time. 

“We warn a angle seat because 
you can't have a Congress in San 
Francisco when the executive is 
based in Washington." said Peter 
Price, a British member who is 
leading a campaign against a new 
building. 

At a time when the Maastricht 
Treaty has given it real influence 
over European Union policies, the 
parliament is stymied by being 
based some 440 kilometers (273 
miles) away from the real power 
brokers — the European Commis- 
sion and the Council of Ministers 
of the 12 member states — in Brus- 
sels. Mr. Price contends. 

He says parliament wastes men 
than 100 million Ecus (SI 10 mil- 
lion) a year, or 15 percent of its 
budget, on shuffling around and 
duplicating offices and equipment 
in the two cities and in Luxem- 
bourg, home of the parliamentary 
staff. What's more, he considers it 
an affront to democracy that the 
members themselves have never 


French Backing for Brittan? 

Agencr France- Prcsse 

PARIS — Kenneth Clarke. Brit- 
ain's chancellor of the Exchequer, 
said Wednesday during a visit here 
that Sir Leon Brittan could win 
French backing to succeed Jacques 
Dclors as president of the Europe- 
an Commission. 


had the final say on where they siL 

France considers the stakes just 
as vital. From its origins in the 
1950s. the European Union has 
based its legislative bodies in Stras- 
bourg as a symbol of French-Ger- 
man reconciliation. French offi- 
cials point out Parliament today is 
the only EU institution based on 
French soil 

"It was not an economic choice.” 
said Nicole Fontaine of France, 
vice president of the parliament. 
"We made a political and symbolic 
choice. That commitment must be 
honored.'' 

The fact that the commitment is 
being questioned is largely Paris's 
fault. The government dawdled in 
proposing an alternative to the cur- 
rent rented chamber, which is too 
small to handle June's expansion to 
561 seats from 518 and the expect- 
ed arrival of new members next 
year from Austria. Sweden. Fin- 
land and Norway. 

Meanwhile, the natural attrac- 
tion of Brussels has been reinforced 
by the completion there last year of 
an ample new chamber, the first 
part of a 51-2 billion complex on 
which the European Parliament 
has a long-term lease. The chamber 
will play host to four additional 
plenary sessions this year, a num- 
ber many members are eager to see 
increased. 

So France is fighting back, hop- 
ing that its threat to block the cre- 
ation of new seats will force the 
parliament to sign a budding con- 
tract quickly. The tactics are anger- 
ing France's main ally, however, 
because those seats are being added 
to give Eastern Germany represen- 
tation in the parliament for the first 
time. 

Hans-Gert Pottering, the head of 
the German Christian Democratic 
group in parliament, says he ac- 
cepts the French argument for 
Strasbourg but added, "I criticize 
that we are held hostage ” 

Anthony Simpson, a British 
member who sits on a select panel 
negotiating with French authori- 
ties, said those talks might not be 
completed before the start of April, 
the logistical deadline by which 
parliament must know whether the 
election will be for 561 or 5 18 mem- 
ben. 

“My own personal view is that 
the parliament should not sign a 
contract under threat.” he said 

French authorities added to the 
opposition this week by clearing 
the proposed building site. 





AaCDKl 


SOLIDARITY IN THE STREETS — Some of the 20,000 members of the trade union 
Solidarity who protested the government* s budget plan Wednesday in Warsaw. The union wants 
more money for social programs. The government wants to hold the Gne against spe nding that 
amid increase its deficit and spark inflation. Parliament votes on the budget early next month. 


Serbs Suspected of Planning 
Phony Recovery of U.S. Arms 

American Says Accusations Would Follow 

Ooat and Muslim factions filing 

in die war. General Jaies sad he 

rssiSSrJS. S5SSS&-*s 


WatUagtoa Pot Service 

SARAJEVO. Bosnia-Herzegovi- 
na — In an attempt to deflect inter- 
national att e n t ion from the killing 
of 68 people in Sarajevo's market 
last weekend, Bosnian Sab au- 
thorities are planning to accuse the 
United States of air-dropping 
weapons to the Bosom gmtrn- 
ment’s mostly Muslim forces, a se- 
nior American military officer said 

Wednesday 

The offi 
Jim Jones 
Corps, said that soon after the 
120 mm mortar round hit the city's 
central marketplace on Saturday. 
American officers monitoring Bos- 
nian Serb mfitary communications 
picked up “highly credible” infor- 
mation stating that Serb authorities 
were planning to stage a fake recov- 
ery of air-dropped weapons and 
accuse the Uruied States. / 

General Jones asserted that 
Serbs woe patching together an 
American parachute and the rem- 
nants of- a pallet, both used during 
the UR-led operation to air-drop 
food to besieged Muslim areas. 


was 

mi ght suggest that 

one of the-lUL planes 
food would drop out of the flight 
teed by another 

m arkings, that 


plana, with 

was carrying weapons. . 

The general said his ptmapai 
worry was that the Serbs might 
create an incident in order to josti- 

cer. Brigadier Owd S5£5*WS ' 

of the US. Marine that often «p tw.-fa.pdk*.: 


Most mili tary officials have said 
they do. not befieve U&'fonHt 
air-dropping weapons to the Mas- 
fim forces because they comtact the : 
drops at such an altitude that m 
almost every operation some pai- 
las fall on either the Serb or the 
Croat ride: About 85 percent of tte 
parachutes now hit withm a half- 


the international missions in for- 
mer Yugoslavia. The airdrop is the 
only way that numerous places in 
Bosnia can now get food without 
po^g'pg through a Serb checkpoint. 

When it- started in February 
1993, the airdrop was not wel- 
comed by United Nations officials 
or Weston military officers. Bin it 
has proved invaluable at keeping 
tens of thousands of people auve. 
especially in the besieged Muslim 
enclaves. As of Jan. 30, the UR-fed 
operation had dropped 14.252 tons 
of food and 192 tons of medical 
dies. 


" 8 £*lnUC.Utefc- 


across enemy lines. 

Ovtx the past ax nwnths, howev- 
er UN mintary officials have re- 
ported that the Musfon forces have:, 
ob tained- an increasing number of ' 
weapons, mostly light- arms and 
portable anti-tank systems. 

The pffi ra nfc have identified sev- 
eral main sources: Islamic coun- 
tries, which supply die arms 'over- 
land through Croatia by bribing 
Croat officials; Slovenia, and in 
several local cases Serb troops, who 
have sold mortars and howitzers to . 
the Muslims in exchange for salt, 
food and hard currency. • 

/ —JOHN POMFRET 


After a String of Broken Accords , 
Will the Serbs Abide by This One? 


Hashing ton Pan Service 

SARAJEVO — Faced with the 
threat of NATO air strikes after the 
deaths of 68 people in an attack on 
Sarajevo's market, the Bosnian 
Serbs agreed Wednesday to place 
the heavy guns that have bombard- 
ed the city for 22 months under 
United Nations control and allow 
UN forces to wedge themselves be- 
tween waning Muslim and Serbian 
lines. 

Lieutenant General Sir Michael 
Rose of Britain, the UN command- 
er. concluded the accord after a 


series of negotiations amid the ru- 
ins of Sarajevo's airport. 

“This is a very small start to a 
very large problem.” the general 
said. "People should not read too 
much into it” 

Cease-fires and other agree- 
ments are not new in this 22 - 
month-old war, and Wednesday’s 
accord seemed to be a last-ditch 
effort by the Bosnian Serbian 
forces, largely held responsible for 
firing the 120 mm mortar at the 
marketplace, to avoid pressure in 


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the UN. However, BOSNIA: Life in Sarajevo, Hostage to Sniper Whims 

i interest in Bosnia a +■■■■. %?.- _ m. 




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the West to end their siege of Sara- 
jevo. 

In September 1992. Serbs 
around the city agreed to place 
their heavy guns, estimated at more 
than 1.40b pieces occupying 160 
positions, under UN observation, 
but once Western pressure on them 
eased they reneged. In mid-1993, 
faced again with re s u r g e n t Western 
interest in Bosnia, the UN Security 
Council passed a resolution mak- 
ing Sarajevo a “safe area" and stat- 
ing that an attack against this 
crumbling city constituted an at- 
tack against the UN. However, 
when Western interest in Bosnia 
receded, subsequent Serbian artil- 
lery barrages on the city went un- 
answered. 

The difference Wednesday in- 
volved of two points. First, the 
agreement — between Manoilo Mi- 
lovanovic. chief of staff of the Ser- 
bian pmamihtaiy forces, and Jovan 
Diyjak. deputy commander of the 
mostly-Muslim Bosnian Army — 
was brokered against a clear 
change of heart by North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization leaders to 
force the Serbs to roll back their 
heavy guns, described by General 
Rose as any weapon bigger than 
12.7 caliber. 

Secondly, the Serbs accepted the 
idea of interposing UN forces be- 
tween Muslim and Serbian lines 
and. even more significantly, 
agreed to put their weapons under 
UN control — not simply UN ob- 
servation — without simultan xms- 
ly requiring the Muslim ride to put 
their guns under UN lock and key. 

General Rose intimated tbat UN 
forces would position themselves 
between the wo sides as human 
shields to prevent renewed fighting. 

— JOHN POMFRET 


ing days. 

“I have been warned there may 
be an attempt to portray the air- 
drop in other than humanitarian 
(j ght to that we drop arms 
sometimes,” General Jones said. 
“It is not oat of the realm of possi- 
bility of haring an orchestrated 
erect-” 

The general said such accusa- 
tions would be “ludicrous," 
amounting to an “absolute traves- 
ty." 

General Jones is the chief of staff 

of Operation Proride Comfort, the 
m i m m i ditignwt to airlif t and air- 
drop humanitarian aid to millions 
of people in Bosnia. The general's 

wiirrmwii; made d uring a visit 10 
Sarajevo, illustrate die high-stakes 
game of press manipulation in the 
conflict and also the fact that Bos- 
nia's army is indeed obtaining 
more weapons from a variety of 
sources, although General Jones 
said it was not from the American- 
led airlift. 

The general said that rate rumor, 
passed around by some United Na- 
tions officials in Bosnia, concerned 
the methods said to be used by the 
Americans to drop weapons to the 
Muslim forces. 

Before the cargo planes leave the 
Rhein- Main Air Base in Germany, 
they are checked for weapons by 
two Saisoc officers from the Serb, 


Despite Greeks, U S. Plans 
To 



By David Binder 

Nen Ytrk Tima Strdce _• 

WASHINGTON — The United States extended formal recogra-' 
oon on Wednesday to die fanner Yugoslav republic of Macedonia. 

The White House said it would establish full diplomatic re lations , 
«n ra n/Hii/m that Macedonia try to resolve differences with Greece. • 

Diplomatic recognition of Macedonia by the United Stated was 
planned two years ago, but strong objections by Greece and by 
politically mfiimnrtal Gredt-Amcricans held up the action. 

The Athens government Greeted to the name chosen by the Slavic 
republic, one of the six republics to emerge after the cofiapse of the 
fanner Yugoslavia in 1991, daiming that Macedonia was historically 
ir rw* iww ifimMd hylic gltnheiqg the name for the nortiteS'iimost 
administrative district of Greece. . 

The While House appeared to address Athens's concerns by 
calling die state “the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia.'* _• 

“We recognize that Greece and The Former Yugoslav Republic of 
Mar^ftonia Tutv ft outstanding diff ere n ces which we expect will be 
resolved through good faith negotiations,” the White House state- 
ment said. 

The Greeks said the Slavs threatened their territorial integrity tty 
adopting ^ie name Macedonia For months, they successfully de^ 
fended uns position in the 12-member European Union. 

American recognition of the government in Skopje, the capital of 
Macedonia in the former Yugosktvia was extended because key 
European countries like prihrin, France and- Germany had created 
the precedent of opening ties, an American government official said. 


Con do ned hum Plage 1 
a single destructive mortar blast 
that dominaies the pulse of life 
here. 

As Western leaders, NATO and 
the European Union ddnted what 
to do to relieve this city’s strangula- 
tion and pnmsh those responsible 
for Saturday’s atrocity, the two sis- 
ters were considering evacuating 
tbdr pantry and crowding into the 
kitchen. 

Recently, on a particularly busy 
day for one of the s ni pers “up 
there,” as the women put it. a bullet 
smashed into one of their last 
places of refine, passing through a 


in his apartment, which, like that of 
the sisters bdow him, faces the Ser- 
bian mns. 

Unfits the sisters, however, Mr. 
DomazeL a Serb, has refused to' 
cede any territory in his penthouse 
apartment to the men in the hiBs. 
Wi tb his Murihn wife, Aida, he stiB 
works, reads arid sleeps where be - 
used to. Three times he has re- 
placed glass in his front windows, 
mown out by snipers or mortar 
shells. Twice he lias risked ins Efe 
repairing other damage on the roof. 

“It toe* me TO years and about 
560,000 to bold tins place,” he 
said, waving his arm around the 


barricade of dotites and books that sprawling duplex. “Nobody is go- 

w - *-•-!. * ing to cake tins away” 

But wink their house is still al- 
most whole, their family isn’t It 
has been two yearn since the Doma- 
zets have seen their two children, 
both refugees in Norway. Mrs. Do- 
mazet has recently received ap- 
proval from the Nbrw^ian govern- 
ment to travel there toseeMaja, 12. 
and Denis. 9. But the Serbian eactr- 
demeut prevents ter departure 
Like many in Sarajevo, the Do- 
mazeis and the two sisters see link 


Mrs. Dexvisefendic has constructed 
in the Irving room, into what had 
been the safety of this tiny cham- 
ber. 

“Oh. God, 1 was afraid they 
would find us here.” she said. 

Alexander Domazet, 42, a neigh- 
bor. gives new meaning to the ex- 
pression “bouse proud." Over 
about 600 days of war, the graphic 
designer has collected a little more 
than a kilogram of bullets and 
scraps of mortars that have landed 


hope (hai talk in the West about 
relieving the siege oi Sarajevo will 
come to anything. Both .recall rid- 
ing an emotional rollercoaster sev- 
eral times over the last year whea 
pofitirians, especially in tbeUnited 
Stales, gave flKor false hope that 
somehow tbe^ West would hdp end 
their suffering. 

Airdrops of food were seen — 
wrongjy— as a precursor to ak- 
drops of weapons. Clothes £a&- 
fonedfrom Western parachutes be- 
came “Ointoo pants," “Cl inton 
shirts” and “Clinton dresses.”. 
Soon, however, “Clinton, dobro” ~ 
“Cli n t on , good” t— became **C2 m- 
ton, samo price,” — “Clinton, only 


fah^ tales." 


'm an old lady” said Mss. 
Dervisefeodic. “1 know false talk 
when I see it.” 

“Deep in my heart. Frit an opti~ 
mist,” Mr. Domazet added. “It 
seems that we have come to anoth- 
er critical moment in our histoiy- 
Something somewhere lias {got to 
break. I don’t expect mQitanr mietr 
ventioc. These people wifl never 
fight for us. But somehow tins tor-, 
ture has got to end." . " 


NATO: Air Strikes Threatened in 10 Days Unless Serbs Pull BackCiais 


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Continued from Page 1 

city, according to the commander 
of the UN peacekeeping forces. 
Lieutenant General Sir Michael 
} Rose of Britain. 

j NATO diplomats cautioned., 
however, that previous cease-fires 
[ had failed and that the Serbs hod 
broken other promises. 


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MEMORIAL NOTICE 

A memorial service fee 
Gregory C Usher, 
director of the Roz-&coffier 

Bmfc tfc Gastronome Fraropiise, 

wifl he ItL-'kl on Friday. Febmtr>- 
Will, at 17:30 P-tt', at the 
* American Cathedral in Paris. 
23. Awatue George V. 

Mr. l/sher. ->3 tuurs old. 

died Fridav.Feb. 4. 
of an AIDS-related illness. 

A rurhe of Foctfand. Oreem. 
Mr. Usher hud been a rsideni 
of Itiris since ['770. Besides 
creating tiic Ritz-Escuffier nircol 
in 19*P. he lud been <hrcctor of 
ihe Li Varenne Fcoie de Cuisine 
and laser the 
Cordon Bleu tb Pans. 

In 1W). Mr. Usher was awarded 
ilte Owtalier du Merite Agricob 
by the French Goiemmcnr. 

He is survived by his longtime 
comparuja Patrice Bachdard; 

muther and stepfather 
Anne C ami 'S'illird R. Reynolds, 
of potrland: father and 
stepmother Kirk ond jean Usher, 
of Wtufinghai!!. Vt; and three 
hrotiters. Kirk Jr., of San 
Francisco, and Thomas and 
Ciordon. of Portland. 

In lieu rf flowers, co«nbutions 
ittiv be sent to 
the American Library in Ports, 
10. Rue General Lamou, 
75007 Pans. 


“There is no reason logo back," 

said one alliance diplomat. “We are 
right to keep up the pressure.” 

It appeared that Bosnian Serbs 
might be staHing for time to wait 
for outrage over a weekend massa- 
cre of civilians at a Sarajevo market 
to blow over. The mortar attack 
last Saturday, in addition to the 68 
people killed, wounded more than 
200 . 

Canada, along with Greece, re- 
peated its reluctance to use force at 
zbe NATO meeting on Wednesday, 
but diplomats said later that the 
two had agreed to go along with the 
threat, in the hope tbat it would 
improve prospects for peace and 
end the siege before tin deadline. 

Peace talks are due to resume in 

j Geneva on Thursday. 

! Greece, which fears attacks 
[ would bring a wider Balkan war. 
j said that it mould not veto a NATO 
i derision but that it opposed strikes 
1 and would make no military sup- 
: port available. 


over 

thrir targets earmarked. 


Can ad a has backed down from .bombas and ground attack »r- 
itt opposition to air strikes. Prime craft are taking turns in pgtrrJlmft 
Minister Jean Chretien said over Bosnia from bares m'itriy. 

Wednesday in the Canadian Parfia- **-- * ‘ 

TwnL He -said he believed air 
strikes would not be needed be- 
cause Serbian forces had agreed to 
withdraw their heavy weapons. 

He said Canada had accepted 
the possibility of air strikes to “pro- 
lea the civilian population and not 
see the repetition of the massacre of 
the last weekend.” 

Canada bad opposed NATO air 
strikes became of worry about re- 
taliation against Canadian peace- 
keepers in the former Yugoslavia, 
partictriarty a c onting e nt blocked 
by Serbian forces in the eastern 
Muslim enclave of Srebre n ica. But 
Mr. Chrttim said the situation had 
Progressed with Sob agreement to 
allow the Canadians to leave Sre- 
brenica and be relieved by Dutch 
soldiers. 


About iGQ NATO fighter planes, 


sition to military action 'pit ' 
Wednesday, with PreskkaA Beris 
N. Yeltsin in urgent contact, with 
world leaders, apparently m a bid 
to avert strikes. -■ 

Before the meeting in Brnssds. 
started. Mr. Warner, the NATO 
secretaiy^eoerak called for action 
“We nave, had . ennmrf i -w dads,” 
he said. ” 

■ Looking mum after anotber op- 
eration in ms long battle agrinst 
cancer, Mr. WOmer said be had 
come to the meetin g -' ag ainst the . 
advice of his doctors. 

t Radovan Karadzi^ fte leader of 
the Bosnian Seths; who Ins denied ' 
responsibility for the mortar mas- 
sacre, 1ms said any plane attacking ' 
Serbian forces would be shot down. 

(RatazAfl. 


TRADE: Clinton Wants Commitments From Japan 


Cbo&med bom Page i 
mining Japan to meet targets for 
purchases of foreign goods. 

In a letter to USL economists in 
December. Mr. Hosokawa said 
that Japan would achieve a “highly 
significant* reduction in its trade 
surplus in goods and services, bat 
that its actions most be “volun- 
tary” 

The dispute ova- whether Japan 
I has kept its p romises on trade is 
partly a result of the imprecision of 
[ pas: agreements. 

! “A lot of those agreements were 
really vague. ' said Clyde V.- 
PrestowirzJr„ president of the Eco- 
nomic Strategy Institute in Wash- 
ington and a former U5. trade ne- 
gotiator. “Both sides could 


interpret them as they wanted to. 
The Japanese could* dann with 
some justification that they did just 
what they said they would da" 

A senior Japanese diplomat said 
this week that although voluntary 
lusts — free from any threat of 
UJ. trade sanctions — conceivably 
cotrid be accepted, the mood be- 
tween the two sides' negotiators 
was too soar now to permit pro- 
gress. 

He expressed hope that Mr. 
Clinton and -Mr. Hosokawa would 
be able to improve the chemi 

bat the fear remained that 

United Stares would tan voluntary 
goals into binding coamitQie&ts, 
enforced by trade actions. 

The hard tine on both adfag 


leaves littie room for compromise, 
negotiators agree. 

“it does look like a ooOiaon 
o»ne."said C Fred Bergsteo, <fi- 
rcetor of the Institute for Interna- 
tional Ec onomics 
Th e Clinton adirini nniti m, in 
ppniculia, has bolstered expect*- 
tons among bnsuKis leaders and 
Congress that iiwilliiot bade down 
on. demands fdr ywfir comani- 
roents from J^an co fut ure trade 
progress^ eventf that leads to trade 
sanctions. 


O IOO 1 7538 




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■: T- if\\ L® iff V 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1994 


Page 5 















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Page 6 


T HURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1994 . 

OPINION 


tin 


Herald 


INTERNATIONAL 

v'-VT 7 



tribune 


PI BUSHED WITH THE NEW TURK TIMES A >11 THE WttHTOiflW POST 


The Rest Is Up to Beijing 


The State Department's annual review of 
human rights paints a grim picture of China's 
police state, documenting torture, forced con- 
fessions and long imprisonment for ideologi- 
cal "crimes." The White House must decide 
this spring on China's continued access to low 
American tariffs; the report is a reminder of 
how far Beijing still has to go to meet the 
conditions that President Bill Clinton set 
down in an executive order last May. 

That order set only two firm conditions; 
that China ea.se restrictions on emigration 
and comply with us own promises to stop 
exporting goods made by enslaved prisoners. 
It also calied on Beijing to demonstrate sig- 
nificant progress on releasing political pris- 
oners. ending forced abortion and steriliza- 
tion. easing religious persecution, allowing 
medical treatment Tor prisoners, protecting 
Tibet's cultural heritage and stopping the 
jamming of Voice of .America broadcasts. 

For the administration, and for most human 
right:, activists, renewal of trade privileges is the 
goal, hut not ir Beijing makes a mockery of 
reasonable ILS. conditions. The administra- 
tion's final derision will most likely hinge on 
three things; the fate of some 100 political 
prisoners about whom Washington has ex- 
pressed special concern; negotiations for Red 
Cross inspections of Chinese prison camps; 


and China's follow-through on its agreement to 
allow U.S. inspection of sites where the produc- 
tion of slave labor exports has been all e ged 

Beijing has made some premising human 
rights gestures in the early weeks of this year, 
so it is reasonable to hope that renewal will be 
possible, although probably some conditions 
will still need to be attached. 

Some argue — correctly — that China's 
continued economic contact with the West 
has a positive influence on human rights, and 
that to end China's trade privileges would 
isolate further those Chinese who are strug- 
gling for democracy. However, the United 
States now buys one-third or China's exports 
and provides Beijing with its only significant 
hard currency. To lose trade privileges would 
be a severe blow for Beijing; America has a lot 
more leverage over China than it ever exercised 
in the years of George Bush's presidency. 

The challenge for President Clinton is to 
balance America's humane values with legiti- 
mate U.S. business and strategic interests, in- 
cluding the need for Chinese cooperation in 
discouraging North Korea from developing nu- 
clear weapons. The best way to achieve that 
balance is to keep human rights demands mod- 
est and achievable. Mr. Clinton's 1993 execu- 
tive order did thaL The rest is up to Beijing. 

— THE SEW YORK TIMES. 


Hear the Budget Noises 


ft is a ritual, and not an altogether un- 
healthy one. that as soon as a president’s 
budget lands, the opposition party takes off 
on the attack. Democrats usually attack Re- 
publican presidents for going after worthy 
domestic programs. Republicans attack Dem- 
ocratic presidents for spending too much alto- 
gether. except perhaps on defense. The rules 
generally held this week, with Republicans 
complaining that President Bill Clinton was 
cutting the deficit too little and defense too 
much. Bui before the partisan battle begins in 
earnest, it is worth examining some of the 
choices that Mr. Clinton bas actually made. 
Whatever else is true of his new budget, it 
clearly reflects the constraints of the two big 
deficit reduction deals of recent years, one 
passed under George Bush in 1990, the other 
pushed by Mr. Clinton last year. Both deals 
forced a pro-government president to take 
some major whacks at government. 

For example. Mr. Clinton's budget for 
housing includes a big increase in funding for 
programs for the homeless — from $823 mil- 
lion in 1994 to S 1.63 billion for 1995. But to 
pay for this he has sharply cut spending on 
public housing. 

In the Health and Human Services budget, 
Mr. Clinton includes a major increase in fi- 
n an ring for Head Start along with increases 
for immunization and drug treatment pro- 
grams and for research at the National Insti- 
tutes of Health. But he slashes die feel assis- 
tance program for low-income people by 
more man's) billion. 


In the Agriculture Department total out- 
lays are down by $4.6 billion, mosdy because 
of cuts in price support programs for farmers. 
But smaller shifts within the department are 
also revealing. Food stamp spending is cut by 
about $365 million, but spending on the 
Women, Infants and Children program is up 
by almost exactly the same amount. 

Mr. Clinton’s choices have already been 
challenged. Interestingly, many of the chal- 
lenges have come from Democrats and con- 
stituencies friendly to the president 

Senate Majority Leader George Mitchell, a 
Clinton loyalist is unhappy with the fuel 
assistance oils. Representative Ron DeUunis, 
the California Democrat who chairs the 
Armed Services Committee, thinks Mr. Clin- 
ton has given too much to the Pentagon. Mr. 
Clinton has long been dose to the Children’s 
Defense Fund, but Sharon Daly, the group’s 
government affairs director, criticized him for 
"robbing Peter to pay Paul” in making some 
of his domestic cuts. 

The fact that the presdent is bring criticized 
by both Democrats and Republicans does not 
prove that he has achieved some golden mean 
of moderation. But the difficult choices reflect- 
ed in his budget do demonstrate that over a 
period of years, in a messy and often conten- 
tious way. Congress has put some real and 
rather tough limitations on federal spending. 
The deficit is a long way from zero, but for 
now, at least, the numbers —and the political 
pressures — are moving in the right direction. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Wish the New Boy Well 


"When was the lost time you saw Michael 
Jordan nervous?" the Chicago White Sox gen- 
eral manager Ron Schueler asked on Monday. 
Amid the astonishment and occasionally 
churlish speculation over Mr. Jordan’s deri- 
sion to play professional baseball, the ques- 
tion is a good one to keep in mind. 

Some see the whole thing as a grab for more 
money by Mr. Jordan and by the While Sox 
owner Jerry Retnsdorf. who now has an in- 
vtant gate attraction in Nashville, where Mr. 
Jordan sill start learning his new trade. Oth- 
ers asked shy Mr. Reimdorf gave this man a 
cranes over others who have paid more dues 
and %hc wn m^re promise. The answer is that 
Michael Jordan is a phenomenal talent, and it 
:s a iVrinaiir.g experiment — as if Albert 
Einsieir. had decided to give up physics to try 


finding a cure Tor cancer. Somebody, some- 
where. would have given him a research grant 
Mr. Jordan will keep his lucrative endorse- 
ments whether he plays baseball or not He is 
hardly in need of money or fame, although 
cynics may see this as a publicity buildup for a 
return to basketball. Fans, incurable roman- 
tics, will prefer to believe that what he really 
needed — as he said when he retired from 
basketball — was a challenge. Something to 
gel nervous abouL It’s a long shot; as more 
than one major league player pointed out he 
has not vet faced a good curve baU. If he 
wants a challenge, that ought to do it. StilL we 
wish him well. In basketball. Michael Jordan 
long ago left behind the fear of failure and the 
opportunity to grow. Now he has both. 

— THE SEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Comment 


Why the Gun to Japan's Head? 

La;: July. B;L : Gmion :aid that “there is no 
rilaieral relationship than our 
reiaiir - ,h:p w :h Japan.” Indeed, the American 
president this was a fact that “bears re- 
pealLtz." V.c -hare that view. .And we think 
Prime \!;rj>*.er Morihiro Hcsokawa might find 
:t bears rvpiatir.z when he sits down with the 
preveer.: :r 'A .Jiurztor: to find out what the 
heck America think' it is doing with its .Asia 
Tciiev Washington'' policy seems curious!} 
deigned ■.<< aiienjie long-lime friends while 
Irttini 1 asv.wsd enemies off the book. 

American bodzennglof Japan! comes just as 
inersaunp ir.raiizaiion is impressing upon Ja- 
that' i": i*- rv.> longer passible to run a 
R .ihinsor. Crusoe economy and remain com- 
retiti -e. in the mid's «T a resolution — no less 
than the bust-up cf Japan Inc — Mr. Clinton 
his .--d r. giv*: the Japanese the moral 
h -ah around -v. free trade. 

"fr. aitno;: every comer r.f .Asia, the adminis- 
tration's poi’cics hj-.s met with bafflement. [Or. 
China-, what A>::t would like to see is a policy 
•Vii ni»ntl-. increases the pressure for libcraiiza* 
lir,-, 'ihrouah trade tmd ir.’.esuncnu Instead. 


Mickey Kamor daw* back China's textile quo- 
tas and gloats 3 bout imposing a new one on 
silk. The While house has done wfcal no one in 
19^9 would nave thought possible; created 
sympathy for Beijing. 

Ours is not an argument against .Amen can 
leadership; jus: the opposite. But America will 
better serve its own interests and goals if it 
draws them far more narrowly and leads by 
example, especially on trade liberakzation. 

— For Eastern Econonac RevieKtHeng Kony. 

For years. America has been urging Japan to 
loosen the grip of powerful bureaucrats on 
industry . stimulate domestic consumer demand 
and cut red tape — all measures designed to 
spur Japanese to buy mote foreign goods. Ja- 
pan now has a prime minister. Morihiro Ho- 
sokawa. who want to do all three. So what 
does Washington do? Put a gun to his bead and 
cock the hammer. Washington calls [its ap- 
proach! "voluntary import expansion." What it 
amounts to is an aSfvma ti vc-oclira program 
for L'5. industry. If you cannot win Japanese 
consumer- through honest competiiition. set 
up quotas that force them to buy Araencaa. 

— 77if Clone and Moil tTmruo). 



International Herala Tnbune 

ESTABLISHED Ito? 

K ATHARJNE GRAHAM. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 
C“Chs:rmtr: 

RICHARD Mt CLEAN. PubinterS Ourf Ewici.r 
JOHN VINOCUR. Etfoer.ccJLv* i ViceP* z&n 

• WALTS'. WELLS.. 1 Unn LL* • SAMUEL A3T. KATHERINE KNGRRmJ 
CHARLES '-flTCHEH fORE Ikpur. ££a r- CARL GEWTRTZ. v 

• H05ERT j r.C>‘- AHUE. EJi/ir jJy ctim-rui Fu.ys •JONATHAN G AGE. 3uszru~ and Finance Edfr'r 

• RENE BONDV. Diyur. PaNe&er* J AMES McLEOD. Aj-.trz.xnr Dtrmnr 

• jl.'ANTTA I. CASPAKL Insviustml Lnefryitk* e Dmc nr» ROBERT FAKKE. OmJtSknDuraor. Europe 
[kn-xeurtte la FabHeaxn : Rtehard D Surmn: 



Nations Can Resolve to Act, but Europe Isn’t a Nation 


P ARIS —The tragedy of Bosnia has de- 
monstrated the bankruptcy of the idea of 
collective international responsibility and ac- 
tion. The belief that it is up to "the inter- 
national community" to do something in Yu- 
goslavia has proved the derisive obstacle to 
anything senous being done. Only nations 
act That is what has been demonstrated. 

Serbia, in 1991 a nation but not yet a state, 
launched this war. The Croatian nation, 

'Europe’wiUhavean 
international role when the 
individual nations of Europe 
resume the burden of judging 
and acting on their own, 

which had contributed to provoking the war, 
retaliated against the Serbs. Subsequently a' 
Bosnian nation, which before did not really 
exist, was created by the war and now’ has 
begun to impose its will upon events, to the 
dismay of Sorbs and Croats. 

The international community — in all of its 
arises: United Nations, European Union, 
Conference on Security and Cooperation in 
Europe. NATO — has proved incapable of an 
effective response because it is internally di- 
vided. There is no international community 
with a coherent common view of Yugoslavia 
or a capacity for common action. 

The idea that there is such a community 
derives from the conviction thaL there ought 


By William Pfaff 

to be one. The lethal rivalries or nationalism 
and national self-aggrandizement during the 
last two centuries have inspired two attempts 
to establish international quasi-governments, 
or agencies of international order: the League 
of Nations and the United Nations. 

Both were founded on the false notion that 
a parliament of the world’s governments re- 
presents the will of the world’s peoples. Those 
peoples have themselves been se ntimen tally - 
thought to possess common interests that 
outweigh their national differences, and to be 
fundamentally disposed — as peoples, not 
nations — toward peace and altruism. Evi- 
dence to the contrary, as in Yugoslavia, has 
generally tended to be disregarded. 

The United Natioos indudes a limited 
number of democratic nations, and these are 
only erratically devoted to justice and a better 
life for others rhan themselves. The UN mem- 
bership otherwise is composed of self -aggran- 
dizing authoritarian governments of various 
hues, or frankly despotic ones. 

Nations usually concern themselves with the. 
fortunes of others only when it suits their own 
interests. There are exceptions, but not many. 
Altruism exists but is rardy disinterested. The 
international interventions of the United 
States government, from World War I to the 
Gulf War, have invariably been produced by 
a theory or ideological conviction that Ameri- 
can interests ultimately were implicated. 

The permanent members of the Security 
Council — only three of than confirmed 
democracies — deride what the United Na- 


tions does. This, in practice, has meant that in 
the absence of the Soviet veto (he United 
Nations has mostly done what the United 
States has wanted, from the 1950 intervention 
in Korea to the 1991 intervention ru Iraq. 

Only nations are responsible actors. Even 
wizen they ad collectively it is allied action, 
not ooninrunity action.-Tocre is a fundamen- 
tal difference. Nations are responsible, com- 
munities are not. Alliances add up to more 
than their individual members became all 
have agreed on what to do. Communities add 
up to less. , because their members do not 
necessarily agree, yet everyone has had to be 
brought along for the community to act at aH 

The 12 conn hies of the E u rope an Union 
have been unable to agree on a common 
program of actum and risk with respect to 
Yugoslavia because they have never readied a 
common agreement on bow their interests are 
at stake. Even the Earopeandemand that 
Sarajevo’s siege be lifted, issued after Meal- 
day's meeting of foreign nrinistcra in Brussels, 
had to be equivocal in order to reconcile the 
new belligerence of France and Belgium with 
Greece’s reluctance to endorse any ultimatum 
to the Serbs. The European 12, pins the Unit- 
ed States, simply do not see the Yugoslav 
issues in the same way. Hence they have been 
incapable of collective action. 

The 12 countries have set for themselves 
the goal of a common foreign policy. The 
fundamental lack of logic of this has once 
again been shown in the Yugoslav crisis. 

A European Union in econ omi c and social 
mactera is-passible because its member; have 
common economic and soda! interests, as 
well as a consciousness of themselves as a 


historical and cultural cwimrani^.^ihe 

T^S^fSuiSStSSSiS 

of a world 


ooflectire security agaulst ^to^al aggres- 


aon, an interest in peace, a coMcraW 
the values of Western political avjbzatran. 

Thai does not add up to a forognP^-^ 
k iajc .«im wkimd countries nave 



allies following: On Yugoslavia there -has 
been no American leadership, hence no so* 
tion beyond the humflinlarian- 
The lesson of Yugoslavia, coming at acme 

of .qualified American . dis erga g fan e n t from 
Western leadership, is that no mtonatiOBU 
comm unity exists to takeover the responsibil- 
ities the United States is putting as > Eu- 
rope cannot do so because “Europe has no 
foreign policy — — ami cannot have one 
The lesson is that only individual nations 
have foreign policies. “Europe? will have ax 
international role, and the omaaty to deal 

with Yugoslavia and the crises that will fwlow 

the Yugoslav crisis, when the individual na- 
tions m Europe hare resained the burden, of 
j udging and acting on their own. Nations still 
are the only responsible political units. _ 
The demonstration of that fact i* provided 
by the abandoned Bosnian nation, which is 
doing more to save hself. and the values of 
liberal democracy, than either “Europe" or 
the United Statas. or both together. 

International Herald Tribune. ■ 

© Las Angeles Times SymGcate. f. 


A Rescue Plan for Bosnia in Three Words: lift. Arm and Strike 


A rlington. Virginia — To 

. write or to sit in silent tribute 
to the innocent victims of a heinous 
crime in my Sarajevo? 

At least 68 people were killed and 
more than 2D0 badly wounded in the 
marketplace close to the cathedral 
in the heart of old Sarajevo last 
Saturday. Coldheaned murderers 
aimed their deadly 120mm mortar 
shell at the saddest place in the sad- 
dest city in the whole world: at a 
market where there are no goods to 
sell and where there is no money to 
buy. and where desperate people, 
old, women with children, unarmed 
civilians, search for things they 
haven't seen for almost two years. 

It was the single deadliest massa- 
cre among so many committed 
amiinst civilians in the Bosnian capi- 
tal by Serbian forces besieging iL 
CNN’s cameras at the site of the 
crime recorded angry voices yelling 
“Thank you. Mr. Bulros Ghnli. 
thank you. President Clinton.** Of 
course, these people don't blame 
the two leaders for the killing. In 
Sarajevo even children know well 


By Kemal Kurspahie 


who is shooting at them. Confused, 
the media regularly report that 
Muslims accuse Serbs and Serbs 
accuse Muslims, although there is 
not a angle incident to prove the 
perverse idea that Muslims massa- 
cre their own children. 

Those cries represent Sarajevans’ 
shock and disbelief that authorities 
with the power to stop the crimes 
could just stand by. ft is less than 
three weeks since the NATO sum- 
nut in Brussels issued another threat 
that air strikes might be used against 
Serbs if the strangulation of Saraje- 
vo continued or if they did not allow 
opening of the Tuzla airport or re- 
placement of Caaadbn peacekeep- 
ers in besieged Srebrenica. 

i agreed with President Bill Clin- 
ton's warning to NATO leaders not 
to make that threat if they did not 
mean to conduct air strikes. If they 
woe serious in unanimously issuing 
that statement, they bad to act on 
the very day the s ummi t was over. 
That day Serbs shelled Sarajevo. 


massacring another nine civilians. 

There were three other challenges 
to the responsible world leadership. 

Two weeks ago, a shell lolled six 
children sledding near apartment 
buildings in tne working-class 
neighborhood of Alipasino Polje. 

Last Friday, another Serbian shell 
exploded in the neighborhood of 
Dobrinja, which was btrilt as the 
Olympic ViDage for the Winter 
Olympic Games 10 years ago, loll- 
ing eight people, mostly women 
waiting in !»» for humanitarian aid. 

And on Saturday — you aD saw 
what happeoed- 

My dty is living, and dying, under 
a triple death sentence. First, bran 
Serbian gunners aiming at and hit- 
ting civilian neighborhoods, market- 
places. hospitals, helpless citizens. 

Second, from misery. In the midst 
of a second winter of tenor, Sarajevo 
is windowless and without heat, food; 
water, electricity or gas supplies. 

Third, from international indiffer- 
ence. The civilized world just watches 


us being exterminated, shows no will 
to protect us and even, imposes an 
arms embargo that deprives us of the 
right to seif-defense: The em- 
bargo, which prevents the victim 

from AefmA mg hirrv&iF is the only 

international resolution actually be- 

mg im p l BTiainait in B twiiii 

What is happening is not dvfi 
war. ti is mote a war against civiliza- 
tion: a gains t fiviqg together in a 
multiethnic. mohMeligjous, multi- 
cultural society of tolerance. Besieg- 
ing and massacring Sarajevo, Rado- 
van Karadzic's Serbs are killing that 

OsJobcx§ mje^my Sertriandq^ 
who is replacing me while 1 am in 
the United States, our Serbian re- 
porters and oohmmisls — would 
nave no problem identifying who are 
the bad ones and who thegood ones. 

For the civilized wodd, it is Tong 
since time to stop the killing of Bos- 
nia and her people. 

Inac tion amounts to complicity 
m & crime. It encourages fascism to 
over through the Balkans and 
making “national security 


ui AUUU 

spill ovei 
Europe, 


interests" much harder to defend 
than now. What could be done? 

: Three things in just three words: 
tift, ann and strike. . - 
Tif t the nrrws emh argo-against the 
country under aggression to gi veil a 
fair chance for self-defense. 

Ann Bosnians who are exposed to 
terror by the huge arsenals of the 
Yugoslav army’s tea’ 

Strike from the air tizose ; 
positions from which Sarajevo ; 
other Bosnian dries have been, ter- 
rorized for almost two years now. 
That would help create a balance 
of forces and a more favorable at-, 
mosphere for real peace negotia- 
tions. The current blackmail against 
Bosnia to accept realities created by. 
force promises only to divide the 
country along ethnic tines and. to 
invite new years of ethnic tensions, 
violence ana even more “deansug." 

The writer is editor in chief of the 
doily Ostibodjejge, which hos pob- 
tished throughout the siege of Saraje- 
vo. He contributed this comment tc 
The Washington PceL ■ 


Japan: 



T OKYO — For nearly four de- 
cades. the relationship between 
Japan and the United States stood as 
a great success story. In a remarkably 
brief lime, the two countries passed 
from bitter conflict to dose alliance. 
The rise of a common adversary, the 
former Soviet Union, was a key fac- 
tor. But the relationship came to be 
much more than a security alliance. 
The two nations developed an unpre- 
cedented degree of economic interde- 
pendence, or great benefit to both. 

And despite deep differences of 
culture and history, the two countries 
have come to share a set of political 
values about bow nations should be- 
have toward each other and how gov- 
ernments should behave toward the 
people they govern. 

Why. that, is the relationship now 
so charged with political tension, eco- 
nomic friction and. if opinion polls 
arc accurate, growing mutual disen- 
chantment among both publics? 

Why. on the eve of Fndav’s meet- 
ing in Washington between President 
Bill Clmton and Prime Minister Mor- 
ihiro Hosokawa. are Americans omi- 
nously saying that no deal is better 
than a bad «feiL while Japanese warn 
that this time "no" really means 
“co"7 Deadlines loom. Catenet offi- 
cers have been on urgent missions 
back and forth across the Pacific. 

A partial explanation lies in the 


By Stephen Bosworth 


changed global environment. The 
end of the Cold War removed some 
of the old glue of the alliance. Japan's 
economic rise, particularly within 
Asia, altered the architecture of the 
relationship. No longer so dependent 
on the American security shield, and 
eager to play a larger political role in 
Asia. Japan has begun to define its 
interests and set its policies with less 
regard to the United States. 

Tokyo's flirtation with member- 
ship in the Malaysian-sponsored East 
Asian Economic Caucus. Trom which 
the United States would be excluded, 
and its coolness to American enthusi- 
asm for the Asia-Pacific Economic 
Cooperation forum are two examples 
of Japan's willingness to pursue a 
course apart from, even opposed to. 
that Of the United States. 

But more fundamentally, the pro- 
blems in the U.S.-Japonese relation- 
ship result from internal conditions 
in the two countries. The United 
States has become preoccupied with 
its domestic condition. The economy 
is performing better tiun in recent 

years, but the public mood remains 
sour. In the last 20 years Americans 
have suffered dedining real wages, 
stagnant family incomes, rising crime 
and growing anxiety about economic 
and personal security. 


Still Waiting for Recovery 


By Miron Mushkat 

H ONG KONG — Wailing for a 
Japanese recover.- has peer, a 
long anc frustrating experience. Sev- 
eral - Japan watchers, undaunted, in- 
sist that there is light a: the end of the 
tunnel. They say the household sector 
is poised to return to the marketplace 
and dri'e the economy forward 
True there are two reasons for 
cautious optimism about Japanese 
private consumption. Households are 
not heavily burdened bv debt, and 
disinflation is L'ltsg real persona] 
disposable income. 

Unfortunately, there are counter- 
vailing forces. Wages are static, bo- 
nuses are shrinking, overtime is 
plummeting, asset prices are declin- 
ing and imeraplcyrrect is nsinz. And 
with uncertainly' about ;cb scurvy 
and income levels gr .-wLiz. the pic- 
ture is far front reassuring." 

Another restraining ctfluencr is 
the demand for durable gcods. Most 
big items purchased duric| the boom 
— color television sets, ref tors, 
washing machines — ;os; aVut 1U 
years, so demand for such items will 
revive very sfowiy. Car, have a 
shorter We* but are very; expensive. 

Consumer durables Like air condi- 
tioners and microwave ovens, owned 
by a smaller percentage of the popu- 
lation. may benefit from expanding 
coverage, hut that wiii net aioite fuel 
a solid economic recover.. 

So i: rs unrealistic topb high hopes 
on the anticipated cu: :s the individ- 
ual income tax rate, even if it materi- 
alizes on the scale envisioned. Viewed 
increasing]-, as a panacea fer Japan’s 
economic ills, it may produce virtual- 


ly no tangible benefits because, in 
part, or the sharp deterioration in 
government finances. 

Many households presumably wifi 
realize the inevitability of a future 
increase in taxes, and will raise their 
savings by an amount dose to the 
current tax reduction. This would 
leave private consumption levels 
largely unchanged. 

The preoccupation with taxes has 
diverted attention from other serious 
problems, particularly those plaguing 
the banking and property sectors. 
They should loom larger on the agen- 
da of the economic crisis marusonem 
team in Tokyo. While these problems 
may not lead themselves to simple 
Keynesian remedies, experience sug- 
gests that they respond to unconven- 
tional fains of “policy therapy. 

The single-minded pursuit of a fis- 
cal cure may have prevented the 
monetary engine from shifting into 
higher gear. Interest rates in Japan, if 
adjusted for inflationary expecta- 
tions. are too high for this stage of the 
business cycle. An even more accom- 
modating monetary policy is needed. 

The writer, rhef eemmast for Asia 
a Lehman Brothers in Hong Kong 
contributed this comment to ike Inxr. 
national Herald Tnbune. 


Correction 

Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin of 
Israel, correctly named in a fust and 
second reference, was misnamed in 
subsequent references in “At Best a 
Very Qualified Optimism.*’ on this 
page on Tuesday. 


Politically, the internationalist co^ 
all Cion chat sustained American for- 
eign policy through World War II 
and the Cold War has disintegrated, 
and the United States has yet to find 
a fresh consensus about its role and 
responsibilities in the world. Presi- 
dent Clinton is an outward-looking 
leader, at least on international eco- 
nomic issues that are linked to his 
domestic goals. But be is heavily fo- 
cused on a domestic agenda and de- 
pendent on inward-looking political 
constituencies. 

The changes in Japan are equally 
profound. The economy is mired in 
the most severe recession since 1949. 
There is a growing recognition that 
the problems are more than just a 
cyclical reaction to the excesses of the 
"bubble economy” of the late 1980s. 

Jn a real sense, the crisis is structur- 
al even institutional In its postwar 
drive Tor economic modernization, 
Japan developed an economic system 
biased toward savings, production 
and exports. Consumption was se- 
verely discouraged. For years this 
system served japan well. Two gener- 
ations of Japanese willingly sacri- 
ficed their standard of living in the 
nation's interest 

But Japan is now a mature econo- 
my with a very large role to the inter- 
national economic system. Its well- 
bang is more than ever dependent on 
the global economy, and the perfor- 
mance of the global economy is more 
and more influenced by Japan. 

The Japanese public, meanwhile, 
ha> become much more worldly. As 
they travel more, people ask them- 
selves why. if their country is so 
wealthy, they cannot live better. They 
have begun to realize that the answer 
to that question lies in the systematic 
bios against consumption. 

Since ibe 1980s. Japan has had a 
large imbalance between savings and 
investment. This has increased as 
both consumption and private invest- 
ment declined in the current reces- 
sion. As economists know, an excess 
of savings over investment translates 

into a huge current account surplus, 
in turn producing strong upward 
pressure on the nation's currency. 

In a more flexible economic sys- 
tem. this would have led to increased 
consumption, reducing the overhang 
of savings and moderating the rise of 
the yen. In Japan, however, the bias 
against consumption has thrust a dis- 
proportionate share of the adjust- 
ment burden onto the exchange rale, 
and the rising yen has driven the 
economy down further. 

Japanese Firms have lost their com- 
petitive edge and new face the same 
pressures for restructuring that 
American companies experienced be- 
ginning in the mid-1980s. Unemploy- 
ment has begun to edge upward and 
could rise dramatically, at least by 
Japanese standards, if large corpora- 
tions moke a concerted drivv to re- 
gain competitiveness. 

The cost in lost economic growth 
has been enormous. The cost to the 
United Slates in terms of tost Japa- 
nese demand for American exports 
a also large. 

The political cos! to the U.S. Jap- 
anese relationship is even greater. 


The same regulations, policies, cor- 
porate behavior and public attitudes 
that create a bias against consump- 
tion make Japan far Jess accessible 
to foreign goods and foreign compa- 
nies than is. for example, the United 
States. And therein hes the core of 
the. political problem between the 
two countries. 

As long as Americans wens not so 
concerned about their domestic con- 
ditions and the Japanese economy 
was smaller, the asymmetry of ac- 
cess between the two economies did 
not matter so much. Now it does. 

The tough question is what to do 
about it The Clinton administration 
has pursued essentially the same 
policy on the trade issue as the Rea- 
gan and Bush administrations. This 
policy flows in part from a long- 
standing stnun of legalism in Ameri- 
can foreign policy — a faith that if 
the United States can just persuade 
other countries to sign the right con- 
tract, its problems will be resolved. 

Thus the Clinton administration 
has concentrated its political ener- 
gies on negotiating a so-called 
framework fora new economic part- 


open runner sectors at the Japanese 
market, including the fixing of 
quantitative guiaeposts against 
which to measure progress. 

The Japanese, who have gained 
much experience in bilateral market- 
opening negotiations with the United 
States in recent years, will probably 
go along with much of a framework 
agreement, as they did with the Struc- 
tural Impediments Initiative of the 
Bosh administration. Thus far, how- 
ever. they have resisted the setting of 

S ititative standards. They Tear 
these would soon become targets 
which. iT not met, would prompt uni- 
lateral U S. trade sanctions, 
la the cod, this disagreement may 
be papered over to avoid an open 
crisis at the Gmtoa-Hosakawa sum- 
mit. Then again it may noL Either 
way, the cost to the overall balance of 


U.S. bflateral interests with Japan in 
toms of political friction and public 
acrimony will be high. ‘ ' 

’ - An American administration can- 
not ignore the issues of access to 
Japanese markets. But Washington 
should understand that while it can 
nudge the Japanese, the serums struc- 
tural changes needed to solve the 
problem must come Grom within Ja- 
pan. The Japanese must sec a reorien- 
tation of the economic system as be- 
ing in their own interest, not just a 
gesture of political accommodation 1 
with the United States. • 

The shift in economic priorities wfll 
require dramatic change in 
politics: Fortunately, - that 
now seems to be under way. . 

The postwar political structures 
are collapsing. After 38 years in cra- 
trtd of the Japanese government, the 
liberal Democratic Party suddenly 
finds itself in the opposition. The 
Socialists, long the predictable jop- 
po si tion, find themselves, rather un- 
comfortably, in the governing coali- 
tion. Japan's huge urban . middle 
class is beginning to assert itself po- 
litically, and a new generation of 

to vie for support from 'that utitfdfe 
class with cafls for dean government 
and economic deregulation for the 
benefit of consumers^. 

Political reform may not come 
quickly in Ja pan although, the pace 
of change in the last few months has 
been breatht aking . But political re-' 
form is inevitable. With it will come 
econonric cfaange, relief from the bias' 

. against- consumption and. greater 
openness to foreign products^ . In-, 
deed, the desire for economic change 
is much of w hat the pre s s ur e for por 
btical reform is all abouL 


The writer, a former U.S. ambassa- 
dor to the Philippines, is president of 
the U.S.'Japan Foundation, a private 
nonprofit body that sponsors leader- 
ship exchange programs. HeamDib- 
uted this comment to the Lnienunion- 
aT Herald Tribune, 


IN OUR PAGES; 100, 75 AND 50 VEAttS ACO 


1894c Balkan Bandage 

PARIS — The storm which recently 
appeared to threaten the peace of 
Europe, in the direction of Montene- 
gro, has passed away —until it forms 
again. It was caused by an attempt on 
the part of the Albanian tribes to 
avenge the death of a number of their 
fellows at the hands of the Montene- 
grins. The Turkish Government re- 
cognized the danger which was immi- 
nent and intervened. The Governor 
of. Scutari sent for the Albanian lead- 
era, and assured them that the Sultan 
would rake up their cause, promising 
that (he Montenegrins would admit 
that they were in the wrong. The 
Albanians consented to wan. 

1919: Prince's Defiance 

LONDON — Cablegrams from New 
York reproduce some interesting 
statements made by the ex-Kroo- 
prinz (ti Germany to a “New York 
World'* correspondent at Wieringen. 
Asked what he thought about die 


possibility of his lying ex tradited 
with the Kaiser, the ex-JCronprinz 
sad: “They’ll never get me, theyTl 
jwver get me — affve. They want my 
head and I know -it . . .-Oaoencesa 
and Uoyd George are looting for 
tome one toput toe whole blame for 
the war on. They’re looking foe sop* 
goats. And they've racked my-fatner 

and mwflt in a. 


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are. 


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and myself to be the 
ceauisablood 

1944: France Is Bombed. 

MfflP ON —[From our New York 
e ™ troa -l tne steady bomb barrage 
along the French invasion coasts ad- 

^toan*^* tn ^ a ^ todfl^rfFbb. 

era striking at railroad yards yd re- 
pair shops at Teignicr. AU the bomb- 
= r f , r ««ned safely. The attack 
the Marauders’ deepest pen»- 
tiatiofi.of toe Continent and ^jpar- 

SJKJPw sur P rise tothe Germans. 

bad b«n allowing Aflkd plan» 
to pound thc coasaJ area with vW 
tyro opposition for the last few weeks. 


Ill 

}$&'■ 

; i$5 v ■ 
:34V*' ■ 

.V*L ^ 


Tve jacked my- father- i* ^ 

be toe goats. Clemen-. 

Itirirsty old man." ' ■ \ ” - 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1994 


Page? 


v % 


OPINION 


■; v. 




Given Good Times, Clinton 
Can Win the Budget Debate 


By E. J„ Dionne 


XKJ ASHINGTON — What a differ- 
VY J?£L* ycar mate ' When Presh 


gel Iasi February, Washington could 
JJe denoL Absent “tougji action” and 

bmer medicine” to blot out the red ink. 

U was said, the coontry faced economic 

tunnod anda rabdBon of the voters, not 

to mention loams, plagues and only 
G( ^J U1CW v ' hai olhci catastrophes. 

When Mr. Clinton presentedhis bud- 
get Monday, there were still some voices 
canaraed about the deficit, but the fe- 
vct had passed. The poQs now show the 
deficit way down the list of problems 

wunnna flu ' 


> wn. uibtuusuurccs rcajjy enangedY 

that its own deficit reduction program 
has done the trick. After afl. a deficit that 
had been nearly $300 bOKoo in 1992 is 
coining down to $176.1 bUHtm the year 
“We have ended drift and broken the 
gridlock of the past,™ Mr. Clinton said in 
a triumphant budget mwaragp 
The Republicans may have inadver- 
tently helped Mr. Clinton make this point 
when they pretended that last year’s defr- 
tit package included big taxes on the 
middle class. It did not — most of the 
taxes were on the well-to-do. But the 
more the Republicans talked about how 
draconian Mr. Clinton’s lax plan was, tbe 
more the country was convinced that the 
president had done something important. 
But the passing of the defititobstsaon 
) has as much to do with the economic 
recovery as with anything Democrats or 
Republicans (fid. As a practical matter, 
the recovery itself brought the deficit 
down by increasing the government's tax 
revenues and decreasing spending, for 
programs that kick in to ease the pain of 
recessions. George Bush's deficiL reduc- 
tion plan appeared to fail because its 
was followed by an economic 
— vn. Tbe Gin ton deficit reduction 
_i lodes better because it was followed 
1 a recovery. Tuning may have been the 


sides, the deficit never mattered to 
people as much as bigger questions, such 

as how the economy was performing and 
bow the government was spending their 
money, when people told pollsters that 
they were worried about the deficit, . 
many figured that high deficits were 
responsible for the ec on om i c duggjA- 
ness of the Budi years. If the economyis 
growing, many people do not care abemt 
deficits, which is why Ronald Reagan 
got away with rolling up such tag ones. 

The deficit was also a' shorthand for 
people’s complaints about how govern- 
ment worked. Seme fiscal conservatives 
would like the government to do less on 
principle, and they would fed that way 
even if there were no deficits. For them, 
“cut the deficit" really meant "cut the 
size of government" Many other Ameri- 
cans had no objection to government on 


principle, but did not thbiir the govern- 
ment was doing anything for them. They 
assumed the government must be wast- 
ing wbar- it was spending. So they, too, 
said, “cut. the deficiL™ 

Ross Perot did weD when he could use 
the deficit to unite these quite different 
groups. Mr. Perot's eclipse began in ear- 
nest after be was pounded by Vice Presi- 
dent Al.Gore in last year's NAFTA 
debate,' but its main any is the declin- 
ing importance of the deficit issue. Thai 

is why Mr. Perot has been scrambling to 
find a new issue. 

Mr. Omtotfs strategy has been lospEl 
the anti-defidt constituency. He will nev- 
er win many voles from the anti-govern- 
ment crowd — they form the bean of the 
Republican Party. But he can win over 
those who want the government to do 
things for them, and to behave more 
efficiently. The healthcare and job train- 
ing components of the Clinton program 
send tbe message that government will 
help tbe middle class. Last year's deficit 
reduction plan (along with welfare re- 
form and “reinventing government”) is 
aimed at convincing doubters that Mr. 

■ Qintan cares about efficiency as much as 
Mr. Perot says be does. 

The Clinton strategy is a lot easier to 
describe than to pull off. For example, 
because tbe ceflingsin last year’s budget 
agreement are tight, Mr. Clinton has to 
persuade Democrats in Congress to-cut 
programs they refused to cut when the 
Republicans held the White House if he 
is to have money for new programs. 

- If Congress overturns Mr. Clinton’s 
spending cuts, many of his education 
and job traisingiscreases will go out the 
window, too. And Republicans whose 
districts benefit from tne programs Mr. 
Clinton is cutting will have the best of 
both worlds: They wifi rafi against Mr. 
Clinton as a "big spender” wide quietly 
wodting with Democrats to beat some of 
the Clinton reductions. 

Mr: Clinton will also get no quarter 
from tbe policy elites who are stiD fixed 
on cuts in Medicare, Medicaid and Social 
Security. There is certainly a need to 

contain these costs, winch means above 
aH containing Ihe costs of health care. Bui 
that issue isnow tied up with tbe Oimon 
health proposal You can count on critics 
of the Clinton plan trying to chang e the 
subject from health reform to govern- 
ment “entitlement” vending by arguing 
that every dime paid in mescal prenti- 
ums under his proposal is really pit of a 
increase in the federal budget. Mr. 
goes from being “heakh reform- 
er" to “big spender." 

Still, if the economy keeps growing, 
Mr. Clinton. tik&Ronald Reagan before 
him, will be able w bury a Tot erf the 
budget and deficit arguments under 
reams of good news. Stare; Americans 
care about the deficit Bui most people 
care a lot more about letting the good 
times roH They’re right . 

. The Washington Posl 

nt . H i - III. ■■ ■ ■ 



r Nonprofit , 9 in Their Case , 
Is Putting It Too Kindly 


By Anita Quindlen 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Why India Needs Kashmir 

India has tbe fifth largest economy in 
the world, according to the Internation- 
al Monetary Fund. And it is the most 
populous secular democracy. Minority 
Muslims. Christians and Sikhs routinely 
have risen to positions as cabinet minis- 
ters, Supreme Court justices, ambassa- 
dors and even captains of the national 
cricket tennis ana field hockey teams. 

Suppose, for argument's sake, that 
one day Kashmir disappeared from the 
Indian union because it is a Muslim- 
majority province: The hitherto unwa- 
vering comnritmeDl of India's 600 mil- 
lion Hindus to secularism could receive 
a rude shock, and is Muslims would 
lose their privileged positions. That is 
why India must never give up Kashmir. 

Tbe United States, as the world's po- 
liceman, could play a primordial role here 
by forcing Pakistan to stop harboring, 
training and arming extremists — Kash- 
miris and foreigners — and allowing 
them to infiltrate into Kashmir. Thai in 
turn would allow India to maintain peace 
and hold elections in the province after 
giving it a large degree of autonomy. 

At the same time, it would be a mis- 
calculation to expect the largest democ- 
racy to surrender its nuclear and missile 
option. In 1962, when India was caught 
unprepared and its northern borders 
were overrun by Chinese forces, nobody 
went to its rescue. 

What if Communist extremists came 
to power wain in China and Islamic 
fundamentalists got the upper hand in 
Pakistan, Afghanistan, Tajiks tan and 
the Middle East, and all of them joined 
faces to threaten India's security? 

Many Indians see such a scenario as 


more credible than that of America and 
Britain being attacked by an unidenti- 
fied enemy, which is the raison d’dtre for 
their nuclear and missile arsenals. 

M. VASUDEVAN. 

Cannes. 


An Apocalyptic View 

In his column of Jan. 26 (“Rabin and 
Sharon: Disagreeing on Terrorism. Space 
and Time'’). A M. Rosenthal gives Ariel 
Sharon an opportunity to propagate his 
apocalyptic views, echoing the Likud 
propaganda line that “almost half of 
Israel did back Likud." 

Tbe fact is that in the June 1992 
elections, Likud was reduced from 47 
members in the 120-member Knesset to 
32, just over one-fourth. It is true that 
two other extreme rightist parties won 
seats, but Likud as a party has no claim 
to anything like “half of Israel." 

Tbe proof of that statement could 
have been noted when, after the Israd- 
PLO agreement was signed last Septem- 
ber in Washington, more than 60 per- 
cent of Israelis polled said that they 
favored the agreement. 

UDI SEIDNER. 

Tel Aviv. 

China and Women's Rights 

Regarding " Human-Rights Report's 
New. Grim Focus” f Feb. 4): 

The U.’S. State Department's annual 
human rights report is correct to men- 
tion China as a primary offender in the 
abuse of women s rights. 


This is why il is all the more surprising 
that the United Nations is planning to 
hold its fourth World Conference on 
Women in Beijing. 

Many human rights organizations 
plan to boycott this conference, because 
there will be no chance Tor free debate of 
the vile abuse of women in the host 
country. The United Nations still has a 
chance to reverse this mistaken decision. 

CAROLINE WOOD. 

Frankfurt. 


daring at the Continent 

Bravo to Roy Denman for his arti- 
cle on the thoroughly destructive atti- 
tude of the British media to all things 
Continental (“Read All About It — 
Good Old Brits vs. the Wicked Conti- 
nent, “ Opinion, Feb. 7). 

The pernicious propaganda cam- 
paign against the European Union, 
waged in recent years by both the 
press and senior members of the Brit- 
ish political establishment, has preju- 
diced, beyond belief, the attitude of 
the average Briton toward Europe. 

This animosity, now deeply rooted, 
is certainly not in Britain’s interest. 
The denigration of all things European 
has been carried out so crudely that it 
has deeply offended and alienated a 
great many people. 

And it has brought into question, 
both in Europe and now by ail accounts 
in tbe United States, the usefulness of 
any British contribution to debates 
about European affairs. 

ANTHONY J. HARRISON. 

Nice. 


N EW YORK — Can’t beat the mail 
in this line of work: 20 pounds of 
documents in a class action suit, a list of 
questions from kids about violent lyrics 
in rap music, holy cards, invective, in- 
sults (sometimes all three from the same 
person), the occasional rebuttal in free 
verse, tire heartfelt stories. 

But even amidst the plaintive, the cu- 
rious and the bizarre, the newsletter of 

MEANWHILE 

the Living Truth Ministries in Austin. 
Texas, stands out. 

The newsletter. Flashpoint, is a kind 
of freewheeling smorgasbord of conspir- 
acy theories, as mesmerizing as a hypno- 
tist’s watch. “What is the shocking truth 
about the unmarked black helicopters 
now being observed in Texas. Idaho. 
California and other locations through- 
out America?” asks a recent issue. 

There is the alleged link between multi- 
national corporations, the Yale secret so- 
ciety Skull and Bones and the “Commu- 
nist butchers in Vietnam." There is tbe 
real story behind Attorney General Janet 
Reno: “An oddball radical, she owns 35 
pet peacocks, all named Horace!" 

The current Flashpoint flashpoint is, 
naturally. Hillary Rodham Clinton. 
Along with tbe usual strong woman/evil 
witch material. Texe Mans, a former air 
force officer and former faculty member 
at the University of Texas who runs the 
ministry, calls Mrs. Clinton a “doctri- 
naire Marxist" who has recruited “other 
America-hating subversives for key ad- 
ministration posts" and who communes 
n7tb the spirit of Eleanor Roosevelt. 

Once you get past the fact that Mr. 
Marrs cannot tell the difference between 
a liberal and a Marxist — and between 
admiration for and communicating with 
the dead — you have to come to one 
conclusion. America is some great nation, 
when such nonsense can come under the 
rubric or the free exchange of ideas. 

Except that in this case it is not free at 
alL You pay. In the comer of each of the 
25.000 issues of Flashpoint that go out 
each month is a little legend identifying 
Living Truth Ministries as a “nonprofit 
org." According to Postal Service ana- 
lysts. postage for nonprofit organiza- 
tions was subsidized at a cost to the 
taxpayer of more than $500 million last 
year. “Obviously." says a spokesman 
about the price of a stamp, “this hastens 
rate increases." 

What a peculiarly American scenario. 
Through the simple expedient of filling 
out Postal Form 3624. attaching a feder- 
al tax form and a financial statement, 
thousands of organizations have their 
postage underwritten by the govern- 
ment, some of them organizations that 
use their mailings to attack federal 
handouts and government spending. 

There are probably pragmatists who 
would argue that aO that underwriting 
balances out. and that much of it goes to 


groups as universally beloved as the 
March of Dimes and the American Can- 
cer Society. But it drives me wild lo know 
that even a single cent of my money goes 
to pay for the mailings of the National 
Rifle Association and Operation Rescue, 
and that money they save on postage 
helps them support gun-friendly candi- 
dates and abortion clinic blockades. Just 
as it would drive others nuts to know that 
they help underwrite literature sent out 
by Planned Parenthood and the National 
Abortion Rights Action League. 

U is hard lo figure out the public good 
involved in having government subsidize 
Flashpoint, except to feed the fantasies of 
those who believe in the “Kissinger- 
Rcckefefler cabal" and to provide a few 
laughs Tor those who do noL While the 
prepster membership of Yale's Skull and 
Bones had led some to hypothesize that 
meetings are largely devoted to arguing 
about whether squash is manlier than 
tennis, Flashpoint concludes that Bones- 
men are “occultists” in “America's most 
diabolical secret society." 

As the arguments about political cor- 
rectness linger on like a very bad cold, it 
is worth remembering that postal cor- 
rectness, at least, is not a problem. Not 
when Me Mans is in constant, govern- 
ment-subsidized communication with 
those who believe Donna Shalala. Ma- 
deleine AJbright and the other women of 
the Clinton administration are part of a 
“longstanding, serpentine network of in- 
ternational revolutionaries.” 

It is a great big open-minded nation 
that can sustain and even encourage this 
sort of thing I just wish my stamps were 
going to cure malignancy, not create it. 

The New York Times. 


Hatred, Subjectively 

N EWSPAPERS constitutionally fa- 
vor free speech. And the foundation 
of a free press is at least partly its role as a 
forum for ideas — maybe especially for 
ideas that are not popular. But newspa- 
pers do not want to give aid and comfort 
to the horrid words that can result from 
free speech. They do not want to imply 
that freedom of speech ends when some 
journalists find the message offensive. 

The newspaper’s typical solution is to 
base coverage on the controversy that 
swells up around hateful remarks or 
acts. But newspapers don't have to see 
hate as the equivalent of a controversial' 
local government proposal. The story of 
hateful speech is not a debate with two 
potentially defensible sides. 

I would propose that the newspaper is 
excused from depicting objectively those 
ideas that violate, or encourage violating, 
the rules that govern how we live togeth- 
er: We agree that it is wrong to kilL to lie 
or Cheat. We keep promises, value justice 
and see people as individuals who are 
owed dignity, respect and benevolence. 
—Joanne Byrd. The Washington Post. 


BOOKS 


BITTER WINDS: 

A Memoir of My Years In 
China's Gulag ' 

By Harry Wu and Carolyn Wa-. 
keman. 290 pages. $22.95. Wi- 
ley. 

Reviewed by 
Andrew J. Nathan 

H ARRY wu is man with a 
missan to expose China's 
system of labor-reform camps. The . 
camps house an unknown number 
of prisoners, ranging from convict- 
ed criminals to pofitkal and reli- 
gious offenders committed without 
benefit of trial In the Mao years, 
they also confined people whose 

lineal than “right- 

ists," like Wn. 

In an earlier boot “Laogai: Tire 
Chinese Gulag" ( taogai is the Chi- 
nese term for labor reform), Wn 
desorbed tbe catrp 'sysiem. Al- 
though Chiha has jails, most pris- 
oners are held in this complex of 
farms, mines and factories where 
labor supposedly reforms the pris- 
oners even as it helps China’s pro- 
ductivity. 

Export of labor-camp products 
to the United. States became an 
issue a few years ago, ihanksm part 
to Wu's publicity efforts, congres- 
sional testimony and repeals on 
“60 Minutes." China signed an 
agreement in 1992 to cease such 


WHAT THEY'RE READING 


• Miguel A. Torres, the head of 
the Bodegas Miguel Torres in Span, 
just finished reading the Spanish 
translation of “ From the Tablets of 
Sumer” by Samuel Noah Kramer. 

“My interest in ancient civiliza- 
tions increases through tbe years 
and Srimer, the most ancient of aH 
dv2izatians,is described marvdous- 
| ft in tirisbpok. Among other things, 
J I was very interested to find refer- 
ences to cultivating vines and mak- 
ing wine." {At Goodman, IHT) 



exports, but Asia Watch recently 
produced evidence that they have 
not honored the commitment. 

- Here Wu supplements the objec- 
tive detail of his first bode wiLh the 
story of his own 19ryear labor 
camp experience from 1960 to: 
1979. It is a h umiliating tale of 

- rain, hunger and de moral iz a tion. 
Wu tells it ably with .the aid of 
Carolyn Wakeraan, who also co- 
authored "To the Storm: The Od- 
yssey of a Revolutionary Chinese 
Woman." 

There have been many memoirs 
about the suffering of the Chinese 
under Mao, but none about life in 
camp. ■ 

In many ways life inside resem- 
bled Hfe outside. There are the; 
«tng themes of poverty,, arbitrary 
power, hysterical political confor- 
mity and persecution of one anoth- 
er by the oppressed. 


But life in the camps was worse. 
Wu devotes a large pan of (he 
book to the famine years of 1959- 
1962, when he nearly died of hun- 

r . Many of his comrades actual- 
did — one because his body 
couldn’t cope when he bolted 
down two forbidden com muffins. 
Wu learned to eat whatever ani- 
mal life he could find, to find grain 
in rat holes and to steal from 
weaker prisoners. 

In contrast to practices in Soviet 
and Nazi camps, Chinese guards 
were brutal out rarely sadistic. 
Hungry and cold themselves, the 
guards in Wu’s account seem disci- 
plined and role-bound and occa- 
sionally committed acts of decency. 

Bui the normal camp regimen 
was harsh. In the book’s most har- 
rowing passage, Wu describes a 
week. he spent in solitary confine- 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscott 

T he* BURGAY International 
Challenge Match, play*? 
December in Manhattan, provided 
one deal that challenged the com- 
mentators and Vugraph spectators. 
Looking at the fonr hands shown m 

the diagram, with South facing a 
trump lead in a *ree-spad& con- 
tract, would you choose to ptay or 
defend? 

After the compulsory one no- 
trump opening. North-South 
would have done vcH w defend. 

North, Paul Sotowajv rwpened » 
shown with two clubs. Ttostowrt 
dubs and spades, and prompted 


his partner. Bob Goldman, to issue 
a game invitation with a jonzp to 
three spades, reaching a precarious 
coa tract 

After a trump- lead and low card 
from the dummy, the European 
East,' Soldano DeFalco, had a 
problem. If be made die normal 
play of the nine. South would have 
won with king, crossed to the dub 
ace and raffed a- dub. Then be 
would have -used the. heart jack as 
as entry for another club ruff, and 
played heart winners to discard di- 
amond Iriseirs . from the -.dummy. 
Wea would, ruff the fourth. heart, 
but the dummy , would score two 
more tricks to give’ South nine. 

DeFaleodid better by takingthe 
spade ace, cashing two diamond 
winners to make sure of 'them, and 
tending -the spade jack. Sploway 


woo with the king, led to the queen 
and played a fourth round, going 
down one. . 

. - NORTH 
• 0732 
2 

0 94 

+ AQ74Z 

W E S T EAST (D) 

+ 84 * A J W9 

0 94 3 - OM85 

08953 ’ OAKQ 

*8853 *KJ9 

SOUTH 

*K6S 

S7AXQ78 

OJ1072 

*18 

East and West were vulnerable. 
Tbebiddbu: 

East Sonili West North 

1 NX. Pass Pass '2* 
3* Pass 


meat, lying in a cold, dark coffin- 
sized cell with almost nothing to 
eaL After a few days he began to 
hallucinate. 

As in Chinese civilian life, the 
worst atrocities were committed 
by victims on one another. The 
genius of Mao's system was to set 
citizen against citizen in a compe- 
tition for virtue in the eyes of the 
regime. Camp existence was rife 
with jealousy, informers, factions 
and outright fights. During the 
Cultural Revolution prisoners de- 
nounced and beat one another in 
“struggle meetings" similar to 
those conducted around the coun- 
tiy. 

A Kafkaesque feature of tbe 
Chinese camp system is the prac- 
tice of giving indefinite sentences 
for political offenses. The more a 
prisoner insists on his innocence, 
the more recalcitrant he is consid- 
ered to be and the longer he stays 
in prison. 

Perhaps even worse is the prac- 
tice of “resettlement," by which 
prisoners deemed sufficiently re- 
formed are “released" as workers, 
assigned to the same factory or 
farm for which they bad worked as 
slave laborers. An indefinite sen- 
tence becomes a life in limbo — 
the worker is legally free but un- 
able to move from the camp. Wu 
was reclassified in this way in 
1969, but served another 10 years 
before he could leave the camp 
system and move eventually to 
America. 

Labor did reform Wn. It taught 
him to become ruthlessly amoral, 
to place survival above everything 
fflsf But his fundamental stub- 
bornness and his religious faith sur- 
vived, inspired by sparks of hu- 
manity encountered in a few fellow 
prisoners. Once he was free, he 
round the strength to embark on a 
course of fighting the system from 
abroad. 

Reading Wu’s book helps clarify 
the issue of labor-camp exports, 
recently clouded by the official 
Chinese argument that American 
prisons also produce for tbe mar- 
ketplace and sometimes even for 
export. His account reminds us of 
the moral difference between im- 
prisonment under a system of jus- 
tice and political imprisonment, 
and between normal imprisonment 
and slave labor. 


West led ibe spade four. 


Andrew J. Nathan, director of the 
East Asian Institute at Columbia 
University, wrote this for The Wash- 
ington Posl 


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Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1994 


HEALTH /SCIENCE 


New Prostate Guidelines Why Birds and Beea L T ™' Llk ! ' *"*}?** 


By Warren E Leary 

V«n York Tine* Sen i<e 


W ASHINGTON — Men with enlarged 
prostates should consider many 
treatment other than surgery to re- 
lieve their symptoms, including, in 
some cases, no treatment at all. federal health 
■'fficiafs say. 

New federal guidelines for treating benign en- 
larged prostates say that men with mild-to-moder- 
ate symptoms may want to consider periods of 
doctor-monitored observation, or "watchful wait- 
ing." instead of choosing drug or surgical therapy 

right away. 

Dr. Philip R. Lee. assistant secretary for health 
in the Health and Human Services Department, 
said the guidelines conclude that the ultimate deci- 
sion on treatment For enlarged prostates, which are 
not life-threatening, should be left up to the pa- 
tient. 


Dr. John D. McConnell of the University of 
Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, 
chairman of a 13-member nongovernment panel 
that drafted the guidelines, suid the large regional 
variations in how enlarged pros tales were treated 


indicated that doctors and patients needed therapy 
recommendations. 

Studies and the experience of experts indicate 
that some doctors may be recommending surgery 
to reduce prostate size, or drug therapy, without 
adequately considering the patients’ symptoms 
and how much the condition is interfering with 
their quality of life. Dr. McConnell said. In addi- 
tion. he said, some tests routinely given to men 
who report prostate problems may be unnecessary. 

Doctors should not use kidney X-rays, ultra- 
sound imaging or cystoscopy, in which an endo- 
scope is employed to view the urinary tract, unless 
they suspect an unusual problem, the guidelines 
said. Experts said these commonly used tests often 
do not add much to determining die best treatment 
and cost millions of dollars a year. 

The prostate gland is a walnut-sized gland in tbe 
pelvis that for unknown reasons enlarges in many 
men over 50. This condition, called benign prostat- 
ic hyperplasia, is not related to cancer of the 
prostate, a leading killer of older men. 

Enlarged prostate glands affect an estimated 10 
million .Americans, federal health experts say. and 
are round in varying degrees in 50 percent of men 
over age 60. Those who have a family history of the 
condition and black Americans arc at higher risk. 




... 4-4 ► Lu.-L-t.--4 4 







S Bk antler 

i Male with ttw largest and 

1 mo* «ymmeWealrBC*s<i^«* 

— 1 t«vB the larfleat harems. Elk* mat 

• toss fights may losa.antter 

symmetry — and females.. 



TTl 


t f i P m. ij i 


Risks of Pregnancy Tests 


Possible Causes 
Of Asymmetry 

Influences that mar symmetry 
usually act early In development, 
affecting the individual in the egg 
or womb or in the larval stage. 
Scientists conjecture that the 
ability to develop normally 
despite such stresses could 
have a genetic basis. These 


'"Vl “T f” l 5 I I i 




j It |iciHp cijn*oj rl p| T cl __ 

""trsii ■ r |- 





Bam swallow tall 
Female bam swallows prefer a 
long-4atfed mate wtth a 
symmetrical wishbone pattern at 
feathers the same size and color 
| on both sides of the taE. 


are some likely stress factors: 

• Poor nutrition 


By Esther B. Fein 

X«n- Y.v4 Trues Sertnc 


EW YORK. — Jeannie Evans was pregnant 
Iasi year and had no reason to expect her 
child would be bom with any problems. She 
was 28 years old. and her risk of having a 
baby with a birth defect caused by abnormal chromo- 
'sorries was I in 435 — too low. according io standard 
medical opinion, for her to undergo an amniocentesis 
‘ lest and court an even greater chance that the proce- 
dure might cause a miscarriage. 

But that logic was illogical to Evans, a social worker 
who lives in Manhattan. "I didn't feel the trauma of 
'losing a pregnancy was the same as the trauma of 
-having on abnormal baby." she said. 

-* With the support of her doctors, she had amniocen- 
tesis and joined a rapidly growing number of younger 
women who. health-care professionals say. are ignor- 
ing tbe medical standard that only women over 35 or 
those with a history of genetic abnormalities should 
.risk a miscarriage by having the tesL which detects 
-chromosomal disorders in fetuses. 

•• The rise in use of the test among young women — 
reported in interviews by doctors, genetic counselors 
and insurers across the United Stales — has triggered 
<i heated debate over whether it is a wise use of existing 
^technology or a waste of health-care dollars that are 
sorely needed elsewhere. 

“This issue has all the ethical considerations in 
health-care reform now." said Dr. John Larsen, direc- 
tor of the Wilson Genetics Center at George Washing- 
ton University Medical Center. “It's about the conflu- 
ence of technology and personal choice and social 
responsibility and financial liability. .And the debate 
;wi» only expand as our ability to test for more genetic 
problems expands." 

Many younger women — and indeed many doctors 
— are challenging the notion that the emotional and 
financial costs of having to raise a seriously disable d 
-child are in any way comparable to the costs of losing 
a pregnancy. 

“Even I in 1.500 is not a very comforting risk if 
you're that one." said Evans, whose son. Ryan, is now 
5 months old. ‘i don’t think that I’m equipped to 


handle a baby with a severe disability. As it is there's 
enough stress raising a wonderful healthy child." 

Doctors designated 35 as the benchmark for having 
amniocentesis because at that age the risk of giving 
birth to a baby with such problems — I in 192 — is 
greater than the risk of miscarriage due to the proce- 
dure — 1 in 200. 

But many doctors, genetic counselors, health econo- 
mists and women question that reasoning, saying that 
the evaluation of risk is very' personal and differs from 
woman to woman. 


Unusual temperature conditions 
Pollution 

Increased maternal age 

Radioactivity 

Parasites 

Disease microbes 

Attacks by predators 

Fights with competitors of same species 


•t- 


Scorpion fly 

A mate scorpion tty (above and 
left) with symmetrical wings can 
be detected not only by afgfrt but 
by scent For some resaon, there 
Is an association between whig 
sym me try and h or mone stgnate. 
Even minute differences count 


1/^Ml RotaW/TbeNev Y«i 


A woman in her 40$ with a history of infertility 
might fear a miscarriage more than having an affected 
child, while a woman in her 20$. having a second child, 
might dread more the burden of a severely abnormal 
baby and decide to have an abortion. 

“It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to realize there’s 
no logic in this standard.” said Dr. Keith A. Eddle- 
man. the director of prenatal diagnosis at The New 
York Hospilal-Comell Medical Center, who has seen 
a sharp dedine in the age of women having the tesL 
"They are unequal risks. 

Many young women who had the test and discov- 
ered their babies were normal said they were not sure 
what they would have done if the results had shown an 
abnormality. Most said that their decision to continue 
with the pregnancy or to have an abortion would 
depend upon the severity of the disorder. All said that 
even if they chose to have the baby, they would want 
to be prepared. 

“In my case, there was no way the baby would have 
lived for more than a week." said one 29-year-old 
woman, who had an abortion after discovering through 
an amniocentesis that her fetus was missing most of its 
brain. “It was the worst thing 1 have ever gone through, 
but 1 can't even imagine what it would have been like if I 
hadn’t bad the test and didn't know." 


When Beauty Is More Than Skin Deep 


By Natalie Angier 

VfK- >•¥<• Times Service 


“If we are ever going to get costs under control. »e 
ore going io have to make some hard choices, like 
limiting who is covered for this lesL" said Alain Ento- 
vcn. a health economist at Stanford University. "We 
must not go on acting as if such thing are free. We are 
diverting money from programs that are important to 
the life, health and weU-being of people." 


I EW YORK — Beauty is only skin 
deep. How sweet that old chestnut 
is. equally comforting to the un- 
beautiful' who know they have so 
much beyond physical appearance to offer 
the world, and the' beautiful, who. after years 
of being pursued for their prettiness, really 
do want to be loved for their inner selves. " 

The only problem with the cliche, say 
evolutionary biologists, is that it may not be 
true. In the view of a growing number of 
researchers who study why animals are at- 
tracted to each other, a beautiful face and 
figure may be alluring not for whimsical 
aesthetic reasons, but because outward beau- 
ty is a reasonably reliable indicator of under- 
lying quality. 

These biologists have gathered evidence 
from studies of species as diverse as zebra 
finches, scorpion flies, elk and human beings 
that creatures appraise the overall worthi- 


ness of a potential mate by looking for at 
least one classic benchmark of beauiv: svm- 


least one classic benchmark of beauty: sym- 
metry. 

By this theory, the choosier partner in a 
pair — usually though not always the Female 
— seeks in a suitor the maximum possible 


balance between tbe left and right halves of 
tbe body. 

She looks for signs of exquisite harmony, 
checking that the left wing is the same length 
and shape as the right, for example, or that 
the lips extend out in mirror-image curves 
from the center of the face. In searching for 
symmetry, she gains essential clues to tbe 
state of the mares health, the vigor of his 
immune system, the ability of his genes to 
have withstood the tribulations of the envi- 
ronment as he was growing up. 

The new emphasis on the importance of 
symmetry to mate choice is one of those 
annoying developments in evolutionary re- 
search that (ends oblique validity to in- 
grained prejudices — in this case, to a fairy- 
tale view of the world, in which princes and 
princesses are righteous, strong and lovely, 
while the bad folk are misshapen and ugly. 

Biologists emphasize that symmetry is just 
pan of ihe story of how animals make their 
choices and that much remains to be learned 
about what, in any given species, the posses- 
sion of a perfectly proportioned body an- 
nounces io one’s peers. 

Nevertheless, symmetry does seem to play 
a role in desirability. Reporting in a recent 
issue of the journal Nature. Dr. John P. 
Swaddle and Dr. Innes C. Cuthill of the 
University of Bristol in England found that 


when they put a variety of colored bands cm 
the legs of male zebra finches, the females 
vastly preferred males with symmetrically 
banded legs over those given bands of differ- 
ent colors on each leg. a mampuhttion that 
apparently made the males look as goofy io 
potential mates as somebody wearing mis- 
matched socks. 


Writing in the journal Trends in Ecology 
and Evolution. Dr. Paul J. Watson and Dr:. 
Randy Tbomh31 of the University of New 
Mexico in .Albuquerque, sum up the data 
gathered thus far on the rede of symmetry fo 
mate selection. In their own work, they have 
shown that female scorpion flies can detect a 
male with symmetrical wings either visually 
or simply by sniffing the chemical signal — 
tbe pheromone — he emits. (For some rea- 
son. there is an association between the sym- 
metry of a male’s wings and bis scent, but 
scientists don't know wiry.) Given tbe choice 


It turns but that a male dk who loses a 
light to another male — and who is thus 
likely to lose all or part of his harem to that 
victorious competitor — win 'grow an asym- 
metrical segment on his antler the following 
year, the sony obverse of a scarlet letter. 

By the new evolutionary hypothesis, a 
symmetrical body demonstrates that the 
male’s central operating systems were all in 
peak, form during important phases of his 
growth. 

A well-proportioned body may indicate 
that the male possesses an immune system 
capable of resisting infection by parasites, 
which are known to cause uneven growth of 


between tbe pheromone of a male with wines 
that differ very slightly in length and me 


that differ very slightly in length and the 
cologne of a suitor with matched wing*, she 
will move toward the scent of the even- 
keeled fly. 

Researchers who study dk have deter- 
mined that the males who possess the largest 
harems of females not only sport the largest 
racks of an here, but also the most symmetri- 
ca] ones. 


feathers. wings, fur dr bone: Or it may 
signal- a more global robustness, one capa- 
ble of withstanding such threats to proper 
development as scarcity of food, extreme 
temperatures or ambient toxins. 
r In theory, females will select a symmetri- 
cal male either Tor the superior genes that 
he can donate to her offspring or- because 
he is likely to be in good enough shape to 
help out with rearing and protecting their 
young. - . 

“The individuals who have had a good 
developmental background come out more 
symmetrical." said Dr.ThamhilL 

“They’re put together better and they’ll 
do better m competition for resources and 
mates." 


IN BRIEF 


LONDON < Reutersi — A major eruption of 
Mount Vesuvius in southern Italy could engulf 
an area inhabited by about one million people 
ir. 1 5 minutes or less, causing destruction on a 
mass 'caic. researchers reported Thursday. 

Writing tn the British journal Nature, scien- 
ti.vts from the L aned States and Italy said an 
eruption would have "catastrophic effects” for 
the people living on the slopes of Vesuvius and 
within a sever -kilometer (4. 5-mile > radius. Ve- 
suvius. dormant since 1 944. overlooks Naples, 
ere of 1 1 ah's most crowded cities. 


Two of the most deadly eruptions were in 
A. D. 7V. when volcanic am overwhelmed the 
towns of Pompeii and Herculaneum, and in 
1631. when the town of Torre del Greco was 
wiped out. In the case of Pompeii, death came 
so swiftly that some victims were petrified in 
terror-stricken poses bv thick gray asb. 

The research team. led by Dr. Flavio Dobran 
of New York University, used data on past 
eruptions to create computer models of the 
extent ar.d force of lava flows from Vesuvius. 


The researchers concluded thar destruction of 
the urban sprawl around the mountain could be 
rapid and widespread. 


Therapy for Parkinson’s Victims 


Dr. Dobran and colleagues from Rome and 
Pisa said that people living within striking dis- 
tance of the volcano risked" catastrophe “unless 
effective evacuation plans and new roads are 
built and people beau depopulating the area.” 
They called for greater use of computer models 
to help fc recast" future erap jeas and develop 
evacuation strategies. 


By Gina IColata 

.Vf» Ycrk Timet Semce 


CROSSWORD 


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EW YORK — Margaret Fleming. 
45. has had Parkinson's disease for 
15 years. Her medications no longer 
control tbe tremors and jerking 
movements caused by this progressive, degen- 
erative. neurological disease and she is getting 
increasingly desperate. 

She and several hundred other patients with 
• the disease went to Columbia Presbyterian Med- 
ical Cen ler in New York ro learn about enroliiM 
in a new feu era] study assessing a potential 
therapy using transplanted ressi tissue. 

The S4.5 miilioc study is the govenuneat’s 
first foray into the promising world of fetal 
Us&ue transplants, although private researchers 
have been trying out various therapies on their 
own for years. 

For more than a decade, while scientists have 
considered the potential of using brain cells of 
aborted fetuses to correct devastating neuro- 
logical disorders, tbe V. S. Bcn ranm e nt banned 
use of federal funds to pay for studies 
involving sucb transplants, fearing that such 
work could encourage abortions. 

Some researchers, however, were so eager to 
go ahead with the studies that they began con- 
ducting them anyway, without federal funds. 
And patients wanted the surgery so much that 


Although the investigator who is conducting 
the federal study has been conducting a study 
of bis own for five years, in which everyone 
receives fetal cells, half the patients in the new 
study win have sham operations. 

Tbe principal investigator in both studies is 
Dr. Curt Freed, a neurobiologist at the Univer- 
sity of Colorado Health Sciences Center in' 
Denver, For several yean. Dr. Freed and a few 
other groups have been reporting that some 
patients are substantially helped by fetal cell 
implants. 

Dr. Freed said he had operated on 17 pa- 
tients. Two-thirds improved and one- third were 
strikingly better, be said. Three patients bad 
strokes after the fetal cells were injected into 
thar brains, he said. 

But because symptoms of Parkinson's dis- 


mental therapy, surely drilling holes in some- 
one’s head is not the best current therapy." 

Dr. Wifliam Langston, director of die Par- 
kinson’s Institute, in Sunnyvale, California, 
disagreed. He said he saw the need for tbe sham 
surgery, and said the study had “an outstanding 
design." Tbe sham surgery, he added, “is 
breathtaking. I don’t know if I’d have tbe 
gumption to do it.” 


Freed said the sham surgery involved mini- 
mal risk. 


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they enrolled ia programs offering these un- 
proved treatments. .Some traveled to other 
countries, including China and Cuba, for the 
operation. 

A year ago. almost as soon os he became 
president Bill Ginton lifted the ban. Now, with 
the government's support and blessing the feta! 
xl] implants are about to be putto a rigorous 
scientific test. Most researchers have agreed 
that the disorder that should be most amenable 
to treatment is Parkinson’s disease, and it is 
with that disease that the study wilt begin. 

The proposed operation is 'not without its 
risks, nor is the studv without its controversies. 


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some skeptics asked whether it was the fetal 
cells or the idea of having them implanted thar 
made the difference. 

“We have been living with that criticism for 
five years." Dr. Freed said in an interview, “lx is 
one thing for us to be convinced and another 
thing for tbe rest of the community to be 
convinced." 

The sham surgery, like the real surgery, con- 
sists of shaving the patient’s bead, cutting two 
oval holes in the skuD. and then closing the 
skull again. Like the real surgery, it is done 
while the patient is awoke, takes about four 
hours, and requires a hospital stay of a few 
days. Unlike Ihe real stugoy. in tbe sham 
operation no fetal cells arc implanted in the 
brain. Those who have the sham operation will 
be offered die real thing tbe next year. 

Dr. Samnef Hell man, a professor who spe- 
cializes in clinical trials of cancer therapies at 
the University of Chicago, said he found tbe 
situation appalling. 

“It’s incredible, be said. “Even if you accept 
the premise that you randomly allocate patients 
between the best current therapy and an etperi- 


Paririnson's disease, which afflicts at least a 
half a million Americans, is caused by the death 
of a relatively small number of brain cells, 
about half a million, an amount »hai would fit 
on the bead of a {tin. But these cells secrete 
c h e mi cals that are responsible for the control of 
movement Although medications can control 
symptoms at first they become less ayi less 
effective as years go by. As the tii«aaa» pro- 
gresses, patients develop rigidity and tremors. 
Sometimes they stumble ana fall or jerk uncon- 
trollably. At other times they are as rigid as 
stones, unable to move at. all. 


T HE new surgezy involves replacing the 
missing brain cells with cells from a 
fetus. These cells first appear at about 
six to eight weeks of gestation, .when 
the fetus is just a half-inch long. Dr. Freed said. 
He said the cells are “like little spheres,” vrith- 
out the exianave bairfike projections that they 
eventually grow and use to connect to other 
brain cells. 


Ms. Fleming said that the main thing that 
bothered her was the graphic descriptions of 
die surgical procedure. She said die was 
shocked when die learned she would be.awake 
durnig the operation but, she said. “I can han- 
dle it. If she is not accepted for tbe federal 
study- she said, “I’d start fnmtnusmg" to go 
the $40,000 for the Other one. She feel* dw ha* 


the $40,000 for the other one. She feels she has 

pother options. Tm at a desperate stage,” site 


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International Herald Tribune, Thursday, February 10 t 1994 


Page 9 


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THE TRIB INDEX 116 ... ^ 

Werratof^HeraW TriW World Stock Index ©, composed of 

SnKSSS r S ,y - ,nve ^? bte stocks 25 countries, compiled 
by Btoomberg Business News. Jan. 1 , 1992=100. 

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The index tacks US. denar iotas of stocks tor Tokyo, How York. London, and 
Aigondno, AuataB a. Austria, arigtoa. Brazil, Canada, Ctdto. Dsmrorfc, Fitted, 
Franco, Germany, Kong Kona «Wy, Medea, Mat h ertanito Mao Taotonri. Norway, 
Stogoxm, Spain. Sweden, Owllartml and Vanaioala. Pot Tokyo, New Yodt and 
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Write loTriblndBK 181 Avenue Charles deGaute.9252t NeuBly Codex. France. 


Clinton-Hosakawa: Hopes Dashed 

Chance for New Beginning on Trade Is Fading Fast 


By David E. Sanger 

New York Tinas Service 

TOKYO — From the time they met seven 
months ago — a new American president and 
Japan’s most prominent reformer — Bill 
Gnu on and Morihiro Hosokawa had agreed 
thdr countries needed a radically new way to 
deal with each other. 

Neither Washington n or Tokyo could al- 
ias d to continue the cycle of bickering, stone- 
walling and threats of retaliation, they said, 
that had gradually poisoned their trade rela- 
tions over the previous decade. 

Aides to both of the young new leaders kept 
talking enthusiastically about what they had in 
common, about thdr mandates for reform and 
common outlook cm the world. This time, they 
said, dungs would be different 

But just a day before Mr. Hosokawa was to 
fly off for his first trip to Washington, few 
were talking that way. 

After three weeks rtf lurching from one 
crisis that threatened to turn him out of office 
to another, Mr. Hosokawa admitted to Japa- 
nese reporters Wednesday that negotiations 


on a broad new “framework" for U ^.-Japa- 
nese trade relations had gone nowhere. 

^Everything has come to an impasse.** the 
prime minister said. The two sides have never 
gpt past their f undamen tal disagreement on 
how to measure progress in opening markets 
— a disagreement that was papered over 
when the framework idea was born last sum- 
mer and was left to be resolved later. 

Later has arrived. Each side appears to be 
be counting on a last-minute concession from 
the other to keep the talks from being the 
immin ent train wreck that editorial cartoon- 
ists in Japan are depicting them as. Mr. Ho- 
sokawa has survived (wo close brushes with 
political disaster in the past month, but there 
are doubts among bis advisers that be can 
sidestep this one. 

In a frenzy of last-minute activity, Mr. 
Hosokawa sent a secret envoy, Akharie Kip- 
chi, to see Mr. Clinton late Tuesday to plead 
for rime, to convey the message that the 
prime minister's intentions are good but that 
his coalition government is in such chaos that 
he cannot yel deliver. 


Mr. Kiuchi was politely sent packing, hav- 
ing been reminded that for months, Mr. Clin- 
ton has been sending envoys to Tokyo to urge 
political leaders to get involved in the trade 
talks ami overrule the country’s powerful 
rurf-protecting bureaucrats. 

"They still didn't get the message.” one 
American official in Tokyo said 
Wednesday night, Mr’ Hosokawa dis- 
patched another envoy. Tsutomu Hata, his 
foreign minister and deputy prime minister, 
in hope that he will be able to patch some- 
thing together Thursday. 

But by Friday in Washington. Mr. Clinton 
and Mr. Hosokawa will face a choice: Find a 
way to talk around their disagreements nomn 
or face t* confrontation with perhaps one 
another’s most important economic ally. 
Treasury Secretary Lloyd Bentsen has said he 
would rather have no deal than a bad deal. 
“We will not settle for anything cosmetic.” he 
vowed during a visit to Japan two weeks ago. 

Fearful that the White House is focused 
exclusively on trade, Japanese officials are 
See HOSAKAWA, Page 13 


SGS-Thomson Ready to Take on Intel 


O International Herald Tribune 


By Jacques Neher 

lalcmaiionni Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Pasquak Pistorio has the air of a 
satisfied man, one who believes be has beaten 
the odds in transforming SGS-Thomson Micro- 
electronics NV from an unfocused, unprofit- 
able maker of semiconductors for die French 
and Italian maHrwta. into a lean but powerful 
force in the global electronics marketplace. 

Now, with his balance sheet and bottom line 
back to health, the 58-year-old executive said he 
was pondering a much bigger bet — challenging 
Intel Corp. as a maker of chips for personal 
computers, a market expected to grow to $9.6 
trillion by 1997. 

Forged out of the 1987 merger of limping 
French and Italian state-owned seanconductor 
companies, SGS-Thomson is back from the 
brink, boasting 1993 profits of around $160 
million, from $3 million in 1992. With costs cut 
to the bone and the drip market doing well, Mr. 
Pistoriopnsdicted earnings would grow 15 per- 
cent to 20 percent in 1994, in line with sales that 
could grow from $2.06 trillion in 1993 to more 
than $2.4 billion this year. 

M rm glad to say that we made it, that this has 
been a successful merger," Mr. Pistorio said. 
“Now the company is ready to grow faster than 
the market and be one of the major players in 
the world." 

Promising SGS-Thomson will never see red 


ink again — the company lost dose to a half- 
billion dollars between 1987 and 1991 — the 
rotund and jovial Sicilian laid out his strategy 
for “phase 2” of SGS-Thomson's development. 
Key to this strategy is privatization, which be 
said he had recommended to his French and 
Italian shareholders, and an expansion into 
Asia, where he is in talks to create a chip- 
manufacturing operation in China to supply 
the Chinese and neighboring export markets. 

SGS-Tbomson. which employs 19,500 peo- 
ple, is not on the French government's list of 21 
companies it plans to privatize, and prospects 
for selling the company in the near future are 
complicated by political uncertainty m Italy, 
analysts said. 

Looking east, the company already has an 
advantage over its competitors, as SGS. under 
Mr. Piston, began investing in Singapore in 
1981. Its facilities there and in Malaysia now 
account for 30 percent of the company's wafer 
production and the local manufacturing pres- 
ence has facilitated its entry into markets such 
as South Korea and Taiwan. Expanding into 
China would be logical extension of this strate- 
gy, he said. 

“1 envision manufacturing in China within the 
next five years," the executive said. While the 
Chinese market is still in its formative stage, he 
predicted that within 10 years China would sur- 
pass the European market as a consumer of 


U.S. Recovery 
Gives a Boost 
To Ford Profits 


semiconductors, worth some 514 billion in sales. 

At the same lime. Mr. Pistorio said he was 
“seriously** weighing an attack on Intel the San- 
ta Clara. California, company which has a Dear- 
monopoly on microprocessors, which pet oral the 
calculations in personal computers. Up to now. 
SGS-Thomson has skirted this market, focusing 
instead on memory and logic chips designed for 
specialized applications such as home appli- 
ances, telecommunications and cars. 

SGS-Tbomson. analysts said, is well placed 
to take a good bite out of Intel's market, provid- 
ed it can muster the formidable cash outlay 
necessary to make the silicon wafers They said 
that $500 milli on to SI billion is required to 
design a production process and build a plant. 

“They could definitely eat into Intel’s mar- 
ket." said Bipin Parmer, semiconductor analyst 
with Dataquest Europe. "They have a global 
distribution system in place, along with strong 
sales, marketing and application bases." 

Unlike other challengers to Intel such as 
Advanced Micro Devices Inc., which hare had 
to face costly and time-consuming legal battles 
over use of Intel’s chip designs, SGS-Thomson 
asserts it can copy these designs legally. It 
inherited a license-sharing agreement forged in 
the mid-80s between Intel and Mostek Corp.. a 
U.S. unit of Thomson that went bankrupt. 

Intel however, said the legal picture was far 

See CHIPS, Page 13 


By Lawrence Malkin 

Iniemononal Herald Tnhme 

NEW YORK — Pacing the re- 
covery of the U.S. autombile indus- 
try. Ford Motor Co, on Wednesday 
reported a 5153 billion profit for 
1993. its largest since 1989 and a 
turnaround from the previous 
year's loss. 

Ford's financial-services sector 
was responsible for two-thirds of 
the company's 1993 profits, earn- 
ing a record $1.6 billion, largely as 
a consequence of low interest rates. 

U.S. automotive operations 
earned 5669 million in the fourth 
quarter for the best quarter in a 
decade, rebounding from a loss of 
S 128 million in the year-ago period. 
Vehicle sales worldwide rose 3.5 
percent to 1.45 million cars and 
tracks for the year. 

American automakers are on the 
mead thanks to an improving econ- 
omy - A combination of low interest 
rates that helped spur demand, im- 
proved marketing and quality, pro- 
duction efficiencies, and favorable 
labor relations helped sales peak in 
the final quarter of 1993. 

This year. U.S. auto sales are 
forecast at about 143 million, half 
a million above 1993. That projec- 
tion includes about 22 million im- 
ported cars and about 13 million 
Japanese cars made in America — 
a declining foreign market share as 
the Big Three ouunaneuver the 
Japanese in sales of trucks, mini- 
vans. and recreational vehicles. 

Chrysler, the smallest and most 
nimble of the Big Three, has al- 
ready reported an almost fivefold 
increase in profits in 1993. to a 
record S14 billion. 

On Thursday. General Motors 
Corp.. the largest of the three and 
most sluggish' along the road to 
recovery, also is expected to report 
1993 profiLs after last year’s record 
losses. Stock analysis forecast an- 
nual earnings of between $1 .80 and 
52.40 a share for GM. 

[Three GM units released results 
Wednesday. Bloomberg Business 
News reported GM Hughes and 
Electronic Data Systems posted 
profit increases for the fourth quar- 


ter. but net income at the compa- 
ny’s financing arm, GM Accep- 
tance Corp.. fell 29 percent, 
because it provided loans for a re- 
duced number of cars. At GM 
Hughes, net income rose 18 per- 
cent, to $276.3 million on cost-cut- 
ting and improved sales, while 
Electronic Data Systems posted a 
14 percent gain in profits, to $202.9 
million, on increased sales. ] 

Ford earned 5435 a share, but 
that did not live up to Wall Street's 
expectations, and its stock fell 1 to 
68*-4. GM and Chrysler shares also 
slipped, with GM losing ft to 6414 
and Chrysler falling ft to 6 Hi. 

“It's called take your profit and 
ran," said Arvid Jouppi, an auto 
analyst at Keane Securities in De- 
troit! “Ford has led this revival by 
starting its turnaround early in the 
1980s and it now leads the industry 
in bread-and-butter sales all across 
its line." 

Ford’s market share improved 
worldwide in 1993, gaining 0.8 per- 
cent. to 25.5 percent, of the 
bouyant U3. market and 02 per- 
cent, to 11.6 percent, of the disas- 
trous European market. Ford lost 
5407 million in Europe Iasi year, 
down from 5647 million in 1992. 

Ford's worldwide sales rose 8 
percent last year, to $108.52 billion, 
from 5100.13 billion in 1992 Dur- 
ing the booming final quarter, sales 
rose 9 percent to $27.8 billion,. 

In 1992 Font lost 57.4 billion, 
although only $502 million of that 
represented operating losses, with 
the r emainder written off under 
new accounting rules for retire- 
ment and health-care benefits. 

Ford’s automotive operations 
outside the United States lost $372 
million in the fourth quarter, includ- 
ing a S57 million restructuring 
charge to dose its Capri plant in 
Sydney. (Page 15 1 

The company also cut Jaguar 
PLCs operating loss to 536 million 
in 1993 from $112 million in 1992 
but it is still swallowing the costs of 
reorganizing the British luxury car 
manufacturer it bought in 1989. The 
bin for Jaguar came to SI09 million 
in the final quarter of 1993. 


* 

4 


INTERNATIONAL MANAGER 

The Office Hits the Road 


By Kirk Johnson 

New Ycnk Times Service 

H ARTFORD, Connecticut — Workers 
like John A. Craz arethe great hopefor 
old corporate center docs like Han- 
ford, and perhaps their greatest threat 
as wdl: He's been liberated from his office. 

Rootless, mobile, aimed with 120 megabytes in 
his briefcase, Mr. Cruz — a 32-year-old account 
executive of Travelers Corp. — is one of_a new 
breed of high-tech nomads who are changing the 
face and the culture of many companies. 

They are cousins to the telecommuters who work 
(ram borne and direct descendants of the traveling 
salesmen of yesteryear, and they specialize in being 
anywhere and nowhere but always as dose to the 
customer as passible and always on-line. Mr. Cruz 
has computed insurance audits in parki ng lot s and 
at restaurant counters. His laptop computer is 
actually used on his lap. 

Like that of a traveling salesman, Mr. Cruz’s 
existence can be lonely. He still drops by the gray 
stone Travelers headquarters here once a week or 
so, mainly to hear the scuttlebutt, but his bosses do 
not encourage it be said. 

“We used to have more of an office feeling," be 
said, driving one recent morning to an appoint- 
ment at one of his accounts, an auto parts ware- 
house. “Now it’s really Eke you’re on your own. 

Computer specialists and insurance analysts ray 
that cost pressures are prompting many omnpames 
and industries in the New York region and eronnd 
the nation to move fastff at 
enrolovccs as high-tech road wamors. Most irotatuy. 
International BusmcssMachu^ Corp. 
start an entirely office-rreesdeforeem 

At American Tdepbcoe & 

percent of tbe company s 37^,000 

Sir work on wheels or m other novel settings. 


But few industries are fikdy to be transformed 
as fundamentally as the paper-heavy insurance 
business, where corporate traditions of conserva- 
tive, centralized management are colhdiiig with the 
1990s values of fleet feet and fast modems. 

“We’re at the initial explosion point right now," 
said Raymond L Howell, an assistant vice presi- 
dmt at ITT Hartford, another big Hanford-based 
company that is testing the waters of mobile tech- 
nology. “There's a whole convergence here." 

Under fierce pressure to cut costs, insurance 
executives say that two important insights make 
Che mobile work force irresistible. First, insurance 
is essentially a disembodied product anyway, ide- 
ally suited to being electronically blipped, faxed 
and phoned from one place to another, without 
r e gar d to place. The second is that all the appara- 
tus of modem telecommunications — laptops, 
modems, cellular phones, voice m a il , electronic 
mail, and beepers — keeps everyone in touch all 
tbe time and lets managers track nonoffice workers 

and thdr performance even more closely than 
people sitting just down the balL 

For example, there is a computer program that 
can, with a touch of a button, in the presumed 
comfort of one’s own car, reveal a landowners' grid 
showing every place of business in a salesman's 
territory, who owns it, how to get there. Other 
companies are using artificial-intelligence programs 
that hdp insurance workers crane up with new 
questions and avoid unnecessary rates for abeady- 
insnrcddienis to fine-tune their msurance packages. 

What pushes jnst as hard against such chan ge s , 
however, are.lhe decad e s gone before, when the 
insurance badness was defined by its vast corpo- 
rate cocoons. Being solid was more important than 
being swift. “Theyre trying to take a very central- 
ized, controlled and ordered culture and move it 

See MOBILE, Page 13 


SAS to Trim 
2,900 Jobs in 
Cost-Cutting 

Compiled hr Oar Staff From DapaJdia 

STOCKHOLM — Scandinavian 
Airlines System said Wednesday 
that it would cut 2900 jobs this year 
as pan of a cost-catling package. 

The announcement prompted 
speculation that airline employees 
might stage wildcat strikes or slow- 
downs during the Winter Olympics 
in Lfflehammer. Norway. SAS is 
the official carrier for the games, 
which are to open on Saturday. 

Tbe cuts are pan of a package of 
measures announced in December 
by Jan Rdnas, chief executive of 
tbe airline, that called for trimming 
costs by almost 3 billion, kronor 
(5375 million) over two years. Most 
of the cuts wiU be done’ by the end 
of 1994, the airline said. 

SAS, which is half-owned by the 
governments of Norway. Sweden 
and Denmark, currently has about 
20,000 employees. 

Other parts of the savings plan 
include reducing operational ex- 
penses, canceling routes, and sell- 
ing aircraft 

Tbe carrier’s plans were severely 
affected by the collapse last fall of 
the proposed Alcazar alliance, 
which would have united SAS, 
KLM Royal Dutch Airlines, Swis- 
sair and Austrian Airlines. 

Tbe airline also announced it 
had completed sale of its 421 per- 
cent stake in the Chilean carrier 
LanChile. (AP. AFP ) 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


Cross Bat« 


MHSmtoni 


Fraoktort 

UwtalaJ 

mono 


Feb.9 

„ Dii Ff Lira tun a* tre cs puhb 

* * — MS> urn urn- ua* 

im not ton ua ^ M jms- 

“ 0,15 him* u® <*»■ vm U»vum 1 -zxr 

• 9JS1 MW HSIB 1W» HUI IW 3“ 

122 ^ ra im.ui uw-uuti — 

uts ® UW Ml* US was UO» l«to 

— 1 *““ iSS ~ 3JM' ums un ' u»* *W 

*** "2 *22 ™ sstouwn* — 

. *** ,*« sOSl wx iws *w w* mM *** 

iku IVC vm m w w ana van 

ISM ,a? * Zurich. tHkms momreentanc Maw Yortoni Toronto 

rotas td 3 P.m. mix* on* dam: *: ItoH s of NOf «■«■* HAS taS 

a To tin ere ooundf o. 

Dvwtota. 

OBwr pollw V**" ** «r. 

Csrrwcy WS 2=*» 

Aneol.waa H.Zea*anes UH5 

AatmL* !g!lw WlA mra.tnm 

igflT.EU. TM» .22. 3L34 Plto-pw ZTA 

Beat on vox arum "»?**■* *** 

niVmu l inn M* 0Jt» nrt .eseaOO 1WJ* 

bmumh 4JM* tort**},. J1U _ i«ii ssafirM Van 

sx— » *sfsr ™ *** ■ 

rhMHto stft? 


Eurocurrency Deposits 


Feb. 9 


Donor 

D-Mortc 

SoriS* 

Franc 

SterUng 

French 

Fraac 

Yen 

ECU 

1 nontti 3l4-3» 

6-6V* 

4W4* 

SV5-5U. 

6ta-6V» 

2hr2N 

A l»4% 

IntohiJ V3*» 

S V, 

M-4W 

5^-SV. 

obk-oao 

Z*-2U 

4M'. 

«monms . mcm 


4dVfc 

5Mi, 


2Wr2*V 


I rear MVt 

SY*4 *. i 

3 »V3 44. 

5S*-5Y* 


2-2*> 

FU-STk 


Haw York M 
Ports 
tom* 
Toronto 
Zartcft 
■ ECU 
ISM 


Sourest: OetMan, Uoytto Bank. 

/adtsaepdaoiaial ni artxxd t aeaosllsaftlnMIonaMmumlweoohvieati. 


Kay Monof Rates 


ttit w ar pots 

1MT.M 1055 
S.Kor.'fOo nm 
Smi. krone M387 
ntm* -. 3LO 
itrfboM 2M5 
Ttrttokflro 17071. 
UAEfirnm' 3474 
VHLHUir. 10? JO 


United States 
Ofccomfnfe 
MviUi . 

FOtfinH towto 
XMRtkCDs 
CociwLPoperllldays 
MmtfrTrMwytffi 
l-yeor Troeswy &«U 
S-foarTTOory note 
taear Tromt note 
M wrTh—riH 
TO fir Troo m rr no te 


Close 
3J» 

too 

J* 
103 
MO 
3 2* 
3J3 
4JB 
531 
SAT 
592 
Ml 

Mor ra iLvdi today Bandy oato 273 


Pity. 

100 

uo 

zoo 

am 

19 

331 

an 

M2 

538 

£57 

59 

MS 

272 


HMD 

tak tolerate 
Can mom 

HTOflra KtWX UUBK 

3-fnonrti internal* 
t-auan totertw* 
Umar out 

Praam 

Merveattai rate 
CaUmMty 
tMaffiJMWtaaK 
tottraort 
HMUt Mortal* 

TO-yaar OAT 


S* 

5 1 * 

5V» 


sv> 

5 ft 

yu 

5ft 

5W 

5ft 

kSA 

154 

fijfl 

4M 

6% 

Aft 

6ft 

6% 

6V, 

4ft 

6ft 

too 

599 

SB 


cma wr 
Vmantti faiiet bunk 


rd Rotas 


mbv »oar 

l«32 USU 

SI 

liB I"* 

MG 

imt* F'imuo P*ew , 


C g iowO 


nan .m uu i to-dcr 
ideUte ‘ Ufll T34U IMS 

I iS5 \ 25J 

— vans tjOtf 

lto*5 ' a^/gnMBetol.-JaomQwiwena^naflMxi 

par* S at r«*w» tTekvot: Pont Bard ot Canada 

ea Frame -r^Z 2- ■ - 1 '' 


MonMBttltt 
toTOar c oocn u nc a i I 


uuatord rate 
Call manor 
1-Bieatb totoftoBk 

tawntoertoto 
UMottimwi 
13 -tear SomT 


1* nb 
2 x 2* 
2« 2h 
2Vb 2» 
2h 21k 
1S4 . 3JB 

W 

£15 £U 
6.10 £10 
sn in 

578 570 

±00 1M 


MWM.' HBUieri- biooumwi" 

Lynch. Ban* ot Tokyo. Commerzbonx, 
GnenmaHMantOBu. Credit Lnanols. 


Gold 

Zurich 


AM. 

PM. 

Ch’sc 

36075 

3SU5 

4-040 


36075 

4-020 

38 UP 

0578 

4-1.60 

r ounce. 

London otftdel 


New York 
US. doOors 
iaotiZunthond New York oaeataaandOo* 
toe Prices. New York Cemex lAprll} 
Source: Heater* 



Banco Safra SA 


Consolidated 
and Sun 

These statements and summaries represent the 

Statements of Condition 

Hilaries of Results 

msotidated accounts of Banco Safra SA and its subsidiaries. 

December 31, 

1993 

1992 ] 


(in thousands of USS except per share data) J 

Cash and due from banks — 

$ 61,611 

5 72,042 

Interest bearing deposits with banks 

232^86 

186,069 

Investment securities — — 

653,266 

870,357 

Federal funds sold and securities purchased 



under resale agreements - — ~ 

1,859345 

1,487,311 

Loans, net of unearned income - 

1302362 

1.436322 

Allowance for possible loan losses 

(53361) 

(56323) 

Loans (net) 

1,749301 

1.379,999 


365,142 

394,197 

I Total assets 

$ 4322350 

$ 4,389,975 

Liabilities 



Total deposits - - 

$ 2344351 

5 2.219324 

Federal funds purchased and securities sold 



under repurchase agreements - - 

373,798 

463.224 

Other borrowed funds - 

962344 

607,413 

Other liabilities.- 

974345 

817,584 

Shareholders ' Equity 



Capital stock and reserves — 

199393 

184,908 

Retained earnings 

75319 

87.62 2 

Total shareholders' equity - 

266312 

282,530 

Total liabilities and shareholders' equity 

$ 4322350 

$ 4.389375 

Book value per share 

$ 038 

S 0.62 

Net income, for the year ended 

S 108365 

$ 82.924 

Net income per share....- — - 

$ 034 

S 0.18 

v 


J 


Banco Safra S A 

Avenida Paulista, 2.100 
Sao Paulo - Brazil 


Banking Locations 

- Sao Paulo - Aeroparto, BarSo, Bom Retiro. Brds. Central Boa Vista. Central XV. Cidade Jardim. Dom Jos§ Gaspar. Faria Lima. 
Higienopdlis. Ipiranga. Itaim. Jardins, Laps, Mooca, Morumbi, Parafso, Peuliste/Augusta. Santo Amaro. Trianon, Vila Maria - Rio 
de Janeiro - Candelaria. Castelo. Ipanema. Madureira. Rio Bratco - BeI6m - Belo Horizonte - Blumenau - Brasilia - Campinas - 
Campo Grande - Caxias do Sul - Curitiba - Fortaleza - GoiSnia - Guarulhos - Joinville - Jundiaf - Londrina - Maceid - Manaus - 
Piracicaba - Porto Alegre - Recife - RibeirSo Preto - Salvador - Santo Andre - Santos - SSo Bernardo do Campo - 
Sio Gaetano do Sul - Sorocaba - Vitoria - Cayman Islands - New York 







nm 


<0- es* 


Page 10 

MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1994 


U.S./ATTHe_CLO« 


Via Ajjodnted Pref* 


Advancing Bonds 
Aid Stock Prices 


Ccmpi kd hr Ow Staff From Dispoitha iawef-than-expecied founh-quar- 

NEW YORK — The ability of ter earnings and being downgraded 
Treasury bond prices to rise after by several analysts. 


only average demand at the govern- 
ment's auction of JQ-year notes al- 
lowed the stock market to climb. 


The largest U.S. waste- manage- 
ment company said Tuesday that 
fourth-quarter net income fell to 


The Treasury sold 512 billion in $162.9 million from $182.8 million 
10-year notes at the second leg of in the year-ago quarter. The com- 

- .i n ■ - ki i Kncmi« 


its three-part quarterly refinancin' pany blamed “difficult business 
— conditions" in its solid and hazard- 
11. Y. Stock* ous waste operations. 


g,and the issue met moderate de- 
mand. But investors had been 
braced for a weaker auction after 
the sale of three-year notes on 
Tuesday showed tepid interest 
among investors. 


ous waste opera t tons. 

Stock in the company's Chemi- 
cal Waste Management subsidiary 
fell to to 10H. A restructuring of the 
division has been a drag on WMJCs 
performance since September, but 
WMX said the restructuring was 
on schedule and the unit was meet- 



Dow Jones Atreragat 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


0 p» «h« lot 


i mkamtMmtjswnn -am 
Tnn 1829.19 183*70 102503 183670 -S51 

urn ii$m 730M Siam nan -on 
Comp 141932 I426J4 1417.94 142179 ’7JB 


Close Wgft Lot Praw.CMp- 


Industrials 


Standard & Poor's Mows 


industrials 

TroftsA 

unuitts 

Finooec 


hw lot cm* arse 
5S2AB 5033 S51 *9 + 1J4 
U2.9S 4199* 442.1* —02! 
1460S 14139 W509 +0S4 


4473 406 444* + 031 

47141 471 03 47177 + 122 
4)9,77 437.12 43827 +140 


COCOA (LOT 

5H*1togP<r metric Tun WSDlWlM 
Mr 887 888 091 08 834 03 

MOT 895 997 902 88? 885- 884 

J*l 907 906 911 900 S97 898 

Sep ® MS fa H7 TO W 

E*L volume: 3411 
CO FT* BE (LCE) 

Mlon per mttilc ten-tab ef S laa* 

Mo MIS 1218 WOO 141 a M 10 MU 


KM ' LOT 
GASOIL (IPEJ ' 
UAtfeUanpcr 


CBS EaramgsRi^ 39% for Quarter 


122B 1221 1222 Ml? 1309 1211 
JU 1212 MIS 1215 1209 12M 12M 

Sep 1215 1217 1214 1218 1205 1208 

NOV 1215 121* 1213 1208 1203 1288 

Jon 1209 1215 12C e 12® N.T. 1202 

Mar N.T. 1215 N.T. N.T. N.T. 1202 

E*t. volume: Z132 

HWI LOT CM* ora* 
WHITE SUMR (MaW) 

Mien per metric toatab MSB Ms 

2 £ SS SSSSSifS 

AM 30450 30400 MM 3M50 + 

Od 27220 N.T. 21120 27250 + 120 

Dee RT. N.T. 28929 29100 + 120 

Mer 29048 N.T. 28950 29120 Uocn. 

EsI. volume: 141*. Open Int: 13278. 


NYSE Indexes 


Composite 

•ndusriote 

Transp 

UfXtv 

finance 


2432? 241.94 24220 -094 
32U1 32149 323.13 -MV 
28)05 77844 77929 — 0.13 
m 7 0 99*11 999 flQ . BW 
2IS. ca 71447 71747 -I.OI 


I NASDAQ Indexes 


Fab TC2S 

M* 1*100 

APT 14420 

Mb US25 

Job .14300 

Jel U12S 

AH 14*20 

S*P 14928 

Oe RT. 

NP* RT. 

uee .ystx 

■Mi ■ NX 

brent crude oil ni 
U2. Milan per DorrtHi 
Mar .1328 1342 

Apt 14A4 -1323 

Mar 1428 U69 

JM UJJ UM 

Jlrt 1448 1*09 

AH 1459 1422 

50P ' 1422 1422 

act 1475 1425 

Ngr Ufl 14.92 

EsT. volume; S7245 . 


the period r« to «6.4 


0*11288 bomb 
1348 1347 — 027 
US* 1324 —024 
1173 1473 —449 
U94 1194 —047 

1*0? 1428 —844 

K22 K22 — 044 

1422 ua? -a* 
UTS W1 '—034 
MR 1428 —MS 

Own fad. 30044 


Wednesday, dosing a S311. . *^ 4 tJrvisiMista- 

The company said the GBS network, Late 

dons and CBS Radio had improved results. The dfi k ul /~ Q NRCs 
Show- with David LcGemm Which b«* consistently 
“Tonight** ii* iterates* alfo boosted earnings. 


In late trading, the benchmark ^ revenue targets. Stock in the 
.SUR company's Rust International unit 


NYSE Most Actives 


7*. 1 Comws to 
- Industrie^ 
cm i a am 

Insurance 

finance 
Trarao. 
Telecom 


78725 783.65 78431 .321 
82424 820JB 8342* *528 
69*74 6913S 6*524 >Ui 
93743 *34.12 92421 .032 
*9845 8*035 08635 —423 
79227 78521 7W4 >444 
178.13 17449 178.12 -1.14 


Stock Indexes 


Metals 


I hm lot aase Cbme 

F7SE188 (UFFE) 


14/32. at 97 28/32, with (he yield 
down to 6.41 percent from 6.45 
percent Tuesday. 


fell & to 2 IS. S 

Auto stocks were active, with £Jrnm 
F ord falling I to 68!* after reporting 


The^pcemreofibebondmar- 

kei offered a hft to stocks, with the ^ Molors ^ * l0 and 


P° w 1 °Td nd '™ 2i Chrysler fell % to 614. 


ing up 2 5-? 9 P?'™- at M-JI-JL Jn 7 over-the-counter trading. 


Advancing nsues outnumbered Speclrum ^formation Techno! 
declining ones on the_New \ ork K. rem _ intrf ra ; n in B to u 


aecomog ones on « ogies remained active, gaining U to 

Stodt Exchange by a |3-io-2 ratia 3 % ,6. sliU recoverinTf^m a 
Trading was active despite a snow n|lineenn M n n dav after John Scul- 


RJRNCB 

Scans 

GnMslr 

WdsEI 

FartlM 

TdMex 

NTSaml 

Moturias 

Ctirvslr 

Betnsn 

GTE 

SkwTai 


VOL HM> LOT Last Cb 
1 48507 35*8 239* 24 V, —31* 
*9395 13V. 12«fe 13V. 

<jsn 34 22'* z 3V. 

36739 7b 7 7Vi -'A 
36M4 49*h 4* 49 -1'* 


AMEX Stock Indox 


31464 45% 63V. 64V. 

30731 IS’* 14* 15 


4«L75 4774* 4*044 


S^/4* “S --A Dow Jon— Bond A wr— ■■ 

77640 42% 61* 61V» — % _ 

37439 n* 23* Z3V. — % 30 floods KK22 +Mf 

71262 33* 32 * 33* — * 10 Utl HIM Unctv 

20775 40 37* 39% *2* 16 industrials 1D546 + 0-17 


i racing was acm e uespue u plunge on Monday after John Scul- 

s orm that slowed traffic and fey reigned as chief executive offi- 
daved offices throughout the New J.shSeholdem are calling for the 


AMEX Most Acthros 


Markot Sates 


York area. mmnanv' 

WMX Technologies topped the 5°™P?* y 
most-active list, plunging 3** to ° n * 
24’*. or 12 percenL cuter posting 


company's president and directors 


(Bloomberg, Reuters) 


YEN: Uncertainty Weakens Dollar 


Continued from Page 1 
said. “When we drew up that list we 
were instructed not to include po- 
litical matters. I think the thinking 
in some pans of the administration 
is that currency manipulation is an 
economic matter, but that thinking 


Foreign Exchange 


is not universally held in the ad- 
ministration." 

Other options could include an 


day. The dollar had jumped when 
Reuters quoted the U.S. aide as say- 
ing Washington would not seek to 
drive up the yen if the talks failed. 

Earlier, traders sold dollars amid 
speculation the two countries 
would not reach an accord on 
opening Japan’s markets before! 
Prime Minister Morihiro Ho- 
sokawa meets with Mr. Clinton. 

The dollar also weakened against 
the Deutsche mark, after a speech 
by a Bundesbank directorate mem- 


NYTim 

EchoBov 

HtnwtB 

tvaxCo 

GiCYLne 

ENSCO 

Elan 

Hasbro 

OierMli 

EroLA 

InMan 

PtyGvm 

5P1B 

OBrien 

omen v 


V 06 

HMl 

Lot 

LOT 

a%- 

17859 27 

74 V, 

24% 

*% 

11497 

12 % 

13% 

13% 

„ 

N42 


IV B 

ta» 

*v = 

8491 

37'a 

34% 

34'H 

- 1 % 

5700 

lflrt 

9% 

10 

X. 

5122 

3% 

3*v 

1 % 

• '■ 

ioaa 44% 

43 

a 

—1 

*809 

34 

331% 

33 % 

— % 

3944 

39% 

18 

19% 

*1% 

3990 


% 

■Vj, 

-Uv 

3883 

33% 

SI'S 

23% 

*1% 

3594 

250 

23V, 

WVj 

*2 

3405 

6% 

4% 

4% 

% 

3351 

7V„ 

3 

2'% 

- % 

3180 

30% 

20% 

38% 

• ■% 


NYSE 4 Bjn. votofne 


CM* Pr«vl 

AM DM 

ALUMINUM (HMl Grade) 

OoDon per metric tea 

spa I 124720 rasBJH 19420 

Fc noord 12*850 12*92* 129520 

COPPER CATHODES (Hbb Grad*) 

ootarc per inefrtc M 

See* 1*5350 155420 1S7120 

Pavanl 387890 187720 189800 

LEAS 

OoUan per metric ton 
San 48920 49020 49820 

Forward 50340 50350 51220 

NICKEL 

SS^ — TSSrW. 57M20 
Forward 500020 540520 58X20 : 

TIN 

□a Mar* per metric ton 

Soar S4020 534500 wwe , 

Forward 539520 539420 538020 . 

Sfat m*jnt 9*520 m*l 

Forward 103100 103520 101020 


tar .. 34382 339Z2 34302 — 1 

aa 36482 34422. 34442 — 1 

•0 34422 36422 34445 - — 1 

Etat. volume: 2U9». Open int^ 75391 


Sourest: Jtsvtan Motff, A sa od ataH Pnux 
London ton Financial Furore* gx c wewg* . 
Inn ADaiNM ©ee tan 


Westinghoase Set to Sell Supply Unit . 

PITTSBUMH (Reuters) — ■ Wesriswjwuse ^Electric j 

Wednesday it had &. prospective ' buyer for its Westnighoyse Bearn j 

Sthe tmit would probably be sold for S300 mito to S400 ; 

jnfllk»; T!»eysaaCIaytoii,I>ttri^ft Rfc&IdCnU»eNwYQritim^ * 

meat firm, was probabty the interested buyer. Clayton Dumber has wo , 
management buyouts of large units of a number of m ^ or L cor P 0 r a ^ r ^- « 

Thcsnj^ily unit is one of four businesses Westmgbouse has planned to . 
sell' since annoumang a restructuring in -November 1992. The oiviaon. t 

based in Kttsbnigh. employs 3jOOG people. 


CtnoBSb Tudoy Prrv. 

Aluminum, lb 0575 0578 

CaHee, Bra*, to 0445 0*45 

Copper eiecfroMta tb 1214 12M 

Iron FOB. ton 71328 2732D 

Load, tb 034 - 034 

Silver, troy az 521 8223 

Steel (scrap), tan DU3 uoxt 

Tkrwlb 32*97 ■ 32965 

Zinc, lb 0*802 0*815 


Goodyear Posts a 29% Profit Gain 

AKRON. OK6 (AI^^Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. said Wednesday ; 
its ; earnings cfimbecL 29. -percent in the fourth quarter, hoping the r 
ticemakerpost a prdfit foraB of 1993 despite a sUgpt drop in sales. 

Goodyear earned SH3.2 milli on, or 76 cents a share, in the last three ■ 
macthsof 1 993. comparDdw 2 th 587 JmiBios; Or 61 cents a shame, a year . 

eariicr. Saks in the tmartcr slipped to $2.92 Wlion from 5253 hDHon. For . 

the year, Goodyear earned S3 bL 8 million, or $2.64 a share, on sales of • 
$11.64 biQkn. It kst $658.6 millio n in 1992 on sales of SI 1.79 bilhon. ; 


Ame«4pjn.«Mme 
Juki nrev. cons, dose 
NASDAQ 4 pjn. volume 
NASDAQ prrv. 4 volume 

NYSE volume us 


OhrfdMdt 


UK T«U, uuuuycor CMFUCU AJO/jO IWIIIWj IA *»a-\n ft auMi'b - 

$11.64 biOkm. It kst $658^ millio n in 1992 on sales oT SI 1.79 bilhon. 

fleet to Target Low-Ineome Groups 


Rnandai 


M.Y.S-E. Odd-Lot Tnuttng 


•included in Hiesam nouns. 


NYSE Diary 


I SAP 100 Index Options 


Htab Low Clou Qtcns* 
3-MONTH STERLING (UFFE) 
tSMAM-Ptecf INK) 

Mar MJ» 9423 942* —021 

JOB 9424 94.90 9424 —023 

5BP 9429 9424 9427 — 023 

D«c 9478 9422 9421 —0.04 

Mar 9421 9420 9*4.1 —026 

Jm 9447 9429 9441 -027 

S«P 9421 9*29 9471 —0.10 

Dec 9427 9350 94JG -al5 

Mar 9320 9328 9326 —an 

Jan 9322 9X63 *173 — B.N 

E st. volume: 57254 Open Ml: 429244. 
34MQNTM EURODOLLARS (UFFC1 


Per Ami Pay R*c 
INCREASED 


FstladtanaCaip 
ROYontar TWlbertnd 


.13 M >17 
U0 348 Ml 


INITIAL 

Inti Flavors n - 27 3-22 A* 

IRREGULAR 

BJcNYOjmodipf . 25 >15 W 

PrudnN Natl Muni _ .10 >18 2-25 

T«tafo nl Ca DtEspn h 225 >T7 >11 

Mipprax amaant per ADR. 

REGULAR 


Nr Hr IN M 6* Mr M 


Total issues 
NOTMX/IS 
New Lows 


— *» — 

*7 I* — 

* it* — 

9. I*. TV 


SI miiikn 

ptso naepet 


Mor 

8636 

9635 

9637 

Jot 

9605 

9603 

960* 

Sta 

9902 

9648 

95-73 

Dec 

95-31 

9S» 

9503 

Ma- 

N.T. 

N.T. 

95.14 

Jon 

N.T. 

N.T. 

94.92 

Sep 

N.T. 

N.T. 

9472 


Amflx Diary 


- - - s 

— — — N 

a nu - is 


IV 7*. 

VN J* - 
IN JV 5V 


immediate imposition of trade her. Edgar Meister. in which he 
sanctions against Japan, or at least said that the German central bank 


moves toward sanctions. 

in that vein. Senator Max Bau- 
cus, a Montana Democrat and 


would ignore calls for it to cut in- 
terest rates at a faster pace. 

The U.S. unit slipped to 1.7575 


Advanced 

Drained 

Lfncficnocd 

Total dues 
NewMitms 

New LOWS 


On* 

PlfV, 

05 

430 

11% 

Pi 

I9i 

TTm 

IT: 

U>% 

TA 

n. 

n 

4 

4 % 

s% 

BTO 



05 

Ta 

r. 

I!' 4 

— 

» 

5% 

TV 

■— 

343 

323 

<40 

2% 

s 

J x 

9 

Pi 

TV. 

rit 

tr* 

266 

290 

MS 

"*M 

7% 

4 -: 


8 

KT, 

nro 


206 

214 

<3 

% 

V. 

2% 

At 

12% 

WTO 

15 % 

— 

819 

835 

<55 

% 

TO 

l\ 


«*» 

n% 

29 

OT 

10 

17 

TOO 

6 

% 

%6 

>% 

2T: 

— 

— 

29- 

11 

14 

465 


K 

'? 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 


chairman of the international trade DM Irom J.7650 on Tuesday. 


NASDAQ Diary 


Qota: (eNf taLtaOl; HM MM W.NI2fS 
POT *M VOL 1592(6, M GOT «. 4MII7 


subcommittee of the Finance Com- The British pound hit a seven- 


mmee. said Wednesday that the month low. and finished at 


“probability” was “quite high” for SI. 4605. down from S 1.4669. 
Washineton to reintroduce retalia- f aFX. Reuters. AFP. Bbomberg} 


Washington to reintroduce retalia- 
tory measures to force Japan to 
open its markets if the talks failed. 

“We should renew Super 301 to 
strengthen our trade policy on Ja- 
pan." Mr. Baucus said. He was re- 
ferring to a mechanism used in 
1989 and 1990 to force open the 
satellite and supercomputer mar- 
kets in Japan. 

The uncertainly about the future 
course of Japan-U.S. trade rela- 
tions left the dollar relatively un- 
moved against the yen. 

In New York on Wednesday, the 


To hpisioes 
NewHiom 
New lows 


1754 1437 

1351 138* 

1675 1745 

4782 4780 

114 80 

57 5* 


Price OtcN 0KN DccM DkH DKH OeeH 

n* — — - «• — — 

IPI — — — — 

41 - — — 1 1 * - 

ffi - - — 1*» — — 

« — - — 2* - - 

COT: m* rot nw cost bit 11.18! 

POT MU rot «•: raw dot NL 152149 
Scarce: CBO£. 


EsL volume: 934. Open bit- 1.968. 

3440 NTH eUROMARKS (UFFE) 

DM1 milltaB - pH of H* pet 
Mar *431 *435 901 +004 

Joa 9425 9446 9423 +QW 

SOP HM 9426 9525 + 023 

Dec 9527 95.12 9522 +IUH 

Mur 9534 9521 9533 + 025 

Jm> 95X3 9522 9523 +&33 

5w 9528 9517 9528 + 033 

Dec 9515 9506 9515 +OIO 

Mar 95D2 9424 9504 +00] 

JOB *422 *40] 9425 +081 

Est. votanro: 17LS7X Opbb ML: ML2S5. 
LONG GILT (UFFE) 

ISAM* - pta A 32ad» Ol 188 PCI 
Mar 11+03 11501 115-29 —0-11 

Jua US- 10 114-15 11509 —>11 

ESI. volume: 1*0249. OMfl Int: 137239. 
GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND (UFFE) 
DM gRta* ■ Pta o« IB* pet 
Mar 99.27 9A58 9920 +A19 

Job 99.13 9551 99.12 +021 

Esl. votumD: 3<4045 Open trrt.: 19091 


AGCO Cara 
On ck moH BMI 
Eaaitv inea AT&T 
JaffertMCtauP 
KetthtaY iraTnim 
Mood M im rain 
MnudMual Port 
Mnod Muni Part II 
Muni HI income 
N indtana PSadfpM 
PM Income Fd 
|Pfd IncaMnsmnl 


S n >u >i 

30 44 M 


PM IncoOoportun 
i Port tone General I 
i Precision Cratport 
PraoraMve Coral 

Smllti Carona^H 
USF&G Coral 
Xerox Cora B 
2enlx Income FdH 


M 2243 2-15 >1 

O 05 2-17 1-17 
O JS l-T? W1 
M 091 2-18 2-38 
M J»1 2-1 B 2-28 
M 061 2-18 M8 
M 054 2-H 2-28 

HA . JS >14+14 
M 097 2-18 2-28 
M 054 2>ia . 2 -28 
M 073 2-18 ■ >78 
Q 00 J-2S +15 
Q J 6 « +4 

0 05 3-11 >31 

Q 05 3-22 4+ 

Q 05 4-11 +59 
O JS 3-4 +1 

M 066 2-1* 2-28 

SPECIAL 


NEW YORK <AP) — Fleet Financial Group Inc., attempting to 
resolve questions oyer its lending practices* plans to an nounce an $8 j 
bilhon loan program for low- and moderate-income borrowers, sources 
familiar with the program said Wednesday. 

The program would be one of the hugest ever in the baakin^mdusay. 
said Bruce Marks, executive director of the Boston-based Union Neigh- 
borhood Assistance Coip. 

fleet li« been. by allegations that its finance company busi- 

ness, Fleet Finance Inc? of Atlanta, targeted low-income blacks with 
loons that carried occessta fees and interest rates. According to attorney* - 
who have followed the company. Fleet wants to resolve qnesaoas about 
its twining prances jg order to minimise opposition toils merger plans. 


Texaco Settles Louisiana Royalty Soil • 

NEW ORLEANS (Combined Dispatches). — Texaco. Inc. said • 
Wednesday rtu» it would pay Louisiana $250 million and spend $152 j 
milK nn in the *t«tr (in economic development projects' to settle a dispute , 
over alleged underpayment of royalties on ml and gas leases: 

Under ierms of tbewit-of-courl settJemcnt, Louisan* will drop claims ■ 
against Texaco totaling SI. 1, trillion for the alleged underpayment. The ' 
settlement still roust be accepted by a federal judge. . . (AFX, AP) • 


ConuiMMiltv Pmh 
Aovontar Tfmbtr a 


_ 01 >1 >15 

. 400 2-28 3-31 


STOCK 

attzera Util AM cash equhratanl of .1*75 

STOCK SPOT 


For Gr^hoand, a Dismal Quarter 


FN Indkona Carp 4 tar 3 

ITT Cara iNunof Rovaniar Inc tar Mn>( 

tamML 


botbuoI; v-paynWe ta CoBadloa foods; m- 
■aNIr; ■ Mi arta r lv; s taiu l bbp j pI 


£ Dublin Press Firm Expands to South Africa MetallgeseUschaft Advances 


NEW YORKfBlotudxzg^-r-GieyhoandLiiies Inc. stock pricefdl an ■ 
Wednesday after the bus company reported a fourth-quarter loss. ’ 
Late Tuesday, thc company reponed losses from opaatiais o£$6.02 > 
mitlinn, compared with net income of $53jn31k«i, or 37 cents, in the ■ 
same period in 1992. For the year. Greyhound reported profit from ‘ 
operations of $629 nriffm n, or 43 centra Aare, compared with $10.9 * 
miHk m, or 96 cents, in 1992. The stock .wa&off 75 cents, closing at $10. * 
Company executives biamed tihe efisappointing results on a stow travel * 
industry, bad weather and fxohlems introducing a new. reservation ^stem. * 


.4 FP-Eud Se*t in the company that publishes Britain’s Independent 

LONDON — Independent Newspapers PLC of newspaper. The £18.4 million (S27 million) stake made 
Dublin again widened its portfolio by sealing a deal Tony O’Reilly, the Irish media tycoon who is chairman 
Wednesday to take a 31 percent stage in the largest of HJ. Heinz Co. the biggest single shareholder in 


U.S. currency closed slightly lower Newspaper shares. 


Wednesday to take a 31 percent stage in the largest 
newspaper chain in South Africa. 

The Irish company said it was acquiring (he stake in 
Argus Newspapers for 20 million punts (514.2 mil- 
lion^ to be financed through an issue of Independent 


of HJ. Heinz Co, the hugest single shareholder in 
Newspaper Publishing PLC 
Argus Newspapers sales last year totaled 135 mil- 
lion punts, and pretax profit was 10 J million punts. It 


publishes more than 4 million newspaper a week, and 
has the leading daily ne w sp a pers in Johannesburg. 


at 108.35 yen. after 108.75 on Tues- Independent Newspapersjust took a 25 percent stake Cape Town and Durban. 


Bloomberg Businas Sews 

NEW YORK —A British bank lost its bid Wednesday to block 
the restructuring of Metallgesellschaft AG by suing the German 
metal and minin g conglomerate's U.S. unit. 

The New York Stale Supreme Court denied a request from 
Standard Chartered PLC for an injunction against the restructuring. 

Separately, Metallgesellschaft Coip„ the LLS. unit, said it ar- 
ranged for up to $300 million of secured bank financing and reached 
agreements with most of- its banks that give it 90 days to restructure 
its existing loans. 


For the Record 


TRW Inc. said its eacungsJtwe^ percaurro thelomritquarfcr and it _. 
had a profit for the year, reversing a ynr-ouUer Ion.; .+l A ¥) 

Bethlehem Steel Goip. mid it had fik^a r^Siratkm statement for a i 
public offering of . 12 ndBomcpmmtBi shares, arid that miBsi oraflidf the * 
proceeds would gp to its^peaupoo ftztuL .r _ J Return) 

Loral Corp.aaid its Space SystanS/Lobfl unit has been gnmted a $46 ' 
million loan from tiie *panese€xpbr^&i^pbrt fturir^^)-finance the , 
launchings of two tekcommunications satellites . . ; 1 ( Bloomberg ) \ 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


U.S. FUTURES 


Oran .Moh LOT Oon OS OAM 


t 4ot_- v ON^, W On* 0 *-(W* 


* 90 U franca Nile tab. 9 

ClBHPrn. 


Ouan HOT Lot Oos* Ota OoJnf 


Amsterdam 


ABN Amra hm 69.10 6**0 
ACF HOMlin M S?j60 


ACF HOMlin «) 

Anon 1» 

Anoia a 

Afeo 20? 

AMEV B2-K 

BoH-Awssaneo 44.70 

CSM 
D5V. 

Elifvier 
Fsi+er 
G*!-Bn>:«l« 

HBG 
Hvuwhen 
HMWim 
Hunier Douglas 
IHC CalenO 
Inter Mueller 
ir.r Neflericna 
«LW. 

KNPBT 

Neaiic.o 

OceGrir.len 
PcVno*c 
rai'ros 
Pairjrori 
P»era 

PX^mra 

RalnKB 
Rcrmto 
Rural Sutcn 
Si or* 

Un.^ver 
»» Ornme-ra 
•/fly 

AaiffVXlvwr 

EOE NMMx L 437.4* 
Frevim : 4J6J* 


Helsinki 


Amer-Yhtymo 

1)1 


Enso-GuJrell 

*570 *570 

HuMamaki 

?ll 


ILOJ*. 

1670 


KrAlrtlnif 

126 



S3? 

225 

Nokia 

J24 

37* 

Pohloia 

100 

98 

Rfroola 

H8 

117 

Sfockmorm 

320 

3IS 

HEX Index : 19*121 
previous : 19*357 



Kinaflsfier 

Laeeroke 
Lend s«c 

LOPorte 


Tokyo 


Hong Kong 


Bk Easl Asm 54 sue i 

Camay Pacific 1340 13 m 
Cneuna Kona 4730 a>io , 
Cnma LOTI Pwr 46 '5 45.75 
Doirv Farm Inti 1380 1340 
HanaLunaDe* 18.10 i»20 


Harrs berm Bonk 7750 77J0 


H*nOCTVJ« Land S3 S3 ; 
UK Air Ena 48 4475 1 

HK Owia Cos 7140 21 40 
Hr Elecrri- mn aw 
HK Land M50 T 8 W 

HK Real!* Trw*l 2540 2500 
H5BC HoldMai >73 124 

HK 54k3t»j HIH 14 13.90 
HK Telecomm 15.70 15 70 
HK Ferry 1140 1110 I 

Hultfi Mtamoea 39.75 3 ? 25 
H,5an Dev 39 TtK 

Jardine main 77 SO 7S 
Jordin* Sir HM K2i 35 
KOTMon MCtor 1790 1720 
Mandarin Orient 1120 17 

Miramar HolK 2 S 0 C S 
New World Dev 36 3675 
SHK Proas 6 * 4L5Q 

SlelUJi 500 500 

Smre POC A 64 63 

Tor Cheurw Pros 13 W I3J3 i 
TVE 355 1651 

wnarfHOfd 34 75 34.75 
Wing on Inn »1<0 13.70 
ninsar ma. 1150 1330 | 
B sea* l wtej: «» 
previous : 11454.10 


Brussels 


Ayrt-yju. 

-v Flit 

Sraea 

Etren 

3e*=ert 

Ccoerili 

Caceaa 

Do:haize 

Etcarraocl 

5>S 

GBL 

G+voert 

KreaelSank 

Pelrct'na 


779f 2840 
3003 7995 
4745 42J5 
73*0 7400 
21725 23775 
IK 182 
5780 5720 
U96 1400 

«41 J0H 

1550 1570 

4790 43*1 

*690 ma 
>640 7483 


Loth Gen era 
LlavdlBCnfc 
Moris So 
ME PC 
Not') Power 
ttamest 
NtliWst Water 
Pearson 
PS.0 
Piikinatcn 
PowerGen 
Prudential 
Rank Or* 
PecUtt Cal 
Pee laid 
Peed lnr> 
Reuters 
RMCGrouo 
Rolls Pa#ce 
Rctnmfi I until 
Parol Seal 
PTZ 

Sonsburv 
Scot Newras 
Scot Power 
Sears Holds 
Servem Trent 
Snell 


36 3475 
44 4250 
500 500 
04 63 


Smirti H r en ew 

SmithKIine B 
Smith ,'WHi 
Son Alliance 
Tate &Lne 
Tesco 
Thorn EYi 
TomfciflS 
tsb Group 
um lever 

UMBiVTjiTS 

vedatone 
far Lsar 3' : 
Wellcome 
rfihiisread 
wlUlams Haas 
WllliS Corrocn 


Accor 

Air UauMe 

Alcatel Alsttion 

Aro 

Bancoire ICIel 
BIC 

BMP 

Bmrraues 

BSN-GD 

Carretaur 

CCF 

Cerus 
Charaeurs 
Ciments Franc 
Chib Med 
EU-Anulialne 

Ell-Son H 
Euro Oivwv 
Gen. Ecu* 
Haras 
I metal 

Lafora* Coooee 
Learand 
Lvon. Euj> 
Oreai il'i 
L VJV.H. 
Matra-Hachette 

! Michel in B 
. Moullner 
Purtcas 
Peauner inti 
Pernod-Rrcara 
Pemeat 
PrimemiTS (Au< 

RoChjrecrtTHrwe 

Rh-Pou'enc A 
Raft 51 Lou s 
Reaoute iloi 
S aint Go bain 
5E.B. 

Sta Generate 

Suez 

TtuxnsonJISF 
Total 
U A.P. 

Valeo 




F.T. 10 Mdev : 243170 
EHEWSa : 34J9.1 1 


Previou* : 2*400* 


Sao Paulo 


Johannesburg 


bs.oi Beioe K'O 5*75 
See Oer. B cr ave 8*73 at 60 
3oc Gen Betaowe JWS 2850 
Safina !S!M 15775 

Seiro, 15100 14700 

Trsctetei 11500 11775 

UCB "492J J4730 

Corre al StaOiadex : 77 6609 

p revio us : 777201 


Frankfurt 


AEG 

A'liosj H0I3 

Atttns 

AVO 

BASF 

ESrer 

Bar HrDoOank 
9a , .’ereirnut 
BBC 

BMP Sank 

B u:n 

Commenaor* 

Csmipentol 

Gaunter Bmi 

CVO-JISQ 

DiBsaeora 
Of^cne Benk 
OaoMs _ 
Dresdrer Book 
FeKtnueWe 
F Ktl-op Haescn 


AECi 
a 1 teen 
Analo Airier 
Borlo»* 
Blrvaor 
BuHeis 
De Been 
Drietantetn 
Gen car 
GFSA 
Harmon » 
HOTveM Steel 
Stool 

HeaUank Grn 

H — NImmAmIm 
powiionrein 

PusMcl 
SA Brews 
Si Helena 
Sascl 
Aelkom 
AesferaDeep 


Madrid 


«s 95 88 V 3430 34J0 

20 * 2 M I BcO Cer.lrd HUB 29W 3C25 
MA — Bot-co Somasdcr 77*0 ccc 
0 4 CEPSA 3TT5 3200 

MA 491 Draaodv: 259C 1605 

109 TCS I Endesa t«o TWO 

S 0 7S 5CJC Ercros '-5C 144 

820 &70 Iberdrola 1 i:X It 45 

-II 71 taeiol 6SM 47*0 

~ - — — ' — CHI C35 

2160 2165 


3 245C | Taocealero 
16 75 16- Teieianics 


Banco 9o Brasil 12R) 

BcnesM 800 

Bradesco 930 

Brahma MQC0 ' 

, Ppranopanem o I31C 

Pe'raoras tkjo 

; Tetetrus 2539 

Vale Rio Doce 5»a) 

Varia 9500 


‘0»i 16- Itinwiw . oj .• 

S49 f* i 5-E. General index . 352.17 

V IS ?7S0 1 Prtrum : 35472 


Anal Eiectr 
Asaht Oemtcal 
Asohl Glass 
Bank of Tokyo 
Bridgestone 

Canon 

Cano 

Da) Nippon Print 
Daiwa House 
Daiwa Securities 
Fcnuc 
Full Bonk 
Full Photo 
Fulitsu 
Hitachi 
Hitachi Cable 
Hondo 
Ita Yakodo 
itachu 

japan Airlines 
Kallma 
KotsqI Po«ror 
Kawasaki SSeel 
r.irin Hr nver r 
Komatsu 
Kubala 
Kvocera 
Matsu Etec wds 
wersu Elee Wks 
fwiitsublshi Bk 
Mitsubishi Kasei 
Mitaubisni Elee 
Mlrsuthihi Hev 
Mitsubishi Cora 
Mitsui ond Co 
.Mrtaukeshi 

Mirsumi 

NEC 

NG< irsuiotars 
Nikko Securities 

Nippon Kaeafcu 
Nippon Oil 
Nippon Steel 
Niocan Yusen 
Nissan _ 
Nomura Sec 
NTT 

Cfvmpus Oattes! 
Pioneer 
Ptaoh 
San re Elec 

Sharp 

Sfurmcu 

SMnetsuChem 

Sony 

Sumihxno Bk 
Sumimmo Cnern 
Surii Marine 
S«n Homo Metal 
To) sal Cara 
Toidus Marine 
TakedaChem 

TDK 

Tarim 

To* nr Marine 

Tc»»OEieCPP 
TcepOT PrprtiBfl 
T oral ind 
Toshao 
Torota 
YofftocR! See 


Camdev 

S ,BC 

Canadian Pacific 
Can Packers 
Can Tire a 


Grains 

iManw»- aeaarapara 
r 174 1461k 3 


902OCTM 11.16 027 H.T? 
9.t76Acr 95 11.16 11.11 110* 

«L5746or*S 
1007 Ju! 95 
100700 95 

IM87 Tuetscta* I 7481 

OW 127-449 bp 1179 


♦8A4 T7064 
HUB 4JB7 
-am 4D 


! cci. Ind B 

aoeoOT 

Zomnco 


Canniest Exp! 
OenraonNUnB 
C-ckenson Min A 
Dotasa 
Svtax a 

Echo Bov Mines 
Eauitv Silver A 
FCA inti 
F«inaA 
P+tcner Chcdr A 
FPi 

: cwiB 
, GcMrora 
‘ GLKCdo Pes 
, Hers :nll 
! Hrir.-a GkJ Mines 
! Mcii ruee 
' H5TWCP! 

• rtusssn'sBer 


1 :na 

intererav o>: 
. :smod 
Lsscr; 
LCb-’OT Co 


WHEAT (CBOT) uakimnnn-iainnrlaiM 

1WV; 300 Marta 147 374 2441k 3J5H 

172 100 MOrN 157 XM XV 3+3*. 

256 2M A* 94 146 150'- 2M 300 

357^ 202 S«P *4 24816 351 3 Mb* 259% 

246 20 Dec 94 334 358% 3S»> 15T* 

1 a 111 Jb)95 mi hi Ml ui 

Enwes 13000 Tue'vsrSes 800 
Tip's opoiM 4a.9H or a* 

WHEAT OtaOT) MQ»#uiT«»P™m-OGasriOT*OTN 
193 2J9 Mar 94 3471, 359 14T- 

279V, 2.9* May 94 3J4 14044 350 148 

135 2.97 JUI94 X44 30% 144 3rO'» 

315U, 10T'. See 94 144 M iron 146 ]«W 

348 21795 Dec 94 3JD% 334>i 358% 35Ti 

2 STn IC . MX 75 JSPA 

Est sales na Turnsoles 5JS3 
TW-. aa aiW 830 up 426 
CORN (CBOT) saaaovrrw-imrop- OTj i awttuvro 
111*, 307%6tar96 219% 29JU 290% 295".r 

216* v 306HMOV94 297 30IW 194'i 101 

116 .- 241 M«4 2VTV, lCT*. 2971', XC9 

2*T, 2,«-7>D*4 2*3’.# 2*6% 283 296<a 

2TJI# 2J6-,DeC9J 2C% 2JI 24fii 2JO% 

2 391, lS3",Ato9S 27* 2J7 2 M 276% 

302 273 Atav95 279 3*7; 279 UO’i 

24 Ta 2J4'#JU<95 279 211^ 27* 2*1 

7-5S-, 25 I t DrcW 233 237 253 236'v 

EB COWS 4CC00 Toe s OSes 37037 
Tuesopennl D0304 Cfl »67 


*■* 6*1 U47B 
-OD 6 .8,966 
•003% 1 4022 


•806% 1X3*6 
.605*3 AH5 
-001% 10457 
-606 2292 

• tunv, ?s 
‘SJBV, S 


,0*3% 9S7» 
• 003% 11.793 

-aar# i«.au 
* 00 % 
•BSJ% 2951 
•an 2&5 

-tun 594 

-001V, 14 


953M<rH MO 1*87 RI7D 
978 May 94 111* HU IHC 
999Ju<*4 1145 1147 !D4 

1030 Sap 94 1170 1173 1140 

1041 DccM II* 1301 IWO 
T0776OT9S 1230 H30 U14 

ill l May JS l*to 1340 1340 

13250495 124* 1290 1240 

1275 StatS 

s IAN Tue's-sries 12097 
*nw 89,102 UP 35 
IJUKZ CNCTNJ Rtata- — rl 
1430 Ma- 94 18*03 HR45 10405 
«90*Moy 94 70700 11108 W7JQ 
192500*94 11*40 1147* 11040 
10150 Sep 94 1EL50 1T3J8 11150 
MU9NevM 117-5* 1MJ8 II7JO 
1050 0m 95 11908 11975 11700 
KJ40O66OT9S 71700 11700 11700 
Ota* 95 
0**5 

» 5300 TulUdh 2087 

»N 17061 UP 20 


-*SS 


•2 1X993 
—4 80*7 


.458 90S! 
• 425 X9*S 
4 ATS 1JN 


' 9U6Stata' 9S71 9S04 9S4S 
9DJ10ecN 9530 9S0S 9X29 
903* NOT 9S 9X12- 91D 9X12 

-taTIJOBta 9*09 MM 94J8 
9101 Sap 95 944* 9473 944* 

FJ*Dac« 9CO HAT UA 1 
a 312791 Wlmta 4EJH 
Wit 1*79473 OH 45777 
4 POUND (CMBD SOTBOOTHIntat 
10OQBMar94 UU46 10*76 103*4 
14588 0m 94 10520 10S5O 10500 
1058OSro9( 10fl* 14500 1000 
103BODacf* 

tt UAD TOTLsatoi aLMB 
WiW 4X431 l*> 1041 
IAN DOLLAR (CM89Q snrOT-IOT 
- 8J3MNOT9* 274m *0465 817(0 
*0365 Junta 07*48 07499 X7479 
HWSStpta 07440 O7«0 07*30 
BjnsDmita 07*43 07*48 07*25 
07376 Mqt 95 
07430 0m 95 

n 6031 Tim's, idtoi 5088 

wnks 15065 ta use 



Metals 


056*2 Ma- 94 0-5655 05680 OS6S3 
80WF Junta 8JSD 05690 09522. 

jro fw-M 

I 29043 Tu*%mS» *7.514 

ink* 157013 off INI 

SEYB( (C3NER3 irom-lNWH 


•DU70W 
+17 -.9022 
*17 335 

*17 37 


YcfSO ino A 
V# ••m 
74c r* Res 
•VocLecn Harter 
Visai a 
N ano ’rr3 A 
Norandaij ic 
Nor anas Forest 
trCf" Enevpy 
Nihera Teiecorr 
f*?v3 Cora 
Csheae 
PoptTin A 
PVsre- Dame 
Poca Pta ratowt 
FAACsra 

Pena:sscnce 
Rsse-sB 
Rsrw -OT g _ 
Oars' Bank Can 
Sown* *hes 
Sc=trs Hoso 
Secprcm 
S ears Cor 
SneS Car 
Sherrill Conto" 
SHI Srsteratoe 


’ 7 54 5*9 Vi MV 94 W: 8 .7TA 672-« tin 

: 701 STTiMayta 808 '- j 804% 6.77 1 ., 40J', 

; :_5a 5«r<,04« 4*o'n oar , ut-i U6'i 

70S ITS 0OU*4 4739 , 67F» OTUy ATT, 

r 6B9V- 6.17 Seat* 4-58 801% 058 *01'k 

7071, S0S , ..6touH *09 401 407 407V. 

I 070 618-5 01195 647M 653 647c, L53 

; 6731', 6 « 6NP 95 696 698 656 608 

603 44JV.JOI9S 600 600 i-SSV, 6SF, 

I 650 : 1*1 55 Nov 95 623 621 619 63% 

• E3OT 4X880 Tw'suta 3*00? 


*004 56873 

•OJW-5 ALSO 
•OOffi 35097 
-OATS 601 
*00573 1783 
*08714 1*011 
•MTV, 1007 
*ao*v, 777 
•oar m 
-S*T- 882 


22‘5 Sh 
360 OH 
3T»9 3T » 
10 + 10 + 
102 101 
tr«e 17>» 
29*5 Fh 
2ta 20% 


See- flrcusKe 

Si-etta a 

7£.s.ts! Enera 

trt B 


■ oraraa Dm-n 
Tcrster B 
TrsnscITs Ut 1 
T.-srsCdo P-pe 
2r.icnFi-MA 
Irraips 
7fi K A 
■jnccra Snerar 
TSC 2884*9698 


29% 
U4« 14% 
9 9, 

3Y JB*» 

7% S 
0*‘4 19% 
11 % 11 
7% 7% 

in, iri 

19,'* 2B 
8"y 9% 
29‘» 2*% 
26% »’.3 
M’S IT- 
11% Sirs 
25 "k 26 

16 15% 
19*1 UM 

l'4 420 
16— 16% 
103 0.*B 
070 070 


Tursooenmt 169.117 alt 1501 
SOYBEAN MEAL ICSOTl i 
23790 18SJBMor94 19170 

23200 TBSJOLtoVta 196SB 

230 00 172X0*9* 191*0 

2 T 10 B ItUOAegta 193*0 

21000 189005*0*4 19190 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY* FEBRUARY 10, 1994 
— advertisement 

international FUNDS 


Page 11 


Feb. 9, 1994 


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w Jaoan DlversKled Fund — S »* 


■v Optima Emerald Fd Lid — » 

iv Oaflma Fund 5 

■v Optima Futures Fund 4 

w Op tana Gtabol Fund-- — * 
iv Optima Perfculo Fd Lid. — S 

w Optima Short Fund- 5 

FACTUAL 

0 Eternity Fund Ltd— S 

0 Infinity Fund Lid — J 

d star High Yhrtd Fd Ltd * 

PARIQAS-GROUP 

■v Luxor — - — — * 

0 Parvest USA B„ S 

d P arvew J«wn B— — — v 

0 Parvesi Asia Poclt B * 

0 Parvesi Europe B— — Ecu 

d Parvesi Holland B Fi 

d Parvest France B— -FF 

0 Parvesi Germany B dm 

0 Parvesi Obli-OolInrB * 

0 Parvesi Obi F DM B- DM 

0 Parvest Obli- Yen B Y 

tf Parvest OWKSulden B FI 

0 Porvesi ObiFFranc B FF 

d Parvesi OMFStar B * 

a Parvesi OblFEcu B— Era 

0 Porvesi OWFBetoxB LF 

tf Parvesi S-T Dollar B. * 

0 Parvest 5-T Europe 8 Ecu 

0 Poorest S-T DEM B DM 

0 Porvesi 5-T FRF B FF 

0 Parvesi 5T Bef PHiS B BF 

tf Parvest Gtabol B_ LF 

0 Parvesi lid Bond B S 

0 Parvesi OWI-Liro B Lit 

0 Parvest ini Eaulties B > 

PERMAL GROUP 

/ Commodities Ltd J 

f Drakkar Growin N.V— S 

f Emerging mmshwos S 

/ EuroMir (Ecu) Ltd — Eai 

t Investment Hides NV 1 

f Media 8. Commurications J 

/ unseal Lid * 

PICTET A Cl E -GROUP 

w P.CF UK Vat ILimi— c 

iv P.CF Germoval (Lux I DM 

vP*.F HDromvai (Luxl j, 

w P.CF woiiber I Lux) Ptos 

iv P.CF Valitolla (Luxl Lfl 

w P.CF WOltronce (Lux) FF 

■v Vatoond SFR l Lux) SF 

ivvaRxmd USD (La* I s 

wurtbond Ecu (Lux) fai 

ir ValDond FRF ILuvl FF 

» Votbond GBP (Lu«) 1 

iv VOtoond DEM (Lux) DM 

wUSSBdPtti(Un) J 

wEmero Mkts (Lux) > 

wEur.Oeeart(Luy) Ecu 

b Gtatxd Value l Luxl — — Eai 

w Euroval (Lux) — Ecu 

0 Pictet VoJsutae (CH) 5F 

m Inti smalt Can NOM) — -J 


70*i 

96*7 

29.94 

11627*6 

133136*0 

34544ft 

30634 

243*6 

19735 

102259 

10147 

310.19 

104007*0 

219.71 

19959 

15569 

243*6 

743*0 


d PG Money Plus r FL FI U22ft 

d RG Money Phis f S » JS* 

tf PG Money Pius F Dm DM 11046 

d RG Money «rt F SF 5F 105.75 

More Robeco see *"»iero«n Stoats 
ROTHSCHILD (GROUP EDMOND DE) 
IK-HOUSE FUNDS _ 
w ASton CoWtai MotoingsFdJ 
wDaiwoLCFPiimscWBBdJ IM149 

m Da two LCF Rothsch Bb— ,JWW> 

w Farce Cow TrodHlimCHFJF 

wLEKOm— * TW.fJ 

■v LeveratMd Coo Holdings — 5 ,46^ 

0 Prl Owuenge Swiss Fd — JF JWL79 

a PrieoultY Fd-Euroee Ecu ra«0 

0 Prieaglir Ftf«eivel« SF 121511 

0 Prieauliy Fd-Loim Am S ]».»« 

b Prl Dana Fund Ecu Ecu HUM 

b Prtoond Fund U5D -J 

a PrlDond Fd HY Enwr Mkts* JJ*3M 

w Seieciivc inve* Sa * WMrt 

b Source—— 5 20*1)80 

w US Bard Plus * 

w vor tortus —ECU 1500*4 

ROTHSCHILD (GROUP EDMOND DE) 

OTHER FUNDS .a—,*, 

0 Attar Joeon Emerg. Grawm* 18J3SU 

w E stall Eur Purtn lm Tst— Eat B4)B 
■v Euroo SiroiN investmta —Ecu 10A500 

a integral Futures » '*^4 

OOaltoestGloeolFd General DM 196499 

0 OpUges) Gtaoai Fix income DM I7 Ja« 

a Paciilc Nies Fund * *-5 

w Permol orakkor Growth NV* MB** 

1 Satecllon Honmn FF 8108125 

0 Vlctoire Artane— 1 ®«*B 

ROTHSCHILD ASSET MGMT IC.I1 LTD 

mNtfnrM Leveraged HW S 97001 

0 Tokyo PoafK Hides iSeoU 162-1* 

SAFDIE GRDU P/KEY ADVISORS LTD 
m Kev Diversified me Fd U(LS I1586«) 

SAFRA REPUBLIC HOLDING 

w Republic GAM 5 I5A99 

w Republic GAM America—* 
wReaGAMEmMktsGtoOrtJ 59-U 

iv p«a GAM Em Mkts Lot AmS 

w Republic GAM Europe 5F_SF J3S22 

wReoublto GAM Eurooe USI5 119» 

w ReauOUC GAM GfWIh CHF JF 12237 

iv Republic GAM Growth ! — i ran 

■V RMuDIto GAM Growlh USSA 171.51 

wRenuWto GAM Opportunity s 2SB 

W neaudilc GAM Partita- * '6140 

» Republic Gnsey Doi inc S IBM 

w Republic Gnsey Eur Ine — DM 16*8 

w Republic L« Am Alloc S 1M35 

w RetxiCdc Ltd AmArgenL-J 18747 

w Reoabito Lot Am Brajli — * 1U57 

w Republic Lot Am Mexico—* I0ki4 

w Republic Lm Am venex. — S 
w Reo Salomon SrrafFd Lid J 99J* 

SANTANDER NEW WORLD INV. 

m Commander Fund * !Br2£, 

m Explorer Fund * 126.9B8 

SKAND1NAV1SKA EN5KILDA BAN KEN 
S-E-BAN KEN FUND 

d Eurooa UK A ;■« 

0 FiarronOstarn inc * J 's 

tf Global Inc — * '*ft 

0 Lakamodrl Inc * l-“ , 

0 Varlden Inc —5 1-10 

0 Jaoan Inc — Y 96.99 

0 Minolnc — } ' « 

d Sverige Inc _Se* i'-TO 

0 Nordamerlkn ine * ;** 

tf Teknoiogl inc — J 

a Sverige Roraefond inc— Se* 1836 

5KANDIFONDS 

tf Eaultv IWI Act * 17JJ 

tf Eautfy I nil me 5 '*34 

0 Equity Global * 

0 Eaultv Nat. Resource* S I.J2 

d Eauilv japan Y noil 

0 Eauilv Nordic 3 '-g 

d Eauilv U K i J-5 

d Equity Continental Europe J ' JO 

tf Enid tv Mediterranean * '*) 

d Eaultv Norm America i 2T* 

0 Equity For East 1 

tf inti Emerging Market* * Lrt 

tf Bond Inri Ace * 'J™ 

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tf Bond Eurooe Act s 159 

a Band Europe me s , “E 

tf Band Sweden Acc Sek 6* 

0 Bond Sweden Inc —Sek ll-J 

a Band DEM ACC DM 131 

0 Bond DEM inc —DM W8 

a Band Dollar US acc S J-M 

0 Bond Dollar US inc s 1.10 

0 Curr. US Dollar * i !■» 

tf Curr. Swedish Kronor Sek 1236 

SOCIETE GENERALE GROUP 
SOGELUX FUND I5F) 

w SF Bonds A USA S 16*8 

iv SF Bontfs B Germany DM na 

wSF Bonds C France — FF 13435 

• 5F Bond* E GJ1 1 

w SF Bond* F Japan Y an 

w SF Bond* G Eurooe Ecu 63B 

wSF Bonds HWorw Wide — * IL72 

iv SF Bond* J Belgium BF 65008 

w SFEq.K Norm Americo— S ^ 

wSF EaLW.Euroue Ecu 3733 

w SF Eq. M PodflC Basin Y '594 

wSFEa-P Growth Countries 5 ”•« 

wSFEaO Gold Mines s 3467 

w SF Ea R world wide * , JA>* 

wSF Short Terms France — FF 1662)67 

w u Chur] Term T pur _£ai 162D 

50DITICA5SET MANAGEMENT INC 

wSAM Brazil— S 

wSAMDhmmHIed— — * 1)ji0 

wSAM/AteGatT Hedge * ’l^" 

:asgsr-----| is 

w GSAM composite— _—-S 370.16 

» SHB Band Fund- -} J“7 

i wSvemka Set Fd Amer Sh — » 1ft" 

iv Svensko Set Fd Germany -J 
wSvenskoSel.FdinnBdShJ '2J* 

i wSvcnskoSeLFd infISh * 

i w Svanska Set Fd Japan Y « 

i iv Svenska SeL FdMHFMkt — Set '20^ 

I w Svenska Sel. Fd PoeH » — | 

1 w Svenska Sel. Fd Swed Ms_5e» 1«B4( 

> w svenska Sel FdSylvioSh -Ecu 15601 

l SWISS BANK CORP. 

1 0 SBC 100 index Fund -SF 197501 

1 d SBC Eauilv PW-Austrolta-AS ZteJI 

I tf SBC Equlhr PtlKunadO — CJ 227JK 

9 tf SBC Eauilv PtO-Eurone Ecu TON 

5 tf SBCEqPttFNethertand*— FI «7.a 

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1 tf SBCBondPIfl-AwtrSA — A» 117.J 

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8 tf SBC Band Pttt-COhS B CS 'B.T 

6 0 SBC Bond PMt-OM A DM 174J 

0 d SBC Band PtfhDM B —— — DM 

7 0 SBC Bond Plll-tkilch G. A_F 175* 

0 SBC Band Pm-Outoh G. B-FI I87J 

12 tf SBC Band PHHEcu A Ecu 1 JM 

14 0 SBC Band PHt-Eai B EM 1»J 

£ 0 SBC Band PW-FF A FF 616* 

14 0 SBC Bond Pltl-FF B FP 704-* 

S tf SBC Bona PIH-Pta* A/B — Plus W2»* 

a d SBC Bono Ptf FSterllng A — t W.' 

u 0 SBC Bond Ptfl- Sterling B — t *4* 

0 SBC Bond PWTtDllO-SF A — SF J169J 

n 0 SBC Band PorttoitoSF B — SF 1431* 

17 0 5BC Bond PHHJSJA S BU 

M 0 5BC Band PtIFUM B * IJJJ 

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go 0 SBC Bond Pill-Yen B Y "7BMX 

46 dSBCMMF A*_ « fTTSJ 

24 0 SBCMMF-BFR BF IHKU 

DO 0 SBC MMF Con*—- a 

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59 0 SBC DM Short-Term B DM 131ft. 

47 0 SBC MMF - Dutch G Fl 73ta> 


- Cto,, B * ,D - H 

THORNTON MANAGEMENT LTD 

tf Pod I Invt Fd SA 1 to-l] 

d PdOftnwf Fd 5A DM— DM 

d EasiernCiWMderFund-rJ 
d Thor. Util Dragon* M Lid. * 

tf IhorfltonOrtMllnc MLWS 

tf Thornton Ttoer Fd Ltd J £■“ 

a Monoord Scfedten— * Si 

w J okuri n- * isji 

NEW TIGER 5EL. FUND 

tf Hang Kone. — » J't 

gS mne*. -H «» 

tfUS^to- \ 

dUSIUtoM WV. » as 

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TTORNIDH TAIWAN FUND 

tf Equ>ly Income- 5 i« 

d Eaultv Growih — 

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d J • Fund 

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d UBZ Euro-income Fund — SF R4 

0 UBZ World income Fund— Ecu «. 

tf UBZ Gold Fund — J ,’gl 

d UBZ Nippon Convert — SF ^ 

tf Asto Growth Convert SFR JF 
tf Asto Growth Cwwert USS — 1 I™, 

tf UBZ DM -Band Fund -DM nu 

a UBZ D- Fund 

0 UBZ Swtsft Equity Fund— *F 
0 UBZ American Eq Fund — } JJj 

UNTON^B/WCAfR^ASSBT MGT (UBAM) 

INTERNATIONAL. NASSAU 

wArdeHnvesi- ■ — J 

"KSBE ” 1 — 

w Bocoiin - ; im 

w Bectanvesi J Jflf’ 

wBrurinvest -» ,111: 


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w Dmvesi. J 

w Dlnvesl Asia 5 — — — * JsJ'Jf ‘ 

mt Dlnvest inti Fix Uto Sire* — S JOOBMl 

wJogmuKj- J “* 3 ? 

w LarantovKi. S 

wMonf Invest J 

w Mart Invesi * 

wMounnvesl- f uSSf! 

w Mourtflvesl Comtogletf S 

iv Maur Invest Ecu Ecu ’JfniS! 

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tv Puhar overtv * 

w Ouambivest 6 

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w TudJnvesl i MS'S : 

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UNION BANCAIRE ASSET MGT (UBAMJ 
INTERNATIONAL LUXEMBOURG 

w UBAM 5 Bond * ”W4*. 

w UBAM DEM Bond DM lliftn 

w UBAM Emerging Grawm _5 JW532 

w UBAM FRF Band FF 060*1 

w UBAM Germany DM [3549 

w UBAM Global Bond Ecu 142736 

iv UBAM Japan Y 9 *J*^S 

w UBAM Sta PoeH 6 Asm — S Jl.W 

w UBAM US Eauilies * 13SZ72 

UNION BANK OF SWITZER LAND/ 1 NT RAG 


0 Eml Ntih index Ptos A — Ft 
0 Em) NeflL tfldrx Flu* B — Fl 

0 EmlSaatn lnd.«*4* PW 

0 Eml Soatalnd. Plus B JTa 

1 0 Eml UK index Plus A t 

d Eml UK index Phn D ( 

ai Enigma Currency Fd — — S 
m Equator Offshore LftL——J 
w EHrtr.Mo imr.M Eai Bd FdEai 
w EiPlr.Sto Inv. SB) Eur Fd_* 

0 Europe 1997- * 

0 Europe OOl tool tons Ear 

« F.I.T. Fund FF --FF 

w FM.P, Porltelta * 

w Fairfield inn LM 5 

w Falriletd Sentry LM 5 

w FoirfieW StrolrihfS L9d — S 

mFatom Fund -J 

m Firebird Oversea* Ltd S 

w First Eaate Fond S 

w First Ecu Ltd Ecu 

in First Frontier Fimd— — J 
mFlrsl Inti immhnenl Ltd—* 

iv FL Trust Alia * 

w FL TruH Swilrerlond SF 

0 Fondltatta — •*_ 

w Feniux ' Monev sf 

w Fan to* 2 Devise SF 

■V Fanhix 3 - Wtl Btfld 5F 

w Formuta Selection Fd— 5 F 

m Future Generation Ltd * 

mGEN General tan Ltd * 

mGems prouresshie Fd LW-J 
m German Sel. Associates— DM 

mGFMC Growth Fund 5 

w Global 9) Fund Udl * 

w Gtobal ArMtrnee Ltd SF 

O Gtabol CopFtfBVh Lid * 

w Gtobal Futures Mat Ltd—J 
m Global Monetary Fd Ltd — S 
nGsmrd SF 

tf GreenLine France FP 

mGaoromeed CapittS imm»4 LF 

w Honttnaer Latin Amer 1 

t HoussmaonHIdgiN.V— J 

vHD Investment* LW 5 

m Hemisphere Neutral Dec 31 IS 
tf Herilooe Coo Growth FdLHJS 

wHestta Fund * 

b Highbridge Couflai Corn — 5 

m Horizon Fund FF 

v* mex Holdings Ltd SF 

iv I FDC Japan Fund Y 

O ILA-IGB. — — * 

0 ILA-IGF -5 

0 ILA-INL * 

w indigo Currency Fd Lid — S 

1 inlt Securities FwwJ Ecu 

tf Interfund 5A — * 

1 0 inuesto DWS — — DM 

w Japan Pacific Fund s 

mJBPonSeiectton Asses Y 

w Japan Seiecilan Fund — J 
■ Kenmar Gtd. Senes 2 * 

w KeiunarGiuiunieed * 

mKi Asto Pacific Fd Ltd 5 

iv KM Gtobal J 

0 KML - II High Yield » 

w Korea Dynamic Fund * 

w Korea Growth Trust- - S 

mUF. Yield & Growth Fd * 

iv La^avette Holdings Ltd — * 
m La Jolla Int Grtti Fd Lid — % 
b Lqierman: DtfshoreSrroi—J 

w Leaf Sicav— — ; 

m Leu PertormiXK* Fd 1 

iv LF inienwUanaf * 

m London Pnrttolta Senrtces-6 
,olPS mil h.p.B ■■ — — J 


d Amco — |F y 

d BancHnvesi SF 6l«By 

d Bnt-lnvest — SF 165*0 y 

tf Canoe — |F 

0 Convert- Invest — *F 15739 v 

0 D-iWirk-inve*l -DM 21740 y 

tf Dolior-lnvesl S J1J-SJ 

tf Energie- invesi SF »»« 

d Espoc SF ra»v 

I n jffil: 

d FrSdl - =f F 

a SF 

tf Globinvest SF raMv 

tf Geld- Invest SF 

0 Gulden- 1 iwe9 F ‘ 

d Hetoelimresi SF 165Jbv 

d H ollong- invesi g ^ 

d Jopon-lnvest. SF 

dPod ik-nvesi * F sag* 

0 Skundinovlen- Invest SF !£*{£ v 

0 Slerf Ina-mvrrcl J _ 7X64 v 

tf Swiss Franc- invesi SF 

0 Sima — SF ML5D 

dswlssreal — SF ra*0 

d UBS America Latina SF i«*0y 

tf UBS America Lai mo S 

tf UB5 Asto New Horizon SF 

0 UBS Asia New Horizon » jj** 

tf UBS Small C. Europe SF 

0 UBS Small C. Europe DM 

tf UBS Port Inv SFR inc — — SF IM V 

0 UBS Port Inv SFR Cop G-JF 1284Sy 

tf UBS Pori Inv Ecu inc — !]'■* Y 
tf UBS Port Inv Ecu Inc— —Ecu 66Z! y 

d UBS Port Inv Ecu Cop G—SF , 'J® 5 V 

tf UB5 Port Inv Ecu Cop G — Ecu ™ fly 

0 UBS Port inv U5* Inc S 79.«r 

tf UBS Port Inv US* MK JF ''-• 4 ® v 

tf UBS Port Inv USS Cop G — SF >>745 v 

fl UBSPOII InvUSJCapG— * reJftv 

0 UBS Port mv DM Inc SF 10.75 y 

0 UBS Port inv DM In c . .. DM |Oto V 

tf JBSPori rnvDMCaoG — SF 105*6v 

fl UBS Port Inv DM COP G— DM ra30y 

d Yen- Invesi. — Y ™m*0y 

0 UBS MM Invest -US1 * 

0 UBS MM InvwMSI « 

0 UBS MM InveM-Ecu Ecu 509*3 

0 UBS MM invesJ-Yen V toDtojOQ 

0 UBS MM mveN-Ut— Lll 'WJJJ** 

0 U85 MM Invest-SFH A SF 

0 UBS MM Invest-SF R T SF 

0 UBS MM Invert-FF F f 

0 UBS MM lm*sl-HFL Fl 10 AV7 

0 UBS MM Invesl-Can 5 & 'OIL® 

0 UBS MM InveM-BFR— — BF ^AHftBO 
0 UBS Short Term Inv-DM— DM 5«* 

0 UBS Band Inv-Eeu A Ea. 111*9 v 

0 UBS Band mv-EeuT Ecu igjjj 

0 UBS BQH0 inv SFR 5F JOftM » 

0 UBS Bond InvOM DM JlB^g * 

0 UBS Bond InvWS* * l 

a UBS Bond inv FF FF 1JS4M V 

0 UBS Band Inv-Can S — CS HI*’ J 

tf UBS Bond inv-LIt— -Lll '2'1*£b» » 

d UBS BJ-USS Extra Yield — S W4J 9 

tf UBS FU Term mv-USS94-J* 

0 UB5 Fix Term InwlH « [__■ t t'167 v 

0 UBS Fl* Term Inv-SFR 96-SF 1123 V 

d UBS Fix Term inv-DM 9ft— DM 11578 9 

0 UBS Fl* Term lnv-|ai W-Eai IM*J » 
0 UB5 FU Term Inv-FF 9ft — FF IU.16 v 

0 UB5 Ea Inv-EtaOPe A DM v 

0 UBS Ea inv-Eurape T. DM 

tf UBSEalnv-SCdPUSA S '&»* 

0 UBS Port I FI*mc(SFRl_SF 
0 UBS Porn Fix inc (DMI —DM 

0 UBS Port I FU lnc (Ecu)— Ecu 187-54 V 

tf UBS Port I Fix Inc (US61 — * J5123 

tf UB5 Captnv-90<U) SFR — JF 

rf UBS Cap Inv-WlO US* * 'WS5 y 

a UBS Cop inv-OQ/lO Germ — DM 17435 > 

WORLD FOLIO MUTUAL FUND* 

01 Dally income ■».. ■* 

d DM Dalhr income DM 

d S Bona Income- * *'2 

0 Non ■ 1 Bonds * "31 

0 Global Bonds- S 

tf Gtabol Balanced 5 

a Gtaoai Eauirhs * ‘J® 

d US Conservalive E«iiHrs_S iftiJ 

0 U5 Aoresslve Equine* J J4.W 

tf European Equltte* * ”■» 

a PoUflc Equine* J ’J-12 

0 Natural Resource* — — — J 
YIELD ENHANCEMENT STRATEGISTS 

tf Enhanced Trros. Returns _» UZteJ 


794.11 

7)448 

13211*0 

13849*8 

13931 

15133 

21.94 

1113S 

11630 

73S 

11*0 

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15247 

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319.10 

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13434 

156*7 

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■v Tokyo Pot Hokt N.V * 

MERRILL LYirat 

tf Dad or Assets Portfolio 1 

d Prime Rote Porttallo. -J .. 

MERRILL LYNCH SHOin-TERM 

WORLD INCOME PORTFOLIO 

tf DossA 1 

tf Class B — — * 

AUSTRALIAN DOLLAR PORTFOLIO 

a Category A M 

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CANADIAN DOLLAR PORTFOLIO 
d CdeoonrA- ■ -g 

if CfltttDQTV fl 1 ~ - Q 

CORPORATE HIGH INCOME PTFL 

tf Class A-l -3 

tf CtaSSA-2 * 


m Inti Smalt Can nOMI-—-* _ 477,w 
PREMIER INVESTMENT FUNDS LTD 
c/o PD. Bax 110a Grand Cayman 

mProSSer^ USEouitv Fimd-S l»W 

m Premter Ea Risk Mat Fd — 5 IB636 

m Premier Inti Eq Fund-— J JW* 

m Premier Sovereign Bd Fd— 5 jmri 

171 Premier Gtobal Bd F0_ — S tJteM 

m Premier Tofat Return Fd— 5 132177 

tf Emerging Him St Trip— J «*6 

m Putnam Em. Into St Trig* «.» 

tf Putnam Glob. High Growth* 183J 

d Putnam High Int GNMA FdS 
tf Putnam Inri Fund——— * ,s - n 

QUANTUM GROUP OF FUNDS 
w Emerging Growth Fd N.V—S —El'S 

w Oaontuai Fund NV — 1 

w Quantum Reathr Trori—— -5 M4M 

w Quantum UK Really Fimd-l JlJ.ie 

w Quint* mn Fund N.V — * "'•fi 

■1 Qimv Firm M W -* 

QUARRY MANAGEMENT LTD 
Telephone : 809 - 94M09B 
Fool mile : 809 - 94M862 

d Altos Arbitrage FdLM 5 »» 

tf Hesperis Fund LM 6 

0 Meridian Hedge FdLM s/s* in** 

tf Zenitn Fund Ltd Vi—j—-* 8ft* 2 

REGENT FUND MWLAGEMENT LTD 

w New Korea Growth Fd S 1347 

wPodncArtjBrggo “ 

w Regent Leveraged Firi 1 Fi-S 

tf Regent Gtw Am Grttvfd— J 6»S 

d Regenl GUjI Euro Grtti Fd J 4 .tj» 

d Reoted Glol Resources— S *4™ 

d Regenl Gihi Infl Grtti Id — 5 

tf Regent Gtbl Job Grtti Fd— S 2SWJ 

tf Regent GNU Pod! Basin — S 44M 

d Regent GW Reserve 5 

tf Regent GIU Tiger J "g; 

d Reoenr Glol UK Grtti Fd — S 

ra RJ- Country WridFd— -5 

w undervalued Assets Ser 1 _J 11-® 

d Regent Sri Lunko Fd J "jS 

m Recent Padflc Hdg Fd 5 H 14177 

FOB InJMAZ Rone«am.i3111B Hlt2« 

d RG America Fund Fl ]»40 

d RG Europe Fimd F g™ 

tf RG Podflc Fund- -F '“S 

tf RG Dlvlrenle Fund F! 55*0 


0 SBC MMF -ECU 

0 SBC MMF ■ Esc -If 446257*8 

0 SBC MMF ■ FF — FF 74*8047 

0SBCMMF-LH- SaWllJO 

tf S8C MMF - Pino Fta 1S9M6M 

tf SBC MMF - Schilling AS J 1£f® 

tf SBC MMF -Sterling * 

0 SBC MMF ■ SF — SF 

a SBC MMF ■ US- Dollar S 

0 SBC ftSMF ■ USS/II » 

d sbc mmf - ven y *»ra* 

0 SBC Glbi-PUl SF Grth SF 1KM7 

0 SBC GIW-PMI Ecu Grth Ecu I3fti« 

0 SBC G1M- Ptfl USD Grta 1 1225SB 

0 SBC Glrt-PtH SF Yld A SF 1155.71 

d SBC Glrt-PtU SF YW B. SF 

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d SBC Glrt-Ptfl Ecu Yld B — Ecu 13J6g 

0 SBC GlW-Pttl USD Yld A— J 11«M 

0 SBC Glrt-PtU USO YW B—S 121WB 

d SBC Girt- PHIS Fine A sf iiaai 

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0 Class A. * 


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w ActtaraiMcmce Sleav- FF 

w Art I townee Sicav » 

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w Arttvest mil Sicav S 

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m Advanced Lotto Fd Ltd 5 

w Advanced Sira trews Lta_j 

wAiG Taiwan Fund 5 

mAnna invesimret— — — 
w Aqulla inlernaHanal Fuad J 

w Arbllln imrtrttmrrrl S 

w Argus Fund Batonced SF 

w Argus Fund Band— sf 

0 Asto Oceania Fund » 

w ASS (Aslenl AG—— DM 

wASS I Derivative! AG Dm 

w ASS (Zeros) AG DM 

mAnodotfd in«*Ktars inc — i 
m Amena Fund Ltd— —5 

w ATO Nikkei Fund ——5 

w Banzai Hedged Growth Fd J 
■ Beckman Hit C«to Acc— 5 

w BEM Inter national Ltd 1 

tf Blkuben-Marval EEF .Ecu 

fl Bleomor GUd Fd (Coymanli 
tf Blecmar GtobailBanomaU S 

m Cal Euro Leverage Fd Ltd J 

tf CB German Index Fund OM 

m Carvin Growth Fund 5 

w Oladel Limited SF 

*v CM USA j 

n CMI Investment Fund S 

m Columbus Hotomgs J 

m Concorde inv Fund- » 

m Conlivesl Actions ln«_ BF 

w Conlivesl OUi Belux CT BF 

vr Cart Ives) OUU world DM 

w Convert. Fdmri A Certs — J 
w convert. FdtnriB Certs — J 

m Crete Drill Cap — — — * 

mCRM Futures Fund Ltd 1 

m Cu rimer Inti N.V * 

w Cwrr. Concert 1000 — —* 

d D. Witter wkJ WWe ivt Tst J 

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a Doiwa Jason Fund— — j 
a DBCC 1 Naftn Band Fund— 5 

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w Eos Overseas Fund Lid — >. 

m Elite world Fund Ltd sf 

tf Eml Beta. ind. Pius A BF 

a Eml Beta. Ind. Pius B- BF 

tf Emi France Intt. Pius* — FF 
0 Eml France Hid. Phis B — FF, 

0 Eml Germ. Ind. Plus A DM 

0 Eml Germ Ind. Plus B DM 


m Lyra seL Holdings 5F 

wM I MuHFStraregv * 

w MJCIngdon OHshore. N-V-— J 
w Maritime MIFSedor t LM* 
w Mtierhorn Offshore Fd — 5 

w MB E Japan Fund — LF 

m McGinn rs Gtobal (Jan 31) -5 
iumCM inf. Limited—; — —* 
v Miliennliim mternaf tonal —5 

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m Momentum Guild Ltd 1 

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0 NCA Fund S 

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w Noble Partners Inti Ltd 5 

m NSP F.l.T. Lid J 

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mOnoertoeimer UJ Art— J 
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w Oracle Fund LM J 

m Overt oak Performance 6 

m Poclt RIM Quo BVI Jan 31 J 
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INTERiN ATlON AL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1994 


JpJ-M CP»llS£> 


Page 13 


TI i 


Bonds Offer 
Philips Key 
To Grundig 

Compikd by Our Staff From Dispatches 

AMSTERDAM — a group of 
banks will - sell their convertible 
bonds in German consumer elec- 
tronics company Grundig AG in the 
next few days* and one of the banks 
said Wednesday that the Dutch 
company Philips Eteoronfcs NV 
wiii snap up the issues to increase its 
stake in the German company. 

Union Bank of Switzerland con- 
firmed it planned to seQ its stake in 
Grundig to Philips, but a Philips 
spokesman would not comment on 
the company's interest in Grundig. 

Philips already owns 31.6 per- 
cent G run dig’s common shares. If 
it buys the bonds and converts 
them to stock on March 31, Philips 
would increase hs stake in Grundig 
to 50.5 percent. 

“We are going to sell our partici- 
pation m Grundig sometime in the 
next days because the bonds are to 
be convened on March 31.” said 
Franz Raggcnbass, a UBS spokes- 
man in Zurich. “It's not our policy 
to hold any stakes in industries 
other than banking." 

A consortium of other b anks in 
Switzerland. Germany and the 
Netherlands led by Dresdner Bank 
also will sell their stake. Mr. Ragg- 
genbass said. The bonds are worth 
roughly 250 million Deutsche 
marks ($142 million), he said. 

Grundig said Monday that it ex- 
pected a record loss of 350 million 
Deutsche marks in the year ending 
March 31 because demand for con- 
sumer electronics products has 
been hit hard by the German reces- 
sion. (Bloond/erg, AFX) 


Hope Drives Prague Stocks 9 Rally 

Prices Soar Despite Shortage of Data on Companies 


By Heniy Copeland 

Special at tie Herald Tribune ' 

PRAGUE — - An. index of the 30 largest 
Czech equities has risen nearly fourfold since 
September and climbed 50 percent in Janu- 
ary alone. But because of operating condi- 
tions in one of the capitalist world's newest 
outposts, this is both the best of markets and 
the worst 

<( lt can be very frustrating," Alexander 
Angdl director of sales and trading at Wood 
& Co, said. “We spend so much time collect- 
ing information and then analyzing it and 

- then publishing it And. by the time it is out 
the stock that we were saying was a good buy 
at 1 ,200 koruna ($40) and might go to 2.000 is 
trading at 2^00 ” 

Prague's bourse is the product of Eastern 
Europe's most audacious privatization pro- 
gram, beam in the spring of 1992 when the 
country that was then Czechoslovakia offered 
each citizen a coupon bode to use in bidding 
. for portions of nearly 1400 state-owned com- 
panies. The coupon books cost 1.000 koruna. 
Now, Czechs who chose well could seU those 
.shares for as much as 200.000 koruna. 

Launched in June 1993 with securities 
bought by 6 million Czechs, Prague's market 
emerged just as emerging markets had come 
into vogue with international money manag- 
ers. Poland, in the midst of an eightfold rise 

- in 1993. -whetted -appetites for Eastern Eu- 
rope. The Czech Republic’s market — with 
price/ earnings ratios then in the tingle digits 
and an inflation rate one-third that of Poland 

- seemed destined to be caught in the same 
updraft 

Since August international players have 
dumped $100 million a month into Czech 
equities, according to Andrew Reicber of CS 
First Boston in Prague. The company has 
fielded orders from institutions as far away as 
Melbourne and Los Angeles. ' 


With just under 1.000 equities, the Czech 
- market appears gigantic betide its regional 
competitors: Poland and Hungary boas* few- 
er than 60 shares between them. But if foreign 
investors expected a smorgasbord in Prague. 
they have wandered into something more like 
an Easter-egg hunt. 

Nearly half of the Czech Republic’s equi- 
ties have not yet traded. Mr. Retcher said. 
Only about 100 trade “with any degree of 
regularity." he added, and be only rated five 
as “realty tradeable." 

For investors weary of hyperdTidem mar- 
kets where news has been so thoroughly dis- 

BSTERlSATfONAL STOCKS 

counted that a dan thrown at a list of stocks 
can outperform professional investors. 
Prague is delightfully inefficient. .Analysts 
here are still trying to pry results for 1992 out 
of many companies. With even stale data 
scarce, “it’s really a question of kicking the 
tires, doing our own due diligence," Mi. An- 
gel! said. 

Once a broker identifies an attractive com- 
pany, the game has just begun. Seventy-two 
percent of Czechs who invested entrusted 
.their privatization coupons to investment 
funds that bid for stocks for them; now. 
nearly half of aO shares are held by just 14 
such funds. Aspiring buyers must negotiate 
with the managers of these funds. 

*Tve got to go knock on doors." Mr. An- 
gel] said. “Typically, to get blocks of stock 
out, one has to pay between 24 perceot and 
10 percent over the last traded price." 

With the ratio of a stock's price to the 
company's earnings per share pushing above 
40 on some issues, Czechs appear amused by 
their market's lofty levels. 


“We ask how- long it can go on like this." 
said MichaJ Konecny. director at Koraero 
Brokers, which has seven offices. Mr. Kon- 
eeny, formerly a professor or economics, said 
most of his company’s 700 retail customers 
come in only to sdJ the shares thev had 
bought in the original voucher privatization. 
“Last week, one client sold his bank shares 
and got J 60.000 koruna,” he sa w. “Someone 
who invested in a bad way sitii has t\000 or 
7,000 koruna." 

In another sign of eagerness to cash oul 
sellers outnumber buyers by 2-to-l on the so- 
called RM System, an over-the-counter net- 
work designed for retail investors. In pan 
because or this predominance of retail sellers, 
prices on the privately owned RM System are 
as much one- third below those on the stock 
exchange. 

CS First Boston’s Mr. Reicber shared the 
retail investors' caution. “These companies 
were dumped into Lhe private sector wans 
and all," ne said, and will need a couple of 
years to get up to speed. It will be entrepre- 
neurs and foreign companies, not publicly 
traded companies, that will generate the 3 
percent to 4 percent growth projected for the 
Czech economy in 1994, he said. 

At Wood & Co.. Mr. Angell is more san- 
guine. at least about Ceske Energeticke Za- 
vody AS. which supplies SO percent of the 
country's electricity and accounts for one- 
quarter of the Czech market's estimated capi- 
talization. 

It would cost $13 billion to replace Ceske 
Energeticke generating capacity. Mr. Angell 
said, yet the company’s current market capi- 
talization is only about $44 billion. “I'm 
hoping and praying that it will correct back 
20 or 30 percent." he said, so that investors 
can buy more of the stock. 


HOSOKAWA: Japanese Leader Says Talks With US, at r an Impasse 9 CHIPS: 

Continued from Page 9 as soon as another one is eEminat- services on the basis of price and from the siart on quantifiable men- Jtgtrtygpr ChnJJpti&P 

again talking of a need to give equal ed. quality rather than corporate or po- surements of progress, something WtUUdigo 


Continued from Page 9 
again talking of a need to give equal 
weight to security issues in Asia 
and the “global cooperation" pro- 
grams between the two countries inr 
such areas as AIDS research, space 
and other scientific pursuits. 

One official of the Japanese For- 
eign Ministry went so far the other 
day as to warn that a breach in the 
Japanese-American relationship 
would be the wrong signal to send 
North Korea at a time of growing 
tension over that country’s refusal 
to allow international inspection of 
its nuclear program. 

Such efforts to change the sub- 
ject have clearly frustrated the 


But after months of- promises bocal 'relationships, 
from senior Japanese politicians Jo practice, how 


that they would step in to overrule soknwa has repeatedly backed 
the. bureaucrats. Mr- Mondale is down — first on reforming the po- 


stiil waiting. “We get in there, and Bocal system, then on a stimulus 
they say there is no problem, their package to spur a recession-bound 
market is open," he said recently, economy — because of a revolt 
“If that's the case, why are we ne- sparked" by the Socialists, the big- 


ical relationships. that was missing from the previous 

Jo practice, however. Mr. Ho- soch effort, former President 
kawa has repeatedly backed George Bush's awkwardly named 
iwd — first on reforming the po- structural impediments initiative. 


gotiaring? 


gest party in his coalition. As a 


LUfll W 03 IILLXHUg, I1UIII UiC UI01UU3 O 

such effort, former President , CoMmowl from Page 9 
George Bush's awkwardly named J5® “The way we read it. 
structural impediments initiative. SGS-Tnomson s U4. subsidiary is 

the only one that can have access to 
Japan rgected that idea, with an our licenses “ said John Thompson, 
argument that makes perfect eco- an Intel spokesman. “We don't be- 
nomic sense: One cannot set uir- (ieve that the license would free up 
gets for an American, or any other, an SGS-Thorason plant in Italv to 


Sheraton 
Wins Bid 
For Ciga 


f.wpiJh Our Surf From Dispatches 

MILAN — ITT Corp.’s Shera- 
lon Hotels unit signed an accord 
with fiie of Ciga Hotels largest 
creditor hanks to buy the troubled 
Italian hotel chain, a Ciga spokes- 
man said. 

Although Sheraton executives 
would not discuss the purchase 
priLC. sources dose to the U.S. ho- 
tel chain said the winning bid was 
for billion lire (S 5 30 million I. 
Claudio Mioreili. the Ciga spokes- 
man. said Sheraton would not 
make an official statement until (he 
purchase was formalized. 

Sharaton's purchase will not be 
official until Ciga shareholders ap- 
prove a capital increase to make the 
takeover possible. That action is 
expected on Tuevdax . 

Mr. Mioreili said that as pan of 
the agreement. Sheraton will bid 
for Ogj's outstanding shares on 
the stock market. Ciga shares have 
been suspended since November, 
bur trade once a week on Friday. 
They were Iasi at 750 lire. 

Sheraton also must win approval 
from the 31 banks that hold Ciga's 
roughly $650 million lire in debt. 
However, the five banks on the 
steering committee that already ap- 
proved the deal represent about 75 
percent of the debt. 

“It was by far the simplest offer. 
It will allow us to get about 72 
percent of out money back.” said 
one ban); source quoted by the II 
Sole ; 24 Ore financial newspaper. 

Under pressure from its creuiior 
banks. Ciga Iasi spring gave Me- 
diobanca SpA a mandate - to find a 
buyer for the hotel chain, which has 
not been profitable since 1989. 

Ciga is staggering under the 
weight of J.l trillion lire of debt. It 
lost - 1 1 0.2 billion lire in the first half 
of 1993. Sheraton, which entered 
the bidding process only days ago. 
snatched the hotel chain from two 
rival bidders. Forte PLC and Host 
Marriott Corp. 


Frankfurt 
DAX ' 


London 

FFS& 100 Index 


• Paris 

CAC40 




- 2403 - 



1993 1994: 


Exchange tm* 

Amsterdam AEX 

Brussels Stoc 

Frankfurt PAX 

Frankfurt FAZ 

Helsinki HEX 

London Flna 

London • FTS 

Madrid Gem 

MHan MIB 

Paris CAC 

Stockholm Affai 

Vfcfjna Stoc 

Zurich SBS 

Sources: Reuters. AFP 


1994: 
index 

AEX . 437.40 

Stock Index 7,769.79 

PAX ’ 2,085.59 

FAZ ; 808.01 

HEX ■■ 1 ,945-2 r 

Financial Times 30 2,633,70 
FTSE 100 3,429.10 


0 J F 


Wednesday Prev. 

Close ' Close 


Close 

436.54 

7.772.21 

2.107.21 
814.14 


% 

Change 

+ 0.20 

-007 

-1.04- 

-0.75 


General index 
MIB 

CAG 40 

Affaers vaertden 
Stock Index 
SBS 


352.17 
1,09400 
2,302.06 
1,826.12 
501.63 
14)54 £4 


1.943.57. +O.OB 

2.641.50 -0.30 

3,440.20 -0.32 

354.72 -0.72 

1,083.00 +1.02 

2,299.85 +01 0 

1.824.5 0 +0.09 

502.33 -0-14 

1,070.52 -1.48 

Inictniiiiirul Hrrakl lnhune 


Very briefly: 

• Total $A said net attributable profit crept up to 2.9 billion French 
francs ($486 million) last year from 2.S billion francs in 1992. according 
to preliminary figures: the results were at the lower end of analysts' 
forecasts but in line with the oil company’s own predictions. 

• Montedison SpA shares fell 3 percent to 1.152 lire t68 cents), a day after 
an investment firm claimed it was buying about 6 percent of the food and 
chemical company and the European Commission announced an inquiry 
into its planned plastics venture with Royal Dutch/ Shell Group. 

• Preussag AG said operating profit in the year ended in September fell to 
346.6 million DeuLsdie marks (S197 million) from 789 .S million DM a 
year earlier it said it would reduce employment at its Preussag Stahl AG 
steel unit to 9.500 by the end of 1996 from 10.000 now. 

• Fokker NV expects to make an announcement on an extensive cosi- 
cutting plan next week, a spokesman Tor the aircraft maker said after 
Dutch newspapers quoted company sources as saying Fokker would lay 
off more than 1.200 employees, or almost 10 percent of the total. 

• Italy's employment minister, Gino Giugni. said talks on job cuts at Flat 
SpA could resume next week and urged a rapid settlement to avoid unrest 
in the auto industry. 

• Air France scheduled meetings with employees over the next few weeks 
to talk about a restructuring plan, according (o Force Oinriere. the union 
representing the majority of the state-owned carrier's workers. 

Rewert. fiJiK-mhi-.’z, iFX 


" But for Mr. Ginton, the choices result, he has had to ally hims elf 
are vastly complicated by the poht- with the Liberal Democrats or the 


share of its market without aban- 
doning free-market principles. 


ical upheavals here in Tokyo. Mr. bureaucrats, the forces he had 
Ginton has invested heavily in Mr. vowed to defeat. 


treaucrais. the forces he had After Mr. Miyazawa and Mr. ,r <>mcor 
wed to defeat. Ginton retired to a sushi bar for ? on | lDa 

The framework talks are the far- private talks last summer, an agree- Centrum 


produce." 

InieL he added, “will not shrink 
from competition." Intel produced 


IMI Surge Seen Helping Next Privatization 


Compi/rJf ’ i Our Staff Frm Dispatches 


first day of trading. 23 percent abme its public sale 


Hosokawa and the reform program The framework talks are the lat- private talks last summer, an agree- raiuum computer cnip 
he has come to represent. In word, est incarnation of an old idea: to mem ensued: “Objective criteria" ***^8 ne r l ^ 1 L n ^ s ° 
if not yet in deed, Mr. Hosokawa find a comprehensive approach to would be used to measure progress on sales or ix.x bHyon. 
has embraced an agenda once put the problem of Japan's trade sur- in such problem areas as trade in ‘ ar> 


ject have clearly frustrated the if not yet in deed, Mr. Hosokawa find a comprehensive approach to 
American ambassador here; Walter has embraced an agenda once put the problem of Japan's trade sur- 
F. Mondale. Mr. Mondale arrived forth by Japan's greatest critics: He plus, muting efforts to encourage 
in Tokyo brimming with .ideas., jvants radical deregulation, a shift Japanese consumers to buy import- 
about how to get the two countries of power from producers to con- ed goods with specific attention to 
out of .their rut. in which a new sumersand a country (hat buys car key industries and markets, 
barrier to trade magically pops up parts and insurance and banking But the United States insisted 


Trained as an electronics engi- 
neer. Mr. Pisiorio worked 18 years 


autos and auto parts, insurance. retrain wnwi <oyui> 

intellectual-property rights and wth Motorola Inc., rang from a 
government purchases ottelecom- salesman in Italy in 1963 to general 


NYSE 

Wednasdjrv’s ctosincr 

Tables Include the nationwide prtoes up to 
the closing on Wall Street and do not reflect 
ite trades elsewhere. VmThe Associated Press 

(Continued) ... 


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government purchases of telecom- 
munications equipment and medi- 
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manager for international business, 
based in Phoenix. Arizona. In 1«80. 
he left to join Italy's SGS. then a 
money-losing chip producer with 
around S100 million in sales. 

“I gave up my salary and stock 


that of Banca CommerciaJe Indiana SpA. as high as as 11 had Wllh L redito Haliano 
possible, analysis said Wednesday. l 'zed in December. Banca 

But where dial maximum is will largely be dictated Wednesday at 5.51? lire, 
bv fundamentals and stock market valuations of J n France- meanwhile, app 
Banca CommerciaJe. they added. offer of shares in Eir Aquiia 

“The government is bound to go toward the top end senbed by two to two-and-a-r 
of the range now," said William Cowan. Italy analvsi The public offer of 38? franc 
with James Capel & Co. in London. close Thursday evening. 

IMI closed at 13.400 lire i$7.89) Wednesday in its 


ommerciale ended 


In France, meanwhile, applications for the public 
offer of shares in Eir Aquitaine have beep, oversub- 
scribed by two to two-and-a-half times, sources said. 
The public offer of 38? francs iSM.-i 0 ) a share is to 
close Thursday evening. 

I Reuter- £,'. v»i/vrei 


options at Motorola m exchange MOBILE: High-Tech Highway Creates New Nomads 

for an armored car." he recalled. C? o J 


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noting that executives at that time 
were often targeted by the Italian 
terrorist group, the Red Brigades. 

In 1987. he was picked to oversee 
the marriage or SGS and Thomson 
Semiconductors. At the time, the 
company had combined sales of 
around $700 million. 

Over the next six years. Mr. Pis- 
torio streamlined the business, 
closing seven plants — 15 remain 
— ana focused research efforts on 
several key areas. 

At the same time, he forged alli- 
ances with a dozen key customers 
to jointly develop products for 
them as well as for third parties, a 
strategy that boosted sales. Most 
recently, the company signed such 
an accord with Northern Telecom 
Ltd., which handed over its Rancho 
Bernardo plant to SGS-Thomson 
to produce telecommunications 
chips. 

The executive also attacked the 
balance sheet, combining capital 
infusions and profits to reduce the 
debL which had peaked in 1989 at 
$900 million, twice shareholder eq- 
uity, Debt currently stands at 
around S300 million, giving the 
company a “very comfortable" 28 
percent debt-equity ratio. 


Continued from Page 9 
toward a more mobile and decen- 
tralized operating environment." 


plan (hat includes putting more 
technology in the hands of front- 


hours with Mr. Cruz's Oju Gener- 
al notebook computer. About 12U 


said Fred Amoroso, president of 4.000 job cuts. 2.000 of them in 


line employees. An additional jobs have been eliminated in just 


the insurance industry consulting 
group at IBM. “This is not easily 
accomplished. ” 

It hurts, too. For Hartford. 


Connecticut were announced last 
month, and a $1.03 .billion charge 
for the reductions led the company 
to report a record quarterly loss of 


where nearh one oul or three jobs $1.13 billion on Wednesday. 

• .-j . . -J r- -.r ••0/1... ....... . 


is lied to insurance, financial ser- 
vices or real estate, more workers 
on the road means fewer who think 
of the city as home, or as a place to 
spend their money or leisure time. 

For Mr. Cruz, an office-in-a- 


“When you start moving people 
out of their domain, out of their 
private space, the employee goes 
through a lot of pain — there's no 
water cooler to socialize around." 
said Trav Waltrip. a vice president 


briefcase has meant long hours — in charge of telecommunications at 
at least an hour-and-a-half more a Travelers. “But it's an almost irre- 


(his one function, and the company 
saves about S6 million a year. 

Although there arc only seteral 
hundred fully mobile workers at 
the company now. Traveler* envi- 
sions that ultimately a> much as 2? 
percent of its 28.000-metuber work 
force could eventually be moved 
from the workplace tv* a more tran- 
sient existence. 

It has already turned many lives 
upside down. 


day than in the past, he said — and 
thousands more miles a year be- 
hind the wheel of his Plymouth. It 
has also meant a loss of office ca- 
maraderie. 

Many workers have lost more 
than thaL They have lost their jobs 


sistible force because of the money 
to be saved." 

Mr. Waltrip said that the task 
that Mr. Cruz performs — essen- 
tially a re-evaluation of whether a 
business customer’s insurance pre- 
miums match the risk involved in 


Leveraged — 

l 9?5h ,,n ° 7 - 02 - 94 

Holdings USS6619 

Listed ''ii die 
:\nureni.im 
Siovk Exchange 

InfnniMriiin: 

MwsPiera'n C.ipii.4 M-in-iccmcnr 
R-.ikin 55. 1**12 KK XmMcnJam. 
Tel.: + 51-20-*: I H III. 


as the need for a corporate support providing it protection — took 30 
staff diminishes and these new separate steps just two and a half 
technologies make jobs like data- years ago. From the pen and paper 


entry clerks expendable. 

Aetna Life & Casualty Co., for 


at the site, through a data process- 
ing center in Waterbury. Connecti- 


example. the city's largest employ- cm. now dosed, and ultimately to 
er. has eliminated about 8.000 jobs the company's mainframe oompui- 


in the past three years company- 
wide as part of a “re-engineering" 


er. the task could take as long as 40 
days. It can now be done in 24 


CURRENCY AND CAPITAL MARKET SERVICES 


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IrtncbeMcr Hiiimt. 77 Lomim Wall - lamdon ECJM 'iNP 
TcL(Tl-382 , »~45 Fax: 0T1-.W2 9*8“ 


FOREIGN EXCHANGE 


2-* Hour London Dealing Dtrsk 
Competitive Rates & Daih' Fax Sheet 
Cu/t far frtn/.Hsr iiifoneMtirui *? brochure 


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For further details 
on bow to place your listing contact: 
PATRICK FALCONER in London 

Tel: (44) 7! 83<* 48 OZ 
Fax: (44 1 71 2-tO 225-4 

RcraibSsSribunf. 


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IV4M.4«4.IWV.Wt.luA~>*IIW 

UV1NG IN THE U.S.? 

NOW PRINTED IN 
NEWARK 
FOR SAME DAY 
DELIVERY IN KEY CITIES 

TO SlfBSCRJBE. CALL 

1 - 800-882 2884 

(fN NEW YORK, CALL 212-752 .5890) 


■a *»Vl S7S 77V, - 


m ii fi in as a** 

'■'fi S ; ,S JiS S5 


as-: 


Premium offices 
and services at a prestigious 
address . ja /% 

- T ,. 

m .(h w 

totA '..-s-.f*.'. •«- 1 ■ .“3r 

Modem fully equipped and serviced offices available on a 
daily, weekly or monthly basis. Secretarial and translation' 
services. Personalized telephone service. Meeting facilities. 

To contact our professional and friendly staff please call: 

BRUSSELS: tel: +32-2 rethKhSh ia\: +32-2 "VSiv {ill 

-fltk BASEL/CENEVA/LUCERNF./ZUG ‘ZURICH 
w tel: +41 -1 214^2 02. fax: +41-1 214 n? !•» 

LAUSANNE: 

teJ: +41-21 Ml 13 13. fax; +41-21 Ml 13 in 
4** LIMASSOL/ NICOS1A/LARN AC A: 

tel: +3?7-5 355^44, 357-3354423. fax: - *57-5 5^1*10 

O PARIS/BORDEAUX'LILLELNON-Rl^LFN. 
RENNES/MONTPELL IE R/ TOLi.Ol'SE : 
tel: +33-b7 (iW 74 tW). fax: +33-tv n‘i 74 n« 

LONDON: tel: +44-71 351 57fi3. fax. +44-71 331 

MILANO/ROMA: tel: +3*-2 481^ 4271. lav: +’,u-2 4Sli I *2'* 

o TEL- AV I V J ER USA LEM : 

tel: +972-3 b93 S3 K3. fax: +n72-3hU3‘t3'il 

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tel: +3I-2H 52H 75 fl3. fax: -*-31-2(1 520 75 fn 

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For more information or other locations please confacl 
WORLD-WIDE BUS1NES5 CENTRES NEPvVORK Sales offices: 

EUROPE, EBS AG, Bahnhofsirasse 52, S001 Zurich ■ ~ 
tel: +41-1 2l4ti2h2. fax: +41-1 214 o5P fwP 

AMERICA, Madison Avenue, Suite i00u. 4 - 

New York 10022, tel: +1-212 txl502ili\ fa v -1-212 VS V 









Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1994 


** 


NASDAQ 

Wednesday's Prices 

NASDAQ prices as of 4 p.m. New York time. 
This list compiled by the AP. consists otthe 1,000 
most iradea securities in terms of dollar value. It is 
updated twice a year. 


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ID 471 17 

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AMEX 

Wednesday's Closing 

Tables include the nationwide prices up 10 
the closing on Wall Street and do not reflect 
late trades elsewhere. Via The Associated Press 


17 lAjmh 

Hon LOW Hoc* 


Oi» no PE 1006 MOO LOWLdeSICMBC 


64 9». 

60 % 
78 13' '■ 
168 4’'* 
15 4 

w as*. 


- 63 

9 14 

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130 

*49 

405 


735 II W 
97 31% 
47 3-.b 

32 6% 


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lO'i 9W AM Intin .. . 

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MW r-.AMC - 19 

5 WAUC _ _ 

6% IWARIHU - — 

26 ■ 24'-. ARM F pi _. _ 

7». I-.ASR -73c 119 _ 

75% 67*. ATT Fa 7 69C40 _ 

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6 4 S3 Alex at 3.75 69 

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7J'-; 14*. A.VXCA JJ 37994 
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■ APE., in lie 1 4 _ 


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790 

3 

1300 

1153 

7441 


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91 11W 
32 42% 
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16 20’. 
4 70% 


18 

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2435 

559 

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to SS.A'rewA . IJ 

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13 

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4% 4% - 

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10% 10W ■ 
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3% 5». — 
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62% 43% — ' 
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44' 'j 44 V. 

4'. 4', 

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ISW ISW 
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13% 13% — 
47' j 42% — I 
17% I7W - 
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70". 20> . _ 
7% 7% 

1IW II". 


13 . „ . 

Hwn Low Mop 


Sb 

Oi, Yld PE 100* %9H LowLnlcsl Oi'ge 


M 2d 

1600 63 


.08 J 
3190 J 


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3 


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13 V. 10%CaDP.NI .96 ».9 _ 
17W 9%CaDRl7n 96 7.9 - 
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MW SWCarmel _ 13 

14% B'VCarmgln _ 139 

% Wi.cersoen 
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17V» 12WCeMSo 1606 9 7 ... 
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25 9%C7lpEn ... IB 

27 IOViOmTIVM ... _ 

MW SWOrtP-vT II 1.0 17 

taw 17%OBWirp J4b46 13 
40% 16% QtoySfl 5 -. 36 

2 T., 13%Oi>6f 194 

32',35%Oi6fnp» 1.81 66 .. 

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15, 4WCr:o«i 

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8*. r,Ct*F*J XM J M 

46% W.CJearCa ... 64 

9W IWGIn.cos _. _. 

7% AiConiD - IJ 

17", J'.CconiTrn .. SB 

10 SWConcnSIr 68 7J _ 
27 >. TWCOiNI, JO .9 M 
23W16'.CPlAop!A2JO 1 1-0 - 

2TWI0’.,C3llAHol 2-81 1 143 .. 
6% ■■•CcTOcto .. 67 

3*i«Col Lb _ - 

9% 7WGHPEI 7* 91 

:iw a ColuEno _ ID 

17 1C% Ccminc _ — 

6% i'.CirdAsm xj7e 1. 1 .. 
31% l2WC yrjre fc _ 

I', l Cmc r / v — - 

10*. 4WOPM8F . * 

9% 6 -iCcnTMN .. 78 

33’ . 9%Convn3i 2 JO I .. 15 
9% rwCnvsIE _. 52 

12% 7 Ccotoi 33 U .. 

1 9 ■■» 12 % Cross 64 4J 

24% »%Cn«1M .. _ 

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29*. 13 CwnCr .'2 A 23 

7 4 .CriMArn 

73‘, 19WCuoic J3o 24 62 

la liWCirw 64 4.1 __ 

4’. 2*> .Cvcom n _ _ 


243 2»% 
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10 71V, 
12 12W 
10 12% 
40 12W 
75 10% 
133 12', 
30 % 

* 18N 
18 25 W 
101 10% 
18 15', 
5 7W 
123 I9W 
96 5*6 

67 la', 
198 10W 


169 45 W 
957 IW 
129 7N 
38 4'i 

28 9'l 

33 21*. 
17 22% 
492 19% 
67S «">i 
2861 6 , 


12% 17% 
17', 12V. 
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V. V. 

S W 18V. 

V. 25', 
10% 10", 
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rw 7W 
19 W 19% 
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16% 14% 
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4'i',. S--J.4 
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23% 24% 
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38 MW 
15V i ISV-i 
27' ■ 77% 
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75 25 

13% MW 
6V, 6V, 
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1'9>. IW 
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3', 9% 
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Ti'i an 
19’. 19% 
Al.i S' . 


T'. 'VuFonjmR _ _ ZZ 

8% 5%FH*Adv n 65 1(L& ... 1 

6*» J'.lFrbREn JO M - a 

SW 3 FrfSrfn .40 9.1 _ 1 

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9', 4 "..Frebenius _ 6C 

4». 2V. FnCCm .16 3.9 10 

21% lTWFrisOiy -24b 1.8 IT 

2% ?>» 2% 

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4% 4% 4% • W 

4% 4% 4% —5. 

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13% 12% 13% - % 

1 g-H J 


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IJ Mono, 
HWTHjOW 5100 


a» YIO PE ’eas H.yi Lcl-ntgioi'iir 


Div YM PE H»i rtoh LowLcsalOr oe- 


30 ISW 

161 6' i 

110 I9>. 

177 tW 

10 9*, 

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S3! 15', 
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12 1C 

4C6 14% 
42 71'. 
■ law 


IS', IS"; 
6W 6't 
I9W 19* . 
1% TV. 
»% 9W 
8% 8', 
MW IS"; 
9% aw 
10 10 
MW 14% 


74 22> 
199 IS' 
1117 T* 


18 I8W 
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19% 10’i 
4 % 4-, 
71% 22’. 
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a: ?w 


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3% 2WBAHD 
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?2*.e5,BHC 
27 .PCSarM 66 

:<w * Be«r 
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saw M Ecroctst id 

awrviBcnFd 1930 
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36WW .ES7.WKn 2 61 
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124 90 anroCo 7.00c 

W i v,Bew.‘fli 

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Mi?tW3iliVr.-' 23r 
17% 19 ftsPA 
j ■ i &i»nm 

3W > iB-’AHa 
ISWir.BiKBtWn 109 
■SWUiBCAian 7«a 
lJ'.U'.B*UCn 79o 
59' ; 36',BlOr*CP 76CC 
nw 17>4Kes»TB M 
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. 31 

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s.a . 


9 

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6.1 II 
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IJ 34 
IA 34 
8.4 M 

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7.1 74 

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7.9 
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14 
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i r- r-h i %. 

254 4W 4W 4> % . 

rr 7 i 7% 7 , . 
1223 79% 79 79% 

66 ?!W MW 7IW 

;i low low iow 

760 5 W 5V, SW 

l(T 14'.. TOW 74’. 
23 22W 22W 72% 

J IJW »?■-. 12% 
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MO 25 74’. ?5 

26 21% 25 W 25) . 

5 I ■! V% I'C 
e 71% 711,71% 
147 21 W 2I .2IW 
30 ' . i*. ' % 

447 tBW IS IB'-; 
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104 6"-n 4W 4, 
60 5% 5*. SW 

6>7 «' . 5W 6 

44? MWdi: 34% 
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44 MV. 7AW 75 

70 7% ;% 

9 93 92 93 

3066 15'; 14W IS*. ■ 

3 1 II 

9 22 W 22% 2TW ■ 
197 12% IT', IJW 
777 1 . u 1% r-« 
81 7 . 2% 7% 

■84 I7W012W 12% 

■ I 13% 13% 13% 

mA 14 14 14 

706 47% 41% 47% 

1 76% 26W MW 
740 30% 30% 30*. 

I 31V. 31 Vi 31’, 
65 ISW MW 14% 
125 JW 3Vj 3% 
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174 9 8% 9 

XWulJW ISW U% 

41 U3% 3% In 

116 13% 13 IJ', 

S 3". 3". 3". 

1477 2'-i l i . 7... 

459 73 W 22*. 23". 


I 

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— % 
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.. 29 
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Cm Fin 

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746 7 6% 1 

92 8% 8W B . 

336 8% aw 8’; 

560 7 7". 

44 12' i 12*; IJW 
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491 ] '. , 1 1.,. 

370 6J 63*5 63% 

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3 1 I ' 


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3 I WCarotG n 

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aw r.DcnrHd 
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8 % 5' .Doer 
17% r'.Decarpts 
7’-. SWBCIEK 
sw 2 , '>cianiMi 

77'.. 15S&W1C 
4% JWCnpA 
4W 2*.C«?3 B 
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IS'., V.C4W * 
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7% 7-'.Di>Com 
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11% IS'-iCorclIi 
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Page 15 

ASIA/PACIFIC 


Rebroadcasting, Not Direct Access, Is the Surer Route 

By Michael Richardson 

IruamukMal Herald Tribune 

k. T M C ° m pwiticai among satel- 

me leleyision broadcasters intensifies in Asia, 


■ . ■, utcimd irie- 

viarai sroe has gamed a bead start on its 
nvds in the Chinese market by finding a 
niche in rebroadcas ting 6 

. Starting new month, the Australia Televi- 
se? Luanaaonal service wfll be relayed to 
oght million subscriber* of a rapidly expand- 
ing cable network operated by the Guanez- 
hou Tefeviooa & Radio Broadcasting^Sp. 
in southern China 

Wendell Wu, general manager of the cor- 
poration’s Australian unit mMriboumc, said 
that Australia Television had been chosen as 
the firs English- language service for the 20- 
channel cable network because of its pro- 
grammiiig and good rdaticmsWp with the 
Chinese government and television stations. 

Australia Television is a unit of Australian 
Broadens ticg Co^ Australia’s national tdevi^ 
sion and radio service, which operates as an 
independent body although h gets same oT its 
funds from the gove rnment 

Earlier this month. Australian Broadcast- 
ing Ca signed agreements with China's Min- 
istry for Radio, Fflm and Television and 
Cent ral Ch ina TV, the country’s m«tn televi- 
sion organization. The agreements open the 
way for transmission of Australia Televi- 
sion’s programs on Chinese domestic chan- 
nels. 

“The arrangement wflj dramatically in- 
crease the available audience of Australia 
Television," said David ESQ, managing direc- 
tor of Australian Broadcasting Co. in Sydney. 

The deals with China are the fust since 
Beijing announced in September curbs on 
ownership of satellite television receiving 
dishes and a tightening of regulations i 
ing international television si gnals 1 
into China via satellite. 

Analysts said that direct access to satellite 
television broadcasts in Asia was being limit- 
ed either by government controls or the rela- 
tively high cost of buying the two-meter (ax- 
and-a-half-footj dishes needed to pick up 
most of the signals. 

As a result, (he companies likely to gain the 


mosL viewers and attract the most advertisers 
are those that eater into rebroadcasting ar- 
rangements with local television stations and 
rable networks in Asian countries. Many of 
these local stations and networks are owned 
. or controlled by governments, governing po- 
litical parties or relatives or friends of govern- 
ing groups. 

The “globalization of television which is 
taking place in Asia is essentially a local 


With Beijing limiting 
direct satellite access, 
companies that are most 
likely to gain are those 
that make deals for 
rebroadcasting. 


activity," Mr. HID said. “It is the rebroadcast- 
ing that is going to dictate the growth.” 

Australia Television has negotiated re- 
broadcast arrangements in the Phffippines. 
Thailand, Singapore and Laos as well as 
China. Mr. Hill said that Burma was Hkdy to 
stm rebroadcasting Australia Television 
ims soon and similar negotiations were 
way in Indonesia and Malaysia. 

setai 
'estem 

satellite broadcasters such as Rupert Mur- 
doch's STAR TV in Hong Kong, which relays 
the BBCs international television service as 
well as American entertainment programs. 

Bering's move was also seen as an attempt 
to control reception of Cable News Network 
and other UiL broadcasters that plan to 
beam into China and other parts of Aria on a 
new generation of more powerful satellites 
that are to be put into orbit over the next IS 
months. 

However, Gary Brown, regional media di- 


rector at the advertising agency Leo Burnett 

Australia Television "show that China is not 
completely xenophobic about foreign broad- 
casting. 

“Those deals could set a positive precedent 
for others to negotiate similar arrangements." 

Mr. Wu said that he expected Guangzhou 
Television to sign a contract with an English- 
language satellite broadcaster of business and 
financial news in the next few weeks for 
inclusion in (he cable network. Analysts sard 
the broadcaster is likely to be Singapore- 
based Asian Business News. 

Mr. Hill, who visited China recently, said 
that a number of Chinese officials had indi- 
cated that the news documentary and other 
programs Australia Television was offering 
were more relevant and interesting to a Chi- 
nese audience than the programs of other 
Western broadcasters. 

He said CNN was perceived by Chinese 
officials to be “too American-centric, and the 
BBC too British in focus. “They see us as far 


The Chinese dampdown was widely 
as a blow to tteambztions of major Wes 


Mr. Wu said Guangzhou Television had 
already started dubbing Australia Television 
drama series and documentaries into Chinese 
and would soon start providing them to 
about 200 provindal stations in China. 

Australia Television programs are also 
fikely to be included on the Beijing and 
Shanghai cable networks when (hey start lat- 
er this year, Mr. Wo said. 

A survey being finalized by independent 
consultants shows that as many as 25 million 
people in Asia have access to Australia Tele- 
vision's frill program. STAR TV claims 42 
million full program viewers in the region. 

Mr. HiU said that after barely a year, Aus- 
tralia Television was covering about 40 per- 
cent of operating costs by corporate sponsor- 
ship, a form of advertising in which a 
company adopts a particular program but 
promotes itself only at the beginning and end 
of the show. 

Mr. HID said that be expected the company 
to be at least breaking even by the end of 1994 
after more corporate sponsors realized the 
value of gaining direct access to a huge audi- 
ence of Asian consumers. 


Japan Sees Weak 
0.2% Expansion 
In Current Year 


Complied by Oia Staff Fran Dispatcher 

TOKYO — Japan confirmed 
Wednesday that its economy was 
stagnating! with the Economic 
Hanning Agency forecasting gross 
national product growth of just 
0.2 percent for the year ending 
March 31. 

That would be the country’s 
slowest growth in almost 20 years, 
since the slump caused by a surge 
in oil prices in 1974. The agency 
previously predicted growth of 3.3 
percent for this year. 

An agency official added that the 
government had set growth targets 
of 2.6 percent in gross national 
product and 2.4 percent in gross 
domestic product for the following 
year, ending March 31, 1995. 

Meanwhile; the Bank of Japan's 
governor, Yasushi Mieno. said the 
economy was still stagnant and 
said he was not considering any 
change in monetary policy. 

He said the 15.25 trillion yen 
{$140 billion) fiscal stimulus pack- 
age the government had announced 
Tuesday was “an appropriate step" 
in its efforts to boost the economy. 

He said that changes in interest 
rates, which already were at “ex- 
tremely low r " levels, would have no 
immediate effect on the economy 
and added that last week's tighten- 
ing of U.S. monetary policy by the 
Federal Reserve Board was unlike- 
ly to have any immediate impact on 
currency exchange rates. 

The stimulus package drew luke- 
warm reviews Wednesday from in- 
vestors and economists. 

“U’s better than nothing." Rich- 
ard C. Koo. senior economist at 
Nomura Research Institute, said. 
But he said the package had been 
“determined a long time ago" in 
response to economic problems of 


the lime and that now, in Japan, 
“we have a major political disaster 
on our hands." 

Japanese stock prices tumbled 
Wednesday, with the Nikkei index 
losing about 2 percent indicating 
that investors believed the package 
might not be bold enough to help 
the economy or defuse the rising 
trade tensions between Japan and 
the United States. 

The plan, announced just three 
days before Prime Minister Mori- 
hiro Hosokawa was to meet with 
President BUI Clinton in Washing- 
ton, also drew only a tepid response 
from U.S. Treasury Secretary 
Lloyd Bentxen. 

Washington had urged Tokyo to 
stimulate consumer spending in the 
hope Japan would increase pur- 
chases of foreign goods, reducing its 
S5Q billion trade surplus with the 
United States. Instead, just ahead of 
the summit meeting, Japanese and 
U.S. negotiators remain at odds over 
a US. demand that the two sides set 
numerical targets for measuring the 
openness of Japan's markets. 

{Reuters. AFX, AP. Bloomberg) 

■ Carmakers Downgraded 

Standard & Poor’s Asia Ltd. said 
it was downgrading debt of Nissan 
Motor Co. and Honda Motor Co. 
but affirming its rating on Toyota 
Motor Corp. debt, Agence France- 
Presse reported. ' 

S&P added that although it was 
reaffirming the AAA rating ac- 
corded to Toyota's 519 billion of 
debt, the automaker's outlook was 
negative, as “industry conditions 
are not expected to improve signifi- 
cantly over the near term." 


Murdoch Has Pkms for India, Ford Australia to Close Production Plant 

But Political Obstacles Loom 


NEW DELHI— Ri 


Retool 

Murdoch told Indian officials Wednesday 


sees as a major growth region for his satellite STAR TV network. 

But the plans of the Australian-born media executive; whose weekkmg 
first visit to India has evoked widespread interest, have met with resis- 
tance from opposition parties. 

STAR TV, based in Hong Kong, beams five international channels to 
India, including the popular Hinm-language ZEE-TV. . 

Mr. Murdoch told Minister of State for External Affairs Sahnan 
Khursheed that he was “seritinsly connmmlating a series of investments 
here.” a Foreign Ministry spokesman said 
The Press Trust of India quoted Mr. Murdoch as saying he planned to 
set up two hew music cbantiels for fndia-Mri Murdoch was not available • 
for comment - . -v 

Newspaper reports said he was exploring a link between hfe 20th 
Century-Fox Fflm Corp. and India’s RJP. Goenka group for film and 
soundtrack distribution. 

But officials said the projects would depend on Mr. Murdoch’s 


Janata Party has conveyed its disapproval erf much that is beamed by 
STAR TV to Indian audiences, saying that it canid “have serious impact 
an the cultural outlook of the people." 

But Mr. Murdoch has discounted such fears in newspaper interviews, 
saying: “If a culture is strong enough, ft will survive and people will 
respect other cultures, Abo it is good for us to learn from each other." 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatdies 

SYDNEY — Ford Motor Co. of 
Australia said Wednesday it would 
end production of the Capri con- 
vertible in May and halt assembly 
of its Laser compact hatchback 
model in Srotember, dosing its 
only Sydney factory. 

The unit of Ford Motor Co. of 
the United States said one-time 

charges of 89 million Australian 
dollars (564 million) related to dos- 
ing those operations had caused its 
net loss to widen, to 45 3 million 
dbfiats nr 1993 from 30 mfltion 
dollars a year earlier. On an operat- 
ing basis, Ford Australia swnng to 
a profit of 76 million dollars last 
year from a loss of 37 ntiflion dol- 
lars in 199Z 

The demise of the Capri, the 
Ford unit’s major export model, 
had been predicted. Lee Mis- 
kowski, who retired last month as 

f^^my’divuion in Detroit, said 
in September that 1994 “could be 


the last year" for the model 

“Sales of the Capri in the United 
States have fallen below the thresh- 
old level required to continue pro- 
duction of this model" Ford Aus- 
tralia said. 

Die Capri, marketed by the Iin- 
coin-Mercury division of Ford Mo- 
tor, was introduced in the United 


by combining operations at two 
plants into one. 

Shutting down the Homebosh 
plant, which assembles Lasers from 
imported parts, will mean the loss 
of 400 jobs, or 5 percent of Ford 
Australia's work force. 

Laser models sold in Australia 
are to be imported from existing 


The dosing will reduce the number of 
major automobile factories in Australia to 
four, compared with eight in the mid- 
1980s. 


States in July 1990. Sales there 
dropped to 9327 in 1993 from 
21300 m 1991. 

The closing of the Homebosh 
production plant in suburban Syd- 
ney will reduce the number of ma- 
jor automobile plants in Australia 
to four, compared with eight in the 
mid-1980s. Toyota. Motor Corp. 
plans to reduce the number further 


production lines in Japan once lo- 
cal assembly ceases. 

“Increasing costs of complete 
knock-down assembly, reduced 
tariff levels and declining volumes 
have made local assembly of the 
Laser no longer economically via- 
ble,” Ford said. 

But Ford, which was the top sell- 
er of passenger vehicles in Austra- 


lia last year, said it intended to 
remain in the Australian market. 

"We are continuing to invest sig- 
nificant sums to bring new and 
improved products to market and 
to improve our quality, efficiency 
and productivity,” John Ogden, 
Ford Australia’s president, said. 
He predicted that Ford's car sales 
in Australia would rise about 2 per- 
cent, or J0.000 vehicles, to about 
565,000 in 1994. 

Ford's pullback comes when 
some other carmakers in Australia 
are expanding. Last week. Mitsubi- 
shi Motors Corp. said it planned to 
spend 500 million dollars upgrad- 
ing its plants near Adelaide in 
South Australia. 

In addition. General Motors 
Corp.’s local subsidiary recently 
announced a 100 million dollar-a- 
year program to upgrade its local 
facilities to meet demand for some 
of its top-selling Commodore mod- 
els, and Toyota Motor Corp- said it 
would open a 420 million dollar 
plant near Melbourne this year. 



Exchange'. 


index 


Hong Kong Hang Seng 


inert 

Wednesday Prov. ..V= : 3 ■■ 
Cfos£ . . ' Close • . .prangs 
1 1,504.00 .1 


..Singapore 

Straits Times 

.2,341.60 - 2.321.64 - .*tL86 

Sydney 

AS Ordinanesv 

' 7 2^TO^' :: ^".3<^40-.^ r ^d; -. 

Tokyo 

Nikkei 225 ' 

1 9,641 ia 2R2SL23 --2J32 , 

Kuala Lumpur Composite 

Closed ; .1,108-?? ; • . 

Bangkok 

SET 

1,403*3 1,365.73;. 42.78- 

Seoul 

Composite Stock 

Closed 92&0O .. 

Taipei 

Weighted Price 

Closed ■ -6,294.13 ' '. 

Manila 

Composite • 

2*995-33 2,952.85.. V\M ! ' 

Jakarta 

Stock index 

580 £5 594.12 -Z27' 

New Zealand 

NZSE-40 

2,369.16 2^73.69 -0.19 

Bombay 

National index 

1337-19 1,98R9Q ' 

Sources: Reuters, AFP 

luernatiimil HenU Tribune 

Very briefly; 


•Air- India chairman Y.C Deveshwar resigned to return to the ITC Ltd- a 
tobacco company said to be preparing to launch a private airline in India. 

• Japan Air Lines Co. may seek government subsidies that would allow it 
to retrain or lay off workers to combat deteriorating returns because of a 
drop in international passengers. 

■ Federal Express Corp. said it would begin delivery to Ho Chi Mini city, 
Hanoi and Dan an g now that the United States has lifted its trade 
embargo against Vietnam. 

• McThai Co-, the owner and operator of McDonald’s restaurants in 
Vietnam, win spend 300 million baht (Sll million) to expand by 50 
percent this year, adding at least 10 new outlets. 

• Tokyo Electric Power Co. will build the world's largest “pump-up" 
electric power plant, which uses the gravitational force of water running 
downhill to generate power, in central Japan. 

■ First Commercial Bank. Taiwan's fifth- largest bank, was granted a 
license to conduct business in Hong Kong. 

• The United Arab Emirates and Indonesia signed an agreement to 
encourage trade by eliminating double taxation and reducing taxes. 

• India exported 29 percent fewer textiles in the first 8 months of fiscal 
1993-94 than in the comparable year-ago period. 

• Seven Japanese banks raised their long-term prime lending rate by 0,3 
percentage points to 3.8 percent. 

• Nissan France, the French sales subsidiary of Nissan Motor Co., said 

fourth-quarter sales rose S.6 perent, but sales for all of (993 fell 5.1 
percen L A FF. Reuren. A FX. Bloomberg 


Marubeni Loss Figure Rises 

Bhvmherg Business Mens 

TOKYO — The trading company Marubeni Corp- said Wednes- 
day that recent extraordinary losses were higher than forecast and 
that it would sell a leasing subsidiary to help offset the deficits. 

In October, Marubeni had forecast extraordinary losses of 23 
billion yen (S212 million) for the six months ended SepL 30. On 
Wednesday, the company said the amount would be 33 billion yen. 
The losses' are linked to'the cancellation of tokkin and other trust 
investments managed by the subsidiary. Marubeni Leasing. Tokkin 
funds are invested in securities on behalf of companies that seek for 
laxpurposes to keep these holdings separate from other investments. 

The company said it would sell its entire 50 billion yen in the 
investments by March. Marubeni is now expecting net profit in the 
half year to March to fall to 7 billion yen. down from previous 
forecasts of 13 billion yen. 

To offset losses, the company said it had 8 billion yen set aside 
from the previous year. But proceeds from the sale of the subsidiary 
and the liquidation of the tokkin and fund trust investments, even 
when added to the S billion yen reserves, will not cover the losses 
entirely, the company said. 


INTERNATIONAL RECRUITMENT 


EXECUTIVE 

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MINERAL POSITIONS 
iUillAMl 








Bloomberg 

BUSINESS NEWS 




New Zealand 
Correspondent 

New Zealand has emerged from years of financial 
deregulation to become a darling of the international 
investment community. 

Bloomberg Business News is looking for an 
aggressive journalist to design and execute our coverage 
of the New Zealand story. 

The. successful candidate will have five or more years 
experience as a reporter with a top news organisation 
and a strong background in business and finance. 

Interested applicants should send or fax resumes to 
David Butts, Tokyo bureau chief. Fax to 813-3435-1946 
or mail ro Bloomberg, ShibaDairoon 1-12-16, 
Minato-ku, Tokyo 1 05, Japan. 


« or nu 

■ Mina 


J 


Far East 

Purchasing Director 

{Hong Kong based) 

Our client, a well known industrial group has defined a 
new global sourcing strategy. The rapid growth of the 
purchasing volume in the Far East |ca. US$ 25 Mio. by 
1 996) now requires the setting up of a regional team to be 
based in Hong Kong, whose mission will be to closely 
monitor the existing contracts, prepare for the planned 
expansion and to develop new sources of supply, mainly 
for industrial goods and components. To lead this unit, 
we are seeking an experienced business manager 
(generalist), age 33-45, with a technical education and 
professional background in either purchasing or 
sales/marketing. Extensive Far East experience and 
familiari ty with business methods and standards of the 
area are indispensable. 

The scope of the position and the level of responsibility 
requires a result oriented personality with good 
analytical/planning abilities and strong interpersonal skills. 
Languages: English and German/French. For a first contact, 
please write, fax or phone in confidence to Feisonnel and 
Management Consultants Inc, P.O. Box 315, CH-8030 
Zurich. Tel.: 4 1-( I i/383 47 33, Fax: 4 H 1 1/383 70 68. 


ccMMissnimpmx 

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mtoffiDtod cfldbon and w. buwni 

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YOWG EXPORT MANAGER 

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The E1B, the financial institution of the European Union. i^r'A Jf " ^ 

is currently seeking for its headquarters in LUXEMBOURG a 

Loan Officer ^ 

for operations in countries outside the European Union 

Duties: Financial analysis, coordination of project appraisal and monitoring 
in one or more countries in Africa. 

Qualifications: □ university degree; □ at least 3 years experience in 
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Languages: As the working languages are English and French, it is 
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The E1B offers attractive terms of employment a generous salary and a 
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EUROPEAN INVESTMENT BANK, 

Recruitment Division (Ref.: PA 9405) 

100 boulevard Konrad Adenauer 
L-2950 LUXEMBOURG. Fax: 4379 3360. 

Applications will be treated in strictest confidence and will not be returned. 


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YOU SAW THIS AD. 

So did nearly half a million well-educated, 
influential and successful readers. 

Shouldn't you too place 
your recruitment ads in the 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE? 


EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 


European Sales Executive 

German diploma engineer, 45, {university degrees in 
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experience within targe international business, seeks 
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• Deal driven selfstarter * Strang communicator with excellent 
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of financing and structuring capital, intensive business (cross 
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business for international operating US companies in Europe 

• 20 years sales experience - most complex and sophisticated 

high tech products and financial services 
Preferred location would be Central or Eastern Europe but will 
consider interesting proposals. 

Please reply to. Box 3499, IHT, Friedrichstr. 1 5, 
60323 Frankfurt, Germany. 









i*.« f«ot 


t&m fSm 


** • 





Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1904 


SPORTS 


Russian NHL Star Fetisov Hopes to Remain Statesman o 



ante 


By Alex Yannis 

Vat York Times Sermr 

NEW YORK — He was the pioneer, the man most 
responsible Tor paving the way for all the talented young 
Russian hockey players who followed him to North Amer- 
ica and into the National Hockey League. 

That was five years ago. Now.' Vyacheslav Fetisov has 
visions of becoming the first member of what was the 
powerful Soviet hockey machine to coach in the NHL 

Feti.sov battled with the Soviet authorities for years 
before he was allowed to leave the Red Army team and 
join the New Jersey Devils in the summer of 1989. He 
became a symbol for the country's hockey players and 
Russians in general. 

"The system had control of everything and everybody." 
Fetisov said of the grip of organized hockey on players 
and teams in the former Soviet Union. Even as captain of 
the Red Army (earn that captured gold medals in the 
Olympics and world championships. Fetisov had little 
leverage within the system. 

"The idea of playing somewhere else was not entirely up 


to you." Fetisov said. “It was a question of human rights. 
People now know what freedom of choice is." 

Because of his accomplishments as a player and his 
persistent battle for freedom to play where he chose. 
Fetisov i$ revered in his native country and especially by 
hockey players in North America. 

"He is like God in Russia.” said Valeri Zelepukin. the 
25-year-old Russian left wing of the Devils, “It's because 
or him that so many Russian players are in the league 
now." 


If the 35 -year-old defenseman sounds like a politician, 
politics is one of his options after be finishes his career as a 
player. If and when he considers entering politics, he said, 
he would discuss the matter with Gary Kasparov, the 
world chess champion, who is a dose friend. 

“He's in politics and he wants me to be involved," 
Fetisov said of Kasparov. 

One of Fetisov’s major disappointments with life in 
North America, he said, was the political apathy of athlet- 


- v — his first contract with the Devils he- fVvrmtwt 
S 100*000 lo the school he Attended rs s chj[ J pouring yp {q ■ 
Moscow. 


And Monday, Fetisov joined the rest of the DevOsin the- 
the Brownstcme House restaurant 


ic stars. 


Fetisov is usually the first man Russian players, includ- 
ing stars like Buffalo's Alexander Mogjlny, Detroit's Ser- 
gei Fedorov and Vancouver's Pavel Bure, seek for advice 
when their team visits New Jerse\ or the Devils go on the 
road. 


: sports superstars get involved in politics 
: the idols for the people,” Fetisov said. 


U I have so much experience at both sides.” Fetisov said. 
“I’ve been a player since I was 15. Now I have some 
international experience. 1 have some good things to offer. 
I've learned some things about the different cultures, the 
mentality of people in Moscow, the United States and 
west Canada.” 


"I’d like to see 
because they are 

“Instead, they're looking to advertise sporting goods." 

Fetisov believes he should reciprocate for what hockey 
has given him. 

“I've been blessed with the good life and family because 
or hockey," said Fetisov, who lives in New Jersey with his 
wife. Lada, a former ballerina, and frequently comes into 
the city for Broadway shows or to visit Friends, “I want to 
give some back.” 

In that spirit. Fetisov revealed that shortly after he 


team's annual dinner at 

in Paterson, New Jersey, where the pfayers sefred food 
and drinks to the customers to raise money for children’s 
charities. Fetisov was elated to report that the team raised 
534,000. 

Whatever Fetisov chooses to do when he is dene as a 
player, hockey is likely to remain a part of Ins life. 

“I love hockey and that's where I want to be,", be said, “I 
want to communicate with players: AH my life I played 
with the best players and bad it lot of success." : 

If be becomes an owner, be will try to unlearn one 
lesson he has learned playing in the NHL: “Owners want 
you to win without asking whether yon have the players.*’ 

Fetisov's prescription Tor winning is “togetherness.” He 
said that was what made the old Soviet system a success; 
the players cared a great deal for each other onand off the 


“There is no secret abbot strategy and tfidtiop* any 
more." Fetisov sakL “The difference in winning is kntw-. 
mg your people and getting the most out of them. As long . 
asyuu brmgmcm tagethff, .instill the idea of togetherness,, 
then you'D be successful” 


Oneday.Fetisotr said, there wffl 
what he called “nnKmited potential" and he predicted that 
the Russians will be port of it 


“I can see the Russian bodfccy industry get to be big 
hincnwHc^ like show business," Fetisov said. 

But for now, his concerns are more local. Fetisov 


ice. 


the Devils capture tbe Stanley Cup- 

. “You must understand that I love hockey and the 
Stanley Cup is one of the few things that I have not wot as 
a player," said Fetisov, who is in the best physical oondi- - 
tion of his career and hopes to play two more years. 
“Every hockey player's life is empty. without a Stanley 
Cop." 


All Together Now, 
Michigan Wins 


Th,' 4nrcuUcJ Press 
The Fab Five reunion meant first 
place for Michigan. 

The Ihh-ranked Wolverines 
rook over j 1 the top of the Big Ten 
standings on Tuesday night with a 
91-67 victory .-iver No. 12 Indiana, 
in Coach Bob Knight's 700th game 
with the Hoosiers. 

The game also marked the return 


The Blue Devils (17-2! 8-2 ACCj 
trailed by 12 late in the first half, 
but Chris Collins hit a 3-poimer 
and layup to give Duke the lead for 
good at 62-58 with 4: 16 left. 

T ravis Best and Drew Barry each 
missed a 3-pointer in the final 11 
seconds for the Yellow Jackets ( 1 2- 
9, 3-7). who have lost four of five. 


COLLEGE BASKETBALL 


from one-game suspensions of 
Michigan's Ray Jackson and Jim- 
my King, ft was also the center- 
piece of u quick visit from Chris 
Webber, one of the National Bask- 
weball A>socaiton> top rookies 
who broke up the Fab Five when he 
left for the pros after his sopho- 
more year. 

"Chris gave us a little talk before 
the game.” said Jafen Rose, his best 
friend and former classmate. “It 
really meant a lot to see him." 

Webber sat on the bench during 
the game, the same view Jackson 
and King had last Saturday during a 
victor. 1 over Michigan State. They 
were reinstated by Coach Steve 
Fisher after suspensions for what he 
termed a "violation or team policy." 

The players were interviewed by 
the Ann Arbor police as pari of an 
investigation into the shoplifting of 
beer from a convenience store. 

Michigan ( 16-4, 8-2j had lost tbe 
earlier meeting to the Hoosiers ( 14- 
5. 7-3». blowing a big early lead. 
The Wolverines jumped in front 
again and stayed there this time, 
leading by 46-30 at halftime. 

"We maintained the lead and 
didn't let up our intensity like we 
did in the first game," said Rose, 
who had 20 points. “We played 
smart for 40 minutes.” 

Juwan Howard, the fifth mem- 
ber of what ma\ be the best recruit- 


visiting Duke was led by Marty 
Clark, a reserve who bad a" season- 
high 17 points, and Eric Meek, 10 
points and 10 rebounds. Best and 
James Forrest each had 18 for 
Georgia Tech. 

West Virginia 78, No. 8 Temple 
71: Tbe Mountaineers (14-5. 7-3 
Atlantic 10) swept the season series 
from the visiting Owls { 16-3. 9-2] 
and snapped the nation's longest 
Division I winning streak at 10 
games. 

West Virginia, which had lost 
three straight, trailed by 13 with 
7:42 remaining. Temple's Rick 
Brunson sent the game into over- 
time at 63-63 on a 3-pointer with 13 
seconds left. Zain Shaw's 3-pointer 
with 1:13 togo gave the Mountain- 
eers the lead for good at 73-71. 

Pervires Greene led West Virgin- 
ia with 27 points. Aaron McKie led 
the Owls with 26. 21 in the first 
half. 



Olson Joins Braves 
In $1.5 Million Deal 


The 


Press 


NEW YORK —After 1 1/2 months of searching, rdiever Gregg 
Olson found a new .team, agreeing to -a 51.5 mflfion, one-year, 
contract with the Atlanta Braves. - 

Olson, 27, tore a ligament in his right elbow midway through last 
season and pitched only eight inniiigs forthe Baltimore Orioles after 
the All-Star break. He bad 29 saves in 35 opportunities last season 
before being placed on -the disabled' list Aug. 9. He then was 
activated Sept. 22 bat made just one appearance and finished 0-2 
with a 1.60 ERA, 

An orthopedist, James Andrews, said last month that Olson 
wouldn’t need surgery, and the Braves’ orthopedist, Joe Chandler, 
gave a similar opinion on Monday. 

Of the salar y, $1 mfllk mwill be paid on opening day and $500,000 
during the remainder of die season. He can cam S2 nriGkra in 
performance bonuses.* S25.000 per appearance from 1-40 and 
550,000 per appearance from 41-60. 

In arbitration, the first basanan Kevin Man lost his case against 
the New York Yankees and win be paid 5425,000 rather than 
5490,000. He made 5225.000 last season, when he Mf.205 with nine 
honors .and 25 RBIs. . ... .... 

Five players settled, leaving 31 remaining. Tbe bigpest deal went 
to the Milwaukee outfidder Greg/Vaughn, a 512 mflkoa, three-year 
contract that could tie tiordTas much as 513.65 nSffidn. 


Vaughn 28. wbo led the loun with 30 home runs and 97 RBIs last 
season, made SI, 177^00. in 1993. He was slowed by a right shoulder 
injury during the second hatf of w season and had just 11 homers 
ami 29 RBIs after the All-Star break. He wound up tutting .267. 


He gets a $300000 signing bonus, 529 mflfinn this season, a 
mimmumof$4xmlfionin 1995 and a mt nrminn nf $4.8 irrilHn nm 1996. 


■ The Houston right-hander Fete Hanusch settled at $3,205,000, a 


raise of 51 J8 mQtiaLThe outfidder Marquis Grissom and Montreal 

pubic bis! 


Aiks Fmfdcfaonf Renter) 

Milwaukee’s Todd Day found Rockets in every direction as he attempted to drive to the basket, but the Bucks won at heme, 106-98. ' 


agreed at 5396 mDlkm, more than doobip ^s 51.5 mfltion salary last 
season. The Colorado outfidder Dante Bichetti settled at 525 
milli on, nearly four times his 1993 salary of 5735,000. 


Jazz Dodge a Late 3-Point Barrage to Edge the Nuggets by a Long Shot 



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mg c!as> ever, added 19 points, 

anil 


while King had 17 ana Jackson 13. 

Alan Henderson had 18 points 
and Dumon Bailey 17 forihe Hoo- 


•'1 thought Michigan played real- 
ly well." Knight said. “We just 
didn't play as wdi as we could 
have. Obviously, that's why it 
wasn’t good a game as you 
would have thought." 

No. 2 Duke 66. Georgia Tech 63: 


The .4 nncuaed Press 

The Utah Jazz had a 94-86 lead with 
less than 40 seconds left, so the victory 
was certain, right? 

Not by a long shot. 

Three’3-po'miers by Denver's Rodney 
Rogers — helped along by two turnovers 
by Karl Malone on inbounds passes — 
wiped out the margin in 8.8 seconds, 
giving the Nuggets a 95-94 lead with 20 
seconds left. But Jeff Malone's 18-footer 
from the comer with 1 2 seconds left saved 
the Jazz from an embarrassing defeat. 

When Tyrone Corbin blocked another 
shot by Rogers and the Jazz got the ball 
after a scramble under the basket. Utah 
had a 96-95 victory Tuesday night in 
Denver. 

“That's the craziest finish I've seen in a 
while.” Jeff Malone said. 

The Jazz did not call a timeout after 
Rogers gave the Nuggets the lead. 


T ve seen guys make 3-pointers quick- 
ly." said John Stockton, who finished 
with 22 points and 12 assists. “But not to 
go ahead in a game. We didn't call a 
timeout because we hoped to catch them 


1:2! left. Rogers hit the first of his four 3- 
pointers. and Bryant Stith scored to re- 
duce the Denver defid l to 92-86 with 1:12 
lo play. 


NBA HIGHLIGHTS 


unorganized and tried to get a good, early 
open shot. There was an opening for Jeff, 
and he hit it.” 


Spurs 110, BuDets 9ft San Antonio 
won its eighth straight game as David 
Robinson had 31 points, 14 rebounds. 10 
assists and 7 blocks against Washington, 
giving hint a league-best four triple-dou- 
bles this season. 


Karl Malone scored 24 points for the 
Jazz. Rogers, who made all four of his 5- 
point attempts, led the Nuggets with 23 
points, while LaPhonso Ellis scored IS. 


The Nuggets trailed. 68-46. in the third 
quarter before Kevin Brooks sparked a 
rally with two 20-foot jumpers as Denver 
closed to 76-63 entering the final period. 

After Utah moved ahead bv 92-8 1 with 


Michael Adams scored 25 points for 
the Bullets, who were victimized by a 1 9-0 
second-half run that sent them to their 
18th loss in 23 road games this season. 
Vinny Del Negro scored 21 points for tbe 
Spurs, who matched their longest win- 
run £ streak of the season. 


BuUs 118, Clippers 89: Scottie Pippen 
had 22 points. 14 rebounds and 9 assists 
as Chicago won at Los Angeles for its 


ninth consecutive victory over the Clip- 
pers. 

Tbe Clippers, who have not beaten tbe 
Bulls since Nov. 26, 1989, were led by 
Danny Manning with 22 points. 

Horace Grant also scored 22 points for. 
the Bulls, who shot 55 percent from the 
field, malting the Clippers 0-11 when 
their opponent makes 50 percent or bet- 
ter. 

Pippen. who will make his thud con- 
secutive All-Star start next Sunday, fin- 
ished one assist shy of his 14th career 
triple-double and third of the season. 

Trail Blazers 124, Kings 100: Clyde 
Drexler. who has made a career-low 40 
percent of his shots this season, snapped 
out of a shooting slump with 21 points on 
9- for- 15 shooting in Portland's rout of 
visiting Sacramento. 

Wayrnan Tisdale had 26 points and 


Walt Williams 20 for the Kh^s, who lost 
their ninth straght road game. Mitch 
Richmond, slated -to be Sacramento’s 
first AD-Star player on Sunday in Minne- 
apolis, sat out the gune with bade, 
spasms. 

Gifford Robinson scored 20 points, 
Teny Porter 18 and Buck Williams 17- 
points for the Blazers. 

lakcis 107, Sons 104: Los Angeles 
rallied from a 16-pomr deficit in the third, 
quarter to beat Phoenix for its fifth 
straight home victory. 

Sedale Threatt scored 13 of his 26 
points in the final quarter for the Lakers, “ 
who trailed by 75-59 before a 20-4. buns. . 
in the last 5:34 of the third period made it 
79-79. Los Angeles took the lead for 
on consecutive boskets by VIgde Di _ 
and James Worthy, making the scorelOP 
97 with 2:48 remaining. 


Mavericks MS. Thaberwoircs 105: 
Dallas, which, ha^just five victories in 47 
games this season, defeated Minnesota 
for the foortii tone in five; games this 
season. 


vuug WUilUi VI uuav uuiug 

in overtime for the Mavericks. EQs toDow 
shot . gave thcm.a 1QJ-99 Jtead after his 
thrtcSbint play with 2:10 remaining put 
Dallas SheaS 99-94, / 

Jttfftti Mtttouni fait three free throws 
in theftaal 23 seconds, and Tun Jackson 
added two ftwlshots with 3 j 6 seconds left 
to seal the victory and hand the visiting 
Thnberwpl ves tberr sixth consecutive de- 
le : -if- ,. r . .- . . . 

Jackson and Mashbum sewed 24 
points each to 'lead the Mavericks. Dong 
West had 24points and Micheal WflHaras 
ijfor the Tunherwdves,,who trailed by 
-84 with 54 seconds left in regulation, 
but stBl forced the overtime. 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


PEANUTS 


GALVIN AND HOBBES 


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INTERNATIONA L HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1994 


Page 1 7 


Samaranch 
Not Worthy, 


■ - 0 


Ctmp'ded br Our Staff From Dtspattka 

LILLEHAMMHR. Norway 
The International Olympic Com- 
mittee, already a regular target of 
the Norwegian press, received an- 
other jolt Wednesday when Nor- 
way s roost popular athlete «iy]|ff d 
the IOC’s president Juan Antonio 
Samaranch, of being unfit to lead 
the Olympic movement. 

The attack carried special iinpact 
because it came from the cross- 
country skier Vegard Ulvang, the 
triple gold medalist who will take 
the Olympic oath on behalf of 
1,900 athletes at the Games’ open- 
ing ceremony on Saturday. 

ulvang assailed Samaranch's 
ties to (he fascist regime of General 
Francisco Franco in Spain. 

“It is bad and may not be worthy 
of a sports movement,'' he said. 
“The IOC is not always worthy of 
sport." 

“The IOC should be given a dif- 
ferent, democratic structure,” Ul- 
vang said in a Norwegian television 
interview, excerpts of which were 
published Wednesday in VG, the 
nation's largest newspaper. 

The IOC issued an official re- 
sponse Wednesday, suggesting that 
the skier — a medal favorite in the 
Games — should not bite the hand 
that feeds him. 

“To a certain degree, he owes his 
worldwide celebrity to the Olympic 
Games, the Games of the IOC,” 
said the IOCs director general. 
Francois Canard. “We read his 
quotes that the Olympics are a ‘cir- 
cus.' Nobody is compelled to par- 
ticipate in the Olympic Games." 

“These type of comments are not 
new,” he added. “It just shows that 
be does not know us. He doesn't 
know the IOC well, be doesn’t i 
know the IOC president. He iswel-’ 
come any time at the IOC. We 
would be quite happy to see him 
and talk to him. He can express his 
views and meet the president" 
Carrard also took exceptkKi with 
U I vang's suggestion that the IOC is 
undemocratic. 

“The IOC is a far more demo- 
cratic organization than it used to 
be," he said. “We have had much 
more democracy in the last 10 years 
than before." 

Gerhard Heiberg, president of 
the Lillehammcr Olympic Organiz- 
ing Committee, sough to play 
down the controversy and. claimed . 
that Ulvang may have been mis- 
quoted or taken out ofxootna. 

“h will fade away,” BesaitL “It's . 
not a big issue, bin it is a voy 
interesting situation. It has todo 
with Norwegian mentality, the way 
we live and think.” 

Also on Wednesday, Samaranch 
said he would soon visit Sarajevo to 
show his solidarity with the be- 
sieged host ciry of the 1984 'Winter 
Games. 

He had widely been expected to 
put off the long-planned visit after 
a United Nations-hacked Olympic 
truce for Bosnia had failed. But he 
said on Swiss radio that he intend- 
ed io make the trip “in the coming 
days." 

Samaranch gave no details of 
when he would make the trip, but 
IOC sources said it could not be 
before the opening ceremony on 
Saturday. The liUehajnmer Games 
end Feb. 27. (AP. Reuters) 



Harding Faces 7 Charges 
FromU.S. Olympic Panel 

Burden of Proof likely to Be on Skater 


By Jere Longman 

\ft> J ivA Times Serene 

jjfi HAMAR. Norway — When 
Si Tonya Harding is called before a 
disciplinary board Tuesday, her 
spot on the Olympic icam hanging 
in the balance, she will face a list of 
seven charges from the U.S. Olym- 
pic Committee that question her 
behavior in upholding the ideals of 
fair play and sportsmanship. 

Moreover. Harding will appar- 
ently hear the burden of proof to 
show- why she should be allowed to 
remain on the team. 

The USOC has scheduled a 
** meeting of its 1 3-member adminis- 
. trative board at an Olso hotel on 


Tonya Harding's shirt said it all as sbe turned a camera on journalists outside the apartment where she is staying in Beaverton, Oregon, trative board at an Olso hotel c 

Legal Experts Back USOC Power to Expel Skater 


By Saundra Tony 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Olympic 
Committee has broad powers to expd the 
figure skater Tonya Harding from the Lil- 
fehammer Gaines next week, even if prose- 
cutors do not charge her with any criminal 
involvement in the attack on Nancy Kerri- 
gan, legal experts said. 

Although Harding would almost certain- 
ly protest such a ban by fifing suit in federal 
court, she might have a difficult time per- 
suading a judge to override a deri&oa by a 
private sports body, several said. 

“That is the nature of the beast Harding 
agreed to going in," said John Dowd, the 
attorney who handled the investigation of 
Fete Rose for the late baseball commis- 
sioner, Bart Giamaui, before Rose was 
banned for life from the. game. 

When Harding, the U.S. champion, 
signed on as a member of the U.S. team, 
she agreed to abide by its rules and proce- 


U.S. ^Pomen Win 
Shot at Medal in 
Skating Relay 

The A ssodoted Press 

HAMAR. Norway— The U.S. 
women's 3, 000-meter relay team 
wiD unexpectedly get the chance to 
defend the silver medal it won in 
short-trade speedskating in the 
1992 Winter Olympics. 

Apparently elimraaled from the 
Olympics by a fall in the' 1993 
world championships in Beijing, 
the UJS. team was invited Wednes- 
day after North Korea officially 
elected not to attend. 

Japan and Australia were ahead 
of the US. in tbe Olympic rotation, 
but apparently decided that they 
did not have enough tune to pre- 
pare teams. The short-track compe- 
tition begins Feb; 22. 

Two Tday-ieam members — 
Cathy Turner, the 1992 500-metar 
gold medalist, and Amy Peterson 
— already had qualified for indi- 
vidual races. Other team members 
are Nikki Ziegelroeyer, Shana 
Sundstiom and Karen Cashman. 
Turner. Petetson mid Zkgdrneyer 
were members of the 1992 team. 


dures, which includes checks and balances 
on its powers, Dowd said. 

“That is why you have a hearing," he 
added. “You can make your pitch. That is 
the system that you agreed to." 

In addition, several c riminal defense 
lawyers said Harding faced the possibility 
of criminal charges even if she was un- 
aware in advance of the Jan. 6 attack on 
Kerrigan, as she has stated, but learned of 
it later and failed to notify the authorities 
immediately, as she admitted on Jan. 27. 

According to Dowd, her failure to re- 
port the information was not like that of 
an innocent bystander. 

“Sbe had a clear interest in the outcome 
because it was an injury to a competitor " 
he said. 

A former assistant U.S. attorney. Nancy 
Tuque, said possible charges could include 
concealment of a f dotty or even accessory 
after tbe fact — both felonies. 

But even with oat criminal charges to 
rely on, the USOC has broad powers to 
expd an athlete for failure to live up to its 


code of ethics, and that appears to be the 
focus of a Games Administrative Board 
hearing set for Tuesday in Oslo. 

The USOCs executive director, Harvey 
Schiller, said the inquiry would deal more 
with “sportsmanship and fair play rather 
than criminal matters 

Dowd and others said the U.S. Figure 
Skating Association and the USOC had 
provided Harding with ample due process, 
including notification of complaints and a 
chance to defend herself. 

But Mi mi Dane, lawyer in Columbus, 
Ohio, argued that Harding was not getting 
a fair shake because the USOC and the 
Games Administrative Board were acting 
“as prosecutor and judge at the same 
time" in her case. 

“The USOC is bringing the charges 
against her. and making the determina- 
tion," said Dane. 

Dane is one of the lawyers representing 
the sprinter Butch Reynolds, who won a 
S27 million judgment in federal court 
against the international ruling body of 


track and field in a dispute that dealt with 
his suspension from the sport. 

Rulings in Reynolds' case and others, 
sbe said, hare established that sports fed- 
erations, in particular the USOC. which 
“controls every avenue of an Olympic ath- 
lete’s ability to compete, must comport 
with fundamental fairness and due pro- 
cess” when they discipline athletes. 

Harding must weigh whether she should 
testify at the bearing Tuesday, given that 
sbe could still face criminal charges, said a 
New York attorney, Shepard Goldfeiu. 
Should sbe invoke her Fifth Amendment 
right against testifying on the grounds that 
it might incriminate her? That action 
would surely weigh against her with the 
Olympic panel and later with the courts in 
any civil challenge of the panel's action. 

For the USOC, there is a similarly vola- 
tile issue. 1/ the panel expels her anil she is 
never charged in the attack, “think of the 
damage claim" she could bring against the 
USOC. Goldfein said. 



Pint VinifT/Agacc Fnau-Picuc 

The Japanese speed-skater Torn Aoyanagi practiced Wednesday in Hamar, Norway, with a mask simulating high-altitude conditions. 


Tuesday to determine Harding's 
status on the American figure-skat- 
ing team. It will be an administra- 
tive, rather than a criminal pro- 
ceeding. 

Therefore, the list of charges will 
deal with Harding's conformity to 
such lofty, vague standards as hon- 
or, fairness and sportsmanship and 
whether she properly represented 
an athlete of the United States. 

The allegations come in connec- 
tion with her involvement in the 
Jan. 6 attack on Nancy Kerrigan at 
the national championships in De- 
troiL 

Harding was notified of the hear- 
ing late Monday in Portland. Ore- 
gon. Her lawyers there were still 
formulating a response, but dearly 
Harding is in tbe position of having 
to convince the Olympic committee 
not to remove her from the team. 

“At the bearing, you may show 
why you should not be disci- 
plined,” the hearing notice said. 

The Olympics begin Saturday, 
and the women's figure-skating 
competition begins Feb. 23. The 
last day for changes on the roster is 
Feb. 21. 

The list of charges were present- 
ed in five pages of documents and 
labeled “CHARGES PRESENT- 
ED.” They ranged from indistinct 
ethical transgressions to more spe- 
cific references to potential iegd 
concerns facing Harding regarding 
the attack. The document also set 
forth the hearing procedure and 
possible penalties. 

The charges drew the attention 
of legal experts as much for what 
they didn't set forth in terras of due 
process as for what they did. Never 
mentioned, for instance, was the 
calling of witnesses. 

According to the Olympic code 
of conduct that Harding signed for 
the 1994 Winter Games, in the case 
of a hearing “both parties will be 
given the opportunity to examine 
and cross-examine ail witnesses.” 
But the charges say nothing about 
whether she will face live witnesses 
or merely accusations contained in 
documents. 

Several other crucial questions 
were also left unanswered, includ- 
ing: How many attorneys will Har- 
ding be allowed to have represent 
het7 Who will pay for her attorneys 
to travel to Norway? Who will bear 
the cost of transporting witnesses? 
When and will the USOC present a 
list of witnesses to Handing's attor- 
neys so that they may prepare their 
defense? 

"Those particular issues will be 
covered in the next few days in 
discussions with her attorneys." 
said Harvey Schiller, executive" di- 
rector of the USOC. 

The games administrative board 
is charged with resolving all dis- 
putes that have not been settled by 
the time the Olympic delegation 
departs the Untied States. All deci- 
sions by the board are final, though 
Harding could then seek relief in 
court. 

It has nol been determined bow- 
many votes among board members 
would be needed to remove Har- 
ding. Olympic officials said. The 
board intends to conduct the hear- 
ing even if Hardmg declines to ap- 
pear. Schiller said. She is tentative- 


ly scheduled to arrive in Norway on 
Tuesday, the day of (be hearing 

The USOCs list of charges 
against Harding reiterated the find- 
ings on Saturday of a figure-skating 
association panel. The panel said 
that reasonable grounds existed to 
believe that Harding had violated 
the sport's code of ethics. 

The first charge stales that Har- 
ding “committed an act, made a 
statement or engaged in conduct” 
in connection with a plan to injure 
Kerrigan and in connection with 
the subsequent investigation of 
that plan. 

Her actions, the charge said, vio- 
lates a USOC bylaw that an athlete 
conduct himself or herself “at all 
times and in all places as befits 
worthy representatives of [your] 
country and in conformity with the 
tradition of the Olympic Games." 

Her former husband, Jeff Giiloo- 
lv, has said that Harding knew of 
the plan to attack Kerrigan and 
gave the final go-ahead. Harding 
has maintained she had no prior 
knowledge of the attack, saying 
that she learned only afterward 
that several persons close to her 
were involved. 

She has admitted withholding 
that evidence from authorities. 

This may leave Harding the most 
vulnerable at the hearing. 

Portions of the other charges in- 
clude the following: 

• That Harding’s conduct vio- 
lates the 1994 Winter Olympic 
Games Code of Conduct, which 
she signal on Jan. 9. after the na- 
tional championships, and which 
stipulates that an athlete must be- 
have "in conformity with tbe tradi- 
tions of the Olympic Games and in 
such a manner that you bring credit 
and honor to yourself, your team- 
mates. your national governing 
body (the skating association), the 
United States Olympic Committee 
and the United States of America.” 

• That Harding's conduct is del- 
rimental to the welfare of figure 
skating and the tradition of the 
Olympic Games and violates her 
responsibility under the rales of the 
figure-skating association “to ex- 
emplify the highest standards of 
fairness, ethical behavior and genu- 
ine good sportsmanship in any of 
your relations with others.” 

•That Harding's conduct violat- 
ed her obligations to the UJS. Figure 
Skating Association to “avoid any 
action or conduct that could reason- 
ably be expected to significantly dis- 
rupt" the team, to comply with tbe 
“highest, standards or fairness, ethi- 
cal behavior and genuine good 
sportsmanship, both on and off the 
ice," to conduct herself in a manner 
“indicative of representatives of the 
United States, demonstrating con- 
sideration for the rights, privileges 
and wri/are of others." and to re- 
frain from behavior that is known to 
be “unacceptable." 

• That Harding's conduct violat- 
ed a fundamental principle of the 
IOC Olympic Charter, which re- 
quires an Olympian to “create a 
way of life based on the education- 
al value of good example and re- 
spect for universal fundamental 
ethical principles." 


Whitaker Sets Bout With Cardona 

NEW YORK 1NYT) — Five months after scoring what just about 
everybody but two or the judges thought was a decisive victory in San 
Antonio 'over the previously indomitable Julio Cisar Cbkyez, PenielJ 
(Sweetpea) Whitaker said that he was putting his World Boxing Council 
welterweight title on the line once again, this time in a hometown setting 
in Norfolk. Virginia. • • • 

His opponent in the April 19 bout, a mandatory WBC challenge, will 
be Santas Cardona, a lillte-known Puerto Rican who was being touted 
Tuesday as a big, strong brawler. Cardona, who has a 29-3 record with 19 
knockouts, earned the challenge with impressive victories over kevm 
Pompey and Livingstone Bramble, a two-time dteinpion; 

Whitaker, who wen his wdterwdgbt title by defeating James (Buddy) 
McGin in New York's Madison Square Garden last year, retained urn 
the bout against Chavez, which was ruled a majority draw after two of the 
judges scored it even and one gave it to Whitaker. 


Maradona Vows to Play in ^4 Cup 


BUENOS AIRES (AP> —The Argentine socrerstar D 
said Wednesdav that he would play in the World Cop m th 

_ J U, ininnN Ann hafTWS With t 


3 Maradona 
foiled States 


Maradona, accused of shooting an atr nfle at journalists outside his 
summer home last week, admitted for the fast time, m thenewspaper La 
Vnzrid Puebla that be had been involved m the mcidenL Five journalists 
were slighlh’ injured Feb. 2 by air rifle peltas shot from Maradona shame. 

On Monday, the newspaper Clara reported that Maradona and set 
other oeonte had taken part in the beating of a photographer in a bar. 
Maradrarasaid CJarin’s version was false, bat did not say whether he beat 
Mateos, who was not seriously injured. 

Tyson Is Granted Hearing in Jane 

INDIANAPOLIS (APj — A Jane, hearing has been set for Mike 
Tyson’s lawyers to ague that prosecutors knew his accuser had planned 

to sue the boxer and make rootw from the 

The stale Court of Appeals ruled in December that Tyson was flooded - 
to a hearing to determine whether prareeutora withheld formation at 
trial that might have resulted in a different verdict. Judge Patma J. 
Gifford «f Marion Superior Court set a hearing on tbe wue for June II 
Tyson's attorneys will get a th an* to cm mnmtudM 
knew that Tvson's accuser and her lawyera planned to file a avj lawsuit 
against the 'boxer, ff the judge rata id* 

SfiSufe 

America beamy pageant He is serving a 6-year pos<» term. 

For the Record 

Ahm Prrwt of France, who announced his retirement from Formula 
OnISngmi Septemberafnar worts Ksfomth title, with 

Williams- RenS has accepted an invitation from McLaren to test its 
new (Reuters) 


NBA Standings 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
ANandc EMvKdoa 

W L Pet 


New York 

33 13 

J17 



Orlando 

28 » 

585 

7 

Miami 

23 22 

ill 

9Vj 

Mew Jersey 

21 24 

.467 

lift 

Boston 

20 26 

.425 

13 

PtWodetPhia 

20 38 

jOS 

13 

Wnshbmtoa 

IS 31 

326 

IB 


Central Dfvtsioa 



Atbeito 

33 12 

333 



Chicago 

33 13 

317 

W 

Clevoiand 

24 22 

522 

VYl 

Imflona 

22 23 

M9 

11 

OurioTte . 

23 24 

jm 

llW 

Milwaukee 

U 33 

336 

20 

Oetrart 

M 38 

20 

23<b 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Midwest Dtvtslwa 

W L Pet GB 

Houston 33 12 733 — 

San Antonio 34 14 JOB v> 

UlOtl 31 17 A* 6 Jl* 

Dtiwer 1 22 24 ,478 11W 

Minnesota 14 31 JIT 19 

Deltas 5 42 .106 » 

Pacific Dfvtsioa 

Seattle . - 34 10 .773 — 

PWtenln as is At7 4ta 

Portland . 37 19 JB7 3 

Golden State 25 TO JS6 **> 

LA Lafctn 17 28 J76 171c 

LACitanen 16 28 JM 18 

Sacramento TJ 32 787 2IU 

TUESDAY'S RESULTS 

33 to as 35— 1 84 

CMnmand 27 M IS M— 1T2 

- JLJa Morris 7-133-4 19, Coleman 7-ISM If, 
Anderson S-WM 22. C:Jawmioro 9-15 0-4 IB. 
. Price Mr n. Beboondi N e w Jersey 56 
(Comma* 15), Cleveland 43 l Nance 9). As- 
sw*— New Jersey 21 I Anderson 5). Oevetand 
32 iPrtee ll). 

Houma MU 18 »- to 

MmwwJu* W 91 M JJ-TM 

H; Otari uwui 1114 74 27. Maxwell 5-14 1-2 U 
SraWiMMUEileWMULM: BricfcawsU 
Ml 34 If. Murdock 10-18 7-8 23. Stetamts— 
Houston a (Otalimon 121. Milwaukee 44 
tfiafcer Bl AssMS— Houston V IBrsoks 6i. 
WtaxMkce 27 t Murdock 12). 
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Joctaon 9-ia 6-T 34. Rdbornwh- Wdnnrjolc 51 
IMtmv MJ. Dallas 51 ( Jones 8). Assists— Min- 
nesota 22 rwuikms 8), Dodos 17 (Jackson 61. 
MtosWnpton 25 28 22 33— M 

feBAaftwto IS 3t IT 30— lit 

W; CMoneyp-PM i& Adams ns to 2k S: 
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[Adorns 8). San Antonio 27 IRabinm »). 
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Denver 1* T7 to 33-W 

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D: t-ltls 4-13 HH1 18. Ream 8-T3 34 31 Re- 1 


bo*ut»~Utah£l (Spencer 11). Denver Si IE(- 
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22 (Pock ft. 

Chicago 33 » J1 M—lil 

LA COttaers 35 99 18 17 — 89 

C: P Inpen 10-18 1-2 73, HGrent fl-12 8-7 23. 
LA: Monntaio 8-16 84 23, Hamer 6-15 5-7 18. 
Rehoands— auca8o57(Pippen U). LosAnw 
les 47 (Voueht 8). Aws«— cwcooo 32 I Pip- 
ped t). los Armeies Z1 (j.Wlfiloms 5). 

PtaocnU 34 74 19 JS— 104 

LA Lakers M 33 38 S-107 

P; Ceaalka 10-24 w 22. Green n-188-7 to 
LA: Lyndl M3 34 W, Dtvoc 7-IB 54 If, 
Threatt 11-19 to RetoomuO— Phoenix 58 
(West 13), Las Angeles SI ( Dlvac IS). Assist*— 
PhoerWe 28 (K. Johnson 101. Las Angelos 25 
(Dlvoc Threatt 8). 

Sacnsnaato 38 22 27 25—100 

POrttand 31 30 28 35—124 

S: W.W1U lams 6-168421, Tlsdaie 12-223-226. 
P: C Rafilnson 10-18 M to Drenler 9-153-321. 
Reboands — Sacrgnscnta 54 (Wilson 74). Pori, 
land 53 (B. HVCams 757. *aMh~SocromaHo 
26 IU Smith 81. Port land 31 IStrlcfcland. Por- 
ter 8). 


NHL Standings 


NY Ronoers 
New Jersey 
Ftorfcta 
Washington 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Atlantic Division 

W L T Pts GF 6A 
oere 34 M 4 72 190 138 

nwv 29 17 6 64 109 145 


19 10 56 ISO 140 


PWkxJetoWo 

24 

28 

4 

52 

190 

201 

NY tstonders 

to 

26 

6 

46 

176 

1B0 

Tampa Bov 

20 

36 

6 

48 

139 

182 

Northeast' DhiNon 




Montreal 

28 

19 

B 

6t 

181 

154 

Boston 

27 

18 

9 

63 

178 

153 

Pittsburgh 

» 

16 

11 

63 

192 

186 

Buffalo 

28 

23 

5 

57 

in 

145 

fluetee 

21 

29 

5 

47 

J75 

If) 

Hartford 

19 

38 

6 

44 

158 

188 

Ottawa 

9 

40 

e 

26 

V44 

2S8 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Central DWHkm 



w 

L 

T 

Pt» GF 

DA 

Toronto • 

76 

16 

11 

67 

185 

155 

Defroft 

30 

18 

S 

6S 

234 

TB5 

5). Louis 

28 

19 

B 


178 

181 

Danas 

2B 

20 

7 

83 

192 

177 

Chlujyti 

25 

27 

4 

56 

159 

JS1 

WUmines 

17 32 t 
Pacific MvMoa 

41 

188 

276 

Cafgory 

37 

If 

f 

6i 

203 

173 

Vancouver 

37 

25 

2 

58 

185 

ITS 

San Jgse 

If 

» 

11 

49 

152 

172 

Aratedn 

21 

11 

4 

48 

154 

172 

Los Angela 

19 

Z? 

4 

44 

195 

207 

Edmonton 

IS 

33 

8 

38 

173 

202 


TUESDAY'S RESULTS 
PMMeMria 2 8 18-3 

Ottawa iii b— a 

Pm* Period; PMfllM* i iBrimr Amour. 
Seranekt; O-LamO l| (HvftoMnv Shaw); 
tspl.P- Renters 21 (UadrabRtccMI.Seceiid 
Period: O-Yeshin 24 (Lginto Ruilcka)) too). 
Third Period: p-nenben H (Rodte, Eta- 
lundl; O-Ruztdco 5 (LomO. vgriihi); (00). 
Stats on ooot; P (on MocMov) 7-8-9-3—27. 0 
(on Roussel) 15+84-31. 


Boston >8 4-4 

Quebec 1 8 0—1 

First Period: G-Youno to (Sakic. Sunflni; 
(OP). B-SmatlnskJ 17 IStumged; B-Stewart 3 
(Roberts. Featherstone). Third Period: B- 
Qot»30 INeeifl.- B-Oaies71 (Juneau, Neely): 
B-Ootes 22 (Neetyli B-Donato to (Bouraue, 
SmoltasWj; (pp|.8iwtsan«aal: H lor TtaMWL 
Cloutier 1 104-19-37. Q Ion Casey) 7-104—23. 
Beftato * 0 l— I 

N.Y. islander* 1 • 2—3 

First Period: N.Y.-Mclnnb 15 (Ferraro). 
Third Period: B-Audelte to (Planle. Smnn- 
llk); N.v.-Fldtlev 10 (King, Ferraro); N.Y.- 
Thonias26 1 MotoUiov. Hogue) ; (ea l . Statsoa 
goal: b (on McLennan) 84-13—27. n.Y. Ion 
Futtrl 15-7- 14 — 36. 

Vancouver 8 3 1-8 

Detroit 2 1 9—3 

First Period: D-Sheaaara 39 lY r era nu i. 
Lklstram); D-YZernrtm 11 (Lldstrom, Cci- 
toy); Ipb). Second Period: V-Cotot 7 1 Ron- 
lUng); V-Lumme 8 (Ronning. CaurmaH): 
Ipp). D-Yzermon 12 (Drake).- v-Bure 30 (So 
bven, Ronnlna). Third Period: V-Carson 8 
(Linden. Gefinas); V-Romng 15 (Bure, 
Courtnail) ; V -Craven 10 (Bure, Limn me I. 
Stats oa goat: v ion Ciwveuoe) 11-9-10—30. D 
(on McLean) 12-7.7— to 
Winnipeg 1 3 5-5 

Si. Louis 1 3 o-8 

First Period: 5L-Jomey >5 (Snonanan. La- 
levttteu SL-Boun 7 (Hull. Dudiesne): w- 
Doml 7 iZhomnov, Ulanov): SL-Huii 38 


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(Chase); 5L-Brown ll (Ducnesne.Snonohoni; 
(OP). Second Period: SL-Baron 4 (Hull. Jan- 
neri: w- Tomlinson ( (Souttol; W Emerson 73 
(Steen. Shannon) : SL-MontaomerY 5. Third Pe- 
riod: lW-Zhmnov 18. lW-TkOOiuh. 28 iTomUn- 
son;. Shots «o goal: w Ion Josertil n-17-15 — *3. 
Si- Ian Essenso. CTNedll 13-11-18-34. 
Chicago 8 I 2—3 

San Jose 1 2 1—4 

First Period: SJ. EIIk tl (Oucftew, Fal- 
boon 1 second Period: C -Wilkinson 2 t Lo- 
rn Leux) : ipo). SJ. -Baker 4 1 Norton) ; S-i.-Ozo- 
llnsn 13 (Makarov. Norton). Third Period: 
5J.-Errev 11 lOdaers. Baker): C-Pouim 18 
iRuuitu. Russell] : C-WWnrltn 2 (Graham. S. 
Smilhi. Stmts oa goo): C ion iroel 8-11-18—38. 
5 _/. (or) HockeH) 8-7-7—23 


THIRD TEST 

India vs. Sri Lanka. Second Oar 
Wednesday, in Ahmedabad. India 
inula Isi Innings: 3294 

ENGLISH FA CUP 
Fourth Round Regtar 
Blockeura 0. Charnon 1 

ITALIAN CUP 
First Leg. SwMflnal 
Somodorla 2, Parma 1 


BASEBALL 
American League 

BOSTON — Agreed to terms •im CoHos 
Quintana, in Desertion, on 1-year contract. 

CHICAGO WHITE SOX— Agreed to terms 
with Michael Jordan, outfielder, on mlnor- 
imuc contract and invited him to spring 
■raining os norvrosler plover, 

CLEVELAND— Agreed 10 terms wltnTonr 
Pena, catcher, an mbw-leogue con trod 

DETROIT— Agreed la terms with Tim 
Belcner, pitcher, on l-vear contract. 

MILWAUKEE— Agreed to lermi with Greg 
Vaughn, outttekfer. on 3-year contract. 

MINNESOTA— Agreed 10 terms with Scot I 
Erickson. Pot Matwhes. Oscar Munac, Dave 
Stevem and Kevin Tanam. oh chert; Matt 
Walbeck. catcher: Jett Rebouiet, Chin Hole. 
Demy Hocking. David McCarty, Gary Scotl 
and Scott Slahovtak. inDeMers; and Pedro 
Munoz. oulHelaer. on t-vear contracts. 

TEXAS — Agreed to lerms with Roger Pov- 
1 lk. pitcher, on I -rear contract. 

National League 

ATLANTA— Agreed to terms with Gregg 
Olson, piicher. on i-vear contract. 

COLORADO— Agreed to terms with Dante 
Bichette, outfielder- on 1-veot canfracl. 

HOUSTON— Agreed to terms with Pete 
Harnlsch and Tom Edens. Pilchers, an l-vear 
con tracts. 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


(Continued From Page 4) 


MONTREAL— Agreed to terms with Tamil 
Benitez and Marauis Grissom, outfielders, on 
i-vear comrocis 

14 Y. MET&— Agreed lo terms with Reyn- 
aldo Ordonei. shortstop, on a minor -teagus 
contract. 

PHILADELPHIA— Agreed to terms with 
Curl Schilling, pitcher, on l-vear contract. 

BASKETBALL 

Notional Basketball Assectattoo 
NBA— Named New York forward Charles 
Da* lev to Eastern Conference All-Star team, 
replacing Alonzo Mourning who Is m lured. 

CLEVELAND— Acilvated Tyrone HIIL tar- 
ward. tram Iniured list. Signed lav Guldtager, 
center, lo contract tor reaiMndor ot season, 
and then out him on Iniured fist. 

FOOTBALL 

National Foothall League 
DETROIT — waived Melvin Jenkins, oar- 
nerback. 

HOUSTON— Promoted offensive coorainocor 
K(vm Gitoride to nssisiont head coach on rrf- 
fense. Named Dtc« Courv ottensive coordmator. 

tamp a BAY— Nomed David Culiev wide re- 
cehnrscooch; Ken Oorke defensive Ime coach, 
coid Johnnie Lvnn defensive hocks coocn. 

HOCKEY 

Nattonol Hockey League 
NHL— Suspended Harttora left wing Brkm 
Preaa tor 4 games arid fined Mm 54M tor 
stashing Montreal's Vincent Damonoutae In 
gome on Feb, z 


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V. 


Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1994 


ART BUCHWALD 


My Rolls and Adolph 


Y17ASHINGT0N - There are 
VV areumems in f 


argument in favor of guns 
and arguments against them. Zol- 
tan, a millionaire Hollywood pro* 
ducer, is the proud owner of a .45 
semi Snout and showed it to me 
when we were driving to the race* 
track in his Rolls-Royce. 

“I keep Adolph right here on my 
lap," he confid- 
ed. "if anybody 
gives me trouble 
1 go POW." 

“That's terrif- 
ic." I told him. 

“But isn't it 
tough to hold 
the gun in one 
hand and drive 
with the other?" 

have^o make [ Bndnrald 
phone coll. I can'L tell you what it 
means to hold a gun dose to me 
when I am in the car. There are still 
a lot of crazy people driving on Lhe 
California freeways, and most of 
them hate people in Rolls-Royces. 
But nobody fools with me. Adolph 
could wipe out a Greyhound bus if 
1 wanted it to." 

“Do you ever get the urge to 
shoot a person even if he didn't do 
anything?” 



Ancient Tombs 
Found in Paris 


Agrru r France- Prcae 

P ARIS — The discovery of a 
Merovingian necropolis in Par- 
is is proof or the urbanization of 
the Right Bank of the Seine in the 
early Middle Ages, according to 
Michel PetiL curator of the region- 
al archaeology department. 

It contains the first tomb of a 
high Frankish dignitary ever found 
in central Paris. The burial site at 
Place Baudoyer. in the fourth ar- 
rondissemenL was uncovered by 
chance during digging for a parking 
facility. About 60 tombs were 
found, dating from the fourth to 
the seventh centuries. 

The Merovingians were a Frank- 
ish dynasty that reigned in Gaul and 
Germany from about 500 to 751. 
Petit was particularly enthusiastic 
about the sarcophagus of a prince or 
princess of the sixth century that 
contains jewels, a dagger sheath and 
materials woven from gold thread. 


"Sure. I get the urge. If someone 
gets too close to me or cuts me off, 
he could find himself in Flanders 
Field alongside the poppies." 

“I assume that nobody has made 
a move on you since you got the 
gun.” 

“No. but I wish they would. I 
wish the beck they'd honk at me 
just once. Adolpb would like noth- 
ing more than to make them get on 
their knees and beg for mercy'." 

“Aren't you afraid that you 
might accidentally shoot yourself 
in the groin?" 

"Not me. I was personally given 
safety instructions by Charlton 
Heston. I have also completed 10 
hours on the shooting range. Peo- 
ple (ike me never shoot themselves 
in the groin." 

Suddenly Zoltan whispered to 
me, “While we’ve been driving I've 
noticed three cars that could possi- 
bly ram my Rolls-Royce and total 
iL ! have a good mind to fire a 
warning shot over their hoods." 

I said. "I don't see them." 

“Over there — the Pontiac with 
the two guys wearing baseball caps 
who are pointing at me. then the 
guy wbo’s always looking back at 
his mirror to keep his eye on me. 
Finally there's the car that passed 
me a half-hour ago. and the driver 
laughed at me. My finger is getting 
itchy." 

"Wait." ! said, “if you make a 
mistake they'll give you 10 years. 
Maybe they're not even looking at 
the Rolls or. even if they are, it's 
only out of envy, not hostility." 

□ 


Zoltan snorted, “You don’t have 
any idea what it's like to own a 
Rolls. I drive to the shopping mart 
or to the car wash ana someone 
follows me home and sticks me up 
in ray driveway. Every time I go to 
the theater someone is waiting to 
pounce. That’s why I love Adolph. 
If those din-bags come at me he 
speaks for both of us." 

“If everyone hates people in 
Rolls-Royces, why don't you drive 
a Honda?" 

Zoltan almost went through the 
roof of his cor. "With my money, 
who'd want to own a Honda?" 

“Anybody who doesn't like to 
worry about being followed.” 

“It wouldn't be fair to trade in 
my Rolls for a Honda." Zoltan 
said. "What would I do wun 
Adolph?*' 


Richard Galliano and the New Musette 


By Mike Zwerin 

Intemtuumal Herald Tribute 


P ARIS— Picture a smoke- filled cafe in 
a black-and-white Jean Gabin movie. 
A man in a beret with a handlebar mous- 
tache and cheeks reddened from daily 
wine clutches a baguette. The yellow- 
skinned Gi lanes cigarette hanging from 
the comer of bis mouth has gone out. He 
and others like him are listening ro Edith 
Piaf records. In come three Manouche 
guitarists who begin to play something 
vaguely resembling a tango. It gels crow d- 
ed. The red-cheeked men dance with pale 
women. People sing, smoke, drink and 
laugh. It's called a Bal Musette. 

The musette was originally a 17th-centu- 
ry French bagpipe, and the name came to 

be applied to popular dances and parties 
that featured it. in the early 20th century it 
became a fixture in Parisian working-class 

cafes. Manouche (French Gypsy) guitar 

players, some of them cousins named Rein- 
hardt and Ferret, discovered jazz music 
played in America by people persecuted for 
their color like themselves. Over the years, 
the bagpipe was replaced by an accordion. 
The Manouches preferred jazzistic liberty 
of expression, and while the rhythmic pat- 
tern remained three, they began to stomp 
om a pompe. a guitar chord on every bear. It 
was called the “swing waltz." 

From this brief summary or contempo- 
rary popular music, one common denomi- 
nator emerges. Africa. Africa is everywhere. 
The musette emerged from French fusion 
with the popular music of African and 
I talian immigrants. In Argentina, African 
and Italian immigrants mixed with the 
Spaniards and Indians already there and it 
was called the tango. African. Spanish and 
Indian folklore came together in Cuba and 


out mme the mamba African, Creole and 
European influences in the southern United 
States gave birth to the blues. The bines 
came to France via African-. American jazz- 
men who Django Reinhardt called “my 
brothers." and the Swing Waltz lurried into 
Le Jazz Hot. Django's octaves influenced 
Wes Montgomery and Montgomery came 
back to haunt Django with more of them 
and faster. Louis Armstrong called Edith 
Piaf “a great blues singer" 

The accordion went out of style with its 
cousin the bandonion as well as the musette 
and the tango they were associated with. 
They all became emblems of squareness 
and'all are in vogue again. The music goes 
'round and 'round arid it comes out here. 

The laie Asfor Piazzolla. whose influence 
continues to pop up everywhere, is to be 
thanked for the “New Tanga" an innova- 
tive. influential melange ctf Stravinsky, Gtl 
Evans and the old tango. The French accor- 

Piazzolla. bis mentor, at Chartes^eGmiS 
airport not long before the latter had a 
stroke. Driving into town. Piazzolla advised 


him to forget about playing American jazz 
because the accordion has European not 
American roots and so docs Galliano. “1 
suggest you look into the “New Musette,’ ” 
he said. “The rest is up to you." Galliano 
looked into iL 

His latest album “ViaggkT (Dreyfus) 
currently tops the Frcndi jazz charts, with 
10,000 copies sold. This is not a number 
worthy of Madonna, but the bottom fine 
in this pw is not the last number. The 
New Musette is the first major original 
French musical style since Django Rein- 
hardt and the string swing of the Quintet 
of the Hot Chib of France in the 1930s. It 
also represents a strong riposte to quotas 
imposed by protectionist politicians de- 
fending French culture agamst American 
pop-musical imperialism. 

Nationali ty has nothing, to do with it 
You listen to the New Musttte because it’s 
the real thing - It happens to be French : — 
with, remember, strong African and Italian 
influences. Should the French defend their 
music pffirat Italian cultural im p e rialism? 
Given the atmosphere of the day. the name 
itself might cause problems. like “New 
Tanga" “New Musette" is named in Eng- 
lish. I'm not translating iL Is this a Trojan 
Horse, some way to break the blockade, to 
sneak through the quota? Those Americans 
can be slippery. 

Galliano was bom in Cannes in 1950. 
He picked up the accordion at the ace of 5. 
His father was an accordionist in the mu- 
sette tradition. He feds “very It al ian," still 
has family in Perugia and Rome and goes 
down there often to water fcos roots. But, 
parallel to P iazzolla, Galliano adds ad- 
vanced elements to his sources — the 


modes of the pianist Bill Evans, the 
“sheets of sound” of John Cdtrane, the 


World Music acconfiomst Gaffiano. 

ChnrtUB Rnw 



ica tv Toots TTudemaiB (trim is Belgian}. 
He was overwhelmed by lie voteamcririw. 
of African-American drummer .Max 
Roach. At first it. was not a conscious, 
influence, they were just sounds in bis ear. 

He did however choose to ijpbrc to dd ‘ 
musette tratfition, be ncrer pkyed the old 
riagors- He thfnlm it. may be a sort of" 
rebellion against Ins father. He never fdt 
comfortable playing that baguette-and-be- 
retmusc. Before Pfezzofla suggested a leap 
into the future, GaBianb fed made a gocri 
firing ve^ much in tbepc^^ 
mg singers fike Ctecdc Noogaro and Jim-' 
etto Greco. But being an amompanist was 
not the stuff of his dreams, A gig on a 
Saturday night TV varietyshow was not a 
step forwmL All the white he kept looking . 
far American jazz-squeezebox ancestors 
but only found s few m smaH-prinl —Art 
van Damme, Joe Mooney, Mat Mathews, a 
1949befcc^renditk)nof“Cbm)kee"bytiie 
pianist George Shearing.. 

So he seems to be stack m toe future. 
Piazzolla handed him the torch, and he's 
carrying ft. The vision seems to bc becoro- 
ing reality. He wants to play Paris, now 
. . . France, now. He relates to the music 
of multicultural, rambow-ookiied francp- 


Mano Negra, who add up the sum total of 
rh4r African, Mediterranean and Caribbe- 
an influ ences. Their mrisic is more than 
merely French, it is outward-bound rather 
than inbred. Wbaz side of the quota fine are 
they on? Are they “pure" enough for those 
who define it? 

Welcome to the world of Worid Music. 
Gaffiano avoids the Broadway song form 
not because be has anything against it, on 
the contrary. It's just sot ms culture. He 
would like to investigate Afro, further. 
Coincidentally, 1 recently heard the same 
desire expressed by the classic bebop pia- 
nist Hank Jones. Africa is eveywfere. 

the term New Musette is convenient 
commercially but creatively Smiting. Gal- 
liano wants more poetry, more delicacy, 
more creative use of sflence. He is interested . 
in the oanoert h»n rather tham tbe Ami* 
bafl. Drummers obsessed with a back beat 
or the Charleston have him in a cage. 

Galliano dies a more recent and perti- 
nent ^uide. A free-thinking American saxo- 
phonist and long-time resident of Paris, he 
plays and writes short, coheave, deceptively 
simple jazz fines with all sorts of harmonic 
and rhythmic land xmnes that inspire him to 
fry and break cc through to the other ride. 
Ins is just the kind of guru he needs to free 
himself from the yoke of his African Ital- 
ian Argentine and Mammche masters — to 
hdp him explore his Frenchness. Too bad, 
the guru is African-American. 


PEOPLE 


• ft 


'Schindler** List’ Gets 
12 Oscar Nominations 

“Schmdkr'j List,” Steven SpieL 
berg’s Holocaust drama, captured 
12- nominations for Academy 
Awards. The other bestpjcOne 
nominees vnae *Tbe Puma” “The 
Remains of tbe Day” ‘The Fugi- 
tive". and “In the Name- of the Fa- 
ther.*’ lit atkfitioa to Spidbag, best 
director jwnanations wetc Jane 
CauMri for “The Piano"; Jim 
Sheridan, “In the Name of tbe Fa- 
ther”; James Ivory, “The Remains . 
of die Day," and Rabat Altana 
“Short Cuts.” Best actpr .aaniaees 
were: Danid Day-Lewis, Tfinife 
Name of tte* FithflrT; Iterate 
Ftshhome, “What’s LovpGottoDo 
with If; Tam Me* *t%aadd~ 
pfate"; AndKMQr Hopfcta^fhe Re- - 
mains of tbe Day,” and Item N«- 



nominatinns 

“Whate Love Got 
Stodoviiatemi 
Separation”; 
Piana"®™®' 1- 

mains of the 



iVi 
id 

U*. 

andDdir* 

r, ‘^feadow^ffi^’ Nonanat- 
ed far best ' foragh-bmgp»ra Ehn 
were: “BcBe >&<Xjne? (§p«m\; 
“Farewell Mr. Concubine" (Hong 
Kong); Wyn” (Britain,’ 


Wdsh. Umgu^jefc ?rhe Seem of 
■ Green Papaya" (Vietnam), and 
"TIte Banquet” (Taiwan): - 

• - • r &-*&■■■ 

And the^i4ie.. a£e thoRazzies; 
The bax-cfljcxyhft “Indecent Pro^ 
po^aT* arid “SKm;" with Sharon 
Stew, nnmtripes far the 14th 
annual Raztie Awards for toe year's . 
wont in' .movies,' with seven each. 
The AreoMScfcwaneeegger mega- ■ 
budget bomb “Last Action Hero” 
and “Body of Evidence,” st aring 
MadowafoSowed with six apiece. 
AD four films were nremwawri for 
worst picture, atom with “Cliff- 
hanger, starring Sylvester. StaL 
lone. The winners win beamwonced 
Manto 20, a day before the Oscars. 

The Dncheas of Yoct trill join a 
flight carrying $2 million in relief 
supplies to audrea in Bosnia ton 
week. The relief is being provided 
by theU. Sl - based Americans and 
niildww in Grias,an organization 
founded by the duchess. 


IMERMBOim 

CLASSIFIED 

Appears on . Pages 4 & 15 


WEATHER 


WEEKEND SKI REPORT 


Europe 


Forecast for Friday through Sinday, as provided by Accu-Weather. 


Today 


Alp** 

Amvw^an, 

Ank.ua 

ABirm 

Br%ad* 

Baitn 

Bnnwh 

ButQprf-iJ 

Copflrtwyn 

CbuWW 

DuMn 

cdmtw^i 

Fd-rxa 

PtariJiBi 

Onrm 

nmc-*i 

ISOntui 

LasPakoan 

LntMn 

Uo*«J 

MAbi 


V-a 




5 - 

!Sok»- 


OF 

OF 


OF 

OF 


1«-W 

9.4B 

a 

I9.W 

10/50 

9 

4WI 

S.Vi 

c 

0/43 

1/94 

PC 

S/41 

104 

1 

6/43 

-2/29 

r 

12-53 

•i4« 

l 

1306 

8/43 

c 

IJM 

?<«4 

sh 

14/57 

8/46 » 

2.3S 

49/ 

n 

JOS 

•C.22 

Gfl 

104 

•1/31 

J 

104 

-4/25 

tol 

&'4I 

-101 


6/43 

0.08 

PC 

I.T4 

3/27 

m 

0.02 

-4/J5 

sn 

104 

-lOI 

VI 

2/3S 

-e/ 2 5 

c 

I7« 

3/40 

9 

17/E? 

9/48 

■» 

t2i53 

0.43 

* 

12/53 

6«*3 

PC 

».« 

409 

0 

0/40 

5/41 

flh 

!0/S0 

104 

pc 

8/4« 

002 

pc 

■111 

7/29 

VI 

•IOI 

7/70 W 

f-43 

-2^9 ue 

B't.1 

-»OI 

9 

■S T4 ■ 

■14.7 

PC 

-4 25 

IOO 

9 

B'« 

4/37 

1 

9/46 

2/35 

r 

SPm 

1S*9 

» 

23/70 

14/57 

« 

16«I 

0.’46 

pc 

17-e? 

9-48 

PC 

9/« 

205 

9 

a '46 

409 

9h 


7.07 

til 

15/59 

409 

9 

E/« 

ore 


7/ 44 

IOI 

pc 

0 10 

■14/7 

PC 

41/IB ' 

■I5» 

9 


•its 9 

to! 

2.T5 

*.22 

4 

I2.U 

JOT- 

pc 

12 T J 

307 

2 

- ^ 

■O'-.F 

c 

3.7T" 

1 ifi 

P*- 

12 W 

8 4 i 

• 

14/57 

9.46 


'..:i 

104 

1 

P'4* 

9 97 

DC 

(iTf 

* 727 

to 

1 I! 

7 09 

3H 

3112 

-J.~» 

1 

4TJ 

IJ1 

•jy 

! I'M 

20S. 

PC 

5.'46 

U3J 

pc 

-s.-ie 

-C4 

- 

7.20 

15.6 

5 

.- -i 

974 

’J 

1.04 

•709 

> 



North America 

Dry. cotd woaBwf *8 prevail 
from Chicago to Del rod Fri- 
day. Snow will arrive Satur- 
day and spread nortneast- 
ward through Buttalo and 
Toronto A mwture ot snow. 
ko and ram tmS occur farther 
south, from Indianapolis to 
Pittsburgh Heavy ram; win 
;oak the Southeastern 
s’ates Sunday 


Europe 

Cold win perasi over Scara*- 
nava and the former USSR 
Friday into the weekend. Dry 
weather wD ptevaK m much 
ot this region, mdurtng Lite- 
hammor. A slow-moving 
storm in lhe southeastern 
MctJler-jnean Sea wfl bring 
rain and gusty wines to 
Greece ard southwestern 
Ti^key 


Asia 

Tokyo wlB hove dry. season- 
able weather Friday. A lew 
showers are posaaie Satur- 
day. then Simdav will be dry 
and coaler. Northern Japan 
will have scattered snows 
Friday mlo the weekend 
Beijing wifl hcvn dry. season- 
aWe weather tate ims ween 
white Hang Kong has C tends 
gvmg way to sunshme 


Middle East 


Latin America 


p :« 

- 1\ 


zen ; 
:?-<l p- 
pr. 

•ta- -Jl 
-*■ r- ,r 
-rrt t 


IT 5.3» v. 
?'ic -1BI« pc 
443 -I.OI p- 
J/t» -UTS at 
3?r on 

4.13 3T7 w 


Oceania 


Today 
Hgh Low 
OF OF 
Bow raw !t.K> 

'Tiro Kit 

r-jnuscus I raE JI39 

JmjKdrrr. IS«I 8.’4E 

L-o-T -i-.X* S4I 

Poo* 24.75 tj.55 


W Htgh Low W 
OF OF 
pc !3« n«e 9 

s rt.7.3 a « t 

9 IPW 4-31 3 
9 16 6t 7.44 3 

o .to :« i 
J MOB I4.T7 J 


laid 

High Low W tflgk Low W 
OF OF OF OF 

Bumos Ao*9 Z7IBO "Eh4 pc c 

Caracaa ?«■«! ^373 pc 38 « J373 pc 

Lun, a&T) M m pc «i79 ;i7ij oc 

M™»Ccy 3iT3 12.53 pc 2ICO ')'« c 
thotrUnr-p 2P82 2373 pc 23.1* n ~J pc 

Sw*j(p 2475 rj.T* cc l] B [r 




•4-57 pr 22 7T 15 51 , 

ie-54 pc 26.7S ie« pr 


Lcgmd: i w. lcstV 
sn-snow. Kc. W-V>eaT«3. 


cw v?f. c<tovc/. sn-sncwtjs. t-riunctefshmrs. r-*ar. S-snow runes. 

A0 pugis. for e ca s ts and data p ep. Me d by Accu-Wfeadter. tnc. 2 !9*t 


Asia 


Today 


Tomonow 


Wgh 

lam 

W 


tea* It 


OF 

C/F 


OF 

OF 

todidi 

3SW9 

J6.7V 

t 

aa.m 

M/75 sh 

Ovo 

JOT 

104 

r 

403 

-2*29 ah 

Hong Kong 

1HU4 

18*1 

1 

19*6 

1509 | 

3203 

28. "71 

e 

3301 

23/73 pc 

NnOcfia 

27.00 

19.-50 

a 

26/79 

9*48 a 

Smt 

307 

•61H 

9 

307 

007 d 

Sharon 

12*50 

7/44 

•A 

11.52 

6-41 r 


X K 

25.77 

t 

26.118 

84/75 1 

Toon 

•.tv. 

1509 

ah 

28/71 

16,61 sh 

Wpl 

S/41 

-J-27 

PC 

7/44 

■101 <r 

Africa 

tljm 

Copr 7ovr 

14.07 

<«» pe 

164EI 

•r>tso a 

26.73 

1 752 

■ 

28.71 

12.53 pc 

CsuUana 

iwee 

7H4 

■ 

IWM 

848 a 

1 line 

83/73 

V4I 

B 

86.79 

0 M 6 a 

legos 

31 .O 8 

86.79 

PC 

31.88 

28/7? Dc 

Uantb 

2S.0P 

10.00 

• 

38.88 

14.57 pc 

Tuna 

14.57 

6/43 

PC 

16*1 

7144 y 

North America 

4n*w»Ji 

■5.T4 

■ ■64 

X 

•SiiH 

•177 K 

49W44 

e.-»: 


* 

*152 

£■43 K 

9j»h 

-5 74 

•1 IS 

1 

•62 * 

• 9 . '6 DC 

CTngo 

«■;? 

"3 

z 

or’ 

9 -15 pc 

Dwwt* 

1C M 

•COT 

pp 

7/44 

■U'18 t 

X>nc* 

*. 1! 

•2 11 

PC 

-JOT 

■10 15 pc 

HcncUki 

:s~ 

K53 

oh 

87* 

lOTO DC 

Hbb.ti 

* 4« 

205 

pc 

14-57 

8-«6 a 

ArsSn 

19 64 

? -42 

» 

-864 

«'« DC 

6n 

23 04 

■3M 

PC 

nic 

87*68 Dc 

MrwocW 

_*"8 , 

1 

St 

-706 

■14 T pc 

Mnrt 

•15.5 

1 * •*: 

9 

Til 

84--H pc 

*«SUIJ 

23^4 

1565 

■ 

23* 

7368 1 

•Irw Yr» 

-3 ~ 

-9 'c 

5 

373 

*72 DC 

Fhra-Ti 

:: m 

J ’45 

t 

23 73 

7.44 1 

tV F»J r 

•; u 

- u 

yi 

‘/■Si 

5‘41 DC 

0 nr« 

5 47 

r sT- 


t-41 

8 35 t 

7 cmrt: 

••7 O . 

"t 4 

pc 

"7/ 

’«7 Pc 


•".O’ 

~TT. 

C 

2X 

425 fx 



Depot Mtu. RM. Snow Leal 
L U Ptatoa Piataa Stela Snow 


llaaort 
Andorra 

Pas Ce la Casa 160 210 Good Open Pwdr 2/9 fteserr key apart, supero sttitng 
Sotdeu 1 70 SO Good Open Pwck 3/9 Baton tuty open. excoMerX sMng 


Austria 







igls 

0 60 

Good 

Cfcd 

Vnr 

2/8 

S'BKBsapen. tourer Hopta pasty 

Kit2buhel 

40130 

Good 

Open 

Pwdr 

2*9 

61:64 UtMopen. proof peaaskkng 

Saaibach 

65 145 

Good 

Open 

Petal 

1/31 

Aaaasopen some icy pachas 

Schladming 

40 145 

Good 

Open 

tr 

2/0 

MHOs open trosh snm. 

StAnfon 

4O?70 

Good 

Qwi 

var 

2/fi 

AS *ffs open, goocf upper stupas 

Franca 







Atpe d’Huez 

130 230 

Good 

Open 

Var 

2/0 

7B-’86 «ts open good ptste stdtrg 

Les Arcs 

110 340 

Good 

Open Pwdr 

2/0 

SB- 64 bra open, grant ekting 

Avoriaz 

155 195 

Good 

Open 

Pwdr 

2/8 

Good string on besh snot* 

Cauterels 

1*0 245 

Good 

Open PBkd 

2/4 

It. 15 Ua open good sung 

Chamonix 

40 360 

Good 

Often 

Var 

2/8 

Upper slopes excellent 

Courchevel • 

140 195 

CVwl 

Open 

Pckd 

2/0 

AB 64 mend 95 pom open 

Les Deui Alpes 

80 300 

Good 

Open 

POKt 

1/28 

SO 63 HOs open, kxefypato thing 

Rame 

!00 305 

Good 

Open 

var 

2/8 

24-2BMtsopea same fresh snow 

Isola 

1E3 22C 

Goad 

Open 

PChd 

2-4 

23 ktis open exceBenr skuig 

Mar. bet 

70 2C0 

Gcod 

Open 

Pckd 

2/0 

AHMsopmn magrxmedpnm 

La Piagne 

145 300 

Good 

Open 

Rdkd 

1 '28 

AB 1 12 bits open, icypahhas 

Serre Chevalier 

40 160 

Good 

Open 

Var 

2/5 

34 rj era open eteamresung 

Tignes 

T«?29C 

Good 

Open Pwdr 

2/5 

Breeders pasaer skting 

Vai ri'teibm 

135 22C 

Good 

Open 

Pwdr 

2'S 

49 54 Ua open sttyd) ekttig 

Vai Thorens 

14C 300 

Good 

Opop 

Var 

2-4 

AB 60s open good slang 

Oamtany 







Gamusch 

5320 

Gcod 

Same 

Var 

2,0 

Upper pauamrceBenl 

Oberalort 

2C 15C 

Gcoa 

Seme 

Pwdr 

2-8 

Best slang on mper slopes 

ittey 







Bormio 

20 1 EG 

Good 

Open 

va/ 

2'7 

EtceBen tepme 1-~OOm 


Raaort 

Cenrinia 

Cortina 

Coutmayeur 

Selva 

SestHftra 


Depth Mtn. flaa. anew Last 
L UVMmPMm ataki Seow .. ... 

'90400 Good Open Pwdr 2/8. Btca0arsskSftg an Hash snow 
25 faa Good Open Pwdr 2/B Piti* sttanarnwHant 
1 30.230 flood .Ckd Var 2/5 ZZrZTUttepan. gao a.j pUrQ . 
55120 Good Open Pwdr 2/6 -MTS HIb upon.- uBanndaapm 



'>• * -r «• — 


BthwinirT 


h 


LiDehammer 

GO 00 

Good 

Opart Pm« 

2/8 

7/B BBs qperutoW odnUans 

Sjm| n 

aaqutoB-Berat 

T402B0 

Good 

Open Vet 

2/9 

21/22 mend 35/43 IOs open 

SiritearianU 

Areas 

90100 

Good 

Open dusty 

2/7‘ 

AH iBUtsapdn sapetbsking 

Crans Montana 

40150 

Good 

Open Var 

2/6 

Fresh snow improving cantMBons 

Davos 

85170 

Good 

Open Pwdr 

2/8 

ABBBsafxn eroetM ooncMtons 

GrtndatwakJ 

20110 

Fee 

Poor Crusty 

2/8 

Upper skty» remain good 

Gst»ad 

20 CO 

ft* 

Worn V8r 

2/B 

60/69 Ua open, some ley potchee 

Vereier 

25360 

Good 

Open var 

2/8 

37/30 Os Open exceBens skBng 

Wengen 

30110 

Good 

Far Pwdr 

2/8 

Upper ektpes good 

Zsrmatt 

70 230 

Good 

Open Pwdr are 

32/36 BBs open. arceOent shtog 

U-S. 

Aspen 

125 140 

flood 

Open Pwdr 

2/8 

ABB BUS Open 

Haavwdy 

75 146 

Good 

Open var 

2/8 

20/25 8ts open 

Mammoth 

105 195 

flood 

Opwi Pwdr 

2 /a 

26/30 efts open 

Park City 

70145 

Good 

Open Pwdr 

2 /a 

AB 1 **Bsapan 

Steamboat 

110 1S5 

Hard 

Open Petal 

2/3 

19/20 Ua open 

Taos 

V75 >96 

flood 

Open Pcfcd 

2/3 

Resort fuBy open - ■ 

Tafluride 

IIS 140 

Good 

Open Pwdr 

2/8 

Ati 10 Ms open 

vafl 

105140 

Good 

Opwi Pwdr 

2/8 

AB 25 UK open 


Key UUDefdt ki on on tower and upper stapes. Mbs. PMasMounMntide pistes. Rea. 
PMeaRun taadng to raeott vOags. AitAiMctol snow. 

fltonrftaaoasd/QrtatSita'C&toafQaatBritata 


Travel in a world without borders, time zones 

or language barriers. 


AB5T Access Numbers. 

How total! around the world. 

I I -irr£ rise than tvlimtind ihf iuunm~niu ait: LolKn^lnm 
Z Dvjl :he ij'^rt>j vaaluiK .VEkT .V12.' \umir7. 

.Vi ART f njd hh-^pt-jkin^ Cipna ii.w n:\imx prunipt will ask fnrfihc phone number you wish to call or connect you m a 

ir.i--'xner*4m-kr rt-pr^».-niarivf. . 

To ircchc your fice walks card of /flXT'sAccess Ntnribas, just dial iheaccessnomtwof 
ihecrxnitr>' jTKi’netn andask for Customer Service ■ 


COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


Hungary* 


OQa -800-01X11 


Australia 


0014-881 -Oil lrdanJ*« 


90000 1 


^«wr 


UdUr/tCtUx 1 


B3b 300 bTW : iiiil \%} 

t tutrt •V..J 


Ipu^ip-c :i wt .rid wlieiv y »u i jn aJ! <:■ nr.ir, [f r: i.-.yi.y -an !:■. >;n .\iul 
rc;tc ’'' - ••liw-*-’* lr« *ni • jvct 1 25 o ‘unir;^. Clsr\ cr-c wtrit - -.r m * v. h ; ; J, >pcjk vour 

• " - ’ nji-J. iyc. -Irh-c > srjnsijicc! in>uniiy. Ctl! > our c !:cr.r> :u 3 V.m «7.T” ihey l! t!v niessisK tn 


j *c»Lrf i . , m * * 

• ... ... ^ your nu j :it ;i :iv - v p» title n : ’ur. .\|i i.’tb i> iv.'W j> w::.: ATc. j 

{ ' ntiitM ■4a>4iea<> .3**- ft. .,. ■_ . . . _ 

. [o use ui'.’s; ser. ices, vli.ii l ne .Vjlv; Ai_i.es> NumlxT -:<i v v ’tt re In und yciu l! j;et till ih 

help ynu need. Willi these Access Numhers anti your AioT Cuilsns Ctrd. interr.ur!» cul.m.u - .e'- rr hee:; easier. 

It yt .u dr /n't have an .AT&T Caliinj; Ctrd r#r yy.i d like nv. ire snf« *muiunn on .'TaT ^!r ihai >er.:ce-> ; u>t caii usmt* ihe 
c‘ riV'.r.ient Access Numbers o;s vviurnahc 


OiinaJPRC*** 

10611 

Ireland 

1-800-550-000 

Guam 

018-672 

Italy* 

172-1011 

Hong Kong 

800-1111 

Liechtenstein- 

15500-11 

India* 

000-1 n 


8*196 

Indonesia* 

00801-10 

Uixemhiurji 

omfloiii 

V,u-i* 

•lnjW-1 1 1 

Make* 

0000890-110 

Korea 

009-11 

Monaco* 

194-0011 

Kora** 

IV 


06 G 2291 U 

Malaysia* 

800-0011 

Norway* 

800-190-11 

"'■'-'n ZuiijmJ 


Poland**- 

0*0104800111 

Philippines' 

105*11 

Portugal* 

05017-1-288 

Ru»ia~(MOKw) 

15M0« 

BftfMHh 

01-8004288 

Saipan* 

235-2872 

Skmkfat 

0042000101 

SiMStporv 

Nuojun-m 

Spain 

90O9WXM1 

sn Linkj 

■ijK-lA' 

Sweden* 

02O795-6li 

Taiwan* 

0080-102880 

Switzerland* 

ivyoo-u 

'riuiijixt* 

«i 01 »MWMIU 

UJC. - 

050O8M0W 

EUROPE 

MIDDLE EAST 

Armenia” 

SU.I4I11 

Bahrain 

800001 

Austria — 

022-903011 

Egypt* (Cairo) 

5100200 

Ik'^tlllll* 

trS-HUPM 

bred 

177-100-2727 

ikiljvu 

ijn-S-SV-italtl 

Kuwafc 

800-288 

Croatia"* 

99-3800 n 

Lebanon (Bdrgtj 

426401 

O.pnh* 


Saudi Anhia 

1400100 

Czech Hep 

00-4 2000101 

Tnrfccy* 

00000-12277 

Denmark' 

8002-0010 

AMERICAS 

France 

19*0011 

Be&n» 4 

U/i-tW-AJOlUl 

595 

Germany 

01300010 

Bolivia* 

08001111 

Greece* 

00000-1311 

Bcazfl 

0008810 


COUNTRY 

access number 

CbOc 

. OOa-Q312 

Colombia 

960-11-0010 

'Costa Btcam 

114 

Ecuador* 

.... . . - n9 - 

ElSalvadofli 

- - - 190 

Guatemala* 

-190 

'OofmaBT*- 

t65 

Honduras^ 

• m 

•ModOQAAto. 

95-800462-4240 

Mongol GM8B8KIM0 Hr 

PllUUBIfl . 

- -ns. 

Pern* ' 

- :1» 

.. Suriname - 

156- 

Unjguxy 

. .00-0410 

. Venezuela** 

• 80011-120 

CARIBBEAN • 

Bahamej - 

H0M7MW1 

■Bermuda* - 

• - ;i400«M8ai' 

British Vx 

1-800-872-2881 

Cayman Mantte 1-800872-28®.. 

Grenada* 


HteT . „ 

. - . OCQT0aW2r28© 

Jamaica** 

0800872-2881 

NertLAritB 

001-800472-2881 

•St KfaVNevfa 

r*T-8flft872288l ' 

. . • . 

AHOCA-kl-.- 

Gabon* 

, -OOa-OOli 

Gambia* 

. 00111' 

fcnjri* 

flbedt- - 

•=SBaqt * mt, 

aSYrtAnifttinii^^ ' 


vi- 


101-1992 




; AJ?iT 


?n,r '-'Vt/'.I'MW J, ml WgHdCom ■’nn»c 

-I- - rw IWMBJ •n'Wi- .. . - , -i UVT 1 jDKuqi- 

*' ’■ - 11 " 1 ■wwiips'l-ew iswi-wte.nl hi.iui Lf. • 

«»I FnMCimtrxT,,'. j. lami n:k<u« i , -<MHiminlitJil 
S*f FwMCimwn -^-naci»L^3p|d., 

wiManevit,?.. j»*u'*,iFiiii*iiiti,..Miiii-.trjid.4,wiL‘ 

‘Ha i lupm utiwx'i 1 4 1- vi i « ,r,3*x' . e<l i. adui k4r 

’.-r-w . B, lUvmiHtaitll 

tfs/a 1p«in 


•aw i>« nr iwueihinM 
MOttaluluwuah 
-••IHMcrfcvwmsfanrftKtauitBn 

KUltiUM 





M4WH nJfa* » Wl fwme 
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