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INTERNATIONAL 


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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


Paris, Friday, February 11, 1994 



No. 34,509 


What It Took to Bring 
jU.S. and Allies Together 

NATO Credibility Gap and the Plight 
Df UN Troops Finally Tipped Balance 


Bosnia Trace 
Takes Hold, 
But the Serbs 


By Craig R. Whitney 

.Vw York Times Semce 

BONN — Whai makes the latest NATO 
hreal to bomb Serbian artillery positions 
round Sarajevo different from earlier threats 
ry the allies to use air strikes to stop the cruel 
iege of the city? 

This time, the United States and its allies 
fclearly understand the threat the same way. and 
or the first time both now seem ready to make 
good on the threat if the Serbs disregard it. 

“NATO has finally made a credible threat to 
|tse bombs to stop the violence in Sarajevo." an 
official in Chancellor Helmut Kohl’s office here 


! spoke 

bnes and about the shift that has taken place on 
both sides of the Atlantic about the need for 
P-S- involvement. 

In May, France, Britain and most of the 
ither European allies rebuffed an American 
ilan to use air strikes against Serbian military 
argeis and lift the weapons embargo for the 
Bosnian Muslims, who were suffering the most 
rom the war there. 

But the fighting went on, and in August the 
hllies came around to issuing a threat to use air 
bower if attacks against civilians continued, 
plow, they say. they really mean iL 
What brought them to this point. European 
and American officials say. were two things. 

I The Europeans were sick and tired of keep- 
ng thousands of peacekeeping troops with 
Jailed Nations forces in Bosnia-Herzegovina 
vbo could only look on helplessly at almost 
laily atrocities, trying to get food and medicine 
trough to civilians trapped, like them, in a war 
hai none of the combatants yet wanted to end. 

And both Europeans and Americans were 
tware that letting the Serbs go unpunished for 
gnoring earlier threats could have fatal conse- 
quences for ihe credibility of an alliance that 
hey all still believe is the best security frame- 
work to ensure a safe transition from Cold War 
o cooperation with the new democracies to 
their east 

This lime, the Clinton administration care- 
ully prepared the ground for the strategy it 
lrged on its allies, instead of coming to them as 
secretary of Slate Warren M. Christopher did 
asi May with a proposal for which they were 
iot ready. 

Mr. Clinton worked the telephones with 
Resident Francois Mitterrand of France, 
‘lime Minister John Major of Britain and 
rhpnceflor Kohl of Germany. And Peter Tar- 
loff. the undersecretary- of srale for political 
rffak^and Charles Redman.-tbe Uix-envoyio 
be Balkan peace talks, met with European 




Vadpudi 


Anita Wachtex, the defending Worid Cup overall champion, is one of the very strong Austrian team’s golden hopes in Lfflebammer. 

\Lillehammer Ready to Greet the World 


By Ian Thomsen 

fnumaiand Herald Tribune . 

LILLEHAMMER, Norway — The ground is whiter than the 


liOchammer’s 1 15-kilometer (70-mile) valley. The final building was 
completed last spring. Then all at Norway waited. 

It came. 



:Iouds. This town’s 23,000 residents Walk, crunching upon it. with a . . Thesnow isevoywhere, in nearly record amounts, as if in answer to 
sense of pride equal to their refief. Their lepatatkmsliavc been saved. . \ w 


When the International Olympic Committee awarded - the 17th. 
Winter Olympic Games to this central Norwegian town in 1988, its 
nembera had in nrind the postcard image of streets coaled m peaceful 
dlcncing snow. For the five winters thereafter, it hardly snowed. Ihe 
lasts could have manufactured snow forAlberto Tamba and the 
« her skiers, but that wmddhave beat like serving take-oat pizza loan 
toaored guest 

For five years. LrOehammer nude good on every ride. Old roads 
bvere tom up and new ones lard. New btdldm^ went up across the 
(valley. Cons traction can be wearying, especially for people who live m 
)a small town in order to avoid just that ‘ 

Representatives of the majority who never believed the Qforipics 
ivou!d come weronow 'w rgtm nk twerAo anffcipaied windfall Some — 
fe!.Q5 biJhoo was 
host city, were spiwuf out 


.. . .every prayer. If any more falls, it ought hinder the movement of the 
expected 100,000 daily visitors, most of them traveling the single 
railroad line and two- lane highway from Oslo. 180 kilometers to the 
south. LiHehammer was predominantly a summer resort before, but 
that identity might be changed forever. 

Just outside the city, rugged d eatings have been filled in with a soft, 
white layer nearly 3 meters (9 feet) deep in spots, not to be touched 
until the spring thaw. It dines to the green fir trees, giving them a 
graying sense of age and nobility, and it covers the rooftops like 
blankets over rows of sleepers. So magreal is it atop Hal] ell the Alpine 
skiing, venue, that the snow hangs from the undersides of roofs in 
gjanl swirls like soft ice cream. 

On Saturday, the majority of the 1,988 athletes from 69 countries 


march through the' sn ow and i nto the ski-jumping arena, where 
loHarbar and Cncwik^rister tbwnsin - Continued on Page 19 


officials Wednesday to talk not only about 
military steps but also about the diplomatic 
steps that are to follow to try to bring about a 
peace settlement. 

The shift in the European attitude began with 
the two meetings of NATO ambassadors in 
Brussels on Aug. 2 and 9. when the United 
States convinced its allies that threatening the 
Serbs with action might have some effect on the 
battlefield. Attacks on Sarajevo did diminish, 
for a while, after the threats were made. 

Bui by the end of the year, it was dear that' 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

words were not enough, as Mr. Ointon told 
other NATO leaders at the alliance summit 
meeting in Brussels Jan. 10-11. 

It was then, according to senior German 
officials, that the British and French, who to- 
gether provide about 10.000 of the troops in the 
UN protection force in Bosnia, indicated seri- 
ously that they were beginning to conclude that 
the mission was a mockery and that it was 
pom dess to continue, unless something drastic 
happened to change things. 

The French had insisted on raising the issue 
of Bosnia at the summit talks, and for several 
weeks afterward tried unsuccessfully to get the 
United States to put pressure on the Bosnian 
Muslims to agree to a peace settlement splitting 
their country up with the Serbs and Croats. For 
a while, some American officials suspected that 
what the French were really trying to do was to 
find a way of blaming the United States if they 

See ALLIES, Page 4 


Russia Urges a Meeting 
Of the Security Council 

Russia called Tor an urgent meeting of the 
UN Security Council in an apparent attempt 
to block air strikes, but the United Slates 
quickly rebuffed the appeal. iPage 4) 

In other major developments: 

• The United Nations agreed to set up a 
commission of inquiry into the Sarajevo mar- 
ket massacre, clearing the way for Bosnian 
peace talks to continue. (Page 2) 

• NATO military planners will benefit 
from months of reconnaissance and from the 
presence of sophisticated spy planes that 
were still in the experimental stage during the 
Gulf War. (Page 2) 



4T&T to Scrap 

15.000 Positions 

NEW YORK (AF) — AT&T said 
fhursday That it would efimmate 14,000 lo 

15.000 jobs in the tong^listance compa- 
iy's communications units over two. years 
o cut costs and stay competitive. , 

More than half the job cuts will be tn 
nanagement. Employees in the 96^00- 
itrong communications services group wiB 
* offered incentives to leave The cuts 
ome oh top of thousands of jobs tha t 
eiephone companies are already scrap- 
ling to to cut back cu operators and 
echnicians. AT&T said it aimed to save 
1900 million a year from the latest cuts. • 

In addition, American Telephone 4 
Telegraph Co. will dose sales and service 
jperations in Providence, Rhode Wand; 
rharieston. West Virginia; Bloomington, 
dinnesota; Cheyenne, Wyoming; Itasca, 
Binois; Pleasanton, California, and Silver 
spring, Maryland. 




Kiosk 


Israel and PLO Breathe Easier, but Warn of Work Ahead 


‘ By Clyde Hibernian 

Hem York Times Service 

JERICHO. Israeli-Occupied West Bank — 
Although praising their new accord on security 
arrangements as a breakthrough, Israd and the 
Palestine- Liberation Organization cautioned 
Thursday that they still needed more weeks of 
negotiations to get Palestinian self-rule under 
way in Jericho and the Gaza Strip. 

As details emerged about the partial agree- 
Jmeni initialed in Cmo on Wednesday night, 
jPrime Minister Yitzhak. Rabin of Israel said it 
(would take at least another month to dear 
(remaining obstacles on economic relations, 



Figures in Swiss 



Book Review 
Crossword - 


Page 7. 

Phge*. 



cl— fcMB 

Sonic Lfflebammer has been ready 
for die Games to start snee eaity 
December. 


transfer of dvfl authority in the occupied terri- 
tories and lingering security matters. 

Until they are all resolved, Israeli officials 
said, they mB not order the troop withdrawal 
from Gaza and Jericho that was supposed to 
have begun on Dec. 1 3 but has been hdd up by 
snags in the negotiations. Promised releases erf 
Pales tinian prisoners also seemed likely to be 
put on bold until a full agreement is reached. 

The PLO chairman, Yasser Arafat, who 
readied the understandings in Cairo with For- 
eign Minister Shimon Poes, said he hoped 
everything could be settled in two weeks. 

- Whether it takes another four weeks or two, 
w even less, there was no edebrating Thursday 


on the streets of placid Jericho and turbulent 
Gaza. Palestinians, disenchanted because noth- 
ing has changed in their daily lives five months 
after Israel and the PLO signed the initial self- 
rule accord on the While House lawn, recog- 
nized that they still had a way to gp. Many said 
they would not believe that Israd meant busi- 
ness about its promised withdrawal of forces 
until they saw it 

Also unhappy were Jewish settlers in the 
territories and rightist opposition parties, 
which said that the Cairo agreement had pul 
Palestinians closer to their hoped-for state and 
Israelis deeper in danger. 

Bui Israeli government offidals, although far 


From ebullient, breathed sighs of relief that they 
had left Cairo with 3 deal that largely look care 
of critical issues like security prccedures at 
border crossings, control over Gaza roads con- 
necting settlements to Israel and the size of the 
autonomous Jericho district — 55 square kilo- 
meters (21 square miles), although that detail is 
not unalterably settled. 

For both sides, the important point was that 
they could claim a breakthrough after weeks of 
grueling negotiations and frustrating deadlocks 
that were threatening to lead nowhere. Neither 
side wanted to see yet another Peres- Arafat 
meeting — the third in three weeks — produce 

See MIDEAST, Page 5 


onnais 


By Alan Friedman. 

Intemanomi Herald Tribune 

PARIS— Crfcdit Lyonnais, the giant state- 
cootroBed bank tb^ has been chosen for priva- 
tization, became entangled in fresh controversy 
Thursday as its former chairman and a top 
executive woe placed under investigation in 
connection with the bankruptcy of a Swiss 
tnpany involved in tbetakeover of MGM, the 
Hollywood studio. 

Jean- Yves Haberer, who was removed as 
rihainrmn in November, and Francois Gffle, a 
managing director of the bank, woe smnmoned 
for questioning by a Swiss judge who is investi- 
gating Sasea, an insolvent Geneva- based com- 
pany that received Credit Lyonnais leans. - 

Before it filed Tor bankruptcy in 1992, Sasea 
was part of a web of companies that controlled 
Metro-CoWwyxi-Mayer (no, the financially 
troubled film Studio whose takeover in 1990 
was tacked by loans from Credit Lyonnais. 

The Swiss judicial order comes at an awk- 
ward time for the French government of Prime 
Monster Edouard BaHaduz. which is underfire 
from other bankers in Paris fra - its {dans to 
iqect more than $500 miUiori- into the loss- 
ridden Cnfidit Lyonnais as a prelude io its 
privatization. 

A lawyer for the bank said the two men had 
already been cooperating and were now less 
Hkdy to jo to Geneva, and if was undear what 

.u - ' — 5 * — . TV. ' 


China Not on Board Over North Korea 


By Julia Preston 

H'tafting/on Pan Semce 

UNITED NATIONS. New York — China 
has turned down a request to join the other 
four permanent members of the United Na- 
tions Security Councfl in telling North Kore- 
an diplomats that their country most allow 
international nuclear inspections. 

In two repent meetings, UN diplomats 
said, Britain and France proposed that they, 
along with the United Stares, Russia and 
China, should warn North Korean diplomats 
at the United Nations that the issue was 


almost certain to come to the Security Coun- 
cil this month. China refused to participate. 

In the delicate diplomacy surrounding 
North- Korea’s refusal to allow inspections of 
key nudear facilities. China confirmed by 
this move that it will not dose ranks with the 
West to impose sanctions on the isolated 
Communist government in Pyongyang even 
if it violates nuclear treaties. 

Officials of the International Atomic Ener- 
gy Agency are scheduled to meet in Vienna 
on Feb. 21 . It seems virtually certain they will 
determine (hat North Korea has broken the 


pattern of inspections required to comply 
with international nuclear pacts. The matter 
would then go to the Security Council for 
consideration of sanctions. North Korea has 
said it will regard imposition of UN sanctions 
as an act of war. 

Qtina, an ally of North Korea, is the only 
major power that has friendly influence on 
Pyongyang. 

China has given no indication that it would 
veto sanctions. UN diplomats said, but it is 
now clear that China re mains at odds with 
the other Security Council powers. 


They Threaten to Hold 
Aid Workers if NATO 
Launches Air Attacks 

Compiled hr Our Suff From Dispoiches 

SARAJEVO. Bosnia-Herzegovina — The 
guns surrounding Sarajevo fell silent Thursday 
as a cease-fire took hold under (he threat of 
NATO air strikes, but Bosnian Serbian offidals 
warned (hat air attacks on their positions would 
spark retaliation. 

Bosnian Serbian generals also threatened to 
bold foreign aid workers against their will in 
case of air strikes. “If representatives of their 
countries bomb us. they will remain with us,” 
General Milan Gvero said. 

Genera] Gvero made the comments as re- 
ports surfaced of aid workers being withdrawn 
and indications that Serbs were preventing 
some from leaving. 

But the Serbian forces allowed United Na- 
tions peacekeeping troops to move into six 
frontline zones of Sarajevo on Thursday as part 
of a plan to lift the siege. 

Six French army mechanized platoons with 
40 soldiers each and armed with 90mm cannons 
were deployed, and at least two more positions 
were to be put under UN supervision on Fri- 
day. a UN spokesman said. 

Comments from General Gvero and another 
top general continued a line of tough talk from 
Bosnian Serbs after the North Atlantic Treaty 
Organization issued an ultimatum for them to 
remove their heavy weapons from around Sara- 
jevo within 10 days or face air strikes. 

General Gvero. along with General Manojlo 
Mfiovanovic. also cast doubts on a verbal 
agreement reached Wednesday in Sarajevo to 
put their hear/ weapons under UN control. 

The Serbian artillery would not move unilat- 
erally. General Gvero said. 

“We want peace, and we are for relocation, 
but we cannot leave our people without de- 
fense.” General Gvero said. “In other words, if 
we move our artillery a kilometer, the Muslims 
will have to do the same.” 

The Muslim-led government has far fewer 
pieces of heavy weapons and little place to 
move tnem in besieged Sarajevo. 

But for the moment, the gun* arv'-nd Lhe 
Bosnian caritai "ere joiet. in Sara : f--i chil- 
dren made their way out of sheli-sCJired build- 
ings and ventured onto streets and playgrounds 
near the front lines. 

A mood or exhilaration broke out at times 
during the sudden return, however fragile, of 
humanity to the devastated city. Children living 
in exposed apartments along “sniper alley" said 
it was the first time they had played outside in 
almost two years. 

.After months of death and disappointment 
over failed truce efforts and peace negotiations, 
many people in Sarajevo permitted themselves 
a rav of hope. But dozens of previous truces 
have collapsed during Bosnia’s war. and many 
residents remained wary. 

The new UN commander for Bosnia. Lieu- 
tenant General Sir Michael Rose of Britain, 
said this truce was different because the Serbs 
were under greater international pressure and 
had agreed to pull back their heavy weapons. 

As tbe French units moved into position, 
soldiers with a tank and six armored cars took 
over the Braistvo-Jcdinstvo Bridge facing the 
Serbian-held Grbavica suburb. 

Later, General Rose crossed the bridge and 
stopped amid wrecked cars, trenches and mine 
fields on the Serbian side to talk to reporters. 
Serbian civilians, separated from the rest of 
Sarajevo by 22 months of war. watched from 
their windows. 

The allies on Wednesday told Bosnian Serbs 
to withdraw howitzers, mortars and anti-air- 
craft guns within 20 kilometers ( 12 miles) of 
Sarajevo by midnight Feb. 20 or risk NATO air 
attacks. They also authorized immediate air 
strikes on artillery that attack civilians in the 
city. 

Even if Serbs withdraw their artillery, the 
threat to the city would not end. Many of tbe 
deaths in Sarajevo have been atiributed to snip- 

See BOSNIA. Page 4 


Who’s No. 1? For Once -Smug Japanese, It’s America 


By T. R- Reid 

Washington Peat Semce 

TOKYO — In Japan today, America is Su- 


. Newsstand Prices, 

Andorra..... 9.00 FF 

Cameroon..l.*pCFA g^ ton .„NJ0FF 
Egypt.,.— E-P^ 5000 Arabia -AWR- 

Fronee 9.00 FF f^Sgal.—WOCFA 

Gabon .WOCFA 

Greece .300 Dr- T im»sw ^ 

Ivory Coast .Ll*> CFA Turkey 

fSS^mui &*£»**** 


contended that Thursday’s summons was 

See BANK, Page 4 


Dow Jones ■ Trib index 



The Dollar ■ ■ ■ 

WrwVcfc. TJwdtap 


ptlwOUtdOW 


DM 


1.7534 


1.7575 


Found 


1A625 


1.4605 


Yen' 


108.25 


re- 


53555 


With Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa 
headed for a White House visit with President 
Bill Ointon cm Friday, the Japanese press is 
filled with reports declaring that the United 
States has overcome its economic problems and 
regained its traditional perch as industrial, fi- 
nancial and political powerhouse of the globe. 

“Japan’s mood toward America has re- 
versed,” said Te nnnas a Nakanishi, apolitical 
scientist at Shizuoka University. There's a 
sense that American industry has really 
changed in the last few years. The Japanese now 
understand that America is die toughest com- 
petitor in markets around the world.” 

In this homogeneous, media-saturated coun- 
try, where new ideas and fashions spread the 
length of the land in the blink of an eye, the 
only remaining dispute about the widely report- 
ed American revival is what to call it. 

In a 16-part front-page series on America’s 
“high-tech comeback,” the Yomiuri Shimbun. 
Japan’s tent newspaper, dose the title 
“America’s New Tide."* An influential political 
newsletter refers to The New American 
MighL” 

But the most popular new term seems to be 
“Wang Sam,” referring to Unde Sam. This not 
only geb across the idea of an American recov- 
ery, but also has a built-in irony — recalling 
“Rising Sun,” the best-selling novel by Michael 
Criduon published in 1992, when Americans 



Mr. Hosokawa and bis wife, Kayoko, as they prepared to board a plane for Washington 
Thursday. A trade deal was seal slipping despite hts foreign ministers efforts. Page 11. 

and Japanese agreed that Japan was tbe real editors were clamoring for these articles saying 
economic^ powerhouse. ‘Japan is No. 1.’ Now nobody here would be- 

“A couple of year? ago." said Yoichi Masu- lieve that, so they all want articles that say the 
zoe, a political consultant, “all tbe magazine one that is really strong is America." 


So Far, at least, the Rising Sam concept is 
limited to economic and industrial matters. In 
social terms, the Japanese press continues to 
portray America as dangerous and decadent. 

Last month, for example, an episode of a 
popular Japanese television comedy series por- 
trayed a family trip to Hawaii in which family 
members were assaulted by a black bellboy who 
did not like his tip, robbed twice and arrested 
by tbe police on false drug charges. 

Bu( that sense of America as a snake pit is 
hardly new in Japan. What is new is the wide- 
spread conviction that the United Slates is a 
much stronger industrial and financial compet- 
itor than it was just two years ago. 

The Rising Sam idea has clearly reached into 
the upper levels of government here as Mr. 
Hosokawa and his cabinet prepare for the 
meeting with Mr. Clinton. 

“Talking to Japanese bureaucrats now, we. 
don’t hear that smugness anymore,” said Rep- 
resentative Robert £ Wise’Jr., Democrat of 
West Virginia, who met with senior Japanese 
officials in Tokyo last month. “I was really 
struck by the new respect for America.” 

It was just two years ago that Prime Minister 
Kiichi Miyazawa sat next to President George 
Bush at a news conference in Tokyo and ex- 
plained why he fell “sympathy" for America. 

“There are homeless people, there is the 
problem of AIDS and so on.” Mr. Miyazau a 
said, as Mr. Bush's face grew redder. “Educa- 
tion is not as high as in Lhe past. .And U.S. 
industries are not as competitive as in the pasL 
for various reasons." 


1 







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Plage 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11,1994 



BOSNIA DEADLINE/ 


LF INHERITANCE 



Accepts Serb Demand 
in Sarajevo Attack 




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By David B. Ottaway 

WiKni^;r*vr Pcet Service 

GENEVA — The Muslim-led 
Bosnian government gave in here 
on Thursday to a Bosnian Serb 
demand for the establishment of a 
United Nations commission to in- 
vestigate who was responsible for 
firing the mortar shell that killed 68 
people in a Sarajevo marketplace 
last ’Saturday. 

The agreement on a commission 
allowed the Bosnian peace talks to 
resume under the pressure of a 
NATO ultimatum issued Wednes- 
day to the Serbs to withdraw their 
heavy weapons from around Sara- 
jevo before Feb. 21 or face air 
strikes. 

The two international mediators. 
Lord Owen and Thorvald Siol ten- 
berg. indicated that they hoped to 
make use of the urgency created by 
the ultimatum to push for a sepa- 
rate agreement to place the city 
under UN administration immedi- 
ately and have it demilitarized. 

But after a day of talks here, the 
Bosnian Serb leader. Radovan 
Karadzic, said the Muslim-led Bos- 
nian government had rejected ne- 
gotiations on such a partial accord. 

“They do not accept a solution 
Tor Sarajevo before an overall solu- 
tion. and that is the result of NATO 
involvement," he said. 

There was no immediate Bosnian 
government reaction to Mr. Karad- 
zic’s assertions, but the government 
is known to be opposed to the com- 
plete demilitarization of its forces 
in Sarajevo. 

The Bosnian delegation had ve- 
hemently opposed the Serb de- 
mand, saying there was no need for 
"some silly commission" and as- 
serting that the Serbs were “just 
trying to buy time." 

The talks' appeared headed for 
yet another deadlock on Thursday 
morning after Mr. Karadzic re- 
fused to participate in their re- 
sumption unless an international 
inquiry of the Sarajevo killing s was 
undertaken. He also refused to an- 
swer questions about whether he 
intended to meet the terms of the 
NATO ultimatum. 

NATO ordered the Bosnian 
Serbs to pull back their heavy 
weapons around Sarajevo to at 
least 20 kilometers (12 miles) and 
threatened air strikes to destroy 


any that remain starting at 1 A.M. 
on Feb. 21 Sarajevo time. 

Mr. Karadzic said the Bosnian 
Serbian forces would go ahead with 
the withdrawal of their heavy 
weapons from the Sarajevo region 
as they had agreed at the city’s 
airport Wednesday during talks 

sponsored by the commander of 
the UN Protection Force in Bosnia, 
Lieutenant General Sir Michael 

Rose. 

Under the Rose accord, the Bos- 
nian government and the Bosnian 
Serbs agreed to an immediate 
cease-fire, the positioning of UN 
peacekeeping forces in “key loca- 
tions’* around the dry and UN 
monitoring and supervision of all 
heavy weapons. 

A Russian deputy foreign minis- 
ter, Vi tali Churkin, also said the 
Bosnian Serbs were committed to 
cany out their commitments to 
General Rose while raising ques- 
tions about the implementation of 
the NATO ultimatum. 

“It is going to be the United 
Nations or NATO?" he asked. “In 
our view, it must be the United 
Nations. It must be the Security 
Council" 


Even before the ultimatum. Lord 
Owen and Mr. Stoltecberg had 
been working cm a plan to reach a 
separate accord among the three 
warring Bosnian factions to place 
the Sarajevo region immediately 
under UN administration and pro- 
ceed with its demilitarization. 

Las t Sunday, they met with Mr. 
Karadzic for five hours in Zvor- 
nick, a town straddling the Serbi- 
an-Bosaian border, and got his 
agreement to negotiate on a sepa- 
rate Sarajevo agreement. On 
Thursday, Lord Owen called it 
their “Sarajevo first policy.” 

The two mediators bad hoped to 
reach an agreement in Geneva, 
possibly this week, based on the 
progress already achieved in earlier 
talks about the status of Sarajevo. 
The Bosnian Serbs have given up 
their demand that the city be divid- 
ed into two cities and both sides 
have given their assent in principle 
to put Sarajevo under UN adminis- 
tration for a two-year period. 

But the Bosnian government, af- 
ter first agreeing to the demilitari- 
zation of the Sarajevo district last 
fall, is now having second thoughts. 




***«*!&« 




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French soldiers with the UN forces in Sarajevo taking up positioiis o&Tbursday between Musfim aad Serbian troops to Inoutor a cooe-fire. 


Kit Gets the Call, NATO Is Well Prepared 


By Barry James 

International Herald Tribune 


NATO planners preparing targets for 
possible attack is Bosnia have the benefit 
of months of reconnaissance and the pres- 
ence of sophisticated spy planes that were 
still in the experimental stage during the 
Gulf War. 


Grumman E-SA J-STARS survefllaase 
aircraft over the Adriatic Sea. 

The secret, converted Bocmg 707s, 
which took part in the Gulf War as untest- 
ed prototypes, are believed capable of 
tracking moving trucks and men even in 
the mountainous Bosnian terrain. J- 


Panl Rogers, director of the School of 
Peace Studies at the University of Brad- 
ford in England, said NATO planes would 
also need to have a reliable methods of 


. distinguishing between combatants and 
ogees on the 


The NATO forces that may be called to 
enforce an ul timatum to stop firing on the 
Bosnian capital, Sarajevo, have the sans 
kind of resources available to coalition 
forces in the Gulf: a combination of carri- 
er- and land-based fighters equipped with 
laser-guided “smart bombs,” conventional 
bombs and anti-personnel duster weap- 
ons, according to military sources. 

The biggest improvement since the 1991 
Gulf conflict is in aerial surveillance and 
control If an attack is launched, the North 
Atlantic Treaty Organization aircraft wQl 
be guided to targets by controllers aboard 


STARS stands for Joint Surveillance and 
Target Attack Radar Systems. 

The Serbian artillery and tank positions 
arc well known to planners after months of 
daily surveillance flights. 

Bat (he experience of tracking mobile 
Scud launchers in Iraq made it clear that it 
may be harder to detect highly mobile 
forces in vans or trucks, or on fool Many 
of the Bosnian- Serbian forces surrounding 
Sarajevo are equipped with mortars that 
can be carried % one or two men. They 
were the chief weapons produced by the 
farmer Yugoslav Army for fighting in 
mountains. 


refugees on the move in the same regions. 
He said any attacks will present a greatly 
different set of problems than die Gulf 
conflict, where much of Iraq was declared 
a free-fire zone in which any thing moving 
was a fair target 

NATO gave the Serbs 10 days to remove 
heavy weapons to at least 20 kilometers 
(12 miles) from the center of Sarajevo or 
put them nrvtt-r United Nations control. 
The interdiction refers to any weapon in 
PTp»$g of p 7mm a heavy m aA rnw gim 

In Washington, Pentagon r>ff»a*ls said 
the ^rial attack force would employ more 
than 100 fighter-bombers, backed up by 
Arams, of tanker s and other support 
planes. 

The aircraft are based aboard carriers in 


the Adriatic, indoding America’s Sarato- 
ga, Britain’s Ark. Royal and Frances Cfe- 
meucean, and at aitfiritis in Italy. 

At the Pentagon, officials said about 
100 heavy weapons, indoding artillery, 
mortars, tanks and multiple-rocket 
launchers, bad been detected m the 20- 
kflometer radius. Nearly all belong to Bos- 
nian Serbs. 

The Ser bian forces are equipped with 
"Soviet-supplied surface-to-axrrmaaies that 
could oblige pilots to launch their bombs 
from nrawarieq ibfe hei g hts, rather than 

making lowJevd attacks. Military sources 
said that one of the aircraft best suited to 
raids in steeply mountainous terrain was 
the UJ5. A-10 Warthpg, a lumbering twin- 
jet that has die advantage of being able to 
survive heavy damage from ground fire. 

With aircraft from Britain, France, the, 
Netherlands, Spain aod Turkey as wdl as 
the United Steles, NATO has virtually 
total domination of Bosnian does. 


WORLD BRIEFS 


UN Report Cites Sudan Massacres 


GENEVA (AP) — Government and rebel forces in Sudan have 

massacred of civiBaasinind&criiniiiiireldfflhgaaiid-^bdiipted 


children on a manag e scale, according to a United Nations report. . 

the United Nations Human Rights Coanni 


The 


: submitted to the _ _ . _ 

sion cited grim details of widespread executions, torture, 
rpent in “ghost houses" in- northern Sudan ; aad. defiberate 
dvihan targets zn war-shattered southern rcgkxx. i ‘ l-'ri ^ 

“Potentially, all categories and strata o£ tbepopolafion *re*ffected by 
violations of human rights committed by agent&of die government or by 
abuses against the life, security and freedom cf the inffividnal committed 
by members of the SPLA factions," the report* prepared by Ga^ar Biro, 
a UN official, said. - . 


U.So Urges Muslims to Cut the Best Deal, and Stick With It 


By Daniel Williams 
and Ann Devroy 

H'air.nvicn Post Service 

WASHINGTON — President Bill Clin- 
ton has marked an ead to U.S. reluctance 
to pressure the Muslims of Bosnia. 

In effect, the administration has given in 


to European appeals to dose a deal with 
the Muslims. 


. Foreign Minister Alain Juppfc 
of France and Foreign Secretary Douglas 
Hurd of Britain recently told Secretary of 
State Warren M. Christopher that Europe- 
an efforts at peace negotiations in the for- 
mer Yugoslavia would end if Washington 
did not intervene with the Muslims. 

“This had a big impact on Christopher," 


a U.S. official said. “Either we had to 
continue to sit out and wail for Bosnia to 
bum out, or get involved." 

Mr. Clin ton said Wednesday that the 
United States would press the Muslim-led 
govpnmem of Bosnia to state its minhnnm 
territorial demands in negotiations with 
the Bosnian Serbs, and would assess 
whether those demands were realistic. 

Mr. Clinton said that while it was up to 
the Muslims to deride, Washington would 
“share with them as dearly and honestly as 
we can what we think both the political and 
military situation is." 

The Muslims have resisted an offer from 
the Serbs of territory that guarantees no 


access to the Adriatic Sea, the Sava River 
in northern Bosnia or connections among 
isolated Muslim enclaves surrounded by 
Serbian territory. Washington backs these 
demands. 

“There is an awful lot of fighting and an 
awful lot of dying going on now over rela- 
tively small patches of land," Mr. Clinton 
said. 

Asked if the administration was going to 
pressure the Bosnian Muslims to back off 
some of their demands. Mr. Clinton said, 
“That’s not exactly true." 

One administration official described 
the shift in attitude as designed “to get the 
Bosnian Muslims to understand that we 


are not gang to help them win this war, 
and that within pretty small margins they 
are not going to end op with morit more, 
and that the international community is 
seriously losing pati en ce." 

The breakup of Yugoslavia in 1991 led 
its component republics to declare inde- 
pendence, despite the fact that numerous 
ethnic and religious factions in the popula- 
tion were spread throughout the country. 
The Muslims, the majority in Bosnia, have 
been engaged in a two-year war against 
separatist Serbian and Croatian militias. 


unwilling to use force to maintain iL 
Swwrig no military solution, the United 
States began to embrace partition. U.S. 
officials now weary that the Muslims, who. 
have, enjoyed recent battlefield success 
against the Croats, are tempted to perse- 
vere against long .odds. The Croats and 
Serbs are gearing up for major spring of- 
fensives that would *crush the Muslims,” a 
senior official said. - 


mm on an outlying Moscow : ^ 
Rnssiaoat to the A m erican s- 


supported by neighboring Serbia and 
Croatia. Tbef 


: United States long backed the 
territorial integrity of Bosnia, but was 


Mr. Clinton said die United States 
hoped the Bosnian Muslims “have been 
sufficiently affected by the carnagp involve 
ing civilians in the last few days" that they 
wSl see it is in their interest to achieve a 
peaceful settlement 


Surrounding a «n»W statue of. 
they accused Mr. Yritsm adlh; 

Japanese, and of hardships brought by refagms. 

Some in the.crowd, which moody consisted of pensioners, held ®gas 
that read “Long live the Soviet Constiratian” or exalting the “tfictaior- 
shijp of the; wodting class." Others waved die red flag of die former Sprat 
Union. A few damn police officers sioodat the end of the square faj did 
not intervene in the demonstration. Diehard C ommuni sts and other 
hard-hnas have repeatedly toed to stage mass demonstrations ovgr the 
last two months, but their largest orie» far attracted only about :3^Q0 
people. • •• • ... i ; ■ 


Clinton Cites U.S. 'Interests’ 


Cenpiird b: Oar Stiff F'-m bspauhez 

WASH iNOTON — President 
3£ Ciir.irr. A: -riurtday that the 
L'titsc v.cs no: trying to 

pick a i‘izh: .. \i Bosnian Serbs but 
that jjpiia!. Sarajevo, 

art ::v’_ir. p.-ptilation must be 
sa-.cd. 


The NATO Statement on Bosnia 


“Sarajr-c- : nr. of the Humpty 
Dumpy Mr. Clinton 

said a'.'i Tie;', impromptu news 
conferenic it u;-.- White House. "If 
you war.*, e.ryezs '<■? be put back 
together agi” — the country — 
you've i:t : j L?r? .Sarajevo from 
total cellar : jo; to try to 
save lv :; r.-ept: if you can." 

At tre r-r’.iv.z. nvanwitSe, a 
ssuo? :-.\i tia: the 

Vcitii S.L. .-■ v z: nro jiidicg to- 
ward sor r. vj.- former Yugoslav 
republic. He ^rc;:ed cut the role of 
an;, -ir s -J m:ght follow the 

NATO on Wednesday 

to Sk'.'-r..a7 i -.T" • •J.'-lr.ara* ta?nr 


guns from the vicinity of Sarajevo 
and stop all shelling of the city. 

“We have set a definite, precise 
mission, that is to reduce tne car- 
nage caused by the shelling or the 
potential to shell Sarajevo.” Depu- 
ty Undersecretary of Defense Wal- 
ter Slocembe said. 

“That's the only objective we 
have at this stage,” he said. “It does 
not star: us on a slippery slope 
toward a generalized campaign of 
air strikes." 

Mr. Clinton said at the White 
House that the ultimatum issued by 
the North Atlantic Treaty Organi- 
zation was within the twunds of 
previous United Nations Security 
Council resolutions. On Thursday. 
Russia demanded a meeting erf the 
council to discuss the Bosnia crisis. 

ror the second straight day, Mr. 
Clrntcn and President Boris N. 
Yeltsin of Russia were unable to 
consult by telephone cn NATO's 
decision. The White House tiled 



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tr.L* tari driver, "SiinA too dx roc" * 
frtSIS- 5. rue Dounou 
r.ERIJN ■ Grand rtc-td cjplarudi; 
’-'.•\MtCUFC: 3!richenhcf 



“technical difficulties” aad sched- 
uling problems. 

Mr. Clinton indicated that the 
problem was in Moscow. .Asked 
why he could not get through to 
Mr* Yeltsin, the president said: “I 
don’t know. You’ll have to ask 
them.” 

The Senate Republican leader. 
Bob Dole of Kansas, welcomed the 
NATO decision on Tfcnrsda;. and 
said be booed it was not simply 
another idle threat. But he also 
sharply attacked wba: he colled the 
administration's “wiilinzness to 
subordinate U5. inrerests to tie 
UN agenda” and :o mra deri-lces 
affecting American foreign policy 
over to 'the U\ iecrvLzry-geoer^. 
Butros Butrcs Gholl. 

Mr. Slocombe said in ti:e Penta- 
gon briefing that if a Serb big gun 
or a mortar fires a: Sarajevo, thro 
aB Serb artillery and otiser targets 
in the area would be subject :o 
attack from American. British. 
French and other warplanes. 

“It is one of the reasons that we 
wanted to be sure that tire auiicri- 
zation is to attack a doss cf toraets. 
so that we are not is this game cf 
having to find the right .Tjormr and 
go after that particular monar." ne 
said. 

“ If they fira." he said "tirey nr: 
only put themselves in jeopardy, 
they pul a whole variety of 
in the wboie 3osnios Serb army in 
jeopardy." (Rmen, APi 


Th: .iaocated Pra i 

Following ere excerpu from ike statement issued 
it , Brussels by the Sank Atlantic Treaty Organat- 
:kz or, Bosnian air strikes: 

Decisions made at the meeting of the North 
Atlantic Council on 9tii Februarv 1994. 

Tne Council: 

( • i expresses its indignation at the iadiscri uri- 
nate attacks which have once again struck the 
pecp’.e cf Sarajevo in recent days: 

jZ j ro:ss that the siege cf Sarajevo is continuing, 
and that conssqaentiy the Bosnian Serbs bear the 
main responsibility for the tragic loss of civilian 
life tire: results from it; 

■j . reaffirms the Alliance’s supi 
lire se'.tiemen: of *J:e conflict i 
to 'H parties: 

■ 4 recalls tire: on 1 1th Janaaiy 1994. the Heads 
c: Sreie and Government of the members of the 
Allrenae reaffirmed their readiness, in accordance 
*;ti: tire .Alliance decisions o' 2nd and 9tb August 
'. 997. to cany out air strikes in order to prevent the 
strangulation cf Sarajevo; 

"f roidemns tire continuing siege of Sarajevo 
ar.d. sr.'s, a vise- to ending it, calls for the with- 
•ir_w ji. rr regreuping and placing under UNPRO- 
FOR ccntroL within 10 days, of heavy weapons 
fincinrang ranks. artiL'ery pieces, mortars, multiple 
rrciie' '.ranchers, gasifcs and anti-aircraft weap- 
ons ;f tie Bosnian Serb fcrccs located in an area 
witi-on 20 Itilcceters of tfce center of Sarajevo, and 
stcr-ii zi on area attain two kilometers of the 


support for a negnti- 

: in Bosnia, agreeable 


*.”» cals upon the government of Bosnia- Herze- 
s r.tsi wrtsa the some period, to place the heavy 
weapons in its possession within the Sarajevo ex- 
z:zt d^cribed above under UNPROFOR 
oratici. and to refrain from attacks launched from 


within the a m e n t confrontation lines in the city; 

(8) calls upon the parties to respect the cease: 
fire; all concerned should make every effort, dur- 
ing this 10-day period, to achieve by agreexneat the 
withdrawal or control of heavy weapons as called 
for in the preceding paragraphs; failure to reach 
such an ag reement wul not result in the extosiou 
of this period; 

(9) authorizes the NATO military authorities to 
support UNPROFOR in carrying out its task of 
identifying heavy weapons that have not beat 
withdrawn or regrouped in conformity with these 
derisions; 

(10) decides that, 10 days from 2400 GMT 10th 
February 1994, heavy weapons of any of the par- 
ties found within the Sarajevo cxaasioa zone, 
unless controlled by UNPROFOR, will, along 
with their direct and essential military support 
facilities, be subject toNATO air strikes winatwiD 
be c o nd u ct e d in close coordination with the UN 
Secretary General and mB be consistent with the 
North Atlantic Council's derations of 2d and 9th 
August 1993; 

(11) accepts, effective today, the request of the 
UN Secretary-General of the 6th of February and 
accordingly authorizes the co mmander in chief. 
Allied Forces Southern Europe to launch air 
strikes, at the request of the United Nations, 
a gains t artillery or mortar positions in or around 
Sarajevo (induding any outside the exclusion 
zone) which are determined by UNPROFOR to be 
responsible for attacks against civilian targets in 
that city; 


(12) demands strict resge c t for the safety of 


UNPROFOR and other UN and relief agency 
personnel throughout Bosnia -Herzegovina acti for 
the right of free access of all these personnel to 

Sarajevo; 


Malaysian Police Baid Rock Concert 


KUALA LUMPUR (Ratters) — Malaysian police and Ishunic offi- 
rials broke up a Chinese New^ Y« 


fear's concert because it breached a local 
entertainment code; the national news agency Bemama td/d lhurtiacy. 

Police in Kota Banvcapittl of northern Kelanten State, and" officials 
rf the sta te I s brn ncReEgi^Aff^ De p artment rakfed the rode coroert 
at the city's Chinese Assembly HdL- • 

Kdantan recently introd u c e d a stria Mamie penal code prescribing 
Kmb amputation for thieves, the stoning to death of women lor adnltay 
aad public whippings for drunkards. Sncecomngro power in Kdantan 
after Malaysia's 1990 general election, the Islamic government has also 
banned alcohoL lotteries and unisex hairdressers. 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


Fewer Air Delays in Europe in^ *93 ' 

BRUSSELS (Reuters) — European airimes suffered fewer delays last 
year, but at a great cost to thexnsrives to improve gkTra ffi c co ntro ls, the 
Associ a tion of E uro p ean Airlines said Thursday. . - _ • . 

The Brussels-based ca^mratiOT of 24 scheduled European airlines 


: of diflereni systems. 

Ramtebm, hhsfs hofy suntii at fasting;’ vnS begin Friday, SaatS 
Arabia’a Supge m e J Bfioa g CoiaQ la mao p noBdVedneaday: Most cf die 
world’s tHDiimMutiiiQsfc^ow Saudi Arabia’s zuBiig^tiiice Mam’s hofiest 
shrines are at Mecca, and Medina. Daring Ramadan, f a st front 

dawn to dusk, abstaining from food, dnnk uryd yrt Resranrants, food 
stores aad many pnbfofarifitiesadjiia' mAiiigfro^ fjj>) 

The nomber of forrign toadsts visiting Spate last year rose by 33 
percent to 57 nrifficn, the Ministry of Tounsm srifun Bnahyi ad 
1994 is predicted to be a benmer yeg for flic mdtmtry. Turning s mqed 
around 12 percent to Jl8.I b3Sco. (Batten) 

He U&.Fbfcraf Attetfon AdtefitistridloB wmtts -to increase 



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announced. Government g af a xs mow thar commuter pfemesarefrtc 
times tnarc HlMjy to have an accident than kcgei airiineis. (NTH 


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Not Stalking Rnshdie, Iranian Sayer | . 

TEHRAN (AFP) — Iran has no plmis to trade down and kffljthe 
British writef Salman Rnshdic, who w 
Toll RnTtnliah Khommri far whal he said was 
tire parliameutaiy speaker, Afi Akbar Nates 
Mr. Nategh Non, quoted by tiic official’ Iranian press agency 
said Mr. Rushdie had been sentenced to death accenting to Mamie law, 
bnr that ”did not mwm ff?nriWmr*OtlWb« j y p i t f wm Iran to lrillJHin "ptnt- 

he added, “Any Motion from any mme r of tim vodd can ratty out the 
otdaB 

Mr. Rushdie was condemned to death cmFeb. 14, 1989;:for his •novel 
*Tbr 0 Satamc_Vexscs."Iraniaii kadexsbaveufrfyidthcseatencc.aDd a 

rriigim t foundation here has pot a S2 onJSaa price op. Mr. Rushdtfs 
head.' -' ' > ' . - -■ 


MOSCOW (AP) — Raising Soviet flags and shooting “Judas!” about 
200 people demonstrated in freezs^ qoJd.llmnsdtty against Presideat j 
Bods N. Ydlsm’s ecoQosmc and pobtiral rduitmi: ' J 


than 15 munitesm 1992cdnparedto 16.$ per cent in 1992. 

But the association said thennraovanent only came at a cost ot aroono 
5600 mdSon from 1991 to !993. It said this tmdeffizmd the need to find & 
rin^e air-traffic control system far Europe id replace the present pateff 
work of diflereni systems. 


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or tfce Right’s Fund-Raisers 


By Thomas B. EdsaB- 


• * / * run orrvice 

W^DNGTON — The switch from 12 yean of 

. . sarcsts; 

- . coonljy .rachmg for their waQcts and .checkbooks. ■ 

- ’% nce a direct-map oo nsnhant whotos 

worited^ kx the: Conservative Caucus and the Totarig 
Aanaicaj Foundation, put iuakxanctly: “When gays 
I don’t like get m office, it's like the second commg.’’ 
“We are doing as well as wie were dong a year after 


nmtions, Hilary Rodham CBntoLbi burnt * 
- profoundly threatening, and profitable symbol to the 
tight. •'■.■■. ■: • 

■ • _ Richard Norman, a direct-mail fund-raiser whose' 
c lients include Oliver L. North, the fanner National 
S«^£y CburKril&ide wtoisnnmingfortbeReptibli- 
caa nomination for Senate froin^^mia. destaibed 
focus group studtesof conservative donors. 


aton is seen as a typical poJhSdan a 


way good pofitkaan, is die negative sense: wflfog to 
say anything-and do anything toget re-dectexvto 

- said. “Bui Hulary is dangerous. She is committed to as 
agenda, and she is ruthless. Thoseare the words they 
used. There is a tremendous fear of hcroui there/ 

•: .The cash flow to the political right has not been 
weakened by the post-deed on spread of- new eonser- 

- varivcorgamzarions, adding to au already long list of 
■ research groups and foundations : boosing potential 

/Republican presidential andidaies andthar prospec- 
tive advisers. ■' 

' These new solicitors of conservative donors indode 
American Cause, a foundation whose chairman is 
“Patrick X Buchanan, the conservative writer and un- 
successful Republican p r^ririwirial candidate; Em- 
power America, which prorides a forum for former 
Representative Yin Weber rad the former Reagan and 
Bnsh artmmistratioa aides William. J. Bennett, Jack 
Kemp and Jeane Kirkpatrick; the Progress & Free- 
dom Foundation, which has offered a' podium' -to 
• RcpresemativeNewt Gingrich of Georgia, the Repub- 
. lean whip, and the Prefect for the Republican Future, 
wbereWiQiam Kristol, aide to former Vice President 
Dan Quaylc, has beenpressmgcougrcssioiialRepubli- 
cans on the health-care issue. 


Conversely, nosy, but not all, liberal groups are 
finding that a friend in the White House does not help 
r the bank account. 

Bruce HamSton, conservation director of the Sierra 
Qub’ said direct-mail prospecting for new members 
iiad become increasingly expensive. Membership in 
“the environmental organization peaked at 650,000 in 
1991.- he said, and is now at about 550,000 as the 

'organization is ranting more to solicitation of major 

donors and to such fund-raising devices as licensing 
sponsorship of Sierra Club games to MB ion Bradley, 
tf Sierra Club scenes for Microsoft computer software 
ami John Muir hats marketed by The Nature 
Company. 

. “Back in the James Watt-Rouaid Reagan era, our 
budget was steadily growing, and now it has flattened 
om," Mr. Hand! too said, referring to Mr. Reagan's 
conservative interior minister. 

■ Jennie Thompson, senior fund-raising adviser at the 
liberal direct-mail firm Cravet, Mathews, Smith & 
Co., said women’s and environmental groups were 
now in the process of “'reinventing their messages” to 


prevent “riding against the tide of the perception that 
everything is now O.K.” 


For several liberal women's groups, recent Supreme 
Court decisions and the election of Mr. Clinton, a 
supporter of abortion rights, eased many of the fears 
of abortion-rights advocates and slowed what had 
been a surge of feminist fund-raising during the Rea- 
gan-Bush years. 

Now, as Mr. Clinton has successfully raised taxes 
on the most affluent, liberalized federal abortion poli- 
cy and changed the military's policy on gay recruits, 
conservative groups are re-energized. 

Chuck Greener, communications director for the 
Republican National Committee, said the committee 
had increased the number of those contributing less 
than $100 Trom 410.000 in 1992 to 600,000 in 1993. 
Charles Ontdorff, administrative vice chairman of the 
Conservative Caucus, said that membership had in- 
creased from about 75.000 at the end of 1992 to 
100,000 now, and that the organization had been able 
to increase its net operating budget from $600,000 to 
$750,000. 

Richard A. Viguerie, one of the original conserva- 
tive direct-mail fund-raisers, who struggled occasion- 
ally through hard times in the 1980s, said the atmo- 
sphere in his business “is like Christmas Eve.” 





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ZotSeUcjmei 


, YANKEE GO HOME? — U^. soUfiers biAfag a school wafl near die Pacific coast village of Jmndnco, Colombia. Their 
presence —ostensibly a goodwill expedition- —-was ndedmcoostiWlonal by the Council of Stale; Presides! Cfear Garina Trupo 
1 sad be wonM ignore the TerfctTbel50AaiericansamTedmPecember. About 100 other U^. troops are s ta tio n e d fa Colombia. 

Marines’ Toy Charily Target of Inquiry 


„• .. ... ; By liz Spayd . . . . 

Wash in gton Pear Sawn - ■ 

• WASHINGTON lor 

p^eolkttixiheariyS^ 

v through a tiirec Hnafl cn ^ffi^-big.ft)Ood»-. 
^ tkm officiate ackrrowicdge ^tto fitti e oMhe 

^/^cha^y^so^ ip* target*^ it federal 

• - investigation into triictheritSKram president 
-'tfiverted itioneyfrom tlwTKXiprofitorpimza- 
~ ^'tion and- engaged gi ottof financial iumropa- 

• f tties for his own benefit; according to foaaii* 

tion officials and odiers fannliar with the < 
inquiry. . .. ...... . - 

. Marine Keserve trffidris said they were 
Wambling to comet the problems. B ut the y 
^aid they woe wtxxied ttet the -foundation s 
questionable management practices would 
” jeopardize the success of .the annual gjft^ drive, 
winS began mem tea 40 years aga 
Z . while toys donated to reserve units across 
Ihe United States are reaching chfldrm who' 
-need item, most of the money donated through 
7 vfhe reserve’s foundation, which -was created 
^ J -three years ago, fa not 
7~ Ot the nrarey the foundatioD nosed m its 
' most recent fiscal year — ■ tndndmg corporate 
gifts and those from federal warkors through 
-• wCcunltincd Federal Canqj^n — lOpero^. 
went to buy UiySrfiniaaaal. records show. Tne 
rest was spent on numagemait, fund-rmang 
- expenses and materials used to promote the 
reserve's toy appeal, 

For the second year in a row, the donations 
■" mailed in by more tfaafi ZXMMO people taoss 


the^ country did not cover the cost of running 
the group’s direci-mal effort, according to the 
chanty's records. 

"Inis' foundation "has been an anbafraSs- 
HJent^ sakl dientenunt- Geaeral- Matthew X : 


gbocm five months ago. “But we are trym^tb' 
pulthetram on the trade, wodring seven days a 
wedt to assure tbepubBc’s money goes where it 
shodd." - 

v Foundation officials said the most serious 

md^tocman, Jeny L. King. Mr. logins 
dismissed last summer after a newro^xx, The 
Buffalo News, in Buffalo, New Yore, reported 
that he had been convicted of tax evasion and 
conspi ri ng to deal in counterfeit money. 

V General Cooper said the foundation was co- 
operating with investigators from the Justice 
Department and the U.S. attorney's office in 
Buffalo to determine whether Mr. King had 
taken mcaiey from the charity. 1 : T 
/ Both irf those offices declined to confirm 
triietber they .were conducting investigations. 
Mr. King also declined to comment on 
■ •’Wednesday. • 

"After Mrr King left, General Cooper sand, 
numerous questions began to arise about how 
the foundation’s records were kept and whether 
Mr. King had finmded money into toy compa- 
nies in -which he had a financial interest 

A new audit by a Maryland accounting firm 
said that so many invokes, purcfcasc orders and 
other recarib were missing that the auditors 
codd not document whether hundreds of thou- 
sands of dollar s worth of transactions were 
authortic. 

The finandal report also raised questions 


about whether the foundation paid for goods 
and services that were not received. It ques- 
tioned the group’s relationship with two toy 
’ companies, in winch. Mr. King had a fmanoal 
--interest. . 

Foundation officials said they had moved ' 
swiftly to put the charity bade on track: They 
installed a new president, expanded the board 
of directors, instituted tighter financial controls 
and moved the headquarters from Amherst, 
New York, near Buffalo, to rent-free mace at 
Quantico Marine Base, in Quantise, Virginia. 

Bel questions remain. 

In a report issued this week by the Better 
Business Bureau, the foundation is cited as 
violating six of the consumer watchdog group’s 
22 standards for charitable organizations. 
Among the group's concerns are the amount of 
money spent oil fund raising and management 
and the lack of complete financial data on the 
foundation’s operations. 

“It is unfortunate that so much of their 
money is being consumed by fund-raising costs 
and overhead,’’ said.Beanett Weiner, who over- 
sees the bureau’s charity division. “1 would 
think that should be a serious concern of con- 
tributors.” 

General Cooper, who is paid a salary of 
$100,000, and his operations manager, who 
receives $ 45 , 000 , are the only employees on the 
payroll. The biggest expenses, records show, 
have been printing costs and consulting fees 
paid to the company that runs the foundation's 
direct-mafi appeal. 

General Cooper declined to discuss the ;terms 
of that agreement, except to say that it was 
being reviewed so that the charity could receive 
more favorable terms. 


Away 

Fro m Politics 

• Fenple irith tow Wood pres- 
sgo appear more likely to suf- 


A Lighter U.S, Hand in Nicaragua 


to researchers at the Universi- 
ty of r'aWnrnbi at San Dieg°. 
They said a study of 600 men. 
over the age of tifhshow ed that 
those with low Wood pressure 
had high scores-on^ * question- 
naire for depression. 

• Two ofM*y Los Aagges 
poSce officers were arrested 
after they went on a shooting 
spree, firing from the open 
Widows of their jackup truck 
on the terrified passengers Of a 
moving bos and a CaUfMina- 
Highway Patrolman, anthon- 
ties said. 

• Hiree people 

■1 m nf tndi Bes®®- 


' . New York Tima Service 

MANAGUA, Ntcaragna — In storp contrast to 
Washington’s jnstification for its policy toward Nica- 
ragua in the 1980s; the US. ambassador here rays he 
has been instructed to encoorage the . development of 


institutions to mature without meddling from 
Washington. : 

- This policy shifts was first announced in-October in 
Washmgton by Alexander ^ W.^ Watson, assistant secre- 
tary o# stale ror inter-American affairs, who attributed 
f ftapnK tjrat rtum s Tq Niearagna to its leaders' looking 
to w^ritington to resdw 4or proWerns. • 

But tile antiassafirr, Jtilm F. Maisto, appears to 
have gone further by acknowledging that u^S. influ- 
ffim m the past hdped weaken Nicaragna’s political 
system by supporting undemocratic governments as 
inngagttoy w ere f rie ndly to Washington's interests. 

: Mr. Mafeto, a career (Splosnat who was previously 


deputy assistant secretary of state for Central Ameri- 1 
ca, said U^. policy in the region had been “tailor- 
made for dictators’ 1 for most erf this century by offer- 
ing stability at the cost of democracy. 

“The United States wanted someone in command 
of the situation to make sure that the bad guys didn’t 
get in,” he said m a recent interview hoe. “And at the 
same time we were looking toward protecting US. 
investments." 

The Nicaraguan left has long denounced Washing- 
ton’s support for dictators who repressed efforts to- 
ward democracy. 

Carlos Tunnerman Bcmhebn, wbo was the Nicara- 
ffian ambassador to W ashington for the Sandinista 
government in the 1980s, described Mr. Maisto’s anal- 
ysis as being “very close to whal we have always said." 

Referring to the State Department, he added in an 
interview, *They always denied it, but if they are 
admitting it now, there is a responsibility to repair the 
damage.” 


• Three people tbongffl . . . 

SStSS? A Theorist on the Stone Age Dies 


grand of tins 

Sl Patrick’s Day parade m 
San Francisco, a parade 


•The 


lave meed wse^eimifr 


millio n aouig . 

suit centered around 

nascoodocL aDeg® 00 ® 

made about each o(ba- No-- 
details were .made .p™® 
about the agreement m New 
Qriesns. _ ' 

•The eftor in dW. 8 * Tte 
Yfflte* Voice, ■to |nA ti® a 
^rSabnaoKi hisres^a^ 
M Wednesday after 

five ye»» 

NtrwWnwWyo^S* 

:f-5SS3KSS53!r 


ItOlfffV 

LOS ANGELES — MajiGim- 
btnas, 73, an . archaeologist who 
theorized thatwomeuwere revered 
as goddesses 6,000 to 8,000 years 
ago^ has died'of cancer. 

Ms. Gimbutas, profewor emen- 
tustrf European archaedogy at the 
UmveratytrfCaHwniaatLosAn- 
geJcs, fozmed her ihewy after ex- 
tensive re se ar ch in Birope, where 
rim found tivmwmdsof female inh 


' Hff books, “The Civilization of 
the ’Goddess,*? “Goddesses -mid 
Gads of <Bd Etngwf’ and "The 
Xanguagtofthe Goddess,” .diat 
lcn^ltiKeaabiiShedyiewtbat.the 
' Europe cf the StOTe Age was itolo- 
doBMatedc. . ... 


Frank Cormkr, 66, 
Ex-Wtate House Reporter 
- WASHINGTON (AP)— Frank 
Cormier, 66, who covered five pres- 
idents as While House coire^xm- 
dent ftff The Associated Press, died 
Wednesday at a convalescent home 
in sibnrban Fairfax, Virpma, after 
a long batik against a disabling 
nerve disorder. 

Before his retirement in 1980 be- 
cause of illness, Mr. Connier tod 
bees tiie senior wire service corre- 
spondent at the White House. As 
White House correspondent for 


nearly 20 years, Mr. Goonier cov- 
ered John F. Kennedy, Lyndon B.. 
Johnson, Richard Nixon, Gerald 
R_ Ford and Jimmy Carter. 

He reported cm the assassination 


New Therapy Offers 
Hope to Millions 
Of Ulcer Sufferers 


By Lawrence K. Altman 

York Tima Semce 

BETHESDA, Maryland — Set- 
ting a new standard of care for 
muttons of people with stomach 
ulcers, a panel of medical experts 
say that antimicrobial agents, in- 
cluding antibiotics, should be add- 
ed to the conventional treatments 
for the common ailment. 

The recommendation reflects ev- 
idence from studies in the last few 
years that ulcere are caused by in- 
fection with a bacterium, Helico- 
bacterium pylori. The goal of anti- 
microbial therapy is to knock oui 
the bacteria permanently and thus 
to prevent recurrences. 

The recommendation was made 
Wednesday by an independent 
panel convened by (he National 
Institutes of Health, a federal agen- 
cy in Bethesda, as part of a pro- 
gram intended to resolve contro- 
vasies in health care. 

The chairman of the panel. Dr. 
Tadataka Yamada, who heads the 
department of medicine at the Uni- 
versity of Michigan in Ann Arbor, 
said he believed his was the first 
professional group to officially rec- 
ommend anti-microbial drugs for 
treatment of ulcers. 

The panel's recommendation ap- 
plies not only to the 400.000 new 


cases that are expected to be diag- 
nosed this year, but also to the 
more than 4 mflK nn Americans 
now being treated for ulcers. 

There are two types of ulcere. 
The most common is duodenal 
which occurs in the portion of the 
bowel connecting the stomach and 
small intestine. The other is gastric, 
and occurs in the stomach. 

Dr. Yamada estimated that doc- 
tors now prescribed anti-microbial 
drugs for “no more than 1 to 2 
percent, if that, of ulcer patients" in 
the United States. The small num- 
ber may reflect what had been a 
continuing uncertainty over the ef- 
fectiveness of anti-nricrobials for 
ulcere. 

The addition of anti-microbial 
therapy offers ulcer patients the 
promise of a full cure with one 
course of drug therapy. It also of- 
fers the posaMity of fewer compli- 
cations, like bleeding and blockage 
of the intestine from swelling and 

inflamma tion. 

“We now have an opportunity to 
cure a disease that previously we 
bad only been able to suppress or 
control and sometimes not all suc- 
cessfully," said Dr. Ann L. B. Wil- 
liams of George Washington Uni- 
versity Medical Center in 
Washington, a panel member. 


APOLITICAL NOTES* 


A Move to Protect the Poor and UnorW— 

WASHINGTON —The Clinton administration is about to order 
an federal agencies to ensure that their programs do not unfairly 
inflict environmental harm on the poor and members of minorities, 
officials said. 

An executive order to be signed within days by President Bill 
Clinton would require every agency to come up with a comprehen- 
sive strategy to redress and prevent such inequities, which until 
recently were rarely considered in setting federal policies. 

The order would govern programs as diverse as the removal of 
lead from public housing, pollution control in urban rivers, the 
i ranging of hazardous-waste incinerators, the exposure of farm 
workers to pesticides and the setting of health standards for contam- 
inants found in game and fish. 

In planning federal programs, enforcing pollution laws and writ- 
ing regulations, agencies frill have to make sure that all segments of 
the population have equal opportunities to make their views known 
and to benefit from the results. 

Among the programs that would be affected is the Superfund, 
which helps pay for the cleanup of toxic- waste sites, many of which 
are in depressed urban areas populated mainly by racial minorities. 
Under the order, the Superfund program would have to correct 
disparities in the pace of cleaning up those rites. (NYT 

On Gun Control, the Number* Don’t Add Up 

WASHINGTON —Only 17 percent of U.S. criminal records are 
iu shape to be of use in maxing background checks of gun purchas- 
ers, according to Attorney General Janet Reno. 

Background checks will be required starting Feb. 28, when a new 
handgun -control law goes into effect. 

In a speech to a meeting of the Bureau of Justice Statistics, Ms. 
Reno said the latest data, in 1992, showed that 17.5 million of the 
53.3 milli on c riminal histories are storable nationally by oomputer. 
And only 9.2 million of all records are complete, she said. (APi 

Hayden Challenges the System Once Again 

LOS ANGELES — Tom Hayden, a California state senator, 
onetime leader of anti-war student radicals and longtime challenger 
of the establishment, has rattled the political cage again by ottering 
the June 7 Democratic primary for governor of California as “a 
messenger" of political reform. 

Mr. Hayden, 54. said be was not under any illusion about actually 
winning elec lira as governor, but be said he would use his candidacy 
as a platform for forcing a solution to “the obstinate problem of 
power and money" that he said dominates California politics. 

“We have become dangerously lost. I think, in the values of 
Babylon,” he said. 

Mr. Hayden’s decision was a surprise to the California political 
establishment He said he bad considered the idea for some time but 
did not decide to file for office until Tuesday night (LA T) 

In Whitewater Case, a Report of Shredding 

LITTLE ROCK, Arkansas — Robert B. Fiske Jr„ the special 
counsel appointed to investigate financial dealings by Mr. Clinton 
and his family when he was governor of Arkansas, will investigate 
allegations that employees at the Rose law firm here have shredded 
documents relating to Whitewater Development Corn. 

Rose officials denied the claim, which was published in The 
Washington Times. The newspaper said documents on the real estate 
investment of Mr. CHmon ami his wife. Hillary Rodham Clinton, a 
former partner in the film, had been shredded last Thursday. ( WP ) 

Quote/ Unquote 

Sam Sexton, director of the Department of Corrections in Prince 
George’s County, Maryland, whose jaD was the scene of a speech by 
President Clinton cm crime and drugs: “To my knowledge, there has 
never been a president of the United States who has visited a 
confinement facility. There have been some who have come rather 
close." (NYT) 



University of Maryland 
University College 

Schwabisch Gmiind, Germany 


MASTER OF INTERNATIONAL 
MANAGEMENT (M.I.M.) 

The University of Maryland University College is offering a Master of International Management 
degree through its new campus located in the heart of Germany. The M.I.M. is part of a 
comprehensive university program at Schwabisch Gmiind that also includes bachelors of arts and 
science degrees. This intensive one year residential graduate program is structured from the 
highly successful program offered at College Park, Maryland and Washington, D.C. The curricu- 
lum focuses on the practical applications of international management in a global environment. 

A cohort group of 35 students will begin the five term graduate program on August 22, 1994 
and will c ulmin ate its studies by working in teams that will develop business strategies for 
selected international corporations in Europe. 

ADMISSION CRITERIA 

Participants will be drawn from all regions of the world on a competitive basis. Successful applicants 
will have the following qualifications: 

■ A minimum of 2 years of business experience 

■ Fluency in English and proficiency in one other business language (TOEFL score a bove 600)* 

■ A Bachelors degree or equivalent (minimum Z75 GPA on 4.0 Scale) 

■ Management Admissions Test (GMAT) or a Graduate Record Examination (GRE) 

* Participants who score 550-600 areeligible for conditional acceptance, but must successfully complete 
an intensive two-month language program. 


tuition and COSTS 


For the full program. Tuition is 
Books, lodging and meals (approximate) 
Application Processing Fee 
Total 


37.125.00 

13.200.00 
250.00 

50375.00 


of P residen t John F. Kennedy in 
1963 from Dallas and wrote four 
books, including a personalized ac- 
fccnml of the Johnson administra- 
tion. 

Staton Dadq 85. founder of The 
Journal o f American Cardiology 
audits editor in chief fra more than 
30 yean, died Monday of conges- 
tive heart Mure at New Yoric’s 
Mount Sinai Medical Center, 
where he tod worked most of his 

life, 

Raymond A. Hare, 92, an Arabist 
in the U.S. State Department who 
rose through the ranks Of the for- 
eign service to serve as ambassador 
. to fbnr countries in the Middle East 
and as an gy ris rent secretary of 
state; died Wednesday of pneumo- 
nia at hs home in Washington. 


Candidates must provide their own transportation and financial resources. 

Hfot more information call 1-800-895-9625 or mail this coupon to7"J 

J University of Maryland University College 
I Graduate School of Management & Technology i 

I University Boulevard @ Adelphi Road (IHTRB 021 194) I 

College Park, MD 20742-1614 USA. . 

Telefax 301-985-4611 


Address 

City /State/Zip . 

Country 

Daytime Phone 




1 


r.» 


■ . TWv Ite iC dSJ 


Page 4 


Assailing NATO, 
Russia Calls lor 
UN Council Meeting 


UVTEKNATIOIVAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11 , 1994 , 

ALLIE S; BANK: Stcf» Judge Om OffkMe 

Coming Together ■jSgg&S&i 


#* ? 






By Celestine Bohien 

New York Times Service 

MOSCOW — Russia called 
Thursday for an urgent meeting of 
the United Nations Security Coun- 


cil, after one of Moscow’s top dip- 
lomats accused NATO leaders of 


lomats accused NATO leaders of 
usurping the UN’s peacekeeping 

role with their ul timatum to forces 


“For the Americans, air strikes 
are dose to a domestic political 
necessity," a Western diplomat in 
Moscow said, "while for the Rus- 
sians. they are close to a domestic 
political disaster/" 

In the past year, Russia has 
carved out its own position on the 


deployed in the siege of Sarajevo. 

"Why should NATO resolve set- 
tlement problems, in the farm of an 

ul timatum at that, and threaten to 
use military methods?" said First 
Deputy Foreign Minister Anatoli 
A damishin in an interview with the 
news agency Interfax. "This be- 
longs to the competence of the UN, 

not NATO." 

In an official statement issued 
later, the Foreign Ministry said the 
Security Council should be con- 
vened immediately to consider a 
Russian proposal to place Sarajevo 
under UN protection. He de- 
scribed such a move as “essentially 
dose" to the North Atlantic Treaty 
Organization's call for warring par- 
ties to put their weapons under UN 
control 

[The United States said Thurs- 
day that there was no need for a 
new meeting of the Security Coun- 
cil, Reuters reported from Wash- 
ington. “The NATO decision was 
in the context of previous UN reso- 
lutions." said a U.S. official, who 
asked not to be identified. The offi- 
cial added that there was "no re- 
quirement" for a new meeting. 

[The Security Council plans to 
bold an open debate Friday on the 
Bosnian crisis, but members said 
the council would not take any ac- 
tion to change NATO’s ultima- 
tum.] 

Russia, a consistent opponent of 
any use of force in the Bosnian 
conflict, has been left out of the 
most recent debate, which was 


war in the former Yugoslavia, argu- 
ing that its historic tics to Serbia 


sparked by the shelling last week- 
end of a Sarajevo marketplace. In 
the attack, 68 people died and more 
than 200 were injured. 

A meeting of the Security Coun- 
cil. of which Russia is one of five 
permanent members and therefore 
has veto power, would bring the 
debate back within Moscow’s reach 
and give it leverage over the issue of 
intervention. But the Western al- 
lies, with the support of the UN 
secretary-general. Buiros Bulros 
Ghali, have chosen to bypass the 
Security Council, in large part to 
avoid an uncomfortable dash with 
Russia. 


But, with emotions running high 
a both sides, the debate over the 


on both sides, the debate over the 
use of force has already put rela- 
tions between Russia and the West 
to a new test. 


give it a special role and influence 
over Belgrade. In opposing the in- 
tervention. Russia has argued that 
air strikes will generate support for 
Serbian extremists in Serbia and 
Bosnia and prolong the war. 

Russia's position has been 
hemmed in recently by the shrill 
voices of Russian nationalists, 
whose influence has increased since 
the ultranationalist Vladimir V. 
Zhirinovsky won an impressive vic- 
tory in the December parliamenta- 
ry elections. 

In the State Duma this week. Mr. 
Zhirinovsky again escalated his 
rhetoric, wanting that a NATO air 
strike against Serbian positions 
could lead to World War ILL Re- 
porting Thursday on his trip to 
Serbia last week. Mr. Zhirinovsky 
called cm Russians to rise to the 
defense of the Serbs, their Slavic 
and Orthodox kin. 

“There is only one way oat of the 
crisis," be said. "This is something 
desired by all the Serbian people, 
all the 20 million Serbs are asking 
for only one thing: "Russia, Rus- 
sians, protea us.’ ” 

"If anyone dares to bomb the 
dues in Bosnia," he added, “that 
would amount to a declaration of 
war on Russia. We will never toler- 
ate that" 

■ Greece Assails NATO 

Greece criticized its NATO allies 
on Thursday for their "totally 
wrong and guilty decision'* to 
threaten air strikes in Bosnia, sug- 
gesting that they were taking sides 
in a civil war and risking the spread 
of conflict in the Balkans, Reuters 
reported from Athens. 

After meeting his senior cabinet 
ministers. Prime Minister Andreas 
Papandreou said the preparations 
for Western military intervention 
in Bosnia had no dear objective. 

He asked: "Is the military opera- 
tion meant to hit one of the three 
members in the confrontation — 
Serbia — to bring it to its knees? 
And which problem will this 
solve?” 

In Greece's harshest condemna- 
tion of NATO’s threat to lake mili- 
tary action, Mr. Papandreou said 
the Bosnian crisis bad been 



Comhaed from Page I 
decided to puB their forces out of 
the Balkans 

But both French and German 
officials were strongly impressed 
by Mr. Clinton's endorsement at 
the summit talks of European ef- 
forts to build a separate defense 
identity within the North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization. 

In the end, the French appear to 
have accepted the idea that the Eu- 
ropean Union could not deal with 


Coothmed from ftge 1 
“purely procedural" and would 
have so otfea in France. 

Cridit Lyonnais* the biggtei 
non-Japanese bank- in : the .wind, 
with more than $300 billion in total 

assets, said it was “stupefied”, by 
the judge's action. The Sank, how- 
. ever, has been criticized for budd- 
ing up an international portfaEb of 


va this week had ended abruptly 
after Mr.. GiUe called Jqdge Cro- =. 
chet a“tbug/* ; 3r : 

Credit Lyonnais said 'Ibursdayu 
had written off most of its Sasea 
dd»t in 1992 as part ofits total : 
ym-tnss provisions of 14.7 bPIiQa . ■; 
Frea$ fraBCs ($2-5 bilHon). 

S ash* Serafimovsfci, an anal}?! 
with MemBLyndi in London, said .. 
tite:bants 1993 proviapns could . 
total as much as 19 Wflitm francs.' 

He predicted that Credit Lyonnais 
wdd -report 'a '1993 loss A1B 
bdlian francs, compared wjhAjef- ; 
feit of lAbfflioa francs. in 1992. 

. Last Moody’s Investore 

Service lacx pet thedebt of Credit 


the Bosnian problem alone, and 
that they could work toother with 
thor American allies to use NATO 
leverage on it 

It was a Frencb-American pro- 
posal that carried the day in Brus- 
sels on Wednesday. Whal tipped 
the balance was the killing of 68 
people by a mortar shell fired at a 
Sarajevo market over toe weekend, 
and the pictures that revived public 
revulsion in Europe over the con- 
tinumg barbarity on its eastern 
doorstep. 

It sriD took toe alfics 14 hours to 
agree to the proposal and dearly 
most of them nope that they do not 
ever have to drop a angle bomb. If 
toe Serbs comply with toe NATO 
ultimatum and withdraw their gntts 
20 Ititaneters (12 miles) from Sara- 
jevo within toe 10-day Unlit, and no 
further shots are fired into the city, 
toe allies may not have to act 

If they do, European officials 
say, they may yet regret ft. Bomb- 
ing could be the first step in a long 
and ever-widening chain of direct 
involvement in the war, and Britain 
anH fjwnita , in particular; fear the 
possibility of retaliation against toe 
UN forces. 

And the greatest casualty could, 
be the relationship the United 



Gk|hfWRaMi 

U.S. Admiral Jeremy ML Boorria, center, and General Jean Cot of France, left, after meeting 
Thursday at Zagreb airport They discussed a possible air strike against Serbian positions. 


BOSNIA: Cease-Fire Holds 


Continued fma Page 1 


ers, and some Serbian artillery has 
a range of 40 kilometers. 

Britain said Thursday that it had 
suspended its aid convoys in Bos- 
nia as a '’prudent precaution" after 
toe NATO ultimatum. An official 
said it acted to ensure toe safety of 
its 2300 troops and government 
aid workers on duty lor the UN 
High Commissioner for Refugees. 

Officials insisted that fears that 
British aid workers and troops 


could be used as a human shield by 
parties to toe Bosnian conflict were 
over-dramatizing the risks they 
faced. 

The troops and aid workers had 
been given time to withdraw to safe 
locations in case of any retaliation 
by forces in Bosnia. Additional de- 
fensive measures “against all possi- 
ble eventualities” were in place, an 
Official mid 

Another official, exp laining the 
background of the decision to sus- 


Bonn lifts Order 
On Expulsion of 
Croatia Refugees 


States and its allies are trying to 
buBd with democratic Russia. Mr. 


Pope Holds Meeting 
With First Israeli Envoy 


prompted by Western political 
blunders in 1991 that would now be 
compounded by military blunders. 


Reuters 

VATICAN CITY — Pope John 
Paul II on Thursday received 
Shmuel Hadas. Israel's first diplo- 
matic representative to the Vatican. 

Israel and toe Vatican signed an 
agreement mutually recognizing 
each other on Dec. 31. They are 
expected to forge full diplomatic 
relations and exchange ambassa- 
dors this year. Mr. Hadas’s status is 
special representative. 


ence of the warring parties in Bos- 
nia restricting convoys made 
prudence crudaL “The security 
and safety of aid workers in Bosnia 
is paramount.” one official said. 

The United Nations has pulled 
mast of its aid workers out of one 
Serbian-held town but the Sobs 
have blocked others from leaving, 
UN officials said Thursday. 

Sylvana Foa. a spokeswoman for 
the UN refugee agency in Geneva, 
denied that it was pulling out its 
workers as a precaution against re- 
prisals. She said a few workers were 
leaving for consultations in Zagreb. 
Croatia, next week with the head of 
the agency, Sadako Ogata. (A FP, 
Reuters, A?) 


New York Times Service 

BONN — The German authori- 
ties have lifted a blanket expulsion 
order that would have sent 100,000 
refugees from the war in the Bal- 
kans back to Croatia by toe end of 
April officials said Thursday. 

According to a new accord be- 
tween the interior ministers of the 
16 German states and toe federal 
government in Bonn, only refugees 
from Croatian territory deemed by 
German authorities to be “paci- 
fied" wfll hare to go back tins year. 

Those from the one-third of Cro- 
atian territory occupied by Serbs 
who want annexation with Serbia, 
and refugees judged to be hardship 
cases, had their pennissoa to stay 
here extended until June 30, 1995. 

Goman authorities had decided 
in mid- 1993 that people from Cro- 
atia no longer qualified as refugees. 

But human-rights groups and ex- 
ile organizations say that ethnic 
cleansing had left a third of Cro- 
atian territory ruined and in Serbi- 
an hands, and made unthinkable a 
forced return of refugees- 


bufld with democratic Russia. Mr. 
Kohl was among Western leaders 
who spoke with President Boris N. 
Yeltsin, to try to explain the NATO 
decision before it was made, offi- 
cials in Bonn said, but Russia went 
ahead and called a meeting of the 
UN Security Council Thursday in 
displeasure. 

“We don't want to lose the Rus- 
sians over Bosnia,” a European of- 
ficial said. 

The relationship frith toe Rus- 
sians is not all that coaid be lost if 
the does not confront the 

war in Bosnia successfully, but 
many officials on this ride of tire 
Atlantic believe it has taken a step 
toward success by making dear to 
aggressors they snub their 
noses at it at thor peril. ■ 


Slovakia Signs NATO Fact 

Reuters 

BRUSSELS — Slovakia has be- 
come the seventh East European 
country to sign a nnStazy partner- 
ship deal or Partnership for Peace, 
with NATO. . . 


luoua. . ? . 

Tire greatest controversy has sur- 
rounded its hacking of toe takeover 
of MGM in 1990 partnership 

led by Florid Horim, Sasea’s chair- 
man, and Giancarlo Parretti. a 
■ flamb oyant financier who & Stffl 
appealing a fraud conviction in his 
jmtive Italy. 

■ Sasea crashed under toe burden 

of about 5.1 bflHon Swiss francs 
■($3.4 button) of debts in October 
1992, five months after Credit Ly- 
onnais took formal control of 
MGM in a MS. foreclosure move: 
Mr. Fiorini is in jail in Geneva on 
.suspicion- of fraud The French 
bank's debt exposure to Sasea is 
about 650 tniffion Swiss francs, ac- 
cording to its lawyers. . 

On Thursday, Judge Jean-Ldtns 
Crochet, who is investigating possi- 
ble fraud in connection -wan toe 
collapse rif Sasea, issued a formal 
notice of investigation against Mr. 
Haberer arid Mr. GtDe. who has 
been Handling MGM matters for 
Crtdit Lyonnais. TheSwiss judge’s 
su mm o n s, known as a mandat aa~ 
metier, means both men could he 
detained and held for questioning 
for as long as 24 hours if they 
should eater Switzerland. 

Under the leadership of Mr. Ha' 
barer — who was recently trans- 
ferred to Cr&dit National a much 
smaller state-owned bank -r- the 
Dutch affiliate of Crfcdil Lyonnais 
supplied $1 bflHon oHoans used by 
Mr. F iorini and Mr. Parretti to 
find their takeover of MGM. - 

Mr. Parretti was chairman of 
MGM until 1991 when Crfdlt Ly- 
onnais removed him and began a 
long legal battle in the - .United 
States far control erf the mowe stn- 
dio. The bank is now hoping to turn 
MGM around and sell it. . , 

Judge Crochet is investigating 
whether Gift Lyonnais had oper- 
ational control of Sasea at the time 

at its bankruptcy. The baric, winch 
icsdf made. a oonulunt of fraud 
against Mr. Fiorini in May 1993, 
argues that it played no role in 
Sasea’s decirioa to file.for bank- 
ruptcy, ac co rdin g to Dominique 
Ponoet. its GenewHrased lawyer. 

Credit Lyonnais contended that 
toe Swiss judicial order had been 
issued in retaliation for its own 
request on Wednesday for Judge 
Crochet to recuse himself from the 
Sasea investigation. The bank, say^ 
ins that Mr. Gflle had voluntarily 
submitted to questioning in the 
judge’s office an Monday and 
Tuesday, termed the judge's action 
"gratuitous harassment 

Mr. Fanoet, who said that Credit 
Lyonnais had been a victim of 






• % & * ‘ 

^€v ;4 ' 


«K: \ 

. >■ 




,, 


review list for .a, possible down- 
grade, citing t&i bank’s large load 
of probkmloans and possible res- 
cue plans for it being discussed in 
Paris. ' . 

An aide to Mr. Haberer in Pans 
drtjfoea to comment on toe Swiss] 
judge's action. The BaHadux gov- 
emmient replaced Mr. Haberer in 
Novemberjvith Jean Pcyrdevade, 
fbemer chairman of the major in-' 
surer Union des Assurances de Far- . 

is. Mr. -Peyrdevade has moved 


t. •*' 




■as?... 




' - - 


ouidfly to reorganize the Credit; 
Lyonnais management and t ac kl e 
problem loans,- including its huge 
portfolio of real estate loans. 


Hindus Kill 3 \ 
In Biet^bdoidfor 
Fatal Bombing J 


The .Associated Press 


. NEW DELHI — - A cjnftw was 
imposed on Thursday in the north-, 
era town of Kampur after Hindu 
mobs killed .three people ini ‘ the 
worst outbreak of religious vio- 
lence m India m months,-. 


aftffnIfc«hiprt5ticraaTvasIaI«d 
in'a bomb attack, the police s rid. 
Two of toe three- victims flf the 
Hmdu mobs were Muslims and toe 
third was not immediately ideate 

fed. .- ••••--. • 

In December 1992,'ancientifin-, 
dn-Musfim tensions erupted Into' 
the biggest communal cohfiagra- 
- tkm mTour decades when Hindu 
friwtics destroyed a mosque/set- 
tmg off two months of nationwide! 
. riots that killed 2,000 people.- .-The.' 
country had remained, largely 
peaceful since then. : : 

The ifirin politician, Kala Bach- 
. xta of toe rightist BhandiyaJanate 
' Party, is befieved to have led at- 
tacks on "several Muslim homes, 
during the J992 riots. 

No one immediately took re-! 
spoosftHlfty for the bomb attack, 
but Mudmw who wanted revenge 
were suspected. . -V. ■. ; 

■i •: -i- -• r.--» '>•. 


Provisional Airport Authority Hong Kong 


SELECTION OF CONTRACTORS - BUILDING AND CIVIL ENGINEERING WORKS FOR THE CONSTRUCTION OF THE NEW AIRPORT AT CHEK LAP KOK 


Over the past two years the Authority has drawn up a Hat c! 
contractors inte res ted in undertaking construction works for 
Hong Kong's new airport. 


An enquiry document was sent to those who had previously 
expressed interest, to members of the Hong Kong Construc- 
tion Association, and to oversees contractors (chiefly through 
Consulates based in Hong Kong and Trade Offices). The 
Authority has used the information gathered to generate a 
database categorising the various companies. 


To date, companies accepted are categorised as foflows:- 
CAT . ! Denotes Contracts of unimited value. 

CAT .11 Denotes Contracts up to the value of HKSSOm. 
CAT. ill Denotes Contracts up to the value of tflCJTOm. 


REGISTER OF CONTRACTORS 
CIVIL ENGINEERING WORKS 
CATEGORY 


ChiO 

Engl wrin g Sfrudum 

Works Piling StMtwortr 


Alfred McAJpme International Umited 
AMEC International Construction Ltd. 

Aofci Corporation 
Bachy Soietenche Group 
Balfour Beatty Urntod 
Bona i Oil Offshore Platform 
Fabrication Company 
Boskate IrrternaJtonaJ BV 
Bidders Federal (Hong Kong) Ltd. 
Campenon Bernard SGE 
Corrpagnie d’EntrepnsesCFE 
Chatwm Engineering Limited 
Gheo Snng Foundation Limited 
Cheung Kee Fung Cheung 
Construct**) Co., lid. 

China Civil Engineering 

Construction Corporation 
China Fupan Corporation tor International 
Tadino- Economic Cooperation 
China Harbour Engineering Company 
Chma International Water & 

Electric Gap- 
China Slate Construction 
Engineering Corporation 
Chong Kee Construction Company Limited 
Chui Hfang Construction Co. Ltd. 

Chung Chm Construction & 

Engi n ee r i n g Co.. Ltd. 

Chung Shmg Construction Co_ Ltd. 


Cleveland Structural Engineering United I 


Construction Techniques Ltd. 

Costae* Building and Civil Engineering Lid. 
Cutxsitas y Mzov. SA. 

DaeEm Engineering Co., Ud. 

DaxJO Concrete (Hong Kong) lid. 

Detoe Fong Construction Ca. Ltd. 

Diekscn Construction Co H Ltd. 

Dotty Stmouni Engineering 
Downer & Company Limited 
Dragages at Travaux Publics 
(Hong Kong) Ltd. 

Entrecanales y Tavora. S A 
Frank; Contractors Ltd. 

Freyssmet Hong Kong Unvted 
Gammon Construction Ud. 

George Wrnipey Iniamalional Lumtod 
Gecwoda Con fa ac t ora (HK) Ltd. 


I CMI 


1 REGISTER OF CONTRACTORS 1 

cpeywnr BUILDING WORKS CATEGORY 

Gold Banner Construction & 


SflHdtogtebrts 

Development Ltd. 
Heitt+WOemerBau-AG 

IX 

1 

Cempuy 

Cfepory 

Hervywcy Construction Company limited 

1 

Alfred McAtplne International Unfed 

1 

Hip King Construction Co.. Ltd. 

1 

i AMEC Wmatlonal Construction Ltd. 

1 

Hong Kang Kmang let Builders Unfed 


M AoW Corporation 

1 

Hotendache Aarwienwig Maatschappij BV 

I 

Beflour Beatty Unfed 

1 

Hsm Chong (Foundations) Lid. 


Bolon Constacbon Co., Ud. 

ill 

ha in Chong Construction Co., Ltd. 

; 

Blotters Federal (Hong Kong) Ltd. 

Itl 

Hung Wan Construction Company, Unfed 


I Campenon Bernard SGE 

1 

Hyundai Engceemg & 


Compagme cfEntrepnses CFE 

1 

Constructor Co . Ltd. 

i 

! Chatwn Engineering Limited 

i 

ftochuCorporafton 

: 

Ghee Cheung Hng 8 Co, Ltd. 

t 

JDC Corporation 

i 

Chee Shoig Foundation Unfed 

I 

John Lsrg Internationa! Ud. 

I 

I Cheung Kee Fung Cheung 


K. H. Foundalions Ltd. 


Construction Co, Ud. 

1 

Kam Kuan Constructor Co. Ltd. 

!-i 

China Civil Engfosenng Construction 


IGer Hong Kong Limited 

; 


1 

Kumagai Gumi Group 


China Fujian Corporation tor Internationa] 


Leighton Bruckner Feundaton 


Tecrtvj- Economic Cooperetron 

1 

Engineering Ud. 


China Hartwttf Engineering Company 

l 

Lite Construction & Engineering Co.. Ud. 

L ley Construction (Hong Kong) Ud. 

II 

i! China kumabonal Water 8 Electee Corp. 

Otere SteteConstmcton Engineering 

1 

Luen Cheong Tjb Construehon Co. Ud. 

: 

II Corporation 

1 

MaedaCorpcratcn 


Chung Chin Construction & 


McCcnnefl Dowell Constructors Lid. 

i 

Engineering Co^Ud. 

1 

Mrtsui Ccnstructon Co.. Ud. 

; 

• Chung Shing Constructor Co., Lid. 

<1 

Ngo Kee ConsfrucLon Co.. Ltd. 

i : 

Cleveland Structural Engrreerlng Unfed 

1 

Nippon Steel Corporation 


Construction Techniques Ud. 

in 

Nishimatsu Construction Company Lmtoc 

! 

Ccstam Buittmg and CM Engineering Ud. 

1 

NKK Corporation 

i 

Cuteertas y Mzov. SA. 

1 

Obayasni Corporation 

i 

1 DaefimEnp nearing Co. .Lid. 

1 

CLS International Lrrted 


Defoe Fong Construction Co., Lid. 

» 

Paul r Ganstmacn Co., lw. 

! 

i Desire Pacffie Limited 

II 

S. Y. Eng-neewg Company Limited 


Stckson Conrirudito Co„ Ltd. 

1 

Samsung Heavy :ndustnes Co.. Ud. 

i 

Dragages at Travaux Pubfics 


Sarnwhan Corporation 

! 

(Hong Kong) Unfed 

1 

Stermaj Corporation 

1 

Entrecanales y Tavora, S A. 

» 

Shu On Civfl Confrafers Ud. 

l 

i 1 Gammon Constructor Lid. 

1 

Shui On Construction Co.. Ltd. 

Shun Shmg Corstructon & 


George Wimpay international Limited 

Gold Banner Construction 4 

l 

Engineering Co.. Ltd. 

■ 

DavatepmantlJd. 

II 

Snipe Constructor Lrreted 

i: 

Hp Hmg Constructor Co., Lid. 

1 

SKanska Intematcna! C-vd Engnegmg AB 


' ’ Hong KtoaKwongTSi Butters UmBsd 

H 

Spie Batignofies 

s 

j Hop Shing Constructor Co., Ltd. 

ill 

Surrey Miu's Erginesnng & 


| Hsin Chong Construction Co, Lid. 

1 

Corts!ructorTCo..Ud. 


; Hung Wan Constructort Company. LmtsO 

1 

T.S. Wong & Co., Ud. 


! tfochu Corporation 

: 

Tai Hng (Engineers & Builders) Lmted 

ii 

JDC Corporation 

i 

Takeneka Corporation 

I 

1 John Laing IrflamaUonal Lid. 

i 

Takenaka Horg Kong Ltd. 


Karr WO Construction Company Unfed 

i 

Thrmac Ccnatrwton Lmited 

} 

1 Kin Tat Construction Co, Ltd. 

HI 

Taylor Woodrow international Umtod 

i 

1 KumagaiGumi Group 

i Lfo Ccfltturtfcn 1 Engineering Co.. Ud. 

1 

To’s Universe Construction Co.. LM. 


II 

Tobtshima Corporation 

1 

MaedaCeiporaton 

1 

Universal Dockyard unfed 

i 

Mean ContnKtion Co.. Ud. 

1 

Wsh Seng General Contractore Ud. 


Ngo Kee Construction Co.. Ud. 


Wsu Kee (Zfina) Construction & 


Nippon Steal Corporation 

1 

Transportation Company Limted 

! 

ffesftimalsu Construction Company Lsnfed 

1 

Wafer Bau-Aidtengesefischaft 

I 

Corporation 

f 

Wan Chung Constructor Co.. Ud. 


Obayashi Corporator 

1 

Wanscn Construction Co.. Ud. 


OLSlntanretfanal Urntod 

! 

WeconLtd. 


B airt Y Ccnstructon Co. Ltd. 

1 

Wing Fai Ccnstructon Co. Ud. 

! 

Progress Construction Unfed 

n 

Wing Mou Constructior Co. Ltd 

i; 

Sarwnan Corporator 

i 

Wong Po Kee Urn. ted 

-- 

Shimizu Corporation 

i 

Woon LeeCanstructon Co. Ltd. 


Shui On Construction Co^Ud. 

i 

Yau Lee Ccnstructon Co . Ud 


Siam Shing Constnicton 8 


Zarnl5teaiSWgCO.Ud 


t EngmaertngCe^LU. 

i 


" Skanska Intemational CM Engineering A0 
South Star Construction Company Limited 
Sung Foo Kee, Unfed 
TS.Wong&Co^Ltd. 

Tte Hteg (E ngin eer s & BuDdere) Unfed 
Tatanaki Corporation 
TWrenaks Hong KOng LteL 
TwreacConstmeSon Limited . 

Taylor Woodrow International Limited 
To's Universe Construction Co., Ltd. 
Tbbiste ma Corporat i on 
tWi Seng General Cont rac tor s Ltd. 
water Bau-AWiengeseBschilt 
WWi Chung Construction Co ^ Lid. 

Wsnson Constnaiton Co., Ud. 

WeconLtd. 

Wing F* Construction Co. Lid. 

Wing Mou Construction Co. Ud. 

Woan Lee Construction Co. Ltd. 

Yau Lee Construction Co., Ud. 


CoatrectM2A- Mttsl Workforce Acoommodeflon,. 
Imployerte Office and <fontractor*e Itemeit Office 
(DsetgnaMContenicti . 

La^jMon Contractors (Asia) Unfed 
SlttiOnConstrucflonCo^Ltd. . 

Airport Ptatform Contractors -Ovl Works 
•' Joint Wntum (APOCWJV) . 

H^> Hfog Construction Co^ Lid. 

Shun SWng ConabucSon &' Engineering Co^^ Ud. 
Dragages et Ttevaux Puhdcs (Hong Kong^LW., 
.. Paul Y Construction Co^Ltd. 

Hung Wan ConstrucBon Company, Unfed ' 

Ysu LeeConstmcflonCfo, Ltd. 

KamVlfo Construction CanyMny Limited 
Cheung Kee Fung Ctwung ConstncSonCo^ Ltd. 


Contract 90S- Raw WMerSubmeifcieRpeSne 

LdghtonLamaJ.V. 

ShteOnCMlOontractoreLtd. 

McCwmefl DoweB/U.DX. JoW Vbntwe 
Costern -IfehfmatsuJotetWnlure 
Dragages at TVavauxPuUcs (Hong Kcng) Lld. 


Contract MS -Temporary UtBRIsa, ftoedworiai ' 
and Bridge* 

Leighton Co n trac tors (Asia) Unfed 
Airport Pktfonn Contactors- CM Woria 
Jolrd venture (AP&CWJV) 

M ftselTnn 

AONwpociDan 
- Sung Foo Kee part9LW. . . 

China Ffojten- Downer -McAlpine Joint Venfota 
WteiKn-CFE- Express Joint Wsntura 
H a ni yvic y /ChunWoConaorflum 
Chut Hng ComUncdon Co. Ud. 
VWngMaaConabucdonOo.Lid. .. 


The Authority is eurranlly updating these Ists and 
invites those i n te reste d but not fisted above to apply to 
wrangtora*PraguailicsaonQues 8 o nntera“ by 
Monday, 29 Fabtuuy, 199*, 5 pm (Hong Kong toe). 
Thwe ad ar the AuthorflywB up date as fate annua^iL 
Those interastod should apply ta- 


The Prejsct Daactor 
Prmrfstonsl Airport Authority Hong Kong 
2Ste Ftoor, Central Plaza 
18 Hsrtrour Road, Wanchai 
Hong Kong ' 

ForthsteterfenofMs^sfaFok. - 
FtaNo : (852)8028231 
Tel No : (852)8247724 


From the 1st cuuortly avaitetito Btettfewing 
contractors have been sstected to Bidforths works 
fated below. 


Contract egr- T MBpot ar y r sny Hutted i ■ 
BarlblnB toracmiMk (Design and ConsaucQ _ . 

. Gammon Corfea*nLhl -j3*teHart)our .: - 
Cn tf n se rtn g Company Jofottew itu ia 

. ShutOn Joint Venters 

Dagagea st TravwwPubBc* (Hong Kong) Ltd. 

UohmnalDocfcywd Unfed 
McCteSMI Dowsil Constructors lid. 
WterHfo-CFE Joint Verdure- - 


Contend 301 - P asse n ge r Tmwifoal Feondatfona 
Gammon Consbxiction Ltd. - ffetemetsu 
Construction Co.. Lid. Job* Venture 
Leighton Ctertrectore (Asia) Umftad 
Shu On -caree SWng JoW Ventura 
FrenW Contractors Ud. 

KpMnC Consiiudtoi Ca, Ud. 

• Dragages at Travaux Publics ^fong Kong) Lto. 
Amse r Chins State Joint fedora 
Aoki Corporation 

Hdn Chong Chak Lap MokRrendtehnJV - 

CDE Joint Verdure 


ContnciMa -AedcCrushteg PtedBtlis 
NtehtewteuCoRseuctfon Company Lkifed 
Wsi Kee (Zens) Construction J^Traps p q dafo n 
Coc np eny Unfed 

China Fujten- Oovriec- Mortipfe JoKfeitfe 
Me Stone Company Un fed 
RsdtendOencreletM. 

■ Pfon es rOu s ni e i fidQOd. • ~ 


foarkfifeksepsratelfewabecornpfiecfand 
pubfahed In due cause farefoddcalandiiiedtenlctf 
cw 4i actoa ^ apppfife,. min or wor ks eodsped— w > . 
syfems contractors. ' 



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jufSP. 


bos 


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; Iiymlndey-Kr; 


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iBhsro! ihr ; 
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► ** 


Page 5 


Afrikaner Group Sets Boycott 

1 of Campaign Violence 


South Africa War 

By Paul Taylor 


MIDEAST: 

Breathing Easier 


N|J 

* ^ , 







j * 



JOHANNESBURG — The Af- 
ricaner Vjdksfrorit. an mnbrtsQa 

S ot rightists seeking an iude- 
:nt white homeland, an- 
nounced Thursday that it would 
not participate to Sooth Africa’s 
first all-races election and warned 
that the campaign wBU be riddled 
with violence. . 

The announcement, winch came 
two days before the deaditw for 
political parties to register far (he 
April 26-28 dectuML, is. oqrecled to 
to a campaign of civil 
land sabotage that has 
„ jxa among the loosely 
allied band of militant n Atiag 
Ferdi Hartzenbcrg, the Volks- 
front chairman, said & would con- 
- tinue to seek peaceful to 
achieve his organization's HhtmtiH 
for a separate -nation for Afrika- 
ners, the 3 miffinn whites (in a na- 


tion of 40 mflfion) who are descen- 
dants of Dutch, 


French and 


- — Duti 
German settlers. 

But he said he folly expected 
Afrikaners to become targets of vi- 
olence from the blade forces in the 


coming months. “If they crush us, 
what most we do?” he said. “I think 
we most use a little bit of force to 
protect onrsdves.” 

- President Frederik W. de Klerk 
said be was disappointed with the 
announcement, but added, “We 
cannot allow armnority to stop the 
train, and derail the process.” 

fix the last week, the government 
and the African, National Congress 
had offered the Voflafrom ahdtwo 
otoer holdout parties, the Wade 
h om eland government of Bophuih- 
aiswana and the Zulu-based In- 
katoa Freedom Party, a two-ballot 
system, regional taxation powers 
and a constitutional comrmtment 
to- explore , ways to accommodate 
the nationalistic aspirations of Af- 
rikaners and other ethnic groups. 
-But thehard-hners in the Vrnks- 
front had bdd out for afirm guar- 
antee thtoan Afrikaner state would 
be created. Ndsoa Mandela, the 
ANC president, has catcgpnaRy 
rated that out; he says the ANC 
could never accept restricting citi- 
zenship rights by race or ethmdty. 

The Voftsfront will proceed with 
plans to set np separate shadow 


governments in the small towns 
where its support is strongest ll 
says it will not recognize the legiti- 
macy of the government elected in 

April, and wdl pursue tax boycotts 
and other forms of civil resistance. 


Although Mr. Hartzcnl 
trays Ins supporters as the likely 
victims of violence^ there is do 
question that they know how to 
instigate it. Nine rightists are now 
in police custody in connection 
with more than 30 bomb blasts that 
have been set off in the last six 

weeks. 

There are believed to be tens of 
thousands of militant rightists or- 
ganized into saxes of small, area- 
based paramilitary commando 
units. Most are wdl armed, and 
virtually all are former soldiers. 

Eugene Terre'Blanche, head of 
the Afrikaner Resistance Move- 
ment, winch dawns 40,000 such 
commandos, flanked Mr. Hartzen- 
berg at his news conference Thurs- 
day. Hesiod he did not see how any 
dectioo could be held without the 
support of the Afrikaners, die 
Tswanas and the Zulus. 


Continued from Page 1 

nothing tangible for an increasing- 
ly restless public. 

Israeli officials acknowledged 
that many substantive issues re- 
mained, but they said they had 
overcome the most difficult securi- 
ty disputes and had shown that 
they and the Palestinians could 
move forward. 

“I believe certain walls of suspi- 


cion are starting to crumble,” said 
Foras 


Uri Saw, the Foreign Ministry di- 
rector-general and a senior negotia- 
tor.” 

Mr. Rabin called the agreement 
“an important step forward,” 
praise echoed by President BlD 
Clinton, who said it represented 
“another big milestone.” 

Palestinian leaders were more re- 
served, no doubt because Mr. Ara- 
fat had backed down on key mat- 
ters like Israel’s demand for veto 


power over Lravelers trying to cross 
from J 






Reuters 

TOULOUSE, France — Airbus 
Industrie said Thursday that its A- 
330 passenger jet had resumed 
commercial nights after the resolu- 
tion of problems with its undercar- 
riage that led to suspension ctfser- 
vice last month. 

Bernard Ziegler, t**^""*** direc- 
tor at the four-nation European 
consortium, s&d at a news confer- 
ence that the problems were due to 
a sensor near the landing gear. 

A new A-330, bound for Mar- 
seille, hail to return to Paris in 
midfgg hr oa Jan. 28 after it could 
not retract its Undercarriage. It was 

the third thug tin* plane hod aij gi. 
wiffii prob lems of thw Hnd- 

An Airbus -spokesman .ssid die 


sensor, wind) uses magnetic beams 
todredc that everything is working 
f, had had a sensitivity of a 
i of a second and that tins 
lewd bad now been changed to a 
tenth of a second. . 

Tire A-330 restarted operations 
on Thursday from Paris’s Oriy air- 
port. Airbus said. ' ' 

. Airbus adopted a. procedure that 
will allow up to three rttempts at 
retracting the undercarriage and 
installed a system. far continuous 
monitoring during withdrawal of 
the landing gear. 

The A-330 is ft twin-engine jet 
with 412 seats. Companies in 
France, Britain, Germany and 
Spain make up the Airbus consor- 
tium. 


U.S. House Votes to Revive 



Italy Recovers 
Long-Missing 
Raphael Work 


Reuters 

ROME — The police in Ita- 
ly said Thursday that they bad 
recovered a painting attribut- 
ed to the Renaissance artist 
Raphael rhaf hai? fa m naming 
for a century. 

“The Madonna with Quid 
and Lamb,” believed to dan- 
from 1506. was recovered 
from a bank vault in Mflan, 
apparently by investigators 
posing as millionaire buyers. 
A police spokesman said die 
panning had been brought 
into Italy from Switzerland. 
He said two I talians and two 
foreigners would be charged in 
the case. 

Italian news reports said the 
officers had posed as buyers 
and offered 40 bflfion fire (324 
million) for the painting, 
which had belonged to the 
family of the 19th-century 
Italian poet Giacomo Leopar- 
di and dis a p p e ar ed 100 years 
ago. 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — The Bouse 
of Representatives voted Thursday 
to revive independent counsel to- 
ns after _r 


nearly $ 
intoine: 


vestigatioms after .rejecting a Re- 
publican plan to have, the neutral 

prosecutors conduct afi cnmmalm- 


The House hill; sbn0fr to a ver- 
sion passed Ijy.tfae-Senate, would 
lastfmfiveyeara —-and emee again 
allow court-appointed axmsds to 
investigate fr&h government offi- 
cials. The vote was 356 to 56. 

The old independent axmsd law 
expired in December 1992 after 
Senate Repnbficaas, angry over the 


340 miffio n investigation, 
into theirm-cantra affair, killed it 
witou-fifibus ter. 

This lime; the drirate tinned par- 
tisan when Republicam proposed 
that all criminal Ttroestigatioos of 
HgTO^ and Sen ate membe rs ber 

that would' 
givethe artomeygencral a choice in 
mvestigatmg lawmakers. 

: The kgislationwiS not affect the 
investigation of President Bin CHn- 
ton ana his wife; Hfllaiv Rodham 
Cfinton, into financial dealings 


Castro Will Authorize 
Some Jews to Leave 


when Mr.Gmton'was governor oS 
Arkansas. 


The Associated Press 

JERUSALEM — President Fi- 
dd Castro of Cuba wfll grant any 
individual request from Israel to let 
Cuban Jewim families emigrate, 
die Israeli drief rabbi, Yisrad Lau, 
said on returning from a trip to 
Cuba. 

- But Mr. Castro, who strictly re- 
stricts the number of people per- 
mitted to leave, will not allow a 
mass emigration of the 1,000 Jews 
in Cuba, Rabin Lau said. 


Jordan and Egypt into the 
territories. 

Although Israel wiD share au- 
thority at border passages with the 
PLO. Israel is clearly the senior 
partner under the Cairo accord and 
wiD be able to stop Palestinians it 
considers suspicious and turn away 
any traveler who is not a West 
Bank or Gaza Strip resident. That 
includes Palestinian refugees, Mr. 
Savir said. 

Bui Mr. Arafat, who was looking 
for symbols of authority in the ter- 
ritories, could claim victory with 
the right to post armed Palestinian 
police officers and fly the Palestin- 
ian fl gg at border terminals. 

“These were tough negotiations 
and we didn't get everything we 
wanted,” Nabil Shaath, a senior 
PLO negotiator, said in Cairo. “But 
then neither did the Israelis.” 

As Israeli officials describe the 
talks, they involved weighing Isra- 
el's need for security assurances 
a gariKt the Pales tinians desire to 
demonstrate they are in char ge of 
Ihdr own lives. The officials mast- 
ed that they held firm on security, 
but m«de concessions to the Pales- 
tinians when that was not at issue. 

“We want them to demonstrate 
their ability to control what’s going 
an, which is the basis of this whole 
agreement,” said Environment 
Minister Yossi SariH t a negotiator 
in Cairo. “If it turns out that this 
agreement relies on a weak reed, we 
haven't achieved anything.” 

Still to be settled are key details 
about the Palestinian police force 
and its relationship with toe Israeli 
army. Among the unanswered 
questions: Can the army, in hot 
pursuit of a Pales tinian suspected 
of killing a settler, chase him into a 
Gaza refugee camp? Or must it 
turn the job over to the Palestinian 
police, even though many Israelis 
assume that the hunt would stop? 

On toe economic front, customs 
procedures and Palestinian access 
to overseas markets have yet to be 
defined. Similarly, important areas 
of civil authority remain undear, 
including Palestinian broadcast 
rights and water distribution. 

“In my assessment, another 
month win be needed to finish the 
details of the agreement to a full 
accord,” Mr. Rabin said. “I hope a 
month will be enough. It could take 
a little more. Remember, in oar 
eyes there are no sacred dates.” 


BOOKS 


A SCIENTIST IN THE 
: CITY 

« By James TrefiL 266 pages. 
'Z $23.95. Doubleday. 


WHAT THEY RE READING 


” Reviewed by 
■Z Witold Rybczynski 
Z A Ta mrwn«it when American 

* /A dries are suffering toss of jobs, 

^ high crime, ffrMwiciiil insolvency 

* and physical deterioration, (here 
4 ^ naturally enough, m any books 
T on the subject of oar worse n i n g 

* urban condition. A few — pitifully 
~ few — deal with solutions; most 
Z deal with toe problems that beset 
a centra l cities ami the people who 
- live m them, and most view the aty 
T from the perspective of toe social 

* sciences. ' ■ 

” “A Scientist in the.Gty,” which 

might have been tilled more acca- 


vZUgtoir Bnednki, f o r mer 
U; SL national security adviser, is 
reading *T» Europe's Name ” by 
Thhotfb' Gaiton Ash. - 

“The book confirms my suspi- 
cions that some German Si*D lead- 
exs were mampnlated by toe Sovi- 
ets.” . 

(Shse Gerzien, IBT) 



nngtn nave oecu 

ratdy if less attractively, “A Physi- 
cist m the Oty,” takes a different 
course. Jtones TYc£3» a professor « 

physics at George Mason Universi- 
ty and toe author of several popu- 
lar bodes, inducting “The Dictio- 
nary of Cultural literacy” and 
“Saencc Matters* examines the 
natural forces that have draped toe 
dry and, in the process, reminds us 
that while the metropolis is man- . 

made, it is also apart of the natural 

world - ' 

“Suburban sprawl,” concrete 
i angle” and A air-conditioned 
nightmare” — the last, Henry 
Mila’s phrase — conjure ap pop*- 
lar images. Since Tho mas Jcffcfr 
son, Americans bamoonrras&d 
town and country, bot Trefil 
describes the.dty itsdf ssme“- 
ewtem. “When a aty * bom, be 

■ ft. ImmI nf «*r«CT5lem IS 


verse. These discoveries fall, chief- 
ly, into three categories: new 
boiltong. materials, dmaeat ways 
to unlock stored energy in forad 
fods, and the abffity to store and 
tpwr«nit information dectromcal- 
ly. Sted. and. rrinfonced-coiKarcte 
construction — 1 and devatras — 
obviously aUered the appearance of 
cities; so (fid toe use of electricity 
and of toe gas-driven amomotfle, 
which made dties more spread but 

than ever before. The latest discov- 
eries concerning the transmisBOP 
of decttcaacmfonnation have also 
affected the form of cities and are 
rare of toe main forces to the cre- 
ation of information-based dusters 
of biddings and toops~what the 
Washington 'Prat water Joel Gar- 
rcau has- christened “edge caties.” 

Despite las enqihaas cm toe effect 
'of science andtedmaiogy <m urban 


fife, TVrfiJ is not a technological de- 
tennmist Has becomes evident in 
the second and, to my mind, more 
absorbing part of “A Scientist in the 
City” wind) speculates about the 
future of urban devdopmenL 
". . The author . grammes various 
posable scenarios for toe American 
f. Some, Kite the vertical city so 
‘ of architects bran Frank 
Wright to Le Corbusier, he 


dw. Sot 
beloved 


unHkdy . The desire (not the 
ana hiT 


abilit y) to build bi ^ier and hitter 
a p pe ar s to have waned to the two 
decadessnceQricago’5 Sears Tow- 
er became toe woriefs tallest bond- 
ing. Other scenarios, like the 
spread-out suburban dry, or the 
edge city, whose growth is fueled 
by the centrifugal effect of individ- 
ual transportation and information 
technologies, are more plausible, 
although They will depend to a 


great extent on the development of 
more effective — and cleaner — 
personal transportation. Trefil 
raises the intriguing question of 
what effect magnetic levitation, or 
maglev, trains will have on urban 
growth. Since such trains are ex- 
tremdy fast (300 nriles, or 480 kilo- 
meters, an hour) and allow wide- 
spread population dispersal (there 
is no locomotive, each car can 
move independently), “urban 
sprawl would be diluted to the 
point of nonexistence.” 

Trefil, who is a regular commen- 
tator for National Public Radio, 
occasionally lapses into an annoy- 
ingly breezy prose but on the 
whole, “A Scientist in the City” is 
dear and coherent. It is also re- 
freshingly dear-eyed and unsenti- 
mental- “Cities, like people, have a 
natural lifespan,” the author 
writes. “We should look at than 
toe way we look at any other sys- 
tem in nature. like old friends, 
they should be enjoyed, even cher- 
ished, while they’re here and 
mourned when they pass away. We 
should realize that they evolve with 
time and that toe death of cities, 
Kite the d«*th of individuals, is a 
natural part of evolution.” Unfor- 
tunately, fra at least some of our 
decaying cities, demise may be toe 

Hkeliest scenario of alL 


Witold Rybczynski, whose latest 
book is “Looking Around : A Jour- 
ney Through Architecture. wrote 
this for The Washington Post. 


BRIDGE 


WTUCL dU tir J , 

created, one that operates acccsd- 

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ndb and fakras both ad^flwMo 

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are becoming a 


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an fixture. When cadg 
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cockroach, a is 


describes toc.modero^»^ 
m, dact of-aseoes 

rfxxn toe ***** ^ 


' . By Alan Trqscott 

ICTIONARIES rarely have' 
L/ photographs, and -one.' whb. 
cartoons may tre unique. The 
Bridge-Player’s Dictionary has 
both, and also 1,400 terms,- both 
iatoaical and cdkvpuL It isa 
page hard-cover book, obtainable 
far $22.95, including 
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pBes; (80P)274-2221. : 

The dictionary gves toe d ia- 
gramed examine at a dummy rever- 
sal Norto-Sbttto ^have oratod to 
seven qjades, and toe 'diagram 
jives a possible route. North’s two 
vdAzanp is Jacoby, adring for a 
tingl Mreyand four no-tnnnp is toe 
. modem variety of Blackwood, Ro- 
Wiv . Kcy CfiUPd. A fiuednb re- 
; ^»iaawn‘zeri nr three key 
roa^commug toe tiiimp Itipg to- 
jgetocrwQh the four aces. Frve dia- 
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timp queen, and ax dubs shows 
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rin gtaon rfiamond ail ton top 

and the dnb king he gam- 
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The diamond niffs have allowed 
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overtridc by toe same play. 


NORTH 
4 J 20 0 

9 AK5 
0 A 754 

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WEST BAST 

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Both rides are vulnerable- rtwbtd- 


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Put 

Pw 



Pan 

Pan 


Wot ted toe heart 



Palestinian boys on Thursday in Jericho, where there was tittle celebrating over the Israefi-PLO self-rule agreement signed in Cairo. 


Excerpts From Israeli-PLO Agreement 


Reuters 

Following are excerpts from the official text 
of the Israeli-PLO partial agreement signed 
Wednesday and made public by Israel on 
Thursday. 


The Cairo Agreement 


On the three lateral roads connecting toe 
Israeli settlements in toe Gsza Strip to Israel 
. . . including the adjacent sides upon winch 
toe security of traffic along toese roads is 
dependent, toe Israeli authorities will have all 
necessary responsibilities and powers in or- 
der to conduct independent security activity, 
including Israeli patrols. 


3. Arrangements for Entry from Egypt and 
an Through the Palestinian Wing. 


The Jericho Area 

The size of toe Jericho area will be as 
depicted on toe agreed map attached to this 
agrcemeoC. 

In addition, while not part of the Jericho 
area: 

a. Pending the entry into force of toe inter- 
im agreement, the holy site of Nebi Mousa 
wfl] be under toe auspices of the Palestinian 
Authority for religious purposes. 

b. During religious events that take place 
three tim** a year and other roecial o ccasi ons 
that wiD be coordinated with the Israeli au- 
thorities, Palestinians will have toe right to 
religious pilgrimage to toe al-Maghtas under 
toe Palestinian flag. 

Roads within Jericho riiy will be under 
Palestinian control. Joint patrols on the main 
roads wfll be operated, led by the Palestinian 
vehicle. 

The Gaza Strip 

During the interim period toe Gush Katif 
and Erez settlement areas, as well as the other 
settlements in the Gaza Strip, and toe Israeli 
military installation area along toe Egyptian 
border in the Gaza Strip, as indicated on (he 
attached map. wfll be under Israeli authority. 


Other Issues 

1. General 

While Israel remains responsible during 
the interim period for external security, in- 
cluding along toe Egyptian border and toe 
Jordanian line, border crossing shall lake 
place according to the arrangements included 
in this article. 

The two sides are determined io do their 
utmost to maintain toe dignity of persons 
passing through toe border crossings. To this 
end, thie mec hanism created wfll rely heavily 
on brief and modem procedures. 

In each border crossing there win be one 
terminal consisting of two wines. The first 
wing will serve Palestinian residents of toe 
Gaza Strip and West Bank and visitors to 
toese areas (hereinafter ’toe Palestinian 
wing’). The second wing will serve Israelis 
and others (hereinafter 'the Israeli wing*). 
There will be a closed Israeli checking area 
and a closed Palestinian checking area. 

Special arrangements will apply to VJ.P.S 
crossing through the Palestinian wing. 

Palestinian policemen present at toe termi- 
nal will be armed with handguns. Thor de- 
ployment wfll be decided upon in Tabs. 


Jordan Through toe Palestinian Wing. 

a. At the entrance to the Palestinian wing 
there wfll be a Palestinian policeman and a 
raised Palestinian nag 

b. Before entering toe Palestinian wing, 
passengers will identify their personal lug- 
gage and it wfll be placed cm a conveyor belt. 
Each side wfll be able to inspect such luggage 
made its own checking area, using its own 
personnei 

c. Persons entering toe Palestinian wing 
will pass through a magnetic gate. An Israeli 
policeman and a Pales tinian policeman will 
be posted on each side of tins gate. In toe 
event of suspicion, each side will be entitled 
to require a physical inspection to be con- 
ducted in inspection booths to be located 
adjacent to tire gate. Passengers wfll be in- 
spected by a Palestinian policeman in the 
presence of an Israeli policeman. 

d. Having completed toe above phase, per- 
sons entering toe Palestinian wing will pass 
through one of three lanes for the purpose of 
identification and document control. 

In the event of suspicion regarding a pas- 
senger in any of the three lanes, eachsde may 
question such passenger in its dosed check- 
ing area. 

If, at the conclusion of this questioning, the 
suspicion has not been removed, such passen- 
1 be apprehended, after toe other side 
been notified. In case of a Palestinian 


suspect being apprehended ^y toe Israeli 


ride, a Palestinian policeman ’ 
meet with toe suspect. 


1 be asked to 


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Page 6 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1994 


OPINION 


Heralfc 


INTERNATIONAL 



Srtbunc 


PUBLISHED WITH THE HEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


A Deadline in Bosnia 


Get Serious or Shut Up 

There is talk radio and there is, especially in 
respect to Bosnia, talk policy: an interminable 
ventilation of alarms and alibis, contingencies 


backdowns, aD of which end up with new heaps 
of Bosnian dead and deep sighs by the United 
States, its friends in the United Nations and its 
allies in NATO. This has become the predict- 
able pattern of the 22-month Bosnian war. Ibe 
insunn question is whether the diode generated 
by the most recent Serbian atrocity in Sarajevo 
will break this ignoble mold. 

True, there is a new spate of diplomatic 
heavy breathing. In the latest episode of a 
Ping-Pong game that began in 1992, President 
Bill Clinton has endorsed a United Nations 
call cm NATO to “prepare” (whatever that 
means) for bombing Serbian heavy weapons 
around Sarajevo. On Wednesday. NATO, 
which last August had pledged to strike if the 
Serbs did not end tbdr strangulation of the 
city, set a 10-day deadline for the Serbs to 
comply or face strikes. Also on Wednesday, (he 
Serbs agreed to pull back their siege guns from 
Sarajevo and to park them, with the Bosnian 
government's guns, under UN watch. The 
Serbs did not sign anything but that is of small 
consequence since their word is worthless. 

It is American credibility that concerns us 

A Momentous Step 

Bosnian Serb forces are taking the latest 
NATO bombing ultima turn seriously, and 
Americans should, too. The Clinton adminis- 
tration needs to assert more effective U-S. 
leadership within NATO than it has until now 
on the Bosnian issue; otherwise this emotion- 
ally satisfying riposte to last Saturday after- 
noon's carnage in Sarajevo could lead to cost- 
ly and frustrating NATO ground involvement. 
It could also perversely encourage coercion of 
the Bosnian government to accept an unjust 
European peace formula. 

In a momentous step, the Western military 
alliance, which has never before taken any 
combat action, declared on Wednesday that 
Bosnian Serb forces must withdraw their 
heavy guns to a line 20 kilometers outside 
Sarajevo by Feb. 20 or risk aerial attack by 
NATO jets. FoimaJly. it will be up to United 
Nations Secretary-General Butros Butros 
Ghali to order the first strike. 

Even before the alliance voted in Brussels, 
Serbian forces agreed to a cease-fire and of- 
fered to put their siege artillery under UN 
control. If the Serbs keep their word this time, 
the ultimatum will be judged a great success. 
But, as President Bill Clinton himself recog- 
nizes. NATO cannot afford to make any more 
empty threats. If the Sabs do not comply with 
the terms of the ultimatum, it will be under 
tremendous pressure to carry out its bombing 
threat. Bombing Serbian artillery positions is 
likely to poison Western relations with Mos- 
cow,' which favors the Serbs, and provoke 
anti-NATO sentiment in pro-Serbian Greece, 
an alliance member. It is also unlikely that it 
would end or even slow the Bosnian war. 

The Bosnian government’s much smaller 
number of heavy guns must also be turned 


most How disappointing to observe that Wil- 
liam Perry, who has been secretary of defease 
only a few days, is already picking op the 
CHnton administration's (filatory Bosnia style. 
The press's emphasis on air strikes, he told 
rep o r te rs, was “entirety in app r o priate." and 
be volunteered a primer on the downside of 
such a tactic. How can it be that the Pentagon 
needs to be reminded that there is an upside as 
weD as a downside and that its task is to find 
the best way to support the president, who — 
repeating his wanness of empty threats — 
insists that be now truly means to act? 

Smart policy requires, of coarse, not a 
mindless NATO whack, as emotionally satis- 
fying as that might briefly be. It requires 
political thinking to link military acts to a 
negotiated peace. Conceivably, the United 
States is finall y getting into this part of the act. 
It is not just hanging back and saying "no" to 
the Europeans' idea of an imposed peace that 
would love the Muslims with an unviable 
enclave. It is coming forward to promote its 
own idea to give them something a face-saving 
bit bigger, better and more voluntary. 

At least we hope that this is what the 
American government is doing. At this point 
in the dying of Bosnia, more talk policy is an 
obscenity. If the U.S. government is not con- 
ducting a serious policy, it should just shut op. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


over to UN monitors under the ultimatum. If 
its forces try to exploit the neutralizing of the 
Serbs' artillery advantage to push back die 
front lines around Sarajevo, European gov- 
ernments would fed obliged to find a way to 
restrain the Bosnians. 

Europe is already anxious about Bosnia’s 
improving ability to defend itself, and wants 
to enlist U.S. diplomatic pressure on B osnia 
to accept the partition maps drawn up by 
David Owen and his UN counterpart, Thor- 
vald Stdtenberg. Washington has until now 
sympathized with Bosnian government d«m« 
that those maps deny it the territorial integrity 
and transit corridors it needs to survive. 

Meanwhile the Serbs, if thwarted in Sara- 
jevo, can be expected to shift their efforts to 
another front, or to vent their fnry against 
the 13,000 UN peacekeepers stationed in 
Bosnia. That would raise new cries for air 
strikes, and even ground relief operations, to 
vindicate NATO’s credibility. 

Having issued the ultimatum, NATO 
should not now step back. But it is op to the 
Clinton administration to make dear that this 
is a humanitarian action that does not commit 
the United States to deeper involvement in 
European diplomatic maneuvers or ground 
peacekeeping operations. That wiD limit some 
of the risks now undertaken. 

The surest way out for the long term is to 
assign the job of defending Bosnian civilians 
whore it belongs, to the Bosnian government. 
That will require an energetic U.S. diplomatic 
campaign to lift the UN aims embargo that 
has given the Serbs their advantage in heavy 
weaponry. Bosnia is not a ward of NATO or 
the United Nations but a violated sovereign 
state. The best thing the world can do for it is 
to gpt out of the way and let h defend itself. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Yes, the Young Will Pay 


Tucked away in the new U.S. federal bud- 
get is a 14-page essay that wfll throw gasoline 
on the fires of generational warfare. The essay 
offers statistical backing for a theory especial- 
ly popular among Americans under 30: that 
their generation will have to pay out a lot of 
money to cover the costs of today's govern- 
ment borrowing and tomorrow's' retirement 
costs for bab> boomers. The younger crowd 
can take only so much comfort from the fact 
that members of the baby boom are. in turn, 
paying out a lot more than their elders. 

The essay is built around calculations of 
“net tax rates" on generations, calculated by 
figuring out the taxes that their members will 
pay during then lifetimes and subtracting the 
benefits they will get back from the govern- 
ment (such as Social Security payments). An 
.American bom in 1910 has a good deal: the 
net lifetime tax rate is only 27.2 percent of 
income. The average baby boomer born in 
1950 can expect to pay out 33.2 percent. The 
tax take goes up to 36.5 percent for those born 
m 1970. and 36.9 percent for those bora in 
1980. Older folks did especially well because 
taxes were relatively low during their younger 
years, but Social Security payments have risen 
steadily with inflation. 

The Office of Management and Budget also 
provided calculations of what people can ex- 
pect to pay in or get back from the govern- 
ment over the res: of their lives. A wo man 
bom in 1922 is in great shape — her tax 
payment will be j negative SI 24.600. because 
she wi!! be receiving lots more government 
benefits I such as Social Security) than she will 
pay back in taxes. But the average man born 
in 1952 will pay in S171.000 more to the 
government than he will take out: the average 
woman bora in the same year will pay in 
S69.000 more ihan she will take out. it is 

■worse if birth was in 1967; tile average man 
bora that year will pay in a net S203.000. the 
average woman S 101.000. 

The study did offer one other useful set of 


findings suggesting that when it comes to 
generational imbalances, the United States is 
fairer than Italy, but substantially less fair 
than Norway — Italy and Norway bring the 
only other two countries that keep “genera- 
tional accounts.” According to the budget 
document, the generational imbalance in Italy 
is two to three limes greater than that of the 
United States because Italy’s debt is propor- 
tionately higher, because the Italian govern- 
ment pays out more is transfer payments, and 
because its population is aging more rapidly. 
But Norway, with a smaller debt than toe 
United States, has a “generational imbalance” 
only half as large as America's. 

Estimates tike these are a very long way 
from perfect, since they assume a future much 
like the present, which could turn out to be 
quite wrong. Who. for example, would have 
predicted the high inflation of the late 1970s 
and the impact it would have on the indexed 
Social Security payments going to this genera- 
tion of elderly Americans? Still, the figures do 
show that this generation of budget-makers 
ought to pay more heed to toe interests of the 
nut generation of taxpayers. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 

Other Comment 

Tune to Act in Bosnia 

It is as in Hiller's time — that is how 
European diplomats are behaving. Facing 
Bosnian genocide, they hesitate, scared by 
their shadows. They mumble lies. They hope 
to calm the aggressor with concessions. They 
say they want to prevent toe worst; in so doing 
they prepare catastrophe. For us and for our 
chiidren. we have to do something to stop the 
war in ex- Yugoslavia. Military intervention 
will have costs, even heavy ones. However, 
tomorrow it will be harder and bloodier. 

— II Masaggero (Rome). 



International Herald Tribune 

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If the Serbs Retaliate, Harsh Escalation Should Follow 


W ASHINGTON — Whenever the West 
pretended to be ready to bomb toe 
Serbian artillery shelling Sarajevo, the Seths 
would pretend to agree to stop toe slaughter. 
Then the West didn’t bomb and toe Sots 
didn’t stop. This time had better be different. 
Public opinion is finally beginning to pul 
political beat on feckless leaders. 

The revulsion at spinelessness in Europe 
and leaderiessness in America caused an un- 
announced deal to be cut between France, 
which has the most troops in Bosnia, and the 
United States, which, if not acting like a 
superpower, can at least be a superbroker. 

France undertook to get toe British, Cana- 
dians and Greeks to go along with token 
NATO air strikes if the Serbs failed to pufl 
back their artillery. The United States agreed 
to “encourage” Bosnian Muslims to accept 
modification of the humiliating deal offered 
by the Serbs and Croats. 

A troubling aspect of tins Clinton policy is 
his choice of envoy to the allies — Undersec- 
retary of State Peter Taraoff, architect of the 
notorious Tarnoff Doctrine: America is too 
poo: to get involved. 

Is toe Western threat to bomb Serbian 


By William Safire 

artillery and mortars stiB a pretense? Appar- 
ently not; a White House aide says that any 
artillery piece spotted within a specified dis- 
tance from Sarajevo next week wm be target- 
ed, and any long-range piece outside that fine 
that fires atthe city will also be Wasted. 

But what will happen, wony toe hand- 
wringers, if the Serbs double-cross us again 
and do not back off? What if they respond to 
coercion by attacking the peacekeeping 
troops — won’t we be drawn into a quagmire: 

That was the question that paralyzed West- 
ern action for two long years. We listened to 
toe hand-wringers and it cost 200,000 lives. 
NATO dallied until its credibility was shat- 
tered and the alliance was brought to the. 
brink of disintegration. Dithering has had its 
bloody day; now give intervention a chance. 

The step after next should be no secret: If 
tire Serbs retaliate, harsh escalation must fol- 
low. If die troops under UN commandcarwot 
defend themselves as a fighting force, they 
should be withdrawn, turning over toetr 
equipment to the Bosnians. No hostages. 


Western force would take out aggressor 
bridges, supply depots, port facilities. If 
countrywide tactical air support does sot 
help Bosnian forces turn tire tide, smart 
bombs will find unmanned targets and oat 
will go the lights in Belgrade. 

Peace in toe Balkans will come not when, 
the Muslims agree to be good victims, dot 
when rtn*aians and Muslims “makeup their 
own mind to quit killing each other” m Bill 
Clinton’s phrase, but when a good oT-Enrope- 

an balance of power is achieved. 

Today’s war-cansing imbalance can be 

an forces no longer hindered by an arms 
embargo, and with the political effect of eco- 
nomic privation visited on those in Serbia 
c alling the tools in Bosnia. 

But this extended escalation need not take 
place. As soon as NATO’s will to use its 
power is exhibited dramatically, or as soon as 
• Serbian commanders begin bearing anguished 
demands from their real headquarters, the 
peace table wiD become the scene ctf great 
progress. And the primary peacekeepers must 
be tripartite teams of tire former enemies. 

As the American end of the Fnmcb- Ameri- 


can deal to demonstrate NATO backbone, a 
Clinton adviser tells me, the United States is 
prepared to work diplomatically with tire 
Bosnians asuhas not before. 

Tf rh»t means that Washington will find OUt 
their bottom line and help titan formulate 
proposals for equitable partition and a viable 
nation, fine. But if “encouragement” means 
that America leans on them to abandon sov- 
ereignty in their capital or give up corridor 
connection of their enclaves and access to tire 
sea, that would be a betrayal. 

Pictures can energize diplomats. Almost as 

stunning as tire images of death in tire market- 

dace was last week's photo of tire visit to 
Sarajevo of Pakistan’s prime minister, Bena- 
zir Bhutto, marching alongside Turkey’s 
prime minister, Tansu Ciller. These were not 
merely two women showing humanitarian 
concern. These were two elected leaders of 
large, powerful Muslim countries telling 
Christendom that tbdr coreligionists in Bos- 
nia would not be humiliated and annihilated 
without serious global consequences. 

- That helped the message get through: inter- 
vention now or disaster later. 

The New York Tones. 


Central Asia: Stationing the Fox at the Chicken Coop Entrance 


P ARIS —The web of military and 

am n o mift a greements that Rnysia 
is weaving, across tire independent 
states on its ragged southern cringe is 
indicator of a new burst of expan- 
sionism. Expansion could come if po- 
litical and economic trends continue 
to spiral downward in Russia. 

But for the time being Russia is 
acting in the Caucasus Central 
Asia much as Britain and France did 
30 yean ago in securing militflry 
bases and economic advantage in 
their farmer colonies. 

Pre mi ses of Russian financial or 
tarhniffai aid accompany a Russian 
military presence intended to secure 
the newly independent regimes against 
in ternal and external threat Gtizens 
of Kenya or Chad will instantiy recog- 
nize tins pcstcdonial pattern. 

Alain Juppe did not find the com- 
parison flattering when I suggested il 
to hiirL But France’s urbane, analyti- 
cal foreign mini«*w did characterize 
Russia's actions in its “near abroad” 
with less alarm than do American 
commentators who see a plot to subju- 
gate Russia’s neighbors first and then 


By Jim Hoagland 


reconstruct tire Soviet empire. “The 
Ruarinns are b eginning M take tfringt 

h»rk in hand throughout the lamer 
Soviet Urban," Mr. Jupp6 said of the 
friendship treaty that Russia and 
Georgia signed on Feb. 3. “The treaty 
is a reaffirmation of the Russian role 
in Georgia,” which. President Eduard 
Shevardnadze of Geoigia fek obliged 
to accept to preserve his young nauon 
against separatist forces. 

The treaty provides the Russians 
with three rinktaiy bases in Georgia. 
Russian troops will also now be for- 
mally stationed in war-cam Armenia 
and Azerbaijan. Wars brought toe 
Russian military back into these three 
Caucasus nations. Abundant oil and 
natural gas reserves in the new Stans 
of Central Asa — Kazakhstan, Turk- 
menistan and Uzbekistan — also cre- 
ate strong interest in Moscow in re- 
establishing a strong presence. 

But a balancing factor, often over- 
looked. emerged deariy daring a re- 
markable conversation among the five 
most important Muslim leaders of 


Central Asia, that occurred receatiy al 
the World Economic Forum in Davos, 
Swi tzerland. That factor is the sharp 
and unwieldy differences existing 
wi thin the patchwork, q uilt Of natinq « 
that were given unexpected and un- 
sought liberation by toe Soviet col- 
lapse. Stitched together by seif-interest 
and fear, as well as geography, these 
new nations are de termine d to draw 
the Russians back in only far 
to presave their own independence. 

The West, accustomed to seeing the 
Soviet empire as a monoEth, risks not 
seeing the Central Asian trees for the 
Russian forest The United Slates and 
its European allies risk depriving the 
new stales of vital room to maneuver 
by seeing events in the Stans of Cm- 
tral Asia only or largely through the 
prism of Russian nafionaikm and its 
bistory of expansionism. 

This should be avoided. The Great 
Game, as the military-based diplo- 
macy of the I9to century was styled, 
has become the Greater Game, with 
multiple actors and many possible 


outcomes that tire Russians wifi influ- 
ence bet not control 

Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto of 
Pakistan and President Suleyman 
Demire! of Turirey came to Davos to 
pitch their countries as natural geo- 
graphic and financial outlets for toe 
landlocked Central Asians. This huck- 
sterism at a high level suggests the 
enormous stakes involved in toe con- 
struction of new pipelines for oil and 
tr ansportation sy stems ^md finan- 
cial networks out of Central Asia. 

Wain Karimov, president of Uz- 
bekistan, bluntly rejected Miss Bhut- 
to’s simplistic assurances that the war 
in Afghanistan and Islamic funda- 
mentalism are not major threats to the 
entire region. “Russ a is the guarantor 
of security in Central Asia,” he said. 

But Mr. Karimov and Sapaxmurad 
Niyazcv, president of Turkmenistan, 
which already has three small Uii. oil 
companies operating on its sod, also 
indicated that they would resist ef- 
forts by Moscow to re-establish eco- 
nomic domination over their territo- 
ries. “We grve priority to Russia and 
to Turkey, Mr. Karimov said, point- 


edly putting Ankara on the same 
footing economically as Moscow. 

The most fareedng and wdl estab- 
lished of the new leaders of Central 
Aria, Nursultan Nazarbayev, presi- 
dent of Kazakhstan, echoed that 
thought when I asked him if he con- 
sidered Russia toe guarantor of his 
security. He noted that bis oti-riefa 
nation is bordered by “huge states, 
Russia. China. Turkey," with whom 
Kazakhstan will maintain “an equali- 
ty of friendship.” 

The best guarantor at security for 
Kazakhstan would be Western in- 
vestment, which be implied will en- 
able the Central Asians to ease them- 
selves out of the Russian orbit 

These leaders accept that station- 
ing toe Russian fox at toe chicken 
coop entrance is a dangerous tactic. 
But with Western investment and 
Western diplomatic support for their 
diversity, toty hope to keep the fox 
on the leash this tune. It is too early 
to assume pessimistically that they 
will not be able to do that and thus 
help deprive them of that chance. 

The Washington Post. 


North Korea: Clinton Could Invite Kim H Sung to Join the World 


W ASHINGTON —Time is rap- 
idly running out for a peaceful 
solution to the North Korean nuclear 
crisis. Washington and Pyongyang 
are deadlocked in negotiations that 
now appear destined to fail. The 
United States must quickly reverse 
this downward spiraL Nothing less 
than personal intervention by Presi- 
dent Bill Clinton will suffice. 

For toe past year, the United 
States has attempted to persuade 
North Korea to accept international 
safeguards on its nuclear activities 
and remain in toe Nuclear Nonpro- 
liferation Treaty. Pyongyang has de- 
nied inspectors unfettered access to 
all its nuclear facilities. Suspicions 
that North Korea was secretly build- 
ing a bomb hardened in November 
when toe U.S. intelligence commu- 
nity concluded that it probably 


By Mitchell Reiss 


bad one or two nuclear weapons. 

The crisis may soon reach a point 
of no return. On Feb. 21, Hans Blix, 
director of the International Atomic 
Energy Agency, is expected to report 
that the agency can no longer verify 
that North Korea is abiding by its 
safeguard obligations. He will then 
refer the mailer to the United Nations. 

This will trigger a cyde of action 
and reaction that will inflame ten- 
sions on the Korean Peninsula. The 
annual U.S.-South Korean Team Spir- 
it military exercises, winch Pyongyang 
has repeatedly said arc provocative 
and must be canceled, will be sched- 
uled for March. The promised third 
round of negotiations between the 
United States and toe North will be 
canceled. The UN Securitv Council 


will consider imposing economic sanc- 
tions on North Korea for violating its 
safeguards obligations. Regardless of 
the outcome, Pyongyang will formally 
withdraw from toe Nuclear Nonpro- 
liferation Treaty to show toe world 
that it cannot be bulbed. 

The situation wiB deteriorate fur- 
ther if toe North then decides to shut 
down its Yangbyon nuclear research 
reactor and remove the core. Without 
international monitoring or safe- 
guards, worst-case analysts will con- 
clude that Pyongyang is reprocessing 
the spent fuel from the core to make a 
half-dozen additional nuclear bombs. 
Having failed to keep toe Noth in toe 
treaty or even to Emit its stockpile of 
nudear weapons, toe Clinton adminis- 
tration may feel compelled to use its 


new “counteipn^iferation strategy” to 
attack Nath Korea’s nudear sites, 
ton such a strike could result in a 
second Korean war, this time fought 
with weapons of mass destruction. 

How can the United States avoid 
such a nightmare? Events have out- 
paced toe North Korean and Ameri- 
can offiriab-who have been negotiat- 
ing fa the past 12 months. A dramatic 
gesture is needed to break toe dead- 
lock. President Clinton should under- 
take personal diplomacy by sending a 
later to Kim II Sung, the North Kore- 
an ruler. Mr. Kim, bead of an extreme- 
ly isolated regime, could not fafl to be 
impressed. Nothing could be more 
flattering to him than to be treated as 
an equal by the leader of the most 
powerful country in the wold. 

What would such a letter say? Mr. 
Clintcm should reiterate that toe Unit- 


Taiwan: A Studied Exercise in Vacation Diplomacy 


T AIPEI — Diplomacy as an in- 
strument of statecraft has takai 
many forms in recent years, including 
toe summit and funeral varieties. 
From Taiwan, there now comes a 
novel concept: vacation diplomacy. 

President Lee Teng-hui and bis 
wife have set out for Indonesia and 
Thailand ostensibly for a private va- 
cation during toe Chinese New 
Year, which started tins Thursday. 
They are accompanied by two cabi- 
net ministers who are not normally 
part of a holiday entourage, even for 
a head of government. 

This visit is, in fact, part of a con- 
tinuing effort to promote Taiwan’s 


By Michael Leifer 


international acceptance. Since Tai- 
wan ceased to represent China in the 
United Nations in 1971, toe Taipei 
government has given up its preten- 
sion to be the government of aD of 
China. It is stiD committed to unifica- 
tion. but oa the basis of the formula 
“one China, two political entities.” 

For Taiwan, vacation diplomacy is 
a way of engaging in informal rela- 
tionships with governments that have 
no intention of breaking their ties 
with Beijing. For example, last month 
Prime Minister Lien Qian and three 
cabinet colleagues vacationed in Sin- 


gapore and Malaysia. They were re- 
ceived in both countries at the highest 
level of government. 

A similar welcome has been ex- 
pected in Indonesia from President 
Suharto and in Thailand from Prime 
Minister Oman LeekpaL The Taiwan 
press has reported that President Lee 
would meet Prime Minister Vo Van 
Kiel of Vietnam during his stay on 
toe Indonesian resort island of Bali. 

For those countries willing to re- 
ceive senior members of toe Taiwan 
government the chief attraction is 
economic. In response to Beijing's 


The Real Peace Process Is Going Well 


N EW YORK — Arriving in a 
farm village south of la Aviv 
at New Year's Eve was angularly 
unexciting. All that was special was 
that we had been met by our entire 
Israeli family at the airport; usually 
one of the parents is too busy to 
ante or one of our twin grand- 
daughters has a cold. For Israelis 
the new year had begun in Septem- 
ber, on Rosh Hastaanah. As for 
news, the big splash that mutual 
recognition Between toe Vatican 
and Israel had made in the Ameri- 
can and European papers was not 
that mind-boggling to Israelis. 

The stay of Vatican and Israeli 
officials exchanging formal docu- 
ments was front-page, but only a bit 
store special Ihan the still continu- 
ing stream of newly or reknil rela- 
tions between the Jewish state and 
countries all over toe world that 
until recently had refused to ac- 
knowledge IsraeTs existence. 

The Vatican was special because 
of toe lateness of its acknowledg- 
ment that toe Holy Land is gov- 
erned by Jews, and because of the 
tragedy-filled history between toe 
two religious communities, which 
of course had a lot to do with the 
lateness. When Rome said “yes" to 
a Jewish government headquar- 
tered in Jerusalem, more than 130 
countries had already (fame so. 

Dozens, particularly in Africa and 
Asia, which had d»nwi«d Israel be- 
cause of threats from an Arab wodd 
baked by toe might of toe Soviet 
Union, are now doing diplomatic 
and eoonomic business in Israd. 

This, the end of toe isolation of 
the Jewish state from much of the 
world community, is the real stay 


By Robert B. Goldmann 

of Israel since the collapse of toe 
Soviet Union. With that collapse, 
which has fundamentally changed 
so much in the world in the last few 
years, ended the possibility of an 
existence-threatening war lor Isra- 
el. The supply of arms to hostile 
Arab states slopped or dribbled to 
little. Arab hostility lost its punch, 
and in some cases even its frown. 
In this perspective, the peace 
process rein vigorated by the hand- 
shake that thrilled the wold and 
yielded Yasser Arafat and Yitzhak 
Rabin a spot on that annual Time 
magazine cover was not such great 
news. To be sure, il was spectacular 
to witness. Bui it is only part of (hat 
larger process of Israel s acceptance 
m toe world community. 

Nor does it matter too much if 
the peace process takes longer and 
meets more obstacles than had been 
expected. The real peace process is 
that other one — recognition of 
Israel; trade with it; the craiet but 
very real breakdown of the Arab 
boycott; the steady growth (tf in- 
vestments and joint ventures taking 
advantage of IsraeTs skilled work 
force, enriched in recent years by 
large numbers of immigrants from 
the then Soviet Union; the tourists 
and business people from Asia who 
stood in line ahead of toy wife and 
me at Ben-Gurion airport 
There was a 25 percent drop in 
IsraeTs trade defiat in toe year to 
last November. Exports in the Jan- 
uary-November period of 1993. 
compared with toe same period of 
1992, were up by 15 percent. Em- 


ployment in toe third quarter of 
1993 rose by 6.5 percent Buried 
amid news ctf new investments was 
a report that an Israeli company, 
Tadiran, was setting up a cellular 
telephone network in rural C hina. 

What all this new political and 
economic activity adds up to is the 
big news of the “peace process.” Not 
only does no responsible political 
leader or public or media figure 
question land’s “right to exist” any 
longer (a demeaning farmnlation to 
begin with). With IsraeTs steadily 
advancing integration into the inter- 
national community, there no longer 
exists a threat to her survival. 

It was not long ago that it was 
accurate to say that Israel could not 
afford to lose a war, because that 
would mean toe end of toe country. 
In this history of reliance on toe 
wefl-nigh superhuman performance 
trf its mOitaiy lie toe roots of foaeTs 
fanatic concern with national securi- 
ty — or, to put it more bluntly, its 
deep sense of insecurity. There is 
today an unarticulated sense of relief 
and hope that was not there before. 

Along with acceptance by the 
world, there is bound to come more 
concent whb toe worid beyond Leb- 
anon. Syria and toe West Bank. Ac-' 
cepiance implies a degree of respoo- 
aoDity toward those who accept 
Perhaps the next challenge, vdnte 
laael makes and ensures peace with 
its neighbors, wiD be to match its 
contri&ttions to tropical agriculture 
and state-of-tbo-art electronics with 
a quality (tf statesmanship that tran- 
scends the neighborhood After aD, 
it was Isaiah who coined that phrase 
about swords and plowshares. 

International Herald Tribune. 


charge that Taipei has been engaged 
in “money diplomacy,” Mr. Lien ac- 
knowledged that “our biggest bar- 
gaming chip in foreign raations is 
our economic strength.” Taiwan has 
extensive trade with and investment 
in Southeast Asia. 

Bui vacation diplomacy is not a 
substitute for exclusive diptomalic rec- 
ognition. Taiwan has beat campaign- 
ing at the same time lot a seat in the 
United Nations. Since China wields a 
veto in toe Security Council, Taiwan’s 
immediate aim is evidently to develop 
an association with the world body at 
a level below formal representation — 
observer status, perhaps, as wdl as 
membership in agencies, such as the 
Worid Bank, where Taiwan’s econom- 
ic strength would enable il to play a 
larger international role. 

Taiwan preserves its de facto inde- 
pendence by having modern armed 
forces. Vacation diplomacy allows il 
to complement these military precau- 
tions to enhance its security. 

By widening all forms of interna- 
tionk association, Taiwan seeks tc 
make mainland China's talk of unifi- 
cation an its own terms increasingly 
difficult to justify. 

The writer, professor of intemation 
al relations a the lonaon School q 
Economies and Political Science, con 
nibuted this comment to die Interna 
lional Herald Tribune. 


ed Slates has no aggressive designs on 
North Korea and rejects the idea of 
reunifying the peninsula by force. He 
could enqtoaaze America's respect for 
the sovereignty and independence of 
the North, while stating that huge 
military forces on both aides of the 
demilitarized zone have preserved a 
fragile peace for more than 40 years, 
be should propose that Washington 
and Pyongyang seek a less confronta- 
tional and more mutually beneficial 
relationship. He should express hope 
for a peaceful solution to the current 
impasse and urge Mr. Kim to use his 
best efforts to achieve such a goal. 

For President dmton and the Unit- 
ed Stales, there is little risk in sending 
such a letter and a potentially huge 
gain should North Korea permit inter- 
national inspections and stay in toe 
treaty. Like the 1952 pledge By Presi- 
dent Dwight Eisenhower to “go to 
Korea” to end toe Korean War, it is 
just the sort of dramatic gesture that 
might break toe stalemate. 

Ef Mr. Kim does not reply, or if the 
North's nuclear policy does not 
change, the United States has lost 
nothing. Mr. Clinton wiD have shown 
toe world that he is willing to go the 
extra mile for peace in Korea. 

His initiative would be especially 
appreciated by South Korea, which is 
increasingly fearful that American 
behavior may provoke toe North. 
And il will be easier to get Seoul's 
approval to reinforce the U.S. mili- 
tary presence in the South if Mr. 
Chnton has demonstrated willing- 
ness to reach out to Mr. Kim. 

Mr. Clinton would score political 
points in other ways as wdL Belea- 
guered by foreign policy failures in 
Somalia, Haiti and Bosnia, he needs 
to show that he can bring the passion, 
intelligence and creativity be has 
demonstrated on domestic affairs to 
the international arena. 

It may be too late to solve the 
North Korean nudear problem. But' 
strong, confident leadership would- 
reassure the American people and- 
U.S. allies that Mr. Gmion is en-” 
gaged and in control of events. Tune- . 
is Tunning out Send the letter now. - 


The writer is guest scholar al thei 
Woodrow Wilson International Center, 
for Scholars in Washington, where hr 
is completing a book on nuclear mw-" 
proliferation. He contributed this com-, 
meat to the Herald Tribune. 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO: 


1894s A Bizarre Tale 

PARIS — Hie Figaro this morning 
[Feb. 11] tdls a stray of a certain M. 
Leroy, Commissary of Police at 
Troovilk; who wished to gtt rid (tf his 
wife. He started a ant for divorce, but 
be decided to put her out of toe way 
fra a few years. Taking advantage of 
his position M. Leroy forcibly se- 
questrated bis wife in a couvenL Al- 
ter a month and a Half Mute Leroy 
persuaded theXady Superior that she 
had been toe victim of an infamous 
plot and was allowed to go free. But, 
fearing to cause trouble. to the Lady 
Superior, Mme. Leroy kept silence 
about what had occurred. Meanwhile 
a divorce had been pronounced. 

1919: Spartadst Menace 

LONDON — The Spartacist men- 
ace, vrimjt had beat scotched and, as 
some people thought, destroyed, has 
.beat suddenly renewed in 
Increasing disorders and ali gnin g 
general unrest throughout toe ooun- 


tiy are reported in toe latest GeratanT 
official wirdess messages. Under tlx: 
leadership of Eic&horn, formerly Pre- 
fect of Itoike, toe Spartadsts again' 
attacked toe Government troops yes-, 
terday [Feb. 9] as the latter were re- 
quisitioning supplies in toe Central. 
Markets. Five were killed and thirty' 
wounded in toe first attack. - 

1944: All-Side Attack * 

ALGIERS — [From our New Yorkr 
edition;] The Germans have begun ttf 
attack from aO land sides the Allied; 
expeditionary forces- that landed o&r 

the Anzb-Nettuno>beachhead in Ita-~ 
ly oh Jan. 22. While the enemy*^ 
strongest blow fell on the troops en- 
trenched north and west of Canocettf . 
(Apriha), smaller Nazi units adv 
. vanced along toe coast from the? 
northwest and southeast, and also*- 
_ fried to beat . the Allies bock from 
portions west of Cisterna. AS the* 
. attacks were repulsed, and near Cb-^ 
tenia American troops counter- at-* 
tacked and made a slight advance. ' 


1 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1994 





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OPINION 



i: The Search 
For a Better, Richer World 


By Flora Lewis 


N ew DELHI Ills a : 

from Davos to DdMia pracncaj- 
iy every sense. Th$ contrast was all the 
greater last week whea l wentlrom the 
power conference of a cojaple of thou- 
sand Important People, including a 
score of govcnnnnu heads and lots of 
big businessmen at the annual World 
Economic Forum in the chic Swiss 
Resort, to . a seminar in' New Delhi , os 
Religion and Politics,” 

; Davos was about money. ' It . was 
about power,. loo, but the steady- un- 
dercurrent was. about the power to 
attract money, the importance of 


of something missing* Both 
/eft the threat of the old : ■ 
demons— hatred, misery, 
war — cmd were looking 
for ways to put them down* 
There’s far to go. 


sound money to a stable soac 
the climate it takes to grow weal _ 
the empire of ' the market. .- It- -was 
about money and the hopes of na- 
tions, money that knows no borders, 
money’s constant, relentless drive to 
reproduce itself . 

The observation that economics has 
replaced security as the key concern of 
international relations is already trite. 
The people who come to Davos also 
worry about political upheaval, vio- 
lent conflict, acute social grievance, 
but especially because these can make 
things unpredictable, distort trade 
and destroy assets. 

Money needs a steady; reliable 
world. The old complaint that arms 
merchants need wars to consume their 
products ' has not been - totally re- 
moved. But it is a marginal matter 
compared with .the new recognition 
that conquest is a much more expen- 



se world, and that 
sellers depend on buyers whocan.af- 
tord what they offer. 

It is fine as far as it goes. The market 
has proved more effective than any 
other system in producing what peo- : 
pie need and want to consume. Bat 
it isn’t enough. 

Not only do its statistics leave out 
too many people hard pot to compete, 
and Ignore the real pains of the rat 
race, they don’t account for all the 
other yearnings that motivate people, 
sometimes to suicidal violence. .. 

Delhi was abont.ideas and beliefs. 
The seminar, with some 35 self-ac- 
knowledged intellectuals, was orga- 


nized by Uncscoand the Rajiv Gandhi 
Foundation to discuss the tensions 
arising in today’s world between the 

claims of religion and politics. 

There were Christians, Jews, Hin- 
dus, Muslims, Coufudans, address- 
ing, from their different backgrounds, 
the issues of church and state, divine 
right and human rights, the secular 
North- and the traditionalist South. 
Mostly, though, they shared a like- 
minded liberalism of spirit, a plea 
ior tolerance, with the exception of a 
couple of fundamentalists whose ar- 
' gmuente only confirmed the convic- 
tions of the others. 

After all, these were intellectuals 
defending' the right to think for titan- . 
selves^ which is indeed endangered in 
many of their societies by those who 
claim certain 7 knowledge of what God 
wants than to think 
_ But at the same time they recog- 
nized the urge of religion as commuxu- 

g , ; as identity, a solid framework 
r morality and a solace before the 
et ernal mysteries of life and death, 
of human meaning. 

Iris a signal failure of modern intel- 
lectuals that they have been unable to 
supply a. coherent basis for morality 
and ethics as an alternative to the 
traditional commands, put by the ab- 
solutists of religious authority in 
a way that denies bee thought, indi- 
vidual investigation. 

: Science gives no answers. On the 
contrary, it is posing deeply troubling 
new questions once, left only to reli- 
gion. The churches respond from 
within the traditions that they have 
shaped into dogma. 

Population is a familiar example. 
Historically, human survival depend- 
. ed on fertility. Multiply, say the scrip- 
tures. That has happened, to the point 
where future human survival may de- 
pend on restraint, on accepting limi ts 
which must be . voluntary to preserve 
human dignity. 

Bnt there are newer, even more dif- 
ficult dilemmas ahead, having to do 
with genetic manipulatio n, concep- 
tion and birth in previously unimagin- 
able circumstances, the whole new 
field . of bioethics. The churches have 
had no new revelations? Where they 
dominate .politics, they reject ques- 
tioning, mount barriers, divide people 
and encourage tnrmoil even as they 
gather in the.fajthfnL . 

. So Delhi and Davos were not so far 
apart after aS, searching for a more 
open world, r better prospects. They 
both had a na gg in g , uneasy sense of 
something missing, surge of invention 
and money, and not much of an idea 
on bow to deal with it Both felt the 
Day threat of the dd demons, hatred, 
fanaticism, nationalism, misery, war, 
and were looking for ways to put them 
down. There’s far to go. 

-O flora Lems. 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


The Bosnian Predicament 

Regarding “ And So It Continues in 
Sarajevo, Death by Death ” (Opinion, 
Feb. 3) by Zlatko Dizdareric: 

The presort predicament is the politi- 
cal choice not of the outside world but of 
the Bosnian government. The problem is 
President Alija Izetbegovic’s calculated 
gamble not to negotiate seriously, in 
hopes that a military victory may yet 
produce a Muslim-dominated unitary 
Bosnian state — even against the will of 
its Christian (Serb and Croat) majority. 

To ignore (he Muslim rejection of toe 
Geneva settlement and to focus atten- 
tion on the suffering civilians of one side 
illustrates the meaning of the term 
“atrocity propaganda.” 

Casualties are fewer in Sarajevo today 
than a year ago. and the people me fed 
by the United Nations. Mass deaths can 
be avoided if the West rejects the moral 
Uadcmafl of the Muslim authorities. 

S. TRIFKOVIC. 

London. 

Premature Independence 

Regarding "More Meaningless Banal- 
ities" (Opinion, Feb. 8) by Jim HoaglamL 

When, in 1992, the Bosnian Muslim 
president. Alga Izetbegovic. declared 
the country’s independence without 
consulting its Serbs and Croats, he 
should have known that he thereby 
signed Bosnia's death warrant. 

He may have been misled by the im- 
mediate recognition, by Germany, a 
country whose constitution bars its sol- 
diers from fighting abroad. Subsequent 
recognition by other countries and many 


promises and “meaningless ba- 
ll ties” kept his hopes alive. Obviously 
of late be has been receiving arms and 
“volunteere" to fight back. 

At this point further carnage in Sara- 
jevo (for which the Serbs, for the first 
time, deny responsibility) is working in 
his favor, helped by professional public 
relations efforts in Lbe United States. 

It is time to curse all three bouses and 
stop the Muslims from prolonging the 
war and (he sufferings of the civilian 
population indefinitely. It should also 
be a warning to all nations not to recog- 
nize the independence of a split-off na- 
tion unless the majority of its people 
have given (heir consent. . 

RAINER ESSLEN. 

Avignon, France. 

Hie Ultimate Horror 

Regarding “ U.S . Leaders Ignore Geno- 
cide, Aide Says" (Feb. 5) by Tim Weiner: 

The daily television pictures from Sa- 
rajevo confirm Hannah Arendt’s dictum 
that the ultimate horror is that there is 
no honor. Europe stands by wringing its 
hands and waiting for American leader- 
ship, which is nowhere to be seen. 

But surely the ultimate in moral bank- 
ruptcy has to be the statement by Timo- 
thy Wirth, the State Department coun- 
selor. Mr. Winh is a defeated senator 
from Colorado, long-time Washington 
insider and Democratic Party worthy. 

According to your article, a Stale De- 
partment colleague of Mr. Wirth’s, 
Richard Johnson, said that Mr. Wirth 
agreed that “the moral stakes in Bosnia 
were hi g h , bnt asserted that there were 
even higher moral stakes at play: ’the 


Fresh Snow 9 Radiant Faces : 
Let the Memory Inform Us 


survival of the fragile liberal coalition 
represented by this presidency.’ " 

So genocide has to take second place 
to Bill Clinton's re-election. As a former 
Democratic National Committeeman 
representing Democrats Abroad. I must 
ask in dismay: Can these Democrats be 
the heirs to Woodrow Wilson and 
Franklin Roosevelt, to Harry Truman 
and Adlai Stevenson? 

FRANCIS M. S. PEEL 
New York. 

Nonrabid Britain 

Those who write about Britain's regu- 
lations concerning rabies forget the 
most important factor There is no ra- 
bies in the wildlife of Britain. 

Domestic animals can be immunize d, 
wildlife cannot. When I was visited by a 
fox in my inner London garden, rabies 
never crossed ray mind, only dehghL 
Were rabies to otter Britain, this Fox, 
and other urban wildlife, would have 
to be put down. 

CHRISTINE S. FREMANTLE 
London. 


Latvian Jews 

When visiting Riga, the capital of Lat- 
via, late last year, 1 observed to my 
consternation that, in identification 
cards issued by the Latvian government. 
Jewish citizens of Latvia were not identi- 
fied as Latvians but as “Jews." This is 
painfully dose to the Nazi categoriza- 
tion system. 

B. PRESS. 

Berlin. 


A SPEN. Colorado — 1 am haunted 
by a scene of peace and joy. 

Scores of young people in brightly 
colored costumes dance to music of 
brotherhood and hope. Hand in hand, 
they frolic, smiling. laughing. Their rap- 
ture is infectious. A huge crowd, sur- 
rounding the dancers in a modern stadi- 
um, cheers in solidarity. 

There are people from every part erf 
the globe. Yet no one is counting num- 
bers or measuring differences. All have 

MEANWHILE 

become one — all colors, races, reli- 
gions, nationalities, creeds — joined in 
celebration of life. 

Where could this be. except in some 
utopian fantasy? 

Not Germany, where skinheads as- 
sault non-Aryans. Not England or 
France, where immigrants are not al- 
ways made welcome. Not Northern Ire- 
land or Mexico. Angola or Algeria. 

The joyous scene again occupies my 
thoughts. Fresh snow has turned the 
landscape white. The day seems pure, 
the cold goes unnoticed. Everywhere 
there are children, their faces radiant 
But suddenly, everyone looks up. Doves 
swoop and soar and fill the sky. 

But where is this? Where in a world of 
violence and intolerance? 

In my halcyon scene, people are shak- 
ing hands and Uniting arms. A bright 
flame bums above the stadium. 

And now I know where this is. and 
when, and 1 am rick. 

There are no doves in the sky any- 
more. Instead, there is death — artillery 
and mortar sbdls. The snow is stained 
with blood. The stadium is in ruin. 
There is no laughter, no hope. The flame 
is oul A holocaust of haired bums. 

How is it possible to reconcile this 
reality with memories of Sarajevo 10 
years ago — Sarajevo the Olympic city, 
so proud, so happy, so peaceful? 

Friday, when the joy of opening cere- 
monies rn Sarajevo repeats itself in the 
Norwegian town of LiQehamraer. la us 
remember what Sarajevo had, and what 
humanity has lost and continues to lose. 

Let us ran ember that the essential 
message of the Games is not found in 
triple axels, slap shots or medal counts. 
It is found in 44 words of the Olympic 
Charter: "The goal erf the Olympic 
movement is to contribute to budding a 
peaceful and better world by educating 
youth through sport practiced without 
discrimination of any kind, and in the 
Olympic spirit, which requires mutual 


By Greg Lewis 

understanding with a spirit of friend- 


Letten intended for publication 
should be addressed “Letters to the 
Editor " and contain the writer’s sig- 
nature, name and full address. Let- 
ters should be brief and are subject to 
editing We eternal be responsible for 
the return of unseated manuscripts. 


ship, solidarity and fair play.” 

Events make it easy to scoff at this 
idealism. The Tonya’ Harding affair 
mocks Olympic values. Politics and 
commercialism seem as much a part of 
the modern Games as computer timers. 
A recent book. “The Lords of the 
Rings.'* attacks the International 
Olympic Committee’s members, meth- 
ods and motives. 

Of themselves, the Olympic rings are 
neither hallowed nor lalismanic. But if 
you look past sport's bureaucrats, its 
hype and exploitation, you nil] find a 
transcendani Olympian spirit. 

It enveloped me in Sarajevo, as 1 
stood on the infield during opening cere- 
monies. surrounded by Serbs, Croats, 
Muslims and people of every other eth- 
nic group and belief, celebrating togeth- 
er. It changed me iu Seoul, where I 
walked among 10,000 rejoicing athletes 
during dosing ceremonies. Representa- 
tives. of every part of the human spec- 
trum had come to beat one another and 
to prove they were the best, and they 
had — not by winning medals but by 
winning friends. 

Olympians are coming together again, 
not as representatives of their sport or 
their country, but of their ideals. Two 
Olympians, the American Marilyn King 
(pentathlon. 72 and 76) and the Rus- 
sian Yelena Petushkova (gold and silver 
medalist, dressage. 72) have gathered 
other Olympians to form an internation- 
al organization called the Peace Team, 
to encourage people everywhere to look 
at peace as a common and achievable 
goal. 

Scores of Olympians, as diverse as the 
gymnast Nadia Comaneci, the figure 
skater Scott Hamilton, the speed skater 
Bonnie Blair, the swimmer Donna de- 
V arena, and the downhill skier Franz 
Klammer, have joined in an effort to 
ensure that Olympic ideals do serve all 
h umani ty. Their partner in this effort is 
the Aspen Institute, a think tank. 

Lflleharamer has created its own hu- 
manitarian organization, Olympic Aid, 
raising funds to build a more peaceful 
world. And in September, (he United 
Nations will open its doors for a meeting 
of the world’s Olympians. 

But first, there will be Lilleh amm er 
1994. Hockey. Slalom. Bobsled. All the 
excitement. It should be a showcase for 
the best that mankind can be. 

Watching these Games will make 
many of us wish we could have been 
Olympians. In the true spirit of the 
Olympics, we can. The choice is ours — 
to make the world like Sarajevo 1984, or 
Sarajevo today. 

The writer is a television sports com- 
mentator who has covered four Olympic 
Games, and is a co-founder of Spirit of 
HOPE, based in Aspen. Colorado. He 
contributed this comment to the Interna- 
tional Herald Tribune. 


- 4 





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International Herald Tribune 
Friday, February II, 1994 
Page 8 


Z A r 


Tracking Hungarian Green 


By Alan Levy 

B ADACSONY, Hungary — The 
S6.4 billion-a-year California wine 
industry claims Hungarian roots. 
Back in 1849, Count Agoston Har- 
aszthy, always more soldier of fortune than 
aristocrat, arrived in San Diego just a few 
months after gold was discovered in them 
thar hills. Unable to slake his own claim as 
he roamed the territory, this failed '49er 
didn't fail to recognize other treasures: soil 
and sun even more ideal for grape-growing 
than his native continent's. He bought land 
up north in Sonoma and persuaded the gov- 
ernor of California to send him on a vine- 
yard tour of Europe; there would be do fee, 
but expenses would be reimbursed 
In 1862, Harasztby returned to California 
with 100,000 cuttings from 300 classic Old 
World wine-grape varieties, some of which, 
transplanted, did indeed grow grapes far 
finer than their noble forebears. But Califor- 
nia now was a state of the union and its 
legislature reneged on the territorial ex-gov- 
ernor’s agreement to pay Harasztby's 
SI 2,000 expense account Irate and frustrat- 
ed. the count moved south in quest of new 
fortune — but, crossing a stream in Nicara- 
gua in 1869, he fell into the water and was 
eaten by alligators. 

gCMi ' 

-V.- • 

~...< >«,*•. . * -I 5 .-,"./. 

\n 


His sons, Arpad and Attila, who had 
stayed home to run the vineyards, built their 
winery into one of California’s major labels, 
Buena Vista. Decades later, a delegation of 
Hun garian winegrowers visited the New 
World and were especially taken with a semi- 
dry white wine called Green Hungarian that 
neither they nor anybody else in Hungary 
was able to trace. 

Three years ago. while researching a travel 
guide to post-Commumst Hungary, I first 
beheld the Badacsony. a spooky, coffin-like 
basalt peak of the highlands along the re- 
mote west end of Lake Balaton's otherwise 
touristed north shore. Actually, the 438-me- 
ter (1,437-foot) Mount Badacsony — its 
slopes rising from the lake — is an extinct 
volcano flanked by conical hills on which 
land has been tilled painfully and lovingly 
for centuries. There are vineyards every- 
where and interesting, often splendid, white 
wines — most notably, the Big Three: Ries- 
lings, Veknyelu (Blue Stem) and Szurkebarat 
(Pinot Gris) whose makers maintain that 
“no vine will produce good wine unless it can 
see its own reflection in the Balaton." They 
believe it is not enough for the sun to shine 
on a vine; the undersides of the leaves also 
need light, which is reflected from the lake’s 
mirror-like surface. Others claim the wine 
draws its strength from the fire of old volca- 
noes and its color from sunlight on the lake. 

I N a tavern in the town — actually, a 
lum-of-the-centuiy villa overlooking 
the lake — I told the tale of Count 
Harasztby and his mysterious Green 
Hungarian to the innkeeper, Janos Peter. “I 
think l have the answer to the riddle," be 
said. Darting into his wine cellar, be emerged 
with a bottle of Zoldszilvani (Green Syl- 
vaner) that, to the best of ray memory, great- 
ly resembled the Green Hungarian I tasted 
in California in 1989. 

At the time, I was more interested in the 
saga of Janos Peter, who was looking like 
one of the new Hungary’s first success sto- 
ries. In the declining days of communism in 
the 1980s. he had leased the decaying villa 
from a trade union that had been using and 
abusing it and. by guaranteeing two years’ 
hot meals free, assembled a team of workers 
to remodel it without pay. The bouse also 
served as kitchen and wine cellar for an 
adjoining garden restaurant. But this base 
camp was just the beginning of why his 


HOTELS 


neighbors, sometimes with mockery, re- 
ferred to him as “Peter the Great-" 

His empire already straddled both sides of 
the road above, continuing upward through 
vineyards to a 600-seat stone-floored, vine- 
covered indoor-outdoor terrace restaurant, 
Szoloskert (Garden of Grapes), with ceramic 
stove and Cinemascopic views of Balaton 
and Badacsony. And, like any imperialist, 
Peter was pla nning expansion — to year- 
round. instead of June- September, opera- 
tion, plus a partnership in a neighboring 
pension for overnight guests. 

Late in 1993. 1 relumed to Badacsony to 
see how Peter was faring and to try’ to solve 
the mystery of the Green Hungarian's 
source. To my dismay, Peter was no longer 
there. The Szoloskert restaurant was now the 
Malibu discotheque. The pension hadn’t 
opened all summer. But the Nagy family, at 
whose cozy country inn, Borbaralok 
(Friends of Wine). I took lo d gi n g, knew 
where to find him. for their eldest son, Istvan 
Jr„ bad taken over the lease on the Szolos- 
ken. Their second son, Miklos, offered to 
drive me 40 kilometers (25 miles) to the spa 
town of Heviz, where Peter’s newly opened 
Badacsony Wine Restaurant was bustling 
with business, even off-season. 

A little thinner at 48, but no less jovial 
rhfm when last we met, Janos Peter calls 
himself “one of the early victims of Hungar- 
ian capitalism." 

“The present government didn't respond 
kindly to my kina of privatization,' ’ he said, 
“so I could obtain no federal subsidies or 
loans and therefore couldn't find any part- 
ners because the system wanted me to start 
from scratch." In other words, having made 
deals with a communist union and its work- 
ers at a time when communists were die only 
people with whom one could deal had cost 
him dearly. A mild heart attack at the begin- 
ning of 1993 convinced him to bow out 
before the struggle consumed Him. 

Instead, he bought out a state-run strip- 
tease-and-jazz club and transformed it into 


« - l -3«, Of! 

-"‘Ja r 


-4- 




Rgtei 


r. 

«: d'f. h •'•"•ftAg’f 


a folksy eatery with live Gypsy music, beany 
food and “no other wines^but the best Ba- 
dacsonys properly served" Year-round op- 
eration hi an international spa seemed less 
stressful than the feast-and-famine roller 
coaster of a wine resort with a short summer 
season. 

Peter opened a bottle of Green Sylvan er as 
perfect accompaniment to my exquisitely 
heavy dinner of lightly fried goose breasts in 
a mushroom sauce shvered with cheese and 
sauerkraut and accompanied by buttery 
parsley potatoes. “A half a bottle a day 
opens the arteries." he assured me. leading 
inevitably to the closing cliche: “Wine is the 
best doctor.” 

Earlier in the day, I hod met with Peter 
Bekassy. president of the Badacsony Wine 
Growers Association, who told me that be- 
cause the grape yields low qualities, Green 
Sylvaner had virtually disappeared from the 
market in Communist times. But he wished 
me well in establishing Green Sylvaner's link 
with California's Green Hungarian — and 
awaited results of the acid test: a tasting in 
California by Agoston Harasztby's great- 
grandson. Jan Haraszihy, who manages the 
Buena Vista Vineyards in Sonoma. A trusted 
courier was dispatched with two bottles of 
Zoldszilvani: a Janos Peter young 1990 and a 
Nagy family vintage 1984. The latter was my 
reward for declaring that the Nagy s’ “open" 
1989 Zoldszilvani from the barrel was the 
purest and tartest I'd ever tasted; it went 
perfectly with Lake Balaton’s best-loved 
fish, a pike-perch variant called fogos. 


My courier drove two hours from San 
Francisco to Sonoma on northern Califor- 
nia's rainiest day of 1993. She arrived by 
back roads after a flash flood had washed 
out the bridge from the winery to the Har- 
aszihy bouse, between the bdi tower and the 
ruins of the guest bouse, which had caught 
fire on Thanksgiving night. Jan Harasztby 
chilled the wines before filling two Buena 
Vista glasses with the Nagy s’ 1984 Green 
Sylvaner. which be studied, swirled and 
sniffed before pronouncing. “Nice bou- 
quet” sipping and saying: “I like that very 
much. Sometimes white wines are so delicate 
they’re anemic. This is not one of those. This 
has a full flavor." 

After a few more sips. Harasztby asked his 
viator: “Did you read 'Sesame ana Lilies' in 
high school : 

Not entirely surprised by the blank look 
this elicited, he went on: “In it, John Ruskin 
said, ‘Words are the unjust stewards of men’s 
ideas.’ I hesitate to say too much. I would 
almost say it’s an aggressive wine. No, 
‘strong 1 and ’aggressive' are not (he right 
words. This wane has personality, it has the 
flavor of the grape. Character, lots of charac- 
ter. A remarkable wine." 

J ANOS PETER’S 1990 he liked a little 
less, though he noted that its relative 
youth made it smoother and darker. 
Since, for some of the same reasons 
the Communists gave, Buena Vista no longer 
makes Green Hungarian or any other Syl- 
vaner, he trotted out a bottle of WefbeTs 
Green Hungarian, which he praised as “what 
we drink at home." It was sweeter than either 
Zotdszilvam. But now came the key ques- 
tion: Were the wines related? 

“Almost certainly no,” he replied. “One 
fact that’ s very little' known is that my grand- 
father couldn't go back to Hungary in the 
1850s because he’d supported the 1848 revolt 
against the Habsburgs and there was a price 
on his head. So none of the grapes be 
brought back came from Hungary. They all 
were from France, Italy. Spam, Germany 
and Austria; somehow he got into Austria, 
even (hough it was Habsbing headquarters. 
And I would guess that Green Hungarian is 
of Austrian origin.” 

The Austrian border is barely 65 kilome- 
ters miles) from Badacsony. The search for 
the Green Hungarian’s tools goes on. 

Alan Levy, author of "The Wiescnthal 
File ,” is editor in chief of The Prague Past. 


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SQ 10 Bl Few « 56 S SI 

OAKY FUGHTS AT LOWECT MBu 
cry mqof F<cr* amw«r in i t n er 
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OLYMPIC RENTALS 


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HOLIDAY RENTALS 

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ImtnatioBal 
Herald Tribune 
ads work 


ISS MUIE iEIBE 


'■'j -f' 

# 1 . 



Scenes from “Wrestling Earnest Hemingway” (top), “The Friends” (bottom left) and “The Blue Kite. 


Tha Frfends 

Directed by Shiji SomaL Ja- 
pan. 

Three little boys befriend an old 
recluse, fix up his derelict house 
and find (hat the funny old lady 
down (he street may have been 
his great love back in ancient 
wartime days. The old gent is 
Rentaro Mikuni, one of Japan’s 
finest film actors, the funny 
lady is Chikage Awashima, re- 
membered from some of the 
best films of the '50s, and Somai 
directed the 1986 “Typhoon 
Gab” and last year’s splendid 
“Ohikoshi.” Nonetheless, all 
are defeated by a stereotyped 
script based on a commercial 
children's novel The three two- 
dimensional kids (the sensitive 
one, the smart one. the fat rare) 
are inculcated with the social 
virtues (be respectful to your 
elders, help (be poor) and — as 
opines one of the adults at the 
end — learn a valuable lesson. I 
have no idea what it is — per- 
haps not to make an “Our 
Gang” segment that lasts two 
hours. (Donald Richie. I HT) 

Gunman 

Directed by Deran Sarafian. 
U.S. 

Who would have thought that 
Christ op he Lambert, the stony- 
faced hero of “Greys toke: The 
Legend of Taizan,” had a sense 


of humor? ffis career has in- 
cluded some nnintentional 
comedy, but the planned good- 
ness of his performance in 
“Gunmen" is the best surprise 
in this otherwise witless action 
movie. Lambert's character, a 
smuggler name d Ham, reluc- 
tantly becomes part of a buddy 
team with a drug-enforcement 
agent named Cole, played by 
Mario Van Peebles. The pku 
involves a boatload of stolen 
drug money. Lambert’s charac- 
ter is ingenuous and not too 
bright. Van Peebles’s is cagey, 
though not as cagey as he 
thinks. They might have been 
an en g agin g twun, but they are 
stranded without a script Lam- 
bert's humor comes from comic 
grimaces rather than anything 
he is given to say. Lambert and 
Van Peebles are planning to 
team up a g*»n in “Highlander 
DL” Get them a script, fast. 

(Gbtjti James, NYT) 

The Blua Kite 

Directed by Turn. Zhuang- 
zhuang. China. ■ 

Mao’s regime, with its banners, 
chants, and slogans like “The 
Great Leap Forward,” sounds 
like a natural for a movie, but 
getting the movie made- arid- 
past the censors is still a hazard- 
ous business. After Chen Kaige 
and Zhang Yimon, Tian 
Zhuangzhuang has made a film 


celebrated abroad, banned at 
home. The stray is cold through 
the eyes of Tletcru, a boy who 
survives the shifting dictates of . 
a capririous regime. In a Beijing 
neighborhood that looks like a 
village square. famiW life is 
ground to dust Tietoas mol her 
(Lu Liping) is widowed three 
times; each of his “fathers” 
makes Teton a blue kite that 
flies high briefly, ending 19 in 
tatters. The first husband, de- 
nounced by the second, dies in 
eadle; the last falls victim to die 
Cultural Revolution; the moth- 
er is sent to a work camp. The 
action is minimal, scenes are 
shot mostly indoors at a dinner 
table, where the remaining 
members of this decimated 
family gather, with strained 
smiles, under the pall of dela- 
tion, humiliation and banish- 
ment Three remarkable boys 
playTletou at different ages: Yi 
Tian Tfinwg Wenyao, Chen 
Xraoman. 

(Joan Dupont, IHT) 

WmtHng 
Ernest Hombigway 

Directed by Randd Haines. 

as. -■ 

RichardHfflrjp andRobqrt Dp- r 
vail are an “rakt couple” of col- 
orful codgers in “WrestHng -Er- 
nest - Hemingway,” an 
endearing buddy movie for the 


senior crowd. Harris is in ftiil.i 0 
strut as a framer sea captain, * 
Frank, recently beached in^ 
Sweetwater, a faded Florida re- . 
sort town: Abandoned by his * 
son to a seedy apartment bufld-_ 
ing beside the sea, be finds the 
transition difficult. Moby Dick ^ 
would find it eerier to get com- “ 
fortable in a goldfish bowL It 5 . 
a friend be needs, and it’s a 
friend he giets. Duvall whose 
performance is as controlled as 
Harris’s is overblown, obvious- ’ 
ly fell bead over beds in love «, 
with the role of Walter, a fussy* 
Cuban bachelor with a passrar; 
for bacon sandwiches, cross- . 
word puzzles and ballroom 
dancing alone in his room. Do- ’ 
vaU, a - model of old-world - 
courtliness and age-stiffened ' 
movements, also manag es to " 
sound more Kke a Havana ho- 
meboy than Ricky Ricardo. “ 
Aside from their loneliness, the-J' 
two men have little in common, -' 
but they are increarin^y drawn ' 
together and soon become in-M 
sparable. Nrither man, you : 
see, has really had a life. Walter ,'j 
has never tripped the light fan- • 
tastic with an actual woman — 
only fantasies: And Frank, the 
eteroal chOd, has never grown * 
up. They dp grow, of course, ^ 
into 1 : better veraons of them-., 
selves — a process that is pro- .•* 0 
foundif not surpriring. 

(Rita Kempky, WP) % ~ 


Stress Relief, Italian TV Style 


By Ken Shulman 

F LORENCE — In the midst of the 
journey through their evening, Ita- 
ly's television audience finds itself 
once again in Dante Alighieri's 
savage wood. Each Monday and Friday, 
between the end of the early movie and the 
beginning of the late night news, the actor 
Vittorio Gass man reads a canto from “La 
Divina Commedia," the nation's (and per- 
haps the world's) most treasured poem. 

Dante’s delightful terza rima is not just 
highbrow TV fare. The first 15-minute read- 
ing — on Dec. 12 — attracted neatly 3 
million viewers. In their first three episodes, 
Gassman and Dante have averaged close to a 
10-percent audience share, quite a draw for 
serious, erudite theater. 

“This is just an indication of how relevant 
Dante is to our time,” says Rubino Rubini, 
who directs Gassman in the 40-episode se- 
ries. “There is not one canto in The Inferno’ 
that does not contain at least two verses that 
are part of our common parlance today.” 

Historically, public readings of Dante 
have served more than the cause of litera- 
ture. The poet Giovanni Boccaccio gave the 
first public reading of ‘The Divine Comedy” 
in Santa Croce church in Florence in 1373 as 
the city's posthumous apology for having 
exiled Dante. In the early I9th century, 
Italian actors unfurled the work of the poet 
who had given their country its language as a 
rallying cry for national unity. 

Aside from getting good ratings, the latest 


Dante project has another, very 1990s aim: 
to heal and make whole. 

“I am convinced that The DivineCoowy 
hdps us to live better,” soys Rubini, who also 
directed Gasman in his 1992 stag? and edevi- 
rion drama, “Ulysses and the White Whale.” 
“I think the poem helps us to tolerate waiting 
in traffic, working lunches, tdevisiaa pro- 
grams and that bristling vulgarity that some 
people try to pass off as modem life. Given 
that there is a moment during the day when a 
person has to watch television, we axe not 
displeased that in that moment a person can 
stumble onto The Divine Gamedy.' ” 

So, instead of "The Wheel of Fortune^ or 
“Bcavis and Butt-bead,” Italy is offered one 
of the most magnificent works of world 
literature. Popular and somewhat melodra- 
matic, Gassman’s Dante is more like a vac- 
cine than a cure. Gassman p rescribes «npH , 
regular doses of poison in aider to render 


■ What's the most ejmensive city for a 
Valentine’s Day date? Ask Harlequin 
Enterprises. Its annual Romance 
Report says Tokyo by a long shot; a 
Vaimtine's card, a box of chocolates, 
a dozen roses, dining and dancing, a lima 
and a nightcap win set you back 
almost 51,300. Cheapest: Sydney, at S300. 


f E9SSMBI 


viewers immune to the toxins of daily life. 
And because Hdi is obviously a more effeo-’ 
live antigen than Heaven, 34 of the 40 cantos* 
in the series come from “The Inferno.” > 

The readings were fihued from May to July^ 
in 8^ to 10-hour sessions that usually indpdeiL 
two full cantos. It was a draining enterprise 
for the crew, and especially for Gassman, who; 
experienced a profound depression during hi£ 
journey through Dante’s epic poem. \ 

“You can’t confront The Divine Comedy’; 
without suffering some wound,” says the 71?: 
year-old actor.- “It is a plunge into the mys-; 
teries of the soul into suffering. I worked- 
like a beast The poet’s pages tortured me* 
But when 'we finished, I felt a liberation. The., 
journey was over. And I was cured.” » 

It remains to be seen whether Gassman’s; 
encounter with Dante will prove as there-, 
peutic for his audience as it was for the actor. » 
Critics charge that be imposes too much of 1 
his own ptacronalhy on the poet. StiD, wheth-' 
ex attracted ty Dante or by Gassman, view- ■ 
ers continue to time their sets to the first, 
channel between 10:45 and 12:00 F. M. and:, 
to purchase the set of 22 “Gassman Reads 1 
Dante” videotapes. 

T tried to read Dante in a dear way,” says 
the actor. “To make him comprehensible by 
respecting the metric roles of the poem, i! 
wanted to stress that in Dante, tbe fonn of 1 
his lango ag e is identical 10 its content. I 
wanted to sound . every word.” ' 

Ken Shulman is an American writer based, 
in lady. 


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International Herald Tribune 
Friday, February II, 1994 
Page 9 



’s Hottest Festival: Meltdown in Albuquerque 


By Richard Laser ■ 

LB UQUERQUE, New Mnricn — 
p “*”' v ^brwuy f mjjbchetut of the 

st, lovers of the cKiK pet>- 
rtp taste, seQ. and talk 
Foods Festival, which 
“1 M&tdcwn, is the cot- 




pcppcis. _ 
fdso bflte'itsdf as 


Wes that gives us sweet bdl peppesvtbe 
“oderai^y hot jalqwdo and the searing ha- 
Mdero. 7 !k festival, held at Albuqnoque 
Convention Center, ’ is the brainchild of 
Mary Jane WOan and Dave DeWitL This- 
fmsband-and-wife team brought us “Whole 
Chile Pepper Book” (with Niiicy GcdacK L 
.Food Lover’s Handbook to the South west” 
““ Magazine (The word is 

Spewed chih or chile, depending on the re- 
gion.) 

This year the festival will t»Va place from 
Feb. 18 to 20. The first day is forbnyers ih 
the food tndusny; the second and third daws 
are open to the public. Anyone who pays the 
entry fee of $4 can sample his way th mn&h 
tiie center in pursuit of the “drib high,” an 
endorphin-rdeasing response to what would 
otherwise be"a painful experience. .' 

> With more than & hundred exhibitors us- 
ing two dozen varieties of chflies, the festival' 
is testament not only to the appeal that has 
made salsa a chanenge to ketchup’s suprem- 
acy, bat also to the seductive nature of food 
itself. There are a few medium-sized compa- 
nies at the festival, but most exhibitors are 

the romance of the dufi pftppc^SMch^as 
become the most nbigititoos symbol of 
Southwestern style, gracing everything from 
boxer shorts to wmd dtfmi* Even New 
Mexico's professional soccer team is name d 
the Chiles. 

Although chilis arc a versatile foodstuff, 
as attested to by their use in everything from 



pasta to peanut brittle, the important char- 
acteristic is the bum. The sensation, caused 
by the chemical capaiscin, ranges from a 
mild tingle to searing p ain, and evokes a 
passionate response m the hearts and 
mouths of the faithful 

Sosanoe HQon, a young Texan who quit 
her job as a stockbroker to create Taste 
Teasers, a company setting hot foods with a 
Texan bait,' exemplifies the ir reverent fiery 
food entrepreneur. Under her businesslike 
blazer she wears a pepper-festooned bustier. 

She handed me a sample of her sweet, 
jaiapefio spread, the Ultimate Texas Jam, 
smeared on a. cracker with some cream 
cheese. “It’s my mom's redpe,” rite said. 
“Instead of Wooder bread, I grew up on 
jaiapefio spread and com refish.” Hfioa is 
now putting the jaiapefio spread in fine Eu- 
ropean dark chocolates, which rite markets 


under the name Hot Chocolates. For more 
burn, she has marinated black beans with 
peppera. 

Bum is, of course, a matter of taste: 
Dave’s Gourmet, maker of Dave’s Insanity 
Sauce, is trying to create the hottest culinary 
experience known to man. The founder. 
Dave Hiischkopf, was on hand at the last 
festival, wearing a s traitjacket and making 
tasters sign a joke waiver before allowing 
people to test his sauce. “Most of the sauces 
are limited by using the hottest peppers,” he 
says. “We’ve gone beyond that by nring 
pepper extract, which is much hotter. Any 
hotter would be irresponsible." Another 
company that caters to adherents of the 
"hotter is better’’ philosophy is Religious 
Experience Foods of Grand Junction, Colo- 
rado. Its Religious Experience Hot Sauce, 
which I sampled at the festival, comes in four 


Brood Scath 


>: mild, original, hot and tire wrath. 
Jeffrey Gerlach, president of Los Dos of 
Albuquerque, a distributor of products 
made by Quetzl Co., has a different philoso- 
phy about heat “Our emphasis is on flavor," 
he says. “It’s always easy to add heat — 
that’s a cowardly way to produce a hot 
sauce." Quetzl says it spent six years in Costa 
Rica developing its version of the hafcafiero 
chili, according to research the hottest chili 
around. At the show last February some of 
Quetzl's products were so new they did not 
even have labels. Its five sauces, Caribbean 
and Central American in origin, are made 
with the rica red chili. One of the company’s 
more unusual flavors was B anana Rama 
sauce, a concoction of habanera, banana, 
tamarind, brown sugar and other spices. 

Hot food means barbecue to many, of 
course, especially in the Southwest. Sam 


Bass's barbecue sauce, called Notorious, tied 
for second place in the 1993 barbecue cate- 
gory, although it was my personal favorite. 
“J started with it in about 1985 ” said Bass, 
who was once in the oil business. “I got it to 
where I wanted about three years ago. It 
tastes sweet, it tastes smoky, then a little hot 
comes in back behind it." 

Much of the food al the ’93 festival was 
produced in the Southwest and the Caribbe- 
an — but there are some surprises. Tied for 
first place in the marinade category was Mrs. 
Dog’s Jerk Sauce, a variety erf a" Jamaican 
sauce. Mrs. Dog is the name of a golden 
retriever owned by Julie Applegate of Grand 
Rapids, Michigan. Applegate, who also 
makes a superb Disappearing Mustard 
Sauce, says peppers helped hex overcome 
chronic fatigue syndrome. She says her “mis- 
sion is to spice up the Midwest.* 4 

Crazy Cajun, a company from Petaluma, 
California, makes a barbecue sauce that uses 
brewed coffee for added flavor. The second- 
place salsa winner, Jose Madrid, was from 
Zanesville. Ohio. The biggest catalogue of 
products belonged to Lona Hotta, a compa- 
ny from Overland Park, Kansas, devoted to 

s^jicy pesto 

her company Spaghetti Western. Mary 
Dawn Wright, a classically trained French 
chef, gave up her catering business to start 
World Harvest, a pasta company. She works 
with a part-time employee. Among her pasta 
flavors are Red ChQe, Green Chile. Thai 
Chile Peanut. Salsa! Salsa! and Chipotle 
Pepper. 

Extremes and odd pairings are (he salient 
feature at the show. A visitor can start with a 
Sumptuous Selections Bloody Mary, accom- 
panied by the chih -coated nuts of Enchanted 
Desert Products, move along to the various 
meat, fish and chicken dishes and finish with 
Lotta Hotta’s Jalapeno Dutch Chocolate 


ay 

fin 


lading and developing fiery foods. 

Julie Feldman, who makes 
sauces, a sort of Mexican-Iialian blend," calls 


Fudge. A suitable accompaniment would be 
the 1993 winner of die most unusual product 
award. Cave Creek Chile Beer, made by the 
brothers Ed and Dick Chilleen. 

Cave Creek is a pilsener beer with a whole 
serrano pepper in each bottle. The pepper 
releases most of its heat into the beer, leaving 
a pleasant tasting and relatively mild beer- 
scented pepper. * a Ii kind of grows on you. " 
says Ed Chilleen, “like salsa and chips." 

Herb Schon of New York, second-place 
winner in the unusual product category, has 
added jaiapefio rugelach to the other variet- 
ies offered by Grandma's Recipe Rugelach. 
El Rancho, as be calls it, is surprisingly sweet 
and unshocking. Schon says he has obtained 
kosher certification for the product and 
hopes to move his operation to the South- 
west 

A LTHOUGH the festival food may 
be international. New Mexico still 
reigns as Chili Land, where the 
potent little peppers are sold from 
tbe backs of pickup trucks and in abandoned 
gasoline stations, where salsa is on every 
restaurant table, and one gets used to tbe 
question “Red or green?” in short order. 

And though exhibitors come and go, each 
year the Fiery Foods Festival continues to 
grow. This year’s festival will have 125 ex- 
hibitors, with a large Caribbean contingent 
and 10 chefs demonstrating their techniques. 

For the curious, one visit may be enough, 
but for the true chili lover two days are too 
short for tasting such delights as Heart of the 
Desen’s New Mexico Chili PLsiachioes, Sa- 
guaro’s chili and lime-flavored, hand-cooked 
potato chips, Don Alfonso's chipoiles in 
adobo, Vagin Fire’s hot sauces from St. 
John, and a volcano’s worth of salsa, mari- 
nades and barbecue sauces. 


Richard Lemer, who frequently travels to 
the southwestern United States, wrote this for 
The New York Toner. 


/// un ff/n 


AUSTRIA 


Vienna 

Kunstforum der Bank Austria, tal: 
(222) 531-24, open datiy. Continu- 
ing/To Feb. 20: "Barack In NeapeL" 
Paintings and sketches ot the Nea- 
politan school ot Baroque in the 17th 
and 18th centuries. 

KunstHaus Wien, tab 712-0495. 
open datty. To May 1 : "Lb Corbusier, 
the Architect - Charies-Edouard 
JannereL the Painter." As an archi- 
tect, Le Corbusier (1887-1965) be- 
came world tamou8> as the painter he 
remained Charies-Bdouard Janneret 
The exhibition features 150 draw- 
ings, paintings, sculptures, architec- 
tural models and tapestry. 

Museum Modemer Kunst !m Palais 
Liechtenstein, tel: 317-6900. closed 
Mondays. To April 4: “Anne et Pat- 
rick Foiner." Subjective reconstruc- 
tions. bust from charcoal, easy, mar- 
ble or wood, and Inspired by 
archaeotogtatfl traces a! pas* cNttza- 
tons. 


BELGIUM 


Bnmata 

Musdes Royaux d’Art et (THfartoire, 
lei: (2 ) 741-7211, dosed Mondays. 
To April 17: "Miniatures Mogholasde 
I'lnde.” Miniatures from the New Del- 
hi museum, depicting life at the court 
of the Mogul emperors, harem 
scenes, and scenes from epic poems 
such as "Ramayana." 


BRITAIN 


>pera House, tab 38-1241. 
i "Barber of Souffle." CHrect- 
lephen Lawless, conducted 

en Barlow, with WUHam Bur- 

te McCamey and Geoffrey 
=eb. 26, March 1, 3 and 5. 

dge 

wtffiam Museum, tel: (223) 
, closed Mondays. To May 
ihige: Snow, Moon aid FJow- 
reefriptychs as wefl as sin- 



Tokyo Station Gallery, tel: (3) 
3212-2485. closed Mondays. To 
April 3: "Florentine Renaissance 
Drawings tram Christ Church. Ox- 
ford" 100 drawings including works 
by Leonardo, Michelangelo and Ra- 
phael. 

SPAIN 

Valencia 

IV AM Centre Julio Gonzalez, tel: 
(6) 386-3000, closed Mondays. To 
April 24: "Wladyslaw Strzeminski." A 
retrospective including paintings, 
drawings, furniture and typographi- 
cal designs. Wladyslaw Stzeminski 
(1893-1952) was born in Byelorus- 
sia and became a triend ol Malevich 
and a member ot the Russian avant- 
garde until 1922 when he moved to 
Poland and gathered an impressive 
art collection lor the Lodz Museum. 

SWTTZERLANP 

I oiigfln ng 

Fondabon de [‘Hermitage, tel: (21 ) 
320-50-01 . Closed Mondays. To May 
1 ; "La Nouvelie Vague: L'Estampe 
Japonaise de 1868 a 1939." 160 


Left, Tibetan art at the British Museum in London; 
Fernand Leger’s “Breakfast” in Tel Aviv show. 


jseum, tei: (71) 323-8525, 
y. To April 17: ’ 'Himalayan 
nese Art from the Schmflt- 
aJJection.” The Tttretan and 
material contains a wide 


terras aid historic^ refr 
jres The tea ceremony 
Ubs from the 15th to the 
jries. 

ademy of Arts, tot (71) 
l, open daily. Continu- 
al 2: ‘The Unknown Mod- 
ore than 400 drawingsby 
st Amedeo Modtofiara from 
924. Also Continuing /To 
in Pursuit of the Absolute: 
Ancient Worid." 300 mae- 
from the George Ortiz, cof- 
dudlng Sumenan carvmgs, 
sculptures and Greek 
zases andjewety.es weff 
jion of works from thecuF 
mca, the Americas and toe 
jnds. 

and Albert Museum, tel: 
, open daily. Confrn- 
0: ‘‘Faberge: imperial 


arth Art GaBBry, tef: (61 ) 
dosed Sundays. To 

■Siajow of the Forest 

i the BartXzon School 
e rrtd- 1 9 tivcentury paknt- 
ch landscape, as w efl las 

I influences on those an- 

i Museum, 

xfed Mondays 

pr-s Choice: Wetfwiaref- 

js from the IS ftte !7th 
~vto rks by Rembrandt, 
i other lesser-fawwn art- 


ctudas films, conferences and three 
shows, win travel to Barcelona. 

Jeu de Raurne, tei: 42-60-69-69, 
dosed Mondays. To March 13: 
"Janes Bishop. ' A retrospective of 
the worics of the American-bom ab- 
stract painter, fnciucfing 30 paintings 
on canvas and . 62 ate on paper, 
spanning the years 1957 to 1987. 
The exhibition win travel to Monster, 
Germany. . 

Musde du Louvre, tab 40-20-51-51 , 
dosed Tuesdays. To April 18: “Lar- 
gesse: Parti Pris de Jean Staro- 
binski.” The historian /critic has cho- 
sen works of art to illustrate his 
interpretation of the word "gift" On 
display are 10 photographs and 70 
prints and drawings. Inducting works 
rCanBQdo, Doner and 
antinuing/To April 18: 
mania: L’Egypte dans I’Art 
td 1750-1 930. "Egypt as a source of 
inspiration to an artistic domains. 
Musde National de I'Orangerte, tet 
42-97-48-1 6L dosed Tueolays. To 
May 23: "Las Nympheas et Louis 
Cane.” . Explores Claude Mood’s 
“Nympheas" through; the eyes cf 
Lods Cana, a contemporary painter. 
Musde (TOrsay, tel: 40-49-48-14, 
dosed Mondays. To May 8: "LaJeu- 
nesse des Musses. Las Musees de 
France au XlXeme Slecte.” A study ot 
toe way 19tivcentury Ranch muse- 
ums were organized, and what com- 
prises a good museum today. Exhib- 
rted pieces are cutied from museums 
ati over France, inducing Dijon and 
Aries. 

. de la BastiKe. tef: 43-4396' 
Richard Strauss’s • , Sa^ome. ,, Dj- 


Gferke, conducted by Heinz Fricke, 
with Jaakko Ryhanen/Maiti Salrrtrt- 
en/Jan-Hendrik Rootering, Julia Var- 
ady/Luana DeVoi. Thomas Sunne- 
ganto/Roberr Schunk. March 5, 8, 
12 and 18. 

Stuttgart 

Staatoalerie, td: (711) 212-4101, 
closed Mondays. Continuing/To 
Feb. 20. "Henn Matisse: Zeichnun- 
und Gouaches Decoupees." 
i and cutouts. 

Wuppertal 

Von der Heydt-Mu8eum, tel: (202) 
563-6231, ctoeed Mondays. Cwttbv 
ufng/To March 20: ‘Von Cranach 
bis Monel" Masterpieces from the 
Bucharest National Art Museum. 


ISRAEL 


Tel Aviv 

Tel Aviv Museum of Art tel: 972-3- 
695-7361. To May 3: "Fernand Le- 
gen Selected Works," A ctispiay ot 1 6 
pa inting s and drawings. Although 
connected to Cubism, Leger devel- 
oped his version of ttes style with the 
celebration of machine culture. 

ITALY " 

Man 

Toatro alia Scale, tel: (2) 8091-60. 
Puccini's "La ftondine." Directed by 
Nicholas Joel, conducted by Glanan- 
dree Gavazzeni/Stefano Ramzani. 
with Pietro Balt o, Paolo Barbadni. 


Alessandro Cassis and Denla Maz- 
zola Gavazzeni. Feb. 16, 18, 20, 22, 
24. 26, 27, March 1 and 3. 

Naples 

Teatro San Carlo, tel: (81) 797- 
2111. Donizetti’s "La Sonnambula." 
Directed by Sandro Sequi, conduct- 
ed by Richard Bonynge with MarieHa 
Devia. Feb. 26. March 1. 3, 6 and a 
Venice 

Chtesa San Bfatolomeo. open daily. 
To May 1: "II Tintoretto: Rapprazsrv 
taoorti Sacre nelle Chese Vene- 
zlane." 15 large religious pictures in- 
cluding "The Christening" and "The 
Last Supper" from the churches ot 
San Polo and San Silvestro. 


JAPAN 

Kyoto 

Art Gallery in Amagasaki Cultural 
Center, tel: 06-487-0806, closed 
Tuesdays To Feb. 20: "Kazuka Iwar 
said Space Art." More than 160 
paintings by the space artist who de- 
picts astrological scenes based on 


his own observations through his 
homemade telescope. 

Tokyo 

Hakone Open Air Museum, tel: (4) 
602-1161. To March 21: ‘‘Amokto 
Pomodoro." 73 works including 
sculptures and prints by contempo- 
rary Italian sculptor. 

National Museum of Western Art, 
tel: (3) 3828-51 31, dosed Mondays. 
Continuing/To April 3: "Great 
French Paintings from tbe Barnes 
Collection." Pictures selected from 
toe collection of Dr. Albert C. Barnes 
in Philadelphia. 


Taisho and Showa periods (II 
1939), depicting landscapes as well 
as popular scenes in the tea houses, 
at the Kabuki theater and In the 
streets. 

Martigny 

Fondation Pierre-Giannada, tel: 
(26) 22-39-78. open daily. To March 
6: "Marie Larrencm: A Hundred 
Works from the Marie Laurencin Mu- 
seum in Japan." 100 oil paintings, 
watercolors drawings and icono- 
graphlc documents by the French 
painter, characterized by her pastel 
palette, her finely silhouetted por- 
traits and graceful flowers and ani- 
mals. 

UNITED STATES "" 

Houston 

The Menll Collection, tel: (713) 
525-9400. dosed Mondays and 
Tuesdays. Continuing/To April 2: 
“Rdywholyover: A Circus." A com- 
plex intermedia event by composer 
John Cage, featuring work by artists 


whose Influence bears on Ceae’s 
art, displayed in changing arrange- 
ments and complemented by video 
screenings, films, musical events and 
readings. 

New York 

Guggenheim Museum, tel: (212) 
423-3840, closed Thursdays. To 
April 17: "Robert Morris: The Mind / 
Body Problem." A survey ot the mini- 
malist artist’s career from the eariv 
1 960s to the present, including con- 
ceptual works, environmental instal- 
lations and investigations ol materi- 
als. Simultaneously, nine works with 
mirrors are exhibited at the Guggen- 
heim Museum SoHo. 

Metropolitan Museum ot Art, tel: 
(212) 570-3951, closed Mondays. 
Continuing/To April 3: "Degas 
Landscapes." 61 pastels, monotypes 
and oil paintings by Degas, many 
inspired by his journey through Bur- 
gundy in 1890. 

Museum of Modem Art. let: (212) 
708-9400. open daily. To May 17: 
"Three Masters of the Bauhaus: 
Lyonei Feininger, vasify Kandinsky 
and Paul Klee." Printed work by 
three masters who taught at the Bau- 
haus dunng the 1920s, including 
Kandinsky’s print portfolio "Small 
World." some ol Klee’s color litho- 
graphs. and Feininger's woodcuts. 
Taipei Gallery, tel: (212) 373-1854, 
closed Saturdays and Sundays. To 
March 11: "Buddhist Images in Gilt 
Metal." 50 13th- lo 18tb-cen tunes 
Buddhist imams from the Chang 
Foundation in Taiwan. 

Pasadena 

Norton Simon Museum, tel: (814) 
449-6840, open Thursday through 
Sunday. To Sept. 11: ■‘Kandinsky." 
More than 30 paintings, watercolors. 
prints and letters covering two de- 
cades ol the artist’s career, from 
1912 to 1932. 

Washington 

The Kennedy Center, tel: (202) 
416-7800. Verdi’s "Un Balk) In Mas- 
chera." Directed by Dieter Kaegi, 
conducted by Cal Stewart KeHog, 
with Lisa Gasteen, Richard Margison, 
Valun Zhand and Bargara Dever. 
Feb. 26. March 3. 6, 8. 11, 14 and 
19. 


URUngandLedhie 
18, 21. 24 and 


Feb. 15, 
1.3,7. 


Vere atB as 

Chateau de Versailles, tel: 30-84- 
744)0, dosed Mondays. Conti'nth 
lng/To Feb. 27: ’Versailles et les 
Tables Royates en Europe du 
xvueme au XlXeme Sfecie." 


GERMANY 




tef: 91-14-92- 
fs. continu- 
es Saint Lau- 

jpidou, id: 44- 
sCa^T 10 Ms/ 
new***® en 
-■ Paintings, 
graphs show 
tnrav 


Benin 

Internationale Fll ntf ss tspte ie, tel: 
(030) 25*88-176. To Feb. 21. The 
44th Berfin FBm Festival tochJdee 
such categories as International Fo- 
rum of Young Gimme. Panorama 
and Refroepective. 
ftanktet 

SchirnKunstfiBDe, tel: (069) 29-98- 
82-0. open daily. To April 17: ’ Goki- 
Mm. Schwert ind Baberechatee." 
Gold heimefeswoede wid silver trea- 
swes 'represerti 6.000 years of Ho- 


rn am . 

rtsjs from the 
i ip dtee. The 


Munich 

Bayenache' Steateoper. tei: (89) 
22-18-16. Wagner’s' "De- Ffegande 
HoBander." Dfrectad by Hervung von 


Rate the world's best restaurants 
with Patricia Wells. 

The IHTs restaurant critic has set out 
on a rare and ambitious gastronomic ioumey, a 
search for the 10 best restaurants in the wond. 

. . She will be rating, in month-tomonth 

articles, the top restaurants from region to 
region, and comparing them to one another. 

Whether it's the best in dim sum, 
delicious but secret sushi bars or the finest of 
French tables, she will guide readers with 
articles about inexpensive restaurants as well 
as the grand ones in the world's major cities. 

She win also share her tips on how to select 

quality restaurants in unfamiliar territory. 

Don't miss this series. 



COMING FEBRUARY 14th 

BEIX3UM/NETHERLANDS/ 

LUXEMBOURG 


Patricia Wells is tbe author of The Food 
lover’s Guide to Pons, now in its 
third edition. . 






<5>T. MOGTTZ - Switzerland 


NEW LUXURY FLATS 
FOR SALE 


Foreigners can buy. 

Please contact us soon, as only a few remain available. 

CIJV. (MMOB1LIARE, 

Via Montan i 2, Merano. Italy, 

Mr Pichler 

Tel.: (+39) 473232810, Fax: (+39) 473233617 


Looking for 


Isms REA^y^ Swfaariand? 

MONTREUX 

An erqutsilB on dwetopawnt of doplei 
a prt n en H bui cn la mo mte ingdB )oa> abate 
Montas. WBi an** panonric tfmoftta 
tela and Alps. Three to tow bedrooms, si w#i 
large IwacES. fle des9i It ortubal and ol f» 
highest quafity. Prion start tarn as low at 
SftJOjDOlAtaaiwi M nMle m waB^ 
oeMktkWaogiMi 
MQLdb Wee; 

-M241 wmaus - ten amuMr 


fantastic new Z-bed-duplex- 
apartment. 107 m2 and 2 balconies 
15 m2, garage, dose to center 
and ski-Ufts, magnificent view. 
At one hour from Geneva Airport. 
SFr. 850,000.-. 


M. Mariotti in Geneva, 
Tel* 41 72.7331530. 
Faxr4L22.733J4.69 


AUCTION SALE at the CHAMBRE DES NOTAIRES 
12 avenue Victoria PARIS 
on March 1 st, 1994 at 2 : 30 P.M 


Office building (with 14 parkings spaces) 

62/64 Boulevard Pereire, 75017 PARIS 
9 Ftoora, 652 sqm. Usable floor space : 1499 sqm. Revenue : 1704.178 FF. 
Startrig price : 47.731500 FF. 

Tecftrfcal Momiafon : MrVIALAR (1) 44 51 24 50 
Judicial information : MrGOSSAHT (1) 45 44 3870 
Notaire responsible for sale. 

MeADER (1)4544 38 70 












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International Herald Tribune World Slock index O, composed of 
280 international uweatabfe stocks from 25 countries, compiled 
by Bloomberg Business News. Jan. 1,1992 - 100. . 

120 


Latins See 
Red Over 
Bananas 


* ■ !. 


• .. s. 



.VA 




EU Quota System 
Rotten , They Say 


By Tom Buexide 

International HeraU Tribune 

BRUSSELS — Latin American 
countries hit bade at the European 
Union in their banana battle on 
Thursday, demanding that the 
Union virtually dismantle its quota 
and tariff barriers or be dragged 
before the soon-to-be- created 
world trade cop. 

EU officials rejected the de- 
mand, however, which left both 
sides on coarse for a clash that 
involves much more than the 
Union's $2 bQHon-a-year appetite 
for bananas. 

The dispute has provoked out- 
rage in banana-kjvmg Germany, 
the world's largest consumer. It im- 


. aiAj iiuis u 

regarded as a symbol of liberation 
in the former list Germany. _ 
The case also could decide 
whether Hade privileges Europe 
has tong extended to farmer colo- 
nies and other developing countries 
will be outlawed whim new trade 
rules www*- into force next year. 

Officials from the five, countries 
Ecuador, Guatemala, Hondu- 
ras, Panama and Mexico — de- 


Made in Japan but Flawed 


By Steven Brull 

Iniermiional Herald Tribune 


lnternmonal Herald Tribune - 1( . 

in^VSo^S^M^ Trade Deal Slipping 

Despite Hata Talks 

1980s, they challenged their peers m Japan to 1/CSJHlU XMJXLa xmno 
engage in similar self -examination. „ 


igage in similar self-examination. 

Now, five years later, the Japanese are about to 
release “Made in Japan." But its authors are al- 
ready saying that the project has foundered over a 
twrfr of prwtafiric independence and the collapse of 
the bubble economy, which desiccated rosy no- 
tions of Japan’s economic fundamentals. 

“At MIT, they addressed the real issues, said 
Haruo Shimada, a professor erf economics at Kao 

r «>kn 1mA onthorq* investigation mtO 


GM Returns 


ifitability 


Lags Rivals 


Reuters 

WASHINGTON — A U.S. official said Thurs- 
day that {he odds were running high against a 
transpacific trade deal in time for the U.S. -Japan 
summit meeting Friday. n 

“The odds are pretty high we won’t have a deal, 
the official said on condition of anonymity. “We’re 
pretty far apart everywhere." 


handful cm market-opening acais raore nrausm 
Bill Gin ton and Prime Minister Morihiro Ho- 
sokawa meet here Friday, but the offidsl said 
chances for were 70-30 against success. 

is oaacauy neaimy, « , Hoping to break the logjam, Foreign Mimsier 

thounht the oroiect should examine broader issues Tsulomu Hata flew into Washington on Wcones- 

rdated to the nwtin, bureaucracy, politics and day evening. More talks are scheduled between 
Stacatian. ‘Tbeseareihe real problems," he said. Mr. Hata and the VS. side hter puraJay, but the 
“Made in Japan” reflects the challenges of find- official said that thus far there had been no sub- 

• r- ■ _ . . . l . — MMvrafinn rSlttn ennttup nmdfKC 


funding from industry, so we had 
pletdy diff emit set of questions." _ 

Instead of focusing on Japanese industry, which 
is basically healthy, he said, many academics 


ing fault in a society where cooperation often 
m»mw avoiding criticism. So whereas “Made m 


avounng cmnanm. 

America" helped inform the U-S.-Jagan Structural 
Impediment negotiations during George Bushs 

IA im mlUr^tv tn Spin the 


impCOPlJGIH I ltp wnu wM “““B _ — • — D , L 

presidency, “Made in Japan" is unlikely to help the 
world’s two biggest economies resolve their so- 
called framework trade talks, which are dead- 
locked over Washington's demand that Tokyo 
agree to objective criteria to measure market ac- 
cess. Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa is hop ' 
for a breakthrough when he meets Presdent 
nininn in Washmgton on Friday. 

Anthtos refused to discuss the content of “Made 
in Japan" in detail Bui they said it would offer an 
analysis of the strengths of Japanese industry 
based on production technology developed 
through cooperation on the workshop floor. 


stantiveinugiEM- ... 

Mr. Hata said the two sides had made headway, 
but the U.S. secretary of state, Warren M. Christo- 
pher, said Washington was “disappointed" with 
the scant progress. 


However, the work also will point out that 
Japan’s persistent trade surpluses and an end to 
theeia of rising demand for cars, electronics and 
other comm odities win put new pressures on man- 
agers. For survival, an international perspective 
and communication skills will become increasingly 

U1 ^W^ lt need to have another book," Mr. Shi- 


See BOOK, Page 15 


u«im Nattafanda, NnrZMbmd, Nanny, 
cLmuii— — i^h saadn. Hwltflirl anrl Vnua/iiala For Tokyo, New Yoric a nd 
London. gw Max Jp couponed of ton 2D lop Issum In terns at martini cnpMatinttion. 
oCutmtse the ton lep stocks arBUnckod. 


Industrial Sectors 


ita. 


Enorgr 11SJ90 115J1 -rt)25 C^MGooda 11828 11455 -0.75 


127.45 12520 +039 BawH*faM« 12055 121.40 -0JS 


Ffenxa 12063 12M5 -*0.48 DorawC”* 9924 10045 -0-fil 


S«vfM 12093 12523 Uncti 


13727 13759 -023 




ta for banana h 
tons from 2D mulim and sladi tar- 
iffs on Latin imports. Those moves 

would pose a serious threat to the 

so-called ACP countries: African, 
Paribbgan and Pacific nations, led 
by the Ivory Coast, Cameroon and 
St Tuna, which now get duty-free 
access to the European market 
Farm Commissioner Rate Stri- 
cken rejected the demand as unre- 
alistic. One commission official 
said such a bag increase in Latin 
imports would send banana juices 
plummeting and “destroy die econ- 
omies ofthe ACP countries." In- 
stead, Mr. Strichen restated an EU 
offer tondseits quota to 2.1 million 
fAna this year mid 22 mfllioD in 
1995, and said that offer would 



’ of Finance 


By Joshua Mills 

New York 77 met Service 

NEW YORK — When Nfichad 
Bloombergs next expansion erf Ins 

financial news empire goes on televi- 
sion — it is scheduled to make its 

debut on May 1 —you may be able 

to count the viewers on one, or no, 
fingers. 

Mr. Bloomberg said Wednesday 
that his Bloomberg Financial Mar- 
kets service would create a 13-hour- 
a-day, 7-day-a-week television news 
service called Bloomberg Direct that 
wfll be transmitted on DirecTV, a 
saidHte-to-home broadcasting ser- 
vice that will go on the air in April 
But tqrecewe the signal, viewers 


will need to buy satellite dishes from 
RCA Corp. for about S700, and 

these will not go on sak until ApnL 

So when the service begins, “in eight 

to 10 markets, not nationally at 
first,” said Linda Brill of DirecTV, 
there may be no audience. 

But both Mr. Bloomberg and 
DirecTV, which is owned by GM 
Hughes Electronics, said they ex- 
ported steady growth for thistp- 
of service, which is known as D 


nnnrial institutions, pension funds 
and others receive the service. 


He also has a news service, 
Bloomberg Business News; an aD- 
business-news radio station, 
WBBR-AM in New York Gty, and 
a public television show. 

DirecTV will allow dish owners 
to select a package of programs 
from a menu, with rates of $21.95 
and $29.95 a month. 


for direct broadcast satellite. 
“DBS will work; it's worked m 



By Reginald Dak 

International Herald TrSme 


W ashington— it is not snr - 

mising Americans are nnmnig 

out of patience with Japan. Do- 
spite 15 frustrating yemsof ne- 
gotiations. cajolery and threats — 

SSuation of the to-- ^£££*§ 1 
up vast and pohncdly omwcei itaWe trade 

^Ptoses with the grates. 


Sq tins ritne, the Americans insist, it is 
axng to be different Japan will have to 
accept numerical criteria that will show how 
far its c ommi tments to reduce its trade sur- 
plus are earned om in wactice. If xiot, serious 

trade' sanctions could follow. 

- Bat the Japanese do not trust the Amcn- 
cansi ritiKT. Even though American officials 
nrektjweetiy that the criteria ate only meant 


brina tougher — so tough, m fact, that he k 
rctifcssly endangering b»meettj« ’ 

Su neither s^bfinks, tbctanKffl^. «d 
rirtm^y unprecedentod discard and re- 

Washington’s^mniMfru^a- 

tkmTncwis not tbetooew ?}* 

Kan. Mr. GSntau ^aridsoefe^^- Ho- 
sotawa is not an enemy but a potrnnnlai^. 


D^pite frustrations, 
now is not the tone to pick 
a fight. Clinton should 
see that Hosokawa is a 
potential ally. 


mg performance, the Japanese ] 
ten twice already. 


■simprov- 

beenbit- 


tiuyuw — _ 

the atmo^bere between 
ashington is inrolymg that 

^ buramram nm *e^ gy- ^ ^ 

But there rs a saw m 


ports rfscamcCTidrictnis and auto parts, wlridi 
the Japanese thought wo® nonbmdmg, woe 

■ ■■* ■ ■ .-■> W.r thm Aiwriranc M CTIXT- 


' Tokyo, too. is drier- 

mined not to be led up the garden path mm. 

The Japanese, of coarse, are quite right to 
suspect that what the Americans really want 
are not statistical yardsticks, of which thoe are 
more than enough already, but guaranteed 
Wtimtrm shares <rf specific Japanese maritets. 

Therefe amajor inconastency in the Amm- 
can position. In virtually the same breath, the 
Americans are pressing Japan to cwen its mm^ 
Las and insisting on measures mat require 
government intervention — the very kind of 

coflnaon between pnbfic and private sectors 
that Washington has so kng denounced. 


Of course, the Japanese government stiU 
has much more control over its industry, BnO 
its market, than the United States does. Bid 
W ashing ton's aim should be to reduce that 
control, not strengthen it. 

“ Indeed tl» whole problem, says Clyde V. 
Prestowhz Jr„ presdent ofthe Econonnc 
Strategy Institute m Washington, is that me 
Japanese system is reared to reaming w- 
poits. In a study released this week, Mr. 
Prestowitz argues that tradioonfll macroeco- 
nonac methods— such as bdsle n n g Japan s 
nxjwth and manipulating exchange rates 
£fll never significantly reduce such a struc- 
tural trade deficit. CHnton-style measures are 
needed, he says. L . 

But even Mr. Prestowitz, a Japan hawk, 
concedes that Mr. Clinton, in trymg to pry 
open Japanese markets, and Mr. Hosokawa, 
hTseekmg to deregulate the economy, are 
actually on the same side. Both men have to 
fight Japp’s entrenched bureaucratic and 
business interests, he said. 

Mr. Clinton, in fact, should tryto strength- 
en Mr. Hosokawa with a successful smmnit 
meeting, not risk weakening torn witii a farted 
one. The president’s approach so far shows 

nwre amcem with outdmng his ptedecessore 

in toughness than appreciation of toe poten- 
tial for real change in Japan- 

While the United Stales should be 
agine the world to move to a stronger muin- 
lateral trading system, Mr. Ginionis mgag- 
ing in bilateral bullying. He should try 
misting Mr. Hosokawa instead- 

If Washington would just drop its winrul 
insistence cm targets, there is every bone of a 
more constructive US.- Japanese 
ship. When be meets Mr. Hosokawa at the 
White House on Friday, Mr. Omtou should 
Mink first 


Europe," Mr. Bloomberg said 
Wednesday. “In a year, thereH be 
maybe a million viewers." He riso 
predicted the price of a satellite . 
dish would fan to $200 to $300- _ 
Mr. Bloomberg’s core business is- 
providing financial data to the 
business world on computer termi- 
nals that he leases for $1,000 a 
month each. More than 34,000 &- 


The format Mr. Bloomberg said, 
would be “talking beads, who will 
ry U up and present analytical 
screens’ of data gathered by the 
250 reporters and €00 researchers 
employed by Bloomberg Business 
News and "Bloomberg Financial 
Markets, his basic data service. 
Bloomberg Direct will go up 
against CNBC which is carried on 
several thousand cable systems and 
will be carried on DirecTV. 


By Lawrence Malkin 

Ifoenanond Herdd Tribune 

NEW YORK — Cosi-cutting 
moved General Motors Corp.’s core 
American automobile factories into 
profit by the end of last year, the 
company reported Thursday, but its 
new rTtaivrmnn said the world’s larg- 
est automaker still has “a lot to do 
to rebuild its sales and profits. 

In its report covering the first full 
year since fTiarrman John Smith Jr. 
was brought in by a stockholder 
revolt to apply stre amlinin g meth- 
ods that made GM Europe profit- 
aide, the company said rt earned 
$25 bflboiL Tnai compares with a 
record $23.5 billion loss in 1991 
In the final quarter of 1993, 
GM^s profits were $12 billion, a 
turnaround from the quarterly loss 
of $652 million a year ago. 

GM said its North American 
automotive operations earned $427 
million in the fourth quarter, the 
first rime the bottom line in the 
division was profitable since the 
United Stales began slipping into 
recession in the second quarter of 
1989. For the year, however, there 
operations, comprising the U.S., 
Cnparla and Mexico, lost 5982 mil- 
lion, which included a $589 million 
charge to close plants. 

About half, or SI .22 bQhon, or 
GM*s 1993 worldwide profit was 
earned abroad; a decline from 
$1 J5 billion the year before. Profit 
in South America almost quadru- 
pled last year, to a record $798 
million, but faded to make up for 
the collapse of income — to $604 
mini on from $133 bQhon — in last 
year’s disastrous European markeL 
The U3. economic recovery obvi- 
ously was the wave that caused 
GM’s last-quarter turnaround, 
along with the rest of Detroit’s new- 
ly profitable Big Three. Another ma- 
jor factor was the 11 percent appre- 
ciation of the yen, “which opened 
the eyes of U.S. consumers that we 
can make good cars here, too," said 
Arvid M. Jouppi. an analyst with 
Keane Securities in Detroit. 

But even though GM increased 
North American car and truck 


The real test for GM this year wiD 

mm* when it introduces Chevrolet 
and Oldsmobile models to compete 
with Ford and Chrysler models that 

have already established themselves 
in the markeL 

GM also played catch-up with its 
competitors on production costs, 
first by closing overlapping plants 
and dumping thousands of employ- 
ees through early retirements and 
buyouts. G. Richard Wagoner, the 
r-hw-f financial officer, Said GM’S 
US. salaried workforce would be 
further reduced “to the high 60,000 
range” from the current 71,000. 

He also said he expected the 
company’s hourly workforce to fall 
tclSKoO by the end <^1^4-^ 
hourly workforce totaled 262,000 
at the end of 1993. 


Software Merger 
Is Valued at 


$ 400 Million 


sales by 6.6 percent, it earned less 
than its rivals from the industry’s 


ical buoyancy and its market 

e slipped to 333 percent from 

33.9 percent GM shifted us focus 
toward high-profit retail customos 
from high-volume fleet sales, which 
cost it market share. 


Compiled h, Ow Staff From Dispatches 

SAN MATEO, California — 
America’s largest educational 
software company, Brodobund 
Software Inc, is to be taken over 
by an entertainment software 
company. Electronic Arts, in a 
S40Q million deal. 

Analysts said the deal, an- 
nounced late Wednesday, was a 
logical way for Electronic Arts 
to beef up its offerings in edu- 
cational software, the fastest- 

growing segment of the market. 

Also, “it initially provides 
Broderbund with an entree into 
Europe, where they haven’t 
been big,” said Kevin McCar- 
thy at Mabou Securities. 

Shares of Electronic Arts 
rose $3.50 to $29 in over-the- 
counter trading on Thursday. 
Broderbund's shares were up 
$4,875 at $45,875. 

Holders or Broderbund 
common stock will receive 1.6 
shares of Electronic Arts com- 
mon stock for each share of 
Broderbund. 

Broderbund bad sales of 
$96 million in its last financial 
year. Electronic Arts had $298 
milli on in sales. 


TuRREHCY Ml INTEREST RATO 


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TRADITION... 

ONLY WITHIN INNOVATION 


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Zurich 


AM. 

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UAdoHacsperoone*. U***tMMt*- 
tesv Zurich and N*e Yurit #*ntnomdcto> 
to prices; Mm York Came* WFW 
Sooroa: Reuters. 



Head Office - 96-98, ru da Rh6ne - 1204 GENtVE 
GENEVE . ZURICH - LUGANO - LONDON - NASSAU - NEW YORK - TOKYO - HONG KONG - ISTANBUL - AMERICA LATINA 


1 






&*• ra*e 


Page 12 

market diary 


INTERNATIONAL WF.BATJ) TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1994' 


u s. /AT THE CLOSE 


Focus on Inflation 
Weighs on Stocks 


VtoAHodoMftiH 


"I.; . ""A;:, ^ 




Campifcd by Our Staff From Dispatches 

NEW YORK — US. stock and 
Treasury bond prices fell Thursday 
on concern that Friday's producer 
price report for January would 
show resurgent inflation. 

The producer price report wiD be 
the first major set of inflation data 
to be released since the Federal 

W.Y. Stocks 

Reserve Board pushed up the fed- 
eral funds rate, which is the rate 
banks charge each other for over- 
night loans, on Feb. 4. Rising infla- 
tion could spur the central bank to 
push rates higher, analysts said. 

High rates pressure stock prices 
because capital for business expan- 
sion becomes expensive, and alter- 
native investments such as certifi- 
cates of deposit and money-market 
accounts offer improved yields. 

The Dow Jones industrial aver- 
age dosed down 36.S8 points, at 
3,895.34. Dedining issues outpaced 
advances by 5 to 3 on the New 
York Stock Exchange. 

Slocks also got a jolt from com- 
ments by Elaine GanareliL a Leh- 
man Brothers analyst who is credit- 
ed with predicting the 1987 market 
collapse. Ms. GarzareUi said stocks 
normally fall 4 percent to 7 percent 
in response to an initial increase in 
interest rates by the Fed. She also 


said she remained bullish on the 
stock market in die long term. 

Conadering her remarks did not 
represent a shift in opinion, the 
slump in stocks shows how con- 
cerned investors are about rising 
interest rates, traders said. 

Automotive issues were active for 
a second day, with General Motors 
losing Itt to 62% despite reporting a 
profit for 1993. Ford Ml 2Vi to 66 , 
and Chrysler dropped 1% to 59% in 
active trading. 

In the over-the-counter market. 
Egghead fell 1 to 9% after the soft- 
ware company said retail price dis- 
counting slashed third-quarter 
earnings by a third. 

LM wesson's American deposi- 
tary receipts dropped 2% to 42%, 
despite the telecommunications 
equipment company’s report that its 
profit doubled in 1993. Ericsson , 
slipped with a seU-off that hit most 1 
Stockholm stocks. (Page 13) i 

In the bond market, inflation con- j 
cems outweighed support from 
strong demand at theflnal leg of the 
Treasury's quarterly refinancing. 
The benchmark 30-year Treasury 
bond was down 11/32 at 97 16/32in 
late trading, with the yield rising to 
6.44 percent from 6.41 percent. 

Toe government sold SI 1 billion 
in 30-year bonds at an average yield 
of 6.43 percent to finish up its $40 
billion quarterly refunding. 

(Bloomberg, Km&u-Ridder) 


Dow Jon— A ff rag ii 

Open Htt LOW Lor CM. 

Indus M3L71 393840 38053 38950 —3858 
Tram 183X82 1B37J5 I8M+0 1(1X50—19.20 
Utn J1XG3 21834 71113 71540 —3M 
CCfUD 1424X4 14C&40 14100 141070—1109 

Standard A Poor’s lmtan* 




•* .***>* ; s ■••• # :*■* : 1 


Industrials 

Transe. 

UfllMfO 

Finance 

5PSM 

SP 10Q 


HU Low Oat 0*99 
55247 547.95 SOM — 180 
442.1? 4JLH 434» —6.1? 
JA5JM M139 )£L39 — 2® 
4AM 4130 4430—03? 
473.13 46871 44373—334 
43935 43535 43SJ0 —109 


NYSE Indexes 


■ i '■ 

. At. I... 

<■'. ■ 'ivv*.- ■ ' • ■■■•■ ' v 


Comoasate 243.13 24099 261.0* — 1JK 

industrials 323.56 . 31.12 ot.it — i.m 

TTOWp, 27951 27103 27638 —121 

unity 222.99 22009 220.11 —2.77 

Finance 080 71644 31441 —149 


” A ^ONI>4F 

■■ -.-reran i ■ ■ mm I 


NASDAQ Index** 


NYSE Most Acttm 



VaL Web 

Low 

Lata 

dm- 




42 Vi 

—116 


55315 0 


uu 



30173 607i 

66 

66 



45070 22 

21 H 

2M6 



40613 1SVW 

1416 

IS 



3*737 «V, 

38V> 

40 V, 



38503 3> 

34 

319 



35282 61V, 

5W, 




35027 I9M 

1* 

19Vri 


Merck 


3446 



NASDAQ Most Actives 


VOL MBit 

LOW 

Last 

ClM- 

SnecTcn 

8373* 3V* 



* Vs 







60340 20 Vi 

1B<-1 

19*i 

-216 


43669 2746 



—1 

Intel ■ 

38631 64 

61 v. 

63<* 

—** 

APwrCv* 

34024 0 

» 

2SM 


ErfcT«H 

3371* 45V* 

42Mi 

4ZM 

—214 

v|AWAirt 

32370 21* 

Mu 

1»V» 

— 1*B 


32036 7W 

7M6 

72 

—2’- 

USBcOR 

27146 MV, 

27+6 

28 

>49 


HU LOW Lm> CBS. 

Composrto 78848 783JJ 7830 —3.17 

Industrie*, 82649 821 « S3133 —7.97 

BOJ*I 498.14 69341 49441 —14* 

Insurance 92451 91957 92148 — 3JB 

Rnonce 091.13 80X05 88844 —144 

Transe. aoo.17 7TC25 79447 +10 

Telecom 17842 17555 17575 —2.13 


A— EX Stock Indag 

Hob Low Lost CM. 
48142 47749 479.13 —144 

Paw Jjonaa Bond Aworagos 

dost dfoe 
20 Bonds I04J9 —0.13 

10 WBJftos 10115 —cun 

10 Industrials 10641 —033 

MarketidH 


German Rate Doubts 
Drive Down the Dollar 


NYSE Diary 



EUROPEAN FUTURES 


Om HMO Law piwv.Oom 


COCOA CLOD 

SMrlMPor metric tanJon of »lm 
MV m m 895 B80 887 « 

May 9oi 152 so* gra sis m 

m *n ?« ?n m m m 

Sap 927 928 938 71? 923 925 

DtC 943 944 N6 93? KA TLA. 

MOT 957 938 956 951 — — 

MOT 965 970 963 W3 — — 

Jul 974 n? N.T. M.T. — — 

S8P 98* 089 N.T. NX — — 

Dtc WO 1005 N.T. M.T. — — 

Erf. volume: 4035 
COFFEE (LCEJ 

Donors per metric tow-fats of 3 tans - 
Mor ia» W» 1,21? UK 1215 U1B 

May ms w* % r m ism ljan 1,221 

JU 1,207 1300 L218 1208 1012 1415 

$ m IM 1011 USD I m U15 1017 

HOV 1,210 UI2 1J30 U13 U15 1,214 

Jan LW U12 12ZB 1215 W» ISIS 

MOT 1.203 IJB 1317 I OR N.T. 1515 

EtaL volume; 6.116 

HIP Low Cbm one 
WHITE SUGAR P*allf) 

Donors per metric taa-Ma of 5i tons 
Mr 31040 30740 30440 31940 + QJ0 

May 30640 30400 30440 3B6J0 4- ISO 

» N-T- N.T. 304L38 30600 4- 1 JO 
29300 N.T. 29140 21340 + 040 
DK N.T. N.T. 289 AO 291+0 + B» 

MOT 290J0 N.T. 29040 29Z00 + 535 

Ext. volume: 592. Open lid.: 13071. 


Metals 

OOM Previous 

DM Att. Bid Aik 

ALUMINUM (Moft Grader 
Doifori per metric too 

gw I»AM 103540 185UD 185AM , 

fy>grd >87140 1(7640 1(7640 187740 j TJSVsJams 

DoHan per raelrlc Ion 

Spot . «40 48640 489 JO 49050 

Forward 49UQ 49940 50340 50350 

NICKEL 

Dollnra or —trie tag 

-5PO« 577040 578040 574000 574500 

Forward 583040 554840 550500 580540 

Donor* par metric ton 
S»l 536740 53)040 514040 534&09 

Daflan par me&lc laa 

Sp ot 95140 95240 96440 96540 

Forward 969 JD 97000 103340 103540 


Industrial 

won Low Lot some one 
CASOILUPE) 

UL5L doOan per mettfc IopMi otiw ton 


MT 14340 141 JS 142 35 14175 +US 

I May - 142JS 14140 UL7S Hl» + 8 JS 

Jim 142.25 lOJD MZ SO 14JJ0 +ES 

I JM 14450 14X50 144JSB U4M +0M 

mp mm urn M640 +ms 

sea 15040 14740 149 JO 1494Q +a£ 

Od ism 15073 13175 15240 N.T. 

HVf 15U8 15340 T&00 ISAM K.T. 

DK 15025 15425 15475 15440 NT! 

EsLvokme: 26403. OnaloL 120MM9 i . 

sr ss as as 

May 1341 .1160 1176 1174 +0LBI 

Jam 1448 1345 1440 EL99 +005 

JOI U36 1440 1448 1441 — UH 

Mg I4j» 1427 M2? M27 +045 

s SS VS VS 

Nov 1444 UM 1446 1441—849 

E*l. vakmw: 47 JU . Opan brt. 163L488 

Stock indexes 

FTSEMOtL Ml ^ ° 8 *°— 
OSporfMaKPOtM 

Mar 34484 33844 3ms — 3QJ 

JOB 34534 3435J 34144 —305 

EsL volmmcrniMt. O m lnt?*U67. — 81 * 
Inn Pmtiaiaam ewe flUKP A 


DtvManda 


UA Jobless Qaims Drop 47,000 

«,000, to 374,000, according to a Bioombergau^- JfltteWCTOTS 

week, daims'rose a revised 50,000, to4j3,W0i 

increase of 59,000, to 422,00a Last wetfs TOSthe largest since a 

doaeasc of 5^000 daims in the week ended Juiyil. . 

analysts sra^dris month V Bhw Chip 
Sedtma, Ariama, newsletter^ sees the eoonotmr 
this year. Jf so, ii would be the fastest growth snee 3S percent m vm* 

Moodfs Downgrades Walt Disney 

NEW YORK (Reotere^Mood^s Inves ^sServfc g Inc. aj M Tteg. 

and medium-term notes to AI from Aa3- . . ' 

About SU bfflxm of kmg-tenn debt secunheswereaggted. . 

The downgrades reflect Moody’s expectation that Eu roPffiMfy bCA s 
operating performance vrill remain under pressure, increasing Wait 
Disney’s r& esmosure if ft continues to back tho amusement part, of 
wbidi ft owis 4$ percent. ... 

BFGoodridhi Is Profitable Again 

AKRON, Ohio (Combined Dispatches)— BFGoodrich said Thmsday 
that it had returned to profitabffity in the fourth quarter and all <tf 1W3 


583040 JB4840 58 MM 5S8S4P 


CV REIT .27 

*-l tarSravtnoMWhsilMMPiM 
INITIAL 

AnuMtnduOo - .» 

AHonnsOraap - JB5 

BabMn Lyon AAB n - 45 

Safinn wndwd in . .1187 

IRREOULAR 

British Patrol AOR x jn 

Entonvan Tod Rot - • 435 

FOrral&p _ 44 

PatnaWMr PrmHUn ■ ..1125 


2-» 30 
+1 4-15 
2-22 341 

2-18 2-38 


2-25 « 

2-15- 2-38 
2-21 348 
2-W MS 


Compiled by Oar Staff From Dispatcher 

NEW YORK — The dollar feO in 
active trading Thursday after a 
member of the Bundesbank’s poli- 
cymaking body hinted the German 
central bank might not be inclined 
to reduce interest rales immediately. 

The member, Hans-Jiirgen 
Knapp, said the Bundesbank would 

Foreign Exchange 

not take any action that could 
cause the dollar to “overshoot" 
against the Deutsche mark. 

Mr. Krupp also was quoted as 
saying the Bundesbank was moni- 
toring the effect on the foreign- 
exchange market of the Federal 
Reserve Board’s increase in short- 
term U.S. interest rates last week. 
The dollar has risen against the 
mark and other major European 
currencies since the Fed acted. 

Earlier. Otto Lambsdorff, a for- 
mer German economics minister, 
was quoted as saying that Fridays 
increase by the Fed had made It 
difficult harder for the Bundesbank 
to cat rates. 

At the end of New Yorit trading, 
the dollar was quoted at 1.7554 
DM, down from 1.7575 DM on 


Wednesday, and at 108.25 yen, 
compared with 10835 yen. The 
U.S. currency fell to 5.9515 French 
francs Tram 5.9725, but it edged up 
to 1.4793 Swiss francs from 1.4785. 

The pound, rebounding from a 
seven-year low readied Wednes- 
day, rose to 51.4625 from 51.4605. 

Some analysts said that Toes- , 
day’s quarter-point reduction in 
the Bank of England’s mtnimmm | 
lending rale appeared to have been 
inspired more by political than by 
economic factors, damaging the 
credibility of British officials. 

Amy Smith, senior foreign-ex- 
change analyst for the consulting 
firm IDEA, said one of the reasons 
the dollar eased against the yen was 
a belief the U3. -Japanese trade 
talks were not likely to succeed and 
the U3. Treasury might try to “talk 
the yen higher” as a means of re- 
ducing Japan’s trade surplus. 

Hugh Walsh, a dealer at ENG 
Capital Markets, said traders had 
started selling dollars for marks 
and' Swiss francs after the dollar 
retreated below 1.7640 DM on 
Wednesday. He said more selling 
orders bad been triggered Thurs- 
day when the dollar fell below a 
support level at 1.7550 DM. 

(AFX, Reuters} 


m 1289 

1317 850 

415 600 

2739 2739 

74 98 

52 46 


278 344 

314 267 

231 705 

825 836 

14 18 

II 11 


AOvaneod 
Declined 
Undmuod 
TOfcd issues 
NewHiatis 

NOW LOWS 


Amu Diary 


ToW issues 
New Highs 
New Lows 


NASDAQ Diary 


Advanced 

Declined 

Unchanged 
Total Issues 


Certain oflcrinis of securities, fiaudal 
services or aaercm a ml ww, paMafced in 
tku new spaper are not authorized in couin 
joufretkan in «4ddi tbe Isteimtianil Herald 
Tribune ii datribmed. inc lading the United 
States of America, and do am constitute 
offerings of KCariSes, services or Interna in 
tbssc jurisdictions. The Imenntioaal Herald 
Tribune assumes ao responsrixfity triuBocm 
fix any a dv q liatnrnt t for offering of any land. 


N.Y.S.E. Odd-Lot Trading 

Buy Safes short- 
Fefc 9 1457,144 1316232 49245 

Feb. 8 1467383 <319417 21J86 

FetL 7 1279356 142SL996 34281 1 

Fab. 4 1437488 1.926479 55432 

Fab. 3 938.146 1367332 41309 

•tnctudeiS In the sates fauna. 

SAP lOO Index Options 


PrfcnFct) Hr 4tr Ibr M Mr 4or ibr 
3B - - - - h 1 - - 

385-----%-- 
B9- — — — r. H- — 

3i - - - - 

408 — — — — 'A "WiT%3Jt 

«5--_ - *%1%- 

— aiaSiM 
IK — — — — U 1% 2% — 

CD - au- - % I W 7% 5% 
m i« 16* — - % »4ta- 

« !H IM V - % 3b Si 71* 

tt » H «P, - K A A - 

M^nKnnnnii 
m % 3 d — 4% 916 11 — 

« h MW 3 4%1I%n%14^IM 

4Sk,%MW—1Chl7 — — 

4H«W'6<niF«— — — - 

46S—SWV — — — — — 

Cettt: total «d 6546; total outn mL5ta«l 
Ads: taM VOL 127218; Mtd Bpen H. man 

Wffi OacN Dec 15 DctN Dec N DacB DacN 

37% - - — SW — - 

4fl — — — « 1% - 

«fc 7% - - 11k MW - 

43 1% - - IS ft — 

GdlE him raL 14; latd eeen U. TUB 
9NK total sd. 2437; MM open HR. 10*11 
SHtaKCME 


Financial 

Hkdl Inge l*lnam flyMM 

34HONTH STIRLING (LIFFEJ 
■SBMM - Pis of Ml Pet 

Mar 9440 9427 9429 Unch. 

Jmi MJ3 9430 9432 — 842 

Sep 9449 9433 9*17 Unch. 

DK 9429 9422 9426 — 042 

MOT 9431 9434 9437 — 0SM 

Jets 9430 9422 9426 —845 

Sep 9421 94.12 94JS —BBS 

DSC 9442 9333 9356 —846 

MOT 9148 9U8 9379 — 8D7 

Jvn 9324 9337 9335 — 348 

EsL vohpne: 4M76. open kit.: 43U46. 
S4WONTH EURODOLLARS C LIFFEJ 
81 ntOJoa-ptsof M8pa 
MOT 9627 9137 9427 Unch. 

JOB 9637 9646 9646 UodL 

Sep 9524 9574 9523 Unch. 

DOC M2S 9534 9533 Unch. 

Mar N.T. N.T. 9517 + 041 

Jon N.T. N.T. 9633 +041 

SOP N.T. N.T. 9423 -1-042 

ESI. volume: 475. open irtL: 11350- 
3JHOHTH EIIROMAfUCS {LIFFEJ 
DM1 mlMao - pis of uo pet 
Mar 9422 9427 9420 —041 

Jan 9426 9449 9424 —841 

SB*. 55.S7 95® 9545 UndJ. 

DK 9525 95.18 9522 UndL 

MOT 9535 55-3® 9133 Unch. 

Jmi 9SJ4 KSJm 9533 Unch 

SOP 9529 9522 9524 — 842 

OK 9518 9571 9574 —841 

Mar 9545 S5.08 S* Unch 

Jan 9432 9446 9431 —0471 

Est. volume: 115417. Open bit.: 952221. 
LpNOBlLTOJFFEI 
(SUM ■ pis & 32mts Of HO Pd 
Mar 116-08 11546 713-24 —045 

Jan 115-16 11+25 11543 —046 

Est. volume: 121401. Open Inti 156079. 
GER44AN GOVERNMENT BUND tUFFE} 
DM 258480 - Pts «l 188 PCI 
Mer 91-36 ELM 99.17 —an 

JOS 9923 9828 WM —004 

Est. volume: 718489. Open bit: 2^047. 


AtnmnwFreioM 
Aicm AhDn 
Allegheny Lutfiam 
Arytalnttnf 
AHanfo Gas 
Bomwen indast 
CtanMnocm 
Colonial Oas 
CottCorp 
Cummins Engine 

DawCJwmtcnl 

EnerstsSAADR 
Gen Houseworm 
Global HI I ncoDU r 
Haftann Income 
■nil Alum 

MacMillan Bleedel 
Modern Controls 
Nil OtY Bncshrs 
NattensGvtncD 2803 
Nan Sanitary 
Manama Forest 
, Occidental Peiral 
1 PocMCorp 


O 475 2-21 M 
Q 475 242 3-22 
O .12 248 +1 

^7 

Q JQ 3-Tl MS 
a J» 1-25 3-17 
a 31 3-1 3-15 

a 42 3-18 MS 
a .125 >1 3-15 

a 45 341 +29 
X .1125 2-18 
O 48 3-17 

M .US 3-18 
M .12 2-18 

Q 23 3-21 

a .15 2-22 

Q 45 54 

Q 22 344 

M m MS 

Q 46 2-22 

« M 34 
25 3-10 
O 27 +22 

Q 45 2-25 ■ 

B 26 2-21 

G M- *73 

a 32 2-28 

M MS 248 

O 32 H 

G 48 245 


Provident Lf AAB Q 36 7 

RatiMtDOttr G .14- > 

State Mull Secur O 42 2 

2002 Target Teem- M 4M 2 

VF Carp Q 42 5 

Western invRE a 48 2 

Mipprac amaaM per starh 

STOCK 

Fuji ptnto ADR approx amount Per 
q-obumuI; m iwyable hi Co n odta n fa 
Htaa Bd y; +< ia anerty> Men twaaa 


Spot ComnodttlM 


oiKTHmsaraiicataa. .. 

’■ Much of the gain was attributable to profit from discontntued opera- 
tions, but tbc company its to its specialty chemicals and aerospace 

divisions for die annual peformanceL 

BFGoodrich earned S&L5 million, or S2JA per share, in the last mree 
months of 1993 in contrast to aloss of $ 2 L 7 m 3 BaaaycareariiCT. Saks 
for the quarter rose 21. 6 percent, to M883nnffiioii,£rMn $401.4 milBmjn 
1992. For the year, BFGoodridi erased S12&3 million, orS4. 62 per sl^c, 
in contrast to a loss of J295.9 miirkm ,-™ 1992- Annual sales rose I0J 
percent to SI. 82 bUBcra from S1.65 bfflkm in 1992. ■ (AP, Bloomberg) 

Syron Is Named Amex Chainnan 

NEW- YORK (Comtsued Di^atches) — The American Stock Ex- 
change's governors on Thur sday named Richard F. Syron, president of the 
Federal Reserve Bank tif Boston, file adumgeft ltth chairman. Mr. ^yrrai 
wfll assume office April U He succeeds James Jones, who was appointed 
ambassador to Mexico by President Bill CKnton m August. 

Mr Syrrm j rwna fhei Ameri cam wiacmdal time. ItrnXHteda 

km> of SI J nuDkm in 1991 before reibooiidmgwitft a profit of $1.4 million 
in 1992. By contrast, theNew York Stock Exchange earned $40.8 mHhon 
in 1992 and the National Association, of Securities Dealers Inc. earned 
S35.1 mfllkjn in 1992. . (Knt&il-Riddcr, Bloomberg) 

For fire Record 

Hasbro loti, said its fomtb-qnarter earnings before a charge increased 
.23 percent on h^her sales of classic games such as Monopoly and of 
newer toys Eke Barney the dinosaur. In the latest quarter, a $10 nuHian 
restrncturing charge produced net income of $70.7 milKa n. (Bloomberg) 

BANANAS: Latins Pursue EU 


Cmunatflty 

Today 

Ptwv. 

Atom mum, lb 

8571 

8575 

Cotfea. Brac.tb 
COBpprelectrotytlc.B> 

0+7 

LOU 

0+6S- 
* UJ4 

Iran FOB, Ion 

213JD0 

213X0 

Load, lb 

834 

834 

saw. troroB 

50 

50 

stteJ (scrap), tan 

13X33 

13131 

Tin, ns 

3+023 

315897 

zineb 

a+ora 

8+002 


Canfimed from Page 11 
lapse if not accepted^ byTnesday. 

Foreign Miniver Marithza Ruiz 
de Yidman of jGnattanala..sakI she 
still hoped the Europeans would 
n^ptiate a compromise, largely be- 
caase a pand of die General Agreo- 
menton Tariffs and Trade has con- 
demned Europe's banana barriers 
as protectionist in a report, to be. 
released offiaafly Friday. 


Paris Lets 3 Shareholders Merge Stakes in Canal Plus 

Rouen tioa.said Thursday, but tine companies will not are normalhr obliged to make a bid for 

PARIS — Agence Havas, CompagnieGraer- be required to bid for more as is usual in such thirds, but the market watchd^ agency a 


Reuters 

PARIS — Agence Havas, Compagnie Gener- 
ate des Eaux and Society Generate plan to fuse 
their slakes in Canal Plus S A. taking their joint 
holding in the cable television station to 48.7 
percent, the French stock exchanges assoda- 


firmnKtanrK 

Under French regulations, when a company 
or companies acting in concert take their stake 
above one-third of another corporation, they 


are normally obliged to make a bid for two- 
thiids, but the market ^ watchdcqs agency accept- 
ed a request from the companies . 

Havas currently holds 23 5 percent of Canal 
Plus; GfateraJe des Eaux has 20.1 percent and 
Soabok Gfateraic 5.1 percent. • - 


noted. If Europe does not heed the 
findings, she added,, the Latin 
countries wifl. demand grwthw in- 
vestigation wbea-the-Worid Trade 
Orgrutizatian succeeds the GATT 
next year, wife power to enforce 
pand dedskus to tire first time. 

“I assure you you wiH have Panel 
Na 3, and we will win Pand No. 
3,” tire said. 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


U.S. FUTURES 


Seam Seaaati 
HWi Low 


Opal Won Low data Os Oam hm> . Low 


The Latin Americans sayEarope, 
can play ^by fair trade rules without 
harming its ACP allies. Their plan 
would hare Europe channel its tar- 
iff income back to the ACP coun- 
tries as directaid, rather than osing 
current quotas and tariffs to guar- 
antee those countries some 20 per- 
cent of theEU market at prices wdl 
above what the Latins charge. . 

. But the comnrisskm official, who 
spoke on conditioiiTrf anonymity, 
said the tariff cuts proposed by the 
Latins would dash by at least half 
the 200 nriQiau Ecus CS22I imlfian) 
raised by -banana- tariffs last yea r. 
Betides, he smd of the ACT Woe, 
*fif they- can’t sell their product, all 
the direct aid in the wodd won’t 
help them.” 

Brandon Mttchener in Frankfurt 
contributed ta this article. • ■ 


Opwt im Low Clan Cha Qatar 


Agones Fionca Rrusa Feb. 10 


Amsterdam 

A3N Amro HU 68.10 68.10 
ACF HaUlna WJ.70 60 

A««an 10 *^D ms 

Ahold 52.19 S3 

Alja 210.10 3 w 

AJAEV E un 82.*® 

Bob-Wcuonen 44.93 44 SO 
CSIA 75.10 7529 

DSM 112J3 1KL50 

Ebewier 1BE40 19 ijo 

FoJcker 22.70 2XtD 

GJF-Broarfes 5520 55 JO 
HBG 234 53253 

HoJlH+K 23550 23440 
Hoosa-vw 62.40 6453 


Vn AwodaNd Fnm 


Season Season 
HW Low 


Open Htah Law Close Cha Op.tr* 


Helsinki 


Amer-Yirtyma 

128 

10 

EnK+GuDelt 

45 4S20 

Hutrtamotcl 

200 

01 

K.OP. 

16.10 

I6J0 

Kymmene 

125 

10 

Metro 

235 

237 

Nokia 

325 

30 

Porno k. 

99 

100 

Reno la 

117 

118 

Stockmann 

315 

320 


HEX Index ; 193X4 
Pnfyiaa* ; i«54i 


Hunter Douote: !750 8650 
4160 44 

s-® **■» 

•jtn Nedertand «aio 8950 


KLM 

KNP BT 

NWflloyd 

Oca Orlrien 

PoUwed 

ritri lias 

7Clr#i v . 1 1 

FsCKO 

Rodamco 

Rcifnca 

NSfM fO 

Bavol [>.-ch 

Static 
'Jrllevw 
Van Gfnmerr 
VNU 


a:z sis 

SO 50 48 

SJ49 TtLB 

56 S5.1D 
4750 <7.90 

81» 8450 

10353 12959 
t!M 6440 
134.73 1 2343 
KB--:' ltM 10 
21 :.JC 21350 
42.93 *15! 
220JS 23240 
51.?3 » 

199.33 T9183 


Johannesburg 

lAECI £ 18.73 

ArotoAnwr 2W 

rlows NA 2945 


y;o1ters/Kl-.-wcr TT853 72163 


Blvvcor 
Birtltfi 
De Beers 

□rlefontaln 
Gencor 
GFSA 
Harmony 
Hlghveld Steel 

Kloof „ 

NwttoankGra 

Randlunteln 

Rinptal 

5A Brewi 
51 Helena 
Sasoi 
yiieikam 
WcmemDow 

z&sp.mi 


750 8 

NA 49 

no lw 

5025 50.75 
835 AS 
8950 91 

2550 25 

1725 16J5 
45 46SC 
S 2775 
3950 4050 
75 74 

87 SS 

40 40 
2253 2225 

41 41 
760 7(5 

: 484433 


Brussels 


AMC-U.V. 
-AG Fin 
P tried 
Bnrca 

•tokocrl 

Cocfcerlll 

Coseoa 

DeF»m 

EiecJraari 

GI8 

GBL 

Gaeaeri 

Kradlclricn* 

Petrafina 

Pcwe rfln 

Rawl Beige 


7723 2793 
2X0 3000 
<290 <745 
2330 2360 
24500 23725 
179 IK) 
5740 5780 
1*63 149* 
6250 tJO 
1560 -550 
4330 CTC 
wn ifK 
tua 7«o 
10675 JC900 
TZf) 3255 
6030 6013 


•! Markets Closed teSSTSaS? 


Roval Scot 
RTZ 

Sakariurv 
ScufNewen 
Sent Power 
Sears Hotas — 
Severn Trent 5.99 

— 731 

s5I 

Smlrn Nephew 149 

SnriThKllne B +15 

Smirti rmu 4*7 

Sun AB lanes 
Tata & Ltrle 

Thant EMI 
Tartarins 
TS 8 Groua 
'Jnllever 
Uld Biscuits 
votiafone mb 

TScrLacnT'S 5141 

Wellcome 
Whltferaad 

wiilionw HOSTS 3.96 

Wilis Carraan US 


Madrid 

BBV 3415 3438 

Bca Central HKt>. THiu 2990 

Bata Santander 7JM 7ZSO 

CEPSA 3200 3T75 

ora goaos 2B5 2S90 

EreJeia 7580 7680 

E rents .149 uo 

trierarala I 1140 1139 

Ormol 4815 4800 

Tosccciera an 

Telefonica 2T20 7168 

SJE. GenerqlliMa : 25353 


Gen. Eau* 7787 2749 

Havas 46850 469 JO 

Imatal 650 644 

Lotorge Coeaee 46&M669JO 
Uegrand 5800 5820 

Lvon. Eaux 591 594 

OreaitL'l 130 w 

LVJVIH. 3900 3905 

Mctro+tadierte T7A.S1 17130 
Mkmlln B 259 JO 262J0 

Moulllies 12+50 124.90 

POfUxts 550 550 

Pechlnevlntl 215 72490 

Pernoo-Rlcard 42041820 
PautJBOt *7® 847 

FrtHw no s (Au) 1033 1033 

BotHotaetmlaue 541 sa 

Kts-Poulenc A 149^1 ISO 

Rati. 51. Loub 1705 1690 

RetJaute (La) 1027 Tim 

Satat Gctoaln 474 M» 

5.E.B. SOD 583 

SM GAINVUle TUB 723 

Sun 36140 35820 

Thnmson-CSF 199JD 196J0 
Tatot 35180 34820 

UJU*. 210 J 0212 JO 

Valeo 1513 1520 


Sao Paulo 


Banco Oo Brasil 

Banrsftl 

Bntdesco 

Bronmo 

mmawmo 

Pelt (jU m 

Teieoras 

Vale RIoDoce 

Var la 

a: m 701 

KSESTSSi' 


1350 1270 
.jwg sere 
I12X V3G0 
1550a 1400a 
1440 1313 
HIM 9900 
28100 25300 
61500 29000 

icooa moo 


See Gen Banaue MM 
5oc Gen Seta isue 2345 .2845 

senna isisc l!J90 

solve/ 131W 15130 

SS*" assyg 


Frankfurt 

AEG MA 16X83 

Allianz Hgta 2659 UI7 
AHecCT 6*8 60 

Aska 1100 1163 

BASF 29850 390 

Sever 361 a* 

bct. Mraa bonk _ 456 4<s 

Bev VareSisbk 511 SS 536 
BBC 669 670 

BHF Bonk 
BMW 

CotonerrurJc 
Continental 
Daimler' Bent 


66? 670 

<344850 
£33 777 
15915+50 
2S6J9 250 
67981060 

489 474 

Utfeacoefc 25156 250 

□wtacSie Bank 811 BOI 

3dUB»S 571 560 

OftfCntf Bank 4104Q1M 

FeMmu e Me 3373345= 

"F Krusa Hsesdi 1B51BZ50 
H uu eiuw 323 J15 

Harkal 62130615J0 

■Hoctiihri 1210 1170 

Moeetsl MIX 298 

H Uzi iiann 1900 995 

N?r!en 236 236 

IWKA 391 386 

Krill Sail 157 JO 158 

Kerstwa s«S34ja 

KCuffXH JPJO 478 

KHO 124.0 IB 

KEoeOcner Werae U5 125 

unae ..JB3 854 

UimuBwe U1J0181J0 

MAN SOt 430 

Momesmenn <3643850 

Metsneesed msa m 

Muensn Rueck i5M 2580 

PortCh* .8^, 818 

Prtussos 46550455a 

PWA 237 227 

RWE 46>a4«2a 

Rneinmetall iso 3H 

E^erlna WJg 

SEL 388396J0 

Stamens 69580 689 

Ttivssen 259 

verts 3JT 

Veto 488J0W129 

VEW 360 357 

Vise ~ — 

wStS Umim 70S 798 

KSSSTfiES" 
ESJSSi «T 


The stock markets 
in Hong Kong and 
Singapore were closed 
Thursday for a holi- 
day. 

London 

Abu< Notl 4.99 
AII*K Lyons 6.18 
A-'lD WtaBlns 2.78 2.96 

Aravll Groin US 
AssBiit Foods 56S 
BAA 1045 1055 

BAe SM 

! Bone Scoriend 277 


BAT 5 

BET 

Blue Circle 
BOC Grain 
Boots 

BawnlOT 

BP ASS 

Bril Airways 475 

Brit Gas 

Bril Steel 1/2 

Bril Totecom 4 J6 

BTR 181 

Cede Wire 
CadbufY Set) 

Ceradon 4.M 

coats VJvatla 27? 

Comm Unfcta 645 

CaarteuiK 5.13 

ECC Grauu 
Enterprise oil am 

Eurotunnel 520 

Flsans 1 J 6 

Forte 251 

GEC 144 

Gen‘1 Acc 648 

Giera ssa 

Grand Met 447 

GRE 127 

Cutanea 8.13 

G ‘ JS H5 

Hanson 299 

HKfsObwn IJ7 

HSBC HKtSS KL5Z 

,CI KS 

InctMxoe US 

HJnafWwr 645 

Lodoroke Iffl 

Land Sec 7J» 

Lasorw 
Lcsmo _ 

Lm oi Gen Grp 5B8 

Ltoyds Bank 615 

Manu So 
ME PC 
Non Power 
NafWost — 

Nitiwst water 543 

Pearson 
P&O 
pnkinaton 
PewerGen 
Prudent id 

Rank Ora 1845 

RecklH Cal 
Redtand 
Reed mti 

Reuters 2345 

ftMC Grata 
Ralls Ravce !-o; 

Rethmn Hrtt) +54 


Milan 

Banco Comm 5490 5625 
Bostael 85J0 8625 1 

Benafrcn stous 2 a9?S 26 4 0 0 


Stockholm 


Kubota 
Krocera 
Matsu Etec tads 
Matsu EtecWks 
MltSUMsM Bfc . 
MifsuUsM Kasei 
Mitsubishi Etac 
Mitsubishi Hev 
Mttsublsni Carp 
Mitsui and Co 
MiimiuaM 
Mitsumi 
NEC 

NGK InsuWnrs 
Nik ho securities 
NipaanKaeaku 
Niaaonon 
Nippon Steel 
Nippon Yusen 
Nissan 
notwcSk 
NTT 

Olympus Cptlcd 
Pkncer 
Ricoh 
Sanyo EIk 
Sham 
5WraoIu_ 
Shlnetsu Chem 
Sony 

S umitomo B k 
Suinllumc CSlem 
5urni Marine 
Sumltamc /AetaJ 
TalselCerp 
Toisho Marine 
Takeaa Chem 
TDK 
TfliiJn 

To* <0 -Marine 
Tokyo Elec Pw 
T oaten Print:™ 
Torav inc. 
TosriOc 
To’/cta 
V araoM 5ec 
a: < IX. 

Mkto l 225 : 79991 

?ss?^i; 3 i 8 . 

Prey loos : 1598 


Toronto 


629 620 

eeec 67 a 

1720 1630 
1120 1129 
3BM 2360 
47B 471 

573 563 

701 711 

1090 1000 
739 732 

870 
1900 1380 
104C 1C40 
106C TOW 

13GC 1290 ! 
957 946 i 
720 73 

3(9 ZS3 
615 All 
SS 525-1 
S9G 2250 ! 
9550a 943a ! 
157C 1CSC . 
31X 3TSC > 

777 795 1 

461 US . 
1640 1600 I 
686 6 .T l 
1930 1923 i 
6 I» 4HC 
TITO 21*C I 
442 45C \ 

595 9'5 
3S 790 - 
753 73 ! 

855 340 i 
1230 ™ ; 
4270 C40 i 
4H 452 : 
325 1329 : 
340C 34E- 

313 ir: 

66C S6C | 
74c 7T 
9X :jk\ 
Ml 867 


MccLean Hunter 17 
MdMOA 27 

Name I.Td A _T> 
Ptcrcndri Inc 24** 
Noroneta Fcrest fTki 
Noraen Enerar 15V« 
Ninerr. Telecom <1^ 
NriVriCorp 9 j* 

Csno«E 2T.U 

PS3U?lhA 160 

Placer a™ K’i 
Paco Peiralecra ]0 
PAA Cara 1 J4 

gey roc* rr*. 

Renaissance 79 v, 
Raoetsa 20 

R i it ir+na 97 

Rcral Senk Csn W 
Scaorre Res •£« 
scctrsKriSP W t 
Sees ram *> 

Sears Can Fu 

Ine * 1 Can 39-^ 

Srierr.lt Gerttan li-4 
5HL Sntemwe IPs 
Southe rn IT'S 

Socr Aeraoac* l»Jk 
StalCSA 8 > 

■'oJtsmon Enera X-i 
Tear S 26-y 

Thomsen News 17 
Tc-o n ta&wm CTJfc 
TlriStarG Sy 

TlsMtflri U!:l TSJi 
“rc-iC*5 P.x T9J. 
Tr. an F-rl A *15 
Tr;-s=c :t m u 

TrlzK A 3.W 

u-.ss-p Enerav XS5 
TSE joa lad**: 444530 


CIR 22*9 22BD 

Ored Ital 26 « 36® 

Enienem 2499 2660 

Ferfln 2055 2917 

Ferfln Rlxo 825 781 

FlOtSPA 4912 4850 

Ftamecconlcc 1ES0 less 

Generali 405*5 4000 

I FI 19360 19158 

Itakwn 132*8 ima 

itaisas 587T ms 

itaiDWriUlore 402TO jnso 

Medlaricica IMS) ms 

Montedison ilff 11 S3 

Olivetti 2*28 2440 

Pirelli 4540 4400 

RAS 3*0027050 

Ri*iCK»ita iciOO ITOJ 

salpem 3605 3495 

San Paata Tori no loan ictfo 

sip 4401 am 

5ME 3*70 3930 

Snta 1959 1909 

Stands 3*50 SOW 

SMI 4749 4*01 

Toro ASSl R)3D 30750 30199 


AGA 
ASM A 
Astro A 
Alias Copco 
E lectrolux B 

Ericsson 356 3*1 BCE *t 

ESielK-A 126 124 Be Nava SCCKa X’-'s 

Handetsricml'mi 136 130 BC Gel 18*9 

investor b 30J Sa HC Telecom 

Norsk. HrQro 2S1257J0 BF Realty Hds M3 

Procardia AF 14 s im Bramctaa C.4T 

sandvik B 132 136 Brunswick e 

SCA-A 144 Mi CAE Oje 

S-E Batken 6+58 67 Camdev 5-5 

SteTdtaF IB? 188 CIBC 

SkonrtD no ns cenadiar PeciHe S*< 

SXF 141 J4I CcnPOcem-f IPS 

Stora 460 464 Can Tire A 12’: 

TreUeoora BF m V Carter « 

Valve 657 673 Coro i«Q 

Atf u e rs vaertaM : 17tW2 CCLInd B 13*; 

prtviaws : KT*.)? ^ 

_ Ccnwmt E»a_ 22 H 

Der.lsan tfm B Zt* 

Tokyo Olekenser Min A 4« 

■ Hijlij tfft ?i p- 

Akal Eleetr 684 463 ZJA 

ASM Chemical n? 698 Ect» Ba» Mines 

1170 tiro EwitvsTiver a T£< 

B atik at Tefc ra 1580 1580 p^A tall 4 13 

Fed ina A B't 

Canon JMO JMO FletcherOwnA 

CatlO tin 1120 Fpi +9a 

DOI Nippon Print 1820 17S8 ainfra S 

Daivn House I M0 16*0 GpidCarp p, 

□ohm SeairlTies I71Q 1880 Gull Cde Res <- 

. *55 SSS Hees inn W<s 

L u SZS. SS Hernia GId Mines ! J 

Full Phata 249D 2520 HoJILnoar t/^ 

'2S ■*£ 

Hiioon 900 898 Hudsons Boy 791 

HltaettCaHe 845 855 irrSra 

Hondo 1620 T44C 3SV. 

ItaYokodo 5680 ag iitterarae otoe 23+, 

lioctMl 665 IB jannoct 1 ~ ", 

Japan Airlines 649 66* LdMtt H 1 * 

riolkmo 952 949 LODtowCQ 7z0 

— an V* Mockmcio 1T--9 

RSwasdETsSS Bl na Maanalnt.'A sss* 

Klrbi Brewery 1220 1750 Moriiime M's 

KMMtsu PS 865 1 Mqric Pet _ 81a 


435 435 Ariilfin Price !7 f » 

555 565 Aonlca Eagle IV-i 1* 

171 im AirCanad 6*5 6 

445 449 Airierta Enerar S 

3*6 404 Am Barrlrt: Res 35*s 74 


Sydney 


6.18V] Jon 95 6-53 

653 

6509* 

ism-aoov> 

1,786 

880 

7U0 Oct K 

M+0 

6*2 Mar « eJB'.j 

*58 '- 1 

651 


298 

mo 


KB 

5*l'iNOv95 622 

US', 1 

60 

ua*-. *aoi>u 

07 

917 

9898 

B*. safes 

B90DK9S *875 1875 BUS 

NA WWi.«St* 1500 

8830 


! previous : 1 ( 26.12 


Tokyo 


Montreal 


Alcan Afcnlrwn 3TH 32^ 

Ba* Montreal HU, jgia 

Ben Canada <3*. *r\ 

Bcmbardtar B X'n ZTi 

Cambtor JI'a 21 n 

Cascades Ft 8 

□cm in lor: Text A ft 71 

Dcnetiue A 26'+ SB* 

MseMUtan Bl 23 3'6 

Natl Bk Canada Ji u 

Power Cora. wh 

Oueaec Tel 31« r.ta 

OueOecor A 19 19 

OuebeearB 19 n 

TeMOlCbe 20*6 2946 

Untvo Tm rv i 

Vtoeetran 2954 Vm 

BSSSWl^ 


Arcf 7322 

*'i: sc 

0HP 12-0 

Sera: +45 

Bccseinv 1 .:* iJo 
Zsm Vyer S.13 

Osmc-os 5JB 

ZOA 1640 

CSP , 5 

£45 

Passers anew 133 
Good-nan Field T.to 
13. AUSTCSIQ 1U3 
tacaeitan 2.15 

mim 1P1 

NSSAjUBanli 12.18 
sews Csra 1114 
Stae Netww-t 6 

H Brsaee. Kll 340 
P'-opeer "ista SM 
N~ndp Peas idw 2 ao 
ZC T Resources 1.45 
Scr.tat 4 

TN7 L43 

AeSem Mini™ ?-73 
wevpacBarJiino Szo 
MOOSSiOt 461 


Zurich 


ECHO Bc» Mines !». :n 

!£3 Eau:tv Silver A T£e ! 

S» FCAtatl 4 13 * 2 : 

|430 1490 Pad IM a B'-S » 

H9 J3JS Fletcher Own A IC=s 


' B ft? 267 | 

-.tf ase 9 tew wn 618 ! 

■ 23C Brwr. to, B 13a? 7373 

. t M Ge.vv 3 930 HO 

CSW^rnasE 732 710 

' u-f* 7 *" C <123 

■ -■£»- 3 12« 1773 

:r»re-5ca.nf B ZOO inn 

. Jeir^.i B BJo 880 

LanS.cGrrR 970 9TB 
l 600 650 

, VoevetiM* B 440 425 

Nestle R 1334 13<5 

! Oe-.'it B'Jinrie R 1&S15L50 
Pcratso ma a 1615 1500 
Pnoa Hda pc 7710 Tins 

' Scl -3 Rj^XOi'C 148 145 

: Seme 9 <39 4145 

! S^-raer 3 75W 7650 
1 r Ju'.ZK PC 913 895 

. Sw-SSB-KCsraB 491 500 i 
< Swiss Reintur ft 659 sn 
Swissair R uo ns 

' -35 S !4j9 un 

'"ESSEl 


7W 710 
*53 4T23 
12*0 1373 


970 970 
600 650 
.*40 425 
1334 1345 


Grains 

WHEAT tOUW MWaiAWnn-nanwinM _ 

194 h 100 Mar 94 XtiVi 37716 37m 372V,— a03V. 01739 

172 1» MOV »4 IAS U6 262 16m-0J»'A 9^87 

156 1» JUM 150 15016 148 1487,-001 ft 1«77 

up.. 103 s*p 9< ui ui ie w -om«. un 

165 J » Dec 94 257Ui 29 156*4 3JT<— 0JB 3447 

142 111 A49S 241 7 

Est.sdes NA. Wed's, sites 119» 

WfCTS Ope n Ire 50 387 up 458 
WHEAT ewi smivnaiTu»-<atniw Iw4wl 
197 298 Marta 268 168 Vi 366 26615-001 1X447 

279 T 4 2.98 Mav94 261 1615* 15Tti 15055—00111 8040 

155 297 JUM 1477i 3471h 34*51 K4V, — OJOH. 104C4 

155'.i lC2HSe»94 J47V, X*7!v 34541 146 —OSS2V, 1240 

16c in^Decta 1536: 133 152 152W— OOW 983 

152V, 343’:*B6cr« 154W-4MM 3 

Est soles na. wws, sues 6JW 

ntafsapantat 34+79 cH AM 

CORN loon unanTMmm.Mgnwra<M 

1114. JjnsMcrM 23SVs ita 2*3 2*5 -00056 8X385 

Hi'-* uBVsfttavta ir:v, iov< um in 974*6 

llt'-j 241 AH 94 IffT-, IDT- 181 1CI1> *00054 (2370 

29T.* ZVltaM l£*Vs 2865* ISFa 284W UJffiO 

2736. 236V/ Dec ta 173 V, 2/1 270 UWfc 46J12 

279V, 253*^ Mar 95 2 .'4- 2WV, 27SV. UtV.-SUO'^ 29M 

2D 172 M3V 95 280 28C 27W, 180 — Um 271 

7S2-, 2/41, AH 95 277VJ 281 277V, 281 639 

258' , UlUiDtcH 7J6 25*'ti 2H 236V, *WA K 

EH. K*e* NA. W+Ts-jaWs S7.9!l 
wed's ooeneit 72241Q up 1904 
SOYBEANS ICBOn 14aBtMH W WwiW».oo*ws aa r l ai W i 
7J4 SAMMcrta L7» 6J9U 6JJ 479 *08011 58JB5 

751 &97HMOV94 6J3V, 68S5. 483 4645V-MI 44J3 

:sa IM'iJulM 4JT.1 688'-* 498 48714*05193 31.113 

7J5 438 Aetata ITT/, 681 47*14 *81 *01014 *877 

689V, 6.1J 5C8M 462'i 663 640 681 -MBVi 18M 

737V, S55ViNdv94 4AV. 64U* 6454, 4*7 -OOW4 31427 

670 418“, Jnn95 633 633 650*. 437V,— ootr/l 1,784 

6JTW 642 Mar 95 e38'.j *M t 69 638 IM I 

673 642'.-, JU 95 &37Y.-A2J 717 : 

5JI’iNay*5 42! 423'. i 421 4J3K *a01>4 9T7 

Es, Wes NA UVMVWKS C34I 1 

wed's aoHiint itaJM us US 

SOYBCANMEAL ICBOT) nm-OtotHW j 

23730 1*520 MW M TW4C 19640 1WJ0 194 10 -Cl 10 30437 ! 

3008 18153 May 94 19630 IMJD 19530 I9S80 -630 H J03 ; 

74)00 IVUBJulM 194/0 m.73 1954) 19400 —UMUPSX I 

22JJB 1913364)094 19J.3J K3J0 194.10 19*20 —1 .00 VMS 

31080 WJOSraf* T7L713 19X00 192*0 1*130 — 2* 140 I 

man is7.iaoa« 19200 vkjz toad rnjo — 03 c zjm 

21980 460DK94 I9IJX 7T.H 19CAJ 19180 —020 6421 

3X30 !B65DJen95 191 70 19133 19030 19030 -070 <91 

Ea. Wes NAWK-s. scars 1X97* 
wed’soatnbir 89J*7_ utt ZB 
SOYHANOO. lOKrrj •egoca *- aatibw rcoe& 

3375 21 13 Mar 74 T8JT 2143 2U6 33JB *013 267*7 

33*5 TIJOIMbvM 2434 2U? 2835 28J8 *017 16879 

2970 71 35 AH 94 HIJ 2SJ1 28.11 2620 r0.ll 19291 

39 2G 71 AS ABB 94 Z78D 1235 1745 27.74 ~&07 5301 

sue MSw 94 2725 2T2S 3.18 7*21 *001 MM 

7/e a.noa« 742 s 7435 2*75 hjs can 

a* CIO Dec M 75J3 25JK 25*5 OJB »OD* 681 

7455 245Jtt»95 253C 3U7 2538 7158 < 089 W 

2\n 2330 MOT 95 ISJS *fi.tO If 

64CV95 1525 2525 1929 7520 

Est. Wes NA Wee’s. SOWS 7IJ3S 
taftweiw 9*254 up ir.2 

Livestock 

CATTLE KMOD «MUk-cMw6 _ 

745 7C.90WOW 7230 71.9} 7237 7223 >010 9J91 

82-1 73 70 Aor** 75.10 7530 I4J0 7 US — OM 37 

7485 71J}Jun«4 71*0 71X TIC 7X55 -005 20.K7 

*187 JCJOtalOta 7185 7113 CLJS 719S -010 1201 S 

TJ82 71IBOa*< 7160 7171 2337 I3JJ *028 8.713 

713 7235 Dec W 7380 n.90 TJS «JS .ft* 1,973 

7425 2180 Fee 95 7340 7150 •'235 rUS •OJB 6* 

E*. safes 12449 WttfLvm [1,956 
Wed’s open w W,7JC on 884 
FEEDBICATTLE ICMEP) sunm-vaaro 
8135 7922 Marta 8280 H87 K8C IftW *0.n Ult 

8580 2920 Apr 9* 79.95 8020 7985 800! —003 3436 

8140 7173 Mcirta 79.90 8080 1925 TIKI —OH UH 

KUO NJSAuoW 8!87 8182 8080 BIOS -0IS 1431 

JIJ0 .TSJSWTta 3253 KUT SIX *247 -J>r0 »B 

81.13 793004 94 8825 K JJ 8030 8035 -007 253 

8880 7745 7*7* T* BJD BUS 8070 BQ.9J _8.n 138 

7960 79 OC Jen 75 17 JB 8 

Es> SM 74* Wrd-vWcs LOW 
‘Ned's open M 1V2J w Mi 
NOGS (CMERJ noaciB.. F^mown. 

935 dUOFoota «80 4f.t3 <645 48.92 -483 9399 

5191 29 82 AOP 9* 4960 69.72 4977 69J7 *085 14416 

54n 4537 Aid 96 54.40 5*60 54J0 54.0 -407 7,K2‘ 

S5J7 4U8AHH S3 Ji S19T 5363 S3.7C -0* 2,981 

52*0 4635 AuO 9* 5330 Sl« 33X5 S2.D -JX15 2JJ4 

69 75 4160 Oct 94 (840 BUS 02] 4LX7 -405 1*0* 

5U0 4UBDKta 4930 4930 4985 *17 *002 18* 

50JD 4880 Feb 95 4963 *75 69*5 4975 —085 233 

«LH 40.90 Apr 95 4U0 57 

Fit eta U8 Witta +07 
WetfiooanM 32.219 off 499 


1LS7 9.17 Mor 95 TUB 

1130 1457 MOV 95 1130 

TUO I1L57JulfS 

1131 14570095 

Eat.sM UTSZJMkF+m* 
WMTlSpenH 13*826 up 1 
COCOA (NCSEI Nmatcfen 
u« HitaH M® 

DM tnMorta lilt 

065 99TA4W 1W 

077 noosepta ins 

1389 toiioecta 1193 

1387 T077 Mar ts 025 

1600 linworts 1235 

1607 7225 Jul»S 

050 TZ75SJPM 

Ettsate Ifc® Wtaflsd* 
Wad's open tat 88X15 off * 
ORANMJUKE tNCINI eu 
0425 *45BMorta 07*0 

0580 BtJUMmrta 17173 

QUO mSLUH 1140 
13438 0X50 Sen 94 11450 

134D0 108IX) New 94 

13280 1ELSOJ0O95 HUB 

S3. W4J0MarlS 

Est iotas MA.WM’akM 

KM'S open Id 17393 OR 81 


1132 1LD 
1130 1130 


» w-rao 

107 

talHtP, 

ii ss 

IIS 1747 
1174 1165 

7199 ITO 
1225 7220 

ms ms 


moo mso 

11075 U9J0 
71430 ran 
11450 71535 

12080 HITS 

<ST7 


-401 U99 
-081 (17 

—407 280 

-881 111 


•*5 MAM 
+7 USS 
*10 4779 
tl 7819 


— LSS 8J08 
—1*0 1944 
— IJO 1303 
—US *31 
— 115 541 
-It? TO 


Metals - 

e com* 0K34XJ nmnK-om 
2X80 Marta 04*5 8730 S5JO 
7680 AST M *785 1780 8415 

7X60 May ta I46S 8783 8U1 

74» Junta 

7420 AH M 8480 *30 8580 

74.90 S«P 9s W.15 8715 8473 

7335 DecW 8730 1730 8458 
7490 Jan «3 

7XU0F4B95 8455 1451 8SJ0 

4220 Mar 95 8880 8880 1739 

>48388ay 95 

noiAHto etn (xao bub 

THBAoafS 

79.nS(OtS 


-090 6384 

-930 +557 
-465 3** 



Industrials 

CUT TON 2 QIC110 iTtniard 

2** UAMwta 7635 7735 7570 


wn«4 44532 Off 8H 
0*0400. Mtw -ntawrya rP. 


0*8 

4650 Fib 94 




53L2 


5565 


529+ 

5420 

S26A 

3320 



Aorta 




53X2 




5*10 

su 



S65L0 

371XA49* 

5370 

5960 

SKO 

5368 



3765 taw 94 

5405 

5480 

5*85 

54X3 


5R0 

MBOD9CN 

5450 

5540 

5140 

5*75 


5440 

«L0JM» 




5485 







SSXI 


5844 

PUMnff 




5571 


5VSX 

4280 AH 95 

5440 

SKO 

5860 

5(1+ 

— IS 


6910 tap 95 






920 

SVJBDtCtS 

57X5 

5785 

37X5 

SM 

— L3 


7Mt 57+7 Mover J 

no 38JDJUI94 1 

711A 9981 Oct 94 J 

49.99 9M80KM 4 

IBM <250 MorH T 

7X35 .. 6480Moyf5 3 

1188 70JBJUI9S- 

G9L 99*96 HA WkTa 
V mrsOPMM 54*9 C 


763S 7735 7570 

8678 7737 7417 

7490 7730 7450 

7135 7230 7280 

4R50 7001 «J5 
7888 7888 7880 
7885 7180 RJ5 


I Accor . 

[ Air Ltawidt 


7S3 753 

853 8S3 


Alcatel AMlwnn J** 7*J 

Ara WTO 1501 

BcBKBlre ICleJ tM M2 

785 38430 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY II, 1994 


Page 


13 


EUROPE 





*v 

t\ 


Strong Year lor Communications 

Erwsson Profit Doubles Analysts Pleased with BT 


. STOCKHOLM. — Profit 3t 
LM EricsKOQ AEroore than dou- 
bled ini 993 on strong growth in 

the mobile telephone business 
and a devaluation of the Swedish 
krona. 

_The telecommunic&tions- 
cqaifmtcnt company said Thors- ' 
dajrit earned 3.1 bfflron kronor 
(W85 mUhon) in 1993, compared 
with 1306 billion in I992~SaIes 
rose to 62.9 bflKori kronor from 
47 bflliML The company ~ 

to raise its dividend to 45 kronor 
per share from 33. 

Despite the better-than-ex- 
pectcd results, Ericsson’s stock 
idl 5 leronor, to356 kronor, annd 
a wave of . setting on the Stock- 
hohn bourse. The Affaersvaed- 
deh index. Ml 1.8 percent, to ' 
1,793.02, and traders Mid there' 
were few people interested in 
buying Swedish stotfes. . 

Ears Ramqvist, chairman of 
Ericsson, said! he expected even 
higher profit in 1994. 

Tire 1993 earning* spurt was 
led by a 70 percent sales increase 
in the company's mobile commu- 
nications division, where orders 


have increased for nine consecn-' 
five quarters. 

Ericsson said it has oomcred a 
40 percent share tit worldwide 
mobile analpg market and holds 
an even greater Share of the digi- 
tal market Asian markets, in par- 
ticular, showed strong growth. 

As evidence of that, the com- 
pany said Thursday it had won a 
mobile telephone system order 
from Thailand worth' 150 million 

kronor. ■ _ 

- The 20 percent devaluation of 
the Swedish currency in late 1 992 
also has begun to have a positive 
: impact on earaings, the company 
said. A drop in value of the krona 

spurred increased sales to foreign 

customers. 

Ericcson said it had unfill ed 
orders totaling 67.6 bfltion kro- 
nor at the end of l 993, compared 
with 53.4 hQhon at the end of 
1991 

Earnings in tire fourth quarter 
were reduced by a goodwill charge 
of 305 nuDkat kronor. 

Mr. Rainqvist said the compa- 
ny would concentrate on research 
and development. 

(Bloomberg, AFX) 


Ompiledby Otr Staff From Dispatches 

LONDON — British Telecom- 
munications PLC said third-quar- 
ter pretax profit after charges for 
layoffs was £698 million (S10 mo- 
tion), down I patent from the 
£705 million earned in the year- 
ago period but at the top end of 
analysts' expectations. 

Tire company took a £142 mil- 
lion charge for layoffs in the 
quarter ended Dec. 31, b ring in g 
total costs of layoffs in the first 
three quartern of its financial year 
to £292 million. 

Analysts were expecting BT to 
earn between £660 milfioa and 
£700 nriUion, and the results 
briefly sent shares higher in Lon- 
don. “From our perspective, it 
was a great quarter” said Robert 
Morris, an analyst at Goldman, 
Sachs & Ccl, winch had predicted 
pretax profit of £683 mini™ 

Eanungs got a boost from in- 
creasing telephone call volume, 
winch analysts saw as a sign of 
consumer confidence in the Brit- 
ish economy. Bat some of that 
rise in phone use was spurred by 
special discounts and other rate 
cuts. 

Sr tain Variance, the dq jfflwn 


of British Telecommunications, 

said (he steady growth in demand 
for service offset die impact of 
price cuts on the bottom line. 

But be added that the full im- 
pact of reductions under the cur- 
rent year’s price-increase cap 
“has yet to be felt" 

Domestic telephone-call sales 

grew by 23 percent in the nine 
months and % 3.9 percent in the 
third quarter. 

“The main th eme i$ that inland 
call volumes continue on a secure 
growth trend,** an analyst said. 
“This is the third or fourth quar- 
ter of improved volume, and 
they've made the point that 
growth is outweighing increasing 
discounts." 

BT said sales in the quarter 
were £3.43 billion, op from 338 
bOboa in the 1992 quarter. In the 
nine months, sales were £1030 
Inlfion, up from £9.81 billion. 

International telephone call 
sales increased by 83 percent in 
the nine months, but the impact of 
that growth was offset by rate re- 
dactions. Telephone-exchange 
line rental revenue increased by 
83 percent in the nine mouths. 

(Bloomberg, Reuters ) 


BP Returns to Profit 
Despite Decline 
In Energy Prices 


Devalued CFA 
CausesOuster 
OfSCOA Chief 

CamydaTby Chr Staff From Dupaidta 

PARIS — Jacques Marce- 
lin, chairman of SODA SA, die 
import-export concern, after 
tire company dropped his pro- 
ject for expansion into the 
French large-scale distribu- 
tion sector, SCOA announced 
Thursday. Us decision was 
made because erf the recent 50 
percent devaluation of the 
CFA franc, a hard knock for 
SCOA, which is beavDy in- 
volved in trading with Africa. 

SCOA controlled by Com- 
pagnie Fmandbre de Paribas, 
said h would “devote itself sole- 
ly to refocusing its activities 
with the goal of cutting its 
debt” A company spokesman. 
Jean-Pkrre Merrier, said Mri 
Marcefin had been eager to see 
the retail projects through, , 
“and so be preferred to lay 
down his responsibilities. 

(AFP, Bloomberg, Reuters) 


Amstrad Warns of Possible Loss 


CmpffedbpOteSk^FinmDapatAa 

LONDON —Amstrad PLC said 
Thursday that it was fikdy to have 
a loss for its full year, after report- 
ing a 69 percent drop in first-half 
, to £L7 million ($23 million) 
i £5.6 minion a year earlier. 

Alan Sugar, chairman of the con- 
sumer electronics concern, said, 
“Shareholders shoold recognize the 
possibility of the company turning 


in a loss for the full year,'* which 
ends June 30. 

He said its “best expectations" 
for the year would be “to try and 
maintain & break-even position.” 
But be said even that might be 
“difficult to achieve, particularly if 
the much-heralded UK. economic 
upturn fails to translate into con- 
sumer confidence.” 

Mr. Sugar said margins in con- 
sumer electronics remained under 


Norske Bank Posts ’93 Profit 


AFP-ExidNews 

OSLO — Den norske Bank AS, 
Norway’s largest banking compa- 
ny, said Thunsday it had a pretax 
profit of 982 nriffion krona ($130 
milli™) last year, reveramg a loss 
of 3.05 billion kroner in 1992. 

Net interest income rose 15 per- 
cent. to 537 biE on kroner, and net 
credit Losses were cut 36 percent, to 
3.11 Hffion kroner, the company 
said. It said otha operating income 
rose 30 percent, to 3.49 bfition kro- 
ner, while operating profit before 
loan losses and write-downs was up 
63 percent to 435 WBon krona. 


Dai norske Bank said it cut op- 
erating expenses by 73 percent last 
year, after adjusting for inflation 
and “changes in statutory levies.” 

Most of the cost cuts were imple- 
mented in the first part of 1993, it 
said, and costs were higher in the 
fourth quarter because of increased 
economic activity and a change in 
the basis for calculating pension 
expenses caused by falling interest 
rates. 

Group assets at the end of 1993 
were estimated at 161 billion kro- 
na, down from 187.6 billion kro- 
na in 1992: 


pressure because of oversupply, 
price-cutting and low demand 

“The UJC. market, which is tra- 
ditionally our largest, has suffered 
the most," Mr. Sitgar said. 

Mr. Sugar said the company's 
second haft, which corresponds to 
the first six months of the calendar 
year, was normally a period of low- 
er rales than its fust half. 

Sales in the first half fell 31 per- 
cent, to £139.9 million, as Amstrad 
cut its output of products that 
could not be sold profitably in cur- 
rent market conditions. 

Mr. Sugar said Amstrad had cut 
costs in its Australian business and 
did not expect to have a loss in that 
country. 

But Amstrad’ s Italian business 
has performed poorly, be said, and 
is expected to increase its provi- 
sions against bad debts. 

Amstrad said it would pay an 
unchang ed first-half dividend of 
03 pence a share, but it said the 
second-half dividend would de- 
pend on the company's results. 

Alastair Makolmsen, an analyst 
at Barclays de Zoeie Wedd, said the 
Gist-half profit was below expecta- 
tions. ( Reuters, Bloomberg) 


Ccvnpilcd by Our Staff From Dispatches 

LONDON — British Petroleum 
Co. said Thursday it earned £896 
million (S131 million) in 1993. 
turning around from a £352 million 
loss in 1992. 

The results reflected the compa- 
ny’s efforts to buffer itself from 
plunging crude cal prices by cutting 
costs and selling various assets. But 
the company said ample supplies 
and unrprtair) d emand meant the 
outlook for oil prices remains weak. 

Analysts had been expecting BP 
to post a larger profit, with most 
expecting about £1.03 billion. 

“They are slightly disappointing 
results," said Phmp Morgan, an an- 
alyst with Paribas Capital Markets 
in London. “The boost from asset 
sales and exchange rates is unlikely 
to be repeated in 1994. but this 
year’s figures should still show a 
slight improvement." 

For a while, investors apparently 
shared that sentiment, bidding the 
company’s stock up to a 53-week 
hig h before selling off on a reas- 
sessment of longer-ienn earnings 
potential in the face of still-weak 
cril prices. BP shares ended down 5 
pence; at 385 pence. 

BP also reported that fourth- 
quarter earnings fell 72 percent 
from the year-ago period, to £54 
million from £193 milli on Results 
for the quarter were reduced by a 
one-time £284 million charge for 
reorganizing of the company's Eu- 
ropean chemicals operation. 


Lotcer Costs 
HelpStatoil 

Reuters 

OSLO — Norway’s state- 
owned oil company, Statozl 
A/S, said Thursday that its 
pretax profit had risen 21 pa- 
cent in 1993, to 12 billion Lo- 
ner (S1.6 billion). 

Staioil said a reduction in 
operating costs had compen- 
sated for the fact that a rising 
share of its output comes from 
marginally profitable fields. 

Net financial charges for 
1993 were just ova 700 million 
krona, compared with 2.7 bil- 
lion the previous year. 


The chemicals unit posted a 1 993 
operating loss of £68 million but 
should return to profitability b 
1994, the company said. 

Eanungs in the company’s ex- 
ploration and production division 
fell 20 percent in the fourth quarter 
from the year-ago period, primarily 
because of weak crude prices. 

BP sold its Noth Sea crude for 
an average SI 5.47 pa band in the 
fourth quarter, compared with 
S 192>9 per barrel b the fourth 
quarter of 1992. 

(Bloomberg, AFX, Reuters) 


COMPANY RESULTS 


Revenue and profils or 
losses, in millions, are in 
local currencies unless 
otherwise Indicated. 

Britain 


United States 

Aetna Life 

4ttig«ar. im wn 

Revenue 11W 09*. 

Net Loss 1,731. 191 SO 

American Cyanamid 


BOC 

1 st Qaar. 1*M 
Revenue — - £W3JO 
Pretax Net— toJB.90 
Per Shore— — 
a: Lass. 

BTR 

1 st Qwar. 1994 

Revenue HSL 

Pretax Net— 

Per Shore— 1X073 


1993 
776JQ 
KL80 
0.1 Ul 


1993 

Uta. 

7DSJX) 

0072 


France 

Total 

Year 1993 1992 

Protll 29ML TBOL 

Per Share 1X20 1200 


tthOwr. 

1991 

1992 

Revenue — 

■W^O 

9S460 

Met Inc. {O1VX30 

71 JO 

Per Shore 

— 

oao 

year 

1993 

1992 

Revenue 

4277. 

41% 

Net inc. - — 

0)1.11*. 

3VS.I0 

Per Share 

— 

435 

a: Loss. 



Anheuser-Busch Cos 

4tftQuar. 

1993 

1*92 

Revenue — 

xa 6*. 

3.116. 

Net Inc. 

16640 

16150 

Per Shore 

(U2 

058 

Year 

19*3 

1992 

Revenue — . 

lillS 

11062 

Net inc. 

91060 

99*20 

Per Shore 

155 

146 


Norway 


Staton 

Year 1993 1992 

Revenue 81.TOQ 7000. 

Oner Net TlttO. 12400. 


1993 year net excludes 
Otanes at 5590 million. 

CBS 

emoeor. 1993 1992 

Revenue 1,00. 9t&ja 

Net Inc. 4M0 3X30 

Per Snore— ITT 214 

Year 1993 1992 

Revenue-, 15m ISO. 

Net Inc 326JD 11.00 

Per Shore 2U? 5L23 


Elec. Data Systems 
410 Quar. 1993 1992 

Revenue 2JU. 2.145. 

Net Inc — 202.90 17100 

Per Shore 0X2 037 

Year 1993 1992 

Revenue 0562. 0219. 

Net Inc. 72X00 63530 

Per Shore 151 133 

Eneethanf 

etb Qaar. 1993 1993 

Revenue 53935 54406 

Net Inc 4156 2006 

PerShare — 028 

Year 1993 1992 

Revenue 2,151 2X00 

Net Inc 67200 1062 

Per Shore — 001 Oil 

Nets Include charges of JMJ 
million In 19*3 Quarter and at 
Sit million vs. SMSmllHan m 
lull rears. 


Ford Motor 

emOaar. 1993 1 992 

Revenue 27341. 23^06. 

Net Inc _ ntJKlalBecui 

Per Share 1J0 — 

Year 1993 1992 

Revenue — 100521 . 100.132 
Net Inc— 2^29.(0)7385 

Per Share OSS — 

a: Loss. Quarter nets include 
atoroes of Shi million and 
gains a 1 SIS.' million vs. 
charges ol S4I9 million. 


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Card If Exp. Date 


Signature. 


Investor’s Europe 





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Sources: Routers, AFP 

tntenauooal HenU Trihat* 

Very briefly! 


• Gennany said private industry was not shouldering enough of the risk b 
making financing proposals for the Transrapid, the planned high-speed 
magnetic-levitation train; but the consortium that is building the tram 
insisted its plans were realistic. 

• Ptaifipp Hahmann AG, a Goman construction and power-generation 
iy, said it expected to post “good" 1993 results and pay an 

' dividend of 12 Deutsche marks (56.82) a share. 

• Boderns AG, 80 percent-owned by the troubled German conglomerate 
MetaBeeseflschaft AG, said it had profit of 58 million DM m the year 
ended Sept 30; it earned 66.9 million DM b the previous period, a nine- 
month financial year that ended Sept- 30, 1991 

• Volkswagen AG continued to lead b market share in Western Europe, 
but its share fell to 15.5 percent b January from 16.6 percent in January 
1993. according to an bdustry group’s figures for the 12 European Union 
nations phis Austria, Finland, Norway, Sweden and Switzerland. 

• Volvo AB said it had sold its stake of about 25 percent b the Swedish 
investment company Custos AB for 1.7 billion kronor (S21 1 million) and 
would post a one-time gam of about 916 million kronor. 

• Dutch corporate bankruptcies rose 27 percent in 1993, with 5,510 
companies filing, the Centra) Bureau of Statistics said. 

• Saber AG agreed to merge its worldwide papa businesses with those of 
J.M. Vath GmbH of Heidenheiin, Germany, through a new company to 
be called Voitb Suiza Pqfa t tdm fc, 

• Hsfsfcmd Nycotned AS, a Norwegian pharmaceuticals and chemicals 

company, said it had agreed to buy 50 percent of Yew Tree Phannacenti- 
cah, an anti-cancer research company, from OPG Group of the Nether- 
lands. Reuters. AFX. Bloomberg. AP. Knight- Ridder 



OIL fr MONEY 

CONFERENCES 

1994 


We are pleased to announce the dates 
for the two major energy forums co- 
sponsored by the Internationa] Herald 
Tribune and The Oil Daily Group. 


OIL & MONEY 
Asia & the Pacific 
Singapore 
June 15 & 16 

OIL & MONEY 
London 
October 17 & 18 


For further rnformxaum, please contact: 

Brenda Hagerry 
International Herald Tribune 
63 Long Acre. London WC2 
Tel: (44 71) 836 4802 Far: (44 71) 836 0717 


The Oil Daily Group 

ItmlbSSribunc 


To our readers in Franco 

It’s never been easier to subscribe 
and save with Our new toll free 

service. 

Just edl us today at 05437-437 








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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY, FEBRUARY II, 1994 


Tokyo Turns to Public Debt, 
Keeps Spending Rise to 1% 


Page 15 

ASIA/PACIFIC 


TOKYO — Japan’s cabinet on 
Thureaay approved a 73 trim™ 
yen ($672 buBon) draft budget for 
the coming fiscal year, an increase 
of just 1 percent from the current 
year and one that raises public debt 
while reducing aid to localities. 

The moderate spending increase 
was prompted in part by the gov- 
ernment's forecast of a sharp de- 
crease in tax revenue for the year 
that begins April I. 

One of the larger budget in- 
creases is a 4 percent rise in spend- 


ing on public works, aimed ax stixn- 
nlating the economy, to 8.9 triDion 
yen. Development assistance 
climbs 4 percent to 1 triUkm yen. 


Defense spending, isprqjected to 
rise 0.8 percent to 4.6 triDion yen. 

For the Erst time in five years, 

the budget resorts to deficu-fmano- 
ing bonds to help pay for an in- 
come-tax cm. In Jtqiaa, bonds that 
are used to finance a budget deficit 
are distin guish ed from so-caDed 
construction bonds, which are used 
id pay for specific projects. 


Kumagai Gumi Sets Sales 
Of Retd Estate in Britain 

Canpdai b? Our Staff Frtm Dispatches 

TOKYO — Kumagai Gunn Co. wfll sell 70 bflhan yen ($644 


estate units before the current financial year ends March 31, its 
m a na g in g director, Saidahpigii ITwmgi, Sfliri Thursday, 

He said most of the faopaties sold would be those in Britain, 
where the real estate market is more active than in some other 
countries- Kumagai also has properties in the United States and the 
Pacific region, including Australia. ‘ 

Afte r the sales, Kumi&ai wffl have about 54Q biffiop yen of unsold 
overseas properties, Mr. Uesugi said. Kumag ai aggressively expand- 
ed its development business, especially overseas, in the late 1980s 
and has been hit by the prolonged worldwide property stam p. 

But separately Thursday, die construction company raised its profit 
forecast for the current year. It said it unconsolidated pretax 

profit of 20 bflfion yen, rather than the 9 Wlfim yen mated in 
November, because of its oost-cotfing efforts and a dedme in interest 
expenses. It had ament prefit of 29M bflfion yen in the previous year, 
its forecast of net profit was unchanged from November’s esti- 


mate of ! billion 

yen, father than 


t profit was unchanged 
l, tart it said it expected s 
billion yen. 


to total 840 MBaa 
(Reuters, AFP) 


eaue wfll fall 12 percent, to 53.6 
trillion yen from 613 trillion yen 
projected in last year’s initial bud- 
get draft. 

The ministry said the majority of 
that drop was due to a reduction in 
income taxes and local residence 
taxes announced by the govern- 
ment this week, with the rest 
caused by lower tax payments from 
individuals and companies whose 
incomes were cut by Japan’s severe 
and continuing recession. 

To make up for its drop in in- 
come, the government will increase 
its issuance of bonds and reduce 
subsidies to local governments. 

The Finance Ministry estimates 
the government will issue nearly 14 
trillion yen of construction bonds 
and deficit-covering bonds in the 
year starting April 1. Last year’s 
budget called for issuing 8 inffion 
yen of bonds. The budget’s depen- 
dence on bonds will be 18.7 per- 
cent, the second -highest ratio in 
Japan’s postwar history, after 193 
percent m 1987. 

The cabinet’s approval of the 
budget came only a few hours be- 
fore Prime Minister Morihiro Ho- 
sokawa’s departure for Washing- 
ton for talks with President Bui 
Clinton. 

The draft budget was delayed for 
a month and a half by wrangling in 
parliament over the tax cut and 
over political reforms. 

The cabinet also approved a 
third supplementary budget for 
this year, totaling 2.1 trillion yea, to 
help implement the tax cut and 
other economic measures an- 
nounced this week. 

(AJP. Bloomberg) 


Digging Sydney’s Metals 


By Michael Richardson 

SnSemaaanal Herald Tribune 

MELBOURNE — American 
demand for shares in base^meial 
mining companies has given a 
powerful lift to Australian stocks 
in recent weeks, but with mar- 
ket’s key index falling 4 percent 
this week, analysts are wonder- 
ing whether the boom can last 

The rise in the AD Ordinaries 
index over the past year has been 
spectacular. Its dose of 23343 on 
Thursday is 41 percent higher 
than the’ level a year ago and 21 
percent above the level just six 
months ago. But it was down 983 
points from the close last week. 

In recent weeks, analysis said, 
offshore money has been flowing 
into the market. Much of the in- 
vestment was ascribed to Ameri- 
can mutual anrf pension funds 
attracted by prospects of capital 
gains in resource stocks, which 
would benefit from an accelera- 
tion of world economic growth. 

“The main driving force has 
been foreign money,” said Peter 
Wetherall, director and head of 
research at McIntosh Baring. 
“The US. funds have been the 
big swinger.” He added the ma- 
jor concern he had about the 
Australian market was that com- 
modity prices aright fall if con- 
sumer demand for metals faded' 
to catch up with supply. 

Mark OTkten, manager of Aus- 
tralian equity operations at AMP 
Investments in Sydney, said: 
“What we don’t know is whether 
the Americans are going to be 
shart-tenn or long-tom players. 
Just a halt to their buying would 
give the market some indigestion-" 


Bloomberg Business Sev. I 

CANBERRA — The unemployment rate tell in January to its 
lowest level in 20 months, the government announced Thursday, and 
employment rose for a fifth consecutive month. 

The jobless rate fell to 10.6 percent from 10.7 percent the month 
before — contrary to many economists' forecasts of a rise — and 
from a peak of 113 percent in late 1992. Employment grew by 
22.000, to a seasonally adjusted 7,874.600. 

The decrease in the unemployment rate was achieved even though 
a larger number of people were actively looking for work, the 
government said. The participation rate, used as an indicator or Lhe 
number of people seeking jobs, rose one point, to 63.1 percent. 

“These figures are good, very good.” said John Fraser, an economist 
with SBC Australia, a unit of Swiss Bank Carp. “They are consistent 
with an economy showing dear and broad signs of strength.” 


In the last three months, an 
American investor in an Austra- 
lian stock that simply kept pace 
with the AD Ordinaries Index 
would have made a 25 percent 
gain in U.S. dollar terms. About 
half would have come from the 
rise of the market and the rest 
from the appreciation of the 
Australian dollar. 

Among the miners, the stock 
of CRA Ltd. has risen about 26 
percent in the past three months. 
In the same period, the value of 
stock in M1M Holdings Ltd. 
jumped nearly 48 percent; West- 
ern Muring Corp., 54 percent; 
Comalco Lui, 61 percent; and 
Pasminco Ltd, 95 percent. 

Western Mining reported on 
Thursday a 38 percent rise in net 
income for the six months 
through Dec. 31. Bloomberg 
Business News reported from 


Sydney. Most of the gains came 
from the company's interest in 
Alcoa of Australia, the alumi- 
num producer. Its nickel opera- 
tions lost money and gold reve- 
nue was little changed. 

Also reflecting current weak- 
ness in the metals industry, which 
investors apparently are betting 
wfll end, Broken Hill Proprietary 
Co. said on Wednesday that it 
had accepted an average 7.6 per- 
cent reduction in the price of iron 
ore sold to Japanese steel mills. 
The reduction reflects the slump 
in the Japanese steel industry. 

Many analysts, however, said 
the current pullback in stock 
prices was a healthy consolidation 
and that there has been little sign 
of panic selling. “This was a cor- 
rection we had to have," said John 
Bowie Wilson, director of Ham- 
bras Equities Ltd in Sydney. 


India Moves to Ring In a Modem Age of Telecom Services 


By Kevin Murphy 

International Herald Tribune 

NEW DELHI — Nagarajan YittaL, the 
self-styled “Gorbachev of India’s tele- 
coms,” has six phones, most ringing at 
once, in an office crowded with bureau- 
crats. lobbyists and salesmen who would 
rather wait in person than test their tack 
with India's woeful telephone system. 

That leaves just undo' 7 milli on phones 
for his 870 mflH on countrymen, a service 
vacuum that has prompted India to wel- 
come, but not yet reward foreign tdeccm- 
mumcarions co m pa ni es rushing- into the 
country. 

“The Indian people are fed up,” said Mr. 
VittaL As eharnnan of Tnflin’ s Telecom 
Comisston, be is pushing for more tdp- 
phoncs for the masses and massive reforms 
likdy to upset the 470,000 bureaucrats and 
heavily unionized workers in India’s De- 
partment of Telecommunications. 


“My actions are popular with the people, 
but within the system there is stfll great 
resistance to change," said Mr. VittaL a 
career dvfl servant. He is trying to set up a 
regulatory body separate from the tele- 
phone system, sjrih the national system 
into four regional operations and end 
large-scale abuses within it 
After a four- to eight-year wait or a 
30,000 rupee ($967) babe, customers re- 
sourceful enough to get a new telephone 
line installed can find that unscrupulous 
workers “rent” their tine to other people 
who dial internationally for hours. The 
o riginal owner stfll gets the bid 
On the other band, some residents of New 
Delhi and Bombay say they have neva 
received a telephone hoi, but instead are 
regularly visited by phone c ompan y workers 
who demand unofficial payments. Mean- 
while, tHonamds of villages, where tire ma- 
jority of Indians five, have no telephones. 


The government is trying to remedy the 
Situa tion by eHminatnig migmanagirnen t 
and by courting international investment to 
help it install 20 million telephones by 2000. 
Its abitity to succeed is widdy seen as a 
prerequisite for India’s economic takeoff. 

The foreign companies competing to be 
the first through the country’s bureaucratic 
and legal maze to profitabtity say India’s 
dealings with them are an early test of its 
overall welcome for foreign business. 

“India has taken the intdlectnal leap on 
telecoms reform many other countries nave 
found so difficult,” said a Hong Kong- 
based analyst who estimates that the coun- 
try needs at least $20 bflKon in investment 
to meet its imnrediale goals. 

Foreign telephone company representa- 
tives in India t hink that it could cost as 
much as $40 bilHon to give only one in 10 
people of India’s middle class their own 
fully functioning phone line. 


*T am reasonably confident India will 
create the right conditions to attract the 
necessary capital but exactly how it plays 
out and who succeeds among the foreign 
groups is anyone's guess.” the analyst said. 

Twenty-one international companies are 
vying far contracts to provide basic equip- 
ment and expertise, value-added, high-tech 
services such as pagers, mobile phones and 
dedicated small-scale satellite networks, and 
in few deals — such as one proposed by U S 
West Inc. — entire domestic systems to rival 
the existing, inadequaie facilities. 

The Indian government has guaranteed 
its established international carrier, Videsh 
Sandbar Nigam Ltd. a monopoly, but tire 
domestic situation is not dear; Videsh San- 
rhar Nigam is trying to gain permission to 
enter the domestic market alongside new 
foreign players. 

However, court battles between bidders 


Hong Kong' 
.Hang Seng •' 

12000— H 


Singapore 

Straits Times 


Jobs Increase in Australia 



TdKyo 
Nikkei 225 

2100 0 * 4 -1-- • 


m s"dii d ' Jf -:' ^VcTi 
19S3 1994 -1993 

Exchange '■ index 

Hong Kong Hang Song - • , 

Singapore Straits Times ' 

Sydney . . A8 Orifioaries' " . 

Tokyo NIKkBi 225 . 

Kuala Lumpur Composite ’ 
Bangko k S£T . 

f Seoul Compos ^ Stock 

Taipei Weighted Price 

Manila Composite 

Jakarta Stocki ntiax 

New Zealand NZSE-40 

Bombay National index '. 

Sources: Reuters. AFP 




nn? ■ ® dj f 

.... fgg4 •■■■19937 ••• . 1994. 

’Thursday'.- Prev. ' ' 

Close ■ ' Close Change 

Cbsed '. Itjoiob-' 
"Closed ■ 2,341.60- 
2£3&30. 2,270,90 -1.6t 

. 19,990.70. 19.841.38 +0.75 
Closed 1,108.72 ■■ - 
1,41053 1,403.63 40.49 

Closed ■ 323.00 ■ 

Closed '"'uaMAsT “ 
3.013-76 ; 2.99533 +0.62 

~ 580.05 ~ ^ 

2,36432 2369.16 -oTs 

: 1,93944 ' 1 ,937.1S +0.12 

Intcmatianal Herald TnKoic 


for paging and mobile-phone franchises and 
a top-level deria on-making vacuum on oth- 
er major contracts illustrate tire desperate 
need for institutional reforms. 

Companies that were unsuccessful in 
tiurir first applications for franchises chal- 
lenged tire process in court and won. Bui 
then, in the case of cellular phone licences, 
companies that applied to operate in one 
city but were then directed to another loca- 
tion instead, appealed the overturning of the 
first awards. Decisions are pending. 

IVe cannot really do anything until ba- 
sic telecom reforms are under way and a 
regulatory body established," said Anion 
Abrahams of Telestra Corp.. the overseas 
arm of Australia's government-owned tele- 
communications company. "Once that 
happens, interconnection fires to the exist- 
ing network can be set and we can all avoid 
ending up in court for every new contract" 


Very briefly: 

• China's customs statistics said 1993 exports of crude and oil products 
were 23.15 milli on metric tons (162 million barrels), down J3.9 percent, 
while imports surged 72 percent, to 33.03 nriHion tons, according to 
Nihon Keizai Shimbun of Japan. It was the first time China had been a 
net importer of crude o3 and oil products in 30 years, an event that had 
been widely expected to occur in 1994. 

a Noble C hina Inc, agreed to buy a 70 percent interest in a brewery in 
Shouguang. Shandong province, for about 203 million Canadian dollars 
($15 million) from China Coast Property Development Ltd.; China Coast 
is owned by Li Cbui Cbuen. who is a brother of the controlling 
shareholder of Noble China, Lei Kal Cheong. 

• Great Eastern Shipping Ltd. of India is planning a second Euroissue to 
raise funds for buying ships. Great Eastern last month raised $ 100 million 
from an issue of global depositary receipts. 

• Coca-Cola Aroaul Ltd. said a 9 percent rise in Australian sales and 
expansion in Asia and Eastern Europe pushed net profit last year up 45 
percent to a record 94.4 million Aust ralian dollars ($68 million). 

• The Bank of T hailand governor, Vijit Suptait, says he sees no reason for 
a devaluation of the baht despite recent speculation that a widening Thai 
current account deficit would require one. He also said that gross 
domestic product could grow more than 8 percent in 1994. 

• Nippon Ido Tsushi Corp_ a cellular phone company, says ii wfll promote 
Motorola Inc’s phone system by in vesting 30 billion yen (S2 76 million) to 
expand the area served by Motorola’s cellular phone system over the next 
two years, thus ending its policy of expanding Motorola rival Nippon 
Telegraph & Telephone Corp.'s service. 

■ The Bank of Japan said that commercial-bank lending rose 0-5 percent 
from a year earlier in January, after a 05 percent increase in December. 

• Jusco Co. is to wind up three units, involving write-offs totaling 7.38 
billion yen. The units are Sanyo Jusco KK, Nihon Direct KK and 
Antorama life Tokaf. 

• Sumitomo Corp. says it will invest in a partnership with Tde-Couumau- 
cations Inc. and other investors ro buy three cable television operators 
serving in the Southeast United States' 

• IBM Japan Inc shed about 1500 workers over a four-month period 
beginning in October. Jiji Press reported. 

Reuters, AFX, Bloomberg. Knight-RidJer 


NYSE 

Tliursdasr 1 * Closing 

Tables include the nationwide prions up to 
the closing on Wan Street and do not reflect 
late trades elsewhere. Via The Associated Press 


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BOOK: 'Made in Japan 9 It May Be, built’s Unrevealing Industry Analysis 


Continued from Page 11 

mada said. The problems with the 
work stem in large measure from 
the relative isolation and poverty of 
Japanese academia. Unlike their 


He added that Japanese academics, 
unlike their American counter- 
parts. had few dose contacts with 
industry. 

“Made in Japan" is two years 


c^am^Mn-.wKidS belrind schedule One year was lost flicttagjanan- 
m^motivation ^d access to - 1 r 
conduct independent research. SLSPSff nST hada . se,lse , of F 

Japanese scholars found that they 

rraflH nnt nrnr«ri Jnd<»nfinriftnifv " hOD J*D (51.8 rttillKMlJ Twm 34 knowledge the V 


companies 10 fundlhe pn^ecL 

gflni?g a study of inaustiy without Ouce research began, the prob- 
ihe cooperation of industry,” said ^ em bscmJK one of reconciling m- 
Kazuaki Maiumo, director of re- consistencies between two groups 
search at lhe Japan Techno-Eco- traditionally have had little 
nonrics Society, the semigovem- contact. Mr. Shimada recalled that 
mental group that oversaw the ^ corporate side said, “ ‘Please 
project. % a company were ap- don’t refer to the fact that we've 
proacbed by an academic alone,” problems with American 

ne said, “they’d be extremely reluc- competitors.’ " 
tant to part with any information.” He added, “We were operating 


under the assumption that prob- 
lems didn’t exist.” 

The collapse of the economic 
bubble further complicated efforts 
to son out the structural problems 
afflicting Japanese industry. Al- 
though scholars by the late 1980s 
had a sense of problems to come, 
many in industry were slow to ac- 
knowledge the way the bubble had 
distorted their peffonnance. Many 
basked in the analysis of "Made in 
America,” which heaped praise on 
Japanese business practices such as 
teamwork, in-house training, and 
patient capital facilitating research 
and development spending. 


As one would expect, a diversity 
of views made the task of editing 
lhe group project cumbersome. Bui 
it was made even more difficult by 
the sophistry of Japanese scholars. 

The solution was to hire a retired 
editor from Japan's best-selling 
newspaper, Yomiuri Shimbun. His 
goal was to cut one-third of the 
material so the book could come in 
at under 500 pages in Japanese. 

"Made in Japan” is the provi- 
sional title of the book, which will 
be published in Japanese at the end 
of April. An English-language pub- 
lisher is being sought. 


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(Continued From Page 10) 




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Page 16 


NASDAQ 

time. 

updated twice a year. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1994 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1994 



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d CS Euro Blur Olka A -DM 0481 


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d CS UK Fund A t WJB 

0 CS UK Fwid B— £ MB 

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d CS FF Bond B - . FF ™88 

0 CS Captlol 5FR 2000 SF *40581 

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GARTMORE H1D05UEZ FUNDS 49/51/94 
Tat: 052)445*24470 
Foe: 052)4454 21 
BOND PORTFOLIOS 

0 DEM Bond DfeSTS DM 

0 Dtoerfeond DIS289 SF 

0 Oottor Bond Dts222 S 


0 Eunipeon Bd_Dts L24 Ecu 

0 French Fmc_Dlsia72 — FF 

0 GtoboJ Bond__J7ta222 S 

EQUITY PORTFOLIOS 
0 ASEAN S 


482 

125 

152 

134 

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0 Asia Pacific 


0 Continental Enron*— 
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RESERVE FUNDS 

d DEM D Is 552 DM 

d P a ll or P U 2 J 7 * 

0 French Frenc FF 

0 Yon Reserve Y 

GVFIROR FUHDS 

London : 071-4994171, Geneva : 41-23255530 

“ ■ - - ' 77031 

4950919 
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984 

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5.10 

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tv (B) Oenosee Short i 4435 

w (O Oenesea Opportunity — J 15734 

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wll Pacific Bend B SF 144730 

GLOBAL ASSST MANAGEMENT 
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II AIM SLDangtoeJ ol Man 4442*42450 
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w GAM Franc* FF 

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to GAM FBob Yield 

w GAM East Asia tne. 
w GAM Japan. 


w GAM Money MktaUSS s 

0 Do Sterling. 


0 De Sates Franc— 
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3F 


0 Da Yen Y 

to GAM Allocated MIH-Fd S 

iv GAM Emera MldsMIH-FdJl 

w QAM MUI-Eurone USs S 

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wGMAtmCUM USS 1 

w GAM Mnrhel Neutral. s 

toGAMTradtanDM DM 

wGAMrradtaaUS s 

w GAM Overseas. 

W GAM Pacific— 

w GAM Selection 

tvGAMSIraaoare/MrtavNa -3 

iv GAM SF Speckri Bond 5F 

wGAMTVd* S 

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iv GAMul Investments — - 8 


wGAM Vatuc^H 
w GAM Whitethorn 
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iv GAM Band USSDnt 

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w GAM Band 


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wGAM Bond YOB— — — Y 

to GAM Bond DM DM 

w GAM Band C. 1 

iv GAM t Special Bond— 1 

to GAM UnNwert USS— —S 


39184 
51521 
23*54 
38095 
10573 
14089 
vnj9 
9482 
217584 
27989 
219 JM 
14181 
801 34 
04989 
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10084 
105M 
1000980 
10684 
10988 
15181 
15187 
2BU9 
11931 
14584 
183X2 
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92987 
73553 
715X7 
133X2 
3S89 
5KL20 
825X1 
13480 
10585 
486.17 
U4J09 
21785 
HS83 
1458900 
12334 
14515 
15171 
17382 
370.16 


SWISS REGISTERED FUNDS 4M-422 2624 
Mnatotwci ran as e 173XH 803iZur1di 

0 GAM (CH) AnwrtCO SF 147373 

0 QAM (CH) Europe SF MS.W 

0 GAM (CH) Montodl SF JJH54 

0 GAM (CH] PoefBe— —SF 300.91 

SEC REGISTERED FUNDS 

■ n sE I S/rdStrevLNY 30032, 71 W I M aOB 

to GAM Eon** S 9254 

wGAM Global S WUT 

iv GAM to ternottonid 9 21523 

wGAM North Amorim S 90X4 

to GAM Ppd flc Bon in S 19183 

IRISH REGISTERED UCITS 
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toGAMAmortaxeuiAcc DM ,950 

wGAM Earapa Are -DM 13981 

r em IM-I tr, IMS 14A50 

w GAM Tokyo Acc DM 17234 

WGAM ToM Bond DM ACC—DM 112JB 

WOAM Untverwl DM ACC — DM 19970 

GLOBAL CAPITAL MANAGE ME NT LTD 
Bermuda: (009) J954M0 FbkMWI 29MU0 
JWH GLOBAL 5TRATEGI ES LTD 


MASENB1CHLER ASSET MANflT GasJjtbR 
wHutoihtaHofCtonAG—S 5W8D 

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m Heptagon CMC Fund s 10985 

HERMES ASSET MANAS EMOIT LTD 
Bertmido:tB09129S 400, LwcUH)«* 4461 
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at Hermes European Fond — Ecu 35781 

ntHermes North AmertaBi Mb 
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m Hermes Globa] Fund 5 4P80 

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mHwmes Sterling Fd 1 UMJ 

m Hermes Gain Fund s _ *34-17 

INCOME PARTNERS (ASIA) IJMITED 
iv Aten Find Income Fd — I M 702 

INTERNATIONAL ASSETS FUND 
lBdRDWLL-2**9Uxea>t)oura 
w Europe Sud E - r ni 1053-7 

IIITENIIATIOMAL MGMT INCOME FUI» 
to Treasury Compartment FdJTL 1D1W5 

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Te(: 44 534 73114 
d Maklmuoi Income Fund 

d Sterling MnsdPtfl 

0 Pioneer Markets 


0 Oham Global Strategy— 4 

0 Ado Super Growth S 

0 Nippon warrant Fund S 

0 Ada Tiger wwrare S 

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0 GM N.W. 199* 


PREMIER SELECT FUNDS 

0 American Growth S 

0 Awrtaei Ei ite ne-t M S 

0 Asia T!w Growth 1 

0 Dollar Reserve S 

0 European Growth 3 

0 European Enterprise s 

0 Global Emeralna Marhtte-s 

0 Globed Growth S 

0 Nippon Enterprise S 

0 Nippon Growth S 

0 UK Growth 
0 ' 


0 North Ainertoan Warrant 
|0 Greater anna Don^H 


LlttO 
22440 
7.1050 
178100 ■ 
278300 
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42900 
38300 
98900 

43900 

10.1406 

138200 

52500 

5.3700 

45100 

warn 

93400 

7X300 

umi 

58W0 


88900 


DEUTSCHE MARK PORTFOLIO 
0 CatesorvA DM 


0 Category B. 


-DM 


i ]7X 

- - 1133 

EUROPEAN BOND PORTFOLIO (DM1 

dCtaSA-l S 1489 

0 CktStA-2 S 17.16 

d Class B-i s 1*85 

0 Class B-2 J 1785 

EUROPEAN BOND PORTFOLIO (USD 

0 Class A- 1 DM 

0 CkSSA-7 DM 

d Class M * 

0 Class B-2 % 

POUND STERLING PORTFOLIO 
0 Category A. 


a Category B. 


US DOLLAR PORTFOLIO 

0 Gotcgorr A 

d CotepnrvB 

YEN PORTFOLIO 
0 Catenary A. 
d CotegoryB. 


1529 

108« 

1079 

1084 

17.11 

IlTB 

1418 

13X3 

123) 

13G3 

022 

2271 

*.90 

10X3 


Feb. 10, 1994 


■ quotes brand on iMM prices. 

W - regutarty; (t| • twice amUy; |m) - monthly. 

a ?3 Money Plus F DM DM 115X8 

a RG Money Plus FSF 3F 1057* 

//.ore Rsixcu *< A m stefBotn smoa 
ROTHSCHILD (GROUP EDMOND DE) 
IN-HOUSE FUNDS 
nr Aslan Caattal HokSngi Fd-S 
wDeuwe LCF RofhsedWM-S 

wDelwOLCF RatIBCtI Eq S 

to Force Cmn Tradition chf JF 
■“ I . s 


MULTI CURRENCY BOND PTFL 
0 dossA..- ..X 

0 Class B S 

US FEDE RAL SECURITIES PTFL 

0 Clan A s 

d Class B S 

MERRILL LYNCH 

EQUITY / CONVERTIBLE SERIES 

BASIC VALUE PORTFOLIO 

0 Class A S 

0 dess B s 

CONVERTIBLE SECURITIES PTFL 

d Class A 1 

d Class B i 

GLOBAL ALLOCATION PTFL (USS) 

0 CUBS A S 

0 OnssB 5 

GLOBAL EQUITY PORTFOLIO 

0 Cion A 1 

0 Oass B S 

EURO EQUITY PORTFOLIO 

0 QassA s 

0 Class B 1 

LATIN AMERICA PORTFOLIO 

0 Oast A S 

0 Class B s 

WORLD NATURAL RESOURCES PTFL 

0 ClassA S I2J6 

0 dassB. 5 1189 


1177 

1595 

1135 


ITALPORTUNE INTL. FUNDS 
iv Class A [Aenr. Growth IttrtJS 

toQcasB [Global Equity) S 

« date C (Global Bond) s 

iv dan D( Ear Band) Ew, __ 

JAftDHK FLEMING • 8P0 Bex 11441 Ha KB 

0JF ASEAN Trad 5 634B 

0JF For East WTntTr — 5 4181 

d JF Global Cum. Tr S 1450 

d JF Ham Kang Trust S 25X2 

0 JF Jam Sm. Co Tr_ 

0JF Japan Trad. 


DRAGON PORTFOLIO 

0 CIOSSA 

0 Class B 


0 jFMnluyiicTrusL 
0 JF Pacific Inc. Tr. 


0 JF Utalteid Trust % 

JOHN GOVETT MAMT (ULMJ LTD 
Td: 44S24 ■ 62 94 20 

iv Gawett Man. Futures C 

■vGorettttm.Put.UM % 

to Gantts Gear. Cun- S 

■vGavati Man-SwUrtwr Fd — S 
JULIUS BAER GROUP 

d Baerttend SF 

0 Ombre SF 

d Emribaer Ameticn S 

0 Eaulbaer Eirrane. 

0 SFR-BAEF 
0 stockbar. 

0 5wbd»r. 


1274980 

2519 

M28 

39.15 


1784 

1733 

MERRILL LYNCH MEXICAN INC PORT 

0 Mexham IncSPtfl O A S 10.17 

0 Mnrlaot IncS Ptfl a B S 14T7 

d Mexican me Peso Ptfl Cl A A 1514 

0 Mexican Inc Peso Ptfl OBJ 1413 

MOMENTUM ASSET MANAGEMENT 
w Momentum NcrvtHIler Pert-S 1(021 

mMnmantiim RnMwwFd— S 13739 

mltomntum RyR Rll —8 9*8) 

M0RVAL VOHWILLER ASSET I6GT Co 
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wiMKerfunds-wniereq na —1 
MULTI MANAGER N.V. 

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to European Growth Fd Ecu 

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d Austro Band Fund, 
d Swlsi Band Fun 
0 dm Band Fund. 

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d Global Band Fund. 
d Eure Slock Fund— 
0 US Stock Fund. 

0 PacHIc Stock Ft— 

0 Swtei. 5tock Fund— 
0 Sneckd Swtea Stock. 
0 Joann Stock Fmd 


-Ecu 


0 German State Fund DM 

0 Karwm Stock Fund — S 

d Swiss Franc Cnsb— SF 

0 DM Cate Fund— dm 

0 ECU Cash Fund — 

0 Stertlno Com ftmd 
d Dollar Cash Fund 


Ecu 


»K3 Flnmlol&Metob 
w CD) KT Global— 
w IF) G7 Currency-. 
iv(H) YenFinonckri 


13492 

9481 

B&1D 

141X7 

11588 

HB57 

1482 

985 

125557 

1282 

1492 

10X4 


123734 


to U) Dhrersffled Rsk Adi— S 

w(K) lull Currency *. Band _S 

to JWH WORLDWIDE FNO-S 
GOLDMAN SACHS 
wGSAdl Rate MarL F0 1 1 — 8 

m<35 Gtobd Currency S 

toOSGtebal Bwttv— S 

w GS World Band Fund S 

wGSMtortd Income FHmd s 

GOTTEX FUND MANA GEMEN T 

wG Swap Fund- — — Eai 

GRANITE CAPITAL INTI. GROUP 
w Granite Cnptlul Equity — J 18M4 

w GranHe Capital ate) Nmitnds 18489 

w Granite Ccwdol Mu rtnoa e -S 132B 

or ASSET MANAGEMENT (IRELAND) LTD 
Til : 144) 71 -7164567 

0 GT Aston Fd A Stum S 5987 

0 GT Aeeon R] B Shores % «X3 

0 GT Asto Ftmd A Shores S Xte 

0 GT Ada Fund B Shares S 2489 

0 GT Aston SnxW Comp A ShS 2584 

0 GTANan Small Camp BShJ 2180 

0 GT Australia Ffl A Shares— S 3U4 

0 GTAintrc*la FdBShrees-S 3788 

0 GT Astir. Small Co A Sh — I 3181 

0 GT Aadr.SasMI Co B Sh — S 3U3 

0GT Berry Japan Fd A Sh—i 2388 

d GT Berry Japan Fd B Sh_ 5 
0 GT Bond Fd A glares 8 

0 GT Donor Fond B Sh 1 3SJ4 

d GT Emeretan MUs A Sh— 8 2279 

0 GTEjnorgtaaMktlB Sh—S 2293 

0 GTEmMktSrepMCoASbJS 987 

0 GT Em Mkt 5<ndl Oi B Sh Jl 987 

toGT Euro Small CnFd A BL8 4110 

wGTeeroSraoBCoFdBShJ 43JD 

0OTH«wKiwMBS|»rttS 9UB 

0 GT HmhuPoadtoiter B Sbs 1151 

« GTJa> ore Stocks Fd asw i2sa 

to GTJOPDTC Stacks FdBSM 1258 

wGT JapSmeE Co FdASh — 5 1484 


2111 

2591 

2088 



PLC (44 71 710 46 67) 


M81 

2434 

957 

957 

1414 

1427 

5472 

5486 

) 

2482 

1291 

5344 


wGT 
wG-T. 

0 GT 
0 GT 
0 GT 
0 GT 
r GT 
r GT 
ST... 
d G.T. 

0G.T. 

0 G.T. 

WG.T. - - 

to B.T." Korea Fund s 783 

to&T. Newly batCauntr Fd— S 7545 

v6.T. US Smob CBmpantoB— S 23J5 

GUERNSEY CAPITAL MAMAGEMENT LTD 

1 GCMGtabafSd.cn. 3 11387 

GUINNESS FUGHT FD MUCKS [Owtnrl LM 
GUINNESS FLIGHT GLBL STRATEGY FD 

0 Managw) Currency S 4481 

0 Gtobdi BoreL. — S 3890 

0 GMbal Mob income BamL-5 

0 GIB 8. S Band 1 UJ2 

-dEure High tat Band 1 34X6 

d Global t eflv S 9*99 

0 American Bliw Chip S 2987 

0 Japan and Poctae s 13438 

d UK 2844 

0 European — ; 1 11189 

GUINNESS FLIGHT INTL AC CUM FD 

d.DHisrtiemat Money DM B72U 

d US Denar Money % 38J3I 

0 US Dollar HIS*i Y<J Band — S 2430 


0 Franck Franc Cash -FF 

iv Multi advisor Forex Fd S 

KEY ASSET MANAGEMENT INC 

a) Key Global Hedge— -8 

mKiv Hedge Fund Inc s 

m Kar Hedge Investments — 5 
KIDDER, PEABODY 

b OMsaaetrice Fund (Jd S 

ft III Find LM S 

b intr Guaranteed Fond s 

0 Stonehenge L td S 

LATIN AMERICAN SECURITIES 
Tel : London 871 IBS 1234 
0 Argen ti n ia n Invest Ou SimvS 
0 Bradlkm invest Co Sioav—S 
w CotomMan invest Co Slcovj 
■r Lotto Amer Extra Yield Fd * 
d Latm Adwricn Income Oo_8 
0 Lottn Amertcon invest Co— s 
0 Modcan Invest Co Slcnv— 8 
iv Peruvian invest On Sicov — % 

LEHMAN BROTHERS 
0 Aslan Dima Pori NV A — % 

0 Aston Dragon PortNV B —S 

0 atonal AdvtaDn Port NV AJ 
d Global Atfvtmrs Port NV BJ 
0 Lehman Cur Adv.A/B — _ 5 
0 P i emte r Pot u refl Adv A/B-S 

L1PH) INVESTMENTS 

34/F Uppo Tower Cortre. 89 QwamMiyJt K 


3472 

3154 

1354 

12801 

1505 

1273 

5411 

U77 

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ULW 

1287 

ijjn 

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iv Java Fond_— 

wAsean Fixed Inc Fd — 
iv IDR Money Market Fd. 
w DIO Money Market Fd 
iv Indonesian Growth Fd. 
w Askm Growth Fund — 
ir AsKm Warrant F 


1181 

M80 

12J9 

1044 

3488 

1*61 

994 


LLOYD GEORGE MNCM6T ten) 64S4ED 

to Antenna Fund— S IMS 

w LG Aston smaller Cos Fd_ S 384J» 

to LG Indto Fund LM— S 1587 

LOMBARD. 0WER * CIE - GROU P 
OB LI FLEX LTD 1C1) 

d MuUlcurrancv * “51 

0 DoHor Medium Term S 2*» 

0 Oottor Lana Term J 

0 Japanese Yen Y M44M 

0 Pound Stortbig * M 

0 Deutsche Mork DM IBM 

d Dutch Florin ft 

0 HY Eure Currencies Ecu 1751 

0 Swiss Franc — — SF U84 

0 US DoHor Short Term— — * 12M 

0 MY Eure Curr DtvM Pay — Era 12 x 2 

0 Swiss Mu iHu w ra n ct 
0 European Currency 
0 BetotonFrrex 



0 French Franc 

0 Swtes Mum-Dhridend 

0 Swiss Franc Short-Term — SF 

0 CanaiMim DoUor CS 

0 Dutch FtartnMwtll FI 

0 States Franc Dtvtd Puv — SF 

0 CADMuMcur. Dhr CS 

0 MeWfsmmeanCUrr SF 

0 Converti bles .-SF 


MALABAR CAP MGMT ( 

mMokftar Inft Fund j 

MAN INTERNATIONAL FUTURE5 

mum Limited -ttdlnorr — I 
mMlnt Limited - Incom e- ■ S 
mMW GW LW- Spec issue— 1 

m Mild Gtd LM-N<w 2003 X 

aMtat Gtd LM~ Jim 1994 s 

m MM Gtd LM-Dec 1994 S 

m MM Gtd LM -Aug 1995 S 

mMtat Gtd Currencies-— — S 
m MM GM Currencies 2601 — J 

03 Mint SP Res LM I BNP) S 

mAltuma GM Futures S 

m Athene Gtd Currencies 1 

m Athena GM Ftoanctats inc-S 
m Aitaeno GM Flnncsote Cap 8 

ID AH L Capital Mkte Fd S 

mAHLCommodnr Fund S 

mAHL Currency Fund S 

mAHL Real Time Trad Fd — * 
mAHL GM Real Time Trd — S 
nrMapGaaronteed 1996 LkL-S 
mMop Lsverngefl Recav. LtdA 

«n8*APGuarantDed 2B» » 

mMMGGI Fin 3803 S 


144* 

105J4 

14X3 

14X8 

11.13 

1174 

1159 

144* 

l| LTD 

2217 


51X5 

1402 

1286 

27.19 

22.14 

2S44 

1781 

1LH 

1157 

IT589 

1336 

9X2 

1182 

12JO 

1380 

HUS 

9.17 

983 
989 

984 
1246 
1117 
1529 


MATTHEWS INTERNATIONAL. MOT 

EMERGING ASIAN ST RATEGI ES FUND 

moan A » »1M5 

■v nw» » * 12154 

MCKINLEY CAPITAL PARTNER* LTD 

or The Corsair Fund LM S 12458 

uvwp mwnv 

Rokln 54 W12US, Amsterdam 12457111881 


w Asia Poc. Growth Fd K.V. 


4358 

4793 

12985 

3534 

11144 

76X8 

5215 

4419 

24SL14 

180 

MUS 


to Aston Setecdan Fd NV. — 
w DP Amer. Growth Fd N.V.—S 

iv EMS Oftshare Fd N.V 2 

w Earope Grawte Fund N-V. _F1 
toJrexsi Dlversined Fund — S 

■ Leveraged COP Hp M— S 

to Tokyo Poe. HokL N.V S 

MERRILL LYNCH 

0 Donor Assets PorttaHo J 

0 Prime Rote ParHoi m 1 

MERRILL LYNCH SHORT-TERM 
WORLD INCOME PORTFOLIO 
0 Qua* — - 8 

S^4LCUMBNCY BOND SERIES 
AUSTRALIAN DOLLAR PORTFOLIO 

d Category A.. .« I 9 * 

0 Categcry n — — AS 1982 

CANADIAN DOLLAR PORTFOLIO 

0 Category A CS 

d Cole miry P _ n 

CORPORATE HIGH INCOME PTFL 
0 CtoesA-1 
tfCfe 


1*99 

1*39 


1*44 

1487 


1654 

mea 


1407 

95S 


104 

1131 


1851 

1418 


1553 

1284 

1*35 

1297*00 

JW7 


—W — i Fund 
w Market mmm 
I nr World Boom 


1446 

2454 

16X4 

1151 

Ml 

1139 

1135 


NICHOLAS-APPLEQATE CAPITAL MOT 

to NA nuUr Growth Fd S 14788 

iv NA Hedge Ftmd S tel-95 

NOMURA INTL (HONG KONG) LTD 

0 Nomura Jakarta Fund s 885 

NORIT CURRENCY FUND 

m NCF USD S I111S 

mNCFDEM DM 88557 

01 NCF CHF 5F 917X4 

ffl NCF FRF FF 441282 

rnNCFJPY Y 8269586 

m NCF BE F BF 2474280 

OtMEY ASSET MANAGEMENT LTO 

21 Grasvenar STXdn WIX«FEX*-71-499299B 

0 aster European DM 1B383 

w Oder Eunmeim * 

to Odev Eurap Growth Inc DM 149.17 

toOdvy Eurap Growth Acc — DM 14979 

w Oder Eure Grin Sterinc — £ 4432 

iv Odev Eura Grin Star Acc _1 4584 

OLYMPIA CAPITAL INTL. INC 
Williams House. Hamilton HMI1. Bermuda 
Tel: 809 292-UU Fn : 859 295-2XB 
iv FtaNwry Group 


w Olympta Securlte SF 54 

iv Otvnmto Stars Emera Mkts S 
iv Winch. Eostem Dragon — 5 
w Winch Frontier —3 


iv Which. FuLOlyimila «cr_S 
to Which. Gl Sec Inc PI (A) — S 
to Which 01 Sec Inc PI fd — % 
w Winch Hkta inn Mndlson -Ecu 

to Winch Hkto lnrt Ser D Ecu 

iv Winch Hkta Inn Ser F Ecu 

to Winch Hida Otv Star Hedges 
• Winch. Reser. Mum. Gv HdJ 

to Winchester Thailand S 

OPTIMA FUND MMI AGE ME NT 
73 Front SL Hnmll teLBermudo 809 29SJ4S8 
wOntfma Emerald F0LM—JI 
wOpttara Fund 3 


22437 

17489 

1D19J9 

1493 

31985 

15151 

882 

881 

145130 

171834 

170181 

1285X1 

7185 

31X6 


w Optima Futures Fund— S 

to Optima Global Fund s 

w Optima Perimla Fd Ltd — 5 

w Optima Short Fund..,, S 

FACTUAL 

0 EternBy Fund Ltd. — S 

0 infinity Fund Lie S 

dShtoHign Yield Fd Ltd — 8 
PAJtlBAVGROUP 
to Umar - * 


0 ParveflUSAB 

0 Parvesl Japan B— 
0 Poorest AitaPatKG 
d Parvesl Europe B — 
0 Poorest Holland B— 
0 Poorest Frances 


1403 
1985 
1489 
1U2 
1435 
431 

3388310 

924X153 

171.1*34 

8X4 
?<(» 
572400 
.. -J139. 
2434 
14787 
139115 
40089 
184130 
1955X2 


0 Parvesl Germany B DM 

d Poorest OWl-DQlMr B S u 

0 Poorest OOD-DMB— DM ------ 

0 Parvesl 0Ml-Y«B__ Y IMMUJ 

0 Parrest Owl-Golden B FI lfflB94 

d Poorest OWFFrene B FF 215*29 

0 Pnrvest ObteSter E £ 17*J4 

0 Parvesl OWFEcuB Era 1053 

0 PnrveHCOlHteluxB LF 1-4K86 

0 Parvesl S-T Dollar B S 11JS7 

d PnnreslS-7 Ewoo# B Era K983 

0 Parvesl !rT DEM B DM H?J4 

0 Parvesl S-T FHFB__ FF tt50J7 

0 Parvesr S-T Bet Plus B BF WO 686 

0 Porvest Globed 9 LF tSJM 

0 Parvesl lnt Bond B 6 , 31! 

0 Parvesl ObiHJra B Lit 56948180 


0 Pwest Inl Equirhrt B, 
HEMAL GROUP 
f ComtnodHies Lid 


11434 

I04a53 

3K7JN 

103448 

192*84 

1455.75 

115753 

183152 


/ Drakkar Growth N.v. 

f Emerging Mkb HMas _ 

t EoroMlr (Ecu) LM Ecu 

I investment Hkta N.V— S 

f Media 4 Commutecorions-S 

f Nascal Lid 5 

PICTET 5 CIE -GROUP 

w PX.F UK VOI (Lux) £ 498) 

to P.C.F Germavol (Lux) DM 

to PjQF Noromvm (Lux) 1 3*^0 

to PJCf VUber (Lux). Ptps JH198D 

to PjOF VodtaHa (Lam Ml 11571180 

iv P.CF VaHrance (Lux) FF 

toVataandSFRILuxi 5F 3B59 

wValbood USD (Ua) s 

w Valbond Ecu (Lux) Era 1MJJ 

iv Vatband FRF (Lux). J=F ltm» 

to Valbond GBP (Lux I £ !«■« 

to VWband DEM (Lux) DM SJU9 

w US SBd PHI I Lux) 1 

wErnere Mkts(Lux)— » 3W^ 

ivEur. Opport (Lux) ECU 1SM9 

b Gtabui Value ILux) Era 1H8* 

to Eurovgl IL«) 1 Ecu .084 

0 Pictet Vefedme(CH) SF 7gLi& 

mind Small Cap 1 1 DM) — — J __<*73> 

PREMIER INVESTMENT FUHDS LTD 
c/a PA Bax 1104 Grand Cayman 
Fax: (809) *49«*3 
m Premier US Equity Fund _i 
m Premier Eq R1AMM Fd — S 

m Premier UdlEo Fund » 

m Premier Sovereign Bd Fd_S 
m Premier GMM Bd Fa -_— % 
m Premier Total Return Fd— S 
PUTNAM 

d Emerging Htth sc. Tnai—S 
w Putnam Em. Into. Sc Trusts 
0 Putnam Gleb. High Growth 5 
0 Putnam High Inc. GNMA FdS 
0 Putnam mn Fund S 


QUANTUM OROUP OF FUNDS 
to Emerging Growth M N.V.-S 

to Quantum Fund N.V 1 

to Quantum RvoMY Trust — -J 
iv Quantum UK Realty Fund_t 

to Quasar Inti Fond N.V S 

iv Quota Fond N.V l 

QUARRY MANAGEMENT LTO 
Tetenhane : 86* - 9448650 
FocsfaiUle : 809 - 949-8062 

0 Allas Arbitrage Fd Ltd s 

0 Heraerls Ftnd LM— S 


to Leveraged Can Holdings — i 

b Prl Challenge Swto Fd SF 

O PTleauTT* Fd- Europe Ecu 

a Prteguirv Fo+whreiia SF 

0 Prtcquiry FU-LflHn Am— S 

b Prtbond Fund Era Era 

O PrBxvvJ Fund U5D S 

b PrlDand Fd hy Emer Mkt>5 

w Svtecllvt Imresi SA S 

b Source J 

to us Bona Ptat S 

toVnrlgpto Fra 


124083 

129036 

138789 

152471 

151493 

132177 

43.10 

4479 

1435 

9JB 

1484 

31930 

2277431 

144X4 

1 n .11 

2Z7J07 

23420 


0 Mertdkm Hedge Fd Dd srt3 

0 Zenith Fund Ltd &/S 3 

RESENT RIND MANAGEMENT LTD 

w New Korea Growth Fd s 

nr Pocfflc Arbitrage Co S 

iv Regent Leveraged Fut Fd-S 
0 Regent Gtal Am Grth Fd — s 
0 Regent GW Euro Grth Fd_l 

0 Regent Gtal Resources S 

0 Regent GRH udi Grth Id — 5 
0 Regent GUd Jan Grth Fd— 8 
0 Regent GRJ PocU Basbi — S 
0 Regent GRX Reserve 5 


9529 

10490 

16139 

64X2 


11X7 

98S 

8334 

63753 

*1499 

2X394 

2X372 

29491 

4X832 

21658 

35342 

28364 

28*73 

1185 

1L73 

111X177 


44.14 

1012X2 

115*54 

1027224 

244784 

44.1* 

128279 

122966 

122515 

U5.943 

124484 

115847 

119744 

399X60 

2081300 

1014X79 

119573 


ROTHSCHILD (GROUP EDMOND DE) 
OTHER FUNDS 

0 Asla/Jcmm Emerg. Growths 
w Esorli Eur Partn Inv Tst— Era 
w Eurap Sirateo limuiui ta— Era 

D Integral Futurm S 

b Oangesl Global Fd General DM 
b Qpttaest Global ft* Income DM 

d PCClTic Nles Fund 5 

■v Permai drakkar Growth NVS 

1 Selection Horizon . — FF 


b VIcMre Arlene. 


0 Reatnl GM UK Grth Fd. 
im Rj_ Country Wnd Fd — 
ir Undervalued Assets Ser 1 
0 Regent Sr) Lanka Fd 
m Reseat Pacific Hdg " 

ROBECO GROUP 
POB 9738060 AZ RoHerdanU31)U 2241224 

0 RG America Fend — FI 

0 RG Europe Fund FI Jg.29 

0 RG Poctflc Fund FI 15680 

rf RGDlVtreltteFiJWJ- FI M 

0RG Money Phis FF) FI 112^ 

0 RG Money Pius F6——J llB® 


1434740 
151 388 
1D4J00 
100*74 
19449* 

173X43 

987 
308784 
8105825 

- - 514781 

ROTHSCHILD ASSET MGMT (CJI LTD 
mNrmrod Leveraged Hid— ^ *7401 

0 Tokvo Port Re hubs (Sea)-S 181 80 

SAFDIE GROUP/KEY ADVISORS LTD 
m Key Diversified Inc Fd LkLS IL5B640 
SAFRA REPUBLIC HOLDING 
w Republic GAM— S 15*99 

m fleoubllc GAM America S 127X8 

» Rea GAM Em Mkts Gtobol J 1985 

iv Rep GAM Em Mkts Lai AmS 12672 

w Republic GAM Euroae 5F — SF US22 

w Republic GAM Europe USSJ 11980 

nr Republic GAM Grwlh CHF JF 12227 

h. ReouHic G am Growth c t iuoo 

w Republic GAM Growth USS8 171 J8 

w Reauolac GAM Opportunity S 125X2 

to Republic GAM Pod Be S 141X0 

tr Republic Gravr DM me— S 1073 

to ReautNlc Gnsev Eur Inc — DM HUB 

to Republic Lai Am AUoc- 1 1042S 

to Republic Lot Am Argent —S 107X7 

w Republic Lai Am Brazil —S 11387 

w Republic Lai Am Mexico — S 10484 

w Republic Lai Am Venez—A 103X8 

iv Rea Salomon Shot FdLMJS 99.96 

SANTANDER NEW WORLD INV. 
m Commander Fund S 10588* 

m Explorer Fund 5 I25JM 

SKANDIKAVISKA EKSKILOA KANKEN 
S-E-BANKEN FUND 
0 Europe Inc 


d Flovran Ostern Inc -5 

d Gtobol Inc S 

0 Lakomecel Inc 1 

0 uartremlnc S 


d Japan me. 
0 Mine UK- 
0 Sverige Inc. 


0 Ncrdamertha Inc 
0 TeknolOBl Inc 


d Sverige Rauefond Inc Sc 

SKANDIFONDS 

ff Equity lnrt acc S 

a Eauitv lnrt inc I 

0 EoultY Global. 


0 Equity NO* Resources- 

0 Equity Japan — 

0 Equity Nordic 
d Equity ILK 


-I 


d Equity ConllncnMI EuroatJl 

d Eaultv MedRerronean 1 

0 Equity North America S 

d Equity Far East — —I 
d lnrt Emetgbia Markets — S 

0 Band lnrt Acc s 

0 Bond lnrt Inc S 

d Bond Europe Aa: S 

d Band Europe Inc, 


d Band Sweden Acc. 

0 Bond Sweden Inc- 
0 Bend DEM Acc 

0 Bond DEM Inc 

0 Baid Dollar US Acc. 
0 Bond Dollar US Ine- 
rt Curr. US Dollar. 


181 

189 

IJB 

188 

189 

9481 

181 

1098 

1JH 

188 

1087 

1781 

1421 

L42 

1X3 

11081 

1X2 

1J0 

1J0 

181 

220 

527 

122 

1174 

788 

188 

0.98 

1402 

1128 

121 

497 

1X5 

181 

185 

1226 


d Curr. SweiflNi Kronor _5ek 

SO Cl ETC GEHERALE GROUP 
SOGELUX FUND (SF) 
iv SF Bonds A IIS A ... — S 

• SF Bonds B Germany DM 

w SF BondsC France FF 

toSF Bonds E G8 r 

* SF Bonds F japan Y 

w SF Bonds GEaraoe — —Era 
iy SF Bonds H world Wide — J 

nrSF Bonds J Belgium — BF 

toSF Eq. K North Amerkh — S 

to SF Eq. L w .Europe Ecu 

toSF Eq. M PadOc Basin Y 

iv SF Ea. P Growth Countries J 

toSF EO.Q Gold Mines S 

toSF Ea. R Worldwide S 

to SF Short Term S France — FF ----- 

to SF Short Term T Eur. Era 1420 

SOD1T1C ASSET MANAGEMENT INC 

iv SAM Brazil 1 282.78 

nr SAM Diversified S «4X5 

to SAM/McGair Hedge S 115X8 

toSAMOPPOrtirnttv— 9 13*27 

to SAM Strategy * lOAJ 

m Alpha SAM S 13221 

toGSAM Composite— J 37414 

5VENSKA HANDELS BANKEN SJL 
144 Bd de la PelniB*. L-2330 Luxembourg 
b SHB Bond Fund 


1480 

128) 

134J5 

1285 

2318 

1428 

1472 

BSBOO 

1980 

17.13 
1994 
19.11 
34X2 

14.14 
1682347 


. toSvensknSd.FdAmerSh— S 
ivSvenskaSeL FdGermanr—S 
toSvomka Sel. Fd intr Bd Sh-S 
w Svonska SeL Fd mri Sh— l 
w Svenska Set Fd Japan— Y 
w Svenskn SeL Fd Mlti-Mkt — Sek 
to Svenska Sot Fd PocM 5h__S 
iv Svenska 5eL Fd Swed B(te-Sck 
vr Svenska Sei. Fd Sylvia Sh -Era 
SWISS BANK CORP. 

d SBC 100 Index Fund SF 

0 SBC Equity Pffl-Austrolta—AJ 
0 SBC Equity PtIFCimOdn — CS 
0 SBC Equity PW-Eurupe— Ecu 
0 SBC Ea Ptfl -Netherlands — FI 

d SBC Govern Bd A/B S S 

0 SBC Band Ptfl-Austr 5 A — AS 
d 5BC Bond Pift-Austr 1 B — as 

0 SBC BondPifl-Can8A a 

0 SBC Band PttFCanJIB— _CS 

0 SBC Bond PtfHJM A DM 

0 SBC Bond PIMM B — DM 

0 SBC Bond Ptfl-Outch G. a_ FI 
d SBC Bond PifHSutchG. B— F! 

d SBC Bond Ptfl-Era A Era 

d SBC Band Pttl-Ecu B Era 

0 SBC Bond Pltl-FF A FF 

0 SBC Bond PHi-FFB FF 


5587 

1489 

1125 

1224 

6122 

406 

12027 

493 

145444 

158429 

1*43X0 

23480 

■mm 

21580 

41580 

100411 

11787 

127X3 

11925 

13584 

T7495 

16583 

174.11 

18783 

119X0 

134X0 

61624 

78*31 


0 SBC Bond Ptfl-PtOS A/B Ptus 1BZ2480 

0 SBC Bund PMWterWW A— 6 44M 

d SBC Bond PltVSterllre B — £ 6484 

0 SBC Bond PortWto-SF A— 8F 1M9J4 

0 SBC Bond PortfolkhSF B — SF M3284 

0 SBC Bond Ptfi-USS A S 164X4 

0 SBC Bond PtlHISS B * 

0 SBC Bond Ptfl-Yen A V 

0 SBC Bond PtB-Yen B Y 

d SSCMMF-Al AS 


0 SBCMMF-BFR- 
0 SBC MMF - CanS- 


-BF 


-CS 


0 SBC DM Short-Term A DM 

0 SBC DM Short-Term B DM 

0 SBC MMF ■ Dutch G. FI 

0 SBC MMF - Era. Era 

0 SBC MMF - EaC- 
0 SBCMMF-FF. 

0 SBC MMF ■ Lit— 

0 SBC MMF - Ptoi . 


HIM 
11221180 
1T73MJ0 
4277X9 
11112986 
465*99 
169381 
131784 
731*49 
3731X5 

444B2780 

FF 

Lit 929978180 

Pin 39991988 

A5 3149213 

x 2905.17 

584120 


tf SBC MMF - Schilling 

0 SBC MMF - Sterling J 

0 SBC MMF-SF -SF 

0 SBC MMF -US -Daitar 5 77M84 

0 sbc mmf - uss/ii s aaan 

0 5BC MMF - Yen— — Y 40017980 

0 SBC GBU-Pttl SF Grth SF 114411 


0 SBC GM-Ptfi Era Grth Ecu 

0 SBC GBrt-Ptfl USD Grth S 

0 SBC Glbi-Plfl SF YM A SF 

0 SBC GM-Ptfi SF Yld B SF 

0 SBC Gtaf-Ptfl Era Yld A — Ecu 
0 5BC Gtw-Ptfl Era Yld B — Era 
0 SBC GM-Ptfl USD YW A — l 
0 SBC GIM-Ptfl USD Yld B— 8 

0 SBC GRU-Ptfl 5F InC A SF 

0 SBC GIM-Ptfl SF inc B SF 

0 SBC GOV- Ptfl Ecu inc A Ecu 

0 SBC GtW-Ptfl Ecu Inc B Era 

0 SBC GtaC-Ptft USD Inc A — 5 
0 SBC GM-PHI USD Inc B_5 
0 SBC Glbl PW-OM Growth _DM 
d SBC Glbi PifW)M YW A/B -DM 
d SBC GUN PNW3M Inc A/B-DM 
d SBC E merging Mmketi_J 
0 SBC Small & Mid C0P9S*-SF 
0 Amertenvatar—— — . S 

0 AratoVolor — C 

0 As la Portfolio---— 1 

0 Convert Band Selection— — SF 

0 D-Mark Bond Selection DM 

0 Dollar Bond Median 1 

0 Era Band Selection Era 

0 Florin Band Selection FI 

d France Vo lor ff 

d German la Voter, 

0 GoUPortlolte. 


137123 
1229X4 
1X8X4 
1245X7 
127181 
140084 
HO* JO 
122021 
112123 
1UIM3 

nun 

120483 

103789 

HQ82 

115189 

110422 

W7JI1 

mm 

558X0 

35887 

24473 

74444 

11720 

11470 

139X3 

10420 

13485 

2282.17 

52922 


0 ibertavoior 
0 ItatVoter _.. . 
0 jcpcnPortteilq- 


-5 

-Pto 


3*3X2 
6791*80 

47BS11X0 

„ Y 2495980 

0 Sterling Bond Setectton E IB M 

d Sw. Foreign Band Se4ectkm8F 1J287 

d 5wtoVolnr._ SF 4»-® 

0Unhmnat Bead Selection _SF 8125 

d unhreriat Fund SF 

0 Yen Bona Setedten____Y 1WS80 

TEMPLETON W.WIDE INVESTMENTS 
GROWTH PORTFOLIO 

0 Class A- 1 S 

0 aaasA-2 S 


0 CkBS A-3. 


d Ck»s B-l 

0 Oast B-2. — S 

INCOME PORTFOLIO 

0 ClassA -S 

0 oast B » 


1437 

17JQ 

14.18 

1193 

1738 


THORNTON MANAGEMENT LTD 

0 Padf Iftvt Ffl SA C £ 

0 Podf UivtFdSAOM- DM 

0 EftWni CrusaAr Fund — 1 
0 Thor. LOT Dragons Fd LW J 
0 Thornton Orient Inc Fd Ltd I 

d Thornton Tiger Fd Ltd 1 

d Mteioped Satedtan 5 

iv Jakarta J 

a ifnrm * 

NEW TIGER SEL. FUND 

d Heno Kang * 

d jama- ; 

d Phtltpoinei— s 

d Thailand s 

0 Mattvsta 1 

d Indonesia. 


0 USS Liquidity. 
0 China. 


0 Slngmore . » 

THORNTON TAIWAN FUND 

0 Equity IlKomr— * 

0 Eautty Growth 3 

0 UauUHtv— * 

UEBERSEEBANK ZurtCB 
0 a- Fund SF 

d 6 - Fund SF 

0 J - Funo SF 

0M-Fund. SF 


0 UBZ Eura- Income Fund — SF 
d UBZ warm iname Fund— Ecu 

0 UBZ GoW Fund— — 1 

0 UBZ N tenon Convert SF 

0 AUd Growth Convert SFR-SF 
0 Alto Gruwlh Convert USS— 5 
0 UBZ DM - Bonn T ‘ 

0 UBZ D ■ Fund 

0 UBZ SwM Equity Fund- 
0 UBZ American Ea Fund. 

0 UBZ *- Bond Fund. 


1423 
41.93 
1787 
49X0 
39 J4 
6186 
7783 
1925 
15X7 

77 83 
17.74 
81X9 

3438 

1180 

1416 

2229 

25X1 

14X3 

1481 

HUM 

13*5X0 

71494 

36623 

133923 

1181 

(081 

13170 

125483 

1375X4 

131182 

104X6 

11520 

12583 

9474 

1C0X7 


UNION BAMCAIRE ASSET MGT III BAM) 
INTE R NATIONAL, NASSAU 
w ArM Invest— . — — S 

1- — ■ X 

toBocoflfl— * 

iv Beck Invest S 


r Brudnvest. 
rCreSPl 


j Dlntuturas 
iv Din 


DfenresiAsto! 

Dtoved Inti Fix Inc Stral—S 

Joa Invest. S 


to Lera) 

toMmlnvest. 
iv M or h i tvMt _ 


w Maurlnvest Camtnsted 
wMourtrtveetEra. 

» Pulsar S 


.Era 


.> Pulsar Ov 
toOuontlnv 


wQuant|nvast93. 


wTudlnvest. 

wUrstovest. 


UNION BANCAIRE ASSET MGT (UBAMI 
INTERNATIONAL. LUXEMBOURG 
wll BAM 5 Bond 5 


290086 z 
139422 Z 
1271X3 Z 
141475 z 
111127 z 
127328 t 
1165.17 z 
3024Hz 
1259.15 z 
HM444Z 
220449Z 
1069801 
133983 l 
134324 Z 
400481 z 
HM261 
IBS6X4I 
2410X12 
242187 z 
298187 z 
1491X3 l 
3927 JO r 
1181X21 
43469 1 


■ UBAM DEM Band. 


-DM 


w UBAM Emerging Growth _S 

to UBAM FRF Band FF 

rUBAM Germany DM 


w U RAM Gtabal Band, 
iv ubam Japan. 


-Era 


t UBAM Sth PacK 4 Asia 

w UBAM U5 Equities 

UNION BANK OF SWITZERLAND/INTRAG 
0 Amen ■ 3F 


1197X4 2 
113483 z 
189522 2 
526456 Z 
1209X9 2 
M2774Z 
9904862 
341.192 
1352721 


0 BamHnvest. 
0 Brtt-lnve5t_ 
0 Canoe 


-SF 

_SF 


0 Canvert-lmresl 


0 O-Mark-ItT 
0 Dollar-ln 



0 Gotd-l overt - 


0 Gukten-invest- 
0 Hotvet Invert. 


0 HoJUmd- Invert. 
0 HOC. 


d Jaaan- invest . 


0 Padflo-lirvest 
d Sam 


0 Skondhiavlen-lnvert. 
0 Stertl no- Invert. 


-SF 


0 Suds Franc-tnvest . 
0 Sima. 


0 Swtereol.. . --XF 

0 UBS America Latino SF 

d UBS Amerira Latina 1 

d UBS Arta New Horizon 5F 

d UBS Asia Now Horizon s 

0 UB5 Snail C Europe SF 

0 UBS Small C. Europe —DM 

0 UBS Port Inv SFR Inc SF 

0 UBS Part inv SFR Coo G— SF 

d UBS Port inv Era Inc SF 

0 UBS Part Inv Ea me Ea 

0 UBS Fort Inv Ea CapG — SF 
0 UBS Port Inv Ecu CapG— Ecu 

0 UBS Port Inv USS Inc 1 

0 UB5 Part Inv USS Inc SF 

0 UBS Part Inv USS Coo G—SF 
0 UBS Port inv USS CapG— 8 

0 UBS Port Inv DM Inc SF 

d UBS Port Inv DM Inc DM 

0 UBS Port Inv DM Coo G — SF 
0 UBS Port Inv DM CapG — DM 

0 Yen- invest — Y 

d UBSMMlnvert-usS s 

0 DBS MM I overt -t 51. 

0 UBS MM Invert-Era _ 

0 UBS MM invert- Yen Y 

0 UBS MM Invert-Lit. 

0 UBS MM Invest-SFR A SF 

0 UBS MM Invert-SFR T SF 

0 UBS MM Invert-FF FF 

0 UBSMM Invert-HFL R 

0 UBS MM Invert-Can S CS 

0 UBSMM Invwt-BFR BF 

0 UBS Short Term inv -DM — DM 
0 UBS Band inv-Ea A — — Ea 

d UBS Bond mv-EcuT Era 

0 UBS Band liiv^FR SF 

0 UBS Bond Inv-DM, DM 

0 UBS Btoid Inv-USS S 

0 UBS Bond Inv-FF — FF 


0 UBS Band IntoConS 
0 UBS Bond Inv-Lll 


_a 


0 UB5 BJ-USS Ertra Yield I 

0 UBS Fb Term Inv-USS *4— 5 
0 UBS FI* Term ImMSt 94 — l 
d UBS Fix Term lnv SFR*6_5F 
0 UBS FI* Term Inv-DM 96— DM 
d UBS Fix Term Inv-Era 96— Era 
0 UBS FI* Term Inv-FF 94 — FF 

0 UBS Eq Inv-Ewooe A DM 

0 UBS Eq Inv-Euroo* T DM 

0 UBS Eq Inv-S Cop USA-— 8 
0 UBS Part I R« Inc 15FR1— 5F 
0 UBS Port I Fix Inc (DMI —DM 
d UBS Port l H* inc l Era) —Era 
0 UBS Port r Fix inciusil— s 
0 UB5 Cop lnv-90/10 SFR — -SF 

0 UBS COP lnv-90/10 USS 5 

0 UBS Cap inv-93/MI Germ — DM 
WORLPFOUO MUTUAL FUNDS 
0 5 Dally Income 5 

0 DM Daitv income DM 

0 5 Bond Income, S 

0 Nan -1 Bonds— — — S 

0 Hotel Borate 1 

0 Global Balanced 1 

d Global E uuttles 


0 US Conservative Equities— 5 
0 US Anremlve Equities S 

0 European Equities -_—S 
0 Padflc EquINeS- 


5088V 
4170 V 
16380v 
8680 V 
15780 y 
21470 V 
11921 y 
12580 V 
19450 V 
38780 y 
356X0 y 
23150 y 
253X0 V 

12580 y 

20250 V 
!9250y 
10580 V 
34780 V 
14880 V 
244X0 v 
55280v 
21280 V 
28488V 
210X9 V 
214J0V 
24450 
195X0 
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9*73 v 
11780 V 
72X4 V 
KBXOy 
12570 V 
11400V 
12085 y 
HITS y 

4413y 
1 1*70 y 
7034V 
7*X4y 
117 Jlv 
11735 y 
7939 V 
10380 v 
12338y 
10535 V 

1 

9149980V 

160489 

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2627480 
54VX6 
111X5 V 
14483 V 
106X7 V 
10977 V 
irate v 

115196 V 

11184V 
121143080 v 
9970 V 
10*17 V 
11187y 

112.15 V 
11572 v 
11483V 
11414 V 
25486 V 
24381V 

137.15 V 
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10571V 
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10180 v 
HMt 
10776 V 
11434 V 

180 
180 
1774 
2425 
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W.15 
!*X4 
1515 
1505 
11X5 
1*11 
685 


0 natural Resources— — 1 

YIELD ENHANCEMENT STRATEGISTS 
0 Enhanced Treav Returns— 5 1.1B00 


Other Funds 

to Actlcrotaance Slmv 

to AdMremce Sicov 

to Actlfutum Lid ———8 
to Acttgestlon Sicov. 


to Acitwrt Inn Slav 
to Adelaide 


.FF 

8 

-FF 


m Advanced Latin Fd Ltd 

iv Advanced 5mxegies Ltd — s 

w AlG Tatwon Fund — 1 

m Anna Invesftnent * 

w Aaut la international Fund -I 
w ArUfln i n vudaie n t — 5_ 

iv Argus Fund Batonced SF 

w Argus Fund Band . S F 

0 Asia Oceania Fund, 
to ASS I Artec) AG - 
to ASS (Derivative) 

w ASS norm) AG 

m Associated Invertors Inc. — » 

w Alheaa Fired Ltd 5 

to ATO NBkfeel Fund —X 

to Bcrezm Hedged Growth FdJ 

iv Beckman Irt Cop Acc s 

to DEM i m e ma tlanot Ud 5 

d Blkuben-Morval EEF -feu 

d Bleanar GM Fd I Cayman I J 
0 Btecmor doboUBahamaa) S 

0 C.C.LI ■ 3 

m Col Birn Leverage Fd Lld-5 

0 CB German Index Fond DM 

mCervin Growth Fund 5 

■ atndrt Limited -SF 

to CM USA 5 

to CM) Investmem Fund S 

mCotambas Holdings 6 

m Concorde inv Pima — — » _ 

to Contlvgst Actions lnrt— BF 

to Centlvesi Obll Bekm CT— BF 
toCorrttvert OcmMrtl — — DM 
to Convert. Fd lnrt A Certs — 5 
to Convert Fd lid 1 ! B Certs — 8 
mCrate Drill Ca n ■ * 

niCRM Futures Food Ud 5 

to Cumber iitfl N.V J 

w Out. Concert 2006 — — — » 

0 d. WWter Wld Wide fvf Trt-8 


to D.GX _ 

d Dolwa Jaaon Fund. 


0 DBCC / Nafln Band Fund— 5 
vr Derluartve Asset Alte c 3 

d DntY ha Amerta Fun d » 

to Egs Oversees Fund Ltd S 

m Elite World Fund LM SF 

d Eml Beta. ind. Plus A BF 

0 Eml Beta. lad. Plus B BF 

d £mt France tad. Pius A — FF 
0 Eml France Ind. Plus B — FF 

0 Eml Germ. ImL Has A DM 

0 End Germ. Ind. Plus B DM 

d Eml Nolh. Index Plus A — Fi 


97048 

1012X7 

74455 

2476 

10B2.lt 

109X9 

162.17 

110895 

iDanun 

40173 
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121181 
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110834 
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im mn 
1084880 
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16474 
711*3 


0 Eml Neth. index Plus I 
0 Eml Spain tad. Plus A- — - P to 

d Eml Seam ind. Plus B Pto 

0 Eml UK index Pius A 1 

0 Eml UK Index Plus B 1 

m Enigma Currency Fd 5 

m Eaulsrar ottsiwre ua 5 

w Esalr. Stu inv. M Ecu Bd FdEra 
iv Esalr. Sta Inv. 5lh Eur Fd-3 
0 Europe 1992 5 


a Europe OMtoatkn. 

toF.l.T. Fund FF 

w FXILP. Pprttellu 

w FatrtMO lnrt Ltd— 
wFalrlMd Sentry Ltd. 


.Ecu 


.FF 


w Fairflete Strategies Ltd — S 
aiFatvm Fund... 8 

mFlriWrd Overseas Ltd 5 

* First Eagle Fund 5 

w First Ecu LM Ea> 

m First Frontier Fund— » 

mFU-H inti invesment Lid— S 

to FL Trust asm 5 

w FL Trust SwHzerkmd 5F 

0 Fandllailo 


toFankml Money. 
FanluxlDwIu. 


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w Formula Sdeaion Fd_ 
m Future Genera hi re Ltd. 
mGEM Gencratten LM- 


_SF 


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m German Sel. Associates DM 

mGFMC Growth Fund 5 

i* Global *3 Fund Ltd S S 

to Global Arbitrage Ltd SF 

b Global Cop Fd But Ltd. 


iv Gtabal Futures wet Ltd — 1 
m Global Monetary Fd LM — 5 

nr Gannon] 5F 

0 GreenUne France ...FF 

m Guaranteed Caattal Invm 94 LF 

toHariXnaer Lathi Amer 5 

t Haussmann Hides N.v.-. — s 

w HB investmenis Lid S 

m H e mi sp here Neutral Dec 31 S 
0 Hrrttugr Coo Growth »=d LMS 

vHtHIfl Fund— 5 

b Hlgnbrhtee Caollol Carp — 5 

* Horizon Fund FF 

w Ibex Holdings LW SF 

to I FDC Japan Fired—. Y 

8 ILA-lGB 5 


b ILA-IGF. 
b ILA-INL 


w Indigo Oxrencv Fd Ltd. 

r Inti Securities Fund 

0 Interbred SA 

d mvereaDws. 


to Japan Pacific Fired- 
re Janre Selection Ames 
to Japan Setectton Fund 
w Kenmor GhL Series 2. 
to Kenmar Guanxiteed . 
m K1 Asia Pacific Fd 
w KM Global 


0 KML - II High Yield- 


i» Korea Dynamic Fund 5 

w Korea Growth Trurt — , — 5 

ml_F. Yield 8. Growth Fd 1 

iv Lo Fayette Holdings LW — S 
fflLo Jolla lnt Grm Fd Ltd — 5 
a L ute rman: Offshore Strut— 5 

iv Loaf Sicov 5 

m Leu PertormcBtee Fa .3 
wLF InternatlonoJ —I 
m London Porttolto Services— S 

m LPS Inti H.PJ8 S 

toUwcfund ■ -j 

m Lynx Sri. HokBnus -SF 

to M I Main-Strategy 5 

w MKIraxten Offshore. N.V — 5 
w Mvlrtme Mlt-Secior I LW-S 
w Matterhorn Offshore r 
ivMBE Japan Fund. 


ffl McGinnis Gtabal (Jan H)-S 

m MCM Hit. Umitcd s 

nr Millennium International — I 

fflMJM Internotlonol Ud 1 

m Momentum Guild LM 5 

toMunthrturcs FF 

0 NCA Fired — I 

d NewMIUenniun Flit. Ltd — S 

0 Nrwbank Debentures 5 

0 NM Inc. 5 Growth Fund 5 

mNMT Aslan SeL Portfolio — S 

iv NeWe Partners inti Ltd 1 

m NSP F.t.T. Ltd 1 

m Ocean Strategies Limited— $ 

to Old ironside Inti LM 5 

m Omega Overseas Partners J 

fflOppenhetmer liJS. Arb. s 

to Optimal ENecl Fat. Ltd A —5 
w Optimal EHect Ful- Ltd B— SF 
mOotimam Fund- 8 

iv Oracle Fund Ltd S 

/n Overtook Performance s 

m Podf RIM One BVI Jan 31 -5 

raPAN hi ternot land Ltd 5 

•rPanrarrl inc. 5 

m Panpipes Offshore (Nov 30) S 

mParaaon Fund Limited 5 

ffl Parallax Fund Ltd— —S 
fflPequotintl Fund. 


w Pfurtgestlon PlurHarex FF 

w Pturloestton Ptartvaleur— FF 
to Plurlvest Stcav .... — — FF 
m Pombav Overseas Ltd _S 
m Portuguese Smaller Co— 5 
mPtlma Band Plus Fd LM — 5 
m Prime Capital Fund Ltd — J 

m Prime Multi- invest 5 

m Prl men Fund — S 


-DM 


0 Prottrent 5A. 
to Pyramid inv Fd 

0 RAD Inl. Inv. Fd 5 

d Regal tall Fund Lid i 

1 Rlc Inovest Fund A. 5 

t Rtclrwvert Fund B 5 

w Rkheaurt Bcttvmv inc S 

i» RM Futures Fund Sicov — % 

w Salter'S Inti EoultY —Era 

to Sailor's tall Fixed Ecu 

0 Sanyo Kle. Spain Fd ~S 

0 Sarakreek HoMlno N.V. — J 

to Saturn Fund. — S 

m Savov Fund Ltd. S 

m SC Fundam. Val BVI Ltd— J 
d SCI ' Tech-SA Luxctnbounis 

nrsclmltar Guar. Carr Fa S 

mSdmltar Guaranteed Ri — s 
m SetecfoGtaOal Hedge Fd— S 

0 Selective Fut. Ptfl Ltd x 

mSemga rs J 

to Sinclair Multlfund Ltd ■ S 
w SJO Gtabal 1409)921-45*5, — S 
w Smith Bareev Wridwd Sec-S 
to 5mtth Baraev yyrtdwd Spec t 
w SP Interaattanaf SA A 5h — S 
»5P Internal tonal SA BSh—S 

ffl Spirit Hedge MW 5 

m Spirit Neutral HM S 

w Staniev Ra» Futures Fund .FF 
w StaUXtardt Okeas Fd LM — 5 

w Stetahordf Realty Trurt 5 

mStrkter Fund 8 

mShunw Offshore LM- 


0 Siresef Gtabal III Ltd- 
0 Sunset Global (We — 

m Sussex MctSorr 

mTaa Currency. 



mTus Currency II. 
w Techno Growth Fired. 

0 Templeton Gtabal Inc. 
m Die Bridge Fund N.V.. 
m The Geo-Global Offshore — 5 
d The Instil Kuttl Advfcwre — 5 

ffl The j Fund B.VJ. LM s 

w The Jaguar Fund N.V.. 5 

0 The Latin Equities Fd 5 

0 The M*A*R*S Fd Slew A— S 

0 The M-A-R’S Fd sicov 1 DM 

mine Seychelles Fd Lid— 5 

wThema M-M Futixes J 

b THC (OTCJ Jaa Fd SlravJ 
O Tokyo (OTC1 Fund Slcnv — S 

w Trtxw Global Hurt Ltd S 

0 Transpacific Fund—— —Y 
iv Trinity Futures Fd 
m Triumph I 


mTriumnh 1 1 1 > 

/n Triumph iv 1 

0 Turauolse Fund— 5 

m Tweedy Browne IntliLv .— S 
iv Tweedy Browne ilv. □ A— S 
to Tweedy Browne iw.G B — i 

0 Uba Futures rF 

d UtaFuhares. Donor — -5 

d Umbretto Debi Fund Ud — 5 
d Umbrella FixtdLId— — 5 

to Uni Bond Fund— — Era 

w Uni Capital Attemogna. DM 

w Uni CoWtol Convertibles —Era 

toUnl-Gtobd SIccvDEM DM 

to mu-Gtobal Sicov Era Era 

to Uni-Global Slrav FRF — FF 

to um-Gtobai Sicov FS AF 

to Uni-Gtabal Skav USD 3 

0 unlco Equity Fund DM 

0 Unlco Irtv. Fund DM 

m Unmade* CHF SF 


m Unmade* CHF Reg. 

mlini trades FRF 

rn Unltrades USD 

• Ureas inl* lid 

mVattxrene- 


5F 

-FF 


ffl Victor Futures Fund— -5 
D Vovager Investments Ptc — S 


m weUes WBder Inti Fd 5 

w wilier Japan — Y 

w Wilier South East Asia 5 

to wiiiaworiaor mn cfm s 

0 win Global Fd Bd. Pitt Era 

0 Win Global Fd Ea PHI — .Fra 

d Win Global Fd Pn P1H SF 

0 World Batonced Fund SA— 5 

fflWorWwkto Limited 5 

■v WPG Farher Dseas Puri _ 5 
ffl WW Caaitol Grth Fd Ltd — 5 

mYOtrea SF 

rnZeohvr Hedge Fund S 

rnZwele HIM Lid S 


72432 

13*3600 

1401180 

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152.76 

2082 

111.75 
11420 

735 

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152.76 
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319 JO 

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153*34 

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6121383 

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For information on how to list your fund, fax Simon OSBORN at (33-1) 46 37 21 33. 



the conference will be 
divided into the 

FOLLOWING SESSIONS; 

Derivative and alternative 
ijwesting approaches, 
Bond and currency. Equity, 


GLOBAL FUNlpfANAGEMENT 

Which Way are tli^narkets Moving ? 


THE EXPERTS DERATE THE TRENDS ■ DOLD^g[GRAND HOTEL - ZURICH • MARCH 25*24 ■ 1994 

Hftal OSS Bribune 


FOR FURTHER INFORMATION 
ON THE CONFERENCE; 

Brenda Hagerty, 
International Herald Tribune 
63 Long Acre, London WC2E 9JH 
England 

Tel: (44 71)836 4802 
Fax; (44 71)836 0717 



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77 


Page 18 


Compded by Our Staff From Dispcuttcs 

VALENCIENNES, France — 
Bernard Tapie, the flamboyant 
businessman and politician who 
owns the soccer team, was placed 
under judicial investigation Thurs- 
day in connection with the bribery 
case involving OJympkjue Mar- 
seille and ordered to resign as the 
dub’s chairman by April 20. 

Judge Bernard Beffy, who is in- 
vestigating the alleged attempt by 
Marseille to bribe opponents to 
lose a key French league match. 



SPORTS 


Marseille’s Tapie Charged 
In Soccer Bribery Case 


also placed Tapie under investiga- 


tion tor interfering with witnesses. 
Being placed under investigation in 
France is the equivalent of being 
charged with a crime in other judi- 
cial systems. 

Tapie, who was released on bail 
of 250,000 francs (S42.000). 
stormed out of the judge's cham- 
bers “almost without waiting for 
the magistrate to finish reading the 
indictment," a justice official said. 

An official statement by the pub- 
lic prosecutor said Tapie, the self- 
made millionaire and proi£g& of 
President Francois Mitterrand who 
was the minister for urban affairs 


in the Socialist govomnent ousted 
last March, had declined to answer 
the charges. 

Tapie played down the latest set- 
back after talking with his lawyer. 

“There are more serious things,” 
he said. “There are people suffer- 
ing. There are tragedies in the 

world. Things should be kept in 
proportion and this matter reduced 
to its real dimension, which is not 
very i mportant." 

In Marseille, angry fans gathered 
at the dub grounds to protest the 
judge's decia®. 

Tapie claimed that Beffy “wants 
to destroy Ofympique MarsdUe." 

“His decision to forbid me from 
being president of OM obviously 
has nothing to do with a search for 
truth on the judicial level," Tapie 
said. 

On of Tapie's lawyers. Frauds 


Debacker, questioned whether the 
judge had the right to 


right to remand a 
sitting member of parliament on 
bafl. 

Another lawyer, Francis Spiner, 
said Beffy’s order to Tapie to quit 
as club cha irman was unjustified. 


The National Assembly, of 
which Tapie is a member, is not in 
session now. On Jan. 1(1 when it 
was, a parliamentary committee 
turned down an application from 
Beffy for Tapie's immunity to be 
lifted, saying the case was too “im- 
precise." 

In December, after parliament 
lifted Tapie’s immunity from pros- 
ecution m that case, Tapie was 
charged With misuse of corporate 
funds from the scale-manufactur- 
ing company Testut, which owned 
by his investment group, Bernard 
Tapie Finance. He is alleged to 
have used a Testut loan for political 
expenses and to buy forward Chris 
Waddle from the English club Tot- 
tenham Hotspur. 

Tapie has denied wrongdoing in 
both the Testut and OM cases. 

Beffy is investigating accusations 
(hat Marseille cried to bribe Valen- 
ciennes players to go easy in a 
league match just before the Euro- 


Freocb dub to win a European 
title 


SIDELINES 


Way Geared for Toronto NBA Team 

TORONTO (AP) — The Ontario government and the NBA an- 
nounced an agreement Thursday that removes pro basketball from the 


Tapie is alleged to have tried to 
persuade two witnesses, the former 
Valenciennes coach. Boro Pri- 
morac, and Marseille midfidder 
Jean- Jacques Eyddie, to change 
their testimooy to say Marseille md 
not initiate the bribes. 



K indal spans lottay and chars the way for Toronto to become the 
_ie’s 28inteam, 


in the 1995-96 season. 

The league awarded the franchise to a Toronto group led by John 
Bitove Jr. in November an the condition NBA games be taken off the 
Pro-Line lottery. 

The Toronto announcement came less than 24 hours after the a group 
hoping for an NBA expansion franchise in Vancouver said it would 
remove basketball betting from the British Columbia lottery. 


EydeHe has admitted giving a 
250,000-franc bribe to Valenci- 
ennes player Christopbe Robert, 
who, with Argentine midfidder 
Jorge Bmrucbaga, admitted receiv- 
ing it. They were placed under in- 
vestigation. 


taeri IfUfool/KcattBi 

Bernard Tapie leaving court: Judge “wants to destroy team.* 


of the bribe. Bernes was also placed 
under investigation, but has denied 
involvement. 


They also named Tapie’s then 
at Olympique. 


Yankees Get Mulholland From Phils 


right-hand-man 
Jean-Fiene Beanes, as the initiator 


Marseille has been banned from 
European competition this season 
and stripped of hs French league 
title. 


Tapie, who was forced to sell 
three star players because of the 

chib’s enarnig financial probl em* 

has said he is looking for a buyer 
for the dub, which is now in second 
place in the league standings. 

(Reuters, AP, AFP) 


The Associated Pros 

K< 

comes to 
other season.' 

The third-ranked Roorbacks 
ended the Wildcats’ 33-game 
hgmecomt wnmingstreak Wednes- 
day night, and it was Arkansas 
which last beat fourth-ranked Ken- 
tucky at home. 

“My congratulations go to Ar- 
kansas,” said the Wildcats’ coach, 
Rick Fitino. “IheyVe done this to 
us twice in a row. They've beat fhe 
superior basketball team twice in a 
row." 

This 90-82 decision came courte- 
sy of the Razothacks’ press, winch 
spread Kentucky’s offense, and a 
technical foul against Rodrxck 
Rhodes of the Wildcats. 

Rhodes had two 3-pcinters and a 
three-point play in a 12-0 run thaz 
gave Kentucky (18-4, 7-3 South- 
eastern Conference) a 39-24 lead 
with 4:46 left in the first half. But 
the sophomore forward became the 
goat when he was assessed an un- 
sportsmanslike rerhmrwl foal for 
having words with Corey Beck. Ar- 
kansas (17-2, 7-2) scared eight 
straight points and was.only 47-41 
behind at halftime. ' 

“Til take the blame for this loss.” 
Rhodes said. “My emotions got oat 
of hand, and that was a key part of 
tfiit game." 

Kentucky, which had won five 
straight, still led by 54-49 on Jared 
Rockett's layup with 15:15 to go. 
Rnl Cfint Mc Daniel pv nine points 
in a 19-3 run that gave Arkansas a 
68-59 lead with 9-J.l left. 

The Wildcats were in it until the 

final minute- fhrwgh, and it wasn't 

im til Travis Ford missed a 3-pamt- 
a with Arkansas iwufag, 79-77, 
that the Razorbacks pulled away. 

Scotty Thurman had 26 points 
and Corliss Williamson got 21 for 
Arkansas, w hich beat Kentucky, 


1054$, at Rupp Arena on Jan. 25. 
1992. 

1 The iMnw play just core a rea- 
son aixy they are in different divi- 
sions of the Southeastern Confer- 
ence. 

Rhodes led Kentucky with 22 
pcwnts and Tony Ddk added 16. 

“Some things are better not said 
and I*m pretty upset," Pitmo said. 


the visiting L - . 

No. 1 9 AlaWia-Btamlam TS, 
DePmd 73: The last of Robert 
Simmon's 22 points for the visiting 
Blazers (IM. 6-2 Great hfidwnt) 
(?nv!jni a tiebreaking jumper with 
45 seconds left end the Blue De- 
mons (13-7, 2-6)_djdn’t score again. 
DePaufs Tom Kkinsdnnuit, who 


COLLEGE BASKETBALL 


“It's the most disappointed Fye 
been in a inm of mne in 20 years 

01 H Boston 
College 91: DooyriQ Marshall had 
33 points and his basket with 2^28 
kft in the second overtime gave the 
visiting Hates (20-2, 10-1 Big 
East) a 93-90 lead. Connecticut had 
the chance to win at the end of 
regulation but Marshal] missed a 
driving layup at the buzzer; the 
Eagles (16-7, 7-5) had two shots to 
win at die end of the first overtime. 
Bitty Ctutey had a career-high^ 
points mjd mpreheri Ins career-high 
with 16 rebounds for Boston Col- 


bad 27 of his career-high 37 points 
in the second huff, bad a shot 
blocked in fte lana . 

. . Na20Flaridn74,Mls5iss^5$: 
Craig Brawn had 21 points, 13 re- 
bounds and six assists as the visit- 


ed 


ing Gators (19-3, 9-i SEC) beat the 

Ridsds (11-8, 4-5). 


.1 * ... , 


No. 21 Wbconsa 77, Pm & 
64: Frohman center Rashard Grif- 
fith, bad: after missing two games 
withaineeiigHiy, scored 15 points 

unpn>v«d1fl^l2-b at homers seJ- 
son, their best dart there since 
1929-30. John. AmauhTs 18 pomts 
led tiie Nittany liens (10-9, 3-7). 

No. 23 Mmresota 79, Ohio St 
T3i Voshon Lenard scored 14 of his 
24 pomts in the final 10 mnnttes as 
the Golden Gophers (16-7, 6-4 Big 


v'.: v . ■ 


A- 


> r 
.■> 

• - / 




F—‘ 


10 Ptsdoe 98; Novtinresfenr 
81: Glam Robinson scared 29 


Too) won at home by shooting ff7 
* 's field m the secood 


*.r * ‘ 


„ l- 


Big Ten) cruised to their 21st 
victay in 22 games agamstthe vte 
iting Wildcats (9-9, 0-9V . 

15 Nfissorei 82, Coteredo 70: 
Mdvin Booker had 19 points as the 
Tigers (17-2, 8-0 Big Eight) won 
thnr 12th in a row at nome. Donny 
Boyce had 27 paints for. the Buffa- 
loes (10-10, 2-6), who lost their 23d 
straight at Missouri and- have 
dropped 76 of 77 regdarreasbn 
con f erence road games. 

No. 17 Salat Loris 90; Iowa St 
75c Scott HighmaA had 23 pants 
and die ttfllflmitt (19-0 hit 12 3- 
pomtn. Derrick Hayes and Joins 


it from thei 

Carter had 22 pants 
and 10 rebounds for MmnSoota; 
Derek Andcracm led Ohio State 
(10-11, 3-7) with 19 points. 

No. 24 Bfinofe 72, Michigan St 
64: Deon Thomas had 25 pomla as 
the Fighting fifim (13-5, 6-3. Big 
Ten) wan at home. Shawn Respat 
got 27 paints for .the Spartans ?14- 
9, 5-6), who were o u treored, 22-7, 
at.thefoul.fineL 


S.^T- 


9 








for iHv wti m nt i u futmutian 


s*. 


Reod THE MONEY RffORT 
evarySaiunkiy In dw IHT 




s. 



i for three young players, while < 
outfielder Metises AJou and Colorado third baseman Charlie Hayes 
settled. 

Alou agreed to a S1.4 million, one-year deal, nearly seven times his 
S2I0.000 salary last season. Hayes and the Rockies were believed to have 
settled below the midpoint. 

Glenn Davis, 32, who was released by Baltimore on Sept. 8 after three 
injury-filled seasons, signed a minor league contract with the New York 
Mets in an effort to resurrect his career. 


SCOREBOARD 


& 


BASKETBALL 


NBA Standings 


NH Torft CMS 13— 114 

PMtadalpWa H 17 II 13—7* 

N.Y.: EwineB-14 7-2 u. Karts S-141 -3 M.P: 
Wocm#raoon 7-18 6-6 2B. Bradtav 3-14 MIS 
Koeouod3-New Tart 55 (Oakley 12), pfrfto- 


For the Record 


South Africa has been admitted to Rugby League’s centenary World 
Cup, to be held in Britain late next year, it was announced in London 
following an international board meeting. (Reuters) 

Andy. Cole, the Newcastle striker who is the leading scorer in England’s 
Premier League, will be out for at least three weeks with a tarn shoulder 
muscle. (AP) 

Sean Efliott, the Detroit forward whose kidney ailment scuttled a trade 
to Houston, said bell take an indefinite leave of absence to dear up the p 
problem. (AP) 

Cal Ripken Jr. became the major league baseball’s att-time top home- 
run hiltmg shortstop last July 15, with his 278th; Ernie Banks, who 
formerly topped the list, had been credited with 16 homers at shortstop 
that be hao nit while playing first base. The Elias Sports Bureau, the 
official keeper of major league statistics, discovered the error four years 
ago but failed to inform Ripken’s team, the Baltimore Orioles. (AP) 

Two Mexican travel agencies, whose customers found in Atlanta that 
they did not have tickets to the game after buying Super Bowl packages, 
have been refunded more than 5500.000 by a i ews ticket agency. (AP) 
Chris Pyatt of Britain retained his WBO middleweight title with a first- 
round technical knockout of Mark Cameron of South Africa in Brent- 
wood, England. (AP) 

Bud Wilkinson, 77, who turned Oklahoma's football program into a 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 



Aftantfc Dtvtslao 




W L 

Pet 

SB 

New York 

34 13 

723 

— 

Ortando 

27 20 

574 

7 

Miami 

23 23 

sx 

10V* 

New Jersey 

22 24 

xn 

lUh 

Boston 

20 27 

XU 

14 

Philadelphia 

20 27 

XU 

14 

Washington 

15 31 

J26 

11W 


Cealrel Dtvtataa 



Atlanta 

33 13 

J17 

— 

Chlamo 

33 13 

.717 

_ 

Cleveland 

24 23 

511 

9VJ 

Indiana 

23 23 

SX 

10 

Charlotte 

22 25 

M 6 

1IW 

Milwaukee 

14 33 

-MB 

ifb 

Detroit 

11 36 

334 

22W 

WBSTRRN CONFERENCE 



MHwatDIvWan 




W L 

Pet 

GO 

Houston 

33 12 

333 

— 

San Antonia 

34 Id 

303 

w 

Uttar 

31 18 

A33 

4 

Denver 

22 34 

xn 

11W 

Minnesota 

14 32 

30* 

IF* 

Dallas 

5 « 

.106 

2* 


Pacific DMsien 



Sectftle 

35 10 

371 

— 

Phaenix 

31 IS 

474 

4W 

Porttand 

27 20 

-374 

9 

Golden State 

26 20 

465 

TVs 

LA Lakers 

18 28 

391 

17W 

LA CliDPon 

16 29 

356 

I» 

Sacramento 

14 32 

su 

7 1W 

WEDNESDAY'S RESULTS 



UelPMg S3 (WNttarspoon TO. Anltto-Waw 
York 36 (Starts*). PNtaAfeMa 17 (Barron). 

Altana n n x sa—v 

Orlando 3* 71 If 3fr— 1M 

A: Wilkins 12-21 34 30b ENo 6-11 H1SLO:5con 
•-0-J1 1-2 34 O’Neal 14-30 *-17 37. iMPound* 
Ananias Wlllli, Kona*. BJoytock 7).Ortondo 
53 (O’Neal 13). Assists— ABcnto 34 (Blaylock 
13). Ortcwto 3t (Hardaway, Andterai *1. 
Detroit 36 « 33 Jt-W 

Boston 31 tf 31 it— *3 

D: Mills 3-12 0-0 13. Potyiiieo 6-14 0-0 Ik 
nomas 11-34 5-3 a. B: Parish 7-10 3-4 17, 
McOailel 7-17 2-3 M. Rrt — w di C l i tm lt Si 
(Poly rice 11). Sotton 52 (Pariah 12J. AielHs— 
Dotrol>26 (Thamns*), Boston 26 (DooBtas*!. 
OOKtaa State 43 14 S3 16-136 

Charlgtta 13 S3 M 36—114 

O: Sprewen ]J- 17 4^34. Weber 10-1 3 2-4 22, A. 
Johnson f-14 »4 2a C: E. Johnson 8-19 64 24, 
Hawkins 14.16 11-13 41. Baboon di Ooktan 
SlctaSI (Owens 10), Char lotted* (Hawkins *). 
Assists— GoMfen State 37 (Sprcwall. Owens 4). 
CKsrtatte 20 IBooues 10). 
incEtroa 33 1* 27 23-169 

Mtatai 37 77 33 31— If 

i: MOCev 50-12 10-12 3a Will toms *-14 7-1 3. 
M: Rtce6-U6-6iaSdkOly7-115-101*,Sml1ti6- 
11 7-6 1*. B e tw u n dS — Intftta 0 47 (Williams I), 


SI (Millar IS). Assists— Mlnaestito 22 IWU- 
Ucms 10). PhawMs 27 (Millar 11). 

14 76 SI 2*— *4 
23 71 S3 30— 1H 
P.-C R0»M0i?d-72MT* OrtKtdr 746MM 
S: Payton 7-10 5-6 l?, pierce 0-12 2-2 IB. Re- 
bo ucdi P ortland 54 (Kersey m, Seattle 61 
(Kama TO. AMtats— Porttand l* (SMddand, 
CJCoMnsan 4). SaaTile 34 (Payton fl. 

SI 71 I* 23— H 
74 3* 23 IS — 105 
LA. CLIPPERS: Manning 8-11 74 23, 
Harper *-20 M26. Grant 9-20 M 22. 6: Webb 4- 
106-12 17. Richmond 1505 *431 Rabaande— 
Los AnaaWs S2 ( J-WIDIams I). Sacnimatto 9* 
(Simmons 11). AssMe— Loo Angelas 36 (Jodc- 
■on 5), Socramento 76 (Webb 12). 


AMnnoMta 19. Ohio St. 73 

Missouri E2, Colonxlo TO 

Mar Kansas city 61, Wadilngtan, Mo. 25 

Nabrasba 76, Kiaaai Sc 68 

Oh to U. M, W. Michigan dt 

Purdue A M o r M wentani 81 

S. IBTnals W, Indiana St. 6* 

St Louis *0. Iowa St. 75 
Toledo 77, Akron 70 
Wisconsin 77, Pam St 44 


Calgary 


Anaheim - 
L os Angele s 
Edmonton 


30 1* 
27. 21 
1* 34 
21 31 
2B 27 
U 34 


6S .209. 174 
50 MJ176 
4*152 172 
44 154- 172 
46 TO 209 
38 174 2M 


SOCCER 


"V 

2-* 

\k:s. 


FRENCH FIRST DIVISION 
norrene a Toutalsa 1 
Pods St GannaDt ft MaiMBir 0 




INGUSH PJL CUP 


CS"' 


KY. 


SOUTHWEST 
Tons 94, Southern Meth. 66 
Tamo AIM 79, oral Roberts 66 
Texas Tech 9ft Baylor M 
TuNo 7*. WkJltta St 64 


Major Collega Scores 


HOCKEY 


23 2« 17 31-93 
as 10 2S 27—106 
C: Hill 7-16 4-7 16. JoWllltaano 5-16 4-4 14. 
Ferry 7-16 m u. n J.; Anderson 10-14 w at 
ISC 


Gnltom 7-13 54 1*. 


dynasty as the university's coach during the 1940s and 1950s, died of 
" borne in St. Louis. 


congestive heart failure at his I 


(AP) 


( JaWIIHoms 14). N«w Jersey 4| (Jawtincms. 
Gillian 8). Assist*— Cleveland i* iwilklns 5?, 
New Jersey 23 (Anderson. Edwards fl. 


Miami 45 (Soflmhr 9). A lot i In dl a n o S 
(Workmen 7). Miami II (Shew I). 

LA Lakars 34 IS 21 36-tB 

Ulab 21 21 29 25- 96 

LA LAKERS; Wvac 5* 7-9 if. Threat! 9-15 
7-725. L’ : K. -Vslcae 10-179-1229. Corbin 6-13 1-T 
13. Rebounds— ‘-as Angela S3 I Lynch 12), 
Utah 52 (KJMaJane HI. AsNsta— La Angela 
17 (Van E»ei 4). Utah 29 (Stockton 13). 
Miaaesata 29 37 33 16-166 

Phoenix 34 37 31 36—111 

-V.: Lcetawr 6-14 id-ij ZL Rider 10-22 34 24. 
Parser 19-16 1-1 25. P: Cebolla 10-20 44 2i 
Green 7-1 j 5-a a K. Johnson 6-13 H4 X Rb- 
boiRd*— Minnesota 59 (Loettner 12), Pheonbc 


BAST L 

BockoeU TOO. LataYette 74 . 
Cemaetfait 94, Beaton Colleee 91.2QT 
Fordh nm 64 Army 66 
Holy Cron 10. Lehigh 104. OT 
Namr 6B. Cotaata 47 
Steno 6ft Loyola Md. 71 
SI. Peters 72. Mo nh ottan 63 
SOUTH 

Arkansas 90, Kantucky 82 
Florida 74. MisNsslapf 55 
Mia Valley St. 7ft Delta St. 75 
H. Carolina St. 67. Vlrolnlo 54 
NX. -Greensboro K Co oN al Carol (no 64 
Radford 71. Wtattrep 64 
Richmond 77, Old Dominion 73 
Sooth Caroline 9), demon 86 
Tennes s ee St 11 Tomb-Martin M 
Vanderbilt 64. Auburn 40 
Wtniom 3. Mary 79. VMJ 66 
MIDWEST 

Ala-Slrmlnoham 7ft oePeid 73 
Bowling Green 9ft Bafl St 91, OT 
Detroit Mercy *6. W. INInols 63 
D reflta 61. Crotahtan 7ft OT 
E. MkJitacn 6ft Kant 58 
llltaots 72. Michigan St. 44 
intaots SL 6ft SW Missouri Sf. 60 
MemoWs si. 84, Doytan 7) 

MtamL Ohio 81, Cent. MkMgmi 59 


NHLStafxHogs 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Atlantic Division 


NY Rangers 

w 

34 

L 

15 

T PM OF OA 
4 72 1t3 140 

New Jersey 

29 

17 

6 

64 W T45 

FbrMo 

23 

It 

W 

56 ISO 140 

Warning tan 

25 

25 

4 

54 173 10 

PWlodeWita 

as 

26 

4 

a 198 201 

NY (Wonders 

30 

26 

4 

46 m ue 

Taropa Boy 

20 

28 

6 

46 IV T62 

HOfttlOlf 
Wontr«ol 79 

DIvMoa 

It 8 

64 M3 157 

Baden 

27 

n 

9 

43 176 151 

Pittsburgh 

26 

w 

11 

63 192 186 

BoNata 

21 

23 

5 

57 171 14 

Quebec 

21 

28 

5 

47 ITS 191 

ejjii fdju it 

rKHTroro 

19 

30 

6 

44 158 188 

Ottawa 

t 

40 

8 

36 US 20 

WESTERN CONFERENCE ’ 



w 

L 


PM 

OP 

OA 

Toronto 

. 28 

16 

11 

0 

185 

IS 

Detroit 

30 

18 

5 

65 

234 

IBS 

Data 

29 

20 

7 

65 

196 

181 

St Louts 

28 

19 

8 

64 

178 

M) 

CMcage 

25 

23 ’ 

6 

56 

14) 

MB 

Winnipeg 

17 

31 

7 

41 

168 

230 


WEDNESDAY'S RESULTS 

I 3 16 B— a 

1 2 6 1—4 

PM Period: N.Y.-Orova 34 (Mewler, 
LaetctO; (pp). MOamphoaa St (Muller, 
Baflowi); (pp). 9LY.-Gravt6 35 (Meatar.Zb- 
bw). Second Ported: H.YrZubov6'{Kayidev. 
Gartner): (pp). ALSctkieidBr 12 (Odetein); 
(PPL Afro loro# 14 (Oetfardta,- Omft- 
phouae). (ppL Overtime: MOatianEni-9. 
Shots oa goal: N.Y. (an Roy»l4-U*4-37.M 
too HeoftrJ V4F5 3 aft ■ -- - . J ■ 

WM n bia *• .' 6 1 ’ »-«• 

Ddua v - f*. i . as 

Sad period: W-Eaglaft (ihlCHEvason 
11 (DaMai): (oPLTMrd Parted: (VM>dano32 . 
(QMdlbd. Caortnollli (Xourtmdl 14 
W m. Hatcher); ODahtan M (CoartnoU. 
Modano); (ppL W-TtaxtH* » (Do ml). (*L 
MM ae Oort: W (an Moagl 74-12-27. D (an 
OTMII1 17-16-11-44. 

2 a i—4 
.6 16-1 
PM Period: C-TItav 2B { RdtdMi, Ptaury); 
CpMaclmds 21 (Me m aewdy k . Robots), 
(pp) Jaaoad Parted: C-Ntauwamfyk 33 (Ma- 
cliedA Kacxmar): (pp). C-Flaurv.. 22 
(NlaeemayK, Robots!; (pp). c-Rrtdwr 26 - 
Cntav); E-Rice w (WarankaLTMrd Period: 
ORebderi 27 (WWft Mens). Shots oeeialrC. 
(an Ranfont BrattmaMe) 16-06 3ft E ton 
Verotta) 476 » . • 

aricobe 1 ■ 1-4 

Los A ni s ia 11 as 

First Period: C-Grohoni 12 (Wainrlciv 
ftautta); ft lb Angela Karri J24BUnL 
(sM-Soceed period: UA/*tuddy 3 (oretxky, 
5amwroad. Third Period: Uta-Bloke M 
(Gronahv RycheU; 35LJL-Blake. u (Kun-L. 
OanmUv); OMerphv 38 (RoeaidL IWn- 
rtcW. Shots m tool: C too Staobor) 12-77- 
22-41 LA. It» Beffour) 74-U-Oft 


Stockport ft Bristol city 4 
Foartfc H 


t;-- — 




Aranal 1, BoHaa ft OT 

Barmdevl. PtymoUth 0 

Leeds ftOMtotf Untied ft OT - 

Linen ft NmcostlgA - 

flh o m eld W edaaduy ft Qiaieea ft OT 

Stake LOWan l 

West Ham 1. Notts Qsrty ft OT 

, ITAUAlFCUP 
•PM Lon; SSmMM 
ANCQoa >, TPrfda 0 : 

DUTCH CUP. • 


P-- -- 


t-.i.* 


.Aknt 1, Hebnoad Iport T 
»IBC ft ADO the Hague 1 ... . 

FeveaooKl 4. MCC WaalMdlk 2 
MAC Breda 1, PSV Etaemm ft ot 


CAJtLSBERO CUP 
Denmark ft United States ft OT 
Denmark imp penalty stuxdout 4-2 ; 
Hang Kong 6, Roma nl o ft OT an Panama 
Hong Kero teaa penalty WMtaub 54 


..r 

1 7 T,J r 


CRICKET 


THIRD TEST 

India vs. flrf Lanka, Third Day 
TharMtar. le Ahmedabaft tarta 
Sri Lanka 1st fautags: 119 
India 1st knntaB*; W 0383 avers) 

Sri Lroka 2d hedngs: 1544 OS avers) 

FIRST TEST 

Mow zertaad es. Pakistan, First Day 
Tftoredar, hi Bdee Pdrtc, new Zhataed 

New ZMtand 1st taatags: aa-ie (413 own) 
PakWro 1st hmtans: 61-4 (is overs) 


ttliVij’v ][ 


Ol 






DENTSTS THE MENACE 


PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 


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To our readers in Austria 

IPs never been easier 
to subscribe and save. 

Just coil toll-free: 
0660*8155 
or fax: 06069-175413 






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Sues for $20 Million 


h^? TL ^ ND ’ ° re 8° n — Tonya 
Hanlmg said m court documents filed 
Thursday that she has done nothing to 
warrant her removal from the U.S. 
Olympic team and would be ‘inepara- 
Wy banned if I were hot allowed to 
comp eter m Norway. 

The U.S. figure skating champ^ n 
sjwimtted the documents as pan of a 
pt> million lawsuit filed against the 
US. Olympic Committee. Harding & 
wtog to prevent the USOCfrom 
Kumng a hearing Tuesday in Oslo on 
whether she should be forced off the 
team far her alleged role in the attack 
® rival skater Nancy Kerrigan. 

A hearing on the lawsuit was sched- 
uled for Friday in Claris rp^ County 
Circnit Court in nearby Oregon City, 
where the suit was filed. 

To bade up the lawsuit, filed late' 
Wednesday, Harding’s artoroeys -sub- 
mitted 67 pages of supporting docu- 
ments Thursday, including a proposed 
tanptHan; restraining order to prevent 
the USOC bearing and affidavits from 
H a r ding and her coach, Diane RawKh- 
SOtt. 

Harding said in her affidavit that she 
had worked her entire life toward the 
goal of competing in the Winter Olym- 
pic Games, which begirt Saturday in 


“I have done nothing that would war- 
nmtmyranovalfrc>mtl^U^(Myi™ 
' team and I would be irreparably 
harmed if 1 were not allowed to com- 
pete," she said. 

She said she coaid not afford to pay 
■ the expenses of attorneys and witnesses 
who would testify on her b ehalf at the 
USOC hearing in Oslo. 

Rawiinson said in her affidavit that, 
because of security concerns, it may be 
impossible to get Harding to Oslo by 
Tuesday. 

, . Neither Kerrigan, who arrived in Lfl- 
lehammer on Tnuraday, nor Har ding 
are expected to take part in Saturday's 
opening ceremony, a spokesman for the 
US. team said. 

The 16-page lawsuit filed by Har- 
ding’s attorneys daims her 20-year 
dream of winning an Olympic grid 
medal would be wrongfnByand unfair- 
ly dashed by any attempt toremoveher 
from the figure dating team. 

The "USOC s conduct is ar b i tr ary , 
capricious, mabcious and contrary to 
law and fact,” the suit says jnst before 
asking for the S20 miffio n. It also sedks 
compensatory damages to be deter- 
mined at a tnaL . 

But the portion that undoubtedly 1 
means the . mostito the .embattled 23- 
year-old sk ater is the request for the 
temporaxy restraining order and pins-, 
limmary injunction pr eve ntin g- the 
USOC from taking any action to re- 
move her from the Olympic team. 

The USOC has scheduled a hearing 
of its Games Adnunistrative Board in 
Oslo to opnsider whether there is snffi- 
Cxent reason to keep her out of the' 


competition in liOdha miner. On Mon- 
day, the USOC sent Harding's attor- 
neys seven accusations that were based, 
in part, on a finding by a UJ5. figure 
Scaring Association panel that there 
was reasonable cause to believe she was 
involved in or knew about the plot to 
attack Kerrigan. 

The lawsuit notes drat some of those 
who have admitted' their role in the 
conspiracy have implicated Harding, 
but that those aOegatioas have not re- 
sulted in any charges. A grand jury 
investigating the case is not expected to 
return any hK&ctmcnts until March 21. 

The lawsuit contends the USOC ac- 
tion violates her rights as a member of 
the figure sharing association and 
amounts to double jeopardy because 
rite is still subject to the USFSA inqui- 
ry. The figure skamg group has ordered 

. Harding to appear at a disciplinary 
hearing and has given her nntil March 7 
to respond. 

The snit also daims the USOC lacks 
jurisdiction to take any action based on 
conduct that occurred before she be- 
came a manbe of the Olympic team. 

Rrt the suifs most detailed aDega- 
rions are aimed at the hearing schednled 
in Osip, which, the suit contends, does 
not provide adequate due process be- 
cause: 

• Harding was not given adequate 
notice of the specific charges; 

- • The time and place for the hearing 
made itimpractical for Harding to at- 
tend; ■ " 

• The hearing was not set before an 
impartial body of fact-finders; 

• Harding was denied the right to 
call witnesses and require their atten- 
dance; 

• She was denied the o p portunity to 
cross-examine witnesses; 

• The USOC faded to provide an 
appeals procednreand written notice of 
sachjHOcednre; and . 

• The right to a fofl and fair hearing 
before theUS. figure Sating Assoria- 

: turn hearings panel was effectively de- 
, strayed 

.Asjredtfttekwsuit meant that Har- 
t-Ba g would not appear before the ; 
USOC panel, her attorney, Robert C 
Weaver Jr, said; “We’re going to ex- 
haust this first and see where it goes." 

The Iisor planned tn wwtinmt 
Thursday in Portland to counter the 
suit, the cmnmittee's executive director, 
Harvey SdriHec, said. 

“We want to just give Tonya the ; 
opportunity- to speak to the board and 
to. discuss some of; the j$&es that are 
involved,” SdriDcr stud on “CBS Tins - 1 






m 


Olympic Television Schedules 




’ - * 

i m i 


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Saturday’s Events 

Opening Ceremonies - 1500. 

Ice Hockey - Finland vs. Czech Republic, 
1100; Russia vs. Norway, 1730; Austria vs. 
Germany. 2000. 

Saturday’s TV 

EUROPE 

All times are local 

Austria - ORF: 1545-1845, 2000 - 2006 . 2055- 
2330. 

Britain - BSC: 1215-1715; BBC2: 1500-1700. 
2340-0025. 

Bulgaria - BNT/ Channel 1: 1700-1900; 
Channel 2: 2030-2130, 0030-0100. 

Croatia - HRT/TV2; 1 500-1925, 2330-2400. 
Cyprus - CYBC: 1700-1900, 0030-01 CX). 
Czech RepiteKc - C7V: 1145-1800. 2330- 
2400. 

Denmarit - DR: 1545-1800 
Estonia - ETV: 1650-1900. 

Finland - TV1: 1245-1530, 2050-2115; TV2: 
t 1645-1900. 

* France - FR3: 0930-1000. 2345^145; TF1: 
1550-1805. 

Germany - ARD: 1145-1430. 1545-1815, 
yf ■ *. 2058-2330, 2310-2400. 

Greece - ET2: 1700-1900; ET1: 0030-0100. 
Hungary - MTV/Channel 1: 2005-2020; 
Channel 2: 1550-1600 
Iceland - RUV: 1700-1645, 2315-2345. 

Italy - RAH: 1600-1800; RAI3: 1730-1800. 
Latvia - LT: 1655-1900,2330-2400. 

Lithuania - LRT: 1700-1900. 

Luxembourg - CLT: HJghJigWs on evening 
news. 1900-2000. 

Macedonia - MKR TV/Chan net 1: 1500- 
1700; 1725-2000; 2230-2300; Channel 2: 
1055-1330; 1955-2230. 

Monaco - TMC/IT: 1200-1430; 1430-1600; 
1 600-1 800; 0050-0245. 

Netherlands - NOS: 0930-2335. 

Norway - NRK: 1130-2300. 

Poland - TVP/PR1: 1555-1800. 2205-2305; 
PR2: 0005-0135. 

Portugal - TV2: 2300-2320; RTPl: 1100- 
1120. 

Romania - RTVR: 1700-1900, 0030-0100; 
Channel 2: 2030-2200. 

Russia - RTO: 1355-1630, 1755-2000; RTR: 
2025-2255. 

Slovalda - STV/SK: 1555-1 BOO. 

Slovenia - RTVSLO: 1530-1855. 

Spain - TVE2: 1 600-1 BOO; RTVE: 1200-2400. 
Sweden - SVT/ Chan net 1; 1530-1800. 1930- 
2100; 7V2 1825-1930 
Switzerland - TSH/TSt/DRS: 1600-1800. 
Tistey - THT: 1700-1900.0025^200. 
Ukraine - DTRU/UT1: 1700-1900, 0030- 
0100 . 

Eurosport - 1200-1430, 1600-contimjous 
coverage. 

ASIA/PACIFIC 
All times are local 
Japan - NHK: 2200-0600 
China - CCTV: 23000100. 

South Korea - KBS: 23500210, MBC: 2400- 
0130 

Star TV - 23000100. 

NORTH AMERICA 
All limes are EST 
Canada - CTV: 0900-1600. 

UnHsd States - CBS: 0800-1100 23350035. 
Mexico - Televisa: 1100-1400. 2200-2230. 
Information provided by foe IOC, TVW, and 
individual broadcasters; compiled by the IHT. 


YmcctK Fimrfoe 

Nancy Kem gan arrmng Tbusday in Oslo, en route to the Ofympk Games in ffflefimiimer. Asked as she was 
leaving Boston if she was pr^aired to skate with Tonya Hmt&ig, Kmigan replied: ‘Tin prepared for die 
competition.” And abort the Olympic irah mi g schedule, which wortd require her to practice side-by-side with 
Hanfen g, Kerrigan told reporters: “Fm more mcondortabie staling here talking to aO of yon guys." 


Ember, Harding’s farmer husband, 
Jeff GOkioly, asked a court for permis- 
sion to travel to Norway to testify be- 
fore the USOC panel 

Gfllooly also asked that ihe resnhs 
an FBI fifrdttcctm- test he took as part 


of Jas jdMLltergim arrangement be dis- 
dosed to Ins attorney so they can be 
presented to the USOC board, if it asks 
tor them. 

Norm Frink, the chief deputy district 
attorney in Multnomah County, which 
includes Portland, said prosecutors 
would not oppose the motions. 

G&ooty has pleaded guilty to racke- 


teering for his role in the Jan. 6 attack 
on Ktfrigm and has said Harding was 
in on the plot and gave the final go- 
ahead. In exchange for his plea, he will 
be sentenced to two years in prison and 
fined S 100,000, and no additional 
charges will be filed against him. 

dc^^thas admitted she learaedclat 


people around her were involved in the 

P lot when she returned from the US. 
igure Skating Championships, and did 
not report it to authorities immediately. 

The USOC had asked if GiDooly 
would be available to testify at the disci- 
plinary hearing. But Schiller said 
Thursday that “we do not plan to ask 
Mr. GUlooly to appear 


In Tonya’s Movie 9 Let’s Hear a Word From the Sponsors 


- By Ian Thomsen 

hamodanat Sendd 7H&MW 

TH1EHAMMER, Norway —^ “Yam witness), Mr. Mason.” 
JJJfaar honor, I call . . . Juan Antonio Samaranch.” - 
The judge bang* his gavel to bush the spectators. 

Right now it looks Weak. Everyone thinks she’s guilty of some- 
thing. The evidence of phone records and doodled 

notes has been bmbfing against her. Her own husband — rather, ex- 
r Iniritend^hastimted an her. Even tfriwy’renotgrangio charge her 

with ill*- «wne, even if they allow her to skate, no way in Norway 
she’s going to win an Olympic medal becan* the judges wiR never 
reward her. Right?. 

The only one who can get Tonya Hardi ng out at tins is retry 
Muon, that hero of the American television courtroom. 

“Mr. Samaranch, you are president of the International Olympic 
Committee,” Mason begins. “And — - — ■ ■ 

“I most certainly am not,” Sa- rquit * 

? a y 5 -. , . . 


“Need 1 remind you or uk penauy iurpoj uiy 
f ask you again: Are you or are you not now devoting your fif e to 
winning the Nobel Prize for Peace?" 

“fYes.” 

“That will be aQ,” Mason says, while S amaran ch lurches from the 

box with what appears to be a slipped . • 

This is tite part^ere Peny Mason destroys evoyouebe caBs to 
TsJnnn*! knows he does it It never nwoives me 


** a" 

Jti'- 


money, and that almost evoyoue is profiting oont-ae ensumg 

!&*££££& -ya* m . sffl 

owner of the New ^ Yoric Yankres, if my menway saves me correct- 

lyr- 


"Jn my rime as owner,” says Stein brenner, squirming because he 
was expecting to answer questions about the $10,000 he reportedly 
donated io Harding ,l the Yankees have won two World Series and 
become the most lucrative . . 

Peny cuts him off. “And you’ve fired bow many managers?” 

“Tanya’s the one on trial here.” 

“Isn’t it right that in the 17 yean that you weren’t banished fm 
conspiring with a known gambler that you have fired t9 managers, 
and you haven’t won so much as a divisional championship m a 
down years? Is that not right, sir?” 

"That will be all,” Mason says, leaving Slembreuner with his 
mouth agape. 

He takes mi only the most impossible cases. The evidence is 
always stacked against his chenls like the news cameras at Harding’s 
practice rink If it were up to the public, his diems would be sent to 
the gas chamb er without a trial As it is, the district attorney, 
Hamil ton Berger, never seems to learn from his mistakes. He 
approaches every case with an arrogance bordering on the danger- 
ous. 

A good lawyer identifies that arrogance. He knows that nobody is 
innocent You’re looking down your nose at his client? You’re better 
than she is? Let’s just put you on the witness stand, where you have 
to tdl the troth, and then well see what you’re all about That’s what 
most of Peny Mason's trials come down to. 

He makes every accuser fed as low as they’ve made his diem feel 
He evens the plzyitz, ridd Of course, with 10 minutes left yoa’rc no 
closer to behevmg his client wiD get off than yon were in the 

^Ws'iswittn the renowned private detective, Paul Drake, enters 
the co u rt room . Mason excuses himself to whisper privately with 
Pad in the aisle. No poem the courtroom can hear the conversation, 
but you and I can. 

Peny says, “Where is that witness?" 

Paul sayc “My man in Portland has been looking up and down 
the West Coast Peny, be swears there is no witness.” 

Peny looks ovex at his client. The ice queen is dying for a smoke. 
Paul senses Perry’s fatigue. 

“Way to go with Stembieaner,” Paul says, smiling. 


Is Mason looking down at his watch? You can’t tell: his arm is out 
of the picture. But yon and everyone watching knows there are only- 
seven minutes left as he grimaces a smOe at Paul. He turns and 
approaches the bench saying. "Your honor, the defense calls . . ” 
Does be call Gfllooly, the ex-husband who has implicated Har- 
ding? Does hr call the bodyguard? The alleged assailant? Is there a 
vital go-between of whom we haven’t beard? Maybe he calls one of 
the dozens of people profiting from the mess. 

The whole developing scandal has been turned into a made- for- 
television movie, with commercials four times an hour. Public 
opinion polls show that more and more Americans believe Harding 
should not compete in LDlehammer, and the Olympic community 
has dearly been sensitive to these polls. In TV-reduced terms, there 
are only seven minutes of airtime until Harding's status is to be 
reviewed by a U.S. Olympic Committee panel in Oslo on Tuesday. 
They s hould let the TV movie play itself out 

I NDEED, a good lawyer should put the Olympic people onlhe 
stand and reveal the motives driving their judgment erf Harding 
— not to bury thorn, but simply to learn the train. 

From the beginning, they’ve been wishing that she would simply 
disappear to save them from negative publicity. At the same time, 
they are ultimately going to pocket that publicity in the form of 
higher TV ratin g s translated into more television revenue. In the 
past, they have arbitrarily applied the rules of sports m a n s h ip to 
some athletes and not to others. Is their goal to avoid the downside 
of publicity, or are they interested in the Olympic ideal of truth? 

If they were hdd under the same unsparing light as Harding, 
would you entrust them with the decision? 

In that same light, woald you believe her ex-husband? 

Even if Harding is charged in the conspiracy, she has not been 
proved guilty. The only truth right now is we don't know the truth. 
Maybe she found out afterward and was loo scared and depressed to 
come forward because she knew she wouldn’t be believed. It’s 
unlikely, but maybe she still isn't sore how everything happened. 

In an interactive, TV-movie world based on ratings and applause, 
it’s just not fair to turn off the set before the final act. If Perry Mason 
has taught us anything about justice, it’s that when the accusers are 
truly revealed, you find yourself rooting for the accused. 


Sunday’s Events 

Att times mv GMT 

Alpine Skiing - men's Downhill, 1000. 
Cross-Country Skflng - Women's 15-kJkxne- 
ter treestyle. 0900. 

Flgum Skating — Pairs technical program, 
1900- 

Ice Hockey - Sweden va. Slovakia. 1400; 
Italy va. Canada, 1630; France vs. United 
States. 1900. 

Luge - Men's Singles, First and Second 
Runs, 0900. 

Speedakattng - Men's 5,000 meters, 1400. 

Sunday's TV 

EUROPE 

AU times ara local 

Austria - ORF: 0600-0900. 0950-1300. 1300- 
1800, 1945-2010. 22452345. 

Britain - 8802:0910-1130.1810-1900,2140- 
2235. 

Bulgaria - BNT/Channel 1: 1100-1345, 

1 91 51 945, 2230-2355; Channel 2: 1 700-1 830, 
2430-0100. 

Croatia - HRT/HTVZ 1045-1230, 1455 
1800, 2300-2330, 0030-0300. 

Cyprus - CYBC: 17151745, 2230-2300. 

Czech Repufaflc - CTV: 09151230, 1455 

1730, 19452015.23152400 

Denmark - DR: 09551230, 14551730, 2145 

2230. 

Estonia - ETV: 10551400. 15551800, 1915 
1945,21452330. 

Finland - TV1: 10451410; TV2: 15551830. 
France - FR2: 1820-1925; FR3: 10451200, 
19552230. 

Germany - ARD: 09451300. 14451840, 
20152245. 

Greece - ET2: 13051330. 19151945; ET1: 
24050100. 

Hungary - MTV/Channel 1: 1100-1 13Q, 
14551730, 22552355. 

Iceland - RUV: 08551045, D9551130, 1355 
1745, 17151745, 18251855, 2230-2300, 
23350030. 

Hafy - RAI2: 2415-0130; RAI3; 08551230. 
Latvia - LT: 10551330, 19151945, 0035 
0100. 

Lithuania - LFTTV: 11051230, 2130-2145. 
Luxembourg - CLT: Highlights on evening 
news, 19052000. 

Macedonia - MKRTV/ctiannel 1: 0855 
1130, 09551215, 13551630, 17151745, 

1 7551830. 22352300; Channel 2: 08551 030, 
13551720, 18552130. 18552135; Channel 3: 
16251900. 

Monaco - TMC/IT: 10051200, 17351940, 
2300-0105 

Netherlands - NOS: 09352350. 

Norway - NRK: 09051 BOO. 20052300. 2305 
2340; TV2: 18451900. 

Poland - TVP/PR2: 09551100, 19052000, 
005105: PR1: 11051230, 16051730. 2205 
2300. 

Portugal - TV2: 23052320; RTPl: 1105 

1120. 

Romania - RTVR: 11551230. 19151945. 
00350100. 


Russia - RTO: 16051645, 22052300, 0035 
0230; RTR: 11551400,22152240, 2330-0040. 
Slovakia - STV/SK: 06051250, 14551845. 
Stovanta - RTVSLO: 09351750.19552320. 
Spain - TVE2: Starting at 1200; RTVE: 1005 
2400. 

Sweden - SVT/7V2 09451145; Channel 1: 
11451230, 14451730, 20052100. 
Switzerland - TSI/TSR/DRS: 10051335. 
14451615. 

Turkey - TRT: 21350020. 

Ukraine - DTRU/UTI: 11051245, 1815 
1900. 0030-0105, UT2: 19151945, 2200-2400. 
Eurosport 0600-continuous coverage. 
ASIA/PACIFIC 
All times are local 
Australia - Channel 9: 20350100. 

New Zealand - TV1: 21352400. 

Japan - NHK: 22052400. 24050200 (gener- 
al); 12351500, 18050630 (satellite); 1305 
1500. 19052200 (HFVIslon). 

Hong Kong - TVB: 24050100. 

South Korea - KBS: 12451350; MBC: 2405 
0130. 

Malaysia - TV3: 23150015. 

Singapore - SBC /Channel 12: 2400-0100. 
Star TV - Starting at 1800. 

NORTH AMERICA 
All times are EST 

Canada - CTV: 09051700. 21052330. 
United States - CBS: 09051200. 14351 800, 
20052300. 2335-0035. 

Mexico - Televisa: 12051500, 22052230. 
Information provided by foe IOC, TVW, and 
Individual broadcasters; compiled by the IHT. 

Monday's Events 

AO times are GMT 

Alpine Siding - Men's combined downhill, 

1000 . 

Cross-Country Siding - Men's 30-kilometer 
freestyle. 0930. 

Ice Hockey - Germany vs. Norway. 1400; 
Czech Republic vs. Austria, 1630; Russia vs. 
Finland, 1900. 

Luge - Men's singles, third and fourth runs, 
0900. 

Speedskating - Men's 500 meters. 1300. 

Monday’s TV 

EUROPE 

All times are local 

Austria - ORF: 06050950, 09551955. 2015 
2100.22352330. 

Britain - BBC2: 14151550;20052100;2315 
2355. 

Bulgaria - B NT/ Channel 1: 12051400, 
17051740. 19151945; Channel 2: 2055- 
2330, 0030-0100. 

Croatia - HRT/HTV2: 14551710. 2235 
0030. 

Cyprus - CYBC: 17151745. 22352300. 
Czech Republic - CTV/Ctiannel 1: 0915 
1300. 19452015. 23050005; Channel 2: 
17152000.20052230. 

Denmark - DR: 10251433. 14551730, 2135 
2215. 

Estonia - ETV: 11251345, 14351600. 1915 
1945.21452330. 

Finland - TV1; 11051605. 20552330; TV2: 
19051930. 

France - FR2: 09551020. 10251050, 1055 
1200, 12051250; FR3: 14351455. 15051740, 
20052030. 

Germany - ZDF: 09551750, 21052145. 
Greece - ET1: 08350900. 17051800; ET2: 
19151945. 

Hungary - MTV/Channel 1: 15151600; 
Channel 2: 19052059, 22052235. 

Iceland - RUV: 09351130. 12551400, 1825 
1855, 23152345. 

Italy - RAH: 09551300; RAI2: 2415-0100; 
RAI3: 17351800. 

LaMa - LT: 10551330. 19151945, 0035 
0100. 

Lithuania - LRT: 11251400.21352150. 
Luxembourg — CLT: Highlights on evening 
news, 19052000. 

Macedonia - MKR TV/Chan nei 1: 0855 
1130, 12551420; Channel 2: 09251200, 
3551630. 17151745. 17551830. 1855 
2130, 22352300; Channel 3: 09351150, 
16251900- 

Honaco - TMC/IT: 10051300; 13151400; 
16051925; 01050300 
Netherlands - NOS. 09352S15. 

Norway - NRK: 09051750, 20052400; TVZ: 
18451900. 

Poland - TVP/PR1: 09651100, 18351855, 
22052300; PR2: 1 105-7300, 16051 725, 1905- 
2000,00050105. 

Portugal - 7V2: 23052320; RTPl: 1105 
1120. 

Romania - HTVB/Channel 1: 1200-1330, 
14351 BOO. 19151945. 00350100; Channel 2: 
20552330. 

Russia - RTO: 12251500, 18351915. 2155 
0030; RTR: 12551400, 15551700, 1 7051715, 
21352205. 

Slovakia - STV/SK: 06050830. 10251055, 
11551300, 18151845. 

Slovenia - RTVSLO: 10051405; 17051845; 
19552015; 20352245. 

Spain - RTVE: 1 0052400; TVE2: 14451500. 
Sweden - SVT/TV2: 10151300. 13551520, 
20052145; Channel 1: 21452300. 

Switzerland - TSR/TBI/DRS: 10351300, 
14051530: S + : 2005223a 
Turkey - TRT; 1 8052015, 21052330. 
Ukraine - DTRU/UTI: 14551800. 0035 
0100: UT2: 12051340, 19151945. 

Eurosport - 06052230, 2400-contJnuou8 
coverage. 

ASIA /PACIFIC 
All times am local 
Austratia - Channel 9: 20350100. 

New Zealand - TV1 : 07050800. 2130-2400. 
Japan - NHK: 22052400 (general); 1235 
T504 78050630 (satellite); 1300-1500 , 1605 
2200 (HM/«on). 

China - CCTV: 1800-2100, 23052400. 

Hong Kong - TVB: 2400-0100. 

South Korea - KBS. 14351730. 22052300, 
24150140; MBC: 10051300. 

Malaysia - TV 3: 23152415. 

Singapore - SBC/Channel 12: 24050100. 
Star TV - starting at 0300. Starting at 1800. 
NORTH AMERICA 
All times are EST 

Canada - CTV: 06350900. 13351700, 2005 

2200. 

United States - CBS: 0700-0900. 20052300, 
0037-0137; TNT: 13051800. 

Mexico - Televisa: 07051100, 17051900, 
23352400. 

Information provided by the IOC, TWI, and 
individual broadcasters; compiled by foe IHT. 


First ‘Green’ Games: Plenty of Snow Underfoot and a Flame Overhead 


GAMES NOTEI 


A 


*■* * 


A 


! Crttiteort from Page 1 

I win fall act Of the sky. 

; -giitittsiSsSSS 

! worid champion, who had b«a practid^ las 
i jumps with a torc h bekl h igh 

\ Thursday ami now, to afl ihe worid. iiwfflbc 

l-Gmben who wiD embody Norway. 

to^down tbemomiiatnandjainpm.tbrnst- 

iDg the Olympic flame out before tom. 

! ' -I was a fittie 

; should be used inthts ■ 

j asTtiw «b d^eeno 1* “ te 

* way” _ . 

i “ He meant it far the 7,050 
J carried it 8 . 0 q 0 kflonK^^«N^A^ 


From Groberi’s soaring h eigh t , the valley mil 
gain in imgesty, white sprawling Lake ifiosa 
might sftnnV to the size of an ice zink. Those 
watching from the ground win be surrounded 
by hills that are oomfartabte and gradual, with 
no chnltengrng peaks m sigitt undrawing, 
but 4,850kflometers of crosa-coratiy Trails in- 


Whea 250,000 Norwegians smpKed for the 
30,000 tickets available to watch the Olympic 
biathlon and cross-coimtiy events, organizers 
decided to open the ccrases to anyraci^ing to 
ski of snowsboe through the wooda Oa those 
days, the troIfaGfNorwgianfi 
to come out en masse in t&eir bright parkas and 
bobbed hats, bigger and more handsome than 
in the fairy tales. 

The Games, which end Feb. 27, ore threat- 
ened by . the shadow of the American figure 
skaters Nancy Keriigan and Tonya Harding. It 
tt mostly a false threat — nothing when com- 
pared with the realooe that led to the attack on - 


jomt (by plane). . • " 


Perhaps, their shadow will obscure the 
adriewancats of' other athletes. More Body, 


even if ihe U.S. Olympic committee allows 
Harding to skate, the sensational details erf the 
attack will also gobble op whatever ihe women 
do on the ice. Their moment might already have 
passed — unless Kerrigan is able 'to 'take the 
next step, gathering herself to win the gold 
mcdaL these wooid lien become her Olympics. 

The field could survive without Harding and 
Kerrigan. It features former professionals mak- 

an BaBanoT^ Viftor Petrenko and Katarina 
Witt .The hockey competition has never been 
tighter. In most other sports, theNorwegjans — 
-who used to dominate the Winter Gaines — 
have experienced a renaissance, just in time for 
a nonnally stoic people to let out emotions bum 
up for six years. They understand these sports, 
and their nation might win more medals than 
any other. 

In practical terms, laDehammer will be re- 
membered as the first of the staggered Games, 
craning two years after the Olympics in Albert- 
ville, France. From now on, the Winter Games 
will take place in the middle of the four-year, 
cyde between Summer Olympics. 

More significantly, organizers hope they will 


be commended for invoking a "green” ap- 
proach to the Olympic movemenL 

Under pressure from en viro nm en talisls and 
the public, organizers agreed to institute con- 
trols while developing the venues, fines of up 
to $10,000 helped protect trees. The positioning 
of (he Hamar speed-skating hafl — resembling 
the hull of an overturned Vflting ship — was 
rihnngp d to protect a bird sanctuary. The Gjo- 
vik hockey arena was built inside a mountain, 
with the excavated rock shoring up the nearby 
coastline. And bullets will be retrieved from the 
biathlon course. 

It remains to be seat whether such initiatives 
are maintained in future Olympics by the prag- 
matic IOC, bat environmentalists say tins 
should only be the beginning. 

If the worid could take in the view to be 
commanded Saturday by Gruben, it might 
surely agree: 

In each host country, the Olympics become a 
celebration of everyifamg (h at came before 
From the heavens, uflehammer looks as peace- 
ful and safe as did Sarajevo 10 years ago when it 
hdd the Winter Games. 


Houses in the town descend like steps to the 
bottom of the hill, the edge of a frozen lake and 
a colony of 18 tents and a pen of reindeer. The 
tents have beat erected by the Sami people, 
who believe theirs to be the first culture in 
Norway. They live mostly to the north, with 
trucks and satellite (fishes outside their homes. 
It is only in the last generation dial they have 
regained the right to teach their own language 
in school. Here, they have created a temporary 
village for the world to visiL 

Last Friday, two of the reindeer escaped. 
One of them climbed ihe residential hifl into 
central liltehaimrig, where the animal roamed 
the pedestrian walkway, mmglmg with the 
guests. It was chased through a tunnel and out 
on to the lake, where men on snowmobites could 
not catch it 

Eventually, a bell tied to the neck of another 
reindeer hired it back to the Sami village and its 
residents dressed in bright robes, bonnets and 
boots made of reindeer fur. 

On Saturday, (he Olympic flame wili traverse 
all this in the hand of a Norw egian. If the wind 
is strong enough — who knows? — it might 
land in yesterday. 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatcher 

The controversial interview in which Norwe- 
gian skier Vegard Ulvang criticized the Interna- 
tional Olympic Committee and its presktem, 
Juan Antonio Samaranch, was recorded a 
month ago, a spokesman for the Uflehammer 

i^rang^ttsAednled to swear ihe Olympic 
oath on behalf of afl athletes at Saturday’s 
opening ceremony. He apologised to Samar- 
anch at a private meeting Thursday, and the 
IOCs director general Francois Canard, said, 
“Our relationship with LOOC is perfecL” 

The full transcript of the interview showed 
that Ulvang had bees asked about the IOC and 
Samaranch right at the end of a long interview 
and had also qualified his reply. 

“He is very upset and depressed,” said the 
organizing committee, spokesman. Odd Ustad. 
“He has been through a tough period.” 

• Downhill skier Franco Colturi was 
dropped from Italy’s team after testing positive 
for anabolic steroids, the Italian Athletic Feder- 
ation said. 

• Speed skater Bonnie Blair, bidding to be- 

come the first U.S, woman to win five gold 
medals, likely will enter the 1,500-meter race, 
her coach said (AP, Raders) 





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Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERA LD TR IBUN E, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1994 



SPORTS 

Faces Old and New to Watch in the Norwegian Woods 


By Christopher Clarey 

Special to the Htrald Tribune 

LILLEHAMMER, Norway — It will be akin 
to a soccer match in Italy, a sumo tournament 
in Japan or a basketball game in In diana. It will 
lode right and ring true. Norway is made for the 
Winter Olympics, and for the first time in 42 
years the Winter Games have made their way to 
Norway, home of endless evergreens and two 
short words: ski and slalom. 

While the world watches these Norwegian 
woods, the world's best skiers, skaters and slid- 
ers will try to benefit from the windfall born of 
the International Olympic Committee's desire 
to keep the Summer Games from overshadow- 
ing their smaller winter offspring. 

Only two years have passed since Winter 
Olympians last congregated, in the French 
Alps, and many of those who captured hearts, 
minds and medals there will be striving for 
repeat performances in the higher latitudes and 
lower altitudes of central Norway. 

Among the names that should ring a moun- 
tain cowbell: Kjetil Andre Aamodt, Bonnie 
Blair. Surya Bonaly, Marc Girardelli, Viktor 
Petrenko, Vreni Schneider, Vegard Ulvang, 
Pe m ilia Wiberg, and. of course. Alberto (La 
Bomba) Tomba, the Italian star who felt des- 
tined for glcny in Calgary (Alberta) in 1988 and 
Albertville (make that Alberto- ville) in 1992. 
but who has had a harder time claiming mani- 
fest destiny in Lillehammer. 

Tomba could still win medals, however, 
along with a few ghosts from Olympics even 
longer ago. A new International Skating Union 
rule has opened the door to prodigal sons and 
daughters from the professional figure-skating 
ranks. Brian Boitano. the American who lob- 
bied vigorously for the opportunity, will be 
joined in the Hamar skating arena by three 
other gold-medal winners from Calgary: Ger- 
many’s Katarina Witt and Russia's Ekaterina 
Gordeeva and Sergei Grinkov. For those feel- 
ing nostalgic for 1984 and much happier times 
in Sarajevo, there will be the consummate ice 
dancers Jayne Torvill and Christopher Dean of 
Britain. 

The skaters will not be bothered by the 
weather, but it could affect those competing 
outdoors. Lillehammer has not had this much 
snow in February since 1951, and more is 
predicted. Not that the hosts, who have suf- 
fered through several light winters in recent 
years, are complaining. 

“It's a nice problem for us to have," said 
Svein Mundal chief of the race committee at 
KviifjeQ, site or the Alpine speed events. 

A look at the medal contenders in each sport: 

Alpine Skiing 

One woman and two men have a realistic 
shot at the unprecedented feat of winning an 
Alpine medal in three consecutive Olympics : 
Anita Wachter of Austria, Franck Piccard of 
France and Tomba, the effervescent Italian 
who has curbed some of his late-night habits 
but lost none of his bravado. 

Long the best technical skier in the world, 
Tomba always saves his best for Olympic years. 
He won both slalom races in Calgary and re- 
pealed in the giant slalom in 1992. In the last 
month, he has relumed to peak form. Those 
who could spoil Tomba's party in the slalom 
include Norway's Finn Christian Jagge, Aus- 
tria's Thomas Stangassinger and Jure Kosir, a 
young Slovene who moonlights as a rap singer. 

The man to watch in every event is Aamodt, 
the overall World Cup leader and front man for 
the group of Norwegian skiers who call them- 
selves the attacking Vikings. Two other danger- 
ous all-arounders are GOntfaer Mader of Aus- 
tria and Girardelli of Luxembourg, the five- 
time World Cup overall champion who broke 
his Olympic hex with a silver in 1992. 

In the downhill Patrick Ortlieb, the burly 
Austrian who won gold on the serpentine 
course in Albertville, could repeat. The bad 
news for him is that this course is said to be 
tailor-made for yet another Norwegian, Atle 
Skaardal. Tommy Moe of the United States 
could break through in the downhill or super- 
jtiam slalom, which will be held on bis 24th 
birthday. 

Woman to watch include Deborah Compag- 
noni of Italy in the giant slalom. Katja Seizinger 
of Germany in tbe speed events. Wiberg of 
Sweden in just about everything and the vener- 
able Schneider of Switzerland, who was invisi- 
ble in Albertville but has returned to top form 


Day-by-Day Schedule of Events 


Ailtmes 

GMT 

ri 

E 

LI 


BLl 

[H * 

LJ 

E 


• 

n 

El 


I FIGURE 

1 SKATING ! 

SPEED SKATING 

LONG TRACK SHORT TRACK 

HOCKEY 

i 603SLEC 

; 1 LUGE 

ALPirJE 


! COUNTRY 1 F «e^ST v L 

- ; CCME::j:D 

■ : Ki ,u:r.:nr;G 1 

SAT. 

12 




Finland vs. Czech Rep., 1100 
Russia vs. Nomay. 1730 
Ausma vs. Germany, 2000 









SUN. 

13 

Pairs, technical 
program. 

1900 

Men's 

5,000m 

1400 


Sweden vs. Stovataa. 1400 
Italy vs. Canada. 1630 
France vs. U.S.. 1900 


Men’s 

singles, 

0900 

Mar’s 

dawnhK 

1000 


Women's 

15Kfree. 

0900 




HON. 

14 


Men's 

500m 

1300 


Germany vs. Norway, 1400 
Czech Rep. vs. Austria. 1630 
Russia vs. Finland. 1900 


Men's 

singles, 

0900 

Men's combined 
dovmfffl, 
1000 


Men's 

3QKtree, 

0930 




TUE. 

15 

Pans, free 
program, 

1900 



Sweden vs. Italy, 1400 

U.S. vs. Slovakia, 1630 
Canada vs. France. 1900 


Women's 

singles. 

0900 

Women's 

Super-G, 

1000 


Women's Moguls 

SKdassicai, efimhation, 
0930 1130 



WED. 

16 


Men's 

1,500m 

1300 


Austna vs. Russia, 1400 
Czech Rep. vs. Germany, 1630 
Norway vs. Finland, 1900 


Women's 

singles. 

0900 




Moguls 
final, 
1130. '• 

- 


THURS. 

17 

Men's technical 
program. 

1800 

Women's 

3,000m 

1300 


Slovakia vs. Italy, 1400 
France vs. Sweden. 1630 
Canada vs. U.S. 1900 



Men's 

Super-G, 

1000 


Men's 10K 0930 
women’s 1W 

1130 




PHI. 

18 

Ice Dance 
compulsories, 
1800 

Men's 

1,000m 

1300 


Germany vs. Russia, 1400 
Finland vs. Austria. 1630 
Czech Rep. vs. Norway, 1900 


Men's 

doUite, 

0900 


Women’s 

15K, 

0900 



Normal hi aid 
jump, Mvkfual. 
1130 - 


SAT. 

19 

Men's free 
program. 

1800 

Women's 

500m 

1300 


Canada vs. Slovakia. 1400 

Italy vs. France. 1630 

U.S. vs. Sweden, 1900 

Two-man, 

0900 


Women's 

dawnhO, 

1000 


Men's 15K 
freepusiit, 

1130 


15K cross-courtiy, 
InrfiwduaL 

1130 


SUN. 

20 

Ice Dance, 
original 

program. 1800 

Men's 

10,000m 

1300 


Russia vs. Czech Rep., 1400 
Germany vs. Finland. 1630 
Norway vs. Austria. 1900 

Two-man, 

0900 


Women's 
contend 
dcwnhH, 1000 

Men's 20K. 
0900 




Large hS, 

1200 

MON. 

21 

ice Dance, 
free program, 
1800 

Women's 

1500m 

1300 


Sweden vs. Canada. 1400 
Slovakia vs. France, 1630 

U5. vs. Italy. 1900 



Women's 
comb, slalom, 

. 0630,1200 


Women’s Aerfab, 

4xS< relay, atndnafari. 

0930 1200 


TUE. 

22 



Men's 1 , 000 m, 
women's 3.000m 
relays. 1800 

Consolation. 1530 
Consolation, 2000 





MerfS 

4xl0K relay. 

0930 



large W, 
team, 

1130 

WEO. 

23 

Women's 

technical 

program. 

1800 

Women's 

1.000m 

1500 


Quarterfinal, 1400 
Quarterfinal 1530 
Quarterfinal, 1630 
Quarterfinal. 2000 



Men's 
giant slalom 
0630,1230 

Women's 

7-5K.0900 
Men’s 10K 
1200 



Normal MB 

SW jump, 
teem. v - . 
1030 


THURS. 

24 



Women's 500m 
and 3,000m relays, 
men's 5,000m relay, 
1800 

Ninth place. 1400 

11th place, 1530 
Consolation, 1830 
Consolation. 2000 



Women's 
giant slalom 
0830,1200 


Womens 

30K classical, 

1130 

Aerials, 

final.. 

1100 

3X10K 
cross- 
country, 
team, 0900 


FRI. 

25 

Women's 
tree program, 
1800 

Women's 

5,000m 

1300 


Semifinal. 1830 

Semifinal. 2000 



Men's contend 
slalom, 

0630, 1200 

Women’s 

4x7JK relay, 

0900 



Normal hil, 
1130 , 

SAT. 

26 

ExhftHtions, 

1400 


Men's 500m and 
5,000m relays; 
women's 1 , 000 m 
relay. 1800 

7th place. 1530 

5th place, 1830 

Bronze Medal, 2000 

Four-man, 

0900 


Women's 

slalom, 

0830,1200 

Men's 

4x75K relay, 

1200 




SUN. 

27 




Gold Medal. 

1*515 

Four-man, 

0900 


Men's siakHn, 
0630,1200 


Men's 50K 
classical. 0900 


- 



Donat Acfc- 

in 1992. m the two- 


ri titans. Weder and bis 

, won the only Swiss 

Hoppe, who bas woo 
and WorifroTin previous Olympaj 
cently dismissed from the German Array be- 
cause he had failed to disclose lmte with the 
Stasi, tire former East German 
police. But Hoppe wffl still » 

£Sng with Hanud Czudaj, who disclosed his 
Stasi links before the 1992 Games. 

Ski Jumping 

and — ortfle Combined 


in the technical events. Urska Hrovat, the best 
of a young group of Slovenes, is also a threat in 
the slalom. 

The biggest threat to Wachter and the Austri- 
ans will be the emotional whirlwind that fol- 
lowed the death of their teammate Ulrike Maier 
after crashing in the Ganniscfa-Partenkuchco 
downhill on Jan. 29. 


Figure Skating 

Long before something wicked came Nancy 
Kerrigan's way in Detroit on Jan. 6, the figure- 
skating competition was set to be the showpiece 
of tire Games. Every event will feature at least 
one previous Olympic champion, and the men’s 
and pairs events wifi feature two. 

Only tire gold medal in the pairs is posable to 
predict with much confidence: Gordeeva and 
Grinkov, who are now married and haye a 
child, were on a different plane than their rivals 
at the European championships in Copenhagen 
last month, and their grace and skill should be 


enough to give them the gold over their fellow 
Russians, Natalya MIshkutienok and Artur 
Dmitriev, whose original program is below 
their usual standard. (Their free program re- 
mains a sight to behold.) 

The men’s and ice-dancing events will have 
tire sooogest fields in history. Petrenko, the 
Ukrainian wbo is the 1992 Olympic champion, 
perhaps has a slight edge, based on his victory 
in Skate America and his impressive perfor- 
mance in Copenhagen. But be will need to rail 
on all his resources to hold off Boitano and 
Kurt Browning of Canada, the four-time world 
champion. But neither of them manag e d to win 
his national title this season: Boitano was beat- 
en by Scott Davis, Browning by the remarkable 
jumper Elvis Stojko. Neither Davis nor Stojko 
will be out of the medal hunt in Hamar. 

The ice dancing wffi be a three-way struggle 
among Torvill and Dean and two Russian cou- 
ples, Maya Usova an d Alexander Zhrilni and 
Oksana Gritschuk and Yevgeni Flatov. Torvill 
and Dean barely won in Copenhagen, and their 


much-ballyhooed free dance failed to bowl over 

tbe judges. 

In a normal year, Torvill and Dean’s success- 
ful comeback would be the talk of the global 
village, but this is no normal year. And whethrr 
Tonya Harding is allowed to set skate on Ha- 
mars ice or not, the women will be the primary 
focus. _ 

Kerrigan appears to be completely recovered 
from the blow to her knee, but the truth is that 
she has never skated cleanly in a major interna- 
tional competition. If she can rise above her 
past, she has an excellau chance at gold and a 
lifetime's supply of endorsement 

If not, the spoils will probably go to Oskana 
Baiul of Ukraine, the defending world dumpi- 
on. or Bonaly of France, the European chans- 
on. Both have flaws: Baiul is ill at ease with 
combination jumps, and Bonaly still lacks art- 
istry. Witt, tire two-time gpM medalist from the 
former East Germany, whose jumps are no 
match for her younger competitors, will be 
fortnnate to finish in tire top eight. 


Lug* and Bobstod 


German has long been tire lingua franca' of 
the luge circuit Austrians, Germans and Ger- 
man-speaking Italians have won 23 of tire 24 
gold medals awarded in tire Olympics. On tire 
picturesque trad: near Lfflcharnmcr, they are 
likely to do well again, Germany’s Georg Hadd 
and the doubles team of Stefan Krtassc and 
Jan Behrendt are back to defend their tides. 

But this time, tire Americans could finally 
transform the luge competition into a multifin- 
gual event. Although tire men's gold-medal fa- 
vorite is Austria’s Marinis Prodt, both Wcndd 
Suckow and Duncan Kennedy of tire UJ5. team 
are capable of winning their country's first lug: 
medaL If they falter, their teammate. Cammy ' 
Myler, who woo the last World Cup event <rf 
the season, could break through in tire women’s 
event. The favorite for the gold is Gahride 
Kohlisch of Germany, the Wood Cup leader! 

Switzerland’s Gustav Wedar could drive iris 
nation to two gold medals in tire bobsled com- 


Events Built for Speed 


The Alpine events will tie held at different venues. The events below, at Kvrtfjell. are 
considered the fastest, with an emphasis on speed over technical skills. 


In Luge, U.S.-German Tales of Courage 


START: MEN S DOWNHILL 
START: WOMEN S DOWNHILL 

One trip down at speeds 
exceeding 70 miles an hour 
It takes less than two minutes 
and the fastest lime wins 


START: MEN S SUPER-G 
A combination of downhill and 
giant slaiom Again, one run 
down the hilt arid the fastest 
skier wins. The course is 
shorter than the downhill and 
has at leas’. 35 gates, at least 
25 meters apart, placing a little 
more emphasis on technical 
skills than ihe downhill. 


: START: WOMENS 5 UPER-G 
Just one run down the hill that 
has a vertical drop of 350-500 
meters compared to 500-650 
meters for men. 


START: MEN’S COMBINED 
The rime ol this one 
down-hill run is combined 
with two slalom runs the 
following day. 


THEMfAS' 


THE CLAW*—- 


TH£RNf8HJUW>— 


3 ’, 



THE REtiffltSft RfCHE 


■|V\ ’ 


Sources. - The Gi/topiC 
Fadbook: The Complete 
Book of the Winter Olympics: 
Winter Games Made Simple 


The Ns* Vnrt Time. 


By Johnette Howard 

H'azrinpcr Pm Sfrjff 

LILLEHAMMER. Norway — She bad no 
inkling of wha: had happened until sbe sat up 
and noticed the blood ‘■nattered ewer her rac ing 
suit 

Before that she was lying on her back on her 
luge sled, traveling upward of 75 miles per hoar 
down the course in Whttrrberg. Germany, one 
of the fastest in the world. 

About halfway down, she caught a glimpse of 
a man trying to get off the course two turns 
away. She though: nothing of iL not even when 
she “felt the impact" 

Then? 

“Then I jus! remember hearing a thud." 

“And I thought." she remembered, ** 'What 
happened? Why am I slowing down?* " 

She wass'i knocked off her sled. Only at tire 
bottom of the track did tire American luger 
Bethany Caicaterra-Mc Mahon learn the boni- 
fying truth: Tbe dull, half-iccc-wide runners of 
her sled had severed the ire of the German 
team’s brad coach. Sep? Led below the knee. 

Lena, wac was sweeping snow off the track 
between training rons. had sot beard the "all 
clear" call that a is. sounded down the track 
before Calcaterra-McMahon began her run. 

“.As I found later, he's deaf in one ear." 
Calcaterra-McMahcn said. 

By the time she pushed out of the starting 
gate and iregan ratting down the coarse. Lenz 
noticed her — but too lais. 

As Lenz scrareclec '-0 ge*. off the track, his 
spiked shoes betrayed him. He fell. Calcaterra- 
McMaboc shot by. As Lenz lay there, bis leg 
cut cIsiil he pushed the button' on the walkie- 
talkie he carried to communicate with his team 
and said: "It was ray fault My foot has been 
cut off. It was my fault. Get help." 

Almost three months have passed. And Cal- 
caterra- Me Mahon. 2G. sal now in a cramped 
interview- room at the Winter Olympics and 
tried hard to act unaffected. How much she 
cried or shook with fear or reconsidered her 
participation in lusraz. she won’t exactly say. 

She concedes that she did all of thaL but 


talking to her teammates and her stepfather, a 
psychiatrist in Watcrbury. Connecticut, helped. 
Knowing Lenz had absolved her of any blame 
was crucial, too — especially when die learned 
the next day that doctors Had been unable to 
reattach his leg in emergency surgery. 

That was bad news. The good news? Caka- 
terra-McMafaon. breaking into a grin, said she 
and two of her U.S. luge teammates saw Lenz at 
the athletes* village hoe and they found, first- 
hand, that word of his remarkable recovery was 
true. 

Lenz. wbo was 59 when the accident oc- 
curred, was fitted with a prosthesis just three 
weeks after the accident. A member of tire UJS. 
Luge Federation saw him ax a World Cop event 
less than two months after tbe accident and be 
was back at work, walking with a cane, idling 
tire American, “Hey. Don’t wony about me. 
I'm fine. Really. I*m fine." 

“Even when be was in the ambulance being 
rushed to tire hospital," Calcatena-McMahon 
recalled, "people said he was asking, ‘How is 
the girl? Is she afl right? IssheOJCT" 

And when she saw Lenz in the athletes' 
village this week? 

"He said, 'We've got logo dancing,' " Calca- 
icrTa-McMahoQ said, laughing. 

Much like Lenz, Calcatcrra-McMabon bad 
to summon courage after tire incident In her 
mind she knew "it was a fluke accident — 
something that's never happened before." But 
she also concedes, "I'm not going to say it 
wasn’t bard afterward. It was." 

During a typical ran, lugers are flattened by 
pressure up to seven times the force of gravity 
— twice the g-forces that astronauts led on 
takeoff. In addition to high speeds, drey cannot 
see what is happening as they fly down twisting 
courses because lifting your head — even 
though it's a natural thing to do heading into a 
diabohcal curve or switchback mm— can add 
three- or four-hundredths of a second to your 
time, which can be tire difference between vic- 
tory and defeat. 

Although lugers who crash break bones now 
and then, a far mote common problem is the 
barns they get when their limbs scrape against 


the ice — tire friction-caused heat melting tbe 
plastic fiber of their bodysuits. 

Still, Calcaterra-McMahan denies being 
haimtwt by any new thoug hts about the inher- 
ent danger of raging. 

"Serious accidents are rare,” she says. "I 
know thaL" 

But that didn't make what happened to Lenz 
any easier to get ova:. 

Three bears after the accident — after she’d 
thrown away her blood-spattered racing suit 
and found another, after U.S. coach Wolfgang 
Schadler had duct-taped a crack in her sled and 
realigned the steering — takatenra-McJvfabon 
was back cm the track, forced to press on 
because the non day’s race was tire Iasi Olym- 
pic qualifier of tire season and her spot cm the 
U.S. team was tenuous. 

“1 was second on the team, but I was only one 
point ahead of tbe girim third," she said. "If I 
hadn’t competed, it would bare been up to a 
discretionary board to put me on the team or 
not But I didn’t want it to oome down to thaL” 

This is only Gdcatma-McMabon's fast win- 
ter on the senior circuit, after aH Though sbe 
has four US. junior titles — winning her first a! 
age 15 — she hadn't built tap any raft of 
accomplishments at tire highest lewL 

So she kepi training that day. When she was 
alone, she shook arm cried, according to a 
teammate. But on the track she was deter- 
mined. "I wanted so bad to have that Olympic 
experie n ce . " she says. 

When tire rare finally came the next dw; she 
finished fifth her best World Cup finish of 
tbe season. Sic nude the Olympic team. 

Then, said a US. Lnge official, “Em told She 
locked herself in ha room for 20 mmoles and 

cried, just cried.” rim __ ^ 

jgagjgseajjg ! aaSSSSe 

dotfshe did. She would nm off and took tor Soyfetw- 

gS&ftfiSSaiSS /SfifflSHSsSSS 

■ssazaasSSsS 

says. *T think that’s exactly what I'd do." : ham pere d hy afragilg kmy . u - 


Short-track, which made its medal debut in 
Albertville, has added two more races for 1994: 
tire men’s SCO meters and women’s 1,000 mo- 
tets. Once again, the Americans, the Canadi- 
ans, the Chinese and tire South Koreans will be 
the skaters to beaL A few names to remember: 
Cathy Turner, the American who won gpld in 
1992; Lee Joon Ho, a Sooth Korean who is 
favored to win the men’s 1,000, and Wflf 
O'Reilly, a British sprinter. 

flr—ty swing 

Only the mogul slaers got the chance to 
compete far official medals m AlbertviDe. This 
time, 'tire aeriafists also will have the honor 
Donna Wembredu of tire United Stales, who 
has made a re m a rkabl e comeback from maj»r 
knee surgery, is ajood bet to repeat in the 


women's moguls. Tbecolorful French star Ed- 
gar Groqjiroo is a slightly less prohibitive fa- 
voote to repeat in the men’s event, where his 
teammate Olivier Cotte and the 


*■ I 


Four men have soared above the rest tins 
season: Espen Bredesen of Norway, Jens 
Weissfioa of Germany, Noriaki Kasai of Japac 
and the aptriwtiredeed Andreas (Andre) Gold- 
berger of Austria. Jarodav Sakala, a Czech, is 
nkn dangerous, particularly mi the large huL 
The Norwegians and tire Austrians a re th e 
favorites in the team competition. The Finns, 
who have won a total of six gold medals m 
jum p in g at the last three Olympics, are oo 
longer reigning supreme, largely because me 
phenom Toni Niemmen, a double grad 
medalist in Albertville, lost bis touch and even- 
tually his place on the Finnish Olympic team. 

As for Nordic combined, that da un ti n g mar- 
riage of normal-hill ski jumping and a 15- 
Hinmm er cross-country ski race, there is. only 
one wamfs to remember: Kenji Ogfrvara of Ja- 
pan. He could be the surest bet in Lilkhamnw . 
largely because he is an excellent jumper. 

Cross-Country Skiing 
' and Bfarthlofi 

The Norwegians swept the five men’s events 
in 1992, bm a repeat performance is unlikely, in 
lame part because Vladimir Smirnov of Ka- 
zakhstan has been the dominant skier tins sea- 
son. But Smirnov, who lives in Sweden, will still 
have his hands full with Iris Norwegian friends 
Bjorn Dachfie and Ulvang, who will get enor- 
mous support from the vocal home crowd. 

In the women's events, expect lots more med- 
als from three skiers who were dominant in 
AlbertviDe: Lyubov Egorova and Elena Vialbe 
of Russia and Stcfania Belmondo of Italy. 

In tiie biathlon, winch has long beat the 
. domain of Germans and Russians, the French 
«wd CsmaA jam could be doing some celebrat- 
ing. Patrice BaiDy-Salins of France is a tenta- 
tive favorite in. the men’s races, and France’s 
Anne Briand and Canada’s dynamic Myriam 
Bedard are two of the favorites in the women’s 
events. . . • 

BaiUy-Salins’s principal rivals wiB be Sergei 
Tarasov of Russia and three Germans: Sven 
Fischer, Ricco Gross and perhaps Mark Kirch- 
ner, who won two golds and a stiver in 1992 bat 
has struggled of late. Briand and Bedard will 
have to contend with Nathalie San ter of Italy 
and Antje Harvey of Germany, who won a gold 
and two sDvos in AlbertviDe. 


icm Hocfcwy 

Since it formed the core of the gbld-medal- 

- winning Ui^cd Team in 1992, Russia’s vaunt- 
ed hockey program has had to endure adminis- 
trative infighting, economic hardship and 
nearly total turnover (riven that the National 
Hodtey League in North America has no hard- 
anrency problem). . 

But tire talent pool runs dap in their trou- 
Wod nmun,-and tire Russians — with their 

- agedtowin the 1993 vrorid^^^rionships and 
could cgjtnre another goW in LiUchaimner. 

Although iXMic orthe Russian players have’ 
dympic experience, then feisty coach, Viktor 
Tuftcmov, has plenty. Tikhonov, 65, began 
coaching the Soviet national team in the orid- 
1970s riod did a masteriy job with his young 
team in Albertwlle, although he was dismissed 
after faDing to win. the subsequent world title. 

ff the Rrashms fail to gel, the Swedes, led by 
the 20-year-old center Peter Forsbcqj, have tire 
best diance to take the gold. The bronze could 
go to tire Canadians or the Czechs, who could 
run into their former teammates from Slovakia 
in the quarterfinals. 

Speed Skating 

ff all goes acoirding to plan on the fast track 
in the stadium shaped Hkp an inverted Viking 
ship, tire sprints wffl bdongto tire Americans, 
the middle distances to the Dutch and the long 
distances to the Norwegians and tire Germans. 

Blair, who has already won three golds for 
tire United States, could repeat her sweep erf the 
500- and 1,000-meter events in Albertville. 
Gtmda Niemann of Germany a gym looks un- 
touchable in the 3,000- and 5,000-meter races. 

For tbe men, the big question is whether Dan 
Jansen of the United States can finally put an 
end to fats Olympic travails. Jansen, wbo fefl 
twice in Calgary after l«*rnfng of his sister’s 
death, fell victim to excessive expectations in 
Albertvilte. This win most certahuy be his final 
chance to live up to Us talent The men’s 
distance events wiQ be .<lc.-Mft<t to the sound of 
wild cheering from tire Norwegian and tire 
Dutch fans, wbo foflow the sport Eke nobody 
else. The brat chance for the Dutch is Falko 
Zandstra in the 1,500-nreter evenL The Norwe- 
are counting on Johann Olav to 
home gold in the 5,000- and 10,000-meter 













rirc 


GOLD, SILVER, BRONZE. AND BLUE. 


IBM has played a supporting role in the Olympie 
Caines since i960. But this time it’s different. More 
than j.ust providing hardware, systems software and 
support, we helped plan, design, integrate and manage 
the 19 94 Olympic Winter Games. IBM-based 
systems helped the Olympic Organizing Committee 


optimize a billion-doll ar investment by simplifying 
inventory control, stat gathering, ticketing and lod- 
ging. And, at a touch of a screen, journalists can gain 
access to all the results and the relevant background 
information. Further evidence of how we ? re helping 
to open the 1994 Olympic Winter Games to the world. 


f V 
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Olympic Sponsor 


via 




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. ©1994 IBM Goip. 











Page 22 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY II, 1994 


POSTCARD 


Berlin: Embassy Puzzle 


By Stephen Kinzer 

Sen- Yfrk rimes Service 

B ERLIN — When diy planners 
here envision the Berlin of the 
future, one or their most vivid im- 
ages is of the stately American Em- 
bassy that would be rebuilt on its 
former site next to the Branden- 
burg Gate. 

Germans and Americans alike 
expect the building to be an an- 
chor of the new Berlin and a sym- 
bol of the United States’ determi- 
nation to remain a major force is 
Europe. It will be perhaps die 
most important embassy building 
ihe United States will construct in 
this decade, and the site at Pariser 
Platz. adjacent not only to the 


Reichstag, the once and future 
home of the German parliament, 
is arguably the most desirable in 
Berlin. 

But the recent arrival of a new 
American ambassador with a pen- 
chant Tor challenging established 
views has sent shudders of fear and 
disbelief through architectural and 
city planning circles here. The am- 
bassador, Richard C. Holbrooke, 
has made it known that he is con- 
sidering building the new embassy 
somewhere other than Pariser 
Platz. 

□ 

“Nowhere can you achieve what 
you can achieve at Pariser Platz." 
said Rudiger Patzschke, one of 
many Berlin architects who are 
alarmed by the ambassador's posi- 
tion. “Plenty of countries would 
love to have their embassies there. 
It just wouldn’t make sense for the 
.Americans to go anywhere else. If 
thev find (he site too small or the 
rules too restrictive, they could put 
just their reception rooms and a 
few offices there. But to abandon 
the site altogether would not make 
sense." 

Holbrooke said: “it is our hope 
that we will be able to build at 
Pariser Platz. but we haven't made 
a final decision yet because we 
don't have the final German speci- 
fications. U the Germans can ac- 
commodate us. we’ll end up there. 
But we are looking at alternate 
sites, and if we are faced with deal- 
breaking specifications, well go 
another way. 

“One of the factors to consider is 
that Pariser Platz is an ensemble 
site. We’d be pan of a duster of 


buildings. If we choose another 
ate, we could have a free-standing 
building, which id some ways 
would be preferable." 

Some architects here have sug- 
gested that Holbrooke is in effort 
Muffing and that his search for al- 
ternate sites may be a charade. 
They suspect that his true goal is 
simply to scare dty officials into 
giving the United States more con- 
trol over the design of its Pariser 
Platz site. 

□ 

The French government is also 
planning to build a new embassy 
on land it owns at Pariser Platz. 
and Britain expects to build on an 
adjacent plot. City officials have 


sign restrictions intended to assure 
that the plaza regains a measure of 
its original grandeur. 

Among the alternative sites Hol- 
brooke has via ted is one on Alex- 
anderpiatz in the eastern pan of the 
dty. The site, owned by the Radis- 
son hotel chain, is across a channel 
from the Berlin Cathedral 

Holbrooke recently shewed both 
sites to the architect !. M. Pei, who 
was in Berlin on a visit after attend- 
ing the inauguration of his newly 
designed halls at the Louvre in Par- 
is. The ambassador said later that 
Pei bad advised him to consider the 
Pariser Platz site favorably. 

“He said that a very great dty 
needs a center, and that as the new 
Berlin emerges. Pariser Platz will 
probably be the most important 
location in the city in a psychologi- 
cal sense," Holbrooke said. 

Pei also reportedly said be did 
not want to be considered as a 
possible architect of the new em- 
bassy. 

□ 

A century ago, Pariser Platz was 
known as “the kaiser's reception 
room." It lies on the edge of the 
sprawling Tiergorten. once a royal 
bunting ground and now a magnet 
for cyclists and sun bathers. The 
neoclassical architecture that once 
dominated the plaza was meant to 
symbolize Germany's commitment 
to the democratic ideals of ancient 
Greece. 

Holbrooke said he hoped to have 
a final decision by the end of this 
month. “Whatever we dedde is go- 
ing to have a long-term impact on 
the dty. We don't want to make a 
mistake." 


A Family Life on Both Sides of ‘Color Line 


By Mary Ann French 

Washington Pan Service 

W ASHINGTON — Here and now, 
little by little, a taboo is being bro- 
ken. Modern-day prgudice amoqg black 
Americans, one "against another, is being 
exposed. Irrational biases based on skin 
color are being aired. African Americans 
of all (he many hues created by miscegena- 
tion — whether forced or not — are find- 
ing a way to Question someone rise's defi- 
nition of them. 

Heretofore, however mixed, and in what- 
ever proportions, the “one-drop rule" pre- 


vailed. une orop ch du oiuuu in jvu* 
v eins determined how you were classified in 
this American apartheid. It applied across 
the board, from the redboned to the blue- 
black. which according to the author Shiriee 
Taylor Haizlrp's color chart indudes: “hon- 
ey. caramel ivory, peaches-and-cream. ma- 
hogany, coal blue, red bronze, amber, tar, 
riiiney. snow, chocolate, coffee, ebony, 
clear, bright, light, dark, alabaster, tan, 
rosy, molasses, "toffee, taffy, caft-au-lsit, 
nutmeg, leafy, high yellow, paper-bag-tan, 
and purple." 

All those skin colors were seen as the 
same — whether in the eyes of Jim Crow or 
Uncle Sam. 

“We've been socialized to say we're only 
black." says Haizlip. who has written the 
confounding story of her Washington fam- 
ily and life on both sides of the color line. It 
is tilled “The Sweeter the Juice." after die 
old saying (“The blacker the boxy . . 

She took the boric — her first — to 10 
publishers and got nine offers. Forty pro- 
duction companies are after the movie 
rights. All this stir over what Haizlip says is 
“a dirty little, but not quite so secret, thing." 

“We've been brainwashed," says HaizOp. 
“White Americans and Mack Americans 
just accepted it as something almost handed 
down from God, you know, or on the 
mountain, with Moses, without remember- 
ing. without thinking that it was just a law 
made by people, by white people, for what- 
ever their political or socioeconomic rea- 
sons at the time." 

As for Haulip’s own coloring, she says 
she is often mistaken in her travels for 
white. Her skin is the sort of pale that looks 
as though its pigment has somehow been 
removed, leaving a visual sense of loss. Her 
reddish-brown hair, by her own description, 
is “not quite ' nappy,’ but h tangled, knotted 
easily, and required a light presang with a 
hot comb." 

Some of Haizlip’s discomfort with the 
lighter end of the color spectrum, she ex- 

J ilains. is related to the dark skin of her 
aiber — the Reverend Julian Taylor — and 
that of her grandfather — the Reverend 
W illiam Taylor Sr., founder oT Washing- 
ton’s Florida Avenue Baptist Church. She 



Ml ©lewy/Tbe V^n^um PM 

Shiriee Taylor Haizfip’s color chart embraces many shades. 


fancies herself sharing the burdens and joys 
of their coloring, even to the point of seeing 
a b ro wn face when she spies herself in a 
mirror. “1 see on two levels," says Haizlip . 
“through the eyes and the heart" 

In ber book, which is subtitled “A Family 
Memoir in Black and White" (Simon and 
Schuster), Haizfip at tacks Highlan d Beach, 
the private resort near Annapriis rounded a 
century ago by the family of Frederick 
Douglass. “It was filled with people who 
looked too while, East Indian or Native 
American," she writes. “There were not 
enough brown faces for my comfort. There 
was too much talk of color, hair texture and 
family connections." 

On ilw» morning, Haizlip. 57. is tatUng 
about her daughters — Detrdre and Melis- 
sa, an actress and a lawyer. 

“One is light like me, and one is dark like 
my husband," Haizlip says. “And I'm glad 
they were not raised in Washington becanse 
I think they would have been damayrf 
children. We would have done our best in 
the home, but there would stDl have been 
that problem" Fen according to Haizlip, 
black Washington is “rigidly stratified by 
color and class." She has never lived here, 
but she grew up hearing the tales her par- 
ents, aunts and nudes told about their 
hometown. She describes it as a place 


topped by “the light and the weQ-to-dp, 
who strove to protea and replicate them- 
selves. They practiced pigmentation endog- 
amy. They wallowed in then' whiteness. 
They Dannled their straight hair, their high 
noses and ihm bps." 

Perhaps it’s becanse so marry blacks in 
Washington came up from jraptmtais in 
Virginia, that mother of more presidents 
than any other state, she offers. Haizlip 
herself has traced her ancestry bade to Mar- 
tha Dandridge CtatiSt the wife of George 
Washington. “So many people who were 
light-skinned were tied to the American 
aristocracy," she says. “They felt proud of 
that, and wanted to keq> that separation ri 
themselves.” 

Aside from the color conundrum, howev- 
er, Haizlip seem* to think Made Washing- 
ton's upper crust is laudable. She quotes the 
historian Carter ,G. Woodson 
how African American families began gain- 
ing prominence when “a member who ac- 
complished something unusual and others 
of his descendants lived up to that record by 
likewise achieving distraction." Haizlip 
adds: “Wealth was not the mast important 
factor in belonging- Education was toe key. 
With each saccecrang generation, the group 
bec am e more inmbinH and more secure: 
They attained education, property, finan- 


cial security and, most of all respectability.; 
But they did not completely turn that 
backs on their darker or Less affluent breth- 
ren. A good number of (hem founded or 
participated in the forerunners of, civil 
rights organizations that designed to 
uplift the 'masses* of their people." 

Yet these people, or thor descendants, 
she feared, would have damaged her chit, 
(hen. • 

On second thought, Haizhp called badt 
later in the day to ask a reporter 10 “modi- 
fy” or “srike” the statement. “Orjust am- 
ply add my new disclaimer, h sounds as if 

(YMtHnnmff o wh/ife omim nf hMib- 


and I really don’t want to do that I don’t 
want it to scan as if evayone m any partm- - 
ulargrot^inWadiingUHiIsadestrtiaiveor 
a bad or a vile persoa." 

Haizlip does have emotional cause to 
lash out at Washington. It was here rial her 
mother — Margaret Morris — and a youn- 
ger, phyacafly deformed brother woe 
abandoned by their faner-dmiied father, 
siblings, aunts and nodes, who decided to . 
move west where they could start new Jives 
and pass for while. Morris, vrixse mother 
had died when she was 4, was then startled 
amoDg guardians who ranged from the bi- 
zarre to the abusve. -.: fc 

“Mother tdd me that rite was not with 
her father, or her brothers and sister bo- - 
cause she wm *too brown,’ " Habdip writes 
of her earliest efforts to trace ber family 
. tree. "No matter bow beautiful the autumn, 
itsonstf signaled the begi nning of a season- 
al sadness for ny mother. Hex melancholy 
would deepen as Christmas approached. I 
remember feeling helplessly protective of 
her as she talked of cfcBdhood holiday wish- 
es unfulfilled." 

Mtirotfs melancholy persisted despite the 
happy marriage bonry ? life she wilt in 
Connecticut. “As my mother approached 
her 80th birthday, I made a conscious deo- 
skm to ore whatever means possible to find 
her family ** 

Haizlip used detectives to track down her 
mother's last surviving abSn& Grace Mor- 
ris Cramer, whom she found Uring alone in 
a trailer park in Caifamia, the traces of tan 
in be face buried under layers of white 
powder. Haizlip tells the end of her story . 
with a vindictive flourish, noting trium- 
phantly dial her mother now lives in a ’ 

** mnna rni ** 

When rise reunited the two asters, Haiz- 
lip was struck by how much they looked 
and fadkwf alike Eacfa.aho Bto eadi 

han a Hanght w rmmwri PiUriiM and n g wiiA . - 
sen named Jeffrey. Both are widowed now, 

-after long marriages. Both have hot tern-. - 
pecs. They live in worlds that are vastly 
different, out are amOariy cotor-consdous 
and prejudiced. One is Mack, die other 
white. 


people 


Limbaugfc Goes Orange 

Fresh as a lemon; Rush Dm- 
baagh, the JalesLptab man for the S’ 

Florida Citrus Commission, is leav- 
- iug a sour taste in some mouths. 

The ifehtist raffia and TV talk show- 
host, brown for bashing feminists 
■■aad President CEntan, starts his SI 
nnUioa job with the commission at 
Monday — - the same board that 
.dedded. Aaita Bryant .and Bat 
Reynolds were too controversial to 
promote orange juice: Governor 
Lawton Okies, a Dcmocm, is not 
pleased. A- spokesman quoted 
Chiles assaying, “Ora: orange juice 
leaves a good taste with people and 
should be promoted on programs 
tha represent good taste." 

D ; - 

Jack Valenti, head of the Motion 
Pictures Association of . America 
and the U. S. film industry's main 
lobbyist, called for a rebramfliation 1 

with tire French indmrny. Speaking 1 
at -the annual television festival 
held in Monte Casio, Valenti told 
“all my French friends" that both 
sides should look beyond the trade 
n ego tiati on lastyaE. Oh, yet, and 
a word of advice: He said the 

Ftendtoonld“conqueP’tiieAi)rer- 
ican film mar ket if they invested in 
U. S. movie house chains. 


Daily Star that oh rounds of his 
Surrey village south of London, to 
encourage people to came to church, 
be “knoacBd on die door of h partic- 
ularly, grand house a very nice 
Aap answered and said Ms name 
was Erie " Noticing a guitar at the 
house, the 1 vicar asked the resident to 
play for a. service and allowed a 
couple of months’ practice. The man 
said he ooold probaMy do without 
rehearsal, and shortly afterward 
Eric Clapton appeared at the 
church, accompanying hymns. . . 
□ 

■ Entity Schindler, widow of the 
hero of Steven Spielberg’s 
“Schindler's List," wishes the movie 
success and says she’s getting a cut 


in the proceeds. Schindler, 86, who 
lives in a two-room house outside 
Buenos Aires, declined to say what 
percentage she bad been offered. 
Her hurittnd, Oskar, died in 1974. 


SmRMlOIUL 

CLASSIFIED - 

. . Appears on Paget 8 & 10 ' 



Europe 


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Oceania 


WEATHER 


Forecast lor Saturday through Monday, as provided by Accu-Weather. 



Today 


Tomorrow 



High 

Low 

W 

Mgh 

Lot 

W 


CIF 

OF 


OF 

OF 


AIJ.VW) 

191M 

10/50 

1 

17*7 

S/48 

n 


4.-J9 

-3/29 

pc 

4/39 

-1/31 



6 '43 

•1/31 

»l» 

7/44 

-3/Z7 

c 


IS'M 

S'43 

c 

1253 

0/43 

r 


1J/57 

7/44 

a 

16*1 

8/46 



?13S 

■0/22 

•m 

7.05 

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ifje 

-4/2S 

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•1/31 

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6'« 

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pc 

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-t/31 


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■-•'37 

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Ccomfsgm 
C-7-JJ Sri 

-1/31 

17163 

-7.2P e 

6/4* s 

"34 

lp/64 

-504 

9/46 

s 

B 


17.-33 

5/41 


13/55 

4/33 

V 


B.46 

439 

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9/48 

4.09 

1 


ear. 

-10I 


6/4U 

-2«9 


r rzrifcr. 

30/ 

•1/01 

sf 

2/35 

■2/29 


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‘C3 

0 m pc 

6/43 

■2/29 


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-10*15. ■ 

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9 

-13/9 

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.307 

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8/46 

1/34 

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in Pi'f^.u 

73-73 

1457 

a 

21/70 

14/57 



17.13 

9.-4S 


1W61 

9*48 

3 


?■«. 

3/37 

»h 

9/48 

3/17 

c 



307 


14*57 

3/37 

» 

f/Jdi 

T'4J 

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6/43 

-3/27 



■‘.in 

•21. -5 

* 

-14/7 

■Z8/-H 3 


S<JL 

-6.72 

OT 

2/35 

■8/22 



1353 

205 

> 

12.53 

2/35 


C-.o 

-7T3 

-1B.O 


-10/15 

•29/3 

■ 

=34-4 


9/4C 

9 

15/M 

9/48 



7«4 

205 

3*1 

S'*3 

sac 

c 


t-31 

<02 

3* 

-IQ1 

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■077 

| 

6.43 

-t/31 


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1.74 

pc 

a<4« 

-1/31 

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^ ^ - w ; «TyC 




Mg » Lo« 
OF OF 

33 /Bi sem 

409 -2/29 
19*8 Mfil 

32« tarn 

20 KB 9*48 

307 -3.-27 
•2/S3 409 

28*2 24/75 
22/71 18*1 
7144 -1 <31 


Jetstream 

North America 

Snow wilt blanket ihe area 
(ram Toronto lo Montreal ito 
w ee k e nd. A mixture of snow, 
ice and rain will occur farther 
south, from Pittsburgh to 
Boston. Heavy rains will 
soak lha Southeastern 
sfales over lha weekend. A 
new storm wilt bring rain to 
Seattle and Vancouver Sun- 
day. tohh snow ta’Bng aiiand. 

Middle East 


I Uronsorabt/ 


Europe 

Bitter cold will persist over 
Scandinavia ard Ihe former 
USSR Friday r’o the week- 
end Oy weather wll prevail 
in much of f*wf region, 
including Ultehammer. Very 
cold weather wifi move slow- 
ly wefhian: across Germ any 
and the Low Countries this 
aei'i'.r j Ram will soaV 
S/eecc aotJ wesem Tur*try. 


Asia 

Tokyo will be chilly wer the 
weekend. There b a chance 
of some snow Friday North- 
ern Japan win be wndy with 
bursts of snow this weekend 
Beijing will have dry. season- 
able Fnday into the weekend 
while Hong Kang is doudy 
with periods of ram. Mantfa 
vrW be svtny and v«y warm. 


Latin America 


-6-22 -13.5 9 
409 3 pc 
■ me -12/11 9 
e.'43 -sra pc 
2.T5 -405 pc 
-GO 2 l?/tl c 
307 -105 pc 


14.57 pc 2271 15/53 pc 
Km 13 TO Sh 25/79 19*8 pc 


Today Tooowot Today Tuwill 

«0* Lot If Wsf» Lot » H»S*r Lot W HJph Lot ' 

OF OF CF Cff G.7 OF CIF or 

3wu nse it <52 3 ie«4 tldj Burra Aan 22 ■’I IfGt I 25/77 I7.C7 | 

Caro 21.70 -.44 i IVSC P- PC Ocean 28 -e? 73 73 3C 29«4 2373 I 

□mm* I7'52 4/33 a 14 57 177 7c jtra »73 IlTD pc 27/30 2770 ; 

JnuBkm 18 51 7/44 « 15.53 3-46 pc Mora Ce* 2170 7 '44 ;c 2271 8 43 ; 

hot? 29 tS !S » 24 75 3 37 rc 12 ■» 7J75 pe SV 2*75 i 

Riyadh 2S/Z2 13'SS 9 27.8S 13.55 pc a, 79 1J.53 o: 32/89 14.57 : 

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sn-snew. Mce. «f-»c£v A0 napa. towan and d*a provided by Acea-Weedwr, k«. ■- IS 


WEEKEND SKI REPORT 






Depth HkL Rea. Snow Last 
L U PMes P W w State Snow ConKoenta 



18*1 

9/48 pc 

17*2 

lOOC pc 

CjpaTOTi 

22/71 

11,52 

s 

23rt3 

13*5 pc 


ia*< 

BMS 

« 

17*2 

7/44 pc 


28/79 

3*7 

» 

29/84 

8146 pc 


31 IBS 

25/77 

pc 33 .-91 

28/79 fx 


28.-82 

11.52 


28.52 

13*5 pc 

TufttS 

16*1 

409 

pc 

16*1 

7/44 PC 

North America 

Ardung* 

*18 -IBt? 


■11/13 

■17/2 pc 

ASWS. 

8.46 


* 


4/39 C 

Baden 

-077 

-872 

W 

-1Q1 

-6/22 * 


104 

-5C4 

X 

1/34 

-7/20 m 

Cvovr 

3.07 

•13/15 

c 

5/41 

•10/75 ■ 

Mr* 

■tit 

■872 

■ 

2/35 

-4/25 ST 

K?V»Ju 

27*0 

taw, 


27*0 

19.-80 fC 

PwnW 

13*5 

6^3 

B 

19.86 

6/43 * 


13*5 

3-<8 

• 

20«8 

S/48 » 



23*9 


zneo 

f«** PC 

UrrapcCv 

-57* 

-S/18 

if 

-770 

-14/7 9f 

Sfcrtrml 

-10*15 

-17.7 


-872 

-15* PC 

*b*»: 

ZB ' 32 

KW 

■ 

Z7/80 

20*8 pc 

Now Vat 

2 75 

-475 

w* 

104 

•1/77 «r 


IE *< 


M 

23.73 

7*4 • 


14 57 

40 

9 

74/57 

7 44 pc 

SM» 

T*44 

2® 

«h 

®.’4a 

409 r 

Terric 

■874 

«fi8 

PC 

-405 

•10/15 C 


zaz 

-273 


2.55 

C 02 ■ 


Pas de lo Casa 160 210 
Soideu 170 230 

Austria 

Igls 0 70 

stapes patchy 
Kltzbuhel <0 130 

Saaibach 65 145 

ScMadming jo l<0 

SLAnton <0 270 


Good Coen Pwi 
Good Open Pwdr 


Aipe d-Hues 125 220 

Les Area IQ5 335 

Avonaz :55*CO 

Cauterets 135 2<S 

Chamonix <0 360 

Courchevel ijo 195 

Lea Deux Alpes 30 300 
Flame MC22E 

Isold 196235 

Men be) 73 155 

La Bagne i50 3tc 

Serre Chevalier <0 t60 
Tignes '60 3C0 

Val d'lsflre 14 c 350 

VaJ Th ow m ko 3Co 


Gocd Open Pwdr 
GtxxJ Onan Pckd 
Good Open Icy 
Good Open Var 

Good Coen Var 
Good Open Pwdr 
Good Open Pvntr 
Good Open Pckd 
Good Oj>en Var 
Good Oben Pckd 
Good Open Pckd 
Good Omn Var 
Gcod Cpan Peer 
GocO Open Pckd 
Gocd Open Pwdr 
G=cc Oben Var 
Good ft»n Pied" 
Gocd Csen Pwfir 
Gssd Open Var 


2/3 Superb stMng an beeh powder 
2 9 Fu3y open, axceBem contSHam 

2 8 5*6 *te Upon, tartar 

2/5 61 Ec lifts open, grwt piste thing 
2/9 AB bbs open, some tay patches 
2*9 Fresh grow abate UXXkn 
2/8 AM Uts open, good upper stapes 

2 8 76 B6Uts open, gooppste skiing 
a a SB '64 Btt open, freef skiing 
2/8 AS itia open, gooa ding 
it a n 15 sat open, good slung 
2>B Upper stapes arcesent 
2/8 AB 64 mts end OS pidee open 
2*9 5<7 63 Ms open, tardy piste sung 
2*8 X/SSMs open, same tndidtoar 
2 9 AS 23 u& open. enceSent datag 
2 8 All *9 set open, groomed pads 
2.-B All US tills open, by petehee 
2/5 74 . 77 LBs open mceSe nt sXSng 
Z'6 St-54 as cpm eJcceOer* ding 
2/B St. 6* ms Open, supam dang 
2-8 All 29 LBs open, good dang 


Garmisch 

Obersdori 


5 220 Coed Some vai 2 8 Upper p&es excellent 

K :=C GxC Serre PwO 2 a Best slung on upper stapes 

22i<5 Good Cser> Var 2*7 ExceOem abate 1700m 







DepK Mto. . Rea. tone Id* 

L U Pteiee Pletoe Stele Snow C w n wrt e - 

90 395 Good Open Pirn* 2/8 Bantam ddbg on Iresh anon 
25 130 Good Open Pwdr 2/8 M IBs open, plsle ddngaxeaBant 
115229 Good CW. Var .2/5 2S/2T B*. open, good ddtog 
. 55120 Good Open Pwt 2/8 At 75 Bit open, seta tends open 
120250 Good Open Pwdr 2/6 16/19 SPs open, superb ding 


UHeh a m m ar 60 80 Good Open Pwdr 2/8 7/8 at opan, greet commons 


Cendna 
Cortina 
Courayaur 
Selva . . 
SMtriftfW- 


BaquieraBeraf 140 255 Good Open Var 2/S 21/22 &Br oM 36/43 /Ms open 


Arana . 

Crans Montana 

Daws 

Gflndefwaid 

Gstaad 

Vertter 

Wengen 

Zarmatt 

UA 

Aapen ' 1 

Haivaniy 
Mammoth 1 

PWK City 
Stoat nlwat 1 

Taos 1 

Ten unde 1 

Vaii 1 


Open Pw* 2/9 
Open var 2ra 
Open Podr 2/8 
BoorCnaty 2/8 
worn Vor 2/8 
Open . var 2/8 
Fair Pwdr 2/8 
Open PW* 2/8 


At 16 8SS epon. HKPwfj sMng 
Fresh snow Improvi n g conations 
A23B dtsopm, aroaawr stitag 
Upper dopes randh good 
68/69 Ks open, warn paxhes 
37/39 SSs open. exoMent skSng 
' Uooer slones nood 
32/36 At* open, emtio* dong 


Open Pw* 
Open var 
Open Pw* 
Open Pw* 
Open Pwdr 
Open Pckd 
Open p«* 
Open Pw* 


2/9 MB Ms open 
2/8 20/25 m a open 
an 26/30 Ms qden 
2/8 M i* Ms open 
2/B IB/20 Ms otmi 
2/3 Resort tidy open 
2/9" AB 10 Ms Open 
2/9 AB 25 Bde open 


Ker UUOetxh in cm on taaer and tipper dope*. Mta. I’W s yM o una a ns I rla pistes. Raa. 
Pliaiftia iwtnQ to rasart vflege. A/tArMOai am. 

Repms sjpptod by ihe 9n dub 0 / Great Brian 


Travel in a world without borders, time zones 

or language barriers. 


! CnBingCerd . P n - u ” * v} '- r '- • * :LI ‘-till »L:n*.r\ to civjniry 2 s e^riy as you can from home. And 

; . fcjch ihe L' **. Ji xl il\ fre 1 : a uver I 4.9 aiiiKich. Converse v. idi someone who doesn't speak your 

| 23b ctRj blunge. Ann: -r-ndaLed ir.si..irJ> . Ci!i y« .ur clients 3 a m. k rawing they’ll gel ihe message in 

* g ' ^ / your voice ji m> >:•. i > *!i!e ii« ’ur. .vl this is r« ’tv pos.sihic with ATiST ; 

f . a* uaJ Ali-laVfvUi . .. .. 

T>.t v* v e mese ssji . ives. (..sal rp- Jid Ai.ce>.> N'jmrvr «“■•? me country you're in and you'll iW all the 

help ' >u need. With these Access Number- and our Af&r C'iiip., 1 ; Card. :n;emat:onai caiimz h.vtnewr been easier. 

If you don’i have an .MiT Cailint: Card or you'd like more Information on .VjXT dob-J services, just call as using the 
con 5 , eiiienc Access N'umlxr-v r *n you." rinht 


ATsT 


C Y/y \ Aioa 


AKT Access Numbers . 

How to canaround the world. 

I l -inn ih«.* chon (■■el'.-v.-.lmJ the cr.unwy you arccaHingfwm. 
i DLilihuccirc^pnRJinjs XKT/\tci.->sNurTihtT. 

. s \r.5Aa KnsliNh^ -^rsr.ikmpOperjif.irorvxfltvpnjinja ivtU 44 k ^ the phone nutnhery-oualsh local! or c«inect>-ou to j 

^u*;rciLT*47r\iirereiircNenLitn'e. - - 

To recciveyour free ^uBct caixlof ABETS AccosNwribera, wstefia! theacceasnuirtjcrttf 
the country you're in and ink for Customer Service 


COUNTRY ACCESS NITHBER 
AgjgjjjggC 

Australia 0014881811 


CUiixPRCvm 

Cram 


10611 

018-872 


Hoag Kong 

India* 

Indonesia* 

800-1111 
000 -ITT 

.Ufun* 

1JU39-11I 

Korea 

009-11 

Korsaa 

11" 

Maiaj-wa 

\«rw A-.'.Lind 

sahxiii 

000411 


Philippines* 

Russia *~T Moscow ) 
StipatT 

Siric-pstu 


Taiwao* 

T u:UnJ» 

Amcniy 1 

■\n5tria*"* 

!t.i‘;.tru 

Croatia** 

CKChRep 

Denmark* 

Bnhntf* 

ftuce 

Germany 

Grc«** 


EUROPE 


gstilll 

ggg^gll 

llTH-l IjfljQ 

9»3»G011 

IHMMUiT 

WMZtKWIOl 

8001-0010 

9800-100-10 

10**0011 

0130-0010 

00800*1311 


103-11 

155-50*2 

23*28-2 

W>'iilH*lll 

ooeoioafro 

tBiioniMiH 


' Poland**** 

Portugal* 


COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER 

Hangary* OgajOOgmi 

9«»ooi 

tretond ' 1-600-550000 

Bair 172*1011 

U rr hirn U dn* ISfrOQ-ll 

Uthtawti* 8^196 

timmhrxirs OOOfMim 

Mate* 0800890-110 

Momwni* g^OOU 

Ndhertonda- 064722-9111 

Poorer 800-190-11 

Poland**** (U010-i«Mmi 

Portage* -gorngg 

Roman* 01-800*4288 

SfamMa 004200P1Q1 

Spain 900-99-00-11 

Sweden’ 020-7g»63i 

Swten rian d* 1554W-H 

ujc oyKWooii 

agPOUEZAST 

Bahrain 8004XH 

^gype- (Cairo) 5100200 

Urod 177-I00-27Z7 

Ruwrafi 800-288 

titoiwi(Bdrnt) 4264WL 

Sawk Arabia t-BOO-HB 

Tosktr 00400-12277 

AMERICAS 


COUNTRY 

q«flc 

CoInmMn 

■ CoeaWaf 

Ecuador* 

BSatvadof 

Guaetnala* 

G uy ana — 

HooduraPto 

Modcoau 


ACCESS NUMBER 

< 004.-0312 

980-11-0010 

114 

' 1 H9 

190 

190 

165 

123 

95-800-462-4240 


SfaraMa 

Spain 


NkaaagnatMmgna) 

Paranan 

tW ... 

Suriname 

Uruguay 

Venezuela** 


174 

10 ? 

l?i 

156 

00-0410 

awn -120 


Afger«na» 

Befiac* 

Bolfrtt* 

BooS 


OOMOgjOBAlll 

55? 

oooo-nn 

00040 10 


- Bema ida* 

BriashVl 

Cayman fatoto 

Grenada* • 
Haiti* 

Janata** 

Bwh-Antfl 

■ ScKte/Ncvta 

A 

fijotf 

CssgAtsr 

Kenya* 

tiheri* 

MstiawT 


CAB1BBEAN 

1-000-872-2881 
. 1-8Q0-8T2-2881 

' ' 1-800-872-288! 
rafa . MWTOgB 

' 1 >80^872-2881 

001-800-972-2883 
^ <W(XHP2-288i" 

001-800^72-2881 
fa 1-800-872-2881 

AFRKA 

OQa-OOli 

ooin' 

■ 0300.10 

797-797' 

101-1992 


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